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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

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TENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



- \ 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



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YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1885. 




BOSTON: • 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 
N o^ 39 Abch Street. 

1886. 



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[Document 25 — 1886.] 



CITY OF l^» BOSTON. 




TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD 



THE YEAR ENDIM DECEMBER 31, 1885. 



Boston Watee Boaed Office, 

January 1, 1886. 

The Boston "Water Board presents its Tenth Report, in 
accordance with the requirements of the ordinances. 

Condition of the Works. 

Under the capable supervision of the City Engineer and 
his Assistant, and of the Division Superintendents, tlie opera- 
tions of all departments of the Water -Works proper have 
been satisfactorily conducted. The reservoirs, conduits, and 
main pipe lines are generally in good condition. It is 
believed that some repairs may be required on restricted 
portions of the Cochituate Aqueduct. The new Reservoir 
No. 4, on Cold-spring brook, is completed, and about 
500,000,000 gallons of water are already stored therein. It 
will undoubtedly be filled to its full capacity, say 1,300,000,- 
000 gallons, during the winter. Anticipating this addition 
to our reserve supply, preparations have been begun for 
removing the shallow flowage in Basin 3, for which appro- 
priations have heretofore been made, but which could not 
safely be undertaken until Basin 4 was fi.nished. 



2 City Document No. 25. 

The conduit across Farm pond was" not completed Octo- 
ber 1, 1885, as contracted for, and the contractors causmg 
us great delay and annoyance, we took possession of the 
work December 1. We shall be able to complete it about 
June 1, 1886, within the appropriation. 

It has been our intention to complete the new High-Service 
Works during the year 1886, but as the contract for pumps 
has been declared void, a material delay must ensue. The 
main pipes have been purchased, and 6,500 feet were laid 
during the fall of 1885 ; the remainder will be laid the coming 
season. Work on the reservoir was begun in October, and 
is to be completed December 1, 1886. 

We think it unlikely that during the coming year we shall 
deem it necessary to undertake new work requiring any 
considerable outlay of money. We are investigating certain 
matters with respect to the condition of the aqueducts, and as 
to the improvement of the upper Sudbury waters, which may 
be developed during the coming season. 

On arriving at any definite conclusions, as a result of these 
investigations, we shall ask the City Council for the neces- 
sary appropriations. 

Water Rates. 

The estimates of expenses and revenue made at the begin- 
ning of the financial year have been confirmed by the results 
recorded elsewhere. According to the estimates, there 
would have accrued a surplus of about $120,000. As this 
surplus would have been taken from the consumers of water, 
and would have gone into the Sinking-Fund, where it is 
not required, we decided to reduce the water rates for 
1886. The bills for the year being already prepared for 
issue January 1, the most practicable and convenient method 
of reaching this end was by ordering a discount upon the 
payment of bills. Such a discount, of six per cent., was 
accordingly ordered as to bills for water to be paid for 
according to schedule. The matter of reducing the meter 
rates is under consideration. 

Whatever may be the meter rates adopted, they will be 
based upon the idea of giving all parties a reduction equal, in 
percentage, to those granted to schedule takers ; and, further, 
of making a somewhat lower rate to those who use the larger 
quantities. It has been decided that there is no authority 
for making different rates to different persons on account of 
the use to which water is devoted ; that is to say, a hospital 
must pay as much as a stable ; a manufacturer must pay as 
much as a hotel — quantity for quantity. But, on the other 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 3 

hand, there is authority for equalizing the charge to hirge 
consumers, in view of the lessened cost of procurement, deliv- 
ery and maintenance of the larger quantity consumed, by 
makino; the rates for "excess" over certain fixed limits at a 
lower rate. This is not, as might on superficial view be 
supposed, a "discrimination," and it cannot become so, 
unless, in carrying out the principle, it be perverted by 
practical injustice and inequality. It will be our duty to 
avoid any error in this direction. 

We see no reason why the reductions of 1886 will not hold 
good — i.e., as to the gross amount conceded to water-takers 
— in 1887 ; but the Board will take time to consider whether 
there may be a better method of accomplishing the result 
than the expedient just adopted. 

The matter of revision of contracts with Chelsea, Somer- 
ville, and Everett, is now before the City Council. 



Waste of Water. 

It Vv^ill be observed that the tables of consumption of 
water disclose the fact that the reduced rate of 1884 has been 
fairly maintained in 1885. The use of the Deacon Detector 
system and sidewalk stopcocks, and the operations of the 
Department of Inspection and Waste, have all contributed 
to this result. The use of meters cannot be said thus far to 
have had any appreciable influence upon the consumption of 
water. It is to be hoped that the time may come when re- 
liable meters can be supplied, which, instead of being an 
annoyance to water-takers, will not only serve their con- 
venience, but their pecuniary interests. We have been im- 
pressed with the results accomplished in some other cities, 
and look forward to the time when a better system can be 
adopted. Our remarks under the head of " Meter Division " 
will explain the causes which now hamper our action. 

The Division of Inspection and Waste has undoubtedly 
served a good purpose, and it is now conducted under such 
rules that we have little or no complaint from it. The in- 
spection has perhaps been excessive, and we have reduced 
the force by twenty per cent. 



Meter Division. 

The aflfairs of this division are not in a satisfactory 
state. A large number of the meters supplied by the 
Tremont Meter Co. have been rejected after trial, and the 
company have as yet failed to replace them. It is hoped 



4 City Document No. 25. 

that early in the year they will be able to give us serviceable 
meters, to meet their engagements. We shall then be able 
to relieve the department of the extraneous work which it is 
now doing, and devote it to its legitimate business. Mean- 
time we have placed in charge of the department Mr. 
George S. Follansbee, a capable mechanic, and have made 
other changes by way of reducing the numbers and expense 
of the force. 



Quality of the Water. 

As reported by the Division Superintendents, and as 
shown b}^ the periodical analyses made for us by Prof. E. S. 
Wood, the quality of the Avater has been comparatively good. 
The copiousness of the supply has undoubtedly had a large 
influence in maintaining the quality of the water, but the 
work done in removing pollutions, and in cleansing the 
^basins and conduits, must also be taken into account. 

In commenting upon the potability or drinkable quality of 
water sup})lied to a large city, or in speaking of a given sup- 
ply as " pure" or otherwise, we have to deal with the subject 
entirely by comparison. In determining the apparent con- 
stituents of a selected sample of water, the chemist is able 
simply to indicate the proportionate quantities of certain ele- 
ments, the preponderance or absence of which makes the 
water either fit or unfit fov domestic use. Even the chemist 
cannot determine wdiether any insidious germ of transmissible 
disease, deposited in stream or lake, has been eliminated in 
transit. So we must regard the water as it is drawn from 
our service pipes, in the light of the closest analysis known 
to science, as pure or impure according to the standards of 
purity which are practicable in connection with large water 
supplies, and not by an ideal standard of purity — such as 
would be aflbrded by the bubbling spring on the mountain- 
side of a wild country. Applying this rule, w'e find the water 
supplied our citizens to-day to be a good drinking water. 
And comparing it with the supplies of other large cities we 
do not find it inferior ; on the contrary, there are few cities 
whose water is so good as that of our main supply. 

But while we are justified in reaching this comfortable judg- 
ment as to the quality of the water, we are in no sense re- 
lieved from the labor, anxiety, and cost of the efibrts to fur- 
ther reduce the causes of pollution which exist, and which it 
may not be possible wholly to eradicate, even with the most 
rigid enforcement of tlie law. Circumstances may arise 
which would render the class of pollutions Avhich appear 
harmless most vicious in their eflects ; and at all times there 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 5 

is danger of the development of those obscure incitements 
to disease which tlie chemist cannot detect. 

Our si)ecial report of Sept. 21, 1885, respecting pollu- 
tions of the water supply, stated what had been done by this 
Board up to that time. Since then active efforts have been 
in progress in the Mystic valley to divert the house-drainage 
from the streams, with the result of curing more than half 
the cases which existed iu September. Something has also 
been done to remedy the indirect factory drainage. On the 
Cochituate Division some additional remedies have been 
applied in Natick and Framingham, and we have arranged 
for the cure of a few conspicuously bad cases in Ashland, by 
the purchase of the properties. A more careful canvass on 
the Sudbury's tributary in Marlboro' developed a large 
number of cases not included in our former report, and the 
application of remedies has been begun. 

It is known that the towns of Marlboro' and Westboro' 
have under consideration plans of drainnge. So far as we 
know, the towns of Framingham and Natick have not yet un- 
dertaken any systematic investigations of this subject. There 
would seem to be every reason why all these towns should 
immediately and seriously consider a matter so vital to their 
health and prosperity. If the commission appointed by the 
Legislature shall report plans acceptable to all these towns 
nothing will remain but to carry them into effect. Whether 
such projects are undertaken as a sequence of State legisla- 
lation, or independently, whatever is done must have a bear- 
ing upon the water supply of the city. It would be 
imprudent for the City of Boston to commit itself in advance 
to any single or joint plan ; but we believe it safe to say that 
the City Council would sustain us in promising favorable 
consideration to any and all plans in which we may have a 
collateral interest, unless such plans are manifestly unfair to 
us in their pecuniary features. 

The same remark will apply to plans for draining the 
Mystic valley, but perhaps to a more limited extent. In 
September we expressed an opinion, formed upon perhaps a 
too cursory examination of the territory, that a considerable 
part of the Mystic supply might be permanently saved. 
Later and more careful consideration leads us to fear that 
but a small part of the supply can be kept in a comparatively 
pure state. A considerable time must elapse before any 
new supply can be substituted for the Mystic, and in the 
meantime all our effort, without opj^ression, must be exerted 
to reduce the pollutions which abound on every side. But 
even supposing it possible to prevent every existing factory 
from draining, directly or indirectly, into the streams, and 



6 City Document No. 25. 

\ 

to eflfectually cut off every house drain and stable connection, 
we are confronted with the facts that the towns of Winchester, 
Woburn, and Stonehani have o-rown and are o-rowino; with 
ahnost phenomenal speed ; that new factories are going up, 
new houses, stables, and outhouses are being Imilt, and it 
will be but few years before the structures and population 
will be ahnost as closely gathered as those of the city itself. 
When that time comes, even the street-wash would render 
the water impure ; and the conclusion is forced upon us that 
a substitute for the Mystic must soon be obtained. 



New Supply. 

There is no present need to augment our main supply 
(Cochituate and Sudbury). With the existing storage 
capacity, and at the present rate of consumption, we have 
a supply safe to meet, even in times of drought, the wants 
of the city for several years to come. 

Application has been made to the Legislature for the 
waters of the Shawsheen river, to replace the present Mystic 
supply. There are two reasons for this : first, the present 
suppl}^ even if it couki be maintained in a fair state of 
purity, afibrds but a narrow margin of excess over actual 
wants, especially in a time of drought; second, it is impos- 
sible to long maintain the supply in a satisfactory condition. 

It woukl be premature to now express any opinion as to 
the best disposition of the Shawsheen water, if obtained. 
The surveys of the Shawsheen and Mystic valleys, authorized 
by the City Council, and already begun, will put us in 
possession of such additional information as will be needed 
to prepare the most judicious plans in this regard. The 
great and important known facts are : that this supply 
is near us, rising in the towns of Lexinaton and Bedford ; 
that it lies in a purely rural country, uncontaminated, and 
likely to remain so; that there are no serious antagonistic 
interests ; that it will afford an average of upwards of 
20,000,000 gallons of water daily ; and that the cost of 
making it avaihible, whatever it may be, cannot be dis- 
proportional to its value. 

In this connection it is proper to mention that there have 
been brought to our attention divers schemes, — for separate 
domestic supply, — for supply from subterranean sources, 
— and for supply to be taken from large streams at remote 
points. Of these only the first is worthy of any present con- 
sideration. It may be possible at some future day to 
separate some part of our supply — the best adapted for the 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 7 

purpose — -and devote it solely to domestic use. We shall 
look further in the practicability and expediency of such a 
scheme. As to a subterranean supply, to be derived from 
driven wells, there is no such geological formation in this part 
of the country as would give promise of any such supply. 
And as to ol^taining water from large streams at distant points, 
no scheme of the sort has been sugo;ested which would not 
give us practically the same thing that we now contemplate 
abandoning on the Mystic, — only on a larger scale and at 
great cost, — i.e., river water, now contaminated, and daily 
mcreasing in contamination. It would be adopting a method 
which experience has taught Boston and other large cities 
that it is unsafe to continue. For instance, the city of 
Philadelphia, so many years supplied by the Schuylkill 
river, though protected by laws as stringent as our own, 
finds the task of keeping the waters of that river fit to drink 
too great to accomplish, and intends, at great cost, to abandon 
its supply for another, which is free from the objections 
which pertain to the present one. 

The Beacon Hill Eeservoir Site. 

In November, 1880, the reservoir site on Beacon Hill, the 
use of which had been abandoned, was taken by the Board 
of Aldermen as a site for a court-house. The original cost 
of this property was over $500,000. Upon abandonment 
there was, of course, a large loss in the money value of the 
estate ; but whatever the land and superstructure were 
worth in money should have been realized in some form 
to be credited to the Water- Works. The consideration of 
this matter has slumbered during five years, and the Water- 
Works have lost the benefit of the compensation, which 
should have been made five years ago, and of the income of 
whatever might then have been realized. The estate is not to 
be used for a court-house, and the statute under which other 
estates were lately taken for that purpose provided that 
"all estates taken for a court-house," under the Act of 1880, 
" are hereby re-vested in the City of Boston, as though said 
act had not been passed." The plain reading of this would 
seem to be that the Beacon-hill site " revests " in the city 
as a part of the Cochituate Water- Works. But we are 
informed by the Corporation Counsel, that the City Council 
has done certain acts respecting this site which must be un- 
done by their action before the Water Board can obtain 
possession of the property. We have no disposition to 
force an immediate adjustment, or to antagonize any interest 
of the city in any other direction ; Ijut it is evident that the 



8 City Document No. 25. 

annual cost of our water-works is increased by an amount 
equal to the interest on the unproductive capital represented 
by this estate. 

We append tables of general statistics, and of the condi- 
tion of the water debts and special appropriations ; and also 
the reports of the City Engineer, Water Registrar, and 
the Division Superintendents. In these will be found full 
details of the work of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HORACE T. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM B. SMART, 
THOMAS F. DOHERTY, 

Boston Water' Board. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



General Statistics. 



Sddburt and Cochituate Works. 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


Daily average consumption in gallons 


32,836,900 


25,090,500 


25,607,200 


Daily average consumption in gallons per inhabi- 


94.9 

5,085,600 
15.5 


71.9 

5,171,120 
20.6 


72.4 


Daily average amount used through meters, gal- 


6,186,668 
24.2 


Percentage of total consumption metered . . . 




49,290 
2,919 

378.0 
4,446 


50,632 
4,666 

388.5 
4,573 


51,810 
4,417 

400 




Length of supply and distributing mains, in 


Number of fire-hydrants in use 


4,681 


Yearly revenue from water-rates 


$1,107,704 17 


$1,203,192 55 


$1,239,757 99 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$371,074 61 


$378,484 75 


$452,961 60 


Percentage of total revenue from metered water, 


31.8 


31.5 


36.5 


Cost of works on May 1, :883, 1884,1885 .... 


$17,184,751 14 


$17,775,955 68 


$18,173,644 45 


Yearly expense of maintenance 


$300,851 34 


$336,578 36 


$•321,137 26 


MrsTic Works. 








Daily average consumption in gallons 


7,093,500 


6,209,700 


6,737,350 


Daily average consumption in gallons perinhabi- 


76 

933,150 
13.1 


64.5 

869,246 


67.9 


Daily average amount used through meters, gal- 


1,012,755 
15.0 


Percentage of total consumption metered . . . 


14.0 


Number of services 


14,453 


14,939 


15,928 




501 

147.2 
770 


571 

1129.2 

794 




Length of supply and distributing mains, in 


131.0 


Number of fire-hydrants in use 


781 




$259,791 28 


$262,243 50 


$276,557 60 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$68,116 91 


$63,627 39 


$74,128 87 


Percentage of total revenue from metered water, 


26.2 


24.3 


26.8 


Cost of works on May 1, 1883, 1884, 1885. . . . 


$1,641,762 22 


$1,648,452 35 


$1,6.56,266 70 


Yearly expense of maintenance 


$116,572 94 


$128,126 40 


$122,858 00 



1 Reduction caused by correction of errors in previous reports. 



10 City Document No. 25. 



Earnings and Expenditures. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water- Works from 
all sources for the year ending December 31, 1885, were as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $1,239,757 99 
Income from shutting off and letting on 

water, and fees ..... 2,508 50 

Service-pipes, sale of old materials, etc. . 17,904 97 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 5,267 72 



$1,265,439 18 



The total expejiditures of the Cochituate 
Water-Works for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1885, were as follows, viz. : — 

Current expenses . . . $321,13726 
Extension paid from income 

previous to March, 1885 . 70,799 59 

Interest on funded debt . 676,142 44 



$1,068,079 29 



Balance Dec. 31, 1885 . . . $197,359 89 

From this apparent balance is to be deducted the amount 
required for Sinking-Fund. 

The total receipts of the Mystic Water- Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending December 31, 1885, were as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $276,557 60 

Income from shuttino- oif and lettino; on 

water, and fees . . . . . 716 50 

Service-pipes, repairs, etc. . . . 2,993 26 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 2,616 32 



$282,883 68 



The total expenditures of the Mystic 
Water-Works for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1885, were as follows : — 



Amount carried forward . ... $282,883 68 



Keport or THE Water Board. 



11 



Amount hrouglit forward . 
Current expenses . . . $122,858 00 

Interest on funded debt . 48,775 00 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 

ville, and Everett, under 

contract . . . . 40,726 23 



Balance Dec. 31, 1885 



$282,883 68 



212,359 23 

$70,524 45 



From this apparent balance is to be deducted the amount 
required for Sinking-Fund. 





Outstanding Loans. 






The outstandino; Cocbituate Water Loans at this date, 


Jan. 1, 1886, 


exclusive of the Additional 


Supply, 


are as 


follows : — 










5 per cent. Sterlin 


g Loan 








(£399,500) 


. $1,947,273 98 




Due Oct. 


1, 1902 


5 per cent. Loans 


100,000 00 


$100,000 


Due April 


1, 1906 


5 per cent. Loan 


1,000 00 


1,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1907 




( 


' 500,000 


Due Dec. 


12. 1897 






450,000 


Due June 


16, 1898 






540,000 


Due Oct. 


3, 1898 






250,000 


Due April 27, 1899 






625,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1901 






688,000 


Due April 


1, 1901 






330,000 


Due July 


1, 1901 






413,000 


Due April 


1, 1903 


6 per cent. Loans 


. 4,253,000 00 < 


38,000 
161,000 


Due April 
Due Jan. 


1, 1904 
1, 1905 






142,700 


Due April 


1, 1905 






6,000 


Dae Oct. 


1, 1905 






82,550 


Due Jan. 


1, 1906 






8,750 


Due April 


1, 1906 






4,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1906 






8,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1907 






5,000 


Due A])ril 


1, 1907 






1,000 


Due July 


1, 1907 






{ 280,000 
111,000 

257,000 


Due April 


1, 1910 


4 per cent. Loan 


671,000 00 < 


Due July 
Due Jan. 


1, 1913 
1, 1914 






23,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1915 






f 50,000 

144,200 

50,000 


Due Jan. 


1, 1915 


3| per cent. Loan 


294,200 00 < 


Due April 
Due April 


1, 1915 
1, 1915 






50,000 


Due Oct. 


1, 1915 




$7,266,473 98 





12 



City Document No. 25. 



The outstanding Mystic Water Loans at this date, Jan. 1, 
1886, are as follows : — 



6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans 



5 per cent, currency 
Mystic Water Loans 

6 per cent, currency 
Mystic Sewer Loans 

4 per cent. Loan 





r $35,000 


Due April 




1886 




60,000 


Due Oct 




1886 




50,000 


Due Oct. 




1887 




3,000 


Due April 




1888 




100,000 


Due July 




1890 


$586,000 00 ■ 


51,000 


Due Jan. 




1891 




139,000 


Due July 




1891 




67,000 


Due Jan. 




1892 




42,000 


Due July 




1892 




t 39,000 


Due July 




1893 


( 


i 6,000 


Due Oct. 




1893 


108,000 00 ' 


) 102,000 


Due April 




1894 


130,000 00 


130,000 


Due April 




1886 


15,000 00 


15,000 


Due Oct. 




1913 


$839,000 00 





The following statement shows the appropriations by the 
City Council for an additional supply of water, with the 
loans issued to meet them, and the amount of expenditures 
to Jan. 1, 1886 : — 



APPROPRIATIONS . 



Oct. 21, 1871. — Transfer from Reserved Fund 

Apr. 12, 1872. — Order for Treasui-er to borrow 

Apr. 11, 1873.— 

Feb. 26, 1875.— 

July 1, 1876.— 

Apr. 20, 1878. — 

Apr. 11, 1879.— 

Aug. 17, 1881.— 

June 2, 1883.— 

Oct. 14, 1884. — 

Total appropriations to April 30, 1885 





$10,000 00 




100,000 00 




500,000 00 




1,500,000 00 




2,000,000 00 




600,000 00 




350,000 00 




324,000 00 




621,000 00 




150,000 00 




$6,155,000 00 



Oct. 1, 1875.— Premium on $1,000,000 bond, under 

order of Feb. 26, 1875 . $83,700 00 
April 1, 1876.— Premium on $452,000 

bonds, under order of 

Feb. 26, 1875 . . 47,786 80 
Oct. 1, 1876. — Premium on $2,000,000 

bonds, under order of 

July 1, 1876 . . . 221,400 00 



Amount carried forward 



352,886 80 
5,507,886 80 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



13 



Ainount brought forivard 



,507,886 80 



EXPENDED. 
1871-72 . ... 

1872-73 

1873-74 including $20,897.50, discount 

on bonds sold, January, 

1874 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 ■ 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1884-85 
May 1, 1885, to Jan. 1, 1886 



12. 
61, 



114, 

224, 

7.^3, 

1,924, 

1,257, 

635. 

213. 

97, 

35. 

167, 

423, 

276, 

126, 



302 

278 



102 
956 
613 
060 
715 
658 
350 
406 
677 
621 
625 
292 
683 



77 
68 
49 
24 
26 
08 
97 
78 
98 
43 
79 
13 
99 



6,344,347 23 



Balance of appropriations unexpended, January 1, 1886, $163,539 57 



The outstanding loans on account of Additional Supply of 
Water, on Jan. 1, 1886, are as follows : — 









r 


$324,000 


Due April 1, 1912 










82,000 


Due July 1, 1908 










588,000 


Due April 1, 1908 








. $1,576,000^ 


336,000 


Due Oct. 1, 1913 


4 


per cent. 


Loans . 


209,000 


Due Jan. 1, 1914 










18,500 


Due April 1, li>14 








1 


16,000 


Due Oct. 1, 1914 








I 
( 


1,500 
1,000,000 


Due April 1, 1915 
Due Oct. 1, 1905 


5 


per cent. 


Loans . 


3,452,000^ 


452,000 
2,000,000 


Due April 1, 1906 
Due Oct. 1,1906 


5 


per cent. 


Loan , 


12,000 


100,000 


Due April 1,1908 
Due July 1, 1902 


6 


per cent. 


Loans . 


644,000 < 


492,000 
8,000 


J)ue April 1,1903 
Due Jan. 1,1904 








I 


44,000 


Due July 1, 1905 


4J 


per cent. 


Loan . 


268,000 




Due Oct. 1, 1908 




$5,951,000 





Total Water Debt of the City of Boston, January 1, 1886. 



Cochituate 
Mystic 



$13,217,473 98 
839,000 00 



$14,056,473 98 



14 



City Document No. 25. 



damages 



Cost of Construction of the CocJiituate Water- Works to 
January 1, 1886. 

Cost of Water-Works to January 1, 1850, as 

per final report of Water Commissioners 
Extension to East Boston 
Jamaica-pond aqueduct 
New dam at Lake Cochituate 
Raising lake two feet, including damages 
Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con 

nections with lake . 
New main from Brookline reservoir 
Land and water rights and land 

since January 1, 1850 
New pipe-yard and repair-shop 
Upper yard, buildings, etc. 
New water-pipes. East Boston 
New main, East Boston 
Pumping-works at Lake Cochituate 
High-service, stand-pipe, engine-house, and 

engines 
High-service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
Parker-Hill reservoir 
Charles-river siphon .... 
Keeper's house, Parker Hill 
Temporary high-service, Brighton 
New stable at Chestnut-hill reservoir . 
Pegan dam, Natick .... 
Willow dam, Natick . . . . 

High-service, East Boston . 
New main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir 



including land 



New high-service works 

Cost of laying main pipe for extension in 

Roxbury, Dorchester, Brighton, and West 

Roxbury Districts ..... 
Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of layino; main pipe since January 1, 

1850 . " 

Extension of mains, etc. (from loans) . 



^3,998,051 83 

281,065 44 

13,237 50 

10,940 08 

28,002 18 

18,982 23 

304,991 83 

49,486 17 

2bMQ 51 

9,165 63 

20,999 43 

24,878 08 

23,577 69 

103,829 53 

27,860 29 

2,461,232 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

2,764 90 

7,865 86 

8,103 55 

1,394 06 

1,567 29 

22,960 07 

341,702 28 

168,513 42 



1,758,512 22 

6,344,347 23 

2,147,982 35 

104,820 95 

$18,567,279 19 



Report of the Watee. Board. 



15 



Cost of Construction of the Mystic Water - Works to 
January 1, 1886. 



Salaries 

Engineering 

Land damages . 

Reservoir . . . 

Dam 

Conduit . 

Engine-house, coal-shed, and chimney 

Engines . 

Grubbing pond . 

Iron pipes 

Iron pipes, trenching 

City distribution 

Hydrants . 

Stopcocks 

Miscellaneous items . 

Roadway and bridge . 

Lowering Mystic river 

Inspections 

Service-pipes and meters 

Hydrants for Somerville and Medford 

Somerville distribution 

Dwelling-house for engineer and fi 

(pumping-station) . 
Chelsea extension 
Medford extension 
Drinking-fountains 
New line of supply main 
Stable and pipe-yard . 
Extension of engine-house and boiler 
New force-main 
Mystic sewer 
New stable, engine-house 
Additional force-main 
Temporary pumping-works 
New work-shop 
Cost of laying main pipe since 1873 



reman 



$17 

33 

91 

141 

17 

129 

36 

150 

9 

108 

61 

162 

19 

19 

14 

3 

3 

1 

133 

2, 

2 

4 

37 

3 

1 

203 

8 

33 

9 

136 

1 

24 
6 
3 

20 



644 


61 


746 


87 


855 


38 


856 


26 


167 


26 


714 


30 


112 


99 


096 


70 


393 


26 


437 


10 


029 


59 


335 


23 


976 


21 


262 


52 


012 


51 


529 


22 


012 


06 


824 


79 


858 


70 


653 


08 


492 


10 


871 


02 


347 


86 


997 


41 


415 


05 


050 


09 


964 


64 


727 


43 


875 


17 


245 


70 


767 


39 


882 


96 


905 


15 


000 


00 


744 


78 



.,656,805 39 



EEPOET or CITY ENGINEEE, 



Office of City Engineee, 
City Hall, Boston, January 16, 1886. 

Col. H. T. Eockwell, CliairmoM Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the revised 
ordinances, I respectfully submit the following report on the 
condition of the Water- Works ; — 



SUDBURY-RIVER RESERVOIES AND LAKE 
COCHITUATE. 

The supply of water during the past year has been abun- 
dant and of good quality. In consequence of the reduction 
which has been made in the amount of water used, and 
the favorable distribution of rain during the year, the 
storage reservoirs have been kept nearer high-water 'mark 
than for a number of years. 

Beservoir JSfo. 1. — Has been practically full during the 
entire year, the lowest point reached being in October, when 
its surface was 1.73 below the top of the flash-boards. 

From January 1 to June 14 water was wasted at Dam 
No. 1. Between June 14 and November 7 one and one-half 
million gallons per day were discharged from this reservoir 
into the river, as required by law, and on the latter date 
waste again commenced over the dam, and has continued to 
the present time. No water has been drawn from this reser- 
voir for the city's supply during the year. 

Beservoir JSFo. 2. — On Jan. 1, 1885, Reservoir No. 2 w^as 
166.15 feet above tide-marsh level, and water was running 
over the dam. The reservoir remained full until June 14, 
and during the remainder of June and the month of July its 
surface lowered rapidly, so that on August 2 it was practically 
empty. Heavy rains during the month of October tilled the 
reservoir, and on November 10 water passed over the top of 
the flash-boards. The flash-boards were taken off on Nov. 
12, lowering the reservoir about 12 inches. On Jan. 1, 
1886, its surface was 166.11 feet above tide-marsh level. 



Report of the Water Board. 17 

Reservoir JVb. 3. — Water was running over the crest of 
Dam No. 3, on January 1, 1885, and the reservoh-'s surface 
remained at, or near, the level of the crest until the latter 
part of the month of June. From June 24 to eluly 2, water was 
taken from this reservoir for the supply of the city, and its sur- 
face fell 1.6 ft. to grade 173.40. It remained near this level 
until October 13, when it gradually tilled, and on November 
3, waste began over the dam. On December 12 the waste 
gates were opened at the dam for the purpose of emptying 
the reservoir, in order to facilitate the removal of loam and 
other material for the correction of shallow iiowao;e. On 
January 1 the surface of the reservoir had been lowered 16.4 
ft. and stood at grade 158.85. 

Reservoir iVo. 4. — This reservoir, which has been in pro- 
cess of construction for the past four years, is now practically 
completed. On October 13 proposals were received for 
building the superstructure of the gate-chamber, and the 
contract Avas awarded to E.. E.. Mayers & Co., who have 
nearly iinished their contract. 

On February 4, 1885, the gates were closed, and the res- 
ervoir filled to the depth of 15 feet at the gate-house, which 
was as high as the reservoir could be filled without interfer- 
ing with the completion of the work. During September 
and October 186,000,000 gallons were drawn from the res- 
ervoir, lowering its surface about 11 feet. In November 
the gates were closed, and the surfiice of the reservoir at the 
present time (January 1, 1886) stands at grade 193.65 
above tide-marsh level, or 26.65 feet above the lower influent 
pipe to the gate-chamber. 

The completion of this reservoir adds an average daily 
supply of 5,000,000 gallons to the available supply. The 
reservoir covers an area of 162 acres in the valley of Cold 
Spring brook, and will contain, Avhen full, about 1,300,000,000 
gallons. The dam is 1,857 feet in length, 54 feet in height 
above the meadow, and 83 feet above bed-rock, at its high- 
est point. It is 20 feet wide on top, with an outside slope 
of 2^ to 1, the inside slope being 1^ to 1 above the berme, 
and 1.65 to 1 below. The inner slope above the berme is 
covered with paving 15 inches thick, laid on 12 inches of 
broken stone; below the berme the slope is riprapped. The 
dam contains a centre or core-wall of concrete, which extends 
across the valley and down to the bedrock. This Avail is 8 
feet in width at the base, 3 feet at the top, and contains 
20,900 cubic yards of cement concrete. The inside face of 
the Avail is covered with a half-inch coating of Portland- 
cement mortar, subsequently covered with a wash of pure 
cement. 



18 City Documejs^t No. 25. 

Tne dam is composed of 248,500 cubic 3^ards of o-ravel 
and clay, spread in eight-inch layers, watered and rolled. 

The gate-house contains one eftluent and two influeut 
chambers, so arranged that Avater can be drawn from the 
reservoir at different depths. 

An overilow and waste-way, 30 feet in width, are situated 
at the extreme easterly end of the dam. 

When the reservoir is full the least depth of water will be 
eight feet, and the depth at the dam 48 leet. 

The cost of the reservoir and dam to Jan. 1, 1886, is 
$772,420.73, exclusive of land damages, which amounted to 
$2(5, 772. 02. 

Farm Pond. — During the months of January, February, 
and March, the surface of the pond was kept about 147 feet 
above tide-mtirsh level; it was then lowered to grade 145, 
in order to facilitate work upon the conduit across the pond, 
and kept at that elevation until December 1. The ])()nd was 
then filled, and eJan. 1, 1886, was 14^.22 feet al)()ve tide- 
marsh level. The Framingham Water Company take their 
supjjly from this pond, and also have a connection with the 
supi)ly c(mduit ii-om the Sudbury river. A brick chamber 
for the connection of their pi[)o with the conduit was built 
between fluly 27 and 30. The total an)ount of water taken 
rdning the year has been 61,800,000 g;dlons. 

Lake (Joel dill ate.. — Ox\ Jan. 1, 18^55, the lake's surface 
was 2.1)3 feet below high-water mark ; it rose gradually 
during the month of January, and on Febinary 12 began to 
wa.ste at the d.iin, and continued to waste untii March 24. On 
April 30 the lake stood at high-water mark, and water was 
wasted frcnn Ajjiil 30 to May 3, from May 14 to l(),May 
18 to 20, and June 5 to 10. 

Ko water wa« drawn from the lake from June 2 to 24, 
and its surtace reuiJiined at high-water mark. After the 
latter date its surface gradually fell, and on October 29 it 
stood at 121). 07, the lowest point I'cached during the year. 
On Jan. 1, ]88<), it had risen to 131.47, or 2.(Sy feet below 
high-water mark. 

iSo water has been drawn from Dudley i)ond during the 
year, and the pond is now^ full. 

The upper filter basin on Pegan brook has been cleaned, 
and the banks re-graded, nmch improving the appt^arance of 
the i)asin. Most of the sources of pollution on this brook 
have been removed. 

I would renew the I'econmiendation, made in the last annual 
report, that the temporary pumi)ing-inathinery l)e removed 
from the gate-house to .some more secure yitualion. 
Plate 4, facing page 30, graphically shows the varying 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



19 



heights of the different reservoirs, the rainfall on the Sud- 
bui'v-river water- shed, and the daily amounts drawn from the 
Sudburv-river reservoirs, durins: the year. 

The following table shows the heights of the different reser- 
voirs on the first of each month : — 







Res. No. 1. 
Topofflasli- 

bciai-ds, 

15y.-J^». 


Rps. No. 2. 

Top of flash- 

board.'*, 

167.12. 


Res. No. 3. 

Crest of 

Dam, 

175.24. 


Res. No. 4. 

Cre.«l of 

overflow, 

214.21. 


Farm Pond. 


Lake 

Cochituate. 

Top of flash- 
boards, 
134.36. 


Jan. 


1, 1S85 . 


158.01 


166.15 


175.56 


. . . 


146 83 


131.43 


Feb. 




157.73 


165.95 


175.41 




146.90 


132,74 


M.ir. 




157.83 


166.13 


175.07 


180.81 


146.97 


132.47 


Apr. 




158.15 


166.34 


175.69 


185.12 


145.75 


132.62 


May 




159.40 


167.46 


175.50 


182.24 


145.04 


134.36 


June 




1.59.. 5-2 


167.28 


175.37 


182.57 


145.07 


134.22 


July 




158.98 


163.36 


173.56 


182.77 


145.16 


134.11 


Aug. 




157.87 


155.68 


173.12 


183.12 


145.05 


1.32.64 


Sept. 




158.10 


155.14 


173.94 


184.77 


145.03 


131.38 


Oct. 




157.60 


155.84 


173.15 


179. SI 


145.01 


129.93 


Nov. 




158.19 


162.93 


174.99 


173.58 


145.00 


129.17 


Dec. 




158.02 


166.16 


175.62 


185.86 


145.01 


130.60 


Jan. 


],18S6. 


158.02 


166.11 


158.85 


193.65 


149.33 


1.31.47 



Water has been drawn from the Sudbury-river reservoirs 
for the supply of the city as follows : — 



Jan. 


1 to Fel^. 


11, 


from 


Reservoir No. 


2. 


leb. 


11 to March 29, 






" No. 


3. 


jNlarch 29 to 


April 


3, 




F: 


irm Pond. 




Ajjiil 


:^ to 


June 


u, 




Reservoir No. 


3. 


June 


14 to 


June 


24, 






" No. 


2. 


June 


24 to 


Julv 


2, 






No. 


3. 


Jidy 


2 to 


July 


27, 






" No. 


2. 


July 


31 to 


Aug. 


2, 






No. 


2. 


Aug. 


2 to 


Aug. 


6, 






No. 


3. 


Aug. 


() to 


yei)t. 


4, 






" No. 


2. 


Sept. 


4 to 


Sept. 


11, 






No. 


3. 


S<'[)t. 


11 to 


Nov. 


2(), 






No. 


2. 


IS'ov. 


28 to 


Dec. 


5, 






No. 


2. 


Dec. 


f) to 


Dec. 


9, 






" Nos 


2 and 3 


Dec. 


9 to 


Dec. 


20, 






No. 


2. 


Dec. 


23 to 


Jan. 


1,'8G, 






No 


2. 



20 City Document No. 25. 



Farm-Pond Conduit. 

The construction of the conduit across the pond has been 
in progress during the past season ; but the contractor, G. 
M. Cushing, of New York, having failed to complete his 
work within the time called for by the contract, the work 
was seized by the Water Board on Dec. o. 

The total length of the conduit is 3,700 feet. On Dec. 
1, when the work closed for the season, 3,550 feet of the 
conduit-trench had been excavated, the masonry conduit was 
completed for a length of 3,100 feet and 2,640 feet of the 
embankment was finished. Riprap was placed on 2,400 
feet of the embankment, leaving 1,360 feet to be completed. 
The work will be finished early in the coming season. 

Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in service 358 days, 
and the Cochituate aqueduct 339 days during the year. 

Each aqueduct has been cleaned twice, the last cleaning 
having been just completed. Some sections of the Beacon- 
street tunnel of the Sudbury-river aqueduct should be lined 
with brick, as rocks which had fallen from the roof of the 
tunnel were found each time that the conduit was cleaned. 

The masonry of the Waban arches has been carefully 
repointed with Portland cement, at a cost of $650. 

From January 4 to June 2 the water in the Cochituate 
aqueduct was kept at a depth of five feet ; from January 2 to 
24th the conduit was not in use ; on January 24 the flow was 
again started at a height of five feet above the bottom of the 
conduit, but was reduced to four feet from June 28 to July 
8, when it was again raised to five feet; on July 23 it was 
increased to five and one-half feet, and has been kept at that 
height since that date. 

This aqueduct at the crossing of the Newton Circuit Rail- 
road, between Stations 170+45 and 171 -|- 84, has been 
strengthened by the addition of a concrete foundation and an 
additional ring of brick-work on the top arch. 

The Chestiiut-Hill, Brookline, Parker-Hill, and East 
Boston reservoirs are in good condition. The average 
monthly heights of all the reservoirs are shown by the 
table on page 30. 

Highland Pumping—Station. 

The Worthington engine at this station has been in use 
every day during the year, the total pumping time having 
been 7,609| hours, an average of about 21 hours per day. 



Eeport of the Water Boaed. 21 

The total quantity of water pumped during the year was 
961,449,500 ijallons, an increase of 8.6 per cent, over the 
amount for 1884. 

Total coal consumed 1,740,800 lbs., of which 14.3 percent, 
were ashes and clinkers. 

Averacre hft, 110.44 ft. 

Quantity pumped per pound of coal, 552.3 gallons. Daily 
average amount pumped, 2,634,100 gallons. Average duty 
(no deductions), 50,871,500 ft. -lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal used. 

Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries $4,426 44 

Fuel 4,027 90 

Repairs 22 60 

Oil, waste, and packing . . . . . 42 18 

Sundry small supplies . . . . . 177 92 

18,697 04 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 8.191 cents. 

New High-Service Works. 

On December 22, 1884, an order for a loan of $766,000 
for the construction of new high-service works was passed 
by the City Council. During the month of January surveys 
and investigations were made with reference to determining 
the most advantageous site for a reservoir, and a contract 
was made with A. H. McNeal, of Burlington, N.J., for 
2,920 tons of pipes and special castings required for tlie force 
and supply mains. Negotiations were entered into with the 
firm of H. R. Worthington, of New York, for two pumping- 
engines, with boilers and fittings, and on May 19 a contract 
was signed for furnishing them in accordance with sjiecifica- 
tions prepared by this department. The Corporation Counsel, 
on Oct. 24, gave his opinion that the contract was not valid 
unless it was ratified by the City Council, which ratification 
the Council refused. 

On June 15, the Mayor sent a communication to the City 
Council, recommending further examination of the proposed 
plan for new high-service works, and, on July 2, an order 
was passed by the City Council authorizing the appointment 
of a commission to examine and report upon the question. 

On July 13, L. F. Rice, S. B. Stebbins, and L. Foster 
Morse were appointed as meml>crs of this coiuniission, and, 
on August 31, they submitted the result ui their iiivestiga- 



•22 City Document No. 25. 

tioiis (City Doc. 122, 1885). The recommendations of this 
commission were considered and concurred in by Jos. P. 
Davis, A. Ftcley, and E. C. Clarke, who acted as consult- 
ing engineers. 

On Septeml>er 14 the Act of the Legislature, authorizing 
the construction of the works, was accepted by the City 
Council, and on September 18 the laying of the suppl)'-niaiu 
between Fisher-Hill and Parker-Hill reservoirs was ctjm- 
menced. 

Plans and specifications for the construction of Fisher- 
Hill reservoir having been prepared, proposals for doing this 
work Avere received (m September 29, and on October 7 the 
contract was signed by Moulton &, O'Mahoney, of Lawrence, 
Mass. Work on the reservoir was begun on October 10, 
and continued until December 31. Seventeen thousand 
cubic yards of loam have been removed from the site of the 
reservoir, and piled up for future use. 

The work of pipe-laying, which was done by the Superin- 
dent of the Eastern Division, stopped for the season on De- 
cember 9 ; the total amount laid was 5,282 feet of 24-inch, 
and 1,327 feet of 30-inch pipe. 



Mystic Lake. 

Water was wasted at the outlet dam, with the exception 
of a few days, from January 1 to June 9. Small quantities 
were wasted between June 17 and 27, after which no water 
passed over the dam until October 27, when waste again 
began, and has continued to the present time. 

The lake has been nearly full during the entire year, the 
lowest point reached being 5.14 feet above tide-marsh level, 
or 1.86 feet below high- water mark. 

The buildings and grounds about the gate-house have been 
improved in appearance. 

Consideral)le attention has been given to the removal of 
sources of pollution ; hut the increase of the population and 
the character of the business done upon the water-shed of 
the Mystic supply make this a more difficult problem each 
year. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. 

The treatment of the sewage from the tanneries, by the re- 
moval in settling tanks of the heavier portions of the sus- 
pended matter, has been continued during the year. The 
engine and boiler have been thoroughly repaired, and the 
pump replaced by a new one of the same pattern. 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



23 



Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit has lieen cleaned twice, and is now in good 
condition. Tho concrete walks about" the reservoir have 
been resurfaced, and a portion of the cobble-stone gutters 
covered with concrete. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The table on page 36 shows in detail the work done at this 
station. 

En<?ine No. 1 was in use 1.08f> hours 15 min., pumping l.S7,Si;i,S00 gallons. 

'' " 2 " " 2,.'>4() " " 4(;r.7;)s,()oo " 

" " 3 " " c'o-ta " 25 " " ].80a.L'8!).(]00 " 



Total amount pumped 



2,458,1)01,400 " 

. G,02G,SOO lbs. 



Total amount of CO \1 consumed .... 

Of wliicli 8 '.) i>er cent, were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 148.6!) feet. 

Quantity pumped ])er pnnr.d of coal, 408 gallons. 

Average duty of engines (no deduction), 50,51)4,400 ft. -lbs. per 100 lbs. of 
coal. 

Daily average amount pumped, G, 730,700 gallons, an increase of 8.5 per 
cent, from that of the year 18s4. 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries ...... 

Fuel 

Oil, waste, and packing . 

Repairs ...... 

Small supplies .... 



17,703 72 

10,373 72 

1,321 50 

2,348 47 

103 05 



Total $21,850 52 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 5.976 cents. 

Engine No. 3 has been thoroughly repaired during the past 
season, and is now in good order. The average quantity 
pumped per pound of coal was reduced by the use of coal of 
poor quality during the latter part of the year. 

Consumption. 

The daily avei-age consumption during the year was as 
follows : — 



Gallons. 



Sudbury and Cochituate supply 
Mystic supply 



25,607,200 
6,737,350 



Gallons 
pt 1- lioad 
per day 

72.4 
68.0 



Total 



32,344,550 



71.2 



24 City Document No. '/d^. 

The consumption of the Sudbury and Cochituate works 
shows an increase of 2 per cent, from that of the year 
1884, the Mj'stic 8.5 per cent., and the combined supplies 
3.3 per cent. The table on page 28, and Plate 3 tacing 
same page show the daily average consumption for each 
month for a number of years. 

Quality. 

The water supplied in the city has been of good quality 
throughout the year. 

The cucumber taste has not been noticed. Algoe were 
noticed in Keservoirs Nos. 1 and 3 in small quantities. The 
water in Farm Pond has contained more suspended matter 
than usual, owing to the work going on in the pond. The 
water of the Cochituate and Mystic lakes has been good 
throughout the year. 

Detection or Waste. 

The measures for the detection and prevention of waste of 
water have been continued during the year with satisfactory 
results. The following report of Assistant Engineer Dexter 
Brackett, who is in charge of this work, shows in detail the 
work accomplished : — 

City Engineer's Office, 

Boston, January 11, 1886. 
"William Jackson, Esq., Oitu Engineer: — 

"Dear Sir, — I respectfull}^ submit the following report 
of work done in connection with the detection of waste : — 

" The Deacon meters were placed in service on the first of 
April, and readings taken to determine the waste in each of 
the 137 sections into which the city is divided. These read- 
ings showed an increase in the waste in some of the sections 
from the time when the previous readings were taken in the 
fall of 1884. Sections showing an excessive amount of waste 
were reported to Mr. Cashman, Superintendent of Inspection 
and Waste Department for house-to-house examination. 

"All sections showing a large amount of waste have been 
tested from time to time, to learn the eflect of the work of 
the inspectors, and the readings taken in the fall show a 
gratifying reduction in many cases. The following table 
shows the saving- eflfected in a number of the sections : — 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



25 





c 
o 

1 = 

So 


Gallons per head per^day. 




Location of 
Sections. 


At first reading 
of meter. 


At last reading 
of meter. 


per head per 
24 hours. 




Total. 


Night 

rate per 

24 hrs. 


Total. 


Night 
rate per 
24 hrs. 


Total. 


Night 
rate. 


Fleet St. See. 1 . . . . 

" " " 2 . . . . 

Cooper St. " 2 . . . . 

Leverett st. " 1 . . . . 

Washington st. Sec. 1 . . 

Motte St. " 1 . . 

Waltham st. No. 1, Sec. 2 

" " 2, " 1 

« .. << 2, «' 2 

Harrison ave., " 1 

Bow (Join st. " 2, " 1 

Allen St., " 2 


3,550 
1,850 
1,850 
1,400 
2,200 
2,900 
2,000 
1,700 
2,900 
2,800 
1,800 
3,250 


51.4 

72. 

92.3 

75.4 

77.5 

46.9 

90.5 

62.4 

44.3 

72.9 

81.3 

54. 


39.8 

50.6 

68. 

63. 

42. 

28.7 

44.8 

34.3 

25. 

50.3 

69.4 

35.2 


28.1 

54. 

53.3 

54.1 

52. 

25.7 

79.2 

49. 

30.2 

46.6 

44.4 

40.8 


12.8 
33.7 
22.1 
26.8 
26.6 
8.2 
28.2 
24. 
13.6 
20.1 
21.4 
23.3 


23.3 

18. 

39. 

21.3 

25.5 

21.2 

11.3 

13.4 

14.1 

26.3 

36.9 

13.2 


27.0 

16.9 

45.9 

36.2 

15.4 

20.5 

16.6 

10.3 

11.4 

30.2 

48. 

11.9 



" The total amount saved in the above sections was about 
600,000 gallons per day. 

"During the year about 9,000 Church stopcocks have 
been received and tested. The work of setting them was 
begun on May 13, and continued until November 27 ; the 
total number of cocks set during that time was 5,584. 

"All the services in the portion of the city pro])er bounded 
by Albany, Essex, and Boylston streets, Columbus avenue, 
Berkeley and Tremont streets, and the Roxbury line, have 
been provided with the stopcocks, except in cases where it 
was not practicable to set them on account of granite side- 
walks, coal-holes, etc. All cast-iron service pipes have been 
replaced by new pipes of lead. 

" As soon as these stopcocks were set they were used in 
connection with the Deacon meters, and the results obtained 
show that an accessible stopcock on every service pipe is of 
great advantage in detecting waste. Each service pipe was 
tested between 11 P.M. and 4 A.M., and 1,319 services, or 
nearl}^ 25 per cent, of the total number, were reported to the 
Inspection and Waste Department for examination. 309 
cases were twice reported, 34 three times, and 6 four times, 
making a total number of 1,668 reports. The total waste 
from the 1,319 services was 38,000 gallons per hour. Exam- 
inations of these reports by the waste inspectors showed 253 



26 City Document No. 25. 

dofbctivo fiiucets, 262 defective water-closets, 360 defective 
l)all-cocks, 60 defective service-pipes, and oo2 cases of negli- 
o\>iit or wilful waste. 

"The settino- of sidewalk stopcocks on all of the service 
pipes should be completed as soon as possible. 
"Respectfully submitted, 

"DEXTER BRACKETT, 

" Assiatunt Engineer .''^ 



Distribution. 



The supply and distrilmtino; mains of the Sudbury and 
Cochituate works have been extended about 11.5 miles since 
May 1. making the total length now in use 40!) miles. 
There have also been 4,755 feet of ])ipe relaid with new pipe 
of larger diameter. Plate 1 shows the greater portion of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate distribution system. 

The distributing m^ins of the Mystic works have been ex- 
tended 9,621 feet, and 11,183 feet of the wrought-iron and 
cement ])ipe have been replaced by cast-iron pipes. The 
total length of supply and distributing mains connected with 
these works is now 131 miles. 

The i:)laus showing the location of the pipes, gates, and hy- 
drants have been corrected as usual. 



General Condition and Rkquirements of the Works. 

The completion of Reservoir No. 4 increases the available 
capacity of the Sudbury and Cochituate works to about 
35,000',000 gallons per day. 

The Mystic supply, however, cannot be depended upon 
to supi)ly much more than 7.000,000 gallons per day in a 
dry season. As our present daily average consumption from 
these Avorks has nearly reached that amount, it is evident 
that some steps should be taken either to increase the storage 
on the present water-shed, or to obtain a supply from some 
other source. 

Surveys to determine the practicability of ditferent schemes 
for the increase and improvement of the supply are now in 
progress. 

Although much has been done during the past ten or 
twelve years in enlarging the [)ipe-distrii)uti()n system, the 
growth of the city and modern ideas of fire-supply demand 
more work in this direction. There are also certain sections 



Plate I. 




Plate 2. 




ScALC m/f F/6S. 2 »3. 



Scale for Fi&s.I-4--S-6 and 7. 




Q 



FiG.3. 
LowRY Hydrant. 




Post Hydrant. 




no-. ■¥-. 
LawRY Hydrant wjth Small ValvC 



FiG. S. ,, 

LowRY Hydrant w.tm 9 IYalve; 






Fio-.e. 
LowRY Hydrant with SupPLeM£'»TARr Valyc t 






';-.'. 7'' A'^'V^Jc^w. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 27 

of the city where the pipes were laid in mnrsh-miicl ; the iron 
in the pipes laid in this material is destroyed hy chemical 
action, and the pi[)es are untible to withstand the ])ressure. 
The hydrants introduced at the time of the construction 
of the works, in 1848, were of small size (see Plate 2, 
Fio-. 7), and were connected with the street main by branch- 
pipes, four inches in diameter. 

Since 186S l)ut few of these hydrants have been set, and 
many of them have l)een replaced by the Lowry and Post 
hydi'ants, which ai*e of larger capacity. 

There are, however, 1 ,513 hydrants of the old pattern still 
in use. These should be gradually replaced by improved 
hydrants. I would, therefore, recommend that $50,(;00 be 
appropriated, to be exi^ended during the present season 
in the improvement of the distribution system. 

Ai)pended to this report will be found the usual tables in 
regard to rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 
There will also be found a table showing the monthly and 
yearly rainfall at Lake Cochituate since 1852, and a series 
of tables giving the rainfall, rainfall collected, and per- 
centages collected on the Sudbury, Cochituate, and Mystic 
water-sheds for a number of years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 
City Engineer and Engineer B. W. Board. 



28 



City Document No. 25. 



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K-l 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the rainfell and daily ava^ge consumption 
for eacli month. 



Yearh^ Aveixiges sltown thus 



plate: 3. 




"tr^ ^^^ "" "^ " ^ 



CONSUMfl-EZ 



canAy, A/tV!rT 



=ff=^ 



^^ : 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



29 









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cr 








c 


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c 








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c 


c 








c 




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^ 


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t- 


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cc 


tc 




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c 


cr 




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c 


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Eeport of the Water Board. 



33 

























t-^ 










IN 




J 


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CO 


lO 


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^ 


IN 


cq 


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i-( 


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I— 1 




rH 








n 





CO CO Oi OS 



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rji '^ CO ^ 



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rH O i-H 



















o 


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to 


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to 


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34 



City Document No. 25. 



'^ 



<2 






^-5 



'tjQO 

OS CO 






fKl 



o ;3 — 



o ira -^ 00 



CO r-{ tr* CO 

■^ \0 "^ ^ 



a <o c^ -^ 



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UO CO (N 00 O CI 
C<t rH T-( 1-1 i-( 






«^ OO C-l o 



CM iH r-l <N 






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o o o 
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— ( O f-H 



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OO 00 00 CO OO (» 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



35 









o 


o 


o 


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CO 






JO -sqt 001 -isd 
































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36 



City Document No. 25. 






CQ 



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o« 



Report of the Water Board. 



37 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sudbiiry-River Water-shed for 
the Year 1885. 



1885. 


3 
1-5 






<1 


^ 

S 


3 
1-5 


1-5 


1 

3 
< 


S 

a 
« 

m 


u 

O 

o 


u 

a 

.a 

a 

g 

12; 


a 

o 

Q 


1 . . . . 




0.12 


0.15 




0.635 






2.34 






0.75 


0.015 


2 . . . . 






3. . . . 














0.035 




. . . 


1.24 




0.03 


4. . . . 
















1.81 




0.145 




0.04 


5 . . . . 




0.005 




1.235 




0.92 




0.045 


0.22 






0.14 


6. . . . 


1.05 












0.03 






0.45 






7 . . . . 












. 














8 . 




0.05 


0.025 


0.18 


0.445 


0.685 


0.21 
0.50 












9. . . . 






0.84 




1.67 


0.315 


10 . 




2.535 






















11 
















0.055 










12. . . . 


0.95 






0.115 


















13 ... . 




















1.59 






14 ... 




0.01 
0.04 


0.03 
0.36 




0.96 




0.37 


0.175 








0.795 


15 . 












16. . . . 


1.58 












0.055 








17 




0.98 
0.08 


0.015 






0.095 














18. . . . 






0.665 






0.02 






. . . 


0.37 


19 ... . 
















0.05 






0.24 




20 ... . 


























21 ... . 














0.09 






0.36 




0.025 


22 ... . 












0.225 




0.37 


0.31 








23 ... . 










0.27 












24 . . . 


665 
























25 ... . 




0.045 


. . . 




0.06 






1.10 










26. . . . 








0.945 








. . . 






3.365 




27 ... . 


























28 ... . 


0.46 
























29 ... . 






0.435 


1.13 




0.94 


0.19 












30 ... . 


0.005 








1.31 


0.07 




31 ... . 






0.055 




0.45 






1.22 




0.09 


Totals . 


4.71 


3.865 


1.07 


3.605 


3.485 


2.865 


1.425 


7.1S5 


1.425 


5.095 


6.095 


2.72 



Total rainfall during year, 43.545 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, located at Framingham and Westboro'. 



38 



City Document No. 25. 



Rainfall in iiiclies and hundredths on Lake Cochituate Water-shed, for the 

Year 1885. 



1885. 


>-5 


5 


i 


<1 


IS 


c 
3 


3 


3 
3 
< 


S 

a 

m 


o 
o 


a 

> 
o 


a 

o 

Q 


1 


0.03 


0.14 












1.95 
03 


0.02 




0.80 


01 


2. . . . 


0.18 


. . . 


0.66 




0.02 




3. . . . 








. . . 






0.38 






1.30 




0.02 


4 
















1.60 
0.03 


0.24 


0.18 




15 


5. . . . 




0.02 




1.42 




1.15 






6. . . . 


1.05 












0.03 






0.52 






7 . . . . 


























8 




0.05 


0.02 


0.20 


0.39 


0.53 


0.19 

0.46 












9 , . . 




. . . 


0.70 




1.44 


0.32 


10 ... . 




2.47 














0.20 








11 ... . 
















0.04 










12 ... . 


1.35 




0.02 


0.09 


















13 ... . 
















0.08 




1.52 






14 . . 




0.03 
0.02 


0.02 
0.36 




0.86 




0.31 


0.05 








0.75 


15 












16 


1 72 




















17 ... . 




1.12 
0.07 


0.02 




0.86 


0.02 




0.01 










18. . . . 




0.39 


19 . ... 
















0.07 






0.21 




20 ... . 


























21 ... 




















0.38 






22 












0.12 




0.53 
0.13 


0.47 








23. . . . 










0.30 










0.03 


24 ... . 


0.63 








0.03 
















25 ... . 




0.06 






0.01 






1.23 










26. . . . 








0.89 














2.74 




27 ... . 


























28 ... . 


0.47 










0.69 














29 ... . 






0.45 


1.11 


• • • 


0.45 


0.34 


1.25 




1.36 


0.07 




30. . . . 








31 ... . 






0.02 




0.35 






0.01 








0.65 


Totals . 


5.25 


3.98 


1.09 


3.71 


3.46 


2.96 


1.73 


7.01 


1.63 


5.26 


5.26 


2.32 



Total rainfall during year, 43.66 inches. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



39 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Mystic-Lake Wateo'-shed for the 

Year 1885. 



2.025 



Totals. 4.83 3.40 1.175 3.445 3.945 4.41 2.04 5.90 1.425 5.52 6.31 2.10 



0.065 
0.165 



1.415 
0.123 



0.425 
0.015 



.17 



0.37 



Total rainfall during year, 44.50 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Station. 



40 



City Document JSTo. 25. 



"^ 























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1 


1 




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cr 


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M 






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cc 


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cc 




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co cc 


in 




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CO 


CO 


co 


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G- 




D- 


^^ 


^ >-< 00 (M oc 


<M 

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C 


c 




CN 


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c 


co ^ o (M 1-1 e^ 


i-< 


a 




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t-l 1- 


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cr 


D- 


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CO 


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CO 






















CO 










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ir 


t~ CO 


t- cr 


cr 


\r 




IT 


^ 


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o 




o- 


^ 


CO 




t- 




CXI o- 


00 cc 


cr 


IM 


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»r 


T* 


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iT 


■* ^ 


Tt 


■^ 




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"* 




















































c 


- 


i 




























C 




b. 


) 


^ 
























b 


D 




m 
























_c 














H 






















































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c 








< 


















c 


^ 




a. 






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1 

i 

a 

1 








t 


c 

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5 


I- 

Q, 




















a 


c 


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1 


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1 








1 

c 


S 

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1 ? 


c 
c 

1 


0. 


1 
c 


1 

1 


c 
1 


1 

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c 

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cc 


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1 





Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



41 



Tahle showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations 
on the Water- Works. 





Temperature op Air. 


Temperature op 
Water, 


1S85. 


Mystic Pumping- 
Station. 


Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingh 


jm. 


Brookline 
Reser'r. 


Mystic 
Eng. 
Ho. 




a 
s 
1 


a 

3 

a 

'3 

9 


i 
1 


a 
a 

3 


a 
B 




i 


a 

3 

a 
1 


a 

3 

a 

a 






g 


January . 


57. 


—6. 


24.7 


58. 


—4. 


26.4 


58. 


—7. 


26.2 


36.6 


34.0 


February . 


44.5 


—3. 


17.6 


49. 


—5. 


19.0 


46. 


-4. 


18.1 


36.5 


34.8 


March . . 


54.5 


1.5 


25.8 


59. 


2. 


27.0 


57. 


—1. 


27.2 


37.6 


35.0 


April. . . 


80. 


24.5 


45.8 


85. 


26. 


48.0 


82. 


24. 


47.9 


45.3 


42.0 


May . . . 


80.5 


27. 


51.9 


84. 


26. 


53.9 


83. 


25. 


54.8 


55.6 


54.3 


June . . . 


91. 


41. 


65.3 


94. 


40. 


66.5 


92. 


40. 


66.9 


67.5 


67.0 


July . . . 


94.5 


49. 


70.5 


95. 


48.5 


71.9 


96. 


46. 


72.2 


73.9 


74.5 


August. . 


88. 


42.5 


66.8 


90. 


40.5 


67.4 


89. 


42. 


67.7 


74.4 


73.3 


September 


81.5 


34. 


58.1 


84.5 


32. 


58.6 


82. 


33. 


58.9 


65.8 


65.2 


October . 


73. 


28.5 


49.8 


75. 


27. 


50.3 


77. 


26. 


50.1 


57.2 


56.8 


November 


66. 


18. 


40.7 


69. 


15. 


41.2 


67. 


11. 


41.5 


47.5 


48.4 


December 


58.5 


9. 


29.7 


60. 


7. 


30.4 


61. 


6. 


30.8 


37.2 


36.5 



42 



City Document No. 25. 



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^ 



■* 









CO 





lIBjnrea 


1^ 


(M 


I-H 


■* 


(N 


^ 

















'"' 


'"' 







§ 
















•to 


to 


a> 


00 


^ 


CO 




•nEjoTBa 







■* 


'Jf 




(N 


ai 




CO 


to 


Oi 










^ 


■* 


Ttl 


10 


!M 


00 





CO 


CO 


rH 


to 


'i' 


CO 


^ 






•paioatioo 






ci 

























H 


■^uao jaj; 




t- 




■^ 


to 





CO 


CO 






c^ 






^ 


•pa^oaiioo 


i 



CC 


to 





to 


to 


s 


^ 


CO 


S 


'* 


cq 


CO 


VO 


I[Bjnrea 


*^ 


0^ 


■^ 


^ 


(N 


^ 














r-i 


"^ 


'"' 


00 




eA 
































^ 


t^ 








•* 


CO 


to 


to 


JM 





ira 


C30 







•IIBjurea 


■5 


CO 
CO 


°2 
d 







<N 


d 


tA 


CO 


^ 


to 


^ 


Tf 






*N 


























^• 






•pajoanoo 























OJ 




5 


00 


« 

H 


•}aao jaj 




■* 


'^ 


CO 


vr3 




(M 












•paioanoo 


«o 


CO 

02 


^ 


I-H 


-* 


3 


to 


(5 


s 


CO 


CO 





^^ 


00 


IIBjniBH 


1 


1-1 


CO 


CO 


T)( 


T-( 





(M 


^ 





rH 


(N 


cq 


to 




» 










































to 


00 


cq 




01 




■* 









•IIBjniBH 




rH 


CO 


>o 




to 


en 








>o 










^ 








^ 


IN 




■^ 


ia 


CO 


■^ 


CO 


10 


■5 






*^ 








tH 








































• 


• 








































TT m 




» 

§ 
1^ 




1 


1 


S-t 


s 
■^ 


1 


<0 

a 
1-3 


1-3 


3 
SB 

<1 


a 

a 

<u 
CD 


1 






i 
> 


^4 

1 



S, 
0) 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



43 







•pDjoanoD 




o 


lO 


t- 


IM 


t. 


00 


o 


1-1 


CO 


CO 


^ 


a> 


CO 












'Tf 




,-H 












WD 








S' 










s 






-* 


















■paioajtoo 


i 


■o 


OJ 


^ 




g 


o 


g 


(N 


CO 


s 


00 


rH 


(M 




r4 


ITOuiBa 


>^ 


CO 


c^ 


'"' 


CO 


(N 


*"* 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c; 








i 








to 


o 




to 


CO 


lO 








CO 






•IPjnrea 


"5 


OS 




rA 


d 


CO 


"* 


CO 


^" 






<N 




CO 










•pojoanoo 




o> 


■^ 


00 


Tj; 


(N 


oi 




>o 




't 


en 


a> 


00 




« 












§5 














^ 








■pa^oajjoo 


< 


o 


1- 


00 


(31 


to 


-* 


to 


§ 


s 


o 


to 


oo 


CO 




at) 

H 


lIBjurea 


Ȥ 


ffO 


'"' 


CO 


to 


cq 


<=■ 


o 


'"' 


o 


c^ 


'"' 


c^ 


(M 






^ 






^ 




^ 


m 




^ 




^ 




.o 


CO 






•[IBjurea 


<i 














o 


r~* 




I— ' 












o 


























m 








^ 


























tH 










■p8?03JI00 




00 


00 


o 


CO 


00 


00 


to 


xa 


o 


t- 


^ 


CO 


■n 








,_! 




to 


t^ 










t- 


ira 


^ 








« 






to 


to 


■* 


s 


CO 






r-H 


LS 




■^ 


CO 






•pa;08i|OD 


i 


^ 


CO 

as 


Tli 


o 


o 


^ 


^ 


CO 


o 


CT) 


o 
o 


(M 


(M 






lIBjareH 


*§ 


rH 


o 


r- i 


CO 


'"' 


"* 


o 


r-t 


'"' 


■^ 


IM 


rH 


J:; 






■ i 




^ 








^ 














^ 






•IlBjnrea 


< 




CO 


O 


Ir- 




c^ 












^ 










f_j 


^ 




^ 


CO 




»o 






CO 


"* 




oo 








►^ 


























^ 










•pajoaiioo 




o 


o 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CD 


to 


00 


00 


00 


in 


^ 


^ 








OS 






CO 










to 






t^ 






H 

ac 

H 






■^ 


O) 










rH 






rH 










•pajoanoo 


i 


CO 

o 


<M 


in 


00 


o 
o 


5 


CO 


o 


o 


g 


o 

CO 


(M 


to 




liujarea 


'S, 


'"' 


(M 


c^ 


'"' 


cq 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


'"' 


'"' 


rH 






« 








n. 




to 




















•tlBjniBa 


.< 




CO 








Ol 






«* 
















^ 


(N 


o 






lO 


<N 


CO 


f_t 


lO 


t. 


CO 


in 
































tK 










•pajoaiioo 




























I- 






































© 






to 


00 


U5 


■^ 






'"' 




CO 












•paioaj]oo 


i 


t^ 


CO 


00 

CO 


^- 


to 


CT 


CO 


■* 


to 


rH 


a, 


t- 


o 




at) 


ni3juiEy: 




Tl< 


CO 


CO 


to 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


I-H 


o 


o 


to 

(M 






d 


.o 


m 






^ 


.o 








to 


o 










•II'Bjurea 


< 








00 








o 




02 












^ 


t- 


^ 


to 


00 


CO 


^ 




oq 


o 


t^ 


-* 


CO 


in 








►^ 




































•paioanoo 








^ 


















CO 


eq 




eJ 






■* 


c^ 


-* 


Ol 


(M 




(N 


O) 


i-H 


<M 


rfl 


>o 


CO 




■pa}oa[[po 


i 


(M 


^ 


CO 


^ 


o 
(^^ 


o 


'^ 


lO 


o 


CO 


g 


rH 


§ 




9 
at) 

H 


UBjnrea 


>^ 


'^ 


"^ 


CO 


N 


oq 


tH 


o 


o 


'-' 


cq 


■^ 


CO 


S 






s 




^ 


c<< 


,_ 




CO 


CO 


^ 


™ 


o 


to 


03 


^ 






•iranrea 


►^ 


CO 


o 


>o 


cj 




CO 


(N 


e^ 


«; 


en 


CO 


.n 


to 












'. 




• 










• 






• 


'^ S 






H 
O 




>^ 




^ 










,-4^ 


a 




6 


tu 


•3 Si 
















^ 
3 


d 


>> 
3 
»-5 


3 


ft 

01 


B 
o 
O 


> 


<0 

ft 


H 



44 



City Document No. 25. 











- Oi 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(M 


115 


t- 


r-l 


CO 


to 


OJ 


CO 


t_ 






•pa^oanoo 




t~ 


lO 


CO 


CO 


<M 


-# 


^ 


to 


^ 


to 


00 


CO 


00 






■;aao .laj; 




^' 


" 


















^ 


cq 


cq 






» 


t- 


^ 


o> 


l~ 


•* 


to 


CO 


CO 


^ 






^ 






o 


■p3103[100 


« 










«* 


o 


CO 




IM 






to 






H 


llBjnrea 


•^ 








rH 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 






=c 




lO 


CO 


'^ 


OO 


in 


o 


^ 


m 


in 
















o 


o 




CI 


m 




o 




to 


OJ 












•IlBjniBa 


1^ 


CO 


Tf 


cq 


(M 


"^ 


rH 


"^ 


CO 


T-t 


cq 


"^ 


cq 


CO 










■pajoanoo 




^ 


CO 


o 


to 


o 


to 


t- 


t- 


o 


« 


IM 


OJ 


OJ 












































to 






05 


IH 








CO 


to 


cq 


cq 


^ 






« 


o> 


<M 


o 


00 


O 


^ 


CO 


in 


^ 








^ 




9 


■paioajioo 






^ 








*^ 




O) 








o 


CO 





t* 


IIBjaiBa 


I-H - 
















o 


o 


o 


'"' 


b- 
rH 




H 




*N 


























































K 






OS 


o 


o 






o 


rl< 


00 












^ 


O 


























OJ 


OJ 




O 




•IIBjnre^j 


■8 


IM 


CO 


CO 


^ 


iH 


'K 


CO 


to 


'-' 


o 


CJ 


CO 


?? 


O 




































1 




•pajoaijoo 




CO 


03 


to 


t- 




(M 


in 


o 


00 


CO 


o 


00 


cq 




































'^ 








lO 


UJ 




in 


cq 


eq 


"^ 


1-1 


M 




CO 




-* 


-^ 




^ 


lO 


^ 




to 


to 




^ 


^ 




CO 


^ 


-* 


-* 




« 


•papaijoo 


s 






■^ 








'^ 














4i 

1 


H 


IltjjareH 


1 






" 


IM 




o 


o 












cq 










































CO 


o 










■* 








cq 


00 












Oi 










■* 


a> 








r-1 


in 






•IIBjnrea 


•^ 


lO 


in 


Tll 


lO 


o 


CO 


CO 


to 


rH 


lO 


to 


in 


CO 


^i 






lS 


























in 


s 






s 




























tj 




•paioa[[oo 




to 


Ol 


^ 


o 


to 


CO 


CO 


to 


00 


CO 


CO 


to 


OJ 




































O 










(N 


00 




lO 


CO 


eq 


^ 


cn 


*H 


CO 










4 


o 


f. 


^ 


Tf 


^ 


rq 


lO 


^ 


to 


to 




to 


^ 


)« 


•paioanoo 


2^ 


CM 


















T—l 




OJ 


I— t 




H 




tH 


f-i 


to 


CO 


(M 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1-1 


cq 


T-\ 


CO 

cq 


'^ 




cc 














^ 










































OJ 


o 








•lIBjurea 


lS 


CO 


O 


b- 


CO 


CO 


<M 


IM 


CO 


o 


CO 


to 


'-' 


S 






































































Ci 




































•^ 




•papaiioo 




m 


■>* 


OJ 


i-; 


C51 


CO 


o> 


CO 


IM 


CO 


T-l 


in 


CO 


































§ 








« 


■* 


to 


iH 


o 


CO 






IM 


CJ 


cq 


CO 


•V 


-^ 




» 










CO 


^ 


■* 




on 




in 




■nf 


tt 


•papaiioo 












•* 
















"^ 


?i 


i» 


I[Bjarea 




■^ 


'"' 


■o 


T* 


r-i 












i—i 








H 




•^ 




























a^ 






K 


















on 




















IM 


-* 








'^ 




cn 










^ 




•IIBJUTB-a 




.H 


■* 


t- 


CO 


(M 


iH 


OJ 


IM 


CO 


CI 


to 


CO 


otj 


'^ 






^ 


























s£ 


1 


'«» 


































w 




•paioajioo 




O 


00 


(M 


in 


o> 


t- 


1~* 


IM 


1* 


to 


in 




to 


»^ 










j^ 


1:~. 






t~. 


f_( 








OJ 












m 


■^ 


03 


CO 


(M 




■^ 




cq 


1* 




CO 






» 


M 


IM 


to 


>o 


OJ 


ao 


in 


IM 


o 




to 




1^ 




» 


•pajoanoo 


S 




05 


to 








(M 








OJ 




in 




H 


IlBjurea 


« 

^ 


O 


C^ 


<M 


CO 




1-1 


O 


O 


o 






1-1 


^ 






» 




o 










^ 


m 




































Tti 






OJ 


OJ 






•IIBjnrea 


"5 


IM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


in 


CO 


^ 


^ 


tij 


i 








^ 
















































• 








. 








H 




























3 ?„ 






B 
























^ 




C3 2' 






o 




C3 
1-5 


p 

1 


.a 


P. 


^ 




>;. 


3 
3 


i 


i-i 


a 

a) 
> 
o 


a 


^1 

O C4 










fe 


;^ 


<. 


1^ 


1-J 


>^ 


-< 


02 


O 


|2i 


P 





Report of the Water Board. 



45 





•psioajioo 




^ 


<M 


»- 


CO 


t_ 


•* 


o 


00 


>ffl 


o 


o 


t~ 


t- 






CD 


O 


cq 


CO 


CO 


■* 






»o 


iC^ 


OS 








■^nao aa^j 








cq 




^ 


IH 






TH 


'"' 


CO 




co 




«: 


O 


o 


^ 


CO 


„ 


CO 


o 


CO 


X5 




^ 








•pa}oai[oo 


-< 




cq 


cq 




"^ 


d 




CO 

d 






CO 




>o 


llBjniBa 


>^ 


























r-1 


H 




































^ 


00 


Ol 


^ 


CO 


CD 


cr. 


^_^ 




CD 












^) 


C^ 


OS 


o 


t- 


^ 


Ol 


t- 


o 








CO 


CD 




•IIBJUIBH 


1 


>= 


CO 


" 


co 


CO 


cq 


" 


'^ 


rH 


i» 


la 


(M 


CO 






■paioa[ioo 




00 


■cjl 


Ol 


rH 


UT 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


o> 


r-< 


i_ 


(M 


IM 






1-H 


t. 


CO 


>o 


t- 


t^ 






^^ 








O-l 




■laao jaj 










IH 




■^ 




tH 


'~' 


T-l 




CO 


rti 




« 


•* 


CD 


,_ 


O 




(_ 


CO 


^ 










^ 


at) 


•pa^oanoo 


« 


°°. 


(N 


^ 


Tli 




d 


d 


d 


d 


CO 




00 


(N 


ITOurea 


■^ 


























IH 




so 


Ol 


"* 


o 


O 


(N 


00 


<M 




o 






^ 


^ 






^ 


CO 




iC3 


CO 




CO 




•* 


03 




CO 


CO 


in 




•lIBjarea 


< 
^ 


Tt< 




^ 


CO 


(N 


« 


-* 


"* 


O 


<N 


o. 


o 


115 






•pa^oaiioo 




(M 


CO 


00 


rt 


o> 


t- 


to 


CO 


^ 


>o 


o 


00 


■^ 






CTi 


tX 


o 


CO 


^H 


CO 


o 


OO 


^ 


^ 










■^uao .laj 








"-I, 










■^ 


^ 


rH 






CO 




• 


^ 


ro 


•* 


CD 


CD 


^ 


<M 


^ 






^ 




^ 


es 

ft 

H 


•paioanoo 


< 


d 








(N 


o 


O 


o 






"* 


o> 


r-i 


nv!jnrea 


*^ 






























■ 


OO 


o> 


o 


,_ 


lO 


^ 


CO 


OJ 


^ 


CD 


CO 










«a 


00 








O 


OO 


00 


CO 


CO 




o 




IM 




•ItBjniBa 


1 


N 


CO 


" 


<M 


CO 


" 


(M 


o 


rH 


lO 


IM 


« 


CO 






•papanoo 




o 


03 


o 


CO 




rH 


'^ 


M 


- 


o: 


"* 


CO 


^ 




"inaa m^ 






"^ 






CO 








■" 


CO 


CD 


^ 


CO 




CO 


^ 


o 


1^ 


CO 


o 


(M 


CO 


^ 


^ 


-* 






lO 


K) 
H 


•pa^oanoo 


-« 


°^ 


CO 


co' 


d 


rH 




o 


o 


ro 


CO 




o; 


o 


ntJJurey; 


»^ 


























r~i 




60 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<-n 


CO 


^ 


OJ 


-* 


o 


fvi 




^ 








'D 






t- 


00 




CO 








(N 




r-l 


(M 




•IIBjniBa 


1 




CO 


(M 


r-t 


^ 




CO 




05 


(M 


O 


■M 


§ 




•paioanoo 




iO 


CO 

d 


^ 


•* 


CO 
oi 


o 


«> 


CO 


00 


-* 


» 




OO 




■}nao .laj 








rH 


O 


CO 


(N 






rH 




(N 




CO 




CO 


en 


CO 


CD 


Ol 


CD 


^ 


CD 


Oi 












H 
OB 

ao 

H 


•paioaiioo 


< 


rH 


<N 




I-H 


O) 


CO 












'^ 


CO 


IlBjaiTJH 


i 


























I-H 




- 


CO 


CO 


cn 


^ 


a> 


CO 


OO 






j_ 












^ 








t~ 


rH 










00 






O 




•lIBjnniy: 


»^ 




Tf 


•* 




CO 


T}( 


IM 


" 


<N 


<N 


CO 


CO 


Tt( 










• 














• 












W 
































E-i 
































8 




>. 


>1 














a 

02 


.^ 


,Q 




QQ ^ 




;5 




3 

c 


3 


1 

3 


Oh 

<5 




a> 

n 

3 


"3 


so 

3 


3 

o 

o 


> 


1 


o =« 
Eh 



46 



City Document No. 25. 





•pajoanoo 








00 


o> 


U5 


CO 


00 


f 


1-1 


IM 


^ 


t. 














CD 


CO 




to 


CO 


y-t 


o 


lO 


l>» 


t^ 


^ 






n 






(N 


^ 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 




(M 


rH 




IM 






•pajoanoo 


< 


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00 


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s 


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en 


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cq 


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■<s 


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CD 


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£ 


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^ 


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CO 


^ 


(N 


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o 


o 


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o 


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Ol 


H 


































ei 


























in 












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t- 


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IN 


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c» 






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t. 


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3 




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ft 


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> 
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15 


a 

o 
a 
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Repoet of the Water Board. 



47 



Rainfall Received and Collected on the Mystic Water-shed. — Concluded. 





1S84. 


1885. 


Month. 


1 
S 


■a 
a 

.So 




1 
p 
'S 


-a 
.Ho 


a ^ 

an 




Inches. 


Inches. 




Inches. 


Inches. 




January 


4.745 

6.085 

4.255 

3.18 

2.95 

4.635 

3.72 

4.855 

0.70 

2.70 

2.005 

4.56 


1.49 
3.89 
5.42 
3.85 
1.48 
0.85 
0.58 
0.60 
0.23 
0.27 
0.35 
1.17 


31.5 

63.9 

127.3 

121.2 

50.2 

18.3 

15.5 

12.4 

33.5 

9.9 

17.4 

25.6 


4.83 

3.50 

1.175 

3.445 

3.945 

4.41 

2.04 

5.90 

1.425 

5.52 

6..31 

2.10 


1.79 
1.81 
2.05 
2.03 
2.18 
0.86 
0.47 
0.54 
0.34 
0.68 
2.41 
2.39 


37.1 
53.3 




174.5 




58.8 


May 


55.3 




19.6 




22.8 




9.2 




23.7 




12.2 




38.2 




113.6 








44.39 


20.18 


45.5 


44.50 


17.55 


39.4 







48 



City Document No. 25. 





•pajosnoo 




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00 


to 


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U5 


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a> 


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CO 


t. 






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to 


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^ 


in 


in 


oo 






^ 


cJ 




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in 








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Cl 


■^ 


CO 




« 


00 


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CO 


o 


O 


O 


cq 


^ 


cq 


to 






^ 


o 

H 


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1 


o 


o 




o 


a> 


CO 


CO 


cq 


^ 


00 








lliijaiea 


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CO 


cq 


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o 


o 


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to 


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in 


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oo 






































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to 


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-* 




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in 


5 








cq 


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■llBjarea 


►^ 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


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x> 


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in 


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^ 



fi^ 



Report of the Water Board. 



49 



•pajoajioo 



•pai03i[oo 



■iranrea 



i-^ l^ o 



CO CJ o 



<M C3 C) "M 



•pDlODHOO 

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CO 00 »o o 
<M 1-1 1-1 C^ 



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a -9 a 



f5 3 <; a 



<! OQ O 1^ ft 





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^ 


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CO 


t_ 


t_ 


t_ 


C3 


CO 


^ 


t_ 






CO 


- 


1* 


O 


s 


o 


o 


CT> 


CO 


o 


rH 


" 


^ 


^ 


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i 


s 


CO 

CD 


-H 


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oo 


CO 

o 


CO 


•3 




CO 


ro 


CO 

(o 


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^ 


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*~i 


I-i 


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CO 


^ 


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o 


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o 


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CO 
C-l 


H 


































- •Ili'jnrea 


1 


CO 

o 


lO 


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t- 

^ 


o 
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i 


CD 


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^ 


-* 


rH 


CO 




►^ 


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CO 


^ 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


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o 


IM 


CM 


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-* 



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C» 


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•p0;o3t{oo 




CD 


135 


CO 


a> 


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CD 


00 


o 


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CO 




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CO 




rH 


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ci 


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^ 




^ 




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90 

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lli:jaii3a 


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^ 


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o 




'°. 




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►^ 





























■pajoaiioo 




r- 


00 


«! 


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t— 


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» 


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< 




-* 


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CO 


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c«,0 

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rrt 00 OJ 

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iS^co" 



a a. 3 
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50 



City Document No. 25. 



Rainfall at Lake CocMtuate, 1852 to 1885, inclusive. 





Teak. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


1853 . 


5.80 


1.76 


4.42 


9.60 


2.60 


2.00 


2.16 


8.27 


2.04 


3.40 


2.76 


3.12 


47.93 


1853 . 


3.68 


6.56 


2.92 


3.80 


6.32 


0.56 


2.84 


7.20 


5.44 


4.56 


5.20 


6.59 


55.73 


1854 . 


2.45 


5.16 


4.16 


5.60 


3.92 


2.08 


2.32 


0.28 


3.68 


3.37 


7.79 


2.34 


43.15 


1855 . 


4.52 


3.50 


1.91 


2.65 


0.82 


1.98 


3.86 


0.77 


0.75 


4.16 


4.84 


5.20 


34.96 


1856 . 


1.44 


0.22 


0.66 


4.27 


7.81 


1.77 


1.76 


11.40 


3.13 


2.34 


1.43 


4.57 


40.80 


385r . 


2.51 


1.30 


1.72 


10.23 


7.15 


4.02 


8.85 


6.62 


4.27 


7.06 


3.07 


6.30 


63.10 


1858 . 


2.61 


3.32 


3.87 


4.39 


2.23 


10.17 


3.46 


6.42 


5.17 


2.12 


2.91 


1.99 


48.66 


1859 , 


5.64 


2.91 


10.95 


1.37 


3.46 


3.16 


0.99 


7.69 


4.56 


0.33 


3.55 


4.41 


49.02 


I860 . 


1.24 


3.80 


1.98 


2.25 


1.98 


11.16 


6.82 


4.89 


9.92 


1.72 


5.97 


3.71 


55.44 


1861 . 


2.51 


3.81 


2.75 


6.44 


3.12 


2.64 


1.62 


7.79 


2.76 


3.20 


6.20 


2.60 


45.44 


1862 . 


7.82 


1.08 


4.18 


1.85 


2.71 


6.58 


6.54 


1.43 


2.62 


4.83 


7.69 


2.36 


49.69 


1863 . 


4.10 


4.38 


3.57 


11.34 


2.66 


1.98 


14.12 


5.61 


3.39 


4.56 


8.54 


5.05 


69.30 


1864 . 


3.37 


0.98 


8.44 


4.02 


2.84 


0.58 


1.06 


3.56 


1.52 


6.50 


5.45 


4.28 


42.60 


1865 . 


4.99 


4.45 


5.48 


2.18 


8.25 


0.91 


3.10 


3.36 


1.66 


6.99 


4.78 


3.31 


49.46 


1866 . 


1.44 


5.80 


3.92 


1.94 


6.46 


4.80 


13.35 


3.98 


8.36 


3.43 


4.52 


4.32 


62.32 


186^ . 


2.76 


5.40 


5.65 


2.43 


6.46 


2.95 


5.36 


12.36 


1.08 


7.27 


2.63 


1.90 


56.25 


1868 . 


3.70 


1.18 


2.51 


5.61 


8.12 


2.95 


2.10 


7.38 


7.69 


1.19 


6.77 


0.45 


49.71 


1869 . 


3.71 


7.07 


7.52 


2.57 


7.59 


3.68 


2.63 


2.34 


8.49 


9.50 


3.26 


5.98 


64.34 


18 TO . 


7.85 


4.68 


6.0J 


8.81 


3.14 


4.05 


3.10 


2.03 


0.61 


7.96 


4.40 


S.19 


55.89 


1871 . 


1.31 


2.30 


5.02 


2.29 


5.66 


5.96 


2.20 


3.56 


1.46 


5. 38 


7.01 


3.24 


45.39 


1873 . 


1.86 


1.37 


3.06 


1.74 


3.24 


4.27 


5.55 


9.76 


6.29 


3.69 


4.22 


3.42 


48.47 


1873 . 


4.24 


2.43 


3.98 


2.69 


3.24 


0.38 


4.08 


7.17 


2.62 


6.11 


4.54 


3.95 


45.43 


1874 . 


2.96 


2.90 


1.19 


6.36 


3.40 


4.79 


3.16 


4.83 


1.55 


1.04 


2.05 


1.70 


35.93 


1875 . 


2.42 


S.15 


3.74 


3.23 


3.56 


6.24 


3.57 


5.53 


3.43 


4.85 


4.83 


0.94 


45.49 


1876 . 


1.83 


4,21 


7.43 


3.24 


2.80 


1.60 


9.49 


2.19 


3.98 


2.00 


6.59 


3.13 


48.49 


1877 . 


3.19 


0.53 


7.79 


3.24 


3.73 


2.64 


2.77 


3.35 


0.46 


8.14 


6.94 


1.02 


43.80 


1878 . 


5.77 


5.93 


4.20 


5.63 


0.83 


3.33 


3.47 


6.94 


1.12 


5.15 


6.09 


5.12 


53.58 


1879 . 


2.00 


3.05 


3.90 


4.69 


1.20 


4.14 


3.38 


6.43 


1.74 


0.90 


2.98 


3.60 


38.01 


1880 . 


3.07 


4.05 


2.83 


2.94 


1.98 


1.25 


7.00 


3.81 


1.69 


2.95 


1.70 


2.56 


35.83 


1881 . 


5.56 


4.43 


4.79 


1.71 


3.18 


4.83 


2.78 


1.13 


2.13 


2.87 


3. So 


3.83 


41.09 


1883 . 


5.93 


3.96 


2.7b 


1.89 


4.73 


1.87 


3.49 


1.14 


9.20 


2.22 


0.93 


2.17 


40.29 


1883 . 


2.88 


3.59 


1.76 


2.27 


3.95 


1.81 


2.88 


0.39 


1.31 


5.16 


2.00 


3.14 


31.20 


1884 . 


4.39 


6.04 


4.50 


3.80 


2.92 


3.88 


4.42 


4.49 


0.90 


2.59 


2.33 


5.31 


45.57 


1885 . 


5.25 


3.98 


1.09 


3.71 


3.46 


2.96 


1.73 


7.01 


1.63 


5.26 


5.26 


2.32 


43.66 


Av'rages, 


3.67 


3.51 


4.14 


4.14 


3.99 


3.47 


4.29 


5.03 


3.43 


4.20 


4.51 


3.44 


47.82 



ANNUAL EEPOET OF THE WATER 
EEGISTEAE, 

FOE, THE YEAR 1885. 



Office of the Water Eegistear, City Hall, 

Boston, January 1, 1886, 

H. T. Rockwell, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 
Sir, — In compliance with the requirements of Section 9, 
Chapter 30, of the Revised Ordinances, the Water Registrar 
submits tlie following report for the year 1885 : — 

For convenience of reference he has continued the method 
which existed before the union of the Cochituate and Mystic 
Departments. 

The total number of water-takers now entered in the 
Cochituate Department is 59,972, being an increase of 3,611 
over the previous year. 

The total receipts from all sources during the year 1885 
are $1,260,171.46. 

The details of this amount are as follows : — 



Received from sale of water furnished in 

1885 

Received from sale of water furnished in 

previous years .... 
Received for labor and material furnished 

for elevator, fire, and motor pipes . 
Received from sales of old material 
Received for service-pipes and repairs . 
Received for off and on water for repairs 
Received for merchandise furnished other 

departments ..... 
Received for summonses 
Received for off and on water for non-pay 

ment of rates .... 

Received for fines for waste 



;l, 132, 293 58 

107,464 41 

5,140 10 
4,669 95 
2,801 30 
3,128 88 

2,104 74 
1,452 50 

1,056 00 
60 00 



,260,171 46 



52 



City Document No. 25. 



The estimated income from the sale of water 

for the 3^ear 1886 is ... . 

From all other sources .... 



$1,178,000 00 
20,000 00 

$1,198,000 00 



The difference between the receipts of 1885 and the 
estimated income for 1886 is owing to the reduction of 
6% on the schedule rates, and the anticipated reduction in 
meter rates for 1886. 

The expenditures of the Cochituate Department for the 
year 1885 have been $45,929.93. 

The items of this expenditure are as follows : — 



Salaries 

Labor — Service Division 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses . 
Postage, etc. 



$30,596 39 

12,744 52 

1,577 56 

764 87 

246 59 

$45,929 93 



The total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 4,077. 











SIZES. 












KIND. 


5^ in. 


Xin. 


lin. 


Iji in. 


2 in. 


Sin. 


4 in. 


6 in. 


TOTAL. 


Worthiugton 

Crown 


430 
8S8 


1 

69 

1,859 


423 

111 

100 

1 


26 

27 


65 
21 


9 

15 


6 

8 


1 




Desper 

New England .... 


16 
1 










































Total 


1,335 


1,929 


635 


53 


86 


24 


14 


1 


4,077 



There are also 255 elevators, and 85 motors, with indica- 
tors attached, to register the quantity of water consumed. 

There are 53 drinking-fountains established within the city 
limits. Those marked * are arranged for continuous flow of 
water. The balance have automatic fixtures, operating the 
flow of water when required. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 53 

City Proper. 

* Boston Common (6). 
North square. 

Washington street, opposite Blackstone square. 
Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street. 

" " head of Rowe's wharf. 

Atlantic avenue, near N.Y. & N.E. R.E. freight-house. 
Haymarket square. 
Causeway street, at Boston and Lowell R.R. depot. 

" " junction Merrimac street. 

Charles street, opposite the Jail. 

" " near Boylston street. 

Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Albany street, opposite water-works, pipe-yard. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the drawbridge. 

East Boston. 
Maverick square. 
Central square. 
Bennington street, junction Chelsea street. 

South Bosto7i. 

Foundry street, opposite First street. 

Fourth street, near Foundry street. 
" " junction Emerson street. 

" " corner Q street. 

Telegraph Hill. 

Sixth street, near P street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 

Roxhury. 

Albany street, junction Dearborn street. 

* Eliot square. 

Eustis street, near Washington street. 
Heath street, near Treinont street. 
Pynchon street, near Roxbury street. 
Tremont street, junction Cabot street. 
Blue Hill ave., opposite Oakland Garden. 

West Roxhury. 
Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets. 
Centre and LaGrange streets. West Roxbury village. 



54 City Document No. 25. 

Morton street, junction South street. 

Roslindale, Taft's hotel. 

Washington street, near Williams street. 

Dorchester. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street. 
Neponset avenue, cor. Walnut street. 
Upham's Corner. 
Glover's Corner. 
Grove Hall, 

Brighton. 
Barry's Corner. 

Market street. Cattle-fair Hotel. 
Union square. 

Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel. 
Washington street, Oak square. 

There are 28 stand-pipes now located for street-sprinkling 
purposes, as follows : — 

Tremont street and Hammond park. 

Clay street, corner Tremont street. 

Eliot square. 

Brookline avenue, corner Longwood avenue. 

St. James street, corner Warren street. 

Blue Hill avenue, between Waverley and Clifford streets. 

Warren street, corner Gaston street. 

Egleston square, corner Walnut ave. 

Upham's Corner. 

Field's Corner. 

Dorchester avenue, near Savin Hill avenue. 

Dorchester avenue, at Old Boston line. 

Beach street, Harrison square. 

Union square, Brighton. 

Washington street, corner Winship street, Brighton. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, corner of South street. 

Dudley street, opposite Howard avenue. 

Paris street, corner of Meridian street. 

Corner Munroe, Walnut avenue. 

Near Francis, Tremont street. 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain. 

Emerson street, junction Third street. 

Beacon street, corner Brookline avenue. 

Boylston street, near Fairfield street. 

Cambridge street, Brighton. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



55 



Huntin<2:ton avenue, near Camden street. 

M street, between Fourth and Emerson streets. 

First street, between C and D. 



The following table exhibits the classes of premises to 
which meters are attached, the amount of w^ater consumed, 
and the revenue assessed for the yGiir 1885. 



Class op Premises. 



Hotels 

Apartment Hotels 

Business premises . . : 

Steam Railroads 

Sugar Refineries 

Factories and Machinists 

Iron Works and Foundries 

Mills and Engines 

Marble and Stone Works 

Gas Companies 

Breweries 

Oil Works 

Chemical Works 

Laundries 

Restaurants , 

Stables 

Theatres and Halls 

Hospitals , 

Schools 

City, State, and Government Buildings , 

Steamers and Shipping 

Elevators and Motors , 

Electric Light Companies , 

Miscellaneous ■ 



Totals 



1884. 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



19,446,104 

17,058,166 

51,641,069 

26,592,829 

29,522,760 

22,087,052 

5,489,472 

4,562,819 

2,493,42.3 

7,252,200 

9,061,837 

1,532,898 

2,128,750 

424,000 

3,401,990 

9,767,765 

1,390,000 

1,643,000 

1,656,006 

8,001,702 

7,537,190 

13,929,396 

2,662,000 

3,068,187 



252,350,665 



Amount 
Assessed. 



^29,169 13 

25,587 20 

77,461 53 

39,889 22 

44,284 14 

33,130 51 

8,234 19 

6,844 19 

3,740 13 

10,878 30 

13,592 82 

2,299 47 

3,193 12 

636 00 

5,102 98 

14,651 61 

2,0S5 00 

2,464 50 

2,484 01 

12,002 55 

11,428 30 

20,894 08 

3,993 00 

4,438 77 



378,484 75 



188.5. 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



21,255,194 

56,513,773 

64,131,173 

23,002,380 

28,594,000 

22,770,098 

4,402,173 

2,672,000 

2,275,700 

9,044,432 

7,626,000 

1,690,000 

2,801,000 

326,000 

5,187,300 

10,028,384 

738,000 

3,610,000 

2,884,893 

7,620,686 

7,526,000 

12,824,833 

3,248,874 

1,116,667 



Amount 
Assessed. 



301,889,560 



$31,882 29 

84,770 66 

96,196 76 

.34,503 57 

42,891 00 

34,155 13 

6,603 26 

4,008 00 

3,413 55 

13,566 67 

11,439 00 

2,-535 00 

4,201 50 

489 00 

7,781 00 

15,042 57 

1,107 00 

5,415 00 

4,327 34 

11,431 00 

11,416 76 

19,237 24 

4,873 30 

1,675 00 



$452,961 60 



56 



City Document No. 25. 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848 : — 



Ke( 


3eived by Water Commissioners, 


as per 


Auditor's 


report. 


in 1848 . 


. 


. 


. 


$972 81 


From January 1 


, 1849, to J 


anuary 1 


,1850 


71,657 79 






1850, 




1851 


99 


025 45 






1851, 




1852 


161 


052 85 






1852, 




1853 


179 


567 39 






1853, 




1854 


196 


352 32 






1854, 




1855 


217 


007 51 






1855, 




1856 


266 


302 77 






1856, 




1857 


282 


651 84 






1857, 




1858 


289 


328 83 






1858, 




1859 


302 


409 73 






1859, 




1860 


314 


808 97 






1860, 




1861 


334 


544 86 






1861, 




1862 


365 


323 96 






1862, 




1863 


373 


922 33 






1863, 




1864 


394 


506 25 






1864, 




1865 


430 


710 76 






1865, 




1866 


450 


341 48 






1866, 




1867 


486 


538 25 






1867, 




1868 


522 


130 93 






1868, 




1869 


553 


744 88 






1869, 




1870 


597 


328 55 






1870, 




1871 


708 


783 68 






1871, 




1872 


774 


445 70 






1872, 




1873 


862 


704 08 






1873, 




1874 


917 


■115 92 






1874, 




1875 


977 


020 48 






1875, 




1876 


. 1,005 


120 94 






1876, 




1877 


. 1,029 


643 70 






1877, 




1878 


. 1,015 


562 89 






1878, 




1879 


. 1,010 


584 30 






1879, 




1880 


. 1,025 


803 14 






1880, 




1881 


. 1,039 


896 17 






1881, 




1882 


. 1,087 


528 49 






1882. 




1883 


. 1,127 


982 32 






1883, 




1884 


. 1,167 


704 17 






1884, 




1885 


. 1,203,192 55 






1885, 




1886 


. 1,239, 


757 99 



Eepoet of the Watee Boaed. 



57 



The following table exhibits the 
takers since January 1, 1850 : — 



yearly increase of water- 













Takers. 


Increase- 


From 


January 


1, 1850, 


to January 


1, 1851, 


13,463 




I i 


I i 


1851, 


( ( 


1852, 


16,076 


2,613 


li 


1 1 


1852, 


( I 


1853, 


16,862 


786 


(( 


i i 


1853, 


li 


1854, 


18,110 


1,308 


(( 


(< 


1854, 


ii 


1855, 


19,193 


1,023 


(( 


1 1 


1855, 


I i 


1856, 


19,998 


805 


(( 


(C 


1856, 


I i 


1857, 


20,806 


808 


(( 


(( 


1857, 


(( 


1858, 


21,602 


796 


(( 


( ( 


1858, 


(( 


1859, 


22,414 


812 


( (, 


(< 


1859, 


( ( 


1860, 


23,271 


857 


( 6 


( ( 


1860, 


i i 


1861, 


24,316 


1,045 


ii 


11 


1861, 


i i 


1862, 


25,486 


1,170 


i i 


i i 


1862, 


I i 


1863, 


26,289 


803 


i i 


1 1 


1863, 


i I 


1864, 


26,851 


562 


i i 


i I 


1864, 


i I 


1865, 


27,046 


195 


it 


1 1 


1865, 


1 1 


1866, 


27,489 


443 


li 


1 1 


1866, 


i i 


1867, 


27,754 


265 


i i 


1 1 


1867, 


i i 


1868, 


28,104 


350 


( ( 


1 1 


1868, 


I i 


1869, 


29,738 


1,634 


i i 


I i 


1869, 


i i 


1870, 


31,500 


1,762 


a 


I i 


1870, 


i i 


1871, 


36,132 


4,632 


a 


ii 


1871, 


1 1 


1872, 


38,716 


2,584 


i i 


i I 


1872, 


I i 


1873, 


40,688 


1,972 


1 1 


(C 


1873, 


i I 


1874, 


42,345 


1,657 


a 


( ( 


1874, 


i I 


1875, 


44,676 


2,331 


li 


ii 


1875, 


(< 


1876, 


46,885 


2,209 


(( 


i i 


1876, 


(i 


1877, 


48,328 


1,443 


(C 


(( 


1877, 


( i 


1878, 


49,970 


1,642 


( I 


( I 


1878, 


li 


1879, 


51,523 


1,553 


1 1 


i I 


1879, 


i I 


1880, 


52,268 


745 


1 1 


i I 


1880, 


(( 


1881, 


53,254 


986 


1 1 


I i 


1881, 


(( 


1882, 


53,655 


401 


1 1 


i I 


1882, 


(( 


1883, 


52,817 




I i 


1 1 


1883, 


11 


1884, 


54,168 


1,351 


1 1 


1 1 


1884, 


(( 


1885, 


56,361 


2,193 


li 


il 


1885, 


(( 


1886, 


59,972 


3,611 



58 



City Document No. 25. 



The Service Division is in charge of Mr. C. F. Doherty, 
to whom all applications are made for service-pipes and 
repairs, for shutting off and letting on water, and to whom 
all stoppages in the water-supply are reported. 

The total number of applications received during the year 
is as follows : — 



Number of service-pipes 


. 1,414 


For turning on water, first time 


. 1,484 


" repairs on service-pipes . 


. 1,223 


" off and on for non-payment 


. 1,280 


" " " " repairs 


. 3,866 


" " «' " waste . . . 


4 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



59 









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60 



City Document No. 25. 



Mystic Division. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1886 is 18,497, distributed as follows : Charlestown Dis- 
trict, 6,336; Somerville, 5,718; Chelsea, 5,227; Everett, 
1,216. 

The total revenue received from all sources for the year 
1885 is $280,553.26, the detail of which is as follows : — 





] 885 Rates. 


Pi'evious Years' 
Rates. 


Charlestown District 
Somerville .... 
Chelsea .... 
Everett .... 


$110,452 01 
72,962 53 
64,952 24 
12,084 25 


$11,055 31 

2,326 25 

2,248 81 

476 20 




$260,451 03 


$16,106 57 


Total amount of water rates . 

Labor and material furnished for work on fire 


. $276,557 60 


and service pipes 
Sale of old material 




2,508 72 
659 98 


Off and on water for repairs 




300 00 


Summonses 




210 50 


Off and on for non-payment . 
Maintaining meters 




206 00 
110 46 




$280,553 26 



The percentage allowed the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, 
and town of Everett, under the existing contract, on water 
rates collected during the year in the respective districts, is 
as follows : — 



Somerville 

Chelsea 

Everett 



$20,615 52 

17,380 41 

1,884 07 

$39,880 00 



The expenditure of the office, including collections in 
Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett, was . $8,047 83 



Report of the Watee Board. 



61 



The items are as follows 
Salaries 

Printing and stationery 
Postage, telephone, etc. 
Travelling expenses 



1,925 00 
605 04 
376 84 
140 50 



,047 38 



The estimated income from the sale of water for the year 

1886 is $224,600 00 

From all other sources ..... 3,000 00 



$227,600 00 



Table slioiving the member of Places turned off for Non-payment of Rates, 
during the Tear 1S85, the Number turned on again, and the Number still 
remaining off. 





Number 
turned oflf. 


Number 
turned on. 


Number 
remaining off. 




46 
77 
46 
14 


36 

55 

40 

9 


10 




22 




6 


Everett 


5 






Totals 


183 


140 


43 







Stand-pipes for Street-watering. 

The whole number in use in this department is 36, dis- 
tributed as follows : — 



CharlestoiDn District. 

Cambridge street, near Stickney & Poor's factory. 

" " " Railroad. 

" City stables. 

" Allen street. 

" Main street. 

" Harvard school building. 

" Laurel street. 



Rutherford avenue , 



South Eden street, 
Prescott " 

Monument square, 



Chelsea. 

Cary square, corner Forsyth street. 
Broadway, near Stockton street. 
" " Cary avenue. 



62 



City Document No. 25. 



Somerville. 



Washinjyton street, corner 



near 



Summer street, 
Somerville avenue, 



Broadway, 



opposite 
near 



Somerville avenue, " 
Spring street, " 

Beacon street, " 

Pinckney street, •' 

Pearl street, " 

Highland avenue, corner 
Main street, junction 

Medford street, near 



Boston street. 
Myrtle street. 
Union square. 
Elm street. 
Laurel street. 
Poplar street. 
Cambridge line. 
Merriam street. 
Mossland street. 
Franklin street. 
Public Park. 
Clarendon avenue. 
439 Somerville avenue. 
Somerville avenue. 
Cooney street. 
Pearl street. 
Cross street. 
Medford street. 
Broadway. 
Sycamore street. 



Everett. 

Broadway, near Engine-bouse. 
Pleasant street. 



Main street, 
Chelsea " 
Ferry ' ' 



Chandler's. 
Chelsea street. 
Winter street. 
Nichols street. 



Drinking-Fouktains . 

The whole number in use in this department is 18, dis- 
tributed as follows: — 



Chariestoion District. 

corner Tufts street. 

" South Eden street. 
" Hancock square. 
" near Tufts wharf. 

Austin street, opposite Front street. 



Bunker Hill street 
Canal street, 
Main street. 



Automatic. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



63 



Chelsea. 

Broadway square. 

" near bridge. 
Pearl street, corner Marginal street. 
Eastern avenue, corner Crescent avenue. 



Automatic. 



Somerville. 

Union square. 

Broadway, corner Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, corner Walnut street. 
Medford street, " Central street. 
Davis square. 

an 

Broadway, opposite public park. 

Somerville avenue, junction Washington street. 



Automatic. 



Automatic. 



Everett. 
Main street, junction Broadway. 



Automatic. 



64 



City Docibient No. 25. 



The following Table exhibits the Classes of Premises to which tieters are 
applied, the amount of Water consumed, and the Amount assessed for the 
Years 1884 and I8S5. 



Class of Premises. 



Steam Railroads . . . . ^ 

Horse Railroads 

Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co. 
City and government buildings . . . . 

Schools 

Stables 

Factories 

Chemical works 

Foundries 

Breweries 

Gas companies 

Oil-works 

Mills and engines 

Hotels 

Model houses 

McLean Insane Asylum 

Slaughter-houses 

Business purposes 

Wharves 

Laundries ' 

Elevators and motors 

Bakeries 

Restaurants 

Miscellaneous 

Tanneries 



Total , 



1884. 



Amount 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



15,704,172 

936,190 

1,415,420 

3,038,112 

860,528 

1,928,298 

4,749,162 

774,160 

815,244 

869,004 

161,769' 

337,148 

870,305 

465,994 

714,007 

1,628,621 

1,367,951 

567,174 

778,669 

484,169 

236,930 

275,080 

232,506 

2,134,192 

1,074,366 

42,419,180 



Amount 
Assessed. 



$23,556 19 

1,404 29 

2,123 13 

4,557 07 

1,290 69 

2,892 21 

7,123 50 

1,161 23 

1,222 83 

1,303 49 

242 63 

505 71 

1,305 44 

698 98 

1,070 93 

2,442 90 

2,051 91 

850 74 

1,167 94 

726 21 

355 37 

412 59 

348 71 

3,201 21 

1,611 49 

$63,627 39 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



18,108,785 

929,059 

997,200 

5,772,367 

882,862 

1,965,474 

5,311,874 

963,331 

785,480 

932,463 

209,420 

178,174 

835,530 

427,755 

1,557,896 

1,643,610 

2,454,816 

624,254 

749,648 

399,888 

109,758 

425,380 

227,266 

1,849,815 

1,077,096 

49,419,201 



Amount 
Assessed. 



$27,163 17 

1,393 58 

1,495 80 

8,658 53 

1,324 28 

2,948 16 

7,967 82 

1,445 00 

1,178 25 

1,398 69 

314 13 

267 29 

1,253 30 

641 64 

2,336 86 

2,465 39 

3,682 21 

936 40 

1,124 50 

599 86 

164 61 

638 09 

340 94 

2,774 75 

1,615 62 

$74,128 87 



Report of the Water Board. 



65 



The quantity used through meters in the different districts 
was as follows : — 





1884. 


1885. 




Cubic feet. 


Amount. 


Cubic feet. 


Amount. 




28,345,934 

7,180,866 

5,962,421 

929,959 


$42,518 15 

10,770 99 

8,943 33 

1,394 92 


34,202,376 
8,209,761 
5,868,046 
1,139,018 


$51,303 50 

12,314 72 

8,802 11 

1 708 54 




Chelsea 






Total 


42,419,180 


$63,627 39 


49,419,201 


$74,128 87 





66 



City Document No. 25. 



to 

00 
00 






fs; 



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o 

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s 



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Repoet of the Water Board. 



67 



Statement showing the amount of water-rates received 
since the introduction of Mystic-pond w^ater, November 29, 
1865, and the amount paid the several districts supplied 
under existing contracts : — 







•6 
p.£; 

a " 
< 


11 


a 
u 


"S s 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 
to Mystic 
Water- 
Works. 


Charlestown, 1865 


$27,045 10 




$27,045 10 








" 1866 


47,247 16 




47,247 16 








•' 1867 


60,188 83 




60,188 83 








" 1868 


68,815 32 




68,815 32 








1869 


74,369 81 




74,369 81 








1870 


82,2.30 79 




82,230 79 








1871 


87,259 70 




87,259 70 








1872 


97,727 36 




97,727 36 








" 1873 


99,455 66 




99,455 66 








1874 


111,420 30 




111,420 30 








1875 


118,568 00 




118,568 00 








" 1876 


116,271 17 




116,271 17 








1877 


109,963 25 




109,963 25 








" 1878 


104,174 76 




104,174 76 








«• 1879 


98,.313 88 




98,313 88 








1880 


1 2,590 50 




102,590 50 








" 1881 


106,927 90 




106,927 90 








" 1882 


109,921 18 




109,921 18 








« 1883 


115,462 25 




115,462 25 








'« 1884 


115,781 43 




115,781 43 








«' Jan. 1,1886 


110,452 01 




110,4.52 01 


$1,964,186 36 




$1,964,186 36 








East Boston, 1870 


$54,885 28 


$15,015 06 


$39,870 22 








" 1871 


63,871 71 


18,348 73 


45,022 98 








«' 1872 


70,957 40 


21,383 02 


49,574 38 








1873 


77,480 79 


23,992 38 


53,488 41 








1874 


77,776 9; 


24,122 83 


53,654 08 








" 1875 


70,256 26 


21,102 53 


49,153 73 








" 1876 


72,046 78 


21,818 74 


50,228 04 








" 1877 


66,637 43 


19,655 03 


46,982 40 








" 1878 


65,088 96 


16,535 63 


48,553 33 








" 1879 


66,165 94 


32,139 10 


24,026 84 








<• 1880 


50,973 39 


10,889 36 


40,084 03 


725,640 85 


225,002 41 


500,638 44 




forward 








Amounts carried 


$2,689,827 21 


'$225,002 41 


$2,464,824 80 



68 



CiTT Document No. 25. 





o > 

'il 


1 

Paid under 
contract. 


a 

3 
O 

a 


Total 

amount 

received. 


Total 

amount 

paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 
to Mystic 
Water- 
Works. 


Amnuiif.s hrmi.nh.t 


forward 
$3,632 80 
19,548 14 






$2,689,82721 


$225,002 41 


$2,464,824 80 


Chelt 


ea, 1868 
(6 mos.) 
1868-69 


$544 92 
2,932 22 


$3,087 88 
16,615 92 






1869-70 


26,474 26 


4,294 85 


22,179 41 










1870-71 


31,161 56 


5,290 .39 


25,871 17 










1871-72 


38,714 16 


7,178 54 


31,535 62 










1872-73 


42,239 50 


8,171 85 


34,067 65 










1873-74 


45,169 46 


9,050 85 


36,118 61 










1874.-75 


50,644 51 


10,757 90 


39,886 61 










1875-76 


60,934 20 


10,873 66 


40,060 54 










1876-77 


49,893 35 


10,468 02 


39,425 33 










1877-78 


49,496 59 


10,348 99 


39,147 60 










1878-79 


50,368 45 


10,647 79 


39,720 66 










1879-80 


61,785 24 


11,214 09 


40,571 15 










1880-81 


54,990 65 


12,496 26 


42,494 39 










1881-82 


57,535 56 


13,514 23 


44,021 33 










1882-83 


61,510 34 


15,104 14 


46,406 20 










1883-84 


63,263 53 


15,805 42 


47,458 11 










1884-85 


64,859 60 


16,443 84 


48,415 76 










Jan. 1, 1886 


59,890 54 


14,456 21 


45,434 33 
















872,112 44 


189,594 17 


682,518 27 


Some 


rville, 1869 

(6 mos.) 

1870 


$6,572 62 
13,189 89 


$985 89 
1,978 49 


$5,586 73 
11,211 40 




1871 


20,029 68 


3,005 94 


17,023 74 










" 1872 


25,275 13 


4,055 02 


21,220 11 










' 1873 


30,930 81 


5,232 70 


25,698 11 










1874 


37,325 96 


6,831 48 


30,494 48 










1875 


47,912 43 


9,873 73 


38,038 70 










1876 


49,743 55 


10,423 08 


39,320 47 










1877 


49,873 19 


10,461 97 


39,411 22 










1878 


53,581 31 


11,932 52 


41,648 79 










" 1879 


54,329 13 


12,231 65 


42,097 48 










1880 


56,988 65 


13,295 45 


43,693 20 










1881 


65,394 32 


16,657 73 


48,736 59 










1882 


69,656 63 


18,362 65 


51,293 98 










1883 


73,872 23 


20,048 89 


53,823 34 










1884 


73,120 00 


19,748 00 


53,372 00 










' Jan. 1,1886 


72,960 53 


19,684 22 


53,276 31 


800,756 06 


184,809 41 


615,946 65 










Amounts carried forward 


$4,362,69571 


$599,405 99 


$3,763,289 72 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



69 





° s 




1 
1 


Total 
amount 
received. 


Total 

amount 

Paid under 

contract. 


Net amount 
to Mystic 
Water- 
Works. 


Amounts brought 
Everett, 1872-73 


forward 
$3,603 34 






$4,362,695 71 


$599,405 99 


$3,763,289 72 


$540 51 


$3,062 83 






1873-74 


4,365 84 


654 88 


3,710 96 








1874-75 


4,677 58 


701 63 


3,975 95 








1875-76 


5,861 80 


879 28 


4,982 52 








1876-77 


6,548 38 


982 26 


5,566 12 








'« 1877-78 


7,401 99 


1,110 29 


6,291 70 








" 1878-79 


7,429 06 


1,114 36 


6,314 70 








" 1879-80 


7,642 05 


1,146 33 


6,495 72 








1880-81 


8,329 87 


1,249 47 


7,080 40 








" 1881-82 


8,868 48 


1,330 29 


7,538 19 








" 1882-83 


9,946 46 


1,491 98 


8,454 48 








" 1883-84 


10,078 54 


1,511 79 


8,566 75 








" 1884-85 


11,345 03 


1,701 76 


9,643 27 








" Jan. 1,1886 


10,991 30 


1,648 70 


9,342 60 


107,089 72 


16,063 53 


91,026 19 


Total to Jan. 1, '86 








$4,469,785 43 


$615,469 52 


$3,854,-315 91 













Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Register 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir, Jan. 1, 1886. 
Col. Horace T. .Rockwell, Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report for the Western Division of the 
Boston Water- Works is submitted herewith. The date of 
the hist report was May 1, 1885. This report covers the 
remainder of the year. 

SuDBURY-RlVER BaSINS. 

Basins 1 and 2 are full and running over. The water in 
Basin 3 is wasting into the river. It is the intention to 
empty this basin entirely, in order to prepare for the work 
of removing that portion of the shallow flowage which re- 
mains to be done. The quality of the water in Basin 2 has 
been very o-ood durino- the whole season. Basin 3 has o-iven 
the usual trouble in this respect. The greater portion of the 
supply for the city has been drawn from Basin 2. Late 
in the season Basin 4 contributed its quota of water which 
had been stored during the summer. These are the prin- 
cipal facts in regard to the Sudbury supply. A more de- 
tailed account will be found under each basin. 



Basin 1. 

On May 1, 1885, the water in this basin stood at grade 
159.40 above tide-marsh level in Boston, and water was 
wasting over the dam. The water was of fair quality, with 
the exception of the four weeks following August 10. Algm 
were noticed at various times durino- the summer. On June 
15 waste over the dam ceased, and the surface gradually fell 
to 157.87 on August 1, when it rose and was kept at about 
158 until October 30, when a rise brought the water level 
with the flash-boards, and on November 7 waste into the river 
was begun. December 12 the flash-boards were removed, and 
the water allowed to pass over the stone crest to date. The 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 71 

highest pomt reached was 159.71 on May 6, and the lowest 
157.56 on October 3. Not less than 1,500,000 gallons daily 
have been allowed to pass into the river from this basin, in 
accordance with the law, during the wdiole period covered by 
this report. The usual amount of care has been given to the 
maintenance of the works around the basin. Attention was 
called in my last report to the defects in the 48-in. pipe 
line in the bottom of this basin. Its condition is such 
as to require the greatest precaution in running water 
through it. 



Basin 2. 

On May 1, 1885, this basin stood at grade 167.46. Water 
was wasting over the dam, and this continued until June 13, 
when water was drawn for the supply of the city, causing 
the surface to fall gradually to 154.95, on August 2. Heavy 
rains caused a rise to 158.73, on August 12. On Novem- 
ber 10 the basin was full, and waste began, which has con- 
tinued in varying quantities to date. The highest point 
reached was 167.51, on May 2, and the lowest 154.80, on 
September 24. While there have been times when the 
water was of a slightly dark color, yet, as a rule, the water 
has been of excellent quality. 

Besides the usual routine work on this basin the following 
extra work has been done. About 2,860 square yards of 
heavy riprap have been placed in several exposed positions 
around the margin of the basin, principally near Nevins' 
Point. At the upper end of the basin, on the Fountain-st. 
side, the old riprap was brought up to a point well above 
high water. Also around the wooden dam, where the old 
work was hurriedly left uncompleted, more or less patching 
has been done, and, extending in an easterly direction, a 
strip 778 feet in length was built up to proper grade. Foun- 
tain street, within the limits of the basin, has to be main- 
tained by the city. Some gravelling of the surface was 
begun during the past season, and will have to be completed 
during the present year. The old Foster house, at the head 
of the basin, has been pulled down, the cellar filled, and the 
a;rounds o:raded. 

Besides these pieces of work the regular basin force has 
been moved to Lake Cochituate to assist in work at that 
place, and also to points on the Sudbury and Cochituate 
aqueducts, when the regular cleanings have been in progress. 
The gate house, dam, culverts, and other structures con- 
nected with this basin, are in excellent order and require no 
immediate repairs. 



72 City Document No. 25. 



Basin 3. 

On May 1 this basin was at elevation 175.50, and water 
was flowing over the stone crest. 

On June 3 the waste ceased, and the water fell to 175.02 
on the 5th. On the 7th it was flowing over the crest again 
for two days, when it began to fall, and on August 4 was at 
772.91. The water remained at about this level until Octo- 
ber 16, when a rise took place. On November 3 water 
began to waste over the dam, and so continued until Decem- 
ber 5, when water was drawn off into Farm Pond. On 
December 10 it was decided to draw off the whole of the 
basin, in order to be ready for work on the shallow flowage 
as early in the spring as possible. The highest point reached 
was 175.97, on November 26. The basin is now practi- 
cally level with the water in Basin 1. On July 18 a rank 
taste was observed in the water at the bottom of the basin, 
and this bad taste gradually extended upwards towards the 
surface, which on August 10 became slightly tainted. 

From this time the condition improved, and by the last of 
August had become of normal quality, except at the very 
bottom. On June 13 algce were noticed, but they have 
never been in sufficient quantity to cause trouble. In carry- 
ing on the work of reducing the shallow flowage it will Idc 
very desirable that we should not be held to an}^ rigid line 
or grade, but that where deposits of mud are found within 
convenient reach they can be moved, even although below the 
eight-feet limit. 

Water for the supply of the city has been drawn from this 
basin from May 1 to June 13 ; June 24 to July 2 ; 
August 2 to August 6; September 4 to September 11, 
and December 5 to December 8. The gate-house and 
dam are in very good order. 

Faem Pond. 

On May 1 Farm Pond was at elevation 145.04. The 
surface was kept at grade 145, or about four feet below high 
water, until December 2. This was done to facilitate work 
on the conduit. The pond was filled during the first week 
in December, principally from Basin 3. On December 9 
the water stood at 149.25. 

The highest point reached was 149.30, on December 20, 
and the lowest 144.94, on September 7. The water con- 
tained as a rule more matter in suspension' than usual, owing 
to the work of construction going on in the pond, and to 
the heavy winds stirring up the mud in the shallow water. 



Repoet of the Water Board. 73 

Between July 27 and July 30 a brick chamber was built 
connecting with the supply conduit, to enable the Framing- 
ham Water Co. to draw water directly from the aqueduct, 
as per agreement with your Board. 

Lake Cochituate. 

The quality of the water in this lake has been remarkably 
good. The efforts which have been made to keep the sewage 
of the towns and villages out of the brooks supplying its waters 
must have caused an improvement. ■ Still, notwithstanding the 
most persistent efforts and the most determined system of 
inspection, it is not likely that entire relief will be had until 
comprehensive sewerage schemes are carried out in the towns 
immediately surrounding our water-supply areas. Since 
May 1 almost all of the polluters of Pegan Brook in Natick 
have built cesspools and connected their drains with them. 
A minute system of inspection has been carried out, and 
plans and descriptions of every case have been submitted to 
your Board. As analyses of the waters of Pegan Brook still 
show considerable amount of sewage contamination, it is sus- 
pected that during the night, or at other times, the contents 
of the cesspools still find their way into the waters of the 
brook through the old drains. It is important that these old 
connections with the brook be cut off, if it is possible to 
cause their removal by legal process. The names of all 
stubborn parties who have refused to do anything about their 
drainage, or who have pretended to mitigate the evil without 
really having done so, have been given to the City Solicitor, 
who, I understand, has proceeded against them. 

During the last week in November, under instructions from 
your Board, I began the work of cleaning out the upper filter 
basin of Pegan Brook. As the water was high in the lake, a 
steam-pump was put in and the waters of the brook taken 
through the basin in a sluice. After the mud was taken out, 
the banks were re-graded to a new line and section, and the 
appearance of the whole place very much improved by 
gravelling the borders. Some 2,000 cubic yards of material 
were moved during the two weeks that the work was in 
progress. 

On May 1, 1885, the surface of Lake Cochituate stood at 
high-water mark, with a small amount of water passing over 
the dam at the outlet. The maximum amount of waste was 
1.46 feet, on May 2. On May 20 the stop-planks were put 
in, and no more water passed over the dam until June 5, 
when, for five days, a small amount of water was run to 
waste. 



74 City Document No. 25. 

The surface was kept at about 134.36 until June 24, when 
it began to fall, reaching; grade 129.07, on October 29, the 
lowest point reached during the season. The water is now 
about three feet below high water. The engines, boilers, 
and pumps used last year are still at the gate-house, and 
should be removed to a more secure situation. The usual 
analyses have been made every three months by Prof. E. S. 
Wood. 

Dudley Pond. 

This pond is now full. We have had such an excellent 
supply from other portions of the work, that no water has 
been drawn from this source. 



SUDBURY-KIVER AqUEDUCT. 

This aqueduct has been in daily service since May 1, 
with the exception of a few days, when undergoing cleaning. 
It has brought to the city a total of over 3,343,500,000 
gallons, or an average of 13,640,000 gallons daily. This 
average is somewhat less than last year. The greatest 
amount run in any one day was 32,800,000 gallons, on June 
8, and the least 4,800,000 gallons, on December 2. On July 
27 water was shut off, and the aqueduct thoroughly cleaned 
July 28, 29, and 30, from Farm Pond to Chestnut-Hill 
Keservoir. The upper portion, as far as Bacon's waste- 
w^eir, was quite dirty, with a thick deposit of mud over the 
whole distance, which I ascribe to the low water in Farm 
Pond and the stirring up of the muddy bottom in heavy 
winds. A small quantity oii Sjjongilla was found in spots, at 
intervals, as usual. It was in the incipient stages of growth, 
and clung to the brick-work with great tenacity. During the 
cleanings more deposit is found on the embankments, on the 
curves, and on the southerly side of the aqueduct, than in 
other places. The southerly side cleans harder, especially 
after the summer season. At the Beacon-street tunnel, near 
the reservoir, about seven tip-cart loads of stone, which had 
fallen from the roof, were removed. It is evident that some 
portions of this tunnel should be bricked as soon as possible. 
A second cleaning of the conduit took place on December 
21, 22, and 23. The interior was in a worse state than 
at the first cleaning, but the same relative conditions were 
found. The fact that sponge almost never grows in the 
lower portions of either the Sudbury or Cochituate aqueduct 
is difficult to explain, and requires investigation. I would 
recommend that from Station 780 to 781, and from 801 to 809, 



Report of the Water Board. 75 

of the Beacon-street tunnel, be lined during the coming sea- 
sou, as more fallen stone was found during this second 
cleaning. The following method of brushing out the interior 
has proved by experience to be the most effective and eco- 
nomical, and I give it in detail, as it may prove useful to 
others. The entire length of the aqueduct is 83,832 feet, 
1,800 feet of which is cast-iron siphon-pipe. The whole dis- 
tance is divided into six portions, and is thoroughly cleaned 
in three days' time, by six gangs of eight men each, three men 
on a side with heavy corn brooms, and two following on the 
bottom with rattans. On the first day the sweepers work up- 
stream, taking off the worst portions of the dirt, which leaves 
comparatively clean water for the following days, when they 
work down, o-iving the final cleanino- in a more thorouo^h man- 
ner, and sweeping the bottom clear of all the dirt. It has 
been found that this cannot be accomplished by flushing. 
The following points have been found to be convenient for 
each gang to cleanse, depending somewhat upon the location 
of man-holes and waste-wires : — 

Gang No. 1, Stations to 136. (24 stations east of Course Brook.) 
" " 2, " 1.36 to 271 -I- 40. (Bacon's Brook.) 
" " 3, " 271 -|- 40 to 405. (18 stations east of Waban bridge.) 
" " 4, " 405 to 540. (West Siphon chamber.) 
" " 5, " 558 to 688. (20 stations west of Walnut St., Newton.) 
" " 6, " 688 to 838 -|- 32. (Terminal Gate-house, C. H. Ees.) 



On Aug. 3 the pointing of the Waban arches was be- 
gun. The cement was entirely gone from a number of the 
joints, especially in the belt-courses, steps, and abutments, 
which allowed rain to enter the interior of the structure, — 
a source of considerable damao-e, through freezinof, etc. All 
of imperfect pointing was removed to a depth of from four 
to six inches, and the spaces thoroughly filled either with oil 
or Portland cement, according to the position. The Port- 
land cement was used three parts of cement to one of sharp 
sand, which I have found to give excellent results. The 
joints in the brick-work were not cut out, on account of the 
danger of injuring the bricks. As a general rule, the joints 
had washed out three-eighths of an inch in depth, and were 
found solid beyond. The}^ were pointed, without cutting, 
with Portland cement, slightly colored with Brandon red. 
The brick-work was first thoroughly cleaned of all saltpetre 
and other stains by means of washes of muriatic and oxalic 
acids. The total cost was $650. It is believed that this 
work as done will stand many years with but little repair. 
The usual care has been given to the maintenance of the 
exterior of the aqueduct. 



76 City Document No. 25. 



The Cochituate Aqueduct. 

Oa May 1 a height of five feet of water was run in this 
structure, and so maintained until July 23. On this day 
the liead was raised to five and one-half feet, which has been 
kept unchanged during the remainder of the year. Between 
June 2 and June 24 water was drawn out of the aque- 
duct for the purpose of putting a foundation under the 
structure at the crossing of the new Circuit Railroad in 
Newton. Advantage was also taken of the opportunity at 
this time to clean the interior, which was done from the 
lake to the reservoir. 

A second cleaning was also given between Dec. 27 and 
Dec. 31. The condition of this structure, as regards clean- 
liness, was never as good as now. The semi-annual brush- 
ings leave little to be desired. The following lengths of the 
aqueduct are cleansed by each of the six gangs of men : — 

No. 1, Stations to 140 (18 stations west of Dedraan's Brook). 
" 2, " 140 to 280 (near Wellesley Hills High School). 
" 3, " 280 to 132, 2d Division (10 stations east of Westerly Syphon 

Chamber). 
"4, " 132, 2d Division, to 8 -|-50, 3d Division (Waste-Weir, Newton 

Centre). 
" 5, " 8-}-50, 3d Division, to 109, 3d Division (28 stations east of 

ventilator). 
" 6, " 109, 3d Pivision, to 209 -f- 89 (Brookline Reservoir). 



The crossing of the new Circuit Railroad in Newton, so 
near the grade of aqueduct, required the strengthening of its 
section for a length of 139 feet. The centre line of the rail- 
road location, midway between their two tracks, is at Station 
170 -\- 70.16 of the aqueduct. The westerly end of masonry 
strengthening was at Station 170 + 45.16, and the easterly 
end at Station 171 + 84.16. 

To allow for freight tracks and depot grounds excavation 
was made under the structure in sections and brick piers, 
built under its bottom. The water was then shut off, and 
the sides and bottom surrounded with an outer shell of con- 
crete, about 6 inches in thickness, under the centre line, and 
about 1 foot 9 inches at the sides. On this an extra ring 
of brick was laid over the top arch, and a coating of cement 
plaster added. 

The work was done at the expense of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. No other work of any importance has 
been done on this aqueduct. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



77 



Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir. 

The oTOLinds around the reservoir are in excellent condi- 
tion. All of the gate-houses have been kept in good repair. 
Work has already begun upon the preparation of material 
to put upon the driveways next spring. The stone-crusher 
in use at Dam IV. has been removed to the reservoir. 
About one-half of the water used in the city has been drawn 
through Chestnut-Hill reservoir, and no bad taste has been 
noticed at this point during the past season. The usual 
meteorological and other observations have been made. A 
table of rainfall, showing the time of beginning and ending 
of each storm, is appended. 

A new manure-shed has been built near the stone stable. 
The shed has a concrete bottom, for the retention of all the 
liquids. It will prove a great convenience in the prepara- 
tion of manure to be applied to the grounds. All of the hay 
used by the Division, some forty tons in all, has been cut 
on the grounds around the reservoirs. 

Brookline Eeservoir. 

The grounds and structures connected with this reservoir 
are in good order. The tall fence on Dudley street has been 
cut down, and a row of climbing plants set out at its base, 
much to the improvement of the neighborhood. No other 
new work has been done at this point during the year. 

Very respectfully, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Superintendent. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir for year ending Dec. 31,1885. 



i 




a 

C/3 O 


Duration. 


6 

Jan. 27 
" 28 




^ -• Duration. 

O (h.S 
q o « 
CO M 


Jan. 6 
" 12 
" 12 
" 15 
" 16 


1.14 
.86 
.07 

1 

5- 1-82 

1 .82 


Rain. 

Snow 
and 
Rain. 

Snow 

and 

Rain. 


4 a.m to 4.15 p.m. 
5.45 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 
4.25 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 

10.30 a.m. 

to 
10..30 p.m. 

4.15 a.m. 

to 
3.45 p.m. 


I .62 


9.00 p.m. 
Snow to 
6 p.m. 


Total . 


5.33 




" 17 
" 24 


Feb. 1 

" 4 


.17 
.05 


SnowlO.lO a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
Rain. 3.20 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 



78 



City Document No. 25. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 







fl 








c 




6 
ft 


a 
t— 1 


02 o 


Duration. 


CD 
S 


a 


02 O 


Duration. 


Feb. 6 


.01 


Snow 


8.40 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


May 1 


1 ,., 




12.45 p.m. 






flurry 




" 2 


J .92 


Rain. 


to 
11.30 a.m. 


" 8 


.07 


Snow 


8.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


8 


.46 


„ 


12.30p.m. to 10.40p.m. 


" 9 


) 




10.00 p.m. 












[1.77 


Rain. 


to 


" 14 






6.30 a.m. 


" 10 


) 




1.30 p.m. 


" 15 


i .98 


" 


to 
1 a.m. 


" 13 


) 


Snow 














S .05 


flur- 




" 18 






1.15 p.m. 


" 14 


1 


ries. 






( •''^ 


■ 1 


to 






Snow 


4.10 p.m. 


" 19 






5 a.m. 


" 16 


.96 


and 


to 














Rain. 


10.00 p.m. 


" 23 


.32 


[< 


7.45 a.m. to 5.10 p.m. 


" 18 


.08 


Snow 


8.00 a.m. to 2.10 p.m. 


" 24 


.03 


,( 


6 p.m. to 12 p.m. 


<' 25 


.06 


Snow 


4.30 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 


" 30 


.57 




3.15 p.m. 

to 
6 p.m. 










" 31 




Total . 


3.22 
















Total . 


4.02 






Mar. 1 

8 


.27 
.01 


Rain 
Snow 


5.15p.m. toll p.m. 
6.15 a.m. to 9 a.m. 






June 4 






10 p.m. 












( 1.30 


Rain. 


to 


" 12 


.07 


" 


5.15 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


" 5 






6.15 p.m. 


" 13 

« 14 


1 .02 


Lt. 

Snow 


11.15 a.m. 

to 
8.45 a. m. 


" 8 
" 22 


.27 
.11 


: 


2.20 p.m. to 4.20 p.m. 
10 a.m. to 11.15 a.m. 


" 15 


.39 


Rain 
and 
Snow 


1.15 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


" 28 


1 1.26 




8.10 p.m. 
to 








" 29 






4 a.m. 


« 11 


.05 


Snow 


12.05 a.m to 1.00 a.m. 


" 29 


1.17 


,, 


4.55 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 


" 28 


J 




11.00 p.m. 












> .44 


" 


to 


" 30 


.03 


Mist. 


9.30 p.m. to 11 p.m. 


" 29 






9.30 a.m. 












Total . 


4.14 
















Total . 


1.25 
















July 3 
8 


.11 
.25 


Rain 


5.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 
12.05 a.m. to 4.00 a.m. 


April 3 


) 




9.30 p.m. 




\ 1.23 


Rain. 


to 










" 4 


) 




4.30 p. m. 


" 9 


.24 


" 


5.25 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 7 


i .22 


,, 


11.00 p.m. 
to 


" 14 


.19 


" 


4.00 p.m to 9.30 p.m. 


" 8 


) 




5.30 am. 


" 29 


.81 


" 


4.15 p.m. to 6.20 p.m. 


" 12 
" 26 


.14 
1.00 


" 


12.30 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 
11.30 a.m. to 11 p.m. 


Total . 








1.60 






" 28 






6.45 p.m. 
to 










i .87 


« 










" 29 


) 




8 p.m. 


Aug. 1 
4 

5 


1.76 

.67 
.02 


Rain 


4.25 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 
3.30 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 
8.30 p.m. to 9.15 p.m. 


Total . 


•3.46 






" 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



79 



Table of Ramfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 







p 








a 




1 


1 


II 


Duration. 


o 


IE 
.a 


II 


Duration. 


fi 


& 


m o 







n 
I— i 


n 1^ 

QQ O 




Aug. 11 


.02 


Show- 


2.15 p.m. 5.15 p.m. 


Oct. 29 


1 1.58 


Rain. 


4.15 p.m. 
to 


13 


.04 
.09 


ers 
Show- 
er 


1.30 p.m. to 2.00 p.m. 
7.20 a.m. to 8.45 a.m. 


" 30 


( 




4.00 p.m, 


19 


















Total . 


5.87 






22 


1- 


Show- 
ers. 


5.00 a.m. to 6.15 a.m. 
12.05 p.m. to 12.35 p.m. 










23 


















Nov. 2 


0.96 


Rain. 


6.30 a.m. to 1.45 p.m. 


23 


) 




8.45 p.m. 










[ .13 


" 


to 


6 


1 






24 


s 




1.30 a.m. 


"• 7 




Show- 


11.00 p.m. 


24 


\ 




4.45 p.m. 




■1.24 


ers 
and 


to 




> 1.34 


Rain 


to 


8 






25 


' 




9.00 p.m. 


9 




Mist. 


9.30 a.m. 


•30 






9.00 a.m. 






Rain. 






1.21 


" 


to 


" 19 


.23 


and 


11.50 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


31 






10 a.m. 


" 22 




Snow. 


11.00 a.m. 


31 


.03 




5.30 p.m. to 5.40 p.m- 


" 23 




Snow. 


























" 24 


.3.90 


and 


to 


Total . 


6.03 






" 25 




Rain. 












" 26 
" 30 


.09 


Snow. 


3.00 p.m. 










2.30 p.m. to 12.00 mid- 


Sept. 1 


.02 


Rain 


8 p.m. to 9.45 p.m. 








[night. 


« 4 


) 




9.00 p.m. 












[ .29 


" 


to 


Total . 


6.42 






6 


.70 


,, 


6.10 a.m. 

12.05 a.m. to 8.30 a.m. 










9 


















Dec. 1 


.09 


Snow. 


12.00 midnight to 2.30 


" 9 


.24 


" 


7.15 p.m. to 8.15 p.m. 








[p.m. 
7.30 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 










" 3 


.03 


" 


" 22 


) 




7.45 p.m. 






Rain 






[ .50 


" 


to 


4 


.08 


and 


8.00p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 


" 23 


) 




7.30 am. 






Snow. 












" 5 
9 


.10 

.23 


Rain. 


1.15 p.m. to 3.50 p.m. 










3.00 a.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


Total . 


1.75 




















" 13 


\ .85 


„ 


3.00 p.m. 
to 










" 14 
" 17 


) 




9.15 p.m. 










12.45 p.m. 


Oct. 2 


}... 




4.00 p.m. 




.15 


Snow. 


to 




\ 1.25 


Rain. 


to 


" 18 


) 




1.00 a.m. 


3 


) 




3.15 p.m. 


" 18 




Snow 


11.30 a.m. 


" 6 


.58 


" 


9.00 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


" 19 


-\ .40 


and 
Rain. 


to 
10.15 a.m. 


" 13 


) 




10.20 a.m. 




i 








\ 2.12 


" 


to 


" 21 


.01 


Snow. 


1.10 p.m. to 3.15 p.m. 


" 14 


) 




12.30 p.m. 








" 21 


.30 


" 


6.20 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


" 31 


.40 


Rain. 


3 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 


" 28 


1 .04 


„ 


10.45 p.m. 
to 


















" 29 


( 




3.30 a.m. 


Total . 


2.34 







EEPORT OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OE 
THE EASTEEN DIVISION. 



January 1, 1886. 

Horace T. Rockwell, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — Herewith I present my report for the season com- 
mencing May 1, 1885, and ending at date. 1 believe that all 
of the works of this division are in excellent condition. 
During this past season no breakages or accidents of any 
serious nature have occurred. The work of laying the 
mains for the new high-service was begun September 19, 
and closed for the winter December 17. It will be re- 
sumed as early in the year as the weather will admit. I 
propose also to commence the raising of the 48-inch main on 
Beacon street as early as circumstances will warrant. 



Main-Pipe. 

The whole length of main-pipe, of different sizes, laid since 
the commencement of the works to the present time is 450.05 
miles. The whole length of pipe laid during the season is 
66,299 feet, or 12.55 miles. 

Whole length now in service, 400.07 miles. 



Service-Pipes. 

Whole number put in last season . . . . 1,170 

Length in feet . . . . . . . 34,698 

Total number to date ...... 51,810 



Hydrants and Stopcocks. 

88 hydrants and 131 stopcocks established during^ the 
season. 



Report of the Water Board. 



81 



Relaying of Enlarged Sizes. 



Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Size now. 


No. of Feet. 


Size 
formerly. 


Brown ave. . . . 


Pine and Florence 


12 


44 


8 




P and Q 


12 


137 


6 


Priuceton " 


Brooks and Prescott 


8 


980 


6 


Webster " . . 


Cottage and Belmont 


10 


856 


6 


Marion " 


Bennington and White .... 


8 


1,844 


6 


Bernard " . . 


Norfolk and N. Y. and N.E.R.R. 


12 


32 


6 


Commercial wharf 


Atlantic ave. and the water . . 


6 


600 


4 


Beacon street . . 


Hereford and W. Chester park . 


12 


262 


4 




Taken up and Abandoned. 






8-inch 
6-inch 
4-inch 







44 feet. 
.4,384 " 
. 862 " 




Changed. 









4 I -inch out, and 4 l.^-ineh put 

1 |-inch out, and 1 1^-inch put 

2 |-inch out, and 2 1^-inch put 
2 |-inch out, and 2 I5 inch put in. 

21 |-inch out, and 21 1-inch put in. 

13 f-inch out, and 13 |-inch put in. 

1 ^-inch out, and 1 g-inch put in. 



82 



City Document No. 25. 



Statement of Liocation, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1885. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; S.B., South Boston; E.B., East Boston; B.H., Boston High- 
lands; D., Dorchester; W.R., West Roxbury ; Bri., Brighton. 



In what Street. 



Fisher ave 

Perkins 

Day 

Terrace 

Columbus ave. . . 

Beacon 

West Chester Park 
Congress ave. . . . 

gecond 

Sweet 

Elm Hill ave. . . . 
Brookline ave. . 

Hoiborn 

Codman 

Bernard 

Bernard place . . 
Richfield .... 
Hamilton ave. . . 
Columbia .... 
Lawrence ave. . 
Milton ave. . . . 
Geneva ave. . . . 
Wesley ave. . . . 
Walk Hill .... 
Blue Hill ave. . . 
Erie ave 



Between what Streets. 



Brighton and Boylston 



Total SO-inch . . . 

Prince and Day 

Perkins and Atwood ave. 



Total 24-inch 

New Heath and Parker place 



Total 16-inch 

South of Camden 

Hereford and W. Chester Park . 
Storage Building and Beacon . . 
A. and N.T. and N.E. R.R. , . . 

P and Q 

EUery and Boston 

Crawford and Seaver 

Burlington and Beacon 

Warren and Blue Hill ave 

Dorchester ave. and Washington 

Norfolk and Park 

From Barnard 

Columbia and Olney 

Columbia and Everett 

Quincy and Richfield 

Blue Hill ave. and Cedar .... 

Prospect and Evans 

Columbia and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. 

From Savin Hill ave 

Back and Norfolk 

Walkhill and N.T. & N.E. R.R. . 
New Seaver and Michigan ave. . 



Carried forward , 



Br'k- 

liae 



W.R, 



B.H. 



B.H. 



S.B. 



Dor. 



24 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



83 



Statement of L/Ocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Norfolk .... 
Romsey .... 
Centre . . . . 

Mill 

Florence . . . 
Hyde Park ave. 
Blakemore . . 
Washington . . 
La Grange . . 

Birch 

Corey 

Day 

Everett . . . . 
North Beacon . 
Faneuil . . . . 



Webster 
Mt. Hope 



Ipswich . . . 
Curtis .... 
Moore .... 
Princeton . . 
Marion . . . 
Atwood ave. 
Quincy . . . 
Hartford . . 
Torrey . . . 
Millville ave. 
Norfolk . . . 
Armandine . 
Park .... 
Stanwood ave. 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Walk HUl and Forest Hill .... 
Dorchester ave. and Sagamore . . 
A list on and Washington .... 
Holmes place and O.C. & N. R.R. 

Ashland and Sycamore 

Florence and Richards ave. . . . 
Hyde Park and Brown aves. . . 
Dudley and Metropolitan ave. . . 

From Centre 

South and Prospect 

South and Providence R.R. . . . 
Corner Perkins ......... 

Vernon and Western ave 

Wicklow and Watertown line . . 
Market and Parsons 



Total 12-inch , 



Cottage and Belmont sq 

Canterbury and Hyde Park line 



Total 10-inch , 



Beacon and Commonwealth ave. . . , 

Chelsea and Pope 

Milton and Homer 

Brooks and Prescott 

Bennington and White 

From Day , 

Columbia and Magnolia 

Howard and Howard ave 

Learned and Withington 

Dorchester ave. and O. C. and N. R.R. 
Walk Hill and N.Y. & N.E. R.R. . . , 

Milton ave. and Washington 

Standish Jive. and Bernard 

From Columbia 



Carried forward . 



Dor. 



W.R. 



E.B. 
W.R 



B. 

E.B. 



Dor. 



14,003 

1,432 

227 

64 

136 

90 

1,778 

406 

254 

67 

246 

393 

26 

242 

1,199 

653 

21,216 



1,428 

522 
354 
106 
980 
1,844 
119 
343 
511 

22 
178 

58 
558 

40 
122 

5,757 



84 



City Document No. 25. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Mt. Hope . . . 
Robeson . . . 
Fairview . . . 
Boylston . . . 
Sj'camore . . . 
Ashland . . . 
Hyde Park ave 
Sedgwick . . . 

Birch 

Franklin . . . 
Summit ave. . . 
Bigelow . . . 



Commercial whf., N.side 
Commonwealth ave. . . 

Marlboro', 

'New Washington . . . 

Isabella 

Greenwich 

Carlton 

Bolton 

East Fifth 

Vinton 

East Third 

Sixth 

Mitchell 

Rogers 

Chelsea 

Milton 

Homer 

West Eagle 

Bennington 

Wordsworth 

Putnam 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Canterbury and Hyde Park ave. . 
Forest Hill and Sigourney .... 

Peter and Jones 

Chestnut ave. and A 

Poplar and Hawthorne 

Brown and Hyde Park ave. . . . 
Richards ave. and Hyde Park line 

Centre and Elm 

Prospect and Dudley ave 

Cambridge and B. & A.R.R. . . 

Allston and Summer 

Brook and Faneuil 



Total 8-inch 

Atlantic ave. and the water . . .. 
West Chester park and Ipswich . 

Hereford and Ipswich 

Friend and Haymarket sg. . . . 
Berkeley and Ferdinand . . . . 
Columbus ave. and Carlton . . , 
Greenwick park and Rutland . . 
Second and N.T. & N.B. R.R . . 

Hand I 

Dorchester and O.C. and N. R.R. 

P and Q 

Hand I 

Ninth and O.C. & jST. R.R 

Preble and Hyde 

Curtis and Byron 

Moore and Byron 

Moore and Byron 

Brooks and Meridian 

Moore and Swift 

Homer and Pope 

Condor and Eagle 



W.R. 



Bri. 



Carried forward 



Report of the Water Board. 



85 



Stateiiieut of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Pope 

Wintbrop .... 

Renfrew 

Ray 

Southwood . . . . 
Phillips . . . . , 
Highland park . . 
Cedar park ... 

Georgia 

Cohden 

Court 

George 

Shirley 

Hews 

Montrose ave. . . . 

Clay 

Simmons 

Copley 

jtSTew Atherton . . 
Jarvis place . . . . 

Sterhug 

Gary 

Whitney place . . 
Grampian way . . 

Eastman 

Hall court 

Draper court . . . 

Clark 

Learned 

Oapp 

Bodwell park . . . 
McClellan ave. . . 

Fox ave 

Percival ave. . . . 
Fuller 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

Curtis and Saratoga 

Blue Hill ave. and Dennis . . 
Harrison ave. and Eustis . . 
Regent and Hurlburt . . . . 

From Blue Hill ave 

Smith and Conant 

Cedar and Cedar park . . . . 
From Highland park . . . . 
Blue Hill ave. and Hartwell . 
Washington and Walnut ave. 

Holborn and Quincy 

Langdon and Hudson . . . . 

George and Dudley 

Regent and Rockland . . . . 
Moreland and Warren . . . . 
Elmwood and Simmons . . . 

Clay and Vernon 

From School 

Copley and Amory 

From George 

Warwick and Cabot 

Riverside and Ruggles .... 

From Tremont 

Savin and Savin Hill ave. . . 

Boston and Elder 

From Adam 

Opposite Clark 

Bellevue and Draper court . 

Norfolk and Torrey 

East Chester park and Oakes 
Bird and Bodwell park . . . 
Blue Hill ave. and Erie ave. . 
Adam and Percival ave. . . . 

Pox and Bowdoin 

Milton ave. and Capon . . . 



E.B. 
B.H. 



Carried forward 



7,977 
121 
2S6 

98 
243 

44 
2C9 
190 
100 
155 
195 
221 
238 

31 
147 
161 
122 
303 
244 
274 
157 
182 
155 
161 
47 
220 
380 
28 
332 
192 
117 
1.53 
171 
77 
27 
100 

13,917 



86 City Document No. 25. 

Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Fenton court . . . 

Fuller , 

Creek 

Kew 

Virginia 

Millet 

Foster 

Marshfield . . . 
Batchelder ... 
Vaughn ave. . . 
Tileston ave. . . 

Grant 

Corhett 

Fairview .... 
Van "Winkle . . 
Sawyer ave. . . . 

Gibson 

Auckland .... 

Beale 

Evans 

Elder 

A 

Jamaica 

Starr Lane . . . 

Story place . . . 

C 

Weld place . . . 

Clement ave. . . 

Farrington ave. . 

John A. Andrew 

Carolina ave. . . 

Ballard 

Goldsmith court . 

Conway 

Call .... . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Greenwich and Fenton 

Washington and Dorchester ave. . . . 
Pleasant and Dorchester ave. . . . . , 

From Dorchester ave 

Dudley and Bird 

From Wheatland ave 

Freeman and Dorchester ave 

Clifton and Batchelder 

Cottage and Marshfield 

From Geneva ave. ... ■ 

Walk Hill and Blue Hill ave 

Harbor View and Crescent ave. . . . 

Norfolk and Evans 

From Train 

O.C. and if. R.R. and Dorchester ave. 

Savin Hill and Downer aves 

Adam and Dorchester ave 

From Savin Hill ave 

O.C. and N. K.R. and Dorchester ave. 

Capen and Nelson 

Eastman and Humphrey 

Boylston and Spring park 

From Jamaica 

Centre and Seaverns ave 

From Greenough ave 

Boylston and Spring park 

Washington and Providence R.R. . . 

From Farrington ave 

Clement ave. and Oak 

Newberne and Sedgwick 

South and Lee 

Custer and Centre 

From Centre 

Fairview and South 

Gordon and Everett 



Dor. 



W.R. 



Carried forward , 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



87 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Lee 

Helena 

Kew 

Woodman .... 
Gordon .... ■ . 
Ballard place . . . 

Reedsdale 

Allston 

Vernon place . . . 

Franklin 

Tremont 

Church 

New 

Guildford 

Saunders . . .• . . 
Orchard .... • . 

Gordon 

Linden . • . . . . 

Tremont 

Boylston square . . 
Castle court . . . . 

Whiting 

Linwood square . . 
Dana court . . . . 

Downing 

Blue Hill ave. . . . 
Vine-st. court . . . 
A court 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forwurd .... 

Child and Carolina ave 

Lamartine and Providence R.R. 

From Chemical ave 

Custer and Jamaica 

Call and Everett 

From Ballard 

Harvard and Brighton ave. . . 
Warren and Allston square . . 

From Vernon 

Cambridge and B. & A. R.R. . 
Washington and Newton Line . 
Washington and Vernon . . . 

From Waverly 

Saunders and Orchard 

Cambridge and Guildford . . . 
Guildford and Gordon . . . . 
Orchard and Cambridge . , . . 
Reedsdale and Brighton ave. . . 
Total, 6-inch 



Indiana and B. & A. R.R. . 
Washington and Boylston . 

From Everett , 

From Warren , 

Linwood and Centre . . . 
From Dana place .... 
Culvert and Vernon . . . 
Alaska and Moreland . . 

From Vine . 

From Chestnut ave. . . . 
Total, 4-inch . . . 



W.R. 



B. 



E.B. 
B.H, 



W.R. 



;0,602 

145 

162 

334 

48 

11 

161 

489 

540 

214 

42 

214 

111 

671 

335 

116 

78 

76 

364 

24,713 

67 

46 

106 

36 

70 

110 

368 

315 

167 

86 

1,377 



88 City Document No. 25. 

Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Kelaid and Abandoned in 1885. 















In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


5 


m 


a 


<D K 


Bro-wn ave 


Pine and Florence 


W.R. 


8 


44 


12 




44 






P and Q 


8.B. 


6 
6 






137 
351 
184 
980 


12 


ilitchell 


From Ninth 


E.B. 










Princeton 


Brooks and Prescott 




8 


Webster 


Qottage and Belmont 


" 


" 


856 


10 


Marion 


Bennington and White 


" 


" 


1,844 


8 


Bernard 


Norfolk and N.T. & N.E. R.R. . . 
Atlantic ave. and the water .... 


Dor. 
B. 


4 


32 


12 




4,384 




Commercial wharf . . 


600 


6 


Beacon 


Hereford and W. Chester park . . 


" 


" 


262 


12 




862 






Raised. 
From Ninth . ^ 


S.B. 


6 






Mitchell 


51 






Lowered. 










Holborn 


Blue Hill ave. and Warren .... 


B.H. 


12 


60 




Kittredge 


Washington and Albano 

Relaid. 


W.R. 


8 


416 




Shirley 


Hawthorne and Shirley ave .... 


Win- 
throp. 


8 


217 





Eepoet of the Water Boaed 



89 



I-I CO i-H 



2- a 



i-( (M CD 



E i 



a « 



.2 « 



5 2 

MI'S 



=1. 2^ P< a 



O W) t>i o 



fe :: 



90 



City Document No. 25. 



B^ 



0^ 






5J1 



CO CD tJ* 
Tt< I-H .-H 



•~ ^ a 



b« it 60 ■g 



1-1 hJ i-:i H 









vO r-l <0 .! 


* (M 


















•?aa^ UT 




CD^ CO 




m 


mSuai 


1-1 1-1 (N 
CO. 


0^ lO 




t 

in 












i 




•9d[J JO 


tH r-{ ^ Jr- O 


o 








aeqran^ 






-' 


IH 














T# lO o 




. 








•}93^ tn 
















P 


q:(SneT[ 










CO 


















































•adij JO 






r^ r-l lO 












aaqamjy[ 




























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•■jaa J m 
















H Bj 


qjSaa^ 










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m p 










































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aaqtunj^ 




































•}aa^ m 








1 1-1 










H 


xi%SaB'j 










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H 










































CO 




■aclia JO 






CO rH CD 








IJO 


fl 


.19 qui n^ 


















M 






















s 










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•>s 


1? 

o 


•?99 J nt 






"* 












H 


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co" 






^ 


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'^ 


■9d!<j JO 






(M 


CD 

o 




Z' 


-to 

1 


H 


J9quiti^ 














C3 


fe 


!5 
















o 




o 

H 
O 


•}99 J m 










CO 




p 




w 


















W 

D 

o 


•adij JO 








IC 


^ 




e 

3 




J9qainj>j 


• 
















OQ 
















5 
















2 








■n i-i o- 














■}9a^ ui 








61 


6B 




izi 


qiSuQi 






"* 


61 


M 




H 










< 


a 




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m 












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tH r-l o: 














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^ 
































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1—1 


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rol't 


iO|00 









Report of the Water Board. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Tear 1885. 



91 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 






Whebe. 










36 
1 


30 
1 


24 


20 


16 


12 

14 
1 


9 
1 


8 

1 


6 

32 
4 


4 

23 
2 


3 

4 


2 

4 
1 


17 
1 


2 


1 
10 


% 
5 


1 


\ 

5 
2 


Total. 




■■ 231 
52 


352 


South Boston 


63 








1 


2 




3 


2 

1 




10 


2 




5 






1 
3 


1 


77 
98 


6 
1 


89 


Boston Highlands 






124 


Dorchester 


















3 


1 




1 








1 


65 


. 


71 


West Roxbury 












1 




1 


2 
















31 




35 


Brighton 


1 


1 


1 


2 


- 


19 


4 


2 


51 


28 


4 


11 


18 


2 


14 




15 


14 


15 


Totals 


7 


569 


749 







111 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards : joints, 3(5 ; settlmg of earth, 10 ; 
defective pipe, 17 ; defective packing, 32 ; de- 
fective gate, 12 ; by frost, 1 ; by blasting, 3. 
Total 

Of 3-inch and in service-pipes : joints, 18 ; settling 
of earth, 113; settling of wall, 2; defective 
packing, 23 ; defective pipe, 130 ; defective 
faucet, 6 ; defective coupling, 4 ; faucet punched 
out, 3 ; stiff connections, 17 ; by pick, 46 ; eaten 
by rats, 9 ; pipe not in use, 1 ; nail-hole, 1 ; eaten 
by soil, 2; by sounding-rod, 1; by blasting, 6. 
Total 

Stoppages by fish, 18 ; by frost, 17 ; by rust, 197 ; 
gasket, 3 ; dirt, 21. Total .... 



Total 



382 
256 
749 



92 



City Document JSTo. 25. 



statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1885. 



Year. 



1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880, 

1881 

1882, 

1883 

1884 

1885 



DiAMETEK. 



Four inohes and 
upwards. 



32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 

213 

211 

135 

145 

170 

171 

253 

111 



Less than four 
inches. 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
594 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
707 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 
734 
801 
1,024 
995 
929 
833 
1,248 
782 
1,127 
638 



Totals. 



104 

237 

323 

345 

354 

294 

307 

363 

401 

531 

592 

508 

490 

494 

489 

607 

675 

609 

531 

489 

926 

1,565 

1,647 

1,229 

2,554 

928 

948 

910 

1,237 

1,206 

1,064 

1,028 

1,248 

953 

1,380 

749 



Repoet of the Water Board 



93 



Hydrants. 

During the year 171 hydrants have been established, and 
88 abandoned. 





Established. 


Abandoned. 






11 


o 


>> 

o 


1 
o 
W 


3 




o 


o 


3 
o 

pq 


o 


o 
H 




5 
2 
7 
4 
17 
11 
7 


23 
3 
6 
14 
10 
4 
2 


23 
1 
7 
2 
5 
3 


1 

3 
6 
4 
1 


52 
6 
20 
23 
38 
22 
10 


3 






40 
1 

12 
8 
5 
2 
1 


43 

1 

13 

16 
8 
5 
2 


9 




5 




1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

10 


1 


6 
1 
1 


7 


Boston Highlands 


7 
30 


West Roxbury 


17 

s 








53 


62 


41 


15 


171 


1 


7 


69 


88 


83 



Total number up to January 1, 1886. 



Boston 

South Boston . . . 
East Boston . . . 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester . . . . 
West Roxhury . . 

Brighton 

Deer Island . . . 
Brookline . . . . 
Chelsea 



fq 






123 

36 

39 

57 

108 

211 

155 

16 



509 
144 
119 



2,145 



714 
326 
159 
120 
87 
58 
39 



1,513 



1,395 
526 
331 

851 
831 
436 
280 
16 



4,681 



94 City Document No. 25. 

93 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 174 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 

Stopcocks. 

131 new stopcocks have been established this year. 97 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. The 
stopcocks have had the proper attention paid them. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. R. JONES, 

Superintendent Eastern Division. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DEPARTMENT. 



Mystic Department, Boston Water-Works, 

Charlestown District, Jan. 1, 1886. 

Col. Horace T. Eockwell, Gliairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The report of this department for the year ending 
December 31, 1885, is herewith submitted. 



Mystic Lake. 

Dm'ing the past year the water has been good and abun- 
dant. The liigh water has prevented the cleaning recom- 
mended in my last report. Considerable work has been 
done in Wedge Pond and in the river. The gate-keeper's 
house at the lake has been remodelled, clapboarded, and 
painted outside. The trees have been trimmed, making an 
improvement in the looks of the grounds. During the storm 
in November the fishway was destroyed, and will have to be 
rebuilt this winter. 

Under your direction I have spent considerable time in 
investigating and stopping cases of pollution. I find that 
the people on the water-shed show a disposition to do what 
they can to remedy such cases. 



Mystic- Valley Sewer. 

The sewer is in good condition. The old pump at the 
pumping-station has been replaced by a new one of the same 
size, with a larger discharge-pipe, which causes the pump to 
run much easier with a smaller consumption of coal. The 
engine and boiler have been thoroughly repaired the past 
season, and are now as good as new. We still get good 
results from the use of the sewao'e as a fertilizer. 



96 City Document No. 25. 



Conduit. 

The conduit is in good condition ; it was cleaned in Sep- 
tember. At that time there was quite a growth of moss and 
some sponge, which readily came off by the use of brooms 
and scrubl)ing. I would recommend that a few more man- 
holes be built to better facilitate cleaning. 



Keservoie. 

The reservoir is in good condition. The west basin and 
pipe leading to gate-chamber from the same should be 
cleaned the next season. The walks around the top of the 
reservoir have been resurfticed, and one gutter on the first 
slope concreted. I would recommend that the work on the 
gutters be continued the next season, and in a few years they 
will all be done, saving the amount now spent in labor keep- 
ing the grass and weeds from the present cobble-stone 
gutters. 

EoADS AND Grounds. 

All the roads are in poor condition, as mentioned in my 
last report. I would recommend that a stone-crusher engine 
and road-roller be purchased, so that a beginning can be 
made towards the improvement of the roads. The work can 
be done by the permanent men, so that the cost will be 
small, and in a few years the roads can all be put in first- 
class condition. The grounds have been top-dressed, and 
are lookmg well. A new building for the storage of hay, 
wagons, and tools has been built the past season. The 
stable has l)een remodelled. All the buildings ought to be 
painted the next season. 

Pumping— Service . 

No. 3 pump is now having done the repairs mentioned in 
my last report. When completed the pump will be as good 
as new. Nos. 1 and 2 need extensive repairs to their air- 
pumps, and if they are to be kept in service, would recommend 
the purchase of an independent air-pump ; but think the 
better plan would be to replace No. 1 with a larger pump, as 
the time is not far distant when we shall need a larger pump- 
ing plant. The first opportunity should be taken to make 
temporary repairs on the Nos. 1 and 2 pumps. The repairs 
to the engine have been continued ; the building has been 
painted outside, and is now in fair condition. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



97 



Distribution^ Pipes. 

These have been extended in this district by the addition 
of 448 feet of 4- inch and 348 feet of 6-inch pipe. There 
have been 7,912 feet of cement-lined pipe replaced with 
cast-iron. The annexed tables show the amount of work 
done in this branch. 



Hydrants and Gates. 

Three new Lowry hydrants and one post hydrant have 
been placed this year. 

Twelve old Lowry hydrants have been replaced with new 
and one post replaced with a Boston Lowry. Twelve rotten 
hydrant-boxes have been replaced. There have been added 
seven 4-inch and four 8-inch gates ; and eight 4-inch gates, 
twenty 6-inch, and six 8-inch gates have been renewed. 49 
rotten gate-boxes have been renewed. 



Service Pipes and Boxes. 

Forty-eight new services have been laid in this district the 
past year. 119 services were relaid or repaired, in which 
1,261| feet of lead pipe were used. Forty-three |-in. tin- 
lined pipes were replaced by |-in. lead, 25 leaks were re- 
paired, 51 stoppages were caused by eels, 29 by rust, and 
8 by moss. 339 wooden-service pipe-boxes were replaced 
by cast-iron ones. 

New Services. 



Size. 


f-inch. 


l-lnch. 


8-inch. 


Total number. 


Total feet. 


Number .... 


43 


4 


1 


48 


1,379 



Summary of Services connected with the Works, January 1, 1886. 





Charlestown. 


Somerville. 


Chelsea. 


Everett. 


Total. 


No. of Services . 
Length in Feet . . 


5,643 
151,287 


4,334 
144,558 


5,000 
123,471 


951 
21,218 


15,928 
440,534 



440,534 feet, or 83 miles 2,294 feet. 



98 



City Document No. 25. 



Breaks and Leaks on Distribution- Pipe. 



Size of Pipes. 


24 


10 


8 


6 


4 


3 


2 


Total. 




1 




1 


14 

15 

18 

6 


17 

20 

23 

6 


2 


7 


40 




38 






5 


8 


54 










12 
















Totals 


1 


5 


9 


53 


66 


2 


7 


144 







Extension of Distribution-Pipe. 





Size op Pipe. 


Total feet. 


Location. 


4-inch. 


6-inch. 


8-inch. 


10-iach. 


Brighton street . 
Monument place, 
Hathon square . 


36 
132 

1,616 

651 

2,080 


120 






156 






132 


228 

3,953 

200 

250 






228 






5,569 


Chelsea 


310 


45 


1,206 
2,330 










Totals 


4,515 


4,751 


310 


45 


9,621 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 



99 



Distribution- Pipes Relaid. 



Location. 



Maudlin street . . . 
Adams street . . . 
Union street . . . . 
Rutherford avenue 
Devins street . . , 
Dunstable street . , 
Stetson's court . . 
Franklin street . . 
High street . . . , 
Eden street ... 
Monument street 
Crescent place . - 
Front street . . . 
Bunker Hill street 
Main street . . , 
Haverhill street . 
Bolton place . . 
Somerville street 
Chelsea street . . 

Totals .... 



Original 

size. 


4-inch. 


6-inch. 


8-inch. 


Total feet. 


Inches. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 




4 




240 




240 


6 
6 






276 


276 


12 


468 


480 


6 




972 




972 


6 




540 




540 


4 




456 




456 


2 
4 


120 






120 


300 





300 


6 




528 




528 


4 


42 


384 




426 


4 




384 




384 


4 
6 


48 






48 




1,188 
708 


1,188 
708 


6 
4 








708 


708 


6 




72 




72 


2 


168 
132 






168 


2,550 




2,682 






887 




887 




522 


8,489 


2,172 


11,183 



100 



City Document No. 25. 



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102 City Document No. 25. 

Connected with the works are the necessary tools, horses, 
and wagons to do the work, all of which are in good con- 
dition. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. HENRY BEOWN, 

jSuperintendent. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
METEH DIVISION. 



Office of Scperintendent Meter Division, 

221 Federal Street, Boston, Jan. 1, 1886. 

H. T. Rockwell, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of this department for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1885, is herewith submitted. 

Total number of meters in service May 1, 1885, in the 
Cochituate Department, 4,389. During the year 63 addi- 
tional meters have been applied and 393 discontinued, mak- 
ing; the total number in service to date 4,059. 

Total number of meters in service May 1, 1885, m the 
Mystic Department, 567. During the year there have been 
70 additional meters applied and 34 discontinued, making the 
total number in service to date 603. 

Total number in the whole works, 4,662. 



Style of Meter. 


6-in. 


4-in. 


3-in. 


2-in. 


4-in. 


1-in. 


3-in. 


i-in. 


Total. 




f Worthington . 
O 
g. Crown .... 


1 


6 
5 


16 
16 


67 
22 


25 
28 


359 
121 
122 
2 
73 
10 
24 


58 

1,876 

4 

57 

49 

151 

2 

2,197 


420 
899 

12 
85 
72 


893 

1,150 

1,998 

18 

267 

154 

175 

7 




p 












4,059 


■ Worthington . 
.JJ Crown .... 


2 


8 
6 


3 
6 


38 
8 


3 
1 










1 


4 




603 
















3 


25 


42 


139 


57 


711 


1,488 


4,662 





There have been purchased during the year 400 |-inch and 
64 1-inch Tremont Meters, making the total number received 
from the Tremont Meter Co. to date 4,442, of which 4,099 
are |-inch and 343 1-inch, distributed as follows : — 



104 



City Document No. 25. 



In service Cochituate Department 
" " Mystic " 

Rejected and returned 

" at shop 
Unavailable .... 
Others on hand 



In service Cochituate Department 
" " Mystic " 

Rejected at shop 
Others on hand 



5-inch. 

1,876 
151 

1,430 
171 
102 
369 



4,099 



1 inch. 

122 

24 

20 
177 
343 



4,442 



13 Crown Meters have been purchased, and 55 Crown 
Meters, of different sizes, have been repaired, at an expense 
of $388.60. 

52 meters of the Worthington pattern have been con- 
demned as useless : worn out in service. 

55 decayed street boxes have been replaced, and 12 re- 
paired. 

All outside meters have been packed with hay, to protect 
them from frost during the winter months. 

The mechanical defects mentioned in last year's report in 
the construction of the Tremont Meter still continues. 
Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. S. FOLLANSBEE, 

Sujpei intendent. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OE THE 
INSPECTION AND WASTE DIVISION. 



Division of Inspection and Waste, 

City Hall, Boston, Jan. 1, 1886. 

Horace T. Rockwell, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The following report of the work of this division 
from May 1, 1885, to January 1, 1886, is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

At the date of my last annual report (May 1, 1885) about 
half of the general house-to-house inspection for revenue in 
the CochitLiate Department (begun January 10) was fin- 
ished. The entire inspection was completed about the end 
of July, and the returns passed to Water Registrar Davis. 

The house-to-house inspections made in previous years, 
for data on which to assess the water rents, were, I consid- 
ered, for various reasons, defective, inasmuch as correct in- 
formation on which to base the assessment of rates was not 
furnished to the Water Registrar. I therefore deemed it 
necessary that the inspection should be thoroughly accurate 
and reliable in every respect. Accordingly I had a verifica- 
tion made of each of the 56,000 reports received, and I have 
no hesitation in saying that the results of the inspection 
were the most reliable and accurate ever sent to the Water 
Registrar's Department, and that, consequently, a propor- 
tionate increase in the revenue of the department will result. 

In the Mystic Department one of the inspection divisions 
(Division 1) was employed during the period mentioned. 
On July 1 the water bills for Chelsea, Everett, and Revere 
were delivered by the inspectors of Division 1, and, begin- 
ning July 31, a house-to-house inspection was made of 
Charle'stown and Somerville, for the present January bills, 
which the division is at present engaged in delivering. 

After the close of the inspection for revenue in the Cochit- 
uate Department the inspectors of Inspection Divisions 2, 3, 
and 4 were placed on the water districts map])ed out by 
the City Engineer, where Divisions 2 and 4 remained for the 
summer checking waste, and enforcing hand-hose rcgula- 



106 



City Document No. 25. 



tions ; Division 3 being placed inspecting premises classed 
as model houses on which special rates are charged. Dur- 
ing the same period Division 1 was engaged in its inspection 
of the Mystic Department, and Division 5 (Deacon Division) 
was employed in the Deacon service, checking the waste in 
districts indicated by the Deacon Meters. 

Exposed Pipes. 

On October 31, 1885, I received the following order from 
the Water Board : "From this date you will cause reports 
to be made upon the condition of service connections with 
respect to liability of freezing ; you will confer with the 
Board at once as to details." 

In compliance with this order, when the necessary blanks 
had been printed, the division began (November 6) to report 
premises where the supply-pipes were found to be exposed, 
and liable to freeze in cold weather. Up to January 1 
(inst.) 1,287 reports of this class were received, dis- 
tributed over the districts mentioned in the schedule here- 
under : — 



District. 


c3 

a 

Si 

.■2 


w O 

S a, 

(4-1 O 

o a 
o o 


> • 
o -a 
o a 

° f 
oft 

55 


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a 
S cu 

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P5 


a 
'53 
^ . 

^ o >< 

o -^ o 


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O 

a . 
g^ 




> U,'^b'I 


' 330 
159 

91 
225 
133 
119 

10 

169 

5 

46 


> 529 


235 


127 












Boston Highlands 






108 










Bomerville 










24,457 


1,287 


529 


235 


127 


108 



The above shows that 5.26 per cent, of the premises ex- 
amined since November 6 have been found with pipes liable 
to freeze ; that of the 529 notices to secure against frost 
issued, 127 were, on reexamination, found properly protected, 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



107 



and 108 cases in which the notification was not complied 
with. Promises, however, have been made by those notified 
that the requirements of the notice will be attended to. 

During the period embraced in this report two inspectors, 
viz., P. J. Smith and B. F. McKenna, died. Chief Inspector 
James H. McGuire was suspended from service for neglect 
of duty, and Chief Inspector Carroll was elected to the 
Board of Aldermen. 

Cochituate Department. 

The decrease in the daily consumption, especially in the 
Cochituate Department, effected by checking waste, has been 
remarkable since the formation of this division. Notwith- 
standing increase of population and manufactures during the 
two and a half years since the Inspection and Waste Division 
has been organized the supply has been steadily decreasing. 
To illustrate this I give below the average daily consumption 
for the eight months covered by this report, with the like 
consumption for the same months of the year before inspec- 
tion to check waste began. The schedule shoAvs an average 
daily saving of 8,707,912 gallons, or 25.84 per cent., as com- 
pared with the supply two and a half years ago before in- 
spection to check waste began. It will, therefore, readily be 
seen that if, in the calculation of saving, increase of popula- 
tion and manufactures were considered, the figures would 
show largely in excess. 



Month. 



May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 

August. . 
September 

October . 
November 
December 



Averages for each month , 



Befokb In- 
spection. 



Average daily 
Consumption. 



Gallons. . 

1883. 
32,169,500 
33,419,200 
36,774,000 
37,141,000 
83,645,600 

1882. 
31,563,800 
31,318,700 
32,352,800 



33,548,075 



ArTBB Inspec- 
tion. 



Average daily 
Consumption. 



Gallons. 
1885. 
22,168,400 
27,214,800 
26,606,200 
24,680,000 
26,493,600 

24,945,500 
22,092,800 
24,520,000 



24,840,162 



Average 

daily 
Saving. 



Gallons. 

10,001,100 
6,204,400 
10,167,800 
12,461,000 
7,152,000 

6,618,300 
9,225,900 
7,832,800 



5,707,912 



Per cent. 
Saved. 



31.09 
18.57 
27.65 
33.55 
21.26 

20.97 
29.46 
24.21 



108 



City Document No. 25. 



Mystic Department. 

In the IVfystic Department, owing to the imperfect condi- 
tion of the street-mains in Somerville and Chelsea, and the 
district not being as well covered by inspectors as the Co- 
chituate Division the saving has been nothing to compare 
with the latter division. For the six months of this report 
in which a saving has been effected it has averaged daily 
609,533 gallons, or 8.68 per cent., as compared with the like 
six months before inspection began. The following schedule 
ffives the fio;ures : — 



Month. 


Before 
Inspection, 


After 
Inspection. 


Average daily 
Saving. 


Per cent. 
Saved. 


§ a 

M § 

O 


Average daily 
Consumption. 


Average daily 
Consumption. 


May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September . . 

October .... 
November . . . 
December . . . 


Gallons. 

1883. 
6,319,100 
6,912,500 
7,307,600 
7,261,500 
5,846,300 

1882. 
6,011,300 
5,577,400 
6,877,600 


Gallons. 
1885. 
5,605,700 
6,594,200 
6,513,300 
£,047,600 
5,931,900 

5,914,900 
5,710,300 
6,356,700 


Gallons. 

713,400 

318,300 

794,300 

1,213,900 

96,400 
520,900 


11.29 
4.6 
10.87 
16.72 

1.06 
7.57 


Gallons. 

85,600 
132,900 


Averages . . 


6,514,162 


6,084,325 


609,533 


8.68 





Report of the Water Board. 



109 



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110 



City Document No. 25. 



a 3 . 
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'pajaATiap siiia: J^ib^w 



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sanja 



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Eeport of the Watee Board. 



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-CO CO r-1 tH 



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112 



City Docibient No. 28. 



Other work done by the division, and not included in the 
foregoing schedule, is as follows : — 



From what Source Received. 



Engineer's Department 
Police " 
Health " 
Service Division . . . . 
Citizens 



Wilful Waste. 
Reports 
Received. 




During the eight months of this report 390 fines have 
been inflicted for non-repairs of water-fixtures, wilful waste 
of water, and violations of hose regulations. 

Of these 31 were collected and 259 abated, for various 
causes. 

During the same period the water has been cut off for non- 
repairs from 3 premises, and let on again to 3. 

The amount of cash received for fines, and turned over to 
the Water Registrars , is as follows : — 



To Registrar of Cochituate Dept. 

" Mystic " 



Amount refunded . 



Total 



160 00 
2 00 



$62 00 
6 00 



. $68 00 



The $6 collected in fines, and afterward refunded to the 
parties, was done b}^ order of the Water Board. 
Yery respectfull}^ 

D. B. CASHMAN, 

Superintendent. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 113 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO MAY 1, 1885. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 
4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 
t 
Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of tlie Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers haying Charge op the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slabe, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25. 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works. From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to Mai-ch 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 
3, 1885. 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. AvERY Richards were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 1856J Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned June 
5,1860$ Four years. 



114 



City Document No. 25. 



Ebenezek Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 1865J ~. . Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867| One year and nine months. 

John H. Thoendike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868J One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April, 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 ....... Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resign^l May 

31, 1875 Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876 One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55J . . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 62, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59t\ Eight years. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 . . . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56 . . . Four years. 

James W. Seaver, 1851J One year. 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851 J. 

John T. Heakd, 1851^ One year. 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55^ . . Four years. 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853$ Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ One year. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55J .... Three years. 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 . . . Six years. 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ . . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 Two years. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ .... Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ .... Three years. 

John T. Dinglet, 1856 and 59$ Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856$ Two months. 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64,$ Eight years. 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 68, 69, 60, and 61$ . . . . Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. . . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 . . . Six years. 

Clement Willis, 1860 One year. 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ One year. 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ ... . Three years. 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 Two years. 

John F. Pray, 1862 One year. 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 One year. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ Three years. 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66$ Two years. 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ . . . Four years. 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . . . . Three years. 

William S. Hills, 1867 One year. 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ One year. 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69$ . . . . Two years. 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68, and 69 .... Three years. 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 . , . . ^ . . One year. 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ . . . . ' . . One year. 

John O. Poor, 1870 One year. 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 One year. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



115 



, 69, and 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 

and 71 

George Lem-is, 1868, 69, 70, and 71 
Sidney Squires, 1871:!: .... 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 
Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 

72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74^ 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74$ 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* . 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 . 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75$ 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 . 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 

and 76t 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t . 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t. 
Nahum M. Morrison, 1876f . 
Augustus Parker, 1876t 



75, 



Nine years. 
Four years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned N'ov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B.Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President ; and 
July 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one j'ear, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864r-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin i-esigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

J Deceased. 



116 City Document No. 25. 

Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879 ; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. J 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to present time. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 25, 1885, to present time. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from Aug. 26, 1885, to present time. 

Organization of the Board for Year 1885. 

Chairman. 

William A. Simmons, to Aug. 18. 

Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 26. 

CJlerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. • 
Henry M. Wightman, to April 3.$ 
Wm. Jackson, from April 21. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

Deputy Collector and Clerk, Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Department. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
J. Henky Brown. 

Superintendent of Meter Division. 

Hiram Cutts, to ISTov. 16. 
George S. Follansbee, from Nov. 16. 

Superintendent of Inspection and Waste Division. 
D. B. Cashman. 

X Deceased. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Report of the Water Board. 

Condition of the works . 

Water-rates . 

Waste of water 

Meter division 

Quality of the water 

New supply 

Beacon-Hill Eeservoir site 

Table giving general statistics, 1883-85 

Earnings and expenditures, loans, etc. 

Cost of Cochituate works, Jan. 1, 1886 
" Mystic " " " 

Report of the City Engineer. 

Sudbury-river reservoirs and Lake Cochituate 

Reservoir No. 4 . . . . 

Farm-pond conduit 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs 

Highland pumping- station 

New high-service works 

Mystic lake ..... 

Mystic-valley sewer 

Mystic conduit and reservoir . 

Mystic pumping-station . 

Consumption ..... 

Quality of water .... 

Waste prevention .... 
Table showing saving effected 

Distribution system 

General condition and requirements of works 

Tables and diagrams : — 

Daily average consumption, 1879-85 
Diagram showing daily Average consumption, 1875-85 
Diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1879-85 
Average monthly and yearly heights of reservoirs, 1884-85 
Diagram showing heights of reservoirs, rainfall, etc. 
Yield of Sudbury-river water-shed, rainfall, etc., 1875-85 
" " Lake Cochituate " " " " 1852-85 

" " Mystic Lake " " " " 1876-85 



FAOB 

1 
2 

3 
3 
4 
6 

7 

9 

10-13 

14 

15 

16-19 
17 
20 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 
25 
26 
26 

28 
28 
29 
30 
30 
31 
32 
34 



118 City Document No. 25. 



Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Highland station, 

1885 35 

Monthly amounts pumped, coal used, etc., at Mystic station, 

1885 36 

Daily rainfall on Sudbury-river water-shed, 1885 ... 37 

" " " Lake Cochituate " " " • . . 38 

" " " Mystic Lake " << " . . . 39 

Monthly rainfall at various places, 1885 . . ... . 40 

" temperature of air and water, 1885 .... 41 

Rainfall received and collected on the Cochituate water-shed, 

1863-85 42-45 

Rainfall received and collected on the Mystic water-shed, 

1878-85 46 

Rainfall received and collected on the Sudbury-river water- 
shed, 1875-85 48 

Monthly rainfall at Lake Cochituate, 1852-85 ... 60 
Report op the Water Registrar, Cochituate Department. 

Number of water-takers ......... 51 

Revenue for the year 1885 ........ 51 

Number and size of meters in use ....... 52 

Location of public drinking-fountains ...... 53 

" " stand-pipes for street sprinkling .... 54 

Quantity used and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers, 1884-85 . . . ' 55 

Yearly revenue from water-rates, 1849-85 . . . . . 56 

Number of water-takers, 1850-85 . . . . . . . 57 

Number and kind of water fixtures in use 59 

Mystic Department. 

Number of water-takers 60 

Revenue received, 1885 ......... 60 

Location of stand-pipes for street sprinkling .... 61 

" " public drinking-fountains ...... 62 

Quantity used and revenue received from different classes of 

metered takers, 1884 64 

Number and kind of water fixtures in use . . . . . 66 

Yearly revenue from water-rates, 1865-85 ..... 67 
Report of the Superintendent of the Western Division. 

Sudbury-river basins ......... 70 

Basin 1 70 

Basin 2 71 

Basin 3 72 

Farm Pond 72 

Lake Cochituate .......... 73 

Sudbury-river aqueduct . . . . . . . . • 74 

Cochituate aqueduct ......... 76 

Chestnut-Hill reservoir ..... i ... 77 

Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill reservoir ...... 77 



Contents. 119 

PAGE 

Report of Superintendent or Eastern Division. 

Main pipe and services laid and relaid ...... 80 

Table of location, size, and length of pipe mains laid in 1885 . 82-87 
Table of location, size, and length of pipe mains relaid and aban- 
doned in 1885 88 

Table showing length of mains laid during 1885 and length in use 

Jan. I, 1886 89 

Table showing number and length of service-pipes laid in 1885 

and total number Jan. 1, 1886 ....... 90 

Leaks repaired, 1885 ...... • . . 91 

Table showing number of leaks and stoppages, 1850-85 . . 92 

Number of hydrants established in 1885 and total in use . . 93 

Report of Superintendent of the Mystic Department. 

Mystic lake 95 

Mystic-valley sewer ......... 95 

Conduit 96 

Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . 96 

Roads and grounds ......... 96 

Pumping service 96 

Distribution-pipes 97 

Tables showing mains and services laid in 1885 .... 97-98 

Tables showing number of gates and hydrants connected with the 

works ............ 100 

Table showing sizes and lengths of mains connected with the 

works ............ 101 

Report of the Superintendent of the Meter Division. 

Number of meters in use ........ 103 

Report of the Superintendent of the Inspection and Waste 
Department. 

Work accomplished 103 

Schedules of work done by diflFerent inspectors .... 109 

Civil Organization of the Water-Works . . . ■ . . 113 



(Oct., 1885, 20,000) 

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