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Full text of "Annual report of the Board of Police for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




SECOM) ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF police: 



(i 



CITV OF BOSTON. 



DFXEMBKIJ, 188C. 



BOSTON : 

WKIGHT & Pr/TTEK PRIXTIXQ CO.. STATE PRINTERS, 

Mi Tiirt Okfick Squark. 

1887. 

\ 



Ibi-io -:?i .' i?i^S rfv 






HE PORT. 



nnvtlQlARTERS OF THE POLICE DEP\m«ST, 

Office or the Boa>u> or PoiiCF, 

7 Pehbekto.v S«rAKR, B08TOX, Dec 1, 188G. 

To His Excellpncy Georoe D. Robinson, Ootxmor. 

Your Excellency : — The Bonrcl of Police for the city of 
Ra<ton, in compliance with the provisions of chapter 323 of 
the Acts of 1885, has the honor to submit the following re- 
jiort of the work of the police tlepartnient for the year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 1886: — 

The Department. 

OJicern. 
The police department as at present constitiite<l is com- 
posed of 



BoanI of Polico, . 

Clerk of lh« Bonr.l, . 

Sin>erintendent of Polici.', 

Dcpoty Soperintcndent of Polit-*, 

C'liief Inspector, . 

Inspectors, . 

Inspector of Intelligence OflSces, 

Ins|>ector oj Cnrriages, 

Inspector of Wii;;ons, 

Insj>cctor of Pawnbrokers, 

Inspector of Clnlms, . 

Clerk to Saperintendent of PoHce, 

Assistant Inspector of Carriage and Wagon IJceascs, 

Assistant Inspector of Pawnbrokers, 

rrojHrty Clerk. . 

Captains, . 

Lieutenants 

Sergeants, . 

Piitrolinen, , 

Hous«i Watchmen. 

Assistant Ke<?|HT» City Prison, 



3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 
I 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
I 

16 
34 
53 
0.19 
10 
-7 



4 SliCOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Steward City Prison, 1 

Matron City Prison 1 

Engineer, 1 

Firemen, . 3 

Dediictiii'' from the forefjoint; the executive otlicers, head- 
quiuters staff and officers employed in special service, leaves 
the effective strength of the department 759 men, or one to 
every 527 of the population. The distribution of the force 
is shown by Table I. On November 30 there were six 
vacancies, viz., one lieutenant, two sergeants and three 
patrolmen. During the year forty-one officers were ap- 
pointed, sixteen discharged, eleven resigned, five retired on 
pension and eight died. (See Tables II. and III.) 

Capt. Horace M. Ford, of Division 11, was discharged 
from the department Oct. 12, 1886. Capt. James W. 
Twombly, of Division 10, was retired, at his own request, 
and placed upon (he pension roll Nov. (>, 1886. Lieut. 
James P. J. Hancy, on special duty at headquarters, died 
July 17, 1886. Lieut. Lyman W. Gould, keeper of the 
City Prison, died Nov. 20, 1886. Capt. R. H. Wilkins, of 
Division 2, was appointed keeper of the City Prison, mak- 
ing three vacancies in the rank of captain. Lieuts. James 
H. Lambert, James M. Coulter and William H. Brown were 
promoted to the rank of captain to fill the vacancies. These 
officers stood the highest on the civil service list, — Captain 
Lambert having 98 per cent.. Captain Coulter 97^*^ per 
cent., and Captain Brown 94 per cent., all in class A. 

Sergts. George W. Westcott, Philemon D. Warren and 
Philip McBryan were promoted to be lieutenants, their re- 
spective standing being 96 per cent., 95 per cent, and 94^ 
per cent., in class A. 

Patrolman Benjamin .V. Durgin was promoted to be ser- 
geant, his standing being 95^ per cent., in class A. 

William A. Ham, formerly Chief Inspector, who was dis- 
charged in September, 1885, was reinstated by the Supreme 
Court, but resigned without assuming the office. 

The health of the force compared favorably with the pre- 
ceding twelve months, the returns showing a reduction in 
the percentage of absence on account of sickness. The 
average number of men .absent was twenty per day, or 2.5.3 



I 

1 



BOARD OF POLICE. 5 

per will, of the force. (See Table IV.) Last year the 
average w.-is twenty-nine per day, or 3.66 per cent, of the 
force. This, in a climate such as our», where the causes of 
sickness are chiefly attributable to exposure to the weather, 
is a low percentage. But for all that the loss of twenty men 
per day throughout the year seriously interferes with the 
work of tiie department. The force is now not large enout^h 
to {xitrol the city as it should be done, or as the public de- 
sire, and every man who is absent from duty cripples the 
departUK-iit to that extent. In addition to this, the absentee- 
ism on account of leaves of absence, the annual vacations, 
etc., will increjise the percentage to an average of alxjut 10 
per cent. This is a very serious matter when the extent of 
the territory to be protected is taken into consideration. 
The ix)Iice jurisdiction of the city, exclusive of the harlx)r, 
comprises thirt3--seven square miles of territory, 40(> miles 
of public and 100 miles of private streets, with a population 
of alKiut 400,000. The patrol duty is performed by 6S8 
men, being about eighteen p.atrolmen to each square mile of 
territory, nearly three-quarters of a mile of streets to each 
patrolman, and one patrolman to about .i81 people. Every 
patn>lm!ui absent from duty leaves a route which must be 
coveretl by the officers on the adjoining routes, thercbv add- 
ing to the work of those officers, and by increasing the 
area to i»e covered (already in many instances too large) 
diminishing the effectiveness of tiie men. 

To meet this it is recommended that provision be made 
for the addition to the force of a class of men qualitied to 
take the places of regular officers who may l)e absent from 
duty, who shall be paid only while doing duty, and who 
shall I>c entitled to preference in appointments on the reirular 
force. This service might take the place of the six months' 
probationary period for which officers are now appointed 
under the civil service rules. If this were done, the depart- 
ment could be kept at all times up to its full strength, and 
the experience that these " substitutes" wouhl aajuTre dur- 
ing their apprenticeship would be of inestimable benetit to 
themselves and the public when they are appointed on the 
permanent force. To carry this suggestion into effect would 
require additional legislation. 



6 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

During the yc:u- 123 complaints were iiiado against officers, 
which were investigated by the Board. The nature of the 
complaints and the disposition of the cases is shown in 
Table V. 

Horses. 

On the 1st of December, 1885, there were twenty-two 
horses in the service of the department. During the year 
seven l)ec:une incajjacitated for service on account of age or 
defects of various kiiids, and they were sold and replaced by 
others. 

Early in the summer, complaints were frequently made by 
residents in the ninth, eleventh and thirteenth divisions, of 
depredations licing committed in their fruit orchards and 
flower gardens by roving lioys and young men ; and as a 
means of furnishing additional i)olice protection to the peo- 
]i!e of those parts of the city four horses were hired on the 
15th of August, and continued in service until the 30th of 
October, at an expense of $316, and with highly satisfactory 
results. This was considered more economical than to h'lv'e 
purchased horses which would not have been needed during 
the winter and would have had to bo sold at a sacrifice, or 
wintered at considerable expense. 

Nine new horses have been pui'chased during the year, and 
at the present time there are twenty-four in use of the de- 
partment, as shown by Table VI. 

Work of the Department. 
Arrests, 
The total number of persons arrested was 28,510, against 
28,795 the preceding year, being a decrease of 285. There 
was a decrease in all classes of offences, except those against 
the license laws. The percentage of increase and decrease 
was as follows : — 

FerCenC 

Offences against the person, Decrease 2| 

12 
17} 

IJ 
Increase 85^ 



Offences against property, committed with violence, 
Offences against property, committed without violence 
Malicious offences against property, 
Forgery and offences against the currency, . 
Offences not included in the foregoing, . 
Offences against the license laws, .... 
(See Tables VII. and VIII.) 



BOARD OF POLICE. 7 

Five tliousiUid six hundred and cijrhl jttrrfona were ar- 
rested on warniiits, and 22,902 without ararrantH ; 25,170 
persons wei-o held for trial, and 3,340 werecli«:hargcd on ex- 
amination. The number of males arrest-trj was 23,430; t»f 
females, 5,080 ; of foreigners, 13,930, «r, af»proximatoly. 
■iS{g per ecnt. ; minors, 3,983. Of Hkt UAal number of 
persons arrested, 8,468, or 29^, per eeoL, were non- 
residents. 

The number of lodgers accommo<lale>4 at the station- 
houses was 2,222. Xo record is kept of tbttte who apply 
for lodgings and are directed to the WarfirtT's Lodge. 

There was a decrease in the percentage Af arrests Ibr seri- 
ous od'oncos lu compared with 1885. Ainr«:*i« for murder 
decreased 43 per cent. ; manslaughter, uy int-r cent. ; rob- 
bery, 24 per cent.; forgery, 20 perceut.; ♦inipie larceny, 
.S per cent. ; felonious larceny, 36 per cent. ; .simple assaulta, 
3 per cent. ; felonious assaults, 7 per cenl. Arrxjsts for as- 
saidts on otticcrs decreased 72 per ccnL T^ most serious 
case of this kind occurred on Sunday, A]ail IS, 1886, when 
Patrolman J. li. Sullivan, of Division 6, w»* assaulted by 
two men, one of whom was armed with u licUcfact. OfScer 
Sullivan was finally compelled to shoot ont of his ajssailants, 
and was himself shot through the hand ly the other. The 
assailant who was shot died soon after In* removal to the 
hospital; the other w.as arrested and s«Bitt:nced to eit^ht 
years in the State Prison. Officer SuIIkao was not only 
exonerated by the justice who investigalefl ibc affair, but 
was also complimented for the forbcarsnce *bowa by him 
under the circumstances. 

The arrests for minor offences decreaawL Idle and dis- 
orderly persons decreased 8 per cent. ; nijfiilwalking, 8 per 
cent. ; vagnmcy, 38 per cent. ; stublnirn ciildren, 13 jier 
cent. 

Arrests for drunkenness decreased three-tenths of one i>er 
cent., and for common drunkards, 48 per u«t. ; this subject 
is referred to in another part of this report. 

Arrests for breaking and entering inc3ira»*f| 4i per cent. 
Arrests for gambling incre:ised 57^ i)cr oert, ; Ikji' there was 
a<lecroaso of 5U per cent, in arrests for sEwnbUng on the 
Lord's day. The department made 285 mifh oa ffamblincr 



8 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

lioiises, ancstcd 131 persons and seized property to the 
iimount of $12,271.55. Prosecutions for keeping gambling 
houses increased 200 per cent., and for maintaining lotteries, 
158 per cent. 

There was an increase of 9 per cent, in the number of in- 
sane persons taken in charge, and of 131 per cent, in the 
number of neglected children. 

Arrests for ofl'enccs against chastity incrciised 17 per cent., 
for violation of the liquor law, 50 per cent., and for viola- 
tion of the Sunday law, 235 per cent. 

Beginninsr with 1880 the number of arrests increased an- 
nually until 1885, c.\cc[>ting in 1883. In 1881 there were 
3,670 more arrests than in 1880 ; in 1882, 2,256 more than 
in 1881 ; in 1883, 100 less than in 1882 ; in 1884, 523 more 
than in 1883; in 1885, 2,208 less than in 1884; in 188(;, 
412 less than in 1885. During this period the population 
steadily increased, but the percentage of arrests continually 
decreased. The average population was 380,000 ; average 
number of arrests, 2i),000 ; number of arrests in the past 
year, 28,510, or 550 below the average. 

The statistics of arrests are not, however, a reliable stan- 
dard by which the companitive increase or decrease of crime, 
or the efficiency of a police force may be measured. They 
can only be taken for what they are worth, as a means of 
forming an opinion on the subject. Perhaps a better test by 
which to judge the efficiency of a force is given by compar- 
ing the amount of stolen property reported, one year with 
another; for this indicates to some extent the success of the 
police in preventing crime. Applying this to our statistics 
it will be seen that the average amount of stolen property 
rejwrted since 1880 was $103,052.83. In 1886 it was 
$77,956.39, or $25,090.44 less than the average. 

In the same period the average amount of property stolen 
in and out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston 
police, was $120,223.62. The amount recovered in 1886 
was $122,260.20, or $2,036.58 more than the aver.age. 

The average amount of fines imposed l)y. the courts was 
$69,151.24; in 1886 the amount was $109,969.31, or 
$40,818.07 more than the average. The average miraber of 
days' attendance in court was 20,178; in 1886 there were 



( 



BOARD OF POLICE. 9 

2l,'A:i'.*, or 4,771 nu>re than tho average. The avenigc 
amount of witncj^s fees earned was $1U,881.91 ; in 1886 the 
amount was $22,9 ')2. 13. or 13,070.21 more than the aver- 
a<rc. Table IX. gives these fignres in detail. 

The incrcnso in the namber of complaints for viobtion of 
the Sunday law is attributable to tho recent decision of the 
Supreme Judicial Court in the case of Commonwealth v. 
Dcxtra. It had been a custom of many years* standing to 
allow ctrtain kinds of business to be transacted on the Lord's 
day, on the gnjund that they were works of necessity and 
charity. Thus barbers and apothecaries were allowed to 
keep ofien. and some dealers in articles of food were per- 
mitted to open for a short time in the forenoon. Again, 
l>erson* who conscientioasly f»elievcd that the seventh day 
was tfj* Sal»I)ath, and refrainwl from lal)or on that day, were 
supf)ow!j to I>e exempted t"tom the reciuirements of the law. 
Ill the decision referreil to the court construed the statute to 
mean that tlie law prohibits the keeping oj^en a shop, ware- 
house or workshop for the pijr]>ose of doing business therein 
on tlie I»rd's day, and tltit the exception of works of neces- 
sity awl cliarily did not refer to keeping sho|>s open, but 
that it Tas limited to work an<l labor. Thus two s<'[jarate 
and dL»»inct otronecs were <lefined : 1 , keeping 0[)en i^hoi>s, 
and 2, doini; any work or l;if»fjr, except works of necessity 
and cburity. 

The conditii>us have change«l so since the law was origi- 
nally eacacted that its strict enforcement will entail much in- 
convenience and, iu many ci-res, gieat hardship to the public. 
For a lunimfn-r of years it his Iteen a custom for the jioorer 
classes, who have not the tacilitics for keeping food fredi, to 
purcha** their Sunday's dinner on Saturday evening, have it 
kept in the ilealor's lefrigerator over night and delivered Sun- 
day morning. The dental of this privilege, esi)eciall3- in the 
summer s^^ason, is a serious inconvenience, more particularly 
when it comes to the delivery of fresh milk for infants' use. 
To prereut the s;ilc of medicines is liable to do great barm, 
especially in c-ase of sudden illness. If the law should l»e oon- 
strue<J lo prohibit the running of public conveyanc-es, the 
conseqaeoces in a city of the *ize and topography of Boston 
would f* verj- inconvenient, to say the le:ist. Such means 



10 



SECOND ANNUAL KEPORT. 



of transit have Ijocoino ii necessity of modern times, a neces- 
sity which did not exist and could not be foreseen when the 
law was framed, and to now deprive the public of their use 
would be imposing a hardship. 

The expressions of opinion through the public press and 
otherwise, since the shops were closed on Sunday, shows 
that while there is no disposition on the part of the general 
public to break down the observance of Sunday as a day of 
religious worship, rest aud recreation, there is a desire that 
the law should bo amended so as to conform to the present 
condition of society and the requirements of an urban popu- 
lation. 

NalivUy (if Prisoners. 



United States, . 


. 14.626 


Denmark, . 


15 


Hritisli Provinces, 


. 2,133 


AVales, 


44 


Ireland, 


8,674 


Belgiuu), . 


7 


Kngland, . 


. 1,29'J 


Russia, 


117 


France, 


87 


South America, . 


14 


Germany, . 


440 


Holland, . 


16 


Italy, .... 


209 


China, 


67 


Portugal, . 


34 


East and West Indies, 


28 


Sweden, . 


185 


Japan, 


1 


Scotland, . 


. . 395 


AustniHa, . 


5 


Spain, 


19 


Austria, . 


12 


Norway, . 


65 








Switzerland, 


11 


Total 


28,510 


Africa, 


8 







Inspectors' Department. 
The sUitistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the figures showing the general work of the de- 
partment, but, as the duties are of a special nature and the 
work compares most favorably with that of other years, the 
following statement will be of interest : — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . . . 412 
Fugitives from justice from other States arrested and delivered to 

oflBcers from those States, 15 

Fugitives from justice arrested in other States and brought back 

to Boston for trial, 21 

Number of cases investigated 1,877 

Number of days spent in court by oflicers, . . . . . 1,257 

Amount of fees earned by officers, $1,244 84 

Amount of stolen property recovered, 55,416 2ii 

Amount of fines imposed by conrt 3,842 13 

Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, . . -221:^ 



BOAliD OF POLICE. 11 

Medical Examiners' Assistant. 
Tlic officer detailed to assist the medical examiners of 
Suflolk County invetitig-ated 230 cases, attended 113 in- 
quests, summoned 400 witnesses. There were 193 cases 
investigated in and 37 out of the city. 

Inspector of Claims. 
The Inspector of Claims investigated and reported upon 
201 cases. 

Harbor iService. 

During the year a cliange was made in the lines of the 
eighth division, by which the hmd and wharf portion of the 
division w:is transferred to Division 1, and the eighth divi-^ 
sion confined to the lmrf)or and the islands therein. This 
covers an area of land and water of al)()ut 37,300 acres, or 
fifty-eight square miles. The recommendation contained in 
the last report, that the captain of this division should 
receive his appointment as harbo r master from the Board of 
Police, is renewed. The special duties performed l)y the 
officers of this division were as follows : — 

Value of property, consisting of float-stages, boats, rigging, etc-., 

recovered $-',412 7.5 

Number of vessels hoanlcil, frum foreign i)orts, .... 928 
Number of vessels onkred from the cliauuel to tlio jjroper 

anchorage, 2,147 

Number of vessels morcd from channel with steamer, ... 10 

Alarms of fire attended on water front, 85 

Fires extinguished on board vessels (no alarm), .... 13 

Boats challenged 1,552 

Sick .and injured persons assisted 64 

Cases investigated, 938 

Dead bodies recovered, 26 

Rescued from drowning, 34 

Vessels reported to Booird of Health 23 

Vessels ordered to coek-bill yards, ....... 97 

Vessels ordered to qnarantine, 1 

The following arrivals were reported : — 

Number of arrivals from foreign ports during llic year: — 

Steamers, 352 

Ships 24 

Barks . . 222 



12 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Brigs, 166 

Schooners 147 

Number of Krrivals from ilomestic ports, vessels of all kinds, . 8,044 

From the British Provinces, 1,4.')0 

Total, foreign and domestic ports, 10,405 

Licenses. 
The total number of licenses of all kinds, except for the 
s;ile of intoxicating liquor, issued was 15,741 ; transferred, 
42; cancelled, 943. The officers investigated 1,415 com- 
plaints arising under these licenses. The fees collected and 
jwid into the city treasury amounted to $29,431. (See 
Table X. ) The department reported to the Board of Health 
on 291 applications for fruit, fish and vegetable pedlers' and 
grease collectors' permits. 

Ambulance Service. 
There are three ambulances in use in the department, stji- 
tioned in Divisions 1, 4 and 7. Ambulance No. 1, Division 
1, made 314 runs, and conveyed 182 persons to the hospital, 
21 home and 111 to other places. Ambulance No. 2, Divi- 
sion 4, made 392 runs, and conveyed 283 iMjrsons to the 
hospital, 31 home and 78 to other places. Ambulance No. 
3, Division 7, made 62 runs, and conveyed 35 persons to 
the hospital, 11 home and 16 to other places. 

Miscellaneous Ilusiness. 

Accidents reported, I,5'i7 

Buildings found open, 2,417 

Cases investigated 9,811 

Dangerous buildings reported, 26 

Dangerous cliimneys reported, 28 

Dead l>odies cared for, 144 

Defective cesspools reported, 161 

Defective drains reported, 71 

Defective gas pipes rejwrted, 18 

Defective h3-drants reported, . 60 

Defective lamps reported 3,258 

Defective sewers reported, 2 

Defective streets and walks reported, 11,395 

Defective water pipes reported, 69 

Disturbances suppressed 4,207 

Kxtra duties performed 18,302 

Fire alarms given, 467 






BOARD OF POLICE. 13 

Fires extinguished, . . ' 442 

Intoxicated persona a.«sisted, 414 

f-ost children found 1,587 

Persons rescued from drowning, 36 

Sick persons assistol 1,339 

Stray teams found, 324 

Street obstructions reniovcd, 52,556 

Water running to waste reported, 268 

Value of property taken from ])risoners and lodgers, . . $40,002 75 
Value of proi>erty rejKirted stolen in the city, . . 77,956 39 

Value of property recovered, 122,260 20 

Amount of fines imposed by courts, 109,969 31 

Totil years of impiisonment, 1,567J 

Total days of attendance in court by ollicers, .... 24,959 
Total amount of witness fees earned, $22,952 12 

Soxip for iJie Poor. 
By request of tho city council the depaitment undertook 
the prepat-ation .nnd issuance of soup to the poor of the city. 
The time of distribution w.as from January 19 to April 1,3, 
inclusive, a period of eighty-five days. 

Gallons made, 13,728 

Families supplied, 15,487 

Meals fumislieil, 74,718 

Total appropri.ition $2,500 00 

Amonot expended, . . • 2,297 62 

Balance unexpended, $202 48 

Average cost per gallon, 16.7 cents. 

Average cost per meal 3 cents. 

Special Servicer. 

Last February a portion of Roxbur}- was inundated by an 
overflow of Stony Brook. The force w.as the recipient of a 
complimentary letter from His Honor the Mayor recogniz- 
ing its services on that occasion. 

The Independent Order of Odd Fellows had a laro'e 
parade on September 22 last, when 2G2 men were detailed 
to protect the route of the procession. A letter was re- 
ceived from the committee of arrangements thankino- the 
officers for their services. 

The President of the United States visited the city No- 



I 
I 

i 
U SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

vembtr 8 last. A detail of 461 men was made for street 
duty. His Excellency the Governor and His Honor the 
Ma^-or were l)oth pleased to express their appreciation of 
the excellent manner in which the force performed its duty > 

on that occasion. 

Sale of Intoxicating Liquor. 

The total number of places licensed for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquor in the license year 1886 was 2,094 ; licenses 
cincelled, 8 ; licenses surrendered, .5 ; licenses forfeited, 21 ; 
licenses voided by conviction in court, 1. (See Table XI.) 
Total number Nov. 30, 2,059, or one to every 194 of the 
population. Of these, 1,363 were licensed to sell to be 
drank on the premises, or one to every 293 of the population. 



Number of complaints for violations of conditions of licenses j 

made to Board of Police, 267 ' 

Number of hearings given, 2C7 * 

Number of licenses forfeited, 108 ( 

Number of complaints for violation of conditions of licenses ] 

made in court, 124 } 

Arrests for selling without a license, 398 ^ 

Seizures made, 715 j 

Amount of liquors seized (gallons) 4,125 ] 

Number of applications for licenses rejected, .... 1,068 j 

i 
The following shows the nature of the complaints upon ! 

which licenses were forfeited by the Board of Police from 

Dec. 1, 1885, to Nov. 30, 1886: — 

Violation of Sunday law, 22 

Violation of screen law, 1 

Opening unlicensed doors, 19 

SeTling to minors, 10 

Selling to be carried off premises, not allowed by license, . . 8 

Selling in room not allowed by license, 3 

Selling between hours of 11 o'clock P M. and 6 o'clock A. M., . .5 

Keeping and exposing for sale liquors not allowed by license, . . 39 

Selling to an intoxicated person, . 1 

Amount paid into the city treasury for license fees, . $608,113 00 

The fees for licenses were considerably incre.iscd at the 
beginning of the present license year, and although there 



nOAHD OP K)LICE. 15 

wofi a rediK-tioii in the number of licensed places, the 
reteniie from fees was $103,020 more than in 1885. 

The reduction in the number of licensed phices is attribu- 
tiible to l^everal causes. The increase in the prices of licenses 
WHS one. Again, it was found that there were many places 
which had been doing .in illegal business, such as selling to 
be drank on the premises under a grocer's or wholesale 
dealer's license, and others that were doing business within 
6choolhou.se limits under diflerent subterfuges. There were 
albo many places that were totally unsuitable for the purpose, 
by reason of their location, etc. 

It having been urged that it was in the interest of tem- 
perance to entouriigc the use of malt liquors and thereby de- 
crease the consumption of distilled spirit-s, a new class of 
licenses was introduced, giving the right to sell malt liquor, 
cider and light wines for the sum of $125. yixty-two 
licenses of this class were granted. 

The department has given particular attention to the pre- 
vention of the sale of liquor on the Lord's day, and it is 
gratifying to say that the efforts in this direction have met 
with considerable success and have been endorsed by the 
majority of licensed dealers, as well as the mass of the com- 
munity. What has been accomplished is shown by the fact 
that there has been a decrease of seventeen and seven-eighths 
per cent, in the arrests for drunkenness on Sunday as com- 
pared with the preceding twelve months. The Board, how- 
ever, does not wish to be understood as asserting that Sunday 
selling lias been completely stopped. The trafhc has been 
driren into holes and corners, into back kitchens and rooms 
in tenement houses ; but it is an evil which, like the un- 
licensed sale of liquor, cannot be entirely aljated, unless the 
bu3-er were to be made an offender against the law and 
equally culpable with the seller. 

There was a large increase in the numl>cr of arrests for 
selling liquor without a license. This is a consequence of a 
stricter enforcement of the law and a greater amount of 
energy- on the part of officers. In most of the unlicensed 
pla/.«s tljc sale of a mak liquor commonly known as " Berlin 
Ijer-r." made for the pumose and rontainin"' !e«<« fbnn ^hrr^r> 



16 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

which is cither carried in a bottle in the ijocket of the seller 
or kept in a vessel which can he overturned and its contents 
emptied into a sink upon the entrance of an officer, lousi- 
ness carried on in this way is necessarily limited, but as it 
is entirely uncontrollable, a great deal of mischief is done ; 
and for the good of society, as well as in justice to those 
dealers who pay tor their licenses and endeavor to conform 
to the law, no efforts should be spared to break it up. The 
number of arrests for this offence indicates that the force has 
shown considerable zeal in the work, and, considering the 
difficulties, the officers have succeeded remarkably well. 
But the most effectual measure that could be adopted would 
be to remove the three per cent, limit, and to i)ermit the 
seizure of the vessels and implements of sale found on un- 
licensed premises. 

The arrests for drunkenness averaged forty-four per day 
during the year, or four and one-half per cent, of the popu- 
lation. There was a decrease of three-tenths of one per 
cent, in the arrests for drunkenness during the year-as com- 
pared with 1885, while the estimated increase in population 
was al)out two and one-half per cent. As compared with 
1880 there was an increase often per cent, in population and 
an increase of 1.044 per cent, in drunkenness;. The arrests 
for drunkenness since 1880 have averaged 17,121 per annum, 
so that in 1886 there were 942 arrests less than the average. 
In 1874, the last year under the probibilorv' law, with a 
population of 337,000, there were 3,0!>0 places where liquor 
was sold, and 19,324 dnmken persons came under the notice 
of the police. In 1886, with a population of 400,000, there 
were 2,0.59 licensed places (including druggists and whole- 
sale places), and 16,179 drunken persons were arrested. 

BtriLDINGS. 

The station-houses, with the exception of that in Division 

1, are generally in good condition. The houses in Division 

2, 4 and .5 will have to be enlarged in the near future, to ac- 
commodate the increased business in those divisions. 

At the beginning of the present liiuincial year a requisition 
was made on the city council for a new station-house in 
Division 1 , but no appropriation was made for the purpose. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 17 

Later in the year the Board of Police sent a commmiication 
to the city couucil, suggesting that the present station-house 
and the hou<o in Division 8, wbicli owing to a recent cliange 
in the lines of that division is no longer needed by tlic de- 
partment, should be disposed of and the proceeds appropri- 
ated to the enx-liun of a new station-house for Division 1 , and 
;i small buiUUng on the water front for Division 8. It was 
believed that the cs.tates would sell for enough to pay for the 
new buildings and leave a Iwlanee to the city trcaaur\'. 
This comtnunication is now before a committee of the city 
council. It is sincerely hoped that a new station-houtc will 
soon l>e provide*! in Division 1, for the present building is a 
disgrace to the city. 

Work on the new Back Bay Station-house was su^jicnded, 
the appropriation having been exhausted. The building is 
ready for plastering, and it b the intention of the city archi- 
tect to resume work as soon as funds are furnished. 

A stable was built in Division 14, and dlled a long felt 
want. It is desirable that stables should be built in Divi- 
sions 11 and 13, where the horses are now kept at liverj* 
stables. 

Steam-heating apparatus was put in Station-house 3, 
which was formerly iosufficiently heated by furnaces and 
stoves. 

The ordinary reiwir^ on station-houses have been made b3' 
the public building department. For a number of years 
such repairs wor« made by meml>ers of the force detailed for 
the paqxjse, the stock being purchased from the appropria- 
tion. It was the opinion of the Board tluit members of the 
force could be better employed in doing their regular duty, 
instead of mechanical work; that l^ing a number of men 
from ^reet duty increased the la.bar of other members of the 
force beyond what it should l>e ; and that it was not good 
policy to deprive our mechanics of lie work which properly 
belonged to them. For these reascms the Superintendent of 
Public Buildings was notified that the practice would fx; dis- 
continned, and that he would be expected to make all repairs 
and alterations which might be needed. 



18 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Financial. 

The total cxpcndituro for police purposes duing the year, 
including liquor license expenses, was $1,003,450.15. From 
this should bo deducted the amount received for uniform 
cloth, etc., and paid into the treasury, $8,831.89, leaving 
the net cost of maintaining the department, $994,624.26. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees 
for licenses over ^vhich the police had supervision was 
$610,187.29. (SeoTul.lcXII.) 

At the beginning of the present financial year the Board 
of Police, in conformity with section 4 of chapter 323, Acts 
of 1885, made requisition on tiie city council for the sum of 
$1,020,761.37. This amount included $25,000 for a police 
signal system. His Honor the Mayor approved the requisi- 
tion, with the exception of the item for the signal system. 
The city council reduced tiie amount to $980,000, and made 
no provision for the extra sum tiiat will be needed in conse- 
quence of the adoption of the weekly p.ayment system. As 
the principal items of expense are in the nature of fi.xed 
diargcs, no opportunity is left for a sufScicnt reduction to 
n)cet the reducc<l appropriation ; therefore, there will prolj- 
ably be a deficit at the end of the year. 

Pensions and Benefits. 

On the 1st of December, 1885, there were seventy-nine 
pensioners on the roll. During the year eight died and five 
were added, viz., one captain and four patrolmen, leaving 
scvcntj'-six on the roll at date. A list of pensioners will be 
found in Table XHI. 

The pensions now amount to $29,516.95 per annum. The 
Board of Police renews the recommendation, contained in 
the last report, that the amount received for licenses of 
which the police have supervision (not including liquoi 
licenses) be applied to the creation of a fund for the pa}'- 
mcnt of pensions. The law relating to pensions does pot 
authorize the retirement of an ofiicer of hisrher rank than 
captain. There is no good reason why an officer who has 



BOARD OF POLICE. 19 

att.iinctl Iho rank of superintendent or deputy superintend- 
ent slmuld not, when incapncitated from further service, l>e 
retired as of that rank. It would be hut siniplo justice to 
the ollicer who has, by long years of faithful service in the 
depMrtment, worked his way up to the highest rank. 

The Tulico Charitable Fund is maintained hy witness fees 
eanieil hy officers. The income is appiie<l to tlie relief of 
persons who have received an honorable disclini-go from the 
police foive l)y reason of sickness, ago or other inal)ilit3', 
and wlio aix*, in consequence thereof, in necessitous circum- 
stances ; ami also to the relief of the widows and orphans, 
in necessitous circumstances, of officers who died while in the 
senice. On May 1, 1886, the invested fund amounted to 
$154,;>.')0; cash in treasury, $G03.11 ; income unexpended, 
$3,5S9.88. There were forty-tive beneficiaries receiving 
yearly $8,280. The trustees consist of the ^layor, City 
Treasurer and City Auditor. 

The rolico Relief Association is a voluntary organization 
of the mou>l)crs of the force, for the purpose of aiding sick 
meml)crs and paying a death l)enefit to the family of n 
deceased member. Its fund is sapported l)y an annual as- 
sessment of |4 on each member and by the proceeds of the 
annual police ball, together with snch donations as may be 
received fmm the public. Each member is entitled to $7 
per week when sick. On the death of n member his family 
receives $1,000, and on the death of a member's wife he 
receives $100. The invested fund now amounts to $18,00<1. 
The payments for the v-ear amounted to $20,000. The asso- 
ciation is managed b^' a board of directors, chosen by the 
association at its annual meeting. The by-laws arc subject 
to the approval of the Board of Police. 



Police Signal Ststesi. 

In the last report the Board of Police called attention to 
the advantages of the police signal system as applied to the 
work of the department. In the requisition for an appropri- 
ation for the present financial year, the Board included a 
sum for the introduction of the system, but the mayor and 



20 SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT. 

city council did not grant the request. Early in the year 
the ^lunicipal Signal Company of Boston called the atten- 
tion of the Board to their new and as yet untried system, 
and ofl'cred to put it into a division on trial for a period of 
six months, subject to acceptance or rejection. I'liis offer 
was accepted, and the system was introduced into Division 
6, comprising part of South Boston, where it has been in 
operation since Juno 7. Beginning on that date the wagon 
has made 1,029 runs, covering an aggregate distance of 
811j^g miles. Nino hundred and eighty-one prisoners were 
conveyed to the station-house, sixty-five injured, feeble- 
minded and insane persons were carried to the station-house, 
the hospital or to their homes, and six lost children were 
carried to the station-house. In several instances life was 
saved by the prompt arrival of the wagon and the celerity 
and comfort with which injured persons were conveyed to 
the iiospital. A detailed statement of the work performed 
will be found in Tal)Ie XIV. The success which has at- 
tended the introduction of the system in Division G has demon- 
strated beyond cavil its value to the police department. It 
is as necessary to the dcpailment as the fire alarm is to the 
fire department ; and the increased efficiency of the force, 
the greater protection to life and property consequent upon 
its adoption more than compensates for its cost. It is to be 
hoped that the system will be extended over the entire city, 
and it is believed that the successful work in Division 6 has 
created a favorable impression upon many who were inclined 
to look with disfavor upon it. The city council is now con- 
sidering the expediency of providing by loan for the intro- 
duction of the system, and if the measure is favorably acted 
upon, the Board will take steps to place it in every division 
as quickly as possible.* 

Emergency Lectures. 
During the year the Massachusetts Emergency and Hy- 
giene Association gave fifty lectures to members of the force, 
which were largely attended. The knowledge acquired at 
these lectures has tended to extend the usefulness of the 

• Since the above was written the city eonncll authorized a loan of JIOO.OOO for 
the purpose, but the measure wai yetoed by the mayor. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 21 

forte, as tnis shown bv several cues in which a practical 
appEcaUon of the lessons tanjliit preserved life or aniclio- 
raltil sulforing. 

On the -i>;h of Octolwr last, 1±3 men were calloil lo liead- 
qoarters to roccivc the diplotm» of examination and certifi- 
cates of moril awardetl to them hnr the society. 

The following ofHcers receirtil certificates : — 

Di-rlaon 2, 1 ie-iit. Thomas Weir, for ikHfal application of splints and 

bandages. 
2, rskiTol. G. G. Stnait, for ei«»r.iin^ Eieraorrhage sereni times. 
•1, IJ«^5. J, II Laml*rt, rt-i<ei£.T>l ♦erriccs in cases of injurv. 
C, IVtrv'l, Tiru Envrri;;bt, ^ «»£ifTlai«j/ncalion ofs|>lint>and ban- 
C, r.A:Tv>l. C. L. Skelton, / .Si^ea lo fracture of tliigh Ix-no. 
f», ijiMut. r.. \V. Swan, chttrfch-:^ bftnoiThagc. 
'J, StTgt. C. W. Hunt, appli<^jc.'n'E of fence pickets to frarturcd leg. 
9, ratTv>l. Lawrence Kane, kkilial application of splints to com- 

pi»und fracture. 
9, r,tt3\>l. S. D. Gardiner, ipiatut appCed to com(>ound fracture 

«>f leg. 
9, Pativd. W. S. Devht, 'kilfoT apptication of splints made from 

ffocc pickets to fracti3r»i8 ihi^h Ixine. 
9, Patrv*!. P. G. Gre«n, skZtxi application of band.igws and of 

splints made from ffoe* ^ga^keti to fractured thigJi tK>ne. 
10, Str^t. J. J. Currr, making oytD&^rlable for tninsp'.»nition to 

Sx.i#pit;il of woman witi IWoIwrn thigli. 

10, Patrvl. E. II. Burrill, »knii£ .vppticsiion of splints to broken 

amklc. 

11, Ser^. E. F. IlallahaD, ^ »^^<3ca£«OB of splints to compound 
11, I*ati\>L W. F. PeTTT, / irMiare. 

1 1 , IMivl. \V. J. Sweener, pruugx aid, case of attempted cuicide. 

IJ. I"a»jv«l. F. S. Anbens. -Vi - - . 

, „ , , ,. , . , I restoring to consciousness wo- 

l-MVitroI. Ed ward Herald, Jr,* i i ■ 

. , n . r. I T> I "o*"" apparently drowned. 

12, P4ti\>l. P. J. Porter, } rr j 

l:J, IVitivd. Matthew Qnigley, eSMf:kiag hemorrhage. 

13, I"atr<>l. \V. B. Lailer, «*T-jrg life by skilful application cf 

toamiquet. 

14, Patrol. A. X. Bates, skilfMly Kaodaging broken leg. 
i:>, S^rst. P. D. Warren, \ 

l.i. l-atkd. Jeremiah aBrica,>'=^^'*^°S hemonhago. 



COXCIXSKW- 

T* conclude, the Board of F«Aice desires to express its 
plcsLHire with the good work ptnfr/nned by the force during 
the year. The men did their daty intelligently and cfii- 



22 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

ciently, and, it is believed, to the satisfaction of the citizens 
of Boston. The diminution in crime is due in a great 
measure to their vigilance in preventing offences and prompt- 
ness in detecting otl'enders. It h also proper that the Board 
should acknowledge the courteous relations which Iiavo ex- 
isted between it and the several departments of the city 
governmcut. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. WHITING, 
WILLIAM H. LEE, 
W. M. OSBORNE, 

Board of Pulice. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 



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24 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



TAni.F, II. 

Officers appointed by the Board of Police during the Ytar endimj 
Nov. 30, 1SS6. 



NAME. 


Date 

of 

Appointment. 


i 
< 


Birthplace. 


Previous Occupation. 


Allen, I.CWU L., . 


Mar. 29, 1S86, 


27 


Llmlngto. . Me., . 


Brakeman. 


Austin, William M., . 


• 


28 


Windham, Me., . 


Driver. •- 


Btrry, Walter M., 


Juno 14, " 


ti 


So. Boston, Mass., 


Driver. - 


Brown, James E., 


Oct. 25, ■• 


24 


II II 


Teamster. - 


Brazer, Charles R., . 


.. 


20 


Jamaica Plain, Mass., 


Clerk. ' 


Cr*ne, George B., Jr., 


Dec. 14,15-95, 


25 


Boston, Mass., . 


Longflhoreman. 


Oonboy, Jnraos D., 


" 


SO 


Iri-land, 


R. R. police officer. 


Cunningham, James F , 


Mar. 29,1S36, 


22 


Boston, Mass., . 


Tinsmith. 


Oounor, John W., 


*i II 


27 


Newton, Mass., . 


Brass finisher. 


Dunn, Edward J., 


June 14, " 


25 


Bcltuate, Mass., . 


Klght wftichroan. 


I>nnn, William H., 


Oct. 25, •• 


24 


So. Boston, Mass., 


Teomster. - 


KWri.iiie, i'elcr C, 


Mar. 29, " 


25 


Boston, Mass., , 


Shipping ngent. 


Frnich, Frank W., 


Jan. 4, •* 


23 


Woodstock, Vt., 


Clerk. -' 


Griffin, John J., . 


Apr. 6, " 


2:1 


Charlestown, Mass., . 


Teamster." 


Golden, MUhael J., . 


Oct. 25, " 


24 


Bocton, Mass., . 


Clerk. - 


H^niman, Joseph, 


Mar. 29, '■ 


25 


Wlscossctt, Me., 


Clc^k.- 


n>ye«, Pttir A, . 


Juno 14, " 


24 


Charlestown, Mass., . 


Blncksmith, 


Jcnkiof, Ilcnry R., 


Dec. 14, 1&85, 


29 


Boston, Mass., . 


Porter. 


Johnson, Juhn P., 


June 14, 188C, 


27 


11 II ^ , 


Lead ginzlcr. 


Keiran, James B., 


Dec. 14, 1885, 


24 


" . . 


Upholsterer. 


Kenney, William II., . 


Jan. 4, 1886, 


26 


Charlestown, Mou., . 


Sheriff's keeper. 


Ltary, Richard U., 


Mar. 29, " 


23 


rhllftdcJi.hla, Pa^ 


Teamster. - 


LoTell, Albert F., 


Apr. S, " 


29 


Weymouth, Mosi^ . 


Conductor. 


Leary, J' rc-miah J., . 


June 14, *• 


24 


E IJoetoD, Mass., 


Boiler maker. 


Lynch, Diiniel J., . 


Mar. 29, " 


25 


HoHlon, Mfiss., . 


Teamster. - 


Murphy, William H., . 


Jnne 14, " 


27 


Chnrlestown^ Mass., . 


Bookbinder. 


Morrijey, Michael J., . 


11 


24 


M . 


Plumber. 


lloore, William F., . 


Oct. 25, " 


27 


Boston, Mass., . 


Expressman. 


Kash, Henry M., . 


Dec. 14, 1885, 


23 


Bhcrburne, Mam., 


Clerks 


Newton, Edwin A., . 


Apr. 5, 1886, 


90 


Uedford. Maai.. . 


Driver. ' 


O'Day, Richard J., . 


Mar. 29, " 


23 


Boiton, Masa., . 


Lithoaraph etone pol- 
ish, r. 
Driver. .- 


Oberton, George W., . 


Oct. 25, " 


23 


Cnmden, Me., 


Packard, Herman A., . 


Mar. 29, " 


26 


UffldfieW, Me., . . 


Shipping clerk. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 



25 



OJicers appointed, etc. — Conclmled. 



XAUE. 



P.U 

of M 

AppolulmeBI. ^ 



Blrlhpluf. 



Previous Occupation. 



Prince, UwU W., 
Rellly, John J-, . 
KAiDfey, Fnuik, . 
Salllvao, Jvncm P., 
Sbarkey, John J.. 
Walkifw, Jwn** J., 
Wilwenh, Chirin J., 
Znhn, Frederick D , 



Jane 14, 


18M. 


M 


Jia. 4, 


M 


25 


Apr. S, 


" 


23 


JuD« 14, 


•• 


iS 


Ort. 2i, 


" 


S 


Uu. », 


" 


24 


" 


M 


26 


Dee. U. 


" 


M 



Boaton. UaBs.^ . 

Chorlcfltown, Uom , 
CincinnaU, O., . 
Medford, Mags., . 
Boston, Mass., . 



Drlvcr.- 
Cablnet m&ker. 
Piilnlcr. 

BaggAge master. 
CK-rk. 
Talntcr. 
Tfftm*'tcr*- 
IVovUlon dealer. 



Averse spe, 



25i ye&n. 



Table III. 

Officers D'^hargeiU Resigned, Retired and Deceased during the 
Year ending JVbv. 30^ 1SS6, 



XAUE. 


DUcbar^ed. 


Rcalgned. 


Retired. 


Deceased. 


LeoKtb 
8erTle«. 


Alley, Dank-i B., . 


Mar. 4.'8«. 


. 


- 


- 


10 yra. 


Brown, Samorl E , 


- 


- 


June 24, "Se, 


- 


23 " 


Bradley, n.llip J., 


- 


May 8. -SB, 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Borleigh, Xaroy O., 


- 


Jan. K, 'S*. 


- 


- 


13 jrm. 


Barrili, Lenmel B., 


- 


Dec 31, "85, 


- 


- 


11 " 


Barker, Chartn, . 


Jan. 22. -S*. 


- 


- 


- 


4 " 


Clark, Charle*. . . 


- 


- 


Dec. 10, v., 


- 


1« " 


Driscoll, John il, . 


Feb. 1,-ht. 


- 


- 


- 


5 •• 


Dunn. Dar.ford D., 


- 


- 


- 


July 6, -SG. 


3 •• 


Dearborn, S»niael S^ . 


- 


- 


Aug. 5, '56, 


- 


li " 


Finn, John U^ 


- 


- 


- 


May 10, •S'i, 


11 " 


Ford, Horac* JT., . 


Ort. 12,'9«. 


- 


- 




23 - 


Femald, Jaise* Q., 


May S.-K, 


- 


- 




3 •• 


Gordon, EJvard W., . 


Jnly I,-*!. 


- 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Qonld, Lyman W., 


- 


- 


- 


Xov. 20, '86, 


22 yrs. 


Gurney, Charte* H., . 


Mar. 11, 'M, 


- 


- 


. 


9 " 


Gillla, William, . 


- 


Oct. :, "se. 


- 


- 


3 " 


Gardner, John 11., 


- 


Jan. 7, -Se, 


- 


- 


11 ■• 


Gladbach. JoMph, 


Oct. SS.-Sfw 


- 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Golden. MicliaH J.. 


- 


Oct. 26, "SS, 


- 


- 


Iday. 



26 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



Officers Discharged, etc. — Concluded. 



NAME. 


Discharged. 


Resigned, 


Retired. 


Deceased. 


Length 

of 
Service. 


n«n), Vnillnin A., . 


- 


Bept. 18, '68, 


- 


- 


28 yrs. 


Ilowird, Jnmt'8 11., 


- 


Apr. 5, "M, 


- 


- 


6 " 


Ilaoey, James P. J., • 


- 


- 


- 


July 17, '86, 


9 " 


Uawes, Wllllnra O., 


Mar. 28. -Se, 


. 


- 


- 


9 " 


Henderson, DavlJ, ' . 


Mar. 26, 'SS, 


- 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Ilendereon, Jas. E , Jr., 


- 


Sept. 27, 'Se, 


- 


- 


1 " 


Howard, John J., . 


Feb. 19, -Se, 




- 


- 


3moB. 


Kennedy, S.'imuel, 


Dec. 19, tS, 


- 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Kendall, William J., . 


Jan. 4, '8«, 


- 


- 


- 


1 " 


KoMman, Max, 


- 


- 


- 


Apr. 23, "86, 


8 yrs. 


Kenney, 'Wllllani H., . 


Feb. 19, "Sa, 


- 




- 


2mo«. 


McDoonld, Charles T., . 


- 


- 


Apr. 27, -SS, 


- 


13 yrs. 


Mitchell, Jaraee J., 


- 


- 


- 


Aug. 22, '86, 


5 •' 


Myers, Edward D., 


May 25, "86, 


- 


- 


- 


17 " 


Packard, Herman A., . 


- 


Apr. 27, "M, 


- 


- 


1 mo. 


Roberts, Marlln W., . 


- 


Jan. 18, '88, 


- 


- 


1 yr. 


Bpencer, Chnrlcs A., . 


Feb. 23, -Se, 


- 


- 


- 


3 yrs. 


Twombly, Jatnei W., . 


- 


- 


Not. 6, '66, 


- 


28 " 


Tewteebury, Uichard- 
•OD A 


* 


-■ 


_ 


Jone 3, "86, 


3-i ■■ 



Table IV. 

Number of Days' Absence from Dntr/ hy Reason of Sickness diirijig 
the Tear ending Nov. 30, 1886. 



December, 1885. . . .726 


July, 1886, . 


. 886 


Janu.iry, 1886, 






757 


August, " 


. 493 


February, " 






651 


September, " 


. 426 


March, " 






821 


October, 


. 377 


April, 






729 


November, " 


. 445 


May, 






800 






June, " 






565 


Total, 


7,176 



Number of men on the force, 790. 

Average number sick daily, 20, or 2.53 per cent, of total number. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 



27 



Table V. 
CompIaiHU a<jahisl Officers f,-om Dec. 1, ISSo, to Dec. 1, 1S36. 



Hank. 



SATCKE OF COMrUIST. 



Capt. I Neglect of duty, 

1 
Lieut. Neglect of duty, 

SergL Assault, . 

" Deslrojing property, 

Neglect of duty, 

I'alrol. Intoxication, . 

" Intoxication and neglect of 

duty, . 



Intoxication and assault 
battery. 



Neglect of duty, 
' Non-payment of bills, 
" ": Neglect of duty, 

I Disrespect of superior officers 



and 



1 



Conduct unbecoming an offi 
cer. 



Disobedience and conduct ui>- 
\ becoming an officer, . 

" Leaving route without permis 
• sion. 



I Not properly patrolliag his 
i route, . 



" jj Abosire language, . 



„ t 



« Illegal arrest, . 
I Neglect of duty. 



J 



: Sleeping while on duty, . 

i 

j Non-payment of bills, . 

I 

I Disrespect to superior officer. 

Intoxication, . 



rrirpcAltion of CAse. 



Dismzued from force. 
CompLu'nt dismissed. 



Placed on file. 
Dismiiied from force. 



R*/<riinanded in general 

orrlers. 
Rtirt-imanded in general 

orders. 
Refjrimanded in general 

orders. 

Ecprimanded in general 
ordfcTi. 

Itcprinaanded in general 
orders. 

Reprimanded in general 
orders. 

Repriukinded in general 

ordeia. 
Beifrimanded in general 

orrlers. 
Placed on file. 



23 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



Complaints against Officers, etc. — Concluded. 



^ 


EAnk. 


JJATDRE OF COMI'LAINT. 


D(ipo«ltloD of Case. 


2 


Patrol. 


Assault and battery, 


Placed on file. 


1 


*i 


Abusive language, . 


li (1 


1 


U 


I^;iving city without permis- 
sion, 


U (t 


1 


li 


Intoxication, .... 


Officer resigned. 


1 


" 


Neglect of duty. 


Retired on pension. 


€ 


u 


Neglect of duty, 


Complaint dismissed. 


15 


u 


Alleged assault. 


U (( 


€ 


" 


9 

Alleged assault and battery, . 


« it 


S 


u 


Alleged assault and tyranny, . 


U (t 


I 


» 


Assaulting a prisoner, 


a It 


2 


« 


Cruel treatment of prisoner, . 


U II 


S 


M 


Illegal arrests. 


U 11 


2 


It 


Profane and abusive language. 


U IC 


9 


M 


Conduct unbecoming an offi- 
cer 


U It 


I 


U 


Loitering in saloon and threat- 
ened assault. 


U II 


I 


U 


Bringing false charges against 
complainant, 


U tl 


3 


M 


Xon-payment of bills. 


U M 


1 


U 


Leaving his route, . 


U It 


I 


M 


Receiving stolen goods, . 


U tl 


■a 


•4 


Alleged intoxication, 


U tl 


2 


• • 


Violation of Rule III., . 


U tl 


3 


M 


Assault, 

123 complaints. 


Complaint withdrawn. 



BOARD OF POLICE. 



29 



Table VI. 
Sftotcinr; ynmber and Distribution of Jlorsex used in tie D'jxirtmcnt. 



Dmsios. 



Rtdtac. 



I 



i>£irisc. ToUl, 



Head(]iiftrtcrs, 
1. . 
3. . 
*, . ■ 

6, . 

7. . . 

10. . . 

11. . 

12. . 

13. . 
U. . 

Total, 



U 



1 ' - 

r 
f 

- : 1 

- i _ 
» 

- ! 1 
1 



I 



Table VII. 

Comparative SlafemeTit of O^ejicesfor which ArraU wen made in 

18S3 and 1SS6. 



ye»rl» 

Xov. 30, 

ISSS. 



Tort* 

men. I 



De- 



Offences njainst the person. 

Offences .igainst property committed 
with violence, 

Offences ajrainst property committed 
without violence, .... 

Malicious offences against property, . 

Forgery and offences sgainst the cur- 
rency, 

Offences not included in the forego- 

ia? 

Offences against the license laws. 



Total decrease, 



3,019 

554 

2,681 
17 

70 

22,014 
440 



2^53^ - 

5»| - 

14 

823 \ 5i3 




66 

19 

323 
3 



255 



30 



SECOND ANNUAL RErORT. 



Tabxe VIII. 

Shotchirj Number of Persons Arrested and Nature of Offence, for 
Year ending Nov. 30., 18SG. 



NATURE OF CRIME. 


Mnlei. 


Females. 


ToUL 


Abandoning child, . . 


- 


2 


2 


Adultery, 


27 


19 


46 


Aiding .1 prisoner to escape, 


1 


- 


1 


Arson, 


13 


- 


13 


attempt to commit, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Ai«iuit, simple, . ' 


1,980 


328 


2,3a3 


felonious, 


193 


18 


211 


" indecent, 


11 


- 


11 


" on an ofllcer, 


7 


- 


7 


Assuming to be an officer, .... 


3 


- 


3 


" to be a common victualler, . 


2 


- 


2 


Attempt to pass a forged order, . 


1 


- 


1 


" to pass altered United States note. 


1 


- 


1 


" to obstruct a train, .... 


1 


- 


1 


" to extort money, .... 


6 


- 


6 


Boil bond, 





3 


5 


Bastardy, 


7 


- 


7 


Burglars' tools, having in possession, . 


5 


- 


5 


Burglary, 


7 


- 


7 


" accessory to, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Breaking and entering a building. 


75 


1 


76 


Breaking and entering a building, attempt at. 


13 


- 


13 


Carried forward, 


2,357 


371 


2,728 



BOARD OF POLICE. 

Xumber of Persons Arrested, etc. — Continued. 



31 



XATURE or I MIME. 


M«k<L 


remilci. 


Total. 

1 


Brought forward, 


2,5.37 


371 


2.723 


Bre:\l;in<; and entering a dwelling, suspi- 
cion of, . . . . ■ . 


3 


— 


3 


Bre:iking and entering » .«lioj», suspicion of, 


1 


- 


1 


avosstfl. . 


6 


- 


6 


" "a railxvay car, . 


11 


- 


11 


Capias, 


- 


1 


1 


Carrj ing concealed wcapi^iis 


1« 


- 


13 


City ordinances, violation of the. 


61.5 


11 


626 


Common beggars, 


2 





4 


" brawlers, 


- 


15 


15 




eo 


4G 


106 


Cheating by false pretenccJi, 


3 


~ 


3 


Contempt of court, 


6 


1 


7 


Conspiring to defraud, 


2 


- 


2 


Counterfeit money, attempt to pass, . 


4 


- 


4 


" passing, 


10 





12 


" dies, having in i>assession, 


3 


- 


3 


Counterfeiting, 


1 


- 


1 


Cruelty to dumb animals, .... 


22 


- 


22 


Defrauding an inn-holder 


11 


- 


11 


" a boarding-bou»e ket;per, . 


1 


- 


1 


Default warrant 


58 


28 


S6 


Deserters, 


IS 


- 


13 


Disorderly, 


49-2 


150 


642 


Disturbing the peace, 


145 


45 


190 


Carried forward 


3349 


672 


4,521 



32 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Number of Persona Arrested, etc. — Continued. 



NATURE OF CRIME. 


Males. 


Femnles. 


Total. 


BrotujH forward, 


3,849 


672 


4,521 


Disturbing a public meeting, 


8 


- 


8 


" a school. 




3 


- 


3 


Dog law, violation of the, 




25 


- 


25 


Drunkenness, 




13,304 


2,875 


16,179 


Embezzlement, 




135 


5 


140 


Escaped convicts, . 




6 


1 


7 


Evading p.iyment of faro, 




23 


1 


24 


Exposing obscene print, 




2 


- 


■ 2 


Fast driving. 




16 


- 


16 


Forgery, 




42 


1 


43 


Fornication, . 




96 


100 


196 


Fraud, attempt to obtain money by, . 


1 


- 


1 


obtaining money by. 


44 


3 


47 


" " property by, . 


25 


3 


28 


Fugitive from justice, .... 


17 


- 


17 


Gambling, 


% 


- 


96 


" on the Lord's day. 


17 


- 


17 


" obtaining money by, . 


1 




1 


" leasing a room for. 


1 




1 


" house, keeping a, . . . 


9 


- 


9 


" implements, haringinpossession. 


3 


- 


3 


Giving false alarm of fire, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Having adulterated milk, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Housebreaking, 


93 


- 


93 


Idle and disorderly persons. 


129 


158 


287 


Carried forward, . 


. 


17,947 


3,819 


21,766 



BOARD OF POLICE. 
Xumber nf Persons Arrtsteil, etc. — Continued. 



3;j 



XATLKE or llil.MK. 


Maks. 


Kemale*. 

i 


T.*ll, 


liroutjht forward, .... 


• \ 17,947 


3,819 


21,7CC 


Inik-ccnt oxposnre of person, 


n 


- 


27 


Insane 


' 197 


7o 


272 


Keeping ;i lioa>e of ill-fuiui-, 


21 


C:: 


M 


n noisy anil ili.sonlerly liooi*'. 


! •'' 


'•' 


17 


Kidnapping, 


- 


2 


2 


attempt at, . . . 


1 


- 


I 


(.arccny, attempt to coniniir. 


•j 


- 


>l 


■* nccessory to, . 


1 


- 


I 


suspicion of, . 


n^ 


10 


134 


simple, 


USCl 


2... 


l,Clo 


** felonious, .... 


214 


.".9 


253 


[>•«-(] and lascivious coliabitalion. 


Itj 


17 


.-VJ 


l.eising tenement for house of ill-fame. 


- 


1 


1 


r^eased property, concealing, 


I 


- 


7 


conveying. 


9 


2 


11 


selling. 


,s 


•> 
• 1 


11 


Li/jnor law, violation of tlic, 


447 


107 


;-..-i4 


fxmery, maintaining a 


SI 


_ 


31 


tickels, selling, 


.5 


- 


3 


Lobster law, violation of llie, 


11 


- 


11 


SLiliciuus mischief, .... 


2.>) 


:tl 


2S6 


trespass, .... 


24 


1 


25 


ll.inslaughter, 


4 


- 


-4 


" suspicion ol', . 


1 1 


- 


I 


.^f:ly)lenl, ...... 


2 


- 


.t 


f"arritd forward, .... 


20,722 

■ 


4,4.iy 


-'j>lGl 



U SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Number of Pertcns Arrested, etc. — Continued. 



:«ATUKE or CKUiE. 


MalM. 


Females. 


Total. 


Broitghl forward, . 




20,722 


4,439 


2.0,1 (il 


Mortgaged pioiwutj', concealing, 




1.1 


7 


22 


" " selling. 




.T 





5 


Miinler, . ' . 




C 


2 


8 


" attempt to. 




1 


- 


1 


" suspicion ol'. 




8 


1 


9 


Neglected cliildreii. 




' 18 


19 


m 


Night-walking, .... 




1 


2.04 


2o4 


Obstrncting an oflicer iinlawfully, 




1 


1 


2 


Opium joint, keeping, . 




1 i 


- 


2 


" " resorting to, . 




9 


- 


9 


Ptmsing a worthless check, . 




3 


- 


3 


Perjary, 




7 


1 


8 


reddling witlio\it a license, . 




6 


~ 


G 


Pool-room, keeping. 




5 


- 


(, 


Polygamy 




2 


2 


4 


Prize-fight, being present at. 




2 


- 


o 


Prize-fighting 




3 


- 


3 


Profanity in a public place, . 




124 


48 


172 


Railroad law, violation of the. 




100 




100 


Kape, 




6 


- 


6 


" attempt to, 




4 


- 


4 


liefiising duty as a seaman, . 




9 


- 


9 


" to assist an officer. 




3 


- 


3 


" to support a family. 




79 


- 


79 


Receiving stolen goods, 




34 


4 


38 


Carried forward, .... 


21,172 


4,780 


25,952 





150AKD OF POLICE. 

.VwhiiVj- of J'vrsons Arrealed, etc. — Continued. 



3d 



sxurtx. OK ii:iMK. 


t 

1 Malca. 


1 

: Kemales. 

i 


TuUL 


/:r</uj;kf /i^viard, .... 


. 1 -.'1.172 


4,780 


2.7,952 


Uesctdiig |}uia<vi«?ini, .... 


. ; 7 


- 


7 


» - .ittiiiipt at, . 


11 


- 


11 


lUjf>l*n. 


79 


-> 

i 


81 


.ittVmjc ii, . . . . 





- 


5 


** ♦(Utfrteia (■{, .... 


.5 


- 


5 


nd nil* UlJK-d St:lIC~ 111 'il. 


1 


- 


1 


Kuo.iM'a.t% 


G7 


2() 


93 


SvIIin^' u(tul:i>rj;»i crinily, . 


3 


- 


3 


- liguwr c<a «j(ftioii ilay, 


1 




1 


** .i'.w^Crr wkhoiit :i lici'iLsc, 


1 •> 

■ 1 


_ 


•} 


■* ili'.iuxuiirr'i.rinc iiiibLniiiiietl, 


1 




1 


Shuj»-br'.:iiilj»;; 


233 


_ 


233 


S»*»I<»uiv, 


o 


- 


-> 


SU.-:iIiug ;B Birfe-, 


•-'7 


• - 


27 


SloW»'jrii (tiUMrea, .... 


72 


37 


109 


Sa«jncio\* f*ri«aa, .... 


013 


118 


l.i'ei 


Sunflaj Sif.w, T-Jotttjoii of the. 


231 


20 


-.'51 


Surr«md»iii».i<l hj pcliatidii oIlioLT, 




1 


1 


'rhrirzU:\ia>^ h>"»ET harm, . 


50 


7 


57 


TrUiUL-t„ 


GO 


1 


67 


Unla»-fiil xunn*, kitsn-^ jirociit at. 


ii 


- 


48 


*st£iin(»n, assisting .it. 


' 


- 


7 


•• •^ raaintiining. 


1 


- 


I 


L'nU-w'fiiDj tE*ai^ A niilroail car, . 


2 

1 


- 


2 


■" -^ » team. 


•' ifj 


- 


12 


CarrifA fir^vvird 


. ■ 23,048 


4,992 


28,040 



36 SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 

Number of Persons Arrested, etc. — Concluded. 



NATtRE OF CRIME. 



Droiif/hl forward, 

Unliiwfully using a boat, 

United States revenue law, violation of tlin, I 

Uttering a worthless note, 

United States shipping law, violation of the. 

Vagrancy, i 

Witnesses detained at station-houses, . 



Total number of arrests. 



3I«'.M. 1 


Ketnalea. 


Total. 


•23,018 


4,992 


28,010 


v! 


_ 


7 


3 




3 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


163 


37 


200 


205 


52 


257 


23,429 


5,081 


•28,.i]0 



BOARD OF POLICE. 



37 



T» »^ o 00 Ci -^ c: 

I- c^ r^ o c 71 

-•: — n -^ — o 

^ X '^ 00 X ri 



= e 











00 t 


rr. 










i; 



- 3 



O X) n l~ 

o — 3 o 

-J » X o 






CO 



i ^ 



- 


- 


o 


o 


- 


, 


_ 


:^ 


— 




o 


*-1 


CO 


■71 


— 


— , 


_^ 


X 


*^ 


r* 


_^ 




X 


X 






-o 






-jc 


X 






o 




















f'O 


X 




c:» 


r> 










o 




o 


^ 



fc — — 



3 — Tt -^ 

»- f- 2 £ 

-. '" ^ H 

' X" 30 



X 



»* 



— -c -.^ c> 

-^ -^ f- X 
X -ff- — o" 



"o" 



3 






?. 3! 



— ^ 



u: -^ 



3C. 



= 3300 
Ci = =J. o o 
r; s ^ o 



o 
o 



rs 



CO 



o 

O 

o 
o 

o 



2? t 



U 



= i 



/ 



38 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



Taui.k X. 

Licenses of <(?/ CIussck. exwjit for Sale of LItjiwr, Issued, etc., to 

Xov. 30, ISSf!. 



fLA4s OF LlCKNllK. 


i 
1 


C 
« 


1 

5 


t> 


tf. 


•6 

V 

1 

S 




Ihukney iarii.iL'i.s, 


1,240 


19 


38 


478 


- 


$1,240 


AVacoo:? 


3,848 


Ifl 


10 


271 


- 


3,848 i ■ 


Pavmbrokcrs, 


641 










SeixinJ-hiind artitlo.«, 


100 


1 
1 










Junk, 


212 


1 




096 


$4,095 00 


3,130 


Second-hand clolliiii^', . 


74 












Auctionccrb 


131. 










ii 

41.-, ,.! 


Intelligence olliccs, 


Ki 


7 


3 


- 


- 


13iliianl.|KX>l and !r{p|iluliilik'!i 
and lx)« ling alleys, 


831 


- 




- 


_ 


1,G02 




Skaiins rink 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.5 




Sircct-railwiiy coniliiclur.- und 
drivers, .... 


1,10U 


_ 


8S0 


- 


_ 


37-) 




I'rivale dctcclivcs, . 


7 


- 


_ 


- 


70 


} 


l>i«S^ 


7.nm 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18,03.5 


1 


Tuial 


lo,723 


42 


913 


1,445 


§4,09.1 M 


?29.41G 





Table XI. 

Xiimlirr of PliiaiH Licensed to sell InloxiaUiug Liquors, 1SS6. 









i, 




•6 




i 






■s 




^ 




>. = 


•— 
























s 






•a c 










« 




o 








(LASS OF LlChNMK. 


2 




CO 


o 


Hr 


O 
1 ^* 






















S 








§86 


« 






i = 


J 


^ 


^ 


3 ! 


r- 


1. 


InnhoMcr ".V," 


37 


1 


. 




_ 


1 

36 


1 1- 


Innholder " B," 


20 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


20 


1. 


Victnallor, 


1,139 


3 


o 


8 


- 


1,126 




Viauallcr, 


126 


- 


_ 


.1 


- 


121 


3. 


Victualler 


62 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


60 


4. 


Distiller 


3 


_ 


_ 




_ 


3 


4. 


A\TK,lcsale Dealer " U," . 


46 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


46 


4. 


MTioIejalc Dealer " C," . 


35 


_ 


_ 




- 


35 


4. 


Grocer 


280 


3 


2 


fi 


- 


269 


5. 


Brewer, 


19 


_ 


_ 




_ 


19 


,5. 


Wholesale Dealer und liottlcr, . 


10 


_ 


_ 




_ 


46 


5. 


Retail Dealer 


.50 


I 


I 


1 




47 


6. 


Druggist, 

Total, 


231 




- 


- 


- 


231 


= 


2,094 


8 


5 


21 


■ 


2,059 



















BOARD OP POLICE. 



39 



Table XII. 

Financial Statement for Tear ending Xm: .10, 7.WC. 



KxPF.NKITrRES 

P:iy ol the olllcers, . 

Fuel anil liglil, 

Water .iml ice, 

Furniture and bedding, . 

rriuting and stationery, . 

Care anil cleaning station-houses and city pris^'n. 

Repairs to station-houses and city prison, 

Kepairs and supplies for |>olice steamers, 

Kent anil care ol telephone and telegraph line.*. 

Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles. 

Purchase of horses and vehicles, . 

Care of tlags, llagstafTs, ro])es, stakes, etc., . 

Carting jjrisoners to and from stations and city p 

Feeding prisoners 

Medical attendance, 

Carriage hire, 

Pursnit of criminals, 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets. 

Pensions, 

Badges, liutton';, dubs, belts, insignia, etc., . 
Miscellaneous, car faros for ofEcers, etc.. 



Total 

Expenses of license department, . 



S8C4,9;;9 


C3 


11,400 


70 


2,177 


fA 


;l,82.0 


52 


3,9S7 


SI 


9,1. SS 


28 


1 ,022 


S7 


7,.>'<7 


«9 


2,270 


00 


10,.V.2 


49 


2,904 


2.5 


720 


2C 


.5,1 11.1 


.'K> 


1,4I.T 


57 


2,970 


20 


.360 C3 


3,014 


C4 


8,831 


89 


28,8.17 


27 


2,C81 


•20 


2,273 


97 


$974,016 


24 


29,439 


91 



Total, 



§1,003,4.10 1.1 



40 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



Financiai Slalemfvt — Conchulcd. 



Receipts. 

For .ill licenses (except for sale of liquor),') ,, ... 
For sale of unclaimed property, etc., [■ i-v„„„_, 

For extra services of cflicers, . . . } 
Dog licenses (credited to school deparliiuMit), 

Total, 

For liquor licenses, 

Total, 

.\mount received for uniforru clolli, elc. 

Total, 



810,781 no 

.^3G 82 

n..OGC 47 

IS.eS.") 00 

$41,519 29 

G08.il 3 00 

$649,632 29 

8,831 89 

$058,464 18 



Tai'.le XIII. 
List of Pensioned Officers. 




BOARD OF POLICE. 



JJst of /V».*^y»«f Officers. — Continued. 



41 



NAME. 


1"' 




! A.,. 


t Yenrt 

of 
Str«lc. 


, Aboont or 
■ Itmlon. 


DntF of 
Rfllrt-zDiTil. 


Currier, Jacolt II., 


Ptanimun. 




Bo 


2. 


«36.5 00 


1 .May 19. 1882. 


Chapman, Lory D., 


- 




^7 


10 


365 00 


Mar. 13, 188.5. 


Carroll, James E., 


1 




' VI 


\l 


365 00 


Oct. 31, 188*. 


Clart, Charles, 


- 




52 


11 


. 36500 


Dec 3, 1885. 


Dearborn, Samuel S , . 


■* 




; 58 


15 


365 00 


Aag. 5, 1886. 


Dunbar, .Abraham M., . 


.. 




43 


13 


365 00 


Oct. 18. 1878. 


' Drake, Amos G., . 

1 


•<■ 




f>.') 


I 

i 17 


365 00 


Dec. 1.5, 1881. 


Drew. Alfred R., . 


Pi^Strp^Lt., 


,-i9 


20 


425 00 


April 20, 1883. 


Dolan, Charles, 


I'aunrraiia, 




fiO 


24 


365 00 


Oct. 31, 1885. 


Fitzgerald, William, 

1 


•- 




CO 


15 


36.5 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


. Folfom, Hawley, . 

1 


Pl-^Ttt.. 


Ix. 


CO 


30 


4S6 67 


April 29, 1882. 


1 Famnni, George H., 


Pas-iunuB, 




50 


16 


365 00 


Aug. 25, 1885. 


Freeman, Ephraim W., 


•« 




56 


20 


365 00 


Ang. 25, 1885. 


FiBh. Stephen N., . 


- 




62 


26 


365 00 


Oct. 21. 1885. 


Ford, Lafayette, . 


- 




59 


25 


36.1 00 


Oct. 31, 1885. 


GoTe, Jonathan S , 


- 




57 


20 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Griggs, Robert D., 


- 




69 


26 


365 00 


Dec 9, 1882. 


Graves, Edward Y., 


I'aUSirit.tt, 


55 


24 


415 00 


XoT 28, 1883. 


1 Hill, William B., . 






57 


9 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1870. 


1 Bnnkins, John H., 


- 


, 


66 


28 


365 00 


Oct. IS, 1878. 


Hnlchins, Calvin, . 


- 


, 


62 


33 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Hicks, William E., 


- 




57 


22 


365 00 


Mar. 17, 1879. 


Harris, Augustine M., . : 


- 




no 


16 j 


365 00 


Nov. 8, 1883. 


Uulcbins, Loring G., . 


- 




C4 


1 

16 ; 


365 00 


XoT. 2S, 1883. 


Howard, Salmon, . . . 


- 


.1 

1 


52 


24 


365 00 


April 8, 1884. 


' Holbrook, Anthony, 


- 


1 


60 


28 


365 00 


Oct. 30, 1885. 


Hollis, Edwin A., . 


- 




44 


19 \ 


365 00 


Jan. 2, 1885. 


Kendall, William, 


- 


f 


CO 


26 \ 


365 00 


XoT. 5, 1882. 


Kelly, James, . . 1 


- 


t 


56 


17 '. 


365 00 


Ang. 25, 1885. 


Lewis, Stephen L., 


P«U*er?t, 


- ; 


50 


19 \ 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Leighton, Leonard, 



Paatrman. 


' 1 


63 


24 


365 00 


May 8, 1882. 



42 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



IJxt of Feiisione'l Officers. — Coiicliided. 



NAME. 


1 

I'osilioii. 


.*sc. 




Amount of 


rial* of 
Ketlrenjent. 


Luut, Lallicr, 


Patrolman, . 


69 


•24 


?36.'> 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Macdonald, Aliel B., . 


•' 


i'l 


•20 


:«.■■> oo 


Oct. 31, 1879. 


Moulton, James F., 


• 4 


54 


17 


36.5 00 


Oct. 31, 1879. 


McXamara, Michael, . 


•' 


:,2 


1 < 


36.5 00 


Oct. 29, 1881. 


Jtaynard, Gcorje S., 


Pat., Sergt. . 


1 Gl 

1 


■23 


Sft'i 00 


.Mar. 3, 1883. 


McComiick, James, 


Patrolman. 


1 
44 


16 


365 00 


Dec 8, 188.-.. 


McDonald, Alexander, . 


Capt., 


6.5 


■i.'i 


4Se 67 


June 23, 188.5. 


McGee, Jame*, 


Patrolman, 


47 


•21) 


36.-I 00 


Oct. 31, 188.".. 


McDonald, Charles T., . 


i 


39 


12 


36.-) 00 


April 27, 1886. 


Ostrander, All^rt, 


" 


69 


i.') 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Palmer, Samuel, . 


i 1* 


70 


18 


.•565 OO 


Mar. 17, 1879. 


Perkins, Henrv H., 


: Pat., .Sergt., . 


49 


17 


36.5 00 


Oct. 29, 1881. 


Perrj-, John \V^ . 


j Patrolnu»n, 


Bl 


•22 


365 00 


April 13, 1882. 


Ilcgan, John H., . 


; 


ii7 


16 


36.5 00 


April 13, 1882. 


Iloss, Samuel B., . 


1 « 


09 


28 


36.5 00 


Oct. 31, 188.5. 


llobinson, Gilman B., . 


i 


.">4 


19 


36.". 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


TwomWy, James W., . 


; Pat., Sergt., Lt., 












; Capt., . 


.Vi 


28 


G68 C7 


Nov. 6, 1886. 


Savage, John l^ . 


• Patrolman, 


1 49 


17 


.■!6o 00 


Oct 31, 1879. 


Scott, Jesse D., 


" 


61 


17 


36.5 00 


Sept. 20, ISSl. 


.Slickney, Willfcim ^^'., . 


" 


.t8 


23 


365 00 


Oct. 31,1879. 


.Stone, Charlc.", 


" 


70 


19 


365 00 


Sept. 20, 1881. 


Thompson, I$aiah P., . 


•■ 


.'ig 


29 


365 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


Vote. Thomas C, . 


" 


6.3 


15 


36.) 00 


Oct. 29, 1881. 


Wedger, John B., . 


" 


57 


17 


36.5 00 


Oct. 18, 1878. 


AVeeks. Cliarles C, 


" 


33 


8 


36.5 00 


Oct. IS, 1878. 


AValker, Ciiarles A., . 


•■ 


51 


21 


365 00 


Sept. .30, 1881. 


Wintbip, Oliver L., 


Pat., Sergt , Lt., 


54 


24 


415 00 


Sept. 21, 1883. 


Wells, John K^ . 


i Patrolman, 


.V! 


30 


365 00 


Dec. 29, 1883. 


White, Chri-'topber. 


' 


.50 


12 


.38.5 00 


June 8, 188.5. 


Wa>gait, Knus, 


II « 


r>« 


31 


.•56.') 00 


Oct. 31, 188.-.. 



>' 



BOAKD OF POLICE. 



43 



Tai!I.e XIV- 
Work of the Si'jinil Sj'-teiii. lHvijii/jat K, Jmtkt 7 to Nov. 30, ISSG. 



Wliole number of runs, 

Xurubor of runs to bring in prisontrs, .. 
Number of runs for miscellaneous pur^cMxs*, 

Natuke fyr J?«imcE- 

rrisoners brought to station-Iioiise hi vw^n^!. 
Injured persons brought to station in \rifjijai. 
Injured persons taken linnie in wa^oji. 
Injured persons taken to hospital in irii^r/n. 
Feeble persons in mind, and iniane i^rini^i* to- station 
I/Oit children brought to station. . ., , . 

Runs to fire alarms, 

Conveying detail of officers 

Uuns for liquor seizures, 

Conveying body of drowned boy lK«ut, 
Conveying body of man to morgu>-. 
Runs to quell disturbance, . . , , . 
Miscellaneous, 



918 
111 



Number 


of 


mi 


cs 


nm 


frdui June 7 1/ 
in .Inly, 


July T, 


113^ 
138Jj 


•t 






" 




in Aiigu>I, . 


.- -- - 


17;5 


•1 






.. 




in September, 
in Octo!)er, . 


- 


146 
130; 


** 


ital 


ni 


ml 


in N'overal>er, 
)cr of miles run. 


' 


110| 


T. 


»'!,». 



1.029 



l,0-.'9 



•JSI 


918 


10 


10 


Vl 


1-.' 


;u 


:U 


9 


9 


u 


r, 




10 




4 




6 


1 


1 


2 


•1 




3 




14 



1,029 



7,810 



9999 06314 391 9