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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

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TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1887, 




C^ss-. s~o 



m 



7 



BOSTON: 
ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 

No. 39 ARCH STREET. 

1888. 



/ f 



[Document 20 — 1888.] 




TWELFTH AMUAL REPORT 



FOE THE 



TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1887. 



Boston Watee Board Office, 

Boston, January 1, 1888. 

To the Honorable the City Council: — 

The Boston Water Board present their Annual Report for 
the year ending Dec. 31, 1887. 

A comprehensive summary of the revenue and expendi- 
tures of the Department for the calendar year may be made 
as follows : — 

Eevenue. 

Cochituate Department, income . . . $1,275,298 32 

Mystic " "... 295,196 99 

Proceeds of Construction, Extension, and 

Improvement Loans .... 589,625 19 



!, 160, 120 50 



exten- 



EXPENDITURES. 

Cochituate Department, maintenance 
" " construction, 

sion, etc. 
interest on deht 
required sinking-fund, 
maintenance 
interest on debt 
refund of rates 

surplus (to sinking-fund), 21, 4G(> 63 
" " 12,550 00 



Mystic 



Cochituate 
Mystic 



$342,246 93 

589,625 19 
721,584 76 
190,000 00 
153,345 02 
44,927 50 
84,374 47 



$2,160,120 50 



2 City Document No. 20. 

The principal accounts; for the past two years, compare 
as follows : — 

1880. 1887. 

Care and maintenance Co- 

chitLiate Department . $339,710 06 $342,246 93 
Care and mtiintenance Mystic 

Department . . . 134,616 85 153,345 02 

Extension of mains . . 3 75,069 46 343,903 15 

Additional supply of water, 144,306 04 40,078 62 

New hio-h service . . 141,085 56 160,866 80 



As our appropriations are made for the iinancial, and not 
for the calendar year, no financial statement which we can 
make is so complete or satisfying for purposes of close 
comparison as that embodied in the City Auditor's Report ; 
but we append, in addition to the customary general tables 
of statistics, condition of debt, etc., some new tables, giving 
an account of our expenditures in classified form, and a list 
of contracts pending and completed during the year. 

EXTENSION OF MAINS. 

The work done under this head in 1887 exceeded that of 
any year since 1875. The demands of the outlying districts 
for new water service necessitated the laying of over twenty- 
two miles of mains, as against fourteen in 1886. 

In addition to this, a portion of the work of laying an 
enlarged main to East Boston has been done ; a new pipe-box 
and fender has been built across Mystic river ; and a portion 
of the pipes for connecting the Cochituate system with Charles- 
town has been laid. The East Boston and Charlestown work 
will be completed the coming season. 

New location and grades for Beacon street having been 
established by the town of Brookline, 1,528 feet of our 48- 
inch main, near the foot of Corey Hill, were taken up and 
a corresponding length of new pipes laid. 

Sidewalk stop-cocks have been placed for over 6,000 ser- 
vices during the year, making the total number now set 
25,000. These stop-cocks, as expected, prove very con- 
venient and economical. 



NEW HIGH SERVICE. 

The new High Service Works approach completion. 
Fisher-hill reservoir is finished, and is already in service, 
water being pumped thereto from the Elmwood-st. 



Report of the Water Board. 3 

station. Ground was broken for the foundations of the 
new jDumping-station at Chestnut Hill, in January last, and 
the several contracts for foundations, masonry, roofing, etc., 
have been advanced with the greatest possible despatch. 
The boilers are in place, one of the Gaskill engines is in 
readiness for use and the other is nearly so. It is expected 
that the steam connections will be made early in this month, 
and that within a few weeks pumping may actually begin. 
This will relieve us from any further apprehension of a 
failure of the high service supply through over-tasking the 
old pumps, and will also enable us very shortly to extend 
the area of this service to districts which have long needed it. 

The appropriation for high service was $766,000, of which 
$511,000 has been expended. There will be required to 
meet outstanding contracts and to complete the service, 
including the extension of the East Boston high service to 
Breed's island, not more than $175,000. 

All the purposes included in the estimates for the New 
High Service, excepting the purchases of land for Reservoir 
No. 3 (estimated at $28,000), will be accomplished at a cost 
nearly $170,000 less than the estimates. There have been, 
and are to be, charged to the appropriation, the expenses of 
objects not included in the estimates (viz., the extensions of 
the high service to West Roxbury, Charlestown, and Breed's 
Island), amounting to $125,000. And when all these mat- 
ters are completed, there will be, according to our present 
calculation, a balance remaining of at least $70,000. 

IMPROVEMENTS AT LAKE COCHITUATE. 

Some important improvements have been begun at Lake 
Cochituate. Those portions of the lake where the brooks 
enter have remained shallow, and during the summer 
-jcQDnths have presented opportunity for the accumulation 
and generation of noxious elements in the water. Being 
authorized thereto by the City Council, we began the work 
of remedying this as early in the season as the lake could be 
safely drawn down. The inlets at Beaver Dam brook and 
Course brook, and a shallow cove near the inlet from Dug 
pond, have been excavated, abrupt gravelled banks have 
been substituted for muddy shallows, and in these localities 
we shall have deeper water, a better current, and other 
greatly improved conditions. The work so far done has 
cost about $29,000. 

The estimate for the whole work as contemplate "• at the 
beginning of the season was $40,000, and include* /move- 
ments on the "Began" meadow, which are to be made next 



4 City Document No. 20. 

season. Upon drawing down the lake, we find that it will 
be desirable to extend the work to two or three localities 
not included in onr original estimates, and we shall ask for 
authority to do so. 

REMOVAL OF POLLUTIONS. 

A year since we expressed a confident expectation that 
some schemes of sewerage for Framingham and Marlboro', 
beneficial to our water-supply, might soon be undertaken. 
We are glad to state that the town of Framingham obtained 
from the Legislature an act authorizing it to build a sewer 
system ; and the City Council, having authorized us to 
arrange for a contribution to the cost of such a system, ne- 
gotiations have been actively carried on, with a fair prospect 
of agreement in the near future. The Selectmen of the town 
of Marlboro' are now engaged in preparing a sewerage 
scheme for that town ; and we expect an opportunity to ne- 
gotiate with them within two or three months. In these two 
towns are located the greater part of the pollution cases 
which actively threaten injury to our main water-supply. 

There is no obligation resting upon the city of Boston to 
assist towns in providing sewerage, except so far as the 
method of constructing and caring for their systems involves 
expense beyond what might be required if such system were 
arranged Avithout reference to our water-supply. It is to be 
expected that the parties with whom we have to deal will 
claim no less than what is fully their due ; but unless they 
persist in demands which are unreasonably large, we an- 
ticipate no serious difficulty or delay in making satisfactory 
arrangements. 

In the absence of any movement in good taith by the town 
governments to adopt means of diverting the sewage, it 
would have been our duty to invoke the law in several cases. 
But, as the matter stands, it has appeared to be wise policy to 
avoid legal conflicts, and to encourage the town authorities 
to the adoption of such measures as we could legall}^ assist 
in carrying out. 

Even after the town systems of sewerage are established 
there will remain some highly important schemes for reducing 
pollution to be considered ; but it is not expedient to take 
them up at present. 

Constant surveillance in the Mystic District has enabled us 
to prevent any increase of polluting causes ; but the general 
condition of the territory remains, and, for reasons heretofore 
stated, must remain, a menace to the quality of the water. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 5 

QUALITY OF THE WATER. 

In our report for 1886 we submitted facts showing that 
the quality of the main supply (Cochituate and Sudbury) 
was excellent in itself, and superior to that of any large 
American city on the seaboard. We have only now to state 
that the quality has been maintained, and remains good. 
The Mystic supply appears, from the result of analyses, to 
have been, through the year, of about the same quality as 
last year, but from the nature of its surroundings, we not 
only can expect no improvement, but must anticipate a grad- 
ual deterioration. 

The following memoranda of the results of analyses made 
for us near the close of the years 1886 and 1887, indicate 
that there is no material change in the chemical constituents 
of the waters. 



d 






Residue. 


a 
o 

a 
a 
< 


o 3 
.a 


o 
a 

5 








•6 

o 

s 


"o 
> 


"5 
o 


0.0000 


0.0230 


0.60 


1.50 


3.68 


5.10 


0.0015 


0.0243 


0.50 


2.35 


3.25 


5 60 


0.0628 


0.0320 


2.45 


8.45 


5.05 


13.50 


0.0334 


0.0190 


2.75 


9.60 


5.40 


15.00 



Boston (main supply) 1S86 
" «• " 1887 

" (Mystic " 1886 
" " " 1887 



(Ficrnrcs express parts in 100,000. The above figures, ag to main supply, are averages 
of analyses for October and January. The figures as to Mystic supply are for the closing 
analysis of the year. The summer analyses in this district show less ammonia, chlorine, and 
residue.) 



The comment of Prof. E. S. Wood, our analyist, on an- 
alysis in October, is : " Basin 3, Sudbury river. Farm Pt)nd, 
Lake Cochituate, and the service waters are in better condi- 
tion than in October, 1885 or 1886; and that of Chestnut 
Hill reservoir better than in 1886." Kespecting a later an- 
alysis (for January, 1888), he says: "The waters of Stony 
Brook, Basin 3, Sudbury river, and Basin 4, are better than 
in January, 1887. Those from Farm Pond, Lake Cochitu- 
ate, Chestnut Hill Peservoir, and Cold Spring Brook, are in 
about tlie same condition as in January, 1887." 

The State Board of Health have made periodical analyses 
of our waters, the results of which have been furnished us. 
They correspond closely with those made by Professor Wood. 
At the close of the year, they reported, as did Professor 



6 City Document No. 20. 

Wood, a large increase of free ammonia in the Mystic 
water. This water seems to be subject to this variation 
durins: the winter. 

In the course of a recent public address upon " The odor 
and color of Surface Waters," Prof. T. M. Drown, of the In- 
stitute of Technology, commended the Sudbury and Cochitu- 
ate supply " for its stability and freedom from change in the 
condition in which it flows from the tap of the consumer." 
This observation was based on a series of analyses extending 
over several weeks, all of which, respecting the ammonias, 
showed better results than we have cited above. 

The State Board have lately made some experiments in 
regard to bacteria. The results indicate a very satisfactory 
condition of things in that particular as to our main supply. 

CONSUMPTION AND WASTE OF WATER. 

In our last report we devoted considerable space to a con- 
sideration of this subject, and demonstrated that our average 
consumption (74 gallons per capita per day) was not unrea- 
sonably large by comparison with other large cities. It is 
to be expected that as cities grow the per capita rate will 
gradually increase, but we have cherished a hope that our 
consumption might not, at present, exceed a rate of seventy- 
live gallons. Our records show a consumption in the Mj^stic 
District of 72 gallons, and in the Cochituate department of 
80 gallons. We do not regard the latter as a ])ermanent 
rate, for, owing to causes not yet fully ascertained, the con- 
sumption during several months was exceptionally large, and 
later has resumed more normal proportions. 

The systems of checking waste heretofore prevailing have 
been continued. They serve to bring to early notice impor- 
tant leaks in the mains, and also to prevent householders 
and others from long-continued maintenance of leaky and 
wasteful fixtures. One fact is established by the experience 
of the past year, that there is, in strictly domestic consump- 
tion, a perceptible augmentation. The cases where any 
dwelling-house section showed a reduced consumption were 
A'"ery rare. 

METERS. 

By reference to the report of the Superintendent of the 
Meter Division it will be observed that the number of meters 
in service is less than last year. It has been found necessary 
to remove a large number of meters which had proved ineffi- 
cient, and the replacements have not equalled the removals. 



Report op the Water Board. 7 

Many of the meters had been in continuous use for years. 
These were taken out, tested, and if found worthless, replaced 
by new meters ; or, if found fit, with repairs, for further service, 
a.a:ain put in use. Many cases were found where the con- 
sumer was reaping the benefit of great errors in the meter. 
The net result of this overhauling is that, notwithstanding 
the rates for metered water have been within two years re- 
duced ten per cent., and the number of meters has been in 
the same time reduced twenty per cent., the revenue from 
this class of services has largely increased. This indicates 
a greatly improved condition of efficiency in the meters and 
in the meter division. 

Last spring we entered upon the task of making a full test 
of such water-meters as might be offered. The tests were 
begun April 25 and concluded in October. Our reasons for 
engaging in this test were these : — 

The city has heretofore expended large sums for water- 
meters, many of which have proved unreliable. Whether or 
not it will ever be expedient to procure meters in large num- 
bers, it will be necessary from year to year to procure cer- 
tain quantities to rephice those worn out and proved ineffi- 
cient, and to meet new requirements. Numerous new 
inventions are offered with claims of superior merit, but about 
which the ordinary tests fail to supply a basis for a sound 
opinion. All " tests " of which we have any knowledge have 
been very superficial ; and, in fact, every city about to pur- 
chase meters has been reduced to the choice of taking a meter 
because other people are using it ; i.e. it has had a " large 
sale " ; or of accepting the opinion of an engineer or other 
superintending officer, who may or may not be qualified to 
make a selection, and who may or may not be wedded to 
some pet theory. There is, and has been, .no such thing as 
a settled or accepted judgment on the merits of the mechan- 
ical principles involved in the different styles brought to the 
public attention. 

The construction of a " perfect " water-meter — accurate 
and durable under all conditions — is acknowledged to have 
presented more difficulties to the inventor than almost any 
other problem in mechanics ; and there are those who still 
maintain that the thing cannot be done, except approximately. 
Yet there have been meters in the market for years which 
enjoy a fair reputation ; and the claims of the later invent- 
ors are loud and persistent. - It has been often said that 
there was no way of surely testing a meter except by a 
period of long service ; and it was open to us to take a quan- 
tity of each of the most promising inventions, to put them in 
service in different localities and under all conditions, and 



8 City Document No. 20, 

await results. This would have been a tedious process, en- 
tailing in itself considerable expense ; and we felt that, 
in view of the known and possible future wants of the city, 
we ought to try a more thorough, and at the same time more 
expeditious, method. 

We therefore committed the matter to Messrs. L. Fred. 
Rice, Charles Carr, and N. M. Lowe (two engineers and one 
expert inventor, and all men of high repute in their way), 
to make exhaustive experiments. The number of meters 
presented for examination was fully double what we antici- 
pated, and the work w^as necessarily prolonged ; but the 
report is expected within a short time. 

We are not informed, even in a general way, of the con- 
clusions which will be presented to us ; but we feel certain 
that they will enable us at least to avoid repeating the waste 
involved in some past transactions ; and we hope that they 
may be of such a character as to guide us, sooner or later, to 
the selection of machines both sound in principle and reliable 
in practice. It will be interesting to compare the results 
i-eached with those recorded through a series of years by the 
departnient. Our experience has developed defects, of one 
kind or another, in nearly all the meters we have had in 
use ; and if, as we anticipate, these tests supplement our 
experience with an elucidation of the scientific or mechanical 
causes which underlie the defects noted, we shall be greatly 
assisted in endeavoring to limit our selections to the kinds 
which indicate the closest approach to perfection. It is to 
be expected that the opinions expressed will meet with wide 
discussion, — in some cases perhaps with dissent, — but, 
in the end, we feel that results will be reached of great 
value, not only to ourselves, but to the interest of all water- 
works. 

An impression has gone abroad that a large extension of 
the meter system is contemplated. So far as this Board is 
concerned that impression is unfounded. At present we do 
not need many more meters than are now in service ; but we 
shall need to replace a good many that will from time to time be 
taken out on account of age or infirmity. A'\^ith the natural 
increase of services of all kinds, there will be some increase 
of meters required; but the time has not arrived, in our 
judgment, for the adoption of an enlarged scheme of meter 
service. The occasion for what may be called a "general" 
meter service can only exist in such cities as are compelled 
to maintain high water-rates ; or in such cities as are con- 
strained to carry their economy of supply to the point of 
parsimony. Boston is at present in neither category. 



Repoet or THE Water Board. 



WATER FOS CHELSEA, SOMERVILLE, AND EVERETT. 

The joint application to the Legislature of 1887, by the 
cities of Boston, Chelsea, and Somerville, and the town of 
Everett, for a grant of the waters of the Shawshine river, 
was denied. The case was clearly presented to the commit- 
tee, which considered it. It was shown that the Mystic supply 
would at an early day be insufficient in quantity, and might 
soon be unfit for domestic use ; it was shown that the capacity 
of the Shawshine river was equal to the demands of 300,000 
people, and that by the time the population of the Mj'stic 
district reached that point, the proportional interest of the 
City of Boston (or, specifically, Charlestown) would be not 
more than one-sixth of the whole ; and it was thus demonstrated 
that for Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett the " water ques- 
tion " was a matter of vital importance, to be met by getting 
the Shawshine river, o?^ some other supply, without delay. 
The committee were convinced, and reported a bill to the 
Legislature. It was there supported with some earnestness 
by a portion of the liejDresentatives of the places interested, 
and half-heartedly by others. We regret to say that many 
Boston Representatives were indifi'erent, and some actively 
opposed the measure. A misinterpretation of the relations 
of Boston to Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett — to the 
effect that we should be bound in law or equity to give them 
water from our Cochituate supply, in case of failure of the 
Mystic supply — was industriously fostered and circulated, 
and found credence. Finally, the bill was rejected. 

We have taken no measures to revive the question before 
the Legislature of 1888. Having for two successive years 
labored earnestly for the advantage of communities which 
have failed thus far to give the project that hearty and united 
support which is necessary to bring success, we have deemed 
it wise to make no further effort now. If Chelsea, Somer- 
ville, and Everett shall take the initiative, and bestir them- 
selves as they ought, we shall be glad, if the help of Boston 
can avail them anything, to lend our cordial aid. 

But, as to alternatives, Ave see no reason why we should 
not be out-spoken here, as we have been in our private 
conferences with the interested parties. If they think, 
or can be brought to think, that the Mystic system would, 
if relieved of the necessity of supplying Charlestown, 
serve their purpose for a term- of years ; and that, with 
the Mystic Water- Works in their hands, they could afford 
to take the chances of that term of 3'cars, and of there- 
after getting the Shawshine or some other sup[)ly to eke out 
their wants, we should be read}' to recommend the City 



10 City Document No. 20. 

Council to take measures for the transfer of the Mystic 
Water-Works to their ownership. We are ready to dissolve 
partnership on the most favorable terms. They have no 
claim whatever upon Boston, except for Mystic water, and 
Boston has no other Avater to sell them. Wilhin a few years 
Boston will be confronted with the prospective exhaustion of 
its own supply, and will be seeking a new one. The com- 
munities named ought to realize the position they are placed 
in, and act. We have sounded repeated notes of warning, 
and otherwise done, perhaps, more than our duty. For the 
present we drop the subject. 

RESERVOIR NO. 5. 

By authority of the City Council we have made purchases of 
land on the borders of Indian brook in Hopkinton and Ashland 
for a site for a new reservoir. We have acquired 310 acres, 
for $20,316, which, allowing for value of farm-houses and 
buildings, makes the average cost of land about $60 an acre. 
About 100 acres more remain to be obtained, respecting 
which arrangements are pending. 

We renew our recommendation that the construction of 
this reservoir be proceeded with at once. While we do not 
present the matter as one of paramount necessity, we feel 
that the reasons heretofore adduced are sound, that we ought 
to be prepared for all accidents of interruption to, or injury 
of our supply. It will require five years to build the basin, 
fill it, and have its contents tit for use ; and by that time our 
demands will reach about 90 per cent, of the supply which 
is available to-day. A larger margin Avill certainly put us in 
a safer and more comfortable condition. 

NEW APPROPRIATIONS. 

Excepting for the proposed new reservoir, and for the cus- 
tomary appropriations for extension of mains, we do not antici- 
pate any necessity for new appropriations this year. It is 
probable that we may ask that provision be made for enlarging, 
by transfer, the amounts of one or two of the existing minor 
appropriations ; but with reference to these matters, special 
communications will be made to the City Council, when our 
plans are further matured. 

We have in hand an application from the Board of Direc- 
tors for Public Institutions for an extension of the service 
to Long Island. The necessity therefor is represented as 
urgent. The City Engineer has furnished us with estimates 
of the cost, and we shall shortly bring the matter to the 
notice of the City Council. 



Report of the Water Board. 11 

We refer to reports of the City Engineer, the Water 
Registrar, and the several Division Superintendents, for 
details of interest respecting the transactions of the depart- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HORACE T. ROCKWELL, 
WILLIAM B. SMART, 
THOMAS F. DOHERTY, 

Boston Water Board. 



12 



City Document No. 20. 



General Statistics. 



Sudbury and Cochituate Woeks. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


Daily average consumption in gallons . . . 


25,607,200 


26,627,900 


29,852,100 


Daily average consumption iu gallons per 


72.4 
6,186,668 


74.3 
6,373,200 


80.7 


Daily average amount used through meters, 
gallons 


7,229,700 


Percentage of total consumption metered . 


24.2 


23.9 


24.1 




51,810 
4,417 


53,400 


55,235 
3,393 


Xuraber of meters and motors 


3,763 


Length of supply and distributing mains, in 


400 
4,681 


414 
4,806 


430.5 


Number of fire-hydrants in use 


4,990 


Yearly revenue from water-rates 


$1,239,757 99 


$1,206,064 69 


$1,244,191 75 


Yearly revenue from metered water .... 


$452,961 60 


$400,706 85 


$451,335 09 


Percentage of total revenue from metered 


36.5 
$18,567,279 19 


33.2 
$18,973,616 03 


36.3 


Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1886, 1887, and 1888, 


$19,527,483 32 


Yearly expense of maintenance 


$321,137 26 


$336,507 37 


$339,693 34 


Mystic Works. 








Daily average consumption in gallons . . . 


6,737,350 


7,399,800 


7,629,000 


Daily average consumption in gallons per 


67.9 


72.5 


72.7 


Daily average amount used through meters, 
gallons 


1,012,755 


1,117,600 


1,248,200 


Percentage of total consumption metered . 


15.0 


15.1 


16.4 


Number of services 


15,928 


16,110 


16,809 


Number of meters and motors 


594 


469 


428 


Length of supply and distributing mains, 


131.0 

781 


133.2 
818 


136.1 


Number of fire-hydrants in use 


935 


Yearly revenue from water-rates 


$276,557 60 


$249,609 62 


$293,018 65 




$74,128 87 


$69,.330 48 


$76,241 82 


Percentage of total revenue from metered 


26.8 
$1,656,805 39 


27.8 
$1,657,458 97 


26.0 


Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1886, 1887, and 1888, 


$1,659,639 37 


Yearly expense of maintenance 


$122,858 00 


$134,439 43 


$153,345 02 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 13 



Earnings and Expenditures. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water- Works from all 
sources for the year ending December 31, 1887, were as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . 11,244,191 75 

Income from shutting of and letting on 

water, and fees ..... 3,036 00 

Elevator, fire and service pipes, sale of old 

materials, etc 28,070 57 



$1,275,298 32 



The total expenditures of the Cochituate 
Water-Works for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1887, were as follows, viz. : — 
Current expenses . . . $339,693 34 

Ke funded water-rates . . 553 59 

Transferred to City Collector's 

Department . . . 2,000 00 

Interest on funded debt . 721,584 76 



$1,063,831 69 



Balance Dec. 31, 1887 . . . $211,466 63 

The total receipts of the Mystic Water- Works, from all 

sources, for the year ending December 31, 1887, were as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $293,018 65 
Income from shutting off and letting on 

water, and fees ..... 328 75 

Service-pipes, repairs, etc. . . . 1,849 59 



$295,196 99 



The total expenditures of the Mystic 
Water-Works for the yeai' ending December 
31, 1887, were as follows : — 
Current expenses . . . $153,345 02 
Interest on funded debt . 44,927 50 

Refunded water-rates . . 470 83 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 

ville, and Everett, under 

contract . . . .' 83,903 64 



282,646 99 



Balance Dec. 31, 1887 . . . $12,550 00 



14 City Document No. 20. 

Cost of Construction, and Condition of the Water 

Debts. 

Cost of construction of Cochituate Works 

to Jan. 1, 1887 $18,973,616 03 

Transfer sidewalk Stopcock! 
account : ! 

(Special Appropriation of f $50,000 00 
Jan. 4, 1884) .J 

Expended in 1887, as follows, 
viz. : — 

Extension of Mains, 

etc. . . $302,921 87 

New Hi o;h- Ser- 
vice Works, 160,866 80 

Additional sup- 
ply of water, 40,078 62 

503,867 29 

553,867 29 



Cost of construction of Cochituate 

Water AYorks, to Jan. 1, 1888 . $19,527,483 32 



The outstanding Cochituate Water Loans, 
Jan. 1, 1887, were $13,890,273 98 

Issued during year 1887, as follows : — 
Appropriation, Hi oh Service, 

4% 'Loans . $349,700 00 



r Extension of Mains, 



. etc. : — 

] 3% Loans, $200,000 

^31% " 150,000 

350,000 00 

Additional supply of 

Water, 3i% Loans . 35,000 00 
Protection of Water 

Supply, 31% Loans, 50,000 00 
Improvement of Lake 
Cochituate, 31-% 
Loans . . . 40,000 00 



824,700 00 
Total Cochituate Debt, Jan. 1, 1888 . $14,714,973 98 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 15 

Cochituate Water Sinking Fund, Jan. 1, 

1«87 $3,853,269 61 

Cocliituate Water Sinking Fund, Jan. 1, 

1888 4,271,168 59 

Net Cochituate Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1887, 10,037,004 37 

" 1, 1888, 10,443,805 39 



Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1887 $1,657,458 97 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1888 1,659,639 37 



The outstanding Mystic Water Loans, Jan. 

1, 1887, were $839,000 00 

Kedemption of Debt, due October 1, 1887, 

(6% Loans) 50,000 00 

$789,000 00 
Kenewal of Debt due Oct. 1, 1887 (3^% 

Loans) " . 50,000 00 

Total Mystic Debt, Jan. 1, 1888 . . $839,000 00 



Mystic Water Sinking Fund, Jan. 1, 1887, $594,639 00 

" " " " 1, 1888, 655,133 52 

Net Mystic Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1887 . 244,361 00 

" J, 1888 . 183,866 48 



(( (( (( (« 



16 



City Document No. 20. 



EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 

January Draft, 1887, to January Draft, 1^ 



Extension of Mains : - 
Labor 
Salaries . 
Teaming . 
Blasting . 

Water-pipes, Contracts 
Miscellaneous . 
Stock 



$93,455 45 

1,798 27 

7,322 75 

12,050 06 

160,622 81 

7,002 89 

60,950 92 



,3^3 



S343,fD3 15 



HigJi Service: — 
Labor .... 
Teaming .... 
Salaries .... 
Stock .... 
Blasting .... 
Water-pipes, Contract 
Fisher-Hill Keservoir, Contract 
West Roxbury Pumping-StatioQ Con 

tract . . . . 

Wronght-ii'ou Tank, Contract . 
Foundations, New Pumping-Station 

Chestnut Hill, Contract 
Freestone, New Pumping-Station 

Chestnut Hill, Contract 
Land purchased ... 
Masonry, New Pumping-Stat'n, Chest 

nut Hill, Contract 
Gate-House, Fisher-Hill Reservoir 

Contract .... 
Dwelling-house, Contract 
Boilers, New Pumping-Station, Chest- 
nut Hill, Contract 



515,789 94 
1,167 99 
5,125 61 
9,213 48 
977 67 
4,350 09 

38,223 11 

2,852 50 
2,650 00 

31,833 68 

12,500 00 
400 00 

19,000 00 

8,000 00 
1,000 00 

3,000 00 



$160,866 80 



Litroduction of Meters and Inspection : — 

New Meters $11,576 15 

Stock for Meter supplies . . . 1,240 21 

Expenses of Special Water-Meter Test — 

Salaries of Commissioners, etc. . 5,863 25 

Stock and expenses . . . 1,852 11 

Labor 2,028 24 



S-22,559 96 



Eeport of the Water Board. 17 

Improvement of LaJce Cochituate : — 

Labor $19,193 58 - 

Salaries 940 00 

Travelling expenses . . . 505 05 

Teaming 1,272 88 

Stock, tools, and expenses . . 1,005 15 

$22,916 66 



Additional Supply : — 

Salaries (Engineers') . . . $5,871 72 

Labor . . . . . . 451 53 

Materials and expenses . . . 3,090 27 

Contractsfor work on Shallow Flowage 10,221 35 

Teaming 143 75 

Land purchased for Basin V. . . 20,300 00 



),078 62 



Maintenance Accounts, Cochituate "Water- Works. 
Boston Water Board: — 

Salaries of two Commissioners, four 

Clerks, and Messenger . . .$13,271 24 
Travelling expenses and miscellaneous . 1,752 82 
Printing and stationery . . . 662 23 

Advertising and postage . . . 485 18 



Water Registrar's Department : — 
Salaries of Registrar, ten Clerks, seven 
Inspectors, Foremen, Marine Agent, 
and laborers in Service Division . $40,873 01 
Travelling expenses and miscellaneous . 1,538 29 
Printing and stationery . • . 1,398 37 

Advertising and postage . . . 85 60 



;,171 47 



Eastern Division : — 
Salaries of Superintendent, Clerks, and 

Foreman $6,750 74 

Travelling expenses and transportation 

of men 1,852 33 

Printing and stationery .... 551 76 
Miscellaneous ..... 152 51 



43,895 27 



Western Division : — 

Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant 
Superintendent, Clerks, and Special 
Agent ...... 

Travelling expenses . . . . 

Printing and stationery 

Miscellaneous ..... 



Amount carried forward, 



9,307 34 



^9,313 39 

1,144 59 

428 91 

128 55 


11,015 44 
$80,389 52 





18 



City Document No. 20. 



Amount brought forward, 
Inspection and Waste Division : — 

Salaries of Superintendent, three Clerks 
and Inspectors . 

Travelling expenses 

Printing and stationery . 

Miscellaneous 



$80,389 52 



Federal-st. Yard: — 
Workshop, blacksmith shop, etc. 



!,198 20 

980 70 

364 53 

25 25 



Meter Division : — 






Salaries of Superintendent, 


one Foreman, 




and one Clerk . 




$4,283 46 


Travelling expenses 




160 61 


Printing and stationery . 




51 92 


New meters . 




429 38 


Setting and repairing . 




12,302 68 


Stable .... 




873 88 


Tools and miscellaneous 




764 65 



34,568 68 



18,666 58 



5,035 13 



Albany -St. Yard : — 
Pipe yard, stable, etc. 



8,889 52 



Maverick Wharf (depot for furnishing water to 

shipping), rent, and salar}- of agent 
Telephones ....... 

Special agents' (2) salaries, travelling expenses, etc. 
Cochituate Aqueduct ..... 

Sudbury Aqueduct ..... 

Main pipe relaying (including stock and labor) 

" " repairing " " "• "• 

Hydrants " '' " " " 

Stopcocks 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes, and repairing (includin 
stock and labor) ..... 

Tools and repairing (including stock and labor) 
Streets " " 

Fountains " " " 

Stables '' 

Waste detectors " " 

Main-pipe cleaning " " 

Basins, Framingham and Ashland (including stock 
and labor) ...... 

Service-pipe repairing (including stock and labor) 
High service, Roxbury, including fuel, salaries, re 
pairs, etc. ....... 



2,020 00 
779 81 

2,440 92 

2,996 6C 
10,828 43 
21,808 03 

7,115 27 
19,076 65 

3,401 86 

5,463 58 

7,604 69 

6,484 74 

2,574 96 

8,201 07 

9,846 66 

9,748 69 

5,989 03 
13,772 49 

12,186 89 



Amount carried forrcard, 



$300,089 86 



Eeport of the Water Board. 19 

Amoiint brought fonoard, $300,089 86 

High service, East Boston (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) 3,189 42 

High service, Brighton (including fuel, salaries, re- 
pairs, etc.) 3,148 74 

High service, West Roxbury (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) 2,343 46 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir (including stable, care of 

grounds, etc) ....... 12,851 10 

Parker- Hill Reservoir 1,611 18 

Brookline Reservoir ...... 1,694 18 

East Boston Reservoir . . . . . . 591 45 

South Boston Reservoir . . . . . . 110 55 

Lake Cochituate . . . . ' . . . 4,759 20 

Chestnnt-Hill driveway 2,038 51 

Collector of Water-rates, salary .... 2,499 34 

Taxes 781 94 

Damages 881 06 

Analysis of water, etc 350 00 

Merchandise sold (pipes and castings, in cases of 

emergency) 2,753 36 



$339,693 34 



Maintenance Accounts, Mystic Water- Works. 

Boston Water Board : — 
Salaries of one Commissioner and one 

assistant clerk $4,226 00 

Printing and stationery . . . 94 33 

Advertising and postage . . . 158 96 

Travelling expenses and miscellaneous . 171 30 



Water Registrar's Department: — 
Salaries of Deputy Collector, two Clerks, 

and three Inspectors .... 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses .... 
Advertisiug, postage, and miscellaneous. 

Superintendent'' s Department : — 

Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant Su- 
perintendent, and Clerk 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses . . .' • 
Miscellaneous . . . . . 



$8,321 


69 


516 


27 


142 


35 


411 


03 


$5,445 


19 


114 


12 


97 


32 


79 


69 



$4,650 69 



9,391 34 



5,736 32 



Amount carried forward, $19,778 25 



20 



City Document No. 20. 



Amount brought forward^ 

Inspection and Waste Division : — 

Salaries of Inspectors .... $9,200 91 
Travelling expenses . . . . 193 69 
Printing and stationery . . . 103 72 

Meter Division: — 

New Meters $83 46 

Setting and repairing . . . . 6,031 68 

Tools 42 31 

Stable 619 34 

Travelling expenses and miscellaneous . 120 12 

Off and on water (labor) ..... 

Main-pipe laying (including stock and labor) 

" relaying " 

' ' repairing ' ' 

Service-pipe laying " 

" " repairing " 

Hvdrants and gates, repairing" 

Streets " " 

Lake . 

Conduit 

Engine-house 

Stables 

Reservoir 

Pumping-service, salaries and wages . $8,261 20 

Fuel 14,183 60 

Repairs 2,507 89 

Oils, waste, and packing, and small 

supplies 3,559 80 



Repair-shop and pipe-yard .... 

Fountains ....... 

Tools and repairing ..... 

Taxes ........ 

Mystic Sewer (repairs, and pumping, and treatment 
of sewage) ...... 

Temporary pumping-works at lake 

Waste detector service .... 

Mystic-Valley surveys ..... 

Connections with Cochituate Service 
Merchandise sold ...... 



),778 25 



9,498 32 



6,796 91 
2,852 76 
2,180 40 
7,842 44 
1,116 02 

929 07 
3,108 17 
3,714 73 

550 91 
7,505 22 
2,574 28 
8,607 28 
8,369 37 
2,625 75 



28,512 49 

2,750 20 

771 53 

2,202 15 

143 71 

16,453 35 

362 88 

1,276 97 

2,302 46 

10,257 68 

261 72 



$153,345 02 



Report of the Water Board. 



21 






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City Document No. 20. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



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EEPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, 
City Hall, Boston, January 27, 1888. 

Col. H. T. Rockwell, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 
Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the revised 
ordinances I respectfully submit the following report on the 
condition of the Water- Works : — 

The Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall of the past year was somewhat below the 
average, but occurred at such seasons that the percentage 
collected was large ; consequently the amount of water re- 
ceived in the storage reservoirs has been larger than for any 
year since 1878. The rainfall and quantities collected have 
been as follows : — 



Sudbury. 


Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


Rainfall, inches, 42.705 


41.58 


46.42 


collected inches, 24.227 


23.47 


22.17 


Daily average yield, 






gallons 86,749,300 


21,089,200 


28,376,600 



The rainfall having been quite evenly distributed through- 
out the year there has been no scarcity of water at any time, 
and the storage reservoirs have been kept nearly full for the 
greater portion of the year. Very little trouble has been 
experienced from the growth of algje, and the quality of the 
water, with the exception of that of the Mystic supply, has 
been good. 

The fluctuations of the dilFerent reservoirs are graphically 
shown by diagrams facing page 46, and the condition of 
the several reservoirs during the year is given more in detail 
in the following statements : — 

SuDBURY-RlVER RESERVOIRS AND LaKE CoCHITUATE. 

Reservoir N^o. 1. — Water was wasted over the crest of 

dam No. 1, from January 1 to May 25, 1887. Both sets 

of flash-boards were then put on the dam and the reservoir 
allowed to fill. 



Report of the Water Board. 25 

On June 2 waste began again, and continued until June 
26, with the exception of three days. Between November 
16 and November 23 water was drawn into Farm pond, 
and on November 25 the reservoir surface stood at 156.62, 
the lowest point reached during the year. On December 
11 the water had risen to the level of the stone crest, and 
has been wasting since that date. 

Reservoir No. 2. — This reservoir remained full from the 
beginning of the year until the middle of June, and water 
was running over the crest of the dam during the greater 
portion of that time. 

On July 18 the surface had fallen about 4 feet, and 
during July and August it was from 2\ to 3" feet below the 
top of the flash-boards. In September the water was falling ; 
on October 4 it reached its lowest point for the year, — 
160.32 above tide-marsh level, or 6.80 below the top of the 
flash-boards ; and on December 14 it was level with the 
stone crest of the dam. 

On January 1, 1888, the water stood at 165.94 above 
tide-marsh level. 

Reservoir JVb. 3. — This reservoir was full and overflowing 
on January 1, 1887. On January 8 the waste-gates were 
opened, and on February 2 the reservoir was empty. The 
gates were closed on February 10; on the 21st waste 
began over the dam, and continued until June 13, after 
which date the water surface gradually fell until October 4, 
when it stood at 171.73, or 3.51 feet below the stone crest of 
the dam. On December 6 the reservoir was again full, 
and since that date water has been wasting over the dam. 

Reservoir JSFo. 4.- — On January 1, 1887, the water sur- 
face stood at 205.93 above tide-marsh level, or about 10 feet 
below high-water mark. On February 1 it had risen to 
211.33, and it was kept near that level until the middle of 
March, when the waste-gates were closed and the reservoir 
allowed to fill. On March 28 waste began over the stone 
crest of the dam, and continued, with the exception of about 
two weeks in July and six days in August, until September 
21st. From October 4 to November 15 water was drawn 
from this reservoir for the city's supply, lowering its surface 
about 10 feet to 204.98. The reservoir is now slowly filling, 
standing at 207.82 on January 1, 1888. 

Farm Pond. — The average level of this pond for the year 
has been 149.24, and its surface has been kept within three or 
four inches of that elevation. Algae appeared in the pond 
in June, and from June 2 to August 24 no water was 
taken from it, the supply for the city being taken through the 
new conduit across the pond. 



2G City Document No. 20. 

The Framingham Water Co. has drawn from the pond 
during the year 87,500,000 gallons. 

Lake OocJdtuate. — On January 1, 1887, the hike surface 
was 129.77 feet above the tide-marsh level, or 4.59 feet 
below high-watermark; it remained about grade 130 until 
January 24, when it rose rapidly. The stop-planks were 
removed, and waste began on January 29. Waste was 
continued during the greater portion of the time until May 

9, when the stop-planks were replaced. The surface then 
fell slowly until July 29, when the waste-gate was opened 
for the purpose of more rapidly lowering the water, in order 
to facilitate the work of improving the shallow portion of the 
lake. The lowest point reached was 125.12, on November 

10, and on January 1, 1888, the surface stood at 125.63. 
Early in September the water in the lake having fallen suffi- 
ciently, work was begun upon the improvement of certain 
portions of the lake in the vicinity of the Boston and Albany 
Railroad. The troubles occurring in this part of the lake 
have been already alluded to in previous reports. It was 
determined to deepen the water in certain places and to fill 
the margins in others, as has already been done in the reser- 
voirs on the Sudbury river. The work was divided into six 
sections. The first of these extended north of the railroad in 
the valley of Beaver Dam brook. The fourth section was in 
the vicinity of the entrance of Course brook into the lake, 
and still another section adjacent to the Natick cemetery. 
These were all completed in accordance with the plans made 
the previous winter, and on December 20 the men were dis- 
charged and the water raised in this portion of the lake by 
putting in the stop-planks at the circular dam. The whole 
work was done by day's labor. The new banks were covered 
with clean gravel, supplied by the Boston and Albany Rail- 
road Co. About 50,000 cubic yards of material were han- 
dled, of which 7,000 were gravel. The remainder was prin- 
cipally mud and peat. Plans will be made during the 
present winter for continuing this work in the Pegan 
meadows on the northerly side of the railway. 

No water has been received in the lake from the Sudbury 
river or Dudley pond during the year. The following table 
shows the heights of the different reservoirs on the first of 
each month : — 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



27 



Reservoir 

No. 1. 

Top 

of flash- 
boards. 
159.29. 


Reservoir 
No. 2. 
Top 

of flash- 
boards, 
167.12. 


Reservoir 

No. 3. 

Crest of 

dam, 

175.24. 


Reservoir 

No. 4. 

Crest of 

overflow, 

214.21. 


Farm 
Pond. 


157.98 


166.13 


175.54 


204.93 


149.28 


158.92 


163.80 


160.20 


211.33 


149.28 


158.12 


166.25 


174.00 


211.13 


149.21 


158.32 


166.40 


175.51 


214.70 


149.35 


158.51 


166.48 


176.02 


214.87 


149.33 


159.17 


167.22 


175.40 


215.10 


149.27 


159.24 


165.89 


175.00 


214.91 


149.14 


158.89 


164.21 


173.70 


214.91 


149.31 


159.10 


165.73 


173.71 


214.95 


149.39 


158.86 


160.59 


171.89 


214.75 


149.26 


158.63 


161.44 


172.36 


208.25 


149.23 


156.87 


165.59 


174.84 


205.80 


149.24 


157.79 


165.94 


175.46 


207.89 


149.24 



Lake Co- 
chituate. 

Top 
of flash- 
boards. 
134.36. 



January 1, 1887 
February 1, " 
March 1, " 
April 1, " 

May 1, " 

June 1, " 

July 1, " 

August 1, " 
September 1, " 
October 1, " 
November 1, " 
December 1, " 
January 1, 1888 



129.77 
133.42 
133.16 
133.82 
134.29 
133.97 
133.35 
131.45 
127.34 
125.99 
125.38 
125.39 
125.63 



Water has been drawn from the Siidbury-river reserv^oirs 
for the supply of the city as follows : — 



Januaiy 1 to February 25 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

February 26 to April 9 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

April 10 to April 24 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

April 2() to April 27 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

April 28 to May 20 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

May 20 to May 23 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

May 23 to May 27 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

May 27 to May 30 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

May 30 to June 9 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

June 10 to June 19 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

June 19 to June 24 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

June 25 to June 27 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

June 27 to June 30 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

June 30 to July 10 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

July 14 to July 17 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

July 18 to July 19 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

July 22 to July 24 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

July 28 to July 31 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

August 1, from Res. No. 2. 

August 5 to August 7 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

August 8, from Res. No. 2. 



28 City Document No. 20. 

Auffust 12 to Ausrust 14 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

August 15, from Res. No. 2. 

Auo-ust 19 to Auofust 21 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 and 3. 

August 24 to September 8 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

September 9 to September 11 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 
and 3. 

September 14 to October 3 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 
and 3. 

October 4 to November 14 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

November 15 and IG, from Res. No. 1. 

November 17 to November 22 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 1 
and 2. 

November 23 to December 5 inclusive, from Res. No. 2. 

December 5 to December 12 inclusive, from Res. Nos. 2 
and 3. 

December 13 to January 1, 1888, inclusive, from Res. 
No. 2. 

The conduit across Farm pond was used from June 2 to 
August 24 ; during the remainder of the year the supply 
was taken directly from Farm pond. 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use 342 days 
and the Cochituate aqueduct 3591 days. The former has 
delivered into Chestnut-Hill reservoir 6,124,100,000 gallons, 
equal to a daily average supply of 16,778,400 gallons, while 
4,802,120,700 gallons, equal to 13,156,500 gallons per day, 
have been drawn from Lake Cochituate. Both aqueducts 
have been cleaned once during the year ; the details of this 
work will be found in the report of the Superintendent of 
the Western Division. The depths of water run in the 
Cochituate aqueduct have been as follows: — 

January 1 to 7 inclusive, 6.50 feet. 
January 8 to February 15 inclusive, 550 feet. 
February 15 to 17 inclusive, 6 feet. 
February 18 to June 27 inclusive, 5.50 feet. 
June 28 to July 6 inclusive, 6 feet. 
July 7 to August 26 inclusive, 6.50 feet. 

From August 26 to January 1, 1888, the depth of water 
in the aqueduct has been governed by the level of the water 
in the lake, the depth being only about 4 feet during 
November. The Chestnut Hill, Brookline, Parker Hill, and 



Report or the Water Board. 29 

East Boston reservoirs are in good condition. The average 
monthly and yearly heights of all the reservoirs is shown by 
the table on page 46. 

High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

The daily average amount of water pumped at the High- 
land station has been 3,441,000 gallons, an increase of 17.9 
per cent, from that of the year 1886. The Worthington 
engine has been run 7,935 hours 45 minutes, an average of 
21 hours 45 minutes per day, and has pumped 1,241,782,500 
gallons, an average of about 3,400,000 per day. 

One of the Boston Machine Co. engines was used for 197 
hours, and pumped 14,198,700 gallons. 

Total coal consumed, 2,541,900 lbs., of which 15.5 per 
cent, were ashes and clinkers. 

Average lift, 115.88 feet. 

Quantity pumped per pound of coal, 494.1 gallons. 

Average duty (no deductions), 47,752,800 ft. -lbs. per 
100 lbs. 

Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries . 

Fuel 

Repairing 

Oil waste, and packing 

Small supplies 

Total . 

Cost per million gallons lifted one foot high, 8.351 cents. 

At the East Boston station the daily average amount 
pumped has been 329,500 gallons ; at the West Roxbury 
station 34,100 gallons, and at the Brighton station about 
200,000 gallons. 

New High-Service Works. 

These works are approaching completion, and within a 
few weeks the pnmping-stations at Roxbury and Brighton 
will be abandoned, and the new works placed in service. 
Plans for the pumping- station at Chestnut Hill were pre- 
pared during the latter part of 1886, and, in order that work 
upon the masonry might be begun as soon as the season 
would permit, the excavations were begun on January 10, 
and continued until March 31, under the direction of Mr. 



$4,593 72 


7,217 53 


44 00 


124 24 


174 11 


$12,153 60 



30 City Document No. 20. 

Fitzgerald, Superintendent of the Western Division. Plans 
and specifications were prepared for the foundations for 
the building and engines, together with the chimney, pump- 
wells, screen and connection chambers, and on March 2 
a contract was executed with Collins & Ham for doing 
the work. They began active operations on April 1, and 
completed their contract on September 9. A contract for 
the masonry of the superstructure was awarded to Donahue 
Bros, on April 5, and on June 27 they commenced work 
on the erection of the building. 

The walls of the building are now nearly completed, and 
the contractors for the iron roofs are erecting the trusses for 
the coal-shed and boiler-house. On May 6 a contract was 
made with George Miles, for furnishing and setting two 
boilers, and they are now set, and covered by a temporary 
wooden building. The first shipment of the Gaskill engines 
arrived on August 16, and the work of setting up the 
machincr}' has been in progress during the past four months. 
One engine is now ready to be started, and the second 
engine will be completed in a few weeks. The engines 
have been covered by a temporary wooden building to 
facilitate erection, and in order that they may be used before 
the completion of the permanent building. 

The laying of the force main and the connections with the 
pumps have been completed by the Superintendent of the 
Eastern Division. 

During the winter of 1886-87 Fisher-Hill reservoir, 
though uncompleted, was partially filled with water for the 
purpose of protecting the completed work from the frost. 
On April 8 the waste-gate was opened, and on April 21 the 
reservoir was empty. 

Work was resumed by the contractors, Moulton and 
O'Mahoney, on April 27, and was continued by them 
through the season, until November 18, when their contract 
was completed. 

On November 30 the sluice-gates at the gate-chamber 
were finished, and the v/ater was let into the basin, reaching 
high-water mark on Jan. 2, 1888. The following descrip- 
tion and plates show the construction of this reservoir : — 

The reservoir is rectangular in shape, 500 feet by 295 feet, 
measured at the top of the inner slope of the embankment, 
and 423 by 218 feet at the bottom of the slope. The high- 
water mark is 241 feet above tide-marsh level ; the top of 
the earth embankment 245 feet; the foot of the inner slope 
223 feet; the centre of the reservoir 221 feet, and the invert 
of the 36-inch pipe 220 feet. The reservoir is built partly 
in excavation and partly in embankment. The embankment 



Fisher Hill Reservoir 

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Fisher Hill Reservoir. 



S£rcrr/oN on line' C'D. 



SCAtE or FEET. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 31 

is 20 feet wide on top, with outside slopes of two horizontal 
to one vertical, and inside slopes of 1| horizontal to 1 ver- 
tical. It is composed of the material from the excavation, a 
compact, clayey gravel spread in 4-inch layers, Avatered and 
thoroughly rolled. The inner slope of the embankment is 
covered to above the high-water line with a layer of puddle 
2 feet in thickness, composed of the natural material, from 
which all the large stones were removed, and brick clay, 
thoroughly mixed in the proportion of | natural material 
and ^ clay, wet and rammed in place. This puddle is cov- 
ered from the base of the slope to grade 235 with a layer of 
Portland cement concrete 9 inches in thickness. Between 
grade 235 and 243 the slope is covered with a paving of 
Roxbury stone 15 inches in thickness underlaid by 12 inches 
of small broken stone. 

To prevent any slipping of the puddle or of the paving on 
the slope, an abutment of American cement concrete is placed 
at the foot of the slope, as shown on section. The bottom of 
the reservoir is covered with 2 feet of puddle, composed of 
the natural material mixed in thin layers with a small quan- 
tity of clay, wet and rolled. For a distance of 10 feet from 
the foot of the slope the bottom is covered with a layer of 
Portland cement concrete 6 inches in thickness. The bot- 
tom slopes toward the centre, and is drained by a concrete 
gutter to the gate-chamber. The outer slope of the embank- 
ment is covered with loam 2 feet in thickness, there being a 
surplus of loam from the excavation. A gravel walk 8 feet 
in width surrounds the reservoir on the top of the embank- 
ment. The gate-chamber is located in the centre of the 
easterly embankment. It is 20 feet by 20 feet 10 inches, 
inside dimensions, with side-walls of rubble granite masonry 
26 feet high, 5 feet C^ inches thick at the bottom, and 3 feet (I 
inches at the top, and is divided by brick partition walls into 
influent and effluent chambers, as shown on the accompany- 
ing plate. The foundation course is a bed of American ce- 
ment concrete 2 feet thick, and below this there are three 
cut-off walls of concrete 2 feet square, running parallel with 
the centre line of the eml)ankment, designed to cut off leak- 
age. The water enters the gate-chamber through a 3()-inch 
pipe, passes out through a 3G-inch pipe, and enters the reser- 
voir near the centre. A- brick division wall, with sluice-gate 
at the bottom and stop-planks above, prevents the reservoir 
from being emptied in case of a break in the force-main. 
By means of two sluice-gates in the effluent chnmber, water 
can be taken from different depths. The pipe for overflow 
and drainage is 16 inches in diameter; it is reduced to 12 
inches outside of the reservoir, and carried down Fisher ave- 



32 CiTT Document No. 20. 

nue to Boylston street, there connecting with a surface drain. 
The drain from the reservoir of the town of Brookline is also 
connected with this pipe. The superstructure of the gate- 
house is brick with trimmings of Longmeadow brown stone. 
The work is now complete with the exception of some grad- 
ing and sowing of the grounds, which will be done in the 
spring. 

The total cost of this reservoir to date is as follows : — 

Land $92,042 00 

Construction of reservoir : — 

81,095 cubic yards earth excavation, $33,248 95 

97 " " rock " 121 25 

2,476 " " clay delivered . 6,315 80 

5,566 " " slope puddle . 3,005 6^ 

6,429 " " bottom " . 3,085 92 

2,155 " " ballast in place . 5,387 50 

561 " " American cement 

concrete . 3,096 72 
1,350 " " Portland cement 

concrete . 10,287 00 
139 " " brick masonry . 1,390 00 
394 " " rubble " . 3,546 00 
1,104 " " slope paving . 3,94128 
21.2 " " dimension ma- 
sonry, 6-cut . 805 60 
37.7 " " dimension ma- 
sonry, quarry 
face" . . 848 25 
139 lineal feet 36-inch pipe laid, 37 53 
42 " " 16-inch " " 6 30 
141 cubic yards granite slope 

paving .... 554 13 

Extra labor and materials . . 289 40 



Total paid Moulton & O'Mahoney . . . 75,967 27 

Sluice-gates, etc. ...... 1,215 00 

Gate-house superstructure .... 8,912 00 

Miscellaneous ; including engineering, advertis- 
ing, office, etc 9,948 35 



Total cost of reservoir . . . $188,084 62 



The total amount expended from the appropriation for new 
high-service on January 1, 1888, was $464,981.86, of which 
$31,330.82 was expended for the West Roxbury high-service. 



Rkport of the Water Board. 33 

Plans and estimates have been made for high-service works 
to supply the high land of Breed's island, the construction 
of which was authorized by the City Council, A wrought- 
iron tank will be erected on the summit of Breed's Hill, to 
which water will be forced by pumps located at the present 
pumping-station near the reservoir. 

The work can be commenced as soon as the weather will 
permit. 

Mystic Lake. 

The surface of the lake was 5.52 feet above tide-marsh 
level on January 1, 1887, and water was wasting over the 
outlet dam. Waste was continued until June 12. The 
lake surface remained near high- water mark until September, 
and water was wasted over the dam during the greater por- 
tion of the month of August. On October 1 the lake was 
1.79 feet below high water. During October and November 
the lake surface slowly rose, and on December 15 waste 
was commenced at the outlet dam. 



Mystic- Valley Sewer. 

The treatment of the sewage has been continued as in past 
years. Experiments have been in i)rogress during the past 
year for the purpose of finding a more satisfactory method 
of treating the sewage than that now used. The results of 
these experiments have been encouraging, and I recommend 
their continuance on a more extended scale. 

In this connection I may add that the present wooden 
tanks are so old and decayed that new ones are necessary ; 
the engine is in need of renewal, and the reconstruction 
of these old works can be, at conjparatively small expense, 
so adai)ted as to be used either with the present method of 
treatment or in connection with a more satisfactory one, 
should the experiments prove successful. 



Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit was cleaned on June 8, and again on Sep- 
tember 30. The reservoir is in good condition. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The table on page 49 shows the work done by the 
engines at this station during each month of the past year. 



34 City Document No. 20. 

Enyine No. 1 was in use 109 hours 20 minutes pumping 18,633,400 gallons. 

•' " 2 " " 1,531 " 50 " " 278,851,700 " 

•' " 3 " " 8,615 " 30 " " 2,487,168,000 " 

Total amount pumped 2,784,653,100 " 

Total amouut of coal consumed 6,007,900 lbs. 

Percentage of ashes and clinkers, 8.9. 
Averase lift, 147.73 ftet. 

Quantity pumped per pound of coal, 463.5 arallons. 

Average duty of engines, no deductions, 57,106,200 feet lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal. 
Daily average amount pumped 7,629,200 gallons, an increase of 3.1 per cent from that of the 
year 1886. 

Cost of Pumfping. 

Salaries $8,283 05 

Fuel 11,122 91 

Repairs Q-2b <o^ 

Oil, waste, and packing .... 1,555 49 

Small supplies . . . . . . 174 58 



Total $21,761 72 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 5.29 cents. 

The trusses supporting the roof of Ihe engine-house were 
old, badly distorted, and in an unsafe condition ; they are 
now being rei)]aced by new ones of a new design. The roof 
of the coal bunker has rotted away, and I recommend that 
it be re[)laced by a shed roof during the present year. 

Consumption. 

The daily average consumption has been as follows ; — 

Gallons Gallons 

Sudbury and Cochituate supply 
Mystic supply 

The above figures show an increase in the consumption of 
the Sudbury and Cochituate works of 12.1 percent, over that 
of the 3'ear 1886, of the Mystic works of 3.1 per cent, and of 
the combined supplies of 10.1 per cent. The increase on 
the Sudbury and Cochituate works has been larger than the 
probable increase in population. Although the number of 
premises supplied through meters has been reduced, there 
has lieen a large increase in the amount of metered water 
used, amounting to an increased daily consumpticm of 856,- 
500 gallons of metered water, — about 13 per cent, over that 
of the year 1886, the metered water used in 1887 being at 
the rate of 7,229,700 gallons daily. Should allowance be 
made for the fewer premises metered, the percentage of 



per day. 


per capita. 


29,852,100 


80.7 


7,629,000 


72.7 



Eeport of the Water Board. 35 

increase would be higher. The fact that the number of new 
service-pipes laid during the year has been larger than for 
any year since 1871 furnishes another reason for a large 
legitimate increase in consumption. 



Detection of Waste. 

The operation of the Deacon waste detection system and 
the work of setting stopcocks on the old service-pipes has 
been continued under the personal charge of Assistant 
Dexter Brackett, who reports as follows : — 



CiTr Engineer's Office, 

Boston, January 11, 1887. 

William Jackson, Esq., Cihj Engineer: — 

Dear Sir, — The detection of waste by the Deacon 
meters and sidewalk stopcocks was begun on April 13, and 
continued until November 26. There are now connected 
with the works 75 Deacon meters, through which are sup- 
plied about 353,500 people, divided into 153 sections. Dur- 
ing the season 728 diagrams were taken, showing the hourly 
rate of consumption and waste in these sections. In con- 
nection with the operation of the meters, night examinations 
have been made of all services which have been provided 
with shut-off cocks in the sidewalk, and all indications of 
waste reported to the Waste Detection Department with the 
following: results : — 

Number of services Reported def. Reported def. 





tested. 


once. 


twice. 


South Boston 


. 6,925 


1,005 


97 


North and West Ends . 


. 4,1)50 


464 


. 


South End Church cocks 


. 6,406 


1,460 


173 


Charlestown 


. . 


358 


• • 



Total 3,287 270 

By examination by the Inspection and Waste Department 
the causes of waste were found to be as follows : — 



36 



City Document No. 20. 





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206 


336 


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358 


Charleeiown 


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The work of placing sidewalk stopcocks on the old service- 
pipes was begun for the season on April 18, and continued 
with a force of about 50 men until November 12. During 
that time 6,035 cocks were set, and 128 of the Church stop- 
cocks were replaced by the ordinary pattern. This depart- 
ment has also established 19 new service-pipes, and replaced 
284 cast-iron service-pipes with lead. 

These iron services had been in use since the introduction 
of water, and were badly tuberculatcd. In many cases the 
passage for water had been reduced from the original diame- 
ter of H inches to ^ inch or | inch. The cost of these 
stopcocks set in position, including cost of service-box, 
labor, etc., has been about $5 each. 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Assistant Engineer. 

Distribution. 

During the year 1887 the following changes have been 
made in the distribution systems : — 



SUDBURY AXD COCHITUATE WORKS. 



Size of 


Total Lena;th laid 


Length of Pipe 


Pipe. 


and relaid. 


abandoned. 


4 


973 


3,848 


6 


47,926 


5,611 


8 


21,779 


. . 


10 


5,771 


, , 


12 


42,718 


. 


16 


1 ,093 


. 


20 


, , 


1,256 


24 


5,929 


. 


30 


2,562 


. 


36 


52 


. 


48 


1,528 


1,528 



130,331 



12,243 



MYSTIC WORKS. 
Length laid. Length abandoned. 



3,451 

24,293 

500 

4,690 

660 



33,594 



570 
172 



90 



9,832 



Eeport of the Water Board. 37 

The total length of pipe laid on the Sudbury and 
Cochituate works was 24.68 miles; of this amount 2.32 
miles were laid to replace existing pipes which were relaid 
for various reasons, raakino; a net increase in the total length 
in use of 22.36 miles. This is the largest amount of pipe 
laid on the Sudbury and Cochituate works since 1875. On 
the Mj^stic works the mains have been extended 23,762 feet, 
and 9,928 feet of wrought-iron and cement pipe have been 
replaced by cast-iron pipes. The Cochituate distribution 
has been also gi-eatly improved by removing the tubercles 
from the old 6-inch and 12-inch mains, by means of the 
Sweeney pipe-scraper. In the City proper, South and East 
Boston, there were cleaned during the year 40,932 feet of 
6-inch and 20,280 feet of 12-inch pipe, at an average cost 
of 13.7 cents per foot for the 6-inch, and of 20 cents per foot 
for the 12-inch. 

An order of the City Council, approved May 28, 1887, 
authorized the laying of a new main for the improvement of 
the East Boston supply, and a contract was made on June 
11, with R. D. Wood & Co., for 1,100 tons of 24-inch pipe 
at $35, and 170 terns of 30-inch pipe at $34.50, per gross 
ton. In July the City Council authorized the laying of 
pipes for the supply of Charlestown from the Cochituate 
works. As the new main to East Boston was to be laid 
through Charlestown, the original plan for the East Boston 
main was modified by enlarging the size of the new main 
between the City proper and Charlestown, and connecting 
it with the large mains on the Common instead of with the 
24-inch at Haymarket square. On September 21 a con- 
tract for 1,28() tons of 16-ineh and 30-inch pipe, at $30.69, 
was made with the Gloucester Iron Works. The contract 
of R. D. Wood & Co. has been completed, and 5,356 feet of 
24-inch and 1,256 feet of 30-inch main laid in Charlestown 
and on Chelsea bridge. In connection with this work the 
bridge which carries the water pipe across the Mystic river 
has been rebuilt. This bridge was built in 1850, and the 
boxing rebuilt in 1867, when the Mystic works were ex- 
tended to Chelsea. The boxing and fender-tjiiard were 
very badly decayed. The cf)ntract for doing this work was 
made with J. N. Hayes & Co., on August 29, for the sum 
of $14,500. The old piles were cut down and spliced in a 
substantial manner, with 10 by 12 inch hard-pine sticks. 
Three 10 by 14 inch longitudinal stringers, supported by 
6 by 12 inch double girder caps are bolted to the tops of 
the spliced piles; a flooring of 4-inch spruce plank is laid 
upon the stringers, making a platform 8^ feet in width, on 
which are laid the 16-inch and 30-inch pipes. The pipes are 



38 City Document No. 20. 

covered by a housing large enough to be entered for exam- 
ining and repairing the pipes. The new fender is placed 
IG feet from the bridge, so as to provide a protection against 
injury from vessels. 

The relocation and chano-e of o;rade of Beacon street, in 
the town of Bi'ookline, has necessitated the relaj'ing of 1,528 
feet of the 48-inch main, and there are other portions of the 
main which will require lowering during the coming sea- 
son. A large amount of work has been done in connection 
with the petitions for main pipe, of which there were 249 
during the season. Plans have been made, and lines and 
grades given, for all pipes laid during the year, and all 
gates and hj^drants have been located and plotted upon 
the location plans tiled in this office. 

Miscellaneous. 

The sea-wall at the Albany-street pipe-yard has been rebuilt 
by Boynton Brothers, at a cost of about $10,500. The old 
wall was taken down, additional piles driven, and the wall 
rebuilt, using new stone for the face, and also for a substan- 
tial cut-stone caf)ping. On the face of the wall is an oak- 
pile fender with hard-pine cap. Examinations and estimates 
have been made of the cost of supplying the public institu- 
tions on Long Island with Cochituate water. 

The following is a report from Mr. Desmond Fitzgerald, 
resident enoineer, of the work intrusted to his charoe : — 

Boston, Jan. 1, 1888. 
WiLLL\M Jackson, Esq., 

Chief Engineer Boston Wafer- Works: — 

Sir, — The following brief rei)ort is submitted of en- 
gineering work on additional sujiph' and the iniprovcunent 
of the old sources. During the winter of 1886-7 surveys 
and plans were made for the deepening of live sections of 
shallow flowage at Lake Cochituate, in the vicinity of the 
Beaver-dam and Course-brook valleys. This work Avas 
begim under your direction in September, and prosecuted to 
completion on December 20. 

About 50,000 cubic yards of material have lieen moved. 
Plans have also l^een made for the further application of the 
same treatment to the Pegan meadows. Surveys and plans 
have been made in connection with studies already made for 
the construction of an additional basin in the Indian- brook 
valley of the Sudbury-river supply. A number of lines 
have been run, and estimates made for the relocation of the 
highways, and borings for fountlations are now in progress. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 39 

Detail plans are making for a new dam at the outlet of Lake 
Cochituate, and other engineering studies in connection with 
the disposal of the sewage of the towns of Franiingham and 
Marlboro' have been made by the engineering force. 

Very truly yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Resident Engineer. 

In General. 

The new dam at the outlet of Lake Cochituate should be 
built durino- the comins: season when the conditions will 
be favorable for doing the work, as the water will be 
kept down in order to facilitate the deepening of some 
portions of the lake. Detail plans for this dam are now 
being prepared. It is especially important that advantage 
should be taken of the present opportunity to do this work, 
as the increasing consumption wjU make demands upon the 
sources of supply in the near future which will require all 
the available storage capacity to be utilized, and it would 
not then be safe to draw down the waters of the lake at a 
proper season of the year for constructing the dam. The 
new basin on Indian brook, for which a greater part of the 
land has been purchased, will require several seasons foi- its 
construction ; it is therefore imi)ortant that work should be 
commenced this year. Plans and investigations are now in 
progress, for the purpose of determining the final location 
of the dam, the most economical method of treating the shal- 
lower margins, and for the relocation of streets in Hopkinton 
and Ashland crossing the proposed location of the basin. 
The water from the Mystic supply is constantl}^ deteriorating, 
although constant efibrts have been made to protect its 
sources from pollution. The character of the water-shed is 
unfavorable for the collection of pure water, as its already 
large population is constantly growing, and without a system 
of sewers this must necessarily tend to continually increase 
the causes which render water unfit for d(jmestic use. 

The pipe-yard on Albany street is not large enough, and could 
the vacant wharf owned by the city, and adjoining this yard, 
be obtained, it would furnish additional space for storing 
pipes, which is much needed. The sea-wall on front of this 
wharf should be rebuilt; this will cost about $G,000, and if 
the Water Department should assume this expense it would 
be a fair consideration for its use. 

In some sections of the city su))plied from old tuberculated 
pipes the character of the plumbing in the houses is such 



40 City Document No. 20. 

that it is not practicable to clean the pipes with the machine 
which has been so successfully used elsewhere, and these 
pipes should be relaid, especially as in some cases larger 
oues are needed. The stand-pipe at Roxbury is now of no 
value to the water service of the city ; it has outlived its use- 
fulness, and I recommend that the Board consider what dis- 
position should be made of it. 

As soon as the new high-service works are placed in 
operation, it is the intention to increase the territory now 
supplied by the high-service. This will necessitate consid- 
erable work, changing connections and laying new mains. 
Plans for the work are now being studied, and work can be 
commenced early in the season. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-shed, etc. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 

City Engineer and Engineer B. W. Board. 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the rainfall and daily average Consurnption 
for each month. 




Eeport or THE Water Board. 



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42 



CiTr Document No. 20. 



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43 



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c 


3 cc 






CO 


t- 




a 


c 


C 






o 


o 


T 




c 






a 


Cs 


c- 


r cc 








c 


a 


1- 


!z 


^ 


' i-i 


■^ 


^ 






■^ 


0- 


CO 


CO 




C£ 


T 


w c 


r-i 


lO 


CD 




tt 


oc 


< C» 




5 


;_ - 




1 u- 




O-I^ 








3 C 




CO 


IN 












































^ 


r i- 


" -"i 






oT 












3 1- 




cT 


" 








CO 


CO 


(n" 


c 






^ 


c 


o 


o 


o 


~^ 




> c 


(. 


o 


o 


c 


c 


c 


3 C 


3 O 


o 


o 








c 


c 


o 


o 


o 






c 




o 


o 


c 


c 




3 C 


> o 


o 


o 




c 


c 


c 


c- 


05_ 


<;>^ 


■o_ 






i- 


c 






cc 


t- 


^ T 


t ° 






















































i" c 


c 




i" CO 


oT 








3 --( 


f a 




ca 


c 




" cc 


> Tl 


^ CD 


o 


CO 








c 




(N 




.o 






3 C 




-f 




a 






3 t~ 


CO 


01 


CO 




»^ 


Z. ^ 








03 


Ol 






> o 






"* 


T) 


c- 




H cc 


3 U5 


r-* 


















































r t- 


c 






co" 


m" 




~ c: 


j" c 

1 -1 


! 1- 




CO 








r r- 


^ cT 


of 


CD 


c 


c 










Ol 


m 






1 If 






V 


c 




3 O 


i ^. 


o 


C3 


•^ 




-1 


]^ c 


1- 




CD_ 


o_ 




L ^ 


L '^ 


;_ C 


c^i 




a 






5 C 


x,^ 


rH 














































> u- 








5 CO 


co" 




fr- 


r t- 


• t~ 


" cc 


TlT 


c^ 


c 


■cl 






f -qT 


■* 


>o 




















































































CIJ 










































>-• 


? 


o 


c 


^ 


,J 


1 CO 


-)i 


u. 


ee 


5 r- 


a 


3 O 


o 


^ 


o 


Cf 






3 CD 


,_ 


> 
















I' 


r- 




t- 


CO 






« 






3 CO 


CO 


<< 


SI 






Si 




H r-< 


rH 


00 


a 




%■ 


a 




s 


s^ 










00 




^ 1 






46 



City Document No. 20. 



cq 



'!:^ 



^ 
















iCO 


CO 


IM 


t— 


10 


a 


l^ 


'J* 


CO 


^ 


t. 


ll u 


t> 






CO 






CO 






CO 






CO 


1— 


C^ 


00 


CD 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


Mystic 
Reservoi 
High wat 

147.00. 


00 

l-l 


^ 


-+ 


-^ 


>* 


'^ 


'^ 


^ 


^ 


-* 


^ 


-Tl 


-* 


-t< 






r^ 






T-\ 




r-i 


rH 




rH 


rH 




CO 
00 
00 


Oi 


CO 


itO 


^ 


CO 


^ 





CO 





~~io~~ 


^ 


UO 


00 


CO 


00 
CD 


CO 

CD 


CO 
CD 






CO 

CD 


CD 


CD 


q 

CO 


2 


00 
CO 


CO 


-t* 


■^ 


'd* 




rH 


^ 


'^ 


"* 


tH 


^ 


-;*< 


-Tf 


•* 




r-4 


^ 




iH 


'"' 




rH 




r~i 














00 

00 


00 


~^ 


^ 


CO 


CO 


-* 


^ 


^ 








10 


.* 


CO 


u 


ITS 




t-^ 








rH 


CO 


q 


"^ 


q 




CO 


o 


'* 





ua 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CO 


10 


lO 


10 


.0 


10 


.2 rtl ^ . 


iH 




























00 
00 


CO 


00 


^ 


CO 


CD 





■* 


^ 


•* 


(M 


CO 


J_ 


a> 




CO 




O; 


rH 
CO 


CO 


O^ 


0. 


CO 


q 
d 


02 

i 


q 
d 


^ 


•* 




I-) 






























C^ 


^ 


CO 





.0 


(_ 


CO 


-* 


CO 


IM 





^ 


CI 


„ 


^ • ^ 


CO 
















CO 




q 


r-J 


^ 




ff "o -g o 
t. r* =: = 


00 

CO 




^ 


CO 


C» 


t-^ 


1^ 


00 


CO 


^ 






CO 


^^ 






















rH 






r^ 


(N 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


(M 


(M 


IM 


IM 


<M 


IM 


55 


IM 




00 
00 





CO 


■* 


t_ 





00 


CO 


X 


IM 


CO 


10 


(M 


CO 


^. Q) 2fj01 


ro 


-* 




rH 


CO 




q 


CO 


q 


rH 




CO 


Ol 


(Sf^S 


^ 


1^ 


t>I 


00 


ai 


00 


00 


t^ 


t- 


CO 


1-^ 


00 


^ 






r-* 






rH 










rH 








iH 


(M 


IM 


IM 


!M 


0^ 


C) 


<M 


CM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 




t> 


lO 


c» 


CD 


CO 


.n 


Tfl 


CO 


CT. 


7-i 


l_ 


CO 


10 


Ttl 


a.5:S . 










^ 


-* 




CO 


q 


'^1 






q 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


r^l 


d 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^ O c3 'O 


00 


IN 


C-) 


(N 


IN 


<M 


IM 


6^ 


<N 


IM 


IM 


IN 


(M 


<M 


O oi _■ ^ 


iH 






r-i 




r-i 


r-i 






rH 




rH 




rH 


CO 
00 
00 


o> 


CO 


t- 


CO 


CD 


^ 


,_ 


•ra 


rH 


10 





CO 


CO 


^ 




CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 


-* 


■* 


CO 


CO 


-* 




CO 


w«5 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IM 


CO 






(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 




<-{ 


■^ 


"^ 




r-^ 






y-\ 


1-i 


rH 












l> 


,^ 


00 


IM 


t_ 





^ 


ira 


IM 








CO 


CO 


00 




■* 


■* 




lO 




1-— 




q 


10 




00 




10 


stnut-H 
sservoir 
gh wate 
124.00. 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C''^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 




IM 


(N 


IM 


IM 


■M 


IM 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


<M 


iH 












■^ 


rH 


rH 


'"' 


rH 








CD 


10 


,_ 


01 





CD 


IM 


Ol 


vra 


•HI 





■ 


^ 


a 


















q 


CO 


q 




q 




00 
00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


en 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


'- 


CO 


O) 






IM 


(M 


IM 


<M 




01 


(M 




C) 




H 




'"' 


r~i 










rH 






'-' 




■^ 






CO 


,^ 


U3 


t_ 


CO 


CD 


01 


CO 


CO 


~ro~ 


J, 


o> 


CS 


2 ffl 


^ 


t— ( 


rH 





IM 






q 




CD 


O] 


M 


IM 


00 





CO 


CO 


^ 


-* 


CO 


IM 


CO 


CO 


>o 


lO 


10 


d 


o 2 Scg 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 


CO 


(M 


IM 


!M 


IM 


IM 


CO 


rH 


rH 




r~t 


7-1 


'-' 


^ 


'"' 


'"' 


■^ 


'"' 


rH 


'"' 


'"' 


6 

00 
00 


,_ 


CO 





OJ 


(M 


10 


,_ 


.ra 


^ 


.0 


CO 


OD 


UO 





CO 


CO 


IM 




CO 
CO 


a> 


d 


lO 


00 


q 


(M 

CO 


2 


CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


IM 


IM 


!M 




CO 




H 






r^ 


"-I 


■^ 


r~{ 


r-< 


rH 








""1 


" 




00 


IM 


CO 


_, 


^ 


ira 


-f 


CO 


ira 


CO 





CD 


C?) 


d 


-a 'S 

O rt o 


5^ 


01 


IM 




(M 

Cli 


IM 


oi 


oi 


IM 

d 


CO 

d 


IM 

d 


IM 

d 


00 


-* 


^ 


-* 


•* 


-* 


^ 


-+ 


'^i 


-* 


-^ 


•* 


^ 


^ 


H 


r-f 








■^ 




■^ 




'"' 


rH 




■^ 


■^ 


C£> 
00 
00 


IM 


.n 


OD 





^ 





CD 


^ 


^ 





rH 


IM 


>o 


6i 


CO 













q 


C-J 


01 


01 


q 


C-J 


CO 


£S 


OS 


c^ 


C^ 


10 


■to 


10 





to 


uO 


lO 


CD 


d 


CO 




-* 


-* 


-* 


rf* 


•* 


-* 


•Tf 


-ti 


-* 


•* 


rti 


-* 


I-l 


'"' 




rH 




r-\ 






r~i 


rH 


rH 




'"' 


■^ 









CO 


a> 


CO 


a> 


00 


t- 


^ 


CD 


^ 





t^ 









lO 





co_ 


CO 


C31 




q 


CO 


CD 




<q 


q 


00 


j^ 


,_5 


IM 


•^ 


^ 


-* 


-* 


-tH 


^ 


rH 


CC3 


CD 


IM 




00 































H 


01 


IM 


IM 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


<M 


IM 


<U O 3J rf 
































6 

00 
00 




CO 


CO 




CO 










CI 




10 




Til 







to 




UO 


lO 


q 


q 


CO 


CD 


t-; 


00 


« £ 


j^ 


CD 


f^ 


■cj* 


■^ 


-t|! 


^ 


f-^ 


CD 


^ 


OD 


^ 


t- 


a 






















(35 










r-l 




IM 


IM 


IM 


IM 


0<1 


(M 


IM 






rH 


IM 


(M 






(X> 


■^ 


lO 


.0 


<5 


Oi 


CO 


(M 


rH 


10 


IM 


UO 


t- 


t-l "^ 


co_ 


a> 


rH 


CO 






IM 


^ 


rH 


q 








00 


,_^ 


16 


1(0 


10 


>ra 


»o 


■<* 


CO 


CO 


,-^ 


CO 


UO 


CO 


l"i^" 


00 














t- 






t- 


Jt- 






rH 


r-i 


'-' 


rH 


rH 


'-' 


rH 




'-' 


■^ 




rH 


'"' 


'"' 


(U O (D uO 


CO 
00 
00 


•* 


•^ 





CO 


~~CD~~ 


CD 


co 


-* 


CD 


cn 


-ii 


^ 


^ 


IM 

00 


m 






lO 


0; 


q 
•* 


^ 


'^ 


q 


rH 

=2" 


'^ 


q 


OQ 


















10 


10 


CO 




■0 




iH 


'"' 


^ 


rH 


J-< 


■^ 


"^ 


r~l 


'-' 






rH 


'"' 






00 


.TtH 


^ 


lO 


^ 


00 


05 


CO 


a> 


OD 


~~io~~ 


-^ 


CO 




fc. "P 


»o 


CO 


IM 

CD 


CO 

CO 


r^.* 


0; 

CD 


^ 


TdH 


CO 


(M 

rH 


IM 


UO 


g 




00 


CD 




CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 






CD 


CD 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


>-< 




rH 






















o o t- 


























































m 17 ja CD 


6 

00 
00 


01 


CO 


'* 




-* 


IM 




(M 


•!* 






IM 







'*. 


01 


CO 


IM 


CO 


CO 


t-; 


CC 


CO 


IM 




IM 


P^ i3 


CO 


CD 


co' 


CD 


^ 


t-I 


^ 


CD 


CD 


CD 


cq 


»o 


co' 


li, 


CO 


CD 




CO 


CO 


CO 
rH 


CO 






!-i 


CO 


CD 


CO 




. 


>o 





IM 


CO 


^ 


f_ 


CO 


00 


IM 





^ 


j_ 


la 


.S "H 


00 




IM 

CO 


Ol 


OJ 
CO 



CO 


CO 


q 


q 


q 

d 


CO 
CO 


°° 


•* 


CO 


_: 3 _; 


00 


iO 






















UO 








1-1 






rH 






rH 












536-^^ 


























































Shi- .30 


CO 
00 
00 
1-1 


to 


CO 


IM 


-* 




CO 


a> 













CO 


0; 


rjl 


^ 


10 






^ 


^ 


^ 


q 


q 






f^ .3 


t^ 


00 


t-1 


iO 


id 


to 


Tjl 


-* 


-H* 


^ 


-J 


t-l 


UO 


fi< 


lO 


s 


s 






lO 




rH 


S 


rH 




rH 


ira 






>3 


>> 

^ 


• 




• 




. 




^ 
.= 




.Q 


.Q 


tU) 




C8 


C3 



ji 










2 


g 



.0 


a 


I 


.^2 







a 


0) 


2 

CS 






a) 
a 


>> 
3 
•-5 


- 


ft 


1 


> 

c 





rj S 






f^ 


a 


<i 


s 


1^ 


-^ 


OQ 





iz; 


fl 


>H 



Boston Water Works. 

Diagram showing the heights of Sudbury River Reservoirs, Farm Pond, and Cochituate arid Mystic 
Lakes, and the Rainfall on the Sudbury River Water Shed during the year- 1887. 




Ja/TUOfy. 


roh^uory 


A/a^c/r 


/^/Ot-l/ 


My 


June 


Vc//y 


Au^usf- 


S&pts^het- 


Ocfoh^^ 


Novefrth^f 


Decetrrhfii- 




W MtLL ION 


t 




■ 


1 1 


j(" 


Il 






■ ll 11 


'1 


1 


1 1 


' 


v\ 


' 




_L'i 


' 1 




~r 


1 II 


' III' '1 


.. 1 

20S 

195 
ISO 
ISS 

A 
\ 

170 K 

.J 
\ 

ISO y> 

ISS 
ISO 
14.5 
I4G 
135 
130 
IZS 

s 














1 1 




BM«^.,,\, 
























P 1 






"'■ 










































RES. 


a. 


3. 


























































I3SO 

ax 

1113 

n3o 

I/3S 
IOS7 
/OM 
983 
9«S 

lai 

8S3 
SOS 
7«7 

7ie 
ee? 
e<w 
s/o 
S7* 

133 
SO* 
*7I 
t3S 
■iog 
377 

3*a 

Z33 
1S7 
i*i 

lie 

I3S 
I7t 
IS3 
13* 

in 

t* 
es 

31 
Zl 

s 

2 

377 
32* 
S7* 
223 
187 
143 
IIS 
8S 
S3 
38 


sea 

SIS 
482 
433 
338 
3S7 
317 
277 
238 

aoo 

/«* 
131 

73 
43 
23 
14 

% 

8 

I32S 
IGBo 
I4SO 
I230 

SIS 

eis 

•MO 
i70 
/07 


1224 
1142 

loel 
aP2 

303 

747 
«7/ 
537 
S2S 
'4S4 
33e 
34c 
288 
238 
131 
147 
I07 
72 
41 
18 

\ 
3SO 

3ie 
2Se 

/9t 
144 

32 
■44 


2a 
xs 








































sr or'hA/^ 




^ 


























































^•-'Xy 




















r 
























I 
















































y^ 




















\ 


/■ 


^^ 




















\ 


^^^^ 


/ 




















\ 


" 


























































































































135 

I30 

iss 

1 

^/75 

. /TO 






















































































































































































































































































































































































^ 
































































































i 
























.,1 
























., 
























1, 
























( 














—J. 


. 




.--■.,-. 


, 


-— j- 




rsr or n,^ft] 


-a 






-■— 


~t^ 




.' '.- 


/ \1 ''■ 








"^ — . 








. 


■ 
















"~ — ■- ^ y" 






4'' 




\ 


; 








' 






^^^ 




'_/i^-- 




\ 


1 
























H 








1, 














'-'^ 


























1' 






















\ 




















, 




. 


jL5»-r-w- 






^— — A-^ 


ff»/^-T>r#V^* 


» /vn. .= 








I 




X ^ 


Ja 












r 


\ 






V /■ ■ 


^ 


\\ 


A^ 










' — \ r 


'^^^Z 


\ 




/ 




u 


f i? 














\/\ 




/ 






^ ^ 














\ 


Ai 


/ 






^■ 














\ 


J ^ 


^ y 


















- 








ISS 
ISO 
I4S 
HO 
ISS 
I30 

lie 
s 

o 


-1^ 


\J ^^ 


A/s-V> 




r- 




==..«.^.^ 


est) MOASJZi, 


^MAM-L^.. 




z =1 — 












— ^r^ 












— ^ 


-.L^"''''^ 




























































I- 
























\ 
























- i- 








































































i" 






""' 




■■ '* 






























































































































































, 
















































1 
















— . — 


- 
























































































































i 


~. /-- 


^_,;„ — ^ 


bn 





















— y 




- 






















/ 
















\ 


























\ 


























\ 


























'- — 


.^ 








n 




















'^^ ^^ 
































^ . 
































































^^^^fi^^^^r" 


^^^ 


aflca 


MY^- 


r/C LAKr 











'"'YIN' 


f>.^^^- 


^'n>'^'^^ 


-^ 
















-'^SS^ - 


""""^ '""T 


MX 




















































1- 













































































































































































Repoet of the Water Board. 



47 



u '5 — 



pH ° 



C^g 



OS «o (>? '^ 



05 CI ^ 



1— O CI 00 O lO 



O CD I— I 



a §3.9 

5— a 
1= = c o 
si'-'Si-l 

^ O o 



o iH 3 



° ? ■' 






=; X 




























en 




-^ 






CO 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


cn 




r-^ 








,_l 






l-H 










Tt* 












•^ 










-1 C-l 








CO 














t^ 


CO 


« 


^ 


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^ 


la 


C<) 


OD 


tJD 


CO 


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CN 






l-H 















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vn CO CO O GO 



1-- rH rH O CO 
■Tt< O CD O CD 

O CD t— CO CD 



00 lO CI CD 



CD Ol Ol iH 



CD CD CO CD 



CD^ 00^ uO^ CD^ 
CO Co" C0~ CO CO cf C^" c^" c4" ci cf C^ 



I- t- CO 



■-+ »0 CD 



48 



City Document No. 2i). 



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oc 


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cc 


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b- 


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c 




OS 


tc 


rjT 


c. 


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CO 


o 


s" 


of 


JO -sqi 001 -lad 








cc 


(> 


t- 


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CO 


s 


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saqav! -luoD aaj; 














t-t 










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c^ 


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CO 


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Cs 


« 


C^ 


tc 


c 


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o 
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tT cc 


c 


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tc 


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tc 


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£ 


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tc 


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Report or the Water Board. 



49 









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? 













o 


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001 -lad spnnod 


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co' 


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oi" r-T cT cT 

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t» ^ CO c- 

T-T oT CO <y 
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CD 



nooj ui ^'inQ 


^ 


to 


H 


^ 


I-H^ 


O^ CO^ CO to 
O" «-^ CO to 


t-^ (N CT t- 
CO 1-^ t-T CC 








■o 


lO 


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to u3 >o in 


o io u^ »r 


lO 






^ 


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c» 


t- T-l OJ lO 


C-l CO u- 


ir 


CO 


•laaj 
HI mi aS'B.iaAY 


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^ 




oo 


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3 CO ^ 






^ 1 




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3 




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b- t^ i~; t, 

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psdtnnd yCiTiuBn^ 






11 


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to 


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5v ^ 


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to 


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CB 


saqsB -laao jaj 


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00 CO 03 oi 


CT CT a 


C 


00 


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50 



City Document No. 20. 



Rainfall in inches aiid hundredths on the Sudbury River Water-shed for 

the Year 1887. 



1887. 


5 

1-2 


g 


p 


P. 
<1 


^ 
a 


a 

D 


1-5 


an 

-A 


g 

ft 
m 


o 

O 


0) 

a 
> 

o 


S 




1 


0.055 








0.025 


. . . 






0.785 






2 : 








1.20 




1.60 


. . . 


0.82 


0.015 


0.09 






3 




0.675 








0.035 








0.185 




0.015 


4 • 




















0.035 






5 ' 








0.045 












0.01 




0.18 


6 


1.125 


0.035 


1.24 




0.08 
0.02 




0.055 


0.16 










7 . . . 1 


0.575 








8 




42 






















9 . . . 


24 










0.01 














10 ; 






0.985 




. . . 




0.77 




0.145 




0.655 




11 i 




0.285 




. . . 








1.00 




0.415 




0.84 


12 • . . . 


























13 


























14 . . . 


1 48 
















0.455 








15 




0.30 


0.015 
















1.09 
0.045 


0.685 


16 




0.01 


0.425 
















17 


0.65 








0.61 












18 ■ 








0..595 




0.015 


. . . 


1.17 








0.485 


19 . . 




1.795 


0.22 
















0.285 




20 












0.215 










21 




0.01 




. . . 




0.05 






1.315 




0.285 


22 




0.11 








0.295 






0.085 








23 






0.975 






0.62 














24 


0.59 


0.465 




0.055 






2.115 


1.775 










25 






0.02 




0.18 


. . . 


. . . 








0.335 




26 


0.225 


0.685 




0.87 


. . . 


. . . 














27 .... 
























0.325 


28 .... 








0.015 

0.49 

0.57 


885 












0.26 


1.065 


29 


0.835 




1.435 






0.21 


0.02 
0.12 








30 


0.045 








SI 


























Totals . 


5.20 


4.78 


4.90 


4.265 


1.165 


2.65 


3.76 


5.28 


1.32 


2.835 


2.67 


3.88 



Total rainfall during the year, 42.705 inches. 

Being an average of two^ gauges located at Framingham and Westboro'. 



Report of the Water Board. 



51 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on Lake Cochituate Water-shed for 1887. 



0.10 
1.14 



Totals . 5.29 5.34 5.10 4.45 1.02 2.58 3.77 3.70 1.28 2.49 2.76 3.80 



Total rainfall during the year, 41.58 inches. 



52 



City Document No. 20. 



Rainfall in inches and Jiundi 



edths on the Mystic 
1887. 



Lake Watershed for 



18S7. 


3 

a 

C3 
•-5 


g 
CD 


S 
1^ 


ft 


a 


o 

a 

3 

1^ 


3 


i 

3 
a) 

3 




o 
O 


si 
a 

o 


a 

a> 

a> 
Q 


1 

2 

3 




0.62 




1.20 


1.24 


0.01 


0.50 




0.905 
0.105 
0.125 




0.02 


4 


























5 








0.045 
















0.14 


6 


0.975 


0.015 


1.065 




0.09 




0.015 


0.52 










7 


0.85 








8 . . . . 




0.52 






















9 


0.195 
























10 

11 

12 




0.305 


1.03 


. . . 

0.015 






1.18 
0.585 


0.30 


0.215 
0.24 


0.78 


0.82 


0.765 


13 ... 


























14 . ... 


1.26 
























15 ... , 




0.13 


0.01 
0.005 

0.34 


















0.72 


16 




0.56 
0.59 


. . . 




0.04 
0.025 


0.505 


. . . 




1.315 




17 

18 

19 


0.70 


1.645 


0.41 


20 
















0..525 






0.25 




21 




















1.125 




0.38 


22 

23 




0.145 


1.025 
0.015 






0.445 
1.01 


1.275 
0.905 
0.275 




0.165 








24 

25 

■26 

27 


0.90 
0.175 


0.565 
0.525 


0.15 
1.04 


0.165 


2.605 
0.01 






0.40 


0.37 


28 










1.435 












0.265 


0.77 


29 

30 

31 


1.04 




1.51 


1.005 






2.275 




0.03 
































ToUlh . 


5.245 


4.47 


5.00 


4.605 


1.69 


2.695 


6.585 


4.965 


1.50 


3.04 


3.05 


3.575 



Total rainfall during the year 46.42 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Station, 



Report of the Water Board. 



53 



i-H »0 »0 »0 



ir- T-H ^ 



CQCOCOCOCOCOCOCOfMCO 



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t- rH G3 (M »0 CI 



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CO CO CO (M 



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CO CO CO ■H^ 



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|>J C^ (M 



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CO t- -^ CD O CD 



r^ r^ r^ ^ 



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t- CO CD CO 
(N CO CO OJ 

lO 00 lO lO 



lO t— Ol CO CO 
CI CO CD (3) CO 



CI <M CJ »0 *M 

O »0 »f5 lO lO 



CI ^ CO CO CTi 03 CI 
CI CD CJ CO O Cl 1— 



hJ W Oh P 

c V o o a a 
■£ •- " w £ S 



a, C o « 

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^4Sis6a;3:^fpmo 



54 



City Document No. 20. 



Rainfall received and collected, 1887. 







Mystic. 


CoceiTUATE. 


SUDBUBT. 


Months. 


-1 
g 
"a 

Inches. 


g 1 Rainfall 
g" collected. 


11 

" s 

Per 

cent. 


"3 
a 
"3 


II 


SI 


"3 
a 




£1 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


January 
February 
March . 
April , 
May . . 
June . 
July. . 
August 
Sepiembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 




5.245 

4.47 

5.00 

4.605 

1.69 

2.695 

6.585 

4.965 

1.50 

3.04 

3.05 

3.575 


3.16 
3.61 
3.60 
3.75 
1.89 
1.27 
0.87 
1.35 
0.48 
0.57 
0.71 
0.91 


60.23 
80.81 
72.00 
81.34 
112.03 
47.26 
13.21 
27.11 
32.01 
18.67 
23.41 
25.63 

47.77 


5.29 
5.34 
5.10 
4.45 
1.02 
2.58 
3.77 
3.70 
1.28 
2.49 
2.76 
3.80 


4.06 
4.34 
4.70 
3.36 
1.35 
0.82 
0.72 
1.33 
0.64 
0.49 
0.70 
0.96 


76.81 
81.27 
92.23 
75.48 
132.35 
31.79 
19.12 
35.81 
50.04 
19.80 
25.16 
25.33 


5.20 

4.78 

4.90 

4.265 

1.165 

2.65 

3.76 

5.28 

1.32 

2.835 

2.67 

3.88 


4.619 
4.558 
5.116 
4.522 
1.799 
0.714 
0.204 
0.382 
0.191 
0..339 
0.636 
1.147 


88.82 

95.35 

104.40 

106.03 

154.46 

26.93 1 

5.45 

7.24 

14.52 

11.96 

23 83 

29.58 


Totals and j 
averages \ 


46.42 


22.17 


41.58 


23.47 


56.45 


42.705 


24.227 


56.73 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



55 



Talle showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on 
the Water- Works. 









Tbmpebatukb of Aik. 


Tempekatuke of 
Water. 


188T. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
house. 




i 


s 

g 

"a 


i 
1 


S 

s 


a 
3.* 

"a 


a 




d 


January . 






54.0 


-14.5 


23.1 


56.0 


-24.0 


21.8 


36.7 


34.0 


February 






46.5 


1.0 


27.6 


48.0 


-1.0 


27.7 


36.4 


33.5 


March . . 






49.5 


5.0 


30.2 


50.0 


7.0 


30.6 


37.0 


34.1 


April . . 






76.0 


22.0 


43.1 


79.0 


20.0 


44.0 


43.5 


41.1 


May . . . 






88.0 


35.5 


59.4 


90.0 


34.0 


61.3 


58.8 


' 60.5 


June . . . 






92.0 


41.5 


65.1 


94.0 


41.0 


66.2 


66.0 


67.5 


July . . . 






95.5 


57.0 


74.6 


97.0 


57.0 


76.2 


74.5 


75.8 


August . 






86.5 


47.0 


66.5 


88 .0 


45.0 


67.0 


73.6 


73.8 


September 






80.0 


32.5 


58.3 


80.0 


29.0 


58.0 


66.1 


65.9 


October . 






72.0 


24.0 


49.5 


77.0 


19.0 


50.0 


55.8 


56.1 


November 






67.0 


16.0 


40.5 


6S.0 


14.0 


39.6 


43.1 


44.2 


December 






57.5 


-1.0 


30.6 


58.0 


-3.0 


29.6 


87.2 


36.2 



56 



City Document No. 20. 



"^ s 






rH i-H (M CO CO -^ CO 



•paioaj 
-[ob iiB^uica 



CO CO !M CO 



•jiBjuica 



•pg^Dai 



CO C^ CO Ol 



CO CO CO Ol 



iH 00 CO t^ 



l-l 05 CO 



O -^ IH CO CO 



•pa^oaj 

"100 u'jj'n^a *q 



»0 r— I CS O 



CO i-H CO t- 



Oi CO Oi 



<M (M (N CO 



'll^^aj^H 






CD IM CO (M 



rH iC CD 



CO CI CO CO 



^ s 



O <N iH 



00 -* n 
05 •* O 
>0 rH T-5 



•lltjjniii'a 



•pa^oDi 



IN <N •« 



COCOQOCOCO(NC<I(M 



•paioaj 
•100 livjuurji 



•IP^JtireM 



•pajoai 
"100 •}uao -18J 



CO CO lO Ol 



CO t— CO ^ 



o; 00 CO C5 

1-1 rH rH O 



CO 00 05 CO 



00 ^ CO o 



•pajD^i 
■[00 ii«;ni«H 



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^ C3i C3i T# (N 
lO CS CM CO CO 



•licjuic>i 



•p3503[ 



C35 in CO 00 



CO *- CO t' 



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IN rH rH 



•paioaj 
-100 ll-EjaiBH 1^ 



Ol CO CO CO 



•n«jnrea 



CO CO CO CO OS 



•pa^oai 
"100 "jaao J8<j 



»0 CD (M en 



'pa^oa[ 
-100 iTOui^^ ^*; 



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00 CO <M I-H 



I— I CO CO lO 



CM C<J <M (M 



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ire 


(N 


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00 


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05 


00 


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oo 


IN 


o 


^ 


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o 


00 




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•* 


o 


-* 


^ 






"lOD iivjuni'jj 


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'-' 


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^ 


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O iz; ft 



WATER EEGISTRAirS REPORT. 

JANUARY 1, ] 



Office of the Water Registrar, 

Boston, Jan. 2, 1888. 

Horace T. Rockwell, Esq., O/i airman Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of the Water Registrar as re- 
quired by Section 9, Chapter 30, of the Revised Ordinances 
is herewith submitted. 

CocHiTUATE Works. 

The total receipts of the Cochitiiate Works 

for the year ending Dec. 31, 1887, have . 

been $1,275,298 32 

The detail of this amount is as follows : — 

Received from sale of water furnished in 

1887 11,128,708 89 

Received from sale of water furnished in 

1886 . . 115,482 8Q 

Received from elevator, motor and fire pipes, 3,183 45 

" " service-pipes and repairs . 6,950 77 

" " sale of merchandise . . 1,352 61 

" *' oft' and on water for repairs . 2,394 25 

" tines 1,625 00 

" " rent of water-posts . . 345 00 
" " of!" and on water for non- 
payment . . . . 1,411 00 



$1,261,453 83 
Add sundry receipts by Water Board . 13,844 49 



Total $1,275,298 32 

Mystic Works. 

The total receipts of the Mystic Works dur- 
ing the year 1887 have been . . . $295,196 99 



58 



City Document No. 20. 



The detail of this amount is as follows : — 

Received from the sale of water in 1887, 
" " " " " " " 1886, 

" " service and fire pipes . 

" " off and on water for repairs . 

" " fines 

" " oft' and on water for non- 

payment 
" ^ " maintenance (stand-pipes) . 
'< " sale of old material 



Add sundry receipts by Water Board 



$273,754 32 


19,204 


33 


45H 


08 


240 


00 


178 


50 


164 


00 


45 


00 


25 


84 


$294,128 


07 


1,068 


92 


$295,196 


99 



The percentaire allowed the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, 
and town of Everett under contract, is as follows : — 

Somerville $43,109 25 

Chelsea 33,911 27 

Everett 7,558 17 



,578 69 



The expenditures of this department for the year 1887 
are as follow^s : — 



For salaries 

Labor 

Printing and stationery 

Travelling expenses . 

Postage, telephone, etc. 



Mystic. 

;8,321 69 

2,852 76 

516 27 

142 35 

411 03 

12,244 10 



Cochituate. 

,466 85 

11,406 16 

1,398 37 

1,538 29 

85 60 

43,895 27 



The estimated income from all sources from 
the Mystic and Cochituate departments 
for the year 1888 is . . 



$1,607,000 00 



From w^ater-rates . 
" all other sources 



Mystic. 



Cochituate. 



$310,000 00 $1,265,000 00 
2,000 00 30,000 00 



Total 



112,000 00 $1,295,000 00 



Report of the Water Board. 59 

The total number of takers supplied by Cochituate 

Works is . . ^ 58,983 

The total number of takers supplied by Mystic 

W^orks is • . 19,893 

The total number of meters now applied to 
premises of both Cochituate and Mystic Works 
is . . . . . . '. . . 3,534 

The following tabie represents the size, kind, and location 
of each meter : — 



60 



City Document No. 20. 



Size and Kind of Meter. 




a 
1 

C3 

O 


c3 

.a 
O 


'> 

u 

a 

o 

02 


S 


o 

H 




208 

403 

429 

57 

72 

13 

7 

1,061 

116 

155 

27 

27 

20 

11 

1 

412 

36 

12 

1 


18 
24 
39 

15 

1 

4 

78 

32 

12 

1 

6 

4 

4 

2 

6 

5 


7 
20 
14 
2 
8 
1 

13 
6 
4 

1 


8 
9 
18 
2 
8 


1 

1 
1 

2 


242 




< <C 


457 


1 ' 


, 


501 


1', ' 


1 <( 


61 


9 ' 


< «t 


105 


3 ' 


, 


15 


4 ' 




2 
12 
5 
5 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 


13 

1 164 






159 


1 ' 


. 


177 


It ' 


i <i 


29 


<> < 


. 


35 


3 ' 


( t( 


26 


4 ' 


< 


16 


6 ' 


( ii 






3 


1 ' 




3 
1 






421 








45 


g ' 




12 














1 


1 ' 


< 












i ' 




1 
6 
11 
9 
6 










1 


s ' 












6 




* Ball & Fitz 










11 


5 ' 












10 


1 • 


■ 








6 


2 ' 


« 










2 


3 ' 


(C 






1 


2 




' Spooner 


1 
1 




1 


1 ' 










1 




















1 

2 

1 
2 
5 










1 


1 < 












2 


li ' 


1 <i 










1 


1 ' 


' Balance Valve 

' Star 










2 


i ' 










6 
















Total 


3,114 


253 


81 


79 


7 


3,534 





Report of the Water Board. 



6] 



Cochituate Works. 

The following tal)le exhibits the classes of premises to 
which meters are attached, the amount of water consumed, 
and the revenue assessed for the years 1886 and 1887 : — 



Class of Premises 



Hotels 

Apartment Hotels 

Business Premises 

Steam Railroads 

Sugar Refineries , . . 

Factories and Machinists ....... 

Iron Works and Foundries 

Mills and Engines 

Marble and Stone Works 

Gas Companies 

Breweries 

Oil Works 

Chemical Works . 

Laundries 

Restaurants 

Stables 

Theatres and Halls 

Hospitals 

Schools 

City, State, and Government Buildings 

Steamers and Shipping 

Elevators and Motors 

Electric Light Companies 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



23,980,000 

41,425,000 

64,699,000 

26,493,000 

29,973,000 

23,623,000 

5,963,000 

3,093,000 

2,263,000 

12,699,000 

10,409,000 

1,709,000 

2,680,000 

437,000 

4,763,000 

11,257,000 

1,223,000 

1,986,000 

2,814,000 

9,548,000 

7,816,000 

15,222,000 

4,280,000 

1,776,000 



310,161,000 



Amount 

at^sessed. 



$29,843 90 

56,026 50 

86,856 1" 

32,271 40 

36,083 00 

31,153 63 

7,428 IC 

4,143 70 

2,922 35 

15,416 90 

12,896 20 

2,158 30 

3,264 00 

577 80 

6,436 40 

15,330 00 

1,602 50 

2,484 60 

3,791 30 

11,956 10 

9,986 60 

20,461 90 

5,248 20 

2,367 30 



$400,706 85 



1887. 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



30,439,000 

37,438,000 

72,490,000 

31,239,000 

35,479,000 

31,901,000 

6,581,000 

2,012,000 

2,679,000 

15,415,000 

14,344,000 

1,089,000 

2,105,000 

640,000 

7,103,000 

13,282,000 

1,235,000 

1,778,000 

2,873,000 

10,491,000 

8,004,000 

15,912,000 

5,242,000 

2,074,000 



351,845,000 



Anouut 

assessed. 



$37,637 63 

50,297 40 

96,301 95 

37,941 40 

42,691 10 

41,519 00 

8,176 40 

2,699 50 

3,426 10 

18,756 99 

17,636 20 

1,393 10 

2,566 20 

840 20 

9,608 40 

17,922 20 

1,662 00 

2,229 60 

3,921 90 

13,107 20 

10,256 82 

21,662 50 

6,405 20 

2,776 10 



$451,335 09 



62 



City Document No. 20. 



Mystic Works. 

The following table exhibits the classes of premises to which 
meters are attached, the amount of water consumed, and the 
revenue assessed for the years 1886 and 1887 : — 



Class or Premises. 



Steam Railroads 

Horse Railroads 

Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co. 
City and Government Buildings . . . 

Schools 

Stables 

Factories 

Chemical Works 

Foundries 

Breweries 

Gas Companies 

Oil Works • . . 

Mills and Engines 

Hotels 

Model Houses 

McLean Insane Asylum 

Slaughter-houses 

Business Purposes 

Wharves 

Laundries ... 

Elevators and Motors 

Bakeries 

Restaurants 

Tanneries 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



21,225,860 

999,353 

1,333,037 

6,523,518 

853,956 

1,945,374 

5,639,307 

1,033,113 

759,946 

816,000 

279,960 

131,575 

760,835 

481,989 

1,910,633 

1,320,780 

2,439,370 

640,703 

429,792 

386,780 

99,144 

454,705 

145,000 

988,458 

2,791,000 



54,390,138 



Amount 

assessed. 



^25,705 40 
1,333 43 

1.623 64 
8,127 32 
1,189 13 
2,634 91 

7.624 65 
1,409 98 
1,073 75 
1,041 30 

369 97 

179 59 

1,067 39 

657 20 

2,611 47 

1,608 63 

2,975 30 

897 61 

586 76 

548 60 

139 30 

621 64 

203 90 

1,265 68 

3,833 93 



$69,330 48 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



24,741,825 

1,298,212 

1,132,000 

6,550,817 

917,572 

2,023,916 

5,411,259 

1,168,000 

734,948 

909,642 

717,790 

3,230 

1,126,559 

600,520 

1,721,.500 

1,330,000 

3,814,783 

927,461 

691,581 

372,468 

63,571 

485,000 

189,169 

1,003,513 

2,810,457 



60,745,293 



Amount 
assessed. 



$29,903 41 
1,662 67 
1,382 4b 
8,144 67 
1,264 86 
2,828 61 
7,056 28 
1,428 80 

999 60 
1,146 19 

897 02 

4 52 

1,517 37 

823 85 
2,.394 05 
1,620 00 
4,642 54 
1,276 63 

925 38 

503 15 
89 00 

652 00 

264 54 
1,275 93 
3,538 35 



$76,241 82 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



63 



The quantity used through meters in the different districts 
was as follows : — 



Charleetown 
Somerville . 
Chelsea . . 
Everett . . 



Total 54,390,138 $69,330 48 



1SS6. 



Cubic feet. Amoimt, 



38,896,106 
7,864,843 
6,331,974 
1,297,215 



$48,532 81 

10,118 67 

8,894 97 

1,784 03 



188T. 



Cubic feet. Amount, 



42,333,136 
9,817,027 
7,241,496 
1,353,634 



60,745,293 



$52,836 16 
12,468 05 
9,254 90 
1,682 71 



$76,241 82 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848: — 



Received by 


Water Commissioners, as per 




Auditor's 


report, in 1848 


, . , 


1972 81 


From 


January 1 , 1849, to January 1, 1850 . 


71,657 79 






1850, 


1851 . 


99,025 45 






1851, 


1852 . 


161,052 85 






1852, 


1853 . 


179,567 39 






1853, 


1854 . 


196,352 32 






1854, ' 


1855 . 


217,007 51 






1855, 


1856 . 


266,302 77 






1856, 


1857 . 


282,651 84 






1857, 


1858 . 


289,328 83 






1858, 


1859 . 


302,409 73 






1859, 


1860 . 


314,808 97 






1860, 


1861 . 


334,544 86 






1861, 


1862 . 


365,323 96 






1862, 


1863 . 


373,922 33 






1863, 


1864 . 


394,506 25 






1864, 


1865 . 


430,710 76 






1865, 


1866 . 


450,341 48 






1866, 


1867 . 


486,538 25 






1867, 


1868 . 


522,130 93 






1868, 


1869 . 


553,744 88 






1869, 


1870 . 


597,328 55 






1870, 


1871 . 


708,783 68 






1871, 


1872 . 


774,445 70 






1872, 


1873 . 


862,704 08 



64 



City Document No. 20. 



From 



January 1 


, 1873, 


to January 1 


,1874 . 


$917,415 92 






1874, 




1875 . 


977,020 48 






1875, 




1876 . 


1,005,120 94 






1876, 




1877 . 


1,029,643 70 






1877, 




1878 . 


1,015,562 89 






1878, 




1879 . 


1,010,584 30 






1879, 




1880 . 


1,025,803 14 






1880, 




1881 . 


1,039,896 17 






1881, 




1882 . 


1,087,528 49 






1882, 




1883 . 


1,127,982 32 






1883, 




1884 . 


1,167,704 17 






1884, 




1885 . 


1,203,192 55 






1885, 




1886 . 


1,239,757 99 






1886, 




1887 . 


1,206,064 69 






1887, 




1888 . 


1,244,191 75 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Mystic water since its introduction, November 29, 

1864: — 



From November 29, 1864, to January 1, 1866, 
" January 1, 186(), to January 1, 1867 . 



1867, 
1868, 
1869, 
1870, 
1871, 
1872, 
1873, 
1874, 
1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 
1880, 
1881, 
1882, 
1883, 
1884, 
1885, 
1886, 
1887, 



18()8 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
18^2 
1883 
1884 
1885 
18.86 
1887 
1888 



$22,419 55 
46,447 69 
56,532 04 
89,758 21 
105,948 98 
176,769 57 
203.824 88 
237,926 
257,983 
269,868 
31.0,672 
291,992 
286,590 
283,439 
270, 59i) 
273,735 
230,856 
251,928 53 
260,011 91 
265,921 04 
276,557 60 
249,609 62 
293,018 65 



25 
15 

22 
92 
98 
18 
89 
82 
24 
78 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



65 



The daily returns from the Service Division represent a 
total of 10,355 orders received during the year, as follows : — 

Application for service-pipes .... 1,901 

" turning on water for first time . 2,010 

" repairs in service-pipes . . 1,390 

" off and on water for repairs . 3,473 

" " " " non-payment 1,581 

Total 10,355 



Drinking-Fountains . 

« 

The total number of drinking-fountains established to Jan. 
1, 1888, is 68, all of which, with the exception of 12, have 
automatic fixtures to prevent the flow of water. 

They are distributed as follows, viz. : — 



Boston Proper 

East Boston 

South Boston 

Koxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Brighton . 

Charlestown 

Chelsea 

Somerville 

Everett 



21 

4 

8 
7 
5 

5 
6 
1 
4 
1 



68 



Hydraulic Motors. 



The total number of hydraulic motors now located is 90, 
being an increase of 15 during the year 1887. They are 
applied to a variety of business premises, church organs, etc. 



Hydraulic Elevators. 

The total number of hydraulic elevators established to 
date is 283, being an increase of 10 over the previous year. 
They are located principally in business premises and apart- 
nient-honses. 



66 



City Document No. 20. 



Water-Posts. 

There are 124 water-posts now located for street-sprink- 
ling purposes, being an increase of 14 during the past year. 
They are located as follows : — 



Boston Proper 








5 


South Boston 








5 


East Boston 








1 


Eoxbury 








14 


Dorchester . 








17 


West Roxbury 








25 


Brighton 








16 


Charlestown District 








6 


Chelsea 








3 


Somerville . 








26 


Everett 








6 



123 



Report of the Water Board. 



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M 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



South Framingham, Jan. 1, 1888. 

Col. H. T. Rockwell, Chairman Boston Water Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report for the Western Division of the 
Boston Water-Works is submitted herewith. 

SUDBURY-RIVER BaSINS. 

Basins 1,2, and 3 are full, and water wasting over the 
dams. Basin 4 is not y-et full. The quality of the water 
has generally been excellent throughout the year. The 
supply, as usual, has been principally drawn from Basin 2. 
From October 4 to November 15 water was drawn from 
Basin No. 4. This basin was of better quality than last 
year, and after July was better than any of the other basins, 
attributable to its greater depth. In Basin No. 3 the water 
near the bottom was not very good during the summer 
which was probably owing to the large amount of work done 
there during the previous year. 

Between October 5 and November 8 a considerable amount 
of algce appeared in Basin 3, and no water was drawn from 
that source during this period ; otherwise the water has been 
freer from vegetable growth than usual. 

These are the principal facts in regard to the Sudbury 
supply. A more detailed account will be found under each 
basin. 

Basin 1. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, the water in this basin stood at grade 
157.98 above tide-marsh level in Boston, and water was 
wasting over the dam. 

On May 25 both sets of flash-boards were put on the stone 
crest. On June 2 the water began to run over the top of 
the flash-boards, and continued to waste, with the exception 
of three days, until June 26. 

On November 10 the basin stood at elevation 158.49. 

Between November 16 and November 23 water was drawn 
into Farm Pond, and the level reduced to 156.63. The 



Eeport of the Water Board. 69 

water then gradually rose, and on December 11 began to 
waste over the stone crest, and so continued to the end of 
the year. 

The lowest point reached during the year was on Novem- 
ber 25, viz., 156.62, and the highest, 159.69, on June 2. 
The flow of one and one-half million gallons per day has been 
passed into the river every day, in accordance with the law. 
The usual amount of care has been given to the maintenance 
of the works around the basin. The 48-inch main in the 
bottom of this reservoir has not been repaired. It is in bad 
condition, but no favorable opportunity has oflered for ex- 
amining the joints. 

Basin 2. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, this basin stood at grade 166.13, and 
water was wasting over the stone crest of the dam. This 
continued until May 25, when both sets of flash-boards were 
put in place. Water flowed over the top of these flash- 
boards from June 1 to June 10, when a temporary set of 
boards was added, raising the surface to 167.50. On June 
16 waste stopped, and as the water was drawn for the supply 
of the city, the b:isin gradually lowered to elevation 163.64, 
on July 20. It then rose, and was kept for about a month at 
165.00, afterwards falling to 160.32, on October 4, when the 
basin was reinforced by the supply from Basin No. 4. On 
December 14 water was flowing over the stone crest of the 
dam, and so continued, with the exception of four days in 
December, to the end of the year. The flash-boards were 
removed on March 22. The highest elevation reached was 
167.53, on eTune 14, and the lowest, 160.32, on October 4. 

No work of any importance has been done at Basin 2 
during the year, with the exception of the ordinary routine 
work attending the maintenance of the dam and gate-house, 
and the management of the water. 

Basin 3. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, this basin stood at elevation 175.54, and 
water was wasting over the stone crest. It continued to 
overflow until Jan. 8, when, the waste-gates being opened, 
the surface fell to 158.16, and it was kept at about this 
height until the gates were closed, on Jan. 10. The surface 
then rose, and on Feb. 21 began to waste over the dam. On 
June 13 waste stopped, and the water gradually fell to 
171.73, on Oct. 4. After this date the basin filled, and on 
Dec. 6 waste began over the dam, and has so continued 
to the present time. The highest elevation reached during 



70 City Document No. 20. 

the year was 176.02, on May 1, and the lowest, 158.16, on 
Feb. 7. During the early spring the basin was purposely 
kept at low level, when there was an abundance of water 
running in the river, for the purpose of washing out the 
basin by increasing the velocity of How. This carried off 
some of the detritus left from the work of shallow flowage 
executed during the previous year. 

Basin 4. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, this basin stood at grade 204.93, but rose 
to 210.55, on Jan. 26, when the gates were partially opened. 
From this time until March 20 the surface was kept at about 
211.00or 212.00. On March 28 the basin was allowed to rise 
until it overflowed the stone cj'cst. On May 17 flash-boards 
were put in place, which carried the water up to very near 
the high-water line. On Jul}'^ 7 waste stopped. On July 
23 waste again began, and continued, with the exception of 
six days in August, until Sept. 21. On Oct. 4 water was 
drawn from the basin, and the surface fell to 204.98, on 
Nov. 15, at which time the gates were closed. 

The highest elevation has been 215.10, on June 1, and the 
lowest, 204.93, on Jan. 1. The basin has not yet filled, but 
will undoubtedl}'^ be running over before long. It is now 
207.82. 

A considerable amount of work has been done by the 
regular basin force at this point during the year, both on the 
embankment of the dam and on the grounds. 

About 150 evergreen trees have been set out. During the 
autumn the old office w^as changed into a dwelling for the 
attendant in charge of the dam. 

Farm Pond. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, this pond stood at elevation 149.28. It 
was kept at about this height during the entire year. The 
highest point was reached on April 30, viz., 149.44, and the 
lowest, on July 17, viz., 148.92. 

During a portion of the summer, water from the Sudbury 
basins was run through the Farm-Pond aqueduct on account 
of the appearance of algm in the water. 

The Farm Pond Water Co. have pumped 87,500,000 
gallons during the year from Farm Pond, or an average of 
240,000 gallons daily. 

Water was drawn directly from Farm Pond, from January 
1 to June 2, and from the afternoon of August 24 until the 
end of the year. W^ater was drawn through Farm-Pond 
aqueduct from June 2 to August 24. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 71 



Lake Cochituate. 

On January 1, 1887, the surface of the lake stood at 
129.77, 4.59 feet below high water. On January 29, the 
water having risen to 132.15, the stop-planks were taken 
out, and waste began over the outlet dam. The greatest 
height on the weir at any one time was 1.224 feet. 

On April 26 the lake reached 134.36 high-water mark. 
The surface fell steadily during the summer and autumn, the 
level of the water being reduced by waste into the river, in 
order to facilitate the work on shallow flowage, which was 
carried out between September and December. The lowest 
point reached was on November 10, viz., 125.12. The sur- 
face stands at 125.63 at the present time. The water has 
been hardly up to the average, owing to considerable work 
of construction going on in the upper portions of the lake. 

Inspections of the old cases of sewage pollution in the 
towns on the sources of supply have been made from time to 
time, but no regular inspector has been employed. Owing 
to negotiations now going on between your Board and the 
towns, no cases have been carried into tlae courts. The city 
is still threatened with serious trouble in Brookline, owing 
to sewage which still percolates into the tunnel. 



Dudley Pond. 

We have had no occasion to draw water from this pond 
during the year. 



Sudbury-river Aqueduct. 

This structure has been in service during the entire year, 
with the exception of 23 days, when the flow was stopped 
to lay a wooden track in one of the tunnels for the cleaning 
machine. 

It has carried to the city a total of 6,124,100,000 gallons, 
or a daily average of 16,778,400 gallons, a considerable in- 
crease over last year. The largest amount run on any one 
day was 44,000,000 gallons, on Aua'ust 20, and the smallest, 
6,900,000 gallons. May 31. 

The upper portions of the aqueduct Averc cleaned by 
machine during the summer as far as the Rosemary syphon. 
The brick-work was very dirty. From Farm Pond to 
Bacon's waste-weir there was a quantity of black deposit 
and some sponge. 

Considerable work has been done on the first ten miles of 



72 City Document No. 20. 

the aqueduct in the way of preparation for the machine. 
The waste-weirs have been provided with tracks over the 
catch-basins and through the Rockland and Badger-hill tun- 
nels. The material used for the track was southern pine. 
The rails are 4 in. by 8 in., and the cross-ties 1 in. by 8 in., 
with bevelled edges. The ties were placed 10 feet apart ; 
the ends of the ties were fastened to the side-walls with 
wooden plugs driven into the brick or stone work. The 
bottoms of these tunnels are of concrete, and quite rough. 
In the West pipe-chamber an elevator has been constructed 
to hoist the cleaning-machine out of the aqueduct. It i§ 
operated by diflferential pulleys. 

The lower portion of the aqueduct from the East syphon- 
chamber to Chestnut-Hill reservoir has been cleaned by 
hand-labor, but this is not as effective as the machine-work. 
The cleaning was done September 12, 13, and 14. 

" The fences that cross the aqueduct on the sides of the 
road crossings, and which were built when the aqueduct was 
constructed, were found to be in a rotten condition. These 
fences were built with mortised posts and rails. They have 
been rebuilt with round chestnut posts and board-rails. The 
usual attention has been paid to the embankments, loaming, 
sodding, and top-dressing. The loam was taken from the 
wooded sections along the line during the winter. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct. 

On Jan. 1, 1887, a depth of 6.5 feet was run to the reser- 
voirs, and so maintained until the 8th, when the flow was 
reduced to 5.50 feet, and this amount was unchanged until 
June 27, when 6 inches more was added to the flow. On 
July 1 this amount was increased to 6.5 feet, and when the 
surface of the lake reached this point, about September 1, the 
amount run in the aqueduct has depended upon the level of 
the lake. We have now 4i feet running. 

On October 24, 25, and 2Q the whole length of the aque- 
duct to Brookline reservoir was cleaned. From the lake to 
Station 30 there was a strono; o-rowth of veo;etable matter, 
but it was only about | of an inch long. It gradually dimin- 
ished to Station 40. From Station 40 to 130 there was a 
heavy coating of muddy deposit. Spongilla was found prin- 
cipally upon the bottom. From Station 40 to 102 the sponge 
growth was found in greater quantities than nearer the lake, 
and was evenly distributed over the brick-work. A consider- 
able growth of sponge of recent formation was found between 
Station 130 and 270, and it was easily removed. 

The whole aqueduct, as far as the Grantville waste-weir, 



Report of the Water Board. 73 

was very dirty, but gradually decreasing east of this point. 
I'he Brookline tunnel gave indications of sewage matter. It is 
evident that the drainage must come from other places than 
those already connected with the sewer, and an investigation 
of this important matter must be made at an early day. 

The bushes have been mowed during the year the whole 
length of the aqueduct. This is found to be the cheapest 
method of getting rid of them, as a scythe can be used before 
they get too large. Some work has been begun upon the 
embankments. They have been neglected for so many years 
that there is now hardly any loam left upon them. Without 
this protection the embankments gradually waste away at the 
upper portions. Some five thousand small pines and shrubs 
have been dug up and transplanted to the grounds around 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, by the aqueduct force, and some 
fences have been built. 

The portion of the Cochituate aqueduct between Chestnut 
Hill and Brookline reservoirs was shut off from the supply 
between July 26 and September 3, to allow for the building 
of a connection chamber at the new high-service works. 



Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

This reservoir has been in constant use throughout the 
year. The water has been of good quality. 

Another row of English elms has been planted on the north 
side of Beacon street. Additional shrubs and trees have 
been planted at various points in the grounds. It will be 
advisable to limit the planting to native shrubs, and to avoid 
anything in the way of flowers on the grounds of this reser- 
voir. If this policy is pursued for a number of years, and 
good judgment used in the planting, this territory will become 
a very attractive one. 

During the Avinter and spring, at the request of the City 
Engineer, I took charge of the deep trenching for the foun- 
dation of the new hio:h-service works. The digging was 
begun January 10, and finished March 31. This involved the 
employment of something like a hundred men, and the 
trenches had to be closely sheeted to a considerable depth. 

The construction of these works has added somewhat to 
the routine work of the department during the whole year. 

The usual meteorological and other observations have been 
made. 

The maintenance of the driveway is now charged to the 
water-works, no appropriation therefor being made by the 
City Council. 



74 



City Document No. 20. 



Brookline Reservoir. 

The ground and structures at this point are. in good order. 
About half of the water used in Boston has been sent through 
this reservoir. 

No new work has been done during the year. 

A table of rainfall at the Chestnut-Hill reservoir is ap- 
pended, showing the times of beginning and ending of each 
storm. 

Very respectfully yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Resident Engineer and 8ujperintendent. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Rill Reservoir for year eliding Dec. 31, 18S7. 


Date. 


<u 




it 


Duration. 


Date. 


a) 
Si 
o 

a 


o . 


Duration. 








CQ 






M 


m 




Jan. 


1 


0.04 


Mist 


During da3'. 


Feb. 24 


0.50 


Snow 
and 


5.30 a.m. 
to 


" 


5 


1 1.10 


Rain 
and 


8.00 p.m. 
to 






Rain 
Snow 


11.30 a.m. 


" 


6 


i 


Snow 


1 50 p.m. 


" 26 


0.42 


and 
Rain 


1.45 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 




9 


0.22 


Snow 
Snow 


11.30 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
12.10 a.m. 




















" 


14 


1.24 


and 
Rain 


to 
3.30 p.m. 


Total . 


4.44 








15 


0.06 


Light 
Snow 


During day. 










" 
















Snow 


4.30 a.m. 


Mar. 5 


) 


Snow 


10.30 p.m. 


•< 


17 


0.86 


and 


to 




\ 1.09 


and to 








Rain 


11..50 p.m. 


" 6 


) 


Rain 


10.15 p.m. 


<• 


24 


0.86 


Rain 


10.00 a.m. to 6.15 p.m. 






Rain 


4.00 a.m. 








Rain 


11.10 a.m. 


" 10 


1.20 


and 


to 




26 


0.14 


and 
Snow 


to 
9.30 p.m. 


" 18 


0.07 


Snow 
Snow 
and 


11.00 p.m. 
During 


«' 


29 


) 




( 2.15 p.m. 






Mist 


day. 






{ 1.05 


Rain 


to 






Show- 


During 


" 


30 


) 




(1.30 p.m. 


" 19 


0.10 


ers 




Total . 


5.57 






" 22 


ill5 


Mist 
Rain 


day. 

3.45 a.m. 
to 












" 23 


jl.15 


Snow 


10.00 a.m. 


Feb. 


2 


0.41 


Snow 


8.30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. 
















Snow 


4.00 a.m. 


" 28 


1.49 


Rain 


1.45 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 




6 


0.06 


and 
Rain 


to 
6.15 p.m. 


« 28 


) 




10.10 p.m. 


'< 


7 


) 


Snow 


6.30 p.m. 




[ 0.10 


Snow 


to 






\ 0.50 


and 


to 


" 29 


)■ 




12.20 a.m. 


" 


8 
10 


0.27 


Rain 
Rain 


11.00 p.m. 

12.10 a.m to 4.00 a.m. 










« 




















. Total . 


5.20 






" 


10 


0.08 


Snow 
and 


12.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 
1.00 a.m. 
to 










« 


15 


O.M 
















Rain 


2.00 p.m. 


April 2 


1.35 


Snow 


3.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 








Snow 












" 


If 


1.9C 


and 
Rain 


9.45 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


" 16 


0.56 


Rain 


4.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


" 


2- 


0.1[ 


SI Snow 


8.45 a.m. to 5.15 p.m. 


" 18 


0.58 


Snow 


11.30 a.m. to 11.50 p.m. 



^Report of the Water Board. 75 

Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 







o . 








o . 




Date. 


0) 


^a 


Duration. 


Date. 


-3 


^.3 


Duration. 






5« 






a 


^« 




April 23 
" 24 


1 0.10 


Rain 


9.00 p.m. 

to 
3.00 a.m. 


July 22 
" 23 


1.16 
0.24 


Rain 


7.00 a.m. to 1.15 p.m. 
12.20 a.m. to 3.30 a.m. 


" 25 
" 26 


!"■ 


" 


10.00 p.m. 

to 
11.00 a.m. 


" 23 
" 24 


0.67 
0.18 


** 


12.45 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. 
10.05 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 


" 28 
» 29 


0.55 


" 


3.45 p.m. 

to 
4.00 a.m. 


" 29 


0.20 


" 


6.30 p.m. to 8.15 p.m. 










" 29 
" 30 


1 0.49 


« 


4.05 p.m. 

to 
5.00 a.m. 


Total . 


3.69 






Aug. 2 


0.36 


Rain 












4.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. 


Total . 


4.74 






" 6 
« 11 


0.13 
0.38 


Show- 
ers 

Rain 


1.45 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 












May 7 

8 


1 0.20 


Rain 


5.00 p.m. 

to 
12.30 a.m. 


" 18 
" 20 


0.45 
0.19 


« 


7.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 
12.55 p.m. to 2.00 p.m. 


" 25 


0.09 


" 


8.45 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. 


'' 20 


0.33 


" 


7.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


" 26 


0.04 


" 


5.20 a.m. to 6.30 a.m. 


" 22 




Rain 


4.00 a.m. 


•' 26 


0.08 


" 


9.30 p.m. to 11.15 p.m. 


" 23 


•1.69 


and 
show- 


to 


" 27 
" 28 
" 29 


1 1.28 


Rain 
and 

Mist 


9.00 p.m. 

to 
9.00 p.m. 


" 24 




ers 


5.45 p.m. 


Total . 


3.53 






Total . 


1.69 






Sept. 7 
" 7 


0.61 


Rain 


1.15 a.m. to 5.00 a.m. 












June 1 

" 2 


1 0.97 


Rain 


5.30 a.m. 

to 
10.30 a.m. 


" 10 
<• 12 


0.24 
0.32 


" 


1.00 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 
9.30 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


" 22 
" 23 
" 23 
" 24 


0.27 


" 


6.20 p.m. 

to 
7.30 a.m. 

9.00 a.m. 

to 
6.45 a.m. 


" 22 
" 29 


0.14 
0.04 


" 


3.45 a.m. to 11.00 a.m. 
11.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


1 0.84 


" 


Total . 


1.35 






Total . 


2.08 

! 






Oct. 1 
" 2 


1.00 
0.06 


Rain 


5.40 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. 










4.00 p.m. to 7.45 p.m. 


July 10 


1 




1.15 a.m. 


" 3 


0.09 


" 


1..30 p.m. to 4.45 p.m. 


" 11 


1 1.10 


Rain 


to 


" 11 


0.76 


" 


1.30 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. 


" 12 
" 17 
" 18 


1 




3.00 a.m. 

3.00 p.m. 

to 
3.30 p.m. 


" 21 


1..30 


" 


12.15 a.m. to 1..30 p.m. 


I 0.14 


tihow 
ere 


Total . 


3.21 







76 City Document No. 20. 

Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



Date. 


a) 

-s 

a 

M 


u 
o . 

O rt 


Nov. 10 


0.82 


Rain 


" 15 
" 16 
" 19 


1.15 
0.09 
0.20 


Snow 
and 
Rain 
Rain 


" 25 


0.25 


" 


" 28 


0.24 


" 


Total . 


2.75 




Dec. 5 


0.14 


Rain 


" 10 






" 11 


I 0.78 


•< 


" 12 


J 





Duration. 



4.45 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 
4.45 a.m. to 1.15 p.m. 
4.00 a.m. to 9.15 a.m. 
12.30 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. 
1.15 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 
12.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 



9.00 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 
10.45 p.m. 

to 
8.45 a.m. 



Date. 


a> 

Si 






a 

M 




Dec. 15 


0.6S 


Rain 
Rain 


" 18 


0.52 


and 
Snow 


" 21 


0.23 


Snow 


" 26 


{ 0.47 


„ 


" 27 


) 


Snow 


" 28 


0.84 


and 
Rain 


Total . 


3.66 





Duration. 



11.30 a.m. to 11.30 p.m. 
3.20 a.m. to 11.15 p.m. 
2.00 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 



2.00 p.m. 

to 
12.30 p.m. 



7.15 a.m. to 6.45 p.m. 



Total Rainfall for year 41.91 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Jan. 1, 1888. 
Horace T. Eockwell, Esq., Chairman of Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — I herewith present m}^ report for the year 1887. 
I consider the works of this division to be in excellent con- 
dition. 

Beyond the ordinary amount of labor in the maintenance 
of the Avorks, the laying of main and service pipes by peti- 
tions, the introduction of fire and elevator pipes, etc., etc., 
there has been laid the 12-inch main to Germantown ; the 
remainder of the " New High-Service " mains ; the relaying 
of 1,528 feet of 48-inch mains, and the taking up of the same 
number of feet of the old mains on Beacon street, in order 
to change the location of that line ; also the continuance of 
cleaning the works of the old pipes in Boston, East and 
South Boston. Last year we cleaned 15,280 feet of 6-inch 
pipe (omitted in the report of that year) ; this year 20,280 
feet of 12-inch, and 40,932 feet of 6-inch. 

The tables that follow show that there have been laid and 
relaid more main pipes this year than in any year since 1875, 
the year succeeding the annexation of West Roxbury and 
Brighton, and more service-pipes than in any year since 
1871. 

Main Pipe. 

The length of pipes of different sizes laid and relaid dur- 
ing the year is 130,331 feet, or 24.68 miles. 

Whole length laid since commencement of 

the work ...... 491.24 miles. 

Whole length now in service . . . 436.54 miles. 

Service-Pipes. 

Whole numl)cr put in last year .... 1,835 

Length in feet 53,995 

Total number to date ..... 55,235 



78 



City Document No. 20. 



Hydrants and Stopcocks. 

There have been 245 hydrants and 270 stopcocks estab- 
lished durmg the year. 

Relaying of Enlarged Sizes. 



Street. 



Minot .... 
Dartmouth . 
Staniford . . 
Esses .... 
Washington . 
Dover .... 

F 

Battery . . . 
Staniford . . 
Athens . . . 
Silver .... 
Emerson . . 
Linden park . 
Beecher court 
Chelsea hridge 



Between what Streets. 



Leverett and Chelsea . . . . 
Tremont and Columbus ave. 
Merrimac and Green . . . . 
South and Chauncy , . . . 

State and Milk 

Tremont and Shawmut ave. 

Second and Fourth 

Commercial and Ilanover . 
Merrimac and Green .... 
B and Dorchester ... 

AandF 

L and M 

Gay and Simmons 

Linden park and Linden ave 
Boston and Chelsea . . . . 



Size 


No. of 


now. 


Feet. 


10 


629 


12 


1,170 


8 


186 


8 


952 


12 


750 


10 


801 


8 


991 


6 


351 


8 


100 


6 


2,797 


6 


51 


6 


221 


6 


219 


6 


39 


30 


1,256 



Taken up and Abandoned. 



20-inch 


. 


, 


, 


. 


. 


. 


1,256 feet 


6-inch 


, 


. 


, 


, 


. 


. 


5,614 " 


4-inch 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


3,848 " 








Changed. 






1 


2-inch iron 


out, 


11 


1-inch 


lead 


put in. 


11 


1 i 

2 


i a 




11 


1- " 


( ( 


( ( ( ( 


1 
1 


1 i 
2 
1 ' 


' lead 




1 
1 


3 a 
4 

2 " 






2 


1 ' 


i I ^ 




2 


n " 


i t. 


it a 


1 


1 ' 


i 1 1 




1 


1 " 


a 


a a 


1 


8 


i a 




1 


I2 " 


i i 


a a 


24 


5 i 
8 


< ( ( 




24 


1 " 


i. i 


a a 


5 
13 


5 i 
8 


I I i 




5 
13 


1 " 


i I 


it a 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



Statement of Location, Size, and ISTvimber of Feet of Pipe 

laid in 1887. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; S.B., South Boston; E.B., East Boston; B.H., Boston High- 
lands; D., Dorchester; W.R., West Roxbury; Chel., Chelsea; Bri., Brighton; Bro'k., 
Brookline; Chs'n, Charlestown. 



In what Street. 



Beacon 

Chestnut-hill reservoir 
lot 

Chestnut-hill reservoir 
lot 

Chestnut-hill ave. . . . 

Brighton 

Chelsea bridge .... 

Chelsea bridge .... 
Day 

Parker-hill reservoir lot 

Park, Adams, and Chel- 
sea 

Exeter 

Chestnut-hill ave. . . . 

Dartmouth 

Jersey 

Boylston 

Audubon road .... 

Washington 

■Westland ave 

Rumford road .... 
West Newton .... 
Boylston • 



Between what Streets. 



Washington and Summit ave. 
Total 48-inch . . . . 



Chestnut-hill ave. and Reservoir lane 
Total 36-inch 



Chestnut-hill ave. and Resei-voir lane 

Beacon and Brookline line 

Boston line and R.R. bridge .... 

Boston and Chelsea 

Total 30-inch 



Boston and Chelsea 

Creighton and Perkins .... 
Fisher ave. and the gate-house . 



City square and Chelsea 
Total 24-inch . . 



Huntington ave. and Newbury 

Beacon and Brookline line . . 

Total 16-inch 



Tremont and Columbus ave 

Beacon and Boylston 

Jersey and Audubon road 

From Boylston 

State and Milk 

Parker and Rumford road 

Westland and Boylston 

Huntington ave. and B. & Prov. R.R. 

Parker and Audubon road 

Carried forward 



Bri. 



Bri. 



Bro'k 
Chel. 



Chel 
B.H. 



B. 
Bri. 



B. 



820 

180 

306 

1,256 

2,56 2 

160 
543 
30 

5,196 



5,929 

912 

181 

1,093 

1,170 

1,023 
957 

1,000 
750 
254 

1,180 
201 
325 

6,860 



80 



City Document No. 20. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Boston , 

Ford 

Walley 

Elm-hill ave. . . 
Humboldt ... 
Glen road ... 
Richfield .... 
Oakland .... 

Adams 

East Chester Park 
Washington . . 
Southern ave. . . 
Warner ave. . . 
Westville . . . . , 
Codraan . . . . . 
Coolidge ave. . . 
Lauriatave. ... 
Prospect ave. . . . 
Wesley ave. . . . 

Sydney 

Hewlett 

Dudley ave. . . . 
Neponset ave. . , 
Metropolitan ave. . 

May 

Canterbury . . . . 

Centre 

Grove • 

Hyde Park ave. . , 

Beech 

Walnut 

Washington . . . 

Poplar 

Baker 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Washburn and Blake 

Breed and Saratoga 

Leyden and Gladstone 

Howland and Crawford 

Waumbeck and Seaver .... . . 

Erie ave. and Read ave 

Olney and Davidson place 

River and Rockville 

Centre and King 

Clapp and Boston 

Fuller and Fairmount 

Whitfield and Bernard 

Harvard and Park 

Bowdoin and Ditson 

Adams and Carruth 

Warner ave. and Bernard 

Bernard ave. and Blue Hill ave. . . . 

Norfolk and Milton ave 

From Savin-hill ave 

Savin-hill ave. and Belfort 

Walter and Centre 

Washington and Birch 

Hyde-Park ave. and Canterbury . . 

Washington and Poplar 

Pond and Centre 

Mt. Hope ave. and Prov. R.R. bridge , 

Spring and Grove . . 

Centre and Washington , 

From Walkhill ■ ■ . . . 

Washington and Poplar 

School and Sigoumey 

Grove and Rockland 

Dale and Beech 

Spring and Belle ave 

Carried forward 



8.B. 



E.B. 



Dor. 



W.R. 



466 

20 

414 

100 

1,967 

154 

307 

193 

805 

320 

262 

741 

195 

1,168 

380 

136 

1,564 

145 

180 

1,027 

1,686 

108 

1,022 

2,726 

49 

1,558 

3,522 

3,090 

145 

2,729 

620 

1,448 

136 

477 

29,860 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



81 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continved. 



In what Street. 



Gardner 

La Grange 

Shaw 

Florence 

Florence 

Washinaton 

Everett 

Roxbiny ave 

Chestnut-hill resei-voir 
lot 

Minot 

Beacon 

Dover 

Belvidere 

Byron 

Harvest 

Idaho 

Bavin-hill ave 

Oriole 

Bellevue 

Ipswich 

Btaniford 

West Newbury .... 

Esflex 

F 

Leydcn 

Gladstone 

Homestead 

Day 

Puritan ave 

Gushing ave 



Between what Streets. 



Brought foricard . . . 

Baker and Adams 

Linnett and Lark 

La Grange and Sparrow . . . 
Ashland and Sycamore . . • . 
Blakemore and Sherwood . . . 
Walkhill and Hyde Park aves. 
ISTorth Beacon and Braintree . 
From Englewood ave 



0pp. engine house . . 
Total 12-inch . 



Leverett and Nashua 

■West Chester Park and Ipswich , 
Shawmut ave. and Tremont . . . , 

From West Chester Park 

Saratoga and Pope , , 

Boston and Dorchester ave. . . . , 

From River 

Wesley ave. and Grampian way . 

Park and Bellevue 

Oriole and Linnett 

Total lO-iuch 



Beacon and Marlboro' . . . 
Green and Merrimac . . . . 
Ipswich and Brookline ave. . 

South and Chauncy 

Second and Fourth 

From Walley 

Walley and Breed 

Humboldt and Waluut aves. 
Creighton and Atwood ave. . 

From Richfield 

Upham and Jerome 

Carried forward . 



Bri. 



E.B. 
Dor. 



W.R. 



B. 



S.B. 
E.B. 



B.H. 



Dor. 



29,860 
1,954 
1,682 
841 
120 
194 
237 
386 
561 

23 
42,718 



601 
801 
78 
960 
480 
lOS 
863 
894 
357 

47 

525 

38 

952 

991 

1,510 
465 
292 
115 
212 
119 

5,266 



82 



City Document No. 20. 



Statement of Ijocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Argyle 

Norfolk 

Gleason 

Back 

Alban 

McClellan ave 

Dorchester ave 

Bellevue ave 

Granite ave 

Dorchester ave 

Bellevue 

Linnett 

Sedgwick 

St. John 

Willow 

Walk Hill ave 

Summit ave 

Clarendon ave 

Kittredge ave 

Ashland 

Cass 

Grove 

Central 

Walter 

fiymmes 

Mt. Vernon 

Wexford 

Braintree 

Arlington 

Matchett 

■ Chestnut-hill reservoir 
lot 

Reed 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . . 

Ashmont and Welles ave 

Walk Hill and R.R. bridge . . , 
Harvard and McClellan ave. . . 

Austin and Morton 

Ashniout and Welles ave. . . . 

Erie .ivc. and Gleason 

Bailej' and Codman 

From Lauriat ave 

Milton and R.R. crossing . . . 

Ashmont and Delle 

Linnett and Rutledgp 

Bellevue and La Grange . . . . 

Elm and South 

Centre and Rockview , 

Centre and Weld ... - . . . . 

From Walkliill 

Metropolitan ave. and Hemmen , 
Kittredge and Augustus ave. . , 
Albano and Clarendon ave. . . 
Canterbury and Berry . . . . , 

Centre and Oak ave 

Washington and Dedham line , 
Centre and B. & Prov. R.R. . , 

Hewlett and Peter 

Fairview and Walter 

Eastburn and Rockland . . . - 
Market and Hillside ave. . . . , 

Milton and Everett , 

From Parsons 

From Washington 



Stable and Reservoir lane , 
Total 8-inch . . , 



Colbum and Walnut place 
Carried forward 



Dor. 



W. R. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



83 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Streets. 



"Walnut place . . . 
Derby place . . . 

Battery 

East Concord . . . 
East Springfield . 
Falmouth .... 
Coramonwealth ave 
Caledonia .... 
St. Botolph .... 

Keumore 

Ipswich ..... 
Washington . . . 

St. Paul 

Haviland 

Kewhury 

Hereford 

Boylston 

M 

Ninth 

Athens 

H 

G 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Silver 

East Fourth . . . 

Emerson 

Ceylon 

Falcon 

Bennington .... 

Pope 

Bayswator .... 

Collins 

Linden Park . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

From Reed • . 

Washington and Clifton place . . . 

Commercial and Hanover 

Albany and Harrison ave. ..... 

Albany and Harrison ave 

West Chester Park and Dalton . . . 

Jersey and Kenmore 

West Chester Park and Falmouth . 
Cumberland and West Chester Park 
Commonwealth ave. and Beacon . . 

Boylston and B. & A. R.R ' . 

Dover and Ashland place 

Falmouth and Caledonia 

West Chester Park and Parker . . . 
West Chester Park and Ipswich . . 

Boylston and Newbury 

Ipswich and Rumford road 

Eighth and the water 

L and M 

B and Dorchester 

Broadway and Third 

Broadway and Tnird 

G and H 

H and I 

Across F 

G and I 

L and M 

Preble and Hyde 

Brooks and Glendon 

Byron and Wordsworth 

Curtis and Moore 

Saratoga and Washburn 

Bayswater and Austin ave 

Gay and Simmons 

Carried forward 



S.B. 



12 
100 
127 
351 
528 
692 
503 
1,203 
519 
209 
220 
517 
254 
354 
186 
544 
185 

45 

461 

320 

2,797 

77 

17 
154 
259 

51 
510 
221 
.310 
1,181 
253 
113 
857 
358 
398 
14,886 



84 City Document No. 20. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between wbat Streets. 



Beecher court . . 
Haynes Park . . . 

A court 

Maple 

Howard 

Pierpout 

Montrose 

Armstrong . . . . 

Ashley 

Thwing terrace . . 

Fenwiek 

Oregon 

Ruthven 

Hutchina 

Marshfield . . . . 
Waumbeck • • . . 

Howland 

Wenonah . . . . 

Bolster 

Centre 

Wait 

Rockingham place 
Farnham . , . . . 
Southwood . . . . 
Hazelwood . . . 

Burt ave 

Foster 

Whitfield . . . . 

Union ave 

Brent 

Beale 

Gouldville terrace 
Davidson place . . 
Highland ave. . . 



Brought forward .... 
Linden park and Linden ave. . . 

From Warren 

From Parker 

Georgia and Cheney 

Gerard and Magazine 

Station and Prentiss 

Warren and Moreland 

Ashley and Mozart 

Chestnut ave. and Armstrong . . 

From Highland 

Circuit and Hulbert . . . . • . . 

Smith and Conant 

Humboldt ave. and Nasby . . . 
Humboldt ave. and Harold . . . 

Bachelder and Clifton 

Humboldt ave. and Warren . . . 
Humboldt ave. aud Elm-hill ave. 
Waumbeck and Elm-hill ave. . . 

Wyman and Mozart 

New Heath and Highland . . • 

Hillside and Tremont 

Linden park and Cabot 

Reed and Gerard 

From Blue Hill ave 

Munroe and Townsend 

Ashmont and Washington . . . 
Dorchester ave. and Freeman . . 
Wheatland ave. and Park .... 
Rosseter and Geneva ave. . . . 
Washington and Carlisle .... 
Dorchester ave. and Carruth . . 

From Brook ave 

From Richfield 

From Miuot 

Carried forward .... 



B.H, 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



85 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Dorset 

Evans 

Clarence place . . 
Harvard ave. . . . 
Kenwood . . . . 
Sawyer ave. . . . 

Pierce ave 

Bellevue terrace . 
Brook- ave. place . 
Field court . . . . 
Sidney place . . . 
New Minot . . . . 
Stanton ave . . . . 

Delle 

Fairfax 

Kilton 

King 

Lombard ave, . . 

Freeman 

Hillside 

Eoekview . . . . 

Malvern 

Bicknell ave. . . . 

Shellon 

Auckland . . . . 
Wilton ave. . . . 
Buttonwood . . . 
Wheatland ave. . . 

Nonquit 

Waterloo 

Bellevue 

Whitman ..... 

Gibson 

Brook place . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . 
Boston and Dorchester ave. 
Corbett and Nelson .... 
Herbert and Whitfield . . 

From Harvard 

From Allston 

Gushing and Downer ave. 
Plain and Newhall .... 

From Quincy 

From Brook ave 

From Willow 

From Dudley ' 

Fredericka and Adams . . 
Evans and Norfolk .... 
From Dorchester ave. . . 
Beaumont and Carruth . . 
Norfolk and Stanton ave. . 

Adam and Train 

Carruth and Bushnell . . 
Charles and Foster .... 
Adam and Rockview . . . 

From Hillside 

Adam and Milton .... 

From Harvard 

From Adam 

From Savin-hill ave. ... 
Norfolk and Lauriat ave. . 
Vernon and Locust . . . 
Kilton and the railroad . . 

From Dudley 

From Harvard 

Trull and Quincy 

From Norfolk 

Adam and Dorchester ave. , 
Clifton and Dudley .... 

Carried forward . 



22,717 
314 
110 
131 
360 
180 
250 
146 
333 
114 
212 

57 
252 
211 
706 
314 
293 
292 

50 
150 
333 
203 
203 
312 
909 
212 
183 

60 
135 
188 

60 
103 
389 
151 
122 
30,745 



86 



City Document No. 20. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Gontinued. 



In what Street. 



Coolidge ave.- . . 
Warner ave. . . . 

Tappan 

Central ave. . . . 
Brookside ave. . . 

Hagar 

Starr lane .... 

Him man 

Peter 

Oilman 

Sherwood . . . . 

Ashland 

Wren 

Call 

Franklin Park . . 
Union terrace . . . 

Cypress 

Prospect ave. . . . 

Rockland 

Paul Gore . . . . 

German 

Carolina ave. . . . 

Ashland 

Johnson 

Pine 

Sparrow 

School 

Woodman . . . . 

A court 

Alaric 

Greenwood place . 
Richards ave. . . . 

Oak ave 

Huntington ave . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

From Bernard 

Coolidge ave. and Park ...... 

From South 

From Washington 

Germania and Cornwall 

Thomas and Eliot 

Seaverns ave. and Centre 

From Summit 

Skinner and Walter 

Canterbury and Berry 

Ashland and Prospect ave 

Brown ave. and Sherwood . . . . 

Rutledge and Oriole 

Starr and Gordon 

From Walnut 

Forest hills ave. and Morton . . . 

Spring and Baker 

From Baker 

Washington and Dedham line . . 

Chestnut ave. and Centre 

Washington and Grove 

South and John A. Andrew . . . . 

Cass and Johnson 

From Ashland 

Brown ave. and Sherwood . . . . 

Shaw and Washington 

Amory and Copley square . . . . 

Custer and Jamaica 

From Woodman 

From Centre 

From Greenough 

Hyde Park and Huntington ave. . 

From Cass 

Richards ave. and Hyde Park ave. 

Canned forward 



Dor. 



Report of the Water Board. 87 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In -what Street. 



A court . . . . 
A new street . 
A new street . 
Nelson . . . . 
Linnett . . . . 
Eastburn . . . 

High 

Dunboy ave. . 
Kelly court . . 
Riverdale . . 
Rockland . . . 
Lexington ave. 
A new street . 
Crescent ave. . 
Mansfield . . 
Gordon . . . 
Hillside ave. . 
Hichbora . . . 
Parsons . . . 



Chestniitbill reservoir 
lot 



BuckiDgbam place 
A new street . 
Scott place . . 
Nintb-st. place 
A court .... 
Hay den court 
Oakland park . 
Cliadwick court 
A court . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . 

From Washington 

From Spring 

From Neponset ave 

Boylston and Spring Park . 

Lennett and Martin 

Washington and Mt. Vernon 
Dunboy and Bigelow .... 

Bigelow and High 

From Western ave 

Vernon and Western ave. . 
From Chestnut-hill ave. . . 
Washington and Union . . . 

From Cambridge 

From Washington 

Cambridge and Hill ave. . . 
Cambridge and Orchard . . 

From Wexford 

North Beacon and Herrick . 
Bennett and Surry 



Opposite engine house 
Total 6-inch . 



From Buckingham . 
From Hereford . . . 

From Fifth 

From Ninth .... 
From Heath .... 
From Washington . 
From Oakland . . . 
From Cbadwick . . 
From Leonard . . . 
Total 4-inch 



S.B. 



B.H. 



Dor. 



42,721 
227 
221 
137 

24 
714 

10 
259 
428 
2T6 
499 
110 
345 
245 
976 

60 

25 
210 
187 
132 

40 



47,926 



141 

143 

38 

104 

118 

83 

83 

174 

973 



88 



City Document No. 20. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Relaid and Abandoned in 1887. 



In what Street. 



Minot .... 
Dartmouth . . 
Staniford . . 
Essex .... 
Washington . 
Dover .... 
Livingston . . 

F 

Copley .... 

Battery . . . 
Staniford . . 
Province court 
Athens . . . 
Silver .... 
Emerson . . . 
Linden Park . 
Beecher court 

Chelsea bridge 

Beacon . . . 
Sherwood . , 

Pine 

Shirley . . . 

Boylston . . 

Beacon . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Leverett and Nashua . . . . 
Tremont and Columbus ave. 
Merrimac and Green . . . . 
South and Chauncy . . . . 

State and Milk 

Tremont and Shawmut ave. 
Charles and the water . . . 

Second and Fourth 

From School 

Total 6-inch . . . . 



Commercial and Hanover . . 
Merrimac and Green .... 

From Province 

B and Dorchester 

A and F 

L and M 

Gay and Simmons 

Linden Park and Linden ave. 
Total 4-inch . .■ . . 



Boston and Chelsea . 
Total 20-inch 



Lowered. 
Summit ave. and Washington st. 

Pine and Garden 

Brown ave. and Sherwood . . . 
George and Dudley 

Raised. 
West Chester Park and Parker . 

Relaid. 
Summit ave. and Washington . 



S.B. 
W.R. 



S.B. 



B.H. 



Bro'k 
W.R. 



B.H. 



B. 



Bro'k 



629 
1,170 
186 
952 
750 
801 
117 
991 
15 



5,611 



351 
100 

70 
2,797 

51 
221 
219 

39 



3,84- 



385 

178 

50 

255 



1,528 



10-in. 
12 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



89 






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Report of the Water Board. 91 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1887- 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


Where. 


40 
1 

1 


36 
1 

1 


30 

2 

2 


28 
6 

6 


24 
1 

1 


20 

2 

2 
8 
3 

15 


16 

8 

8 


12 

18 
2 
2 
3 
4 
1 

30 


8 
10 

1 
11 


6 

41 
4 
5 

8 
9 

2 
1 

TO 


4 

21 
2 
1 
2 
1 

27 


3 

5 

5 


2 

6 
1 

10 

2 
5 

24 


19 
19 


1 
1 


1 
9 

5 
1 

15 


% 
7 

1 
8 


» 


I 

1 
1 

2 
4 

1 

10 


Total. 




347 
107 
55 
148 
67 
38 
25 


507 


South Boston 

East Boston 

Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

West Eoxbury 

Brighton 


119 
73 

185 
85 
46 
26 


Totals 


787 


1,041 





Of the leaks that have occurred m pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards : joints, 83 ; settling of earth, 12 ; 
defective pipe, 11; defective stopcock, 24; de- 
fective packing, 37 ; frost, 2 ; by blasting, 1 ; 
bolts eaten off by salt water, 1 ; dropping of gas 
syphon on pipe, 1. Total . . . . 172 

Of 3-inch pipes and in service-pipes : joints, 34 ; 
settling of earth, 161 ; settling of boxing, 3 ; 
defective pipe, 168 ; defective packing, 13 ; de- 
fective coupling, 19 ; defective faucet, 2 ; defec- 
tive valves, 6 ; faucet punched out, 2 ; faucet 
pulled out, 3 ; faucet blown out, 1 ; faucet loose 
at main, 3 ; faucet broken off at main, 1 ; pipes 
not in use, 11 ; gnawed by rats, 13 ; struck by 
pick, 91 ; cut by parties, 6 ; dumping of stone, 
2; by frost, 3; by blasting, 5. Total . . 556 

Stoppages by rust, 226 ; by dirt, 45 ; by fish, 16 ; 

by frost, 17 ; by gasket, 6 ; by solder, 3. Total, 313 



Total 



1,041 



92 



City Document No. 20. 



Siatement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1887. 



Year. 



Diameter. 



Four inches and 
upwards. 



Less than four 
inches. 



Total. 



1850, 
1851. 
1852, 
1853. 
1854, 
1855. 
1856, 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861 . 
1862. 
1863. 
186-t. 
1865. 

1866 . 

1867 . 
1868. 
1869 . 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875 . 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882 . 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 



32 


72 


104 


64 


173 


237 


82 


241 


323 


85 


260 


345 


74 


280 


254 


75 


219 


294 


75 


232 


307 


85 


278 


363 


77 


S24 


401 


82. 


449 


531 


134 


458 


592 


109 


399 


508 


117 


373 


490 


97 


397 


494 


95 


594 


489 


111 


496 


607 


139 


536 


675 


122 


487 


609 


82 


449 


531 


82 


407 


489 


157 


707 


926 


185 


1,380 


1,565 


188 


1,459 


1,647 


153 


1,076 


1,229 


434 


2,120 


2,554 


203 


725 


928 


214 


734 


948 


109 


801 


910 


213 


1,024 


1,237 


211 


995 


1,206 


135 


929 


1,064 


145 


833 


1,028 


170 


1,248 


1,248 


171 


782 


953 


253 


1,127 


1,380 


111 


638 


749 


150 


725 


875 


172 


869 


1,041 



Report of the Water Board. 



93 



Hydrants. 

Durinof the year 245 hydrants have been established and 
63 abandoned. 





Established. 


Abandoned. 




>5 

o 

C5 


o 


o 


c 
o 

o ■ 


"3 
o 


CI ^ 
o o 

o 


1 


o 
1^ 


o 

o 


2 

O 


a 


Boston 


4 


17 

10 
9 
7 
33 
55 
18 


21 
17 

4 
2 
2 

7 

1 


3 
1 

4 
1 


42 
28 
13 
14 
50 
76 
22 


3 
1 






19 
12 
1 
3 
4 
5 
1 


22 
13 
1 
4 
13 
9 
1 

63 


20 
15 






12 


Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

"West Roxhury 


5 
11 
14 

2 


5 

4 




1 
4 


10 
37 
67 
21 














36 


149 


54 


6 


245 


13 




5 


45 


182 



Total number vp to January 1, 1888. 





■^ o 


a 

o 


o 
Ph 


> 
o 


o 

o 


"3 
o 
H 




51 
16 
18 
37 
102 
104 
32 


1 


143 

62 

52 

67 

148 

271 

174 

16 


651 
178 
127 
651 
669 
111 
63 


677 
295 
156 
119 
88 
67 
39 


1,422 
652 






353 




874 




907 




543 




308 




16 








5 


3 

7 


8 










7 
















360 


1 


933 


2,255 


1,441 


4,990 



94 City Document No. 20. 

131 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new, 
or repaired ones, and 215 boxes have been taken out and 
replaced by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 

Stopcocks. 

270 new stopcocks have been established this year; 160 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. The 
stopcocks have had the proper attention paid them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EZEKIEL R. JONES, 

jSvperintendeut JEJasiern Division. 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DEPAETMENT. 



Mystic Department, Boston Water-Works, 

Charlestown District, Jan. 1, 1888. 

Col. Horace T. Rockavell, Gliairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The rejDort of this department for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1887, is herewith submitted. 

Mystic Lake. 

With the rainfall of this year all danger of pumping at 
the lake has passed. The lake has stood higher this year 
than for a great number of years past, and at this date is 
almost full. Ovvino- to the hei<yht of water we have been un- 
able to do any cleaning below Whitney's dam, and have 
confined our work to Wedge Pond and Horn-Pond stream. 
This stream has been cleaned its whole length, and is now 
in better condition than ever, as I can find no record of any 
cleaning having been done on that stream. We have had no 
complaints of the water this past year, which seems proof 
that the annual cleaning has somewhat improved the water. 
The pollution has been thoroughly looked after, and there 
still continues an improvement in the visible cases, though 
the invisible ones, owing to the nature of the soil, must con- 
tinue to increase. The building in the towns of Woburn, 
Winchester, and Stoneham is rapidly increasing, and, owing 
to the lack of sewers, the quantity of indirect drainage must 
continue to increase. The gate-house and pump-houses are 
in good condition. The house now occupied by the keeper 
should be condemned, and a new one built in a more healthy 
location. Some of the fences need rebuilding this year. The 
grading of the land has been continued the past year. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. 

This branch of the department remains the same as last 
year; the amount of sewage slightly increases. During the 
past year a number of experiments for the treatment of the 
sewage matter have been tried. 



96 City Document No. 20. 

The new buildings and pumps mentioned in my last report 
have not been built, as we thought it best to know just 
what would be needed ; we shall have to replace the engine 
this year. The sewer and catch-basins are all in good condi- 
tion. 

Conduit. 

The conduit was cleaned in June and September ; at both 
times found plenty of sponge and mud ; it was thoroughly 
swept and scrubbed, and the dirt taken out. I would again 
reconnnend the enlargement of the gate-house at the river 
end, and the buildins: of more man-holes. 



Eeservoie. 

The banks of the reservoir were thoroughly top-dressed 
with manure last year, and again this ; the grass shows the 
improvement. The roads and walks are in good condition. 
The gate-house will need some slight repairs this year. The 
whole reservoir should be cleaned out this year, and the 
stone-work pointed. 



Roads and Grounds. 

At the engine-house the edgestones have been reset, the 
sidewalks and gutters have been concreted, and part of the 
street macadamized ; shall continue the work the present 
year. 



Pumping-Seevice . 

The boilers and pumps have needed few repairs the past 
year, and remain in about the same condition. They are 
old, and begin to show signs of wear. We are at present 
rebuilding the roof of the engine-house. We found, on ex- 
amination, that the old trusses were unsafe, and we are put- 
ting in six new ones. When the new ones are in position the 
roof will be supported on them and the old ones removed. 

The roof of the coal-bunker has rotted away the past sea- 
son. I recommend that a shed-roof be built over it. The 
dwelling-house occupied by the engineer needs considerable 
repairs, and the plumbing in the same will have to be re- 
newed this year. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



97 



Distribution-Pipes . 

These have been extended by the addition of 660 feet 16- 
inch, 156 feet 6-inch; 5,692 feet of cement-lined pipe have 
been replaced with cast-iron. We have also kid 5, 196 feet 
of 24-inch pipe for connection with the Cochituate works. 



Hydrants and Gates. 

Two additional Lowrys and 6 Boston Lowrys have been 
placed this year ; 1 old pattern Lowry replaced with a new 
one ; 2 Boston Lowrys substituted for posts, and 6 posts for 
flush hydrants. There have been 17 hj^drants repaired and 12 
rotten hydrant-boxes replaced; 1 4-in., 3 6-in., 1 8-in 
gates have been added; 4 4-in., 18 6-in., 2 8-in. have been 
replaced with new ; 5 2-in., 2 6-in. blow-offs have been estab- 
lished, 19 gates repaired, 40 gate-boxes renewed. 



Service-Pipes and Boxes. 

Forty-three new services were laid and 130 repaired, in 
which 1,253 feet of lead pipe were used ; 35 ^-in. services re- 
placed by larger ones ; 37 leaks were repaired. There have 
been 34 stoppages by eels, and 24 by rust ; there have been 
278 M'ooden service-boxes replaced by cast-iron. 



Fountains. 

I would recommend that the cast-iron fountains on Austin 
and Bunker-Hill streets be removed, and stone troughs sub- 
stituted, and that a new one be established on Chelsea street, 
near the bridge. 



Number of New Services and Length in Feet. 



Location. 


Number. 


Feet. 




43 
370 
104 
177 


1,102 




13,867 




2,988 




3,894 






Total 


694 


21,851 





98 



City Document No. 20. 



Number and Length of Services connected with the Works Jan. 1, IS8S. 



Location. 


Charlestown. 


Somerville. 


Chelsea. 


Everett. 


Total. 


No. of services 

Length in feet 


5,T37 
153,662 


4,996 
169,738 


4,821 
129,671 


1,255 
27,830 


16,809 
480,901 



480,901 feet, or 92 miles 5,140 feet. 



Bj'eaks and Leaks in Distribution- Pipes. 





Location. 




Sizi 


OF Pipes. 




Total. 




10" 


8" 


6" 


4" 


3" 








1 
40 
11 

2 


11 
32 
24 


6 
5 


12 






5 

10 

1 


83 




7 


57 




3 












Total 


7 


16 


54 


66 


11 


155 











Extension of Distribution- Pipes. 





Size of Pipes. 


Total. 




16" 


10" 


8" 


6" 


4" 


2" 










48 






48 




660 










660 








108 
8,990 
4,446 
1,889 






108 








15 


720 

866 

1,318 


173 


9,904 
9 912 






4,600 






3,207 










Total 


660 


4,600 


15 


15,481 


2,910 


173 


23 839 







Report or the Water Board. 



99 



Distribution- Pipes Eelaid. 





Obiginal 

SIZE. 


4" 


6" 


8" 


10" 


Total. 


Location. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Henley street 

Putnam street 

Harvard street 

Polk street 

Concord street 

Trenton street 

School street 

Cross street 


6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 


24 
12 

12 
240 

96 

31 

126 


396 
300 
348 
600 
396 
420 
540 
420 






420 






312 






348 






600 






408 






420 






540 






420 






240 


Albion place 

Bdgeworth street 

Prospect street 


348 
444 
708 
300 






348 






444 






708 






300 








96 




3,136 
456 


485 


90 


3,652 






672 








Total 




541 


8,812 


485 


90 


9,228 









100 



City Document No. 20. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



101 



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O 02 O M 



EEPOET OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF 
THE METER DIVISION. 



Office of Superintendent of Meter Division, 

221 Federal Street, Boston, Jan. 1, 1888. 

HoEACE T, EocKWELL, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report of the Meter Division for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1887, is herewith submitted. 

During the ^''ear there have been purchased for the Co- 
chituate Department 496 meters, of the following kind and 
size : — 





2' 


11" 


1" 


%'• 


s 


Total. 


Worthington 

'•B. W. W." 


12 


21 


40 


50 
324 

10 
6 
6 
3 


15 
6 


123 
324 










25 










6 


Star 








6 


Thomson 






2 


5 








6 










1 


1 














12 


21 


42 


400 


21 


496 



In the Cochituate Department there have been 86 additional 
meters applied, and 388 discontinued, making the total num- 
ber in service to date 3,128. 

1,121 changes have been made. Of this number 356 
were taken out especiall}'^ for test, 32 for enlargement, 13 
clocks broken or defaced, 74 leaking, 7 levers and pistons 
broken, 13 stoppages in pipes, 84 ordered out as not work- 
ing satisfactorily, 28 frozen, 5 on account of noise of meter 
when working, and 509 for various causes. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



103 



Meters in Service, Cochituate Department, Jan. 1, 1888. 





6" 


4" 


3" 


2" 


I5" 


1" 


? 


r 


h 


Total. 






6 


13 


73 


51 


429 


87 

301 

110 

441 

2 

7 

6 

5 


200 

1,077 

9 
12 

6 
1 




859 


"B. W.W." 








301 


Crown 


1 


11 


16 


25 


35 


148 
45 


1,423 
486 














11 


Ball & Fitts 












6 


25 














6 


Star 














5 
















6 


















1 
















1 
1 


1 


Frost 










1 


1 


1 


4 
















1 


17 


29 


98 


87 


629 


961 


1,305 


1 


3,128 



193 meters and 28 service pipes have been found leaking 
and repaired, 61 clocks taken off and replaced by new, and 
the location changed of 34 meters. 

48 new street boxes have been set, 26 decayed boxes taken 
out and replaced by new, 29 repaired and 6S removed, and 
the streets put in good condition. 

All outside boxes have been packed with hay to protect 
the meters from frost. 

The couplings on 410 meters have been sealed with com- 
position clamps, which prevent the meter being taken off 
without the knowledge of this department. 

116 meters have been sent to the factory for repairs, viz., 
52 Worthingtons, 49 Crowns, 4 Ball & Fitts, 11 Desper ; 
162 have been condemned as worn out in service. 

At the yard 1,616 meters were tested, 64 taken apart, 
cleaned and repaired ; 35 clocks and 98 gears have been 
changed to adjust meters to the proper test. 

All new meters are tested on full |, -| and ^- streams before 
being placed in service. 



104 



City Document No. 20. 



Mystic Department. 

Total number of meters in service to date, 420. 

During the year 25 additional meters have been applied, 
77 discontinued, and 260 changes made, for various causes. 

By-passes have been placed on the following meters : 
Crowns, 2 6-in., 2 4-in., 1 3-in. ; Worthington, 2 4-in. and 1 
3-in. The object being to give a positive supply of water in 
case of fire, as the water can be shut ofl' from the meter and 
be allowed to pass around the same. 



Meters in service. Mystic Department, to date. 





6-in. 


4-in. 


3-in. 


2-in. 


1|-in. 


1-in. 


l-in. 


l-in. 


Total. 






6 


2 


33 


4 


73 


50 
4 

43 
9 
1 
1 


34 
103 


201 


" B.W.W." 




4 




2 


5 


6 


8 


2 


22 
9 


191 




18 


Ball & Fitts 






2 


2 




5 


Star 










1 




















2 


11 


10 


43 


6 


103 


108 


137 


420 



One hundred and seventy-two meters have been taken out 
especially for test and examination; 12 ordered out as not 
working satisfactorily; 76 clocks broken, leaking, and vari- 
ous causes. 

Meters repaired, 52 ; repairs consisting of changing clocks, 
repairing leaks, etc. 

Pipes found leaking and repaired, 6 ; location of meters 
changed, 3. 

Four |-in. " B.W.W." meters have been purchased, and 
the following sent to the factory for repairs : 11 Worthington 
and 28 Crowns. 

Nine new street boxes have been set, 22 decayed taken 
out and replaced by new ; 44 repaired and 78 discontinued, 
and streets put in good condition. 

All outside boxes have been hayed for the winter. 

Meter couplings scaled with composition clamps, 253. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



105 



General Statement, for the Year. 



Purchased 

New set 

Discontinued . . . 
Changed 

Tested at shop . . . 
Repaired at shop . 
Repaired in service 
Repaired at factory 
Locations changed . 
Couplings scaled . 

Reset 

Repaired 

Repaired leaking . 
In service 



CocHiTUATE Dbpt. Mystic Dept 



383 

1,121 

1,616 

197 

193 

116 

34 

410 



3,128 



4 
25 

77 
260 



52 

39 

3 

253 



Respectfully, 

GEO. S. FOLLANSBEE, 

Superintendent. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF THE 
INSPECTION AND WASTE DIVISION. 



Division of Inspection and Waste, 

City Hall, Jan. 1, 1888. 

To Horace T. Eockwell, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The following report of this division for the year 
from January 1, 1887, to January 1, 1888, is respectfully 
submitted. 

The inspection force on the 1st January, 1887, consisted 
of thirty inspectors and three chief inspectors. 

On March 21 three inspectors were detailed to work under 
the Water Registrar of the Mystic Department : they con- 
tinued there until December 5. In April eleven inspectors 
were assigned to Water Registrar Davis to inspect the 
Cochituate Department for the assessing of water-rates ; they 
worked under him until August 1. The remaining sixteen 
inspectors were engaged during the year checking the waste 
indicated by the Deacon meters and Church stop-cocks ; 
work was begun on the meters and stop-cocks April 25, and 
continued until November 26, when the meters were taken 
up. 

Inspector R. E. Maguire resigned in January, and Dillon 
McCormack, a suspended inspector, was reinstated to fill the 
vacancy. Another suspended inspector — Solomon Bach- 
arach — was reinstated July 8. 

During the summer months the inspection force having all 
the work they could possibly attend to in the Cochituate and 
Mystic divisions, five inspectors were temporarily appointed 
to enforce the ordinance in relation to hand hose, fountains, 
sprinklers, etc. ; they were on duty — three from the begin- 
ning of June, and two additional from July 16 to the 1st of 
November, when their services were dispensed with. 

On October 18 the location of the three divisions of in- 
spectors were changed as follows, viz. : the men who had 
been employed in the Roxbury, Dorchester, West Roxbury, 
and Brighton districts were transferred to Somerville, Chel- 
sea, Everett, Revere, and Charlestown. The men on duty 
in the latter districts were placed in the middle district, com- 
prising South Boston and the city proper ; those at work in 



Report of the Water Board. 



107 



the city proper were placed in the Roxbury and Brighton 
districts. 

The order issued by the Water Board March 14, to have 
inspectors state in their daily reports the hour of visit to each 
premises, has been productive of good results by affording a 
check on the work of each inspector every hour of the day. 

Notwithstanding the facilities afforded by the Deacon 
meters and Church stop-cocks to check waste, and that 
nearly 2,000 premises more than the previous year were re- 
ported wasting water, the consumption of the year in the 
Cochituate division averaged 12.28 per cent, over that of 
1886. This, I consider, in a great measure, may be the result 
of increase in population, business premises, and thousands 
of water-closets ordered in by the Board of Health where 
vaults previously existed. 

The following table shows the consumption in the Co- 
chituate Department for the 3"ear, also for the year before 
inspection began. Notwithstanding increase of population, 
buildings, and other increased sources of consumption, the 
figures show a saving of 10.40 per cent., or an average of 
3,523,492 gallons for each day of the year, as compared 
with the year before inspection. 



Month. 






Befoke 
Inspection. 


Average daily 
Consumption, 

1887. 


Average daily 

Saving in 
1887, as against 
Consumption the 
year before In- 
spection began. 


Per cent. 

saved as 

against year 




Average daily 
Consumption. 


before 
Inspection. 


January, 1883 
February, " 
March, " 
April, 

May, " 
June, " 
July, " 
August, " 
September, " 
October, 1882 
November, " 
December, " 






Gallons. 
1882-1883. 

34,715,500 
32,690,700 
34,110,700 
30,617,600 
32,169,500 
33,419,200 
36,774,000 
37,141,000 
33,645,600 
31,563,800 
31,318,700 
32,352,800 


Gallons. 

32,687,600 
31,224,400 
28,124,100 
25,.591,500 
27,925,000 
30,069,000 
30,469,700 
30,063,100 
31,946,600 
30,562,700 
28,002,000 
31,511,500 


Gallons. 

2,027,900 
1,466,300 
5,986,600 
5,026,100 
4,244,500 
3,350,200 
6,304,300 
7,077,900 
1,699,000 
1,001,100 
3,256,700 
841,300 


5.84 

4.48 

17.55 

16.41 

13.19 

10.02 

17.14 

19.05 

5.04 

3.17 

10.37 

2.6 


Averages for 
month . , 


e 


ach ) 


33,376,591 


29,853,100 


3,523,492 


10.40 



108 



City Document No. 20. 



The following schedule gives the Mystic consumption for 
the year, as also before inspection began, with the increase 
or decrease as compared with the consumption of 1886 : — 



Month. 



January . . 
February . . 
March . . . 
April .... 
May .... 
Juue .... 
July .... 
August . . . 
September . 

October . . 
November . 
December . 

Averages 



Before 
Inspection. 



After 
Inspection. 



Average daily 
Consumption. 



Gallons. 

1883. 

8,369,600 

7,714,700 

7,737,300 

6,171,100 

6,319,100 

6,912,500 

7,307,600 

7,261,500 

6,846,300 

1882. 
6,011,300 
5,577,400 
6,877,600 



6,842,166 



Average daily 
Consumption 

for 1887. 



10,488,600 
9,346,700 
8,175,000 
6,933,800 
6,916,300 
7,159,800 
7,250,000 
6,871,900 
6,877,600 

6,436,600 
7,361,200 
7,835,300 



7,637,733 



Increase 

over 
Consump- 
tion of 
1886. 



23.2 
0.1 
5.1 
4.5 
7.3 
3.1 



Decrease 
in Con- 
sumption 
of 1887 as 
against that 
of 1886. 



2.5 
4.1 
9.3 



Report of the Water Board. 



109 



The following table gives the work performed by each 
insjDector in checking waste : — 



NSPECTOB. 



Bacharach, S. . . . 
Berran, Joseph . . . 
Cassidy, M. F. J. . . 
Connolly, John J. . 
Corbett, John J. . . 
Daly, James F. . . . 
Desmond, John F. . 
Dunn, -John J. • . . 
Edmonds, Michael F. 
Finnigan, D. A. . . 
Foye, JohnE. . . . 
Hassett, John B. . . 
Kane, James J. . . . 
Kilduff, William . . 
McCarty, 0. F. . . . 
McCarthy, T., jr. . . 
McCormack, D. . . . 
McNamara, John J. 
Maguire, Hugh . . . 
Murphy, John J. . . 
Murray, Thos. F. . . 
Neagle, Joseph B. . 
Quigley, John J. . . 
Quigley, James L. . 
Koss, George F. . . 

Rosnosky, R 

Roth, John H. . . . 
Smith, Lawrence . . 
Sweeny, C.F. ... 
'I'oland, Joseph II. . 
Wood, Walter B. . . 



ST 



^■S 



2,006 
3,358 
4,394 
2,322 
2,979 
3,425 
4,762 
5,580 
5,045 
5,168 
2,990 
4,602 
3,400 
4,991 
5,244 
1,445 
3,095 
3,475 
2,933 
4,519 
4,271 
1,436 
3,301 
1,203 
4,797 
3,093 
1,716 
3,504 
1,186 
4,138 
5,093 

109,471 



Defective Pixtuebs. 



«S 



170 
129 
378 

52 
324 
255 
241 
594 
455 
759 
137 
478 
833 
640 
508 
369 
186 
156 

69 
575 
584 
673 
173 
301 
533 
206 
864 
504 
190 

58 
499 

11,893 



° 1=1 



117 

246 
178 
282 
997 
241 
602 
421 
764 
144 
466 
875 
613 
450 

86 
174 
137 

73 
530 
542 
588 
157 

51 
478 
159 
770 
484 

29 

58 
474 

11,314 



a s 



160 
147 
358 
136 
375 
1,259 
252 
527 
407 
771 
168 
450 
744 
578 
398 

19 
163 
163 

70 
772 
727 
381 

42 

55 
465 

64 
499 
619 

18 

35 
452 

11,274 



Wilful Wj>ste 
Reports. 



110 City Document No. 20. 

During the year 340 fines were inflicted for non-repairs of 
water-fixtures, wilful waste, and violations of hose regula- 
tions. Of these only 5 were collected ; 335 were abated for 
various causes, in most cases the persons fined being allowed 
additional time to comply with the ordinances to make re- 
pairs, etc. 

During the same period the water has been cut off for 
non-payment of fines, etc., from one water-taker and let on 
again to one. 

The amount of cash received for fines and turned over to 
the City Collector was $10, viz. : — 

Cochituate Department . . . . . $8 00 
Mystic Department 2 00 



$10 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. B. CASHMAN, 

SujjerintendenL 



SUMMAEY OP STATISTICS. 

REPOET OF 1887. 

In Accoedance with the Recommendation of the New 
England Watek- Works Association. 



Boston Water-Works, Suflfolk County, Massachusetts, sup- 
plies also the cities of Somerville and Chelsea, and the town 
of Everett. 

Population by census of 1885 : — 

Boston 390,393 

Chelsea 25,709 

Somerville 29,971 

Everett 5,825 



Total 451,898 

Date of construction : — 

Cochituate works ...... 1848 

Mystic " 1864 

By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury River, and 
Mystic Lake. 

Mode of supply. — Seventy per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty " " " pumping " 

Pumping. 

Cochituate. Mystic. 

Builder of pump- ( H. R. Worthington. H. R. AVorthington. 
ing machinery, ( Boston Machine Co. 

Description of coal used : — 

a Kind, — Anthracite, Bituminous, 

c Size, — Furnace, Broken. 

e Price per gross ton, $4.94 to $5.87 $3.86 and $4.29. 
/ Per cent, of ash, — 15.5 8.9. 



112 



City Document No. 20. 



COCHTTHATE. MySTIC. 

Coal consumed for year in lbs., 2,541,900 6,007,900 

Total pnmpage for year in galls., 1,255,981,200 2,784,653,100 
Average dynamic head in feet, 115.88 147.73 

Gallons pumped per lb. of coal, 494.1 4()3.5 

Duty in foot lbs. per 100 lbs. 

of coal (no deductions) . 47,752,800 57,106,200 

Cost of pumping figured on 

pumping-station expenses, 

viz.:— $12,153.60 $21,761.72 

Cost per million gallons raised 

to reservoir ' . . . $9.68 $7.81 

Cost per million gallons raised 

one foot high . . . $0.0835 $0.0529 

Consumption. 

CocHiTUATE. Mystic. ' 

Estimated population . . 370,000 105.000 

Estimated population sup- 
plied .... 360,000 103,000 

Total consumption, gallons . 10,896,008,000 2,784,595,000 

Passed through domestic 

meters . . . . ^ 280,785,000 12,911,250 

Passed through manufactur- 
ing meters . . . 2,358,052,500 442,678,400 

Average daily consumption, 

gallons .... 29,852,100 7,629,000 

Gallons per day, each in- 
habitant . ". . . 80.8 72.7 

Gallons per day, each con- 
sumer .... 82.9 74.1 

Gallons per day to each tap, 540 454 



Distribution. 








COCHITUATE. 


Mystic. 


Mains. 






Cast-iron, "SV 


"rought-Iron, 




Cast-iron. 


and Cement. 


Kind of pipe used : — 










Size .... 


48-in. 


to 4-in. 


30-in. 


to 3-in. 


Extended, miles 




22.36 




4.51 


Total now in use 




436.50 




137.76 


Distribution pipes less than 










4-in., length, miles 









6.2 


Hydrants added 




184 




43 


Hydrants now in use 




4,990 




935 


Stop-gates added 




249 




65 


Stop-gates now in use 




4,667 




1,301 



Report of the Water Board. 



113 



Bebvices. 

Kind of pipe used : — 
Size 

Extended, feet 
Service taps added 
Total now in use . 
Meters discontinued 
Meters now in use 
Motors and elevators in 
use . . . . 



COCHITUATE. 




Mystic. 


Lead. 


Lead an 


d Wrought-Iron . 


|-in. to 2-in. 


h 


in. to 2-in. 


53,995 




21,851 


1,835 




694 


55,235 




16,804 


301 




49 


3,114 




420 



365 



114 



City Document No. 20. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



115 



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116 City Document No. 20. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO JANUARY 1, 1888. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 
4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848.t 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4. 1850.$ 

AViLLiAM S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 185.0. t 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to Novembei-, 1870.$ 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works. From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 
3, 1885.$ 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

CocHiTUATE Water Board. 
Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 
7, 1856$ . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856. and resigned June 

5, 1860$ Four years. 



Civil Organization of the Board. 



117 



Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 186o$ Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867$ • One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868f One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April, 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January i, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 

31, 1875 Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876 One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55$ . . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59$ . Eight years. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55 J . . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56$ . . . Four years. 

James W. Seaver, 1851$ One year. 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851$. 

John T. Heard, 1851$ One year. 

Adam W. Thaxtek, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55$ . . Four years. 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853$ Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ . One year. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55$ ... . Three years. 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 . . . Six years. 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ . . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 Two years. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ . . . . Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ .... Three years. 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856$ Two months. 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64.$ Eight years. 

Samukl Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ . . . . Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. . . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 01, 62, 63, 64, and 65 . . .Six years. 

Clement Willis, 1860 One year. 

G. E. Fierce, 1860$ One year. 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ .... Three years. 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 Two years. 

John F. Fray, 1862 One year. 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 One year. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ Three years. 

Otis Norcross, * 1865 and 66$ Two years. 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ . . . Four years. 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . . . . Three years. 

William S. Hills, 1867 One year. 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ One year. 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69$ . . . . Two years. 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68, and 69 .... Three years. 

Francis .4. OsBORN, 1869 One year. 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ One year. 

John O. Poor, 1870 One year. 

HoLLis R. Gray, 1870 One year. 



118 



City Document No. 20. 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 

and 71 Nine years. 

George Lem^s, 1868, 69, 70, and 71$ . . . . Four years. 

Sidney Squires, 1871J One year. 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 One year. 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 . . . Four years. 

Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, and 

72 Seven years. 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74$ . . . Three years. 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 .... Two years. 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74$ . . . Five years. 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* Three years. 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 Three yeai-s. 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75$ . . . Three years. 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 One year. 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . . Five years. 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . Six years. 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75, 

and 76t . Ten years. 

Charles E. Powers, * 1875 and 1876t .... Two years. 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t One year. 

Nahum M. Morrison, 1876f . . . . . . One year. 

Augustus Parker, 1876$ One year. 



*Mr. John H. 'Wilkins resio:ned Nov. 15, 1855, and Chai-les Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Roofers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President; and 
July 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the Citj'. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

$ Deceased. 



Civil Organization of the Board. 119 



Boston Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. §awyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. J 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 188-3. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to present time. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 25, 1885, to present time. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from Aug. 26, 1885, to present time. 



Organization of the Board for Year 1887. 

Chairman. 
Horace T. Rockwell. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. 
William Jackson. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

Deputy Collector and Clerk, Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Departmeyit. 
EzEKiEL R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division of Cochituate Departm.ent. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
J. Henry Brown. 

Superintendent of Meter Division. 
George S. Follansbee. 

Superintendent of Inspection and Waste Division. 

D. B. C ASHMAN. 
X Deceased. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS, 



111) 



Report of the Water Board .... 

General summary of revenue and expenditures 

Summary of the principal expenditures 

Extension of mains ..... 

New high-service ...... 

Improvements at Lake Cochituate . 

Quality of the water ..... 

The removal of pollutions .... 

Consumption and waste of water . 

Meters 

Water for Chelsea, Somerville, and Everett . 

Reservoir No. 5 ..... . 

General Statistics. (See also Summary of statistic 
Earnings and Expenditures 

Cost op Construction and Condition of the Debts 
Expenditure Accounts in detail 

List of Contracts 

Report of the Engineer .... 

Yield of sources of supply 

Sudhury reservoirs and Lake Cochituate 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs . 

High-service pumping-stations 

New high-service works .... 

Mystic lake, sewer, reservoir, and pumping-station 

Detection of waste 

Distribution ..... 

General condition and requirements 
Tables of consumption, diversion of Sudbury-river water, amounts 
drawn from Lake Cochituate, rainfall, operations of pumping- 
stations, etc. 
Report of the Water Registrar 

Financial statement 

Meters 

Yearly revenue 

Fountains, motors, etc. . 

Water-fixtures 



PAGE 

1-11 

1 

2 

2 

2 

3 

5 

4 

6 

6 

9 

10 

12 

13 

14 

16 

21 

24-56 

24 

24 

28 

29 

29 

83 

35 

36 

39 



41-56 
57 
57 

59-62 
63 
65 
67 



122 City Document No. 20. 

PAGE 

Report of Superintendent or Western Division .... 68-76 

Sudburj-river basins ......... 68-70 

Farm pond ............ 70 

Lake Cochituate .......... 71 

Aqueducts ........... 71-72 

Chestnut-hill and Brookline reservoirs ...... 73 

Rainfall 74 

Report of Superintendent of Eastern Division .... 77 
Main pipe laid and relaid, location and length of same, total pipe 

in use, repairs, leaks and stoppages, hydrants in use, etc. . 77-94 

Report of the Superintendent of the Mystic Department 95-101 

Report of the Superintendent of the Meter Division . 102-105 

Report of the Superintendent of the Inspection and Waste 

Division 106-110 

Summary of Statistics (arranged per recommendation of New Eng- 
land Water- Works Association) 111-115 

Civil Organization of the Board, 1845 to 1887 . . . 116-119 



(Mar., 1887, 20,000) 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



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