(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 9999 06660 958 5 



niBi 



,i..^0^^^ 



AMi 



TiJ A T^WT 



1. mjn 




^1 BOSTONIA Ml 












I Accessions 



^^0,-0f<5 



Shell T^o 



^ ^^11^^ n'tY, 




trl\ t \ Ii\ 












Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofbo1888boston 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 




S 






BOSTON; 
ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 



No. 39 ARCH STREBT. 



18 8 9 



/ ,: \ : n 



[/'^^y^uj A / / 



/ <ij 






[DoouMEi^T 31—1889.] 



CITY OF i^l:M BOSTON. 




THIETEENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Office of the Boston Water Board, 

City Hall, Boston, Jan. 1, 1889. 

To the Honorable the Gity Council: — 

The Boston Water Board present their report for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1888, including a financial statement cover- 
ing the expenditures in the various departments ; and also 
the reports of the Water Registrar, the City Engineer, and 
the Superintendents of the Eastern and Western divisions, 
and the Inspection and Waste and Meter Departments : — 

EXTENSION OF MAINS. 

A large amount of work on " Extension of Mains " has 
been done during the past year. Some twenty miles of 
pipe-laying was required to supply the demand. Excepting 
the previous season, the quantity of work completed has 
exceeded that of any year since 1875. The additional main 
to East Boston has been completed, Avith the exception of the 
connecting siphon at Warren bridge. When this part of 
the work is finished that district will have an abundant 
supply. 

New mains have been laid connecting Charlestown with 



2 City Document No. 31. 

the Cochituate and Sudbury river systems ; and when the 
new siphon at the draw of Warren bridge is built, the con- 
nection will be complete, and the Bunker Hill District can be 
supplied with these waters whenever deemed necessary. 

Much of the work of laying a main to Moon Island, for 
the sewerage works, and from thence across the bay to 
Long Island, for the pauper institution, has been accom- 
plished, and the remainder will be finished early in the 
spring. The Quincy Water Company offered to furnish 
water to these places. The offer was considered very care- 
fully by the Board, but it was finally decided that it would 
be better for the city to supply its own institutions with 
water rather than depend on any private corporation. Not 
the least reason for this decision was that ultimately it would 
result in a saving to Boston to take that course. 

STOPCOCKS. 

Five thousand sidewalk stopcocks have been placed during 
the past year, making 30,000 now in service. This work 
has proved of great convenience and saving to the depart- 
ment. 

HIGH SERVICE. 

The new pumping-station at Chestnut Hill (a cut of which 
appears in another part of this report) is finished, excepting 
a few details. The two Gaskill engines have been in use, 
more or less, during the past year pumping water into the 
Fisher-Hill reservoir. A new gate-house has also been 
built and the adjacent grounds graded and sodded. The 
reservoir and grounds will now present an appearance in 
accordance with other parts of the works. 

Considerable territory in the city proper has been added 
to high service. Some five and one-half million gallons 
are now being pumped daily. This service will be extended 
from time to time as the needs of the community require. 

The old pumping-station on Elmwood street, Roxbury, 
has been discontinued. The machinery and boilers will be 
sold and the proceeds turned into the sinking-fund. 

High-service pipes have been laid to the draw on Warren 
bridge, also on the other side in Charlestown, and it only 
remains to make the connection under the draw to complete 
high service for that district whenever deemed advisable. 

The City Council will be asked for an appropriation to 
extend the high-service system in Roxbury and Dorchester, 
and to lay an additional main from Parker Hdl to the Com- 
mon. This last item is necessary in order to increase the 



Report of the Water Board. S 

pressure and to guard against the inconveniences which wonld 
result in case of accident from our having hut a single main. 

A wooden house with an ohservatory has been built 
around the high -service tower on Mt. Bellevue (a cut of 
which appears in this report), and the grounds will be 
graded the coming season. A similar tank has also been built 
on Breed's Hill, East Boston, to accommodate residents of 
that locality who ai'e unable to secure a sui)ply from the 
ordinary service. We intend to surround this with a build- 
ing much the same as at Mt. Bellevue. 

A new pumping-station has been built on Condor street, 
East Boston, to which the pumps from the old building are 
being removed. The Brighton pumping-station has been 
discontinued. The pump will be removed to East Boston, to 
be used in supplying the tank on Breed's Hill. 

When the work in hand and contemplated is finished, in 
all probability very little will remain to be done in the way 
of high service for some years to come, with the exception 
of extending mains wherever required. 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The wet season last summer made it a difficult matter to 
keep Lake Cochituate drawn down sufficiently to enable the 
contractor to pursue the work on the shallow flowage. 
However, 60,000 yards of earth were excavated from the 
Pegan and Hanchett meadows ; shallow places have been 
made deep ; the banks have been gravelled ; and the dis- 
agreeable vegetable growths removed. For this work 
$30,000 were transferred from the high-service appropria- 
tion, by order of the City Council. There still remain a few 
spots that need attention. The results of the work last year 
and this have been so satisfactory that the Board hopes to 
be able to eradicate all shallow flowage from the lake. The 
dyke separating the lake from the Pegan meadows has been 
removed, thereby creating a better circulation ; and this 
work, together with the removal of shallow flowage, must re- 
sult in a vast improvement in the quality of the water. 

Preparations have been made towards constructing a new 
dam at the outlet of the lake, the old one being deemed in- 
adequate for the service. 

POLLUTION. 

Since our last report the town of Framingham has begun 
to build a system of sewerage works which, when comi)leted, 
will be of great advantage to our water-supply. Marlboro' 
obtained an act from the last Legislature giving that town the 



4 City Document No. 31. 

right to construct a sewerage system. It is hoped that other 
towns in the neighborhood of the Sudbury and Cochituate 
sources will follow their example. Money has been appro- 
priated by the City Council to aid these towns in diverting 
their sewage from our water-shed. More will be asked for 
when other towns display a disposition to imitate Framing- 
ham and Marlboro'. 

A constant watch is kept by this department on the terri- 
tory surrounding our water-supply to detect any pollution of 
the water. A full record of each case discovered is on file. 
Several cases have been turned over to the Law Department 
for prosecution. We hope by vigorous proceedings in this 
direction to prevent pollution in the future. 

The matter of the Mystic-Valley sewerage is now being 
agitated, and it is hoped that a successful solution of this 
important question will soon be reached. In the meantime 
everything possible is being done to keep pollution out of 
the streams and ponds leading to Mystic lake. 

FILTRATION. 

Some attention has been given during the past year to the 
matter of filtration. The Board has visited several places to 
examine into the different systems, and will pursue their 
investigations in order to gain knowledge that may be applied 
with advantage to portions of our water-supply. Experi- 
ments have been made during the summer at Basin 2 and at 
Chestnut Hill, but the results have not been such as to 
warrant a report upon them at this time. 

INDIAN-BROOK-BASIN. 

The Board again desires to call the attention of the gov- 
ernment to the urgent necessity for beginning the work of 
constructing the new basin, No. 5, on Indian brook, in the 
towns of Ashland and Hopkinton. The former City Engi- 
neers, Messrs. Joseph P. Davis and Henry M. Wightman, 
and the present engineer, Mr. William Jackson, have, at 
various times, made careful studies of this subject, and all 
agree that the waters of this brook should be stored as a part 
ot the city's supply. In a report to the Board (City Docu- 
ment No.\01, 1881, pages 56, 57, and 58), Mr. Wightman, 
speaking of the available storage-places on the Sudbury river 
and its branches, says : — 

First. Whitehall pond (a compensating reservoir built by the city 
at the time the Cochituate works were constructed and afterwards sold), 
situated near the head-waters of the rivers, with a water-shed of about 
five square miles. 



Report of the Water Board. 5 

This pond will store about 900,000,000 gallons, and is a valuable 
storage-basin ; but the city, under ordinaiy circumstances, obtains now 
as much advantage from it as it would if it owned it, as all the water 
that is run from it is intercepted by the city's dams on the rivers below. 
Its use by the mills is at a time, usually, when the city needs the water, 
that is, in the dryer months. 

Second. A basin on the lower pai't of Indian brook could be obtained, 
'but it is not a veiy favorable site, and its capacity would be small com- 
pared with the others on this branch of the river. 

Third. On the main stream, above Ashland, a large basin could be 
built, but it would interfere with manufacturing establishments, and 
would require the raising of the road-bed of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad for a long distance. 

It is doubtful whether the city could obtain the necessary rights to 
interfere with the railroad ; but, even if it could, the delay in obtaining 
them would amount to one season at least, and the cost of these rights, 
and of mill damages, independent of the cost of consti'uction, would, 
obviously, be very high. 

Basin No. 7, on Angle brook, will contain about 1,500,000,000 gal- 
lons, and will add about 5,000,000 gallons per day. 

Its water-shed is 7.765 square miles. 

It would not fill in a dry year, but its flow-line has been determined 
so as to secure the least area of shallow flowage in proportion to its size 
of basin. The dams will be about 1.200 feet long, the maximum 
depth of water at the dam 20 feet, and the flowage area, with marginal 
lands and islands, will be 873 acres. 



In a report to the Board, dated March 3, 1888, City En- 
gineer Jackson, speaking of the development of the Sudbury- 
river supply, w^ith particular reference to the proposed basin 
No. 5, says : — 



In Mr. Whitman's report, before quoted, he refers to a basin on the 
lower part of this brook ; but further investigations show that, higher 
up the stream, there is an excellent opportunity to construct a large 
basin. 

This basin lies in the towns of Ashland and Hopkinton, the dam being 
in Ashland. Indian brook rises in the southerly part of Hopkinton, and 
flows in a northerly direction about five iniles, joining the Sudbury river 
in Ashland. 

The water-shed above the proposed dam is about 5.9 square miles in 
area, and, with the exce])tion of a part of the village of Hopkinton, the 
teri'itory is sparsely settled and largely covered with timber. 

The village of Hopkinton is situated about one and a half miles from 
the head of the proposed basin, and a considerable portion of it, say 
three-quarters, drains in the direction of the basin ; but the drainage is 
almost wholly soil-filtered before reaching the stream, and the propor- 
tion of cases which would need to be treated as "pollutions" is very 
small. It is quite practicable to adopt the comparatively inexpensive 
system devised by the Massachusetts Drainage Commission for disposing 
of all the sewage outside the water-shed ; and, sooner or later, this Avill 
undoubtedly be accomplished. 

The elevation of the basin is assumed at grade 295, 50 feet above the 
valley at the dam, giving a capacity of 1,600,000,000 gallons, equal to 
15i inches of rainfall on the watei'-shed. 

The area flowed is 235 acres, and consists of wood and rather poor 
farming lands. The side-hills are steep and rocky, the meadows in the 



6 City Document No. 31. 

lower part of the valley are cleared and cultivated, the upper part being 
swampy and covered with timber and boulders. 

The dam will be similar in construction to Dam 4 ; it will be about 
400 I'eet long at the level of the meadow, and 1,500 feet long at the top 
of the embankment. It is assumed that the foundation will be like that 
found at Dam 4. Should, however, the borings develop different condi- 
tions, the plan for the dam may have to be modified. 

The basin will flow three roads ; these it is proposed to provide for 
by changing their location, as described in a special report to your 
Board. 

The basin may be considered good for a daily average supply of 
4,500,000 gallons. This figure is based upon the yield of the Sudbury 
river from Jan. 1, 1878, to Feb. 1, 1884. 

The estimated cost of this basin is $775,000. 

The location of this basin is a very favorable one, both as regards its 
storage capacity and the purity of the water collected. 



The Board has already purchased 321 1 acres of the land 
required for the basin, at a cost of $22,175, which is at the 
rate of about $69 an acre. This amount includes the build- 
ings upon three small farms, which, Avhen sold, will realize 
a few hundred dollars. About ninety acres additional land 
remain to be acquired. 

Itbeinof necessary to discontinue and relocate certain hiijh- 
ways lying within the flowage area of the ))roposed new 
basin, a petition from this Board was duly presented to the 
county commissioners of Middlesex county praying for such 
discontinuance and relocation. Several hearings were had, 
at which representatives of the town of Hopkinton and other 
parties were present, and an amicable agreement was reached 
satisfactory to all parties. On the 29th of December, 1888, 
an order was passed by the county commissiimers granting 
the petition of the Board. Damages to private parties 
amounting to $75 were awarded ; and it was further ordered 
that the cit}^ should pay the town of Hopkinton the sura of 
$1,000, as a fail- and just sum towards the expenses of main- 
taining the additional length of roads necessitated by the 
changes referred to. It was also ordered that the city shall 
lay out and construct the roads on or before the tirst day of 
January, 1890. 

It will thus be seen that the work must l)e commenced 
very soon ; and while the work upon the highways is being 
carried on, an engineei'ing force should be employed in making 
tiie borings and other surveys necessary, properly to deter- 
mine the site for the new dam. With the utmost energy in 
pushing the construction, the Engineer states that it will 
require three full seasons to build the reservoir ; and as the 
water ought to remain at least one year without being used, 
it will be four and possibly five years before it can be 
properly added to the city's supply. 



Report of the Water Board. 7 

" MYSTIC-VALLEY SEWAGE. 

For several years one of the vexed questions occupying 
the attention of the Board has been the proper treatment of 
the sewage of the Mystic-valley sewer built a dozen years 
ago. During the past year plans were made by the City 
Engineer and experiments made with results which justified 
the erection of a plant for chemically treating the sewage, 
which we are pleased to say is now in successful operation, 
and which we think will effectually abate any further 
nuisance in the lower Mystic lake. The works are built on 
the city's land in Winchester, a short distance below the 
old engine-house, and consist of a new engine-house, 
with four large tanks, covered by an auxiliary building, 
a chemical-room, in Avhich is situated the pump for rais- 
ing the sewage into the tanks, and three tanks or vats 
for dissolving the chemicals. The large tanks adjoin 
the engine-house, and are each 40 feet in width by 60 feet 
in length, and are arranged with one end and one side ad- 
joining each other, covering an erea of 80 feet by 100 feet. 
The floor of the tanks slopes towards an open drain, which also 
slopes towards a large brick well, into which all the sludge 
from the tanks is drained. The sewage is first pumped out 
of a well built at the end of the branch sewer by a centrif- 
ugal suction- pump. As the sewage rises in the suction- 
pipe, the precipitant (crude snip. -alumina) is applied from 
a small pipe extending from one of the chemical vats, and is 
thoroughly mixed with the sewage as it passes through the 
pump. It is then discharo-ed into a flume built on the top of 
the tanks, which conveys it to either tank desired. These 
tanks are filled successively, and the sewage is allowed 
to rest three hours before emptying. At that time it is found 
that all the matter in suspension and a large proportion of 
the matter in solution has precipitated, covering the bottom 
of the tank with sludge. The tanks are then emptied and 
the sludge drained into a well, from which it is taken to ad- 
joining land for removal. The Superintendent estimates the 
total amount of sewage passing through the sewer each 
twenty-four hours at 400,000 gallons, and it has been de- 
monstrated to his satisfaction that by running the works from 
seven or eight in the morning to two o'clock the next morn- 
ing, all that absolutely requires treating can be treated. An 
illustration of the plant is given in this report. 

CONSUMPTION AND WASTE OF WATER. 

The consumption during the past year shows an average 
of 88 gallons daily per capita on the Cochituate and Sud- 
bury systems, and 76.5 on the Mystic, — an increase over the 



8 City Document No. 31. 

previous twelve months of 10.9 percent, on the combined 
supplies. This extraordinarily large increase in the use of 
water was due mainly to the excessive cold weather in the 
early winter months. In January and February the con- 
sumption averaged over 50,000,000 gallons daily on the 
combined supplies, as against less than 40,000,000 gallons 
during the other months. This rate of increase, if main- 
tained, would speedily bring us up to the limit of our pres- 
ent means of supply. While we are confident that this 
ratio will not continue, it should be borne in mind that not 
only is the city growing rapidly, but the number of transient 
and suburban people who use our Xvater is largely on the 
increase, and should be included in any estimate of popula- 
tion. It should also be stated that as a basis for ascertain- 
ing the number of gallons consumed daily per capita the 
population of Boston, including Charlestown, has been 
figured as 420,000, which is believed to be a low estimate. 

METERS. 

Since the^ appearance of our last annual report, the Report 
of the Meter-Testing Commission has been made public, and 
has attracted much attention on account of the thoroughness 
of the description given of the merits and faults of a large 
number of meters subjected to trial. The test failed to in- 
dicate that any one meter was so far superior that the com- 
missioners were willing to recommend it as the best, but it 
showed that there were several which could be relied upon 
to perform reasonably accurate service. A perfect water- 
meter is yet among the improvements of the future. 

This Board has purchased meters in small quantities from 
time to time during the past year, to supply the places of 
the defective Tremont meters which are being removed fi'om 
service as rapidly as possible. At the end of another year 
there "will probably be very few in the department. We 
have now in use about 3,500 meters of different patterns, 
and we advocate the policy of frequent examinations with a 
view to keeping them in good running order. In many 
cities the policy is followed of allowing meters to take care of 
themselves, but the delicate mechanism of the parts justifies 
care and supervision if accurate results are to be expected. 
Especially in view of the fact that no meter has as yet been 
invented which, in our opinion, is entirely reliable, those 
in service should not be allowed to perform any great length 
of duty without being taken out for testing. We believe 
that the policy suggested, if attentively adhered to, will save 
the city a considerable amount annually in the way of 
revenue. 



Eeport or THE Water Boaed. 9 

QUALITY OP THE WATER. 

The quality of the water on the Cochituate and Sudbury 
systems has continued to be very good, as indicated by the 
accompanying report and table compiled by Prof. E. S. 
Wood, our analyst, which gives a comparative statement as 
to the condition of the water-supply during the past two 
years, Beaver Dam brook, to which he refers, will certainly 
improve as soon as the Framingham seweiage system is 
completed, when the sewage of that town will no longer 
reach the waters that flow into Lake Cochituate. It is hoi)ed 
that Natick, Marlborough, and Westborough will soon intro- 
duce similar systems, should the Framingham works prove as 
successful as is anticipated. 

The quality of the Mystic, probably owing to the heavy 
and frequent rainfalls, has been more satisfactory than we 
expected. 



10 



City Document No. 31. 



Harvard Medical School, 

Boston, Feb. 18, 1889| 
To the Boston Water Commissioners : — \ 

Gentlemen, — Herewith please find the average results of the qua! 
terly analyses made by me of the waters collected from the varioA 
sources of water-supply for the city of Boston during the years 18^\ 
and 1888, arranged in tabular form for convenience of comparison. 



Water Analysis. 

[Figures express parts per 100,000 of water.] 

Average Results of Quarterly Analyses of Boston Waters in 1887 andX 

1888. 



Location. 


Free 
Ammonia. 


"Albuminoid" 
Ammonia. 


Chlorine. 


Total. 


Color. 


I. Stony Brook, head of 


(1887 


0.0025 


0.0251 


0.60 


6.95 


2.0 


Btisiu 3 ..... . 


(1888 


0.0049 


0.0286 


0.50 


6.50 


1.85 


II. Basin 3, near Dam 3 . 


f 1887 
!l888 


0.0086 
0.0038 


0.0264 
0.0203 


0.46 
0.54 


6.42 
5.85 


1.9 
2.15 


III. Sudbury River, head of 


(1887 


0.0032 


0.0231 


0.40 


6.55 


2.0 


Basin 2 


(1888 


0.0018 


0.0299 


0.34 


4.45 


1.75 


IV. Basin 2, near Dam 2 . 


'1887 
!l888 


0.0045 
0.0013 


0.0256 
0.0312 


0.39 
0.47 


5.25 
6.58 


1.8 
1.8 


V. Farm Pond, influent 
Chamber 


(1887 
( 1888 


0.0056 
0.0041 


0.0245 

0.0282 


0..39 
0.48 


5.85 
5.90 


1.7 
2.1 


VI. Farm Pond, efliuent 
Chamber 


(1887 
(1883 


0.0081 
0.0062 


0.0259 
0.0247 


0.425 
0.495 


6.18 
5.50 


1.62 
2.45 


VII. Terminus Sudbury 

Aqueduct, 


(1887 
(1888 


0.0063 
0.0016 


0.0229 
0.0211 


0.425 
0.48 


6.90 
5.85 


1.9 
2.15 


VIII. Beaver Dam Brook . . 


(1887 
\ 1888 


0.0084 
00071 


0.0195 
0.0325 


0.67 
0.45 


9.15 
7.52 


2.2 
2.1 


IX. Lake Cochituate, Gate- 


(1887 


0.0022 


0.0145 


0.52 


6.92 


3.0 


House 


Us88 


0.0018 


0.0157 


0.54 


6.78 


4.7 


X. Terminus Cochituate 
Aqueduct 


(1887 
(1888 


0.0040 
0.0018 


0.0139 
0.0186 


0.52 
0.61 


5.68 
6.00 


3.7 
5.2 


XI. C. n. Reservoir, eflBu- 
ent Gate House . . . 


(1887 
^888 


0.0044 
0.0022 


0.0175 
0.0216 


0.49 
0.54 


5.02 
5.70 


3.0 
3.55 


XII. Service, Boylston st. • 


(1887 
( 1888 


0.0006 
0.0007 


0.0185 
0.0224 


0.49 
0.50 


5.40 
6.18 


3.0 
3.5 


XIII. Cold Rpving Brook, 
head of Basin 4 . . . 


(1887 
(1888 


0.0024 
0.0026 


0.0258 
0.0384 


0.39 
0.27 


5.72 
6.20 


1.9 
1.55 


XIV. Basin 4, near Dam 4 . 


(1887 
(1888 


0.0040 
0.0015 


0.0297 
0.0232 


0.34 
0.35 


5.80 
4.42 


1.8 
2.0 




2 
g 

h 

o 

z 

a. 



Repoet of the Water Board. 11 

From these figures it Avill be noticed that, with two exceptions, the 
waters differed but slightly in the two years, — no more, in fact, than 
would naturally be expected in the averages calculated from the results 
of so small a number of analyses per year. 

The two exceptions referred to are the waters of Beaver Dam brook 
and Cold Spring brook. In the water of Beaver Dam brook the amount 
of albuminoid ammonia averaged 0.0195 parts per 100,000 in 1887, and 
0.0325 parts in 1888, which increase is explained by the unusually large 
amount of impurity in this water in January, April, and October, as 
will be seen by reference to the quarterly reports. Beaver Dam brook 
water has not yielded such large amounts of albuminoid ammonia since 
1883 and 1884. In the case of the water from Cold Spring brook, the 
amount of albuminoid ammonia increased from 0.0258 parts per 100,000 
in 1887 to 0.0384 parts in 1888 ; this increase was shown chiefly in the Oc- 
tober analysis, when it reached 0.0624 parts per 100,000, and at tlae same 
time the water contained 8.10 ])arts per 100,000 of total residue. This in- 
crease in the amount f)f impurity in the Cold S])ring brook water may, 
perhaps, be explained hj some necessnry disturbance to the bed of the 
stream a short time previous to the collection of the water on October 1. 

With I'eference to the cohn- of the waters it will be noticed that in all 
of the basins and reservoirs the water was less dee])ly colored in 1888 
than in 1887 with the exccjption of Basin 2, in which case the color 
averaged the same in the two years. / 

Very respectfully yours, 

EDWARD S. WOOD, M.D. 



New Appropriations. 

We shall ask for the usaal loan for extension of mains, 
and it is extremely desirable that our request, made last 
year and referred to the Finance Committee, for a loan for 
beginning the work on Basin 5, be granted. We shall also 
ask for appropriations for building a new stable at the 
All)any-street yard ; for continuing needed improi^ements at 
Lake Cochituate, including a new dam at the outlet; and for 
two new boilers, and repairs upon the engines at the Mystic 
pumping-station. These items will be placed in the regular 
appropriation bill, to be paid from revenue in each case. 

Accompanying this will be found the reports of the Water 
Registrar, the City Engineer, and the Division Superin- 
tendents, to which attention is respectfully called. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS F. DOHERTY, 
WILLIAM B. SMART, 
ROBERT GRANT, 

Boston Water Board. 



12 



City Document No. 31. 



General Statistics. 



f UDBUBT AND COCHITUATE WOBKS. 



1887. 



Daily average consumption in gallons . . 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through meters, 
gallons 



Percentage of total consumption metered 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles . . . ., 



Number of fire-hydrants in use .... 

Yearly revenue from water-rates , . , 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on Jan . 1 , 1 887, 1888, and 1889, 
Yearly expense of maintenance . . . , 



Mystic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons . 

Dmiy average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through meters, 
gallons 



Percentage of total consumption metered . 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use .... 

Yearly revenue from water-rates .... 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water , 



Costof works on .Jan. 1, 1887, 1888, and 1889, 
Yearly expense of maintenance . . . , 



26,627,900 

74.3 

6,373,200 

23.9 

53,400 

3,763 

414 

4,806 

$1,206,064 69 

$400,706 85 

33.2 

^18,973, 616 03 
$336,507 37 

7,399,800 

72 5 

1,117,600 

15.1 

16,110 

469 

133.2 
818 

$249,609 62 
$69,330 48 

27.8 

$1,657,458 97 

$134,439 43 



29,852,100 



7,229,700 

24.1 

55,235 

3,393 

436.5 

4,990 

$1,244,191 75 

$451,335 09 

36.3 

$19,527,483 32 

$339,693 34 

7,629,000 

72.7 

1,248,200 

16.4 

16,809 

428 

136.1 
935 

$293,018 65 
$76,241 82 

26.0 

$1,659,639 37 

$153,345 02 



33,310,700 



7,844,900 

23.6 

56,947 

3,532 

456.68 

5,008 

$1,317,385 92 

$465,653 49 

35.3 

$20,049,614 53 

$383,638 16 

8,258,400 

76.5 

1,272,600 

15.4 

17,607 

395 

142.2 
956 

$306,637 22 
$75,830 78 

24.7 

$1,690,757 30 

$162,086 42 



Report of the Water Board. 13 



Earnings and Expenditures. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water-Works from all 
sources for the year ending December 31, 1888, were as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $1,317,385 92 

Income from shutting off and letting on 

water, and fees . . . . • 2,861 90 

Elevator, fire and service pipes, sale of old 

materials, etc 36,726 64 



The total expenditures of the Cochituate 
Water-Works for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1888, 'were as follows, viz. : — 
Current expenses . . . $381,638 16 

Refunded water-rates . . 515 27 

Transferred to City Collector's 

Department . . . 2,000 00 

Interest on funded debt . 735,791 40 



$1,356,974 46 



1,119,944 83 



Balance Dec. 31, 1888 . . . $237,029 63 

The total receipts of the Mystic Water- Works, from all 

sources, for the year ending December 31, 1888, Avere as 
follows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water . . . $306,637 22 
Income from shutting off and letting on 

water, and fees ..... 727 50 

Service-pipes, repairs, etc. . . . 1,232 91 



The total expenditures of the Mystic 
Water-Works for the year ending December 
31, 1888, were as follows : — 
Current expenses . . . $162,086 42 

Interest on funded debt . 41,992 50 

Refunded water-rates . . 72 75 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somer- 

ville, and Everett, under 

contract .... 89,789 98 



$308,597 63 



293,941 65 



Balance Dec. 31, 1888 . . . $14,655 98 



14 City Document No. 31. 

Cost of Construction, and Condition of the Water 

Debts. 

Cost of construction of Cochituate Works 

to Jan. 1, 1888 $19,527,483 32 

Expended in 1888, as follows, viz. : — 

Extension of Mains, etc. . $279,715 48 

New High-Service Works . 233,437 49 

Additioual supply of water . 8,978 24 



522,131 21 



Cost of construction of Cochituate 

W^ater-Wouks to Jan. 1, 1889 . $20,049,614 53 



The outstanding Cochituate Water Loans, 
Jan. 1, 1888, were $14,714,973 98 

Issued during year 1888, as follows : — 

Appropriation, High Service, 

4% Loans . $26,300 00 
♦' ('Extension of 

j Mains, etc. : 
]3^% Loans . 100,000 00 
14:% " . 100,000 00 

226,300 00 



Total Cochituate Debt, Jan. 1, 1889 . $14,941,273 98 



Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 

1888 $4,271,168 59 

Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 

1889 4,738,893 70 

Net Cochituate Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1888, 10,443,805 39 

" " 1, 1889, 10,202,380 28 



Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1888 ...... $1,670,034 48 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1889 .,,,.. 1,690,757 30 



Eeport of the Water Board. 15 

The outstfinding Mystic Water Loans, Jan. 

1, 1888, were $839,000 00 

Total Mystic Debt, Jan. 1, 1889 . . 839,000 00 



Mystic Water Sinking Fund, Jan. 1, 1888, $655,133 52 

" 1, 1889, 704,041 22 

Net Mystic Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1888 . 183,866 48 

" 1, 1889 . 134,958 78 



16 



City Document No. 31. 



EXPENDITURE ACCOUNTS. 



Jakuary Dbaft, 1888, to January Draft, 1889. 

Extension of 3 fains: — 

Labor ...... $94,427 79 

Salaries 1,680 18 

Teaming 7,400 00 

Blasting 8,755 96 

Water-pipes, Contracts . . . 134,853 09 

Miscellaneous .... 10,927 04 

Stock 62,834 87 



$320,878 93 



High Service: — 

Labor $30,176 24 

Teaming ..... 1,607 12 

Salaries 4,614 65 

Stock 23,429 05 

Blasting 25 21 

Land purchased .... 2,709 10 
Miscellaneous .... 12,017 33 
Water-pipes, Contract . . . 24,215 79 
Fisher-Hill Gate House, Contract . 912 00 
Water Tower, Mt. Bellevue, Con- 
tract 4,100 00 

West Roxbury Pumps, Contract . 2,299 56 

Wrought-iron Tank, Breed's Island, 

Contract ..... 2,420 00 
East Boston Pumping-Station, Con- 
tract 4,000 00 

Ceiling, New Pumping - Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . 2,042 75 

Copper Work, New Pumping Stat'n, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . 1,100 00 

Freestone, New Pumping-Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . 12,754 82 

Carpentry, New Pumping-Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . 3,800 00 

Masonry, New Pumping-Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . 26,642 04 

Roofing, New Pumping-Stat'n, Chest- 
nut Hill, Contract . . . 4,000 00 
Painting, Pumping-Station, Chest- 
nut liill, Contract ... 500 00 

Amount carried forward, $163,365 66 



Eeport of the Water Boaed. 



IZ 



Amount hronght forward, $163,365 66 

Dwelling-house, Contract . . . 3,375 63 

Iron Roof, New Pumping-Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract . . . 15,610 00 

Boilers, New Pumping-Station, Chest- 
nut Hill, Contract .... 3,003 00 

Pumping-engines, New Pumping- 
Station, Chestnut Hill, Contract . 48,083 20 



Introduction of Meters and Inspection : - 

New Meters . . . . . 

Stock for Meter supplies . 

Expenses of SpecialWater-Meter Test — 

Salaries of Commissioners, etc. 

Stock and expenses 

Labor ..... 



Improvement of Lake CocJiituate , 

Labor .... 
Salaries (Engineers) . 
Travelling expenses . 
Teaming .... 
Stock, tools, and expenses 



Additional Supply : — 
Salaries (Engineers) . 
Labor .... 
Mateiials and expenses 
Travelling expenses . 
Land purchased for Basin V. 
Gate House, Dam IV., Contract 



16,675 


29 


4,035 


31 


1,985 


00 


320 


86 


487 


10 


16,674 


32 


2,765 


00 


230 


37 


1,151 


25 


2,700 


97 


$1,896 


50 


1,989 


34 


1,937 


50 


335 


75 


2,537 


15 


282 


00 



$233,437 49 



;,503 56 



;,521 91 



!,978 24 



Maintenance Accounts, Cochituate Water- Works. 

Boston Water Board : — 

Salaries of two Commissioners, two 
Clerks, Purchasing Agent, and Mes- 
senger $12,800 47 

Travelling expenses and miscellaneous, 1,903 72 

Printing and stationery . . . 944 03 

Advertising and postage . . . 682 60 



Amoxint carried forward^ 



$16,330 82 
$16,330 82 



18 



City Document No. 31. 



Amount brought forward^ 
Water Registrar's Department : — 

Salaries of Registrar, ten Clerks, seven 
Inspectors, Foremen, Marine Agent, 
Messenger, and laborers in Service 
Division ..... 

Travelling expenses and miscellane- 
ons ...... 

Printing and stationery 

Advertising and postage . 

Eastern Division : — 
Salaries of Superintendents, Clerks, 

and Foreman ..... 
Travelling expenses and transportation 

of men ...... 

Printing and stationery . ... 

Miscellaneous ..... 

Western Division : »— 

Salaries of Superiatendent, Assistant 
Superintendent, Clerks, and Special 
Agent ...... 

Travelling expenses .... 

Printing and stationery . . . 

Miscellaneous ..... 

Inspection and Waste Division: — 

Salaries of Superintendent, three 

Clerks, and Ins[)ectors . 
Travelling expenses .... 
Printing and stationery 
Miscellaneous ..... 

Meter Division: — 

Salaries of Superintendent, one Fore- 
man, and one Clei'k 

Travelling expenses . 

Printing and stationery 

New meters 

Setting and repairing 

Stable 

Tools and miscellaneous- 

Federal-st. Yard: — 
Workshop, blacksmith shop, etc. 

Amount carried forward, 



816,330 82 



$41,647 21 

1,681 17 

1,369 27 

65 00 



57,977 96 

2,905 72 

916 77 

154 76 



58,909 81 

1,623 29 

156 58 

364 15 



44,762 65 



11,955 21 



11,053 86 



55,337 


27 






901 


78 






259 


50 






17 


50 










36,516 


05 


H,450 


47 


204 


75 






72 


17 






705 


97 






13,355 


56 






603 


88 






1,889 


55 










21,282 


35 






. 


• 


7,971 


99 




$149,872 


93 



Report of the Water Board. 19 

Amount brought fonoard, $149,872 93 
Albcmy-st. Yard : — 

Pipe-yard, stable, etc., and rebuilding sea-wall . 24,350 82 
Maverick Wliarf (depot for furnishing water to 

sliipping), rent, and salary of agent . . . 2,029 59 

Teleijhones ........ 973 55 

Special agents' (3) salaries, travelling expenses, etc., 2,861 62 

Cochituate Aqueduct ...... 1,548 93 

Sudbury Aqueduct ...... 5,714 93 

Main-pipe relaying (including stock and labor) . 25,171 34 
'' repairing " "■ " " . 10,655 11 
Hvdrants " " " " " . 17,845 70 
Stopcocks '' " " " " . 3,588 30 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes, and repairing (includ- 
ing stock and labor) ...... 4,774 97 

Tools and repairing (including stock and labor) . 8,100 07 

Streets " " '' " " . 9,795 38 

Fountains " " " " " . 3,5<s7 23 

Stables " " " " . 10,282 59 

Waste detectors " " " " . 1 5,991 85 
Basins, Framingham and Ashland (including stock 

and labor) 7,819 42 

Service-pipe repairing (including stock and labor), 18,854 74 
High service, Roxbury (including fuel, salaries, re- 
pairs, etc.) (Discontinued in July) . . . 7,282 58 
High service, Chestnut Hill (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.), (from March, 1888) . . . 10,158 52 
High service. East Boston (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) . . .... . 3,277 13 

High service, Brighton (including fuel, salaries, re- 
pairs, etc.) (Discontinued in April, 1888), . 739 56 
High service. West Roxbury (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) 2,607 06 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir (including stable, care of 

grounds, etc.) ....... 17,712 14 

Parker-Hill Reservoir 1,912 29 

Brookline Reservoir . . . . . . 1,105 95 

East Boston Reservoir 696 07 

South Boston Reservoir ...... 154 93 

Fisher-Hill Reservoir 916 88 

Lake Cochituate . 3,093 44 

Chestnut-Hill driveway 1,882 26 

Collector of Water-rates, salary . . . . 2,500 00 

Taxes ......... 538 55 

Damages 2,432 28 

Analysis of water, etc. . . . . ... 390 00 

Merchandise sold (pipes and castings, in cases of 

emergency) . . . . . . . 419 45 



11,638 16 



20 



City Document No. 31. 



Maintenance Accounts, Mystic Water- Wokks. 

Boston Water Board : — 

Salaries of one Commissioner and one 
Assistant Clerk .... 

Printing and stationery 
Advertising and postage 
Travelling expenses and miscellaneous, 



^4,701 


00 


83 


44 


11 


50 


184 


7o 



Water Registrar's Department : — 

Salaries of Deputy Collector, two Clerks, 
and three Inspectors .... 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses .... 
Advertising, postage, and miscellaneous, 



Superintendent' s Departrtient : — 

Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant 

Superintendents, and Clerk 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses .... 
Miscellaneous ..... 



58,370 


00 


518 


89 


236 


80 


369 


34 



;,036 69 

127 40 

381 80 

98 15 



Inspection and Waste Division : 

Salaries of Inspectors . 
Travelling expenses 



Meter Division : — 
New Meters - 
Setting and repairing 
Tools . 
Stable . 

Travelling expenses 
Miscellaneous 



.$10,027 35 
79 60 



$237 
5,336 



11 

72 



62 01 
598 87 

93 45 
564 30 



Off and on water (labor) .... 
Main-pipe laying (including stock and labor), 

'' relaying 

" repairing 
Service-pipe laying 

" repairing 

Hydiants and gates, repairing 
Streets, " 

Lake ..... 
Conduit . . . . 



$4,980 69 



9,495 03 



6,644 04 



10,106 95 



6,892 46 

3,246 83 

1,800 

8,570 

1,491 

1,219 

3,816 

1,577 

679 
8,396 

771 



66 
17 
92 
94 
99 
14 
30 
19 
14 



Amount carried forward, 



$G9,689 45 



Keport of the AVatee Board. 



21 



^ Amount brought forward, 

Engine-house 

Stables 

Reservoir 

Pumping Service, salaries and wages . $8,758 10 

Fuel 8,333 41 

Repairs 1,172 08 

Oils, waste, and packing, and small 

supplies 2,694 14 

Repair- shop . 

Fountains 

Tools and repairing 

Taxes . ". . . 

Mystic Sewer (repairs, and pumping and treatment 

of sewage) 
Waste-Detector Service 
Connections with Cochituate Service 
Merchandise sold .... 



569,689 45 

10,478 70 

■6,403 96 

4,518 72 



20,957 73 

2,978 00 

720 12 

1,216 76 

145 31 

24,755 91 

606 10 

18,922 16 

693 50 



$162,086 42 



22 



City Document No. 31. 



-5 i 

a 1 



o 
o 







<M 'i" O 
00 O O 










CO 
CO 


















J.5 




00 (M IT 












■* 


















^ 




















Tl* 


















o 




^ffl ^ 
















CO .? 
















^ 






















^ 














rs 


























(3 














^ 


























o 














S 


























O^ 














H 


























■€& 










































-^ 
















o c^ 


-t^OOOiOOifiCO 


^ 




5 O CO O 


o o 


o 


o o 


d . 




00 o o o ^3 ot 


o to CO 


>o 


TJl O CO o 


o o 


o 


o o 


P'^ 


COTj<(MCO(NCDWtiOt^O 


^_, 


CO o »o o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o •— 


CO yr 


-f O 1- 


O C^ lO t- b- 


•M 


O CD O C-1 


<=> o 


.o 


o ^ 


i« 


o_ O 


_^cD^o^Oi_»-^^-Tf_i^-oq^co 


CT 


m oo i-H t-. 


°. rH 




'^ rH 




»r 


>r 


CO CO O '^ <o tss -^ 


lO 


tH 00 o 


5 1-1 


^ i-i 






^ 


^ 0^ tH 




r-t r-i 






'*. 






05 














^ 




























































V 












, 






























o 






■ ^ 












_^ 






















« 






5 












n 






















g 






■ s 












rs 










































o 










































g 












c 










0) 






2^ 












< 


o c 


c 






. c 


^ 








o 






O 














o c 


c 


c 


c 






c 


o o 


^ 


o o >o o 




o 










o a: 


c 


c 




C 


. c 


c 


^. ° 


CO 


q o j_; o 


c 


o 


o 


O S 




o c^ 


o 


oc 


e- 




^ c 


c 


-* rH 


■** 


t-^ O I- 


O 






CO 


o a 




o a: 


a 


■c^ 




c 






»^ CO 


■^ 


00 CD •# c-l 


C 


OJ 










cT 1- 


c- 


" ° 


5 




■^ 


■ t- 


_ ai_ « 




c^ a 


- 0-f '^ 


C 




o 


o " 




tr 


c- 


•a 




ot 


c 


r- 


t£ 


" oT -^ 


*# 




-f .- 




-f QO 




«& « 


> « 


f « 


)■ « 


^ « 


^ # 


^ 


> ■» ^ 


€©■ 


■»«■•€&€© 


« «■ 


«& 


«■ n 
























a 

o 

o 




o 






, 






























o 
























































i~ 






























c 






























a 






a 


[3 


o M 
■■3 bu 






• 






. 




a 




c 
c 










) 

r 


■t: 


o 
a 
w 
tJi) 


m 


S a 
a? ft 
bn g 
a a 
ft Ph 


a 


c 
c 






■s . 

C3 

a 




■£ 

;. 










1 


,5 


"S 


s- 


a 


s 


£ 






M 


M 




K 






c 








5 






-1- 


^ a 


g 


1 


1 




bo 


c 


a 
■ft 


C3 


< 




o 


5 


:i 


1 

£ 


D 

-4 


'c 


a 


c 
'£ 
£ 


. 1 


a 




E 


£ 




a 

a 


M g 

a a 
■ft P-i 


.a 


"c 




s 

c 

'r 

r 
c 


c 
£ 

a 


£ 
- 

£ 




c 

2 


c 

a 


> 

c 
c 

t: 


c 
a 

'£ 


£ 


c 

< 

5 


a 

, i 

o 

o 

a 
o 


_a 

a 
o 

o 

o 


1 -a 
5 O s 

i o 1 

O a J 
J 5 a 

^- 1 " 
a a ? 


K 

■^ 1 

o 

O 


£ 

E 
c 


O 


ai 
>> 

a 
P 

a 
a 


g 

a 
■> 
o 

a 
1 i 




£ 
oc 

c 


1 


> 

c 
c 


- ^ 

'c 




c 
a 


£ 

a 

£ 




D 

C 
C 

;- 
c 
c 




til 

_a 




■ft ' 
■ft °c 
a £ 

1 = 


'£ 

u 

1 


' 2 

i 
a 


^. 1 

be .J, 

a o 
cd ft 

O ft 

o o 


be 
a 
■3) 

T3 

2 


c3 V 

"3) DQ 
■a o 

a o 

P-i o 




E- 


fe 


s 


K 


a 


C 


c: 


;- 


e: 


G 


o 

CO 


oc 


>r 


E 


^ 


o 


O 


fi 


co" 




















b- 


















00 








00 


































00 








CO 












































































l-' 






■2 


^ 


^ 


lO 


to 


Oi 


o 


Oi 


Oi 


<> 


^ 


^ 




en 


^ 


o" 


•^ 


CD 


^ 


S 


•tT 






c< 






IH 




c- 






IH 


<N 


s 


IN 






i-H 


r^ 


1~^ 


(N 


'H 


6 


1 


o 


r3 


> J 


3 


3 








- 


- 


. 


> 

o 


- 


- 


- 


a' 

C3 
*-5 


- 


-§ 




< 




<1 


a 




< 










Iz 










Ii( 









































































> 




















































































•c 




































^ 






c 
a 




m 


O 








3 












o 

o 
■a 


6 


L4 




a 
o 


O 


o 


L4 




o 








d 




^ 








a 
o 


O 


o 




a 


b) 


° 


a 


m 


^t- 


i>5 






be 


IH 





01 








W 
!2i 


> 




O 


p 


5- 


> 


1 =s 


4^ 


c: 


■u 


(S 


^ 


Sh 


"S 

o 

a 


5- 

> 




2 
pa 

a 



a 




c 

d 
.a 
o 




C3 

. .a 

c 

T3 
P 

CI 


c 

(S 

a 
c 

1 
> 


6 

. a 


o 
a 

a 
o 


,a 
o 


C3 
OQ 

a 
xs 
o 




o 
a 

03 


a cs 
a ? 


cq 

a 
o 
a 


c 
M 
a 

C 

a 
> 


o 

■3 




c 


1 


o 
P 
* 


* 


QQ 


? 


o 

o 
* 


o 




5 
* 


* 


o 
* 


* 


* 


o 
* 


■^ 
H 


o 
cq 
# 


o 

cq 





Report of the Water Board. 



23 



r-l ^ CO f-l 



s o 






w -f ^ 



i— 00 to CO 



tC 22 00 



CO CO -f 



§ I - 



•c 6 



S f^ n 



w 


<D 


te 




o 


OJ 


■hJ 


o 


3 


s 


O 


H 



- Q M- " 



J? C5 



^ O q o s 



g « fci i3 



tT I* 



« Q 



pa o 



•- •■-' 11 



M02P5Moca«e3ncqPatfrL,|Spq 



I-i C« (M 



(M IM (M C^ 



<N CO CO CO <0 O^ ^ 
(M (N CN Ol (N <M 



g &H g B ^ 



dj « 



►3 ie hJ hj ij 



a a 



3 " 
=« ^ 



a d 



> w 



C3 »:; 



24 



City Document No. 31. 



1-1 
B 



1^ 





c 


5 per cubic yard . . . 

4 per cubic yard . . . 
each, delivered . . . 
per cubic yard . . . 
91 per ton, 2,240 lbs. 

85.00 

per cubic yard . . . 
per lineal foot .... 
.00 

;ents per cubic yard . 

5 per cubic yard . . . 

91 per ton, 2,240 lbs. 

.00 

.00 



I- Oi in 



«©«■»€& 



a 
c 



a 

© 

o 



II 



H 



"E H H 



"2 -5 .s ft 



£ a 






M £ a 



t; •- o 



■§0 5 



o -5 ■= c 



o ca pi^ 03 M CQ ca 



.2 "^ 



- J, o 



1-1 CO O 



r-f CA m 



be c 



M M 



? tp Q 1-1 



pa a 



3 a 



fe 2 



a Ci H <i 



W is 






h? O Cd O &H h5 



Report of the Water Board. 



25 



?D >n CO l^ 



•p 'G 'C 'o '^ 

c3 3 rt c: n 

>i P-t >» * >t >t 

O o t) • o o 

S 3 3 .23 

S 3 3 3 3 

o o o • o o 



«■ ■» ^ «• 



I- l~ o 



&, a a. 



€»«■«■«■ 



0) — 3 



cS ^ 



P5 3 






3 cJ a t, o Q 

t) Cj — Cw 



3 _ g 



o -i 



£ « J 



S Q 



bn'3^ be si) te '-S 5jJ jjJ 



5 1. '^^ ^. ^. 
^ bo bB SB be 



o _2 _2 _B £ ^ ^ 



ti -s -a 



'- -g i( _a ^ _« 



o — — 



CO Oi i-( ,— ( ^1 



B O 


ca 


CO 


cc 


M 


« 


Ph 


02 


Ch 


cq 


cq 


m 


p=< 


P5 


n 


O 
CC 


H 


a 


n 


» 


ca 


< 


»H 


1 , 


- 


' 


- 


= 


: 


: 


3 


' 


: 


- 


- 


: 


- 


: 


: 


- 


z 


:: 


= 


i 


' 


- 



e^ i-i — I 



iJ a 



bB := := 



Q ^^ ri fe ^ 

r-i "2 J --J '^ 



= = O H 



s 


— . 


O 




a 


c 


<« 


o 


o 
O 


a 
o 
O 




CJ 


O 


O 


o 


o 



C 3 X" 



I :? 



^ ~ s a 3 3 



3 3rhw a>^'-^ ^-5 



EEPOET OP CITY ENGINEEE. 



Office of City Engineer, 
City Hall, Boston, Jan. 21, 1889. 

Col. Thos. F. Doherty, Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — 111 accordance with the requirements of the Revised 
Ordinances, I respectfully submit the following report on the 
condition of the Water-Works : — 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall during the first seven months of the year was 
a little below the average, but since August 1 it has l)een 
unusually heavy, the total rainfall for the year at Lake 
Cochituate beins; the laro;est recorded since 1869. 

The rainfoll and (Quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds are as follows : — 

Sudbnrj'. 

Rainfall, inches 57.465 

" collected inches, 35.749 
Daily average yield, 

gallons, 127,642,900 ^ 

The quality of the water from the Sudbury and Cochituate 
supplies has been good, and that from the Mystic has caused 
less complaint than usual. 

The fluctuations in the amount of storage in the different 
lakes and reservoirs are shown graphically by an appended 
diao-ram. The condition of the different reservoirs durinsj 
the year is given below. 

SuDBURY-RlVER RESERVOIRS AND LaKE CoCHITUATE. 

lieservoir No. 1. — Water was wasting at the dam on Jan- 
uary 1, and, with the exception of two days in January, con- 
tinued to waste until June 8, when the stop-planks were 
placed upon the dam. On Juno 28 wasting began again, and 
continued till July 13. The surface of the reservoir con- 



Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


56.93 


56.745 


30.97 


31.12 


51,400 


25,001,600 



Eeport of the Water Board. 27 

tinned near high-water mark the balance of the season, waste 
beginning again on August 23, and continuing until the pres- 
ent time. 

Reservoir JVo. 2. — This reservoir was full until June 24, 
it then gradually fell until August 4, when the surface of the 
water had fallen to grade 1G0.53, or Q.i^ feet below the top 
of the flash-boards, which was the lowest point reached 
during the year. Water has been flowing over the dam from 
September 23 to the present time. 

Reservoir No. 3. — Water was flowing over the dam from 
January 1 to January 25, from February 22 to Feln-uary 23, 
from March 28 to June 6, from June 26 to July 10, and 
from August 24 to the present time. The lowest point 
reached during the year was on March 20, when the surface 
of the water was at grade 169.41, or 5.83 feet below the 
crest of the dam. 

Reservoir No. 4. — On Jan. 1, 1888, the water in the 
reservoir stood at grade 207.89, or 7.32 feet below the top 
of the flash-boards. The reservoir gradually filled during 
January and February, and the water remained in the 
vicinity of high-water mark until the 1st of August, when 
the rcseivoir was drawn upon to supply the city. On Au- 
gust 21 the water was at grade 211.20, and after that date it 
began to rise, reaching the top of the stop-planks on Sep- 
tember 28. Since that date the reservoir has remained 
practically full. 

Farm Pond. — The surface of this pond has been kept 
at an average level of 149.11 feet above tide-marsh level. 

The conduit through the pond was in use from June 23 to 
July 10, and from December 15 to December 31. During 
the balance of the year the water was taken through the pond. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped 61,500,000 
gallons from the pond, or a daily average of 168,033 gallons. 

Lake CocJiituate. — On Jan. 1, 1888, the surft^ce of the 
lake was at grade 125.63, or 8.73 feet below high water. 
It began to rise during the latter part of February, until, on 
March 31, it reached grade 131.20, but soon began to fall. 

Excepting August, water was wasted at the outlet of the 
lake during a part of each mouth, from March to December, 
inclusive, so as to allow the work to be done at the Pegan 
meadows. 

On August 20, a contract was made with Auguste 
Saucier for the removal of 60,000 cubic yards of material 
on Pegan meadows for the improvement of the shallow 



28 



City Document No. 31. 



flowage, so as to give a depth of 6 feet on the meadows at 
high water. 

The accomplishment of this work was attended with much 
difficulty, on account of the unusual amount of rainfall, and 
the contractor is to be complimented for the fidelity with 
which he has carried out his agreement. 

The plans for building a new dam at the outlet of 
the lake have been revised during the year, and late in 
the season the work of construction was commenced ; but the 
necessity of wasting large volumes of water, in order to 
allow the work on the Pegan meadows to be completed, has 
delayed the work, and, excepting the coffer dam, but little 
has been done. 



Reservoir 
No. 1. 
Top 

of flash- 
boards. 
159.29. 



ReseiToir 

No. 2. 

Top 

of fliisli- 

bo.ards. 

167.12. 



Reservoir 

No. 3. 

Crest of 

dam. 

175.24. 



Rrsei-voir 
No. 4. 
Top 
of flash- 
boards. 
215.21. 



Farm 
Pond. 



Lake Co- 
chituato. 

Top 
of flash- 
boards. 
134 36. 



Jan. 1, 1888 

Feb. 1, " 
March 1, " 
April 1, " 

May 1, " 

June 1, " 

July 1, " 

Aug. 1, " 

Sept. 1, " 
Oct. 1, 

Nov. 1, " 

Dec. 1, " 
Jan. 1, 1889 



157.79 
157.59 
158.05 
158.52 
157.87 
157.97 
159.40 
158.58 
159.34 
158.08 
156.62 
156.68 
158.07 



165.94 
166.25 
166.20 
166.29 
166.04 
166.16 
166.17 
161.25 
163.88 
167.39 
167.39 
166.67 
166.24 



175.46 
174.28 
173.40 
175.49 
175.37 
175.52 
175.38 
173.49 
175.32 
175.62 
175.63 
175.72 
175.58 



207.89 
211.67 
215.21 
213.80 
214.64 
215.17 
215.14 
215.09 
211.92 
215.20 
215.18 
214.79 
214.61 



549.24 
149.21 
149.22 
149.17 
149.25 
149.28 
149.-25 
149.28 
149.24 
147.46 
149.27 
149.28 
149.25 



125.63 
125.70 
128.84 
131.16 
130.02 
130.12 
128.59 
126.48 
126.11 
128.03 
127.84 
129.90 
130.71 



Water has been drawn from the different reservoirs on 
Sudbury river to supply the city, as follows : — 

Heservoir JSfo. 2, January 1 to 22 inclusive. 

June 23 to July 9 inclusive. 
July 25 to September 12 inclusive. 
September 17 to September 26 inclusive. 
September 29 to October 15 inclusive. 
October 21. 

Reservoir JSfo. 3, January 31 to June 7 inclusive. 

November 3 to December 12 inclusive. 



Report of the "Water Board. 29 

Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3, January 23 to 30 inclusive. 

June 7 to 20 inclusive. 

July 10 to 24 inclusive. 

September 16 to 20 inclusive. 

September 22 to November 2 in- 
clusive. 

December 13 to December 31 in- 
clusive. 

Farm Pond, January 1 to June 23. 

July 10 to December 15. 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use during the 
whole or portions of 362 days, and the Cochituate aqueduct 
has been in use 358 days. The former has delivered into 
Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs 7,224,700,000 gal- 
lons, equal to a daily average supply of 19,739,600 gallons ; 
and the latter has delivered 4,968,503,100 gallons, or 
13,575,100 gallons per day. 

Both aqueducts have been cleaned during the year ; the 
details of this work will be found in the report of the Super- 
intendent of the Western Division. 

In the Cochituate aqueduct from February 22 to June 27, 
and from September 27 to December 31, a depth of 6 feet 
of water was run ; from June 27 to July 8, a depth of 6 feet 
6 inches was run ; for the balance of the year the depth of 
water run in the aqueduct followed the level of the lake. 

The Chestnut-Hill, Brookline, Fisher-Hill, Parker-Hill, 
and East Boston reservoirs are in good condition. 

Fisher- Hill reservoir has been in use during the whole 
year. The grading of the grounds was finished during the 
early part of the summer, a drain-pipe was laid from the 
back side of the reservoir lot to connect with the drain in 
Fisher-Hill avenue, shrubs were planted, the walks and 
slopes resurfaced, and the slopes and grounds seeded with 
grass. 

The loam surfacing of the slopes slipped in three or four 
places during the very severe storm of September 26, and 
another small slip occurred during the storm of November 
"26. These slips are common to new embankments Avith a 
clayey subsoil, but will not probably occur after a strong 
sod has formed. 

Parker-Hill reservoir was shut otf from the distribution, 
and the hish-service districts Avere supplied directly from 
Fisher-Hiirreservoir, from Dec. 3, 1887, to July 2, 1888. 



30 City Document No. 31. 

Since that date a circulation has been kept up in the reser- 
voir by throttling the inlet gate. 

West Roxbury has been supplied directly from Fisher Hill 
during the entire year. 

The average monthly and yearly heights of all the reser- 
voirs are shown by an annexed table. 

HiGH-S ERVICE PuMPING-StATIONS . 

The Elmwood-street putnping-station was discontinued on 
May 8, at 11 P.M., after having been in use since March 1, 
1870, and the force of engineers and firemen was transferred 
to Chestnut Hill. The daily average amount pumped at this 
station, from January 1 to May 8, was 3,659,400 gallons. 

The Brighton pumping-station w^as closed in January, and 
the engineer transferred to Chestnut Hill. The pumps have 
been taken down, and one of them will be transferred to the 
new station at East Boston, to pump the water for the Breed's 
Island high service. 

The Brighton pumping-station was built in 1876 for the 
tem{)orary supply of the high-service district of Brighton 
until the Chestnut Hill pumping-station should be built. 

At the East Boston station the daily average amount 
pumped from January 1 to October 30 was 353,200 gallons ; 
since the last date, with the exception of one day in 
December, no water has been pumped, as, on account of the 
increased supply furnished by the new 24-inch main, the 
reservoir can be filled from the low^-service mains at night. 
During extreme cold weather pumping will have to be 
resorted to. 

At the West Poxbury pumping-station the daily average 
amount pumped was 40,560 gallons. The daily amount of 
water used varied from an average of 20,800 gallons in April 
to 74,800 gallons in January ; but nearly one-half of the 
apparent consumption during the winter months was due to 
the opening of a connection between the West Roxbury high 
service and the general high service, to prevent the freezing 
of the water in the pipe over the Park-street bridge. 

The tank on Bellevue Hill has been enclosed by an obser- 
vatory tower, which it is expected will prevent any trouble 
from ice in the tank. 

New High-Service Works. 

Work upon the pumping-machinery and boilers was so 
far advanced January 21, that fires were started under one 
of the boilers, and engine No. 1 was run for a short time. 




HELIOTYPE PRINTIKG 



BELLEVUE HILL TOWER. 



X 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



31 



On February 1, engine No. 2 was started, and they were 
ran irregularly nearly every day until May 9, when they 
wei-e put into regular service, the jiumps at Elmwood street 
being abandoned. The pumps are completed, excepting 
some minor details and painting. 

A duty trial was made of engine No. 1, together with 
boiler No. 2, on August 9 and 10, and trials were made of 
engine No. 2 with boiler No. 1 on August 22 and 23, and 
on September 26 and 27. Engine No. 1 developed a duty of 
103,284,500 ft.-lbs. from 1,100 lbs. of steam at 212^, and 
engine No. 2 a duty of 105,004,300 ft.-lbs. The best result 
obtained from the boilers was an actual evaporation of 10 
lbs. of water per pound of coal used, or an equivalent evapo- 
ration of 11.57 lbs. from and at 212°. 

Amount of water pumped at Elmwood-street and Chestnut- 
Hill pnmping-stations in li 



Elmwood street. 



Chestnut Hill. 



Total 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



141,970,300 
115,072,000 
102,284,500 
92,287,000 
20,444,500 



2,271,500 

31,011,875 

35,349,850 

31,643,175 

107,409,500 

144,288,925 

171,114,750 

170,841,875 

160,001,215 

157,559,500 

151,792,250 

170,032,100 



144,241,800 
146,083,875 
137,634,350 
123,930,175 
127,854,0'JO 
144,288,925 
171,114,750 
170,841,875 
160,001,215 
157,559,500 
151,792,250 
170,032,100 



Daily average amount pumped 



, 4,932,700 gallons. 



In June several districts were changed from low service 
to high service. In the city proper, 3.5 miles of streets 
were so changed ; in Roxbury, 3.9 miles ; in Dorchester, 2,2 
miles; and in West Roxbury, 0.6 miles. 

The amount of water used by the high service increased 
from 3,691,000 gallons per day in 1887 to 4,932,700 gallons 
in 1888. The increase during the last half of the year, after 
the territory supplied was enlarged, being 1,597,600 gallons 
per day, or 42.8 per cent, over the consumption for the cor- 
responding months in 1887. 



32 City Document No 31. 



Description of Chestnut-Hill Pumping- Station. 

The buildings consist of an engine-room, 84 feet 10 inches 
by 64 feet 8 inches, with a basement; a boiler-room, 79 feet 
10 inches by 56 feet 2 inches ; and a coal-room, 65 feet 4 
incites by 62 feet, connected with the boiler-room by an ex- 
tension 43 feet 8 inches by 19 feet 10 inches. 

West of the pumping-station is a circular screen chamber, 
which is connected with the Cochituate aqueduct by a brick 
conduit 4 feet by 4 feet 4 inches in section, and with the 
48- inch pipe from the Sudbury conduit by a 36-inch iron 
pipe, A third connection can be made with Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir by a 48-inch pipe when desired, the pipe for this 
connection beinof laid from the screen chamber to the centre 
of Beacon street. Through these connections water can be 
drawn directly from either the Cochituate or the Sudbury 
conduit, or from the reservoir, as may from time to time 
seem best. 

Double screens made of copper wire can be placed in 
grooves built into the masonry, and iron sluice-gates and stop- 
planks are arranged for controlling the flow of the water. 

A brick conduit 4 feet by 5 feet in section connects the 
screen-chamber with the pump-wells in the basement of the 
enginc-ro(»ni. There are three wells ; two of them are each 
18 feet i)y 10 feet and 16 feet deep, and the third, which was 
provided for a future pumping- engine, is 21 feet by 10 feet 
by 16 feet. 

These wells are connected w^ith the conduit through 3 feet 
by 3 feet iron sluice-gates. 

In order to provide for the possible extension of the 
engine-room for a fourth pumping-enginc, a gate-opening 
for a proposed pump-well has been built into the foundation 
wall on the west end of the building, and the bottom of a 
foundation wall between the present building and the screen- 
chamber has been built, so that an extension to the present 
buildino- can be built at any time without interfering with the 
operation of the present pumping-plant. 

Each well can be emptied through a 12-inch drain-pipe, 
which also receives the waste water from the condensers of 
the engines. 

The basement has a concrete floor, and in it will be fitted 
up a repair shop. 

The i)umping-plant consists of two Gaskill horizontal com- 
pound engines, each having a capacity of 8,000,000 gallons 
in 24 hours ; they were built l)y the Holly Company, of Lock- 
port, N.Y. 



BOSTON AND ALBANf K. If. NEtVTCM C/ZtCU/r 




mUttfpe Timmf Ci.Bostm 



Report of the Water Board. 33 

The high-pressure c^'linders are 21 inches diameter, the low- 
pressure cylinders 42 inches diameter, the water-i)lungers 25 
inches diameter, and all have a stroke of 3(i inches. The 
phjngcr displacement is 302 gallons per revolution, and the 
maximum piston speed, as per contract, is 115 feet per minute. 
The foundation of each pump consists of a solid block of 
American cement concrete 14 feet 5 inches in thickness, and 
on each foundation aie built four brick piers 6 feet 8 inches 
high, surmounted by a granite coping 12 inches in thickness. 
The engines and pumps are secured in position by l|-inch 
bolts, which arc built into the entire depth of the brick foun- 
dations. The force mains from each pump are 24 inches in 
diameter, and they unite outside of the building with a 30- 
inch pipe which extends to Fisher-Hill reservoir, — a distance 
of 5,800 feet. Bi'anches and gates have l)een placed in the 
force main, so that a third and fourth pumping-engine can be 
connected with the force main without stopping the pumping. 
Branches have also been located for a second force main. / 

The steam is furnished by two horizontal tubular steel 
boilers, 78 inches in diameter, 18 feet 5 inches lono-. The 
shell is ^Q inch thick, and each boiler contains 151 tubes, 3 
inches in diameter. Each boiler contains 2,171 square feet 
of heating surface and 49 square feet of grate surface. A 
feed-water heater is placed in the flue between the boilers. 
It is made of 80 brass tubes, each 2^ inches diameter and 15 
feet long, sujiported by racks on a portable carriage. It has 
a heating surlace of 931 square feet. The main steam-pipe 
from the boilers to the engine-room is 10 inches in diameter. 
The smoke-flue from the boilers to the chimney is of brick, 
and is carried under the floor of the boiler-room. 

The chimney is located in the extension of the coal house. 
It is 150 feet in height above the floor of the boiler-ioom, 
and the foundations extend to solid earth at a depth of 26 
feet. The foundation is 27 feet 10 inches square at the 
bottom, and is stepped in to 20 feet square at the grade of 
the bottom of the flue where the brick masonry beains. 

The foundation is of Portland cen)ent concrete to a height 
of 6 feet above its base, and the upper portion is of rubble 
masonry laid solid in American cement mortar. A door is 
placed in the chimney at its l)ase for the removal of soot, 
and an opening for a second smoke-flue has been built and 
bricked up until needed. The chimney is drawn into a 
circular form above the opening for the flues. The outside 
shell at the base is 15 feet in diameter and is 28 inches thick ; 
it has an outside batter of 0.288 inches per foot, and its 
thickness is gradually reduced to 16 inches at a point 96 feet 
above the floor. The flue is circular, its inside diameter is 5 



34 City Document No. 31. 

feet (i inches, and its wall is 12 inches thick at the base and 
4 inches at the top, which is 20 feet below the top of the 
outs^ide shelh The chimney has a cast-iron cap, and is fitted 
with two -^-inch copper lightning-i'ods. 

The coal-room contains four l)ins 51 feet k)ng, 14 feet 6 
inches wide, and 13 feet high ; they will hold about 1,000 tons 
of coal. 

The coal is raised to an elevated run, from which it is 
dumped into the bins. Scales are provided, so that the coal 
can be weighed before dumping. 

East Boston and Breed's Island High Service. 

The works will soon be in working order. The pumping- 
station is l)uilt of brick, with brownstone trimmings, and is 
located on Condor street, nearly opposite Brooks street. 

The su[)i)ly is taken through a 16-inch su(;tion-pipe, which 
connects with the 24-inch pipe which crosses Chelsea creek 
near this point. 

A 12-inch force main is laid from the i)nmping-station to 
the reservoir on Brooks street; and another 12- inch force 
main is laid from the pumping-station, a distance of 11,000 
feet, to a wrought-iron tank on the summit of Breed's Island, 
or Orient Heights. This tank is 24 feet in diameter and 40 
feet hiii'h. The bottom of the tank is 154. GO feet above 
water-works base. 

The two pumps now located in the old pumping-station at 
the reservoir lot will be moved into the new building to fur- 
nish the supply for the East Boston high service, and one 
of the pumps from the discontinued Brighton pumping- 
station will be used for the Breed's Island service. 

The piping is so arranged that all the pumps can be used 
for either district. 

Contracts for this work have been made as follows : — 

Pumping-station, Donahue Bros. & Co. . . $8,650 00 

Pump foundations, J. IT. Etridge, Nov. 10., 1888, 316 25 

Boilers, two, E. Hodo-e & Co.,\\ov. 30, 1888 . 838 00 

Tank, George Miles, March 13, 1888 . . . 2,420 00 

The foundations of the tank and the laying of the water- 
pipe were done by the day. 

Mystic Lake. 

Water was wasted over the dam from January 1 to Jan- 
uary 22, from February 5 to February 9, from February 20 



Report of the Water Board. 35 

to June 3, from June 14 to June 16, jind from September 26 
to December 31. 

The lowest point reached daring the year was on Sep- 
tember 17, when the surface of the hd^e was at grade 4.26, 
or 2.74 feet below high water. The yield of the watershed 
of the lake is shown by a table on page 52. 



My^^tic-V alley Seaver. 

The new settling-tanks have been completed and are in 
successful operation. The works consist of a pump-well 
connected by a brick sewer Avith the main sewer, a sewage- 
pump, an engine, an engine-house, four settling- tanks, a 
sludge-well, a sludge-pump, and a series of settling-basins 
for receiving the sludge. 

In the engine-house are three vats, so arranged that the 
precipitant is fed to the sewage from one vat placed lower 
and between the other two, in which the precipitant is dis- 
solved ; each vat is provided with a steam-pipe for heating 
the water used, and with an appliance for stirring, which is 
run from the engine. 

After the precipitant is fed to the sewage, it is raised by 
pumping to the settling-tanks, where, after a tank is filled, 
it is allowed to settle for about three hours. The clarified 
liquid is then drawn off by means of narrow stop-planks, 
Avhich are removed one by one. At this season of the year 
the tanks can be filled six times before it is necessary to re- 
move the deposited sludge. This is removed through sluices 
which connect with a sludge-well placed in the middle 
space between the four tanks. From this sludge-well the 
sludge is pumped into a flume, by which it is carried to the 
settling-basins. 

The average flow of the sewer is about 400,000 gallons in 
24 hours, 75 per cent, of which is between 8 A.M. and 8 
P.M. After 12 P.M. the flow from the sewer is practically 
clear water. 

The results of several experiments show that 1 volume 
of sludge is deposited in the tanks to 30 volumes of sew- 
age received. The sludge contains about 4 parts of dry 
solids to 9() parts of water; the Avater disappears in the 
settling-basins, and Ave have remaining a product sufficiently 
dry to be easily handled, and containing 4 parts of solids to 12 
parts of water. On this basis the amount of "dry product " 
Avould be 10 cubic yards daily. The cost of the Avorks, in- 
cluding the preparation of the settling-basins and incidentals, 
was $10,410.18. 



36 



City Document No. 31. 



The accompanying plan and view shows the arrangement of 
the works. 

Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit has been cleaned twice during the year, and 
is in good condition. 

The eastern division of the reserv^oir was cleaned in 1884, 
and the other division should be cleaned out this year. The 
stone masonry of the western division has been repointed. 



Mystic Pumfing-Station. 

The repairs to the roof of the pumping-station were com- 
pleted early in the year. The flat roof of the coal-bunker, 
which was badly decayed, has been replaced by a shed roof. 
The four old boilers have about outlived their usefuhiess, 
and it would be economy to replace them with a new plant. 

The table on page 43 shows the work done by the pump- 
ing-engines during the year. 



Engine No. 1 was in use 1,703 hours 55 minutes 
" " 2 " " 2,6S9 " 30 " 

" " 3 " " 7,482 " 45 " 



pumping 279,878,500 gallons. 
" 494,3-28,700 " 

" 2,248,115,200 " 



Total amount pumped 



3,022,322,400 



Total amount of coal consumed, 6,924,000 lbs. 

Percentage ashes and clinkers, 8.4. 

Average lift, in feet, 147.65. 

Quantity pumped per pound of coal, 436.5 gallons. 

Average duly of engines, no deduclions, 53,750,600 ft. -lbs. per 100 lbs. of coal. 

Daily average amount pumped, 8,257,700 gallons, an increase of 8.2 per cent. 



Cost of Pumping 
Salaries .... 

Fuel 

Repairs .... 
Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 



$8,731 65 

13,684 02 

1,075 76 

790 59 

102 73 



Total $24,384 75 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 5.48 cents. 



Consumption. 
The daily average consumption has been as follows : — 



Sudbury and Cochituate supply 
Mystic supply . 



Gallons 
per day. 

33,310,700 
8,258,400 



Gallons 
per capita. 

88 
76.5 



boston water work^. 
General Plan of Mystic Valley Sewerage Works. 



SCALE. 




Stluvfpt fnabag Ce Jtstn. 



Eeport of the Water Boakd. 



37 



The above figures show an increase of 11.6 per cent, in 
the c()nsuni[)tion from the Sudbury and Cochituate works 
over that of the year 1887, of 8.2 per cent, from the Mystic 
works, and 10.9 per cent from the combined supplies. 



Distribution. 

Durins: the year the following changes have been made in 
the distribution system : — 





SUDBUET-COCHITUATE WORKS. 


Mystic 


Works. 


Size of 
Pipe. 


Total Length laid 
and rulaid. 


Length of Pipe 
abandoned. 


Length 
laid. 


Length 
abandoned. 


4 


799 


7,570 


1,263 


6 


225 


6 


59,449 


4,811 


6,276 






8 


15,008 


215 








10 


2,744 




126 






12 


29,328 


3,002 


487 






16 


6,129 


262 


1,286 






20 


58 


170 








24 


3,400 


. . 


115 






30 


5,709 




427 






Total length 


122,624 


16,030 


9,980 


6,225 



The total length of pipe laid on the Sudbury and Co- 
chituate works was 23.22 miles, and 3.04 miles have been 
abandoned, making a net increase of 20.18 miles in the total 
length in use. On the Mystic works the mains have been 
extended 9,980 feet, and 6,225 feet of 4-inch wrought-iron 
and cement pipe have been abandoned. 

The 24-inch main to East Boston, the laying of which was 
commenced in 1887, has been completed between City square 
in Charlestown and Chelsea creek in Chelsea, and the new 
30 and 16 inch mains have been laid, with the exception of 
the portion on Warren bridge. The new 30-inch main has 
been connected with the old 20-inch pipe at each end of the 
bridge, and the pressure on the pipe in East Boston is in- 
creased 10 or 12 pounds. The 30-inch main stalls from the 
40-inch main on Boston Common oj^posite Mason street, and 
runs diagonally across the Common to the corner of Park 
and Beacon streets, thence through Beacon, Bowdoin, Alls- 



38 City Document No. 31. 

ton, and Bulfinch streets, Bowdoin square, Chardon, Portland, 
Traverse, Haverhill, Causeway, and Beverly streets, to War- 
ren bridofe, where it connects with the old 2()-inch main. A 
connection has also been made with the okl 24-inch main in 
Chardon street. These two connections with the new main 
have increased the head in the pipes at the north end of the city. 

The 16-inch high -service main was laid from the corner of 
Mt. Vernon and Joy streets, through Joy, Myrtle, Derne, 
Bowdoin, and Cambridge streets to Chardon street, and from 
this point to Warren bridge the 16-inch and oO-inch pij)es 
are laid in the same trench. On the Charlestown side the 
30-inch and 16-inch pipes start near the crossing of the freight 
railroad on Warren avenue, and are laid in the same trench 
to City square, where the 30-inch is reduced to 24-inch, 
and connections are made with the 20-inch Cochituate and 
the 16-inch Mystic mains. The 24-inch and 16-inch pipes 
continue through Park street to Common street, where the 
})ipes separate, the 16-inch running to Monument square, 
through Common and Winthrop streets, and the 24-inch 
through Common, Adams, and Chelsea streets to Chelsea 
bridge. The new 24-inch i)ipe was laid through the filled 
portion of Chelsea bridge, l)ut the new 24-inch and the old 
24-iiich pii)es are connected and carried over the bridge 
proper in one line of 30-inch pipe. In Chelsea the new 
20-inch pipe was laid in Broadway, Williams, and Marginal 
streets, and is connected with the old 20-inch and 24-inch 
pipes crossing Chelsea creek to East Boston. When the 
30-inch is laid across Warren bridge, there will be two inde- 
pendent lines to East Boston, with the exception of the 
sections on Chelsea bridge. 

A contract was made with the Gloucester Iron Works on 
July 17 for furnishing 440 tons of 6-inch water-pipe for the 
supply of Long Island, and on August 3 a contract was made 
with Geo. W. Townsend for furnishing and laying a line of 
6-inch pipe, with John F. Ward's flexible joints, between 
Moon and Long Islands. Each length of pipe between 
Moon and Long Islands was encased by four spruce planks, 
11 feet 4 inches long and 3^ inches thick, and the space be- 
tween the case and the pipe Avas filled with lime and cement 
grout, to protect the iron from the sewage that is discharged 
near that point. The pipe is placed below the surface of 
the bottom of the channel wherever there is less than 10 
feet of water at mean low tide. The length of the line is 
3,415 feet. The pipe was laid for a distance of 10,270 feet 
on Moon Island and through Scjuantum. All further progress 
was delayed by complications with the town of Quincy. A 
contract was made with J. N. Hayes & Co. for building the 



Report of the AVater Board. 39 

siphon and pi[)e-box at Neponset bridge for $8,000, but the 
work was dehived for the same reason. 



Miscellaneous. 

The pipe-yard on Albany street has been enlarged by 
taking the adjoining wharf formerly occupied by the City 
Hospital Department, and a sea-wall, 1G8 feet in length, 
was built on the water-front to replace the old wall, at a cost 
of $5,965.90. 

The following is a report from Mr. Desmond FitzGerald, 
Resident Engineer, of the work intrusted to his charge : — 

Boston, Jan. 1, 1889. 

William Jackson, Esq., Chief Engineer Boston Water- 
Works:— 

Sir, — I submit herewith a brief report of the engineering 
work accomplished during the past year by the force on ad- 
ditional su[)ply and improvement of the old sources. 

Early in the year borings were begun at Basin 5 to ascer- 
tain the depth of the bed-rock below the surface of the valley, 
at the site of the dam. Two test-[)its were partially sunk, 
but their indications were so different from the water-borings 
that it became evident that little reliance could be placed on 
the ordinary wash-out system. The ground is so full of large 
boulders that it will be necessary to use the diamond drill. 
On March 10 all work on the new basin was suspended from 
lack of appropriations. 

During the summer, surveys were made of the Course brook 
and Pegan meadows, at Lake Cochituate, and plans perfected 
for their improvement, by lowering the grade of the bottom, 
and filling the shallow portions. On August 20 a contract 
was made by the Water Board with Auguste Saucier for the 
removal of sixty thousand cubic yards of material at the 
Pegan meadows, and this work has just been satisfactorily 
completed. 

Plans for new location of the highways on the site of Basin 
5 have been made during the year, and have been accepted 
by the County Commissioners of Middlesex County. 

Some experimental work on the subject of filtration has 
been prosecuted by the force und(;r my direction, but the 
results are not sufficiently advanced to report upon at the 
present time. 

Very truly yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Resident Engineer. 



40 City Document No. 31. 



In General. 

The high-service district in the city proper is now sup- 
plied by ti 24-inch pipe from Parker-Hill reservoir to Pynchon 
street, a distance of 2,90U feet; thence by a 20-inch pi[)e to 
Berkeley street, a distance of 4,520 feet, where the 12-inch 
pipe for the South Boston supply is taken off; thence by n 
IG-inch pipe to the 16-inch by lO-inch branch on Boston 
Common, a distance of 2,600 feet. During this season a 
large territory has been added to the high-service district in 
the city proper, and it is also proposed to make connections 
so that a portion of the Charlestown district can be supplied 
when the Mystic supply runs short. Estimating the max- 
imum flow at })reseiit to be li times the average consump- 
tion, there is a loss of head at the 16-inch by 16-inch branch 
of 25 feet, besides ti sudden momentary additional loss of 
head of 30 feet, caused by the large draught of elevators. 
To remedy this excessive loss of head, it is necessary to 
provide an additional line of pipe from Parker-Hill res- 
ervoir.' The additional line of pipe is also desirable in the 
contingency of an accident to the present line. I therefore 
reconunend that a 20-inch main be laid from the present 24- 
inch pipe in Fisher avenue, at Parker Hill, to the 16-inch by 
l()-inch branch on the Common. 

In the Roxbury and Dorchester high-service districts the 
present consumption is about 2,500,000 gallons daily, and in 
the higher portions of the districts the supply is at times 
unsatisfactoiy. To remedy the trouble now existing, and to 
provide for the future wants of this growing disti'ict, it is 
necessary to lay a new main from the 1 6-inch pipe at the corner 
of Parker and Centre streets, to the vicinity of Eggleston 
square, where, by being extended as necessity may require, 
it can be connected with the 12-inch pipes in Washington 
street and Walnut, Humboldt, Elm Hill, and Blue Hill 
avenues ; also the 12-inch pipe in Seaver street should be 
connected from Walnut avenue to Maple street ; and the 
connection between the 16-inch pipe in Centre street and 
the 24-inch pipe in Perkins street should be changed to 
16-inch. 

The sizes of pipes recommended above are based on the 
assumption that, when required, a main will be laid for 
the supply of Dorchester by way of Forest Hills and the 
proposed reservoir in West Roxbury. 

The capacity of the combined Sudbur}^ and Cochituate sup- 
plies, as at present developed, is 35,500,000 gallons daily for 



Report of the Water Board, 41 

a dry year. The consumption for tho past year was 33,310,- 
700 gallons daily, an increase of 11.6 per cent, over the con- 
sumption of the previous year. Assuming that the increase 
for the next year will be equal to that of last year, the 
consuni])tion Avill reach 37,174,700 gallons daily. That is,. 
our consumption would be more than the dry years' ca- 
pacity of our siip|)ly as at present developed. It is. there- 
fore, evident that, for the protection of the city against i\i 
probable season of short supply of water, it is necessary to^ 
begin the further development of its I'esources at once. 

After authority is obtained to ]iroceed with the work of" 
building an additional basin, several months will be required! 
for necessary investigations and studies l)ef()re the actual con- 
struction of a storage-basin can be proceeded with. The- 
work of construction can, under the most favorable condi- 
tions, be completed in three working seasons ; nearly one- 
season will be required for the preliminary work, and the 
basin should be allowed to be filled one year before water is- 
used from it ; thus five years are required for the completion^ 
ready for use, of a storage-basin. 

The figures below give the daily average rates of consump- 
tion for the past five years from the Sudbury and Cochituate 
works : — 

1884 . . . 25,090,500 irallons. 

1885 . . . 25,607,200 " " 

1886 . . . 26,627,900 

1887 . . . 29,^52,100 ^" 

1888 . . . 33,310,700 " 



The above shows an increase for the four years past of 
32.8 per cent. Assuming the same rate of increased con- 
sumption, we should have in 1892 a daily avei-agc consumption 
of about 44,250,000 gallons. It is not believed, however, 
that the increase during this period will be at this rate, but 
a comparison of the rates of increase in the past live cor- 
responding periods shows that it is reasonable to ex))ect that 
the increase may not be less than 10 per cent. This per- 
centage is based upon the assumption that it is safe to allow 
for a considei'able reduction in the amount of water wasted, 
the waste of last year being largely increased by the long- 
continued cold weather during the early months. We may 
anticipate with reasonable certainty that in 1892 our water- 
works will be called upon to siqoply at least 36,750,000 
gallons daily to the district now supplied by the Cochituate 
and Sudbury works ; and should any additional territory 



42 City Document No. 31. 

now supplied from other sources be supplied from these 
works, this amount would be proportiontitely increased. 

The capacity of the additional b-'.sin, for which the land 
has been partly acquired, is 4,500,000 gallons daily, and it 
will be seen trom the above that, even with the development 
of this basin, the works, with no allowance for possible ad- 
ditions to the territory now supplied, will have but a cora- 
[)aratively small surplus capacity. 

It is, therefore, necessary that the construction of an addi- 
tional basin should be proceeded with, and I wish to uroe 
upon your Board the importance of using every effort to ob- 
tain the necessary authority from the City Council. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 

City Engineer and Engineer Boston Water Board. 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

DiagK'am showing' the Kainfall and daily aver'age Consumption 
for' each month. 
Yearly Averages shown thus 


^ 


/87S 


/(f/e 1 /S77 1 /c?7(? 1 /873 1 /cf^"*? 1 /:?£?/ 1 /SSZ 


/SS3\ /SS4 1 /cftf^" 1 /S86 \ 1887 \ 1888 


5 




m^ 




^H^JF^vv^^^^^^ 




P 


^T^T 


H9 




ll 

w 




(■t* 


•*=»■ 


"*T^" " 


1^ 






■■ T] 


1 


^=*r 


■^^^ 


WP -T 


^ 


40 
J9 

X 










i 




= 


= 




^ 


^ 


1 




I 


i 


= 


= 


1 


1 


= 


= 








=^^3S 


^W^ 


40 

37 
3C 






1 




E 




I 


a 


P^ 


~ 




EE 




Mt 


— LI 




z 


3 




-Lj 1 


Lii 

i 




^'y 


T^" 


3«- 
33 




n "T 




^-¥ 


i 


fN# 


E 


N^ 


^ 




- 




1 


i 


E 


=11 


^^-'^^= 




^ 




i 


ft 






3« 
53 
32 

3/ 

30 

2« 

a. 5 

2/ § 


31 
30 

a 

^ as 

Sao 
1 « 

1 « 


4 





ri 

N 


H 




5 


n 


1 




5 

i 


^ 


1 


c 


H 




^ 


M 


3 


^ 


^ 

n 


1 

— kJ 


1 


1 
* 


1 


i 


u 


^: 


^ 


io 

e 

s 
s 

4 
J 

/ 




d 


J 


fiw=<s 


=^=^ 


m 


w 

tf 


1 


^^ 


^ 


tpfc^ 




u 


=±,3:^ 


4^ 


/2 
10 

♦ 
3 

2 





Hebtjpe Tmtmg Ci.Bistm. 



Report of the Watek Board. 



43 





































o 




o 


1 
















o 


o 


■^ 






o 


001 -I'l'l spunod 


-a 


















CD 


■". 




CD 


o 
















CO 


Ci 






CO 






-jooj 111 iCmcj 


^ 


»_ 


"t. 


OD_ 


•* 


CO o^ 




"i 


co_ 


~ 


trz 


>ri 


co" 






■^ 


iO 


ira 


.o 


-!f »C 




lO 






«0 










Ol 


r^ 






OD OO 


r-l 


^ 


^ 





CO 


01 


UO 


•lor>j III 


■g 


CD 


cc 








': ^. 


1- 


oo 


'^". 






































I*, 


^ 


T-( 


^ 


-TtH 


-f -t* 


^ 


^ 


-n -* 


^ 


■* 




•|v:oo JO -qi .lad 






(y 




00 




,_ 


CO 




1- 


-1 


ir> 


c 




^; 




aj 




- "-3 


lO 






CO 






poiliund .^jijuun^ 




C-l 


^ 




-* 


o o 


Ti< 


•cf 


■^ ^ 


•* 




^ 


•s.ioyjniio pill! 


5, . 


-J" 


00 


'- 


CO 


Tf o 


!M 


■- 


U5 


n. 


-* 


CO 


-r 




1^ ^ 






















































•s.ioyini^o pni! 




to 


CTi 


o 




OC CO 






!D CO 


■^ 


-f 




saqsi! Ill noun; 


<2 


■5 


CD 


t-f 




-* r- 


CO 




<M 


-• 


^ 


CI 




OSbMOAl! i|!i:(I 


^ 


n 


<M 


(N 


'"' 




■i T-i 


'"' 


■"■ 


i-t 


"^ 


^ 


•^ 


*"* 






« 


^ 


rr 




C» 1- 


„ 






r. 


,_ 


.1 


CO 


•patuiisiioo 


^ 


c? 


^ 


io 




(^ S 


o 






CD 




Oi 


]coo JO ^iiiioiim 


•^ 


CD 


|, 


,_ 


1^ 


,. 


CD 


go" 


I-. 


CD 


^ 


1(0 


l_ 


00 


oSu.iOAB i|!L'a 


































O 


O 


— 


o 


o o 




o 




o 


<ro 


o 




























•pndiund 


^ 
















■ to o 




OJ 


l-^ 






















































o 




O^IMOAU »<^|1U(]; 


c 


■-_ 




"^l 


'^i. 








CO o 




o 




;b 


■^ 


- 




^^ 




CO 


^^ 


l^ I 




^ 


'^ 








o 


C; 


o 


o 




^ 








o 


o 






























00 










O 00 


Tt 






J 


en 






•pad am d 


s 


tD 


!S 


CD 




.r 






1:; 


2 S 


Pi 


^ 


?:! 






























c 






CD 


oo" 




lo" 








■o 


(M 










































<N 


Cq IM 


CI 


M 


Ot (M 


Ol 




CO 






O 


o 


c:, 














Q 






































■^■a 


cc 








o 




CD 


(N 






-' 


CO 


-* 


CI 
































































































































<a 






























;s 


























la 


C-l 












o> 


C) 


<M C-T 


c^ 


c-l 


CI^ 




^ 




.o 












lO 


• .o 














■^ 








-^ 




^ 


"^ 


-* 




•* 


z; 


5-5.2 


^ 




























fd 


,° P.= 




































■* 


e-i 




00 




ro 












CT 




^ 


»- 


CO 


'- 


CO 








'- 


O i-H 


CD 


^ 


-t 








o 


o 


„ 


o 


c- 


o 


o 


^ 








o 
































































































o p" 


































































05 




O 


o 


o 
















<^ 
































C5 




-1< 








0-1 














P4 




en 




'^ 


CO 


o» 














? 
































z 




rJ 


lo 


lO 




■o 


.o 














































a 
































































H 


































































=0 


t- 


a 


O 




1^ 


Ci 


,(- 


»o 




^j 


-+ 


C5 


































"^ 


t^ 










'"* 


" 


■^ 












co_ 








o 


o 


O 


o 


:^ 


o 


o 








_^ 








































s =^ 


;:; 


cc 


1- 


rH 












CI 




CO 








11 


O 


lO 


r-4 


lO 


OJ 


o 


00 






tC 














































^1 




CD 




o 




IM 


o 




CD 




GO 


Ed 

3 


<!< ^ 


^ 


;; 


CO 


§ 


o 


•- 


vO 


CO 


(M 


"^ 




" 


CO 


CJ 


SO 

— a . 


g 


o 






o 

CO 






o 

CO 




s 






o 


IS 


z 


ti ■- o 


"^ 




























w 
































° s^ 


































































































t3 






"^ 




•* 
























































3D 


^ 


































c ci. 


at) 


^ 




>s 






















o 




r1 


o 

s 




H 


^ 


C5 
3 

c 


5 


3 


5, 


>> 






s> 


■> 


3 
SB 

3 


i 1 

ft 5 




> 
o 


5 > 

O =3 

Eh 








irj 


ta 


rt 




< 




l;^ 


►t 








< 


5C O 




;?: 


« 





44 



City Document No. 31. 



^ 


t-^ 




t^ 


w 


C) 


c^ 


0^ 


^ 


r-~. 


s 


*r 


■<s 


'i? 


'W 


« 


<u 


s 


■Sj 


't?. 



-?. 








« 


^,3 


OS 


— 


^ 


•.- 




cr^ 


■+C 


or, 


~ 


CO 






s '^ 





"^ 


(o 


^ 














s 




o 




'^ 


C» 


c 


^is 


5> 




e 


i^ 






'ts 


5i 






«> 


e^ 






tS 


r> 










^ 






<K> 






o 


S 


S 


o 


c 


"^ 


«55 


lU 



s ^ 



•pmor)[l03 


1 




































imn'P}! io 


':j 






cc 
lit 






Ti 


c 


s 


cc 


CO 

•a 


■ri 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 

c^ 


CO 


aSiquooioj 


5^ 




































(S; 




































~-6 
















































c- 


cc 


>* o .r 


cc 


ce 




cc 




o 


•? 


O C7 


^ 






CD Tt 


c 
cr 


oi lO c~ 


CC 

cc 


cc 


c 


c 






^ 


IN 1-1 C^ 




■^ 1- 


CO i-H C^ 


(M C^ 






•— 


c^ 


«1 


•^ 












































































cc 




.n 


tr 


c; 


c 






- 




CT 


O 


o 


cc 


e- 


■ iO 


«iH 


^ 


c- 


l- 




c- 






cc 






^ 


CC 


C^ 


cc 


■!f 


cr 


c^ 


a 


"o 


I^ 


>r 


cc 


-f 


c 


cc 


(/ 


a 


>r 


if- 


CT 


CT 


C<1 


CT 


1^- 


CO 




Tt 


»c 


-^ 


cc 


- 


tc 


•^ 


-^ 




•^ 


-* 


CC 


•^ 


tj 






'3 


►^ 












































































^ 


o = 






c 


5_ 


o o o o o c 


o o c 






<= 


c 










o o c 


o o <= 


c; 


o o 








00 .r 






cc 


cc 




r-H a- 


C^ -Til C^ 


_^ CO cc CO 






































eo 


ZZ 


C-. oc 








cr 




"* ; 




C= 


c 


c 




o" 
























CC 




c 


cc 




^5~j 


^ 




to l~ 






c 


I- 




■ ^ 


-t 


cr 


c 

CT 


_ (M_ ^ 


= = "a 


c 






(M 






5 






rl C^ 


C^ 


Ol 




T-H r-( i-H 


i;! 


































*ct c — 




































os--^ 










































































^ 




c 


c 


C 








o 


c 


C 


£ 


cc 


c: 




c 


c 


c 


c — — 




c 


c: 


c 






c 


o 
















o o 








o c 






c 


c 


s 


C 


CT 


c 


c 




c- 




o_ 










































o- 








c 








-ct 


c 


CT 




cr 








•rt 


« tc 






CO cc 






CT 




-r 




C5 




o 


c- 


C> T- 








c 


o cc c^ 




c; 




CT 


CO -* 






































c^ 


« ■* 








CC »-- 


CT 






(ci cc 


•^1 




cc 


C-l 0. 






c 




<o cr 




C) T 






c 




<S 






ir 










CO -^ iT 


0- 


cr 


& 


b c- 




^og 




































CC 


to t- 




>i- 


cc 


c-i CO cc 




CO ir: 






CO 












































c 




c 


c 






c 






c= 






o 






o 












c 


c 






o 






O 






o 






o 








o 












o 






O 






o 






o_ 








o 












o 






o 
























c 


c 












cc 


















o 


c^ 


















c^ 






o 






00 




o 




_ 




I, 


ec 






,_ 






CT 












ocT 




hJ 








s 








1 












^ 






CTi 
CO 


B 






































o 






































< 






































C3 












































































o 








<r 






c 






c 


o 




o 


C3 




c 


c 






E-i 














c 












o 






c 


c 






m 


c 


s 




<= 

or 






c 
c 


c 
C: 




c 






c 


CC 
c= 




c 


•^ 








'3 


^ 








































a 












c- 


-t 












CO 






c 




c 






c; 


o- 




ce 






c 


•i 




^ -r 








^5 




Oi 












c- 








t- 












ui 






































o o 






































■*-i E > 






































^ " c^ 






































C— 25 


Co 














































































































cc 












































































'O 






c 


c 






c 


c 






C 


c 


c 


c 






o 








c 


c 










c 




C 




c 










° ^ ;i 




o- 






^ 






c 


c 




C 


c 




c 


*^ 




c^ 


^ is .iii 




tc 




c 








c 






CT 


c 


cc 


cc 


c 










ffi 




c- 








<= 




C 




c 








c 


-+ 


^ 


c 


5 




c 


J 


a 




c 


;. 


IT 


c- 


■ ^ 


. '~ 


- ^ 


c 

c 


o 








cr 






r 


c 




|z 






cc 


cc 




''4 




^ '^ ° 


i 






c- 
c 




CC 


ff 


ir 


C 






C' 


^ 


•rt^ 


^^=^ 




^ 


c^ 


Tt 




C 








C 
















Q 




c 


c 


c 


c 


^ 


<z 


c 


c 


c 


C 


^ 


^ 


-c 


c 


c 


c 


o -^ '^ 




c 


G 


c 


c 








cc 




c 




c 




c 




o 








c 




t£ 


c 


c 


c 


c 


CT 


c 




t^ 




c 


o_ 


Z> f--^ 


cc 


^ 


a 


c 


a 


i^ 


c 


l(- 






,r 


c 


e- 




c 


.r 


lo" 


g-^ 






<^- 


c- 


a 




CT 






c 


CT 








c 






O 


c 


a 


c^ 


C"- 


i- 


o- 


_ f- 








c 


c 


? 


cc 


. ^ 


., "^1 


ill 




^ 




■^ 






-f 


c 




a 


CT 


CT 












e 












- 






c 


C 






c 




cc 




^5 


CT 




s 




-a 










cc 




CT 




cc 


-^ 


02 




































c> 


c^ 


c 


^ 


•^ 


^ 


Tt 


■^ 


cc 


cc 


CC 


iT 


cc 


•a 


•<1 


-* 


^ 




































a 




































< 




































a 




































tH 


















. 






















(> 




1 -n 




> «: 


l^ 




a 






C^ 


0- 


■<J 
















s ir 














cc 


C£ 


CC 


cc 


cc 


cc 










« 




cr 


or 


^ a 




c' 




a 


cr 





oc 


cr- 


* 


'f 


oc 





Report of the Water Board. 



45 









u^ 








o 


CO 












c-i 


IM* 


CD 




CO 






§ m 


'J" 




00 








•^ 




-^ 


^ 


IM 




M 


CO 


^ 


CO 














.o 




M 


(M 


,^ 


-+ 


^ 


•* 




o 


T}> 


■n 


^ 


^ 


... 


(M 


l_ 


„ 


to 


Ci o 


O 


I-H 








»o 


lO 


f-l 


CO 


cc 


CO 


M 


o 




Ol 


to 






o> 




-+ r-^ 






t- 


|. 




t^ 




CO 




l-. 




«D 


to 


o 






r-i 


c^ 


o 


rH 


(N C-1 












































^ 




,^ 












00 


^ 










^ 




J^ 






00 


l^ « 


00 


CO 


-* 


•* 






f 






o 




























OD 


ir^ 




to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


to 


th 


o 


l~l 


to 


CO 


to 


T-H 


to 


I-. 


-3. tC 


o 


■^ 




^ 


CO 




•^ 


^ 








■^ 


-^ 




■'I' 




■^ 
















o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












































(N CO_ 




irt 


to 
to" 


M 




o~ 






co" 


co" 


to* 


■^ 






co" 




CO 


cT 


-^ 





lO G^ •— 



00 — ' .-H 



r^t Ci c:> 






<M (>» I-H 



rH )-l (M C^ 



5 O 


o 


o 


CO 


Oi 


CD 


to 


o 


00 


I- 


o 


OO 


QO 


to 


>o 


c-1 


to 


CO 


5 


^ 






1^ 




r-t 


Ol 


o 


J. 


^ 


cr> 


CO 




to 








c-1 


l~. 


(XI 


r^i 










































O <N 




to 


^ 






o 


to 


c-1 


C-l 


C-I 


L- 


a= 




o 












n o 


(^ 


C-I 


Ol 


-I- 


(M 




.^ 


to 


1~, 


^ 


to 


1^ 


to 




o 


to 


CO 


I— 


1— 












































to 








'='. 




^ 




'^. 


■^^ 


^■L 


co_ 


o 


^'•- 






^, 


o^ 


*""- 



00 O O CD 



OD lO I— I 



I- lO 00 






^ IS 



rH ^ CO 



to DO to to 



i-t I^ C-1 



C-1 to CO OO 
-r O i-H to 



IH CO r^ 



rl I-l CO 



°=5 
£ O 



o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


„ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










^ 


o 
























































to 




















CI 








•^ 




o 


o 




to 


c-l 


o 


to 


o> 




CO 


1^ 


C5 


o 


l. 


CO 


^ 








OO 
























































































































































































































c^ 


l-- 


to 










t— 








OJ 




to 


o 


-* 


00 


a-. 




to to 


to 


>o 


tO 


CO 


CO 


l- 


"^ 


t- 


^'" 


CO 


•^ 


c^ 


CO 


■* 


"* 


■* 


-^ 


■* 


•* 


>o 













































CO GO 00 00 



oococccooocooooo 



00 00 00 00 



46 



City Document No. 31. 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on LaJce Cochitiiate Water-shed for the 

Year 1SS8. 



1888. 



1 . 

2 . 

3 . 
1. 
6 . 

6 . 

7 . 

8 . 
9. 

10. 
11 . 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17 . 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 

22 . 

23 . 
24. 
25. 

26 . 

27 . 

28 . 
29. 
30 . 
31. 



Totals. 



0.02 
0.02 



3.55 5.60 2.51 4 



04 



0.08 



03 



0.65 
0.22 



0.13 
0.06 



0.10 
0.43 



0.05 
0.19 



58 



2.07 1.67 6.32 8.81 



0.82 



Total rainfall during the year, 56.93 inches. 



Report of the Water Board. 



47 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths 'on the Sudbury-river Water-shed for the 

Year 1888. 



1888. 


3 
c 


5 
.5 


.a 
1 


< 






3 
1-5 


Si) 

< 


3 

a 

a 


c 
O 


.£3 
£ 

O 


s 

o 




1 


1.395 




0.01 






0.01 


0.105 




0.185 








2 






0.02 


0.605 


0.095 

. . . 










0.625 


0.085 




3 








4 


0.095 


0.765 












0.025 
1.195 


0.01 








5 




0.88 


0.12 


0.13 


0.03 






04 


6 










7 


0.04 


















1.74 




• 


8 


0.07 


0.18 






















9 






0..365 




0.005 




1.785 


0.015 


1.93 


0.64 


10 


0.20 
























11 




0.705 




0.49 
0.02 




0.12 


0.055 










0.52 


12 




0.68 








13 


0.475 




3.165 




2.54 






1.61 




1.235 






14 








0.035 




0.576 








0.15 


. . . 




15 


0.135 








0.295 


0.215 




0.045 






0.S05 




16 






















19 




IT 


0.73 








. . . 


. 




0.355 




0.25 






18 




0.035 




0.04 




0.06 






1.S8 






3.955 


19 










0.38 




0.315 








0.40 


. . . 


20 




1.22 








0.16 








0.465 






21 






1.085 


0.355 




0.09 


0.51 


2.995 


1,415 






01 


22 












23 


0.04 










0.08 


0.025 




0.03 






, , 


24 




















865 






25 


0.97 


0.78 






0.02 
0.105 


0.15 
0.395 














26 






2.60 




3.625 


. . . 


27 














09 










0.23 


28 






1.74 




0.81 






. . . 




0.645 




29 












0.085 


0.005 








0.19 




30 










0.065 
0.03 


0.465 














31 










0.265 












Totals , . 


4.15 


3.685 


6.02 


2.425 


4.825 


2.535 


1.405 


6.225 


8.585 


4.99 


7.225 


5.395 



Total rainfall during Ihe year, 57.4ti5 inchen. 

Being an average of two gauges loeated at Framingbam and Westboro' 



48 



City Document No. 31 



'^ 



t^ 







o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


— 


^ 


^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






ao 




c» 


o 


]l~ 










CO 














« 




cT 


cq" 


to 








err 




to" 


cd" 




oo 






o 








CO 




to 


.o 


to 


c- 












SfD 




to 


C-1^ 


on^ 


°i 


to 






c-i 




°i 


en 


(N 




































m 


;^ 


= 


CT. 


*■" 


to 


'^ 


oo 


"^ 


'~ 


'^ 


to" 


t-^ 


ckT 








o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<r^ 


^y 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 








o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 








to 


t— 


o 




CO 


CO 


o 




to 


tD_ 


CJ 




o_ 






co" 


to* 


lO* 


co^ 


to" 


cT 


o 


^ 


c/^ 


to" 


^ 


irC 


<^ 












CO 
















CO 








ac 


•# 


CO 


t— ' 


CT 


c 


^^ 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


•* 


CO 


oc 


S_ i 






1-1 


o 


<£ 


00 


to 


to" 


•^ 


'~ 


to 


to 


to" 


■■^ 


■^ 


'-" 








o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C5 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 






tD 


CO 




o_ 




o 




"v 


oo 


IM_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


!» 






QC 


o" 




cT 


to 


^ 






to 




<m" 


to" 


CO 


oT 






tH 






CO 


-f 




CO 


to 










o> 




33 


QC 




'-"l 


I-;, 


to_ 




°l 






'".s 


Itr 


^ 


o 


co__ 




w 


** 


CO 


OJ 


'~ 


to" 


to 


to" 


l-^ 


'■" 


"^ 


to 


to 


00 


"^ 




o 




o 


-5 


o 


""^ 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 






^ 


as 




oT 


1-^ 






-f" 


CO 
CO 


tD_ 




•tl" 


CO 

o" 


S" 


CO 






tra 




CO 


•* 


o 


en 






CO 


rf 






CO 




Q 


so 

H 






■* 


to 


>o" 


to" 


iO_ 


o 


en 




o 


CO 

to 


to" 




H 






'^ 


























ro 




— . 


o 


o 


c:3 


to 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


CO 




>^ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


.ra 


o 




o 


o 














o_ 




CO 






(>J_ 










a 


oT 


oT 


,^ 


of 


<=r 


irT 


0-f 


CO 


^ 


•* 


oT 


to 


Ci 








^• 






o 


-* 




CO 
















CO 


o_ 


CO 


C0_ 


(N 






«_ 


o_ 


>i^ 


"v 


r-^ 


co_ 


Cl^ 






H 


CO 


to" 


to 


lO 


>o 


to 


to 


to 


to" 


o 


o 


to 


to" 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






« 


s_ 












to_ 




CO 


(N 


to 


>o 








(XI 


cT 


-J-~ 






o" 








to 




o~ 


7-^ 


oT 






to 




CO 








o 


to 


-1- 


en 


CO 










<» 


C<3 


I— 




T— ' 


CO 


CJ_ 


CO 




c» 


•* 


O;, 


1- 


00 






FH 


CO 


'"•' 


'- 


to 


to 


to" 


'~ 


"■- 


uO 


>o" 


o" 


to" 


C^ 








o 


o 


o 


~o"~ 


o 


o 


o 


— 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






« 




C0__ 






CD__ 


tl^ 


^ 


0-l_ 




CO 


"^ 


^ 


-* 






« 






n 


to" 


CO 






(n" 










-fi' 








CO 




-f 


o 


to 




















5C 


c/r 


CJ_ 




cn_ 




to 




cn 


o 


o 












































H 


'" 


'~ 


to 


o" 


o 


o 


to 


to 


o 


to" 


>c 


to 


to 












o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<=■ 


o 


C3 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










o 


^ 


CO 


o_ 




't 


1- 


o 


00 


ro 


Cl^ 








Ira" 


,f^ 


f^ 


CO^ 


cf 


to" 


-* 


i>r 


to 


o 


CO 


to 


o 






OD 


o 


to 




o 






CO 


CO 




o 










OD 


^ 










o 


to 










to 


CO 






































IH 


O 


CO 


to 




o 
















CO 








^ 


•* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C-l 


CI 


CO 


CO 








(^ 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 








to 


CJ 






o_ 


o 






to 


l- 


o^ 


li^ 








{% 
































X 














OJ 




to" 
















■M 


C-) 


ffi 




o 


to 


to 


•* 




to 




lO 






X 


to 








fo 


o 


tr 


to 


o 


lO 


o_ 


uo 


«i 






H 


'^r 


y^ 


co" 


t'-" 


1^ 


to 


CO 


CO 


rS 


o" 


oT 


^ 


esT 








m 


CO 


(M 


ci 


0<1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


CO 


CI 








o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


— 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 








Oi 






•*_ 








to_ 


to_ 




Cl_ 




°v 






S 
































« 








o" 


o 






o' 








CO 








to 




00 




CC 








CO 




CO 


o 








X 




IM_ 






to_ 




05_ 








o_ 




to 




































H 


CO 


OD 








to 




■* 




to 




a> 


to 








IM 


Ol 


Ol 


o-i 


<M 




Ol 


Ol 


(M 


(M 


CI 


CI 


CI 








O 


~~o~~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


.!0 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


itO 




o 




rt 


en 


■^ 


C-)_ 










-f 


to 


vO 




en 


Cl_ 






X 








o" 




^ 


to" 


to" 






cf 


-f 










-r 


CT. 


Ol 


to 






CO 


en 






CI 


o 




p 


X 


1 - 




tD_ 






0-1 


to 


tD_ 




en 


o>_ 




to_ 




T^ 


to" 


r^ 


1^ 


^r 


'^l" 


l^ 


to^ 


•i<" 


to" 


-t" 


^ 


-^^^ 


IQ* 




;5 






CO 


Ol 


C<1 


!>1 


(M 


!M 




IM 


IN 


CI 


CI 


CI 








o 


o 


CO 


""o" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


— 


o 


o 




H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




X 




o_ 


C5^ 




uO_ 


to^ 


o 


c-^ 






CI 


00 






H 


of 


oo" 


^ 


^^ 


00 


-+' 


.—7 


ire" 


en" 


of 


-^ 


-^ 


cT 




^ 


to 


c» 




CO 


o 


CO 


o 


to 






itO 




Ci 






X 




»r? 










-r 


o 


CO 


o 


0!_ 


Cl_ 


o_ 




t3 
































H 






CO 






to 






to 












H 
1— 1 




CO 


IM 




(N 


(N 


Ol 


0-1 


Ol 


CI 


Ol 


CI 


CI 


CI 






o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


.-5 






o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




O 


« 


uo^ 


"■■^ 




to__ 






o^ 


o_ 






co_ 


s_ 


°i. 




O 


X 






o" 




a 




-!<' 






























■^ 






CO 








X 


t-— 


to 


T-H 


to_ 


r-' 


^ 


l--^ 




to 


o 


oo 


'— ' 


00^ 






H 


—(T 


r^r 


-TlT 


<£ 


^T 


r^ 


to 


1^ 


CO 


oT 


CO* 


o 


cf 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


CI 


CO 


CO 








o 


o 


^ 


~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 




o 


o 






X 




CO 


co_ 


o_ 




-^ 


CO_ 


co_ 


o^ 




l'^ 




00 






^ 


of 


to" 


t-^ 


cc 


00 


c-f 


oT 


^ 


« 


CO 


cf 


o" 














to 








C71 


to 












X 






H 








o>_ 




tD__ 


o 


CO 


CO 


<3> 






































fH 


IM 


-rr 


c-r 


o 




CO 


o" 


■^ 








cf 










CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o» 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 
































as 
































CJ 






n 


























^ 






H 
O 


ci 
3 

a 

0! 


2 




E 


C3 


o 
a 


>, 

3 
1-5 


si) 

3 


/2 


o 


s 

o 


o 


> 

cj 

>. 

s 








fc 


s 


<; 


:a 


*? 


<< 


o 


^ 


fi 


>< 





Report of the Water Board. 



49 
































































































cu 











CO 








0^ 


t^ 


cp^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 





o_ 


o_ 


ti:i 




































00 


o 5 3 




o' 


cT . 





cT 





o* 


0' 


o* 


co' 


0" 


a 





cT 


o~ 


oi' 


Cl 








C> 



































CO 


b S'^ 




-^ 




"^ 


<» 


CO 





en 


to 






05_ 


IM 








<X> 


































'■ « — 


« 








oT 




oT 


00" 


to 






cT 




<3* 






H 


^~ 


C§ 


Oi 





Oi 


to 


to 






C<1 




CO 







IM 




rH 




ca 




OS 


<o 


•^ 




•^ 


a 


to 


lO 


-^ 


-* 




N 


H" 





































~o 















































































0^ 










o_ 


0^ 










0^ 





CO 


^ 






































i« 




S 


cT 


0" 


0" 


0" 


0" 





cT 


0" 




0" 







CO 


co" 




« 


o ^ -ci 


Cj 














C3 











































to 


>o_ 


00 


CO 


CO 












« 






































e 


c^ 




to 




^" 






c-r 




o< 




CO 






to 


H 


fC — 


CA 







10 


00 










h- 








IN 








^K 


CD 


^ 


■* 


CO 


TT 


T 


CO 


CO 


>o 


to 






to 


S' 










~o 


























~~o 





"o 














































t-J 























0^ 


CP 




t= 


0^ 




0^ 


o_ 





0^ 











00 






































«D 


.= |:S 




(^ 




cT 








a 





0" 


0" 





0" 


0" 






















CD 





































^i 


co^ 


•* 


0^ 




•-^ 


>o 


""^ 


l^ 




.» 




to^ 


to^ 


"*_ 




B 


c-r 


0" 




I- 


-f 




'K 


CO 


•* 


■* 




0' 




r~ 




F^ 




;^ 







to 




tl* 


IM 


CO 


to 


I-H 








to 


to 


I-H 




Ck 




CO 




CO 


CO 


■^ 


U5 


tH 


Tfl 


•^ 


CO 


■n 


IM_ 

•ra" 












(3 


























~~o 





~o 










































































o_ 


o_ 





o_ 


o_ 


o_ 





o_ 





o_ 


o_ 








































>ft 






0" 








0" 


0" 


o" 


0* 





0" 





0" 


<= 


0" 


0" 


^ 


Of) 


o - ^ 


© 







<z> 





































^ si; 





CO 





^ 


0" 




o_ 


-* 




to 


CO 


l~ 


01 


^ 


-*" 


CO 


1-1 


r= -^ 


^ 














to 


CO 


c 




tc 


OJ 




(M 


!N 






OS 


■^ 





•* 


CO 






Til 




CO 


CO 


<N 


CO 


01^ 


to 




























~C5 








~~o 


C 






























































"^ -'" 


0^ 


0^ 











o_ 


o_ 








0^ 


c 


o_ 





0^ 








hl« 


s 


0" 


o' 


cT 








0" 


0' 


0" 


0" 





0" 


c 


0" 








^ 















































o_ 


^ 


10 


CO 


■* 








(N_ 




OS_ 


tro 


co_ 












c 




•tf 


or 


00 




^r 


d 









co" 






§ 









c^ 




to 






to 









■* 




to 


c: 


(31 




* 


OS 





IN 


CO 


(M 


04 


rr 


'j 




^ 


-^ 


CO 




to 









00 




































• 





















~§ 


g 










g 





to 


H 




2 




0, 






























CO 


'^ 






^ 











































CO 








tp 





CO 










CO 












































bo 


c 












00" 















CO 








;s 




01 
0^ 








to 






• 








T^ 








O 





































































































~~c 





~~o 



































<z> 






c 











"r- "fC 


05 





o_ 


0^ 


0^ 


o_ 


0^ 





c 





c: 


o_ 


CO 


o_ 








_ S O 


s 


(^ 





0" 


0' 


0" 











<o" 


c 


0" 





0" 








O s -'' 


•2 




























c; 
















h ts-i 








l-^ 






to 


CO 


en 


I-H^ 


cr 






05 










o — 


s 


co" 


i-T 


-iT 


•ra" 


CO 


rS 


^ 





t-^ 


r- 


0" 


tc 


en" 












^5 


CO 




CO 


CO 




CO 






to 


oc 


M 


c^ 









M 


OS 







to 


lO 


to 




l^ 


to 


■^ 






in 


"^1 


c^ 


— (T 


00 






























t-T 






to 


00 

H 










^ 





-r:. 



















ffl s 


• 



































■n 


sf 




^ ci 






























■^ 






^1 










t= 


c^ 
















0" 






















































°i 


o_ 
























^1 


c 


" 




^ 




cT 
















»o* 








1^ 


• 




iH 


to 

05 


to 
















CM 








O 




























T~l 

































c 





"~c 





^ 



























































■^ % 


0:1 


0^ 


0^ 


o_ 


0^ 





0, 


c 


G 


o_ 


c 


0^ 


c 


o_ 


0^ 


CO 


« 


!- :^ 


s 


0" 








c^ 





0' 








0" 


c 


<=" 


c 





0" 


cT 


00 


O S »■> 































c 















H £z: 









CO 








en 


CO 




c^ 


CO^ 




!^^ 


C-l_ 


r-_ 


00 

H 




































s 















tc 


lO 


00 




oT 




in" 


iCi" 






^ 


c; 







00 









if. 









e^ 


CO 


CO 


(M 




03 


lO 


Cl 


o_ 




•a 


^ 


to 




CO 


>r 


lis 


tc 
































= 


c 










^ 


^ 








■M ^ 






















c 


c 










c 


























CO 





c 


(^ 


o_ 




0, 

















































E » 










cT 


CD 





CO 


c 


c 


0" 


c 


G 


c 











C ~; 


^ 





















c 





c 





c 











b £" 


"S 




CO 

0" 


to_ 


0" 


cT 


I-H 


^ 


c 




0- 







l- 















;b 










to 


■^ 




Cv- 

















H 


OS 


00 


to 


00 


00 


en 


05 


cr 




L— 


^ 


CO 


-d 


CD 


co" 


co" 


« 






























CO 





CO 


00 

H 


'^ 


























~~c 







s" 




'? 3 


s 
























c 


CO 


00" 




































































S 










073 


c 
























(, 


i-T 








^0= 


<i 
























^ 


S 






























c 


c 





c 


> 


c 


> 




















































Plfl 





















c 




o_ 


c 


- '-^ 


c 


0^ 








s 


































^ C ^ 

















.0 


c 


c 


0" 


c 


r 0" 


c 


0* 








^1 = 


-5 
































c 











"S 


CD 




oc" 





0^ 


CO 


-1 


c 


U5 

icT 


tc 


otT 


0- 
















Cij 







to 




to 


OS 






•^ 


CI 


OS 


c 





0^ 







OS 


CD 


•o 


■M 


CO 


'^ 




c^ 


*r 


■<* 


■<1 


CO 


^ 


•"Jp 


co" 


c-f 


00 
00 






























iQ 


?1 





B 












g 


§ 




















§ 


0" 


H 











o_ 


o_ 






























































r 3 













0" 


o" 


0" 














cT 








t-l-= 


-2 

































to 








TJ* 






co_ 




























































a 


« 


CO 


r-i 























CO 








^a 


ti 


CM 


" 




to 


00 


CO 

r-t 














s; 






































. 


,^^— , 
































. 


= "§- 






w 

H 

z: 







|>i 





















I 


; c^ 


1^ H 


^iE 






a 


3 

g 




03 


p. 


C5 




n 


_5 


■5 E 


a 


1 


) 




3 2 
J 


"> ~ 


K ^ 








1-3 


P=^ 


s 


<i 


^ 


"-J 


'- 


< 


c 


) 'A 


P 


i 


B 


<i 



50 



City Document No. 31. 



e^ 


CO 


5» 


uo 


■t§ 


00 


■K» 


o 


S 








§ 




-e 


^ 


s 


Vi 



o ft:; 






1"^ 






'C t*, 



£ 


'^ 


_2 

o 


3 


,>^ 




is 




oo" 



"♦^ 



5>j 



i>a 





© 


































1 






5? =■« 
- s a 


•%x 




5 •* CO CO ,-< !0 


ifflcoto-*iracOr-il.n 




s 


00 C^ Ci « 


3 CO lO 


(31 i-< •* Tj; .0 I 


- c-i 00 




= ■— ^ o 





^ 00 1 


- (N u 


t l-H 


»f^ -# CO d to c 


1 i> 




o o.S o 


'^ ^ >0 "* CO T)l 


•^COuJTjI-^OCO Im 






K 


































^ 


































^ts 




CO 00 t- t- 10 <M ira 


(M CO Tf to uo t- a 






cfl 1» 


oj 




00 CO I 


- 00 to 


CO aO r-( CI IM - 






eS .S 





5; en ^ -* I 


- T- 





rH i-H 1 


cn 01 


3 IM t- 


: cn 




.5 S 


d « 'O a 


i c-i d 


- 00 r- 


1 CO CO (M rti If 


3 r-i 






d (M (N CO »-t i-l <N 


1-1 l-t (M r1 IN CM C 


3 (N 




«1 


^ 






































CO 00 r-( 0> Ir- <3> 


*<# »0 lO It 


5 if5 W 


3 




S 




02 to - 


' CO 




to 


cn 00 c 


3 T)< to tc 


3 O) 




<U 


■* lO ^ -1; rt rH 


CO t- 1- 


1 lO l- 


11 


M 0; 




c 


<; 


iO Oi •* t^ rH 00 '^ 


d c4 I 


- CO to M i- 


- ^ 






^ tH Til in Tj> CO •* 


CO CO Tt TJ1 TjH Tji »r 


3 TJI 






1 


































(U 




































SB 




0000000 


c 


> 




c: S 




0000000 


000000c 


> 




S wS 


0^ 


(N_ rj^ M (N 1M_ CO__ 03_ 


". "^l "^ ^ *^ ^ ° 






> 3 IS 3 
cs o o > 


s 


oT 00" oT c 


1 c^ CO 


cT trT oT i-T 0" d* c- 


CO 




•S 


05 I- 


to CO -* If 


CO 


i-H c- 




3 T*1 Tl 


f C^ 








^ (M CO CO OS C- 




00 cn I- t- t- tc 


i. ". 




S o 




































e 


00 TJ. (M o> CI CO 


■^ -* t- l-H to I- 


oT 




CS 


t- 00 r^ CC Td 


" t- 


to Til 00 to 00 00 c- 






p 








































0000000 


<= 


Q 








0000000 


000000c 






-w 9 




0000000 


000000c 









































s 3 p « 


s 


d 


000000c 


'CO* 




-o 


000000c 









t- I- 


O) to 


U^ IC5^ T— f TJ* i^ 


10 C^ 






o o o > 


^ 


co" cjT •^'" (m" 06" i-T d" 


to" TiT otT — 


c- 


1> 


i>r 




C! 


OJ T)1 (M ^ t^ 


>o 


CO r- 


CO to r- 






<i 


.0. CO T) 


(N "C 10 CO 


to - to I- 




to t^ 


o__ 




o 




»' 


(M T* 1- ira CD to 


Co" TlT rJ TtT 01" 1- 


tc 


oT 








H CO CO ^ (N rt IM 


5^ 1-1 CO <N fM CO Tj 


^ 












^ 










c 







































s 































c 









































































d 

































s 























































tc 


T)l 
















o 






c 


" 






ocT 


oT to 


to 














h^ 


6 




to 








ir 




Ttl 
















^ 















CO o_ 


Til 












H* 






















IH ■ 
















o 








































K 














































































O 






c 







c 




















c 








H 






c 







c 














c 




c 








GQ 






c 









<= 














c 


c 


c 


















































OD 







c 




c 











C 




c 




c 










a 


ss 







c 



















c 




c 










-S 


CO 






















ir 


Tt 












■3 










































tc 




c- 


■5 


IM 










r 




Tt 




c 













8 


03 








tc 














tc 




03 










(S 








to 


o- 




t- 






t- 


^ 


Tf 


r- 


CO 


































































c 













c 


c 


t-, 


c 







vh a 

o o 







c 










c 











































o_ 










c 




C 




o_ 






































c S * 53 


ec 















c 


0" 











c= 











cT 




s 


c 






















c 


c 















C 




cr 




c 










a- 


CJ 


a 






iC 


>n 














































CJ 


00 


>c 






oT 


n 




oc 




c; 











8 




-Tt 


CO 


(N 








t^ 




(M 






CO 


T| 


CN 







cr 


ri 


r- 







C4_ 


(M 


C- 







c 


cc 





■^ 




^ p 






































a- 




t-- 









t: 


t- 




c 


CO 




cr 


co" 






c 


(M 


CO 


CO 


(N 


^ 


'^ 






C< 




IM 


0^ 


CO 


(N 




E 
























c 


c 


c 


c 







mtof 
used 
lingha 
r Co. 


























c 


c 










2 






















c 


c 






c 

































oc 




ir 








Ill 


























tc 


t- 


^ 


r-T 




1 






















s 




oc 


tc 






.o 




































-*- ^ ^ — . 







c 

































J5 


























c 




c 
















^ M ™ 5 .^' 






















o_ 














c 








°i, 
























d" 


c 
















c 


(^ 












in 
































to 




5^ o 2 J. 3 

_^ 'u 3 p jj 












c- 


c^ 


CO 


c- 


c 


t£ 




tc 






CO 




^ 




oc 


T* 


c- 


3! 





in 


>o 


«n 


C 


Tf 


CD 


Tt 


1! 


CO 






ir 


IN 







Tl 




TT 


CO 


iC 






t£ 


c 


(N 


00 




c 2 ~ ^ 'fi 

3 l-T" 1)^ 


3 




IT 




•^ 






00 


t^ 


11 














co_ 




;s 


































IN 


IM 


l-H 


CO 




to 


ocT 






tc 





■O 


to 




icT 




o o* X^W 




































1^^" 




































a 
















' 





















■< 
































5(> 




H 
















• 
















2 




tx 




lO 


to 


I- 


00 


ai 





^ 


t^ 


CO 


•^ 


lO 


to 


t_ 


00 


















tx> 




oc 


oc 


00 


a 


oc 




a 


> 










0! 


n 


r- 


oc 


oc 


r- 


f-1 




I- 


I-( 


I- 


r- 


00 

t-l 




< 





Boston Water Works. 

©iagrcirr) showing the heights of SudbuKy l^iv/eK l^eserVoirS. FaiTn Pond, and eoehitugite and 
Mystie Lak^S, and the l^ainfsill on the SuelbuKy I'^iv'ei' Water Shed during the yeat^ I8S8. 



Ocfobei- Novemhrr- Dscumbei' 




£*/ 



IZZ4 
llfi 

/oe/ 
3Sl 
303 
82* 

y*7 
eii 

S37 
S2S 

*s* 

331 
34a 
IBS 

238 




§/«5 



:3 

/3iS 



4-4^ 
270 



3 So 




FAITH Pai^D 



Lt \K-C C.aCHI ruATC 



It y-s-ric I jk ffr 




^^^-^ — ^ 



2 



^^^^^ ^^ 



=/: 



:^e 



TJeliff^eTrmtijii Co. Btswi. 



Report of the Water Board. 



51 



-Hill 
■Oir. 
ater. 

0. 




=2 


o 


.o 


IM 


^ 


to 




o 


















lo 












o 






'^ 


CO 


00 
00 


Ol 


en 


05 


OJ 


Cl 


OJ 


OS 


00 


Oi 






































<ij S ''-; 


<N 


c^ 


M 


(M 


IM 


(M 










(M 


IM 


(M 


.= Sb^5 


00 




























i^-^ 

^'^X 


rH 
































00 


»o 


Ol 


to 


j^ 




t. 








,-_. 


QO 


•o 


. t- 


00 




as 


CO 


l^ 


CO 




-* 






^ 


CD 


CD 


■* 


-^ '^ 


CO 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


o 




to 








ystic 

ervo 

vva 

7.00. 


00 












-* 


-* 


^ 


Tt 


Th 




-^ 




rH 


'"' 


*"• 


*"* 


^ 


^ 


'^ 


•"^ 


•"■• 


•"• 


•"^ 


T-H 


*"• 






o 


o 


o 


OO 


'M 


l^ 






t. 




00 


,—1 


1^ 


§ sf/^; 


t> 








t- 


t— 












1-* 


00 


r- 


00 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 




.^ 


















T)l 






-* 


-* 




-* 








'"' 


iH 


'"' 




'"' 


'"' 




'^ 


'"' 




*"• 


■^ 












rH 


ol 


(N 


to 


r-i 


rH 






r-l 




rv] 


00 




%, 


00 








OO 


tO 








1— t 


IM 


00 


(M 


CO 


^ • -^ 


00 
00 


lO 


in 


O 


.ra 


to 


to 


o 


^ 


iC 


to 


^ 


lO 


^ 


li^i 


1-1 




































00 




















'^'~"bsi^ 




lO 


.o 


t- 




to 


1^ 


r~t 


CO 


OJ 


•* 


CD 




CO 


00 


■* 


to 


ilO 


to 


to 


to 


to 






•o 






lO 


a 


00 
rH 
































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












,_, 






Z-I . j-i 


00 
















OS 




o 


OO 


o 


-^ 


Parker-Hi 

Reservoii 

High wate 

219.00. 


00 


en 


o: 


Oi 


OJ 


Ol 




t™ 


t.1 


OD 






00 


00 


00 


































IM 








<M 


(M 


IM 


IM 


(N 


G^ 




rH 


to 


o 


lO 


t^ 












l^ 




^ 






























00 
00 




t- 


OO 


00 




t-: 


00 




t- 




00 


CO 


l^ 


<M 


cq 


IM 


(M 


IM 


IM 


IM 


(M 


<M 


CI 


G<l 


<M 


(M 




00 


(M 


00 


CO 


to 


o 


■ftH 


E— 


CO 


t.. 


E^ 








o • 'T 


IM 






o 






to 




xO 


IM 






t 






CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 










CO 






C^ 


l!^§ 


00 




















IM 


C^ 




(N 


1-1 


'"' 


*"* 




'"' 


'^ 


'"' 


■^ 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


^ 








.o 


OO 


to 


CO 


o 


•* 


CO 


OS 


rH 


t— 












r-* 




^ 










CO 


O 


(M 






O 


00 


m 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


IM 










CO 




00 






























r-l 




" 






■^ 


'" 


"^ 






rH 






^ 


—' 




a> 


o 


CO 




lO 


IM 


to 


CO 


in 




,_^ 


r- < 


<IO 


S • ^ 




















t- 


tP 


tO 


-^ 


CD 


W.i;3 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 








*1 O CS o 


00 


"^ 






^ 










Cl 


<N 








§1^3 


H 




*"* 


^ 




*"* 


'"' 


" 


*"* 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 






00 


(M 




o 




























U3 






CO 


o 












.= P^B 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 
























IM 




<N 








M 


O " 


r-l 


■^ 


'"' 


"^ 


"^ 


'"' 




^ 






'"' 


'"' 




'"' 








o 


lO 


O 




















a5 *■* 




ai 


■* 


CJ 








CO 




TP 


OS 








00 


ira 


to 


en 


O 


o 


O) 


t- 


to 


CD 


t^ 


J^ 






« ^■S.ri 


00 














iM 




IM 


IM 


(M 


CO 




Lak 

ochiti 

134.3 


iH 


*"* 


*"* 


""^ 


'"' 


^ 


'^ 


*"* 


■^ 


^ 


•^ 


""* 


•^ 


""^ 




CO 


t-> 


la 


t— 




to 








OS 


1^ 






00 


o 


CO 


CO 






CO 




OS 


CO 


to 


(M 




M 


og 


00 
iH 








CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


'a, 






(M 


r-( 


CO 






i^ 


o> 


L-. 


o 


00 






-3C 


f— 




1- 


1^1 


rH 




00 


01 










(M 


eq 


IM 


CO 




C^ 


Tf 


rH 




00 


Ol 


Ol 


cn 


Ci 




OS 






00 


OO 








5 So 


00 












^ 




Tjt 


"* 










f^^n 


iH 


■^ 


^ 


'"' 


"^ 


'^ 


■-" 


'~' 






'-' 


'"' 


rH 


rH 




t' 


(N 


C-3 


^ 


l^ 


>ra 
















.^ 










0^ 


(M 






(M 




<M 








a> 


C6 


Oi 


a> 


o> 


OS 


OS 










OJ 




iSa 


iH 




rH 


iH 






tH 


-* 






•^ 


1-1 


;^ 


^ 


■ 


00 
00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


ifO 


t— 


CO 


rH 






3 


f-,j 


[., 




=: *? 


d 


c-i 


CO 


-* 




lO 


•n 






0-; 


O 


5 


OJ 


ervo 
0.4 
boa 
5.21 


00 
iH 


(N 


o<. 


<M 


<M 


IM 


(M 


(M 


o^ 


(M 


«5 


IM 


?^ 


M 


00 
00 




CO 


Ol 


to 






















s 






to 

-* 




OS 

-* 


Tfl 


-* 


00 


to 




to 


O 
(M 


fc 


r^ 
















c^ 


(M 


IM 


■M 


IM 


(M 




00 


s 


OJ 


-H. 


to 


r-. 






l^ 






00 










r- 




»o 




r-^ 


-tt^ 


c^ 


^ 




lO 






O . 0) . 
> CO - -t 


00 


o 


CO 


(N 


>a 


in 


■ra 






to 


lO 








00 


I' 


tj- 


t— 


t^ 


1^ 








t- 


t— 






Ir- 


^ O « o 




*"* 




*"* 




■"* 


'"' 


^ 


'"' 


'"' 


'"^ 


^ 


'~' 


'"' 






-* 


O 


U5 




















^^1- 




to 


Ol 










<M 


•^ 


I— ' 


OS 


M 


CO 


CO 


00 


rH 


.n 


UO 


O 


lO 


»fO 


-f 


CO 


CO 


r- 


CO 


lo 




OQ 


iH 


!^" 




I-^ 


^ 










tH 


S 


t- 


1;; 




• 


00 
00 


CD 


(M 


OS 


r-< 


i^ 


rH 


to 


m 




rH 


00 




■<* 






CI 


e^ 






OO 




Tf 




■* 


CO 




t— 


.1^ ^ 








to 


to 


















g^§2 


1 ^ 


s 


'^ 






to 


to 


r^ 




CD 


to 


s 


to 


§ 


Reser 
No 

lash b 
167. 




























00 


^ 


-* 


■n 


CO 


00 


§ 


■* 


OS 


00 


(M 


s 


OO 


to 


lO 


u-s 


to 


to 


to 










rH 








00 














to 




CO 


to 


CO 






cn 


iH 


'"' 


'^ 




'"' 


•^ 


'"' 




'"' 










■H 


-jD 


00 


o 


=> 


O) 


CO 


rH 






J-t 




IM 


lO 




















OS 


OS 


(N 


lO 


o 


CO 








I— 


00 


OD 


00 


OO 




oc 


00 




^^ 


(^ 




OO 


00 
iH 


;i:i 






i-H 


r^ 




>o 


•a 




rt 


s 


UO 


s 


00 
00 


rH 


o 


(M 


oi 


O 


CO 


§ 


OS 


IM 

O 


§ 


» 


^ 


TJI 


« § 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


(» 


OS 


OS 


OO 




00 


^ 






















lO 














H 


'"' 


'"' 


■^ 


•" 


" 


'"' 


'-' 




i—i 


—' 




T-i 


rH 


EH 






>. 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




0) 

a 

ft 


u 


fe 

.Q 




60 


o 




3 
0) 


1 


<1 


^ 
a 


a 
a 

1-5 


3 

i-s 


D 

tic 
3 
<1 


1 

o 

o 


o 


a 
ft 





52 



City Document No. 31. 



•t^ 






t^ 








i 

« 


>a 


|S 






s 




o 


, 


S 


on 


^ 


CO 




^ 


« 


M 




o 


i<! 


<:o 


t> 


t>. 


-K» 


on 


ft^ 


f~< 






cq 





o 




















-I* 


CC 


00 t- 


l- 


-K 1 r-^ 1 






"^o 


CO 


C-5 


CO 


o 


»f5 










-* 1- 






CO 






s 






I-, 








co 




ir 




1^ 








g-t; =? 


o 


•* 


O 


Tf 


^ 


CO 


^ 


CO 




^ 


CO "* 


^ 


u- 


^ 






































i, '^ § 


<s; 












































^ 


t~ .o 


CI 


CO O >0 t- (M 1 CO 1 




— -a 






O 




o 












■-! 1 "■^ 1 




'S -2 


S 






lO 




(M 


00 in 




o t- o 


(^ 




cs 




r~ O 


^ 


(N 




IM 




I-H 




r-l 




(N rH <N (M 


" 1 -> 1 




™ m 






































































































ei 3 








































.n 










• O 












O 1 00 1 
















(M 












^ 




O 


O 


o 


CO 














M 






QJ 


1^ 






lO 




r-H Ol 


rH 












•* 






CO 


CO 


^ CO 


CO 


■* tP »* -* lO 1 ^ 1 




a 


O 


































►^ 




























1 




tof 
col- 
Lake. 






o 




o 


o 


O O 


o 


O O O O O O 
































c» 


o^ 


-^ CO 




CO CDi 00 CO CO CO 




































O CD 


<M 




CO 1- 


O 1 O 1 




a ~~. ^ 


^ 


T-i 


C-J 


o 


CO 


""» 






a> 


»- 


» '*., ^., '^ 




. =i 




























^. fl = T3 




C-l 


<M 


CO 






C^ 1-1 




(> 


c^ c^ c- 


CO 1 IN 1 




Ci 
































rt :3 .^ "tj 


































« -^ 














































^ 


<~ 


O 


o 


<- 


o •= 


^ 


O 1 O 1 




a-H a 






















































•r; 


<M 1 O 1 




11^^ 






















































31 CO 












































^ 








c 


m 






c 








00 




Total a 

of lia 

collec 

La 






























































































(S 




CO 


o 


"^ 


t^ 










*"! "~ 


CO 










Ol 


o 


C-l 












o 


CO c; 


c 




ca 










































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o c 


c 


c 




































































































































o 










o o = 
















CO 


en 




o 


o 










o c 


c; 


c 






















































































































hj 


B 






(N 


























<i 










r-t 
























w 






































o 






































<5 






















































































































































H 


















o 




















ca 


a 


2 














o 
o 


























































a 










































































O 














CO 






cr 




















o 




o 


o 


^ 


r- 


o 






c: 


c 


o 


c 


o 








o 






o 


O 


O 


o 




r~ 




c: 




c 


o 










ira 


CO 




<M 












cr 


c 








°2^ 




"^ 


CO 


t~. 


r-H 


,-, 




CO 






/— 




c~ 








































5 


oT 


o" 




■o 




CO 




-f 


C: 




c 
o- 


• ^ 


-^ 


"". 




ill 


































B 


CO 


(M 




CO 






-* 


o 




>r 




•! 


o- 






to 


CO 




CO 




Oi 




^ 


(N 




y- 


1^, 






CO 




<;>a 


































r* 






































o 


O 


o 


o 


o 




o 


O 




c= 


C= 


O 


o 


o 




a 




o 




o 


o 


o 


c 






r 


c 




C 


CO 


o 




°^i 






"^ 


o" 






cr 






C. 














^ ■- a 


8 








































— . 




.- "i 


■"- 




, o 


cr 


, "^ 




lO 




















-^H 
















°Sa 




































|^^ 


o 


00 


-^ 


CO 


a. 


»c 


CO 


^ 


CC 




c 




o 




c d 3 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(N 






IM 


IM 


(M 










'^'fs'^ 




































































a 


































<1 


































w 


































h 






























CO 

1 








CO 


1- 


CO 


o 


o 




IM 


CO 


~{ 










Q) 












































r^ 


I-( 


IH 


r-t 


r-i 


r- 


»^ 


r-1 




li^ 


?- 




r- 


< 


1 



Report of the Watee Board. 



53 



Rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Mystic Lake Water-shed, 
for 18S8. 



1888. 




D 
01 




ft 




a 

3 




3 
P 
< 


£ 

o 
m 


O 
O 
O 


o 

B 
p 

o 


u 

D 

a 

ft 


1 


1.395 








0.125 




0.02 




0.28 








2 . 






0.095 


0.93 










. 


1.13 






3 


















0.095 




4 

5 ... 


0.09 


0.47 














0.01 










0.83 


0.20 














0.04 


6 








0.06 




1.61 










7 . . 




















1.095 






8 


0.0ri5 


0.195 






















9 








. • . 


0.365 








0.89 




1.52 


0.60 


10 


0.] 15 








0.10 






. . . 










11 




0.68 




0.64 
0.025 




0.11 


0.615 










0.84 


12 




0.775 








13 


0.435 




2.115 




2.72 






1.52 




0.235 






14 








0.125 




0.83 








0.125 






15 


0.09 


0.02 






0.26 


0.185 




0.055 






0.745 




16 


. . . 










. . . 






0.06 




0.17 




17 


0.875 




0.005 






. . . 




0.49 




0.265 






18 


. . . 






0.065 




. . . 






1.965 






3.57 


19 


. . . 








0.26 




0.24 








0.345 




20 




1.045 








0.07 








0.525 






21 






1.135 


0.225 




0.015 


0.84 


2.555 


1.305 
0.02 








22 








23 


0.03 










0.235 






0.015 








24 








. . . 






0.01 






0.945 






25 




0.87 








0.10 


. . . 






. 






26 


0.925 










0.32 






3.24 




3.82 




27 














0.09 










0.22 


28 






1.835 


. . . 


0.70 




0.03 


. . . 




0.635 






29 ... . 












0.03 


0.05 








0.155 




30 










0.30 


0.2J5 




31 




. 






0.065 


0.305 












Totals . . 


4.05 


3.28 


5.185 


2.84 


5.095 


2.20 


2.23 


C.23 


8.56 


4.955 


6.85 


5.2T 



Total rainfall during the year, 56.745 inches. 



54 



City Document No. 31. 



^ 



fej 



















■s 








t^ 


r - 


* I 










CO -f* OS -*• M Cl 


3C0r-C0<NrHOJ|iOlC3» 






"ca 


OiOiOsc^oocqu^-^c^-^OiTj^loloq 






o 


to Ol -^ O ifS I 


-COOCOOOOJOIOOUS 






oootoooo«D>oo>ra>o|o|-* 








CO 


-ICOCD'MC<ICOQCCC 


1 lO 1 
il O IM -+ OO 






<U 


CD CD i-H CO - 


-: -T oi •* • 


- t- CO CO CO 0? 






Q 




5 U^ lO u 


3 .O U 


3ir3tOTj1ir5iO^Ou^^ 




























L-^ 


1 « 1 






> 


CO -* i-i ^- c3 


a c 


qt~oococoooiMli-)lf- 






O 


O CO a 


si-Jcoc-^-o-dii-iaicoc-io; 






^ 


t— k— cdodcot— eOOTt-osiotolfc— 1*^ 




























O 


1 ^ 1 








iO 0> 05 -^ 






J -* a 


3 CC 






o 


m o; CO lO 00 o cr t- to CO «-; i-H I ,-- 1 ,ra 






o 


^■iO-*-*-*iC3-*'*-*-^ci 


5 I- lO CO 




























CD 


t 00 1 








i-(0100C10i05COCO-*tOCD(M[l~ 


t- 






D. 


oqOSrMriHC^cOCOCr 


3 00 lO Ol t- -)• »^ 






03 


Gocioooojooc»coo6t--co^-t-[a 


■ 1 "" 




























^ 


1 ic 


= 1 






bh 


c<i r- 00 c 




OS -^ OO lO OT »c5 ■: 


' ro 1 CO 






3 


C^ t- CO 03 OS -d 


_ (J? l-I r- 


< IM OO (M CO lO 






^ 


COCDkOCD»OCDt't--t--CD'^»r 


' 1 " 


J CO 






. 






















^ 


^ 








>. 


"r =■ 


c^cOi-ior^-*-*oou7.Tj 


C 


Ol 








CO u- 


CT 1-1 i-H « ■^ 




lO CO O C£ 




1 1-; 






1-5 


rHTHrHC^c4c^C^C^cir-03C^ 


c- 


I •-< 




























_ 


CT 








Oi 


I- <= 


t- 




cr 




« i-H 1-4 Ti. O C 


IT 


Ol 






a 


o 


OC 


(M u- 


IM r- 


c^ 


*^ kO T-^ ex 




^ 








3 


(M 


IM 


IM 


(M iM e« 


e^ 


0^ 


IM <M •M O- 


Cs 


1m" 


















u- 










(= 




^ 








>^ 


M 


O 




o 


ic^ 


•^ 


o 


o 


cc 


C 


Ol c 




o 






C9 


CO 


in 




Ol 


OC 


o: 




r 


CO 








o 








a 


^ 


■* 






Tf 


u: 




CO 


T^ 


»r: 


CO T* 


-^ 


■" 




























(M 




C 
















•* 








CO 


CO 


(M 






C 


m 






a, 

< 


E 


ir 


C- 


Tf 






CO 


'^ «: 


t- ir- O 




CO 






CSI 


(M 


(M 


(M 


(N 


Ol 


IM 


OJ 


IM O) 


C 


^ 


(N 


im" 






^ 






















_ 




^ 








o 




»- 


CO 


O 






CO 


CO 








IM 






S-t 


CO 


C< 






O 


01 


a 




C^ 




in 




1^ 


CO 






a 


>o 


33 


>o 


m 






■c* 






lO 


CO 


CO 


O 


03 




























t- 




in 








i 


o 




CO 




e: 


^ 


o 


CO 


»■- 


-* 


o 




CO 










t- 


CO 


c< 








a 


c- 


O 


cc 


\i. 


lO 


00 






fo 


M 


co 


CO 


:o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IM 


co 


CO 


•« 


•^ 


CO 


































CO 










M 


en 






tn 






■^ in 




CC 


CO 




CO 






r* 








CO 




a 


CO 


>o 


f 


CC 




c 


CM 






^ 


•* 


•>* 


CO 


■* CO 


CO 


ec 


C-5 


■* •<* 


w: 


-» 


ci 


























c 




C 
C 
b 













H 




















'Z 


c 


•E 










o 

-4 






















c 






s 






£ 




















1 


1 




■> 
























!- 


■• c 


c 


- 

a 






















c 




C 


r 


i 

c 


c- 


^ 










4 








c 




s 




s- 

a 

C 

' 1 


C 




"a 


c 










I 
> b 




£ 


a. 


1- 


'5 




1 


1 


1 


4 

b 

> 

< 


32 








C 


> c 


C 


c 


_t 




t 


c 


t 


1 






c" 








a 


■ ! 

1 ft 


< 


^ 


i 1 




12 


c 

^ 1 


£ 




"a 
1 I 


1 







Report of the "Water Board. 



55 



Rainfall received and collected, 1888. 





Mystic. 


COCHITUATE. 


SUDBDHT. 


Months. 


<2 
a 
"S 
Pi 


— 13 

3- 
"5S 


^1 


g 


11 


11 
^1 


a 
1 


— -d 
«1 


SI 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May .... 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December . 


4.05 

3.28 

5.185 

2.84 

5.095 

2.20 

2.23 

6.23 

8.56 

4.955 

6.85 

6.27 


1.43 

3.32 
4.28 
3.27 
2.88 
0.84 
0.39 
0.54 
1.31 
2.74 
5.04 
5.08 


35.20 

101.25 

82.48 

115.21 

56.59 

38.08 

17.46 

8.75 

15.29 

55.28 

73.55 

96.41 


4.13 
3.55 
5.60 
2.51 
4.63 
2.07 
1.67 
6.32 
8.81 
4.95 
7.03 
5.66 


1.13 

2.77 
4.76 
3.45 
2.37 
0.53 
0.47 
0.94 
2.31 
2.57 
4.21 
5.46 


27.46 
78.01 
85.00 
137.34 
51.19 
25.78 
28.06 
14.87 
26.24 
51.90 
59.92 
96.39 


4.15 

3.685 

6.02 

2.425 

4.825 

2.535 

1.405 

6.225 

8.585 

4.99 

7.225 

5.395 


1.878 
3.255 
5.775 
4.566 
2.912 
0.728 
0.209 
0.677 
1.994 
3.566 
4.761 
5.428 


45.26 
88.32 
95.93 

188.30 
60.35 
28.70 
14.90 
10.87 
23.22 
71.45 
65.90 

100.60 


Totals and } 
averages \ 


56.745 


31.12 


54.84 


56.93 


30.97 


54.40 


57.465 


35.749 


62.21 



56 



City Docujient No. 31. 



Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at different Stations on 
the Water- Works. 



1S8S. 



January 
February 
March 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



Tejipeeatube op Air. 



Chestnut-IIiH Reservoir. 



5.^.5 
51.0 
54.5 
76.5 
79.0 
96.0 
S6.5 
89.0 
77.5 
68.5 



-10.5 
-5.0 
9.5 
19.5 
32.5 
43.0 
48.0 
49.0 
30.0 
26.5 
11.0 
4.0 



18.7 
26.3 
30.6 
41.0 
53.3 
663 
67.5 
6S.8 
58.6 
46.2 
42.5 
32.8 



Framingham. 



53.0 
51.0 
52.0 
SO.O 
83.0 
96.0 
87.0 
92.0 
78.0 
67.0 
72.0 
58.0 



-19.0 

-6.0 

6.0 

19.0 

31.0 

39.0 

45.0 

46.0 

27.0 

28.0 

8.0 

4.0 



18.1 
25.8 
20.8 
41.9 
53.2 
67.6 
67.7 
63.3 
59.4 
46.3 
41.7 
32.6 



Tempf.ratdre oi" 
Water. 



Hrnoklinc 
llcservoir. 



36.5 
36.2 
36.9 
42.7 
54.3 
67.4 
71.1 
72.2 
66.3 
52.2 
46.1 
36.6 



Mystic 

EllLMIlC- 

liouse. 



34.1 
34.2 
34.0 

40.7 
54.7 
67.4 
69.8 
72.1 
66.1 
52.5 
46.6 
35.9 



WATER llEGISTRAirS EEPOET. 

JANUARY 1, 1889. 



Office of the ^yATER Eegistrae, 

Boston, Jan. 1,1889. 

Thomas F. Doherty, Esq., CJiairman Boston Water 
Board: — 
Sir, — The annual report of the Water Re_2;istrar, as 
required by Scot. 9, Chap. 30, of the Revised Ordinances, 
is herewith submitted. 

CocHiTUATE Works. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Works 

for the year ending Dec. 31, '88, have been $1,356,974 46 



The detail of this amount is as follows : — 

Received from sales of water furnished in 

1889 $2,426 00 

Received from sales of water furnished in 

1888 1,189,381 23 

Received from sales of water furnished in 

1^87 125,578 69 

Received from sales of old meters . . 10,071 57 

service-pipes and repairs . 3,958 27 

sale of old material . . 5,794 35 

" merchandise . . 3,453 75 

" old pipe . . . 2,625 00 

elevator, fire and motor pipes, 4,005 91 
miscellaneous sources and 

labor .... 2,852 13 
off and on water, for repairs, 2,112 26 
otf and on water, for non-pay- 
ment .... 1,371 60 



Carried forward, 



.,353,630 76 



58 



City Document No. 31. 



Brought forward. 
Received from fees 

* ' rent of water-posts 
" rents . 
*' fines for waste 
*' rebate on gas 

Total .... 



$1,353,680 76 

1,490 30 

566 79 

1,141 90 

130 00 

14 71 

$1,356,974 46 



Mystic "Works. 

The total receipts of the Mystic Works have 
been during the year 1888 . 



The detail of this amount is as follows : — 

Received from the sale of water in 1888, 
" " «' " 1887, 

" *< *« " 1889, 

*• " service and fire pipes . 

*' '* oft' and on water for repairs, 

** '< off and on water for non- 

payment 
** *' fines r summonses) 

** " rent of water-posts 

" " sale of old material 



Add sundry receipts by Water Board 
Total 



$308,597 


63 


$286,206 


12 


19,794 


60 


636 


50 


509 


41 


303 


00 


226 


00 


198 


50 


20 


00 


9 


71 


$307,903 


84 


693 


79 


$308,597 


63 



The percentage allowed the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, 
and town of Everett under contract is as follows : — 



Somerville 

Chelsea 

Everett 



$47,230 77 

35,168 93 

8,635 01 



$91,034 71 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



59 



The expenditures of this department for the year 1888 
are as follows : — 





Mystic. 


Cocliituate. 


For salaries 


. $8,870 00 


$30,975 00 


Labor .... 


1,971 90 


10,672 21 


Printing and stationery . 


518 89 


1,369 27 


Travelling expenses 


236 80 


1,681 17 


Postage, telephone, etc. . 


3()9 34 


65 00 


Total 


. 111,466 93 


$44,762 65 



The estimated income from all sources from 
the Mystic and Cochituate departments 
for the year 1889 is ... . $1,702,000 00 



From water-rates 
" all other sources 

Total . 



Mystic. 

115,000 00 
2,000 00 



Cochituate. 

,357,000 00 
28,000 00 



7,000 00 $1,385,000 00 



The total number of takers supplied by Cochituate 

Works is 61,902 

The total number of takers supplied by Mystic 

Works is 20,518 

The total number of meters now applied to 
premises of both Cochituate and Mystic Works 
is 3,539 



The following table represents the size, kind, and location 
of meters ; — 



60 



City Document No. 31. 



Size and Kind of Meter. 




o 
1 


C3 
O 

6 


o 




3 

o 




127 

802 

476 

68 

80 

19 

6 

1,067 

117 

158 

33 

27 

18 

13 

1 

58 
9 
5 
1 
1 
22 
12 
8 
5 


11 

26 
35 

14 

1 

5 

58 

25 

14 

2 

6 

4 

3 


6 

20 
17 

2 

7 
2 

20 
8 
4 


4 
5 
21 
2 
8 


1 

2 


148 




856 


5 

1 t( << 


550 




72 


O <( « 


lU 




22 




3 

17 

8 

5 


1 
,1 


14 




1,162 




159 




182 




35 


^2 

2 ** '< 


1 
1 


2 
1 
1 


1 


35 


3 n <« 


24 




19 




3 










58 


3^ << *( 






1 




11 




5 












1 


5 










1 












22 


6 t( "Rnll ,1'' Fit7 










12 




1 








9 


i 








5 


2 <« «< 






' 3 




3 








1 






5 
6 
2 


























































4 ° 












^Q. 










5 












6 


3 " Weir 










2 














3,152 


207 


90 


81 


9 


3,539 







Eeport of the Water Board. 



Gl 



CocHiTUATE Works. 

The following table exhibits the classes of premises to 
which melcrs are attached, the amount of Avater consumed, 
and the revenue assessed for the years 1887 and 1888 ; — 



Class of Pkemises. 



Hotels 

Apartment Hotels 

Business Premises 

Steam Railroads 

Sugar Refineries 

Factories and Machine Shops 

Iron Works aud Foundries 

Mills and Engines 

Marble and Stone Works 

Gas Companies 

Breweries 

Oil-Works 

Chemical Works 

Laundries 

Restaurants 

Stables 

Theatres and Halls 

Hospitals 

Schools 

City, State, aud Government Buildings . 

Steamers and Shipping 

Elevators and Motors 

Electric-I.ight Companies 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



1887. 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



30,439,000 

37,438,000 

72,490,000 

31,239,000 

35,479,000 

31,901,000 

6,551,000 

2,012,000 

2,679,000 

15,415,000 

14,344,000 

1,089,000 

2,105,000 

640,000 

7,103,000 

13,282,000 

1,235,000 

1,778,000 

2,873,000 

10,491,000 

8,004,000 

15,912,000 

5,242,000 

2,074,000 



351,845,000 



Amount 
assessed. 



$37,637 63 

50,297 40 

96,301 95 

37,941 40 

42,691 10 

41,519 00 

8;1T6 40 

2,699 50 

3,426 10 

18,756 99 

17,636 20 

1,393 10 

2,566 20 

840 20 

9,608 40 

17,922 20 

1,662 00 

2,229 60 

3,921 90 

13,107 20 

10,256 82 

21,562 50 

6,405 20 

2,776 10 



$451 ,.335 09 



1888. 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic leei. 



31,875,000 

39,196,000 

76,896,C00 

36,414,000 

26,804,000 

36,388,000 

6,705,000 

2,346,000 

2,505,000 

16,112,000 

13,993,000 

820,000 

1,551,000 

1,252,000 

6,867,0C0 

15,523,000 

1,224,000 

2,680,000 

2,830,000 

11,226,000 

9,015,000 

19,844,000 

6,265,000 

2,500,000 



370,831,090 



Amount 

assessed. 



$39,227 70 

52,278 80 

102,165 75 

41,460 30 

25,990 40 

46,837 60 

8,294 80 

3,179 70 

3,230 00 

17,442 30 

17,214 60 

1,079 10 

2,522 20 

1,629 60 

9,277 30 

20,724 90 

1,664 80 

3,330 00 

3,877 70 

15,211 SO 

11,536 14 

26,614 90 

7,650 70 

3,206 40 



$465,653 49 



62 



Ci%Y Document No. 31. 



Mystic Works. 

The following table exhibits the classes of premises to which 
meters are attached, the amount of water consumed, and the 
revenue assessed for the years 1887 and 1888 : — 



Class of Pkemisbs. 



Steam Railroads 

Horse Railroads 

Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator Co, 
City and Government Buildings . . ■ 

Schools 

Stables 

Factories . 

Chemical Works 

Foundries 

Breweries 

Gas Companies 

Oil-W'orks 

Mills and Engines 

Hotels 

Model Houses 

McLean Insane Asylum 

Slaughter-houses 

Business Purposes .......... 

Wharves 

Laundries .............. 

Elevators and Motors 

Bakeries 

Restaurants 

Tanneries . , . 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



1887. 



Quantity 

used. 

Cubic feet. 



24,741,325 

1,298,212 

1,132,001) 

6,550,817 

917,572 

2,023,916 

5,411,259 

1,168,000 

734,948 

909,642 

717,790 

3,230 

1,126,559 

600,520 

1,721,500 

1,330,000 

3,814,783 

927,461 

691,581 

372,468 

63,571 

485,000 

189,169 

1,003,513 

2,810,457 



,745,293 



Amount 
assessed. 



$29,903 41 
1,662 67 
1,332 40 
8,144 67 
1,264 86 
2,828 61 
7,056 28 
1,428 80 

999 60 
1,146 19 

897 02 

4 52 

1,517 37 

823 85 
2,394 05 
1,620 00 
4,642 54 
1,276 63 

925 38 

503 15 
89 00 

652 00 

264 54 
1,275 93 
3,538 35 



$76,241 82 



1888. 



Quantity 

used. 
Cubic feet. 



22,795,288 

1,339,285 

90S,459 

8,542,928 

971,288 

2,046.377 

5,379,742 

1,231,000 

819,121 

967,360 

911,679 



1,020,871 

619,961 

543,474 

1,352,000 

5,632,261 

1,163,749 

665,542 

370,113 

480,917 

466,781 

106,794 

986,056 

2,819,411 



62,140,457 



Amount 
assessed. 



$25,042 11 
1,775 35 
1,271 85 
10,432 80 
1,226 68 
2,893 63 
7,289 57 
1,516 20 
1,125 15 
1,220 50 
1,164 78 



1,381 97 

829 79 

760 77 

1,046 40 

6,820 71 

1,600 13 

902 35 

503 15 

667 38 

660 79 

158 91 

1,247 28 

3,742 53 



75,880 78 



Eeport of the Water ^^oard. 



63 



The quantity used through meters in the different districts 
was as follows : — 





1887. 


1888. 




Cubic feet. 


Amount. 


Cubic feet. 


AmouDt. 




42,353,136 
9,817,027 
7,241,496 
1,353,634 


$52,836 16 
12,468 Co 
9,254 90 
1,682 71 


40,622,593 

12,076,491 

7,800,884 

1,640,489 


$48,236 59 
15,288 08 
10,305 13 
2,050 98 






Everett 




Total 


60,745,293 


$76,241 82 


62,140,457 


$75,8S0 78 





The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848: — 



Received 


by Water Commissioners 


as per 




Auditor 


's report, in 1848 


, , 


$972 81 


From Jan 


uary 1, 1849, to January 1 


, 1850 . 


71,657 79 




1850, 




1851 . 


99,025 45 




1851, 




1852 . 


161,052 85 




1852, 




1853 . 


179,567 39 




1853, 




1854 . 


196,352 32 




1854, 




1855 . 


217,007 51 




1855, 




1856 . 


266,302 77 




1856, 




1857 . 


282,651 84 




1857, 




1858 . 


289,328 83 




1858, 




1859 . 


302,409 73 




1859, 




1860 . 


314,808 97 




1860, 




1861 . 


334,544 86 




1861, 




1862 . 


365,323 96 




1862, 




1863 . 


373,922 33 




1863, 




1864 . 


394,506 25 




1864, 




1865 . 


430,710 76 




1865, 




1866 . 


450,341 48 




1866, 




1867 . 


486,538 25 




1867, 




1868 . 


522,130 93 




1868, 




1869 . 


553,744 88 




1869, 




1870 . 


597,328 55 




1870, 




1871 . 


708,783 68 




1871, 




1872 . 


774,445 70 




1872, 




1873 . 


862,704 08 



64 



CiT^ Document No. 31. 



From January 1, 1873, to January 1, 1874 
1874, 

1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 
1880, 
1881, 
1882, 
1883, 
1884, 
1885, 
188(3, 
1887, 
1888, 



1874 . 


$917,415 


92 


1875 . 


977,020 


48 


1876 . 


1,005,120 


94 


1877 . 


1,029,643 


70 


1878 . 


1,015,562 


89 


1879 . 


1,010,584 


30 


1880 . 


1,025,803 


14 


1881 . 


1,039,896 


17 


1882 . 


1,087,528 


49 


1883 . 


1,127,982 


32 


1884 . 


1,167,704 


17 


1885 . 


1,203,192 


55 


1886 . 


1,239,757 


99 


1887 . 


1,206,064 


69 


1888 . 


1,244,191 


75 


1889 . 


1,317,385 


92 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Mystic water since its introduction, November 29, 
1864: — 



From 


November 29, 1864, to January 1, 1866, 


$22,419 55 




January 1, 1866, to January 1, 1867 . 


46,447 69 






1867, 


1868 . 


56,532 04 






1868, 


1869 . 


89,758 21 






1869, 


1870 . 


105,948 98 






1870, 


1871 . 


176,769 57 






1871, 


1872 . 


203,824 88 






1872, 


1873 . 


237,91^6 25 






1873, 


1874 . 


257,983 15 






1874, 


1875 . 


269,868 22 






1875, 


1876 . 


310,672 92 






1876, 


1877 . 


291,992 98 






1877, 


1878 . 


286,590 18 






1878, 


1879 . 


283,439 89 






1879, 


1880 . 


270,599 82 






1880, 


1881 . 


273,735 24 






1881, 


1882 . 


230,856 78 






1882, 


1883 . 


251,928 53 






1883, 


' 1884 . 


260,011 91 






1884, 


1885 . 


265,921 04 






1885, 


1886 . 


276,557 60 






1886, 


1887 . 


249,6 J9 62 






1887, 


1888 . 


293,018 65 






1888, 


1889 . 


306,637 22 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



65 



The daily returns from the Service Divisions represent a 
total of 9,983 orders received during the year, as follows : — 

Application for service-pipes .... 2,546 

" " turning on water for first time . 2,285 

" " repairs in service-pipes . . 1,391 

" "off and on water for repairs . 2,641 

" " ." " " non-payment 1,120 

Total 9,983 



Drinking-Fountatns . 

The total number of drinking-fountains established to Jan. 
1, 1889, is 84, all of which, with the exception of 12, have 
automatic fixtures to prevent the continuous flow of water. 

They are distributed as follows, viz. : — 



Boston Proper . 








23 


East Boston 








4 


South Boston 








8 


Roxbury 








7 


West Roxbury . 








15 


Dorchester 








6 


Brighton . 








5 


Charlestown 








8 


Chelsea 








2 


Somerville 








5 


Everett 








1 



84 



Hydraulic Motors. 



The total number of hydraulic motors now located is 91, 
being an increase of 1 during the year 1888. They are 
applied to a variety of business premises, church organs, etc. 



Hydraulic Elevators. 

The total number of hydraulic elevators established to 
date is 316, being an increase of 33 over the previous year. 
They are located principally in business premises and apart- 
ment-houses. 



66 



City Document No. 31, 



Water-Posts. 

There are 156 water-posts now located for street-sprink- 
ling purposes, being an increase of 32 during the past year. 



i are located as loUows : — 








Boston Proper ..... 8 


South Boston 






6 


East Boston 






1 


Roxbury 






25 


Dorchester . . . , 






28 


West Roxbury 






. 29 


Brighton 






. 17 


Charlestown District 






6 


Chelsea 






4 


Somerville . 






26 


Everett 






6 

156 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



67 









^ 








j-^ 




-ri* 


TiJ 


00 


Oi 


, 


























•sjnBjpiCH &?«A]jj 














<M 




CO 










CD 




^ 


CO 


^ 


lO 


00 


^ 


00 


IM 


■UIB[a 'BlBUUfl 


c^ 


O 

CO 


lO 


<M 


CO 


to 




CO 


CO 












.rs 


m 


^ 


cs 


IM 


^ 








to 




•oi-jBcuo^ny 


OJ 




^ 


rt 


*" 


C» 






^ 






'SITJUUfl 




(N 








CO 


















T-i 


to 


.o 




.o 














•9qn;-;ooj 




(N 




-^ 




CO 














>re 




to 




^ 


ur 






^ 




.o 




M 




•* 
















CO 


•s.i8(Idon-do^g 




" 








i-T 














m 








^ 


tr. 


^ 






^ 






























o 


CO 


T— < 




•«• 




IM 


IM 


IM 




OS 


•sqn;-qsB^ 




^ 


>o 


^ 




CO 




" 


IM 




■Tt* 














_ 




^ 


^ 


to 


00 




















■^ 




















r-l 










•gqni-qiBa 


I-H 


CO 


^ 




o 


IM 


i-l 


tH 


IM 




l» 




•siitiBA 








to 




s 














q8n[j[ 




. 








" 
















en 


(M 




■* 


■* 






00 




oo 




•qsriM 


. 


iM 










O 


CO 






rH 




rr, 


t^ 


CD 


to 


00 


.O 


U5 


^ 




^ 


S 


H 


•ajsBAV 


en 




^ 






-* 


IM 


'-' 


•* 






O 

O 




























-* 


00 


^ 


to 


-;!< 


„ 


^ 




OJ 




^ 


•joddoH 


CO 




05 




<>» 


CO 






i-H 




CO 


Ed 




























^ 


^ 


rH 


o 


CO 


IM 








00 




1 






"2 






















'd" 


to 


'^'' 


!h 


oT 


05 


IN 


OX 


to 
co" 


l« 


o 
en 






■r** 


<N 


to 


tt< 


^ 


t- 








































•9anss8j(i 




2" 




[3- 






'* 


Tt 




-' 






^aajjg 


























to 


to 


f. 


co 


^ 


CO 






rr 






















































•siAiog 




CO 


00 




t- 


§ 


« 


!M 


CO 




"^ 




-* 


cn 


,_ 


t- 


„ 


-* 










^ 








































O 


O 




Ol 


o> 


•93[Uig 


ai 


^ 


cq 


s 


tH 


o 


" 


oo 


OJ 


*"* 


§ 






05 


=. 


t- 


IM 


r- 










^ 


















































•sdBX 


^ 


-* 


^ 


co 


• CO 


-tf 


IH 


r-( 


IM 




o 






• 


t- 










• 




• 










<M 




























to 








O 




















IM 






















r-( 


lO 








■g 


;: 


S 


: 




















ft 
















- O 


























Ttl 




CO 




a 






































OJ 


K 


^ 


^ 


(Z 


^ 








OQ 




















































g, 






m 




C 


2 




> 


J2 






t: 


V, 


"C 


■TS 


■a 


b 


•j; 


— 




a 


Eh 








« 




















^ 


■ ^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




O 


fl 
y 


o 

02 


H 




II 






CO 

p4 



T3 



rI2 

s 



Hi 

0^ 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



South Framingham, Jan. 1, 1889. 

Col. Thomas F. Doherty, Chairman Boston Water 
Board : — 

Sir, — The annual report of the Western Division of the 
Boston "Water- Works is submitted herewith. 

SuDBURY-RlVER BaSINS. 

Owing to the large rainfall of the past year all of the 
basins have been well supplied with water. They are now 
full, and large amounts of water are daily wasting over the 
dams. The quality of the water has been unusutdly good, 
although at times some differences have been noted in the 
water as it flows into the basins and out of thera, in favor of 
the former. 

Possibly the large volumes have not allowed the water to 
remain in storag-e for sufficient time for the beneficial effects 
of air and rest to affect the quality. 

On June 19 a small amount of algae appeared in Basin 3, 
but early in the autumn almost entirely disappeared. 

Algae have not appeared in sufficient numbers in any of 
our waters this year to give any trouble. A rough prelimi- 
nary survey has been made of the Sudbury river, in the 
neighborhood of the Cedar swamp, with a view to its 
improvement ; another survey has been made for a new 
channel for Cold Spring brook, from Dam 4 to Main street. 

The above are the principal facts in regard to the Sudbury 
supply. A more detailed account will be found under each 
basin. 

Basin 1. 

On Jan. 1, 1888, the water was at elevation 157.79, and 
was wasting over stone crest of dam, and so continued until 
June 8, when flash-boards were put in place. On June 28 



Report of the Water Board. 69 

water was wasting over the top of the flash-boards, and con- 
tinued to waste until July 10. The surface then fell to 
elevation 158.51, on Auo-iist 5 and 6, but on the 23d was 
again wasting over flash-boards or through waste-gates until 
September 29, when flash-boards were removed. After this 
it w^asted over stone crest or through waste-gates until 
December 19, when, waste-gates being finally closed, water 
ran over stone crest the remainder of the year. The highest 
elevation reached was 159.87, on March 22. The lowest 
elevation was 155.75, on December 9. The flow of one and 
one-half millions of gallons has been passed into the river 
every day in accordance with the law. The usual amount 
of care has been given to the maintenance of the works 
around the basin. The 48-inch main in the bottom of the 
reservoir has not been repaired. It is in bad condition, but 
no favorable opportunity has • ofiered for examining the 
joints. 

No water has been drawn from Basin 1 to supply the 
city during the year. 



Basin 2. 

On Jan. 1, 1888, the water was at elevation 165.94, and 
was wasting over stone crest, and continued to waste till Jan- 
uary 21, w4ien the water lowered a little, but was wasting 
again on February 1, and continued to waste, with the 
exception of a few days in March, when waste-gates were 
opened, until June 8, when flash-boards were put in place. 
On June 16 water was wasting over flash-boards, and so con- 
tinued till the 20th, when an extra set of temporary flash- 
boards were added, the tops of which were at elevation 
167.50. The water then rose to elevation 167.49, on 
the 23d. 

The water in the basin stood at elevation 160.53, on 
August 4, 164.85 on the 26th, and at 161.43 on September 

10. The temporary flash-boards were removed on Sep- 
tember 22. Water was wasted over flash-boards until 
November 26, when all of the flash-boards were removed. 
With the exception of six days in December the water then 
flowed over the stone cresi the remainder of the year. 

The highest elevation reached was 167.64, on November 

11, and the lowest, 160.53, on August 4. 

The only work of any importance that has been done at 
Basin 2, during the year, with the exception of the ordinary 
routine work attending the maintenance of the dam and 
gate- house and the management of the water, was the laying 



70 City Document No. 31. 

of 1,300 linear feet of stone paving on the easterly side of 
the basin, on the Nevins' place. 

In November an experimental plant to test the Warren 
filter was put up at the dam, and observations made under 
a variety of circumstances to test tlie capacity of the filter 
and its ability to remove the micro-organisms existing in the 
water. 

Water has been drawn from this source for the supply of 
the city between the following dates : — 



January 1 to January 23. 
June 23 to July 10. 
July 23 to September 12. 



September 17 to September 26. 
September 29 to October 16. 
October 20 to October 22. 



Basin 3. 

On Jan. 1, 1888, this basin stood at grade 175.46, and 
water was wasting over the stone crest. 

The basin continued to overflow until the 25th. On Jan- 
uary 23 the supply for the city was drawn partly from this 
source, and after the 30th wholly from this source, until 
June 8. On February 20 the grade of the surface was 
171.11, and water was flowins; over the crest on the 22d and 
23d. On March 20 the water had fallen to 169.41, but it 
soon rose, and on the 28th was again wasting over the dam. 
Waste continued either over the crest or through the waste- 
gates until June 7. Between June 8 and June 20 a portion 
of the supply only was taken from Basin 3. On June 14 
the surface was at elevation 174.69, and on the 26th rose 
above the stone crest, and waste continued until July 11. 
Between July 10 and July 23 a portion of the supply for the 
city was taken from Basin 3, and the water was lowered to 
grade 173.43, on August 6. On August 24 the basin was 
aofain full and wastino- over the crest of the dam until the end 
of the year. The highest point reached has been 176.30, on 
January 2, and the lowest 169.41, on March 20. A portion 
of the supply was drawn between October 16 and October 
20, and between October 22 and November 2. 

From the latter date to December 13 the whole of the 
supply was drawn from this source, owing to the favorable 
able quality of the water, and a partial supply from December 
13 to the end of the year. No new work has been done at 
this point. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 71 



Basin 4. 

On eTan. 1, 1888, water in this basin stood at grade 207.89, 
and rose gradually to 215.21, on March 1, when stop-planks 
were removed from overflow, and water wasted over the 
stone crest until March 17. 

The waste-gates were opened at this date to carry on some 
experiments for flow through the gates, and the surface fell 
to 211.95, on the 21st. On April 4 the stop planks were 
replaced, and on the 8th the water reached 215.00. From 
this time until August 4 the basin remained full, the overflow 
being carried over the crest, or through the gates, as occasion 
demanded. On August 3 the supply for Basin 2 was drawn 
from this source, and so continued until the 22d. 

On the 21st the surface had ftillen to 211.20, but on 
September 28 was again above 215.00 and wasting over the 
flash-boards, until November 21, when the boards were 
removed and the water allowed to run over the stone crest 
for the remainder of the year. The highest elevation has 
been 215.31, on April 9, and the lowest, 207.89, on Jan- 
uary 1. 

A considerable amount of eno-ineerino; work has been done 
at this basin in the way of experiments to ascertam the co- 
efficients of the waste-gates, and also to determine accurately 
the amount of water flowing over the stone crest with 
varying heights of basin. Two weirs, 20 feet in length, were 
erected, and many experiments made, from which tables and 
curves of flow will be plotted. 



Farm Pond. 

On Jan. 1, 1888, this pond stood at elevation 149.24, and 
has been kept at about high-water mark (149.25) through the 
greater part of the year. 

Between September 12 and October 16 the surface was 
drawn down about 1.8 feet at the request of the Selectmen 
of Framingham, for the convenience of the contractors who 
were building the sewers for the town. The highest eleva- 
tion was 149.80, on December 28, and the lowest, 147.27, on 
September 17. 

Water was drawn through Farm-pond aqueduct from June 
23 to July 10, and from December 15 to end of the year; 
at other times the water was drawn directly through the 
pond. 

The Framingham Water Company have pumped 61 ,500,000 
gallons from Farm pond, an average of 168,000 gallons daily. 



72 City Document No. 31. 



Lake Cochituate. 

On Jan. 1, 1888, the lake stood at elevation 125.63, 8.73 
feet below high water. On March 14, the water having 
risen to 128.91, the waste-gates were opened at the outlet 
dams on account of projected work at the Pegan meadows 
later in the year. On March 31 the surface was at 131.20, 
but early in April it began to fall gradually, and by means 
of waste-gates was kept below 128.00 for a large part of the 
summer and autumn. 

A total of 4,229,200,000 gallons has been wasted during the 
year. Plans were made for the removal of 60,000 cubic yards 
of material from the Pegan meadows, and on August 20th 
your Board made a contract with Auguste Saucier, of South 
Framingham, for the execution of the work at the very low 
price of 29 cents per cubic yard, which included the facing of 
the embankments with gravel. This work has been carried 
out. The old dike extending across the lake was removed, 
as it was found by experience that the damming up of this 
shallow water produced an excessive growth of vegetable 
life. The old o-ravel and rock dams in Peofan brook were 
also removed. A new culvert, at a lower elevation, was built 
under the road at the upper portions of the meadows. 

The town of Natick endeavored to stop the city from 
taking away the dike, as they wished to build a road upon 
it across the lake, but the courts refused to grant an injunc- 
tion. This whole work has been prosecuted under the most 
adverse conditions. The excessive rains interfered materially 
with the execution, but the contractors have carried out their 
agreement. It was intended to have done some shallow 
flowage-work at the mouth of Course brook, but the rainy 
weather prevented. 

Work on a new dam was begun late in the season, but 
beyond laying out the lines and erecting a cofter-dam little 
was accomplished. It was necessary, in order to complete 
the Pegan brook w^ork, to waste water in such larg6 amounts 
over the site of the new dam that it was impracticable to 
excavate for the foundation. The highest point reached 
during the year was 131.40, on December 21. The lowest 
elevation was 125.61, on February 4. 

Water was wasted from .Lake Cochituate through the 
outlet eates between the followinir dates, viz. : From March 
14 to April 1 ; April 23 to April 25 ; May 13 to May 22 ; 
June 4 to June 7 ; July 4 to July 12 ; September 27 to end 
of the year. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 73 



SuDBURY-RlVER AqUEDUCT. 

This structure has been in service during the entire year, 
with the exception of about twelve clays, when the iiow was 
stopped to clean the aqueduct and for other purposes. It 
has carried to the city a total of 7,224,700,000 gallons, or a 
daily average of 19,739,600 gallons, — a considerable in- 
crease over last year. 

On June 5, 21, and 22 the aqueduct was swept its entire 
length. The cleaning from Farm pond to the West Siphon 
Chamber was done by machine. From the East Chamber to 
Chestnut-Hill Reservoir hand-labor was used. 

The brick-work in the upper portions as far as Bacon's 
Waste Weir was very dirty, being covered with a black 
muddy deposit. There was no spongilla. 

In the Beacon-street tunnel, about six cart-loads of rock 
were removed, which had fallen from the roof. In the last 
cleaning, which has recently taken place, we found a large 
quantity of heavy pieces of rock which had fallen in the 
neighborhood of Stations 803 and 804. It is evident, from 
what has recently taken place in this direction, that it is un- 
safe to put off the time for bricking up portions of this tunnel 
any longer. Plans have already been made for this work, 
and I earnestly recommend that the arch be put in during the 
coming season. 

The Waban embankment, which is one of the highest on 
the line, has been coated with 180 cart-loads of loam. 

Hurd's embankment has been treated in the same way. A 
considerable amount of painting along the line has been 
done by the ordinary maintenance force, such as the iron- 
work of roofs, floors, and gratings in gates, houses, etc. 

A careful examination has been made recently of the point- 
ing of the masonry structures along the line of the Sudbury 
and Cochituate, aqueducts executed a few years ago, prin- 
cipally in 1880. It has been found that wherever elastic oil 
cement was used in the pointing, it is still intact in good con- 
dition and free from cracks ; but that, excepting in vertical 
joints, the cement pointing (whether either Portland or Amer- 
ican cement was used) is more or less cracked. I believe it 
to be better to point such masonry, as platforms, steps, 
stone-roofing, projecting belt, and capping courses, with elas- 
tic cement. The joints should be large, of good width and 
depth, to receive as large a quantity of cement as the char- 
acter of the work will allow. 

The larger the joint the longer its continued elasticity. 



City Document No. 31. 



The Cochituate Aqueduct. 

From January 1 to February 22, the depth of water 
maintained in this structure depended upon the depth of 
Avater in the lake ; there not being sufficient water in the lake 
to give a depth of six feet in the aqueduct ; but on the latter 
date, the surface of the lake having reached grade 127.00, six 
feet of water were run until June 27, when six inches more 
were added to the flow. 

On July 8, the level of the lake having fallen to this point, 
and continuing to fall, the level maintained in the aqueduct 
followed the surface of the lake until September 27, after 
which a depth of six feet was maintained in the aqueduct un- 
til the end of the year. 

On May 14, 15, and 16, the whole length of the in- 
terior was cleaned from the lake to Brookline reservoir. 
From the lake to Station 130, the brick- work was covered 
with a deep coating of black mud, but there was very little 
spongilla. When the spongilla was found it occurred under 
the muddy deposit, which latter was different in character 
from that usually noticed. 

In the Brookline tunnel, sewage still percolates through the 
seams of the rock, and this is an evil which it is difficult to 
reach. Our experience in this matter is of great value wher- 
ever tunnels for water-works purposes are built near thickly 
settled communities. It is very difficult, if not impractica- 
ble, to arch a tunnel after the aqueduct comes into use ; and 
wherever there is the slightest doubt about the possibility of 
a tunnel acting as a drain for a considerable territory over 
and about it, there should be no hesitancy in making it, in 
the first place, as water-tight as possible by permanent lining. 

On December 18 and 19 a second cleaning of this struct- 
ure took place. The brick- work as far as Station 40 was 
covered with black mud, under which was a reddish deposit 
of spongilla. From Station 40 to Dedman's brook there 
was a considerable amount of red and white sponge. 

Owing to the impossibility of wasting water at Webber's 
brook, the aqueduct could only be cleaned as far as the inter- 
mediate gate-house at Chestnut-Hill reservoir. 

The usual amount of care has been bestowed upon the 
fences, mowing the bushes, and repairing the embankments. 
At Newton Highlands an embankment which was wearing 
away was covered with a foot of soil, sodded, and fenced to 
preserve it from cattle. 

The Cochituate aqueduct has been in continuous use, with 
the exception of seven days, during the entire year. 



Report of the Water Board. 75 



Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 

A great deal of new work has been done at this point dur- 
ing the past year. Tlie building of the high-service pumping- 
statiou has necessitated an entire remodelling of the grounds 
in this vicinity. An extra force of men has been kept at 
work during a large part of the season. The old buildings 
and sheds have been removed, driveways laid out, and an 
undulating lawn built which required the purchase of several 
thousand yards of loam. The grading has been completed, 
but the planting of shrubs and the sowing of grass remains 
to be done next spring. 

A new row of sheds and a general work-shop building, 
containing a carpenter shop and blacksmith shop, have been 
begun. 

All the gate-houses, driveways, and other works around 
this reservoir are in good condition. 

The water has been in constant use during the year, and 
has been of excellent quality. The experiments on tlltration 
begun at Basin 2 are now carried on at this reservoir, but 
will require another 3^ear for completion. 

The usual meteorological and other observations have been 
made. 

The maintenance of the driveway has been charged to our 
ordinary maintenance account, no special appropriation hav- 
ing been made by the City Council for this purpose. 

Brookline Reservoir. 

Everything in connection with this reservoir is in good 
order. About half the water used in Boston has been sent 
through the Brookline reservoir. 

The water has been of excellent quality throughout the 
year. No improvements have been made. 

Fisher-Hill Reservoir. 

At the request of the City Engineer, I took charge of the 
completion of the work in and around this reservoir. 

The banks were graded and the grounds laid out and 
planted on the boundaries with some 2,000 shrubs and trees. 
The grounds are now in excellent condition. A table of 
rainfall at Chestnut-Hill reservoir is added. 

Very respectfully, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

ResideM Engineer and Superintendent. 



76 



City Document No. 31. 



Table of Rainfall at Ohestnut-Hill Reservoir for Year ending Dec. 31, 1888. 



Bate. 


CD 
O 

a 


o . 

m 


Duration. 


Date. 


V 

a 


o . 

o c^ 
GQ 


Duration. 


Jan. 1 
" 2 


I 1.38 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


1.15 a.m. to 

7.40 a.m. 


Mar. 13 
" 14 


, 0.26 


3 now 


3.30 p.m. to 

11.30 a.m. 


" 4 
5 


1 0.08 


Snow 


8.30 p.m. to 

12.10 a.m. 


" 20 
" 21 


1.16 


Rain 


5.00 p.m. to 

11.45 p.m. 


" 8 
" 10 


0.17 
0.12 


'* 


7.30 a.m. to 2,30 p.m. 
6.15 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 26 

" 27 


i 0.89 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


11.30 a.m. to 

4.00 a.m. 


" 13 


0.47 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


6.30 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


" 27 
" 28 


0.52 


Rain 


10.15 p.m. to 

10.30 a.m. 


" 15 


0.08 
1 0.76 

0.02 


Snow 


during evening. 
3.45 p.m. to 

3.15 p.m. 
8.15 p.m. to 

1.30 a.m. 


" 29 


0.23 


" 


4.45 a.m. to 9.40 a.m. 


<< yi 
" 18 


Total . 


5.53 






" 23 
" 24 


Apr. 1 
2 


i 0.73 


Rain 
and 
Snow 


9.20 p.m. to 

12.15 p.m. 


•' 25 

" 26 


1 0.80 


Snow 
and 
Rain 


9.30 p.m. to 

10.45 a.m. 


" 5 
" 6 
" 10 
" 11 
« 14 

" 20 
" 21 


1 0.83 

1 0.55 

0.09 

1 0.24 


Rain 

Snow 
and 
Rain 

Rain 

Rain 
and 
Snow 


3.00 p.m. to 

5.00 a.m. 


Total . 


3.88 






5.45 p.m. to 

11.00 a.m. 


Peb. 4 

7 


0.45 
( 0.06 


Snow 
and 
Rain 

Snow 


1.00 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. to 

2.00 a.m. 


12.05 p.m. to 11.00p.m. 
2.00 p.m. to 

2.15 p.m. 


8 










8 


0.10 
1 

;.o.7o 
i 


Rain 

Snow 


2.40 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 
4.30 p.m. 

to 


Total . 


2.44 






" 10 
" 11 


May 1 
" 2 


1 0.06 


Mist 


11.50 a.m. to 

1.30 p.m. 


" 12 


J 




3.00 a.m. 


5 


0.24 


Rain 


4.00 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. 


" 20 
" 21 


\- 


Rain 


1.30 p.m. to 

2.00 a.m. 


8 
9 


1 0.57 


" 


11.00 p.m. to 

11.00 a.m. 


" 2f 


0.8b 


Snow 

and 

Rain 


11.55 a.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


" 11 
" 11 

" 14 


0.49 

1 1.62 

1.32 

[ o.oc 

) 0.2C 


" 


2.15 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 
7.00 p.m. to 


Total . 


3.34 






12.30 p.m. 
5.15 a.m. to 12.15 p.m. 


Mar. ' 


; 1 0.. 


t Sno-n 


9.30 p.m. to 

2.45 a.m. 


3.30 a.m. to 5.00 a.m. 
3.00 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 


" 1 
" 1 


i 2.3 

3 ' 


Rain 
i and 

Sno-w 


6.15 a.m. 
/ 10.00 a.m. 


" 1 
" 1< 


\ 0.3( 
3 


) " 


8.00 p.m. to 

3.00 p.m. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



77 



Table of Rainfall at Ohestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 







^ 








^ 






(E 


° a 






m 


°d 




Date. 


a 


^ "^ 
025 


Duration. 


Date. 


a 


^•3 


Duration. 




M 


m 






M 


m 




May 28 


) 




2.30 a.m. to 


Aug. 21 


) 




6.00 p.m. to 




\ 0.85 


Rain 






[ 3.44 


Rain 




" 29 


) 




6.00 a.m. 


" 22 


) 




3.00 a.m. 


" 30 
" 31 


0.10 
0.09 


,, 


2.00 a.m. to 9.15 a.m. 
9.30 p.m. to 11.50 p.m. 










<' 


Total . 


7.20 






Total . 


5.90 






Sept. 1 
8 


0.22 
0.66 


Rain 


7.00 a.m. to 11..50 a.m. 










3.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


June 6 


) .. 




11 p.m. to 


" 9 


) 




9.30 p.m. to 




\ 0.14 


Rain 






) 1.35 




" 7 


) 




2.30 a.m. 


" 10 


1 




5.45 a.m. 


" 14 


0.78 




9.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 


" 12 


0.59 




12.45 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. 


" 15 


0.35 




9.00 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


" 13 


0.07 




1.45 to 4.00 a.m. 


" 20 


0.11 




9.40 a.m. to 2. "0 p.m. 


" 16 


0.08 




7.00 p.m. to 11.50 p.m. 


" 21 


0.03 




11.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


" 17 


) 




12.50 p.m. to 


" 23 


0.06 




8.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


" 18 


1 1.94 




7.00 p.m. 


" 26 


0.77 




1.50 p.m. to 6.15 p.m. 


" 21 


0.24 




12.15 a.m. to 8.00 a.m. 


" 30 


0.34 




9.25 p.m. to 10. -15 p.m. 


" 21 

" 22 


1 0.75 




10..30 a.m. to 










, 7.00 a.m. 


Total . 


2.58 






" 22 
" 26 


0.03 
3.50 




7.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 










1.00 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. 


July 11 


0.22 


Raiu 


7.20 p.m. to 11.55 p.m. 


« 28 


0.02 




12.05 a.m. to 3.00 a.m. 


" 20 


0.09 
0.51 




12.05 a.m. to 5.30 a.m. 
1.55 p.m. to 2.20 p.m. 










" 20 


















Total . 


9.45 






" 22 


0.70 
0.16 




10.30 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 
4.10 p.m. to 4.35. 










" 23 


Oct. 1 


) 




11.45 a.m. to 


" 27 


0.10 




7.45 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 2 


1 0.52 


Rain 


10.30 a.m. 


" 29 


0.06 




7.40 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


" 2 


0.18 


■' 


3.35 p.m. 10 4.00 p.m. 


" 31 


' 0.14 




11.00 p.m. to 3.00 a.m. 
Aug. 1. 


" 6 
" 7 
" 7 


1 0.82 
0.42 


" 


7.30 a.m. to 

8.30 a.m. 


Total . 


1.98 






10.00 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 










" 12 


) 




5.15 p.m. to 




















0.30 


•< 




Aug. 1 


0.18 


Rain 


12.00 p.m., July 31, to 
3.00 a.m. 


" 13 
" 13 


) 




10.30 a.m. 
10.30 p.m to 


"■ 6 


1.17 


" 


12.10 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 




1 0.13 


II 












" 14 




11.30 a.m. 


" 12 


> 




10.10 a.m. to 6.15 p.m. 












Sl.73 


<< 




« 17 


0.16 


" 


3.45 p.m. to 6.15 p.m. 


" 13 


> 




3.00 a.m. to 11.55 a.m. 


" 19 


) 




8.15 p.m. to 


" 13 


0.07 


" 


3.45 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. 


'< 20 


1 0.44 


*' 


4.00 a.m. 


" 17 


0.51 




1.45 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 











78 



City Document No. 31, 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-IIill Reservoir. — Concluded. 















= =• 




Date. 


.a 
c 




Duration. 


Date. 


o 
a 




Duration. 


Oct. 23 


) 




11.00 p.m. to 


Nov. 24 


1 


Snow 


4.30 a.m. 




\ 0.94 


Rain 










" 24 


) 




2.20 p.m. 


" 25 


M-50 


and 


to 


" 24 


0.03 


" 


4.10 p.m. to 4.45 p.m. 


" 27 


Rain 


6.30 p.m. 


" 2i 


0.06 


" 


7.30 p.m. 


" 29 


0.26 


Rain 


11.30 a.m.to 11.30 p.m. 


" 27 
















" 28 


1 0.47 
0.07 


«' 


4.00 a.m. 
6.45 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


Total . 


8.17 






" 28 


Dec. 4 

5 


0.02 
0.02 


Snow 
Rain 


1.30 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


Total . 


4.54 






9.30 p.m. to 11.50 p.m. 










8 


\ 0.63 


Rain 
and 


10.45 p.m. to 












Nov. 3 


0.07 


Rain 


12.10 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 9 


S 


Snow 


6.45 p.m. 


" 8 


\ 0.20 


„ 


6.30 p.m. to 


" 11 


0.99 


Rain 


7.45 a.m.to 10.30 p.m. 


9 


S 




6.45 a.m. 


" 17 


\ 3.51 


<■ 


4.00 a.m. to 


" 9 


0.05 


" 


10.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 


" 18 


S 




11.50 a.m. 


" 10 


1.55 


" 


12.05 a.m. to 10.15 p.m. 


" 27 


0.19 


" 


5.15 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


" 15 


0.93 


" 


8.00 a.m. to 10.30p.m. 










" 16 


) 


Rain 


4.00 p.m. to 


Total . 


5.36 








1 0.19 


and 
Snow 






" 17 


1.30 a.m. 




" 19 


0.40 


Rain 


5.00 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


Total I 


lainfal 


for Year 60.27 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN AND MYSTIC DIVISIONS. 



Office of Sup't Eastern and Mystic Divisions, 

Jan. 1, 1889. 

T. F. DoHERTY, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — I respectfully submit the report of the Eastern and 
Mystic Divisions of the Boston Water- Works for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1888. 

Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

Dlftrihution. — The supply and distributing mains con- 
nected with the Cochituate works have been extended 20.2 
miles, and 2.25 miles have been relaid. The length of mains 
now connected with the works is 456.7 miles. The laying 
of the new 30-inch main from the Common to Charlestown, 
with 24-inch extension to East Boston, has been completed, 
with the exception of the section on Warren bridge, and by 
means of connections between the new and old' mains is now 
used for the improvement of the East Boston supply. 

The effect of the new main has been to increase the pres- 
sure throughout East Boston about 12 lbs. per square inch, 
so that the supply in that district is now equal to that in other 
sections of the city. 

The 16-inch main, for the supply of high service in Charles- 
town, has been laid, with the exception of the section across 
Warren bridge. Where the 30-inch and 16-inch pipes pass 
under the tracks of the Boston &, Maine R.E., at Travers 
street, wrought-iron pipes, 50 feet in length, imbedded in 
Portland cement concrete, were used in place of the ordinary 
cast-iron pipe. 

About two miles of pipe have been laid on Moon Island 
and in Squantum, for the supply of the city institutions on 
Long Island ; and the flexible pipe, 3,415 feet in length, be- 
tween Moon and Long islands, has been laid by Gr. W. Town- 
send, the contractor. 

On account of the change of grade of Beacon street in 
Brookline, the 48-inch pipe has been lowered for a length of 
1,190 feet. 



80 City Document No. 31. 

Hydrants.. — One hundred and seventy-nine fire hydrants 
have been established, and sixty-one hj^drants have been 
abandoned, making a net increase of 118 for the 3'ear. The 
total number now connected with the system is 5,108. 

Although many of the small Boston hydrants have been 
repUiced by those of the Post or Lowry patterns, there yet 
remain 1,400 in service. Many of these hydrants should be 
replaced by improved patterns of larger size ; and I suggest 
that at least 100 of them be changed during the coming 
season. 

Services. — During the past year, 1,814 services, with an 
aggregate length nearly 10 miles, have been laid, and 102 
services have been abandoned, making the net increase for 
the year 1,712. 

The work of placing sidewalk stopcocks on the old service 
pipes has been continued, and 3,405 stopcocks have been 
set. 

The present method of laying pipes by the heating, gas, 
telephone, and electric-light companies throughout the 
business portion of the city, as affecting the pipes of this 
department, demands serious consideration. 

In many cases the pipes or masonry conduits of these 
companies are laid in such a manner that access to our mains 
and services, for repairs or other necessary work, is a practi- 
cal impossibility. Many changes have been made in our 
pipes to accommodate the work of the Boston Heating Com- 
pany, and these changes have seldom, if ever, been made 
without detriment to our system. No pipe or conduit 
should be placed within two feet of our mains without special 
permission from this department, and all locations in the 
streets should be approved by the City Engineer before 
work is begun. 

High- Service Woi'lss. — On May 8 the })umping-engines 
at the Elmwood -street station were stopped, and all the water 
for the high-service supply has since that date been pumped 
at the new station at Chestnut Hill. The old machinery at 
the Elmwood-street station has been sold. 

Between June 19 and July 3 the territory supplied from 
the high-service works was increased by the addition of the 
district bounded by Tremont, Boylston, Washington, and 
Court streets in the city proper, and several districts in 
Boston Hio;hlands and Dorchester. The hioh-service district 
in Brighton has been supplied from the Chestnut-Hill works 
since tlie latter part of January, 1888. 

The grounds around the West Roxbury pumping-station 



Eeport of the Water Board. 81 

have been graded and sowed and a sidewalk-curbing set. 
The grounds about the tower on Bellevue Hill should be 
graded during the coming season. 

Pipe- Yards and Buildings. — The Albany-street pipe- 
yard has been enlarged by the transfer to this department of 
the adjoining wharf. The new portion of the yard has been 
graded, a new and substantial sea-wall built on the water- 
line, and new fences on the street. A new stable and en- 
larged buildings for storage of materials are very much 
needed at this yard. New stables have been built in 
Brio-hton and East Boston. 

Fountains. — Six drinking- fountains have been presented 
to the city by Godfrey L. Cabot. Five of these have been 
set at the following points : Columbus avenue, opposite the 
Boston & Providence depot ; Fort-Hill square, Post-OfEce 
square, Winthrop square, Leverett street, near Charles street. 
A circular granite fountain for horses has been erected in 
Custom-House square by the Massachusetts Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, from a fund given by Dor- 
othea L. Dix. A circular iron fountain for horses has been 
erected at Mattapan, and a small fountain for men has been 
set at Madison park. The total number of public drinking- 
fountains now in charge of this department is as follows : — 

For men and animals . . . . . . .51 

For animals only . . . . . . .3 

For men only ........ 8 

Total 62 

Water-Posts. — In order that the use of fire-hydrants for 
filling watering-carts might be avoided as far as possible, 
the number of water-posts has been increased during the 
year from 84 to 119. 

Mystic Works. 

Mystic Lahe and Water-shed. — Owing to the excessive 
rainfall of the past year the water in the lake has been drawn 
but 2.74 feet below high water, and waste has been allowed 
over the outlet dam during the greater portion of the 
time. 

During the summer there is a very large vegetable growth 
in the shallow water of Wedge pond and on the river above 



82 City Document No. 31. 

Whitney's dam. As this is very obnoxious to tiie eye, 
and probably does not tend to improve the quality of the 
water, about 20 men were employed in its removal, and in 
cleaning around the shores. The interior of the gate-chamber 
at the lake has been painted and the keeper's house re- 
paired. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. — Works for the chemical treat- 
ment of the tannery sewage have been in process of con- 
struction during the past year, under the direction of the 
City Engineer, and are now in working condition. The 
quantity of sewage hns largely increased within a few 
years, and the settling- basins at some of the tanneries are not 
of sufficient capacity. The result is that a large amount of 
solid matter, which should be retained in the catch-basins, 
is carried into the sewer and there deposited. During the 
spring this deposit, which was found to be from six to twelve 
inches in depth, was removed by scraping and flushing. 

A new stable has been built, a roadway to the new build- 
ings partially constructed, and the old buildings and tanks 
are now being removed. 

Conduit.— The conduit is in good condition. It was 
cleaned on June 22, and again on November 20. 

Pumping- Station. — The repairs on the engine-house roof, 
which were in progress at the date of the last report, have 
been completed, the walls of the engine-room have been 
painted, new windows set, and the old tin roof of the build- 
ing, which was in very poor condition, has been rei)laced by 
one of tar and gravel. 

The coal-shed has been improved by the substitution of a 
shed roof for the old ilat covering, which was badly de- 
cayed. 

Engines Nos. 2 and 3 have been overhauled and put in 
good condition. Sufficient repairs have been made on Engine 
No. 1 to enable its use during the present winter ; but if these 
works are to be used for supplying Charlestown, this engine 
should be replaced by a new one of larger capacity. Boilers 
Nos. 1,2, and 3 have received some small repairs, and are in 
good condition. The four old boilers should be replaced by 
new ones during the present year. 

The grounds and buildings about the pumping-station are 
in good order. 

Reservoir. — The stone-work on the western division of 
the reservoir has been pointed with Portland cement, the in- 



Extended. 

3,755 feet. 
2,024 " 
9,276 " 
8,113 " 


Relaid. 

6,225 feet 

270 " 
6,146 '< 


23,168 feet. 


12,641 feet, 



Report of the Water Board. 83 

terior of the gate-house has been painted and the roof re- 
paired. 

The grounds are in good condition, with the exception of 
some of the fences, which should be rebuilt. The reservoir 
should be cleaned during the present year. 

Distribution. — The mains connected with this system 
have been extended and relaid as follows : — 



Charlestown 
Chelsea . 
Somerville 
Everett . 



Total length of mains now supplied, 141.5 miles. 

Fifty new services have been laid in Charlestown, and 748 
in Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett, making the total num- 
ber to Jan. 1, 1889, 17,607. 

An ornamental iron fountain has been set at the junction 
of Charles River and Warren avenues. 



Detection of Waste. 

The detection of waste by the Deacon meters and sidewalk 
stopcocks was begun on April 9 and continued until Novem- 
ber 1. There are connected with the works 74 meters, 
through which are supplied about 370,000 people, divided 
into 151 sections. 

The growth of the city and the extension of the high-ser- 
vice territory has rendered necessary the rearrangement of 
some of the sections and the setting of additional meters. 
For this purpose ten Deacon meters have been purchased, 
and a portion of these will be set for use during the present 
year. 

In connection with the operations of the meters, night ex- 
aminations have been made of all the services which have 
been provided with shut-off cocks in the sidewalk. The ser- 
vices in South Boston and the city proper, with the excep- 
tion of the Back Bay district, have been tested twice, the 
Charlestown, East Boston, Chelsea, and Back Bay services 
once. 



84 



CiTT Document No. 31. 



From these examinations the following table has been pre- 
pared : — 



Number 

of Services 

tested. 



Reported 
Once. 



Defective 
Twice. 



Per Cent, 
reported 
Defective. 



South Boston 

South End, Church stopcocks 

North and West Ends, and Back Bay . . 

Charlestown 

East Boston 

Chelsea 

Total 



6,162 
7,103 
7,066 
5,750 
741 
2,087 



1,371 
1,340 
1,297 

620 
58 

108 



28,909 



4,794 



164 
214 
189 



22.2 
18.6 
18.3 
10.8 
7.8 
5.1 



The defective services were reported to the Inspection and 
Waste Department, and the premises were examined by 
them, and the causes of waste reported, as follows : — 





CO a 

Sis 


S) 

IB J= 


o 
O 


i 

o 


o 
a 

1 


p 
o 


0) 

p 
■3 


M 




ft 



"3 
a 


p 
2 

K 


> 

"3 
> 

M 

a 
tt 






ffl 

a 

is 


■30Q 


a'3) 


South Boston .... 
Church stopcocks 
North and West Ends. 
Charlestown .... 

East Boston 

Chelsea 


147 

97 

85 

40 

4 

8 


13 

16 

16 

6 

3 

3 


296 
503 
250 

87 
9 

14 


299 
313 
226 
134 
8 
17 


386 
284 
403 
130 
6 
16 


1 

7 


4 
13 


16 

10 

10 

2 


1 
6 

1 

2 


1 
1 
1 
1 


43 
43 

48 
5 


3 


3 
90 
33 

3 

1 
1 


28 
8 
7 
2 

1 


531 
512 
695 

255 
19 
50 



Report of the Water Board. 



85 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1888. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; 8.B., South Boston; E.B., East Boston; B.H., Boston 
Highlands; Dor., Dorchester; W.R., West Roxbury; Bri., Brighton; Chel., Chelsea; Qui., 
Quincy. 



In what Street. 



Chestnut-Hill reservoir 
yard 



Boston Common . 

Beacon 

Bowdoin .... 

Allston 

Buliinch .... 
Chardon .... 
Portland .... 

Travers 

Haverhill .... 
Causeway .... 
Beverly 



Chardon . 

Brooks- street extension, 

Broadway 

"Williams 

Marginal 



Beverly .... 
Huntington ave. 



Myrtle . . 
Bowdoin . 
Cambridge 
Chardon . 
Portland . 



Between what Streets. 



Beacon street and engine-house 
Total 48-inch 



Mason and Beacon , 

Park and Bowdoin 

Beacon and Allston 

Bowdoin and Bulfinch 

Court and Allston 

Bowdoin square and Merrimac . 
Merrimac and Travers . . . , , 
Portland and Haverhill . . . , 

Travers and Causeway 

Haverhill and Beverly 

Causeway and the bridge . . . 
Total 30-inch 



At Hawkins , 

Condor and the water . . . . 
Chelsea bridge and Williams , 
Broadway and Marginal . . , 



Total 24-inch 



Opposite Fitchburg R.R. depot 

At Parker 

Total 20-inch 



Joy and Hancock , 

Derne and Cambridge .... 

Bowdoin and Chardon 

Bowdoin square and Merrimac . 

Merrimac and Travers . . . . 

Carried forward , . , 



Bri. 



B. 



B. 

E.B. 
Chel. 



B. 
B.H. 



125 



1,415 
202 
706 
192 
647 
843 
160 
544 
538 
165 
297 



5.709 

12 

176 

1,590 

720 

902 



3,400 



58 



162 
675 
235 
873 
160 
2,105 



86 



City Document No. 31. 



Statement of LiOcation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Boston Common . . 

Derne 

Joy 

Travers ....... 

Haverhill 

Causeway 

Beverly 

Condor 

Huntington avenue . 
Huntington avenue . 

Bromfield 

Bowdoin square . . . 

Federal .' 

Gainsborough . . . . 

Beacon 

Beacon 

West Newton . . . . 
East Eighth . . , . . 

Condor 

Glendon 

East Eagle 

Shelby 

Saratoga 

Ford 

Breed 

Gladstone 

Park 

Orient ave 

Brooks 

Seaver ........ 

Paris er Hill ave. . . . 

Parker 

Crawford 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . 

0pp. Mason 

Bowdoin and Hancock .... 
Mt. Vernon and Myrtle . . . 
Portland and Haverhill . . . 
Travers and Causeway .... 
Haverhill and Beverly .... 
Causeway and the bridge . . 
Brooks and Putnam . . . . . 
Parker and Longwood avenue 
Tremont and Worthington . . 

Total 16 inch .... 



Tremont and Washington .... 

Bulfinch and Green 

Summer and Federal-street bridge 
Huntington ave. and Falmouth . . 
Brighton ave. and St. Mary . . . 

Tremont and Somerset 

Huntington ave. and Falmouth . . 

N and O 

Brooks and Glendon 

Condor and East Eagle 

Glendon and Shelby 

East Eagle and Saratoga 

Shelby and Ford 

Saratoga and Lnyden 

Lej'den and Gladstone 

Breed and Park 

Glads-tone and Orient ave 

Park and the stand-pipe ..... 

Condor and Eagle 

Humboldt and Walnut ave. . . . 
Reservoir gate and Hillside ave. . 
Huntington ave. and Ruggles . . , 

Walnut ave. and Harold 

Carried forward .... 



E.B. 
B.H. 



S.B. 
E.B. 



B.H. 



16 



12 



Report or the Water Board. 



87 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Cheney 

East Chester park . . 

Centre 

Sydney . 

Commercial . • . . . 

Ashmont 

Lauriat ave 

Robinson 

"Washington . . . . 

Nelson ' . 

Geneva ave 

Florence . . . . . . 

Canterbury 

Weld 

May ........ 

Florence .... J . 

Washington 

Centre ....... 

Isleworth 

Beacon . 

Brooks 1 , 

Western ave 

Belvidere 

Green ........ 

Falmouth 

Dalton 

Idaho 

Congress ave. ... 
Briggs place . . . 

Myrtle 

Pemberton square 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . 

Blue-Hill ave. and Elm-Hill ave. . . . 
Swett and N. Y. & N. E. R.E. bridge , 

Allston and Carlisle 

Savin Hill and Romsay ave 

Neponset ave. and O. C. R.R. bridge 

Neponset ave. and Newhall 

Lyons and Blue-Hill ave 

Draper and Adams 

Ruggles place and Codraan 

Evans and Selden 

Westville and Leroy ......... 

Blakemore and Sherwood 

Poplar and Perkins 

Willow and Church 

Centre and Pond 

Ashland and Sycamore 

Bailey and Morton 

South and Hewlett 

Beacon and Englewood . . ■ 

Chestnut-Hill ave. and Isleworth . . . 

Newton and B. & A. R.R 

Everett and No. Harvard 

Total 12-inch 



West Chester park and Dalton . 
Bowdoin square and Chambers 
Caledonia and W. Newton . . , 
Falmouth and Belvidere . . . . 

From River 

Total 10 inch ...... 



Atlantic ave. and the bridge 

From Shawmut ave 

Russell and Grove 

Prom Tremont 

Carried forward 



Dor, 



W.R 



12 



20,479 
842 
663 

87 
241 
635 
302 
157 
580 

72 
512 
225 

25 
629 
387 
844 
346 
254 
1,048 
349 

11 

102 

638 

29,328 

351 
9»0 
627 
352 

474 
2,744 

427 
166 
715 
128 



1,436 



88 



City Document No. 31. 



statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Tremont 

Charles Gate, East 
Washington . . . , 
Gainsborough . . , 

Chambers 

Staniford . . . . , 

Gladstone 

Howard ...... 

Centre , 

Homestead . . . , 
Minden ...... 

Draper ...... 

Cushing ave. . . . 

Vernon 

Melville ave. . . . 

Lyons 

Beaumont 

Alban ...... 

Puritan ave. . . . . 

Bowdoin ave. . . . 

Eldon 

Homestead . . . . 

Gleason 

Armandine . . . ■ 
Stanwood ave. . . 

Willard 

Prince 

Perkins 

Paine 

Roslin ave 

Berry 

Sedgwick 

Charles ...... 

Temple 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward ...... 

Head place and Boylston 

Commonwealth ave. and B. & A. R.R. 

Dover and Waltham 

Huntington ave. and O. C R.R. . . . 

At Green 

At Green 

Breed and Park 

Hampden and Gerard 

Highland and Marcella 

Walnut ave. and Humboldt ave. . . . 

Day and Walden 

Westville and Homes ave 

Hancock and Everett 

Buttonwood and Von Hillern .... 

Allston and O. C. R.R 

Lauriat and Chapman ave 

Adams and West Moreland 

Ashmont and Welles ave. ...... 

From Richfield 

Eldon and Washington 

Rosseter and Bowdoin ave 

Magnolia and Hartford 

Harvard and Willard 

Washington and Milton ave. ..... 

Columbia and Blue-Hill ave. ..... 

Gleason and Bicknell 

Perkins and Pond 

Pond ave. and Prince 

Walkhill and Canterbury 

Beech and James 

Canterbury and Manning 

Elm and South 

From Poplar 

Ivory and O. C. R.R 



B. 



E.B. 
B.H. 



Carried fonoard , 



Repokt of the Water Board. 



89 



Statement of LiOcation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Bourne . . . . 
Kittredge . . . 
Willow . . . . 
Glen road . . , 
Weldon . . . . 
Roslindale ave. 
Beacon . . . , 

Aldee 

Englewood ave, 
Braintree . . . 

Thorn . . . . 
Andrew place . 

Milk 

St. Botolph . . 
Hancock • . . 
Cambridge . . 
St. Botolph . . 
Hereford . . . 
West Newbury 

Mayo 

Cobb 

Caledonia . . . 
Phillips . . . . 
St. Botolph . . 
Falmouth . . . 
Batavia . . . . 
Boylston • . . 
Aldine . . . . 
Private way . . 
Belvidere . . . 
Lafayette . . . 
North Margin . 
Randolph . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Walkhill and Shelby 

Clarendon and Norfolk - 

Centre and Weld 

Sigourney and Walnut 

From Washington , 

Central ave. and Beech 

From Chestnut-Hill Pumping-Station , 

Franklin and Athol 

Isleworth and Elm ave 

Wilton and Hano 

Total 8-inch 



East Canton and Andrew pi 

Thorn and Bush 

Washington and Arch 

West Newton and Garrison 

Cambridge and Myrtle 

Hancock and Lynde 

West Chester park and Cumberland . . . 

Newbury and Boylston 

West Chester park and Charles Gate, East 

Castle and Cobb 

Mayo and Shawmut ave 

Falmouth and Huntington ave 

West Cedar and Irving 

West Chester park and Gainsborough . . 

From Gainsborough 

Falmouth and Parker 

Gloucester and Hereford .... • . . . . 

Summer and Congress ave 

From Atlantic ave 

Falmouth and Dalton 

Endicott and Prince 

Lafaj-ette and Thacher 

Albany and Harrison ave 

Carried forward 



W.R 



11,725 
542 
264 
202 
89 
342 
162 
513 
247 
514 
408 

15,008 

135 

154 

239 

294 

62 

42 

50 

48 

342 

83 

127 

315 

1,002 

88 

252 

95 

305 

446 

159 

126 

141 

142 

420 



90 



City Document No. 31. 



Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Shaving 

Follen ...... 

Charles Gate, East 

Silver 

Preble ...... 

Roger ....... 

East Fourth .... 

Atlantic 

Emerson 

M 

K 

M 

"Washburn .... 

Morris 

Bennington .... 

Homer 

White-st. extension 
Thwing terrace . . 
Clayton place . . . 

Procyon 

Penryth 

Harold ...... 

Ruthven 

Southwood , . . . 

Kensington . . . . 

Lament ...... 

Phillips ...... 

Fairbury 

Waumbeck . . . . 

Bolster ...... 

Valentine 

Malbon place . . . 

Sunnyside 

A court ...... 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Federal and Mt. Washington ave. . 

St. Botolphand O. C.R.R 

Commonwealth and B. & A. R.R. 
Dorchester ave. and Dorchester st. 

Liberty and O. C. R.R 

Preble and Hyde 

H and I 

From Eighth 

L and M 

Broadway and Emerson ..... 

Ninth and the water ....... 

First and Third 

Dorchester ave. and Boston . . . 

Brooks and Marion 

Wordsworth and Saratoga .... 

Moore and Byron 

Border and the water 

From Highland 

From Magazine 

From Greenwich 

Centre and Pynchon 

Homestead and Hutchins . . . . 

Harold and Elm -Hill ave 

From Blue-Hill ave. ....... 

Bainbridge and Elmore 

Vernon and Linden park . . . . 

Smith and Tremont . 

Blue-Hill ave. and Rand 

Wabeno and Humboldt ave. . . . 

Wyman and Mozart ....... 

From Thornton 

From Washington ........ 

Centre and Minden ....... 

From Parker , 



E. B 



B.H. 



Carried forward . 



1 16,419 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



91 



Statement of Ijocatioii, Size, etc. — Continved. 



In what Street. 



Gay Head .... 

Wabeno 

Devon 

Pleasant place . . 
Oak Grove terrace 

Centre 

Georaria 

Bellevue terrace . 

Carlisle 

Private way . . . 
Tuttle ave. . . . 

Elmo 

Williams park . . 
Beale ...... 

Brent 

Marshfield .... 

Hopkins 

Brooks 

Spencer ..... 

Burt ave 

Olney 

Corbett 

Kenwood . . . . 
Warner ave. . . . 

Taylor 

Longmeadow . . 
Malvern ..... 
Percival ave. . . 

Rowena 

Bushnell .... 

Millett 

Temple place . . 
Chapman ave. . . 
Delhi 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

Centre and Minden 

Waumbeck and Wabon . . , 
Warren and Blue-Hill ave. . . 
Heath ave. and Heath . . . , 
From Ruggles ........ 

Highland and Pynchon . . 
Maple and Blue Hill ave. . 
Quincy and Quincy .... 

Centre and Welles ave. . . . 

From Harvard 

Savin-Hill ave. and Hartland - 

Erie and Erie ave , 

From East 

Dorchester ave. and Carruth 
Washington and Carlisle . . 
Batchelder and Clifton . . . , 

Corbett and Evans 

From Dorchester ave. . . . 
From Wheatland ave. . . . 
Washington and Ashmont . 
Union and Geneva ave. . . . 

Evans and Morton 

From Allston 

Coolidge ave. and Park . . 
Dudley and Clifton .... 
Clifton and Batchelder . . . 

Adams and Milton 

Bowdoin and Hancock . . . 
Bushnell and Carruth . . . 
Rowena and Lombard . . . 
Wheatland and Talbot ave. 

From Temple 

Birch and Athol ...... 

From Norfolk 



Carried forward ..,.., , ... 24,267 



B.H 



Dor. 



16,419 
351 
145 

72 

368 

24 

311 

403 

194 

216 

1,198 

214 

250 

36 

36 

48 

499 

50 

100 

272 

115 

252 

260 

60 

381 

172 

163 

172 

467 

15 

36 

131 

603 

120 



92 



City Document No. 31. 



Statement of Ijocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



West Moreland 
Van Winkle . • 
Westcott . . . 
Cbipman . . . 
Waterloo . . . 
Bertram ... 
Folsom .... 
Woodward park 
Englewood . . 

Evans 

Selden .... 

Loud , 

Minot 

Rill ....... 

Howe 

Willard 

Fairview . . . . 

Private way . • , 
Leroy ...... 

Riverview . . . 
Hartford terrace 

Draper 

James . . . . , 
Sherwood . . . ■ 
Rockview . . . . 

Spruce 

Goldsmith . . , 
Weld park . . . 
Hillburn . . . . 

Anson 

Franklin park . . 
Norfolk . . . . 
John A. Andrew 
Crosby square . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . 
Adams and Beaumont . . . 
Carruth and Dorchester ave. 

From Park 

Norfolk and Torrey .... 
Harvard and Sydney place . 

From Neponset ave 

From Woodward park . . . 
Folsom and Howard ave. . . 

From Hillsdale 

Nelson and Corbett .... 

Nelson and Capen 

From Dorchester ave. . . . 
Frederika and Carruth . . . 
Hancock and Ware .... 
From Dorchester ave. . . . 
Gleason and Bicknell . . . 
Boutwell ave. and Train . . 
From Savin-Hill ave. . . . 
Ditson and Geneva ave. . . 

From Adams 

From Hartford 

Westville and Robinson . . 
Poplar and Roslin ave. . . 

Florence and Pine 

Hazel and St. John .... 

From Bourne 

From Centre . 

From Centre ....... 

Poplar and Clarendon . . . 
South and O. C. & N. R.R. 
Walnut and Williams . . . 
Washington and Kittredge . 
Sedgwick and Elm .... 

Call and O. C. & N. R.R. . 



Dor. 



Carried forward 



W.R, 



24,267 

746 

421 

579 

50 

163 

211 

38 

112 

192 

28 

318 

131 

84 

332 

291 

164 

232 

60 

92 

204 

204 

54 

918 

337 

100 

792 

506 

80 

403 

288 

2,109 

2.^9 

61 

130 



34,936 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



93 



Statement of liocation. Size, etc. — Continue 



In what Street. 



Cottage ave. . . 
Huntington ave. 
Private way . . 
Brookside ave. 
Montgomery . 

Carl 

Hall 

Central ave. . . 
Cedar ave. . . 
School .... 
St. Mark . . . 
Private way . , 
Prospect ave. . 
"Webber .... 

Dent 

Richards ave. . 

Elm 

New Atherton 
Parley Vale ave, 
Goldsmith pi. . 
Fessenden . . . 
Larch pi. . . . 
Boynton . . . 
Newbern ave. . 
Paul Gore . . 
Parsons . . . . 
Riverdale . . . 
Gordon . . . . 
School . . , . 
Parker court . 
Englewood ave. 
Everett square 

Hano 

Sparhawk ave. 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

Shaw and Centre 

Canterbury and Richards ave. . 

From Washington 

Boylston and Germania . . , 

From Spring 

From Kirk 

South and O. C. R.R 

"Washington and Roslindale ave. 
Lamartine and Oakdale .... 

Boylston and Copley 

South and O.C. R.R. . . . . . 

"Weldon and "Walkhill 

From Baker . . . . 

" Canterbury ....... 

" Ivory . . 

Huntington and Newbern ave. . 

Everett and Revere 

Amory and Copley 

Rockview and Centre 

From Centre 

Chestnut ave. and Rockview . . 
Hyde Park ave. and O. C. R.R. 

South and O. C. R.R 

Canterbury and Richards ave. . 
Chestnut and Centre ...... 

Bennett and Surrey 

"Western ave. and Vernon . . . 
Cambridge and No. Beacon . . 
Market and Portsmouth . . . . 

From "Wexford ......... 

Elm and Brookline line . . . , 
Raymond and Raymond . . . . 

Braintree and Cambridge . . . . 

Sparhawk and Cambridge . . . 



Carried forward , 



"W.R. 



Bri. 



34,936 
1,796 
333 
185 
306 
305 
261 
513 
617 
326 

60 
319 
199 
107 
384 
104 
237 
109 
124 
814 

81 
272 
262 
477 
616 

98 
158 

22 
475 
150 
192 
176 

48 
394 

19 



45,475 



94 



City Document No. 31. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Athol 

Moon island . . 
Titus' farm . , 
Buckins ave. . , 
Squantum street 



Brattle square . 
Ninth-st. place 
Hart place . . . 
Norcross place 
Everett court . 
Mulberry place 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Holton and Aldee 

The water and Mr. Titus' field 

Moon island driveway and Huckins ave. 
Mr. Titus' field and Squantum street . . 

From Huckins ave 

Between Long and Moon islands . . . . 

Total 6-inch 



Brattle and Elm 

From Ninth . . 

" Eighth . . 



Everett . . . 

Dudley . . . 

Total 4-inch 



Bri. 



8.B. 



E.B. 
B.H. 



45,475 

289 

6,714 

1,850 

1,029 

677 

3,415 

59,449 

112 
114 
154 
154 
108 
157 



Eeport of the Water Boaed. 



95 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Relaid and Abandoned in 1888. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


5 




a 
►3 


Si 

33 « 


Elmwpod 


Roxbui-y and engine-house 

Total 20-inch 


B.H. 


20 


170 






170 






Elmwood and Pynchon 1 . 

Total 16-inch 


B. H. 


16 




Engine-house 


262 






262 






Summer and the bridge 

Huntington ave. and the bridge .... 
Total 12-inch 


B. 
B.H. 


12 




Federal 


2,209 
793 


12-in. 
12 








3,002 








B. 
W.R. 


8 
8 




Central court 

Mt. Vernon 


75 
140 




Across R.R. bridge 

Total 8 inch 






215 

726 

320 

940 

1,146 

453 

19 

27 

100 

342 

200 

378 

78 

82 




Bromfield 

Beacon . 

Green 


Tremont and Washington ...... 

Somerset and Tremont 

Bowdoin square and Chambers .... 


B. 

B.H. 

Dor. 
W.R. 


6 


12 

12 

10 

8 


Myrtle. 

Chambers 


Russell and Anderson ........ 

At Green 


8 
8 
8 


Bowdoin square .... 

Blue-Hill ave 

Blue-Hill ave 






Cottage and Alaska 

Woodbine and Southwood 




Olney 


Union and Geneva aves 

Fessenden and Cedar aves 

Total 6-iDch , 


6 


Chestnut ave 






4,811 








B. 


4 




Brigga place 

Corigress ........ 

Myrtle 


150 
375 
262 
1,002 
141 
142 


8 


Atlantic ave. and the bridge 


8 
8 


Phillips 

Lafayette 

No. Margin 


West Cedar and Irving 


6 
6 


Lafayette and Thacher 

Carried forward 


6 








2,072 





96 



City Document No. 31. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Relaid and Abandoned in 1888. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Shaving . . 
Silver • . . 
Edgewood . 
Blue-Hill ave. 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Federal st. and Mt. "Washington ave. 
Dorchester st. and Dorchester ave. . 
Blue-Hill ave. and Warren st. . . , 

Dennis and Alaska 

Total 4-ineh 



B. 

S.B. 
B.H. 



2,072 
381 

3,825 
977 
315 



7,570 






Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 
Pipes Lowered. 



In what Street. 



Beacon . 
Allandale 
Pine . . . 
Gramercy 



Between what Streets. 



Summit ave. and Park . . 

From Centre 

Brown ave. and Sherwood 
From Camhridge 



B'kl'n 
W.R. 



48 



1,190 
340 
256 
130 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



97 



arj 






■^ 00 









''^ 











tH 




o 




tH 




31 




= c 


^j 


JQ 




^ 




i-H to 1 . • 










^ 


to 




^ 


CO CO CO 


CO 




oo T-l 1 ^ S 










^ 


to_ 


to_ 


(M 


o 


o 






^tC 


tM o^ 






(» 






TtT 


oT 






00 


■*" 






S- s 






'rt 








<M 




r-( 








(M 






















CO 








^-gco 

5 §"2 






o 




cT 












c4" 




































IN ^ 










.ra 


o 


OJ 


O 


O CO -* 


h- 






' -ff 










00 










o 












^ 




en 


to 


t- 






'^^ 


1 


to 






C^ 










•^ 










00 






























(?^ 


















I-H 




















i-t 








o> 


I, 


05 


O 


rt - 


- t- 


to 




O (N 1 t- 










CO 


IM 


^ 


^ 






»o 












« 






"*_ 


■^ 




OO 


t-^ 


i>r 




CO 


O 














.ra 


























en 












2- 








O^ 








CO 


,_ 


oo 


-* 


„ 


T tH to 


o 








CD 










CO 


CO 


o 






IM 










<>» 






ao 




^ 


^ 












^ 








O 








to 


•* 


•* 


O 






O 


a> 








o 






© 




o 


(M 


^ 










(N 








lO 




















'^ 










■^ 






H 


































to 




cq 








Ol 










di 










CI 












(M 










^ 








I-H 


O 


CM 


^ 


^ 




• t. 


^ 




CO Td 1 o 






« 




o> 




C-l 


-* 


o 








-^ 










O 


o> 


co_ 




CO 


■* 


o_ 




o_ 








iH 




































ctT 




CO 


-* 






Cl" 






m 






lO 




(M 








CO 






























to 








■c 








o 


t. 


Ol 


1. 


(M tC 


(_ 


00 




o c- 


, t- 




« 






QO 


cq 




to 


CO 












g 




IM 






















H 




































lO 








Ol 








Ci 










lO 




















if:) 




g 


































o 


_, 


oo 


^ 


O I- 


00 


^ 








00 




H 


© 




§ 


CO 


ira 






^5 


CO 








^ 




CM 


« 




co' 












CO* 










• CO 




jri 






Ttl 












-^ 










Tji 




fM 




































CO 


o 


o 


IM 






CO 


<N 








CO 




o 


^ 




CJ_ 


1< 












^ 








CO 




« 


« 








co" 








t-^ 


















'^ 












^ 










'^ 








































^ 












-* 


. 








-* 




at) 




•* 












•* 










-«*' 




S 




Ol 












<M 










« 




"^ 
































ft 


































Ttl 


03 


03 


CO 






CO 


(M 




o 


CO 






© 






tH 


o 








-* 


■M 




-^ 










o 




















CO 






« 




































»« 














(N 


CO* 










^ 












lO 








lO 








^ 


(M 














-* 


(M 




to cr 


o 






c 




-* 
















■* 








































o 






M 




































o 
















o 


















I^ 
















f) 








-N 








^ 


^ 














•* 


^ 




ta 


Oi 






© 




o_ 
















o_ 






'^ 


00 






^ 




co" 
















CO 








s" 








^ 


^ 














^ 


^_^ 




— ' lO 


(M 






« 


























lO 


IM 
























>o_ 






o 


to 






<!)< 




IM 






















to" 


^ 






































to 


to 






c 


































<o 


to 






© 






















































<a 








a) • 
















^p " 


















Si 








,g 


































































'A 










_a 








60 

a 




c- 








^ 


m 


p: 








O 


CO 
























o 


CO 


T3 

-2® 
























-O . 






















> 


T-i 


a 


■a 




o 




0) 


1-H 


o 


> 


I-H o 


0/00 

a - 








s 


d 

C3 


a 

C3 


3 




s 

a! 


■a • 
g 


a 


a 


s 

C3 


fi 


« i 








15 

Eh 






o ' 

2 ■ 






o • 
a • 




1-5 
3 


P 






" p' 
£^ 

60 00 








9(1 


p 




*^ 




ce 


o 


a 




w 


n « 


R^i) 








-1 




o 


— t^ 


O 


u 


o 




O 


.S o 










^ 


^ 


p< 


•5 S 




■3 n 




^ 


O 
P. 


^ 


a a 


o 










60 

a 


o 
32 


q 


o 
ax 


tot- 

n 


O 


60 

P 


O 
5 




60 O 
§ 02 










h-1 








1-1 








iJ 




>J 










bJ 




E-i 





98 



City Document No. 31, 









■* 


Ir- 














o 


o 








C3 


o 




CO t-;_ 


















O 


m 




CO 






H 


M 




05 






m 


(M 


■M 


to 00 






<3 


CO 




00 l- 






o 


to_ 


C^ 


C] in 






C 


(>r 




cf 


















Ti< 












OJ 


-* 


CO 


00 (N 






fl 


"^ 


CO 


tK >0 






C 


o 




a 












rH 






«3 






1 






;^ 


CO 






oo 




ci 


,a 


(M 






(M 




CO 


c 












00 














00 


























s 


01 






a 




s 


^ 


K 










^ 










tH 


OD 


d 


CO 






CO 


w 


^ 


o 










Ph 


1- 












o 












1^ 




o 


CI 






CO 


J>- 




fl 


•a 


u: 




o 




5s 












o 


c 


o 






CO 


w 


? 


.r-. 










H 


V- 


r-l 
























03 


<>> 


o 




<M 


V-^ 




O 


Tj 








W 


'H 








c5 


Q 












O 


to 










U 


^ 



























§ 














t?5 


o 














1! 


^ 














>H 


^ 














« 


S 














P 
















m 














fi 


^ 














& 














C/} 


1 




































1 


^ J-i 














"i c! 














a> 












3 J 


5 ^ ca 










3 C 












, _l 


H M r-T 
- J3 . 








c 


3 > 


5 s g 

o s 

5 TS ■" 








■f 


5 t 

c ■ 


3 § 5 
3 -g ^ 








c 


3 










- ^ 


5 5 - 










3 


5? c 3 










5 


S 0) o 








t 


■1 1- 


:! h 


^ E- 


^ 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



99 









<M 


t- 


rq 


rH 


CO 


CO 


o 


lO 


CO 


cn 


CO 


to 






f_4 


■* 


00 


1 


to 


,, 












Ci 


00 


CO CO 


rH 




ai 


CO 




00 


C-J 










o 








•?30^ 








■* 


CO 


a 












C3_ 


t- 


c5 








































































(H 




cT 


c^ 










nt qjisaaq; 






















tH 






UO 




tl" 












































































cq 






O 




CI 


•* 


-* 


•H ^ 






-* 




c 


U3 


to 






^ 










H 


■saoiAjag 
JO .laqoiti^ 








rH 






to 




c 




'°^ 


-:# 


(N 


"i, 


o 


^" 






































. 1 


o 


















o 






03 
















o 












!5 

o 












iH 






to 








H^ 








CO 

co~ 






co" 






H 














































HI 
























































rH 






(M 








OO 








^ 




1 


_, 






S 


•S30IA.I9g 
























CO 
tH 








^ 






3 






M 


JO .wqtun^ 








































- 
























O 




o 


o 








lO 






lO 








•133^ 




















«= 


CO 








o 






o 








ni q}Sna''x 






















• 


to" 








t-" 






►- 






5 p 

1^ pq 















































































I 
























• 






,-H 




CO 


»o 








' ?i 






o 






•saoiAJag 
























(N 








!N 






c5 






JO .taquiu^ 
























































l^- 




^ 


J t^ 


^ 


^ 


.ra 


^ 


y. 


a ^ 


CO 


^ 






B 


•laajl 
















I o> 










Si 


tc 


1 00 




































^i 












ui qiSuaq; 






















• 


;=; 










tH 






a 




















































^ 




^ 


< CO 


^ 


t^ 


to 


(M 


c- 


, OO 


ir3 


CO 








•saoiA.iag 
























CO 






to 

CO 




to 

CO 






o 

P 


JO aaqiuiiji 




























~ 




















^ 




a- 




0, 


3 lO 


t- 


iH 


o 


^ 




3 -!t 


CO 


~ ^ 








•jaaiT 






(> 




c 








c> 


ti 




lO 
















m 
















CO 




OO 






r- 




C4 


°i. 






O K 


ut q^Sua'j 
























OO 






o 

rH 




oT 






B <i 










































S d 










































2 w 








rH 










H CO 






o 






f lO 




OO 








•saoiAjag 
















iH 




CO 


CO 






s 




CO 






w 


JO wqauijvj 
















































^ 








^ 


to 








ai 


CO 


. 


n ^ 


CI 


CI 








•;33±l 






"- 








c 


<I CO 








td 


<N 


" 


o 


00 


to 






H 


ni qiSaaq; 
























rH 






rH 




rn" 






O 










































W 










































H 


















H IN 










rH 


C 


1 CI 


CO 


03 






•saoiAjag 
























J: 






2 




^ 






<! 


JO .laqran^ 








































si 




t£ 






.-1 «: 




c 


3 ^ 






t- 


lO 


CO 





o 


-» 


^ 


\ 




•laa^ 


C^ 


C^ 




CO c^ 






11 to 






* c 




CO 






CO 


Oi 






o 














r-^ 










(M 




tc 


to 








n 


UI qjgnaq 






















■* 






■* 




CO 






o 








































W 














































































W 




7- 






rH r- 




c 


^ 00 






e< 


I- 


t-. 


r 


H CO 


rH 


CI 






o 


•saaiA.iag 


























'■ 


H to 


C<1 


■* 






JO .laqranj^ 






































DU 












































tc 




t- 




^ 


0- 


r 


H -^ 


a 




O t£ 


C 


-* 


. 


■t< C^ 


to 


'O 








•laaiC 


c 


^ 


V 
















o u- 




CO 




■3 C 


o 


















c 


? 


r 


H 00 


r- 






r^ 


a> 


r 




to 


Oi_ 






g 


ut q^Sna'j 






















-<' 


CO 






;:; 


r-T 


oT 






o 


















































































m 






1 l> 


) <> 




c 






3 U3 


C 


3 I 


cr 


CO 








to 


o 






o 


•saotAjag 












^ *" 




CO 






* 


c- 


CO 




CO 


to 


oq 






JO aaqum^ 






















































































^ 












































o 












































w 












































P- 












































K 










































^ 




• 




• -C! 


t: 


3 




1 


3 


t: 


3 


■d 






T3 












DQ 








a 


c 








3 


c 


3 


a 






tu 
J3 












O 

H 
S 








o 


c 


3 






D 


c 


3 


o 






O 
















TS 


i: 


3 




1 


3 


T 


3 


-d 






"d 


o 








T 


3 




g -. 




3 


a 




3 


d ? 


3 


a 

C3 




^ 


p 


ra 








4 




- 


-§ i 


a J 


3 
3 


3 - 


, 


2 
« 


3 ■i 


^ £ 


^ 




^ 
% 


S 








iS 


^ 


3 

3 - 


- 


- - 


. 




. 


- 




. - 


. 


. 




J 


3 


.9 






-' 




_ 


)l 


c 


^ c 


<I r 


4* ; 


ct - 


H r- 


r 


H 


■»t r 


Kf « 


= . 


« 




c 
-id &■ 


o 


^ 


i 





100 



City Document No. 31. 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

One hundred and seventy-nine hydrants have been estab- 
lished and 61 abandoned during the year 1888. 





Established. 


Abandoned, 






11 
m 


o 

0-1 


o 


a 

1 
o 


"a 
o 


>> 

m 


o 


>> 

o 

1-1 


a 
o 

o 
« 


o 


o 

IS 


Boston 


7 

1 
1 

4 
17 
18 

4 


5 

1 

4 

16 

18 

21 

9 


28 
10 

2 
8 
2 


1 

1 
1 


40 
12 
5 
23 
44 
42 
13 






2 


25 
11 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 


27 
11 
1 
6 
11 
3 
2 


13 
1 










4 


Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury ........ 


4 
5 

1 


1 
1 


3 


17 
33 
39 
11 








52 


74 


50 


3 


179 


10 


2 


5 


44 


61 


118 



Total number of Hydrants in use January 1, 18S9. 





■S o 


o 


o 
Oh 


o 

^-1 


a 

O 
O 

M 


"3 
o 




56 
17 
19 
37 
114 
122 
35 


1 


148 

63 

56 

82 

166 

291 

183 

16 


579 
188 
127 
653 
574 
113 
63 


652 
284 
155 
119 
86 
56 
38 


1,435 
553 






357 




891 




940 


West Roxbury 


582 
319 




16 








5 


3 

7 


8 










7 
















400 


1 


1,005 


2,302 


1,400 


5,108 



Hydrants taken out and repaired 

Hydrant boxes removed 

: G-ate boxes removed ....... 



138 
229 
172 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



101 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1888. 



Where. 


Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


36 

4 


30 
6 


20 

7 
2 
4 
5 


16 

5 
5 

2 


12 

23 
5 

4 
3 
3 
1 

3P 


8 

8 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

14 


6 

61 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 

77 


4 

38 
7 

1 

46 


3 

5 

5 


2 
8 

2 
1 
1 

12 


1| 

19 
1 


2 
2 


1 

12 

1 
1 
2 

1 
17 


4 

14 
2 
1 

17 


1 


I 

12 
10 
10 

2 


Total. 




554 

i;io 

111 

152 
44 
30 
10 


778 




167 
134 


Bast Boston 
























38 












13 




4 


6 


18 


12 


Totals 


1,031 


34 


1,356 















Causes of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 
4 inches and upwards : — 

Joints ....... 95 

Settling of earth . . . . .16 

Defective stopcocks . . . .21 

" pipes ..... 28 

" stuffing-boxes . . . 4 

" packings .... 31 

Bolts eaten by rust .... 2 

Struck by pick ..... 3 

Steam-Heating Co. .... 1 

Frost 2 



Stoppages by frost 

Of 3-inch and in service-pipes 
Joints . 
Settlino- of earth . 



(( 


boxing 


(( 


wall 


( i 


drain . 


ecti\ 


^e pipes . 


( ( 


couplings 


( i 


stopcocks 


a 


packings 



35 

200 

1 

3 

1 

108 

38 

10 

9 



203 
13 



Carried forward, 



405 



216 



102 



City Document No. 31. 



Brought forwai 
Stopcocks broken 
" pulled 


off 

DUt 








405 
3 
4 


216 


Couplings loose at main 
Struck by pick 
Frost . . 






2 
. 82 
. 24 




Burnt off by parties thawing 
Caving of trench . 


pipes 




1 
3 




Parties digging cellar . 






1 




Gnawed by rats . 






16 




Pipe not in use 
Parties building . 






4 
1 




By Steam-Heating Co. . 
" plumbers 






10 
1 




" Gaslight Cos. 






2 




" Sewer Contractors . 






7 




Parties unknown 






1 




Twisted oif in wall 






1 




Eaten by soil 






1 




Blasting 






3 






572 


Stoppages : — 


By frost outside ..... 195 




" " inside 










168 




" rust 










146 




" fish 










26 




" dirt 










20 




" solder 










4 




" gasket . 










6 




" lead chips 










2 




" silk handkerchief 








1 








668 





Total 



1,356 



Report of the Water Board. 



103 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works. 

statement of the Leaks and Stoppages^ 1850-1888. 





DiAMETBB. 




Tear. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 

214 

109 

213 

211 

135 

145 

170 

171 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
594 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
707 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 
734 
801 
1,024 
995 
929 
833 
1,248 
782 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 


323 


1858 ........ 


345 


1854 


254 


1855 


294 


1S56 

1857 


307 
363 


1858 


401 


1859 


531 


1860 ; 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 


1863 . 

1864 


494 
489 


1865 


607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 


1868 


531 


1869 


489 


1870 


926 


1871 


1,565 


1872 

1873 


1,647 
1,229 


1874 


2,554 


1875 


928 


1876 


948 


1877 


910 


1878 


1,237 


1879 


1,206 


1880 


1,064 


1881 


1,028 


1882 


1,248 


1883 


953 



104 



City Document No. 31. 



statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1888. — Concluded. 





DiAMETEB. 




Year. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


1884 


253 
111 
150 
172 
216 


1,127 
638 
725 
869 

1,140 


1,380 


1885 


749 


1886 . 


875 


1887 


1,040 


1888 


1,356 







Mystic Works. 

Extension of Distribution- Pipes during the Tear 1888. 





Size of Pipes. 




Location. 


4 


6 


8 


lO 


13 


16 


34 


30 


Total . 




48 
96 
96 
183 
423 
132 


336 




126 


487 


57 
542 
237 
450 


115 


■ • 
427 


48 


Johnson avenue 

Eden-street court 

Sherman square 


96 
96 
183 

423 


Cook-street court 


132 
336 






126 










487 












599 














542 














237 














450 
















Total in Charlestown .... 
" " Somerville ...... 

" " Chelsea 

" " Everett 


978 

898 

1,057 

4,473 


336 
7,491 

967 
3,440 


887 
200 


126 


487 


1,286 


115 


427 


3,755 
9,276 
2,024 
8,113 


Total 


7,406 


12,234 


1,087 


126 


487 


1,286 


115 


427 


23,168 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



105 



Mystic Works. 

Distribution- Pipes relaid and abandoned during the Year 1888. 



Location. 


Size of Pipe 
abandoned. 


Size of Pipe laid. 




3 


4 


6 


4 


6 


8 


Totals. 






624 
648 
636 
516 
474 
643 
520 
491 
579 
600 
276 
218 




36 


588 
648 
636 
516 
474 
612 
520 
491 
579 
600 
276 




































Oak " 










Cook " 




. . . . 


31 




Walnut " 




































Short " 
















218 














6,225 

3,367 

270 


2,362 


285 


5,940 

3,784 

270 


2.362 


6 225 


" " Somerville 


417 


6,146 
270 












Total for Mystic "Works . . 


417 


9,862 


2,362 


285 


9,994 


2,362 


12,641 



Mystic Works. 

Leaks in Distribtdion Pipes during the Tear 1888. 







Diameter of 


Pipes. 








10" 


8" 


6" 


4" 


3" 


Totals. 


Charlestown 




1 
13 
3 

1 


2 
39 
19 

6 


7 
24 
38 

1 


3 
1 
1 


10 




1 
2 








Everett 


9 










3 


18 


66 


70 


5 


162 



106 



City Document No. 31. 



O 






•<l 







^ 


CO CO 




-ll 


tA 

■^ 




'^ 1:- 






co^ 


tD_ 0_ 


1 


1 '^ 


H 


00* 


CO CO 




■-T t-T 


o 


o 


CO to 




B •* 


H 














o 


lO o 




* ca 






o 


lO Tfl 




H o 








^ to 


c 


7i ■* 


















CO 


(M 




s 




§ 






-t^ 


■^ QO 




CO 






o 


Oi to 












C^ c^ 




O OO 




-* 


CO* 


oT c^ 










(M 


CO W 


















(M 






-* 


g s 


c 


o 

3 OO 






CI 


I 


o 








o 


o 


r-^' t^ 




^ o* 








CO CO 




(M 






IM 


to t- 




H to 








C2 00 




CO 






o 


0C_ ri<^ 








OO 


ci^ 


T-T ^-T 





■J CO 






<N 


^ l-H 










CO 


to t- 




1^ 










D C-1 




1 to 




o 


00 








- ^ 




^ 


Tti' O 


t 


- to 










<N 




CO 


CO 














H 














n 

o 
z 

M 
















t~ 




H 




^ 




o 








o 
















;z; 












CO 


M 




^ 








(M 


« 














E-i 


























P4 




to 














-* 




to 






S 








-tP 




to 


^ 


I— i 


o 










fi 




c^ 








<M 






<-, 








O 






00 














r-H^ 








tth 




o 














C^l 


to" 








to 






IM 








(N 






°i. 








' 05_ 




Tl- 
















ccT 








to" 

I-H 






to 








to 






CO 








C5 






(N_ 








"=1, 




o 














CO 










(N 






•* 








^ 




















OJ 








03 


















CO 












!^ 
















o 
































H 
















-< 
















O 
















o 
















h4 


















d 












^ 


s 






CO 




o 


















CtJ 














^ 


'r, 


03 


a 


O 




't^ 


a 


to 


c-i 




CS 


s 

o 










,a 


M 


t> 






1 


O 




CB 


o 


w 




II 






vO — ( CD CO 

rH (M T-H 



>0 »0 -^ CO 



O OQ O H 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



107 



Mystic Works. 

Number, Size, and Length of Service-pipes laid during flie Year 1888, and 
number connected with Works Jan. 1, 1889. 





Charlesto'n. 


SOMERVILLE. 


Chelsea. 


EVEBETT. 


Totals. 


Diameter 
IN Inches. 


li 

sec 




«4H • 

° s 

■° t. 

= 02 


.9 


Zl 
a 3 


a 
-= -J 


II 

E 3 

EJGQ 
l2i 


n 
■Sig 

S fv, 

l-I 


. ^ 

3 -^ 

t2i 


.9 

1-1 


li 










2 
1 
2 

19 
90 


50 
29 






2 

20 

405 

281 

90 


50 
409 


1 






19 
395 


380 
15,303 






i 

I 


8 
42 


275 
1,033 


40 

575 

2,070 






15,618 
6,008 
2,070 


220 


4,400 


i 




















Total for year 


50 


1,308 


414 


15,683 


114 


2,784 


220 


4,400 


798 


24,155 


Total No. \ 
Jan. 1, 1889 \ 


5,787 


154,970 


5,410 


185,421 


4,935 


132,435 


1,475 


32,230 


17,607 


505,056 



Repairs of Services in CJiarlestown during the Year 1888. 

Defective service-pipes . . . . . .46 

Struck by pick ....... 5 

Tin- lined pipes, |-in. dia., changed to f-in. dia. lead . 41 
Services lowered ....... 7 

Stoppages by fi'ost ....... 143 

Stoppages by eels . . . . . . .72 

Stoppages by rust . . . . . . .32 

Stoppages by moss . . . . . . .15 

Wooden service-boxes replaced by iron . , '226 



108 



City Document No. 31. 



Mystic Works. 

Hydrants established and abandoned during the Year 1888. 





Established. 


Abandoned. 






la 


o 
P-i 


% 
o 


fl 
S 


i 

□ 

M 




5 


12 
5 


1 


2 


4 




12 


Everett 








5 














5 


17 


1 


2 


21 



Total number of Hydrants in use Jan. 1, 1889. 





Boston 
Lowry. 


6 


o 


3 


3 

o 




28 


49 
385 
168 
87 
2 
2 


181 
2 

1 


42 
2 

6 

1 


300 




387 






170 






88 


Medford 




8 






3 










28 


693 


181 


51 


956 



Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT, 

Supey'intendent Eastern and Mystic Divisions. 



EEPOET OF TIE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
METER DIVISION. 



Office of the Superintendent Meter Division, 

221 Federal Street, Boston, Jan. 1, 1889. 

Thomas F. Doherty, Esq., Ohairman Boston Water 
Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of the Meter Division for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1888, is herewith submitted : — 



CocHiTUATE Department. 

The total number of meters in service to date is 3,133. 
During the year 136 additional meters have been applied to 
the service and 131 discontinued. 



Meters Applied. 





4" 


3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


I" 


i" 


3 


Total. 


Worthington 

" B. W. W." ■. 


1 


4 


9 


10 


27 


41 

25 

1 

2 
1 
2 
1 


1 




93 
25 


Crown 

Ball & Fitts 


1 


1 




1 




8 




12 

2 


















1 


Star 
















2 


Frcst 
















1 






















2 


5 


9 


11 


27 


73 


9 




136 



110 



City Document No. 31. 

Meters Discontinued. 





4" 


3" 


2" 


1|" 


!'■ 


r' 


B 


1" 


Total. 






1 




4 


16 


15 

21 

2 
10 

1 

1 

1 


3 




39 


"B. W. W." 




21 




1 


4 






3 
1 


45 




55 








11 
















1 


Frost 
















1 


Ball & Fitts 












1 
1 




2 














1 




















1 


5 




4 


20 


51 


50 




131 



Five hundred and ninety-three meters have been taken 
out especially for test and examination, 30 for enlargement, 
95 frozen, 65 leaking, 44 clocks broken or defaced, 59 
ordered, and 319 stopped or not registering, making the 
total number of changes for the year 1,205. 

Two hundred and seventy-four meters have been repaired 
in service ; of this number 178 were found leaking, 89 with de- 
faced or broken clocks, and 7 not registering, for various causes. 

Twenty-six service pipes were found leaking and repaired, 
and the location of 39 meters changed. 

Meters in Service Jan. 1, 1889. 





6" 


4" 


3" 


2" 


ir 


1" 


i 


B 


4" 


Total. 






7 


18 


86 


67 


468 


269 

507 

111 

69 

7 

2 

20 

1 

6 

6 

1 

2 


115 

1,092 

11 
3 
1 


1 


1,030 


"B.W. W." 




Crown 


1 


11 


19 


28 


33 


153 

11 

5 


1,448 
80 


Ball & Fitts 












23 














5 
















21 


Frost • 










1 


1 


4 


Star 










6 
















5 
















1 


Weir 














2 






















18 


37 


114 


101 


638 


1,001 


1,222 


1 


3,133 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



Ill 



Four hundred and fifty meters have been purchased during 
the year, of the following style and size : — 





Sin. 


2-in. 


1^-in. 


lin. 


Jin. 


1 in. 


Total. 




4 


6 


6 


50 


180 
183 
20 


1 


246 


"B.W. W." 


183 












20 


Ball Ss Fitts 










1 
















Totals 


4 


6 


6 


50 


383 


1 


450 







One hundred and ninety-six meters have been sent to the 
factory for repairs; viz., 61 Worthington, 113 Crown, 1 
Frost, 2 Ball & Fitts, 2 Star, and 17 B. W. W. 

New street-boxes set, 79 ; repaired, 46. Thirty-eight de- 
cayed boxes have been taken out and replaced by new, and 
32 removed. All boxes have been packed with hay, to pro- 
tect the meters from frost. 

At the shop, 2,156 meters and 5 motors have been tested ; 
29 meters taken apart, cleaned, and repacked; 40 clocks and 
175 gears changed for adjustment and repairs. 



Mystic Department. 

During the year 40 additional meters have been applied, 
and 73 discontinued ; making the total number in service to 
date 387. 



Meters in Service Jan. 1, 1889. 





6-in. 


4.in. 


S-in. 


2.in. 


l^in. 


1-in. 


^in. 


i-in. 


Total. 






8 


3 


SI 


4 


74 


50 

4 

42 


21 
95 


191 


<'B. W. VV." 




4 




2 


6 


6 


8 


2 


24 
2 


185 




2 


Ball & Fitts 






1 


3 




1 




5 














Totals 


2 


14 


10 


42 


6 


100 


97 


116 


387 







112 



City Document No. 31. 



Two hundred and five changes have been made, of which 
82 were taken out for test and examination : 3 for enlarg-e- 



ment 



4 leaking ; 



103 not workinof or reo-istering: : 4 clocks 



broken or defaced ; 4 ordered ; and 5 frozen. 

Five service- pipes found leaking and repaired, and 9 frozen 
and thawed out. 



Meters Applied. 


Meters Discontinued. 




4" 


3" 


2" 


n" 


1" 


1" 


1" 


'3 

O 




4" 


3" 


2" 


11" 


I" 


J 


... 


3 


Worthingtou . 






3 




10 


8 


3 


24 


Worthington . 






3 


. . 


4 


4 


5 


16 


Crown .... 


1 




3 


1 




5 


4 


14 


"B. W.W." . 












1 




1 


Ball & Fitts . . 




2 












2 


Crown .... 

Ball & Fitts . 
Tremont . . . 




2 


3 




5 


14 
2 


30 


52 
2 
2 




1 


2 


6 


1 


10 


13 


7 


40 




• 


2 


6 




9 


21 


35 


73 



Fifteen meters have been sent to the factory for repairs ; 
viz., 14 Crown and 1 Worthington. 

Meters repaired and examined in service, 51 ; of this 
number 13 were found leaking, 11 with broken or defaced 
clock, 20 stopped by fish, and 7 not registering for various 
causes. Meters tested at shop, 416 ; repaired, 58. 

Twenty new street-boxes have been set, 16 repaired, 24 
decayed boxes taken out and replaced by new, 57 removed, 
and the location of 3 meters changed. 



Report of the Water Board. 



113 



General Statement for the Year. 



COCHITUATE. 



Mystic. 



In service 

New set 

Discontinued . . . . 

Changed 

Changed locations . . 
Tested at shop . . . 
Repaired at shop . . 
Repaired at factory . 
Repaired in service , 
Purcliased . . . . , 

Reset 

Repaired 



3,133 
136 
131 

1,205 
39 

2,156 
244 
196 
274 
450 



387 
40 
73 

205 
3 

416 
58 
15 
51 



Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM J. WELCH, 

Sup erintendent. 



DIVISION OE INSPECTION AND WASTE. 



Office, City Hall, Jan. 1, 1889. 

To Thomas F. Doherty, Esq., Chairman Boston Water 

Board : — 

Sir, — The following report of this division for the year 
enfling Dec. 31, 1888, is respectfully submitted. 

The inspection force on the 1st of January, 1888, con- 
sisted of thirt3^-one inspectors and three chief inspectors. 
During the year two inspectors resigned. One appointment 
was made through the Civil-Service Commission, to till one 
of the vacancies, the other was not filled, leaving the present 
number of inspectors thirty. 

Three inspectors were sent to the Mystic Division January 
2 to deliver bills ; they were employed there for over two 
weeks. 

Early in March five inspectors were again detailed to the 
same district, under the Water Registrar, to deliver delin- 
quent notices. 

On April 21 twelve inspectors were detailed for duty in 
the Cochituate Division, and five to the Mystic Division, 
under the Water Registrar, to take statistics for assessing 
the water-rates. The latter were employed in the manner 
indicated until October 29 ; the men detailed to the Cochitu- 
ate Division reported back for waste duty early in August. 
All the rate bills and notices in the Mystic Division were 
served by inspectors. 

The work of checking the waste indicated by the Deacon 
meters and Church stopcocks was begun in the middle of 
April, and was continued until the end of October. 

During the summer months the rules relating to the illegal 
use of hand-hose weie rigorously enforced. 'I'o properly 
perform this duty it was found necessary to employ seven men 
for temporary duty, as seventeen of the regular inspectors 
were working for the Water Registrar. The additional men 
were appointed through the Civil-Service Commissioners. 
They beuau duty June 11 and continued work until October 
2(). 



Report of the Watee Boaed. 115 

On April 10 the inspectors were placed in the North and 
West Ends, and a general house-to-house inspection to check 
waste was begun ; it was continued with the available force 
until the present writing. The entire work of the Cochituate 
Division will be finished in a couple of weeks. East Boston, 
Brighton, Dorchester, and West Roxbury are the districts 
now being inspected. The results of the inspection, in which 
is included the house-to-house visits, the Deacon meter and 
Church stopcock work, showed that in 123,718 examinations, 
13,485 premises (nearly 11 per cent.) were found to have 
defective fixtures, and were wasting water. The City Ordi- 
nance in relation to repairs, etc., was enforced in each case. 

The consumption during the year as compared with the 
year 1883, before this division was organized, as will be seen 
by the statistics of the Engineer of the Water Board, in- 
creased materially during the first three and a half months, 
viz., from January 1 to the middle of April. This was 
owing to the very cold weather, the frost being from lour to 
five feet in the ground during most of the period named ; 
faucets were generally left open nights to prevent freezing. 
Durino; the foilowiiio; months there was a marked savins:, 
averaging 8.40 per cent, on the consumption of 1883. 

During the year 5(57 fines were inflicted for non-repair of 
water fixtures, wilful waste, and violations of hose regula- 
tions. Of these only 66 were collected, 501 were abated for 
various causes, in most cases the persons fined being allowed 
additional time to comply with the ordinances, make repairs, 
etc. 

During the same period the water has been cut off for non- 
payment of fines, etc., from ten water-takers, and let on 
again to ten. 

The amount of cash received for fines and turned over to 
the City Collector was $132, viz. : — 

Cochituate Department . . . . . . $112 

Mystic De[)artmcnt ...... 20 



$132 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. B. CASHMAN, 

8ujperiniendent. 



116 



City Document No. 31. 



The following table gives the work performed by each 
inspector in checking waste : — 



Inspectok. 



Bac-haraeh, 8, . . 
Berran, Joseph . . 
Cassidy, M. F.J. . 
Connolly, Jolin <T. 
Corbett, John J. . 
Daly, James F. . . 
Desmoud, John F. 
Dunu, John J. . . 
Kdmbnds, M. F. . 
Finnigan, D. A. . 
Foye, John E. . . 
llassitt, John B. . 
Kane, James J. . . 
Kilduff, William . 
McCarty, C. F. . . 
McCarthy, T.,jr. . 
McCormaok, D. . . 
MsXamara, J. J. . 
Maguire, Hugh . . 
Murphy, John J. . 
Murray, Thos. F. . 
Neagle, Jos. B. . . 
Quigley, John J. . 
Quigley, James L. 
Ross, George F. . 
Rjpnosky, K. . . . 
Roth, John J. . . . 
Smith, Lawrence , 
Sweeny, C.F. . . . 
Toland, Joseph H. 
Wood, Walter B. 
Ward, Fred C. . . 



^1? 

Is 



4,691 

4,057 
5,009 
3,094 
5,178 
5,823 
5,029 
3,040 
2,516 
3,541 
3,550 
5,423 
5,567 
3,011 
5,258 
3,149 
3,992 
3,417 
2,053 
5,227 
5,159 
3,117 
3,980 
2,913 
951 
4,2.39 
4,401 
1,960 
2,941 
4,563 
4,915 
1,954 

123,718 



Defective Fixtures. 



391 
502 
103 
687 
322 
238 
253 
202 
943 
142 
396 
705 
297 
1,023 
443 
131 
132 

59 
837 
813 
408 
163 
466 

95 
253 
747 
487 
402 
173 
708 
566 

13,485 



o Pi 



145 
171 
241 
300 
240 
119 

70 
306 
141 
532 
295 
198 
335 
118 
319 
225 

63 
684 

30 
343 
258 
693 
100 
196 

40 
161 
246 
578 
137 

76 
242 
369 

7,931 



437 
204 
573 

25 
624 
863 
452 
101 
388 
679 
109 
190 
418 
106 
635 
117 
101 
228 

30 
620 
860 
290 
341 
203 
121 
241 
1,179 
600 

69 

174 

841 

1,088 

12,905 



S a, 

sis 



16 



522 



WiLPUL Waste 
Repokts. 



SUMMAEY OF STATISTICS. 

EEPORT OF 



In Accord akce with the Recommendation of the New 
England Water-Works Association. 



Boston Water- Works, Suffolk County, Massuchnsetts, sup- 
plies also the cities of Somerville and Chelsea, and the town 
of Everett. 

Population by census of 1885 : — 

Boston 390,393 

Chelsea 25,709 

Somerville 29,971 

Everett 5,825 



Total ■ . 451,898 

Date of construction : — 

Cochituate Works . . . . . . 1848 

Mystic " . . . . . . 18()4 

By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and 

Mystic lake. 

Mode of supply. — Seventy per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty " " " pumping " 

Pumping. 

COCHITCATE. MtSTIC. 

f Holly Co. (since H. R. Worthington. 
Builder of pump- j May 8). 

ing machinery, j H. R. Worthington 

I (to May 8). 

Description of coal used : — 

( Worthington ) anthracite . 
a Kind, — (Holly) bituminous. Bituminous, 

c Size, — Broken. Broken. 

e Price per gross ton, — $4.98 $4.23 and $4.29 

/ Per cent, of ash,— 7.3 8.4 



118 



City Document No. 31. 

COCHITCATE. 

2,620,558 



Mystic. 

0,924,000 



Coal consumed for year, in^ 

lbs. ' . . " . 
Total pumpaije for year, in 

galls. ." . . . 1,805,374,800 3,022,322,400 

Average dynamic head, in feet, 120.4 147.05 

Gallons pum)3ed per lb. of coal, 087 430.5 

Duty in foot-lbs. per 100 lbs. 

of coal (no deductions) . 72,459,200 53,750,600 

Cost of pumping figured on 

pumping-station expenses, 

viz.:— $15,686.53 $24,384.75 

Cost per million gallons raised 

to reservoir . . . 8.69 8.07 

Cost per million gallons raised 

one foot high . . . 0.0087 0.0548 

Consumption. 

CocHiTUATE. Mystic. 

Estimated population . . 378,600 108,000 

Estimated population sup- 
plied .... 370,000 100,000 
Total consumption, gallons . 12,191,715,000 3,022,583,500 
Passed throuofh domestic 



meters .... 

Passed through manufactur- 
ing meters 

Average daily consumption, 
gallons . . • . 

Gallons per day, each in- 
habitant .... 

Gallons per day, each con- 
sumer .... 

Gallons per day to each tap, 



393,970,000 

2,477,202,500 
33,310,700 

88 

90 
585 



3,804,318 

461,977,300 

8,258,400 

76.5 

77.9 

469 



Distribution. 

Mains. 

COCIIITUATE. 



Kind of pipe used 

Sizes 

Extended, miles 
Total now in use 
Distribution-pipes less than 
4-in., length, miles 



Cast-iron. 



Mystic. 
Cast-iron , Wrouglit- 
Iron and Cement. 
. 48-in.to4-in. 30-in. to 3-in. 

20. is 4.39 

. 450.08 141.5 







5.5 



Eepoet or THE Water Board. 



119 



Ma- 


'ns 


.— 


- Concluded. 








COCHITCATE. 


Mystic. 


Hydrants added 


, 


118 


21 


Hydi-ants now in use 


, 


5,008 


956 


Stop-gates added 


, 


249 


71 


Stop-gates now in use 


• 


4,882 


1,379 




Services. 




Kind of pipe used . 


{ 


Lead. 


Lead and 
Wrought-Iron 


Sizes 


, 


|-in. to 4-in. 


i-in. to 2-in 


Extended, feet 






48,602 


24,155 


Service-taps used 






1,712 


798 


Total now in use 






56,947 


17,607 


Meters discontinued 






i;^i 


73 


Meters now in use . 


, 




3,13a 


387 


Motors and elevators 


in 






use 






399 


8 



120 



City Document, No. 31. 



I— I 



xn 



s s 

fa o 

^' 

H 
w 

a 
o 



00 »c 
CO •— I 
«0 lO 



O^ l~- t^ C-l --^ » -^ CJ 



lo o 



o 
« 

a 
o 



S C^ ^q H « 



.t; 1-4 "^ c 
^ o o =t< 



S = " c 

5 a> j> a> 

o X <i^ >< 



5^.2 



5J _>» o 






HH 



00 .-I Oi 
>-l GO CO 



cq 


C5 






l^l 


lO 


o 


lO 


o 


r/) 


lO 


SM 



IM CO 

of C0~ 



cc I— I 



O O O — ' 

o o o CO 



CI o o co_ 
o o o o 





Hi 


Hi 
G 




1 


n 


03 


CO 




"^ 


C 






- 




;i 








o 








OJ 



CA ^ F^ 



S ^ 



5 V - -S 



:^ 



,J3 iH C li 

a >^ O S 
c K Es< 02 



Pt) 



<i> S c 



P=( 



Eeport or THE Water Board. 



121 



< 
1— 1 




CJ 


1 


^ 




<l 


m 


^ 


td 


>-i 


M 


\^ 







^ 




u 




M 




H 




r/} 




tH 



in 00 


CO 




O C3 


-^ 




,-H lO 


t— 




1 -* lO 


o 




Ol o 


lO 










CO -* 


00 




Si r-H 


o 




(M 


CO 




۩= 


€^ 





00 


00 


o 

CO 


(M 






o 


?! 





o 



© 



0/ kj 



h' PQ 



f^ H H 



t^ 


^^ 


•M 




t- 


O 


(M 


o 


o 


l^ 




CO 


C<1 


CO 




1^ 


r-H 


CJ 














l.O 


cc 






t^ 


CO 





M P 



o 


CO 


lO 


o 


^^ 


o 


no 


(M 


,_, 


t^ 


O 


o 


t-- 


h^ 


o 








GO 


CO 


CO 



br. bJD 



■s -^ 



? ^ 



ffi 02 Ph 



i 3:i a 

Oi g c 



Ph 



pq 



f=* 



122 City Document No. 31. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO JANUARY 1, 1889. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From May 

4, 184G, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1818. t 

E. S. Chesbrough, Cliief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. t 

William S. Wiiitwell, Cliief Engineer of tlie Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 
1, 1855. t 

Geokge H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to Ajiril 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wigiitman, Resident Engineer at C. II. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 18704 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
worlvs. From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to Aprii 
3, 1885.$ 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Wiiitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1819, which was limited to keep in force 
one year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 1856J Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned June 

b, 1860$ Four years. 



Civil Organization of the Board. 



123 



Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 186r4 Five years. 

Otis Noucross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867J ...... One j'ear and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868J ...... One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 J . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to JVIay 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned JVl ay 

31, 1875 Six montlis. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876J One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55J . . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59^ . Eiglit years. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55^ . . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56J . . . Four years. 

James W. Seaver, 1851 1 One year. 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851. J 

John T. Heaud, 1851^ One year. 

Adam W. Thax.ter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55J . . Four years. 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853J Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852^ One year. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55^ .... 'J'hree years. 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 . . . Six years. 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57J . . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 Two years. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59J ..... Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58J . . . . Three years. 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59^ Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856J Two months. 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, GO, 61, 62, 63, and 64, f Eight years. 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61J . . . . Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. . . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859J One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 . . .Six years. 

Clement Willis, 1860 One year. 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ One year. 

Jabez Frederick. 1861, 62, and 63$ .... Three years. 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 Two years. 

John F. Pray, 1862 One year. 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 One year. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ Three years. 

Otis NoRCROSS, * 1865 and 66$ Two years. 

John H. Tiiorxdike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ . . . Four years. 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . . . . Three years. 

William S. Hills, 1867 One j-ear. 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ One year. 

Joseph 1\I. Wightman, 1868 and 69$ .... Two years. 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68, and 69 .... Three years. 

Francis A. OsBORN, 1869 One year. 

Walteu p]. Haaves, 1870$ One year. 

John O. Poor, 1870 One year. 

HoLLis R. Gray, 1870 One year. 



124 



City Docujment No. 31. 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 

and 71t 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71^ . 

SiDNKY Squires, 1871^ .... 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 

Alexander Wadsworth, *1864:, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, and 

72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74% 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74^ 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* . 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 . 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75^ 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 . 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75 

and 76t t 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t • 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t . 
Nahum M. Morrison, 1876t . 
Augustus Parker, 1876f 



Nine years. 
Four years. 
One jear. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two 3-ears. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resio-ned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B.^ofrers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer .Tohnson was elected President; and 
Julv 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned liy the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned Jan. 15, '1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six- years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the orgaiiizatioa of the Boston Water Board. 

j Deceased. 



Civil Organization of the Board. 125 



BosTO?^ Water Board, Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawykr, fi-oni July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stan wood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882.$ 
William A. Soimons, from May 7, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
George ]M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to present time. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from Aug. 26, 1885, to present time. 
Robert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to present time. 

Organization of the Board for Year 1888. 

Chairman. 

Horace T. Rockwell, to April 25. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from May 7. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. 
William Jackson, 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

Deputy Collector and Clerk, Mystic Depa7'tment. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superinteiident of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 

EzEKiEL R. Jones, to Februaiy 20 (resigned). 
Dexter Brackett, from February 20. 

Superintendent of the Western Division and Resident Engineer of 
Additional Supply. 

Desmond FitzGerald. 

Sux)erintendent of Mystic Department. 

J. Henry Brown, to February 20. 
Dexter Brackett, from February 20. 

Superi7itendeni of Meter Division. 

George S. Follansbee, to July 9. 
Wm. J. Welch, from July 9. 

Stiperintendent of Inspection and Waste Division. 
D. B. Cashman. 

t Deceased. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Report of the Water Board ........ 1-11 

Extension of mains ......... 1 

Stop-cocks 2 

High service ........... 2 

Lake Cocliituate .......... 3 

Pollution 3 

Filtration ............ 4 

Indian-brook basin ......... 4-6 

Mystic-valley sewage ......... 7 

Consumption and waste of water ....... 7 

Meters 8 

Quality of water .......... 9 

Analysis of water .......... 10 

New appropriations . . . . . . . . . 11 

General Statistics. (See also Summary of statistics, p. 1 17) . 12 

Eaknixgs and Expenditures ........ 13 

Cost of Constrdction and Condition of the Debts ... 14 

Expenditure Accounts in detail 16 

List of Contracts .......... 22 

Report of the Engineer . . . . . . . . . 2G-42 

Yield of sources of supply . . . . . . . . 26 

Sudbury reservoirs and Lake Cocliituate ..... 26 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs ...... 29 

High-service puraping-stations ....... 30 

New high-service works ......... SO 

Chestnut-hill puniping-station ....... 32 

East Boston high service ......... 34 

Mystic lake 34 

Mystic sewer ........... 35 

Mystic conduit, reservoir, and pumping-station .... 36 

Consumption ........... 36 

Distribution ........... 37 

General condition and requirements ...... 40 

Tables of consumption, diversion of Sudbury-river water, amounts 
drawn from Lake Cocliituate, rainfall, operations of pumping- 
stations, etc. .......... 43-56 

Report op the Water Registrar ....... 57 

Financial statement ......... 57 

Meters 59-G3 

Yearly revenue .......... 63 

Fountains, motors, etc. ......... 65 

Water-fixtures . 67 



128 City Document JSTo. 31. 

Page 

Report of Superintendent of Western Division . . . 68-75 

Sudbury-river basins ......... 68-71 

Farm pond ........... 71 

Lake Cochituate .......... 72 

Aqueducts 73-74 

Chestnut-hill, Brookline, and Fisher-hill reservoirs ... 75 

Rainfall 76 

Report of Sitperintendent of Eastern and Mystic Divisions . 79 
Main pipe laid and relaid, location and length of same, total pipe 

in use, repairs, leaks, and stoppages, hydrants in use, etc. . 79-108 
Report of the Superintendent of the Meter Division . 109-113 
Report of the Superintendent of the Inspection and Waste 

Division 114-116 

Summary of Statistics (arranged per recommendation of New Eng- 
land Water-Works Association) ..... 117-121 
Civil Organization of the Board, 1845 to 1887 . . . 122-125 



:iJ^ 



ip?S 



v^^7 










(Dec, 1888, 20,000) 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBEAET. 



One volume allowed at a time, and obtained pnly by 
card ; to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction 
and juvenile books published within one year) without fine ; 
not to be renewed ; to be reclaimed by messenger after 21 
days, who will collect 20 cents besides fine of 2 cents a day, 
including Sundays and holidays ; not to be lent out of the 
borrower's household, and not to be transferred; to be re- 
turned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced, are expected to report it; and also any undue delay 
in the delivery of books. 

*^*No claim can be established because of the failure of 
any notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 



The record lielow must not be made or altered by borrower. 



la