(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

Accessions 



Shelf Ko. 



% 










GIVETf ■PiTS: 



?3: ^^I^u /lalir llimA^}^ 



^ 



'o^IjLLJML 



^Mi 



Xel/i^iyp: Priming Co Bcston 



W'i- ^"^^^' ■"■'■' ' 



i'i 



I 






i. 






^■v^- 4*- 1.. 



m 













W' 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofbo1890boston 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

nV THE f 



BOSTON WATER BOARD 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1890. 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1891. 






iV 



Office of the Boston Water Board, 

City Hall, Boston, Jan. 1, 1891. 

Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the Gity of Boston : — 

Sir, — The Boston Water Board or Water Supply Depart- 
ment present their report for the year ending Dec. 31, 1890, 
including a statement showing the financial condition of the 
department, and also the Reports of the City Engineer, and 
the Superintendents of the Eastern, Western, and Mystic 
Divisions. During the year the Water Registrar's Depart- 
ment has been made a separate department by ordinance, so 
that the Water Registrar's report is not included herewith 
as formerly, nor do the accounts of his department appear 
subsequent to May 1, 1890, the beginning of the financial 
year. 

The following is a comprehensive summary of the dis- 
bursements by the Boston Water Board for the calendar 
year: — 

Money expenditures Cochituate Water 

Works (see page 10) . 
Mone}^ expenditures Mystic Water Works 

(see page 11) ..... 



Less increase in stock during year (see 
page 12) . 



,633 77 

141,950 85 

$1,078,584 62 

2,800 00 

$1,075,784 62 



Current expenses, Cochituate 

Water Works 
Current expenses, Mystic 

Water Works 
E^xtension of mains, etc. 
Additional supply of water . 
High service 
Introduction of meters and 

inspection, Cochituate 

Carried forward, 



$352,628 61 

137,751 87 

277,243 42 

204,646 12 

24,184 51 

7,859 36 

$1,004,313 89 



iv Water-Supply Department. 

Brought forward, $1,004,313 89 

Introduction of meters and 

inspection, Mystic . . 594 14 
Improvement of Lake Co- 

chituate .... 15,364 06 

Shops, Albany street . . 55,512 53 



.,075,784 62 



REBATE OF WATER-RATES. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate works for the calendar 
year ending Dec. 31, 1890, have been $1,382,422.53, after 
deducting a rebate of seven per cent, on the bills for schedule 
water-rates, issued Jan. 1, 1890, equivalent to about $62,000, 
and the total receipts of the Mystic works have been $332,- 
634.02, after a similar reduction on the bills for schedule 
water-rates issued Jan. 1, 1890, equivalent to about $18,000. 
The Water Board have made another rebate of 10 per cent, 
on the amount of the bills for schedule water-rates, issued 
Jan-. 1, 1891, believing that the financial condition of the 
department will justify such a reduction. 

MYSTIC DEBT. 

On Dec. 31, 1890, the Sinking-Fund for the payment of 
the Mystic debt was but $20,000 less than the amount of the 
debt, and before the end of another year the Sinking-Fund 
requirements for the payment of the entire Mystic debt will 
have been satisfied, and action will be required by the City 
Council to decide what disposition shall be made of the 
surplus revenue. 

NEW WORKSHOPS IN THE EASTERN DIVISION. 

The office of the Superintendent of the Eastern Division 
and the shops of the department in the city were removed 
from 221 Federal street, which has been the headquarters 
of the Eastern Division since 1853, to the pipe-yard on 
Albany street, in which a new, commodious, and substantial 
l)uilding has been built by the Board. A new stable, with 
accommodations for twenty-eight horses, has also been erected 
and occupied at the same place. 

EXTENSION OF MAINS, ETC. 

Twenty miles of pipe-mains have been laid during the 
year, and the total length now connected with the works is 
498.73 miles; 2,118 service-pipes have been laid ; and 255 
hydrants have been put in service, making the present total 
number 5,459. 



Water-Supply Department. v 

At the request of the Fire Department all Post hydrants 
are now provided with three steamer connections, two 21- 
and one 41- inches in diameter. A system of pipes to fur- 
nish a high-service supply, with a pressure of from 70 to 90 
lbs. per square inch, is being laid through the mercantile 
section of the city as a protection against fire and only for 
the supply of fire pipes and sprinkler systems in the build- 
ings of the district. Mains have already been laid for this 
purpose in Kingston, Essex, Bedford, and Summer streets; 
Franklin street between Washington and Oliver streets, 
Pearl street between Franklin street and Atlantic avenue, 
Atlantic avenue between Pearl and Federal streets. Federal 
street between Summer and Essex streets. South and Lin- 
coln streets between Essex and Summer streets, and Oliver 
street between Franklin and Milk streets, at a cost to the 
department of $25,137.67. 

CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The daily average consumption per head of population 
on the Sudbury and Cochituate supply the past year has 
been 82.5 gallons, and on the Mystic supply 70.6 as against 
82.7 and 70.4, respectively, the previous year. The yearly 
daily average total consumption has been 33,871,700 on the 
Cochituate and Sudbury, and 8,301,400 gallons on the 
Mystic, as against 32,070,000 and 7,830,500, respectively, 
in 1889. 

Although the present consumption of water in the city 
shows but a small increase over that of the year 1883, not- 
withstanding an increase of nearly 20 per cent, in popula- 
tion, yet there remains a considerable amount of waste, 
which appears from the reports of the work of the in- 
spectors during the past few years to be largely due to the 
inferior class of water-fixtures used in many buildings, 
especially in cheap tenement or model houses. It seems 
desirable that an ordinance should be passed prohibiting the 
use of certain kinds of fixtures. 



ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. -BASIN 5. -WHITEHALL POND. 

Active work has been carried on during the past year at 
Basin 5, in Ashland and Hopkinton. As the result of 
diamond drill borings during the winter months, the old 
site for the dam was abandoned in favor of one 300 feet 
further up stream. From April 15 until early in December 
a considerable force of men, under Superintendent John J. 
Arthur, has been engaged in the work of stripping the site 



vi Water- Supply Department. 

for the dam, excavating for the core-wall, and building the 
core-wall. The trench is now practically completed and the 
core-wall built across the valley to the surface of the ground. 
Specifications have been prepared for delivering filling upon 
the dam by contract in the spring. The roads around the 
basin have been altered and built by contract. 

A taking by eminent domain has been made of the land, 
dam, and waters of Whitehall pond in Woodville, a village of 
the town of Hopkinton, near the source of the Sudbury river. 
Although the waters of this pond have been a valuable source 
of water supply to the city, it was possible for the owners to 
deprive the city of them at any time by raising or closing the 
dam. Moreover, by its purchase we shall be enabled to 
deepen the pond, and to clear it from stumps and shallow 
flowage, which contribute to deteriorate the water in the 
Sudbury river below ; and we shall be able, b}' raising the 
dam, to increase its yielding capacity from 1,800,000 gallons 
daily, to 3,000,000 gallons daily, in a dry year. Whitehall 
pond covers about 600 acres. Surveys have also been made of 
the Cedar swamp district, so called, at the head-waters of 
the Sudbury river, with a view to seizing this swamp, or a 
portion of it, by eminent domain during the coming year, in 
order to obviate, if possible, the disadvantages to the supply 
which result from the stagnation of the river at this point. 
The Board is of the opinion that the Sudbury-river water 
acquires much of its discoloration and fecundancy in vege- 
table matter as a consequence of being spread out over Cedar 
swamp, which, with the adjacent swamp, covers nearly 1,500 
acres. 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The work of building- the new dam at the outlet of Lake 
Cochituate was resumed, and is practically completed. The 
work of lining the Beacon-street tunnel was continued until 
April 18th, when it was stopped on account of a lack of funds, 
but will be prosecuted during the ensuing year. 

QUALITY OF THE WATER. - MEASURES TO PROTECT THE 
SUPPLY. - WESTERN DIVISION. 

The rainfall during the year on the Cochituate and Sud- 
bury has been about 3 inches more than the average, and 
the quantity of the water has been abundant. The quality 
of the water, as shown by the analyses of well-known chemi- 
cal experts, has been better than ever before, and the Board 
has been able to perceive already, from the analyses sub- 



Water-Supply Department. vii 

mitted, direct results of the eiforts which we have made to 
imj)rove the water for drinking purposes. 

One of the most important measures in connection with the 
improvement of the supply is the contract made during the 
year with the town of Marlborough, whereby the sewage of its 
13,000 inhabitants is to be diverted from the brooks which 
feed Basin 3. A sewerage system, similar in character to 
that adopted by Framingham, is now being constructed by 
the town of Marlborough, and the Boston Water Board have 
agreed to contribute $62,000 to cover the additional expense 
of removing the sewage completely outside of the Sudbury 
water-shed. This sewerage system is to be completed Jan. 
1, ]8*J2. As a consequence of negotiations between this 
Board and the town of Westborough, plans have been made 
under the direction of the town of Westborough for a sewerage 
system for that town, and surveys are now being made to 
determine what sum should be paid by the city of Boston 
to defray the extra expense of conveying the sewage outside 
of the city's water supply. Westborough is situated near the 
head-waters of the Sudbury, and by the proposed system of 
sewerage the sewage of nearly 5,000 people will be treated 
so that no portion of it can find its way into the feeders of 
that river. 

By means of the Framingham sewerage systems, upon 
which these others are modelled, the sewage of the town 
of Framingham is diverted from one of the two principal 
feeders of Lake Cochituate. The system is in active opera- 
tion, and connections have been made with it by a large 
number of manufacturing and other establishments which 
formerly drained into Beaver dam brook ; but although the 
system is working satisfactorily in other respects, the exist- 
ence of an under-drain beneath the main sewer, the eflfluent 
from which empties into onr supply, is in the opinion of our 
engineers a source of danger. Accordingly this Board 
has declined to pay to the town of Framingham the sum of 
$25,000, specified in the contract with that town, until this 
under-drain is stopped up or some means adopted for pump- 
ing the water which now runs by means of the under-drain 
into the feeders of Beaver dam brook. This under-drain 
was not a part of the plans referred to in the contract between 
Framingham and Boston ; and although the effluent from this 
under-drain may be harmless so long as the main sewer and 
connections are tight, the Water Board does not feel that it is 
justified in sanctioning a condition of affairs which may render 
it still possible for any portion of the sewage of Framingham 
to empty into our su[)pl3^ By the removal of the sewage of 
the communities of Framinohara, Marlborouo-h and West- 



viii Water-Supply Department. 

borough, aggregating 28,239 inhabitants, from the waters and 
feeders of the Sudbury, we believe that substantial improve- 
ment will necessarily appear in the future analyses of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate water. If sewerage systems were 
also established by the town of Southborough and the town of 
JSTatick, the grosser evils which affect the supply would be 
largely eradicated. It is especially desirable that the town 
of Natick should adopt a sewerage system in order that 
Pegan brook, the other principal feeder of Lake Cochituate, 
should be wholly freed from sewage matter. Vastly im- 
proved as is the condition of that brook as compared with 
what it once was, it is still more or less impure. It flows 
through the heart of the town of Natick in a covered channel 
difficult of access, and although the city of Boston has by 
repeated injunctions from the courts sought to restrain the 
people of that town from draining directly or indirectly into 
the brook, it is apparent from the condition of the brook that 
a certain number of them still do so secretly. Moreover we 
regret to state that the authorities of Natick have hampered 
our efforts to cut off the drains, which we have reason to be- 
lieve discharge sewage into the brook, by declining to allow 
us to excavate the street along the line of the brook, except 
under conditions which would defeat our purpose. The 
Board are proceeding and intend to proceed vigorously against 
offenders in this town, but we do not believe that Pegan 
brook can be made a desirable source of drinking water until 
a sewerage system is adopted by the town of Natick. 
Boston is willing to contribute its share as in the case of 
the other towns, and we trust that it will not be long before 
the people of Natick become conscious of their own neces- 
sities. 

In addition to the steps taken in pursuance of the policy 
of removing the sewage of entire communities outside of 
our water-shed by cooperation with the local authorities, 
the Water Board has been active in checking individual cases 
of pollution. On the Cochituate and Sudbury water-shed 
eighty cases have been pressed by the City Solicitor at the 
instance of the Board. In the case of thirty-nine of these, 
injunctions have been granted against the parties complained 
of. In the case of many others, legal proceedings have been 
suspended because the parties consented to make necessary 
changes and improvements, so that the drainage from their 
premises should no longer empty into the supply. Very 
nearly five hundred cases of old or new pollutions have been 
investigated, and either remedied or reported to the Law 
Department. Among the important cases in which legal pro- 
ceedings are pending, are those of the town of Westborough 



Water-Supply Department. ix 

and Bernard's straw factory at Westboroug'h, which collec- 
tively drain a large mass of foul matter directly into a swamp 
feeding the Sudbury. Much care has been spent in obtaining 
the necessary evidence to show direct connection between 
this swamp and our supply, and the matter is now pending 
in the courts. The projected Westborough sewerage system if 
adopted will remedy this abuse, but it is desirable that the 
Law Department should press these cases for immediate trial. 

The examinations continuously beino- made at the Biolos;- 
ical Laboratory established a year ago are throwing much 
light upon the condition of the water in the diiferent basins. 
The filtration experiments have been carried on assiduously, 
and much valuable information has been obtained from them ; 
but the problems presented are so novel and difficult that 
considerable time must elapse before we shall be able to 
make definite recommendations in this regard. 

The Water Board cooperated during the year in obtaining 
the passage by the Legislature of Chapter 441 of the Acts of 
1890, whereby the State Board of Health is given authority 
to prohibit the depositing of manure, excrement, garbage, 
and sewage, or any other poUuting matter within one 
hundred feet of the high-water mark of any stream or other 
body of water used as a source of water supply. The 
Board also cooperated in obtaining the passage of an act, 
whereby the Prison Commissioners were authorized to make 
the necessary outlays, at the expense of the Commonwealth, 
to connect the Sherborn Reformatory Prison for Women 
with the Framingham sewerage system. Work has been 
begun by the State authorities, and within a very short time 
this serious source of pollution will have been diverted from 
the supply. 

THE MYSTIC SYSTEM. 

On the Mystic supply equally determined efforts have been 
employed to check pollution. One hundred and thirty-eight 
improvements in premises have been accomplished, and 14 
cases reported to the Law Department for action. Among 
other injunctions granted was one against the Woburn Steam 
Laundry, which discharged about 1,200 gallons of refuse 
daily into the Mystic supply. Subsequently this establish- 
ment and 15 adjacent buildings in Woburn were connected 
with the Mystic-valley sewer by means of an 8-inch drain. 

One of the difficulties in dealing with the Mystic system 
at present is the f\ict that the town of Medford claims, by 
virtue of an injunction granted to that town against the city 
of Boston in 1882, the right to prevent any increase in the 



X Water-Supply Department. 

output of the Mystic-valley sewer, the effluent from which 
empties into the lower Mystic lake. With a view to bridg- 
ino- over the situation until the Metropolitan Main Drainage 
Commission shall have established a sewerage system in the 
towns adjacent to the Mystic supply, we have mooted from 
time to time the advisability of allowing these towns and in- 
dividual establishments to make connections with the Mystic- 
valley sewer ; but in the face of the unwillingness of the 
Medford authorities, we have felt that our hands were 
tied. As the result of a recent conference with the legal 
representative of the town of Medford, the Board have 
directed the Superintendent to run the Mystic-valley sewer 
continuously, night and day, in order that the refuse from 
the tanneries connected with it may be treated without inter- 
mission, and thus avoid the suspicion of creating any nuisance 
in the Mystic river. 

It is an open question whether it would not be advisable 
for the city of Boston to dispose of the Mystic system, if at 
any time the communities outside of Boston, which now use it 
asa water supply, are willing and have authority to purchase 
it. The Mystic system can be depended upon to yield only 
7,000,000 gallons daily in a dry year, and Charlestown, 
Somerville, Everett, and Chelsea, all of which are supplied 
with Mystic water, now often use over 9,000,000 gallons daily. 
Although under our contract with Somerville, Everett, and 
Chelsea, Charlestown is entitled to be supplied first, it would 
practically be a difficult matter in case of a drought to cut off 
the other communities. The only citizens of Boston who 
drink the Mystic water are the people of Charlestown, who 
use less than 3,000,000 gallons daily. Although familiar 
with the fact that the analyses of the Mystic supply compare 
very unfavorably with those of the Cochituate and Sudbury 
water, the people of Charlestown are said to prefer the 
Mystic water. The fact that the Mystic water is more white 
and sparkling than the Cochituate and Sudbury is a very 
deceptive argument. The future of the Mystic system will 
depend largely on the effect which the establishment of the 
Metropolitan drainage system may have upon the analyses 
of the Mystic-river" water. It is very possible that this 
supply can be made wholesome in the future ; but it is equally 
true that the city of Boston, though actively seeking to pro- 
tect the Mystic supply, has but a comparatively small interest 
in maintaining it, except as a source of revenue. From the 
point of view of dollars and cents, it is a valuable piece of 
property. On the other hand, it must not be forgotten that 
the city of Boston may have to pay a large sum by way of 
betterments imposed by the Metropolitan Main Drainage 



Water-Supply Department. xi 

Commission in case the city retains control of the Mystic 
system. In view of the present condition of affairs, the Water 
Board desires to call attention to the fact that the connections 
to unite Charlestown with the Cochituate and Sudbury system 
are complete, and that the Cochituate and Sudbury water can 
be turned on at any time that the people in that section of 
the city so desire. 

KespectfuUy submitted, 

Egbert Grant, 
Philip J. Doherty, 
John W. Leighton, 

Boston Water Board. 



Water-Supply Department. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



SUDBITET AND COCHITUATE WORKS. 



1888. 



Daily average consumption in gallons . . 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
iubabitant 



Daily average amount used through meters, 
gallons 



Percentage of total consumption metered, 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use .... 

Yearly revenue from water-rates . . , 

Yearly revenue from metered water . , 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1888, 1889, and 
1890 



Yearly expense of maintenance 

Mystic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons . . 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through meters, 



Percentage of total consumption metered. 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use .... 

Yearly revenue from water-rates . . . 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1888, 1889. and 

1890 ; . 



Yearly expense of maintenance 



1889. 



7,844,900 

23.6 

56,947 

3,532 

456.68 

5,008 

1,317,385 92 

$165,653 49 

35.3 

!0,049,614 53 
$383,638 16 



74.9 

1,272,600 

15.4 

17,607 

395 

142.2 

956 

$306,637 22 

$75,880 78 

24.7 

51,690,757 30 
$162,086 42 



1890. 



32,070,000 

80.3 

8,118,800 

25.3 

58,810 

3,882 

479.72 

5,225 

51,357,738 30 

$493,239 58 

36.3 

20,432,974 43 
$345,986 88 

7,830,500 



1,341,700 
17.1 

18,527 
413 

147.7 

998 

$317,197 29 

$80,313 19 

24.1 

$1,696,280 76 
$125,660 21 



33,871,700 

82.5 

9,034,800 

26.7 

60,718 

4,078 

498.73 

5.398 

$1,382,422 53 

$554,047 36 

40.1 

$20,994,561 01 
$381,147 10 

8,301,400 

70.6 

1,537,400 

18.5 

19,520 

414 

152.3 

1,073 

$332,634 02 

$89,526 42 

26.9 

$1,708,781 59 
$144,184 44 



Water-Supply Department. 



EARNINGS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Water- Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1890, were as fol- 
lows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water $1,856,501 19 

Income from shutting off and letting on water, and fees . 4,896 69 

Elevator, fire and service pipes, sale of old materials, etc. 21,024 65 



L,382,422 53 



The total expenditures of the Cochituate 
Water-Works from revenue, for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1890, were as follows, viz. : — 

Cm-rent expenses, viz. : — 

Water Supply Dept $352,628 61 

Water Income Dept. (8 mos.) . . . 28,518 49 



L,147 10 

Refunded water-rates 1,293 24 

Interest on funded debt .... 765,079 10 



1,147,519 44 
Balance, Dec. 31, 1890 $234,903 09 

From this apparent balance about $220,000 is required for 
the Sinking Fund. 

The total receipts of the Mystic Water-Works, from all 
sources, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1890, were as fol- 
lows, viz. : — 

Income from sales of water $331,109 44 

Income from shutting off and letting on water, and fees, 428 25 

Service-pipes, repairs, etc 1,096 33 



$332,634 02 



The total expenditures of the Mystic Water- 
Works from revenue, for the year ending Dec. 
31, 1890, were as follows, viz. : — 

Current Expenses, viz. : — 

Water Supply Dept $137,751 87 

Water Income Dept. (8 mos.) . . . 6,432 57 

$144,184 44 
Interest on funded debt .... 42,357 50 

Refunded water-rates 165 75 

Amount paid Chelsea, Somerville, and 

Everett, under contract .... 101,820 09 



288,527 78 



Balance, over and above all requirements, Dec. 31, 
1890 $44,106 24 



Water-Supply Department. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, COCHTrUATE WATER- 
WORKS. 

(From Revenue.) 
January Draft, 1890, to January Draft, 1891. 

Boston Water Board: — 

Salaries of two Commissioners, two 
Cleriis, Purchasing Agent, and Mes- 
senger $12,898 82 

Travelling expenses .... 729 48 

Printing and stationery • • • 562 87 

Advertising, i)ostage, and miscellaneous, 891 85 

$15,083 02 



Water Registrar's Depaitment {4 mos.) : — 

Salaries of Registrar, Clerks, Inspect- 
ors, Foreman, Marine Agent, Mes- 
senger, and laborers in Service 

Division $13,988 82 

Travelling expenses, etc. . . . 373 68 

Printing and stationer}' . , . 243 17 

Miscellaneous ..... 37 75 



Eastern Division : — 

Salaries of Superintendents, Clerks, 

and Foreman $15,702 20 

Travelling expenses and transportation 

of men ...... 574 74 

Printing and stationery . . . 560 47 

Miscellaneous ..... 365 56 



14,643 42 



Western Diviion : — 

Salaries of Snperirtendent, Assistant 

Superintendent, and Clerks . . $8,871 00 

Travelling expenses- .... 1,033 24 

Printing and stationery . . . 586 21 

Miscellaneous . .... 469 86 



17,202 97 



10,960 31 

Meters, setting and repairing ..... 10,338 46 

Workshop, blacksmith shop, etc.. Federal st. . . 7,853 51 

Pipe-yard, maeiiine shop, stable, etc., Albany st. . 13,414 37 
Maverick Wharf (depot for furnishing water to 
shipping), rent, and salary of a^ent (abolished 

July 1) " . . . 1,026 62 

Telephones 1,434 91 



Amount carried fonvard, $91,957 59 



Watee-Supply Department. 



Amount hr ought for > I- ard , S91,957 59 

Special agents (3) , salaries, travelling expenses, etc., 3,791 25 

Cocliituate Aqueduct ...... 2,148 42 

Sudbury Aqueduct (including $12,005.79 for lining 

tunnel) 19,220 04 

Main pipe relaying (including stock and labor) . 13,572 35 
'• repairing " " " '^ . 6,638 67 
Hydrants " " " '' " . 13,799 25 
Stopcocks " " " " " . 2,175 04 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes, and repairing (includ- 
ing stock and labor) ...... 4,209 46 

Tools and repairing (including stock and labor) . 1 1,748 01 

Streets, " " '' '' " . 11,388 42 

Fountains, " " " " " . 2,634 59 

Stables, " " " " " . 10,738 10 

Waste detection " " '' " . 19,030 72 
Basins, Framinghani and Ashland (including stock 

and labor) 5,764 80 

vService-pipe repairing (including stock and labor) . 11,995 94 

Improvement of Sudbury and Cochituate supply . 14,655 97 

Insj^ection of Water Sources . . . . . 3,669 11 
High service. Chestnut Hill (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) 21,248 81 

High service. East Boston (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) . . . . . . . 2,455 59 

High service, WestRoxbury (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) . . . . . . • 2,133 04 

Nes\- stable at Albany-street yard (total cost $23,- 

967.60) 23,677 47 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir (including stable, care of 

grounds, etc.) 15,493 30 

Parker-Hill Reservoir ......_ 3,015 46 

Brookline Reservoir . . . . . . 1,275 79 

East Boston and South Boston Reservoirs . . 584 14 

Fisher-Hill Reservoir 796 69 

Lake Cochituate 3,4 28 24 

Chestnut-Hill driveway 3,931 57 

Collector of Water-rates, salarv (discontinued from 

June 1) . . . . " . . . . 1,517 83 

Taxes (none paid for year 1890) . . , . 2131 

Damages 3,458 29 

Analyses of water, etc. . . . . . . 750 00 

Merchandise sold (pipes and castings, in cases of 

emergency) . . . . . . . 311 20 

Filtration . . . ' 5,647 30 

Biological Laboratory ...... 2,259 53 

New dam at Lake Cochituate (on account) . . 11,485 32 



)2,628 61 



Water-Supply Department. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, MYSTIC WATER- WORKS. 

(From Revenue.) 

January Draft, 1890, to January Draft, 1891. 

Boston Water Board : — 
Salaries of one Commissioner and one 

Assistant Clerk .... 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses and miscellaneous, 



Water Registrar's Department {4 mos.) 
Salaries of Deputy Collector, two 

Clerks, and three Inspectors • 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses .... 
Advertising, postage, and miscellaneous 

SuperintendenC s Department : — 
Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant 

Superintendent, and Clerk 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses . . . 

Miscellaneous ..... 



4,663 


56 


100 


56 


553 


24 


^2,499 


00 


120 


60 


265 


00 


101 


59 



i,679 16 

157 88 

20 00 

25 70 



Meters, setting and repairing . . . . 

Off and on water (labor) ..... 

Main-pipe laying (including stock and labor), 

" relaying " " "■ 

" repairing " " " 

Service-pipe laying " " " 

" repairing " " " 

Hydrants and gates, repairing (including stock and 

labor) ...... 

Streets, repairing (including stock and labor) 
Lake ....... 

Conduit . . . . 

Engine-house (4 mos. merged in pumping service 

account, from May 1, 189u) 
Stables ...... 

Reservoir ...... 

Pumping service (salaries, wages, fuel, repairs, etc.) 
Repair-shop ...... 

Fountains ...... 

Tools and repairing .... 

Taxes ....... 

Mystic Sewer (repairs, and pumping and treatment 

of sewage) ....... 

Amount carried forward, 



5,317 36 



2,986 19 



5,882 74 

2,604 42 

2,817 10 

386 04 

8,932 55 

704 63 

1,077 61 

2,237 61 

4,603 85 

607 46 

9,194 05 

939 81 

2,117 40 

4,413 61 

3,875 44 

29,560 18 

2,589 67 

630 28 

372 79 

30 80 

21,833 36 

$113,714 95 



6 



Watee-Supply Department. 



Amount brovght forward, 
Waste-Detection Service ..... 

Connections witli Cocliituate Service 
Protection of Water Sources (including salaries of 

3 Special Agents on Pollution) 
Anal^'ses of Water 
Filtration . . . 

Damages .... 
Merchandise sold . 



$113,714 


95 


5,450 


60 


12,114 


79 


4,417 


65 


165 


00 


755 


92 


1,046 


01 


86 


95 


$137,751 


87 



DETAILED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE SEVERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 



(From Loans.) 
January Draft, 1890, to January Draft, 1891 



Extension oj Mains: 

Labor 
Teaming . 
Blasting . 

Water-pipes, Contracts 
Miscellaneous . 
Stock 



$99,298 41 
6,384 64 
11,053 02 
94,179 94 
10,201 64 
44,205 67 





$265,323 92 


Stock paid for in previous years (addi- 




tional) ..... 


11,919 50 


Additional Supply of Water : — 




(Account of Basin No. 5, Whitehall Pond and 


Cedar Swamp.) 




Salaries and Labor 


$84,854 52 


Materials ...... 


53,015 01 


Contract, 3 Roads in Ashland anc 




Hopkinton (on account) 


21,575 67 


Contract, Water Plant at Dam . 


1,640 00 


" Building office 


1,344 00 


Engineering .... 


17,208 63 


" supplies .... 


1,216 83 


Rent of Diamond Drills, Derricks, etc 


3,560 61 


Teaming ..... 


15,409 20 


Freights and Express 


1,823 63 


Travelling Expenses . . 


711 93 


Printing, Stationery, and Advertising, 


778 16 


Miscellaneous ... 


1,507 93 



!77,243 42 



,646 12 



"Water-Supply Department. 



High Service : — 
Labor, account Extension of Fire 

Service ...... 

Water Pipes, account Extension of 

V\yq service ..... 
Stock, account Extension of Fire 

Service ...... 

Teaming, account Extension of Fire 

Service ...... 

Miscellaneous, account Extension of 

Fire Service ..... 
Water Tower Breed's Island, Con- 
tract (balance) .... 
Design and Drawings for additional 

Pumping Engine (on account) 
Copper-work, New Pumping-Station, 

Chestnut Hill, Contract (balance), 
Miscellaneous contracts on account of 

Extension to East Boston 



Less Stock not used . . . , 

Introduction of Meters and Inspec- 
tion, Cuchituate Water- Works: — 
New Meters ..... 
Stock for Meters and setting: 



Stock paid for in previous j'ears (addi- 
tional) ...... 



Introduction of Meters and Inspec- 
tion, Mystic Water- Works : — 
New Meters $742 81 



$2,559 


04 




17,690 


76 




2,091 


76 




142 


50 




316 


60 




2,120 


00 




3,871 


72 




2,000 


00 




343 


70 




131,136 
6,951 


08 

57 


$24,184 51 






$7,211 

87 


97 
28 




$7,299 


25 




560 


11 


$7,859 36 









$742 


81 




Less Stock not used . . . 


148 


67 


$594 14 


Improvement of Lake Cochituate : — 






Contract for building New Dam 








(balance) ..... 


$14,065 


40 




Miscellaneous, account of New Dam . 


1,298 


66 


$15,864 06 


Shops, Albany Street : — 






Contract for Building 


$51,709 


96 




" for Elevators 


1,486 


00 




" for Electric Bells and Watch- 








clock .... 


250 


00 




Misc. Items, Inspection, etc. 


2,066 


57 


$55,512 53 









8 Water-Supply Department. 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION, AND CONDmON OF THE 
WATER DEBTS. 

Cost of construction of Cochituate Works 

to Jan. 1, 1890 $20,432,974 43 

Expended in 1890, as follows, viz. : — 

Additional Supply of Water . $204,646 12 
Extension of Mains, etc. . 277,243 42 
High-Service . . . 24,184 51 

Shops, Albany street . . 55,512 53 

561,586 58 



Cost of construction of Cochituate Water- 
Works to Jan. 1, 1891 .... $20,994,561 01 

The outstanding Cochituate Water Loans, 
Jan. 1, 1890, were $15,476,273 98 

Issued during year 1890, as follows : — 

r Additional 

Appropriation,^ ^(^^P^^ °^ 

4% Loans, $300,000 00 
Extension of 
Mains, etc., 
] 3^% Loans, 20,000 00 
I i% " 250,000 00 

' High Service, 
; 3i% Loans, 100,000 00 
[ Afc " 100,000 00 



770,000 00 



Total Cochituate Debt, Jan. 1, 1891 . $16,246,273 98 



Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 

1890 $5,285,456 37 

Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 

1891 . . . . , . . . 5,854,530 21 

Net Cochituate Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1890 . 10,190,817 61 

" 1, 1891 . 10,391,743 77 



Water-Supply Department. 9 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1890 $1,69G,280 76 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1891 1,708,781 59 



The outstandino' Mystic Water Loans, Jan. 

1, 1890, were $839,000 00 

Paid during year 1890 .... 100,000 00 



Total Mystic Debt, Jan. 1, 1891 . . 739,000 00 

Mystic Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 1890 . $754,926 05 

" 1, 1891 . 719,722 81 

Net Mystic Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1890 . $84,073 95 

*' " " " " 1, 1891 . 19,277 19 



10 



Water-Supply Department. 



TOTAL MONEY EXPENDITURF:S, COCHITUATE 
WATER-WORKS, FOR YEAR 1890. 



Stock . 

Labor . 

Salaries 

Travelling expenses 

Printing 

Stationery 

Advertising . 

Postage 

Freights and express 

Rents . 

Gas . 

Teaming 

Repairs 

Taxes . 

Miscellaneous 

Inspection of pipes 

Blasting 

Water pipe contracts 

Coal and wood 

Pumping Service, salaries 
fuel . 
" " repairs 

" " oils, etc 

" " small suppl 

Miscellaneous contracts 

P^ngineering 

Engineering supplies 

Hay and grain (from May 1) 



$142,624 97 
338,713 07 
58,649 26 
8,337 04 
3,649 69 
609 78 
753 16 
239 41 
2,141 04 
6,248 42 
318 92 
23,272 14 
11,904 54 
21 31 
14,592 34 
2,041 66 
11,053 62 
127,080 14 
3,797 90 
8,883 75 
7,045 72 
2,212 36 
765 87 
358 94 
140,502 06 
17,208 63 
1,216 83 
2,391 20 

S936,633 77 



Water-Supply Department. 



11 



TOTAL MONEY EXPENDITURES, MYSTIC WATER- 
^VORKS, FOR YEAR 1890. 



Stock . 
Labor . 
Salaries 
Advertising 
Printing 
Stationery 
Taxes . 
Gas 

Postage 

Travelling expenses 
Coal and wood 
Freights and express 
Teaming 
Hay and grain 
Damages 
Repairs 
Miscellaneous 
Water pipe contract 
Telephones 

Pumping Service, salaries 
'' " fuel . 

" " repaiis 

" " oils, etc. 

'■' " small supplies 

" " new machinery 

Engineering . 
Miscellaneous contracts 
Mystic Sewerage Station, viz 

Salaries and wages 

Cliemicals . 

Repairs 

Small supplies . 



M2,144 24 

42,873 67 
24,050 14 

37 76 
1,317 28 

100 66 

30 80 

109 92 

38 00 
2,932 20 

824 12 

182 77 

20 00 

693 09 

1,067 44 

2,722 51 

2,442 31 

8,705 15 

396 51 

10,273 79 

13,130 01 

378 86 

676 14 

339 98 

3,567 00 

645 00 

6,700 00 

4,879 06 

52 76 

130 85 

488 83 



$141,950 85 



12 Water- Supply Department. 

STATEMENT OF STOCK ACCOUNTS. 

Increase. ' Decrease. 
Cocihituate Water-Works, viz. : — 

Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1889 . . $10,112 37 
" " " Dec. 1, 1890 . . 14,835 57 

Increase during year . . . $4,723 20 $4,723 20 

Mystic Water-Works, viz. : — 

Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1889 . . $3,829 55 
" " Dec. 1, 1890 . . 7,285 72 



Increase during year . . . $3,456 17 3,456 17 

Extension of Mains, etc., viz. : — 

Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1889 . . $47,677 67 

" " Dec. 1, 1890 . . 35,758 17 

Decrease during year . . . $11,919 50 $11,919 50 

High Service, viz. : — 

Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1889 . . .$0,000 00 

" " " Dec. 1, 1890 . . 6,951 57 



Increase during year . . . $6,951 57 6,951 57 

Introduction of Meters and Inspection, 
Cocliituate Water-Works, viz. : — 
Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1><89 . . $3,767 25 
" " Dec. 1, 1890 . . 3,207 14 



Decrease during year . . . $560 11 560 11 

Introduction of Meters and Inspection, 
Mystic Water-Works, viz. : — 
Stock on hand, Dec. 1, 1889 . 
" " Dec. 1, 1890 . 

Increase during year 
Total increase in Stock during year 



|358 82 
507 49 


148 67 




$148 67 






$15,279 61 


$12,479 61 


. 


$2,800 no 





Water-Supply Department. 



13 



© 



C 

a 

eg 

© 











o 


en 






o> 




CO 


(M 











t^ 


OJ 


(^3 


















o 


o 











<N 











01 





i-t 
















CD 


00 




t- 




00 


■* 


C^ 





00 


CO 


i 


CO 












3 




Ci 


3 




-* 







T-i 






CO 


cn 
















^ 


<M 








10 


CD__ 


0: 


CD_ 


^ 


(M 






t- 


Tt^ 












































o 




o; 






CO 






>a 




^'' 




co' 




T-H 


Tt 


»o' 


tH 




H 




«■ 




00 














<^^ 


(M 








o 






































-< 








































. 




IM 


■* 




<M 




CD 


CO 











t- 


03 


CO 





Q 


o 
O 




1 




O 


O 




o 






^ 

















l-l 










CO 




o 


C<l 




CO 




CO 





<N 





00 


tH 


1 


CC 


Q 


^ 








^ 


y-i 











OJ 


CO 


<M 


CO 


CO 










J-, 












■0 


00 


CO 


r-i 


^ 


c; 








as^ 






3 


































o 
n 






^ 


(M 




CO 










C^ 




n< 


(M 




CD 


c^ 








«■ 


















CN 


(>) 














































<• 






c 


00 


■O 




Jf^ 






ai 






















F-i 




O S 


c 


CO 


O 




i~- 














03 
















C: 


to 


CD 




■* 






CO 









O" 
















c S 




o 


CO 



































' o 




o 












(M_^ 









c 





















































H^ 




C-- 


IM 




o 






icT 




(>f 




1^) 












f 


<f 


N 








































^T 




d 


- 


































£S 




_• o 




































g 53 53 




o .^ 




































f^6 d 


a 


»■" o 



o 




to 






























|??M 


o 


T-H "^ ■^ 

CO t: ^ 






"C 


■ 


















O 








ff 


CO 


• (M OJ 


ft 

o 

CO 


tH 

<M 


C3 






















!- 


^ o o 


(M 




«■ 




3 




























^ 
















c 







cr 










c 
c 


_2 




-5 




■3 


3 3 

ft ft 


U 






CD CD 


§ § § 

lo 








o 


p 


C3 O 


c 


a C3 .5 


OJ 


-* <M 


ira 


? 


CC 


•* 


CO t^ 








^ 


a 


:S O 




=*.MO 


ft 


-3 







CD 


im" 


;4- 3" S- 












-* 


CD .-1 C-) 


CO 


'Tt 


CO 


co' -* 


-; 


(> 


C-l 










« 


> ca 


— ^.^ 






-^ 


<& 0^ 


«■ «• 


# 


t m •€& 


«■ s «. 















































i: 










t3 


















be 


^ 








c 








































5 










CO 
(31 






■ ft 

(U 




a 






























-a 

















ci 

a 







o 






3 




) 




a 
3 




c 


1 


f 
C 
p: 


-J C3 

a 
t— 1 




3 

3 

3 J 
3 -i 


13 




a a 

a t: 
a T 
W -^ 


3 bO 

3 2 








< 


3 [ 
3 


O 

O 
ft 

a 

o 




ft 

-a 
a 




5 


' S 

3 -^ 


< 


_J0 

3 m 




1 
3 1 

3 c 


a 

» c3 

5 


? 

ft g 
ft + 


3 a 
\ 1 








^ 


f 1 




C3 








3 tT 


t 




: <: 




\ ^ 








c 


3 t 






ft 






2 ^ 


1 
cr 


) 


'< 


J ^ 


©" 


^ 








5 


3 S 






■ft 






3 ° 




3 t, 




3 = 


■2 


i 1 


















Q> 


















a 










c 

C 


5" ? 


1 








P 


2 

3 

3 .M- 


P 


3 ?: 


c 


5 fe 
: a 


■ ^ 

) in 


C 


3 a> 

- ft 












d 
































CD 

K 

o 




1 


1 i 


) 3 




,3 

3 
p- 






d 








a 
3 « 


p 


h 


3 






O 

a 

H 

z 

o 

o 




h 


i I 

■J 1 


s 1 

^ 02 

3 « 




a 
p 

M 

3 




K 


3 C3 

- a 


i 1-5 





a 

r 3 
3 
3 g 


1 

<: 

K 


3 c 
3 P 

5 -5 


a 
> 2 

i "^ 

3 a 


Si -^ 
c 

« ? 

a t 












s f 


3 1 




o 






3 ^ 


f! 


• a 
■' -a 


P 




3 a 
3 S 


a , 
2 J 


^ ^i 












j o 










3 ,_: 









• .: 




1 


:> 








f! 


:i a 


3 M 




s 




P 


- W 


c 


) >? 


ti 


1 r 


^ 'A 


P5 H 


J 1-3 














































■i 


' S 






CD 




C 







a -* 




3 n 


h CO 




lO 









, »" 


H O 


^ (M 




<M 






H (M 




H <N 


(T 


q 1- 




IM C- 










O) 






























1 




So 


1-1 = 

* 


3 S 

3 

* 






ft 

* 




* 


* 


1 
* 


i >? 

3 p 

» 


* 


* 




* 


* 


C 
* 


> 



14 



Water-Supply Department. 









O CO CO o o o o 


CO CO -* CO 


O rH »0 


r-t 








O tH cc o o o o 


•* CO tr 


5 CO 


O 00 Oi CO 








CC CO Cq CO O O rH 


CO rH CO lO 


' -^ 


H -Tti CO -* 






'cS 


cn 1- 


- ai CO "O o "^ 


00 C5 C- 




•* 05 05 CO 






-2 


CO^ t- CO 




1 CO Ttf 




rH 00_ -cH 


"„ "* 


^. 






O 


c-f 






j^' 








CO rH 


r^ 




o; 






E-i 


m- 


















i£0 












Eh 






































O 












































































o 


O CO CO o o o o 


COCO -!# CO OlOrHiO rH 




o 
O 


O rH CC O O O O 


^ 


CO CO O lOOODCi CO 




r-i 


OD 00 IM CO O O 1-H 


CO rH 00 u^ O -Tl 


» rH 00 ^ 




en -* OJ tc 


»o O -^ 
<M 00 -^ 


CO cn C-l CO 0- 


-* 02 OJ CD 






CO CO CO 




rH CC -Tf CO CO ^ 












































G 


a 








rH 








00 r^ t- rH 




CO 




o 


«■ 


















O t- 












V^ 




































fl 










































































5 




o o 






























h 




o o 

O lO 
































(^^ 


■» 
























































- 




































rt 












































































3 












a 


























S 












a 


























Ph 






































-* 




c 








r 






Eh' 




















S 


2 


Ph 






^ 






a 




T 


'^ 


X 






13 


n:; 


"C 




a 


CO 






"C 


'^ 














^■ 






tH 




^ 




o 


^ 








o 








_J 






^ 




C3 
>> 


c- 
> 


■s > 


S 

a 


g 
S 


IM 


■ 










<5 






1^ 








? 


2 




3 


c 








a 












p 










r 






C3 








o 










a 




z 

a 


C 




s 


4 


;- 

a 


s 


^ O 


a. 


H C 






1^ 








oc 

a 




i( f 


^ e 
c 


' 1 


c 
c 


Pi 

CO 


CO 


c 


o 


o 5^ 


CC 


^ 


O 

o 


p< p 








oc 


■^ 


t- 


c 


IM 


, g 




t- 




+H 


CO 


o- 


- CO 




CO 








e^ 


^ 


>* 








CO 


(> 


c- 


4© 




o- 




-rl< 


(N 


rdJ 








« 


J. « 


* « 


* « 


► 5 


^ # 


f <ft 


« 


f # 


)■ 


^ # 


)■ .«■ » «■ «. «= 






































be 






































a • 












































































■p. • 






































a . 


































u 




a 


































'o 
> 




Pl, • 














5 


























































a 




^ . 














a 










i- 










a 




w . 








a 






^ 










a 














~ • 








■c 






c. 


















t; 


,_^ 




-f-a 






P3 

o 


c 

& 


> 

a 
a 


> 

p: 
a 


'^ c 
P 
^_ 
a. 


P 

> 




a 
o 

" 1 
-a 

cj 


> 

y 
c 
Pi 


c 
P 

a 

<L 


C 

12 
r 

p: 

c 
a 


> 


c 

7 


< 

C 


5 % 
^ 1 

b/i ?- 


> a . 

- "s • 

o . 
o 








r 
a 
;- 






o 


c 
a 

0^ 


5 


c3 


OJ 


c 
c 






1 


be 

a o 


13 

a • 
tt) - 








^ 


t 


i 







s 

p 


o 


a. 
'bl 
C 


) ^ 


p 

O 


b 


" 1 


> 

»=5 


. a ; 
5 . 








C 


& 


) b 


5 bi 


5 'g 

0. 


I 


bB 


bl 


a 


c 






■' ^ 


o 


6 


" §-2 
















^ 














0. 

•I 
C 






O +^ 










(1 


FC 






s 




6 


C3 






a 
p: 


2 


a 


^ 


J 


o 

CO 














C 












-ii 








d 






























o 

p^ 

13 

a 
o 








9 












o 


c 




a 




c 

1 


O 








ffl 
O 

a 


o 




a 

a 

o 












Eh 

< 


C 

ii 


c 


6 
1 


6 


o 




a 






S 

C3 


2 




a 
o 


a 


a 


c 








n 
o 


<3 

!2 


£ 

I 
C 




5 




> 

rH 

a 


0. 

> 


ci 

% 
"o 
O 

d 


> 

!> 
1 


^ > 

a, 
> 


i c 

0) o 


c3 

D ^ 

O 


13 
O 
O 

ft 




ra 
H 

13 
C3 
13 

5 


O 

d 


Q 

a 

o 












< 


K 




•-5 


03 


PC 


<1 


o 


P^ 


<1 


GQ 


>-s 


Eh 








iC 


tc 


00 


CO 


•r. 


o 


^- 


C-" 


CO 


t-T 


^' 


^• 


-* 


-*' 


o 


^" 














rH 




(M 


<N 


(M 


CM 


IN 


CO 




r^ 


rH 


rH 








Eh 
























<o 








•a 






ft 


c 


- 


o 
fe5 


" 


Z 


- 


Z 


:: 


" 


' 


a; 
ft 


CO c 




: 


S 


cS 
3 








* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 






* 


# 


* 





Water-Supply Department. 



]5 



CO CM CO O 
CO T-H CO CO 



CO CO CO CO 



?-l CO CO 



fM i-H rH 



-^ r^ ;-. 



a « 



CO 00 CO O? rH i-( 



QO CO C-J CO 



^ » 



Ph « 

















<- 










^ 




a. 


>n 


5 










c 




^ 


al 


r/ 




*s 


,a 





ft a 



T-H CO rH 



" O 

M -9 



Ml S CLi 







F-H 


03 


ooa 


CI 


a 


^ 


jq 


9 M) 


i-z 


^ 


,4 
an 


O 


.2 a 


an 


<w 


V 


6n 




.3 


0) 

g 
'So 
a 


O 


.5 


,2 


IS 


C3 




P3 


M 


H 


cc 





.2.2 ^ > .^ S 



• rr; tH (K 



C3 M TO Ca f-i C3 



flj 1.0 t\J W 



-S 5 



O H ca -2 



.r; .« Q) 



^^ JS 



fqM&Hp5«pqeqMHOfP 



[in P^ 



>. >» a S 

ii ii ^ -S 

" s ■*! ''S 

.2 .5 1=1 § 

►4 M g ^ 



15 S d 



a: i-H <o CO 00 

i-H <M <>) C^ (M 



•° M 



« r M 53 a 
1-; .-S a ^ •■:: 



O ^ ^ 



fi :^ 



^ -la ■?, 



^' ^ ^ ^ 



n 


?^ 






a 


a 


a 
a 


a 


111 




^, 


h 


^^ 


f!^ 










& 


■> 


0) 


C3 


1< 


P 



IM CT C-J (N CO CO 



^ "< 



16 



Watee- Supply Department. 



■^ lO O -rt^ 



0-1 CO Ci GO 



O O i-H 



(M CO CO lO 



(M CO Ci CO O -t< 
CO O CO CN lO lO 



^ CO rH 



m m= m^ m^ '^ ^ 



f^ ^ 



PQ ^Cq W 



^ =3 -s. S 



^ 6 



° >- .2 2 



§ -g 



_^ -S 



S .2 



tc 


■ ■ 




cs a 


a 


hn 


so 


O 3 


o 

o 


.9 


s 


^ 


C3 


a 


^Sh 


(M 


pa 


K 


H 



r^ .^ .^H 



1^ h ^ 



K^ > oT "< W ft Ui 



60 bj) M SJ3 to 



S"SSffiM«S5S 






5 ^ 



: : ^ 

o 

o 
a 

5 5: S - 


. ? ^ ^ 5 .. =3 



>>^ a f^ fi 



Sr ■S V 



OS -5 
^52 a 



S S o 



C3 
P 


-i-» 


M 


iJ 


P 


_2 


o 


p=; 


6 

•a 


f^ 


O 

d 


0) 

a 

02 






0) 

a 

1-3 



Water-Supply Department. 



17 



< <i 



■^ -: -^ 



a, Ph ft p< p< 



-* ^ (M r-l 1-1 
^^ ^- ^f^ ^i ^^ 



ft ft ft ft ft 

»£t) lO »o >o o 

C3 00 t-; Ci rH 

-^ CO C^ CO d5 



ft O 



■^ ^ 



^ ttf ,-5 



« P 



■? 9 S .3 



p P3 



a « ft g 



^ ^ ft « I . 

SH « *-'' -g ij S 'S ^ 

•2 I i I S 2 -3 -S 



M bo SB 






■S rt 



^2 fl t -9 2 
:3 K«^ g g 2 o 
M ;S P Sow 



be bj) 

.9 .9 



bi) bD be &0 bJD W) 









M S 



o M ^ 



C3 


M 


p 




O 

o 
n 




u 
■a 


hi 
■e ® 

S3.g 










i-i 


^ 


H 


s 



a 


a 


P 


P 


P 










o 


o 




;^ 


pR 


O 


O 




o 


O 


O 


O 


a 


a 


a 


i-= 


►-5 


r- 


C3 
1^ 


C3 
*-5 






s a 



OD (M (M iO O ^ 

rH iH 1-1 <N (M 



IM (N CO CO 



O - 



r-l i-l CO CO rH r-l 



18 "Watee-Supply Department. 



EEPORT OF THE ENGINEER. 



City of Boston, 
Engineering Department, January 1, 1891. 

Mr. Robert Grant, Chairman Boston Water Boai^d: — 

Sir, — In accordance with the reqmrements of the Re- 
vised Ordinances, I respectfully submit the following report 
on the condition of the Water- Works : — 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainftiU during the past year has been more than the 
average amount, but has been unequally distributed. 

During June, July, and August the rainfall was small, 
and the yield of the water-sheds was reduced to so small an 
amount as to cause fears of a drought. 

The rainfall in September and October was large, — that 
of October being greater than in any one month since July, 
1867, and the supply of water has been abundant during the 
latter part of the year. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds are as follows : — 

Sudbury. Cochituate. Mystic. 

Rainfall, inches . 53.00 51.23 49.37 

Rainfall collected , 

inches . . 26.998 24.51 26.04 

Daily average yield 

in gallons . . 96,658,100 22,023,100 33,323,300 

The quality of the Sudbury and Cochituate waters has 
been good, and the quality of the Mystic water has been 
equal to the usual average from that supply. 

The fluctuations in the amount of water in the different 
lakes and reservoirs is shown graphically by an appended 
diagram. 

The condition of the different reservoirs during the year 
is ofiven below : — 



"Water-Supply Depahtmekt. 19 



SUDBL'RY-RlVER RESERVOIRS AND LaKE CoCHITUATE. 

Reservoir No. 1. — Water was wasting at the outlet dam 
from January 1 to July 6, with the exception of two days 
in June, after the stop-planks were placed on the dam. 
Water was also wasting from September 12 to September 
21 ; from September 24 to September 25 ; and from October 
4 to the present time. 

The dam at Reservoir No. 1 is in good condition. 

lleservoir JVb. 2. — This reservoir was full until the latter 
part of June, with the exception of a short time in March, 
when the reservoirs were drawn down in anticipation of the 
usual large spring flow in the river. 

During July the storage was reduced until the 25th, when 
the surface was at grade 160.30, or 5.57 feet below the crest 
of the dam. In the latter part of August the reservoir be- 
gan to fill, and from October 7 till the present time, water 
has been running over the dam. 

The dam at Reservoir No. 2 is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 3. — This reservoir was drawn down 3.75 
feet in the earlj part of March, but soon refilled, and water was 
running over the crest of the dam until July 9. The lowest 
point reached during the summer was on August 17 when the 
surface was 1.25 feet below the crest of the dam. Water 
has been flowing over the dam since September 13. 

The dam at Reservoir No. 3 is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 4. — This reservoir was drawn down about 
3 feet in March, but had refilled on March 25, and remained 
full until July 9. 

From thai date the surface fell until September 13, when 
it was 13.07 feet below the crest of the dam. From the 
latter date the reservoir began to fill, and had risen to the 
crest of the dam on December 18. 

The dam at Reservoir No. 4 is in good condition. 

Far'm Pond. — The surface of the pond has been kept at 
an average heiarht of 149.33 feet above tide marsh level. 

The conduit through the pond has been used all the year, 
excepting from March 21 to April 5, and from November 5 to 
December 14, when the water sent to Chestnut Hill was 
drawn through the pond. 

The Framinghara Water Co. have pumped 74,500,000 
from the pond, or an average of 204,000 gallons per clay. 

Lake Oochituaf.e. — Water was wasting at the outlet dam 
during January, February, and March, and a part of April 
and Mav. On June 1 the surface was 0.39 feet below hiah- 



20 



Water-Supply Department. 



water mark, when the supply for the city began to gradually 
lower the water until September 12, when the surface was 
5.11) feet below high-water mark. 

During the latter part of October the lake filled rapidly, 
and water was allowed to waste at the outlet dam from 
Dec. 1^5 to Dec. 26. 

The dam at Lake Cochituate is in good condition. 

The heiofhts of water in the various storao^e reservoirs on 
the first day of each month are given below. 









Reservoies. 


Farm 
Pond. 


Lake 












Cochitu- 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 




ate. 




Top of 
flash- 
boards. 


Top of 
flash- 
boards. 


Crest of 
Dam. 


Top of 
flash- 
boards. 


High 

Water. 


Top of 
flash- 
boards. 




159.29 


167.12 


175.24 


215.21 


149.25 


134.36 


Jdnuary 1, 1890 






157.95 


166.14 


175.52 


214.56 


149.60 


132.77 


February 1, " 






157.88 


166.04 


175.48 


214.51 


149.10 


132.30 


March 1, " . 






158.18 


166.30 


175.70 


214.68 


149.48 


132.60 


April 1, 






158.34 


166.11 


175.60 


214.76 


149.09 


132.75 


May 1, " 






157.95 


166.14 


175.51 


214.53 


149.41 


133.38 


June 1, 






157.89 


167.26 


175.54 


214.49 


149.69 


133.97 


July 1, 






159.31 


166.43 


175.31 


214.93 


149.40 


132.92 


August 1, " 






158.92 


160.90 


174.74 


211.79 


149.01 


131.19 


September 1, " 






158.57 


161.66 


174.48 


204.51 


148.81 


129.57 


October 1, " 






156.98 


164.07 


175.35 


202.58 


149.17 


129.46 


November 1, " 






158.19 


166.23 


175.37 


210.75 


149.12 


132.37 


December 1, " 






157.76 


166.04 


175.49 


213.86 


149.34 


132.45 


January 1, 1891 . 






157.66 


165.96 


175.32 


214.41 


149.36 


132.49 



Water has been drawn from the diiferent reservoirs on 
the Sudbury river to supply the city, as follows : — 

Reservoir No. 1, and Farm Pond. 
Nov. 5 to Dec. 14. 



Reservoir No. 2. 



Jan. 3 to Jan. 10. 
May 14 to June 8. 
June 11 to July 27. 



Aug. 7 to Sept. 24. 
Sept. 26 to Nov. 4. 



Water-Supply Department. 



21 



Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3. 



Jan. 1 to Jan. 2. 
Jan. 11 to Jan. 13. 
Jan. 17 to Jan. 20. 
Jan. 24 to Jan. 27. 
Jan. 31 to Feb. 3. 
Feb. 7 to Feb. 10. 
Feb. 14 to Feb. 17. 
Feb. 21 to Feb. 24. 
Feb. 28 to Mar. 3. 
Mar. 7 to Mar. 10. 
Mar. 14 to Mar. 17. 



Mar. 21 to Mar. 24. 
Mar. 28 to Mar. 31. 
April 4 to April 7. 
April 11 to April 14. 
April 18 to April 21. 
April 25 to May 13. 
July 28 to Aug. 6. 
Dec. 17 to Dec. 21. 
Dec. 23 to Dec. 28. 
Dec. 31. 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been used 311 days, and 
the Cochituate has been used 355 days. 

The Sudbury conduit has delivered 6,596,000,000 gallons 
into Chestnut-hill and Brookline reservoirs, equal to a 
daily supply of 18,071,200 gallons; the Cochituate aque- 
duct has delivered 5,722,170,800 gallons, or 15,677,200 
gallons per day. 

In the Cochituate aqueduct a flow 6^ feet in depth was 
maintained during the year. The rate of flow in the Sud- 
bury conduit was varied from day to day as was necessary 
to keep the distributing reservoirs at the proper height. 

Both aqueducts have been cleaned as usual during the 
year. 

The Chestnut-hill, Brookline, Fisher-hill, Parker-hill, 
and East Boston reservoirs, and the Bellevue and Breed's 
Island water-towers, are in good condition. 



HiGH-S ERVICE PumPING-StATIONS . 

At the Chestnut-hill station the pumping-engines and 
boilers are in good condition. 

The feed-water heater was thrown out of service from 
April 15 to October 17 on account of the brass tubes in the 
heater having been destroyed by the gases in the smoke 
flue. 

The heater was repaired by substituting galvanized 
wrought-iron tubes for the old brass tubes. 

The duty of the boilers was reduced about 5 per cent, when 
the heater was not in use. 

A storage battery has been connected with the electric- 
lighting plant to furnish lights for the station and biological 



22 WATER-SurPLY Department. 

laboratory during the daytime, or when the dynamo is not 
running. Two arc lights have been connected with the in- 
candescent-circuits, one beino; hung over each enoine. 

One of the Standard Thermometer Co.'s electric gauges 
was placed in the engine-room in June to indicate and regis- 
ter the heights of water in Fisher-hill reservoir. 

A boiler trial was made on December 4 and 5 to verify 
the results indicated by the daily records and to check the 
feed-water meters. 

The trial was conducted under the same conditions as are 
met with during the daily runs, with the exception of care- 
fully weighing the water before it was pumped into the 
boiler. To do this it was necessary to convey the feed-water, 
including that from the steam jackets and radiators, to a 
weighing barrel, instead of passing it directly into the boiler. 

On December 4 the pumping-engine was run till 7 A.M., 
when the steam in the boiler had fallen from 70 to 42.5 lbs., 
no coal having been fed to the furnaces during the previous 
half-hour. The fires were then cleaned and lightly banked 
with 250 lbs. of coal. 

The connections in the feed- water pipes were then changed 
so the water fed to the boiler could be weighed, and at 1) 
A.M. the engine again started, the steam pressure having 
been raised to seventy pounds. 

The height of the water in the boiler was carefully marked 
at 7 A.M., and was left at the same point at the end of the 
trial. 

Duration of trial, including two hours banking, 24 hours 

Average steam pressure ..... 70.18 lbs. 

" temperature feed- water befoi'e heating, 75. (P 

" " " after " . 114.2° 

" of flue front of heater . 358° 

" " " " back " " . 198° 

Total coal used . . . . . . 8,716.5 lbs. 

" ashes removed ..... (J20.5 " 

" combustible 8,09(). " 

" weight of water fed to boiler . . 90,015 " 

Water evaporated per lb. of coal, actual . . 10.33 " 

" " " " " combustible. . 11.12" 
Equivalent evaporation per lb. coal, from and 

at 212°, including feed-water heater . . 12.14" 
Equivalent evaporation excluding feed-water 

heater 11.42 " 

Equivalent evaporation per lb. combustible, 

from and at 2 12°, -including feed-water heater, 13.07 " 
Equivalent evaporation per lb. combustible, 

from and at 212°, excluding feed-water heater, 12.30 " 



Water-Supply Department . 



23 



Coal burnt per sq. foot, grate surface, during 
pumping ....... 

Per cent, ashes and clinkers .... 



10.00 lbs. 
7.12 '* 



The table on page 40 shows the work done by the pump- 
ing-engines and boilers during the year. 



Engine No. 1 was used 3,466 hours, 
pumping ..... 

Engine No. 2 was used 3,344 hours, 
pumping 

Total amount pumped 

" " coal consumed 

Per cent, ashes and clinkers 

Average lift in feet . 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 

Daily average amount pumped . 



1,208,902,600 gals. 

1,160,729,100 " 
2,369,631,700 " 
2,677,281 lbs. 
8.2 
123.16 ft. 
885.1 gals. 
6,492,100 " 



The amount pumped is an increase of 10.5 per cent, over 
that of 1889. 

The same boiler supplied the steam for pumping, and for 
heating and lighting the pumping-station and other buildings 
near the station. 

Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries $9,000 75 

Fuel 5,845 08 

Repairs 2,013 24 

Oil, waste, and packing .... 741 80 

Small supplies ...... 424 08 

Total $18,024 95 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high . $0.0618 

" " " pumped to reservoir . $7.61 

At the West Roxbury pumping-station 14,313,800 gal- 
lons have been pumped, equivalent to a daily average of 
39,200 gallons, or an increase of 10.9 per cent, over 1889. 

At the East Boston pumping-station an average of 8,000 
gallons per day have been pumped to the Breed's Island 
water-tower. 

Water has been pumped into the East Boston reservoir 
only on one day in January, one day in February, one day 
in March, and two days in December, as the reservoir was 
filled during the night from the low-service main during the 
balance of the year. 



24 Water-Supply Department. 

This favorable showing is owing to the mild weather dur- 
ing hist winter. 

Mystic Lake. 

Water was wastino- over the dam durins^ the first half of 
the year with the exception of six days in June. On July 
1 the surface of the lake began to fall, and on September 
10 was at grade 3.02, or 3.98 feet below high- water mark, 
tlie lowest point reached during the year. From this date 
the lake began to fill, and water has been running over the 
dam from October 20 to the present time. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The pump has been run on 335 days, working 5,147 
hours, and has pumped 119,119,670 gallons of sewage, or an 
average of 355,500 gallons per day of pumping. 

The total amount pumped is 19 per cent, more than during 
1889; the increase being due to the increased time of run- 
ning the pumps. 

The total amount of sulphate of alumina used during the 
year was 323,650 pounds, and 191 tons of coal were used in 
pumping. 

Mystic Conduit and Eeservoir. 

The conduit was cleaned during the year, and is in good 
condition. 

The reservoir has not been cleaned during the year, but 
has received the usual care. 

Mystic Pumping-Station. 

Three new boilers have been placed in the boiler-room, 
and the four old boilers that have been in use since 1872 
were taken out. 

The new boilers were built by the Roberts Iron Company, 
of Cambridgeport, from designs made in this office. They 
are similar in size and design to the three other boilers that 
were built six years ago. They are 78 inches in diameter, 17 
feet in length, and each boiler contains 151 tubes of 3 inches 
outside diameter. The boiler shells are of ^^ inch steel, and 
the tube-sheets of |- inch steel. 

The " Jones Economic Furnace " was connected with the 
three older boilers in April, and the same attachment has 
been placed under the new boilers. 

The new boilers were first used on November 6. 

An independent air-pump and condenser has been con- 



Watee-Supply Department. 



25 



nected with the two 5,000,000 pumps, and the old conden- 
sers and air-pumps, which had become badly worn, were 
abandoned. 

A combined dynamo and water motor, furnished by the 
Belknap Water Motor Co., of Portland, has been placed 
in the engine-room, and the buildings have been wired for 
sixty-six incandescent lights. The dynamo has a nominal 
capacity of only thirty lights, but the pipe connections to the 
motor were made large enough to supply power for a larger 
plant, if the plant should prove to be a success. 

The table on page 41 shows the work done by the pump- 
ing-engines during the year. 



Engine No. 



1 was in use 430 hours, 

pumpmg ..... 

Engine No. 2 was in use 1,426 hours, 

15 minutes, pumping 
Enofine No. 3 was in use 8,355 hours, 

45 minutes, pumping 
Total amount pumped 
Total amount of coal consumed 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 
Average lift in feet 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 
Average duty of engines per 100 lbs. of 

coal, no deductions .... 
Daily average amount pumped 



77,644,200 gallons 
270,667,500 " 



2,681,804,800 


i i 


3,030,116,500 


i i 


6,506,000 


lbs. 


9.8 




147.11 




465.7 c 


>:allons 



57,141,800 ft. -lbs. 
8,301,700 gallons 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries $9,544.50 

Fuel 12,686.25 

Repairs (not including new air-pump and 

boilers) 403.52 

Oil, waste, and packing .... 532.28 

Small supplies . . . . . . 340.53 

Total $23,507.08 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, $0.0528 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reser- 
voir . ." $7.76 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption from the combined works, 
and the consumption compared with that of 1889, has been 
as follows : — 



26 



Water-Supply Department. 



1890. 



January . 
February 
March . . 
April . . 
May . . . 
June . . 
July . . . 
August . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 

Average . 



cochituate 
Water. 



11 



o 



33,680,000 
33,030,700 
30,844,400 
30,466,600 
31,381,200 
33,022,700 
36,701,100 
36,316,000 
36,165,800 
33,388,900 
32,955,100 
38,334,100 



33,871,700 



111.6 
92.1 
95.8 
98.9 
95.9 
98.9 
115.2 
115.6 
114.0 
105.5 
104.5 
120.4 



105.6 



Mystic "Works. 



so 



,187,900 
299,700 
,055,800 
,481,600 
,488,400 
,396,000 
,463,300 
,932,200 
,436,700 
,784,100 
,601,300 
,448,300 



8,301,400 



o a 

o 

n 3 CO 
S »<» 
o a " 



105.4 
91.5 
106.9 
104.1 
97.7 
104.7 
113-8 
110.1 
105.9 
102.1 
103.9 
126.4 



106.0 



Combined 
Supply. 



a a 

^2 



o 



41,867,900 
41,330,400 
38,900,200 
37,948,200 
38,869,600 
41,418,700 
46,164,400 
45,248,200 
44,602,500 
41,173,000 
40,556,400 
47,782,400 



42,173,100 



-Is 
sis 



110.3 
92.0 
97.9 
99.9 
96.3 
100.1 
114.9 
114.5 
112.4 
104.7 
104.4 
121.6 



105.7 



The daily average consumption per head of population has 
been as follows : — 



Sudbury and Cochituate supply 
Mystic supply 
Combined supplies 



82.5 gallons 

70.6 " 
79.8 " 



The above figures show an increase of 5.6 per cent, in the 
consumption from the Sudbury and Cochituate works from 
that of the previous year, of 6 per cent, in the consumption 
from the Mystic works, and of 5.7 per cent, increase in the 
consumption from the combined supplies. 



Distribution. 

The following changes were made in the distribution sys- 
tem during the year : — 



"NYater-Supply Depaktment. 



27 





SUDBURT AND COCHITUATB WOKKS. 


Mystic Wokks 


IN Chaklestown. 


Size. 












Total length laid 
and relaid. 


Length 
abandoned. 


Total length laid 
and relaid . 


Length 
abandoned. 


3" 








988 


4" 


1,516 


1,145 


1,416 


2,489 


6 


41,416 


4,121 


4,693 


421 


8" 


11,561 


261 


98 




]0" 


5,791 
36,349 




799 




12" 






16" 


823 


198 






20" 


221 








24" 


8,158 








Total 
length. 


105,835 


5,725 


7,006 


3,898 



The total length of pipe laid on the Sudbury and Cochit- 
uate division was twenty miles, and a little over one mile has 
been abandoned, making a net increase of nineteen miles in 
the total length in use. 

On the Mystic works in Charlestovvn the mains were ex- 
tended 1,792 feet; 1,316 feet of 1-inch and 2-inch service- 
pipes were relaid with 4 and 6-inch main pipes, and 3,898 feet 
of 3, 4, and 6-inch wrought-iron and cement pipes were re- 
placed with cast-iron pipes. 

On the Cochituate division a new high-service main, 24 
inches in diameter, was laid from the 30-inch main in Perkins 
street to Forest hills. 

This pipe is 8,150 feet in length, and should soon be ex- 
tended to the vicinity of Roslindale. 

The high service has been extended to supply a portion of 
Savin Hill, and over two miles of high-service pipes have been 
laid in the City proper, to supply fire-pipes and sprinklers 
inside of buildings. 

The Bellevue high-service pipes have been extended to 
connect with the pipe in Pond street, west of May street, in 
Jamaica Plain, as there were several houses in that district 
that could not be supplied from Fisher-hill reservoir. 

About one mile of main pipes have been relaid with larger 
pipes to improve the fire service in the City proper. 



28 Water-Supply Department. 

Additional Supply. 

The borings, which were commenced last year to determine 
the location and character of the proposed dam, were com- 
pleted early in the year, and a site for the dam Avas chosen 
about 300 feet up-stream from the preliminary location. 

Plans were made and surveys continued so that work was 
commenced in April, and has been continued through the 
season. 

In accordance with your vote of July 8, 1890, "That the 
Engineer be authorized to engage the services of Mr. Jos. 
P. Davis as consulting engineer for the new dam and res- 
ervoir No. 5 and Cedar Swamp," Mr. Davis was engaged as 
consulting engineer, and the following is his report on the 
new dam : — 

New York, Aug. 21, 1890. 
Mr. William Jackson, Oity Engineer, Boston, Mass. : — 

At your request I have visited the site and examined the 
plans of Dam No. 5, of the Sudbury River Water- Works, 
and now present my views on the points to which you have 
called my attention. 

The location of the dam appears to have been well selected, 
as the core-wall can be founded upon ledge rock throughout 
its whole length without excessive excavation. 

This rock, where uncovered, though in general sound and 
firm, is somewhat broken up by shrinkage cracks that prob- 
ably will permit some water to flow under the dam unless 
by puddling or other device it can be prevented from reaching 
the base of the core- wall. 

From the trials that have been made, and from the general 
appearance of the surface, it is not probable that rock much 
freer from fissures would be found by excavating a few feet 
into the ledge. I would therefore advise that it be removed 
only where found decayed or unfit to support the wall. 

Of course you will take great care to select the best 
materials for filling the trench in front of the wall, and to 
have them thoroughly puddled and rammed, and the puddle 
firmly bonded to the side of the trench, that access of water 
to the bed rock at this point may be prevented as far as 
possible. 

With this precaution, and the closing of wide cracks with 
cement grout, I am of opinion that there will be no trouble- 
some leakage, certainly none that can endanger the dam. 

I approve the form and dimensions of the cross-section of 
the dam and its core- wall, but would recommend that the 




o 



Water-Supply Depaet:mext. 29 

latter 1)e ])uilt at least one foot higher than shown on the 
plan, or fully to elevation 298. 

I also approve the proposed method of protecting the 
slopes of the dam and the location and dimensions of the 
wasteway, and of the tail-race, as the latter are outlined 
in the letter of Mr. FitzGerald which you forwarded to me 
"Nvith the plans. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) Jos. P. Davis. 

^Yhen the trench for the core- wall was excavated, it w^as 
found, at the southerly end, to be in a very compact material, 
practically water-tight, and it was deemed useless to carry 
the excavation to solid rock. Consequently, after consulting 
with Mr. Davis, the plan of the core-wall at this point was 
modified. 

The accompanying plates are views of the work of con- 
struction at Dam IS'o. 5. 

A survey for the improvement of Cedar swamp was com- 
menced, and will be continued during the winter, as much of 
the work can only be done when the swamp is frozen. 

The survey of Whitehall pond and its vicinity has been 
completed. 

For particulars see the following report of Desmond Fitz- 
Gerald, Resident Engineer : — 

Office of Additional Supply, 

South Fra3iixgham, Mass., Jan. 1, 1891. 

William Jackson, Esq., City Engineer, etc.: — 

Sir, — I submit herewith a brief report of engineering 
work accomplished during the past year by the "Additional 
Supply" force. 

In Januar}', 1890, a filtration field for the disposition of 
the Marlboro ' sewage was found, lines run, and estimates 
made on the increased cost resulting to the town from 
carrying its sewage entirely outside of the drainage area 
feeding the Boston Water Supply system. The South 
Framingham filtration field, for the disposal of the sewage 
which formerly found its way into Farm pond and Lake 
Cochituate, has been in successful operation during the year. 
Active operations have been carried on at Basin 5 during 
the past season. During the months of January, February, 
and March, diamond drill borings were put down on three 
lines for the dam, and as a result, the old site was aban- 
doned for a situation about 300 feet farther up-stream. 
On April 15 stripping on the site of the dam was started, 



30 "Water-Supply Department. 

ant] on the first of June the excavating for the core- wall 
was begun. On June 24 the bed rock was reached in the 
tirst section. On August 7 the concrete wall was begun. 
In May a water-works system was devised for delivering 
water under pressure at any point of the dam during its 
construction. The work was pushed during the remainder 
of the season until stopped by frost. 

The trench is practically completed and the core-wall 
built across the vallev to the surface of the o-round. The 
following table shows tlie quantities of materials moved 
during the year : — 

Soil stripping . . . . . 27,037 cu. yds. 

Eock 2,125 "" 

Trench excavations .... 20,464 " 

C'oncrete 7,178 " 

Embankment . . . . . 5,370 " 

Stripping in basin .... 18,700 " 

The roads around the basin have been built by Newell & 
Snawling, under their contract of May, 1890. Specifications 
have been prepared for delivering filling upon the dam. 
Gaugings of the flow of Indian bro(jk and from Whitehall 
pond have been observed during the year. 

Plans have been prepared for the "taking" of the neces- 
sary lands around Whitehall pond, and whenever the engi- 
neering force could be spared from Basin 5, surveys have 
been made of the Cedar swamp district. 

The experiments on filtration, begun earl}^ in the year, 
have been unremittingly continued at Chestnut-hill Keser- 
voir. Continuous and intermittent filtration have been 
carried on side by side, and the results closely examined in the 
biological laboratory and chemically by Dr. T. M. Drown. 
It is too early to arrive at definite conclusions in regard to this 
work. Experiments of a diflerent nature from any already 
made have been conducted, and as they are carried on en- 
tirely with the Boston water, we shall be able to know" the 
exact eftects of filtration under ditferent conditions on our 
water supply. 

The work of linino; the Beacon-street tunnel with con- 
Crete was abandoned on April 18 for lack of funds. About 
563 feet of lining was completed. The following table 
shows the cost of lavinof concrete in the tunnel : — 



Water-Supply Department. 



31 



Crushing stone . . . . 


11 


00] 


Der 


cu. yd 


Carting crushed stone 




09 






Quarrying stone 




92 






Screenings .... 




25 






Sand ..... 




31 






Screening sand and gravel 




49 






Transporting materials 


2 


35 






Preparing bottom 




^3 






Cement ..... 


3 


30 






Mixing and laying 


4 


24 






Forms ..... 




94 






Holidays ..... 




30 







Total 



;15 02 " 



Both Rosendale and Portland cement were used. 
Very respectfully yours, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Resident Engineer. 
In General. 

The new dam at the outlet of Lake Cochituate has been 
completed, but much work remains to be done in grading 
the adjacent grounds and removing the old dams ; this 
work may, however, be done from time to time as funds 
may be available. 

Plans have been prepared for a 20,000,000-gallon high- 
duty pumping-engine for the high-service pumping-station 
at Cliestnut-hill Eeservoir ; they will soon be completed. 

The work of lining the Beacon-street tunnel, which was 
stopped in April, has been recommenced, and should be 
continued as far as means are available. 

The disposal of the sewage from the several towns in the 
water-shed has received considerable attention. The Fram- 
ingham sewer system has worked satisfactorily, excepting 
the discharge from an under drain used during the construc- 
tion of the sew^er, which empties into a feeder of Lake 
Cochituate. 

The Mailboro' sewer system is in process of construction, 
and should be completed and in use during this year. Plans 
have been made by Charles A. Allen, civil engineer, of a 
sewerage system for the town of Westboro', and surveys 
are now being made to determine the sum it would be proper 
for the city to pay the town by reason of extra expense to 
it for conveying its sewage outside of the limits of the city's 
water supply. 

The experiments in filtration started last j'ear at Chestnut- 



32 Water-Supply Department. 

hill Reservoir have been continued. The results so far 
obtained indicate, as was expected, that different waters are 
not alike affected by filtration, and, consequently, a small 
filtration plant has been established on the Mystic Water- 
Works. 

The pipe for a 30-inch main from Tremont street through 
East Chester park and Swett street to Dorchester avenue 
has been contracted for and will be laid the coming season. 
This main has been rendered necessary on account of the 
increased consumption of water in South Boston and Dor- 
chester. 

Forty contracts for rock excavation have been made during 
the year. 

Two hundred and seventy-five petitions for main-pipe ex- 
tensions have been received and reported upon in regard to 
grade of street, size of pipe, and cost of laying. 

The pipe laid has been measured, the gates and hydrants 
located, and are being plotted on the plans. 

Sixty-one profiles of unaccepted streets have been made, 
and grades given for grading the streets and laying pipes 
where it was necessary. 

The records from the four pumping-stations, the lakes, 
reservoirs, the Mystic sewer, and the returns from pipe 
foundries, etc., have been carefully kept. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 

William Jackson, 
City Engineer and Engineer Boston Water Board. 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the Rainfall and daily aver'agis Consumption 
for' each month 



Yearly Averages shown thus 




Water-Supply Depaetment. 



33 



g 



'S 



i8 

is: 







I 


§ 


o 


o 


"^ 


CO 


o 


s 


I 


§ 


o 


s 


o 




o 






<» 




-*_ 


o_ 


CO 


CI_ 






co_ 


co_ 


t. 
































© 






•o" 


r-H 




co" 


co" 


C)" 


o 


-^ 












o 






CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 






'^ 


o 




IZI 




". 


o_ 


"^ 


^, 


co_^ 




o_ 








^ 


CO_ 


































M 


CO 


QO" 


oo" 


*" 


■^ 


CO 


a 


CO 


CO 


'"" 


"^ 


£ 


co" 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 








o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 




© 


o 


o_ 


to 


t^ 


CO 








o^ 


^^ 




c^ 






cT 


co" 


jj* 


»ra" 


CO 


t^ 


o" 


co" 


co" 


iS 


to" 


CO 


o" 




o 




CO 












CO 


CI 


I-( 




CO 




ac 




o_ 








o 


CO 






to 


CO 


^ 


00 


































" 


■^ 


CjT 


'^ 


•^ 


'^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^"^ 


"^ 


■^ 


t- 


"^ 






o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(3 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




X) 




°l 


o 




co_ 


C-1^ 


iO_ 


rH^ 




^ 




CD_ 


■^ 




lj^ 


o* 


^f 


co" 


oT 


lo" 


t-" 


cT 


co" 


cd" 


o" 


oo" 


co" 




o 


(M 


■?* 














Cj 


en 






m 


at 




o_ 


IM_ 


Cl^ 


Cj^ 


CO_ 


o_ 


co^ 


CI_ 


o_ 




en^ 


Cl_ 


« 


^ 


^ 


c^ 


tJ" 


to 


t-T 


oo" 


t-T 


t-T 


t-^ 


cd" 


t-T 


co" 
































A 
O 
































o 


o 


o 


^5 


o 


~~o~~ 


~^~~ 


o 


~~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


K- 


)« 






o_ 


co_ 


co_ 


co_ 


o_ 


en 


CO__ 


CD_ 


CI_ 


co__ 


o_ 


P- 


X) 








co" 


co" 


d> 


o" 






cd" 










00 


^ 














o 






CO 




o 


«c 


^ 




l-H^ 


o 


Cl_ 


rH^ 


Cl_ 


co^ 


CO^ 


^ 


co_ 


CO_ 


CD^ 


IH 


o" 


oT 


oT 


<o 


co" 


i>r 


1^ 


co" 


cd" 


co" 


t^ 


t-^ 


t-^ 


H 






























02 




(^~ 


~o 


o 


Q 


~^~ 


~o^ 


~o~ 


~o" 


"~"o"" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


r^ 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




". 




o^ 




o 




U0_ 




CI^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


CO_ 


3 


o* 


o" 


o" 


to" 


:5 


^ 


t^ 


co" 


tro" 


cf 


co" 


co" 


oT 












^ 




CO 








-d* 


en 




on 


o 


C-l^ 


l-^ 


CO_ 


•* 


ai 


^ 


l-H^ 


o^ 


o_ 


.co^ 


o_ 


C0_ 




H 


CO 


en" 


'~ 


to" 


to" 


co" 


*" 


■^ 


■^ 


CO 


CO* 


CO 


■^^ 






3 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


~o~" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








■^ 






to_ 




<M_ 


co__ 




cn__ 


o_ 


C0_ 




co__ 




^ 


en" 


t^ 


c-f 


uo" 


-*" 


co" 


t~^ 


r-T 


^" 


o" 


co" 


t-T 










•rr 


o 






'ri* 


CO 








CO 




DD 


co_ 


o_ 


•*_ 


o_ 




iC 


o^ 


o_ 


cn^ 


en_ 


t— 


CO 






H 


t— 


o" 


oo" 


co" 


o 


CO 


CO 


co" 


.CO 


iro 


o" 


co" 


cd" 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 








o 


o 






•)< 


rH^ 








o_ 




co_ 










CO_ 


































at) 


oT 


CJ 




C-1 


o" 










^ 


en 


c:>" 








-m 


CO 




o 


-f 




CO 




CO 




CO 






« 


o_ 


co_ 




(M 






C0_ 


o 


^~ 




I— 1 


co_ 


CI^ 




1H 


CO 


«5" 


co" 


o 


UO 


co" 


co" 


co" 


CD 


o 


UO 


to" 


co" 

1 








^ 


o 


o 


,3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(-1 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 







© 


o^ 


t- 






l>l_ 






o_ 


co__ 








































c^* 


cT 


1 






CI 


!-H 


to" 








Tf 






CO 


CO 


^„ 






o 






CI 




CO 






QC 




o_ 




CO 


o_ 




co__ 


r-1^ 


-d^ 


en 


CO 


CZ) 




H 


cS 


co" 


o" 


o" 


^ 


co" 


co" 


co" 


co" 


co" 


ci" 


od" 


co" 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 

o 


CO 

o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


"~o~~ 


o 


'^~ 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




© 


o_ 


■^1 


o_ 






ca_ 


CO 


CI 






^_ 


o_ 


C3 
































<Z) 


(^f 




o" 


-5tl 


o 




o 










(£ 


CO 








00 


l-H 








o 


CI 


o 


CO 


CI 






X) 


1— ( 


CO 


r~t 




t-^ 


CO 


CO 


•!)<_ 






uO 




e5 




H 


cT 


in" 


cf 


cT 


cn" 


co" 


fj^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


Cl" 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




X 




o_ 


^_^ 




o^ 




-* 




.-O^ 




cn_ 


Cl_ 






X 


lo" 


.o" 


co' 


co" 


'^r 


to" 


-*" 


cf 


co" 


o~ 


o" 


to" 


CO 






o 


m 




o 


CI 




CO 


CO 




en 








« 


^_^ 






"^ 




CO 


o_ 


^« 




r-i 




tD_ 


co__ 




rt 


o" 


co" 


to" 


f^ 


o" 


,-J" 


cf 


c" 


r-T 


en" 


c/T 


Cl" 


oo" 






■!tl 


■^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


CI 


CO 


C5 






o 


o 


o 


o 


~s~ 


o 


o 


~~o~ 


o 


~o^ 


o 




b 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o 




o 


o 




9t> 




co_ 






o_ 


o_ 


t^ 




CD^ 




o_ 










-i^ 


-f" 


rH 




en" 


cT 


co" 










cr 


OQ 


00 


CI 


C-5 


en 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


CD 


-* 


CD 


CD 








SC 




C-l_ 






c^__ 


o_ 


rt' 


o_ 


o 




o 


o 


C/D 


H 


c-f 


T-T 


co" 


lO* 


1^ 


o" 


o" 


o" 


r-T 


cT 


oo" 


rn" 


oT 




00 


CO 


o5 


IM 


CI 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


CO 

"~o 


Cl 

o 




o 


o 


o 


"~o~~ 


~a~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o" 


P- 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


X 


C5_ 






-a<_ 




ca_ 




CO_ 


CO 


rH^ 






en_ 


W 


^4* 


^ 


o" 


o" 


o" 


^" 


t-T 


o" 


Ip" 


co" 


co" 


to" 


ij" 


m 












CO 








CO 


o 


Cl 


H 


X 




Cl_^ 


CO^ 


-5 


CO__ 


>.o^ 


en__ 


t--;^ 


co^ 


t-^ 


o_ 




co_ 




rt 


OD* 


a^ 


to" 


co" 


-rlT 


co" 


od" 


-+" 


ici" 


cd" 


io 


cT 


cd" 




C^) 


c-1 


C-1 




C-l 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


Cl 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


cT" 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


o 




t-H 


19 


o 


^ 


c-l 


•* 


'l- 




CI 


-Tt^ 


co^ 








Cl 


,_J* 


t^ 


l^ 


o" 


tj£ 


rlT 


co" 


ccT 


co" 


.e^ 


cT 


-jT 




a 

o 
o 


yo 




-* 


05 


t] 


o 




o 






-f 




CI 


o 


cc 










f-4 


C1_ 




to 




en 


o 




co_^ 




























H 


CO 
















o 


Ti- 










C-l 


CO 


Ol 


Ol 


il 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 






^ 


o 


o 


o 


J 


_; 


^ 


o 


o 


r^ 


_^ 


_, 


o 








o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




<X) 


CO 


o 


en 






CO 


o 


CI 








CO 






c^r 


oo" 


^ 


tra" 


co" 


-r 


cT 


o" 


cT 


cf 


-jT 


-*" 


o" 




to 


05 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 




CI 






en 




dC 


rH 




I— 


o 






■^ 


o 


CO 


o_ 


o_ 


CI^ 


o_ 




H 


<>} 


•-J*' 


co" 


^ 


co" 


co" 


lo" 


I'-T 


cd" 


in 


cr 


■r^r 


lo" 






CO 


0^1 


IM 


(M 


CI 


c 


CI 


CI 


CI 


CI 




CI 


Cl 






























ill) 




n 


























2 




Zi 

o 


5 


3 


43 










1 


g 
s 




p 


45 

s 


> 






3 

a 


2 

D 


a 




C3 


.a' 

c 

3 
•-0 


1-5 


to 
3 


o 


> 
o 


u 


1) 






f-o 


fR 


a 


<1 


a 


<1 


M 


o 


'A 


A 


kl 



34 



Water-Supply Department. 



0^ 












o 


c 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


(3) 











o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 













o^ 


o^ 


o_ 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_^ 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


C-J^ 









































^ 




o" 




o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


CO 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 






O 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 






o 


o_ 


o^ 


o 


C0_^ 


I-^ 






^^ 


en 


CO 


""- 


o^ 


o_ 





ac 


^ 


<JD 


ira" 


czT 


[^ 


cd" 


co" 


^ 


o' 


co" 


cT 


co" 


o" 


co" 


CO* 


OD^ 


H 


■o :;5 


Ci 




i- 






CO 


T-l 




C-l 


o 


CO 


C) 




OJ 


en 




OfTl 




■a* 


-* 


^ 








CO 


CO 






CD 




>o_ 






^1-4 




























co" 


to" 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


""o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












o 




o 


o 


o 






o 


o 




o 


o 


o 








-♦^ ^ 




o^ 


o 


o_ 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o^ 




o_ 


CO 


o^ 












































o55 




o" 


o" 


o" 


o~ 


o" 


o" 




o" 


o" 


o 


o" 


o 


o" 








-S 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 




o 


o 








H «=,^ 






o^ 


o_ 


iO_ 


t^ 


CO^ 


o_ 




i-0_ 


l-l^ 


o^ 


Cl_ 


uO 


o 







"iJ — 1 


c 


•^ 




•^^ 


o" 






•*" 


co" 




-* 


'Cf 




cT 




s 




^ -^ 


^ 




ra 




a> 




CO 


CO 


^ 




rH 




o 


CO 


o^ 


co^ 




^k 


^ 




1-T 


■^ 


CO 




o 


-* 


-* 


^ 




co" 


o" 
o 

=2" 


CO 


o2 












§ 
















o 
o 


H 














o 
















o 









^ rt 
































CO 






rt 13 






























o" 










o 




























o 


CO 




















^ 
















-^ 








o^ 






































a 




























£2 










Ci 












C4 
















CO 












o 


o 


Q 


"3 


o 


~a~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~a~ 


~~o 


o 














o 


o 






o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 














o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


0^ 








































OB 


^i! 


s 


cT 


o" 






o" 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


0" 


en 


« 


o 


o 


o 






o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





CO 




^^ 






CO 


C0_ 


o_ 


°i, 






°i. 


(35 


'^. 








QC 


































B 




to 






co" 


c^ 


aj 


CO 


I-H 




o" 




-* 


■^ 


en 


H 


•^ ':^ 


^ 


o 


o 


Ci 




CO 




IM 


(M 




CO 




o 


C-l 




r-f 




OK 




a> 


CO 


^ 


•a 


•^ 


in 


CO 


U3 


■* 


^i 


CO 


C-I^ 


■^l 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


o 














o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 








, 




C9 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


CO 


"*- 




S 


o" 


>::> 


o" 


cT 


o" 


o" 


(3* 


o" 


o 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 





co" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 









^l 


o_ 




"*- 


<M_ 








co_ 


CO 




o_ 






t- 


« 




































!3 


cf 


c-f 


CD 


o" 


■*" ■ 


CO 




CM 




(N 


t- 


co" 


-* 


-cl< 




H 


"^ '^ 


<i 


o 








5 










l- 


o 


o 


CI 


c-l 


I-H 




Oa 




^ 


-* 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


•n 


CO 


CO 




co" 












(^ 


~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










Sic 

oS3 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 






o 


o 






, 


CO 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


co_ 


o 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


c>_ 


o^ 


CO_ 


o_ 


CO 




g 


cT 


o" 


c^ 


•^ 


^ 


cT 


Q** 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o 


0" 


,_7 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




CO 


^ 0^ 




(M 




rli 


o 














00 


<M 


CO_ 




■*_ 


<X) 




































o 


c^ 


o 






•* 




-* 


CO 




rf 




o" 




t- 




H 


r^ -: 


Ci 


o 




CO 


o 


'Jl 


<M 


CO 


CO 




t' 






CO 


CO 






OfTj 


o 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


Tf 


o 


Til 


'J' 


-* 


CO 


lO 


c^ 


c^ 


































lo" 


■0" 










(^ 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o~ 


o 


o 


o 


















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 










+^ " 




o 


o 


o^ 


o 


o 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


CO 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


C-J_ 




oil 


































at) 




<s 






<o 


o' 


o" 


s 


CO 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o 


o" 


0" 


^<" 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 







^$- 




Ol 


't, 




^_, 




o_ 






rH 


CO 


CD 


OJ_ 




t' 


CO 


Xi 


































t: 


CO 


iS 




o" 






^ 




CO 






cT 


^ 


^ 


-l< 


H 


■Q -:: 


t§ 




o 


c^ 




o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


o> 




OJ 




T— 1 




og 


■* 




^ 


o 


CO 




^ 


^ 


CO 


CO 


.<M 


CO 


■^ 


05^ 

0" 










r^ 


~~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 














o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 








■*^ - 


00 


o^ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o^ 


o 


o_ 








oil 


5^ 


o" 


o* 


cT 


o" 


o" 


o" 


CO 


o" 


co" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


cT 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 












l^ 


o 


^ 


""- 




-cf 








C-J^ 


'^^ 


ro_ 


»C0^ 


CO 










1^ 


LO^ 


c-f 


c/T 


C/T 


-r1^ 


cT 


co" 


c-f 


cf 


co" 


of 


-jT 











Ci 


CI 


CO 




C-1 


o 




CO 


o 


-c 




CD 


CO 




* 


Ok 




IM 


C3 


(M 


(M 


^ 


-* 


'I' 


'^ 


^ 


CO 


^ 


CO 

-+" 

o 





CI 
































CO 






- ^ 






o 
o 








~g^ 


o 


o 
o 










co" 


H 


0) *j 

1-5 -ti 


4 




o_ 








o_ 


o_ 


CO 










o_ 


^ 


I— ( 




s 




o" 








o" 


o" 


o 










o" 


CO 






Qj 




o 








o 














o 










CO 








^. 


o_ 


CO_ 


















o-S 




































c 




•* 










of 




















^.9 


;5 




§ 








CO 


r-( 












■^ 








O 




























rH 












o 


~~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


""o"" 


o 


o 








P so 

oS3 




o 


o 








o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o 








CO 


o^ 


o. 


o 


o 


o_ 


o^ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 








s 


s^ 


cT 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


o" 


CO 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 








Hsf 


e 
^ 


"* 








<»_ 


CO__ 


co_ 


OJ_ 




CO 






en 









co" 


1^ 


-d^ 


lo^ 


co" 


y-^ 


'*" 


o" 


t— 


cf 


o" 


co" 


oT 




^ 




j3 — 


CO 


a 


CO 


CO 




CO 




^ 








CO 




ao 

00 


Ok 






CO 




CO 


CO 


*" 


CO 


-* 


-* 


>o 


>o 


2" 


0" 


3" 


OJ 








o 
o 


§ 


""o" 
















o 
o 




CO 
C-) 


H 


^3 


CO 


, 




o_ 


o_ 


<3^ 
















o_ 













o" 


o" 


o" 
















o" 


00" 






O 






o 


o 


o 
















o 






ol 








IM_ 


o^ 


o_ 
















•"i. 














r-l 


C3 


c^ 
















i 








o 




























r^ 












o~~ 


~~o^ 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o~ 


" o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


~o 


o 










+1 c 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 












o^ 




o 


o 


o_ 


o 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 




o^ 


o_ 


o^ 


o_ 


CO . 






































0? 


o2,? 


?; 


o 


o 


o" 


o" 


o" 


S' 


o" 


o" 


o* 


o 


o 


czT 


o" 


0" 


cf . 


« 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




C5 




o 




co__ 


C-l^ 


CO 




°i. 


cc_ 






CO 




c^_ 


c^ 




OKI 




































Q 






c-f 




ct" 




co" 






o 


ccf 


(M 




lo" 




H 


■o •S 


;is 


CJ 




o 




o 


o 






o 






CO 


CO 


CO 


cq 




«H 




Oi 


o_ 


*" 




-* 


CO 


CO 




uO 


o 


CO 


l-^ 


I- 






w 








'• 












u 

0) 






a 


• 








O 




>. 
rt 


J3 










3 
Ml 
3 


a 


0) 


J2 

s 


2 
o 


'3 S r^ 


;~ S 






1— 


"2 


C3 


ft 


>> 

C3 


o 

a 

3 


"3 
1-5 


ft 


o 


> 

o 




H 


— 5 3 

0*^ '^ 


>;"S P 








P 


^ 


a 


<1 


2 


< 


02 


o 


^ 


fl 




H 


< 



Watee-Supply Department. 



35 



=2 g 1 

fa <^ o" 

r i*-i "^ 

■Ki "^ 

CO ifv ■-; 

^ t^ CO 

i^ a 



■^ ^ •" 






^ 






•iJ 


^> 


a 


t*^ 


s 


CB 


>1 


s 


CO 




f^> 


rl 


* 


!- 










s 


tAi 


a! 


t<J 


■•^ 


fl 



ft^ 3 



«. 
-« s 



•JJ ■« fl 
^ § £ 



^ 



o 






































1 




bp — ^ 




OO -* O M 


CO rH (D »r 


00 tc 


-# u- 


0- 






-# 1 


^ 1- i 


s: 


CO i>4 cn to 


CO 05 a 


ri ■* 


n; iT 







ri 


CT 


^. 


■ceni 

of 
ainf 
llecl 


5" 


-*■ 00 l- 


0-1 




r-t c: 


>o It c 


co' «r 


tc 


C; 


00 


d 1 CO 


i! 


-Tf. -!(. lO o 


- 


' 


rr -* CO ■-- 


If -^ 


*^ 







tr 


-* 


5 K 3 
C-i 


►> 




































;— ; T3 




OT 00 t- t^ 


<r^ CI 0-1 00 -+ CO 1- 


t- c 


CO 


~ T-^ 






rH O C/- 


CO 






to Cf 




(> 


-t 




CD 


^ 


-* Oi ^ -^^ 


I- 


r-< IT 


ri ri t-' 


c» 00 c- 


■^ P 




.§1 


■5^ 


d CO ir 


o 


cr c 


00 T-1 CO 00 0^ 


-t 


xr 





d oJ 




Ol <M C- 


CO 






n n c- 


n C- 


c 








IM 




*> 


































1 






o f- 




^ 


~ 


1^ -f .- 


.- 


,- 


.r 






1 






o c 










o- 


CO -+ to 


to uo 





A 


^ 




q O; 




t-H rH CO^ t~^ ri I." 


c 




"* o> 


CO 00 


a 


"5 


.r 


Ci Tt 






CO -f oT 




CO tc 









co" iri 




-* -i- ^ lO 


5 


CO -* CO CO -^i -:)• T --J 




-* 


-* 




1^ 




































0) 

fci) 




o o o o 


0000000000 


^ 


1 


S fl 




o o o o 


000000000c 











(M -11 (N (M 


Cs 


_ CO CO <M (M C£ 


_ t- CO a 




ri 1 If 


OJ C > C 








































OJ CO 05 <M 


0- 


~OC0IMOOi-IC 


c- 







CO 1 ira 


> 3 ^ o 


o 


Ol t^ CO CO 


^ IT 


CO i-( 101 (01 CO -^ 


~t '^ 




CJ o o > 




O <M CO 00 


iM CD 00 03 t- 








0, 


to 1 OJ 










































O 00 ^ <M 


ro(MC0-TfO-tll^r- 


" to 1- 


-*" 


cc 


ri 


^ 




CO t-l 


CO -* t- 


-^ o) to cr 


00 c 





0> 1 00 










1—1 




















ri ri 






Q 










































O C 




o 


c 


c 


00c 


C 





c 









o c 




o 




oooooooc 










^ fl 




o c 


c 


o 


c 


0000c 


<= 


c 





c 








































Total 
moun 
flow i 
liver. 


s 


o c 


c 






c 


ci c 


0" 


c 


CO 


c 




»r 






00000000c 





c 




,5 




c- 


""i o 


°i. ''^ °. '-^ 


r- 


-* 1- 


*^ 


CO 





t-^ 


"s 


CO" CT 


-*" of 


00" i-T co" CO' ^ Of 


r-< CO 1-- 


n 


c 


co" 


C5 O -* O 


<M CO t- 














Ct ^i_ *"* 


Ci 


UO 00 ^^ C-1 


0_ lO oo_ to_ to_ o_ t~ 


cr 


cc 


t-^ o_ 


c- 


o_ 


O 




t-T (m" Tf" rn" 


0" to co" co" -*■ i-T ^ T- 


cc 


t^ 


ir 


o" 






cq CO CO -* 


C-l 1-1 C-l CI ri CO C- 





c- 


1j 


CO 


c- 


CO 










c 
























C" 














c 























c 














c 




















o__ 


c 
























































c 











d 








0" 


c 














c 

































O 












co__ 


CD_ -!*_ 


CT 










It 








o 

(-1 


-^ 




c 








CO 


c-f d" 


'S 






c-f 




" 










cc 












CO 


-f 


















^ 












cs 


CO q_ 


■* 














W 






















n 


















O 










































■^ 










































K 
























~ 





















o 






c 




c 


o 


c 































E-i 












o 
































02 






c 






o_ 












c 




c 




























































s 


c: 




c 


o" 
























c 












fl 






c 


o 


c 































■S 


D- 






t- 


c- 










cc 




















'3 










































"e 






c^ 


'^ 













It 




^ 

















O 




















-^ 








en 












Ci 








to 


o- 




i^ 










-> 


ri 


CO 


































'^ 




'^ 














•H a 

O o 








c; 


o 





c 







C 





c 














~ 













o 





c 


c 


c 




























<= 


o 


o 


o 







c 









c 











o_ 




CO 














































c 


o 

















c 











cT 


c 


to" 


C O"*- m 


•2 






c= 


o 





c 


























c 




fl S'^ > 


cc 


c- 


c^ 


"^l 




c 





o- 


a- 





CO 








10 


■*« 




co_ 


<5 g 


3 

•i 




C-: 


00 




t- 


c 





0* 




a 




CO 


H 


d 


c^ 






I- 




c^ 


(M 




o- 












01 




-* 




CD 





o- 


C 


"* 












c 


to 


oc 





CC 

















































;? 


o- 


0- 











cc 


t^ 


CO 


cr 


c; 











1t< 




c^ 


(M 


CO 


00 


c 




^ 






C-) 




(M 


<M 


CO 


CO 


<0 


<N 


s 

































^ 




















































p fl ay 

fl ^c'p a3 
o a) g ij 


































0^ 





C3 































































d 













CO 


-S 







































CO 






















cc 


CO 


UO 


UO 


oT 


-^ 


0-l_ 






1 






















s 






CO 


•0 




t~ 


.o 






































t^ -, 






































Amount of "Wate 

diverted to Lake 

Cochituate and 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservior. 




c 


C 


c 


o 





















































c 




































c 






o 





c 































CO 


^ 


c 


C 


c 


2" 































0* 


c 


0* 




s 


c 


If^ 







































^- 


o 


CC 


c^ 


c^ 


^ 


0- 


c- 


CO 


Ci 





CO 




CO 


I- 




<n 







It 






(M 


02 







in 




c 


-1 


CO 


1l 


-d 


CO* 


cc 


cT 






<> 


i 


22 


^ 


c 


11 


CO 








CO 













^ 


c- 


IT 


oc 


■^ 
co" 


CO 


cc 


°^ 


t- 


It 
oc 


CO 


0. 





CD 


<0 


C0_ 

co" 


cc 


0" 






































« 




































0> 
50 






































2 




>* 






C£ 


t- 


00 


a 


c 


^ 


e<i 


C^ 


-* 


ir 


CO 


t— 


00 


cs 

























a 


oc 


a 





















2^ 


f-^ 


oc 


CO 
1— ( 




ce 


a 








oc 


a 


a 


a 


00 









3r, 



Water-Supply Department. 





^ 


































































•paioanoo 


s 
































THijuiBJi }0 


y 


~f 


CO 






-* 




O 




•* 


CO 


CO 


rH 




CT 


40 


eSB^naoaaj; 


^ 
































— -d 








































r~i 




























•i^ 






CO 




^ 




^ 


-* 


CO 




CO 


O 


O 




o 


•^ 


o 


O 


<M 


■^ 


C-. 


CO 




i^ 






CO 






,_, 






;::^ 




I— t 


^1 






. C5 




?! 


c> 




»— t 






C^l 




K 8 


►^ 

































r-* Ol CO r-* 



OJ O Ol CO 



ill 


•= 


TS 






















-1 , 






>■ 


O 




a 






o 




>> 

'S 


O 




a 


M 


3 


a 





P C3 

a a 01 » 
^3^-g 



CO O t— 



Cn (M ^ C-1 CO CO <:o 



I- CJ I— 



I— O i-^ 



iH jH C-* 



2" .0" 


uo" 


co" 


-+ 


0" 


of 


ira 


co" 




0" 






































^ 






^ 


lO 


(M 


,—1 














Ol 



































^ 








<o_ 


o_ 






C-l^ 



o a) 






° s a 



O l-H rH 



(^ CO 



CO OJ 00 cn 



CI 00 Oi 01 



00 CO O!) CC 



O O CO (LD 



CO CO CO CO 



Water-supply Department. 



37 



























t-^ 










, 










CO ^ 


CO 


CO 






CO 


-* 




-* 


-i' 




-^ 


















-* 


■* 










CM 


^ 


■* 


t- 


-* 


^ 


o 


-* 


ir> 


^ 


__, 


J_ 


IM 


^ 


j_ 


.0 


^ 


OJ 












lO 












CO 




r-" 




lO 






CI 


OJ 













t. 




t— 




CO 


CD 


t-- 


o 


o 


i-O 


O 


CI 


lO 


r-< 


CO 


o 


t- 


^ 


,— < 


<N C^ 








l-H 




I-( 










r-i 























c? 


o> 


?? 


Ti* 


CO 


CO 




01 


g 








6c 





01 





5 





s 





CO 


CO 


CO 
IN 


3 


s 


-^ 


^ 


-^ 


CO 


-f 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 





CO 


-f 


-v 


-* 


-f 





g 


■0 



CO CO CD 01 



CO g: »- 



»-( (M C-l C-1 



3 





CO 





CO 





a 


CO 


l^ 





<» 


00 


CO 


ira 


C-l 


uo 


CO 





s 


-* 


ti 


3 
■^ 


to 





CO 










;i 




§ 


CO 


s 


10 
01 




01 
00 





CO 
y-t 


<N 

CJ 


>o 


CD 





C! 


10 
5 


3 


OI 


CO 


C5_ 





p 


•^' 


to 

p 


§ 


-* 


CO 
c5 


co_ 




co_ 






CO 




CO 




10 


ira 


1 



C-l CO CO 03 



CO CO CO CO 



T-H CI 00 



CO rH CO (N 



O r-i I-- 



<M Ci CO CO 



S S i^ ^ S 



CO^ CO^ to (M CO (M 

CM <n" CD* CD C/T cT 




































^ 


(^ 




















§ 
















































0" 


0" 




CO* 




^» 


0" 


cT 


-f 


co" 






^^ 




^ 


C^^ 




t-^ 




CD^ 


s_ 














































'^ 


co^ 




I-^ 









I— I 


co 








•^ 




(M 












•n* 




CO 


1^ 


CO 


uo 


r-( 


CO 


01 


t_ 


CD 


n 


,— ( 










CO 


^ 


r'f 




CO* 






CO 














































u." 


xO 


lo' 


0" 


CO- 


CO- 


'-" 




'-" 


'-" 


co" 


'^'' 


c>r 


co" 


^" 


-rf 


0^ 


-^ 


-*" 




xS 


lo" 



CO CO CO CO 



38 



Water-supply Department. 



1^ 



"i^v 



M 




-« 

w 


65 






IS 


«P 


S 




(a 


^ 


■>! 








fc^ 


► « 




IS: 


«5> 






S 


KS 











O »0 0> CI 



CO CO CO CO 



i-H CD CO 



T-H CJ CO 



O r-i 1-H i-t 



a m Oi o 






I- 1-* !-( O CO 

t- CO o »o -* 



CD CD CO O O O 



O CD CO CO 



CO CD CO CO 






(2«M 



fcO »o o o 



CO O CO CO 



00 OD CO CO CO CO 



<>» (M <M CJ C<l (>1 (>» IM <M M 



•ooiAaos ni %o}^ 



1- CD SB'-' 



■*i P cao 
q S -* 
a> SO'"' 



CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


O-I 


CO 


rn 




<N 


!M 


c^ 


O) 


(M 


(M 


(M 


IM 




i^ 


o 


t^ 




1-, 








3 


liO 


iro 




t^ 








CD 


-* 






CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 
























^ 








r-t 


I-H 








C-J 


C-I 





(M C-1 C-l C-1 



;-a^ CO 



Oaj 



^- bo'-' 

C3S 



'A § 



a> 6 



«^i 



CO CO CO CO 

CO CO CO CO 
CI CJ C-1 CJ C-1 



CO CO CO CO CO CO 
C^ CJ C^ C-J W tM 



CO CO CO CO CO CO 



W T-H rrh 



tO CO lO CO 



iM CI. CI CO -t* CO C-1 CT O i-t 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



CD CI O CI 



OOOOClOCDOOOiOlOJO 



C)050103CJOCiC3C101 



OO CI O CI 



c* cj cj c^ c^i CI CI CI CI c^» CI CI 



r-« CD i-H »-t 



c^ c^ c~» c^ 



C^ C4 CI C^ C^ 



l^ C? CO 



I-H C^ tH CO 



lO lO *f3 O 



CO CO -^ »o 

lO iQ >0 O 



O o »- 



cj o a> 



rH r-4 CO 



O T-t CO 00 



CD CD CD CD CD CD 



COCDCOCOCDCDCOl— 



CO CO CO CD 



O 1- 

1— -t^ c^ 



CD CD CO ^ CO CO 



CI 00 i-- 



i-H O r-l 



lO lO iC »o 



f=^ ;^ <5 a t^ ►^ <; 



1 a 



c !?; « 



ro 




CO 


§ 


s 


o 


o 


g 


CO 


CO 


5 


O 


CD 


OD 


00 
fJO 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


CD 


-* 


O 


o 



>ica 



Boston Water Works. 

i\/Iy5tie Lakps. sirpd tipe l^aii^fall 07 tl^e gudfeury I^iVeK VVafeK gl^ed sluCing tlye vest/ IS90. 




c/artuQi^y 


Fehruafy 


A^arc/f 


Api-i/ 


A^ay 


•June 


\July 


August 


Sspiemhsr 


Ocfoher- 


^/o^smhef 


Decemhei- 




/A/ Million 
OALLONS. 




M i 


1 "1 1 


H^ 


i 


Ll 




i'»i r 


■1 1 


. . , 


'inr 






' 


TT 


\ 


"1 


1 




/.o ^ 






tt: 








' 1 


1 


1 


' 1 












1 












LZ 








































RAII 


TALL IN 


INCHES 




- 















rl^ 


4-. 


fic-s. 
a. 





























^■^? 
















FLASH e 


lARDS Dam 


■# 






3.5 1 


I3BO 
/29« 
«*3 
//90 
//3S 
/0S7 
m3& 
333 
9<2 
«97 
453 
80s 
7<S7 

SS7 

1 

377 
324 

229 
/«7 
HS 
IIS 

as 

S3 
38 


ses 
ses 

*Bi 
«9 
338 
3S7 

in 

ZTt 
238 
2oo 
/&* 
/3/ 

73 
49 
29 

/■* 

/92S- 
HBO 
I4SO 

10 ao 
813 
szs 

27° 
/07 


Ii24 
llfi 
losi 
3SZ 
903 
8i4 
7*7 
C7/ 
537 
525 
<t54 
33e 
3<o 
28S 
23S 
131 

lot 
72 
*/ 

IS 

u 

3flo 
3/« 
25« 

I3R 
l-t^ 
9i 


2/c 
205 


^^= — --- 




W 




RESERVOi 


? No. f-. 


=^ 




^ 


— -— =- 




,._-,-yr^ 


2/0 
205- 






— V — 










■^ 






^ 


















\, 
























-^^ 




i\ 




















— Vi 




^ 




















V 




— ^ 






200 
ISO 

ns 

i 

•J 

1 

|/S5 

/50 
/45 
/■« 
liS 
ISO 
IZS 
5 



















v — 


-;^^ 






2oo 

ns 

no 
% 

Ui 
/S5 --J 

■J: 

1 

iss 

01 

145 
lao 
I3S 
130 
IZS 

s 



















\ ^ 
























\y 
































































































































































- 








































rrrTrTO::>=> 


rCY^TTTr^r^ 


^l /.\ 


~ry~~~~^= — 


— -/~ 






ar DAM 3 




_^^ ^ Vn^ 


^__ 








X--4- 










'^^^-ffvo.r" 


'^■^^^ 












w^ 






















































































































1 






zizzT- 


\ 


rLASHB, 


1ARDS DAM 














Vf 






RE 


sknyoiR Uo. 


2 


—7^ 


/ 




1 






3:s: 












/ 












( 








\ 




/ 




















\ 


y^ 












































J — ■ 


FLASH i 


■OAR OS DAM 


t 










--— -■ -^ 






^^ .. 


^/rFs 


fRVOIR A/O. 


7. 




7=-=^=^ 


■ — ■ ■ 






















v=^^--- 






























































































































\ 




.—^■^^_^ 






t 








^::=- 










































rARA 


































































































































































































^ — 
























^^ 




















































































..... ... 






^^^ ■ 


-'^ 


^ 


_^ 










^^^ 






^^^^"■^ ^ 








^^^^- 






/ 




















^^-....^ 




/ 
















L. 


KE COCHI 


'UATr ~~ 


"-^-^^-^ 






































































































































































^^5:^;^:^= 


.;;5r-_^^-r« 


V_ BpA^OS_ i 


IVSClSiAAf: 


- 




■ 


■'^^^r:^?^-^ 


^^^^^^^^^•-1 


'-U^^ 




■^:^.:r:^—L 


JL^ 


^^==-" 


^zz 




—^ 


^^^^'^^^''^■^ 














A 


ySTfC La 











































































































































^ ^ <1 a 






<; m c 12; ft 



Water-Supply Departmext , 



39 



'k. 



IS ^ 



cs 






^ 


CO 


.^ 


M 


v 


o 


rii 


>il 


1-^ 


1:0 


«J 


CO 


■<s 


M 


O) 




sm 




^ 





s 






^ 



^ 
&. 








1 


































t 










SB — "r! 1 


















^ 


CD 


CO 






-# 


CD 




C3 






enta 
of 

infal 
ectei 


s 


-* 


(N 




q 


CO 


•* 


CO 


IM 


^ 


cd 

CO 


d 


•5 


-* 


d 


C-i 


c< 






« «1 


^ 

^ 






































P-i " 








































^"3 

■ eg 






<Ci 
























00 


1 








■^ 


-t 





K! 


q 


Ol 


CD 





CO 


i-H 


^ 


CD 


r-^ 


^ 


■*. 


q 


CO 






•< 





c-i 


lO 





c-i 


C/5 


lO 


oi 


d 


i-I 


^1 


ci 


rH 


uO 


CD 


s 






■^ -^ 


^ 


c^ 


(M 


c^ 




1^ 


I— I 


r-i 




C-] 


tH 


c-i 


IM 


CO 


(M 


(N 


CI 






^ 8 


►^ 












































c:i 




























^ 


















C-l 


T-H 




IM 











^ 


s 




CO 






d 


^ 


q 





q 


CO 






T-H 




CO 








^. 


1-^ 


CO 


CO 


"•^l 






^ 


.< 




CO 


rl^ 


1.0 


_^ 


^ 


ci 


^ 


^ 


-P 


iro 


d 


d 


d 


d 


•+ 










-* 


-* 




CO 


CO 


Tf 


CO 


CO 


■* 


^ 


^ 


•* 









■^ 






'a 








































« 


»-l 






































erage 
tof 
1 col- 
Lake. 








































































































» 


0" 


»" 


=1 


o" 


q_ 


^. 


05 


co_ 


co_ 
cT 


tS 


CO 

d" 


co" 


S" 


0' 


CO 


CO 










(M 


^ 













^ 














d 


s 






Ǥi.3 


^ 


S" 




q_ 
co' 


CD_ 


S" 


<» 


d 


q_ 


0" 







CO 


2" 


CD^ 


00^ 
£3 


0^ 

CO* 






r^sll 


^ 


'^^ 


C-) 


CO 


(M 


r-l 


c\ 




'"' 


0<1 


c^ 


IN 


134 


CO 


« 


CO 


(N 






ft ii 








































_^ 



















- 





























I 






0— El 




















































i 




of 


en 

CD 


q_ 






CO 


q 


-5C' 




CO 


co_ 
cr7 


0" 








C0_ 


cT 


■n 






s.s'Sj 




Ci 


O) 


CO 


-^ 









CO 


CO 


CO 









O-^ 




00 






^ 


\ 


■* 


c= 





t- 







o_ 


CO 




CO 


^ 


t-^ 


c. 


q. 


r-H^ 






=3 «-s^ 


•^ 


t^ 


co' 


0' 


CO 


CO 


T- 





1-1 


-^ 


-* 


t-T 


t^ 


CO 


id 


^" 









— ii m^ 


e 















c-l 


CO 




(31 


G3 










CO 


<c3 






c3-H_a;i-i 


^ 


iHi 


CO 


o_ 


o_ 








CO^ 


^^ 




^"3 


co_ 


■^ 


■^ 


'"i. 


^ 






0^0 




cT 


d 


oi 




0" 






^ 


cT 







a 


-* 






d" 






H°" 
























^ 


^ 


" 


^ 


^ 














^ 


























































































g 














» 


0^ 







q 

















q 
d 














q^ 
d" 


















c: 





















































c- 








10 










<M 


•* 


































































Hi 




c-r 


CD 













t- 




CO 










CO 












c 


CO 


i-i 


c- 


c 








■Tf 




CO 


(3 


th 




















;s 
















CO 
























» 

























































































3 

























































c 


c 















c 






























c 











































c 


c 




q^ 










c 














QQ 


G 


s 












c 




" 


d" 











c 
c 
















^ 




























c 
















'ri 












































































































"" 




CO 


























Ci 


• 
















CO 































^ 


c 


(_ 




c 


3 C 




;_, 


c 


C 


c 


c 


c 


3 
















C 








c 


5 c 


3 C 




<z 


C 




c 


c 


3 











•^ 


C^ 




. "^ 


(> 


c 
c 


> c 

3 CX 


3" <> 


~ ^- 


c 




C 


c 


~ ^ 


3_ q_ 


03_ 







5 r^ 






(> 


^ 


c 


s 


c 


5 C£ 


3 C 




CC 










3 c> 


"5 






K 






u- 


u: 




c 


3 C£ 


3 t- 




a-. 


<3 





t- 






CO 








^ 






































5 ■'" 

!-. fl 


Ci 


c 


cr 






— 


" J 


f "^ 


h -* 






-d 


•^ 


" 


3 CO 























' C 






^ 

















^ 


c:> 


c- 


L ^ 


e£ 




ir 




t *- 


' '^'3^ 


^ 




■^ 5 


r 




3_ 0_ 


'O^ 






Ci 


cd" 


t- 


" a 


r -^ 


c^ 


if 


3" 'J 


c" c- 


r co" 


kT 


t- 


" t- 


r ^ 


1" a 


D~ Co" 


to" 
































I" 




















































1^ 















































c 


> c 


■> c 


3 c 


■> c 


3 C 


3 C 


3 


C 


3 c 


3 C 


3 C 


3 C 


3 









d 







c 


'> G 


5 C 


3 C 


> c 


3 C 


3 C 


3 


c 


3 C 


3 C 


3 C 


3 C 


3 











CO^ 




i "1 


r_ 




c 






1, °. 
































































Y C 






r c 






I-" r-T 


a 




t- 




" C 


■3 •* 


-7t< 






^ !S -^ 









2 C 




f 




< 




H CO 






h u' 






3 00 


CI 






g-S^ 


^ 


cT 


c 




-" c: 


r c 


r li 


o" c 


5" ^ 


3_ •-; 



a 


1 C 
3" C3 


'. "^ 






"- '^- 


°°. 






t. C 

<^ 5 




CO 




3 t 


3 c 











3 




3 C 


3 5 


i C 




3 rH 


rH 






e 




c 




3 ^ 


!■_ « 


3 5 


• I. 


c 


3_ ■*_ 


C£ 




3_ 




1_ c 


3 CI 









Ci 








































CO 


^ 


3 C 


r c- 


f C 


:" s 


•f c 


■f c 


4" cT 





1 Z 


f C 


1 r 


3 C 


CO 


CO 






'>"" 








































r' 








































pj 








































< 








































(d 


































23 






r-i 












































CO 


^ 


— 


c c 


"^ C 




_^ r 


1 c 


-f 


, 


3 C- 


2 I 







-3 


> 
<5 




















































C 








C 


<D 


CO 



























I-l 


1 


H r 


-< r 


H r 








-1 I-l 


r 






H r 




-i r 


-< 









40 



Water-Supply Department. 



s 



c. 



^ 



&a 







•oC-lS 


. 


CT 


CO 




^ 




s 


CO 


r-l 


-* 

•* 


i-l 


00 

CO 


09 


t^ 
















riB piiB 

lUO.ljJ 




;i; 


s 


•paiqBsip 


n 


s 


;i; 


S 


s 


rH 
rH 


.rH 


r-t 











<Z3 








to 


to 


,_ 


1^1 




S 


CO 








V 




rH 











r-1 







C~l 









lL'n;oY 


►-4 








^ 


gjaiaj^ 











0-. 






























































-g gsi 











































































































•^ 




•<+ 




ro 




CO 






0<1 












































































































o 


































a p" 


fel 


en 





01 


en 


cn 


o> 








CTi 




CO 





CO 




^ 


J3 












































Q 
























0) bC6B 





































<ia 








c- 





•fls 


uipiuiq 


t-- 


CO 







CO 










































K^ 




























































P4 




-w 




(M 























5 


O ^3 


fe, 


Oi 


05 


Cl 







uiBa^s 

*■ — 'V 


OU 




Cl 


01 


Oi 


02 




^ - m5? 








































































d 


o ■ 5 '-S -p; 


rfi 




^ 




^ 






'^- 


















•5 g s M 



















-* 














>> 




lO 




UJ 


^^ 




fX} 


t~ 













a> 




3 


^sii 


^ 


OD 


CD 


CO 


t-. 


OD 


CO 


to 


-^1 


C) 


r_4 


01 


,_, 




1 


fc( 






" 


" 


" 


OJ 


o> 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


" 


CO 


01 








OD 


CO 


,_4 






,_H 


r'^ 






1^1 


1^1 


^J 








■^ 


lO 




'*^J 






i^ 


CO 




•^ 


1—1 


LO 


-* 




. 


^ 




CO 










rvi 










jn 




1 


^ 








C-l 


IM 


c-i 


IM 


C-1 


C-1 


(M 




IM 


Ol 


i 


•guijq§i[ 
































pnc SunTjaq 


s 




-!i; 


CO 


IM 


i-; 


■^ 


C-< 


to 





OJ 


iH 


"^ 


00 




































aoj pajDaa.too 






•vt< 


CC 


^1 























•[BOO JO -qi .lad 
































3 
























rH 






paduind A} 
•Sui 


PUBQ^ 


sis 






























}q§!l 


^■ 






























pa-B SnTjuaq joi 


g 


"^ 


t-; 


-* 


"-; 


^ 


'- 




C-1 


"! 








O) 


>-; 












































tr 


-ri 






-t 

















•JKOO ;o -qi aad 
































<i5 






























padttind jfinni;n^ 






























•S.18HUIP puv 


■fti^O 


10 


en 


00 


CO 


en 


lO 


CO 


CO 


IM 


I- 


CO 


CI 


IM 




































J.S^ 




































^_, 


(-^ 




c» 


10 




Ci 


00 


,__, 




<M 


CO 




































•s.i3irnirD 


CO 


CO 


to 


tu 


^ 

























































■-^ 




'"' 


c^ 


*"* 


^ 


IH 


r^ 


r~t 


?H 


ri 


rH 


iH 


OJ 




•petunsuoa 


« 




IS 


s 





CO 


C-1 


T^ 


IM 


iM 


C-1 


CO 




CO 




XBOO JO jnuouiB 


-a 




t-;. 


t- 
















-* 








9SbU9A13 J^[IB(J 


>-l 


to 


•ij 




^~ 


*•' 


'■" 




'~ 


■^^ 


'■'■ 


^"^ 


*~ 


"^ 














CO 












,-H 




1^1 


rH 


r— 1 








































lO 


I-H 


c- 


C-: 





10 


C-. 




cn 


to 


c 


Ci 


C-1 




•paninsuoo {bod 


o 




CI 





;r; 




9, 


^ 


C) 




to 


Tf 


r^ 


;- 






H 


(M 


r-t 


c^ 


IM 


c^ 


<>( 


(N 


IM 


cq 





IM 


C<) 


to_^ 



















































































l>; 


CA 






Ol 


to 


^ 


CO 






•podaind innoius 


o 





10" 




« 


^ 


Ol 




CO 


-:f 






at 


(M 




agBJSAB ^CUBQ 


































CO 







C2 




t- 


T^ 







CO 


>0 




^ 






■o 


■0 


10 


•0 


to 


to 


t- 


to 


■^ 


to 


to 


to 


CO 








lO 











^ 


IT 





t^ 


10 















































cc 












T-^ 


t- 














t— 




■poduind 


5; 


CO 








CO 


CO 




00 


t^ 


1^ 


d 


to 


,—1 


































































"^ 


























c^ 








Ci 
































'"' 


■^ 








C<l 


CM 




(M 




rH 














i-O 






















iT 








































































C-) 


§ s 


S 
































o £< 
































o 
























CO 


C~ 












































<l 






lO 




0: 








to 



















>o 


CO 

















^ 











'Si 


















I-H 


IM 








'~'- 






• Ul/f 




















ira 










H 


o 9 = c 












CO 


















\ Oi 








,-H 












lo 


,— , 


QO 






^ 






■SdJJ 






























^ a *^ 


"^ 


(M 






u:o 








CL. 


rH 






CO 










lO 








lis 








ITS 






lO 








































C'3 


CC 


CO 


r-i. 





^ 
















en 








§1 
































































o 




■*_ 












tc 


o_ 










°2. 






<i 






























'3) 


I-H 










(M 


C- 






rH 










o c E a 


•«?/f 


„§_ 


§ 











C 







8 




cq 


1 § 




CO 


tr 




















1 to 






■&.(// 
































^ ^ '-H 


00 













tL 






^ 




to 


1 CO 
































■a . 
























k 




, 




B 




O 


■< 


>1 
















^ 




a 
,c 


III 


03 




H 


5 


c3 
3 




t. 






•^ a 


i 


3 


& 


ID 




£ 
c 


a 

0) 


13 S) 












1-5 


1^ 


f^ 


, < 


(^ 


f-s 




5 ^ 


tE 





1^ 


ft 


Ci 



Water-Supply Department. 



41 





. nn-i 




o o o 


o o o o o 


o 


o o o 


o 


I'-"" 




o o o 


o o o o o 


o 




o 


]t;;oi jospunod 


cc 


'^ ^« *^ 


CO^ CO_ 0_ CO '-'0_ 




co_ •* t- 


00_ 


001 J-'cI spuiiod 


^ 


3 g ;? 


o" oT of ,-T uo" 

CO O -+ O ^1 


CO 


oT 00 fof 

CI 05 CO 


-)H 


-:iooj: nt Xjno; 


^ 


J, 


■ co" co- 


-f^ 1- 0_ C0__ !M„ 


■*. "'^ '~1 

ocT CO* rj^ 






■-' 


in lO 


o o ir 


lO "0 


UO 


lO lO uoi 


o 






^ 


o 


i-H 05 00 (M OO 


05 


o 5 Jj 


rH 


Ut IJil 83BJ3AV" 


•« 


CO ig --P 


^ lO CO CO_ (N 


oq 


1— ( 


1 


O • CD 
- ^ ^ 


CD cd' CD 1-^ CO 

-* -^ -1* Tt* TtH 


CO 


s - s 




•[BOO 


^ 


o- 


-Tt 


t. 




c 


CO 


c- 


00 


(05 


CO -t: -ti 


l_ 


JO pntiod .od 
p3dcuucl.^;!;nntib 




I-- 


CC 


t-I 


c 


0- 


c* 


<0 


CO 


o 


-^ 


^ 


lO 


ICO 


-* 


§ 


^ 


-* -5 


^ 


"3 


5 


^ 


t- CO -* 
^ rtl -3< 


^ 


•g.i95in!p pUB 


i. . 




c- 


Ti; 


CD 


o 


0- 




o 


o 


lO ^ 00 


OO 


saqsB -^naD aa.j 


(S;"S 


o 


c 


csi 


OO 


c- 


c- 


^ 


o 


o 


d d 05 


d 


■s.wi[a![D 




lO r-l lO 


^ 


CO CO o -* 


-* 


O CC 


,_3 


CO 


pau saqsu 




Ol rH CO 
O CO O 


CD C-l i-H -* en 
C0__ -*^ CD_ en C^_^ 


C3 
CD 


'" -. s 


K 


JO janoaiB 


r-T i-T i-T 




ci 


I-l I-H ci" 


rt 


8SB.I3AB A\lV(l 


































CO OD in 


O CO O I-- o 


o 


as 1- 


h- 


u-O 


•pamnsnoo 




>ra_ i-;^ co_ 


O^ CO CD_ i-l O 




-i^ -* th 


C) 


[BOO JO jnnocuB 


<5 


t-^ t-T to" 


icT >r 


t-, 


O GJ 


c^ 


o co" i-T 


J^ 


93BjaAB X[!Bq; 


H 




IH T-l 1-1 (M r-l 




l-H iH C^ 


iH 




^ 


c 


o o 


O O O CO o 


o 


o o o 


o 


•psdtnnd 


^ 


J' 


CD O 


o o o o o 

-* (N Ol 1-1 CC 


O) 


o o o 




junooiB 




co" rn" 


l^ 


i-l CI C-l uo 


CC 


o -TiT c-f 


rH 


gSBJSAB ^ltBQ[ 


ti 


c^ 


cT 


o_ 


CO CO CO ^ ■* 

Tj<_ -.*_ co_ o_ ai 


o 


Ci .-( CO 
l-l CD_ -^^ 


o 

CO 






] "^ 


co" 


'- 


'- 


oc 


03 CO 


co" 


^- 


1- 


en 


co" 






o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


c 


c= 


o 


o 


o o o 


o 
o 






o 


o 


o 


o 




c 


c 


o 


o 




o o 


o 






^ 






0- 


c 


CO 


■^ 


o^ 






U0__ rl 




■psdiund 


^ 


o~ 


-^ 


-* 


c; 








cjT 


o" 


^, 




s 


jnnoLUB icjox 


•5 


s 


5 


CO 


ir- 


cr 


t: 




co_ 


^. 


O -^ i-H 

CO ^ -=t< 


§■ 




Ci 


^ 


c^ 


cT 




,— 


o 


ir 


i-T 


of 


r-T oc 


'M 








•* 




c^ 




a- 


l^ 




^ IM Oi 


o 








o 


c^ 






- 




<N 


C-i 


(N (N (M 


so" 










c 


o 


c 


o o o o 


o 


o o o 


§ 




P' 




o 




o 




o o o o 


o 


o o o 


M 1 




ss 


^ 


CC 


o_ 


Cs 




-il_ 0_ ^_ 


!N 


(N (M ■=# 








-2 


^ 


p_ 


eg" 


co" c: 


co" CO* cd" 


CO 


o* c^ of 


1 


CO 


ss 




b- 




-tH 


CO 1-H .O CO CD 


101 


as CO CM 






^ 


oz 


*^ 


co^ 




'"t. 


L 


i-O 






1- o 


s" 


o 


<1 S, 


^ 




c 


OQ- 




i-T c 


rH ^ 


co" 


ai' (d' ccT 


3 






£' 








CO c- 


3* '^ 




CO (M <N 


CO 






c- 


■^ 


IM 


c 


o 


o 




^' 


tH 


!N <M (N 


cq* 


oc 


~" 


uO 


o 


.O 


o 


c. 


l'- 


c= 


o 


>o 


c 


<=> tn 


iO 


1 


^ 


o 


'"' 


o 


c 


-* 


c^ 


CO 


T-t 


O O "^ 


"^ 


IS 


■2 '5,2 






























w 




• ^ 




J, 


n 


c 


c- 


CD 




,_ 


CD 


-* -^ C=) 


.Q 




p< 


5^ 


c: 




-t 




-; 


o 




cr. 




c^ 








i§ 


'~ 


CC 


'~ 


'" 






'~' 


CD 


•* 




'■" 


CD 


co^ 








c 


c 


o 




c 


r- 




o 


o 






o 


o 




ai 




c 


cr 


o 




c 


s 




o 


o 








o 




j; 




ir- 


•"1. 




o 


CD 


'^ 


■o_ 








o 






3 Q 
<1 A 


o 


■o 


c- 


CO* 




^ 


oc 


<T 


c-f 


o" 






CI 


* 


(N 
















CC 




Oi 






CO 




d 


■ S 
C5 


I- 




cT 




*" 






co" 


o_ 






iH^ 

d" 


o 




(M 


"^ 


'"' 










^ 


^ 








Si 


SB 

— d • 
■2'S.S 


ss 




o 


o 




c 


o 




o 


o 






o 


o 








o 


o 




c 


CO 




^ 


CO 






o 


tH 


3 

z; 


^ 


























































^3*^ 




S 










o 


















a 


1 


c^ 


o 








o 
1-1 


CO 


?5 


31 






c» 






. 


















^ 


o 




c 


> o 


o 




"o "S 




















o 






o 


o 






s 
















1-^ 






c 




cq 




o 
















o 




<> 




cf 


^" 




Ji 


















■* 


CO 


c 
























CO 


^_ 


c 


I^ 


:. ci^ 


CO 


d 


<i p< 
















I-l 


Tt< 




■- 


co" 


f^" 
































?; 


6B 


s 
















o 


ira 




ir 


lO 


o 




















o 


-* 




-!| 




o 


3 


— a . 


r^ 




























z; 


o pS 


~' 


























1 


W 
































^5- 
























oc 


CI 


o 




















CO 


o 






00 


CO 




Ph 


§ 


















IM 








■5l< 






























'O ^ 


© 

H 


1 


> 

3 

a 


s 
3 


3 

3 






= a 

3 


"5 


3 
3 


a 


hi 
c 


a 

s 

o 


a 

o 

1) 










1-5 


;^ 


<5 


Js 


1-5 


•-0 


<1 


da 


o 


^ 


fi 





42 



Water-Supply Department. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Sudbury River Water-shed for 

the Year 1890. 



1890. 


a 


i 


p 

3 


< 


a 
S 



a 


»-5 


< 


3 

S 

ft 
ffl 


,^ 





C 


s 




£ 




1 






0.18 




0.17 










i 
1 




2 




0.13 


i 












3 




1.075 
0.05 








0.115 
0.025 
0.135 

0.035 










1.055 


4 • • • 


0.155 


0.17 


0.88 
0.635 


0.275 

0.29 

0.22 






2.50 






5.. .. 




0.105 






6 


0.19 




0.885 


0.415 


0.01 


2.125 






0.285 


7 . 








8 




0.88 




0.205 








0.76 






9 .... . 








0.91 






0.295 
0.075 








10 




0.07 




0.365 






0.185 


0.055 






11 . . o . 


0.63 


0.10 












12 .... . 
















0.215 




13 


0.04 








0.09 
0.46 
0.43 
0.05 


1.035 






1.52 






U 


0.245 








0.065 


0.575 






15 . . ... 




1.36 








0.21 




16 


0.74 










0.55 






IT 












0.655 


1.595 


0.775 


2.15 


18 ... . 




0.235 














1.225 




19 




0.56 








0.42 
0.02 










20 


0.095 


0.66 




0.65 




0.735 
0.075 




2.18 






21 


0.055 








22 . 






















23 


0.08 




2.135 










0.675 








0.01 


24 












2.45 






25 




0.705 


0.365 


0.215 




0.05 


0.555 
0.84 










26 . 




1.17 


0.29 






1.76 


97 


0.515 


0.425 




0.935 


1.10 
0.175 


0.16 








23 










29 




0.82 






0.085 






0.395 






30 ... 












0.11 






0.05 


31 


0.24 




0.15 








0.23 




























Totals . . 


2.53 


3.505 


7.735 


2.645 


5.21 


2.03 


2.46 


3.865 


6.00 


10. .51 


1.20 


5.31 



Total rainfall during the year, 53.00 inches. 

Being an average of two gauges, loeated at Framingham and Ashland. 



"\y A TE R-SuppLY Department . 



43 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituaie, for ihe Year 

1890. 



1S90. 



Totals . . 2.3-t 



0.17 



5.31 1.78 2.31 3.34 6.47 10.11 1.24 



01 



Total Rainfall during the year, 51.23 inches. 



44 



Water-Supply Department. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Mystic Lake Water-shed for the 

Year 1890. 



1890. 


3 

3 

% 


February. 


March. 


< 


1 


5 
1-^ 


3 

1-5 


3 
60 
3 
<1 


u 

o 

g 

ft 
m 


s 

3. 

a 
O 


> 
o 

'A 


a 
.a 

a 

01 

o 

(D 
ft 


1 






0.20 




0.20 






0.025 




. . . 






2 




0.155 


















0.005 




3 






0.80 








0.02 








1.135 


4 




0.12 




0.16 




0.54 


0.01 






1.21 


. . . 






0.35 








1.18 
0.92 


0.43 
0.28 




0.03 


0.01 
0.805 








6. , . • . 


0.02 




0.78 




0.285 


7 




. . . 




0.44 






0.01 






0.17 






8 




0.71 






0.395 










0.52 




. . . 


9 








0.81 








0.37 








. 


10 .... . 


0.11 


0.05 






0.37 






0.21 


0.225 


0.075 


0.02 




11 .... . 


0.445 




0.10 






0.62 




0.005 


0.30 








12 




. • . 






. . . 


0.525 






0.53 




0.23 




13 


0.035 




0.01 






0.89 






0.12 








14 .... 




0.255 


1.325 


0.005 


0.375 
0.44 








0.075 
0.585 


0.315 






15 


0.405 










0.235 




16 


0.215 








0.11 








0.53 








17 














0.01 


0.435 


0.19 


1.87 


0.895 




18 ... 




0.325 










1.88 


19 




0.415 








0.30 












20 


0.12 


0.68 




0.715 




0.025 


0.86 




2.405 




■ ■ ■ 


21 






0.05 










0.04 








0.005 


22 


01 














0.135 










23 


o.n 




1.78 










0.195 










24 




0.04 










0.36 


0.005 




1.77 






25 

26 






"'8 


135 




05 


305 
























0.93 




0.33 


. . . 




1.365 


27 


0.55 


0.04 




0.855 


1.48 


0.045 




0.975 










28 




0.355 


0.75 
08 




0.115 
















29 








0.025 






0.505 






00 • 


0.275 
0.08 












0.355 
3.64 








CI 




0.11 








0.27 










Totals . . 


2.725 


3.38 


6.68 


2.405 


6.30 


3.38 


2.265 


3.70 


8.84 


1.385 


4.67 



Total rainfall during the year, 49.37 inches. 

Being au average of two gauges located at Mystic Lake and Winchester. 



Water-Supply Department. 



45 



l[ 








^, J 


: „ 






r| 








' CO >- 










t 


O 

Eh 


I— 1 r~ 


I CO O 00 O 1 


- O CO 


r^ O o 










. 




3 •* u 


•* •* Tif 




" " 


t* -cri 




























CO 


CO 






s 














O 


) 0-1 ^ I 













1 


fl 


o ir 




5 ^ ^ u 


^ CO lO 


UO TJi O 


1 ^" 




























■* 


1 '"'' 




















o 














^ 




1-1 rl T- 


'' '"' 




























^^ 




1 'O 






■g 
















r-^ C- 


I- 




c 


5 O 




^ l- 




3 1 05 






o 


o o o 00 a 


5 Ca Ca I 


00 


o t- c: 


3 1 00 








T-i rn i-( 












" 
































^ 




























-^ cr 


lO Ci cc 






1 OD 






m 


CD c: 


O ^ CO CO CO CO CO 


-* ^ n 


^ 


























CO 


^ 










i-H t- CO (M lO CI lO 


O CO .r 














CO u- 


L 


CO O r^ 




CC c 








< 


CO 00 ^ « CO c^ 


CO Ol OO 


00 -* -m 


|co 




























. 










>2 




00 •* CC 








3 




tro -^ 


r^ CO O l- 


-* 


T-^ ^ 0- 


CO 






(M <^ 


C-l 01 CM C<) (N T-H r-l 


(M CO C 


(M 








































i~^ 


























i- 


C" 






•; 


CO c^ 




00 






i~ 


CO 






1-5 




■" 


o 


■^ 


'^' 


CO c^ 


Ol <N 


"^ 


CO c- 


(M 






























^ 


































C3 










•^ 




-; 


o 




CO Cs 


«3 






•^ 


»r 


-* 


i-O 




iC 


CC 


ir: 


'-'" 


o 


IT 


iO ir 


lO 






















o 






O 






























P. 






CC 


o- 


C 


■:f - 






a> c- 








c- 


(M 


o 


<M 


C 


c- 


"^ 


0-1 (M 


C- 






oi 




























CO 


CO 














- 




O cr 


cr 


CO 


^ 


CO 1^ 


CO 






u 




t~- 






^ 




■^ 


•: 




o 




«c 


Ol 






13 


■^ 1- 


'" 


It- CC 


CO CC 


CC 


CO 


•^ 




tc 


CO 




























,^ 










^ 






C 


c 


O >r 








CC 


CC 














•; 


CO <N 


<= 


00 


(N 










|i( 


CO (T 


c~ 


c- 


r- 


00 o: 


(T 


(N 


CC 


IM 


-=t 


CO 









































7,1 ~ 




























ir 






- 




a> 




t^ 




^ 






1-5 


(N c^ 


c- 


c- 


^ 




"^ 




'"' 


(M 


■^ 


c 


1 '^ 




























* 
































C 


D 


t 
































bi 


D 










































O 




















^ 




i- 


CC 






< 






























































P^ 










4 

c 




c 




X 

;- 


c- 

C 
c- 


C 
r 




a 
















>z 




c 




!^ 






1 


^ 








a 

IE 
c 


C 
c- 

t 




r 


5 


a. 
1- 


0, 

c 


> 
) c 


O 

60 

■73 


1 

c 

£ 




ID 
c3 








<- 


c 




i. 


c 


i. 


c 


'^ 


^ 
"S 
^ 






> 








a 


C 


E 

r 


? 


'■' 


-. > 


■i > 


■> c 


3 




0. 












^ 


(- 


C 


1^ 


1^ 


«- 


pi 


o 




►- 




1 





46 



Watee-Supply Department. 



Rainfall Received and Collected, ISGO. 





SUDBUHT. 


COCHITUATE. 


MrsTic. 


Month. 


'a 
'3 

Inches. 

2.-53 
3..505 
7.735 
2.645 
5.21 
2.03 
2.46 
3.865 
6.00 
10.51 
1.20 
5.31 


Pvainfall 
collected. 


Per cent, 
collected. 


1 

a 
'3 




II 




"3 
n 
"a 


■d 


^■6 




Inches. 

2.237 
2.4G4 
6.498 
S.23G 
2.437 
0.980 
0.192 
0.235 
790 
4.053 
2.097 
1.779 


Per 
cent. 
1 

88.43 
70.29 
84.01 

122.35 
40.78 
48.27 
7.78 
6.08 
13.16 
38.56 

174.72 
33.49 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


Inches. 

2.725 

3.38 

6.68 

2.403 

6. .30 

3.38 

2.265 

3.64 

3.70 

8.84 

1.385 

4.67 


Inches. 

2.07 
2.23 
5.37 
2.93 
3.00 
1.92 
0.43 
0.46 
0.58 
2.61 
1.95 
2.49 


Per 
cent. 


January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May .... 
June . . . 
July .... 
August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December . 


2.34 
3.21 
7.-35 
2.-51 
5..31 
1.78 
2.31 
3.-34 
6.47 
10.11 
1.24 
5.26 

51.23 


1.92 

2.04 
5.87 
2.23 
1.85 
1.41 
0.33 
0.46 
1.40 
3.40 
1.49 
2.11 

24.51 


82.03 
63.43 
79 .'86 
88.86 
34.90 
79.05 
14.18 
13.88 
21.63 
33.67 
119.95 
40.19 

47.85 


75.60 
65.98 
80.41 

121.80 
47.59 
56.86 
18.96 
12.69 
15.64 
29.51 

141.16 
53.48 


Totals and / 
aveiages ) 


53.000 


26.998 


50.94 


49.370 


26.04 


52.75 



Watee-Supply Department. 



Table shovjing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations on 
the Water Worlcs. 









Tempebatuke of Air. 


Temperatitke of 
Water. 




Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Fi-amingham. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
















house. 


1890. 


















S 


s 




g 


H 










s 








p 










P 


s 




















d 






a 


a 
















a 


a 


c! 














o 


o 






S 


S 


S 


S 


a 


a 


a 


S 


January . 






64.0 


5.5 


32.0 


65.0 


12.0 


32.3 


36.0 


35.5 


February 






63.0 


-2.0 


31.9 


62.0 


-1.0 


32.6 


36.1 


35.6 


March . . 






65.0 


-1.0 


33.1 


64.0 


-3.0 


32.9 


37.6 


35.7 


April . . 






72.0 


22.5 


45.9 


72.0 


24.0 


47.0 


46.8 


43.7 


May . . . 






81.5 


34.5 


57.2 


81.0 


34.0 


58.2 


58.8 


59.9 


June . . 






88.5 


42.0 


64.7 


88.0 


42.0 


65.4 


65.5 


64.4 


July . . . 






94.5 


47.0 


70.9 


95.0 


47.0 


71.2 


72.3 


73.7 


August . 






89.5 


47.5 


68.9 


88.0 


47.0 


69.3 


73.2 


74.6 


September 






84.5 


35.5 


63.2 


82.0 


30.0 


62.2 


68.1 


68.2 


October . 






78.0 


31.0 


49.8 


74.0 


28.0 


48.6 


56.6 


57.5 


November 






65.0 


14.0 


40.4 


65.0 


13.0 


37.9 


44.7 


45.5 


December 






54.5 


1.0 


25.4 


50.0 


-1.0 


24.1 


37.4 


35.9 



48 Water-Slpply Department. 



EEPOET OF THE RESIDENT ENGINEER AND 
SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WESTERN DIVI- 
SION. 



South Framingham, Jan. 1, 1891. 
Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report for the Western Division of the 
Boston Water Works is submitted herewith. 

Sudbury-River Basins. 

The rainfall during the past year has been about three 
inches more than the average, and the quantity of water has 
been abundant ; the quality also has been excellent. Although 
the volumes flowing in the streams contributor}^ to the supply 
were not as large as for the two previous years, still the 
basins have been frequently flushed, the circulation has 
been good and no bad water has been allowed to pass into 
the supply. 

During the summer Basin 4 was freely drawn upon and 
Basin 3 kept in reserve, with a most beneficial result upon 
the quality of the water in the city. 

A very careful record has been kept of the condition of 
the water in all the reservoirs, at the surface, mid-depth, 
and bottom. The construction of Dam 5 has been carried 
on during the season. As this work comes under the head 
of Additional Supply, a report has been made to the City 
Engineer on this subject. A sanitary report upon the con- 
dition of the Sudbury and Cochituate supplies was made to 
your Board in March. The takings of lands, etc., for Basin 
5 and Whitehall pond were filed in Jul}' and August. 

The above are the principal facts in regard to the Sudbury 
sources. A more detailed account will be found under each 
basin. 

Basin 1. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, this basin stood at elevation 157.95, and 
water was wastino; over the stone crest and continued to 
w^aste till June 10, when both sets of flash-boards having 
been put in place the water rose, and on the 14th was 
wasting over the flash-boards and continued to waste until 
July 7. 



Water-Supply Department. 49 

The basin tliGii gradually fell to elevation 158.50 on Sep- 
tember 5, but rose to elevation 158.87 on the 13th, when the 
waste-gates were opened to facilitate some work in the river 
below the dam, and on the 18th the flash-boards being also 
removed, the basin fell to elevation 156.35 on the 26th, 
when the waste-gates were closed. The basin then rose, and 
on October 4 water was wasting over the stone crest and 
continued to waste until the present time. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 159.56 
on eJune 15, and the lowest 156.14 on September 22. 

Water was drawn from this source for the supply of the 
city between November 5 and December 15. 

The effect of the freshets passing over Dam 1, during 
several years, has been to scour out the bed of the river, 
just below Winter street. This spring there was found 
quite a large and deep pool with a high ridge of gravel at its 
lower edge. The pool was in such a position that if the 
scouring continued it would be liable to undermine the 
[)aving at the foot of the supply-aqueduct embankment. In 
order to prevent this result that part of the pool nearest the 
supply-aqueduct was paved with heavy stones and part of 
the gravel ridge removed. 

A daily flow of at least one and one-half millions of gallons 
has been passed into the liver below the dam, in accordance 
with the law. 

The usual amount of care has been given to the works 
around the basin. Nothing has been done towards the 
repair of the 48-inch main in the bed of the basin. This is 
in a leaky condition. I think studies should be made for 
the taking of the mud out of the basin and the filling-up and 
excavation of the shallow flowage with a view of using the 
basin in the future as an additional settlino'-basin. 

Basin 2. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, the surface of the water in this basin 
was at elevation 166.14, and water was flowing over the 
stone crest, and it continued to overflow until March 6, 
when the waste-gates having been opened it fell to elevation 
161.58 on the 12th. After being kept down for a week or 
more, the water rose, and on the 24th was again flowing over 
the stone crest. This overflow continued, except for one 
day, until May 19, when the flash-boards being put in 
position the water rose, and on the 21st was running over 
the flash-boards, and continued to run over until June 23. 
The surface then fell to elevation 160.30 on July 25, and 
stood, on an average, just below elevation 161.00 till August 



50 Water-Supply Department. 

25, when it began to vise. The flash-boards were removed 
on September 30, and water flowed over the stone crest on 
October 7, and continued to overflow til] the present time. 
The hio;hest elevation reached was 167.59 on June 16, and 
the lowest 160.30 on July 25. 

Water was drawn wholly from this basin for the supply of 
the city from January 3 to January 11, from May 14 to July 
28, and from August 7 to November 5. The supply was 
drawn partially from this basin, and partially from Basin 3, 
from January 1 to January 3, from January 11 to May 14, 
and from July 28 to August 7, from December 15 till the 
present time. 

The houses on the Williams and Scott places, located on 
the Sudbury river at the head of Basin 2, have been re- 
moved, and the grounds graded and fenced. All dangers 
from pollutions from these estates are now removed. 

Basin 3. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, this basin stood at elevation 175.52, and 
water was flowing over the stone crest, and so continued 
until March 4, when waste-gates being opened the water 
fell to elevation 171.50 on the 12th; on the 18th, the sur- 
face began to rise, and on the 25th was again flowing over 
the stone crest. It continued to overflow, with the excep- 
tion of one day, until July 10. On August 17 the surface 
fell to 174.00, but commenced to rise again, and on Septem- 
ber ]3 was again flowing over the stone crest, and continued 
to overflow the remainder of the year. 

The highest elevation reached was 176.07 on October 21, 
and the lowest was 171.50 on March 12. The whole supply 
of the city has at no time been drawn wholly from this 
basin . 

At times already specified the supply was partially taken 
from this basin and partially from Basin 2. On July 15 the 
water at and near the bottom was found suddenly to have 
assumed a very high color. This color was much darker 
than the color of any of the other waters. It also contained 
a large amount of amorphous matter. This condition con- 
tinued until about August 25, when the color suddenly dis- 
appeared. Between July 24 and August 20 the water had 
also a slight taste and smell. 

Early in June it was noticed that the amorphous matter 
in the water at the bottom increased from about 200 to over 
700 unit masses to the cc. At the same time the cyclotella 
increased at the surface. By July 28 the amoi'phous matter 
increased to 1,920 masses to the cc. As this matter grad- 
ually decreased, the color decreased. At one time the water 



Water-Supply Department. 51 

was of the color of gold, and doubled in depth in the course 
of three hours after beins^ drawn to the surface, reaching' 
3.50 on our scale. 

The chemists have been unable, so far, to explain this 
phenomenon, but it may be due to some chemical change in 
the iron present in the water. 

A table showing the temperature and biological condition 
of the water throughout the year is appended. 

The dam, gate-house, and other portions of this basin are 
in good order. No work of any importance beyond that of 
maintenance has been done at this point during the year. 

Basin 4. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, the surface of the water in this basin was, 
at elevation, 214.56, and water was flowing over the stone 
crest, and so continued till March 5, when a waste-gate 
being opened the water fell to 211.79 on the 13th, but on 
the 26th was again flowing over the stone crest. It con- 
tinued to overflow till June 11, when the lower set of flash- 
boards being put in place the water rose, and on the 18th 
was running over the flash-boards, and continued to flow 
over till July 9, when the upper set of flash-boards was 
placed in position. The water now began to fall, and one of 
the waste-gates being opened on July 15 the water fell to 
201.16 on September 13, when the gate was closed. The 
water then rose gradually, and on December 4 had reached 
elevation 214.14, and was kept a little below the stone crest 
till December 17, when it rose suddenly, and on December 
18 water was wasting over the weir, and continued to over- 
flow the rest of the year. Both sets of flash-boards were re- 
moved on September 27. 

The highest elevation reached was 214.99 on June 19, and 
the lowest 201.16 oh September 13. 

Water was drawn from this source for the supply of the 
city during the greater part of the summer. The quality of 
the water has been excellent throughout the year. The 
muddy appearance of the water at the bottom, which appeared 
on Sept. 18, 1889, and which was fully described in my last 
report, reappeared again on Sept. 18, 1890. It disappeared 
on October 21. On September 25 the free ammonia, which 
was 0.0004 at the surface, was 0.0028 at the bottom ; the 
albuminoid ammonia and the nitrites were about the same at 
both places, while the nitrates were 0.0060 at the surface 
and 0.0020 at the bottom. The amorphous matter at the 
bottom was about double that at the surface. 

A rain gauge was established at Basin 4 early in the year. 



52 Watee-Supply Department. 

A table is appended showing the general condition of the 
water during the year from the observations made in the bio- 
logical laboratory. 

Whitehall Pond. 

This pond having been seized by the city in July was 
jDlaced under my care by vote of the Board on August 21). 
At that date the surface stood at elevation 323.46, or 4.45 
feet below high water line. As water was drawn for the sup- 
ply of the mills the surface gradually lowered to 323.11 on 
October 3. From October 1(>, at which time the water was 
at 323.18, the pond rose gradually to 324.94 on December 
31. 

No interference with the mills has yet been made. The 
water drawn has been daily measured by weir gauging 
located at the outlet of the flume. Some repairs have been 
made to the timbers connected with the gates, which were in 
a decayed condition. A float clause has been established, 
and a house built over it for protection. 

Farm Pond. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, the water in this pond stood at elevation 
149.60. The surface has been kept at about high-water 
mark, elevation 149.25, during the entire year. Water has 
been drawn from this source for the supply of the city from 
March 21 to April 5, and from November 5 to December 
14. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped from 
Farm pond 74,500,000 gallons, an average of 204,000 gal- 
lons daily. The total amount of water wasted from Farm 
pond has been 131,900,000 gallons. Almost all of this 
w^atcr was turned into the Sudbury river. 

The highest elevation reached was 149.95 on October 30, 
and the lowest, 148.76, on August 17 and on September 5 
and 6. 

Lake Cochituate. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, the lake stood at grade 132.77, 1.59 feet 
below high water. The waste gate at this time was open and 
water passing over the weir. The surface of the water was 
kept at about 132.50 until March 4, when the gate in the 
lower dam was opened. This caused the lake to drop to 
131.76 on March 12, but the surface afterwards rose to 
132.40 on April 5^ at which time both waste-gates w^ere 
closed. On May 6 the water stood at grade 133.55. The 
upper waste-gate was then opened for a few days to prevent 



Water-Supply Department. 53 

the lake rising too rapidly, and the surface Avas kept at 
about 134.00 until June 1 by adjusting the gate from time 
to time. 

As work was progressing on the new dam, it Avas necessary 
to manage the lake in a different manner from usual in order 
to prevent damage to the contractor. 

On June 1 the gates were closed and waste ceased. 
The lake then fell, as it was drawn upon, to grade 129 17 on 
September 12, after which it began to rise, reaching elcAation 
132.69 on December 5. By wasting, thesurface has been kept 
at a point about two feet below high water for the remainder 
of the year. 2,364,400,000 gallons have been wasted during 
the year. 

Work was resumed on the new dam early in the season 
and pushed to completion, as far as the contractor's work 
was concerned, on August 23. Some grading was done 
around the site of the dam from time to time during the 
remainder of the year whenever the men could be spared 
from other duties. A road leading to the gateJiouse on the 
southerly side of the dam has been nearly completed. 
There still remains the erection of the bridge controlling the 
flash-l)oards, the placing of the iron weir, etc. The total 
amount paid the contractor, Thomas A. Rovve, was 
$26,293.97. 

No other work of importance has been carried on. The 
usual care has been given to the gate -house and other 
structures around the lake. 

A table is appended showing the changes in microscopical 
life during the year, at the siirfiice, mid-depth, and bottom 
of one of the deep portions of the lake near the aqueduct 
inlet. 

One of the phenomena which we have studied somewhat 
carefully this year is the turbid appearance of the water at 
the bottom of the deeper portions of the lake. 

This turbidity began this year on June 11. On June 
3 the temperature of the water at the surface was (57 
Fahr., at mid-depth 49.5, and at the bottom (60 ft.) 45.5, 
while the living organisms numbered 243 at the surface, 
143.5 at mid- depth, and 70 at the bottom; the amorphous 
matter was in terms of one mass unit 55, 51, and 61.5 at the 
same points and in the same order. 

There had been for a long time previously a great number 
of tabellaria, 2,000 ])er cc, at the surface. On May 30 
these had diminished to 1,000, and on June 3 to 243, as 
al)0ve. On June 11 there were but 110, and on .Tune 19 
78.5 per cc. In a short time the abnormal growth of 
tabellaria at the surface entirely disappeared, and at the 



54 Water-Supply Department. 

same time the amorphous matter at the bottom increased, 
accompanied by a bad smell and taste. A careful examina- 
tion ot" the boundary line of turbid water made on eTune 
13 showed that it was confined to the prism all over the 
lake below 54 feet in depth. This water remained turbid 
until the cooling of the surface in the autumn and the great 
turning over of the lake. On November 11 the temperature 
was the same in every point of the vertical ; viz., the 
water was 47.9 at the surface, 47.9 at a depth of 30 feet, and 
47.3 at a depth of 70 feet. After this time the water 
remained clear and good at the bottom. 

The temperature of the water at the bottom of the 
deepest portions of the lake (70 feet) throughout the 
summer was 44.8 Fahr. 

SuDBURY-ElVER AQUEDUCT. 

The three portions of this aqueduct are in good order. 
The supply aqueduct leading from Dam 1 to Farm pond has 
been cleaned regularly in the same way as the main aque- 
duct. It accumulates dirt on its walls quicker than any 
other conduit we have on the work, and it is necessary to 
sweep it twice a year. The Farm-pond aqueduct has been 
in use 46 days less than the other aqueducts. The main 
aqueduct has been in use but 292 days, owing to work of 
repairs on the Beacon-street tunnel. It has carried to the 
city a total of 6,596,000,000 gallons, or a daily average of 
18^,071,200 gallons for the year. On June 9 and 10 the 
aqueduct was cleaned from the East Pipe Chamber to the 
Terminal Chamber, and from South Framinoham to West 
Pipe Chamber by machine, July 1. At this time the aque- 
duct was very dirty, with muddy deposit and some spongilla. 
On December 15, 16, 17 the second cleaning of the aqueduct 
took place from the syi)hon to the Chestnut-Hill reservoir. 
Owing to difficulty of wasting water along the line without 
injuring the ice crops we have been unable to clean the 
upper end, but this will be done on the first opportunity. 

The work of lining the Beacon-street tunnel has been 
continued this year from January 1 to April 18, when we 
were stopped from lack of funds. Within the last week the 
work has been taken up again and will be carried forward 
this winter. About 560 feet of tunnel has been laid 
between Oct. 22, 1889, and April 18, 1890, from Station 
803 -{-25 to 808-|-90. On examining the tunnel in December 
we found a large mass of rock fallen from the roof at Sta- 
tion 783-|-41, a point never before suspected of weakness. 
The rock was perfectly sound and good, but a seam in 



Water-Supply Department. 55 

wedge form was responsible for the fall of this mass weigh- 
ing over ten tons. It destroyed the track and a switch at 
this point completely. The cost of lajdng concrete in this 
tunnel, exclusive of the track, has been $15.02 per cubic 
yard, which I believe is not extravagant when the difficul- 
ties under which the work is carried on are considered. 

The Syphon Chambers, Course Brook, Bacon's, Fuller's, 
and Clark's waste weir chambers have been thoroughly 
repaired during the year. The joints in the stone and brick 
work were cut out and pointed with Portland and oil 
cements. The brickwork and sandstone were oiled on the 
outside and inside of the buildings with tw^o coats of raw lin- 
seed oil. The sandstone was oiled to arrest disintegration. 

The concrete walks on the Charles river and Waban 
bridges were resurfaced with two thin coatings of tar and 
fine sand. The concrete had become hard and cracked, let- 
ting water into the masonry. Any stonework will soon go 
to pieces if the water and frost gain access to the interior. 

The embankments alonoj the line have received the usual 
attention, the bushes and briars mow^ed and the sodding 
dressed with loam wherever found necessary. The fences 
have been repaired and the drains and culverts cleaned out. 

CocHiTUATE Aqueduct. 

This aqueduct has been in constant service throughout the 
year with the exception of about nine days, when cleaning 
was going on. A depth of six and one-half feet of flow was 
maintained in the aqueduct through the entire year. 

On May 26, 27, 28, and again on December 2, 3, 4, this 
aqueduct was cleaned from the Lake to Brookline reservoir. 
A new flight of steps has been built at the Newton Lower 
Falls embankment. The usual exterior repairs have been 
made. 

Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir. 

No new work has been done at this point during the year. 
The grounds have been kept up to the usual high standard 
of maintenance. The building of the electric railway on 
Beacon street brought out a large number of people during 
the summer, and they strolled al)Out the grounds sometimes 
by the thousand. An additional policeman has been fur- 
nished to maintain order. The driveway around the reser- 
voirs, three miles in length, has been kept in good condition. 
A considerable amount of repairing of its surface has been 
done. 



56 Water-Supply Department. 

BROOitLiNE Reservoir. 

Everything in connection with the Brookline reservoir is 
in good order. About half of the water used in Boston has 
been sent through this reservoir during the past jQur. The 
water has been of the usual good quality. No improvements 
have been made. 

FisHER-HiLi. Reservoir, 

in Brookline, is in good condition. The grounds have been 
maintained as usual by the Chestnut-Hill reservoir force. 

Biological Laboratory. 

Prof. James I. Peck, who was in charge of the biological 
Avork last year, was obliged to resign his office from ill 
health, and his assistant, Mr. E. C. Whipple, has carried on 
the work successfully since his departure. The results 
accomplished by the slight outlay in this department have 
more than met my expectations. Weekly examinations have 
l)een made of the water in all the storage basins, reservoirs, 
and sources of supply at the surface, mid depth, and bottom, 
giving a complete knowledge of the state of the water, with 
the exception of the chemical and bacteria analyses. These 
should be added to the laboratory results, as I have already 
urged. The color, temperature, number, and kind of organ- 
ism, and the quantity of amorphous matter present in the 
water are recorded weekly in suitable books, and the data 
also plotted graphically. In addition to this work, about 90 
special investigations have been made during the year on the 
quality of the water in the brooks feeding the supply, the 
effects of the swamps, etc., and the information so obtained 
has enabled me to get a much clearer idea of the eHects of 
ditierent conditions in the topography at the sources of sup- 
ply on the quality of the water. 

It will also affect the plans for the improvement of the 
water at the least expense, and in the best manner, whenever 
that work is seriously entered upon. 

Filtration Experiments. 

The filtration experiments at Chestnut-Hill reservoir have 
been carried on continuously since they were stai-ted in 
the early summer. Much valuable information has already 
been obtained as to the effects of filtration on the Boston 
water, mechanical, chemical, and biological, but the con- 
ditions resulting from the different seasons are so various, 



WATER-SuprLY Department. 57 

and the problems constantly met with so new and puzzling, 
that it will require several years of investigation to master 
them. For the first time continuous and intermittent filtra- 
tions have been carried on together side by side, and under 
several combinations of materials and methods. 



Inspection or Pollutions Department. 

The following is a digest of the operations of the depart- 
ment for the year past : — 

Total number of cases prepared for the City Solicitor . ^'0 
Injunctions granted ....... 39 

Petitions for injunctions filed . . . . .41 

Cases given to City Solicitor but not filed in court . 31 

Cases inspected (old) ...... 380 

" " (new) 112 

Of the 492 cases inspected, 124 are reported as permii- 
nently remedied ; 217 cases are reported as at present " all 
right " and " safe " : 34 " seem safe " ; 35 are " suspected " 
only, and S2 are " unsatisfactory." There is still a large field 
for able, energetic, and unfaltering work in the remedying 
of every case that threatens the purity of the supply. 

I have during the year reported the details of every case 
in any way connected with the Sudbury and Cochituate sup- 
plies, and these to the number of 683 are contained in the 
volumes on file in the office of the Water Board. Special 
reports have also been made in regard to a number of the 
cases. A great deal of time and thought has been devoted 
to the Westborough cases, and after many ex[)eriments the 
direct legal evidence which was desired by the Law Depart- 
ment was obtained, transmitted to your Board, and then 
placed in the hands of the City Solicitor. 

Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water has on the whole been excellent 
throughout the year. I have collected all the analyses 
which have ever been made, so far as known, of the Boston 
Avater, and suggest the printing of these fifteen tables in a 
separate pamphlet for the information of those interested in 
the chemical quality of the water. The following tables, 
however, give the means of many hundred analyses by 
Dr. Thomas M. Drown and Dr. Edward S. Wood, both 
well-known experts on the subject. 



58 



Water-Supply Department. 



CO • 

CO 



15 






CO o 

2 o' 



S^ 



^ S*"' 



•888t '-^liW 



CO tH C'l (M 



(M Ol i-H (M 



•anijoxqo 



5§ 



C-1 (M CI <M CI (M 



tM O i-H O 



O bo 



CO (M C<« (N 



CO CO CO CO CO CO 



-li^ '^ CO »o CO CO 



•joioo 



1° * a 



a -a 






00)0^0^0^ 



5 flS'i 
« o 3i ; 

<s> -^ ■„■' 






03 "■ 



3 :« M 



a 3 o 



S C - _ ., 

6X1 IE M m b/) 

S d :3 -g c3 

<13 03 03 0) O) 

" a a a a 



03 



03 



:§i ^ o a o 

S OQ m o O o 



'CO'"^'"-* ^ 

' 6^ 6^ do 

3 TS n3 t3 
3 .5:J 03 .^ 03 .j3 03 . 

' 'o o o o 'o o 

> > CD > 03 

|3 So So 

q; ::* (^ o ^ o 

K K M ( 



^^ 



O C3 

!- 3 



3 ta 



-S a 



fePW i_;afqE!Hpj 



Water-Supply Departm ext . 



59 



"tS K 






CO as 1—1 



(M CO CO CO 





00 


J^ 




t^ 


t^ 


-* 


o 


c» 


CO 


o 


^ 


o 


Oi 




O! 


1^ 




Oi 






CD 


a 


•5f 


iO 


CO 


lO 


'^ 


lO 


1:- 


to 


ia 


»o 


o 






















H 
























cc 


,_ 




^ 


,n 




ro 


o 


tH 


o 




CO 


CO 




Tl( 


00 






t-^ 








<M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


cq 


CO 


^ 


.CO 


CO 


CO 


> 




































^ 


^ 


Oi 


o 






o 


en 




OJ 
















IM 


<N 


<N 


J-^ 


<N 


CO 


(M 


<N 


<N 


M 












































f!H 























«D Cq CO C<J 



CO -^ O lO lO o 



i-H (M *M 



CM "M (M fM 





>ra 


OD 






^ 


TO 


CO 


^ 


<-, 


o 


































o 






o 






s 


=2 


=2 


o 


o 






■-i 









E ^ Pi 



f=H K 



60 



Water-Supply Department. 



s 

05 










1 






























a 






1 




























-ti-a 




































































c --^ 


































C,0 


































o^ 


































ID* .. 




































^^s 
















cs 


o> 






























































■^ 


'-' 




































































-S 
















«^ -; 2i 


^ 












to 


















rt i^ j3 


ti 












CO 


CO 
















< 






























^ 


H 












^^ 


'-< 
















* ^ 


1 












!8 


5 
















»>l 
















0) 


0) 
















c5 ^ -^ 
















>= 


>> 












- 




"II 
















-* 


^ 
















f-> — 
















^ 


















'3Q 




















































«4H 


=4H 
















Sol 
« 0.1" 
















a 
































<p 


0) 
















^^ta 
















M 


M 
















t_, 
















f^ 


r«^ 
























.0 


CO 


□0 


to 


^ 


^ 


C-l 


to 


^ 


,^ 


c. 


CO 










' 







°\ 


r-' 


c; 


tO 


1— 


•-^ 


CO 


ITS 


q 




IN 


•* 


CO 







(N 


J-^ 


e4 


zi 


r-H 


rH 


cq" 


5< 


i?i 


CO 


<N 


"* 


CO 


CO 




































'0 



































































i 




-►t 


_»t 


r*r 


m 


^w 




_ht 


~Zt 


-ic. 


r» 


-Ic. 


-ici 


^K^ 


-w 




^ 




i-H 


I—* 


r-l 




1-1 


r-l 


!— t 


r-( 


CO 


1— * 


1— ' 


1— ' 


1— 1 


1"^ 


fl 
































V 




































































■3 
































a 






































« 





CO 


CO 


^ 


.ra 


(M 


CO 


to 





^ 


CO 


t-l 


CO 






' 




to 






q 


q 






r-H 


CO 


01 


C-; 


°i 


q 






C3 



in 


U3 


to 


to 


iri 


■* 


10 


10 


<S 


to 


to 


to 





>o 


H 




H 


































lO 


^ 





-l< 


t_ 


0~1 





^ 


CO 


~ 


0^ 


10 


CO 


CO 


& 






« 


>0 


0; 


Oi 


q 




•* 


^ 


q 


to 




CO 






R 







CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


CO 


CO 


co' 


co' 


CO 


Ed 




> 






























« 






































CO 


J^ 


ci^ 


_^ 


_^ 


CO 


~I 


^ 


CO 


~~tD 


oo 


00 


CO 


^ 






^3 


I— 


q 


o] 


m 


q 


00 


CO 


CO 




t^ 


to 


CO 


-* 


^ 






0) 


<N 


(^i 


<^^ 


c^ 


,^ 


r-4 


c^ 


c<i 


10 


(^i 


s^' 


oi 


^ 


c4 






>< 




































































s 
































6 




(M 


CO 


^ 


^ 


00 


05 


.0 


~ao 


,^ 


to 


^ 


to 


^ 


^ 




B 




-t 


'^ 


tc 


!<: 


CO 


CO 


^ 


^ 


q 


»o 


^ 




■0 


u-S 









































































3 


































:^ 






































^ 


rq 


vO 





to 


to 


in 


•* 


-* 


CO 


CO 


0. 


CO 


^ 






A'^ 




c 


t- 











-^J^ 








to 


Oi 


cn 








M 




(N 


c< 


CO 


<M 


<M 




c-i 




IN 












£■3 





c 


q 





q 


q 


q 


q 


q 





q 


q 


q 


q 








































^1 





































































CO 


,, 


IM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-t< 


fvi 


~ 


10 


to 


^ 


^ 


s 






CO 


~\ 


>n 




(M 




to 




CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


















b 
















c 













< 




0^ 














q 


q 


q 





q 


c 


q 


q 


q 






























^- 


































a 


a 


































3 




































ta 





































a 


rt 


































t— 1 




_^ 
































>a 


."t^ 


a 


































fl 


<D 


































a 


a 
































T3 

a 
02 






^ 
H 



































> 


■3 

> 









02 


















c 







5 S 


s 

a) 














c 




c 


a 


p 













OJ 












a 


c 




J OJ 


CD 

3 


a 


E 


! 






K 


a 









i 


i 


1 


$ 


1 M 


e 


pL 






:=! 


— 


m 








1- 


H P= 


? ^ 


H ft 


H 


■a 
a 


c 
c 

P 


e 


^ 


i ^ 


irl 


w 




pa 








c- 


i 


5 c 


5 P 


5 Hi 


-* 







) a 


"^ 


a 


a> 








_c 


.1 


c 


3 .; 


a a 


a 


a 


£ 


1 


a 


i "S 


■§ a 




*> 








2 


\ 


i c 


3 


3 CS 


C3 


c3 




C3 


•^ 


2 OJ 

3 A 


^^ 


A 


0) 








p 


\ P 


; P 


5 P 


5 « 


P5 


p^ 


^ 


< 


1- 


1 








or 


2 



Watkr-Supply Department. 



61 



The following analysis represents the average condition of 
the tap-water in Boston for the year 189{). The analyses 
were made by Dr. Drown, and were furnished through the 
kindness of the State Board of Health : — 



Residue on Etapobation. 


Nitrogen. 


o 

O 


"a 
o 


a-6 
a o ii 


-73 


6 

a 

5 
3 
o 


-oii 
III 

^<1P 


6 

a 
a 




(S 


a 
■p 

S 


0.35 


4.66 


1.23 


3.38 


.42 


.0169 


.0003 


.0001 


.0240 


2.23 



T^he following is a brief statement of the condition of the 
water, from a biological point of view, at the ditferent 
sources of supply during the past year : — 

Lake Cochituate. 

At the beginning of the year the diatoms Asterionella, 
j\Ielosira, Stephanodiscus, and Tabellaria were present, and 
formed the greater part of the organisms. In the spring 
Asterionella increased to 674 per cc. at the surface (April 
8), after which they disappeared. Meanwhile the Tabel- 
laria had been increasing, and on May 20 there were 2,300 
per cc. at the surface. These imparted to the water a slight 
characteristic taste. During the summer, algae, both Chloro- 
jjhycese and Cyanophyceee, were abundant near the surface. 
At the same time the water at the bottom in those places 
where it was more than 50 feet deep was bad. It had a very 
high color, a bad taste and smell, and contained immense 
quantities of amorphous matter. This bad condition lasted 
until November 11. Since October the diatoms Asterionella 
and Melosira have ajrain been abundant. 



Basin 2. 
Basin 2 has contained comparatively few organisms. 
Throughout the winter and spring diatoms and desmids 
were present in small numbers. During the summer there 
was a growth of the ChloropliN'cete, and at one time, in 
August, Cyclotella and Synedra were somewhat abundant. 
Amorphous matter was also quite plenty about this time. 
Since October the water has contained few organisms. 
Some moulds have been observed since the basin froze over. 
They are most abundant immediately below the ice. 



62 WATER-SUPPLY Department. 

Basin 3. 

During the first three months of the year Astorionclla 
were present in small numbers. These increased rapidly 
during April, and other diatoms appeared. By July these 
had all disappeared, and the algte, Chlorophyceie and 
Cyanophycese, were abundant. During the latter part of 
the summer the water at the bottom of the basin was bad. 
From the surface down to a depth of eighteen feet the water 
was clear, but below that the color rapidly deepened until 
at the bottom it was a dark reddi&h brown. The taste was 
rank, and the odor resembled that of decaying vegetable 
matter on a salt marsh. This condition was confined chiefly 
to the old bed of the brook, where the water was over six- 
teen feet deep. Since October Asterionella have been 
quite abundant. Moulds also api)eared when the basin 
froze over, being most numerous just below the ice. 

Basin 4. 

Basin 4 water contained very few organisms at any time. 
Diatoms were found in small numbers at all seasons, — the 
])rincipal genus being Cyclotella, which were most numerous 
during June and July. During the summer there was a 
slight growth of Chlorophycece and Infusoria. The 
amorphous matter also was not abundant, though during the 
latter part of the summer there was quite an increase at the 
bottom, accompanied by a slight cloudiness of the water. 
This lasted, however, only a short time, and has already 
been alluded to in detail. 

Monthly Averages, 1890. 

The accompanying tables contain the averages of the re- 
sults of analyses for each month from November, 1889 (when 
the record practically began), to Jan. 1, 1891. The results 
are exi)ressed in "number per cc." at the surface, mid-depth, 
and bottom. A table of average temperatures is also given. 

Very respectfully, 

Desmond FitzGerald, 

Res't Encfr and Supt. 



Water-Supply Department. 



63 

































































^ 




























J 
























































o 
























































S 




























o 












a 

o 
















•a 
























































3 












o 
















S 
















a 












ai 












s 














o 
















o 












>i 












w 






- 










J5 
















o 












a. 
o 












o 




.o 












S 
















X 










^ 


5' 












6 




•r; 






































K 


^ 




O 












^ 










< 


o 




"3 












o 

n 


I 






W 


<^ 




a 


- 


dj 




3^ o 




^ 




>M 






« 




GJ 














O 




.£5 














o 




.= "S 








a 








_2 


"oi' 


3 






- 


§< S 


" 


c 




o 








rt __^ 


» 






c 




§ t 




C3 




C3 










;;;2 






o 






03 




>, 








-2--I 


3 


g" 


,-^.-— ., 


N 




^ O C3 




3 




o 










cs" 




1 - -r 




a 






e»-i 




- os'S 
~ ID 
ID . 

a 03 












t- 03 


° .bs 


oi5.^ 


— .2 








^-w-— . o t^ 








































11 


Melos 
Astei 
Steph 
Tabel 


(B a- cj 


Aster 
Tabel 
Melos 
Tabel 
Aster 


CO O E^ " o 






cese, 
ceae. 
Aster 
Melos 














' \ ' 


^^^ 


'. — 








•«.3 ,B- 
























aj g<a, 




S^ap 


flag" m 




o 






1 


a 


a 


a 


a 


■a 


o OS 


" 


III 


G ^ O <~ 
o i ^ fi 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




t; S o o 










o 












-,_. — ^ c3 






03 C3 — ii 












■§ - 




"3 




ct jq >j 




pfl >i-i5 


•r- >ija rt 










ft 


fi 


5 


P 


ft 


5 ^ 




OOfiPOO g 




1 






Oi 


t- 


(M CO ira 


o 


^ 


CO -* 


IM 


CO 


o o 


CO 


^ 




a3 


CO 


o 


OJ 02 lO 


o 




O (33 


O 




CO m 


o> 


>^ 




> 


rH 


•-H 


rH (N 


(M 




r-1 CO 


C3 


^ 


CO 1-1 




e 




< 
























s 




























>^ 




















~ 








^S 






^ 


•M 


j^ 


Cf 


■^ 


00 


(M t- 




CO 


ira CO 


^ 


u 






CO 


o 






o 


cn 


o >o 


o 






CO 


e 


O 


o 

m 




T~f 




IM 






O) o_^ 




'^ 


00 00 




lU 


a 


























rJd 


























c 








-ti 




-f 


^ 


O CO 








o 


l-N 


c 


-a 


o 


iM 


o 




o 




^ ^ 


r^ 


•* 


C= I- 


CO 


g 


rH 


rH 


rH 


C-I 


IM 






r^ 










■< 






























CO 


•* 


^ or 


^ 


^ 


^ 


CO CO 


O 


CO 


rH .O 


^ 










05 


00 c 




cn 


JC- 


CO 1^ 






00 o 








S 1 


J"" 






C^t 








rH 


rH 
































































CO 


_ 


^ (M 


CO 


CO 


o 


1- CO 


^ 


Tf 


o r- 


OS 






o 


oc 


CD 


00 Tt 


o 


IM 




t- CO 




00 


.ra CD 


t>^ 






>■ 






IM 


^ 


cn 


00 








(M lO 


00 




6 


<J 


























1 


CO 


00 


CO 


!M 


^ 


rH 


r-< OD 


O 


CO 


1- -* 


^ 




o 




o 






c-^ 


CO 


to 


•* <M 








cn 






o 


f~< 






CO 


cn 


IM 








r- 00 






oT 


pq 






















i-T 




S 




























2 






















































i5 


^ 


CO 


O 


^1 


c^ 


o 


Ol 


OO <M 


-* 


IM 


OS CO 


lO 




->) 


"S 1 






C! 


o 






CO CO 


O 


t- 


CO CO 






o 


c^ 






-* 


CO 


■* 








(M CO 


t- 




K 


i 


























O 






























CO 


>ra 


r- r) 


IM 


^ 


o 


rH CO 


CO 


,_ 


O r- 


rH 








M 


^ 


t- -1* 


IM 




lO 


-* -* 


-p 


-^ 


(M 01 


00 






(N 




IM 


■^ 


cn 




r^ r^ 






CO -o 


UO 






OQ 












rH** 




































"• 




1 






a> 


.■ 


o 


., 


^ 


. 


s. 


. 


,■ 


.. 


; 






W 






CO 
















































f- 




























!5 


}-, 


tT 














Sm 


tT 


^ 






O 




o 


> 












OJ 




d) 






S 


1 


o 


5 2 


.C 


= 


>. 


« ^ 


3 


a 


1 a 
1 ^ 


a 








o 


<D 


a 


C. 


c! 


P "ZL 


p 


M 


o O 


£ 








''A 


ft 


1^ '^ 


S 


< 


S 


<-i 1-3 


<; 


O 'A 


P 



64 



Watek-Supply Department. 






iM 



a<5 

P O 



E 1-= fi 
-a ? a 8 



a s 



^ .- o 



a o ft CIS p p 







^ 












^ 


cc 


^ 


(N 


^ 


e-i 




^ 










































i-i 






r-\ 
















r-i 


00 


■^ 






























p 
































































n 


















00 


^ 






t^ 


























^ 














o 


I-H 




T— 1 




1-i 














i-t 


rH 


o 


« 






























» 
































<1 










































































IM 




CO 


to 


o 




a> 


-=f 


to 






-c 










































i-l 




c^ 










I-i 


tH 






































































^ 


to 


rq 




rr, 


m 


CO 


OJ 


^ 


o 


to 


o 


to 


O 




^ 
































r-l 




iH 


l-H 




iH 


c< 




03 


■^ 








r-t 




OQ 































I— IfNCOCOOi— ICICD 



I— IMiOiOOCNOCQi— ! 



CNCOCOOi-HrHOTjH 



i-l rH CO 00 '^ 



M CO irr. 



12i « 



< m O ^ Pi 



Watee-Supply Department. 



65 



s a 



fi fi 



"ir-'OQ 



^OS 



a s 



^ ^-£5 P o 
§2 gg| o 
•" jq ^ fl f., "« .. , 



^ ^=5 <J 



a a. 



02 fi 



.5 o 



CO CC CO ^o 



£3 N a. CO 



05 CO CO T— ( 



CO t- CO oj 00 o to 

rH rH rt rl r-l T-l (M 



5- I-; CO CO T* oi 
S a !5 S -* <» 



1:0 



<M <M r-l 
!M t- -)< 
<?» rH rt 



t^ i-H CO 
T-H O C<1 
<N r-f CO 



S S; S S ^ '^ ^ ^ 



So 
cg2 



^ 1-1 '^ CD 



C» Oi CO 10 



CO CD (M to 



1-1 (M t-H 



CO I— I OS -t« 



C^ t- (>3 CO 



CO i-H CD lO 



rl CO r-l 



Oi 1— I CO Ci »A t^ 



•^ l-f 1-1 



^ ft 



p^ ;^ <i s 



□ ^ DO — ^ 



a E 



<5 oQ o f?; p 



66 



Water-Supply Department. 



























s 




































a> 






























.3 




































u 






rfl 






























o 






a 




































o 
















a 






!>, 








^ 






















P3 






ca 








a 




>i 
















-4 






o 








M 




« 


3 






.3 










g 






S 










oT 


2 


O 
















^ 






o 










<D 


3 


73 

a 






o 










P3 






^^ 










o 








3 
















a 

.2 










02 


S" 


03 


_e3 




a 

l-H 














1 
o 


1 


: 


a 

o 












O 




a 

o 














2 


o 




"S 


- 


- 


- 


>1 


» 


3 


- 














-a 


3 




■S 








o 




a 




s 














m 


IB 




a 








^ 




. 




5 


• 












-a 


■a 




■a 








a 




a 




m 


a 












1 

<i> 


1 


: 


1 


- 


' 


: 


o 

C3 


' 


o 


= 


o 

CG 


o 


= 










Q 


fl 




O 








fl 




s 




S 










*^ • 


lO 








^ 


O 


.o 


.o 


^ 


rH 


CO 


to 


CO 


■o 








aM 


lO 








CO 






to 


o 






o 


CT 


l-H 








(a o 




















rH 


<M 














a o 




































«i; 




































aW 




































M 




































O! 


o 


(M 


o 


■* 


O 


OO 


o 


^ 


00 


t- 


CO 


CO 


-* 








O 


ca 


-* 


IM 




lO 


to 


c» 


00 




CO 




o 


l-H 


■* 








> 


iH 








I-H 


l-i 






r-i 


cq 


cq 


CO 








m 




<! 
































P 




































o 














t^ 






















H 






(M 


CO 


CO 






o 




(M 


to 




>o 




to 


CO 




A4 






Ol 


-* 








OS 


o 




o 


to 


(M 




CO 


•* 




fi 




o 




l-H 


T-1 


rH 






r-l 


rH 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(M 


T^ 






O 




m 
































<1 












































































(M 


00 


(M 


■O 


>o 








CO 


>o 


to 


a> 


a> 










T! 




<N 


CO 


f-H 




-^ 


C31 




CO 


o 


CO 


o 


en 


ya 














r-1 












(M 


c^ 


CO 












s 




































M 


^ 


CO 


.O 


OJ 


00 


O 


to 


OO 


(N 


tm 


!N 


00 


Oi 








tH 
P 




-* 


C-) 


O 


■* 


lO 


05 


>o 


to 


^ 




^ 


?H 


CO 








t>* 




IH 




rH 










rH 


IM 


CO 












OQ 


































"~ 


^ . 


CO 








to 


~j^~ 


^ 


CO 


00 


-* 


(N 


CO 


>o 


j^ 








OM 


I-H 












CO 


iH 






^ 


T-H 


IH 










a o 




































P o 




































?W 




































M 




































^ 


»o 


(M 


00 ' 


ci- 


^ 


-^ 


O 


to 


to 


^ 


^ 


^ 


to 








O 


CO 


^ 


(N 






■M 


CO 


to 


to 




CO 


■o 


CO 


(N 








> 
































6 
u 




< 
































oT 






































































m 








o 




to 


o 


OJ 


lO 


00 


a> 






CO 


CO 


00 






^ 


C^ 




<M 






iH 


<?^ 


IM 


(M 


■* 


cq 


CO 


CO 


(M 








o 
































0! 

K 
O 








































OD 


a 


CO 


00 


Oi 


CO 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


lO 


on 


^_ 


<N 






■a 


CO 


CO 


cq 








CO 


to 


m 


00 


CO 


to 


(M 


CO 








■§ 






































^ 


rH 


as 


"^ 


^ 


to 


(M 


CO 


^ 


00 


CJ 


CO 


O) 










(M 


^ 


C^ 








-* 


Ci 




CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


r-i 








^ 




































3 




































QQ 






































C3 


■ 


o 


















• 














































W 






































































iH 




































o 




S 


a 




3 


^ 










s 


a 




u 

1 

> 
o 


4) 

a 










s 


CD 

ft 


a 
a 


5 


o 

3 


ft 
<5 


s 

s 


1-3 


a 

1-5 


60 
<1 


p. 

o 


o 
O 


ft 



Water-Supply Department. 



67 



^ ^ 



rl r1 0\ 



o a 

PQO 



03 - 
















































lO 


^ 


o 


CO 




































5M 










"-I 




'-' 




rH 


■^ 






































































o 






























>, 










,n 






-* 


IM 


O 


o 


a> 


^ 


"5 


SM 




o 




























1-( 






rH 


r-l 


















Id 






























OQ 










































^ 






^ 


CO 


"* 


-* 


iH 


s^ 






o 










CO 


O 




M 










I— ( 


I-l 


r-i 


IH 


rH 


I— 1 






r-( 












n6 































CO 1—1 05 CD 



-^ a» CO CO o CO 

O C5 r-t T-H "^ "^ 
OS CO CN I— ( I— t i-H 



-^ OS lO "^ 






C4 to C-1 lO 



r-l 1-1 r-H CO 



a a 



;zi fi 



pR ;^ <i a 



i-s <! DQ o ;5 fl 



68 



Water-Supply Department. 






<> 







(M 


en 


CO 


c 


i-i 


t- 


CO 


a 


IM 


O 


o 


t. 


t_ 








oo 


o 


]t^ 


CD CD 


^ 


c^ 


•^ 


■!t< 


^ 


CO 


cq 


o 








■* 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 


lO 




UO 


o 


o 




-* 






n 






























^ 






<M 


CO 


CO O 


O 


t- 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


o 


IM 


o 




'an 










IT 








rvl 




i-_ 


lO 


lO 


lO 












CO CO 


-* 


















































< 


a 






























m 


































05 


^ 


O! 


ir 


en 


o 


T* 


CO 


CO 


o 


^ 


<M 


ta 








CO 


o 


o 


ur 


lit! 


CO 


o 


00 


lO 




00 


O 


lO 








'^ 


Tt< 


CO 


CO CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


t- 




CD 


lO 


^ 






































(M 


CO 


^ 


C-l 00 


-* 


t. 


rt 


o 


en 


CD 


CO 


lO 


IM 








i^ 




»r 




t_ 










^^ 






00 






•* 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 


^ 








CO 


CO 


o 


^ 


CO 




M 






























CO 














Tl( 


o 


^ 


>o 


■M 


CO 


-* 


rt< 


en 


iz; 














t~ 


o 


t- 


,_( 




OD 








































































:^ 






























pa 


































lO 


CO 


^ 


-* ^ 


t- 


x 


o 


o 


-!t< 


O 


CO 


CO 


(N 








t^ 






t^ 












lO 


CO 


O 




3 

m 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 


"* 


CO 


CD 








o 


^ 


CO 




































^ 


CD 


CO 


c 


!M 


^ 


to 


j-H 


(N 


^ 


lO 


(M 


CO 


05 






■o 


l- 


to 


ir 


CD 


en 


r~i 


CD 


o 


CO 


t^ 


^ 


CO 


CO 




■* 


CO 


CO 




CO 




CD 


CO 






CO 


O 


•* 


CO 




W 






























(N 














<M 


O 


00 


<N 


IM 


rt 


05 


IM 


^ 


g 














O 


C-l 


l- 


05 


•* 


CO 






CO 
















CO 


co 






CO 




Tji 


CO 
































->i 




• 




























m 




• 






























00 


CC 


CO 


-* 


(X 


05 


o 


05 


O 


OJ 


o 


^ 


^ 


t_ 






lO 


^^ 


lO 




lO 


cn 


(M 








00 










3 
OQ 


■* 


CO 


CO 




CO 


'^ 


CD 








CO 




^ 






































t_ 


t' 


ir- 




(M 


IM 


O 


^ 


o 


o 


en 


^ 


CO 


CO 






CO 




tJ 




CO 


CO 


lO 


lO 


lO 


u^ 


^ 


ITS 










^ 


■^ 


CO 




CO 


-* 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 






H 


M 






























H 
































<1 
































P 
































H 




00 


00 


"* 




en 


C<1 


en 


00 


<M 


o 


J— 1 


00 


CO 


CO 


D 








^^ 




lO 


CO 


t^ 


C5 








O 










■^ 


CO 




CO 


^ 


^ 


^ 














O 


S 






























H 

M 
^ 


































to 


CD 


^ 


V 


CO 


CO 


CD 


o 


CD 


CD 


CO 


o 


Ir- 


^ 








CD 


yr 


lO 


^ 


o 


00 








oo 




>o 


s 
m 


^ 






* 
















^ 


CO 




M 
































H 
































(25 
































3 
































^ 


i 

01 


u 


o 

en 

00 




- 


:: 


: 


= 


- 


' 


(0 


- 


0) 


tT 










t^ 














P 
<1 






^ 


,o 






> 
o 
'A 


a 


P 

a 

1-2 


a 


-a 

C3 


P. 
< 




n 

1-S 




CD 
ft 

c; 


o 

o 


a 

<D 
> 
O 


a 

o 



Watee-Supply Department. 



69 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir for Tear ending Dec. 31, 1890. 



















o . 




Date. 


.a 
d 


o . 


Duration. 


Date. 


a 
a 


Duration. 




5 


M 


OQ 








l-H 


OQ 




Jan. 


0.13 


Rain 


6.45 a.m. to 9.45 a.m. 


Mar. 


1 


) 




















J 0.10 Snow 


11.00 p.m. to 6.00 a.m. 


" 


6 


0.09 


" 


3.00 a.m. to 5.45 a.m. 


" 


2 


) 






" 


10 


0.17 


Snow 


3.00 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 


" 


2 


1 1.02 


„ 


1.00 p.m. to 11.00 a.m. 


" 


11 


( 0.36 


« 


9.30 a.m. to 2.30 a.m. 


" 


3 


' 






" 


12 


) 






" 


6 


0.70 


" 


4.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


" 


15 


\ 0.81 


Rain 


8.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 


" 


14 


■ 


Rain 




** 


16 


) 






** 


15 


1 1.56 


and 
Snow 


5.00a.m. to 1.00 a.m. 


" 


20 


0.05 


" 7.00 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


" 


16 


J 






" 


23 


0.08 


Snow- 


3.30. p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


" 


19 


0.63 


" 


8.30 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 








Snow 




« 


21 


0.04 


Rain 


12.45 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 


27 


0.57 


and 
Rain 


1.15 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


« 


22 


) 


Rain 


















S 1.68 and 


10.45 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 








Rain 




" 


23 


) 


Snow 






30 


0.23 


and 

Snow 


1.30 a.m. to 8.30 p.m. 


^j 


25 


) 








31 


0.03 


Rain 


6.80 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


" 


26 

28 


1 0.40 
) 


Rain 
Rain 


10.00 p.m. to 5.00 a.m. 






1 






Total 


2.52! 








) 1.15 


and 


5.00 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 












■;. 


29 
31 


0.06 


Snow 














9.00 p.m. to midnight. 


Feb. 


2 
3 


1 0.11 


Rain 


5.05 p.m. to 11.30 a.m. 












" 


Tota 




7.64 






" 


4 

8 

10 


0.17 
0.84 
0.03 


Snow 


4.15 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 
1.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. 
8.00 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 








Snow 




" 


Apri 


1 


0.09 


Midnis;ht,March31,to 
6.30 a.m. 












" 


4 


0.17 


Rain 


12.50 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


" 


14 


0.30 


Rain 


6.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. 


a 


7 


0.46 


,. 


7.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 


** 


17 


1 

1 


Rain 




„ 


8 


) 




5.05 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


** 


18 


i.0.25 


and 
Snow 


10.00 p.m. to 1.00 a.m. 


,, 


9 


1 0.96 


" 




" 


19 


- 






,, 


25 


0.15 


„ 


5.00 a.m to 1.00 p.m. 


*' 


20 


0.64 


Snow 


3.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m. 


,, 


26 


) 






" 


24 


1 






„ 


27 


[ 1.10 


*' 


7.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


" 


25 
26 


)-0.57 


Rain 


2.00 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. 












" 






















Tota 




2.93 






" 


28 


0.16 




11.00 a.m. to midnight. 














May 


1 


0.20 


Rain 














5.00 p.m. to 9.45 p.m. 


Total 


3.12 








4 


1 0.77 




12.25 p.m. toO.OO a.m. 


Mar. 


1 


0.30 


Rain 


Midnight Feb. 28 to 


" 


5 












1.00 p.m. 




6 


0.97 




2.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 



7a 



Water-Supply Department. 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 









u 
o . 






00 ° • 




Date. 


<a 
J3 


^^ 


DUKATION. 


Date. 




O ci 


Duration. 




fl 


cg« 






s 






May i 


0.45 


Rain 


1.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Aug. 1 


0.20 


Show 
er 


12.30 a.m. to 7.00 a.m. 


" 1€ 
" 11 

" 14 


1 0.2a 
0.43 


Show- 
ers 


7.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 
2.00a.m to 11.50p.m. 


" 6 
" 9 

" 10 


0.31 

0.2C 

0.06 


Rain 

" 

Show- 
er 


8.55 a.m. to 10,15 a.m. 
8.40 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 

5.00 p m. to 9.40 p.m. 


" 15 

'■■ 16 


0.41 
0.03 


Kain 


11.15 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 
5.10 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


" 17 
" 18 
" 19 
" 20 
" 23 
" 27 


1 0.49 




9.00 p.m. to 7.00 a.m. 


" 20 
" 26 
" 27 

" 28 


0.85 
1 1.33 

0.14 


Show- 
ers 


10.20 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. 
6.45 p.m to 9.00 p.m. 

1.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


1 0.75 

0.38 
0.91 


Rain 


5.30 p.m. to 8.20 a.m. 

1.00 a.m. to 11.00 p.m. 
1.00 a.m. to 9.30 a.m. 










" 30 


0.07 


„ 


1.00 p.m. to 1.30 p.m. 


'J'otal 


5.80 












1 




Total 


3.37 
















June 4 


0.35 

0.34 
0.16 


Show- 
ers 

Rain 


4.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 

8.00 p.m. to 10.20 p.m. 
8.20 p m. to 11.00 p.m. 










5 
6 


Sept. 6 


1 1.57 


Rain 


2.30 p.m. to 3.00 a.m. 


" 12 
" 13 


1 1.43 


" 


2.00 p.m. tolO.OO p.m. 


" 9 
" 10 


1 0.13 


« 


12.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


" 23 

" 27 


0.25 
0.07 


" 


4.00 a.m. to 5.00a.m. 
8.00 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 


" 11 
" 12 
•' 12 


1 0.39 
0.18 


" 


11.00 p.m. to 5.00 a.m. 










9.40 a.m. to 2.00 p.m. 


Total 


2.60 






" 12 
" 13 


1 0.57 


" 


10.30 p.m. to 8.30 a.m. 










July 7 


0.03 


Rain 


9.50 p m. to 10.30 p.m. 


" 14 


■ 1.16 






" 19 


0.12 


Show 
er 


3.30 p.m. to 5.15 p.m. 


" 15 


" 


2.00 p.m. to 11..50a.m. 


" 20 


0.05 


Rain 


8.00 p.m. to 10 p.m. 


" 16 


. 






" 25 
" 26 


1 0.68 


1 
Show- 
ers 


4.00 a.m. toS.SO a.m. 


" 16 
« 17 


0.27 


Show- 
ers 


7.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. 


" 26 


0.96 


Rain 


10.30 a.m. to 4.15 p.m. 


" 17 


) 0.32 


Rain 


8.00 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. 


" 29 


0.12 


" 


7.00 a.m. to 9.45 a.m. 


" 18 


] 






" 31 


0.47 


Show- 
er 


6.15 p.m. to 7. p.m. 


" 26 
Total 


0.30 


Show- 
ers 


3.00 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Total . 


2.43 






4.89 







Water-Supply Department. 



71 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Rill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



Date. 


a 


u 

m 


Duration, 


Date, 

Nov. 17 
" 18 


o 

a 




Duration. 


Oct. 


3 

4 


S 1.07 


Rain, 


5.20 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. 


1 0.83 


Rain. 


7.30 a.m. to 5,00 a.m. 


« 


7 
8 


> 0.72 


« 


2.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 










« 


Total 


1.37 






« 


14 
16 
17 


0.44 
; 1.35 


" 


8.00 a.m. to 1L50 p.m. 
10.45 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 










" 


Dec. 3 

4 


1 1.08 


Snow 
and 
Raiu. 


1.30 a.m. to 6.20 a.m. 


.< 


19 
20 


1 2.04 


» 


10.00 a.m to 3.30 p.m. 


" 5 
" 6 


.0.23 


» 


10,00 a.m. to 4.00 a.m. 


" 


24 
25 
29 
30 


1 ^•'■^ 
1 0.43 


<' 


1.00 a.m to 3.00 a.m. 
9.00 a.m. to 2.00 a.m. 


" 7 
" 17 
« 18 

" 26 
" 27 


J 

I 1.85 
1 1.60 


Rain. 

Snow 
and 
Rain. 


2.00 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. 
7.50 a.m to 2.00 a.m. 














Total 


8.78 















Nov. 


11 
15 


1 0.27 


Rain. 


10.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


Total I 


tainfal 


for Y 


ear 50.21 inches. 


" 


15 
16 


|o.27 


" 


2.00 p.m. to 2.00 a.m. 





72 Water-Supply Department, 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Office of Superintendent of Eastern Division. 

Boston, Jan. 1, 1891. 

Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Dear Sir, — The annual reyjort of the Eastern Division 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1890, is respectfully submitted. 

Distribution. — Twenty miles of pipe mains have been 
laid during the year, and 5,725 feet of pipe has been aban- 
doned, making the net increase in the distribution system 
about nineteen miles, and the total length now connected 
with the works 498.73 miles. 

For the improvement of the high service supply in West 
Roxbury, a 24-inch main, 8,158 feet in length, has been laid 
from the junction of Prince and Perkins streets, through 
Prince, Pond, Eliot, and South streets to the junction of 
Morton street. 

In order to furnish a supply from the high-service tank on 
Mt. Bellevue to the high land in the vicinity of May and 
Pond streets at Jamaica Plain, a 12-inch main has been laid 
in Weld, Centre, and May streets, a distance of 12,6^0 feet. 
In response to the petition of Messrs. Brown, Durrell, and 
Co., and other property owners in the mercantile section of 
the city, an order was passed by the City Council, approved 
March 1, authorizing the expenditure of $100,000, for the 
purpose of laying a system of pipes throughout the mercan- 
tile district to furnish a high-service supply with a pressure 
of from 70 to 90 lbs. per square inch, this supply to be used 
only for the supply of fire pipes and sprinkler systems in the 
buildings of the district. 

In compliance with this order, mains have been laid in 
Kingston, Essex, Bedford, and Summer streets, Franklin 
street between Washington and Oliver streets. Pearl street 
between Franklin street and Atlantic avenue, Atlantic ave- 
nue between Pearl and Federal streets. Federal street between 
Summer and Essex streets. South and Lincoln streets between 
Essex and Summer streets, and Oliver street between Franklin 
and Milk streets. The total length laid for this service has 



Water-Supply Department. 73 

been 11,347 feet, at a cost of $25,137.67. Two hundred 
and seventy-five petitions for the extension of mains have 
been received, of which number 216 have been granted. 

Hydrants. — Two hundred and fifty-five hydrants have 
been established and 81 abandoned, making a net increase 
of 174 for the year. 

The total number now connected with the system is 5,459. 
Fifty-four of the old pattern Boston hydrants have been 
replaced by hydrants of the Post or Lowry patterns. 

At the request of the Fire Department, all Post hydrants 
are now provided with three steamer connections, two 2^ 
inches and one 4J inches in diameter. 

Service-Pipes. — Tvvo thousand one hundred and eighteen 
service-pipes have been laid, with an aggregate length of 
61,838 feet, and 210 services abandoned, malting a net in- 
crease of 1,908 for the year. 

New sidewalk stopcocks have been set on 4,002 services, 
making a total of 28,950 set since this work was begun in 
1885. 

High- Service Works. — The buildings and machinery at 
the Chestnut-Hill, East Boston, and West Roxbury pumping 
stations are in good condition. 

The feed water heater at Chestnut-Hill station has been 
rebuilt, using wrought-iron pipes in place of the brass pipes 
which were destroyed by the gases in the flue. 

Pipe Yard and Buildings. — The new stable at the 
Albany-street yard was occupied on March 1. It is a sub- 
stantial three-story brick building 40 x 110 feet. The first 
floor is devoted to storage of wagons and carriages, with 
ample facilities for washing carriages. On the second floor 
are stalls for twenty-eight horses, and two box stalls for use 
in case of sickness, also an ample harness room. The upper 
floor is used for storage of hay and grain, and has two rat- 
l)roof grain bins, holding 1,000 bushels of oats. 

On November 1 the superintendent's office and shops of 
the department were moved from 221 Federal street, which 
had been the headquarters of this division since 1853, to the 
new building at the Albany-street yard. 

The new building is 41 x 215 feet, three stories in height, 
with a flat roof. On the first floor are located the offices of 
the superintendent and assistants, meter-testing room, 
machine-shop, engine-room, blacksmith-shop, and carpenter- 



74 



Water-Supply Department. 



shop. On the second floor is an office for clerks, a plumber- 
shop, and store-rooms. 

The third floor is devoted to storage purposes. 

The boilers and coal-shed are located in a one-story L. 

The principal items of cost of the building are as fol- 
lows : — 



Giff'ord & Lawrence, building . . . $52,157 00 

E. Hodo:e & Co., boilers . . . . 1,730 00 

C. H. Brown & Co., engine .... 1,43897 

B. F. Sturtevant & Co., heating apparatus . 1,200 00 

Whittier Machine Co., elevators . . . 1,486 00 

Blodgett Bros., electric bells and watch clock, 250 00 

The building occupied as a stable and office in the Dor- 
chester district has been thoroughly repaired. 

I recommend that the old pumping- station in East Boston 
be remodelled and used as a stable and headquarters for the 
men employed in that district. The present building on 
Morris street is located on land in charge of the Paving 
Department, and the building must be raised to the new 
grade of the street if retained. 

Fountains. — The number of drinking-fountains remain 
the same as last year. 

Kepairs have been made to some of the fountains so that 
they can be used during the winter season. 

Water-Posts. — Nineteen water-posts have been erected 
and one abandoned, making the number now in service 170, 
located as follows : — 



Boston Proper .... 


11 


East Boston ..... 


9 


South Boston ..... 


11 


Roxbury ..... 


34 


Dorchester ..... 


45 


West Roxbury .... 


41 


Brighton 


19 


Total 


170 



Reservoirs. — At the Parker-Hill reservoir a new fence 890 
feet in length has been built on two sides of the lot, and 
the fence, keeper's house, and gate house have been painted. 
This reservoir has never been cleaned since it was first filled 



Water-Supply Department. 



75 



in 1875, and I recommend that it be done during the coming 
season. 

The East Boston and South Boston reservoirs are in good 
order, but the fences surrounding both lots are out of repair. 
The fence on the north and east sides of the East Boston 
reservoir should be rebuilt. 

Meters. — The total number of meters in service on Dec, 
31, 1890, was 3,627 on the Cochituate supply and 391 on the 
Mystic works, a total of 4,018. 

The following tables show in detail the work done during 
the year, meters in service, purchased, etc. 



Meters in Service Jan. 1, 1891. 



Cochituate . 


6" 


4" 


3" 


2'i 


14" 


1'' 


r 


1" 


¥' 


Total. 


Worthington .... - . 
B WW 




8 


20 


99 


83 


532 


419 

491 

146 

59 

4 

4 

1 

- 

1 

1 
3 
5 
2 

3 
1 


123 

1,225 
6 
6 

3 


1 


1,284 
491 


Crown . . . . • .... 


1 


n 


28 
2 


28 
9 


56 
14 


187 

22 

4 


1,684 
112 








14 














4 


jTrost 










1 
2 


1 

2 


4 










2 


10 










1 




















3 


Star 


















5 
















3 

4 




5 
































1 
















2 




2 






















1 


21 


50 


138 


156 


748 


1,140 


1,372 


1 


3,627 



76 



Watee-Supply Depaetment. 



Meters Applied. 



CocHiTUATE Department. 


4" 


3" 
1 


2" 

1 


W 
6 


1" 
28 


1" 


i" 


Total. 






35 
19 
13 
29 


1 
65 


78 


B.W.W 




19 




3 


2 


7 
4 


17 

8 


19 

5 


126 




46 












3 


3 


18 


31 


52 


96 


66 


269 



Meters Discontinued. 



CocHiTUATE Department. 


4" 


3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


3 


f 


Total. 


» 


2 


1 


1 


2 


16 


10 
19 
6 
1 
1 
2 


1 

ao 


33 


B W W 


19i 




1 






1 


2 


40 






1 


2 












1 














2 


















3 


1 


2 


3 


18 


39 


31 


9T 



Meters Purchased. 





4" 


3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


3 


s 


Total. 






3 
2 
3 


10 
9 

8 
2 


8 
12 
10 

2 


20 

37 

5 


6 

40 


1 


47 




2 
2 


63 




68 




4 










46 








4 


8 


29 


32 


62 


1 


182 



Water-Supply Department. 



77 



Meters in Service Jan. 1, 1891. 



Mystic Department, 


6'i 


4" 


3 ' 


2" 


11" 


1" 


i" 


1" 


Total. 






8 


3 


35 


4 


76 


52 
3 

46 
1 


14 
84 


192 


B W "W • • . 




3 




2 


6 


6 
1 


10 

1 
3 


2 


29 


185 


Ball & Fitts 


3 






1 




4 


8 














2 


15 


10 


49 


6 


109 


102 


98 


391 



3Ieters Applied. 



Mystic Department. 


4-' 


3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


r' 


i" 


Total. 








4 
1 
3 




6 
4 
2 


6 
2 


1 
6 


17 








13 




1 


1 

2 


7 


Ball & Fitts 






2 




















1 


3 


8 




12 


8 


7 


39 



3Ieters Discontinued. 



Mystic Dbpaetment. 


3" 


2" 


ir' 


1" 


r' 


f 


Total. 






1 




4 


2 
1 

1 


4 
9 


11 


B.W.W 




1 




1 
1 

2 


2 

1 




2 
3 


15 




5 


Ball & Fitts 






2 


















4 


4 




9 


4 


13 


34 



Water-Supply Departmejstt. 



Meters sent to Factory for Repairs. 





3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


i" 


1" 


Total. 






1 
2 
1 


2 
5 

1 


13 
8 
1 
1 






16 




1 


20 


■ • * 

69 


105 




3 










1 




1 














4 


8 


23 


20 


69 


125 



General Statement for the Year. 



In service Jan. 1, 1891 
New set ...... 

Discontinued .... 

Changed ....... 

Changed location . . 
Tested at shop ... 
Repaired at shop . . , 
Repaired at factory . , 
Repaired in service . . 
Purchased 



COCHITUATE. 


Mystic. 


Meters. 


Boxes. 


Meters. 


Boxes. 


3,627 




391 




269 


73 


39 


13 


97 


2 


34 


1 


802 




107 




27 




4 




1,329 




140 




458 




57 




116 




9 




304 


37 


89 


38 


182 









The number of meters changed, tested, and repaired has 
been larger than usual. This is due to having taken out for 
test a large number of meters which had registered from 
300,000 to 5,000,000 cubic feet. Some of these meters were 
found to be so worn as to necessitate their being sent to the 
factory for repairs, while the greater proportion required but 
very small repairs. This work will be continued during the 
comino; season. 



"Water-Supply Department. 



79 



Causes for Changing Meters. 



Clock broken 

Ordered out for examination 

" " " test 

Lever broken 
Leak at packing . 
Clock defaced 
Gear out of order 
Injured by hot water 
Leak at spindle . 
Eust in meter 
Spindle broken . 
No force 

Ratchet broken . 
Water in piston . 
Solder in meter . 
Bolts broken 
Enlargement of service 
Frozen 
Spindle stuck 
Stopped by dirt . 
Packing blown out 
Valve worn out 
Piston " " 
Meter burst 
Piston head broken 
Stopped in service 
" by gasket 
Body broken 
Piston-rod broken 
Points broken off 
Stopped by fish 
Piston broken 
Gear ' ' 

Block worn out 
Lever " " 

Total 



Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


QQ 


16 


233 


39 


282 


1 


5 




7 


2 


7 


10 


33 


3 


20 




15 


1 


17 


4 


5 




12 


1 


4 




1 




4 


1 


1 




27 


8 


4 


1 


3 


1 


7 




17 


1 


3 




7 




1 




1 




16 


2 


1 




2 


1 


1 






2 




5 




3 




2 




2 




1 



802 



107 



80 



WATEE-SuppLr Department. 



Metees Kepatrei 


) IN J 


5ERVI 


CE, AS FOLLOWS : 


— 


Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


Leak at air screw .... 1 




" " stopcock 








5 


5 


" " spindle . 








81 


2 


" " coupling . 








64 


5 


" " packing . 








10 




" " stuffing-box 








2 




" " joint 








10 


5 


Seal broken 








6 


1 


Spindle stuck 








10 


4 


Clock broken 








70 


26 


' ' out of order 








12 


7 


' ' defaced 








19 


27 


Spindle broken . 








2 




Pawl stuck . 








2 




Cap broken . 








1 




Check-valve applied 








2 




Stopped by fish . 








1 


4 


Meter made secure 








4 




Glass broken 








1 




Dirt in clock 








1 


1 


Ratchet broken 










1 


Stopped in service 










1 


Total . 






. 


304 


89 



Waste Detection. 

The work of this department has been continued through- 
out the year. 

The lorce of ten inspectors has been employed continu- 
ously, but the eighteen men employed in the operation of 
the Deacon meter system were suspended from February 6 
to April 1. 

The premises of all the water takers have been examined, 
and more than 10,000 nx^tices to repair defective fixtures 
have been issued. 

The following table shows the work done by the in- 
spectors : — 



Premises examined ..... 
" notified to repair defective fixtures 
" reexamined. .... 

Second notices to repair issued . 
" reexaminations made 



63,633 
10,402 
10,643 

383 
1,836 



Watee-Supply Department. 



81 



Wilful waste notices issued 

Fines collected . . . . . 

Cases of unpaid hose reported 

Violation of hose regulations 

Defective services in street 

Hopper water-closets not self-closing reported 



178 
5 
536 
132 
104 
38 



The defective fixtures may be divided into the following 
classes : — 





4,320 




2,845 




3,769 




17 




684 


er to repair 


51 


( ( ( ( 


101 


, , 


167 



Ball-cocks .... 

Water-closets .... 
Faucets : sink, bowl, and bath-room 
Stopcocks .... 

Services burst inside building 

" " outside " for own 

i( a (( a a ^itj 

Wilful wastes .... 



The territory covered by the Deacon meter system is now 
divided into 176 sections supplied through 81 meters, and 
contains a population of 407,600. On the Cochituate works 
356,600, out of a population of 408,650, can be supplied 
through the meters the system covering all the territory sup- 
plied with water, with the exception of the business portion 
of the city and a few takers on the outskirts of the residen- 
tial district. 

On the Mystic works the system has not been generally 
extended in Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett, owing to the 
fact that the distribution system of those places are not under 
the control of this department. 

The following statement is condensed from the returns 
of the ditFerent sections, and shows the daily average con- 
sumption and also the rate of consumption during the hours 
of 1 to 4 A.M., at the close of the season of 1889, and at 
the beo-innins: and end of the season of 1890 : — 





ft 


2d readings. 


1st beadings. 


2d readings. 




Daily con- 
sumption 
per head. 


Night 

rate 

per head, 

per day. 


Daily con- 
sumption 
per head. 


Night 

rate 

per head, 

per day. 


Daily con- 
sumption 
per head. 


Night 

rate 

per head, 

per day. 


Cochituate Works 
Mystic Works. , . 


356,600 
51,000 


Oallons. 

48.4 
40.1 


Gallons. 
27.1 
23.5 


Gallons. 
52.1 
43.5 


Gallons. 
29.6 
25.2 


Gallons. 
47.7 
36.1 


Gallons. 
27.0 
21.3 



82 Water-Supply Department. 

From the above it appears that the daily average consump- 
tion of the residential portion of the city is not over 50 
Gallons per head per dav, and that of this amount nearly one- 
half may be classed as waste. 

Although the present consumption of water in the city 
shows but a small increase over that of the year 1883, not- 
withstanding an increase of nearly 20 per cent, in population, 
yet there remains a large amount of waste. 

The reports of the work done by the inspectors during the 
past few years show that a large proportion of the waste 
is due to the poor class of water fixtures used in many of the 
buildings. These fixtures, of poor material and workman- 
ship, are almost certain to prove defective within one or two 
months after they are used, and repairs are made with others 
of same class which are found defective at the next visit 
of the inspector. 

Owners and agents of the cheap tenement or model houses 
in which these causes of waste are generally found, as a rule 
pay little attention to notices to repair until threatened with 
a fine. 

In tenement-houses where water-closets or other fixtures 
are used in common by the tenants, it is very difficult to fix 
the responsibility in cases of wilful waste, and where the 
occupants cannot or will not understand the English 
language the case is still more difficult. 

Further reduction of the waste can, I think, be best 
accomplished by the rigid enforcement of ordinances pre- 
scribing the class of fixtures that may be used. 



Water-Supply Department. 



83 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 

laid in 1890. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; S.B., Soutli Boston; E.B., East Boston; Rox., Roxbury ; 
Dor., Dorchester; W.R., West Roxbury ; Bri., Brighton. 



In what Stieet. 



Prince 

Pond ...... 

Eliot ...... 

South ..... 

Huntington ave , 

Huntington ave 



Summer . . . . . 

Lincoln 

Oak 

Albany . . . . . 

Fenway 

Atlantic ave . . . 

Federal 

Kingston 

Bedford 

Franklin 

L 

Boston 

Beachmont .... 
Parker Hill ave . 
East Chester park 
Brookline ave . . 

Parker 

Hutchino ave . . . 
Gkn ave .... 



Between what Streets. 



Perkins and Pond . , 
Prince and Eliot . . . 
Pond and South . • , 
Eliot and Morton . . , 
Total 24.inch . 

Irvington and Exeter . 
Total 20.inch . 



Irvington and Exeter . « , 

Parker and Longwood ave 

Total le.inch . . . , 



Washington and Atlantic ave . 
Bedford and Summer . . . , 
Albany and Washington . . . 
Harvard and Beach . . . . . 
Parker and Westland ave . . , 

Pearl and Summer 

Essex and Summer 

Bedford and Beach ...... 

Lincoln and Washington . • . 
Washington and Oliver . . . . 

Eighth and the water 

Ellery and Powers 

Leyden and Swan 

Parker and Tremont 

Swett and Chesterfield . . . . 
Maple and Burlington ave . • 
Ward and Ruggles . . . . • . 

From Day 

Harvard and White 

Carried forward . . . 



W.R. 



B. 



B. 

Rox. 



S.B. 



E.B. 
Rox. 



Dor. 



20 



2,466 
663 
1,882 
3,147 
8,158 

221 



198 
625 
823 



1,678 

96 

961 

783 

1,673 
847 
390 
740 

1,137 

1,717 
877 
435 
491 
345 
102 
333 
312 
24 
906 
13,847 



84 Water-Supply Department. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Westville . . . 
Geneva ave . . . 
Topliff . . . . 
Homes ave . . . 
Columbia . . . . 
Lawrence ave . 
Magnolia . . . . 
Codman . . . . 

Morton 

Back 

Blue Hill ave. . 
Ashmont . . . , 
Augell . . . . . 
Prospect ... I 
Vermont ave . . 
Prince . . . . . 
Selwyn .... 
Neponset ave. , 
Lowder's lane 

Pond 

Washington . 

Eliot 

Canterbury . . 
Hyde Park ave 
Centre .... 

Weld 

South .... 

Pond 

Centre .... 

May 

Poster .... 
South .... 
Lake 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

Geneva ave and Ditson 

Bowdoin and O.C. R.R .... 

Westville and Bowdoin 

Draper and Topliff 

Stanwood and Richfield .... 

John and Magnolia 

Quincy and Lawrence ave . . . 
Carruth and Dorchester ave. . , 
Norfolk and K.Y. & K.E. R.R. . 

Morton and Walk Hill 

Walk Hill and Tileston ave. . . 
Washington and Ocean . . , • 
Blue Hill ave. and Canterbury . 

Amherst and Linden 

Corey and Mt. Vernon 

At Perkins 

Hewlit and Mozart 

Jewett and Canterbury 

From Centre 

Prince and Orchard 

Walk Hill and Hyde Park ave. . 

Holbrook and South 

Poplar and Ashland • 

Ashland and Mt. Hope . . • . ■ 

Walter and Weld 

Corey and Centre 

At Morton 

Rockwood and Avon 

Green Hill and May ...... 

Pond and Centre 

Mt. Vemon and South 

Lake and Chestnut Hill ave. . . 

South and Kendrick 

Total 12-iaoh 



Dor. 



W.R. 



Bri. 



Water-Supply Department. 



85 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Camden . . . . 
Kingston . . . . 
Bowdoin . . . . 

Essex 

Tremont . . . . 

Oliver 

Mountfort , . . 

Tolman 

Savin Hill ave . 
Church 

Bay State road . 
Tufts ..... 
Somerset .... 

Allston 

Derne 

St.Botolph . . . 

Essex 

South 

Lincoln . . . . 

Pearl 

Central wharf . 
Summer . , . . 
Cowper . . . . 

Dorr 

Fulda 

Minden . . . . 
Chesterfield . . 
Gay Head . . • 
Harrishof . . . 
Round Hill . . . 
Calumet . . . . 
Hillside . . . . 
Pope's Hill . . . 
Draper 



Between what Streets. 



Columbus ave. and Watson . 

Beach and Essex 

Allston and Derne 

Washington and Federal . . 
Church and Jefferson . . . 

Franklin and Milk 

Beacon and St. Mary .... 
Neponset ave. and Korwood 
From Grampian Way . . . 

Weld and Centre 

Total 10-inch 



Beacon and Kenmore .... 

Kingston and Utica 

Allston and Ashburton place . 
Somerset and Bowdoin .... 
Bowdoin and Temple .... 
Garrison and Irvington . . . . 
Washington and Harrison ave. 

Summer and Essex 

Bedford and Essex 

Franklin and Atlantic ave. . . 

North side 

Gilbert and Atlantic ave. . . . 

From Short 

Ewer and Earl 

Ellis and Valentine 

Walden and Day 

From East Chester park . . . 
Centre and Round Hill .... 
Harold and Walnut ave. . . . 

Gay Head and Day 

Tremont and Sachem 

Wait and Parker Hill ave. . . 

Houghton and Neponset ave. . 

Robinson and Homes ave. . . 

Carried forward . . . 



Rox. 
Dor. 



E.B. 
S.B. 
Rox. 



Dor. 



350 
543 
154 

1,554 
70 
351 
612 
822 
419 
916 

5,791 

346 
414 
275 
362 
179 
543 

32 
448 
361 
884 
189 
580 

18 
110 
135 
344 
276 

77 
320 
511 
553 
784 
283 

71 
8,095 



86 "Water-Supply Department. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Waldeok . . , 
Savin Hill Ave 
Quincy .... 

Park 

KorfolS . . . 
King ..... 
Symmes . . . 
Clai-endon park 
Willow. . . . 
Ashland . . . 
Walter .... 
Kittredge . . 
St. John . , . 
Lanark road . 

East Lenox 
Essex place . 
St. Botolph . . 
Rever e . . . . 
Street .... 
Eidgeway lane 
Woodbury . . 
Chandler . . . 
Dundee . . . 
Kingston . . • 
Belvidere . . . 
Gilbert .... 
Bulfinch . . . 
Farnsworth . . 
Street .... 

I . 

Fourth .... 
Earl 



Between what Streets. 



BrougJit forward 

Tremlett and Melville ave. .... 

Pleasant and Dorchester ave. . . . 

Columbia and Mt. Everett . . . . 

Washington and Coffee court . . 
Walk Hill and R.R bridge . . . . 

Train and Neponset ave. ..... 

Fairview and Bussey ....... 

Poplar and Whitford 

Weld and Dunbar . 

Canterbury and Back ...... 

Symmes and Bussey 

Whitford and Metropolitan ave. . 

Rockview and Centre 

Englewood ave. and Kilsyth road 
Total 8-inch 



Fellows and Washington .... 

Essex and Tufts 

Follen and G-arrison ...... 

Charles and the water 

Brimmer and Otter ...... 

Cambridge and Derne 

Washington and Shawmut ave. . 

Tremont and Berkeley 

Dalton and West Chester park . 

Summer and Bedford 

Falmouth and B. & A. R.R. . . 
Summer and Aldine ...... 

Allston and Howard 

Congress and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. 

From Third 

Fourth and Fifth 

Hand I 

Dorr and O.O. R.R 



Dor. 



Carried forward 



W.R 



Bri. 



S.B. 



8,095 
226 
461 
101 
122 

66 
263 
336 
199 
342 
889 

66 
120 

14 

261 

11,561 



293 

93 

266 

288 

405 

633 

170 

12 

808 

374 

123 

65 

30 

514 

137 

281 

20 

420 

4,932 



Water-Supply Department. 87 

Statement of Ijocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Loring .... 
Bennington . . 
Falcon . . . . 
Wordsworth , 
Leyden . . . . 

Pope 

Meridian . . . 
Wordsworth . 
West Eagle . . 
Putnam . . . . 

Kent 

Williams . . . 
Maywood . . . 
Juniper . . . . 
Sherman . . . 

Mills 

Rockland ave. . 
Thornton . . . 
Atherton . . . 
Fairbury . . . 
Mansur . . • , 
Terrace ave. . 
Wayne . . . . 
Sachem . . . 
Savin . . . . 
Cherry ... 
Whitney place 
Round Hill . . 
Fellows pi. . . 
Moreland . . . 
Sterling . . . 
Paulding . . . 

Clife 

Harold . . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . . 

Seventh and Eighth 

Wordsworth and West 

Brook and Putnam 

Coleridge and B., R., Ss L. R. . 
Bennington and Beachmont . . 

Swift and Curtis 

Marion and W. Eagle . . . . • 

Saratoga and Pope 

Meridian and Brook , 

Falcon and Eagle 

Vernon and Roxbury 

Westminster and Shawmut ave. 
Warren and Blue Hill ave. . . . 
Thornton and Juniper terrace . 
Dale and Rockland 



Juniper and Cedar square 

A mory and Copley 

Rand and Blue Hill ave. . , 

Day and Schiller 

From Sheridan 

Maple and Blue Hill ave. . , 
Hillside and Calumet . . . . 
Tupelo and Blue Hill ave. . 
Quincy " " " " 

From Tremont 

Walden and Round Hill . . 

From Fellows 

Dennis and Blue Hill ave. , 
Westminster and Warwick , 
Dale and Bainbridge . . . . 
Washington and Dana . . . 
Townsend and Munroe . . 



Carried forward 11,916 



S.B. 
E. B. 



4,932 
105 
393 
121 
132 
371 
309 

19 
531 
316 

24 
213 
360 
125 
168 
119 
131 

93 
171 
134 
174 
329 
152 
179 
247 
174 

46 

22 
432 
197 
185 
143 
217 
295 
357 



88 



Water-Supply Department. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Judsou 

Townsend .... 

Kenney 

Willlama terrace . 

Elmore 

Aspeu 

Hazel park .... 
Drotney ave. . . . 
G-rainger ..... 
Holborn pi. ... 

Miner 

Bower .' 

Laurel ...... 

Auckland . . . . 

Clarence pi. ... 

Ballou ave 

Payson ave. . . . 
Vaughan ave. . . 

Grace ave 

Middleton ave. . . 
Evans 

Clifton park . . . 

Dracut ...... 

Mattapan 

Bellevue 

Leeds 

Cedar pi 

Clark 

Folsom 

Maxwell 

Street 

Beale , 

Van Winkle . . . 

Street , 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Cottage and Brookfield 

Harold and Humboldt ave. . . . 

From Day 

Williams and Williams .... 
Washington and Mayfair .... 
Copeland and Montrose .... 

From Maywood 

" Brookfield 

Elmore and Kingsbury 

From Holborn . 

Brookline ave. and B. & A. R.R. 
Walnut ave. and AVarren .... 
Bower and Ottawa 

Belfort and Thornley 

Whitfield and Washington . . . 

Norfolk and N.Y. & N.E. R.R. . 

Hancock and Glendale 

From Geneva ave. ....... 

Arcadia and Robinson 

From Norfolk 

Nelson and Corbett 

Clifton and Dudley 

Wrentham and Dorchester ave. 

Tileston and Blue Hill ave . . . 

Quincy and Kane 

Adams and Dorchester ave. . . 

BirdandN.y. &N.E. R.R. .. 

Quincy and Barrington 

From Woodward 

Morton and Milton ave 

From New Minot 

Carruth and Dorchester ave. . . 



Rox. 



From Chickatawbut 



Carried forward 19,024 



11,916 

221 

348 

476 

296 

240 

188 

164 

400 

24?, 

154 

435 

150 

34 

104 

191 

168 

91 

142 

155 

63 

117 

109 

397 

524 

60 

290 

241 

60 

24 

352 

186 

137 

210 

138 



Water-Supply Department. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Co7itim 



In what Street. 



Lj'ndhurst .... 
Dorchester ave. . . 

Leyland 

Street ...... 

Salcombe 

Hillside terrace . . 

Brent 

Bushnell 

Bicknell ave. . . . 

Frost ave 

Wrentham .... 
Wales pi. .... 
Estes 

Grampian way . . 

Laurel 

Mellen 

Street 

Whitfield 

Blakeville . . . . 

Savin Hill ave. . . 

Evelyn 

Granville 

Dakota 

Iowa 

Selden 

Blackwell . . . . 

Dean ave 

St. Gregory court . 

Randolph terrace . 

LeRoy 

Queen 

Ocean 

Tileston ave. . . . 

Hartford terrace . 



Between what Streets. 



BrougJit fcricard . . . 

Allston and Washington 

Dracut and Wrentham 

Burgess and Cottage 

From Dorchester ave. . • . . . . 

" Gushing ave 

" Bailey . 

Washington and Carlisle 

Rowena and Beale . , 

Harvard and White 

Fairview and Boutwell 

Ashmont and Dorchester avenue 

Estes and Puritan ave , 

From Wales 

Savin Hill and Savin Hill ave. . 

From Norfolk 

Ocean and Ashmont 

From Lawrence ave 

Wheatland and Talbot aves. . . 

OIney and Bowdoin 

Sidney and Grampian way . • . 
Norfolk and Blue Hill ave. . . . 

Adams and Milton 

Geneva ave. and Bowdoin sq. . 

Westville and Dakota 

Capen and Nelson 

From Neponset ave 

" Howard ave 

" Dorchester ave 

" Van Winkle 

Ditson and Geneva ave 

From King 

Roslin and Welles ave 

Walk Hill and Blue Hill ave. . . 
From Hartford 



Dor. 



Carried forward , 



19,024 

528 

209 

763 

192 

200 

135 

49 

160 

84 

184 

100 

199 

246 

374 

190 

247 

240 

72 

183 

130 

306 

821 

522 

336 

60 

247 

270 

223 

123 

454 

180 

192 

214 

19 

27,476 



90 



Water- Supply Department. 



Statement of LiOcatioii, Size, etc. — Continued, 



In what Street. 



Mt. Bowdoin terrace 

Holmes pi 

Coffey 

Newhall 

Coolidge ave .... 

Meyers 

Spruce 

Bailey 

Cohasset , 

Amherst 

Custer 

Yale 

Allen 

Paul Gore . . . . . 

Mozart 

Wilkins pi 

Arundel 

Perham 

Henman ...... 

South Fairview . . . 

EglestOQ 

Bradstreet ave . . . 
Weldon ...... 

Rockview . . . . . 

Garden 

Augustus ave . . . 
Carolina ave . . . . 

Argyle 

Brookfield 

Robert 

Maple ....... 

Pomfret 

Ruskin 

Wiggins 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . 

From Eldon 

Mills and Tileston pi 

Newhall and ]Sreponset ave . . . 
Ashmont and Pierce ave .... 

From Bernard 

" Spruce 

Meyers and Florence 

Washington and Washington . . 

Corinth and Albano 

Brandon and Prospect 

Ballard and Goldsmith 

Wachusett and Weldon . . . . 

From Anawan 

Danforth and Chestnut 

Selwyn and Walter 

From Sycamore 

Walter and Selwyn 

Ivory and Winslow 

Summit and Kittredge 

South and Robert 

Boylstou and School 

From Mt. Hope ....... . 

Yale and Hyde Park ave 

St. John and Parley vale . . . 

Maple and Corey 

Whitford and Metropolitan ave 

South and Lee 

From Cromwall 

South and So. Fairview . . . . 
Brookfield and So. Walter . . 
Weld and Garden ... • • . 
Maple and Corey ave 



Dor. 



W.R. 



From Beech 

Carried forward . 



■27,476 

72 

41 

235 

122 

50 

235 

87 

184 

678 

91 

144 

134 

60 

142 

161 

223 

519 

120 

110 

398 

48 

193 

571 

187 

258 

209 

100 

105 

305 

202 

316 

191 

105 

274 

34,346 



Water-Supply Department. Dl 

Statement of Location, Size, etc.— Contiviud. 



In what Street. 



Jewitt 

Grover 

March ave . . . . 
Perkins . • . . . 

Johnston 

Ashland 

Dustin ...... 

Hano 

Pratt 

Richardson . . . . 

Street 

Mt. Vernon . . . . 

Menlo 

Selkirk road , . . 
Cheswick road . , 

Oakland 

Englewood ave. 
Kilsyth road . . . 
Kantasket ave. . . 
Madison ave. . . . 

Pratt 

Saunders . , . . 

Pomeroy 

Henshaw 

Cufflen 

Tremont 

Webster ave. . . . 

Street 

Barstow 

Riverdale pi. . . . 

Leicester 

Rena 

Wordsworth . . . 
Chamberlain . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Bronght forward . . . 
Mt. Hope and ISTeponset ave. . 

From Neponset ave 

Park and Bcllevuc 

Canterbury and Grew .... 

From Jamaica 

Sherwood and Brown ave. . . 
Cambridge and No. Beacon . . 
From Braintree 

" Linden 

" Western ave 

" No. Harvard 

" Rockland 

Sparhawk and Henshaw . . . , 
Sutherland and Cheswick road , 
Selkirk road and Elm ave. . . , 
Washington and Faneuil . . . , 
Elm ave. and Lanark road . . , 
Lanark and Selkirk roads . . . 
Union and Washington . . . . 



Ashford and Linden . . . 
No. Beacon and Pomeroy 

From Saunders 

Menlo and Market .... 
Tremont and Nonantum . 
Washington and Cufflen . 

From Cambridge 

From Webster 

" Saunders 

" Riverdale 

" Surry 

Hubbard and No. Harvard 
From Pratt 

" Cambridge 



W.R 



Bri. 



Carried forward 



34,346 

388 

120 

251 

489 

299 

72 

75 

52 

61 

238 

400 

66 

486 

314 

144 

111 

27 

221 

198 

48 

237 

239 

138 

320 

217 

45 

6 

129 

204 

145 

81 

162 

142 

480 



92 



Water-Supply Department. 



Statement of liocation, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Street 



Bumatead court , 
Humboldt park . 
Minchen court , 
Franklin park , 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 
From Raymond .... 

" Market 

Total e.inch . . . 



From Boylston . . , 
" Bower . . . . 
" Geneva ave. . 
" Walnut ave. . 
" Scarborough . 
Total 4-inch . 



Bri. 



B. 

Rox. 
Dor. 
W.R. 



40,951 
323 
142 

41,416 

65 
137 
136 
807 
371 
1,516 



Water-Supply Department. 



93 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Relaicl and Abandoned in 1890. 



In what Street. 



Huntington ave. 



Central wharf . 
Central ave. . , 



Oak . . . . 

Albany . . 
Camden . . 
KingBton . 
Somerset . 
Bulfinch . 
Allston . . 
Bowdoin , 
Derne - . . 

Revere . . 

Tremont . 

Bower . . 

Laurel . . 

Pope's Hill 

Pratt . . . 



Street 

Ridgway lane , 
Revere . . . , 



Between what Streets. 



Irvington and Exeter 
Total 16-inch 



North side 

Centre and Old Colony R.R. 
Total 8-inch . . . . 



Albany and Washington . . . 

Harvard and Beach 

Watson and Columbus ave. . 

Beach and Essex 

Allston and Ashburton pi. . , 
" Bulfinch pi. . , 
Somerset and Bowdoin . . , 

Allston and Derne 

Bowdoin and Temple ... 
Charles and the water . . , 
Church and Jefferson . . . 
Walnut and Humboldt aves. 

Bower and Ottawa 

Houghton and Neponset ave. 
Linden and Wordsworth . . 
Total e.inch .... 



From Brimmer . . . 

Cambridge and Derne 

Charles and the water 

Total 4-inch . 



B. 

W.R. 



B. 



Rox. 



Dor. 
Bri 






198 
198 



189 
Y2 
261 



c^2 



16 



961 

783 

350 

543 

275 

30 

362 

139 

179 

181 

70 

150 

34 

19 

45 

4,121 



405 

633 

107 

1,145 



94 



Water-Supply Department. 



Pipes Lowered. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


s 




i 

a 






B. 
Dor. 
Bri. 

W.R. 

Rox. 
Dor. 


6 

8 
12 


350 


Dracut 

Dustiu 


Dorchester ave. and Wrentham 


75 
150 




Total 6-incli 






575 


Brandon 


Birch and Amherst 

Total 8-inch 


75 
75 










400 






125 




Total 12-inch .... 


525 













Pipes Raised. 



In what Btreet. 


Between what Streets. 


5 




n 






Rox. 

ct 


6 


415 






220 




Total 6-inch 


635 






Rox. 


12 


200 




Total 






200 

















Water-Supply Department. 



95 



2? 



S 
CO 



■? to 






s 

I 

JO 







1 




^ 




T-H 


lO 


00 »0 GO 


rH 


to 






to rvi 


o 
















>5 C-> rH OJ 


m 






S 1 o :;; 




"3 
o 


1 


^~z. 


•"i. 




^ 


(M I 


■;, 


00_ 


CO 




-*__ 


"- s 






1 


lO 






lO 


en" 
to 


o 




co" 


|co 




H 




c4' 














of 










1 S 










3 


to 


^ >o oo SS 


o 








• 1 CO 




* 




to 


S 


tH ^ 


-* 


to 








Ol 

1 -Hl^ 








rO 




i-T 




rH 


to 










fSf 








'~' 














rH 










1^ 






CO 


-* 


to 




1-1- -^ rH 


to 




o 


M rH 








o 






f IM rH O 


r^ 








to 
































e 




CO 


(>f 


5! 


'"' •*" 


O 


c-f 








to" 

O 








T-H 














r-T 










1 tH 








^ 


^ 


OO rH 












lO 








o 


to 


CO to 




« 












« 




lO 




o^ 




(N 


l>1_ 










<M_ 






























crT 








(M 




tH 








. ^ 










CT 






rt 


<M 


rt 


C^ 




• t-l 


-tJ4 








(M 










CO 


Ci 






O 


^ 












^ 




CD^ 




^ 


"- 








• •*_ 










•* 




H 




>— f 




»o 








• i^ 










• i-^ 








CO^ 














CO 










CO 






s 


to 


a. 
31 


t' 


CJi 


IM 

Ol 




3 ^ 1 3 1 




?) 




^ 


o 


co^ 








CO 






o 


ca 




« 




o 


tH 


to" 

CO 








1 


^ 




<m" 


% 








'^ 
























^ 








CO 


s; 


CO 


rH CO 




CO 


o 




O CQ 1 r^ 1 










en 








C 




CO 


o 




CI 


1 o 


s 


F^ 




"^ 




CO 








o_ 










o_ 


o 






o 














to 










to 


z; 




































































M 


lO 


tH 


rH 




-r*^ 


to 








■* 
-*__ 


z 






^. 


CO 










•*_ 


CO 








CO 






o 














c»" 










oT 


t^ 
































s 






f2 


CO 


CO 


Tj( 




^_J 


J_ 








: 1 3 

1 lo" 


o 


SI 




00 


-* 


o 

CO~ 








co_ 

uO 


'S 






































• 1 


































QC 




^ 














^ 










^ 


a 


« 




c^ 














IM 










IM 


■< 
































w 
































fi 




































rt 


M 












^ 


IM 




c 




^ 




© 




s 














o_ 


(N 




^ 




05 

to 




« 




co" 














CO 






c^ 




o 




© 




1 














1 


oq 

rH 




t: 


- 


o 

rH 
CO_ 




M 




o" 














o" 










o* 








(M 














cq 










IM 




© 




co" 
(>1 


^ 










CO 
CO 
(M 


'~ 




Til 




: ! s 








rH 


ri 












T-\ 


^ 




rH 


^ 


S ^1 








O 

ci 














(M 






q 
td 




Ol 

Ttl 


































to 








© 






























to 

01 




IM 




© 








































































5 • 
























































to . 






tm • 




O 










> 








a 


o 






3 . 






_a . 




CO 




55 
O 


o 




73 










iH 




-d 






























rH 


s 


'3 ■ 
o • 




ffl 


^ • 


s 


d 


s 


CO 


rH 




^pS 






p 


p 
08 


ci 




5 


a 


C3 


3 


c; 


5 


p" 

c3 


c 


PrH 
O „ 






PS 
H 


1-5 
O 

P 


□ 

a; 
a 
o 

o 
5 






o • 
•a 
p • 

2 


P 


m 


d 




o 

3 


a 


^ rH 






a 


3 ■ 




a 


a ■ 




a 


o 




P 


o 


P 












C 




O 


• r-l 


o 


» 


.1-1 


o 


CU CO 






-e 






G 




o 


^ 


P. 


r^ 


J3 


p 


— /"I 








s 


c 




O 






Cfl 


o 




fcB 
P 


o 


si 








1-! 








i- 






l-i 




1-^ 








hH 




Eh 


II 



96 



Watee-Supply Department. 



I- 



















co 




II 








n 


ira 










"3 


o 


c^ 


■b 


to 








CO 






-^ 






O 


CO 






CO 






H 
















CO 




ic 


•* 












c- 


to 








5 




^ 


o^ 






<i^ 


















-* 


t- CO 








^ 




-* CO 








c- 






co_ 






e 


c- 






r-t 




£/) 


















cc 






00 






(N 






(>» 




o 


QfC 












M 














g 






























X 




1 

IM to 1 










(M O 1 






c 






o 




< 


a> 


co" 




CO 















































o <^ 


cn CO 








O r- 


(M c» 








Ci 










« 


co" 




ccT 






m 
















<N 




<M 




















tt 


CM 




C-1 






H 


















i- 
















c 


















K- 














y* 


^ c' 












<= 


a 


> 


■3 I-( 








a- 


,c 




ro 












c 












b 


f 


■-1 












c 


) >-<" 








c 


^ 












r 




■5 


c! 










■c 


1-5 













n: 


O 








r 




c 
c 
c 












J. 
c 












j: 


^ 




,a 














53 










1 




W) 










r 


a 








_a 


,^ 


j: 


^ 








r 


a 


) b 


) "ce 










c 


c 












a 


a 


o 








t^ 


h- 


1- 


r 


H 



Water-Supplt Department. 



97 







o 


^ 


s 




CO 


■s 


^ 


CD 


O 


O 




(N 


00 


^ 


vO 


■* 


o 


CD 


•^ 




•593J 


CO 


CO 


CO 


at 


s 


CO 




S 


3 


C 


(M 


CO 


CD 
0-1 


CO 


05 

CO_^ 


'* 


o 


o 


a- 


m 


ni q^SaaT; 




















CO 




I-^ 




co' 


co" 




^ 


^ 1 


^ 


»J 




































■o 




liT 








































1 












































O 






o 






o 


CO 


t- 


CO 


02 


o 


c: 




CO 


Ol 






OD 


o 


CO 


E- 


JO jaqranjvi; 




so 




(N 


C-J 










o 




ira 


r-i 


» 




I- 


ci 


1 


§ 


o 


•%S9} 




00 














o 


s 




^ 




s 


(N 




^ 


C-1 


S3 


m q^Sua^; 




























lO 






lO 




icT 


H 










































M 












































a 






rt 












ri 


IH 


(M 




<N 




CO 


^ 




o 


lO 


-* 


S 


■saoiAjeg 




























oc 












JO aaqoinjsj; 














































s? 
















■? 




C-l 




J_ 


^ 




o 


Tl< 


CO 


.^ 


•laaj 




CO 
















c: 




•^ 




CO 

CO 






cc 


o 


t^ 


ui q:jSnai 




























oo' 






OD 




oo" 
































































o 




CC 




CO 


ira 




uo 


^ 


o 




■saoiAjag 




























CO 






CC 

CO 




CO 

CO 


JO jaqumjsj 














































c 




1^ 


a 




^ 






Tt 


to 




■^ 


^ 




o 


CO 


OCI 


•^aaj 




^ 




iT 


'~ 




■^ 








o 




t- 


^ 




§ 


^ 


^ 


H 


HI mSaai 




























Tt 










■*" 


P4 










































n 










































u 












I- 




I- 






cc 


CO r- 




t- 


^ 




0- 


t^ 


IM 


o 


•saoTAjag 




























^ 


rH 




oc 


tH 


-* 


fi 


JO jaquin^ 












































c 


(5 


§ 




Cv 




c 




»r 


c 


Gi t- 




^ 


O 


t- 


cc 


CD 


o 


K 


■laaj 


ec 


tr 




g 




"" 






d 


CO CO 






CO 




c^ 


iQ 


t^ 


ai q'jSuai 




























o 






^ 




CO 






























'~ 










1-1 










































M 




r- 


K 


r- 




^ 




?• 




e^ 


oc 


T)( oc 




' ir 


u^ 


a- 


5 cc 


00 


CO 


o 


•saoiAiag 




















(>3 




■" 




CO 


r-i 




in 


IM 


o 


p— 1 


JO J[aqranj>j 








































£5 
O 












t- 


^ 


c^ 






^ 




oc 


C 


CO 


(N 


G 


u- 


CO 


cq 


naaj 












^^ 


0* 






^ 




^ 


a 


' s 


"^ 


? 




CO 


■H 


H 


UI qi§uai 




























tf: 






ut 




irf 


O 








































































































CC 




IM 


r- 










lO 


CO 


m 


•saoiAaag 




























J: 






t- 


i-H 


l-H 


-«1 


JO .laqiunjs]; 








































i, 






t£ 






-^ 




a 




a 


cy 


^ 


CC 


^ 


■< t- 


•^ 


c^ 


c^ 


i-H 


^ 


o 

E-i 
03 

o 
eQ 
w 


naaj 














•" 






§ 




s 


•d 


o- 


CO 




5 


c» 


oq 

CO 


ni qiSuaq 




























<N 


" 




CO 




of 




















































^ 




^ 






cc 




oc 


^ 


OC 


^ 


cc 


CO 


r-T 


■<* 


P 
O 


•saotAiag 




























G 


I-i 




C<1 

I-i 


<N 


o 


JO jaqtun^ 








































m 














































C 


c> 




tc 


cc 


u- 


t- 


CC 


cc 


c 


a 


cc 


t- 


If; 


CD 


^ 


X 


t-. 


"~ 




•laaj 


o 


>r 




CT 


c 




a 




»r 


c^ 


i^ 


• cc 


c 








cc 


Oi 






Cv 


•5 




t- 






<?* 




Tt 


•5 




cc 




CO 


CO^ 






\ 


c^ 


i, 


ai q^aa^; 




















r- 








"* 


oi' 




oc 


<n" 


<o 


o 




























































































































C 




c 


cr 








c^ 


c 


cc 


^ 


<: 


^ 








CR 




< If: 


CO 


C<l 


M 


•saoiAiag 
JO joqainj^ 




c^ 




Cs 












^ 




(?5 




'~ 


Ci 






<N 


s 




fa 










































o 










































^ 






t: 


3 




• t 


3 


. X 


: 




T 




t: 


3 


T3 












OS 






a 






Q 




c 






Q 








<U 














c 


3 




c 


p 


c 
c 






C 

c 


5 




> 


Q 
O 






o 
n 

C3 


a 




P4 






1 


i 








t: 






T 




^ 


3 


T3 








o 


'Z 




c 


I T 




J 


^ - 


c 






C 


3 

3 '^ 


c 


: 

3 -Z 


g 


- 


T 








s 


j " 


j 


2 •; 


3 ' 


^ 


3 ^ 


1 ^ 




■• 


,C 


3 ^ 


^ 


3 •- 
3 ^ 


■S 




c 


a 


3 




m 


^ 
































^ 










































c 










c 


3 


" 


" 


" 


■ 


1^ 


CI 


ei I 


■t 


" 


" 


' 


■" 


" 


" 






^\ 






cc 


3 -^ 


1 ^ 


f C 


3 ? 


1 c 


? ^ 








T- 


H Kl 


t c 


^t le 


» «1W 


r^ 


CT 




1 



98 "Water-Supply Departjment. 

Two hundred and fifty-five hydrants have been established 
and eighty-one abandoned during the year 1890. 





Established. 




Abandoned. 






' 


tk 










>. 










03 










o 




ss 




>> 


p 


. 


n 








IS 
o 










E: 










oi-i 


o 


o 


o 


§-^ 


o 


o 


o 


4> 




W 


fM 


rA 


P4 


H 


m 


Ph 


1-1 


fq 


H 


125 


Boston 


3 


19 


30 




52 


. . . 


. . 


1 


35 


36 


16 






4 
12 
18 


5 
3 
9 




9 
17 
40 


1 

5 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 

5 

7 


2 

8 

13 


7 




2 
13 


9 


Roxbury 


27 


Dorchester 


31 


30 


3 


1 


65 


2 




3 


4 


9 


56 


West Roxbury 


21 


23 






44 


5 


• . 




3 


8 


36 




14 


11 


2 


1 


28 


4 


1 






5 


23 








84 


117 


52 


2 


255 


17 


3 


6 


55 


81 


174 



Hydrants taken out and repaired 74 

Hydrant boxes renewed 134 

Gate boxes renewed 151 



Total Numher of Hydrants in use Jan., 1891. 





Boston 
Lowry. 


1^ 
b 


Post. 


o 


a 

O 

o 

m 


3 

o 


Boston 


68 
17 
24 
52 
164 
155 
50 


1 


203 

74 

78 

118 

237 

333 

202 

16 


664 
200 
137 
664 
572 
113 
66 


533 

274 

138 

106 

82 

53 

38 


1,468 
566 




377 




940 


Dorchester 

West Roxbury 


1,055 
654 




356 




16 


Brookline 






5 


3 

7 


8 










7 








7 
4 


.... 


7 








4 
















530 


1 


1,272 


2,421 


1,234 


5,458 



Water-Supply Department. 



99 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year J890. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


Total. 




40 
1 

1 
2 


36 

1 
1 


30 
3 

1 
4 


24 

1 

1 

2 


20 

10 

2 
3 

15 


16 
7 

1 

8 


12 

23 

2 
1 
8 
3 
3 

40 


10 

1 
1 

1 

3 


8 

5 

1 
1 
1 

8 


6 

38 
7 
7 

14 
6 
4 

76 


4 

20 
3 

1 



24 


3 
1 

• 
1 


2 

3 

1 

2 
1 

7 


2 

1 

1 

1 
. 

5 


n 

3 

3 


1 

10 
2 
1 
3 

1 

16 


i 

10 

2 
3 

1 

1 

17 


i 


i 




Boston 

South Boston ...... 

East Boston 


290 
66 
37 

140 

79 

26 

8 

646 


4 
3 
6 
2 

4 

1 
20 


431 

87 

58 

182 


Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 


95 
35 
10 




898 



Causes of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches 
diameter and upwards : — 



Settling of earth . 








. 26 


Blasting 








1 


Defective joints . 








52 


*' pipes . 
" valves . 








36 
4 


♦' packing 
<' stujffing-box 








33 

22 


'* stopcocks 
Struck by pick . 








4 

2 


Of 3-inch and in service-pipes : — 


Settling of earth 162 


Gnawed by rats . 
Nail-hole 








6 

2 


Defective joints . 
" packing 
" coupling 
' ' stopcocks 
" pipes . 

Struck by pick 








20 
21 
12 
6 
150 
54 



— 180 



433 



Carried forvjcird, 



613 



100 



Water-Supply Department. 



Brought forward. 
Stoppages by : — 
Fish . 
Dirt . 
Gasket 
Solder 
Rust . 
Frost . 



Total . 



613 



21 

31 

5 

4 

217 

7 



285 
898 



Water-Supply Department. 



101 



Statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1890. 



Yeak. 



Diameter. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


32 


72 


64 


173 


82 


241 


85 


260 


74 


280 


75 


219 


75 


232 


85 


278 


77 


234 


82 


449 


134 


458 


109 


399 


117 


373 


97 


397 


95 


594 


111 


496 


139 


.536 


122 


487 


82 


449 


82 


407 


157 


707 


185 


1,380 


188 


1,459 


153 


1,076 


434 


2,120 


203 


725 


214 


734 


109 


801 


213 


1,024 


211 


995 


135 


929 


145 


833 


170 


1,248 


171 


782 


253 


1,127 



1850 . . 

1851 . . 

1852 . . 

1853 . . 

1854 . . 

1855 . , 

1856 . . 

1857 . . 

1858 . . 

1859 . . 

1860 . . 

1861 . ". 

1862 . . 

1863 . . 

1864 . . 

1865 . . 

1866 . . 

1867 . . 

1868 . . 

1869 . . 
1870. . 

1871 . . 

1872 . . 

1873 . . 
1874. . 

1875 . , 

1876 . . 

1877 . . 

1878 . . 

1879 . . 

1880 . . 

1881 . . 

1882 . . 

1883 . . 

1884 . . 



104 

237 

323 

345 

354 

294 

307 

363 

311 

531 

.592 

508 

490 

494 

689 

607 

675 

609 

531 

489 

864 

1,565 

1,647 

1,229 

2,554 

928 

948 

910 

1,237 

1,206 

1,064 

978 

1,418 

953 

1,380 



102 



Water-Supply Department. 



statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1890. — Concluded. 





DiAMETEE. 




Year. 


Four inches 
and upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


1885 


Ill 
150 
172 
216 
183 
180 


638 
725 
869 
1,140 
849 
718 


749 


1886 


875 


1887 


1,041 
1,356 


1888 . , 


1889 


1,032 
898 


1890 







Respectfully submitted, 

Dexter Brackett, 
Superintendent Eastern Division. 



Water-supply Department. 10^ 



EEPORT OF THE SUPEEINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DIVISION. 



Mystic Department, 

Boston, Jan. 1, 1891, 

Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: — 

Sir, — The annual report of this department for the year 
1890 is herewith submitted. 

Mystic Lake. 

Waste has owerflowed the dam throughout the year, 
except from July 1 to October 19. The lowest point 
reached was on September 10, when it was 3.02 above 
tide-marsh level. During the season the usual force of men 
has been employed in removing the vegetable growth from 
Horn and Wedge ponds, and from the river above Whitney's 
dam. All along the supply the edges have been freed from 
all contaminating matter, and some of the feeders bedded 
with gravel. At the dam the old spruce flash- l)oards were 
replaced by hard-pine ones ; slight repairs w^ere made on the 
bridge, and the general surroundings kept in good condition. 
A watercloset and a new force-pump have been put in the 
gate-keeper's residence. I would call the attention of the 
Board to the necessity of a telephone at this station. 

Reservoir. 

The roads adjoining the reservoir have been graded ; 
about 1,100 feet of the road leading to the pumping station 
have been macadamized, and 1,4U0 feet of wooden fence 
built. 

The sides were top-dressed, as usual ; the walks on the 
top and the steps leading to the same were repaired. The 
drain from the dry- well at the gate-house has also been 
repaired. 

Conduit. 

This has received the customary cleaning and flushing ; 
new copper-screens have been put in the gate-chamber and a 
few slight repairs done at the waste- weir. 



104 Water-Supply Department. 

Force Mains. 

During the year a few leaks were discovered and the 
defects promptly remedied ; so that now the mains are 
apparently in good order. 

Pumping Station. 

Three new boilers were built, by the Roberts Iron 
Company of Carabridgeport, Mass., to replace the four old 
boilers that were erected in 1872. The new ones are similar 
in size and design to the three other boilers that were placed 
in the boiler room in 1884. They were first put in service 
on November 6. In April an attachment for admitting air 
to the furnaces at the bridge wall was placed in boilers Nos. 
1, 2, and 3, by Mr. F. A. Jones, and later a similar appliance 
was attached to the new boilers, Nos. 4, 5, and 6. At 
present boilers Nos. 1,2, and 3 are being overhauled. 

The independent air-pump and condenser mentioned in the 
last report has been connected Avith engines Nos. 1 and 2, 
and the old air-pumps and the old condensers have been 
abandoned. The new machine was furnished by Henry R. 
Worthington, of New York. A combined dynamo and water- 
motor was purchased of the Belknap Water Motor Gmipany, 
of Portland, Me., and the building was wired for GO incan- 
descent lights. The capacity of the dynamo is nominally 
thirty 16-candle power lights. 

Sanitary improvements have been made at the engine- 
house, also at the engineers' residences. The coal-shed has 
been extended 20 feet, and a Fairbank's platform-scales 
erected within. The concrete walks and gutters were re- 
paired, and the surrounding grounds restored to a good 
condition. Near the engine-house a filtration plant for ex- 
perimental purposes has been constructed in accordance with 
the plans of the City Engineer. I recommend that Engine 
No. 1, which has a pumping capacity of but 5,000,000 gal- 
lons per day, be replaced by an engine of more than twice 
that pumping capacity. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. 

The quantity of sewage pumped, from Jan. 1, 1890, to 
Jan. 1, 1891, was 119,119,670 gallons, to which was ap- 
plied 323,650 pounds of crude sulphate of alumina. The 
quantity of sludge precipitated and removed from the works 
was 3,305,673 gallons, containing about 96 per cent, of 
moisture, or, stated on the basis of cubic yards, after the 



Water-Supply Department. 105 

elimination of 86 per cent, of moisture the quantity of sludge 
removed was 2,611 cubic yards. 

Tile amount of coal required to furnish power for pumping 
the sewage was 191 tons. 

Compared with the quantity of sewage pumped during the 
whole of last year, there was an increase during this year of 8 
per cent. The rate of precipitant used, from Jan. 1, 1890, 
to Jan. 1, l&i91, was one part of crude sulphate of alumina to 
3,067 parts of sewage, or 1.36 tons per 1,000,000 galh)ns of 
sewage. The cause of this access of pumping was due to 
the greater quantity of surface-water taken into the sewer. 

The character of the effluent discharg-ed from the tanks 
during the past year has been clearer, and has contained 
less color than that of the previous year. The only repairs 
required on the plant have been the substitution of 25 new 
tubes in the boiler and a few improvements on the engine 
and pumps. Awatercloset was built in the chemical room ; 
also, an office was fitted up in the barn for the engineer in 
charge of the work. 

Pollution. 

Three inspectors were employed in this department most 
of the year patroling the streams and interviewing the prop- 
erty owners in regard to the disposal of their sewage with a 
view of making changes where such were necessary. In a 
few cases the property owners, after being notified, continued 
to defy the law relating to the pollution of streams, but, 
generally, they have complied with our wishes, and made 
important changes for the purity of the supply. The most 
important case remedied was that of the Woburn Steam 
Laundry, owned by Messrs. A. L. and H. L. Richardson. 

This establishment discharged daily about 1,200 gallons 
of refuse into our supply. 

This case was reported to the Law Department on Sep- 
tember 4, and on the 6th an injunction was granted. In a 
few days thereafter an 8-inch drain was laid in Main street, 
connecting with Mystic-valley sewer, and the laundry 
sewage was diverted from the water supply. Subsequently, 
about fifteen adjacent buildings were connected with this 
drain. About fourteen cases have been submitted to the 
Law Department. One hundred and thirty-eight improve- 
ments have been accomplished during the past year, as fol- 
lows : 46 new cesspools and 5 new vaults biiilt, 23 cess- 
pools and 5 vaults cleaned, to prevent overflowing ; 34 
drains, 3 cesspools, 4 vaults, and 3 pig-pens abandoned, 
and 15 manure-pipes removed. 



106 



Water-Supply Department. 



Distribution- Pipes . 

The distribution-pipes have been extended by the addition 
of 799 feet of 10-inch pipe, 98 feet of 8-inch pipe, (i52 feet 
of 6-inch pipe, and 1,559^ feet of 4-inch pipe. There have 
been 3,898 feet of cement-lined pipe replaced by cast-iron 
pipe. There was but one break in main pipe during the 
year. There are remaining in Charlestovvn about 14,500 
feet of cement-lined distribution pipe, varying in size from 
2 inch to 20 inch. 

I recommend that, during the coming year, all the cement- 
lined pipe be replaced by cast-iron pipe. 

Hydrants and Gates. 

Eighty-one street Lowry hydrants were abandoned and 
new ones substituted. Eight additional, 8 Lowry and 2 
Boston Lowry hydrants were established. One hundred and 
twenty-two hydrant stems, 39 gate boxes, and 87 hydrant 
boxes were replaced by new ones. Five 4-inch, 15 6-inch, 
and 1 8-inch gate were removed. 

Fountains and Stand-Pipes. 

The small drinking fountain in City sqmire was removed 
and a large one erected. Five additional stand-pipes for 
street watering-carts have been established. 

Service-Pipes and Boxes. 

Forty-eight new services have been laid, and 132 repaired, 
for which 927 feet of lead-pipe were required. Thirty-one 
1-inch tin lined service-pipes were replaced by larger ones, 
and 16 leaks repaired. Fifty-seven stoppages by eels, 24 by 
rust, and 4 by moss were blown out. One hundred and 
sixty-one service-boxes were renewed. 



New Services. 



Size 


i" 


3 
11 


1" 


2' 


Total Number. 


Total ft. 








27 


1 


9 


48 


l,247i 





Summary of Services connected 


with Wot 


•ks Jan. 


1, 1891 






Charlestown. 


Somerville. 


Chelsea. 


Everett. 


Total. 


Number of services 

Number of feet 


5,905 
157,751 


6,445 
216,304 


5,136 
137,710 


20,34 
40,268 


19,520 
552,033 



Watee-Supply Department. 



107 



Breaks and LeaJcs on Distribution Pipes. 





4" 


6" 


8" 


10" 


12" 


Total. 








1 
12 










1 




9 


11 


2 


3 


37 







Extension of Distribution Pipes. 





3" 


4" 


6" 


8" 


10" 


12" 


16" 


Total. 










376 


373 


98 


799 






1,254 


Rutherford ave B & M R R. . . 








336 






122 










122 






24 










24 






198 
256 










198 
















256 
















75 






50 
100 












50 
















100 






2o5 










255 






81 
158 










81 
















158 






1431 

16,3i:S 

860 

4,637 


3,677 


1,647 
626 


540 




1431 






605 
312 

7,583 


22,797 






1,798 










12,220 


















9,916 


22,6201 


3,775 


3,072 


540 

1 




39,923^ 



108 



WATER-SUPPLY Department. 



Distribution Pipes Relaid. 



Location. 



Scott's court . . , 
Gibbs lane . . . , 
Brighton street . . 
Beacham street . 
West street . . . 
Baldwin street . 
Salem ave. . . . 
(Tackson street . 
Decatur street . 
Stone street . . 
Thompson street 
Chambers street 



Original 

Si e. 



3-in. 
4 in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
3-in. 
4-in. 
3-in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
4-in. 
6.in. 
6-in. 



423 
286 
1,080 
304 
332 
220 
219 
1431 
2771 



398 
219 
96 
423 
286 
1,080 
304 
232 
220 
219 
143| 
277i 



3,898 



Hydrants Established. 





Established 




Abandoned. 






1 






rt 












» 






>a 






o 




>, 


§1 




^ 


I— t 
















o 




s 


s 






8 


2 




2 


8 


Somerville 






49 


6 


43 


Chelsea 






9 
15 

73 


2 


7 
15 












8 


2 


10 


73 







Total Number of Hydrants in use Jan. 2, 1891. 



Charlestown . . . 
Somerville . . . . 

Chelsea 

Everett 

Medford 

Pumping Station 

Total . . . 



193 

2 



50 
457 
184 
102 

2 

2 



39 



48 



315 
459 
186 
103 



1,074 



Watee-Supply Department. 



109 





1 


C5 


y^ 




CD 




Ol 


1 


o 






05 


<M 


CO 








J 


^ 






CO 


!N 


?• 1 


^ 


^ 


o" 


lO* 


-* 


r 






!M 




o 


o 









CO 


r-l 




00 


in 1 
















'^f 














^ 
























.9 


CT> 














03 
























CD 




















CO 






















to 














CO 






a 














OS 




a 


=1 














IN 
























§ 


(M 














(N 






<M 














IM 
























d 


°i 














°l, 
























gi 


CD 














co" 




iH 














tH 






O 














o 
























.9 








































o 


to 














CO 




(N 
























^ 










(_ 








OD 














.9 




CO 










CO 








































*"* 




















o 






00 






oo 






^ 






^ 








CO 


d 








M 






^. 


















H 


CO 


o 






G^ 






c^" 


W 


IM 












(N 


o 


















15 
















h- ( 
















g 






















CO 










CO 




d 




o_ 










o^ 


e 


-* 




CO 










oo" 


H 


















E^ 


















H 
^ 




















^ 


^ 










^ 






o 










Ttl 


fl 


fl 


o_ 












(N 


















1-1 


lo" 


Oi 










-* 




iH 












c^ 






CD 


^ 


CO 


00 


00 










lO 


IM 


CO 




c 




C0_ 




r-i 




















o 


lO 


o" 






Oi 






rH 


<N 




-* 






o 


CO 


^ 




-* 










00 








d 




















CD_ 








(M 










00 


C<< 


^ 




of 


I-' 






^ 


j_ 


o 


^ 


IM 








lO 


o 


o 




d 


CO^ 


t- 












r-T 


cd" 


cxT 


t-T 


^ 




to 


to 


o 


CO 


-* 


o 

CO 






O 


^ 


lO 


lO 


^ 






C-) 


-* 




o 






a 


CO 


05 


00 


o 


T— f 






-jT 


oT 


CD* 


j^ 


oo" 




-* 


IN 






■* 


(M 






o 


>o 


CO 


-* 


(N 






o 




rH 


1-H 






d 


"*- 


^^ 




CTJ 


o_ 






(n" 








oT 




CO 










<M 




15 


• 


" 










o 


a 


a 










M 


^ 


ffl 










<1 


o 


;;5 










U 


■*^ 


'? 


03 


^ 


^^ 




o 


a> 


^ 


a> 




C3 




Hi 


Tl 


a 

o 




OJ 


o 






i 


.a 




iri 






o 




X! 




O 




A 





"^ 



U5 


CO 




IM 




uo 

rH 


















T-i 








0^ 


r-( 








- 


Tj( 








"* 
















^ 
























tH CO 
CO (M 






iffl 


t- <M 00 IM 

i-H (M rH 


g 


lO t- IM lO 
lO (M <M 


r-l 


0> ^ IM CD 

Ol rH CO -* 
rH CO 




CO lO lO ■* 
to C-l 1— CO 


CD 


IM >C O ■* 
r-l CO 


r-l 




a 
o 


a 

o 




a) 


E 


3 

M 

o 

-H 



55 




>- 


s: 




■o» 


3 




c^ 


^ 



>,c/:) 



lU r*< 



o 



no 



Water-Supply Department. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

REPORT OF 1890. 

In Accordance with the Recommendation of the New 
England Water-Works Association. 



Boston Water- Works, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 
supplies also the cities of Somerville and Chelsea, and the 
town of Everett. 



Population by census of 1890 : — 

Boston . 
Chelsea . 
Somerville 
Everett . 

Total . 

Date of construction : — 
Cochituate Works . 
Mystic " 



448,477 
27,909 
40,152 
11,068 

527,606 



1848 
1864 



By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and 

Mystic lake. 

Mode of supply. — Sixty-five per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty-five " 

Pumping. 

Cochituate. 

Builder of pumping 

machinery, — Holly Co. 

Description of coal used : — 
a Kind, — Bituminous, 

c Size, — Broken. 

e Price per gross ton, — $4.70 
y Per cent, of ash, — 8.2 



" pumping " 

Mystic. 

H. R. Worthinffton. 



Bituminous. 
Broken. 

$4.20. 
9.8. 



WATER-SurrLY Department. Ill 

CocHiTUATB. Mystic. 

Coal consumed for year, in 

lbs 2,677,281 6,506,000 

Total pumpage for year, in 

galls. . . ' . . 2,369,631,700 3,030,116,500 

Average dynamic head, in 



feet .... 


123.16 


147.11 


Gallons pumped per lb. of 






coal .... 


885.1 


465.7 


Duty in foot-lbs. per 100 lbs. 






of coal (no deductions) 


98,069,200 


57,141,800 


Cost of pumping figured on 






pumping-station expenses, 






viz. : — 


$18,024 95 


$23,507 08 


Cost per million gallons raised 






to reservoir 


$7 61 


$7 76 


Cost per million gallons raised 






one foot high . 


$0.0618 


$0.0528 


Consumption. 






COCHITUATE. 


Mystic, 


Estimated population . 


410,600 


117,700 



Estimated population sup- 
plied .... 405,000 115,000 

Total consumption, gallons, 12,363,178,400 3,030,015,000 

Passed through domestic 

meters .... 318,840,000 6,978,400 

Passed through business 

meters . . . . 2,978,872,500 554,178,300 

Average daily consumption, 

gallons . ' . . . 33,871,700 8,301,400 

Gallons per daj', each in- 
habitant .... 82.5 70.6 

Gallons per day, each con- 
sumer . . . . 84.7 72.1 

Gallons per day to each tap, 558. 425. 

Distribution. 
Mains. 

COCHITXTATE. MTSTIC. 

Kind of pipe used . > Cast-Iron. ^^ ' '^"'j A^^^^S 

^ ^ 5 J^i'O'^ ^^^ Cement. 

Sizes. . . .- . 48-in. to4-in. 30-in. to3-in. 

Extended, miles . . 19.00 4.6 

Total now in use . . 498.73 152.3 



112 



Water-Supply Department. 



Distribution-pipes less than 

4-in., length, miles . 
Hydrants added . 
Hydrants now in use . 
Stop- gates added 
Stop-gates now in use 



Kind of pipe used 

Sizes 

Extended, feet . 
Service-taps added 
Total now in use 
Meters added 
Meters now in use 
Motors and elevators in 



.S' 



use 



COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 





5.4 


173 


73 


5,458 


1,074 


2(55 


113 


5,412 


1,575 


'er vices. 




Lead. 


Lead and 
Wrought-Iron. 


. |-in. to4-in. 


^-in. to 2-in. 


57,282 


20,360 


1,908 


993 


60,718 


19,520 


172 


5 


3,627 


391 


451 


23 



SCHEDULES OF PROPERTY 



WATER-SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 



lU 



"Water-Supply Department. 











CO 


o 


,-H 


O 


to o 


-* 


(M 




oo 


^ 


O 


o 


to 


,_, 


CO 


o 


CO 


lO 








c-i — oti o o .-H I- ro 


O CO 


-* o -r CO -t* 05 o> o 




o 


F- 


•* (M 1-- eo ^r CO to r-i 


co_ a3_ 


I- <», i^i C'i, °, '^^ '^ '- 




U m 


Oi -f CO (m" — " oT lO 


to" (m" 


trT co" i>r t-^ of cT -iT to" 




O .iJ 


-* t' CO i-H Ol to o 


en rH 


NIMCOOtNOCO — 




> 


^ r-t r-t 




CO rH rH 






P- 














.O C-1 




to d 


to 










I3i 






cc 


00 CO 




I-I (M 












CO 








-* Oi o> 




to t- 


d 






CO to 




Ttl CO 






^ 


s 




(M CO 


c^ 






CO 




. TT -# 








rH o) ri 


• to .. 'H lO to 


,_ 






CO o> 




• 00 to 






to 


1~ ^ (h 

O i-H 


t- >o 1^ 


CO 






>o ^ 




05 Oi 








"" 


















CO C-1 CO 


• 00 


— ' rH 


rf 






CO 


»nj to CO 


■^ 




00 


CO I-H 


>o 


CO r-j 










rH lO Ol 


s 






^1 
















B 






















t^ 




(M 




• 








IM 








05 


. 
















s 






















• Ci 
















































O O VO 


CO 


to u^ 


•r> 








t- CO CI 


X 1 




O 


to L^ rH 


. ■* 


1-1 tH 


CO 






CO <N 


ca CO 




^ 


CO 
















'^ ^^ 






















- 




















^ 


H 




cn 


-;)< 


CO 


05 rH 


00 






>o to 


to CO 00 




o 


<N 






o 


-a< l- 


(M 






CO UO 


O CO ^ 




















cq 


r~i 


^^1 


!z; 






















_ 




















, e 


^ 




rH 






05 


(M a> 


IM 






to to rH (M (M CO 


1^' 


i-i 


CO 


















<M rH rH rH 


cs 




(N 






















CO 








00 o 


^ 






lO rH -* IM rH 


^ 


s 


o 


iH 


















'S -^ 
























* 


1^ 


rf 


^ 






to 


co" ^ 


lO 






^ OD rH rn >0 - 






(M 












































"1 


































S -5 










IM 


(N l- 


00 CO 


O to rH rH IM CC CO 




O 


(M 












© -S 




M 














e<s 


















>>a 






















tH 




(N 


(N iH 




(M 




^ rH 


•* 00 


-M 




to 




















u ~^ 




CQ 




















£ ■§ 


























ft ^ 


























oo 


















•<* rH rH 






O 


CO 






















;, Jc 




^ 
























!k . 






















































Ul 






CO 






in 










rH t- 




r-i 






cq o 






■!* 


I-H 




























© J^ 


































^ 


































































© , 




o 


IM 






■-I 
























rH r-i 


^^ CO 




o 


































F^ ^ 






































rt .g- 










































































© t. 




























































































i '^■ 














































^ ^ 










































































































































^ 














































a 














































»j 














































>a 














































cs 




























































































^ 






































CD 


































a 0) 


















aj 
















-q fl 


c 














1 1 s 1 1 : 








O O '^ 














1 




<D a ID 
> > > 


^ a a ai S 
2 cs cs o pa 

° M 5 •€ tH . 












^ ° O m > > 


5 3 3 
o o a 


i ^- ^ 1 1 „ ^ 










to Ol -" 
rH CO to 


S ^ ^ « i ^ 1 








Ph 


o 


CO 


^ 


(1^ 


fis 


-kj 


-e 




A 


r-i 


r^ 


o 


CO 


•* 


;>! 


n 


o 


CQ 





"Water-Supply Department. 



llf) 



1,040 

7,225 
5,294 
7,671 


83,649 

1,8.30 

6,080 

212 




en co__ 

•* i-T 
















'. s 










; "^ 


CO C-l 
t- CO 






to 










Ol IM «0 in 

1-1 05 >o m 




CO CO 
M r-1 














o 






o 

1-! 
















1—1 
























CO 




















t- O CO 
CO CO 






<N 








(M 






lO 






Tf 00 














CO 






"^ ?3 














o 1-1 -* 


o 














CO 


05 


CO o 














(M 


CO 


IN IM 

1-1 














IE> 








s 








CO 




CO 








(M 
































> 

Si 
c 

(5 


> 

m 

a 
S 


a) 

2. 
m 

hti 

.S 
'c 
a 
to 

O 


S 

a 


;- 

• o 

3 


a 
o 

S 

c 
p 


n 
? 

O 

o 

p 

C3 

m 


61) 


1 


□ 
P 
hH 

A 
ti 

o 

1 
*^ 

m 
a 
a, 

5 


0) 

1-1 

W) 

s 







IIG 



Water-Supply Department. 



Statement of Service Pipe and Fittings. 











Diameter 


IN Inches. 










3 


2>o^ 


2 


IK 


IK 


1 


K 


% 


y. 


3^ 
>8 




3,150 


4,493 


2,591 


7,306 


8,046 
234 
146 
68 
69 
78 
47 


11,149 
920 
100 
632 
1,232 
175 
1,277 
164 


20 
12 

5 

50 

1 












Pounds Block Tin Pipe . . 
























1 


23 


100 
52 
94 

150 
13 




















18 

48 


62 
60 


79 
36 












































41 
19 


23 
15 

89 


3 


98 




Stopcocks, Air 








13 
13 
4 




Plugs 






7 
36 


103 


320 


39 




















5 




872 
17 
13 
29 


175 










































136 
761 












Wrought-iron Pipe, feet . . . 
Check Valves 


361 




360 
1 
4 




40 
1 


















4 
3 
3 














1 




2 
33 


1 
38 


6 


3 




Irou T 




3 




9 








44 


Iron L 








3 




20 


6 


. . . . 


6 




Iron Elbows 






6 




Church Stopcocks 














348 
161 
991 






Sidewalk Upright Tops .... 


















Sidewalk Upright Bottoms . . 



















Water- Supply Department. 



117 



Hydrant and Gate Specials. 





Lo wry- 
Hydrants. 


Post 
Hydrants. 


B. Lowry 
Hydrants. 


Boston 
Hydrants. 


Boston 
Hydrants, 
old pat- 
tern. 


Gates. 




28 
226 


7 
43 
12 


7 
4 


13 

82 


65 
51 




Pots 








Pots with Caps 

Bottom Extensions .... 

Wooden Boxes 

Rubber Gaskets 

Frames ... 


44 
27 
88 

136 
45 
59 
59 
30 

132 










7 
50 
154 
32 
26 


4 

5 

191 

72 

81 


5 

28 

121 

318 

75 
39 


39 
31 
24 


33 

512 
340 


Bonnets 








Bolts 


107 


87 


39 






141 


Top Extensions 


2 
5 



































]18 



WATER-SurPLY Department. 

Parts of Unfinished Hydrants and Gates. 



Iron Barrels 

Iron Tops 

Iron Bodies 

Iron Nuts 

Iron Valves 

Iron Washers 

Iron Rings 

Iron Guides 

Iron Stuffing Boxes 

Iron Cap-Rings, lbs 

Iron Caps 

Iron Cross-bar Caps 

Iron Cross-bar 

Iron Bolts 

Iron Sides 

Composition Glands 

Composition Nuts and Screws .... 
Composition Rd. Head Screws . . . 

Composition Nipples 

Composition Valve Seats 

Composition Nuts 

Composition Bolts 

Composition Wastes 

Composition Rings . . . 

Composition Valves 

Composition Screws 

Composition Small Rings 

Composition Small Collars . . . . . 
Composition StuiSng Boxes . . . . . 

Composition Collar Bolts 

Composition lbs. (unfinished) . . . . 
Rubber Valves, lbs. 



Lowry 
Hydrant. 



128 
300 



61 

34 

21S 



250 
1,218 

468 



Post 
Hydrant. 



87 
10 

362 
43 
82 
15 

103 



B Lowry 
Hydrant. 



8 

24 

310 

3 



867 



58 



Boston 
Hydrant. 



Gates. 



19 



941 
10 



167 
52 



2 
20 
66 
91 
163 
21 



4,029 



AYater-Supply Departmekt. 

Meters and Fittings. 



119 



CocHiTUATE Department. 




Diameter in 


Inche 


s. 






4 


3 


2 


li 


1 


1 


1 






3 

2 
1 


9 
3 


7 


17 

12 

1 

105 


5 

2 

1 

68 


3 


Crown ... 


1 
1 


10 




9 

2 
4 


50 
2 






















250 












418 
4 


100 










1 


7 
47 
4 




















3 
7 
1 
8 
19 


3 

8 


20 








1 
19 

3 






13 
9 
1 
















B. W. W. Clocks 


1 


14 


23 

242 






2 
1 
















5 




6 


4 

113 

2 

260 


3 
















4 

28 




Condemned Meters. 






















23 
















77 












2 
1 

2 




5 

13 












3 












1 



















120 



AVater-Supply Department. 



Miscellaneous Property, Cochituate Meter 
Department, on hand. 

6 brass butts, 2 plumber's bags, 2 pairs rubber boots, 4 horse 
blankets, 12 lbs. sheet brass, 60 lbs. leather board, 2 i^ipe cutters, 1 
wire cutter, 2 boxes candles, 1 crowbar, 34 meter frame covers, 24 
Worthington meter c-a,ps, 16 Crown meter caps, 15 lbs cop]jer, 2,662 lbs. 
old composition, 210 old couj^lings, 337 lbs. seal clamps, 838 lbs. old 
clocks, 1 pair calliisers, 2 diflferential pulley-blocks, 1 iron crane, 1 iron 
derrick, 1 wood derrick, 83 iron dowells, 1 hand drill, 1 electric appli- 
ance, 2 plumber's furnaces, 22 meter frames, 1 oil feeder, 300 meter-clock 
glasses, 2 pressiu'e gauges, 2 paving hammers, 2 sets harness, 2 horses, 
2 iron horses, 93 feet rubber hose, 3 electric battery jars, 2 fifteen-feet 
ladders, 1 testing machine, 1 brass pump, 1 galvanized pump, 2 picks, 
2 solder pots, 1 pung, 1 Worthington pattern, 1,425 lbs. old lead pipe, 
2 Avire plyers, 3 rammers, 50 lbs. rubber, 2 shovels, 1 die stock, 1 sleigh, 
1 Fairbanks scales, 1 Howe scales, 1 plumber's gas stove, 1 iron saw, 88 
lbs. solder, 1 four-inch chain tongs, 2 troAvels, 2 water tanks, 1 vise, I 
eddy valve, 1 working wagon, 1 driving wagon, 2 monkey wrenches, 2 
fork wi'enches, 2 Stillson wrenclies. 



Meters and Fittings, Mystic Department. 



Mystic Depaetmbnt. 




DiAMETEE IN 


Inche 


s. 








3 


2 


^ 


1 


1 


s 


5 








3 

2 




. 1 
1 

2 


6 
3 


2 

24 




12 






30 




1 
2 


3 


Ball & Fitts 












2 




18 

22 

3 


33 




110 


206 
50 


10 


377 






72 


Elbows (Iron) 




8 
12 






11 






18 


36 

8 






66 








8 




16 










6 


6 




1 












1 


Condemned Metees. 






3 


3 
1 
1 






6 










22 




23 


Ball & Fitts 




3 






4 

















"VVATER-SurPLY Department. 121 

Miscellaneous Property, Mystic Meter Department, 

ON hand. 

1 j)ipe-cntter, 4 cold chisels, 2 crowbars, 1 clock, 1 set one to two-inch 
dies, 2 oil feeders, 1 plumber's furnace, 1 chain fall, 25 lantern globes, 
1 hatchet, 1 set harness, 1 horse, 28 calking irons, 2 gasket irons, 4 lan- 
terns, 4 levers, 4 diamond jioints, 4 picks, 1 die plate, 1 pung, 1 i-am- 
mer, 1 shears, 1 steel square, 2 carpenter's saws, 1 scales, 2 shovels, I 
oil tank, 1 testing tank, 4 cutting tools, 3 monkey wi'enches, 1 Still son 
wrench, 2 wagons, 48 meter frames, 98 meter covers. 

Miscellaneous Property Cochituate Department, 
ON hand. 

3 lbs. oxalic acid, 2 lbs. muriatic acid, 6^ lbs. antimony, 6 anvils, 21 
axes, 10 grub-axes, 2 axles, 1 axle set, 11 augurs, 1 cask albamural, 4 
window-awnings, 67 bolts, 6 x ^^ 20 tire bolts, 4 x j^^g- ; 275 bolts, oi x ^^g ; 
55 bolts, I5 X i ; 46 bolts, 6x1; 36 bolts, 3^ x i ; 405 bolts, 4x5; 14U 
bolts, 3i x I ; 212 bolts, 2xj\; 2,926 bolts, 3^ x | ; 188 bolts, 2k x ^^- ; 
39 bolts, U X i ; 32 bolts, 5d x 1 ; 105 bolts, 4^ x § ; 742 bolts, 2^ x | ; 349 
bolts, Ux|; 2,717 bolts, 31 x|; 140 bolts, 1^ x | ; 30 bolts, 3x1; 47 
bolts, 6^x1; 72 carriage bolts, 4^ x f ; 36 carriage bolts, 2^ x i ; 90 car- 
riage bolts, 7xJg; 20 carriage bolts, 3x^^g; 92 carriage bolts, 2^X5; 
17 sweating bolts, 18 Lowry collar bolts, 3 two-inch stretching bolts, 2 
one and one-half-inch stretching bolts, 4 one and one-quarter-inch 
stretching bolts, 6 one-inch stretching bolts, 10 three-quarter-inch 
stretching bolts, 14 five-eighth-inch stretching bolts, 6 rattan brooms, 99 
corn brooms, 3 stable brooms, 11 whisk brooms, 6 pinch bars, 1 tamping 
bar, 50 crowbars, 3 boring bars, 166 hoisting screw bars, 8 kerosene 
barrels, 2 bushel baskets, 6 waste baskets, 1 charcoal basket, 2 bellows, 
10 summer blankets, 40 street blankets, 36 stable blankets, 700 wooden 
paving blocks, 763 stone paving blocks, 8 block planes, 1 window 
brush, 6 dust brushes, 23 horse brushes, 20 paint brushes, 2 forty-horse- 
power boilers, 5 wire brushes, 23 water-trough brushes, 1 9 bench brushes, 
4 open buggies, 4 covered buggies, 1 pair rubber boots, 1 pair stuffing 
boot, 4 interference boots, 189 lbs. borax, 4 " B. VV. \V." brands, 115 lbs. 
sheet brass, 3,927 old bricks, 3,146 paving bricks, 13 lbs. Bristol bricks, 
102 fire bi'icks, 275 lbs. brimstone, 4 plumbers' bags, 2 feed bags, 40 
gas burners, 94 lantern burners, 3 street roller boxes, 7 rosin boxes, 3 
notice boxes, 8 Lowry collar boxes, 1 sponge box, 1 set | to 1-inch bits, 1 
bit brace, 4 book-cases, 2 iron beds, 3 string bells, 1 tower bell, 3 bickern, 
1 jilumb bob, 6 brass butts, 30 lamp chimney's, 1 hand cart, 1 ti]) cart, 60 
pieces carpenter's chalk, 4 lbs. red chalk, 12 one-half-gal. cans, 9 one- 
gal, cans, 13 five-gal. cans, 2 ten-gal. cans, 4 rope chains, 2 eight-inch 
iron chains, 6 six-inch iron chains, 6 twelve-inch iron chains, 6 sixteeu- 
inch iron chains, 1 twenty-inch iron chain, 1 twenty-four-inch iron 
chain, 2 thirty-inch iron chains, 1 forty-eight-inch iron chain, 1 sixty- 
inch ii'on chain, 6 iron chains with hooks, 100 ft. jDolished chain, 2 lead 
cutters, 2 wire cutters, 2 bolt cutters, 11 office chairs, 2 high chairs, 7 
swing office chairs, 2 counters, 1^ bundles clapboards, 8 wooden water- 
trough covers, 1 large pipe callii^ers, 5 callipers, 1 screw chest, 1 bbl. 
Portland cement, 1 can belting cement, 23 curr}^ combs, 1 hay cutter, 
13 hydrant chucks, 5 independent jaw chucks, 1 universal chuck, 8 
small iron chucks, 3 iron chucks, 4 old chucks, 30 baskets charcoal, 11 
carpenters' chisels, 136 cutting chisels, 28 lead chisels, 88 cold chisels, 1 
turning chisel, 8,585 lbs. fire clay, 5 tons anthracite coal, ^ ton ciimb 
coal, 9 fioat ball cocks, 1 pair centres, 20 extra lathe centres, 4 door 
clamiJS, 2 Howard clocks, 1 watchman's clock, 5 carriage canopies, 7 



122 Water-Supply Department. 

chair cushions, 2 sixteen-inch derricks, 1 twenty-inch derrick, 1 twenty- 
fonr-inch derrick, 1 thirty-inch derrick, 2 forty-inch derricks, 1 forty- 
eight-incli derrick, 1 Lowry screw dog, 1 stopcoclc nut dog, 29 lathe 
dogs, 17 clamp dogs, 1 set stone dogs, 1 radial drill, 1 two-foot eight- 
inch upright swing drill, 1 one-foot six-inch upright swing drill, 1 up- 
right drill, 1 breast drill, 12 five-eighth-inch drills, 6 three-quarter-inch 
drills, 4 one-inch drills, 22 twist drills, 198 flat drills, 1 one-inch drill 
and tap, 1 one and one-quai-ter-inch drill and tap, 1 set dies, 4 doors, 
2x6x7; 107 fountain dijDpers, 160 unfinished dippers, 15 long-handle 
dippers, 3 thawing dippers, 2 desks, 6 roll-top desks, 2 standing desks, 

I C. H. Brown & Co. 12-inch x 34-inch engine, 17 oil feeders, 12 " B. T." 
fullers, 6 " B. T." flatters, 1 portable furnace, 13 plumbers' furnaces, 
8 lead furnaces, 3 lead furnace frames, 12 manure forks, 7 hay forks, 

II falls, 4 forges, 10 galvanized eighteen-inch funnels, 465 assorted 
tiles, 3 pressure gauges, 2 gasket gauges, 35 goose-necks, 600 tons 
gravel, 4 grindstones, 9 large grates, 10 small grates, 35 panes plain 
glass 19^x11, 15 panes ground glass 19x11, 2 brick hammei's, 5 cai*- 
penter's hammers, 2 claw hammers, 16 leaving hammers, 38 sledge 
hammers, 15 stone hammers, 14 hand hammers, I trip hammer, 7 ham- 
mer hooks, 6 blacksmith's hammers, 55 plumber's hammers, 31 driving 
hammers, 1 Pean hammer, 12 tons hay, 64 wooden horses, 24 horses, 7 
axe handles, 511 pick handles, 6 sledge handles, 16 hatchets, 3 pieces, 
suction hose, 1 hose-carriage, 6 pieces W P. hose, 299 feet |-ineh hose, 
8 feet 1-inch hose, 25 feet l|-inch hose, 600 feet 2-inch linen hose, 64 feet 
2-^-inch hose, 17 hose couplings-, 28 hose noxzles, 17 hose spanners, 9 
hose racks, 100 feet 2J-inch leather hose, 290 chain hooks, 7 shave hooks. 
1 pum]^ hook, 2 pot hooks, 18 coat hooks, 18 team harnesses, 6 buggy 
harnesses, 2 tip-cart harnesses, 18 hobs for Fox lathe, 1 coal hod, 26 
wooden heads, 6,752 lbs. ref. iron, 2,176 lbs. Norway iron. 6 six- 
inch jointers, 4 eight-inch jointers, 3 ten-inch jointers, 4 twelve-inch 
jointers, 1 sixteen-inch jointer, 2 twenty-irich jointers, 2 fountain jets, 
1 one-horse iigger, 1 hand iio-o-er 23 lead kettles, 8 heating; kettles, 7 
paring knives, 10 chipping knives, 1 horse-shoeing kit, 3 large sqmire 
lantei'ns, 94 lantern burners, 20 lantern burner tops, 315 white lantern 
globes, 24 red lantern globes, 317 lanterns, 5 fo-rty-eig.ht-inch pipe lad- 
ders, 23 small ladles, 15 large ladles, 2 lamps, 1 long lever, 1 short lever,. 
5 marking lines, 8 sjairit levels, 5 lbs. black lead, 122 lbs. red lead, 30 lbs. 
sheet lead, 200 lbs. white lead, 2 engine lathes 18 inches x 8 feet, 1 en- 
gine lathe 18 inches x 6 feet, 1 engine lathe 24 inches x 14 feet, 1 engine 
lathe 27 inches x 12 feet, 1 sjjeed lathe 16 inches x5 feet, 1 Fox lathe 18 
inches X 6 feet, 1 Fox lathe 14 inches x 5 feet, 13 lbs. sole leather, 27,682 
feet kyanized lumber, 3,819 feet creosoted plank, 32,915 feet creosoted 
boards, 1,055 feet whitewood, 132 feet maple, 1,200 feet hard pine, 
1,500 feet spruce sheeting, 400 feet 4 inch x 4 inch spruce, 150 feet 2- 
incli oak plank, 400 feet 3-inch oak plank, 11 eight-foot cedar posts, 60 
feet hard pine, 8 five-eighth-inch thawing machines, 6 tive-eighth-inch 
drilling machines, 2 one-inch drilling machines, 3 lawn-mowing ma- 
chines, 1 tire upsetting machine, 1 bending machine, 3 six-inch pij^e- 
cleaning machines, 2 twelve-inch pipe-cleaning machines, 1 horse- 
clipping m;u'hine, 1 tool-heading machine, 1 boring machine, 1 rolling 
machine, 1 bolt-heading machine, 3 stopcock testing machines, 4 floor 
mops, 2 four-quart measui-es, 9 bushels meal, 40 yards iron-wire net- . 
ting, 285 lbs. 6d. nails, 10 lbs. lOd. nails, 100 lbs. lOd. cutnails, 390 lbs. 
20d. nails, 200 lbs. 30d. nails, 725 lbs. 40d. wire nails, 200 lbs. 40d. cut 
nails, 25 lbs. upholstering nails, 4 pks. | Clout nails, 117 lbs. horse-shoe 
nails, 12,400 1-hour notices, 10,000 2-hour notices, 33,250 3-hour notices, 
18,655 5-hour notices, 12,500 7-hour notices, 6,000 12-hour notices, 415 
bu. oats, 282 gal. kerosene oil, 75 gal. lini^eed oil, 22 gal. cylinder oil, 
20 gal. neatsfoot oil, 2 oil-tanks, 20 Drajaer oilers, 35 lbs. tarred paper, 
577 picks, 292 pick-eyes, 23 padlock-hasjjs, 24 padlocks, 1 oil-pan, 6 



Water-Supply Department. 123 

stable-pails, 228 water-pails, 1 (galvanized) ash-pail, 1 Edison force- 
pump, 1 pnmp, 5 3-in. diaphragm pumps, 10 copper pumps, 6 force 
pumps, 1 Worthington feed pump, 1 Blake feed pump, 1 Harrison force- 
pump, 2 brass jjumps, 1 bbl. black paint, 175 lbs. No. 185 paint, 100 lbs.. 
No. 158 paint, 75 lbs. No. 176 paint, 125 lbs. No. 164 jjaint, 25 lbs.. No.. 
150 paint, 100 lbs. tinted Newport paint, 70 ft. drain-pipe, -±5 ft. 4-in. 
soil-pipe, 3 pieces suction-pipe, 19 pipe-tongs, 48 lbs. | block-tin pipe,. 
473 lbs. ^2 ^^^'^^^■^^'^ PU'S, 29 ft. 4-in. stove-pipe, 7 ft. 5-in. stove-pipe,. 
4 pipe cutters, 2 sets planes, 1 shoe plane, 1 j)laner 5 feet x 22'inches x 16, 
inches, 35 diamond points, 13 bull pomts, 2 six-inch puddling heads, 4 
eight-inch puddling heads, 1 ten inch puddling head, 4 twelve-inch pud- 
dling heads, 1 sixteen-inch pudding head, 15 pungs, 4 pks. Horse Medi- 
cine powder, ^ gal. polish, 5 lbs. putty, 1 jjroving pi-ess, 2 letterpresses,. 
11 small B. pulleys, 2 iron pulleys, 3 chain hoist jDulleys, 3 belt i>unches, 

6 surface plates, 7 four-inch wood plugs, 1 six-inch wood plug, 1 eight- 
inch wood plug, 1 twelve-inch plug, 1 plumb and line-, 5 soldering potss. 

2 water pots, 5 .small lead pots, 4 large lead pots, 435 leather pack- 
ings 11 lbs. jDOtash, 6 iron rakes, 7 wooden rakes, 440 lantern rests. 
55 rammers, 27 rammer heads, 1 hand ix)ller, 2 breast rollers, 18 iron 
rollers, 21 wooden rollers, 7 spades, 32 surcingles, 1 sled, 3 bottles- 
salve, 1 iron sheriff, 28 signs (JSo Smoking), 40 signs (No Passing), 55 
hydrant signs, 6 post squeezers, 10 Lowry squeezers, 2 stopcock 
squeezers, 60 lbs. solder, 7 solder irons, 85 lbs. wijoing solder, 3 sets. 
iron stamps, 3 gallons shellac, 1 sink-trap, 40 window sashes, 1 swage- 
block, 3 bush, shorts, 1 hoi'se s-ling, 23 papei'S iron tacks, 30 lbs. tallow, 

3 measuring tapes, 78 sheets tin, 130 lbs. pig tin, 4 toolboxes, 6 tool 
houses, 1 torch, 1 box tripoli, 13 trowels, 6 gals, turpentine, 2' large- 
granite tablets, 6 glass tubes, | x 12 inches, 185 brass tubes, 1 ice-water 
tank, 3 tables, 3 gas tong-s, 6 twelve4nch pipe tongs, 54 blaeksraith's; 
tongs, 2 clay tubs, 1 target, 1 wheel traveller, 6 stone troughs, 2 two- 
inch W. P. valves, 16 gals, black varnish, 25 vises, 21 wagons, 9 Sw. 
wrenches, 10 Stillson wrenches, 241 monkey wrenches, 126 post hy- 
drant wrenches, 25 gate wrenches, 17 service wrenches, 35 Boston hy- 
drant wrenches, 31 Lowry hydrant wrenches, 4 larg-e service-pipe 
wrenches, 20 air-cock wrenches, 32 wharf-hydrant wrenches, 3 Lowry 
collar wrenches, 3 twenty-foui'-inch stopcock wi'enches, 1 forty-eight- 
inch gate wrench, 39 large fork wrenches, 21 small fork wrenc-lies, 13 
socket wrenches^ 340 lbs. 3-inch rope, 63 lbs. 2'-inch rope, 1 six-inch 
strap rope, 1 twelve-inch strap rope, 14 rachets, 7 woollen robes, 7 fur 
robes, 4 scythe rifles, 34 lbs. copper rivets, 2 lbs. i-ound head rivets, 7 
jDlumber's rasps, 10 lbs. sheet rubber, 2i) rubber pump valves, 4 lathe- 
rests, 27 tap reamers, 12 Huter reamers, ^ lb. rawhide lacing, J 25 lbs. 
grinding sand, 2 tons sand, 8 cross-cut saws, 14 hand-saws, 14 wood-saws, 

7 circular saws, 3 metal saws, 12 hack saws, 1 pair shears, 1 grass. 
shears, 2 six-inch pipe shears, 9 twelve-inch pipe shears, 3 s-mall scales, 

4 platform scales, 2 gravel screens, 3 screw-drivers, 100 lbs. 5 x ^ inch 
spikes, 9 hand spikes, 100 o-ne-half-inch screws, 66 five-eighths-inch 
screws, 6 gross |-inch screws, 4 gi-oss 1-inch screws, 3 gross H-inch 
screws, 1 gross 2-inch screws, 1 gross 24-inch serews, 1 gross 2.i-inch 
screws, 3 gross l^-inch screws, 351 lag screws, 70 hoisting screws, 8 
jack screws, 4 scythes, 3 scythe snaths, 15 scythe st&nes, 124 lead sets, 
346 round-point shovels, 9 Jong-handle shovels, 44 square-jjoint shovels, 
4 snow shovels, 1 coal shovel, 6- lbs. common soajj, 55 lbs. castile soap, 
1 spoke shave, 2 draw shaves, 2 oil stoves, 6 sleighs, 1 sickle, 7 large 
stoves, 6 tool-house stoves, 1 office stove, 7 scjuares, 6,2-18 lbs. steel, i 
bale straw, 36 stone chisels, 49 stone points, 37 stone drills, 10 stone 
wedges, 25 1 lbs. cotton waste, 74 iron wedges, 585 wooden wedges, 8 
stone-cutter's wedges, 7 wedges, 15 gross wicking-, 2.5 torch wicks, 
281 lantern wicks, 10 wheelbarrows, 15 lbs. iron wire, 10 lbs. brass 
wire, 25 lbs. barbed wire, 23 cords wood, 1 pair pip^ wheels, 1 sixteen- 



124 Water-Supply Departmeist. 

inch hand wheel, 1 twelve-inch hand wheel, 3 emery wheels, 3 drilling- 
machine wheels, 3 tool-house wheels, 20 buggy washers, 4 storm windows 
5 feet 10 inches x 2 feet 8 inches. 

Property at Chestnut-Hill Pumping-Station. 

1 anvil, 3 brushes, 5 brooms, 1 set engine brasses, 2 sets i^Iain grate 
bars, 2 iron bedsteads, 1 bureau, 2 pair blankets, 150 assorted joint 
bolts, 1 set bits, I bit stock, 1 storage battery, 1 steam blower (for 
tiues), 1 set hoisting blocks, 500 tons Cumberland coal, 2 clocks, 5 
chairs, 10 cold chisels, 1 set carpenter's chisels, 1 fifteen-inch chuck (4 
jaws), 1 No. 3 Little Giant chuck, 1 set planer centres, 2 set crotches, 1 
oil cabinet, 2 coal cars, 1 crane, 18 T. S. twist i to l^-inch drills, 30 S. 
S. twist Jq to 1-inch drills, 1 set ^ to 1-inch dies, 1 twenty- four- inch up- 
right drill, 24 lathe dogs, 1 grindstone dresser, 1 emery wheel dresser, 

1 breast drill, one 300 light " Standard Vermont" dynamo, 2 desks, 2 
Gaskill engines, 1 Payne 7 x 10-inch engine, 1 double 5x12 hoisting 
engine, 1 emery wheel, 150 assorted pipe fittings, 2 rope falls, 2 chain 

2 falls, doz. assorted files, 1 forge, 1 set car2oenters' gouges, 1 Jones' 
peerless recording gauge, 2 mercury gauges, 2 float gauges, 1 electric 
gauge, 1 grindstone, 11 eighteen-inch manhole gaskets, 24 sixteen x ten- 
inch manhole gaskets, 24 six x four handhole gaskets, 10 banister grates, 
150 ft. woven hose, 50 feet 2-inch rubber hose, 100 feet ^-inch rubber 
hose, 1 hatchet, 4 Thompson indicators, 1 Hopkinson indicator, 2 sol- 
dering irons, 1 step ladder, 1 thirty-foot ladder, 1 twenty-foot ladder, 2 
sets bed linen, 2 Ward arc lamjas, 225 Sawyer Man 16 C. P. lamps, 70 
Sawyer Man 32 C. P. lamps, 19 square complete lamps, 6 hand lamps, 1 
spirit level, 1 sixteen-inch x 8-f eet engine lathe, 14 lbs. white lead, 10 
lbs. red lead, 2 mattresses, 1 No. 13 Turk's water motor, 2 sets furnace 
mouth-pieces, 1 three-quarter-inch hose nozzle, 1 set nickel oilers, 1 one- 
gal, copper-feeder oiler, 2 one-quart copper-feeder oilers, 2 gal. boiled 
linseed oil, 10 gal. cylinder oil, 30 gal. machine oil, 8 gal. kerosene oil, 

3 three x two x three Worthington pumps, 1 four and one-half x two and 
three-quarters X four Worthington pump, 1 eight x five x ten Knowles 
pump, 1 five X three x eight air jiump, 4 planes, 1 twenty-two-incli x five- 
foot Wheeler planer, 1 die plate, 1 elevated platform, 1 watering pot, 2 
two-inch hosepipes, 400 feet (various sizes) wrought-iron pipe, 30 lbs. 
sheet packing, 75 lbs. steam jjacking, 1 set parallel j)iece3, 2 ratchets, 
20 fluted y^g to l.^-inch reamers, 3 scoop shovels, 2 platform scales, 1 
small scale, 4 chain slings, 3 rope slings, 3 lbs. solder, 40 lbs. steel, 4 
saws, 1 hack saw, 1 two-foot square, 1 black walnut table, 2 two and 
one-half-inch pipe tongs, L set J to '2h pipe tools, 1 set lathe tools, 1 set 
planer tools, 1 set blacksmith's tools, 10 fire tools, 1 set J to 1;^ jDipe 
taps, 1 set 4 to 1^ hand taps, 1 set 5 to 1-inch die plate taps, 1 two-inch 
tap, 16 assorted sizes taps, 1 kerosene oil tank, 2 Nason traps, 1 hoisting 
tackle, 4 hot water thermometers, 3 vises, 1 planer vise, 21 assorted 
sizes steam valves, 1,000 pump valves, 8 rubber air valves, 3 coils 
brass wire, 4 tap wrenches, 5 Stillson wrenches, 10 screw wrenches, 13 
socket wrenches, 29 fork wrenches, 150 lbs. cotton waste, 4 large 
wheelbarrows, 1 small wheelbarrow. 

Property at East Boston Pumping-Station. 

1 axe, 1 pick-axe, 1 iron bedstead and bedclothes, 2 twenty-five 
horse-power boilei's and fittings, 1 extra set grate bars, 3 brooms, 
1 dusi-brush, 1 window-brush, 1 clock, 2 chairs, 1 clothes closet, 
6 cold chisels, 1 oil cabinet, 1 pt. can, 1 qt. can, 1 one-half gal. 
can, 1 oiling can, 1 black walnut desk, 6 files, 2 mercury gauges, 3 
water gauges, 3 steam gauges, 1 " Edison " recording gauge, 1 heater. 



Water-Supply Department. 125 

100 ft. f . rubber hose, 1 electric indicator, 2 ladders (one 11 ft., one 
16 ft.), 1 step ladder, 21 gals, cylinder oil, 30 gals, spindle oil, 20 lbs. 
steam packing, 2 Worthington pumps, compound H. P. and fittings; 

1 Worthington H. P. pump, 12 x 7 x 10 ; 1 Blake feed pump, 3x2x5; 

2 pails, 1 hand-saw, 1 sledge, 1 shovel, 1 set fire tools, 1 iron wheel- 
barrow, 2 gate wrenches, 6 fork wrenches, 2 socket wrenches, 3 
Stillson wrenches, 3 monkey wrenches, 10 lbs. cotton waste. 

Property at West Roxbury Pumping-Station. 

1 axe, 2 lbs. oxalic acid. 2 brooms, 1 window-brush, 8 glass oil-cups, 

3 wooden chairs, 3 cold chisels, 1 flue-cleaner, 3 oil-cans, 2 tons anthra- 
cite coal, 1 set grates, 1 hoe, 1 mop-handle, 1 hammer, 50 ft. 1-inch 

• rubber hose, 6 gauge glasses, I step-ladder, 2 ladders, 6 lanterns, 1 
lawn mower, 2 oil-measures, 5 gals, kerosene oil, 16 gals, cylinder oil, 36 
gals, spindle oil, 8 rubber gauge packing, 22 rubber packings, 5 ft. 
^-inch flax packings, 2 Knowles pumps, 2 copper pans, 2 pails, 3 lbs. 
green paint, 1 garden-i^ake, 1 lawn-rake, 11 pump-springs, 1 saw, 5 fire 
tools, 1 c]t. turpentine, 2 tunnels, 1 socket-wrench, 2 gland wrenches, 7 
iron wrenches, 1 pump-valve wrench, 2 monkey wrenches, 2 Stillson 
wrenches, 1 grate wrench, 1 stopcock wrench, 1 iron wheelbarrow. 

Property of City of Boston oh Mystic Division, 
eeal estate. 

Charlestown District. — About 13,050 square feet of land, corner Tufts 
and Medford streets, Ward 3, with brick shop, brick stable, and two 
wooden buildings thereon. 

Winchester. — At Mystic Sewerage Station, about 6| acres of land, 
with two wooden buildings and stable thereon ; at Bacon's Bridge, about 
3^ acres ; at Wedge Pond, near Main street, about h. acre. 

Medford. — Near Tuft's College, about 10^ acres of land, on which is 
built the reservoir ; near Mystic Lake, a one-family wooden dwelling, 
two wooden engine houses, and two sheds, built on "leased land. 

Arlington. — On Mystic street, about b^^j^ acres of land ; on New 
Mystic street, about 32,450 square feet. 

ISomerville. — About 12 acres of land, with brick engine-house, brick 
and stone coal shed, wooden stable, two wooden sheds, and a two family 
wooden dwellino- thereon. 



126 



A\'ater-Supply Department. 



PERSONAL PROPERTY. 
Statement of Pipes, Specials, etc., on hand. 













Diameter. 












o 

.9 

CO 

2 


.s 

o 

CO 

19 
1 


A 

.9 

16 

2 
2 


A 

.9 
3 


A 
a 

l-H 

34 

33 
9 

4 
5 


o 

a 

18 

9 

8 


o 
.9 
o 

1 
1 

2 

4 

19 

25 


.9 

CO 

1 

2 

14 
17 
3 


-d 
a 

CD 

15 

4 
3 

6 
14 

24 
5 


a 
10 

1 

6 
14 
5 


.a 
o 
a 

CO 




















1 










Eighth Turns 




1 
■I 


. 












Offsetts 






Reducers 






2 
4 


1 
6 


3 
3 


2] 

1 

17 








6 


11 


Phigs 










2 


3 


3 











CharlestoiDn Yard. 

Gates. — 2 ten-inch gates, 2 eight-inch gates, 9 six-inch gates, 24 
frames and covers, and 25 covers. 

Hydrants. — 18 Lowry hydrant bbls., 4 frames, 5 round covers, 2 
Lowry frames, tops and covers, 2 Boston Lowry bbls., and 5 Boston 
Lowry frames and covers. 

Service Fipe Materials. — 255 lbs. 1-inch lead i^ipe, 1,470 lbs. |-inch 
lead pipe, 1,395 lbs. |-inch lead pipe, 111 lbs. ^-inch lead pipe, 120 five- 
eighths- inch stopcocks, 5 one-inch corporation cocks, 25 three-quarter- 
inch corporation cocks, 24 five-eighths-inch corporation cocks, 108 lbs. 
solder, and 30 service boxes. 

Paints, Oils, etc. — 1 bbl. kerosene, 3 bbls. cylinder and 20 gallons 
linseed oils, 2 gallons tm-pentine, 20 lbs. red lead, 30 lbs. mixed paints, 
and 1 can putty. 

Other Stock, Tools, etc. — 5 tool chests, 7 derricks, 1 Fairbanks scales, 
2 tapping machines, 1 drilling machine, 1 sheet-iron roller, 1 bending 
machine, 2 diaphragm pumps, 15 hand pumps, 2 force pumps, 30 round- 
pointed shovels, 85 square-pointed shovels, 5 wooden snow shovels, 31 
coal scoops, 18 new hoisting-blocks, assorted sizes, 1 portable forge, 26 
iron rakes, 11 hoes, 9 crowbars, 10 rammers, 5 lead ladles, 5 lead pots, 
2 coils manilla rope, 24 tubular lanterns, 4 bushel baskets, 4 blocks and 
falls complete, 5 doz. pick handles, 4 bbls. lamp chimneys, 19 bundles 
lamp wicks, 3 trench furnaces, 5 hydrant chucks; 7 Stillson, 10 Coe's, 4 
pipe, 16 gate, 10 monkey, 9 service, and 5 Lowry wrenches ; 4 rachets, 
2 die stocks ; 20 dies, assorted sizes ; 4 jiipe cutters, 3 pairs bench 
shears, 1 pipe and 2 bench vises, 3 chain tongs, 2 railroad saws, 2 
rachet bit-stocks, 12 cold and 15 cutting chisels, 17 calking hammers, 
34 calking sets, 15 wedges, 3 j-arn irons, 7 diamond points, 7 paving 



Water-Supply Depaktmp:nt. 127 

and 7 sledj^e hammers, 30 pairs rubber boots, 4 stoves, 17,100 lbs. pig 
lead, 270 lbs. jute packing, 6 sheets zinc, o office desks with accom- 
panying articles, 4 chairs, and a few patterns. 

At Stable. — 3 horses. 3 buggies, 1 express wagon, 1 pung, 2 sleighs. 
2 express harnesses, 2 driving harnesses, 5 halters, 6 horse blankets, 2 
shovels, 1 rake, and 2 tons hay. 

Puinrting Station. 

1 Worthington pump of 8,000,000 gallons pumping capacity per day, 
2 Worthington pumps of 5,000,000 gallons pumping capacity per day, 

2 feed pumps, 6 new steel boilers, 1 independent air pump and condenser, 

1 combined dynamo and water motor, 1 water motor and lathe, 1 spirit 
level, 1 grindstone, 1 portable forge, 6 striking and 3 claw hammers, 4 
hatchets, 14 stone hammers, 2 ladders, 2 ice hatchets, 2 ice hooks, 6 ice 
chisels, 28 hay rakes, 14 pond rakes, 1 cross-cut saw, 1 hand saw, 1 
wood saw, 6 spades, 9 scoop shovels, 1 small hammer, 3 gate wa-enches, 

3 hedge cutters, 6 lengths 2d-inch rubber hose, 6 blocks and falls com- 
plete, 2 leading blocks, 2 derrick guys, 24 brooms, 12 net handles, 5 
gravel screens, 1 brace and bit, 2 bushel baskets, 5 water pails, 1 stove, 
3 mamu-e hooks, 18 hoes, 21 rakes, 1 shackle bar. 6 feed bags, 2 screens, 

2 wheelbarrows, 16 wooden rollers, 1 pair large pipe wheels, 2 lawn 
mowers, 6 kegs nails, 2 cold chisels, 1 chain harness, 1 steel square, 1 
car harness, 2 ladders, 1 desk, 3 chairs, 2 iron vises, about 80U tons coal, 
and 1 Fairbanks' platform scales. 

Somerville Stable. 

4 horses, 3 robes, 7 stable and 8 street blankets, 3 double manure 
wagons, 1 hay ligging, 2 double tip carts, 2 single carts, 1 express 
wagon, 1 buggy, 3 double harnesses, 1 express harness, 1 driving har- 
ness, 1 double and 2 single sleds, 1 sleigh, 1 pung, 1 mowing-machine, 
1 horse-rake, 2 sets car harnesses, 1 stove, 3 shovels, 2 rakes, and about 
25 tons hay. 

Reservoir. 

1 brass water-gauge, 4 shovels, 1 axe, 1 pick, 3 lanterns, 2 lamps. 1 
stove, 2 chairs, 1 clock, 1 table, 2 wrenches, 2 sets blocks and falls, 1 
chain fall, 1 hoe and 1 saw. 

]\rystic Sewerage Station. 

1 Hoadle}^ engine, 4 pumps, 4 large tanks, 3 vats, 1 Fairbanks' scales, 

1 pipe cutter, 1 die stock and set of dies, 1 hammer, 1 pair snipj^ers, 1 . 
spanner, 4 cold chisels, 1 stove, 2 desks, 1 table, 3 chairs, 2 pairs chain 
tongs, 1 belt clamps, 12 dip nets, 65 brass-mounted sewer poles, 20 iron- 
mounted sewer jjoles, 8 picks, 23 shovels, 7 hoes, 1 spirit level, 4 I'akes, 

3 forks, 3 bars, 1 hay fork, 5 wheelbarrows, h bbl. black and ^ bbl. 
kerosene oils ; 3 Stilson, 5 Coe's, 2 T, 1 straight, 2 fork, and five cross 
wrenches. 

Mystic Stable. 

2 horses, 2 tip carts, 1 express wagon, 1 pung, 2 sleds, 2 sets harness, 

2 wheelbarrows, 3 lamjps, 2 shovels, 1 hoe, 2 stable blankets, and 5 
tons hay. 



128 WATER-SUPPLY Department. 



Lake. 

2 Hoadley engines, 1 portable pump, 12 flat-bottomed boats, 2 keel 
boats, (3 pairs oars, 1 belt clamps, 25 feet 1^-ineh rubber hose, 2o feet 
1-inch rubber hose, 2 sets blocks ; 1 bbl. kerosene, % bbl. lard, and | bbl. 
cylinder oils : 12 kerosene lamps, 4 oil cans, 6 monkey wrenches, 2 belt 
awls, 1 screw-driver, 1 square, 3 lbs. elastic joacking', 5 ladders, 2 
grappling irons, 1 water pan, 2 hoes, 6 rakes, 6 scrapers, 1 ice tongs, 5 
ice chisels, 2 buck saws, 1 hand saw, and 1 pair scales. 



LIST OF CITY PROPERTY ON THE WESTERN 
DIVISION, 1890. 

Lake Cochituate. 

2 axes, 1 anvil, 1 buggy, 1 boat, 2 border knives, 1 brush scythe, 3 
brooms, 1 B. \V. W. stamj), 2 pr. block and falls, 1 carryall, 1 cart, 

1 coal shovel, 6 chains, 3 chairs. 3 die plates and taps, 2 desks, 2 
drawing boards, 1 dustpan, 1 dust brush, 1 dust broom, 2 engines, 50 
h. p. " Andrews' pat.," 1 express wagon. 1 feather duster, 3 dung forks, 

2 fur robes, 1 grub hoe, 1 garden fork, 1 grind stone, 2 gravel screens, 

1 horse, 4 harnesses, 1 house pump, 1 horizontal double acting suction 
and force pump ; 4 hand saws, 5 hoes, 1 hammer, 1 iron vice, 2 iron- 
bars. 8 iron rakes, 35 iron cranks, 3 kegs of nails, 3 planes,' 1 pung. 

2 i^icks, 2 sixteen-inch pumps, Andrews' pat. ; 35 posts, 8 percolating 
boxes, 1 portable forge, quantity of old lumber, 4 rain gauges, 2 pr. rub- 
ber boots, 8 receiving tanks, 1 street blanket, 1 stable blanket, 2 sponges, 

1 sledge, 1 square, 72 stojs planks, 1 Fairbanks scale, 2 small scales, 10 
shovels, 3 snow shovels, 4 long-handle shovels, 3 sickles. 2 spades, 
quantity of old steel and iron, 2 scufflers, 2 tin sprinklers, 2 scythes, 50 
feet of smoke-stack, 50 feet of 3-inch steam pipe, 100 feet of 1 5-inch 
steam pijie, 100 feet of l^-inch steam pipe, 1 stove, 1 spirit level, I 
bunch tar roj^e, 9 thermometers, 2 woollen robes, 5 water pails, 1 
eighteen-inch m. wrench, 1 two-inch s. wrench, lot of old Avindow 
sash, 30 wheelbarrows, 1 pr. oars, 1 pr. row locks, 5 white-wash 
brushes, 6 paint brushes. 1 hay knife, 1 road roller (stone), 1 range, 1 
raft, 1 table, 2 stojD-plank hooks, 1 mirror, 1 marble slab. 

So. Framixgham Office. 

2 desks, 1 table, 1 chest of drawers, 1 clock, 1 mirror, 1 letter press, 

2 thermometers, 2 lamps, 1 stove and funnel, 1 coal hod, 1 dust pan 
and brush, 1 feather duster, 1 wash bowl and faucet, 1 pr. shears, 6 
chairs, 2 inkstands, 1 tumbler, 1 drawing table, 1 bookcase, 1 barom- 
eter, 1 current meter. 

Tool-House at So. Framingham Office. 

2 axes, 2 augurs, 1 brush, 3 bits, 1 pr. clippers, 1 crow bar, 4 cleavers, 

3 tons coal, 1 grub hoe, 2 ice chisels, 1 lawn mower. 1 mallet, 1 oiler, 
1 oil can, 1 plane, 1 rake, 100 feet rubber hose, 2 snow shovels, 2 square 
shovels, L c. e. saw, 1 buck saw, 1 steel square, 1 tool chest, 1 sickle. 

Farm-Pond Gate House. 

1 boat. 1 coal hod. 1 ton coal, 20 rails, 2 pr. car wheels, 1 dust pan, 1 
dust brush, 1 fork, 1 gate wrench, 1 hammer, 4 iron rods, 2 ladders, 3 
lanterns, 1 monkey wrench, 1 ]Dr. oars, 2 pails, 1 rake, 2 pi's. rubber 



Water-Supply Department. 129 

boots, 58 stop planks, 1 stove with fixtures, 2 shovels, 1 scraper, 1 
scythe, 1 screw driver, 1 screen broom, 1 table, 1 wheelbarrow, 2 ice 
chisels. 

Storehouse at So. Framingham. 

1 box of blacksmith's tools, 1 bell, 1 claw bar, 1 desk, 4 drawers, 6 
drawing boards, 2 frost bars, 6 cast-ii'on floor plates, 3 drag forks, 1 
grindstone, 2 moi'tar hoes. 2 sets of hoisting-gear, 1 hay cutter, 4 stone- 
breakers, 2 wooden horses, 1 striking hammer, 5 stone hammers, 2 hay 
knives, 2 iron strap holsters, 4 iron beams, 4 iron standards, lot of iron 
scraps, 1 iron sink, 1 ice saw, 2 ladders, 8 old lanterns, 1 naphtha stove, 
1 oven, lot of different sized pipe, 1 paper rack, 2 pieces steam pipe, 2 
old copper pumps, 1 piece of 3-inch pipe with brass sti^ainer, 2 sheet-iron 
pans, 97 pick handles, 37 old picks, lot of steam pipe, I piece lead pipe, 
1 iron rod, lot of old rubber boots, 24 new shovels, 1 stump puller, 2 
gravel screens, 1 stove, 123 old shovels, 6 screen drums, 33 square 
shovels, 2 coils of screen, 1 iron safe, 1 B. W. W. sign, 1 hoisting-tub, 
1 iron tamper, 6 table leaves, 6 thirty feet weir plank, 10 twenty feet 
weir plank, 1 coil of wire, 1 old water tank, 4 blacksmith foi*ge, 1 
boiler, 1 box of blacksmith's tools, 1 steam shovel, 1 aqueduct 
cleaning machine. 

Inlet Chamber Farm Pond. 

26 stop planks, 5 stop planks for siphon culvert under section A ; 1 
broom, 1 pail, 1 boat hook, 1 differential pulley, 1 wooden stop i3lank 
gate. 

Sluice in Farm Pond Dyke. 

8 stop planks, 2 sets stop plank hooks. 

New South Dam. 

4 stop planks. 

Temporary Dam. 

40 flash boards, 29 stop planks, 1 bulkhead, 2 gates for measuring- 
the flow, 4 stop-plank hooks. 

Basin 1. 

1 axe, 2 boat hooks, 1 brand, 1 broom, 1 dust brush, 1 feather duster, 

1 long brush, 1 stove brush, 1 scrubbing brush, 1 bushel basket, coal 
shovel, 41 flash boards, 50 flash-board pins, 2 gate handles, 4 set stop- 
plank hooks, 1 hammer, 1 kettle, 2 ladders, 1 lantern, 1 monkey wrench, 

2 oilers, 2 oil cans, 110 stop planks, 1 poker, 1 dust pan, 1 pail, 1 twelve- 
foot rod, 1 river gauge, 1 ratchet, 8 pair rubber boots, 1 set steps, 1 stove 
with pipe, 2 shovels, 1 sponge, 1 tumbler, 1 boat, 1 pair oars. 

Basin 2. 

1 axe, 1 boat, 1 long brush, 1 scrubbing brush, 1 stove brush, 1 dust 
brush, 1 coal hod, 1 duster, 42 flash boards, 3 figured rods, 2 gate hand- 
les, 28 bags fertilizer, 1 grass hook, 8 stop-plank hooks, T hammer, 
1 ice chisel, 1 iron rake, 1 kettle, 1 ladder, 1 lantern, 2 monkey 
wrenches, 1 qt. naphtha, 2 oilers, 1 pair oars, 2 pails, 1 box polish, 
1 ratchet, 2 one-gal. oil cans, 94 stop planks, 1 stove, 1 set of steps, 
1 sponge, 1 fire shovel, 2 square shovels, 1 round shovel, 1 snow shovel, 
1 scuffle hoe, 1 buck saw, 1 common saw, 1 tumbler. 



130 Water- Supply Department. 

Basin 3. 

1 axe, 1 boat, 4 brushes, 1 coal hod, 1 duster, 1 twelve-ft. rod, 2 boat 
hooks, 6 stop-plank hooks, 2 gate handles, 1 hammer, 3 ice chisels, 
1 kettle, 1 ladder, 1 lantern, 2 one-gal. oil cans, 2 oilers, 1 pail, 1 ratchet, 
1 iron rake, 1 scuffle rake, 1 stove, 1 set of steps, 120 stoj) planks, 
1 sponge, 2 shovels, 1 thermometer, 1 wrench, 2 tumblers. 

Basin 4. 

1 boat, 3 bars, 1 bush scj^the, 1 border knife, 1 bitstock, 1 bushel 
l»asket, 11 pair car wheels, 5 chairs, 1 clock, 1 desk, 1 lot fish j^lates, 
5 frogs, 1 hay fork, 1 dung fork, 1 set flash boards, 2 grindstones, 
1 point gauge, 1 hand cart, 2 jjieces of hose, 1 nail hammer, 1 sledge 
hammer, 1 inkstand, 5 ladders, 2 oil cans, 1 pair oars, 1 piece 12-inch 
pipe, 3 pieces 48-inch pipe, 1183 posts, o picks, 2 paving rammers, 1 lot 
R.R. spikes, 4 R.R. switches, 4 i-akes, 590 R.R. rails, 1 lot R.R. chairs, 
8 shovels, 1 sjiade, 1 spirit level, 2 saws, 1 scythe and snath, 16 tele- 
graph poles, 144 sleepers, 4 brass caps, 1 copper float, 2 iron rods, 
3 lanterns, 4 levers, 1 monkey wrench, 1 oiler, 3 one-half gal. oil cans, 
8 pike poles, 2 ten-inch poles, 1 pair rubber boots, 1 piece rubber hose, 

1 steel tape, 1 stove, 1 straight edge. 

Tool House and Yard at Bullard Place. 

6 auger bits, 1 anvil, 1 border knife, 6 bits (bridle), 1 brace, 2 B. W. 
W. brands, 2 slope boards, 3 bill hooks, 2 block and falls, 3 odd blocks, 
8 stone chains, 13 crow bars, 1 chain and fall, 4 corking tools, 1 coal 
hod, 1 carpenter's bench, 1 piece canvas, 20 drills, 1 Edison pump and 

2 extra gaskets, 180 fence posts, 4 manure forks, 6 hay forks, 1 fire 
shovel, lot of old fence rails, 1 grindstone, 16 grub axes, 1 paver's 
hammer, 1 hay knife, 4 drill hammers, 12 hay caps, 4 wooden horses, 
lot of old iron, 3 jack screws, 1 jack plane, 1 reflector, 2 ladders, 3 lan- 
terns, 3 wooden malls, 1 melting pot, 1 mallet, 120 lbs. of nails, oil 
stone, 30 gallons of paint, 3 pails, 26 picks, 67 pick handles, 2 j)okers, 
10 gallons of kerosene oil, 4 pieces 48-inch pipe and 3 sleeves, lot of old 

-3-ineh plank, lot of short plank, 1 wooden roller, 2 rain scales, 10 iron 
rakes, 6 wooden rakes, 1 paver's rammer, 2 sickles, 1 I'ough table, 

3 stone hammers, 3 gravel screens, 6 long shovels, 7 short shovels, 
17 square shovels, 6 scythes complete, 3 old scythe blades, 1 steel 
square, 1 spirit level, 1 saw set, 4 hand saws, 3 cross-cut saws, 1 snow 
shovel, 1 stove, 1 stone di'ag, 7 rough benches, 1 tree ti'immer, 2 tun- 
nels, 1 lot of old timber, 10 old window sash, 2 well pulleys, 1 well 
bucket, 6 wrenches, 6 wheelbarrows. 

Barn at Bullard Place. 

6 horse blankets, 2 horse brushes, 2 brooms, 3 ton bedding, 1 rubber 
blanket, 2 buggies, 2 surcingles, 2 combs, 1 express wagon, 2 forks, 
1 hay M^agon, 2 express harness, 1 light harness, 2 cart harness, 14 ton 
of hay, 1 wagon-jack, 2 hoes, 15 bushel oats, 1 pung, 2 robes, 2 rain 
gauges, 2 sleighs, 1 cart, 2 wrenches, 3 horses. 

Course Brook Waste Weir. 

1 iron rake, 1 oil can, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 old wheelbarrow, 1 long- 
handle shovel, 1 grub hoe, 1 scythe, 1 wooden rake, 1 water pail, 1 piece 
of rope, 1 long-handle ice chisel, 2 old side brushes for cleaning-ma- 
chine ; 12 stop-planks, 4-inch x 8-ineh x 9 feet 8 inches long; 8 stop 
planks, 4 feet 6 inches long; 4 stop plank hooks, machinery and dam 
used for turning water into Course Brook. 



WATER-SuppLr Department. 131 



Bacon's Brook Waste Weir. 

10 yards old canvass, 2 wooden horses, 1 wooden stand for making 
brushes, 1 iron bar, 1 hand drill, 1 brush wrench, 1 iron pot, 2 lbs. 
resin, 1 form for bottom of aqueduct, 1 dam for aqueduct, 2 old brooms ; 
12 stoi^ j)lanks, 4-inch x 8-inch x 9 feet 8 inches long ; 4 stop planks, 4 
feet 6 inches long, 1 old stove, 4 stop-plank hooks, 1 wheelbarrow, 3 
grub hoes, 1 pick, 1 shovel, 1 spade, 1 long-handle shovel, 1 long-handle 
spade, 1 grass hook, 1 water pail, 1 oil can, 1 iron rake, 1 old brush, 2 
side brushes and 9 lbs. rattan for brushes for cleaning-machine, 50 lbs. 
nails. 

West Siphon Chamber. 

1 stove, 1 coal hod and poker, 1 coal box, 500 lbs. coal, 1 twelve-foot 
ladder, 1 closet, 1 water gauge ; 52 stop planks, 4-inch x 8-inch x 6 feet 
long, 1 aqueduct cleaning machine and 4 brushes, 2 screen jacks, 4 
hoisting tackles, 100 feet of rope, 1 hard-pine frame for lowering and 
raising cleaning machine, 31 pairs rubber boots, 1 axe, 1 saw, 1 oil can, 
1 wrench, 1 cold chisel, 1 rasp, half-gallon black paint, half-box 
candles, 1 mat, 2 striking-hammers, 1 barrel used on dam of machine; 

1 jiiece of rope, 20 feet long, 400 feet old boards covering floor. 

Rosemary Brook Blow-off. 

2 wrenches. 

Fuller's Brook Waste Weir. 

12 stop-planks, 4-inch x 8-inch x 9 feet 8 inches long ; 8 stop-planks, 
4 feet 6 inches long; 4 stojo-plank hooks, 1 shovel, 1 long-handle ice 
■chisel, 6 lbs. nails, half-box candles. 

Tool shed, near Fuller's Waste Weir. 

1 sixteen-foot ladder, 2 twelve-foot ladders, 2 wheelbarrows, 2 scythes, 

2 water pails, 2 pair pulley blocks, 17 old rattan brooms, 1 cement box, 
4 wooden rammers, 1 iron-faced rammer, 1 long-handle spade, 1 spade, 
1 iron rake, 1 long-handle ice chisel, 1 cold chisel, 2 hand drills, 1 
wooden rake ; 2 iron ladders, 8 feet long; 30 reflectors, 3 chains, 1 ton 
of old scrap iron ; 7 pieces hard pine, 6-inch x 8-inch x 8 feet long ; 200 
old brick, lot of hard-pine wedges. 

East Siphon Chamber. 

6 corn brooms, 1 pickaxe, 1 grub axe, 1 ox chain, 1 pair rubber 
boots, 1 sixteen-foot ladder, 1 pail, I bush scythe, 52 stop planks, 2 
hooks ; 33 pieces hard pine, 6-inch x 8-inch x 9 feet long. 

Charles River Bridge. 

2 wheelbarrows, 1 shovel, 1 rake, 10 reflectors, 1 ten-foot ladder, 7 
pairs rubber boots, 7 old corn brooms, 1 rattan broom, 24 candles. 

Clark's Waste Weir. 

20 stop planks, 4 stop-plank hooks, 1 grub axe, 1 bar, 3 rattan brooms, 

3 reflectors, 2 corn brooms. 



132 Water-Supply Department. 



Shanty at Tunnel. 

1 ladder, sixteen feet long ; 2 ladders, twelve feet long ; 2 wheel- 
barrows, 2 scythes, 2 water pails, 2 j)air pulley blocks, 17 rattan brooms, 
17 corn iDrooms, 5 rammers, 1 spade, 1 rake, 1 ice chisel, 1 cold chisel, 
2 hand-drills, 1 wooden rake, 30 reflectors. 



Effluent Gate-House. 

1 stove and coal hod, 1 settee, 1 coal box, 2 tons of coal, hydraulic 
apparatus, 5 pictures, 1 water gauge, 1 thermometer, 1 broom, 2 
brushes, 1 feather duster, 1 dust pan and brush, 2 lanterns, 1 scrubbing 
brush, 1 sponge, 1 window brush, 2 wire scoops, 1 mat, 1 rattan broom, 

1 twelve-foot ladder, 1 step ladder, 3 oil cans, 1 floor brush, 3 'wi'enehes,, 

2 gate wrenches, 1 fountain nozzle, 4 stop-jjlank hooks, 100 feet gas 
pipe, 2 four-foot glass tubes, 2 long ice chisels, 33 stop planks, 1 gallon 
vinegar, 1 gallon kerosene oil, 2 quarts sperm oil, 1 tunnel, 2 pails, 25 
feet rubber hose, 1 shovel, 1 grub hoe, 1 pick, 25 feet galvanized iron, 
chain and lock. 

Terminal Chamber. 

1 stove and coal hod, 1 dust pan and brush, 1 coal box and 1,600 
pounds coal, 1 twenty-foot ladder, 1 step ladder, 1 feather duster, 1 mat, 

2 stop-plank hooks, 25 stop planks, 6 screens, 1 wire scoop, 2 lanterns, 

3 oil cans, 1 i^air rubber boots, 1 iron rake, 1 large iron boat. 

Intermediate Gate-House. 

18 stop planks, 1 wrench, 2 hooks. 

Influent Gate-House. 

26 long stop planks for aqueduct, 14 stop planks for gate house, 4 
hooks, 1 extra brass screw. 



Tool House. 

1 oil cabinet, 1 large tin box, 6 large paint brushes, 16 pairs rubber 
boots, 6 frost wedges, 1 fifteen-inch pulley block, 4 iron sheaves, 2 lad- 
ders, 5 oil cups, 4 oil glasses, 1 flue cleaner, 2 hose wrenches, 1 small 
set steam pipe, i barrel old lamps and chimneys, 175 feet small iron 
chain, 1 leather belt 9 inches wide, lot of old rope, 1 copper elbow, 8 
gallons lard oil, 4 gallons sperm oil, 48 gallons kerosene, 100 pounds 
cotton waste, ^ box Babbit's soap, 42 boxes candles, i gross matches, 
20 candlesticks, 2 dozen rattan brooms, 17 water pails, 22 pick handles, 
5 bushel baskets, 3 stable pails, 4 striking hammers, 5 grass hooks, 50 
jDounds oakum, 1 dozen scrubbing brushes, 5 stove brushes, 1 dozen fl.at 
paint brushes, 1 water tank, 2 screen doors, 6 pairs brass butts, 6 hand 
drills, 4 dozen shims and wedges, 25 pounds white lead, 1 dozen sledge 
handles, 3 sledge hammers, 3 axes, 16 hay forks, 2 border knives, 2 
paving hammers, 1 pruning saw, 5 paving rammers, 1 copper tamping 
rod, 3 manure forks, 10 dippers, 1 hay knife, 10 scufflers, 1 cross-cut 
saw, 8 locks, 4 feed baskets, 2 hay ropes, 20 pounds axle grease, 4 
spading forks, 4 plow points, 2 painters jacks, 1 jack screw, 40 gallons 
grey paint, 1 gallon varnish, sand paper, 1 heavy chain fall, 1 copper 



WaTER-SuPPLY DEPAPtTMENT. 133 

pump, 3 cloz. hay caps, 10 mason's trowels, 1 sand jDump, 40 grain bags, 
16 round paint brushes, 5 wliite-wash brushes, 2 lbs. spono-es, 1 lawn 
mower, 10 tin I'etieetors, 5 floor brushes, 6 dust brushes, 25 feet rubber 
hose, 6 kerosene lamps, 16 scythe Avhetters, 1 bunch window cord, 1 
alcohol paint burner, 1 pr. sheep shears, 3 gals, turpentine, 8 spades, 3 
small hand hammers, 2 diaphragm pumps, three sti'ainers, 161 picks, 10 
grub hoes, 26 ii'on bars, 15 chains, 20 I'ound-point shovels, 12 squai'e- 
point spades, 12 snow sliovels, 58 hay rakes, 10 iron rakes, 6 snaths, 
3 doz. corn brooms, 12 oil jackets, 2 stoves, 2 bush scythes and snaths, 
1 hose carriage, and 300 feet of hose, ij 



Stable. 

8 horses, 2 sets double harnesses, 2 heavy wagon harnesses, 2 express 
harnesses, 2 driving harnesses, 4 cart harnesses, 7 pair hames, 12 hal- 
ters, 6 surcingles, 1 stove, 1 coal hod, 3 qts. neatsfoot oil, 2 gals, sperm 
oil, 5 curry brushes and combs. 1 set of lead chains, 1 hay cutter, 100 
lbs. bran, 20 bu. oats, 2 bu. cracked corn, 6 bu. salt, 25 tons hay, 1 
laroom, 1 open buggy, 1 covered buggy, 1 carryall, 1 sleigh, 1 pung, 2 
whips, 1 feather duster, 1 jack, 1 water pot, 25 bu. carrots, 3 boats, 1 
rfire extinguisher, 2 shovels, 1 looking glass, 2 chaii's, 3 pigs, 3 oil lan- 
terns, 1 harness pan, 12 dirnip car wheels and castings, 35 feet 2-inch 
lead pipe, 2pr. strap iron hinges, 6 feet long; 100 lbs. old copper wire, 
800 lbs. old wire screens, 1 lot of old scrap iron, 1 manhole grate, 1 
evaporation tank. 

Repair Shops. 

1 forge, 1 anvil, 1 set of blacksmith's tools, 1 vise, 1 set of stock dies 
and taps, 1 ratchet drill, 2 pair pipe tongs, 2 solid die plates, 2 cold 
chisels, 2 soldering irons, 500 lbs. scrap iron, 1 rivet cutter, 1 upright 
drill, 75 lbs. steel, 150 lbs. Norway iron, 1 assortment of rivets and 
bolts, li doz. files, 1,200 lbs. Cumberland coal, 5 saws, 10 planes, 12 
chisels, 2 try squares, 2 steel squares, 1 bevel, 3 screw drivers, 1 spoke 
shave, 4 augei'S, 2 levels, 1 clock, 2 gauges, 1 draw knife, 1 stove and 
coal hod, 800 lbs. coal, 23 kegs assorted nails, 1 oil can, 1 ladder hook, 
2 hammers, 1 axe, 1 hatchet, 1 adze, 1 boring machine and bitts, 1 bitt 
stock and bitts, 1 saw set, sand paper, 1 self-registering rain gauge, 6 
hand screws. 



Yard . 

1 jack, 1 ladder, 1,200 feet plank walk, 1 two-horse cai't, 1 scraper, 1 
harrow, 1 hay rake, 1 horse mowing machine, 1 horse hay tedder, 2 hay 
wagons, 2 express wagons, 1 two-horse wagon, 4 dump carts, 2 water- 
ing carts, 2 two-horse sleds, 1 two-horse truck, 1 road roller, 4 roller 
wheels, 2 moving wheels, 2 hand carts, 2 hand rollers, 2 snow plows, 2 
sets lead Isars, 3 plows, 2 stone drags, 8 wheelbarrows, 25 granite 
iDounds, 4 gravel screens, 2 grhidstones, 300 feet sjjruce boards, 800 feet 
siDruce plank, 2 bundles laths, 1 set Fairbank's hay scales, 3 gravel 
•screen frames, 25 brick hods, 8 tons coal, 1 tripod derrick, 1 boom 
derrick and rigging, 1 movable jaw, 2 check jiieces, and 1 jaw plate for 
crv;sher, 1,500 bricks, 1 old boiler, 4 earthen pipe, 3 feet long 1 foot 
-diameter, 8 earthern pipe, 3 feet long, 3 inches diameter, 5 earthen pipe, 
3 feet long, 1^ feet diameter, 350 stone tile, 18 feet service pipe, and 2 
elbows, 2h tons old railroad iron, 24 settees, 2 rain gauges, 1 self- 
recording rain gauge, 2 thermometers, 1 self-recording thermometer. 



134 Water-Supply Depaetment. 



Brookline Reservoir. 

1 writing desk, 2 keys, 1 book, 1 pen rack, 1 pitcher, 1 tumbler, 1 
sj^ittoon, 1 lantern, 1 stove, 34 feet of pipe, 1 coal hod, 1 fire shovel, 1 
poker, 1 stove briash, 1 dust brush, 1 dust pan, 1 feather duster, 1 corn 
broom, 1 rattan broom, 2 scrubbing brushes, 2 settees^ 1 chair, 1 floor- 
mat, 1 water gauge, 4 gate keys, 1 wrench, 2 wheels, 1 cover, 1 air- 
cock wrench, 1 frame for gates, 2 chamber wheels, 1 crank, 89 stop 
planks, 8 screens for water, 4 notices, 2 thermometers, 4 iron rods, 2 
screen doors, 6 window screens, 3 gas fixtures, 1 pair rubber boots. 1 
scythe, 3 shovels, 1 pick, 1 hoe, 1 sickle, 1 scuffler, 1 spade, 2 water 
pails, 1 sponge, 1 bushel basket, 1 border knife, 1 sprinkler, 1 axe, 1 
cold chisel, 3 ladders, 1 step-ladder, 1 crowbar, 4 padlocks, 197 earthen 
pipe, 3 feet long, 1 foot diameter; 25 stone posts, 5 feet long. 

Fisher Hill Gate-House. 

1 writing desk. 1 book, 1 pen stand, 1 lamp, 1 lantern, 1 stove, 1 
poker, 1 piece of zinc, 1 coal hod, 1 dust pan, 1 brush, 1 duster, 1 
broom, 2 gauges, 1 gate wrench, 1 window brush, 1 shovel, 81 stop 
planks, 2 iron rods, 3 chairs, 1 water pail, 1 mat, 2 oil cans, 3 signs, 1 
key, 1 scoop net, 1 hammer, 1 grindstone, 4 keys for 48-inch connection, 
1 wrench, 2 covers. 

Property or City of Boston, at Basin 5, Ashland. 

There are two farm houses and two stables, one new oflSce, one black- 
smith, storehouse and carj^enter shop combined, one dining-room, 
one dormitory and outhouse; 1 weir, 1 high gravel screen, with 3 size 
screens, 1 water-supply plant, ( comprising 1 Worthington duplex 
pumping engine, 1 wooden tank sixteen feet x eight feet, 1 three-inch 
check valve, 2 three-incli stop and waste valves, 3 three-inch gate valves, 
1 three-inch exiDansion joint, 16 feet three-inch five-ply hose, 1 strainer 
for suction pipe, 15 feet of suction pipe, 600 feet three-inch delivery pipe,. 
500 feet three-inch service pipe, and 1600 feet of piping, three inches 
and two and one-half and two inches, with thirty-four places for hose 
connections) ; 9 engine houses, 1 small tool house, 1 powder maga- 
zine, 2 poi'table sanitaries, 1 Flume, 1 double runner pung; 4 transits, 

3 levels, 4 levelling rods, 4 sighting rods, 3 steel tapes, 5 cloth tapes, 

4 plumb bobs, 2 steel straight edges, 2 planimeters and engineers' sta- 
tionery, squares and triangles, and weights. 3 pieces of canvas, 4 sign 
boards ( Pris^ate Way ) . 

Axes, Scythes, Mattocks, Hatchets and Adzes. — 2 hay knives, 3 hay 
snaths, 3 brush scythes, 3 hay scythes, 3 brush snaths, 3 whetstones, 
18 axes, 3 adzes,- 1 carjjenter's bench axe, 15 axe handles, 39 mattocks, 
4 bench axes. 

Augers. — 8 crank augers, 1 boring machine (aiad two bits), 1 frame 
auger, one and one-quai'ter inch, and 1 set Jennings' bits and brace. 

Belting. — 82 feet eight-inch rubber belting, 91 feet six-inch rubber 
belting, 33 feet foiu'-inch rubber belting, 68 feet eight-inch leather 
belting. 

Barrows. — 28 iron wheelbarrows, 6 new wooden canal barrows and 
52 old wooden barrows. 

Blacksmith'' s Fixtures. — 1 portable forge, 1 thirty-six-inch bellow, 
new, ( one bellow broken ), 2 anvils, 1 sow anvil, 1 set swages, one and 
one-half inch, one and one-eighth inch, one inch, seven-eighths of an 
inch and five-eighths of an inch, 5 bottom fullers one and one-half 
inch, one and one-eighth inch, one inch, seven-eighths of an inch, 
and five-eighths of an inch, 4 top fullers, one and one-eighth inch, one 



" Water-Supply Department. 135 

inch, seven-eighths of an inch and five-eighths of an inch, 1 flatter. 
1 cold and 1 hot chisel, 1 set heading tools (8 pieces), 2 vises (old), 
1 tuyere iron, ( and 1 useless ) , 10 pounds borax, 1 pinion wheel for 
forge, 15 pairs tongs. 

Brick. — About 3,800 bricks. 

Boots. — 50 pair serviceable boots ( 35 hip, 15 short), and 2 other 
kinds of boots. 

Carpenters' Sundries. — 1 jointer, 1 jack plane, 1 steel square, 3 fi-am- 
ing chisels, 1 draw shave, 1 level, six hundred feet one-inch finished 
pine boards, five hundred feet sheating, one hundred and fifty feet oak. 

Cement. — 1578 Hoffman & Newark, and 247 Portland cement. 

Cement .Tester and Fixtures. — 1 cement tester with following articles : 
12 pans for saturating samples, 12 moulds for brickets, 3 small scales,^ 
5 assorted sieves (20-100), 1 graduated glass, 1 set steel figures, 
1 one-quarter-pound weight, 1 one-pound weight, 1 bitstock and bit, 
1 scoop, 1 basket, 3 bags inspector's bungs, 2 wooden racks. 

Concrete Mixer. — 2 concrete mixers, 1 useless mixer, 10 diamond 
paddles, 8 square paddles, 17 bolts for diamond paddles, 25 bolts for 
square paddles, 1 set of cement paddles for cement only, one-half box 
for mixer. 

Coal. — 5 tons stove coal, and 20 tons Cumberland coal. 

Croivbars. — 79 crowbars, and two tamping bars. 

Crusher.— 1 fifteen by nine crusher, 1 journal bearing, six toggles, 2 
sets jaws, 1 set cheeks, 1 set steel bearings, 4 ten-inch toggles, 4 ten 
and one-half inch toggles, 3 eleven-inch toggles, 5 twelve-inch toggles, 
5 thirteen-inch toggles. 

Chain. — 925 feet, various lengths and sizes. 

Derrick and Fixtures. — 1 windlass, 1 foot block, 4 twelve-inch single 
blocks, 1 sixteen-inch single, 10 twelve-inch double blocks, 2 six-inch 
single blocks, 15 pounds oakum, 7 tackles (6 one hundred and twenty 
feet long and 1 seventy-five feet long), 2 derricks, standing (1 thirtjr 
feet high, fair, 1 twenty-five feet, useless), 1 large derrick, unmounted, 
7 Cram derricks and fixtures on hire. 

Drags. — 3 three-foot drags for stone. 

Brill. — 1 tripod steam drill (Little Giant, No. 2), 50 feet steam hose, 

1 sand pump. 

Explosives. — 1,650 feet tape fuse, 1 battery wire, 1 battery, 1 box 
(75 pounds) forcite, 5 boxes dynamite caps, 550 small caps. 

Engines and Boilers. — 1 Hawes & Hersey engine and boiler (five-horse 
power), 1 portable Hoadley, on wheels. No. 1408 (twenty-five horse 
power), 4 Edward Kendall & Sons' engines, Nos. 2107, 2119, 2126, 2125 
(fifteen-horse power each), 2 Edward Kendall & Sons' engines, Nos. 2127, 
2128 (ten-horse power) (these engines are double cylinder holsters), 1 
Ames iron-work engine and boiler. No. 10227 (thirty-horse power) 1 
Payne engine and boiler (twelve-horse power), 1 Russ & Hittinger en- 
gine and boiler, bolster, No. 367 (sixteen-horse power), 1 stuffing box 
for Payne engine, 1 new economizer boiler, No. 817. 

Hammers. — 3 four and one-half pound, hand-drill hammers, 23 strik- 
ing hammers, 17 hand-drill hammers, 3 iron bracing hammers, 33 stone- 
breaking hammers, 12 wooden beetles, 3 iron mauls, 1 dozen driving 
caps, 6 bracing maul handles, 18 striking-hammer handles, 15 bench 
axe handles, 30 drill-hammer handles, 8 maul handles, 35 stone-break- 
ing hammer handles. 

Hoes. — 36 grub hoes, 13 mortar hoes, and 2 mortar beds. 

Hose, Common. — 18 fifty-feet lengths, one and one-half-inch wired 
hose, 5 fifty-feet lengths of hose, 3 nozzles with sprinklers. 

Hose, Suction. — 10 feet 4-inch suction hose with flange, 3 strainers, 3 
spanners. 5 ten-foot lengths of three-inch suction hose with couplings, 

2 twelve-foot lengths of three-inch suction hose wth couplings, 3 sixteen- 
foot lengths of three-inch suction hose with couplings, 1 seventeen-foot 



136 Water-Supply Depaet3ient. 

length of three-inch suction hose with couplings (wived), 2 eighteen- 
foot lengths of six-inch suction hose with couplings. 

Iron. — 17 feet, one-quarter inch round, 129 feet, one-half inch, 
round, 22 feet, five-eighths inch round, 104 feet, seven-eighths inch 
round, 19 feet, three-quarters inch round, 25 feet, one inch round, 1 foot, 
one and one-eighth inch round, 35 feet, one and one-quarter inch 
round, 73 feet, two by one-half flat, 29 feet, one and three-quarters by one- 
quarter flat, 3 feet, one and seven-eighths by one and one-quarter flat, 1 
foot, seven-eighths by one-quarter flat, 70 feet, three-quarters-inch half- 
Tound iron, 5 feet two-inch squai'e iron, 20 feet one and one-quarter inch 
square iron, or about 1,166 pounds of serviceable iron in all. 

Steel. — 140 feet one and one-half-inch octagon (jumper drills), 112 
feet one and one-quarter-inch octagon steel (jumpers), 82 feet three-quar- 
ter-inch octagon (jumper drills), 31 feet one and one-quarter-in eh octa- 
gon, 5 feet one and one-eighth-inch octagon, 24feet one and one-half-inch 
octagon, 64 feet three-quarter-inch octagon, 1 foot one-inch octagon 
steel, 50 feet three-quarter-inch square steel, 1 foot one-half inch square, 
40 feet one inch square steel, 1 foot one and one-half inch square, 44 
feet one and one-quarter-inch square steel, or about 2,018 pounds ser- 
viceable steel in all. 

Lanterns and Globes. — 30 lights of glass for square lanterns, G square 
lanterns No. 8, 20 lanterns, 28 white lantern globes, and 20 red lantern 
globes. 

Machinist Fixtures. — 1 two and one-half-inch globe valve, 6 one and 
one-half-inch globe valves, 9 one and one-quarter-inch globe valves, 11 
one-inch globe valves, 7 three-quarter inch, 5 one-half inch, 2 three- 
eighth inch, 2 one-quarter inch, 3 three-quarter-inch gate valves, 3 one- 
inch check valves, 3 one-quarter inch, 3 one-half inch, 2 three-quarter 
inch, 2 three-eight inch, 1 die stock (small), one-eighth, one inch with 
dies, taps, and bushings (6 dies, 6 taps), 1 die stock (large) one and 
one-quarter, 2 inches, 2 taps, 3 dies, and bushing, 10 twelve-inch mon- 
key wrenclies, 1 fourteen-inch monkey wrench, 1 six-inch monkey 
wrench, 1 eighteen-inch monkey wrench, 1 twenty-four-inch monkey 
Avrench, 1 six-inch Stillson wrench, 1 twelve-inch Still son wrench, 1 
fourteen-inch Stillson wrench, 2 pairs blacksmith's and engineer's 
tongs, 2 pairs No. 3 chain tongs, 3 pairs No. 3 Brown's tongs, 1 
large and 1 small j)ipe cutter, 1 Packer ratchet, 1 Brest drill, 1 set of 
twist drills (7 pieces), 1 Hack saw and two blades, 17 sqviirt cans, 12 
oilcans (snout), 1 gallon can, 1 two-quai*t can, 4 quart cans, 4 square 
feet rubber sheet packing, 13 feet one inch square Tuck's packing 
(Avater) , 20 feet half-round steam packing, 1 package Selden's packing, 
2 one-inch steam whistles, 1 Ellis lubricator, 2 square feet one-sixteenth 
rubber sheet packing, 20 pounds best Babbitt and ladle, 2 angle ii'ons, 
h roll of No. 70 emery cloth, 25 pounds waste, 2 hand lamps, 1^ pounds 
copper I'ivets and burrs, 12 eight-inch maple rollers, 8 six-inch maple 
rollers, 1 two and one-half-inch tube cleaner, \ side of lace leather, 
1 ball of lamp wicking, ^ dozen miscellaneous water glasses. 

Nails and Bolts. — 3 kegs 40d wire nails, 1 keg 40d cut, 1 of 30d cut, 
li of 20d cut, 1 of lOd cut, 2 of 70d cut, 60 twelve-inch spikes, k barrel 
bolts, four and one-half by five-eighths, h keg bolts half -inch by two and 
one-half-inch, 250 coach screws four-inch by one-half inch, and 300 
pounds miscellaneous bolts and nuts. 

Oil Clothing. — 32 oil suits (old, 33 coats, 28 pants) . 

Oils and Tallow. — i barrel tallow, 2 barrels cylinder oil, 2 barrels 
lard oil, 2 barrels lubricating oil, 2 barrels centennial oil. 

Paints and Oils. — 30 pounds white lead, 20 pounds putty, 3 four-inch 
flat brushes, 1 gallon linseed oil, 1 povmd lamp black, 1 barrel standard 
paint, 1 barrel asphaltum paint. 

Ploughs. — 3 ploughs (2 common and 1 Hildreth"s) . and 1 No. 4 plough 
point. 



Water-Supply Department. 137 

- Pumps and Fixtures. — 1 Xo. 2 spout pump, 3 six-inch Edwavds' cen- 
trifugal, 1 four-inch Edwards' centrifugal, 1 submerged pump (with 
"520 pounds shafting, 7 boxes, 6 collars, 2 couplings), 2 Blake steam 
pumps, 1 Blake wrecking pump No. 5175, 3 No. 3 Edson diaphragm 
pumps, 2 Douglass hand pumps, 1 Worthington duplex, 2 rvibber dia- 
phragms for Edson pump, 2 four-inch foot valves, 2 six-inch foot valves. 

Plugs and Feathers. — 25 pounds of plugs and feathers. 

Pails. — 26 water pails (old), 15 other pails for cement and mortar, 
h dozen new cup dippers, h dozen old dippers. 

Piclcs and Handles. — 250 pick handles (48 of which are new) , 150 ser- 
viceable picks. 

Piping and Fixtures. — Couplings. — 7 three-inch, 2 two and one-half 
Inch, 6 two-inch, 15 one and one-half inch, 10 one and one-quarter 
inch, 8 one-inch, 7 three-quarter inch, 2 three-eighth inch, 1 one-inch. 
Tight and left coupling, 3 three-inch brass hose and pipe coupling, 1 
one-half inch to three-eight inch reducing coupling, 2 one and one-half 
inch by one-inch hose and pipe coupling brass. Unions. — 7 one and 
one-half inch, 8 one and one-quarter inch, 4 one-inch, 5 three-quarter 
inch, 5 one-half inch, 1 three-eighths inch, 3 one-quarter inch, 1 one 
and one-quarter-inch brass union, 1 three-quarter-inch brass union. 
Close nipples. — 1 eight-inch, 1 three-inch, 2 two-inch, 13 one and one- 
Tialf inch, 11 one and one-quarter inch, 9 one-inch, 3 three-quarter inch, 
1 one-half inch, 3 one-quarter inch ; short nipples : 2 two and one-half 
inch, 2 one and one-quarter inch, 2 one-inch, 5 three-quarter inch, 2 
one-half inch, 2 three-eighth inch, 1 one-quarter inch. Elbows. — 1 
eight-inch, 3 three-inch, 1 five-inch, 3 two and one-half inch, 11 one 
and one-half inch, 19 one and one-quarter inch, 9 three-quarter inch, 
15 one-inch, 2 two-inch, 13 one-half inch, 7 three-eighth inch, 5 one- 
quarter inch, 1 one-half inch by three-eighth inch reducing elbow, 4 
forty-five's elbows. Reducing bushings. — 1 eighth-inch by six-inch, 2 one 
and one-half inch by one inch, 1 one and one-half inch by three-qiaarter 
inch, 2 one and one-half inch by one-quarter inch, 4 one and one-half 
inch by one and one-quarter inch, 8 one inch by three-quarter inch, 6 thi-ee- 
quarterinch by one-half inch. 1 three-quarter inch by three-eighth inch, 2 
one-half inch by three-eighth inch, 2 one-half inch by three-eighth inch, 3 
three-eighth inch by one-quarter inch, 1 one-quarter inch by one-eighth 
inch, 9 one and one-quarter inch by one inch, 2 three-quarter inch hose and 
pipe bushing, 1 one and one-quarter inch by three-quarter inch reducing 
bushing. Tees. — 1 three-inch, 10 one and one-half inch, 7 one and one- 
quarter inch, 16 one-inch, 9 three-quarter inch, 3 one-half inch, 4 one- 
quarter inch, 3 two inch by two inch by one and one-quarter inch, 1 
three inch by three inch by one and one-half inch, 1 three-quarter inch 
Idj'- three-quarter inch by one-quarter inch, 2 three-eighth inch tees. 
Plugs. — 1 two-inch, 4 one and one-half-inch, 1 one and one-quarter 
inch, 2 one-inch, 9 thi'ee-quarter-inch, 3 one-half -inch, 1 three-eighth- 
inch brass plug. Caps. — 4 one-inch, 1 three-inch, 1 one and one-half- 
inch. Pipe. — 90 feet of three-inch steam pipe, 54 feet of two-inch, 
790 feet of one and one-half -inch, 385 feet of one and one-quarter-inch, 
12 feet of two and one-half-inch, 45 feet of one-inch, 194 feet of three- 
quarter-inch, 18 feet of one-half-inch, 16 feet of three-eighth-inch, 
10 feet of one-quarter-inch, 12 feet of one-eighth-inch. 3 four-inch 
pipe flanges, 4 two-inch iron flange unions. Piping. — 7 pieces four- 
inch galvanized suction pipe, 38 feet for Edwai-ds' pump, 18 pieces six- 
inch galvanized suction pipe, 81 feet for Edwards' pump. 

Rope. — 19 chain ropes (six feet chain on each rope), 10 tag ropes, 
1434 feet of two and one-half -inch, 344 feet of two-inch, 1275 feet of 
three and one-half-inch, 54 feet of three-inch, and 1 coil about 700 feet 
five-inch rope. 

Rollers. — 3 street rollers ( iron ) ( two horse ) . 

Saivs. — 3 cross-cut saws, 6 hand saws, 1 compass saw, 2 saw sets. 



138 Water-Supply Department. 

Shovels. — 12 round points long-handled, 433 round-pointed short- 
handled (new and old), 83 square-pointed short-handled (new and old). 

Sa7id Screens and Gravel Screens. — 2 new sand screens three-quarter- 
inch mesh, 18 sand and gravel screens. 

Ttcbs. — 20 three-quarter-yard steel buckets or tubs, 4 one-half-yard 
steel tubs, 4 wooden tubs ( two large and tAvo small ), and 2 iron tubs. 

Wife Netting. — 15 feet of one-half-inch mesh, 3 feet 2 inches of three- 
eighth-inch mesh wire netting. 

Office and Fixtures. — Old Office : 1 table, 1 settee, 1 Rochester lamp, 
1 swivel office chair, 5 arm chairs ( only two good ) , 1 old desk, [n 
new office are the following: 11 wire window screens, 3 wire door 
screens, 12 ai'm chairs, 6 stools, 8 awnings, 3 engineer's tables and 1 
chest, 2 cabinets for plans, 1 roll for paper, 2 student lamps, 3 Rochester 
lamps, 4 waste-paper baskets, 2 cuspidors, 1 water pitcher, 1 pan, 
1 brush, 3 wooden spittoons, 2 roll-top desks (new), 1 oak counter 
desk, 2 flat desks (old), 2 safes (one a combination new, and one an old 
one), 9 window curtains, 3 desk chairs, 3 rubber mats, 1 pulp pail, 
basin and tin dipper, 1 kettle (hot water), 1 large clock, 1 small clock, 
1 copying press, 1 water bi'ush and mug, 1 shoe brush and dauber, 

1 stove brush, 1 hand brush, 1 wire soap dish, 2 brush bi'ooms, 1 stamp, 

2 double inkstands, 4 ink wells, 1 mucilage bottle, and engineer's books, 
and a number of time books and account books and stationeiy. 

Stoves and Fixtures. — 1 No. 3 cylinder stove, with 1 shovel, 
poker, three-gallon boiler, 1 chair, 1 Magee parlor, with 1 hod and 2 
pokers, 1 globe heater (old), 1 No. 23 Devonshire range (useless), 
1 "Railroad King" No. 14, with pipe, elbows and tainter, 2 Bow- 
doins' with pipe and elbows, 1 hod, 1 shovel, and 3 pokers. 

Stable and Fixtures. — 15 tons hay, 3 wooden rakes, 1 iron rake, 

3 pitchforks, 3 horses (two bays and one black), 1 Concord buggy, 

1 Goddard buggy, 1 express wagon, 1 cover for express wagon, 1 black 
fur robe, 1 plush robe, 4 sti'eet blankets, 3 stable blankets, 3 surcingles, 
3 haltei-s, 1 express harness, 2 carriage harnesses, 1 wagon jack, 1 rub- 
ber blanket, 1 duster, 1 currycomb, 1 dandy brush, 2 chamois, 2 
sponges, 2 ox yokes with 4 bow pins, 2 ox chains, 2 ox goads, 3 linen 
sheets, 1 brush. 

Sundries. — 1 large and 1 small grindstone, 2 jack screws, 7 corn 
brooms, 3 stove-pipe elbows, 10 sticks of solder, 6 clothes-line pulleys, 

2 stencils (Basin 5, B. W. W. ), 1 whiffletree, 2 I'olls tarred paper, 
5 boxes of railroad spikes and miscellaneous iron, 1 roll copper vv^ire, 
li dozen of stable bi'oom handles, 1 dozen of new stable brooms, 2 old 
stable brooms, 1 table and settee, 17 yale locks, 8 hogsheads, 3 brand- 
ing irons, 1 mason trowel, 6 tool boxes, 25 railroad rails, 75 railroad 
sleepers, 2 I'ailroad stone dump carts, 5 surprise whistles, 2 two-inch 
foot rules, 6 goggles, 2 dozen carpenter's jDeneils, 1 mason's line, 1 tape 
line, 1 old tape line, 2 mortar beds. 

Lumber. — 400,000 feet in two-inch, and timber sizes (in and out of 
trench), capable of being used again for future needs. 



Water-Supply Depaetment. 139 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO JANUARY 1, 1891. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale.J James F. Baldwin,^ Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From Mav, 
1846, to November, 1848. J 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. t 

William S. Whitw^ell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to Octo- 
ber 1, 185o.t 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 18o5.t 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. J 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, ta 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. t 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury-river 
works. From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Desmond FitzGerald, Resident Engineer on Additional Supply. 
From February 20, 1889, to present time. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 
3, 1885.t 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year ; and in 1851 the Coehituate Water Board was established. 

CocHiTUATE Water Board. 
Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 1856t Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned June 

5, 1860t Four years. 



140 



Water-Supply Department. 



Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired Api'il 

3, 186ot Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867t One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868$ ...... One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Brablee, elected April 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871J . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874$ One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 

31, 1875 Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876$ One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55 J 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59$ 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55$ 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53, and 56$ 

James W. Seaver, 1851$ 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851.$ 

John T. Heard, 1851$ .... 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 56$ 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853$ 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ .... 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55$ 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . 

TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ . 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ . 

Joseph Smith, 1856$ .... 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64,$ 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ . 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 

Clement Willis, 1860$ .... 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ .... 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Pray, 1862 .... 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 .... 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66$ 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . 

William S. Hills, 1867 .... 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69$ 

Benjamin James, *1858, 68, and 69 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ 

John O. Poor, 1870 .... 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 



Five years. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Four years. 
One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Six years. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 
Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 
One year. 
Six years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Two years. 
Three years. 
One year 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



Water-Supply Department. 



141 



, 69, and 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 

and 71t 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71^ . 
Sidney Squires, 187 If .... 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 
Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 

72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74$ 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74$ 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* . 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72, and 75 . 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75$ 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 . 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75, 

and 76t $ 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t. 
Nahum M. Morrison, 1876t . 
Augustus Parker, 1876t 



Nine years. 
Four years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
Five years. 
Six years. 

Ten years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resic^ned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry 13. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. "Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President ; and 
July 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Noi'cross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one 3'ear, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872.' 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Served until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

t Deceased. 



142 Water-Supply Department. 



Boston Water Board, 

Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882.$ 
William A, Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to March 18, 1889. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from Aug. 26, 1885, to May 5, 1890. 
Robert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to present time. 
Philip J. Doherty, from^March 18, 1889, to present time. 
.John W. Leighton, from'May 5, 1890, to present time. 

Organization of the Board for Year 1890. 

Chairman. 
Robert Grant. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. 
William Jackson. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

Deputy Collector and Clerk, Mystic Department. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

■Superintendent of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 
Dexter Brackett. 

Superintendent of the Western^Division and Besident Engineer of 
Additional Supply. 

Desmond FitzGerald. 

Superintendent of Mystic Department. 
Eugene S. Sullivan. 

X Deceased. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Heport of the Water Board . 

Disbursements .......... 

Rebate of water rates ........ 

Mystic debt 

New workshops ......... 

Extension of mains, etc. ........ 

Consumption of water ........ 

Additional supply ......... 

Lake Cochituate ......... 

Quality of water, etc. ........ 

Mystic system .......... 

General Statistics. (See also summary of statistics, p. 110) 
Earnings and Expenditures ....... 

Maintenance Accounts ........ 

Expenditure Accounts in Detail ...... 

■Cost of Construction and Condition of the Debts 

Money Expenditures ......... 

Stock Accounts .......... 

XiisT of Contracts ......... 

Report op the Engineer . . . . . . . 

Yield of sources of supply ....... 

Sudbury reservoirs and Lake Cochituate ...... 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs ..... 

High-service pumping-stations ....... 

Mystic lake .......... 

Mystic sewer .......... 

Mystic conduit, reservoir, and pumping-station 

Consumption . . 

Distribution .......... 

Additional supply . . . . . . . . 

In general ... ....... 

Tables of consumption, diversion of Sudbury-river water, amounts 
drawn from Lake Cochituate, rainfall, operations of pumping- 
stations, etc. .......... 

Report of Superintendent of Western Division . 

Sudbury-river basins ........ 

Whitehall pond 

Farm pond .......... 

Lake Cochituate ......... 

Aqueducts .......... 

Chestnut-hill, Brookline, and Fisher-hill reservoirs . 



PAGE 

I-XI 

III-IV 

IV 

IV 

IV 



VI 
VI-IX 
IX-XI 

1 

2 

3-6 

6-7 

8-9 

10-11 

12 

13-17 

18-32 

18 

19-21 

21 

21-23 

24 

24 

24-25 

25-26 

26-27 

28-31 

31-32 



33-47 
48-62 
48-51 
52 
52 
52-54 
54-55 
55-56 



144 



Contents. 



Report of Superintendent of Western Division, continued. 

Biological laboratory 

Filtration . 

Pollution . 

Quality of water 

Rainfall tables, etc. . 
Report of Superintendent op Eastern Division 

Distribution mains and hydrants 

Service-pipes, high service, yards, fountains, etc. 

Meters ........ 

"Waste detection ...... 

Statement of location, size and number of feet of pipe laid 
Report of Superintendent op the Mystic Division 
Summary op Statistics (arranged per recommendation of 

England Water-Works Association) 
Schedules op Property ..... 
Civil Organization op the Board, 1845 to 1891 



etc., 



New 



56 
56 

57 
57-62 
63-71 

72-102 
72-73 
73-74 
75-80 
80-82 

88-102 
103-109 

110-112 
113-138 
139-142 



^ 



:^^ 






^; 



(Feb., 1891, 20,000) 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



One volume allowed at a time, and obtained onlv by- 
card ; to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction 
and juvenile books published within one year) without fine ; 
not to be renewed ; to be reclaimed by messenger after 21 
da-- '>o will collect 20 cents besidesfine of 2 cents a day, 
inCj.it Hi- ' Sundays and holidays; not to be lent out of the 
borro\' s household, and not to be transferred; to be re- 
turned :his Hall. 

Bi^ wers finding- this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced.. ..re expected to report it; and also any undue delay 
in the delivery of books. 

%* No claim can be established because of the failure of 
any notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 



ihe record telow must not te made or altered by borrower. 






's>^' 



M 

m 



Hm 






liMk 



■■4c- F-y^ 






t ,. -w't-f- 



Wi