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Full text of "Annual report of the Boston Water Board, for the year ending .."

JTtllDtype Printing Cp Bojt'j-i 



With Compliments of 

Boston Water Board. 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witin funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofbo9192bost 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPOET 



',r 



BOSTON WATER BOARD, 



FOR THE 



Thirteen Months ending January 31, 1892. 






Prfnteti far tf)0 department, 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 
1892. 



(V 






Office of the Boston Water Board, 

City Hall, Boston, Feb. 1, 1892. 

Hon. JSTathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor, of the City of Boston : 

Sir : The Boston Water Board, or Water Supply Depart- 
ment, submit their report for the thirteen months ending Jan. 
31, 1892. In accordance with an order of the City Council 
approved Dec. 5, 1891, this report covers thirteen months 
instead of the calendar year, which must be kept in mind 
in comparing the financial figures herein set forth with those 
contained in the previous reports of this department. 

The following is a comprehensive summary of the dis- 
bursements by the department for the said thirteen months 
ending Jan. 31, 1892 : 

Money expenditures, Cochituate Water- 
Works (see page 12) . . . . $1,014,159 93 

Money expenditures. Mystic Water-Works 

(see page 13) . . . " . . 161,643 93 



Current expenses, Cochituate 

Water- Works . . . $398,755 93 
Current expenses, Mystic 

Water-Works . . . 163,723 80 

Extension of Mains, etc. . 311,129 80 

Additional Supply of Water . 328,854 30 

High service . . . 4,136 92 

Shops, Albany street . . 4,390 89 
Introduction of meters and 

inspection, Cochituate . 3,207 14 
Introduction of meters and 

inspection. Mystic . . 507 49 



,175,803 86 



Add decrease in stock during year (see 

page 14) 38,902 41 



$1,214,706 27 



,214,706 27 



2 City Document No. 40. 

We submit a brief summary of the principal facts of in- 
terest in relation to the work of the department, together 
with a detailed statement of the doings and condition of the 
separate divisions. 

REVENUE. 

The total receipts of the Cochituate Works from all 
sources for the thirteen months ending Jan. 31, 1892, have 
( been $1,946,446.16. Of this amount,"$l, 838,494.30 was re- 
(, ceived from sales of water. No rebate was made on the bills 
I for schedule rates issued Jan. 1, 1892, for the reason that it 
'' is deemed advisable in lieu thereof to make important reduc- 
tions in the charges to certain of the city departments for 
' the use of water. 

MYSTIC DEBT. 

The Sinking Fund for the payment of the Mystic Debt ex- 
ceeds the amount of the debt $68,208.70, and action should 
be taken by the City Council to make some disposition of 
the surplus revenue. 

WATER REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT. 

In 1890 the Water Registrar's Department was made a 
separate department by ordinance, under the name of the 
Water Income Department. In the opinion of this Board 
the practical working of this separation has been inconvenient 
and confusing, and interferes with an economical and efficient 
operation of the water service. By a consolidation of the 
Water Registrar's with this department a saving of at least 
$10,000 could be effected. 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

On June 1, by appointment of the Board, Mr. William 
J. Welch assumed the duties of Superintendent of the East- 
ern Division in place of Mr. Dexter Brackett, resigned. 

EXTENSION OF MAINS. 

Twenty-one miles of pipe-mains have been laid during the 
thirteen months, and the total length now connected with the 
works is 518.79 miles; 2,374 service-pipes have been laid, 
and 327 hydrants have been put in service, making the 
present total number 5,705. 

For the convenience of the Fire Department a series of 



Water-Supply Department. 3 

maps has been prepared showing the location of all hydrants, 
and indicating the number of engines that could be massed at 
any given point. 

CONSUMPTION OP WATER. 

The daily average consumption per head of population on 
the Sudbury and Cochituate supply the past year has been 
89.3 gallons, and on the Mystic supply 74.7 gallons, as 
against 82.5 and 70.6, respectively, the previous year. The 
yearly daily average consumption has been 37,686,900 
gallons on the Cochituate and Sudbury, and 9,055,200 
gallons on the Mystic, as against 33,871,700 and 8,301,400, 
respectively, in 1890. 

BASIN 6- 

The name of Basin 5 has been changed to Basin 6 for the 
sake of uniformity. The basins on the Stony-brook branch 
are now numbered with odd numbers, 1, 3, and 5, and those 
on the main branch of the Sudbury with even numbers, 2, 4, 
and 6. The work of construction on the basin has been 
prosecuted actively fi'om the early spring until late in the 
fall. The excavation of the trench for the core-wall of the 
dam has been completed, the core-wall built and the trench 
refilled. The embankment and wall of the dam is now five 
feet above the elevation of the lowest part of the valley, 
and will be nearly if not entirely completed by the end of 
another season. This work on the trench and wall of the 
dam has been done by day labor, as in the previous year, by 
the tulvice of the City Engineer. The work of stripping the 
basin and the shallow flowage has been divided into sections, 
and let by contract as follows : 

Estimated amounts. 

Section A. Joseph Gennaro, 30^ cts. per cubic yard . $24,0(3-4 50 

Section B. Auguste Saucier, 26 cts. per cubic yard . . 21,502 GO 
Section C. Moulton, O'Mahony, & Trumbull, 40 cts. per 

cubic yard 32,200 00 

Section 1). Moulton, O'Mahoney, & Trumbull, (52 cts. per 

cubic yard 37,448 00 

This contract work is well advanced, and will probably be 
completed by the end of another season. 

Contracts have also been made for delivering filling for the 
dam (estimated amount $57,300) ; for the supply of cut 
stone for the gate-chamber ($2,234) ; and for the building of 
the lower section of tiie wasteway (estimated amount 
19,597.50.) 



4 City Document No. 40. 

WHITEHALL POND. 

At Whitehall pond surveys and bormgs are being made 
for a new dam at the outlet ; a dredging-plant, consisting of 
a dredger and three scows, has been built ; and in the spring 
the work of removing the mud and stumps from the bottom 
of this reservoir will be undertaken. 

CEDAR SWAMP. 

The surveys and plans for the acquisition and treatment 
of the so-called Cedar swamp, which have been delayed 
])y the difficulties of the undertaking, are practically cpn)- 
pleted, and by the end of another year the Board hope to 
have begun the work of draining the 1,500 acres of marsh 
land at the sources of the Sudl)ury river, from which, as was 
stated in our last report, we believe that the Sudbury water 
acquires much of its discoloration and fecundancy in vege- 
table matter. 

ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 

Surveys and borings have already been begun for Basins 
5, 7, and 9 on the Stony-brook branch of the Sudbury 
river, as the growing needs of the city demand that these 
basins, which will be a continuous series, should be con- 
structed without delay. 

MEASURES TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF THE SUPPLY. 

The main trunk sewer of the Marlboro' sewerage 
system has been completed and is in working order, and a 
few connections have already been made. The authorities 
of Marlboro' have promised that there shall be no delay 
in the matter of connections, and that by the end of another 
six months the sewage of that municipality will be di- 
verted from Boston's water-supply. We have paid to 
Marlboro' the sum of $41,333.33 due under our contract 
on the completion of the trunk sewer, and a further amount 
will be paid when a reasonable number of connections has 
been made. This will make the total sum contributed by 
Boston $62,000. It is obvious that this removal of the 
sewage of 14,000 people outside the water-shed of the Sud- 
))ury river will be a very great benefit to the supply. 
The quality of the water in Basin 3, on the Stony-brook 
branch, has never been very good, owing to the close prox- 
imity of this basin to the city of Marlboro'. In fact, we 
have used Basin 3 as little as possible on this account. 

A contract has been made between the city of Boston and 



WATER-SurPLY DErAKTMENT. 5 

the town of Westboro', situated near the head-waters of the 
Sudbury river, under which the city has agreed to contribute 
the sum of $20,000 toward the expense of a sewerage sys- 
tem for that town, Avhereby the sewage of its 5,000 peoi)le 
will be diverted from the Sudbury water-shed. We are 
ghid to report that the work of construction of this system 
has been pushed so rapidly that the main trunk sewer will 
be completed by the middle of the current month (Feb- 
ruary ) . 

THE FUTURE OF THE SUPPLY. 

With the addition of Basin o and the series of Basins 5,7,9, 
the storage capacity of the Sudbury and Cochituate sup- 
ph'es (49,0ii0,000 gallons in a dry year) will have been 
exhausted. AVe have used, during the present year, on the 
Cochituate and Sudbury supplies, which furnish water to 
every district of the city excepting Charlestown, a daily 
average of 37,(i8G,900 gallons, from which it appears that 
there is a leeway of less than 12,000,000 gallons between 
the present necessities and the limit of Boston's water- 
supply. Of course, in ordinary years, the Sudl)ury and 
Cochituate water-sheds yield far more than 49,000,000 
gallons, but in a season of drought only 49,000,000 can 
be counted on. Judging from the ratio of increase of 
our population we have a sufficient water-su})i)ly for ten 
years, assuming that we have to supply no greater territory, 
through annexations or otherwise, than at present, and 
assuming that the water-takers of Charlestown continue to 
be satisfied with Mystic water. By the end of ten years, 
however, we shall, in all probability, need an additional 
supply, and we shall need at that time not merely to know 
where to go for it, but to have the work of construction 
well under way and at least a portion of the new supply 
available for use. In other words, the city ought by the 
end of another five years to decide upon the source of su})ply 
which seems most available in order to allow for the inev- 
itable delays which must ensue before the necessary legisla- 
tion can be obtained and the consequent loans authorized. 

\\\{\\ this end in view, the present Board have already begun 
to examine into the question of a future supply. During the 
past six months visits have been made to Lake Winnipiseo- 
gee, the Nashua river, and the Deertield river, and a series 
of investigations has been mapped out for the ensuing year. 
It is too early as yet to make any definite statements con- 
cerning a pr()l)able choice ; but we desire to call attention to 
the fact that we have the subject under careful consideration. 



6 



City Document No. 40. 



It is undoubtedly true that the rapid growth of neighboring 
cities and towns is making the problem of a sufficient water- 
supply for these communities more perplexing from year to 
year, and it seems not improbable that Boston's future supply 
may have to be of a metropolitan character ; that is to say, 
of sufficient capacity to relieve other needs than our own. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, COCHITUATE 

WORKS. 



WATER- 



(From Revenue.) 
January Draft, 1891, to Feuruary Draft, 1892 (13 mos.). 

Boston Water Board: 

Salaries of two Commissioners, two 
Clerks, Purchasing Agent, and Mes- 
senger $14,123 05 

Travelling expenses .... 1,966 92 

Printing and stationery' . . . 521 11 

Advertising, postage, and miscellaneous, 942 67 



Eastern Division: 

Salaries of Superintendents, Clerks, 
and Foreman ..... 

Travelling expenses and transportation 
of men ...... 

Printing and stationery 

Miscellaneous ..... 

Western Division : 

Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant 

Superintendent, and Clerks 
Travelling expenses .... 
Printing and stationery 
Miscellaneous ..... 



!2,352 18 

1,147 54 

639 63 

544 29 



>5,400 99 

2,303 82 

500 40 

372 17 



New meters and setting . . . 

Meters, repairing . . • . . 

Workshop, blacksmith-shop, etc.. Federal st. (prop- 
erty sold April 23, 1891) . 

Machine-shop, Albany st. . . . 

Telephones ...... 

Special agents, salaries, travelling expenses, etc. 

Cochituate Aqueduct .... 

Sudbury Aqueduct (including $16,590.68 for 
tunnel) ...... 

Carried forward^ 



7,553 75 



24,683 64 



28,577 38 

8,449 24 

14,418 24 

2,802 33 

8,402 97 

1,539 80 

2,387 13 

3,264 %Q 

21,673 27 



,752 41 



Water-Supply Department. 



Brought forward, 
Main pipe relaying (incliidiog stock and labor) 

"■ repairing " " " " 

Hydrants '" " " " " 

Stopcocks " " u ii it 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes, and repairing (includ 

ing stock and labor) ..... 
Tools and repairing (including stock and labor) 
Streets " " " " " 

Fountains, " " " " " 

Stables, " " " " " 

Waste-detection " " " " 

Basins, Framingham and Ashland (including stock 

and labor) ....... 

Service-pipe repairing (including stock and labor) 
Protection of Sudbury and Cochituate supply . 
Inspection of water sources . . 
High service, Chestnut hill (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) ...... 

High service, East Boston (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) ....... 

High service, West Roxbury (including fuel, salaries, 

repairs, etc.) ....... 

Albany-street yard ...... 

Chestnut-hill Reservoir (including stable, care of 

grounds, etc.) ...... 

Parker-hill Reservoir ..... 

Brookliue Reservoir ..... 

East Boston and South Boston Reservoirs 
Fisher- hill Reservoir ..... 

Lake Cochituate ...... 

Chestnut-hill driveway ..... 

Taxes ........ 

Damages ....... 

Analyses of water, etc. ..... 

Merchandise sold (pipes and castings, in cases of 

emergency) ...... 

Filtration ....... 

Biological Laboratory ..... 

New dam at Lake Cochituate (balance) . 



$133,752 41 

9,180 83 

7,073 76 

32,147 79 

3,282 02 

5,542 46 

10,244 56 

7,933 33 

3,678 85 

15,729 59 

20,166 91 

21,945 46 

19,608 14 

2,976 91 

1,099 60 

21,147 61 

2,860 04 

3,213 97 
9,746 99 



[8,265 
1,828 
2,182 



61 
38 
15 



3,424 57 



26 
79 



1,746 
5,962 

12,330 59 

1,995 36 

5,344 18 

680 00 

182 04 
7,869 76 
2,111 87 
3,501 14 



$398,755 93 



City Document No. 40. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS, MYSTIC WATER-WORKS 

(From Revenue.) 
January Draft, 1891, to February Draft, 1892 (13 mos.). 
Boston Water Board : 

Salaries of one Commissioner and one 

Assistant Clerk .... $5,200 00 

Printing and stationery ... 38 40 

Travelling expenses and miscellaneous, 237 58 



Superintendent's Department: 

Salaries of Superintendent, Assistant 

Superintendent, and Clerk 
Printing and stationery 
Travelling expenses .... 
Miscellaneous ..... 



,480 44 
94 48 
67 50 
30 35 



Engineer's Department ...... 

Meters, setting and repairing . . . . . 

Off and on water (labor) . . . . . 

Main-pipe laying (including stock and labor) , 

" relaying " " " 

" repairing *' " " 

Service-pipe laying " " " 

" repairing " " " 

Hydrants and gates, repairing (including stock and 

labor ........ 

Streets, repairing (including stock and labor) . 
Lake ........ 

Conduit ....... 

New meters and setting ..... 

Stables ........ 

Reservoir ....... 

Pumping service (salaries, wages, fuel, repairs, etc.) 
Repair-shop ....... 

Fountains ....... 

Tools and repairing ..... 

Mystic Sewer (repairs, and pumping and treatment 

of sewage) ...... 

Waste Detection Service .... 

Protection of water sources (including salaries of 

three Special Agents on Pollution) 
Analyses of Water ..... 

Filtration ....... 

Damages ....... 

Merchandise sold ...... 



f5,475 98 



6,672 77 
3,403 67 
2,233 53 
4,067 62 
2,162 11 
7,828 98 
1,635 76 
1,837 26 
2,787 29 

5,259 80 

656 04 

11,234 52 

1,646 97 

395 52 

5,892 90 

4,618 85 

45,399 58 

1,846 89 

1,022 18 

577 39 

22,034 72 
7,582 74 

5,821 31 

150 00 

1,032 89 

10,173 46 

273 07 



.63,723 80 



Watp:r-Supply Department. 



DETAILED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE SEVERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

(From Loans.) 
January Draft, 1891, to February Draft, 1892 (13 mos.). 
Extension of Mains: 

Labor ^100,717 74 

6,262 23 



Teaming . 
Blasting 

Water-pipes, contracts 
Stock 
Miscellaneous . 



11,070 75 

105,494 07 

43,301 30 

78 93 



$270,085 27 
Stock paid for in previous years (addi- 
tional) 41,044 53 

Additional Supj)Iy of Water : 
(Account of Basin No. 6, Whitehall poud, Cedar 

swamp, etc.) 
Salaries and labor .... $101,51429 

Materials 29,875 50 

Contract, 3 roads in Ashland and Hop- 

kinton (balance) .... 5,740 15 

Contract, filliug on Dam No. 6 (on 

account) 4,671 15 

Contract, cut stone, gate-chamber, 

Dam 6 2,234 00 

Contract, stripping Section A, Basin 

6 (on account) .... 14,710 63 
Contract, stripping Section B, Basin 6 

(on account) 8,925 09 

Contract, stripping Section C, Basin 6 

(on account) ..... 13,167 86 

Contract, stripping Section D, Basin 6 

(on account) ..... 21,878 93 

Contract, lower section, wasteway, 

Dam 6 ..... . 9,761 09 

City of Marlboro' on account of con- 
tract for a sewerage system to pro- 
tect city water-supply . . . 41,333 33 
Engineering and supplies . . . 16,206 87 
Land damages ..... 32,450 00 

Teaming 19,808 91 

Freights and express .... 1,615 10 

Travelling expenses .... 1,234 99 

I'rinting, stationery, and advertising . 539 25 

Miscellaneous ..... 3,187 16 



-1,129 80 



$328,854 30 



10 City Document No. 40. 

High Service : 

Labor on foundation for additional 
pumping-engiiie at Chestnut-hill 
station ...... 

Stock, account extension of fire-ser- 
vice 2,308 18 

Design and drawings for additional 

pumping-engine (on account) . . 1,130 96 



:,136 92 



Introduction of Meters and Inspec- 
tion, Cochituate Water- Works : 
New meters and setting from stock paid for in 

previous years ....... $ 3,207 14 

Introduction of Meters and Inspec- 
tion, Mystic Water- Works : 
New meters and setting from stock paid for in 

previous years ....... $5 07 49 

Shops, Albany Street: 

Contract for engine .... $1,438 97 

" for two boilers . . . 1,730 00 

" for steam-blower . . . 1,200 GO 

Miscellaneous items . . . . 21 92 

$4,390 89 



Water-Sui'PLy Department. 11 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION, AND CONDITION OF 
THE WATER DEBTS. 

Cost of constriK^tion of Cochituate Works 
to Jim. 1, 1891 (including $453.99 
omitted in last report) . . . .$20,995,015 00 

Expended from Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 

1892 (13 months), as follows, viz. ; 
Additional Supply of Water . $328,854 30 
Extension of Mains, etc. . 311,129 80 
High service . . . 4,136 92 

Shops, Albany street . . 4,390 89 



648,511 91 



Cost of construction of Cochituate Water- 
Works to Feb. 1, 1892 .... $21,643, 526 91 

The outstandiuo; Cochituate Water Loans 

Jan. 1, 1891, "were .... $16,246,273 98 

Issued during the year 1891, as follows : 

f Additional 

Appropriation, <j ^^llll^ 

I 4%LoLns. $137,500 00 
f Extension 
J J J of Mains, 

j etc., 4% 
I Loans . 100,000 00 

$237,500 00 
Paid during year 1891 . 60,000 00 

177,500 00 



Total Cochituate Debt, Feb. 1, 1892 . . $16,423,773 98 

Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 

1891 $5,854,530 21 

Cochituate Water Sinking-Fund, Feb. 1, 

1892 6,471,545 34 

Net Cochituate Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1891 . 10,391,743 77 

" Feb. 1, 1892 . 9,952,228 64 



12 City Document No. 40. 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Jan. 1, 1891 $1,708,781 59 

Cost of construction of Mystic Works to 

Feb. 1, 1892 1,710,943 70 



The outstanding Mystic Water Loans, Jan. 

1, 1891, were $739,000 00 

Paid during year 1891 .... 257,000 00 

Total Mystic Debt, Feb. 1, 1892 . . $482,000 00 



Mystic Water Sinking-Fund, Jan. 1, 1891 . $719,722 81 

Feb. 1, 1892 . 550,208 70 

Net Mystic Water Debt, Jan. 1, 1891 . $19,277 19 

Feb. 1, 1892 . 0,000 00 



TOTAL MONEY EXPENDITURES, COCHITUATE WATER- 
WORKS, FROM JANUARY 1, 1891, TO FEBRUARY 
1, 1892. 



Stock . 

Labor 

Salaries 

Travelling expenses 

Printing 

Stationery . 

Advertising 

Postage 

Freights and express 

Rents 

Gas . 

Teaming 

Repairs 

Land damages, etc. 

Taxes 

Miscellaneous 

Inspection of pipes 

Blasting 

Water-pipe contracts 

Coal and wood . 

Pumping Service, salaries 
" " fuel 

" " repairs 

" " oils, etc, 

" '• small supplies 

Carried forward, 



04 



70 



^33,881 14 

389,089 31 

69,728 68 

11,071 39 

1,480 06 

578 68 

843 35 

160 50 

2,168 39 

4,158 

283 

28,945 

17,853 04 

32,450 00 

1,995 36 

11,046 45 

2,143 99 

11,302 54 

114,766 36 

4,844 05 

11,247 45 

6,231 82 

810 28 

581 97 

330 11 

857,992 34 



Water-Supply Department. 



13 



Brouglit forward, 
Miscellaneous contracts 
Engineering 
Engineering supplies . 
Hay and grain 



$857,992 34 

3 30,933 72 

18,486 91 

479 88 

6,267 08 

$1,014,159 93 



TOTAL MONEY EXPENDITURES, MYSTIC WATER- 
WORKS, FROM JANUARY 1, 1891, TO FEBRUARY 1, 

1892. 



Stock . 
Labor . 
Salaries 
Advertising 
Printing 
Stationery 
Gas . 
Postage 

Travelling expenses 
Coal and wood 
Freights and express 
Teaming 
Ha}' and grain 
Damages 
Repairs 
Miscellaneous 
Water- i)ipe contract 
Telephones . 
Pumping Service, salaries 
'■ " fuel . 

" " repairs 

" " oils, etc. 

" " small supplies 

*■' " new machinery 

Engineering 
Mystic Sewerage Station, viz 

Salaries and wages . 

Fuel 

Chemicals 

Repairs 

Small supplies . 

New machinery 



$7,444 19 

47,685 35 

27,175 51 

37 83 

105 25 

53 81 

68 80 

14 50 

2,063 90 

337 97 

26 18 

7 50 

967 59 

10,173 46 

3,018 54 

814 15 

3,044 74 

328 81 

11 895 64 

16,942 95 

1,076 09 

996 71 

531 89 

8,789 80 

2,287 00 

10,681 17 

1,031 63 

2,626 26 

153 03 

1,164 68 

99 00 



.61,643 39 



14 



City Document No. 40. 



STATEMENT OF STOCK ACCOUNTS. 

Increase. 



Cochituate Water-Works, viz. : 
Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 
" Jan. 1, 1892 

Increase during year 



Decrease. 



^14,835 57 
25,080 37 

$10,244 80 ."810,244 80 



Mystic Water-Works, viz. : 

Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 . . $7,285 72 

" " Jan. 1, 1892 . . 5,205 85 

Decrease during year . . . $2,079 87 



$2,079 87 



Extension of Mains, etc., viz. : 

Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890, as per 

last report $35,758 17 

Accumulation of stock from special 
appropriations in previous years, 
not heretofore included in the 
Stock Account of tlie books at 
the Water Board office . . 102,630 98 

Actual stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 . $138,389 15 
Stock on hand Jan. 1, 1892 . , 97,344 62 

Actual decrease during year . . $41,044 53 

High Service, viz. : 

Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 . . $6,95157 
" Jan. 1, 1892 . . 4,643 39 

Decrease during year . . . $2,308 18 



41,044 53 



2,308 18 



Introduction of Meters and Inspection, 
Cochituate Water-Works, viz. : 
Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 . . $3,207 14 

Stock on hand Jan. 1, 1892 . . 0,000 00 

Decrease during year . . . .$3,207 14 



3,207 14 



Introduction of Meters and Inspec- 
tion, Mystic Water-Works, viz. : 
Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1890 . . $507 49 

" Jan, 1, 1892 . . 000 00 

Decrease during year . ... $507 49 



10,244 80 



507 49 
19.147 21 



Total decrease In stock during year 



1,902 41 



Water-Supply Department. 



15 



Account of Expenditures on Additional Supply Aijpropri- 
ation (Dec, 1889), $1,045,000. 



Basin 6 : 
Engineering 

Contracts on Basin . . 

City Labor. Superintendent's monthly rolls 

Labor and teaming 

Materials, Supplies, and Miscellaneous . , . 



Totals 

Dam 6: 

Engineering 

Contracts on Dam 

■ Monthly Rolls . . . 

, Labor and Teaming 
Supplies and Miscellaneous . . . 



City Labor • 



Totals 

Whitehall Pond : 

Engineering 

Contract (dredging plant) , 
City labor ( " " ) . 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 



Totals 

Cedar Swamp : 

Engineering , 

Supplies and Miscellaneous 
Land Damages , 



Totals . 

Chattanooga : 

Engineering 

Land . . . . 



Totals 



From Jan.l, 

1890, Draft lo 

Jan. 1, 1891, 

inclusive. 

1891. 



$7,576 21 

22,247 67 

200 99 

8,078 91 

4,418 51 



$42,522 29 

4,229 53 

17,479 27 

3,335 20 

89,283 15 

49,134 31 



$163,461 46 



1,784 18 



2,137 99 

$3,922 17 

2,570 64 
1,303 41 



$3,874 05 



From Feb. 1, 

1891, to Jan. 

1, 1892, 

inclusive. 

1893. 



$4,552 29 
64,422 66 
448 00 
12,705 07 
10,284 09 



^92,412 11 

6,671 67 
20,547 97 

3,539 73 
84,534 61 
20,892 19 



$136,186 17 

1,276 83 

5,526 70 

5,649 00 

2,772 15 



$15,224 68 

2,128 11 

94 05 

15,750 00 



$17,972 16 

78 00 
16,000 00 

$16,078 00 



Total to date 
of Jan. 31, 



$12,128 50 

86,670 33 

648 99 

20,783 98 

14,702 60 



$134,934 40 

10,901 20 

38,027 24 

6,874 93 

173,817 76 

70,026 50 



$299,647 63 

3,061 01 
5,526 70 
5,649 00 
4,910 14 



$19,146 85 

4,698 75 

1,397 46 

15,750 00 



$21,846 21 



78 00 
16,000 00 



$16,078 00 



16 



City Document No. 40. 



Account of Expenditures on Additional Supply Appropri- 
ation. — (^Continued). 



From Jan.l. 

1890, Draft to 

Jan. 1, 1891, 

inclusive. 

1891. 



From Feb. 1, 

1891, to Jan. 

1, 1892, 

inclusive. 

1893. 



Total to date 
of Jan. 31, 

1892. 



City of Marlboro' . 

Drainage . . . . 
Bami 5: 

Engineering . . 



$41,333 33 



514 00 



$41,333 33 



RECAPITULATION. 



Basin 6 

Dam 6 

Whitehall Pond . . 
Cedar Swamp . . . 
Chattanooga • . . 
City of Marlboro' 
Basin 5 (Surveys) . 

Totals . . . . 



$42,522 29 

163,461 46 

3,922 17 

3,874 05 



$213,779 97 



$92,412 11 


136,186 17 


15,224 68 


17,972 16 


16,078 00 


41,333 33 


514 00 


$319,720 45 



$134,934 40 
299,647 63 
19,146 85 
21,846 21 
16,078 00 
41,333 33 
514 00 

$533,500 42 



"\^\'ater-Supply Department. 



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22 



City Document No. 40. 
GENERAL STATISTICS. 



SCDBUET AND COCHITUATE M^ORKS. 



Daily average consumption in gallons . . 

Daily average consumption in gallons per 
iohabltaQt 



Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 

Percentage of total consumption metered, 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 

Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates . . . . 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . . 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 

Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1889, and 1890, 
Feb. 1, 1892 



Yearly expense of maintenance 

Mystic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons . . 

Dally average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 

Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 

Percentage of total consumption metered, 

Number of sei'vices 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing mains, 
in miles 



Number of fire-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates .... 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . . 

Percentage of total revenue from metered 
water 



Cost of works on Jan. 1, 1889, and 1890, 
and Feb. 1, 1892 



yearly expense of maintenance , 



1889. 



32,070,000 

80.3 

8,118,800 

25.3 

58,810 

3,882 

479.72 

5,225 

$1,357,738 30 

$493,239 58 

36.3 

$20,432,974 43 
$345,986 88 

7,830,500 

68.7 

1,341,700 

17.1 

18,527 

413 

147.7 

998 

$317,197 29 

$80,313 19 

24.1 

$1,696,280 76 
$125,660 21 



1890. 



33,871,700 

82.5 

9,034,800 

26.7 

60,718 

4,078 

498,73 

5,398 

$1,382,422 53 

$554,047 36 

40.1 

$20,995,015 00 
$381,147 10 

8,341,400 

70.6 

1,537,400 

18.5 

19,520 

414 

152.3 

1,073 

$332,634 02 

$89,526 42 

26.9 

$1,708,781 59 
$144,184 44 



1891. 



37,686,980 



10,186,400 

27.0 

62,877 

4,357 

519 

5,643 

* $1,838,494 30 

t $606,451 CO 

33 

* $21,643,526 91 

* $398,755 92 

9,055,200 

74.7 

1,845,500 

20.4 

20,566 

427 

158 
1,116 

* $406,784 26 
t $102,719 26 

25.2 

$1,710,943 70 

* $174,421 92 



* Thirteen months. 



■f Twelve months. 



Kespectfully submitted, 

Egbert Grant, 
John W. Leighton, 
Thomas F. Doherty, 

Boston Water Board. 



Water-Supply Department. 23 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Office of Superintendent of Eastern Division, 

710 Albany Street, Boston, Feb. 1, 1892. 

Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boslon Water Board: 

Dear Sir: I herewith respectfully submit the annual 
report of the Eastern Division for the year ending Jan. 31, 
1«92. 

Distribution. — Twenty-one miles of pipe mains have ]:)een 
laid during the year, and 5,258 feet of pipe have been aban- 
doned, milking a net increase in the distribution system of 
twenty miles and a total length of 518.79 miles now con- 
nected with the works. 

Two thousand and eighteen feet of 24- inch pipe main have 
been laid through the Arnold Arboretum for the improve- 
ment of the West Roxbury high-service supply. 

For the improvement of the South Boston and Dorchester 
supply, 3,998 feet of 30-inch pipe main have been hud 
through Chester equare, Chester park, East Chester park, 
and Swett street. Owing to the large increase in the num- 
ber of petitions for small extensions of pipe mains, work 
had to be temporarily suspended on this pipe, but it will 
be resumed as speedily as possible. 

The Bellevue high-service pipes have been extended 1,379 
feet through Church and Centre streets and connected to 
Montclair avenue. A 12-inch check-valve also was put in 
at the corner of Pond and May streets, and the water turned 
on to the pipes in Pond street, between May street and 
Brookline line, April 28, 1891. 

Three hundred and seven petitions for extension of mains 
have been received, and 277, including 11 of 1890, have 
been granted. 

Hydrants. — Three hundred and twenty-seven hydrants 
have been established and eighty abandoned, making a net 
increase of 247 and a total of 5,705 hydrants now connected 
with the system. 

Thirty-four of the old pattern Boston hydrants have been 
replaced ))y hydrants of the Post or Lowry patterns. 
During the year IGO Post hydrants in service htive been sup- 
plied with 4^-inch steamer connections as requested l^y the 
Fire De[)artment. 

The work of improving the Post hydrant, so as to have an 



24 City Document No. 40. 

independent shut-oiF or valve for each steamer connection, is 
being pushed as speedily as possible. 

Service Pipes. — Two thousand three hundred and seventy- 
four service pipes have been laid, with an aggregate length 
of <^9,859 feet, and 215 services have been abandoned, mak- 
ing a net increase of 2,159 pipes for the year. 

High-Service Works. 

Chestnut-Hill Station. — The following repairs have been 
made on Engine No. 1 : One full set of Babbitt packing- 
rings for piston-rods and valve-stems (12 set) ; 4 wrought- 
iron cross heads with steel pins, to replace the cast-iron ones, 
wdiich were badly worn ; brasses on both ends of air-pump 
rods ; 1 set of air-pump valves ; and 2 gibbs for left side of 
fork- rod". 

Engine No. 2. One full set of Babbitt packing-rings for 
piston-rods and valve-stems (12 set) ; 4 wrought-iron cross- 
heads with steel pins, to replace the cast-iron ones, which 
were badly worn ; brasses on both ends of air-pump rods ; 
1 strap to replace the one broken on left-hand fork-rod ; 4 
gibbs to replace the broken ones ; and one set of air-pump 
valves. 

The usual amount of work has been done on both engines, 
such as cleaning brasses, oveihauling pump-valves, and other 
minor repairs. 

Boilers. — The furnaces of all the boilers have been re- 
lined. 

Feed-iyumps. — Both pumps have been repaired, and are 
in good condition. 

Dynamo. — The insulation ring of the commutator burned 
out was repaired, and is now running. 

All the repairs, with the exception of beam of No. 2 En- 
gine, and the dynamo, were done by the regular employees 
at this station. 

East Boston Station. — The roof of the building has been 
repaired and some pointing done outside. To make a bed- 
room, a partition was put up inside, which was stained and 
varnished, together with the Avindow-frames and sashes. 
1 he pumps and boilers are in good condition. 

West Boxbury Station. — Owing to numerous complaints 
from the water-takers on this service of a continual noise 
while the ]iump is at work, an air-chamber has been put in 
at the pump, which has greatly relieved the trouble. The 
pump and boilers have had their regular attention. 

Elmwood-street Station. — This building was vacated by 
the department some time since. As the work formerly 



Water-Supply Depaetmext. 25 

done there is now done at the Chestnut-hill Pumping- 
station, and as this building can be put to no practical use 
by this department, authoritj^ has been asked from the City 
Government to sell the premises. 

The stiuid-pipes at Mt. Bellevue, West lioxbury, and 
Orient Heights, East Boston, are in good condition. 

Pipe Yard and Buildings. — The machine-shop, which 
was built last year, is in good condition. 

The stable, which is also new, is in good condition, and is 
now heated by steam supplied from the machine-shop, which 
does away with the danger from an overheated stove. I 
would recommend that the old shed on the north side of the 
yard be torn down, and a 2-story brick building be 
erected in its stead, to be used for the storage of wagons, 
sleighs, cement, and other material. 

District Stables. 

East Boston. — The old pumping-station has been re- 
modelled and is now used as a stable and workshop for this 
district. The work was done by the department. 

Dorchester. — A new 1^-story wooden stable is being 
erected on Gibson street for this district, and when com- 
pleted will have stalls for 4 horses, a large wagon-room, 
and also 3 small rooms to be used as a headquarters for the 
men. 

West Roxhury. — The building owned by A. H. Tomp- 
kins, now occupied as a stable and headquarters, is alto- 
gether inadequate for the needs of this district. I recommend 
that a site be selected in the vicinity of South and Centre 
streets, and a building, to be used as a stable and workshop, 
be erected as soon as possible. 

Brighton. — The stable is in good condition. 

Reservoirs. 

Pai'her Hill. — The keeper's house has been repaired in- 
side, and the gate-house and grounds are in good condition. 
This reservoir, which has never been cleaned since it was 
first filled in 1875, is to be cleaned duiing the comng 
season. 

East Boston. — A fence 844 feet— in length has been 
rebuilt on the north and east sides. The reservoir and the 
grounds around it are in good condition. 

8o2dh Boston. — The reservoir is in good condition, but 
the fence around it is out of repair and is to be rebuilt. 



26 



City Document No. 40. 



Waste Detection. 

The work of this department has been continued through- 
out the year. 

The force consists of eleven inspectors, ten of whom have 
been employed the whole year and one since Oct. 19, 18U1. 

The premises of all water-takers have been examined, and 
more than 8,000 notices to repair defective fixtures have been 
issued. 

The following table shows the work of the mspectors dur- 
ing the year : 

Premises examined ...... 63,700 

" notified to repair defective fixtures . 8,735 

" reexamined . . . . . 8,661 

Second notices to repair issued .... 325 

" reexaminations made . . . . 753 

Wilful waste notices issued .... 104 

Fines collected ....... 2 

Defective services in street . . . . . 120 

Hopper water-closets not self-closing, reported . 78 

The defective fixtures may be divided into the following 
classes : 



Ball-cocks .... 

Water-closets 

Faucets ; sink, bowl, and bath-tub 

Stopcocks .... 

Services burst inside building 

" " outside " for owner to repair 

(( (( (( (( (( citv " " 

Wilful waste 



3,848 

2,476 

3,078 

10 

439 

94 

106 

104 



The Deacon Meter System. 

Cochituate Division. — There are now in use 81 Deacon 
meters, 74 on the Cochituate system and 7 on the Mystic 
system. The territorj^ supplied by the meters is divided into 
176 sections. The entire residential portion of Boston can 
now be tested by the meters with the exception of a portion 
of West Roxbury and that portion of the Back Bay district 
bounded by Boylston street, Parker street, and the Boston & 
Providence Railroad. 

Mystic Division. — Charlestown is practically covered by 
meters, one meter supplies a small pru'tion of Somerville, 
and one about one-quarter of Chelsea. Everett has no 
meter. 

The followino; statement is condensed from the returns of 



Water-Supply Department. 



27 



the different sections, and shows the daily average consump- 
tion and also the rate consumption during the hours of 1 to 4 
A.M. at the close of the season of 1890 and the beginning 
and end of the season of 1891 : 





a 
o 

S 

3 

p< 
o 

Ph 


1890. 


1891. 




2d BEADING. 


1st reading. 


2d reading. 




Daily coQ 
sumption. 


Night 
rate. 


Daily con- 
sumption. 


Night 
rate. 


Daily con- 
sumptiou. 


Night 
rate. 


Cochituate .... 
Mystic 


360,200 
46,200 


Gallons. 
47.5 
35.3 


Gallons. 
27.6 
20.0 


Gallons. 
52.1 
45.1 


Gallons. 
31.8 
27.3 


Gallons. 
53.7 
45.2 


Gallons. 
33.2 
29.6 



Meters. 

Cochituate Division. — Three hundred and thirty- four 
meters have been applied, and 122 have been discontinued, 
making a net increase of 212, and the total number in 
service, 3,839. 

Mystic Division. — Thirty-nine meters have been applied, 
24 have been discontinued, making a net mcrease of 15 
meters, and the total number now in service, 406. 

Water-Posts. 

Eighty-six water-posts have been erected and 5 abandoned, 
making the number now in use 251. 

Fountains. 

Five drinking-fountains have been erected during the past 
yep.r. The rapid growth of the city and the corresponding 
increase of travel make it imperative from humane con- 
siderations that many special locations be supplied with 
drinking-fountains. Many of the drinking-fountains now 
in use are of antique pattern and inconvenient, and should 
be replaced by those of recent improvement and invention, 
which may be used by both man and beast. 

In the city proper, a drinking-fountain has been erected 
at the junction of Maiden and Wareham streets ; the stone 
foundation of the drinking-fountain at the corner of Boylston 
and Charles streets has been reset, and the one in Custom- 
House square was raised. 

The old fountain on Broadway, at Independence square, 
South Boston, has been abandoned, and an ornamental iron 
drinking-fountain has been erected in its place. 



28 



City Document No. 40. 



The drill kino;- 



On account of the improvements made in Central and 
Maverick squares, East Boston, two old stone watering- 
troughs have been abandoned, and ornamental iron drinking- 
fountains for beasts only, and furnished with electric-light 
posts, have been erected in their stead 
fountain in Belmont square has been abandoned. 

On Adams street, corner Minot, Dorchester, a drinking- 
fountain of modern style for man and beast has taken the 
place of the old one. The drinking-fountain at the junction 
of Adams and Neponset avenue has been removed by order 
of the Board of Aldermen. 

The following is a list of fountains now in use : 

Note. — (f ) Indicates a continuous flow of water in warm weather. 
(*) Automatic fixtui'es for man and beast in warm weather, and a 
continuous flow of water for beasts in cold weather. (J) Continuous 
flow of water summer and winter. (§) Automatic fixtures for man. 
(II) Automatic fixtures for man and beast in warm weather only. 

Citu Proper. 

No. 

49 Mt. Washington avenue, at drawbridge 

22 Maiden street, junction Wareham street 

63 North square .... 

46 Post-Office square 

33 Tremont street, at Clarendon 

47 Winthrop square 
32 Washington street, at Blackstone squar 

39 West Chester park, near Westland avenue 

48 Atlantic avenue, at India wharf . 

43 Atlantic avenue, at Rowe's wharf 
42 Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street 
31 Albany street, opposite Concord . 

56 Boston Common ..... 

57 Boston Common . 

58 Boston Common ..... 

59 Boston Common ..... 

60 Boston Common ..... 

61 Boston Common ..... 

36 Beacon street, corner Charles 
72 Beacon street, junction Commonwealth avenu 

37 Charles street, opposite the jail 

34 Columbus avenue, opposite Church 
63 Causeway street, at B. & L. R.R. depot 

40 Causeway street, junction Merrimac 

35 Charles street, corner Boylston 
45 Custom-FIouse square . 

44 Fort-hill square .... 

41 Haymarket square 

38 Leverett street, at Cambridge bridge 



Water-Supply Department, 



29 



East Boston. 

No. 

51 Central square .... 

52 Bennington street, junction Chelsea 
50 Maverick square .... 
64 Neptune road, at Wood Island park 

53 Saratoga street, junction Pope 

South Boston. 

28 A street, near First 

25 Dorchester avenue, junction Boston 

21) Foundry street, opposite First 

30 Fourth street, corner Foundry 

27 Fourth street, corner Dorchester . 

'2Q Fourth street, junction Emerson . 

68 Independence square . 

69 Q street, near Fifth 

70 Sixth street, near P . 

71 Telegraph hill . 

Roxbury. 

16 Albany street, junction Dearborn 

13 Eliot square .... 
15 Eustis street, corner Washington . 

6 Heath street, at Tremont 

12 Pynchon street, near Roxbury 

14 Tremont street, junction Cabot 

66 Westminster street, opposite Williams 



Dorchester. 

54 Adams street, opposite Minot 

18 Blue Hill avenue, junction Washington 

17 Blue Hill avenue, opposite Franklin park 

67 Commercial street, opposite Beach 

16 Dorchester avenue, junction Adams 

23 Glover's Corner ..... 
20 Neponset avenue, opposite Walnut street 
56 River street, junction Blue Hill avenue 

24 Upham's Corner ..... 



West Boxhury. 

5 Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets 
55 " " " South street 

1 " " opposite Spring street 

3 South street, junction Morton street 

2 Washington street, junction South street 

4 " " near Burnett . 



30 



City DocuaiENT No. 40. 



Brighton. 

So. 

11 Barry's Corner ..... 

05 Beacon street, opp. Chestnut-hill Reservoir 

8 Market street, Cattle Fair Hotel . 

10 Union square ..... 

9 Western avenue, Charles-river Hotel 
7 Washington street, at Oak square 



Meters Applied. 



COCHITUATE. 


4" 
1 


3' 


2" 


11" 


1" 


% 


i" 


Total. 




1 


9 


17 


44 


25 
18 
23 
13 
59 
1 


3 

57 
6 

1 
1 


100 


B W. W 


18 




4 


3 
1 


6 
2 


8 
2 


18 
11 


119 




35 






60 














2 


















5 


5 


17 


27 


73 


139 


68 


334 



Meters Discontinued. 



COCHITUATE. 


4 


2" 


1^' 


1" 


%•' 


i' 


Total. 


Worthington 






2 


3 

1 
1 


11 
2 


11 
3 
1 

12 


18 
56 


45 




1 


63 




2 


B W. "W 






12 


















1 


2 


5 


13 


27 


74 


122 



Meters sent to Factory for Repairs. 



COCHITUATE. 


3'' 


2" 


li" 


1" 


1" 


f 


Total. 


Worthington 






8 

2 


3 

2 


14 
9 
3 


1 

16 

7 


56 
2 
1 


26 




3 


83 




12 










1 


















3 


10 


5 


26 


24 


59 


127 



Watee-Supply Department. 



31 



Meters Purchased. 





4" 


3" 


2" 


11" 


1" 


4 


s 


Total. 




3 
2 


3 
4 
1 


12 
8 
3 


19 

7 

12 


21 
10 
20 


12 
32 
17 
96 

1 
4 


14 
4 

6 


70 




63 




67 






100 














14 














10 


















5 


8 


23 


38 


51 


162 


24 


311 



Meters in Service January 31, 1892. 



COCHITUATE. 


6" 


4" 


3" 


2" 


1" 


r' 


V 


Total. 


Worthington 




10 


24 


111 


99 


561 


409 

482 

185 

73 

3 

93 

3 

1 

2 

2 

4 

1 


108 

1,206 

19 

5 

4 

6 

3 

1 


1,322 


B W. W 




482 




1 


16 
1 


29 
4 


32 
13 


58 
23 


204 

37 

2 


1,731 




170 


Ball & Fitts 




10 














97 










1 


1 

1 


1 


12 


Frost 








2 












2 
















5 


Star 














4 
















1 
















1 






















1 


27 


57 


157 


182 


805 


1,258 


1,352 


3,839 



32 



City Document No. 40. 



Metehs in Service Feb. 1, 1892. 



Mystic Department. 


6" 


4" 


3'' 


2" 


11- 


1" 


3" 


5 


Total. 






8 
5 


3 
9 


33 
9 


6 
2 


76 
33 


56 

48 

2 


10 

89 


192 




2 


197 


B. W. W 


2 






1 


2 


2 

1 


2 


6 


11 


Ball and Fitta 




1 




4 
















2 


14 


14 


45 


10 


115 


107 


99 


406 



Meters Applied. 



Mystic Department. 


3" 


2 


1|" 


1" 


r 


B 


Total. 




1 
1 
1 
1 


2 


1 


4 
3 


1 

8 


7 


12 




20 






2 


6 


Ball and Fitts 






1 


















4 


2 


3 


14 


9 


7 


39 



Meters Discontinued. 



Mystic Department, 


4" 


3" 


2" 


1|' 


1" 


3" 


1" 


Total. 








2 
2 


1 


2 
1 
2 


4 
4 


2 
2 


10 




1 


1 


10 




4 














1 


1 


4 


1 


5 


8 


4 


24 



Meters sent to Factory for Eepairs. 



Mystic Department. 


4" 


2" 


1" 


a" 


r 


Total. 


Worthington 










3 
9 


2 

7 


5 




1 


1 


4 


22 








1 


1 


4 


12 


9 


27 



Water-Supply Department. 



33 



Meters Repaired in Service. 



Clock broken 
" defaced 
Leak at spindle 
" " coupling 
" " nipple 
" " body 
Stopped by fish 
Coupling broken 
Gear stuck 
Spindle stuck 
Nipple broken 



Causes for Changing Meters. 



Ordered out for examination 

" " " test 
Injured by frost 

" " hot water 

" " fire 
No force 
Leak at spindle 
Enlargement of service 
Filled with rust 
Clock broken 
Gravel in meter 
Lever broken 
Stopped in service 
Leak at packing 
Spindle broken 
Gear worn 

" broken . 
Clock defaced 
Lever detached 
Solder in meter 
Changed location 
Gear out of order 
Piston worn . 

" broken 
Eatchet " 
Body " 
Disc '• 

Leak at coupling 



Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


82 


29 


25 


12 


78 


9 


49 


1 


6 




2 






10 




1 


3 




2 






1 


247 


63 


~"~ 


-~ 


tlS. 
Cochituate. 


Mystic 


207 


62 


90 


11 


Li 




18 


2 


2 




57 


4 


13 


1 


40 


5 


30 


3 


37 


4 


2 


I 


7 


1 


14 


7 


9 




6 


i 


5 




12 


3 


7 




1 




5 




2 




5 




3 


1 


2 






1 


2 




2 




2 





695 



107 



34 



City Document No. 40. 



General Statement foe the Year 1891. 





COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 




Meters. 


Boxes. 


Meters. 


Boxes. 




3,839 

334 

122 

695 

19 

1,715 
401 
127 
247 
311 


57 

...... 



67 


406 
39 
24 

107 
6 

149 
46 
27 
63 






6 


ZHscontinaed 








Tested at shop , 

Repaired at shop . 




Repaired in service ........... 

Parcbased 


41 



Water-Supply Department. 



35 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1891. 

Note. — B. indicates Boston; 8.B., South Boston; E.B., East Boston; Rox., Roxbury; 
Dor., Dorchester; W. Rox., West Roxbury ; Bri., Brighton. 



In what Street. 



Chester sq 

" park .... 
East Chester park . , 
Swett 

Arnold Arboretum . 

Congress 

Terrace 

Huntington ave. . . 
Talbot ave 

Aldine 

Audubon road . . . 
Gainsborough . . . 

Berkeley 

B 

E 

Byron ....... 

Bennington .... 

Holborn 

Magazine 

Kemble ...... 

Gerard 

Humboldt ave. . • . 
E.Chester park . . . 
Washington .... 

Lawn 

Hayden 

Parker Hill ave. . . 



Between what Streets. 



Washington and Shawmut ave , 

" " Harrison ave , 

Harrison ave. and Swett , 

E. Chester park and N. Y. & N.E. R.R., 
Total 30-inch 



Walter and South 
Total 24 inch . 



A and B 

Alleghany and New Heath 

Parker and Longwood ave. 

Harvard and Bernard . . 

Total 16-inch 



Atlantic ave. and Estes . . , 
Westland and Brookline ave. 
Falmouth and Parker .... 
Chandler and Columbus ave. 
Second and Congress .... 
" " Athens .... 
Bennington and Homer . . . 
Saratoga and Ashley .... 
Warren and Blue Hill ave. . 
Norfolk ave. and Kemble . 
Magazine and Hampden . . 
Norfolk ave. and Swett . . 
Walnut ave. and Waumbeck , 

At Albany , 

At Chester park 

Hayden and Heath 

Fisher ave. and Lawn . . . , 

Parker and Hillside . . . . . 

Carried forward . . . , 



B. and Rox 
Rox. 



W.Rox. 



S.B. 
Rox. 



Dor. 



S.B. 



E.B. 



Rox. 



Rox. 



30 



16 



47 

768 

1,284 

1,899 

3,998 

2,018 
2,818 



737 

120 

473 

508 

1,838 



322 

1,073 

209 

154 

2,468 

442 

223 

125 

258 

227 

1,276 

1,758 

2,391 

25 

6 

494 

283 

494 

12,228 



36 City Document No. 40. 

Statement of Ijocation, Size,%tc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Shirley . . . 
Hutching ave. 
VTestville 
Codman . . 
Magnolia . . 
Stockton . . 
Morton . . . 
Seldon . . . 
Homes ave. 
Butler . . . 
West Seldon 
Centre . . . 
Bernard . . 
Harvard . . 
Edson . . . 
May .... 
Dudley ave. 
Bellevue ave. 
Florence . . 
Baker . . . 
La Grange . 
Centre . . . 
Centre . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Norfolk ave. and George 

From Day 

Geneva ave. and Ditson 

Dorchester ave. and Washington . . 

Quincy and Lawrence ave 

Milton ave. and Washington . . . . 
N. T. & N. E. R.R. and Fairmount 

Morton and Nelson 

Toplifie and Draper 

Bearse and Vose 

From Morton 

Washington and Carlisle 

Talbot ave. and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. 

Blue Hill ave. and Abbott 

Norfolk and Milton ave 

Pond and Centre 

Bellevue ave. and Metcalf 

Centre and Cornell 

Marion and Harrison 

Gardner and Mt. Vernon 

Jordan and Vale , . . 

Grove and Dedham line 

Hewlitt and Arundel 



Hewlilt Centre and Walter . 



Montclair ave. . 
New Call .... 
Western ave. . . 
Cambridge . . . 
Sutherland road 

Lake 

Faneuil . . . . 
Warren . . . . 
Homes ave. . . . 
Bigelow . . . . 



Centre and Merlin 

Keyes and Boynton 

No. Harvard and Cambridge line 
Chamberlin " " " 

Selkirk and Lanark roads . . . . 

Kendricken and South 

Market and Parson 

Cambridge and Allston 

From No. Harvard 

Webster and Dunboy 

Total 12-inch 



Rox. 



Dor. 



W. Rox 



Bri 



12 



12,228 

450 

133 

262 

218 

165 

118 

991 

35 

56 

2il 

851 

324 

50 

206 

64 

64 

114 

1,074 

198 

1,888 

419 

2,719 

275 

17 

491 

175 

3,079 

1,241 

51 

413 

190 

955 

1,087 

525 

31,367 



Water-Supply Department. 37 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Randolph . . 
Plympton . . 
Wareham . . 
Harvest . . . 
Medway . . . 
Carruth . . • 
Tolman . . . 
Centre .... 
Church .... 
Brook .... 
Royal road . . 
Murdock . . . 

Boylston . . . 
Maiden .... 
Hathaway . . 

Reed 

Thorndike . . 

Btate 

Merchants row 
Alger . . . . 
"Washington . 
Washburn . . 
East Ninth . . 
Preble . . . . 
Vinton . . . . 
Gladstone . . 
Fulda . . . . 
Calumet . . . 
Harrishoff . . 
Holland . . . 
Gay Head . . 
Kingsbury . . 
Heath . . . . 
Dimock . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Albany and Harrison ave. 



Boston and Dorchester ave. . 

Branch and Bearse 

Codman and Van Winkle . . 
Norwood and Neponset ave. . 

South and Church 

Centre and Weld . 

Hill and Bellevue ave. . . . . 
Cambridge and Coolidge road 

Hill and Spring 

Total lOinch 



West Chester Park and B. & A. R.R. . 

Wareham and Albany 

Congress and Summer 

Thorndike and Walnut place 

Reed and Washington 

At Merchants row 

State and Chatham 

Dorchester ave. and Dorchester . . . 

At Essex 

Dorchester ave. and Boston 

Old Harbor and G 

Wendall and Vinton 

Preble and Dorchester 

From Breed 

Highland and Valentine 

Hillside and Pequot 

Humboldt ave. and Harold 



Minden and Centre .... 
Washington and Grainger 
Lawn and Tremont . . . 
Amory and Washington . 
Carried forward . . 



Dor. 



W. Rox. 



Bri. 



S.B. 
B. 
S.B. 



E.B. 
Rox. 



455 
405 
372 
531 
290 
539 
136 
140 

1,239 
689 
923 
652 

6,371 



366 
786 
485 
613 
177 
6 

50 
1,056 

12 
557 
159 
169 
666 
189 
332 
924 

52 

48 
236 
234 
11.1 
249 
7,479 



38 



City Document No. 40. 



Statement of Liocation, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Round Hill 

King 

Train 

Welles ave 

Bearse 

Rosemont ...... 

Rosemont terrace . . . 

Julian ave 

Melbourne 

Kilton 

Street off Carruth . . 

Pierce ave 

Norfolk 

Street 

Algonquin 

Elizabeth . 

Astoria 

Fuller 

Street off King . . . . 

Bowdoin ave 

Brookford 

Duncan 

Seaborn 

Fenton 

Northern ave 

Templeton 

Landseer ....... 

Walter 

Harrison 

Baker pi 

Cornell ........ 

Mendum 

Fairview 

Kittredge 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Day and Gay Head . 

Queen and Adams 

King and Boutwell ave. ..... 

Ocean and Argyle 

From Crest ave. 

" Adams 

" Rosemont 

Judson and Howard ave 

Centre and Welles ave 

Park and Harvard 

Carruth and O. C. R.R. ..... 

Adams and New hall 

Walkhill and N. Y. and N. E. R.R. 

From Norfolk 

Washington and Harvard .... 
Norfolk and Astoria ....... 

Elizabeth and Flint 

Morton and Capen 

King and Rosemont 

Hawes ave. and Morse 

Dromey and Howard aves 

Granger and Leonard 

Centre and Kenwood 

Duncan and Fenton pi 

Whitfield and Washington .... 

From Adams 

Bellevue and La Grange 

Symmes and Weld 

Florence and O. C. R.R 

From Baker 

Orange and Hill 

Walter and Fairview 

Proctor and Mendum ....... 

Norfolk and Metropolitan ave. . . 
Carried forward 



Rox. 
Dor. 



W. Rox. 



7,479 
318 
829 
215 

59 
877 
403 
160 
408 
162 
174 

33 
617 
238 
133 
964 
329 
105 
304 
254 
204 
170 
126 
322 
172 
256 
196 
299 
997 
|32 

33 
496 
259 
344 

48 
18,515 



Water-Supply Department. 39 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Temple . . . , 
Charles ... 
Kittredge . . 
Brookside ave 
Bellevue . . . 
Weldon . . , 
Arlington . , 
Lanark road . 
Coolidge road 
Aldie . . . . 
Summit ave. . 
Bradbury . . 
Murdock . . . 
Mt. Vernon , 
Windom . . . 
Dustin . . . . 
Holland road . 

Chandler . . . 

Cobb 

Haviland . . . 
Harcourt . . . 
E. Lenox . . . 
Newcomb . . 
Pinckney . . . 
Walnut pi. . . 
McLellan . . . 
Albemarle . . 
East Ninth . . 
Cottage . . . 
Tudor . . . . 
Monks . . . . 
Bolton . . . . 
Old Harbor . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . . 

Ivory and O. C. R.R 

Kittredge and Poplar 

James and Charles 

Green and Germania 

Cornell and Hemlock 

From Wenhara 

Market and Arlington pi. . . . 
Kilsyth and Sunderland roads 
Mansfield and No. Harvard . • 

Franklin and Athol 

Allston and Sumner 

Franklin and Mansfield .... 

Whitney and Hill 

Foster and Rockland 

Home ave. and Cambridge , . 
Cambridge and No. Harvard . 
No. Harvard and Royal Road 
Total S-inch 



Berkeley and Tremont 

Washington and Shawmut ave. 
W. Chester park and Parker st. 
St. Botolph and O. C. R.R. . . . 
Reed and Washington 



Louisburg sq. and Cedar . 
Reed and Washington . . 

From Reed 

St. Botolph and O. C. R.R. 

K and N 

E. Ninth and O. C. R.R. . 

D and E 

E. Sixth and E. Seventh . 

At E 

Eighth and Ninth .... 
Carried forward , . 



W. Rox. 



Bri. 



B. 



S.B, 



18,515 
98 
207 
311 
811 
312 
272 
35T 
899 
976 
131 

no 

206 
248 
340 
760 
490 
942 
25,985 



156 

269 

323 

271 

7 

22 
7 

95 
152 
253 
1,101 
164 
163 
297 

55 

75 



3,411 



40 City Document *No. 40. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Hall pi. . . . . , 

Sleeper ...... 

Cowper . . . . , 

Pope ...... 

Collins ...... 

Terrace pi. . . . . 

Falcon 

Homer ... • . , 
Terrace . . . . . 
Schiller . . . . , 
Perch ...... 

Pike . . 

Putnam pi 

Forbes 

Ingleside 

Holiworthy . . , 
Hamerton . . . , 

G-rainger 

Dalmatia 

Bickford 

Duncan 

Sunnyside terrace 
Hawthorne ave. , 

Binney 

Smyrna . # . , . 

Smith 

Dromey ave. . . . 

Dakota 

Oregon ...... 

Cobden 

Grotto glen . . , 

Street 

Conantpl. . . . . 
Howland 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

From E. Fifth 

Congress and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. 
Wordsworth and the water . . . . 

Byron and Moore 

From Bayswater 

Webster and Webster 

Brooks and Putnam 

Moore and Byron 

Alleghany and K. Heath 

Heath and Mansur 

From Pike 

Albany and Perch 

From Roxbury . . 

Centre and Chestnut ave 

Dacia and Blue Hill ave 

Walnut and Humboldt aves. . . . 
Humboldt ave. and Harold . . . . 

Elmore and Kingsbury 

Blue Hill and Howard aves. . . . 
Centre and Bromley park . . . . 

From Ruggles . 

Centre and Creighton 

From Washington 

Longwood ave. and Smyrna . . . 

Binney and Brookline ave 

Whitney and Worthington . . . . 

From Brookford 

Holborn and Gaston 

Conant and Smith 

Walnut ave. and Washington . . . 
From Day 

" Amory 

" Conant 

" Humboldt ave 



Carried forward 



S.B. 



E.B. 



Rox. 



■3,411 
146 

60 
147 

72 

79 
131 

60 
102 

30 
102 
142 
121 
181 
366 
248 

45 

48 
228 
131 
333 
200 
322 
234 
127 

55 
104 

63 
493 
128 
254 

30 
414 
137 
238 

8,982 



Water-Supply Department. 41 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Marshfield . . . . 
Moreland terrace . 
Johnson ave. . . . 
Buckley ave. . . . 
Wyoming . . . . 

Heath ave 

Edgebill 

Gaston ...... 

Gurney 

St. Mary 

Blackwell . . . . 

Dudley 

Pleasant pi. . . . 

Brent 

Granville pi. . . . 

Eaton 

Street 

Birch 

Oak terrace . . . . 
Cunningham . . . 

Oleander 

Josephine . . . . 

Corbett 

Chapman ave. . . 

Vose 

Evans 

Hopkins . . . . . 
Faulkner . . . . , 
Freeman .... 

Elmont 

Street 

Baker pi 

Rill 

Street 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Norfolk ave. and Batchelder 

Blue Hill ave. and Dennis 

Buckley ave. and Centre 

From Johnson ave 

Warren and Wehano 

Heath pi. and Heath 

Round Hill and Gay Head 

Blue Hill and Dakota aves 

Tremont and Parker 

Commonwealth ave. and B. & A. R.R. 

Neponset ave. and Bowman 

Monadnock and Nonquit 

From Savin Hill ave 

Washington and Carlisle 

From Dean ave 

" Tolraan 

" New Minot 

Chapman ave. and Oak terrace .... 

Birch and Lyons 

Howard ave. and Magnolia 

Bird and Alexander ave 

Geneva ave. and Ditson 

Morton and Evans 

Tucker and Lauriat ave 

Butler and Crest 

Corbett and Morton 

Evans and Corbett ■ 

Freeman and Trowbridge court . . . 

Faulkner and Charles 

From Waterlow 

" Ballou ave 

" Washington 

" Ware 

" Carruth 



Rox. 



Dor. 



Carried forward 



237 

42 

148 

83 

36 

48 

625 

190 

36 

217 

97 

189 

91 

190 

87 

64 

212 

52 

491 

235 

262 

257 

117 

108 

435 

263 

44 

166 

17 

80 

106 

6 

42 

33 



114,288 



42 City Document No. 40. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Wrentham . . 

Elton 

Albert pi. . . 
Street . . . . 
Lyndhurst . . 
Bowdoin sq. . 
Dakota . . . . 
Leroy . . . . 
Branch . . . . 
Brad lee . . . 
Mt. Everett . . 
Neponset ave. 
Whitfield . . 
Sewell . . . . 
Dalmatia . . . 
Percival ave. . 
Tileston . . . 
Clarkson . . . 
Wheatland ave, 
Auckland . . 
Buttonwood . 
Street . . . . 
Hawes ave. . . 
Grace ave. . . 
Carson . . . . 
Norwood . . . 
Folsom .... 
Tremlet park . 
Shawmut park 
White .... 
Judaon . . . . 
Leeds .... 
Bowman . . . 
Granger . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward .... 

Dorchester ave. and Ashmont 

" « •< Sagamore 

From Adams 

" Norfolk 

AUston and Washington . . . 
Dakota and Westville ave. . . 
Geneva ave. and Bowdoin sq. 

Ditson . . . 

Medway and Butler 

Algonquin and School .... 
Barrington and Quincy .... 

King and Boutwell ave 

Wheatland and Northern aves. 

From Neponset ave 

Howard and Blue Hill aves. . 

Fox and Church 

Blue Hill ave. and Walkhill . 
Quincy and Barrington .... 
Kilton and N. Y. & N. E. R.R. 

Elton and Belfort 

Vernon and Locust 

From Magnolia 

Bowdoin ave. and Washington 
Arcadia and Robinson .... 
Mt. Vernon and the water . . 

From Tolman 

Dudley and Harlow ...... 

Hooper and Waldeck 

King and Rosemont 

From McClellan 

W. Cottage and Julian ave. . . 

From Savin Hill ave 

Blaokwell and Chickatawbut . 
Clayton and Duncan 



Carried forward 



Dor. 





14,288 
411 


6 




226 




171 




138 




604 




142 




24 




105 




232 



23,112 



Water-Supply Department. 
Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



43 



In what Street. 



Arundel . . . . 

Arcadia court . 

Morse 

Hillside terrace 

Fenton pi. . , , 

Howe 

Ballard way . . 

Jackson pi. . . . 

Huntington ave, 

Robert 

Prospect ave. . . 

Keyes 

Street 

Buchanan court 

Street 

Street 

Abbott 

Ashfield .... 

Myers 

Brook ..... 

Cornell 

Atherton ave. . 
Bradstreet . . . 

Clifton 

James 

So. Fairview . . 
Plainsiield . . . 
Ballard pi. . . . 
Henshaw .... 
Pomfret . . . . . 

Cornwall 

Paul Gore . . . , 
Wenham . . . . . 
Ballard 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

From Beaumont 

From Dorchester ave 

Bowdoin ave. and "Washington . . . 

Bailey and Fuller 

Fenton and Greenwich 

From Hancock 

" Jamaica 

" "Washington 

Canterbury and Hyde Park line . . 

Brookfield and So. Walter 

Sheldon and Sycamore 

Meehan and Forest Hills 

From Weldon 

" South 

" Gardner 

" Union ave . . . . 

" Willow 

"Walter and Fairview 

From Spruce 

Florence and Sycamore 

Roslindale and Orange 

"Washington and Albano ...... 

From Mt. Hope 

Albano and Norfolk 

Kittredge and Poplar 

Brookfield and So. "Walter ..... 

Keyes and Williams 

From Ballard 

" Centre 

Corey and Maple 

Brookside ave. and Stony Brook . . 

Lamartine and Danforth 

Hyde Park ave. and Tale ... 
Centre and Custer 



Dor. 



W. Box. 



Carried forward I . . . 130,028 



23,112 

413 

334 

54 

126 

81 

206 

98 

234 

339 

190 

116 

470 

150 

114 

13 

146 

201 

367 

197 

87 

257 

173 

153 

476 

362 

96 

178 

30 

370 

260 

197 

139 

116 

173 



44 City Document No. 40. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Metcalf .... 

Jones 

Custer 

Rockview pi. . . 
Maxfield .... 
Egleston .... 
Paul Gore . . . 
Arundel .... 
Starr lane . . . 
Metropolitan ave. 
Woodside . . . 
Lexington ave. . 
Webster .... 
Grant ave. . . . 

Rena 

Mansfield . . . 
Madison ave. . . 
Wadsworth . . 
Si 1 kirk road . . 

Seattle 

Almy 

Sorrento .... 
Kenneth .... 

Bayard 

Harriet 

Kilsyth road . . 
Chiswick road . 
Dunboy .... 

Hollis pi 

Haskell road . . 
Richardson . . . 
Andrew road . . 
Homer road . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

From Dudley 

Fairview and "Walter 

From Goldsmith 

" Rockview 

Bellevue and La Grange 

Boylston and School 

Centre and Chestnut ave 

Walter and Centre 

Centre and Seaverns ave 

From Washington 

" Burroughs 

Washington and Union 

From Cambridge 

" Wilton 

North Harvard and Hubbard .... 

Bradbury and Eaton 

Washington and Union 

Ashford and Pratt 

Sutherland and Kilsyth roads . . . 

Home ave. and Cambridge 

Windom and Seattle 

Cambridge and Home ave 

Franklin and Bayard 

Kenneth and Weitz ........ 

From Parson 

Lanark and Lanark road 

Silkirk road and Commonwealth ave. 

High and Faneuil 

From Allston 

Coolidge and Holland roads .... 

From Western ave 

Coolidge and Holland roads .... 



W. Rox. 



Bri. 



Total 6-inch 



Water-Sufply Department. 
Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Concluded. 



45 



In what Street. 



Winter pi. . . 
Haymarket pi. 
K- street pi. . . 
Street . . . . 
Cherry court . 
Dana court . . 
Clayton pi. . . 
Street . . . 
Street . . . . 
Brookside ave. 
Morgan pi. . . 



Total numberfeet laid 



Between what Streets. 



From Winter ....... 

Avery and Biimstead court . 
From K , 

" Third , 

" Cherry 

" Dana 

" Clayton 

" Oakdale 

" Chestnut ave. . . . 
Green and Cornwall .... 

From Grover 

Total 4-inch 



S.B. 



Dor. 
W. Rox. 



lOS 
44 
123 
114 
2C9 
45 
147 
130 
116 
220 
155 
1,411 

3,998 

2,018 

1,838 

31,367 

6,371 

25,985 

38,190 

1,411 

111,178 



46 



City Document No. 40. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Kelaid and Abandoned in 1891. 



In what Street. 



Berkeley 
Harvard . 

Randolph 
Plympton 
Wareham 
Maiden . 
Fourth . 
E . . . . 
Vinton . 
B . . , . 
Downer . 
St. Mary . 
Baker pi. 

Winter pi, 
Tudor . . 
Bolton . . 
Vinton . 
Forbes . , 

St. Mary . 



Between what Streets. 



Chandler and Columbus ave. 

Blue Hill ave. and Abbott . 

Total 12-inch 



Albany and Harrison ave. 



" " Wareham 

Q and the park 

Second and Athens 

Preble and Dorchester 

First and Second 

From Tremont 

Commonwealth ave. and B. & A. R.R. 
From Bird 

Total 6-inch 



From Winter .... 

D and E 

At E ....,.., , 

Preble and Dorchester 

From Chestnut ave. . 

Total 4-inch . . . 



Commonwealth ave. and B. & A. R.R. 



B. 
Dor. 



S.B. 



Rox. 



Dor. 



S.B. 



W.R. 



Lead. 
Rox. IJ 



5 = 



154 
206 
.360 



445 
405 
372 
786 
194 
442 
107 
273 
758 
141 



3,983 



108 
163 

55 
559 

30 
915 



12 
12 

10 

10 

10 

8 



12 

8 

12 



6 



4 
6 
6 
8 



Water-Supply Department . 
Statement of Pipes Lowered. 



47 



In what Street. 



Dudley . . 

Munroe . 

Symmea . 

Seattle . . 
Dunboy . 

Sturbridge 



Between what Streets. 



At Hampden . . . 
Total 24-inch , 



Humboldt ave. and Hazelwood 
Total 12-inch 



From Walter . . 
Total 8-inch 



Cambridge and Home ave. 

Bigelow and High . . , . 

Total 6-inch 



Rox. 



W.R. 



Bri. 



100 
100 

295 
295 

400 
400 

300 
268 



Raised. 



Sandford and River 
Total e.inch . . 



Dor. 



631 
631 



48 



City Document No. 40. 



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Water-Supply Department. 



51 



Three hundred and twenty-seven hydrants have been es- 
tablished and eighty abandoned during the year ]891. 





ESTABLISHI 


D. 


'a 
o 


Abandonee 




3 

o 


o 




o 

t-1 


1 


S g 
PQ'-' 


a 
2 
o 

« 


o 

1-1 


o 

H-l 


o o 


a 
o 

o 


o 
a 

0) 




8 
11 
1 
10 
4 
1 
7 


15 
10 
2 
29 
65 
37 
44 


5 
4 
1 
15 
27 
14 
16 


1 


28 
25 
4 
55 
96 
52 
67 


1 

6 
2 


1 


4 
1 
1 
4 
12 
7 
7 


9 
9 

6 
6 

2 
2 


14 
10 
1 
17 
20 
9 
9 


14 




15 




3 




38 




76 


West Roxbury 

Brighton 


43 

58 




42 


202 


82 


1 


327 


9 


1 


36 


34 


80 


247 



Hydrants taken and repaired 
Hydrant-boxes renewed . . . 
Grate-boxes renewed . . . . , 
Deacon meter-boxee renewfd , 



219 

202 

248 

5 



Total Number of Hydrants in use Feb. 1, 1891. 





o 


o 




a 
o 

o 
B 


a 
o 

o 
W 


C3 
o 




671 
211 
138 
668 
574 
114 
73 


218 

84 

80 

146 

302 

371 

246 

16 


69 
20 
24 
63 
179 
161 
59 


1 


524 
265 
138 
101 
76 
51 
36 


1,482 
581 






380 




978 




1 131 




697 




414 




16 




5 






3 

7 


8 










7 






7 
4 






7 












4 






• • ■ \- • ■ 








2,451 


1,474 


575 


1 


1,201 


5,705 



52 



City Document No. 40. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1891. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


Total. 




40 
2 


36 
3 


30 
5 


24 


20 

7 

2 

11 

2 

22 


16 

7 
2 

9 


12 

23 

2 
8 
3 
3 

2 

1 

42 


10 
1 

1 


8 
5 

2 

1 
8 


6 

41 
10 
4 
5 
8 
1 
1 

70 


4 

22 
3 
1 
3 

29 


3 
2 

1 
3 


2 

14 
4 
2 
6 
2 
6 

34 


n 

6 

1 
1 

7 


n 
1 

1 
1 

3 


1 
13 

3 

1 
1 

18 


i 


5 


; 




9 
1 

5 
15 


312 

70 
52 
133 
51 
30 
14 

662] 


5 477 


South Boston 


S 99 
1 86 










1 
1 


1 160 


Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Newton Lower Falls 

Deer Island 


2 
4 


3 


5 


1 67 

44 

16 

2 

1 




6 952 



Causes of leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches 
diameter and upwards : 



Settling of earth . 








20 


Blasting 








1 


Defective joints . 








103 


" pipes . 
" stopcocks 
*' packing 
" stuffing-box . 








10 
5 

48 
6 


<« clamps . 








1 


Of 3-inch and in service-pipes : 

Settling of earth 189 


Gnawed by rats . 








14 


Defective Joints . 
" packing 
" coupling 
" - stopcocks 
" pipes . 
" uprights 
" valves . 








. 20 
7 
. 17 
. 45 
. Ill 
. 48 
. 17 


Plug loose . 








1 


Struck by pick . 








. (50 



194 



Carried forioard 



529 



194 



Water-Supply Department. 




53 


Brought forward .... 
Drilling ...... 


529 
1 


194 


Eaten by soil ..... 


9 




Fire 


1 




Broken by steam-roller 


6 




In way of sewer ..... 


33 


579 


Stoppao:e by 

Dirt 


32 




Gasket ...... 


8 




Fish 


6 




Eust ....... 


116 




Frost 


17 








179 


Total . . . 




952 



54 



City Document No. 40. 



Statement of L-eaks and Stoppages, 1850-1891. 





Diameter. 




Year. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 
64 
82 
85 
74 
75 
75 
85 
77 
82 
134 
109 
117 
97 
95 
111 
139 
122 
82 
82 
157 
185 
188 
153 
434 
208 
214 
109 
213 
211 
135 
145 
170 
171 
253 


72 

173 

241 

260 

280 

219 

232 

278 

234 

449 

458 

399 

373 

397 

594 

496 

536 

487 

449 

407 

707 

1,380 

1,459 

1,076 

2,160 

725 

734 

801 

1,024 

995 

929 

833 

1,248 

782 

1,127 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 


323 


1853 


345 


1854 •• . . 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363 


1858 


401 


1859 


531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 


1863 


494 


1864 


489 


1865 


607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 


1868 


531 


1869 


489 


1870 


926 


1871 


1,565 


1872 


1,647 


1873 


1,229 


1874 ........ 


2,554 


1875 


928 


1876 


948 


1877 


910 


1878 


1,237 


1879 


1,206 


1880 


1,064 


1881 


1,028 


1882 


1,418 


1883 


953 


1884 


1,380 







Water-Supply Department. 



55 



Statement of Leaks and Stoppages, 1850-1891. — Concluded. 





Diameter. 




Year. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


Total. 


18S5 


Ill 
150 
172 
216 
183 
180 
179 


638 

725 

869 

1,140 

849 
718 
758 


749 


1886 


875 


1887 . 


1,040 
1,356 

1,032 
898 


1888 

1889 


1890 


1891 


952 



Respectfully submitted, 

William J. Welch, 
Superintendent Eastern Division. 



5G Cut Document No, 40. 



KEPORT OF THE RESIDENT ENGINEER AND 
SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WESTERN DIVI- 
SION. 



South Framingham, Jan. 1, 1892. 

Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: 

Sir : The annual report of the Western Division of the 
Boston Water- Works is submitted herewith. 

SUDBURY-RlVER BaSINS. 

Water-shed, 76.2 square miles. 

The rainfall in 1891 was 49.21 inches, about 1.21 inches 
more than the average. The quantity of water has been 
abundant and the quality has been excellent. The rainfall 
for the last four months of the year was deficient, and the 
streams in consequence ran low and caused general alarm, 
but the drought was by no means protracted or severe. 

A notable improvement has been completed at the outlet 
of Basin 4, and a large temporary weir twenty feet in width 
erected at the outlet of Lake Cochituate, to measure the water 
passing over the new dam. 

A self-recordino; rain-o^au£fe has been established at Corda- 
ville, very nearly in the centre of the Sudbury-river water- 
shed. 

Many surveys have been made on different portions of the 
work for expected improvements in the way of taking land 
upon the borders of the brooks and regulating the swamps. 

An extension to the old office at South Framingham was 
begun in November, and a new office built for the pollution 
department. 

During the latter part of the autumn and early winter 
Basin 4 could not be called upon to supply the city, owing to 
the work going on at the outlet. Very careful studies have 
been made of the condition of the water in the various 
sources. The temperature and the number of the organism'^ 
have been recorded at the surface, mid-depth, and bottom of 
all the basins. 

The construction of Basin 6 has been carried on daring 
the season. A large amount of the stripping has been done 



Wateh-Supply Department. 57 

and the foundations of the core-wall have l>een back-filled to 
the surface of the o-round and the earth embankment started. 
A dredging-plant has been built upon Whitehall pond. 

Basin 1. 

Grades, H. W., 161.00; Stone crest, 137.54. 
Area, 149 acres; Greatest depth, 14 feet ; Contents, 288,000,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, this basin stood at elevation 157.66 
above tide-marsh level in Boston, and water was wasting 
over the stone crest, and continued to waste until May 11, 
when both sets of stop-planks were put in place, and the 
water rose. On May 17 waste over the Hash -boards began 
and continued, with the exception of May 28-30 and June 
14-20, until Jul}^ 3, when the supply for the city was drawn 
for a few days from this basin. The level fell to 157.07 on 
July 6. On September 8 the water rose to 158.07, and 
afterwards fell to 157.00, on November U. The basin re- 
mained nearly at this elevation for the rest of the year. 

Both sets of flash-boards were removed on October 31. 
The highest elevation reached during the year was 159.70, 
on January 12, and the lowest, 156.83, on November 22. 

No water has been drawn from this source for the supplj'' 
of the city, with the exception of the days already referred 
to. 

The work of removing the gravel ridge from the bed of 
the river just below Winter street was resumed this year 
and completed. Some fencing has been removed around 
the basin, but with this exception no repairs or alterations of 
importance have been begun. The 48-inch main in the bot- 
tom of Basin 1 is in poor condition. I renew ni}'^ recom- 
mendations of last year, that studies should be made during 
the coming year to put this basin in as good condition as 
Basins 2, 3, and 4 by removing the shallow fiowage, and 
repairing the pipe-line, with a view to using the basin in the 
future for an additional settling basin. 

A daily flow of at least one and one-half millions of 
gallons has been passed into the river below the dam, in ac- 
cordance with the law. 

On Aug. 13, 1891, a careful biological and chemical ex- 
amination was made of the water in Basin 1, it having stood 
for some time without much circulation. Five different 
places were taken. The average temperature of the water 
at the surface was 78.7°, from two to three deo'rees hio-her 
than the surfjices of Basins 2 and 3 at the same time The 
color at the surface w^as from 0.50 to 0.60, somewhat lower 
than tha other basins. The organisms averaged approximately 



58 City Document No. 40. 

300 to the CO., both at the surface and bottom, but the 
amorphous matter at the bottom was high, 1584.0 to the cc. 
Protococcus was the most numerous of the organisms. 
Chemical analyses made at the same time showed nothing 
unusual. The water was of normal quality. 

Basin 2. 

Gradex, H. W., 168.00; Stone crest, 163.87. 
Area, 137 acres ; Greatest depth, 17 feet ; Contents, 530,000,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, the surface of the water in this basin 
was at elevation 165.96, and water was flowing over the 
stone crest. It continued to overflow until May 9, when 
both sets of flash-boards were put in place. • On May 13 
water flowed over the flash-boards, and so continued until 
May 22, with the exception of May 15 and 16. The basin 
gradually fell to 157.64 on August 19. and remained at some 
point between 158.00 and 162.00 until December 8. Dur- 
ing the remainder of the year, the level varied from 161.00 
to l(i4.00. October 3 both sets of flash-boards were re- 
moved. The highest point renched during the year was 
167.27, on May \ii, and the lowest, 157.64, August 19. 

Water for the supply of the city was drawn wholly from 
this source from May 16 to May 25, May 28 to June 11, 
June 14 to July 2, July 6 to August 19, September 15 
to September, 25, December 1 to December 2, and from 
Dec. 19 to dale. The supply was drawn partially from 
this basin and partially from Basin 3, from January 1 
to May 16, May '2h to May 28, June 11 to June 14, August 
19 to September 15, September 25 to December 1, and from 
December 2 to December 19. 

Seven hundred sixty-eight feet of old fence have been re- 
moved at the head of this basin, near Fountain street, and a 
new fence built and other portions of the old fence repaired. 
The gate-house, gates, dam, and other structures have been 
maintained in good condition during the year. 

The number of organisms has been greater this year in 
Basin 2 than last year. The general mean at the surface has 
been about 322 to the cc, and the amorphous matter about 
the same, viz., 338. The color of the water at the surface 
has averaged 0.78 on the Nessler scale. Until May the 
organisms were low in Basin 2, then Synedra and Cyclotella 
appeared, and throughout the summer increased, but never 
rose much above 1,000 to the cc, well inside the danger- 
line. Chlorophyctie was also present. During the dry 
season, when the water was low, the organisms were unus- 
ually abundant. The experience of weekly examinations 
for two years has shown us that the predominant organisms 



Water-Supply Department. 59 

in Basin 2 are Synedra, Cyclotella, and Protococcus, and that 
the number of organisms per cc. is likely to rise to 500 Syne- 
dra, 150 Cyclotella, and 75 Protococcus. 

During 1891, 45 observations have been made on the 
color of the influent water at the head of Basin 2, and it has 
been found to be usually 1.00. The lowest color observed 
was 0.32, and the highest 1.80. 

Basin 3. 

Grades, H. W., 177.00; Stone crest, 176.24. 
Area, 283 acres; Greatest depth, 21 feet; Contents, 1,081,000,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, this basin stood at elevation 175.32, and 
water was flowing over the stone crest, and continued to 
waste either over the crest or through the gates until August 
12, with the exception of the following days : January 27- 
29, February 4-8, 11-16, March 25, 26, 31 to April 1, May 
2, 3, 8-12, 15-17, 27-30, June 14-17, and on July 28. 
After August 12 the surface fell gradually to 162.32 on 
November 24. From this time it rose quite steadily to 
166.93, on December 31. The highest point reached during 
the year was 176.30, on January 12, and the lowest, 162.32, 
November 24. 

Water for the supply of the city has been at no time 
drawn solely from this basin, but the storage was drawn 
upon after August 12 during the whole of the autumn, and 
the surface was drawn down about 13 feet. The dates on 
which the supply was taken partly from this basin, and 
partly from Basin 2, have already been given. 

Until the last of April there were very few organisms in 
Basin 3. At this time there was a shoi't but vigorous 
growth of Synedra and Tabellaria. Chlorophyceas appeared 
in May and Cyanophyceas in June, and until December they 
were both more or less numerous. From the middle of June 
to the middle of September the bottom was stagnant, and 
when this water had been brought into circulation, by the 
drawing down of the surface, and thus allowing the influence 
of the wind to be felt, there was a great increase in Aster- 
ionella and Protococcus. By the end of the year the organ- 
isms w'ere again few in number. During the last part of 
April the color at the bottom of this basin began to increase 
from 0.65 to 2.40, on July 14, and, at the same time, the 
Amorphous matter increased from 150 to the cc. to about 
6,000. A distinctly bad taste was noticeable in July, near 
the bottom, but, fortunately, we are not obliged to draw 
the supply in the summer from any other point than the 
surface. 



60 City Document No. 40. 

The effect of drawing down the basin was particularly 
noticed in November. Last year the basin was only lowered 
3.75 feet below the crest, and this was in the spring of the 
year. During the summer and autumn of 1890 the basin 
was practically full, and the organisms at no time rose above 
a monthly average of 325 at the surface, while in November, 
1^91, they rose to an average of 1,020 at the surface, and 
practically the same all the way to the bottom. 

The advantage of havino; another large storage basin above 
Basin 3, to modify the character of the influent, will be very 
great. Surveys for this much-needed improvement have 
been begun and are in progress. Plans are also under way 
for a filter basin, which is much needed for the Marlboro' 
brook. 

In last year's report I referred to the sudden increase of 
color observed in bottom samples after they were brought to 
the surface. On Aug. 1, 1891, the following observations 
were made on samples taken from the old river-bed in the 
bottom of the basin. The layer of dark water was found to 
be 3 feet deep. The color of the sample from the bottom 
when taken was 1.30. In five minutes after taking it 
was 1.60; ten minutes, 1.80; fifteen minutes, 1.90; thirty 
minutes, 2.20; two hours, 2.23; two days, 3.50. A sam- 
ple taken three feet above the bottom was 1.20 when taken, 
1.30 at the end of ten minutes, 1.40 at the end of a half- 
hour, and 1.80 at the end of two days. 

The following table, the result of two years' observations, 
gives the prevailing organisms in Basin 3, together with the 
number per cc, which they are liable to reach. 

500 Asterionella. 100 Coelospherium. 

250 Protococcus. 100 Tabellaria. 

250 Synedra. 50 Cyclotella. 

150 Chroococcus. 30 Clathrocystis. 

The color of the water at the surface has averaged 0.70, and 
the same figure holds good for the mid-depth also. The 
temperature of the surface has averaged about 53° Fahr. 
The following observations have been made during the past 
year on the brooks feeding the basin : 



Water-Supply Department. 



61 



Stony Brook, below entrance of Angle Brook . 
Stony Brook, above entrance of Angle Brook . 

Stony Brook, above Southboro' 

Angle Brook, below Broad Meadow Brook . . 
Angle Brook, above Broad Meadow Brook . . 
Broad Meadow Brook 



No. of 
Obs. 


Usual 
Color. 


5 


0.95 


5 


1.00 


5 


1.50 


5 


0.85 


4 


0.60 


3 


1.20 



Minimum 
Color. 



0.75 
0.65 
0.82 
0.60 
0.50 
1.10 



Maximum 
Color. 



1.20 
1.60 
2.40 
1.00 
0.75 
1.50 



The color of Stony-brook water throughout its whole 
length was at its highest point in July. 

Basin 4. 

Grades, H. ^Y., 216.21; Stone crest, 2 J 4.21. 
Area, 162 acres; Greatest depth, 49 feet; Contents, 1,416,400,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, the surface of this basin stood at eleva- 
tion 214.41, and water was wasting over the crest. This 
continued until January 24, when a waste-gate having been 
opened, the basin fell to 210.15, on January 31. The sur- 
face remained between 209 and 211 until March 2H, when 
the waste-gate was closed, and the basin, on April 6, began to 
waste again over the stone crest. On May 9 a set of flash- 
boards were put on the dam, and a second set was added 
May 11. The basin was now kept at about 214.80 until 
July 15, when the storagewas drawn upon for the supply of 
the city. On September 26 the basin reached its lowest 
])oint, 202.91, when the gate was closed on account of work 
at the outlet. After this the w^ater rose gradually to 207.77, 
on December 31. 

Both sets of flash-boards were removed on October 3. 
The highest point reached by the water during the year was 
215.20, on June 23, and the lowest, 202.90, on October 2. 

On September 28 the force of men at work at the outlet of 
Lake Cochituate Avas transferred to Basin 4, and excavations 
begun for the new outlet to the overflow and pipes from the 
gate-house. It has been the intention of the Board to un- 
dertake this improvement for several years, but no proper 
opportunity has before presented itself. The 48-inch pipes 
under 50 feet head discharged formerly into the old brook 
channel, as did also the wasteway. There was no protec- 
tion to the channel from scour, and the general appearance 
did not correspond with the substantial nature of the dam or 
the general work done by the city. The improvement con- 
sisted in digging a new outlet for the water with proper 



Q2 City Document No. 40. 

allignment, and extending a canal through the meadow he- 
low as far as the first bridge. The first 287 feet of the 
channel was concreted and paved on the bottom and paved 
on the sides up to the high-water line. The concrete was 
finished on November 22, and the paving all completed on 
December 18. The excavations for the canal were then be- 
gun and are still in progress. Provision was made for 
inserting a temporary weir in the channel to measure the 
total leakage from the basin. Sheeting, tongued and 
grooved, was driven on the line of the weir and connected 
with the masonry. The mud on the line of the improve- 
ment had to be excavated for some distance on each side of 
the new work and its place filled with coarse gravel. The 
total cost of the work on the outlet proper, including filling 
the old channels, building weirs, and under-draining the side 
hill, was $10,635. 

In the early part of the summer a weir was placed across 
Cold Spring brook, at the head of the basin, connected with a 
gauge-house in which was place^i a self-registering apparatus. 
By this means a continuous profile of flow has been obtained, 
to study in connection with the amount drawn from the 
basin, and the effect on the surrounding water tables. 

The gate-house, which has been heretofore covered with a 
temporary wooden floor, has been fitted with steel beams and 
iron cover plates, to correspond with the floors in the other 
gate-houses. 

One thousand one hundred and fifty-eight feet of fence 
have been built at this basin during the past year, princi- 
l)ally between the city land and that owned by Eames & 
Handy. 

The quality of the water has been excellent. The follow- 
ing is a list of the predominant organisms, founded on 
weekly observations for two years, together with the num- 
ber per cc. which these organisms are liable to reach : 

150 Cyclotella. 
100 Protococcus. 
20 Closterium. 

The temperature of the water at the surface has averaged 
fdoout 53° Fahr. The temperature at the bottom in summer 
is about 51.5". The color at the surface has averaged 0.55 
during the year, and at mid-depth about 0.65. The mean 
of the influent is about 1.23. The difference between these 
Hgures shows the beneficial effect of long storage. 

Until May the organisms were few in number; at that 
time Synedra began, which was soon followed by a much 



Water-Supply Department. 



63 



larger growth of Protococcus and Cyclotella. The Protococ- 
cus lasted only a short time, but Cyclotella have remained 
abundant ever since. The growth has been chiefly at the 
surface. Amorphous matter was quite abundant during 
October, and but little stagnation at the bottom was observed. 
The following observations have been made on the feeder 
of Basin 4 ; 



Cold Spring Brook, at basin influent . 
" " " above Pond's mill 



No. of 
Obs. 



Usual 
Color. 



1.2.5 
2.00 



Minimum 
Color. 



0.62 
1.10 



Maximum 
Color. 



2.40 
3.70 



In the table appended to this report of this division will 
be found a detailed statement of the ^organisms which this 
bnsin contains and which are comparatively few in number. 



Whitehall Pond. 

Elevation E. W., 327.91; Bottom of gates, 317.70; Area, 60S acres; Contents, 
1,237,000,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, the surface of the water m the pond 
stood at grade 324.91, three feet below high- water. On 
Jan. 25 the water had risen to 326.51, the highest point 
reached during the year. The surffice then gradually fell to 
326 on May 11. From this date the pond fell at the rate of 
about six inches per month until Nov. 26, when its surface 
stood at 322.43, the lowest point reached during the year. 
The water then rose to 322.94, on Dec. 31. 

The waste-gates have been under the control of the mill- 
owners, and no attempts have been made to interfere with 
them. The gates have been closed from 2.30 P.M. Nov. 
30 to 7 A.M. Dec. 1, and from 7 A.M. Dec. 4 to 7 A.M. 
Dec. 14, — a total of about 10| days. During the remainder 
of the year one gate has been open all the time, to provide 
water for the use of the mills. A weir measurement has 
been kept of the amount of the effluent. From the first 
week in February to the first week in April large quanti- 
ties of water were wasted in order to prevent the pond 
from rising too high. Calculations show that it is not safe 
to keep the pond Avithin two feet of high- water with the 
present lack of a spillway. All the water wasted or used 
from the pond has to }iass through the gates, and these are 
not of sufficient capacity to pass a veiy severe freshet. The 
attention of the County Commissioners has been called to 



64 City Document No. 40. 

the inadequate size of the culvert under the hlo;hway at 
Wood's shoe-shop. It will not pass more than 5U, 000, 000 
o-allons in 24 hours. 

The distino-uishino; feature of the orsfanisms in Whitehall 
pond is the large number of Infusorias found in its water 
compared with the other sources of Boston's supply. In 
February, Dinobryon, Glenodinium, and Tintinnidium were 
abundant. In June, Uroglena-Volvox appeared, and on 
June 11 there were 150 colonies to the cc. in some portions 
of the pond. The water was distinctly red, and looked like 
a mud puddle. The odor was very disagreeable. The air, 
blowing from the pond, smelled oily. The next day it was 
found that the water had cleared, and in a few days the odor 
was gone, and the water practically as good as ever. This 
process of rapid decay is characteristic of this little animal, 
but the effect on such a large mass of water is very curious. 
In Sei)tember the organisms averaged about 20 to the cc, 
and considerable fresh-water sponge was noticed growing on 
the old stumps in the shallow portions of the pond. On 
Oct. 29 approximately 50 organisms to the cc. were present, 
including 15 Uroglena-Volvox, 18 Asterionella, etc. A 
dredging plant, consisting of one dredge, one steamer, and 
three scows, has been built during the year, preparatory to 
dredging the mud and stumps whenever this work Can be 
done^ The total cost has been $ 13,944. 2y. The first work 
on the plant was started on July 24, and completed Decem- 
ber 3 1 . 

Farm Pond. 

Grade, II. W., 149.2.5 ; Area, 163 acres; Contents, 167,500,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1891, the water in this pond stood at grade 
149.3(). The surface has been kept at about high- water 
mark during the year. No water has been drawn from this 
source for the supply of the city. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped 80,500,000 
gallons during the year, or 221,000 gallons daily. 

The total amount of water wasted from the pond has been 
184,200,000 gallons. The larger part of this was turned 
into the Sudbury river. 

The highest elevation reached during the year was 149.99, 
on March 25, and the lowest, 148.68, November 23. 

The frames to the screens in the gate-house having become 
decayed, were renewed. They have been in service since 
Oct()ber, 1881. 



Water-Supply Department. 65 



Lake Cochituate. 

H. W., 134.36; Area, 800 acres ; Capacity above 127 .36, 1,308,000,000 gallons. 

On Jan. 1, 1890, the kike stood at elevation 132.49, 
1.87 feet below high-water. January 2 the waste -gate at 
the upper dam was opened, and, with the exception of 20 
days, was kept open until April 25. During this interval 
the surface was kept at an average height of 133.20. On 
April 25 the water stood at 134.26. On May 5, the water 
still being at 134, the waste-gate was again opened, and 
the surface fell to 133.58 on May 11. The waste-gate 
was then finally closed, and the experiments on the flow of 
water over the new dam stopped. The lake gradually fell to 
126.44, 7.92 feet below high-water, on November 26. On 
December 15 it was at 126.50, rising gradually to 127.32, on 
December 31 . 

Flash-boards were removed from the upper dam from 
January 25 to March 18, and from March 23 to April 11. 
The waste of water through the dam at outlet has amounted 
to 6,063,700,000 gallons. 

A considerable amount of grading and other work has 
been accomplished during the year in the vicinity of the new 
dam. A bridge, supported on cast-iron brackets, has been 
built upon the crest of the new dam, and the brackets con- 
tain guides for a double set of stop-planks. April 1 the 
work of removing a portion of the old dam below the new 
dam was begun, the crest was lowered, and the old iron weir, 
23 feet long, placed again in position at a lower level, with 
a channel of approach, etc., in order to measure accurately 
the water flowing over the new dam and determine certain 
coeflScients. This work was hardly entered upon before it 
had to be abandoned for more pressing calls in other direc- 
tions ; but we hope to complete these experiments during the 
coming year. A road leading to the new dam has been 
built, its sides riprapped, the pool deepened between the 
dams, and the upper dam removed as far as possible, leav- 
ing only such parts of the embankment in position as will 
enable us to regulate the height of the water flowing over 
the new dam during the experiments. About 910 square 
3'ards of riprap and 113 square yards of paved gutter have 
been placed and about 5,000 cul)ic yards of earth removed. 

During the autumn a large number of stumps were re- 
moved from the Snake brook meadow and other portions of 
the lake. Eleven thousand two hundred and eight feet of new 
fencing have been built and 12,808 feet of old fence repaired. 
The interior of the gate-house has been painted and repaired. 

The quality of the water has been good throughout the 



6Q City Document No. 40. 

year. A table is appended showing the changes in the mi- 
croscopical life from month to month, temperature, color, etc. 
The following is a list of predominant organisms in Lake 
Cochituate, based on weekly ol)servations for two years, 
together with the number of organisms per cc, sometimes 
reached, or which may be commonly looked for. 



2,000 Asterionella. 
1,000 Tabeliaria. 

750 Melosira. 

300 Protococcus. 

250 Synedra. 

200 Crenothrix. 



150 Anabffina (sterile), 

100 Cyclotella, 

50 Microcystis. 

50 Monas. 

25 Coelospheriura. 

25 Clathrocystis. 



The average temperature of the surface of the water has 
been about 53° Fahr., the mid depth 44", and the bottom 
42*^ at 70 feet. Concerning the average temperature at the 
bottom, I feel less sure every year. Our weekly observa- 
tions, which are supposed to be taken to the tenth of a 
degree, show considerable variation, even during the period 
of stagnation. From July 13 to August 25 a thermometer 
enclosed in a large bottle was allowed to remain at the bot- 
tom. The averaoe of eiirht observations made between 
those dates was 43.2° Fahr., the extremes being 43.1 and 
43.4. On July 30 a careful observer was sent to the lake, 
and he found the temperature 43.2. The apparatus was lost 
on Sept. 3, and the thermometer was not left again at the 
bottom until September 23, which I think accounts for the 
high average in September, viz., 44.3°. From September 
23 to the great turning over, the average of six observations 
gave 43.6. The grade of the surface was, however, about three 
feet lower than earlier in the season. From all the evidence 
in my possession, I am inclined to believe that, with a full 
lake, the bottom temperature would have been uniformly 
43.2 from April to November ; but this will be further inves- 
tio-ated durins; the comino; year. 

At the beginning of 1891 Melosira and Asterionella were 
abundant. They decreased until March 1, when there were 
very few organisms. During April Asterionella multiplied 
rapidly, and on May 5 reached their maximum, 4,024 per 
cc, at the surface. The water had a slight local odor and 
taste characteristic of Asterionella. During May there was a 
slight growth of Tabeliaria, Cyclotella, and Synedra. By 
the middle of June these had disappeared, and there were 
few diatoms during the summer months. 

In June the Chlorophyce^e and Cyanophycese appeared 
and remained more or less abundant durins; the warm 



Water-Supply Department. 



67 



weather. The water at the bottom of the lake began to be 
stagnant about the first of June. At first it became cloudy, 
then the color began to deepen, and continued to grow 
darker until Sept. 29, when it was a rich gold color, 5.00 on 
the Nessler scale. The amorphous matter in the meantime 
increased and Crenothrix became abundant. 

On Nov. 3 this water was brought to the surface by the 
great overturning caused by temperature and gravitation, 
and there was a rapid increase of organisms. Melosira, 
Asterionella, and Synedra became abundant at all depths, and 
at the end of the year they were growing vigorously. 

The temperature throughout the vertical did not become 
uniform until Nov. 10. On April 23 a careful examination 
of the water at fourteen different points was made, and in a 
general way the results were similar to those found the year 
before at the same time. The organisms were most abun- 
dant at the northerly end and decreased quite regularly 
towards the southern division. This regular decrease was 
most perfect in the case of the Asterionella at the surface. 
On Sept. 21 a layer of water about 15 feet deep and extend- 
ing trom 25 to 40 feet in depth had peculiar taste, and it 
was found to be due to the presence of about 14 Synedra- 
Uvella to the cc, an Infusorian formerly known to us by the 
name of Hydromorum. 

The following examinations have been made of the brooks 
feedino- the lake : 



Snake Brook, at mouth 

Pegan Brook, at mouth 

Dug Pond, outlet 

Course Brook, at mouth 

Beaver Dam Brook, above Waushaken . . 
Beaver Dam Brook, outlet of Waushaken 
Beaver Dam Brook, at mouth , , 



No. of 
Obs. 


Usual 
color. 


3 


0.30 


10 


0,30 


10 


0.18 


16 


1.20 


4 


1.50 


5 


0.35 


16 


1.00 



Minimum 
color. 



0.30 
0.12 
0.10 
0.58 
1.00 
0.25 
0.90 



Maximum 
coSor. 



0.35 
O.60 
O.30 
2,30 
2,30 
0,40 
1.90 



Dudley Pond. 

Grade, IT. W., 146.46; 18-inc/t pipe, 130.36; 18-inch pipe, 127.36. 
Area, 81 acres ; Greatest depth, 27 feet ; Cimtents, 250,000,000 gallons. 

Water was drawn from this source between Deceml)cr 14 
and December 31. When the stop-planks were removed 
from the inlet on the first-named date the water stood three 
feet below high-water, and the elevation of Lake Cochituate 
was 126.56. 



68 City Document No. 40. 

On Jan. 1, 1892, the surface at Dudley pond had fallen 
to 139.46. The wooden stop-plank grooves in the gate 
chamber have been renewed. 



SuDBUEY-RlVER AQUEDUCT. 

Grades, 141.352 at Farm pond ; 124.051 at termiyial gate-house. 
Length, 15.89 miles ; Size, 7 ft. 8 in. X 9 ft.; Capacity, 109,000,000 gallons 24 hours. 

The three portions of this aqueduct are in excellent con- 
dition. They have all been thoroughly cleaned twice during 
the year. The Supply and Farm pond aqueducts were 
cleaned by machine on June 8 and October 27. The main 
aqueduct was cleaned by machine on June 30 and December 
1 between Farm pond and the West Syphon Chamber, and 
by hand between the East Syphon Chamber and Chestnut- 
hill Reservoir on January 15, 16, and November 17, 18. 
On June 15, 16 the upper portion of the main aqueduct was 
cleaned by hand on those portions of the brickwork not 
reached by the machine, and comprising the upper arch. The 
bottom of Rockland-street tunnel was thoroughly cleaned 
and swept on December 8 and 9, and the bottom of the 
Bndgcr-hill tunnel on December 14 and 15. Spongilla- 
fluviatilis grows in these places, and it was all removed. 

The water has been run throuifh the whole leno-th of all 
three aqueducts from the gate-house of Dam 1 throughout 
the year, which means that Farm pond has not been used as 
an intermediate storage reservoir, as is sometimes done. The 
water in Farm pond is now so good that it will be used dur- 
ing the coming year. 

Owing to work on the Beacon-street tunnel, the aqueducts 
have been in use only during 274 days. They have carried 
8,306,600,000 gallons to the city, or a daily average of 22,- 
757,800 gallons for the year. 

During the first week in September a large amount of dirt 
began to collect on the screens in the Farm-pond gate- 
house. The flow of the water was so seriously retarded 
that from September 16 to October 27 the screens had to be 
cleaned constantly day and night ; on the latter date, while 
cleaning the interiors, the Supply and Farm pond aqueducts 
were found to be very dirty. The 48- inch i)ipe in Basin 1 
collects a great deal of dirt from the bottom of this basin, 
owing to its leaky condition, which shows the importance of 
taking this work in hand. The pipe-line has been flushed 
into the river below Dam 1 five times during the year. 

The w^ork of lining the Beacon-street tunnel was continued 
this year between Dec. 22, 1890, and May 7, 1891. About 
342 feet of lining was placed in this interval. Work was 



Water-Supply Department. 69 

begun at Station 808-(-94.6 and finished at Station 810, con- 
necting at this latter point with the old brick lining put in 
when the aqueduct was built. Work was then pushed in a 
westerlj'^ direction, beginning at Station 803+21 and com- 
pleted to Station 800-}-95. Total length of lining completed 
between October, 1889, and the present date, 905 feet. We 
have lately been preparing to begin again the third season's 
work in the tunnel. 

The cost of laying concrete this past year has been $13.14 
per cubic yard, exclusive of cost of track. Nine hundred 
and ninety-six cubic yards were placed. The work is done 
under great difficulties, but has been admirably managed by 
Mr. J. W. Oldham, the foreman in charge. 

No extensive repairs have been found necessary to the 
structures along the line of the aqueduct. The terminal 
gate-house, however, was thoroughly pointed in the autumn. 
The embankments have received the usual attention, and the 
watercourses and culverts have been cleaned. 

CocHiTUATE Aqueduct. 

Grades, 121.03 at lake ; 116.77 at Brookline reservoir. 
Length, 14.60 miles; Size, 5 ft. X 6ft.4in.; Capacity , 20,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. 

This aqueduct has been in constant service throughout the 
year with the exception of twelve and one-half days, seven 
for cleaning and five and one-half for repairs on break in 
syphon line. A depth of six and one-half feet was main- 
tained until October 18, which was as long as the heio-ht of 
the lake would permit the running of this amount of water. 
Since that date the depth at the intake has fluctuated with 
the varying heights of the lake. 

On May 25, 26, 27, and again on November 9, 10, and 11, 
this aqueduct was thoroughly cleaned from the lake to 
Brookline reservoir. On the latter date the brickwork was 
very dirty, especially for the first 4,000 feet from the inlet. 
On Sunday, April 19, a leak was discovered in the upper 
of the syphon pipes crossing the Charles-river valley at 
Newton Lower Falls. The leak was found by a little girl, 
who notified Mr. Ware, and although the side of the hill 
was washed out somewhat b}^ the break, the water was shut 
off before serious results ensued. 

The former break at this point, in March, 1859, was a dis- 
aster of considerable magnitude ; but a repetition was happily 
avoided. There are four syphon lines at this point, one 36- 
inch pipe, two 30-inch pipes, and one 40-inch pipe. The 
break in 1891 was on the 40-inch line, and caused by the il- 
legal filling of a street which carried the bell of the upper 
pipe down into the pipe below. 



70 City Document No. 40. 

The ventilator was pointed September 28 to October 5, 
with Portland and elastic cements. No important repairs 
have been made on the rest of the aqueduct, but the bushes 
have been mowed and the embankments and fences repaired 
in the usual manner. 

Chestnut-Hill Keseryoir. 

n. W., 125.00; Dam, 128.00; Effluent pipes, 99.80. 

Area, Lawrence Basin, 37.5 acres; Contents, 166,000,000 gallons; Bradlee Basin, 87.5 

acres; Contents, S91 ,000,000. Total contents above grade one hundred, 

557,000,000 gallons. 

A large amount of work has been done at this point dur- 
ing the year. The grounds have not only been kept up to 
their usual high standard of maintenance, but extensive 
improvements have been inaugurated. The old circles near 
the intermediate gate-house have been taken out and the 
lines of the driveway changed so as materially to improve 
the appearance of the reservoir. The old road to Beacon 
street has been turned into a triangle to be planted with 
shrubs, and two new driveways opened, one on each side of 
the triangle. The work is still incomplete. A large num- 
ber of hardy shrul)S have been obtained and set out in the 
nursery preparatory to spring planting. 

A new fence has been erected between the reservoir 
grounds and the cemetery. A police-signal system has been 
put around the driveway, connected with a Hall registering- 
clock in the Superintendent's office, so that a daily register 
can be made of the beats of the police officers. The cost 
was about $l,i>00. The driveways have been kept in good 
order. 

The quality of the water in Chestnut-hill Reservoir has 
been good throughout the year. It is exceedingly difficult 
with the present awkward arrangement of inlets to provide a 
thorough mixture of Sudbury and Cochituate water. The 
former arrives, generally, at the reservoir with a color of 
0.75, and the latter with a color of 0.25. To produce 
a satisfactory result they should both enter the Law- 
rence basin at the farthest point from the outlet. I have 
found, after careful study, that with the old order of 
things the Lawrence basin has been practically useless as 
influencing the stored water, as its water has been practically 
colorless from long standing and from the difficulty of mak- 
ing it play its part in the circulation. I have succeeded, after 
a number of experiments, and by keeping its surface some- 
what higher than the Bradlee basin, in increasing its color 
and lessening that in the lower basin, but a few radical 
changes need to be made to produce a perfect result. 



Water- Supply Department. 71 



Brookline Reservoir. 

n.W., 125.00; Area, 23 acres ; GreateBt depth, 24 feet ; Contents, 
119,683,960 gallons. 

Everything in connection with the Brookline reservoir is 
in good order. One-half of the water used in Boston has 
been sent through this reservoir during the year. The water 
has been of the usual good quality. The effluent gate-house 
was thoroughly pointed during the autumn, and painted in- 
side. No other work beyond the usual maintenance has 
been done. 

Fisher-Hill Reservoir. 

Zr. W., 241.00; Pipe inverts, 220.00; depth, 21 feet; Contents, 13,400,000 above 223. 

The reservoir is in good condition. The grounds have 
been maintained as usual by the Chestnut-hill Reservoir 
force. 

Biological Laboratory. 

This laboratory has turned out excellent work throughout 
the year. Besides the usual weekly examinations of the 
waters in all the storage reservoirs and sources of supply, 
sixty-five special reports have been made on subjects de- 
mandino; investio:ation. such as the condition of the brooks 
feeding the Sudbury and Cochituate supplies. In the latter 
part of the year determinations of the bacteria in the water 
have been added to the other biological work. Photographs 
have been made from time to time of micro-organisms in the 
water, and after much trouble in this branch of the work we 
have succeeded in producing excellent plates. Four sub- 
jects have been reproduced by the heliotype process, and are 
shown in the accompanying plates. 

Filtration Experiments. 

These experiments have been carried on continually at 
Chestnut-hill Reservoir, and much information collected 
during the year. 

Inspection of Pollutions Department. 

The following is a digest of the operations of the depart- 
ment for the year : 

Total number of cases prepared for City Solicitor . 31 
Injunctions granted . . . . . . 17 

Petitions for injunctions filed . . . . .6 



72 City Document No. 40. 

Cases given to City Solicitor, but not filed in court . 8 

Legal notices sent ....... 70 

Cases inspected (old) ...... 499 

" " (new) ...... 63 

Of the 562 cases inspected, 152 are reported as "Rem- 
edied," 309 as "Safe at present," 45 "Seem safe," 9 
"Suspected," 47 "Unsatisfactory." 

Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water has on the whole been very good 
throughout the year. 

The following tables give, first, the average condition of the 
water as delivered at a tap in Bostcm during the year 1891, 
from analyses by Dr. Thomas M. Drown; and, secondly, 
means of quarterly analyses of 1890-2 of diiferent portions 
of the supply. They afford a ready means for comparison 
with the condition of the water as given in the last annual 
report. 

The succeeding tables contain the average results of bio- 
logical examinations made during the past yeai", together 
with temperature observations and rainfall records. 

Desmond FitzGerald, 

Hesident Enginetr and Sup't. 




ASTERIONELLA (DlATOMACE^) X 285 




Melosira (Diatomace^) >^ 285 





ClOSTKRIUM (DeSMIDIE^) X 200 













MiCRASTERIAS (DeSMIDIR«) X 2 00 



Water-Supply Department. 



73 



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Water-Supply Department. 



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to 1-1 (N CO o t- 



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<=> ^ ^ 

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0) ^ 



76 



City Document No. 40. 



5(0 



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Water-Supply Department. 



( i 



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78 



City Document No. 40. 



!0 X 



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« 




Diatoms. Moulds. 

" lufnsoria. 

Diatoms (Syuedra). 
Ohlorophycefe. 
Diatoms (Cyclotella). 
Chlorophyoete. 
Diatoms (Cyclotella). 
Chlorophycefe. 
Diatoms (Cyclotella). 




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do 


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Month. 




1 






gS £"S >vg >>b0-"O p. g 



nh 



WATER-SuprLY Department. 



79 



<;:) 










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80 



City Document No. 40. 





<v 




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3 
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1 



Water-Supply Department. 



81 



TABLE IV. 

Temperatures for 1891 (Fahrenheit). 



Concluded. 



January 
February . 
March . . 
April . • . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 

Mean . 



Chestntjt-Hill 

Reservoir 
Gate-Houses. 



35.8 
34.8 
36.4 
48.8 
57.0 
62.1 
71.9 
72.2 
69.8 
57.5 
44.5 
38.2 



O 



36.0 
36.8 
37.3 
46.0 
55.9 
65.3 
71.5 
72.9 
69.2 
58.8 
46.5 
40.4 



34.6 
36.2 
36.8 
48.6 
57.4 
66.1 
72.3 
73.6 
69.3 
58.5 
45.2 
38.5 



53.1 



Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir. 



33.2 
37.7 
49.0 
57.9 
67.0 
73.4 
74.9 
70.4 
58.8 
45.2 
38.2 



34.8 
37.6 

48.4 
56.3 
65.0 

70.2 
72.4 
68.8 
58.7 
45.6 
38.4 



54.2 



35.5 
37.9 
46.4 
54.5 
56.3 
57.2 
58.7 
59.5 
57.2 
45.1 
38.6 



49.7 



36.1 
35.8 
37.4 
48.2 
56.9 
64.6 
71.7 
72.8 
69.4 
58.8 
44.4 
38.7 

52.9 






39.9 
40.7 
41.8 
48.8 
56.2 



42.0 
39.9 
39.9 
44.2 
.50.7 



64.4 


56.9 


70.8 


60.6 


72.1 


62.9 


69.0 


62.5 


59.9 


59.1 


47.3 


51.4 


41.7 


47.0 


54.4 


51.4 



The above figures are based on weekly observations. 



82 



City Document No. 40. 



CO tfS CO 



OtDrHCOOiOOCO 



CO >0 CO CD 



COOe^CNfMCDOfMCOO 



CO O CO CO -^ '^ 



i-H lO »-( CO »-H (N 



■^ (M to 



O -* Ol t- 
OO t- CO CD 



CO i-H 0> CO o 
CO C^ -^ CO t^ 






M ^ 



CO O (N O Cl 



05 i-H CO t- 



00 


«o 


lO 


°> 


r~i 


I-H 


C-l 


c; 


00 


t- 


to 


o; 


s 


00 


00 


«3 


oo 


o; 


s 


s 


'dH 


o 


to 


£ 



-!# CO CO 



O r-t 
(N CO 



OO Jr- CD OO 



-T^i T^J* to 00 



»0 Oi O C5 



0) 



0) 



© 



'^ T*l 00 



J:- CO Tj< CO O 



t— iO Tf 



t^ xo a> 



t- CO CO 



CD -^ CO CS 



*M OO CO CO 
CO "^ CD OS 



OOw^Ol'Mi-HO-H 
CD-rr*^CD050CiOO 



CO 00 05 Ol O 
CO »0 Tjl 00 CO 



O Ol -^ CD 



O CO (M CD 
O 03 O) C) 



C^ Ol i-H CR CO (M 
O OO CO OO CO i-H 



OS lO O O 

05 05 00 o: 



oo CO CO 00 CO r-t 



Oi CO CO C^ 
I— 00 CO I— I 



O t— (M CO O CO 
CO CO Ol CO Ol CO 



E2 =« 
o u 
o a) 

c _ 

cu g 
. o 

csT3 

Q P 

t- o 

> « 



Tj< CO O Oi C-l 
<N CO CO CO Tj< 



»0 CO CO •* 



t— CD lO Ol t- 
(M TJ< -^ CO lO 



i-l CO CO lO 



(M b- CO en lO 
(M (N CO CO CO 



oo CO OJ CO CO CO 

Cq CO CO CO CO CO 



Oi ra CO 



<M CO CO CO CO 



O ^ 1-H 



C-1 I-H I-H I-H 



►? fe s <fl s 



_>> >lt 



-< cQ o Iz; p 



Water-Supply Department. 



83 



Table V. — Colors:, 1891. — Concluded. 











Chestnut-Hill 

Reservoir. 
Gate-Houses. 


Chestnut-Hill Resek- 

VOIB. 


o 

m 


o 

a 
.a 

a, o 

o 

o 
PQ 




Month. 


|3 
W 


1 

o 
o 
O 


i 






o 


a 


it 

Eh 05 




.76 

.64 
.51 
.63 
.90 
.90 
.82 
.83 
.81 
.70 
.70 
1.06 


.22 
.30 
.37 
.35 
.33 
.27 
.18 
.17 
.15 
.12 
.25 
.27 


.41 
.37 
.41 
.44 
.45 
.49 
.40 
.39 
.37 
.33 
.37 
.50 










.45 
.41 
.41 
.48 
.72 
.77 
.65 
.53 
.40 
.36 
.39 
.59 


.42 
.35 
.39 
.42 
.51 
.58 
.51 
.42 
.35 
.41 
.37 
.52 


.38 


Februarj 
March . 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
Septemb 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 


er 

r 
r . 






.26 
.41 
.45 
.48 
.52 
.40 
.40 
.36 
.34 
.37 
.48 


.37 
.41 
.45 
.48 
.52 
.41 
.41 
.36 
.35 
.37 
.48 


.40 
.42 
.45 
.48 
.43 
.41 
.82 
1.80 
.67 
.38 
.47 


.34 
.41 
.45 
.48 
.49 
.41 
.54 
.84 
.45 
.37 
.48 


.33 
.30' 
.32 
.41 
.61 
.55 
.42 
.38 
.34 
.31 
.43 


Mean 


.77 


.25 


.41 


.40 


.42 


.61 


.48 


.51 


.44 


.40 



The above figures are based on observations made once each week. 



84 



City Docujient No. 40. 



eo 






CO 

a 





® 


• 


X 


^ 


H 


S 


rt 


^ 


s 


PQ 


c« 


^ 


^ 


H 






O 













in 




C32 


CO 


en 




O 


m 


o 


CM 


CO 


o 


Tii 


t-. 


c; 


O 






CD 


o> 


I-i 


CO 


(M 




<M 


O 


IM 




tr- 


t^ 


lQ 


U3 






O 


CO 


CO 


,_j 




CO 


Q 


CO 


j^ 


\a 


CO 


CO 


^ 


>* 








-Tt* 




CD 


>C 




IM 


o 


•* 


IM 


O 




c-i 


CO 




.frj 


r-^^ 




(3 


^„ 




"^ 


O 




CO__ 


co__ 




°i. 




C0_ 




o 


t-T 


co" 


oT 


t-T 


e-i 


t--" 


CO 


co" 


cr 


tJ* 


o" 


c<f 


-d^ 


co" 




E-i 


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rH 














7-\ 


rH 


iM 


CO 


















lO 


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ro 


CO 


o 


00 


to 


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vC 






-* 




CO 




O 




•8jC8A.ing 


















^_ 


o 


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to 


^ 


O 


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to 




jflddng 


















fe 


■* 
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5 


<M 


CO 


CO 








JO n011D910.IJ 
































s= 






^ 


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t^ 


cn 


"T^ 


lO 


CO 


Ir- 


^-\ 


o 


o 


O 




o 








O 


•* 






rH 


CO 


os 


CD 


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CO 




•a^BtniqooQ 


CO 


(N 


o 


00 


»c 


CO 


Td 


to 


00 


^ 


to 


UO 




CO 




8>iT!T 


GO 




t- 




t^ 










o 


t- 












CI 


o_ 


CM 




(M 


IM 




CD 


to 


IM 


rH 




o_ 




inaraaAO-idtuj 






"^ 






















«■ 






CD 


^ 


CO 


lO 




<M 


^ 


to 


»o 




o 


^ 


Oi 


00 






CO 


CO 




CO 


cc 


CO 


CO 


CO 


U3 




\a 


rH 




OO 




•pnnnx 


Ci 


t^ 


00 


CO 


oc 


lO 


C3S 


to 


00 




CO 


•* 


CD 


(^ 






-* 








IM 


O 










-* 




to 




Sntniq; 


«■ 


co_ 


CO 


00_ 


t> 


Tl<_ 


(M 










IM 


CO 








o 


rvT 


^ 


CO 


"^ 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


lO 


-cfl 






03 


O 


CO 




o- 


to 


o 




lO 




CO 


00 


I-H 








-* 


CO 


1^ 


t. 


0- 


in 


03 


CD 


o 


C3 


CO 


CO 


■<# 


o 




•noT^BJin^ 




^ 
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o 


co_ 


a- 


uO 


<M 

CO 


UO 


to 


lO 




o 
CO 


§ 


to 

l-H 






CO 


o 


,— ( 


^ 


t- 


IM 


,_( 


CD 


to 


CD 


-^ 


rH 


IM 


CO 






o 


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rH 


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^ 


CO 




o 


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o 


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5 


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CO 


s 


to 


CO 


t- 


CO 


§ 


CO 
,00 


s 


s 


CO 


CO 
CI 




noiioaclsnj; 


«■ 


m 


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o 




lO 


CO 


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^ 


CO 


'Jl 


■* 


00 


IM 

to" 






CO 


o 


^ 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


t. 


CO 


to 


OD 


IM 


IM 










CO 


CO 


-* T-i 


OO 


CI 


t- 


CO 


^ 


rH 


C2 






•}n8tnui3da(j 


CO 


CO 


(M 


(>) 


S ro 


o 


^ 


IM 


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o 


O 


IM 


U5 




IBoigoiotg; 




e-i 


CO 


-* 


IM <M 


CO 


TIf 


-<n 


IM 


^ 


Ttl 


•^ 


05_ 

Til 
































» 






CO 


CO 


»o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


"O 


»n 


~[;^ 


o 


O 


CO 






t- 




o 


CO 






o 


lO 


IM 


t-^ 


-* 


(M 




r^ 




•ji0Ajas3>x 


C31 




o 

00 


05 




CO 


rH 




;::; 


CO 


CD 


CO 


»:: 


to 




mH--i8qs!i[ 


« 






CO 








CO 






r-^ 






€& 






C^ 


(N 


o 


o 




o 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


U5 


00 


O 






1^3 


o 








o 


t- 


o 


<a 


(M 


»o 






rH 




MiOA.iasa'jj 




o 


to 


CO 
CO 




IM 

00 


co 


CO 


o 


CO 
CO 


CD 


CO 


IM 


to 




anii5ioo.ia 


«■ 




I-H 


-* 








IM 






CO 






im" 






,_, 


CO 


c» 


c^l 


"^ 


,_, 


lO 


lO 


-* 


CO 


1^ 


to 


.O 


IM 






o> 


iH 


lO 


OD 


if 


en 


o 


CO 




CD 


to 


IM 


CO 






•jjBAVaAUd 


to 


t£ 


o 


IM 


c- 


5 


(M 

o 


o> 


(M 


CO 


IM 

to 


OD 


s 


OO 

3; 




•H -6 


(M 


CO 


CO 






o 




lO 


CJ_ 


IM^ 


co_ 


00 


to__ 


co_ 












































T^ 








rn' 






r-T 


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«■ 


























"A 






to 


o 


^ 


CI 




r-{ 


CO 


CO 


•* 


00 


OD 


<M 


^ 


t<- 






CD 




o 




c- 


r-i 


CO 


CO 


^ 


rH 


O 




r-< 


r^ 




•JI0AJ8S9'a 


CO 


^ 


,_, 


00 


o 


1 CO 


CO 


00 


^ 


l-_ 


^ 


,_, 


^ 


T-K 




lUH 


O 


^ 


0^ 


C-1 


CC 


-i^ 


to 




CO 


IM 












(M 


a: 






c 




o_ 


IM_ 




00__ 


■ra_ 


co^ 


-*_ 


^ 




































-lun^saqo 


S 






<N 




'"' 


im" 


'"' 


r-^ 


*"* 


r-T 


r-T 


-*" 


s 

^ 






,— ( 


CO 


lO 


o 


~o 


3 ^ 


^^, 


o 


IM 


o 


rH 


O 


lO 


rH 






lO 


CO 




CO 


o 


1 O 


CO 


rH 


CO 


■o 


<M 


to 


cc 


d 




•aiBnjtqooo 


CO 


<* 


s 


IM 




H to 


IM 

IM 


O 


CO 


O) 


00 

CO 


S 


IM 


^ 




8j[t3T;, 


s 


(N 


(M 


IM 






c; 


IM 




CO 


to 


CO 


00 


•* 

4& 






CO 


CO 


t~. 


'^ 




3 ^ 


o> 


l» 


CO 


00 


o 


C5 


o 


l-H 






IM 




CO 


O 




5 ^ 


CO 


Ci 




IM 


o 


o 


o 


O 




•^onp9nI)y 


C<1 


CO 




rH 




3 OO 
= CO 


CO 


(M 

CO 


CO 


o 


o 


IM 


CO 


U5 
O 




ajBajiqooo 


-* 
^ 


CO 


i-H 


rH 




rH 




tH 




IM 


CO 


^ 


CO 


■I& 






CD 


t. 


O 


CO 


c 


H OD 


t^ 


f^ 


cr- 


IM 


CD 


rH 


IM 


CO 






05 


iH 


03 


^ 




t( CO 


■M 


1— 


o 


IM 


UO 


lO 


CO 


CO 




■^onpanb-y 


CD 
05 


CO 


o 

o 


CO 
CO 




5 CO 
5 CO 


CO 




-* 


t- 


<M 

05 


to 


g 


E2 




X-iaqpng 


CO 


CO 








IM 


"* 


-* 


CO 


CO 




^ 










Oi 


CO 


00~ 


^ 


^ 


JH 03 


CO 


t- 


,_( 


OO 


t^ 


CI 


CO 


CO 






CO 


o 


.» 


'^f 




H to 


tH 


IM 


lO 




CD 


IM 


to 


cq 






-* 


i-H 


!M 


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c 


O 


CO 


CO 


t' 


CI 


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-* 


^-\ 


CD 




•smsBa 


o 


5 


"5 

lO 




c 


% s 


to 






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CO 
IM~ 


CO_ 
uo" 


""„ 


O 






o 


00 


t- 


oo 


~~c 


<I ■* 


•* 


CO 


""cf~ 


rH 


(M 


Tl< 


u^ 


00 






ffl 


o 


00 


o 




* CO 


(M 


CO 


IM 


O 


CO 




^r< 


CJ 




•notstATQ; 


CO 


S 


s 


(N 


° 


2 S 


to 


s 


CO 


IM 


00 
CO 


00 


O 

o 


CO 




ujaiga M 




t- 


00 


O 




o> 


05 


^ 


CO 


O 


lA 


o 

r-T 




CO 

co" 

I-H 






f_t 


























J 






Ci 


- 


~ 


- 




z 


- 


r 


- 


; 


- 


; 


^ 


[ 






I— ( 
















^ 








CO ■ 


1 






^- 


r^ 


rH* 


rn" 




H 


rn" 


r^ 


T^ 


^- 


1-^' 


rH 


1 
"-H IM 


1 m 






1-5 


,o 


tH 

s 


^ 

a 








bj) 


ft 


■5 


> 

o 


0) 


. C3 

C3'^ 
>-5 


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S 


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<1 




t >^ 


<^ 


iM 


O 


Iz; 


P 


H 



Water-Supply Department. 



85 



TABLE VII. 

Table of Rainfall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir for Year ending^ 

Dec. 31, 1891. 




86 City Document No. 40. 

Table of Gaiufall at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. — Continued. 







^ 














m 


o , 






• 






Date. 




O t3 


Duration. 


Date. 


a 


Snow or 
Rain. 


Duration. 




M 


m 






M 






June 3 


) 






Aug. 27 


) 








\ 0.42 


Rain. 


10.00 p.m. to 4.00a.m. 




1.17 


Rain. 


1.00 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


" 4 


) 






" 28 


) 






" 17 


1 






" 30 


1 0.50 


,, 


5.30 a.m. to midnight. 


" 18 
" 19 


> 1.15 


Showers 
and Mist. 


12.30p.m. to 9.30p.m. 


" 31 






-" 20 


Total. 


4.02 






" 21 


1 
















I 1.75 


Rain. 


9.30 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 










-" 22 


) 






Sept. 1 


0.02 


Mist. 


Midnight, Aug. 31 , to 
9.45 a.m. 


" 26 


0.23 


Shower. 


4.20 p.m. to 4.50 p.m. 


" 5 


" 






" 29 


0.03 


" 


2.30 a.m. to 3.00 a.m. 


6 

7 


;. 2.83 


Rain. 


10.30 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


r & 










Total. 


4.04 






" 13 
" 14 
'■ 29 


{ 0.10 


Mist. 


9.30 p.m to 2.30 a.m. 


July 4 
" 7 


0.20 
0.56 


Shower. 
Rain. 


4.00 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 
1.30 p.m. to 5.30 a.m. 


0.12 


Showers. 


7.00 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. 












8 








Total 


3.07 






" 15 


0.07 


Showers. 


7.30p.m. to 10.30p.m. 










" 18 


Oct. 5 


0.07 


Rain. 


6.30 a.m. to 11.50 a.m. 




\ 0.30 


Rain. 


5.30 p.m. to 3.00 a.m. 










" 19 


) 






" 7 


1 2.45 


« 


6.20 p.m. to 7.00 a m. 


" 24 


0.71 


" 


9.00 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


8 


) 






•' 28 


1 0.75 




9.00 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. 


" 11 


0.02 


Showers. 


2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. 


" 29 


' 






" 13 


\ 1.33 


Rain. 


4.00 p.m. to 7.00 a m. 


" 30 


{ 0.85 


,, 


8.30 p.m. to 2.00 a.m. 


" 14 


) 






" 31 


) 






" 15 


0.04 


Shower. 


I'.OOp.m. to 3.00 p.m. 










" 20 
" 22 


1.04 


Rain. 
Rain 


7.00 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


Total. 


3.44 














" 23 

" 27 


( 0.62 


and 
Snow. 

Rain. 


4.00 p.m. to 11.00 :\.m. 










0.13 


7.15 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


Aug. 1 


\ 0.16 


Rain. 


9.30 p.m. to 1.00 a.m. 










2 




Total. 


5.70 






6 


0.38 
0.26 


Showers. 


1.00 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 
6.20 p.m. to 11.15 p.m. 










" 7 


















Nov. 11 


0.32 


Rain. 


11.45 a.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


" 12 


0.32 


Thunder 
showers. 


2.45 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


" 16 


■^ 






" 15 


0.60 


Rain. 


9.15 a.m. to 1.00 a.m. 


" 17 


. 0.93 


" 


6.30 p.m. to 2.00 a.m. 


" 16 








" 18 


J 






" 21 


) 
















[ 0.63 


" 


10.45 p.m. to 9.30 a.m. 


" 23 


0.23 


Showers. 


6.30 a.m. to 9.30 p.m. 


" 22 


) 















Water-Supply Department. 



87 



Table of Rainfall at Chestnut- Hill Reservoir. — Concluded. 



Date. 


ja 


Snow or 
Rain. 


Duration. 


Date. 


0) 

.a 

o 
a 


Snow or 
Rain. 


Duration. 


Nov. 26 
" 27 
<« 28 


1 1.19 
0.03 


Rain. 

Mists. 


6.00 p.m. to 4.00 a.m. 
5.30 a.m. to 6.30 a.m. 


Dec. 24 
" 25 
" 26 
" 29 
" 30 

Total. 


[ 0.65 
0.28 
1.21 


Rain. 


9.50 a.m. to 12.30 a.m. 
3.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


Total. 


2.70 






8.15 p.m. to 1.00 p.m. 


Dec. 4 


0.3f) 
0.40 

1 0.52 

0.31 


Rain. 

Snow 

and 

Rain. 

Rain. 


7.00 p.m. to 10.15 a.m. 
3.30 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. 

4.30 a.m. to 9.00 a.m. 

2.00 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


3.73 






" 7 
" 15 
" 16 
•' 23 


Total rainfall for year, 49.63 inches. 



88 City Document No. 40. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER. 



City of Boston, . 

Engineeking Department, 

[50 City Hall, February 1, 1892. 

Me. Robert Grant, Ghairman Boston Water Board : 

Sir: In accordance with the requirements of the Revised 
Ordinances, I respectfully submit the following report on the 
condition of the Water-Works. 

Sources or Supply. 

The rainfall upon the water-sheds durins; the past year 
varied but little from the averMge amount, but less than the 
usual proportion fell during the summer and fall months, 
consequently the stornge in the reservoirs began to be re- 
duced in June and July, and steadily decreased until the 
latter part of December. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds were as follows : 

Sudbury. Cochituate. Mystic. 

Rainfall in inches . 49.52 46.42 47.40 

Rainfall collected, 

inches .... 27.612 32.07 28.60 

Daily average yield 

of water - shed, 

gallons . . . 98,900,000 28,800,000 36,600,000 

The quality of the water from all the supplies has been 
comparatively good. 

The fluctuations in the amounts of Avater in the different 
lakes and reservoirs are shown graphically by an appended 
diagram. 

The condition of the different reservoirs during the year is 
given below : 

lieservoir JVo. 1. — Water was wasting at the dam from 
January 1 to July 2, with the exception of five days in May, 
after the stop-planks were placed on the dam, and during five 



Water-Supply Department. 89 

days in June. No water wasted over the dam after July 2, 
and only the one and one-half million gallons per day was 
allowed to flow through the waste-gates, as required by law. 
The dam is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 2. — Water was flowing over the dam or 
through the gates of Dam 2 until May 9, when the flash- 
boards were placed in position. The reservoir filled to 
the top of the flash-boards four days later, but water was 
drawn from this reservoir to supply the city on the 14tli, 
and the surface immediately fell below the top of the flash- 
board, and the reservoir did not fill again during the year. 
The lowest point reached was on August 19, when the sur- 
face was 9.48 feet below the top of the flash-boards. 
The dam at Reservoir 2 is in good condition. 
Reservoir JSTo. 3. — This reservoir was full until the middle 
of August, except during February and March, when it was 
drawn down in anticipation of the usual large spring flow. 
On August 19 this reservoir was drawn from to supply the 
city, and its surface gradually fell until November 24, when 
it was at grade 162.32, or 12.92 feet below the crest of the 
overflow. 

On Jan. 1, 1892, it had risen to 167.19, or 8.05 feet below 
the crest. 

The dam at Reservoir 3 is in good condition. 
Reservoir JSTo. 4. — This reservoir was kept full until July 
15, with the exception that it was lowered as usual in the 
spring. 

On July 15 the outlet gate was partially opened to furnish 
a portion of the city's supply, and the reservoir gradually 
fell until September 26, when the gate was closed. The 
height at that date was 202.91, or 12.30 feet below the top of 
the flash-boards. Since that date no water has been drawn 
from the reservoir, and its surface has gradually risen. On 
January 1 its height was 207.85, or 6,36 feet below the 
crest of the dam. 

The dam of Reservoir No. 4 is in good condition. 
Farm Pond. — The surface of the pond has been kept at 
an average height of 149.12. 

The conduit through the pond has been in use all the year, 
no water having been drawn from the pond to supply the 
city. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped 80,500,000 

gallons from the pond, an average of 220,500 gallons per day. 

Lake Cochiiuate. — Water was wasted from the outlet 

dam from January 2 to 7, and from January 12 to April 25. 

The surface of the lake began to fall on April 26, and 

continued to fall slowly and with great regularity until 



90 



City Document No. 40. 



November 26, when it was at grade 126.44, or 7.92 feet be- 
low high-water, the lowest point during the year. 

The lake began to fill during the latter part of December, 
and on January 1 it had risen to grade 127.84, or 7.02 feet 
below high-water line. 

The heights of water in the various storage reservoirs on 
the first day of each month are given below : 













Rbsbrvoiks. 


Farm 
Pond. 


Lake 

COCHITU- 
ATE. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 




Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

159.29 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

167.12 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 

175.24 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

215.21 


High- 
Water. 

149.25 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

134.36 


January 1, 18 
February 1, ' 
March 1, ' 
April 1, 
May 1, 

June 1, ' 
July 1, 

August 1, ' 
September 1, 
October 1, ' 
November 1, ' 
December 1, ' 
January 1, 1892 


91 








157.66 

158.23 
158.27 
158.07 
157.77 
159.37 
159.37 
157.68 
157.89 
157.59 
157.25 
157.00 
157.20 


165.96 
166.13 
166.20 
166.27 
166.00 
166.10 
165.37 
160.36 
159.33 
158.93 
159.08 
160.80 
153.55 


175.32 
175.36 
175.45 
3 75.42 
175.34 
175.41 
175.36 
175..31 
174.03 
172.12 
167.70 
163.50 
167.19 


214.41 
210.11 
210.77 
211.97 
214.53 
214.74 
214.81 
211.56 
206.21 
202.91 
203.97 
205.46 
207.85 


149.36 
149.17 
149.90 
148.97 
149.39 
149.26 
149.09 
148.89 
148.93 
148.79 
148.81 
148.80 
148.99 


132.49 
133.14 
132.75 
134.14 
134.12 
133.20 
132.22 
130.71 
129.48 
128.30 
127.06 
126.69 
127.34 



Water has been drawn from the difierent reservoirs as 
follows : 

Eeservoir No. 1. 

July 3 to 6, inclusive. 

Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2. 
July 2. 



Reservoir No. 2. 



May 17 to 24. 
May 28 to June 7, 
June 9 to 10. 
June 16 to 18. 



June 30 to July 1. 
July 7 to Aug. 18. 
Sept. 15 to 24. 
Dec. 20 to 31. 



Water-Supply Department. 



91 



Jan. 1 to 4. 
Jan. 7 to 11. 
Jan. 15 to 18. 
Jan. 22 to 26. 
Jan. 29 to Feb. 1 
Feb. 5 to 8. 
Feb. 12 to 15. 
Feb. 19 to 23. 
Feb. 27 to March 
March 5 to 8. 
March 12 to 15. 
March 19 to 22. 
March 26 to 28. 
April 1 to 4. 



Eeservoirs Nos. 2 and 3. 

April 8 to 11. 
April 16 to 18. 
April 20 to 26. 
April 30 to May 3. 
May 7 to 9. 
May 14 to 16. 
May 25 to 27. 
June 11 to 14. 
Aug. 19 to Sept. 14. 
Sept. 25 to Oct. 26. 
Oct. 28 to Nov. 16. 
Nov. 19 to 29. 
Dec. 1 to 19. 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river conduit has been used 298 daj's, and 
the Cochituate has been used 352 days. The Sudbury 
conduit has delivered 8,306,600,000 gallons into Chestnut- 
hill and Brookline reservoirs, equal to a daily supply of 
22,760,000 gallons; the Cochituate aqueduct has delivered 
5,508,180,000 gallons, or 15,091,000 gallons per day. 

In the Cochituate aqueduct a nearly uniform depth of six 
and one-half feet was maintained until the middle of Octo- 
ber, when the surface of the lake had fallen so low that this 
depth could not be maintained. 

During the balance of the year the depth in the aqueduct 
closely followed the depth in the lake above the bottom of 
the aqueduct, and at one time it was only five feet four 
inches. 

The rate of flow in the Sudbury conduit was varied almost 
daily to maintain the desired height in the distributing reser- 
voirs. Both conduits were cleaned as usual during the year. 

On April 19 one of the 40-inch siphon-pipes of the Cochitu- 
ate aqueduct at Newton Lower Falls was split by the weight 
of gravel-filling that had been deposited over the pipes in 
building a new street across the location of the siphon. The 
water was shut off and the split pipe replaced before any 
damage had been done. 

The Chestnut-hill, Brookline, Fisher-hill, Parker-hill, and 
East Boston reservoirs, and the Breed's Island water-tower, 
are in good condition. I recommend that the elm-trees at 
the base of the Chestnut-hill reservoir dam be removed. 
The inside of the iron water-tower on Bellevue hill should 
be painted this year. 



92 



City Document No. 40. 



The South Boston reservoir has not been in daily use for 
many years, but is kept partially full of water for use in 
special emergencies, and for this reason is still of value to 
the water-supply service. A check-valve should be placed 
in the high-service connection with this reservoir, to auto- 
matically supply the tire-hydrants within the high-service 
district of South Boston in case of serious fires. 



High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

At Chestnut hill the pumping-engines and boilers are in 
excellent condition. 

A permanent apparatus for weighing the feed-water has 
been placed in the boiler-room, and the accuracy of the feed- 
water meters is now easily ascertained from time to time, 
so that corrections can be made in calculating the efficiency 
of the boilers. 

The table on page 108 shows in detail the work done by the 
pumping-engines and boilers during the year. 



Engine No. 1 was used 3,419| 

hours, pumping 
Engine No. 2 was used 3,768^ 

hours, pumping 
Total amount pumped . 
Total amount coal consumed . 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 
Average lift in feet 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 
Daily average amount pumped 



1,264,475,610 gallons. 

1,386,688,800 
2,651,1(54,410 

2,910,751 pounds. 
8.5 
124.6 

910.8 gallons. 
7,263,500 



The amount pumped is an increase of 11.9 per cent, over 
that of 1890. 

The same boiler supplied steam for pumping, and for heat- 
ing and lighting the pumping-station and other buildings 
near the station. 



Cost of Pumping. 
Salaries 

Fuel .... 
Repairs 

Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 

Total . 



;9,590 40 

6,558 28 

701 93 

534 51 

257 18 

.7,642 30 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot high . $0,053 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir . 6.65 



WATER-SuprLY Department. 93 

At the West Roxbuiy pumping-station 24,108,000 gallons 
have been pumped, equivalent to a daily average of 66,000 
gallons, — an increase of 68.4 per cent, over that pumped in 
1890. 

At the East Boston pumping-station an average of 15,500 
gallons per day has been pumped into the Breed's Island 
vs^ater-tovver. 

Water was pumped into the East Boston reservoir only 
on two days in January, one day in February, and two days 
in March, as the reservoir could be filled during the night 
from the low-service mains during the balance of the year. 

Mystic Lake. 

Water was wasted over the dam almost constantly until 
June 9, and again from June 22 to June 28. From this date 
the surface of the lake gradually fell until it was 7.67 feet 
below high-water on November 26, or only 3.50 feet above 
the bottom of the conduit. This was only about 4 inches 
above the point where the supply for the pumping-station 
could not be maintained by gravity. 

Early in October the centrifugal pumps were placed in 
position at the lake to raise the water into the conduit, but 
fortunately it was not necessary to use them. 

Advantao;e was taken of the low stage of the water to 
repoint the masonry at the overflow. 

On January 1, 1892, the water in the lake had risen to 
grade 2.32, or 4.68 feet below high-water, and water was 
wasting over the dam on January 15. 

The table on page 106 shows the yield of the water-shed. 
The rainfall there recorded is an average from two gauges, 
one located at the lake and one in Winchester. 

The record of the latter gauge was kept by Mr. L. R. 
Symmes, formerly assistant superintendent, gratuitously 
until his death, last February. Since his death the gauge 
has been maintained and records kept by Miss A. F. 
Symmes. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The pump was run 356 daj^s during the year of 1891, 
working 6,3911 hours, and has pumped 119,404,000 gallons of 
sewage, or an average of 335,400 gallons per day of pump- 
ing. The amount pumped is only one-fourth of one per 
cent, greater than in 1890. 

The total amount of sulphate of alumina used during the 
year was 303,780 pounds, and 173 tons of coal were used in 
pumping. 



94 City Document No. 40. 



Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit was cleaned twice during the year, and is in 
good condition. 

New sills and grooves for the screens should be placed in 
the screen-chamber, and the roof of the chamber should be 
raised to facilitate the chaneino^ of the screens. A new 
gate should be placed on the blow-off pipe, to exclude the 
tide-water. 

The reservoir has not been cleaned for several years, 
otherwise it is in good condition. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The pumps have received quite extensive repairs, and are 
in good condition. 

The three older boilers should have new fronts, to corre- 
spond with those on the new boilers ; a sluice-gate should be 
placed in the pump-well of Engine No. 3, as under the pres- 
ent condition any accident to the foot-valve of this pump 
would necessitate the stopping of the whole plant. A du- 
plicate dynamo for lighting the building should be procured, 
and it would be an economical measure to build a new chim- 
ney of larger capacity if the plant is to be continued in 
service. 

The table on page 109 shows in detail the work done by 
the pumping-engine during the year. 

Engine No. 1 was in use 884 

hours, pumping ' . . . 145,186,500 gallons. 
Engine No. 2 was in use 1,774| 

hours, pumping . . . 346,862,000 " 
Engine No. 3 was in use 8,352^- 

hours, pumping . . t 2,812,902,400 

Total amount pumped . . . 3,304,951,000 " 

Total amount coal consumed . 6,988,500 pounds. 

Percentage ashes and clinkers . 10.2 

Average lift in feet . . . 148.02 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal . 472.9 gallons. 
Average duty of engine per 100 

lbs. of coal, no deductions . 58,380,500 ft, -lbs. 

Daily average amount pumped . 9,054,700 gallons. 

The amount pumped is an increase of 9.1 per cent, over 
that of 1890. 



Water-Supply Department. 



95 



Cost of Pumping. 
Salaries .... 

Fuel 

Repairs .... 
Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 

Total 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high . 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir . 



$9,628 07 

13,946 42 

954 69 

983 96 

444 89 

$25,958 03 

$0,053 
7.85 



Consumption. 
The daily average consumption from the combined works, 
and the consumption, compared with that of 1890, was as 
follows : 



January. . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



cochituatb 
Works. 



11 



37,230,100 
37,280,700 
35,533,400 
35,751,600 
36,580,700 
37,801,900 
39,062,500 
39,460,400 
40,677,700 
38,845,600 
36,640,800 
37,342,500 



Average 37,686,900 



i3i 



fLi 



110.5 
112.9 
115.2 
117.3 
116.6 
114.5 
106.4 
108.7 
112.5 
116.3 
111.2 
97.4 



Mtstic Works. 






9,389,300 
9,466,900 
8,811,000 
8,045,800 
8,841,300 
9,478,400 
9,581,700 
9,122,300 
9,128,700 
9,259,100 
8,585,200 
8,960,600 



o ^ 

ill 



111.3 



9,055,200 



114.7 
114.1 
109.4 
107.5 
118.1 
112.9 
101.3 
102.1 
108.2 
118.9 
112.9 
94.6 



Combined 
Supplies. 



go 



109.1 



46,619,400 
46,747,600 
44,344,400 
43,797,400 
45,423,900 
47,280,300 
48,644,200 
48,582,800 
49,806,400 
48,104,800 
45,226,000 
46,303,10 



46,742,100 



<*-f o 

OS 
p 00 00 

O O (^ 



111.3 
113.1 
114.0 
115.4 
113.9 
114.2 
105.4 
107.4 
111.7 
116.8 
111.5 



110.8 



The daily average consumption per head of population 
was as follows : 

Sudbury and Cochituate supply, 89.3 gallons. 

Mystic supply . -. . . 74.7" " 

Combined supplies . . . 86.0 " 



96 



City Document No. 40. 



The above figures show an increase of 11.3 per cent, in 
the consumption supplied from the Sudbury and Cochituate 
works from that of the previous year; of 9.1 per cent, in 
the consumption supplied from the Mystic works ; and of 
10.8 per cent, increase in the consumption supplied by the 
combined supplies. 

Deacon Meters. 

There are now in use 81 meters, — 74 on the Cochituate sys- 
tem and 7 on the Mystic system, — and the territory covered 
by the meters is divided into 176 sections ; 8 sections were not 
tested during the past year. 

The quantity supplied to the entire residential portion of 
Boston can now be tested by the meters, excepting a portion 
of West Roxbury and that portion of the Back Bay district 
bounded by Boylston street, Parker street, and the Boston 
& Providence Railroad. 

During the coming year two meters should be placed in 
the latter territory ; but the West Roxbury district cannot 
be advantageously tested until the district is more densely 
populated. 

On the Mystic system Charlestown is practically covered 
by meters ; one meter covers a small portion of Somerville, 
and one about one-quarter of Chelsea. Everett has no 
meters. 

The estimated population supplied with water, and the 
population that is covered by Deacon meters in the different 
sections of the city, is as follows : 



Section. 


Estimated 
Population. 


Population 
on Meters. 


City proper . 


164,875 


132,000 


Roxbury ' . 


104,000 


84,000 


West Roxbury 


28,510 


14,300 


Dorchester . 


34,025 


27,500 


Brighton 


13,700 


5,400 


South Boston 


76,535 


65,000 


East Boston 


41,375 


32,000 


Charlestown 


45,930 


32,500 


Chelsea 


33,775 


9,300 


Somerville . 


46,675 


4,400 



The consolidated results of the readings of the various 
sections is shown in the following table, in which is given the 
final reading of 1890, the first and last readings of this year, 
the difierences between the first and second readings of this 
year, and the differences between the last readings of this 
year and those of 1890. 



Water-Supply Department. 



97 



Cocliituate System. 



Section. 



Population. 



City proper . 
Roxbury . . . 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . . 
Brighton . . . 
South Boston 
East Boston . 



132,000 
84,000 
14,300 
27,500 
5,400 
65,000 
32,000 



360,200 



1890. 

2d Reading. 



Daily 
con. 



52.5 
49.2 
53.3 
49.0 
52.1 
40.5 
34.5 



Night 
rate. 



29.4 
28.8 
23.1 
25.8 
24.0 
24.0 
20.2 



27.6 



1891. 

1st Reading. 



Daily 
con. 



56.9 
58.1 
50.6 
52.8 
61.3 
41.3 
35.7 



Night 
rate. 



35.3 
36.4 
23.1 
25.2 
27.1 
25.6 
24.2 



1891. 

2d Reading. 



Daily 
con. 



61.7 
53.5 



47.3 
39.9 



53.7 



Night 
rate. . 



37.5 



27.7 



26.6 
25.6; 



33.2 



Mystic System. 



Charlestown 
Somerville . 
Chelsea . . 



32,500 


33.8 


17.8 


40.6 


24.0 


41.5 


4,400 


43.2 


26.2 


82.1 


4S.5 


78.3 


9,300 


37.2 


24.9 


44.4 


29.5 


43.1 


46,200 


35.3 


20.0 


45.1 


27.3 


45.2 



25,2 
58.8, 
32.3^ 



Additional Supply. , • 

At Daiti No. 6 the excavation for the core-wall has been 
completed, the Wall built in the trench, and the trench re- 
filled. This work was difficult ; the building of the core- 
wall could not be done at a rapid rate, great care being 
necessary in removing the bracino; and in doing the refill inoj. 

The embankment and core-Avall of the dam have been built- 
to about five feet above the elevation of the lowest part of the 
valley, and the work is now in such condition that com- 
paratively rapid progress can be made, all of the difficult 
work having been done. 

The work of stripping the basin and the shallow-flowage 
work is well advanced. It will probably be completed this 
year. 

The surveys of Cedar swamp, and the plans for its im- 
provement, are practically completed. At Whitehall pond 
surveys and borings are being made for a new dam at the 
outlet ; a dredging plant has been built, and the work of 



98 City Document No. 40. 

removing mud and stumps from the bottom of the pond can 
be commenced in the spring. 

On the Stony-brook branch of the Sudbury, surveys and 
borings are being made for Basins 5, 7, and 9, the construc- 
tion of which must soon be commenced, as the increased 
consumption of water, due to the growth of the city, will 
keep pace with the increased capacity to be added by the 
completion of Basin No. 6. 

For particulars see the following report of Desmond Fitz- 
Gerald, Kesident Engineer: 

Boston Watek-Works, Office of Additional Sttpplt, 

South Fkamingham, Mass., I'eb. 1, 1892. 

William Jackson, Esq., Oity Engineer: 

Sm : I submit herewith a brief report of engineering work 
accomplished during the past year by the "Additional 
Supply " force. 

The name of Basin 5 has been changed to Basin 6, in order 
to bring all the even numbers on the Sudbury branch of the 
supply. Although the core-wall of this basin was heavily 
covered with hay, the frost got into the trench in January, 
1891, and attacked the concrete, even at the bottom of the 
trench, 30 feet deep, necessitating the laying of steam-pipes. 
January 9 a contract was made with Charles H. Hale for 
delivering filling on the dam. April 6 the trench was 
uncovered and pumped out. May 5 the work of depositing 
concrete was begun. June 3 the core-wall was completed, 
and the back-filling begun, the sheeting being cut off in 
sections about 2 feet high, in order that the back-filling 
might be thoroughly rammed and bonded to the sides of the 
trench. On September 2 the back-filling reached the sur- 
face of the ground, and the embankment was begun. Sep- 
tember 29 the contractor suspended operations, and on 
October 9 the work was continued by the bondsman, Mr. 
Barnabas Clark. The embankment has been built to the 
height of five feet above the meadow. A gap 20 feet wide 
was left in the core-wall to pass freshets during the winter 
and spring. 

The gate-house for the 48-incb pipe has been built and the 
pipe laid on rock foundation and covered with brickwork. 
It discharges into the wasteway, the lower section of which 
has been built. The upper gate-house has been begun. All 
eate-house, pipe, and core-wall trenches have been back- 
filled. 

May 25 a contract was made with Charles H. Hale for 
building the lower section of the wasteway, 220 feet long, 
and on September 24 the work was completed. 



Water-Supply Department. 



99 



July 14 four sections for stripping the bottom of the basin 
were let, and about two-fifths of this work has been done in 
a satisfactory and economical manner. 

Daring the latter part of the summer a railroad was built 
connecting the Boston & Albany R.R. with the basin. After 
its completion about 25,000 cubic yards of loam were hauled 
to the Muddy-river Improvement on behalf of the town of 
Brookline. 

The principal specifications and contracts prepared during 
the year were those for the stripping and shaHow flowage, 
the raih'oad, and the lower section of the wasteway. The 
following table shows the work accomplished thus far at the 
new basin : 



Work done at Basin 

Clearing . 

Stripping earth (city con 

tract 
Stripping earth (contract) 
Stripping rock . 
Collecting stone 
Trench excavation, earth 
Trench excavation, rock 
Crushing stone . 
Concrete . 
Plaster . 
Back-filling 
Embankment . 
Screening sand and gravel 
Rubble- stone delivered 
Stone-masonry 
Brick-masonry 
Delivering clay (city labor) 
Laying 4<S-inch pipe . 
Laying 36-inch pipe . 
Loaming embankment 
Wasteway 



Surveys have been continued on various portions of the 
water-shed. The work of lining the Beacon-street tunnel 
has been prosecuted from Dec. 30, 1890, to May 14, 1891. 
The cost of laying the concrete was 113.14 this year against 
$15.02 last year. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Ilesident Engineer. 



6 DURING 1890 


AND 1891 


. 


1890. 


J 891. 




19 


acres. 


23 acres. 


47,891 


cu. yds. 


50,940 cu 


.yds 







175,000 




2,125 




536 




15,953 




4,423 




19,450 




4,641 




1,018 




1,051 




6,857 




2,994 




7,179 




2,498 




2,174 




2,132 




507 




10,875 




5,362 




15,928 




4,221 




2,751 




19 




466 









534 




35 




291 









593 







lin. ft. 


414 lin. ft. 





( ( 


12 


a 





c. y. 


322 c 


y. 





lin. ft. 


220 lin^ ft. 



100 City Document No. 40. 

In General. 

The sewerage system of the city of Marlboro' is well ad- 
vanced, the main sewer is completed, the filtration areas are 
prepared, and a considerable portion of the sei*vice- sewers 
are laid. The system will be in operation early this year, 
and it will greatly improve the quality of the water collected 
by the Stony-brook branch of the Sudbury river. 

The sewerage system of the town of Westboro' is under 
construction, and will probably be in operation in the near 
future. 

Work has been begun upon the foundations of the new 
pumping-engine at Chestnut-hill pumping-station, and the 
plans for the engine are nearly completed. 

The daily amount pumped at this station increases about 
12 per cent, each year, and will exceed the nominal capacity 
of one pumping-engine next year ; consequently the work 
on the new engine must be pushed as rapidly as possible. 

At the Mystic station the pumps are duplicated to a 
capacity of 10,000,000 gallons per day, and at the present 
rate of increase the daily average consumption in 1893 will 
exceed this amount. 

In this connection I wish to call attention to the fact that 
the total capacity of the Mystic system is but 7,000,000 
gallons daily in a dry year, and to recommend that the de- 
pendant municipalities make some provision to meet the 
inevitable deticieiicy which must sooner or later occur. 

Thirty-seven contracts for rock excavation have been made 
during the year. Two hundred and ninety-nine petitions 
for main -pipe extensions have been reported upon in regard 
to grade of street, size of pipe, and cost of laying. 

The pipe laid has been measured, the gates and hydrants 
located, and are being plotted on the plans. 

Thirty-five pi-ofiles of unaccepted streets have been made, 
and grades given for grading the streets and laying pipes 
where it was necessary. 

The records from the four pumping-stations, the lakes, 
reservoirs, the Mystic sewer, and the returns from pipe 
foundries, etc., have been carefully kept. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 

William Jackson, 

Qily Engineer. 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

DiagKam showing the rlainfall and daily everagie Consumption 
foi'each inon+h. 



"i^arly A\ivrages shovyn i-hus 




Water-Supply Department. 



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102 



City Document No. 40. 






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Water-Supply Department. 



105 



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Boston Water Works^ 

roiagcam showing the heights otSudbury Rivef Resei-voii'Sj Fat-m Pond, and Cochituate and 
Mystic Lakes, and the Roin-foll on the Sudbui-^ RiVer Water Shed during the y&ar- iSSI. 




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Water-Supply Department. 



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108 



City Document No. 40. 



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Watek-Supply Department. 



109 



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110 



City Document No. 40. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Sudbury River Water- shed for the 

Year 1891. 



1891. 


i 

1-5 






ft 

<1 


13 


o 
a 

1-5 




3 
Ml 
P 
< 


u 

4) 

a 

a. 

Q 
OQ 


1 

o 
O 


u 

a 

> 
o 


u 
a> 

a 

a 

<u 

Q 


1 




0.340 












0.130 










2 .... • 


1.425 










0.385 














3 . . 




0.545 


2.065 


2.480 
0.010 


0.100 
















4 . . 






0.500 


0.225 










0..565 


5 .... 


0.105 








0.115 






6 .... . 


0.155 












0.345 
0.070 


2.040 








7 . . 












0.715 


0.020 
1.695 




415 


8 




0.650 














9 




1.455 


















10 




0.770 




















11 






0.480 












0.065 


0..320 




12 


1.130 






0.070 






0.525 






13 




0.900 










0.190 


0.495 






14 .... . 


0.035 


















15 






0.635 






0.020 


0.730 


0.070 


0.020 




0.475 


16 




0.070 
0.120 
0.550 




1.160 






17 




















0.830 




18 


1.875 


0.110 


0.160 
















19 ... . 




1.195 


0.355 












20 . ... 














0.770 






21 




0.750 


1.945 


















22 . . . 


1.295 




0.030 


1.675 




0.810 
0.110 










23 










0.575 


0.500 


0.380 


24 














0.655 


0.640 


25 . . . 


0.725 






0.140 






0.010 










26 ... . 


1.185 




0.100 












0.330 


27 .... . 


0.040 














0.085 


1.400 
0.040 




28 


0.100 












1.645 

0.285 
0.065 






29 ... . 


0.390 






0.550 


0.015 


0.785 
0.640 


0.080 








30 






0.880 


31 








































Totala. . 


7.020 


5.235 


6.475 


3.905 


2.010 


3.770 


3.395 


4.725 


2.380 


3.830 


3.090 


3.685 



Total rainfall duritia; the year, 49.520 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Framingham and Ashland. 



Water-Supply Department. Ill 

Rainfallin Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituaie for the year 1S91. 



1891. 


3 
c 






P< 
<1 


a 
3 


a 
p 





SB 

3 
< 


S 

0) 

m 


o 
O 


.a 

a 

> 
o 


o 

1 
o 

0) 

ft 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 


1.33 
21 


0.34 
0.42 


1.63 


2.40 


0.12 


0.53 




0.12 










0.33 


0.18 










0.38 






0.35 






g 




13 












0.49 
0.01 


1.77 






















0.64 






0.22 


8 

9 




0.70 


1.26 










1.78 






10 




0.80 






















11 .... 








0.39 












0.07 
0.53 


0.31 




12 

13 


1.01 




76 




0.06 






0.77 


0.23 




14 . 


03 




















15 








0.60 






0.03 


0.61 


0.04 


0.03 


0.81 


0.54 


16 

17 




0.03 






0.82 






18 


2.00 


0.59 


0.08 


0.16 


0.01 
















19 . . 


1.02 


0.34 












20 






0.65 






21 




71 






















22 

23 


1.05 




1.76 






1.87 




0.76 
0.03 




0.60 


0.37 


0.32 


24 














0.68 








25 

26 

27 • . 


0.67 
02 


1.17 




0.07 


0.15 








0.11 


1.33 
0.02 


0.91 


28 

29 


0.35 


0.13 






0.51 


0.03 


0.58 


1.83 


0.08 




30 










0.80 


31 














0.54 


0.29 
































Totals . . 


6.67 


5.02 


5.49 


3.62 


1.67 


3.78 


2.99 


4.91 


2.12 


4.14 


2.84 


3.17 



Total rainfall during the year, 46.42 inches. 



112 



City Document No. 40. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Mystic Ldke Water-shed for the 

Year 1891. 



1891. 


S 

a 

C3 
1-3 


1 


i 


ft 
< 


3 




1^ 


1 

p 
<1 


a 
.a 

B 
& 


u 

<o 

o 
o 

o 


u 

s 

a 

o 


S 
ft 


1 .... 




0.540 


' 








0.025 










2 .... . 


1.130 








0.305 
0.395 
0.015 












3 


0.480 


1.920 


2.135 


0.120 


0.005 
0.185 












4 












0.365 


5 


0.145 












0.195 






6 


0.215 












0.585 
0.130 


1.825 


0.005 




7 








0.020 




0.710 


0.260 


8 . . 




0.680 








1.595 






9 




0.905 


















10 . .... 




0.785 




















11 






0.285 












0.035 


0.380 




12 


1.035 












0.025 






13 




0.880 




0.045 






0.225 








14 


0.020 










1.155 
0.050 






15 






0.495 






0.035 


0.750 






0.575 


16 








1.445 






17 




0.445 












0.015 




0.520 




18 .... 


1.475 




0.145 












19 




0.105 




1.540 


0.325 












20 














1.075 






21 




0.740 


2.230 












0.015 






22 


1.030 




0.115 


2.155 




0.530 








23 ... . 




0.030 






0.460 


0.265 


0.380 


24 








0.410 


0.010 




0.540 


25 


1.010 


0.010 
1.060 




0.090 














26 .... . 


0.075 














0.350 


27 


0.030 














0.170 


1.405 
0.030 




28 


0.120 








0.010 
0.010 


0.655 
0.855 


1.470 






29 .... 


0.370 






0.630 


0.080 






30 












0.940 


31 










0.010 




0.355 


































Totals . , 


6.245 


5.075 


6.070 


3.150 


2.460 


4.430 


3.180 


3.880 


2.160 


4.735 


2.605 


3.410 



Total rainfall during the year, 47.400 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Mystic Luke and Winchester. 



Water-Supply Department. 



113 



(M 1-1 CO CO 



<M CO 00 O 



<o oi Oi a> 



CO 


s 


CO 


o 

CM 


<M 

to 




§ 


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O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


05 


00 


CO 


CO 


00 


00 



MCOCONC^^^INIMINIM 



-.; °i 



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CO 00 CO »o 



fi^ 



d ■*# o «o CI CO CO 

t-; '^ CN r- C-1 rH cr- 
CO CO CO CO CO CO (M 



N CI (M <M 



C^ ^ 



<N (M CO Ol (M Cq 



CO (N CO 



CO CO O I-H CO 

ir:> lO CO lO 



CO rH CO CO rH 
lO O vO lO vO 



t- O CO rH 



i 



t- C-l <M CO 

CO 05 i-l CI 



to CO CD to 



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t-1 f^ 



a) _ a; 

rt P V- tJO 

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3 1? g 



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a n 



h^ 1-1 



114 



City Document No. 40. 



Rainfall Received and Collected 1891. 





SuiiBURT. 


COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 








^ to 




'6 


_-d 






■a 


Month. 


Is 
.9 


.9? 


a o 
o o 


Rainfall 


Rainfal 
collect 


■~ o 


Rainfal 


Rainfal 
collect 


Per cen 
colled 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


January . . 


7.020 


5.383 


76.69 


6.67 


6.26 


93.81 


6.245 


6.2S6 


100.67 


February . 


5.235 


5.616 


107.28 


5.02 


6.62 


131.93 


5.075 


5.969 


117.61 


March . . . 


6.475 


7.944 


122.69 


5.49 


8.03 


146.26 


6.070 


7.208 


118.74 


April . . . 


3.905 


4.138 


105.97 


3.62 


4.31 


119.15 


3.150 


3.434 


109 01 


May .... 


2.010 


1.039 


51.70 


1.67 


0.88 


52.75 


2.460 


1.402 


57.01 


June . . . 


3.770 


0.714 


]8.92 


3.78 


0.77 


20.36 


4.430 


1.010 


22.80 


July .... 


3.395 


0.266 


7.83 


2.99 


0.50 


16.65 


3.180 


0.422 


13.27 


August . . 


4.725 


0.290 


6.15 


4.91 


0.72 


14.69 


3.880 


0.439 


11.31 


September . 


2.380 


0.350 


14.71 


2.12 


0.76 


35.91 


2.160 


0.417 


19.32 


October . . 


3.830 


0.375 


9.78 


4.14 


0.79 


18.95 


4.735 


0.575 


12.14 


K'ovember . 


3.090 


0.526 


17.03 


2.84 


0.83 


29.21 


2.605 


0.565 


21.68 


December . 


3.685 


0.971 


26.34 


3.17 


1.60 


50.47 


3.410 


0.873 


25.59 


Totals and ) 
averages \ 


49.520 


27.612 


55.76 


46.42 


32.07 


69.08 


47.400 


28.600 


60.34 



Water-Supply Department. 



115 



Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations on 
the Water- Woj-Jcs. 









Tempeeatube of Air. 


Temperature of 
Water. 


1891. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Fi 


amingham. 


Broobline 
Resei-voir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
House. 




a 
a 

ca 


a 

3 

a 

'a 


a 
a 


a 

3 

a 


a 

3 

a 

n 

3 


n 


a 

O 


a 


January . 






54.0 


9.0 


29.3 


51.0 


0.0 


28.3 


36.3 


34.0 


February 






62.0 


2.0 


31.5 


62.0 


-1.0 


31.1 


36.0 


34.1 


March . . 






54.0 


00 


33.8 


51.0 


0.0 


32.9 


37.1 


35.2 


April . . 






78.0 


24.0 


49.5 


77.0 


24.0 


49.0 


48.8 


48.3 


May . . . 






88.5 


30.0 


57.2 


85.0 


30.0 


57.3 


57.0 


58.1 


June . . 






96.0 


42.5 


65.9 


96.0 


38.0 


65.4 


65.1 


68.2 


July . . . 






90.5 


51.0 


68.6 


89.0 


46.0 


67.5 


71.5 


70.7 


August . 






90.0 


47.5 


70.2 


94.0 


45.0 


69.4 


73.6 


74.5 


September 






90.0 


47.0 


67.2 


88.0 


44.0 


65.4 


69.7 


69.3 


October . 






86.0 


23.5 


51.0 


84.0 


26.0 


48.6 


58.2 


59.5 


November 






66.0 


9.5 


41.4 


66.0 


6.0 


39.0 


44.6 


44.7 


December 






64.0 


12.0 


39.2 


67.0 


8.0 


37.8 


38.2 


39.2 



116 City Document No. 40. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
MYSTIC DIVISION. 



Robert Grant, Esq., Chairman Boston Water Board: 

Sir : The report of the Mystic Division of the Boston 
Water-Works, from Jan. 1, 1891, to Feb. 1, 1892, is 
herewith submitted. 

Mystic Lake. 

Mystic lake was nearly full until the last of June, when it 
began to fall until November 26. It was then 7.67 feet 
below high-water mark. On January Ij it had filled 
to within 4.68 feet below high- water, and was wasting over 
the ilash-boards January 15. 

The stonework at the dam has been pointed and the 
wooden bridge rebuilt. The bridge across the Abbajona 
river, known as Bacon's bridge, has been replanked with 
3-inch planks. A wooden fence 865 feet long has been 
built on the Arlington road, leading to the lake, and a tele- 
phone placed in the gate-keeper's house. At the engine- 
houses, stone foundations have been laid for the boilers, and 
the floors newly timbered and planked. The engines, boil- 
ers, and pumps have been overhauled and thoroughly re- 
paired. The usual work of removing the algcE from Horn 
and Wedge ponds, and that section of the river above Whit- 
ney's dam, has been done. Taking advantage of the lowness 
of the water during the early tall, we have cleansed and in 
some places gravelled portions of the beds of the lake, ponds, 
and feeders. 

Mystic Reservoir. 

Five hundred and fifty feet of the road leading to the 
pumping-station have been macadamized and 638 feet of 
wooden fence built. All the seats along the walk on top of 
the reservoir have been repaired, and some repairs have 
been made in and about the gate-house. The banks have 
been top-dressed, and the adjoining roads have received 
the customary care. The basins will be cleaned and 
repaired during the coming spring. 

Conduit. 

The conduit has been cleaned and flushed twice in the 
past year and a few defects remedied. 



Water-Supply Department. 117 

Force-Mains. 

A new check-valve has been placed in the 30-inch main 
connected with Engine No. 3 and a 2-inch blow-otFput on 
the main connected with the effluent chamber. 

P UMPIN g-St ation . 

Engines iSTos. 1 and 2 have been furnished with new valve- 
rods, and Engine No. 1 has had a new set of water-valves 
attached. The boiler-pumps have been thoroughly over- 
hauled and repaired, and the doors of boilers Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3 have had improved fire-proof linings affixed. All the 
boilers have been cleaned and inspected, and, at present, 
boilers Nos. 4, 5, and 6 ai-e again laid up for the same pur- 
pose- Much-needed sanitary improvements have been made 
in the basement of the engine-house. Engines Nos. 1, 2, 
and 3 and the engine-room have been painted, and the 
grounds adjacent to the engine-house have been kept in good 
condition. 

Mystic-Valley Sewer. 

The quantity of sewage pumped during the thirteen 
oionths has been 133,102,028 gallons, to which was applied as 
a precipitant 331,890 lbs. of crude sulphate of alumina. 
The quantity of sludge precipitated, and also pumped, was 
2,953,611 gallons. This sludge in its fluid condition contained 
at least 96 percent, moisture, and before it became sufficient- 
ly hard to handle by excavation it lost 84 per cent, of its 
original moisture. The sludge in this semi-state contained 
moisture to the amount of 75 per cent, of its bulk ; and 
2,334 cubic yards of it was removed from the settling basins. 
A large proportion of this sludge was carted away by a 
neio-hborins: farmer, who used it as a fertilizer. The rate of 
application of precipitant, during the time covered by this 
report, was 1 part to 3,354 parts of sewage, or 1.24 tons 
per 1,000,000 gallons of sewage. The amount of coal used 
was 210.66 tons. 

In May, a new centrifugal pump of larger size was substi- 
tuted for the old sewage pump. A movable cage, for in- 
tercepting large pieces of floating matter in the sewage, has 
been fitted to the gate-frame of one of the sewer manholes 
near the works. This has proved of great benefit by retain- 
ing considerable hair and leather which otherwise would 
have passed to the sewage pump, and thereby have had a ten- 
dency to clog it. The roadway has been improved and two 
new sludge-basins built. A stone foundation has been laid 
for the boiler, a few slight repairs have been made on the 



118 City Document No. 40. 

pumps, a new smoke-stack erected, and new belting substi- 
tuted. 

The plant is in good condition, with the exception of the 
flume, which conveys the sewage to the several tanks, and 
the sludge-gates in the tank building ; but in the coming 
spring the necessary repairs will be made. 

Pollution Inspection. 

Many of the landlords and householders along the supply 
have been interviewed, and most of them have displayed 
a willingness to comply with our requirements. One hundred 
and eighty old cases and 155 new cases have been inspected ; 
87 cesspools and 12 vaults have been cleaned, to prevent 
overflowing ; 20 new cesspools and 3 vaults built ; 28 drains 
and 3 vaults abandoned; 16 manure-piles, 23 sinks, 11 
Avater-closets, and 2 urinals removed. In the case of the 
last three items the fixtures have been arranged to discharge 
into the Woburn city drain, which connects with Mystic 
sewer. 

An experiment to filter the sewage at Dow's tannery, 
Woburn, has met with fair success. The sewage from this 
establishment contains a large quantity of lime and grease, 
which must be removed before the effluent water is applied 
to the filter: and if these substances can be eliminated, the 
desired result will probably be obtained. 

Filtration Experiments. 

An experimental station for filtering Mystic water has 
been established at West Medford, near the pumping-sta- 
tion. The results obtained thus far, both by the continuous 
and the intermittent methods of filtering, show that a con- 
tinuation of the experiments will be required, in order to 
give results from which positive conclusions may be drawn. 

Distribution-Pipes . 

The distribution-pipes have been extended by the addi- 
tion of 452 feet of 8-inch pipe, 591 feet of 6-inch pipe, and 
105 feet of 4-inch pipe. There have been 4,597 feet of 
cement-lined pipes replaced by cast-iron pipes. 

There are remaining in the Charlestown District 9,900 
feet of cement-lined distribution-pipes, varying from 2 
inches to 20 inches. 



Water-supply Department. 



119 



Hydrants and Gates. 

Seven new hydrants, 4 street Lowry hydrants, and 4 Post 
hydrants have been established. Twelve street Lowry 
hydrants have been abandoned and new ones substituted. 
One flush hydrant has been replaced by a street Lowry 
hydrant. Fifteen additional gates have been established : 
1 sixteen-inch gate, 3 twelve-inch gates, 1 eight-inch gate, 
a six-inch gates, and 2 four-inch gates. 

Fountains and Stand-Pipes. 

One new drinking- fountain has been erected on Monument 
square, and 8 additional stand-pipes, for street-watering 
carts, have been established. 

Service-Pipes and Boxes. 

Eighty-two new services have been laid and 135 services 
repaired, for which 3,009 feet of lead pipe and 1,148 feet 
of cast-iron pipe were required. Thirty-six one-half inch, 
and 2 five-eighths inch tin-lined services have been removed 
and larger pipes substituted. Twenty-one wooden service- 
boxes have been replaced by iron boxes. Ten leaks have 
been repaired, and 42 stoppages by eels, 12 by rust, and 19 
by moss, have been blown out. 





New Services. 








Size 


|-in. 


S-in- 


1 in. 


2-in. 


6-in. 


Total number. 


Total ft. 




51 


11 


4 


12 


4 


82 


2,318 








Summary of Services connected with Works, Feb. 1, 1892. 



Number of services 
Number of feet . . 



Charlestown. 



5,987 
160,069 



Somerville, 



6,953 
232,852 



Chelsea. 



5,231 
140,856 



Everett. 



2,387 
47,598 



Total. 



20,558 
581,375 



Breaks and Leaks on Distribution-Pipes. 






Size of Pipes 


3in. 


4-in. 


6.in. 


S-in. 


10-ln. 


Total. 








1 

6 
12 






1 




2 


21 

22 


1 
1 


4 


34 




35 









120 



City Document No. 40. 



Distribution-Pipes Relaid. 



Location, 



Caldwell street . . . . 
Main street, Rider Pipe 

Sever street 

Main street, Rider Pipe 

Main street, Rider Pipe 

Medford street 

Medford street 

Prescott street 

Pleasant street 

School street . 

Charles-street court 

Charles street 

Chelsea . 

Chelsea . 

Chelsea . , 

Somerville 

Somerville 

S6merville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Somerville 

Everett . 

Everett . 

Everett . 

Everett . 

Everett . 



Original 

Size 



6-in. 

6-in. 

4-in. 

6-in. 

8-in. 

6-in. 
12-in. 

6-in. 

4-in. 

4-in. 

3.in. 

4-in. 

4-in. 

3-in. 

6-in. 

4-in. 

6-iu. 

8.in. 
10-in. 
12-in. 
14-in. 
18-in. 
20-in. 
10-in. 

6-in. 

6-in. 

4-in. 

8-in. 



6-in. 



680 

.216 

202J 

72 

4001 

170 

337 

306 

339i 

2,363 
135 
564 
305 

2,032 



196 
589 



,906 



227 



2,778 



12 in. 



1,506 



2,024 



14-in. 



18-in. 



,793 



680 

216 

2021 

72 

1,506 
4001 
170 
337 
306 
3391 

2,363 
135 
564 
305 

2,032 

2,906 
227 

2,024 

1,793 
700 
743 
178 
227 
196 
589 

2,778 

22,357i 



Water-supply Department. 



121 



Extension of Distribution-Pipes. 



Size or Pipes. 


2-in. 


3-in. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


Total. 


Main and Alford sts., Rider Pipe . 








98 


236 
216 


















Hayes court, off Everett street . . 






105 








Shurtleff court 






48 
445 

8,049 
120 

9,915 
























1,233 




647 

129 

4,576 


3,502 


730 




Chelsea 




Everett 






1,362 


















1,233 




5,457 


18,675 


5,316 


730 


31,411 



122 



City Document No. 40. 






O 






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rH IM i-H 


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"Water- Supply Department. 



123 



Hydrants Established. 





Established. 


Abandoned. 


6 




o 
1-5 


Boston 
Lowry. 


o 


5 


a 

o 

a 

M 
1 




5 





4 
31 


1 


8 




31 
















26 




26 










Total 


5 




61 


1 


65 







Total Number of Hydrants in use Feb. 1, 1892. 



Charlestown 

Somerville 


198 
2 


33 


54 

465 

184 

123 

2 

2 


38 

2 

6 
1 


323 

467 
186 




1 




129 




8 








3 










Total 


201 


33 


835 


47 


1,116 







Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene S. Sullivan, 

/Sujjerintendent. 



124 City Document No. 40. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

REPORT OF 1891. 

In Accordance with the Recommendation of the New 
England Water-Works Association. 



Boston Water-Works, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 
supplies also the cities of Soinerville and Chelsea, and the 
town of Everett. 

Population by census of 1890 : 

Boston 448,477 

Chelsea 27,909 

Somerville . . . . . . . 40,152 

Everett 11,068 



Total 527,606 

Date of construction : 

Cochituate Works . . . . . . 1848 

Mystic " 1864 

By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and 

Mystic lake. 

Mode of supply. — Sixty- five per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty-five " " " pumping " 

Pumping. 

Cochituate. Mystic. 

Builder of pumping 

machinery . . Holly Co. H. R. Worthington. 

Description of coal used : 

a Kind . . Bituminous. Bituminous. 

c Size . . . Broken. Broken. 

e Price per gross 

ton, in bins, |4.90. $4.34. 

/"Per cent, of ash, 8.5. 10.2. 



Water-Supply Department. 125 

CocHiTUATE. Mystic. 

Coal consumed for year, in 

lbs 2,910,751 6,988,500 

Total pumpage for year, in 

gallons .... 2,651,164,400 3,304,951,000 
Average dynamic head, in 



feet .... 

Gallons pumped per lb. of 

coal .... 

Duty in foot-lbs. per 100 lbs. 

of coal .... 

Cost of pumping figured on 

pumping-station expenses, 

viz. : 
Cost per million gallons raised 

to reservoir 
Cost per million gallons raised 

one foot high . 



124.60 
910.8 
101,380,800 

$17,642 30 

$6 65 

$0,053 



417,000 



Consumption. 

COCHITUATE. 

Estimated population . . 422,100 

Estimated population sup 

plied 
Total consumption, gallons. 
Passed through meters 
Average daily consumption 

gallons . 
Gallons per day, each in 

habitant . 
Gallons per day, each con 

sumer 
Gallons per day to each tap, 

Distribution. 

Mains. 



148.02 
472.9 
58,380,500 

$25,958 02 

$7 85 

$0,053 



Mystic. 

121,200 
120,000 



13,755,735,400 3,305,139,500 
3,717,945,000 673,625,900 



37,686,900 

89.3 

90.4 
599 



9,055,200 

74.7 

75.5 
440 



Kind of pipe used 

Sizes . 

Extended, miles 
Total now in use 
Distribution-pipes less than 

4- in., length miles 
Hydrants added . 



COCHITUATE. 




Mystic. 


^ ,T Cast-iron, Wrouo-ht- 
Cast-iron. ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^-^^^^ 


. 48"in. to 4-in 


30 


-in. to 3-in. 


20. 




5.8 


519. 




158. 


n 






5.5 


247 




65 



12G 



City Document No. 40. 



Hydrants now in use 
Stop-gates added 
Stop-gates now in use 



COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 


5,684 


1,116 


289 


114 


5,691 


1,689 



Services. 



Kind of pipe used 


. \ 


Lead. 


Lead and 
Wrought-Iron. 


Sizes 




. -|-in. to 4-in. 


i-in. to 2-in. 


Extended, feet . 




64,224 


28,695 


Service-taps added 




2,159 


1,036 


Total now in use 




62,877 


20,556 


Meters added 




212 


15 


Meters now in use 




3,839 


406 


Motors and elevators 


in use, 


518 


21 



Watek-Supply Department. 127 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER-WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO JANUARY 1, 1892. 

Water Commissioneks. 

Nathan Hale,:j: James F. Baldwin, J Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. J 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. t 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to Octo- 
ber 1, 1855. t 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, 
to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 18554 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. J 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. t 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbuiy-river 
works. From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 
1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 
3, 1885. t 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

Desmond FitzGerald, Resident Engineer on Additional Supply. 
From February 20, 1889, to present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell, 
and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, subject to the 
direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by an ordi- 
nance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force 
one year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

Cochituate Water Board. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned A]3ril 

7, 1856t Five years 



128 



City Document No. 40. 



John H. ^^'ILKINS, elected in 1856, and resigned June 

5. 18()0t Four years. 

Ebenezek Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

8, I860 J • • • • • • • • .Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867^ One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868t ...... One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871^ . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 

1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874J ....... One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and resigned May 

31, 1875 ......... Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 

1876t . . One year. 



Members of the Board. 

Tho:\ias Wet.aiore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55f . . Five years. 

John II. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58, and 59^ . Eight" j^ears. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54, and 55^ . . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 63, and 56$ . . . Four years. 

James W. Seaver, 1851$ One year. 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851.$ 

John T. Heakd, 1851$ ....... One year. 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55$ , . Four years. 

Sajii'SON Reed, 1852 and 1853$ Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852$ One year. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54, and 55$ .... 'Jhree years, 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58, and 61 . . . Six years. 

(Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56, and 57$ . . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55$ .... Two years. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58, and 59$ .... Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57, and 58$ .... Three years. 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59$ ..... Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856$ ....... Two months. 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64$ Eight years. 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60, and 61$ .... Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62, and 63$. . . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859$ ...... One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64, and 65 . . .Six years. 

Clement Willis, 1860$ One year. 

G. E. Pierce, 1860$ One year. 

J ABEZ Frederick, 1861, 62, and 63$ .... Three years. 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 ..... Two years. 

John F. Pray, 1862$ ....... One year. 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 . One year. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65, and 66$ Three years. 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 66$ Two years. 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66, and 67$ . . . Four years. 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67, and 68 . . . . Three years. 

AVii.LiAM S. Hills, 1867 ....... One year. 

Charles R. Train, 1868$ ...... One year. 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69$ .... Two years. 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68, and 69 .... Three years. 

Francis A. OSBORN, 1869 One year 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870$ One year. 



Water-Supply Department. 



129 



John O. Pook, 1870 One year. 

HoLLis R. Gray, 1870 One year. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 

and 71t Nine years. 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, and 71t .... Four years. 

Sidney Squires, 1871:]: One year. 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872 One year. 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, and 72 . . . Four years. 
Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, and 

72 .......... Seven years. 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73, and 74^... Three years. 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 .... Two years. 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73, and 74^. . . Five years. 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74, and 75* Three years. 

Amos L. NOYES, 1871, 72, and 75 Three years. 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74, and 75^ . . . Three years, 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 One year. 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75, and 7QfX • ■ Five years. 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76t . Six years. 
L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75, 

and 76t J Ten years. 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876t .... Two years. 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876t One year. 

Nahum M. Morrison, 1876f One year. 

Augustus Parker, 1876t One year. 



*Mi'. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected to 
fill the vacancy. Mr. Heniy B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer .Johnson was elected President ; and 
July 2 Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis JSToi'cross resigned .Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected 
Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was reelected in 
1868. Alexander Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was reelected in 1872. 
Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

t Sei-ved until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

i Deceased. 



130 City Document No. 40. 

Boston Water Board, 

Organized July 31, 1876. 

Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. J 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to Aug. 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from"May 4, 1885, to March 18, 1889. 
Horace T. Rockwell, from Aug. 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888. 
Philip J. Doherty, from March 18, 1889, to May 4, 1891. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from Aug. 26, 1885, to May 5, 1890 ; and from 

May 4, 1891, to present time. 
Robert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to present time. 
John W. Leighton, from May 5, 1890, to present time. 

Organization of the Board for Year 1891. 
Chairman. 
Robert Grant. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Board. 
William Jackson. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

Deputy Collector and Clerk, Mystic Dexiartment. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintejident of the Eastern Division of Cochituate Department. 

Dexter Brackett, to June 1 (resigned). 
William J. Welch, from June 1. 

Superintendent of the Western Division and Resident Engineer of 
Additional Supply. 

Desmond FitzGerald. 

Sujierintendent of Mystic Department. 
Eugene S. Sullivan. 

X Deceased. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Report op the Water Board : paob 

Disbursements . . .... . . . . . 2 

Revenue ........... 2 

Mystic debt . , 2 

Water Registrar's Department ....... 3 

Eastern Division ......... 3 

Extension of mains, etc. ........ 3 

Consumption of water ........ 3 

Additional supply, Basin 6, Whiteliall Pond, and Cedar 

Swamp ........... 3-4 

Quality of Water, etc. ........ 5 

Future supply .......... 5-6 

Maintenance Accounts . . . . . . . . . 6-9 

Expenditure Accounts in Detail 9-10-15-16 

Cost of Construction and Condition op the Debts . . 11-12 

Monet Expenditures . . . . . . . . . 12-13 

Stock Accounts .......... 14 

List of Contracts ......... 17-21 

General Statistics. (See also summary of statistics, p. 124.) . 22 

Report of Superintendent op Eastern Division . . . 23-55 

Distribution mains and hydrants ...... 23-24 

Higli-service works ......... 24-25 

Distri(!t stables 25 

Reservoirs .......... 25 

Waste detection 26 

Deacon meter-system ........ 26-27 

Meters, water-posts and fountains ...... 27-34 

Tables of pipe laid, hydrants established, etc. .... 35-55 

Report of Superintendent of Western Division . . . 56-72 

Sudburj-river basins ........ 56-63 

Whitehall pond 63-64 

Farm pond .......... 64 

Lake Cochituate 65-67 

Aqueducts 68-70 

Chestnut-hill, Brookline, and Fisher-hill reservoirs . . . 70-71 

Biological laboratory ........ 71 

Filtration 71 

Pollution 71-72 

Quality of water 72 

Analyses and rainfall tables, etc 73-87 



132 Table of Contents. 

PAGE 

Keport of the Engineer ........ 88-100 

Yield of sources of supply ....... 88 

Sudbury reservoirs and Lake Cocliituate ..... 88-91 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs ..... 91-92 

High-service pumping-stations . . . . . ... 92-9B 

Mystic lake 93 

Mystic sewer .......... 93 

Mystic conduit, reservoir, and pumping-station . . . 94-95 

Consumption .......... 95-96 

Deacon meters .......... 96-97 

Additional supply ......... 97-99 

In general ........... 100 

Tables of consumption, diversion of Sudbury-river water, amounts 
drawn from Lake Cochituate, rainfall, operations of pumping- 
stations, etc 101-115 

Eeport of Superintendent of Mtstic Division . . . 116-123 

Summary of Statistics . . . . . . . . 124-126 

Civil Organization op the Board, 1845-1892 .... 127-130