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Full text of "Annual report of the Brooklyn Park Commissioners .."



, 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BROOKLYN 



Park Commissioners 



— FOE THE — 



YEAE 1884. 



§r0JDkIjm: 

PRINTED FOR THE COMMISSIONERS. 

1885. 



3RK! 
3BOTAISICAL 1 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE — 



BROOKLYN 



Park Commissioners 



YEAR 1884. 



PRINTED FOR THE COMMISSIONERS. 

1885. 



* 



COMMISSIONERS AND OFFICERS. 



COMMISSIONERS : 

JOHN GIBB, ANDREW DOUGHERTY, 

D. H. HOUGHTALING, GEORGE W. CHAUNCEY, 

CHARLES GARLICHS, HENRY W. MAXWELL, 

THOMAS C. SMITH, LEANDER WATERBURY, 

THE MAYOR, ex-qfficio. 



OFFICERS : 

President : 
JOHN GIBB. 



Secretary : 
ANDREW A. SMITH. 



Chief Engineer and Superintendent: 
JOHN Y. CULYER. 



REPORT 



Brooklyn Park Commissioners. 



Office of the Brooklyn Park Commissioners, ) 

City Hall, V 

Brooklyn, January 1, 1885. ) 

To the Honorable the Mayor and Common Council of the city of 
Brooklyn: 

Gentlemen : 

The Brooklyn Park Commissioners, in accordance with the 
requirements of the -statute, present herewith their report for 
the year ending December 31, 1884. ' 

There will be found appended statements showing in detail 
the moneys received and the sources whence they were derived, 
together with the full and circumstantial exhibit of the expen- 
ditures for all purposes during the year. 

The Commissioners are gratified to state that a moderate 
increase in the appropriation for the maintenance of the parks 
will relieve, to some extent, the difficulties attendant upon the 
discharge of their responsibilities for the ensuing year. 

The need of a stated annual fund for construction purposes 
in the development and improvement of unfinished portions 
of the Park, becomes more apparent each } 7 ear. 



REPORT OF THE 



This is particularly the case with regard to that portion of 
the Park lying along- Ninth avenue, from Third to Fifteenth 
street, forming the southeasterly boundary of the Twenty- 
second Ward, and contiguous to the Eighth Ward of this city. 

The commpletion of this work, in accordance with the 
original design of the Park, would greatly aid in assuring a 
deservedly high character for the contiguous property. It 
would invite improvements inuring to the benefit of the city, 
while it would secure an ample return to its treasury, many 
times in excess of the outlay, through the increased assessable 
value of the property thus improved. 

In regard to the policy of selling the remainder of the east 
side lands, it has not been thought desirable to dispose of 
them pending the litigation which the city is now pressing to 
an issue as fast as practicable. 

For the details of the work we refer you to the accompany- 
ing report of the Chief Engineer and Superintendent. 



Respectfully, 

JOHN GIBB, 



President. 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER AND SUPERINTENDENT, 



Office of Chief Engineer and Superintendent, | 
Brooklyn, December I, 1884. [ 

To the Brooklyn Park Commissioners. 
Gentlemen : 
The work of the Commissioners during the past year has 
been mainly confined to that for which its principal fund is 
provided, viz., the maintenance of the several Parks, Parkways, 
&c. 

Our operations, of necessity, have been limited to the current 
and seasonable demands made upon us by the public for the 
appropriate uses of these several works, the object having been 
to extend all the facilities in our power to visitors, and at the 
same time, as far as possible, preserve from destruction the 
groundwork of the principal improvements in our charge. It 
is unnecessaiy, therefore, to make more than passing allusion to 
the condition of the parks in detail, which, for need of a more 
liberal provision for expenditure during the period which has 
intervened since our construction fund was exhausted, ten 
years ago, have suffered from deteriorations caused by use and 
exposure, far beyond the limitations of real economy. This 
state of facts has been so constantly reiterated as to fully en- 
lighten the public in regard to our restricted financial resources, 
and has justly deterred criticism as to the condition of impor- 
tant parts of the work to which, with a liberal fund at our 
disposal, we would otherwise be exposed. It has been demand- 
ed of us, during the year, a careful and economical adjustment 
of our means to meet the requirements made upon us. 

Notwithstanding the many disadvantages under which we 
have labored for a number of years, as regards our ability to 
do all that would seem to be desirable, the parks have never 
before been put to such general and apparently satisfactory 
use by the people. This is in part the evidence and result of an 



REP0IIT OF THE 



increased appreciation of the means afforded for recreation, 
and in part to some modification of the prestige of Coney 
Island as a resort, interest in which prevailed so generally 
among our people a few years ago. This greatly increased use 
during the last two years has been specially noteworthy. As a 
resort for picnicking, the Park seems to have permanently 
taken the place of many resorts whose imperfect accommoda- 
tions and meretricious attractions had previously afforded 
opportunity for out-door pleasuring to large numbers of people. 
During the past year the school and church organizations 
(statistical details of which will be found elseAvhere), without 
regard to sect, have found congenial and acceptable facilities at 
the Park; it having acquired a deserved repute for comfort, 
variety of entertainment, and freedom from annoyance and 
danger. These attractions, together with the accessibility of 
the grounds, have established for them a permanent reputation 
in almost every way as a desirable resort. The provisions for 
other special out-door recreation, such as lawn tennis, croquet, 
archery, bicycling, cricket, lacrosse, foot-ball and base-ball, 
miniature yacht sailing, ice boating, and other winter sports on 
the ice, have been cheerfully extended to large numbers in a belief 
that the encouragement of such uses of the Park were in 
harmony with the ideas governing those who planned it, which 
in substance were to make it, as far as possible, available to the 
whole public for every proper and reasonable pleasure. These 
provisions, to a large extent, are not common to public parks 
generally, and in arranging accommodations for some of them 
a considerable expenditure of money was required. This has 
caused the diversion of a portion of our limited funds from the 
more specific requirements of maintenance work, but the results 
of these expenditures have contributed so directly to the comfort 
and pleasure of all classes of our citizens that it can hardly be 
made the subject of regret. 

The principal features of the work of the year have been the 
renewal of the surfaces of portions of our road system, made 
necessary l>\ their condition as to wear, ordinary deterioration 
and superficial treatment, to which they had been subjected. 



BBOOKLYN PAEK COMMISSIOKEBS. 



The East Drive, averaging forty-five feet in width, from 
near Battle Pass to the southerly entrance of the Park, the 
length being about 5,200 feet, was re-surfaced with Eoa Hook 
gravel, involving an aggregate expenditure for labor and 
material of nearly eleven thousand (11,000) dollars. 

The gravel is in all respects similar to that used in the 
original construction of the roads on Central Park, ana was 
procured from a remarkable deposit of this material on the 
Tan Courtlandt estate at Eoa Hook, on the Hudson river, a 
short distance above Peekskill. It seems probable that though 
expensive as to cost of transportation. Arc, it is the best 
natural product out of which" to construct drives for pleasure 
riding that has yet been brought into use. 

The repairs to this portion of the Park drives amounted 
substantially to a partial reconstruction, and involved a pro 
rata expenditure for the year, for this class of work, out of pro- 
portion to the amount available for such purpose from our 
yearly stipend. Being, however, a part of the principal drive 
of the Park and forming practically the main thoroughfare in 
connection with the Parkway to the Island, the public have 
enjoyed and no doubt appreciated the increased comfort and 
facilities which this renovated roadwork has afforded. 

The covering of gravel was limited to a thickness of three 
inches — with this we shall probably be enabled to maintain a 
fail - surface for two or three seasons, when it will be required 
to be renewed. 

The removal of the old buildings at the junction of Fifteenth 
street and the city line during the previous year enabled us to 
carry through the line of the roadway and to define the 
entrance at that point. The lines of walk on either side were 
also opened and graded, and these, together with the contiguous 
surfaces, which were roughly shaped, have been left in an un- 
finished condition, awaiting opportunity to renew operations 
next Spring. Scarcity of suitable soil for surfacing in this 
neighborhood may make it necessary to procure the required 



REPORT OF Till'. 



material Prom distant points al an increased expenditure, other- 
wise superficial treatment, which in the matter of soil for turf 
and planting must always prove uneconomical in the end, must 
be substituted. 

A well kept turf of vigorous growth frequently cut, as is the 
custom during the summer season, is very exhaustive of I lie 
sustenance contained in the soil, and unless this is restored by 
frequent applications of manure or other fertilizers, will result 
in a deteriorated and scanty supply of grass. 

A considerable expenditure was also required at the Well. 
This amounted in part to the renewal of the plant required for 
operating our water service. The original boiler, after seven- 
teen years' use, during which period it had been frequently 
repaired, was finally condemned by the official Inspector, and 
a new wrought-iron horizontal tubular boiler of increased 
capacity was put in its place. The covering of the well was 
also entirely renewed. 

The structure known as the Promenade Drive Shelter, on the 
south side of the Park, was reduced in height by the removal of 
a considerable part of the whole. The original intention was 
to equip this frame work with a series of awnings for the pro- 
tection of the public, with the expectation that it would invite 
visitors to gather at this point to view the driving, &c; but the 
distance from many points of the Park and its central resorts, 
would seem to suggest too remote a contingency to justify the 
comparatively expensive maintenance which the idea practically 
carried out would involve, and has suggested the modification 
which has been accomplished. 

The lease of the Litchfield Mansion expired during the 
month of -January of this year. The building, without modifi- 
cation in any important particular of its interior arrangements, 
was put to use for the adminstration offices of the Commission 
in the month of April. The Litchfield Mansion being nearly 
thirty years old, there were many details of its construction 
that needed repair, together with considerable painting of out- 
side work -a new heating apparatus was put in — since which 
time it has served as a convenient executive headquarters. 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



Repairs and painting to the permanent buildings, bridges 
and rustic work were made necessary by their deteriorated 
condition and their increased use. 

Owing to the wide-spread interest in lawn tennis playing, all 
the available space in the picnic house shelter was fitted np with 
lockers for the storage of the clothing, nets, &c, of the players. 
A portion of the basement of the Litchfield Mansion has also 
been temporarily fitted up for the purpose. 

The Park fences, to which attention has been called in 
previous reports, were in bad condition and have required a 
great deal of repair during the year. The length of the en- 
closing fence is nearly four miles, and the frequent renewal of 
posts, pickets, bottom boards, &c, involved a considerable 
outlay for labor and material, and will continue to do so until 
replaced by a more sightly and substantial substitute. 

In addition to the features of the work thus specially noted, 
the force has been busily engaged throughout the year on 
usual maintenance work, incidental to the several works under 
our charge. 

In the early winter months, and particularly during the prev- 
alence of skating, sleighing and other winter sports, the care 
of the ice and roads, removal of snow, &c., required the services 
of our entire force. A number of snow storms at frequent 
intervals during January and February proved somewhat em- 
barrassing in view of the fact that the cleaning of the small 
parks throughout the city was required to be provided for 
simultaneously with the other exacting demands of the season. 

The work of general restoration in the Spring corresponds 
very much to that of the old fashioned custom of house clean- 
ing which everywhere prevails. The road surfaces had been 
broken up by the frost and were generally repaired. The turf, 
spaces and plantations littered with dead leaves, decayed wood, 
&c, were thoroughly cleaned, the water courses, silt basins 
and drainage system were overhauled, and the deposits carried 
into them by the storms removed. Considerable pruning was 

2 



10 REPORT OF THE 



done as late in the season as was permitted, and a number of 
evergreens and other plants removed from crowded plantations 
and transferred to more open and desirable sites. With the 
advent of Spring the more general use of the Park as a resort 
became apparent. As soon as the turf was in a suitable con- 
dition to be used for field games, lawn tennis, archery and 
croquet was established and participated in by their numerous 
votaries. These sports continued without interruption until 
Thanksgiving Day. 

Over two hundred regularly organized tennis clubs were pro- 
vided with courts and lockers during the summer. For this 
purpose alone, nearly twenty acres of the Long Meadow were 
used, the grass Avas cut as frequently as three times a week, 
and the courts marked out and otherwise maintained without 
charge of any kind to those seeking recreation in this form, at 
the Park. 

The Annual Sunday School Meeting and Parade occurred on 
the 21st day of May. The schools gathered together in three 
divisions at different points, where seats for 12,000 children, 
stands for speakers, &c, were erected, and the whole space, 
including the north end of the Long Meadow, was enclosed for 
the manoeuvres which followed the usual ceremonies. The 
weather was in all respects favorable, and it is estimated that 
from 25,000 to 30,000 persons visited the Park and witnessed 
the ceremonies and parade. 

On Sunday, the 25th, the customary memorial services under 
the auspices of the Grand Army of the Republic were held at 
the Lincoln monument on the Plaza at the Park and at the 
bomb of the prison ship martyrs at Fort Greene. The usual 
arrangements were made for the accommodation of the public. 
The Lincoln statue was profusely decorated with plants and 
flowers, many of which were contributed for the purpose by 
the pupils of Public Schools Nos. 9, 15, 39 and 42. 

On the 28th of May, exercises were held by the St. Patrick 
Society of this city, commemorative of the birthday of the poet 
Moore, at the Pedestrian Concourse. 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 11 

A meeting of the Eastern Archery Association, under the 
auspices of the Brooklyn Archery Club, was held at the Archery 
Grounds in the Park on Decoration day. The picnic season 
commenced with Anniversary day, and throughout the months 
of June, July, August and September, the grounds were almost 
daily occupied by church, school and other organizations, to- 
gether with many social and family parties. 

The skating season commenced on January 4, 1883, and 
ceased March 5, 1884, making a total of twenty-six days of 
skating for the season of 1883 and 1884. 

The weather throughout this p>eriod was very favorable for 
winter sports. Nearly fifty acres of ice was frequently used by 
the public, who enjoyed every facility for skating, ice-boat sail- 
ing, curling and other winter ice sports. Snow storms caused 
the principal interruption to an otherwise more frecpient daily 
use of the ice. The attendance was greatly in excess of 
previous seasons, and at times our public buildings were insuffi- 
cient for the purpose. No serious accident occurred during 
this period. The first concert of the season occurred on Sat- 
urday, June 7th, and continued throughout the month of June, 
July and August, making thirteen concerts in all. The music 
was furnished by Mr. Luciano Conterno of this city, under 
whose direction there was given a most satisfactory series of 
concerts. 

The season for field sports at the Parade Ground opened in 
the month of May, and the grounds were occupied, with 
scarcely any intermission, during the remaining fine weather of 
the }*ear. Aside from the numerously organized base-ball, 
cricket, lacrosse and foot-ball clubs, composed of youth and 
adults, to whom grounds have been assigned for the season, 
over 1,000 general permits were issued for other games of this 
character. On Saturdays, frequently, and on special holidays, 
we were at times unable to meet the demands made upon us. 

Bicycle and tricyle riding has greatly increased during the 
year. The use of the Park for this purpose has been restricted 
to the walks, where, with such regulations as it was desirable to 



VI RErORT OF THE 



impose, ample facilities were afforded without serious inter- 
ference with the privileges of others. The use of the Eastern 
Parkway, the Ocean Parkway and the Concourse at Coney 
Island, lias been permitted without limitation and with no 
apparent conflict with the comfort or safety of drivers. The 
principal riders are expert in the management of their machines 
and conform to the rules which have been in part made up 
from their own experience. So long as these rules are intelli- 
gently complied with I see no reason to modify the provisions 
for using the Park for those seeking recreation in this manner. 

As to the unfinished portions of the Park, to which refer- 
ence is frequently made, comprising more particularly the 
considerable unimproved area along the westerly boundary of 
the Park lying along the extreme limits of the Twenty-second 
and contiguous to the Eighth Ward of this city, it ma}' be said 
that suggestions favoring the renewal of construction work is 
entitled to the careful attention of the Commissioners. The 
tendency of improvement in the earlier years of construction 
carried the work through the main body of the area, its prin- 
cipal features following the trend of travel towards the southerly 
entrance. Our means, which had been provided by law for con- 
struction purposes, were exhausted ten years ago, since which 
time the area just referred to along Ninth avenue and Fifteenth 
street has remained in a slate of incompletion. This, at the 
time of the cessation of the work, attracted no especial atten- 
tion or criticism in view of the generally unimproved state of 
that portion of the two Wards alluded to, bordering upon and 
adjacent to the Park. Since then, however, the property of the 
neighborhood has recovered to a substantial degree from the 
effects of the general financial depression which prevailed in 
1ST:!, the transfers of property at improved prices, which afford 
every promise of stability, and the erection of numerous build- 
ings throughout the district, indicate the early attainment of 
a high class reputation for the whole western slope of the 
Park. 

The conformation of the area from Flatbush avenue to 
Fifteenth street, and even beyond, and extending nearly to the 



BROOKLYN PAKE COMMISSIONERS. 13 

borders of the unsightly neighborhood to the south of Fifth 
avenue, combines to a notable degree, in its sloping surface and 
the character of the underlying material, conditions in every 
way favorable for a permanently healthy dwelling place. The 
few irregularities in the surface which have served in the past 
to impede temporarily the passage of the surface water, have 
almost all been removed, and will soon entirely disappear by 
reason of the improvements in progress or of those soon to 
follow. 

The completion of the streets by suitable pavements and a 
perfected sewerage will entirely remove the possibilit} r of 
annoyance which often arises from arrested ground water per- 
colating through the surface. The numerous excavations that 
are being made from time to time for the foundations of buil- 
dings, disclose to the most casual observer, the fact that the 
substratas of gravel and sand afford the most favorable con- 
ditions for the rapid carrying off, by natural drainage, of any 
water that may find its way through the surface, and that dry 
foundations in cellars must of necessity be the rule. 

The geological structure of the Park, as would seem quite 
natural, is in the main a counterpart of that just referred to. 
The system of drainage and the care of surface water is prob- 
ably as complete as can be found in the country, while it is also 
the fact, to be demonstrated at any time, that no deleterious 
influences to health exist upon the Park that could be charged 
with affecting in any degree, disadvantageously, the healthful- 
ness of the circumjacent territory. The waters that flow into 
the lake of the Pai'k, and the water in the lake itself, throughout 
any season of the year, is more suitable for potable purposes 
than the water supply that exists to-day for several communities 
of people not many miles from this city. The presence of 
vegetation during the summer months in portions of the lake 
is entirely natural, and is common to bodies of fresh water and 
streams everywhere. This vegetation consists of a minute and 
inferior plant believed to be of the Lemna order, commonly 
known as duckweed, and is blown over the surfaces from the 
shores, where it is first developed, into the inlets and narrow 



14 REPORT OF THE 



bays of the lake and presents an unsightly appearance through- 
out portions of the season, but that it has ever seriously 
affected the health of any one, it is not believed. This much 
may be said in answer to occasional public reference to this 
subject. 

A comparison, at this time, of the progressive assessments 
of value of the Twenty-second Ward particularly, would seem 
to justify the conclusions as to the importance of interests to 
be favorably operated upon by the further improvement of the 
unfinished portions of the Park. In like manner the interests 
of the Eighth and Ninth Wards would be benefited to an 
important degree. 

Within this particular area of the Park referred to, portions 
of the surface have been worked over, and will remain as they 
now are permanently. The walks have been outlined and 
graded, but no permanent superstructure has as yet been put 
upon them, with the exception of that connecting with the Ninth 
street entrance. The plantations are incomplete and will 
require modifications and additions in important particulars. 

The permanent occupation of the Litchfield Mansion for 
park purposes suggests the opening for public uses, of the 
section lying between it and the Ninth street entrance, which 
has remained to the present time in a condition substantially 
as originally taken. A very considerable amount would be 
involved, necessarily, in the improvement of this area, but with 
suitable treatment would be found to add greatly to the 
resources of the Park. No particular estimates have been 
made as to the cost of this contemplated work, and the amount 
necessary for the purpose would be controlled entirely by the 
perfection of detail to which the Commissioners shall ultimately 
commit themselves, and to the extent which it would be 
desirable t<> cany on the work in harmony with the original 
design, but an early consideration of the question, in view of 
the valuable influences that would quickly result from this 
work, is undoubtedly desirable. 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 15 



Other but less important sections remain in an unfinished 
state. Of these, that in the neighborhood of the Willink 
entrance, running south along Ocean avenue, is one. The 
neighborhood of the entrance just opened at the junction of 
Fifteenth street and the City line is another. 

Of important structures contemplated, the completion of the 
bridge at a site already established, adjacent to the temporary 
bridge over the northern inlet of the Lake, is perhaps one that 
would justify the earliest consideration on the part of the 
Commissioners. The erection of a bridge at this point and 
the modifications of the drive across it, which would result in 
a material improvement in the grades, would justify at the 
same time the continuation of work upon the unfinished 
surfaces of the slope and portions of the Peninsula, bordering 
upon the Lake. Within a short distance of this permanent 
bridge site it has been the intention to erect the hotel, which 
naturally would be of more ambitious design than any structure 
now in use upon the Park. The site is a commanding and 
accessible one, and would afford from its piazzas and windows 
an outlook upon the Lake, and would comprehend in a broad 
vista the intermediate section of the Island between the Park 
and the Island, and an expansive view of the ocean itself. 

The want of .suitable provision for restaurant facilities, for 
the temporary care of horses and vehicles, and such accom- 
modation as visitors, particularly in carriages, demand, has 
greatly emphasized the criticisms as to the want of such accom- 
modation which has followed upon the great increase in 
pleasure riding in the community during the past ten years. 

The Lookout Hill neighborhood, a considerable portion of 
which is utilized as a site for the Park Reservoir, has been 
intended to be used as a site for an observatory, the position 
being every way favorable, and perhaps without parallel for 
such purposes in either city, in view of the fine outlook to be 
afforded from such elevation as the contemplated structure 
would command. While minor portions of the Park must of 
necessity require more attention and expenditure than their 



lf> REPORT OF THE 



proportional share of the present maintenance fund would 
suffice for, the features contemplated in the original construc- 
tion just enumerated are l>\ far the most important, and are 

probably named in the order of interests, from a public point 
of view, tn which they are entitled. 

Of the work which it is desirable to outline for the ensuing 
year, the continuation of resurfacing the main drives will merit 
the earliest attention. Resuming operations at the point 
where they were discontinued last year, viz., at the junction of 
the drives at the southerly entrance of the Park, it is intended 
to continue the repairs to the road superstructure! on the main 
lino parallel with the old Coney Island road, Fifteenth street 
and Ninth avenue, constructing a new branch drive to Litch- 
field Mansion, and continuing the work thence toward the main 
entrance. The length of surface to be worked over, the roadway 
being generally in bad condition, is between one and two miles, 
and when completed, if we shall be able to do so, will furnish 
a restored road surface upon the main circuit drive aggregating 
a length of between three and four miles. Repairs to the other 
drives, to the bridle roads and portions of the more important 
walk lines are also contemplated. 

The condition of the unsold portion of the east side lands, 
with regard to which any present action on the part of the Com- 
missioners is held in abeyance, owing to some technical ques- 
tions concerning matters of title which have been raised, soon 
to be finally disposed of by the courts, it is believed, has been 
made the occasion of criticism of the Commissioners, as to de- 
lay in their ultimate disposal. After the sale of a large number 
of these lots at the public auction, which took place in 1881, 
the failure to complete the purchase, on the part of a purchaser, 
has tended to retard their improvement up to the present time. 
It is not comtemplated that any further indebtedness shall be 
incurred in connection with them, beyond such as will be 
inciderftal to a further sale, but public sentiment undoubtedly 
favors an early disposal of the property still belonging to the 
city, in order that it shall not, from their abandoned condition, 
continue to operate against the general character of the neigh- 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 17 

borhood, and that the further benefits to accrue from a sale 
and the improvement of it shall commence to operate in favor 
of the city's interest. Such a sale, not involving absolute 
sacrifice of the property, and its transfer to private owners, 
even at moderate prices, would result in benefits from several 
sources which are not now possible to be availed of. The 
amount to be derived from their sale and, subsequently, from 
taxes, upon an increased valuation and improvement, would 
quickly add a considerable revenue to the city, while the 
influence to be exerted by the development of the area, gener- 
ally, upon other sections of the neighborhood, would represent 
a considerable money value and prove a creditable auxiliary to 
the available resources so desirable at this time, with which 
to meet the general financial engagements of the city. 

SMALL PARKS. 

No special features of work upon the small parks of the 
city call for particular mention at this time. They have been 
maintained in as good condition as was possible under the cir- 
cumstances, and have been largely used as neighborood resorts ; 
their increased use would justify a more liberal expenditure, 
especially in the case of Fort Greene. The large structure of 
wood on the higher portion of this park, used as a shelter and 
resting place, is very much out of repair and should be replaced 
by a more substantial one. It is proposed, however, to make 
it temporarily servicable by necessary repairs during the com- 
ing season. 

Tennis playing at Fort Greene and Tompkins Park was per- 
mitted throughout the season to the fullest extent afforded by 
the turfed spaces available. An additional police service upon 
these parks, which is contemplated for next year, will add to 
the further security of the public. 

During the year a portion of the flagstone forming the plaza 
in front of the City Hall was removed. The underlying 
material was replaced with soil and covered with turf. This 
effected a desirable change in the character of the area 

3 



IS REPORT OF THE 



generally, and it is believed to have met with approval. A 
substantial curb of granite or Milestone may be substituted, 
and with such planting as the early Spring will afford oppor- 
tunity for, the general effect will be considerably enhanced. 
Such further improvements of this area, together with the 
surrounding sidewalks of the main building as were outlined 
upon plans prepared in the early part of the year, would greatly 
exceed any means that the Commission would seem to be 
justified in expending in the absence of special appropriations 
for the purpose, but the central position of the representative 
official structure of the city would warrant it. Indeed the 
general effect and appearance of the City Hall building, due to 
its immediate surroundings, lack character and finish and 
would be greatly improved by the change suggested. 

OCEAN PAllKWAY. 

A considerable portion of the main drive was repaired and 
resurfaced with gravel during the year and very much improved. 
The work upon other portions of the road will be resumed 
in the ensuing spring. The Concourse at Coney Island, which 
had been in a very dilapidated condition, was resurfaced with 
concrete in a substantial manner by Mr. J. P. Cranford of this 
city, at cost of $30,000, for which a special appropriation had 
been obtained from the County authorities. This work extend- 
ed over the length and breadth of the main roadway for a width 
of 75 feet, and a length of over 2,700 feet. The irregularities 
of the surface required, in order to adjust it to a suitable grade, 
the application of material varying in depth from 2 inches to 
8 inches. 

The Concourse area generally continues to serve as a most 
desirable adjunct to the few resources of the Island, provided for 
public use, to which no expense is attached and entirely free 
from modifying and undesirable features that pertain to certain 
portions of the Island. The importance and value of the 
reservation for public purposes cannot but be impressed upon 
all who are familiar with the relation it bears to other pent ions 
of the Island. 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 19 

With suitable means, its usefulness could be increased a 
hundred fold. Provisions for carrying out the project sub- 
mitted for the consideration of the Supervisors would not only 
enable the Commission to ensure to the citizens of Brooklyn 
greater comfort and enjoyment at the Island, but would increase 
the value of important parts of the Island itself. The interests 
controlled by the Commissioners for the people are too im- 
portant not to have impressed upon them the responsibilities 
concerning its extended development as a seaside resort. In 
previous reports it has been suggested the necessity for a more 
efficient police surveillance of the Island. A still more serious 
subject is the provision for the removal of sewage. No suit- 
able plan of sewerage can be effected otherwise than by uniting 
all the interests that would share its benefits. The conditions 
would seem to limit the resources of engineering, within 
reasonable expenditures, to two projects ; the first, that of the 
rather complex arrangement of collecting the sewage at various 
points, its preparation by disinfecting processes or by compost- 
ing, and its frequent removal, and its use for fertilizing purposes. 

The second plan would be to construct a tidal sewer, parallel 
with the ocean line, of suitable dimensions to meet present and 
reasonable future requirements, having its outlet at the west 
end of the Island, where all material discharged from it would 
reach a permanent current that would carry it away from the 
shore. The latter project would seem to be the most practicable, 
and would be most likely to prove the more servicable, as it 
certainly would be the most economical in the end. It is a 
matter of surprise that a scheme for improving the sewerage 
at the Island has not been effected, in view of its importance 
and of the great interests to be favorably affected by it. 

EASTERN PARKWAY. 

The renovation of this important thoroughfare has been pro- 
vided for during the coming Spring by the purchase and stor- 
age upon the line of the necessary material. The renewal of the 
entire surface from the Plaza to Brooklyn avenue is contempla- 
ted as early in the season as will be favorable for this impor- 



20 REPORT OF THE 



taut work. I beg leave to submit the usual statistical returns, 
together with the list of the names, occupation, and length of 
service of all employes during the year; this list comprises 
a large number of men temporarily employed during the emer- 
gent seasons of work, and were required to supplement our 
ordinary force. These were discharged, in all cases, as soon as 
the necessity ceased. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN Y. CULYER, 

Chief Engineer <nnl Superintendent 



BKOOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



21 



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BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



23 



Revenues derived from the Public Parks of the City of Brooklyn. 



Balance brought forward from January 1, 1884. 

Rentals 

"Water sales 

Old material sold 

Sheep sold , 

Impounded animals — fees aud sales 

Care of broken wagons, sleighs, &c 



Paid S. H. Mildenberg return rentals of old building. 
Paid into the City Treasury 



$239 12 



$6,684 25 

666 04 

222 50 

164 38 

11 95 

5 00 


7,754 12 
7,993 24 


45 00 

7,948 24 


$7,993 24 



December 31, 1884. 



24 



REPORT OF THE 



Statement of Accounts Certified to Auditor During the Year 1884. 



Date. 



Jan 



Feb. 



Name. 



ravioli 



John Y. ( 'ulyer 

William Bergen, Agent 
Edward R. Shipman . . . 



L. Brandeis .V Sou 
Charles E. Teale A Co. 
Paul C. Coffin 



William Porter's Sous 

('. M. Mnseman A Bro 

Metropolitan Gaslight Company, 
Brooklyn Gaslight Company 



Henry Werner 



For. 



Laborers. &c 



Incidental Expenses. . 

Coal 

Oats, &C 

(Join, feed and meal . 

Salt 

Galvanized pipe 

Uniforms for keepers 
Hardware 



Lam | S, &C 

Horse equipments. 
Gas 



Stephen Stevenson 

A. V. Benoit 

Frederick Loeser & Co [Supplies 

Pratt, Manufacturing Company. . .[Naphtha 

Beers & Kessegtrie 

C . M . Moseman & Bro 

C. W. Keenan 



Hickory 

Chestnut posts, &c. 

Soap, Ac 

Tracing cloth 



Hosford & Son 



L. Brandeis A Son . 
Wm. Berri's Sons. 
Watson & Pittinger 
Henry Werner ... . 



W. B. Dayton it Son. . . 

Balch, Price A Co 

A. V. Benoit 

C. M. .Moseman A Pro. 
Howell A Saxtan 



Andrew A. Smith . . . 

Pay roll 

Edward E Shipman 
Pay roll 



Lumber 

Horse equipments. 

Supplies 

Oil 

Blank books 

Stationery 



\ c 



Record books 

Supplies 

Cocoa Mats 

Lumber 

Locust posts, Ac 



Supplies 

Hats for keepers. 

Hydrometer 

Harness 

Gratings 



< Mliee expenses. . . . 
( Mticers and clerks 

Oats, Ac 

Lai Hirers, Ac. 



Amount. 



s.V 



806 
204 

171 

Ii8 
253 
152 

88 

6 

180 

30 

212 

21) 

223 

25 

52 

225 

" 8 

38 

30 

32 

4 

10 

6 

IS 

5 

64 

140 

4 

27 

18 

7 

40 

32 

47 

2 

46 

89 

:i 

81 

89 

12 

8 

7 

90 

24 

7 

874 

195 

,039 

122 

175 



98 
45 
I '.2 
G8 
75 
50 
2d 
52 
m; 

00 

10 

76 

04 
50 

50 

no 
05 
50 
85 
24 
40 
88 
05 
65 
10 
00 
29 
93 
50 
10 
DO 
III) 

50 

02 
50 

0) 
25 
90 

25 
no 
07 
on 
mi 
50 
su 
no 
62 
10 
45 
17 
05 
r,n 



BROOKLYN PAKE COMMISSIONERS. 



25 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date. 



Name . 



8 John Y. Cnlyer 

8 Wm . Bergen, Agent . 



8 
8 
8 
8 
13 

13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
L3 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
20 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 
6 



Isaac Knee, Jr 

L'dward K. Shipman. 



L. V Placeman. 



William Porter's Sons. 



The Automatic Globe Gas Co. . 
Pratt Manufacturing Company 
C. W. Keenan 



Frederick Loeser & Co. 



Union Steam Printing Estabm't. 

tlenry Weruer 

Hosford A Sons 

William Berri's Sons 

Hosford & Sons 



Wm B . Dayton A- Son . . . 
Metropolitan Gaslight Co. 
Brooklyn Gaslight Co ... . 



C. W. Keenan 

A W . Shadbolt A Son 

L. Y. Plageman 

Beers & Besseguie .... 

Paul C. Coffin 

Watson A' Pittinger.. . 
John iYJ. Bulwiukle .... 
Town of Gravesend . . . 

Hosford & Sons 

Pay roll 



John Y. Culyer 

Wm. Bergen, Agent. . 
Edward K. Shipman. 



Foe. 



Incidental expenses. 
Coal 



Harness repairing, Ac. 

Corn 

Oats 



Amount. 



for 



Feed, meal, Ac 

Gits 

Medical treatment 

horses 

Lamp supplies 

Lanterns 

Lamp globes 

Nuphtha 

Glass, Ac 

Home Light oil 

Strips of rubber . 

Home Light oil, glass, Ac 

Window glass 

Hume Light oil 

■'upplies 



Towels, &c 

Brushes and combs. 

Printing 

Locust lamp posts. . . 

Stationer j- 

Carpet 

Stationery 



Stove supplies. 
Gas 



White lead, &c 

Wagon supplies 

Med. treatment for horse 

Lumber .... 

Hardware 

Lumber 

Stationery 

Taxes of 1883 on gravel pit 

Directory 

Officers and clerks. 
Laborers, Ac 



Incidental expenses . 

Coal 

Oats 



$60 91 

404 75 

10 50 

26 25 

54 00 

164 50 

45 40 
58 75 

17 00 
25 85 
60 00 
48 00 

48 26 
19 40 

21 25 

22 80 
30 53 
13 50 
19 22 

6 90 
34 80 
12 00 

3 24 

6 00 
72 00 
37 50 
15 12 

7 75 

4 10 

49 75 

8 42 

46 37 
32 40 
27 96 

4 55 
100 00 

8 00 
199 53 
123 83 
266 73 

3 35 

4 05 
3 00 

874 16 
5,240 68 
. 110 40 
316 77 
436 65 
. 61 60 
307 25 
152 75 



26 



REPORT OK THE 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor -Continued. 



Date . 



Mar 



April 



Name . 



Edward R. Shipman . 
Paul Coffin 



Henry Werner . ... 
Stephen Stevenson. . . . 
A. W. Shadbolt & Son. 



William Porter's Sons 

Union Steam Printing Estabm'i . 

Hewey Moutanies . 

C. W. Keenan ... . 



Fob. 



Feed, meal, &c 
Hardware 



Keuyon & Newton 

Guiseppe Tagliabue Thermometer 



Moulding, &c 

Soap 

Wagon supplies ami 

pairing 

Lamp wicks 

Printing 

Tobacco stems 

Home Light oil 

Supplies 

Doors 



Pratt Manufacturing Company. 

Rubber Clothing Co 

Peter B. BracMn 

Union Steam Printing EstabmM 
0. M. Moseman & Bro 



C. W. Keenan. 



Hosford & Sons 

Metropolitan Gaslight Co 
Henry II. Worthington. . . 



Beers & Resseguie 
Howell & Saxtan. . 



Isaac Knee, Jr . 
Hosford & Sons. 



Brooklyn Union Publishing Co. 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle 

Pay-roll '. 



William Bergen, Agent 



John Y. Culver. 
Paul 0. Coffin.. 



Brooklyn Daily Times 
Edward K. Shipman . . 



T. B. Sidebotham, Jr. 



Naphtha 

Rubber boots 

Corn and carrots 

Printing 

Breeching straps 

( lurry combs and brushes 
Shoe thread and leather, 

Alcohol, &c 

Window glass 

Stationery 

Gas .....' 

Brass nipples 



Lumber 

Repairing fence. 



Harness. . . 
Stationery 



Advertising for proposals 



Officers and clerks. 
Laborers, Ac 



A MOUNT. 



( 'oal 



Incidental Expenses 
Hardware 



Advertising for proposals 

Oats, Ac..' 

I !orn 

Printing Annual Report, 
IN*:} 



$26 nii 

ll'.i 69 

L16 59 

L36 5] 

•21 25 

326 60 

2 00 

Hi oo 

1 no 

19 22 
i:s 49 

;-> (10 

I INI 

IN 17 

25 67 

40 00 

I 50 

1 (id 

1 in 50 

1 65 

6 10 

18 96 

26 25 

22 57 
:; 16 
1 00 

128 44 

75 77 

20 00 
67 50 
24 oo 

9 00 

17 00 

21 50 
33 90 

874 16 

6,171 80 

78 '20 

405 00 

542 15 

1 17 00 

78 70 

65 41 

Mil 69 

15 50 

Hi!) 21 

23 no 
L95 95 

Hi 50 

33 00 



BEOOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



27 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date. 


Name. 


For. 


Amount. 


April 7 

7 


Henry Werner 




$68 95 




28 


7 


«. i? 


!< 


35 20 


7 




Oak Posts 

Mouldings 


48 00 






14 86 


10 


CM. Mosernan & Bro 

C. W. Keenan 


Harness 


29 50 


10 
10 


Supplies 


34 86 
22 92 


10 


Automatic Globe Gaslight Co ... . 
C. W. Keenan 


<t 


121 01 


10 
10 


Automatic gas lamps .... 

Castor oil 

Naphtha 


450 00 
1 00 


10 


Janes & Kirtland 


' 47 93 


10 


Lamp hinges 


544 60 


10 


Jacob G. Miner. , . . . 

Metropolitan Gaslight Co . . . 
Union Steam Printing Estabm't. . 
C . W . Keenan 


1 80 


10 


Gas 


36 92 


10 

11 


Printing 

Supplies 


26 00 

8 20 


11 






6 00 


11 
11 
11 


John Morton & Sons 

C . W . Keenan 

Hosford & Sons 




2 10 

25 90 

9 32 


11 
11 
11 


Supplies 

Stationery 


2 65 
11 50 
10 20 


11 




2 00 


11 






312 20 


11 


Brooklyn Freie Presse 


Car iage hire 


26 00 


11 


Advertising for proposals 
Officers and clerks 


20 40 


19 


Pay roll 


874 16 


May 5 
5 




9,800 44 


c< 


156 65 


5 


c. 


<< 


666 67 


5 


CI 


<c 


1,179 27 


5 
5 
5 


John Y . Culyer 

Vandei'bilt Bros'. Nephew 

William Bergen 


Incidental expenses. .... 
Grass and clover seed. . . 
Coal 


74 17 
291 60 
230 50 


7 


Louis D. Beck 

C. E. Sandford 


Gravel 


2,007 52 


8 


Watchman's register . . . 
Feed and meal 


50 00 


8 


Edward R. Shipman 


24 40 


8 




Oats, &c 


202 00 


8 


Henry Werner 


Door and sash 


5 75 


8 


Mouldings, &c 


12 00 


8 


H . Hawkes 


Plumbings, &c, "Litch- 
field Mansion " 

Balusters 




8 


Henry Werner 


696 10 
21 65 


8 




Pine Slats 


100 00 


8 


L. V. Plageman 


Oak 


4 00 


8 


Hardware 


33 00 


8 


PaulC. Coffin.. 


182 08 


8 






31 20 


8 


Henry R. Worthington 


Overhauling, &c. , engine 








640 27 



28 



REPORT OF THE 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date. 


Name. 


Fob. 


Amount. 


May 8 

S 
10 


Gillie & ( reoghegan 


Steam heating apparatus. 
1 loi Ler at Park well 


$1,125 00 


Smith Brothers 

\. W. Shadbolt .V. Son 


1,450 do 

is 75 


10 






'.17 1 1 


10 


Metropolitan Gaslight (' >mpany. . 
L. H. Smith 




'.17 16 


10 


<< 


:;:; 08 


10 
10 
10 


Park well supplies .... 
Moving safe 


SI 12 
2 50 

18 00 


10 


Brick and cement 

Printing. 


7 52 


10 


John Morton A' Son 


r, do 


11) 




26 50 


10 


Pinion Steam Printing Estabm't. . 
Beers & Resseguie 


13 oo 


• 10 
10 


Lumber 


<;:s os 
166 1 1 


10 


C. W. Keenan 


Lead pipe 


1 L6 


10 


Home J , i . - ] 1 1 Oil 


9 67 


10 


Paints, oils, &c 


C,o 7o 


10 




112 34 


10 


<< 


s 65 


1(1 
111 


" 




90 

1 25 


10 




21 CO 


10 


,, 


Whiting, Ac 


1 00 


10 


<c 


4 SO 


10 


<< 


:: c,o 


10 


(( 


13 10 


10 


<< 


:; en 


10 


(I 


22 00 


10 


<< 


21 20 


10 


Union Steam Printing Estabm't. 

Kenvon & Newton . 

Win'. Wull's Souk 

0. M. M. semaD .V Bro 


■A 75 


1(1 




01 80 


10 

11) 


Ledger 

Printing 


7 50 
17 50 


10 

1(1 


Sash 

Marline 


2 no 
11 56 


1(1 


Rubber horse cover 

Stirrup leather, Ac 


5 oo 


10 

111 




ic oo 
51 71 


10 






51 '.)2 


HI 
10 


Balch, Trie.' & Co 

Jo'cob < '< Miner 


Police officers' hat 

Soap 


1 00 

56 50 


10 


Stephen Slevenson 


6 25 


11 

10 

111 


A. V. Benoit 

C. W. Keenan 

I Irni'v Werner 


Drawing materials 

Lumber 


11 20 
26 7:? 
11 40 


10 


Watson A Pittenger 


59 7;", 


1(1 






os 64 


20 


Payroll .' 


( (fficers and clerks 


874 ic 


• 1 1, Me 1 




15,555 20 


4 


<< 


399 70 


4 


<£ 


" 


2,598 lo 






BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



29 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date. 



June 



Name. 



John Y. Cuyler 

William Bergen, Agent. 

Louis D. Beck 



Cowperthwait Company.. 
Vanderbilt Bros'. Nephew 

Dr. Jerome Walker 

Davis & Fitzgerald 

Whitehouse & Wells 

Edward R. Shipman 



Paul C. Coffin . . 
C. W. Keenan. 



CM. Moseman & Bro . . 
Henrv Werner 



Hosford & Sons 

L . Brandeis & Son . . 

E I . Horsman 

Pratt Manufacturing Co. 
Wm. Wall's Sons 



Peck & Snyder 

Rubber Clothing Co. 

A. V. Benoit 

Beers .& Resseguie . . 
Frank J Cole 



Union Steam Printing Estabm't . 

Isaac Knee, Jr 

Michael Pierce 

Thomas McCann 

Pratt Brothers 

C. M. Moseman & Bro 



C. W. Keenan. . 
Hosford & Sons. 



Peter B. Bracken . . 

W. & J. Sloane 

National Meter Co. 

Mica Roofing Co . . . 



Foe. 



Incidental expenses . 
Coal 



Gravel 



Office furniture, &c 

Agricultural Implements. 

Medical services 

Binding Book of Accounts 
Glass 



Burl ap bags 

Corn 

Oats, feed, &c. . . ...... 

Hardware 

Aqua fortis 

White lead, &c 

Supplies 

Whiting 

White lead and paints. 

Supplies 

Whiting 

Wagon harness 

Pine plugs 

Hickory truck poles. . . 

Oak bars 

Stationery 

Plumbing supplies. . . . 

Tennis markers 

Naphtha 

Cotton, oakum, &c. . . . 
Rope, bunting, &c . . . . 

Stop nets , 

Hose 

Linen tapes 

Lumber 

Collars and gloves for 

keepers 

Printing 

Repairing harness, &c. 

Use of roadways 

Cement pipe 

Trees 

Harness 



Paints, oils, &c. 

Stationery 

Inkstand 

Bay horse .... 

Carpets . 

Meter supplies. 

Tar "....' 



Amount . 



$78 19 
214 95 

20 40 
2,342 72 

337 85 

412 00 

79 50 

25 00 

16 50 
90 00 
13 00 

2 80 
174 85 
428 14 

3 50 
15 05 

21 90 
21 72 
77 35 
32 70 
23 35 

130 00 
9 00 

6 00 
23 50 
15 90 
48 06 

8 00 
51 61 
13 90 

166 87 
20 CO 
50 00 

7 50 
302 30 

34 88 
13 50 
27 75 
25 00 
30 00 
252 75 
57 50 

17 50 
53 26 

2 00 
1 25 
300 00 
290 57 
1 90 
1 95 

9 00 



30 



REPORT OF THE 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date. 



June 13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
13 
23 
24 
24 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
:: 
:; 
3 



July 



('. W. Keenan 

L . V . Plageman . 

Carr & Hobson . . 

Frederick Loeser & Co 

W. B Dayton 

Union Steam Printing Estabm't. 

Thomas McCann 

Frederick Loeser & Co. 

Howell & Saxtan 

James G. Pollard. 

L. Brandeis & Son 

Brooklyn Gaslight Company. . . . 



Name. 



Cornelius Winant. . . . 
Ken von & Newtmi . . 
W. B. Dayton & Son. 
I [osford & Sons 



Metropi ilitan ( raslight ( Jompany . 

S. Henderson & Son 

Andrew A . Smith , 

Hosford & Sons 

Pay-roll 

L . Conterno 

Watson it Pittinger 

Pay-roll 

L . Conterno 



Thomas McCann . 
Pay-roll 



J. P. Cranford 

William Bergen, Agent 



John Y. Culver. 
Isaac Harris . . . 



John Gallagher & Bro 

Louis I). Beck 

Vanderbilt Pros'. Nephew. 

Fred. Stone .V Co 

0. M Moseman .V Bro. . . . 
C. W Keenan 



I leers & Ressegnie . . , 
Edward It. Shapman 



Foe. 



Flagstaff 

Sash and doors 

Range supplies 

Stationery 

Pins.....* 

Paints, &c 

Attendance on sick horses 

Lawn Mower 

Supplies 



Printing. 

(i ravel .. 

Supplies. 



Large roller and supydies 

Repairing picks 

Iron pipe 

Gas 



Office expenses 

Inkstands 

Laborers 

Music, first concert. . . . 

Lumber 

Officers and clerks 
Music, second concert. 

" third concert. . . 

" fourth concert 

(iravel 

Laborers, &c 



Balance due on contract. 
Coal 



Incidental expenses 
Hauling gravid .... 



Carriage hire 

Boa Hook gravel 

Agricultural implements. 
Sleeves for hydrants 

Harness supplies 

Home Light oil 

Supplies 

I tome Light oil 

Matches. 

Supplies. 

Lumber 

Suit and meal 



Amount. 



$50 00 

7 50 
:i 85 
7 75 
2 40 
31 45 
12 00 
9 50 

11 7:". 

10 23 

9 50 

47!) 75 

6 00 
328 18 

35 0(1 
s 85 
35 00 
28 56 
28 35 

7 50 
s is 

'.10 

827 85 
160 00 
982 40 
s7l L6 
160 oo 
160 on 

100 00 
1,1 2.S 00 

8,636 15 

132 45 
622 35 

2,032 94 
017 04 

127 50 

102 00 

69 os 

1,025 SS 

1,692 oo 

17 50 

075 85 



11 10 

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:::i :;:; 

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13 DO 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



31 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Continued. 



Date . 


Name. 


Foe. 


Amount. 


July 9 
9 


Edward R. Shipman 


Oats, feed &c 


$87 20 






101 10 


9 


Union Steam Printing Estabni't. . 
Watson & Pittinger 


Printing 


14 50 


9 


Felt 


35 87 


9 




280 00 


9 




4 30 


9 




Lamp supplies 

Naphtha 


12 CO 


9 
9 


Pratt Manufacturing Co 


51 03 

51 77 


9 




Castings for urinals 

Hardware 


49 50 


9 
9 


Paul C. Coffin * 

C. A'. Brandt 


7 20 
162 61 


9 
9 
9 


Gas 

Repairing harness, &c . . . 
Gas 


15 00 

28 52 
69 50 


9 

9 


Brooklyn Gaslight Co 


27 86 
41 44 


9 




Combs 

Printing 


1 08 


9 


Brooklyn Daily Eagle 

Hosf ord & Sons 


5 25 


9 
9 


Stationery 


13 75 
4 97 


9 


CM. Moseman & Bro 

N Y Deodorizing Co 


Harness 


75 


9 


Disinfectants 

Unloading gravel, &c . . . . 

" 6th " 

7th " 

Officers and clerks ,,... 
Music, 8th concert 

" 9th " 

" 10th '• 

Laborers, &c 


36 00 


9 




105 75 


8 




15 50 


9 

9 

16 

22 


Pay roll 


160 00 
160 00 
160 00 
874 16 


21 


L . Conterno 


160 00 


Aug . 5 




160 00 


5 


t < 


160 00 


5 




4,715 93 


5 




287 50 


5 


t. 


<< 


1,847 48 


7 


William Bergen, Agent 


Coal 


198 90 


7 




30 60 


7 

7 


John Y . Culyer 

John M . Bulwinkle 


Incidental expenses 

Criminal and penal code. 

Session laws, 1884 

Roa Hook gravel 

Unloading gravel 

Oats, feed and meal 

Oats and corn 


60 12 
1 05 


7 


L . K . Strouse & Co 


6 50 


7 




2 00 




Louis D . Beck 


1,822 65 


7 


Dennis Wheeler 


208 17 


7 
7 


Edward R . Shipman 


68 25 
94 13 


7 


L . Conterno 

Metropolitan Gas Light Co .... 

National Meter Co 

Smith Bros 


Music 


80 00 


7 


Lumber 


7 80 


12 


Gas 


26 95 


12 
12 


Repairs to meter 

" steam roller. . 

Repairingboiler house, &c. 


1 10 

217 18 


12 


Paul C. Coffin 


141 94 


12 




52 00 



32 



RErORT OF THE 



Statement of Accounts certified /<> Auditor'- Continued. 



Date 


Name . 


Foe. 


Amount. 


Aug. 12 
12 


A. W. Shadboli & Son 


[ce for park offices 

Repairing picks, &c 


si | -'ii 


Knickerbocker lee Co 


2 80 


12 
12 
12 

12 


C. M. Moseman & Bro 

Brooklyn Gas Light Co 

Union Steam Printing Estabm't. . 

Prospect Park & 0. I. R. R. Co! ! 
Win. Wall's Sons 


12 82 
8 66 

1 (10 
1 50 


12 




1 50 


12 




25 06 


12 

12 
1" 


Printing 


36 12 
4 50 

10 00 


12 

12 


Railroad tickets 


C> 00 

;,o no 


12 
12 


Al arline 


50 oo 

i; to 


12 


Pratt Manufacturing Co 

Watson tV Pittinger 


Naphtha 


51 77 


12 




s 55 


12 
12 




Lime and Ct ment 


l <;:, 
3 v5 


12 
12 






:i 75 
18 70 


12 




I 35 


12 




Whi'ing ... 


7 :;i 


12 




20 10 


12 


" 


1 l"ine Li^'lit oil 


13 oo 


12 


Signal oil, &c 


53 98 


12 

12 


Brooklyn Improvement Co 

W. B. Davis 

Pay roll 

L. < 'onterno 


( iastor oil and whiting. . . 

Whiting and oil 

1 >ockage 


28 35 
21 7:5 
120 00 


12 
19 
20 


Repairs to wagon 

Music, 1 1th concert. . . 

12th " . . 
Laborers, &c 


22 50 

874 10 
100 00 


27 

Sept. 4 

4 


Pa\ roll 


11,0 00 

0,110 ::i 
112 05 


4 
4 


William Bergen, Agent 


( !oal 


72S 01 
153 00 


4 




35 70 


4 
9 

9 


John Y. Culver 

Edward R. Shipman 


Incidental expenses. . . . 
( >atme;il ... 

Automatic lubricator. . . . 

Music. Kith concert 

Unloading scows, &c .... 

Repairing buggy 

Medical attendance tor 


65 69 

His 38 

7 50 


9 
9 




104 63 

22 50 


9 


I j < 'onterno ... 


100 00 


10 
11 
13 


Dniiiis Wheeler 

( Iharles Wintervrerb . 


50 21 

20 75 


22 


Stephen Stevenson 


horses 

( (facers and clerks .... 


11 00 
6 25 


22 
22 
30 


Union Steam Printing Estabm't 

Payroll 

Paul C. Coffin 


2 50 

874 10 

1 80 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



33 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor' — Continued. 



Date. 


Name. 


Fob. 


Amount. 


Sept. 30 
30 


C. W. Keenan 


Automatic burners 

Home Light oil 


$30 00 
7 30 


30 




34 83 


30 


c< 


Lubricating oil 

Oil for machinery 

Stationery 

Harness 


19 50 


30 


(< 


79 10 


30 


Hosf orcl & Sons 


5 75 


30 




16 75 


30 


C. M. Moseman & Bro 

William H. Douglass 

Prospect Park & C. I. K. R. Co. . 
Pratt Manufacturing Co 


3 00 


30 
30 
30 
30 


Railroad ticket 

Gas 


2 25 

2 50 

50 00 

44 46 


30 
30 


Metropolitan Gaslight Co :' . 

Brooklyn Gaslight Oo 


28 35 

29 26 


30 


<< 


23 52 


30 

30 


Frank J. Cole 

E. H. Wells. . 


Gloves for keepers 


10 50 

9 20 


30 


C. W. Keenan 

C. W. Keenan 

Hosford & Sons 

Brooklyn, Fl'bu'h & O. I. R.R. Co 

Peter B. Bracken 

Payroll 


Paints, &c 


23 50 


30 

30 


Dockage .... 


40 00 
15 50 


30 
30 

Oct. 1 
4 


Railroad tickets 

Repairing harness 


4 85 
50 00 

5 30 
869 17 


4 






835 17 


4 


< G 


Coal 

Printing 


432 22 


6 


William Bergen, Agent 


137 70 


7 


John Y. Culyer 


52 32 


7 
7 


The Brooklyn Improvement Co. . 
Union Steam Printing Estabm't . 

Metropolitan Gas Light Co 

Brooklyn Gas Light Co 


10 00 
4 50 


7 
7 
7 


Stationery 

Gas 


1 75 
29 22 
36 96 


7 
7 


£< 


29 96 


Oonev Island Gas. Fuel it L. Co. . 


t< 


118 00 


7 


<■ 


117 00 


7 Paul C. Coffin 


Hardware 


48 50 


7 


C. W. Keenan 


Whiting 


22 13 


7 


Glaziers' point 


60 


7 


A. W. Shadbolt & Son 


Home Light oil 


14 40 


7 


Wagon repairs, &c 

Repairing harness 

Oats, &c 


101 67 


7 
7 


Isaac Knee 

L. Brandeis & Son 


54 25 
3 60 


7 


Edward R. Shipman 


81 13 


8 




Corn, meal, &c 


46 60 


18 


Payroll 


Oats 


76 88 


Nov. 7 


Officers and clerks 

Drugs 

Kerosene oil 


874 16 


7 
7 


Wm. H. Douglas 

C. W. Keenan 


6 75 
13 95 


7 




Home Light oil. &c 

Paint brushes, &c 

Drawing materials 


16 95 


7 


i< 


7 40 


7 


A. V. Benoit 


15 00 



:;i 



KK1-011T OF THE 



Statement of Accounts certified to Auditor — Concluded. 



Date. 


Name. 


Fob. 


Amount. 


Nov. 7 


Union Steam Printing Estabm't . 

Metropolitan Gaslight Company. . 
CM. Mosemtin & Bro 


bts. Arc 


$94 93 


7 
7 


a 


5 00 

6 on 


7 

7 


Gas 

Chamois and brush 


31 68 

2 50 


7 




7.") 


7 






15 70 


7 




( irate to heater 


2 50 


7 


Coney Island Fuel, Gas & Light Co. 
Brooklyn Gaslight Company 

W B. Davis 




34 91 


7 


Gas 


117 00 


7 


n 


33 32 


7 
7 


Repairing wagons, Ac. . . . 
Rep'ng green house boiler 

Coal 


36 26 

2 25 


7 

7 
7 
7 


William Bergen, Agent 


47 00 

23 75 

116 15 

52 25 


7 


Newcorub & Co 


Hats for keepers 

Incidental expenses. . . . 

Repairs to machinery. . . . 
Railroad tickets 


9 75 


7 


John Y. Culyer 


57 32 


Dec. 5 




17 117 


5 




93 10 


5 


Brooklyn, Flatb'h & C.I. R.R. Co. 

Pratt Manufacturing Company. . . 
Brooklyn Gaslight Company. . . . 

Edward II. Shipman 

William Bergen, Agent 


50 00 


5 


Steam gauges 


48 (to 


5 
5 


Gas 


36 24 
21 00 


5 
5 


Oats 

Coal 

Carriage hire 

Attendance on sick hi uses 

Well boiler supplies 

Iron pipe 


71 25 
224 10 


5 

5 


John Gallagher & Bro 

L. V. Plageman 


2:5 on 
17 00 


5 


Cole & Co 


8 60 


5 


Felix Campbell 


10 


5 


L. Brandeis & Son. . 




2 50 


5 


C. W. Keenan 




5 20 


5 


C. M. Moseman & Bro 


Insurance 


:; 5o 


5 




7 50 


5 


Williamsburgh City Fire Ins. Co. 
Total 


17G 96 


5 


Office expenses 


7 37 










$138,104 42 









BEOOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



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BROOKLYN PAEK COMMISSIONERS. 



37 






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BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



49 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 

Latitude, 40° 41 North , Longitude, 73° 57 West from Greenwich. 
Height of Instrument above the sea, 220 feet. 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 1 



Table shoiving the observed height of the Barometer, monthly, for the 
year ending December 31, 1884. 







Mean 


Mean 


Mean 


h 




P 




Months. 


at 


at 


at 


£ a 


S 


z 




7 A. M. 


2 P. M. 


9 P. M. 


§a 




•A 


& 










£ 


S 


§ 




January 


29 954 


29.897 


29.891 


29.914 


30 485 


29.123 


1.362 


February 




29.839 


29 . 840 


29.839 


29.727 


30.404 


29.311 


1.093 


March 




29.823 


29.859 


29.828 


29 . 837 


29.986 


29.612 


.374 


April 




29 . 687 


29.634 


29 . S72 


29.731 


30.002 


29.083 


.919 


May 




29.714 


29.724 


29. 80 J 


29.771 


3U . 083 


29.415 


.668 


June 




29 872 


29.902 


29.875 


29.897 


30.269 


29.595 


.671 


July 




29 483 


29.428 


29.693 


29 683 


29 867 


29 . 396 


.471 


August 




29 848 


29.851 


29 . 989 


29.829 


30.086 


29.540 


.546 


September. . . . 




29.810 


29 . 855 


29.850 


29.831 


30.269 


29 576 


.693 


October 




29 . 947 


29.859 


29.957 


29.916 


30.259 


29 . 540 


.719 


November .... 




29.851 


29.833 


29 835 


29.855 


30 . 236 


29.315 


.921 


December 




29.936 


29.929 


29.922 


29 929 


30.362 


29.361 


1 . 001 



Annual mean at 7 A. M. . . 29 813 

Annual mean at 2 P. M " 29.801 

Annual mean at 9 P. M 29.862 

Annual mean of 1,098 observations 29.825 

Maximum, January 27, 2 P. M 30 . 485 

Minimum, April 2, 9 P. M 29.083 

Eange 1.402 



50 



REPORT OF THE 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 2. 

DRY. 



Table showing the state of Thermometer, monthly, for the //car 
ending December 31, 1884. 



Months. 



January. . . 
February . 
March .... 
April . . . . 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October. . . 
November. 
December 









a 


• 


Mean 


Mian 


Mean 


p 


p 


AT 


AT 


AT 


<5 


« 


7 A. M. 


2 P. M . 


9 P. M. 


< 
3 




24.40 


30.32 


26.74 


|:i 50 


7.00 


32 92 


38 12 


33 52 


54 . 50 


5.00 


2!) . 28 


36.88 


54.51 


61.50 


6.00 


49.94 


53.48 


46 . 42 


78.00 


30.00 


52.42 


67 uu 


61.16 


96.00 


kC 00 


66 . 34 


78.14 


68.00 


92 . 50 


11 on 


68.50 


77.5 »4 


70.80 


92 mi 


54.00 


70.00 


80 68 


72.23 


94 on 


54 . 00 


68.96 


81.36 


71.28 


94.00 


47.00 


54 . 82 


65.73 


58 ill 


86.50 


32.00 


11 '.Hi 


50.30 


i»;. en 


67.50 


20.01) 


34.90 


11 10 


39.80 


59.50 


O.OO 



36.50 
49 50 

55 50 

IS III! 

56 00 
48.50 
38 00 

in 00 
47 00 
54 . 50 
57.50 
59.50 



Annual mean, dry, at 7 A. M 49 . 53 

Annual mean, dry, at 2 P. M 58.43 

Annual mean, dry, at 9 P. M 55 . 75 

Annual mean, dry, at 1,098 observations 54.57 

Maximum, dry, May 22 96.00 

Minimum, dry, December 19 . 00 

Range 96.00 



BROOKLYN PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



51 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 3. 



Table showing the state of Thermometer, monthly, for the year 
ending December 31, 1884. 



Months. 



January . . 
February. 

March . . . 

April 

May 

Jane 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October. . 
November 
December 



Mean 


Mkan 


Mean 




p 


AT 
7 A. M. 


AT 
2 P. M. 


at 

9 P. M. 


< 




21.58 


27.04 


25.50 


40.00 


6.00 


30.(19 


34.31 


30.66 


50.00 


4.00 


26.05 


34.87 


31.33 


55 00 


4 00 


40.80 


48 34 


44.66 


56 00 


31.00 


50.96 


60 U4 


52 . 94 


74.00 


41.00 


61.10 


68:78 


62.34 


80.00 


50.00 


62.44 


69 54 


66 12 


79.00 


55.00 


64.55 


70.67 


66.67 


78.00 


55.00 


60.42 


69.98 


64.62 


80 00 


48.00 


49.63 


58.39 


54 39 


70.00 


34 00 


37.00 


40.60 


41 . 80 


57 00 


19 00 


30.40 


37.10 


36.40 


56.(0 


2.00 



Range. 



34.00 
46 00 
51 00 
25.00 
33.00 
30.00 
24.00 
23.00 
32.00 
36.00 
38.00 
54.00 



Annual mean, wet, at 7 A. M 44 .59 

Annual mean, wet, at 2 P. M 59 . 97 

Annual mean, wet, at 9 P. M 48.12 

Annual mean, wet, of 1,098 observations 50 . 98 

Maximum, wet, August 6 . 80 . 00 

Minimum, wet, December 20 2 . 00 

Range , 78.00 



52 



RETORT OF THE 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 4. 

Table shoioing the force of Vapor, monthly, for the //car ending 
December 31, 1884. 



January . . 
February 
.March.. *. . . 
April . 

May 

June 

July 

August . . 
September 
( (ctober. . . 
November 
December. 



Months. 



Ml" AN 

AT 
7 A. M. 



(ISS 

.137 

138 

.209 

.321 

. 47-» 

497 

551 

173 

.360 

.169 

137 



Mean 

AT 
2 P. M. 



109 

110 

211 
. 275 

444 
.616 
.627 

(143 
. 586 

433 
.212 

177 



Mean 

AT 
9 P. M. 

104 


Monthly. 
Mean 


100 


.141 


.141 


.186 


17* 


239 


.240 


352 


.372 


.495 


.528 


590 


.571 


.638 


.610 


549 


. 536 


369 


309 


.219 


.199 


.175 


103 



Force of vapor, maximum, September 6 1.033 

Force of vapor, minimum, March 1 007 

Range * 1 026 



BEOOKLYN PAEK COMMISSIONEKS. 



53 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 5. 



Table shoicing the relative humidity (saturation being 100 J, monthly, 
for the year ending December 31, 1884 



Months. 


Mean 
at 

7 A. M. 


Mean 

AT 
2 P. M. 


Mean 
at 

9 P.M. 


Monthly. 
Mean 




.57 
.65 
.56 
.69 
.72 
.71 
.72 
.74 
.66 
.66 
61 
.63 


.63 
.59 
.66 
.68 
.63 
61 
.65 
.59 
.57 
.62 
.56 
.61 


.68 
.67 
.68 
.73 
.72 
.59 
.75 
.75 
.71 
.71 
.66 
.69 


.63 


February. . . . 


.67 


March 




63 


April 




.70 


M ay 


.69 




.63 


July 

September 




.71 




.63 
•64 


October . . 




.66 


November 




.61 


December 




.64 








Maximum, 


^November 24 








....100. 


Minimum, 


March 1 








11 


Range .... 










89 



54 



REPORT OF THE BROOKLYN TARK COMMISSIONERS. 



METEOROLOGICAL TABLE No. 6. 



Table showing tlve duration and depth of rain, snow and prevailing 
triads, monthly, during flic year ending December 31, 1884. 



Months. 



January . . 
February . 
March ... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



« ^^ 

rt b. 

■-*■* c 

1 * 

£ 

15 
14 
12 

s 

8 

2 

5 

8 

2 

7 

4 



Rain 
Duration. 



6.45 
5.175 
5.77 
2.46 
3.92 
5.15 
6.711 
8.46 
207 
2.885 
2 . R035 
5.87 



a 
a . 

"S DO 



7 . 45 
13.825 
19.915 
22 375 
26.295 
31.445 
38.156 
46.616 
46.823 
49.708 
52.315 
59 275 



Fall of Snow. 



11 00 



a . 



0035 

09 



Ph 



N. W. 
N. W. 
N. W. 
N. W 
N. VV. 
S. 

s. 

S. 

w 

w. 

w 

w. 



§ Melted as it fell.