(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

mmf:i 



fill*'-' 
■ It 



w 



m^ 






m 



5t ■; 



ill 

jilt's ■ 

Hit* '■i*l. ■■' ' 



:. i : • 






.kb *S357.56 



^ 



I .'3 70- 




Lp 




[Document 39 — 1888.] 




CITY OF i-„._J BOSTON. 



TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEEE, 



FOR THE YEAR 1887. 



Office of the City Engineer, City Hall, 

Boston, January 2, 1888. 
To the Honorable City Council : — 

In compliance with the seventh section of the ordinance 
reUiting to the Engineer's Department, the following report 
of the expenses and operations of the department for the 
year 1887 is respectfully sui)mitted. 

The duties of the City Engineer may be classified under 
the following heads : — 

A. — Those pertaining to the City Engineer's Department 
proper, which consist in examination and supervision of 
structural repairs of l)ridges ; in designing and superintend- 
ing the construction of new bridges, retaining- walls, city 
wharves, etc., and in miscellaneous engineering work called 
for by the City Council. (City Engineer's Department.) 

B. — Superintendence of the Sudbury River, Cochituate, 
and Mystic AVater- Works, including charge of new construc- 
tions for these works. (Water- Works.) 

C. — Charge of the constiuction of a system of intercept- 
ing and outlet sewers. (Improved Sewerage, or Main 
Drainage.) 

D. — Charo-e of the enofineerino: work in connection with 
the Back Bay and other proposed parks. (Parks.) 



2 City Document No. 39. 

The expenses incurred under the head C are paid wholly 
from a special appropriation. 

A. — City Engineer's Department. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 
January 1, 18b 7, to January 1, 1888 : — 

Amount expended from department appropria- 
tion for 1886-87 $8,695 16 

Amount expended from department appropria- 
tion for 1887-88 23,527 47 



Total $32,222 63 

Condition of department appropriation : — 

Amount of appropriation for financial year 

1887-88 $33,000 00 

Amount expended to January 1, 1888 . . 23,527 47 



Unexpended balance, January 1, 1888 . $9,472 53 

Classification of Expenses. 

Salaries of City Engineer, assistants, draughts- 
men, transit-men, levellers, rod-men, etc. . $29,443 75 
Engineering instruments and repairs of same . 235 12 

Drawing-paper, and all materials for making 

plans 314 08 

Stationery, printing-stock, note-books, post- 
age, etc. ....... 307 11 

Reference library, binding books, and photo- 
graphs of work ..... 257 43 

Printing 65 30 

Travelling expenses (including horse-keeping, 

repairs on vehicle, etc.) .... 756 37 
Telephone service . . . . . 120 00 
Furniture cases for plans and books, etc. . 346 04 
Blue-process printing ..... 122 39 
Incidental expenses, and all other small sup- 
plies 255 04 



Total $32,222 63 

The number of persons employed and paid from the de- 
partment appropriation was, on the 1st of January, 1887 
(including the City Engineer), 20. The present number is 



Report of City Engineer. 3 

20. The operations of the department for the year, together 
with such general information relating to the various works 
and structures, finished and in progress, as is thought to be 
of interest, are given in the following statements : — 

BRIDGES. 

In accordance with Section 5, Chapter 18, of the Revised 
Ordinances, the estimates of cost of repairs submitted by 
the Superintendent of Bridges has been revised and reported 
upon, and structural repairs'required have been ordered and 
supervised. 

As required by Section 4 of the above, examinations have 
been made of all bridges within the city limits. 

The name of the bridge at Cottage Farm, over the Boston 
& Alban}^ Railroad, has been changed from Brighton avenue 
to Commonwealth avenue, on account of the change in the 
name of the avenue. 

In the list those marked with an asterisk are over navi- 
gable waters, and are each provided with a draw. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

Ashland street. Ward 23, over Boston & Providence Rail- 
road. 

Athens street, over N.Y. & N.E. Railroad. 

Beacon Entrance, Back Bay, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkele}' street, over Boston & Providence Railroad. 

Blakemore street, over Boston & Providence Railroad, 
Ward 23. 

Boylston street, in Back Bay. 
*Broadway, over Fort Point Channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 
*Chelsea (South), over South Channel, Mystic river. 
*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Ward 24. 
*Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay. 

Congress street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany and Boston & 
Providence Railroads. 



4 City Document No. 39. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point Channel. 
*Federal street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Franklin-street foot-bridge, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Linden Park street, over Stony Brook. 
*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 
*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort Point Channel. 

Newton street, over Boston & Providence Railroad. 

Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Swett street, east of N.Y. & N.Pl Railroad. 

Swett street, west of N.Y. & N.E. Railroad. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

AVest Chester park, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
West Chester park, over Boston & Providence Railroad. 
West Rutland-square foot-bridge, over Boston & Provi- 
dence Railroad. 
Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 
WITHIN its Limits. 

*Carabridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

Central avenue, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Chelsea (North), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Ward 25 (Brookline) to Cambridge. 
*Granite, from Dorchester, Ward 24, to Milton. 

Longwood avenue, from Ward 22 to Brookline. 

Mattapan, from Ward 24 to Milton. 

Milton, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Ward 24 to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, from Biigliton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

HI. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Alban}' street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

Dorchester street, over Old Colony Railroad. 
*Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 
*We8t Boston, from lioston to Caml)ridge. 



Report of City Engineer. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 

Ifit. — Boston & Albany Bailroad. 

Commou wealth avenue, Brighton. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Treniont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Bailroad. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Bailroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston ti* Providence Railroad. 

Beech street, Ward 23. 

Bellevue street, Ward 23. 

Canterbury street. Ward 23. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, Ward 23. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets. Ward 23. 

Dudley avenue, Ward 23. 

Park street, Ward 23. 

5th. — Boston, Bevere Beach, & Lynn Bailroad. 
Everett street. 

6th. — JSfew York & New England Bailroad. 

Broadway. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Fifth street. 

Forest Hills avenue. Ward 24. 

Fourth street. 

Harvard street, Ward 24. 

Norfolk " " " 

Norfolk " " " 

Second street. 

Silver street. 

Sixth street. 

Third street. 

Washington street. Ward 24. 



6 City Document No. 39. 

7th. — Old Colony Railroad. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Commercial street. ^' 

Savin Hill avenue. 

Recapitulation. 

I. Number Avholly supported l)y Boston . . 39 

II. Numl)er of which Boston supports the part with- 
in its limits ...... 14 

III. Nnm]>er of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ..... 5 

IV. Number supported by Railroad Corporations : — 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 5 

2. Boston & Maine 2 

3. " " Eastern Div. ... 2 

4. Boston & Providence ..... 7 

5. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn ... 1 

6. New York & New Enoland .... 13 

7. Old Colony . . ^ 5 

Total number ...... 93 



L — BRIDGES WHOLLY SUPPORTED BY BOSTON. 

ASHLAND-STREET BrIDGE (OVER BoSTON & PROVIDENCE 

Railroad, Ward 23). 
This bridge is in good condition. 

Athens-street Bridge (over New York & New Eng- 
land Railroad). 

This bridge needs painting ; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 



Beacon-entrance Bridge (in Back Bay, over Boston 
& Albany Railroad). 

This bridge has been painted, and the roadway sheathed. 
Jt is in good condition. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over outlet of Back Bay). 
This brido^e is in ojood condition. 



Eeport of City Engineer. 7 

Beacox-street Bridge (over Bostox & Albany Rail- 
road). 

This bridge is not yet in use. The street has l^een 
widened, and the bridge is now being changed from 70 
ft. to 94 ft. in width, by and at the expense of the West End 
Land Company. The abutments have been finished, bat the 
addition to the iron bridge is not yet done. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad). 

This bridge has been repaired by replacing the roadway 
floor-beams which were defective, and laying new under and 
upper floors. The sidewalks should be renewed this year. 
The bridge is in good condition, but it is a weak structure. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Providence 

Railroad). 

The concrete surface and the plank under floor of the side- 
walk is in poor condition ; a part of the bridge is in need of 
painting. 

Blakemore-street Bridge (over Boston & Providence 

Railroad ) . 

This bridge is in o;ood condition. 

Boylston-street Bridge (in Back Bay). 

The parapet and portions of the masonry are in need of 
pointing, otherwise it is in good condition. This bridge is 
maintained by the Park Department. 

*Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

The \mder floor has been relaid on one 100-foot span, and 
the bridge was painted partly in 1886 and partly in 1887. 
The floor of the remaining 100-foot span should be renewed ; 
otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Broadway Bridge (over Boston & Albany Railroad). 

The bridge has been painted throughout, the floor having 
been removed for the purpose. It is in good condition. 

Brookline-a VENUE Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad) . 

This bridge has been painted, and it is in good condition. 



8 City Document No. 39. 

*Charles-kiver Bridge (from Boston to Charles- 
town ) . 

A new enoine and boiler for movinp; the draw was put in 
place early in the year, and ha.s furnished ample power for 
that purpose. 

The settlement of the draw foundation continues to be a 
sour'ce of trouble and expense, and it will be necessary to 
rebuild a part of it during the coming year. The bridge as 
a whole is okl, and in poor condition. No extensive repairs 
w^ere made during the year. 

*Chelsea Bridge (South) (over South Channel, Mystic 

Eiver) . 

The lower track of the draw will require repairs in the 
spring, otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

The hand-power formerly used for turning the draw has 
been replaced by horse-power. 

*Chelsea-street Bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea) . 

The part of this bridge between the draw and Chelsea, 
about one hundred feet in length, was destroyed by tire on 
September 7, and the draw was damaged to some extent. 

The tire was caused by an explosion on board a schooner 
loaded with naphtha; its mooring ropes were burned' ofl\ and 
the burning vessel drifted against the bridge. The damages 
were repaired at a cost of about $3,000. The draw is old, 
narrow, and badly decayed, and can be made to last but a 
short time longer. The bridge, excepting the draw, is in 
good condition. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad). 

There are several wire ropes attached to the trusses as 
stays to a telegraph })ole which should be removed. Only 
ordinary repairs have been made, and the bridge is in fair 
condition. 

*COMMERCIAL PoiNT, OR TeNEAN BrIDGE (WaRD 24). 

This bridge is in fair condition. 

Commonwealth-avenue Bridge (in Back Bay). 

No repairs have been made on this bridge. It is in good 
condition. 



Report of City Engineer. 9 

*C0NGRESS-STREET BrIDGE (OVER FORT PoiNT CHANNEL). 

A special appropriation of $13,200 was made, for the pur- 
pose of repairinii" the draw pier, and protectino- the founda- 
tion of the draw from the effects of deei)ening the channel by 
the United States government. 

The work of doing the above repairs was done by Mr. F. 
G. Whitcomb, under a contract dated August 19, 1887. 

The plank face of the pier and water-ways, with the pro- 
tecting corner-irons, were removed, and two hundred and 
thirty additional oak piles, each forty-eight feet in length, 
driven. The face of the water-ways on ]>oth channels and 
the ends of the pier were planked with oak and maple plank, 
and the corner-irons replaced in good condition. 

The total cost of the work was $10,796.40. 

The bridge has been painted, and ordinaiy re{)airs made. 
The fender is in bad condition, the upper ends of a number 
of the bridge |)iles are decayed, and a considerable amount 
of repairs to pile work will be required this year. The 
boilers which furnish steam for moving the draw are old and 
past repair, and it will be necessary to renew at legist one of 
them during the coming year. 

When the bridge was built, the end towards the city 
proper abutted upon Russia wharf, part of its width lieing 
upon the solid wharf, and part over the adjacent dock. As 
it was reasonably certain that the dock would be tilled before 
many years, the widening was made upon a pile structure, to 
save the construction of an expensive retaining-wall. The 
dock and the vacant space under the Ijridge have been filled 
without expense to the city, and the bridge floor over this 
filled space should be removed, and the paving replaced upon 
the solid earth. 

Dartmouth-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany and 
Boston & Providence Railroad). 

The under floor of this bridge has been patched, and should 
be renewed the next time the bridge is sheathed ; other- 
wise the ])ridge is in good condition. 

*Dover-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

One sidewalk has been replanked. The bridge is in fair 
condition. 

*Federal-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

^ This bridge was built in 1828, rebuilt and widened in 
/ 1858, again rebuilt and widened in 1878, and portions of the 



10 City Document No. 39. 

structure date from each of these periods. The wooden 
draws built in 1873 are in such had condition that expensive 
repairs will be needed to keep them in use another year, and 
when the repairs are made the structure will not be worth 
the money expended. The recommendations of the past three 
years is renewed, — that the l)rid,<j:e be rebuilt with a new 
iron draw of the full width of the bridge, to be moved by 
steam-power. 

Only the repairs al)solutely required have been made dur- 
ing the year. 

Feedinand-strket Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 

This is a poor bridge ; a portion of it is carried on posts, 
and the span over the railroad is composed of three iron 
trusses of two patterns, and two wooden trusses. It is nar- 
row, inconvenient, and unsightly. The portion supported 
on posts should be tilled solid, and a new bridge built over 
the railroad. 

Franklin-street Foot-bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad). 

This bridge is in good condition. 

HUNTINGTON-AVENUE BrIDGE (OVER BoSTON & AlBANY 

Railroad). 

The under floor of this bridge has been renewed, the side- 
walks replanked, and the bridge painted. It is in good 
condition. 

Linden Park-street Bridge (over Stony Brook). 
This bridofe is in a good condition. 

*Malden Bridge (fkom Charlestown to Everett) . 

This bridge has a wooden draw, built in 1872, which is old 
and weak. It will require some repairs during the coming 
year. 

The bridge and })ier are in fair condition. 

*Mehidiax-street Bhid(!e (fkom East Boston to 
Chelsea ) . 

The sidewalks have been newly concreted, and the bridge 
has been })ainted. The lower track of the draw should be 
renewed, and a new set of wheels pi'ovided. 



Report of City Engineer. 11 

*Mt. AVashington-avenue Bridge (over Fort Point 

Channel). 

An appropriation was made for protecting; this bridge 
against the proposed deepening of the Channel by the U.S. 
government : but, owing to the failure of the River and Har- 
bor bill in Congress, the work of dredging has not been con- 
tinued above Congress-street bridge, and consequently the 
money appropriated for repairing this bridge was not used. 
It is still intended at some future time to deepen the channel 
as far as Federal-street bridge, and before this is done these 
repairs will have to be made. 

Only ordinar}' repairs have been made, and the bridge is 
in good condition. 

Newton-street Bridge (over Boston & Providence 

Railroad). 

This bridge is in good condition. 

Public Garden Foot-bridge. 

The wood-work has been renewed, the bridge painted, 
and the abutments and piers pointed, under specitications 
prepared in 1886. 

The bridsre is in good condition. 

Shawmut-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road) . 

A twenty-four-inch wrought-iron gas-pipe has been laid 
under the westerly sidewalk by the Bay State Gas Co. 
The iron-work of the span over the main tracks is in need 
of painting; otherwise the bridge is in fair condition. Like 
all the bridges over railroads, this one shows the effects of 
corrosion from the smoke of the locomotives. No paint yet 
used has been found to be proof against the action of these 
gases, and the iron of all the bridges over railroads is de- 
teriorating more or less from this cause. 

Swett-street Bridges (over South-bay Sluices). 

These bridges will require extensive repairs next year. 
They were intended, when built, to be only temporary struc- 
tures, and are now in bad condition. 

* Warren Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 

Only slight repairs have been required, and the bridge is 
in good condition, except that it should be painted. 



12 City Documknt No. 39. 

AVest Chest'eu Park Bridge (over Boston 6c Albany 
Railroad). 

Tlie sidownlks are poor, the wood-work is in bad condi- 
tiim, and the iron-work needs pjunting. The bridge should 
1)6 thoroughly overhauled, and made to contbrm to the street 
in ))r()file. 

AVest Chester Park Bridge (over Boston & Providence 

Railroad ) . 

This bridge needs painting; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

West Rutland-square Foot-bridge (over Boston & 
Providence Railroad) . 

This bridge is in good condition. 

AYiNTHROP Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

P^ighteen piles have been driven in this bridge to replace 
an equal number which had become seriously weakened by 
the Limnoria terf^hrani^, .. ov sea-worm. The piling was 
cross-braced, and the bridge is now in good condition. 



11. —BRIDGES OF WHICH BOSTON SUPPORTS 
THE PARr WITHIN ITS LIMITS. 

* Cambridge-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 

bridge). 

The draw-pier needs replanking ; otherwise the bridge is 
in good condition. 

Central-avenue Bridge (over Neponset River, Dor- 
chester Lower Mills). 

This l)ridge is in good condition. 

* Chelsea Bridge (North, from Mystic-river Cor- 

poration Wharf to Chelsea). 

The wooden draw is old, and will require some repairs. 
The bridge has been painted, and is now in fair condition. 

* Essex-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

The tioor of this bridge has been put in good condition 
by replacing a large number of decayed stringers, rehiying 



Keport of City Engineer. 13 

the under floor and sheathing ; the sidewalk and fence have 
also been renewed. The ])ile.s are ssniall and old, and the 
bridge is too narrow to acconnnodate the hirge amount ot" 
travel over it. The widening ot" Connnonwealth avenue will 
make a steep grade at the Boston end of the bridge, which 
grade, and the railroad crossing at the head of the bridge, will 
require the replacing of the bridge by an elevated strueiure, 
or its relocation. 

* Granite Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The draw is in bad condition, and will require repairs 
when navigation opens. The remainder of the bridge is in 
good condition. 

LONGWOOD-AVENUE BrIDGE (FROM WaRI) 22 TO BrOOK- 

line). 

This is a wooden trestle, and some of the posts are set in 
the gronnd. These have conniienced to decay, and require 
attention. The roadway also needs repair, and the fence 
should be painted. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The recommendation made last year is repeated : '' The 
bridge should be re[)lace(l 1)y a stronger one '' The bridge 
is a weak structure, and is in poor condition. 

Milton Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The wood-work of this bridge should be repaired during 
the low stage of the river, and the iron-work painted. The 
stone-work of a part of the bridge is in pooi condition, but 
no change has been observed in it during the past year. 

*Neponset Bridge (from Ward 24 to Quincy). 

The up-stream pier has been replanked, and the down- 
stream pier is in need of it ; otherwise the bridge is in fair 
condition. Notice has been given of an intention to petition 
the Legislature for an Act requiring the water-Wiiys of 
bridges on this river to be thirty-six feet in width. 

*North Beacon-street Bridge (from Brighton lo 
Watertown). 

This bridge is in good condition. 



14 City Document No. 39. 

*NoRTH Hauvahd-street Bridge (from Brighton to 

Cambridge ) . 

The abutment w;is badly sliaken b\^ the collapse of a sewer 
outlet, and is in bad condition. The brido-e is in fair condi- 
lion. 

Spring-street Bridge (from Ward 23 to Dedham). 
This bridge is in good condition. 

* Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Cam- 

bridge). 

> '^ The draw requires some repairs ; otherwise the bridge is 

y/J in good condition. 

* Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Water-^ 

town). 

This bridge was repaired, and a new abutment built, in 
1886. The draw is an inconvenient one, and it is difficult 
to pass vessels of kirge size ; but the bridge as a structure is 
in fair condition. 



III. — BRIDGES OF WHICH BOSTON PAYS A PART 
OF THE COST OF MAINTENANCE. 

Albany-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road ) . 

The construction of the abutments of this bridge was 
described in last year's report. During the year the iron 
superstructure has been erected, the abutments have been 
pointed, the parapet set, and the apj)roachcs })ut in order. 

The total cost of the woi'k done by the city was $20,226.92. 
The Boston & Albany Railroad (^o., as per agreement with 
the city, built the south abutment, raised the grade of the 
approaches at the southerly end of the bridge, waived all 
grade damages, paid the city $3,000, and will pay to the 
city one-half the cost of the futui'e maintenance of the 
bridoe. 



Eeport of City Engineer. 15 

*Canal Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

*Prison-point Bridge (from Charlestown to 
Cambridge). 

*West Boston Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

These bridges are in care of two commissioners, one ap- 
pointed by eacli city, and the expense of maintaining the 
bridges is borne equally by each city. The Boston Commis- 
sioner maizes an annual report in print. (City Doc. 25, 
1888.) 

West Boston bridge is old, and narrow for the large 
amount of travel over it. The roadway and one sidewalk 
are in need of re[)airs, which the Commissioners contemplate 
making during the year. 

Pi'ison Point bridge is in fair condition. The paving on 
Canal bridge is in bad condition, and some of the piles 
which carry the bridge are very old and may require repairs 
at any time. 

Dorchester-street Bridge (over Old Colony Rail- 
road). 

The iron-work is in need of painting ; otherwise the l)ridge 
is in ofood condition. 



IV. — BRIDGES SUPPORTED BY RAILROADS. 

Four l)ridges over the Dedham branch of the Boston & 
Providence Railroad have been rebuilt since the last report, 
namely, Bellevue avenue, Park street. Beech street, and Dud- 
ley avenue; and the Centre-street bridge over the main road 
has been thoroughly repaired. 

The bridge on Harrison avenue over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad has been partly rebuilt. The bridges over the same 
road on Washington street and Tremont street are in bad 
condition from the wasting of the iron from rust, and require 
immediate attention. 

The other bridges given in the list of those supi)orted by 
railroad corporations are in fair condition, and require no 
special mention. 



IG City Document No. 39. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION 

IX 1887. 

BOYLSTON-STREET BRIDGE. 

The abutments for this bridge, begun in 1880, have been 
completed, at a cost of $77,375.77. The general design and 
construction of these abutments are shown in the accompany- 
ing plate. 

Plans for the superstructure of this bridge have been 
prepared, and it is expected that the entire work will be 
completed during the coming summer. 

Wharf at Long Island. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for a wlinrf at the 
north-westerly side of Long Island, and the work was let to 
Mclnnis & Parker, the lowest bidders. The work was com- 
pleted July 23, and cost $7,422. U4. 

The new wharf is built on the site of the old wharf, has 
berths for three vessels, and a depth of seven to eight feet of 
water at low tide at its outer end. It is of similar construc- 
tion to the wharf built in 1886, on the opposite side of the 
island, and is provided with a movable drop for loading and 
unloading freight. The walls of the solid portion of the 
wharf have been partly rebuilt. 



QUINCY-STREET BrIDGE. 

This is a railroad l)ridge overQuincy street, and an agree- 
ment has been made l)ctween the city and the New York & 
New England Railroad Company under which the bridge is 
to l)e I>uilt by the railroad company, in accordance with plans 
to be approved by the City Engineer, and the city is to pay 
one-half the cost of the work. 

The abutments are nearly completed. 



Paving Wharf. 

Plans and specitications have been prepared for rebuilding 
the wharf at No. 521 Commercial street, recently purchased 
by the city for a paving wharf. The contriu't for building 
the wliarf has been awarded to Benjamin Young. No work 
has yet l)een done. 



Keport of City Engineer. 17 

East Boston Ferries. 

Plans and specitications were drawn for rehuildini!; two 
piers of the slips for the South Ferry in East Boston, and 
the work was let to ^Nlelnnis & Parker in September. 

The piers are to be built with oak piles and faced with oak 
walins: pieces and maple plank. One drop is to be taken 
out, three sets of guide piles driven and Htted, and slight 
changes made in the third pier, to better accommodate the 
boats. 

The work will probably be completed in February. 

Statue of Lief Ericsson. 

A concrete foundation for this statue was put in place, at 
a cost of $221.95. 

Other woik of a miscellaneous character may be classed 
as follows : — 

Plans and Specifications. 

For Iron pier, Marine Park. 

Water-pipe, Chestnut-hill avenue. 

Boilers, steam-pipe, gates, etc., Chestnut-hill Pumping- 

station. 
Iron roofs, Chestnut-hill Pumping-station. 
Engine-house roof. Mystic Pumping-station. 
Cumberland-street bulkhead. 
Stone-crushing plant, Dorchester paving-3'ard. 

Estimates. 

For Bridge on Beachmont avenue. 
"' " Talbot " 

New draw for Maiden Bridge. 

Works to abate nuisances at Pope's Hill stations in 
Dorchester, and at Germantown, Ward 23. 

The usual large amount of work of a general character has 
been done during the year. Under this head may be classed 
record-plans, maps for Water- Works and Park Department, 
copying, tracing, and blue-printing plans. 



18 



City Document No. 39. 



B. —WATER-WORKS. 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall of the past year was somewhat below the 
average, but was quite evenly distributed throuofhout the 
year, so that there has been no scarcity of water at any time, 
and the storage reservoirs have been kept nearly full for the 
greater portion of the year. 

Very little trouble has been experienced from the growth 
of alga?, and the quality of the water, with the exception of 
the Mystic supply, has been good. 

The work of improving the shallow portions of Lake 
Cochituate l)y deepening certain portions and filling the 
margins in others, as was done in the Sudbury-river reser- 
voirs in 188f), was commenced in September, and continued 
until December 20. 

The work done was confined to the valleys of Course and 
Beaver-dam brooks, and a section near the Natick cemetery. 

About 50,000 cubic yards of material was handled. 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption of water from the com- 
bined works has been as follows : — 



January . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



Cocliituate Works. 

32,687,600 
31,224,300 
28,124,100 
25,591,500 
27,925,000 
30,069,000 
30,469,000 
30,063,100 
31,946,600 
30,562,700 
28,062,000 
31,511,500 



Mystic Works. 

10,488,600 
9,346,700 
8,175,000 
6,933,800 
6,916,300 
7,159,800 
7,250,000 
6,871,900 
6,868,600 
6,436,600 
7,361,200 
7,835,300 



Total. 

43,176,200 
40,571,000 
36,299,100 
32,525,300 
34,841,300 
37,228,800 
37,719,700 
36,935,000 
38,815,200 
36,999,300 
35,423,200 
39,346,800 



Averages 



29,852,100 7,629,000 37,481,100 



The daily average consumjition per head of population has 
been as follows : — 



Keport of City Engineer. 19 

Sudbury and Cochituate supply . . . 80.8 gallons. 

Mystic supi)ly 72.7 " 

Total supply . . . . .79. " 

The above figures show an increase in the consumption of 
the Sudbury and Cochituate works of 12.1 per cent, over 
that of the year 1886 ; of the Mystic works of 3.1 per cent., 
and of the combined supplies of 10.1 per cent. The increase 
on the Sudbury and Cochituate works has been larger than 
the probable increase in population. Although the number 
of premises supplied through meters has been reduced, there 
has been a large increase in the amount of metered Avater 
used, amounting to an increased daily consumption of 856,- 
500 gallons of metered water, — about 13 per cent, over that 
of the year 188i), the metered water used in 1887 being at 
the rate of 7,229,700 gallons daily. Should allowance be 
made for the fewer premises metered, the percentage of 
increase would be higher. The fact that the number of new 
service -pipes laid during the 3'ear has been larger than for 
anv year since 1871 furnishes another reason for a larse 
legitimate increase in consumption. 



New Higpi-Service Works. 

These "works are approaching completion, and within a 
few weeks the pumping-stations at Koxbury and Brighton 
will be abandoned, and the new works placed in service. 
Plans for the pumi)ing- station at Chestnut Hill were being pre- 
pared during the latter part of 1886, and, in order that work 
upon the masonry might be begun as soon as the season 
would permit, the excavations were begun on January 10, 
and continued until March 31, under the direction of Mr. 
Fitzgerald, Superintendent of the Western Division. Plans 
and specifications were prepared for the foundations for 
the building and engines, together with the chimney, pump- 
wells, screen, and connection chambers, and on March 2 
a contract was executed with Collins & Ham for doinsf 
the work. They began active operations on April 1, and 
completed their contract on Septemlier 9. A coutract for 
the masonry of the superstructure was awarded to Donahue 
Bros, on April 5, and on June 27 they commenced work 
on the erection of the building. 

The walls of the building are now nearly completed, and 
the contractors for the iron roofs are erecting the trusses for 
the coal-shed and boiler-house. On May 6 a contract was 
made with Georo;e Miles, for furnishino; and settinof two 



20 City Document No. 39. 

boilers, and ihe^^ are now set, and covered by a temporary 
wooden building. The first shipment of the Gaskill engines 
arrived on August 16, and the work of setting up the 
machinery has been in progress during the past four months. 
One engine is now ready to be started, and the second 
engine will be completed in a few weeks. The engines 
have been covered by a temporary wooden building to 
facilitate erection, and in order that they may be used before 
the completion of the permanent building. 

The laying of the force main and the connections with the 
pumps have been completed by the Superintendent of the 
Eastern Division. 

During the winter of 1886-87 Fisher-Hill reservoir, 
though uncompleted, was partially filled with water for the 
purpose of protecting the completed work from the frost. 
On April 8 the waste-gate was opened, and on April 21 the 
reservoir was empty. 

Work was resumed by the contractors, Moulton & 
O'Mahouey, on April 27, and was continued by them 
through the season, until November 18, when their contract 
was completed. 

On November 30 the sluice-gates at the gate-chamber 
were finished, and the water was let into the basin, reaching 
high-water mark on Jan. 6, 1888. The following descrip- 
tion and plates show the construction of this reservoir : — 

The reservoir is rectangular in shape, 500 feet by 295 feet, 
measured at the top of the inner slope of the emliankment, 
and 423 by 218 feet at the bottom of the slope. The high- 
water mark is 241 feet above tide-marsh level ; the top of 
the earth embankment 245 feet ; the foot of the inner slope 
223 feet; the centre of ihc reservoir 221 feet, and the invert 
of the 3()-inch pipe 220 feet. The reservoir is built i)artly 
in excavation and partly in embankment. The embankment 
is 20 feet wide on top, with outside slopes of 2 horizontal 
to 1 vertical, and inside slopes of 1| horizontal to 1 ver- 
tical. It is composed of the mtiterial from the excavation, a 
compact, clayey gravel spread in 4-inch layers, watered and 
thoroughly rolled. The irmer sl()[)e of the embankment is 
covered to above the high- water line with a layer of puddle 
2 feet in thickness, composed of the natural material, from 
which all the large stones were removed, and brick clay, 
thoroughly mixed in tlu; proportion of | natural mtiterial 
and .j clay, wet and rammed in place. This puddle is cov- 
ered from the base of the slope to grade 235 with a layer of 
Portland cement concrete !) inches in thickness. Between 



'.+-r'C-.^ 



■i V v."» n^-i*- 








Fisher Hill Reservoir. 

PLAA/. 




nSH€R 



AVENUE- 



HitJ'f^VSi''' 



SCALE orr£-£T. 



Report of City Engineer. 21 

grade 235 and 243 the slope is covered with a pavino; of 
Koxhury stone 15 inches in thickness, underhiid by 12 inches 
of small broken stone. 

To prevent any slip[)in2: of the puddle or of the paving on 
the slope, an al)utnient of American cement concrete is placed 
at the foot of the slope, as shown on section. The bottom of 
the reservoir is covered with 2 feet of paddle, composed of 
the natural material mixed in thin layers with a small quan- 
tity of clay, wet and rolled. For a distance of 10 feet from 
the foot of the slope the bottom is covered with a layer of 
l*ortland cement concrete (5 inches in thickness. The bot- 
tom slopes toward the centre, and is drained by a concrete 
gutter to the gate-chamber. The outer slope of the embank- 
ment is covered with loam 2 feet in thickness, there being a 
surplus of loam fi'om the excavation. A gravel walk 8 feet 
in width surrounds the reservoir on the top of the embank- 
ment. The gate-chamber is located in the centre of the 
'^•isterly embankment. It is 20 feet by 20 feet 10 inches, 
inside dimensions, with side-walls of rubble granite masonry 
2G feet high, 5 feet 6 inch<!s thick at the bottom, and 3 feet (5 
inches at the top, and is divided by brick partition walls into 
influent and etHuent chambers, as shown on the accompany- 
ing plate. The foundation course is a bed of American ce- 
ment concrete 2 feet thick, and below this there are three 
cut-ofl' walls of concrete 2 feet square, running parallel with 
the centre line of the embankment, designed to cut off leak- 
age. The water enters the o-ate-chanil)er throuofh a 3()-inch 
pipe, passes out through a 3(>inch pipe, and enters the reser- 
voir near the centre. A brick division wall, with sluice-gate 
at the bottom and stop-planks above, prevents the reservoir 
from being emptied in case of a break in the force-main. 
By means of two sluice-gates in the effluent chamber water 
can be taken from different depths. The pipe for overflow 
and drainage is 16 inches in diameter; it is reduced to 12 
inches outside of the reservoir, and carried down Fisher ave- 
nue to Boylston street, there connecting \v\th a surface drain. 
The drain from the reservoir of the town of Brookline is also 
connected with this pipe. The superstructure of the gate- 
house is brick, with trinjmings of Longmeadow biown-stone. 
The work is now^ complete with the exception of some grad- 
ing and sowing of the grounds, which will be done in the 
spring. 

The total cost of this reservoir to date is as follows : — 



22 City Document No. 39. 

Land $92,042 00 

Construction of reservoii- : — 
81,095 cul)ic' yards earth excavation, $33, 248 95 



97 


( ( 


( ( 


rock " 


121 


25 


2,476 


( ( 


( ( 


clay delivered . 


6,315 


80 


5,566 


i i 


i i 


slope puddle . 


3,005 


64 


6,429 


(( 


a 


bottom " 


3,085 


92 


2,155 


(( 


I i 


ballast in place . 


5,387 


50 


561 


( ( 


i i 


American cement 












concrete 


3,096 


72 


1,350 


i i 


I i 


Portland cement 












concrete 


10,287 


00 


139 


( c 


I i 


brick masonry . 


1,390 


00 


394 


( ( 


i i 


rubble " 


3,546 


00 


1,104 


( ( 


i i 


slope paving 


3,941 


28 


21.2 


( ( 


( ( 


dimension ma- 












sonry, 6-cut . 


805 


60 


37.7 


( ( 


(( 


dimension ma- 
sonry, quarry 












ftice 


848 


25 


139 liiiea 


1 feet 36-inch pipe laid. 


37 


53 


42 


i i 


(( 


16-inch " " 


6 


30 


141 cubi 


ic yards granite slope 








P!l 


Lving 


. . 


554 


13 


iXtra labor 


and materials 


289 


40 



Total paid Moulton & O'Mahoney . . . 75,967 27 

Sluice-gates, etc. . . . . . . 1,215 00 

Gate-house superstructure .... 8,912 00 

Miscellaneous ; including engineering, advertis- 
ing, office, etc. ...... 9,948 35 



Total cost of reservoir . . . $188,084 62 



The total amount expended from the appropriation for new 
high-service on January 1, 1888, was $464,981.86, of which 
$31,330.82 was expended for the West Roxbury high-service. 

Plans and estimates have been made for high-service works 
to su})i)ly the high lands of Breed's Island, the construction 
of which was authorizinl by the City Council. A wrought- 
iron tank will be erected on the summit of Breed's Hill, to 
which water will be forced b}' pumps located at the present 
pumping-station near the reservoir. 

The work can be commenced as soon as the weather will 
permit. 




SCy^LE- or- rE-e-r. 

I 1 Z. i ■4- S d 
I HH b-r^ h-rT T 1 



Fisher Hill Reservoir 




71 


O 




>. 


X 


n 


r 
r 


O 


7^ 


> 


m 


^ 


C/) 


CD 


Ml 


m 


A) 

< 


■p 











•M|l:;|l|jl|| 







.1 ^Y 



Gate Chamber. 
Fisher Hjll Reservoir. 

S£'CT/0/V ON LIN€ C-Q. scale or rETE-T. 



Report of City Engineer. 23 



Distribution. 



The total length of pipe laid on the Sudbury and 
Cocliituate works was 24. G8 miles ; of this amount 2.82 
miles were laid to rephice pipes existing which were relaid 
for various reasons, making a net increase in the total length 
in use of 22.36 miles. This is the largest amount of pipe 
laid on the Sudbury and Cochituate works since 1875. On 
the M^'stic Avorks the mains have been extended 23,762 feet, 
and 9,928 feet of wronght-iron and cement pipe have been 
replaced by cast-iron pipes. The Cochituate distribution 
has been also greatly im))roved by removing the tubercles 
from the old 6-inch and 12-inch mains, by means of the 
Sweeney pipe-scraper. In the City proper, South and East 
Boston, there were cleaned during the year 40,932 feet of 
6-inch and 20,280 feet of 12-inch pipe, at an average cost 
of 13.7 cents per foot for the 6-inch, and of 20 cents per foot 
for the 12-inch. 

An order of the City Council, approved May 28, 1887, 
authorized the laying of a new main for the improvement of 
the East Boston supply, and a contract was made on June 
11, with R. D. Wood & Co., for 1,100 tons of 24-inch pipe 
at $35, and 170 tons of 30-inch pipe at $34.50, per gross 
ton. In July the City Council authorized the laying of 
pipes for the supply of Charlestown fi-om the Cochituate 
works. As the new main to East Boston was to be laid 
through Charlestown, the original plan for the East Boston 
main was modified by enlarging the size of the new main 
between the City proper and Charlestown, and connecting 
it with the large mains on the Common instead of with the 
24-inch at Haymarket square. On Septeml)er 21 a con- 
tract for 1,280 tons of 16-inch and 30-inch pipe, at $30.69, 
was made with the Gloucester Iron Works. The contract 
of R. D. Wood & Co. has been completed, and 5,356 feet of 
24-inch and 1,256 feet of 30-inch main laid in Charlestown 
and on Chelsea bridge. In connection with this work the 
bridge Avhich <arries the water-pipe across the Mystic river 
has been I'ebuilt. This bridge was built in 1850, and the 
boxing rebuilt in 1867, when the Mystic works were ex- 
tended to Chelsea. The boxing and fender-g-uard were 
very badly decayed. The contract for doing this work was 
made with J. X. Hayes & Co., on August 29, for the sum 
of $14,500. The old piles were cut down and spliced in a 
substantial manner, with 10 by 12 inch hard-pine sticks. 
Three 10 by 14 inch longitudinal stringers, supported by 
6 by 12 inch double girder caps, are bolted to the tops of 
the spliced piles ; a flooring of 4-inch spruce plank is laid 



24 City Document No. 39. 

upon the stringers, mnking a i)l;itl()rni 8J feet in width, on 
which are laid the l(i-inch and 3()-inch pipes. The pipes are 
covered l)y a housing laige enough to be entered for exam- 
ining and repairing the pipes. The new fender is placed 
1() feet from the bridge, so as to provide a protection against 
injury from vesvsels. 

The relocation and change of grade of Beacon street, in 
the town of Brookline. has necessitated the relaying of 1,528 
ieet of the 48-inch main, and there are other })ortions of the 
main which will requii'c lowering during the coming season. 

The sea-wall at the All)any-street ])ipe-yard has been rebuilt 
by Boynton Brothers, at a cost of about $10,500. The old 
wall was taken down, additional piles driven, and the wall 
I'cbuilt, using new stone for the face, and also for a substan- 
tial cut- stone cai)ping. On the face of the wall is an oak- 
pile fender with hard-pine cap. Examinntions and estimates 
have been made of the cost of supplying the public institu- 
tions on Long Island with Cochituate water. 



C — MAIN DRAINAGE WORKS. 

This woik was [)ut into operation in January, 1884, and 
has been in continuous use since that date. 

The service rendered by the system has equalled the 
expectations of its designers, and it has accomplished all 
that was claimed for it. The removal of the sewage from 
the portions of the city emln-aced by the system has greatly 
improved docks and flats within their limits which were 
formerly exceedingly otiensive, and were yearly becoming 
more of a nuisance; but, while Boston has taken cure of its 
pollutions, Cambridge and Brookline still continue to pour 
a yearly increasing volume of sewage into the Charles-river 
basin, and if they are allowed to continue to do so will in 
time reproduce in this section of the city a nuisance already 
once abated. 

The State Board of Health is now considering the subject 
of the disposal of the sewage from the territory contiguous 
to Boston and of certain sections of the cit}' not embraced by 
the Main Drainage Works; and it is hoped that their labois 
will brinir tangible results in the near future. 

In compliance with a vote of the City Council, passed 
December 31, 1887, the maintenance of these works was 
transferred to the Sewer Department, January 2, 1888. 

The construction woik of the past year included the com- 
pletion of Section <J, South Boston intercepting sewer, the 
contract for which was signed in 188(5; the replacing of the 



Report of City P^ngineer. 



25 



rip-rap about the eastern shaft of Dorchester-bay tunnel ; a 
connection with Stony brook at Chiy street ; the buildinp; of 
blocks at Old Harbor Point, in which to run the tow-boat 
and sludire scows to n)ake repairs; the laying of water-pi[)e 
on the line of the tank sewer ; the bulkhead at Lowland 
street, South Boston ; the placing of an iron fence around 
Moon Island reservoir and of a crane on the wharf. 

There is much work rcnmining to be done that will facili- 
tate the economic maiutiMiance of the work, and it should be 
done at an early day. 

The average daily amount of sewage pumped for the 
years 18^5, 1886, and 1887 is shown as folhjws : — 





" Daily Av 


jrage of Sewage Pumped, 


in Gallons. 




issr). 


1880. 


1887. 


January 


39,0Hi,276 


41,063,812 


58,648,433 


Fel)ruary 


45,59a,!)()5 


60,612,617 


53,827,805 


March . 


85,01)5,506 


39,774,669 


52,857,787 


April 


28,700,868 


36,725,288 


50,431,531 


May . 


30,306,228 


32,157,392 


36,214,703 


June 


29,931,484 


26,625,076 


40,631,019 


July 


29,642,964 


31,743,685 


38,172,331 


August . 


36,9^16,434 


32,326.434 


38,881,361 


September 


28,761,290 


32,903,724 


35,777,621 


October 


31,476,179 


33,395,604 


37,330,106 


November 


38,917,253 


34,170,833 


37,134,588 


December 


32,894,281 


40,894,411 


43,660,600 



Average . 33,874,575 36,866,129 43,630,657 

Maximum daily amount pumped in 1887, 116,972,611 

lions 

Minimum daily amount pumped in 1887, 27,796,17(5 

Cost of Pumping. 



gallons 



gallons 



Labor . 

Coal . 

Water . 

Valves 

Gasoline 

Oil . . . 

Packing 

AVaste . 

Renewals, repairs, etc. 



$17,334 96 

8,687 48 

711 (iO 

838 82 

529 05 

500 22 

198 61 

49 12 

3,316 84 



$32,166 70 
Cost per million gallons lifted one foot high, $0.0585. 



26 City Document No. 39. 

Main and Intercepting Sewers. 

In addition to the regular inspection of the gates, regula- 
tors, and other appurtenances, a large amount of work has 
been done by the regular force, removing from the sewers 
deposits of gravel, and scraping from the side walls accumula- 
tions of grease. The sewers are at present remarkal)ly free 
from all deposits, and all the iron-work has been thoroughly 
cleaned, repaired, and coated. 

Considerable work has been done, moving over and chang- 
ing the elevation of man-holes, necessitated by laying of 
horse-railroad tracks and the regrading of streets. 

The connection made at Clay street with Stony brook in 
case of a freshet will allow it to overtlow into the Cabot- 
street intercepting sewer. 

The bidkhead was built at Lowland street. South Boston, 
to hold the tilling for the roadwa}' ; this was done in accord- 
ance with an agreement made for the right of way. 

The overtlow sewers at First and Livingstone streets, 
which were cut off by the construction of the Charles River 
Embankment, ought to be extended, as the capacity of the 
overflow in that district is comparatively small, and a freshet 
might cause considerable damage. 

The office accommodations at the Main Drainage 3'ard on 
East Chester park are inconveniently small, and a more 
suitable office should be provided as soon as funds can be 
spared for this })urpose. 

Section Six, South Boston Intercepting Sewer. 

This section was completed and connected with the system 
in October. 

Pumping-Station . 

The pumping machinery is in good working condition. 
The following table shows the })erformance of the engines at 
the pumi)ing-station during the year 1887 : — 



Report of City Engineer. 



27 





1 




^ 


CO 


o 


CO 


-i< 


CO 


CO 


00 


■* 


00 


•* 


sa 


o , 






o 


-:t< 


to 


-f 




o 




CO 


C-1 


lO 


r-j 


o 


"* 


•IWntBH 


■~6 


Tj! 


■^ 


CO 


c4 


o^ 


-* 


CO 


'"' 


ci 


CA 


CO 


^ 






I-H 


CO 


3 


00 


CO 


~co~ 


t— 


vO 


~J^ 


CD 


■^ 


s 


•* 






ffi> 


00 






CO 








CO 




CO 




•|tioo 
JO -sqi 001 -tad 
•eqi-}ooj ut Ana 


0? 


00 




co" 




oT 


CO 


CO 


r-T 


3 


oT 


CJ^ 


"I 


°5. 


"^ 


00 


00 

CO 


o 


o 


CO 


00 
CO 


s 


§ 


CO 




C)_ 


CO 


^ 


CO 




o 


irT 


cT 




oo" 


ir^ 


o" 


r^ 






oT 




03 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o> 


c5 


o 


O 


o 


o> 


o> 
















'-' 






rH 


"^ 


•" 










lO 


__ 


t^ 


o 


lO 


o 


00 


Q: 


O 


o 


o 


CD 


Cfl 


njil aSBjaAy 


^ 


i 




o 

?? 


to 


to 


CO 


00 
CO 


CO 


•* 




^ 


i 


lO 

^ 






n 


(M 


^ 


o 


<M 


~co~~ 


o 


■^ 


CI 


o 


CO 


lO 


3J 


•IBOO JO -qi aad 


1 


xO 


^ 




§ 


CO 


-* 


C0_ 


« 




lb 


-5 


CI^ 


^ 


padamd stionBO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co" 


CO 


co" 


co" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co" 


•s.i85iai|3 pnB 




CO 

o 


o 


CD 

o 


e4 


-* 


^ 


CO 


^ 


•-i 


"# 


rH 


00 

o 


2 


saqsi! JO •\iwo aaj 






r-t 








rH 


r-f 


rH 


rH 


<-* 






rH 






o 


CD 


CO 


-* 


^ 


^^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


PH 


t~ 


•pasn jBOD JO 


• 


o^ 


CS 


ai 


S. 


5 


CO 


?5 




«. 


o 

CO__ 


Id 


CO 


5 


i.niB aSBaaAB jCubo; 


o 
s 


00 


s 


•^ 


CO 


l-l 


r^ 




- 


O 


o" 


o" 


co" 

rH 








-^ 


o 


(^ 


f-^ 


CO 


"ln~~ 


,-H 


,-H 


t— 1 


CD 


CO 


o 


t— 






CO 


o 




CO 


o 






CD 




O 




O 


>C 






-* 






irs^ 




CO 




CO 


CD 






co_ 


CO 


■padnind innorac 


s 




jj" 


t^ 




-* 




c-r 


^ 


^ 


o" 


-jh" 


<=" 


o 


aSBaaAc iCited 


c 


CO 


°?s 


00 


1 


(N 


CO 
CO 


J:; 


CO 


J:; 


CO 


C^ 


CO 


s 




!i 




co" 


(N 


o 




cT 


00 




iO 


t-^ 




CO 


s" 




xrt 


tC 




»o 


CO 


Tjl 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


n 


Tf 






o 


-* 


■^ 


to 


^_, 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


o 


00 


CD 


o 


ITS 






(N 


CO 


o 




a> 


00 


to 


CO 






-jl 










"t. 


o 


-* 


a 




o 


^ 




to 


CJ 


CO 




(M 
































•padrand 


~i 


o 


t? 


05 


4 


in 


s 




<M 


g5' 


u 


23 


s 


t 




^ 




rH 


lO 


OS 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CI 


o 


"•^ 


r^^ 


^unomt! iB}ox 




CO 






of 


|^^ 


oo" 


CO 


lO 


CO 




-*" 


CO 






e 




O 


CO 


r-( 


(M 






o 




o 






O 




ti 


GO 




CO 


5_ 




^ 


rH^ 


0^ 


CO 




rH^ 


CO 


<» 






"-^ 


rH 


"-^ 


'-'" 


"'' 


"" 


r-T 


■-*" 


'^" 


'-'" 


•-^ 


'^ 


s 








o 


C^ 


CD 


■^ 


-M 


o 


CO 


oq 


CO 


to 


CO 


-* 


s 








oo 






s 




r)< 


I— 


CO 


CD 


CO 


■o 


s 


00 








Oi 








s 


!N 


o-;^ 










CO 


c? 




































•padrand 


o 


CO 


CD 


§ 


to 


o> 


CO 

C3 


g 


o 


§ 


^ 


c! 


00 


2 


■^ 






CO 


-^ 


-* 


CO 


oi_ 


CO 




CO 






00 


"^ 


"^ 


^ 


innouiY' 


s 


oi 








CO 


p 


lo" 




lO 


^ 


t-T 


lo" 


cf 




^ 






»rr 


00 








o 












3 




00 


O 


CO 




'~ 


IM 


*" 




CD 


o 


T)l 


T* 


Ci 






CI 


o 


"^ 


o 


CO 


iC 


-* 


,-H 


lO 


rH 


o 


>a 


S 


H 


•aran 


^ 


■^ 
•^ 


-* 


iC 




o 


CO 


o 


CO 
CO 


o 


d 


o 


r^ 


CO 

to 




Sniduinj 


fc; 


^ 


o 


CO 


1 


to 


CO 


00 

•a 


o 


CO 


^ 


CO 


S 


CO 

o 
to 






CI 


■^ 


oo 


«M 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


^ 


!» 


o 


00 


CI 














M 


o 


00 




o 


^„ 




CI 




rH 








-* 




(M 


CO_ 


CO 






00 


o_ 


CI 


>o 


UO 




































•padrand 


o 


w 


o 


i? 


o 


to 


o 


o 

00 


CO 


CO 


o" 


§ 


rf 


3 


CO , 






c^ 


-* 


CO 


03_ 






^ 


IM__ 


c5 


lO 


°i. 


•* 




» 


lanoraY" 


"S 


CO 




ce" 




^ 


la 


b^ 


c-f 


cf 


vC 




oT 


o 




^I: 


CO 






^ 


^ 


o 






CI 


Ci 


o 


-* 


-* 


is 






o 


1- 


00 


to 


CO 


<s 


rjl 


o 


^ 


o 


CO 




CO 






'N 


Q, 


(M 


OD 


CO 


CO 


f^ 


IM 


o 


t-. 


Ol 


o 


CO 


H 


•smii 


^ 




° 


n 


to 


rH 


o 

CD 


m 


O 


•o 


o 


r)< 


CI 


CO 
CO 




Snidraii^j 


^ 


■-0 


CD 


00 

;d 


CO 


00 


o 


?? 


Tf 


CO 


T)> 


.ra 


CD 


-* 








,_, 


'M 


C3 


(M 


CO 


IM 


■M 


iC 


00 


rH 


o 


t. 


S3 








CO 


o 


o 


Ol 




05 


OO 


CD 




^ 


03 


r-^ 


o 








o 


CO 




o 


■* 


(N 


CD 






O 


CI 


a> 




































i?J 


•padrand 


O 


•i> 


g 


C-l 


to 


a 


^" 


02 


lO 


CD 


o 


vO 


S 


o> 










o 


Cl 


Ol 


CO 




-TtH 






rlH^ 








S 
z; 


junom'V' 


« 


CO 




4" 




cT 


fC 




.re" 






,^ 


CO 


o" 




!i 




GO 


^ 




O, 


CI 


-1' 




" 


CI 


-* 


CO 






»o 


<>i 


o 


lO 


o 


O 


CO 


■o 


O 


CO 


rH 


o 


s 


•araii 


^ 


o 


(M 


o 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


Tj< 


<N 


CO 




O 


CO 


o 




Sntdra'nj 


^ 


o 


n 


00 
CO 


s 


DO 


CO 


^ 


'« 




CD 


O 
C<l 


CO 


o 








1^ 


CD 


,_, 


00 


to 


T)< 


00 


CO 


1/5 


'O 


o 


rH 


lO 














CO 


o 




o 


00 


00 


OJ 






?a 








Ci 


do 


' (M 


00 


rH^ 


CO 


"J. 


CD 


^> 


■^ 


o 


00 


^ 


































•-5 


•padrand 


s 


ifT 


c-f 




i 


00 
O 


(M 


i 


C^ 


OO 


00 


CI 


9! 

CO 


i 


o 

IB 


innoraY 


s 


co" 


5 


CO 






»o 


co" 


cT 


TiT 


,_r 


oT 


lO 


^ 




^ 


to 


c= 


-* 






c^ 


(M 




d 


rH 


CO 


? 






iC 


^^ 


OD 


o 


>o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


O 


•o 


CO 


•aran 
Suidranj 


^ 


o 


-* 


^ 


s 


rH 






CI 


CO 


o 


lO 


CO 


tH 




^ 


■^ 


g 


S 


s 


to 


•* 


a 


S 


CO 


s 


s 


a> 


i 






















. 














i 


>» 

5 


J3 
cS 


H. 


?? 


a 


>. 


3 
61) 

3 


a 

3 
p. 
<s 
w 


o 


33 

a 
S 
o 


(a 

a 

o 










►^ 


S 


s 




S 


•? 


<^ 


<< 


o 


^ 


fi 





28 City Document No. 39. 

Several minor additions to the plant have heen made 
during the year, and a few changes were also made, all of 
which have proved heneticial. 

A machine-shop has been fitted up in the (Migine-house, 
consisting of an engine, a i)laner, a lathe, a drilling-machine, 
and a grindstone. By means of this shop a large amount of 
machine work has heen done l)y the employees, which other- 
wise would have had to have been sent to a shop, the ex- 
pense and inconvenience ol' sending being often more than 
that of doing the wcn'k. Blocks have been put up, by the 
means of wliich ordinary repairs can be made on the two 
boat and sludge scows. The grounds have been enclosed by 
a tight board-fence, and the temporary office has been fitted 
up as for })ermanent use; it is heated by steam. 

The force employed on construction was discharged in 
April. Plans for a new building, to contain a stal)le and 
tenement for the teamster, have been made by the City 
Architect. It should be constructed during the coming 
year. 

The flooring in the engine-house should be laid, and the 
balconies around the VA'orthington pumps put up, to give 
the room a finished appearance. There should, also, l)e an 
iron grating placed at the easterly side of the pumps in the 
engine house. 

Deposit Sewers. 

A water-pipe has been laid in the embankment over the 
dei)osit sewers to furnish water for the sludge-carrier engine, 
and watering the embankment during tlu^ dry weather in 
summer. 

By changes made in the sludge-tank, and by increasing 
the size of the pipe leading to it from the deposit sewers, 
and \vith the increased efficiency of the new " scraper," the 
cost of delivering the sludge to the scows has been decreased 
about forty per cent. A sludge scraper and carrier for the 
southerly deposit sewer, siiuilar to those in the northerly 
one, should l)e built at once, and a permanent building 
erected over the eni>ine. 

Considerable difficulty has been encounted in towing the 
sludge scow outside during rough weather, which could be 
overcome by fitting the scow with a round bow. A new 
boiler is needed in the tow-boat, as the steam pressure^ 
jdlowed on the ])resent one is not sufficient to work the boat 
to the best advantage. 

A coal-shed built on the wharf at the pumping-station 
would save labor in handlinu: the coal used on the tow-boat. 



Received 


Kemovod 


cub. yds. 


cub. yds. 


1,270 


(59.8() 


200 


Shut (Idwu for 
nlK-iariuns. 


185 


139.71 


280 


482.91 


240 


3(i8.24 


1()0 


505.29 


4S0 


49^.61 


450 


512.40 


a 90 


()72 (55 


380 


605.34 


510 


523.02 


890 


HO 1.5 5 



Report of City Engineer. 29 

The following table shows the amount of material in the 
deposit sewers at the commencement of the year, the quan- 
tity received and the quantity removed from them duriuii: the 
year : — 



January ..... 

February ..... 

March ^ 

April ..... 

.Alay 

June ..... 

July ..... 

August ..... 

Se]itember ..... 

October ..... 

November ..... 

December . . . . , 

Total 4,935 4,977.58 

Tunnel. 

The last test made to ascertain the condition of the tunnel 
showed it to be clearer than at the previous test. 

The contract for placing rip-raj) about the middle shaft 
has l)een finished. 

The erection of the })umps at the last shaft should not be 
longer delayed. 

The risk run, in having no facilities for pumping out the 
tunnel in case of any accident to it, is a sufficient reason for 
urging an approf)riati()n for at least ])lacing in position for 
use the machinery purchased several years ago for that 
purpose. 

Flume. 

The top planking of the tlume has been re-spiked from 
above for its entire lenj^th, as it was found to be insecure ; 
the original s})ikes having been almost entirely rusted away 
by the sewage. 

There has been some settlement during the year, and when 
four ))umps were running there was considerable leakage ; 
but the flumeh as been wedged up, to the proper grade and 
the tie rods drawn up, so that the leakage is comi)aratively 
small. It is at present in very fair condition, and will stand 
a year or two longer if no undue strain is brought upon it. 



30 City Document No. 39. 

Moox Island. 

The regular force has been cmplo^'ecl through the year, 
and the work has gone on smoothly. Iron stairways with 
posts and rails have been constructed in the engine-house, 
the gate-house, and to all the divisions of" the reservoir. 
Parts of the turbine-wheel which were badly rusted and 
worn have l)een renewed. A crane has been erected on the 
wharf to facilitate the landing from vessels of coal and other 
su[)plies. The copper roof covering of the buildings being 
acted upon by the gases from the sewage, it has i)een 
protected by two coats of roof-paint. Other portions of the 
buildings were painted when necessary for preservation. 
Considerable pointing has been done in the discharge sewers 
and on the reservoir walls, and about a week's work grading 
the embankment where it had been washed by storms. 

The wharf should be extended to deeper water, as the tow- 
boat cannot haul up to it after half-tide. The temporary 
wharf, built for construction, has l)een used ; l)ut it is l)adiy 
rotted, and is liable to be carried away at any time. A per- 
manent store-house and tenement for the use of the men 
employed on the work should be constructed, and the old 
buildings removed, as they are unsightly and insufficient. 

The following is a statement of the condition of the ap- 
propriation for Improved Sewerage, January 1, 1888 : — 

Construction. 

Total appropriation $.5,480,444 93 

Transfers by City Council . . . . 67,500 00 



$5,412,944 93 
Total expenditure .5,392,407 28 



Unex[)ended l)alance .... $20,537 65 

The available l)alance is about $6,000 less than this, by 

the amounts due, under existinu' contracts, on outstandins: 
bills. 

Maintenance. 

Approi)riation for 1887-88 .... $70,820 00 

Expended to January 1, 1888 . . . 49,243 59 

Balance unexpended ..... $21,576 41 



Kepout of City Engineer. 31 



D. — PARKS. 

For the purpose ot" making this report a complete record 
of the work of this department the following statement, 
which was made to the Park Commissioners, and printed in 
their report to the City Council, is given : — 

The Parkway. — Back Bay Fens. 

Excavation of Waterway . — Upon the passage of the appropriation 
for Park Construction work was at once begun putting in order the 
dredging-phint, which, having been use for five years, needed extensive 
repairs. 

Early in April the excavation of the waterway through the marsh at 
the southerly end of The Fens was resumed. lUiis work has been con- 
tinued through the season, and the waterway completed as far as the 
location of the proposed bridge at the junction of the Fenway and 
Audubon Road. ^A'ork in this direction can go no further until the ad- 
ditional land required between this point and Brciokline .A.venue is 
secm-ed, as the material to be excavated from the waterway will be 
needed for filling on the Parkway and cannot now be disposed of witli- 
out encroaching upon private lands. Unless this work can go on dur- 
ing the next season the dredging-plant will have but a few weeks' work 
to do. 

In addition to the above, a large amount of work was done in trim- 
ming up portions of the shores, and of the bottom of the basin, which 
had been passed by in previous seasons. 

Grading of Marsh. — The grading of the large area of marsh north 
of Agassiz Road has been completed, the area graded the past season 
being 7.6 acres. A portion of this area has been covered with marsh- 
sods cut from the old marsh, and the balance of the area is to be seeded 
with marsh grasses. The material for grading was excavated by the 
dredger, loaded on scows, and unloaded and moved into place by wheel- 
barrows. On account of the long distance a large part of the material 
had to be moved over soft ground the work has been sIoav and expen- 
sive. 

Drainage. — Drains and catch-basins have been built in all that part 
of the Parkway north of Agassiz Road. The length of drain laid has 
been 2.700 feet, the number of man-holes built 5, and tlie number of 
catch-basins, 26. The drains on Boylston Entrance, and on the street 
between Boylston Entrance and the B. & A. R.R., discliargeinto a sewer 
build by the Sewer Department in 1886. The other drains, on the east 
side of the Parkway, discharge into the covered channel of Stony 
Brook, except two catch-basins on the ride, which have an outlet into 
the waterway. 

The drains on the west side of the Parkwa}' discharge into the water- 
way at a point about 250 feet north of Agassiz Bridge. An outlet for 
the drains to be built on Agassiz Road has lieen constructed. 

Man-holes have been built at every change of line and grade, and 
catch-basins have been built on each side of the roadway about 3u0 feet 
apart. 

The accompanying drawings show the forms of catch-basins built. 

lioadways and IVatks. — The curbstones wei"e set and gutters |)aved 
on a part of the roadway in 1885. Jn addition, during the past year, 
8.849 lineal feet of curbstone have been set, and 3,953 square yards of 
gutters paved. 3,600 lineal feet of curlxstone and about 32,000 paving 
blocks are on hand. 



32 City Document No. 39. 

The grade of Boylstoii Entrance was raised to meet a change in the 
established grade of BoylsttJn Street; the curbstone and gutters were 
taken up. the entrance filled to the new grade, and the curbstone reset 
and gutters repaved. The roadway from Common wealth Avenue to West- 
land Avenue and tiie roadway at Boylston Entrance liave been finished. 

'i'he roadway oH the west side of tlie Parkway fi-om the B. & A. K.R. 
to Agassiz Briiige has been nearl}' sub-graded, and about one-half of it is 
stoned, so that, the curbstones and gutters being in place, but little 
work is needed to comj)lete this section. The completion of Agassiz 
Road has been delayed on account of tlie bi'idge not ijeing completed in 
season to allow the old channel across the road to be filled. TIk; bridge 
is now so iar finished that it can be used, and the curbstone being on 
hand for this road it will take but a short time to eom[)lete it after the 
next season opens. The roadways have been constructed in the follow- 
ing manner: The roadbed was' carefully graded to 8 inches below the 
surface of the finished road and thoroughly rolled. The curbstones 
were first set; the gutters were paved with rectangular granite blocks, 
for a width generally of 4 feet, the blocks being laid in rows at right an- 
gles to the line of curb; the surface of the paving at the curb is 7 inches 
below the top of the curb, and rises 2 inches in the width of 4 feet. 
The roadway was then covered with broken stone ; the stone. was broken 
to sizes about as follows : foi- the first 4 inches in depth about 4 inches 
in diameter; then 3 inches in depth 2.i inches in diameter; then 1 inch 
in depth about 1 inch in diameter; then a layer of screened gravel or 
fine stone sci'eenings from the crushers was spread oil top ; each layer 
was watered and rolled with -ji-i-ton sectional grooved rolleis. The sur- 
face of the roadway has a fall from the centre to the guttei' of 1 in 30. 
The al)ove-described method of road construction is cheaper and less 
substantial than would be desirable if the conditions were difi'erent. It 
must be understood, however, that the land upon which the roads are 
built has been but recently filled, and the filling is still settling, and 
will continue to tlo so for some years. A roadwa}- ])repared as this has 
been will last until the filling has reached a firm bearing, when it will 
be necessary to regrade the siu'face, and a more enduring foundation can 
be laid if desired. There is, on the other hand, this to be said in favor 
of a cheap method of construction in this locality, — that the filling 
being of loose gravel and the surface of the roadway bemg at all points 
several feet above the level of the ground Avater, the subsoil will be well 
drained, and a light covering of road metal will wear much better than 
it would under less favorable conditiot)s. Nearl}' all of the stone used 
has been purchased by contract, and of such a size as could be received 
by a stone-crusher. It was suggested at the beginning of the season 
that the amount of stone received could be more accurately ascertained 
if it was purchased by weight instead of b}' the more usual method of 
measurement in carts. Experience has confu'med this opinion. Scales 
were set up near the A>'estland Entrance, and all stone purchased has 
been weighed. 

A stone-crushing plant was piuvhased and set up near the same point, 
and the stone has been crushed at a less price than the same could have 
been purchased, and the rate of crushing has been controlled to suit the 
woi-k in hand i)etter than if it had been done by private parties. 

Tlie VVat(;r Department have, duiing the year, laid the mains which 
will be required on those parts of the Barkway where work has been in 
progress, .so that, except for making hou><e connections with the water- 
mains, there will be no occasion for disturbing the road-bed. It is sup- 
])0.sed that the sewers and gas-|)ipes for this district will be laid in the 
l)ack passageways, and not in the Parkway- 

The ride from just east of the P)oylston Bridge, along the east side of 
the Fens, has been completed as far as Agassiz Koad. Where it bordeis 
the driveway it is separated therefrom by gutters 4 feet wide, paved 



Kepokt of City Engineer. 33 

in a dishing form ; at other places there are cobblestone gutters on either 
side. The ride was constructed by subgradingto one foot below finished 
surface ; it was then filled to grade with gravel, from which all stones 
larger than three-quarters inch in diameter had been sejiarated by 
screening. 

Gutters of concrete were laid on each side of the foot-path between 
the ride and tlie water. 

The Avalk on the easterly and northerly sides of the drive between 
Commonwealth Avenue and Boylston Entrance has been paved with 
brick ; walks in other places have been graded, and a small portion 
finished by making a suiface of 5 inches of crushed stone, the upper 
inch being of fine screenings, and the whole thoroughly watered and 
rolled. 

The accompanying sketch shows the construction of the walks, drive, 
and ride. 

Agassiz Bridge. — Early in the spring plans were prepared for a deck 
bridge with stone abutments, but it was afterwards decided to build a 
bridge of an entirely different character. The change was made so late 
that, on account of the work of park construction having been resumed, 
the time of the engineering force was so occupied that there was some 
delay in preparing new plans and specifications. 

On the 22d of July proposals were advertised for the building of this 
bridge, and the contract for doing the work was signed on August 16. 
Work was begun immediately upon the excavation for the foundation. 
This work was done by the" city, the dredging-plant being used, as it 
could be done in this way more cheaply and quickly than if it had been 
included in the contract. Dams of mud and gravel were built across 
the channel to enclose the site of the bridge. The contractor began 
work on September 22, and at this date his work is completed, except 
removing the centres from the arches and cleaning the brick-work. 

The bridge consists of five semi-circular arches, the middle arch 
having a span of 12 feet; those on either side of the middle, spans of 
lOi feet, and the outer arches, sj^ans of 9 feet. The wings are returned 
on lines neai'lj' parallel with the roadway. The foundation is a 4-inch 
spruce platform supported on spruce piles, capped with 10 in. X 10 in. 
spruce caps ; a line of sheet piling is driven across each end of the plat- 
form. 

Granite masonry abutments and piers, in courses of 2-feet rise, were 
built on this platform to the spring line of the arches. The arches, 
except at the ends, are of brick, the middle one being 16 inches in thick- 
ness and the others 12 inches in thickness. The ends of the arches are 
of RoxbuiT stone boulders, dressed sufficiently to make good radial 
joints, the exposed faces being left in their natural condition. The 
voussoirs are laid in cement ; but the spandrels, the wall above the 
arches, and the vving-walls above the level of the water are of selected 
Roxbury stone boulders, laid dry, with pockets of loam between and 
behind them so that vines or small shrubs can be grown over the face of 
the wall. The walls have considerable batter, the cross-section having 
a curved profile. The line of the wall is on a curve, and above it the 
bank will slope upwai'ds to the line of the walk, where there is to be a 
low parapet. Over the middle arches, on either side of the bi'idge, 
small bays will be built out from the walk. This work, with the ex- 
ception of the parapet walls, will be completed in a few weeks. The 
stone for the face walls was brought from Franklin Park, having been 
taken from old field fences. The arches and abutments have been back- 
filled, and as soon as the ice breaks up in the spring, so that the dredger 
can work, the dams will be removed, and the present channel across the 
road filled to gi'ade. 

Loaming and Planting. — Quite a large area in detached portions, 
including spaces for trees between the walks and drives, have been 



34 City Document No. 39. 

graded with loam, and a considerable amount of planting has been done 
under the immediate direction of the Assistant Landscape Gardener. A 
force of gardeners and laborers has also been emplo^'ed throughout the 
season, imder his direction, in the care of the plantations. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

Work was resumed hei'e on February 3, quarrying stone for thedrive- 
wa3"s. This was continued until the frost was sufficiently out of the 
ground to allow work on the drives. The drive to the sunmiit of Bussey 
Hill was ]jartially sub-graded in 1885. This work was continued and 
completed late in the fall. The grading of the top of the hill required 
the moving of a large amount of material, and, as it was all moved up- 
hill, it was exjiensive. The grading of the lower part of this drive, 
near its juncture with the drive around the hill, furnished a large amount 
of material, which was used for filling the drive across the small pond in 
rear of the college buildings. 

The drive was constructed in the following manner : The roadway was 
sub-graded so as to allow a depth of one foot for stone, the surface 
having a pitch of 1 in 20 from the centre to the gutter. 

Catch-basins were built on each side of the roadway about 300 feet 
apart, with outlets on the side hill below the driveway. Tile drains 
were laid on each side of the drivewaj^, for draining the subsoil ; the 
one on the up-hill side was on the outer line of the sidewalk, while the 
drain on the down-hill side was on the line of the gutter ; these drains 
were laid at a depth of 2 feet 6 inches below the surface, and the}^ dis- 
charge into the catch-l)asins. 

The gutters were then excavated 6 inches below the sub-grade of the 
roadway, and filled with screened gi'avel as a foundation for paving. 
The gutters are 3 feet wide, of cobblestones which were picked out of 
the excavation. A stone foundation 9 inches in thickness was laid on 
the roadway. After breaking down all unevennesses of these stones 
they were covered with 3 inches of crushed stone from 2^ to 1^ inches 
in diameter, well rolled, and this was then covered with screened 
gravel or stone dust thoroughly watered and rolled to a hard surface. 
The walks are separated from the gutters by a border of loam 2 feet 
wide and Id feet deep. The walks have a fall of i inch to a foot, from 
the outer edge to the loam border. They are constructed of (! inches of 
crushed stone, covered with stone dust well compacted by watering and 
rolling. 

The driveway from South to Centre Street has needed but slight 
repairs during the year. Pearly in the spring a short length of gutter 
was relaid, it having settled out of shape, and in the fall the whole 
surface rec;eived a thin coating of stone screenings, wliicli was th<jr- 
oughly rolled. 

The spring or reservoir at the foot of Bussey Hill, near tlu; drive, 
from which the college obtained its water supply, had l)een partially 
drained by the building of the drive, so that in dry weather a sufficient 
supply of water could not be easily obtained. To remedy this, a well 
was dug to a depth of about 8 feet below the bottom of the spring, 
and curbed with a dry stone wall ; it has given an ami)le sui)ply of 
water. 

FuANKUN Park. 

Work was begun here early in April. The Playstead ^vas (irst 
cleared of stone, the stone being broken up and deposited where it 
could be conveniently us(;d on the drivewa}'. A large area, about 
9 acres, being too low to i)e drained, the soil was removed, and it was 



Report of City Engineer. 35 

then filled, the j^reatest depth of filling being; 6 feet; the filling came 
from the exeavations for the driveway and its adjoining slopes. After 
the filling was done the soil was restored ; drains were laid for draining 
the Playstead ; the field of 27 acres received a top dressing of stable 
manure and other fertilizers, and was then ploughed and tilled through 
the summer. In September grass-seed was sown, which, before cold 
Aveather set in, was well started. 

The grading of the drives around tlie Playstead has been carried on 
through the season, and is substantially completed. About 8,200 square 
yards of roadway have been ballasted, of which about 6,000 square yards 
are covered with crushed stone, and only require covering with a coating 
of binding gravel or screenings from the crushed stones to be com- 
pleted ; 2,246 square yards of gutters have been paved with rectangular 
granite blocks ; 6,740 square yards of walks have been covered with 
crushed stone, and l,00o square yards entirely finished. Catch-basins 
and drains have been built for draining the whole of the drives around 
the Pla3'stead, except for a short distance near the entrance to the 
Country Park. Usually 2-inch tile drains have been laid under the 
gutters on each side of the drive. Generally the method of construction 
of the driveways is the same as that described for the Arboretum, 
excej^t that the roadway, gutters, grass border, and walks are wider at 
Franklin Park than at the Arboretum, and the gutters are paved with 
granite blocks instead of cobblestones. 

The catch- basins both here and at the Arboretum are of the form 
shown in the accompanying sketch. The total length of vitrified pipe- 
drains laid is 4,397 feet, varying in diameter from 8 inches to 18 inches. 
The lengtb of tile <lrain is 7,200 feet, 2 inches and 3 inches in diameter. 
The number of man-holes built is 5, and the number of catch-basins 25. 

A stone-crushing plant was purchased, and this has crushed all the 
stone used for surfacing the drives and walks. 

About 1,200 lineal feet of the circuit drive around The Country Park 
has been graded, and work on this drive is now in progress. 

The Overlook. — The wall which supports the Overlook has been com- 
pleted, with the exception of the coping. The walk which the wall 
supi^orts has been gi'aded, and covered with crushed stone. The site of 
the proposed Iniilding has been partially excavated, and a drain to 
connect the linilding with the sewer in Sigourney Street is being built. 

Admini>itr(ition Bnildings. — The dwelling-house at the corner of 
Williams and Walnut Streets has been occupied as an office for the 
police and engineering forces since the park was laid out. During the 
past season there have been built in the rear of it a carpenter shop, 
a blacksmith sJKip, and a yard and sheds for the storage of materials and 
tools. 

The dwelling-house and stable have been painted, as have also the 
dwelling-house and stable occupied by the Assistant Landscape 
Gardener. 

Marine Park. 

At the beginning of the season changes were made in the building at 
the entrance to the pier to furnish larger accommodations for women 
and children, and also to jjrovide a kitchen for the I'efectory. 

A small amount of grading was done where the grading of Q Street 
had left some dangerous slopes on the ])ai-k line. 

Considerable filling has been dumped on the fiats by parties Avho have 
been dredging in the vicinity. A portion of this filling has been of 
gravel, which will probably remain where deposited; but the balance, 
being claj', may be washed away by the action of the waves. 

Wooden Pier. — No repairs have been required on the wooden pier. 

The number of lamps under the shelter at the outer end of the pier 



36 City Document No. 39. 

was iiifreaseil, and a style of lamp ])ureliased which was hotter suited 
to the locality and conditions than those first used. 

h'on Pier. — A contract was made on July 11 for the constrnction of 
a permanent iron pier, extending from the tempoi'ary wooden pier. 
The length of iron pier contracted for is 12 sj^ans, oi" 741 feet, with the 
option on the part of the Commissioners of requiring an additional 
6 spans, or 808 lineal feet, to be built. The contractors began work on 
the ground September 9, and at present have sunk the foundation 
columns for 6 spans, and the colunms ai-e partially filled with concrete. 

A large amount of iron-work for the superstructure is on the ground, 
and everything is in good shape for going on with the work as soon as 
the Aveather is suitable for placing the concrete. 

Wood Island Park. 

Upon Arbor day about one hundred trees were j)lanted upon Neptune 
Road, the soil for the same having been deposited in 1.S85. 

On the 27th of April a contract was made for building the abutments 
for a bridge over the Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn R.R. Work was 
begun on May 9, and completed December 9. 

Chahles-River Embankment. 

A force was set to work here on August 26, gi'ading the grounds. 
Nearly sufficient matex'ial was on the ground for the purpose, the Em- 
liankment having been, for the past two 3'ears, a free dumping-ground 
for clean earth, or other material suitable for filling. A large amount 
of ashes has been deposited on the grounds hy the Health Department. 
The whole of the Embankment has l^een graded to a sub-grade, with the 
exception of the ])ortions occupied by the Paving Department and the 
Commissioners of West Boston Bridge. The force is now engaged 
covering portions of the grounds where ashes were used for sub-grading 
with a layer of clay. 

The gymnastic ground at the northerlj' end of the Embankment has 
been covered one foot in dei)t]i with gravel dredged from Charles 
River. A contract was made October 31 for covering the areas to be 
planted with loam This work is now in progress, and it is expected to 
have it completed in season for planting in the spring. 

Covered Channel of Muddy River. 

This conduit, damaged as descril^ed in the repoit of the City Engineer 
for 188-1, was repaired in 1885, but a length of about 650 feet received 
but slight repairs at that time, it lieing thought that the settlement and 
conse(juent distortion had ceased. It, Iiowever, continued to grow 
woi'se, and about a year ago it becauu^ necessary to support it by interior 
bracing. This bracing still rcniiains in the conduit, but it is an obstruc- 
tion to the flow of wat(!r. and is lialile to cause seiious tr()ul)le. This 
section will have to be ])ractically ivbuilt. Freipu^it examinations of 
the- whole conduit have been made, and no deterioration has been dis- 
covered in any other part of it. 

In (Jeneral. 

A large amount of W(irk, not described in the foregoing account, has 
been done, such as the making of surveys, plans ami estimates for work 
to be done in the future. 

During the ])ast year an unusually large amount of work similar in 
character to that on the jiarks has Ikm'U in jirogress in this vicinity; 



Report of City Engineer. 37 

consequently there has been great difficulty in securing competent 
workmen, even at the advanced wages which it has been necessary to 
pa}-. Contractors have been unable to obtain materials promptly, "and 
this, with the high price of labor and materials, has caused frequent 
delays and unusually high prices. 

In consequence of these conditions, which could not have been fore- 
seen when the estimates were made, the cost of the work done this 
season has been in excess of that estimated, and the delays consequent 
upon the difficulty of obtaining labor have retarded the work so that 
the volume of work done during the season was less than was expected. 

The table showing the widths of draw-openings in the 
bridges over tide-water in this city is given in the Appendix, 
The openings have all been renjeasured for this report. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, 

City Engineer, 



38 



I— ! 
ft 

H 
Ph 
Ph 
<1 






•« 



•<s> 

O 


















5>i 






City Document No. 39. 

cot-cooOOGOCOOcOOeO'— 'OOf-'-HO 







^^ ^ 

3 • -^c 

'o o 3 '^ 9 
• • • • a 1^ * • -W 

^ ....Q 1^l;fl^o 

^ " . "i" . S o o ^^4 ^ . P^ .. . 

O t-sSci^-d JH OO 0«S coOJ 

^ MOOOO O QQ ,PW WP^ 



Report of City Engineer. 39 



COCOCOCOCC>COCO-^»OkO-^'*CO'*"^<I<ICOCOCOCOCCCCCOCOCCCO 



1— li— !•—(,— Ii— It— (i—li—(G<l (N I— IG<I I— li— II— ll— ll— I 



fcC . . . „ . — . . . ^ . be 



% 






rC ^ -S " 


iL Jl 


o 


•r o „ a 








> rH 


q; ^ 


-gosd 


Wo 


j3 




o c 


Q 


o = o a 


c a 


o - 








5<l 9 5<I 


w S 


^ 


23 c 


© CQ 


c 


^ ^ 'TJ O 




■^-> - 


;_i '^ ;-( -^ -> 




OO V. 


53 w 03 ^ - 


S3 cB 


O 


^tl^tt 


_a 53 



C3- ci- o'Crt -S^fL'T^O 

^.,^5.- ^ioios-^222^'oo 






c c 

c eq 

K CO 



O) 



P5 



"o '3 o 

bD 



'r^ 



P5 ^ 
p:j 
b/D 







c 


« ■* 


- 








-tJ "^ 










a) 


-/3 


^ 









S 'S 


c c 


a 






u 


c .S 


?5X 


S3 






-a S 




6 ^ 






• 


b/L n 






^ 


•* 


, 


'T. ^ 


Jl 




^ 




-M 














--^ '^ 


SO 


'-»j 




1 




•P^ . 




^c 




C 




t >. 


_ 

'a ? 
^ 


73 


S3 


a; 





c2 


0^3 


s^ 


^. - 


^li^; 


-^"^O 



O c3 

PQO 



c 
o 
ii. r— w a 



o a 
a pq - C :: 



.-a ^ -o lI^i-l i^-ojo; oc— i-b»ha. 



CONTENTS CITY EN(}INEER'S REPORT FOR 1887. 



FAOB 

A. — City Engineer's Department 2 

Classification of Expenses 2 

Bridges 3 

Adams street 6, 16 

Albany street 4, 14 

Ashland street 3, 6 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue 6 

Athens street , ... 3, 6 

Beacon Entrance Back-bay fens 3, 6 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back-bay fens 3, 6 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R , 3, 7 

Beech street 5 

Bellevue street ... 5 

Berkeley street, B. & A. R.E 3, 7 

Berkeley street, B. & P. R.R 3, 7 

Blakemore street 3, 7 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 16 

Boylston street. Back-bay fens 3, 7 

Broadway 5 

Broadway, over Fort Point Channel 3, 7 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 3, 7 

Brookline avenue, over B. & A. R.R 3, 7 

Cambridge street 4, 12 

Canal 4, 14 

Canterbury street 5 

Cedar Grove Cemetery 6 

Central avenue ... 4, 12 

Centre street, or Hog bridge 5 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets 5 

Charles river 3, 8 

Chelsea (North) 4, 12 

Chelsea (South) 3, 8 

Chelsea street . . 3, 8 

Columbus avenue 3, 8 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 3, 8 

Commercial street H 

Commonwealth avenue 3,5, 8 

Congress street 3, 9 

Dartmouth street 3, 9 

Dorchester avenue 5 

Dorchester street 4, 15 

Dover street 4, 9 

Dudley avenue 5 

Essex street 4, 12 

Everett street 5 

Federal street 4, 9 

Ferdinand street 4, 10 

Fifth street 5 



42 City Document No. 39. 

Bridges, — continued. page 

Forest Hills avenue , 5 

Fourth street 5 

Franklin-street foot-bridge 4,10 

Granite 4,13 

Harvard street 5 

Harrison avenue . . 5 

Huntington avenue 4, 10 

Linden Park street 4, 10 

Longwood avenue 4, 13 

Main street 5 

Midden 4, 10 

Market street 5 

Mattapan 4, 13 

Meridian street 4, 10 

Milton 4,13 

Mt. Washington avenue 4, 11 

Mystic avenue 5 

Neponset 4, 13 

Newton street 4, 11 

Norfolk street 5 

North Beacon street 4, 13 

North Harvard street 4, 14 

Park street 5 

Prison-point 4, 14 

Public Garden foot-bridge 4, 11 

Savin Hill avenue 6 

Second street 5 

Sliawmut avenue 4, 11 

Silver street 5 

Sixth street 5 

Spring street 4, 14 

Swett street, east of N.Y. & N.E. R.R 4, 11 

Swett street, west of N.Y. & N.E. R.R 4, 11 

Third street 5 

Tremont street 5 

Warren 4, 11 

Washington street 5 

Washington street, Ward 24 5 

Western avenue to Cambridge 4, 14 

Western avenue to Watertown. . . 4, 14 

West Boston 4, 15 

West Chester park, over B. & A. R.R 4,12 

West Chester park, over B. & P. R.R 4,12 

West Rutland square, foot-bridge over B. & P. R.R 4, 12 

Winthrop 4, 12 

Misceli-xnp:ous Works AND Constructions in 1887 16 

Boylston-street bridge Ifi 

Illustration : Abutments and wing-walls 16 

East Boston ferries 17 

Estimates 17 

Iron Pier, Marine park 17 

Paving wharf • • • • 16 

Quincy-street bridge 16 

Statue of Lief Erickson 17 

Wharf at Long Island 16 

In general 18 

B. — Watek-Works .. . 18 

Sources of supply 18 

Consumption 18 

New high-service works 19 

Distribution system 23 

Ulustration : Fisher Hill reservoir 20 

Illustrations: Gate Chamber Fisher Hill Reservoir 22 



Contents. 43 



PAGE 



C. — Main Drainage 24 

Average daily amount sewage pumped 25 

Cost of pumping ... 25 

Main and intercepting sewers 26 

Section 6, South Boston intercepting sewer 26 

Pumping-station 26 

Record of engines 27 

Deposit sewers 28 

Tunnel 29 

Flume 29 

Moon Island 30 

Expenses 30 

D. — Parks 31 

Back-bay Fens 31 

The Parkway 31 

Excavation of water-way 31 

Grading of marsh 31 

Drainage 31 

Roadways and walks 31 

Agassiz bridge 33 

Loaming and planting 33 

Arnold Arboretum 34 

Franklin park 34 

The Overlook 35 

Administration buildings 35 

Marine park 35 

Wooden pier , 35 

Iron pier 36 

Wood Island Park '. 36 

Charles River Embankment. . . 36 

Covered channel of Muddy River 36 

In general 36 

Appendix A, showing width of draw-opening 38 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06315 933 7 



iihli' 



■*y;'-*r 



:';!;'!l'' 



hi