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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

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W.inrfi Fri^tf.fCr'E-'- 



ENGINEERING DEPAETMENT. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL BEPOET 



CITY ENai]^EER, 



BOSTON, 



FOE, THE YEAR 1891. 



PrintclJ for t^z JBcpartmcnt, 




BOSTON : 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1892. 



With Compliments of 



City Eivgineer. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENai^EEK, 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1891, 



^rtntct) for t^z department. 




BOSTON : 
ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1892. 






/S, -/r- 

1 m-fm-if /c/"(M^-vi 






Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 1892. 

Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with tlie Kevised Ordinances the fol- 
lowing report of the expenses and operations of the depart- 
ment for the year 1891 is respectfully submitted : 

The report of this department may be classified under the 
following heads : 

A. — The examination and supervision of structural re- 
pairs of bridges, the designing and superintending the con- 
struction of new bridges, retaining-walls, city wharves, etc., 
and in miscellaneous engineering work called for by the City 
Council. 

B. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the Sudbury-river, Cochituate, and Mystic Water-Works, 
including charge of new constructions for these works. 

C. — Charge of the construction of a system of intercept- 
ing and outlet sewers. 

D. — Charge of the eno;ineerino; work in connection with 
the parks. 

E. — Charge of the engineering work, except for Sewer 
Division, in connection with the Street Department. 

The expenses incurred under the head " C " are paid 
wholly from a special appropriation. 



A. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 
January 1, 1891, to January 31, 1892 : 

Amount expended from department appropria- 
tion for 1890-91 $9,633 69 

Amount expended from department appropria- 
tion for 1891-92 26,989 69 



Total $36,623 38 



City Document No. 11. 

Statement of Expenditures, Department Appro- 
priations. 



Object or Expenditubes. 



Salaries of City Engineer, assistants, 
draughtsmen, transitmen, level- 
lers, rodmen, etc , 

Engineering instruments and re- 
pairs of same 

Drawing-paper, and all materials 
for making plans 

Stationery, printing-stock, note- 
books, postage, etc 

Printing 

Reference library, binding books, 
and photographs of works . . . . 

Travelling expenses (including 
horse-keeping, repairs on vehi- 
cles, etc. ) 

Telephone service 

Furniture cases for plans and books, 
etc 4 

Blue-process printing 

Incidental expenses, and all other 
small supplies 



Totals . 



1891. 

January to 

May 1. 



134 20 



202 55 
60 20 



151 25 

50 88 



),633 69 



1891. 
May to Jan- 
uary 31. 



547 06 


$24,465 22 


72 10 


914 74 


105 16 


306 45 


164 10 


222 22 


146 19 


99 40 



170 25 



476 84 
144 35 

30 00 
2 50 

157 72 



$26,989 69 



Total 
Expenditures, 

Jan. 1, 1891, 
to Jan. 31, 1892. 



,012 28 

986 84 

411 61 

386 32 
245 59 

304 45 



679 39 
204 55 

.30 00 
153 75 

208 60 



5,623 38 



Engineering Department. 



Charles-River Bridges. 
Appropriation $15,400 00 

Statement of Expenses from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892. 



Object of Expendittjee. 



Jan. 1, 1891, to 
May 1, 1891. 



May 1, 1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



Total 

Expended, 

Jan. 1, 1891, 

to Jan. 31, 1892. 



Cambridge-st. bridge, A. Mclnnis, 
contractor, for widening draw- 
opening 

Essex-st. bridge, W. A. Kenrick &, 
Son, contractors, for widening 
draw-opening 

Nortli Harvard-st. bridge, John 
Cavanagh & Co., contractors, for 
widening draw-opening 

Western-ave. bridge, Wm. Miller, 
contractor, for widening draw- 
opening 

Inspection 

Printing and stationery 

Lumber 

Ironwork 



$1,125 00 



1,106 72 



376 00 
34 54 
14 35 
42 75 



$941 27 
3,500 00 



3,714 00 



$2,066 27 
3,500 00 
1,106 72 



3,714 00 

376 00 

34 54 

14 35 

42 75 



Totals 



2,699 36 



5,155 27 



),854 63 



Appropriation . . . . 

Expended previous to Jan. 1, 

1891 

Expended from Jan. 1, 1891, to 

Jan. 31,1892 



Balance Feb. 1, 1892 



$3,383 19 
10,854 63 



$15,400 00 



14,237 82 
$1,162 18 



4 City Dooiument No. 11. 

Federal-street Bridge. 
Appropriation $100,000 00 



Statement of Expenses from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892. 



Object op Expenditure. 



Anti-friction rolls 

Carpenter work, pulling piles, etc.. 

Dynamometer 

Engineering and inspection 

Electric machinery 

Freight and coal 

Ironwork and hardware 

Machinery for draws . . . , 

Pig-lead for counterbalance, and 
labor on same 

Rent of hoisting-engine 

Sidewalk and paving 

Snatch-blocks, casks, and rope . . . . 

Travelling expenses and postage . . . 

Shaw & Miller, contractors for re- 
building 

Pittsburg Bridge Co., contractors 
for iron draws 

Charles Carr, contractor steel 
trucks 



Jan. 1, 1891, to 
May 1, 1S91. 



$340 00 

73 00 

36 00 

939 58 



35 85 
346 36 



1,543 46 

230 00 

150 00 

105 23 

11 89 

7,418 80 

4,266 33 

2,744 00 



May 1, 1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



$527 16 



991 75 
3,871 69 



989 19 

1,843 17 

1,258 77 

427 50 

112 39 

40 42 

5 82 

42,232 77 

6,086 80 



Total 

Expended, 

Jan. 1, 1891, 

to Jan. 31, 1892. 



$340 00 
600 16 

36 00 
1,931 33 
3,871 69 

35 85 
1,335 55 
1,843 17 

2,802 23 

657 50 

262 39 

145 65 

17 71 

49,651 57 

10,353 13 

2,744 00 



Totals. 



$18,240 50 



5,387 43 



$76,627 93 



Appropriation 

Expended previous to Jan. 1, 

1891 

Expended from Jan. 1, 1891, to 

Jan. 31, 1892 



,657 24 
76,627 93 



$100,000 00 



99,285 17 



Balance Feb. 1, 1892 



'14 83 



Engineering Department. 



Ferdinand-street Bridge. 
Appropriation . . . . . . $35,000 00 

Statement of Expenses from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 31, 1892. 



Object of Espenditueb. 



Advertising , 

Engineering and inspection 

Printing and stationery 

Travelling expenses . . . . 

Parapet stone 

Parapet and coping-stone, south 

abutment 

Cutting, coping, and building fence. 

Teaming 

R. P. Hav/kins, contractor, iron 

bridge 

R. D. Shanahan, contractor, retain- 

ing-wall 

Street department 



Jan. 1,1891, to 
May 1, 1891. 



$28 38 



58 12 
18 88 



May 1,1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1S92. 



$575 00 



6 30 
20 00 

198 00 

350 00 

18 CO 

4,096 45 

4,321 33 
5,890 77 



Total 

Expended, 

Jan. 1, 1891, to 

Jan. 31, 1892. 



#28 38 

575 00 

58 12 

25 18 

20 00 

198 00 

350 00 

18 00 

4,096 45 

4,321 33 

5,890 77 



Totals 



)5 38 



15,475 85 



),581 23 



Appropriation .... 
Expended previous to Jan. 1, 1891, 
Expended from Jan. 1, 1891, to Jan. 

31, 1892 

Transferred to Harvard bridge, June 

2, 1891 . . 

Transferred to Milton bridge, Oct. 

1, 1891 

Transferred to West Newton street, 

paving, Oct. 5, 1891 



$43 80 

15,581 23 

10,000 00 

2,500 00 

5,000 00 



$35,000 00 



33,125 03 



Balance Feb. 1, 1892 



$1,874 97 



City Document No. 11. 



Improved Sewerage. 
Total appropriations . . . . $5,913,164 93 

Statement of Expenses, Irnproved Sewerage, Jan. 1, 1S91, to Jan. 31, 1892. 



Object of Expenditure. 



General Office expenses 

Moon Island 

Pumping-station 

" outside 

Sec. 1, Brighton, Int. Sewer. 

3, Dorchester, " " 

4, 

5, " " 

6, " 
7, 



9, " " " ... 

10, " " 

5,6, East side, " " 

3, Outfall Sewer 

7, South Boston, Int. Sewer. 



Jan. 1,1891, to 
May 1, 1891. 



^3,916 20 

990 75 

180 00 

985 00 

3 00 

1,532 98 

2,075 83 

2,548 29 

142 17 



12,402 G6 

26,190 79 

1,018 15 

383 89 

150 00 

150 00 



May 1, 1891, to 
Jan. 31, 1892. 



),813 56 



3,514 78 
1,369 84 



72 08 

39 19 

14,209 42 

39 20 

28,565 60 

26,650 66 

55,441 89 

23 72 



Total 

Expended, 

Jan. 1, ] 891, to 

Jan. 31, 1892. 



$13,729 76 

990 75 

180 00 

985 00 

3,517 78 

1,532 98 

3,445 67 

2,548 29 

214 25 

39 19 

14,209 42 

39 20 

40,968 26 

52,841 45 

56,460 04 

383 89 

173 72 

150 00 



Totals 



$52,669 71 



.$139,739 94 



$192,409 65 



Appropriations 

Expended previous to Jan. 

1, 1891. 
Expended from Jan. 1, 

1891, to Jan. 31, 1892 . 



Balance Feb. 1, 1892 



.,(572,836 76 
192,409 65 



,913,164 93 



5,865,246 41 
$47,918 52 



Engineering Department. 



BRIDGES. 



The inspection of the highway bridges for the annual 
report of their safety and completeness has been made, and, 
as usual, besides the highway bridges, all such bridges as the 
Public Garden foot-bridge and the bridges in the Parks have 
also been inspected. 

During the year twelve notifications have been received 
that bridges have been stripped preparatory to repairing the 
same, and when notified examinations have been made, plans 
furnished, and supervision of repairs made when necessary. 

Federal-street bridge, which was being rebuilt when the 
last annual report was made, has been completed. 

List of Bridges Inspected. 

In the list those marked with an * are over navigable 
water, and are each provided with a draw. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

Agassiz road, in Back Bay Fens. 

Ashland street, Ward 23, over Providence Division Old 
Colony Railroad. 

Athens street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Beacon Entrance, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad. 

Blakemore street, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad, Ward 23. 

Bolton street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Boylston street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Broadway, over Fort Point Channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

*Charles River, from Boston to Charlestown. 

*Chelsea (south), over South Channel, Mystic river. 

*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Ward 24. 



8 City Document No. 11. 

Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay Fens. 

*Congress street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Cottage-street foot-bridge, over Flats, East Boston. 

Cornwall street, over Stony Brook, Ward 23. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany and Providence 
Division Old Colony Railroad. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point Channel. 

*Federal street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Fen, Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Franklin-street foot-bridge, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Gold street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Irvington street, over Providence Division, Old Colony 
Railroad. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Linden Park street, over Stony brook. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort Point Channel. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach, &, Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Newton street, over Providence Division Old Colony Rail- 
road. 

Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony brook. Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of New York & New England Railroad. 

Swett street, west of New York & New England Railroad. 

*Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Chester park, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

West Chester park, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad. 

West Rutland square foot-bridge, over Providence Divi- 
sion Old Colony Railroad. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 
WITHIN ITS Limits. 

*Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Chelsea (north), from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Ward 25 (Brookline) to Cambridge. 
*Granite, from Dorchester, Ward 24, to Milton. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Longwood avenue, from Ward 22 to Brookline. 
Mattapaii, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
Milton, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*!N"eponset, from Ward 24 to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbuiy to Dedham. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Dorchester street, over Old Colony Railroad. 
*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 
*Piison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 
*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

lY. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st. — Boston (& Albany Railroad. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston (& Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — JSTew York S New England Railroad. 

Broadway. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Fifth street. 

Forest Hills avenue, Ward 24. 



10 City Document No. 11. 

Fourth street. 

Harvard street, Ward 24. 

Norfolk " " " 

Norfolk " " " 

Second street. 

Silver street. 

Sixth street. 

Third street. 

Washington street, Ward 24. 



6th. — Old Qolony Railroad. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Commercial street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 



7th. — Old Colony Railroad, Providence Division. 

Beech street, Ward 23. 

Bellevue street, Ward 23. 

Canterbury street, Ward 23. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, Ward 23. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, Ward 23. 

Dudley avenue, Ward 23. 

Park street, Ward 23 o 



Recapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . .51 
II. Number of which Boston supports the part within 

its limits ....... 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ...... 6 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 5 

2. Boston & Maine, Western Division ... 2 

3. " " Eastern Division ... 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn ... 1 

5. New York & New England . . . .13 

6. Old Colony .7 5 

7. " " Providence Division ... 7 

Total number . . . . . . . 106 



Engineering Department. 11 

Four bridges have been added to the list this year, 
name 1 3" : 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook. Ward 23 ; Irvington 
street foot-bridge, over the Providence Division of the Old 
Colony Kailroad , and two bridges in the Back Bay Fens, 
viz., the Fen bridge, and the Stony-brook bridge over the 
new outlet to Stony brook. 

I. — BRIDGES WHOLLY SUPPORTED BY BOSTON. 

Agassiz-road Bridge in Back Bay Fens. 

This brido-e w\as built in 1887, of brick and stone mas- 
onry. It is maintained by the Park Department, and is in 
good condition. 

Ashland-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony Railroad, Ward 23). 

The present structure is of iron, and was built in 1875. 
The ironwork and fences should be painted ; otherwise it is 
in good condition. 

Athens-street Bridge (over New York & New 
England Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1874. The iron- 
work is badly rusted and is in bad condition. The recom- 
mendation of last year is renewed, " that the ironwork be 
stripped and painted." 

Beacon-entrance Bridge (in Back Bay Fens, over 
Boston & Albany Railroad), 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1881-82. 
It is maintained l)y the Park Department, and is in good 
condition. It has been painted. 

Beacon-street Bridee (over Outlet of Back Bay). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. The ironwork 
should be painted, otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built in 1884-85 ; it was 
widened in 1887-88, and the central roadway Avas widened 
a few feet for the accommodation of the cars of the West 
End Street Railway Co., at the expense of that corporation. 

The bridge is in good condition. 



12 City Document No. 11. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Kailroad) . 

Id process of rebuilding. (See page 90.) 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony Eatlroad). 

The spans over the main track have not been stripped 
since 1879. At that time the iron beams were found to be 
somewhat wasted by rust, and intermediate wooden beams 
were added. 

So far as can be seen the wooden beams are in good con- 
dition, but it is recommended that this part of the bridge 
be stripped so that it may be more carefully examined. 

The remainder of the bridge is in fair condition. 

A movement has been made toward replacing a portion of 
the bridge by longer spans in order to make both the high- 
way and the raih'oad more safe, and also to better accommo- 
liate the railroad. 

Blakemore-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1881-82. It is in 
good condition. 



C3^ 



Bolton-street Bridge (over New York & New 
England Railroad). 

This is a new wooden brids^e. It is in o-ood condition. 

BOYLSTON-STREET ArCH BrIDGE (iN BaCK BaY FeNS). 

The small cracks in the masonry and parapet which have 
existed since the bridge was built, still open slightly after 
pointing. They have no significance except as an indication 
that the whole area around the bridge still continues to 
settle at a slow rate. The brido:e is in g-ood condition. 

BOYLSTON-STREET BrIDGE (oVER BoSTON & AlBANY 

Railroad) . 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1886-88. 

An ornamental railing, extending over the adjoining re- 
taining-walls should be provided in place of the present 
temporary fence. 

No repairs have been needed, and the bridge is in good 
condition. 



Engineering Department. 13 



* Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point Channel) . 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1869-71, and the 
draw and its foundation were rebuilt in 1874-75. 

The floor-beams on the lOO-ft. span are crooked and out 
of plumb ; they were originally weak, and appear to be 
even worse than they actually are. 

The" main trusses over Foundry and Lehigh streets are out 
of plumb, and are weak. Estimates have been made for re- 
newing the 100-ft. span, and the spans over Foundry and 
Lehigh streets, and for strengthening the column sections 
of the brido-e so as to make the structure strono; enouo-h to 
carry the long electric cars now used by the West End 
Street Eailway Co. 

The sidewalks are in poor condition ; the concrete should 
be repaired, and the under floor patched where necessary. 

The draw-pier is in good condition, so far as it can be 
seen, but it has not been examined by a diver to ascertain the 
amount of damage done by Limnoria. The examination of 
two years ago showed extensive damage already done, and 
further examination should be made next summer. 

Broadway Bridge (over Boston & Albany Kailroad). 

This bridge is of iron, and was built in 1880-81. 
The ironwork is very rusty. 

The bridge should be stripped of woodwork, cleaned, 
and painted. 

Brookline-a venue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
* Kailroad.) 

This bridge is of iron, and was built in 1884. It is in 
good condition. 

Byron-street Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach, & 
Lynn Railroad). 

This is a wooden bridge. It was built in 1889. It is in 
good condition. 

* Charles-river Bridge (from Boston to 
Charlestown). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw. The 
original bridge was built in 1785-86 ; the present structure 
was built in 1854-55 ; the draw was Wilt in 1870. 

The down-stream pier is in bad condition ; the lower end 
has been forced out of place from one to two feet, and yields 



14 City Document 'Ko. 11. 

as much more when struck by vessels. The fender-guard is 
in a ruinous condition. 

The sag in the bridge toward the east is more consider- 
able tlian lieretofore, and unless the cross-bracino; before 
recommended is soon applied, it will become dangerous. 
Several buildings belonging to private parties and attached 
to the bridge are in precarious condition for lack of suitable 
foundation. 

The floor timbers of the draw are in bad condition. A 
picket fence has been built in place of the old rails on the 
draw, to prevent persons from going under the draw ; an un- 
identified tramp having been killed by so doing. 

Estimates have been made for rebuildino- the bridge. 

* Chelsea Bridge, South (^over South Channel, Mystic 

Kiver) . 

This is a pile bridge with an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-3, and the present structure in 
1876^-77. 

Apparatus has been provided for moving the draw by 
steam. 

The bridge needs a few ordinary repairs, but is in good 
condition as a whole. 

* Chelsea-street Bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea.) 

This is a wooden pile bridge ; was originally built in 1834 ; 
was rebuilt in 1848, and again rebuilt in 1873, and the 
present draw was built in 1868. 

The part of the bridge between the draw and Chelsea was 
burned in 1887, and rebuilt in a temporary manner, and the 
draw is so low that it will be necessary to raise the grade of 
the whole bridge when a new draw is built. 

Estimates for rebuildino; this bridae was made in 1889. 
It is narrow and inconvenient, and the draw and its founda- 
tion are in a dangerous condition. The travel over the 
bridge is increasing, and the passage of vessels through the 
draw is increasing. It is a dangerous bridge, and its re- 
building should not be delayed. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad) . 

This is an iron bridge, was originally built in 1865, and 
the present structure was built in 1876-77. 

The bridge is in good condition, except that it is made a 



Engineering Department. 15 

point of attachment for telephone pole guys, and one truss 
has its upper chord thrown out of line by the strain. The 
guys should not be allowed to remain. 

* Commercial-point, or Tenean, Bridge (Ward 24). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
It was originally built in 1833, and the present structure was 
built in 1875. 

This bridge requires repairs, and probably some of the 
main beams of the draws will have to be renewed next 
season. 

Commonwealth-avenue Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This is an iron bridge, and it was built in 1881-82. The 
ironwork needs painting; otherwise it is in good condition. 

* Congress-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron turn-table draw 
on a stone masonry foundation. It was built in 1874-75. 
The fenders are in bad condition, and the heads of exposed 
spur shores are in some cases rotten. The floor of the main 
bridge has been patched, and requires more repairs of the 
same kind. The surface of the sidewalks should be renewed 
and the under floor patched. A long piece of the sidewalk 
was removed for the construction of a building on the south 
side at the city end of the bridge. 

A defective main pile was discovered and reported, and 
the kyanized spruce covering plank on the draw-pier is 
commencing to decay. 

Cornwall-street Bridge (over Stony Brook, Ward 23). 

This small wooden bridge was built this year. (See 
page 91.) 

Cottage-street Foot-bridge (over Flats, East 
Boston). 

This is a new wooden pile bridge, built in 1889 for foot 
travel only. It is in good condition. 

Dartmouth-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
AND Providence Division Old Colony Kailroad). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built of wood in 1869, and 
the present structure was built in 1878-79. It is in good 
condition. 



16 City Docuivient No. 11. 



* Dover-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a double iron draw ; it 
was originally built in 1805, was rebuilt in 1858-59, and 
the present structure was built in 1876. The concrete side- 
walk is in poor condition. A considerable part of it should 
be relaid, and the woodwork beneath it repaired. The 
main floor of the roadway should be carefully examined by 
removing portions of the paving. It is known to be more 
or less decayed. 

The channel was partially widened several years since to 
a width of 36 feet, but the work was never completed, and 
now, at about the level of low water, it is less than that width 
(which is the legal width of the draw-opening for the bridge) . 
The track timber of the dravr and the fender-guard have 
been repaired. 



*Federal-street (over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was originally built in 1827-28 ; was rebuilt 
in 1857-58, was again rebuilt in 1872-73, and the present 
structure, which is a wooden pile bridge with a double iron 
draw, was built during the past two years. It is in good 
condition. (See page 33.) 



Fen Bridge (Back Bay Fens). 

This new bridge is nearly finished, and can soon be 
opened to travel. 



Ferdinand-street (over Boston & Albany 
Kailroad). 

This is an iron bridge. It was originally built in 1864-65, 
and was strengthened in 1877. The old structure has been 
removed and replaced by a new bridge. It is in good con- 
dition. (See page 35.) 



Franklin-street Foot-bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1883. New 
wooden treads for the stairs are needed, and the bridge 
should be painted. 



Engineering Department. 17 



Gold-street Foot-bridge (over New York and New 
England Railroad). 

This is a wooden foot-bridge built in 1890. 
This bridge is in good condition. 



HUNTINGTON-AVENUE BrIDGE (oVER BoSTON & AlBANT 

Railroad) . 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1872, and the 
abutments were rebuilt in 1876-77. 

The wing-walls of the abutments should be pointed. The 
bridge is in good condition, but its surface should 'be regu- 
lated so as to conform to a proper grade of the approaches. 



Irvington-street Foot-bridge (over Providence Divi- 
sion Old Colony Railroad). 

This is a new bridge built this year. (See page 91.) 



Leyden-street Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach, 
& Lynn Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1889. It needs painting; 
otherwise it is in good condition. 



*Malden Bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 

The original bridge was built in 1787. The present struct- 
ure was built in 1875, and the draw was built in 1872. 

The draw-pier and the face of the water-way through the 
bridge are in bad condition. The draw is very old for a 
wooden structure ; the wood is decayed in many places, the 
cross-beam, which carries the weight of both trusses to the 
centre is weak, and the draw-foundation is in poor condi- 
tion. 

Two bents of piles in the fixed part of the bridge, which 
rest on an old crib, are settling, and should be repaired in 
the spring. Estimates have been made for building a new 
draw. 



18 City Document No. 11. 



*Meridian-street Bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden turn-table 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built 
in 1856. It was rebuilt soon afterwards ; was widened and 
relmilt as at present in 1884, excepting the draw, which was 
built in 1875-76. 

The bridge has been painted, and is in good condition. 

*Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge (over Fort Point 
Channel ) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw. It was 
built in 1854, and was rebuilt in 1870-71. 

The turn-table of the draw has been repaired. The deck 
of the draw newly planked with hard-pine and calked, and 
the bridge painted. The draw-pier is so low that high tides 
cover it. The draw-tender's house has been enlarged and 
refitted. The waterways need replanking in part. 

Neptune-road Bridge (over Eevere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad in East Boston). 

This is an iron bridge, and it was built in 1887-88. 

It is maintained by the Park Department. 

It needs painting ; otherwise it is in good condition. 

Newton-street Bridge (over Providence Division Old 
Colony Railroad.) 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1872. 
It is in good condition. 

Public Garden Foot-bridge. 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1867, and was 
thoroughly repaired in 1887. 

The floor is worn and needs renewal ; otherwise it is in 
good condition. 

Shawmut-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad) . 

This is an iron bridge, and it was built in 1871. 

The electric-wire poles of the West End Street Railway 
Co. are so placed as to make an unsightly bend in the orna- 
mental parapet. The structure of the bridge is in good con- 
dition. 



Engineeeestg Department. 19 

Stony-brook Bridge (Back Bay Fens). 

This is a new bridge, now in process of construction. 
(See page 74.) 

SWETT-STREET BRIDGES (OVER SoUTH BaY SlUICES) . 

These are wooden bridges, and were built in 1875. 

The easterly bridge is in safe condition, and tlie repairs 
recommended on the westerly bridge have been made. 

The bulkhead wings to both bridges are in bad condition, 
but they still continue to serve their purpose. 

* Warren Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw ; it was 
originally built in 1828, and the present structure was built 
in 1883-84. 

The fender-guard has been repaired. The kyanized 
spruce plank on the draw-pier, laid seven years ago, has 
commenced to decay, and will require patching. 

The concrete sidewalk on the down-stream side of the 
bridge should be resurfaced. As a whole the brido;e is in 
good condition. 

West Chester Park Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Kailroad) . 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. 

It is in good condition. The grade of the surface of the 
bridge and approaches should be improved, as recommended 
for Huntinoton-avenue brido;e. 

West Chester Park Bridge (over Providence Divi- 
sion Old Colony Eailroad). 

This is an iron bridge, and it was built in 1876. 
It is in good condition. 

West Kutland-square Foot-bridge (over Providence 
Division Old Colony Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge; it was built in 1882, and is in 
good condition. 

It should be painted. 

WiNTHROP Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge without a draw ; it was originally 
built in 1839, was rebuilt in 1851, and was extensively re- 
paired in 1870. 

The bridge is old and poor, but is still in a safe condition. 



20 City Document No. 11. 



II. — BRIDGES OF WHICH BOSTON SUPPORTS 
THE PART WITHIN ITS LIMITS. 

* Cambridge-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
It was rebuilt in 1884. 

The work of widening the passageway for vessels, which 
was in progress under the supervision of the City Engineer 
of Cambridge at the date of the last report, has been com- 
pleted. 

The division of the cost between the two cities has not yet 
been finally adjusted, but the total cost will fall within the 
appropriation of $15,400 made by the city of Boston for the 
four bridges over the Charles river ; namely, Cambridge 
street, Western avenue to Cambridge, North Harvard street, 
and Essex street. 

The draw-pier has been lengthened slightly and planked. 

The bridjce is in o:ood condition. 

Central-avenue Bridge (over Neponset River, Dor- 
chester Lower Mills). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. 
It is in good condition. 

*Chelsea Bridge, North (from Mystic-river Corpora- 
tion Wharf to Chelsea). 

The original structure was built in 1802-3 ; the present 
structure was built in 1880, except the draw, which was 
built in 1873. 

Apparatus has been provided for moving the draw by 
steam. The fixed part of the bridge is in fair condition. 
The arrangements for draining the gravel under the paving 
do not work well, and water continues to drip over the 
outer stringers for a long time after rain. The draw and 
draw foundation are in poor condition. 

The cluster of piles under the draw pivot should be 
spliced, and there is much rotten wood in the draw. It 
should be partially stripped and the defective parts re- 
moved. 

*Essex-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw, 
and was originally built in 1850. 



Engineering Department. 21 

The work of widening the waterway has been completed, 
and the draw is in good condition, except that it needs re- 
planking ; a new sidewalk has been built. 

The bridge as a whole is old and poor and should be 
rebuilt, as a natural consequence of the widening of Common- 
wealth avenue, so as to cross the Grand Junction Railroad 
above grade. (See page 38.) 

*Granite Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

This bridge was originally built in 1837. It is a wooden 
pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 

The draw-piers are not well placed with reference to the 
course of the river and the direction of the current, conse- 
quently great difficulty is found in passing vessels through 
there, and travel over the bridge is delayed b}'- the long time 
required to pass vessels of large size. 

LONGWOOD-A VENUE BrIDGE (FROM WaRD 22 TO 

Brooexine). 

The present structure was built in 1877. This is a wooden 
bridge on wooden posts set in the ground. 

The posts which carry the bridge are decaying near the 
surface of the ground. They should be put in order ; other- 
wise the bridge is in good condition. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

This is an old iron bridge ; it is in a dangerous condition. 
It should be replaced by a stone bridge. 

Milton Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The original structure is very old ; it was widened in 
1871-72. The older part of this bridge was built of stone, 
and the widening is an iron structure on stone columns. 
The floor of this bridge has been repaired and the fences 
painted. It is in fair condition. 

*Neponset Bridge (from Ward 24 to Quincy). 

The original structure was built in 1802 ; the present 
structure in 1877. 

The lower pier has been planked and a new sidewalk 
built. The bridge is in fair condition. The ironwork 
should be painted. 



22 City Document No. 11. 



*NoRTH Beacon-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The original structure was built in 1822, and the present 
structure in 1884. It is in fair condition. 

Estimates have been made for rebuilding and widening 
the waterways of the bridge, and the next lower -one on the 
river, namely. Western avenue to Watertown, the expense 
to be divided between Boston and Watertown. 



* North Harvard-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cabibridge). 

This bridofe was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt 
in 1879. 

The work of widening the waterway to 36 feet has been 
completed, and a new shelter for the draw-tender built. 
The abutment is in poor condition. (See page 38.) 

Spring-street Bridge (from Ward 23 to Dedham). 

This is a stone bridge, and it is in good condition, except 
that the rail on the bridge is too low. 

*Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge ) . 

The original structure was built in 1824 ; the present 
structure was built in 1879-80. The waterway has been 
widened to 36 feet under the supervision of the City Engi- 
neer of Cambridge. The pier needs planking. The draw 
should be adjusted and made to run easier than at present. 

* Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown), 

This is a wooden pile bridge. It was built in 1824, the 
present draw was built in 1883, and the abutment was re- 
built in 1886. It is in good condition. As before stated 
under head of "North Beacon Street bridge," estimates have 
been made for rebuilding the bridge and widening the pas- 
sageway for vessels. 



. Engineering Department. 23 

m.— BRIDGES OF WHICH BOSTON PAYS A PART 
OF THE COST OF MAINTENANCE. 

Albany-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) . 

The orioinal structure was built in 1856-57 ; was rebuilt 
in 1867-68, and again in 1886-87. 
It is in o;ood condition. 

*Canal Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

*Prison-point Bridge (from Charlestown to 
Cambridge. 

*West Boston Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge.) 

These bridges are in the care of two commissioners, ap- 
pointed, one from Boston and one from Cambridge, and the 
expense of maintenance is borne equally by each city. 
The commissioner for the city of Boston is the Superintend- 
ent of Streets. 

West Boston Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron turn-table draw. 
The bridge was originally built in 1792-93, was rebuilt in 
1854, and repaired in 1871. The draw was rebuilt in 1875. 

The repairs of the westerly bulkhead, sidewalk, and adja- 
cent roadway, recommended as necessary in the last report, 
have been made. 

Substantially the same plan was adopted as that used in 
repairing the opposite side of the bridge in 1886. The 
bridge has been relieved of a large and useless weight of 
gravel and mud, all decayed timber has been removed, a 
new sidewalk of hard-pine timber and kyanized spruce plank 
has been built, and upon it a brick sidewalk, laid in sand, 
was laid. The old edgestones have been reset, the road- 
way plank, wherever uncovered, has been protected by 
a layer of salt mud, and the roadway between the curbstone 
and street-railroad track has been repaired, using the old 
paving-blocks. 

The part of the bridge repaired as above described in- 
cludes all the up-stream sidewalk between the draw and the 
Cambridge abutment, and about one hundred feet in length 
on the same side of the bridge next the Boston abutment. 

Bids were advertised for and the contract was awarded to 
Josiah Shaw, the lowest bidder. 



24 CiTr Document No. 11. 

Total cost, $10,520.50, of which city of Boston j)aid one- 
half. 

A new boiler for the engine turning the draw has been 
provided, and the turning apparatus put in good order. 
The up-stream end of the draw-pier is in bad condition, and 
will require to be repaired and strengthened. The plank 
sides of the waterway are in bad condition, and require 
immediate attention. 

The paving of the roadway and sidewalks from the draw 
to the Boston end, and the bulkheads next the Charles-river 
embankment, should be repaired. With the exceptions above 
noted the bridge is in as good condition as it is practicable 
to put so old and narrow a structure. The need of a new 
and wider bridge becomes more apparent year by year. 

Canal, or Craigie's Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turn-table 
draw. The bridge was originally built in 1808, was rebuilt 
in 1852, and again rebuilt and widened in 1874. Some of the 
piles in this bridge date from 1808. 

The foundation to the engine-house on the draw-pier has 
been put in good condition. A portion of the roadway 
paving was relaid last year ; the remaining surface should be 
repaired. 

The fender on the up-stream side is in bad condition. The 
hard bottom prevents the driving of piles in the usual man- 
ner, and a different plan must be adopted to protect the 
bridge from vessels. The sides of the waterway need new 
planking. 

The wooden draw shows signs of age, and the piling under 
the Boston end will soon require attention. The bridge as a 
whole is in fairly good and safe condition. 

Prison-point Bridge. 

This bridge was originally built in 1833, and the present 
structure was built in 1876-77. It is a wooden pile bridge, 
with an iron leaf draw. 

The draw- pier has been replanked, and necessary repairs 
made to the roadway and machinery for moving the draw. 

Dorchester-street Bridge (over Old Colony 
Railroad). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built in 1869. 
This bridge is principally supported by the Old Colony 
Railroad. No repairs have been made upon it. In last 



Engeneering Department. 25 

year's report the following statement was made : " The 
bridge has not been stripped and painted for ten years. It is 
known to be in bad condition, just how bad cannot be ascer- 
tained without removing all the woodwork. It should be 
thoroughly overhauled in the spring," Nothing has yet been 
done. 

*Harvard Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

This bridge is practically completed, and was opened for 
travel Sept.l, 1891. It is still in the hands of the commis- 
sion by which it was built. 

The bridge is built across the Charles river, and connects 
West Chester park, in Boston, with Front street, in Cam- 
bridge. 

The length of the bridge between centres of bearings on 
abutments is 2,164 ft. 9 in. ; the distance between harbor 
lines, measured at centre line of bridge, being 2,159 ft. 4| 
in. 

The bridge is a deck bridge, its width, excepting at and 
near draw, being 69 ft. 4 in. measured between centre of 
railings. This width is divided into one roadway 51 ft. wide, 
and two sidewalks each 9 ft. 2 in. wide. 

The draw is 48 ft. 4 in. wide between centres of railings, 
the width of roadway being 34 ft. 6 in. and the width of each 
sidewalk 6 ft. 11 in. The elevations of roadway curb on 
bridge, above Boston city base, are 21 ft. at abutments, and 
increase to 29.5 ft. at piers 6 and 17, the bridge being level 
between these two piers. 

The requirements to be fulfilled in the design of the bridge 
were such that only spans of moderate length could be used, 
and as built, the bridge is composed of fixed and suspended 
spans, generally 75 ft. 21- in. long, with piers averaging 90 
ft. 3 in. between centre. 

The bed of the river at the bridge is generally composed 
of a deposit of mud and other soft material, overlying clay 
of varying consistency, excepting near the ends of the bridge, 
where gravel is found. 

The substructure consists of two masonry abutments, 
twenty-three masonry piers, and one pile foundation and 
fender-pier for draw-span. 

The foundations for the abutments and masonry piers 
were built on the same general plan. The bottom of the 
river was excavated by dredging to such depths and over 
such areas, at and about the proposed foundations, as was 
thought expedient, in the case of the abutment foundations 
the dredging being carried to 4 feet below city base, and to 



26 City Document No. 11. 

depths varying from 3 ft. to 15 ft. for the pier foundations, 
the depths being determined by the amomit of soft material 
at the pier. 

The Boston abutment, and all piers, excepting Nos. 21, 
22, and 23, rest on piles. These piles are sound and 
straight spruce piles, not less than 6 in. diameter at the 
point, and of such size at the butt that, when cut off at 
grade, one- half of them were 10 in. diameter, and the bal- 
ance not less than 9 in. diameter. All measurements of 
piles were taken under the bark. The piles under the 
abutment were driven vertically, but under the piers the 
outside rows were driven with an inclination of one horizon- 
tal to twenty vertical. 

All piles were cut off at a point about 2 ft. below city 
base, a slight variation in the levels of the tops of the piles 
being allowed. After the piles were driven a sheet-pile 
curbing was constructed about the space to be occupied by 
the foundation, the curbing being built with its top at grade 
6 ft. above city base, or at about half-way between average 
high and low tide. 

The purpose of this curbing was to form an inexpensive 
coffer-dam for " half-tide " work, in constructing the con- 
crete base and stonework, and also when partially removed 
by cutting off at grade .83 ft., to retain the material under 
and about the piles and to protect the concrete base. 

The space enclosed by the sheet-pile curbing was filled 
with concrete to grade 0, the concrete below grade 1 below 
city base being deposited around and on top of the piles 
through large sheet-iron pipes. No dumping of concrete 
into the water was allowed. 

The concrete so deposited formed a water-tight bottom to 
the curbing or coffer-dam, and the balance, or upper foot in 
thickness, of the concrete was carefully deposited in place 
and levelled while the coffer-dam was free from water. 

The concrete was made of one part of Portland cement, 
two parts of sand, and five parts of broken stone or pebbles 
from \ in. to 2 J in. in their greatest diameter ; all parts by 
measure. 

The concrete foundations of the Cambridge abutment, and 
of piers 21, 22, and 23, rest directly upon the gravel bottom. 
The abutment masonry is of granite laid in American cement 
mortar, made of one part of cement and two parts of sand. 
The stones in the faces of the abutments are large rect- 
angular blocks, laid in six courses, varying from 21 in. to 
24 in. in thickness, the stones in each course being of equal 
rise. The stones are laid with 1-in. horizontal and vertical 
face joints. About one-fifth of the face area of the wall is 




w 

o 

Q 

\ — I 

m 

Q 

< 
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Engineeeing Department. 27 

composed of headers not less than five feet in depth. Face 
stones are qurny-faced, full and pitched to line, without 
drill or dog holes, and with no projections of more than 3 
in., and no hollow faces. Backino- is of larsre rubble-stones 
W'ell bonded to face-stones. 

Bridge-seat courses are rough-hammered on top and laid 
with f-in. vertical joints and 1-in. horizontal or bed joints. 
Front of course is quarry-faced, pitched to line. Parapet- 
courses are rough-hauimerecj on all exposed surfaces, and 
laid Avith f-in. joints throughout. 

All face joints in the abutments are pointed with Portland 
cement mortar for a depth of 2J in. 

The pier masonry is of granite laid in Portland cement 
mortar, made of one part of cement and two parts of sand. 

The thickness of the piers, at bottom, is 6 ft. 9 in., and at 
top 4 ft. in. to 4 ft. 6 in., according to height of pier. 
The lower, or foundation, course is made of headers extend- 
ing the entire thickness of the pier. The beds of this course 
are dressed to lay not more than 1-in. joints, the builds 
dressed to lay f-in. joints, and the vertical joints dressed for 
f-in. joints, for one foot from faces of piers, the balance of 
vertical joints being from 1 in. to 1^ in. wide. The end 
stones of the foundation-course are of special shape. 

The rise of courses in the piers, between the concrete 
foundation and the coping-course, is as follows: For piers 4 
and 19, 2 ft. 3 in. ; for all other piers the lower two courses 
are 2 ft. 3 in., and the remaining courses 2 ft. in. The 
courses above the bottom or header course are of ashler 
masonry, laid in " Flemish bond," with special stones and 
bond at the ends of the piers. 

The stretchers are not less than 6 ft. long, excepting at 
ends of piers, and are not less than 23 in. wide where the 
piers are 4 ft. thick, and not less than 2 ft. wide where the 
thickness of the piers exceed 4 ft., the face batter being 
included in these widths. The end vertical joints for a dis- 
tance of one foot from face of pier, and the beds and builds, 
are dressed to lay f-in. joints ; the back is quarry-split. 
The headers extend through the pier and are not less than 

2 ft. wide, and have beds, builds, and one foot of vertical 
joints, from face of pier, dressed for f-in. joints. Pier faces 
of stones are quarry-faced, with no projections of more than 

3 in., and no hollow faces ; they are pitched to line and bat- 
ter required. The pointed ends of piers are cut with a 
l|-in. chisel draft on each side of pier. 

The spaces between the stones of the stretcher-courses 
are filled with concrete of the same kind as used in the 
foundation. The coping-course is 2 ft. thick, and is from 



28 City Document No. 11. 

4 ft. 9 in. to 5 ft. 3 in. wide, according to width of pier. 
The stones of these courses are dressed for f-in. bed and 
vertical joints, and are rough-liammered full to line on top. 
Faces are quarry-faced, pitched to line, and show no drill or 
dog holes. 

End stones are dowelled to stones below with l|-in. iron 
dowels set in neat cement mortar. The pointed end of this 
course has 1|— in. chisel draft each side of point. Stone 
blocks 3 ft. 6 m. by 4 ft. 6 in. and 171 in. to 24| in. thick 
are set on the piers to take shoes of bridge girders. They 
are dowelled to coping-course with l|^-in. diameter iron 
dowels set in Portland cement. 

The general details of piers are shown in the " Section 
of Pier 9," on accompanying plate. 

The curbing is shown as cut off after the pier was com- 
pleted, the dotted portion extending to grade 6 ft. above 
city base, being that used as a cofier-dam for half-tide work. 
The coffer-dam served the purpose for which they were in- 
tended, that of facilitating the depositing and levelling of 
the upper portion of the concrete foundation, and allowing 
the stonework to be laid out of water. 

On many of the piers the entire foundation-course was 
laid while the curbing was free from water between half ebb 
and half flood tide. 

The foundation-piles shown are those at the middle of the 
pier. The number of piles in a pier were 112, excepting 
for piers 11 and 12, where they were increased in number to 
140. 

The width of the concrete foundations of piers 11 and 12 
was increased to 15 feet. 

The foundation of draw is made of oak piles capped with 
hard-pine timber. The timbers supporting bottom track of 
draw are 18 in. by 18 in., laid in two courses upon radial 
timbers 18 in. by 18 in., resting on capping of piles. 

The draw-pier is 56 ft. wide and 356 ft. long, and is made 
of oak piles, capped and planked. The caps are hard-pine 
and the planking is 3-in. kyanized spruce. The faces of the 
pier are planked with 4-in. hard-pine, laid vertically, and 
fastened with 1^-in. oak treenails. 

Oak pile fenders, planked in same manner as faces of 
draw-pier, are built on channel sides of piers 11 and 12. 
The width of channels or waterways at draw is 36 ft. plus. 

The superstructure consists of 23 fixed spans and one 
swing draw-span. It is of the cantilever type, the general 
spans being alternately 75 ft. 2| in. and 105 ft. 3^ in. 
between centres of piers. The shorter spans are provided 
with cantilevers 15 ft. ^ in. long projecting beyond each 



HARVARD BRIDGE. 

SECTION OF PIER 9. 





SCALE or FEET. 



Engineering Depaetment. 529 

pier. From these cantilevers a span 75 ft. 2i in. long is 
suspended, forming, with the cantilevers, the longer span of 
105 ft. o| in. The end spans and those next to draw are 
modifications of this system. The main girders are plate 
girders, and are in four lines, 17 ft. 4 in. on centres. They 
are generally 8 ft. deep over piers and 5 ft. deep at mid 
span, the depth being measured from out to out of flange 
angle-irons. The general panel length is 15 ft. i in. The 
girders set upon fixed and roller shoes on the piers, connec- 
tion between girders and shoes being made by pins. The 
suspended girders are attached to cantilevers by means of 
pin and link connections, which, with the rollers on the piers, 
provide for expansion and contraction. 

The floor-beams and sidewalk-brackets are plate girders, 
riveted to the main girders. The lateral bracing systems 
are made of rods with loop-eyes and sleeve-nuts, and struts 
of built section where necessary. The sway bracing is of 
adjustable rods or riveted angle-braces. 

The fixed spans of the bridge were erected without false 
works. Two main girders of each span, together with the 
floor-beams coming between them, were riveted together, on 
shore, and transported to position on a scow. By taking 
advantage of the tide, and by arrangements for increasing 
or diminishing the draught of the scow, the span was 
easily placed upon the pier or hung in position between 
the cantilevers. The draw span-girders are plate girders, 
two in number, 8 ft. deep over turn-table, 4 ft. deep at ends, 
and 143 ft. 8 in. long over all. The main girders are 
placed 35 ft. apart on centres. Floor-beams and sidewalk- 
brackets are plate girders. 

The main girders are connected to two heavy cross girders 
6 ft. deep, which rest upon the drum of the turn-table. The 
turn-table drum is of wrought iron, 33 ft. in diameter and 2 
ft. 6 in. deep, fitted with a planed cast-iron track. Wheels 
are cast iron, 21 in. in diameter, with turned treads 71- in. 
wide. Bottom track is of cast iron, planed on both sides. 

Roadway and sidewalk stringers are hard-pine, notched to 
floor-beams and sidewalk-brackets, to give required grade 
and pitch to sidewalks and roadway. 

The under course of roadway plank on fixed spans is 4-in. 
thick k3'anized spruce, and the upper course 2-in. thick 
spruce, excepting between the street-car tracks where it is 
3 in. thick. The roadway is provided with iron scuppers 
for draining it. Sidewalk plank on fixed spans is 21- in. thick 
kyanized spruce. 

The wearing surface of the walks is made of asphalt, laid 
in the following manner : The plank having been covered 



30 



City DocuaiENT No. 11. 



with heavy sheathing paper, a layer of gravel and pebbles, 
or small stone screenings, mixed with coal-tar pitch, was 
laid, this layer being approximately 1 in. thick ; on this a 
base layer of asphalt | in. thick was placed. Barber Trinidad 
asphalt being used on one-half of the work and Limmer 
asphalt mastic being used on the other half. 

The inner edges of the sidewalk are fitted with an angle- 
iron guard, and the outer edges are provided with a white- 
pine facia and galvanized-iron edging. The flooring for the 
draw-spans is the same as that for the fixed spans, excepting 
that the sidewalk is covered with 2-in. thick white-pine plank. 

The railing posts are cast iron and are connected to special 
castings fastened to ends of sidewalk-brackets. Every other 
post extends above the hand-rail and carries a globe for a 
light. The upper or hand-rail of the railing is made of a 
3^-in. diameter boiler-tube and a l|-in. channel-iron; the 
lower rail is made of a 2l-in. channel-iron, and the inter- 
mediate rail of 1| in. X | in. bar iron. The vertical rods 
are | in. diameter. 

One-half of the lamp-posts on the fixed spans, and all of those 
on the draw, are provided with incandescent electric lights; 
the balance of the lamp-posts being fitted with gas-lights. 

The power for operating the draw is obtained from a 10- 
horse power Thomson-Houston electric-motor placed under 
the roadway and connected to gearing which can also be 
operated by hand-power. The draw is also provided with a 
friction-brake for controlling its motion during opening and 
landing. The motor and brake are operated from a point on 
the sidewalk of the draw. 

Table showing ike Number- of times the Draw was opened, and the Number 
of Vessels which passed through Harvard Bridge. 



No. of 


No. of 


Openings. 


Vessels 




11 


98 


100 


97 


110 


239 


269 


261 


380 


287 


381 


257 


362 


180 


253 


178 


258 


97 


139 


198 


285 


160 


203 



January . . 
February , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September 
October .. 
November. 
December 

Totals 



2,058 



2,751 



Engineering Department. 31 



IV.— BRIDGES SUPPORTED BY RAILROADS. 

Washington- street bridge, over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, has been partially rebuilt. A new roadway has 
been provided, and the old roadway girders are only used 
to carry the sidewalk. 

Savin Hill avenue bridge has not yet been rebuilt, but an 
appropriation has been made by the city for paying the part of 
the cost of doino- so on account of a widenins; of the street. 

The extension of the electric car service of the West End 
Street Railway Co. has raised questions concerning the 
strength of many highway bridges maintained by railroad 
corporations and of the libability of the city, if any. Conse- 
quently the Corporation Counsel was requested by the City 
Council to advise it, and he rendered the following opinion, 
which is also printed in the City Council Minutes for 1891, 
page 1157 : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Corporation Counsel, Nov. 21, 1891. 
To the Honorable the Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen : I am requested to give my opinion as to the powers of 
the Board of Aldermen as Surveyors of Highways, or County C'om- 
missioners, in regard to the matters referred to in a letter of William 
Jackson, City Engineer, dated Nov. 16, 1891. From reading this letter, 
and the proceedings of the Board on its receipt, I suppose that j^our 
honorable body wish my opinion as to whether the New York & New 
England Railroad Company can be comj^elled by the Board of Alder- 
men to strengthen its bridge on Broadway so as to allow electric cars to 
be run over it Avith safety. I am informed that the bridge referred to 
is one which by law the New York & New England Railroad Company 
is bound to keep in repair, and that the bridge is in good rej^air, and 
strong enough to sustain a weight of twelve or fourteen tons, but not 
strong enough to sustain the weight of one of the long electric cars now 
used by the West End Railroad Company, together with the number of 
passen gers that are often carried on such cars. 

The", theory concerning highways seems to be that they are the 
property of the people of the Commonwealth, and ai'e under the control 
of the Legislature, except where the Legislature has delegated authority 
to some municipality or public body. By law cities and towns are 
obliged to keep the highways within their limits reasonably safe and 
convenient, except where other provision is made. 

In this case other provision has been made by the Legislature, and the 
city of Boston and your Board have no power in the matter. In the 
language of the Supreme Court in Rouse v. Sonierville, 130 Mass., 363, 
" By law this bridge and approaches are to be made and kept in repair 
by the railroad corporation. As a matter of law and of right the city 
can in no mode interfere with the construction and repair of such 
approaches otherwise than an individual might." If the New York & 
New England Railroad Company does not keep its bridge in repair, an 
information lies in favor of the Attorney-General of the Commonwealth 
for its neglect so to do, and it is also liable to any traveller who is in- 
jured by reason of any defect in such bridge. But as the Legis- 
lature has provided that neither towns, cities, nor other persons bound 
by law to repair ways shall be liable for damages to any person whose 



32 City Document No. 11. 

carriage and the load thereon exceed the weight of six tons, I do not 
think the New York & New England Railroad Company can be com- 
pelled by any process of law to strengthen its bridge so as to bear the 
weight of vehicles which, with their loads, sometimes weigh nearly 
twenty tons. If a part of the highway is strong enough to sustain the 
weight of a vehicle weighing more than twice the weight limited by the 
statutes, I have no doubt that it is reasonably safe and convenient in 
the meaning of the statute. If your honorable body is infoi'med, or has 
reason to believe, that any portion of a highway is not strong enough to 
support the weight of the electric cars in use by the West End Road, 
and is strong enough to fulfil the statute requirements, your Board 
ought not to permit the use of such heavy cars upon such highway 
until the street-railway company has so strengthened svicli portion of 
the highAvay as to make it possible to operate such cars without danger 
to life. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Thomas M. Babson, 

Corjjoraiioii Counsel. 

The bridges over the New York & New England Eailroad, 
on Norfolk street, referred to in last year's report, have been 
slightly repaired. They are poor bridges. 

The other bridges in the list of bridges supported are 
strong enough for ordinary travel, and require no special 
mention . 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION 

IN 1891. 

Bennington-street Culvert. 
See page 90. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Railroad) . 
See page 90. 

Curbing for Public Squares in East Boston. 

At the request of the Superintendent of Public Grounds, 
plans and specifications were prepared for granite curbings 
around Belmont, Central, and Maverick squares. East 
Boston. 

The curbing at Belmont square was furnished by J. Har- 
rington & Son, Somerville, at a cost of $2,998 ; that at Cen- 
tral square by Austin Ford, Cambridge, at a cost of $3,165, 
and that at Maverick square by B. F. Nay & Co., at a cost 
of $1,533.20. 

Chelsea-Bridge Steam Power. 
See page 91. 



Engineering Department. 33 

Chelsea Bridge (North) Fender-guard. 
See page 91. 

Cornavall-street Bridge. 
See page 91. 

East Boston Bridge. 

In compliance with the following order of the City Coun- 
cil, approved by the Mayor, Sept. 19, 1891, 

"That the City Engineer communicate with citizens of 
East Boston, and, in consultation with them, prepare plans 
for a bridge to East Boston, and take such measures as he 
deems proper to assist the Board of Harbor and Land Com- 
missioners in their inquiry as to the expediency of construct- 
ing a bridge to East Boston," a plan was devised for a bridge 
to East Boston. 

The proposed bridge was located near the North ferry, 
and, with its approaches, was about 2,300 feet long, the 
channel at this point being about 1,450 feet between bulk- 
head lines. The proposed bridge was an iron structure, 
supported on piers ; it was 80 feet in width with a swing 
draw 60 feet wide, having two draw ways, 100 feet wide, for 
vessels, the vessel drawways to have a clear height under 
the draw of 35 feet at mean high water. The roadway of 
the bridge was to be of granite-block pavement, excepting 
on the draw, where it was to be of wood. 

Federal-street Bridge. 

As mentioned in the last annual report, the rebuilding of 
every part of this bridge, except the two draws, was let to 
Shaw & Miller, by contract, dated July 23, 1890, for $67,467. 

The bridge was rebuilt, one-half at a time, without inter- 
ruption to travel.' The up-stream half of the bridge was 
closed to travel July 29, 1890 ; opened to travel Feb. 14, 
1891 ; the down-stream half was closed to travel Feb. 16, 
and opened Aug. 12, 1891. The up-stream half was again 
closed Aug. 18, 1891, and the whole bridge was opened to 
travel Sept. 12, 1891, and the whole work on Shaw & 
Miller's contract was completed Oct. 16, 1891. 

The bridge is 69 feet wide between fences and is built of 
hard-pine lumber on an oak-pile foundation. There are two 
sidewalks, each 10 feet wide, covered with asphalt, on a base 
of coal-tar concrete. The roadway is 49 feet wide, except 
at the draws, where it is divided into two roadways, each 21 
feet in width. 



34 City Document No. 11. 

The roadway is covered with 6-inch kyanized spruce 
lumber ; on this is a layer of fine coal-tar concrete, three 
inches thick, heavily rolled while hot ; above this is a granite- 
block paving laid in a bed of sand, having the joints filled 
with small pebbles and run with hot paving-cement. 

The down-stream pier has been lengthened 58 feet ; the 
drawway has been widened from 36 feet to 41 feet 10 inches, 
and is now planked with vertical planks extending 2 feet 
below low water. 

The iron draws in the bridge are two in number, and are 
of the retractile pattern. The channel span of each draw 
are placed side by side, the draws being drawn to opposite 
sides of the channel when opened. 

Each draw is 32 feet 9 inches wide between centres of 
main girders, and carries a roadway 21 feet wide in the clear, 
and a sidewalk 10 feet 3 inches wide from curb to centre 
of railing. 

Each draw is composed of two non-continuous plate girder 
spans, one of which spans the channel through the bridge, the 
other, or rear span, being supported on trucks running on 
tracks built on the draw foundation. 

When a draw is closed, and in position for travel over it, 
the channel span is supported at its front end on shoe-plates 
on the main bridge, the other end being attached to and 
supported by the rear span by a pin connection. When the 
draw is in motion or run off, the front end of the channel 
span is supported by suspension rods passing over Samson 
posts on rear span to back end of this span, proper counter- 
balances being provided where necessary. The counter- 
balance used on these draws are cast-iron boxes filled with 
lead. 

The motive power for the draws is electricity, in addition 
to which gearing, etc., is provided for operating them by 
hand or horse power in case of accident to the electric plant. 

Each draw is moved by a 20-horse power Thomson- 
Houston motor, connected by shafting to a horizontal drum 
under the draw, from which drum motion is transmitted to 
the draw by a wire rope. The general arrangement of 
drums, etc., is similar to that for the draws at Warren bridge. 

The draws are operated and controlled by one man, from a 
small house situated near the channel, on the Boston side. 
Thus far the electric power has worked satisfactorily. 

The draws and the machinery for operating them were 
designed by this department. 

The contractors for the pile bridge were Shaw & Miller, 
of Boston. 

The draws were built by the Pittsburgh Bridge Co., and 



Engineeeing Depaktment. 35 

the machinery by the Whittier Machine Co., of Boston, and 
Miller & Shaw, Cambridge. 

The electric plant was furnished by the Thomson-Houston 
Motor Co., Boston. 

The total expenditure for the work to Feb. 1 was 
$99,285.17. 

Fekdinand-street Bridge (over the Boston & Albany 

Kailroad) . 

In July, 1890, this bridge was closed by order of the 
Mayor, an examination made by this department having 
shown that it was unsafe to permit its further use. An 
appropriation of $35,000 for rebuilding the bridge was made 
by the City Council and approved by the Mayor, Nov. 12, 
1890. Plans and specifications were at once prepared and 
the work advertised Dec. 10, 1890. 

The plan of rebuilding provided for filling solid the por- 
tion of the street, north of the railroad track, supported by 
iron posts, and for building a retaining-wall on the westerly 
line of the street, about 73 feet long, to hold this filling and 
to supersede an old timber bulkhead. The only portion 
remaining to be bridged was that over the track of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad. 

The bridge is a single span of two through-plate girders, 
79 feet long, and is 40 feet wide between centres of railings, 
affording a clear roadway of 22 feet, and two overhanging 
sidewalks of 7 feet 6 inches each. The two main girders are 
6 feet 6 inches deep at the centre, and 5 feet 6 iiiciies deep 
at the ends, and were designed so that in case the bridge 
should be widened to 50 feet it would be only necessary to 
add one new girder and one set of floor-beams, as illustrated 
in last year's report. The floor-beams and sidewalk brackets 
are built iron beams and the stringers are of hard-pine. 
The roadway planking is of spruce, under course 4 inches 
thick and upper course 2 inches thick. The sidewalk 
planking is 2 inches hard-pine. - The fences are 6 feet high, 
made of matched white-pine boards. New granite parapets 
were laid on both abutments, and the coping on the south- 
east retaining-wall was relaid and brought to the new grade 
of the street. 

As it was desirable to complete the work of rebuilding as 
speedily as possible, it was deemed best to build the retain- 
ing-wall of concrete. The wall as built is supported on a 
spruce pile foundation with a cap of Portland cement con- 
crete, 4 feet thick and varying in width from 13 feet at the 
highest part of the wall to 11 feet at the low end. The 



36 City Document No. 11. 

body of the wall is built of cement concrete made in the 
proportions of one part of cement, two parts of sand, and 
five parts of broken stones, deposited in layers of 8 inches 
in thickness and thoroughly rammed. With the exception 
of an upper course, 12 inches thick, the cement used was 
American hydraulic of approved brand. Portland cement 
was used for the upper 12-inch course. Extending from the 
foundation to the coping, a brick facing, 8 inches thick, was 
built in front of the wall, laid solid in Portland cement 
mortar and thoroughly bonded to it. Along the entire 
length of the wall a granite coping, 30 inches wide and 18 
inches thick, was laid, and on this was placed a close board 
fence, 6 feet high, supported by iron standards. 

The contractor for the retaining-wall and parapets was 
R. D. Shanahan, of Portland, Me. ; total amount paid, 
$4,869.23. The contractor for the superstructure was the 
R. F. Hawkins Iron Works, Springfield, Mass. ; amount 
paid, $4,096.45. The total amount expended by this depart- 
ment from the appropriation, including engineering and 
inspection, was $9,734.36. 

Ferky Department. 

The building of a part of the ferry-slip at East Boston, 
North ferry, by J. N. Hayes & Co., mentioned in the last 
annual report, was completed Feb. 14, 1891, and the cost of 
the contract work was $7,480. 

An interesting feature of this work was the successful 
driving of twenty-five very large oak piles, with the small 
end upward, reversing the usual method. The work of 
driving these piles was done without difficulty. As these 
piles are not required to sustain weight, but to resist sidewise 
thrusts and blows, applied from twenty to thirty feet above 
hard bottom, they are found to be much more efficient than 
if driven in the usual way. 

Estimates, detailed plans, specifications, and contract for 
building a foundation for head-house and rebuilding part of 
two ferry-piers at the East Boston landing of the North 
ferry have been furnished, and the contract for doing the 
work was awarded to Nay & Ellis, for $9,456. Work was 
begun Oct. 24 and continued to Dec. 31. Work cannot be 
resumed until the head-house now being built is ready for 
occupancy. The payments on account of the contract to 
Feb. 1, 1892, have been $3,219.80. 

Plans, estimates, and specifications were made for building a 
wharf adjoining the new head-house ; the contract for doing 
the work, with the exception of the planking, which was done 



Ferdinand Street Bridge. 

Section of Retaining Wall. 
1891. 






-X— — 



|<-2-C^ 




Port-land Cement Concrete- 






J. 






Ballast 











g'^ Drain Pipe- 



K^RADE f.5o 




Engineering Department. 37 

by the Ferry Department, was awarded to Nay & Ellis, and 
completed Jan. 18, 1892, at a cost of $1,665. 

Soundings have been taken and plans made showing 
depth of water in all of the ferry-slips, except at the East 
Boston side of the North ferry. 

All of the above work has been done under the superin- 
tendence of this department. 

Hill-street Ketaining-wall. 
See page 92. 

Irvington-street Foot-bridge (over Providence 
Division, Old Colony Railroad). 

See page 92. 

Irvington-street and Yarmouth-street Retaining— 

walls. 

See page 92. 

L-STREET Abutment. 
See page 93. 

L-STREET Bridge. 

The Legislature, at its session of 1891, passed the follow- 
ing act : 

[Chap. 388.] 

An Act to provide a public highway bridge across the 
reserved channel at south boston. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1 . The city of Boston is hereby authorized and required to 
build and maintain a public highway bridge across the reserved channel 
on the South Boston flats in said city, connecting Eastern avenue or 
Congi-ess sti-eet, so called, as laid out and graded by the Common- 
wealth, with L street extended to the southerly line of said channel. 
Said bridge shall be constructed in accordance with plans prescribed or 
approved by the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners. Upon the 
completion of said bridge, provided the same is completed before the 
first day of August in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two, forty 
per cent, of the cost thereof shall be reimbursed by the Commonwealth 
to said city out of the Commonwealth's flats improvement fund estab- 
lished by chapter two hundred and thirty-seven of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and seventy-eight. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved June 9, 1891. 

Plans and specifications were prepared which received the 
approval of the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, 
Oct. 29, 1891. The work was advertised on Dec. 14, 1891, 



38 City Document No. 11. 

soliciting proposals for the completion of, the work at differ- 
ent dates; namely, July 15, 1892, and Dec. 1, 1892. The 
contract for the work has not been awarded at this date, 
pending action of the Legislature on a petition of His Honor 
the Mayor for an extension of the time for completing the 
work from Aug. 1 to Dec. 1, 1892. 

L-STKEET Bulkhead. 
See page 93. 

NoHTH Harvard-steeet and Essex-street Bridges, 
Brighton to Cambridge. 

These bridges have been partly rebuilt for the purpose of 
providing them with draw channels 36 feet in width. 

The work was done under the direction of the City Engi- 
neer of Boston, the City of Cambridge pajdng one-half the 
cost. 

The work on North Harvard-street bridge was described 
in the last report, and was completed Feb. 9, 1891. 

Essex-street bridge was opened to travel March 21, and 
was completed May 1, 1891. 

Public Institutions. 

Special examination of the wharves at Deer, Long, and 
Eainsford islands was made at the request of the commis- 
sioners, and a report submitted to them. 

EOXBURY-CANAL SeA-WALL. 

See page 93. 

Savin Hill Avenue Bridge (over Old Colony Eail- 

road) . 

Plans for building a new bridge on Savin Hill avenue have 
been submitted by the Old Colony Railroad, and an agree- 
ment made with the railroad company for doing the work, 
the city to pay $5,000 of the cost thereof. 

Stony-brook Improvement (Roslindale Branches). 
See page 93. 

Walks in Public Grounds. 

Plans and specifications were made for concrete walks on 
the Common, from West-street entrance to Park-street steps, 



Engineering Department. 39 

the work being done by Simpson Bros., at a cost of 
$2,691. 

Plans and specifications were also made for paving Mont- 
gomery square, walks on Blackstone square, and walk on 
the Common, from Tremont street, opposite Winter street 
to Beacon street, opposite Spruce street, with Hastings as- 
phalt tiles. 

The work was done by John Turner & Co., and cost as 
follows : Montgomery square, $814.00 ; Blackstone square, 
$3,900.00; and walk on Common, $3,676.40. 

The above work was done under the supervision of this 
department. 

Special Examination of Bridges. 

Special examination of Broadway bridge, over New York 
& New England Railroad ; Broadway bridge, over Fort Point 
Channel ; Winthrop bridge, and Washington-street bridge, 
over New York & New England Railroad, were made to 
ascertain their strength under electric-railroad traffic. 

Other work of a miscellaneous character was principally 
as follows : 

Plans and Estimates. 

For abolition of grade crossings at Washington street, 
Forest Hills, and at Cambridge street, Allston. 

For elevating Chelsea bridge over the tracks of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad. 

For tunnel for foot traffic at Franklin street, Allston. 

For temporary bridge to Castle Island, and draw for same. 

For a bridge to East Boston. 

Estimates. 

For a bridge for New York & New England Railroad, at 
Geneva avenue. 

For filling on Ninth street, between Gr and H streets. 

For a retaining-wall at corner of G and Ninth streets. 

For rebuilding Western-avenue brido;e to Watertown. 

For rebuilding North Beacon street bridge to Watertown. 

A large amount of miscellaneous office- work has also been 
done, such as making record plans, maps for Water and 
Park departments, and copying, tracing, and blue-printing 
plans. 

In General. 

About May 1, Assistant Engineer Henry Manley was 
assigned to the immediate direction of the several paving 



40 City Document No. 11. 

contracts for the Street Department, and the work in prog- 
ress of construction, which was in his charge, was assumed 
by Assistant City Engineer John E. Cheney in addition to 
his other duties. 

Eapid Transit. 

By act of the Legislature for the year 1891, the City 
Engineer was made ex officio a member of the Rapid Tran- 
sit Commission, and much time has been devoted to that 
commission. 



Engineering Department. 41 



B. 



[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE BOSTON 
WATER BOARD.] 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall upon the water-sheds durins; the past year 
varied but little from the average amount, but less than the 
usual proportion fell during the summer and fall months, 
consequently the storage in the reservoirs began to be re- 
duced in June and July, and steadily decreased until the 
latter part of December. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds were as follows : 





Sudbury. 


Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


Eainfall in inches . 


49.52 


46.42 


47.40 


Rainfall collected. 








inches .... 


27.612 


32.07 


28.60 


Daily average yield 








of water - shed, 








gallons . . . 


98,900,000 


28,800,000 


36,600,000 



The quality of the water from all the supplies has been 
comparatively good. 

The fluctuations in the amounts of water in the different 
lakes and reservoirs are shown graphically by an appended 
diagram. 

The condition of the different reservoirs during the year is 
given below : 

Reservoir No. 1. — Water was wasting at the dam from 
January 1 to July 2, with the exception of five days in May, 
after the stop-planks were placed on the dam, and during five 
days in June. No water wasted over the dam after July 2, 
and only the one and one-half million gallons per day was 
allowed to flow through the waste-gates, as required by law. 

The dam is in good condition. 



42 CiiY Document No. 11. 

Reservoir JSFo. 2. — Water was flowing over the dam or 
through the gates of Dam 2 until May 9, when the fiash- 
boarcls were placed in position. The reservoir filled to 
the top of the flash-boards four days later, but water was 
drawn from this reservoir to supply the city on the 14th, 
and the surface immediately fell below the top of the flash- 
board, and the reservoir did not fill again during the year. 
The lowest point reached was on August ID, when the sur- 
face was 9.48 feet below the top of the flash-boards. 

The dam at Reservoir 2 is in good condition. 

Reservoir JSFo. 3. — This reservoir was full until the middle 
of August, except during February and March, when it was 
drawn down in anticipation of the usual large spring flow. 
On August 19 this reservoir was drawn from to supply the 
city, and its surface gradually fell until November 24, when 
it was at grade 162.32, or 12.92 feet below the crest of the 
overflow. 

On Jan. 1, 1892, it had risen to 167.19, or 8.05 feet below 
the crest. 

The dam at Reservoir 3 is in good condition. 

Reservoir JSfo. 4. — This reservoir was kept full until July 
15, with the exception that it was lowered as usual in the 
spring. 

On July 15 the outlet gate was partially opened to furnish 
a portion of the city's supply, and the reservoir gradually 
fell until September 26, when the gate was closed. The 
height at that date was 202.91, or 12.30 feet below the top of 
the flash-boards. Since that date no water has been drawn 
from the reservoir, and its surface has gradually risen. On 
January 1 its height was 207.85, or 6.36 feet below the 
crest of the dam . 

The dam of Reservoir No. 4 is in good condition. 

Farm Pond. — The surface of the pond has been kept at 
an average height of 149.12. 

The conduit through the pond has been in use all the year, 
no water having been drawn from the pond to supply the 
city. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped 80,500,000 
gallons from the pond, an average of 220,500 gallons per day. 

Lake Cochituate. — Water was wasted from the outlet 
dam from January 2 to 7, and from January 12 to April 25. 

The surface of the lake began to fall on April 26, and 
continued to fall slowly and with great regularity until 



Engineering Department. 43 

November 26, Avhen it was at grade 126.44, or 7.92 feet be- 
low high-water, the lowest point during the year. 

The lake began to fill during the latter part of December, 
and on January 1 it had risen to grade 127.34, or 7.02 feet 
below high-w^ater line. 

The heights of water in the various storage reservoirs on 
the first day of each month are given below : 











Resekvoiks. 


Farm 
Pond. 


Lake 

COCHITU- 

ATE. 




No.l. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 




Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

159.29 


Top of 

Flash- 
boards. 

167.12 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 

175.24 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

215.21 


High- 
Water. 

149.25 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

134.36 


January 1, 1S91 
February 1, " 
March 1, " 
April 1, " 
May 1, 

June 1, " 
July 1, 

August 1, " 
September 1, " 
October 1, " 
November 1, " 
December 1, " 
January 1, 1892 . 








157.66 
158.23 
158.27 
158.07 
157.77 
159.37 
159.37 
157.68 
157.89 
157.59 
157.25 
157.00 
157.20 


165.96 
166.13 
166.20 
166.27 
166.00 
166.10 
165.37 
160.36 
159.33 
158.93 
159.08 
160.80 
163.55 


175.32 
175.36 
175.45 
175.42 
175.34 
175.41 
175.36 
175.31 
174.03 
172.12 
167.70 
163.50 
167.19 


214.41 
210.11 
210.77 
211.97 
214.53 
214.74 
214.81 
211.56 
206.21 
202.91 
203.97 
205.46 
207.85 


149.36 
149.17 
149.90 
148.97 
149.39 
149.26 
149.09 
1*8.89 
148.93 
148.79 
148.81 
148.80 
148.99 


132.49 
133.14 
132.75 
134.14 
134.12 
133.20 
132.22 
130.71 
129.48 
128.30 
127.06 
126.69 
127.34 



Water has been drawn from the different reservoirs as 
follows : 

Keservoir No. 1. 
July 3 to 6, inclusive. 

Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2. 
July 2. 



Eeservoir No. 2. 



May 17 to 24. 
May 28 to June 7. 
June 9 to 10. 
June 16 to 18. 



June 30 to July 1. 
July 7 to Aug. 18. 
Sept. 15 to 24. 
Dec. 20 to 31. 



44 



City Document No. 11. 



Keservoirs Nos. 2 and 3. 




Jan. 1 to 4. 


April 8 to 11. 




Jan. 7 to 11. 


April 16 to 18. 




Jan. 15 to 18. 


April 20 to 26. 




Jan. 22 to 26. 


April 30 to May 


3. 


Jan. 29 to Feb. 1. 


May 7 to 9. 




Feb. 5 to 8. 


May 14 to 16. 




Feb. 12 to 15. 


May 25 to 27. 




Feb. 19 to 23. 


June 11 to 14. 




Feb. 27 to March 1. 


Aug. 19 to Sept. 


14 


March 5 to 8. 


Sept. 25 to Oct. 


26. 


March 12 to 15. 


Oct. 28 to Nov. 


16. 


March 19 to 22. 


Nov. 19 to 29. 




March 26 to 28. 


Dec. 1 to 19. 




April 1 to 4. 







Aqueducts and Distributing Eeservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river conduit has been used 298 days, and 
the Cochituate has been used 352 days. The Sudbury 
conduit has delivered 8,306,600,000 gallons into Chestnut- 
hill and Brookline reservoirs, equal to a daily supply of 
22,760,000 gallons ; the Cochituate aqueduct has delivered 
5,508,180,000 gallons, or 15,091,000 gallons per day. 

In the Cochituate aqueduct a nearly uniform depth of six 
and one-half feet was maintained until the middle of Octo- 
ber, when the surface of the lake had fallen so low that this 
depth could not be maintained. 

During the balance of the year the depth in the aqueduct 
closely followed the depth in the lake above the bottom of 
the aqueduct, and at one time it was only five feet four 
inches. 

The rate of flow in the Sudbury conduit was varied almost 
daily to maintain the desired height in the distributing reser- 
voirs. Both conduits were cleaned as usual during the year. 

On April 19 one of the 40-inch siphon-pipes of the Cochitu- 
ate aqueduct at Newton Lower Falls was split by the weight 
of gravel-filling that had been deposited over the pipes in 
building a new street across the location of the siphon. The 
water was shut oif and the split pipe replaced before any 
damage had been done. 

The Chestnut-hill, Brookline, Fisher-hill, Parker-hill, and 
East Boston reservoirs, and the Breed's Island water-tower, 
are in good condition. I recommend that the elm-trees at 
the base of the Chestnut-hill reservoir dam be removed. 
The inside of the iron water-tower on Belle vue hill should 
be painted this year. 



Engineering Department. 



45 



The South Boston reservoir has not been in daily use for 
many years, but is Icept partially full of water for use in 
special emergencies, and for this reason is still of value to 
the water-supply service. A check-valve should be placed 
in the high-service connection with this reservoir, to auto- 
matically supply the fire-hydrants within the high-service 
district of South Boston in case of serious fires. 



High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

At Chestnut hill the pumping-engines and boilers are in 
excellent condition. 

A permanent apparatus for weighing the feed-water has 
been placed in the boiler-room, and the accuracy of the feed- 
water meters is now easily ascertained from time to time, 
so that corrections can be made in calculating the efficiency 
of the boilers. 

The table on page 62 shows in detail the work done by the 
pumping-engines and boilers during the year. 



Engine No. 1 was used 3,419| 

hours, pumping 
Engine No. 2 was used 3,768^ 

hours, pumping 
Total amount pumped . 
Total amount coal consumed . 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 
Averao;e lift in feet 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 
Daily average amount pumped 



1,264,475,610 gallons. 

1,386,688,800 
2,651,164,410 

2,910,751 pounds. 
8.5 
124.6 

910.8 gallons. 
7,263,500 



The amount pumped is an increase of 11.9 per cent, over 
that of 1890. 

The same boiler supplied steam for pumping, and for heat- 
ing and lighting the pumping-station and other buildings 
near the station. 

Cost of Pumping. 
Salaries 

Fuel .... 
Repairs 

Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 

Total . . . . . 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir 



$9,590 


40 


6,558 


28 


701 


93 


534 


51 


257 


18 


$17,642 30 


$0,053 


6.65 



46 City Document No. 11. 

At the West Roxbury pumping-station 24,108,000 gallons 
have been pumi)ed, equivalent to a daily average of 66,000 
gallons, — an increase of 68.4 per cent, over that pumped in 
1890. 

At the East Boston pumping-station an average of 13,500 
gallons per day has been pumped into the Breed's Island 
water-tower. 

Water was pumped into the East Boston reservoir only 
on two days in January, one day in February, and two days 
in March, as the reservoir could be filled during the night 
from the low-service mains during the balance of the year. 



Mystic Lake. 

Water was wasted over the dam almost constantly until 
June 9, and again from June 22 to June 28. From this date 
the surface of the lake gradually fell until it was 7.67 feet 
below high-water on November 2Q, or only 3.50 feet above 
the bottom of the conduit. This was only about 4 inches 
above the point where the supply for the pumping-station 
could not be maintained by gravity. 

Early in October the centrifugal pumps were placed in 
position at the lake to raise the Avater into the conduit, but 
fortunately it was not necessary to use them. 

Advantage was taken of the low stage of the water to 
repoint the masonry at the overflow. 

On January 1, 1892, the water in the lake had risen to 
grade 2.32, or 4.68 feet below high-water, and water was 
wasting over the dam on January 15. 

The table on page 60 shows the yield of the water-shed. 
The rainfall there recorded is an average from two gauges, 
one located at the lake and one in Winchester. 

The record of the latter gauge was kept by Mr. L. E. 
Symmes, formerly assistant superintendent, gratuitously 
until his death, last February. Since his death the gauge 
has been maintained and records kept by Miss A. F. 
Symmes. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The pump was run 356 days during the year of 1891, 
working 6,3911 hours, and has pumped 119,404,000 gallons of 
sewage, or an average of 335,400 gallons per day of pump- 
ing. The amount pumped is only one-fourth of one per 
cent, greater than in 1890. 

The total amount of sulphate of alumina used during the 



Engineering Department. 47 

year was 303,780 pounds, aud 173 tons of coal were used in 
pumping. 

Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit was cleaned twice during the year, and is in 
good condition. 

New sills and grooves for the screens should be placed in 
the screen-chamber, and the roof of the chamber should be 
raised to facilitate the changing of the screens. A new 
gate should be placed on the blow-off pipe, to exclude the 
tide-water. 

The reservoir has not been cleaned for several years, 
otherwise it is in good condition. 



Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The pumps have received quite extensive repairs, and are 
in good condition. 

The three older boilers should have new fronts, to corre- 
spond with those on the new boilers ; a sluice-gate should be 
placed in the pump-well of Engine No. 3, as under the pres- 
ent condition any accident to the foot-valve of this pump 
would necessitate the stopping of the whole plant. A du- 
plicate dynamo for lighting the building should be procured, 
and it would be an economical measure to build a new chim- 
ney of larger capacity if the plant is to be continued in 
service. 

The table on page 63 shows in detail the work done by 
the pumping-engines during the year. 



Engine No. 1 was in use 

hours, pumping . . . 145,186,500 gallons. 
Engine No. 2 was in use 1,774-| 

hours, pumping . . . 346,862,000 " 
Engine No. 3 was in use 8,3521- 

hours, pumping . . t 2,812,902,400 " 

Total amount pumped . . . 3,304,951,000 " 

Total amount coal consumed . 6,988,500 pounds. 

Percentage ashes and clinkers . 10.2 

Average lift in feet . . . 148.02 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal . 472.9 gallons. 
Average duty of engine per 100 

lbs. of coal, no deductions . 58,380,500 ft.-lbs. 

Daily average amount pumped . 9,054,700 gallons. 



48 



City Document No. 11. 



The amount pumped is an increase of 9.1 per cent, over 
that of 1890. 



Cost or Pumping. 



Salaries 
Fuel . 
Repairs 
Oil, waste, 



and packing 



Small supplies 
Total 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot high . 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir . 



$9,628 


07 


13,946 


42 


954 


69 


983 


96 


444 


89 


$25,958 03 


$0,053 


7.85 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption from the combined works, 
and the consumption, compared with that of 1890, was as 
follows : 



cochittjate 
Works. 



a=3 






Mystic Works. 



O 






Combined 
Supplies. 



go 



0) 0< 

^O o 

Ph 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 

Average 



37,230,100 
37,280,700 
35,533,400 
35,751,600 
36,580,700 
37,801,900 
39,062,500 
39,460,400 
40,677,700 
38,845,600 
36,640,800 
37,342,500 



110.5 
112.9 
115.2 
117.3 
116.6 
114.5 
106.4 
108.7 
112.5 
116.3 
111.2 
97.4 



9,389,300 
9,466,900 
8,811,000 
8,045,800 
8,841,300 
9,478,400 
9,581,700 
9,122,300 
9,128,700 
9,259,100 
8,585,200 
8,960,600 



114.7 
114.1 
109.4 
107.5 
118.1 
112.9 
101.3 
102.1 
108.2 
118.9 
112.9 
94.6 



46,619,400 
46,747,600 
44,344,400 
43,797,400 
45,421,900 
47,280,300 
48,644,200 
48,582,800 
49,806,400 
48,104,800 
45,226,000 
46,303,10 



111.3 
113.1 
114.0 
115.4 
113.9 
114.2 
105.4 
107.4 
111.7 
116.8 
111.5 



37,686,900 



111.3 



9,055,200 



109.1 



46,742,100 



110.8 



Engineering Department. 



49 



The daily average consumption per liead of population 
was as follows : 

Sudbury and Cochituate supply, 89.3 gallons. 

Mystic supply . . . . 74.7 " 

Combined supplies . . . 86.0 " 

The above figures show an increase of 11.3 per cent, in 
the consumption supplied from the Sudbury and Cochituate 
works from that of the previous year; of 9.1 per cent, in 
the consumption supplied from the Mystic works ; and of 
10.8 per cent, increase in the consumption supplied by the 
combined supplies. 

Deacon Meters. 

There are now in use 81 meters, — 74 on the Cochituate sys- 
tem and 7 on the Mystic system, — and the territory covered 
by the meters is divided into 176 sections ; 8 sections were not 
tested during the past year. 

The quantity supplied to the entire residential portion of 
Boston can now be tested by the meters, excepting a portion 
of West Roxbury and that portion of the Back Bay district 
bounded by Boylston street, Parker street, and the Boston 
& Providence Railroad. 

During the coming year two meters should be placed in 
the latter territory ; but the West Roxbury district cannot 
be advantageously tested until the district is more densely 
populated. 

On the Mystic system Charlestown is practically covered 
by meters ; one meter covers a small portion of Somerville, 
and one about one-quarter of Chelsea. Everett has no 
meters. 

The estimated population supplied with water, and the 
population that is covered by Deacon meters in the diiferent 
sections of the city, is as follows : 



Section. 

City proper . 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester . 
Brighton 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Charlestown 
Chelsea 
Somerville . 



Estimated 
Population. 


Population 
on Meiers. 


164,875 


132,000 


104,000 


84,000 


28,510 


14,300 


34,025 


27,500 


13,700 


5,400 


76,535 


65,000 


41,375 


32,000 


45,930 


32,500 


33,775 


9,300 


46,675 


4,400 



50 



City Docibient No. 11, 



The consolidated results of the readings of the various 
sections is shown in the following table, in which is given the 
final reading of 1890, the first and last readings of this year, 
the diiferences between the first and second reading-s of this 
year, and the differences between the last readings of this 
year and those of 1890. 

Cochituate System. 



Section. 


Population. 


1890. 

2d Reading. 


1891. 

1st Reading. 


1891. 

2d Reading. 




Daily 
con. 


Night 
rate. 


Daily 
con. 


Night 
rate. 


Daily 
con. 


Night 
rate. 


City proper 


132,000 
84,000 
14,300 
27,500 
5,400 
65,000 
32,000 


52.5 
49.2 
53.3 
49.0 
52.1 
40.5 
34.5 


29.4 
28.8 
23.1 
25.8 
24.0 
24.0 
20.2 


56.9 
58.1 
50.6 
52.8 
61.3 
41.3 
35.7 


35.3 
36.4 
23.1 

25.2 
27.1 
25.6 
24.2 ■ 


61.7 
53.5 

49.9 


37.5 
36.8 


West Roxbury 

Dorchester 


27.7 


South Boston 

East Boston 


47.3 
39.9 


26.6 
25.6 




360,200 


47.5 


27.6 


52.1 


31.8 


53.7 


33.2 



Mystic System. 



Charlestowu 

Somerville . . ■ 


32,500 
4,400 
9,300 


33.8 
43.2 
37.2 


17.8 
26.2 
24.9 


40.6 
82.1 

44.4 


24.0 
48.5 
29.5 


41.5 
78.3 
43.1 


25.2 
58.8 
32.3 








46,200 


35.3 


20.0 


45.1 


27.3 


45.2 


29.6 



Additional Supply. 

At Dam No. 6 the excavation for the core-wall has been 
completed, the wall built in the trench, and the trench re- 
filled. This work was difficult ; the building of the core- 
wall could not be done at a rapid rate, great care being 
necessary in removing the bracing and in doing the refilling. 

The embankment and core-wall of the dam have been built 
to about five feet above the elevation of the lowest part of the 
valley, and the work is now in such condition that com- 
paratively rapid progress can be made, all of the difficult 
work having; been done. 



Engineering Department. 51 

The work of stripping the basin and the shallow-flowage 
work is well advanced. It will probably be completed this 
year. 

The surveys of Cedar swamp, and the plans for its im- 
provement, are practically completed. At Whitehall pond 
surveys and borings are being made for a new dam at the 
outlet ; a dredging plant has been built, and the work of 
removing mud and stumps from the bottom of the pond can 
be commenced in the spring. 

On the Stony-brook branch of the Sudbury, surveys and 
borings are beino- made for Basins 5,7, and 9, the construe- 
tion of which must soon be commenced, as the increased 
consumption of water, due to the growth of the city, will 
keep pace with the increased capacity to be added by the 
completion of Basin No. 6. 

For particulars see the following report of Desmond Fitz- 
Gerald , Resident Engineer : 



Boston Water-Works, Office of Additional Supply, 

South Framingham, Mass., Feb. 1, 1892. 

William Jackson, Esq., City Engineer: 

Sir : I submit herewith a brief report of engineering work 
accomplished during the past year by the "Additional 
Supply " force. 

The name of Basin 5 has been changed to Basin 6, in order 
to bring all the even numbers on the Sudbury branch of the 
supply. Although the core-wall of this basin was heavily 
covered with hay, the frost got into the trench in January, 
1891, and attacked the concrete, even at the bottom of the 
trench, 30 feet deep, necessitating the laying of steam-pipes. 
January 9 a contract was made with Charles H. Hale for 
delivering filling on the dam. April 6 the trench was 
uncovered and pumped out. May 5 the work of depositing 
concrete was begun. June 3 the core-wall was completed, 
and the back-fillino- begun, the sheetinof beino; cut otF in 
sections about 2 feet high, in order that the back-filling 
might be thoroughly rammed and bonded to the sides of the 
trench. On September 2 the back-filling reached the sur- 
face of the gi'ound, and the embankment was begun. Sep- 
tember 29 the contractor suspended operations, and on 
October 9 the work was continued by the bondsman, Mr. 
Barnabas Clark. The embankment has been built to the 
height of five feet above the meadow. A gap 20 feet wide 
was left in the core-wall to pass freshets during the winter 
and spring. 

The gate-house for the 48-inch pipe has been built and the 



52 



City Document No. 11. 



pipe laid on rock foundation and covered with brickwork. 
It discharges into the wastevvay, the lower section of which 
has been built. The upper gate-house has been begun. All 
gate-house, pipe, and core-wall trenches have been back- 
filled. 

May 25 a contract was made with Charles H. Hale for 
building the lower section of the wasteway, 220 feet long, 
and on September 24 the work was completed. 

July 14 four sections for stripping the bottom of the basin 
were let, and about two-fifths of this work has been done in 
a satisfactory and economical manner. 

During the latter part of the summer a railroad was built 
connecting the Boston & Albany R.E.. with the basin. After 
its completion about 25,000 cubic yards of loam were hauled 
to the Muddy-river Improvement on behalf of the town of 
Brookline. 

The principal specifications and contracts prepared during 
the year were those for the stripping and shallow flowage, 
the railroad, and the lower section of the wasteway. The 
following table shows the work accomplished thus far at the 
new basin : 



Work done at Basin 6 during 1890 and 1891. 



Clearing .... 
Stripping earth (city con- 
tract .... 
Stripping earth (contract), 
Stripping rock . 
Collecting stone 
Trench excavation, earth . 
Trench excavation, rock 
Crushing stone . 
Concrete .... 
Plaster .... 
Back-filling 
Embankment . 
Screening sand and gravel, 
Rubble- stone delivered 
Stone-masonry 
Brick-masonry 
Delivering clay (city labor), 
Laying 48-inch pipe . 
Laying 36-inch pipe . 
Loaming embankment 
Wasteway 



1890. 




J 891. 




19 


acres. 


23 acres. 


47,891 


cu. yds. 


50,940 cu 


.yds 









175,000 




2,125 






536 




15,953 






4,423 




19,450 






4,641 




1,018 






1,051 




6,857 






2,994 




7,179 






2,498 




2,174 






2,132 




507 






10,875 




5,362 






15,928 




4,221 






2,751 




19 






466 











534 




35 






291 











593 







lin. ft. 


414 lin. ft. 





( ( 


12 


(( 





c. y. 


322 c. 


y- 





lir 


.: ft. 


220 lii 


1. ft. 



Engineering Department. 53 

SLirve3's have been continued on various portions of the 
water-shed. The work of lining the Beacon-street tunnel 
has been prosecuted from Dec. 50, 1890, to May 14, 1891. 
The cost of laying the concrete was $13.14 this year against 
$15.02 last year. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Resident Engineer. 



In General. 



The sewerage system of the city of Marlboro' is well ad- 
vanced, the main sewer is completed, the filtration areas are 
prepared, and a considerable portion of the service- sewers 
are laid. The system will be in operation early this year, 
and it will greatly improve the quality of the water collected 
by the Stony-brook branch of the Sudbury river. 

The sewerage system of the town of Westboro' is under 
construction, and will probably be in operation in the near 
future. 

Work has been begun upon the foundations of the new 
pumping-engine at Chestnut-hill pumping-station, and the 
plans for the engine are nearly completed. 

The daily amount pumped at this station increases about 
12 per cent, each year, and will exceed the nominal capacity 
of one pumping-engine next year ; consequently the work 
on the new engine must be pushed as rapidly as possible. 

At the Mystic station the pumps are duplicated to a 
capacity of 10,000,000 gallons per day, and at the present 
rate of increase the daily average consumption in 1893 will 
exceed this amount. 

In this connection I wish to call attention to the fact that 
the total capacity of the Mystic system is but 7,000,000 
gallons daily in a dry year, and to recommend that the de- 
pendant municipalities make some provision to meet the 
inevitable deficiency which must sooner or later occur. 

Thirty-seven contracts for rock excavation have been made 
during the year. Two hundred and ninety-nine petitions 
for main-pipe extensions have been reported upon in regard 
to grade of street, size of pipe, and cost of laying. 

The pipe laid has been measured, the gates and hydrants 
located, and are being plotted on the plans. 

Thirty-five profiles of unaccepted streets have been made, 
and grades given for grading the streets and laying pipes 
where it was necessary. 



54 City Document No. 11. 

The records from the four pumping-stations, the lakes, 
reservoirs, the Mystic sewer, and the returns from pipe 
foundries, etc., have been carefully kept. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 





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Engineering Department. 



57 









OO -T 


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cc 


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58 



City Document No. 11. 















•^ 00 





f 


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I- 







Engineering Department. 



59 



rj* CQ CC CO 



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t-lrHiMi-lrHi-H(MG^rHrH 



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60 



City Document No. 11. 



-1 








































1 


lentag 
of 

nfall 
ected. 


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cc 


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ir 





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2 -3=: 


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>*Kt. cocH\i-r\Mi.^ 



,9 



Engineering Department. 



61 



"i^ 






>5 




















o 


o 




CD 


lO 




CO 


IM 


CO 




' = ^s 


i-l 




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CO 


CD 




CD 






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cq 


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a 


05 




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Parker- 

Reserv 

High-w 

219.0 




































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CO 


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o 


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to 










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05 






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r-t 


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cq 


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t- 




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0. 


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rvoir 
wate 
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r-i 




a 0) a 








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Chest 

Res 

High 

12 


O 

05 


CO 


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00 
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05 


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P-^ Ocq_ 
S 6 ■« 


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pH 






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r-i 


























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to 






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li, 


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IM 






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CO 


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r-i 






O 






05 


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lO 


lO 


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to 


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en 


^ 








Reservo 

No. 3. 

Stone ere 

175.24. 


00 






























'"' 


'~' 


rH 


'"' 


rH 


l-< 


iH 


'"' 


■"* 


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r-i 


rH 






■ra 


t~ 


IM 


CO 


CO 


o 


t^ 


,_, 








^^ 






O 






Ol 


in 


lO 


-* 


rH 


(M 








-* 


(M 




05 


»0 


lO 


CO 


>o 


lO 


■o 


lO 


rtl 


lO 


lO 


to 


to 


to 




00 


" 






1-1 


1-1 






r-i 




s 


J^ 


!^ 


r-t 




• 




o 


CO 


t~. 


IM 








CO 


t. 


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p^ 




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r-t 




o 


»o 










00 


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to 






T— 1 




05 


CO 


CO 


*a 














00 


00 








o ._• « -; 


00 
r-t 


























CO 




Reserv 

No. 2 

lash bo 

167.12 


'"' 




■^ 




IH 


'"' 


rH 


'"' 




'"' 


r-i 


r-i 


I-l 






ffl 


"O 


CO 


00 


t. 


OO 


t^ 


CD 


IM 


to 


CO 


Ol 


00 




05 


to 


CO 


-J^ 




irS 


'I 


CO 




O 


'^. 


CO 


O 






00 
r-t 






























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"^ 


T-i 




, 


H 


CO 


CO 


lO 








t^ 


t. 




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t^ 




00 




'^ 








r-i 


CO 


CO 


lO 


t^ 




Ol 


o 


Oi 






05 


00 


OO 


00 


OO 


00 




^^ 


ItJ 


t— 


t^ 


CO 


t-. 






ervo 

0.1. 

boa 
9.29. 


GO 

r-{ 










iO 




lO 


>o 


o 






to 






•^ 


^ 


'"' 
















'"' 










>o 


05 


Oi 










j^ 






IM 








ri- 


05 




°5 


CO 
00 


00 




OO 


OJ 


CO 
00 






cn 




»^ 




00 
H 
























to 






5 




^ 


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3 


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S 
0) 

a, 

0) 


<u 
o 

o 


m 

a 


u 

a 


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p 

C3 




C3 


A. 


>> 

CJ 


a 


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o 


in 

o 


TO [> 



62 



City Document No. 11. 




•IBCHOY 



ai o lo 

9 a a 



O) O i-H 



2 O 


O 


O 


<-> 










^ 














o 








CO 






1 C) 


CI 


O 




f^l 


(M 


t^ 




o 
































t' 




















































■* 












rS 






f-l 






O 


o 


o 


o 




o o o 



CO C30 ai CO 



C^ O^ C3 O) O) 






o o c- 



CO T-l CD CO CD lO 






CC Oi OS Ol Ol 



a> o 00 



joj pa^oajioQ 
"IBoo JO -qi jad 
padoind iCi^i'^o'en^ 



rH'^C^'^(McocDcocc>(NcO 



CO Ol Tp -^ 



O^ O Oi o^ o^ 






ni y![ aSeiaAY 


■M 


to 


O 


C^ 


^ 


CO 


00 


c^ 


lO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


(>1 


O 

to 


^ 


CO 
r-1 


^ 


a 




g 


a 


l-l 


1-1 


a 


a 




IM 


1 



puB SnjiBaq aoj 
nonoajaoo o^ 
"IBOO JO -qi .tad 



eq 1-1 T-H 



03 C^ 03 C^ C3 03 



•8jaj[niio pan 
saqsB "^aso ja j 






CO 00 00 00 00 CO 



■sjaj[ntio 
paB eaqsB ibjoj, 



Cq i-l IM rl 



t^ 1— I to 1— ( t^ iH 



1-1 r-l IM (M 



■paujnsnoo 
|Boo JO jnnotnB 



■^ CO C^ U5 



a^ 



'^^ 



CO CO IM C-J 
to CO to to 



•patunsnoo \V03 
JO innoniB l^jox 



S o5 



co^ to C^ CO^ Oi 00_ 

t-^ oo" rn' c<r oo" to" 



(M 01 <M (M 



padtnnd ^nnocac 



05 »0 Ci lO 



£ 


'^ 


cq 
to 


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to 


s 


s 


o 


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05 
CO 


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to 


CD 


to 


CO 


t- 


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t- 


"^ 


QO 


•^ 


t- 


*- 


(M 


i 


§ 


i 


o 

to 


o 


in 


CO 


t2 


o 


lO 


o 
to 


1-1 


to 


o 


to 




03 


CO 
05 


C-1_ 


i-l 


co_ 


pi 


f; 



•padrand 
^nnoni'B ibjox 



(M 1-1 05 1-1 



OS <M CO CO 



Ol (M (M M (N C-l 



EH o,"-^ 






<! p. 



eg,-Ss -SUB 



<-if^'S'<'M'^^>~.<ia^O';i^Q 






Engineering Department. 



63 







•TBOO 




§ 















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64 



City Document No. 11, 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Sudbury River Water-shed for the 

Year 1891. 



1891. 


% 
a 








^ 
^ 


a 

1-5 




r3 


S 

s 


CD 
,Q 
O 
o 

O 


a 

CD 

> 
o 


a) 

g 

o 

CD 

Q 


1 




0..040 










0.130 










2 .... • 


1.425 










0.385 












3 


0.545 


2.065 


2.480 
0.010 


0.100 














4 




0.500 


0.225 










0.565 


5 


0.105 








0.115 






6 


0.155 












0.345 
0.070 


2.040 






7 












0.715 


0.020 
1.695 




415 


8 




0.650 












9 






1.455 


















10 




0.770 




















11 








0.480 












0.065 


0.320 




12 


1.130 






0.070 






0.525 






13 




0.900 








0.190 


0.495 






14 


0.035 




















15 






0.635 
0.160 






0.020 


0.730 


0.070 


0.020 




475 


16 




0.070 
0.120 
0.550 


0.110 


1.160 






17 














0.830 




18 


1.875 




19 




1.195 


0.355 












20 














0.770 






21 




0.750 


1.945 


















22. . . . 


1.295 




0.030 


1.675 




0.810 
0.110 










23 










0.575 


0.500 


380 


24 














0.655 


640 


25 


0.725 
0.040 






0.140 






0.010 










26 

27 


1.185 




0.100 








0.085 


1.400 
040 


0.330 


28 


0.100 












1.645 

0.285 
0.065 






29 


0.390 






0.550 


0.015 


0.785 
0.640 


0.080 








30 












0.880 


31 








































Totals. . 


7.020 


5.235 


6.475 


3.905 


2.010 


3.770 


3.395 


4.725 


2.380 


3.830 


3.090 


3.685 



Total rainfall during the year, 49.520 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Framinghara and Ashland. 



Engesteerestg Department. 



65 



Rainfallin Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituate for the Year 1891. 



1891. 


a 

1-5 


C3 
3 




< 


^ 
a 


a 

3 
t-5 




1 

3 


u 

CO 
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a 

CD 

Ph 
0) 

m 


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0) 

o 
O 


u 

a 

> 
o 


a 

<p 


1 




0.34 












0.12 










2 

3 

4 

5 

g 


1.33 

0.21 


0.42 
0.13 


1.63 


2.40 


0.12 


0.53 














0.33 














0.49 
0.01 


1.77 


0.35 




















0.64 








3 




70 












1.78 






9 






1.26 




















10 . . 




n SO 






















11 .... 






0.39 












0.07 
0.53 






12 

13 


1.01 




0.76 




0.06 






0.77 


0.23 




14 .... 


0.03 




















15 

16 

17 • 




0.03 




0.60 


0.82 




0.03 


0.61 


0.04 


0.03 






IS 

19 

20 . 


2.00 


0.59 


0.08 


0.16 


0.01 
















1.02 


0.34 
















0.65 






21 




71 






















22 

23 


1.05 




1.76 






1.87 




0.76 
0.03 




0.60 






24 ... 














0.68 








25 

26 


0.67 
02 


1.17 




0.07 


0.15 










0.11 


1.33 
0.02 




28 




0.13 












1.83 


0.08 




29 

30 


0.35 








0.51 


0.03 


0.58 












0.80 


31 














0.54 


0.29 
































Totals . . 


6.67 


5.02 


5.49 


3.62 


1.67 


3.78 


2.99 


4.91 


2.12 


4.14 


2.84 


3.17 



Total rainfall during the year, 46.42 inches. 



66 



City Docitment 'No. 11. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Mystic Lake Watershed for the 

Year 1891. 



1891. 


1 


5 


3 


< 




0) 

c 

1-5 


"a 
1-^ 


3 

p 
< 


u 
o 

a 

B 

a 


1 
O 


u 

s 


a 

V 

ft 


1. . . . . 
2 

a 


1.130 


0.540 
0.480 


1.920 


2.135 


0.120 


0.305 
0.305 
0.015 


0.005 
0.185 


0.025 










4. . . . . 


0.145 










0.365 


5 






0.195 






6. , . . . 

■y 


0.215 

0.680 


0.905 




0.02O 




0.710 


0.585 
0.130 


1.825 


0.005 


0.260 


8 .... . 




1.595 






9 






10 




0.785 




















11 






0.285 












0.035 


0.380 




12 


1.035 














0.025 






13 .... , 




0.880 




0.045 






0.225 








14 


0.020 










1.155 
0.050 






15 






0.495 






0.035 


0.750 






0.575 


16 








1.445 




17 

18 .... 
19 


1.475 


0.445 


0.105 


0.145 


1.540 


. . . 

0.325 




0.015 




0.520 




20 














1.075 






21 




0.740 


2.230 












015 




22 


1.030 




0.115 


2.155 




0.530 










23. ... . 




0.030 






0.460 


0.265 


0.380 


24 












0.410 


0.010 






0.540 


25 


1.010 


0.010 
1.060 




0.090 














26 


0.075 














0.350 


27 


0.030 
0.370 














0.170 


1.405 
0.030 




28 

29 


0.120 






0.630 


0.010 
0.010 


0.655 
0.855 


1.470 


0.080 




30 












940 


31 










0.010 




0.355 
































Totals . . 


6.245 


5.075 


6.070 


3.150 


2.460 


4.430 


3.180 


3.880 


2.160 


4.735 


2.605 


3.410 



Total rainfall during the year, 47.400 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Mystic Lake and Winchester. 



Engineering Department. 



67 



fe) 



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68 



City Document No, 11. 



Rainfall Received and Collected 1891. 





SUUBUBT. 


COCHITUATE. 


Mtstic. 


Month. 


"3 


|1 


-a 

CD o 

Ph 


Rainfall. 


Rainfall 
collected. 


a o 
o a) 

u O 
a) o 


Rainfall. 


Rainfall 
collected. 


Per cent. 
I collected. 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


January . . 


7.020 


5.383 


76.69 


6.67 


6.26 


93.81 


6.245 


6.286 


100.67 


February . 


5.235 


5.616 


107.28 


5.02 


6.62 


131.93 


5.075 


5.969 


117.61 


March . . . 


6.475 


7.94-1 


122.69 


5.49 


8.03 


146.26 


6.070 


7.208 


118.74 


April . . . 


3.905 


4.138 


105.97 


3.62 


4.31 


119.15 


3.150 


3.434 


109.01 


May ... . 


2.010 


1.039 


51.70 


1.67 


0.88 


52.75 


2.460 


1.402 


57.01 


June . . . 


3.770 


0.714 


18.92 


3.78 


0.77 


20.36 


4.430 


1.010 


22.80 


July .... 


3.395 


0.266 


7.83 


2.99 


0.50 


16.65 


3.180 


0.422 


13.27 


August . . 


4.725 


0.290 


6.15 


4.91 


0.72 


14.69 


3.880 


0.439 


11.31 


September . 


2.380 


0.350 


14.71 


2.12 


0.76 


35.91 


2.160 


0.417 


19.32 


October . . 


3.830 


0.375 


9.78 


4.14 


0.79 


18.95 


4.735 


0.575 


12.14 


November . 


3.090 


0.526 


17.03 


2.84 


0.83 


29.21 


2.605 


0.565 


21.68 


December . 


3.685 


0.971 


26.34 


3.17 


1.60 


50.47 


3.410 


0.873 


25.59 


Totals and ] 
averages \ 


49.520 


27.612 


55.76 


46.42 


32.07 


69.08 


47.400 


28.600 


60.34 



Engineering Department. 



69 



Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations on 
the Water- Wo7-ks. 











Temperature op Air. 


Temperature op 
Water. 


1S91. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
House. 




a 
a 


a 

3 

a 




a" 
a 


a 
a 

'3 


cl 

03 
0) 


a 

a 

2 


a 


January 
February 
March . 
April . 

May , . 
June . 
July . . 
August 
Septembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 


r 

r 

r 






54.0 
62.0 
54.0 
78.0 
88.5 
96.0 
90.5 
90.0 
90.0 
86.0 
66.0 
64.0 


9.0 

2.0 

0.0 

24.0 

30.0 

42.5 

51.0 

47.5 

47.0 

23.5 

9.5 

12.0 


29.3 
31.5 
33.8 
49.5 
57.2 
65.9 
68.6 
70.2 
67.2 
51.0 
41.4 
39.2 


51.0 
62.0 
51.0 
77.0 
85.0 
96.0 
89.0 
94.0 
88.0 
84.0 
66.0 
67.0 


0.0 
-1.0 

0.0 
24.0 
30.0 
38.0 
46.0 
45.0 
44.0 
26.0 

6.0 

8.0 


28.3 
31.1 
32.9 
49.0 
57.3 
65.4 
67.5 
69.4 
65.4 
48.6 
39.0 
37.8 


36.3 
36.0 
37.1 
48.8 
57.0 
65.1 
71.5 
73.6 
69.7 
58.2 
44.6 
38.2 


34.0 
34.1 
35.2 

48.3 
58.1 
68.2 
70.7 
74.5 
69.3 
59.5 
44.7 
39.2 



70 City Document No. 11. 

C. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

The construction of the extension of the Improved Sew- 
erage system has been continued the past year, the amount 
expended being $192,409.65. 

The condition of the appropriation on Feb. 1, 1892, was 
as follows : 

Total appropriations $5,913,164 93 

Total expenditures 5,865,246 41 

Unexpended balance Feb. 1, 1892 . . $47,918 52 

The work done during the year was limited by the funds 
available, and is described briefly as follows : 

City Proper, Sections 5 and 6, East Side. 

These sections extend in Atlantic avenue and Commercial 
street, from Central wharf to Hanover street, a distance of 
3,120 feet. The sewers were completed in August and are 
now in service ; for a distance of 2,716 feet from Central 
wharf the sewer is of brick, egg-shaped, 2 feet 4 inches X 3 
feet 6 inches, with concrete foundations and side walls, and 
is laid on a grade of 1 foot in 1,500 feet. The remaining 
404 feet of sewer is of 15-inch Akron pipe, embedded in and 
covered by concrete, and is laid on a grade of 1 foot in 200 
feet. Tide-gates and sump manholes were built at Hanover 
and Battery streets, and six common sewers were inter- 
cepted at these points. At Chirl^e street a sump manhole 
was built and three common sewers were intercepted, and 
the old outlet in the dock at this point was bulkheaded ofi*. 
At Clinton street 20 feet of 5 feet X 6 feet wooden sewer 
in that street were rebuilt, and a 10-incb inlet pipe built 
into the intercepting sewer. 

In addition to the above work, 70 feet of common sewer 
(2 feet X 3 feet brick) was rebuilt near Hanover street, and 
160 feet of old wooden sewer at Clarke street, which leaked 
badly, was replaced by a 12-inch Akron pipe, built in the 
old box sewer and surrounded by concrete. 

The work on these sections was done by day labor ; it 
was almost entirely tidework, and was unusually difScult ; 
and the obstructions found in the made land, through which 
the sewer was built, increased the difficulty and ex})ense of 
the work . More than 350 cubic yards of stone was taken from 



Engineering Department. 71 

old sea-walls found in the trench ; while timber, in the shape 
of wharves, foundations, piles, etc., was encountered in large 
quantities. 

All of the sewers which formerly emptied into the docks 
along the water-front, in the city proper, are now inter- 
cepted. 

Dorchester. 

On August 19 the sum of $58,000, which had been appro- 
priated in 1890 for the settlement of land damages at Squan- 
tum and Moon Island, was, by vote of the city government, 
made available for the purposes of Improved Sewerage con- 
struction. 

Work was at once begun on Section 8, Dorchester, by 
day labor, with the force previously employed on Sections 5 
and 6 of the east side intercepting sewers, and is now in 
progress. This section extends, in the valley of the Nepon- 
set river, along the northerly line of the location of the Old 
Colony Railroad, through private land, from Marsh street to 
Granite avenue, a distance of 1,950 feet. The sewer is of 
brick, 4 feet 6 inches in diameter, and is laid on an inclina- 
tion of 1 foot in 2,000 feet. The trench varies in depth from 
20 feet to 39 feet, and can be worked to advantage in the 
winter season. 

Section 10, Dorchester, extends in Butler, Adams, and 
Washington streets, at Dorchester Lower Mills, from Hun- 
toon street to the foot of Baker's court, a distance of 1,600 
feet. A contract for building this section was awarded in 
January, 1891, to A. A. Hall, and the work was completed 
by him in November last, at a cost of about |41,000, The 
sewer is laid on a grade of one foot in 2,000 feet; it is of 
brick, egg-shaped, 3 feet by 4 feet ; the excavation was made 
by tunnelling, with the exception of a short, open cutting on 
each end ; the material was solid rock, conglomerate and 
slate being found in about equal proportions ; the space be- 
tween the brickwork of the sewer and the surrounding rock 
was solidly tilled with concrete. The average distance from 
the surface of the ground to the roof of the tunnel was 
about 25 feet, yet no damage resulted to the buildings front- 
ing on the streets, from the jar or vibration of the ground. 
At one point a five-story brick building stood within 23 feet 
of the centre line of the tunnel, with the bottom of its 
foundation-walls 15 feet above the tunnel roof; the building 
was not injured. The only damage done during the prog- 
ress of the work was a slight breakage of glass in the win- 
dows of some of the houses in close proximity to the 
shaft- openings, due directly to the concussion of the air. 



72 City Document No. 11. 

Travel on the surface of the street was not seriously 
interrupted. 

No work has been done on Sections 6, 7, 9, and 11, Dor- 
chester, owing to w\ant of appropriation. 

Outfall Sewer. 

Section 3, outfall sewer, was being constructed at the 
time of the last annual report, under contract, by H. P. 
Nawn. This section extends for 2,100 feet in the embank- 
ment between Squantum and Moon Island. The sewer is 
of brick, 12 feet wide and 11 feet high. It has an unusually 
heavy concrete foundation, with side walls of rubble masonry 
— iron rods passing through the foundation and arch, as 
described in last year's report. During the past year 1,300 
feet of sewer has been built, and there remains 350 feet to 
be built under Mr. Nawn's contract. 

The completion during the coming summer of the remain- 
ing 1,920 feet of sewer in the embankment is impera- 
tive. The wooden flume, which now conveys the sewage 
from Squantum to Moon Island, has been in use seven years, 
and is in a decidedly dangerous condition. Many of the 
supporting piles are eaten by worms, and much of the 
woodwork is badly decayed. Great care and constant re- 
pairs will be necessary to maintain the flume in working 
order for another year. 

An appropriation of $90,000 will be necessary to com- 
plete this sewer which will replace the flume. The work 
can be done during the coming summer if a beginning is 
made as soon as the weather permits. 

During the past year a total length of intercepting sewer 
of 5,385 feet has been built. 

An appropriation of $355,000 will be required to com- 
plete the Improved Sewerage system as proposed. This 
includes Sections 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 of the Dorchester Inter- 
cepting, the sewer from Squantum to Moon Island, the sea- 
wall at Moon Island, and the pumping-station at the East 
shaft of the Dorchester-Bay tunnel. 

Section 1, Brighton Intercepting Sewer. 

The contractors for building this difficult section of sewer 
was the National Construction Co., of Boston, who should 
have been credited with the successful construction of this 
work in last year's report, but by an error the credit was 
given to other parties. 



Engineering Department. 73 



D. 

[from the city engineer's report to the board of 
park commissioners.] 

The Parkway. — Back Bay Fens. 

Excavation of Waterway. — At the beginning of the yeur 
there remained a small portion of the waterway in Longwood 
entrance which had not been excavated. This was done 
early in the season, and this part of the work is now entirely 
completed. The dredging-plant has been sold to the Water 
Department. 

lioachvays and Walks. — Audubon road has been finished 
to Brookline avenue, and was opened to travel on January 
3, 1892. 

The roadway and walks on and near Agassiz bridge have 
been resurfaced, the curbstones reset, and the gutters re- 
paved. This was made necessary by the settlement of the 
tilling in that vicinity. 

The Fenway between Huntington and Tremont entrances 
has been graded, except a small part occupied by piles of 
loam. The ride on this section has been nearly all sur- 
faced, and the walk next the water has been graded, its 
gutters built, and a portion of it covered with crushed stone. 
On March 20, 1891, contracts were made with Cape Ann 
Granite Co. for furnishing 2.838 lineal feet of curbstone at 
$1.49 per lineal foot, and with S. & R. J. Lombard for fur- 
nishing 110,000 paving-blocks, at $44.90 per thousand. 
Both of these contracts have been completed. 

The stone-crusher has been run continuously since Sep- 
tember 2, and a large amount of stone is now on hand for 
use on the roads and walks during the coming season. The 
stone for crushing has been purchased as needed, from dilfer- 
ent parties, at prices varying from 75 to 90 cents per ton. 

billing. — At the Tremont and Longwood entrances all 
the filling required has been done under a contract with the 
Boston & Albany R.R. Co., dated September 16, 1890. 
The work was completed on February 4, 1892, and the total 
amount of filling deposited was 161,099 cubic yards, at 51 
cents per cubic yard. 

Agassiz Bridge. — The parapet walls of this bridge have 
been built, thus completing this structure. 

Een Bridge. — On November 24, 1890, a contract was 
made with Mr. William H. Ward, of Lowell, for building this 
bridge, with the exception of the face walls above the water 



74 City Document No. 11. 

level. He began work February 20, 1891, and finished on 
September 29, The face-walls were built by masons in the 
employ of the Park Department. The entire work was com- 
pleted on November 17. 

This is a masonry arch bridge of 15 feet span and A width 
of 96 feet. The foundation is of spruce piles capped with 
10 X 10 inch spruce caps, which are covered with 4-inch 
spruce phink, the surface of the plank being at grade — 0.5. 
The abutments are of granite, 12 feet 6 inches high ; and the 
arch is of brick except at the ends, 20 inches thick, with a 
rise of 4 feet; the ends of the arches, the wing- walls above 
grade 7.5, and the parapet are all of rustic masonry com- 
posed of Roxbury stone, all except the voussoirs laid dry, 
with the spaces between the stones filled with loam. The 
parapet is of quarried stones very roughly dressed, while the 
stones below the parapet are field bowlders laid without any 
cutting. The cost of the whole structure was $27,669.34. 

Stony-brooh Bridge. — On June 23, 1891, a contract was 
made with Sampson, Clark, & Co., of Boston, for building 
the superstructure of this bridge. Work was begun on July 
1, and it is nearly completed. The bridge spans the water- 
way leading from the outlet of the new channel of Stony 
brook and supports the main drive and ride of the Fenway. 
It consists of five arches of 10-feet span each — three over the 
waterway and two over foot-paths on either side of the 
waterway. The bridge is 85 feet wide between the para- 
pets. The arches are supported by piers 2 feet square ex- 
cept at the ends of the main piers, where they are 2 feet X 
3 feet 6 inches. Below grade 9.5 the piers are supported by 
a continuous wall 2 feet thick. At the southerly side of the 
bridge there is at each end a flight of steps leading from the 
walks next the driveways from Huntington avenue to the 
walks passing under the bridge, which latter connect with 
the walks along the borders of the main waterway ; by this 
means a passage is furnished to people on foot to all parts 
of the Fens without crossins: the drive or ride at ofrade. In 
connection with these passageways, recesses for seats are 
built in the abutments of the bridge. On the northerly end 
of the bridge there is to be an iron foot-bridge, just above 
the level of the water, to connect the two walks. The face- 
work of the masonry is of speckled brick, with trimmings of 
Milford granite. The barrel vaults underneath the bridge 
are lined with glazed brick of different colors, laid in pat- 
terns. On each staircase there is a drinking-fountain, and 
the walls are piped for lighting the drive, and also the walks 
under the bridge. The foundations of the bridse were built 



Engineering Department. 75 

in 1887 by the Sewer Department, as a part of the new 
channel of Stony brook. 

The work was done under the dh'ection of this depart- 
ment, from designs furnished hy Messrs. F. L. Olmstead & 
Co., and Walker & Kimball, architects. 

Culvert and Retaining -wall at Brookline Avenue. — The 
culvert under Brookline avenue, connectino; Muddy river 
with the waterway in the Fens, has been extended, and the 
foundations for a retaining-wall at its end have been built. 
The culvert is elliptical in section, 9 feet high and 7 feet 
wide, with side walls of concrete lined with brick and a 
brick arch 12 inches thick. It is on a pile and timber phit- 
form. There is a rectangular manhole at the end, with 
grooves for stop-plank. The retaining-wall at the end of 
the culvert is semicircular in plan, and is built of concrete, 
resting upon a pile foundation to grade 7 ; above grade 7 the 
wall is to be of bowlder work of the same character as the 
face-walls of the Fen bridge. This bowlder work was not 
included in the contract, and has not yet been built. The 
contractor for this work was Mr. Wm. H. Ward, of Lowell. 
His contract was dated June 23, 1891 ; work was begun on 
July 1 and finished on January 7, 1892. The cost of the 
work covered by the contract was $8,042. 

Grading of Slojoes, Loaming, and Planting. — The 
slopes between the ride and the water on that part of the 
Fens between Huntington and Tremont entrances, have been 
graded and covered with loam, except a small portion near 
Stony-brook bridge. The slopes on the Long wood entrance 
and on a part of the Tremont entrance have been finished in 
the same manner. 

Miscellaneous. — Fifty additional settees have been pur- 
chased and placed along the walks. The regrading of the 
plantations on Commonwealth avenue, between West Ches- 
ter park and Beacon street, has been completed, and the 
section between West Chester park and Charlesgate East has 
been planted. 

The following table, giving the principal items of work 
completed, has been corrected to date : 

Per cent, 
of whole. 

Channel excavated 

Shore completed 

Marsh completed 

Driveway completed . 

Walks completed 

Ride completed 

Curbstone set 

Gutters paved . . . 



. 1,227,000 sq. ft. 


100 


26,700 lin. ft. 


100 


833,000 sq. ft. 


100 


60,000 sq. yds. 


68 


24,000 


46 


8,000 


60 


25,946 lin. ft. 


75 


13,300 sq. yds. 


67 



76 City Document No. 11. 







Per cent, 
of whole. 


Area covered with loam 


1,023,000 sq. ft. 


75 


Area planted 


841,500 


60 


Boundary fence 


4,047 lin. ft. 


26 


Drain laid 


6,498 " 




Manholes .... 


6 




Catch-basins 


77 




Brido^es and culverts . 


6 





A large amount of other work has been partially com- 
pleted, but cannot be classified. 

The usual force engaged upon the care of plantations, 
roads, walks, etc., has been employed duiing the year, and 
the expense of the same has been charged to the appropria- 
tion for maintenance. 

Muddy River and Stony Brook Covered Channels. 

The former of these remains in bad condition, as was 
described in the report for 1887. As the town of Brookline 
contemplates improving the channels of the brooks flowing 
into Muddy river, so that in time of freshet the discharge of 
water into the new open channel through the Parkway will 
come more suddenly than it does at present, in my opinion 
it is necessary that the covered channel should be repaired 
and all obstructions removed. The Stony- brook conduit is 
in good condition, except that the temporary work at the 
outlet into Charles river has been somewhat damaged by 
storms. The gate-chamber has been provided with window- 
frames and sashes, the same having been omitted when it was 
built. 

Muddy River. 

The contracts in force at the date of the last annual report 
have all been completed, except a small portion on Section 
C. The buildings on the Downer-street section were re- 
moved early in the summer, and on June 23 a contract was 
made with Richard D. Shanahan for grading this section. 
The work was completed in December. 

The payments under the above five contracts were as 
follows, the names given being those of the contractors : 

Section A. — James Killian . . . .$14,896 24 

Section B. — Owen Nawn .... 6,883 05 

Section O. — Edward F. Brigham (contract not 

finished) 10,503 92 

/S'ec<^o?^ Z>. — H. P. Nawn .... 87,30473 

Downer-Street Section. — Richard D. Shanahan . 4,576 33 



Engineering Department. 77 

All of the above contracts included the excavation of the 
waterway and the upland and the disposal of the excavated 
material as filling on ground which required it. The material 
was not sufficient for doing all the filling required, nor was 
much of it suitable for foundations for roads and walks. 

On Oct. 21, 1891, a contract was made with the Boston 
& Albany Raih'oad Company for furnishing and depositing 
all filling required on that portion of the improvement north 
and west of the waterway between Brookline avenue and 
the city boundary. The work is now in progress. A 
contract was made on November 28, with Moulton & 
O'Mahoney, for doing all the grading required on that 
portion of the improvement on the south and east of the 
waterway, extending as far as Perkins street. This work 
is progressing favorably. Preliminary plans for the bridge 
on Brookline avenue having been furnished by Messrs. 
Olmsted & Co., working plans and specifications were pre- 
pared, in consultation with this department, by Mr. A. II. 
French, engineer for the Brookline Park Commissioners. 
A contract for buildino- this brido;e was made on December 
oU with John Sheehan, of Lynn, and work is now in prog- 
ress under the direction of the Brookline Park Commis- 
sioners. 

Plans are now being prepared for the Tremout and Belle- 
vue street bridges, and proposals for doing the work will 
shortly be received. 

Arrangements having being made in conjunction w^th 
the town of Brookline for the transportation of loam from 
Basin 6 of the Boston Water-Works, a contract was made 
with James A. Cahill on July 14 for grading a branch rail- 
road from the main line of the Boston & Albany Railroad to 
the basin ; the work was completed in September, at a cost 
to the city of Boston of $1,750.18 ; on September 28 a con- 
tract was made with the Boston & Albany Railroad Com- 
pany for laying the track on the above branch railroad, and 
for transporting the loam to the Parkway ; nothing has yet 
been done for the Boston Park Department under this con- 
tract, except the lajdng of the track. 

The drain from the House of the Good Shepherd having 
been cut off" by the removal of the sewer in Downer street, 
it was extended by a siphon under the waterway, and con- 
nected with the sewer in Brookline avenue. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

At the beginning of 1891, work was in progress on the 
grading of the road around the north side of Bussey hill and 



78 City Document No. 11. 

across the meadow to the Parkway near Centre and Orchard 
streets, under a contract with Wm. T. Davis. This contract 
was subsequently amended, so as to include the grading of 
the road leadino; from the before-mentioned road to the 
Parkway near South street. Another contract was made on 
July 23 for grading a temporary road across the Parkway 
to Centre street. The work called for by these contracts 
has been finished. The total amount of material moved 
under them was 70,035 cubic yards, and the payments were 
$24,945.51. There remains a small amount of grading to 
be done where there has been a settlement of the filling 
across the meadow. On about 1,700 lineal feet of this road 
— being the portion of the north side of Bussey hill — the 
catch-basins and drains have been built, the gutters paved, 
and the roadway ballasted. 

On the road leading from the main drive to Walter street, 
the catch-basins and drains have been built and the gutters 
paved. The Water Department has laid a 24-inch water- 
pipe through this road, but the work not having been com- 
pleted until recently, the road has not been surfaced ; it can 
be done early in the spring. 

Franklin Park. 

Drives, Hides, and Wcdks. — Glen-lane wall has been 
completed, but the delay in doing it caused by the press of 
other work for the masons has prevented the completion 
of the surfacino;. The section between Blue Hill avenue and 
the entrance road from Columbia street has been entirely 
finished, while on the section between the last-mentioned 
road and the crossing of old Glen road the drains and catch- 
basins have been built and most of the gutters paved, so that 
it will require but a short time to complete the work. 

The triangular space between Blue Hill avenue, the en- 
trance from Columbia street, and the easterly end of the 
Greeting has been graded, and the plantations prepared for 
planting. The circle at the easterly end of the Greeting has 
been graded. The curbstone has been set, the gutters paved, 
and the roadway ballasted. Loop road has been finished, and 
the last section of it was opened to travel on May 24. The 
walks in the vicinity are nearly finished, and 1,500 lineal 
feet of granite steps have been purchased for the same. The 
ride through the Wilderness has been surfaced. Circuit 
drive is sub-graded from the junction with the road to 
Columbia street, around the easterly side of the Park to the 
entrance from Morton street, except a short section across 
the valley near Canterbury street, were a culvert is to be 



Engineering Department. 79 

built, and a section between Canterbury hill and the pond 
which requires tilling. On about 800 lineal feet of the Cir- 
cuit drive the gutters have been paved and the roadway 
ballasted. 

The walk from EUicottdale to the top of Scarboro' hill has 
been built. 

Drainage. — The main drain at the westerly end of the 
Greeting has been extended so as to drain the swampy 
ground near by. Drains have been built on the easterly end 
of the Greeting, on Glen lane, and on Circuit drive. 

Ellicotldale. — That portion of this ground where the 
gardener's cottage formerly stood has been finished. 

Schoolmaster Hill. — The masonry work of the arbor and 
of the shelter has been completed, including an additional 
drinking-fouutain. The wookwork of the arbor for support- 
ing vines has been erected, so that this structure is complete, 
except paving of the walks. 

Ponds. — Work is now in progress on the excavation of 
the proposed ponds south of Scarboro' hill, the material being 
used for filling on Circuit drive, and for building a dam 
between the ponds and Morton street. 

Miscellaneous. — A shelter at the carrias^e-stand at the 
entrance to the Park opposite Columbia street is in progress 
of construction. The flock of sheep increased during the 
year to 168 in number, and in the fall (54 wethers and old 
ewes were sold for $350.88. The yield of wool was 792 
lbs., which was sold for $187.74. In May lamp-posts and 
lanters with oil lamps were placed along Glen lane by the 
Lamp Department, and they have since been maintained by 
that department. 

The following table shows the principal items of work com- 
pleted to date, but it should not be understood as being a 
complete statement of the work done, as a large amount of 
labor has been expended on work which cannot be classified : 



Driveways completed . 


76,000 sq. 


yds., 


or 5 miles. 


Walks completed . 


47,700 


a 


or 6| miles. 


Ride completed 


10,500 


ii 


or 1 of a mile. 


Gutters paved 


15,100 


i 




Curbstone set 


. • . 




6,460 lin ft. 


6-in. water-pipe laid 








3,000 " 


4-in. water-pipe laid 








1,150 '« 


Hydrants 








7 


Drinking-fountains 








8 


Bridge 








1 


Boundary wall 








4,468 lin. ft. 


2-ft. 9-in. brick drain . 








. 706 " 



80 



City Document No. 11. 



2 ft. X 2 ft. X 6 in. brick drain 






180 1 


in. ft. 


2-ft. brick drain 






769 


(( 


18-in. pipe drain 






3,020 


(( 


15-in. pipe drain 






2,895 


(( 


12-in. pipe drain 






1,546 


(( 


10-in. pipe drain 






1,844 


a 


8-in. pipe drain 






7,914 


a 


4-in. pipe drain 






190 


a 


4-in. agricultural tile drain 






2,100 


a 


3-in. agricultural tile drain 






3,520 


a 


2-in. agricultural tile drain 






26,713 


a 


1^-in, agricultural tile drain 






19,700 


(( 


Total drain .... 






71,097 


(( 


Manholes .... 






41 




Catch-basins and inlets 






143 




Open channel for brook 






2,300 


a 


Area of ground graded and planted 


or 


• 




seeded ..... 


. 




85 


acres. 


Gateway ..... 


. 




1 




800 lineal feet of Circuit drive 


have 


been 


ballasted and 


covered with crushed stone, whi 


e 2,200 lineal feet 


have 


been sub-sraded and drained. 











Marine Park. 

Filling. — The filling done under the contract with 
Joseph E. White, dated October 5, 1889, was completed on 
October 16, 1891. There were deposited 268,450 cubic 
yards ; the amount paid was $163,754.50. The work of 
filling north of Broadway, under the contract with Perkins 
& White, dated September 10, 1890, is still in progress, 
there having been deposited 310,000 cubic yards. 

Loam. — On October 12, 1891, a contract was made 
with Perkins & White for furnishing and placing loam on 
that portion of the Park south of the south line of Broadway 
extended. This work is now in progress. 

Q-street Biilkliead. — On February 14, 1891, a contract 
was made with Perkins & White for building a l)ulkhead on 
easterly line of Q street, extending northerly 440 feet from 
East First street, for retaining the filling on the Park. The 
work was completed in November, at a cost of |4,985. 

Castle-island Bridge. — On July 14, 1891, a contract was 
made with William L. Miller for building a temporary pile- 
bridge to connect the mainland with Castle island. Work 
was begun on August 4, and will be completed early the 
coming season. 

Miscellaneous. — Additional toilet accommodations for 



Engineering Department. 81 

men have been provided at the refectory buildhig. One 
hundred settees have been placed upon the iron pier, and a 
new boat purchased. 

Wood-island Park. 

Additional land and flats having been taken for an extension 
of the Park, thereby rendering necessary a revision of the 
plan. But little work of construction has been done. A 
topographical survey of the land taken has been made. 

The grounds prepared in 1890 have been planted. 

Charlesbank. 

^fell's Gymnasium. — The grounds and apparatus having 
been put in thorough repair, the gymnasium was opened for 
the season on March 30. Beginning on May 19, the gym- 
nasium was opened in the evening until 9.30 o'clock. For 
this reason 13 electric-arc lights were provided within the 
grounds. This change has been very popular, the attend- 
ance in the evening during the warm weather having been 
large and very orderly. The nights having become so cool 
that the evening attendance had largely fallen off, the even- 
ing opening was discontinued on November 7. The gymna- 
sium was closed for the season on January 2, 1892. The 
attendance for the season was 169,591, an average of 707 
per day. Of this number there attended after 7 o'clock 
P.M. 46,548, or an average of 312 per evening. 

Experience has shown that further accommodations in the 
shape of bathing and dressing rooms are very much neaded 
in connection with the gymnasium. 

Women's Lavatory Building. — This building was com- 
pleted early in the season, it having been constructed under 
the direction of Messrs. Walker & Kimball, architects. It 
is of two stories, the lower story being devoted to rooms for 
the boatmen and workmen and a tool-shed. The upper 
story is occupied as a woman's lavatory and entrance to the 
women's gymnasium. Toilet accommodations and boxes for 
depositing clothing are provided, and turnstiles, with a reg- 
ister attached, control the passage to the gymnasium. 

Women's Gymnasium and Girls' Playground. — During 
the spring the gymnastic apparatus furnished by D. A. Sar- 
gent, M.D., was put in place, the frames for supporting the 
same having been erected the previous season. This appar- 
atus consists of the following pieces : 

2 balance swino;s and frames. 
2 seesaws, with side-rails. 



82 City Docuiment No. 11. 

2 seesaws, plain. 

2 single swings. 

2 pole ladders. 

2 perpendicular ladders. 

4 perpendicular ladders, combined. 

5 serpentine ladders. 

1 horizontal rope-ladder. 

2 perpendicular climbing-poles. 
4 long inclined poles. 

4 short inclined poles. 
4 hanging-ropes. 
12 swinging-ropes. 
1 long inclined rope, with attachments. 
1 set of high parallel bars. 

1 set of movable parallel bars. 

2 sets of horizontal bars, adjustable. 

2 sets of flying-rings, with pulley attachments. 
2 single trapezes, with pulley attachments. 

11 travelling- rings, with attachments. 
2 o;iant strides. 

12 pairs chest weights. 
1 set of vaulting-bars. 

1 set of movable standards for high jumping 
98 pairs wooden dumb-bells. 
98 pairs wooden Indian clubs. 
98 short wands. 
25 long wands. 
24 iron quoits. 
12 iron hoops. 
12 jumping-ropes. 

A temporary fence was built around the gymnasium to 
serve as a screen until the trees and shrubs have become 
grown. Closets for the dumb-bells, wands, etc., also, six- 
teen dressing-booths were built within the enclosure. Three 
sand-courts were constructed in the rear of the building. 
The Girls' Playground consists of a smooth lawn around 
which runs a cinder track an eighth of a mile in length. A 
wooden shelter with seats overlooking the playground has 
been built under the direction of Messrs. Walker & Kimball. 

The gymnasium and playground were opened on June 1 
and closed on October 31. They have been in the charge of 
the Massachusetts Emergency and Hygiene Association, 
which has provided for their superintendence and the in- 
struction of those using the apparatus. The attendance 
during the season in both the ground and gymnasium was 
144,539, of which number 13,010 were admitted to the play- 



Engineering Depaetiment. 83 

ground on Sundays, the gymnasium being closed on that 
day. The average attendance on week days was 1,095. 

Brick Walk. — On September 29, a contract was made 
with Adehird Phaneuf for paving with brick the walk along 
Charles street. The work was completed on November 17, 
and there were laid 3,190 square yards of walk, at a cost of 
$4,822.10. 

Miscellaneous. — Fifty additional settees have been pur- 
chased, and temporary awnings have been erected over a 
portion of them. 

Charlesto^vn Parks. 

On August 11a small force was set at work on Charles- 
town Heights grading the grounds, which work is still in 
progress. 

At the playground, on Alford street, the Street Depart- 
ment is dumping ashes for filling, and considerable material 
has been received from other parties without expense to the 
city ; the buildings have been removed from the Guild prop- 
erty with one exception, and the vats of the old tannery 
filled with earth. 

Miscellaneous . 

Various land-surveys and plans have been made during 
the year, including those of the land taken for the Dorches- 
ter Park on Dorchester avenue and Adams street, for the 
proposed extension of the South Boston Parkway, and for a 
proposed muster-ground. Estimates have been made of the 
cost of various improvements under consideration by the 
department. 



84 City Document No. 11. 



E. 



[FEOM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE STREET 
DEPARTMENT.] 

Mr. H. H. Carter, Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir : I herewith submit the following report of the work 
done under ray direction for your department. 

Plans and profiles of streets to be paved were made, quan- 
tities estimated, and specifications prepared. 

The work done is shown in the accompanying tables ; the 
city furnished all material except paving-gravel, and gener- 
ally the materials were delivered to the contractor from 
wharves or from city yards. In some cases the paving- 
blocks were delivered by the city on or in the vicinity of the 
work. Such of the old materials as the city could use were 
delivered by the contractor. 

It will thus be seen that the prices contained in the tables 
have no comparative value, since the conditions differed on 
each street, some being paved, others macadamized or grav- 
elled ; also the length of haul for new supplies and for dis- 
posing of old material, and the relative quantity of each, was 
far from uniform. 

Under seventeen contracts, 4.35 miles of street were 
paved at a cost, exclusive of material furnished by the city, 
of $169,161.02. 

The following is a brief summary of the items : 

52,744 sq. yds. block paving on gravel furnished were 
laid at an average cost of $1,155 per sq. yd. 

9,294 sq. yds. block paving on a cement concrete base, 
with pitched joints, were laid at an average cost of $2,727 
per sq. yd. 

15,189 sq. yds. of asphalt paving were laid ; average cost, 
with cement concrete base, $3,635 per sq. yd. ; when the 
old base was used, the cost was $2,025 per sq. yd. 

31,509 linear feet of edgestones were set at an average 
cost of $0,329 per linear ft. 

21,372 sq. yds. sidewalk were relaid at an average cost 
of $0,836 per sq. yd. 

3,079 sq. yds. of flagging cross-walks were laid at an av- 
erage cost of $1,184 per sq. yd. 

The specifications of one contract provided that the city 



Engineering Department. 85 

should furnish the gravel and remove the old materials. The 
quantities of work done under that contract have been in- 
cluded in the totals of work done in the above statements, 
but they have not been used in determining the average 
costs. Counts of paving-blocks used in small areas actually 
laid are found to be variable. The average of the largest 
areas where exact number of blocks used is obtainable is 
about 25 large and about 38 small blocks to the square 
yard. The cost of blocks, including culling and wharfage, is 
about five cents per small block, and seven and one-half 
cents per large block, making the cost for blocks per yard 
$1.90 in each case. The small blocks came from Quincy, 
Mass., and were used for suburban streets; they were de- 
livered on the work. The large blocks came mostly from 
Cape Ann, and were delivered on wharves. 

The average cost of block paving on a gravel foundation 
was $1.15 + $1.90 = $3.05 per sq. yd. 

The work was done under somewhat severe specifications, 
requiring the removal of 13 inches of old material, the grad- 
ing and rolling the road-bed, and the furnishing of 6 inches 
of new gravel. The cost of supervision and inspection is 
not included in the above. Details of the work done are as 
follows : 

A Street, South Boston, from Broadway to First 
street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel founda- 
tion, by Collins &, Ham. The old surface was of cobble 
paving. The old cobbles were hauled to the crusher at 
Broadway bridge, the surplus earth to L-street extension ; 
the new paving-blocks were hauled from the New York 
& New England R.R. wharf, and the edgestoues and flagging 
from the Albany-street paving yard. 

First Street, from New York & New England E.R. to 
F street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was gen- 
erally of gravel, with concrete patches, and one block from 
E street to F street was paved with cobbles. The 
old cobbles were hauled to the crusher at Broadway bridge, 
the surplus earth to the L-street dump. The new granite 
blocks were hauled from the New York & New England 
E,.R. wharf and from the Bay State wharf, the edgestones 
and the flagging from the South End yard ; the edgestones 
were delivered to the contractor on the street. 

Troy sii^eet, from Harrison avenue to Albany street, was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by James 
Grant & Co. The old surface was of macadam, and was 
very hard. The cobble-stones in the gutter were hauled to 
the Broadway-bridge crusher, the earth and macadam to 



86 City Docuaient No. 11. 

East Chester park, between Swett street and New York & 
New England R.R. ; the new granite blocks, and all other 
new materials furnished by the city, were delivered from the 
Albany-street yard. 

Longivood avenue, from Huntington avenue to Parker 
street, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, 
by James Doherty & Co. The old surface was of macadam ; 
the surplus earth was hauled to Parker street, near Hunting- 
ton avenue ; the cobble-stones from the gutters to the 
Tremont-street crusher; the Quincy paving-blocks were 
delivered on the street, and all other materials furnished by 
the city were hauled from the Albany-street yard. 

Austin street, Oharlestown, from Main street to Ruther- 
ford avenue, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by John Turner & Co. The old surfiice was of 
macadam. The surplus material was the property of the 
contractor, and the cobble gutter-stones were purchased by 
him from the city ; the granite paving-blocks and the cross- 
walks were delivered to the contractor on the street, and the 
other materials came from the Charlestown paving yard, on 
Medford street. 

A short section of the street in front of a church 
was paved with asphalt by the Barber Asphalt Paving 
Com])any. 

Fulton street, from Richmond street to Lewis street, was 
paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by B. F. 
Nay & Co. Tlie old surface was paved with cobl)le-stones, 
which were hauled to the crusher at Broadway bridge ; the 
surplus earth was disposed of by the contractor ; the granite 
paving-blocks and all paving materials were delivered from 
the North End paving yard, on Commercial street 

Cohmibus avenue, from the railroad bridge to West 
Chester park, was nearly all resurfaced by the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The concrete base where de- 
fective was patched, and if not found at proper grade was 
brought to grade, the new concrete furnished being paid for 
by the cubic yard. A portion of the street was patched by 
the company at its own expense, under a five-year guarantee 
given in 1887 ; a small portion of the old surface was 
patched. A })lan has been prepared and filed with the con- 
tract showing the areas under guarantee, and the time of 
expiration of the same. The old material was wasted and 
used for filling on Parker street. The new work is to be 
kept in order by the company for five years under the 
contract. 

Bedofrd street, from Chauncy to Columbia street, and 
Kingston street, from Summer to Bedford street, were 



Engineering Department. 87 

paved with granite blocks, with pitched joints on a Rosen- 
dale cement base, by H. Gore & Co. 

The surface was paved, and a portion of the old blocks 
were used in the new work ; the culls were hauled to Scotia 
street on the Back Bay ; the surplus earth was hauled to 
Parker street ; the new granite blocks were hauled from Wales 
wharf; and the other new material from the Albany-street 
yard. 

Dudley street, from Washington street to Blue Hill 
avenue, was repaved by James Grant & Co. The old sur- 
face was partly of macadam and partly paved with granite 
block paving. The old blocks of suitable quality were used 
in repaviug, and the culls were delivered to the Bird-street 
yard ; the surplus filling was delivered on Marshfield and 
Shirley streets ; the new Quincy granite blocks and the side- 
walk bricks were delivered to the contractor on the street, 
and the other new material was hauled from the Albany- 
street yard. 

Terrace street, from Tremont to New Heath street, was 
paved by A. A. Libby & Co. The old surface was of 
macadam, and the old material was used for surfacing 
several streets within a radius of one mile from Terrace 
street. The new Quincy blocks, the edgestones, and the 
sidewalk bricks were delivered on the street. The new 
flagging was hauled from the Albany-street yard. The 
joints of the paving opposite the school-house, next Tremont 
street, were pitched at an extra expense of seventy-three 
cents per square yard. 

Second street, from B street to Granite street, and 
Third street, from A street to Second street. South 
Boston, were paved with granite blocks on a gravel founda- 
tion, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was cobble-stone 
paving, the old stones were hauled to the crusher at Broad- 
way bridge, and the surplus excavation was hauled to the 
L-street extension. The new granite blocks were hauled 
from the New York & New England wharf, the sidewalk 
bricks were delivered on the street, and the flagging was 
hauled from the Albany-street yard. 

Tremont street, from Scollay square to Boylston street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a Rosendale cement con- 
crete base, by H. Gore & Co. The work was let in two 
sections, with Temple place as the point of division. The 
old granite blocks were delivered by the contractor on 
sundry streets, within one and a half miles' haul, and the 
surplus earth was the property of the contractor. The new 
granite blocks were hauled from Burnham's wharf, the 
paving-bricks were delivered on the street, and the flagging 



88 City Document No. 11. 

in part was delivered from the Albany-street yard, and in 
part delivered on the street. The joints of the new paving 
were filled with hot screened pebbles and hot pavino;-pitch. 

Second street, from Dorchester to E street, South Boston, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel foundation, by J. 
Doherty & Co. The old surface was of cobble paving. The 
old cobbles were delivered on Ninth street, opposite H street ; 
the surplus excavation was delivered on the L-street exten- 
sion. The new granite blocks were hauled from the Bay 
State wharf, the paving-bricks were delivered on the street, 
and the flagging hauled from the Albany-street yard. 

Dorchester street, from Dorchester avenue to Ninth street. 
South Boston, was paved with granite blocks on a gravel 
foundation, by Collins & Ham. The old surface was partly 
paved with granite blocks and partly macadamized. The 
old granite blocks in good condition were used in the new 
work, and the culls and surplus earth were delivered by the 
contractor on sundry streets within half a mile, mostly on 
Washburn street ; the old cobble gutter-stones were hauled to 
tlie crusher at Broadway bridge ; the new paving-blocks were 
hauled from the Thompson & Baker coal wharf on Ninth street ; 
the paving-bricks were delivered on the street, and the flag- 
ging was hauled frorn the Albany-street yard. The paving 
in front of the school-house was laid with pitched joints. 

Beacon street, from Arlington street to Charles street, was 
paved from the street-railroad track to the northerly edge- 
stone with as{)halt on a Portland cement concrete base, by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The gutters and 
toothing strip next the railroad track were paved with granite 
blocks, partly delivered from Burnham's wharf and partly 
delivered on the street ; the surplus excavation was hauled to 
Scotia street. The remainder of the street l)etween the 
same points was repaved with the old granite blocks, by J. 
Doherty & Co. This portion was the narrow strip under 
the trees, adjoining the Public Garden. The joints in the 
paving were tilled with hot pebbles and pitch. 

The accompanying table, showing the length of ac- 
cepted streets in Boston, the area of roadway in each, and 
the area of each kind of paving or roadway construction, 
have been prepared for the use of the Street Department. 
This table is an entirely new computation from the best 
obtainable original sources. The measurements have been 
principally made from careful surveys of the Surveying 
Department, and when information could not be obtained 
from original surveys, the streets have been measured. 
They have also been examined to determine the charac- 
ter of the paving, and as it is impossible to determine 



City of Boston, Engineering Department. — Table showing Details of Contract Street Paving, Season of 1891. 





QraDite blocka on concrete. 
Item A. 


Graoite blocks on gravel. 
Item B. 


Trinidad asphalt on concrete. 
Item C. 


For setting edgestones. 
Item E. 


For laying biick sidewalk. 
Item F. 


For laying crosswalk. 
Item G. 


Extra work. 
Item H. 






Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final ealimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Bid. 


Final estimate. 


Final estimate 


estimate. 








$1 05 


2,542 sq. yds. 

$2,669 10 

9,400 sq. yds. 

$11,092 00 

1,952 sq^ yds. 

$2,967 04 
6,313 sq. yds. 

.$6,481 86 
1,318 sq. yds. 

$1,713 40 
1 829 sq. yds- 

$1,883 87 






$0 55 


1,362 lin. ft. 

$749 10 

4,434 lin. ft. 

$2,438 70 

1,009 lin. ft. 

$353 15 
2,796 lin. ft. 

$419 40 
1,115 lin. ft. 

$390 25 
955 lin. ft. 

$200 55 


.$0.91 


1,124 sq. yds. 

$1,022 84 

1,897 sq. yds. 

$1,726 27 

627.5 sq. yds. 

$828 30 

1,774 sq. yds. 

$1,170 84 

700 sq. yds. 

$700 00 

621 sq. yds. 

$391 23 


$1 15 


175 sq. yds. 

$201 25 

337 sq. yds. 

•$387 55 

72.5 sq. yds. 

$143 55 

206 sq. yds. 

$55 62 

76 sq. yds. 

$114 00 

14.5 sq. yds. 

$7 98 


' $27'66 
















$4,669 89 








1 18 






55 


0.91 
""1.32" 
"0.66' 


1 15 
198 












491 72 


16,136 24 








1 52 






35 












87 40 


4,379 44 








1 22 






15 


27 


Lon^wood ^ 






29 90 


8,157 62 








1 30 






35 


1 00 
6 63 


1 50 












34 25 


2,951 90 









1 03 






21 


66 












346 15 


2,829 78 










$3 75 


1,088J sq. yds. 
$4,081 25 
































4,081 25 




$2 66 


2,186|sq. yds. 
§5,816 53 








30 


629 lin. ft. 

$188 70 

5,600 lin. ft. 

$1,668 00 

3,778 lin. ft. 

$1,227 85 


91 
079' 


462i sq. yds. 

$420 88 

4,124 sq. yds. 

$3,257 96 

1,720 sq. yds. 

$1,290 00 


2 34 


134tV sq. yds. 

".$314 73 

542 sq. yds. 

$769 64 

113 sq. yds. 

$146 90 

237.5 sq. yds. 

$249 38 

122 sq. yds. 

$164 70 

276 sq. yds. 

$717 24 

394 sq. yds. 














231 21 


6,972 05 






95 


9,106 sq. yds. 

.$8,650 70 
5,995 sq. yds. 

.$6,294 75 






28 


1 42 












185 97 


14,432 27 


T a -p strppt 






1.05 






32i 


75 


1 30 












584 48 


9,543 98 


Beacon street 


2 00 


115.5 sq. yds. 
$231 00 




3 60 


3,633 sq. yds. 
$13,078 80 






1 05 
















13,559 18 






1 17 


3,899 sq. yds. 

$4,661 83 

574 sq. yds. 

$683 06 

1,042 sq. yds. 

$1,239 98 
5,022 sq. yds. 

.$6,277 .50 
4,752 sq. yds. 

$6,415 20 




33 


1,906 lin. ft. 

$328 98 
791 lin. ft. 

$308 49 
1,326 lin. ft. 

$517 14 
2,651 lin. ft. 

$609 73 
3,157 lin. ft. 

$757 68 


91 


1,518 sq. yds. 

$1,381 38 

937 sq. yds. 

$843 30 

1,100 sq. yds. 

$990 00 

2,128 sq. yds. 

$1,659 84 

2,639 sq. yds. 

$2,190 37 


1 35 














245 20 


6,982 09 


Tremont street — Boylston street to Temple place. 


2 76 


3,592 sq. yds. 

$9,913 92 
3,400 sq. yds. 

$9,3«4 00 


1 19 
...„. 

125 ' 






39 


90 


2 74 
""'2 74" 

"'i'oo' 






393 29 


12,859 30 


Tremont street — Temple place to Scollay square. 


2 76 






39 


90 








$1,079 56 
172 sq. yds. 

$172 00 
207 sq. yds. 

$279 45 


691 82 


13,802 50 










23 


78 














291 35 


9,010 42 








1 35 






24 


83 


1 35 










294 63 


9,937 33 
























$2,545 


9,294.2 sq. yds. 


.$1,188 


52,744 sq. yds. 


$3,675 


4,721 sq. yds. 


$0,332 


31,509 lin. ft. 


$0,871 


21,372 sq. yds. 


$1,173 


3,079 sq. yds. 














^2.727 


$25,345 45 


$1,155 


$60,930 29 


.$3,635 


$17,160 05 


$0,329 


$10,357 72 


$0,836 


817,873 21 


$1,184 


$4,803 55 


$3,834 97 


$140,.<;05 24 




28,855 78 
$169,161 02 



Note. — The average for croBswalkB do not include those in Bedford and Kingston streets and Tremont street. 
Thirty-nine dollars was deducted from Item " G " on Tremont street (Boyiston to Temple place), as per final estimate. 
Alflo the following quantities were not included in the above table, on account of their not coming under the regular items ; but they i 
eluded in total cost of all work, as per table. 



Beacon street, J. Doherty : 



5963 sq. yds. granite blockB on gravel, at $1.37 
loai " " " " " " " fto.fi.^ 



30 loads old asphalt bought from city 



4.038 71 
$27,591 71 



27,531 71 
$28,855 78 



Engineeeing Department. 



89 



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90 City Document No. 11. 

at this season of the year whether a street is macad- 
amized or simply gravelled, the table has been checked by 
the district foreman and by the Deputy Superintendent of 
Streets. In giving lengths and areas, care has been taken to 
include intersections of streets but once, and the detail table 
shows the streets from which the intersections have been 
deducted. The general rule has been to include intersec- 
tions as part of the principal street. 

The engineering force has done considerable work of a 
miscellaneous character, and numerous estimates for new 
work have also been made. 

Bennington-Street Culvert. 

Plans and estimates were made for a wooden culvert 
across Bennington street, between Saratoga street and Wads- 
worth street. 

Berkeley-Street Bridge, over the B. & A. B,.R. 

A contract was made with John Cavanagh & Co., dated 
October 9, 1891, for taking down the parapets and bridge 
seats of Berkeley-street bridge and rebuilding the same 
with granite masonry laid solid in cement mortar, of the 
dimensions required to receive the new bridge. This work 
is now complete, with the exception of one parapet stone 
which cannot be placed until the truss used for a temporary 
support of the telephone wires is removed. 

The contract price for the work is $2,290. 

An agreement was made with the Boston Bridge Works, 
October 7, 1891, for removing the old bridge, for the sum of 
$350. The work called for under this agreement has been 
completed, with the exception of the sidewalk truss carrying 
the telephone wires, which was moved sufficiently to allow 
the new bridge to be placed. As soon as the wires are in 
place on the bridge, this truss will be removed. 

The new superstructure is a through plate girder bridge, 
consisting of six lines of plate girders, dividing the street into 
two roadways ; two sidewalks and a centre walk is also used 
for two lines of water-pipes. The bridge is seventy-one feet 
long and seventy-eight feet six inches wide between centres 
of sidewalk girders. The four roadway girders have curved 
upper flanges five feet six inches deep at centres, and four 
feet six inches deep at ends. The two sidewalk girders are 
four feet six inches deep, with straight upper flanges, and are 
to have hand-rails on top. The floor-beams for the roadway 
are built beams, and for the walks are 9-inch steel I beams. 



Engineering Department. 91 

The roadway and sidewalk stringers are of hard-pine, the 
roadway flooring-plank is of spruce, the under course being 
four inches thick and the upper course two inches thick. The 
sidewalk is planked with 2-inch hard-pine. 

The contractor for the ironwork was the Boston Bridg-e 
Works, and the contract price was $4,898. 

The wooden flooring and the painting of the bridge have 
been done by the Bridge Division. 

Chelsea Bridge, North, Steam-power. 

Machinery for moving both the north and south draws of 
Chelsea bridge by .steam-power has been erected and is now 
ready for use. On the pier of the south draw, there is an en- 
gine-house 15X20 feet, in which is placed a double 6X12 
inch engine and boiler. An endless chain passes around 
the turntable drum of the draw, and the power is transmitted 
from the engine by bevel gearing, a horizontal shaft, and 
sprocket wheel. 

At the north draw an addition 26 X 32 feet has been 
made to the draw-pier on which the engine-house is placed. 
This draw is to be moved by means of wire roi)es attached to 
the draw and to a 36-inch drum in the engine-house. A re- 
versing-engine with two 6 X 12 inch cylinders will fur- 
nish the power. 

At each draw a winch-head has been placed for working 
vessels through the draw by steam-power. 

The machinery has been furnished and set up b}^ Miller 
& Shaw, and the engine-houses and other woodwork was 
done by the Bridge Division. 

Cpielsea Bridge, North, Fender-guard. 

Plans and specifications for building a fender-guard 173 
feet lono; at the north draw of Chelsea bridsfe have been 
made. 



Cornwall-Street Bridge, over Stony-Brook Channel. 

A plan and bill of material for a new bridge on Cornwall 
street were furnished, and the structure has been built by 
the Bridge Division. 

The bridge has a single span, 32 feet long over all, 
and a total width of 40 feet, divided into a roadway of 
26 feet and two sidewalks of 7 feet each. The span con- 
sists of 12 lines of trussed beams, each made of two 6 X 12 
inch hard-pine sticks, trussed by a l|^-inch diameter rod. 



92 City Document No. 11. 

The roadway planking is of spruce, tlie under course being 
4 inches thick and the upper, or sheathing course, being 2 
inches thick. Tlie sidewalk is planked with 3-inch planed 
hard-pine. 

The end supports of the bridge are timber bulkheads, 
each having nine 10 inch X 10 inch hard-pine posts, with a 6 
inch X 10 inch hard-pine sill, sunk about 9 feet into the 
ground, and capped with a 12 inch x 12 inch hard-pine stick. 

Hill- Street Eetaining-wall. 

A contract was made with Donovan & Brock, Boston, 
dated October 6, 1891, for building a retaining-wall at the 
easterly end of Hill street, on the line of Sackvilie street. 

The wall is of granite, laid solid in cement mortar, and 
rests on a concrete foundation. The wall is capped with a 
granite coping, and has on top a close board fence 5 feet 
high. 

Total amount paid contractor, $1,485. 

Irvington-Street and Yarmouth-Street Retaining- 

WALLS. 

These walls are located one on each side of the Prov- 
idence Division of the Old Colony Railroad, at the ends of 
Irvington and Yarmouth streets, the streets being in line 
with each other. 

A contract was made with R. D. Shanahan, dated June 
15, 1891, for building a retaining-wall at the end of 
Irvington street, and for adding buttresses to the retaining- 
wall at the end of Yarmouth street. 

The wall is of granite laid solid in cement mortar, and 
rests upon a pile foundation with concrete cap. Granite 
buttresses were built at the back of the wall to afford a suf- 
ficient foundation for the piers of an iron foot-bridge. At 
the back of the wall on Yarmouth street, similar buttresses 
were built of concrete, with granite coping-stones. 

The total cost of the work, including the repointing of 
the wall on Yarmouth street, was $3,537. 

Irvington-Street Foot-bridge, over Providence 
Division, Old Colony Railroad. 

An iron foot-bridge has been built over the tracks of the 
Providence Division of the Old Colony Railroad, on the line 
of Irvington and Yarmouth streets. The bridge is a through 
bridge of the riveted bowstring type, resting upon wrought- 
iron piers. The tops of the piers are on a level with the 
floor of the bridge, and are reached by stairways from the 






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Engine EEiNG Department. 93 

sidewalks of each street. The stairways are of wrought 
iron with hard-pine treads. The bridge was built by the 
R. F. Hawkins Iron Works, of Springfield, Mass., under 
contract dated Sept. 16, 1891, at a total cost of $1,773. 

L-Street Abutment. 

The contract for building the south abutment of L-street 
bridge was let to Perkins & White, of Boston, under date 
of Oct. 28, 1891, for $5,925, and calls for the completion of 
the work on or before June 15, 1892. At this date the piles 
have been driven and capped for the foundation, and the 
larger portion of the ballast and rip-rap placed. 

L-Street Bulkhead, South Boston. 

Plans and specifications were made in 1890 for extending 
L-street bulkhead northerly from the bulkhead built in 
1889 ; the length of bulkhead to be built being 727 feet, en- 
closing 328^ feet of street extension. 

The contract for building the bulkhead was awarded to F. 
G. Whitcomb for $7,200 ; the work was begun April 23 and 
completed July 27, 1891, at a total cost of $7,210. 

Eoxbury-Canal Sea-wall. 

Plans and specifications were made for building a sea-wall 
on Roxbury canal and adjacent dock at the Paving wharf of 
the Street Department. 

No work has yet been done on the wall. 



Stony-Brook Improvement. 

Roslinddle Branches. 

This improvement contemplates a channel sufficiently large 
to carry the rainfall from a tributary water-shed of about 
1,000 acres, and will, when this improvement is completed, 
prevent the flooding in this vicinity during heavy rains ; but 
until the channel has been farther extended up-stream about 
300 feet, there will still be danger of occasional floods. 

The work done during the past season embraced both the 
main branch of Stony brook at Roslindale and also a small 
brook flowing into it. The larger channel extends from a 
point on the old brook channel about 160 feet below Poplar 
street, through private land, and in Poplar and Washington 
streets, a distance of 665 feet. It is partly open and partly 
covered. The open portion below Poplar street is 12 feet 



94 City Document No. 11. 

Avide, with side-walls of rubble masonry nowhere less than 
6.8 feet high. It is laid on a grade of 1 foot in 100 ; 
the covered channel varies in size from 11 feet 6 inches wide 
X 6 feet 6 inches high to 9 feet wide X 8 feet 6 inches high. 
Both side-walls and the arch are of rubble masonry ; the 
inclinations are 1 foot in 100 feet and 1 foot in 56 feet ; 22 
feet of open channel, 9 feet wide, was built at the up-stream 
end ; the bottom is paved throughout with stone or brick, and 
a concrete foundation extends under both walls and under 
the paved bottom. The smaller brook channel extends from 
Birch street through private lands, across Cohasset street, 
and again through private lands to its junction with the 
larger channel on the north-west side of Washino;ton street ; 
a total distance of 507 feet. This channel is a stone culvert 
4 feet 6 inches high and 5 feet wide ; it is laid on an inclina- 
tion of 1 foot in 125 feet; the side-walls are of rubble with 
granite covering-stones ; the paving is of stone ; a concrete 
foundation extends under the side-walls and under the 
paved bottom. 

Bids for the construction of the work were received July 
20, and the contract was awarded to H. P. Nawn, the 
lowest bidder. 

In connection with the brook channels, and during their 
construction, 340 feet of pipe sewer was built, with the 
necessary branches, manholes, etc. This sewer was neces- 
sary in order to afford drainage to houses on the westerly 
side of Washington street, which were cut oif from the 
common sewer in that street by the low grade of the new 
channel ; this work was done to much better advantage 
during the construction of the brook channel than would 
have been possible after the completion of the w^ork. The 
sewer is of 10-inch Akron pipe, surrounded by concrete ; 
it is located for a distance of 185 feet immediately outside of 
the walls of the brook channel, and for the remaining 155 
feet, until it enters the common sewer on Washington street, 
is laid under the new channel, immediately beneath the 
concrete foundation. 



WIDTHS OF DRAW-OPENINGS. 

The table showing the widths of draw-openings in the 
bridges over tide-water in this city is given in Appendix A. 
The openings have all been remeasured for this report. 

William Jackson, 

Cit^ Engineer. 



CITY e:n^gi]^eees. 

1850-1892. 



E. S. CHESBEOUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 18, 1850, to Oct., 1855.' 

JAMES SLADE, 

Oct. 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863.' 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to Nov. 25, 1872. 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M, Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880.^ 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885." 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to present time. 



1 Died August 18, 1886. == Resigned March 20, 1880. 

3 Died August -25, 1882. * Died April 3, 1885. 



96 



City Document No. 11. 



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98 City Document No. 11. 



APPENDIX B. 

City of Boston, Revised Ordinances, 1892. 
CHAPTER 12. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Section 1. The engineering department shall be nnder the 
charge of the city engineer, who shall be consulted on all matters 
relating to public improvements of every kind where the advice 
of a civil engineer would be of service ; shall, unless otherwise 
specially provided, take charge of the construction of all public 
works of the city which properly come under the direction of a 
civil engineer ; shall, except as to sewers, perform all engineering 
services, and make all examinations and prepare all statements, 
plans, specifications, and contracts which any department may 
need in the discharge of its duties ; shall, upon being notified 
b}' the superintendent of streets, supervise all repairs on the 
bridges of the city used as highways which affect the safety of 
the structures, and shall, when required by the mayor or by any 
officer or board in charge of a department, measure the work 
done by contract for the city, and certify to the result of such 
measurement. 

Sect. 2. Said engineer shall in his annual report include a re- 
port of the safety and completeness of all ponds, basins, and res- 
ervoirs under the charge of the water-supply department, and of 
all bridges within the city limits used as highways. 



Engineering Departivient. 



99 



APPEISTDIX C. 

Engineering Department, Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as 

follows : 

2 Temple transits. 

5 BufF & Berger transits. 
5 Gurley transits. 

I Staekpole transit. 

3 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 

5 Gurley levels. 

II Boston rods. 

4 New York rods. 

3 Troy rods. 

Cases for plans and books. 



Reference Library, 830 vols. 
7,945 Plans Engineering Works, 

loose. 
14 vols. Plans Engineering 

Works, bound. 
Photographs of Engineering 

Works. 
Apparatus for blue-printing. 
1 microscope. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holosteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pr. field-glasses. 

2 typewriters. 

2 dynamometers. 

1 pentagraph. 

1 calculatinsf-machine. 



IMPROVED SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION. 

Schedule of Property in Charge of Engineering Department, 
February, 1892. 



2 adzes. 

2 augers. 
14 axes. 
11 bars. 

3 blocks. 

1 blue-print frame. 

2 bookcases. 

1 Bromley's Atlas, vol. 5. 
5 brooms. 
9 buildings. 
1 buggy. 

3 brass scales. 

4 calkiug-irons. 
8 chains. 

14 chairs. 

1 chuck hydrant. 

29 covers, manhole. 

1 compass beam. 

2 cases drawers. 
1 dei'rick, tripod. 



5 desks. 
10 drills. 

1 diaphragm (Edson pump). 

2 drawing instruments (sets). 

3 drawing-tables. 
1 engine, Erie. 
10 files. 

29 frames, manhole. 
1 grindstone. 

30 gasolene lamps. 
1 harness. 

17 hammers. 

48 handles. 

3 hatchets. 

3 hoes. 

350 ft. hose, hand. 

48 ft. hose, suction. 

50 ft. hose, steam. 

1 horse. 

1,762 ft. iron pipe, l|-in. 



100 



City Document No. 11. 



17 lanterns. 
1 level, hand. 

4 levels, engineers. 

5 levelling-rods. 
12 mauls. 

3 measuring-rods. 
16 mounting-boards. 
24 moulds, cement. 

3 oil suits. 

6 oil cans. 
15 pails. 

1 plummet lamp. 
38 picks. 

1 planimeter. 
9 plumb-bobs. 

2 presses, letter. 
1 pump, hand. 

1 pump, steam, 
paper, drawing. 

4 poles, levelling. 
21 pipe, suction. 

7 rammers. 



29 rubber boots. 

2 rubber coats. 

3 rubber hats. 

6 ropes, chain. 

7 rods, sighting. 

2 sand-heaters. 
1 sand screen. 

5 saws. 

4 scrapers. 
49 shovels. 

6 tapes, steel. 

7 tapes, cloth. 
7 stoves. 

130 steps, manhole. 
] sleigh. 

3 tables. 

3 tool-boxes. 

4 transits. 

1 testing-machine, cement. 
6 wheelbarrows. 
12 wrenches. 



Engineering Department. 101 



APPEOT)IX D. 

Elevations referred to Boston City Base. (The city base is 0.64 ft. below- 
mean low tide.) 
Feet. 

0.00 City base. 
15.66 Highest tide, April, 1851. 
15.33 Coping of dry dock, Cbarlestown Navy Yard. 
12.94 Greatest elevation of high tide per U. S. Tide Table, Nov. 

5, 1892 (12.30+0.64)=12.94. 
10.44 Mean high water. 
8.64 Least elevation of high tide per U. S. Tide Table, 1892 

(8.0+0. 64)=8. 64. 
2.84 Greatest elevation of low tide per U. S. Tide Table, Sept. 

1, 1892 (2.2+0.64):=2.84. 
0.64 Mean low Tide. 
— 1.96 Lowest elevation of low tide per U. S. Tide Table, April 
28, 1892 (—2.6+0.64)= —1.96. 
5.00 Piles cut off for building. 

9.91 Water- Works base (approx. tide marsh level). 
9.82 South Boston base. 
' — 4.98 Cambridge City base. 
0.38 South Boston Flats base. 

^ Cambridge city base is 4.98 ft. below Boston city base. 



102 



City Docibient No. 11. 





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CONTENTS ENGINEEEING DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 

1868-1891,^ D. R.- 



Stibject. 



Year. 



Doc. 



^dams-street bridge (over O. C. R.R.) - 



Adams-street survey . . . 
Additional water-supply 



Agassiz-road bridge (in B. B. Fens) 



Albany-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . . 



Albany-street bridge (over Roxbury canal) 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1868 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1888 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1868 

1870 

1871 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1870 

1871 

1873 

1874 



54 
41 
38 
22 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
38 
39 

D.R. 

39 

117 

38 

39 

D.R. 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
14 
15 
23 
20 



23 
20 
16 
29 
15 
12 

8 
37 
35 
32 
27 
27 
60 
37 
37 
33 

5 

6, 64 

7, 64 

9 
21 
37 
69 
46 
35 
38 
32 
24 
26 
22 
17 
16 
19 
19 
19 
22 
18 
14 
14 
15 
17 
19 
22 
29 
54 
38 
21 



1 The dates given are for the year in which the document was published. 

2 Department Report. 



104 



City Docujvient No. 11. 



Subject. 



Albany-street bridge (over Roxbury canal) . 



Albany-street pipe-yard sea-wall. 

Albany-street wall 

Alford-street sea-wall 



Al 



gse. 



Appropriations and expenditures, M. D. 

il (I u 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs . . 



Army and navy monument 
Arnold Arboretum, P 



Artesian borings, M. D 

Ashland-street bridge (over Providence Div. O. C. 



Year. 



R.R.) 



Ashmont-street bridge (over O. C. R.R.) 

Asphalt walk on common 

Athens-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.E.) 



1875 
1876 

1877 
1878 
1879 
1888 
1868 
1881 
1882 
1880 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1875 
1884 
1885 
1887 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1878 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
lf-'88 



Doc. 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1884 
1891 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



1888 



19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
39 
22 
25 
52 
33 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
19 
55 
54 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
. 39 

D.R. 
54 

D.R. 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 



Page. 



19 
12 



7 
24 
12 
17 
20 
27 
56 
57 
49 
29 
30 
43 
52 
51 
30 
34 
65 
63 
65 
38 
19 
13 



7 

7 

7 

8 

7, 19 

7 

8 

9 

6 

5 

6 

6 

7 

9 

20 

25 

20 

13 



Engineering Department. 



105 



Subject. 



Athens-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. E.R.) 



Atlantic-avenue filling 

" retaining-wall, near Russia wharf . 

" soundings 

" sea-wall 

" sidewalk 



survey 



lack Bay : 



bridges, 
Fens. . . 



fillins: 



improvement 
park 



Basins, Water-Works : 

Nos. 2, 3, 4 

Basin No. 4 

" 5 

Basin 1 dam 

" 2 " 

" 3 " 

" 2 shallow flowage ... . 

" 3 " " 

" 3 " " 

" 4 " " 

Beachmont avenue 

Beacon-entrance bridge : 

(B. B. Fens, over B. & A. R.R.) 



Beacon-hill high-service, W. W. 
Beacon street 

" " raising grade 

" " " pipe 



Beacon street and Brookline avenue 

Beacon-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



Year. 


Doc. 


1889 


37 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1871 


15 


1875 


19 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1883 


63 


1885 


54 


1870 


14 


1873 


23 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1882 


62 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


188G 


41 


1887 


38 


1879 


22 


1885 


54 


1889 


38 


1884 


55 


1885 


64 


1889 


38 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1880 


33 


1884 


55 


1884 


65 


1887 


38 


1886 


41 


1888 


39 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1871 


15 


1883 


53 


1887 


38 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1885 


64 


1873 


23 


1885 


54 



7 

7 

10 
42 
41 

9 
41 
20 
24 

9 



26 
31 
63 

61 
63 
43 
48 
48 
49 
46 
46 
30 
24 
49 
63 

32 
34 
58 
35 
29 
30 
32 
32 
18 
24 
17 



8, 48 

7, 50 

8 

9 

7 

6 

6 

7 

7 

10 

19 

25 

16 

22 

24 

24 

35 

3, 8 



106 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Beacon-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . , 



Beacon-street bridge (over outlet of B. B. Fens pond; 
see, also, Mill-dam bridge) 



Tear. 



Beacon-street widening 

Beacon-street and Commonwealth-avenue bridges 

Beech-street bridge (over Providence Div., 0. C. R.R.) 



Bellevue-avenue bridge (over Prov. Div., O. C. R.R.) 



Bennington-street extension 

Berkeley-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



Berkeley-street bridge (over Prov. Div., O. C. R.R.) 




1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


89 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


58 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1878 


20 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1887 


38 


1868 


22 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 



Year. 



Engineering Department. 



107 



Subject. 



Berkeley-street bridge (over Prov. Div., O. C. R.R.) 



Berkeley 



street retaininsc-walls. 



Berwick-park retaining-wall 

Blakemore-street bridge (over Prov. Div., 0. C. E.E.) 



B. & A. R.R. bridge (over Park water-way) . . . 

Boilers, Chestnut-Hill Pumping-station 

" Highland " 

" Mystic " 

Bolton-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) 

Boston Common, asphalt walk 

Bothnia-street bulkhead 

Boundary-wall for the Country Park, P 

(I (( (I It 

Boylston-street bridge (B. B. Fens) . . . 

( c a ii 

a (I i( 

(( (< i< 

(( <( t( 

ic (( a 

(( (( (( 

(< (( (( 

C( (C ' (C 

" " " 

" " " 

l( <( <( 

Boylston-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . . . 



1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1871 
1874 
1877 
1876 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1882 
1883 
1888 
IS 78 
1884 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1885 



Doc. 



Page. 



20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
15 
20 
15 
24 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
52 
53 
39 
20 
55 
39 

D.R. 

D.R. 
39 
39 

D.R. 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
54 



22 
21 
14 

8 
9 
8 
7 
8 
10 



9 

10 
7 
7 
6 
7 
8 

10 

49 

37 

26 

35 

22 

10, 20 

9 

8 

9 

10 

7 

7 

6 



10 
45 
49 
17 
31 
34 

8, 22 
11 
25 
25 
63 
66 
41 
44 
49 

8,50 

9, 50 
10 

7 
7 
6 
8 
8 
11 
50 



108 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Boylston-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



" " test of eye-bars 

" " Illustration ... . 

Boylston-street bulkhead 

Boylston-street extension 

Bridge over reserved channel 

Bridges 



" Inspected 

" The life of, over railroads 

Bridges supported by railroad corporations 




1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1876 
1890 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



Bridges supported by railroad corporations : 

Adams-street bridge (over 0. C. R.R.), 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1890 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 

1885 
1886 
1887 



39 

117 

38 

39 

D.R. 
38 
38 
38 
24 
39 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
65 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 

D.R. 
39 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 

54 
41 
38 



16 

16 

7 

8, 19 

8 

11 

20 

19 

21 

33 

25 

15 

27 

53 

3, 36 

17 

15 

9 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3,44 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 

3 

6 

5 

21 

37 

38 

32 

25 

27 

23 

18 

17 

19 

19 

20 

23 

20 

15 

15 

16 

5 

6,21 



23 
20 
16 



Engineering Department. 



109 



Subject. 


Tear. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Bridges supported hy railroad corporations : 








Ashraont-street bridge (over 0. C. R.R.) 


. 1884 


55 


20 


Beech-street " (over Prov. Dir., 0. C. R.R 


. 1878 


20 


27 


" " " 




1883 


53 


19 


(( K (t 




1884 


55 


20 


(i (( (( 




1885 


54 


23 


(( U (C 




1886 


41 


20 


(1 (( It 




1887 


38 


15 


(( li li 




1888 


39 


15 


Bellevue-ave. " " 




1887 


38 


15 


" " " 




1888 


39 


15 


Canterbury-st. " " 




1883 


53 


18 


Centre-street " " 




1881 


25 


17 


l( (( (C 




188-t 


55 


20 


U U 11 




1885 


54 


23 


(1 (( 11 




1886 


41 


20 


11 11 11 1( 11 11 11 


1888 


39 


15 


" and Mt. Vernon-street bridge 








(over Prov. Div. 0. C. R.R. 


) 1881 


25 


17 


(1 11 11 11 11 11 11 


1884 


55 


20 


(I (1 11 11 It 11 (1 


1885 


54 


23 


11 11(1 11 11 11 11 


1886 


41 


20 


11 11 11 It If 11 11 


1889 


38 


18 


Commercial-street bridge (over 0. C. R.R.). 


. 1881 


25 


17 


11 11 11 11 11 


1884 


55 


20 


Cottage Farm " (over B. & A. R.R. 


) 1885 


65 


20 


Dudley-ave. bridge (over Prov. Div. O.C. R.R. 


) 1878 


20 


27 


11 11 It It 11 11 


1886 


41 


20 


It II 11 ti It It 


1887 


38 


15 


It (1 II 11 II 11 


1888 


39 


15 


Fourth-street " (over N.Y. & N.E. R.R.) , 


. 1880 


33 


18 


Harrison-ave. " (over B. & A. R.R.) 


. 1885 


64 


23 


11 11 11 It It 


. 1886 


41 


20 


11 11 II 11 11 


. 1887 


38 


15 


11 11 11 11 11 


. 1888 


39 


15 


Norfolk-street " (over N.Y. & N. E. R.R 


) 1884 


55 


20 


11 It 11 11 It It 


1885 


64 


23 


11 It 11 i( It 11 


1890 


39 


14 


Park-street " (over Prov. Div. O.C. R.R 


) 1888 


39 


15 


Second-street " (over N.Y. & N.E. R.R.) . 


. 1877 


15 


25 


11 11 i< It It 11 


. 1878 


20 


27 


It II 11 11 11 11 


. 1880 


13 


18 


Sharon-street " (over Prov. Div. O.C. R.R 


) 1878 


20 


27 


Silver-street " (over N.Y. & N.E. R.R.) . 


. 1878 


20 


27 


Sixth-street " " " " " . 


. 1877 


15 


25 


Third-street " " n it n _ 


. 1887 


15 


25 


11 It It 11 11 11 


. 1879 


22 


28 


11 11 11 11 11 It 


. 1880 


33 


18 


Tremont-st. " (over B. & A. R.R.) 


. 1885 


54 


23 


It 11 11 11 It 


1886 


41 


20 


11 ti 11 (1 11 


, 1888 


38 


15 


It 11 ti ti It 


. 1889 


39 


18 


It It It II 11 


. 1890 


39 


21 


Washington-st. bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . . 


. 1885 


54 


23 


(1 11 11 11 11 _ _ 


. 1886 


41 


20 


11 11 II It It 


. 1887 


38 


15 


It It 11 II It 


. 1888 


39 


15 


(1 II 11 It 11 


. 1889 


38 


5, 18 


(( 11 11 


It 11 


. 1890 


39 


21 



110 



City Document No. 11. 



Bridges wholly supported by Boston 

Bridges of which Boston supports the part within its 
limits - 

Bridges of which Boston pays a part of the cost of main- 
tenance 

Bridges over the B., H., & E. R.R., special report. . . . 

Bridges, extension West Chester j^ark 

Bridges, total number (102) 

" (102) 

Brighton survey 

Brighton temporary high-service works, W. W 

<C it IC (1 <l 

Brighton pumping-works, W. W 

H 1( 11 

Brimmer-street sewer, M. D 

Broadway bridge (over Fort-point channel) 

i; K 11 u »i 

(I U II 11 <( 

11 1 ( 11 11 II 
11 11 11 It 11 

If If ft 11 11 

11 If II II II 

If If f 1 If II 

< 1 If 1 . II II 

If 1< II II If 

(f f f II 11 II 

II II 11 II II 

If 11 11 11 11 

fl 11 II II II 

11 f 1 If II II 

II 11 If 11 II 

II II II II II 

If II 11 If f f 

Broadway bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 

If If II II If 

11 II (1 II II 

If 11 If 11 u 

II II (I U II 

II II If f 1 II 

ff fl ff ff fl 

If f 1 f f f f If 

11 11 II If ff 

11 II II If f f 

Broadway extension 

Broadway extension (over B. & A. R.R.) , 

ff If f f If II 

II II II II II 

Brookline avenue , 

" " raising pipe , 

Brookline-avenue bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1874 


20 


1874 


20 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1875 


19 


1877 


15 


1880 


83 


1878 


20 


1879 


21 


1884 


55 


1870 


14 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1868 


22 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1884 


55 


1883 


53 


1885 


54 


1873 


23 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 



Page. 



6,9 



7 
62 
37 
6 
9 
12 
33 
24 
31 
27 
42 
27 
38 
22, 50 
21 
14 



5, 17 
10 
9 
9 
9 
10 
7 



11 

10 
9 

10 

10 
8 
7 
7 
8 
9 

11 

14, 30 

15, 26 
42 
19 
21 
20 
25 
34 
35 

3, 10 
11 



Engineering Department. 



Ill 



Subject. 



Brookline-avenue bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . 



Brookline-avenue bridge (over Muddy river) 



Buildings at Cliarlesbank 



Bulkhead at First and Q streets, So. Boston 

" " Bothnia street 

' ' " Boylston street 

" " City Point 

" " Cumberland street 

" " Ferdinand " 

" L " 



" " Lowland " 

Bussey park and Arnold Arboretum, P. 



Byron-street bridge (over B., R. B., & L. R.R.) , 



C^^nibridge- street bridge (Brighton to Cambridge) 



" " proposed 

Cambridge-street crossing (over B. & A. It. R.) 
Camden-street foot-bridge 

Canal bridge (Boston to Cambridge) 



Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


1888 


117 


7 


1889 


38 


9 


1890 


39 


9 


1891 


D.R. 


12 


1874 


20 


23 


1875 


19 


24 


1876 


24 


20 


1877 


15 


9 


1878 


20 


10 


1879 


22 


9 


1880 


33 


8 


1881 


25 


8 


1882 


52 


11 


1883 


53 


10 


1884 


55 


9 


1890 


39 


66 


1891 


D.R. 


G9 


1885 


54 


24 


1890 


39 


25 


1889 


38 


21 


1887 


38 


17 


1888 


39 


17 


1884 


55 


22 


1890 


39 


23 


1891 


D.R. 


25 


1888 


39 


26 


1884 


55 


52 


1885 


54 


61 


1886 


41 


47 


1890 


39 


9, 22 


1891 


D.R. 


12 


1874 


20 


32 


1875 


19 


34 


1876 


24 


30 


1877 


15 


21 


1878 


20 


20 


1879 


22 


19 


1880 


33 


12 


1881 


25 


13 


1882 


52 


16 


1883 


53 


15 


1884 


55 


16 


1885 


54 


19 


1886 


41 


16 


1887 


38 


11 


1888 


39 


12 


1888 


117 


12, 18 


1889 


38 


14, 21 


1890 


39 


16 


1891 


D.R. 


18 


1887 


38 


18 


1882 


52 


25 


18S5 


54 


23 


1886 


41 


20 


1873 


23 


29 


1874 


20 


35, 48 


1875 


19 


38, 50 


1876 


24 


32,41 



112 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Canal bridge (Boston to Cambridge) . 



Canterbury-street bridge (over Providence Division 
0. C. R.R 



Castle-street retaining-wall 
Cedar Grove Cemetery bridge (over Shawmut Branch 
O.C. R.K 



of' 



R.K.) 



Cement Tests, M. D 

Cemetery wall, East Boston 

Central- avenue bridge (to Milton) 



Centre-street bridge (over Providence Division 
0. C. R.R.) 



Centre- street and Mt. Vernon-street bridge (over Prov 
Div. O. C. R.R) 

(( 1( (( (( (1 II 11 (1 

a (1 (( " " << " " 

i( It ii (( t< i( 11 " 

Change-avenue survey . . , . 

Change of location of the Eastern and B. & A. R.R. 

East Boston 

Charlesbank, see Charles-river embankment 

' ' Buildings 

Charles-river bridge (Boston to Charlestown) 



Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


1877 


15 


25,43 


1878 


20 


27 


1879 


22 


23 


1880 


33 


17 


1881 


25 


16 


1882 


52 


19 


1883 


53 


19 


1884 


55 


19 


1885 


64 


22 


1886 


41 


19 


1887 


38 


14 


1888 


39 


15 


1888 


117 


15 


1889 


38 


17 


1890 


:'9 


19 


1891 


D.R 


22 


1883 


53 


19 


1883 


23 


24 


1876 


24 


33 


1878 


20 


39 


1873 


23 


35 


1877 


15 


21 


1878 


20 


21 


1879 


22 


19 


1880 


33 


13 


1881 


25 


13 


1882 


52 


16 


1883 


53 


16 


1884 


55 


16 


1885 


54 


20 


1886 


41 


16 


1887 


38 


12 


1888 


39 


12 


1888 


117 


13 


1889 


33 


14 


1890 


39 


16 


1891 


D.R. 


18 


1884 


55 


20 


1886 


41 


20 


1888 


39 


15 


1881 


25 


17 


1884 


55 


20 


1885 


54 


23 


1886 


41 


20 


1889 


38 


18 


1868 


22 


29 


1875 


19 


41 


1890 


39 


66 


1891 


D.R. 


69 


1874 


20 


24,43 


1875 


19 


24, 38 


1876 


24 


21 


1877 


15 


9 


1878 


20 


10 



Engineering Department. 



113 



Subject. 



Charles-river bridge (Boston to Cliarlestown) 



Year. Doc. 



Charles-river embankment 



dredg 



work completed 



Charles and Neponset river bridges 

Chelsea bridge (Charlestown to Chelsea) . 



Chelsea bridge, North (Mystic Eiver Corporation's wharf 
to Chelsea) 




1879 

1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1876 
1889 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 

1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



Chelsea-bridge water-pipe box 

Chelsea-st. bridge (East Boston to Chelsea) 



1889 
1890 
1891 

1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1868 



22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
38 
24 
38 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 

25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 

25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
39 
22 



Page. 



10 
8 
9 
11 
10 
10 
10 

11 



7 
9 
9 

12 
58 
52 
48 
30 
36 
68 
66 
61 
38 
21 
82 
34 
30, 46 
22 
21 
20 
18 

13 
16 
16 
16 
20 
16 
12 
12 
18 
15 
16 
18 

13 
11 
11 
10 
11 
11 



9 
10 
12 
23 
20 



114 



City Document No. 11, 



Subject. 



Chelsea-st. bridge (East Boston to Chelsea) 



Chester-park sewer, M. D 

Chester park, East 

Chester park, West, Extension, bridges 
Chestnut-hill reservoir, Water-Works . . 



pumping-station . 



boilers 

description of. 
iron roof ..... 



Church-street district ....... 

" " filling. 
City Engineers, 1850-1891. . . 
City square, granite curbing. 
Clarke's reports 



Cleaning water-pipe 

Cochituate Water- Works. 



Cochituate Water-Works and Sudbury river. 
Columbus-ave. bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) . 




1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1883 


53 


1882 


52 


1874 


20 


1868 


22 


1871 


15 


1888 


39 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1888 


39 


1868 


22 


1870 


14 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1883 


63 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1887 


38 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


2i 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 



Engineering Department. 



115 



Subject. 



Columbus-ave. bridge (over B. & A. R.K.) 



Colonel Cass monument 

Commercial-point, or Tenean, bridge , 



Commercial-street bridge (over O. C. R.R.) . 



Commons and square, walks - 

Commonwealth-avenue bridge (B. B. Fens) 



Commonwealth-avenue extension 



widening 



Condor-street sea-wall .... 
Conduit, Cochituate W.W. 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1881 


25 


1884 


55 


1890 


39 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 



Page. 



9 
12 
11 
11 
11 
12 



10 
10 
13 
25 
36 
59 
41 
26 
25 
21, 43 
10 
13 
10 
9 
9 
12 
11 
11 
12 
12 



10 
10 
13 
17 
20 
24 
45 
11,49 
11 
12 
12 
9 



10 
11 
13 
20 
22 
21 
27 
21 
23 
25 
35 
6 
7 



116 



City Document No, 11. 



Subject. 




Conduit, Cochltuate, W.W , 

Congress-street bridge (over Fort-point channel) . 



Congress-street survey 

Construction and maintenance, M. D. 



Consumption of water. 



Copley-square curve . . . 
Cost of pumping, M. D. 



Cottage Farm bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 
Cottage-street foot-bridge, East Boston . . 



Court-House, curbing 

Covered channel, Stony brook. 



Covered channel. Muddy river. 



1876 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1868 

1887 

1888 

1871 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1884 

1890 

1891 

1890 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1883 

1884 



24 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
22 
38 
39 
15 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
54 
41 
38 
39 
55 
39 
D.R. 
39 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
38 
39 
D.R. 
53 
55 



5 

27 

22 

11 

13 

10 

9 

9 

12 

12 

11 

12 

12 

9 

9 

9 

10 
11 
13 
28 
29 
30 
39 
7 
8 
5 
32 
30 
27 
24 
24 
28 
27 
29 
31 
25 
19 
18 
45 

34, 41 

35, 42 
28 
32 
24 
25 
20 

11, 23 
13 
25 
43 
46 
52 
51 
50 
69 
67 
64 
52 
52 



Engineering Department. 



117 



Subject. 



Covered channel, Muddy river. 



Crispus Attucks monument. . 

Cucumber taste 

Cumberland-street bulkhead. 

Curbing Court-House 

Curbing City sc[uare 



33-street extension. 



" " bridge 

D-street, South Boston 

Dalton-street filling 

Dartmouth-street bridge (over B. e^ A. and Prov. Div. 
O. C. R.R.) 



Deacon meters 

u a 

a it 

Deer-Island fire-service 

" sea-wall 

" water-pipe 

" wharves 

' ' wharf 

(( (i 

" " for steamboat 

(t f( (( (( 

Deposit sewers, M. D 

it n u 

(( (( (( 

Description Chestnut-Hill pumping-station 

Devonshire-street survey, between Milk and Water sts. 
Distribution system, water-supply 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1888 


39 


1889 


58 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1889 


38 


1882 


52 


1888 


89 


1890 


39 


1890 


39 


1881 


25 


1883 


53 


1870 


14 


1889 


38 


1885 


54 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1885 


54 


1882 


52 


1871 


15 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1876 


24 


1882 


52 


1880 


33 


1886 


41 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1868 


22 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 



Page. 



50 
47 
36 
69 
67 
64 
22 
26 
17 
25 
23 

22 
20 
44 
22 
28 

41 
70 
48 
26 
26 
26 
11, 46 
14 
U 
9 
10 
13 
12 
12 
12 
13 
9 
9 
9 
10 
11 
13 
32 
28 
33 
29 
40 
21 
31 
37, 44 
23, 25 
22 
21 
41 
27 
28 
51 
28 
11 
10 
7 



118 



Ctty Document No. 11. 



SURraCT. 



Distribution system 



Dorchester-avenue grade-crossing 

Dorchester Point, South Boston, P ■. 

Dorchester-street bridge (over O. C. R.R.) 



Dorchester-street (Washington Village), survey be- 
tween Middle street and O. C. R.R. bridge 

Dover-street bridge (over Fort-point channel) 



Dover-street connection, M. D. 



Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


1877 


15 


33 


1878 


20 


32 


1879 


22 


28 


1880 


33 


25 


1887 


38 


22 


1888 


39 


23 


1889 


38 


56 


1890 


39 


35 


1891 


D.R. 


35 


1885 


64 


29 


1884 


55 


53 


1870 


14 


43 


1871 


15 


70 


1873 


23 


48 


1874 


20 


28 


1875 


19 


26 


1876 


24 


26 


1877 


15 


11 


1878 


20 


14 


1879 


22 


23 


1880 


33 


17 


1881 


25 


17 


1882 


52 


19 


1883 


53 


19 


1884 


55 


19 


1885 


54 


23 


1886 


41 


20 


1887 


38 


15 


1888 


39 


15 


1888 


117 


16 


1889 


38 


18 


1890 


39 


20 


1891 


D.R. 


23 


1868 


22 


29 


1868 


22 


16 


1870 


14 


29 


1871 


15 


54 


1873 


23 


42 


1874 


20 


28, 58 


1875 


19 


26 


1876 


24 


26 


1877 


15 


11 


1878 


20 


14 


1879 


22 


15 


1880 


33 


9 


1881 


25 


10 


1882 


52 


13 


1883 


53 


13 


1884 


55 


12 


1885 


54 


12 


1886 


41 


13 


1887 


38 


9 


1888 


39 


9 


1888 


117 


9 


1889 


38 


11 


1890 


39 


11 


1891 


D.R. 


14 


1883 


53 


37 



Engineeeing Department. 



119 



Subject. 




Page, 



Dover-street grade-crossing 

Drainage , P 

Drainage, P , . . 

" "of Nazingdale, Franklin Park 

Draw-tenders' reports, giving number of vessels pasS' 
ing through drawbridges, 



Dredging in Eoxbury canal and Charles river. 

Driveways, P 

Drives and Walks, Eranklin Park 



Dudley-avenue bridge (over Prov. Div. O. C. E..R.) 



Dumping-scow, M. D. 



IJa^st Boston cemetery-wall. , . 
" " new main, W. W. 



East Boston ferries 



" *' " new drop 

East Boston high-service works , 

East Boston streets 

East Boston 24-inch main 

East Chester-park extension 

Eastern and northern avenue sea-walls, etc , 

Eastern-avenue bridge (see Congress-street bridge) , 

Eastern-avenue extension 

Eastern-avenue steamboat wharf , 



Ellicott arch, Franklin Park 
EUicottdale, Franklin Park. . 



Ericsson statue 

Embankment wall, P. 



Engineering Department, property schedule, 

office and Improved Sewerage 

Enlargement of water-pipes in East Boston . . . 
Essex-street bridge (Brighton to Cambridge) . . . 



Main 



1885 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1890 

1882 
188;i 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1876 
1886 
1890 
1891 
1878 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1886 

1873 
1871 

1888 
1873 
1883 
1885 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1871 
1881 
1868 
1889 
1882 
1878 
1875 
1874 
1876 
1886 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1883 
1884 

1891 

1871 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 



D 



54 
39 
38 
39 
39 

52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
24 
41 
39 
R. 
20 
41 
38 
39 
41 



29 
31 
63 
61 
64 

48 

54 

54, 56 

54, 56 

52, 54 

38 

47 

63 

65 

27 

20 

15 

15 

23 



33 


35 


15 


33 


39 


23 


23 


33 


63 


21 


54 


28 


39 


17 


38 


22 


39 


25 


D.R. 


24 


15 


70 


25 


26 


22 


34 


38 


57 


52 


24 


23 


36 


19 


27 


20 


37 


24 


38 


41 


21 


38 


65 


39 


64 


39 


64 


D.R. 


66 


39 


17 


53 


50 


55 


51 


D.R. 


76 


15 


32 


19 


35 


24 


30 


15 


23 


20 


23 


22 


21 


33 


13 


25 


15 


52 


17 



120 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 




Page. 



Essex-street bridge (Brighton to Cambridge) , 



Estimate for 30-in. pipe, Charles-street bridge.. 
" " 22-in. ♦' " " .. 

" " 30-in. " Meridian-street bridge 
" " 24-in. " " " .. 

Estimates 



Evaporation, water surface, W.W 

Everett-street bridge (over E. B. & L. R.R.). 
Excavation of water-way, Back-Bay Fens . , . 



Expenses. 



Experiments on the evaporation from water surfaces 

W.W 

Extension, Broadway 



(overB.&A. R.R.) 



1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1871 
1871 
1871 
1871 
1889 
1890 
1877 
1877 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



Chester park. East 

" " West (bridges) 
D street 



1889 
1890 
1891 

1877 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1881 
1882 
1884 
1882 
1874 
1881 



53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
15 
15 
15 
15 1 
38 
39 
15 
15 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
22 
14 
15 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 

15 
22 
14 

15 
25 
52 

55 
52 
20 
25 



16 
16 
20 
17 
12 
12 

13, 18 
15, 21 

17 

19 

86 

36 

35 

36 

39 

25 

34 

25 

46 

50 

50 

50 

46 

31 

63 

61 

63 

24 

4 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

4 

34 

14, 30 
15,26 

42 
19 
21 
20 
24 
37 
22 



Engineering Department. 



121 



Subject. 



Extension, D street 

" Eastern avenue. .. . 

" First and Q streets 

" Huntington avenue 



L-street retaining-wall 
Swett street 



Extension of East Ninth street . . . . 

" " Kilby street 

" W. W., Dorchester . 

" " " Roxbury 

Extracts from Mr. Clarke's report. 



J'almouth- street filling. 
Farm pond 



conduit 



temporary channel 

Federal-street bridge (over Fort-point channel) , 



11 (1 




Federal-st. survey, between Summer and First sts. 
Ferdinand-street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



1883 
1874 
1873 
1882 
1884 
1885 
1876 
1890 
1873 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1887 
1868 
1871 
1871 
1880 
1881 
1883 
1884 
1885 

1883 
1884 
1874 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1882 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
18S8 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1868 
1868 
1870 
1871 



Doc. Page. 



53 
20 
23 
.52 
55 
54 
41 
39 
23 
19 
24 
15 
38 
22 
15 
15 
33 
25 
53 
55 
54 

53 
55 
20 
38 
39 

D.R. 
55 
54 
41 
38 
52 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D. R. 
22 
22 
14 
15 



20 
37 
36 
24 
24 
28 
21 
25 
36 
40 
34 
27 
16 
29 
26 
24 
40 
31 
33 
39 
41 

24 
21 
17 
47,48 
27 
28, 29 
31 
34 
26 
20 
27 
17 
30 
54 
42 
29 
28 
26 
13 
15 
9 

10 

13 

13 

12 

13 

13 

9 

9 

9, 19 

11, 22 

12 

14 

27 

22 

38 

69 



122 



CiTT Document No. 11. 



Subject. 




Page. 



Ferdinand-street bridge (over B. & A. R.E..) 

( C ii U li u 

II U (( (( u 

iC (1 (I 11 11 

(( II I( (1 I( 

(1 (I U (1 u 

(1 1( (1 11 u 

1< I( (( <( (( 

(( II U I( u 

(I II (I (I 11 

<I <I (I (I (I 

I( It (( (I 11 

11 11 (1 11 II 

II 11 11 li II 

11 II (1 11 11 

II II 11 II It 

(1 11 <1 II 1( 

t( 11 11 II II 

(1 11 U 11 II 

<I II 11 II II 

Ferdinand-street bulkhead 

Filling, P 

11 11 

II II 

II II 

" Parkway 

" Marine Park 

II II II 

Filth-hoist 

Filtration, Mystic river 

Fire-service, Deer Island 

First and Q streets extension 

Fisher-hill reservoir 

11 II 

II 11 

Flax and Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co 

Flume, Main Drainage Works 

II U 11 II 

II 11 II II 

Foot-bridges, Berwick park (over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R.) 
" Camden street " " " " " 

" Cottage street, E. Boston 

W. Canton st. (over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R.) 
" W. Rutland sq. (overProv.Div. O. C. R.R.) 

" Franklin street (at Allston) 

Gold street (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) . . . 

' ' Public Garden 

" Sumner street 

Force main 

Forest-hills culverts 

Fort-av«iue retaining-wall 

II II 

Fort-hill surveys 

" grading 

II II 

II 11 
Forty-eight in. main 



1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1891 
1890 
1891 
1883 
1884 
1880 
1882 
1873 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1875 
1886 
1887 
1888 



1879 
1880 
1877 
1878 
1868 
1810 
18T1 
1873 
1881 



23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
64 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
55 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 

D.R. 
39 

D.R. 
53 
55 
33 
52 
23 
41 
38 
39 
19 
41 
38 
39 



22 
33 
15 
20 
22 
14 
15 
23 
25 



48 
29 

29, 51 
27 
13 
17 
15 
10 
10 
13 
13 
13 
13 
14 
9 
10 
9 

11, 22 
12 

14, 24 
22 
43 
48 
48 
49 
46 
63 
66 
68 
41 
43 
26 
29 
36 
27 
20 

20, 22 
12 
43 
28 
29 



28 
21 
26 
27 
26 
15 
47 
16 
26 



Engineering Department. 



123 



Subject. 



Fourth-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) , 
Franklin, or West Roxbury Park 



Franklin street Brighton, raising grade 

Franklin-street foot-bridge (over B. & A. R.R. at All- 

ston station) 



Friend-street sewer, M. D. 
Q-allop's-Island wharf. 



and storehouse. 



Gaskill pumping-engine . 
Gateways, P 



General work, filling, etc. , P 

Gerniantown nuisance , 

Gold-street foot-bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) 

<( (( (( 11 11 11 

Grade-crossing, Dorchester avenue 

" Dover street , 

Grading and loaming, P. , 



Grading of marsh 

11 11 11 

Granite bridge (to Milton) 



Parkway . 



Year. 


Doc. 


1880 


33 


1884 


55 


1885 


o4 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1800 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1884 


55 


1884 


65 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1887 


38 


1873 


23 


1884 


55 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1881 


25 


1888 


39 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1885 


54 


1885 


54 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1886 


41 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1«91 


D.R. 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 



Page. 



18 
52 
51 
48 
30 
34 
65 
63 
65 
26 

22 
13 
14 
9 
10 
10 
II 
13 
15 
24 

32 
24 
20 

22, 30 
66 
63 
40 
17 
25 

15, 24 
29 
29 
51 
49 
46 

31, 33 
64 
62 
63 
63 
61 
35 
58 
44 
33 
35 
30 
23 
23 
21 
14 
15 
17 
16 
17 
20 
12 



124 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Granite bridge (at Milton) 



Granite curb and fence, P. 



Gribble, the, or boring Limnoria — Limnoria Lignorura, 
Gymnastic ground, Charlesbank 



[arrison-avenue bridge 

" " (over B. & A. R.R.) 



Harrison-avenue retaining-wall 

Harrison-ave. retaining-wall, between Northampton and 

Hunneman streets 

Harvard bridge, to Cambridge 



Heights of water in storage reservoirs, W. W. 
High service, W. W 




main pipe, 16 in. 
new 



" pumping-works. , 
" pumping-stations. 



' ' Brighton 

" B. H. pumping-works 

" East Boston and Breed's Island. 

' ' Highland 



pumping-station 



" West Eoxbury . 



boiler. 



Highland hi 



•h service 



pumping-station. 



boiler 

pumping-works . 



1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1889 
1890 

1870 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1875 

1873 

1885 
1890 
1891 
1890 
1891 
1875 
1876 
1878 
1883 
1884 
1887 
1889 
1889 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1871 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1880 
1877 
1889 
1881 
1882 
1885 
1877 
1878 
1880 
1878 
1887 
1889 
1881 
1882 
1885 
1878 
1877 
1878 
1880 



38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
53 
55 
54 
38 
39 

14 
54 
41 
38 
39 
19 

23 
54 
39 

D.R. 
39 

D.R. 
19 
24 
20 
53 
55 
38 
38 
38 
41 
39 
38 
15 
38 
39 

D.R. 
33 
15 
38 
25 
52 
54 
15 
20 
38 
20 
38 
38 
25 
52 
54 
20 
15 
20 
33 



17 
13 
13, 18 
15, 21 
17 
19 
51 
51 
50 
41 
66 

38 
23 
20 
15 
15 
42 

35 
25 
28 
23 
21, 25 
29 
9 
6 
30 
28 
29 
20 
59 
57 
26 
19 
50 
12 
49 
29 
30 
24 
32 
53 
25 
29 
32 
32 
30 
21 
31 
21 
50 
25 
29 
32 
31 
32 
30 
24 



Engineering Depaktment. 



125 



Subject. 



High- street survey 

Holj'oke-street retaining-wall 

Huntington-ave. bridge (over B. & A. E.R.), 



Huntin^ton-ave. extension. 



Illustrations. See Index of Illustrations. 

Index to City Engineer's reports, 18fi8-1888. 

" " " 1868-1889. 

1868-1890. 

ImproTed Sewerage, or Main Drainage . . . . 



Indiana-place retaining-wall. 
Iron pier. Marine Park 



Iron roof, Chestnut-Hill pumping-station . 

Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co 

Kilby- street extension 



Ij-street bulkhead 

Lake Cochituate shallow flowage. 
Lake Cochituate 



Year. 


Doc. 


1868 


22 


1876 


24 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1882 


52 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1873 


23 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1888 


38 


1875 


19 


1868 


22 


1890 


39 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1891 


D.R. 



Page. 



27 
36 
29 
29 
27 
13 
17 
16 
10 
10 
13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
10 
10 
10 
11 
13 
15 
24 
24 
28 
21 



74 

75 
79 
40 
36 
36 
30 
30 
33 
30 
34 
35 
29 
23 
24 
61 
56 
57 
23 
36 
36 
65 
68 
36 

12 

29 



23 

18 

46, 58 

28 



126 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Lamps at 
Leavitt p 

Leyden-s 

Light-rod 
Limnoria 
Linden P 

K 

1( 
(1 

Long-Isla 
Longwoo( 


Charlesbank 


1890 

1881 
1883 
18S6 
1890 
1891 
1878 
1889 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1887 
1888 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
188« 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1874 
1888 
1868 

1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1090 
1891 

1890 


39 
25 
53 
41 
39 

D.R. 
20 
38 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
25 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
20 
39 
22 

15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

I) Jv 

39 


QQ 


uniping-engine, sewage 


30 


It ti 


32 


U (> 


32 


treet bridge (B., R. B., & L. R.R.) 

11 11 u 


13 

15 


borings, M. D 


38 


Lignorum. See Illustrations 


41 




10 


(( a 


10 


a a 


10 


a it 


11 


It tt 


13, 24 


(t tt 


15 


nd wharf 


17 




16 


1-avenue bridge (to Brookline) 


37 




60 
44 




1 ti It 


33, 60 




1 iC tt 


35 




1 tt It 


31 




I ti (t 


23, 47 




t ft ft 


23 




1 tt tt 


21 




t It tt 


14 




t tt It 


15 




( (( If 


17 




1 It It 


17 




1 ft <f 
< i< ft 


17 
20 




f It fi _ 
1 It it 


17 
12 




1 tt It 


13 




f It II 


13 




1 it ft 


15 




t If If 


17 




1 ft It 


19 


Lovejoy's 
Lowland- 
Lunatic ] 

^fjain Dr 

(( 

(1 

(( 

u 
(1 
(( 
(I 
(1 
1' 
11 
Main Dr 
i 


wharf 

■street bulkhead 


38 
26 


lospital 


13 




40 




36 


It If K 


36 


11 II 11 . . . . : 

II If ti 


30 
30 


It i< <i 


33 


If i( ft 


30 


ft 11 It 


34 


tt 11 ft 
ft It It 


35 
29 


It It If 


23 


It It If 


24 


ft ft ti 


61 


It ft It 


56 


It 11 II 


57 


ainage, or Improved Sewerage : 
Appropriations and expenditures 


66 



Engineering Department. 



127 



Subject. 



Main Drainage, or Improved Sewerage : 
Appropriations and expenditures. 

Artesian borings , 

Brimmer-street sewer 

Cement tests 

Chester-park sewer 

Clark's report 




Construction and maintenance 



Cost of pumping 
Deposit sewers. . . 



Dover-street connection. 

Dumping-scow 

Expenses 



Filth-hoist. 
it 

Flume . . . 



Friend-street sewer 

Illustration, floating scraper in deposit sewers, 

" Leavitt engines, log of test. .... 

" main and intercepting sewers, plan, 

" manhole cover 

" Moon-Island reservoirs 



" outlet sewers from Moon-Island 
reservoirs 

" regulator for sewers 

" regulating apparatus. Stony-brook 
intercepting sewer 

" tank, sewer sections 

" tide-gate chamber , . . . . 

Leavitt pumping-engines, sewage 



Light-rod borings 

Main and intercepting sewers . 



Maintenance and construction 



Miscellaneous . 



Moon Island. 



1891 

1878 
1884 
1878 
1883 
1880 
1881 
1883 
188-t 
1885 
1887 
1888 
188G 
1887 
1888 
1886 
1887 



1883 
1886 
1889 
1890 
1883 
188-t 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1887 
1885 
1886 
1880 
1885 
1883 
1884 

1884 
1882 

1881 
1883 
1882 
1881 
1883 
1886 
1878 
1883 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1887 
1888 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



D. R. 

20 
55 
20 
53 
33 
25 
53 
55 
54 
38 
39 
41 
38 
39 
41 
38 
39 
53 
41 
38 
39 
53 
55 
41 
38 
39 
38 
54 
41 
33 
54 
53 
55 

55 
52 



57 
38 
42 
39 
39 
40 
31 
33 
39 
41 
29 
30 
32 
24 
25 
41 
27 
28 
37 
23 
61 
56 
41 
43 
43 
28 
29 
24 
45 
40 
50 
45 
46 
38 

48 
38 



25 


36 


53 


43 


52 


38 


25 


30 


53 


32 


41 


32 


20 


38 


53 


40 


41 


30 


38 


24 


39 


26 


38 


29 


39 


30 


52 


43 


53 


47 


55 


43 


54 


45 


41 


45 


38 


29 


39 


30 



128 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



3Iain Drainage, or Improved Sewerage 
Office and other work 



Outlet sewer section 

Progress, Tabular statement of. 



Pumping-engine tests. 
Pumping-station 



and filth-hoist . . 
and other work, 
sewers . . 



Reservoirs . 



Roxbury-canal sewer 
Salt-water conduit. . . 



Survey of sewers 

Section 1, Brighton, Intercepting Sewer. 



Section 3, 

" 3, 

" 4, 

" 5, 

" 6, 

" 7, 

" 8, 

" 9, 

" 10, 

" 11, 

" 1, 

" 2, 

" 2, 

" 3, 

" 4, 

" 4, 



Dorchester, intercepting sewer. 



east-side sewer 



5, 
6, 
6, 

3, main sewer. 

4, " 
4, " 
4, " 
4i, " 
4.i, " 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1881 


25 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1880 


33 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1881 


25 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1886 


41 


1882 


52 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1880 


33 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1883 


53 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1880 


33 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 



39 
47 
47 
41 
32 
36 
34 
40 
42 
32 
44 
40 
41 
44 
46 
30 
25 
26 
36 
44 
36 
39 
46 
43 
46 
43 
39 
40 
40 
62 
57 
58 
59 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
43 
39 
36 
38 
38 
39 
57 
57 
57 
57 
42 
42 
34 
38 
43 
34 



Engineering Department. 



129 



Subject. 



Main Drainage, or Improved Sewerage : 



Sect: 



main sewer. 



2 

2, 
2 
2, 
2, 
3, 
3, 

3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 



outfall sewer , 



and Moon-Island res 
ervoirs 



outlet " " 

South Boston sewer 



intercepting sewer 

sewer 

intercepting sewer 
sewer 



intercepting sewer 



2, 
3, 
3, 
4, 
4, 
5, 
5, 
6, 
6, 

7, " " " " 

8, " 

8, " 

9, " " " " 
9, " " " " 

2, Stony-brook sewer 

2, " intercepting sewer. 

2, west-side sewer 

4, 
5, 
6, 
7, 
7, 



Sewage pumped . 



Sludge-tank 

Soil-water investigations . 



Surveying 
Tunnel..., 



Worthington pumping-engine, sewage. 



Year. 


Doc. 


1882 


52 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1881 


25 


1881 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1891 


D.R. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


65 


1885 


54 


1884 


55 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1891 


D.E. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.E. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1882 


52 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1885 


54 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1886 


41 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1886 


41 


1878 


20 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1878 


20 



Page. 



38 
43 
34 
48 
35 
37 
41 
43 
44 
46 
37 
41 
44 
45 
47 
61 

89 
43 
46 
46 
48 
47 
48 
45 
44 
35 
44 
35 
39 
42 
25 
26 
69 
58 
59 
58 
59 
38 
35 
39 
42 
41 
44 
57 
67 
29 
28 
25 
41 
39 
40 
44 
38 
42 
28 
29 
31 



130 



City Document No. 11. 



StIBJECT. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Main Draina 
Worl 
Main 

Main 

Main-st. and 
Maiden bridg 

U (( 

it ii 
t< ll 
«( (( 

(C t(. 

n n 

it (6 

(( It 
i( i i 

a a 
a 11 

<( a 

a <( 

Marine park, 

(< (( 
(t (i 
(( <( 

(t (S 

(< (( 
(1 (( 

Mattapan brid 

(C (( 

(( 1 


ge, or Improved Sewerage : 

thington pumping-engine, sewage 

and intercepting sewers 


1881 
1883 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1870 
1871 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1868 
1870 
1871 


25 
53 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
39 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
51 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
14 
15 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
14 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
22 
14 
15 


30 
40 


( (1 <c 


30 


( K <( 


24 


i (( ii 


26 


tenance and construction, M. D 


29 


" " " 

Vlystic-ave. bridges, Charlestown 

e (Charlestown to Everett) .... 


30 
21 
35 


n n 


29 


U (( 


27 


it C( 


14 


(( (( 


18 


4« «( _ _ _ 


16 
10 


se (( 


10 
14 
13 


(( (( 


13 


H, il 


14 




14 

10 

10, 17 


H (C 


10 


(( (( 


11 


t,i a 


13 


(( £( 


15 


South Boston, P 


52 


« (( i< 


48 


t( i< (( 


30 


(( (( u 


35 


(( (( (( 


67 


(( (( (< 


65 


<1 l( ti 


68 


Ige (to Milton) 


36 


« 


59 
33 


(( II 


(t 


36 


(( ( 


,, 


31 


U (1 


(( 


23 


(( ( 


(( 


24 


(( ( 


i( 


21 


(( < 


(( 


14 


(( ( 


(I 


15 


<( ( 


(( 


17 


(( ( 


[ (( 


17 


(( ( 


(( 


17 


(< ( 


(( 


21 


« (f 


• ( 


17 


(t ( 


<( 


12 


it ( 


(t 


13 


<( < 


<( 


14 


(( i 


( (( 


16 


(( ( 


I (( 


17 


»t t 


(C 


19 


Meridian-stre 


et bridge (East Boston to Chelsea) 


18 
34 
65 



Engineering Department. 



131 



Subject. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Meridian-street bridge (East Boston to Chelsea) 


1873 


23 


24,45 


(( 11 11 i( 11 


1874 


20 


30, 61 


<( 11 (1 11 1 ( 


1875 


19 


31 


iC <1 11 It 11 


1876 


24 


28 


(( 11 t( 1( 11 


1877 


15 


15 


<< 11 (I It 1( 


1878 


20 


18 


(( <1 << 11 (1 


1879 


22 


16 


(( 11 11 11 1( 


1880 


33 


10 


<( 11 11 11 (1 


1881 


25 


10 


(( 11 It It It 


1882 


52 


14 


(1 It 11 (t 11 


1883 


53 


14 


<( 11 It 11 It 


1884 


55 


14 


iC II II II It 


1885 


54 


14 


(( It tl <l It 


1886 


41 


14 


«l It II II II 


1887 


38 


10 


11 II II II 11 


1888 


39 


10 


II II II II 11 


1888 


117 


10 


11 II II 11 11 


1889 


38 


12 


i( II 11 It II 


1890 


39 


13 


l< II II tl 11 


1891 


D.R. 


15 


Mill-dam bridge ; see, also. Beacon-street bridge (over 








outlet, Back Bay) . 


1870 


14 


36 


<i (< II It II 


1871 


15 


60 


II II i( II II 


1873 


23 


45 


(1 II (1 (1 II 


1874 


20 


30 


(i (1 (( <( It 


1875 


19 


32 


<C II <l (1 tl 


1876 


24 


28 


t( II (1 (I II 


1877 


15 


16 


(< CI l( (( It 


1878 


20 


18 


(1 <C (1 It tl 


1879 


22 


16 


<c IC CI CI 11 


1880 


33 


10 


It 11 II CC II 


1891 


25 


11 


tl 11 II IC It 


1882 


52 


14 


Mill-dam sluices 


1879 
1880 
1878 


22 
33 
20 


26 


tl II 


22 


Mill-street improvement (Dorchester District) 


27 


Milton bridge (to Milton) 


1870 


14 


36 


11 11 11 


1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 


15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 


58 


II II IC 


45 


II II 11 


33 


ft CI tl 


36 


It II It 


31 


tl II II 


23 


It It II 


24 


It 1 1 It 


21 


II II It 


14 


II II CI 


15 


II II 11 


17 


II II IC 


17 


II 11 CI 


1884 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 


55 
54 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 


17 


II It CI 


21 


It II II 


25 


CI IC It 


17 


CC (I It 


12 


CI II II 


18 


II II II 


14 


II II IC 


16 


CI CI (1 


18 


CC IC CC 


20 



132 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Miscellaneous Work and Construction 




1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1889 

1891 

1886 

1875 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1887 

1888 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1886 

1886 

1881 

1881 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 


23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
25 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
38 
D.E. 
41 
19 
39 
38 
39 
38 
39 
25 
52 
53 
55 
41 
41 

25 

25 
55 
54 
41 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 


35 


(( ti n 




37 


(( << (t 




39 


(( i( (( 




33 






26, 30 

27, 29 


CI (( 11 

(( (< <( 
(1 (< " 




24, 25 
18, 22 
17, 22 


(( (i <( 




20, 25 


(1 i< <( 




20, 25 


(( (( (1 




20, 26 


(( (( it 




24, 29 


(( (( (( 




21, 23 


<( (( i( 




16, 18 


i( (( (( 




16 


li (< i< 




19 


(1 (< (( 




22 


(( <( It 




24 


(( (( >( 
(C (< <1 
(C << (( 


M. D 

11 


43 
47 
43 


(C (( (< 


11 


45 


{( (1 <( 


II 


45 


(( U <( 


w.w 


26 


(( t( 11 


CI 


27 


It (i <( 


CI 


32 


(I (( (( 


II 


29 


II <C iC 


IC 


33 


II II IC 


IC 


34 


I( CI cc 


CC 


58 


11 I( 11 


CI 


40 


(I CI CI 


p 


47 
43 




17 


Monuments, 1 Crispus Attucks 


22 


i Colonel Cass 


25 


Moon Island, M. D 


29 




30 




39 


CI II CI 11 


43 


IC U II CI 


46 


CI I( 11 IC 


46 


CC U 11 tl 


43 


Mt. Bowdoin green, curb 


21 


Mt. Hope station, abutments, etc.. 


now Blakemore- 


92 


Mt. Vernon and Centre-street bridge (over Prov. Div. 

0. C. R.R.)... 

IC CC 11 11 11 II 11 11 
11 CI U IC II CC II 11 
CC CC CI IC CC CI IC II 

Mt. Washington-ave. bridge (over Fort-point channel) 

II IC CC II II 11 
11 il II II 11 IC 
CC CC IC CI IC II 
CI IC 11 11 11 IC 
CC CI IC IC II II 
CC II CC CC II CI 


17 
20 
23 
20 
18 
33 
61 
44 
31 
32 
29 



ENGmEERING DEPARTMENT. 



133 



Subject. 



Mt. "Washington-ave. bridge (over Fort-point channel) 



Muddy river 

Muddy river, covered channel 



Mystic conduit, W. W. 



and reservoir. 



Mystic Lake 



Mystic pumping-station 



Mystic-river filtration. 
Mystic-valley sewer . . 



Tear. 



Doc. 



location of sewer . . 
Kussell-brook line ■ 



1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1891 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1877 

1889 

1891 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1889 

1891 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1889 

1884 

1886 

1891 

1880 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1889 

1891 

1878 

1878 



15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
D.R. 
53 
55 
64 
41 
39 
58 
39 
D.R. 
15 
38 
D.R. 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
38 
D.R. 
20 
22 
33 
38 
65 
41 
D.R. 
33 
15 
20 
22 
52 
53 
55 
64 
41 
38 
D.R. 
20 
20 



16 

18 

17 

II 

11 

14 

14 

14 

15 

14 

10 

11 

10 

12 

14 

16 

65 

52 

52 

60 

47 

36 

69 

67 

64 

36 

55 

33 

37 

32 

28 

25 

24 

28 

26 

28 

30 

54 

32 

32 

28 

25 

55 

34 

27 

33 

26 

37 

32 

29 

30 

28 

30 

33 

28 

54 

33 

34 

34 



134 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Mystic-valley sewer, progress of the work 

" " branch drains 

" " catch-basins 

" " miscellaneous 

" " Russell-brook branch 

" " crossing at the Abbajona river, 

" " (illustration) sewerage works. . 
Mvstic Water-Works 



I^^azingdale, Franklin Park . . 
J^eponset bridge to (Quincy) 



Neptune-road bridge (over B., R. B., & L. R.R.) , 



New main water-pipe across Chelsea creek to 

Boston 

New water-main to East Boston 



East 



Newton-street bridge (over Providence Div., O.C. R.R.) 



Year. 


Doc. 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1889 


38 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1891 


D.R. 


1870 


14 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


18''<2 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1871 


15 


1871 


15 


1888 


39 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 



35 
32 

32 
33 
32 
30 
54 
8 
36 
32 
28 

66 
35 
56 
45 
33 
36 
31 
23 
24 
21 
14 
15 
17 
17 
17 
21 
17 
13 
13 
14, 18 
16, 21 
18 
20 
11 
12 
14 
16 

33 
33 
23 
31 
33 
29 
16 
19 
17 
11 
11 
15 
14 
14 
16 
15 
10 
11 
11 



Engineering Department. 



135 



Subject. 



Newton-street bridge (over Providence Div. O. C. R.R.) 

(( a a (1 u (( 

ti 11 a u <( It 

Norfolk-Street bridges (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) 



Year. 



(< C( 



Northampton-street district . 



Northern avenue or Oliver-street bridge 

North Beacon-street bridge (Brighton to Watertown) 



Northern and Eastern-avenue sea-walls, etc 

North Harvard-street bridge (Brighton to Cambridge), 



North paving wharf 

N. Y. & N. E. R.R., raising grade 

QflEice and other work, M. D 

Oliver street or Northern-avenue bridge 

Outlet sewer section, M. D 

Overlook, Franklin park 



1889 
I 181)0 
1891 
1884 
1885 
1890 
1875 
1876 
1890 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1889 
1887 

1881 
1883 
1890 
1884 
1888 
1889 
1890 



Doc. 



38 
39 
D.R. 
55 
54 
39 
19 
24 
39 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
39 
38 
15 

25 
53 
39 
55 
39 
38 
39 



12 
14 
16 
20 
23 
14 
39 
33 
25 
34 
36 
31 
24 
25 
22 
15 
15 
18 
17 
17 
21 
17 
12 
13 
14 
16 
38 
20 
36 
34 
36 
31 
24 
24 
22 
15 
15 
18 
18 
18 
21 
18 
13 
14 
14, 18 
16, 21 
18 
20 
16 
38 
23 

39 
47 
25 
47 
35 
65 
65 



136 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Tear. 


Doc. 


Page. 


parks 






1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1888 

1888 

1889 

1884 

1885 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1879 

1885 

1873 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1886 

1889 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1891 

1881 

1883 

1884 

1886 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1889 

1890 

1883 


33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
D.E. 
117 
39 
38 
55 
54 
38 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
22 
54 
23 
39 
38 
39 
41 
38 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
52 
53 
55 
54 
D.R. 
25 
53 
55 
41 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
38 
39 
53 


46 






40 


(1 




' 


43 


(( 






48 


(I 






48 


,( 






49 


,1 






46 


(( 






30 


a 






31 


<< 






63 


(( 






61 


(i 






63 


(' 


Agas 

(( 

Arno 

CI 

cc 
cc 

IC 
IC 

Back 

a 

(C 

cc 
cc 

cc 

C( 
Cf 

cc 
(1 

C( 

cc 
ct 

(C 

IC 

cc 

cc 
cc 

cc 
cc 

cc 

C( 

cc 

cc 
C( 
C( 

cc 

CI 


siz bridge 


5 


(1 




33 


(1 


d Arboretum ... 


64 
52 


(I 


cc 


51 


u 


11 


30 


(( 


CI 


34 


cc 


CI 


65 


c< 


CI 


93 


il 


(C 


65 


<< 


Bay 


24 

48 


(( 


" bridges 


26 


(( 


" drainage 


31 


cc 


" " fens 


63 


C( 
C( 


It cc 11 

" driveways 


61 

47 


cc 


It It 


63 


C( 


" excavation of waterway 


46 


cc 


Cl cc 11 


50 


cc 


ci cc tc 


50 


cc 


cc ic cc 


50 


Cc 


(1 cc cc 


46 


cc 


11 IC Cl 


31 


cc 


11 11 cc 


63 


cc 


11 11 IC 


61 


cc 


11 cc IC 


63 


cc 


' ' fens 


31 


cc 




63 


cc 


It 11 


61 


cc 
cc 


" filling 


63 
43 


cc 




48 


cc 


tc cc 


48 


cc 


11 11 


49 


cc 


cc ct 


63 


C( 
(C 


" general work, filling, etc 

" grading and loaming 


40 
51 


(1 


11 cc cc 


49 


JJ 


" " " 

Cl tc 11 


46 
31, 33 


CI 


cc 11 Cl 


64 


(C 


11 tc 11 


62 


C( 

1( 


11 ct cc 

" " of marsh 


63 
63 


1( 


cc Cl 11 


61 


" 


" granite curb and fence 


51 



Engineering Department. 



137 



Subject. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Park "5 


Back B 

(( 1 

Bussey 

Charles 
Charles 




1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1884 
1885 
188') 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1883 
1884 
1890 
1890 
1.S90 
1890 
1882 
1H83 
1884 
1885 
1889 
1890 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1884 
1884 
1885 
188(5 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 

1890 


55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
39 
88 
39 

D.R. 
88 
39 
65 
54 
41 
39 
39 

D.R. 

D.R. 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
38 
53 
55 
39 
39 
39 
39 
52 
63 
55 
54 
38 
39 
63 
55 
54 
41 
39 
58 
39 
55 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 

39 


51 




1 11 (1 11 


50 


,, 




46 


u 


11 


30 


;i 




31 


< ( 




(53 


a 


1 11 11 


61 


n 
n 


' The Parkway (B. B. Pens) 

I 11 11 11 

1 11 11 11 


63 
31 
63 
61 

63 
65 


(I 




66 


,, 


park and Arnold Arboretum 


52 


4t 




51 


,, 


11 (( li 11 


47 


,, 


11 (I 11 11 


66 


(1 


bank, see Charles-river embankment. . . . 
buildinajs 


66 
68 
69 


(1 


-river embankment 


53 


(( 






52 

48 


i< 


< (( 


30 


(( 


1 It 


36 


(< 


1 (1 


36 


(( 


( (( 


66 


<( 
(C 


' " work completed 

wall 

( (1 11 


68 
50 
51 


<< 

cc 


* " buildings 

' " gymnastic ground . . . 
' " lamps 


66 
66 
66 


(( 


' " plantations 


66 


,1 


Coverec 

u 

Coverec 
<( 

Dorche 
Frankli 


1 channel, Stony brook 


46 


(( 


i( 11 11 


52 


(( 


11 11 11 


51 


w 


11 11 11 


50 


( ( 




69 
67 


J^ 


. channel, Muddy river 

1 ( i( 11 


52 

52 


11 


It 11 11 


60 


(( 


11 11 11 


47 


(1 


11 <( It 


36 
69 


(( 


It 11 11 


67 


(( 


ster point. South Boston 


53 


1( 


n park. West Roxbury 


52 


u 


It it 11 


51 


(1 


11 (I It 


48 


(1 


11 tt 11 


30 


(I 


i< 11 11 


34 


(( 


t< t( ft 


65 


<( 


It It ti 


63 


(( 


ti It 11 


65 


n 


" " " boundary wall for 
the Country Park, 


64 



138 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 




Parks, Franklin park, West Roxbury, boundary wall for 

the Country park 
drainage of Naz- 
ingdale 



drives and walks, 

EUicott arch .... 

EUicottdale 

gateways 

Nazingdale 

Overlook 

Playstead green. 



Schoolmaster Hill 
Shelter 



work completed. 
Stony-brook gate-chamber 



illustration 

Marine park, South Boston. 



curbstone, 
filling 



" iron pier. 



" pier-head... 
" wooden pier. 



miscellaneous 



West Roxbury, or Franklin park 
Wood-Island park, East Boston. . 



Parker-hill reservoir. 



1891 

1890 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1881 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1890 
1891 
1887 



1883 
1886 
1888 
1884 
1885 
1884 
1885 
188G 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1874 
1875 



D.R. 

39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 
39 

D.R. 
38 
89 

D.R. 
39 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
25 
64 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 
53 
41 
39 
55 
54 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
20 
19 



66 

64 
65 
63 
65 
65 
64 
64 
66 
66 
63 
66 
35 
65 
65 
66 
63 
66 
66 
65 
63 
63 
66 
48,49 
52 
48 
30 
35 
67 
65 
68 
67 
66 
68 
36 
67 
65 
68 
65 
68 
30 
35 
53 
47 
36 
52 
51 
53 
52 
49 
30 
36 
68 
66 
68 
9 
9 



Engixeering Department. 



139 



Subject. 



Park-street bridge (over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R.) 
Parkway, B. B. Fens 



Passage for row-boats through bridges of Charles river, 

Paving-yard wharf at Charlestown 

Pier-head, Marine park 



Piles, special examination of 
Pickney-street sea-wall 



Pipe, length laid, W. W. . , 
Pipe plans, Water- Works . 



Plans and specifications, miscellaneous, 



Plantations at Charlesbank 

Playstead green, Franklin park. 



Pope's-hill nuisance 

Prison-point bridge (Charlestown to Cambridge) 



Prison-point flats 

Property schedule, engineering department, main 

office and improved sewerage 

Proposed bridge to East Boston 

Proposed Cambridge-street bridge 

Proposed new bridge to Cambridge 

Providence and Berkeley streets, retaining-walls. . . 
Public Garden foot-bridge . 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1888 


39 


1888 


89 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1887 


38 


1883 


53 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1889 


38 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1889 


38 


1874 


20 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 



1879 
1880 



1891 
1890 
1890 
1891 

1888 
1874 
1875 
187(1 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
18,s4 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1883 

1891 
1889 
1887 
1885 
1871 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 



22 
33 
39 
D.R. 
39 
39 
D.R. 
39 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 
D.R. 
53 

D.R. 

38 
38 
54 
15 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 



Page. 



15 
31 
63 
61 
63 
17 
24 
60 
68 
40 
33 
38 
56 
14 
7 
33 
32 
28 
25 
17 
25 
66 
63 
66 
17 
36 
37 
31 
25, 43 
27 
23 
17 
16 
19 
19 
19 
22 
19 
14 
15 
15 
17 
19 
22 
25 

76 
38 
18 
25 
49 
31 
33 
29 
16 
19 
17 
11 
11 



140 



City Document No. 11, 



Subject. 



Public-Garden f oot-bridgre . 



Public-Garden pond . . . 

Pumping-engine tests, Chestnut-hill pumping-station. 



M. D. 



Pumping-station, M. D. 



" sewers, M. D 

" and other work, M. D. 

" and filth-lioist, M. D.. . 

Pynclion street, retaining-wall 



O and first streets, extension. . , 
Quality of water, Water-Works. 



Quincy-street bridge. 



I^ainsf ord's Island wharf 

Kaising grade of Beacon street 

" " Franklin street, Brighton 

" " Brooklyn avenue and Beacon street. 
N. Y. & N. E. R.R 



Raising pipe, Beacon street. 



" " Brookline avenue. 

Rebuilding Warren bridge 

Reports of draw-tenders 



Reservoir, Chestnut Hill. 
Fisher Hill. .. 



Reservoirs, W. W 




Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


1882 


52 


15 


1883 


53 


14 


1884 


55 


14 


1885 


54 


16 


1886 


41 


15 


1887 


38 


10 


1888 


39 


11 


1888 


117 


11 


1889 


38 


12 


1890 


39 


14 


1891 


D. R. 


16 


1882 


52 


25 


1888 


39 


20 


1889 


38 


66 


1886 


41 


32 


1880 


33 


44 


1882 


52 


40 


1883 


53 


41 


1884 


55 


44 


1885 


54 


46 


1886 


41 


30 


1887 


38 


25 


1888 


39 


26 


1881 


25 


36 


1880 


33 


44 


1881 


25 


36 


1874 


20 


38 


1873 


23 


36 


1876 


24 


5 


1880 


33 


27 


1888 


39 


16 


1889 


38 


38 


1876 


24 


37, 42 


1887 


38 


16 


1884 


55 


26 


1885 


54 


24 


1877 


15 


28 


IS 78 


20 


28 


1887 


38 


22 


1888 


39 


24 


1885 


.^4 


34 


1884 


55 


24 


1882 


52 


48 


1883 


53 


54 


1884 


55 


54, 56 


1885 


54 


54, 56 


1886 


41 


52,54 


1871 


15 


5 


1886 


41 


27 


1887 


38 


20 


1888 


39 


20-22 


1874 


20 


91 


1889 


38 


46 


1890 


39 


26 


1891 


D.R. 


27, 2d 


1889 


38 


46 


1890 


39 


26 



Engineering Department. 



141 



Subject. 



Reservoir, W. W., No. 2. 

" <• " 3. 

" " " 3. 

" " 3. 

" " " 4*. 



at Moon Island, M. D 



Retaining-walls. See Sea-walls. 
Retaining-walls, Atlantic avenue, near Russia wharf. 
" Berkeley street 



Berwick park 

Broadway extension. 

Castle street 

Fort avenue 



Harrison avenue 

Harrison avenue, between Northamp- 
ton and Hunneman streets 

Holyoke street 

Indiana place 




L-street extension 
Providence street. 
Pynchon street. . . 
Rockland street. . . 
Seaverns avenue.. 
Shawraut avenue . . 
St. Charles street. 



" Tyler street 

" Webster street 

" W.Rutland square and Durham street. 

" Yarmouth street 

Richmond street survey 

Roadways and walks, P 



Rockland street, retaining- wall. 
Roxbury annex 

" canal, dredging... ... 

" " improvement... 



Roxbury canal, sea-wall . . . . , 
" " sewer, M. D. 
" survey 



gait-water conduit, M. D. 



Schedule of property, main office, and improved sew- 
erage, Engineering Department 



1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 

1889 
1890 
1891 

1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1886 

1875 
1871 
1874 

1887 
1876 
1884 
1873 
1877 
1878 
1875 

1873 
1876 
1870 
1873 
1890 
1871 
1874 
1880 
1875 
1870 
1880 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1883 
1875 
1868 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1880 
1868 
1876 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1889 
1882 
1868 

1882 



1891 



D.R. 

38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
25 
52 
53 
55 
41 

19 
15 
20 
15 
24 
55 
23 
15 
20 
19 

23 
24 
14 
23 
o9 
15 
20 
33 
19 
14 
33 
63 
55 
53 
53 
19 
22 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
33 
22 
24 
22 
33 
25 
38 
52 
22 

52 
53 

D.R. 



Page. 



28, 29 
47 
27 

28, 29 
47 
27 
28 
39 
43 
46 
46 
43 

41 

49 
37 
26 
35 
20 
24 
26 
27 
49 

35 
36 
45 
23 
25 
49 
38 
23 
42 
45 
22 
22 
24 
26 
23 
43 
28 
31 
63 
61 
63 
23 
11 
38 
24 
18 
21 
38 
39 
34 

40 
40 

76 



142 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Schoolmaster Hill, Franklin park. 
Sea-walls, Alford street 



Atlantic avenue 

Condor street 

Deer Island 

Northern and Eastern avenues 
Pinckney street 



pipe-yard, Albany street. 
Roxbury canal 



Swett street 

Seaverns avenue, retaining- wall , 

Second-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.), 



Section 1, Brighton intercepting sewer. 

1, 

3, Dorchester 

3, 

4, 

5, 

6, " 

7, 



9, " 

10, " 

11, 

1, East-side sewer, M. D, 

2, 



3, 

4, " 

5, 

5, 

6, 

6, 

4, Main 

3, " 

4, " 
4, " 

4, " 
4i, " 
4i, " 
U, " 

5, " 
5, 
6 
G 

Outfall 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1891 


D.R. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1888 


39 


1880" 


33 


1889 


38 


1878 


20 


1875 


19 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1880 


33 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.E. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1891 


D.R. 


1880 


33 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1883 


53 


1883 


53 


1890 


39 


181tl 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1884 


55 


1880 


33 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 



Page. 



Engineering Department. 



143 



Subject. 



Section 2, Outfall sewer M. D 

" 3, " " " 

" 3, Outfall sewer and Moon-Island reservoirs. 

" 3, " " " " " . 

»< 3 i< II <' " '« 

(( O <( (( << (( (t 

(( g 11 U (1 (( u 

Outlet " " " " 
" 2, South Boston sewer, M. D 

" 2, 



intercepting sewer, M. D. 

sewer, M. D 

intercepting sewer, M. D. 
sewer, M. D 



intercepting sewer, M. D. 



9, 
9, 

2, Stony-brook sewer, M. D 

2, " intercepting sewer, M. D. 

2, West-side sewer, M. D 

4, 
5, 
6, 
7, 
7, 



Sewage pumped, M. D. 



Sewer at Glover's Corner, Dorchester. 
Shallow flowage 



Lake Cochituate. 



" " Basins 2-3 , 

Sharon-street bridge (over Prov. Div. 0. C. R.R.), 
Shawmut- avenue bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) , 



Tear. 


Doc. 


1885 


54 


1891 


D.K. 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1884 


55 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


18S7 


38 


1888 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1882 


52 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1885 


54 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1886 


41 


1884 


55 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1884 


55 


1878 


20 


1873 


23 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


23 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1887 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 



Pasre. 



47 
61 
39 
43 
46 
46 
48 
47 
43 
45 
44 
35 
44 
35 
39 
42 
25 
26 
59 
58 
59 
58 
59 
38 
35 
39 
42 
41 
54 
57 
57 
29 
23 
25 
22 
27 
18 
18 
32 
27 
22, 48 
31 
83 
29 
16 
19 
17 
11 
11 
15 
14 
14 
16 
15 
10 
11 
11 
12 
14 



144 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Shawmut-avenue bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 

" extension and Indiana-place walls 
Shelter, Franklin park 



Silver-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) 

Sixth-street " " " " " 

Sludge-tank, M. D 

Soil-water investigations, M. D 



Sources of supply, W. W. 



South-Bav dam 



South Boston flats , 

" " high-service W. W 

" " streets 

Special examination of piling. See Illustrations. 
Spring-street bridge (to Dedham) 



St. Charles-street retaining-wall 



Stony-brook covered channel. 



Sudbury river and Lake Cochituate . 
Sudbury river, Basin No. 4, W. W.. 

ii (( a 11 11 

Sudbury-river reservoirs, W. W. . . . 



Farm pond and Lake Cochituate, W. W. 



Year. 


Doc. 


1891 


D.R. 


1870 


14 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1878 


20 


1877 


15 


1S8G 


41 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1886 


41 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1886 


41 


1868 


22 


1871 


15 


1868 


22 


1889 


88 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1880 


38 


1883 


53 


1882 


52 


1883 


58 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1874 


20 


1889 


38 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1881 


25 


1889 


38 


1882 


52 


1883 


,53 


1884 


15 


1885 


54 



Page, 



Engineering Department. 



145 



Subject. 



Sudbury-river works 



SuflFolk-street district. 



Summer-street survey 

Sumner street, East Boston bridges 

" " foot-bridge 

" " tunnel 

Survey, Adams street 

y Atlantic avenue 

* ' Brighton 

' ' Change avenue 

" Devonshire st., between Milk and Water sts. 

" Federal street, between Summer and First sts. 
Fort Hill 

" High street 

" public building lots 

" Richmond street 

" Roxbury 

" of sewers, M. D ... 

" "Washington street, between Kneeland and 
Warren streets 

' ' West street 

' ' West Roxbury 

" Williams street , 

Surveying, M. D , 

Swett-street bridges (over South-bay sluices) 



Swett- 



street extension 



Swett-street sea-wall. 



Table showing evaporation at Beacon-hill and Chest- 
nut-hill reservoirs, W. W 

Table showing widths of draw-openings 



Year. 


Doc. 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1871 


15 


1873 


23 


1868 


22 


1874 


20 


1885 


64 


1886 


41 


1868 


22 


1870 


14 


1875 


19 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1889 


38 


1868 


22 


1868 


22 


1875 


19 


1868 


22 


1878 


20 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1882 


52 


188.3 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1888 


117 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1873 


23 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1877 


15 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 



27, 29 
27 
60 
21 
28 
38 
29 
23 
29 
9 
12 
29 
28 
27 
26 
27 
13 
28 
34 
62 

29 
30 
12 
28 
38 
29 
16 
19 
18 
11 
11 
15 
14 
14 
16 
15 
11 
11 
11 
13 
15 
17 
36 
40 
34 
27 
29 



35 
47 
39 
45 
41 
42 
48 
46 



146 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 




Table showing widths of draw-openings 



heights of water in storage reservoirs . . 

11 (1 <( (( 

rainfall and daily average consumption 
for each month 

rainfall and daily average consumption 
for each month 

the heights of Sudbury-river reservoirs, 
Farm pond, and Cochituate and Mystic 
lakes, also the rainfall on the Sud 
bury river water-shed, during the year 

1889 

Tabular statement of progress, M.D 



Tables showing daily average consumption of water in 
gallons from the Cochituate and 
Mystic works 

" " diversion of Sudbury-river water, 
1882-90 

" " amount of Avater diverted from Sud- 
bury river to Lake Cochituate and 
Cliestnut-Hill reservoir ; amount 
wasted ; amount of flow in river ; 
percentage of rainfall collected, 
etc., 1875-1890 

•• " amount of water drawn from Mystic 
lake ; amount wasted ; amount of 
rainfall collected in lake ; percentage 
of rainfall collected, etc., 1876 to 
1890 

" " amount of water drawn from Lake 
Cochituate ; amount wasted ; amount 
of rainfall collected in lake ; amount 
received into lake from Sudbury 
river; percentage of rainfall col- 
lected, etc., 1852-1890; watershed 
of lake, 12,077 acres 

" " the average monthly and yearly heights 
above tide-marsh level of the water 
in the lakes and reservoirs of the 
Boston Water-Works 

" •« operations at the Chestnut-Hill pump- 
ing station for 1890 . . . . 

" " operations at the Mystic pumping- 
station for 1890 



1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1890 
1891 

1890 

1891 



1890 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 



1891 
1891 



1891 



1891 



1891 

1891 
1891 
1891 



52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
39 

D.R. 

39 
D.R. 



39 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 



D.R. 
D.R. 



D.R. 



D.R. 



D.R. 

D.R. 
D.R. 
D.R. 



50 
56 
58 
58 
66 
32 
38 
72 
72 
72 
28 
29 

41 

42 



46 
41 
32 
36 
34 
40 
42 



42 
48 



44 



45 



46 

48 
49 
50 



Engineeeing Department. 



147 



Subject. 




Tables showing rainfall in inches and hundredths on 
the Sudbury-river water-shed for 
the year 1890 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths at 

Lake Cochituate for the year 1890 . . 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths on 
the Mystic-lake water-shed for the 
year 1890 

" " monthly rainfall in inches during 1890 
at various places in Eastern Massa- 
chusetts 

" " rainfall received and collected, 1890.. 

" " the temperature of air and water at 
various stations on the Water- 
Works 



Talbot avenue 

Temporary channel, Farm pond , 
The Parkway (B. B. Fens) 



Third-street bridge (over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.) .... 

a (c 11 (1 u a 

Tremont- Street bridge (over B. & A. R.R.) 



Tremont-street mall, curb, and fence 

" survey between Boylston street and 

B. & A. R.R. bridge 

Tremont-street water-pipe bridge 

Trinity triangle curb 

Tunnel, M. D 



" Sumner street. East Boston, 
Tyler-street retaining-walls 



V^o^t^t*l6 market (Mercantile wharf) 



"\^alks and roadways, P 

Walks in commons and squares 

Walls, Shawmut-avenue extension and Indiana place 
Warren bridge (to Charlestown) 



1891 
1891 

1891 



1891 
1891 



1891 

1888 
1882 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1877 
1879 
1880 
1885 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1876 

1868 
1868 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1886 
1883 

1876 



1890 
1870 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 



D.R. 
D.R. 

D.R. 



D.R. 
D.R. 



51 

52 

53 



54 
55 



D.R. 


56 


39 


17 


52 


27 


39 


31 


38 


63 


39 


61 


D.R. 


63 


15 


25 


22 


23 


33 


18 


54 


23 


41 


20 


39 


15 


38 


18 


39 


21 


24 


36 


22 


30 


22 


23 


41 


22 


41 


42 


38 


28 


39 


29 


41 


23 


53 


24 


24 


33 


39 


31 


39 


24 


14 


45 


23 


30 


20 


31, 46 


19 


34, 49 


24 


29 


15 


16 


20 


19 


22 


18 


33 


12 


25 


11 


52 


15 


53 


15 


55 


15, 24 


54 


16 


41 


15 



148 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Tear. 


'Doc. 


Page. 




1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1870 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 

1868 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1881 
1888 
1868 
1889 
1887 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1880 


38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
14 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 

22 
53 
55 
54 
22 
39 
22 
38 
38 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
38 
39 

D.R. 
33 


11 




11 


" " " .... 


11 


«' " " ... 


13 


11 U (C 


15 


tc (C (I 


17 


" '« " traffic, Dec. 20, 1888.. 
Washington-street bridge (over B. & A. E.R.) 

11 (I U 11 << 
(( 1( u <( <i 

(( (1 11 u a 

(( << 4( (I U 

(C tt t( a (< 

C( <1 14 11 << 

Washington-street survey, between Kneeland and War- 


13 
38 
23 
20 
15 
15 
18 
21 
23 

29 




28 


11 11 11 


30 


11 11 K 


32 




26 




23 


Water-pipe bridge, Tremont street 

" " between Charlestown and Chelsea. . 


23 
39 
23 




14 


(I 


6 


11 


5 


(< 


6, 12 


1, 


5 


(1 


6 


i( 


4 


(( 


31 


(1 


30 


(1 


26 


11 


23 


<( 


23 


(( 


26 


1, 


25 


(( 


27 


(( 


30 


11 


24 


,, 


18 


<( ... 


18 


11 


45 


11 


26 




27 




15 


<i 11 11 


12 


(1 i( 11 


8 


II .1 If 


37 


<< ■ 11 K 


35 


(( 11 11 

ft ft 1( 


34 

27 


t( It tl 


27 


tl fl I< 


60 


IC ft ft 


37 


fi ft If 


37 


" alcrse 


27 



Engineering Department. 



149 



Subject. 




Water-Works, aqueducts and distributing reservoirs. 



Basin No. 4. 

" 4. 



4 

4 

4 

5 

1 

3, dam 



Beacon- hill reservoir evaporation. 
Beacon street, raising pipe 



Chelsea-bridge water-pipe box. 

Chestnut-hill reservoir 

Chestnut-hill reservoir, evaporation 

'* pumping-station 

" " description of 

" " boilers 

" " engine tests. . 

" " iron roof 

cleaning pipe 

Cochituate W. W 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1885 
1886 
1889 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1877 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1868 
1877 
1888 
1889 
1888 
1889 



conduit, Cochituate 



consumption of water . 



cucumber taste. 
Dam No. 1 

" " 2 

" " 3 

Deacon meters . . 



1887 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1871 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1882 

1879 

1880 

1880 

1882 

1883 



38 
39 
D.E. 
25 
62 
53 
54 
41 
38 
22 
33 
33 
15 
38 
39 
39 
22 
15 
39 
38 
39 
38 
39 
38 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 
D.R. 
52 
22 
33 
33 
52 
53 



5 

32 
30 
27 
24 
24 
28 
27 
28 
31 
25 
19 
18 
45 

34, 41 

35, 42 
26 
35 
29 
20 
32 
28 



150 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



Water-Works, Deacon meters . . . . 
" distribution system. 



Dorchester W. W. extension ... 

East Boston, enlargement of water-pipe. 

" " new main 

" " 24-incli main 

" " water-pipe across Chelsea 

creek 

experiments on the evaporation from 

water surface 

Farm pond 



Farm-pond conduit. 



Farm-pond temporary channel. . 
Farm pond and Lake Cochituate. 



■filtration, Mystic water. 
Fisher-hill reservoir . . . 



Flax and Jamaica Pond Aqueduct Co. 

force main, street, etc 

Gaskill pumping-engine tests 



heights of water in storage reservoirs. 

(( a n 11 

high service 



Beacon Hill 

Brighton pumping-works. 



temporary 



East Boston 

" and Breed's Island, 



Year. 


Doc. 


1885 


54 


1874 


20 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1871 


15 


1871 


15 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1871 


15 


1877 


15 


1874 


20 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


18S6 


41 


1887 


38 


1882 


52 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


15 


1885 


54 


1880 


33 


1886 


41 


1887 


38 


1888 


39 


1875 


19 


1879 


22 


1888 


39 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1891 


D.R. 


1875 


19 


1876 


24 


1878 


20 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1887 


38 


1889 


38 


1871 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1877 


15 


1880 


33 


1881 


25 


1889 


38 



33 
11 
10 
7 
33 
32 
28 
25 
22 
23 
56 
35 
35 
2Q 
32 
23 
57 

33 

34 
17 
47 
27 

28, 29 
31 
34 
26 
20 
27 
26 
25 
27 
30 
26 
27 
20 

20, 22 
12 
28 
20 
66 
28 
29 
9 
6 
30 
28 
29 
20 
69 
19 
31 
27 
24 
33 
24 
26 
53 



Engineering Department. 



151 



Subject. 



Water-Works, high service, Highland 



boiler 

pumping-station 



main pipe, 16-inch, 
new 



pumping-station 
" stations 



" South Boston 

" West Roxbury 

" p u m"p i n g- 

station . . 

illustration, Basin i, section of dam 

" Beacon-st. tunnel, Sudbury- 

river aqueduct, showing 
portions of lining, Plate 1, 

" Beacon-st. tunnel, photo- 
graphs of interior. Plates 
2, 3, 4 

' Dam No. 5, view of site of 
dam 

" Dam No. .", view of bottom 

of trench of core-wall . . . 

" diagram showing rain-fall 

and daily average con- 
sumption each month . . . . 

" diagram showing rain-fall 
and daily average con- 
sumption each month 

*' diagram showing the 
heights of Sudbury-river 
reservoirs, Farm Pond, 
and Cochituate and Mys- 
tic lakes ; also the rain- 
fall on the Sudbury- 
river water-shed, during 
the year 1889 

" diagram showing the 
heights of Sudbury-river 
reservoirs. Farm Pond 
and Cochituate and Mys- 
tic lakes ; also the rain- 
fall on the Sudbury-river 
water-shed, during the 
year 1890... 

" Farm-pond conduit 

" Fisher-hill reservoir 

" " gate-chamber . 

' ' forty - eight - inch water-pipe, 
method of raising 

" Mystic valley service catch- 
basin . • 




1881 
1882 
1885 
1878 
1877 
1878 
1880 
1889 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1871 
1887 

1889 
1884 



1890 

1890 
1891 
1891 

1890 

1891 



1890 



1891 

1887 
1888 



1887 
1879 



25 

52 
54 
20 
15 
20 
33 
38 
41 
39 
38 
38 
39 
D.R. 
15 
38 

38 
55 



39 

39 
D.R. 
D.R. 

39 

D.R. 



Page. 



39 



D.R. 

38 
39 
39 

38 

22 



25 
29 
32 
31 
32 
30 
24 
57 
26 
19 
60 
49 
29 
30 
19 
21 

50 
32 



38 

38 
38 
38 

41 

42 



46 



20 
20 
22 

32 

32 



152 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 



"Water- Works, illustration, Mystic-valley sewer, pipe- 
crossing at Abbajona river, 

" '* Mystic-valley sewerage wk's, 

" " Mystic-valley sewerage wk's, 
sectional elevation 

" *' siphon, thirty-inch, at Warren 
bridge 

" Lake Cochituate 



main water pipe, 48-inch . 
miscellaneous 



Mystic conduit 



(( 


and 


reservoir 


lake . , 




(( 


ii 


(( 


i( 


(C 


11 


(( 


(t 


(( 


u 


pumpi 


ag-st 

n 
(I 
ei 
a 
it 

sewe 

(( 
(( 

(( 
(( 
i( 
(( 

u 
u 

orks 


ation 














tests of boilers, 
boilers 


valley 


r 




(< 









(( 




(( 




it 




(1 






branch drains 

catch-basins 

crossing at Abbajona 
river 


u 

water-w 
(1 


miscellaneous 

Russell-brook b'cli . . 


i( 





1879 

1889 

1889 

1890 
1889 
1891 
1881 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1889 
1891 
1877 
1889 
1891 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 



Doc. 



22 

38 

38 

39 
38 

D.R. 
25 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
38 

D.R. 
15 
38 

D.R. 
15 
20 
22 
33 



1881 


25 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1889 


38 


1891 


D.R. 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1880 


33 


1889 


38 


1891 


D.R. 


1884 


55 


1886 


41 


1884 


55 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 


1879 


22 


1882 


52 


1883 


53 


1884 


55 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1889 


38 


1891 


D.R. 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1876 


24 


1877 


15 


1878 


20 



30 
54 

54 

30 
46, 58 
28 
26 
26 
27 
32 
29 
33 
34 
58 
40 
37 
55 
33 
36 
32 
28 
25 
24 
28 
26 
28 
30 
54 
32 
32 
28 
25 
55 
33 
34 
27 
34 
37 
32, 33 
29 
30 
28 
30 
33 
28 
54 
33 
32 
32 

30 
33 
32 
8 
36 
32 



Engineering Department. 



153 



Subject. 



Water-Works, Mystic water-works 
" Parker-hill reservoir 



pipe, length laid 

pipe-yard sea-wall, Albany street 
quality of water 



reservoirs 



Chestnut Hill. 
Fisher Hill . . . 



No. 



Parker Hill 



Roxbury W. W. extension 

shallow flowage 

" " Basins 2, 3 

" " Basins 

" " Lake Cochituate. 
sources of supply 



Sudbury river 



basins, 
works . 



Sudbury-river reservoir and Lake Co- 
chituate 

tables showing heights of water in stor- 
age reservoirs 

tables showing heights of water in stor- 
age reservoirs 

tables showing rainfall and daily average 

consumption for each month 

tables showing rainfall and daily average 

consumption for each month 

tables showing the heights of Sudbury- 
river reservoirs, Parm 
pond, and Cochituate 
and Mystic lakes, also 
the rainfall on the Sud- 
bury-river water-shed, 
during the year 1889. . . , 




1879 
1874 
1875 
1889 



1876 
1880 
1874 
1868 
1889 
1886 
1887 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1874 
1875 
1871 
1884 
1884 
1887 
1888 
1886 
1887 



1889 
1876 
1887 
1881 
1880 
1881 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1890 

1891 



1890 



20 
19 
38 
39 
24 
33 
20 
22 
38 
41 
38 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 

D.R. 
20 
19 
15 
55 
65 
38 
38 
41 
38 
39 
38 
24 
15 
25 
33 
25 

38 

39 

D.R. 
39 

D.R. 



39 



28 

9 

9 

56 

24 

5 

27 

9 

25 

46 

27 

20 

46 

26 

27, 29 

46, 48 
26 

28, 29 

47, 48 
27 

28, 29 

47 

27 

28 

9 

9 

24 

27 

32 

18 

18 

24 

18 

18 

45 

4 

31 

23 

27, 29 

27 

46 

28 

29 

41 

42 



46 



154 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Tear. 


Doc. 


Page. 


Water-Works 


tables showing daily average consump- 
tioa of water in gallons 
from the Cochituate and 










Mystic works . . 


1891 


D.R. 


42 


<i 


" " diversion of Sudbury-river 










water, 1882-90 


1891 


D.R. 


43 


<< 


" " amount of water diverted 






from Sudbury river to 










Lake Cochituate and 










Chestnut-hill reservoir ; 










amount wasted ; amount 










of flow in river ; per- 










centage of rainfall col- 










lected, etc., 1875-1890.. 


1891 


D.R. 


44 




" " amount of water drawn 
from Mystic lake ; 
amount wasted; amount 
of rainfall collected in 
lake ; percentage of 
rainfall collected, etc., 










1876 to 1890 


1891 


D.R. 


45 




" " amount of water drawn 
from Lake Cochituate ; 
amount wasted ; amount 
of rainfall collected in 
lake ; amount received 
into lake from Sudbury 
river ; percentage of 
rainfall collected, etc., 
1852-1890 ; water-shed 










of lake, 12,077 acres 


1891 


D.R. 


46 


" 


" " the average monthly and 










yearly heights above 










tide-marsh level of the 










water in the lakes and 










reservoirs of the Boston 










Water-Works 


1891 


D.R. 


48 


" 


" " operations at the Chestnut- 






hill pumping-station for 










1890 


1891 


D.R. 


49 


(1 


" " operations at the Mystic 






pumping-station for 1890, 


1891 


D.R. 


50 


<i 


" " rainfall in inches and 










hundredths on the Sud- 










bury-river water-shed 










for the year 1890 


1891 


D.R. 


51 


<( 


" " rainfall in inches and hun- 










dredths at Lake Cocliit- 










uate for the year 1890.. . 


1891 


D.R. 


52 


t( 


" " rainfall in inches and 
hundredths on the Mys- 
tic-lake water-shed for 










the year 1890 


1891 


D.R. 


53 


<( 


" " monthly rainfall in inches 
during 1890 at various 
places in Eastern Massa- 










chusetts, 


1891 


D.R. 


54 


<• 


" " rainfall received and col- 










lected, 1890 


1891 


D.R. 


55 



Engineering Department. 



155 



Subject. 




W ater-Works, tables showing the temperature of air and 

water at various stations 
on tlie Water-Works. . . . 

" Tremont-street water-pipe bridge 

" waste of water 



" water-pipe bridge between Charlestown 

and Chelsea 

Webster-street retaining-wall 

West-street survey 

Western-avenue bridge (Brighton to Cambridge) 



Western-avenue bridge (Brighton to Watertown) 



West-Boston bridge (to Cambridge) . 



1891 

18G8 
1888 
1884 
1885 

1889 
1884 
1868 
1874 
1865 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
188G 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
] 88H 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 



Doc. 



D.R. 

22 
53 
55 
54 

38 
55 
22 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 



25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.K. 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
52 



Page. 



56 
23 
28 
30 

32 

39 
26 
30 
34 
37 
32 
24 
26 
22 
15 
16 
18 
18 
18 
22 
18 
13 
13 

15, 18 
16 
19 
21 
35 
37 
32 
24 
26 
22 
16 
16 
18 
18 
18 
22 
18 
13 
41 
15 

17, 21 
19 
21 
29 

37, 49 

38, 50 
32, 40 
25, 43 

27 
23 
17 
16 
19 



156 



City Document No. 11. 



Subject. 


Year. 


Doc. 


Page. 


West Boston bridge (to Cambridge) 


1883 


15 


19 




1884 


55 


19 


11 11 (( 


1885 
1886 
1887 


54 
41 

38 


22 


11 11 11 


19 


" " " ................. 


14 


" " " 


1888 


39 


15 


11 11 11 


1888 


117 


15 


(1 (1 II 


1889 
1890 
1891 

1877 


38 

39 

D.R. 

15 


17 


(1 II K 


19 


<1 U 11 


22 


West Chester-park bridge (over B. & A. E.R.) 


17 


" " " " " "........ 


1878 


20 


20 


II 11 11 11 u u 


1879 


22 


18 


" " " " " <' 


1880 


33 


12 


II 11 11 11 11 11 


1881 


25 


12 


II It 11 11 II "... 


1882 


52 


16 


II II U 11 11 11 


1883 


53 


15 


U 11 II It II II 


1884 


55 


15 


" " " " " " 


1885 


54 


19 


II 11 II II 11 11 


1886 


41 


15 


'< " " " " " 


1887 


38 


11 


11 11 11 II II 11 


1888 


39 


12 


II 11 11 11 11 11 


1888 


117 


12 


11 11 11 U 11 11 


1889 


38 


14 


11 11 It 11 11 It 


1890 


39 


15 


It 11 11 11 11 II 


1881 


D.R. 


17 


West Chester-park bridge (over Prov. Div. 0, C. E.R.) 


1877 


15 


18 


11 11 It It 11 U It tl 


1878 


20 


20 


It 11 11 11 11 It 11 11 


1879 


22 


18 


It 11 U If If 11 II f 1 


1880 


33 


12 


11 11 11 11 II 11 II 11 


1881 


25 


12 


If 11 11 It 11 il It II 


1882 


52 


16 


11 11 If 11 It 11 II 11 


1883 


53 


15 


11 11 11 If II It It If 


1884 


55 


15 


II 11 It 11 11 °I1 11 It 


1885 


54 


19 


(I 11 11 II 11 11 11 It 


1886 


41 


16 


II 11 11 11 II ft II 11 


1887 


38 


11 


11 II 11 It II 11 It 11 


18.^8 


39 


12 


It 11 It It tl It 11 11 


18S8 


117 


12 


11 11 11 If ft ft 11 11 


1889 


38 


14 


11 11 II 11 11 11 II 11 


1890 


39 


15 


II 11 11 11 II II It 11 


1891 


D. R. 


17 


West Chester park and Commonwealth avenue 


1877 


15 


30 


It 11 till It If 


1878 


20 


29 


" " " extension (bridges) 


1874 


20 


37 


West Roxbury, or Franklin, Park 


1884 


54 


52 


11 11 11 ft 


1885 
1875 


54 
19 


51 


" " survey 


12 


West Rutland-square and Durham-street retaining-walls 








and foot-bridge (over Prov. Div. 0. C. R.R.) 


1883 


63 


23 


West Rutland-square foot-bridge (over Prov. Div. 0. C. 








R.R.) 


1884 


55 


15 


11 It 11 11 11 II 11 


1885 


54 


19 


ft It II II li 11 11 


1886 


41 


16 


If II II II If tl tl 


1887 


38 


11 


i< II II It II It 11 


188« 


39 


12 


<i ti It <i ft ft 11 


1888 


117 


12 


K It 11 tl It 11 It 


1889 


38 


14 


(I II It ft 11 11 tl 


1890 


39 


15 


(C (I 11 11 II It 11 


1891 


D.R. 


17 



Engineeeijng Depaktment. 



157 



Subject. 



"Wharf at Deer Island. 



" " steamboat . . . 

Eastern avenue 

" " Steamboat 



Gallop's Island 



storehouse 



Long Island. 



Lovejoy's 

Mercantile Vegetable Market. 
North paving-yard 



Paving-yard at Charlestown . 

Rainsford's Island 

"Widening of Parker street 

"Wightraan, H. M., obituary 

"Williams-street survey 

"Winthrop bridge (to Winthrop) 




"Wood-Island park, P. 



Wooden pier, Marine park. 



"Worthington pumping-engine . 
" sewage 



1873 

1876 
1882 
1880 
1886 
1876 
1886 
1876 
1873 
1884 
1884 
1887 
1888 
1874 
1876 
1888 
1889 
1883 
1876 
1879 
1886 
1868 
1868 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1887 
1888 
1878 
1881 



Y^'i'mouth-street retaining-wall 1 1875 



23 
28 
52 
33 
41 
24 
41 
24 
23 
55 
55 
38 
39 
20 
24 
39 
38 
53 
24 
22 
41 
22 
22 
14 
15 
23 
20 
19 
24 
15 
20 
22 
33 
25 
51 
53 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
117 
38 
39 

D.R. 
55 
54 
41 
38 
39 
38 
39 

D.R. 
38 
39 
20 
25 

19 



21 
37,44 
23 
22 
21 
38 
21 
38 
32 
23 
23 
37 
16 
38 
33 
16 
38 
24 
37, 42 
25 
50 
28 
21 
35 
55 
46 
32 
33 
30 
21 
20 
19 
12 
21 
16 
15 
15 
19 
16 
11 
12 
12 
14 
16 
17 
53 
52 
49 
30 
36 
68 
66 
68 
30 
35 
31 
30 

43 



158 



City Document No. 11. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Subject. 



Back-bay Park — Stony-brook gate-chamber 

Basin 4, Boston Water- Works — section of dam 



Beacon-street tunnel, Sudbury-river aqueduct, show 
ing portions of lining, Plate 1 



Beacon-street tunnel, photographs of interior. Plates 2, 
3, 4 



Boylston-street bridge, B. & A. R.R., abutments and 
wing-walls 



" " plan of bridge and section. . .. 

" " 21G-foot truss on staging 

" " swinging truss across tracks. . 

Broadway drawbridge 

Dam No. 5, view of site of dam 

Dam No. 5, view of liottom of trench of core-wall 

Dartmouth-street bridge 



Diagram showing rainfall and daily average consump- 
tion for each month 



Diagram showing the heights of Sudbury-river reser- 
voirs, Farm pond, and Cochituate and Mystic lakes, 
also tlie rainfall on the Sudbury-river water-shed, 
during the year 1889 



" " 1890 

Dover-street bridge draws 

Farm-pond conduit 

Ferdinand-street bridge (over B. & A. E.E.) plans 

Fisher-hill reservoir . . 

' ' gate-chamber 

Forty-eight-inch water-pipe, method of raising 

Harvard-bridge plan 



Year. 

1881 
1884 

1890 

1890 

1888 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1876 
1891 
1891 
1879 

1890 
1891 

1890 
1891 

1878 
1887 
1891 
1888 
1888 
1887 
1885 



Doc. 

25 
55 

39 

39 

39 
38 
38 
38 
24 
D.R. 
D.R. 
22 

39 
D.R. 

39 
D.R. 

20 

38 

D.R. 

39 
39 

38 
54 



Page. 

48, 49 
32 

38 

38 

16 
19 
20 
20 
20 
38 
38 
14 

41 
42 

46 
48 
14, 16 
20 
24 
20 
22 
32 
26 



Engineering Department. 

ILLUSTRATIONS.— Continued. 



159 



Subject. 



Improved Sewerage — main and intercepting sewers, 
plan 



floating scraper in deposit sewers, 
Leavitt engines, log of test. 

manhole cover 

Moon-Island reservoir 



outlet sewers from Moon-Island 
reservoir 



regulator for sewers 



" regulating apparatus, Stony-brook 
intercepting sewer 

" tank-sewer, sections 

" tide gate-chamber 

Leyden-street bridge plan (over B., R. B., & L. R.R.) 

Marine park, iron pier, view of one 60-foot span 

Mystic-valley sewer, catch-basin 

" " pipe-crossing at Abbajona river. . 

" " sewerage works 

" " sectional elevation 

Siphon, thirty-inch, at Warren bridge 

Special Examination of Piling : 

Oak pile reduced in size by the Limnoria Tere- 
brans 

Spruce piles destroyed by the Limnoria Tere- 
brans , 



Spruce pile attacked by the Limnoria Tere- 
brans. The lower part shows the pile 
uninjured where it was under the mud. 
No. 1 

Hard-pine timber attacked by the Limnoria. 
No. 2 

Surface of spruce pile attacked by the Limno- 
ria Terebrans 



Year. 


Doc. 


1880 


33 


1885 


54 


1886 


41 


1885 


54 


1883 


53 


188J: 


55 


1884 


55 


1882 


52 


1881 


25 


1883 


53 


1882 


52 


1890 


39 


1889 


38 


1879 


22 


1879 


22 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1890 


39 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 



50 
45 
40 
45 
46 
38 

48 
38 

36 
43 
38 
24 
36 
32 
32 
54 
54 
30 

40 
40 

42 
42 
42 



160 



City Document No. 11. 

ILUSTRATIONS.— Concluded. 



Subject. 



Special Examination of Piling : 

Surface of hard-pine attacked by the Limnoria 
Terebrans , 

Figure 1, Chelura Terebrans; male lateral 
view, enlarged about 12 diameters 

Figure 2, Limnoria Lignorum; dorsal view 
enlarged ten diameters 

Warren-bridge draws 

West Chester-park bridge, B. & A. R.R., abutments, 
" " " Prov.Div.O.C.R.R. " 



Year. 


Doc. 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1889 


38 


1885 


54 


1877 


15 


1877 


15 



42 

43 

40 
16 
20 
18 



h 



CONTENTS REPORT ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT FOR 1891. 



A. — Engineering Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Engineering Department 2 

" " " Charles-river bridges 3 

" " " Federal-street bridge 4 

" " " Eerdinand-street bridge 5 

" " " Improved Sewerage 6 

Bridges inspected 7 

" wholly supported by Boston , 7,11 

" of which Boston supports the part within its limits. . . 8, 20 
" " " pays a part of the cost of mainten- 
ance 9, 23 

" supported by railroad corporations 9 

<< " " " " Boston & Albany 

R.R 9 

«« " " " " Boston & Maine 

R.E., W. Div. .. 9 
«' " " " " Boston & Maine 

R.R.,East. Div., 9 
«' " " " " Boston, Revere 

Beach, & Lynn 

R.R 9 

It (( u u u jsfew York & New 

England R.R... . 9 

" " '< " " Old Colony R.R. . . 10 

Old Colony R.R., 

Providence Div., 10 

" Total number (106) 10 

Bridges 7 

Agassiz road 11 

Albany street 23 

Ashland street 11 

Athens street H 

Beacon entrance. Back-bay fens 11 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back-bay fens 11 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R 11 

Berkeley street, B. & A. R.R 12, 89 

Berkeley street, Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 12 

Blakemore street 12 

Bolton street, N. Y. & N. E. R.R 12 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 12 

Boylston street, Back-bay fens 12 

Broadway, over Eort-point channel 13 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 13 

Brookline avenue 13 

Byron street, B., R. B., & L. R.R 13 

Cambridge street 20 

Canal 23, 24 

Central avenue 20 

Charles river 13 

Chelsea (North) 20, 90 

Chelsea (South) 14 



162 City Document No. 11. 

Bridges, Continued. page 

Chelsea street 14 

Columbus avenue 14 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 15 

Commonwealth avenue, Back-bay fens 15 

Congress street 15 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook 15, 90 

Cottage-street foot-bridge 15 

Dartmouth street 15 

Dorchester street 24 

Dover street 16 

Essex street 20 

Federal street 4,16 

Fen bridge 16 

Ferdinand street 5,16 

Franklin-street foot-bridge, B. & A. R.R 16 

Gold-street foot-bridge, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 17 

Granite 21 

Harvard to Cambridge 25 

Huntington avenue 17 

Irvington-street foot-bridge 17, 91 

Leyden street, B., R. B.", & L. R.R 17 

Longwood avenue 21 

Maiden 17 

Mattapan 21 

Meridian street 18 

Milton 21 

Mt. Washington avenue 18 

Neponset 21 

Neptune road 18 

Newton street , , 18 

North Beacon street 22 

North Harvard street 22 

Prison-point 23, 24 

Public Garden foot-bridge 18 

Savin Plill avenue 31 

Shawmut avenue 18 

Spring street 22 

Stony brook, Back-bay fens 19, 74 

Swett street, east of N. Y. & N. E. R.R 19 

Swett street, west of N. Y. & N. E. R.R 19 

Warren 19 

Washington street 31 

Western avenue to Cambridge 22 

Western avenue to Watertown 22 

West Boston 23 

West Chester park, over B. & A. R.R , 19 

West Chester park, over Prov. Div. 0. C. R.R 19 

West Rutland-square foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. 0. C. 

R.R 19 

Winthrop 19 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1891 32 

Bridges supported by railroads, liability of the city 31 

Bennington-street culvert 90 

Berkeley-street bridge, over B. & A. R.R 90 

Curbing, public squares, in East Boston 32 

Chelsea bridge (North) , steam-power 91 

Chelsea bridge (North), fender-guard 91 

Cornwall-street bridge (over Stony-brook channel) 91 

East Boston bridge 33 

Federal-street bridge 33 

Ferdinand-street bridge 35 

Ferry Department 36 

Hill-street retaining-wall 92 



Engineering Department. 163 

Bridges, Continued. page 

Irvington-street foot-bridge (Prov. Div. O. C. R.R.) 92 

Irvington and Yarmouth street retaining-walls 92 

L-street abutment 93 

L-street bridge 37 

L-street bullihead 93 

Liability of the city on bridges supported by railroads 31 

North Harvard and Essex street bridges, Brighton to 

Cambridge 38 

Plans and estimates 39 

Public institutions 38 

Rapid transit 40 

Roxbury canal sea-wall 93 

Savin Hill avenue bridge 38 

Special examination of bridges 39 

Stony-brook improvement (Roslindale branches) 93 

Walks in public grounds 38 

B. — "Water-Wokks 41 

Additional supply .'50 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs 44 

Basin 6, work done during 1890 and 1891 52 

Consumption 48 

Deacon meters 49 

Parra pond 42 

High-service pumping-stations 45 

Lake Cochituate 42 

Mystic lake 46 

Mystic-valley sewer 46 

Mystic conduit and reservoir 47 

Mystic pumping-station 47 

Miscellaneous 53 

Reservoir No. 1 41, 43 

" " 2 42,43 

" " 3 42,43 

" " 4 42,43 

Sources of supply 41 

Tables showing daily average consumption of water in gal- 
lons from the Cochituate and Mystic works, 55 
" " diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1883-91, . 56 
" " amount of water diverted from Sudbury river 
to Lake Cochituate and Chestnut-hill res- 
ervoir ; amount wasted ; amount of flow in 
river; percentage of rainfall collected, etc., 

1875-1891 57 

" " amount of water drawn from Mystic lake; 
amount wasted ; amount of rainfall col- 
lected in lake; percentage of rainfall col- 
lected, etc., 1876 to 1891 60 

" " amount of water drawn from Lake Cochit- 
uate; amount wasted; amount of rainfall 
collected in lake ; amount received into 
lake from Sudbury river ; percentage of 
rainfall collected, etc., 1852-1891 ; water- 
shed of lake, 12,077 acres 58, 59 

" " the average monthly and yearly heights 
above tide-marsh level of the water in the 
lakes and reservoirs of the Boston water- 
works 61 

" " operations at the Chestnut-hill pumping- 
station for 1891 _. 62 

" " operations at the Mystic pumping-station for 

1891 63 

" '* rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sud- 
bury-river water-shed for the year 1891 .... 64 



164 City Document No. 11. 

Water-Woeks, Continued. taq-e 
Tables showing rainfall in inches and hundredths at Lake 

Cochituate for the year 1891 65 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths on the 

Mystic-lake water-shed for the year 1891 . . 66 
" " monthly rainfall in inches during 1891 at 

various places in Eastern Massachusetts, . 67 

" " rainfall received and collected, 1891 68 

" " the temperature of air and water at various 

stations on the water-works 69 

" " work done at Basin 6 during 1890-91 52 

C. — Improved Sewerage, or Main Drainage 70 

Appropriations and expenditures 70 

City proper 70 

Sections 5 and 6, east side 70 

Brighton : 

Section 1 72 

Dorchester : 

Sections 8, 10 71 

Outfall sewer : 

Section 3 72 

D. — Parks 73 

Arnold Arboretum 77 

Back-bay fens 73 

Agassiz bridge 73 

Brookline avenue retaining- wall and culvert 75 

Excavation of waterway 73 

Pen bridge 73 

Filling 73 

Grading of slopes, loaming, and planting 75 

Miscellaneous 75 

Parkway 73 

Roadways, walks , 73 

Stony-brook bridge 74 

Charlesbank 81 

Brick walk 83 

Men's gymnasium 81 

Women's lavatory building 81 

Women's gymnasium and girls' playground 81 

Charlestown parks 83 

Franklin park 78 

Drives, rides, and walks 78 

Ellicottdale 79 

Miscellaneous 79 

Ponds 79 

Schoolmaster Hill 79 

Marine park 80 

Castle-island bridge 80 

Filling 80 

Loam 80 

Miscellaneous 80 

Q-street bulkhead 80 

Wood-island park 81 

Muddy-river and Stony-brook covered channels 76 

Muddy river 76 

" " Section A 76 

B 76 

C 76 

D 76 

" " " Downer street 76 

E. — Street Department : 

A street. South Boston, Broadway to Pirst street, block 

paving 85 

Austin street, Charlestown, Main street to Rutherford 

avenue, block paving 86 



Engineering Department. 165 

Street Uepaktment, Continued. pagk 

Beacon street, Arlington to Charles street, north side, 

asphalt; sontli side, repaved, pitched joints 88 

Bedford street, Chauncy to Columbia street; Kingston 

street, Summer to Bedford street, block paving, pitched 

joints 86 

Columbus avenue, railroad bridge to W. Chester park, 

asphalt 86 

Dorchester street, Dorchester avenue to Ninth street, block 

paving 88 

Dudley street, Washington street to Blue Hill avenue, 

block pavins: ■ ■ 87 

First street. South Boston, N. Y. & N. E. R.E. to F street, 

block paving , 85 

Fulton street, Richmond to Lewis street, block paving 86 

Kingston, Summer to Bedford street; Bedford, Chauncy to 

Columbia street, block paving, pitched joints 86 

Longwood avenue, Huntington avenue to Parker street, 

block paving 86 

Second street, South Boston, B street to Granite street, and 

Third street, from A street to Second, block paving. . . 87 

Second street, South Boston, Dorchester to E street, block 

paving 88 

Tremont street, ScoUay square to Boylston street, block 

paving, pitched joints 87 

Terrace street, Tremont street to New Heath street, block 

paving 87 

Troy street, Harrison avenue to Albany street, block 

paving 85 

Table showing lengths and areas of paving, on accepted 

streets 89 

Table showing details of contract, street paving, season of 

1891 88 

City Engineeks, 1850-1892 95 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Diagram showing oflScial dimensions of plans 38 

" A. — Water-works: Table showing rainfall and 
daily average consumption for each 

month 55 

" B. — Water-works: Table showing the heights 
of Sudbury-river reservoirs, Farm pond, 
Cochituate and Mystic lakes, and the 
rainfall on the Sudbury-river water-shed 

during the year 1891 61 

Federal-street bridge : View showing drawbridge open 34 

" " " " " closed,.. 34 

Ferdinand-street bridge : Section of retaining-wall 36 

Harvard bridge : G'eneral view 26 

" " Section of Pier 9 28 

Stony-brook channel : Cross-section of new channel and 

retaining-wall, Washington street, Roslindale 92 



APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. Showing width of draw-openings 96 

B. City of Boston Revised Ordinances, 1892, Chapter 12. . 98 

C. Engineering Department, property schedule, main 

office, and Improved Sewerage 99 

D. Elevations referred to Boston city base 101 

E. Index to Engineering Department reports, 1867-1891. . 102 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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