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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

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ENGINEERING DEPAUTMENT. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



CITY ENGINEER, 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1892. 



Printet( for tfje ©epartment. 




BOSTON; 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1893. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY EIsTG-INEER 



V^ith Compliments of 



Qi'lOi' 



illiam |achson, 

City Engineer. 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1893. 



^i^iilliiiliSP^KPip 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER, 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE TEAR 1892. 



^rtnteti for t^t department. 



m: 



v^> w/ 



BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1893. 



Cltttff 



A^i i ^3 



>' L-iSi.^i^ 



ihOf*!^ 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, Feb. 1, 1893. 
Hon. Nathan Matthews, Jr., 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In compliauce with the Revised Ordinances the fol- 
lowing report of the expenses and operations of the depart- 
ment for the year 1892 is submitted : 

The report of this department may l»e classified under the 
following heads : 

A. — The examination and supervision of structural re- 
pairs of bridges ^ the designing and superintending the con- 
struction of new bridges, retaining-walls, city wharves, etc., 
and in miscellaneous engineering work called for by tlie City 
Council. 

B. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the Sudbury-river, Cochituate, and Alystic Water-Works, 
including charge of new constructions for these v/orks. 

C. — Charge of the construction of a system of intercept- 
ing and outlet sewers. 

D. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the parks. 

E. — Charge of the engineering work, except for Sewer 
Division, in connection with the Street Department. 

The expenses incurred under the head "Care paid wholl}' 
from a special appropriation. 



City Document No. 10. 



A. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 
February 1, 1892, to January 31, 1893 : 

Amount of department appropriation for 

1892-93 $40,000 00 

Amount expended from department appro- 
priation for 1892-93 .... 39,999 22 



Unexpended balance . . . . fO 78 



Statement or Expenditures, Department Appropriation. 

Object of expenditures : 

Salaries of City Engineer, assistants, 
draughtsmen, transitmen, levellers, rod- 
men, etc. 

Engineering instruments and 
same .... 

Drawing-paper, and all materials 
plans .... 

Stationery, printing-stock, note-books, post- 
age, etc. 

Printing .... 

Reference library, binding books, and photo- 
graphs of works ..... 349 80 

Travelling expenses (including horse-keep- 
ing, repairs on vehicles, expenses to 
Chicago, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, 
etc.) ....... 

Telephone service ..... 

Furniture cases for plans and books, etc. 

Blue-process printing .... 

Incidental expenses, and all other small 
supplies ...... 

Electric-light wiring .... 

Total . .... 



. 


$35,497 58 


repairs of 


430 56 


for making 




. 


413 44 


books, post- 


356 31 


• • • 


283 77 



1,232 


63 


195 


30 


408 


00 


154 


74 


442 


09 


235 


00 


$39,999 


22 



ICngineering Department. 



Allston Bridge. 



Appropriation city of Boston . , . $90,000 00 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co. . 40,000 00 



$130,000 00 



Items of expenditure : 

Abutments $27,800 00 

Advertising and miscellaneous . . . 443 82 

Bridge guard-posts ..... 185 15 

Engineering and inspection . . . 3,129 82 

Fences, stairs, and sidewalks . . . 1,341 05 

Filling, miscellaneous . . . . Ill 33 

Flagmen 1,690 00 

Labor and teaming. Street Department . 252 90 

Lumber ....... 6 13 

Model of bridge-crossing .... 60 80 

Printing and stock ..... 70 74 

Raising buildings and grading . . . 4,342 51 

Rebuilding sewer, south abutment . . 1,032 05 

Street tilling and grading .... 2,469 76 

B. & A. R.R. Co., contractors for filling- 
north side ': 13,554 27 

McBride, Chris., contractor for fillino- south 

side ' . . 9,962 46 

Cofrode & Say lor, contractors for iron 

bridge 18,990 27 

Dalton, T. S., damages to property . . 1,300 00 
Property of J. W. Mollis deeded to the 

city ^ 21,000 00 



Total $107,743 06 

Total appropriation $130,000 00 

Expended by city of Boston, $67,743 06 
" " Boston & Albany 

R.R. Co., 40,000 00 

107,743 06 



Balance Feb. 1, 1893 . . . $22,256 94 



City Document No. 10. 



Federal-street Bridge. 



Appropriation 



$100,000 00 



Statement of Expenses from Feb. 1, 1892, to Feb. 1, 1893. 
Items of expenditure 



Com. of Mass., displacement of tide-water. 
Hardware ...... 


$26 25 
10 90 


Machinery and iron work . 


. , 


143 37 


Transferred to Congress-street 


Bridge 




(guard) .... 


: : 


534 31 


Total .... 


$714 83 


Appropriation ...... 

Expended previous to Feb. 1, 

1892 .... $99,285 17 

Expended from Feb. 1, 1892, 


$100,000 00 


to Feb. 1, 1893 


714 83 





Total 



$100,000 00 



L-Street Bridge. 

Appropriation .... 

Items of expenditure : 
Advertising .... 
Boat ..... 

Counter-balance and labor 
Draw-trucks .... 
Draw-tender's house (complete) 
Engines (2) for draw 
Engine-house and foundation (complete) 
Engineering and inspection 
Fuel 

Hardware . 
Iron-work 
Lead ballast 
Lumber 

Machinery for draw 
Machinery-work and labor 
Printing and stock 
Soundings 

Steel rails and angle bars 
Sundries . 
Teaming . 



60 -,000 


00 


132 


54 


70 


00 


232 


67 


3,736 


00 


2,033 


18 


1,563 


00 


1,900 


24 


3,759 


03 


30 


80 


27 


42 


49 


14 


794 


04 


179 


67 


1,266 


92 


166 


15 


71 


54 


10 


00 


438 


70 



25 00 



Engineering Department. 5 

Timber covering $89 40 

Water 6 50 

Wire rope 132 94 

King Bridge Co., contractors for iron draw, 10,100 00 

Miller, Wm. L., contractor for pile bridge . 92,756 62 
Rowe, T. A., contractor, retaining-wall 

coping 681 98 



Total $120,254 36 

Loan negotiated Feb. 2, 1892 . . . $100,000 00 

Oct. 11, 1892 . . . 30,000 00 
Transferred from Public Institutions, Jan. 

31, 1892 254 36 



$130,254 36 
Transferred to Street Department . . 10,000 00 



Expended by Engineering Department . $120,254 36 

Rebuilding Bridges to Watertoayn. 

Appropriation, Western avenue and North 

Beacon street $18,000 00 

Items of expenditure : 
Advertising ...... 

Engineering and inspection 

Printing and stock ..... 

Total 

Loan negotiated Sept. 26, 1892 

Expended ...... 



$20 


14 


245 


25 


18 


18 


$283 


57 


$9,000 00 


283 


57 



Balance, Feb. 1, 1893 . . . $8,716 43 

Statues. 

Robert G. Shavj Monu^nent. 

Appropriation, Robert G. Shaw monument, $19,500 00 

Item of expenditure : 
Printing and stock . . . $28 40 

Appropi-iation $19,500 00 

Expended from Feb. 1, 1892, to Feb. 1, 

1893 28 40 



Balance, Feb. 1, 1893 . . . $19,471 60 



6 



City Document No. 10. 



Improved Sewerage. 
Total appropriations .... 

Statement of Expenses from Feb. 2, 1892, to 



Object of expenditure : 
General office expenses 
Brighton sewers 
Charles-river pollution 
East shaft 
Flume, removal 

" East End connection 
" West End connection 
Pumping-station (inside) . 
Sections 5 and 6, East Side Intercepting 

Sewer 
Section 6, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer 
" 8, " " " 

" 9, " " 

" 10, " " " 

" o, Outfall Sewer 
" 3C, " "... 

Total 

Loans negotiated (less $67,500 

transferred) . . .$6,005,500 00 

Revenue .... 66,740 93 

Total 

Expended previous to Feb. 1, 

1892 . . . .$5,865,246 41 

Expended from Feb. 1, 1892, 

to Feb. 1, 1893 . . 161,959 90 



$6,222,240 93 
Feb. i, 1893. 



$13,030 23 

4,574 29 

982 63 

3 63 
28 45 

1,940 00 

2,743 90 

3,370 30 

1,211 00 
21,777 19 
13,966 55 

4 00 
2,594 34 

22,606 46 
73,126 93 

$161,959 90 



6,072,240 93 



6,027,206 31 



Balance, Feb. 1, 1893 



$45,034 62 



Engineering Department. 



Improved Sewerage Construction, 1892. 

Tables showing the cost of the sewer sections in progTess 
during the year of 1892, and other miscellaneous work. 



General Office Expenses. 

Items of expenditure : 
Salaries ..... 
Engineering instruments and repairs 
Drawing-paper and materials for plans 
Stationery and printing-stocl 
Travelling expenses . 
Printing . 
Telephone service 
Board and shoeing of horse 
Blue-process printing 
Sundry small supplies 
Office rent 
Rubber clothing 
Exchange of horse 
Exchange of buggy . 

Total 





$10,029 03 




53 85 


s 


69 70 




52 37 




579 48 




20 30 




90 00 




444 50 




64 14 




223 25 




896 03 




32 58 




200 00 




275 00 


. 


$13,030 23 



Brighton Sewers. 



Item of expenditure 
Labor rolls 

Total 



$4,574 29 
$4,574 29 



Charles-river Pollution. 



Items of expenditure 
Engineering 
Miscellaneous . 



Total 



$927 53 
55 10 

$982 63 



East Shaft. 



Item of expenditure : 



Advertising 



$3 63 



Total 



$3 63 



City Document No. 10. 



Flume Removal. 



Item of expenditure : 



Advertising 



Total 



$28 45 



> 45 



Flume, West End Connection. 



Items of expenditure : 




Bricks ...... 


$274 49 


Car-fares ....... 


31 25 


Cement . . ... 


232 85 


Gravel and sand .... 


201 40 


Lumber ...... 


58 60 


Labor ...... 


1,646 86 


Teaming ...... 


153 20 


Miscellaneous ..... 


145 25 


Total 


$2,743 90 



Flume, East End Connection. 



Item of expenditure : 
Perkins & White (contractors) 

Total 



$1,940 00 
$1,940 00 



Pumping-station ( inside ) . 

Items of expenditure : 

Atlantic Works $1,000 00 

Fuel Economizer Co 2,370 30 

Total $3,370 30 



Sections 5 and 6, East Side Intercepting Sewer. 



Items of expenditure : 
Street paving . . . 
Miscellaneous . 



Expended previous to 1892 
Total 



$1,203 00 
8 00 

$1,211 00 
90,662 26 

^91,873 26 



Engineering Department. 



Section H, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 



Items of expenditure 
Advertising- 
Bricks 
Car-fares 
Cement 
Coal 

Drain-pipe 
General supplie,' 
Hardware 
Insurance 
Labor 
Lumber . 
Miscellaneous 
Piles, and labor on same 
Rent of machinery 
Rubber clothins: 
Sand and gravel 
Stationery 
Teaming 
Tools 



$93 88 
1,827 80 

12 00 
1,825 02 

695 59 
195 67 
336 31 

14 44 

220 00 

13,549 20 

834 29 

11 02 
608 40 
749 40 
112 30 
612 40 

29 98 
536 00 

13 49 













$21,777 


19 


Expended previous to 1892 

Total 

Section 8, Dorchester Intercepti 


447 


38 


$22,224 


57 


NG Sewer. 




Items of expenditure : 




Bricks $1,638 33 


Car-fares 










12 


00 


Cement 










397 


20 


Coal 










208 


86 


Drain-pipe 










49 


98 


General supplies 










96 


12 


Hardware 










41 


00 


Labor 










9,379 


12 


Lumber . 










25 


70 


Rent of machinery 










835 


88 


" " land 










30 


00 


Rubber clothing- 










73 


83 


Sand and gravel 










125 


70 


Stationery 










14 


45 


Teaming 










713 


50 


Tools 










324 


88 



Carried forivard. 



$13,966 55 



10 



City Document No. 10. 



Brought forward^ 
Expended previous to 1892 

Total 



$13,966 55 
14,324 42 



,290 97 



Section 9, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer 

Item of expenditure : 
Car-fares ...... 

Expended previous to 1892 



$4 00 
39 20 



Total 



$43 20 



Section 10, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer 

Items of expenditure : 
Inspection ...... 



Teaming 

A. A. Hall, contractor .... 

Expended previous to 1892 

Total 

Section 3C, Outfall Sewer. 

Items of expenditure : 
Advertising .... 
Hardware .... 

Inspection .... 

Iron rods and nuts (Bacon & Co. ) 
Lumber ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 
Printing .... 

Perkins & White, contractors 

Total 

Section 3, Outfall Sewer. 
Items of expenditure : 
Coal and lumber ..... 

Inspection ...... 

Miscellaneous ..... 

Nawn, H. P., contractor .... 

Expended previous to 1892 

Total 



$50 00 
27 25 
2,517 09 

$2,594 .34 
41,098 26 

$43,692 60 



43 

1,048 38 

1,599 25 

1,705 00 

470 59 

97 54 

64 83 

68,046 91 

$73,126 93 



$322 64 

713 75 

7 00 

21,563 07 

$22,606 46 

71,788 48 

$94,394 94 



Engineering Department. 11 



BRIDGES. 

The inspection of the highway bridges for the annual 
report of their safety and completeness has been made, and 
as usual, besides the highway bridges, all such bridges as 
the Public Garden footbridge and the bridges in the parks 
have also been inspected. 

List of Bridges inspected. 

In the list those marked with an * are over navigable 
water, and are each provided with a draw. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

Agassiz Road, in Back Bay Fens. 

Allston, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Ward 25. 

Ashland street, Ward 23, over Providence Division Old 
Colony Railroad. 

Athens street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Beacon Entrance, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad. 

Blakemore street, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad, Ward 23. 

Bolton street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Boylston street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Broadway, over Fort Point Channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

*Castle Island, from Marine Park, South Boston, to Castle 
Island. 

*Charles River, from Boston to Charlestown. 

*Chelsea (South), over South Channel, Mystic River. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial Point, or Tenean, Ward 24. 

Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay Fens. 

*Congress street, over Foit Point Channel. 

Cottage-street footbridge, over Flats, East Boston. 



12 City Document No. 10. 

Cornwall street, over Stony Brook, Ward 23. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany and Providence 
Division Old Colony Railroad. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point Channel. 

*Federal street, over Fort Point Channel. 

Fen, Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Franklin-street footbridge, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

Gold street, over New York & New England Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Irving-ton street, over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad. 

*L-street Bridge, over Reserved Channel, South Boston 
Flats. 

Ley den street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Linden Park street, over Stonj^ Brook. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mt. Washington avenue, over Fort Point Channel. 

Neptune Road, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Newton street, over Providence Division Old Colony Rail- 
road. 

Public Garden footbridge. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony Brook, Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of New York & New England Railroad. 

Swett street, west of New York & New England Railroad. 

* Warren, from Boston to Charlestown. 

West Chester park, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

West Chester park , over Providence Division Old Colony 
Railroad. 

West Rutland square footbridge, over Providence Divis- 
ion Old Colony Railroad. 

Winthrop, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

11. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 
WITHIN ITS Limits. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Ward 24 to Milton. 
*Chelsea (North) , from Charlestown to Chelsea. 
*Essex street, from Ward 25 (Brookline) to Cambridge. 
*Granite, from Dorchester, Ward 24, to Milton. 
Longwood avenue, from Ward 22 to Brookline. 



Engineering Department. 13 

Mattapan, from Ward 24 to Milton. 

Milton, from Ward 24 to Milton. 

*Neponset, from Ward 24 to Quincy. 

*Nortli Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 

*Noi'tli Harvard street, from Brio-hton to Camhrido^e. 

Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedliam. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to AVatertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

* Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Dorchester street, over Old Colony Railroad. 
Everett-street Bridge, over Boston & Alban}' Railroad, 

Ward 25. 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Prison Point, from Charlestown to Cambridge. 

*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston i& Albany Railroad. 

Cottage Farm, Brighton. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

3d. — Boston & Maine Railroad, Eastern Division. 

Mystic avenue. 
Main street. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, <& Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

Stlt. — JSfew York (& .Neiv England Railroad. 

Broadway. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Fifth street. 



14 City Document No. 10. 

Forest Hills avenue, Ward 24. 

Fourth street. 

Harvard street, Ward 24. 

Norfolk " " " 

Norfolk ii ii ii 

Second street. 

Silver street. 

Sixth street. 

Third street. 

Washington street. Ward 24. 

6th. — Old Colony Railroad. 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Commercial street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — Old Oolony Railroad, Providence Division. 

Beech street. Ward 23. 

Bellevue street. Ward 23. 

Canterbury street. Ward 23. 

Centre street, or Hog Bridge, Ward 23. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets. Ward 23. 

Dudley avenue. Ward 23. 

Park street, Ward 23. 

Eecapitulation. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . .54 

II. Number of which Boston supports the part within 

its limits ....... 14 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ...... 7 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany . . , . . . 5 

2. Boston & Maine, Western Division ... 2 

3. " " Eastern Division ... 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn ... 1 

5. New York & New England .... 13 

6. Old Colony 5 

7. " " Providence Division . . . .7 

Total number . . . . . . .110 

Four bridges have been added to the list this year, namely : 
AUston Bridge, on Boston & Albany R.R. ; Castle Island, 



Engineering Department. 15 

in Marine Park at South Boston ; Everett-street, over the 
Boston & Albany R.R., in Ward 25 ; and L-street Bridge, 
over Reserved Channel, South Boston Flats. 

The following list includes all the bridges supported by 
the city, either in whole or in part. 

Agassiz-road Bridge in Back Bay Fens. 

This bridge was built in 1887, of brick and stone masonry. 
It is maintained by the Park Department, and is in good 
condition. 

Albany-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

The original structure was built in 1856-57 ; was rebuilt 
in 1867-68; and again in 1886-87. It is maintained in 
part by the City of Boston and in jiart by the Boston & 
Albany R.R. It is in good condition. 

Allston Bridge (over Boston &, Albany R.R., 
Ward 25). 

This is a new bridge. To be maintained by the city of 
Boston (see page 29.) 

ASHLAND-STREET BrIDGE (OVER PrOVIDENCE DIVISION 

Old Colony R.R., Ward 23). 

The present structure is of iron, and was built in 1875. 
It is badly in need of painting ; in other respects it is in 
good condition. The recommendation of lust year is re- 
newed : " The iron-work and fences should be painted." 

Athens-street Bridge (over New York & New 
England R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1874. The wood- 
work of the bridge has been renewed and the iron-work and 
fences painted. It is in good condition. 

Beacon-entrance Bridge (in Back Bay Fens, over 
Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1881-82. It is 
maintained by the Park Department, and is in good condition. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over outlet of Back Bay). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. It has been 
painted, and is in good condition. 



16 City Document No. 10. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany E.E.). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built in 1884-85, and was 
widened in 1887-88. It is in good condition. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge ; the present structure was built in 
1891, and the permanent fence has recently been finished. 
The bridge is in good condition.' The abutments should 

be pointed. 

/ 

' Berkeley-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony R.R.). 

Parts of this bridge are in poor condition. The under 
floor is old and decayed ; the concrete sidewalks are poor ; 
it was long since necessary to strengthen the span over the 
main tracks with wooden beams, and it should be taken up 
and renewed. Nothino- has been done toward rebuildinsi: 
this part of the bridge for the benefit of the railroad, as was 
proposed at one time, the railroad to bear a proportion of 
the expense. 

Blakemore-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built in 1881-82. It should 
be painted. It is in good condition otherwise. 

Bolton-street Bridge (over New York & New Eng- 
land E.E.). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. It is in good 
condition. 

Boylston-street Arch Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This is a stone arch-bridge, built in 1881. It is in good 
condition. 

Boylston-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany E.E.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1886-88. No per- 
manent fence has yet been built, but an ornamental railing 
should be provided. The abutments and adjoining re- 
taining- walls are in good condition ; the iron- work needs 
painting. 



Engineereng Department. 17 

* Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1869-71, and the 
draw and its foundation were rebuilt in 1874-75. The con- 
crete sidewalks have been repaired, and the floor underneath 
renewed in part. A new wooden under-floor has been laid 
on the Foundry- street and Lehigh-street spans. The under 
part of the structure has been painted with red lead in all 
parts except the column section between the Foundry-street 
span and the railroad. Estimates have been made for 
strengthening the weak places in the bridge, in anticipation 
of increased travel during the closing of Dover-street bridge. 

The draw pier has not been repaired for some years, and it 
should be carefully examined in favorable weather. The 
bridge as a whole is in an unsatisfactory condition. 

Broadway Bridge (o^her Boston & Albany K.R.). 

This bridge is of iron, and was built in 1880-81. The 
wood-work on the bridge has been renewed, and the iron- 
work of the floor has been painted where it is readily acces- 
sible. A hard-pine floor was laid; a cheaper spruce floor, 
and more thorough cleaning and painting would have been 
preferable. 

It has been found in practice that bridges located over 
railroads where there is very much traffic, and especially 
where the bridges are low, should not be provided with 
an under-floor which will last more than four years, as the 
iron will rapidly deteriorate unless it is frequently cleaned 
and painted, and this can only be done to the floors when 
they are stripped of all woodwork. 

Brookline-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

R.R.). 

This bridge is of iron, and was built in 1884. It is in 
good condition. 

Byron-street Bridge (over Boston, Eevere Beach, & 

Lynn R.E.). 

This is a wooden bridge ; it was built in 1889. The 
fences should be painted ; otherwise it is in good condition. 

* Cambridge-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge with a wooden leaf-draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. It was re- 



18 City Document No. 10. 

built in 1884. The draw was rebuilt and the passageway 
for vessels widened to thirty-six feet in 1891. The bridge 
and draw are in good condition. It is operated by hand 
power, and requires careful adjustment in order that the 
men may be able to raise it. The draw pier is in bad con- 
dition ; the covering-plank is poor, and the down-stream end 
has been damaged by vessels. The pier is too short to ac- 
commodate the larger class of vessels that the widening 
of the draw- way allows to pass through the bridge. 

* Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with wooden turn-table draw. 
The city pays one-half of the cost of maintenance. The 
bridge was originally built in 1808, was rebuilt in 1852, 
and aoain rebuilt and widened in 1874. The bridge is in the 
care of a commission consisting of one commissioner from 
Boston and one from Cambridge. The draw has been painted. 
IS ew tracks for electric cars have been laid by the street-rail- 
way company, and additional repaving has been done by the 
commissioners. The paving is in good condition ; the 
fender and the faces of the passageway for vessels through 
the bridge are in bad condition. The draw is old for a 
wooden structure, and should be thoroughly overhauled and 
kept in the best condition in order to safely carry electric 
cars. 

* Castle-island Bridge (from jMarine Park, South 
Boston, to Castle Island). 

This is a new bridge (see page 148). It is in good 
condition. 

Central-avenue Bridge (over Neponset River, Dor- 
chester Lower Mills). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. The city 
maintains the part within its limits. The under plank is in 
poor condition, and the iron-work should be cleaned and 
painted. 

* Charles-river Bridge (from Boston to 
Charlestown) . 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with an iron draw. The 
original bridge was built in 1785-86 ; the present structure 
was built in 1854-55 ; the draw was built in 1870. The 
bridge has been partly repaved with the old stock, some 
edgestones have been reset, and the roadway is now in fairly 



ENGESrEERING DEPARTMENT. 19 

good condition. The sidewalks on the Charlestown end are 
in very poor condition. The bulkhead at the Charlestown 
end of the draw has been partly rebuilt, and the sides of the 
waterway partly replanked. 

The draw and draw foundation are in poor condition ; the 
wooden tloor-lieams are twenty-three years old, and the ex- 
posed ends are rotten. 

The heavy counterbalance on the short end of the draw is 
insecurely fastened in its place. The rails on which the draw 
runs, the track stringers, and the pile foundation are all in 
bad condition. On the lixed part of the bridge the side bulk- 
heads are very rotten, the paving-stones, although recently 
reset, are old and worn. The bridge is out of line to a serious 
extent ; the fender and piers on the lower side of the bridge 
are in a ruinous condition. 

Electric cars are not allowed to cross the draw on account 
of its weakness, and an inspection of the draw-tender's books 
shows that travel over the bridge was interrupted seventeen 
times during the year 1892 on account of necessary repairs 
or breakdowns of the draw — the detentions on this account 
varying from half an hour to five days. The bridge is worn 
out and not worth repairing. It should be replaced by a 
new structure at once. 

* Chelsea Bridge, North (from Mystic River Cor- 
poration Wharf to Chelsea). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. 

The original structure was built in 1802-3 ; the present 
structure was built in 1880, except the draw, which was 
built in 1873. The bridge is in a rotten condition. The 
draw is twenty years old, and is in a poor condition. It is 
moved by steam, and electric cars cross it. The foundation 
for the draw pivot has been patched. The end floor-beam of 
the draw has been renewed, and the fender on the Boston 
side, near the draw, rebuilt. 

The down-stream draw pier is entirely too short for the 
class of vessels now using the draw, and complaints of poor 
accommodation have been made. 

* Chelsea Bridge, South (over South Channel, Mystic 

River) . 

This is a pile bridge, with an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-3, and the present structure in 
1876-7. The apparatus for moving the draw by steam has 
been finished. New sidewalks and fences have been built on 



20 City Document No. 10. 

the draw, and the fender has been repaired. The old Warren 
Bridge storehouse has been moved to this bridge. 

The contemplated abolition of the Chelsea-street grade 
crossings will require the rebuilding of this bridge at a higher 
grade. 

* Chelsea-street Bridge (from East Boston to 
Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge ; was originally built in 1834 ; 
was rebuilt in 1848, and again rebuilt in 1873, and the 
present draw was built in 1868. There is no change for the 
better in this bridge ; its bad condition was fully reported 
last year. It is old and narrow, and the draw and its 
foundation are in a dangerous condition. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

Eailroad) . 

This is an iron bridge. It was originally built in 1865, 
and the present structure was built in 1876-77. The bridge 
has been painted, and is in good condition. It is still made 
an anchorage for telegraph-pole guys, which should be 
removed. 

* Commercial-point or Tenean Bridge (Ward 24). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with a wooden leaf-draw. It 
was originally built in 1833, and the present structure was 
built in 1875. No repairs of importance have been made. 
The draw is in poor condition, and should be repaired at once. 

Commonwealth-avenue Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This is an iron bridge ; it was built in 1881-82. It has 
been painted, and is in good condition. 

* Congress-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel) . 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with an iron turn-table draw 
on a stone-masonry foundation. It was built in 1874-75. 
The engines, boilers, shafting, and gearing are worn from 
long service, and require extensive repairs. The fender guard 
is now being repaired. The under floors of the bridge and 
sidewalks and the concrete sidewalks are in poor condition. 
The draw is in good order, but the wheels and tracks are 
worn from long use. 



Engineering Department. 21 

Cornwall-street Bridge (over Stony Brook, 
Ward 23). 

This is a small wooden brids^e, built in 1802. It is in o-ood 
condition, except that the outlets for water are insufficient. 
The bridge is at the foot of the grade at either end. 

Cottage-street Footbridge (over Flats, East 
Boston) . 

This is a new wooden pile-bridge, built in 1889 for foot 
travel only. It is in good condition. It was painted, partly, 
in 1891, and finished m 1892. 

Dartmouth-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 
and Providence Division Old Colony K.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built of wood in 1869, and 
the present structure was built in 1878-79. It is in good 
condition. 

Dorchester-street Bridge (over Old Colony E.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1869. The bridge 
is principally supported by the Old Colony Railroad. No 
repairs have been made upon it. In the report for 1890 the 
following statement was made, and repeated in 1891 : "The 
bridge has not been stripped and painted for ten years. It is 
known to be in bad condition, just how bad cannot be ascer- 
tained without removing all the wood-work. It should be 
thoroughly overhauled in the spring." Nothing has yet been 
done. 

The contemplated widening of the railroad for four tracks 
will necessitate rebiulding the liridge ; but meanwhile it is 
not prudent to run the electric cars over it without stripping 
it, and making a careful examination of its condition. 

* Dover-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with a double iron draw. It 
was originally built in 1805, was rebuilt in 1858-59, and the 
present structure was built in 1876. This bridge is in safe 
condition, and but few repairs have been made. The 
abolition of the grade crossing on West Fourth street will 
require the rebuilding of this bridge during the coming 
season. 



22 City Document No. 10. 

* Essex-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile-bridge, with a wooden leaf-draw, and was 
originally built in 1850 ; the draw was rebuilt in 1891. The 
under floor and stringers have been renewed in part, and are 
in good condition ; the draw pier has been repaired, and 
draw-tender's house from ]Mal<ien Bridge has been brought 
here. The changes of grade incident to the widening of 
Commonwealth avenue will require the rebuilding of this 
bridge in the immediate future. 

Everett-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.E., 

Ward 25). 

This is an iron bridge. It was Ijuilt by the Boston & 
Albany Railroad under the grade-crossing act of 1890. The 
railroad will maintain the structure of the ])ridge, and the 
city the approaches and the wearing-surface of the roadway. 

* Federal-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was originally built in 1827-28 ; was rebuilt 
in 1857-58 ; was again rebuilt in 1872-73 ; and the present 
structure, which is a wooden pile-1)ridge with a double iron 
draw, was built in 1891-92. The bridge is in good con- 
dition. The necessary structures have been built, and 
electric cars now cross the bridge. A new public landing 
for boats has been built. The draws are moved by electricity. 

Fen Bridge (Back Bay Fens). 
This bridge was built in 1891-92. It is in good condition. 

Ferdinand- street Bridge (over Boston & Albany 

R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was originally built in 1864-65, 
and was strengthened in 1877. The present structure was 
built in 1892. The bridge is in good condition. The abut- 
ments should be pointed. 

Franklin-street Bridge (Footbridge over Boston 
& Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1883. It has been 
painted and the stairs repaired. It is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 23 

Gold-street Bridge (over New York & New 
England R.R.). 

This is a wooden footbridge, built in 1890. It needs 
painting ; otherwise it is in good condition. 

* Granite Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This bridge 
was originally built in 1837. It is a wooden pile-bridge, 
with a wooden leaf-draw. 

The draw piers are not well placed with reference to the 
course of the river and the direction of the current ; conse- 
quently great difficulty is found in passing vessels through 
the draw, and travel over the bridge is delayed hy the 
unnecessary time required to pass vessels of large size, on 
account of this defect. It has been painted, and is in good 
condition. 

* Harvard Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

This bridge is an iron bridge, and was built in 1887-1891, 
with an iron turntable draw. The city pays one-half of the 
cost of maintenance. The bridge is in the care of a commis- 
sion consisting of one commissioner from Boston and one 
from Cambridge. 

This bridge was opened to the public September 1, 1891, 
and has been in constant use since that date. The plank 
upper floor was laid in 1889, and was in poor condition 
when the bridge Avas opened, it was kept in repair until 
October, 1892, when a new upper floor was laid at an ex- 
pense of $3,533.51. 

The electric cars of the West End fStreet Railway Com- 
pany commenced running on the bridge August 15, 1892. 

The centre of the })in of the draw has been stayed to the 
track circle by rods. 

The bridge is in good condition, except that it should be 
thoroughly painted. 

Huntington- AVENUE Bridge (over Boston & 
Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1872, and the 
abutments were rebuilt in 1876-77. The wing walls of the 
abutment should be pointed. The l)ridge is in good condi- 
tion, but its surface should be regulated so as to conform to 
a proper grade of the approaches. The iron-work needs 
painting. 



24 City Document No. 10. 

Irvington-street Bridge (over Providence Division 
Old Colony K.R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, built in 1892. It should be 
painted ; otherwise it is in good condition. 

L-STREET Bridge. 

(See page 78.) 

Leyden-street Bridge (over Boston, Eevere Beach, 
& Lynn R.E.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1889. It needs painting, 
and some small repairs to the wood- work ; otherwise it is in 
good condition. 

Linden Park-street Bridge (over Stony Brook). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1887. It is in fair con- 
dition, 

LONGWOOD-A VENUE BrIDGE (fROM WaRD 22 TO 

Brookline ) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The j)resent 
structure w^as built in 1877. This is a wooden bridge, on 
wooden posts set in the ground. The posts which carry the 
bridge are decaying near the surface of the ground. They 
should be put in order ; otherwise the bridge is in fair con- 
dition. The construction of the Riverdale Park, which the 
bridge crosses, will hasten the removal of this bridge, which 
is only a temporary structure. 

*Malden Bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 

The original bridge was built in 1787. The present struct- 
ure was built in 1875, and the draw was l3uilt in 1892. 
The draw has been rebuilt in its original form, and the 
electric cars now cross the bridge. The draw piers are old, 
weak, and entirely too short ; the fender is in ruinous con- 
dition. The fences are old and rotten. The paving is poor 
in places. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is an 
old iron bridge ; it is in a dangerous condition, and should 
be replaced by a stone bridge. 



Engineering Department. 25 

* Meridian-street Bridge (from E. Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with a wooden turn-table 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built 
in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards ; was widened and 
re1)uilt as at present in 1864, excepting the draw, which was 
built in 1875-76. It has had only ordinary repairs, but is 
in fair condition. 

Milton Bridge (from Ward 24 to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure is very old; it was widened in 1871-72. 
The older part of this bridge was built of stone, and the 
widening is an iron structure on stone columns. One 
sidewalk has been damaged, and the fence posts broken, 
apparently by a team ; otherwise the bridge is in fair con- 
dition. 

* Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge (over Fort Point 

Channel) . 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with ah iron draw. It was 
built in 1854, and was rebuilt in 1870-71. A new sidewalk 
has been built on the down-stream side, and from the draw 
to South Boston on the up-stream side. 

The draw pier is in poor condition, and is so low that it is 
covered with water at every high course of tides. This is 
the only draw of importance in the city that is moved by 
hand power. The bridge is in fair condition. 

* Neponset Bridge (from Ward 24 to Quincy) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure was built in 1802 ; the present structure 
in 1877. The lower draw-pier has been repaired, and other 
small repairs made. The draw has been painted ; the 
counterbalance end that is submerged in salt water at every 
opening was not painted, and it is much wasted by rust. 
The draw is too heavy to be handled by hand, and it should 
be replaced by a turn-table draw. The bridge is in fair 
condition ; the iron-work should be painted. 

Neptune Road (over Boston, Revere Beach, & 
Lynn R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1887-88. It is 
maintained by the Park Department. It needs painting; 
otherwise it is in good condition. 



26 City Document No. 10. 

Newton-street Bridge (over Providence Division Old 
Colony E.K.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1872, It is in 
good condition. 

* North Beacon-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
Vv'ooden pile-bridge, with a wooden leaf-draw. The original 
structure was built in 1822, and the present structure in 
1884. It is in fair condition. Estimates have been made 
for rebuilding and widening the waterways of the bridge, 
the expense to be divided between Boston and Watertown. 

* North Harvard-street Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge) . 

The city maintains the parts within its limits. This 
bridge was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt in 1879. 
The draw was rebuilt in 1891. The bridge is in good con- 
dition, with the exception of the abutment to which attention 
has been called in previous reports. 

* Prison-point Bridge (from Charlestown to 
Cambridge). 

The city pays one-half of the cost of maintenance. This 
bridge was originally built in 1833, and the present structure 
was built in 187()-77. It is a wooden pile-bridge, with an 
iron leaf-draw. This bridge is in the care of a commission, 
consisting of one commissioner from Boston and one from 
Cambridge. The bridge is in fair condition. The draw- 
bridge is not convenient either for the [)assage of vessels or 
for land travel ; it is raised with difficulty, works very slowly, 
and is not in line with the centre of the channel. It will be 
necessary to rebuild it on a different plan before many years, 
in case the efforts to close the river to vessels are not suc- 
cessful . 

Public Garden Footbridge. 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1867, and was 
thoroughly repaired in 1887. The floor is worn and needs 
renewal ; otherwise it is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 27 



Shawmut-a VENUE Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.E.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1871. The electric- 
wire poles of the West End Street Railway Co. are so 
placed as to make an unsightly bend in the ornamental 
parapet. The bridge is in fair condition. 

Spring-street Bridge (from Ward 23 to Dedham). 

This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part 
within its limits. A new picket fence has been burlt the 
whole leno-th of the bridge. The bridge is in aood condition. 

Stony-brook Bridge (Back Bay Fens). 

This is an ornamental brick arched bridge, with stone 
facings, built in 181)1-2. It is not yet quite completed. 

Swett-street Bridges (over South Bay Sluices). 

These are wooden bridges, and were built in 1875. They 
are temporary structures, and are in poor condition. The 
road^vay in both bridges is safe, but the l>ulkheads that 
support the adjoining sluices are very much out of shape, 
and may require repairs at any time. 

* Warren Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 

This is a wooden pile-bridge, with a double iron draw. It 
was originally built in 1828, and the present structure was 
built in 1883-84. The sidewalk on the down-stream side is in 
})oor condition, and the draws and draw piers are in but fair 
condition. A building for the accommodation of the Bridge 
Division has been erected, and electric cars have been run 
over the bridge this year. Only temporary repairs have 
been made, and the bridge is in generally fair condition. 

* Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to 
Cambridge). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure was l^uilt in 1824 ; the present structure was built 
in 1879-80; the draw^ was rebuilt in 1891. The roadway 
and draw are in good condition. The draw pier is too short ; 
it needs replanking, and some repairs to the piling. 



28 City Document No. 10. 

* Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to 
Watertown). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile-bridge. It was built in 1824 ; the present draw 
was built in 1883 ; and the abutment was rebuilt in 1886. 
(See page 84.) 

*West Boston Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

The city pays one-half of the cost of maintenance. This is 
a wooden pile-bridge, with wooden turn-table drav/. The 
bridge was originally built in 1792-93, was rebuilt in 1854, 
and repaired in 1871. This liridge is in the care of a 
commission, consisting of one from Boston and one from 
Cambridge. A new bulkhead has been built next the 
Charlesbank. The bridge has been painted ; the roadway, 
sidewalks, and fences are in good condition. The draw pier, 
draw, and waterway will require repairs during the coming 
season. (See page 83.) 

West Chester-park Bridge (over Boston & 
Albany R.E.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. The fences 
and iron-work require painting. The approaches should be 
regraded, as has been recommended for several years past. 

West Chester-park Bridge (over Providence 
Division Old Colony E.E.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. The iron- 
work is rusty. The bridge should be stripped of wood-work, 
cleaned, carefully examined, and painted. 

West Rutland-square Footbridge (over Providence 
Division Old Colony R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1882, and is in 
good condition. 

WiNTHROP Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge, without a draw. It was originally 
built in 1839, was rebuilt in 1851, and was extensively re- 
paired in 1870. The bridge is old and poor, but is yet in 
safe condition. 

There are thirty-five highway bridges wholly supported 
by railroad corporations. 



Engineering Department. 29 

Savin Hill Bridge, over the Old Colony Railroad at Savin 
Hill, has been rebuilt, widened, and lengthened. The rail- 
road has done all the work and assumed all the expenses, in- 
cluding grade damages, and the city is to pay not more 
than live thousand ($5,000) dollars to the railroad in consid- 
eration of the bridoe beins; built to conform to the wideuins: 
of Savin Hill avenue. 

The following-named bridges have been strengthened so 
that electric cars can cross them safely, and in some cases 
other repairs have been made. 

Broadway, over New York & New England R.R. 

Dorchester avenue, over New York & New England R.R. 

Fourth street. 

Sixth street. 

Washington street. 

Centre-street or Hog Bridge, Providence Division Old 
Colony R.R. 

Cottage Farm Bridge, over the Boston & Albany R.R. , 
will probably be rebuilt in connection with the widening 
of the avenue. 

Harvard-street and Norfolk-street Bridges will probably be 
rebuilt in connection with street widenings. 

The remaining l^ridges are strong enough for ordinary 
travel, and require no special mention. 

I^HSCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION 

IN 1892. 

Allston Bridge. 

On March 28, 1892, a contract was made with the Boston 
& Albany R.R. Co., for the construction of the abutments 
and retaining-walls required for a bridge over the railroad 
at Cambridge street, Allston. 

The foundations of the abutments and retaining-walls are 
10 feet in width and 4 feet deep, built of American cement 
concrete. A footing-course of large rectangular granite 
blocks two feet in thickness is laid upon the concrete base, 
and upon this are built the abutments and retaining-walls, of 
quarry-faced ashlar masonry, with joints not exceeding one 
inch in width. 

The bridge seat-courses are 5|- feet in width, 2 feet thick, 
with their top surfaces rough pointed. 

The retaining-walls are capped with a granite coping 3 
feet in width, 2 feet thick, rough pointed on top, and dow- 
elled to the course below with 1-inch iron dowels. The walls 
are ballasted with quarry chips. 



30 City Document No. 10. 

The work of building the abutments was delayed on ac- 
count of the difficulty of obtaining the stone from the quarry, 
and the work was not completed until October 17. 

On June 13, a contract was made with Messrs. Cofrode & 
Saylor for the construction and erection of an iron bridge 
across the railroad. 

The bridge as built consists of one through span skewed 
at each end, with four pin-connected trusses, to which the 
floor system of the bridge is suspended. The floor of the 
bridge is divided into a centre roadway 28 feet 6 inches wide 
between centres of trusses, two side roadways varying in 
width from 27 feet 6 inches to 29 feet 6 inches between 
centre lines of trusses. A portion of each side roadway is 
occupied by a sidewalk 7 feet 6 inches in width. 

The trusses vary in length from 137 feet to 144 feet be- 
tween centres of end pins, and are 22 feet in depth between 
centres of top and bottom chord-pins. 

The roadway stringers are 4-inch x 14-inch hard pine 
spaced 2 feet 3 inches on centres. Roadway planking is in 
two courses ; the under course of 4-inch spruce, the upper 
course of 2-incli vulcanized spruce. The sidewalk planking 
is 2-inch hard pine. 

Contracts for doing the filling required to raise the streets 
on either side of the railroad to the new grades were made 
with the Boston & Albany R.R. on June 3, 1892, and with 
Christopher McBride on August 1, 1892. 

The Boston & Albany R.R. Co. commenced work on 
the contract on August 6, and completed the same on Sep- 
tember 24, depositing 26,577 cubic yards in Cambridge, 
Lincoln, and Mansfield streets, on the north side of the 
bridge, at 51 cents per cubic yard, and Christopher McBride, 
between August G and October 24, deposited 17,478 cubic 
yards in Cambridge and Linden streets and Highland avenue, 
on the south side of the railroad, at 57 cents per cubic 
yard. 

For the finished surface of the streets about 2,000 cubic 
yards of stone and gravel were furnished, watered, and 
rolled by Neil McBride and Wm. Scollans, at a cost of 
$2,469.76. 

Buildings affected by the chano'es of o-rade have been 
raised to conform to the revised grades, and the lots re- 
graded ; new fences have been built on the lines of the streets, 
edgestones reset, and gutters repaved. 

The total amount expended to date is $107,743.06. 

Of this amount the Boston & Albany E.R. Co. has paid 
$40,000. 



Engineering Department. 31 

Boston Common. 
Plans and specifications were made for reconstructing the 
steps in Boston Common opposite Joy street, to improve 
the descent. A bid from Austin Ford, of Cambridgeport, to 
do the work for $550 was accepted August 17, and the work 
was done in November. 

Castle Island Bridge. 

(See page 148.) 

Charles-river Pollution. 

In September and October, 1892, at the request of your 
Honor, an examination of the Charles River was made, to 
ascertain the nature and location of the sources of its pollu- 
tion. Previous examinations of a similar nature had been 
made by the State Board of Health (see Report dated Janu- 
ary, 1876), and by the Massachusetts Drainage Commission 
(see Report of 1886). 

The sources of pollution found, and a few others, in- 
formation concerning which was obtained by correspondence 
with the local boards of health, are given in the list which 
follows : 

The list contains also a number of drains from manu- 
facturing establishments, etc., which were not found to be 
contaminating the river, but of which a record is of interest. 
Factories in course of construction, or those which have 
adopted means of preventing pollution, and sewers and 
drains which have been abandoned, or which discharge 
nothing but storm water, are included in the latter category. 
Where pollution was observed, its nature is shown in the 
fifth column of the table ; and where no pollution was ob- 
served, the fifth column is left blank. 

Several of the establishments and drains which were 
polluting the river when the examination was made have 
since ceased to do so. This is the case especially in 
Waltham and Watertown, where the discharge has, in many 
cases, been diverted into the local sewers which flow into 
the South Metropolitan system. Other pollutions will 
probably be diverted from the river in a few months. In 
either of these cases, if the fact is known to this department, 
it is noted in the column headed "Remarks added Januarv, 
1893." 

In cases where it is known that the State Board of Health 
has discussed means of stopping the pollution, reference to 
their discussion is made in the same column, which contains 
also in some cases a note as to the obvious course to be 
pursued in putting an end to the pollution. 



32 



City Document No. 10. 



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33 













Systems of sew- 
age disposal for 
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near river. No plan as 
yet for sewage disposal. 

Rebuilding — will employ 
about 5 hands. 

Very little wool is scoured. 

Run only part of the year. 

Scour some wool, but not 
so much as formerly. 
The pollution here is a 
cause of complaint at Ray 
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35 



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36 



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Engineering Department. 



43 




These will soon 
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town sewer 
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These will soon 
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1 Will soon enter 

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City Document No. 10. 






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61 



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62 



City Document No. 10 



Remarks added 
January, 1893. 






Remarks. 


Ordinary flow runs into 
another sewer, whence it 
goes to Moon Island. 

Ordinary flow goes by an 
18-in. pipe into the Pyn- 
chon St. sewer, and so to 
Moon Island. 

Ordinary flow goes by a 9- 
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st. sewer, ;\nd so to Moon 
Island. 

Ordinary flow goes by a 10- 
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st. sewer, and so to Moon 
Island. 

Ordinary flow goes by a 10- 
iii. pipe across the brook 
and into the Stony-brook 
Sewer in private land, 
and so goes to Moon 
Island. 


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Storm overflow from 48-in. X 
30-in. sewer in Pynchon st. . 

Storm overflow from 18-in. 


Storm overflow from 20-in. x 
16-in. sewer in New Heath st. 

Storm overflow from 39-in. X 
30-in. sewer in Centre st. . . 

Storm overflow from 35-in. X 
27-in. sewer in Hoffmann St., 




Pynchon St., sewer overflow . 

Pyncbou and Cedar sts., 18-in. 
sev.'er overflow 

Pynchon and New Heath sts., 
I5-iu. sewer overflow .... 

Pynchon and Centre sts., 39- 
in. X 36-in. sewer overflow . 

Opposite Hoffmann st , 18-in. 
X 20-in. sewer overflow . . 


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63 



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64 



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70 



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MAF' or eHABtBS RIVEK 

PfUNCtPAL 50U(lCfiB or POLLUrjEJN 




Principal Sources of Pollution 

Oct. 1892 



Engineering Department. 



71 



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72 City Docibient No. 10. 

Considered with reference to pollution, the Charles Kiver 
may be divided into three portions : the upper river, includ- 
ing everythiniz: above the mouth of Boggistere Brook in 
Millis ; the middle portion : reaching from the mouth of 
Boggistere Brook to the lower dam at Watertown ; and the 
tidal portion, reaching from the Watertown Dam to Boston 
Harbor. 

The upper portion receives considerable sewage and 
factory waste, in |)ro[)ortion to the natural flow of the 
stream. The middle portion, except at its very lower end, 
receives very little sewage, excei)t that from the upper divis- 
ion of the river. The tidal portion receives a great pro- 
portion of sewage, even considering the tidal Avater with 
which it is twice a day flushed. The l)ed and banks of this 
portion are very foul, and in some places are oflensive to 
both sight and smell. 

Starting at Milford, the upper division of the river is 
bordered l)y Ilopedale, Belllngham, Franklin, Medway, 
Norfolk, Millis, and Medfleld. In Franklin it receives the 
waters of Mine Brook and in Norfolk of Mill River. In 
Medfleld Stop River, and in Millis, Boggistere Brook enter 
the main stream, coming from Norfolk and Holliston respec- 
tively. This division of the river receives, directly or 
through its tri]>utarics, nranufacturing waste from twenty-four 
establishments, at eight of which wool is scoured. It receives, 
also, the day sewage of about 1,938 operatives, and the 
domestic sewage of a number of families, besides the discharge 
from two sewers at Milford. The water, in several places 
Avhere the total flow is small, notably in Boggistere Brook at 
East Holliston, in Mine Brook at Franklin, and in the main 
river at Milford, is quite foul. But, diluted by fre(j[uent 
accessions of clean water, the appearance of the stream be- 
comes very much improved as it approaches the mouth of 
Boggistere Brook, the head of the second division. 

As it flows thence, l)ordered by Sherborn, Dover, Natick, 
the southern end of Wellesley, Needham, Dedham, West 
Roxbury, and Newton, the stream receives but little sewage 
and hardly any factory waste until it reaches the mouth of 
Rosemary Brook in Wellesley, from which brook it receives 
the day sewage of about 180 operatives in the Union Cycle 
Works at Highland ville in Needham. At the Lower Falls 
in the north-eastern part of Wellesley it receives waste from 
a hosiery mill, a paper mill, and a shcxldy mill, and the day 
sewage of about 193 operatives. A little factory waste 
comes from the Newton side at this point. Weston con- 
tributes but little that is objectionable. In October, when 
the examination was made, Waltham, Watertown, and the 



Engineering Department. 73 

northern part of Newton discharged into the river a large 
amount of ofl'ensive factory- waste , the day sewage of about 
5,400 operatives, and the domestic sewage of about 93 
families ; but a large part of the discharge from Watertown, 
Waltham, and Newton has since been diverted into the 
South ^Metropolitan Sewer. 

The middle division of the river does not ap})ear to be 
offensive to sight and smell, except between Waltham and 
Watertown. Above Waltham the Avater, though brownish 
in color, does not look unclean, and analyses reported by 
the Stale Board of Health show that it is not very foul. The 
offensiveness complained of above the dam at Watertown 
must therefore ]je due principally to the sewage and factory 
Avaste received from Waltham, Watertown, and the northern 
])art of Newton, and when this discharge has l)een entirely 
diverted into the Metro})olitan Sewer, as it soon will ])e, and 
any existing deposits of filth have been removed from the 
river, the nuisance above the dam will ])robably be al)ated, 
so that the entire middle division of the river will be inoffen- 
sive to the senses. 

Needham, Dedham, Brookline, Newton, Wellesley, Wal- 
tham, Watertown, and Belmont take their water supplies 
from filter basins, filter galleries, or large wells on or near 
the banks of this portion of the Charles. These supplies, 
except that of Needham, are prol)ably sul)ject at times to the 
}jercolation of river water. The works of Dedham, Brook- 
line, and Ne^vton have also a direct connection with the river, 
and the Wellesley works, with Rosemary Brook, for use in 
emergencies. The aggregate })opulation of the cities and 
towns which are supplied with ground water from the banks 
of the middle portion of the Charles is al)out 75,000. Ice is 
cut on the river at Waltham, and at Cow Island in West 
Roxbury.^ 

The tidal portion of the river received in Octo))er from 
Watertown consideralile factory and water-closet drainage ; 
from Brighton the whole sewage of about 6,500 people and 
the drainage of the Abattoir, the Trijjc Works, and a wool- 
washing esta1:»lishment ; from Cambridge the sewage of 
nearly the whole population and that of a part of Somer- 

1 Note. — Other water-supplies taken from the Charles River water-shed are as 
follows ; Milford aud llopedale are supplied from three wells ou the banks of the 
Charles above all sources of pollution, liollistou takes its water from a well near an 
uncontaminated pond on a l)ranch of Bopgisterc Brook, and Concord from Sandy 
Pond in Linc(^ln, at the head-waters of the Weston Stony Brook. Cambridge has 
built a storage liasin ou Stony Brook near its junction with the Charles. All the fore- 
going arc in-obably free from pollution. Franklin's supply comes from a well near 
Mine Brook lielow the village, where the brook is cei'tainly contaminated. Ice is i-ut 
on Cedar Swamp Pond in Milford, which is contaminated by drainage from several 
dwellings. 



74 City Document No. 10. 

ville,- besides the drainage of North's and Squire's pork- 
packing houses. Charlestown contributed the sewage of 
al)0ut 19,100 people; Boston proper tliat of, perhaps, 200 
families ; and Koxbury and West Roxbury the sewage of 150 
families, considerable sink-drainage, and a little factory- 
waste. 

Since October a part of the Watertown and Brighton sew- 
age has been diverted into the Metropolitan Sewer, and nearly 
all the rest, including the Abattoir drainage, will probably 
be diverted before the summer of 1893. Boston is taking 
measures to put an end to nearly all the pollution which 
comes from the south bank of the river, but the sewage of 
Cambridge, Somerville, and Charlestown cannot be diverted 
until the North Metropolitan Sewer is ready to receive it. 

The amount of sewage discharged into Charles River from 
two of the Cambridge sewers, between Craigie's Bridge and 
the West Boston Bridge, is probably as great as the sum of 
all discharges of sewage or other filth into the whole river 
above the latter point, but the volume of salt water with 
which it is diluted is so very great that the river between 
these bridges does not seem to be so foul as at other points on 
the tidal stream where the discharge of sewage and the volume 
of tidal water are both less. The most offensive place seems 
to be at the North Beacon-st. Bridge just above the Brighton 
Abattoir and one of the Brighton sewers, though above and 
below the North Harvard-st. Bridge it is nearly as foul. 

The filth in the bed of the river between the l^ridge at the 
Arsenal and the Watertown Dam is probably for the most part 
sewage and refuse brought up by the tide from the Brighton 
and Old Cambridge sewers, and from the Brighton Abattoir, 
and deposited at slack water. This deposition of filth may 
be expected to diminish when the Brighton sewage and the 
Abattoir drainage are diverted into the Metropolitan, and to 
diminish still further when the Cambridge sewage is diverted. 

The surface of the water between Cambridge and Boston- 
is made unsightly by floating rulibish consisting of chips, 
shavings, and small sticks, grass, paper, manure, dead 
animals, and the like. A part of this rulibish is probably 
unavoidably blown into the river, a part is thrown over- 
board from vessels, but the greater part of it. prol)al)ly 
comes from the numerous public and private dumps on the 
banks of the river, and on the adjoining marshes. The 
dumps at the rear of the Abattoir are especially objectionable 
on account of the temptation they ofl'er for easily getting rid 
of very foul refuse. 

A large part of the rain water which falls on the streets of 
Boston goes into the common sewers, and when the volume 



CTTY OF BOSTON-ENCINEERINC DEPAKTMEMT. 

SECTION PROHLES OF PROPOSED TUNNEL 

CONHECTINC 

BOSTON PROPER AND EAST BOSTON. 
JAN. 1093. 




5he£:t No. 2 






f^aH.^ 



Engineering Department. 75 

of water becomes too great to be taken care of by the inter- 
cepting sewers, the sur})his is discharged into tide Avater by 
means of the " storm overtiows ; " the street wash itself is 
sometimes very uuiddy, and it takes with it the sewage with 
which it has become mixed. 

Cambridge and Charlestown, being also sewered on the 
" combined " system, Avill have to adopt a like system of over- 
flows when they make connection with the Mctro})olitan 
Sewer. Therefore, even after tlic com[)lction of the Metro- 
politan system, heavy storms must still produce some dis- 
coloration and pollution of the water in the Charles-river 
basin. 

East Boston Tunnel. 

In compliance with the following order, dated April 18, 
1802, plans and estimates have been prepared for eight 
diflcrent plans (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H) for a tunnel 
connecting East Boston with the city })roper : 

" Ordered, That the City Engineer be requested to prepare 
plans for the construction of a tunnel from East Boston to 
the city proper ; the expense thereof not to exceed one 
thousand dollars, to be charged to the appropriation for 
incidental expenses." 

Proposed Routes. 

No. 1 has been selected with especial reference to the 
present street-car system ; it extends from the corner of 
Hanover and Richmond streets in the city proper to the 
corner of London and Decatur streets in East Boston, and is 
almost a straiijht line throu<ihout its lenixth. Commcncinui; 
at the corner of Hanover and Richmond streets, the line of 
the tunnel passes under Prince, Garden Court, Fleet, Clark, 
North, and Commercial streets, descending from Richmond 
street to Commercial street by a five-per-cent. grade to tlie 
latter street, where elevators connecting the tunnel with the 
surface are proposed; thence by descending and ascending 
grades of five per cent, or less under portions of Union 
and Lincoln wharves, the channel, Maverick and Kelly's 
wharves, to a point near the corner of Siamier and Liver- 
pool streets, where elevators on the East Boston side of the 
tunnel are proposed ; thence by an ascending grade of four 
and three-quarters per cent, under Liverpool and INlaverick 
streets, and along the west side of London street to Decatur 
street. 

No. 2 lies to the south of the previous route. It begins 
in the city proper, at the corner of Commercial and Clinton 
streets, and terminates at the corner of IMeridian and Paris 



76 City Document No. 10. 

streets in East Boston. Commencing at the corner of 
Commercial and Clinton streets, the approach to the tunnel 
passes at the present grades of the surface to the corner of 
Cross and Fulton streets, where the tunnel descends by a 
four-per-cent. grade under Richmond, Lewis, and Com- 
mercial streets ; thence by descending and ascending grades 
under Eastern avenue, Sargent's wharf, and the channel to 
the South Ferry on the East Boston side of the harbor; 
thence by an ascending grade of about three per cent, through 
and under Lewis street, under Sumner street, Maverick 
square, and Maverick street, to the intersection of Meridian 
and Paris streets. 

No. 3 lies to the south of both routes Nos. 1 and 2. It 
begins on Commercial street, between State and Commerce 
streets, and ends at the corner of Meridian and Paris streets 
in East Boston. Commencing at Commercial street, the 
tunnel passes ])y a four and one-tenth per cent, grade under 
the block of Ijuildings lying l)ctween State and Commerce 
streets ; thence by the same descending grade under Atlantic 
avenue and portions of Long, T, and Commercial wharves to 
the pier line ; thence by descending and ascending grades 
under the channel to the South Ferry on the East Boston 
side of the harl>or ; and thence by a three and one-tenth per 
cent, ascending grade through and under Lewis street, under 
Sumner street, Maverick square, and jVIaverick street to the 
intersection of Meridian and Paris streets. 

Plans. 

Plan A contem])lates a single tunnel with inclined ap- 
proaches on Route "No. 1," and is designed for two lines of 
street cars and a walk ten feet wide for pedestrians, with 
passenger elevators on both sides of the water, near the pier 
lines. 

This tunnel will be about live thousand feet long, and Avill 
cost, including land damages, $3, 315,000 ; the land damages 
being estimated at |710,d00. 

-PZcm i? contemplates two tunnels with inclined aj^i^roaches 
under the channel on Route "No. 1," each tunnel being de- 
signed for a sin2:le street-car line and a walk six feet wide 
for pedestrians, with passenger elevators on both sides of the 
water, near the pier lines. 

This tunnel will l)e about five thousand feet long, and will 
cost, including land damages, $3,996,000 ; the land damages 
being estimated at $710,000. 

Plan G contemplates the single larger passenger tunnel on 
the harbor portion of Route " No 1 ; " but instead of having 
the inclined approaches, there are sets of three passenger and 



Engineering Department. 77 

three street-car lifts at each end of the tunnel, — one on Com- 
mercial street in the city proper, and the other on Sumner 
street, near Liverpool street, in East Boston. 

This tunnel will be about two thousand five hundred feet 
lono;, and will cost, including land damages, $2,430,000 ; the 
land damages being estimated at $147,000. 

Plan D is the same as Plan C, except that it contemplates 
two smaller passenger tunnels, instead of the single larger 
one. This tunnel will be about two thousand five hundred 
feet long, and will cost, including land damages, $2,974,000 ; 
the land damages being estimated at $147,000. 

Plan ^contemplates a single tunnel Avith a roadway 27 feet 
wide, having inclined approaches at each end on Route " No. 
2," and is designed for carriages and teams solely. It will 
be about five thousand nine hundred feet long, and will cost, 
including land damages, $4,026,000 ; the land damages being 
estimated at $1,175,000. 

Plan F is the same as Plan E, except that it contemplates 
two tunnels instead of a single one, each tunnel having a 
roadway 18 feet wide. It will be about five thousand nine 
hundred feet long, and will cost, including land damages, 
$4,973,000 ; the hmd damages being estimated at $1,200,000. 

Plan G contemplates a single tunnel, with a roadway 27 
feet wide, having inclined approaches at each end on Route 
'^No. 3," and is designed for carriages and teams solely. 
This tunnel will be aliout five thousand nine hundred feet 
long, and will cost, including land damages, $3,875,000 ; 
the land damages being estimated at $1,115,000. 

Plan TI \fi the same as Plan G, except that it contemplates 
two smaller tunnels instead of the single larger one. This 
tunnel will be about five thousand nine hundred feet long, 
and will cost, including land damages, $4,775,000 ; the land 
damages being estimated at $1,115,000. 

The above estimates have been based on an iron tunnel 
lined with brick, and provision has been made for the use of 
compressed air and the l)uilding of proper shields for driv- 
ing the headings. 

No borings have been made, as the amount of the appro- 
priation was not sufiicient for that purpose ; and the plans 
have necessaril}^ been made on the assumption that the mate- 
rial to be encountered would be of a 3delding nature, like 
gravel or clay. 

If desired, the tunnels on Routes " Nos. 2 and 3 " could be 
built for foot passengers and car trafiic ; the estimated cost 
being practicalh" the same as for the teaming tunnels. It 
would also be possible to build on either of the three routes 
both passenger-trafiic and teaming-traffic tunnels. 



78 City Document No, 10. 

Electric Lighting. 

Several estimates have lieen prepared of tlie cost of esta] )- 
lisbing and maintaining an electric-lighting plant for the city. 
Messrs. Stone & Webster were engaged as Consulting Engi- 
neers. 

The details of the estimate are given in City Doc. 48, 
1893. 

Ferry Department. 

The work on the foundation for the head-house and rebuild- 
ing part of two ferry-piers at the East Boston landing of the 
North Ferry, which was begun October 24, 1891, by Nay & 
Ellis, as mentioned in the last report, was resumed April 19, 
1892, and the work was completed August 1 ; the cost of 
the contract work was $9,449. 

Plans and s})eciiications were made for an additional drop 
foundation and the contract for doing the work, except fur- 
nishing the piles, was awarded, June 27, to Nay & Ellis. 
The work was finished in July, at a cost for contract work of 
$1,640. 

Plans and specifications have been made for changing the 
location of the head-house and rebuilding two ferry-piers at 
the Boston landing of the North Ferry. 

L-street Bridge. 
The following act was passed by the Legislature of 1892 : 

[Chap. 12.] 

An Act to extend the time for building a public highway 
• bridge across the reserved channel in south boston. 

Beii enacted, etc., asfollou's: 

Section 1. The time for completing the bridge across the reserved 
channel on the South Boston flats in tlie city of Boston, authorized by 
chapter tliree hundred and eight^^-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-one, is hereby extended to the thirty-first day of 
December in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two ; and if said 
bridge is completed before said day the Commonwealth shall reimburse 
said city the ]5ortion of the cost thereof provided for in said act, the 
same as if said bridge had been (completed before the first day of 
August in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-two. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

l^Apxirovcd February 13, 1892. 

On the approval of this act the contract for building the 
L-strcet Bridge between the abutments, with the exception 
of the iron draw, was awarded to William L. Miller, of Bos- 
ton, the lowest bidder, for $91,743; the bridge to be 
finished December 1. The work was begun February 29, 
and was completed October 12, 1892. 



Engineering Department. 79 

The bridge is 60 feet wide between fences, and is built of 
hard-pine timber on an oak-pile foundation. There are two 
sidewalks, each 8 feet wide, covered with asphalt on a base 
of coal-tar concrete. The roadway is 44 feet wide, except 
at the draw, where it is divided into two roadways, each ol 
19 feet in width. The roadway is covered with 6-inch hard- 
pine floor ; this is coated with an asphalt compound ; on this 
a layer of fine coal-tar concrete, 3 inches thick and rolled; 
above this is a granite-block paving laid on a bed of sand, 
having the joints filled with pebbles and run with hot paving- 
cement. 

There are two piers and a wharf on the Congress-street side 
of the channel, and fender guards on the L- street side. The 
drawway is 40 feet in width, and is planked vertically. 

There is one draw of the retractile type, having three 
lines of girders, the middle line dividing the roadway into 
two parts. The width between centres of outside girders is 
53 feet ; the space along the middle of the draw occupied by 
the middle girders and fenders is 4 feet ; there are two side- 
walks of 5 feet 6 inches each, and two roadways of 19 feet 
each. 

Each line of girders is composed of two non-continuous 
plate girder-spans, one of which spans the channel ; the 
other, or rear span, being supported on trucks running on 
tracks built on the draw foundation. 

When the draw is in position for travel, the front end of 
the channel span rests on shoe plates on the draw landing of 
the main bridge, the other end being attached to and sup- 
ported by the rear span by a pin connection. When the 
draw is in motion or run off, the front end of the channel 
span is supported by suspension rods passing over Samson 
posts on the rear span to back end of this span, proper 
counter-balances of cast-iron boxes filled with lead being- 
provided where necessary. 

The draw is operated by steam power ; the draw and ma- 
chinery for operating it were designed by this department. 

The contract for building and erecting the draw was made 
August 3, with the King Bridge Company, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, for 19,970. The first load of iron arrived at the 
bridge October 18, and the draw was completed November 
15. 

The draw-tender's house, which is on the Congress-street 
side of the channel, was built by Thomas Keyey, of South 
Boston; ,the engine-house was built b}^ William Miller; the 
trucks were furnished l)y Charles Carr, of Boston ; the ma- 
chinery was built by Miller & Shaw, of Cambridge. 

The cost of the bridge, draw, buildings, machinery, etc.. 



80 City Document No. 10. 

but not including the abutment or wing walls, was $119,- 
572.38. The sum of $50,166.21 has been paid to the City 
by the Commonwealth, as provided by Chapter 388 of the 
Acts of 1891, and Chapter 12 of the Acts of 1892. 
The bridge has not yet been opened to travel. 

L-STREET Bridge Abutment. 
(See page 163.) 

L-street Bridge Retaining-walls. 
(See page 163.) 

Malden-bridge Draw. 
(See page 163.) 

ROXBURY-CANAL SeA-WALL. 

(See page 163.) 

Rapid Transit. 

The investigations of the Rapid Transit problem have 
been continued. 

Robert G. Shaw Monument. 
The following orders were passed by City Council : 

Ordered, That permission be and hereby is granted for the 
location, under the supervision of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Grounds, of a monument in honor of Colonel Robert G. 
Shaw, on Boston Common, in front of the State House, and 
between the Beacon street mall and the sidewalk on Beacon 
street. 

Further Ordered, That the sum of $19,500 be and hereby 
is appropriated for the construction of a suitable base and 
pedestal for said monument ; said sum to be expended under 
the direction of the City Engineer, and to be charged to the 
special appropriation heretofore made for statues of Grant, 
Sheridan, and Farragut. 

And in compliance with them, after several consultations 
with City Architect Edmund M. Wheel wi'ight, conferences 
were had with Messrs. John M. Forbes, Henry Lee, Martin 
P. Kennard, and Edward Atkinson, a committee having 
charge of the monument, with Mr. Augustus St. Gaudens, 
the sculptor, and with Messrs. McKim, Mead, & White, the 
architects of the pedestal. It was thought that there was a 



ENmNEERTNG DEPARTMENT. 81 

possibility that the building of the monument as proposed 
might cause injury to the two trees enclosed by it, and in 
reply to the question raised the following correspondence 
was forwarded to me : 

Boston, July 27, 1892. 
M. P. Kennard, Esq. : 

Dear Sir : Herewith I beg to present to you the plans 
and specifications for the proposed monument to Col. R. G. 
Shaw. 

In explanation of them, I wish to say that the plans have 
been drawn carefully with regard to the preservation of the 
two elm-trees on the site. The walls are supported by piers 
and arches, so as to keep the roots of the trees from being- 
damaged, while suitable openings are provided for the inlet 
of rain-water and air. I enclose letters from Messrs Henry 
S. Codman, H. H. Hunnewell, and C. S. Sargent, whose 
indorsement of the scheme proposed ought to be, in my 
opinion, satisfactory evidence of its feasibility. 

With regard to the specification, I beg to say that, accord- 
ing to information received from Mr. William Jackson, the 
City Engineer, the form of the contract and specification will 
have to be arranged in his ofiice, in accordance with the rules of 
the city ; therefore the specification presented, while contain- 
ing all the requirements I consider necessary'- for the construc- 
tion, is to be regarded as an explanation of my views on the 
subject, which I wish to see embodied in the contract. 

In conclusion, I beg to say that although the superintend- 
ence of the work is to be done by Mr. William Jackson, the 
City Engineer, I reserve the right of the artistic superin- 
tendence of the work for myself or representative. 

I remain. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) Augustus St. Gaudens. 

Accompanying this : 1 specification, 2 letters, 8 drawings. 

BrooivLine, Mass., June 17, 1892. 

My dear Sir : I have examined the plans and specifi- 
cations for the proposed terrace to be built on Beacon street, 
opposite the State House in Boston, to support the Shaw 
monument, with reference to its probable effect upon two 
large elm-trees, the trunks of which you wish to enclose in 
the structure. 



82 City Document No. 10. 

If the terrace walls are supported on iron beams resting on 
masonry piers, or upon arches so that the roots of the trees 
may have an opportunity to extend freely beyond the area to 
l)e occupied by the structure, and if the grade of the bank on 
which the trees now stand is not altered either by removing 
or by adding soil to it, I see no reason why the trees should 
suffer. The open spaces around the trunks which you pro- 
pose will allow the water falling on the surface of the terrace, 
if this is graded properly, to reach the roots of the trees, 
and the openings in the side and rear walls of the terrace 
will furnish ventilation to the enclosed ground. 

I believe, therefore, that the terrace can be built, if the 
slio'lit modifications I have suooested in the construction of 
the foundations are made, without impairing the health or 
shortening the lives of the trees. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) C. S. Sargent. 
A. St. Gaudens, Esq. 

June 22, 1892. 

My dear St. Gaudens : I saw Mr. Hunnewell Sunday, 
and explained to him as well as I could what your plan was 
in regard to the Shaw monument. He said that his expe- 
rience in filling up with soil about trees had been an unfortu- 
nate one, but that if you left the space entirely open under 
the floor, as you propose to do, he thought there would be 
little damage. He expressed his opinion that great care 
should be used in digging the foundations for the piers which 
carry the monument, and which carry the walls of the ter- 
race, to cut as few of the roots as possible, and that, where 
necessary, bridge stones should be used to preserve the 
roots. 

Our opinion, as I have already expressed to you verbally, 
and as I have no doubt Mr. Olmsted would were he here, is 
a very similar one : that if proper precautions are taken, we 
do not think any injury will be done to the trees. We can- 
not urge too strongly that great care should be taken not to 
cut the roots in building the foundations. 

We think that the gratings about the trees should be as 
large as is consistent with your design of seats, and that the 
floor of the terrace should be sloped in such a way that the 
water fallino- on it will drain to these oratino-s. The trees 
will thus get water in about the normal quantity, and if 
some precaution is taken to prevent this water from imme- 
diately flowing down the bank, we think they wdll thrive as 
well as they do now. It would be a good opportunity to 



Engineering Department. ^3 

enrich the soil, and this should not be forgotten, nor should 
the ventilation which was suggested. 
Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Henry Sargent Codman. 

Mr. Augustus St. Gtaudens, 148 West 36th Street, New 
Yorh, JSr. Y. : 

Dear Sir : Agreeably to your request, I will here say 
that the above letter of Mr. Codman's is in conformity with 
the conversation I had with him in regard to the proposed 
plan of the Shaw monument, and that I fully concur with 
hiin in the opinion that no appreciable injury will be caused 
to the trees if the proper precautions, as suggested, are 
taken in doing the work. Great care will be necessary 
in protecting their roots when digging for the foundations, 
and to avoid making any change in the present level of the 
ground by filling up around the trees with soil or any other 
material. 

Yours truly, 
(Signed) H. H. Hunnewell. 

Wellesley, June 29. 

Upon the receipt of the above, the preparation of the con- 
tracts and specifications was commenced. Bids were invited 
from several parties, approved by IMr. St. Gaudens and by 
the Messrs. McKim, Mead, & White, and the contract was 
awarded to Norcross Brothers, of Worcester, Mass., the low- 
est bidder, at $17,980. It is hoped that the monument will 
be completed during the coming summer. 

West Boston Bridge. 

A contract was made with John L. P. Ackers, of Cam- 
l)ridge, in June, 1892, for painting the fences, gates, and 
draw of West Boston Bridge with two coats of pure white- 
lead and raw linseed-oil. The total length of fences painted 
on the bridge, exclusive of the draw, was 4,329 feet; the 
length of the draw being 141 feet. The contract price for 
doing the work w^as $429.50, one-half of which was paid by 
the city of Cambridge. 

A contract was made with Gore & Co win June 20, 1892, 
for paving the roadway of West Boston Bridge from the 
draw to the Boston abutment, with the exception of about 
112 feet in length by 11 feet in width and the space between 
the street-car rails. 

Such old blocks as were found suitable were used in the 



84 City Document No. 10. 

new work, all others beins: new blocks and furnished by the 
contractor. The cost of the work was $936.65, one-half of 
which was paid by the city of Cambridge. 

Western-avenue or Arsenal-street Bridge (to 
Watertown) . 

Plans and estimates have been made in previous years 
for rebuilding this bridge in order to do away with the sharp 
angle which the opening for the passage of vessels makes 
with the channel, thus making it very inconvenient for the 
passage of vessels through the draw ; but the town of Water- 
town, not wishing to cooperate with the city in doing the 
work, has made it necessary to delay the same from year 
to year. 

In September, 1890, Congress passe.d an act whereby the 
sum of $20,000 was appropriated for dredging the Charles 
River above the Western-avenue Bridge, provided, however, 
that the draws in the Western-avenue and North Beacon- 
street Bridges be made to conform to the projected channel 
without cost to the United States. 

Accordingly plans were made by this department for 
rebuilding the bridges so as to have the drawways conform 
to the projected channel, and these were approved by the 
Secretary of War, July 20, 1892. 

Whereas, By an act of Congress approved September 19, 1890, en- 
titled "An act making appropriations for the construction, repair, and 
presei'vation of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for 
other purposes," the sum of twenty thousand dollars was appropriated 
for continuing the impi'ovement of Charles river, at Boston, Massachu- 
setts, to be expended under the direction of the Secretary of War ; and 

Whereas, It is provided by the said act of Congress that no expendi- 
ture of said twenty thousand dollars shall l)e made until th e draws 
in the Arsenal-street and Market-street bridges shall be made to con- 
form to the projected channel, without cost to the United States ; and 

Whereas, The city of Boston, Massachusetts, has submitted to the 
Secretary of War, for his examination and approval, plans for rebuild- 
ing the drawways in the Market-street and Arsenal-street bridges 
across Charles river, at Boston, ]\Iassachusetts, so as to make the draw- 
ways conform to the projected channel ; now. 

Therefore, I, Stephen B. Elkins, Secretary of War, having examined 
and considered the said plans, wliich are hereto attached, do hereby 
approve the same, subject, however, to the following condition : 

That the engineer officer of the United States Army, in charge of the 
district within which the bridges ai'e located, may supervise their alter- 
ation, in order that said plans shall be complied with. 

Witness my hand this twentieth day of July, 1892. 

(Signed) S. B. Elkins, 

Secretary of War. 



Engineering Department, 85 

The Conditions of this Instrument are hereby accepted by the 
city of Boston, INIassachusetts, by its Mayor, thei'eimto lawfully author- 
ized, this fourteenth day of July, 1892. 

(Signed) N. Matthews, Jr., 



In presence of 

(Signed) Nathaniel II. Taylor. 
(Signed) James A. McKibben. 



Mayor. 



Previous to the rebuilding of the bridge the abutment on 
the Watertown side was rebuilt by that town ; plans being 
furnished hy this department. A contract was made Sep- 
tember 12, 1892, with Trumbull & Kyan, of Boston and 
Lawrence, for doing the work, the contract price being 
$1,639.39. 

The plans for rebuilding the bridge call for a wooden 
pile-bridge 33 feet wide between fences, and a sidewalk 8 
feet wide on the down-stream side of the bridge, the pier 
forming an angle of 50° with the street, and a clear width 
of opening for the passage of vessels of 36 feet. 

October 25, 1892, a contract was made with Benj. Young, 
of Chelsea, for doing the work, which was commenced Novem- 
ber 1, 1892, and was nearly completed early in January, 1893, 
when, owing to the severity of the weather, the contractor 
was unable to prosecute the work with diligence, and will 
be unable to complete the work until the ice breaks up in 
the river. 

January 7, 1893, a contract was made with the Boston 
Bridge Works for furnishing an iron swing-draw 29 feet 
in width, including a 6-foot sidewalk on the down-stream side 
of the bridge ; to be erected on the oak-pile foundation al- 
ready built. The draw is now in process of construction at 
the shops of the Boston Bridge Works. The contract price 
for doing the work is $9,250. 



86 City Document No. 10. 



B. 



[FKOM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE BOSTON 
WATER BOARD.] 

Sir : I hereby submit the following report of the work 
done and records kept during the past year, for your Board : 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall during the past year was the smallest since 
1883, and the percentage collected was also unusually small. 
The storage in the several lakes and reservoirs was gradually 
reduced during the summer and fall months until November, 
when all fears of a short supply were removed by the large 
rainfall during that month. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds Avere as follows : 





Sudbury. 


Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


Rainfall in inches 


41.83 


39.04 


39.115 


" collected in 








inches 


16.456 


15.35 


15.98 


Daily average yield 








of water-shed, gal- 








lons 


58,753,000 


13,753,500 


20,390, 7( 



The quality of the water from all the supplies has been 
as good as usual, and the supply from Sudbury river is 
gradually being improved. 

The condition of the dilferent reservoirs during the year is 
given below. 

Reservoir No. 1. — Water was wasting at the dam from 
January 3 to April 15, and from May 12 to June 7. 

No water was wasted for the balance of the year, except 
during six days in November and ten days in December, 
other than the daily flow of one and a half million gallons 
required by law. 

The dam is in good condition. 

Reservoir JSFo. 2. — Water was flowing over the dam 
almost constantly from January 4 to July 10. From this 
date till August 18 the surfiice of this reservoir was gradu- 



Engineering Department. 87 

ally lower, and at the latter date was at grade 161.36, or 
5.76 feet below the top of the flash-boards. 

During the lialaiice of the year the surface of this reser- 
voir rose and fell, reaching its lowest point on November 10, 
when it was 7.58 feet below the top of flash-boards; on 
January 1, 1890, it was 4.08 below. 

The dam of Reservoir 2 is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 3. — The water in this reservoir was 8.05 
feet below the crest of the dam on January 1, but was flow- 
ing over the crest on January 18, and continued to do so 
almost constantly until the last of June. From this date 
the surface gradually fell until August 26, when it was 6.20 
feet below the crest of the dam. This was the lowest point 
reached during the year. On January 1, 1893, it stood at 
grade 171.58, or 3.66 feet below the crest of the dam. The 
dam of this reservoir is in good condition. 

Ileservoir JSTo. 4. — The surface of the water in this res- 
ervoir was 6.36 feet below the crest of the dam, on January 
1, but had filled to overflowing on January 21, and contin- 
ued in this condition until August 16, when the gates were 
opened to furnish a portion of the supply for the city. 
From this date the water gradually fell to grade about 
185.34, or 28.87 feet below the crest of the dam, when the 
outlet gate was closed. On January 1, 1893, the water had 
risen to grade 194,22, or 19.99 feet below the crest of the 
dam. The dam at Reservoir 4 is in good condition. 

Farm Pond. — The water in this pond has been kept at 
an average height of 148.92 aljovc tide marsh level. The 
conduit through the pond was used all the year except from 
May 14 to July 20, and from August 18 to August 30, 
when the supply was drawn through the pond. 

The Framingham Water Company has pumped 82,800,000 
gallons from the pond, an average of 226,200 gallons per day. 

Lahe Cochituate. — On January 1 the water in this lake 
was 7.02 feet below high- water mark, and the lake did not 
fill until May 4. Water was wasting at dam on May 20 to 
24, and May 26 to 28, inclusive. 

The lake continued near high-water mark until the latter 
part of June when it began to tall, and continued to do so 
with great regularity until Noveml^er 13, when it was 6.80 
feet below high-water mark. 

The lowest point reached was on December 8, when it was 
6.91 feet below high water. 

No water was drawn from the lake after December 10, and 
on January 1, 1893, the surface was at grade 128.41, or 5.95 
feet below hi^h water. The dams are in good condition. 



88 



City Document No. 10. 



Water has been drawn from the different reservoirs as 
follows : 

Reservoir No. 1. 



January 9 to 11, inclusive. 
January 14 to 17. 
January 22 to 24 
January 28 to 30. 
February 4 to 7. 
February 11 to 14. 
February 18 to 21. 



February 25 to 28. 
March 3 to 6. 
March 10 to 13. 
March 16 to 20. 
March 24 to 27. 
March 29 to July 19. 



Reservoir No. 2. 



January 1 to 5. 

August 26 to 27. 
September 1 to 9. 
September 13 to Novem- 
ber 14. 
November 18. 



November 21. 
November 26 to 27. 
November 29. 
December 9 to 10. 
December 13 to 17. 



Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3. 



July 20 to August 25. 
August 28 to 31. 
September 10 to 12. 
November 5 to 17. 
November 19 to 20. 



November 23 to 25. 
November 30 to Decem- 
ber 4. 
December 7 to 8. 
December 11 to 12. 



The heights of water in the various storage reservoirs on 
the first day of each month are given on page 89. 



Engineering Department. 



89 





Reservoirs. 


Farm 
Pond. 


Lake 

COCHITO- 
ATE. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 




Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

159.29 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

167.12 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 

175.24 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 

215.21 


High 
Water. 

149.25 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 

134.36 


January 1, 1892 

February 1, " 

March 1, " 

April 1, " 

Mayl, " 

June 1, " 

Julyl, " 

August 1, " 

September 1, " 

October 1, " 

November 1, " 

December 1, " 

January 1, 1893 


157.20 
157.86 
158.00 
157.95 
155.72 
159.54 
156.84 
156.70 
156.35 
156.89 
156.22 
157.60 
157.44 


163.55 
166.10 
166.15 
166.23 
167.21 
167.69 
167.38 
162.63 
164.79 
165.83 
159.70 
165.71 
163.04 


167.19 
175.49 
175.58 
175.64 
175.05 
175.57 
174.89 
171.04 
169.60 
169.88 
170.14 
173.51 
171.58 


207.85 
214.42 
214.49 
214.56 
214.78 
214.58 
215.31 
214.43 
210.55 
199.68 
187.40 
190.66 
194.22 


148.99 
148.50 
148.65 
149.14 
149.00 
149.21 
149.45 
149.05 
148.95 
148.89 
148.55 
148.81 
148.63 


127.34 
130.09 
130.27 
132.75 
134.17 
134.23 
133.83 
132.23 
130.84 
129.51 
127.98 
127.75 
128.41 



Aqueducts and Distributing Eeservoirs. 

The Sudbuiy-river aqueduct has been used 322 days, and 
the Cochituate has been used 342 days, conveying water 
to the distributing reservoirs. The former has delivered 
9,633,200,000 gaUons into Chestnut-hill and Brookline reser- 
voirs, equal to a daily supply of 28,800,000 gallons ; and the 
Cochituate aqueduct has delivered 5,464,800,000 gallons, or 
14,930,000 gallons per day. For 44 days the Sudbury 
aqueduct has also conveyed water to Lake Cochituate, de- 
livering 902,400,000 gallons into the lake. 

A nearly uniform depth of six and one-half feet was main- 
tained in the Cochituate aqueduct while in use. The 
aqueduct was not used after December 10, on account of 
excavations under it by the city of Newton. 

The rate of flow in the Sudbury aqueduct was varied from 
day to day to maintain the desired depth of water in the 
distribution reservoirs. Both aqueducts were cleaned as 
usual during the year. 

The Chestnut-hill, Brookline, Fisher-hill, Parker-hill, 



00 City Document No. 10. 

and East Boston reservoirs and the Breed's-island water- 
tower are in good condition. 

I renew the recommendations made in the last annual re- 
port in regard to Chestnut-hill and South Boston reservoirs, 
and the water-tower on Bellevue hill. 

High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

At Chestnut hill the pumping-engines and boilers are in 
excellent condition. It has been necessary to run the 
pumps much above their rated capacity, and although the 
normal capacity of each pump is 8,000,000 gallons in 24 
hours, Engine No. 2 has pumped over 11,000,000 gallons 
in 24 hours with apparent safety. 

A duplicate dynamo and engine has been added to the 
lighting plant, which is now located in a wooden extension 
built in the rear of the boiler-room. 

The foundations for Engine No. 3 are nearly completed, 
and the work of building the engine is progressing rapidly. 

The table on page 130 shows in detail the work done by 
the pumping-engines and boilers during the year. 

Enoine No. 1 was used 3,976# 

hours, pumping . . . 1,569,863,445 gallons. 

Engine No, 2 was used 3,7581 

hours, pumpmg . . . 1,480,154,830 " 

Total amount pumped . . . 3,050,018,275 " 

Total amount coal consumed . 3,548,105 pounds. 

Percentage, ashes and clinkers . 8.5 

Average lift in feet . . . 126.27 

Quantity pumped per lb. of coal . 859.6 gallons. 

Daily average amount pumped . 8,333,400 " 

The amount pumped is an increase of 14.7 per cent, over 
that of 1891. 

The boilers have been run alternately, one boiler being 
sufficient to furnish the steam for lighting and heating the 
pumping-station and other buildings near it, besides that 
required for pumping. 



Cost of Pumping. 
Salaries .... 

Fuel 

Kepairs .... 

Oil, waste, and packing 
Small supplies 



$10,150 40 

7,490 76 

192 48 

574 95 

352 48 



Total $18,761 07 



Engineering Department. 91 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, $0,049. 

Cost per million gallons pnmped to reservoir, $6.15. 

At the West Koxbury pumping-station, 33,588,675 gal- 
lons have been pumped, or a daily average of 91,800 gal- 
lons, an increase of 39.1 per cent, over the amount pumped 
in 1891. 

At the East Boston pumping-station an average of 18,400 
gallons per day has been pumped into Breed's island water- 
tower, an increase of 36.3 per cent, over the amount 
pumped in 1891. 

Since July 22 w^ater has been pumped daily into the 
East Boston reservoir during the daytime to furnish an 
additional head for the high-service district. The check- 
valve with bypass, against which the pumps work, is 
weighted to give about 20 pounds additional pressure on the 
mains while pumping. About 400,000 gallons were pumped 
daily for this service. 

The small pump that was formerly used at the Brighton 
pumping-station is badly worn, and requires a good deal of 
attention to keep it in running order. The two larger 
pumps can be maintained in good condition with ordinary 
repairs. 

Mystic Lake. 

Water was wasted over the dam almost constantly from 
January 14 to June 7, and from June 27 to July 7. From 
this date the surface of the lake gradually fell until it was 
6.72 feet below high water on November 1 ; this was the 
lowest point reached during the year. 

During November it filled to within 2.70 feet of high 
water, and on January 1, 1893, the lake was eighteen 
inches below high-water mark. The pumps were placed in 
position to pump water into the conduit in October, but the 
November rains raised the level of the lake before it became 
necessary to use them. 

One of the rain-gauges used in the calculation of the yield 
of the water-shed was moved from Symmes Corner to the 
north rescrvoii', Winchester, on September 1. 

Mystic Valley Sewer. 

The pump was run 346 days during the year, working 
6,142| hours, and has pumped 134,576,100 gallons of sew- 
age, an average of 389,500 gallons per day of pumping. 

The amount pumped is 12.9 per cent, more than was 
pumped in 1891. 

The total amount of sulphate aluminum used during the 
year was 338,065 lbs., and 182.9 tons of coal were used in 
pumping. 



I 



92 City Document No. 10. 

Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit is in good condition, except that a new gate 
should be phiced on the blow-off pipe. 

Both divisions of the reservoir were cleaned in June. The 
brick paving on the slopes was found to be in better condi- 
tion than it was at the time of the previous cleaning, and but 
few repairs were necessary. 

There are serious objections to the method now used for 
cleaning the reservoir, and to remedy it a drain should be 
laid to the Mystic river, through which the deposits that 
collect in the reservoir can be flushed ; or sufficient time 
should be allowed for the deposits to dry, so that they can 
be hoisted over the banks. 

If the flushing method be continued, the concrete bottom 
of the reservoir should be renewed, as it is now badly disin- 
tegrated. I renew the recommendation that new sills and 
grooves for the screens be placed in the screen-chamber, and 
that the roof of the chamber be raised to facilitate the chang- 
ing of the screens. 

Mystic Pumping-Station. 

The increased consumption has required that in addition 
to the 8,000,000-gallon pump, one of the smaller pumps be 
run several hours nearly every day, thus reducing the duty 
obtained in 1891. 

The running of Pumping-engine No. 1, which was built in 
1864, is neither satisfactory nor economical; the pump has 
outlived its usefulness. New fronts have been placed on 
boilers Nos. 1, 2, and 3, and the Lamprey attachment for 
heating the feed- water has been placed inside the fire doors. 

I renew the recommendations made in the last report, 
which have not been carried out. 

Engine No. 1 was in use 669^ 

hours, pumping . . . 131,022,700 gallons. 

Engine No. 2 was in use 3,897| 

hours, pumping 
Engine No. 3 was in use 8,042^ 

hours, pumping 
Total amount pumped . 
Total amount coal consumed 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 
Average lift in feet 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 
Average duty of engines per 100 

lbs. of total coal, no deduction . 56,709,000 ft. lbs. 



799,198,200 " 

2,666,495,500 " 
3,596,716,400 " 
7,873,000 pounds. 
10.2 
148.84 
456.8 gallons. 



Engineering Department. 



93 



Daily average amount pumped . 9,827,100 gallons. 

The amount pumped was an increase of 8.8 per cent, over 
that of 1891. 

Cost of PtnviriNG. 
Salaries $9,613 93 



Fuel . . . . 

Kepairs 

Oil waste and packing . 

Small supplies 

Total . 



14,294 22 
511 09 
744 51 
348 44 

525,512 19 

10.048 
7.09 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot high . 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir . 

The table on page 131 shows in detail the work done by 
the pumping-engines during the year. 

Consumption. 

The daily average consumption for 1892, and a comparison 
with that of 1891, is shown by the following table : 



January . . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



Average 



COCHITUATE. 



3 "a 

SO 



36,756,400 
38,881,500 
38,395,100 
37,171,000 
37,055,900 
41,564,000 
45,738,100 
45,031,600 
45,261,000 
44,626,700 
41,347,800 
43,766,400 

41,312,400 



° 2 ,-; 



98.7 
104.3 
108.1 
104.0 
101.3 
109.9 
117.1 
114.1 
111.3 
114.9 
112.8 
118.3 

109.6 



Mystic. 



0.0 

io 

o 
O 



9,878,200 
10,332,200 
9,970,.500 
9,145,000 
9,204,900 
10,140,300 
10,702,900 
9,751,500 
9,549,400 
9,340,500 
9,230,000 
10,473,700 

9,810,800 



'toa 



o o g? 
SOS 

Ph 



105.2 
109.1 
113.2 
113.7 
104.1 
107.0 
111.7 
106.9 
104.6 
100.9 
107.5 
116.9 

108.3 



Combined 
Supplies. 



go 

a 
o 
O 



46,634,600 
49,213,700 
48,365,600 
46,316,000 
46,260,800 
51,710,300 
56,441,000 
54,783,100 
54,810,400 
53,967,200 
.50,577,800 
54,240,100 

51,123,200 



5pa 



Cm 



100.0 
105.3 
109.1 
105.8 
101.8 
109.4 
116.0 
112.8 
110.0 
112.2 
111.8 
117.1 

109.4 



94 City Document No. 10. 

The daily average consumption per head of population 
was as follows : 

Sudbury and Cochituate supply . . . 95.3 gallons. 

Mystic supply . . . . . . 78.6 " 

Combined supplies . . . . .91.6 " 

The above figures show an increase of 9.6 per cent, in the 
consumption from the Sudbury and Cochituate works from 
that of the previous year; of 8.3 per cent, increase in the 
consumption for the Mystic Works ; and of 9.4 per cent, in- 
crease for the combined supplies. 

Distribution. 

The total length of main pipe laid on the Cochituate 
division was nearly 18 miles, and 4,270 feet of pipe have 
been abandoned, making a net increase of a little more than 
17 miles in the total length in use. 

Only about 1,500 feet of pipe were relaid with larger 
sizes to improve the fire service, and I recommend that at 
least one mile of the old mains be relaid this year for that 
purpose. 

The laying of the 30-inch main to South Boston was com- 
pleted on May 27th. 

This main connects with the 30 and 36 inch mains in Tre- 
mont street at West Chester park, and extends through 
Chester park and Swett street to Washington Village, a dis- 
tance of 7,600 feet, connecting with the 20-inch main in 
Boston street. 

A spiral weld steel pipe was used for crossing the sluices 
in Swett street ; the pipe being reduced to 24 inches in diam- 
eter at the two bridges, which are considered to be tem- 
porary structures. 

A 6-inch pipe was laid from Squantum to supply the 
Asylum and Farm School on Thompson's island. The 
work was done by John Cavanagh & Co., who were the 
lowest bidders. The length of the pipe was 6,760 feet, 300 
feet under the channel between Squantum and the island 
being laid with the Ward flexible-jointed pipe. Water was 
turned on in this pipe July 5. 

Water-pipes were laid from the pipe on Long island to 
the hospitals on Gallop's island in the fall; 2,874 feet of 6- 
inch pipe on Long island and 991 feet of 6-inch pipe on 
Gallop's island were laid by John Cavanagh & Co., under a 
contract. A temporary 3-inch wrought-iron pipe 3,798 
feet in length, on the bottom of the channel between the 



Engineering Department. • 95 

islands, was laid by George W. Townsend, under a contract. 
The pipe was put together with screw couplings by divers, 
and was laid in two weeks' time. The temporary pipe w^as 
paid for by the Board of Health. 

The sea-water has been so unusually cold that the (5-inch 
pipe between Moon and Long islands was frozen, after hav- 
ing successfully passed through four winters without accident. 
The pipe is encased in a wooden box of 3^-inch plank, and is 
buried in a trench where there is less than 10 feet of water 
over the pipe at low tide. The freezing probably began in 
deep water, as the water in the hay was only 28 degrees above 
zero. 

In Charlestown the mains were extended 2,208 feet, and 
216 feet of 4-inch pipe were relaid with 6-inch pipe. 

Additional Supply. 

The development of the Sudbury system has been contin- 
ued during the past year. The work of building the basin 
on Indian brook (Basin No. 6) has made fair progress, 
and it will be so far advanced at the end of the present 
season that the basin can be put into service. The surveys 
for additional basins have been nearly finished, and their 
construction must be commenced at once, as the increasing- 
consumption of water by the city has more than kept pace 
with development of the water supply ; and even with Basin 
No. 6 the works have barely sufficient capacity in a dry 
year to supply the present consumption. 

For particulars, see the following report of Desmond 
FitzGerald, Resident Engineer : 

South Framingham, Mass., January 30, 1893. 
William Jackson, Esq., CUt/ Engineer: 

Sir : I submit herewith a l)rief report of engineering work 
accomplished during the past year by the Additional 
Supply force. 

At Basin No. 6 the core-wall was uncovered early in April, 
and on April 25 the first gravel was delivered on the dam. 
Work on the shallow flowage, stripping of basin, and building 
up of the dam was actively prosecuted throughout the season. 
The dam has been raised from grade 250 to 271, or 21 feet. 
Both oate-chambers have been built to crrade. The valves 
have been placed in the lower gate-house. The waste way has 
been completed. Excellent progress was made by the con- 
tractors in stripping the basin. Sections A, B, and C, which 
were let in 1891, have been completed and final estimates 
made. Section D is nearly finished. Section E, above the 



96 



City Document No. 10. 



Coudaville road, was let to John Berry & Co., on January 
13, and is practically completed. 

Mr. N. S. Brock, Assistant Engineer, has been in charge 
of Basin 6. 



Work done at Basin 


6 DURING 1892. 




Concrete .... 


4,116 cubic 


yards. 


Backfilling . 




148 


i ( 


Plaster 




2,140 square 


yards 


Embankment 




12(3,726 cubic 


yards. 


Loaming slope 




1,572 " 


i i 


Riprap " 




2,546 " 


i i 


Stone crushed 




1,579 " 


i i 


Sand and gravel screened 




1,521 " 


a 


Stone masonry 




256 " 


I i 


Brick " 




143 " 


i i 


Stripping earth (contract) 




321,516 " 


i i 


" " (city) 




17,415 


a 


Waste WAY. 








Earth excavation 




3,000 " 


i. i 


Rock .... 




660 " 


I i 


Concrete . 




526 " 


(( 


Paving 




747 square 


yards. 


Rubble masonry 




1,136 cubic 


yards. 


Dimension masonry 




102 " 


(( 


Coping 




1,420 lineal feet. 



During the winter of 1891-2 surveys for Basin 5, on 
Stony brook, were extended, and a new plan made showing 
contours to grade 250, extending down stream as far as 
Nichol's mill. 

A large amount of engineering work has been done on 
problems connected with Cedar swamp. After many trial 
lines, a line for the principal canal has been located and 
plans perfected for all details of construction. 

In May, studies were begun for a basin on the site of this 
swamp. This involves raising the B. & A. R.R. between 
Chattanooga and Westboro', and extensive excavations of 
mud. Plans and approximate estimates have been prepared. 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Resident Engineer. 



Engineering Department. 97 

Sewerage Systems. 
South Framingham, Marlhoro\ Westhoro\ Natiok. 

The sewerage system of Soath Framingham has, with the 
exception of the discharging from the town underdrain, 
worked satisfactorily. The city of Marlboro' and the town 
of Westboro' have so far completed their sewer system as 
to have them in successful operation. 

The town of Natick has made a plan of works and seems 
to be in earnest to do something this year. 

Filtration of the Mystic Supply. 

Although the quality of the water fui-nished by the Mystic 
works has been comparatively good during the past year, 
the large and increasing population on the water-shed, to- 
gether with the objectionable character of the large number 
of factories on the borders of the streams, renders the task 
of maintaining the purity of the water a more difficult one 
from year to year ; and in case of an epidemic of cholera or 
typhoid fever in Winchester or Woburn, there would be great 
danger in using the Mystic water unless it was thoroughly 
filtered. 

If the Mystic works are to be continued in use as a source 
of supply for ten years, and I can see no way by which they 
can be abandoned before that time, I am of the opinion that 
a filtration plant should be at once constructed. 

Judging from the results of the experiments of the State 
Board of Health and of your Board, I can see no reason 
why, if this is done, these works should not furnish water of 
satisfactory quality. 

With this end in view, surveys and estimates have been 
made of the cost of works capable of filtering the entire 
Mystic supply. 

The scheme of works as planned comprises seven filtering 
basins, each having an area of about one acre, to be built on 
the shore of the lake, near the present dam, with a pumping- 
station and engines to raise the water from the lake to the 
filter basins. 

The estimated cost of these works is $/i75,000. 

Capacity of Distribution System. 

In accordance with a vote of your Board, dated January 27, 
1892, an investigation has been made of the capacity of the 
distribution system, considered with reference to the water 
supply available for fire protection, and comparisons have 



98 City Document No. 10. 

been made with the distribution systems of other large cities 
in the United States. 

Connected with the Sudbury and Cochituate works, there 
were, January 1, 1892, 514.4 miles of supply and dis- 
tributing mains, of which 468 miles are of sizes from 4 inches 
to 16 inches in diameter, and may be properly termed the 
distributing mains. The remaining 46.4 miles consist of 
main pipes from 20 inches to 48 inches in diameter, which 
are not tapped for service-pipe or fire-hydrant supplies. 

From the Chestnut-hill and Brookline reservoirs the water 
is brought to the city, a distance of a])0ut four miles, by 
four mains, — 30-inch, 36-inch, 40-inch, and 48 inches in 
diameter. 

These mains will supply in the city, with a pressure of 40 
pounds to the square inch, at least 100 cubic feet per second, 
which is equivalent to an ample supply for 100 steam fire- 
engines. 

Since the great fire of November 9, 1872, the distribution 
system of Boston has been greatly improved by the relaying 
of about 40 miles of 4 and 6 inch mains, with others of much 
greater capacity, and also by the introduction of larger and 
improved patterns of hydrants. 

Throughout the business portion of the city, 16-inch, 12- 
inch, 10-inch, and 8-inch pipes are extensively used ; the 
proportion of these sizes being about 45% of the total distri- 
bution. 

Throughout the mercantile section of the city, embracing 
the district bounded by Washington street, State street. 
Broad street, Atlantic avenue, Federal street, and Beach 
street, a system of water supply is provided for fire protec- 
tion, in addition to the supply aflbrded by the hydrants 
connected with the low-service distribution pipes, by a sep- 
arate system of distribution-pipes to be laid throughout this 
district for the sole purpose of supplying water under high 
pressure (80 to 90 pounds) to stand-pipes and sprinkler 
systems in the buildings of the district. This enables the 
property-owners in this district to provide themselves with a 
water supply for fire protection which is avaihible at all 
times, and which will not be affected by the drafts which are 
made by the fire department from the hydrants. 

In the residential districts the pipes are somewhat smaller, 
and in the suburban sections of Dorchester, West Roxbury, 
and Brighton the capacity of the distribution system for fire 
protection is, as must be expected, much smaller than in the 
more thickly settled portions of the city. 

Connected with the distributing mains there were 5,682 
hydrants and 238 reservoirs for use in case of fire. 



Engineering Department. 99 

Four styles of hydrants are used; viz., the Boston, the 
Lowry, the Boston Lowry, and the Post. 

The Boston hydrant is the pattern exclusively used from 
1848 to 18H8. It has a barrel three inches in diameter, with 
a single 2^-inch outlet, and is supplied by a branch pipe 
from the main 4 inches in diameter. 

The hydrants of this pattern are being gradually replaced 
by others of greater capacity. 

The Lowry hydrant, of which there were 2,449 in use, has 
a 9-inch barrel, and is arranged to supply four steam fire- 
engines, by means of a portable chuck having two 2i-inch 
and two 4-inch outlets, each outlet being provided with a 
separate valve. 

Hydrants of this pattern are generally placed directly over 
the supplying main, and at the junction of connecting pipes. 
When placed in the sidewalk they are supplied by 9-inch or 12- 
inch branches from the mains. 

The Boston Lowry hydrant has a 6-inch barrel, and is 
supplied by a 6-inch branch pipe from the main. This hy- 
drant is generally placed in narrow sidewalks where the 
Post hydrant would inconvenience public travel. Four 
steamers can be attached to this hydrant, but when set in 
the sidewalk it is not often convenient to attach more than 
two steamers. 

The Post hydrant has a 6-inch barrel supplied hy a 6-inch 
branch pipe, and has one 4-inch and two 21^-inch outlets. 

As previously stated, the hydrants used from 1848 to 
1868 had 3-inch barrels, with a single outlet 2^ inches in 
diarneter ; and at the latter date there were in use in the 
city proper, South Boston, and East Boston 1,590 hydrants 
of this pattern. 

During the past twenty years a large number of these old 
hydrants have been replaced by hydrants of the Lowry and 
Post patterns, so that to-day the number of "Boston" 
hydrants in use in the city proper. South Boston, and East 
Boston is 660 less than in 1869. 

Throughout the business portion of the city the hydrants 
are spaced from 150 to 250 feet apart, and from 250 to 300 
feet in the residential districts. 

Below are given extracts from the report of Mr. Dexter 
Brackett, Assistant Engineer, who visited the larger cities of 
the country, and made a personal examination of their distri- 
bution systems. 

" A comparison of the distribution system of Boston with 
those of the other large cities of the country shows that the 
system here is not behind the modern practice in the matter 
of fire protection . 



100 City Document No. 10. 

"As a result of a personal examination of the systems in 
New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit, and 
Cleveland, the following tables and accompanying plans have 
been prepared. 

" The plans in all cases cover the thickly settled business 
portions of the cities. 

" Table No. 1 shows the length in miles of the different 
sizes of pipe in use in the cities named, and table No. 2 gives 
for each city the percentage used of the different sizes. 



Engineering Department. 



101 



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102 



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Engineering Department. 108 

" Bearing in mind the ftict tliat pipe less than six inches in 
diameter is of very little value for fire protection, a study of 
the tables shows very clearly the comparative value of the 
different S3'^stems. It will be noticed that the Y)roportion of 
the sizes below eight inch is less in Boston than in any of 
the cities examined. 

"Baltimore has 235 miles, or more than one-half of its 
distribution system of 3 and 4 inch pipe ; Chicago has 207 
miles, Detroit 166 miles, and Cincinnati 103 miles, while 
Boston has but 24 miles. On the other hand, Boston 
has 147 miles of 12-inch pipe, the proportion of this size 
being larger than in any of the other cities. 

"The efficiency of a system for fire protection depends not 
only upon the size of the mains, but also on the number and 
capacity of the fire hydrants connected with those mains. 
If, as in some of our large cities, the hydrants used are of 
small capacity with a single outlet, allowing of but one 
steamer connection and spaced frimi 300 to 500 feet apart, 
the efficiency of the system is much diminished by the ina- 
bility to concentrate a large number of steamers near any 
given point. To perform effective service, a steamer should 
not be obliged to use more than 500 feet of 2J-inch hose to 
reach the fire. With a line of hose 600 feet in length a 
water-pressure of 120 pounds at the steamer will give an 
effective fire stream about 60 feet above the ground and will 
discharge 240 gallons per minute, while with 100 feet of 
hose the same pressure would give an efiective stream of 94 
feet in height and discharge 340 gallons per minute. 

"It is, therefore, of great advantage to have hydrants of 
large capacity so located that a large number of steamers 
may be placed within a short distance of the fire. 

"The Lowry hydrant used in Boston, being located in the 
centre of streets and provided with outlets for four steamer 
connections, permits of the concentration of the steamers 
much better than any other hydrant in general use. At the 
Bedford-street fire on November 28, 1889, fifty-two steamers 
were in service, and none were located more than 600 feet 
from the fire. In Brooklyn and St. Louis the hydrants 
have but one outlet or hose connection. 

"In New York 80 per cent, of the hydrants have but one 
2J-inch outlet, and all of the hydrants set there during the 
past year (1891) were of this pattern. Table No. 3 shows 
the number of hydrants and fire reservoirs in use in the dif- 
ferent cities, with the number and size of hose connections. 



104 



City Document No. 10. 



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23,397 

12,451 

4,538 

3,715 

18,402 

4,077 

2,876 

7,582 

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PLAN OF PORTION 

BOSTON 

Pipe Lines, H>'drant:' & Connections. 



PHILADELPHIA. 

snowmo 

Pipe Lines, Hydrants 8^ Connections. 




Engineering Department. 



105 



"As before stated, the sizes of the mains and the number 
and capacity of the hydrants are all factors in determining 
the vakie of any distribution system as a means of fire pro- 
tection . 

'' Tai?:ing all of these tacts into consideration, a study has 
been made of the corresponding portions of the systems of 
several cities as shown on the accompanying yjlans. 

"Calculations have been made as to the number of steamers 
that will receive an ample supply of water from hydrants 
located within 500 feet of various points. The points se- 
lected and the results attained for each city are shown by 
the following tables and by the figures enclosed by circles on 
the plans ; 

" Tables showing the number of hydrants and fire reservoirs located 
within 500 feet of different points in or near the business sections 
of the cities named, also the number of steamers, each of 500 gallons 
capacity, that would receive an adequate supply of loater from, 
those hydrants: 



New York. 

Canal street, junction Bowery 
Canal street, junction Broadway . 
Franklin street, jujiction West Broad 

way ..... 

Washington street, junction Chambe 

street ..... 
Prince street, junction Broadway . 
Church street, junction Park place 
Chamber street, junction Park row 
Christie street, junction Rivingtoi 

street ..... 
Cherry street, junction Clinton street 
Grand street, junction Margin street 
Broome street, junction Clinton street 
Market street, junction Madison street 
Pearl street, junction Peck street 
Spring street, junction Varick street 



Hydrants. 

35 
31 

25 

26 
'2Q 
24 
27 

23 
18 
16 
15 
12 
11 
10 



Res. Steamers. 

62 

47 

44 

42 
42 
41 

38 

35 

26 
'2io 
17 
12 
12 
10 



Chicago. 

Randolph street, junction Wabash ave. . 
Adams street, junction La Salle street . 
Wabash avenue, junction Adams street . 
Van Buren street, junction Dearborn 
street ...... 

Lake street, junction Franklin street 



11 


4 


32 


14 


2 


30 


11 


2 


27 


16 




27 


13 


1 


27 



106 



City Document No. 10. 



Madison street, junction Fifth avenue . 
Ontario street, junction La Salle street . 
Van Buren street, junction Franklin 

street ...... 

Randolph street, junction La Salle street, 
Ontario street, junction Market street . 
Union street, junction Indiana street 
Madison street, junction Jefferson street, 
Ontario street, junction Pine street . 
Van Buren street, junction Jefferson 

street ...... 



Hydrants. 


Res. 


Steamer 


13 


1 


25 


14 




25 


10 


1 


22 


11 


1 


22 


8 


1 


18 


10 




17 


10 




17 


9 




14 



13 



St. Louis 
Locust street, junction 11th street 
Locust street, junction 3d street 
Clark street, junction 3d street 
Carr street, junction Broadway 
Market street, junction 7th street 
Gratiot street, junction 7th street 
Market street, junction 14th street 
Franklin street, junction 13th street 
O'Fallon street, junction 9th street 
Gratiot street, junction 14th street . 
Papin street, junction 21st street 
Market street, junction 21st street 
O'Fallon street, junction 16th street 
Carr street, junction 21st street 



19 

19 

16 

16 

13 

12 

11 

11 

8 

7 

6 

5 

5 

4 



19 

19 

16 

16 

13 

12 

11 

11 

8 

7 

6 

5 

5 

4 



Boston. 

Washington street, junction State street . 24 4 60 

Washington street, junction Essex street, 20 2 54 
Washington street, junction Franklin 

street 19 2 51 

Haymarket square . . . . 22 2 51 

Franklin street, junction Pearl street . 20 1 50 

Summer street, junction Federal street . 18 50 

Hanover street, junction Fleet street . 21 49 

Kneeland street, junction South street . 16 40 

Washington street, junction Pleasant street, 18 2 36 

Tremont street, junction Dover street . 14 36 

Causeway street, junction Leverett street, 20 3 35 

Pleasant street, junction Piedmont street, 18 3 28 

Dover street, junction Harrison avenue . 12 26 

Boylston street, junction Berkeley street, 11 25 



Engineering Department. 



107 



Baltimore. 

Hydrants 

Calvert street, junction Baltimore street, 21 
Liberty street, junction Baltimore street, 
Calvert street, junction Franklin street . 
Lombard street, junction Frederick street, 
Camden street, junction Eutaw street 
Lombard street, junction Central avenue, 
Gorman street, junction Greene street 
Orleans street, junction Central avenue . 
Fremont street, junction Portland street, 



Res. 



12 
11 
13 



Steamer. 

37 
29 
25 
23 
16 
15 
12 
10 
7 



Philadelphia. 

Markfet street, junction 12th street . 
Chestnut street, junction 16th street 
Spring Garden, junction 6th street 
Chestnut street, junction 5th street 
Market street, junction 2d street 
Spruce street, junction 12th street 
Walnut street, junction 22d street 
Poplar street, junction 27th street 
Vine street, junction 3d street 
Fairmount street, junction 10th street 
Fairmont street, junction 19th street 
Spruce street, junction 18th street . 
Vine street, junction 11th street 
Vine street, junction 18th street 



14 

13 

15 

15 

14 

9 

8 

11 

11 

10 

10 

8 

7 

7 



23 
18 
18 
17 
16 
14 
13 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 



Brooklyn. 

Fulton street, junction Flatbush avenue . 15 15 

Fulton street, junction Adams street . 15 15 

Nassau street, junction Adams street .11 11 

Hicks street, junction Peirrepont street . 10 10 

President street, junction Fifth avenue . 10 10 

Seventh avenue, junction 9th street . 10 10 

Court street, junction Congress street . 9 9 

Bond street, junction Wykotf street . 9 9 

Park street, junction North Portland street 8 8 

Hoyt street, junction Secor place . . 7 7 

Fulton street, junction Adelphi street . 6 6 

Columbia street, junction President street 6 6 

Sullivan street, junction Van Brunt street 5 5 

Clinton street, junction Fourth place .5 5 " 

A careful study of the facts given vi^arrants the conclusion 
that Boston has as good, if not a better, system of water dis- 



108 



City Document No. 10. 



tribution for fire purposes than any of the other large cities 
of the country ; that the Lowry hydrant in use here will 
supply more steanners than any other hydrant in general use, 
and that the Boston pattern of Post hydrant is of greatei 
capacity than that used by many other cities. 

Of the 1,200 old-style hydrants and 24 miles of 4-inch 
pipe that are now in use, about 50 per cent, should be re- 
placed within a few years. 

Appended are tables showing for all sections of the city 
the number of steamers that it is estimated would receive a 
supply of 500 gallons per minute each from hydrants located 
within 500 feet of the locations given. In considering these 
tables, it must be borne in mind that 500 gallons per minute 
provides for two efficient streams from each steamer, and as 
at any fire some steamers will be using but one line of hose, 
and others will be stopped at any given moment, the number 
of steamers which, under the usual circumstances, could be 
adequately supplied would be somewhat larger than the 
figures given. 

City Proper — Business Section. 

Albany street, junction Canton street . . . .26 

Albany street, junction Concord street . . .27 

Albany street, junction Dover street . . . .25 

Albany street, junction East Chester park . . .35 

Albany street, junction Oak street . . . .32 

Albany street, junction Randolph street . . .16 

Albany street, junction Union Park street . . .16 

Albany street, junction Wareham street ■ . . .32 

Albany street, junction Way street . . . .30 

Atlantic avenue, junction Central wharf . . .35 

Atlantic avenue, junction Clinton street . . .45 

Atlantic avenue, junction Federal street . . .50 

Atlantic avenue, junction India street . . . .45 

Atlantic avenue, junction Oliver street . . .40 

Atlantic avenue, junction Pearl street . . . .50 

Beach street, junction Albany street . . . .40 

Beach street, junction Harrison avenue . . .40 

Bedford street, junction Kingston street . . .50 
Bowdoin square ........ 33 

Brattle square ........ 50 

Causeway street, junction Beverly street . . .25 

Causeway street, junction Friend street . . .33 

Causeway street, junction Leverett street . . .35 

Chapman street, junction Shawmut avenue . . .22 

Chapman street, junction Village street . . .26 

Charlestown street, junction Beverly street . . .60 



Engineeeeng Department. 



109 



Charlestown street, junction Causeway street 
Columbus avenue, junction Berkeley street . 
Columbus avenue, junction Ferdinand street 
Columbus avenue, junction Pleasant street 
Commercial street, junction Charter street 
Commercial street, junction Clinton street 
Commercial street, junction Fleet street 
Commercial street, junction North street 
Commercial street, junction Richmond street 
Commercial street, junction State street 
Court street, junction Sudbury street . 
Eliot street, junction Carver street 
Federal street, near the bridge . 
Federal street, junction East street 
Federal street, junction Kneeland street 
Ferdinand street, junction Melrose street 
Fort Hill square .... 

Franklin street, junction Congress street 
Hanover street, junction Cross street . 
Hanover street, junction Fleet street . 
Harrison avenue, junction Castle street 
Harrison avenue, junction Dover street 
Harrison avenue, junction Harvard street 
Harrison avenue, junction Oak street . 
Haymarket square .... 
Kneeland street, junction Lincoln street 
Leverett street, junction Charles street 
Leverett street, junction Minot street . 
Merrimac street, junction Chardon street 
Milk street, junction Oliver street 
North street, junction Cross street 
Piedmont street, junction Pleasant street 
Prince street, junction Salem street 
Prince street, junction Snovvhill street . 
Scollay square ..... 
Travers street, junction Canal street . 
Tremont street, junction Boylston street 
Tremont street, junction Castle street . 
Tremont street, junction Eliot street . 
Tremont street, junction Mason street . 
Tremont street, junction Pleasant street 
Tremont street, junction School street 
Tremont street, junction Winter street 
Washington street, junction Bedford street 
Washington street, junction Boylston street 
Washington street, junction Castle street 
Washington street, junction Hanover street 



31 
25 
24 
30 
24 
56 
48 
48 
48 
60 
33 
29 
12 
35 
20 
20 
50 
50 
45 
49 
30 
26 
30 
30 
45 
40 
29 
40 
35 
50 
36 
25 
48 
28 
35 
32 
30 
35 
33 
20 
33 
15 
15 
40 
48 
25 
60 



110 



City Document No. 10. 



Washington street, junction Hollis street 
"Washington street, junction Milk street 
Washington street, junction State street 
Washington street, junction Summer street 
Winthrop square .... 



City Pkoper — Residential Section 

Allen street, junction Blossom street . 
Beacon street, junction Arlington street 
Beacon street, junction Charles street . 
Beacon street, junction Chester park . 
Beacon street, junction Exeter street . 
Beacon street, junction Joy street 
Berkeley street, junction Chandler street 
Boylston street, junction Arlington street 
Boylston street, junction Berkeley street 
Boylston street, junction Clarendon street 
Boylston street, junction Exeter street 
Cambridge street, junction Blossom street 
Cambridge street, junction Hancock street 
Charles street, junction Allen street 
Charles street, junction Cambridge street 
Charles street, junction Revere street . 
Clarendon street, junction Appleton street 
Columbus avenue, junction Clarendon street 
Columbus avenue, junction Dartmouth street 
Columbus avenue, junction Holyoke street . 
Columbus avenue, junction Rutland square . 
Columbus avenue, junction West Chester park 
Commonwealth avenue, junction Clarendon street 
Commonwealth avenue, junction Fairfield street 
Dalton street, junction Dundee street . 
Dartmouth street, junction Buckingham street 
Harrison avenue, junction Dedham street 
Harrison avenue, junction Newton street 
Harrison avenue, junction Worcester street . 
Huntington avenue, junction Dartmouth street 
Huntington avenue, junction Gainsborough street 
Huntington avenue, junction Holyoke street 
Huntington avenue, junction Newton street . 
Marlborough street, junction Berkeley street 
Marlborough street, junction Dartmouth street 
Marlborough street, junction Hereford street 
Mt. Vernon street, junction Brimmer street 
Mt. Vernon street, junction Louisburg square 
Myrtle street, junction Grove street . 



Engineeeing Department. 



Ill 



Myrtle street, junction Irving street 
Shavvmut avenue, junction Ctiester square 
Shawmut avenue, junction Concord street 
Shawmut avenue, junction Lenox street 
Shavvmut avenue, junction Newton street 
Shawmut avenue, junction Union park 
Somerset street, junction Ashburton place 
Tremont street, junction Camden street 
Tremont street, junction Clarendon street 
Tremont street, junction Dartmouth street 
Tremont street, junction Pembroke street 
Tremont street, junction Worcester sti'eet 
Warren avenue, junction Dartmouth street 
Washington street, junction Dedham street 
Washington street, junction Newton street 
Washington street, junction Northampton street 
Washington street, junction Waltham street 
West Chester park, junction Belvedere street 
West Chester park, junction Westland avenue 



15 
20 
18 
12 
24 
21 
15 
26 
20 
27 
25 
20 
18 
16 
21 
32 
27 
20 
26 



South Boston. 

A street, junction Congress street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Broadway 
Dorchester avenue, junction Dorchester street 
Dorchester avenue, junction East First street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Kemp street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Middle street . 
Dorchester avenue, junction West Seventh street 
Dorchester street, junction Broadway . 
Dorchester street, junction Eighth street 
Dorchester street, junction East Second street 
Dorchester street, junction Newman street . 
Dorchester street, junction Old Harbor street 
Dorchester street, junction Woodward street 
Dorr street, junction Earl street . 
East Broadway junction I street . 
East Broadway, junction M street 
East Broadway, junction O street 
East Eighth street, junction G street . 
East Eighth street, junction Mercer street 
East Fifth street, junction N street 
East First street, junction I street 
East First street, junction L street 
East First street, junction O street 
East Fourth street, junction L street . 
East Fourth street, junction P street . 



10 

25 
17 
16 
11 
17 
18 
20 
20 
18 
15 
16 
15 

9 
17 
12 

9 
12 
18 
12 
16 
12 
12 
14 
12 



112 



City Docibient No. 10. 



East Ninth street, junction K street 

East Ninth street, junction Old Harbor street 

East Second street, junction P street 

East Seventh street, junction I street 

East Seventh street, junction N street 

East Sixth street, junction G street 

East Sixth street, junction H street 

East Sixth street, junction L street 

East Sixth street, junction P street 

East Third street, junction I street 

East Third street, junction K street 

East Third street, junction O street 

Foundry street, junction West Fourth street 

Foundry street, junction Ontario street 

Granite street, junction Mt. Washington avenue 

Granite street, junction Richards street 

Newman street, junction Lowland street 

Old Harbor street, junction Telegraph street 

Pacific street, junction Thomas park 

Ward street, junction Preble street 

West Broadway, junction B street 

West Broadway, junction F street 

West Fifth street, junction B street 

West Fifth street, junction F street 

West First street, junction B street 

West First street, junction D street 

West First street, junction F street 

West First street, junction Granite street 

West Fourth street, junction A street . 

West Fourth street, junction D street . 

West Ninth street, junction D street . 

West Ninth street, junction Lark street 

West Seventh street, junction D street 

West Seventh street, junction F street 

West Third street, junction A street . 

West Third street, junction C street . 

West Third street, junction E street . 



12 

12 

12 

15 

12 

5 

12 

14 

12 

16 

12 

9 

18 

15 

14 

20 

6 

3 

8 

9 

18 

17 

18 

14 

14 

18 

14 

25 

20 

22 

17 

15 

20 

20 

25 

14 

16 



East Boston. 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street 
Bennington street, junction Marion street 
Bennington street, junction Putnam street 
Brooks street, junction Condor street . 
Central square ..... 
Chelsea street, junction Brooks street . 
Chelsea street, junction Curtis street . 



14 
14 
15 

8 
21 
16 

4 



Engineering Department. 



113 



Chelsea street, junction Decatur street 
Chelsea street, junction Eagle street . 
Chelsea street, junction Marion street . 
Chelsea street, junction P(n'ter street . 
Condor street, junction Putnam street 
Eagle street, junction Falcon street 
Marginal street, junction Cottage street 
Marginal street, junction Lewis street . 
Marginal street, junction Orleans street 
Marginal street, junction K. B. & L. R.R. 
Maverick street, junction Border street 
Maverick street, junction Cottage street 
Maverick street, junction Lamson street 
Maverick street, junction London street 
Meridian street, junction Condor street 
Meridian street, junction London street 
Meridian street, junction Maverick street 
Meridian street, junction Princeton street 
Meridian street, junction Trenton street 
Meridian street, junction White street 
Moore street, junction Homer street . 
Porter street, junction Havre street 
Princeton street, junction Brooks street 
Princeton street, junction Marion street 
Princeton street, junction Prescott street 
Princeton street, junction Putnam street 
Saratoga street, junction Moore street 
Saratoga street, junction Swift street . 
Sumner street, junction Cottage street 
Sumner street, junction Jeftries street . 
Sumner street, junction Lamson street 
Sumner street, junction Lewis street . 
Sumner street, junction Liverpool street 
Sumner street, junction Orleans street 
White street, junction Brooks street . 
White street, junction Putnam street . 



10 
10 
12 
10 
12 
17 
13 
14 
14 

8 
16 
12 

8 
16 
12 
20 
16 
21 
18 
17 

4 
12 
10 
10 
12 
12 

6 

8 
13 

8 

8 
16 
16 
15 
12 
10 



Charlestown. 

Alford street, junction Arlington avenue 
Arlington avenue, junction Dorrance street 
Austin street, junction Lawrence street 
Bartlett street, junction Concord street 
Bartlett street, junction Cross street . 
Bartlett street, junction Salem street . 
Bartlett street, junction Walker street . 
Bunker Hill street, junction Belmont street 



6 
20 
18 
18 
17 
13 
10 



114 



City Document No. 10. 



Bunker Hill street, junction Concord street 
Bunker Hill street, junction Pearl street 
Bunker Hill street, junction Quincy street 
Bunker Hill street, junction Tufts street 
Cambridge street, junction Parker street 
Cambridge street, junction Perkins street 
Chelsea street, junction Henley street . 
Chelsea street, junction Prospect street 
Chelsea street, junction Vine street 
Front street, junction Arrow street 
High street, junction Concord street 
High street, junction Green street 
High street, junction Lexington street . 
Main street, junction Auburn street 
Main street, junction Haverhill street . 
Main street, junction Medford street . 
Main street, junction Mill street . 
Main street, junction Salem street 
Medford street, junction Baldwin street 
Medford street, junction Chelsea street 
Medford street, junction Lexington street 
Medford street, junction Mead street . 
Medford street, junction Pearl street . 
Perkins street, junction Brighton street 
Russell street, junction Mead street 
Rutherford avenue, junction Allen street 
Rutherford avenue, junction Dunstable street 
Rutherford avenue, junction Mill street 
Tremont street, junction Edgeworth street 
Tremont street, junction Lexington street 
Union street, junction Main street 
Union street, junction Washington street 
Warren street, junction Water street . 
Water street, junction Joiner street 
Winthrop street, junction Main street . 



ROXBUEY. 

Alaska street, junction Perrin street . 
Albany street, junction Hunneman street 
Albany street, junction Mall street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction C^herry street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Edgewood street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Moreland street . 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Quincy street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Waverley street 
Brookline avenue, junction Burlington avenue 



Engineering Department. 



115 



Brookline avenue, junction Francis street 
Brookline avenue, junction Longwood avenue 
Brookline avenue, junction Maple avenue 
Cabot street, junction Windsor street . 
Cedar street, junction Hawthorn street 
Centre street, junction Cedar street 
Centre street, junction Heath 
Centre street, junction Lamartine street 
Centre street, junction Pynchon street 
Centre street, junction Sheridan avenue 
Centre street, junction Walden street . 
Centre street, junction Wyman street . 
Circuit street, junction Regent street . 
Clifton street, junction Langdon street 
Dale street, junction Mills street 
Day street, junction Creighton street . 
Dudley street, junction Adams street . 
Dudley street, junction Dearborn street 
Dudley street, junction Dennis street . 
Dudley street, junction Elmwood street 
Dudley street, junction Hampden street 
Dudley street, junction Highland street 
Elm Hill avenue, junction Cheney street 
Elm Hill avenue, junction Howland street 
Eustis street, junction Magazine street 
Hampden street, junction Norfolk avenue 
Heath street, junction Bickford street 
Heath street, junction Day street 
Highland street, junction Cedar street 
Highland street, junction Ellis street . 
Highland street, junction Marcella street 
Highland street, junction Milmont street 
Humboldt avenue, junction Crawford street 
Humboldt avenue, junction Munroe street 
Hunting'ton avenue, junction Longwood avenue 
Huntington avenue, junction Parker street 
Lambert avenue, junction Bartlett street 
Lambert avenue, junction Milmont street 
Moreland street, junction Fairland street 
Mt. Pleasant avenue, junction Fairland street 
Norfolk avenue, junction Gerard street 
Norfolk avenue, junction Magazine street 
Palmer street, junction Winslow street 
Parker street, junction Parker Hill avenue 
Parker street, junction Prentiss street . 
Pynchon street, junction Cedar street . 
Pynchon street, junction Heath street . 



12 
13 

8 
16 

7 
12 
14 
10 
12 
10 
10 

7 

8 
11 

8 
12 
15 
20 
15 
22 
22 
10 

6 
10 
20 
16 

8 
10 

8 
12 

8 
10 
12 
14 
17 
13 

6 

7 

8 

4 
18 
18 
16 
10 
16 
12 
12 



116 



City Document No. 10. 



Regent street, junction Fountain street 
Roxbury street, junction Linden Park street 
Ruggles street, junction Duncan street 
Ruggles street, junction Parker street 
Ruggles street, junction Warwick street 
Ruggles street, junction Westminster street 
Shawmut avenue, junction Hammond street 
Shawmut avenue, junction Ruggles street 
Tremont street, junction Bumstead lane 
Tremont street, junction Heath street . 
Tremont street, junction Francis street 
Tremont street, junction Parker street 
Tremont street, junction Prentiss street 
Tremont street, junction Pynchon street 
Tremont street, junction Ruggles street 
Vernon street, junction Auburn street 
Vernon street, junction Haskins street 
Walden street, junction Mi n den street 
Walnut avenue, junction Bainbridge street 
Walnut avenue, junction Circuit street 
Walnut avenue, junction Dale street . 
Walnut avenue, junction Tovvnsend street 
Warren street, junction Clifford street . 
Warren street, junction Dunreath street 
Warren street, junction Munroe street 
Warren street, junction Regent street . 
Warren street, junction Warren place . 
Warren street, junction Waumbeck street 
Washington street, junction Atherton street 
Washington street, junction Bartlett street 
Washington street, junction Circuit street 
Washington street, junction Dale street 
Washington street, junction Dudley street 
Washington street, junction Nawn street 
Washington street, junction Ruggles street 
Washington street, junction Thorndike street 
Washington street, junction Thornton street 
Washington street, junction Townsend street 
Washington street, junction Vernon street . 
Washington street, junction Westminster avenue 
Westminster street, junction Windsor street 
Winthrop street, junction Cleveland street . 



Dorchester. 

Adams street, junction Ashmont street 
Adams street, junction King street 



Engineering Department. 



117 



Adams street, junction Minot street 
Adams street, junction Neponset avenue 
Adams street, junction Richmond street 
Allston street, junction Centre street . 
Ashland street, junction Mill street 
Ashland street, junction Park street 
Ashmont street, junction Carruth street 
Ashmont street, junction Train street . 
Bird street, junction Bodvvell park 
Boston street, junction Eastman street 
Boston street, junction Mt. Vernon street 
Bowdoin street, junction Adams street 
Bowdoin street, junction Olney street . 
Bowdoin street, junction Washington street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Columbia street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Harvard street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Norfolk street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction River street 
Blue Hill avenue, junction Wales street 
Carruth street, junction Beale street 
Columbia street, junction Bird street . 
Columbia street, junction Seaver street 
Columbia street, junction Quincy street 
Columbia street, junction Stanwood street 
Columl)ia street, junction Washington street 
Commercial street, junction Greenwich street 
Commercial street, junction Park street 
Cottage street, junction Boston street . 
Cottage street, junction Clifton street . 
Cottage street, junction Norfolk avenue 
Cottage street, junction Pleasant street 
Crescent avenue, junction Carson street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Adams street . 
Dorchester avenue, junction Ashmont street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Beach street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Codman street . 
Dorchester avenue, junction Commercial street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Crescent avenue 
Dorchester avenue, junction King street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Leeds street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Mayfield street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Mt. Vernon street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Parkman street 
Dorchester avenue, junction Savin Hill avenue 
Dorchester avenue, junction Washington street 
Dudley street, junction Cottage street . 
Dudley street, junction Howard avenue 



6 

9 

5 

2 

4 

5 

3 

2 

4 

14 

12 

4 

4 

5 

8 

5 

4 

4 

6 

2 

4 

4 

4 

5 

8 

11 

9 

17 

8 

12 

9 

4 

12 

8 

5 

5 

18 

13 

7 

12 

14 

10 

8 

16 

5 

18 
11 



118 



City Document No. 10. 



Dudley street, junction Magnolia street 
Dudley street, junction Monadnock street 
East Chester park, junction Clapp street 
Erie avenue, junction Michigan avenue 
Freeport street, junction Pleasant street 
Freeport street, junction Preston street 
Glen street, junction Trull street 
Hamilton avenue, junction Clark street 
Hancock street, junction Rill street 
Hartford street, junction Robinhood street 
Harvard street, junction Gleason street 
Harvard street, junction School street. 
Harvard street, junction Wales street . 
Howard avenue, junction Quincy street 
Howard avenue, junction Sargent street 
Lauriat avenue, junction Lyons street . 
Magnolia street, junction Howard avenue 
Magnolia street, junction Robinhood street 
Milton avenue, junction Evans street . 
Minot street, junction Sheridan street . 
Neponset avenue, junction Commercial street 
Neponset avenue, junction Minot street 
Neponset avenue, junction Park street 
Neponset avenue, junction Pope's Hill street 
Neponset avenue, junction Taylor street 
Norfolk avenue, junction jMarshfield street 
Norfolk street, junction Chipman street 
Norfolk street, junction Fremont street 
Norfolk street, junction Nelson street . 
Ocean street, junction Welles avenue . 
Pleasant street, junction Mayfield street 
Richiield street, junction Puritan avenue 
River street, junction Cedar street 
River street, junction Temple street 
Sanford street, junction Cedar street . 
Sanford street, junction Temple street . 
Savin Hill avenue, junction Grampian way 
Savin Hill avenue, junction Midland street 
Sawyer avenue, junction Cushing avenue 
Walnut street, junction Ericsson street 
Walnut street,junction Franklin street 
Washington street, junction Ashmont street 
Washington street, junction Centre street 
Washington street, junction Fuller street 
Washington street, junction Wheatland avenue 
Wheatland avenue, junction Whitfield street 



Engineering Department. 



119 



West Roxbury. 

Alveston street, junction Greenough street 
Alveston street, junction Revere street 
Anuwan avenue, junction Beech street . 
Anawan avenue, junction Park street . 
Ashland street, junction Florence street 
Beech street, junction Sycamore street 
Bellevue street, junction Oriole street . 
Bellevue street, junction Rutledge street 
Boylston street, junction Burr street . 
Boylston avenue, junction Amory street 
Brookside avenue, junction Cornwall street 
Brown avenue, junction Ashland street 
Brown avenue, junction Poplar street . 
Centre street, junction Boylston street 
Centre street, junction Burroughs street 
Centre street, junction Central avenue 
Centre street, junction Corey street 
Centre street, junction Eliot street 
Centre street, junction Green street 
Centre street, junction La Grange street 
Centre street, junction May street 
Centre street, junction Mt. Vernon street 
Centre street, junction Orchard street . 
Centre street, junction Pond street 
Centre street, junction Spring Park street 
Centre street, junction Walter street . 
Chestnut street, junction Fessenden street 
Corey street, junction Carl street 
Corey street, junction Weld street 
Eliot street, junction Brewer street 
Green street, junction Boylston avenue 
Green street, junction Chestnut avenue 
Green street, junction Lamartine street 
Grove street, junction Washington street 
Hyde Park avenue, junction Ashland street 
Hyde Park avenue, junction Neponset avenue 
Keyes street, junction Starr street 
Metropolitan avenue, junction Poplar street 
Pond street, junction Eliot street 
Pond street, junction INIay street 
Pond street, junction Prince street 
Poplar street, junction Sycamore street 
Prince street, junction Perkins street . 
Rockview street, junction St. Johns street 
South street, junction Custer street 



6 

7 
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5 
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6 

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5 
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4 
4 
4 
9 

18 
4 
5 

21 

18 
3 
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4 

14 
5 
9 
5 
2 
4 
4 
4 
4 

11 
8 

12 
4 
8 
7 

11 



120 



City Document No. 10. 



South street, junction Keyes street 
Spring Park avenue, junction Rockview street 
Spring street, junction Baker street . 
Spring street, junction Clarence street 
Walk Hill street, junction Canterbury street 
Walk Hill street, junction Hyde Park avenue 
Washington street, junction All)ano street . 
Washington street, junction Ashland street . 
Washington street, junction Beech street 
Washington street, junction Boylston street 
Washington street, junction Cornwall street 
Washington street, junction Metropolitan avenue 
Washington street, junction School street 
Weld street, junction Church street 
Weld street, junction Willow street 



Brighton. 

Allston street, junction Allston square 
Bennett street, junction Parsons street 
Brighton avenue, junction Cambridge street 
Brighton avenue, junction Chester street 
Brighton avenue, junction Harvard avenue 
Brooks street, junction Faneuil street . 
Brooks street, junction Newton sti-eet . 
Cambridge street, at Charles river 
Cambridge street, junction Gordon street 
Cambridge street, junction Harvard avenue 
Cambridge street, junction North Harvard street 
Cambridge street, junction Sparhawk street 
Cambridge street, junction Washington street 
Chester street, junction Ashford street 
Chestnut Hill avenue, junction South street 
Chestnut Hill avenue, junction Union street 
Englewood avenue, junction Islewotth street 
Everett street, junction Lincoln street 
Everett street, junction AVestern avenue 
Faneuil street, junction Parsons street 
Harvard avenue, junction Commonwealth avenue 
Lake street, junction Ken wick street . 
Market street, junction North Beacon street 
Market street, junction Sparhawk street 
Market street, junction Western avenue 
North Beacon street, at Albany R.R. , 
North Beacon street, junction Dustin street . 
North Harvard street, at Charles river 
North Harvard street, junction Western avenue 



Engineering Department. 121 



Washington street, junction Allston street 
Washington street, junction Foster street 
Washington street, junction Lake street 
Washington street, junction Market street 
Washington street, near Newton line . 
Washington street, junction Shannon street 
Washing-ton street, junction Tremont street 
Washington street, junction Union street 



4 

10 

8 

10 
2 
8 
5 
6 



In General. 

A contract was made with Donovan & Brock on August 
22 for building the masonry foundations for Engine No. 3 at 
Chestnut-hill Pumping-station , and the work is nearly com- 
pleted. 

A contract was made with N, F, Palmer, Jr., & Co., of 
New York, on June 8, for l)uilding and erecting Pumping- 
engine No. 3, in accordance with })hins made by Mr. E. D. 
Leavitt. 

The engine will be triple expansion, working three double- 
acting pumps, with the Eiedler patent valve-gear, capable at 
fifty revolutions of pumping 20,000,000 gallons in twenty- 
four hours, and maintaining a duty of 140,000,000 ft. lbs. 
per 100 lbs. of coal. 

Plans have also been made by JMr. Leavitt for a 06-inch 
Belpaire boiler, to supply steam at 185 lbs. pressure for the 
engine. 

The rebuilding of theBrookline-avenue Bridge over Muddy 
lliver, required the shutting off of the 40-inch main for 
several months, and the head throughout the low service was 
materially reduced. The pipe is relaid in the form of a 
siphon over the arch of the bridge. 

The 30 and 36-inch mains must be relaid over the new 
bridge on Tremont street at the Brookline line. New 36- 
inch valves were placed in the 36 and 40 inch mains near 
the corner of Francis street. Five bents of piles, with 
10 X 10 hard-pine caps, Avere placed under the 40-inch 
main in Beacon street, near Exeter street, to replace the old 
trusses which supported the pipe over the former sluices of 
the Water Power Company. 

A plan of a storage reservoir of a capacity of one million 
gallons, for Long Island, has been made for the Directors of 
Public Institutions. This reservoir will cause a more con- 
stant circulation on the pipe line to the island, and the danger 
of freezing the pipe will be lessened. 

Forty contracts for rock excavation were made daring the 
year. Two hundred and ninety-five petitions for main-pipe 



122 City Document No. 10. 

extensions were reported upon in regard to grade of street, 
size of pipe, and cost of laying. 

The pipe laid has been measured, the gates and hydrants 
have been located and plotted on the plans. 

Thirty-three profiles of unaccepted streets have been made 
and grades given for grading the streets and laying pipes 
where required. 

The records from the four pumping-stations, the lakes, 
reservoirs, the Mystic sewer, and the returns from pipe 
foundries, etc., have been carefully kept. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, yield of water-sheds, etc. 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagl^m showing the rainfall and daily average Consumption 
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00 




(N_ 




CO_ 


T)<_ 


en 


^ 


J3_ 






lO 


o 


CO 
































H 


CO 


c^ 


■^ 


to" 


co' 


to 


■^ 


t-^ 


"^ 


to 


CO 


00 


t' 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








^. 






o^ 


OJ_ 


o^ 




CO 


en_ 




00 


^ 






« 


































>n 






-f 












'9. 






Si 
X) 

H 






C5 




lb 


CO 


CO 








^ 


CO 






t-^ 


CO 




rH 


o_ 






o_ 


c^ 


to^ 


CO 


t— 


CO 




to" 


od" 


oo" 


tc 


t^ 


y-^ 


ire" 


lO 


in" 


1>" 


r^ 


!2" 


l-H 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


■* 


-* 


-^ 




^ 


^ 


^ 




o 


~o~~ 


o 


~o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~~c5~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


c= 






^ 






"^ 


CO 




cn_ 


CO^ 






CD_ 


co^ 


ire 


crs^ 






o 


o" 


CO 




cT 




oT 


c^ 




lO 


o 




co" 






CO 


eft 








o 




'O 




-* 




-f 






ae 


(M_ 


C-1 


o 


t— 


>o 




CO 


-1^ 


co_ 


co_ 


to_ 


co^ 


to^ 




H 


tJ' 


t^ 


irT 


>o" 


ccT 


^ 


oT 


c^ 


o" 


oo" 


to" 


t~r 


t-T 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




TT 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o_ 


t- 




to 


s 






CO 




00 






t- 
































© 


<p 


o 












■o 
















CO 




•^ 


CO 


CI 


o 




CO 






CO 






« 


o_ 


o^ 


CO 


-Tl^ 




o 




co_ 




"^ 


°i. 


co^ 


co^ 




H 


co" 


co" 


cT 


cT 


^ 


co" 


co" 


co" 


to 


eo" 


sf 


CJD 


CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


^^ 


"o" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


~o~ 


o 


o 


2~ 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


«) 


o_ 


(N_ 


o" 


nT 


o; 


en 


co_ 


IN 

co" 


00 




in" 


o 


§ 


o 
















o 


e<i 






CI 




QC 




OO 




<»_ 


t- 


CO 


00 


■* 






iO_ 




o 


•4 


'S 


in 


^r 


o" 


'^r 


co" 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


rJ^ 


cf 


^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


H 
H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


s 




at) 
aci 


io" 


o_ 


CO 




o 


to' 








co" 


°1 

CO 

■2 


CI^ 


co" 


<1 




o 






o 


01 




fo 


CO 








■^ 




-i^ 


Tt 




o 


o 


^ 






CO 


CO 


H 


o" 


CO 


o 




o" 




c-f 


of 


^ 


oT 


«" 


Cl" 






^ 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


s 


CO 


CO 


CO 


c^ 


CO 


8 


W 
o 
































o 


o 


o 


'^^ 


^ 


o 


^a~ 


o 


o 


o 


"^^ — 


o 


o 




s 




o 








o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


»» 


CO 






o 


CO 


CO 






CO 




o 


ire 




o 




























ae 

at) 






-* 








OS 


CO 




(M 


of 




cT 


o 






Ol 








CO 














o_ 


c^ 


»-^ 


■o 


Os^ 


o_ 


-J^ 


o^ 


en_ 


lO^ 


o 


ire 


oo_ 




^ 


c^ 


r-T 


co" 


o~ 


t^ 


o" 


co" 


o" 


f^ 


^ 


CO 


^ 


Os" 






CO 


CO 


Ol 




Ol 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


c> 




o 
o 

a; 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^— J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




® 


•"i 


■^ 


-* 




°i. 




^ 


■^ 




(N_ 




Os_ 




» 






CO 


o" 


o 


•rf 




o 




co" 


to" 




i-T 




s 
















CO 




CO 


o 


CI 




ati 


Cl_ 


CO^ 


^ 


CO 


>o 


Ci 


t— 




t^ 


o 




CO_ 






(M 


oo" 


o" 


CO 


-i^ 


CO 


czT 


-^ 


to 


co" 


ire" 


d^ 


CO* 








IM 


(N 


(N 


c^ 


CJ 


o> 


Ol 


CI 


Ol 










. 




















• 




0) 




w 


























cS 




El 
O 


>> 


>. 
















^ 




u 


s 

c: 




S 


^ 

d 


C3 
3 


S3 










s 


s 
s 




s 


s 


_>> 






3 
13 
a! 
1-5 








a 


a 
a 




M 

^ 


o 
"o 

o 


> 
o 

12; 




5 



124 



City Document No. 10. 



(51 

a 
I 

CO 






OJ 





































































































-^ ^ 







o_ 


0^ 





to 


o_ 


o_ 

























3% 
o 5 a) 









































cT 


0" 





to 


0" 


0" 


CO 












0" 























































EnyCS 


-^ 




-* 






"*. 


CO 







CO 




<o^ 




(N 


































§ 

0" 






o_ 






o _ 


e 










'^ 















00" 


CC 






^f-^ 


Cis 


CO 








en 




-* 


01 













act 
H 


02 




to 


tb 


CD 


to 


■^ 


Oi 




OD 


tB 


■^ 


5 


0^ 










"~o 


~o 


=> 




















(U aj 
5.1 


2 













to 
to 


s 

to 





















CO 




c-1 




S 


















































»-; 


"^ 














« 









o-a 


"e 










^ 
















i>r 








H§ 


Ci 






Ti< 


H 




05 















































Oi 








O 
















































~<6 

















~~o 




















<= 
























to 



































o_ 


to 








0^ 


£0 






































i~i 


o fi S 




c 



























IS 




90 
H 





■= 




































<y 






o- 


CO 






a>_ 


-* 


CO t^J^ 


rH_ tO_ 


CO_ 


t^ 




a 


vT 


cT 









tsT 




c-f 


of 




t-T to 




c-f 


^ — 


Q! 








-t 


T* 


c^ 


ira 


0-1 


CO 


rH lb 


to 





c^ 




03 


•^ 


10 





CC 


t- 




t- 








I- co_ 




































1 00 


00 










~c 


























~o 

















c 







to 








^ 


















a 


3'^ 

5 » 


op 





C3 


o_ 







o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ o_ 


o_ 






o 


s; 


c 





0" 








0" 


0' 


0" 


0" 


0" 0" 


CO 0" 


cT 


^ 


-S 


































h|« 




to 


'0_ 


c 


CO 






ira_ 


•* 




.n 





o_ 


ac 


































^ 


B 




lO 




t-^ to 


CO 


'^ 


.15 


to 


Oi to 


IC5 1 CO 


o" 




H 


ja — 


ci 




Oi 








to 







CO (N 




en 








05 


ir 


^ 


T)< 


5 


iC 


15 


to 


to 


to 




CO 1 


"^ 


































1 to 













"0 
































~c 









































c 

















o_ 








to 


o_ 


o_ 


o_ 






(O^ 




o_ 












































a> 







o" 


to 




d 


0" 


CO 


CO 








0" 





0" 








^ 


























CO 
















H"SPh 






to^ 




•a 


t.; 


CO 


to 










s 






CO 




ai — 


« 


-+ 


^'' 


■* 





1^ 


t^ 


~f 


co" 


lo" 


Tj- 


-H<" 




0" 


§ 

0" 



CT. 




•^••:2 


Ci> 


CO 


CD 




en 




to 


CO 


-* 


t- 




.0 


s 


CO 


00 


C3 


•* 


>o 


^ 


tH 


to 


ir 


•0 


•* 


■* 


5 


-t 


IT 




































ac 

H 


^3 


S 






























CO 
CO 


to 

CO 


- 




















































^ 
















^ 


to 






o3 


"3 










0: 
















CO 








H 


ci 










g 
















CO 

















































^ 





to 


^ 





"^"to~ 





"~"o 





"^ 





~c 


j 





































c 





c 










, 




CC 


c 


o_ 


o_ 


c; 







o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


c 


o_ 


c 


"^ 




CO__ 


» 


?S 


r— 


0" 


0" 


to 




0" 


0" 


to" 


o" 


a 


0" 


c 


0" 


0" 


03" 


on 





C 










c 











c 













CO 




'^ 


t-^ 


"*- 


«: 




o_ 


°^ 


CD_ 


to^ 







c- 


t-^ 






aj __ 


C3 










to 




00 


tcT 






to" 


ir 


T*" 


r*" 




H 


J3~ 


^ 


cr 





OS 




CC 




C-1 










c 


(M 








03 


a 


05 


to 


T 


«c 


^ 





tb 





^ 


^ 


CC 


co^ 


c^_ 














































~c 





^ 


^ 


c 











C3 


""c 


> 


~G 


> 





















to 


r— 












G 


3 




J 



















o_ 


c 


c 


0^ 


o_ 




to 


c 


« 0^ 


c 


i. '-'^ 


o_ 


^ 




S 1) 


































l« 










c 




cT 


to" 





0" 


c 


r 0" 


c 


0" 


0" 




90 


-2 


c 
























3 











H'Stf 









t— 


■5 


■^ 


CD^ 






co_ 


c 


i. '^ 


c 


1 ^~^ 


r^ 


t^ 


QfD 


■^ « 


e 




(jf 


to" 




rt 






e-T 










r -H 


^ 


CO 




jqS 


^ 


c 








4l CD 


CO 










c 




-M 






02 




> -* 


^ 


c 


•=t 


t)< 


CO 


CO 


lO 


c: 


' to 




CD 


to" 










^ 


(3 





~c 





^ 





^ 


c 


> 


~~G 


■> 














c 






















c 




c 


3 













c 








c 











o_ 


G 




c 


> <o 


a__ 






S ® 


































X) 




c 


0" 




c 


* 


to" 





0" 


c 


3 




5" 0" 


0" 




-S 


c 




















c 


> 




3 





CO 


•vo 





L '^ 


^ 


c 


^ t^ r-^ 















L 'R. 


^ 


-*_ 






C; 


" 




t- 


" ^ t-^ 


^ 




•*" 






c 






-* 


H 


j:^ 


(i 








c 


-t< CI 




to 






00 












03 


^ 


3 CO 


'tf 


c 


J CO •* 





-i< 


5I 


■^ 


<f CO 




3 (N 


(M_ 
































0" 


o" 










~~c 


J 





^ 





~o~~ 








c 


> 


"^ 


3 0" 


1 























c 








c 


> 


G 


3 







a 


sj- 


Go 


c 








c 


__ o_ o_ 


0^ 




to 


c 


•> G3^ 


G 


- G3^ 


C3_ 


IN 


16 


fl m 


^ 


^ 


r CO 


CO 


c 


" 0" to" 


o" 


to" 


0" 


G 


?" to" 


G 


r cT 


o" 


-* 


+^ <u 


C) 




> 





c 


> 









G 


5 


G 


3 







HSe^ 







i. "*. 


Ci_ 


-ti 


H_ 0_ 


tD_ 


•-^ 






'. ^. 




1 '^ 




C0_ 


03 


e 


a 




0" 


c 




-* 










c 


* H"" 




hT 


iH 


^ 






03 




^ to 


CO 





CO 


c 


3 en 


t- 






l-< 




^ 


H- 10 


^ 


'c 


3 CO t- 


•* 


Tf 






3 IM 




3 <^ 


0" 










^ 








^ 
















~c 





~c 





















































^11 


Co 


c 


o_ 





c 


c 











o_ 


c 


0^ 


c 


C3_ 










c 


(S 


o' 


c 


c 


trT 


o" 


^ 


0" 


,3 


0" 


c 


0" 








■§ 










,^ 
















c 

















c 


"*_ 





oc 


^ 








Ctl^ 








CO 













0) 


g 


t- 


" tl^ 


(N 


(X 


oc 


■^ 


0" 


cd" 


t^" 


QS 


CO 


e^ 


■*" 




Qj 


c 






(^ 


to r-l 


CO 





-* 


c 


to 


CC 


03 







aci 
ap 


OS 


C£ 


) (N 


CO 


Cv 


(T) 


■* 


Ttl 


^ 


^ 


t 




-ti 


CD 


0" 



tD 


03 
to_ 








(— , 








Q 


Q 
















































<o" 


CD 


H 


1^ 
51 


2 












o_ 




g- 










0" 


rH 






^ 




• 



























CD 










CO 








^ 















CO 








o-;5 






•^ 






















to 








EH§ 


<£ 




en 









CD 


10 












-^ 








u 






i-T 






















r-T 






































— w— , 


,- .. , 




w 

E-1 

iz; 


3 






>, 














^1 

01 

a 

a 

a) 




s 






A t^ 
.2d « 

^ a ^ 

ill 


•"'Si; 

.2 **> 






j 


^ 1 


.a 

C3 


:; 


1- « 




>> 

3 


si) 


t 


.0 

> i 

s > 
) 


X 

£ 

a 
c 
a 


3 




03 0) 








>^ 


:^ 


< 


, ^ 


i-s 


^ 


c 


> i? 


Q 


) 


H 


<J^ " 



Engineering Department. 



125 








01 
CUD 






cc 




o 


CO 

to 


CO 


°: 


to 


d 


CO 


to 


^. 


O 


CO 


OJ 


t- 


«. 


»>; 


^ 


to 






M si 


8 


^ 


oc 


t— 


<5 


in 


rH 


cc 


i(- 


■* 


c 


CO 


cn 


to 


c^ 


co 


d 


lO 


CTi 


00 






■^ 


>o 


»o 


"* 


CO 


tT 


■* 


CO 




^ 


"* 


U5 




iO 




iC 


CO 






o o S o 


o 




















































































O C3S 


^ 












































(S; 










































p^ 
















































00 


CO 




t_ 


•a 


eq 


ira 


(>> 


OO 


Td 


to 


us 




at 


CD 


OO 


c< 


to 


to 




3t3 






o 


CO 


cc 




00 


to 


c 








C^ 


o; 


■^ 


lO 


OS 




>r: 


CTl 




03 a 


s 


■^ 


a> 


■^ 


■^ 


t-; 


r- 


iC 




I- 


t- 


<^ 




C-' 




o 


Oi 


tc 




ia 




9 S 


•g 


o 


« 




s 


00 


C-: 


d 


a 




m 


00 


'•■i 


H 


tr> 


Oi 


to 


(^ 


tc 


ci 




c^ 


c^ 


d 


CO 


I-H 


r-( 


c^ 




^ 


o\ 


r- 1 


<M 


<N 


CO 


c^ 


OJ 


c^ 




(N 




'3 s 


►n 














































o 


CO 




^ 


05 


t- 


o 


•* 


o 


■n 


UO 


•O 


»o 


US 










to 








Ol 


to 




CO 






to 


o 




c^ 


-* 


to 


o 


to 


lO 


o 


c^ 


o; 


» 




s 


oo 


Tf 


If: 


c 


Oi 


■^ 


r- 


T- 


CO 








o 




»* 


c^ 


o 










1 


lO 


o 


^ 


t- 


T- 


00 


-**" 


O) 




t~ 


CO 


to 


Ci 


t- 


c 


« 


c 


T- 


o 




a 


■^ 


-* 


^ 


o 


-* 


CO 


'I' 


CO 


« 


-* 


■» 


Til 


"* 


o 


^ 


»o 


-«* 


■* 


-* 




'3 


'^ 










































ii 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




cj ^ a 

<D ^ t^ 
> ^ O 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


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1:0 'N lO in 



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uO Cl <N lO 



lO i-H CO 1-1 

CO CO CO 01 



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cococococococoaDcoco 



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CD t- CO O O '-' C^ 

CO CO CO CO - - — 
CO CO CO CO 






I 



128 



City Document No. 10. 



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t-^ 


oo 


iii 


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C^ O O lO 


ru, o " 


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>o 


•* 


-* 


CO 


^OOINTl<OOTt('*OU3iOtOTII ■* 


^^•=5 








































c3 *! 


S 


o> 


CO 


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t. 


lOINCC-OOt-C^CO-^OOOlr-ll 


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to O CO r-; O to I- 


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o 


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to 


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OO lO 05 C= t-^ IN C^ 


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in ^N 


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cn 


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o 






m r-l ^ 


CO lO >r 


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a 


O 


t^ 


CO 


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lO 


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T-^ i^ ^ -^ ..^ tr 


to to O Ci t-^ o -^ 


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lO 


CO 


CO 


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co-*-<i^Ttimio-*'*co|-*| 


« 


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erage 
it of 
[col- 
Lake. 




o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o o o c 


o o o o c 


o o o o 




o 


o 




o 


o 


o o o c 


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o o o o 








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o 








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uo cr 


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cc 


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Daily av 

amoun 

Rainfall 

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c> 




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to 




on IN o t- Tf 


OlCOt-OCOCOCOICOl 










































to 


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o- 


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o 


o 


o 


o c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 


cc 


cc 


o c 


o 


Total amoun 

of Rainfall 

collected in 

Lake. 




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o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o c 


c 


cc 


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cc 


c 


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1- 


cr 




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cr 


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cr 


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c 


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lit 








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to 








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a 


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c 


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to 


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c: 




t- 


tc 




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to 




o 


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p-l 


c 




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s 


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ri* 


to 


CO 


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CD 


tl 


cc 




d 


c< 


o 


c- 




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^ 


CO 


CO 


00 


oo" 


CO 


IN 


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IN 


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cc 


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cc 


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be 


t« 






































CS 






to 


^^ 


00 


o> 


o 


^. 


IN 


CO 


■* 


in 


to 


t^ 


00 


<n 


o 


r^ 


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> 

< 








t^ 








oo 


ot 
















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o> 


a> 








QO 


IH 


00 


00 


00 

1-1 


oo 

tH 


r- 


OC 


ot 


a 

rH 


J! 


r- 


a 


OC 


a 


00 
r1 


OC 




1 



Engineering Department. 



12^ 



•^ 



'^ 



1 =^si 


©5 


5 


£ 


£ 


f; 


c» 

CO 


S 


§ 


S 


-* 


g 


en 


§ 


s 


Fisher-H 

Reservoi 

High wat 

241.00. 


(Z> 


o 
CI 


o 



01 


s 


1 


1 


CI 


1 




TII 


i5 


i 



cq 





^ 


I-H 


S3 


-jt 

CO 


s 


s 








CO 


UO 
CO 


CO 


CO 


cq 

CO 


CO 


Si 

GC 


o 


o 












cq 


eq 



cq 



oq 



cq 



cq 





1 


Mystic 

Reservoir. 

High water. 

147.00. 


»5 


to 


en 
d 


I-H 


d 






CO 

d 



00 


.0 

i 


CO 
CO 

d 



d 


d 


d 


Oi 


CO 

d 


d 




d 


d 


d 






d 

I-H 


d 


00 

d 


CO 
in 
d 


% 
m 


3 

CO 


00 
d 


1 .. i 




S 


^ 





-* 


g 


»H 


cq 

cq 


00 


- 


•cf 


s 


S 


- 


Mystic 
Lake. 

gh wa 
7.00. 




«5 


'" 





CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


oq 


rH 


cq 


in 


-t 


a> 


m 


CO 


C31 


00 


s 


s 


cq 

CO 


CO 


cq 




cq 




CO 


S 


00 


s 


OD 


-* 


•* 


•* 


.0 


CD 


CO 





CO 














CO 


Parker-Hill 

Reservoir. 

High water. 

219.00. 


05 
OC 




CO 


01 


°2 

0-1 


03 

oo' 
oi 


00 

cq 



^ 

s 


CO 

d 
cq 


CO 


01 

CO 

c5 


06 

oq 


H 


d 
cq 


05 
QC 


00 


IM 


I-H 
0^1 


CO 


cq 


cq 


CO 

cq 



0; 


CO 




en 
cq 




CO 

d 
cq 


05 
d 
cq 


CO 

d 
cq 


Bvookline 

Reservoir. 

High water. 

124.00. 


05 

X 


d 

i-H 


oq 

r-l 


c^ 


CO 

d 


CO 


CO 

d 


CO 
CO 


d 
cq 


Ttl 
d 


cq 

CO 

d 


S3 

CO 

d 


d 
cq 


-* 
d 
cq 


05 




CO 




CO 

cq 


CO 





5^ 





ol 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 

t 

CO 
CO 

d 
cq 


Chestnut- 
Hill 
Keservoir. 
High water. 
124.00. 


05 

00 




i-H 

i" 


d 




CO 

d 


CO 


i 


CO 


CO 


i 


rH 


CI 

d 


rt 


Tt< 


CO 


S 


lb 


-? 





s 


■0 


§ 


§ 


oq 

CO 


CO 


CO 


Oi 
OD 


CO 


C5 


CO 
C-l 


CO 


CO 


CO 
C) 


oq 


CO 


CO 
CI 


CO 

cq 


CO 

cq 


CO 

cq 


CO 

cq 


Lake 
Cochituate. 
High water. 

1.34.36. 


oJ 


O 


31 


CO 


C-. 


s 


•0 





CO 


J:; 


ro 


ss 


CO 
OS 





OC 


1 





CO 


s 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1 


cq 


cq 


cq 


i 


^ 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


00 

CO 


^ 


-CK 



cq 


CO 


r^ 


cq 


Oi 


05 




CO 


CO 
CO 


2 


CO 
CO 


M 


CO 



CO 


en 
cq 




CD 


1 


§ 


Farm Pond, 

High water. 

149.25. 


»!« 


^ 


g 


s 





Oi 


CD 


t' 


a> 





CO 


s 


n 


cq 

en 


QC 


Tit 


-# 


-* 


rH 



-* 


1 


en 

-I* 


•^ 


-f 


^ 


00 


00 


00 
11 


rt 


CO 
-* 


CO 



•0 


CO 


oq 

CO 


j:^ 


CO 

en 


CO 





00 





-K 


S 


00 


o 
•* 


01 


^ 


C3 


1 


en 


^ 


^ 


-* 


^ 


S 


•* 


% 


1 ■- 


(N 


CR 


:| 


.0 


00 

-^1 






CI 


5i 


-c^ 


^ 





s 


CO 


Reservoi 
No. 4. 
Flash 
boards. 
215.21. 


00 


55 




-# 


-* 


-t 

01 


.0 
cq 


oq 


5] 


d 


3 


s 


g 



cq 


05 
CC 


CO 
I-H 


d 


CO 

d 

I-H 


oq 

-^ 

I-H 


oq 


-Ttl 
-•^ 

I-H 
CI 




T)< 


CI 

en 
i 


cq 


i-O 
CO 


cq 


d 
cq 


cq 


1 ^ -e- 


«J 


t-( 


3 


§ 



>« 


g 


00 


CO 


■* 


"2 





s 


s 


CO 


Reservoi 
No. 3. 
Stone cres 
175.24. 


00 


CO 


rH 


s 


12 


S 


p: 


CO 
I-H 





CO 





^ 


CO 


CO 


05 
OO 


CO 


-l< 


CO 


16 



d 


CO 


d 






CO 


3 

CO 


p 

CO 


§ 

CD 


ci 




ei 


g 





CO 




CO 


•0 


00 


-f 


iA 


en 


-1* 



en 


■* 


M 


Reservoi 
No. 2. 
Flash 
boards. 
167.12. 


OC 


CO 

to 

T-l 


'£1 



CO 
rH 


CO 


CO 


d 


-.0 


oq 

CO 


CO 
rH 


g 


CD 


s 





^ 


§ 


CO 




lO 


oq 





CO 
CO 


OS 


CD 


S 


s 


-11 





;il 


05 

2 


s 


CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






cq 

CO 


10 



CO 


1-0 


UO 


1 


1 




«i 


o 


3 





N 


;2 


S 





^ 


S 




CO 


CO 


s 


g 


g^-=i=i 


CC 


I- 


•0 


00 


5 


00 


00 


s 


CO 


CO 


s 


CO 




5 


lO 


Reser 

No. 

Flae 

boar 

159.t 




























^ 


S5 


s 


'-S 


S 


'^ 


CO 


d 


t- 


s 


^ 


OJ 


§ 


00 

a. 


00 


CO 


CC 


CC 


s 


CC 





>« 


s 


^ 


s 


CO 


;2 


10 


Months. 




a 

3 

a 







•"5 
< 


C« 

IS 


a 

3 
1-5 


>> 

B 


3 
<1 




.0 

a 

Si 

a> 
OQ 


3 

1 



s 




u 





130 



City Document No. 10. 



"^ 



u 




•oSI3 IB 




lO 




00 


O) 


C-l 


,_( 


(M 


CO 






C4 


o 








m 




00 


o 


(M 




o> 


on 










o 


"Water 

evaporate 

in boiler p 

lb. of coa 


pUB 

raoij 


H 


f-H 


- 


- 


CI 

I-t 


C< 


s 


^ 


S 


- 


■^^ 


I-l 


IH 


s 










lO 


CO 


lO 








fH 












CO 




o 


o 








M 




CO 


Ttl 


CO 






•[Bnioy 


« 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 




S 






"^ 






'"' 






















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 




o 




T3 g . 
































00 




ai 












Ol 




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o 


o t, M.S 






























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to 












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w 


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rt 










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o 


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o 


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o 


o 


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O 
O 
































CO 






t^ 




•* 




















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^ 
















in 


-* 


o 




h 


s 




























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Pi 








o 


cq 


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■* 














05 




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fei 


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o 








o 


o 




















o 








o 


o 






^ 






en 








o 






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2 '■§ ■^ fn 

5 o <u £? 












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1^ 


























































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3 


































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o> 


o> 


Ol 


OS 


Ol 












OSOaO-^t^t^COt-OiOOC- 
COiO^-^COO-^rMCTCOO 

toococdocococococoeo 

(M(M<M<NiM<N(M(N<NIM<M 



pnB gui^Baq 
joj pai-oajaoQ 
•(BOO JO -qi jad 
padnind X^ijuBn^ 



CO Cq CO w CD ^ 
Oi Oi C3i Oi Oi Oi 



•§ni!>qgi| 

pQB Sai^Baq joj 

aoiioaj.ioo o^ 

•jnoo JO 'qi -lad 

padnind i}i;aBn^ 



00 CO 00 CO QO 00 



•SJ95{nt|0 pUB 

saqsB '^nea i8<j 



■}ua3 



OOOOOiOOOOOOCCCO 



•BI8I[U1[0 

pnB saqsB ib^oj, 



lOCOCDiOCOCOCDO-^iO-tt— 
<M<MC5iMH<M(McNr>lMlN<M 



•patnnsnoo 
^BOD JO jnnoraB 
a§Bj9AB j^ixbq; 



CO »o CO m 

OS Ci Oi Oi 



T^ l--^ Oi^ Oi^ r^ 
Oi Oi Oi Ol tH 



^ 



t^ 



■pacunsaoo ^boo 
JO :>anoaiB \a\o^ 



padrand ^anocuB 
agBaaAB jCiibq 



tM Oi CO O 



IM<MC^C^Cq(MC0CqC^COC^CO 



CO^ CO t^ Oi Oi 



i-H CO 

r-f O 



00 Oi OO OO 



■padrond 

lUnOTOB IBJOJj 



<• p, 



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Ci Oi t- 



CO Oi T— < »o 



e^!^^<^ll^^l^^cq(N'^^ 



o 
Eh 



ag>a 



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i^ ft 

° n 

a 9 

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00 ^ 00 



fc ;g -^ 



"3 3 



» o 12; P 



Engineering Department. 



131 





'1^00 




§ 


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s 







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000 


g § § 


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001 -laci spnnod 
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co" 


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co_ 0>, 

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i 


to 
of 

CO 


CO 

1 


10" i-T to" 

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co_ -* -*_ 

t~ 00 t-T 


O! to 

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of 00 to 




«5 





o 


uo 


to 


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to -^ 


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to CO 


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to 


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to 
























• 






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132 



City Document No. 10. 



Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on the Sudbury -river Water-shed for 

the Year 1892. 



1S93. 


3 

a 

C3 
1-5 


>> 

u 
ca 
P 


'J5 


r. 

a, 
<1 




a 


1-5 


I 

p 
< 


a 
I 

a 
32 


o 

1 

O 


;4 

a 

o 


a 




1 










0.065 




0.175 










0.025 


2 


1.895 


0.880 


1.100 




0.260 






0.615 




3 . . 




0.770 


0.175 


0.795 






010 


4 






0.070 


0.050 




0.125 
0.590 


0.070 
0.070 




5 
















6 . 


0.620 
















0.055 


100 


7 . 


















0.065 




8 . 




0.290 


0.690 


0.025 














615 


9 


0.045 


0.030 




0.290 


0.220 






0.060 






10 


0.330 










2.275 




11 


0.015 


1.645 




0.480 
0.100 






0.980 
0.140 








12 . 


















13 . . . 


1.520 










0.175 
0.605 










14 . . 


0.160 








0.225 




2.440 






280 


15 


0.600 






0.900 








16 










0.335 








1.655 




17 












1.110 


■ • • 


. 


0.285 






18 


0.800 
0.320 




1.215 






0.320 




19 












0.045 






20 


0.080 


















095 


21 






0.490 
0.125 


2.120 
















22 . . . . . 






















23 






0.725 


0.790 


0.125 














24 




0.030 
0.025 






0.150 








25 










0.420 




1.110 








26 .... 








0.235 
0.125 


0.150 








27 










0.395 


0.275 
0.305 


1.770 








28 














0.140 




29 








0.120 










0.110 




30 


0.035 








0.020 








0.590 




31 










1.345 


0.1.30 
































Totals . 


5.850 


3.140 


4.060 


0.830 


5.585 


2.760 


4.230 


4.440 


2.840 


1.170 


5.800 


1.125 



Total rainfall during the year, 41,830 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Framingham and Ashland. 



Engineeeing Department. 133 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituate for the Year 1892. 



1892. 


3 

a 

t3 




1 

IS 


< 




a 

D 


1-5 


D 
SB 

< 


a 


3 

O 


a 

1 


Si 

a 

o 

Q 


1 










0.07 




0.13 










0.05 


2 


1.21 




1.54 






0.02 




0.29 






0.60 




3 




0.96 






0.71 


0.16 


0.72 












4 






0.86 






5 
















0.02 






0.17 




6 


0.54 








0.01 








0.04 






0.11 


7 






















0.06 




8 


0.04 


0.31 


0.60 
0.28 


0.07 
















0.64 


9 . . . 




0.45 


0.12 






0.05 


2.17 




10 








11 




1.32 












1.04 










12 . ... 






0.55 






0.08 










13 


1.39 
























14 




0.17 








0.38 


0.46 




2.57 






0.27 


15 


0.56 








0.97 
















16 


. . . 










. . . 


0.17 








1.43 




17 












1.10 








0.28 






18 






1.08 
















0.42 




19 


1.03 
















0.01 








20 
























0.09 


21 




0.02 




0.49 
0.12 


2.85 
















22 
















23 






0.62 






0.09 














24 


















02 








25 




0.02 






0.21 


0.54 


0.37 










0.02 


26 


2.22 


0.23 


0.01 






27 . ... 










0.09 


0.48 






28 


. . . 






0.10 


0.07 












29 














0.36 






0.22 


0.29 




30 


0.01 










0.01 










31 














1.07 


0.14 
































Totals . 


4.78 


2.80 


4.12 


0.78 


5.46 


3.23 


3.47 


3.79 


2.87 


1.42 


5.14 


1.18 



Total rainfall during the year, 39.04 inches. 



134 



City Document No. 10. 



Raiyifall in Inches and Hundredths on the Mystic Water-shed for the Year 

1892. 



1893. 


a 

1-5 


3 
0) 




p. 

< 




a 
1^ 




3 

be 

< 


a 
ft, 

0) 
02 


u 

J= 

O 
o 
O 


a 

> 
1 


S 
§ 

9) 


1 


1.070 


1.010 


1.130 




0.090 




0.165 


0.070 






0.180 


020 


2 








3 




0.695 


0.205 
0.005 


0.770 


0.525 
0.015 
0.400 


0.030 
0.035 


0.030 
0.060 
1.035 


0.405 
0.085 
0.030 




4 .... 






0.025 


0.005 


.5 












6 

7 


0.680 








■ ' 








0.110 


8 .... 




0.295 


0.660 


0.015 
















0.710 


9 


0.040 




0.405 


0.220 


0.015 
0.010 




0.055 






10 . . 




0.380 






1.870 


0.020 


11 




1.535 




0.560 
0.035 












12 .... 








1.050 
0.150 










13 . ... 


1.425 
0.345 






















14 

15 ... 


0.140 


0.005 




0.980 


0.330 


0.170 


1.615 






0.250 


16 . ... 




0.160 






0.410 


1.295 




17 












1.095 










18 


0.875 
0.145 




1.125 














0.260 




19 . ... 












0.015 








20 




















0.035 


21 ... . 




0.005 




0..515 
0.125 


2.255 
















22 .... 


















23 






0.706 




0.630 


0.070 














24 


0.005 
















25 . 


0.030 








1.025 














26 . ... 








0.215 
120 






2.225 
0.090 


0.310 


0.105 






27 . . . 










1.010 
0.005 


0.015 
0.175 






28 ... 








0.025 
0.110 


0.005 




0.140 


0.145 




29 . ... 










30 . ... 


0.030 










0.375 




31 










0.900 


0.270 
































Totals , . 


4.516 


3.015 


4.005 


0.815 


5.585 


4.150 


2.575 


4.820 


2.005 


1.835 


4.645 


1.150 



Total rainfall during the year, 39.115 inches, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Mystic Lake and Winchester. 



Engineering Department. 



135 





1 












O 


o 


in 


,^ 


1^ 








, 




• 


Oi 




o 


(N 










iO 




IM 








a \ 


^ 


^ 




C» 


o 


t^ 


OO 


tn 


to 












H 1 


-f 


-* 




tX 






CO 




CO 








g 




1 




^_^ 


rr. 


^ 


^ 


Ol 


to 


o 


CO 


CO 


^ 








o 




I— ' 


f— I 


CI 


o 


o 




IN 




O! 


»— 1 








« 


^ 


^ 




r^ 


,_« 


T-^ 


,_) 


I-l 


r-4 


o 


,_( 




"-^ 




o 
























. 


■^ 






^ 




'H* 


<o 


to 


CO 


(M 


<M 


or 


■^ 


<v, 






































1 


ira 


in 


M5 


•» 


■o 


>* 


■* 


>* 


^ 


IO 


CO 




.n 






00 










to 






to 












^ 


c^ 


o 


-* 


CO 










t' 




CO 








o 


f_, 


r^ 


,_H 






rH 


,— ( 


CI 


,-H 


rH 


f_t 








o 


























*"* 










^ 


to 


CO 


tn 


OO 


i-l 


00 


<N 


^ 








*^ 






OO 






OO 


CO 


00 






o> 








02 


C-l 


CO 


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(M 


N 


?-i 


1-1 


rH 


c^ 


(M 


'^ 




ci 












f^l 


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^ 










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CO 


lO 




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•^ 


to 


^' 






o 




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-* 






■M 


-* 


^ 


lO 


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tH 


CO 


CO 


T)l 


d 






j_ 




>3 








CO 








CO 


M 








to 




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Tl< 


•* 


CO 


CO 


OJ 


<M 


c^ 


eq 


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<rq 


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CJ 








f_ 








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^ 


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a 

1-5 




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05 




05 


'^ 








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IM 


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CO 


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to 


00 


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in 


^ 






^ 




>> 


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to 




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in 






in 


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110 


in 








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3 


a 
a, 


o 

0) 
5D 

■a 


O 

a" 


o 


•g 
s 


o 
» 
ao 

a 






3 




O 




y 




a 


b4 


SI 

"a 


^ 


::2 


> 






g 

5 

ELi 


Q 

a 

n 


,1 


a) 




>= 

■^ 




o 


a 

a 


o 


o 


■fl 





136 



City Document No. 10. 



Rainfall Received and Collected, 1892. 







Sudbury. 


COCHITUATB. 


Mystic. 


MOITTH. 


1 
a 


■a 

11 

Pi 


•6 

a o 
0) a) 

!-, o 


1 

a 


T3 

11 

D3 


"6 

a o 

i. o 

p-l 


"3 

a 


■a 

"3 " 


•6 
a o 

<2" 




Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 

cent. 


Inches. 


Inches. 


Per 
cent. 


January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May . . 
June . 
July . 
August 
Septembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 


r . 
r . 


5.850 
3.140 
4.060 
0.830 
5.585 
2.760 
4.230 
4.440 
2.840 
1.170 
5.800 
1.125 


3.335 
1.574 
3.488 
1.504 
2.245 
0.739 
0.382 
0.500 
0.396 
0.224 
1.204 
0.865 


57.01 
50.13 
85.90 
181.15 
40.20 
26.76 
9.03 
11.26 
13.94 
19.18 
20.75 
76.89 


4.7S 
2.80 
4.12 
0.78 
5.46 
3.23 
3.47 
3.79 
2.87 
1.42 
5.14 
1.18 


3.18 
1.64 
3.12 
0.90 
2.03 
0.49 
0.33 
0.56 
0.60 
0.57 
1.09 
0.84 


66.55 
58.50 
75.67 
115.52 
37.13 
15.26 
9.52 
14.68 
21.10 
-10.16 
21.22 
71.09 


4.515 
3.015 
4.005 
0.815 
5.585 
4.150 
2.-575 
4.820 
2.005 
1.835 
4.645 
1.150 


2.49 
1.76 
3.03 
1.33 
2.10 
1.17 
0.66 
0.49 
0.56 
0.45 
1.07 
0.87 


55.04 
58.46 
75.72 
163.57 
37.54 
28.30 
25.70 
10.19 
27.71 
24.29 
23.09 
75.23 


Totals and ) 
averages, ] 


41.830 


16.456 


39.34 


39.04 


15.35 


39.32 


39.115 


15.98 


40.85 



Engineering Department. 



137 



Table shoiuing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations on 
the Water-works. 







TEMrEBATURE OF AlK. 




Temperature of 
Wateb. 


1892. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Fraraingbam. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
House. 




a 
=1 
a 

C3 


a 

g 


a 
ca 

la 


Maximum. 


Minimum. 


Mean. 


Mean. 


Mean. 


January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May . . 
June . 
July . . 
August 
Septembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 


r 

r 

r 






62.0 
44.5 
56.5 
77.0 
83.0 
94.5 
94.0 
95.0 
80.5 
75.0 
66.5 
45.5 


1.0 
3.5 
12.5 
25.5 
31.0 
43.0 
48.0 
53.0 
40.5 
30.0 
19.0 
0.0 


28.0 
27.6 
32.3 
48.3 
55.8 
69.8 
72.0 
70.1 
62.3 
50.8 
40.1 
27.3 


62.0 
49.0 
58.0 
76.0 
83.0 
96.0 
96.0 
94.0 
80.0 
77.0 
65.0 
45.0 


-3.0 
-1.0 
8.0 
21.0 
27.0 
38.0 
45.0 
48.0 
34.0 
23.0 
16.0 
-2.0 


25.7 
27.6 
31.3 
46.3 

54.7 
69.5 
70.9 
68.5 
60.3 
49.6 
38.7 
26.6 


36.5 
36.8 
36.7 
4S.0 
55.7 
69.3 
74.3 
74.7 
67.6 
56.4 
45.5 
36.6 


36.3 
35.9 
35.0 
45.2 
55. S 
70.8 
74.5 
75.8 
66.5 
56.9 
47.2 
36.8 



138 City Document No. 10. 

C. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

The construction of the extension of the Improved Sew- 
erage System has been continued the past year, the amount 
expended being $161,959.90. 

The condition of the appropriation on Feb. 1, 1893, was 
as follows : 

Net appropriations $6,072,240 93 

Total expenditures . . . . . 6,027,206 31 

Unexpended balance Feb. 1, 1893 . $45,034 62 

Outfall Sewer. 

Section 3 Outfall, which has been under construction for 
the past two years, was completed by the contractor, H. P. 
Nawn, in August last, at a cost of $86,480. 

In March, 1892, the contract for building Section 3 C 
Outfall Sewer was awarded to Messrs. Perkins & White, the 
lowest bidders, for $71,904. This section extends in the 
embankment between Squantum and Moon Islands, a distance 
of 1,865 feet. The sew^er is of brick, horseshoe shaped, 
12 feet wide and 11 feet high, with a heavy concrete founda- 
tion, and with side- walls and spandrels of concrete ; iron 
rods are built into the foundation and through the arch, to 
guard against injury to the structure in the event of a' slight 
settlement of the embankment. 

The methods of construction pursued by the contractors 
presented some features of interest : the trench was exca- 
vated wide enough to make bracing unnecessary, by a 
powerful steam " digger," the material being thrown out on 
each side of the embankment ; the back-filling was made by 
the same machine. All transportation was eifected by water, 
and no horses were employed on the work. 

During the working season 37,000 cubic yards of earth 
were excavated, and 20,000 cubic yards back-filled; 7,492 
cubic yards of concrete and 1,806 cubic yards of brick 
masonry were laid. 

In the latter part of November the masonry conduit was 
completed by the contractors, and preparations were at once 
made to build the 55 linear feet of sewer required to connect 



Engineering Department. 139 

the ends of Section 3 and Section 3 C with the old sewer in 
the embiinkment ; the east " connection " was built by 
Messrs. Perkins & White, while the force of men belong- 
ing to the department, under the superintendence of H. J. 
White, were transferred from Section 6, Dorchester, to 
make the west "counection." On the evening of Friday, 
November 25, work was begun on each end and carried on 
without interruption, with all possible speed, until 3 A.M. 
on the following Sunday morning, when the " connections " 
were completed ; pumping at the Calf Pasture Pumping- 
station, which had been suspended for the time being, was 
then resumed, and the sewage has since continued to flow 
through the new conduit. The completion of the outfall 
sewer was of great moment, as the w^ooden flume which it 
rephiced has for several years past been in a dangerous con- 
dition, and has limited in a serious manner the capacity of 
the Improved Sewerage Works. 

The contract for removing the wooden flume between 
Squantum and ]Moon Island was awarded, in December 
last, to Hugh Farrel, the lowest bidder, for the sum of 
$1,527, he agreeing to })ay $127 for the old materials con- 
tained in the structure. 

The contractor is now engaged on this work. 

A contract has been made with Messrs. Perkins & White 
to build an embankment from the Sfjuantum shore to the 
east shaft of the tunnel under Dorchester Bay, with the 
necessary ballast and rip-rap. The prices to be paid are as 
follows : 

Filling (measured in place) . . $0.25 per cubic yard. 

Ballast and rip-rap . . . .1.43 " " 

The contractors prosecuted this work until forced to sus- 
pend operations in January on account of the cold weather, 
the surface of Dorchester Bay being completely frozen over. 

Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 

The construction of this sewer has been carried on en- 
tirely by day labor. At the beginning of the year Section 
8, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer, was being built in a hill 
near Granite avenue ; the de{)th of the trench varied from 
25 to 39 feet, while the material was exceedingly hard, 
making the progress, of necessity, slow. This piece of 
heavy work was completed in June, and the force was moved 
to Section 8, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer, where work is 
now in progress. 



140 City Document No. 10. 

Section 6, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer, extends from 
the end of Section 5 (completed in the autumn of 1890) at 
Freeport street, through private land, Bertram street, Coffee 
street, Freeport-street extension (as proposed by the Board 
of Survey), and private land, to Chickatawbut street, Narra- 
gansett street, a distance of 2,455 feet. 

Bids for furnishing the bricks, cement, screened gravel, 
and drain-pipe required in construction were called for, and 
contracts awarded, in each case, to the lowest bidder, as 
follows : 

F. A. Merriam & Co., 450 M brick, $9.90 per M. 
Waldo Bros., 1,500 bbls. Am. cement, $1.13 per bbl. 
Waldo Bros., 275 bbls. Portland cement, $2.40 per bbl. 
P. J. Lyons, 800 cu. yds. gravel, 87 cents per cubic yd. 
F. A. Merriam & Co., 2,500 lin. ft. drain pipe, 68 per 
cent, off list price. 

The sewer is of brick, circular in shape and 4 feet 6 
inches in diameter, laid on a grade of 1 in 2,500 ; the neat 
work of the invert is laid in Portland cement. When the 
material at the bottom of the trench is suitable it is exca- 
vated to the exact shape required, and the sewer constructed 
of two rings of brick-work ; under less favorable conditions 
a foundation of concrete is built with concrete side- walls, 
the whole resting upon a wooden platform where the bottom 
is wet and sandy. On this section, for a considerable dis- 
tance, beds of mud were encountered, and it has been 
necessary to support the sewer upon piles varying in length 
from 10 to 30 feet. An embankment has been built over 
the sewer in the low marsh-land to protect the brick-work ; 
1,975 linear feet of sewer were built in Dorchester during 
the year. 

To complete the Dorchester Intercepting Sewer to Central 
avenue, as originally designed, it will be necessary to build 
9,100 linear feet of sewer at a cost of $140,000. It is very 
desirable, and easily possible, to complete this work during 
the next year, and afford an outlet for the sewage from the 
thickly settled district in the neighborhood of Milton Lower 
Mills and Central avenue. 

Stony-brook Improvement. 

A survey has been made and plans and estimates prepared 
for improving the channel of Stony Brook, by straightening, 
widening, and deepening, from the Hyde Park line to a point 
1,500 feet below Mt. Hope street. The proposed improve- 
ment would lower the water level in times of ordinary flow, 



' Engineering Department. 141 

and permit the drainage of the low land in the neighborhood ; 
it would have, however, no appreciable effect on the water 
level in case of floods. 

East Shaft. 

The following is a copy of the official permission from the 
United States authorities for tilling outside of the established 
Tines : 

Whereas, by section 3 of an act of Congress, approved July 18, 1892, 
entitled "An Act making approjDriations for the construction, repair, 
and preservation of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for 
other jjurposes," it is declared that it shall not be lawful to excavate or 
till or in any manner to alter or modify the course, location, condition, or 
capacity of any port, roadstead, Tiaven, harbor of refuge, or inclosure 
within the limits of any breakwater, unless approved and authorized bv 
the Secretary of War ; and 

Wliereas, The City of Boston, Massachusetts, has applied to the Sec- 
retary of War for permission to consti'uct an embankment from Squan- 
tum to East Shaft, so called, in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, and has 
submitted for liis approval plans of said embankment, which are hereto 
attached ; 

No2v, therefore, I, L. A. Gi'ant, Acting Secretary of War, do hereby 
authorize the City of Boston, Massachusetts, to construct an embank- 
ment from Squantum to East Shaft, so called, in Boston Harbor, Massa- 
chusetts, in accordance with said jilans, which are hereby approved, 
ui^on the following conditions : 

That the engineer officer of the United States Army, in charge of 
the locality, may supervise the work to be done, in order that said plans 
shall be complied with. 

Witness vaj hand this 2od day of August, 1892. 

(Signed) L. A. Grant, 

Seal of the Acting Secretary of War. 

U.S.A. 
War Office. 

The conditions of the instrument are hereby accei^ted by the Cit}- of 
Boston, Massachusetts, by John H. Lee, Acting Mayor, thereunto law- 
fully authorized, this nineteenth daj" of August, 1892. 

(Signed) John H. Lee. 

In presence of 

James A. Mc&bben, 
Thomas W. O'Rourk. < 



142 City Document No. 10. 



D. 

[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE BOARD OF 
PARK COMMISSIONERS.] 

The Parkway. Back Bay Fens. 

Roadways and Walhs. — The drive on the southerly side 
of Longwood entrance and the connection with the Audubon 
road across Fen Bridge have been finished. 

Charlesgate east, between Beacon street and Charles River, 
has been surfaced. 

On Huntington entrance and over the Stony-brook Bridge 
the drives and walks have l)een completed. The surfacing 
of the Fenway between Huntington and Treniont entrances 
has been completed, and that between Tremont and Long- 
wood entrances is nearly done. This leaves only the 
Tremont entrance to be surfaced. 

The ride through the Fens has been entirely finished, and 
was opened December 28. A contract was made on May 3 
with A. A. Libby & Co., for furnishing for the Fenway 
1,770 linear feet of curbstone, at $1.53 per linear foot. The 
contract was completed Octol)er 18. 

There have been purchased during the year 44,215 paving- 
blocks, at $45 per M, and 6,878 tons of stone for crushing, 
at 79 and 80 cents per ton. 

Filling, — Additional land was acquired for the boundary 
roads at the Tremont entrance, and it was tilled by the 
Boston & Albany Railroad Company for the sum. of 51 cents 
per cubic 3^ard. The work was finished on May 18, and 
required 14,092 cubic yards of filling. 

Stony-brook Bridge. — This bridge, which was described 
in the last annual report, was nearly finished at the date of 
the report, but owing to various delays it was not entirely 
completed until October 1. The total cost was $37,655.19. 

Retaining -v.mU and Oidvert at BrooMine Avenue. — As 
stated last year, this work was completed at that time, with 
the exception of the l)owlder work forming the face of the 
wall above the water. The latter work was done early in 
the season, as was also the grading and surfacing in this 
vicinity. 

Grading of Slopes, Loaming, and Planting. — Most of the 
grading and loaming has been finished, there remaining un- 
finished only the ground occupied by the temporary headquar- 



Engineering Department. 



143 



ters at Westland entrance, a small portion of. Tremont en- 
trance, and some short sections of tree spaces along the 
border walks. Most of the ground which is covered with 
loam has been planted. 

Miscellaneous. — The wooden gates at the outlet of the 
pond, near Beacon street, have been rebuilt ; the plantations 
on Commonwealth avenue, between Charlesgate west and 
Beacon street, have been regraded and planted, and the iron 
fence between Beacon street and the Boston & Albany E.R. 
has been painted. 

The following table gives the principal items of work com- 
pleted to date : 







Per cent, 
of whole. 


Channel excavated . 


1,227,000 sq. ft. 


100 


Shore completed 


26,700 lin. ft. 


100 


Marsh completed 


833,000 sq. ft. 


100 


Driveways completed 


75,000 sq. yds. 


85 


Walks completed 


30,000 sq. yds. 


57 


Ride completed 


14,000 sq. yds. 


100 


Curbstone set . . . 


30,405 lin. ft. 


88 


Gutters paved 


17,100 sq. yds. 


86 


Area covered with loam . 


. 1,187,000 sq. ft. 


87 


Area planted . 


. 1,002,000 sq. ft. 


73 


Boundary fence 


5,687 lin. ft. 


37 


Drains laid 


7,642 lin. ft. 




Man-holes 


6 




Catch-basins . 


98 




Bridges and culverts 


7 





In addition, a large amount of work has been partially 
completed which cannot be classified. 

The usual force has been employed for the care of planta- 
tions, roads, walks, etc., and the expense of the same 
charged to the appropriation for maintenance. 



Stony Brook and Muddy River. 

Covered Channels. — These channels remain in the same 
condition as they were one year ago. The Muddy-river 
conduit is in bad condition, a portion of it near the gate- 
chamber being propped up by inside timbering, which forms 
a serious obstruction to the tiow of water through it, and 
which will cause serious trouble should a flood occur before 
this part of the channel is rebuilt. 



144 City Document No. 10. 



Muddy River. 

Filling, Grading, and Lomn. — The grading on Section 
C, under the contract with Edward F. Brigham, was com- 
pleted early in the season. The final estimate was made 
June 2, and the total amount paid was $13,944.31. Work 
under the contract with Moulton & O'Mahoney is still in 
progress, the payments to date amounting to $59,171.83. 

The filling done on Audubon road by the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company, under its contract dated October 21 , 1891 , 
was completed July 28, 1892. The amount of tilling depos- 
ited was 77,170 cubic yards, at the price of 55 cents per 
cubic yard. 

The Boston & Albany R.R. Company began work De- 
cember 9, under its contract dated September 28, 1891, for 
transporting loam from Basin G of the Boston Water-works ; 
and this work is now in progress. 

Bridges. — The bridge on Brookline avenue has been com- 
pleted, with the exception of a portion of the parapet walls. 
It is a masonry arch of 15 feet span, the abutments and face 
walls being of granite resting on a pile and timber founda- 
tion ; the faces of the walls which show above the ground are 
of seamed faced granite, and the coping is of red granite. The 
interior of the arch is of brick. The width of the structure, 
at rioht angles to the line of the street, is 95 feet 6 inches, 
and consists of a driveway, two walks, and a space to be 
occupied by the 40-inch water main from the Brookline 
Reservoir. 

On April 6 contracts were made with Blanchard & Sias for 
building bridges on Bellevue-street extension and on Tremont 
street. Work on these bridges is now in progress. 

On August 27 a contract was made with Kelly & O'Hearn, 
of Brookline, for building three bridges and a culvert on the 
line of the stream above Leverett Pond. These are small 
masonry structures which carry the drive and walks across 
the brook. They are nearly completed. 

Each of these bridges and culverts is partly in Boston and 
partly in Brookline, and the work is being done under the 
direction of A. H. French, C.E., engineer for the Brookline 
Park Commissioners. The working plans were prepared by 
Mr. French, in consultation with this department, from pre- 
liminary designs furnished by Messrs. F. L. Olmsted & Co. 

Administration Building. — A contract was made on 
September 26 with Charles H. Dodge, for the erection of a 
building near Audubon road at its crossing over the Boston 
& Albany R.R. Work was begun September 27, and it is 
expected that it will be finished early in the coming season. 



Engineering Department. 145 

The buildiEg will contain offices for the police and other de- 
partment employees, and toilet-rooms for the public. 

Jamaicaway and Arborway. 

A contract was made on January 2 with Pierce F. Loner- 
gan, for building a drain 4 feet 6 inches in diameter and 
1,300 feet in lengih, to carry the waters of the brook which 
runs from the land west of Pond street to the Arboretum. 
Work has not yet been commenced. 

On January 16 a contract was made with Saucier Brothers 
for the grading of the Parkway between Perkins and Centre 
streets, on which contract work has not yet been commenced. 

A contract was made on December 12 with Newell & 
Snowling for grading the Parkway between Washington 
street and Forest Hills street. This work has not been 
commenced. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

The Walter-street road was finished early in the season, 
and opened for travel on July 17. The road around the 
north side of Bussey Hill and across the meadow to the 
Parkway, opposite Orchard street, has been finished, and 
was opened to the public on December 18. Three culverts 
were built on the line of this road. 

The road from the last-described road to the Parkway 
near South street has been finished, but has not yet been 
opened, as the approach to it on the Parkway from South 
street has not been entirely graded. 

The above completes the road-building in the Arboretum, 
with the exception of the Parkway along the northerly 
boundary. 

The following table shows the amounts of the main items 
of work done to date : 



or 4.2 



Driveways completed 
Walks completed 
Gutters paved 
18-in. pipe drain 


30,338 sq. yd 
16,138 " 
8,069 " 
315 lin. ft. 


15-in. pipe drain 


298 " 


12-in. pipe drain 


612 '' 


10-in. pipe drain 


367 " 


8-in. pipe drain 
Agricultural tile drain 


2,641 " 
6,343 " 


Catch-basins 


63 


Man-holes 


2 


Culverts 


4 



146 City Document No. 10. 



Franklin Park. 



Drives^ Rides, and Walks. — Glen lane was entirely 
completed and opened to travel on August 13. 

The entrances from Blue Hill avenue opposite Columbia 
street and Glen road have been finished, including the 
circle at the easterly end of the Greeting. The grounds in 
this vicinity have been graded and seeded. 

A shelter, designed by Messrs. Sturgis & Cabot, architects, 
has been erected at the carriage-stand near the entrance op- 
posite Columbia street, for the accommodation of visitors 
waiting for the park carriages. 

In the Wilderness all of the walks north of the brook have 
been built, including the construction of several flights of 
stone steps : the Circuit drive is sub-graded from the easterly 
end of the Greeting to the Morton-street entrance ; the 
drainage is provided for, the gutters have been paved, and 
the driveway ballasted for all but 1,800 feet of its length. 
The drive can be completed early in the coming season. 

Drainage. — A culvert 185 feet in length, 4 feet 6 inches 
wide, and 4 feet 6 inches high, has been built in the valley 
near Canterbury street. The overflow and outlet for Scar- 
boro' Pond has been built across Morton street. 

Schoolmaster Hill. — The woodwork of the Arbor has 
been put in place, and the framework for the roof of the 
Shelter has been erected under the direction of the City 
Architect. A contract has been made for covering the roof 
with tiles. 

Scarboro' Pond. — A contract was made on June 23 with 
Rowe & Hall for completing the excavation of the ponds, 
and the work is nearly done. 

Miscellaneous. — Temporary buildings for the accommo- 
dation of the public have been erected in the Wilderness and 
in Long Crouch Woods. 

The old fence walls in the Country Park have been removed 
and the ground put in order. 

Three hundred additional settees have been purchased. 
The flock of sheep increased in number during the year to 
188, and in December 60 wethers and old ewes were sold for 
$256.44. The yield of wool was 815 pounds, which was sold 
for $194.69. 

The following table shows the principal items of work 
completed to date, but it should not be understood to be a 
complete statement of the work done, as a large amount of 
labor has been expended on work which cannot be classified. 



ENGmEERING DEPARTMENT. 



147 



Driveways completed 

Walks completed . . 51,200 

Kide completed . . 10,500 

Gutters paved . . 18,000 

Curbstone set 

12-in. water-pipe laid 

6-in. water-pipe laid 

4-in. water-pipe laid 

Hydrants 

Drinking-fountains 

Bridge .... 

Gateways 

Boundary wall 

2-ft. 9-iu. brick drain 

2-ft. X 2-ft. 6-in. brick drain 

2-ft. brick drain 

18. -in pipe drain 

15-in. pipe drain 

12-in. pipe drain 

10-in. pipe drain 

8-in. pipe dr<iin 

4-in. pipe drain 

4-in. agricultural tile drain 

3-in. agricultural tile drain 

2-in. agricultural tile drain 

1^-in. agricultural tile drain 

Total drains . 

iSIan-holes 

Catch-basins and inlets 

Culverts 

Open channel for brook 

Area of ground finished, about 



83,700 sq. yds., or 5| miles, 
or 71 " 



or 1 of a 


mile. 


9,000 1 


n. ft. 


200 


(( 


3,500 


(( 


1,150 


(( 


7 




8 




1 




4,468 lin. ft. 


706 




180 




769 




3,140 




2,895 




1,950 




1,954 




8,750 




190 




2,100 




3,520 




26,713 




20,700 




73,567 lin. ft 


50 




152 




1 




2,300 1 


in. ft 


200 acres. 



Twenty-eight hundred linear feet of Circuit drive have 
l)een ballasted, of which 2,300 linear feet have been covered 
with crushed stone, and in addition 1,800 linear feet of drive 
have been graded. 



Franklin Field. 

Surveys were made of this ground early in the season. 
On August 22 a contract was made with Christopher McBride, 
for building a drain which is designed to take the ordinary 
flow of the brook running from the field. It is 2 feet in 
diameter, 1,320 feet in length, and is at such grade that the 
low ground can be underdrained. The work is nearly done. 



148 City Document No. 10. 

This drain is not designed to take care of the flow of the 
brook at times of excessive rainfall, and the field at such 
times will be flooded, as at present, to such a level that the 
yield of the brook can flow ofl' through the old channel, 
which must be kept open. 

On December 3 a contract was made with P. F. Longer- 
gan for the excavation of a temporary drainage-ditch around 
the northerly and easterly sides of the field. Work was 
begun on December 15, and is now in progress. The object 
of this ditch is to intercept the flows of the brooks which 
overflow the field. 

Dorchester Park. 

In the spring the grounds were cleared of rul)bish and 
underbrush, and the dead trees were removed. 

Marine Park. 

Filling. — The tilling to be done under the contract with 
Perkins & White, dated September 10, 1890, is still in prog- 
ress, the amount of material deposited to date being 394,- 
000 cubic yards. The drive and walk along the shore, 
between the foot of Broadway and Sixth street, have been 
sub-graded in readiness for surfacing under a contract with 
Perkins & White, dated April 27, 1892. 

Loam. — The ground to be planted southerly of Broad- 
way extended has been covered with loam by Perkins & 
White, under their contract dated October 12, 1891. The 
amount of loam furnished was 9,503 cubic yards, at $1.39 
per cubic yard. This ground was seeded to grass in the 
spring. 

Caf^ile-islcmd Bridge. — This is a temporary footbridge, 
and was built by William L. IMiller, under a contract dated 
July 14, 1891. The bridge, except the draw, was completed 
June 2, at a cost of $31,973.06. This bridge was built on 
the same general plan as the temporary pier built in 1885. 
It consists of bents of oak piles, 3 piles and 2 spurshores to 
each bent ; the bents are spaced 16 feet apart on centres, and 
are capped with 6-in. X 12-in. hard-pine girder-caps ; on these 
caps are placed hard-pine stringers, 2 ft. 6 in. apart on cen- 
tres ; the stringers are 3 in. X 14 in., except the outside 
ones, which are 4 in. X 14 in. The floor is of 2-in. X 8-in. 
hard-pine plank, planed on the upper side. There is a rail- 
ing of hard pine, 3 feet high, on each side of the pier. 
Seats are built against the railing on each side of the bridge 
in alternate sections of 48 feet in length, thus occupying 
one-half the lenslh of the bridge on each side. 



Engineering Department. 149 

The draw was finished on July 2 ; it consists of Pratt 
trusses, 14 feet apart on centres, with Samson posts and 
rods. The whole length is 108 feet, the draw-opening being 
50 feet in width ; the whole is mounted on trucks. The 
draw may be opened by running it towards Castle Island over 
the floor of the bridge. 

Owino- to delav in obtainins; from the United States au- 
thorities permission to occupy Castle Island, the bridge and 
island were not open to the public until July 29. 

On September 6 a contract was made with Thomas Keyes, 
for covering 211 linear feet of the bridge at the Castle-island 
end with a wooden shelter of the same form as the shelter on 
the pier. This was completed on November 12, at a cost of 
$2,470. 

Castle Island. — The grounds have been cleared of weeds 
and rubbish, and the ruins of several old buildings removed. 
Two buildings for ^vater-closets have been erected, and the 
building formerly occupied by the commander of the garri- 
son has been repaired for the use of the ordnance sergeant in 
charge of the government property. 

Miscellaneous. — Eighteen electric arc lights were placed 
on the bridge and approach. AVork was begun late in the 
fall repainting the iron pier, but owing to the inclemency of 
the weather it was not completed. 

Wood-island Park. 

The only work of construction done during the year has 
been the grading of the playground between the two hills. 
This was done under a contract with Frank M. Wells, dated 
May 27, 1892, and at a cost of $13,993.95. 

Charlesbank. 

No work of construction has been done at this park during 
the year, except that required on the newly planted grounds. 

Men's Gymnasium. — This was opened on May 20, and 
was kept open until nine o'clock in the evening until Novem- 
ber 1, and since that date until dark. The total attendance 
to December 31 was 148,336, of which 46,903 were present 
after six o'clock P.]M. The attendance was not as large as 
in 1891, owing to the gymnasium not having been opened 
until two months later" in 1892 than in 1891. Comparing 
the attendance last year with that of 1891 after May 20, there 
was an increase of about 6,000 in 1892. 

During the summer classes for light athletic exercises were 
organized b}^ the superintendent, and were very popular. 
For this purpose a platform was made from the plank-walks 



150 City Document No. 10. 

which are used in winter, and dumb bells, bar bells, and 
Indian clubs were added to the apparatus. 

There were four accidents reported during the 3'^ear, but 
none of them was of a serious nature. The need of better 
bathinof and dressiniz; accommodations was shown more than 
ever during the past season. 

Skating. — During the recent cold weather the experiment 
was tried of covering the grounds with ice by Hooding and 
sprinkling while the ground was frozen. A good surface for 
skating was secured, but with the small fixtures for obtain- 
ing water on the ground the work of flooding is necessarily- 
slow. The attendance has been all the grounds could ac- 
commodate, having been as high as 2,600 in one day; the 
largest number admitted to the grounds in one day since they 
were first opened. 

Women's Gymnasium and Girls' Playground. — This was 
opened on June 1 and was closed on October 31, and was, as 
in 1891, in charge of the Massachusetts Emergency and 
Hygiene Association. The report of this association to the 
Park Commissioners gives the attendance and other matters 
of interest. 

Miscellaneous. — Considerable work has been done keep- 
ing the grounds, fences, and apparatus in repair, and 
everything is in good condition. Settees have been placed 
alonsc the walk borderino- Charles street. 



Chahlestown Heights. 

On February 12 a contract was made with Jeremiah Sulli- 
van for o-radino; the orrounds. Work was begun on March 
8, and the contract was completed on July 19, the amount 
paid being $5,229.56. A contract was made on August 22 
with Eichard D. Shanahan, for building a wall on the line of 
Medford street, and on a portion of the property line on the 
southerly side of the park. This was finished on December 
13, at a cost of $5,900. The wall is of granite, and is 
4 feet high, capped with a granite coping 10 inches high 
and 2 feet wide. There are two openings in the wall for 
entrances, and the wall at these openings is finished by 
granite posts 5 feet high. 

The walls supporting the terraces have been completed, 
with the exception of the parapets. 

The drainage system has been entirely completed. 

The surplus stone found in the excavation, and not used 
in the walls, has been broken up and deposited on the walks 
for surfacing. 



Engineering Department. 151 

A considerable quantity of loam and manure has been pur- 
chased. 

Charlestown Playground. 

The walls of the old tannery have been removed and the 
upland graded. A large amount of filling was brought from 
Charlestown Heights, under the contract for grading that 
ground, and considerable filling has been received during the 
year from the Street Department and from individuals. 



152 City Document No. 10. 



E. 



[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE STREET 
DEPARTMENT.] 

A statement of the street-paving work done by contract 
has been arranged in tabular form, and two sheets accom- 
panying this report show the details of the work and the 
prices paid for doing the same. 

As was explained at greater length in the report of last 
year, the averages given have only a general value, as each 
piece of work done varies from the others in essential par- 
ticulars. 

The specifications for granite blocks vary from those of 
last year in the length of the block called for, the length this 
year being from 9 to 14 inches, to average 11 J inches, in- 
stead of — as last year — 8 to 12 inches, to average 10 inches. 

As a result of the change about 23 blocks per square yard 
have been used, instead of about 25 as laid last year ; but 
very few small blocks were used. 

Under 56 agreements 5.97 miles of streets have been 
paved at a cost of $193,595.85 paid to the contractors, and 
at a total cost to the city, including the material and labor 
furnished by the Street Department, of $435,160.20. 

The following are the principal items of work done : 
Block-stone paving on a concrete base laid with pitch joints, 
17,089.6 square yards, at an average cost of about $4.75 per 
square yard. Block-stone paving on a gravel base laid with 
pitch joints, 2,282 square yards, at an average cost of about 
$3.70 per square yard. Block-stone paving on a gravel 
base with gravel joints, 45,170 square yards, at an average 
cost of about $3.10 per square yard. Trinidad sheet asphalt 
on a concrete base and on an old cobble-stone paving base, 
20,829 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.60 per 
square yard. Sicilian sheet asphalt on a concrete base, 
3,329 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.60 per 
square yard. Asphalt block pavement on a sand base, 
4,232 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.25 per 
square yard. 

Edgestone set, 36,443 linear feet. 

Brick sidewalks relaid, 24,310 square yards. 

Flagging cross-walks laid, 3,212 square yards. 



Engineering Department. 153 

The following is a description of the paving clone. The 
details of cost and quantities are shown in a tabular statement. 

Athens Street. 

Athens street, from B street to C street, South Boston, 
was paA^ed by H. Gore & Co., with Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 
Portland cement concrete base. The old macadam surface 
was utilized on neighboring streets, and the old cobble-stones 
from the gutters were hauled to the Broadway crusher ; 
edgestones, flagging, and paving-bricks were delivered on 
the street by the city. Two new catch-basins were liuilt. 

Beacon Street. 

•Beacon street, from Dartmouth street to Gloucester street, 
was paved with sheet asphalt on a concrete base , by the Bar- 
ber Asphalt Paving Co., excepting about 150 feet in length at 
Gloucester street, which was paved with Hastings asphalt 
blocks laid on a gravel base by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company, The surface removed was macadam. The road- 
bed was prepared by the regular force of the Street Depart- 
ment, which also disposed of the surplus material. The 
concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company. During the work the 40-inch main water-pipe 
across the old inlet sluices of the full basin of the Boston 
Water Power Company was uncovered. It was formerly 
carried in a heavy wooden box for about 150 feet in 
length, supported by the old stone piers at intervals of about 
25 feet. It had been buried for many years, and the wooden 
trusses were in bad condition, the old wooden box was re- 
moved, and piles were driven and capped between the old 
piers to support the pipe ; the excavation was refilled with 
the old road material. Edgestones were reset by F. H. 
Cowin & Co., and the brick sidewalks were relaid by F. H. 
Cowin & Co. and James Grant. 

Border Street. 

Border street, from White street to Condor street. East 
Boston, was paved by H. Gore & Co., with granite blocks 
on a gravel base. The old surface was of macadam, which 
was delivered with the surplus material on other streets 
within a distance of one mile. Blocks, edgestone, flagging, 
and paving-bricks were delivered on the street by the city. 

The retaining-wall on and near Condor street was par- 
tially rebuilt, and built to grade, as a part of the same con- 
tract. A substantial iron fence was built on the line of the 



154 City Document No. 10. 

wall by George T. McLauthlin & Co. Three new catch- 
basins were built. 

Border street, from North Ferry to Sumner street, East 
Boston, was paved by A. A. Libby & Co., with the old 
granite blocks on a gravel base. The street-railway tracks 
were relaid, and the foot- walks rearranged to correspond to 
the relocation of the ferry entrances. The surplus earth was 
disposed of by the contractor. New blocks, edgestones, 
flagging, and bricks were furnished by the city on the 
ground. Two catch-basins were filled up, and one new one 
was built. 

BOYLSTON StKEET. 

Boylston street, from Church street to Arlington street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, with pitch 
joints, by J. Doherty & Co. The old surface was of 
macadam, which was removed and delivered within one mile 
where required. The new stone blocks, edgestone, and 
flagging furnished by the city were hauled by the contractors 
from the Albany-street yard, and paving-bricks were delivered 
by the city on the work. One new catch-basin was built. 

Broadway. 

Broadway from A street towards Dorchester avenue, 
South Boston, was paved with Sicilian rock asphalt on an 
American cement concrete base, by the National Construction 
Co. The former surface was paved with granite blocks, 
which were hauled to Seventh street between D and E 
streets, and to Sixth street between M and O streets, and 
the surplus material was taken to Vale street. Edgestones 
and bricks were delivered on the work by the city. 

Brighton Street. 

Brighton street, from Allen street to Leverett street, was 
paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., with Trinidad 
sheet asphalt laid on the old cobble-stone pavement. The 
old pavement was partly relaid, and the remains of a former 
asphalt covering removed in part. A partial base or binder 
course of coal-tar concrete was laid over the old pavement. 
The sub-grading was done and the sidewalks put in order by 
P. W. Hernan. 

Cabot Street. 

Cabot street, from Ruggles street to Yernon street, was 
paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., with Trinidad 
asphalt on an American cement concrete base. The old 



Engineering Department. 155 

street surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was done 
by the Street Department. The concrete was laid by the 
Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks and edge- 
stones were relaid by T. Payson. One new catch-basin was 
built. 

Chardon Street. 

Chardon street, from Bowdoin square to Merrimac street, 
was paved with granite blocks, with pitch joints, on a con- 
crete base, by Jones & Meehan. The old surface was paved 
with cobble-stones, which were sold to the city of Cambridge. 
The surplus earth was disposed of by the contractors. 
Paving-blocks, edgestones, and flagging were furnished by 
the city at the West yard on Commercial street, and the 
paving-bricks were delivered on the work. This street was 
paved with a special stone block, which was about one inch 
less in depth than the standard block. One new catch-basin 
was built. 

Charles Street. 

Charles street, from Beacon street to Pinckney street, was 
paved by J. Doherty & Co., with granite blocks, laid with 
pitch joints on a concrete base. The old paving was of 
granite blocks, which were culled and the best used in the 
new work. The surplus blocks were removed by the Street 
Department. The sub-grading, from Beacon to Mt, Yernon 
street, was done by the Street Department. The remainder 
of the sub-grading was done by J. Doherty & Co., who 
disposed of the useless and surplus material. The concrete 
base was laid by the Metropolitan Construction Co. Edge- 
stones and sidewalks were laid by J. Grant. Paving-blocks, 
flagging, and paving-bricks were furnished by the city. 

Cherry Street. 

Cherry street, from Shawmut avenue to Washington 
street, was paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co., with 
Trinidad sheet asphalt laid on an American cement concrete 
base. The former surface was of macadam. The sub- 
grading was done by J. Casey. The concrete base was laid 
by the Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks 
were put in order by the Street Department. 

Davis Street. 

Davis Street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
was paved with Trinidad sheet asphalt, on an American 
cement concrete base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Co. 



156 City Document No. 10. 

The former surface was of macadam. The sub-o;radino^ was 
done by the Street Department. The concrete base was 
laid by the Metropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks 
were put in order by D. Sullivan. 

Decatue Street. 

Decatur street, from Washington street to Harrison ave- 
nue, was paved by H. Gore & Co. with Sicilian rock 
asphalt, on an American cement concrete base. The former 
surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was done by the 
Street Department. The concrete base was laid by the Met- 
ropolitan Construction Co., and the sidewalks put in order 
by P. W. Hernan. 

Dorchester Avenue. 

Estimates were made early in the year for putting this 
avenue in order from South Boston line to Adams street, 
Dorchester, and a large amount of work has been done upon 
it. From Washburn street to Pond street both sides of the 
street between the curb and the railway track have been 
paved. From Pond street to Belfort street the w^esterly 
side of the street has been paved, the easterly side being 
already paved. From Belfort street to Adams street the 
avenue was already paved on both sides. From Adams 
street to Park street the avenue has been paved on both sides 
of the street-railway track. From Park street to Ashmont 
street the avenue has been graded, a new double street-rail- 
way track laid, and the roadway on the easterly side of the 
track paved. On the westerly side of the track, the old 
macadam surface was in fair condition from Park street to 
Centre street, and it was repaired and put in order ; from 
Centre street to Ashmont street a new " Telford-Macadam " 
road has been built on the westerly side of the street. All 
the paving has been made of granite blocks on a gravel base, 
and there is now a continuous paved roadway from the 
city to Ashmont street. From Ashmont street to Rich- 
mond street a new single street-railway track, being the 
easterly section of a future double track, has been laid. The 
street was graded, a heavy rock cut was made near Rich- 
mond street, and a heavy fill made, with slopes covering the 
old retaining-walls, in the valley between Codman and Rich- 
mond streets. This section of the avenue was finished with 
a " Telford-Macadam" surface, the stone from the rock cut 
being utilized for this purpose. The improvement has been 
carried to a point about three hundred feet beyond Richmond 
street ; beyond that point, in the short distance to Adams 



Engineering Department. 157 

street, another heavy rock cut will be required before the im- 
provements are completed. The block paving was done by 
H. Gore & Co. and C. J. Coates, and portions of the street 
were graded by J. Donnellen, J. J. Sullivan, and J. 
McGovern. The rock- work, Telford road-making, and a 
large part of the grading, was done by the Street Department. 
Eleven new catch-basins were built. 

Eliot Street. 

Eliot street, from Washington street to Pleasant street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a concrete base, by C. B. 
Pay son & Co. The old pavement was of granite blocks, 
which were relaid on Stanhope, Pleasant, and other streets. 
The sui'plus earth was delivered on Huntington avenue, be- 
yond Gainsborough street. IS^ew granite blocks, edgestones, 
and flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard, and the bricks were delivered on the work. The 
street-railway was relaid and paved with the old granite 
blocks on a gravel base, and the space between the double 
tracks was paved with new granite blocks on a gravel base. 
Two new catch-basins were built. 

EusTis Street. 

Eustis street, from Washing-ton street to Dearborn street, 
was paved with granite blocks on a gravel base, by A. A. 
Libby & Co. The old surface was of macadam with cobble 
srutters. The old cobble-stones were delivered at the Dimock- 
street crusher, and the surplus material was used on streets 
within one-half mile. Granite blocks, edgestones, and flag- 
ging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street yard, 
and the paving-bricks were delivered on the ground. Two 
new catch-basins were built. 

Florence Street. 

Florence street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
was paved by the Metropolitan Construction Co., with 
Hastings asphalt blocks on a 4-in. American cement con- 
crete base. The former surface was of macadam. The 
sub-grading was done by the Street Department, and the 
sidewalks were put in order by D. Sullivan. 

India Street. 

India street, in front of the Custom-house, was paved by 
J. Doherty & Co., with granite blocks laid with pitch joints, 
on a concrete base. The old paving, of large granite blocks 



158 City Document No. 10. 

about one foot square, was removed by J. J. Sullivan, and 
the sub-grading was done by the Street Department, and the 
concrete base was laid by H. P. Nawn. The edgestone, 
flagging, and sidewalks were relaid by J. Doherty & Co. 
The granite blocks, edgestone, flagging, and bricks were fur- 
nished on the ground by the city. 

Kemble Street. 

Kemble street, from Gerard street to Magazine street, 
was paved by Collins & Ham, with granite blocks on a 
gravel base. This was an ungraded street ; it was graded 
by the contractors, and the surplus material was delivered to 
the city on East Chester Park extension, to abate a nuisance 
caused by standing water. Stone blocks, edgestones, and 
flagging were delivered to the contractors by the city at the 
Albany-street yard, and paving-bricks were delivered on 
the ground. Two new catch-basins were built. 

From Gerard street to Hampden street the street was par- 
tially paved by the same contractors, under an extension of 
their contract. Work was stopped by cold weather, and the 
time for finishing it has been extended to allow of its com- 
pletion in the spring. Four additional catch-basins were 
built. 

MoTTE Street. 

Motte street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue, 
was paved by H. Gore & Co., with Sicilian rock sheet asphalt 
laid on an American cement base. The former street surface 
was granite block paving. The sub-grading was done by 
the Street Department, the concrete base was laid by H. 
P. Nawn, and the sidewalks put in order by F. H. 
Co win & Co. 

Prentiss Street. 

Prentiss street, from Tremont street through Hallock 
street, was paved by H. Gore & Co., with granite blocks on 
a gravel base. The old surface was of macadam. The sur- 
plus material was delivered where required within one-half 
mile, and the old cobble gutter-stones were delivered to the 
Tremont-street crusher. Paving-blocks, edgestones, and 
flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard ; the bricks were delivered to the contractor on the 
street. 

Rutherford Avenue. 

Eutherford avenue, from Essex street to Allen street, was 
paved with granite blocks on gravel by J. Turner & Co. 



Engineering Department. 159 

The roadbed was prepared and all materials were furnished 
bj' the Street Department. Eight new catch-basins were 
built. 

School Street. 

School street, from Washington street to Tremont street, 
was paved by C. B, Payson & Co. with granite blocks, with 
pitch joints, on a concrete base. The old surface was paved 
with granite blocks, which were all removed, with the sur- 
plus material, by H. P. Nawn. The concrete base was laid 
by the Metropolitan Construction Company. Granite blocks 
were specially prepared for this work ; the granite blocks, 
edoestones, flaooing, and bricks were delivered on the 



ground. 



Washington Street. 



Washington street, from Cornhill to Essex and Boylston 
streets, was paved by Jones & Meehan (excepting a small 
portion b}'' C. B. Payson &, Co.) with granite blocks, with 
pitch joints, on a concrete base. The old surface was granite 
block paving, which was hauled to Dorchester avenue, be- 
yond Field's Corner. The surplus earth was disposed of by 
the contractors ; part of it was hauled to the South Boston 
flats, and a part to the vicinity of Huntington avenue. The 
stone blocks were furnished by the city at the Boston Wharf 
Company's wharf on Fort Point channel ; edgestone and 
flagging were furnished by the city at the Albany-street 
yard ; the bricks were delivered on the work. 

The street railroad was entirely rebuilt by the West End 
Company, with an improved rail. The paving between the 
rails is of the same quality, including the concrete founda- 
tion, as the rest of the street, and the tracks were laid to a 
grade conforming with the new street surface. Ten new 
catch-basins were built, giving much better surface drainage 
than before. 

West Chester Park. 

West Chester park from Columbus avenue to Tremont 
street, on the northerly side of the central parkway, was 
paved with Hastings asphalt blocks, on a gravel base, by the 
Metropolitan Construction Company. The former surface 
was of macadam ; the sub-grading was done and the side- 
walks put in order by the Street Department. 

West Chester Park and Chester Square. 

West Chester park and Chester square, from Columbus 
avenue to Washington street, on the southerly side of the 



160 City Document No. 10. 

central parkway, was paved by the Earlier Asphalt Paving 
Company with sheet asphalt, on an American cement con- 
crete base. The sub-grading was done by the Street 
Department, the concrete base was laid by the Metropolitan 
Construction Company, and the edgestones and sidewalks 
were put in order by the Street Department. 

West Newton Street. 

West Newton Street, from Shawmut avenue to Washing- 
ton street, was paved by the Metropolitan Construction 
Company with Hastings asphalt blocks, laid on a sand base. 
The former surface was of macadam. The sub-grading was 
done by the Street Department, and the sidewalks were put 
in order by P. W. Hernan. 

West Second Street. 

West Second street, from B street to E street, South Bos- 
ton, was paved by H. Gore & Co. with granite blocks, on a 
gravel base. The old surface was of cobble-stone paving. 
The cobble-stones were sold to the city of Cambridge, and 
the surplus material was used to fill streets on the South 
Boston flats. Granite blocks were furnished by the city at 
the L-street extension, the edgestones and flagging at the 
Albany-street yard, and the paving-bricks were delivered on 
the street. Three new catch-basins were built. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

The plans, specifications, and form of contract for filling 
the additional width of Commonwealth avenue, between 
Pleasant street and the forks of the road at the corner of 
Beacon street, not including a section at the Cottage Farm 
Bridge, were prepared early in the year, and a contract dated 
May 4, 1892, was made with the Boston Contracting Com- 
pany for furnishing and delivering about 136,000 cubic yards 
of clean filling, at the rate of 49^ cents per cubic yard. The 
material has been taken from a hill in Brookline near Har- 
vard avenue, a short distance from the corner of Common- 
wealth avenue and Brighton avenue. A standard gauge 
track was laid, and Fel)ruary 1, 1893, about 76,000 cubic 
yards of material, measured in the fill, had been delivered 
on the avenue. > Between Cottage Farm Bridge and Pleas- 
ant street, on the marsh, the mud proved to be deep and 
soft, and a very large displacement took place, probably 
amounting to 14,000 cubic yards or more. 

The contract required the material to be measured in the 



Engineering Department. 161 

fill, and owing to the large quantity of tilling required to 
make good the displacement of the mud, for which no payment 
could be made under the contract, work was discontinued b>' 
the contractors. The Cit}' Council, however, authorized the 
payment of the sum of $7,000 on account of the displace- 
ment, the contract was moditied so that the city pays the 
contractors, for moving the material only, the sum of o7 cents 
per cubic yard measured in the lill, the owners of the gravel 
bank being paid Ijy the city 12i cents per cubic yard for the 
filling measured in the ])ank, and the contractors resumed 
work. Under the original contract with the Boston Con- 
tracting Company, 46,640 cubic yards were measured and 
paid for; under the modified contract 29,542 cubic yards had 
been delivered to February 1, 1893. 

Plans. 

The Street Department has turned over to the care of this 
department a set of sectional plans covering a large part of the 
city, and known as '' Sidewalk Plans." They are intended to 
show all structures, whether covered or exposed, and whether 
belonging to private corporations or to the city, existing in 
every street. The set is imperfect, and is so many years 
behind in its corrections as to be of little use. The 
engineering force, not otherwise occupied, has been em- 
ployed in an attempt to bring this set of plans up to date. 

As the information must he sought for largely on the 
street itself, progress is necessarily very slow, and the 
present availalde force will never be able to bring all the 
plans up to date at the same time. It is hoped, however, 
that a system may be arranged by which all changes shall be 
a matter of record when they are made, and the task of 
keeping up the plans thus be one of compilation only, after 
they are once brought up to date. The work can then be 
carried on in the winter, and the larger part of the force re- 
quired for summer work kept employed, and skilled men be 
available when the active season for out-of-door work opens. 
This set of plans will lie of great value when completed, and 
carefully corrected once a year. 

Tables. 

The talile showing the lengths of accepted streets and the 
areas of various kinds of pavement have been corrected to 
February 1, 1893. The streets laid out as highways during 
the 3^ear l)y the Street Commissioners have been added, 
those discontinued deducted, and the changes in the char- 
acter of surfaces of the streets have been compiled. 



1G2 



City Document No. 10, 



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Engineering Departivient. 163 



L-STREET Bridge. — Abutment. 

The contract for building the abutment of L-street bridge,' 
which was let to Perkins & White under date of October 28, 
1891, was comoleted in November, 1892, at a cost of 
$6,231.71. 

L-street Bridge. — Retaining-walls. 

A contract for building two retaining-walls between the 
abutment and the bulkhead luiilt in 1891, and filling the 
space enclosed, was awarded to Thomas A. Rowe, of Boston. 
Work was commenced July 19, 1892, and completed in 
November, at a cost of $9*824.73. 

Malden Bridge. — Draw. 

This draw has been entirely rebuilt during the year, under 
a contract with Josiah Shaw, of Somerville. The draw is of 
the same form and general dimensions as the old one, and 
rests on a new turn-table. The foundations were also re- 
built, all the work above the piles being new, and twelve new 
piles were driven. 

RoxBURY Canal. — Sea-wall. 

Plans and specifications were made in April, 1891, for 
liuilding a sea-wall on Roxbury Canal at the Albany-st. pav- 
ing-wharf, similar to that built at the wharf of the AVater De- 
partment in 1888. The work was advertised October, 1892. 

October 22 a contract was made with Thomas A. Rowe, 
of Boston, for building the wall, and it was completed Jan- 
uary 9, 1893, at a cost of $12,657. 



164 City Document No. 10. 



SAFETY OF PLANS AND RECORDS. 

The offices occupied by this department are not at all fire- 
proof, and consequently, if a fire should occur, valuable 
records, plans, original note-books, etc., would be destroyed, 
entailing great loss and inconvenience. The City Hall, to 
and including the third floor, is of fire-proof construction, 
and I recommend that the fourth and fifth floors be recon- 
structed so as to be fire-proof. 

WIDTHS OF DRAW-OPENINGS. 

The table showing the widths of draw-openings in the 
bridges over tide-water in this city is given in Appendix A. 
The openings have all been remeasured for this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



CITY EISTGHSTEERS. 

1850-1893. 



E. S. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 18, 1850, to Oct., 1855. 

(Died August 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

Oct. 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died August 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to Nov. 25, 1872. 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Resigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. AYIGHTJMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 

(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to present time. 



166 



City Document No. 10. 



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168 City Docuivient No. 10. 



APPENDIX B. 



City of Boston, Revised Ordinances, 1892. 
CHAPTER 12. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Section 1. The engineering department sliall be under the 
charge of the city engineer, who shall be consulted on all matters 
relating to pnblic improvements of every kind where the advice 
of a civil engineer would be of service ; shall, unless otherwise 
specially provided, take charge of the construction of all public 
works of the city which properly come under the direction of a 
civil engineer ; shall, except as to sewers, perform all engineering 
services, and make all examinations and prepare all statements, 
plans, specifications, and contracts which any department may 
need in the discharge of its duties r shall, upon being notified 
by the superintendent of streets, supervise all repairs on the 
bridges of the city used as highways which affect the safety of 
the structures, and shall, wheu required by the mayor or by any 
officer or board in charge of a department, measure the work 
done by contract for the city, and certify to the result of such 
measurement. 

Sect. 2. Said engineer shall in his annual report include a 
report of the safety and completeness of all ponds, basins, and 
reservoirs under the charge of the water-supply department, and 
of all bridges within the city limits used as highways. 



ENGINEERmG DEPARTMENT. 



169 



APPEOT3IX C. 



Engineering Department, Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, 

follows : 

2 Temple transits. 

5 Buff & Berger transits. 
5 Gurley transits. 

I Stackpole transit. 

3 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 

5 Gurley levels. 

II Boston rods. 

4 New York rods. 

3 Troy rods. 

Cases for plans and books. 

Reference Library, 936 vols. 



8,809 Plans Engineering Works, 

loose. 
14 vols. Plans Engineering 

Works, bound. 
Photographs of Engineering 

Works. 
Apparatus for blue-printing. 
1 microscope. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holosteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pair field-glasses. 

2 typewriters. 

2 dynamometers. 
1 pentagraph. 
1 calculating-machine. 
1 volt meter. 



170 City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX D. 



Elevations referred to Boston city base. (The city base is 0.64 ft. below- 
mean low tide.) 
Feet. 

0.00 City base. 
15.66 Highest tide, April, 1851. 
15.33 Coping of dry dock, Charlestown Navy Yard. 
12.94 Greatest elevation of high tide per U.S. Tide Table, June 

14, 1893 (11.70 + 0.64) := 12.34. 
10.44 Mean high water. 
8.64 Least elevation of high tide per U.S. Tide Table, Feb. 11, 

1893 (7.40 + 0.64) =z8.04. 
2.84 Greatest elevation of low tide per U.S. Tide Table, April 

8, 1893 (2.2 + 0.64) =2.84. 
0.64 Mean low tide. 
— 1.96 Lowest elevation of low tide per U.S. Tide Table, April 
18, 1893 (—1.8 + 0.64) = 1.16. 
5.00 Piles cut off for building. 
9.91 Water-works base (approx. tide marsh level). 
9.82 South Boston base. 
' — 4.98 Cambridge city base. 
0.38 South Boston Flats base. 

1 Cambridge city base is 4.98 ft. below Boston city base. 



Engineering Department. 



171 





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CONTENTS REPORT ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT FOR 1892. 



[General index to contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1S92, will be found in 
Report of February 1, 1892.] 

PAGE 

A. — Engineering Department 1 

Statement OP Expenses, Engineering Department 2 

" " " Allston bridge ;', 

" " " Federal-street bridge 4 

" " " Improved sewerage 6 

" " " L-street bridge . 4 

" " " Rebuilding bridges to Watertown . . 5 
" " " Statues — Robert G. Shaw, Monu- 
ment 5 

Bridges inspected 11 

' ' wholly supported by Boston 11 

" of which Boston supports the part within its limits .... 1:^ 
" " " pays a part of the cost of mainte- 
nance ] 8 

" supported by railroad corporations 13 

" " " " " Boston & Albany 

R.R 13 

" . " " " Boston & Maine 

R.R.,W. Div.... 13 
" 41 i< ii (i Boston & Maine 

R.R., East. Div.. 13 
" " " " " Boston, Revere 

Beach, & Lvnn 

R.R ". .. 13 

" " " New York & New 

England R.R 13 

Old Colony R.R... 14 
Old Colony R.R., 

Providence Div. 14 

" Total number (110) 14 

Bridges 11 

Agassiz road. Back-bay fens , 15 

Albany street, over B. & A. R.R 15 

Allston, over B. & A. R.R 15, 29 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 15 

Athens street, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 15 

Beacon entrance, Back-bay fens 15 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back -bay fens 15 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R 16 

Berkeley street, B. & A. R.R 16 

Berkeley street, Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 16 

Blakemore street, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 16 

Bolton street, N. Y. & N. E. R.R 16 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 16 

Boylston street, Back-bay fens 16 

Broadway, over Fort-point channel 17 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 17 

Broadway, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 29 

Brookline avenue, over B. «& A. R.R 17 



174 City Document No. 10. 



Bridges, Continued. page 

Byron street, B., R. B , & L. R.R 17 

Cambridge street . . 17 

Canal or Craigie's 18 

Castle-island, footbridge 18, 31 

Central avenue 18 

Centre street or Hog, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 29 

Charles river 18 

Chelsea (North) 19 

Chelsea (South) 19 

Chelsea street , 20 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R.R 20 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 20 

Commonwealth avenue. Back-bay fens 20 

Congress street .... 20 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook 21 

Cottage-street footbridge 21 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R.R 29 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R.R., and Prov. Div. O. C. 

R.R. 21 

Dorchester street, over O. C. R.R 21 

Dorchester ave., over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 29 

Dover street 21 

Essex street. .... 22 

Everett street, over B. & A . R.R 22 

Federal street 22 

Fen bridge. Back-bay fens 22 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R.R 22 

Fourth street, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 29 

Franklin-street footbridge, B. & A. R.R 22 

Gold-street footbridge, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 23 

Granite . 23 

Harvard to Cambridge 23 

Harvard street, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R.. 29 

Huntington avenue, over B. &, A. R.R 23 

Irvington- street foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R. . . 24 

L-street bridge 78 

Leyden street, E., R. B., & L. R.R 24 

Linden Park street, over Stony brook 24 

Longwood avenue 24 

Maiden , 24 

Mattapan 24 

Meridian street 25 

Milton 25 

Mt. Washington avenue 25 

Neponset 25 

Neptune road, over B., R. B., & L. R.R 25 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 26 

Norfolk street, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R. . . 29 

North Beacon street 26 

North Harvard street 20 

Prison Point 26 

Public Garden footbridge 26 

Savin Hill avenue, over O. C. R.R 29 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R.R 27 

Sixth street, over N. Y. & N. E. R.R 29 

Spring street 27 

Stony brook, Back-bay fens 27 

Swett-street bridges (over south bay sluices) 27 

Warren 27 

Washington street 29 

Western avenue to Cambridge 27 

Western avenue to Watertown 28 

West Boston 28-83 



Engineering Department. 175 

Bridges, Continued. page 

West Chester park, over B. & A. R.R 28 

West Chester park, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R 28 

West Rutland-square footbridge, over Prov. Div. O. C. R.R., 28 

Winthrop 28 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1802 29 

AUston bridge 29 

Boston Common 31 

Castle-island bridge 31 

Charles-river pollution (with tables) 31 

East Boston tunnel 75 

Electric lighting 78 

Ferry Department 78 

L-street bridge 78 

" " abutment 80,163 

" " retaining-walls 80,163 

Maiden-bridge draw 80, 163 

Roxbury-canal sea-wall . 80, 103 

Rapid transit 80 

Robert G. Shaw, Monument 80 

West Boston bridge 83 

Westei-n avenue or Arsenal-street bridge 84 

Safety of plans and records 164 

B. — Water-Works So 

Additional supply 95 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs 89 

Basin 6, work done during 1892 96 

Consumption 93 

Distribution 94 

Distribution system 97 

Farm pond 87, 89 

High-service pumping-stations 90 

Lake Cochituate 87, 89 

Mystic lake 91 

Mystic supply filtration 97 

Mystic-valley sewer . . . 91 

Mystic conduit and reservoir. 92 

Mystic pumping-station 92 

Miscellaneous 121 

Reservoir No. 1 86, 88, 89 

" 2 86,88, 89 

" 3 87,88,89 

" 4 87,89 

Sewerage systems. South Framingham, Marlboro', West- 

boro', Natick 97 

Sources of supply 86 

Table showing daily average cousumption of water in gal- 
lons from the Cochituate and Mystic works, 123 
" " diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1884-92. . . 124 
" " amount of water diverted from Sudbury river 
to Lake Cochituate and Chestnut-hill res- 
ervoir; amount wasted ; amount of flow in 
river; percentage of rainfall collected, etc., 

1875-1892 125 

" " amount of water drawn from Mystic lake; 
amount wasted; amount of rainfall col- 
lected in lake ; percentage of rainfall col- 
lected, etc., 1876 to 1892 128 

" " amount of water drawn from Lake Cochit- 
uate ; amount wasted ; amount of rainfall 
collected in lake; amount received into 
lake from Sudbury river; percentage of 
rainfall collected, etc., 1852-1892; water- 
shed of lake, 12,077 acres 126 



176 City Document No. 10, 

Water- Works, Continued. page 
Table showing the average monthly and yearly heights 
above tide-marsh level of the water in the 
lakes and reservoirs of the Boston Water- 
Works 129 

" " operations at the Chestnut-hill puraping- 

station for 1892 130 

" " operations at the Mystic pumping-station for 

1892 131 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sud- 

bury-river water-shed for the year 1892 .... 132 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths at Lake 

Cochituate for the year 1892 133 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths on the 

Mystic-lake water-shed for the year 1892 . . 134 

" " monthly rainfall in inches during 1892 at 

various places in Eastern Massachusetts. . . 135 

'• " rainfall received and collected, 1892 136 

" " the temperature of air and water at various 

stations on the Water-Works 137 

" " miles of pipe, different sizes in use in large 

cities of the United States, January, 1892. . 101 

" " percentage of difF-^^rent sizes of pipe used Jan- 
uary, 1892 102 

" " number of hydrants and fire reservoirs in use 

in different cities 104 

C. — Improved Sewerage, or Main Drainage . 138 

Appropriations and expenditures 138 

Dorchester : 

Sections 6, 8 139 

Outfall sewer : 

Sections 138 

Section 3, C 138 

Stony-brook improvement 140 

East shaft 141 

D. — Parks 142 

Arnold Arboretum 145 

The Parkway. Back-bay Fens 142 

Brookline avenue retaining-wall and culvert 142 

Filling 142 

Grading of slopes, loaming, and planting 142 

Miscellaneous 143 

Roadways, walks 142 

Stony-brook bridge 142 

Charlesbank 149 

Men's Gymnasium 149 

Skating 150 

Women's Gymnasium and Girls' Playground 150 

Cliarlestown parks ... 150 

Charlestown Heights 150 

Cliarlestown playground 151 

Dorchester park 148 

Franklin park 146 

Franklin Field 147 

Drives, rides, and walks 146 

Drainage 146 

Miscellaneous 146 

Scarboro' pond 146 

Schoolmaster hill 146 

Jamaicaway and Arborway 145 

Marine park 148 

Castle Island 119 

Castle Island bridge . . , 148 

Filling 148 



Engesteering Department. 177 

Parks, Continued. page 

Marine Park : 

Loam 148 

Miscellaneous 149 

Muddy river 144 

" " Filling, grading, and loam 144 

" Bridges 144 

" " Administration building 144 

Muddy river and Stony -brook covered channels . 143 

Wood Island park 149 

E. — Stkeet Department : 

Athens street, South Boston, B to C street, Sicilian rock 

asphalt, on Portland cement concrete base 153 

Beacon street, Dartmouth to Gloucester street, sheet 

asphalt, on concrete base 153 

Border street, East Boston, block paving, on gravel base. . 153 

Boylston street. Church to Arlington street, block paving, 

with gravel base and pitch joints 154 

Broadway, South Boston, A street towards Dorchester 
avenue, Sicilian rock asphalt, on American cement con- 
crete base 154 

Brighton street, Allen to Leverett street, Trinidad asphalt, 

on old cobble-stone pavement 154 

Cabot street, Ruggles to Vernon street, Trinidad asphalt, 

on American cement concrete base 154 

Chardon street, Bowdoin square to Merrimac street, block 

paving, concrete base, pitch joints 155 

Charles street. Beacon to Pinckney street, block paving, 

concrete base, pitch joints 155 

Cherry street, Trinidad asphalt, American cement con- 
crete base 155 

Davis street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, Trini- 
dad asphalt, American cement concrete base ... 155 

Decatur street, Washington to Harrison avenue, Sicilian 

rock asphalt, American cement concrete base 156 

Dorchester avenue, South Boston line to Belfort street, 
block paving ; South Boston line to Pond street, both 
sides ; Pond street to Belfort street, easterly side of 
track ; Adams street to Park street, block paving ; Park 
street to Ashmont street, easterly side, block paving . . 156 

Eliot street, Washington to Pleasant street, block paving, 

concrete base, pitch joints 157 

Eustis street, Washington to Dearborn street, block paving, 157 

Florence street, Washington to Harrison avenue, Hastings 

asphalt blocks, cement base 157 

India street, front of Custom House, block paving, con- 
crete base, pitch joints 157 

Kemble street, Gerard to Magazine street, block paving. . . 158 

Motte street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, Sicil- 
ian rock asphalt, American cement base 158 

Prentiss street, Tremont street through Hallock street, 

block paving 158 

Eutherford avenue, Charlestown, Essex to Allen street, 

block paving 158 

School street, Washington to Tremont street, block paving, 

concrete base, pitch joints 159 

Washington street, Cornhill to Essex and Boylston streets, 

block paving, concrete base, pitch joints 159 

West Chester park, Columbus avenue to Tremont street, 

Hastings asphalt blocks, gravel base 159 

West Chester park and Chester square, Columbus avenue 

to Washington street, Trinidad asphalt, concrete base. . 159 

West Newton street, Shawmut avenue to Washington 

street, Hastings asphalt blocks 160 



178 CiTT Document No. 10. 

Street Department, Continued. page 
West Second street, South Boston, B street to E street, 

block paving 160 

Commonwealth avenue, filling, between tleasant street and 

the forks of the road at Beacon street. ..... ........ 160 

Sidewalk plans 161 

Table showing lengths and areas of paving, on accepted 

streets 162 

CfTT Engineeks, 1850-1893 .... 165 



ILLUSTEATIONS. 

Charles-river pollution : Map of the lower portion of Charles 
river, showing principal sources of pollution, October, 
1892 71 

East Boston tunnel : Plan and sections of proposed tunnel 

connecting Boston proper and East Boston. 75 

Improved sewerage — Diagram of cross-section, section 8, 
Outfall sewer in embankment between Squantum and 
Moonlsland 139 

Improved Sewerage — Plan showing Boston Improved 
Sewerage System, the South Metropolitan, and a por- 
tion of the North Metropolitan Sewerage Systems .... 141 

Water-works : Table showing rainfall and daily average 

consumption for each month 123 

Water-works : Table showing the lieights of Sudbury-river 
reservoirs, Farm pond, Cochituate and Mystic lakes, 
and the rainfall on the Sudbury-river water-shed during 
the year 1892 129 

Water-works : Maps of sections of different cities, showing 
pipe-lines, hydrants, and connections, January, 1892. 
New York City, Chicago, St. Louis, Boston, Baltimore, 
Phildelphia, Brooklyn 104 



APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. Showing width of draw-openings 166 

B. City of Boston Eevised Ordinances, 1892, Chapter 12, 168 

C. Engineering Department, property schedule, main 

office 169 

D. Elevations referred to Boston city base 170 

E. List of Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892.. . 171 



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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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b.r.l-. omaory 
OCT 9 183-