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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPOET 



CITY ENQINEEE, 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1895. 



printElj for tfje ©tpattment. 



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BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 
1896. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



flPlENSSrNIiNTH ISKUAL .BK-'OET 



OF, t4b' >•) 



CIT'f^ "'E^'S'lisT^'EER 



BOSTON, 



With Compliments of 



City Engineer. 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCniLL, CITY PRINTERS. 

189G. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



tW:I;roSrNIlNTK AWJAt MVON 



OF, T'iEi * ! 



CITY E^sTGlNEER 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1895, 



Prtnteti for t^c IBcpartment. 




BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

1896. 



o 



l-fi^'*^ /0J / ffi ^ 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, February 1, 1896. 
Hon. Josiah Quincy, 

Mayor of the Oity of Boston : 

Sir : In compliance with the Revised Ordinances the fol- 
lowing report of the expenses and operations of the depart- 
ment for the year ending January 31, 1896, is submitted : 

The report of the work done by this department may be 
classified under the following heads : 

A. — The examination and supervision of structural re- 
pairs of bridges, the designing and superintending the con- 
struction of new bridges, retaining-walls, city wharves, etc., 
and in miscellaneous engineering work called for by the City 
Council, the giving of lines and grades for property-own- 
ers and builders, the making of plans and profiles for the 
Street Commissioners, and the making of survey plans, etc., 
for the various city departments. 

B. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the Sudbury-river, Cochituate, and Mystic Water-Works, 
including charge of new constructions for these works. 

C. — Charge of the construction of a sj^stem of intercept- 
ing and outlet sewers. 

D. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the parks. 

E. — Charge of the engineering work, except for Sewer 
Division, in connection with the Street Department. 

The expenses incurred under the head " C " are paid wholly 
from a special appropriation. 



2 City Document No. 10. 

A. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 
February 1, 1895, to January 31, 1896 : 

Amount of department appropriation for 

1895-96 $40,000 00 

Transferred from Surveying Department . 13,500 00 

$53,500 00 
Amount expended from department appro- 
priation for 1895-96 .... 53,495 31 

Unexpended balance .... $4 69 

Statement or Expenditures, Department 
Appropriation . 

Object of expenditures : 

Salaries of City Engineer, assistants, 
draughtsmen, transitmen, levellers, rod- 
men, etc $47,059 81 

Engineering instruments and repairs of 

same 691 21 

Drawing-paper, and all materials for mak- 
ing plans 982 85 

Stationery, printing-stock, note-books, post- 
age, etc 520 20 

Printing 426 94 

Reference library, binding books, and pho- 
tographs of works ..... 976 55 

Expenses of Charlesto wn Bridge Committee, 

Travelling expenses (including horse-keep- 
ing, repairs on vehicles, etc.) 

Telephone service 

Furniture cases for plans and books, etc. 

Blue-process printing 

Incidental expenses, and all other small 
supplies .... 

Total .... 



1,224 


36 


190 


50 


272 


10 


191 


86 


958 


93 


$53,495 


31 



Engineering Department. 3 

By chapter 449, Acts of 1895, the Surveying Department 
was consolidated with the Engineering Department on July 
1, 1895. 



Appropriation for financial year 1895-96 

Amount transferred to Street 
Laying-out Department by 
order of the City Council, 
dated June 26, 1895 . . $2,053 56 

Amount expended from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1895, to July 1, 

1895 .... 19,446 44 
Amount expended fi'om July 

1, 1895, to February 1, 

1896 .... 13,497 11 



$35,000 00 



34,997 11 



The unexpended balance of $13,500, remaining July 1, 
1895, was transferred to the Engineering Department by 
order of the City Council, dated June 26, 1895. 

The expenditures of the Surveying Department from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1895, to July 1, 1895, were as follows : 



Salaries . . . . 

Incidental expenses, viz., car- 
fares, ferry tolls, travelling 
expenses, and small supplies 
for oflSce . 

Horse-hire, repairing carriage 
etc. .... 

Drawing-paper and materials 

Report and information relat- 
ing to public docks 

Binding and repairing plans 
in volumes 

Stationery, note-books, etc 

New instruments and repair 
ing . 

Telephone . 

Furniture, repairs 

Hardware 

Books, directories 

Printinor 



etc. 



etc. 



$17,581 81 



571 72 



. U 1 X 

540 


1 u 

34 


160 


35 


128 


62 


s 

125 


00 


112 


61 


111 


69 


60 


00 


28 


85 


13 


05 


11 


00 


1 


40 




$19,446 44 



City Document No. 10. 



Improved Sewerage. 
Total appropriations .... 



$6,375,404 96 



Statement of Expenses from February 1, 1895^ to February 

i, 1896. 
Object of expenditure : 
General office expenses 
East Shaft Roadway .... 
Section 7, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer 



" 11, " " 

Neponset Intercepting Sewer 



Loans negotiated (less 

$67,500 transferred) 
Revenue .... 

Expended previous to Feb- 
ruary 1, 1895 

Expended from February 1 , 
1895, to February 1, 1896, 



Balance February 1, 1896 . 



$6,308,664 03 
66,740 93 



;, 307, 754 96 
33,507 12 



$4,300 55 

500 00 

300 00 

499 32 

3,960 70 

19,472 81 

4,473 74 

$33,507 12 



>,375,404 96 



6,341,262 08 
$34,142 88 



Improved Sewerage Construction, 1895. 
Tables showing the cost of the sewer sections in progress 
during the year 1895, and other miscellaneous work : 

General Office Expenses. 

Items of expenditure : 
Salaries ..... 
Engineering instruments and repairs . 
Drawing-paper and materials for plans 
Stationery and printing-stock 
Travelling expenses . 
Telephone 

Blue-process printing 
Sundry small supplies 
Office rent 

Rubber clothing ..... 

Painting, electric wiring, etc., Room 67, 

City HaU 



$3,094 19 

116 42 

7 88 

31 12 

164 41 

30 00 

19 02 
112 02 
522 69 

20 80 

182 00 



$4,300 55 



Engineering Department. 



East Shaft Roadway. 

Item of expenditure : 
Displacement of tide-water (Com. of Mass.), 



$500 00 













$500 00 


Expended previous to 1895 


5,097 


54 


$5,597 


54 


Neponset Intercepting Sewer. 




Items of expenditure : 




Bricks $38 


80 


Cements . 










71 


20 


Coal 










26 


24 


Drain pipe 










178 


01 


General supplies 










235 


19 


Hardware 










734 


31 


Insurance 










130 


00 


Labor 










2,452 


19 


Lumber . 










239 


05 


Sand and gravel 










48 


25 


Teaming . 










6Q 


50 


Rent of machinery 










254 


00 


Total 


$4,473 


74 



Section 7, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 



Item of expenditure : 



Land damages, Jane W. Robinson 



Expended previous to 1895 
Total 



$300 00 

$300 00 

37,403 89 

$37,703 89 



Section 8, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 
Items of expenditure : 



Land damages, Thomas Mullen heirs 
Miscellaneous .... 



Expended previous to 1895 
Total 



$419 32 
80 00 

$499 32 
39,548 94 

$40,048 26 



City Document No. 10. 



Section 9, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 



Items of expenditure 



Bricks 










$430 50 


Drain pipe 










18 


39 


Cement 










135 


75 


Teaming . 










46 


50 


Coal 










132 


76 


General supplies 










171 


44 


Sand and gravel 










311 


15 


Lumber . 










17 


79 


Labor 










2,491 


42 


Construction damages 








205 


00 




$3,960 70 


Expended previous to 1895 

Total 


37,585 


75 


$41,546 45 



Section 11, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 



Items of expenditure 



Advertising 










$31 75 


Bricks 










1,543 48 


Cement . 










833 30 


Coal 










124 28 


Drain pipe 










174 41 


General supplies 










1,037 69 


Hardware 










33 43 


Insurance 










130 00 


Labor 










14,566 47 


Lumber . 










205 17 


Miscellaneous . 










8 90 


Rent of machinery 










108 00 


Rubber clothing 










73 68 


Sand and gravel 










308 00 


Teaming . 










263 50 


Cut granite stones 










30 75 




$19,472 81 



Engineering Department. 



Abolishment of Grade Crossings. 

Dover-street Bridge. 
Expenditures from February 1, 1895, to February 1, 1896 ; 

Rent (Blacker & Shepards, wharf for pas- 
sageway and repairing same after being 
used by the city) $490 00 

Installing motor for draw (General Electric 

Co.) 373 17 



$863 17 
Expended previous to 1895 . . . 129,590 15 



$130,453 32 



Rebuilding Bridges to Watertown. 

Appropriation, Western avenue and North 

Beacon street . . . $18,000 00 

Transferred August 1, 1894, 

to Franklin street tunnel, 

Brighton . . . . 1,500 00 

$16,500 00 

Expended previous to February 1, 1895 . 10,983 64 

Balance February 1, 1896 . . $5,516 36 

No expenditure during the year of 1895. 

Statues. 
Robert G. Shaw Monument. 

Appropriation, Robert G. Shaw monument, $19,500 00 

Items of expenditure : 
Norcross Brothers, third, 

fourth, and fifth estimate 

on base and pedestal . . $5,595 49 



$5,595 49 
Expended previous to 1895 . 11,928 40 



17,523 89 



Balance February 1, 1896 . . . $1,976 11 



• 


$3,500 00 


$1,629 00 
363 84 




167 90 




140 25 
56 40 




$2,357 39 
1,000 00 


3,357 39 




. 


$142 61 



8 City Document No. 10. 

John Boyle O'Reilly Monument 

Appropriation from Phillips Street-fund 
Income 

Items of expenditure : 
John Harringlon, steps and 

seats .... 

Pay Rolls, labor and teaming, 
Walker & Kimball, architects' 

commissions 
A. A. Libby & Co., labor and 

stock .... 
Curtis & Pope, cement 



Expended previous to 1895 
Balance February 1, 1896 



BEIDGES. 

The annual inspection of all highway and foot bridges has 
been made, together with special examinations and inspec- 
tions when notified by the Superintendent of Streets of the 
progress of repairs. 

In the list of bridges, those marked with a star (*) are 
over navigable waters, and are each provided with a draw, 
the openings in which are shown in a table in Appendix A. 
The widths of the openings have been measured for this 
report. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

Agassiz bridge, in Back Bay Fens. 

AUston bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brigh- 
ton. 

Arbor way bridge, over Stony brook. 

Ashland street, over Providence Division, N.Y., N.H., & 
H. R.R., WestRoxbury. 

Athens street, over New England Railroad. 

Audubon road, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Providence Division, N.Y., N.H., 
& H. R.R. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Bernier-street foot-bridge (in the Riverway). 

Berwick-park foot-bridge, over Providence Division, N.Y., 
N.H., & IL R.R. 

Blakemore street, over Providence Division, N.Y., N.H., 
& H. R.R. 

Bolton street, over New England Railroad. 

Boylstou street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Bridle path in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

*Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

* Castle-island foot-bridge, from Marine park, South Bos- 
ton, to Castle island. 

*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 

Charlesgate, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

*Chelsea, South, over South channel of Mystic river. 

*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond in Franklin park. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 

Commonwealth avenue, in Back Bay Fens. 

*Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook. West Roxbury. 

Cottage Farm bridge, Brighton. 

Cottage-street foot-bridge, over flats. East Boston. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany Railroad and 
Providence Division, N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 

Ellicott arch, in Franklin park. 

*Federal street, over Fort Point channel. 

Fen bridge. Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin park. 

Gold street, over New England Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Irvington-street foot-bridge, over Providence Division, 
N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 

*L street, over Reserved channel, South Boston. 

Leverett-pond foot-bridge, in Leverett park. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Linden Park street, over Stony Brook. 

*Malden, from Charlestown to Everett. 



10 City Document No. 10. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Al])any Railroad. 

Masvsachusctts avenue, over Providence Division, N.Y., 
N.H., & H. R.R. 

*Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

*Mount Washington, over Fort Point channel. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Newton street, over Providence Division, N.Y., N.H., & 
H. R.R. 

Public Garden foot-bridge. 

Roxbury Crossing foot-bridge, over Providence Division, 
N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 

Scarboro' pond foot-bridge (in Franklin park). 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony brook, Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of New England Railroad. 

Swett street, west of New England Railroad. 

* Warren, Boston to Charlestown. 

West Rutland square foot-bridge, over Providence Divis- 
ion, N.Y., N.H., &H. R.R. 

Winthrop, from Breed's island to Winthrop. 



II. — Bridges or which Boston supports the Part within 

ITS Limits. 

Bellevue street, in the River way, over Muddy river. 
Bernier-street foot-bridge, in the River way, over Muddy 
river. 

Brookline avenue, in the River way, over Muddy river. 
*Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Chelsea, North, over North Channel, Mystic river. 
*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 

* Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 

Long wood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, ft-om Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 
Tremont street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Caml^ridge. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 



Engineering Department. 11 

III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the Cost 
OF Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

Chelsea bridge, over the Boston and Maine Eailroad. 

Dorchester street, over Old Colony Division, N.Y., N.H., 
& H. R.R. 

Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Prison Point, Charlestown to Cambridge. 

*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

West Fourth street, over Old Colony Division, N.Y., 
N.H.,&H. R.R. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston <& Maine Railroad, Western Division. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

3d. — Boston & Maine, Eastern Division. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

5th. — New England Railroad. 
Broadway. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Fifth street. 
Fourth street. 
Harvard street, Dorchester. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Norfolk street, Dorchester. 
Norfolk street, Dorchester. 



12 City Document No. 10. 

Second street. 

Silver street. 

Sixth street. 

Third street. 

Washington street, Dorchester. 

6th. — ^ew York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, 
Old Colony Division, 

Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 

Cedar Grove cemetery. 

Commercial street. 

Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R., Providence Division. 

Beech street, West Eoxbury. 
Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 
Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 
Centre street, or Hog bridge. 
Centre and Mt. Vernon streets. 
Dudley avenue. 
Park street. 



Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . 65 
n. Number of which Boston supports that part 

within its limits ..... 18 

in. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ...... 9 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Western Division . . 2 

3. " " Eastern Division . . 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach, & Lynn Railroad . 1 

5. New England Railroad ..... 13 

6. N.y., N.H., & H. R.R., Old Colony Division, 5 

7. ** *' Providence Division, 7 

Total 126 

Agassiz-road Bridge {in Bach Bay Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1887, of brick and stone masonry. 
It is maintained by the Park Department, and is in good 
condition. 



Engineering Department. 13 

Albany-street Bridge (over the Boston <& Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge ; the present structure was built 
in 1886-87. It is maintained in part by the city of Boston 
and in part by the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, 

No painting has been done to the iron-work below the 
floor since the bridge was built ; it is therefore in a very 
rusty condition. As parts of the lower flooring need renew- 
ing, it is recommended that this bridge be thoroughly cleaned 
and painted this year. 

AUston Bridge (over the Boston & Albany R.R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge built in 1892. The portion under 
the floor should be painted this year. 

Arborway Bridge (over Stony Brook, in Parkway, near 
Forest Hills Station). 

This is a wooden bridge resting on abutments of vulcan- 
ized spruce piles. The stringers and under-planking are of 
vulcanized hard-pine. It was built in 1893, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Ashland-street Bridge (over Providence Division, N.Y., 
JSr.IL, S H. R.R., West Roxbury). 

The present structure is of iron, and was built in 1875. 
The iron- work is in good condition, but the fences are poor 
and should be rebuilt. 

Athens-street Bridge (over New England R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1874. It should be 
painted and the sidewalks repaired. 

Audubon-road Bridge (over the Boston <& Albany R.R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1893-94, and 
is in good condition. It is maintained by the Park Depart- 
ment. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Outlet of Back Bay). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. It is in fair 
condition. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884-85, widened in 1887- 
88, and the central roadway further widened in 1890 for the 



14 City Document No. 10. 

convenience and at the expense of the West En4 Street 
Railway Company. The wooden facias and wheel-guards 
should be repaired and the upper portions of the bridge 
painted. 

Bellevue-street Bridge {over Muddy River ^ in the Parkway) . 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 44 ft. span and 15 ft. 
rise. The foundation is of concrete, the face walls of seam- 
faced granite, and the arch of brick. It was built in 1893 
by the Park Departments of Boston and Brookline, and is 
maintained jointly by them. 

Bernier-street Foot-bridge (over Bridle Path, in Riverway)^ 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 38 feet 4 inches 
span. The foundations are of concrete, the exposed face 
walls of seam-faced granite, and the arch is of brick, the 
face brick being buffi-colored. It was built in 1893, and is 
maintained by the Park Department. 

Bernier-street Foot-bridge (over Muddy River) . 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 52 feet span and 14 
feet rise. The foundations are of concrete, the exposed face 
walls are of seam-faced granite, and the arches of brick. It 
was built in 1893 by the Park Departments of Boston and 
Brookline, and is maintained jointly by them. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1891, and is now in good 
condition. The portion of the bridge under the floor begins 
to show signs of rust, and should be painted next year. The 
railing put up in 1892 received but one coat of paint; this 
has now nearly disappeared, and the iron is rusting very 
badly. The recommendations made last year, that this be 
painted and that the temporary railing at the north-easterly 
corner be replaced by a more permanent fence, are repeated 
this year. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Providence Division, N.Y., 
N.H., &H. R.R.). 

This bridge has been reported for a number of years to be 
in bad condition, and only such repairs as seemed absolutely 
necessary have been made. 



Engineering Department. 15 

Berwick-park Foot-bridge {over Providence Division, JV. Y. , 

jsr.ii., & H. R.R.). 

This is an iron foot-bridofe, erected in 1894. The iron 
stairs and i)iers were new, but the trusses and floor-beams 
were those built at Franklin street in 1883. It is in srood 
condition. 

Blakemore-street Bridge (over Providence Division, JSf.Y., 
N.H., & H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1881-82, and is in 
good condition. 

Bolton-street Bridge {over New England R.R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. The fences should 
be painted and sanded. 

Boylston-street Arch Bridge {in Back Bay Fens). 

This is a stone arch bridge, built in 1881. It is in good 
condition. 

Boylston-street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1886-88. During the past 
year the lower floor was taken oflT and the iron-work cleaned 
and painted. A new hard-pine lower floor was put on, and 
the bridge is now in good condition, with the exception of 
the facia, which should be put in good order. 

Bridle-path Bridge, in the Riverway {over Muddy River) . 

This is a masonry bridge of three arches ; the central arch 
is elliptical in form, with a span of 30 feet and a rise of 9 
feet 6 inches ; the side arches are semicircular, 15 feet in 
diameter. The face work is of seam-faced granite and the 
arches are of brick. It was built in 1894 and is maintained 
by the Park Department. 

Broadway Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1869-71, and the 
draw and its foundation were rebuilt in 1874—75. The 
bridge was temporarily strengthened so as to allow electric 
cars to use it in 1893. The lower chords of the trusses over 
the railroad have been boxed in, a new sidewalk has been 
built on the city side of the Lchigh-street span, the upper 
part of the bridge has been painted two coats, and minor re- 



16 City Document No. 10. 

pairs have boon made. The deck of the draw needs renewal, 
the draw foundation needs pointing, and the draw should be 
adjusted so it can be reversed. 

The draw and draw foundations are otherwise in good 
condition and present a creditable appearance ; the remain- 
ing parts of the bridge are old and patched and should be 
rebuilt. 

Broadway Bridge {over Boston & Albany B.B.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. An examina- 
tion of this bridge was made in October, 1895, in conse- 
quence of which a report was sent to the Street Department 
recommending that the iron-work below the floor be painted 
at once. As the new floor of hard-pine laid in 1892 would not 
require renewing for five or six years at least, it was further 
recommended that the painting be done from the under side, 
even if it should be found necessary to have the work done 
on Sundays, the additional expense being warranted by the 
rapid wasting of the structure in its present condition. Noth- 
ing, however, has been done as yet towards carrying out 
these recommendations. 

In the annual report for 1892, in alluding to the new floor 
put on this bridge, attention is called to the folly of putting 
an under floor on a low bridge over a railroad where there is 
much traffic, which will last more than four years, because of 
the rapid deterioration of the iron unless it is frequently 
cleaned and painted, and this work is not usually done except 
when the lower floor is renewed. The fence on this bridge 
is in poor condition, and should be repaired as recommended 
in last year's report. 

BrooJvUne-avenue Bridge (over Boston <& Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884. It is now in good 
condition. There is a guy attached to one of the top chords 
of this bridge, and as the truss has no top lateral bracing 
there is nothing to prevent the chord being thrown out of 
alignment. 

BrooMine-avenue Bridge (over Muddy River, in the 
Riverway) . 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. The 
abutments and face walls are of granite, resting on a pile and 
timber foundation. The face walls are of seam-faced granite. 
The arch is of brick. It was built in 1892 by the Park 
Departments of Boston and Brookline, and is maintained by 
them jointly. 



EXGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 17 

Byron-street Bridge (over Boston, Bevere Beach, di Lynn 

R.R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, ])uilt in 1889. The roadway- 
plank is in poor condition and will need attention. 



Cambridge-street Bridge (from Brighton to Oamhridge) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. It was re- 
built in 1884 ; the draw was rel)uilt in 1891. The draw- 
pier is too short to accommodate the larger class of vessels 
that the widening of the draw-way allows to pass through the 
bridge. A new boat, a buoy, and a better house should be 
provided at this bridge ; the fender-guard, pier, and water- 
way need repairing. The deck of the bridge is getting old 
and will need watching. 



Ganal or Craigie's Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with wooden turn-table draw. 
The city pays one-half the cost of maintenance, ' The bridge 
was originally built in 1808, was rebuilt in 1852, and again 
rebuilt and widened in 1874. The bridge is in the care of a 
commission, consisting of one commissioner from Boston and 
one from Cambridge. The down-stream sidewalk and fence 
on the draw have been rebuilt, several bents on the Cam- 
bridge end of the bridge have been capped and braced, and 
other ordinary repairs made by the aid of the men em- 
ployed on the bridge. The flooring of the sidewalks near 
the Cambridge end and the leaving are in bad condition. 
The water-way needs repairing 1)}^ driving a few piles, re- 
fastening the spur shores and wales, and the addition of some 
planking, and some of the blocks on the draw need renewal. 



Castle-island Foo't-hridge {from Marine Park to Castle 

Island) . 

This is a temporary fo()t-])ridge built in 1892, and is 
maintained by the Park Department. It connects the Ma- 
rine park with Castle island, and is furnished with a draw, so 
that, if desired by the United States authorities, the island 
can lie cut oft' from the shore. The fencing needs jiainting 
and the draw needs setting up. Otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. 



18 City Document No. 10. 

Central-avenue Bridge (over JVeponset River, Dorchester 
Longer Mills). 

This is an iron bridjio, and was built in 1876. The city 
maintains the part within its limits. The bridge should ])e 
stripped and i)ainted, the wood-work renewed, and the abut- 
ment pointed. 

Charles-river Bridge {from Boston to Charlestoum) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw. The 
present bridge was built in 1854-55 ; the draw was built in 
1870. The draw foundation and draw have been rei)aired, 
and one bent of piles that was settling has been strengthened 
by driving additional piles. The main part of the bridge is 
now in safe condition, but the piers and water-ways need 
repairing, the end of the easterly draw pier being in a dan- 
gerous condition and too short. 

See page 145. 

Charlesgate (in Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany 

R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1881-82. It is 
maintained by the Park Department. 
See page 118. 

Chelsea Bridge (over Boston & Maine R.R.). 

This iH'idge extends from Chelsea Bridge North to Chel- 
sea Bridge South, over the location of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, and was built by the railroad company in 
accordance with a decree of the Superior Court, under chap. 
374 of the Acts of 1892. 

This bridge is a deck plate girder bridge of 21 spans from 
40 ft. to 70 ft. in length, with trestle post supports rest- 
ing on masonry piers. It has one stone-paved roadway 45 
ft. wide between curbs, and one plank sidewalk 8 ft. wide. 
Public travel was turned over the bridge at the time of the 
opening of the draw in Chelsea Bridge North to travel, De- 
cember 2^, 1895. The surface of this bridge is to be main- 
tained and kept in repair by the city. 

Chelsea Bridge JVbrth (over JVbrth Channel, Mystic River). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The orig- 
inal structure was built in 1802-3 ; the piles of the present 
bridge were driven in 1880. 



Engineering Department. 19 

That part of the bridge above the caps from the abutment 
to Avithin about S6 feet of the clraAv has been rebuilt by tlie 
Boston & Maine Baih-o.'icl. The draw and draw founda- 
tion and the upper part of the remainder of the bridge Ije- 
longing to the city have been rebuilt by this departine^it. 

See page 146. 

Chelsea Bridge South (over South Channel, Mystic 
^ River). 

This is a pile bridge, with an iron draw. The original 
bridge Avas built in 1802-3. The piles of the present bridge 
were driven, and the draw was built, in 1877. That part of 
the bridge above the girder caps has been rebuilt at a higher 
grade, and the draw raised, by the Boston & Maine Kail- 
road. 

The draw has been painted, and has an entire new floor of 
hard-pine stringers and a calked deck of kyanized spruce. 
This work was done by the Street Department. 

Chelsea-street Bridge {from East Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a pile bridge, with an iron swing draw ; the origi- 
nal bridge was built in 1834; was rebuilt in 1848, 1873, and 
again in 1894-95. The new bridge was opened to team 
travel February 2Q, 1895. The bridge is in good condition. 

Circuit-drive Bridge {over Scarhoro^ Pond, in Franklin - 

Park) . 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 30 feet span and 6 
feet 3 inches rise. The abutments are of granite ashlar 
backed by concrete ; the face walls are of seam-faced granite, 
and the arch is of brick. It was built in 1893, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 187G-77. The iron-work 
below the floor is somewhat rusty ; otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. As reported last year, "It is still made an 
anchorage for telegraph-pole guys," which should be re- 
moved. 

Commercial Point or Tenean Bridge {Dorchester). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
The present bridge was built in 1875. A new deck of 4-inch 
spruce has been put on the pile bridge, and the fences have 



20 City Document No. 10. 

been repaired. The 8trini>ers on the bridije and draw are 
not in good condition, and the draw should be rebuilt. The 
bulkhead at the Boston end is in a dangerous condition, and 
the draw machinery should be put in repair. 

Gommonwealth-avenue Bridge {in Back Bay Fens). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1881-82, and is 
in good condition. 

Gongress-street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron turn-table draw 
on a stone foundation, and was built in 1874—75. The under 
floor of the bridge should be thoroughly repaired. It should 
be uncovered so that its condition can be ascertained, and it 
is probable that it will require an entirely new floor under 
the sidewalk and roadway. Part of the sidewalk and road- 
way is in need of immediate repairs. The upper part of 
the pier should also be uncovered and examined, and will 
probably need extensive repairs. The landings of the draw 
need rebuilding. The sidewalk, bulkliead, and fencing are 
poor and several of the piles are rotten at the top. The 
track, wheels, and other portions of the turn-table are badly 
worn and require constant attention. Extensive repairs are 
needed to put the draw in condition to meet the heavy ser- 
vice it is called upon to perform. The wood-work at the 
ends of the draw is badly split and should be repaired. 

Cornwall-street Bridge {over Stony Brook, West Boxbury). 

This is a small wooden bridge, built in 1892. It is in 
good condition, except that the outlets for water are insuffi- 
cient, the bridge being at the foot of the grade at either end. 

Cottage Farm Bridge {over B. & A. B.B., Brighton). 
See page 147. 

Cottage-street Foot-bridge {over Flats, East Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, Iniilt in 1889 for foot travel 
only. Several pieces of cross-bracing that have been carried 
oft' l)y the ice should be replaced, and others that are soft or 
split at the ends should either be refastened or replaced. 
The floor plank needs renewing in several places, and a few 
fence rails at the ends of the l)ridge should be renewed. The 
brido-e is otherwise in sood condition. 



Engineering Department. 21 

Dartmouth-street Bridge {over B. & A. R.R. and Provi- 
dence Division, JSF. Y., JST.H., & H. B.B.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1878-79. The bridge 
should l)e painted, and the wooden boxing around the ends 
of the floor-beams should be repaired. The network of 
wires which has been placed on this bridge disfigures it 
badly and should be removed. 

Dorchester-street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, J^.Y., 
N.H.,&H. R.B.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1869. It is principally 
maintained by the railroad company, and was repaired in 
1893 as thoroughly as it could be without building new 
girders. 

Dover-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This was originally a wooden pile bridge, built in 1805, 
rebuilt in 1858-59, and again in 1876. In 1893-94, upon 
the abolition of the grade crossing of the Old Colony Rail- 
road, the present iron structure, resting on masonry piers, 
was built. The bridge is in good condition. A portion of 
the foundation of the old draw was not removed at the time 
the present bridge was built, and its very dilapidated condi- 
tion is not in keeping with the rest of the bridge. 

EUicott-arch Bridge ( in Franklin Park) . 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 17 feet 6 inches 
span. It was built in 1889, and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 

Essex-street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw, and was origi- 
nally built in 1850; the draw was rebuilt in 1891. This is 
an old bridge and is in poor condition. Steps have been 
taken by the City Council, in connection with the city of 
Cambridije, lookins; toward buildino^ a new bridae in another 
location. Meanwhile this bridge should be watched and kept 
in safe condition. 

Everett-street Bridge {over B. & A. R.R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1891, by the Boston & 
Albanv Railroad. It is in <xood condition. 



22 City Document No. 10. 

Federal-street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile iron 
draw, and was rebuilt in 1891-92. The upper part and 
sides of the ])rido:e and the l)uildings have been painted. 
New rolls are needed for the cables, and the machinery under 
the wharf on the Boston side should be protected from slush, 
if the dumping of snow from the wharf is to be continued. 
The brido^e is in o-ood condition. 

Fen Bridge {in Back Bay Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1891-92. It is in good condi- 
tion. 

Ferdinand-street Bridge {over Boston <£• Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The lower plank- 
ing should be renewed, and the iron-work below cleaned and 
painted. The fence on the north-west retaining-wall adjoin- 
ing the bridge, which was badly injured by fire in 1891, has 
never been properly repaired. When any work is done at 
the bridge, this fence should be put in good order. 

Forest Hills Entrance Bridge {in Franhlin Park). 
See page 120. 

Gold-street Bridge {over New England P.P.). 
See page 147. 

Granite Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. The bridge 
was originally built in 1837. The sidewalk plank needs 
renewal ; the abutment should l)e repaired, and the fences on 
the draw need painting ; otherwise the bridge is in fair con- 
dition. 

Harvard Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge) . 

This is an iron bridge with an iron turn-table draw, and 
was built in 1887-91. The bridge is in the care of two 
commissioners, one appointed from Boston and one fi'om 
Cambridge, and the expense of maintenance is borne equally 
by each city. The roadway of the bridge for its entire 
length was sheathed in October, 1895. The surface of the 
sidewalks is badly cracked, and the recommendation in the 
last annual report is here renewed, that the contractors who 



Engineering Department. 23 

put down the asphalt be required to restore these walks to a 
satisfactory condition, in compliance with their guarantee. 
No painting has been done during the past year, and with 
the exce])tion of the fences, which were painted in 1893, 
nothing has Ijeen done to the iron-work in the line of paint- 
ing since the bridge ATas built. The recommendation of 
last year, that it be cleaned and painted this year, is here 
repeated. 

Huntington-avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1872, and in 1876- 
77 the abutments were rebuilt and the bridge widened by 
the addition of two new girders. Plans have been prepared 
for a new floor for this bridge which will conform to the new 
grade of the avenue, and the work will be commenced early 
in the coming season. 

Ii'vington-street Foot-bridge (over Providence Division, 

This is an iron foot-bridge, built in 1892. It is in ffood 
condition. 

L-street Bridge (over Reserved Channel, South Boston) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron retractile draw, 
was built in 1892, The blocking for 
refastening, and the draw needs painting. 



It was built in 1892, The blockino- for the engine needs 



Leverett-pond Foot-bridge (in Leverett Park). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 24 feet span and 5 
feet 5 inches rise. The abutments are of concrete, faced 
with granite ; the exposed face-work is of seam-faced granite, 
and the arch is of brick. It was built in 1894, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department, 

Leyden-street Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach, & 
Lynn R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1889. The sidewalk floor 
should be renewed and the fence rails painted ; the roadway 
plank should be examined. 

Linden Park-street Bridge (over Stony Brook) . 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1887. It is in fair con- 
dition. 



24 City Document No. 10. 

Longioood-avenue Bridge {from Roxbury to Brookline) . 

This is a wooden bridge, su})ported ])y wooden posts, and 
was built in 1877. The portion of the bridge maintained 
by Boston is in very poor condition, and must be watched 
carefully to keep it in a safe condition for travel. The con- 
struction of Rivcrdale Park, which the bridge crosses, will 
hasten, it is hoped, the removal of this bridge. 

Maiden Bridge (from Charlestown to Everett). 

The present structure was built in 1875 and the draw m 
1892. Only minor repairs have been made. The draw runs 
hard, and it should be adjusted. The cross-bracing, fender- 
guard, fences, and sidewalk are in very poor condition ; the 
draw-piers are old, weak, and are too short. 

Massac/nisetts-avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. It was thoroughly 
repaired in 1893, with the exception of the wooden fences. 
Both fences are now somewhat decayed, and that on the 
westerly side has been pulled out of line by a .telegraph pole 
which is attached to the girder. The recommendation made 
last year is repeated this year, that, as other means are avail- 
able for supporting the telegraph wires now on this bridge, 
they should be removed without further delay. 

Massachusetts-avenue Bridge {over Providence Division, 
JSr.Y., N.H.,<& H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. It is in good con- 
dition. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is an 
old iron bridge and is in a dano;erous condition, and it should 
be replaced by a stone bridge. 

Meridian-street Bridge {from Bast Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turn-table 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built 
in 18.58. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was widened 
and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, which was built in 
1875-76. The draw is in a dangerous condition, and should 
be replaced by a new structure ; during the year it l^ecame 
necessary to reinforce one of the trusses, which had begun 
to cripple. The draw-piers are in poor condition ; the con- 



Engineering Department. 25 

Crete sidewalks, water-ways, fence on draw, and cross-bracing 
on bridge need repairs. 

Milton Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure is very old. It was widened in 1871-72. The 
older part of this bridge was built of stone, and the widening 
is an iron structure on stone columns. The sidewalks need 
repairs ; otherwise the bridge is in fair condition. 

Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw. It was 
built in 1854, and rebuilt in 1870-71. This is the only draw 
of importance in the city that is moved by hand power. The 
draw^-pier is in poor condition, and it is so low that it is cov- 
ered with w^ater at every high course of tides. The pave- 
ment, the concrete, the sidew^alk flooring on the draw, and 
the fender guard are in poor condition. The water-ways 
should be repaired, and the draw should be adjusted so it 
can be reversed. 

Neponset Bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure was built in 1802, and the present one in 1877. 
The draw is too heavy to be handled by hand, and should be 
replaced by a turn-table draw. 

The electric cars now run over the bridge, shooting across 
the draw with the trolley down, as the upper railroad work 
is in poor condition and the jar disarranges the machinery ; 
the street-car rails at the draw are not of proper lengths and 
interfere with the latches, and leave openings where they join 
the bridge. 

The sidewalk, latches, and piers need repairing and the 
iron draw needs painting, and the railroad work should be put 
and kept in order. 

Neptune-road Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach, dd 
Lynn B.B.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1887-88, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. It is in good condition. 

Heivton-street Bridge {over Providence Division, N. Y., 
JSr.H., (& H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1872. It is in good con- 
dition, excepting the concrete sidewalks, which should be 
resurfaced. 



26 City Document No. 10. 

JVorCh Beacon-street Bridge {from Brighton to Watertown). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden i)ilc bridijc with a wooden leaf draw. The original 
structure was built in 1822, and the present one in 1<S84. 
A new dock of 4-inch s]H'uce has 1>een jmt on the bridge. 
The liooring on the pier is in poor condition, and the sidewalk 
plank needs renewal. An old unused telephone pole on the 
bridge should be removed. 

North Harvard-street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This bridge 
was originally built in 1G62, and was rebuilt in 1879. The 
draw was rebuilt in 1891. The roadway plank needs renewal, 
and the tops of some of the piles are decaying ; the fence on 
the bridge needs repairing, and the abutment is in poor con- 
dition, to which attention has been called in previous reports. 

Prison Point Bridge {from Charlestown to Cambridge) . 

The city pays one-half of the cost of maintenance. This 
bridge was originally built in 1833, and the present structure 
was built in 1876-77. It is a wooden pile bridge, with an 
iron leaf draw. The bridge is in the care of commissioners, 
consisting of one commissioner from Boston and one from 
Cambridge. It is in poor condition. Only ordinary repairs, 
such as planking and sheathing, have been made on the 
bridge. The draw is in bad condition and needs a thorough 
repairing. The question of abolishing the grade crossing 
on the Boston & Maine Railroad, which adjoins the bridge, 
is under discussion. If this should he. accomplished by car- 
rying the highway over the railroad, it would involve the 
rebuilding of the bridge. For this reason only such repairs 
have been made as were absolutely necessary for safety. 

Public Garden Foot-bridge. 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1867, and was 
thoroughly repaired in 1887. In fair condition except the 
floor, which needs renewal. 

Roxbury Crossing Foot-bridqe {over Providence Division, 
N.Y.,N.H., &H. R.R.) 
See page 149. 

Scarboro' Pond Foot-bridge {in Franklin Park). 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 feet span and 8 feet 
3 inches rise. The face work is of quarried face Roxbury 



Engineering Department. 27 

stone, and the arch is of brick. It was built in 1893, and is 
maintained by the Park Department. 

Shawmut-avenue Bridge {over Boston tC Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1871. The whole under 
portion of this bridge needs painting. The report of 
last year in regard to the unsightly bend in the ornamental 
parapet caused by the electric-wire pole of the West End 
Street Railway Company still remains true. 

S2)ring-street Bridge {from West Roxhury to Dedham) . 

This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part within 
its limits. It is in good condition. 

Stony-brook Bridge {Back Bay Fens) . 

This is an ornamental brick arched bridge, with stone fac- 
ings, built in 1891-92, and maintained by the Park Depart- 
ment. It is in good condition. 

Swett-street Bridges {over South Bay Sluices.) 

These are wooden bridges, and were built in 1875. They 
are temporary structures and are in poor condition. The 
bulkheads that support the adjoining sluices are very much 
out of shape, and may require repairs at any time. The 
roadways of these bridges have been kept in safe c6ndition, 
but as bridges they are of but little value. 

Tremont-street Bridge {over Muddy River) . 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. 
The foundation is of concrete, the abutments of granite 
ashlar backed with concrete. The side walls are of seam- 
faced granite, and the arch is of brick. It was built in 1893, 
and is maintained by the Park Departments of Boston and 
Brookline. 

Wain^en Bridge {from Boston to Oharlestown). 

This is a wooden pile l:)ridge, with a double retractile 
iron draw. The present structure was built in 1883-84. 
The sidewalk on the down-stream side and at the entrance 
to Fitchburg Railroad yard, the fender-guard, the draw- 
piers, the deck of the draw and the block-stone pavements 
are in poor condition. The top and sides of the draw have 
been painted, and ordinary repairs have been made. 



28 City Document No. 10. 

West Boston Bridge (from Bostoyi to Cambridge) . 

This bridge is in the care of two commis,sioners, one from 
Boston and one from Cambridge. The city pays one-half 
of the cost of maintenance. This is a wooden pile bridge, 
with a wooden turn-table draw. The bridge was originally 
built in 1792-93, was rebuilt in 1854, and repaired in 1871. 
This is an old, weak bridge, and is in an unsafe condition. 
This bridge, and Canal and Prison Point bridges, are in the 
care of the same commission, and are kept in usable condi- 
tion only by constant care. Three bents of piles on the 
Cambridge side of the draw have l^een strengthened by driv- 
ing twelve oak piles and capping and bracing the bents, and 
the ordinary repairs have been made. 

West Fourth-street Bridge {over Old Colony Division^ JSF. Y., 
JS/.H., i& H. R.R.). 

In 1893-94 the grade crossing of the Old Colony Railroad 
on this street was abolished and an iron bridge built, extend- 
ing from the end of Dover-street bridge at the South Boston 
side ol Fort Point channel to the easterly line of Foundry 
street. The bridge consists of six spans resting on masonry 
piers; each span has three pony trusses, spaced 21 feet 6 
inches on centres, dividing the bridge into two roadways 
18 feet 6 inches wide in the clear and two sidewalks each 
10 feet wide. The entire wearing-surface of the bridge, 
sidewalks as well as roadways, is covered with spruce 
plank; that on the roadway was renewed in October, 1895, 
although the bridge had been opened to travel but ten 
months. The expense of maintaining this wearing-surface, 
under the act abolishing grade crossings, devolves upon the 
city of Boston. 

West Butland-square Foot-bridge {over Providence Division^ 
JSr.Y., JSr.H., & H. R.R.). 

This is an iron foot-bridge, built in 1882. The stair-treads 
are badly Avorn and should be renewed. The sidewalks in 
Rutland square at the foot of the stairs are too low and 
should be regraded. 

Western-avenue Bridge ( from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The present 
bridge was built in 1879-80, and the draw in 1891. The 
deck of the bridge, sidewalk, and fence are in a poor condi- 
tion. The floor beams at the rear of the draw-arms should 
be screws-bolted to the girder-caps, the tops of a few piles are 



Engineering Department. 29 

rotten, the fender-guard and water-way need repairs, the 
draw-pier is too short and out of repair. 

Wesier'n-avenue Bridge (fro7n Brighton to Watertown) . 

The cit}' maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw, and was rebuilt in 
1892-93. It should be painted. 

Winthrop Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge, without a draw. It was originally 
l^uilt in 1839, it was rebuilt in 1851, and was extensively 
repaired in 1870. The sidewalk, which was damaged by ice 
early in the year, will be repaired as soon as the weather 
permits. 

Bridges wholly supported by Railroads. 

The bridges over the Boston & Albany Railroad main- 
tained by that company are in a good or fair condition, and 
require no special report, with the exception of the Washing- 
ton-street bridge. In the report of last year, attention was 
called to the impossibility of making a reasonable estimate 
of the strength of the girders supporting the sidewalks of 
this bridge. During the past year, the corrosion of the iron 
has continued and more of the web has disappeared. Unless 
the railroad company rebuilds this portion of the bridge at 
once, as recommended last year, it would seem that the 
safety of those who are obliged to use this bridge demands 
that the floor be taken up, and a thorough examination made, 
with a view to devising some means of strengthening these 
sidewalks, as it cannot be considered at present in a per- 
fectly safe condition. 

The Norfolk-street bridge, over the New England Rail- 
road, near Dorchester Station, is a narrow bridge in poor 
condition, and the wood- work of Adams-street brido:e, over 
the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R., should be repaired. 

SURVEYING DIVISION. 

The Surveying Department was consolidated with the 
Engineering Department, July 1, 1895 (chapter 449 of the 
Acts of the Legislature) , and the Street Commissioners were, 
with the approval of His Honor the Mayor, appointed in 
charge of the new division of the Engineering De})artment. 

Soon after the consolidation of the department the City 
Hall office of the Surveying Division was taken by the AA'ater 



30 City Document No. 10. 

Dc})artmont, and the plans, 22,000 in nunil)cr, together with 
all the note l)ook.s, instruments, ,su})plies, tables, desks, etc., 
were moved from the City Hall to Room 24 in the Old Court 
House. The " Dorchester branch office," so called, was also 
moved from Rooms 20 and 21 to Room 23 in the Old Court 
House, and the plans and note liooks were so arrang-ed that 
they are easy of access. This work required considerable time 
and care, but now that the main force of the Surveying 
Division is located in connecting rooms on one floor the 
arrangement is found to be much more convenient and 
satisfactory. 

The custom of copying all official plans and binding them 
into volumes, which had been the practice since the City 
Surveyor's office was established, was changed July 1, and 
since then all official plans have been made on tracing-cloth, 
copies being directly obtained hy blue printing, thus saving 
considerable time and expense. 

The boundary line between Boston and Brookline was 
changed by chapter 242 of the Acts of 1894, amended by 
chapter 485 of the Acts of 1894. It was necessary to carefully 
survey the line, commencing at Commonwealth avenue near 
Naples road and ending at a point near the Newton Circuit 
Division of the Boston & Albany Railroad, south of Reser- 
voir lane, a distance of 2 ^^^^^ miles ; this work was done dur- 
ing the month of October ; some forty monuments were set 
in their proper places in the new line, and an accurate de- 
scription made. 

Maps of the new wards as established under an ordinance 
of the City Council, approved by the Mayor, April 30, 1895, 
showing precinct lines as established under an order of the 
Board of Aldermen, dated July 1, 1895, are being prepared 
for the Printing Department. Also a set of maps on a large 
scale, showing new wards and precincts, is being prepared for 
the Board of Election Commissioners. 

The great amount of work accomplished during the sum- 
mer months in givino; lines and o-rades on the avenues re- 
cently extended, relocated, widened, etc., by the Board of 
Street Commissioners, Columbus avenue, Huntington ave- 
nue. Blue Hill avenue. Commonwealth avenue, and Brighton 
avenue, not only for the Sewer and other City Departments, 
but to enable abutters to move their houses and fences back 
to the new lines, kept the several surveying parties steadily 
employed. More lines and grades have been given by the 
department during 1895 than in any other year since the 
great fire of 1872. 

The work of the grade department was largely increased 
the past year on account of the demands of builders for 



Engineering Department. 31 

grades on the new lines of these great avenues, many of the 
buiklings having l)een either sent back to the new street-lines 
or moved to new situations. 

The Sewer Division makes numerous requests for systems 
of catch-basins to be devised for the streets on which they 
arc drawing plans for new sewers, and frequently the Pav- 
ing Division asks for the location of additional catch-basins 
where this department is called upon to make an examina- 
tion and give approval as to location, requiring an inspection 
of the street and of the grade plans before the location of 
the catch-basins can be decided upon. 

iSIany of the assessment plans for sidewalk construction 
are made during the winter months when there are few orders 
for outside work. This also applies to the work on plans 
where construction of streets has been ordered by the Board 
of Street Commissioners under chapter 323 of the Acts of 
1891 and amendments thereto. 

Considerable progress has been made on the plans for the 
revision of grades of streets intersected by the new boule- 
vards, the grades of nearly all the cross-streets being slightly 
different from the grades established for these avenues, and 
it consequently becomes necessary to establish new gi'ades 
for these streets. 

Considerable time is devoted to the examination of plans 
and profiles of private ways submitted by property-owners 
to the Board of Street Commissioners for their approval, 
and the grades are examined and frequently revised. 

Architects and builders apply for the grade of streets upon 
which they are to construct buildings ; the grade being used 
by them for drawing plans. To obtain this information often 
takes considerable time in looking up data from old records 
and plans. 

During the year many public buildings have been staked 
out for contractors working under the Public Buildings de- 
partment, additions have been made to many of the lot plans 
on file in that office, plans and copies of plans have been 
prepared for the Law Department, etc., etc., and quite an 
amount of miscellaneous work has been attended to that 
cannot be classified under any particular head. 

The following list gives the number of orders attended to 
for property-owners and builders and the various city de- 
partments, from July 1, 1895, to February 1, 1896 : 

Street lines given . . . . . . 452 

Street grades given . . . . . . 389 

Street Department, Paving Division . . . 793 

Street Department, Sewer Division . . . 185 



32 



City Document No. 10. 



Buildings Department ^ 
Pul)lic Buildings Department 
Public Grounds Department 
Police Department 
Law Department (accident plans) 
Street Commissioners, plans for laying out streets, 
school-house lots, etc. . . . . , 



3,020 

44 

11 

6 

40 

132 

5,072 



The following tables show the amount of paving work 
measured by the Surveying Division for the years 1894 and 
1895, by months : 



1894. 
April , . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 

1895. 
January . 

Totals . 



306 
2,248 
6,752 
98 
1,545 
2,245 
2,702 
2,633 
4,183 



1> m 

a w 
3 ° 

^-^ 
_ fl 

^ "1 



2,697 
29 
226 
2,063 
2,710 
1,690 
1,689 



12,007 



723 
2,045 

527 
56 
190 
728 
906 



5,175 



>H tC 



279 

1,830 

27 

558 



392 
1,639 
1,173 






619 

180 

3,006 



3,962 



900 

336 

70 



4,146 

1,312 
907 



4,675 



1,406 11,738 



' The greater part of the orders from the Buildings Department are applications 
for building and repairing permits that are examined daily in relation to street lines 
and grades, with a view of preventing encroachments over street lines and the erec- 
tion of buildings at incoiTCCt grades. 



Engineering Department. 



33 



1895. 
April . . . 
May . . . 
JuDe . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 

1896. 
January . 



Totals 



5,216 
6,791 

8,294 
13,247 
12,360 
25,648 
35,969 
20,692 

1,166 
129,383 



o o 



2> " 



2,600 
2,856 
1,968 
4,730 
6,627 
11,640 
20,888 
8,925 



327 
1,482 
1,922 
4,667 
5,355 
5,371 
8,512 
4,856 

448 
32,940 



^ ti 



1,589 
3,348 
2,046 
8,662 
6,110 
15,120 
22,470 
9,045 

311 
68,701 






805 
2,561 
1,451 
1,358 
1,477 
2,651 
1,129 

864 



12,296 



< . 



^s 



282 

655 

257 

10 

13 

12 



1,297 



A.O 



183 



As a matter of record, the following list is given of the 
work done for the Paving Division of the Street Department, 
where- lines and grades were given and paving work meas- 
ured during 1895 : 

East Boston (including Breed's Island). 

Bennington street, from Saratoga street to Walley street. 

Line and grade given for filling. 
Blackinton street, from Walley street to Lej^den street. 

Line and grade given for filling. 
Brooks street, between White street and Eutaw street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Byron street, between Saratoga street and Pope street. 

Line and orrade o-iven for sidewalk at No. 67. 
Byron street, between Bennington street and Saratoga street. 

Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving measured. 
East Eagle street, between Putnam street and Prescott street. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Eutaw street, between INIarion street and Brooks street. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Falcon street, between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade for edgestone. 



34 City Document No. 10. 

Gladstone street, at and near Walley street. Line and grade 

given for gutter paving. 
Leyden street, at and near Walley street. Gutter paving 

measured. 
Marion street, westerly corner Chelsea street. Line and 

grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 
Maverick street, corner of Orleans street. Sidewalk and 

new crossing measured. 
Maverick street, near Cottage street. Line and grade given 

for edgestone at No. 230. 
Meridian street, at Falcon street. Sidewalk and crossing 

measured. 
Monmouth street, between Brooks street and Marion street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Putnam street, between Trenton street and White street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
JPutnam street, Sit ^o. 172. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Sidewalk paving measured. 
Saratoga street, between Putnam street and Prescott street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Saratoga street, between Bennington street and Boston, 

Eevere Beach, & Lynn Railroad. Line for fence. 

Line and grade for street grading. 
Saratoga street, between Moore street and Boston & Albany 

Railroad. Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Saratoga street, between Moore street and Byron street. 

Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone, sidewalk 

and gutter paving measured. 
Saratoga street, between Byron street and Wordsworth 

street. Gutter paving measured. 
Saratoga street, between Chelsea street and Bremen street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Sumner street, at No. 537. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Trenton street, between Brooks street and Prescott street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Walley street, between Leyden street and Gladstone street. 

Gutter paving measured. 
West Eagle street, between Border street and Meridian 

street. Line and grade for edgestone. 
West Eagle street, between INIeridian street and Brooks 

street. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
White street, between Trenton street and Putnam street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 



EXGINEERINQ DEPARTMENT. 35 



Charlestown. 



Albion place. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving 
measured. 

Boyle street. Grade and line for edgestone. 

Bunker Hill street^ Main street to Sackville street. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Chelsea street, Foss street to Chestnut street. Edgestone 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Chelsea street. Vine street to Scotts court. Edgestone and 
roadway paving measured. 

Essex street, Grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Foss street. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving meas- 
ured. 

Mill street. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Mishavjum street. Main street to Rutherford avenue. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 

Monument square. High street to Tremont street. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 

School street. Main street to Summer street. Edgestone, 
sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 

Tibbetts Tovm Way. Grade given and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Wapping street. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving 
measured. 

Warren street, near Winthrop street. Edgestone and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Winthrop street, between Wallace court and Warren street. 
Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 

Rutherford avenue, at Mishawum street. Edgestone, side- 
walk and roadway paving measured. 

South Boston. 

Baldwin street, between Granite street and A street. Line 
and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter, road- 
way, driveway, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Belljlower street, at and near Dorchester avenue. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. 

D street, between West Seventh street and West Eighth 
street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, 
gutter, roadway, crossing, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Dorchester avenue, at and near Swett street. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Dorchester avenue, between West Broadway and Foil; Point 
channel. Roadway paving measured. 



36 City Document No. 10. 

East Fiflh street, at the north-west corner of H street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. 

East Second street, between L street and M street. Line 
and ffrade eiven for edo:estone at No. 723. 

East Third street, between I street and K street. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 

F street, between West Seventh street and West Eiglith 
street. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

H street, between East Second street and East Third street. 
Line and grade given for sidewalk at Nos. 35, 37, 
39. 

street, between East First street and East Second street. 
Line and grade for sidewalk given and edgestone 
measured. 

Richards street, between Granite street and A street. Line 
and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter, road- 
way, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Boston Proper. 

Albany street, at City Hospital. Measurement of asphalt 

repairs. 
Appleton street, at Columbus avenue. Edgestone, sidewalk 

and gutter paving measured. 
Ash street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 
Atlantic avenue, west side, from Broad street to India street. 

Line and grade given. Edgestone and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Beacon street, from Arlington street to Clarendon street. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Beacon street, from Clarendon street to Dartmouth street. 

Cross-walk and gutter paving measured. 
Beacon street, at No. 224. Measurement of artificial stone 

sidewalk. 
Bendalls Lane. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Bennett street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 
Bond street. Edgestone and sidewalk paving measured. 
Boylston street, northwest side, from Gloucester street to 

Hereford street. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter pav- 
ing measured. 
Boylston street, from Massachusetts avenue to Parker street. 

Line and o-rade given for resettino; edo;estone. Edsfe- 

stone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Bradford street. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving 

measured. 



Engineering Department. 37 

Brattle street. Asphalt repairs measured. 

Bristol street, Nos. 6 to 8. Measurement of roadway repaying. 

Buckingham street, from Dartmouth street to Columbus 

avenue. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving 

measured. 
Burhank street. Edgestone, sidewalk and block-stone road- 
way paving measured. 
Chandler street, at Castle Square Hotel. Sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Chandler street, from Berkeley street to Dartmouth street. 

Line and grade given to reset edgestone. Edgestone, 

sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Clarendon street, north side, t'rom Chandler street to Law- 
rence street. Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving 

measured. 
Clark street. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Columbus avenue. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Commonwealth avenue, at east corner of Beacon street. 

Brick sidewalk measured. 
Congress street and Congress square. Line and grade for 

edgestone, and for asphalt block paving, at the Worth- 

ington building. 
Cooper street. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Corning street. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Court square. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Court street. Asphalt repairs measured. 
Dartmouth street, at Commonwealth avenue. Measurement 

of crossing repaved. 
Dartmouth street, at Marlborough street. Measurement of 

gutter and crossing paving. 
Dartmouth street, at Commonwealth avenue. Measurement 

of gutter and crossing paving. 
Dartmouth street, at corner of Huntington avenue. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk and roadway paving measured. 
Derne street, at State House. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Dover street, between Harrison avenue and the bridge. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and roadway paving measured. 
East Canton street, from Washington street to Harrison 

avenue. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
East Newton street, Nos. 88 to 98. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Endicott street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 
Essex place. Edgestone and block-stone roadway paving 

measured. 
Exchange place. Asphalt repairs measured. 



38 City Document No. 10. 

Fairfield street, from Beacon street to Marlborough street. 

Sidewalk repaying measured. 
Falmouth street, at Norway street. Edgestone, gutter and 

cross-walk paving measured. 
Faneuil Hall square, Nos. 54 to 60. Measurement of side- 
walk paving. 
Federal street, No. 221. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Hancock street, at State House extension. Measurement of 

sidewalk paving. 
Hanson street, from Tremont street to Shawmut avenue. 
Edgestone, crossings, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 
Harvard street, from Harrison avenue to Whitmore street. 

Roadway repaving measured. 
Haviland street, at east corner of Turner street. Line and 
grade given for edgestone, and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 
Harrison avenue, near East Concord street. Measurement 

of asphalt repairs. 
Huntington avenue, at east corner of Massachusetts avenue. 

Measurement of gutter paving. 
Inking street, north corner of Myrtle street. Line and grade 

given for edgestone. Sidewalk paving measured. 
KirMand street, from Pleasant street to Corning street. 
Measurement of edgestone, crossings, gutter and side- 
walk repaving. 
Kilhy street, at Milk street. Measurement of asphalt re- 
pairs. 
Laicrence street, at north corner of Clarendon street. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidew^alk paving measured. 
Lincoln street, southea.st side from Tufts street to Essex street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and 
sidewalk paving measured. 
Massachusetts avenue, between Harrison avenue and Albany 
street. Measurement of edgestone ; gutter and sidewalk 
repaving measured. 
Massachusetts avenue, Nos. 159 to 161. Sidewalk repaving 

measured. 
Milford street, from Tremont street to Shawmut avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter, crossing, and sidewalk repaving 
measured. 
Mystic street, from East Canton street to Hamburg street. 
Edgestone, sidewalk and block-stone repaving meas- 
ured. 
Newbury street, between Arlington street and Clarendon 
street. Edgestone, gutter and sidew^alk paving 
measured. 



Engineering Depaktment. 39 

Newbury street^ from Clarendon street to Hereford street. 
Gutter and cross-walk paving measured. 

N^ewbury street, from Hereford street to Massachusetts ave- 
nue. Edgestone, gutter, cross-walk, and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

North street, at No. 6. Measurement of artificial stone side- 
walk. 

N'orthampton street, at Watson street. Edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

North Bennet street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

North Margin street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Noyes ])Jace, from Salem street. Edgestone, sidewalk and 
block-stone roadway paving measured. 

Oak street, from Hudson street to Albany street. Edgestone, 
sidewalk and roadway paving measured. 

Oxford street, from Essex street to Beach street. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Parker street, from Boylston street to Westland avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Pembroke street, from Warren avenue to Shawmut avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter, cross-walk, and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Poplar street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Pinckney street. No. 58. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Ringgold street, from Waltham street to Hanson street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

St. Botolph street, Nos. 163 to 187. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

St. Botolph street, at Follen street. Measurement of cross- 
walk paving. 

St. Charles street, from Chandler street to Boston & Albany 
Railroad. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

St. James avenue. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

St. Stephen street. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

South Russell street, at west corner of Myrtle street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and side- 
walk paving measured. 

State street. No. 99. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Thacher street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Tileston street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Turner street, at Haviland street. Line and grade given for 
edgestone, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Warren avenue, from Berkeley street to Columlnis avenue. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter, 
cross-walk, and sidewalk paving measured. 



40 City Document No. 10. 

War7'enton street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Washington street. No. 1050. Edgestone and sidewalk pav- 
ing measured. 

Water street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

Watson street, westerly side. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Wellington street, from Columbus avenue to Carleton street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

West Canton street, from Columbus avenue to Carleton street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

West Canton street, from Washington street to Appleton 
street. Edgestone, gutter, cross-walk, and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Westland avenue, Nos. 65 to 81. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Wiggin street. Measurement of asphalt repairs. 

ROXBURY. 

Alaska street. Gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Amory street, from Stony brook to Amory avenue. Line 

and grade given for filling. 
Arhloio street, from Walden street to Gay Head street. 

Line and OTade given for construction of extension. 
Aspen street, westerly side, at angle. Line and grade given 

for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Bartlett street, westerly corner of Washington street. Side- 
walk paving measured. 
Bay State Road, Nos. 7, 9, and 13. Sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Beacon street, corner of Deerfield street. Sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Beacon street, at No. 875. Sidewalk paving measured. 
Beacon street, westerly corner of Raleigh street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Beacon street, easterly corner of Commonwealth avenue. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter, and sidewalk paving measured. 
Beacon street, corner of Audubon road. Crossing paving 

measured. 
Beacon street, corner of Mountfoi-t street. Crossing paving 

measured. 
Beacon street, at Audubon circle. Line and grade given for 

edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 



Engineering Department. 41 

Blue Hill avenue, southwesterly corner of Gaston street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Blue Hill avenue, easterly side, near Dove street. Line and 
grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Bower street, at Nos. 113 and 117. Sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Brcok avenue, at Nos. 101 and 103. Sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Brhnswick street, corner of Warren street. Line and grade 
given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Buena Vista avenue, from Warren street to Fenno street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Barney street, from Tremont street to Delle avenue. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. 

Caliifnet street, from Tremont street to Hillside street. Line 
and grade given for resurfacing. 

Cobden. street, from Washington street to Walnut avenue, 
south-westerly side. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Cobden street, at No. 29. Line and grade given for edge- 
stone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Cobden street, easterly corner of Washington street. Line 
and o-rade oriven for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Cobden street, at No. 1. Line and grade given for edge- 
stone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Crawford street, southwesterly side, from Warren street to 
Humboldt avenue. Line and grade given for edge- 
stone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Crawford street, at No. 43. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Crawford street, north and west corners of Harold street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Crawford street, westerly side, near Harold street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Canard street, north and west corners of Tremont street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Canard street, southerly corner of Tremont street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 



42 City Document No. 10. 

Canard street, from Tremont street to Cabot street. Line 
and grade given for tilling. 

Deerjield street, northerly corner of Beacon street. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Devon street, at Nos. 5, 9, and 10. Line and grade given 
for edgcstone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Dudley street, southerly corner of West Cottage street. 
Sidewalk paving measured. 

Dudley street, at is^os. 579 and 583. Sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Eldora street, from Sunset street to Hillside street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 
paving measured. 

Elm Hill avenue, from No. 89 to No. 95. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Elm Hill avenue, north side, between "Wenonah street and 
Howland street. Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Sidewalk paving measured. 

Elm Hiill avenue, southeast side, between Waumbeck street 
and Howland street. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Elm Hill avenue, northerly corner of Howland street. Line 
and gTade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewaik paving measured. 

Fairhury street, north side, from Blue Hill avenue to Rand 
street. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Fenno street, at "church." Line and grade given for edge- 
stone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Fenno street, both sides, at and near Rockland street. Line 
and gi-ade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Francis street, from Binney street to Brookline avenue. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Gaston street, at No. 12. Sidewalk paving measured. 
Gaston street, south-westerly corner of Warren street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 
Gaston street, south side, from Blue Hill avenue to angle. 
Line and orrade aiven for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Georgia street, westerly corner of Maple street. Line and 
gi'ade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 
Greenville street, from Dudley street to Winthrop street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 



Engineeking Department. 43 

Greenwich street, crossing paving measured. 

Ghirney street, northerly corner of Tremont street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Hmnmett street, corner of Grinnell street. Line and grade 

given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Hammond street, at Nos. 10 to 16. Line and grade given 

for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Hammond street, southerly corner of Cabot street. Sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Harold street, north-westerly side, from Crawford street to 

Euthven street. Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Harold street, easterly corner of Homestead street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Harold street, south-easterly side, nearRuthven street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Harold street, southerly corner of Ruthven street. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Harrison avenue, from No. 879 to No. 885. Sidewalk pav- 
ing measured. 
HaiTison avenue, from Zeigler street to Dudley street. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Hazehcood street, from Townsend street to Munroe street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Highland street, easterly corner of Thwing street. Sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Hillside street, from Wait street to Parker Hill avenue. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. 

CO o 

Holhorn street, south side, between Blue Hill avenue and 

Gannett street. Line and grade given for edgestone, 

and paving measured. 
Holhorn street, at Nos. 31, 33, and 34. Sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Hohcortliy street, at Walnut avenue. Line and grade given 

for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sideAvalk paving 

measured. 
Homestead street, north-east side, near Harold street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Homestead street, easterly corner of Harold street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk pa\dng measured. 



44 City Document No. 10. 

Howard avenue^ at No. 5. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Howard avenue^ at Nos. 113 and 115. Edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Howland street, between Elm Hill avenue and Humboldt 
avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Howland street, north-east side, near Elm Hill avenue. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Howland street, northeast corner of Elm Hill avenue. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Hulbert street, near Ray street. Line and grade given for 
edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Humboldt avenue, corner of Townsend street. Line and 
grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Hunneman street, west side, between Washington street and 
Harrison avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Ivy street, in front of new block. Sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Judson street, from West Cottage street to Julian street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Leon street, from Ruggles street, easterly side. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Leon street. Line and grade given for edgestone. 

Leyland street, from No. 5 to No. 9. Edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Longwood avenue, from Brookline avenue to Riverway. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Longwood avenue, westerly corner of Wigglesworth street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter 
and sidew^alk paving measured. 

Madison street, from Washington street to Shawmut avenue. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Mansur street, corner of Schiller street. Line and grade 
given for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Maple street, southerly corner of Wayne street. Sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Maple street, corner Georgia street. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Marcella street, easterly side of Highland street. Line and 



Engineering Department. 45 

grade given for edgestone. Edgestonc, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
May wood street, from Warren street to Hazel park. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Mayicood street, north side, from Hazel park to angle near 

Blue Hill avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. 

Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Mill street, westerly corner of Kockland street. Sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Moreland street, westerly corner of Whiting street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Morley street, from Highland street. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Munroe street, from No. 64 to No. 70. Sidewalk paving 

measured, 
Munroe street, at Hazel wood street. Gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Munroe street, at No. 72. Sidewalk paving measured. 
Munroe street, at Nos. 77, 79, and 81. Line and grade 

given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
N'ew Heath street, northerly corner of Columbus avenue. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving measured. 
Norfolk avenue, from Magazine street to East Cottage street. 

Grade given for resurfacing. 
Otisfield street, corner of Gaston street. Line and grade 

given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Ottaica street, westerly corner of Sherman street. Grade 

given for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 

measured. 
Prescott street, from Hampden to Eustis street. Edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Quincy street, northerly side, from Warren street to Blue 

Hill avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Raleigh street, westerly corner of Beacon street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
RaJeigh street, from" Bay State road to Charles river. Gut- 
ter and cross-walk paving measured. 
Ray street, at No. 9. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk pav- 
ing measured. 
Reed street, south corner of Newcomb street. Line and 



46 City Docibient No. 10. 

grade for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Regent street. No. 84 to No. 88. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Rockland street, at east corner of Walnut avenue. Side- 
walk paving measured. 

Roxbury street, Nos. 98 and 100. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Roxbury street, at south corner of Columbus avenue. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Ruthven street, at No. 78. Line and grade given for edge- 
stone, and paving measured. 

Rutliven street, at south corner of Harold street. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

RutJiven street, northerly side, between Harold street and 
Walnut avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Ruthven street, north-easterly side, near Harold street. Line 
and o;rade aiven for edo^estone. Edo-estone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Sachem street, westerly side. Gutter paving measured. 

Savin street, at Nos. 55, QQ, and 68. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk pav- 
ing measured. 

Schiller street, at south-west corner of Mansur street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Sheridan street, at Nos. 1 and 3. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Shirley street, from George street to Norfolk avenue. Line 
and grade given for grading street. 

Shirley street, from Dudley street to No. 25. Sidewalk pav- 
ing measured. 

Simmons street. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Sterling street, between Shawmut avenue and Westminster 
street. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Sterling street, from Washington street to Shawmut avenue. 
Line and grade oriven for edgestone. 

Sunset street, from Hillside street to Parker Hill avenue. 
Line and grade given for gutters. Gutter paving meas- 
ured. 

Swett street, at Massachusetts avenue. Roadway paving 
measured. 

Taber street, No. 33 to No. 37. Sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Thorndike street, south-west side. Eeed street to Harrison 



Engineering Department. 47 

avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edge- 
stone and sidewalk paving measured. 

Thioing street, at westerly end. Line and grade given for 
edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Toivnsend street, from Harold street to Warren street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Tremont street, at Sewall street. Gutter paving measured. 

Tremont street, south-east side, from Hammond street to 
Kendall street. Edgestone, sidewalk and roadway pav- 
ing measured. 

Tremont street, north-west side, from Walpole street to Cov- 
entry street. Edgestone and roadway paving measured. 

Tremont street, at northerly, southerly, and westerly corners 
of Cunard street. Lines and grade given for edgestone. 
Edgestone and sidewalk paving measured. 

Vernon street, between Cabot street and Haskins street. 
Line and ffrade given for cdo-estone. Edsiestone, orutter 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Vine street, between Dudley street and Mt. Pleasant avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Walnut avenue, at easterly corner of Ruthven street. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Walnut avenue, at Nos. 332 and 354. Sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Walnut avenue, at No. 367. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Walnut avenue, west corner of Cobden street. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Walmtt avenue, at Nos. 76 and 78. Sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Walnut avenue, near Walnut park. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Warren street, at No. 130. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Warr'en street, at Brunswick street. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Wari^en street, at north-west corner of Washington street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, side- 
walk and roadway paving measured. 

Warren street, between Lansing street and Walnut avenue. 
Cross-walk paving measured. 

WasJiington street, between Bartlett street and Guild street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, side- 
walk and roadway paving measured. 

Washington street, at No. 3638. Sidewalk paving measured. 



48 City Document No. 10. 

Washington street^ at south corner of Warren street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. 

Washington street, south-east side, near Ehnore street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Waumheck street, at south corner of Humboldt avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Wayne street, at southerly corner of Maple street. Side- 
walk paving measured. 

Westminster street, at Marble street. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Weston street, between Tremont street and Cabot street. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Whiting street, at west corner of Moreland street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 
paving measured. 

Wigglesvjorth street, at west corner of Longwood avenue. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 

Williams street, between Shawmut avenue and Westminster 
street. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Winthrop street, east side, near Dennis street. Line and 
grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Woodbine street, from Warren street to Blue Hill avenue. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

DOECHESTER. 

Adams street, from Minot street to Frederika street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 
paving measured. 

Adams street, at Lonsdale street. Line given for edgestone. 

Adams street, easterly side, from Minot street to Marsh street. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. 

ATban street, from Welles avenue to Ashmont street. Line 
and o;rade ajiven for edgestone. 

Algonquin street. Lme and grade given for edgestone at 
Nos. 38, 40, 42. 

Algonquin street and Bradlee street. Line and grade for set- 
ting park stone near Washington street. 

Algonquin street, north side, from Harvard street to No. 39. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. 

Algonquin street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at 
No. 35. 



Engineering Department. 49 

AUston street, at Kenwood street. Line and grade given for 

edgestone. 
Auckland street, east side, corner of Savin Hill avenue. Line 

and OTade criven for edorostone. 
Bicknell street, from Harvard street to Bradshaw street. 

Line and grade given for sidewalks. Gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 
Blue Hill avenue. Line and grade given for sidewalk. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured at 

No^ 274. 
JBoiodoin avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone at 

No. 75. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Boiodoin avemie. Line and grade given for edgestone at 

Nos. 71, 73, and measurement of artificial stone side- 
walk at No. 71. 
Bowdoin avemie. Line given for edgestone. 
Bowdoin avenue and Washington street. Line and grade 

given for edgestone. 
Bowdoin street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at 

No. 78. 
Bradlee street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at 

No. 33. 
Bradlee street. Sidewalk measured at No. 37. 
Brent street, north side, between Talbot avenue and Carlisle 

street. Grade o-iven for resettino; edgestone. 
Church street, Winter street to High street. Line and grade 

o;iven for edo^estone. 
Clapp street. Line and grade given for edgestone, at Nos. 

44 to 58. 

dishing avenue, at angle. Line and grade given for side- 
walk, and same measured. 

Gushing avenue, south side, near the church. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. 

Dewey street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at Nos. 

45 to 49. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Dewey street, south side, near Howard avenue. Line and 
grade given for edgestone. 

Glenway street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. Gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving measured . 

Greenwich street, north side, near Freeport street. Line and 
grade given for edgestone. 

Hartford street. Sidewalk paving measured. 

Harvard street, north side, between Waterlow street and New 
England Railroad. Line and grade given for sidewalk. 
Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Hai'vard street, from No. 77 to Sydney place. Line and 



50 City Document No. 10. 

grade given for sidewalk, and artificial stone sidewalk 

measured. 
Howard avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone at 

No. 124. 
Howard avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone at 

Nos. 116-120. 
Judson street. Line and grade for macadamizing. 
Judson street. Line and grade given for edgestone at No. 28. 
Kenwood street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 
Kenwood street, 3.1 the, corner of Allston street. Line and 

grade given for corner circles. 
Leyland street. Line and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 

5 and 7. 
Marslifield street, Clirton street to Norfolk avenue. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. 
Mayfield street, between Pleasant street and Bakersfield street. 

Line and grade given for sidewalk. 
Melville avenue, from Dorchester avenue to Shawnmt Branch 

Railroad. Line and grade for macadamizing. 
yicLeUan str'eet. Line and grade sfiven for edgestone. 
Mt. Vernon street, at the corner of Buttonwood street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. 
Mt. Vernon avenue. Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Oakland street, from River street to New England Railroad. 

Line and grade given for filling. 
Ocean street. Sidewalk paving measured. 
Quincy street, from Blue Hill avenue to Harvard street. 

Line and grade given for macadamizing. 
River street, south side, near Blue Hill avenue. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. 
Romsey street. Line and grade given for sideAvalk at No. 7. 
Sagamore street, Higgins estate. Line and grade given for 

sidewalk. 
Salcomhe street, at Stoughton street. Line and grade given 

for edgestone. 
Sydney street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 4. 
Sydney street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 

169, and sidewalk measured. 
Talbot avenue, from Washington street to Welles avenue. 

Line and gi-ade given for edgestone. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 
WaldecJc street, Park street to Tremlett park. Line and 

grade given, for owners to build street. 
Walnut street, from New York, New Haven, & Hartford Rail- 
road to Ericsson street. Line and grade given for 
edgestone. 



Engineehing Department. 51 

Walton street, south side, near Harley street. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. 

Washington street, south of Dunbar avenue. Line and 
grade given for edgcstone and raih'oad track. 

Washington street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 
424, and sidewalk paving measured. 

Washington street, west side, south of New England Rail- 
road. Line and grade given for edgestone. 

Washington street. Line and grade given for edgestone at 
No. 394, and same measured. 

Washington street, south side, near Harvard street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone, and artificial stone side- 
walk measured. 

Washington street and Wilder street, north-west corner. 
Line and grade given for sidewalk. 

Welles avenue, between Ocean street and Talbot avenue. 
Line and grade given for sidewalk, and gutter paving 
measured. 



Brighton. 

Cambridge street, at Charles river. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Fairbanks street, from Washington street to Faneuil street. 
Lines and grades given for construction, and gutter pav- 
ing measured. 

Gardner street, between Harvard avenue and Malvern street. 
Lines and grades given for artificial stone sidewalks, and 
same measured. 

JVbiih Harvard street, at Western avenue. Line and grade 
given for sidewakl and road construction. Edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Pomeroy street, between Gordon street and Saunders street. 
Line and gi-ade given for sidewalk. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 

Summit avenue, between AUston and Summer streets. Line 
and grade given for grading. 

Sutherland street, between Beacon street and Common- 
wealth avenue. Lines and grades given for gutter pav- 
ing, and same measured. 

Washington street, from Cambridge street to Oak square. 
Lines and grades given for construction on lines of 
relocation. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Winship street, between Chestnut Hill avenue and Washing- 
ton sti'eet. Line given. Edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing measured. 



52 City Document No. 10. 

Western avenne, at North Harvard street. Line and grade 
given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

West Roxbury. 

Bellevue street, from Centre street to Oriole street. Line 

and grade given for construction, and gutter paving 

measured. 
Boylston street, at Lamartine street. Line and grade given 

for construction on line of widening. Edgestone, cross- 
walk, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Boylston street, between Germania street and angle. Line 

and orade oriven for sidewalk. Edorestone, o^utter and 

sidewalk paving measured. 
Brookside avenue, at and near Green street. Line and grade 

given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving 

measured. 
Catherine street, from Florence street to Bourne street. Line 

and grade given for construction. 
Centre street, at the corner of Hastings street. Line and 

grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing measured. 
Centre street, at and near Green street. Line and grade given 

for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Danforth street, between Boylston street and Wyman street. 

Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving measured. 
Green street, between Brookside avenue and Boylston avenue. 

Line and grade given for construction on revised grade. 

Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 
Hewlett street, from Walter street to Selwyn street. Line 

and grade given for construction. 
Hyde Park avenue, at Walk Hill street. Line and grade 

given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Maple street, from Centre street to Weld street. Line given 

for gutter, and same measured. 
March avenue, between Park street and Bellevue street. 

Line and grade given for sidewalk, and gutter paving 

measured. 
Paid Gore street, between Centre street and Chestnut avenue. 

Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving measured. 
Perkins street, at Jamaica Way. Line and grade given, 

Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 



Engineering Department. 53 

Pond street, at the corner of Avon street. Line given. 

Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Poplar street^ at Washington street. Line and grade given 

for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Ridge street, between Sherwood street and Sycamore street. 

Line and grade given for paving gutters, and same 

measured. 
St. John street, between Centre street and Rockview street. 

Line and grade given for construction. Edgestone and 

gutter paving measured. 
Seaverns avenue, at Ehn street. Line given for rebuilding 

retaining- wall. 
South Fair view street, between South street and South Wal- 
ter street. Line and grade given for construction. 
South Walter street, between South street and South Fairview 

street. Line and grade given for construction. 
South street, from Washington street to South Walter street. 

Line and grade given for construction. Edgestone and 

gutter paving measured. 
Sycamore street, between Ashland street and Ridge street. 

Line and grade given for paving gutters, and same 

measured. 
Walk Hill street, at Hyde Park avenue. Line and grade 

given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Washington street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 

3638. Edgestone and artificial stone sidewalk measured. 
Washington street, at Peter Parley street. Line and grade 

given. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Washington street. Line and grade given for 'sidewalk at 

No. 3175. Edgestone and artificial stone sidewalk 

measured. 
Wren street, from Rutledge street to Oriole street. Line and 

grade given for construction, and gutter paving meas- 
ured. 



54 



City Document No. 10. 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYING DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JANUARY 31, 1896. 



Indexed. 



Vol. 



14,15,16, 
and 17 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 

36 

38 ( 

39 1 

40 
41 
42 
43 
44 



General Head under which Classified. 



Plans of estates (lithographed) 



Number 

of 

Plana. 



In Brighton . . . 
in West Roxbury 



widenings, etc. 



School-house and miscellaneous plans 

Plans from actual survey in City Proper 

Profiles of City Proper and Boston Harbor, and ancient plans 

Plans and profiles of streets in East Boston, 1849 

'• " " " " " " 1868 

" " " " " " South Boston, 1848 

" " " " " " " 1860 

" " " " " at South End 

" " " " " in Church and Suffolk St. Dists., 

" " " " various streets 

" " " " streets at South End 

Miscellaneous plans, estates, etc 



Official plans from 1851 to 1854 
Plans of estates 



Hale's plans of the streets in Boston, 1819 
Plans of estates . — . .' 



Ancient plans of estates in South Boston, etc. 
Sectional plans of city lands at South End . . 

Plans of estates in Roxbury 

Carried forward 



221 

187 

31 

53 

17 

2 

664 

505 

95 

130 

91 

45 

45 

27 

39 

21 

38 

16 

15 

69 

97 

103 

112 

131 

108 

256 

118 

176 

66 

494 

46 

24 

77 



4,119 



^ Vol. 8 is a set of Architects' plans, and has been transferred to the Public Buildings 
Department. 



Engineering Department. 



55 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYIXG DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JANUARY 31, 
1896. — Continued. 



Indexed. 



Vol.45 . . 

" 46 . . 

" 47 . . 

" 48 . . 

" 49 . . 

" 50 . . 

" 51 . . 

•' 52 . . 

" 53 . . 

" 54 . . 

" 55 . . 

" 56 . . 

•' 57 . . 

" 58 . . 

" 59 . . 

" 60 . . 

" 61 . . 

" 62 . . 

" 63 . . 

" 64 . . 

" 65 . . 

" 66 . . 

" 67 . . 

" 68 . . 

" 69 . . 

" 70 . . 

" 71 to 82 

" 83 . . 

" 84 . . 

" 85 . . 

" 86 , . 

" 87 . . 



General Head under which Classified. 



Brougfit forward 

Plans of estates in Roxbury 

" " widenings in Roxbury 

" " " etc., in Roxbury 

Third Parish and Grammar School lands in Roxbury . . 

Plans of widenings in Roxbury 

" " city lands and widenings in Roxbury ...... 

Profiles of streets in Roxbury 

Plana of widenings in Brighton 

" " estates in Brighton 

" " city property, etc., in Brighton 

" " widenings in West Roxburj- 

Profiles of streets 

Plans of city property, etc., in West Roxbury 

" " estates, etc., in West Roxbury 

" " " " " " " and Brighton . . 

Charlestown plans, in bound volumes, showing street 
widenings and estates 

Charlestown street surveys 

Miscellaneous plans 

Plans of estates in Roxbury 

" " " etc 

Carried forward 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



4,119 

70 

80 

50 

140 

73 

57 

59 

92 

76 

87 

42 

56 

25 

115 

74 

18 

75 

44 

58 

27 

199 

217 

73 

152 

140 

183 

626 
229 
106 
485 

18 
169 

32 



56 



City Document No. 10. 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYING DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JANUARY 31, 
1896. — Continued. 



Indexed. 



Vol. 



90 . 

91 . 

92 . 

93 . 

94 . 

95 . 

96 . 

97 . 

98 . 



In Drawer A 
Cases CC . 
Drawer E 
F 

G 
H 

L 
M 

N 

In Drawers . . , 
Vol. I. to LXIV. 



General Head under which Classified. 



£r ought forward 

Plans of estates, etc 

Insurance volumeB 

Dorchester surveys 

Plans of estates, etc 

" " " in Dorchester 

Plan of Boston from 1777 to 1891 

Miscellaneous rolled plans 

Plans from surveys in City Proper 

Plans and profiles from surveys in City Proper and 
Roxbury 

South Boston plans and profiles 

East Boston plans and profiles 

Official plans, profiles, etc 

Copies of plans by other surveyors 

Plans of city lands 

4 vols, tracings of plans and profiles 

Copies of official plans indexed in Vol. 31 and Drawer L . . 

Other plans in bound volumes 

Miscellaneous plans of the Back Bay Commission in 
portfolio 

Hanging plans 

Rolled plans not indexed 

Plans in progress, City Proper 

" " " South Boston 

" " " East Boston .... 

" " " Roxbury 

" " " Dorchester 

" " " West Roxbury 

Carried forward 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



8.066 

140 

10 

25 

31 

28 

27 

65 

61 

63 

99 

322 

39 

670 

503 

627 

330 

129 

2,782 

321 

201 

632 

595 

2,632 

1,450 

15 
23 
25 
78 
61 
41 



20,399 



Engineering Department. 



57 



PLANS 

IN 8URVEY1NG DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JANUARY 31, 
1896.— Concluded. 



Indexed. 



General Head under which Classified. 



Brought forward 

Plans in progress, Brighton 

" " " Charlestown 

South Boston sectional plans 

East Boston " " 

Roxbury " " 

West Roxbury " " - . . 

Sectional plans filed by Board of Survey 

Plans filed by the Boston Transit Commission 

15 vols, copies of Assessors' plans 

Indexed plans of Dorchester 

Sectional plans " 

Miscellaneous plots and plans of Dorchester 

Plans of proposed streets submitted by owners and approved 
by the Board of Street Commissioners : 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Charlestown 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Plans of propopcd streets submitted by owners for the ap- 
proval of the Board of Street Commissioners now under 
consideration : 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



20,399 

75 

17 

42 

54 

163 

83 

237 

5 

1,679 

2,412 

232 

516 

10 
29 
107 
1 
53 
31 



26,151 



There are also 4,004 lithographed plans in the office at 



Old Court House not included in the foregoing list, viz. 

Lithographed maps of Dorchester, made in 18C9 . 
" " " " " 1880 . 

" " " West Roxbury, made in 1873 

" " " Brighton, made in 1873 

" " " Fort Hill, made in 1866-69 

" 111! Church-st. district, made in 1868 



39 

163 

43 

19 

106 

189 



58 



City Document No. 10. 



Lithographed maps of Washington-st. widening (parts 1, 2, 3), made 

in 18G0 

" " " Washington-st. extension, made in 1869 

" c< «. North street, made in 1859 

" << << Stony brook, drainage area 

" " " Boston, made in 1866-67 . 

" " " Boston, made in 1888 . 

" " " Su£folk-st. district, made in 1869 

" " " South Boston, made in 1880 

" " " Roxburv, made in 1880 

" " " Charlestown, made in 1890 

" " " Burnt district . 

" << (1 |^jt_ Hope Cemetery 

" " " Winthrop Farm . 

•* " " Hanover avenue 

" " " Muddy river 

" " " Pemberton square, Court House site . 

" " " East Newton street, lots on, sold by auction 

made in 1888 

" " " Public lands in South Boston, sold by auction 

made in 1885 ...... 

" nil Public lands in South Boston, sold by auction 

made in 1888 ...... 

" " " Boylston street, old Public Library lot 

" " " Public lands in South Boston, sold bj^ auction 

made in 1882 

'* " " Boston, Directory map, made in 1886 

" " " Boston, scale 1,600 feet to an inch, made in 1890, 

" n n Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, made in 1891, 

colored plans ....... 

" u <c Boston proper, scale 500 feet to an inch, made 

in 1894 

" " " Exhibit No. 1, City Surveyor's Report, 1893 

" (t li Exhibit No. 2, City Surveyor's Report, 1893 

" n n High street, public lands sold by auction . 

" " " Beacon Hill, State House site 

" " " Harrison avenue. Savage School-house lot, 

auction pltfn 



1,105 

170 

44 

11 

111 

158 

20 

85 

119 

11 

77 

29 

51 

43 

44 

243 

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84 

10 
17 

142 

96 

353 

13 

16 

106 

126 

16 

44 

57 



4,004 



The plan on opposite page was prepared under the direc- 
tion of the former City Surveyor, Mr. Pierre Humbert, 
Jr. , and shows the changes in street and wharf lines in the 
city proper for the hundred years from 1795 to 1895. 



Engineering Department. 



59 



B. 



[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE WATER 
COMMISSIONER.] 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall during the year 1895 was above the average 
in amount, and the supply of water has been ample at all 
times. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds were as follows : 



Rainfall, in inches 

Rainfall collected, in inches 

Daily average yield of watershed, "I 
in gallons J 



Sudbury. 



50.62 
24.196 

86,632,900 



Cochituate. 



48.96 
20.172 

18,125,934 



Mystic. 



48.73 
17.426 

22,300,000 



An unusually large fall of rain occurred October 12-14, 
1895 ; beginning at 1.30 P.M. on Saturday, October 12, 
the rain was continuous and uniform until 4.15 A.M. of 
Monday, October 14, 1895. During that time — less than 
thirty-nine hours — 7.5 inches of rain fell. 



Rese7'voir JVb. 1. 

Grades, H.W., 161.00 ; Tops of FlaHh-hoarda, 159.29 and 158.41; Crest of Dam, 157.64. 

Area, Water Surface, 143 acres ; Greatest Depth, 14 ft.; Contents below 161.00, 

376,900,000 gals.; Below 159.29, 288,400,000 gals. 

The surface of this reservoir was about one foot Ijelow the 
crest of the dam on January 1, 1895. Waste began January 
13 and continued until February 2, and no more waste 
occurred until March 12. 

From March 12 to May 9 water was wasted over the 
dam, and on May 9 the flash-l>oards were placed in position. 
On May 22 the reservoir was full, and waste began over the 
flash-boards, lasting until May 28. From June 5 to June 9 
water was wasted over the flash-1)oards. The flash-])oards 
were removed on October 16, and waste occurred from 
October 16 to January 1, 1896. The dam is in good 
condition. 



60 City Document No. 10. 



Reservoir J^o. 2. 

Grades, II. W., 168.00; Tops of Flash-boards, 1 67. 12 and 166.49 ; Crest of Dam, 165.87. 

Area, Water Surface, 134 acres; Greatest Depth, 17 ft.; Contents Below 168.00, 

668,300,000 gals.; Below 167.12, 629,860,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, water was wasting over the dam. 
From January 3 to 13 there was no waste. Beginning on 
the 13th, water was wasted until February 10. Waste 
occurred from March 11 until May 9, when the flash- boards 
were placed upon the dam. On April 8 the reservoir was 
drawn upon for the supply of the city. During July, 
August, September, and part of October, water was run 
into the reservoir from Reservoirs 4 and 6. The flash- 
boards were removed from the dam on November 6. Waste 
occurred on that day, and continued during the remainder 
of the year. The dam is in good condition. 



Reservoir JSfo. 3. 

Grades, H.W., 177.00; Crest of Dam {no Flash-hoards), 175.24. 

Area at 177.00, 253 acres ; Contents below 177.00, 1,224,500,000 gallons. 

Area at 176.24, 248 acres ; Contents below 175.24, 1,081,500,000 gallons. 

Greatest Depth, 21ft. 

On January 1, 1895, this reservoir was full. On January 
11 waste began, and continued until February 7. Waste 
also occurred from March 10 to May 7. On July 25 the 
surface of reservoir was 5.25 feet below crest of the dam. 
Filling slowly from that time, the water surface reached the 
crest of the dam on October 16. From October 16 to 
January 1, 1896, water has wasted over the dam, excepting 
October 29 and November 16. The dam is in good 
condition. 

Reservoir iVb. 4. 

Grades, II.W., 216.21 ; Tops of Flash-boards, 215.21+and 214.89; 

Crest of Dam, 214.23. 

Area, Water Surface, 167 acres; Greatest Depth, 49 ft.; Contents below 216.21, 

1,416,400,000 gallons. 

On January 1, 1895, the surface of water in the reservoir 
was 18.05 feet below the crest of the dam. The reservoir 
filled gradually, and on April 9 waste began, and continued 
until May 9, when one set of flash-boards was placed upon 
the dam. Water wasted over the first set of flash-boards 
from May 14 to May 23, when the second set of flash-boards 
was added. Waste occurred over the second set from May 
28 to June 19 and from June 28 to July 4. On July 3 the 
reservoir was drawn upon for the supply of the city, and on 
October 12 the water surface had fallen 22.45 feet below the 
crest of the dam. Since October 12 it has been graduall}' 
filling. The dam is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 



61 



Reservoir JVb. 5. 

Work for the year was commenced on April 13, and has 
been prosecuted throughout the year. The following report 
of Desmond FitzGerald, Resident Engineer, gives further 
information in regard to the work on this reservoir, as well 
as other matters connected with additional supply : 

SouTHBOROUGH, Mass., January 1, 1896. 
William Jackson, Esq., City Engineer: 

Dear Sir : Herewith please find report of work accom- 
plished by additional supply force under my direction during 
the past 3^ear. The grounds adjoining the embankment of 
Dam No. 6 have been cleared of waste material, graded, and 
top-dressed with loam. The filter beds are now under con- 
struction ; one bed has been entirely completed and under- 
drained, and the second bed has been graded and is ready 
for the drains. 

Stone bounds have been set at the angles of all the pieces 
of land owned by the city at Basin No. 6. At Dam No. 5 
work was begun on April 13, and continued at a satisfactory 
rate during the year. The following grades indicate in a 
general way the progress made : 

Masonry section from grade 190 to grade 217. 

Earth embankment at northerly end of dam from grade 
203 to grade 210. 

Earth embankment at southerly end of dam from grade 
220 to grade 224. 

The core wall at northerly end of dam is completed to 
grade 211, and at the southerly end to grade 225. 

The northerly wing wall is completed to grade 217, and 
the southerly one to grade 225. 

The quantities of materials handled during the year on the 
dam are as follows : 



Soil moved 
Soil placed on dam 
Earth excavation 
Rock excavation 
Concrete masonry 
Rubble masonry 
Range work 
Plasterinir 



In connection with the reservoir the work of stripping on 



1,409 cubic yards. 

776 
61,109 

2,154 

3,825 
15,812 

2,281 

1,657 square 



62 



City Document No. 10. 



Section A was continued until September. The completion 
of this section must await the removal of the injunction 
which now holds against carrying on work. Early in the 
year plans and specifications were prepared for letting two 
portions of the new Framingham-Marlboro' road, comprising 
about 2| miles in length. 

This work was let in April and completed during the year. 

In February and March plans and specifications were 
prepared for the stripping and shallow flowage connected 
with the Stony-l)rook branch of the basin. This work was 
let in April and is now Avell under way. The following 
quantities of materials have been moved in connection with 
the stripping : 

698,654 cubic yards. 



Split stone masonry . 
Paving in mortar 


. 2,048 " 
369 " 


Concrete masonry 


740 " 


Rubble masonry 

Dry paving 

Rip-rap .... 

Stone wall 


811 " 

730 " 

. 2,784 " 

71 rod 



The contract for building 20,000 linear feet of iron fence 
was made in July, and under this contract 2,300 feet have 
been constructed. The lands owned by the city and the 
road lines have been marked by stone bounds. In April a 
contract was made for grading a series of 20 filter beds near 
Marlboro' Junction. This work has been completed and the 
final estimate is now under way. Besides the above work, a 
number of plans and estimates have been made for an exten- 
sion of the work on this basin. 

Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) Desmond FitzGerald, 

Resident Engineer. 



Reservoir No. 6. 

Grades, H.W., 295.00 ; Top of Flash-boards, 295.00; Crest of Dam, 294.00. 
Estimated Area, 185 acres; Estimated Contents, 1,530,800,000 gals. 

The surface of the reservoir was 15.16 feet below the crest 
of the dam on January 1, 1895. Filling gradually, water 
began to waste over the dam on April 5, and continued 
until May 9, when the first set of flash-boards was placed 
upon the dam. On May 19 water wasted over the flash- 
boards, and continued until May 23. 

The second set was placed upon the dam on May 23, and 
waste occurred over this set from May 23 to June 17. On 



Engineering Department. 63 

October 13 the water surface reached its lowest point, being 
21.74 feet below the crest of the clam. During November 
and December it filled gradually, and on December 27 waste 
began over the crest of the dam. The dam is in good con- 
dition. 

Whitehall Pond. 

Mevation, H.W., 327.91 ; Bottom of Gates, 317.78. 
Area at 327.91, 601 acres; Contents, between 327.91 and 317.78, 1,256,900,000 gals. 

On January 1, 1895, the water surface of this pond was 
323.23 feet, or 4.68 feet below high water. It rose during 
the spring, the water surface on May 1 being 326.95, or .96 
feet below high water. It remained at about this height 
until June 15, when it fell; and on October 12 the water 
surface was 323.22. 

Since October 12 it has been gradually filling. Water 
was drawn from the pond, for the supply of the city, from 
March 25 to April 5, April 9 to 12, April 15 to 20, April 30 
to May 23, June 14 to July 24, August 8 to October 14, and 
November 27 to January 1, 1896. Plans for a new dam at 
Whitehall pond have been perfected. 

Farm Pond. 

Grades, H.W., 149.25; Low Water, 146.00. 
Area at 149.25, 159 acres; Contents, betiveen 149.25 and 146.00, 165,500,000 gals. 

No water was drawn from this pond for the supply of the 
city during the year 1895. 

On January 1, 1895, the surface of the pond was 46 feet 
below high water. High- water mark was reached on Jan- 
uary 23, and on April 15 the water surface was at grade 
149.70. 

It remained at or above 149.00 until August 20. The 
lowest point reached was on September 29, and on October 
14 high-water mark was again reached, remaining at that 
height during November and December. The Framingham 
Water Company has drawn 132,200,000 gallons from the 
pond during the year. 

LaJce Cochituate. 

Grades, U.W., 134.36; Invert Aqueduct, 121.03; Top of Aqueduct, 127.36. 
Area, Water Surface at 134.36, 785 acres ; Contents, hetioeen 134.36 and 127.36, 

1,515,180,000 gals.; between 134.36 and 125.03, 1,910,280,000 gals. 

Approximate Contents, bettreen 134.36 and 121.03, 2,447,000,000 gals. ; Between 

134.36 and 117.03, 2,907,000,000 gals. 

The dam is in good condition. On January 1, 1895, the 
surface of the lake was 8.08 feet below high-water mark. 

It remained at about this level until March 1, when it 
beeau to rise. On March 10 water was turned into the lake 
from the Sudbury river, and on April 15 the water surface 



64 



City Document No. 10. 



was at high-water mark. It remained at about high- water 
mark until May 5, after which its surface fell until October 
12, being 128.28 on that day. On January 1, 1896, the 
water surface was 132.30, or 2.06 feet below high-water 
mark. 

The beds for filtering the water of Pegan brook have been 
in use for the greater portion of the year, and 273,698,000 
gallons have been pumped upon them. No difficulty has 
been experienced in their operation during the winter season. 

Water has been drawn from the difl'erent reservoirs as 
follows : 

From 



7 


A.M. Jan. 1 


to 2 


P.M. Apr. 8 from Reservoir No. 


1. 




2 


P.M. Apr. 8 


" 11.40 A.M. June 27 " 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


11.40 A.M. June 27 


" 11 


A.M. July 19 " • " 


No. 


2. 




11 


A.M. July 19 


" 7 


A.M. July 24 " 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


7 
12 


A.M. July 24 
M. Oct. 1 


" 12 

" 2 


M. Oct. 1 " 
P.M. Oct. 3 No flow. 


No. 


2. 




2 


P.M. Oct. 3 


" 10 


A.M. Oct. 13 from Reservoir Nos. 


2, 


3 


10 


A.M. Oct. 13 


" 11 


A.M. Oct. 24 " '< 


No. 


2. 




11 


A.M. Oct. 24 


" 7 


A.M. Nov. 25 " 


Nos. 


2, 


3 


11 


A.M. Nov. 25 


" 11 


A.M. Dec. 3 " 


No. 


2. 




11 


A.M. Dec. 3 


" 1 


P.M. Dec. 5 No flow. 








1 


P.M. Dec. 5 


" 11 


A.M. Dec. 23 from Reservoir Nos. 


2, 


3 


11 


A.M. Dec. 23 


" 7 


A.M. Jan. 1 " " 


No. 


2. 





The height of the water in the various storage reservoirs 
on the first day of each month is given below : 







KBSKBVOIRa. 


Farm 
Pond. 


White- 
hall 
Pond. 


Lakb 

COCHIT- 
UATK. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 


No. 6. 




Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 


Crest 

of 
Dam. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 


High 

Water. 


High 

Water. 


Top of 
Flash- 
boards. 




159.29 


167.12 


175.24 


214.23 


295.00 


149.25 


327.91 


134.36 


January 1, 1896 




156.50 


166.00 


175.24 


196.18 


278.84 


148.79 


323.23 


126.28 


February 1, " 




157.83 


166.05 


175.45 


201.65 


283.48 


149.06 


324.26 


126.90 


March 1, " 




156.46 


161.22 


172.47 


203.79 


285.21 


149.01 


324.63 


126.50 


April 1, 




157.86 


166.16 


176.66 


212.91 


293.42 


149.35 


325.71 


132.97 


May 1, '< 




157.86 


166.09 


175.37 


214.60 


294.28 


149.63 


326.95 


134.35 


June 1, " 




159.25 


166.05 


174.68 


215.34 


295.02 


149.32 


326.98 


134.04 


July 1, 




159.04 


164.23 


169.46 


215.31 


295.04 


149.01 


325.81 


133.09 


August 1, " 




158.91 


163.97 


170.47 


210.25 


290.58 


149.00 


325.28 


131.72 


September 1, " 




158.68 


163.30 


172.50 


203.98 


283.91 


148.89 


324.62 


130.20 


October 1, " 




158.32 


163.14 


172.57 


194.41 


273.64 


148.58 


323.68 


128.98 


November], " 




157.91 


167.15 


175.66 


197.35 


279.19 


149.27 


324.73 


129.63 


December 1, " 




158.10 


166.23 


175.77 


207.83 


289.92 


149.36 


326.36 


132.71 


January 1, 1896 




158.11 


166.17 


175.75 


213.86 


294.39 


149.67 


325.29 


132.30 



!p!l!il{|||l|!ll|l!l 



\ 



A. 



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T^ \ '' ^\'\ 



r 






Boston W^ter Works. 

Di'dgl'Qm showing the heights o^ SudlouKy Ri'veK ReseiVoii-fe Nos. 4-ancl S. and 
the Rainfall on the Sudbuiy Rivei' Watei' S-ied duKing the year 1895. 




tMimutwr-y 


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tagr 

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Boston V\^ter Works. 

DfagKan-i showing the heigh+s of Sudbuiy Rivei'' F?eser'voii<s Nos. I, 2 and 3, FaCr-n 
Fbnd and CochifL4ai© and Mys+i'o Lakes dui'ing +he yeaK' 18 95". 




Engineering Department. 



65 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use 335.9 days, 
and has delivered 12,908,500,000 gallons into Chestnut-Hill 
Reservoir, and 896,800,000 gallons into Lake Cochituate. 
The Cochituate aqueduct has been used 361 days, and 
delivered 5,654,765,700 gallons. Both aqueducts have been 
cleaned during the year. 

The difierent distributing reservoirs are in good condition. 



High-Service Pumping-Stations. 

The daily average quantity pumped at the Chestnut-Hill 
station was 9.4 per cent, more than in 1894. 

Engine No. 1 was run 4,341 hours 

12 minutes, pumping 
Engine No. 2 was run 2,285 hours 

35 minutes, pumping 
Engine No. 3 was run 1,793 hours 

16 minutes, pumping 
Total amount pumped . 
Amount coal used by Engines Nos 

1 and 2 . 
Amount coal used by Engine No. 3 
Total amount coal used 
Percentage ashes and clinkers 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 

Engines Nos. 1 and 2 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 

Engine No. 3 . 
Daily average amount pumped 

Table VH., on pages 87, 88, shows in detail the work 
done by the engines and boilers. 



1,739,232,730 gallons. 

919,218,525 «' 

1,507,338,275 " 
4,165,789,530 " 

3,363,475 lbs. 
1,503,331 " 
4,866,806 " 
10.3 



790.4 gallons. 



1,002.7 
11,413,100 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries $14,854 11 

Fuel 11,261 46 

Repairs 803 09 

Oil, waste, and packing .... 1,759 73 

Small supplies ...... 2,888 46 

Total $31,566 85 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, $7 58 



66 



City Document No. 10. 



The following are notes of a practice test of Engine No. 
3, made l)y students of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
under the direction of Professor Miller : 



Fire started under boiler 
Engine started ..... 
Engine test began .... 
Engine test ended .... 

Length of engine trial (steam basis) 
Length of engine trial (coal basis) 

Revolutions, 9.08 A.M. to 9.26 A.M. 
Revolutions, 9.15 " 9.15 " 

Coal burned ..... 
Coal burned, less 200 lbs. allowance for fall 

ing grate ..... 

Water received from engine and weighed to 

boiler ...... 

Cold water make up . 

Total amount weighed to boiler . 
Less leakage from feed pump 



Steam required by plant for 24 hours, except 
H.P. jackets ...... 



8.30 A.M. 
9.08 " 
9.15 " 
9.15 " 

24 hours 
24.3 " 

. 73,516 

. 72,843 

16,839 lbs. 
16,639 " 



142,528 
8,532 

151,060 
1,440 



149,620 
146,226 



Tempe r atures . 

Engine-room ..... 

Condensed steam from air pump 

Cold condensing water . 

Hot condensing water . 

Feed water to economizer 

Feed water to boiler from economizer 

Jacket return at engine . 

Jacket return at boiler . 

Gases entering economizer 

Gases leavins; economizer 



23.3° C. 

89.3 F. 

51.9 

85.2 
127. 
198.3 
370.6 
369.6 
502. 
233. 



Engineering Department. 



67 



Pressures. 



Barometer 
Steam at throttle . 
Vacuum in condenser 
First receiver 
Second receiver 
Low-pressure jacket 
Hi2,h-prcssure jacket 
Draught in inches . 



14.85 lbs. 
175.7 " 
27.25 in. 

46.5 lbs. 
2.4 " 

99.6 " 
175.7 " 

0.375 



Horse power. 



Pump H.P. 



Head. Crank. Total. 

High. 80.78 70.08 150.86 

Int. 97.05 89.09 186.14 

Low. 117.12 121.54 238.66 Tot., 575.66 

Pump end. Steam end. Total. 

High. 90.12 85.95 176.07 

Int. 91.59 87.36 178.95 

Low. 87.90 86.94 174.84 529.86 



Steam per H.P. per hour, engine alone 

Coal per H.P. per hour, whole plant 

Lift in feet . 

Water over weir, 24 hours 

Slip .... 

Duty per 100 lbs. coal 

Duty per 1,000,000 B.T.U. 

Duty per 100 lbs. combustible 



11.22 lbs. 

1.18 " 

137.48 ft. 

21,016,000 gals. 

.1.83 percent. 

. 150,045,000 

. 145,470,000 

. 160,000,000 



At the West Koxbury pumping-station the daily average 
quantity pumped was 179,200 gallons, an increase of 47.5 
per cent, over the amount pumped in the previous year. 

At the East Boston station 465,500 gallons per day have 
been pumped for the supply of the high-service district, and 
39,300 gallons per day for the Breed's Island high-service. 



High Service. 

In 1870 the hish-service works were established, with a 
capacity of 5,000,000 gallons daily with no storage. 

In 1874 a reservoir was built on Parker Hill, with a ca- 
pacity of 7,200,000 gallons, the average daily consumption 
being at that time 1,200,000 gallons. Late in 1885 the 
consumption of water from the high service had reached 
2,500,000 gallons daily; the demand for its extension was 
pressing, and a new pumping-station with a capacity of 



Ids City Document No. 10. 

16,000,000 gallons daily was constructed at Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir, and an additional reservoir at Fisher Hill having 
a capacity of 15,400,000 gallons, making with the Parker- 
Hill reservoir a total storage capacity of 22,600,000 gallons. 

In 1894 the consumption had reached over 11,000,000 
gallons daily, and a new pump was added to the Chestnut- 
Hill plant having a capacity of 20,000,000 gallons daily. 

The consumption for high service for the year 1895 
averaged 10,384,600 gallons daily, the maximum being 
11,719,300 gallons; it is evident that our present reserve 
in the Parker and Fisher Hill reservoirs is not sufficient, 
and an additional reservoir or reservoirs should be con- 
structed at once with as large a capacity as it is practicable 
to obtain. It would be desirable to have, were it possible, 
a reservoir storage of 200,000,000 gallons. 

Owing to the rapid increase of the portion of the city 
which is supplied from the high seiwice, steps should also 
be taken at once, looking to the addition of another engine 
to the present plant. The experience of the past shows that 
it requires several years to design and build a pumpiiig- 
engine, and at the present rate of increase in the high-ser- 
vice consumption the safe capacity of the present plant will 
have been reached by the time an additional engine can be 
supplied if work is commenced at once on the plans. 

Mystic Lake. 

Grades, M.W., 7.00; Invert of Aqueduct, — 4.17; Contents, between 7.00 and 1.50, 
442,000,000 gallons. 

On January 1, 1895, the lake surface was 3.63 feet below 
high water. On March 4 it had risen to grade 4.14, and 
the stop-planks were placed upon the dam, waste occurring 
over the stop-planks from March 9 to May 29. On May 29 
the water surface was at 6.85 ; falling gradually, it reached 
grade 4.08 on July 29. The fish- way was opened on April 
16, and was kept open until June 20, when it was closed, 
and remained closed the remainder of the year. 

The lowest point reached during the year was on October 
12, the water surface beinor at grade 2.15, or 4.85 feet below 

1 • 1 DO ' 

high water. 

Waste occurred over the dam from October 15 to Janu- 
ary 1, 1896, with the exception of five days in the early part 
of November. 

The dam at the outlet of the lake is in orood condition . 



Engineering Department. 



69 



Mystic Valley Server. 

The operation of this plant by the city ended on July 18, 
1895, when the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission assumed 
control of it. During the time of operation, 70,013,500 
gallons of sewage were pumped and chemically treated with 
sulphate of aluminum. Table XI., on page 92, gives the 
monthly quantities of sewage pumped, coal and aluminum 
used. 

Mystic Conduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit has been cleaned several times during the 
year. 

The repairs recommended at the conduit screen-chamber, 
namely, replacing the wooden sills with stone sills and the 
renewino; of the orooves for the screens, have been made 
during the year. 



Mystic Puimping-Station. 



Engine No. 1 was used 3,240 hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 2 was used l,392f hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 3 was used 6,676| hours 

pumping .... 
Engine No. 4 was used 380 hours 

pumping .... 
Total quantity pumped . 
Daily average quantity pumped 
Total quantity of coal burned . 
Percentage ashes and clinkers . 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal 



720,723,300 gals. 

295,205,000 " 

2,276,190,200 " 

163,704,200 " 

3,455,822,700 " 

9,468,000 " 

8,121,000 lbs. 

10.9 

425.5 gals. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Salaries 

Fuel .... 

Repairs 

Oil, w^aste, and packing 

Small supplies 



Total $30,569 07 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, $8.84 



m,560 


94 


13,650 


80 


2,867 


04 


1,161 


60 


1,328 


69 



70 City Document No. 10. 

Table VIII., on page 89, shows in detail the work done by 
the engines during the year. The foundation for Engine 
No. 4 was finished and ready for the erection of the engine on 
April 1, 1895, and about April 15 the G. F. Blake Manu- 
facturing Coni})any commenced to deliver parts of the pump 
and began the work of erecting the engine. The engine was 
run for the first time on August 28, and has been in use 
more or less since that time. It has been lagged, painted, 
etc., and is now practically finished and ready to be accei)ted 
by the city. The engine has not yet been tested by the city. 

The Mystic Pumping-engine No. 4 is an independent 
compound beam and flywheel engine of the Leavitt type, and 
operates two differential plunger pumps. 

The steam cylinders are vertical and inverted, one high 
and one low pressure, with pistons connected to opposite 
ends of the beam. 

The pumps are located beneath the engine bedplate, in a 
masonry pit, and their plungers are rigidly connected to the 
steam-piston crossheads. 

The high-pressure piston with its connected pump plunger 
makes its upward stroke at the same time that the low- 
pressure piston and its plunger are making their downward 
stroke, and vice versa. 

The pumps rest upon solid masonry foundations at the 
bottom of the pit, to which they are strongly bolted ; their 
upper ends are firmly secured to the engine bedplate by ad- 
justable stools and bolts. 

The discharge from the pump worked l^y high-pressure 
piston is into the delivery chamlier of the pump worked by 
the low-pressure piston, from whence it enters the force 
main. Similarly the suction main connects with the low- 
pressure pump inlet chamber, with which the inlet chamber 
of the high-pressure pump is connected. 

Each pump consists of three principal sections, viz. : the 
upper chamber, forming the air vessel and containing the 
delivery valves ; middle chamber, containing the suction 
valves ; and lower or inlet chamber, which is constructed to 
form a vacuum chamber. 

The pump valves consist of thin flat rings of composition, 
working over annular openings in the valve seats and closed 
by springs. 

The pedestals for the main beam pin and crank shaft 
journals are formed in the engine bedplate, and are all in the 
same horizontal plane. 

The main framing for supporting the steam cylinders con- 



Engineering Department. 71 

sists of two massive columns forming the crosshead guides 
and five auxiliary columns, all of which have their bases 
bolted to the bedplate and their caps to the entablature. 

The steam distribution is effected by Corliss valves and 
valve gear, with separate eccentrics for the inlet and exhaust 
gear. 

The cylinders are thoroughly steam-jacketed on sides and 
ends, and the exhaust from the high-pressure cylinder enters 
a reheater filled with tubes containing high-pressure steam, 
on its way to the low-pressure cylinder. 

All heated surfaces are thoroughly protected from radiation 
by approved non-conductors and handsome black walnut 
lao^orinof. 

The condensing apparatus is of the jet type, with a double- 
acting horizontal air pump worked from the beam. 

There is a cast-iron gallery surrounding the cylinder 
bases, which is provided with a polished brass handrail and 
finished w^rought-iron stanchions : the gallery is reached by 
an iron stair at the low-pressure end of the engine. 

The leading dimensions of the engine are : 

The high-pressure cylinder is bored 21 inches and the low- 
pressure cylinder 42 inches diameter, with 4-foot stroke of 
pistons. 

The upper pump plungers are turned 14| inches and the 
lower plungers 21 inches diameter, with a stroke of 4 feet. 

The radius of the beam is 51 inches to centres of link and 
connecting-rod attachments, and 17 inches to centre of pin 
working air pump. 

The air pump is 16| inches diameter by 16 inches stroke. 

The horizontal distance between centres of cylinders and 
pumps is 8 feet, ditto between centres of main beam pin, 
and crank shaft 10 feet 83^2 inches. 

The length of connecting rod from centre to centre of 
journals is 10 feet, and of the steam links 3 feet ^ inch. 
The radius of the crank is 2 feet. 

Diameter of flywheel is 18 feet ; weight of same, about 
17 tons. 

Speed of the engine for regular working capacity, 51 
revolutions per minute. Displacement capacity at above 
speed in U. S. gallons per 24 hours amounts to 
10,570,000. 

The working boiler-pressure is 100 pounds per square 
inch above atmosphere. 



72 City Document No, 10. 

The following preliminary test of Engine No. 4 was made 
by the builders, The Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Co., De- 
cember 13-14, 1895 : 

Duration of test, 24 hours 30 seconds. 

Total number of revolutions, 74,385. 

Pressure by gauge near engine, 95.3 lbs. 

Pressure by gauge on receiver, 5.9 lbs. 

Pressure by mercurial column on condenser, 27.3 ins. 

Total pressure per square inch on pump, 65.7 lbs. 

Revolutions per minute, 51.7. 

Horse-powers: High-pressure steam cylinder, top, 74.5; 
bottom, 79.65 ; total, 154.15. Low-pressure steam cylinder, 
top, 83.19; bottom, 83.71; total, 166.9. Both steam 
cylinders, total, 321.05. 

Horse-power of main pump cylinders, 284.86. 

Water pumped in 24 hours by displacement, 10,703,000 
gals. 

Total coal burned during the test, 10,661 lbs. 

Water pumped per pound of coal, 1,004 gallons. 

Coal per pump horse-power, per hour, 1.56 lbs. 

Duty per 100 lbs. of coal, 127,000,000 ft. lbs. 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption for the year was as fol- 
lows : 

Sudbury and Cochituate works . . 50,801,100 gals. 
Mystic works 9,467,000 " 



Total for the combined supplies . 60,268,100 " 

an increase of 3,426,000 gallons, or 6 per cent., from that of 
the previous year. 

On account of the limited quantity of the Mystic supply at 
the beginning of the year, all of Charlestowu District lying 
east of Cambridge street has been supplied from the Cochit- 
uate works during the entire year, with the exception of the 
periods between February 6 to 21, and May 18 to July 13. 

The following table shows the consumption per inhabitant 
for the past two years : 



Engineering Department. 



73 





Cochituate. 


Mystic. 


Combined Supplies. 


Month. 


Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 


Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 


Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 




1894. 


1895, 


1894. 


1895. 


1894. 


1895. 


January 

February 


108.1 

109.6 

99.7 

88.9 

92.6 

101.4 

110.3 

104.0 

98.2 

95.0 

94.8 

97.5 


104.9 
129.4 
107.1 
94.5 
97.3 
102.0 
104.2 
107.0 
107.1 
98.9 
96.7 
105.9 


91.9 
95.4 
83.0 
79.0 
82.1 
96.4 
93.3 
81.8 
94.3 
80.1 
81.3 
92.8 


92.0 
94.8 
83.5 
77.3 
77.6 
83.2 
76.8 
76.5 
93.3 
81.1 
78.8 
86.1 


104.5 

106.5 

96.0 

86.7 

90.2 

100.3 

106.5 

99.0 

97.6 

92.6 

92.7 

96.7 


102.7 
120.7 
102.9 


April . . • 


91.5 




93.3 




97.6 


July 


98.7 




101.6 


September . 


104.7 
95.8 


November 

December 


93.6 
102.4 


Average 


99.8 


104.3 


87.6 


83.3 


97.4 


100.3 



The daily average consumption was, last year, 24 per cent, 
in excess of the dry-year capacity of the combined system 
of water supply. 

Whitehall Pond. 

Last June plans and specifications were prepared for a 
new dam at the outlet of Whitehall pond, for the purpose of 
increasing the storage capacity of the pond, but on account 
of complications arising by reason of the proposed taking of 
the supply systems by the State, nothing was done. It is 
now so evident, however, that the proposed increased 
storage of Whitehall pond is necessary that the construction 
of the new dam should be no longer delayed. 



Corrosion of Pipes by Electrolysis. 

The investigations of the effect of electrolysis upon the 
water-pipes have been continued during the year, under 
the supervision of Messrs. Stone & Webster, and in brief 
the results arrived at are as follows : 



74 City Document No. 10. 

William Jackson, City Engineer, Boston, Mass. : 

Dear Sir : In our reports for the years 1893 and 1894 
we considered the theory of electrol^'tic corrosion of water- 
pipes, giving detailed accounts of the experiments we were 
carrying on, and of our methods of investigation. 

For the past year we have spent a great deal of time in 
taking hydrant readings in almost every part of the city 
where electric-car tracks are located, and have already made 
three minor reports on the work. 

During the summer of 1895 we confined our investigations 
to the most thickly-settled portion of the city, and along the 
car lines extending into the suburbs. These investigations 
showed that the electrical condition of the pipes had changed 
for the better. Readings taken at the service-pipe stations, 
which we installed in 1894, as described in our report for 
that year, showed also that there has been a marked 
improvement. 

In the fall we confined our investigations to the district 
about Brighton. Here in one locality we found slight indi- 
cations of electrolytic corrosion, and in our report for 
November we suggested the remedy of bending the pipes to 
the tracks at a point on Cambridge street. 

Owing to the fact that the ground was frozen, and to the 
unfavorable condition of the weather, we were unable to 
renew electrolytic investigations until the last of March. 
Since that time, however, we have made careful investiga- 
tions in Charlestown and East Boston, and have found no 
indications of danger in these districts. This result is in 
accordance with the observations made last summer. At the 
time of writing this report we are carrying on investigations 
in South Boston, the indications being that there are some 
points of danger ; but we have not arrived at conclusions 
sufficiently definite to be incorporated here. 

The electrical conditions of the pipes is in the main im- 
proving, showing that measures have been taken to lessen 
the possibility of corrosion. Notwithstanding this improve- 
ment, there are districts which are not entirely free from 
electrolytic action ; and, moreover, there is always liability 
to corrosion at isolated points, as well as the ever-present 
danger due to deterioration of rail bonds and supplementary 
return wires. 

(Signed) Stone & Webster. 



Engineering Department. 75 

Distribution. 

On the Cot'hituate works 26\ miles of pipe were laid and 
2^ miles al)and()ned, making a net increase of 23.1 miles 
and a total of 51)5.9 miles now connected with the system. 

A 20-inch main for the supply of Brighton was laid as far 
as Brighton avenue early in the season, and was in service in 
June. 

The 30-inch main for the South Boston low service was 
extended from Washinston Villao^e, through Dorchester 
avenue and D street, as far as Congress street, a length of 
8,373 feet. 

For the improvement of the high service in Roxbury and 
Dorchester, the 48-inch, 42-inch, and a part of the 36-inch 
lines, recommended in 1894, were laid during the year; the 
48-inch pipe extends from the junction of Fisher avenue and 
Boylston street through Boylston, Walnut, and Washington 
streets in Brookline, and through Huntington avenue, to 
Heath street, a length of 8,290 feet; 7,965 feet of this were 
laid hy contract. At Heath street the pipe is divided into 
42-incli and 36-inch lines ; the 42-inch pipe continues through 
Huntington avenue, Clarendon street, Newbury street, the 
Public Garden and the Common, to Park street. Connection 
is made with the 20-inch high-service pipe in Huntington 
avenue, at Wait and Gainsboro' streets. On the Common, 
after connecting with the 20-inch high-service pipe, the 42- 
inch line is reduced to 30 inches. Opposite Temple place 
the 30-inch pipe is again reduced to 16-incli and con- 
tinued to Park street. The length of 42-inch pipe laid was 
15,478 feet, of which 9,186 feet were laid hy contract. Water 
was let on to the 48 and 42 inch lines as far as Wait street 
on October 20, 1895. 

From Huntington avenue and Heath street the 36-inch 
line runs through Heath street as far as Parker street, and is 
connected with the 24-inch high-service pipe at Hayden street 
and at Parker street. These new lines have given an in- 
creaseii pressure in Roxbury and Dorchester, of nine and six 
pounds respectively at times of minimum pressure ; when 
the water was turned on, Parker-Hill Reservoir quickly tilled 
up, and was shut off to prevent overflowing. It is now out 
of service, and will be maintained as a reserve reservoir for 
use in emergency. 

A small pumping-plant has been established on Wayne 
street, at Blue Hill avenue, to improve the service in the 
Elm-Hill district. 

The distriljuting mains connected with the Mystic works 



70 City Document No. 10. 

have been extended 4.9 miles, and 7.4 miles have been 
relaid. The total length now in service is 178.6 miles. 

There has been an increase of 242 in the number of 
hydrants connected with the Cochituate works, making a 
total now in use of 6,459. 

On the Mystic works 97 hydrants have been added, and 
the total now in use is 1,543. 

260 petitions for main pipe have been reported upon, and 
88 contracts for rock excavation have been made. 

Various profiles have been made, levels taken, and lines 
and grades furnished for the main-pipe laying. 

All pipe laid has been located and plotted on the plans. 

During a severe spell of cold weather in January the pipes 
between the islands in the harbor were frozen, and burst in a 
number of places. Service between Moon and Long Islands 
was at once reestablished by laying a 2-inch lead pipe, and 
as soon as practicable contracts were awarded for laying 
6-inch pipe, with Ward's flexible joints, between Long and 
Moon Islands and Long and Gallop's Islands. In each 
case the pipes were laid in a trench excavated 6 feet deep 
between mean high- water marks. After the lines were tested 
the trenches were carefully back-filled. A contract has also 
been awarded for laying a 4-inch flexible pipe from Long 
Island to Bainsford Island. This work is now in progress. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, etc., for the past year, and in addition, 
tables are given of the rainfall, rainfall collected, and per- 
centage collected on the Cochituate water-shed since 1863, 
on the Sudbury-river water-shed since 1875, and on the 
Mystic water-shed since 1878. These will be found valuable 
for future reference. 



Engineering Department. 



77 



GENERAL. STATISTICS. 



SUDBUBT AND COCHITUATK WoBKS. 


1892. 


1898. 


1894. 


1896. 


Daily average consumption in gallons 


41,312,400 


47,453,200 


46,560,000 


50,801,100 


Daily average consumption in gallons per 
inhabitant 


96.1 


107.5 


99.8 


104.3 


Daily average amount used through 


11,225,900 

27.2 


11,651,600 
24.5 


11,170,400 
24.0 


12,084,500 
23.8 


Percentage of total consumption metered. 




65,074 
4,412 

536 
5,793 


66,586 


68 556 


70,879 




4,585 

560 
6,042 


4,877 


4,910 
595.9 


Length of supply and distributing mains, 


572.8 

6,217 

$1,644,406 25 




6,459 
$1,784,954.01 


Yearly revenue from water-rates 


$1,433,413 78 


$1,637,531 94 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$649,672 31 


$683,948 52 


$672,474 17 


$711,467.39 


Percentage of total revenue from metered 


45.3 
$22,243,351 56 


41.8 
$22,727,456 03 


40.9 
$23,583,967 89 


39.9 


Cost of works on February 1 


$25,052,227.53 




$392,762 21 


$433,408 18 


$440,840 63 


$420,907.09 


MT8TIC "WOKKS. 










Daily average consumption in gallons. . . . 


9,810,800 


10,742,500 


10,282,100 


9,467,000 


Daily average consumption in gallons per 


78.8 

1,862,200 
19.0 


84.4 

1,921,570 
17.9 


87.6 

2,014,000 
19.6 


83.3 


Daily average amount used through 


2,105,800 


Percentage of total consumption metered. 


22.2 


Number of services 


21,588 


22,398 


23,257 


24,120 




550 

160 
1,223 


482 

165 
1,306 


515 

173.7 
1,446 


525 


Length of supply and distributing mains. 


178.6 




1,543 




$394,008 75 


$421,573 48 


$447,554 35 


$481,017.15 


Yearly revenue from metered water 


$105,685 66 


$109,367 37 


$115,811 32 


$121,436.10 


Percentage of total revenue from metered 


26.8 

$1,713,227 00 

$129,354 49 


25.9 

$1,721,609 33 

$160,643 97 


25.9 
* $1,676,471 94 


25.2 




$1,803,775.29 




$156,214 05 


$189,194.61 







* $52,637.00 credited on account of sale of portion of Mystic Sewer. 



» 



78 



City Document No. 10. 










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o -.^ « 



BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

DiagV^rn showfng the rainfall and daily evei-fegis Consumption 
'foi''each h^on+h. 

Yearly Aytrage^ Shoi^fl ■^hus 




Engineering Department. 



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Engineering Department. 



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84 



City Document No. 10. 



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51 


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n 


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Engineering Department. 



89 





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cc 


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c 


1 to 


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M 


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■^ 






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1 




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m 


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1 5 


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hi 


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3 


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a 

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90 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE IX. 

Statement of Operations at the East Boston Pumping- Station for the 

Year 1895. 





Engines Nos. 1 and 2. 


Bnqinb No 


. 3. 


"3 



















la 

Eh 


(A 


1895. 


ft. . 

is. 


ill 

-as 
« 3 S 


60 
03 

'3 


1-2 


a2 
d r^ a 


(U 

w 

ID 

p 


.a 


Month. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


1 
54 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per ct. 


Jan. . 


373 


15 


14,869,540 


479,700 


25 


844,020 


27,200 


43,900 


19.1 


Feb. . 


410 


50 


17,078,320 


609,900 


68 


45 


1,035,420 


37,000 


48,750 


18.9 


March, 


374 


05 


15,328,600 


494,500 


53 


10 


816,000 


26,300 


43,540 


18.8 


April . 


322 


50 


13,316,800 


443,900 


53 


25 


770,160 


25,700 


36,380 


17.8 


May . 


345 


00 


14,254,520 


459,900 


68 


15 


961,020 


31,000 


36,150 


18.1 


June . 


334 


05 


13,663,580 


455,500 


88 


15 


1,315,440 


43,800 


.36,100 


18.0 


July . 


336 


15 


13,821,500 


445,900 


95 


00 


1,407,780 


45,400 


36,630 


18.1 


Aug. . 


334 


45 


13,868,820 


447,400 


105 


45 


1,594,260 


51,400 


37,700 


18.0 


Sept. . 


296 


15 


12,116,440 


403,900 


96 


20 


1,443,300 


48,100 


35,200 


18.3 


Oct. . 


329 


30 


13,653,920 


440,400 


91 


15 


1,288,440 


41,600 


35,700 


18.2 


Nov. 


325 


00 


13,011,880 


433,700 


88 


45 


1,169,520 


39,000 


34,870 


18.0 


Dec. . 


355 


25 


14,915,460 


481,100 


116 


35 


1,693,020 


54,600 


43,600 


18.3 


Totals, 


4,137 


15 


169,899,380 


465,500 


979 


55 


14,338,380 


39,300 


468,520 


18.4 



Engines Nob. 1 and 2 pump to the reservoir. 
Engine No. 3 pumps to the tank on Breed's 



tank on Breed's Island. 



Engineering Department. 



91 



TABLE X. 

Statement of Operations at the West Roxbury Pumping- Station for the 

Year 1895. 



1896. 


a 
■& 
a 6 

3 

o 


a 
o . 

II 


•a 

sa 

:;: 3 
a o 


a) ■ 

IS 

>. . 

"5 

2 « 


Total amount of 
coal consumed. 


m 

^ OS 


t 


Month. 


Hours. 


Min. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Percent. 


Feet. 


January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May .... 
June. . . . 
July. . . . 
August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December . 


'390 
410 
399 
357 
395 
583 
446 
494 
471 
440 
410 
462 


30 
30 
30 
00 
00 
00 
30 
30 
30 
00 
00 
00 


4,611,675 
4,783,275 
4,706,400 
4,270,200 
5,019,825 
6,465,600 
5,617.950 
6,344,175 
6,169,950 
5,783,475 
5,540,250 
6,102,975 


148,700 
170,800 
151,800 
142,300 
161,900 
215,500 
181,200 
204,700 
205,700 
186,600 
184,700 
196,900 


145.5 
157.5 
152.6 
162.1 
172.1 
162.8 
166.1 
162.7 
161.0 
155.9 
165.6 
157.1 


31,700 
30,375 
30,850 
26,350 
29,175 
39,425 
33,825 
39,000 
38,325 
37.100 
33,450 
38,850 


18.6 
17.1 
17.3 
16.3 
17.4 
20.4 
18.2 
18.4 
19.4 
18.4 
16.8 
17.3 


135.39 
134.07 
134.83 
136.60 
136.67 
138.88 
138.60 
138.09 
142.52 
148.53 
142.67 
140.83 


Totals and ) 
Averages. \ 


5,260 


00 


65,415,750 


179 200 


160.2 


408,425 


18.1 


138.97 



92 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XI. 

Table showing Work done at the Mystic Sewage Pumping- Station during 

the year 1895. 



1896. 



January 
Pebmary 
March . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 

Totals 



Hrs. 



Min. 



543 


05 


472 


55 


523 


00 


474 


45 


464 


05 


390 


11 


279 


45 









Oallons. 



13,289,800 

10,492,100 

13,670,000 

10,254,800 

9,529,400 

7,296,900 

5,480,500 



Lba. 



25,360 
21,560 
25,740 
20,470 
20,085 
17,775 
12,550 



Lbt. 



32,400 
28,100 
32,500 
28,300 
28,200 
23,500 
16,200 



60 

2*5 s 
= a p £ 



Oallons. 



428,700 
388,600 
441,000 
353,600 
352,900 
304,000 
322,400 



3,147 



70,013,500 



143,540 



189,200 



376,400 



Total number of days engine worked, 186. 

Plant turned over to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission on July 19, 1895. 



Engineering Department. 



93 



TABLE XII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Sudbury River Water- shed for 

the Year 1895. 



1895. 


a 

p 

C3 
»-5 


a 

a 




a. 

< 


>> 


o 

a 

3 
>-5 




D 

3 
< 


a 

a 
p. 

<u 
CD 


<u 
-§ 

o 

o 




u 

a 


1 












0.35 










1.18 




2 

3 




0.150 


0.620 


0.370 








0.10 






0.50 


0.30 


4 




0.140 


0.110 






0.36 












5 


















0.94 


6 






0.100 






0.545 


0.825 












7 


0.585 
0.255 
1.065 








1.365 










8 


1.055 


0.835 












0.155 






9 

10 

11 


1.320 


0.045 




0.51 




0.69 




0.156 




12 




030 










0.27 


0.56 








13 


0.065 




0.750 


2.755 


0.680 


0.08 


0.46 
0.065 

0.065 






0.01 


14 






7.995 
0.04 






16 






0.560 


0.015 






2.465 




16 


0.475 




0.120 


0.095 




17 














87 




18 


0.205 








0.235 






1.13 


0.14 








19 








20 

21 














0.41 


0.12 






0.07 
0.37 




22 

23 


0.255 


0.050 




0.185 




0.03 












0.915 


24 
















0.0Q5 


0.335 
0.675 


0.055 
1.255 


0.205 
0.185 
1.805 




25 






0.145 


0.015 


0.055 
0.315 


0.555 






26 .... 


0.995 






27 






0.295 


1.115 
0.080 


0.13 
2.215 


0.28 
0.89 


0.41 


28 

29 


0.160 




0.185 




30 




0.085 


0.215 


0.130 




31 






0.775 


Totals . 


4.060 


1.895 


2.980 


5.250 


2.020 


2.770 


5.040 


4.150 


2.300 


9.500 


7.805 


3.350 



Total rainfall during the year, 50.62 inches, being an average of two gauges located at 
Framingbam and Ashland. 



94 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XIII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochiiuate for the Year 1895. 



1896. 


a 
a 
a 

•-5 




.a 

Hi 


P. 

<1 


03 


a 



>-5 




I 

a 


a 


U 

1 

o 
O 


u 

a 
« 


a 

Q 


1 






















1.14 




2 . 




0.16 


0.61 


0.38 








0.09 






0.50 


0.27 


3 






4 




0.11 


0.10 




0.08 




0.32 












6 




0.83 


6 . ... 


0.52 




0.09 






0.37 


0.55 












7 


1.67 


. . . 




. . . 




8 




1.38 


0.91 


1.01 


0.04 


. . . 


0.51 




0.59 


0.25 


0.15 




9 


0.20 




10 








\Q 


















11 


1.07 


. . . 






. . . 


. . . 


. . . 




1.17 








12 






0.03 


. . . 


0.66 




. . . 


0.32 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 




13 


0.07 




. . . 


. . . 


. . . 


0.14 


0.39 






6.95 


. . . 




14 


. . . 




0.77 


. . . 




. . . 


0.18 




. . . 




. . . 




15 








2.79 
0.04 


0.59 
0.02 










0.04 


2.37 




10 


0.48 


. . . 


0.11 


. . . 


0.06 








17 






















0.86 




18 


0.19 








0.21 






1.09 


0.12 








19 . ... 








20 


, . . 


. . . 








. . , 




0.02 


. . . 


. . . 


0.47 




21 




0.05 


. . . 






0.03 


. . . 




. . . 


. . . 






22 


0.26 






0.18 












. . . 


. . . 


0.57 


23 


























24 




• • • 




. . . 




0.39 






. . . 


. . . 


0.18 




26 


. • . 




0.15 


. . . 




0.15 








. . . 


. . . 




26 


0.98 




. . . 


. . . 


0.09 








0.30 


. . . 


1.79 




27 








0.25 


0.17 


0.91 


0.13 




• • • 


0.06 


. . . 


0.32 


28 


. . . 




0.26 




29 


0.16 




0.08 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 




0.10 






. . . 




30 


. . . 




. . . 


0.22 


. . . 


1.13 


2.57 




0.59 


. . . 






31 










0.17 






0.67 




1.13 




0.72 


Totals . . 


3.93 


1.70 


3.11 


5.03 


2.03 


3.12 


4.71 


3.96 


2.77 


8.43 


7.46 


2.71 



Total rainfall during the year, 48.96 inches. 



Engineering Department. 



95 



TABLE XIV. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Mystic Lake Water-shed for the Year 

1895. 



1896. 


a 

a 
a 

'-3 


E 




p. 

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a 


a) 

a 


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•-3 


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3 


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a 

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o 


o 

s 

> 
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a 

a 

41 


1 












0.04 


0.25 


0.115 






1.405 
0.585 




2 




0.110 


0.600 


0.365 




0.21 


3 






4 

5 .... 




110 






0.260 


0.225 


18 
















0.095 




















6 






0.096 




0.585 


0.09 


0.225 










0.64 


7 . . 


0.425 














2.55 










8 




0.425 


0.800 
0.010 












0.265 






g 


0.220 


0.785 






0.61 












10 








0.100 








. . . 






0.16 


. . . 


jj 


965 
























12 
















0.175 


1.305 








13 


0.095 








1.255 


0.685 










14 






0.790 


. . . 






0.76 






7.025 


. . . 




16 








2.190 
0.060 


0.470 










0.075 


2.210 




16 


0.410 




0.090 












17 














0.04 








0.80 




18 


. . . 








0.22 




. . . 


1.99 


0.085 




. . . 




19 . . 


150 
























20 






« . . 


... 






. . . 


0.025 






0.485 




21 


. . . 


0.010 


. . . 








. . . 








0.185 




22 

23 


0.245 




0.030 


0.210 


0.035 


0.04 


08 










0.56 
















24 


... 




... 


. . . 






. . . 


0.01 






0.435 




25 






0.160 
0.025 


0.065 


0.09 


0.40 




0.01 


0.060 
0.030 




0.155 




26 


0.900 




. . . 


27 








215 










0.175 


0.075 


1.245 


0.355 


28 






0.205 




0.235 




0.215 


. . . 




29 


0.125 




0.060 


. . . 








0.045 


. . . 








30 






0.040 


0.195 




2.150 


1.985 


0.515 


0.385 


1.350 




• . 


31 






0.536 


Totals . . 


3.535 


0.655 


3.000 


4.185 


3.150 


3.630 


4.345 


5.435 


2.040 


8.790 


7.665 


2.300 



Total rainfall during the year, 48.73 inchee, being an average of two gauges, located at 
Mystic Lake and Mystic Reservoir. 



96 



City Document No. 10. 



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Engineering Department. 



97 



TABLE XVI. 

Table showing the Temperature of Air and Water at Various Stations 
on the Water- Works. 











Temperature op Air. 


Temperature of 
Water. 


1895. 


Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 


Framiagham. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Mystic 
Engine- 
House. 




3 

3 

a 


a 

3 

a 

a 
S 


a 
a 


a 
a 

a 


a 
1 

"3 

3 


a 

as 
<1> 




i 


January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May . . 
June . . 
July. . 
August 
Septembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 


r 

r 
r 






50.0 
44.5 
53.5 
82.0 
94.0 
94.0 
93.0 
92.0 
96.0 
71.0 
73.5 
63.0 


2.0 
-8.5 
11.5 
24.0 
27.5 
46.0 
48.0 
47.5 
38.0 
21.0 
14.5 

6.0 


26.3 
22.4 
34.2 
46.1 
61.2 
69.1 
69.1 
70.4 
65.3 
47.4 
43.9 
33.3 


49.0 
45.0 
52.0 
79.0 
92.0 
93.0 
93.0 
87.0 
96.0 
69.0 
73.0 
60.0 


-4.0 
-13.0 
11.0 
22.0 
26.0 
43.0 
44.0 
40.0 
34.0 
22.0 
16.0 
6.0 


23.4 
20.1 
32.5 
45.1 
59.8 
67.8 
67.1 
67.9 
63.8 
47.0 
43.8 
33.4 


37.0 
36.0 
37.0 
44.6 
59.1 
69.4 
71.3 
72.9 
70.0 
55.9 
46.4 
38.1 


•28.2 
23.8 
34.3 
47.1 
61.2 
69.5 
70.8 
71.2 
67.4 
48.8 
46.2 
36.2 



Note. — The maximum and minimum air temperatures in above table are the highest 
and lowest temperatures in any one day of the month. The mean air temperature is the 
average of the maximum and minimum temperatures of the whole month. The water tem- 
peratures are the mean temperatures for the whole month. 



98 



City Document No. 10. 



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Engineering Department. 



99 



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> 

< 



100 



City Document No. 10. 






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00 






f-t 


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to 


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t- 




t-. 


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CO 


to 


t~. 


o 


^ 


01 




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^ 








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^ 


^ 


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00 


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IN 


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o 


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^ 




l-H 


CO 






I— 1 


1— ' 


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t- 










CI 


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to 


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r^ 


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f— 1 


o 


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tC 


r-l 




o 


















































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00 








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o 




IN 




o 






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o 








ri 




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IN 


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to 








Ol 


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3 


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< 












































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IN 


ta 


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>, 


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to 


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CO 




IN 


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r- 


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^ 




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00 


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m 


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^ 


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t— 


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r-l 


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r-) 


r^ 


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o 


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o 


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^ 


-, 


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o 


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to 


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>> 


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IM 




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r-l 


o 


a 








































C-1 


,n 


o 


CO 


^ 


ro 


Ol 


^ 


m 


no 


m 


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•n 




^ 


to 


oo 


^ 


rn 


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to 


00 


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^ 


00 


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o 




f— < 




CI 


00 


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to 


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to 


CO 


CO 


^ 


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CI 


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r-< 


<3 






























































^ 








o 


o 


m 


t- 










00 


CO 


CO 




■^ 




oo 






00 






t— 




CO 


^ 


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rH 


n 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C-l 


l-< 


CO 


rl 


CI 


in 


to 


lO 


CO 


r^ 


3 








































^ 








^ 


rj 






00 




^_ 








t^ 


^ 


CI 


_^ 




fH 








<N 


f— 1 




Ol 


IN 








Ol 






o> 






a 




f-i 


T^ 






r~i 


T-t 








r-) 




IN 


rH 


rH 


CO 


c» 


CI 


fa 








































M 










r~J 




^ 








O 


CO 










t- 


a 


O) 










a 




t— 


o 






IQ 


t— 1 










■'T 


^ 




<M 


e< 


O 








■<* 


'^ 




CO 


CO 


o 


■^ 




CO 






K 






































< 






































m 






































>H 








































eo 


_^ 


o 


CO 


^ 


30 




o 


^ 


IN 


CO 


■* 


o 


to 


t- 


00 


Ol 


o 






















































oo 




00 


00 


00 

r-l 


00 




00 


00 


00 


s 





Engineering Department. 



101 



<r 






^ 






or, 




<o 




^ 


<o 


to 


I-l 


_ 


to 










m 


«1 


I— 1 


•-* 










o 


CD 


o> 


t- 


a> 




o 


r-i 


-f 


•-I 


<-< 


•-I 


?0 


tc 


00 


o 


CJ 


M 


C) 


l-< 


co 


o 


CO 




































ir 




^ 


^ 


e-i 


^ 


^ 


■« 


^ 


«- 


^ 


>c 




t~ 


00 


^ 


CO 


o 


r^ 


<N 


id 


Ol 


•* 


a> 


» 


^ 




CO 


lO 








^ 












^_i 






t* 


M« 






t^ 
































rH 








5 




o 


<M 


•* 


M 




o 


«D 


ts 


tt> 


^ 


o 


^ 


oo 


^ 


o 


to 


o 




O 


OS 


00 






o> 


■* 


<M 


I— < 




00 


to 


I— 1 


•<t 








o 


o 






CJ 


o 


ir» 


CO 


c^ 




o 






c^ 


to 





*0 05 CO Ol 



O F-l O rH 



<M O) to l-H 



i-l o> o 

CO t- ■<* 

(N 1-5 n' 



O 1^ fc- rH 



to irt to 05 i-H 
C^ US M CO to 



CO CO IN oo 



00 CO CO rH 



« « CO (N 



CO c^ ei >o 

O rH i-H iC 



(^^ i-o 00 CO 



« CO rH 



(N I- H* 



rH (N r- 



O rH rH 



O rH rH 































<0 

as 




1 




1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

L888 . 

1889 

1890 

1891 

892 

893 

894 

896 


> 



102 



City Document No. 10. 






m-J 


ift 


00 


00 


r-> 


"* 


o 


0-. 


o> 


l~ 


(N 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


(N 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


* " 




CO 


eo 




*r3 


-l< 


o 


f— 1 


00 


05 


S! 


t<. 


ta 


^ 


o 


1< 


o 




aV 


Ol 


<N 






■^ 


IN 


c^ 




'^ 






■^ 


'"' 


IN 




01 




2 ^ 






































a-3 






































■*l-5 






































>. 


00 


o 


-* 


^ 


t- 


(N 


01 


t- 


tC 


in 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o> 


<N 


o> 


t- 




00 




^^ 


to 


00 


O 


■* 


<D 


CO 


>ra 


a> 


■* 


00 








CD 


QO 


a 


CO 


^ 


^ 


o 




o 






CO 


CO 


X5 


o 


CO 








•* 


(N 


>H 








































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


-* 


00 


<J> 


a> 


00 


ira 


CO 


00 


o> 


00 


o 






^< 


«5 


OJ 


f-H 


CO 


s; 


t- 


o 


t- 


en 


Oi 


,-^ 


C-I 


00 


oo 








































o 








































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


•^ 


o> 


-t 


>o 


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00 


o 


IN 


o> 


t> 


T-H 




—4 


(N 


r'l 










t^ 








00 




^ 








eo 












^ 






-* 


•"I" 






IN 


CO 


IN 


-t 


« 








































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


t- 


•* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


>o 


CO 


*^ 




(N 




t^ 




o 






















CD 




o 














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11 


CO 




(N 


<N 






CO 




o. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


00 


o 


oo 


00 


^ 


M 


00 


oo 


o 


CO 


O) 


cq 


t^ 


ro 


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-* 


CO 


tK 


CO 


Ir- 


Oi 


^ 


t- 


Ol 


o> 


.o 


lO 














cq 




CO 


(N 


I^ 


IN 






IN 


o> 


IN 


CO 




02 








































o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


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o 


^ 


(N 


CO 


CO 


o 


^^ 


^ 




r~. 






CD 


t^ 
















,—1 






C4 


^ 










































<J 








































o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


^ 


o 


l-H 


a> 


eo 


lO 


^ 


t- 




rH 


en 


o 


o> 




,— ( 


00 


t^ 


c» 


IM 


lO 


o 


t. 


oo 


CO 


CO 


















(N 


(M 


l-H 








CO 






IN 


rH 






'^ 








































O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


rH 


00 


,_ 


CD 


QO 


IN 


CO 


U5 




■* 


Tj" 


t- 


CO 


'M 




ai 






~jt 


o> 




CO 


,_, 










•-3 


« 






M 


<M 


ta 


(N 


C-1 




CO 






<M 


CO 
















































O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


00 


<M 


J_ 


o> 


a> 


CD 


o 


o 


« 


es 


•* 


t- 


t^ 


o 


•* 


CO 


en 


CO 


»c 


CO 


<N 


,^ 




o 






t^ 










<N 


CO 




(N 


US 


CO 


CO 




00 




>o 










1^ 
































IN 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


_, 


IN 


•!> 


J_ 


o 


J_ 


CO 


CO 


'7^ 


a> 


CD 


•* 


-* 


00 


^1 


t^ 


CO 


00 


t-. 


CO 


o 


t. 








ta 


PO 


p. 
<1 












CO 


o> 




CO 




c^ 


o 


OJ 








o> 
























c^ 
















JS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


00 


^ 


M 


a> 


■^ 


CO 


la 


w 


o 


^ 


QO 


o 


o 


rq 


CO 






o 




t^ 


■<(< 


^^ 




1^ 


oo 




ss 


a 




■* 






to 












a> 








oo 


IN 


00 






































^ 








































o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


00 


o 


00 


■* 


o> 


o> 


CO 


es 


js 


,_( 








^ 


»o 


o 


*4< 




t^ 








IN 


a:> 




CD 


■o 












a> 


o> 


(M 


CO 




CO 












CO 




lO 


fa 








































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


05 


o 


U5 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


o> 


a 


t« 


,^ 


CO 


,_t 








o 




,_, 


rsj 


o 


o 


33 


t^ 


CD 


^ 


t^ 




-* 




Tf 


>o 








CO 




CO 




c^ 






CO 






-* 


•-5 






































K 






































< 






































H 






































h 








































CO 


^ 


1-1 


CD 


t- 








^ 




CO 


^ 


■o 


CO 


f_ 


oo 


o> 


o 












































s 










22 


00 


00 


rt 




s 


52 










rt 



Engineering Department. 



103 



00 CO rH 



C^ C-1 CO CI 



Tf <D Oi i-< 



^. CO 00 c^ 



Oi M irS rH 



C^ <M 0> (N 



CI CO IM W 






r-i r- CO 



C^CO(MC0(M(MC^C4 



<0 O 00 CO r-* 



o 


^ 


^ 


CO 


■* 


lO 


CO 


00 


^ 


^_, 


'* 


CO 


(N 


Oi 


o 


00 


00 


t. 


CO 


CO 


t— 


-* 


o 


t-. 


13 


t-. 








t^ 


J^ 
















rH 




■^ 




CO 




<n 




(N 


(N 


I-H 


I-H 


s 


to 


oo 


OS 


>o 


(_ 


o 


o 


■M 


a> 


c» 


00 


^ 


o 


o 


00 


o> 


^ 


Ol 


■M 


T-H 


t. 


o 


CO 


OJ 


,_i 


c* 






t— 








UO 














^ 






CO 






CO 








:o 


CO 

o 



00 


« 


^ 


I-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


O) 


__, 


la 


J_ 


00 


m 


Ol 


^ 


^ 


o> 


CO 


»^ 


CO 


'rft 


.M 


^w 




00 






o 


>o 


CD 


ITS 




























t- 








































8 


o> 


^ 


o 


00 


05 


t_ 


o> 


o 


o 


■o 


05 


CO 


»- 


^ 


t- 


-* 


•* 


22 


00 


CO 


>o 


CO 


« 


,_, 


M 


>-o 


.^ 






*ra 


^^ 


O"* 






























































" 






(N 




CO 


o> 


CO 


o> 


CO 


^ 


(N 


CO 


00 


o 


t~ 


T1" 


a> 


o 


^ 


« 


(N 


(N 


S 


o 


lO 


rl4 


t^ 


o 


1^ 


^ 


30 


00 


CO 


p4 


00 


o 




















o 






'^ 




CO 


o 


CO 


-f 






r^ 



i-H 05 rl 



^ 


CD 


C^ 


i-O 


o 


o 


00 


<o 


O 


CO 


^ 


r»i 


S 


CD 


CO 


o 


t^ 


<N 


IM 


CO 


CD 




(M 








CO 






cq 


00 


00 


o> 


CO 




CO 


-^ 


r-i 


lO 



104 



City Document No. 10. 



>. • 


o 


o> 


^ 










f^ 


>c 


O 


o 


xO 


lO 


in 


in 


in 


o 


O 


in 


in 


o 






lo 
















































M 




•* 


<c 




to 


(M 


























IM 


rH 


t- 


in 


i-. 


t-. 


»n 


t^ 




ic 




■^ 


o 


rH 


us 


CO 


CO 


rH 


f-H 


IM 


-^ 


IM 












o >. 






r-t 








































rH 


a-3 
















































^^ 




























































^ 








>e 


ire 


in 


in 


in 




O 




















to 


















Tji 


to 


















IM 








■^ 




O 


o 


■^1 


•-H 


1— 1 




t— 


r^ 






t^ 


^1 








oo 










00 




lO 








J-^ 








(M 


t~ 


CO 


to 




t— 








f-t 












E-i 


■* 


■^ 


'I- 


U5 


•^ 


CO 




CO 














-* 




Til 


•* 


m 


CO 




to 


TX 










^ 


^ 


00 


00 


to 


o 


O 


o 


in 


o 


m 


o 




in 


lO 


























































(R 




00 




CO 


oo 


OJ 










es 


CO 




T-l 


CO 






00 


00 


CO 




to 


Q 


O 


CO 


o 


to 


■* 


IM 


CO 


c^ 


CO 


U3 


<M 


Tf 


CO 


in 


CO 


in 


CO 


" 


^ 


■* 


CO 


t- 


CO 














in 


__l 


^ 


o 


O 






o 




o 


„ 


„ 












,n 


^ 






















































o 






o 




CO 




O 




to 




IM 


IM 


o 








to 






iz; 


•* 


lO 


to 


t- 


tJ 


""^ 


•* 


'"' 


r~t 


C, 


to 


-* 


(M 


" 


to 


'^ 


CO 


lO 


(M 


CO 


to 


to 

00 


tji 






^ 


>o 


1^ 












o 


lO 


in 


in 


o 


in 














^ 


^ 


















































"S 


00 




U5 


-* 






Ol 


o 


to 


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o 






a> 


IM 


in 


00 


T^ 


O 




to 






o 


■* 


IM 


CO 


to 


o 


CO 


eq 


(M 


o 


IM 


>» 


CO 


IM 


" 


" 


o 


CO 


" 


"^ 


in 


o 


in 


•<ji 












00 




^ 


^ 


o 


iO 


U5 


lO 


o 


in 


in 


o 


o 


o 


>o 


in 


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Engineering Department. 



105 





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106 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XXII. 

Percentage of Rainfall collected on Sudbury-river Water-shed, 
1875 to 1895. 



Tear. 


3 

1 




i 


< 


1 


a 


»-5 


3 


< 


C 

to 

a 
I 

3) 
CD 


1 
2 

o 

O 


a 

I 


lU 

s 

<» 

% 
o 


a 

3> 


11 

o s 

a^ 


1875. . . 


7.6 


76.5 


76.5 


162.9 


59.5 


24.0 


16.0 


12.8 


10.4 


23.8 


46.5 


110.7 


44.9 


16.0 


1876. 






62.7 


54.2 


106.5 


135.4 


73.5 


18.8 


3.6 


42.0 


6.9 


18.6 


32.6 


22.3 


48.2 


10.1 


1877 






36.5 


206.9 


102.7 


120.3 


67.0 


42.5 


12.2 


5.9 


31.9 


13.2 


42.2 


26i.4 


57.9 


11.7 


1878 






57.3 


66.5 


133.4 


48.5 


260.2 


22.5 


7.7 


12.2 


21.5 


14.3 


41.6 


89.0 


52.6 


12.9 


1879 






50.4 


77.4 


80.9 


114.1 


125.8 


18.8 


7.1 


10.8 


12.9 


15.6 


13.2 


19.0 


45.3 


10.3 


1880 






56.0 


74.9 


73.9 


65.0 


50.0 


14.2 


5.0 


5.3 


8.6 


4.8 


19.9 


11.0 


31.9 


5.4 


1881 






13.3 


53.6 


124.6 


133.4 


49.0 


42.8 


21.0 


19.4 


13.0 


11.2 


16.7 


34.9 


46.6 


15.4 


1882 






37.2 


85.2 


191.2 


82.1 


45.5 


54.9 


8.7 


5.9 


6.0 


25.7 


31.5 


24.5 


45.9 


9.2 


1883 






21.2 


43.0 


161.4 


126.3 


40.0 


21.6 


7.7 


19.1 


10.4 


5.9 


19.5 


9.7 


34.1 


7.9 


1884 






34.9 


72.5 


143.1 


111.8 


53.0 


20.9 


10.9 


9.8 


8.9 


6.0 


11.4 


31.9 


50.5 


9.3 


1885 






46.8 


56.4 


262.1 


86.9 


68.4 


25.7 


7.8 


6.0 


14.7 


11.8 


33.3 


77.0 


43.4 


8.9 


1886 






40.9 


123.2 


101.7 


151.1 


42.9 


23.9 


6.3 


4.1 


7.0 


8.0 


25.0 


36.6 


49.5 


6.2 


1887 






88.8 


95.3 


104.4 


106.0 


154.5 


26.9 


5.5 


7.2 


14.5 


12.0 


23.8 


29.6 


56.7 


8.5 


1888 






45.3 


88.3 


95.9 


188.3 


60.3 


28.7 


14.9 


10.9 


23.2 


71.4 


65.9 


100.6 


62.2 


30.4 


1889 






92.4 


116.4 


100.9 


71.4 


53.3 


40.3 


12.6 


61.2 


30.9 


51.6 


63.3 


127.3 


58.2 


33.2 


1890 






88.4 


70.3 


84.0 


122.3 


46.8 


48.3 


7.8 


6.1 


13.2 


38.6 


174.7 


33.5 


50.9 


23.1 


1891 






76.7 


107.3 


122.7 


106.0 


51.7 


18.9 


7.8 


6.1 


14.7 


9.8 


17.0 


26.3 


55.8 


8.9 


1892 






57.0 


50.1 


85.9 


181.1 


40.2 


26.8 


9.0 


11.3 


13.9 


19.2 


20.7 


76.9 


39.3 


11.8 


1893 






26.4 


30.3 


157.7 


101.7 


77.8 


31.9 


11.0 


5.9 


10.8 


9.7 


25.1 


29.2 


45.2 


8.6 


1894 






30.2 


40.8 


278.2 


82.9 


35.4 


62.6 


8.8 


18.4 


9.8 


12.5 


42.1 


26.5 


40.7 


12.0 


1895 






45.4 


62.5 


144.2 


82.7 


56.1 


10.8 


8.2 


9.9 


6.7 


23.0 


72.4 


94.9 


47.8 


15.5 


Totals . 


1015.4 


1651.6 


2731.9 


2380.2 


1510 9 


625.8 


199.6 


290.3 


289.9 


406.7 


828.4 


1275.8 


1007.6 


275.3 


Avei 


H 


;es, 


48.4 


78.6 


130.1 


113.3 


71.9 


29.8 


9.5 


13.8 


13.8 


19.4 


39.4 


60.8 


.48.0 


13.1 



Engineering Department, 



107 








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108 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XXIV. 

Rainfall collected, in Inches, on Mystic Water-shed, 1878 to 1895. 



Yeak. 


u 
a 

§ 
•-3 


>> 

u 
C9 

3 
u 


ci 


P< 
< 


>> 


>-5 




3 
3 


u 

a 
s 
p. 

m 


o 
o 
O 


0) 

s 

12! 


C 

a 

a 

(S 

a 
V 



1 
Eh 


O 3 


1878. . . 




3.55 


3.97 


4.91 


2.21 


2.16 


0.78 


0.48 


1.11 


0.56 


0.71 


1.75 


3.63 


25.82 


2.86 


1879 








1.-2] 


2.33 


3.31 


3.97 


1.95 


0.97 


0.54 


0.70 


0.48 


0.34 


0.45 


0.69 


16.94 


2.06 


1880 










1.70 


2.54 


1.95 


1.50 


0.96 


0.51 


0.67 


0.54 


0.45 


0.36 


0.44 


0.59 


12.21 


2.02 


1881 










0.82 


2.14 


6.79 


2.17 


1.51 


2.05 


0.87 


0.35 


0.31 


0.29 


0.50 


0.87 


18.67 


1.82 


1882 










1.37 


3.03 


4.19 


1.16 


1.85 


0.81 


0.35 


0.22 


0.53 


0.58 


0.39 


0.57 


15.05 


1.68 


1883 










0.70 


1.43 


1.8S 


1.63 


1.20 


0.52 


0.30 


0.22 


0.18 


0.39 


0.42 


0.44 


9.31 


1.09 


1884 










1.49 


3.89 


5.42 


3.85 


1.48 


0.85 


0.58 


0.60 


0.23 


0.27 


0.35 


1.17 


20.18 


1.68 


1885 










1.79 


1.81 


2.05 


2.03 


2.18 


0.86 


0.47 


0.54 


0.34 


0.68 


2.41 


2.39 


17.55 


2.03 


1886 










2.31 


7.70 


3.91 


3.24 


1.27 


0.55 


0.41 


0.25 


0.32 


0.38 


0.88 


1.43 


22.65 


1.36 


1887 










3.16 


3.61 


3.60 


3.75 


1.89 


1.27 


0.87 


1.35 


0.48 


0.57 


0.71 


0.91 


22.17 


3.27 


1888 










1.43 


3.32 


4.28 


3.27 


2.88 


0.84 


0.39 


0.54 


1.31 


2.74 


5.04 


5.08 


31.12 


4.98 


1889 










4.51 


1.83 


1.60 


2.27 


2.18 


1.89 


1.33 


2.05 


1.06 


1.21 


2.49 


3.06 


25.48 


5.65 


1890 










2.07 


2.23 


5.37 


2.93 3.00 


1.92 


0.43 


0.46 


0.58 


2.61 


1.95 


2.49 


26.04 


4.08 


1891 










6.29 


5.97 


7.21 


3.43 1.40 

1 


1.01 


0.42 


0.44 


0.42 


0,58 


0.56 


0.87 


28.60 


1.86 


1892 










2.49 


1.76 


3.03 


l.Ssl 2.10 


1.17 


0.66 


0.49 


0.56 


0.45 


1.07 


0.87 


15.98 


2.16 


1893 










0.75 


2.14 


4.52 


2.72 


4.42 


1.04 


0.47 


0.69 


0.41 


0.55 


0.71 


1.27 


19.69 


2.12 


1894 










1.37 


1.87 


3.05 


2.27 


1.31 


0.91 


0.49 


0.38 


0.36 


0.58 


0.91 


0.90 


14.40 


1.81 


1895 










1.50 


0.81 


3.12 


2.70 


1.31 


0.50 


0.55 


0.77 


0.32 


1.43 


2.34 


2.08 


17.43 


3.07 


Totals 






38.61 


52.38 


70.19 


46.43 


35^)5 


18.45 


10.28 


11.70 


8.90 


14.72 


23.37 


29.31 


359.29 


45.60 


Am 


ei 


as 


'6 


3 . . 


2.14 


2.91 


3.90 


2.58 


1.95 


1.03 


0.57 


0.65 


0.49 


0.82 


1.30 


1.63 


19.96 


2.53 



Engineering Department. 



109 



TABLE XXV. 

Percentage of Waterfall collected at Mystic Water-shed, 1878 to 1895. 



Year. 


a 


03 

3 




a, 
< 


a 




"a 


3 
bo 
3 
<1 


u 

B 

CO 


Hi 

2 

o 

O 


a) 

> 
1 


C 

(V 

a 




i9 

ai-s 


1878 . 






62.6 


69.2 


125.0 


38.6 


322.9 


29.6 


13.5 


14.8 


17.7 


14.3 


30.8 


74.9 


47.8 


14.9 


1879 . 






66.6 


85.4 


93.9 


85.3 


104.9 


24.5 


22.6 


12.8 


2977 


44.2 


16.2 


18.6 


48.0 


20.1 


1880 . 






64.9 


60.1 


78.4 


68.8 


47.3 


34.3 


9.2 


14.7 


31.7 


13.5 


22.9 


23.8 


35.5 


13.5 


1881 . 






14.2 


58.9 


101.5 


141.1 


50.7 


29.9 


33.3 


51.9 


14.1 


13.6 


14.3 


26.3 


44.5 


23.9 


1882 . 






24.8 


64.8 


168.4 


55.0 


40.4 


38.6 


14.9 


20.8 


6.3 


30.0 


22.2 


25.5 


38.4 


12.3 


1883 . 






26.1 


46.7 


84.8 


65.9 


33.5 


31.8 


10.8 


25.7 


12.1 


7.2 


21.1 


14.7 


29.8 


10.3 


1884 . 






31.5 


63.9 


127.3 


121.2 


50.2 


18.3 


15.5 


12.4 


33.5 


9.9 


17.4 


25.6 


45.5 


14.0 


1885 . 






37.1 


53.3 


174.5 


58.8 


55.3 


19.6 


22.8 


9.2 


23.7 


12.2 


38.2 


113.6 


39.4 


13.6 


1886 . 






36.6 


107.3 


101.9 


154.3 


43.0 


35.5 


11.1 


7.8 


10.7 


13.4 


21.7 


29.7 


49.7 


10.7 


1887 . 






60.2 


80.8 


72.0 


81.3 


112.0 


47.3 


13.2 


27.1 


32.0 


18.7 


23.4 


25.6 


47.8 


20.3 


1888 . 






35.2 


101.3 


82.5 


115.2 


56.6 


38.1 


17.5 


8.8 


15.3 


55.3 


73.6 


96.4 


54.8 


22.7 


1889 . 






81.8 


98.2 


70.2 


63.0 


46.9 


57.0 


15.8 


52.2 


22.5 


33.7 


44.1 


107.0 


.50.6 


27.3 


1890 . 






75.6 


66.0 


80.4 


121.8 


47.6 


56.9 


19.0 


12.7 


15.6 


29.5 


141.2 


53.5 


52.8 


22.1 


1891 . 






100.7 


117.0 


118.7 


109.0 


57.0 


22.8 


13.3 


11.3 


19.3 


12.1 


21.7 


25.6 


60.3 


13.3 


1892 . 






55.0 


58.5 


75.7 


163.6 


37.5 


28.3 


25.7 


10.2 


27.7 


24.3 


23.1 


75.2 


40.9 


19.2 


1893 . 






33.3 


28.6 


177.3 


80.7 


70.6 


49.5 


23.2 


12.6 


20.5 


13.4 


31.5 


29.1 


44.5 


15.6 


1894 . 






34.8 


56.5 


280.1 


65.4 


25.3 


125.8 


14.2 


15.1 


14.3 


10.5 


26.0 


22.7 


36.7 


12.9 


1895 . 






42.4 


123.4 


103.9 


64.7 


41.5 


13.7 


12.8 


14.1 


15.7 


14.0 


37.3 


90.7 


35.8 


13.9 


Totals 




883.4 


1340.5 


2116.5 


1653.7 


1243.2 


701.5 


308.4 


331.2 


362.4 


369.8 


626.7 


878.5 


802.8 


300.6 


Averages . 


49.1 


74.5 


117.6 


91.9 


69.1 


39.0 


17.1 


18.6 


20.1 


20.5 


34.8 


48.8 


44.6 


16.7 



110 



City Document No. 10. 






•-I Ci 

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112 



City Document No. 10. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 
REPORT FOR 1895. 



Boston Water Works, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, supplies 
also the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett. 

Population by census of 1895 : 

Boston ......... 

Chelsea ........ 

Somerville ........ 

Everett 



496,920 
31,264 
52,200 
18,573 

598,957 



Total 

Date of construction : 

Cochituate Works 1848 

Mystic 1864 

By whom owned. — Cit}^ of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and Mystic 

lake. 
Mode of supply. — Sixty-five per cent, from gravity works. 
Thirty-five " " pumping " 





Pumping. 


Builder of pumping ma- 
chinery 


Cochituate. Mystic. 

Holly Mfg. Co. H. R. Worthington 
and Quintard and C F. Blake 




Iron Works. Mfg. Co. 


Description of coal used : 
a Kind 


Bituminous. Bituminous. 


c Size . . . . 


Broken. Broken. 


e Price per gross ton, 
in bins . 


$4.27, $3.92^, $3.63, $3.59, 
$3.90. $3.34. 


/Per cent, of ash, 


10.2 10.9 




CocHiTUATB. Mystic. 


Coal consumed for year, in 


libs. . 4,866,806 8,121,000 



Total pumpage for year, in 
gallons ..... 

Gallons pumped per lb. of coal . 

Cost of pumping figured on 
pumping-station expenses, 
viz. :..... 

Cost per million gallons raised 
to reservoir .... 



4,165,789,530 3,455,822,700 
855.9 425.5 



$31,566.85 

$7.58 



$30,569.07 

$8.84 



Engineering Department. 



113 





Consumption. 








COCHITUATE. 


Mystic. 


Estimated population 


, 


487,000 


113,700 


Estimated number of consumers 


483,500 


112,500 


Total consumption, gallons 


. 18,542,416,600 


3,455,460,300 


Passed through meters 


. 


4,410,825,000 


768,600,000 


Percentage metered . 


. 


23.8 


22.2 


Average daily consumpti 


on, gal 


- 




Ions 


. 


50,801,100 


9,467,000 


Gallons per day, each 


inhabi 


- 




tant 


. 


104.3 


83.3 


Gallons per day, each consumer 


, 105.0 


84.1 


Gallons per day to each 


tap 


716.7 


392.5 




Distribution. 






Mains. 








COCHITDATE. 


Mystic. 


Kind of pipe used 


■[ 


n^cir T..^„ Cast-iron, Wrought- 
Cast-lron. ^ j n i. 
Iron, and Cement. 


Sizes .... 




48 in. to 4 in. 


30 in. to 3 in. 


Extended, miles , 




23.1 


4.9 


Total now in use . 




595.9 


178.6 


Distribution-pipes less 


than 






4 in., length, miles . 




2.2 


4.3 


Hydrants added . 




242 


97 


Hydrants now in use . 




6,459 


1,543 


Stop-gates added 




289 


147 


Stop-gates now in use . 




6,648 


2,285 




Services. 




Kind of pipe used 


I_ 


Lead. 


Lead and 
Wrought-Irou. 


Sizes .... 




1 in. to 6 in. 


^ in. to 4 in. 


Extended, feet . 




53,192 


20,524 


Service-taps added 




2,323 


863 


Total now in use 




70,879 


24,120 


Meters added 




61 


10 


Meters now in use 




4,398 


504 


Motors and elevators in 


use . 


512 


21 



114 City Document No. 10. 



C. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

The work of extending the Improved Sewerage System 
has been continued as fast as the limited appropriation would 
admit, and the following is a brief review of the work done 
during the past year : 

The condition of the appropriation on February 1, 1896, 
was as follows : 

Net appropriation $6,375,404 96 

Total expenditures 6,341,262 08 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1896 . $34,142 88 

The following is a report of the work done : 

Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 

During the past year the Dorchester intercepting sewer 
has been constructed to Central avenue, thus completing the 
extension of the Improved Sewerage System ordered by the 
City Government in 1889. The further extension of this 
sewer up the valley of the Xeponset will be built by the 
State under the direction of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission. The work during the year has been carried 
on entirely by day labor under the superintendence of H. J. 
White. 

Section 9 was completed early in the 3'^ear. 

Section 11 was finished in September. This section ex- 
tends from Washington street through Baker's court and 
through private land bordering on the Neponset river, to 
Central avenue, a distance of 1,393 feet. At the beginning 
of the section the size of the sewer is reduced from 3 feet X 
4 feet, egg-shaped, to 2 feet 4 inches x 3 feet 6 inches, 
egg-shaped" At Washington street the grade of the invert 
is about 8 feet above Boston city base. A rise of 3.8 feet in 
40 feet is here made in the grade, after which the inclination 
is 1 in 313 for 900 feet, then 1 in 250 to Central avenue 
where the invert is about 17 feet above Boston city base. 

The excavation in this section was largely in rock, and 
the construction presented some difficulty owing to the 
proximity of Baker's Mill pond, the centre line of the sewer 



Engineering Department. 115 

beinsx within a few feet of the pond, while its invert was 
from four to .six feet below the water level of the pond. A 
careful use of explosives prevented any considerable loss of 
water. As a precaution against future leakage from the 
pond two substantial bulkheads of l)rick were built encircling 
the sewer, cutting off the underdrains and extending entirely 
across the trench up to the surface of the ground. A flush- 
ing manhole, with a suitable gate, was built at the foot of 
Baker's court, and an inlet manhole was constructed nine 
hundred feet above it : the latter is connected with Baker's 
]Mill pond by a 12-inch pipe fitted with a Chapman valve; 
the facilities for flushing are excellent. The contract for 
furnishing bricks for this section was awarded to Parry Bros. 
& Co., the lowest bidders, for $9.90 per M. ; it was satis- 
factorily completed. 

By the construction of the Dorchester intercepting sewer 
an outlet to Moon island is provided for that portion of the 
sewage of Dorchester which would otherwise pollute the 
Neponset river below Central avenue ; the drainage of a 
large part of the town of Milton can be cared for in this 
way if desired. 

Neponset Intercepting Sewer. 

On September 25, 1895, the following order of the Board 
of Aldermen was approved : 

"Whereas, It is here adjudged to be necessary for the 
pul)lic convenience and the public health of the city of Boston 
to continue and extend the improved sewerage system of the 
city of Boston, as shown on the plan hereinafter mentioned, 
it is therefore 

" Ordered, That intercepting sewers, in continuance and 
extension of the Improved Sewerage System of the city of 
Boston, be laid and constructed in the streets and places 
sul)stantially as shown and indicated by dotted red lines 
on a plan dated January, 1895, and marked " City of Boston, 
Engineering Department, Plan of a Part of Dorchester, 
showing Route of Proposed Neponset Intercepting Sewer, 
William Jackson, City Engineer," and that the City Engineer 
be and hereby is directed to lay and construct the same, 
and that the expenses thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Improved Sewerage." 

In December last the Avork authorized by the above order 
was begun and 420 feet of 18-inch pipe, reinforced by con- 
crete, have been laid in Chickatawbut street and Neponset 
avenue ; the average cutting for this distance was 22 feet. 
The proposed Neponset system consists entirely of pipe 



116 City Document No. 10. 

sewers. The flow in the common sewers now discharo-ingr 
into the iSeponset river at Xeponset avenue and Ericsson 
street will be intercepted and carried back to the Dorchester 
intercepting sewer, with which connection is made in Chicka- 
tawbut street at Narragansett. The grades established are 
necessarily flat, but an ample supply of salt water is available 
for flushing. The present sewer outlets will be utilized as 
storm overflows, and suitable tide-gates will be provided. 

The necessity for additional overflows from the Dorchester 
intercepting sewer, to operate in periods of heavy rain when 
the sewage is very much diluted, is apparent, and their 
necessity will be further emjjhasized when the Neponset 
system is constructed and the main sewer is extended up the 
valleys of the Neponset and Mother brook to West Roxbury. 

During the month of September work on improved sewer- 
age construction was suspended and the force of men assisted 
in laying the 42-inch high-service main for the Water Depart- 
ment. In October and November they were employed at 
Highland park. 



Engineering Department. 117 



D. 

[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE BOARD OF 
PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

The construction of the driveways from ArlinsTton street to 
Beacon street was completed so late in the season of 1894 
that it was necessary to do considerable work in the spring 
to put them in proper condition. 

A drain was built from near the Ericsson statue to the 
covered channel of Stony brook to take the surface water 
from that portion of the avenue between Massachusetts 
avenue and Charlesgate East, and the old catch-basins which 
were formerly drained by the leaching of the water through 
the ground were connected with this drain. 

A cross-walk has been laid across the avenue at Kenmore 
street. 

The plantations, where they abut on the cross-streets, 
have been graded so as to turn the water from them and the 
central path into the gutters, in order to prevent its flowing 
across the sidewalks. 

In the summer the trees were badly infested with the 
Orgyia leucostig?na, or tussock moth, and a number of boys 
were employed for the purpose of destroying the cocoons 
and eggs of the first brood of the moths. The caterpillar 
hatched from the eggs laid the previous fall completes its 
work of destruction in June, and then spins its cocoon in 
crevices of the bark of trees or other sheltered spots ; the 
moth emerges about the twenty-first of June, and lays its 
egg upon the surface of the cocoon ; the eggs hatch in a few 
weeks, and a second brood of caterpillars attacks the foliage 
of the trees ; these, in turn, go through the various stages 
of development and deposit their eggs in the same manner 
as before ; these eggs do not hatch until the following 
spring. The eggs can be readily found and easily destroyed 
when the trees are free from foliage. The work which was 
done in July and August was much more diflicult than it 
would have been if done in the winter, but it was very 
satisfactory, and very little damage was done by the second 
brood of caterpillars, and very few of the eggs can now be 
found. The trees will be thoroughly examined during the 
coming month, and all eggs found destroyed, so that there 



118 City Document No. 10. 

will probably be little damage done l^y this insect during 
the next summer. 

The Fens. 

The bridge over the Boston and Albany railroad on 
Charleso-ate" West having settled so as to interfere with 
traffic on the railroad, it was closed to travel in May ; the 
bridge superstructure was raised 17 to 20 inches, and the 
abutments and adjoining retaining walls were built up to 
the new grade, the sidewalks and driveway on the approaches 
were brought up to grade and resurfaced, and the curbstones 
reset. 

A portion of the drive and walks adjoining Fen bridge, 
which had settled so that they were not properly drained, 
were raised and resurfaced. 

Stone seats and a curbing have been built around the 
foundation of the John Boyle O'Reilly statue on the triangu- 
lar area at the junction of Boylston entrance with the Fen- 
way. The foundation for the monument was built 1894. 

RlVERWAY. 

Drives^ Rides, and Walks. — The only work under this 
head during the year has been the surfacing of that portion 
of Audubon road between Brookline avenue and the Boston 
and Albany railroad. This has been completed, with the 
exception of the lioundary walk and a part of the walk near 
the administration building. Granite steps have been built, 
leading from the walk to the entrance to the building. 

Wall. — Ninety-five lineal feet of retaining wall have been 
built between Longwood avenue and Park street on the line 
of the parkway, connecting two sections of wall previously 
built. 

Leverett Park. 

Walks. — All of the walks except those on the hill north 
of Ward's pond have been finished. 

Walls and Fences. — The walls on Perkins street were 
pointed in the spring, and an iron fence 261 feet in length 
was built on top of the wall on the easterly side of Chestnut 
street. 

Miscellaneous. — A temporary boat-landing was built on 
Leverett pond. Repairs have been made to the pumping- 
station building and machinery, and a new drain built from 
the pump-well. A sewer has been built by the Street De- 
partment from Pond avenue through the park drive to 
Castleton street, and a branch is now being built from 
Castleton street to Perkins street. 

The grounds prepared for planting in 1894 have been 
planted or seeded, but much remains to be done. 



Engineering Department. 119 

Jamaica Park. 

Boating Service. — Three temporary boat-landings have 
been built ; the permanent landing near Pond street was 
floored over with plank and a canvas-covered shelter built 
upon it. A wire was laid underground from Centre street 
to the boat-landing, for the purpose of supplying electric 
current to the electric launches, two of which were put 
into service in July. A large numlier of row-boats and 
canoes were also put into service at the same time. 

Refectory. — The Perkins mansion, while in process of 
reconstruction for use as a refectory, was burned on 
March 5th. Nearly the whole of the interior and the roof 
were destroyed, but the walls were not materially injured. 
New plans were at once prepared by the architects, Messrs. 
Wheelwright and Haven, and the work is now nearing com- 
pletion. A sewer is being built to connect the building 
with the sewer in Jamaicaway at Perkins street. 

Miscellaneous. — A short flight of steps has been built on 
the walk leading from the northerly end of the pond to 
Jamaicaway. 

Repairs have been made to the gate-house and to the con- 
duit across Perkins street. 

Arborway. 
No work has been done except at the crossing of the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford railroad, where the railroad 
company have begun the erection of the bridge which is to 
carry the railroad over the parkway and Morton street. 

About 350 feet of water-pipe on the line of pipe leading 
from Jamaica pond to Franklin Park has been laid at the 
above crossing. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

The boundary wall on Centre and Walter streets has been 
finished, and the walls and posts for a gateway at the Forest 
Hills entrance have been built. 

Plans are being prepared for a stone-crushing plant to be 
located on the reservation in the extension of the Arboretum, 
south of Bussey street. 

West Roxbury Parkway. 

Considerable work was done on the topographical survey 
in the early part of the year, but it was discontinued on 
account of the press of other work. Work on the survey 
has, however, been recently resumed. 

The exterior lines of the Parkway have all been marked 
on the ground by stone bounds. 



120 City Document No. 10. 



Franklin Park. 

Forest HilU Entrance. — The bridge, which was nearly 
finished a year ago, and described in the last report, has 
been entirely completed. The drains have all been built, 
and a portion of the drive surfaced. The ledge at the 
junction with Circuit drive has been removed. 

Seaver Street. — The walks and slopes on the park side 
of the street have been finished, and trees have been planted 
on the northerly side of the street. The road from opposite 
Elm Hill avenue to the westerly end of the Greeting has 
been completed. 

Refectory. — This building, begun in 1894, is not yet 
finished, but it is expected that it will be early in the spring. 
The wall supporting the terrace in front of the building was 
finished early in the year. The drive leading to the re- 
fectory from the Greeting is nearly sub-graded, and a wall 
is being built on the westerly side of it. 

Water Supply. — Water-pipes have been laid from Forest 
Hills street to the reservoir on Hagborne hill. There yet 
remain about 4,000 feet of pipe to be laid on Arborway to 
complete the line from Jamaica pond to the reservoir. 

The reservoir is completed and ready for use. It is en- 
tirely below the original surface of the ground, and was 
excavated chiefly in rock, the bottom resting entirely on 
rock. This would have made the cost of the reservoir ex- 
cessively high, except for the fact that the excavation served 
as a quarry, from which material for road surfacing was 
obtained. Inasmuch as the level of the water in the reser- 
voir could not well be kept at a constant height, and its 
appearance, if exposed, would be unsightly, it was thought 
best to have it covered. 

The side walls are perpendicular, of American cement 
concrete, with a thickness nowhere less than one foot, the 
remaining space between the concrete and the ledge being 
filled with dry rubble. 

Brick piers, IG inches square and ten feet high, and 10 
feet apart, were built for supporting the roof. On these 
piers arched ribs of brick masonry were built, running 
lengthwise of the reservoir, the rise of the arches being 1 
foot, the span 9 feet 8 inches, the width 16 inches, and the 
thickness at the crown 8 inches ; the spandrells were levelled 
up to the top of the arches. The ribs, together with the 
side walls, serve as supports for the cylindrical arches, of 
which there are seven, running lengthwise of the reservoir; 
these latter arches are of Portland cement concrete, with a 
rise of one foot in a span of 8 feet 8 inches, and are 8 



Engineering Department. 121 

inches in thickness. Manholes were built in each longitudi- 
nal arch. 

Tlie bottom of the reservoir is covered with a layer of 
American cement concrete 6 inches thick. The liottom and 
the side walls were covered with a layer of Portland cement 
mortar ^ inch thick, and then the whole surface of the side 
walls, bottom, and piers were covered with two coats of 
pure cement wash. 

The top of the reservoir is covered with loam with a least 
depth of 2^ feet. 

The 10-inch force main, which also serves as a supply main, 
branches in a manhole just outside the reservoir and near one 
corner ; each branch is provided with a gate and check valve. 
The branch which supplies the reservoir enters about 6 inches 
above the bottom, and is carried diagonally across the reser- 
voir nearly to the farther corner, where it ends in a globe- 
shaped casting with an opening on top ; the pipe is supported 
on brick piers. The branch which serves for an outflow pipe 
passes under the bottom of the reservoir a short distance, 
and terminates with an opening at the level of the bottom ; it 
is embedded in concrete. 

At the northeasterly corner there is an outlet for draining 
the reservoir and an overflow ])ipe ; this outlet is connected 
with the drainage system of the park, so that by its use 
water can be supplied to the ponds in the park. 

The reservoir covers an area of 9,723 square feet, and has 
a capacity of 851,000 gallons, which is estimated to be a 
week's supply, in the driest time, for water-carts on the drive 
between the reservoir and Jamaica Park, and also for supply- 
ing the loss by evaporation from the ponds in Franklin Park. 

Overlook JBuilding. — Changes were made early in the 
year in the basement of this building in order to enlarge the 
women's lavatory about one-half. 

EJlicottdale and Cottage. — The cottage was opened in 
June, with a matron in charge, and was kept open until 
November 14. There were a great many visitors, and the 
dressing and bath rooms were largely used ])y tennis players. 

Tennis courts were laid out on the field, the department 
furnishing the poles and keeping the courts marked. The 
players provided their own nets, balls, and rackets, which 
they could check and leave in the cottage when not in use. 
The use of this ground is destined to be very popular. Its 
existence is not generally known, but it was no unusual sight 
during the past summer to see twenty courts occupied at one 
time. 

Miscellaneous. — A temporary boat-landing was built at 



122 City Document No. 10. 

Scarboro pond, and a boating-service was maintained here 
through the season. 

A donkey service was established for Sundays, and was 
very much enjoyed by the children. 

The number of sheep is now 221, there having been 82 
sold in the fall. 

Franklin Field. 

A wooden fence 767 feet in length has been built on the 
line between the park property and the cemetery on the 
easterly side. 

The only other work done during the year has been the 
caring for the grass. The turf has improved in condition 
generally, although there has been some settlement, due to 
the withdrawal of the water from the soil by the underdrains. 
Cracks also appeared in the turf; these and the low places 
have been filled. 

During the latter part of the season the new ground was 
used for baseball and football games. 

In October the first military parade occurred on this 
ground. Battery A of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia 
occupied a portion of the field on the occasion of its fall 
field-day. 

The water was turned on to the field on December 9, and 
the first skating was on December 14. 

Dorchester Park. 
No work has been done here during the year. 

Dorchesterway. 

No work of construction has been done here during the 
year by the Park Department. The Street Department has 
built a sewer on the southerly side of the parkway, between 
Pond street and Dorchester avenue. 

An arrangement was made with the Street Department by 
which that department kept the completed drive sprinkled 
during the season, the expense being charged to the Park 
Department. 

Strand WAY. 

Considerable work has lieen done in making surveys and 
plans for the construction of that portion of this parkway 
east of O street, but owing to the delay in determining the 
method of construction at the sites to be occupied by the 
yacht clubs, nothing further has been done. 



Engineering Department. 123 

Marine Park. 

Fillinri. — The work to be done under the contract with 
Williiiui L. Miller, dated July 27, 1894, was finished 
November 21. The total amount of filling done under this 
contract was 217,581 cubic yards, at 47 cents per cubic 
yard. 

Iron Pier. — The settlement of the filling has broken 
some of the columns at the shore end of the pier, so that it 
will be necessary to put new foundations under them. As 
but slight injury has been done to the superstructure, and 
the movement of the columns has nearly ceased, it will be 
well to delay the repairs until the movement has entirely 
stopped. 

Frequent measurements are being taken, and the structure 
is being carefully watched to see if any further damage 
occurs. 

Head House. — The building itself has been completed 
and turned over to the Department. Several minor con- 
tracts for laundry machinery, electrical machinery, and 
lighting fixtures are yet unfinished. 

Miscellaneous. — After the new building is occupied, 
there will be no further use for the old refectory building, 
and it should be removed and the grounds in its vicinity 
graded and planted. 

In June a floating theatre was allowed to be located 
alongside the Castle island bridge. It was maintained by a 
private company, and, having proved a financial failure, was 
removed on July 18. 

Range lights have been erected on the wooden pier by the 
United States Lighthouse Department, and an underground 
wire laid to them. 

A channel has been dredged from the west wharf at Castle 
island to deep water, for the benefit of the boating-service. 

The watering of the driveway was done throughout the 
season by the Street Department, at the expense of the Park 
Department, 

Public Park, North End. 

Surve3^s and plans have been made for the construction of 
a portion of this park. A contract was made on November 
4 with Trumbull and llyan for grading and building walls 
and drains on that portion of the park north of Commer- 
cial street for the sum of $41,752. This work is now in 
progress. 

Wood Island Park. 

The iron fence around the gymnasium ground, and the 
iron frames for supporting the gymnastic apparatus, were 



124 



City Document No. 10. 



completed late in the summer. The cost of this work was 
$2,923.25. 

The gymnastic apparatus was furnished and erected by the 
Narragansett jNIachine Company, of Providence, R.I., at a 
cost of $1,401.78. It consists of the following pieces : 



10 Sets of chest weights. 
10 Sets of breast bars. 

4 Vault bars. 

4 Horizontal l)ars, fixed up- 
rights. 

4 Sets flying rings. 
18 Travelling rings. 

2 Single trapezes. 

1 Triple trapeze. 

2 Stand swings. 
1 Wide ladder. 

1 Inclined ladder. 

2 Cross ladders. 

6 Tilting ladders. 

2 Single upright poles. 



2 Pairs upright poles, fixed 

18 and 16 inches apart. 
8 Climbing poles, swinging. 
8 Climbing ropes. 

3 Sets long inclined bars. 
2 Sets high parallel bars. 

1 Circular parallel. 

2 Giant strides. 
24 Iron quoits. 

3 16-lb. iron shots. 
2 56-lb. weights. 

2 Sets jumping standards. 

4 Vault poles. 

2 Double wire slides. 



Considerable grading was required in the gymnasium 
ground, and a cinder track 20 feet wide and one-fourth of a 
mile long was built around the grounds. A shed for chest 
weights, with lockers for small articles, and fences around 
the places for shot throwing and the cable slides have also 
been built. 

The gymnasium was opened on September 6. The attend- 
ance until the close of the season was 43,356. The appa- 
ratus was dismantled on January 4, and preparations made 
for skating, of which an account will be found under the 
general head of Skating. 

An area of the playground was covered with loam and 
sodded for use as a cricket ground. 

The gymnasium ground is very wet after a heavy rain, and 
should be underdrained during the coming spring. 



CHARLESTOT^^s^ Heights. 

The building has been provided with fixtures for lighting. 
It was opened on June 17, and closed for the winter on No- 
vember 14. A matron was in charge. 

During August, a class in kindergarten work was con- 
ducted under the direction of the Massachusetts Emergency 
and Hygiene Association. 



Engineering Department. 125 

Charlestown Playground. 

No work has been done here during the year except to 
care for the fiUina- done by the city teams and others. 
The area now tilled approximately to grade is 7.3 acres. 

Charlesbank. 

Men's Gymnasium. — The new building was occupied on 
September 30. It is 2\ stories. On the ground floor 
there is a large toilet-room for the public, a room for the use 
of the person in charge of the boating-service, a foreman's 
room, a workmen's room, and a room for the heater. On 
the second floor is an ofiice for the superintendent of the 
gymnasium, a large locker and dressing-room, containing 
196 lockers, a toilet-room, and a bath-room provided with 
6 shower-baths and other fixtures. 

The attic room is used as a store and work room. The 
building is lighted by electricity and is heated by hot water ; 
both hot and cold water are supplied to the toilet and bath 
rooms. The entrance to the gymnasium is through this 
building, and by a bridge from the second floor across the 
runnincj-track. Turn-stiles with a registerino^ attachment 
are placed at the entrance so that a record of the attendance 
can be kept. 

The gymnasium grounds were used for skatino; during; 
February, but were closed during March and April. They 
were opened May 1, and kept open until January 3, when 
the apparatus was dismantled and the gi'ounds flooded for 
skating. During the season the gymnasium was open on 197 
days, the total estimated attendance being about 200,000. 

During the year there were four accidents : three of these 
were while the gymnasium was in use, and were slight ; the 
fourth was during the skating season, a little girl having 
been quite severely injured while attempting to climb over 
the fence. 

Women's Gymnasium. — The enlargement of the build- 
ing was completed early in the season, and it was opened on 
May 15. 

The building has been doubled in size, and now contains 
on the first floor a general waiting-room, an office for the 
superintendent, a large dressing and locker room, contain- 
ing 124 lockers, toilet and bath-rooms, heater-room, fore- 
man's and workmen's rooms, and a store-shed. On the 
second floor there is a toilet-room for women, and a hall 
which is used for gymnastic exercises on stormy days. A 
full account of the work of the gymnasium during the year 



126 City Document No. 10. 

will he found in the report of the Massachusetts Emergency 
and Hygiene Association, which has charge of the work. 

jMisrellaneous. — A drain was l)uilt in the si)ring, connect- 
ing the women's building with the sewer in Charles street, 
the drainage having been previously discharged into the 
river. 

The grounds and walks are in good condition. 

The sea-wall needs pointing badly, and it should be done 
early in the next season. 

Skating. 

As during the past year the first attempt has been made 
on a large scale to maintain ice in a condition for skating, an 
account of the work done and the results obtained may, per- 
haps, be of interest. 

Heretofore, the appropriation for maintenance has been so 
small that very little could be done, and that only on the 
smaller o-rounds of Charlesbank and Wood Island Park. 

Preparations were made to keep the ice in good condition 
on the larger areas of Jamaica Pond and Franklin Field. 
During the skating season, a year ago, visits were made to 
Roger Williams Park, in Providence, R.I., Central Park, 
New York, and Prospect Park, Brooklyn, N.Y., and through 
the kindness of the superintendents of those parks much 
valuable information was obtained. We are also indebted 
to the Superintendent of South Park, Chicago, and the Su- 
perintendent of Parks of Minneapolis for their assistance. 

The work which we have done during the year was largely 
experimental, and therefore more expensive than is likely to 
be the case in the future to secure the same results. 

The only natural water surface or pond where the ice has 
been cared for is Jamaica pond, which has an area of 65 acres. 
This pond does not freeze over until quite late, so that the 
skating season is shorter here than at other grounds. If 
the ice forms to a considerable thickness before it becomes 
covered with snow, the work is much simpler than it is when, 
as was the case this year, there is a heavy snowfall while the 
ice is too thin to support horses ; the snow prevents the ice 
from forming, and the only resource is to make holes at fre- 
quent intervals ; the weight of the snow forces the water up 
through the ice ; the snow soon becomes saturated, and when 
frozen it is usually strong enough to support horses, but it 
is too rough for skating, chieiiy on account of the tracks 
made by the men when making the holes. It is therefore 
necessary to plane the ice. For this purpose a special ice- 
plane was purchased. It consists of a square frame or sled, the 
runners of which are adjustable in height with reference to 



Engineering Department. 127 

the Unite : the latter is lixed to the frame at right angles to 
the line of travel ; at the back there is a pair of handles by 
which a man can guide the plane, and there is also a seat for 
the driver. The plane cuts a width of 52 inches, and can 
be easily hauled b}^ two horses ; with it from 2^ to 3 acres can 
be planed in a working day. It leaves the ice with a very 
smooth surface. 

For removing the chips left by the planer, a scraper has 
been used, of the same pattern as is used in Central Park, 
New York. It consists of two vertical sides of boards, 8 feet 
in length and 18 inches high, joined together at one end at 
an angle of 60 degrees, the point l^eing boarded over to form 
a seat for the driver. The open end has a strong brace, 
placed about midway of the height, and securely bolted to 
the sides, to the ends of which the draught rope is attached. 
The inside faces of the sides have strips of thin iron or steel 
fastened to them at the bottom ; a handle is attached at the 
point for lifting it. This scraper is used with one horse, and 
is dragged over the ice with the open side in front. When a 
load is obtained, it is dragged to the bank, where the driver 
lifts the back corner, thus clearing the snow, turns the scraper 
on the front corners, and starts for another load. This 
scraper clears the ice in a very satisfactory manner. It can 
be used for clearing of light snow% a depth of 8 inches 
having l)een cleared successfully. The scoop scraper used 
by ice companies is very useful for piling the snow on to 
the banks, and thus preventing the settlement of the ice along 
the shore. 

Where the number of skaters is large, the ice becomes worn 
in a short time, so that it is necessary to clean it. For this 
purpose, we have used one-horse street-sweeping machines 
loaned to us by the Street Department. The rims of the 
wheels were wound with wire to prevent slipping. The ma- 
chines swept the material on the ice into windrows, and then 
the triangular scrapers hauled it to the shore. This opera- 
tion could be repeated for several days in succession ; after 
a time, however, the ice would become worn so unevenly 
that it would be necessary to i)lane it again. If a crust forms 
on the surface of the snow, the triangular scraper cannot be 
used until the crust is broken ; to do this, the scoop-scraper 
can be run through the snow to break it up. About 7 acres 
can be swept by one machine in a working day. 

Al)out 20 acres have liecn kept in good condition during 
the past month by the above means. 

At Franklin Field there is an area of over 40 acres of level 
meadow, which is kept dry in summer, but Avhich can be 
flooded in winter by closing a gate at the outlet of the under- 



128 City Document No. 10. 

drains, and turning the flow of the brooks on to the field. 
Ice can be formed here much earlier than on a pond. As 
soon as the ground freezes, the water is turned on to it ; the 
water freezes to the ground, and the latter can then be flooded. 
This cannot be done on ai)ond, as the ice, being of less spe- 
cific gravity than the water, always floats at the top. The 
same method of caring for the ice is pursued here as at 
Jamaica pond, but it can be done more economically, as there 
are no steep banks, and the snow can be scraped clear of the 
ice on to the surrounding ground ; as there is no danger of 
the ice settling, piles of snow can be made at any point on 
the field. When the ice becomes rough it can be planed, or, 
if the w'eather will permit of it, it can be flooded and a new 
surface formed. 

At Charlesbank and Wood Island Park, the conditions are 
similar to those at Franklin Field, except that there is no nat- 
ural water supply, and resort must be had to hydrants. This 
can be done here, as the areas are small and the cost of the 
water is, therefore, not great. The most successful method 
of restoring the worn-out surface at these parks has been by 
spraying with the hose when the temperature is below freez- 
ing. By this means a good body of hard ice can be built up. 

The attendance has been very large at all of the skating 
grounds. At Jamaica Park and Franklin Field there is great 
need of buildings for the accommodation of the large number 
of people who frequent these parks. 

The following table gives some statistics showing the great 
interest felt by the people in the skating and the slight cost 
per person at which the amusement has been furnished : 



Jamaica 
Pond. 


^FTefd." Charlesbank. Woodjsland 


No. of days' skating, 19 


31 43 43 


Total estimated at- 




tendance . . . 90,000 


123,000 99,000 114,000 


Area cleared and 




kept in condition 




for skating . . 20 acres 


20 acres > 1 acre 6 acres 


Total cost . . . $1,588 92 


$864 18 $610 00 $675 24 


Cost per acre . . 79 45 


43 22 610 00 112 54 


Cost per person . 01| 


\ OO^V OOtV ^^1% 



The appended table shows the principal items of com- 
pleted work to date. 



Priucipa] Items Of work completed on the several Parks to January 31, 1806. 







MiiN PiBK System. 


Marine Pakk Btbtbm. 


Charlesbank. 


Wood Island 
Park. 


Ubnriestown 
Heights. 


FtankUn 
Field. 


PnbHc 
Park, 

North 
End. 






Fens. 


Riverway. 


Leveiett 
Parli. 


Jamaica 
Park. 


Arborway. 


Arnold 
Arboretum. 


Prank lin 
Park. 


Dorchester- 
way. 


Marine 
Park. 


Oastle 
Island. 


Totals. 










13,244 sq. yds. 

0.7 mile. 

9,734 sq. yds. 

9,S61 sq. yds. 

0.7 mile. 

3,485 sq. yds. 


25,070 sq. yds. 

1.3 miles. 

1,166 sq. yds. 

0.1 mile. 

17,920 sq. yds. 

1.2 miles. 

7,194 sq. yds. 


30,388 SQ. yds. 

2.1 miles. 
16,138 sq. yds. 

4.2 miles. 


115,361 sq. yds. 

7.7 miles. 

71,271 sq. yds. 

10.3 miles. 

10,500 sq. yds. 

0.76 mile. 

23,987 sq. yds. 

9,630 Hn. ft. 


4,620 sq. yds. 

0.2 mile. 
1,883 sq. yds. 

0.3 mile. 














344,189 sq. yds. 

19.0 miles. 

182,488 sq. yds. 


Driveways completed . . J 


4 milee 
30,600 sq. yds. 
3.4 miles. 
14,000 sg. yds. 
1.1 miles. 
19,900 sq. yds. 
32,931 lin. ft. 
10,026 Hn. ft. 


1.3 miles 

12,900 sq. yds 

1.5 miles. 

17,500 sq. yds. 

1.2 miles. 

6,397 sq. yds. 

1,281 Un. ft. 


17,627 sq. yds. 

2.4 miles 

12,000 sq. yds. 

5,335 sq. yds. 
2,028 lin. ft. 


0.5 mUe. 

2,694 sq. yds. 

0.3 mile. 




Walks completed . . . . | 





14,432 sq. yds. 

1.5 miles. 






4,041 sq. yds. 
0.4 mile. 






Ride completed I 








81,781 sq. yds. 

5.85 miles. 

77,473 sq. yds. 


Giittere paved 


8,069 sq. yds 


785 sq. yds. 
898 lin. ft. 


2,321 sq. yds. 














■ 12<" 
































52311n.ft. 
3,197 lin. ft. 
























6,483 Un. ft. 
7,215 lin. ft. 








1,020 lin. ft. 










































234 un. ft. 










4 
































1,951 lin. ft. 
















1 

12 
9 

1 




















44 




2 






3 




2 

1 


2 


2 
5 


1 








72 
19 


Drinking-fouDtJ 


ins 






I 
























d^ ^ 






























1,316 lin. ft. 

706 lin. ft. 

180 Hn. ft. 
2,159 lin. ft. 
4,971 Un. ft. 
5.896 lin. ft. 
4,675 Hn. ft. 
8,742 lin. ft. 
37,272 Hn. ft. 
4,798 lin. ft. 






































































































Pipe drains, 18 












243 lin. ft. 


315 lin. ft 
298 lin. ft. 
612 lin. ft. 
367 lin. ft. 
2,641 lin. ft. 




















n 








752 lin ft 
















977 Un ft 












350 lin. ft. 
474 Hn. ft, 
418 lin. ft. 


123 Un. ft. 
1,863 lin. ft. 
1,423 liu, ft. 






















829 lin. ft. 
6,832 lin. ft. 
263 lin. ft. 


3,964 lin. ft. 
332 lin. ft. 


294 lin. ft. 
4,361 lin. ft. 












406 lin. ft. 
2,581 Un. ft. 


223 Un. ft. 
610 lin. ft. 








9,812 Un. ft. 


766 Hn. ft. 






1,739 lin. ft. 


245 Un. It. 


518 lin. ft 


































































185 Un. ft. 




2,995 Hn. ft. 
6,913 Hn. ft. 














3,086 lin. ft. 
2,353 Hn. ft. 
3,410 Hn. ft. 
13,061 Hn. ft. 




























26,783 lin. ft. 










3,109 lin. ft. 


















3,425 lin. ft. 
9,713 Hn. ft. 










9,154 lin. ft. 


4,296 lin. ft. 


5,383 lin. ft. 


1,994 lin. ft. 


86,848 lin. ft. 
• 1 
74 
186 


765 lin. ft. 






1,739 Un. ft 


8,639 lin. ft. 


1,343 Un. ft. 


50,181 Hn. ft. 


518 lin. ft 














10 

107 


2 
61 


3 
42 


6 
IS 


9 
41 


2 
63 


1 






17 
19 


10 
13 


3 


3,530 Un. ft. 


4 




Ciitch-baaine an 
Open cbannel 1 
Etetitric-light c 
Electric lighte 


d inlets . . 


11 




692 


ble . . . . 


18,893 lin. ft. 
61 


7,433 illl. ft. 
20 


14,500 lin. ft. 
53 


4,330 Un. ft 
12 


8 15 




13,865 lin. ft. 
36 
4 

4 
















22 




10 


33 


13 




4 














4 


^ 


8 


6 


12 




2 


4 
2,113 Hn. ft. 




1 iron pier. 


1 


2,228 Hn. ft. 
2 

10 acres. 


I 
2 










Boundary wall 




612 lin. ft. 






9,490 Un. ft. 




1 


3 


1 






5 
1 
344 acres. 


1.5 acres. 


1 

1 

16.4 acres. 




1 






16 
















Area of ground finished . . 


107 acres. 


3., acres. 


43 acres. 


13.2 acres 


10.6 acres. 


155 acres. 


6.6 acres. 


3.4 acres. 


42 acres. 

2 








32 lin. ft. 


2 


Retaining- wall 


688 lin. ft. 


6J? lin. ft. 


2,343 lin. ft. 






















8,304 Hn. ft. 


1,171 sq. yds 






















1.171 sq.yds. 




1 


1 


















3 
3,081 sq.yds. 








6 


Cinder track 
















( 2,82) sq.yds. 

( 0.2 mile. 

3,412 Hn. ft. 








5,902 sq. yds. 








261 lin. ft 
















1,346 lin. ft. 




767 lin. ft. 




15,229 Hn. ft. 
























- 






* Bight of these bridges are partly In Brookline. 



]^28 City Document No. 10. 

drains, and turning the flow of the brooks on to the field. 

_Ir.p. <'.:i.n hp. fovinp.d liprp mnf.h parliPr fhnn nn u i-^^.l A . 






ENGINEERmG DEPARTMENT. 129 



E. 



[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE STREET 
DEPARTMENT.] 

The followino- is a report of the work done under my di- 
rection for the Street Department during the year 1895 : 

The work done is similar to that heretofore, with the addi- 
tion of a large amount of work upon the five main avenues, 
the construction of which was authorized hy the Legislature 
of 1895, Chapters 2G8 and 334, referring back to Chapter 
323 of the Acts of 1891 ; namely, Blue Hill avenue, Colum- 
bus-avenue extension, Huntington avenue. Commonwealth- 
avenue extension, and Brighton avenue. These acts require 
the construction of sewers, gas and water pipes in each 
avenue, with house connections for all abutting lots. The 
construction of these, together with other miscellaneous 
structures, such as water-main pipes, underground wires, 
and surface drains, intended to forestall the necessity for 
breaking up the surface of the finished street, require a large 
amount of laljor to be performed before the surfacing of the 
street can be commenced. 

In these avenues, a very large amount of this preliminary 
work has been done. Early in the year estimates were 
made of the cost of construction of these avenues, exclusive 
of sewers and land damages, upon a definite plan, and such 
rough grading as could be done in advance of sewer con- 
struction was commenced ; then as fast as the sewer construc- 
tion was completed contracts were made for grading. The 
work of grading has been in progress during the winter, and 
with a single exception all the rough grading contemplated 
at present is under contract and should be completed by June 
1, 1896, The exception referred to consists of about 20,000 
cubic yards of surpkis material on Blue Hill avenue opposite 
Franklin park. A part of this material can be used to 
supply a deficiency on Columbus avenue, and it is probable 
that the remainder can be used for contemplated improve- 
ments in the near vicinity. 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

The portion of the avenue laid out under the act com- 
mences at Washington street or Grove Hall, and follows the 



130 City Document No. 10. 

course of the old Blue Hill avenue to the Neponset river at 
Mattapan, a distance of 2.86 miles, nearly in a straight line. 
The part between Washington and Walk Hill streets, a dis- 
tance of 2.21 miles, has been ordered to be constructed. 
The part under construction borders on Franklin Park for a 
distance of 2,670 feet, and Franklin Field a distance of 1,340 
feet. It is 120 feet wide throughout, and will be built for the 
greater part of its length with two roadways, each 32.5 
feet wide, a central reservation 25 feet wide for street-cars, 
and two sidewalks, each 15 feet wide. The sidewalk will 
have a loamed space 5 feet in width next the roadway, and 
the central reservation will be loamed and grassed. 

In front of Franklin Park this construction will be varied 
and provision made for easy access to the park. The road- 
ways are to be built of Telford macadam, with paved 
gutters, but with edgestone from Washington street to the 
circle at Talbot avenue only. Ten contracts for rough grad- 
ing have been made, seven of which are not completed at 
this date. One of these contracts includes the road con- 
struction opposite the main entrance to Franklin Park, and 
calls for completion of this section by August 1, 1896. 

Provision has been made for saving all stone suitable for 
use in constructing roadways, but a large part of the rock 
excavated is of such inferior quality as to be only suitable 
for filling. The estimated quantities of grading to be done 
under these contracts, and the corresponding cost of doing 
the work, is as follows : 

Earth excavation . . 100,796.77 cubic yards. 

Rock excavation . . 28,600 cubic yards. 

The average prices to be paid are as follows : 

Earth excavation . . $0,356 per cubic yard. 

Eock excavation . . 1.023 per cubic yard. 

The total amount paid to contractors for work done to 
February 1, 1896, is $18,663.35. 

Columbus Aveistue Extension. 

This avenue extends from Northampton street to Frank- 
lin Park, by the way of Roxbury Crossing, along Pynchon to 
Centre street, then through vacant land to and across Wash- 
ington street and by way of Seaver street to Franklin Park, — 
a total distance of 2.21 miles. It is generally 80 feet wide, 
and is to be built without a special reservation for a street 
railway. The section between Roxbury Crossing and Hog 



Engineering Department. 131 

bridge is about 3,105 feet in length and includes the pres- 
ent and prospective site of Stony brook ; the improvement 
of the brook will necessarily precede the construction of the 
road, and, with the exception of the removal of the buildings, 
filling cellars, etc., no work has been or can be done at 
present. It is intended to pave this section with gi'anite 
blocks. From Roxbury Crossing to the old part of the 
avenue, the roadway will be of asphalt. From Centre street 
to the park the roadway will be of Telford macadam. The 
only work done by this department has been the rough grading 
between Washington and Centre streets. A considerable 
part of the avenue will be in readiness for road-making on 
the opening of the working season, and with the exception of 
the Pynchon- street section, the work will be practically 
finished during 1896. 

Huntington Avenue. 

This avenue extends from Copley square, along the line of 
the old avenue to Tremont street, and thence follows the 
former location of Tremont street to the Brookline line, at 
the Parkway, a distance of 2.25 miles. From Copley square 
to Massachusetts avenue, a distance of 3,240 feet, the boun- 
dary lines are unchanged, but the avenue will be rebuilt with 
a reserved space of 25 feet wide for street cars, two roadways, 
paved with granite blocks, each 25 feet wide, and two side- 
walks, paved with [bricks, each 12^ feet wide. From Mas- 
sachusetts avenue to Tremont street, a distance of 1.15 miles, 
the avenue is widened to 100 feet, laid out in the same man- 
ner and built with Telford macadam roadways and gravel 
sidewalks. The part of Tremont street renamed Huntingion 
avenue, 2,5G3 feet in length, has been widened to a general 
width of 80 feet. In this section there will be no reservation 
for street cars. Roadways will be built of Telford macadam, 
and the sidewalks, which will be 13 feet wide, will be built 
of gravel. The preliminary underground work is well ad- 
vanced on this avenue, and it is expected that the surfacing 
can be begun early in the season. The w^ork done by this 
department was the resetting of the edgestones and the reg- 
ulating of the sidewalks on the northerly side, between 
Copley square and Massachusetts avenue, and the depositing 
of about 10,000 cubic yards of filling between Gainsborough 
street and Longwood avenue. This will not complete the 
filling between these points, and the balance of about 15,000 
cubic yards will be supplied from the surplus on the remain- 
ing parts of the avenue. The gravel filling referred to is 
being furnished for $0.79| per cubic yard, and the work will 
be completed in February, 1896. 



132 City Document No. 10. 

Brighton Avenue. 

This avenue extends from Commonwealth avenue to 
Union square, AUston, a length of 0.67 mile. It is 100 
feet wide, and will be built wdth a central reservation 25 feet 
in width for a street railway, two roadways, the northerly 
one 30 feet wide and the southerly one 25 feet wide, and two 
sidewalks each 10 feet wide. The roadways are to be l)uilt 
of Telford macadam. 

Preliminary underground work is well advanced and the 
surfacing is under contract, conditioned to be completed on 
September 1, 1896. Amount paid to contractors for grading, 
to February 1, 1896, is $2,467.63. 

Commonwealth Avenue Extension. 

Commonwealth avenue has been extended from Chestnut 
Hill avenue, Brighton, to the Newton line, there connecting 
with the Newton boulevard; the extension is 0.71 mile in 
length and 120 feet in width. It is to be built with a central 
reservation 25 feet in width for a street railwa}^ two road- 
ways, the northerly one 25 feet wdde and the southerly one 
40 feet wide, and the two sidewalks each 15 feet^wide. The 
roadwa^^s are to be built of Telford macadam. Four con- 
tracts for rough grading have been let, one of which is still 
unfinished. A large quantity of excellent stone for road 
construction has been found, and there will be a considerable 
surplus of stone and of loam available for other avenues. 
Trap rock of excellent quality is now being delivered at the 
city stone-crusher near by, and is being crushed and piled 
for future use. Eleven thousand one hundred and fifty cubic 
yards of surplus filling has been delivered on the adjoining 
section of Commonwealth avenue. The rough grading, 
including rock excavation, will be completed early in the 
season, and it is expected that the underground work can be 
completed in time to allow of the entire completion of the 
avenue durino; 1896. The total amount of earth excavation 
is estimated at 35,732 cubic yards, and of rock "excavation 
at 9,200 cubic yards. Earth excavated and delivered within 
three-quarters of a mile has cost an average of SO. 284 per 
cubic yard ; earth delivered on the adjoining section of 
Commonwealth avenue, hauled about one mile, has cost 
$0,228 extra per cubic yard for hauling. Rock excavation, 
including breaking, hauling, and piling, has cost an average 
of $1.30 per cubic yard measured in the cut. The total sum 
paid to the contractors for grading, to February 1, 1896, is 
$14,070.79. 



Engineering Department. 133 

The ta!)le showing lengths and areas of paving on accepted 
streets has been carefully revised and compared with the 
list of streets in Boston, published by the Street Commis- 
sioners. As has l^een before stated, there is and can be no 
complete and authoritative list of pul)lic streets in Boston. 
The older streets have become pu])lic in many instances 
without record, and frequently the status of streets and alley- 
ways has been questioned in the interest of abutters. The 
manuscript list in this office, and from which the table has 
been made, is as nearl}^ complete as it can be made at this 
date. In this connection it should be stated that 3,600 
square yards of asphalt pavement, commenced (the concrete 
base only being laid) in 1894 and completed in 1895, have 
been credited to 1894 in the tables. 

Block-stone pavement has been laid with concrete 6 inches 
thick with a cushion coat of sand about IJ inches thick. 
The material used for filling joints, adopted by the Street 
Department, was pebbles and Portland cement grout. The 
cement grout has been mixed with sand in varying quantities 
for experimental purposes. The proportion of one part cement 
to one-fourth part of fine house sand was found to give the 
best results, and was adopted for most of the work done. 
The quantity of cement used varied greatly on difierent jobs, 
the average of all works done being 9.94 square yards of 
pavement per cask of cement, at a cost for cement of $0,231 
per square yard. The cost of filling joints in this manner 
has been about $0.20 less than the sum paid in 1894 for pitch 
and pebble joints. 

Street-paving, on old and new streets, has been supervised 
in all cases where requested, and the following quantities 
have been laid under contracts supervised by this depart- 
ment : 

Block-stone pavement, on a concrete base, laid with Port- 
land cement grout joints, 14,428 square yards, at an average 
cost of about $4.25 per square yard. 

Block-stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with Portland 
cement grout joints, 11,405.6 square yards, at an average 
cost of about $3.10 per square yard. 

Block-stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with gravel 
joints, 13,579 square yards, at an average cost of about 
$2.75 per square yard. 

Trinidad sheet asphalt, with a binder course of asphaltic 
cement concrete, on an American cement concrete base, 
10,639.3 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.65 per 
square yard. 

Sicilian rock asphalt, on an American cement concrete 



134 City Document No. 10. 

base, 7,293.7 square yards, at an average cost of about $3.65 
per square yard. 

Edgestones set, 36,093 linear feet; brick sidewalks laid, 
20,621.5 square yards; gravel sidewalks constructed, 1,835 
square yards; flagging cross-walks laid, 2,217 square yards. 

The following is a statement of the streets paved and con- 
structed, for which plans were made and grades given, and 
the work supervised : 

Ash Street. — From Oak to Nassau street was paved by 
H. Gore & Co. with Sicilian rock asphalt, with a base course 
of bituminous concrete on the existing cobble-stone pave- 
ment. Before putting down the base course, the old cobble- 
stone pavement was relaid by H. Gore & Co. 

Barton Street. — From Leverett to Milton street was 
paved with Sicilian rock asphalt on an American cement 
concrete base. The old pavement was removed and the sub- 
grading was done by the Paving Division. The concrete 
base and asphalt surface was laid by the Boston Asphalt 
Company. The edgestones were reset and the brick side- 
walks relaid byH. Gore & Co. The pavement removed was 
old cobble-stones and granite blocks. 

Billerica Street. — From Causeway to Minot street was 
paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with Port- 
land cement grout joints. The old pavement was removed 
and subgrading done by the Paving Division. The roadway 
was paved, brick sidewalks relaid, and edgestones reset 
by A. A. Libby & Co. The pavement removed was old 
cobble-stones. 

Bond Street. — From Hanson to Milford street was paved 
with Trinidad asphalt, with asphaltic cement concrete binder 
on an American cement concrete base. The street was sub- 
graded by the Paving Division. The concrete base and 
asphalt surface was laid by the Barber Asphalt Paving Com- 
pany. The edgestones were reset and brick sidewalks relaid 
by T. H. & W. A. Payson. The former surface was mac- 
adam. 

Brimmer Street. — From Beacon to Pinckney street was 
paved with Trinidad asphalt, with asphaltic cement concrete 
Tjinder on an American cement concrete base. The sub- 
grading was done by the Paving Division. The concrete 
base and asphaltic surface were laid by the Barber Asphalt 
Paving Company. Edgestones were reset, brick sidewalks 
and flao^o;inor cross-walks were relaid bv T. H. &, W. A. 
Payson. The former surface was macadam. 

Chambers Street. — From Brighton to Charles street was 
paved with Trinidad asphalt, with asphaltic cement concrete 



Engineering Department. 135 

binder. That portion from Brighton street through Auburn 
street has an American cement concrete base ; that portion 
from Auburn to Charles street was laid on old cobble-stone 
pavement. The concrete base and asphalt surface were laid 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. Sub-grading was 
done by the Paving Division. Edgestones were reset, brick 
sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid by T. H. & W. A. 
Payson. The former pavement was old cobble-stones. 

Charles Street (easterly side). — From Pinckney to Cam- 
bridge street, including the easterly track of the West End 
Street Railway, and also the four-foot space between the 
tracks, was paved with large granite blocks, with Portland 
cement grout joints, on an American cement concrete base. 
The old pavement was removed and sub-grading done by 
the Paving Division. Concrete base and block paving was 
laid, edgestones reset, and brick sidewalks relaid by H. 
Gore & Co. The former pavement was old granite blocks. 
The West End Street Railway, l)y agreement, paid for the 
w^ork done in their tracks. Work in front of the Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, which has been postponed on account of 
unfavorable w^eather the previous season, was completed. 
The crushed stone, which was used to make the street pass- 
able temporarily, was taken off and about four inches of the 
concrete base was removed and replaced with four inches of 
Portland cement concrete, on which 2^ inches of Sicilian 
rock asphalt was laid by H. Gore & Co. 

Charter Street. — From Unity street to Jackson avenue 
w^as paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with 
Portland cement grout joints. The old pavement was 
removed and the sub-grading done by the Paving Division. 
The roadway was paved, brick sidewalks relaid, and edge- 
stones reset by C. L. Ward. The pavement removed was 
old cobble-stones. 

Columhus Avenue. — From Park square to beyond Ferdi- 
nand street was paved with large granite blocks, on an 
American cement concrete base, with Portland cement grout 
joints. The old pavement was removed, the sub-grading 
done, the concrete base laid, the roadway paved, edgestones 
reset, and brick sidewalks relaid by H. Gore & Co. The 
West End Street Railway, by agreement, paid for the work 
done in their tracks. Two new catch-lmsins were built. 
The former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Devonshire Street. — From Franklin to Milk street was 
paved with large granite blocks, on an American cement 
concrete base, with Portland cement grout joints. The old 
pavement was barred out and loaded, the sub-grading was 
done, concrete base laid, the roadway paved, and flagging 



136 City Document No. 10. 

cross-walks laid by JaDies Grant & Co. The Paving Division 
furnished teams for carting away surplus material. The 
former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Edinhord' Street. — From Essex to Beach street was paved 
with Trinidad asphalt, with an American cement concrete 
base and asphaltic cement concrete binder, by the Barber 
Asphalt Paving Company. The sub-grading was done by 
the Pavino; Division. The edgestones were reset and brick 
sidewalks relaid by P. Brennan & Co. The former surface 
was macadam. 

Fahin Street. — From Newland to Ivanhoe street was paved 
with Sicilian rock asphalt, with an American cement con- 
crete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The sub-grad- 
ing was done by the Paving Division. Edgestones were 
reset, brick sidewalks and cross-walks relaid, by H. Gore 
& Co. The former pavement was cobble-stones. 

Harrison Avenue (westerly side). — From about 85 
feet south of East Newton street to 100 feet south of East 
Springfield street, and (easterly side) from East Newton 
street, through Stoughton street, was paved with Trinidad 
asphalt, on an American cement concrete base, with asphaltic 
cement binder, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. 
The sub-grading was done by the Paving Division. The 
former pavement was granite blocks. 

Henchman Street. — From Charter to Commercial street 
was paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with 
Portland cement grout joints. The sub-grading was done 
by the Paving Division. The roadway was paved, edge- 
stones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid, 
by J. B. O'Rourke & Co. The former surface was mac- 
adam. 

Lancaster Street. — From Causeway to Merrimac street 
was paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with 
Portland cement grout joints. The sub-grading was done 
by the Paving Division. The roadway paved, edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid, by 
John Turner & Co. The former pavement was asphalt, so 
worn that the cobble-stones on which it was laid were ex- 
posed for large areas. 

Massachusetts Avenue (southerly side). — From Wash- 
ington to Albany street was paved with Sicilian rock asphalt, 
on an American cement concrete base, by H. Gore & Co. 
Work on the above, which had been postponed on account 
of unfavorable weather the |jrevious season, was completed 
in June, 1895. Apart of the asphalt surface, which was laid 
in 1894, was taken up and relaid, the surface of the concrete 



Engineering Department. 137 

base scraped olf and repaired, in part with Portland cement 
concrete, and in part with an asphaltum concrete binder. 

Merchants Row. — From State to North street was paved 
with large granite blocks, on an American cement concrete 
base, with Portland cement grout joints. The sub-grading 
was done hy the Paving Division. The concrete base put 
down, paving laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and 
flagging cross-walks relaid, by A. A. Libby & Co. The 
former pavement was granite blocks. 

JSTorth Margin Street. — From Thacher to Stillman street 
was paved with Trinidad asphalt, on an American cement 
concrete base, with asphaltic cement concrete binder, by the 
Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The sub-grading was 
done by the Paving Division, edgestones were reset and 
brick sidewalks were repaved by T. H. & W. A. Payson. 
The former pavement was part cobble-stones, part old asphalt 
on cobbles, and part macadam. 

Olis Street. — From Summer street to Winthrop square 
was paved with large granite blocks, on gravel base, with 
Portland cement grout joints. The old pavement was barred 
out and loaded, the sub-grading was done, the roadway 
paved, and the flagging cross-walks relaid by James Grant 
& Co. The Paving Division furnished teams for carting 
away the surplus materials. The former pavement was old 
granite blocks. 

Oxford Street. — From Beach to Essex street was paved 
with Trinidad asphalt, on existing macadam, with asphaltic 
cement binder and base course, by the Barber Asphalt Pav- 
ing Company. 

Pinckney Street. — From Charles through Brimmer street 
was paved with Trinidad asphalt, on an American cement 
concrete base, with asphaltic cement concrete binder, by the 
Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The sub-grading was 
done bv the Pa vino; Division. The edgestones were reset 
and the brick sidewalks repaved by T. H. & W. A, Payson. 
The former surface of the street was macadam. 

Prince Street. — From Hanover street to Bennett avenue 
was paved with Sicilian rock asphalt, on an American cement 
concrete base, by H. Gore & Co. The existing block pave- 
ment was removed and the sub-grading done by the Paving 
Division. Edgestones were reset, brick sidewalks and flag- 
ging cross-Avalks were relaid, by H. Gore & Co. The old 
paving-blocks were used on Barton street and on Noyes 
place. The former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Spring Street. — From Poplar to Leverett street was paved 
with Trinidad asphalt, with asphaltic cement concrete base 
course and binder, on existing cobble-stone pavement, by the 



138 City Document No. 10. 

Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The edgestones were 
reset and the brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks 
relaid by J. Turner & Co. The former pavement was 
cobble-stones. 

Sunwier Afreet (northerly side). — From Washington 
to Federal street, with the exception of a part at High street, 
was paved with large granite blocks, on an American cement 
concrete base, with Portland cement joints. The sub-grad- 
ing was done by the Paving Division. The paving was laid, 
the edgestones reset, and the brick sidewalks and flagging 
cross-walks relaid by James Grant & Co. By agreement, 
the West End Street Railway Company paid for 1,438.7 
square yards, at the rate of $0.38 per square yard ; and the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company paid for 936.3 square 
yards, at the rate of $0.38 per square yard. The former 
pavement was old granite blocks. 

Tileston Street. — From Salem to Wiggin street was paved 
with Trinidad asphalt, on an American cement concrete base, 
with asphaltic cement concrete binder, by the Barber Asphalt 
Paving Company. The sub-grading was done, the edge- 
stones were reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid by the 
Paving Division. The former pavement was old cobble- 
stones. 

Warren Street (Charlestown) . — From Winthrop to Soley 
street was paved with Sicilian rock asphalt, on an American 
cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The 
sub-grading was done by the Paving Division. The edge- 
stones were reset, the brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks 
relaid, by John Turner & Co. The pavement removed was 
old granite blocks. 

West Street. — From Tremont to Washington street Avas 
paved with large granite blocks, on an American cement con- 
crete base, and Portland cement grout joints. The old 
pavement was removed, the sub-grading done, the concrete 
base laid, the paving laid, the edgestones reset, the brick 
sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid, by H. Gore & Co. 
The former pavement was old granite blocks. 

Whitmore Street. — From Kneeland to Harvard street was 
paved with Sicilian rock asphalt, on an American cement 
concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The sub- 
grading was done by the Paving Division. The edgestones 
were reset and the brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks 
relaid by H. Gore & Co. The former pavement was macadam. 

New Streets. 
Construction on the following streets has been done under 
Chapter 323 of the Acts of the Legislature of Massachusetts 



Engineering Department. 139 

of 1891, and Acts in amendment thereof or in addition 
thereto. Five of them, namely, Boy Iston street, Ivy street, 
Norway, Parker, and St. Germain streets, were commenced 
in 1894. 

Boylston Street. — From Boy Iston road to Brookline line 
is about 2,070 feet long. The work of filling to sub-grade 
was begun on this street in 1894 and completed April 27, 
1895, at a total cost of $47,819.37, at the rate of $0.62^ per 
cubic yard. The contractor was John O'Brien. No con- 
tracts have yet been made for constructing the street, as 
extensive sewer construction upon piles is in progress. 

Harvard Avenue. — From Commonwealth avenue to the 
Brookline town line is about 550 feet long. The contract 
for constructing this avenue was awarded to William Scollans. 
Work was commenced October 19, 1895, and completed De- 
cember 21, 1895, at a total cost of $3,313.09. This is a 
Telford macadam road, with gravel sidewalks ; the base is 
eight inches and the surface four inches in thickness. Tel- 
ford stone and crushed stone was furnished and delivered by 
the city ; the edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled by the contractor. 

Ivy Street. — From St. Mary to Mountfort street, not in- 
cluding the Audubon road intersection, is about 772 feet 
long. AVork was begun on this street in 1894 and completed 
June 15, 1895, at a total cost of $7,322.44. It is a 6-inch 
macadam road with brick sidewalks. The contractors were 
James Grant & Co. Crushed stone was furnished and deliv- 
ered by the city ; the edgestones were furnished by the city 
and hauled by the contractor. 

Kenmore Street. — From Commonwealth avenue to New- 
bur}'^ street is about 239 feet long. The contract for con- 
structing this street was awarded to Doherty & Connors. 
Work was begun Jul}^ 22, 1895, and completed August 12, 
1895, at a total cost of $974.23. It is a 6-inch macadam 
road with brick sidewalks. The crushed stone was furnished 
and delivered by the city ; edgestones were furnished by the 
city aiid hauled by the contractors. 

Norway Street. — From Massachusetts avenue to Falmouth 
street is about 610 feet long. The contract for constructing 
the street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun May 21, 1895, and completed August 7, 1895, at a 
total costof $3,162.27. This is a Telford macadam road, with 
brick sidewalks ; the base is eight inches and the surface four 
inches in thickness. Telford stone and crushed stone were 
furnished and delivered by the city ; the edgestones were 
furnished by the city and hauled by the contractors. 

Parker Street. — From Ilunting'ton avenue to Westland 



140 City Document No. 10. 

avenue is about 1,687 feet long. Work was begun on this 
street in 1894, as noted above, and completed June 19, 1895, 
at a total cost of $23,850.26. The contractors were Doherty 
& O'Leary. It is a Telford macadam road, with brick side- 
walks ; the base is ten inches and the surface six inches in 
thickness. The contractors furnished all materials used in 
constructing this street. 

iSt. Germain Street. — From Massachusetts avenue to Dal- 
ton street is about 749 feet long. Work was begun on this 
street in 1894, and completed June 8, 1895, at a total cost 
of $4,923.36. The contractors were Quimby & Ferguson. 
It is a Telford macadam road, with brick sidewalks ; the 
base is eight inches and the surface four inches in thickness. 

Sherborn Street. — From Commonwealth avenue to Charles 
river is about 464 feet long. The contract for constructing 
this street was awarded to Doherty & Connors. Work was 
begun July 23, 1895, and completed October 5, 1895, at a 
total cost of $4,214.21. This is a 6-inch macadam road, with 
gravel sidewalks. In addition to the above work, a cap- 
stone and iron fence were placed upon the sea-wall at the 
river ; the capstone was furnished and laid by Joseph Ross 
for $4.92 per lin. foot for 64 feet, or $315. The iron fence, 
built and erected by P. J. Dinn, for $118, is 63 feet 9 
inches long. Crushed stone was furnished and delivered by 
the city ; edgestones were furnished by the city and hauled 
by the contractor. 

Gkading Street-Rail way Tracks. 

The grades for tracks in the following streets have been 
determined and furnished to the street-railway companies. 
On streets marked * the surveys were made and levels taken 
by the railway companies. 

West End Street Railway. 

Battery Street. — From Commercial street to North Ferry. 

Brighton Avenue. — From Commonwealth avenue to Cam- 
bridge street. 

* Brookline Avenue. — From Longwood avenue to the 
Fenway. 

*Oaldtc'eU, Perkins, and Brighton Streets (Charlestown). 
— From jMain to Cambrido-e street. 

* Chelsea Street (Charlestown) . — From Bunker Hill street 
to Vine street. 

Columbus Avenue. — From Park square to beyond Ferdi- 
nand street. 



Engineering Department. 141 

* Commonwealth Avenue. — From St. Paul street to 
beyond Essex street. 

East Sixth Street. — From N street to O street. 

Harvard Avenue. — From Commonwealth avenue to 
Brookline line. 

Huntington Avenue. — From 200 feet north of Vancouver 
street to beyond Longwood avenue. 

Longivood Avenue. — From Autumn street to Huntington 
avenue . 

Lowell Street. — From Causeway street to Brighton street. 

*jSrorfolk Street. — From Washington street to the N.Y. 
& N.E. R.R. bridge. 

JP St7'eet. — From Fourth street to Sixth street. 

* Shawniut Avenue. — From Dover street to Roxbury 
street. 

Summer Street. — From Washington street to Kingston 
street. 

* Summer Street. — From Kingston street to Federal street. 

* Warren Street. — From Dudley street to Grove Hall. 
Washington Street. — From Parsons street to Oak square. 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway. 

* River Street. — From Blue Hill avenue to the Lower 
Mills. 

Lynn & Boston Street-Railway Company. 

* Chelsea Street. — From Vine street to Scotts court. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester-avenue Bridge. — Plan and 
proposed grades for additions to the bridge over the N.Y., 
N.H., & H. R.R. (Old Colony System), necessitated by 
the construction of the Talbot-avenue extension. 

Algonquin and Bradlee Streets. — Plan of proposed park 
curbing for planting-space. 

Slierborn Street. — Plans of proposed granite capstone for 
sea-wall, and also for iron fence. 

Catch-Basins. — Details of coping and gutter-stones for 
corners, Bradlee pattern. 

Riverside Gravel Bank (Auburndale). — Plan and cross- 
section of bank for gravel used for filling on Boylston-street 
extension. 

Harrison Avenue (from East Newton street to East 
Springfield street) . — Plan showing limits of asphalt pave- 
ment under guarantee. 



142 City Document No. 10. 

Commonwealth Avenue (at Washington street) . — Plan 
and cross-section of ledge for measurement. 

Chelsea Street (at Scotts court). — Plan and profile show- 
ing grades of edgestone for the B. & M. R.K. Company. 



Surveys, plans, and estimates for improving and paving 
the following streets have been made : 

Barton Street. — From Lowell street to Minot street. 

Beacon Street. — From Arlington street to Dartmouth 
street. 

Doane Street. — From Kilby street to Broad street. 

Garland Street. — From Washington street to Shawmut 
avenue. 

Harrison Avenue. — From Harvard street to Kneeland 
street. 

Loivell Street. — From Causeway street to Brighton street. 

JSTewbury Street. — From Arlington street to Dartmouth 
street. 

Surveys and plans were made for work upon the following 
streets : grades and lines given, but the work of construction 
was not supervised by this department : 

Austin Street (Charlestown). — From the Fitchburg Rail- 
road track to the B. & M. R.R. track was paved with large 
granite blocks, on a gravel base, with gravel joints. 

Barrett Street. — From Fulton street to North street was 
paved with large granite lilocks, on a gravel base, with Port- 
land cement grout joints ; the old pavement was removed 
and the sub-grading done by the Paving Division. The 
roadway was paved, the edgestones reset, and the brick side- 
walk relaid by A. A. Libby & Co. The former pavement 
was of cobble-stones. 

Barton Street. — From Leverett street to Lowell street was 
paved with granite blocks taken from Prince street and from 
part of Barton street. The blocks were laid on a gravel base 
with gravel joints. The old pavement was taken up and 
sub-grading done by the Paving Division. The roadway 
was paved, the edgestones reset, and the brick sidewalks re- 
laid by J. Turner & Co. The pavement removed was of old 
granite blocks. 

Castle Street. — From Washinojton street to Tremont 
street was paved with granite blocks, on a gravel base, with 
Portland cement grout joints. The sub-grading was done 
by the Paving Division ; the roadway was paved, the edge- 



Engineering Department. 143 

stones reset, brick sidewalks and cross-walks relaid, by James 
Grant & Co. The old pavement was taken up and relaid. 

Commonwealth Avenue. — From Cottage Farm bridge to 
Warren street, lines and grades were given and measure- 
ments made for a large amount of work done upon this part 
of the avenue by the Street Department. 

East Eighth Street. — From H street to K street was paved 
with large granite blocks on a gravel base, with gravel joints. 
The sub-grading was done by the Paving Division. The 
roadway was paved, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and 
cross-walks relaid, by J. B. O'Rourke & Co. Two new 
catch-basins were built. The former surface was macadam. 

East Sixth Street (northerly side). — From N street to O 
street was paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, 
with gravel joints. The sub-grading was done by the Paving 
Division. The roadway was paved, edgestones reset, and 
the brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid by J. B. 
O'Rourke & Co. The former surface was macadam. 

Lewis Street. — From Commercial street to North street 
was paved with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with 
Portland cement joints. The sub-grading was done by the 
Paving Division. The roadway was paved, the edgestones 
reset, and the brick sidewalks and flagging cross-walks relaid 
by A. A. Libby & Co. The former pavement was cobble- 
stones. 

Maverick Street. — From Chelsea street to the B. & M. 
R.R. crossing was paved with large granite blocks, on a 
gravel base, with gravel joints. The sub-grading was done 
by the Paving Division. The roadway was paved, the edge- 
stones reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid by C. L. Ward. 
The former pavement was part cobble-stone and part macadam. 

I* Street. — From Fourth street to Sixth street was paved 
with large granite blocks, on a gravel base, with Portland 
cement grout joints. The sub-grading was done by the 
Paving Division. The roadway was paved, the edgestones 
reset, and the brick sidewalks relaid by J. B. O'Rourke & 
Co. The former surface was macadam. 



The work done by the Surveying Division of this depart- 
ment, for the Street Department, has been almost exclusively 
in the giving of street lines and grades, for setting and 
resetting curljstone, laying brick sidewalks, and the measure- 
ment of the work so constructed, together with the measure- 
ment of some granite paving-work not supervised by this 
department, on Baldwin, Burbank, Bristol, D, Chambers, 
Merrimac, Oak, Richards, and Wapping streets. 



144 



City Document No. 10. 



The total amount of work measured by the Surveying 
Division for the Street Department during the year is as 
follows : 



Edgestone set and reset, lin. ft. 
Block-stone paving, sq. yds. . 
Round-stone paving (gutters), sq. 
Brick sidewalk paving, sq. yds. 
Artificial stone sidewalks, sq. yds. 
Asphalt paviug, sq. yds. 
Coal-tar concrete walks, sq. yds. 



yds. 



129,382 
60,473 
32,941 

68,701 

12,295 

1,297 

183 



Engineering Department. 145 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION IN 

1895. 

Charles-river Bridge. 

A contract was made, June 14, 1895, with J. N. Hayes & 
Co., for repairing the draw foundation of this bridge. Plans 
and specifications were furnished by this department. 

Twenty-six new spruce piles were driven in the founda- 
tion, and capped with hard-pine caps ; two main lines and 
part of the rear line, of track-stringers were replaced with 
new hard-pine sticks, bolted and keyed together, and bolted 
to caps. Four lines of rails were spiked to the main lines 
of track-stringers, and two to the rear line. The old trucks 
under the heavy bearings were replaced by trucks taken from 
the old draws at Dover-street bridge. They were thoroughly 
overhauled, and placed in position by blocking up the draw. 
Six oak piles were driven on the Charlestown side of the 
channel, on the down-stream end of the draw-landing, and 
capped, so as to secure a good landing for the draw. The 
channel-faces of the fender-guards were also repaired. The 
total cost of the entire work done was $4,259.51. 

Chelsea Bridge, from Charlestown to Chelsea. 

The work of abolishing the grade crossings on the Mystic 
wharves by the Boston & Maine R.R., and mentioned in the 
last annual report, has been completed during the year. 

In connection with this work the city has rebuilt the 
North draw and its foundations, over the Mystic river, as 
the old draw was in a decayed and dangerous condition. 

On May 23, 1895, a contract was made with Augustus 
Bellevue & Co., of Boston, to rebuild the draw foundation 
in accordance with plans and specifications furnished by this 
department, the contract price being $19,260. 

The draw foundation is l)uilt of hard-pine lumlier, sup- 
ported by new oak piles. Under this contract the down- 
stream pier was extended for a length of 60 feet, and the 
up-stream pier for a length of 50 feet ; the bridge on the 
Chelsea side of the draw was rebuilt for a length of 21 feet, 
and on the Charlestown side of the draw for an average 
length of 33 feet, the roadway being paved with granite 
blocks. 



146 City Document No. 10. 

The woodwork for a length of al)out 53 feet adjoining the 
above work on the Charlestown side was also rebuilt above 
the piles by Augustus Bellevue & Co., under an accepted 
proposal, for $1,200; the granite-block paving on this part 
of the bridge being done by the Boston & Maine R.R. 

The old draw has been replaced Avith a new steel draw of 
the retractile type, with three lines of main plate girders. 
The draw is 49 feet 11 inches wide between centres of out- 
side railings, and has two roadways and one sidewalk. The 
draw is operated by an electric motor attached to it, the 
electric current being taken, by means of a trolley, from a 
wire supported on the draw foundation. 

The draw machinery is operated from a controller attached 
to the middle samson post of the draw. Hand or horse 
power can also be used for moving the draw. 

The superstructure of the draw was built and erected by 
the Penn Bridge Company, of Beaver Falls, Penn., and the 
trucks built by the Atlantic Works. 

The motor and electrical work was furnished by the Gen- 
eral Electric Company, and the gearing and other machine- 
work by Miller & Shaw. The draw and its appurtenances 
were designed by this department. 

Previous to the rebuilding of the old draw by the city, 
team and foot travel was stopped on this bridge on account 
of the rebuilding of the approach to the viaduct by the Boston 
& Maine R.R. This was considered a good opportunity to 
replace the old draw and its foundations, the Lynn & Boston 
R.R. making provision for electric-car travel by the exten- 
sion of the temporary bridge and constructing a new tem- 
porary draw over the channel, on the up-stream side of the 
old draw. 

The new steel draw was first run on by electricity on 
December 26, 1895, and travel was resumed over the bridge 
on December 28, 1895. 

The total cost charged to this appropriation to February 
1, 1896, was $33,827.91. 



Chelsea-street Bridge. 

As mentioned in the last annual report, the pile structure 
was rebuilt by B. F. Nay & Co., and the steel draw was 
built by the Boston Bridge Works. The bridge was opened 
to team-travel February 26, 1895. The cost of the contract- 
work on the pile bridge was $15,241.53 ; on the steel draw, 
$8,450. The sheathing of the bridge and draw was done by 
the Bridofe Division. 



Engineering Department. 147 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over the Boston & AiiBANY 

Railroad). 

During the past year the following work has been done on 
the northerly section of the bridge : The middle pier has 
been extended 210 feet G inches, and the parapets on the 
abutments set by David S. Crockett & Co., the stone for the 
parapets being furnished by the Cape Ann Granite Company ; 
two steel girders have been built and set in position by the 
Boston Bridge Works ; 20-inch steel beams have been fur- 
nished by Page, Newell, & Co., but are not yet in place; 
and hollow bricks and skewbacks have been furnished by 
the Boston Fire Proof Company. 

Gold-street Bridge. 

Under an order from the Street Department, dated May 
13, 1895, plans and specifications were prepared for abridge 
over the tracks of the New York & New England Railroad at 
Gold street. 

A contract for the abutments was made with Frank H. 
Blaisdell, dated June 11, 1895, for the sum of $1,850, and 
subsequently an agreement was made with him for building 
two short return-walls at the ends of the west abutment. 
Work was begun July 1, and completed about January 1. 
The total amount paid under these two agreements was 
$2,333.45. 

A contract was made with the Boston Bridge Works, dated 
June 11, 1895, for the superstnicture of the bridge, for the 
sum of $1,570, and the work was completed January 20, 
1896. 

This department was also requested to see that the work 
of raising the building on the northerly side of Gold street, 
adjoining the east abutment, was carried out in accordance 
with an agreement made by the Street Department with F. 
H. Blaisdell, dated September 18, 1895. This work was 
finished early in January, satisfactory to the Building Depart- 
ment, and a final estimate made January 24, 1896, for the 
sum of $2,082.37. 

City Hospital Grounds. 

Plans and specifications have been prepared for the grading 
of a portion of the City Hospital grounds, building drains 
and building boundary walls, also surfacing drives and walks. 

The work is ready for advertising for proposals. 



148 City Document No. 10. 

Highland Park. 

During the fall of the past year considerable work has 
been done at Highland park, or old Fort square, Roxbury, 
fi-om plans furnished by Messrs. Olmstead, Olmstcad, & 
Eliot. The design is to restore the Old Fort up to the level 
of the interior platform, omitting the parapet, thus forming 
an elevated playground or concourse in accord with the 
aspect of a fortification. In other parts of the grounds walks 
will be provided, forming a complete circuit within the 
boundary, with widenings in the recesses between the bas- 
tions. The surfiice of the remaining spaces will be covered 
with low bushes, vines, and creepers. Considerably more 
than half the work contemplated has been done, a suitable 
retaining-wall has been built on Fort avenue, and the grading 
and walks on the north side of the grounds have been prac- 
tically completed ; the rough grading of the Old Fort has 
been nearly finished to the level of the platform ; the stand- 
pipe has been painted and repaired. 

A model was prepared by Mr. J. W. McClintock, Civil 
Engineer, based upon the lines shown on a contour plan 
made of the grounds in and upon such other data as could 
be collected. The plan of the grounds showed plainl}^ the 
location of two of the bastions of the Old Fort. 

With the approval of His Honor the Mayor the model was 
donated to the Bostonian Society, September 20, 1895. 

The total cost of the work done under the direction of 
this department was $6,306.06. 

East Boston Ferries. 

Middle Pier, North Ferry. March 27, 1895, a contract 
was made with W. H. Ellis & Co., for extending the middle 
pier at the East Boston side of the North Ferry. The 
pier was extended 30 feet, at a cost for contract work of 
$1,775.60. 

New Drop, South Ferry. A contract was made b}^ the 
Superintendent of Ferries, June 20, 1895, with William 
McKie, to build a new ferry drop to replace the old one at 
the southerly side of the Boston lauding of the South 
Ferry, for $5,611. The old drop was delivered to the 
Ferry Division, its machinery being removed to the new 
drop, and the necessary changes of the foundation and 
landing being made. 

Temporary Foot-bridge at Roxbury Crossing. 

A wooden foot-bridge was built over the tracks of the New 
York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad at Roxbury Crossing, 



Engineering Department. 149 

on Tremont street, under a contract with Josiah Shaw, dated 
June 11, 1895, at a cost of |981. 

West Newton-street Bulkhead. 

A timber bulkhead was built across the end of West New- 
ton street abutting on the line of the Boston & Albany- 
Railroad, under a contract with A. Bellevue & Co., for the 
sum of $344. 



WIDTHS OF DEAW-OPENINGS. 

The table showing the widths of draw-openings in the 
bridges over tide-water in this city is given in Appendix A. 
The openings have all been remeasured for this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

Citi/ Engineer^ 



CITY EN^GIIS^EERS. 

1850-1895. 



E. S. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 18, 1850, to Oct., 1855. 

(Died August 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

Oct. 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died August 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to Nov. 25, 1872. 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Resigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 

(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to the present time. 

(151) 



152 



City Document No. 10. 



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154 City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX B. 



TABLE OF ACCIDENT AND OTHER PLANS MADE FOR THE LAW 
DEPARTMENT, FROM FEBRUARY 1, 1895, TO JULY 1, 1895. 

Boston Proper. 

Appleton Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 42. 

Battery Street. — Plan of street at corner of Commercial street. 

Berwick Park. — Plan of, in front of No. 10. 

Boylston Street. — Plan of street on southerly side in front of old 
Public Library building. 

Church Street. — Plan of street at corner of Boylston street. 

Clarendon Street. — Plan of sti'eet in front of No. 24. 

Columbus Avemie. — Plan of, in front of No. 182. 

Columbus Aoenue. — Plan of, at southeast corner of Camden street. 

East Concord Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 13. 

Friend Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 150, 154. 

Green Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 10, 12. 

Hanover Street. — Plan of street, corner of North Centre street. 

Hanover Street. — Plan of street near corner of Sigourne}' place. 

Hanover Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 372. 

Harrison Avenue. — Plan of, near Stoughton street. 

Huntington Avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 86. 

Isabella Street. — Plan of street in front of Presb3'terian church. 

Joy Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 13. 

Kneeland Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 104, 110. 

Lynde Street. — Plan of street at corner of Green street. 

Massachusetts Avenue. — Plan of, near Albany street. 

Merchants Row. — Plan of, in front of No. 44. 

Milk Street. — Plan of street at corner of Hawley street. 

Northampton street. — Plan of street at corner of Tremont street. 

Northampton Street. — Plan of street at southwest corner of Colum- 
bus avenue. 

Shatvmut Avenue. — Plan of, near Brookline street. 

Summer Street. — Plan of street at corner of South street. 

Travers Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 80. 

Tremont Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 266. 

Tremont Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 782. 

Tremont Street. — Plan of street at corner of Northfield street. 

Washington Street. — Plan of street at corner of Avon street. 

South Boston. 

K Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 64. 
West First Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 421, 423. 
West TJiird Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 164. 
West Fourth Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 436. 



Engineering Department. 155 

Charlestown. 

Bow Street. — Plan of street at corner of Washington street. 
Henley Street. — Plan of street from Park street to Main street. 
Perkins Street. — Plan of street at corner of Cambridge street. 

ROXBURY. 

Hampshire Street. — Plan of street at corner of Culvert street. 
Huntington Avenue. — Plan of, in front of House of Good Shepherd. 
Leon Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 24. 
Rockland Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 55. 
Roxbury Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 104. 
Tremont Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 1485. 
Walnut Avenue. — Plan of, at corner of Circuit street. 
Warren Street. — Plan of street at corner of Taber street. 

Dorchester. 
Cushing Avenue. — Plan, near Upham's Corner. 

Medford. 
Boston Avenue. — Plans of, in Medford. 

Other Plans for Law Department. 

Essex Street. — From Beach street to South street, plan of, show- 
ing estates. 

Harrison Avenue. — From Essex street to Beach street, plan of, 
showing estates. 

Tremont Street. — At the corner of Boylston street, copy of plan 
showing widening on the Common. 



ACCIDENT PLANS MADE FOR THE LAW DEPARTMENT, FROM 
JULY 1, 1895, TO JANUARY 31, 1896. 

Boston Proper. 

Blackstone Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 133. 
Boylston Street. — Plan of street at the corner of Church street. 
Boylston Street. — Plan of street, northerly side opposite old Pub- 
lic Library building. 
Broadway. — Plan of, in front of No. 16. 
Cambridge Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 204. 
Chandler Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 69. 
Columbus Square. — Plan of, in front of No. 4. 
Court Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 61. 
Derne Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 32. 
Eastern Avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 27. 
Friend Street. — Plan of street at the corner of Market street. 
Hanover Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 273. 
Haymarket Square. — Plan of, near Washington street. 
Joy Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 14. 
Merrimac Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 131, 133. 
Phillips Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 65. 



156 City Document No. 10. 

Prince Street. — Plan of, in front of No. 93. 
Hussell Place. — Plan of, in front of Nos. 1, 2. 
Shawmut Avenue. — Plan of, at corner of Rutland street. 
Stoddard Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 3. 
St. James Avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 13. 
Sun Court Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 3. 
Winter Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 17. 

South Boston. 
Dorchester Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 21. 
West Second Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 404. 

Charlestown. 
Devon Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 80. 
Main Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 427. 

ROXBURY. 

Adams Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 46. 
Albany Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 825. 
Bower Street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 8, 10. 
Centre Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 8. 
Prentiss Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 10. 

Dorchester. 
Bruce Street. — Plan of street near Dracut street. 
Gleason Street. — Plan of street in front of Harvard Congrega 

tional Church. 
McLellan Street. — Plan of street near White street. 
Minot Street. — Plan of street near Glide street. 
Parkman Street. — Plan of street in front of No. 9. 

WiNTHROP. 

Main Street. — Plan of street at bridge in Winthrop. 



Engineering Department. 157 



APPENDIX C. 



TABLE SHOWING SURVEYS, PLANS AND PROFILES MADE 
BY THE SURVEYING DEPARTMENT, FROM FEBRUARY 1, 
1895, TO JULY 1, 1895. 

Boston Proper. 

Atlantic Avenue. — Plan of eucroachment at T wharf. 

Bay State Road. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade from 
Sherborn street to Granby street. 

Beacon Street. — Plan of proposed widening from Tremont street 
to Tremont place. 

BendalVs Lane. — Plan of relocation. 

Belvidere Street. — Plan of Mechanic Arts High School, for Super- 
intendent of Public Buildings. 

Boston. — Plan of Boston proper, showing changes in street and 
wharf lines, 1795 to 1895. A copy accompanies this report. 

Carlton Street. — Plan and profile from Yarmouth street to Massa- 
chusetts avenue. 

Commercial Street. — Plan of encroachment, corner of Hanover 
street. 

Catting Street. — Plan and profile of grade from Leverett street 
to Lowell street. 

Granby Street. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade from 
Commonwealth avenue to Charles river. 

India Square. — Plan of proposed widening. 

India Street. — Plan of relocation between India square and 
Atlantic avenue. 

Irving Street. — Plan and profile of grades' at Bowdoin-school lot. 

Laconia Street (formerly Ashland place) . — Plan and profile of 
laying out and grade from Washington street to Harrison 
avenue. 

Nonvay Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Falmouth 
street to Massachusetts avenue. 

Pemberton Square. — Plan of Court House, for Superintendent of 
Public Buildings. 

Prince Street. — Plan of proposed addition to Hancock-school lot. 

Proposed Street. — Plan and profile of proposed lajnng out and 
grade from Boylston street to Lansdowne street. 

South Russell Street. — Plan and profile for grade at Bowdoin- 
school lot. 

State Street. — Plan showing lines around Brazers Building. 

St. Germain Street. — Plan for construction assessment from 
Dallon street to Massachusetts avenue. 

Tremont Street. — Plan of proposed widening from Beacon street 
to Park street. 



158 City Document No. 10. 

Tyler Street. — Plan and profile of grade between Beach street 
and Harvard street. 

Washington Street. — Plan of territor>' bounded by Shawmiit ave- 
nue, Dover street, and Groton street, for Park Department. 

South Boston. 
Dorchester Street. — Plan showing encroachment between "West 
Sixth street and Tudor street. 

East Boston. 

East Boston Terminal. — Two large plans showing proposed 

change of railroad locations. 
Gove Street. — Plan of proposed addition to school lot. 

Charlestown. 
Dorrance Street. — Plan of passageway to Beacham street. 
Pine ^treet- |_lpian of proposed addition to school lot. 

ROXBURT. 

Abbotsford Street. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade 

from Walnut avenue to Crawford street. 
Alleghany Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

extension from Parker street to St. Alphonsus street, with 

grade. 
Comins Terrace. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade from 

Bower street to Munroe-school lot. 
Fenno Street. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade from 

Buena Vista street to Rockland street. 
Intervale Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Blue Hill avenue eastwardly. 
Parker Hill Avenue. — Plan and profile of proposed revision of 

grade from Huntington avenue to Hillside street. 
Prentiss Place. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out, widen- 
ing, and extension from Linden Park street to Cabot street, 

with grade. 
Rvggles Street. — Plan and profile of proposed revision of grade 

from Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 
Wyoyning Street. — Plan and profile of proposed extension to 

Humboldt avenue, with grade. 

Dorchester. 
Bloovifield Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Geneva avenue to Greenbrier street. 
Ellet Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Blue Hill avenue to New York & New England Railroad. 
Harvest Street. — Plan of proposed school lot. 
King Street and Adams Street. — Plan of proposed school lot. 
Lauriat Aoenue. — Plan of laying out and grade from Blue Hill 

avenue to New England Railroad. 



Engineering Department. 159 

West Roxbury. 

Arundel Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Walter street to Selvvyn street. 
Kirk Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Montview street to Crest street. 

Brighton. 

Cambridge Street. — Plan and profile of widening with grade from 

Harvard avenue to Linden street. 
Commonivealth Avenue. — Plan of land belonging to the City of 

Boston, at the corner of Chestnut Hill avenue. 



TABLE OF SURVEYS, PLANS AND PROFILES MADE BY THE 
SURVEYING DIVISION OF THE ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT, FROM JULY 1. 1895, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1896. 

Boston Proper. 

Albany Street. — Approximate plan of proposed widening from 
Lehigh street to Troy street. 

Audubon Road. — Plan for construction assessment from Beacon 
street to Ivy street. 

Bay State Road. — Plan for construction assessment from Sher- 
born street to Granby street. 

Boylston Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Back 
Bay Feus to Brookliue avenue. 

Chambers Street. — Approximate plan for proposed school-house 
site between Poplar street and Allen street. 

Charlestoivn Street. — Approximate plan of proposed widening 
from Haymarket square to Causeway street. 

Clinton Street. — Plan and jirofile of widening with grade, from 
Commercial street to Fulton street, seventy feet wide. 

Clinton Street. — Plan and profile of proposed widening with grade, 
from Commercial street to Fulton street, eighty feet wide. 

Commomoealth Avenue. — Plan showing trees from Arlington street 
to Clarendon street. 

Cross Street. — Approximate plan of proposed widening and exten- 
sion to Haymarket square. 

Granby Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Common- 
wealth avenue to Charles river. 

Harrison Arenue. — Plan for Law Department from Essex street 
to Beach street. 

Kenmore Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Com- 
monwealth avenue to Newbury street. 

Parker Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Westland 
avenue to Himtington avenue. 

Prince Street. — Plan of proposed school-house site near Bennet 
avenue. 

St. Botolph Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade, from Massachusetts avenue to Gainsboro' street. 



160 City Document No. 10. 

Sherborn Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Com- 
monwealth avenue to Charles river. 

State Street. — Plan showing lines around Brazers Building. 

Turner Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Haviland 
street to Astor street. 

South Boston. 

Congress Street. — Plan and profile of proposed widening from A 
street to L street. 

G Street and East Fourth Street. — Plan of proposed High-school 
lot. 

I Stref^t. — Plan of encroachment at No. 134. 

3It. Washington Avenue. — Approximate plan of proposed exten- 
sion to A street. 

West Fourth Street. — Silver street and E street, plan of proposed 
addition to Bigelow-school lot. 

East Boston. 

Lewis Street. — Approximate plan of proposed widening from 

Webster street to South Ferry. 
Maverick Street. — Plan of encroachment at No. 374. 
Wordsioorih Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade, from Saratoga street to Pope street. 

Charlestown. 

Elm Street. — Approximate plan of proposed extension to Mystic 

river. 
Lynde Avenue. — Approximate areas for proposed street. 
Quincy Street. — Plan and profile for proposed laying out and 

grade, from Bunker Hill street to Medford street. 
Stetson Court. — Approximate plan of proposed extension to Park 

street. 

ROXBURY. 

Abbotsford Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Wal- 
nut avenue to Harold street. 

Armory Street. — Plan and profile showing grade from Centre 
street to Amory avenue. 

Brunswick Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade east from Blue Hill avenue. 

Columbxis Avenue and Tremont Street. — Plan and profile for pro- 
posed change of grade at New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

Devon Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
east from Blue Hill avenue. 

Dudley Street. — Plan of widening between Mt. Pleasant avenue 
and Mt. Pleasant place. 

New Heath Street. — Plan and profile with revised grade at east 
side of Columbus avenue. 

Oswald Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from Calumet street to Hillside street. 



Engineering Department. 161 

Parker Hill Avenue, — Plan and profile with revised grade from 

Huntington avenue to Hillside street. 
St. Alphonsus Street. — Plan for construction assessment from 

Tremont street to Calumet street. 
Treviont Street. — Plan of proposed relocation from Linden Park 

street to Texas street. 
Windsor Street. — Plan of discontinuance of part not included in 

the extension of Columbus avenue. 

Dorchester. 

Athehoold Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from School street to Kilton street. 

Blue Hill Avenue. — Plan and profile of relocation and grade from 
Seaver street to Canterbury street. 

Boicdoin Avenue. — Plan of school-house and lot. 

Bradshaio Street (formerly White street). — Plan and profile of 
proposed laying out and grade from Glenway street to Char- 
lotte street. 

Burhank Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from Washington street to Merrill street. 

Centre Street. — Plan and pi'ofile of widening with grade from 
Washington street to Geneva avenue. 

Cook Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from Washington street to Chamberlain street. 

Draper Court. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from Bowdoin street to Coleman street. 

Draper Court. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and exten- 
sion with grade from Bowdoin street to Clark street. 

East Street. — Plan of school-house lot for architect. 

Edioin Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from Dorchester avenue to Shawmut park. 

Fowler Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from Glenway to Greenwood street. 

Gawain Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from Harvard street to Park street. 

Geneva Avenue. — Plan for construction assessment from Dor- 
chester avenue to Westville street. 

Granger Street. — Plan and profile of proposed extension and 
grade to Dorchester avenue. 

Granger Street. — Approximate plan of extension through Leon- 
ard place and Gordon place to Dorchester avenue. 

Greenbrier Street. — Plan and profile of laying out and grade from 
Bowdoin street to Bloomfield street. 

Greenwood Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from Fowler street to Elmo street. 

Greenwood Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade from Elmo street to Harvard street. 

Harbor View Street. — Plan of proposed addition to school-house 
lot. 

Josephine Street. — Plan for construction assessment from Ditsou 
street to Geneva avenue. 



162 City Document No. 10. 

Kingsdale Street (formerly Coolidge avenue) . — Plan and profile 

of laying out and grade from Standish street westerly. 
Lauriat Avenue. — Plan for construction assessment from Blue 

Hill avenue to Thatcher street. 
Leeds Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Savin Hill avenue to Bay street. 
Mellen Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Ocean street to Montague street. 
Mill Street. — Plan of proposed addition to Harris-school lot. 
Millet Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Harvard street to Park street. 
Morton Street. — Plan of school-house and lot near Norfolk 

street. 
Morton Street. — Plan and profile of proposed widening and grade 

from New England Railroad to Norfolk street. 
Pleasant Street. — Plan of proposed relocation from East Cottage 

street to Stoughton street. 
Ramsey Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Dudley street to Hamlet street. 
Hosseter Street. — Plan and profile of proposed extension and 

grade from Bullard street to Bowdoin avenue. 
Robinson Street. — Plan of school lot, with grades, for architect. 
Shawmut Park. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from King street to Templeton street. 
Talbot Avenue. — Plan of proposed high-school lot, corner of 

Centre street. 
Thane Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Harvard street to Park street. 
Washington Street. — Plan and profile of proposed relocation and 

grade from Norfolk street to Fuller street. 
Wilder Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out from 

Washington street to Geneva avenue. 
Wolcott Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Columbia street to Erie street. 

West Roxbdry. 

Back Street. — Approximate plan and profile of proposed grade 

from Blue Hill avenue to Austin street. 
Boylston Avenue. — Plan and profile of revised grade north from 

Green street. 
Brookside Avenue. — Plan and profile of revised grade from Green 

street to Stony Brook. 
Colder Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Blue Hill avenue to Canterbury street. 
Canterbury Street. — Plan and profile of proposed grade from Blue 

Hill avenue to Angell street. 
Fairvieio Street. — Plan and profile of grade from Proctor street 

to Mendum street. 
Oreen Street. — Plan and profile of revised grade from Brookside 

avenue to Boylston avenue. 
Hewlett Street. — Plan of proposed school-house lot, corner of 

Walter street. 



Engineering Department. 163 

Heidett Street. — Plan of school-house lot, corner of Walter street, 

showing grades for architect. 
Jones Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Fairview street to Walter street. 
Menduvi Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Fairview street to Walter street. 
Park Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 

from Centre street to Montview street. 
Stratford Avenue. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade from Anawan avenue to the N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R. 

Brighton. 

Bayard Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from North Harvard street to Kenneth street. 

Cambridge Street. — Plan showing addition to Allston Grammar- 
school lot. 

Cambridge Street. — Plan showing widening at the corner of Hen- 
shaw street. 

Chestnut Hill Avenue. — Plan and profile of proposed widening 
and grade from Beacon street to South street. 

Chiswick Road. — Plan of school-house lot, corner of Chestnut Hill 
avenue. 

Harvard Avenue. — Plan for construction assessment from Com- 
monwealth avenue to Brookline line. 

Kenneth Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out from 
Franklin street to beyond Bayard street. 

South Street. — Plan and profile of proposed widening and grade 
from Chestnut Hill avenue to Commonwealth avenue. 

Weitz Street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade 
from Franklin street to Bayard street. 



164 City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX D. 



TABLE OF PLANS FOR SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS MADE FOR 
PAVING DIVISION OF STREET DEPARTMENT, FROM JULY 
1, 1895, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1896. 

Boston Proper. 

Commonwealth Avenue. — South side between Beacon street and 

Essex street, at Cottage Farm. 
Parker Street. — Between Boylston street and Westland avenue. 
Warren Avenue. — Southeast side between Berkeley street and 

Dartmouth street. 
Washington Street. — At No. 1046. 

South Boston. 

Baldwin Street. — Between B street and Granite street. 

Richards Street. — Between A street and Granite street. 

West Eighth Street. — Northerly corner of D street, Nos. 118 



and 120. 



ROXBDRY. 



Alaska Street. — Southwest side. 

Gaston Street. — South side from angle to Blue Hill avenue. 

Gaston Street. — Southwest corner of Warren street. 

Hammond Street. — Nos. 10 to 16. 

Harold Street and Homestead Street. — Easterly corner. 

Hazehvood Street. — Between Munroe street and Townsend street. 

Howland Street and Elm Hill Avenue. — Northerly corner. 

Maywood Street. — Between Warren street and Blue Hill avenue. 

Quincy Street. — Northeast side from Warren street to Blue Hill 

avenue. 
Sterling Street. — From Shawmut avenue to No. 61. 
Sterling Street. — At No. 84. 
Toivnsend Street. — Warren street to Harold street. 

Dorchester. 

Adams Street. — Between Minot street and Frederika street. 
Alban Street. — Between Ashmont street and Welles avenue. 
Bicknell Street. — At Nos. 35 and 37. 

Kenroood Street. — Between Washington street and Allston street. 
Rosliii Street. — Between Washington street and Harley street. 
Talbot Avenue. — Between Wasliington street and Welles avenue. 
Tremlett Street. — Near Hooper street. 



Engineering Department. 165 

West Roxbury. 

Perkins Street. — Corner of Jaraaicaway. 

South Street. — Between Brookfiekl street and South "Walter street. 

Charlestown. 
Mishawum Street. — Between Main street and Rutberford avenue. 



LIST OF STREETS WHERE LOT FRONTAGES HAVE BEEN OB- 
TAINED FOR THE SEWER DIVISION OF THE STREET 
DEPARTMENT FOR SEWER ASSESSMENTS FOR THE YEAR 
1895. 

Charlestown. 

Chelsea Street. — Westerly side from Medf ord street to Scotts court. 
Lawrence Street. — From Union street to Austin street. 

P^AST Boston. 
Chelsea Street. — At and near Prescott street. 
Marion Street. — From Benniugton street to Havre street. 
Saratoga Street. — From Bennington street to Austin avenue. 

South Boston. 

Dorchester Avenue. — From Fort Point Channel to West Broad- 
way. 
Gold Street. — From A street to B street. 

CiTT Proper. 

Butler Square. — From Chatham street to Butler row. 
Chambers Street. — From Auburn street to Brighton street. 
Curve Street. — From Tyler street to Hudson street. 
Harvard Street. — From Washington street to Hudson street. 
Merrimac Street. — From Portland street to Staniford street. 
North Margin Street. — From Cooper street to Thacher street. 
Noyes Place. — From Salem street westerly. 
Prince Street. — At corner of Salem street. 
Salem Street. — From Noyes place to Prince street. 
Tyler Street. — From Oak street to Curve street. 

ROXBURT. 

Audubon Road. — From Beacon street to Ivy street. 

Comins Terrace. — From Bower street. 

Dalmatia Street. — From Blue Hill avenue to Dacia street. 

Fenno Street. — From Buena Vista avenue to Rockland street. 

Gerard Street. — From Norfork avenue to Massachusetts avenue. 

Heath Street. — From Lawn street to Da}' street. 

Humboldt Avenue. — From Munroe street to Townsend street. 

Munroe Street. — From Humboldt avenue to Walnut avenue. 

Parker Hill Avenue. — Near Sunset street. 

Whiting Street. — From Moreland street westerly. 



166 City Document No. lU. 



Dorchester. 

Adams Street. — From King street to Lonsdale street. 

Centre Street. — From Adams street to a point 630 feet westerly. 

East Cottage Street. — From Dorchester avenue to a point near 

Boston street. 
Glenway Street. — From Erie street to a point 300 feet southerly 

from Page avenue. 
McLellan Street. — From Blue Hill avenue to Page avenue. 
Parkivay. — From Dorchester avenue to Pond street. 
Pond Street. — From East Cottage street to Parkway. 
Tremlett Street. — From Hooper street to a point 200 feet east- 

wardly. 
White Street. — From Glenway street to Bickuell street. 

West Roxburt. 
Angell Street. — From Blue Hill avenue to Canterbury street. 
Corey Street. — From Montview street to Vermont avenu?. 
Hewlett Street. — From Centre street to Walter street. 
Jainaicaway. — From Perkins street to Pond street. 
Landseer Street. — From Bellevue street southerlj-. 
Oriole Street. — From Bellevue street to Wren street. 
South Street. — From Keyes street to Parkway. 
Sylvia Street. — From Washington street to Forest Hills street. 

Weld Street. — From Willow street to Maple street. 

Wren Street. — From Oriole street to Rutledgo street. 

Brighton. 

Bigeloio Street. — From Faneuil street to the bend. 

Cambridge Street. — From Cambridge terrace to point south of 

Union square. 
Cambridge Street. — From Warren street to point north of Dustin 

street. 
Lalce Street. — From Washington street to Commonwealth avenue. 
Nonautum Street. — From Oak square to the Newton line. 
North Beacon Street. — From Everett street to Gordon street. 
Strathmore Road. — From Chestnut Hill avenue to Euglewood 

avenue. 
Sutherland Road. — From Selkirk road to Kinross road. 
Tremont Street. — From Oak square to the Newton line. 
Washington Street. — From Tremont street to the Newton line. 



Engeneering Department. 



167 



APPENDIX E. 



Engineering Department Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as 

follows : 
1 Temple transit. 
5 Buff & Berger transits. 
8 Gurley transits. 

1 Staekpole transit. 

2 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 

5 Gurley levels. 
11 Boston rods. 

3 New York rods. 

4 Troy rods. 

Cases for plans and books. 
Reference Library, 1,012 vol- 
umes. 



9,406 Plans Engineering Works, 

loose. 
14 volumes Plans Engineering 

Works, bound. 
Photographs of Engineering 

Works. 
Apparatus for blue printing. 
1 microscope. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holosteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pair field-glasses. 

2 typewriters. 

2 d^mamometers. 
1 pentagraph. 
1 calculating-machine. 
1 volt meter. 

1 comptometer. 

2 thermophoues. 



Surveying Division. 



3 Temple transits. 
2 Moody transits. 

2 Buff & Berger transits. 

3 Staekpole transits. 

1 Troughton & Sims transit. 
1 Poole transit. 
1 Archibut transit. 



1 Ring transit. 

5 Buff & Berger levels. 

1 Mood}' level. 

2 Temple levels. 
1 Ewiug level. 

1 Gurley level. 
7 Rods. 



168 City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX F. 



Elevations referred to Boston city base. (The city base is 0.64 feet below 
mean low tide.) 

Feet. 

0.00 City base. 

15.66 Highest tide, April 16, 1851. 
15.33 Coping of dry dock, Charlestown Navy Yard. 
12.24 Greatest elevation of high tide, per United States Tide- 
Tables, April 29 and November 6, 1896 (11.6 + 0.64) 
= 12.24. 
8.24 Least elevation of high tide, per United States Tide- 
Tables, January 24 and August 3 and 4, 1896 (7.6 + 
0.64) =8.24. 
2.84 Greatest elevation of low tide, per United States Tide- 
Tables, September 1, 1896 (2.2 + 0.64) = 2.84. 
— 1.36 Least elevation of low tide, per United States Tide-Tables, 
November 6, 1896 (—2.0 + 0.64) = —1.36. 
0.64 Mean low tide. 
5.00 Piles cut off for building. 

9.91 Water-works base (approximate tide-marsh level). 
^ — 4.98 Cambridge city base. 
0.38 South Boston flats base. 

J Cambridge city base is 4.98 feet below Boston city base. 



Engineering Department. 



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CONTENTS REPORT ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT FOR 1895. 



[General index to contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892, will be found in 
Keport of February 1, 1892. J 

PAGE 

A. — Engineering Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Engineering Department 2 

" " " Abolishment grade crossings, Dover- 
street bridge 7 

" " " Improved sewerage 4 

*' " " Rebuilding bridges to Watertown. . . 7 
*' " " Statues — Robert G. Shaw, monu- 
ment. 7 

" " " " J. Boyle O'Reilly, monu- 
ment 8 

Bridges inspected 8 

" wholly supported by Boston 8 

" " " " railroads 29 

*' of which Boston supjjorts the part within its lirnits. ... 10 

*' " " pays a part of the cost of maintenance, 11 

" supported by railroad corporations 11 

" " " " " Boston & Albany R.R., 11 
'• " " " " Boston & Maine R.R., 

W. Div 11 

" " " Boston & Maine R.R., 

East. Div 11 

" " " " " Boston, Revere Beach, 

& Lynn R.R 11 

" " " " " New England R.R... . 11 

N.Y.,N.H., &H. R.R., 

Old Colony Div. ... 12 
" " " " " N.Y.,N.H.,&H.R.R., 

Prov. Div 12 

" Total number (120) 12 

Bridges 12 

Agassiz road. Back-bay fens 12 

Albany street, over B. & A. R.R 13 

AUston, over B. & A. R.R 13 

Arborway, over Stony brook, Parkway 13 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R 13 

Athens street, over N.E. R.R 13 

Audubon road, over B. & A. R.R 13 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back-bay fens 13 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R 13 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, Parkway 14 

Bernier-street foot-bridge, over Bridle path, Riverway 14 

Bernier-street foot-bridge, over Muddy river 14 

Berkeley street, B. & A. R.R '. 14 

Berkeley street, Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R 14 

Berwick-park foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. 

R.R 15 

Blackmore street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H.. & H. R.R. . . 15 

Bolton street, N.E. R.R 15 

Boylston street, Back-bay fens 15 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 16 



172 City Document No. 10. 

Bridges, continued. page 

Bridle path, over Muddy river, in Riverway 15 

Broadway, over Fort-point channel 15 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 16 

Brookline avenue, over B. & A. R.R 16 

Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in Parkway 16 

Byron street, B., R.B., & L. R.R 17 

Cambridge street 17 

Canal or Craigie's 17 

Castle-Island foot-bridge 17 

Central avenue, over Neponset river 18 

Charles river 18 

Charlesgate, Back-bay fens 18 

Chelsea, over B. & M. R.R 18 

Chelsea (North) 18 

Chelsea (South) 19 

Chelsea street 19 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro pond, in Franklin Park 19 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R.R 19 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 19 

Commonwealth avenue. Back-bay fens 20 

Congress street 20 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook 20 

Cottage-street foot-bridge 20 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R.R 20 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R.R., and Prov. Div. N.Y., 

N.H., & H. R.R 21 

"Dorchester street, over Old Colony Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. 

R.R 21 

Dover street 21 

Ellicott arch, in Franklin Park 21 

Essex street 21 

Everett street, over B. & A. R.R 21 

Federal street 22 

Fen bridge, Back-bay fens 22 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R.R 22 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin Park 22 

Gold-street foot-bridge, over N.E. R.R 22 

Granite to Milton 22 

Harvard to Cambridge 22 

Huntington avenue, over B. & A. R.R 23 

Irvington-street foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H., & 

H. R.R 23 

L-street bridge 23 

Leverett pond, foot-bridge in Leverett Park 23 

Leyden street, B., R.B., & L. R.R 23 

Linden-park street, over Stony brook 23 

Longwood avenue 24 

Maiden 24 

Massachusetts avenue, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H.,&H. 

R.R 24 

Massachusetts avenue, over B. & A. R.R 24 

Mattapan 24 

Meridian street 24 

Milton 25 

Mt. Washington avenue 25 

Neponset 25 

Neptune road, over B., R.B., & L. R.R 25 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R 25 

North Beacon street 26 

North Harvard street 26 

Prison Point 26 

Public Garden foot-bridge 26 

Roxbury crossing foot-bridge 26 



Engineering Department. 173 

Bridges, continued. page 

Scarboro pond, foot-bridge in Franklin Park 26 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R.R 27 

Spring street 27 

Stony brook, Back-bay fens 27 

Swett-street bridges (over south-bay sluices) 27 

Tremont street, over Muddy river 27 

Warren 27 

Western avenue to Cambridge 28 

Western avenue to Watertown 29 

West Boston 28 

West Chester Park. (See Massachusetts avenue.) 

West Fourth street (over O.C. Div. N.Y., N.H., & H. R.R.), 28 

West Rutland-square foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. N.Y., 

N.H., & H. R.R 28 

Winthrop 29 

Surveying Division : 

Tables, showing amount paving w^ork measured for the years 

1894-1895 32 

Lines and grades given, and paving work measured, 1895 : 

East Boston and Breed's Island 33 

Charlestown 35 

South Boston 35 

Boston Proper 36 

Roxbury 40 

Dorchester 48 

Brighton 51 

West Roxbury 52 

Plans 54 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1895 : 

Charles-river bridge 145 

Chelsea bridge, Charlestown to Chelsea 145 

Chelsea-street bridge 146 

Cottage-Farm bridge 147 

City Hospital Grounds 147 

East Boston Ferries : 

Middle pier. North Ferry 148 

New drop, South Ferry 148 

Gold-street bridge 147 

Highland park 148 

Miscellaneous 149 

Roxbury crossing, temporary foot-bridge 148 

West Newton street, bulkhead 149 

B. — Water Works 59 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs 65 

Consumption 72 

Corrosion of pipes by electrolysis, report of Stone & Webster, 74 

Distribution 76 

Farm pond 63-64 

High-service pumping-stations 65 

Lake Cochituate 63-64 

Mystic lake 68 

Mystic-valley sewer 69 

Mystic conduit and reservoir 69 

Mystic pumping-station 69 

Reservoir No. 1 59, 64 

'^ 2 60, 64 

" 3 60,64 

" 4 60, 64 

" 5 61 

" 6 62, 64 

Sources of supply 59 

Table, showing daily average consumption of water in gal- 
lons from the Cochituate and Mystic works 78 

Table showing diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1887-95 ... 79 



174 City Document No. 10. 



Water Works, continued. page 

Table showing amount of water diverted from Sudbury river 
to Lake Cochituate and Chestnut-hill res- 
ervoir; amount wasted ; amount of flow in 
river; percentage of rainfall collected, 
etc. , 1875-1895 83 

" " amount of water drawn from Mystic lake ; 
amount wasted; amount of rainfall col- 
lected in lake ; percentage of rainfall 
collected, etc., 1876-1895; water-shed of 
lake, 17,200 acres 85 

" " amount of water drawn from Lake Cochit- 
uate ; amount wasted; amount of rainfall 
collected in lake; amount received into 
lake from Sudbury river; percentage of 
rainfall collected, etc., 1852-1895; water- 
shed of lake, 12,077 acres 80 

" " the average monthly and yearly heights in 
feet above tide-marsh level to which water 
would rise at different stations on the Bos- 
ton Water Works 86 

'* " operations at the Chestnut-bill pumping-sta- 

tion for 1895 87 

" " operations and work done at the Mystic 

pumping-station for 1895 89 

'* " work done at the Mystic sewage pumping- 
station during the year 1895 92 

" " operations at West Roxbury pumping-station 

for 1895 91 

" " operations at East Boston pumping-station 

for 1895 90 

" *' rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sud- 

bury-river water-shed for the year 1895 . . 93 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths at Lake Co- 
chituate for the year 1895 94 

" " rainfall in inches and hundredths on the 

Mystic-lake water-shed for the year 1895. . 95 

" " monthly rainfall in inches during 1895 at 

various places in Eastern Massachusetts. . 96 

" " the temperature of air and water at various 

stations on the Water Works 97 

*' " rainfall in inches on Cochituate water-t*hed, 

1863-1895 98 

" " rainfall collected in inches on Cochituate 

water-shed. 1863-1895 100 

" "■ rainfall, percentage collected on Cochituate 

water-shed, 1863-1895 102 

" " rainfall in inches on Sudburv-river water 

shed, 1875-1895 ' 104 

" •' rainfall collected in inches on Sudbury-river 

water-shed, 1875-1895 105 

" " rainfall, percentage collected on Sudbury- 
river water-shed, 1875-1 895 106 

" " rainfall in inches on Mystic water-shed, 1878- 

1895 107 

** " rainfall collected in inches on Mystic water- 
shed, 1878-1895 108 

" *' rainfall, percentage collected on Mystic 

water-shed, 1878-1895 109 

" " yieldof Sudbury-river water-shed, 1875-1895, 

area of water-shed used, include water 

surfaces 110 

General statistics, 1892, '93, '94, '95 77 

Whitehall pond 63, 64, 73 

Summary of statistics, report for 1895 112 



Engineering Department. 175 

PAGE 

C. — Improved Sewerage, or Main Drainage 114 

Appropriations and expenditures 114 

Dorchester : 

Sections 9, 11 114 

Neponset intercepting sewer 115 

D. — Parks 117 

Arborway 119 

Arboretum 119 

Charlesbank 125 

Men's Gymnasium 125 

Women's Gymnasium and Girl's Playground 125 

Charlestown Heights 124 

Charlestown Playground 125 

Commonwealth avenue 117 

Dorchester Park 122 

Dorchesterway 122 

Fens 118 

Franklin Park 120 

Ellicottdale and Cottage 121 

Forest Hills entrance 120 

Overlook Building 121 

Refectory 120 

Seaver street 120 

Water supply 120 

Franklin Field 122 

Jamaica Park 119 

Boating service 119 

Refectory 119 

Miscellaneous 119 

Leverett Park 118 

Walks 118 

Miscellaneous 118 

Walls and fences 118 

Marine Park 123 

Filling 123 

Head-house 123 

Iron pier 123 

North End Public Park 123 

Riverway 118 

Drives, rides, walks 118 

Wall 118 

Strandway 122 

Skating 126 

West Roxbury Parkway 119 

Wood-Island Park 123 

E. — Street Department 129 

Blue Hill avenue 129 

Brighton avenue 132 

Columbus-avenue extension 130 

Commonwealth-avenue extension 132 

Huntington avenue 131 

Ash street, Oak to Nassau street 134 

Barton street, Leverett to Milton street 134 

Billerica street, Causeway to Minot street 134 

Bond street, Hanson to Milford street 134 

Brimmer street, Beacon to Pinckney street 134 

Chambers street, Brighton to Charles street 134 

Charles street (easterly side), Pinckney to Cambridge street, 135 

Cliarter street, Unity street to Jackson avenue 135 

Columbus avenue. Park square to beyond Ferdinand street. 135 

Devonshire street, Franklin to Milk street 135 

Edinboro' street, Essex to Beach street 136 

Fabin street, Newland to Ivanhoe street 136 

Harrison avenue (westerly side), E. Newton to E. Spring- 
field street 136 



176 City Document No. 10. 

E. — Street Department, continued. pagk 

Henchman street, Charter to Commercial street 136 

Lancaster street, Causeway to Merrimac street 136 

Massachusetts avenue (southerly side), Washington to Al- 
bany street 136 

Merchants Row, State to North street 137 

North Margin street, Thacher to Stillman street 137 

Otis street. Summer street to Winthrop square 137 

Oxford street, Beach to Essex street 137 

Pinckney street, Charles, through Brimmer street 137 

Prince street, Hanover to Bennet avenue 137 

Spring street, Poplar to Leverett street 137 

Summer street (northerly side) , Washington to Federal street, 138 

Tileston street, Salem to Wiggin street 138 

Warren street (Charlestown), Winthrop to Soley street .... 138 

West street, Tremont to Washington street 138 

Whitmore street, Kneeland to Harvard street 138 

Grading street-railway tracks 140 

West End 140 

Norfolk Suburban 141 

Lynn & Boston 141 

New streets 138 

Boylston street 139 

Harvard avenue 139 

Ivy street 139 

Kenmore street 139 

Norway street 139 

Parker street 139 

St. Germain street 140 

Sherborn street 140 

Surveys, plans and estimates, miscellaneous streets 141 

Work done by Surveying Division 143 

City Engineers, 1850-1895 151 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Plan of Boston Proper, showing changes in street and wharf lines, 

1795 to 1895 58 

Park Department : Table showing principal items of work completed 

on the several parks to January 31, 1896 128 

Water-works : Diagrams showing rainfall and daily average consump- 
tion for each month 78 

Water-works : Diagrams showing the heights of Sudbury-river reser- 
voirs, Farm pond, Cochituate and Mystic lakes, and the rainfall 
on the Sudbury-river water- shed during the year 1895 64 



APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. Showing width of draw-openings 152 

B. Table of accident and other plans made for Law De- 

partment, 1895 154 

C. Table showing surveys, plans and profiles, made by 

Surveying Department, from February 1 to July 1, 

1895 157 

D. Table of plans for sidewalk assessments, made for 

Paving Division of Street Department, from July 1, 
1895, to February 1, 1896 164 

E. Engineering Department, propertv schedule, main 

office .' 167 

F. Elevations referred to Boston city base 168 

G. List of Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1895 . . 169 



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