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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



With Compliments of 



illiam larhson, 



City Engineer 




BOSTON: 

Municipal Printing Office, 
1897. 



\^'\i^ 



-TONE ^; ^^BSTER. 

BOOK No /^^ 
SEQJION ^ 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER, 



BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR I896. 



^rmtjcb for i\t ^epartntiEtrf. 




BOSTON: 

Municipal Printing Office, 
1897. 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 
Boston, Feb. 1, 1897. 

Hon. Josiah Qtjincy, 

Mayor of the City of Boston : 

Sir : In comj)liance with the Revised Ordinances the fol- 
lowing report of the expenses and operations of the departs 
ment for the year ending Jan. 31, 1897, is submitted : — 

The report of the work done by this department may be 
classified under the following heads : — 

A. — The examination and supervision of structural re- 
pairs of bridges, the designmg and superintending the con- 
struction of new bridges, retainmg walls, city wharves, etc., 
and in miscellaneous engineering work called for by the City 
Council, the giving of lines and grades for property-owners 
and builders, the making of plans and profiles for the Street 
Commissioners, and the making of survey plans, etc., for the 
various city departments. 

B. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the Sudbury^-river, Cochituate, and JNIystic Water-Works, in- 
cluding charge of new constructions for these works. 

C. — Charge of the construction of a system of intercept- 
ing and outlet sewers. 

D. — Charge of the engineering work in connection with 
the parks. 

E. — Charge of the engineering work, except for Sewer 
Division, in connection with the Street Department. 

The expenses incurred under the head " C " are paid 
wholly from a special appropriation. 



2 City Document No. 10. 

A. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 

Feb. 1, 1896, to Jan. 31, 1897 : 

Amount of department appropriation for 

1896-97 $73,000 00 

Amount expended from department appro- 
priation for 1896-97 .... 71,04999 



Unexpended balance fl,95001 



Stateivient of Expenditures, Department 
Appropriation. 

Object of expenditures : 

Salaries of City Engineer, assistants, 
draughtsmen, transitmen, levellers, rod- 
men, etc. ...... 

Engineering instruments and repairs of 
same ....... 

Drawing-paper, and all materials for making 
plans ....... 

Stationery, printing-stock, note-books, post- 
age, etc. ...... 

Printing ....... 

Reference library, binding books, and photo- 
graphs of works . . . . . 569 15 

Travelling expenses (includmg horse-keep- 
ing, repau's on vehicles, etc.) . . . 1,657 93 

Telephone service ..... 247 80 

Fui-niture cases for plans and books, etc. . 183 19 

Blue-process printing .... 371 23 

Incidental expenses, and all other small 

supplies ...... 536 11 

Total $71,049 99 



164,060 


34 


983 


11 


1,046 


18 


978 


76 


416 


19 



Engineeeing Department. 

Improved Sewerage. 
Total appropriations . - . 

Statement of expenses from Feb. i, 1896^ to 

Object of expenditure : 
General office expenses 
East Shaft Roadway .... 
Section 6, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer 

Mt. Vernon street, Overflow 
Neponset Intercepting Sewer 



Loans negotiated (less 

167,500, transferred) . $6,308,664 03 
Revenue .... 66,740 93 



. 16,375,404 96 


Feb. i, 1897. 


$1,763 


57 


575 


00 


150 


00 


60 


17 


1,350 


00 


12,821 


62 


17,422 


52 


$34,142 


88 



Expended previous to Feb. 

1, 1896 .... $6,341,262 08 
Expended from Feb. 1, 1896, 

to Feb. 1, 1897 . . 34,142 88 



5,375,404 96 



5,375,404 96 



Improved Sewerage Construction, 1896. 

Tables showing the cost of the sewer sections in progress 
during the year 1896, and other miscellaneous work : 



G-eneral Office Expenses. 




Items of expenditure: 




Salaries ...... 


$1,618 27 


Engineering instruments and repairs . 


14 17 


Stationery and printing stock 


19 04 


Travelling expenses .... 


76 10 


Sundries ...... 


35 99 




$1,763 57 



City Document No. 10. 



East Shaft Roadway. 



Item of expenditure : 
Displacement of tide-water (Commonwealtli 

of Massachusetts) $575 00 



$575 00 
Expended previous to 1896 .... 6,597 54 



1,172 54 



Section 6, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 

Item of expenditure : 
John McShean, damages to land during 

construction ...... $150 00 



1150 00 
Expended previous to 1896 .... 45,581 76 



$45,731 76 



Section 7, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 

Item of expenditure : 
Labor $60 17 



17 

Expended previous to 1896 .... 37,703 89 



$37,764 06 



Section 11, Dorchester Intercepting Sewer. 

Item of expenditure : 
Land damages, John Durell. . . . $1,350 00 



$1,350 00 
Expended previous to 1896 . . . . 19,472 81 

$20,822 81 



Engineering Department. 



Mt. Vernon Street, Overflow. 



Items of expenditure : 
Cement 


$307 41 


Lumber . . . . 


2,933 53 


Piles and labor on same 


375 48 


Teaming . . . . 
General supplies . 
Wooden gates 


100 00 
530 40 
130 29 


Labor . . . . . 
Sand and gravel . 
Coal .... 


6,985 22 
217 15 
229 61 


Drain-pipe . . . . 
Brick .... 


4 32 

692 55 


Hardware . . . . 


170 00 


Granite stones 


145 66 



.2,821 62 



Neponset Intercepting Sewer. 



Items of expenditure 



Brick 


1521 


37 






Cement . . . , 


534 


00 






Coal .... 


194 


34 






Drain-pipe . 


2,100 


00 






General supplies . 


405 


41 






Hardware . . . . 


20 


08 






Insurance 


75 


00 






Labor .... 


10,841 


79 






Lumber 


127 


Q6 






Sand and gravel . 


316 


25 






Teaming . . . . 


256 


00 






Rent of machinery- 


974 


50 






Paving 


985 


12 






Granite curbing . 


50 


00 






Rent of land 


21 


00 


$17,422 


52 








^ ^ 


Expended previous to 1896 . 






4,473 


74 




$21,896 


26 



6 City Document No. 10. 

Abolishment of Grade Crossings. 
Dover-street Bridge. 
Expenditures from Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897 
Displacement of tide-water 
(Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts) . . . $153 75 
Land damages, Lawrence J. 

Logan .... 20,475 73 



20,629 48 
Expended previous to 1896 .... 130,453 32 

8151,082 80 



Statues. 
John Boyle O'Reilly Monument. 
Appropriation from Phillips Street-fund 

income $4,250 00 

Items of expenditure : 
Labor .... 1204 86 
Stone pavement . . 405 00 

$609 86 



Expended previous to 1896 . 3,857 39 



3,967 25 



Balance Feb. 1, 1897 .... $282 75 

Robert Cr. Shaw Monument. 

Appropriation, Robert G. Shaw monument, $19,500 00 
No expenditures during the year ending Feb. 

1, 1897. 
Expended previous to 1896 .... 11,928 40 

Balance Feb. 1, 1897 .... $1,976 11 

South Union Station. 

Items of expenditure by the Engineering Department from 
July 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897 : 

Boat $47 50 

270 50 

1,106 28 

3,030 00 

125 00 

64 81 

$4,644 09 



Borings, rent of machinery 

" labor 
Engineering 
Rent of office 
Sundries 



Engineering Department. 



BRIDGES. 



The annual inspection of all liighway and foot-bridges has 
been made, together with special examinations and mspec- 
tions when notified by the Superintendent of Streets of the 
progress of repairs. 

Two bridges, Centre-street bridge and Roxbury Crossing 
foot bridge, have been abolished during the year, on account 
of the raising of the tracks of the Providence Division of the 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 

In the list of bridges those marked with a star (*) are 
over naAagable waters, and are each provided with a draw, 
the openings in which are shown in a table in Appendix A. 
The widths of the openmgs have been measured for this 
report. 

I. — Bridges wholly supported by Boston. 

Agassiz bridge, in Back Bay Fens. 

Allston bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 

Arbor way bridge, over Stony brook. 

Ashland street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R.R., West Roxbury. 

Athens street, over New England Railroad. 

Audubon road, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back Bay Fens. 

Beacon street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Berkeley street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R.R. 

Bernier-street foot-bridge (m the Riverway). 

Berwick-park foot-bridge, over Providence Division, JST. Y., 
N. H. & H. R.R. 

Blakemore street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R.R. 

Bolton street, over New England Railroad. 

Boylston street, in Back Bay Fens. 

Boylston street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Bridle path in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 

*Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lyim Rail- 
road. 

*Castle-island foot-bridge, from Marine park, South Bos- 
ton, to Castle island. 



8 City Docuivient No. 10. 

*Charles river, from Boston to Charlestown. 

Charlesgate, Back Bay Fens, over Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 

* Chelsea, South, over South channel of Mystic river. 

*Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

Cii'cuit drive, over Scarboro' pond in Franklin park. 

Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Commercial point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 

Commonwealth avenue, in Back Baj^ Fens. 

♦Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook, West Roxbury. 

Cottage Farm bridge, Brighton. 

Cottage-street foot-bridge, over flats. East Boston. 

Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany Railroad and 
Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 

*Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 

Elhcott arch, in Franklin park. 

♦Federal street, over Fort Point channel. 

Fen bridge, Back Bay Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin park. 

Gold street, over New England Railroad. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Irvington-street foot-bridge, over Providence Division, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 

*L street, over Reserved channel. South Boston. 

Leverett-pond foot-bridge, in Leverett park. 

Leyden street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Linden Park street, over Stony brook. 

♦Maiden, from Charlestown to Everett. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Massachusetts avenue, over Providence Division, N. Y. 
N. H. & H. R.R. 

♦Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 

♦Mount Washington, over Fort Point channel. 

Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Rail- 
road. 

Newton street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R.R. 

Public Garden, foot-bridge. 

Scarboro' pond foot-bridge, in Franklin park. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Stony brook. Back Bay Fens. 

Swett street, east of New England Railroad. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Swett street, west of New England Railroad. 
* Warren, Boston to Charles town. 

West Rutland square foot-bridge, over Providence Divis- 
ion, N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 

Wintlu'op, from Breed's island to Winthrop. 



II. — Bridges of which Boston supports the Part 

WITHIN its LuVHTS. 

Bellevue street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
Bernier-street foot-bridge, in the Riverway, over Muddy 
river. 

Brookline avenue, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
*Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Chelsea, North, over North Chaimel, Mystic river. 
*Essex street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
* Granite, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Longwood avenue, from Roxbury to Brookline. 
Mattapan, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Milton, from Dorchester to Milton. 
*Neponset, from Dorchester to Quincy. 
*North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
*North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 
Tremont street, in the Riverway, over Muddy river. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
*Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 



III. — Bridges of which Boston pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

*Canal, from Boston to Cambridge. 

Chelsea bridge, over the Boston & Maine Railroad. 

Dorchester street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 
& H. R.R. 

Everett street, over Boston & Albany Railroad, Brighton. 

*Harvard, from Boston to Cambridge. 

*Prison Point, Charlestown to Cambridge. 

*West Boston, from Boston to Cambridge. 

West Fourth street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R.R. 



10 City Document No. 10. 

IV. — Bridges supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston ^ Albany Railroad. 

Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston ^ Maine Railroad^ Western Division. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

3d. — Boston ^ Maine, Eastern Division. 

Main street. 
Mystic avenue. 

^th. — Boston, Revere Beach ^ Lynn Railroad. 
Everett street. 

dth. — JVeiV England Railroad. 

Broadway. 

Dorchester avenue. 

Fifth street. 

Fourth street. 

Harvard street, Dorchester. 

Morton street, Dorchester. 

Norfolk street, Dorchester. 

Norfolk street, Dorchester. 

Second street. 

Silver street. 

Sixth street. 

Third street. 

Wasliington street, Dorchester. 

Gth. — Neiv York, Neio Haven ^ Hartford Railroad, Old 
Colony Division. 
Adams street. 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Freeport street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 



Engineering Department. 11 

7th. — N. F., N. H. ^ H. R.B., Providence Division. 

Beech street, West Roxbuiy. 
Belle viie street, West Roxbiiry. 
Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 
Centre and Mt. Vernon streets. 
Dudley avenue. 
Park street. 

Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . 64 
II. Number of which Boston supports that part 

within its limits . . . . . . 18 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance ...... 9 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany ...... 4 

2. Boston & Maine, Western Division ... 2 

3. Boston & Maine, Eastern Division ... 2 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad . . 1 

5. New England Railroad . . . . . 13 

6. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Old Colony Division . 5 

7. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Providence Division . 6 

Total 124 

Agassiz-^oad Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1887, of brick and stone masonr}^ 
It is maintained by the Park Department, and is in good con- 
dition. 

Albany-street Bridge (over the Boston ^ Albany R.R.^. 

The origmal structure was built in 1856-57 and rebuilt in 
1867-68. The present bridge was built in 1886-87, and 
is maintained in part by the City of Boston, and m part 
by the Boston & Albany Railroad. Durmg the past year 
all the ironwork of the bridge has been cleaned and painted, 
and about one-half of the under-planking has been renewed. 
The work of cleaning and painting was done m a satis- 
factory manner, excepting the under side of the lower flange 
of the floor beams over the main tracks. On account of 
the difficulty of doing this work, except from the railroad 
tracks, the painting was either omitted entirely or so poorly 
done as to be of little value. 



12 City Document No. 10. 

Allston Bridge (over the Boston ^ Albany R.R.^ Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The recommendation 
made last year that the floor be painted is renewed this year. 

Arhorivay Bridge (over Stony Brook., in Parkway^ near Forest 
Hills Station). 

This is a wooden bridge resting on abutments of vulcan- 
ized spruce piles. The strmgers and under-planking are of 
vulcanized hard-pme. It was built in 1893, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Ashland-street Bridge (over Providence Division^ iV. F., N. H. 
^ E. B.R., West Roxhury). 

The present structure is of iron, and was built in 1875. 
The ironwork is in good condition, but the wooden fences are 
very poor, and should be rebuilt at once. 

Athens-street Bridge (over New England R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1874. The bridge is in 
poor condition ; it should be stripped and painted, and the 
upper woodwork should be renewed. 

Auduhon-road Bridge (over the Boston ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is a steel-plate girder bridge, built in 1893-94, and is 
now in good condition. It is maintained by the Park De- 
partment. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Outlet of Back Bay). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. It is in fair 
condition. 

Beacon-street Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884-85, widened in 
1887-88, and the central roadway further widened in 1890 
for the convenience and at the expense of the West End 
Street Railway Company. The konwork of this bridge 
below the flooring is very rusty and the lower planking is 
rotten in places. It is recommended that the flooring be 
taken off and the ironwork cleaned and painted this year. 



Engineering Department. 13 

Bellevue-street Bridge (over Muddy Miver, in the Parkway^. 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 44 feet span and 15 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the Park Departments of 
Boston and Brookline, and is maintained jointly by them. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany M.M.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1891, and is now in good 
condition. During the past year the portion of this bridge 
above the floor has been painted with the exception of the 
outside of the outer girders. There is no apparent reason 
why this small amount of jDainting was omitted. No perma- 
nent railing has as yet been built at the north-easterly corner 
of the bridge, and the existing fence cannot be considered a 
satisfactory protection. 

Berkeley-street Bridge (over Providence Division^ N. T., iV. H. 

^ H. B.B.). 

This bridge has been reported for a number of years to be 
in a bad condition, and only such repairs as seemed abso- 
lutely necessary have been made. By continuing this policy, 
it is probable that this bridge can be made to last until the 
changes mcident to the new southern railroad terminal ren- 
der a bridge at this point uimecessary. 

Bernier-street Foot-bridge (over Bridle Path in Rivenvay'). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 38 feet 4 inches 
span. It was built m 1893, and is maintamed by the Park 
Department. 

Bernier-street Foot-bridge (over Muddy River^. 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 52 feet span and 14 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the Park Departments of 
Boston and Brooklme, and is maintained jointly by them. 

Berwick-park Foot-bridge (over Providence Division^ N. Y.^ 
N. H. ^ H. B.R.). 

This is an iron foot-bridge, erected in 1894. The iron 
stairs and piers were new, but the trusses and floor-beams 
were those built for Franklin street in 1883. It has been 
painted during the year and is in good condition. 



14 City Document No. 10. 

Blalcemore-street Bridge (over Providence Division, N. Y., 
iV: R. ^ H. B.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82. It should be 
painted and the woodwork repaired. 

Bolton-street Bridge (over Neio England B.R.^. 
This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. The sidewalks 
and deck should be renewed and the fences should be re- 
pahed and painted. 

Boylston-street Arch Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This is a stone arch bridge, built in 1881. It is in good 
condition. 

Boylston-street Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany B.MS). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1886-88. It is now in 
good condition. 

Bridle-path Bridge, in the Biverway (over Muddy Biver^. 

This is a masonry bridge of three arches ; the central arch 
is elliptical m form, with a span of 30 feet and a rise of 9 
feet 6 inches ; the side arches are semicircular, 15 feet in 
diameter. It was built in 1894 and is maintained by the 
Park Department. It is in good condition. 

Broadway Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1869-71, and the 
draw and its foundation were rebuilt in 1874-75. The 
bridge was temporarily strengthened in 1893, to allow elec- 
tric cars to use it. The woodwork on the draw has been 
renewed, the lower part of the draw and the iron columns 
under the centre of the draw have been painted, repairs have 
been made on the deck of the bridge and the draw pier, and 
other general work has been done. 

The sidewalks and the lower planking on the main bridge 
and on the Foundry-street span need repairs, and the draw 
foundation should be pointed. The piers and fender-guards 
need renewal. The draw and draw foundation are in good 
condition. 



Engineering Departinient. 15 

Broadway Bridge {over Boston ^ Albany R.R.'). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1880-81. An examina- 
tion of this bridge was made in October, 1895, in conse- 
quence of which a report was sent to the Street Department 
recommending that the konwork below the floor be painted 
at once. Nothing, however, has been done as yet toward 
carrying out this recommendation. If this bridge is to be 
kept in service after the new railroad terminals are com- 
pleted, the ironwork under the floor should be cleaned and 
painted without further delay. The fence on this bridge is 
in poor condition, and should be repaired as recommended in 
the reports for the past two years. 

BrooMine-ave7iue Bridge (over Boston ^ Alhany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884. It is now in good 
condition. 

Brookline-ave7iue Bridge (over Muddy River, in the River- 
way). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1892 by the Park Departments of Boston and 
BrookHne, and is maintained by them jointly. 

Byron-street Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach S^ Lynn 

R.R.y 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. A new spruce 
deck has been put on the bridge. The sidewalk and bulk- 
heads need repairing, and the fence should be painted. 

Cambridge-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge'). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. It was rebuilt 
in 1884 ; the draw was rebuilt in 1891. The draw pier is 
too short to accommodate the larger class of vessels that the 
widenmg of the draw-way allows to pass through the bridge. 
A new boat, a buoy, and a better house should be provided 
at this bridge ; the fender-guard, pier, water-way and stone 
abutment need repairing. The deck of the bridge is old and 
needs repairing. 

Canal or Craigie's Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turn-table 
draw. The city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. The 



16 City Document No. 10. 

bridge was originally Imilt in 1808, was rebuilt in 1852, and 
again rebuilt and widened in 1874. The bridge is in the 
care of a commission, consisting of one commissioner from 
Boston and one from Cambridge. The down-stream wing 
on the water-way has been rebuilt witli new piles and plank ; 
the down-stream end of the draw-pier has been strengthened 
and minor repairs have been made. The sidewalks, sidewalk 
bulkheads and fencing are poor and need rebuilding in part ; 
additional stringers are needed near the draw, and some pile 
work is needed at the Cambridge end ; the roadway should 
be repaved ; the draw is old and needs extensive repairs. 

Castle-Island foot-bridge {from Marine Park to Castle 
Island^. 

This is a temporary foot-bridge, built in 1892, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. It connects the Marine 
park with Castle Island, and is furnished with a draw, so 
that if desned by the United States authorities, the island 
can be cut off from the shore. The fences have been painted ; 
the draw should be adjusted, and mmor repairs are needed 
on the floormg ; otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Central-avenue Bridge (over Neponset River^ Dorchester 
Lower Mills'). 

This is an iron bridge, and was built in 1876. The city 
maintains the part within its limits. The woodwork of this 
bridge is in very poor condition, and the previous recommen- 
dation is repeated that the bridge be stripped and painted, the 
woodwork renewed, and the abutment pomted. 

Charles-river Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw. The 
present bridge was built in 1854-55 ; the draw was built in 
1870. The fence at the Boston end of the bridge needs 
repairing, and the paving on the roadway is poor ; other- 
wise the main bridge is in fair condition ; the piers and the 
fender-guard are in very poor condition. 

Charlesgate (in. Back Bay Fens, over Boston ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. It is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 17 

Chelsea Bridge (over Boston ^ Maine R.R.'). 

This is an iron bridge, built by the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road Company in 1894, and is over the railroad location. 
The surface of the bridge is raamtained by the city ; the 
remainder by the railroad company. It is in good condition. 

Chelsea Bridge Worth (over North Channel 3Iystie River^. 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure was built in 1802-3. The piles under the main 
bridge were chiven in 1880. The upper part of the bridge, 
the draw and draw foundation were built in 1895. 

The old fender-guard is m poor condition. The draw 
should be painted, the concrete walk resurfaced, and the 
water-way on the piers should be repaired. 

Chelsea Bridge South (over South Cliannel^ Mystic River'). 

This is a pile bridge, with an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-3. The piles of the present bridge 
were driven, and the draw was built in 1877. That part 
of the bridge above the girder caps was rebuilt at a higher 
grade, an(| the draw was raised in 1895. The iron fence 
near the house needs painting, and the fender-guards are in 
poor condition ; otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Chelsea-street Bridge (from East BostonM Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron swing draw ; 
the original bridge was built in 1834; was rebuilt in 1848, 
1873, and again in 1894-95. The bridge should be painted, 
and the curbs need to be aligned ; othei-wise the bridge is in 
good condition. 

Circuit-drive Bridge (over Scarboro^ Pond, in Franklin 

Park). 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 30 feet span and 6 feet 
3 inches rise. It was built in 1893, and is maintained by 
the Park Department. 

Columbus-avenue Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876-77. The ironwork 
below the floor is very rusty and should be thoroughly cleaned 
and painted. 



18 City Document No. 10. 

Commercial Point or Tenean Bridge (^Dorchester'), 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
The present bridge was built in 1875. The draw is old and 
should be rebuilt; and the draw machinery should be re- 
paii-ed. The bulkhead at the Boston end is in a dangerous 
condition. 

Commonwealth-avenue Bridge (in Bach Bay Fens). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1881-82, and is in 
good condition. 

Congress-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron turn-table draw 
on a stone foundation, and was built in 1874-75. The deck 
of the bridge and the sidewalks have been repaired in places; 
the fence and drawhouse have been painted, and the machinery- 
has been repaired. The sidewalks and parts of the flooring 
of the bridge are in very poor condition and need immediate 
repairs. The di'aw should be raised in order to relieve the 
excessive wear on the wheels and tracks ; the paving should 
be repaired and the top of pier should be rebuilt. The bridge 
will soon be widened 20 feet at the Boston end, and filled 
solid as far as the harbor line ; as soon as Summer-street 
bridge is built, which will probably be in about eighteen 
months, this bridge should be rebuilt; in the meantime it 
should be Avatched very carefully. 

Cornwall-street Bridge (over Stony Brooh^ West Roxhury). 

This is a small wooden bridge, built in 1892. It is in good 
condition. 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over B. ^ A. R.R., Brighton). 
This is a steel bridge, built in 1895-96. (See page 145.) 

Cottage-street Foo1/-hridge (over Flats, Fast Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, built in 1 889, for foot travel 
only. Some of the piles are commencing to decay; several 
pieces of cross bracing have been carried off by the ice, and 
should be replaced ; others that are soft and split at the ends 
should be refastened or replaced. The floormg is poor in a 
number of places and should be patched, and the fence rails, 
near the ends of the bridge, should be renewed ; otherwise 
the bridge is in good condition. 



Engineering Depaktment. 19 

Dartmouth-street Bridge (over B. ^ A. R.R. and Providence 
Division, N. T., N. H. ^ H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1878-79. It should be 
stripped and thoroughly cleaned and painted this year. The 
underphmking is poor and should be renewed. The network 
of wires which disfigure the bridge should be taken down. 

Dorchester-street Bridge (over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 
N. H. # E. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1869. It is principally 
maintained by the railroad company, and was repaired and put 
in fair condition in 1893. During the past year a 16-in. 
water pipe was placed under the southerly sidewalk and all 
iron work exposed at the time, was cleaned and painted. 

Dover-street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel^. 

This was originally a wooden pile bridge, built in 1805, 
rebuilt m 1858-59, and again in 1876. In 1893-94, upon 
the abolition of the grade crossing of the Old Colony Rail- 
road, the present iron structure resting on masonry piers was 
built. The bridge is in good condition. Portions of the 
foundation of the old draw on the Boston side were allowed 
to remain at the time the present bridge was built, and they 
present a very unsightly appearance and should be removed. 

Ellicott- Arch Bridge (in Franklin Park^. 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 17 feet 6 inches 
span. It was built in 1889, and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 

Essex-street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge'). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw, and was origi- 
nally built in 1850 ; the draw was rebuilt in 1891. The 
main bridge has been rebuilt above the piles. (See p. 146.) 

Everett-street Bridge (over B. ^ A. R.R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge built m 1891 by the Boston & 
Albany railroad. It is in good condition and needs only 
minor repairs to some of the woodwork. 



20 City Document No. 10. 

Federal-street Bridge (^over Fort Point Channel'). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile iron 
draw, and was rebuilt in 1891-92. The drawhouse has been 
painted, and general repau"s have been made. The sidewalks 
need repahing and the fence needs painting ; otherwise it is 
in good condition. 

Fen Bridge (in Back Bay Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1891-92. It is in good con- 
dition. 

Ferdinand-street Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The lower planking 
is poor, should be renewed and the iron work below the floor 
cleaned and painted. 

Forest Hills Entrance Bridge (in Franklin Park). 

This bridge was built in 1894-95. It is maintained by 
the Park Department and is in good condition. 

Gold-street Bridge (over Neiv England R.R.). 

This bridge was built in 1895, replacmg a foot-bridge 
which was built in 1890. The bridge is not open to travel 
as the ramps have not yet been built ; the fence is already 
daubed and cut, and the bridge is dirty and should be 
cleaned. The outside girders should be painted ; the walls 
need a little pointing. 

Granite Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintams the- part withm its limits. The bridge 
was originally built in 1837. The sidewalk and the up-river 
pier need replankmg ; the abutment should be repau'ed and 
the fence on the draw should be painted and the flap-hinge 
should be relocated. 

Harvard Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

This is an iron bridge with an iron turn-table draw, and 
was built in 1887-91. The bridge is in the care of two 
Commissioners, one appointed from Boston and one from 
Cambridge, and the expense of maintenance is borne equally 
by each city. The roadway has been sheathed during the 



Engineering Department. 21 

past year, and one-half of the asphalt sidewalk has been 
renewed by the Contractor who originally put it down, in 
compliance with his guarantee. The Contractor who put 
down the other half of the sidewalk should be required to 
make his work equally good before the time-limit of his 
guarantee expires. A small amount of paintmg of the iron 
work of the bridge has been done during the past year, but 
until the whole bridge is thoroughly painted it cannot be 
said to be in first class condition. 

Huntington-avenue Bridge (^over Boston ^ Albany R.RS). 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1872, and in 1876- 
77 the abutments were rebuilt, and the bridge widened by the 
addition of two new girders. During the past year the 
floormg of the bridge has been entuely rebuilt and made to 
conform to the new grade of the street, parapets have been 
raised and new asphalt sidewalks built. The old girder on 
the centre line of the westerly sidewalk was moved to the 
easterly sidewalk and two new plate girders put in under 
the westerly sidewalk. This change was made necessary 
because of the new 42-inch water-pipe which was carried 
across the bridge on this side. The new girders were built 
by the Boston Bridge Works, under a contract dated Nov. 9, 
1895, and the work of moving the old girder was done by the 
same company ; the total cost being -$2,646.99. The contract 
for the woodwork and for changes in stonework was made 
with W. L. Miller, dated April 11, 1896, and amounted to 
$4,358. The new sidewalks were built by the Boston 
Asphalt Company at a cost of $635.25. The cleaning and 
painting of the girders was done by the Bridge Division of 
the Street Department. 

Irvington street Foot-bridge (over Providence Division^ N. Y.y 

This is an ii'on foot-bridge, built in 1892. It has been 
painted during the past year and is now in good condition. 

L-street Bridge (over Reserved Channel, South Boston^. 

This is a wooden pUe bridge, with an iron retractile draw. 
It was built in 1892. The interior of the house and a part 
of the draw beneath the roadway have been painted. The 
entire bridge should be painted during the coming season ; 
otherwise it is in good condition. 



22 City Docuihent No. 10. 

Leverett-pond Foot-bridge (in Leverett Parli). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 24 feet span and 5 feet 
6 inches rise. It was built m 1894, and is maintained by the 
Park Department. 

Leydenstreet Bridge (over Boston^ Revere Beach S^ Lynn 

R.R.y 

There is an iron bridge, built in 1889. The flooring of the 
roadway and sidewalks needs renewing, and the bridge should 
be painted. 

Linden Park-street Bridge (over Stony Brook^. 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1887. The sidewalk 
plankmg is very thin and should be renewed, and the entire 
bridge painted. 

Longwood-avenue Bridge (from Roxhury to Brookline'). 

This is a wooden bridge, supported by wooden posts, and 
was built in 1877. The portion of the bridge maintained by 
the City of Boston is not in a safe condition, the under- 
planking is so rotten that the strength of the floor depends 
almost entirely on the condition of the sheathing. This 
bridge should be closed to team travel or restricted to very 
light loads.* 

Maiden Bridge (from Charlestown to JEveretf). 

The present structure was built in 1875, and the draw in 
1892. Only general repans have been made. The bridge 
is in poor condition, and should be rebuilt. 

Massachusetts-avenue Bridge (over Boston ^ Albany R.R.'). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. It was thoroughly 
repaned in 1893, with the exception of the wooden fences. 
These fences are now in very poor condition and should be 
rebuilt. The bridge will then be in good condition tlirough- 
out. 

Massachusetts-avenue Bridge (over Providence Division, 
N. y., ]\\ H. ^ H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. It has been painted 
during the past year and is now in good condition. 

* This bridge was closed to travel, April 22, 1897. 



Engineering Department. 23 

3Iattapan Bridge (Jrom Dorchester to Miltori). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is an 
old iron bridge and is in a dangerous condition, and it should 
be replaced by a stone bridge. 



Meridian-street Bridge (from East Boston to Chelsea'). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turn-table 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built 
in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was widened 
and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, wliich was built in 
1875-76. The chords and fences of the draw have been 
rebuilt and the deck repaired. The draw is now moved by 
electricity, and is lighted by incandescent electric lights. 
The draw and the fences have been painted, the concrete 
sidewalks resurfaced, and repairs have been made on the 
fender-guards and water-waj^s. The draw and its bearings 
need adjustment. The stringers on the main bridge, near the 
draw, need strengthening and the water-ways need further 
repairing. (See page 146.) 



Milton Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton'). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The origi- 
nal structure is very old. It was widened in 1871-72. The 
older part of this bridge was built of stone, and the widen- 
ing is an iron structure on stone columns. The sidewalks 
need repairs ; otherwise the bridge is in fair condition. 



Mt. Washington-avejiue Bridge (over Fort Point ChanneV). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw. It was 
built in 1854, and rebuilt in 1870-71; this bridge is in poor 
condition. It has the only draw of importance in the city that 
is moved by hand power ; the draw-pier is in poor condition 
and is so low that it is covered with water at every high 
course of tides. The pavement, concrete sidewalks, sidewalk 
flooring on the draw and the fender-guards are in poor con- 
dition and need early attention. The water-ways are out of 
repair, and the draw should be adjusted so it can be re- 
versed. This bridge should be rebuilt; as the building of 
Dorchester avenue extension will necessitate the rebuilding 
of part of it, the opportunity should be taken of rebuilding 
the whole bridge. 



24 City Document No. 10. 

Neponset Bridge (from Dorche%ter to Quincy'). 

The city maintains the part within its hmits. The origi- 
nal structure was built in 1802, and the present one in 
1877. The draw is too heavy to be handled by hand, and 
should be replaced by a turn-table draw. A new sidewalk 
was built last year. The arrangement of the rails and trolley 
wires on the draw for the street cars is very poor and should 
be remedied at once, and the cars should not be allowed to 
shoot across the draw. New oak headers are needed at the 
ends of the draw and the latches should be repaired ; the 
piers need extensive repairs ; the draw should be painted and 
the machinery adjusted. 

Neptune-road Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach ^ Lynn 

This is an u'on bridge, built m 1887-88, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. The bridge is in good condition, 
except the roadway plank which should be renewed. 

Newton-street Bridge (over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. 

# H. R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built m 1872. It is in good con- 
dition, excepting the concrete sidewalks, which should be 
resurfaced. 

North Beacon-street Bridge (^from Brighton to Watertoivn'). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. The original 
structure was built in 1822, and the present one in 1884. 
The flooring on the pier is in poor condition, and the side- 
walk plank needs renewal. An old unused telephone pole 
on the bridge should be removed. 

North Harvard-street Bridge (from Br'ighton to Cam- 
bridge^. 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This bridge 
was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt, except the 
piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 1891. The abut- 
ment, piling, roadway plank and fence are in poor condition. 
The abutment and main bridge should be rebuilt. 



Engineering Department. 25 

Prison Point Bridge (Jrom Charlestoivn to Cambridge). 

The city pays one-half of the cost of mamtenance. This 
bridge was originally built in 1833, and the present struct- 
ure was built in 1876-77. It is a wooden pile bridge, with 
an u'on leaf draw. The bridge is m the care of commis- 
sioners, consisting of one commissioner from Boston and one 
from Cambridge. It is in poor condition. Only ordinary 
repairs have been made on the bridge. The draw, machinery, 
hinges and the Woodwork on main bridge near the channel 
need thorough repairing ; the top of the pier and the faces of 
the water-way also need repairmg ; this bridge will probably 
be rebuilt within a couple of years, owing to the abolishing 
of the grade crossing of the Boston «& Maine Raiboad. 

Public Garden Foot-bridge. 

This is an iron bridge. It was built in 1867, and was 
thoroughly repaired in 1887. 

Scarboro^ Pond Foot-bridge (in Franklin Park). 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 feet span and 8 
feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893, and is mamtained 
by the Park Department. 

Shaivmut-avenue Bridge (over Bostori ^ Albany R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1871. The girders over 
the main tracks of the railroad are very badly corroded, and 
unless this portion of the bridge is cleaned and painted very 
soon it will be impossible to continue heavy traffic over it. The 
girders on the outer edges of the sidewalks are covered by a 
cast-iron parapet which has not been removed since the 
bridge was built; portions of this covering should be re- 
moved so that a thorough examination can be made of the 
condition of the iron in these girders. 

Spring-street Bridge (from West Roxbury to Bedham). 

This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part with- 
in its limits. It is in good condition. 

Stony-brook Bridge (Back Bay Fens). 

This is an ornamental brick arched bridge, with stone 
facings, built in 1891-92, and maintained by the Park De- 
partment. It is in good condition. 



26 City Document No. 10. 

Swett-street Bridges {over South Bay Sluices'). 

These are wooden bridges, built in 1875, as temporary 
structures ; they are in poor condition and extensive repairs 
should be made on them this year. 

Tremont-street Bridge (over Muddy River). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1893, and is maintained by the Park Departs 
ments of Boston and Brookline. 

Warren Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile iron 
draw. The present structure was built m 1883-84. Two 
new trucks and twelve new wheels have replaced old ones, 
and general repairs have been made. The lower planking on 
the draw needs renewal, the fender guards need rebuilding, 
the concrete sidewalks need resurfacing, and repairs are 
needed on the track strmgers, water-way, fence, piers, road- 
way paving and engines. 

West Boston Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 

This bridge is in the care of two commissioners, one from 
Boston and one from Cambridge. The city pays one-half of 
the cost of maintenance. This is a wooden pile bridge, with 
a wooden turn-table draw. The bridge was originally built 
in 1792-93, was rebuilt in 1854, and repaired in 1871. This 
is an old, weak bridge, and is in an unsafe condition, and 
should be rebuilt. This bridge, and Canal and Prison Point 
bridges are in the care of the same commission, and are kept 
in usable condition only by constant care. The bridge has 
been strengthened by driving ninety-two piles and the addi- 
tion of twelve girder caps and forty-one stringers, and the 
ordinary repairs have been made. 

West Fourth-street Bridge (over Old Colony Division 
K r., JV. E. ^ H. R.B.). 

In 1893-94 the grade crossing of the Old Colony Railroad 
on this street was abolished and an iron bridge built, ex- 
tending from the end of Dover-street bridge at the South 
Boston side of Fort Point channel to the easterly line of 
Foundry street. The bridge is in good condition, except the 
sheathing of the northerly roadway which should be renewed. 



Engineering Department. 27 

The entire wearing surface of this bridge is covered with 
spruce phmk, and to maintain it in a satisfactory condition it 
will be necessary to replank it at least once a year. The 
expense of this work must be borne by the city. 

West Midland-square Foot-bridge (over Providence Divi- 
sion, N. Z, N. H. ^ H. R.B.}. 

This is an iron foot-bridge, built in 1882. New stair- 
treads have been put down and the bridge painted during the 
past year. The sidewalks in Rutland square at the foot of 
the stairs have been put in good condition. 

Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge^. 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The present 
bridge was built in 1879-80, and the draw in 1891. During 
the past summer the horse-cars, which were run over this 
bridge, were superseded by electric cars, necessitating the 
strengtliening of the draw, to which three additional 
stringers were added. The main bridge should be rebuilt 
above the stringers ; the piling, fender-guard, water-way and 
draw pier need repairing, and the draw pier needs lengthen- 
ing and the strmgers at the rear of the draw-arms should be 
screw-bolted to the girder caps. 

Western-avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Watertoivn'). 

The city maintains the part withm its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw, and was rebuilt in 
1892-93. This bridge should be painted, the latches and 
bearings should be adjusted, and scupper holes should be 
made in the flooring of the foundation to drain the central 
portion. 

Winthrop Bridge (from Breed'' s Island to Winthrop'). 

This is a pile bridge without a draw. It was originally 
built in 1839 ; it was rebuilt in 1851, and was extensively re- 
paired in 1870. This is an old bridge, and is only in fair 
condition ; the bulkhead at the Boston end needs repairing ; 
the caps need additional fastenings, and small repau's are 
needed on the fence and sidewalk. 

Bridges Wholly Supported by Railroad Corporations. 

The bridges over the Boston & Albany Railroad maintained 
by that company are in good or fair condition with the ex- 
ception of that on Washmgton street. Attention has been 



28 City Document No. 10. 

called in the annual reports of this department for several 
years past, to the unsafe condition of the sidewalk girders of 
this bridge. It is understood that the railroad company will 
put m new girders this season. During the past year the 
bridge on Market street, Brighton, has been stripped and 
painted, new angle seats for the stringers put on and one new 
girder substituted for an old one which was badly corroded. 

Of the bridges maintained by the N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., 
that at Canterbury street has been entirely rebuilt during the 
year. The bridge now consists of two through plate girders 
64 feet 6 inches long over all, and 5 feet deep. The 
girders are spaced 24 feet apart on centres with two over- 
hanging sidewalks 8 feet wide. The stringers are 4 X 12 
niches hard pine and the plankmg is a single course of 
3-inch hard pine. The bridge on Beech street has been 
strengthened to allow the street cars to pass over. Two new 
I-beams, 20 inches deep, have been placed luider each line of 
rails. The bridge on Adams street has a new hard-pine floor, 
and has been painted. 

The Norfolk-street bridge, over the New England Railroad, 
near Dorchester station, is a narrow bridge, in a dangerous 
condition ; and the bridge on Silver street needs repairing. 

SURVEYING DIVISION. 

The organization of the Surveying Division for the past 
year has remained practically the same as when placed in 
charge of the Street Commissioners, July 1, 1895 ; the 
number of employees engaged on the work being substantially 
unchanged. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the number of orders for 
street lines and grades attended to for builders and contract- 
ors is somewhat smaller than for the preceding year, fully as 
much work has been accomplished, for the volume of work 
has increased in other directions, principally for the Paving 
Division of the Street Department. The Superintendent of 
Streets, early in the season, made the request that all street 
lines and grades given for the construction of artificial stone 
sidewalks be tested after the contractor had completed the 
work, and a report made, certifying that tlie sidewalk had 
been laid at the proper grade and on the correct line. This 
made it necessary for a surveying party to go to the street a 
second time, practically doing the work over twice. This is 
considered to be quite important, however, as a number of 
sidewalks have been found to be constructed at slightly 
different lines and grades than those originally given. As 



ENGmEEBING DEPARTMENT. 29 

13,471 square yards of artificial stone sidewalks have been 
laid during the year, for which street lines and grades have 
been given, it is obvious that the increase in this particular 
line of work has been considerable. 

Some of the more important plans for new streets, where 
accurate surveys of takings and profiles showing proposed 
grades have been made, are given in the following list, a 
complete table, classified under the several districts, being 
given in Appendix C. 

Cove street^ plan and profile, from Summer street to 
Kneeland street, 100 feet wide, showing takings from estates, 
owners' names, grades, etc. 

Summer-street extension, plan and profile, from Purchase 
street to Fort Point channel, 100 feet wide, showing takings 
from estates, owners' names, grades, etc. 

Dorchester-avenue extension^ plan and profile, over Federal- 
street bridge to Summer-street extension, showing takings, 
grades, etc. 

(In making the above plans of streets to be laid out 
around the new Southern Station it was necessary to survey 
some forty-eight estates, look up fifty-two titles in the 
Registry of Deeds, and devote considerable time to the 
question of grades shown in detail on the several profiles.) 

Congress street, from Atlantic avenue to Fort Point 
channel. 

Buljinch jylace, from Bowdoin street to Bulfinch street. 

Trinity place, from Dartmouth street to St. James avenue. 

Peterborough street, from Back Bay Fens to Brookline 
avenue. 

Marginal-street extension. East Boston. 

Reservoir lot, Thomas Park, South Boston. 

Ather ton-street extension, Roxbury. 

Ruggles-street extension, Roxbury. 

Alexander street, Dorchester. 

Fairmount street, Dorchester. 

Martin street. West Roxbury. 

Tremont street, Brighton, from Oak square to the Newton 
line. 

Brooks-street extension, under the Boston and Albany rail- 
road at Faneuil. 

In addition to the above, several correct surveys have been 
made of estates where the Street Commissioners have taken 
land for school purposes ; the two most important being the 



30 City Document No. 10. 

Prince-street lot, showing six estates, and the Chambers- 
street lot, showing fourteen estates or parts of estates. 

A plan, showing nine different estates, lying north of 
Seaver street, with several blue prints of same, was made for 
the Park Commissioners. 

Among the many approximate plans made during the year 
may be mentioned those of : — 

Charlestoivn street^ showing proposed widening from 
Causeway street to Haymarket square. 

Dorchester-avenue extension, from Congress street, north, 
to Atlantic avenue. 

Rutherford-avenue extension, over Bow street to City 
square, Charlestown. 

Preble street, from Dorchester avenue to East Ninth 
street, showing proposed widening and extension. 

Several plans and profiles were made in connection with 
the abolishment of the grade crossings at South street. 
La Grange street and Spring street. West Roxbury. 

Plans and profiles of Bowdoin street, between Beacon 
street and Derne street, of Ashburton place, from Bowdoin 
street to Somerset street, and of Somerset street, from Beacon 
street to Howard street, with proposed extension of same to 
Court street, were made with a view to cutting down the 
grades of the above three streets. 

Several plans, showing the proposed increase in the terri- 
tory now contained in the market limits, were made for 
hearings given by the Street Commissioners. 

A map, showing the location of all the electric lights in 
Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, was made durmg the 
month of October ; also a plan, scale 200 feet to an inch, with 
all electric lights located north of Dover and Berkeley streets. 

The following table gives the number of arc lights in the 
different districts : — 

Arc Lights. 

City Proper : — In streets . . . 839 

Charlesbank . . . 13 

Commonwealth avenue . 39 



East Boston : — In streets . . . 151 



891 



151 



ENGINEERmG DEPARTMENT. 31 

(There are 51 posts in Wood Island 
park but no lamps.) 

South Boston : — In streets . . . 224 

Marine Park . . 4 

Castle Island . . 15 

Castle Island bridge . 17 

260 

Roxhury : — In streets .... 351 

Back Bay Fens ... 45 

Riverway .... 49 

Leverett park ... 1 

446 

Dorcheister : — In streets. . . . 237 

237 



Charlestown : — In streets . . . 175 

Brighton: — In streets . . . . 174 



West Roxhury : — In streets . . . 137 

Jamaica Way and 
Franklin Park . . 72 



175 



174 



209 

2,543 

Street lines and grades, both for foundations and finished 
work, have been given during the year for many prominent 
buildings, among the more important being : Brazer build- 
ing, corner of State street and Devonshire street ; Steinert 
Hall, Boylston street, corner of Carver street; Hotel Tou- 
raine, corner of Boylston street and Tremont street; Sudl)ury 
building, Sudbury street and Hawkins street; Trinity court, 
on Dartmouth street and Trinity place ; the Marlborough, 
at the corner of Massachusetts avenue and Marlboro' street; 
Windemere terrace, on Boylston street, near and west of 
Massachusetts avenue ; the Inverness, at the corner of Beacon 
street and Aberdeen street ; and the seven-story building on 
Bulfinch place, corner of Bulfinch street. 



32 



City Document No. 10. 



Outside work was continued up to the middle of the 
month of December. Since that time the several surveying 
parties have been engaged, makmg assessment plans for the 
Street Commissioners, and for the Paving Division of 
the Street Department, sewer assessment plans, indexing 
survey and level notes, plots, calculations, etc. 

A general index to survey notes, from Jan. 1, 1881, to 
July 1, 1895, has been prepared during the past year, alpha- 
betically arranged in card catalogue form. This index is now 
being type written, and when finished will furnish the office 
with a complete index, contamed in four volumes, all survey 
notes from the establishment of the City Surveyor's office to 
the time of its consolidation with the Engineering Depart- 
ment. 

The following list gives the number of orders attended to 
for property owners and builders and the various city depart- 
ments from Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897. 



Street lines given 








658 


Street grades given 






515 


Street Department, Paving Division 






1,473 


Street Department, Sewer Division 






288 


Buildings Department ^ 






4,832 


Public Buildings Department 








86 


Public Grounds DejDartment 








6 


Law Department . 








114 


Street Commissioners . 








343 


Engineering Department 








79 


Assessors' Department. 








2 


Lamp Department 








2 


Park Department 








1 


Water Department 








10 


Mayor and City Council 








10 



8,419 

Five hundred and forty-one blue prints have been made 
during the year. 



1 The greater part of the orders from the Buildings Department are 
applications for building and repairing permits that are examined daily 
in relation to street lines and grades, with a view of preventing 
encroachments over street lines and the erection of buildings at incorrect 
grades. 



Engesteertng Department. 



33 



The following table gives the monthly amounts of paving 
work measured by the Surveying Division of the Engineer- 
ing Department for the year ending Jan. 31, 1897 : — 



1896. 



February 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septenilier 

October 

November . . . . 
December — 
January, 1897. 



11 



4,098.1 
11,408.0 

8,071.5 
13,251.7 
16,089.2 
15,931.1 
33,932.8 
15,782.7 

1,592.8 






2,658.2 
6,618.3 
5,047.2 
8,927.5 

11,915.2 
9,008.6 

14,490.0 

5,364.8 

922.3 






1,256.5 

691.2 

664.2 

1,084.4 

9.38.5 

4,352.1 

8,920.9 

6,962.4 

105.8 



1,161.8 
6,171.8 
3,716.4 
5,132.9 
5,690.1 
16,179.0 
19,126.9 
10,617.9 
381.5 



422.9 
160.8 
2,176.4 
2,163.8 
1,724.1 
546.7 
2,084.5 
1,991.3 
1,300.9 



£(h 






2,971.4 



Totals. 



120,157.9 



64,952.1 



24,976.0 



8,178.3 



13,471.4 393.5 2,971.4 



How Street Lines Often Become Irregular. 

Every year there are many buildings erected on public 
streets for which no application is made to this office for 
lines and grades, contractors and builders frequently assum- 
ing the line, and often encroaching into the streets with 
steps, bays, porticos, etc. The surveyors are constantly 
watcliing for such encroachments ; but it sometimes happens 
that buildings are nearly completed before reports of en- 
croachments are made. It would seem as though some law 
or an ordinance, should be passed, compelling builders and 
contractors to apply for street lines and grades before they 
obtain permission to build. 

There are many important streets that have no officially 
established lines, and that have become public, either 
through official action of the Selectmen, the Board of 
Aldermen and the Board of Street Commissioners, or by 
prescription. In the city proper, north of Dover and 
Berkeley streets, there are some three hundred and thirty 
public streets ; about one hundred and fifty of these have 
no fixed or officially established lines, and fifty have such 
lines only upon one side or for a part of their length. 



34 City Document No. 10. 

The importance of fixed official lines as a result of correct 
surveys is obvious, when the numerous encroachments of 
builders and contractors upon the public highways are con- 
sidered. Such important thorouglifares as Court street, part 
of Sudbury street, that part of Washington street between 
Cornhill and Milk street, Hanover street on the north-west 
side, Portland street on the westerly side, parts of North 
street, are all instances of streets for which no fixed lines 
have ever been established. 

Lines of occupation by old buildings have been given for 
the erection of new ones without regard for the uniformity 
of line for the entire street, and many of the encroachments 
made by the old structures thus continued. Early in 1875 
a book was opened in the office of the City Surveyor for a 
record of encroachments. Since that time some one hun- 
dred and eighty encroachments of buildings, steps, porticos, 
etc., into the public highways have been entered in it. 
These are, without doubt, but a small part of what have 
occurred, merely those that have come to the notice of the 
employees in the office. It is certain that if these street 
lines could be definitely fixed, and the builders and contracts 
ors compelled by the authority of a statute or an ordinance 
to obtain them before permits to build are issued, the jogs 
and n-regularities now existing in and defacing many of the 
public streets would gradually disappear, and before many 
years the building fronts upon estates would be greatly 
improved from the resulting regularity. Estate o^vners as 
well as the public would benefit by this. Official street 
lines could be given on any property upon request to the 
city for them. Frequent delays in the improvement of real 
estate are caused by the time required to settle upon dis- 
puted questions as to the Imes of bounding streets. The 
uncertain standing of many street lines has, undoubtedly, 
been also a cause of the loss of considerable land in the 
estimation of areas for purposes of taxation. 

Areas of Re-Districted Wards. 

Approximate areas of the new wards on lines established 
by the City Council of 1895 have been computed from the 
most reliable maps in the office, with the following result : — 



Engineering Department. 



36 



Area of Boston — By Wards — In Acres. 



Wards. 



Land. 



Flats. 



Water. 



Areas 

to 
Ward 
Lines. 



Between 

Ward 

and 

Harbor 

Lines. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



Totals. 



1,188 
357 
332 
301 
205 
293 
394 
166 
186 
394 
638 
235 
604 
385 
243 
564 
423 
220 
760 
1,716 
640 
760 
7,615 
3,252 
2,739 



163 

58 



22 



74 
449 
107 
109 

37 



394 



136 



159 



56 
78 
11 



18 
66 

79 



184 



35 
65 



45 

92 

116 



24,610 



1,637 



1,004 



1,510 
415 
388 
467 
216 
293 
412 
232 
287 
394 
822 
235 
713 
899 
350 
673 
460 
220 
760 
2,110 
640 
760 
7,660 
3,480 
2,855 



27,251 



*384 

*57 

**25 



**65 



345 



•Inside of harbor line. 



*0ut8ide of harbor line. 



36 City Document No. 10. 

True Meridian Line. 

Acting under tlie requirements of chapter 286 of the Acts 
of 1870, the Board of Aklermen, under date of Nov. 21, 
1870, passed an order authorizing the City Surveyor to 
erect monuments for the purpose of establishing the true 
meridian line for Suffolk County, and Oct. 2, 1871, directed 
the City Surveyor to keep m liis office a book which should 
contain a record of the location of said line, and in which all 
land surveyors should enter, at least once a year, the varia- 
tions of their compasses and other surveying instruments. 
A State Commissioner had, under the provisions of section 
6 of the aforesaid act, already been appointed, and, after con- 
sultation with him, a suitable locality was decided upon, and 
three granite posts placed on the southerly portion of the 
parade ground on Boston Common. These posts were placed 
200 feet apart ; they are eighteen inches square at the base, 
one foot square at the top, eight feet long, and firmly set in 
a bed of concrete, with tops just below the surface of the 
ground, each covered with a North River flagstone, about 
three feet square, set even with the surface of the ground, 
and having a hole in the centre of each, so arranged that the 
top of each post is easily accessible. Covermg the toj) of 
each post or monument is a piece of metal about eight mches 
in diameter, on wMch are cut two fine intersecting lines 
forming a cross and indicating the four cardinal points 
marked by the letters N. S. E. W. The line running through 
these intersection points in the three monuments is the true 
North and South meridian for Suffolk County. 

During the year 1895, owing to the large amount of gravel 
and other material taken from the subway and placed on the 
parade ground, it was found impossible to get at these monu- 
ments and read the magnetic variations for the several instru- 
ments used in this department, and as it was the intention 
to fill this part of the Common to the extent of several feet, 
it was feared that these meridian posts would be buried 
beyond reach. 

The matter was called to the attention of the Subway 
Engineer, and the Transit Commission caused to be built 
around each monument a brick enclosure from five to seven 
feet high, large enough to enable a man to descend through 
a large manhole, thus preserving the posts for the future use 
of all surveyors of this county. 

The several transits now in use in this office have recently 
been taken to the Common, the magnetic variation read and 
a record made of the same in the book on file for that pur- 



Engineering Department. 37 

pose in this office. The average variation of the needle for 
all the instruments in the office is 12° 5' west from trne 
meridian. A plan, showing in detail the construction of the 
original monuments, is on file in this office, in Vol. 36, page 
157. 

Perambulation of Boundary Lines. 

Section 3 of chapter 27 of the Public Statutes requires 
that " There shall be a perambulation of town lines, and they 
shall be run and the marks renewed, once in every five years, 
by two or more of the selectmen of each town, or by such 
substitutes as they in writing appoint for that purpose. 
After every such renewal the proceedings shall be recorded 
in the records of the respective towns." 

In compliance with the requirements of this act, the Board 
of Aldermen, under date of Feb. 10, 1896, passed an order 
authorizing the perambulation of the several boundary Imes 
between Boston and the adjoining cities and towns, and 
appointed a committee, consisting of three members of the 
Board the City Clerk, and City Engineer, to attend to the 
matter. No plan or note book was found recorded that 
would give the exact location of each bound, the description 
filed in the City Clerk's office giving only the distances 
between the monuments and the directions of the lines, so 
that early in the year and preliminary to the visitation a 
photograph was made of each stone bound, small maps were 
prepared, showing the location of every monument ; the correct 
dimensions of all stone bounds, standing above the surface of 
the ground, were recorded in survey note books, B 439 
(Revere) ; B 448 (Everett and Somerville) ; B 446 (Newton 
and Brookline) ; B 445 (Brookline, Dedham and Hyde 
Park) ; B 435 (Hyde Park) ; and each monument numbered. 
The photographs and small maps, 132 in all, were prepared 
in duplicate, and pasted into two books, one of which accom- 
panied the report of the committee, and is filed in the office 
of the City Clerk, the other m the library of the Engineering 
Department. 

The names of the cities and towns visited, and the date of 
perambulation is herewith given: Revere, May 20, 1896; 
Everett, May 20, 1896 ; SomervHle, May 20, 1896 ; Newton, 
May 22, 1896 ; Brookhne, May 27, 1896 ; Dedham, June 3, 
1896 ; Hyde Park, June 3, 1896. 

As a matter of record, the following list is given of the 
work done for the Pavmg Division of the Street Department, 
from Feb. 1, 1896, to Feb. 1, 1897 : — 



38 City Document No. 10. 

City Proper. 

Albany street^ rear of City Hospital. Measurement of asphalt 
paving. 

Albany street^ northerly corner of Massacliusetts avenue. 
Grade for edgestone. 

Appleton street^ Tremont street to Columbus avenue. Meas- 
urement and levels for profile of curb. 

Batterymarch street^ No. 40. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Bay State Road., north-easterly corner Granby street. Meas- 
urement of sidewalk paving. 

Bay State Road., Nos. 7 to 21. Measurement of gutter 
paving. 

Bay State Road., No. 11. Measurement of sidewalk pav- 
ing and levels to test curb and sidewalk. 

Bay State Road., Nos. 58 to 68. Measurement of side- 
walk paving. 

Beacon street., Massacliusetts avenue to Deerfield street. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter, sidewalk and cross- 
ing paving. 

Beacon street., No. 857. Measurement of edgestone and 
sidewalk paving. 

Beacon street., No. 350. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Berkeley street., westerly corner of Commonwealth avenue. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Berkeley street., Boylston street to Marlboro' street. Meas- 
urement of edgestone, gutter, crossing and sidewalk 
pavmg. 

Blagden street., southerly side. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Boylston street., southerly corner Carver street. Measure- 
ment of sidewalk paving. 

Boylston street., northerly side Berkeley street to Clarendon 
street. Measui-ement of edgestone and gutter paving. 

Boylston street, southerly side Exeter street to Boston and 
Albany R.R. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Boylston street., Fairfield street to Boston and Albany R.R. 
Levels on curb and tracks and revised grade for edge- 
stone. 

Boylston street., southerly side Dartmouth street to Boston 
and Albany R.R. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and crossing paving. 

Brattle square. Measurement of asphalt paving. 

Camden street.^ northerly corner of Columbus avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. 



Engineering Department. 39 

Causeway street, at Wall street. Measurement of roadway 

paving. 
Charlesgate East, easterly side of Commonwealth avenue 

to Marlboro' street. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Chestnut street. Brimmer street to Charles river. Levels to 

test grade. 
Chestnut street, Charles street to Charles river. Measurement 

and levels for profile of curb, line and grade for edgestone, 

and measurement of edgestone, roadway, driveways and 

sidewalk paving. 
Clarendon street. Commonwealth avenue to Marlboro' street. 

Measurement of crossings. 
Commonwealth avenue, westerly corner Berkeley street. 

Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Commonwealth avenue, measurement of sidewalk paving at 

No. 306. 
Commomvealth avenue, north-easterly corner of Charlesgate 

East. Measurement of sidewalk pavmg. 
Concord square, Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 

Measurement and levels for profile of curb. 
Coojyer street. Measurement of asphalt. 
Cottivg street. Line and grade for edgestone and measurement 

of edgestone, roadway and sidewalk paving. 
Cumberland street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of 

edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Dartmouth street, westerly side, between Boylston street 

and Newbmy street. Measurement of crossing paving. 
Durham street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of 

edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
JEast Brookline street, Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Measurement and levels for profile of curb, line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter, crossing and sidewalk paving. 
East Dedham street, Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Measurement and levels for profile of part of curb, 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk pavmg. 
East Lenox street. No. 66. Line and grade for edgestone. 
East Lenox street, Nos. 105 and 107. Line and grade for 

edgestone, levels to test edgestone and sidewalk, and 

measurement of sidewalk paving. 
East Lenox street, north-easterly side Fellows street to 

Harrison avenue. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Endicott street. Measurement of asphalt paving. 
Exeter street, at Boylston street. Measurement of curb and 

gutter paving. 



40 City Document No. 10. 

Flagg street. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Follen street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

G-ainshoro' street, Nos. 1 to 21. Measurement of gutter 
paving. 

Grarrison street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of 
edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

G-arden-court street. Measurement and levels for profile of 
curb, line and grade for edgestone, and measurement 
of edgestone, roadway and sidewalk paving. 

G-ranhy street, north-easterly corner Bay State road. Meas- 
urement of sidewalk paving. 

Harrison avenue, south-easterly side, near Dover street. 
Levels to test curb. 

Harrison avenue, at East Dedham street. Measurement of 
edgestone, roadway and sidewalk paving. 

Hancock street, at State House. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Harcourt street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of 
edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Harvard street, Washington street to Hudson street. 
Measurement and levels for profile of curb. 

Harvard street, Harrison avenue to Hudson street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. 

Holyohe street. Measui^ement and levels for profile of curb 
and grade for edgestone. 

Huntington avenue, Nos. 187 to 191. Measurement of side- 
walk paving. 

Irving street, north-easterly corner Myrtle street. Grade 
for edgestone. 

Irvington street, south-westerly side, at St. Botolph street. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Ivanhoe street, at West Brookline street. Measurement of 
roadway paving. 

Kilhy street. Measurement of asphalt. 

Leverett street, at Cotting street. Measurement of roadway 
paving. 

Marlboro' street, easterly corner Massachusetts avenue. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Marlboro' street, Massachusetts avenue to Charlesgate East. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk pavuig. 

Massachusetts avenue, easterly corner Marlboro' street. Levels 
on curb and measurement of edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving. 

Massachusetts avenue, at St. Botolph street. Measurement 
of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 



Engineering Department. 41 

Merrimac street, northerly corner Travers street. Grade for 
edgestone. 

Mt. Vernon street., north-easterly corner Hancock street. 
Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Myrtle street., northerly side, between South Russell street 
and Irving street. Grade for edgestone. 

Newbury street., No. 20. Measurement of crossing paving. 

Newcomb street., Nos. 10 to 16. Line and grade for edgestone, 
and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving. 

Newcomb street., Washington street to Harrison avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Newland street., at West Brooklme street. Measurement of 
edgestone, roadway and sidewalk paving. 

North square, at North street. Measurement of edgestone, 
roadway and sidewalk paving. 

North Bennett street. Measurement of asphalt. 

North G-rove street, at engine-house. Measurement of paving 
in yard. 

Northampton street, westerly corner Columbus avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. 

Pemberton square. No. 56. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Poplar street. Measurement of asphalt. 

Portland street, westerly corner Travers street. Grade for 
edgestone. 

Revere street. West Cedar street to Grove street. Measure- 
ment of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Reed street, Nos. 20 to 24. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Reed street, easterly corner Thorndike street. Line and 
grade for edgestone, levels to test edgestone and side- 
walk, and measurement of sidewalk paving. 

St. Botolph street, Nos. 173 to 189. Measurement of side- 
walk. 

St. JBotolj^h street, Massachusetts avenue to Irvington street. 
Grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter, crossing and sidewalk paving. 

Scotia street, southerly side, at electric station. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Shawmut avenue, westerly side, at West Brookline street. 
Measurement of edgestone, roadway and sidewalk paving. 

South Russell street, north-westerly corner Myrtle street. 
Grade for edgestone. 

State street. No. 103. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Stillman street, Charlestown street to Endicott street. Meas- 
urement and levels for profile of curb, line and grade for 



42 City Document No. 10. 

edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, roadway and 

sidewalk paving. 
Travel's street^ north-westerly side, between Portland street 

and Merrimac street. Grade for edgestone. 
Union Park street^ Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Measurement and levels for profile of curb, and line and 

grade for edgestone. 
Union Park street, southerly side, between Harrison avenue 

and Albany street. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Wall street. Measurement and levels for profile of curb, line 

and grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

sidewalk and roadway paving. 
West Brookline street, Tremont street to Warren avenue. 

Grade for edgestone and meiisurement of edgestone, 

gutter, crossing and sidewalk paving. 
West Brookline street, Tremont street to Shawmut avenue. 

Measurements and levels for profile of part of curb, line 

and grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter, crossing and sidewalk paving. 
West Brookline street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue. 

Measurement and levels for profile of curb, line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
West Neu'hury street, near Kenmore street. Measurement of 

sidewalk paving. 
Westland avenue, southerly side. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone and sidewalk pav- 
ing. 
West Newton street, at St. Botolph street. Measurement of 

edgestone, gutter, sidewalk and crossing paving. 
Winter street, westerly corner Winter place. Measurement 

of sidewalk paving. 
Yarmouth street. Measurement and levels for profile of curb, 

and grade for edgestone. 

South Boston. 

D street, between West First street and West Third street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Dove street, between E street and Dorchester street. Line 

and grade given for resetting edgestone. Edgestone, 

sidewalk and gutter j)aving measured. 
East Broadway, between L street and M street. Sidewalk 

measured at Nos. 775 and 777. 
East Eighth street, at southerly corner of L street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. 



Engineering Department. 43 

East Fifth street, between G street and H street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. 
East Second street, between O street and P street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone at Nos. 873 and 875. 
East Seventh street, south-easterly corner of L street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. 
East Seventh street, at westerly corner of L street. Line and 

grade given for resetting edgestone. 
East Tliird street, between N street and O street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. 
H street, at westerly corner of East Fifth street. Line and 

grade given for edgestone. 
K street, heivfeew East Ninth street and the water. Line and 

grade given for edgestone at Nos. 216 and 218. 
L street, between East Broadway and East Eighth street. 

Line and grade given for resetting edgestone. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk, gutter repaving and crossing measured. 
L street, between East Seventh street and East Eighth street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Rawson street, between Dorchester avenue and Boston street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Telegraph street, between Dorchester street and Old Harbor 

street. Line and grade given for resetting edgestone. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter repaving measured. 

East Boston (including Breed's Island). 

Be7ini7igto7i street, between Prescott street and Chelsea 
street. Edgestones, sidewalk and roadway repaving 
measured at No. 268. 

Bennington street, from Saratoga street to Walley street. 
Line and grade given for filling. 

Bennington street, between Saratoga street and Walley 
street. Approximate estimate of filling done. 

Blackinton street, at westerly corner of Leyden street. 
Estimate of amount of edgestone required at the Black- 
inton School lot. 

Blackinton street, between Leyden street and AValley street, 
at the Blackinton School lot. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Bremen street, from Sumner street to Maverick street. Line 
and grade given for resetting edgestone. Edgestone 
and sidewalk repaving, and block-stone roadway paving 
measured. 

Byron street, between Saratoga street and Pope street. 
Edgestone, gutter paving and crosswalk measured. 



44 City Document No. 10. 

Chelsea street^ between Prescott street and Bennington 

street. Edges tone, sidewalk and gutter repaying 

measured. 
Falcon street^ between Meridian street and Brooks street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 35 and 37. 
Falcon street^ between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at No. 93. 
Falcon street^ between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. 
Falcon street^ between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at No. 95. 
Falcon street^ between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at No. 97. 
Falcon street^ between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 109 and 111. 
Havre street^ from Maverick street to Decatur street. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter repaying measiu-ed. 
Haynes street^ between Orleans street and Marginal street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, side- 
walk and gutter repaying measured. 
Lamson street, between Everett street and Maverick street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 40 and 42. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Lamson street, between Everett street and Maverick street. 

Estimate of amount of edgestone required at Nos. 40 

and 42. 
Lewis street, at Sumner street. Crossing measured. 
Leyden street, at westerly corner of Blackinton street. Esti- 
mate of amount of edgestone required at the Blackinton 

School lot. 
Leyden street, between Blackinton street and Breed street, 

at the Blackmton School lot. Line and grade given for 

edgestone. Edgestone, sidewalk, gutter and crossing 

paving measured. 
London street, between Meridian street and Porter street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 140 to 148. 

Edgestone, sidewalk and gutter paving measured. 
Morris street, between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone at No. 87. 
Morris street, between Brooks street and Putnam street. 

Estimate of amount of edgestone required at No. 87. 
Orleans street, between Maverick street and Decatur street. 

Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and 

gutter paving measured. 
Orleans street, at Everett street. Edgestone, gutter pav- 
ing and crossing measirred. 



Engineering Department. 45 

Paris street^ at Nos. 132 and 134. Estimate of amount of 
edgestone required. 

Paris street^ between Porter street and Gore street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. 

Paris street^ between Porter street and Gore street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone at Nos. 132 and 134. 

Saratoga street^ from Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R.R. 
to the Wintln-op bridge. Line and grade given for 
grading. 

Saratoga street, from Meridian street to Shelby street. 
Line and grade given for resetting edgestone. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk, gutter paving and crossings measured. 

Sumner street, from Boston & Albany R.R. to Jeffries street. 
Line and grade given for resetting edgestone. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk, gutter paving and crossings measured. 

Walley street, from Bennington street to Leyden street. 
Lme and grade given for fillmg. 

Walley s/^reei, between Bennington street and Leyden street. 
Approximate estimate of amount of filling done. 

Webster street, from Boston & Albany R.R. to Jeffries 
street. Line and grade for resetting edgestone. Edge- 
stone, sidewalk, gutter repaving, block-stone roadway 
and crossings measured. 

Wordsworth street, between Bennmgton street and Milton 
street. Line and grade given for grading. 

Charlestown. 

Decatur street, Medford street to Bunker Hill street. Line 

and grade given for resetting edgestone. 
Main street. City square to Thompson square. Edgestone, 

roadway and sidewalk paving measured. 

ROXBFRY. 

Abhotsford street, south-westerly side. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving, and levels to test curb and sidewalk. 

Aberdeen street, easterly corner Beacon street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Adams street, northerly corner Dudley street. J\Ieasurement 
of sidewalk paving. 

Albany street. No. 845. Measurement of edgestone and 
sidewalk paving. 

Alleghany street, Nos. 1 and 3. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Alpine street, south-westerly side, at bend. Grade for edge- 
stone. 



46 City Document No. 10. 

Amory street, at School street. Measurement of crossing 
paving. 

Atherton street, No. 50. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Levels to test edgestone and sidewalk, and measurement 
of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Bainbridge street, at Mayfair street. Measurement of 
crossing paving. 

Bartlett street, westerly corner Washington street. Measure- 
ment of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Batchelder street. No. 41. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Bickford street, westerly side, near Centre street. Grade for 
edgestone, and measurement of edgestone and gutter 
paving. 

Blue Hill aventce, south-easterly corner Ingleside street. 
Levels to test curb and sidewalk and measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

Blue Hill avenue, at Maywood street. Measurement of cross- 
ing pavmg. 

Blue Mill avenue, north-easterly corner Dove street. Line • 
and grade for edgestone. 

Blue Hill avenue, easterly corner Quincy street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Blue Hill avenue, south-westerly side Quincy street to Law- 
rence avenue. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Bower street, Nos. 30, 32 and 36. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Bromley park, at Bromley street. Measurement of crossing 
paving. 

Cabot street, rear of engine-house. Measurement of edge- 
stone, di'iveway and sidewalk paving. 

Calumet street. No. 88. Lme and grade for edgestone, and 
measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk pav- 
mg. 

Carlisle street, Nos. 7 to 11. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Cedar street. No. 18 and 20. Measurement of edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving. 

Cedar street. No. 105, to Highland street. Measurement of 
edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Cedar street, Nos. 123 to 127. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk pavmg. 

Centre street, north-westerly side, near Penryth street. Meas- 
urement of edgestone and gutter paving. 

Centre street and Creighton street, north-easterly corner. Line 
and grade for edgestone on circle. 



Engineering Department. 47 

Centre street. No. 354. Line and grade for edgestone and 

measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Centre street, easterly corner Sheridan street. Measurement 

of edgestone and gutter paving. 
Chestnut avenue, Nos. 114 to 118. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Clarence street, southerly corner George street. Measure- 
ment of edgestone and gutter paving. 
Cleveland street, Nos. 4 and 6. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Cohden street, Nos. 3 and 5. Line and grade for edgestone 

and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving. 
Cohden street. No. 15. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Columbus avenue. Nos. 1077 and 1079. Levels to test curb 

and sidewalk and measurement of sidewalk pavmg. 
Columbus avenue, Nos. 1120 to 1164. Levels to test curb 

and sidewalk and measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Columbus avenue, north-westerly corner Washington street. 

Line and grade for edgestone. 
Crawford street. No. 102. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving. 
Crawford street, westerly corner Harold street. Line and 

grade for edgestone and measurement of edgestone and 

gutter paving. 
Crawford street. No. 125. Measurement of edgestone and 

gutter paving. 
Crawford street. No. 126. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Crawford street. No. 127. Line and grade for edgestone 

and measurement of edgestone and gutter paving. 
Creighton street, north-westerly corner Centre street. Line 

and grade for edgestone re-marked. 
Creighton street, grade for edgestone. Line for edgestone 

(part way), measurement of edgestone and gutter 

paving. 
Cunard street. No. 31, to Tremont street. Measurement of 

sidewalk paving. 
Dacia street, north-westerly corner Ingleside street. Line 

and grade for edgestone. 
Dacia street, south-westerly corner Dewey street. Line and 

grade for edgestone. 
Dacia street, north-easterly corner Dalmatia street. Line 

and grade for edgestone. 
Dale street, at Regent street. Measurement of crossing 

paving. 
Dalmatia street. No. 43. Line and grade for edgestone. 



48 City Document No. 10. 

Dalmatia street, north-easterly corner Dacia street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. 

Dai/ street, easterly side, near Centre street. Measurement 
of sidewalk paving. 

Dean street. Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving. 

Dearborn street, northerly corner Dudley street. Measure- 
ment of sidewalk paving. 

Dennis street, Nos. 14 and 16. Line and grade for edge- 
stone. 

Dennis street, Nos. 10 to 18. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Dewey street. Blue Hill avenue to Dacia street. Line and 
grade for edgestone and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Dewey street, No. 33. Measurement of edgestone and gutter 
paving. 

Dimock street, crusher. Approximate estimate of crushed 
stone. 

Dorr street, Nos. 20 and 22. Measurement of edgestone, gut- 
ter and sidewalk paving. 

Dudley street, northerly corner Dearborn street. Measure- 
ment of sidewalk paving. 

Dudley street, northerly corner Adams street. Measurement 
of sidewalk paving. 

Dudley street. No. 305. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Dudley street, Nos. 508 to 514. Measurement of edgestone, 
crossing and sidewalk paving. 

Dudley street. No. 517. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Ulm Hill avenue. No. 36. Measurement of sideAvalk paving. 

Elmore street, north-easterly side Kensington street to May- 
fair street. Line and grade for edgestone and meas- 
urement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Eustis street. Dearborn street to Hampden street. Meas- 
urement of edgestone, gutter, crossing and sidewalk 
paving. 

Fairland street, westerly corner Mount Pleasant avenue. 
Line and grade for edgestone, levels to test edgestone 
and sidewalk, and measui'ement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Faxon street, at Smith street. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Felloivs street. East Lenox street to Hunneman street. Meas- 
urement and levels for profile of centre of roadway. 

Felloivs street, northerly corner East Lenox street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 



Engesteering Department. 49 

Fellows street, Nos. 50 and 52. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving. 

Fenno street, easterly corner Rockland street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Fenno street, from Rockland street to Nos. 19 and 20. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Fenno street, Nos. 16 and 29. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Fisher avenue, southerly side from Parker street. Line and 
grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone and 
gutter paving. 

Forest street, southerly corner Mount Pleasant avenue. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Forest street, southerly corner Vine street. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

Forest street, westerly corner Vine street. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

G-aston street. No. 35. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

George street, south-westerly side Clarence street to Langdon 
street. Line and grade for edgestone, and measure- 
ment of edgestone and gutter paving. 

Georgia street. No. 49. Line and grade for edgestone and 
measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Georgia street. No. 39. Line and grade for edgestone, and 
measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Georgia street, northerly corner Warren street. Line and 
grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Glenwood street, south-easterly corner Warren street. Line 
and grade for edgestone, measurement and levels for 
profile, and measurement of edgestone, gutter, crossing 
and sidewalk paving. 

Harold street, westerly corner Crawford street. Line and 
grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone and 
gutter paving. 

Harold street, Nos. 198 and 202. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Heath street, easterly corner Parker street. Line and grade 
for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Heath street. No. 107. Measurement of crossing paving. 

Heath street, near Schiller street. Measurement of crossing 
paving. 

Heath street, at Day street. Measurement of crossing pav- 
ing. 



60 City DocuivrENT No. 10. 

Herman street^ No. 13. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Holhorn street, Nos. 24 and 26. Measurement of edgestone 
and sidewalk paving. 

Holhorn street. No. 32, to Weldon street. Measurement of 
gutter paving. 

Hoivland street, No. 40. Grade for edgestone and measure- 
ment of edgestone and gutter paving. 

Howland street. No. 92, to Humboldt avenue. Line and 
grade for edgestone and crossings, and measurement of 
edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Howland street, southerly corner Humboldt avenue. Measure- 
ment and levels for profile of curb and gutter. 

Howland street, Nos. 42, 82 and 86. Measurement of edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Hoivland street, Humboldt avenue to Elm Hill avenue. 
Measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Humboldt avenue, easterly side, near Walnut avenue. Grade 
for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Humboldt avenue, Nos. 38 to 37. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Humboldt avenue. No. 68. Line and grade for edgestone, 
and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving. 

Humboldt avenue, Nos. 75 and 77. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Humboldt avenue, at Howland street. Line and grade for , 
crossing. 

Hunneman street, Albany street to Harrison avenue. Meas- 
urement and levels for profile of centre of roadway. 

Himneman street, Nos. 15 to 19. Line and grade for edge- 
stone. 

Hunneman street, Nos. 11 to 19. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Hu7itington avenue, westerly corner Wigglesworth street. 
Measurement and levels for profile of curb. 

Hutchings street, southerly side. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving. 

Ingleside street, south-easterly corner Blue Hill avenue. 
Line and grade for edgestone, levels to test edgestone 
and sidewalk, and measurement of edgestone and side- 
walk paving. 

Ingleside street, south-westerly corner of Blue Hill avenue. 
Paving measured. 



Engineering Department. 51 

Ingleside street^ No. 20, to Dacia street. Line and grade for 

edgestone and measurement of edgestone and gutter 

paving. 
Judson street^ No. 24. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving. 
Kenney street^ crusher. Approximate estimate of crushed 

stone. 
Kensington street, easterly corner Elmore street. Line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Lamartine street, at Roys street. Measurement of crossing 

paving. 
Lambert avenue, No. 64. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Lamont street, No. 35, to Lmden Park street. Measurement 

of sidewalk paving. 
Langdon street, Nos. 25 to 35. Line and grade for edgestone, 

and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving. 
Langdon street, Nos. 13 to 17. Measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Lansing street. No. 11. Line and grade for edgestone, and 

measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Linden Park street, at Hampshire street. Measurement of 

crossing paving. 
Linden Park street, Roxbury street to Gay street. Measure- 
ment and levels for profile of curb. 
Linden Park street, Tremont street to Elmwood street. 

Levels on curb and grade fixed. 
Linden Park street, Tremont street to Roxbury street. Grade 

for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving. 
Logan street, north-easterly side, near Lambert avenue. Line 

and grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone 

and gutter paving. 
Magazine street, Massachusetts avenue to Norfolk avenue. 

Line and grade for gutter. 
Magazine street, opposite Dunmore street. Measurement of 

edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Marcella street, at Vale street. Measurement of crossing 

paving. 
Marcella street, easterly corner Thornton street. Line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

sidewalk and gutter paving. 
Mayivood street, southerly corner Warren street. Levels to 

test curb and sidewalk and measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 



52 City Document No. 10. 

Maywood street, Nos. 22 and 24. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Mayivood street, No. 24, to Hazel park. Measurement of gut- 
ter paving. 
Maywood street, Nos. 36, 37, 38 and 39. Measurement of 

sidewalk paving. 
Maywood street, nortlierly side, near Blue Hill avenue. 

Measurement of edgestone and gutter paving. 
Minden street, Nos. 15 and 17. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving and levels to test curb and sidewalk. 
Minden street. No. 123. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving. 
Morelayid street, Nos. 94 and 96. • Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Mount Pleasant avenue, westerly corner Fairland street. 

Grade for edgestone, levels to test curb and sidewalk, 

and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 

paving. 
Mount Pleasant aveiiue, southerly corner Forest street. 

Measurement of sidewalk paving. 
Munroe street. No. 103. Line and grade for edgestone, and 

measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Neiv Heath street, southerly corner Parker street. Line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Oakland street, Nos. 15 to 19. Measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Parker street, Nos. 49 and 51. Measurement of sidewalk 

paving. 
Parker street, between Heath street and New Heath street. 

]\Ieasurement and levels for profile for revised grade. 
Parker street, southerly corner New Heath street. Line and 

grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Parker street, easterly corner Heath street. Line and grade 

for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter 

and sidewalk paving. 
Parker street, at Bromley Park. Measurement of crossing 

paving. 
Phillips street, easterly corner Smith street. Measurement 

of edgestone and gutter paving. 
Pontine street, Nos. 25 and 27. Measurement of edgestone, 

gutter and sidewalk paving. 
Prentiss street, Tremont street to Columbus avenue. Line 

and grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone 

roadway and sidewalk paving. 



Engineering Department. 53 

Quincy street^ at Tupelo street. Measurement of crossing 
paving. 

Quincy street^ No. 42. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Quincy street^ easterly corner Blue Hill avenue. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Regent street, Nos. 94 to 100. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Rockland avenue, Nos. 23 and 25. Measurement of side- 
walk paving. 

Rockland street, Nos. 13 to 19. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Roxbury street, Washington street to Eliot square. Measure- 
ment and levels for profile of curb, grade for edgestone, 
and measurement of edgestone, gutter, crossing and 
sidewalk paving. 

Roxbury street, northerly side, at and near Linden Park 
street. Grade for edgestone re-marked. 

Roxhury street, at Washmgton street, westerly corner. 
Grade for edgestone re-marked and edgestone, roadway 
and sidewalk paving measured. 

Ruggles street, northerly corner Shawmut avenue. Grade for 
edgestone. 

Ruthven street, Nos. 15 to 19. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing. 

Ruthven street. No. 78. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Savin street, Nos. 69 to 83. Line and grade for edgestone 
and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving. 

Shawmut avenue, northerly corner of Ruggles street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Shawmut avenue, Nos. 723 to 731. Measurement of edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Smith street, line and grade for edgestone, and measurement 
of edgestone, gutter, crossing and sidewalk paving. 

Southwood street, north-easterly side, between Blue Hill 
avenue and bend. Line and grade for edgestone 
and measurement of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving. 

Southwood street, south-westerly side. Blue Hill avenue to 
curve. Line and grade for edgestone and measurement 
of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Southu'ood street, north-easterly side, between bends. Line 
and grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 



64 City Docuiment No. 10. 

Southwood street, Nos. 17 and 21, Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving. 

Stafford street, Nos. 2, 4 and 11. Measurement of edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Texas street, Tremont street to bend. Line and grade for 
edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, roadway, and 
sidewalk paving. 

Texas street, at Stony brook. Measurement of edgestone, 
roodway and sidewalk paving. 

Thornton street, easterly corner Marcella street. Line and 
grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Townsend street, north-easterly side, between Washington 
street and Walnut avenue. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing. 

Tremont street, at Cabot street. Measurement of roadway 
paving. 

Tremont street, Nos. 1045 to 1055. Measurement of sidewalk 
pavmg. 

Tremont street, at Gurney street. Measurement of crossing 
paving. 

Tremont street, south-westerly side, from St. Alphonsus 
street, south. Measurement of curb and gutter. 

Valentine street, and Fulda street, easterly comer. Measure- 
ment and levels for profile with regard to change of 
grade at corner. 

Vernon street, northerly side, Cabot street to Haskins street. 
Measui-ement of edgestone, gutter, and sidewalk paving. 

Vine street, westerly corner Forest street. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

Vine street, southerly corner Forest street. Measurement of 
sidewalk pavmg. 

Walnut avenue, at Harold street. Measurement of edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Walnut avenue, Nos. 275 and 279. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone and gutter paving ; 
also levels to test curb and grade marks, revised grade 
for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter, and 
sidewalk paving. 

Walnut avenue, Cobden street to School street. Measure- 
ment and levels for profile of edgestone. 

Walnut avenue. Walnut park to Ruthven street. Measure- 
ment of crossing paving. 

Walnut avenue. No. 340. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 



Engineering Department. &5 

Wai'd street^ near Phillips street. Measurement of gutter 
paving. 

Warren street^ south-westerly corner Washington street. 
Grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone 
and gutter paving. 

Warren street^ No. 46. Measurement of edgestone, gutter 
and sidewalk paving. 

Warren street^ south-westerly corner Rockland street. Grade 
for edgestone. 

Warren street., Nos. 305 to 315. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Warren street, southerly corner Maywood street. Measure- 
ment of sidewalk paving. 

Warren street. No. 380. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

Warren street, Nos. 403 to 417. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Warwick street, at Weston street. Measurement of edge- 
stone, crossing gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Washington street, Dudley street to Eustis street. Measure- 
ment of roadway paving. 

WasJiinc/ton street, south-westerly corner Warren street. 
Grade for edgestone, and measurement of edgestone, 
roadway and sidewalk paving. 

Washington street, Nos. 2646 and 2648. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

Washington street, at Westminster avenue. Measurement 
of crossing paving. 

Washington street, Nos. 2946 and 2948. Measurement of 
sidewalk paving. 

Westminster avenue. Measurement of driveway paving. 

Westminster street, at Williams street. INIeasurement of cross- 
ing paving. 

Westo7i street, Warwick street to Cabot street. Measurement 
of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Whiting street, Nos. 30 and 32. Lme and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving. 

Whiting street. No. 34. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Whiting street, Nos. 32 to 36. Measurement of edgestone, 
gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Wliiting street, Nos. 33 and 35. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, and measurement of edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing. 

Whiting street, north-westerly side, Moreland street to Win- 
throp street. Lme and grade for edgestone. 



56 City Document No. 10. 

Whiting street^ between Moreland street and Winthrop street, 
both sides. Measurement of edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing. 

Wigglesu'orth street, Huntington avenue to Longwood avenue. 
Grade for macadam. 

Wigglesivorth street, westerly corner Huntington avenue. 
Measurement and levels for profile of curb. 

Williams street, westerly corner Shawmut avenue. Measure- 
ment of edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Windsor street, Nos. 9 and 11. Measurement of sidewalk 
paving. 

Winslow street. Measurement and levels for profile of curb. 

Winthrop street. No. 108, to Blue Hill avenue. Measure- 
ment of edgestone required, line and grade for edgestone, 
and measurement of edgestone and gutter paving. 

Winthrop street, Nos. 106 and 108. Measurement of edge- 
stone and gutter paving. 

Woodward avenue, Nos. 29 and 31. Measurement of side- 
walk paving. 

DOECHESTEE. 

Adams street, westerly side, between Parkman street and 
Dix street. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 

Adams street, No. 33. Measurement of frontage for edge- 
stone. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone 
and gutter paving measured. 

Alhan street, Nos. 31, 37, 45, 63, 65, 82 and 92. Sidewalk 
measured. 

Algonquin street, Nos. 31, 33, 35 and 39. Measurement of 
frontage for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk 
paving measured. 

Allston street, north-easterly corner Lyndhurst street. Line 
and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Armandine street, Nos. 43, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 58, 62, 
103 and 105, Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Ashmont street, southerly side, west of Adams street. Line 
and grade given for paving gutters. Paving measured. 

Auckland street, at Nos. 22, 24, 26 and 28. Line and grade 
given for sidewalk. Sidewalk measured. 

Barrington street, south-westerly corner Clarkson street. 
Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone, gutters and 
artificial stone measured. 



Engineering Department. 57 

Barrington street^ Nos. 101 to 109. Eclgestone, gutter and 
sidewalk paving measured. 

Batchelder street^ between East Cottage street and Marsh- 
field street. Line and grade given for edgestone in 
front of estate of Mr. Cullen. 

Bellfloiver street^ between Boston street and Dorchester 
avenue. Edgestone, gutters and sidewalks measured 
for estimate. Line and grade given for retaining wall. 
Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone and 
gutters measured. 

Bellflower street^ Boston street to Dorchester avenue. Line 
and grade given for filling, 

Bellevue street^ opposite Trull street. Line and grade given 
for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Bicknell street, No. 50. Artificial stone measured. 

Bicknell street, at south-westerly corner Bradshaw street. 
Line and grade given for sidewalks. Sidewalk meas- 
ured. 

Bird street, corner Baker place. Plan for edgestone, A. 
Walker estate. Line and grade for edgestone. Edge- 
stone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Blue Hill avenue, near River street. Line and grade for 
edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Bowdoin street, north-westerly corner Draper street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Bowdoin avenue, at No. 101. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Bradlee street, at No. 15. jMeasurement of frontage. 

Bradshaw street, between Bicknell street and Glenway 
street. Line and grade given for construction. Gutter 
paving measured. 

Brent street, northerly side, west of Carlisle street. Artifi- 
cial stone sidewalk measured. 

Brookford street. No. 46. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Brookford street^ north-easterly corner Howard avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and side- 
walk paving measured. 

Centre street, between Washington street and Carlisle street. 
Line and grade given for construction. 

Centre street. Smith estate, near Allston street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Chamherlain street. Line and grade given for artificial stone 
sidewalk. 



68 City Document No. 10. 

Charles street, from Ditson street to Geneva avenue. Line 
and grade given for filling. 

Clayton street, at Granger street. Paving measured. 

Codman street, ledge. Measurement of dust, screenings 
and cracked stone, and amount of telford on hand esti- 
mated. 

Cushing avenue, Nos. 93 and 95. Line and grade for edge- 
stone. Edgestone, artificial stone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Dalmatia street. Measurement of artificial stone at Nos. 4, 
6, 8, 10 and 12. 

Dalmatia street. No. 43. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Danube street. No. 46. Frontage for edgestone. Edgestone 
and gutter paving measured. 

Danube street, easterly side, near Brookford street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Dean street. No. 22. Line and grade tested. 

Dean street, both sides. Plan for sidewalk. Line and grade 
for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Devon street. Measurement of artificial stone paving on both 
sides of street. 

Dewey street, between Blue Hill avenue and Dacia street. 
Line and grade for edgestone. 

Deivey street. No. 32. Line and grade for edgestone. 

Ditson street, westerly side, between Charles street and West- 
ville street. Line and grade for artificial stone paving. 
Line and grade tested. Artificial stone paving meas- 
ured. 

Dorchester avenue, No. 1041. Paving measured. 

Dorchester avenue, Nos. 1853 and 1855. Paving measured. 

Dorchester avenue, at Savin Hill avenue. Paving measured. 

Dorchester avenue, at junction Talbot avenue. Line and 
grade for edgestone. 

Dorchester avenue, south-easterly corner Lonsdale street. 
Artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Draper court, north-Avesterly corner Bowdoin street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Dudley street. No. 738. Line and grade tested. 

Dudley street^ at Hudson street. Line and grade for edge- 
stone, 

Dudley street, Nos. 668 to 678. Artificial stone sidewalk 
measured. 

Dudley street, south-westerly corner Monadnock street. Ar- 
tificial stone sidewalk measured. 



Engesteering Department. 59 

Eastman street. Grade given for filling. 

East Cottage street. Paving measured. 

Edison G-reen, at four corners of Dorchester avenue. Line 

and grade for edgestone circles. Edgestone and gutter 

paving measured. 
Edson street, Nos. 12, 20, 36, 48, 60 and 72. Line and grade 

for sidewalk. Edgestone and artificial stone sidewalk 

paving measured. 
Edwin street., Nos. 12, 14, 16 and 18. Line and grade for 

edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 
Eldon street, southerly side, near Rosseter street. Line and 

grade for edgestone. Artificial stone sidewalk meas- 
ured. 
Erie street, south-easterly corner McLellan street. Line and 

grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 

measured. 
Erie street, north-easterly corner Michigan avenue. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 
Erie street. No. 38. Lme and grade for edgestone. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 
Erie street, at No. 93, and northerly corner McLellan street. 

Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 

paving measured. 
Erie street. No. 88. Line and grade for edgestone. 
Faulkner street. No. 33. Line and grade for sidewalk. Ar- 
tificial stone sidewalk measured. 
Faulkner street, north-easterly corner Freeman street. Line 

and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone, artificial 

stone and gutter paving measured. 
Freeport street, from Dorchester avenue to Pleasant street. 

Line given for edgestone. 
G-eiieva avenue, at corner Leroy street. Line and grade for 

edgestone. Edgestone, artificial stone and gutter paving 

measured. 
G-eneva avenue, near Josephine street. Line and grade given 

for artificial stone sidewalks. Edgestone and artificial 

stone paving measured. 
G-eneva avenue, south-westerly corner Westville street. Line 

and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 

measured. 
Glemvay street, at corner May street. Line and grade for 

sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 

measured. 
Glenway street, westerly side at Page avenue. Line and 

grade for artificial stone paving. Artificial stone paving 

measured. 



60 City Document No. 10. 

Grlemvay street, near Bradshaw street. Line and grade for 
artificial stone tested. Artificial stone sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Grlemvay street, near May street. Line and grade for arti- 
ficial stone sidewalk. Artificial stone sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Hartford street, at Chamblet street. Line and grade for 
setting edges tone circle. 

Hartford street. No. 64. Artificial stone paving measured. 

Hartland street, Sydney street to Saxton street. Line and 
grade for construction. 

Hartland street, northerly corner Sydney street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Hopestill street, westerly corner Northern avenue. Lme and 
grade for artificial stone paving. Line and grade tested. 
Artificial stone paving measured. 

Howard avenue, opposite Dalkeith street. Line and grade 
for sidewalk. Line and grade tested. Artificial stone 
sidewalk, edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Howard avenue, Nos. 256, 258, and 260. Line and grade for 
sidewalk. Line and gi-ade tested. Edgestone, artificial 
stone and sidewalk paving measured. 

Howard avenue, easterly corner Cunningham street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone, gutter and artifi- 
cial stone paving measured. 

Josephine street, Ditson street to Geneva avenue. Artificial 
stone paving measured. 

Kernwood street. No. 78. Line given for sidewalk. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 

Kermvood street, Nos. 41 to 79. Artificial stone paving 
measured. 

Lawrence avenue. No. 85. Artificial stone paving measured. 
Line and grade tested. 

Leyland street, near East Cottage street. Line and grade 
for edgestone. 

Leyland street. No. 3. Measurement of edgestone and gutter 
paving. 

Lonsdale street, at Dorchester avenue. Line given for set- 
ting edgestone corners. 

Magnolia street, near Lawrence avenue. Artificial stone 
paving measured. 

Magnolia street. No. 96. Artificial stone paving measured. 

Magnolia street, between Half Moon street and Hooper 
avenue. Line and grade for edgestone corners. Edge- 
stone and artificial stone paving measured. 



Engineering Department. 61 

Mayfield street^ between Pleasant street and Bakersfield 
street. Line and grade for artificial stone sidewalk. 
Line and grade tested. Edgestone, gutter and artificial 
stone sidewalk measured. 

Marslijield street^ between Clifton street and Batchelder 
street. Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 

Marshfield street, at Lanbrick estate. Levels taken to test 
grade of edgestone. 

McLellan street, between Erie street and Bradshaw street. 
Line and grade for construction. 

McLellan street, line tested in front of Wales' estate. 

Melville avenue, Nos. 18 and 20. Line and grade for side- 
walk. Artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Mill street, opposite Everett street. Line and grade for side- 
walk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Morton street, easterly side, at Codman street. Line and 
grade given. 

Mt. Vernon street, north-westerly corner Dorchester avenue. 
Artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Norfolk street, from Morton street to Walk Hill street. Line 
and grade given for construction. 

Northern avenue, between Washington street and Whitfield 
street. Line and grade for artificial stone sidewalk. 

Northern avenue, westerly corner Hopestill street. Line and 
grade for artificial stone. Line and grade tested. Ar- 
tificial stone measured. 

Park street, southerly side, west of Geneva avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Robinson street, corner Robinson avenue. Edgestone paving 
measured in front of T. F. Lomasney estate. 

Romsey street, from Dorchester avenue to Sagamore street. 
Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 
paving measured. 

Romsey street, from Sagamore street to Sydney street. Line 
and grade for construction. 

Rosedale street, northerly side, 295 feet from Washington 
street. Line and grade for edgestone. Line and grade 
tested. Edgestone, gutter and artificial stone meas- 
ured. 

Roslin street, near Washington street. Line and grade for 
edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Roslin street, northerly side, Washington street to Grace 
street. Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 



62 City Document No. 10. 

Rosseter street^ ledge. Measurement of dust, screenings, 
cracked stone, and amount of Telford on hand, esti- 
mated. 
Sagamore street^ between Belford street and Romsey street. 
Line and grade for construction. 

Sagamore street^ Nos. 10 and 12. Line and grade for edge- 
stone. Edges tone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Salcomhe street^ between Gushing avenue and Hancock street. 
Line and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter 
paving measured. 

Sawyer avenue^ Nos. 91 to 95. Artificial stone sidewalk 
measured. 

Standish street, easterly side, near railroad station. Line and 
grade for artificial stone sidewalk. Line and grade 
tested. Artificial stone measured. 

Sydney street, from Crescent avenue to Hartland street. Line 
and grade for construction. 

Sydney street, northerly corner Hartland street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Talbot avenue, easterly side at Ashmont street. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Talbot avenue, Washington street to New England railroad. 
Line and grade for edgestone. 

Virginia street. No. 33. Artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Washington street, at River street. Levels taken to test 
grade of railroad track. 

Washington street, south of Roslin street. Line and grade 
for construction. 

Washington street, south-easterly corner Kilton street. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Lmeand grade tested. Edge- 
stone, gutter and artificial stone measured. 

Washington street, at south-easterly corner Brent street. Line 
and grade given for stone-wall. 

Washington street, at Roslin street. Line and grade for 
edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Washington street, southerly side, near Harvard street. Meas- 
urement of artificial stone paving at Pope's estate. 

Washington street. No. 332. Frontage measured for edge- 
stone. Line and grade given for edgestone. Edgestone 
and gutter pavmg measured. 

Washington street, Nos. 1171 to 1181. Edgestone paving 
measured. 



Engineering Department. 63 

Washington street^ easterly side Welles avenue. Line and 
grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Washington street^ at Lower Mills. Paving measured. 

Washington street^ north of Armandine street. Paving 
measured. 

Welles avenue and Washington street. Line and grade for 
edgestone. Line and grade tested. Edgestone and 
gutter paving measured. 

Westville street, northerly side, between Geneva avenue and 
Ditson street. Line and grade for sidewalk. 

Westville street, No, 64. Line and grade for artificial stone 
sidewalk. Line and grade tested. Edgestone, gutter and 
artificial stone measured. 

Westville street, south-westerly corner Ditson street. Line 
and grade for artificial stone sidewalk. Line and grade 
tested. Edgestone and artificial stone measured. 

Westville street, south-easterly corner Geneva avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Line and grade tested. Edge- 
stone, gutter and artificial stone measured. 

Westville street, south-westerly corner Geneva avenue. Line 
and grade for edgestone. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Wheatland avenue, northerly side, Washington street to 
Whitfield street. Line and grade for edgestone. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 

West Roxbury. 

Adelaide street, between Boylston street and Spring Park 
avenue. Line and grade given for construction. 

Ashland street, at Florence street. Line and grade given for 
sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Birch street, at South street. Line and grade given for side- 
walk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Boyhton street, easterly side, between Washington street 
and Georgiana street. Line and grade given for side- 
walk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Boylston street, southerly side, between Clive street and 
Nelson street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. 
Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Boylston street, easterly corner of Egleston street. Measure- 
ment of sidewalk paving. 

Centre street, at Paul Gore street. Line and grade given for 
sidewalk. 



64 City Document No. 10. 

Centre street^ near Paul Gore street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. 

Centre street^ easterly corner of Paul Gore street. Measure- 
ment of edges tone, gutter and sidewalk paving. 

Centre street^ from Sheridan street, northerly. Line and 
grade given for setting edgestone. 

Clive street,, easterly side, near Bo^dston street. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Clive street^ Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 22. 
Edgestone and gutter pavmg measured. 

Cohasset street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 
121. 

Cohasset street, westerly side, mear Corinth street. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. 

Corey street, between Pomfret street and Weld street. Line 
and grade given for gutters, and same measured. 

Corey street, easterly side, south of Centre street. Line and 
grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and arti- 
ficial stone sidewalk measured. 

Florence street, at Ashland street. Line and grade given for 
sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Forest Hills street, line and grade given for sidewalk. Edge- 
stone and gutter paving measured. 

Forest Hills street, westerly side, near Peter Parley street. 
Line and grade given for sidewalk. 

Hastings street, from Centre street to JNIontview street. Line 
and grade given for gutters and same measured. 

Hyde Park avenue, near Walk Hill street. Grade given for 
filling. 

Hyde Park avenue, between Woodla^^oi street and Tower 
street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone 
and gutter paving measured. 

Keyes street, at South street. Line and grade given for side- 
walk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving meas- 
ured. 

Keyes street, at Washington street. Lme and grade given 
for sidewalk. 

Mt. Vernon street, easterly side, just north of Montview 
street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone, 
gutter and artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Mt. Vernon street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at 
No. 156. 

Opliir street, at Washmgton street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. 



Engineering Department. 65 

Paul G-ore street^ at crusher. Measurement of crossing pav- 
ing. 

Paul G-ore street. Line and grade given for sidewalk at No. 
71. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Paul G-ore street., at Centre street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving 
measured. 

Peter Parley street., at Forest Hills street. Line and grade 
given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving meas- 
ured. 

Peter Parley street., south side, between Washington street 
and Forest Hills street. Line and grade given for side- 
walk. 

Peter Parley street., at Washington street. Line and revised 
grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter pav- 
ing measured. 

Peter Parley street., at Washington street. Line and grade 
given for sidewalk. 

Ruskin street., from Corey street to Weld street. Line and 
grade given for construction and gutter paving meas- 
ured. 

School street., No. 114. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

School street.. No. 175. Measurement of sidewalk paving. 

South street, at Keyes street. Line and grade given for side- 
walk. Edgestone, gutter and sidewalk paving measured. 

Sycamore street, easterly side, from Florence street to Ash- 
land street. Line and grade given for gutters and same 
measured. 

Vermont street, at Mount Vernon street. Line and grade for 
construction. 

Washington street, at Boylston street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving measured. 

Washington street, westerly side, between Cornwall street and 
Boylston street. Line and grade given for sidewalk. 
Edgestone, gutter and artificial stone sidewalk measured. 

Washington street, at Keyes street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. 

Washington street, at Ophir street. Line and grade given for 
sidewalk. 

Washington streets at Peter Parley street. Line and revised 
grade given for sidewalk. Edgestone and gutter paving 
measured. 

Washington street, at Peter Parley street. Line and grade 
given for sidewalk. 



66 City Document No. 10. 

Brighton. 

Bigeloiv street^ between Faneuil street and Brooks street. 
Line and grade given for reconstruction, and gutter 
paving measured. 

Bigeloiv street^ between Brooks street and Dunboy street. 
Revised grade given. 

Bigelow street^ extension. Line and grade given for filling. 

Cambridge street, at Linden street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. Edges tone, gutter and artificial stone 
sidewalk measured. 

Elmira street, between Murdock street and George street. 
Line and grade given for construction. 

Leicester street, between Washington street and Bennett 
street. Line and grade given for construction. 

Linden street, at Cambridge street. Line and grade given 
for sidewalk. Edges tone, gutter and artificial stone 
sidewalk measured. 

Linden street, at Commonwealth avenue. Line and grade 
given for construction. 

Newton street, extension. Line and grade given for filling. 

Oakland street, at Washington street. Line given for build- 
ing wall. 

Reedsdale street, at Commonwealth avenue. Line and grade 
given for construction. 

Washington street, between Cambridge street and Common- 
wealth avenue. Line and grade given for reconstruc- 
tion. Edges tone and gutters measured. 

Western avenue, southerly side, between Spurr street and the 
bridge. Grade given for sidewalk. 



Enginebring Department. 



67 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYING DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JAN. 31,1897. 



Indexed. 



Vol. 



ltol3». 



14, 15, 16, 
and 17 



18. 
li). 
20. 

21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 

27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 

36. 

381 
39 1 

40. 
41. 
42.. 
43. 
44., 



General Head under which Classifled. 



Plans of estates (lithographed). 



in Brighton 

in West Roxbury. 



widenings, etc. 



School-house and miscellaneous plans 

Plans from actual survey in City Proper 

Profiles of City Proper and Boston Harbor, and ancient 
plans 



Plans and profiles of streets in East Boston, 1849. 

" " " " 1868. 
" " " South Boston, 1848. 

" " " " 1860. 
" " at South End 



in Church and Suffolk street 
Dists 



" various streets 

" streets at South End . 
Miscellaneous plans, estates, etc 



Oflicial plans from 1851 to 1854. 
Plans of estates 



Hale's plans of the streets in Boston, 1819. 
Plans of estates , 



Ancient plans of estates in South Boston, etc. 

Sectional plans of city lands at South End 

Plans of estates in Roxbury 

Carried forivard 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



221 

187 

31 

56 

17 

2 

664 

505 

95 

130 

91 
45 
45 
27 
39 
21 

38 

16 

15 

69 

97 ' 
103 
112 
131 
108 
256 
118 
176 

66 
494 

46 

24 



4,122 



iVol. 8 is a set of Architects' plans, and has been transferred to the Public Buildings 
Department. 



68 



City Document No. 10. 



PLANS 

IN SITBVETmG DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JAN. 31, 1897. 

Continued. 



Indexed. 



Vol. 



69 

70 

71 to 82 



General Head nnder which Classified. 



Brought forward 

Plans of estates In Roxbury. 



" widenlngs in Roxbury 

" " etc., in Roxbury. 



Third Parish and Grammar School lands in Roxbury. 

Plans of widenings in Roxbury 

" " city lands and widenings in Roxbury 

Profiles of streets in Roxbury 



Plans of widenings in Brighton . 
" " estates in Brighton 



" city property, etc., in Brighton. 
" widenings in West Roxbury . . . 



Profiles of streets 

Plans of city property, etc., in West Roxbury. 
" " estates, etc., in West Roxbury 



and Brighton 



Charlestown plans, in bound volumes, showing street- 
widenings and estates 

Charlestown street surveys 

Miscellaneous plans 

Plans of estates in Roxbury 



Carried forward 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



4,122 

70 

80 

60 

140 

73 

57 

59 

92 

76 

87 

42 

56 

25 

115 

74 

18 

76 

44 

58 

27 

199 

217 

73 

152 

140 

183 

626 
229 
106 
485 

18 
169 

32 



8,069 



Engineering Department. 



69 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYING DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JAN. 31, 1897.— 

Coidinued. 



Indexed. 



Vol. 89. 

" 90. 

" 91. 

" 92. 

" 93. 

" 94. 

" 95. 

" 96. 

'• 97. 



" 99 

In Drawer A. 
Cases CO.. 
Drawer E. 



CaseT. 



In Drawers — 
Vol.I.toLXIV. 



General Head under wliich Classified. 



Brought forward.. 
Plans of estates, etc. . 



Insurance volumes.. 



Dorchester surveys.. 



Plans of estates, etc 

" " " in Dorchester 

Maps of Boston, etc 

Miscellaneous rolled plans 

Plans from surveys in City Proper 

Plans and profiles from surveys in City Proper and 
Roxbury 



South Boston plans and profiles 

East Boston plans and profiles 

Official plans, profiles, etc 

Copies of plans hy other surveyors... 

Plans of city lands 

Miscellaneous rolled tracings 

4 vols, tracings of plans and profiles. 



Copies of official plans Indexed in Vol. 31 and Drawer L, 
Maps, etc., in bound volumes 



Miscellaneous plans of the Back Bay Commission In 
portfolio 



Hanging plans 

Plans In progress, City Proper. . . 
South Boston . 



East Boston 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury. 
Carried forivard 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



8,069 

140 

10 

25 

31 

28 

27 

66 

61 

63 

99 

434 

69 

682 

560 

670 

330 

129 

2,819 

323 

201 

338 

632 

257 

2,632 

1,450 

15 
23 
62 
63 
43 
92 
142 
90 



20,673 



70 



City Document No. 10. 



PLANS 

IN SURVEYING DIVISION, ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, JAN. 31, 1897.- 

CoTicluded. 



Indexed. 



General Head under which Classified. 



Brought forward 

Plans in progress, Brighton 

" " " Charlestown 

South Boston sectional plans 

East Boston " " 

Roxbury " " 

West Roxbury " " 

Sectional plans filed by Board of Survey 

Plans filed by the Boston Transit Commission 

15 vols, copies of Assessors' plans 

Indexed plans of Dorchester 

Sectional plans " 

Miscellaneous plots and plans of Dorchester 

Blue prints of official and progress plans 

Plans of proposed streets submitted by owners and ap- 
proved by the Board of Street Commissioners : 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Charlestown 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Plans of proposed streets submitted by owners for the 
approval of the Board of Street Commissioners now 
under consideration : 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 



Number 

of 
Plans. 



20,673 

91 

12 

42 

64 

163 

83 

302 

11 

1,579 

2,312 

232 

527 

149 

12 
38 
129 
1 
69 
37 



26,692 



There are also 4,798 lithographed plans in the office at 
Old Court House not included in the foregoing list, viz. : 



Lithographed maps of Dorchester, made in 1869 . 

" Cl 41 14 .4 <4 1880 . 

" " " West Roxbury, made in 1873 

" " " Brighton, made in 1873 



39 
155 

38 
17 



Engineering Department. 



71 



3) 



Lithographed maps of Fort Hill, made in 1866-69 . 

" " Church-st district, made in 1868 
" " " Washington-st. widening (parts 1, 2, 

made in 1860 ..... 
'« «' " W)shington-st. extension, made in 1869 

" " " North street, made in 1859 

" " " Stony brook, drainage area 

" " " Boston, made in 1866-67 . 

" " " Boston, made in 1888 

" " " Suffolk-st. district, made in 1869 

" " " South Boston, made in 1880 

" " " Roxbury, made in 1880 

" " " Charlestown, made in 1890 

" " " Burnt district . 

" K ii ]\xt. Hope Cemetery 

" " " Winthrop Farm . 

" ii. li Hanover avenue . 

*' " " Muddy river 

" " " Pemberton square. Court House site 

" " " East Newton street, lots on, sold by auc 

tion, made in 1888 
" " " Public lands in South Boston, sold by 

auction, made in 1885 
" i' i'- Public lands in South Boston, sold by 

auction, made in 1888 
" " " Boylston street, old Public Library lot 

" " " Public lands in South Boston, sold by auc 

tion, made in 1882 .... 
" K «i Boston, Directory map, made in 1886 

" " " Boston, scale 1,600 feet to an inch, made 

in 1890 
" '• " Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, made in 

1891, colored plans .... 
«' ii a Boston proper, scale 500 feet to an inch 

made in 1894 

" " " Exhibit No. 1, City Surveyor's Report 

1893 

" " " Exhibit No. 2, City Surveyor's Report 

1893 . 
'« " " Exhibit No. 3, City Surveyor's Report 

1893 

*' *' " High street, public lands sold by auction 

" *' " Beacon Hill, State House site . 

*' " " Harrison avenue, Savage School-house lot 

auction plan . 
" " " Boston proper, showing changes in street 

and wharf lines from 1795 to 1895 



103 

189 

1,197 

330 

44 

10 

109 

125 

33 

74 

114 

4 

77 

28 

49 

44 

44 

216 

42 

82 

8 
17 

136 
60 

300 

13 

16 

133 

115 

114 
16 
41 

57 

609 



4,798 



72 



City Document No. 10. 



B. 

[from the city engineer's report to the water 
commissioner.] 

Sources of Supply. 

The rainfall during the year 1896 was about 10 per cent 
below the average for the past thirty-four years and the con- 
ditions so serious as to arouse fears of a scarcity of water, 
which fortunately were not realized. 

The rainfall and quantities collected on the several water- 
sheds were as follows : — 



Rainfall, in inches 

Rainfall collected, in inches . . 
Daily average yield of water- 
shed, in gallons 



Sudbury. 



43.705 
21.453 

76,628,967 



Cochituate. 



42.780 
20.884 

18,667,700 



Mystic. 



39.795 
19.044 

24,302,000 



Reservoir No. 1. 

Grades, H.W., 161.00; Tops of Flash-boards, 159.29 and 168.41; Crest of Dam, 

157.54; Area, Water Surface, 143 acres; Greatest Depth, 14ft.; Contents 

belotv 161.00, 376,900,000 gals.; Below 159.29, 288,400,000 gals. 

The surface of this reservoir was at grade 158.11 on Jan. 
1, 1896 ; at this time water was wasting over the dam, and 
so continued until April 13, when the flash-boards were 
placed m position. 

On April 16 waste began over the flash-boards and con- 
tinued until May 1. On August 7 the flash-boards were 
removed from the dam. On Novemer 7 the water surface 
reached grade 157.67 and waste began and continued until 
December 3. 

The water surface again reached the crest of the dam on 
Jan. 8, 1897 ; waste began and continued until the 12th. On 
Feb. 1, 1897, the water surface was at grade 156.13. The 
dam is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 2. 

Grades, H.W., 168.00; Tops of Flash-boards, 167.12 and 166.49; Crest of Dam, 
166.87; Area, Water Surface, 134 acres ; Greatest Depth, 17 ft.; Content* be- 
low 168.00, 668,300,000 gals.; Below 167.12, 529,860,000 gals. 

On Jan 1, 1896, water was wasting over dam the water 
surface being at grade 166.17. Waste continued until April 



Engeneering Department. 73 

13, when the flash-boards were placed upon the dam. On 
April 16 waste began over flash-boards and continued until 
May 28, excepting April 19, 20 and 29. On August 7 the 
flash-boards were removed. On March 31 the reservoir was 
drawn upon for the supply of the city. Water was run into 
reservoir, from reservoii'S Nos. 4 and 6, during a few days in 
March ; from reservoir No. 4 during July ; from reservoirs 
Nos. 4 and 6 during August and September ; and from reser- 
voir No. 6 during October and twenty days of November. 
On Feb. 1, 1897, the water surface was at grade 161.87. 
The dam is in good condition. 

Reservoir No. 3. 

Grades, H.W., 177.00; Crest of Dam {no Flash-boards), 175.24; Area at 177.00, 

263 acres ; Conients bdoiv 177.00, 1,224,500,000 gallons. Area at 175.24, 248 

acres; Contents below 175.24, 1,081,600,000 gallons. Greatest Depth, 21ft. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, water was wasting over crest of dam, 
and this waste continued until May 12, with the exception of 
March 17 to March 22. From May 18 the water surface 
fell slowly, and on August 6 it was 7.01 feet below the crest 
of the dam. Filling gradually, from August 6, the water 
surface reached the crest of the dam on November 5, and 
from that date until December 27 water wasted over the dam. 
On Feb. 1, 1897, the water service was at grade 173.31. 
The dam is in good condition. 



Reservoir No. Jj.. 

Grades, H.W., 215.21; Tops of Flash-boards, 215.21+ and 214.89; Crest of Dam, 

214.23; Area, Water Surface, 167 acres; Greatest Depth, 49 ft.; Contents 

below 215.21, 1,416,400,000 gaUo7is. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, the water service in tliis reservoir was 
.37 feet below the crest of the dam. On January 3 waste 
began and continued until April 13, excepting March 19, 20 
and 21. 

On April 13 one set of flash-boards was placed upon 
the dam, and waste occurred over this set on April 16 
and 17. 

On April 18 the second set of flash-boards were placed in 
position, and waste continued until June 27. On June 26 
the reservoir was drawn upon for the supply of the city, and 
on September 29 the water surface had fallen 32.11 feet 
below the crest of the dam. 

Since September 29 it has been gradually filling, and on 
Feb. 1, 1897, the water surface was at grade 199.80. 

The dam is in good condition. 



74 City Document No. 10. 



Reservoir No. 6, 

Oracles, H.W., 295.00; Top of Flash-boards, 295.00; Crest of Dam, 294.00. EstU 
■mated Area, 185 acres; Estim,ated Contents, 1,630^300,000 gals. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, the water surface in this reservoir was 
at grade 294.39 and water was wastmg over the dam, and so 
continued until April 13, with the exception of March 19, 
20, 21 and 22. 

On April 13 one set of flash-boards was placed on the 
dam, and on April 17 the second set was placed in position. 

On April 20 the second set was removed and waste 
occurred from April 20 to April 28, on which date the second 
set was again placed upon the dam. Water wasted over 
the dam from May 3 to May 14, also from May 29 to June 
20. On August 14 the flash-boards were removed. On 
August 1 the water surface began to fall, and reached its 
lowest point on November 20, being 32.31 feet below the 
crest of the dam on that date, since then it has been gradually 
filhng, and on Feb. 1, 1897, the water surface was at grade 
271.59. The dam is in good condition. 

Whitehall Pond. 

Elevation, H.W., 327.91; Bottom of Gates, 317.78. Area at 327.91, 601 acres; con- 
tents, betiveen 327.91 and 317.78, 1,256,900,000 gals. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, the water surface was at grade 325.29, 
or 2.62 feet below high water. It reached grade 326.52 on 
April 20, and remained at about this height until July 1, 
when the water surface began to fall slowly, being at grade 
324.70 on November 2. Since that date it has remained at 
about this grade, being, on Feb. 1, 1897, at grade 325.45. 
Water was drawn from the lake for the supply of the city 
from January 1 to March 29, from September 16 to October 
14, and from November 17 to 30. 

It was decided to build a temporary dam, in order to raise 
the water in this basin two feet ; this work is now in progress. 
The storage capacity wiU be increased about 400,000,000 
gallons. 

Farm Pond. 

Grades, H.W., 149.25"; Low Water, 146.00. Area at 149.25, 169 acres; Contents, 
betweeji 149.26 and 146.00, 165,500,000 gals. 

No water has been drawn from this pond for the supply of 
the city during the year 1896. On Jan. 1, 1896, the surface 
of the pond was at grade 149.67 or .42 feet above high water 
mark, the water surface rose slowly during January, and on 
February 12 was at grade 150.22. During March and April 



Engineering Depaetjvient. 



76 



it remained at about grade 149.50. It began to fall in May 
and reached the lowest pomt of the year on September 5, 
being at grade 148.21 on that date. During the remainder 
of the year it has remained at about grade 148.80, being at 
grade 149.00 on Feb. 1, 1897. 

The Framingham Water Co. has drawn 139,300,000 gal- 
lons from the pond during the year. 



Lake Coehituate. 

Grades, H.W., 134.36; Invert Aqueduct, 121.03; Top of Aqueduct, 127.36. Area, 
Water Surface at 134.36, 785 acres; Contents, between 134.36 and 127.36, 
1,515,180,000 gals ; between 134.36 and 12o.03, 1,910,280,000 gals. ; Approxi- 
mate Contents, between 134.36 and 121.03, 2,447,000,000 gals.; Be- 
tween 134.36 and 117.03, 2,907,000,000 gals. 

The dam is in good condition. On Jan. 1, 1896, the sur- 
face of the lake was 2.06 feet below high water mark ; filling 
gradually, high water mark was reached on April 24. The 
water surface fell during the remainder of the year, being at 
grade 128.75 or 5.61 feet below high water mark on Feb. 
1, 1897. 

The beds for filtermg the water of Pegan brook have been 
in use for the greater portion of the year, and 258,099,000 
gallons have been pumped upon them. No dijBficulty has 
been experienced in their operation during the winter season. 
Water has been drawn from the different reservoirs as 
follows : — 



From 



7 A.M. 
12 M. 

11 A.M. 

5 P.M. 

9 A.M. 

2 P.M. 
12.30 P.M. 
11 A.M. 

7 A.M 

1.30 P.M. 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 6 
Mar. 31 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 17 
May 13 
May 15 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 18 
Dec. 17 



2.45 P.M. Dec. 17 



to 12 M. Jan. 6 from Reservoir No. 2. 

11 A.M, Mar. 31 " " No. 1. 

5 P.M. Apr. 15 " " Nos. 1, 2 

9 A.M. Apr. 17 No flow. 

2 P.M. May 13 from Reservoir Nos. 1, 2 

12.30 P.M. May 15 No flow. 

11 A.M. Nov. 5 from Reservoir Nos. 1, 2 

7 A.M. Nov. 18 " " No. 2. 

1.30 P.M. Dec. 17 " " Nos. 1, 2 

2.45 P.M. Dec. 17 " " No. 1. 

7 A.M. Feb. 1, 1897 " Nos. 1, 2 



76 



City Document No. 10. 



The height of the water in the various storage reservoirs 
on the first day of each month is as follows : — 







Reservoirs. 






















Farm 
Pond. 


White- 
hall 


Lake 














COCHIT- 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 4. 


No. 6. 




PONU. 


UATE. 




Top of 


Top of 


Crest 


Crest 


Top of 


High 
Water. 


High 
Water. 


Top of 




Flash- 


Flash- 


of 


of 


Flash - 


Flash- 




boards. 


boards. 


Dam. 


Dam. 


boards. 


boards. 




159.29 


167.12 


175.24 


214.23 


295.00 


149.25 


327.91 


134.36 


Jan, 1,1896. 


. 158.11 


166,17 


175.75 


213.86 


294. .39 


149.67 


325.29 


132.30 


Feb. 1,1896. 


. 157.80 


166.16 


175.48 


214.51 


294.27 


149.80 


325.09 


132.40 


Mar. 1, 1896. 


. 159.50 


167.33 


176.53 


215.38 


295.27 


149.54 


325.77 


133.66 


Aprill, 1896. 


. 158.24 


166.37 


175.80 


214.78 


294.56 


149.54 


325.86 


133.92 


May 1,1896. 


. 159.30 


167.35 


175.44 


215.20 


294.96 


149.44 


32C.58 


134.25 


June 1, 1896. 


. 1.56.91 


166.65 


172.58 


215.24 


295.13 


149.18 


326.59 


133.27 


July 1, 1896. 


. 156.91 


162.40 


173.02 


213.70 


294.76 


148.95 


326.47 


132.22 


Aug. 1, 1896, 


. 157.05 


162.73 


168.55 


198.52 


294.64 


148.59 


326.09 


130.55 


Sept. 1, 1896. 


. 157.00 


162.73 


168.33 


185.22 


282.24 


148.25 


325.62 


128.92 


Oct. 1, 1896. 


. 157.00 


162.82 


171.36 


182.25 


270.93 


148.59 


335.19 


128.25 


Nov. 1, 1896. 


. 156.90 


163.54 


174.75 


186.79 


268.45 


148.72 


324.69 


127.90 


Dec. 1, 1896. 


. 157.71 


163.70 


175.50 


190.78 


264.18 


148.83 


324.36 


127.80 


Jan. 1, 1897. 


. 156..37 


162.63 


174.82 


195.11 


266.41 


148.78 


324.77 


127.43 


reb. 1,1897. 


. 156.13 


161.37 


173.31 


199.80 


271.59 


149.00 


325.45 


128.75 



Aqueducts and Distributing Reservoirs. 

The Sudbury-river aqueduct has been in use 359.6 days, 
and has delivered 14,857,300,000 gallons to Chestnu1>Hill 
reservoir and 35,500,000 gallons to Lake Cochituate. The 
Cochituate aqueduct has been used 362.4 days and delivered 
5,731,790,000 gaUons. 

Both aqueducts have been cleaned during the year. The 
different distributing reservoirs are in good condition. 



High-Service Pumping Stations. 

The daily average quantity pumped at the Chestnut-Hill 
pumping station was 28 per cent, more than in 1895. 

Engine No. 1 was run 804 hours, 45 

minutes, pumping . . . 301,560,800 gallons. 

Engine No. 2 was run 758 hours, 35 

minutes, pumpmg . . . 286,377,150 gallons. 

Engine No. 3 was run 6,395 hours, 1 

minute, pumpmg .... 4,594,872,800 gallons. 



Total amoimt pumped 



5,182,810,750 gaUons. 



Boston Water Works. 

Didgi-cim showing the he'igh+s of Sudbury RiVei' ReseKvoliS Nos. 1.2 and ^. 
Farin Pond anal Coch'i+uate aftd My*+ic. Lakes dui-ing +he Yeaf 1896. 


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Boston Water Works. 

Diagram showiiig the heights o{ Sudbury River Reservoii-S Nos. 4qfid <o. and 
4-he Ramfall on -the Sudbury River Wbtei' Shed during the year I89S. 




Engineering Department. 77 

Amount of coal used by Engines 

Nos. 1 and 2 . . . . 715,387 lbs. 

Amount of coal used by Engine 

No. 3 4,427,668 lbs. 



Total amount of coal used . 5,143,055 lbs. 

Percentage of ashes and clinkers . 10.8 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal by 

Engines Nos. 1 and 2 . . . 821.8 gallons. 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal by 

Engine No. 3 . . . . 1,037.8 gallons. 
Average lift in feet. Engines Nos. 1 

and 2 121.07 

Average lift in feet. Engine No. 3 123.16 

Daily average amount pumped . 14,609,100 gallons. 

Table VII., on pages 94 and 95, show in detail the work 
done by the engines and boilers. 



Cost of Pumping. 

Salaries ....... 

Fuel 

Repairs ....... 

Oil, waste and packing .... 

Small supplies ..... 

Total ...... 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir 



At the West Roxbury pumping-station the daily average 
quantity pumped was 253,200 gallons, an increase of 41.3 
per cent over the amount pumped in the previous year. At 
the East Boston pumping-station 483,000 gallons per day 
have been pumped for the supply of the high-service dis- 
trict, and 57,600 gallons per day for the Breed's Island high- 
service. Owing to the non-completion of the 36-inch high- 
service line through Roxbury, it was necessary to maintain 
the pumping plant on Blue Hill Avenue and Wayne Street 
during the year, and to keep it in constant service. 



$15,915 24 


10,441 


73 


1,438 


51 


1,413 


06 


542 


13 


$29,750 


67 


$0.0495 


$5.7^ 


[ 



78 



City Document No. 10. 



Mystic Lake. 

On Jan. 1, 1896, the water surface was .96 feet below 
high water ; waste was then occurring over the dam and 
continued until May 2, excepting the period between Jan- 
uary 9 and 24. 

The water surface, which on May 2 was at grade 6.75, 
gradually fell, reaching its lowest point on September 5 ; 
the water surface being at grade — 3.26, or 10.26 feet below 
high water. 

Filling gradually from September 5, it reached grade 6.40 
on December 12. Waste occurred over stop-planks on dam 
from December 10 to 25 ; from Jan. 6 to 11, 1897, and from 
Jan. 22 to 24, 1897. On Feb. 1, 1897, the water surface 
was at grade 5.85. The fishway was opened on April 15, 
and was kept open until June 12, when it was closed, and 
remained so during the rest of the year. The dam at the 
outlet of the lake is in good condition. 



Mystic Cokduit and Reservoir. 

The conduit has been cleaned several times during the 
year. 

Mystic Pumping Station. 

The daily average quantity pumped at the Mystic station 
was 26.2 per cent more than in 1895. 

Engine No. 1 was run 1,962 hours, 15 

minutes, pumping . . . 421,731,900 gallons. 
Engine No. 2 was run 1,030 hours 

45 minutes, pumping . 
Engine No. 3 was run 6,540 hours 

45 minutes, pumping . 
Engine No. 4 was run 3,430 hours 

30 minutes, pumping . 



Total amount pumped 
Amount of coal used by Engines 

Nos. 1, 2 and 3 . 
Amount of coal used by Engine 

No. 4 

Total amount of coal used 



208,004,600 gallons. 
2,222,277,100 gallons. 
1,522,599,300 gallons. 



4,374,612,900 gallons. 
6,907,870 lbs. 
1,792,100 lbs. 



8,699,970 lbs. 



Engineering Department. 



79 



Percentage of ashes and clinkers 
Quantit}^ pumped per lb. of coal by 

Engines Nos. 1, 2 and 3 
Quantity pumped per lb. of coal by 

Engine No. 4 . . . . 
Average lift in feet, Engines Nos. 1, 

2 and 3 

Average lift in feet, Engine No. 4 
Daily average amount pumped . 



11.6 

412.9 gallons. 

849.6 gallons. 

145.72 gallons. 

152.70 gallons. 

11,952,500 gallons. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Salaries . 

Fuel 

Repairs . 

Oil, waste and packing 

Small repairs . 

Total 



113,749 51 

15,706 84 

2,914 61 

1,725 62 

348 79 

134,445 37 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot liigb 
Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir 



).053 



Table VIII., on pages 96 and 97, shows in detail the 
work done by the engines during the year. 



Consumption. 

The daily average consumption for the year was as fol- 
lows : — 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works 
Mystic works .... 



56,288,200 gallons. 
11,951,100 " 



Total for the combined supplies, 68,239, 300 



an increase of 3,426,000 gallons, or 13.2 per cent over that 
of the previous year. During the year Charles town has been 
supplied from the Mystic Works, excepting the periods be- 
tween January 1 to 7 and July 13 to September 28, when 



80 



City Document No. 10. 



the supply was from the Cochituate Works. The following 
table shows the consumption per inhabitant for the past two 
years : — 



Month. 



Cochituate. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita, 



1895. 



January 

February . . , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November . . 
December.. . 

Average 



104.9 
128.4 
107.1 
94.5 
97.3 
102.0 
104.2 
107.0 
107.1 
98.9 



1896. 



128.1 
134.8 
134.5 
118.3 
106.9 
113.2 
116.0 
112.9 
107.1 
106.4 
107.3 
118.6 



Mystic. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 



83.5 
77.3 
77.6 
83.2 
76.8 
76.5 
93.3 
81.1 
78.8 
86.1 



1896. 



96.2 
102.5 
96.9 
87.3 
85.8 
88.4 
85.9 
85.4 
83.1 
78.8 
76.5 
90.6 



Combined 
Supplies. 



Consumption in 
Gallons per Capita. 



1895. 



102.7 

120.7 

102.9 

91.5 

93.3 

97.6 

98.7 

101.6 

104.7 

95.8 

93.6 

102.4 



1896. 



121.0 
127.4 
125.9 
111.2 
102.1 
110.1 
107.2 
107.9 
102.7 
100.1 
100.2 
112.1 



116.8 



83.3 



100.3 



110.6 



Distribution. 

On the Cochituate Works 33.8 miles of pipe were laid and 
9.8 miles abandoned, making a net increase of 24 miles 
and a total of 620 miles now connected with the system. 
Early in the spring a 16-inch high service main was laid 
from Upham's Corner to Thomas Park by way of Boston, 
Dorchester and Telegraph streets, affording an additional 
supply for the South Boston high service district and making 
the reservoir on Thomas Park, which the city contemplated 
taking for a high school site, no longer necessary. The 
length of pipe laid was 8,491 feet, of which amount 3,667 
feet was laid by contract; this line is not yet in service and 
will be used only in an emergency until the completion of 
the 36-inch, 30-inch and 20-inch mains through Roxbury and 
Dorchester. 

The 24-inch low service main in Dorchester was extended 
from Dorchester avenue and East street, through Dorchester 
avenue and Adams street, a distance of 3,888 feet, all the 



Engineering Department. 81 

work being done by contract. This extension has increased 
the minimum head at the Lower Mills 7 feet, as shown in 
Table VI. A further extension of this line to Milton Lower 
Mills should be made during the coming season. 

In June the 42-mch high service main was completed and 
placed in service ; as shown on Table No. VI. the minimum 
head in the city proper was mcreased nearly 20 feet. During 
the months of October and November it was decided to put 
the 48-inch high service main in Brookline out of service 
during the construction of a sewer by the town of Brook- 
line in Walnut street, in close proximity to the water pipe, 
the excavation for the sewer being largely in solid rock ; the 
reduction in pressure and the consequent small consumption 
in gallons on the high service can be seen in Tables VI. and 
VIL, on pages 93, 94 and 95. In September, for the bet- 
ter protection of East Boston, in case of fire, and also to give 
an adequate supply for domestic use, a 20-mch low service 
main was laid from the corner of Brooks and Condor streets 
to Central square by way of Condor and Border streets, the 
length laid being 3,773 feet, of which amount 2,131 feet was 
laid by contract. This line has increased the minimum head 
12 feet. During the coming season it is intended to extend 
the 20-inch pipe in Border street to Maverick street and to 
lay a 16-mch line to Maverick square. 

In May of this year an 8-inch pipe, with Ward's flexi- 
ble joints, was laid across Shirley gut to replace the two 
lines of similar pipe laid in 1870 ; the latter had been broken 
a number of times, and were entirely exposed to a blow from 
passing vessels on the Deer Island shore ; as a matter of fact 
both were broken in this way before water was turned on 
the new line. The work was done, under contract, by George 
W. Townsend ; the pipe was first jointed on the Winthrop 
shore, upon rollers, and was then hauled across the gut, 
empty oil barrels being lashed to it to facilitate the work ; 
it is laid in a trench, excavated six feet deep on each 
shore to low water mark ; at that point the trench decreases 
in depth until it is one foot deep at the middle of the chan- 
nel. 

No trouble was experienced during the past winter with 
the service between the islands in the harbor ; while the cold 
was severe at times, it was not long continued. The precau- 
tion was taken of tapping the pipes on each island at high 
water mark ; during a cold snap the temperature of the 
water in the pipes was taken daily at the different points 
established. In this way the exact conditions are kno^vn, 
and danger of freezmg can probably be averted. 



82 City Document No. 10. 

Sectional plans of the city proper on a scale of 50 feet to 
the inch are bemg prepared ; they are based entirely upon 
actual surveys. 

The distributing mams connected with the Mystic Works 
have been extended 5.4 miles and 0.05 mile have been re- 
laid. The total length now in service is 184 miles. There 
has been an increase of 253 in the number of hydrants con- 
nected with the Cochituate Works, making a total now in 
use of 6,711 . On the Mystic Works 96 hydrants have been 
added, and the total now in use is 1,639 ; 243 petitions for 
main pipe have been reported upon, and 64 contracts for 
rock excavation have been made. Various profiles have been 
made, levels taken and lines and grades furnished for the 
main pipe laying. All pipe laid has been located and plotted 
on the plans. 

Appended to this report will be found the usual tables of 
rainfall, consumption, etc., for the past year, and, in addition, 
tables are given of the rainfall, rainfall collected, and per- 
centage collected on the Cochituate water-shed since 1863, 
on the Sudbuiy river water-shed since 1875, and on the 
Mystic water-shed since 1878. These will be found valuable 
for futui'e reference. 



Engineering Department. 



83 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Sudbury and Cochituate Works, 



1893. 



Daily average consumption in gallons, 

Daily average consumption In gallons 
per inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 



Percentage of total consumption 
metered 

Number of services 

Number of meters and motors 



Length of supply and distributing 
mains, in miles 



Number of flre-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates 

Yearly revenue from metered water. . 

Percentage of total revenue from 
metered water 



Cost of works on February 1 

Yearly expense of maintenance '. 



Mystic Works. 

Daily average consumption in gallons, 

Daily average consumption in gallons 
per inhabitant 



Daily average amount used through 
meters, gallons 



Percentage 
metered . . 



of total consumption 



Number of services 

Number of meters and motors. 



Length of supply and distributing 
mains, in miles 



Nmnber of flre-hydrants in use 

Yearly revenue from water-rates 

Yearly revenue from metered water.. . 

Percentage of total revenue from 
metered water 



Cost of works on February 1 

Yearly expense of maintenance. 



47,453,200 

107.5 

11,651,600 

24.5 
66,586 
4,585 

560 

6,042 

$1,638,772 21 

$683,948 52 

41.8 

$22,727,456 03 

$433,408 18 

10,742,500 

84.4 

1,921,570 

17.9 

22,398 

482 

165 

1,306 

$422,707 31 

$109,367 37 

25.9 

$1,721,609 33 

$160,643 97 



1894. 



46,560,000 

99.8 

11,170,400 

24.0 
68,556 

4,877 

572.8 

6,217 

$1,657,701 23 

$672,474 17 

40.5 

$23,583,967 89 

$440,840 63 

10,282,100 

87.6 

2,014,000 

19.6 

23,257 

515 

173.7 

1,446 

$453,627 50 

$115,811 32 

25.6 

1 $1,676,471 94 

$156,214 05 



1895. 



50,801,100 

104.3 

12,084,500 

23.8 

70,879 

4,910 

595.9 

6,458 

$1,743,292 35 

$711,467 39 

40.8 

$25,052,227 53 

$420,907 09 

9,467,000 

83.3 

2,105,800 

22.2 

24,120 

525 

178.6 

1,543 

$471,188 47 

$121,436 10 

25.8 

$1,803,775 29 

$189,194 61 



1896. 



56,288,200 

116.85 

13,125,700 

23.3 
73,230 

4,788 

619.9 

6,711 

$2,038,526 07 

$775,354 91 

38.0 

$24,608,500 60 

$617,566 53 

11,951,100 

88.26 

2,144,300 

17.9 

24,870 

536 

184.0 

1,639 

$501,755 05 

$122,050 66 

24.3 
$1,806,316 72 



1 $52,637.00 credited on account of sale of portion of Mystic sewer. 
- $1,118,975.74 credited by amount paid by State. 
'^ Mystic department combined with Cochituate. 



84 



City Document No. 10. 



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BOSTON WATER WORKS. 

Diagram showing the rainfall and daily average Conaumpfion 
for each month. 



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Engineering Department. 



85 



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Engineering Department. 



89 



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Engeneering Department. 



91 



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92 



City Document No. 10. 



H 









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1 S 






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52.75 

60.34 

40.85 

44.54 

36.70 

36.8 

49.0 






"ci a 

st 




26.04 
28.60 
15.98 
19.69 
14.40 
17.91 
19.55 


o 

1 
1 




It 
1 


>5 


49.37 

47.40 

39.115 

44.20 

39.24 

48.73 

39.90 


m 
n 
■* 




Daily average 

amount of 
Rainfall col- 
lected in Lake. 


i 

o 


33,323,300 
36,600,000 
20,390,700 
25,192,500 
18,429,500 
22,923,300 
24,951,200 


§ 
o 

i 




Total Amount 

of Rainfall 

collected in 

Lake. 


2 
5 

5 


12,163,012,400 
13,357,531,900 
7,462,979,400 
9,195,271,700 
6,726,769,300 
8,367,004,500 
9,132,142,000 


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2 

5 






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8,953,727,900 
10,027,714,400 
3,474,213,200 
4,958,528,500 
2,752,964,200 
4,528,156,200 
4,559,437,400 


o 
o" 




Amount of 

Water drawn 

from Lake. 


5 

to 


3,212,284,500 
3,500,817,500 
3,811,766,200 
4,331,743,200 
3,996,805,100 
3,682,848,300 
4,617,704,600 


1 

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Engineering Department. 



93 



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96 



City Document No. 10. 



• 


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Engineering Department. 



97 



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t- 00 -<j> to •* 






CO 


co" 


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pum 




05 


to 


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10 




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98 



City Document No. 10 



TABLE IX. 

Statement of Operations at the East Boston Pumping Station for the 

Year 1896. 





Engines Nos. 1 and 2. 


Engine No. 3. 


c4 






V 
5 


1896. 


be 

q 

o 


ill 

■Sp.2 


6 

>■ 

OS 

>. 


bo 

a 

S 

£ 5 


a 

sis 


03 
> 


* . 


Month. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per 
cent. 


Jan 

Feb.... 
March . 
April . . 
May... 
June. . . 
July... 
Aug.... 
Sept.... 
Oct ... . 
Nov.... 
Dec... 


426 
401 
418 
337 
353 
336 
339 
338 
304 
315 
312 
355 


15 

25 
40 
25 
35 
25 
55 
25 
45 
00 
15 
00 


18,390,820 
16,446,920 
16,034,620 
14,0.S7,100 
15,305,080 
14,409,920 
14,347,060 
14,503,160 
12,820,080 
12,842,760 
12,915,700 
14,731,220 


593,200 

567,100 
517,200 
467,900 
493,700 
480,300 
462,800 
467,800 
427,300 
414,300 
430,.500 
475,200 


131 
135 
113 
108 
104 
106 
118 
113 
97 
90 
83 
96 


30 j 

05 1 

50 

30 

30 

00 

05 

45 

30 

30 

30 

30 


2,049,360 

1 57S,6-iO 
2,099,940 

1 781,480 

1,713,300 
1,664,520 
1,659,780 
1,686,420 
1,851,480 
766,240 
1,404,990 
1,261,470 
1,121,640 
1,404,540 


j 66,100 
92,400 
80,500 
55,500 
53,500 
56,200 
59,700 
57,300 
46,800 
40,700 
37,400 
45,300 


53,340 
51,120 
47,910 
39,490 
40,032 
38,500 
40,980 
40,730 
35,885 
36,150 
37,880 
47,000 


18.1 
17.9 
17.9 
17.9 
17.6 
17.5 
17.8 
17.8 
17.9 
18.1 
18.9 
20.0 


Tot'lsA 
Avrg's, 


4,239 


05 


176,784,440 


483,000 


1,799 


15 


21,053,780 


57,600 


508,017 


18.1 



1 This amount was pumped to the tank by Engine 2. 
Engines Nos. 1 and 2 pump to the reservoir. 
Engine No. 3 pumps to the tank on Breed's Island. 



Engineering Department. 



99 



T ABL.E X. 

Statement of Operations at the West Roxbury Pumping Station for the 

Tear 1896. 



1896. 


be 

a 

a 

3 

eg 

o'-S 


c 

11 


a 

If 


S o 

>> . 

03 S 


'u'6 

o o 

si 

P to 

2 a 
S <= 

o w 
H 


o a 

fl o 


3 

c3 
a> 


Month. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


i6s. 


Per cen*. 


Feet. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


626 
492 
491 
498 
644 
664 
709 
793 
725 
680 
651 
676 


30 
00 
00 
30 
30 
30 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 


6,968,675 
6,644,925 
6,828,750 
6,912,525 
8,045,842 
8,238,950 
9,050,992 
9,788,475 
7,137,030 
7,255,785 
7,078,695 
7,740,750 


224,600 
229,100 
220,300 
230,400 
259,500 
274,600 
292,000 
315,800 
237,900 
234,100 
236,000 
249,700 


149.3 

152.8 
162.7 
168.8 
1.59.9 
156.5 
158.7 
177.9 
151.6 
153.4 
152.9 
156.1 


46,625 
43,500 
41,975 
40,950 
50,300 
52,650 
57,000 
55,000 
47,075 
47,285 
46,300 
49,575 


18.9 
18.7 
17.1 
16.4 
18.4 
18.3 
19.5 
21.1 
20.9 
19.8 
21.0 
21.5 


139.96 
139.46 
140.65 
139 47 


May 


143.57 




157 08 


July 


131 08 


August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . 
December 


141.08 
139.02 
145.36 

144.62 
138.85 


Totals and \ 
averages, \ 


7,551 


00 


92,684,694 


253,200 


158.4 


578,235 


19.3 


141.68 



100 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XI. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Sudbury River Water-shed for 

the Tear 1896. 



1896. 


a 

1-5 


P 


g 




OS 


4) 

a 

1-5 







Si 

a> 

a 

(a 

m 
CO 


S3 
1 
"S 

o 


s 

> 

O 


u 

1 
u 

p 


1 




0.50 






















2 






0.540 








0.940 




0.060 






3 


0.015 




1.420 
0.165 


0.035 










4 








0.460 






0.040 


5 








0.130 




0.315 






1.110 




6 




2.515 






1.030 


3.145 


0.565 
0.095 




7 


0.185 


0.315 


0.095 












g 






0.305 






0.135 




9 




0.570 






0.020 


0.655 
0.690 


0.010 








0.980 


10 


0.570 




1.390 








11 


0.026 
0.480 






0.045 








0.100 




12 


0.040 


0.775 
















13 








0.010 






1.445 


0.155 




14 












0.030 


0.295 




15 












1.733 




0.470 






16 




0.055 










0.915 








0.700 


17 






1.295 






0.060 


0.030 
0.025 
0.010 


0.180 
1.175 








18 






0.430 
0.200 




0.085 




0.070 


19 




0.425 


1.0S5 


0.625 








20 


0.035 












21 




090 


0.060 


0.150 






0.030 


0.445 




22 








0.305 


0.115 


o.oso 




23 












0.115 






0.335 


24 






0.025 








0.130 




0.990 


0.025 




"5 












0.495 




26 


1.520 








0.135 










0.325 




27 












0.050 
0.010 










28 












0.020 








0.225 
0.390 
0.110 




29 




1.865 






0.830 










30 




0.925 






0.135 


0.085 


0.995 


0.025 




31 








0.665 




























Totals... 


2.365 


6.435 


6.005 


1.570 


2.575 


3.220 


2.510 


2.395 


7.720 


3.765 


3.020 


2.125 



Total rainfall during the year, 43.705 inches, being an average of two gauges located 
at Framingham and Ashland. 



Engineering Department. 



101 



TABLE XII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths at Lake Cochituate for the Year 1896. 



1896. 


(S 

3 

a 

1-5 




3 


p. 
< 


03 


03 

a 

1-5 


1-5 


to 

S 
bJD 
3 
< 


a 
s 

c 

CO 


1 

o 
O 


u 

(U 

.a 
3 

> 
o 


(4 

ID 

a 

V 

o 

Q 


1 




0.500 


0.660 




















2 




0.580 








1.050 




0.060 






3 


0.010 


0.030 


0.640 
0.290 


0.030 










4 








0.430 






0.030 


5 








0.070 




0.210 


0.550 
0.060 




1.000 




6 


0.180 


2.290 






3.600 


0.400 
0.100 




7 


0.310 


0.040 






0.220 






8 










0.190 




9 




0.510 






0.020 


0.710 
0.580 










0.920 


10 


0.730 








0.130 


1.480 








11 


0.020 
0.560 






0.060 




0.080 
0.010 
0.230 




12 


0.050 


0.780 
















13 


















14 
















0.460 






15 












1.600 


0.450 
0.200 




1.790 






16 




0.070 


1.250 






O.OCO 






860 


17 




0.220 




0.050 


0.160 

0.790 
0.370 

0.100 








18 




0.200 
0.180 






0.050 
0.200 


0.120 




150 


19 




1.030 


0.370 


0.470 








20 


0.010 












21 








0.070 


0.070 


0.220 
0.130 


0.120 
0.020 


0.030 


0.440 




22 












23 






0.020 


0.380 










0.290 


24 












0.110 




0.980 


0.040 
0.260 




25 














0.550 




26 


1.450 




0.010 




0.160 












27 




0.120 












28 












0.030 








0.530 




29 




1.680 






0.800 








0.020 
0.030 




30 


0.870 






0.120 


O.OSO 


0.820 


0.220 




31 








0.590 




























Totals.... 


2.430 


6.040 


5.860 


1.600 


2.270 


3.040 


2.220 


2.430 


8.210 


3.530 


3.000 


2.150 



Total rainfall during the year, 42.780 inches. 



102 



City Docuisient No. 10. 



TABLE XIII. 

Rainfall in Inches and Hundredths on Mystic Lake Water-shed for the 

year 1896. 



1896. 


u 
ci 

3 

a 

CS 
•-5 


3 
6h 


J3 


ft 




a 

3 
1-5 




3 
bo 

3 


u 

s 

a, 


u 

1 

O 


u 

a 

(0 

> 


i 


1 




0.625 






















2 














1.070 




0.040 




110 


3 


0.010 




1.430 


0.675 


0.010 








4 








0.555 








6 










0.030 




0.215 




0.155 
0.350 


1.010 


150 


6 




2.260 






0.670 
0.170 


3.595 
0.140 






0.165 


0.290 


0.025 






0.265 
0.095 




8 


0.025 


0.650 
0.455 


0.380 




9 




0.400 










1 195 


10 


0.535 












1.550 




0.065 




11 








0.080 








12.. 


0.035 


0.520 


0.500 
















13 




















M 
















0.115 


0.930 
0.395 


0.375 




15 












1.070 








16 












0.330 


0.035 






590 


17 






1.100 






0.025 










18 






0.245 
0.250 


0.400 




O.OSO 
0.160 




0.145 




035 


19 


0.005 








20 


0.430 


0.630 






1.155 








21 






0.035 


0.120 


0.305 




0.025 






22 










0.110 
0.285 




0.390 




23 






0.010 


0.580 






0.075 


0.110 




250 


24 










1.095 


0.060 




25 














0.750 




26 


1.125 


















0.315 




27 








0.200 


0.025 


0.120 










28 




















29 




0.610 






0.700 








0.050 
0.035 


0.555 
0.170 




30 




0.830 






0.265 


0.030 


0.665 




31 








0.530 




























Totals. .. 


2.355 


4.845 


4.790 


1.775 


2.010 


2.345 


2.420 


2.610 


7.885 


3.220 


3.320 


2.33 



Total rainfall during the year, 39.905 inches, 
located at Mystic Lake and Mystic Reservoir. 



being an average of two gauges. 



Engineering Department. 



103 



M 

< 









s 


(M (N 00 t- 


C^ rH ;0 lO t- -* -j 


CO 


^ "q* ^ "«i1 -^ -^ CO ^ CO "^ "T 


•* 


H 


























§ 


t-CD^lOOJOt-tOt-M'S' 


CI 


i-IO05i-l00C0 0«C0«0C 


1— 




1=1 


e»CqrH(Mi-IC^(M(M.-Hr-ICV 


c» 


i 




1-1 C5 


^ 


Oi-HC-jotoicoosb-^c 


CI 


"A 


C^ 00 CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO c** 


CO 








o 


OO^OOOirS-^COOrHi— l<MO" 


-<J* 


O 


coeocococococoeocoeocJ 


CO 


^ 




o- 


o> 




CO o r- ») 


rH t- ^ 


O r^ CJ 


:£ 




03 


c-cotooot-t-t-t^coi- 


o- 


l- 


^ 






^ 


I- 


O CO ■* 


!"■ 


Ci CO 00 f-l CO t- 


lO 


<1 


<M 


(M <N 


<N 


IM 


e<i (M <r< c> <N 


C^ 


o 






nr 


<T 




O lO O CO t- 'I 


a- 




3 
1-5 


i-C 00 CO o 


O -l< CO lO OO lO It- 




<M 


(N (N 


l» 


CO <N IN C^ (M (N 


c- 


CI 


O 




o ir 








a 






o- 






1-5 


CO CO CO CO C" 


(M (N 


CI (N IM 


d 


CI 






<M (^ t~ IT 


n a- 


in ■* 1- 


'^i 


o 


00 eo «c 


(M 


oc 


1-1 oc 


00 o c 


V 




s 


c^ 


<N <M 


(M 


1-1 (N i-> i-H (M <N 


(M 


c» 


_; 
































C 




Oi CO O «D lO Tj 




<1 






■^ 


to t- 








CO 


"- 


rt ,- 




■- 


rH ,- 


(N rH O 


■" 


'-' 


fl' 












































u 






C 


X 






C*" 


1-1 IM CT 


Lt 


CO 


lid 


IC 


O If 


•c 


la 


■o -* 


o to <c 


«£ 


>o 


s 


























^ 


ir 


CI (N 


•* 


IT 


05 <= 


oo lo a: 


IT 


^ 


ct 








o «c 


O CO IC 


IT- 


CO 


liH 


IG 


t- cc 


ir 


IT 


lO 1^ 


lO "* •»> 


-<t 


lO 


d 






c 




















lO 


1-5 


c^ 


c^ 


<M 


<M 


C<1 


N 1-1 (M CO d 


<M 


o 






















> 




















































































rt 
























































C 




























C 


> 


























*_ 




• 






















bi 


C * 


























£ 


'* o 
























53 






















r 


c^ 


ft 




















> 

C 


c: 


5 




















^ 


B 


C 


OJ 


















r/ 


I- 


r 


s» 




£ 

c; 


c 


^ 


1 

r 
Z 

C 




1 


I 


b 

c 
£ 


i 
- C 


c 
' £ 


1 


o 

o 
bo 




1 


^ 


- t> 

.1 


<- 


i 


t 


(- 


c" 


^ 


% 






1 

H 


1 


> 
? 


c 


? 
S 


'1 




C 


> 

< 





104 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XV. 

Table shoioing the Temperature of Air and Water of Various Stations on 
the Water-Works. 



January.., 
February. 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August. .. 
September 
October. . . . 
November. 
December. 



Temperature of Air. 



Chestnut-Hill 
Keservoir. 



45.5° 

55.5 

66.0 

87.0 

92.0 

92.5 

94.5 

97.0 

92.0 

75.0 

71.0 

57.5 



-11.5° 
-13.0 
7.0 
23.0 
31.0 
43.5 
49.5 
45.5 
35.0 
25.5 
20.0 
-3.0 



23 .2» 

28.8 

32.1 

48.4 

61.3 

64.1 

72.6 

70.8 

62.1 

48.5 

45.2 

28.0 



Framingham. 



42.0° 

54.0 

03.0 

86.0 

94.0 

92.0 

93.0 

97.0 

89.0 

74.0 

70.0 

55.0 



-11.0° 
-12.0 
7.0 
22.0 
32.0 
44.0 
50.0 
45.0 
32.0 
25.0 
18.0 
-7.0 



22.7o 

27.5 

31.8 

48.5 

62.1 

65.9 

72.7 

71.1 

61.5 

48.6 

44.2 

27.3 



Temperature of 
Water. 



Brookline 
Reservoir. 



35.2° 

35.7 

35.9 

46.6 

61.8 

67.0 

73.3 

73.9 

63.7 

54.2 

47.5 

38.3 



Mystic 
Engine- 
house 



26.3° 

31.2 

31.9 

48.4 

62.1 

67.2 

74.2 

73.2 

63.3 

60.2 

48.5 

29.9 



Note. — The maximum and minimum air temperatures in above table are the high- 
est and lowest temperatures in any one day of the month. The mean air temperature 
is the average of the maximum and minimum temperatures of the whole month. The 
water temperatures are the mean temperatures for the whole month. 



Engineering Department. 



105 



> 


t? 


X 






a:i 






f^ 


C 

s 


^ 


o 


pq 


c3 


< 


s 


H 


o 



<§. 



ft? 



00^ 

5« 






^ 


-I 
















00 


QO 


CD 


(N 


00 


in 


in 


CD 


«5 


rH 


rH 


o 










CI 


















S? 








_: 


CO 


00 


(^' 


CO 


«•> 


in 


05 


o 


(^ 


t- 


■"»• 


CO 


IN 


in 




01 




rH 


(N 


(N 




IM 






N 






r-< 








i~* 








































-*l-5 






































00 








(?> 


in 


^ 


■* 


OS 


OS 


t^ 


3 


eo 


05 


a 


o 


CO 


^ 


eo 


H 


ec 


to 






<N 


t- 








■<* 




-* 


■<* 


















CO 


a> 




s 










in 


00 


5 


eo 


CO 


in 




o 


■^ 


'^ 










■* 


-* 


■"X 


eo 












H 












































^ 


(M 


o 


in 


OO 




S! 


,-, 


in 


o 




CO 




^ 


o 


CD 




o 


<N 


CO 


CO 


03 


TJ" 


o 




■^ 






05 






1—* 


CO 


m 


lO 


•* 


CO 


-* 


j-i 


o 


m 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


r-i 


O 


eo 


r-t 


in 


CO 


IN 


Q 








































s 






(M 




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^ 










05 




05 


CO 


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t- 




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CO 


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,, 






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in 








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CO 


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CO 


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r-t 


















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CO 


CO 


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t- 


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CO 


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35 








CD 




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1-5 
















































CO 






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CO 




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o 


CO 


O 


CO 


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00 


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IN 










I-H 


CO 








in 












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CO 








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CO 


o 


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s 


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3 








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» 


c; 


M 


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in 


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CO 


c- 


t- 


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CO 


N 








































































































^ 


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in 


in 


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0) 


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in 


in 


PH 


t- 


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C^ 


r-( 


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^ 


o 


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CO 


in 


^ 




















































^ 




^ 






CO 




S3 


C5 


1^ 


o 


tr 


d 




CO 


C5 


-* 






I'* 




CO 




C-l 




M* 


*—* 








OS 


•<* 


CO 


■<1< 


,—( 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


t- 


«H 


PH 


■* 


S) 


<N 


r-i 


CO 


in 


(N 


co 








































es 






































-* 






































tf 






































>H 








































^ 


-<* 


« 


CO 




00 


OS 


o 


^ 


«a 




■* 


in 


CO 


t^ 


00 


OS 


o 






























S5 












i-H 


ii 


S 


S 


00 


iH 




00 


00 


s 










f~< 







106 



City Document No. 10. 





«o 




1:0 




00 


, 


>N 


■v 




511 




'« 


-« 


s 


rf*' 



00^ 


s 


§ 


rt 





2 


■>»< 


s 


in 


3: 


§5 


CO 


s 


CO 


OS 

in 





OS 
CO 


IX> 


S 


Si 


00 


CO 


Oi 


01 


10 


CO 


^^ 


rH 


<>> 


(>> 


■*^ 


r-4 


co 




^ 




^1 




Et 




























rH 














































^►^ 






































'JO 





01 





t- 


CO 


>^ 


00 
























K 















tn 













(N 





a> 




CO 





f-H 





f— « 


10 


CO 


CO 


rH 


CO 





y-^ 


CO 










^ 

























10 


in 


















H 








































52 


t- 


-* 


^^ 


!>» 


^ 











^ 








^ 


1- 











»~< 


rH 












t- 




r-* 







CO 


i- 


T—t 




"* 





M 


(M 


CO 


m 


5> 


10 


CO 


10 


(N 


10 


CO 


rH 


in 




01 




If^ 










































































^ 






^ 


CO 





CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


cs 


■* 


^ 
















> 


















t^ 




CO 






10 


CO 





IM 


« 





m 





^ 


0» 


10 


->)< 


(M 


t^ 


10 


j^ 


<N 





s\ 


eo 


CO 








z; 








































J, 


ti 


!0 





CO 


CO 


0; 


•a 


in 


^ 




r<> 














4^ 






rH 






r—* 








rH 




M* 






in 


in 


00 


CO 





ei 


<M 


10 


(M 


10 


CO 


e^ 


■^ 


CO 





-* 


7-1 


eo 


in 


OS 


CO 


in 


■>*" 




































M 





^_, 


„ 


CO 





00 


^ 






















rH 






Ot 












-* 






t- 


o> 




01 


6 




<M 


03 


rH 





r—l 


CO 


rH 


00 


-* 


CO 


(N 


(N 


j^ 


(M 


01 


00 


f. 




CB 


































r-t 






M 


-* 





cs 


^ 


ifS 





IM 


t^ 


^ 


rH 


OS 


CD 


^ 
























t- 


CO 


iO 


eo 


OS 


t- 




in 




"^ 






P 


1— 1 


j—i 





-* 


Ir- 


CO 


eo 


CO 




eo 


■* 


eo 


in 


ei 


eo 


ei 


CO 




<J 






































tA 


00 


OS 


00 


(M 


co 







^ 





^ 


cs 


















■* 




-* 


t- 






CO 




CO 






H* 


CO 


t- 




-* 




9 


IN 


CO 


« 


■* 


,_) 


CO 


CO 


r-t 


OS 


<N 


<M 


eo 


<M 


eo 


-^ 


<» 


■* 


-<« 


"? 








































a 
3 


ss. 


r- 


^ 


00 


CO 


^ 


00 


J^ 


^ 


00 








^ 


























1—^ 










CO 








OS 


■<n 


'-' 


'-' 


CO 


B^ 


'-' 


(N 


(M 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


01 


■-1 


CO 


eo 


S 


(N 


1-5 








































00 






c» 




J_ 








^ 






10 




ro 


^_ 






i-H 










OS 





CO 


CO 




CO 


-* 


-* 







01 


10 


00 


CO 


■* 


CO 


ei 


CO 


ot 




■* 


CO 


in 


rH 


in 


in 


eo 


01 


(M 


CO 
rH 


eo 




^ 


05 


t^ 





y-l 





iO 


^ 


Oi 




IN 


00 


^ 










s 


Pi 










tr- 







la 




in 






01 








IC 


r-l 


rH 


<M 


eo 


CO 


(M 


H* 


« 


eo 


»» 


CO 





eo 


eo 


in 


j-i 


9 


co' 


< 






































XJ 


03 


CO 


CO 





OS 


CO 



















^ 




J, 
























CO 


■* 














CO 


■* 


(N 




-w 


" 


CO 


10 


10 


01 


t- 


10 


■* 


eo 


" 


CO 


in 


3 


-« 




=2 


CO 


CJ 




00 




























■Q 
















•0 


10 


IN 















I- 


OS 


^ 


■* 


eo 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


10 




T^ 


eo 


10 


01 






f-^ 


CO 






^ 


































7-t 






=2 


CO 


O) 


Ci 


lO 
















^ 












a 


















-^ 


CO 


CO 


i^ 




OS 


c~. 


■^ 


t- 


OS 


ci 


U5 


10 


51 


-* 


10 


CO 


IC 




lO 




CO 




m 








r<l 




1-5 


































'-' 




B5 




































01 


H 




































03 


(H 


































f^ 






^ 


«» 


wi 


■^ 


10 


ffi 








^ 




ri 




-^ 








H 


«) 








































rH 


S 


rH 


s 


s 


00 


00 


s 


s 


00 


in 


00 


ii 


00 


00 







Engineering Depabtment. 



107 



< I 

s 



f-i^ 






































o >. 


00 


^^ 


00 


,-H 


(N 


CO 


O 


,_! 


CO 


in 


s 


o» 


to 


o 










I- 


O 




r-l 










CO 


00 


C3 










'^ 


CI 


to 


M 


(>> 


■* 


■^ 


■* 


■* 


IN 


(N 


-* 


■* 


ffl 


01 


IN 


IN 


'N 


c-> 


rH 


sg 






































TCi-5 






































00 


00 


in 


o 


^ 


O 


00 


o» 


00 


CO 


<N 


eo 


IN 


^ 




,, 








C3 


00 




lO 






OS 


05 






C<1 




in 


in 


in 


T-< 




00 






00 


o 


CO 


J— I 


«*• 


,—1 


CO 


lO 


(^ 


1^ 












1^ 










•u 




IN 


^ 


IN 


o> 






(» 
















H 










































n 




05 






j^ 


t- 


^ 


__l 




^ 


IN 




zo 


tH 




^ 


S 




n 










»"• 




w 


<N 














o 







c^ 


^ 


^ 


'^ 


" 


'^ 


CO 


o 


^ 


rH 


IN 


o 


^~* 


o 


^ 


■* 


'"' 


O 












O 




o 






^ 












^, 




S3 


(* 














CO 






O 


CO 


lO 


O 




CO 


o 




>«; 


<N 


'^ 


r-l 


O 


*"* 


" 


^ 


o 


*"* 


IN 


"^ 


o 


^~* 


*"* 


(N 


(N 


o 


o 




<M 


M 


O 


eo 


(-<I 


lO 


t- 


^ 


en 


03 




IN 


03 


Ol 


CO 




o 


03 




CO 
















CO 




o 






•<1< 






•* 


O 


'"' 


'"' 


o 


o 


" 


o 


IN 


'^ 


o 


'^ 


<M 


O 


'"' 


o 


'^ 


o 


o 


o 




00 


OJ 


LO 


•i> 


^ 


lO 


o 




o 


O 


CO 


eo 




CO 


CO 


03 






4) 


en 




-1" 




CO 


CO 






CO 




l- 


in 




CO 






CO 


IN 


o 


o 


o 


,^ 


o 


,_( 


p^ 


o 


o 


,_( 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CO 












































^ 


r»" 


o 


Ol 


CO 








o 


IN 














lO 




-* 






rH 


in 


■^ 




CO 


■^ 






IN 










" 


o 


o 


O 


c^ 


" 


o 


o 


o 


" 


*"* 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 




^ 


^ 




O 


C3 


in 










IM 










^ 






>. 




■^ 


^ 
















CO 


o> 


(N 




to 


■* 




eo 


3 


(N 


o 


o 


,-1 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


"-3 






































6 

a 
s 


t- 


05 


-* 


o 


in 


03 


t- 


t~ 


t- 


o> 


in 


to 


00 


^ 


N 


to 




CO 




•* 


C<5 




o 


in 




CI 


CO 


■^ 


■* 




•* 


in 








o 


O 


o 


o 


1-i 


o 


r^ 


rH 


o 


o 


rH 


o 


r-< 


rH 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


f-i 








































^ 


(M 


o 


-3 


o 


^ 


O 


CO 


o 








03 






to 






■ S 




l^ 


<7< 


c^ 


T-i 
















■* 




CO 


■<* 


■* 


" 


'^ 


■* 


^ 


IN 


CO 


IN 


^ 


^ 


" 


<N 


(N 


" 


" 


IN 


^~* 


*"* 


o 




(M 


lO 


o 


CO 


^, 


00 


O 


,, 








03 






a 




3§ 




P. 


-* 




l- 




00 






00 


















■* 


IN 


c^ 


t-H 


IN 


eo 


IN 


CO 


,-1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


•* 


eo 


o> 


-* 


rH 


<1 






































•§ 




lO 


«D 




o 




^ 


00 




^ 


_ 


^. 






^ 








t^ 


















•* 


CO 


to 




00 


•^ 


eo 


I- 


83 


M 


•>* 


■* 


r1 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


IN 


rH 


eo 


rH 


IN 


in 


CO 


o 


eo 


iH 






































« 








































^ 




^ 






^^ 














^, 




^ 








« 


rH 




I- 






1"* 








O 


in 




03 


t- 


eo 


03 


eo 


e^ 


U 

^ 


M 


'^ 


'^ 


« 


m 


'^ 


" 


eo 


<N 


O 


^ 


IN 


" 


" 


" 


CO 


IN 


0^ 


















^ 






















a 


03 


M 




t- 








i^ 






o 


in 




o 








•>« 


53 

1-5 


" 


IS 


IN 


o 


'^ 


" 




■* 


'^ 




eo 


CO 


O 


" 


^ 


eo 


r-i 


" 


ej 






































't 






































H 






































^ 








































M 


^ 


■n 






00 


03 


o 


^ 


















o 








































i-H 


s 


CO 


s 




i-H 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 
l-H 


00 


00 


00 


S 


00 


^ 



108 



City Document No. 10. 



it 

"St 

o >> 


«5 


-* 


o 


-* 


t- 


^ 


00 


05 


CO 


05 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


^ 


^ 


in 


^ 


^ 






eo 


eo 


eo 


»-< 








in 


l^ 




CO 




t- 




tH 


01 


O 


■^ 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


■^ 


CO 


CO 


00 


in 


(N 


(M 


(M 


'"' 


CO 


eo 


CJ 

o 


CO 


^►^ 






































to 


■^ 


in 


^ 


^ 












^ 






in 








g 


^ 


'^ 






rH 


^ 








o> 














rH 




•* 


•i^ 


o 


in 








,_, 


















O 


a 






H 












(M 


(N 


eo 


OJ 


<N 


eo 








(N 


CD 


N 




o 


(M 


■^ 






o 








^ 


„ 
















c 












r-t 




•* 


e< 


•-H 


CO 


00 






-^ 


CO 




CO 


O 


" 


O 


O 


"^ 


'^ 


O* 


o 


lO 


eo 


(M 


■^ 


o 


'^ 


" 


(N 


^ 


tb 


*-* 




'^ 




^ 










^ 














^ 








> 










o 


(M 


l^ 


(N 




•» 


ao 


o 


o 






eo 




■* 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(N 




o 




IN 


,_, 


o 


y^ 




O 


eo 


,_, 


o 


^ 


^ 


































in 






CO 






,^ 








^ 


^ 




















^^ 








« 


t- 


-* 


-* 


lO 


C5 


Tf 


t- 




o 


CO 




(M 


eo 


I-l 


C 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


(N 


" 


eo 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


^ 


'^ 


eo 






« 


t- 


e^ 


C15 


lO 


O 


-* 




05 


o 


CO 


o 




CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


00 


P. 


(>» 




«> 




(M 


eo 


CO 


eo 




■>* 


t- 


CO 




--^ 


CO 


o 


T* 


t- 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(M 


y^ 


,_f 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


,_, 


CO 


o 


cc 








































CI 


^ 


,^ 


^ 


eo 










CO 




c^ 






o 




CO 


00 


fcii 


o 


o 


o 


to 


eo 










■^ 




lO 




■^ 






lO 




<J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


'"' 


o 


eo 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


§ 


o 




^ 


to 


C5 








^ 
















lO 


1^ 


J^ 


in 




»"* 












l^ 


■* 


CO 


eo 






eo 


CO 




CO 


l^ 




:3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1-t 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


GO 


o 


1-5 








































^ 


















^ 




oa 


m 


in 


o 


^_l 


^ 


05 


C 






o 


CO 




















•rf 


■^ 


t™ 






^ 
















,^ 


,_, 


















1^ 


































<H 














^ 


m 
















^ 






in 




t>> 


c» 


lO 


<N 


eo 


CO 


o 


eo 


eo 


(N 


00 


00 


o 
















'"' 


'"' 


'^ 


*"* 


*"* 


*"* 


^~* 


(M 


*"* 


^ 


o 


C5 


*"* 


o 


c 


o 


8 


1-1 




o: 


s? 


to 


o 


to 


ff> 


CO 


in 


^ 


eo 


^ 


^ 


(M 


in 


in 


^ 


CO 


in 


P< 




a> 


o 






eo 


-* 


i-H 


(N 


eo 


Oi 






CO 


o 






,^ 


o 


iH 


•«< 


(M 


(N 


eo 


CO 


<M 


(M 


■* 


o 


(M 


(N 


eo 


(N 


o 


<M 


<! 






































.c 




to 




,, 


^ 


^ 


o 


CD 


00 






<N 


<N 


in 


o 


(M 


-* 


03 








to 


(N 


in 






o 










in 




in 




l^ 




la 


05 


(N 


-* 


(M 


OS 


-* 


•* 


(N 


lO 


00 


CO 


•* 


(M 


eo 


lO 


^ 


CO 












































05 












m 




<f> 




in 


o 


in 


o 


o 


CD 


^ 




o 












t- 












o 












e^ 


CO 


'^ 


Ol 


ei 


t~ 


■* 


IN 


*"* 


(M 


CO 


1-1 


(N 


" 


o 


CO 


B 


<N 














=0 










CO 


00 


^ 


J^ 


CO 




in 




a 














o 










»— ' 










-^ 




03 








p., 


,_, 






^^ 


^44 


j^ 


CO 






,_( 


f^ 


,_! 


Cl 




►T! 






































S3 




































10 






































U) 


H 


































w 


03 


H 


































1 


a 




































H 


< 






































S 


00 


in 






00 


00 
l-H 


00 




i-l 


I-l 


I-l 


I-l 


r-l 


IH 


iH 







Engineering Department. 



109 

















































l9 

o >. 


lO 


00 


00 


f— ( 


-* 


o 


C5 


<N 


t- 


o^ 


o» 


CO 


CO 


ei 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


■* 


§; 


M 


CO 


■* 


m 




o 


,_l 


00 


05 


^ 


t- 


in 




o 


^ 


o 


00 


^ 












(M 


<n 








(M 








r-t 


(M 












































C 3 








































-♦-5 








































lA 


00 


o 


■t 


>^ 


f. 


<M 


OJ 


,, 


■* 


•n 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


03 


!N 


03 


t- 


00 


"C 






^ 


lO 


oo 


o 


^ 


CO 


s? 




CI 




00 


o 


l>» 


C3 


O 




03 




^ 


■* 




CO 


lO 


CO 


1* 






o 


CO 


-* 




-* 




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112 



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ENGESTEEHrNG DEPARTMENT. 



113 



TABLE XXI. 

Percentage of Bainfall collected on Sudbury-river Water-shed, 
1875 to 1896. 



Tear. 


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1875 


7.6 
62.7 
36.5 
57.3 
50.4 
56.0 
13.3 
37.2 
21.2 
34.9 
46.8 
40.9 
88.8 
45.3 
92.4 
88.4 
76.7 
57.0 
26.4 
30.2 
45.4 
80.9 


76.5 
54.2 

206.9 
66.5 
77.4 
74.9 
53.6 
85.2 
43.0 
72.5 
56.4 

123.2 
95.3 
88.3 

116.4 
70.3 

107.3 
50.1 
30.3 
40.8 
62.5 
62.2 


76.5 
106.5 
102.7 
133.4 

80.9 

73.9 
124.6 
191.2 
161.4 
143.1 
262.1 
101.7 
104.4 

95.9 
100.9 

84.0 
122.7 

85.9 
157.7 
278.2 
144.2 
130.7 


162.9 
135.4 
120.3 

48.5 
114.1 

65.0 
133.4 

82.1 
126.3 
111.8 

86.9 
151.1 
106.0 
188.3 

71.4 
122.3 
106.0 
181.1 
101.7 

82.9 

82.7 
164.3 


59.5 
73.5 
67.0 
260.2 
125.8 
50.0 
49.0 
45.5 
40.0 
53.0 
68.4 
42.9 
154.5 
60.3 
53.3 
46.8 
51.7 
40.2 
77.8 
35.4 
56.1 
24.9 


24.0 
18.8 
42.5 
27.2 
18.8 
14.2 
42.8 
54.9 
21.6 
20.9 
25.7 
23.9 
26.9 
28.7 
40.3 
48.3 
18.9 
26.8 
31.9 
62.6 
10.8 
21.4 


16.0 
3.6 

12.2 
7.7 
7.1 
5.0 

21.0 
8.7 
7.7 

10.9 
7.8 
6.3 
5.5 

14.9 

12.6 
7.8 
7.8 
9.0 

11.0 
8.8 
8.2 
6.8 


12.8 

42.0 
5.9 

12.2 

10.8 
5.3 

19.4 
5.9 

19.1 
9.8 
6.0 
4.1 
7.2 

10.9 

61.2 
6.1 
6.1 

11.3 
5.9 

18.4 
9.9 
4.3 


10.4 

6.9 

31.9 

21.5 

12.9 

8.6 

13.0 

6.0 

10.4 

8.9 

14.7 

7.0 

14.5 

23.2 

30.9 

13.2 

14.7 

13.9 

10.8 

9.8 

6.7 

8.7 


23.8 
18.6 
13.2 
14.3 
15.6 

4.8 
11.2 
25.7 

6.9 

6.0 
11.8 

8.0 
12.0 
71.4 
51.6 
38.6 

9.8 
19.2 

9.7 
12.5 
23.0 
28.0 


46.5 
32.6 
42.2 
41.6 
13.2 
19.9 
16.7 
31.5 
19.5 
11.4 
33.3 
25.0 
23.8 
65.9 
53.3 
174.7 
17.0 
20.7 
25.1 
42.1 
72.4 
37.7 


110.7 
22.3 

264.4 
89.0 
19.0 
11.0 
34.9 
24.5 
9.7 
31.9 
77.0 
36.6 
29.6 

100.6 

127.3 
33.5 
26.3 
76.9 
29.2 
26.5 
94.9 
55.1 


44.9 
48.2 
67.9 
52.6 
45.3 
31.9 
46.6 
45.9 
34.1 
60.6 
43.4 
49.5 
66.7 
62.2 
38.2 
60.9 
55.8 
39.3 
45.2 
40.7 
47.8 
49.1 


16.0 


1876 


10 1 


1877 


11.7 


1878 


12 9 


1879 


10.3 


1880 ... 

1881 


5.4 
15.4 


1882 


9.2 


1883 


7 9 


188i 

1885 


9.3 
8 9 


1886 


6.2 


1887 

1888 


8.5 
30.4 


1889 


33.2 


1890 

1891 


23.1 
8.9 


1892 

1893. . . 


11.8 
8 6 


1894 

1895 


12.0 
15.5 


1896 


11.9 






Totals.... 


1096.3 


1713.8 


2862.6 


2544.5 


1535.8 


647.2 


206.4 


294.6 


298.6 


434.7 


866.1 


1330.9 


1056.7 


287.2 


Averages 


49.8 


77.9 


131.1 


115.7 


69.8 


29.4 


9.4 


13.4 


13.6 


19.8 


39.4 


60.5 


48.0 


13.1 



114 



City Docu]ment No. 10. 







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Engineering Department. 



115 



TABLE XXIII. 

Rainfall Collected in Inches on Mystic Water-shed, 1878 to 1896. 



Tkar. 


u 

as 
3 

a 

03 


u 

OS 

1- 


i 


'u 


(A 


0) 

a 




s 


u 

.:= 
S 

Ph 
IB 


u 
o 
O 


s 

> 
o 

I2i 


0) 
.Q 

a 


1 
o 
H 


o 
«? 

as 

a 


1878 


3.55 


3.97 


4.91 


2.21 


2.16 


0.78 


0.48 


1.11 


0.56 


0.71 


1.75 


3.63 


25.82 


2.86 


1879 


1.21 


2.33 


3.31 


3.97 


1.95 


0.97 


0.54 


0.70 


0.48 


0.34 


0.45 


0.69 


16.94 


2.06 


1880 


1.70 


2.54 


1.95 


1.50 


0.96 


0.51 


0.67 


0.54 


0.45 


0.36 


0.44 


0.59 


12.21 


2.02 


1881 


0.82 


2.14 


6.79 


2.17 


1.51 


2.05 


0.87 


0.35 


0.31 


0.29 


0.50 


0.87 


18.67 


1.82 


1882 


1.37 


3.03 


4.19 


1.16 


1.85 


0.81 


0.35 


0.22 


0.53 


0.58 


0.39 


0.57 


15.05 


1.68 


1883 


0.70 


1.43 


1.88 


1.63 


1.20 


0.52 


0.30 


0.22 


0.18 


0.39 


0.42 


0.44 


9.31 


1.09 


1884 


1.49 


3.89 


5.42 


3.85 


1.48 


0.85 


0.58 


0.60 


0.23 


0.27 


0.35 


1.17 


20.18 


1.68 


1885 


1.79 


1.81 


2.05 


2.03 


2.18 


0.86 


0.47 


0.54 


0.34 


0.68 


2.41 


2.39 


17.55 


2.03 


1886 


2.31 


7.70 


3.91 


3.24 


1.27 


0.55 


0.41 


0.25 


0.32 


0.38 


0.88 


1.43 


22.65 


1.36 


1887 


3.16 


3.61 


3.60 


3.75 


1.89 


1.27 


0.87 


1.35 


0.48 


0.57 


0.71 


0.91 


22.17 


3.27 


1888 


1.43 


3.32 


4.28 


3.27 


2.88 


0.84 


0.39 


0.54 


1.31 


2.74 


5.04 


5.08 


31.12 


4.98 


1889 


4.51 


1.83 


1.60 


2.27 


2.18 


1.89 


1.33 


2.05 


1.06 


1.21 


2.49 


3.06 


25.48 


5.65 


1890 


2.07 


2.23 


5.37 


2.93 


3.00 


1.92 


0.43 


0.46 


0.58 


2.61 


1.95 


2.49 


26.04 


4.08 


1891 


6.29 


5.97 


7.21 


3.43 


1.40 


1.01 


0.42 


0.44 


0.42 


0.58 


0.56 


0.87 


28.60 


1.86 


1892 


2.49 


1.76 


3.03 


1.33 


2.10 


1.17 


0.66 


0.49 


0.56 


0.45 


1.07 


0.87 


15.98 


2.16 


1893 


0.75 


2.14 


4.52 


2.72 


4.42 


1.04 


0.47 


0.69 


0.41 


0.55 


0.71 


1.27 


19.69 


2.12 


1894 


1.37 


1.87 


3.05 


2.27 


1.31 


0.91 


0.49 


0.38 


0.36 


0.58 


0.91 


0.90 


14.40 


1.81 


1895 


1.55 


0.87 


3.16 


2.95 


1.14 


0.54 


0.60 


0.80 


0.36 


1.46 


2.37 


2.12 


17.91 


3.22 


1896 


1.85 


3.40 


4.50 


3.26 


0.77 


0.75 


0.39 


0.34 


1.06 


0.89 


1.11 


1.24 


19.55 


2.68 


Totals.... 


40.41 


55.84 


74.73 


49.84 


35.65 


19.24 


10.72 


12.07 


10.00 


15.64 


24.50 30.59 


379.32 


58.43 


Averages .. 


2.13 


2.94 


3.93 


2.63 


1.88 


1.01 


0.56 


0.63 


0.53 


0.82 


1.29 


1.61 


19.66 


3.55 



116 



City Document No. 10. 



TABLE XXIV. 

Percentage of Rainfall collected at Mystic Water-shed, 1S78 to 1896. 



Tear. 


u 

a 


es 




< 


es 


SI 
3 




P 

< 


s 
i 


)4' 

01 

1 


u 
o 


i 

s 

c 
R 


a 




1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 


62.6 
66.6 
64.9 
14.2 
24.8 
26.1 
31.5 
37.1 
36.6 
60.2 
35.2 
81.8 
75.6 
100.7 
55.0 
33.3 
34.8 
43.7 
78.7 


69.2 
85.4 
60.1 
58.9 
64.8 
46.7 
63.9 
53.3 

107.3 
80.8 

101.3 
98.2 
66.0 

117.6 
58.5 
28.6 
56.5 

132.2 
66.8 


125.0 
93.9 
78.4 
101.5 
168.4 
84.8 
127.3 
174.5 
101.9 
72.0 
82.5 
70.2 
80.4 
118.7 
75.7 
177.3 
280.1 
105.2 
98.9 


38.6 
85.3 
68.8 

141.1 
55.0 
65.9 

121.2 
58.8 

154.3 
81.3 

115.2 
63.0 

121.8 

109.0 

163.6 
80.7 
65.4 
70.6 

183.5 


322.9 
104.9 
47.3 
50.7 
40.4 
33.5 
50.2 
55.3 
43.0 
112.0 
56.6 
46.9 
47.6 
57.0 
37.5 
70.6 
25.3 
36.0 
38.5 


29.6 
24.5 
34.3 
29.9 
38.6 
31.8 
18.3 
19.6 
35.5 
47.3 
88.1 
57.0 
56.9 
22.8 
28.3 
49.5 
125.8 
15.0 
31.9 


13.5 
22.6 
9.2 
33.3 
14.9 
10.8 
15.5 
22.8 
11.1 
13.2 
17.5 
15.8 
19.0 
13.3 
25.7 
23.2 
14.2 
13.8 
16.2 


14.8 
12.8 
14.7 
51.9 
20.8 
25.7 
12.4 
9.2 
7.8 
27.1 
8.8 
22.2 
12.7 
11.3 
10.2 
12.6 
15.1 
14.7 
12.9 


17.7 
29.7 
31.7 
14.1 
6.3 
12.1 
33.5 
23.7 
10.7 
32.0 
15.3 
22.5 
15.6 
19.3 
27.7 
20.5 
14.3 
17.6 
13.5 


14.3 
44.2 
13.5 
13.6 
30.0 
7.2 
9.9 
12.2 
13.4 
18.7 
55.3 
33.7 
29.5 
12.1 
24.3 
13.4 
10.5 
14.4 
27.5 


30.8 
16.2 
22.9 
14.3 
22.2 
21.1 
17.4 
38.2 
21.7 
23.4 
73.6 
44.1 
141.2 
21.7 
23.1 
31.5 
26.0 
37.8 
33.4 


74.9 
18.6 
23.8 
26.3 
25.5 
14.7 
25.6 

113.6 
29.7 
25.6 
96.4 

107.0 
53.5 
25.6 
75.2 
29.1 
22.7 
92.2 
53.1 


47.8 
48.0 
35.5 
44.5 
38.4 
29.8 
45.5 
39.4 
49.7 
47.8 
54.8 
50.6 
52.8 
60.3 
40.9 
44.5 
36.7 
36.8 
49.0 


14.9 
20.1 
13.5 
23.9 
12.3 
10.3 
14.0 
13.6 
10.7 
20.3 
22.7 
27.3 
22.1 
13.3 
19.2 
15.6 
12.9 
15.1 
17.5 


Totals 


963.4 


1416.1 


2216.7 


1843.1 


1276.2 


734.7 


325.6 


347.7 


377.9 


397.7 


660.6 


933.1 


852.8 


319.3 


Averages, 


50.71 


74.53 


116.67 


97.01 


67.17 


38.67 


17.14 


18.30 


19.89 


20.93 


34.77 


49.11 


44.88 


16.81 



Engineering Department. 



117 







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Dally 
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Yield. 
July-Oct. 










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Engineering Departaient. 119 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

EEPOET FOR 1896. 



Boston Water Works, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, supplies 
also the cities of Somerville, Chelsea, and Everett. 

Population by census of 1895 : — 

Boston 496,920 

Chelsea 31,264 

Somerville 52,200 

Everett 18,573 



Total 598,957 

Date of Constiniction : — 

Cochituate Works 1848 

Mystic 1864 

By whom owned. — City of Boston. 

Sources of supply. — Lake Cochituate, Sudbury river, and Mystic 

lake. 
Mode of supply. — Sixty-five per cent from gravity works. 
Thirty- five " " pumping " 

Pumping. 

Cochituate. Mystic. 
Builder of pumping ma- 
chinery . . . Holly Mfg. Co. H. R. Worthington 

and Quintard and G. F. Blake 

Ii-on Works. Mfg. Co. 
Description of coal used : — 

a Kind ... . Bituminous. Bituminous. 

c Size . . . Broken. Broken. 
e Price per gross ton, 

in bins . . $3 90, 3 94, $3 55, 3 63 

4 15 3 66, 3 81 

/ Per cent of ash . 10.8 11.6 

Coal consumed for year, in lbs. 5,143,055 8,699,970 

Total pumpage for year, in 

gallons .... 5,182,810,750 4,374,612,900 

Gallons pumped per lb. of coal . 1,007.7 502.9 

Cost of pumping figured on 

pumping-station expenses, 

viz. : $29,750 67 $34,445 37 

Cost per million gallons raised 

to reservoir .... $5 74 $7 88 



120 



City Document No. 10. 



Consumption. 



Estimated population 

Estimated number of consumers, 

Total consumption, gallons 

Passed thi'ough meters 

Percentage metered . 

Average daily consumption gal- 
lons ..... 

Gallons per day, each inhabi- 
tant ..... 

Gallons per day, each consumer, 



COCHITUATE. 

481,700 

478,200 

20,606,590,000 

4,804,020,000 

23.3 



Mystic. 

135,400 

134,200 

4,374,612,900 

784,800,000 

17.9 



56,288,200 11,951,100 



116.9 
117.7 



88.3 
89.1 





Distribution. 






Mains. 






COCHITUATE. 


Mystic. 


Kind of pipe used . 


. -[ Cast-iron Cast-iron, Wrought- 
( Iron, and Cement. 


Sizes 


.48 in. to 4 in. 


36 in. to 3 in. 


Extended, miles 


23.9 


5.4 


Total now in use . 


619.9 


184.0 


Distribution-pipes less than 4 




in., length, miles 


2.3 


4.0 


Hydrants added 


253 


96 


Hydrants now in use 


6,711 


1,639 


Stop-gates added . 


423 


106 


Stop-gates now in us€ 


; . . 7,087 
Services. 


2,391 


Kind of pipe used 


■] Lead, 


Lead and 
Wrought-Iron. 


Sizes 


. f in. to 6 in. 


^ in. to 4 in. 


Extended, feet . 


59,325 


18,840 


Service-taps added 


2,441 


822 


Total now in use 


73,320 


24,942 


Meters now in use 


4,358 


469 


Motors and elevators 


in use . 534 


21 



Engineering Department. 121 



C. 

IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

The work of extending the Improved Sewerage System 
has been continued as fast as the limited appropriation would 
admit, and the following is a brief review of the work done 
during the past year : — 

The condition of the appropriation on Feb. 1, 1897, was 
as follows : — 

Net appropriation 16,375,404 96 

Total expenditures 6,375,404 96 

The following is a report of the work done : — 

Neponset Intercepting Sewers. 

During the past year the intercepting sewers in Neponset 
have been completed and are now in operation. The sys- 
tem connects with the Dorchester intercepting sewer in 
Chickatawbut street at Narragansett street, from this pomt 
the sewers extend as follows: an 18-inch pipe, remforced 
by concrete in Chickatawbut street and Neponset avenue to 
Walnut street ; a 15-mch pipe, also reinforced in part by 
concrete, in Walnut street to Woods street; a 12-inch pipe 
in Franklin, Fulton, and Ericcson streets to High street ; an 
8-inch pipe in Ericcson street to Walnut street, connecting 
with the sewer in the latter street, about 433 feet of which 
it was necessary to relay at a higher grade. The sewers 
built in Franklin, Fulton, and Ericsson streets are intended 
to serve as common sewers, and slants have been built in 
them for that purpose. In Neponset avenue an 8-mch pipe 
sewer was laid on each side of the street ; on the east side, 
between Walnut and Taylor streets and on the west side 
from Walnut to a point 20 feet beyond the track of the 
N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad. The length of sewers laid in 
the system are as follows : — 

1,115 linear feet, 18-inch pipe. 
1,033 " " 15 " 
2,069 " " 12 " 
2,113 " " 8 " 

6,330 



122 City Document No. 10. 

Of this total 420 linear feet of 18-incli pipe was laid in 1895. 
The sewage from the common sewers is intercepted at three 
points, viz. : On Neponset avenue near Walnut street, on 
Walnut street at Wood street and on Ericsson street at High 
street; at each of these pomts a sump man-hole was built, 
with an overflow into the common sewer providing an ample 
outlet for storm water to the Neponset river; tide-gates, 
with suitable man-holes, were constructed on the common 
sewers where they serve as overflows. 

]\It. Vernon Street Overflow. 

After the completion of work at Neponset the improved 
sewerage force was engaged in building the Mt. Vernon 
street ovei'flow ; this overflow is from the Dorchester Inter- 
cepting Sewer, just before its junction with the main inter- 
cepting sewer in Mt. Vernon street ; crossing over the main 
sewer it extends almost due north, about 500 linear feet to the 
edge of the marsh ; it consists of 491 Imear feet of wooden 
flume, 9 feet 8 inches, by 5 feet 2 inches ; 24 linear feet of brick 
chamber containing two pairs of wooden tide-gates, each 4 
feet 6 inches, by 4 feet 10^ inches ; and, connecting with the 
Dorchester Interceptmg Sewer, 56 linear feet of 7 feet by 7 
feet brick sewer, horseshoe shaped. This overflow is to 
relieve the lower portion of the Dorchester Intercepting 
Sewer m time of storm ; it will not begin to operate until the 
intercepting sewer is flowing under a head of 0.86 feet ; under 
these conditions the overflow will prove unobjectionable. In 
December, 1896, the improved sewerage force which had been 
steadily employed since May, 1890, was disbanded, and the 
men transferred to different departments of the city. 



Engineering Department. 123 



D. 

[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE BOARD OF 
PARK COMMISSIONERS.] 

Commonwealth Avenue. 

Underground conduits for electric wires have been built by the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company between Massachusetts 
avenue and Beacon street, and also on Charlesgate East and 
Charlesgate West, between Commonwealth avenue and Beacon 
street. 

The Fens. 

The only work of construction done here during the year was 
the re-grading and re-surfacing the grounds and walks around 
the John Boyle O'Reilly monument. The area immediately 
around the monument has been covered with an artificial stone 
walk. 

Two small temporary boat-landings were built, one nearly 
opposite Westland entrance and one at Brookline avenue. 

RiVERWAT. 

The yard at the Administration Building has been inclosed by 
a wall on the side towards the park and by a fence on the line of 
the railroad. The walks in the vicinity of the building have been 
surfaced and the plantations graded. The building was opened 
for the use of the public early in the season. 

On Audubon road, between the railroad and Beacon street, the 
Street Department has built sewers on each side of the road, and 
the gas and water-pipes have been laid. The surfacing of the 
road is now in progress. 

A temporary boat-landing was built near the gate-house at 
Brookline avenue. 

Leverett Park. 

Three hundred and forty-four linear feet of 8-inch and 958 
linear feet of 18-inch drains have been built from near the junc- 
tion of Bynner street with the Parkway to Leverett pond. 
Catch-basins at this junction were built by the owners of the 
abutting land. 

Jamaica Park. 

A 6-inch sewer has been built from the Pine Bank Refectory 
to the sewer in Jamaicaway, near Perkins street, a distance of 
1,050 feet. 



124 City Document No. 10. 

On December 14 a contract was made with F. A. Snow for 
grading the drive, walks and slopes on the westerly side of the 
park between Perkins street and Jamaicaway. This work is now 
in progress. 

The water-pipe from the pumping-station is nearly all laid, and 
the boilers and pumps should be repau'ed so that the plant can 
be used. 

Arborway. 

The drive on the traffic road has been surfaced for a distance 
of 1,350 feet westerly from South street. 

On December 1 a contract was made with Thomas F. Broderick 
for building a wall on the line between the Arborway and the 
Arboretum. The work is not yet completed. 

The bridge over the Parkway on the line of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, is nearly finished. This is a 
masonry structure of five arches, and makes an angle with the 
railroad of 63 degrees 3 seconds. The width of the bridge at right 
angles to the railroad is 69 feet. The southerly arch is over 
Morton street, and the northerly arch is over the traffic road on 
the northerly side of the Parkway. Each of these arches has a 
span of 41 feet 2 inches. The central arch has a span of 45 feet 
2 inches, and is over the Parkway drive. On each side of the 
central arch there is an arch of 23 feet 2 inches span, the north- 
erly one being over the bridle path and the southerly one over the 
promenade. The foundations rest upon beds of concrete, varying 
in thickness according to the character of the ground ; all other 
masonry is of granite. The soffits of the arches and the parapets 
are fine pointed ; all other exposed surfaces are quarry faced. 
The bridge is surmounted by a parapet 6 feet high on each side 
of the railroad. 

The bridge was built by the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Company, after plans made by Messrs. Shepley, 
Rutan & Coolidge, architects. 

The drive between Washington street and Forest Hills street 
was opened to travel on August 2. 

Arnold Arboretum. 

A complete crusher plant has been established at the quarry 
on Bussey street, and the work of crushing stone for road con- 
struction and repair is now going on. 

On October 5 a contract was made with James Doonan for 
grading the road on the northerly side of Peters' Hill, between 
the corner of Bussey and Walter streets and the corner of Bussey 
and South streets. This work will be completed early in the com- 
ing season. 

West Roxbury Parkway. 

A topographical survey of the portion of the Parkway between 
the Arboretum and Weld street has been made during the year. 



Engineering Department. 125 



Franklin Park. 

The new drive at Forest Hills entrance was finished and opened 
to travel on August 2.- At the same time Ellieott street, the last 
of the old highways in the park, was closed. The walk through 
this entrance has been finished, and the gravel has been deposited 
on the ride, but some work remains to be done to complete the 
latter. 

At the Refectory the service drive from Blue Hill avenue to 
the service yard of the building has been built. A deep excava- 
tion for the drive and walls six feet high on each side of it were 
necessary. Steps on the path and walls on each side of the path, 
leading from Blue Hill avenue to the Refectory, have been built. 
The wall on the line of the road from Glen lane to the Refectory 
has been completed ; also a wall on the southerly side of Glen lane 
from the Refectory drive to Blue Hill avenue. 

The road to the Refectory and the court in front of the building 
have been surfaced, and the Pergola terrace has been covered with 
a temporary plank floor. 

A drain was laid from the building to Blue Hill avenue, but, 
as at the time the sewer had not been built in that part of the 
avenue, a temporary drain was built from the end of the drain to 
the sewer at Wales street. The sewer has since been built in 
the avenue, and the park drain permanently connected with it. 
Another drain has been built from the carriage shed to the sewer 
in Blue Hill avenue. A 6-inch water pipe was laid from Blue 
Hill avenue to the Refectory. 

The grading of the grounds in this vicinity has been nearly 
finished. The Refectory was opened on July 4. 

Franklin Field. 

No construction work has been done during the year except to 
repair some of the turf which had become winter-killed. 

The Street Department has built a sewer on the southerly and 
easterly sides of the Field between the drainage ditch and the 
boundary line from Lyons street to Talbot avenue. 



DORCHESTERWAY. 

The Street Department has completed the sewers on both sides 
of the Parkway, between Pond street and Dorchester avenue. 
The Water Department is now laying its pipes in this same 
section. 

AVork was resumed in August on the surfacing of the driveway. 
The gutters have been paved, the catch-basins built, the Telford 
foundation laid, and most of it covered with crushed stone on the 
section between Pond street and Dorchester avenue. A large 
amount of rock has been excavated between Dorchester avenue 
and Buttonwood street. 



126 City Document No. 10. 



The Strandway. 



Plans and specifications were prepared, and on June 4 a con- 
tract was made with Jones & Meehan for building the sea wall 
and grading that portion of the Strandway between O street and 
Marine Park, for the sum of $117,000. This work is now being 
done. 

On October 19 a contract was made with Hugh Farrell for 
filling and grading that portion of the Strandway between H and 
O streets. This work will require about 160,000 cubic yards of 
filling which is to be furnished for 47 cents per cubic yard. 
Work was begun early in November, and is now in progress. 

Plans have been prepared for the extension of the storm over- 
flow sewers at I and N streets. 

On December 1 a contract was made with James Dolan for 
removing the surplus loam from the site of the proposed play- 
ground on M, Fii'st and Second streets, and piling the same on the 
Strandway for future use there. The work is nearly finished. 

Marine Park. 

The new head-house was opened to the public on June 17, and 
the pier, which had been kept closed since the preceding winter 
on account of the work on the head-house, was opened on June 19. 

As stated in the last annual report some of the columns sup- 
porting the iron pier had been broken by the pressure of the 
filling forming the beach. Measurements taken at frequent 
intervals having shown that the movement of the columns had 
practically ceased it was decided to repair them. This was done 
in the following manner : Two rows of four-spruce piles each were 
driven, one on each side of the column, on lines parallel to the 
direction of the pier and as near the columns as was practicable. 
The pile-driver was placed on the floor of the pier. Each row 
was capped with a 12-inch hard pine timber. Other piles were 
driven, and the pier was temporarily supported on them by block- 
ing and by clamps around the column. The column then having 
been cut off at the proper grade, and about 1^ feet of the part 
below the cut broken away it was swung into a vertical position 
by jack screws. Two courses of 6-inch hard pine timber, laid 
close, were then placed on the caps and spiked to them, and the 
column lowered on to a bed of cement on the platform. Three 
columns were treated in this manner. The grades of the platforms 
vary according to the grade of the ground, but they are such that 
the timber can all be covered by the filling, and so no evidence of 
the injury be seen. The columns are 4^ feet in diameter, of cast 
iron, IJ inches thick, and filled solid with concrete. The tops of 
the columns are at grade 20, and they were sunk to a depth of from 
60 to 64 feet, the lower 10 feet being in stiff clay, above which 
there was about 28 feet of mud. The weight to be raised in 
moving the columns was about 40 tons. Measurements taken 
since the work was done show no movement. 



Engineering Depaktihent. 127 

The old Refectory building has been removed, and the site 
graded and loamed. 

The house occupied by the sergeant in charge of Fort Indepen- 
dence was thoroughly repaired during the spring. 



Public Park, North End. 

The work under the contract with Trumbull & Ryan, dated 
Nov. 4, 1895, was finished on November 2, at a cost of $43,- 
055.26. This work consisted of the grading of the grounds 
north of Commercial street, the building of catch-basins and 
drains, the building of a wall on the line of Commercial street, 
and the biiilding of all sea walls for the approaches to the 
proposed promenade piers, with the exception of the wall on the 
westerly dock, which was omitted on account of the insufficiency 
of the appropriation at the time. 

On January 18, of this year, a contract was made with William 
L. Miller for building the wall on the westerly dock. This work 
has been begun. 

Plans and specifications have been prepared for building the 
promenade and bath-house piers. 

On September 16 a contract was made with Perkins & White 
for doing all the work, except planting, required to complete the 
section of this park between Charter and Commercial streets. 
This work is to be finished on or before June 1 of this year. 



Wood Island Park. 

Fourteen electric arc lamps have been set up on the gymnasium 
ground, and six on the large field. Three thousand four hundred 
and fifty-seven linear feet of underground conduit, carrying 5,801^ 
linear feet of cable to these lamps, have been built. The work 
was done by the Boston Electric Light Company. 

A portion of the large field was covered with loam to provide 
for two baseball diamonds. 

Agricultural tile drains have been laid in a portion of the gym- 
nasium ground for the better draining of the same. 



Chablestown Heights. 

The only work of construction done here during the year was 
the building of a retaining wall on the line of St. Martin street, 
which was done under a contract with McHale & Heisler, dated 
Sept. 8, 1896. The work was completed late in the season at a 
cost of $4,640. Some grading remains to be done back of this 
wall, and iron railings are required on a part of it, and on the 
walls on either side of the shelter building ; this will complete 
the construction of that portion of this park south of Medford 
street. 



128 City Document No. 10. 



Charlestown Playground. 

The work of filling has gone on as heretofore at no expense to 
the department, except for the levelling of the material. About 
nine acres out of a total of fourteen acres have been filled nearly 
to grade. 

Charlesbank. 

The face of the sea wall was repointed early in the spring, and 
the usual repairs made in the gymnasium. 

Playgrounds. 

Surveys have been made of land for Playgrounds on Neponset 
avenue, Dorchester ; on Bellevue and La Grange streets. West 
Roxbury ; and of the city's lot on First, M and Second streets, 
South Boston. 

The appended table shows the principal items of work com- 
pleted to date. 



Principal items of work completed on the several Parks to January 31, 1897. 





MAIN PAliK Sy8TI-;M. 


Marine Pahk Syst 


.M. 




Wood Island 
Park. 


Cliarlestown 
Heights. 


Franklin 
Field. 


Public 
Park. 
North 
End. 






Kens. 


River%va.v. 


Leverctt 
Park. 


■lamaicn 
Park. 


Arborway. 


Arnold 
Arboretum 


Franklin 
Park 


Dorchester 
way 


Marino 
Park. 


Castle 
Island. 


Chnrlesbdnk. 


Totals. 




87,600 sq. yds. 

4 miles. 

30.000 sq. yds. 


26,667 sq. yds. 

1.3 miles. 

13,089 sq. yds. 


23,760 sq. yds. 

1.2 miles. 

17,627 sq. yds. 

2.4 miles. 

12,000 sq. yds. 

0.9 mile. 

6,336 sq. yds. 

2.028 Un. ft. 


13,244 sq. yds. 

0.7 mile. 

9,734 sq. yds. 

1 mile. 

9,861 sq. yds. 

0.7 mile. 

3,485 sq. yds. 


28,670 sq. yds. 

1.6 miles. 

1,166 sq. yds. 

0.1 mile. 


30.368 sq. yds. 120.894 sq. yds. 


4,620 sq. yds. 

0.2 mile. 
1,883 sq. yds. 

0.3 mile. 


17,686 sq. yds. 














353,528 sq. yds. 

19.6 miles. 

186,660 sq. yds. 

26.85 mUcs. 

86,081 sq. yds. 

6.15 miles. 


Drivpwnys f-omplctud . . . . j 


2.1 miles. 
16,138 sq. yds. 

4.2 miles. 


8.0 miles. 

74.256 sq. yds. 

10.76 miles. 














Walks ••..nii.lrii..i ' 


2.694 sq, yds. 




14,4,32 sq. yds. 
1.5 miles. 




4.041 sq. yds. 
0.4 mUe 








ds I-™. "1. 












liiili- nmiplelvii 


1.1 miles. 
10,900 sq. yds. 
82,931 Un. ft. 
10,020 lin. ft. 


1.2 miles. 
6,6»7 sq. yds. 
1,640 lin. ft. 


1.2 miles. 
8,120 sq. yds, 


8,069 sq. yds. 


1.06 miles. 


















Guttore piived 

Curbstones Bct 


25,039 sq. yds. 
9,966 lin. ft. 
200 Un. ft. 


1,449 sq. yds. 

1,072 lin. ft. 

lOOlln. ft. 


2,321 sq. yds. 




















123Un.ft 






61.211 Un. ft. 














1.332 lin. ft. 






lOiii, 






623 Un. n. 
3,197 lin. ft. 








844 lin. ft. 
17 Iln. ft. 
27Un.ft. 












9,433 Un. ft. 


2I>2 Un. ft. 
137Un.tt. 




1.020 lin. ft. 














1,179 Un. ft. 
llSUn. ft. 
373 Un. ft 








*"""■■ 


366 lin. ft. 






4,005 Un. ft. 
1,002 lin. ft. 

1 
13 

1 






234 Un. ft. 








6,487 lin. ft. 
1,976 Un. ft 


















































44 




^ 




^ 


3 




1 




6 


2 


1 
1 








Hydrants... 








2 








Drinking foun tans 






















Watering troug 










1,316 Un. ft. 


































706 Un. ft. 
180 Un. ft. 




















^ 
































.ft.X2( 


























1,300 Un. ft 












1,270 lin. ft 




243 Un. ft. 


466 Un. ft 
298 Un. ft 
612 lin. ft 
4021In.n 
2,641 iln. ft 


3,640 lin. ft. 
2,895 Un. ft. 
2,023 lin. ft. 










661 lin. ft 
196 Un. ft 
139Un.ft 
606 Ud. ft 
2,681 Un. ft 








PlUd ilns.lS 


77811n,ft 
452Un.ft 
829 Un. ft 
6,832 lin. ft 
263 Un. ft 




762 Un. ft. 
360 Un. ft. 
524 lin. ft 
418 Un. ft. 
1,070 Un. ft. 












977 Un. ft 
976 Un. ft 
1,501 Un. ft 
245 Un. ft 












1631ln. ft 
2,203 Un. ft 
1,592 Un. ft. 
1,320 Iln. ft. 














4,736 Un. ft. 


Win 

Sin 




294 lin. ft. 
4,686 Un. ft. 
186 lin. ft 










253 lin. ft 
826 Un. ft 
182 Un. ft 


100 Un. ft 
698Un. ft 


9,657 Un. ft. 


4,210 lin. ft 
332 lin. ft 


10,301 Un. tl. 

2,640 lin ft. 

190 lin. ft 


819 Un. ft 


1,373 Un. ft. 


95 Iln. ft 


1,739 lin. ft 


38,959 lin. ft. 


'''° 












190 Un. ft. 








240Un. ft 




















1851ln.ft 




2.996 lin. B. 


Agri ult.ir Itl 1 8,4 . 










3,066 Un. ft 
2,363 Un. ft 
3,410 Uu. ft 
13,246 Un. ft 














32SUn.ft 




6.913 Un. ft. 
























3,287 Un. ft 
1,869 Un. ft 
9,229 Un.n 


6,969 Uu. ft 
44,028 Un. ft 
56,181 lin. ft 




39,392 Un. ft. 












3,425 Un. ft 
10,342 Un. ft 


27,470 Un. ft 

86,462 lin. ft 

I 

78 

1S7 














80,192 lin. ft. 


Total drains 


9,154 Hn. ft 


4,642 Un. ft 


6,676 lin. ft 


3,114 lin. ft 


819 Un. ft 


1,373 Un. ft 


96 lin. ft 


1,739 iln. ft 


1,588 Un ft 


798 Un. ft 


206,36- lin. ft. 

1 


Ma 1 1 s 


10 
107 


3 
63 


43 


11 


10 
46 


1,175 Un. ft 


8 






17 
19 


14 


3 
14 


10 
3,530 lin. ft 


^ 


m 


Catch.basins and Inlets- . . 


" 




611 




7,006 Un. ft. 


Elcotric-Uglit caijie 

Electric ligiits 


18,8a31in.ft 
51 


7,433 Un. (1 


14,500 Un. ft 

S3 


4,330 Un. ft 
12 


8,162 Un ft 


13,865 lin. ft 

4 

4,436 Iln. ft 
7 
1 
344 acres 




2,683 Un. ft 
10 






6,801 lin. ft 
20 






76,667 lin. ft. 




33 


13 


' 






273 


4 
2,113 Un. ft 








8 


Bridges and culverts • 


« 


» 


12 




2 




1 Iron pier 


' 




' 








40 








730 Un. ft 

1 




317 Un.n 


9,830 Un.fti 


^ 


1 


» 


1 


1 
1 
13.2 acres 






1 
1 
16.6 acres 




2 
1 
10 acres. 


2 





19 


Flagg-statfs 

Area of ground flnislied. . 






1.6 acres 








5 


109 acres 


36 acres 


43 acres 


10.6 acres 


165 acres 






42 acres. 


1.4 acres. 






688Un.ft 


676 lin. ft 


2,343 lin. ft 


1,626 Un. ft 
1,171 sq. yds 

1 




. 


3,600 Un. ft 














752 Un. ft. 


9,674 Uu. ft. 


Retaining w 




















1,171 sq. yds. 


Gate^hambers 


> 


' 


















3,081 sq. yds. 

0.25 mile. 

1.346 Un. ft. 








6 
















C 2.821 sq. yds. 

1 0.2 mile. 

3,412 Un. ft. 








.%90a sq. Yds 


Cinder track 












8,760 Un. ft 


OOlln.rt 


261 Un. It 


094 Un. ft 
















767 lin. ft.! 


16,328 Un. It. 


T 






40 











* 




45 


1 

























* Eight of tticBO bvldgcs nro partly lu Brooklluo. 



Engineering Department. 129 



E. 

[FROM THE CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT TO THE 
STREET DEPARTMENT.] 

The following is a report of the work done under my direction 
for the Street Department during the year 1896 : — 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

The work on this avenue from Grove Hall to Walk Hill street, 
a distance of 2.21 miles, is in a forward state. It is substantially 
completed from Grove Hall to the principal entrances to Frank- 
lin Park, and the remaining portion was so far advanced, that 
one fairly good roadway for the entire length under construction 
was in use during the winter. Daring the year the excavation or 
rough grading has been completed, the work on the sewers, water 
and gaspipes has been carried forward nearly to completion, and 
about one-half the work of roadway construction done. The 
avenue to Walk Hill street should be completed during the work- 
ing season of 1897. 

The construction of the remaining part of the avenue from 
Walk Hill street to Mattapan, a distance of .65 mile, has not yet 
been ordered. 

The total amount of excavation made has been as follows . — 

Earth 136,984.53 cubic yards. 

Rock 33,913.59 " " 

Total 170,898.12 " " 

Thei-e has been a large surplus of excavated material, and 
after completing the filling required, the remainder has been dis- 
posed of as follows : — 

Delivered on Lauriat avenue (haul about 0.46 mile), 7,524 cu. yds. 
" "Geneva " ( " " 1.67 "), 6,083 " 
" " Columbus avenue between Dimock 
street and West Walnut Park (haul about 1.60 

miles) 7,899 " 

Delivered on Talbot avenue (haul about 0.17 mile), 5,000 " 



Total 26,506 " 

In addition to the above, large and unmeasured quantities of 
filling have been delivered on Franklin Field, Franklin Park, and 
on Blue Hill avenue beyond Walk Hill street. On the section 



130 City Document No. 10. 

nearest Grove Hall, the surplus, amounting to 3,291 cubic yards, 
was disposed of by the contractor under the contract. A large 
part of the rock excavated was of such inferior quality as to be 
only suitable for filling. From the cut near Walk Hill street, 
however, suitable stone was found, and enough was saved to 
furnish stock for Telford base for about 16,000 square yards or 
about 1.07 miles of one roadway. 

The total cost of excavation including its delivery as above 
indicated has been as follows : — 

Earth, 136,984.53 cubic yards .... $57,603.44 

Average cost per cubic yard .... 0.4205 

Rock, ^33, 913.59 cubic yards .... 35,620.87 

Average cost per cubic yard . . . . 1.05 

Most of the work remaining to be done is under contract and 
partially completed. There remains one section of roadway, 
from Glenway street to Canterbury street, which can be put 
under contract on the completion of the sewer, gas and water- 
pipe work. The construction of a retaining-wall next Franklin 
Park must follow the completion of the above-named section of 
roadway, as its site is now occupied by the temporary roadway. 

The Street railroad has been rebuilt from Grove Hall, and 
extended .95 mile to Harvard street. 

The grade established for Blue Hill avenue caused a cut of 
about 11 feet at the entrance to Back street (now Harvard 
street) and a temporary connection was made between them ; 
this was done by contract and is not yet entirely completed. 
The cost will be about $1,1] 0. 

At McLellan street the difference in grade was about 10.5 
feet and excavation for a connection has been in progress by the 
Street Department during the winter ; at other intersections, 
where there are only slight differences in grade, connections will 
be made by the contractors. 

Columbus-Avenue Extension. 

Columbus avenue, from Northampton street to the Roxbury 
crossing, has been substantially completed. It has an asphalt 
roadway, from curb to curb, 54 feet in width, with a double- 
track street railway. The rails used are full-grooved, with both 
tread and guard on a level with the asphalt surface. 

From Northampton street to the southerly line of Terry 
street, a distance of 3,276 feet, the surface is Trinidad asphalt, 
laid by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, the concrete base 
is generally 6 inches in thickness, but for a part of the length 
over the deepest mud the thickness was increased to 10 inches. 
The remainder of the work, 884 feet in length, was laid on a 
6-inch concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company, with im- 
ported Sicilian natural rock asphalt. The preparation of the 



Engineering Department. 131 

roadbod was made by the regular force of the Street Depart- 
ment, large, quantities of unsuitable material was removed, and 
10,987 cubic yards of gravel was delivered by contract and used 
for grading. A steam-roller was kept in use upon it for several 
months, and while settlement is apparent in places, the general 
result is better than could have been reasonably expected, when 
the very bad character of the ground is taken into account. The 
edgestoues were set and the brick sidewalks laid under the super- 
vision of the Street Department. The price paid for asphalt, 
including a 6-inch base of American cement concrete, was $2.90 
per square yard for both sections. The section of the avenue 
from Massachusetts avenue to Northampton street was surfaced 
with Trinidad asphalt, so that Columbus avenue now has a con- 
tinuous asphalt surface from the Boston & Albany raih'oad bridge 
to the Roxbury crossing, a distance of 1.5 miles. 

The section of the avenue between Roxbury crossing and 
Stony brook, near Ritchie street, is occupied at present by the 
contractors for the new conduit for Stony brook, and the sur- 
facing of the street can only be commenced upon the completion 
of this work, and the work upon the other sewers, gas and water 
pipes. 

The section between Ritchie street and West Walnut park can 
be put under contract upon the completion of the underground 
pipe work, which is in a forward state. The remaining section 
of the avenue, extending from West Walnut park to Walnut 
avenue, is nearly completed. It is a Telford macadam roadway 
with edgestones and brick sidewalks. It was let in one con- 
tract. The surplus excavated material was used upon the 
adjoining section, and the work was carried far enough before it 
was closed by the weather, to allow the roadway to be kept open 
during the winter. 

It is expected that the avenue can be completed during the 
working season of 1897. 



Huntington Avenue. 

This avenue extends from Copley square to the Brookline line, 
a length of 2.25 miles. From Copley square to Francis street, 
a distance of 1.75 miles, it is 100 feet in width, and is built with 
a central reserved space 25 feet wide for street cars, two road- 
waj's each 25 feet wide and two sidewalks each 12^ feet wide. 
The remainder of the avenue is 80 feet in width, with one road- 
way 54 feet in width, with a double track street railway in the 
centre, built in the usual manner without a special reservation. 
The sidewalks are each 13 feet wide. Beginning at Copley 
square the first section .13 of a mile long, to the Boston & Albany 
railroad bridge, has Telford macadam roadwaj's and brick side- 
walks. This section was built by the regular force of the Street 
Department. The bridge over the railroad was stripped, cleaned, 
painted and newly floored above the kon girders. One new girder 



132 City Document No. 10. 

was added to carry a new 42-incli water pipe, and in rebuilding, 
the surface of the bridge was rectified to correspond with the 
revised grade and cross section of the avenue. 

From the bridge to Gainsborough street, a distance of .57 of 
a mile, the roadways are laid with natural rock asphalt, on a 6- 
inch American cement concrete base. The grading was done by 
the regular force of the Street Department. The edgestones and 
brick sidewalks were laid by contract with materials furnished 
by the department. The asphalt including base was laid by the 
Boston Asphalt Company and cost $2.90 per square yard. The 
intersection at Massachusetts avenue which has double street 
railroad tracks on each avenue, connected by eight cm'ves, is 
paved with granite blocks on gravel. The next section, from 
Gainsborough to Longwood avenue .78 of a mile in length has 
Telford macadam roadways and gravel sidewalks ; it was built by 
H. Gore & Co. with materials principally fiu-nished by the Street 
Department. The remainder of the avenue, ,74 of a mile in 
length has Telford macadam roadways and was built by Doherty 
& Connors, with materials furnished by the Street Department. 
A few details remain to be completed upon this avenue and the 
work done upon it late in the season will require some further 
attention early in the spring. 

The reserved space upon which the street cars run has been 
loamed, with the intention of seeding it to grass ; this work has 
been done by the West End Street Railway Company which has 
also done similar work upon Commonwealth-avenue extension and 
Blue Hill avenue. 

Brighton Avenue. 

This avenue extends from Commonwealth avenue to Union 
square, Allston, a length of .67 of a mile. It is 100 feet wide, 
with a central loamed reservation 25 feet wide, for street cars, two 
roadways, the northerly one 30 feet wide, and the southerly one 
25 feet wide, and two sidewalks, each 10 feet wide. The road- 
ways are built of Telford macadam, with 10-inch base and 6-inch 
cracked stone covering, with block stone gutters, edgestones and 
gravel sidewalks. 

The work was done by Doherty & Connors, with materials 
(except gutter blocks and flagging) furnished by the Street De- 
partment. The surplus excavated material was deposited on 
Commonwealth avenue, near Cottage-Farm bridge. The work 
of building has been completed, with the exception of repairing 
such defects as may develop during the winter. 

Commonwealth- Avenue Extension. 

The extension of Commonwealth avenue to the Newton line 
has been so far completed as to be in use during the winter. 
Some work is yet to be done, and work done late in the season 
will require attention in the spring. The avenue has been in use 



Engineering Department. 133 

since September. The work of excavation under Neil McBride's 
contract, let in 1895, was completed early in the year, and large 
quantities of excellent stone for Telford base and for crushing, 
including a quantity of the finest trap rock, was quarried and 
stored on adjoining land, and enough to supply the city's crusher 
was delivered daily at the Chestnut Hill avenue crusher, near by. 
Substantially enough stone was quarried and saved to build the 
roadways and furnish a foundation for the sidewalks. The work 
of building the avenue was let to John A. Whittemore's Sons, in 
May, 1896. Block stone for gutters was furnished by the Street 
Department, and the contractors hauled the stone previously 
quarried and not required for Telford base to the crusher, and 
drew crushed stone from the stock there as required. The road- 
ways are built with an 8-inch Telford base and 4-inch crushed 
stone surface, block stone gutters, without edgestones, and gravel 
sidewalks, with broken stone foundation. 

The width of the avenue at this section is 120 feet. The 
northei'ly roadway is 25 feet wide, the southerly roadway 40 feet 
wide, the reserved and loamed space for street cars is 25 feet 
wide, and the two sidewallvs are each 15 feet wide. 

The stone arch which marked the entrance to the Chestnut Hill 
Driveway was taken down and stored on the grounds of the Water 
Department by William Miller, at the contract price of $874. 
The face wall on the Water Department front on the avenue was 
rebuilt in its new position at a cost of $1,684.10. The contracts 
of both McBride and AYhittemore are not yet settled. 

The construction of this section completes the connection 
between Commonwealth avenue in Boston, and Commonwealth 
avenue in Newton, making a continuous wide avenue extending 
from the Public Garden in Boston to Charles river on the further 
boundary of the city of Newton, a distance of 11.14 miles, 5.59 
miles of this avenue being in Boston, and 5.55 miles in Newton. 

The table showing lengths and areas of paving on accepted 
streets has been brought up to Feb. 1, 1897. 

Street pa^-ing has been supervised in all cases where requested. 
All paviug laid on the before-mentioned avenues is included in 
the quantities given. All granite paving laid on concrete base 
has been laid with pitch and pebble joints. 

Block stone pavement, on a concrete base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 9,308.9 square yards. 

Block stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with pitch and 
pebble joints, 5,752 square yards. 

Block stone pavement, on a gravel base, laid with gravel 
joints, 29,046.7 square yards. 

Trinidad sheet asphalt, with a binder course of asphaltic 
cement concrete on an American cement concrete base, 24,782.76 
square yards, at a cost of $2.90 per square yard for large areas, 
and $3 per square yard for small areas, not including the 
preparation of the roadbed. 

Sicilian rock asphalt on an American cement concrete base, 
26,717.2 square yards, at an average cost of about $2.90 per 



13-1 City Document No. 10. 

square yard for large areas, and S3 per square yard for small 
areas, not including the preparation of the roadbed. 

Edgestones set, 107,833 linear feet; gutter paving laid and 
relaid, 44,823.3 square yards; brick sidewalks laid, 49,314.2 
square yards ; gravel sidewalks constructed, 43,888.3 square 
yards; flagging crosswalks laid, 6,044.16 squai^e yards. 

All asphalt paving is laid with a maintenance guarantee for 
five years. 

Acton street, "Washington street to Bradford street, was 
paved with 2^- inches of Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Compan3^ 
The roadway was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks 
and flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street Department. The 
former surface was macadam, with cobble-stone gutters. One 
new catch-basin was built on Bradford street, and one square 
granite catch-basin frame was removed and a cast-iron D frame 
substituted. 

B alter ym arch street. Milk street to Liberty square, was 
paved with 2 inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with 1-i-inch bitu- 
minous concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The old pave- 
ment was removed and the roadway subgraded by the Paving- 
Division. Edgestones were reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kiley. Two square granite catch- 
basin frames were removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. 
Former pavement, old granite blocks. 

Beach street, "Washington street, across Harrison avenue, 
was paved with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement 
concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints, including tracks of 
the "West End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was 
barred out and loaded, roadway subgraded, concrete base and 
paving laid, the edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks were relaid by J. B. O'Rourke. The Sti-eet Department 
furnished teams for carting away old paving blocks and surplus 
material. The "West End Street Railway Company, by agi-ee- 
ment, paid for the portion within its tracks. Former pavement, 
old granite blocks. 

Chauncy street. Summer street to Essex street, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints, including the tracks of the 
West End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was 
barred out and loaded, roadways graded, concrete base and 
paving laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross- 
walks relaid by the Metropolitan Construction Company. The 
Street Department furnished teams for carting away old granite 
blocks and surplus material. The "West End Street Railway Com- 
pany, by agreement, paid for the portion within its tracks. 
Former pavement, old granite blocks. 

Corning street, Shawmut avenue to "Washington street, was 
resurfaced with Trinidad lake asphalt by the Barber Asphalt 



Engineerixg Depahtjment. 135 

Paving Company. This work was clone by the burning process, 
which consists in heating the old surface of the asphalt, scraping 
off the dead asphalt, and applying a new wearing sui'face. The 
price paid for this work was $2 per square yard. 

Columbus avenue, Massachusetts avenue to Northampton 
street, was paved by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company with 
2 inches of Trinidad lake asphalt, with 1^ inches bituminous 
concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base. 
The roadway was subgraded by J. J. Sullivan ; edgestones were 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by Philip 
Doherty. Former surface was macadam with block gutters. 

Devonshire street. State street to Dock square, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints, including tracks of the West 
End Street Railway Company. The old pavement was removed 
and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. Concrete base 
and paving laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid by J. B. O'Rourke. The West End Street Rail- 
way Company, by agreement, paid for the portion within its 
tracks. At the Dock-square end of the street, about 100 square 
yards were repaved on a gravel base temporarily, so that the 
Boston Transit Commission might readily make certain gas pipe 
connections. Former pavement, old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Hamburg street, Mj'stic street to Harrison avenue, was paved 
with 2\ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The road- 
way was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging 
crosswalks relaid, by the Street Department. Former surface 
was macadam, with cobble gutters. Two square granite catch- 
basin frames were removed, and cast-iron D frames substituted. 

Hanover street, Tileston sti-eet to Charter street, and across 
Charter street on the north side, was paved with 2|^ inches of 
Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, 
by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old pavement was re- 
moved and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. Edge- 
stones were reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by H. Gore & Co. One square granite catch-basin frame was 
removed and a cast-iron D frame substituted. Former pavement 
was old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

J\^ street, East Sixth street to East Eighth street, not includ- 
ing tracks of the West End Street Railway Company, was paved 
with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The 
roadway was subgraded by the Street Department. Edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore 
& Co. Former surface was macadam with cobble-stone gutters. 
The laying of the concrete base and asphalt surface was super- 
vised by the Street Department. 

Laconia street^ Washington street to Harrison avenue, was 
paved with 2 inches of Trinidad Lake asphalt on 1^-inch bituminous 



136 City Document No. 10. 

concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base, by 
the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. This street was formerly 
a private way, with brick sidewalks on either side, and a park- 
way in the centre with two rows of trees ; the usual cross section 
for a street of this width was modified so as to preserve the best 
of the trees in the northerly row. The roadway was subgraded, 
edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks laid by 
the Street Department. Two new catch-basins were built. 

Lowell street^ Causeway sti^eet to Brighton street (including 
tracks of the West End Street Railway Company and Union 
Freight Railroad Company) , was paved with large granite blocks 
on a gravel base and bed, with pitch and pebble joints. The old 
pavement was removed and the roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Block pa\ang was laid, edgestones reset, brick side- 
walks and flagging crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kiley & Co. By 
agreement, the West End Street Railway Company and the 
Union Freight Railroad Company paid for the portion within 
their tracks. Three granite catch-basin frames were removed 
and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement, old gran- 
ite blocks on a gravel base. 

3Ieander street^ Maiden street to East Dedham street, was 
paved with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch Ameri- 
can cement concrete base, by the Boston Asphalt Company. The 
roadway was subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and 
flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street Department. Two square 
granite catch-basin frames were removed and cast-iron D frames 
substituted. Former pavement, cobble stones on gravel base. 

31ilk street^ Oliver street to India street, was paved with 
large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base. The old pavement was removed and roadway subgraded 
by the Street Department. Concrete base and paving was laid, 
edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by Jones & Meehan. Four square granite catch-basin frames 
were removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pave- 
ment, old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Mystic street^ Maiden street to East Brookline street, was 
paved with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt, on a 6-inch 
American cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. 
The old pavement was removed, roadway subgraded, edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by the 
Paving Division. Four new catch-basins were built. Former 
pavement was 12-inch square granite blocks on gravel base, 
between Maiden and East Canton streets, and macadam between 
East Canton and East Brookline streets. 

North street, Merchants row to Blackstone street, was paved 
with large granite blocks on a 6-inch American cement concrete 
base, with pitch and pebble joints. The old pavement was barred 
out and loaded, roadway subgraded, concrete base and paving 
laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks 
relaid by the Metropolitan Construction Company. The Street 



Engineering Department. 137 

Department furnished teams for carting away old blocks and 
surplus excavation. Two granite catch-basin frames were 
removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement, 
old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

Norwich street, Mystic street to Meander street, was paved 
with 2^ inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded, edgestones reset, 
and brick sidewalks relaid by the Street Department. Two 
square granite catch-basin frames were removed and cast-iron D 
frames substituted. Former pavement, cobble stones on gravel 
base. 

Ohio street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue, was paved 
with 2|- inches of Sicilian rock asphalt on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base by the Boston Asphalt Company. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by the Street 
Department. Former pavement, old granite blocks on gravel 
base. 

Pine street, Washington street to Harrison avenue, was paved 
with 2 inches of Trinidad Lake asphalt, with 1^ inches bitumi- 
nous concrete binder on a 6-inch American cement concrete base 
by the Barber Asphalt Paving Company. The roadways were 
subgraded, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross- 
walks relaid by the Street Department. One new catch-basin 
was built, and one square granite catch-basin frame was removed 
and a cast-iron D frame substituted. Former pavement was 
macadam with block gutters. 

St. Martin street, Bunker Hill street to Medford street, is 
about 533 feet long, with a difference in level between the above- 
named streets of 55 feet ; from Medford street it rises at the rate 
of 14.34 feet per 100 for 170 feet; from this point five flights 
of artificial stone steps and platforms, 61 feet long and rising 
25.8 feet, were built by Simpson Bros., at a cost of $2,811.20. 
Iron hand rails and fences were built by G. T. McLauthhn & 
Co., at a cost of S310. The excavation was made and founda- 
tions prepared by the Street Department. The portion of the 
street 170 feet from Medford street is to be constructed with a 
macadam roadway, granite block gutters, edgestones and brick 
sidewalks. The work of constructing the street was not very 
far advanced at the end of the working season. 

Taylor street, Dwight street to Milford street, was paved 
with Sicilian rock asphalt on the existing concrete base, by the 
Boston Asphalt Company. Two granite catch-basin frames were 
removed and cast-iron D frames substituted. Former pavement 
was Trinidad lake asphalt. The laying of the asphalt was super- 
vised by the Street Department. 

Water street, Liberty square to Broad sti'eet, was paved 
with 2 inches Trinidad Lake asphalt, with 1^ inches bituminous 
concrete binder, on a 6-inch American cement concrete base by 



138 City Document No. 10. 

the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, The old pavement was 
removed and roadway subgraded by the Street Department. 
Edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid 
by D. J. Kiley. Former pavement, old granite blocks on a 
gravel base. 

Winter street, Tremont street to Washington street, was 
paved with special cut granite blocks on a 6-inch American 
cement concrete base, with pitch and pebble joints. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Concrete base and paving laid, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore & 
Co. Former pavement, old granite blocks on a gravel base. 

New Streets. 

The following streets were constructed under chapter 323 of 
the Acts of the Legislature of Massachusetts of 1891, and Acts 
in amendment thereof or in addition thereto : — 

Ahbotsford street, Walnut avenue to Harold street, is about 
599 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was begun 
June 16, 1896, and completed Aug. 29, 1896, at a total cost 
of $1,864,03. It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel side- 
walks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edgestones were fur- 
nished by the city and hauled to the site of the work by the 
contractors. Flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the 
contractors. 

Audubon road, Beacon street across Ivy street, is about 315 
feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to William Scollans. Work was begun June 
29, 1896, and completed Sept. 10, 1896, at a total cost of 
$5,813.83. This street is 100 feet wide ; it has a 60 feet roadway, 
two brick sidewalks 10 feet wide, and a planting space on either 
side between the sidewalk and roadway. The roadway is Telford 
macadam (8 inches and 4 inches respectively) with granite block 
gutters. Telford stone, crushed stone, edgestone and gutter 
blocks were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor. Bricks, loam and flagging for cross- 
walks were furnished by the contractor. 

J^ay State road, Sherborn street to Granby street, is about 
795 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was begun 
May 4, 1896, and completed Sept. 11, 1896, at a cost of 
$3,749.02. It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Gutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the contractor, 

JBoylston street extension, Boj^lston road to Brookline ave- 
nue, is about 2,070 feet long. The work of filling to sub-grade 



Engineering Department. 139 

was begun in 1894, and completed on April 27, 1895, at a 
cost of $47,819.37. The contractor was John O'Brien. A con- 
tract for constructing the surface of this street was awarded to 
Neil McBride. Work was begun Oct. 20, 1896, and is still in- 
complete. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones are furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Gutter blocks 
are furnished and delivered on the street by the city. Flagging 
for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. Before the cold 
weather stopped work, the contractor had set all the edgestones, 
paved the gutters and placed nearly all the crushed stone. Dur- 
ing the winter, as the weather permitted, he has been hauling in 
gravel to fill out the slopes. 

Clinton street^ Fulton street to Commercial street, is about 
187 feet long. This street was widened 30 feet on the northerly 
side ; it is now 70 feet wide. For taking down a building at the 
corner of Fulton street and removing old area and party walls, 
the sum of $643.05 was paid to A. A. Elston & Co. The old 
pavement was barred out and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. The order for construction required granite block 
pa\'ing on a concrete base, with pitch joints, but, as it is intended 
to build part of an outfall sewer in the street, the roadway was 
paved temporarily with granite blocks on a gravel base. The 
granite block paving was laid, edgestones set, brick sidewalks 
and flagging crosswalks relaid by Dennis J. Kiley & Co. 

Fenelon street, Washington street to Merrill street, is about 
824 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Daniel E. Lynch. Work was begun Oct. 
19, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted; 
it is very nearly completed. The street has a 6-inch macadam 
road, with gravel sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and 
edgestones were furnished by the city, and hauled to the site of 
the work by the contractor. Flagging for crosswalks was fur- 
nished by the contractor, 

Geneva avenxie, West%nlle street to Dorchester avenue, is 
about 2,137 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Finneran & O'Hearn. Work was com- 
menced Nov. 13, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather 
permitted. It is a 6-inch macadam road, "odth gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones are furnished by the city, and 
hauled to the site of the woi"k by the contractor ; gutter blocks 
are furnished and delivered on the street by the city ; flagging 
for crosswalks is furnished by the contractor. The street is 
practically finished for a distance of about 600 feet. 

Granhy street. Commonwealth avenue to Charles river, is 
about 439 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun May 8, 1896, and completed Sept. 11, 1896, at a cost of 
$2,203.22. It is a 6-inch macadam road, with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were fui'uished by the city, and 



140 City Docutnient No. 10. 

hauled to the site of the work hj tlie contractor ; gutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswaUts were furnished by the contractor. A 
contract for furnishing and setting a capstone on the sea wall at 
Charles river was awarded to Trumbull & Ryan; capstone, 64 
feet long, cost $320.00. Anotlier contract for furnishing and 
erecting an iron fence on the above capstone was awarded George 
T. McLauthhu & Co. for S 11 0.00. 

Gree?ibrier street, Bowdoin street to Bloomfield street, is 
about 700 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun June 16, 1896, and completed Oct. 8, 1896, at a cost of 
$2,797.05. It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city and 
hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; gutter blocks 
and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the contractor. 

Josephhie street, Geneva avenue to Ditson street, is about 
627 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to J. J. Nawn. Work was begun .June 4, 
1896, and completed Oct, 16, 1896, at a cost of $1^888.66. It 
is a 4-ineh macadam road. Gravel sidewalks were ordered to 
be built, but on account of a petition from the abutters, a gran- 
olithic sidewalk and edgestone was laid, except in front of two 
lots. Crushed stone and edgestones were furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor. Gutter 
blocks and flagging for crosswalks were furnished by the con- 
tractor 

Lauriat avenue, Blue Hill avenue to Tucker street, is about 
3,160 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of 
this street was awarded to Doherty & Connors ; work was begun 
Oct. 5, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted. 
It is a 6 -inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. Crushed 
stone, gutter blocks and edgestones are furnished by the city 
and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; flagging for 
crosswalks is furnished by the contractor. This street is practi- 
cally finished for a distance of about 1,950 feet. 

Morse street, Washington street to Bowdoin avenue, is about 
223 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Daniel E. Lynch. Work was begun Oct. 
12, 1896, and was continued as long as the weather permitted ; it 
is nearly completed. This street has a 6-inch macadam road 
with gravel sidewalks. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edge- 
stones were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished 
by the contractor. 

St. Alphonsus street, Tremont street to Calumet street, is 
about 720 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface 
of this street was awarded to Quimby & Ferguson. Work was 
begun June 24, 1896, and completed Oct. 10, 1896, at a cost of 
$3,608.62 It is a 6-inch macadam road with gravel sidewalks. 
Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edgestones were fui-nished by 



Engineering Department. 141 

the city and hauled to the site of the work by the contractor ; 
flagging for crosswalks was furnished by the contractor. The 
above contract includes building about 187 feet of retaining-wall, 
average height about 7.5 feet. 

Wilde?' street, Washington street to Geneva avenue, is about 
539 feet long. The contract for constructing the surface of this 
street was awarded to Finneran & O'Hearn. Work was begun 
Oct. 5, 1896, and was practically finished Nov. 28, 1896 ; a small 
amount of work remains to be done to finish the surface of the 
roadway. It is a 6-inch macadam roadway. Gravel sidewalks 
were ordered to be built, but at the request of the owner of 
abutting land they were omitted, so as to allow him to lay gran- 
olithic next season. Crushed stone, gutter blocks and edge- 
stones were furnished by the city and hauled to the site of the 
work by the contractor ; flagging for crosswalks was furnished by 
the contractor. 

Streets were filled to subgrade, by the Metropolitan Construc- 
tion Company, as follows : — 

Noricay street^ from Massachusetts avenue to Parker street, 

2,541 cubic yards, at 50 cents = $1,270.50. 
Hiiggles street, from Parker street to Back Bay Fens, 7,496 

cubic yards, at 65 cents = $4,872.40 
Turner street, from Haviland to Astor streets, 2,380 cubic 

yards, at 50 cents = $1,190. 
Vancouver street, from Huntington avenue to Ruggles street, 

1,444.6 cubic yards, at 65 cents = $938.99. 

Peterborough street, Boylston road to Audubon road, is 
about 1,833 feet long. A contract for filling this street to sub- 
grade was made with the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, on 
Oct. 30, 1896, at the rate of 51 cents per cubic yard measured 
in the cut. Work was begun under this contract, Dec. 2, 1896. 

Grading Street Railway Tracks. 

The grades for tracks in the following streets have been de- 
termined. On streets marked* the surveys were made and levels 
taken by the companies. 

( West End Street Railway .^ 

Alford street, from Maiden Bridge to the Everett line. 

Amory street, Roxbury, from Centre street to the car-house. 

JBeach street, from Washington street across Harrison ave- 
nue. 

Beacon street, from Massachusetts avenue to Deerfield street. 

JBlae Hill avenue, from Washington street to 1,200 feet 
south of Back street. 

Centre, street, Roxbury, at Linwood street. 

Centre street, Roxbury, from Columbus-avenue extension to 
near Wise street. 



142 City Document No. 10. 

Ch.auncy street^ from Suiiinier street to Essex street. 

* Chestnut Hill avenue^ from Commonwealth avenue to 
Sutborland road. 

Coliiwhus avenue, from Massachusetts avenue to Roxbury 
crossing. 

Cohmibus avemie, from West Walnut Park to Washington 
street. 

( J omniirn wealth-avenue extension, from Chestnut Hill avenue 
to the Newton line. 

Devonshire street, from State street to Dock square. 

Dorchester avenue, from West First street to West Seventh 
street. 

East Eighth street, from Dorchester street to Mercer street. 

East Sixth street, from L street to N street. 

Essex street, from Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Hanover street, from Tileston street to Charter street. 

Huntington avenue, from Dartmouth street to the Brookline 
line. 

K street, from East Sixth street to East Eighth street. 

3Iain street, Charlestoion, from City square to Pleasant street. 

Main street, Charlestown, from Wood street to School street. 

* Market street, Brighton, from Western avenue to Washing- 
ton street. 

* Massachusetts avenue, from Bojdston street to Huntington 
avenue. 

* Roxhury street, from Pynchon street to Eliot square. 
Sumner street. East JBoston, from Orleans street to Webster 

street. 

Tremont street, from Columbus avenue to Vernon street. 

Tremont street, BrigJiton, from Oak square to Newton line. 

t Washington street, from Elm street to Haymarket square. 

Washington street, Roxbury, from Vernon street to Warren 
street. 

* Western avenue, from Charles river in Cambridge to Market 
street. 

West Fourth street, at Dorchester avenue. 

( West Roxhury and Roslindale Street Raihoay Company.') 

* Beech street, from Centre street to Belgrade avenue. 

* Brandon street, from Amherst street to South street. 

* Centre street, from Beech street to Alaric street. 

* South street, from Brandon street to AYashington street. 

* Washington street, from Forest Hill station to the Dedham 
line. 

Total length of single track grades, 29.4 miles. 

Surveys and plans were made for work upon the following 
streets and grades and lines given. The work of construction 
was super^^sed by the Street Department : — 

t Survey by the Boston Transit Commission. 



Engineering Department. 143 

Albany street, from Massacbusetts avenue toward East Con- 
cord street, was repaved with granite blocks on a gravel base, on 
account of the paving of Massachusetts avenue, between Albany 
street and Swett street, and raising it to the established grade. 
The old paving was barred out and bed prepared by the Street 
Department. The roadway was repaved, edgestones reset, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by Doherty & Connors. 

Arlington street, from Boylston street to Marlborough street, 
was resurfaced with macadam by the Street Department. Gutters 
relaid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks 
relaid by James Grant & Co. 

Ashland street, from Chambers street to Leverett street, was 
paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The old 
pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street 
Department. Granite block paving was laid, edgestones reset, 
brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by D. J. Kiley. 
Former pavement was cobble-stones. 

City Hall avenue, a footway from School street to Court 
square, was paved with Hastings asphalt Ijlocks on a gravel bed, 
blocks were laid on their broadest faces by H. Gore & Co. The 
old pavement was removed, walk subgraded and bed furnished 
and placed by the Pa\'ing Di^asion. Blocks were furnished by 
H. Gore & Co. Former surface was brick on gravel base. 

Commonwealth avenue, from Cottage-Farm bridge to War- 
ren street. Lines and grades were given and work measured, 
east and west of Cottage-Farm bridge and between Harvard 
avenue and AUston street. 

D street, from West First street to West Third street, was 
paved -nath large granite blocks on a gravel base. The roadway 
was subgraded by the Paving Division. Granite block paving 
was laid, edgestones reset, brick sidewalks and flagging cross- 
walks relaid by H. Gore & Co. Former sm-face was macadam. 

Dorchester avenue, from West First street to West Seventh 
street, was repaved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. 
The old pavement was removed and roadway subgraded by the 
Street Department. Granite block pa\ang was laid, edgestones 
reset, brick sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore 
& Co. Former pavement, old granite blocks on granite base. 

East Eighth street, from Dorchester street to Mercer street 
(on southerly side between edgestone and car track) , was paved 
with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The old pavement 
was removed and roadway subgraded by the Street Depart- 
ment. Granite block paving was laid by H. Gore & Co. Former 
pavement was old granite blocks on gravel base. 

East Sid'th street, from L street to N street, was paved with 
large granite blocks on a gravel base. The roadway was sub- 
graded in part by the Street Department and in part by H. Gore 
& Co. Granite block paving was laid, edgestones reset, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks relaid by H. Gore & Co. 
Former surface was macadam with cobble-stone gutters. 



144 City Document No. 10. 

Eustis street^ from Hampden street to Magazine street, was 
resurfaced with macadam by the Street Department. Cobble- 
stone gutters were relaid, edgestones I'eset, and brick sidewalks 
relaid (including excavation) by C. E. Barnes. 

Massachusetts avenue^ from Albany street to Swett street, 
was paved with large granite blocks on a gravel base. The road- 
way was subgraded by the Street Department. Granite block 
paving was laid, edgestones set and flagging crosswalks laid by 
Dohert}^ & Connors. Five new catch-basins were built. Former 
surface was macadam. 

Treniont street, from Columbus avenue to Prentiss street (on 
northerly side), was repaved with large granite blocks on a 
gravel base. The old pavement was removed and roadway sub- 
graded by the Street Department. Granite block paving, brick 
sidewalks and flagging crosswalks were relaid, and edgestones 
reset by Jones & Meehan. Former pavement was old granite 
blocks on gravel base. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir Archway. Specifications were pre- 
pared, and a contract made with W. L. Miller for taking down 
this archway. All stones were lettered and numbered, and a plan 
showing such numbering is on file in the office of the City Engi- 
neer. Cost of work was $874. 

Commonwealth-avenue Speedxoay. A plan and details for 
swing-gates for either end of the speedway was made. 

Commonwealth-avemie ledge. Plans of cross sections of ledge, 
for measurement of stone removed. This stone was used in the 
construction of Brighton avenue, Bay State road, Granby, Boyls- 
ton and other streets ; also plan of ledge showing outlines Oct. 
1, 1895, and Dec. 5, 1896, and positions of camera when photo- 
graphs of the face of the ledge were taken Dec. 10 and 11, 1896. 

JBoylston street, from Exeter street to Hereford street. Plan 
and estimate for fence. 

Hawthorn gravel bank (Brookline), plan and cross sections 
of bank for gravel used in filling Columbus-avenue extension and 
Huutington-avenue widening, 

Jjivermore gravel bank (Roxbury), plan and cross sections of 
bank for gravel used in filling Columbus-avenue extension. 

Riiggles street, under bridge of Providence^ Di^^sion, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford railroad. Plans, elevations, sec- 
tions and details of elevated sidewalk. 

Surveys, plans and estimates for impro\'ing and paving the 
following streets have been made : — 

Alford street (Charlestown), from Maiden bridge to the 
Everett line. 

Essex street, from South street to Federal street. 
Milk street, from Pearl street to Kilby street. 
Washington street, from Marvin street to Warren street. 



Englneeeing Department. 145 



MISCELLANEOUS WOKK AND CONSTRUCTION IN 

1896. 

Cottage-Farm Bridge. 

During the early part of the year the northerly roadway was 
completed ; the 20-inch steel beams being placed in position by 
A. C. Richtiiond; the bricks, the skewbacks and concrete being 
furnished by the city, and put in place by the MetropoUtan Con- 
struction Company. A Sicilian rock asphalt wearing surface was 
put on the roadway by the Boston Asphalt Company. 

On the completion of the northerly roadway travel was turned 
on that side of the bridge July 9, and the old wooden bridge and 
the two iron girders supporting the water and gas pipes were 
removed. 

New parapets and bearing blocks were furnished by the Cape 
Ann Granite Company, and set in position on the old bridge 
seats on the southerly section of the bridge. 

Slight extensions were made to the easterly end of the north 
abutment and middle pier, the work being done by A. C. Rich- 
mond. 

The 20-inch steel beams were furnished by Page, Newell & 
Co., and placed in position by A. C. Richmond. The lead 
coverings for the steel beams were furnished by E. B. Badger & 
Sons. The bricks, skewbacks and concrete arches between the 
beams were set by the Metropolitan Construction Company, the 
materials being furnished by the city. The asphalt sui'face was 
put on by the Boston Asphalt Company. 

The two steel girders on the easterly side of the bridge, and 
the sidewalk floor beams connected to them were fui'nished in 
place by the Boston Bridge Works. 

Granolithic sidewalks were laid on this section of the bridge 
by Simpson Brothers, of Boston. 

A central way between the car tracks, 13^ feet wide and 5 
inches above the roadwaj^ was built, upon which are placed two 
gas-pipes and one water-pipe. 

Travel was turned over this part of the bridge late in the fall 
and the bridge is practically completed with the exception of the 
sidewalk on the northerly section, and the placing of fence rails 
on the main girders. 

With the exception of the plate girders on the outside lines of 
the bridge, and some special construction under the sidewalks, 
the superstructures is composed of 20-inch steel beams filled be- 
tween with brick arches and Portland cement concrete, on which 
is a wearing surface of Sicilian rock asphalt. The lower flanges 
of the beams are. covered with sheet lead to protect them from 
rust and the corrosion due to gases in smoke from locomotives. 



146 City Document No. 10. 



Essex- STREET Bridge. 

Plans and specifications were prepared by this department for 
making extensive repairs to this bridge. 

A contract was made with William S. Rendle of East Boston, 
on Oct. 14, 1896, for doing the work, which principally consisted 
in removing the top of the old bridge above the piles, from the 
Boston abutment to within 18 feet of the draw, replacing the 
poorest of the old piles with new ones and rebuilding the bridge 
with new hard pine caps, stringers and planking. The sidewalk 
was rebuilt on the down-stream side of the bridge and both fences 
were rebuilt. The total cost of the work was $7,038.95. 

Huntington- A VENUE Bridge, Over Boston & Albany R.R. 
During the past year the flooring of the bridge has been en- 
tirely rebuilt and made to conform to the new grade ; parapets 
were raised and new asphalt sidewalks built. The old girder on 
the centre line of the westerly sidewalk was moved to the easterly 
sidewalk and two new plate girders put in under the westerly side- 
walk. This change was made necessary because of the new 42- 
inch water-pipe which was carried across the bridge on the west- 
erly side. The gu'ders were built by the Boston Bridge Works 
under a contract dated Nov. 9, 1895, and the work of moving the 
old girder was done by the same company ; the total cost being 
02,646.99. The contract for the woodwork and for the changes 
in stonework was made with W. L. Miller, dated April 11, 1896, 
and amounted to $3,097.28. The sidewalks were built by the 
Boston Asphalt Company at a cost of $635.25. The cleaning 
and painting of the gu'ders was done by the Bridge Di\'ision of 
the Street Department. 

Meridian-street Bridge. 

Specifications were made for rebuilding the trusses of the draw 
and a contract for doing the work was made April 11, with W. H. 
Elhs & Co. 

After building the new chords, the draw was tm-ned off, the 
floor and gallows frame were blocked up, the old trusses removed 
and the new ones replaced, using the truss-rods and castings of 
the old di'aw ; the flooring was then refastened to the new chords ; 
repairs were made on a few floor beams and the gallows frame, 
and the new woodwork was painted. The timber used in the 
trusses was furnished by the city. 

The cost of the contract work was $2,025.96. 

After the flooring was fastened to the trusses, the Bridge Divi- 
sion repaired the deck of the draw. The draw was turned off 
May 25, and travel was resumed July 1. 

WiNTHROP Bridge. 
The sidewalk and sidewalk bulkhead were rebuilt for about 
three-quarters of their length ; three piles were driven, and ten 



Engineering Department. 147 

bents of piles were girder-capped in whole or in part, and other 
smaller repairs were made ; the work was done by J. N. Hayes 
& Co., and was completed March 10, 1896, at a cost for contract 
work of $1,519.92. 

City Hospital. 

Grading and Draining Grounds. Plans and specifications 
having been prepared during the previous winter for grading and 
draining a portion of the hospital grounds, a contract was made 
with Dennis F. O'Connell, on February 25, for doing the work. 
It was completed in August at a cost of 119,657.40. 

The work done consisted of draining, grading and loaming the 
grounds and surfacing the drives and walks on that portion of 
the property between the old north line of tSpringfield street and 
Massachusetts avenue. Also the building of brick walls on the 
lines of East Concord street, Albany street and Massachusetts 
avenue, where wooden fences only existed previously, and the 
raising and putting marble coping on the existing brick walls. 

I'Hre iSystem. During the latter part of the year a fire system, 
with the necessary supply pipes, hydrants, standpipes, hose, etc., 
was established in the Boston City Hospital ; it embraced the older 
buildings constructed before the modern methods of protection 
from fire were introduced. In all, eighteen different buildings 
were thoroughly equipped. 

The following materials were used in the work : — 

1,600 linear feet 4 inches to 8 inches cast-iron pipe. 

1,600 " " 2 inches to 4 inches wrought-iron pipe. 

4,000 " " linen fire hose. 

5 post hydrants. 

57 fire connections with valves. 

9 valves 4 inches to 8 inches. 



Congress-street Grade Crossing. 

At the request of the Commission appointed by the Superior 
Court for the alteration of the grade crossing of Congress street 
and the New England Railroad, this department has made the 
necessary surveys, and prepared the plans which have been used 
at the various hearings held by the Commissioners. On the tenth 
of November, 1896, the Commissioners prescribed the manner in 
which the crossing should be abolished, substantially in accord- 
ance with these plans. 

DORCHESTER-AVENUE EXTENSION. 

Early in June, 1896, a party was put in the field to make sur- 
veys for the extension of Dorchester avenue along the water 
front, made necessary by the construction of the new South 
Union Terminal Station. Surveys have been made, and borings 



148 City Document No. 10. 

taken for the entire distance between the proposed extension of 
Summer street and Federal- street bridge, and plans have been 
prepared for the building of a sea wall on the harbor line to main- 
tain the filling in the proposed street. Work on this wall will 
commence early the coming season. 

The necessar}' authority for the construction of the sea wall 
and for filling solid within the street lines has been obtained from 
the Secretary of War, as given in the following licenses : — 

W7ie7'eas, By section 3 of an Act of Congress, approved July 
13, 1892, entitled "An Act making appropriations for the con- 
struction, repair, and preservation of certain public works, on 
rivers and harbors, and for other purposes," it is proNaded that, 
without the permission of the Secretary of War, it shall not 
be lawful to build any wharf, pier, dolphin, boom, dam, 
wier, breakwater, bulkhead, jetty or structure of any kind 
outside established harbor lines, or where no harbor lines are, 
or may be established, in any port, roadstead, haven, harbor, 
navigable river, or other waters of the United States, in 
such manner as shall obstruct or impair navigation, com- 
merce or anchorage of said waters ; or to excavate or fill, or 
in any manner to alter or modify the course, location, condi- 
tion or capacity of any port, roadstead, haven, harbor, harbor 
of refuge, or inclosure within the limits of any breakwater, 
or of the channel of any navigable water of the United States, 
unless approved and authorized by the Secretary of War ; 

^?id whereas, The City of Boston, Massachusetts, has ap- 
plied to the Secretary of War for permission to fill solid, to 
the pier line on Fort Point channel, at Boston, Massachusetts, 
the docks and wharves from Federal-street bridge to the north- 
erly line of what will be the extension of Summer street, as 
shown on the attached drawing; 

Aow, therefore, This is to certify that the Secretary of War 
hereby gives permission to the said city to fill solid to the 
pier line on said channel, the docks and wharves from Federal- 
street bridge to the northerly line of what will be the exten- 
sion of Summer street, as shown on said drawing upon the 
following condition : — 

That said city shall make such compensation for the tide 
water displaced by the authorized structures as, in the opin- 
ion of the Engineer Officer of the United States Army, in 
charge of the locality, may be demanded for the preservation 
and protection of Boston Harbor ; and the work herein per- 
mitted to be done shall be subject to to his supervision and 
approval. 

Witness my hand this tenth day of July, 1896. 
(Signed.) 

Daniel S. Lamont, 
/Secretary of War. 



Engineering Department. 149 

W7iereas, By section 3 of an Act of Congress approved July 
13, 1892, entitled "An Act making appropriations for the con- 
struction, repair and preservation of certain public works on 
rivers and harbors, and for other purposes," it is pro\'1ded 
that, without the permission of the Secretary of War, it shall 
not be lawful to build any wharf, pier, dolphin, boom, dam, 
wier, breakwater, bulkhead, jetty or structure of any kind 
outside established harbor lines, or where no harbor lines are, 
or may be established, in any port, roadstead, haven, harbor, 
navigable river or other waters of the United States, in such 
manner as shall obstruct or impair navigation, commerce or 
anchorage of said waters ; or to excavate or fill, or in any 
manner to alter or modify the course, location, condition or 
capacity of any port, roadstead, haven harbor of refuge, or 
inclosure within the limits of any breakwater or of the chan- 
nel of any navigable water of the United States, unless ap- 
proved and authorized by the Secretary of War ; 

And whereas, The City of Boston, Massachusetts, has ap- 
plied to the Secretary of War for permission to fill outside of 
the harbor line on Fort Point channel, Boston Harbor, Massa- 
chusetts, for the purpose of affording support to the sea wall 
to be built on said channel, as shown on the attached draw- 
ing; 

JVoio, therefore, This is to certify that the Secretary of 
War hereby gives permission to said City of Boston to fill out- 
side of the harbor line on Point Fort channel, at said place, 
for the purpose of affording support to the sea wall to be built 
on said channel, as shown on said drawing, upon the following 
condition : 

That the work herein permitted to be done shall be subject to 
the supervision and approval of the Engineer Officer of the 
United States Army in charge of the locality. 

Witness my hand this twenty-second day of September, 1896. 

(Signed.) 

Daniel A. Lamont, 

/Secretary of' War. 

East Boston Ferries. 

At the request of the Superintendent of Streets a report was 
made Aug. 5, 1896, on the condition of tlie slips, drops and tanks 
of the East Boston Ferries. 

/South Ferry, Boston Side. Two new piers were recommended 
for this landing. At the request of the Superintendent of Streets 
specifications were made for temporarily repairing the outer part 
of the middle pier, and the work was done by W. H. Ellis &, Co., 
under a contract dated Oct. 8, 1896, at a cost of $1,802.15. 

Neio Drops. A contract was made Sept. 16, 1896, with Wil- 
liam McKie to build three new drops to replace three old ones, 



150 City Document No. 10. 

which wore to be removed by the contractor and to become his 
property, the contract price being $14,718. These drops were 
placed at the northerly landing of the North Ferry, East Boston 
side, at the northerly landing of the South Ferry, Boston side, and 
at the southerly landing of the North Ferry, Boston side. These 
drops were respectively put in use at the following dates : Nov. 
23, Dec. 7, 1896, and Jan. 26, 1897. 

New Tanks. Two new tanks were built by J. M. Brooks, and 
were used for the new northerly drop at the East Boston landing 
of the North Ferry, and for the new northerly drop at the Boston 
lauding of the South Ferry. The contract price was $3,500. 

The tank used for the new southerly drop at the Boston landing 
of the North Ferry was taken from the Boston landing of the 
South Ferry and repaired under the direction of the Street Depart- 
ment. 

Atoning at the North Ferry ^ East Boston. Plans and specifi- 
cations were made for an awning over the sidewalk in front of 
the head-house at the North Ferry, East Boston ; the work was 
done by W. H. Ellis & Co., at a cost for contract work of 
$698.64. 

Highland Park. 

During the early part of the past year work was resumed on 
Highland Park, Roxbury, and sufficient seeding down was done 
to preserve the portion of the Old Fort already graded ; the 
greater part of the platform or top was finished and covered with 
clean gravel, making it available for the purpose for which it was 
designed, viz., an elevated playground for children or general 
concourse ; this result was made possible by the co-operation of 
the Sanitary Division of the Street Department in furnishing 
ashes for filling free of charge. 

The total cost of the work done during the season was $573.22. 



Widths of Draw-Openings. 

The widths of draw-openings in the bridges over tide water in 
this city have all been remeasured for this report. 



Appendix A. — Table showing the widths of openings for vessels 

in all bridges provided with draws. 
Appemdix B. — Table of accident and other plans made for the 

Law Department. 
Appendix C. — Table of surveys, plans and profiles made by 

Surveying Division. 
Appendix D. — Edgestone and sidewalk assessment plans made 

for the Paving Division, Street Department. 



ENGmEERING DEPARTMENT. 151 

Appendix E. — List of streets where lot frontages have been ob- 
tained for Sewer Division, Street Department, 
for sewer assessments. 

Appendix F. — Engineering Department property schedule. 

Appendix G. — Elevations referred to Boston City base. 

Appendix H. — Engineering Department Annual reports 1867- 
1897. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



CITY ENGINEERS. 

1850-1896. 



E. S. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 18, 1850, to October, 1855. 
(Died Aug. 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

Oct. 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died Aug. 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to Nov. 25, 1872. 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Nov. 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Eesigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 
(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to the present time. 



154 



City Document No. 10. 



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156 City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX B. 



TABLE OF ACCIDENT AND OTHER PLANS MADE FOR THE 
LAW DEPARTMENT, FROM FEB. 1, 18U6, TO FEB. 1, 1897. 

Boston Proper. 

Allen street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 20 and 22. 
Atlantic avenue. — Plan of, corner of Congress street. 
Auburn street. — Plan of street at corner of Poplar street. 
Sothnia street. — Plan of street, near Belvidere street. 
JBoylston street. — Plan of street at corner of Tremont street. 
Boylston street. — Plan of street in front of No. 182. 
Brighton street. — Plan of estate No. 102. 
Brighton street. — Plan of estate No. 104. 
Brighton street. - Plan of estate No. 106. 
Broad street. — Plan of street in front of No. 185. 
BucJcingham street. — Plan of street in front of No. 25. 
Bnlfinch street. — Plan of street in fz'ont of No. 3. 
Causeway street. — Plan of street opposite Portland street. 
Chandler street, —r Plan of street in front of Castle Square 

Theatre. 
City Hospital. — Plan of fence around Contagious Department. 
Common street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 10 and 10^. 
Cotting street. — Plan of estate No. 13. 
Cotting street. — Plan of street in front of No. 21. 
Cotting street. — Plan of street, corner of Leverett street. 
Cross street. — Plan of sti-eet in front of Nos. 61 and 63. 
Berne street. — Plan of street from Temple street to Bowdoin 

street. 
Bock square. — Plan of, at corner of Exchange street. 
BJast Canton street. — Plan of street in front of No. 47. 
Eastern avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 22. 
Fleet street. — Plan of street in front of No. 32. 
Green street. — Plan of street, corner of Norman street. 
Gray street. — Plan of street, corner of Clarendon street. 
Hanover street. — Plan of street, near Washington street. 
Harrison avenue. — Plan of, corner of Harvard street. 
Harrison avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 372. 
Holyoke street. — Plan of street in front of No. 16. 
Huntington avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 185. 
Joy street. — Plan of street in front of No. 23. 
Kingston street. — Plan of street in front of No. 157. 
Kneeland street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 163 and 165. 
Lawrence street. — Plan of street in front of No. 1^. 



Engineering Department. 157 

Leverett street. — Plan of street, corner of Minot street. 

Lincoln street. — Plan of street, corner of Essex street. 

Margaret street. — Plan of street in front of No. 7. 

Marlboro' street. — Plan of street, corner of Gloucester street. 

Marlboro' street. — Plan of street, corner of Gloucester street. 

I\/ortliamj)ton street. — Plan of street in frorrt of No. 78. 

Oneida street. — Plan of street in front of No. 33. 

Pemberton square. — Plan of, in front of No. 10. 

Poplar street. — Plan of estate No. 92. 

Pevere street. — Plan of estate, corner of Anderson street. 

Shawniut avemie. — Plan of, corner of Osborn place. 

iSJiawniut avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 279. 

S2yring street. — Plan of street in front of No. 28. 

Tileston street. — Plan of estate No. 33. 

Tremont street. — Plan of street in front of No. 168. 

Tremont street. — Plan of street in front of Tremont Theatre, 

Tremont street. — Plan of street in front of No. 791. 

Trumbull street. — Plan of street, near Ivanhoe street. 

Tyler street. — Plan of street in front of No. 13. 

JJtica street. — Plan of street, corner of Kneeland street. 

Warreyiton street. — Plan of estate No. 86. 

Washington street. — Plan of street, opposite Franklin street. 

Washington street. — Plan of street at Haymarket square. 

Washington street. — Plan of street, corner of Motte street. 

Webster avenue. — Plan of estate No. 40. 

West Newton street. — Plan of street, corner of Washington 

street. 
West Newton street. — Plan of street, corner St. Botolph street. 

South Boston. 
Bolton street. — Plan of street in front of No. 70. 
Broadway bridge. — Plan of, near Foundry street. 
Borchester avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 177. 
East Broadway. — Plan of, in front of No. 789. 
Bast Bighth street. — Plan of street in front of No. 497. 
Mercer street. — Plan of street in front of No. 38. 

Old Harbor street. — Plan of street in front of No. 25. 

P street. — Plan of street in front of No. 35. 

Bogers street. — Plan of street, near Dorchester street. 

West First street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 417 and 
419. 

West Third street. — Plan of street at A street. 

East Boston. 
Jeffries street. — Plan of street at Marginal street. 
Putnam street. — Plan of street in front of Nos. 150 and 152. 

Charlestown. 
Bartlett street. — Plan of street in front of No. 75. 
Bunker Bill street. — Plan of street, corner of Lexington street 



158 City Document No. 10. 

Ferrin street. — Plan of northerly side of street, between Edge- 
worth street and Jackson street. 
Mam street. — Plan of street in front of No. 172. 
Monument avenue. — Plan of, in front of No. 14. 
Russell street. — Plan of street in front of No. 8. 
Warren street. — Plan of street, near AYinthi'op street. 

ROXBUKY. 

Conant street. — Plan of street, corner of Oregon street. 
Craicjord street. — Plan of street in front of No. 94. 
Forest street. — Plan of street in front of No. 76. 
Massachusetts avenue. — Plan of, near Swett street. 
Minden street. — Plan of street, corner of Schiller street. 
Seaver street. — Plan of street in front of No. 10. 
St. Alphonsus street. — Plan of street in front of No. 44. 
St. James street. — Plan of street, corner of Alpine street. 
Sterling street. — Plan of street, near Cabot street. 
Vernon street. — Plan of street at Vernon place. 
Washington street. — Plan of street at corner of Guild street. 
Washington street. — Plan of street at Hulbert street. 
Washington street. — Plan of street in front of No. 2750. 
Weston street. — Plan of street in front of No. 24. 
Windsor street. — Plan of street in front of No. 43. 
Wi'ithrop street. — Plan of street in front of No. 17. 
Winthrop street. — Plan of street in front of No. 96. 

Dorchester. 

.Blue Hill avenue. — Plan of near McLellan street. 
Milton avenue. — Plan of near Norfolk street. 
Norfolk street. — Plan of street opposite Engine House. 

West Roxbury. 

Ashland street. — Plan of street corner of Hyde Park avenue. 
Washington street. — Plan of street near Metropolitan avenue. 
Washington street. — Plan of street corner of Hemlock street. 

Brightok. 

Commonwealth avenue. — Plan of near Lake street. 
Commonwealth avenue. — Plan of at the Newton Line. 
Washington street. — Plan of street at Oak square. 



Engineering Department. 159 



APPENDIX C. 



TABLE OF SURVEYS. PLANS AND PROFILES MADE BY THE 
SURVEYING DIVISION OF THE ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT, FROM FEB. 1, 1896 TO FEB. 1, 1897. 

Boston Proper. 

Aberdeen street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
established grade, from Beacon street to Brookline Branch 
of the Boston &, Albany Eaih-oad. 

Alhanij street. — Plan of easterly side of City Hospital lot show- 
ing building and areas. 

Alclen street and vicinity. — Tracing for Street Commissioners. 

Allen street. — Poplar street and Chambers street. Accurate 
plan of estates for taking for school purposes. 

Allston street. — Bowdoin street to Somerset street. Plan and 
profile for proposed grade. 

Anderson street. — Sharpe School. Plan of proposed addition to 
lot. 

Appleton street. — Tremont street to Columbus avenue. Plan 
and profile for revision of grade. 

Ashhvrton jjlace. — Somerset street to Bowdoin street. Plan 
and profile for pi-oposed grade. 

Beach street. — Federal street to South street. Profile to estab- 
lish grade. 

Melvidere street. — Mechanics Arts building, showing line. 

JBennet avenue and Prince street. — Addition to plan of 
estate. 

Bennet avenue and Prince street. — Approximate plan of 
estate. 

Berioicl: park. — Columbus avenue to Carleton street. Profile 
of curb. 

Billerica street. — North-easterly side. Profile of edgestone. 

Boxcdoin street. — Beacon street to Allston street. Plan and 
profile for proposed grade. 

Bulfinch p)l<ice. — Bulfinch street to Bowdoin street. Plan and 
profile for proposed laying out and grade. 

Cambridge street. — Near Bowdoin square. Proposed widening. 

Canal street. — Plan for proposed widening. 

Carleton street. — From West Newton street to Berwick park. 
Plan and profile for proposed laying out and grade. 

Carver street. — Boylston street to Eliot street. Profile of edge- 
stone. 



160 City Document No. 10. 

Chestnut street. — Charles street to Charles river. Plan and 

profile of curb for revising grade. 
Clinton street. — Betterment plan. 
Common street. — Brimmer School. Plan for Superintendent of 

Public Buildings. 
Concord square. — Tremont street to Columbus avenue. Plan 

and profile of curb for revision of grade. 
Congress street. — Plan of proposed widening, from Atlantic 

avenue to bridge. 
Cove street. — Plan of estates to be taken for proposed widening. 

Cove street. — Kneeland street to East street. Plan and profile 
of proposed relocation and grade. 

Dorchester avenue. — Proposed extension, from Federal street 
to Summer street extended. 

Dover street. — Bath-house lot. Showing Fire Department build- 
ing in rear. 

Dover street. — And passageway in rear. Plan showing heights 
and grades for bath-house. 

East street. — Federal street to South street. Profile to establish 
grade. 

East Dedham street. — Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Profile of part of curb for revision of grade. 

East JBrookline street. — Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Plan and profile of curb for revision of grade. 

Essex street. — South street to Federal street. Plan and pro- 
file for grade. 

Federal street. — Proposed widening Summer street to East 
street. 

Federal street. — Plan and profile from Purchase street to Atlan- 
tic avenue. 

Federal street. — Essex street to Summer street. Plan and pro- 
file to establish grade. 

Federal street. — From the bridge northerly. Profile of curb. 

Fort Pobit Channel. — Plan of proposed new street, from oppo- 
site Oliver street to Congress street, showing approximate 
takings. 

Friend street. — Causeway street to Merrimac street. Profile of 
edgestone. 

Fullerton street. — Plan and profile of laying out and established 
grade from Brookline avenue to Fairhaven street. 

Fullerton street. — Plan for construction assessment from Brook- 
line avenue to Fairhaven street. 

Garden Court street. — Plan and profile for revision of grade. 

Harvard street. — Washington street to Hudson street. Plan 
and profile for re\'ision of grade. 

Haverhill street. — Plan for proposed widening. 

Haver] all street. — North of Causeway street. Plan for Superin- 
tendent of Streets. 

Holyoke street. — Plan and profile of curb for revision of grade. 

King's Chapel Burying -ground. — Plan showing location of 
gravestones on north side. 



Engineering Department. 161 

Mt. Washington avenue. — Federal street to bridge. Profile to 

establish grade. 
Nonoay street. — Plan and profile of laying-out and established 

grade from Massachusetts avenue to Parker street. 
Norwuii street. — Plan for construction assessment, from Massa- 
chusetts avenue to Parker street. 
Peterborough street. — Plan and profile of laying out and estab- 
lished grade from Boylston road to Audubon road. 
Peterborough street. — Plan for construction assessment, from 

Boylston road to Audubon road. 
Prince street. — Corner Bennet avenue. Estates taken for 

school piu-poses. 
Prince street. — Northerly corner Bennet avenue. Plan showing 

heights and grades for new school-house. 
Queensberry street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out 

and established grade, from Bo3'^lstou road to Audubon road. 
Somerset street. — Beacon street to Howard street. Plan and 

profile for proposed grade. 
South Mussell street. — At Myrtle street. Profile of cm-b and 

school-house. 
Stillman street. — Charlestown street to Endicott street. Plan 

and profile of curb for revision of grade. 
State street. — Brazer Building. Plan of proposed widening and 

discontinuance. 
Summer street. — From Purchase street to Harbor line. Plan 

and profile for proposed laying out and grade. 
Street from Dartmouth street to Trinity place. — Plan and profile 

for proposed laying out and grade. 
Trinity place. — From St. James avenue to raih'oad. Plan and 

profile for proposed laying out and grade. 
Union Park street. — Washington street to Harrison avenue. 

Plan and profile of curb for revision of grade. 
IVall street. — Plan and profile of curb for revision of grade. 
Webster avenue. — Profile of buildings. 
West Prookline street. — Tremont street to Shawmut avenue. 

Profile of part of curb for revision of grade. 
West JBrookli?ie street. — Washington street to Shawmut avenue. 

Plan and profile of curb for revision of grade. 
West JVeicton street. — At Carleton street. Plan and profile for 

grade. 
Yarmouth street. — Plan and profile of cui-b for grade. 

South Boston. 

Atlantic street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
grade, showing proposed steps between East Eighth street 
and Thomas park. 

£Jast Sixth street. — Northerly corner H street. Plan of the 
Kindergarten school annex to Thomas N. Hart school, 
between East Fifth street and East Sixth street. 



162 City Document No. 10. 

H street. — Northerly corner East Sixth street. Plan of the 

Kindergarten school annex to the Thomas N. Hart school, 

between East Fifth street and East Sixth street. 
Mt. WasJrington avenue. — Plan and profile of proposed laying 

out and extension from Harbor line to D street. 
Short street. Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade, 

between Middle street and Tuckerman street. 
Thomas park. — Plan of reservoir lot. 
Tuckerman street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

grade, between Dorchester street and Short street. 
"West Fifth street and Gold street. — Plan showing measurement 

and areas, between B street and D street. 
'West Fourth street. — Silver street and E street. Plan of the 

Bigelow school lot with proposed addition for grading. 

East Boston (including Breeds Island). 

JBlackinton street. — Plan of the Blackinton school lot, for grading 

at westerly corner of Leyden street. 
JBrigham street. Approximate plan of proposed extension to 

Pearl place. 
Marginal street. — Plan and profile of proposed extension and 

grade from Jeffries street to the water. 
Orleans street. — Plan and profile, showing re^dsed grade, from 

Maverick street to Decatm- street. 

Charlestown. 

Chelsea street. — Approximate plan for proposed widening. 
Elm street. — Five estates between Lincoln street and Hancock 

place. For proposed school lot. 
High street. — Proposed widening. 
Main street. — Plan and profile showing grade, between City 

square and Pleasant street. 
Main street. — Profile of cui'b opposite Winthrop street, westerly. 
Moxdton street. — New school lot. Plan showing levels. 
Rutherford-avenue extension. — Approximate areas for proposed 

new street. 
Sketch of marsh and meadow lands in Charlestown. 
Vine street and Bunker Hill street. — Betterment plan. 

ROXBURY. 

Abbotsford street. — Extension. Plan and profile of proposed 
laying out and estabhshed grade, from Harold street to 
Crawford street. 

Atherton street. — Extension. Plan and profile of proposed lay- 
ing out and established grade, from Amory street to Lamar- 
tine street. 

JBartlett street. — Northerly corner Washington street. Plan and 
profile of ciu'b for grade. 



Engineeeing Department. 163 

Bickford avetme. — Plan aud profile of proposed lajdng out and 

established grade, from Heath street to Wensley street. 
Cedar street. — North-easterly side Highland street to Centre 

street. Plan and profile of edgestone for grade. 
Clifton place. — Extension. Clifton street to Norfolk avenue. 

Plan and profile of buildings for Sewer Dmsion. 
Cottage place. — From Tremont street to New York, New Haven 

& Hartford Railroad. Plan and profile for grade. 
Ctdvert street. — From Tremont street to Ruggles street. Plan 

and profile for revised grade. 
Davenport street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

established grade, from Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 
Dimock street. — Plan and profile from Amory street to beyond 

Columbus avenue, for revising grade. 
Dudley street. — Guild row to Kenilworth street. Plan and pro- 
file of edgestone for grade. 
Fairland street. — Plan of proposed re-location, from Mt. Pleasant 

avenue, southerl3\ 
Felloios street. — East Lenox street to Hunneman street. Plan 

and profile on centre line to test grade. 
Forest street. — Southerly corner Vine street. Plan and profile 

of cui'b for grade. 
Forest street. — Westerly corner Vine street. Plan and profile of 

edgestone for grade. 
Forest street and Vine street. — Plan of north-easterlj^ corner, 

showing trees for Public Grounds Department. 
Highland street. — North-westerly side Cedar street to Lambert 

avenue. Plan and profile of edgestone for grade. 
Uoidand street. — Southerly corner Humboldt avenue. Profile 

of curb and gutter to test grade. 
Hunneman street. — Albany street to Harrison avenue. Plan 

and profile on centre line to test grade. 
Huntington avenue. — Corner Wigglesworth street. Plan and 

profile of cm'b. 
Kenihoorth street. — At Dudley street. Plan and profile of edge- 
stone for grade. 
Linden Park street. — From Roxbury street to Gay street. Plan 

and profile for grade. 
Longvoood avenue. — Plan aud profile of proposed relocation 

and established grade, from the south-easterly side of the 

Riverv\'ay to the Brookline town line. 
New Heath street. — Columbus avenue to Centre street. Plan 

and profile of curb. 
Parker street. — Heath street to Fisher avenue. Plan and profile 

on curb line for grade. 
Parker street. — Heath street to New Heath street. Plan and 

profile of buildings and curb for grade. 
Prentiss street. — Plan and profile from Tremont street to Hal- 

leck street for revising grade. 
Hiverside street. — From Tremont street to Columbus avenue. 

Plan and profile for revision of grade. 



164 City Document No. 10. 

Roxbury street and Centre street. — Plan of proposed reloca 

tiou at junction. 
Roxbury street. — Westerly corner Centre street. Plan and 

profile of curb and buildings for grade. 
Roxbury street. — AVashington street to Eliot square. Plan and 

profile of curb for grade. 
Roxbury street. — From Columbus avenue to Elmwood street. 

Plan and profile of curb. 
Rxiggles street. — Parker street to Parkway. Plan and profile 

for laying out and established grade. 
Riiggles street. — From Tremont street to Halleck street. Plan 

and profile for revision of grade. 
Riiggles street. — Plan and elevations of building corner Oak 

Grove terrace, for Buildings Department. 
Ruggles street. — Plan for construction asssesment, from Parker 

street to Back Bay Fens. 
ISarsfield street. — From Tremont street to Grinnell street. Plan 

and profile for revision of grade. 
Seaver street. — Plan of Franklin park lands on northerly side, 

between Harold street and Walnut avenue. 
Station street. — From Halleck street to Columbus avenue. 

Plan and profile for revising grade. 
Terry street. — From Tremont street to Columbus avenue. Plan 

and profile for revision of grade. 
Tremont street. — From Parker street to Columbus avenue. 

Plan and profile for revising grade. 
Tremont street. — At Roxbury Crossing. Plan showing levels 

on curb, track, etc. 
'Valentine street and Fvlda street. — Easterly corner. Plan 

and profile for revision of grade. 
Va7icouver street. — Plan for construction assessment, from 

Huntington avenue to Ruggles street. 
Vernon street. — Cabot street to Lament street. Plan and 

profile of cui-b for grade. 
Vine street. — Forest street to Mt. Pleasant avenue. Plan and 

profile of curb for grade. 
'Wait street. — Plan and profile of proposed widening and estab- 
lished grade, from Huntington avenue to Hillside street. 
Walpole street. — From Columbus avenue to New York, New 

Haven and Hartford Railroad. Plan and profile for revis- 
ion of grade. 
Warren street.^ Regent street and St. James street. — Square 

at junction. Plan showing widths of sidewalk and heights 

of curb. 
Washington street and KenUworth street. — Plan of land to be 

taken for school purposes. 
Washington street. — Northerly corner Bartlett street. Plan and 

profile of curb for grade. 
Washington street and Bartlett street. — Plan of proposed widen- 
ing at northerly corner. 



Engineering Department. 1G5 

Washin ff ton street. — Plan of proposed relocation between Dale 

street and Circuit street. 
Washington street. — Plan showing encroachments between Dale 

street and Circuit street. 
Weston street. — From Trcmont street to Grinnell street. Plan 

and profile for revision of grade. 
West Walnut j^ark. — Washington street to Brunswick avenue. 

Plan and profile for revision of grade. 
Winsloio street. — Plan and profile of curb for grade. 

Dorchester. 

Alexander street. — From Oleander street to Baker place. Plan 

and profile for laying out and grade. 
Athelioold street. — From Harvard street to Kilton street. Plan 

for construction assessment. 
Beale street. — From Shawmut Branch Railroad to Carruth street. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
Gapen street. — From Evans street to Selden street. Plan and 

profile for proposed laying out and grade. 
Chamberlain street. — From Harvard street to Algonquin street. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
Chamberlain street. — From Algonquin street to Harvard street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Clement street. — From AUston street to Shawmut Branch Rail- 
road. Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Edtoin street. — From Dorchester avenue to Shawmut park. Plan 

for construction assessment. 
Elizabeth street. — From Astoria street to Norfolk street. Plan 

for construction assessment. 
Ellet street. — From Adams street to Dorchester avenue. Plan 

for construction assessment. 
Fairm^ount avenue. — From Washington street to Milton avenue. 

Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Fenelon street. — From Merrill street to Washington street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Gaylord street. — From Chamberlain street to Washington street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Granger street. — Extension through Fenuo place. Plan and 

profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Greenbrier street. — From Bloomfield street to Bowdoin street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Harvard street. — From Blue Hill avenue to Austin street. Plan 

and profile of proposed relocation and grade. 
Hopestill street. — From Northern avenue to Southern avenue. 

Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Leroy street. — From Ditson street to Geneva avenue. Plan 

and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
McLellan street. — Blue Hill avenue to Erie street. Plan and 

profile for relocation and revised grade. 



166 City Document No. 10. 

Mora street. — From Washington street to Milton avenue. Plan 

and profile for laying out and grade. 
Morse street. — From Bowdoin avenue to Washington street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Keponset avenue. — At north-westerly corner Freeport street. 

Plan of lot for Park Department. 
New! lall street. — From Ashmont street to Pierce avenue. Plan 

and profile for revising grade. 
Nightingale street. — From Bernard street to Talbot avenue. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
Norfolk street. — Opposite Walk Hill street. Plan for reloca- 
tion. 
Northern avenue. — From Washington street to Talbot avenue. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
Nottingham street. — From Bowdoin avenue to Bullard street. 

Plan and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Old road. — From Gleuway street, south, to near Wales street. 

Plan for discontinuance. 
Page avenue. — From MeLellan street to Glenway street. Plan 

and profile for laying out and grade. 
Pierce avenue. — From Adams street to Neponset avenue. Plan 

and profile for laying out and grade. 
Puritan avenue. — From Eiehfield street to private way. Plan 

and profile of proposed laying out and grade. 
Randoliih terrace. — From Rowena street to Van Winkle street. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
River street. — At Blue Hill aveuue. Plan for relocation. 
Robinson street. — From Adams street to Draper street. Plan 

and profile for revising grade. 
Shelton street exte?ision. — Plan and profile for re\'ising grade. 
Taylor street. — From Neponset avenue to Rice street. Profile 

. for grade. 
Wessex street. — From Van AVinkle street to Codman street. 

Plan and profile for laying out and grade. 
WeganoA'e street. — From Carruth street to Wessex street. Plan 

and profile for laying out and grade. 
Wilder street. — From Geneva avenue to Washington street. 

Plan for construction assessment. 
Wolcott street. — From Columbia street to Erie street. Plan for 

construction assessment. 

West Roxbury. 

Reech street. — Plan of school-house lot, near Kittredge street, 
showing grades for architect. 

Canterbury street. — Plan showing line of street between Hyde 
Park avenue and Sharon street. 

Cohasset street. — Profile from Corinth street, southerly, for re- 
vising grade. 

Fletcher street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 
established grade from South street to the Bradford estate. 



Engineering Department. 167 

FranTdin place. — Plan of sm-rounding estates for Sewer Division 

of the Street Department. 
Hewlett street. — Plan and profile from Walter street, westerly, 

for revising grade. 
Hyde Park avenue. — Washington street and AValk Hill street. 

Plan of triangle, showing frontages for edgestone. 
La Grange street and JBellev lie street. — Plan of land taken for 

pla3'^ground. 
Morton street. — Plan and profile of proposed laying out and 

established grade, between Park street and La Grange street. 
Paul Gore street. — Plan of land on northerly side purchased for 

school-house lot. 
Peter Parley street. — Plan and profile between Washington 

street and Forest Hills street, for revising grade. 
Sharon street. — Plan of Stephen M. Weld Primary School, for 

Public Buildings Department. 
South street. — Profile of roadway, showing grade between Walter 

street and Congreve street. 
South street. — Profile from Washington street to railroad cross- 
ing on line of proposed widening. 
Walk Hill street. — Plan of land at the corner of Wachusett 

street taken for school-house lot. 
Weld avenue. — Plan and profile of curb from Columbus avenue 

to School street. 

Brighton. 

Pigeloio street. — Plan and profile between Brooks street and 
Dunboy street for revising grade. 

Pigeloio street. — Plan and profile fromFaneuil street, northerly, 
to bend for establishing grade. 

Prighton avenue. — Betterment plan between Commonwealth 
avenue and Cambridge street. 

Brooks street. — Plan and profile showing proposed relocation, 
extension and grade between Holton street and North Beacon 
street. 

Cambridge street. — Plan of new Brighton High School-house lot 
at Warren street, for Public Buildings Department. 

Cambridge street. — Plan showing land added to the AUston 
School lot. 

Catnbridge street. — Plan showing proposed widening between 
Warren street and Dustin street. 

Chiswick road. — Plan of school-house lot at Chestnut Hill ave- 
nue, showing grades for architect. 

Commonwealth avenue. — Assessment plan for laying out between 
Chestnut Hill avenue and Newton line. 

Commomcealth avenue. — Assessment plan for construction be- 
tween Chestnut Hill avenue and Newton line. 

High street. — Plan and profile showing proposed laying-out and 
grade, between Dunboy street and Bigelow street. 



168 City Document No. 10. 

Mackin street and JRichardson street. — Plan showing land 
added to the William A¥irt AVarren School lot. 

Mack'in street and JRichardson street. — Plan of school-house lot, 
showing grades, for Public Buildings Department, 

Malvern street. — Plan and profile, showing proposed laying out 
and grade between Brighton avenue and Ashford street. 

Melton road. — Plan and profile, showing proposed laying-out 
and grade from Wallingford road to Colonial road. 

Menlo street. — Plan for proposed relocation near Sparhawk 
street. 

Konanttim street. — Plan of Oak Square Primary School-house 
lot for Public Buildings Department, 

Nottingham road. — Plan and profile, showing proposed laying- 
out and grade from Melton road, 

Surrey street. — Plan and profile, showing proposed laying-out 
and grade between Market street and Parsons street. 

Tremont street. — Plan and profile, showing proposed relocation 
and grade between Washington street and Newton line. 

'Wallingford road. — Plan and profile, showing proposed laying- 
out and grade between Commonwealth avenue and Chestnut 
Hill avenue. 



Engineering Department. 169 



APPENDIX D. 



EDGESTONE AND SIDEWALK ASSESSMENT PLANS MADE FOR 
THE PAVING DIVISION OF STEEET DEPARTMENT. 

City Proper. 

JBoylston street. — Southerly side, from Exeter street to Boston 
& Albany Railroad. Edgestone assessment plan. 

Colwnhus avenue. — Opposite Ferdinand street. Sidewalk as- 
sessment plan. 

Columhus avenue. — Northerly corner Northampton street. Side- 
walk assessment plan. 

JLaconia street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 

ROXBTJRY. 

AlasJca street. — Part of southerly side for sidewalk assessment. 
JElm Hill avenue. — Northerly corner Rowland street. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Galena street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 
Gaston street. — Southerly side Blue Hill avenue to bend. Plan 

for sidewalk assessment. 
Gaston street. — South-easterly corner Warren street. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Hammond street. — Nos. 10 to 14. Plan for sidewalk assess- 
ment. 
Harold street. — Easterly corner Homestead street. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Hazehcood street. — Measurement for assessment plan. 
Ilotnestead street. — Easterly corner Harold street. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Howland street. — Northerly corner Elm Hill avenue. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Tngleside street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 
Mayv'ood street. — From Warren street. Plan for sidewalk 

assessment. 
Ottaica street. — Southerly side. Sidewalk assessment plan. 
Quincy street. — Northerly side, Warren street to Blue Hill 

avenue. Plan for sidewalk assessment. 
Sterling street. — Northerly corner Shawmut avenue. Plan for 

sidewalk assessment. 
Sterling street. — Southerly corner AVestminster street. Plan 

for sidewalk assessment. 



170 City Document No. 10. 

Dorchester. 

Algonquin street. — Southerly corner Harvard street. Sidewalk 
plan. 

Argyle street. — Plan for edgestone assessment. 

JBellflower street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 

Dean street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 

Hartland street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 

Momsey street. — Dorchester avenue to Sydney street. Edge- 
stone assessment plan. 

Salcomhe street. — Gushing avenue to Stoughton street. Edge- 
stone assessment plan. 

Sydney street. — Hartland street to Crescent avenue. Edgestone 
assessment plan. 

Wheatland avenue. — Washington street to Whitfield street. 
Edgestone assessment plan. 

Talbot avenue. — Norfolk street to New England Raih'oad. 
Edgestone assessment plan. 

Talbot avenue. — Easterly side, at Dorchester avenue. Edge- 
stone and sidewalk assessment plan. 

South Boston. 

D street. — West First street to West Second street. Sidewalk 

assessment plan. 
JEast Sixth street. — M street to N street. Sidewalk assessment 

plan. 
East Sixth street. — N street to O street. Sidewalk assessment 

plan. 
Jiawson street. — Edgestone assessment plan. 



Engineering Department. 171 



APPENDIX E. 



LIST OF STREETS WHERE LOT FRONTAGES HAVE BEEN 
OBTAINED FOR THE SEWER DIVISION OF THE STREET 
DEPARTMENT FOR SEWER ASSESSMENTS FROM FEB. 1, 
1896, TO FEB. 1, 1897. 

Boston Pkopek. 

Atlantic avenue. — From Congress street to Oliver street. 
Auduho7i road. — From Beacon street to Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. 
Beach street. — From Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Congress street. — From Atlantic avenue to Fort Point channel. 
Dundee street. — From Massachusetts avenue to Dalton street. 
Endicott street. — From Thacher street to Causeway street. 
Flagg street. — From Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Huntington avenue. — Both corners of Norway street. 
Laconia street. — From Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Maiden street. — From Washington street to Harrison avenue. 
Maiden street. — From Harrison avenue to Albany street. 
2^orway street.- — From Huntington avenue to Falmouth street. 
JSouth Russell street. — From Myrtle street to Cambridge street. 
Thacher street. — From Endicott street to North Margin street. 
Tyler street. — From Beach street to Harvard street. 
Tyler street. — From Oak street to Curve street. 

South Boston. 

D street. — From West First street to West Second street. 
E street. — From West Seventh street to West Eighth street. 
New YorJc, New Haven cb Hartford Railroad. — From Vinton 

street to Boston place. 
Rawson street. — From Dorchester avenue to Boston street. 
West Second street. — From D street to E street. 

East Boston (including Breeds Island). 

Ashley avenue. — At and near Breed street. 
Leyden street. — From Breed street to Chelsea avenue. 
Lh^erpool street. — From Decatur street to Central square. 
Meridian street. — From Condor street to Nay sti'eet. 
Saratoga street. — From Bennington street to Austin avenue. 



172 City Document No. 10. 

Charlkstown. 
St. Martin street. — From Medford street to Bunker Hill street. 

ROXBURY. 

Mickford street. — From Centre street to Bromley park. 

Bryant street. — Near Huntington avenue. 

Danforth street. — Near Wyman street. 

Evergreen street. — From Day street, westerly. 

Heath street. — From Columbus avenue to New Heath street. 

Kearsarge avenue. — From Warren street, easterly. 

Munroe street. — From Harold street to Humboldt avenue. 

Northampton street. — From Albany street to Fellows street. 

Parlxer street. — From Huntington avenue to Westland avenue. 

Shawmut avenue. — From Roxbury street to Vernon street. 

Ward street. — From Halleck street to New York, New Haven & 

Hartford Railroad. 
Wensley street. — From Parker street to Bucknam street. 

Dorchester. 

Boxodoin street. — At Quincy street. 

Capen street. — Norfolk street to Fuller street. 

Chapman avenue. — Don street to Lyons street. 
Dorchester avenue. — Richmond street to Adams street. 
Edviin street. — From Dorchester avenue to Shawmut park. 
Fxdler street. — From Capen street to Nelson street. 
Lawrence avenue. — At Mascoma street. 
Morton street and Selden street. — At junction. 
Morton street and Evans street. — At junction. 
Norfolk street. — Near Morton street. 

Richmond street. — Dorchester avenue to Washington street. 
Robinson street. — From Draper street to Montello street. 
Rosemont street. — From Adams street to Dorchester avenue. 
Stoughton street. — From Salcombe street to Everett avenue. 

Washington street. — From Adams street to bridge. 

Washington street. — From Fuller street to south of Codman 
street, 

Willowwood street. — From Norfolk street to Lauriat avenue. 

West Roxbury. 

Arundel street. — Walter street to Centre street. 
Beech street. — Newburg street to Parkway. 
Birch street. — South street to Corinth street. 
Bour?ie street. — Canterbury street to Wallace park. 
Canterbury street. — At Walk Hill street. 
Canterbury street. — Walk Hill street to Boui'ne street. 
Centre street. — Boylston terrace to Boylston street. 
Centre street. — Near Lochstead street. 
Corey street. — Near Centre street. 



Engineeking Department. 17 

Florence street. — At Stony brook. 

FraiiMln place. — From Washiugton street. 

Hyde Park avenue. — Stony brook to Walk Hill street. 

Janiaicaway . — At Perkins street. 

Kirk street. — Mont view street to Ci'est street. 

Lauder's Lane. — From Centre street. 

3Iontvieic street. — Corey street to Hastings street. 

Mozart avenue. — Walter street to Selwyn street. 

Mt. Vernon avetiice. — From Rockland street. 

Mockland street. — Mt. Vernon street to Mt. Vernon avenue. 

Sedgwick street. — Near South street. 

iSehcyn street. — Near Arundel street. 

Walk JJill street. — Canterbury street to Paine street. 

Walk Hdl street. — Wachusett street, easterly to bend. 

Brighton. 

Allston square. — 

JBigelow street. — Brooks street to Webster street. 

Brooks street. — Boston and Albany Railroad to Gerrish street. 

Cambridge street. — Rugby street to Dustin street. 

Cambridge street. — Cambridge terrace to Allston Heights. 

Etna street. — North )^eacon street to Elniira street. 

Everett street. — At North Beacon street. 

Gerrish street. — Brooks street to Newton street. 

Jlobart street. — Near Brooks street. 

Holmes avenue. — Harvard avenue to Warren street. 

Holton street. — Athol street to Everett street. 

Murdock street. — Cambridge street to Sparhawk street. 

Neioton street. — Brooks street to Bigelow street. 

N'orth Harvard street. — Hopedale street to Coolidge road. 

JVorth Harvard street. — Western avenue to Charles river. 

JRarkman street. — Brooks street, westerly. 

Western avenue. — Everett street to Waverley street. 



174 



City Document No. 10. 



APPENDIX F. 



Engineebing Department Propebty Schediile, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as fol- 
lows: 

1 Temple transit. 

5 Buff & Berger transits. 

8 Gurley transits. 

1 Stack pole transit. 

2 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 

5 Gurley levels. 
11 Boston rods. 

3 New York rods. 

4 Troy rods. 

Cases for plans and books. 
Reference Library, 1,103 vol- 
umes. 



10,200 Plans Engineering Works, 

loose. 
14 volumes Plans Engineering 

Works, bound. 
Photographs of Engineering 

Works. 
Apparatus for blue printing. 
1 microscope. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holosteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pair iield glasses. 

2 typewriters. 

2 dynamometers. 
1 pentagraph. 
1 calculating-machine. 
1 volt meter. 

1 comptometer. 

2 thermophones. 



Surveying Division. 



3 Temple transits. 
2 Moody transits. 

2 Buff & Berger transits. 

3 Stackpole transits. 

1 Troughton & Sims transit. 
1 Poole transit. 
1 Archibut transit. 



1 King transit. 

5 Buff & Berger levels. 

1 Moody level. 

2 Temple levels. 
1 Ewing level. 

1 Gurley level. 
7 Rods. 



Engineering Department. 175 



APPENDIX G. 



Elevations referred to Boston City base. (The city base is 0.64 feet 
below mean low tide.) 

Feet. 

0.00 City base. 
15.66 Highest tide, April 16, 1851. 

15.33 Coping of dry dock, Charlestown Navy Yard. 

12.34 Greatest elevation of high tide, per United States Tide 

Tables, Nov. 26, 1897 (11.7 + 0.64) =12.34. 
7.74 Least elevation of high tide, per United States Tide 

Tables, Feb. 11, 1897 (7.1 + 0.64)=7.74. 
2.84 Greatest elevation of low tide, per United States Tide 

Tables, Sept. 19 and 20, 1897 (2.2 + 0.64) = 2.84. 

— 1.26 Least elevation of low tide, per United States Tide 

Tables, April 18 and 19, Oct. 27, and Nov. 25, 1897 
(—1.9 + 0.64) = —1.26. 
0.64 Mean low tide. 
5.00 Piles cut off for building. 
9.91 Water- works base ( approximate tide-marsh level). 

— 4.98 Cambridge city base. 
0.38 South Boston flats base. 

Note. — Cambridge city base is 4.98 feet below Boston city base. 



176 



City Document No. 10. 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



CONTENTS — REPORT ENGINEERING DEPART- 
MENT FOR 1896. 



[General index to contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892 will be found 
in Report of February 1, 1892.] 

PAGE 

A. — ENGiNEERixa Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Engineering Department 2 

" " " Abolishment grade crossings, Dover- 
street bridge G 

" " " Improved sewerage 3 

" " " Statues — Robert G. Shaw, monu- 
ment (5 

" " " " J. Boyle 0'E.eilly, monu- 
ment 6 

" " " South Union station fj 

Bridges inspected 7 

" wholly supported by Boston 7 

" " " " railroads 27 

" of which Boston supports the part within its limits 9 

" " " pays a part of the cost of maintenance, 9 

" supported by railroad coporations 10 

*' " '' " " Boston & Albany R.R., 10 
" " " " " Boston & Maine R.R., 

W. Div 10 

" " " " " Boston & Maine R.R., 

East Div 10 

" " " " " Boston, Revere Beach 

& LvnnR.R 10 

New England R.R 10 

N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., 

Old Colony Div 10 

N.Y., N.H. ^H-R-R., 

Prov. Div 11 

" Total number (124) 11 

Bridges 11 

Agassiz road. Back-bay fens 11 

Albany street, over B. & A. R.R 11 

Allston, over B. & A. R.R 12 

Arborway, over Stony brook. Parkway 12 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R 12 

Athens street, over N.E. R.R 12 

Audubon road, over B. & A. R.R 12 

Beacon street, over outlet to Back-bay fens 12 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R 12 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, Parkway 13 

Bernier-street foot-bridge, over Bridle path, Riverway 13 

Bernier-street foot-bridge, over Muddy river 13 

Berkeley street, B. & A. R.R 13 

Berkeley street, Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R 13 

Berwick-park foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. 

R.R 13 

Blakemore street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R 14 

Bolton street, N.E. R.R , 14 

Boylston street, Back-bay fens 14 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 14 

Bridle path, over Muddy river, in Riverway 14 

Broadway, over Fort-point channel 14 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 15 

Brookline avenue, over B. & A. R.R 15 

Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in Parkway 15 



180 City Document No. 10. 



Bridges, continued. page 

Byron street, B., R.B. & L. R.R 15 

Cambridge street 15 

Canal or Craigie's 15 

Castle-Island foot-bridge 16 

Central avenue, over Neponset river 16 

Charles river 16 

Char lesgate. Back-bay fens 16 

Chelsea, over B. & M. R.R 17 

Chelsea (North) 17 

Chelsea (South) 17 

Chelsea street 17 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro pond, in Franklin Park 17 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R.R 17 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 18 

Commonwealth avenue, Back-bay fens 18 

Congress street 18 

Cornwall street, over Stony brook 18 

Cottage-street foot-bridge 18 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R.R 18 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R.R., and Prov. Div. N.Y., 

N.H. & H. R.R 19 

Dorchester street, over Old Colony Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. 

R.R 19 

Dover street 19 

Ellicott arch, in Franklin Park 19 

Essex street 19 

Everett street, over B. & A. R.R 19 

Federal street 20 

Fen bridge. Back-bay fens 20 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R.R 20 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin Park 20 

Gold street, over N. E. R.R 20 

Granite to Milton 20 

Harvard to Cambridge 20 

Huntington avenue, over B. & A. R.R. 21 

Irvington-street foot-bridge, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. 

R.R 21 

L-street bridge 21 

Leverett pond, foot-bridge in Leverett Park 22 

Leyden street, B., R.B. & L. R.R 22 

Linden-park street, over Stony brook 22 

Longwood avenue 22 

Maiden 22 

Massachusetts avenue, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., 22 

Massachusetts avenue, over B. & A. R.R 22 

Mattapan 23 

Meridian street 23 

Milton 23 

Mt. Washington aA'enue 23 

Neponset 24 

Neptune road, over B., R.B. & L. R.R 24 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., 24 

North Beacon street 24 

North Harvard street 24 

Prison Point 25 

Public Garden foot-bridge 25 

Scarboro pond, foot-bridge in Franklin Park 25 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R.R 25 

Spring street 25 

Stony brook, Back-bay fens 25 

Swett-street bridges (over south-bay sluices) 26 

Tremont street, over Muddy river 26 

Warren 26 

Western avenue to Cambridge 27 

Western avenue to Watertown 27 

West Boston 26 

West Chester Park. (See Massachusetts avenue.) 

West Fourth street (over O. C. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.) ... 26 

West Rutland-square foot-bridge, over Prov. DiA^ N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R.R 27 

Winthrop 27 



Engineering Departivibnt. 181 

Surveying Division: page 

Area of Boston — By wards — In acres 35 

Lines and grades given, and paving work measured, 1896: 

East Boston and Breed's Island 43 

Charlestown 45 

South Boston 43 

Boston Proper 38 • 

Roxbary 45 

Dorchester 56 

Brighton 66 

West Roxbury 63 

Perambulation of Boundary lines 37 

Map showing location of all the electric lights in Boston 30 

Plans 67 

Plans, new streets : 

Cove street 29 

Summer-street extension 29 

Dorehester-avenixe extension 29 

Tables, showing amount paving work measured for the year 

1896 33 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1896: 

Cottage Farm bridge 145 

Essex-street bridge 146 

Huntington-avenue bridge (over B. & A.) 146 

Meridian-street bridge 146 

Winthrop bridge 146 

City Hospital : 

Grading and draining grounds 147 

Fire system 147 

Congress-street grade crossing 147 

Dorchester-avenue extension 147 

East Boston Ferries : 

New piers, South ferry, Boston side 149 

New drop, northerly landing, North ferry, East Boston 

side 149 

New drop, northerly landing, South ferry, Boston side 149 

New drop, southerly landing, North ferry, Boston side 149 

New tank, northerly drop. North ferry, East Boston side. . 150 

New tank, northerly drop, South ferry, Boston side 150 

Awning, North ferry. East Boston side 150 

Highland Park 150 

B. — Water Works 72 

Aqueducts and distributing reservoirs 76 

Consumption 79 

Distribution 80 

Farm Pond 74, 76 

High-service pumping-stations 76 

Lake Cochituate 75, 76 

Mystic Lake 78 

Mystic conduit and reservoir 78 

Mystic pumping-station 78 

Reservoir No. 1 72, 76 

" 2 72, 76 

" 3 73,76 

" 4 73,76 

" 6 74,76 

Sources of supply 72 

Table, showing daily average consumption of water in gallons 

from the Cochituate and Mystic works 84 

Table showing diversion of Sudbury-river water, 1890-1896. ... 85 
" " amount of water diverted from Sudbury river 
to Lake Cochituate and Chestnut-hill res- 
ervoir; amount wasted; amount of flow in 
river; percentage of rainfall collected, etc., 

1875-1896 89 

" " amount of water drawn from Mystic lake; 

amount wasted ; amount of rainfall collected 
in lake ; percentage of rainfall collected, etc., 

1876-1896 ; water-s^ed of lake, 17,200 acres. . . 91 
" " amount of water drawn from Lake Cochituate ; 
amount wasted ; amount of rainfall collected 
in Isike; amount received into lake from Sud- 



182 



City Document No. 10. 



B.— WatkkWob.ks, continued. page 

bury river ; percentage of rainfall collected, 
etc., 1853-1896; water-shed of lake, 12,077 

acres 86 

Table showing the average monthly and yearly heights in feet 
above tide-marsh level to which water would 
rise at different stations on the Boston Water 
"Works 93 

operations at the Chestnut-hill pumping-station 

for 1896 94 

operations and work done at the Mystic pump- 
ing station for 1896 96 

operations at "West Roxbury pumping-station 

for 1896 99 

operations at East Boston i^umping-station for 

1896 98 

rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Sud- 

bury-river water-shed for the year 1896 100 

rainfall in ixiches and hundredths at Lake Co- 

chituate for the year 1896 101 

rainfall in inches and hundredths on the Mystic- 
lake water-shed for the year 1896 102 

monthly rainfall in inches during 1896 at vari- 
ous places in Eastern Massachusetts 103 

the temperature of air and water at various sta- 
tions on the "Water "Works 104 

rainfall in inches on Cochitnate water-shed, 

1863-1896 105 

rainfall collected in inches on Cochituate water- 
shed, 1863-1896 107 

rainfall, percentage collected on Cochituate 

water-shed, 1863-1896 109 

rainfall in inches on Sudbury-river water-shed, 

1875-1896 Ill 

rainfall collected in inches on Sudbury-river 

water-shed, 1875-1896. 112 

rainfall, percentage collected on Sudbury-river 

water-shed, 1875-1896 113 

rainfall in inches on Mystic water-shed, 1878- 

1896 114 

rainfall collected in inches on Mystic water- 
shed, 1878-1896 115 

rainfall, percentage collected on Mystic water- 
shed, 1878-1896 116 

yield of Sudbury-river water-shed, 1875-1896, 
area of water-shed used, include water sur- 
f fiops 117 

General statistics, 1893, '94, '95, '96 ..'..\ ........ . 83 

"Whitehall pond 74, 76 

Summary of statistics, report for 1896 119 

C. — Improved Sewerage, or Main Drainage 121 

Appropriations and expenditures 121 

Mt. Vernon-street Overflow 122 

Neponset intercepting sewers 121 

D. — Parks 123 

Arborway 124 

Arboretum 124 

Charlesbank 128 

Charlestown Heights 127 

Charlestown Playground 128 

Commonwealth avenue 123 

Dorchesterway 125 

Fens 123 

Franklin Park 125 

Franklin Field 125 

Jamaica Park 123 

Leverett Park 123 

Marine Park 126 

North End Public Park 127 

Playgrounds 128 

Eiverway 123 

Strandway 126 



Engineering Department. 183 

D. — Parks, contimied. page 

West Roxbury Parkway 124 

Wood-Island Park 127 

E. — Street Department 129 

Blue Hill avenue 129 

Brighton avenue 132 

Columbias-avenue extension 130 

Commonwealth-avenue extension 132 

Huntington avenue 131 

Acton, Washington to Bradford street 134 

Batterymarch, Slilk street to Liberty square 134 

Beach, Washington street across Harrison avenue 134 

Chauncy, Summer to Essex street 134 

Corning, Shawmut avenue to Washington street 134 

Columbus avenue, Massachusetts avenue to Northampton 

street 135 

Devonshire street, State street to Dock square 135 

Hamburg street. Mystic street to Harrison avenue 135 

Hanover, Tileston to Charter street 135 

K street. East Sixth to East Eighth street 135 

Laconia street, Washington street to Harrison avenue 135 

Lowell, Causeway to Brighton street 136 

Meander, Maiden to East Dedham street 136 

Milk street, Oliver to India street 136 

Mystic, Maiden to East Brookline street 136 

North street. Merchants' Row to Blackstone street 136 

Norwich street. Mystic to Meander street 137 

Ohio street, Washington street to Shawmut avenue 137 

Pine street, Washington street to Harrison avenue 137 

St. Martin street. Bunker Hill to Medford street 137 

Taylor, Dwight to Milford street 137 

Water street. Liberty square to Broad street 137 

Winter street, Tremont to Washington street 138 

Grading street railway tracks 141 

West End 141 

West Roxbury and Roslindale Street Railway Co 142 

New Streets 138 

Abbotsford street 338 

Audubon road 138 

Bay State road 138 

Boylston-street extension 138 

Clinton street 139 

Fenelon street 139 

Geneva avenue 139 

Granby street 139 

Greenbrier street 140 

Josephine street 140 

Lauriat avenue 140 

Morse street 140 

St. Alphonsiis street 140 

Wilder street 141 

Surveys, plans and estimates, miscellaneous streets 142 

CiTT Engineers, 1850-1896 163 



184 City Document No. 10. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PAGE 

Park Department: Table showing principal items of work com- 
pleted on the several parks to Jan. 31, 1897 128 

Water-works: Diagrams showing rainfall and daily average con- 
sumption for each month 84 

Water-works : Diagrams showing the heights of Sudbury-river reser- 
voirs, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, Farm pond, Cochituate and Mystic lakes, 
and the rainfall on the Sudbiiry-river water-shed during the year 
1896 76 



APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. — Table showing the widths of openings for vessels 

in all bridges provided with draws 154 

B. — Table of accident and other plans made for the Law 

Department 156 

C. — Table of surveys, plans and profiles made by Survey- 

ing Division 159 

D. — Edgestone and sidewalk assessment plans made for 

the Paving Division, Street Department 169 

E. — List of streets where lot frontages have been obtained 

for Sewer Division, Street Department, for sewer ■ 

assessments 171 

F. — Engineering Department property schedule 174 

G. — Elevations referred to Boston City base 175 

H. — Engineering Department annual reports, 1867-1897 . . - 176 



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