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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



BOSTON 



FOR THE YEAR 1908 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1909 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER 

BOSTON 



Comphments of 



illiam larhson, 

City Engineer. 



CITY OF BOSTON 

rniNTlNG DErARTA'iEMT 

TQno 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1908-1909. 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, February 1, 1909. 

Hon. George A. Hibbard, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — The following report of the expenses and operation 
of this department for the year ending January 31, 1909, is 
submitted. 

The duties of the City Engineer include the designing and 
superintending of the construction of new bridges, retaining 
walls, city wharves and such other public engineering works 
as the City Council may authorize; the making of such sur- 
vey plans, estimates, statements and descriptions and taking 
such levels as the city government or any of its departments 
or committees may require; the custody of all surveys and 
plans relating to the laying out, locating anew, altering, 
widening or discontinuing of streets, and the new engineering 
construction for all departments of the city. He shall be 
consulted on all work where the advice of a civil engineer 
would be of service. The office of the City Engineer was 
established by ordinance on October 31, 1850, and by chapter 
449 of the Acts of 1895. 



2 City Document No. 16. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses from 
February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 

Amount of department appropriation for 1908- 

1909 . $80,000 00 

Revenue 98 07 



Total $80,098 07 

Amount expended for 1908-1909 .... 78,081 56 

Unexpended balance $2,016 51 



Statement of Expenditures, Department Appropriation. 

(As per Auditor's Report, page 59.) 
Salaries: 

Engineer, William Jackson (paid 

as Acting Superintendent of 

Street Department, April 6 to 

13, 1908, inclusive) . . . $5,866 67 
Assistant engineer, draughtsmen 

and assistants .... 66,326 14 

$72,192 81 

Traveling expenses 1,232 87 

Automobile repairs, supplies and storage . . 847 38 

Instruments, tools and repairs .... 797 98 

Horse-keeping 701 50 

Telephone service 540 87 

Blueprinting and photographing .... 455 85 

Stationery 416 50 

Printing 272 05 

Binding and plans 226 40 

Books and papers 161 56 

Washing and small supplies 159 74 

Typewriting 37 34 

Furniture and office expenses 20 81 

Messenger service 17 90 

$78,081 56 



Abolishment of Grade Crossings. 

Congress Street. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Auditing $13 38 

Expended previous to 1908 1,672,011 36 

$1,672,024 74 



Engineering Department. 3 

Dorchester Avenue. 
Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Land-taking $1,620 01 

Expended previous to 1908 1,054,487 26 

$1,056,107 27 

Dudley Street. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Land damages .... $5,325 73 
Relocating water pipes . . . 5,158 42 

Expert services . . . . 100 00 

Auditing 65 00 



Expended previous to 1908 


$10,649 15 
. 183,853 95 




$194,503 10 


East Boston. 


Expenditures from Fel^ruary 1 


, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 


Items of expenditure: 




Paving, fences, etc. 


$5,354 43 


Land damages 


3,028 95 


Engineering . 


1,306 04 


Apprizal services . 


1,445 00 


Inspection .... 


595 00 


Relocating water pipes . 


325 28 


Advertising .... 


12 40 




afi o OR? 10 






Expended previous to 1908 


. 363,158 02 




$375,225 12 



Freeport, Walnut and Other Streets. 
Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Land damages .... $29,950 00 
Apprizal services .... 5,855 00 

Photographs 50 50 

$35,855 50 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 31, 1909: 

Items of expenditure: 

Draw machinery .... $853 69 

Drawtenders' house . . . 401 52 

Legal expenses .... 393 75 



$1,648 96 

Expended previous to 1908 537,615 96 

$539,264 92 



City Document No. 16. 



BoYLSTON Street Bridge. 



Appropriation . 








$60,000 00 


Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 




31, 1909: 




Items of expenditure: 




Rebuilding bridge .... $54,872 45 




Engineering . 






3,303 28 




Alteration of parapet 






720 00 




Paving, etc. 






652 53 




New parapet stones 






304 17 




Printing . 






63 04 




Inspection 






57 50 




Advertising 






27 03 








$60,000 00 




Chelsea Street Bridge. 




Appropriation 


$75,000 00 


Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 




31, 1909: 




Items of expenditure: 




Draw pier and footbridge . . $8,636 18 




Kemoving old draw 




1,185 00 




Engineering . 






204 50 




Inspection 






168 00 




Advertising . 






55 60 




Printing . 






41 44 




Photographs . 






4 50 








10,295 22 




Unexpended balance February 1, 1909 . 


$64,704 78 


Congress Street Bridge. 




Appropriation . 








$35,000 00 



Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 

31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Rebuilding bridge .... $6,413 32 

Draw machinery .... 2,975 00 

Engineering 

Inspection 

Printing . 

Advertising 

Photographs 



Unexpended balance February 1, 1909 



410 00 


280 00 


58 


57 


53 


42 


18 


00 



10,208 31 
$24,791 69 



Engineering Department. 



Huntington Avenue Bridge. 

Appropriation $55,000 00 

Expenditures from February 1, 1908, to January 

31, 1909: 
Items of expenditure: 

Engineering $394 84 

Advertising 16 90 

Photographs 6 00 







lii i-i 


Unexpended balance February 1, 1909 


$54,582 26 


Northern Avenue and Sleeper Street. 


Expenditures from February 1, 1908, 


to January 31, 1909: 


Items of expenditure: 






Draw span and spans 1, 2, 3 . 


$68,861 81 




Draw machinery .... 


35,421 61 




Sea wall at docks 2 and 3 


32,478 07 




Flooring draw span and spans 1 , 2, 3, 


19,700 36 




Paving, fences, etc. 


14,887 51 




Engineering 


8,471 04 




Power plant and drawtenders' 






house 


4,745 40 




Draw foundation and South Bos- 






ton abutment .... 


4,248 00 




Sea wall at dock 1 .... 


3,506 28 




Inspection 


3,230 60 




Rent of office 


376 70 




Light and power .... 


335 27 




Advertising 


235 99 




Land-taking 


226 28 




Printing 


197 96 




Telephone 


38 20 


$196,961 08 






Expended previous to 1908 


• 


565,218 61 
$762,179 69 


Massachusetts Avenue Bridge. 




Appropriation 




$40,000 00 


Expenditures from February 1, 1908, 


to January 




31, 1909: 






Items of expenditure: 






Rebuilding bridge .... 


$19,079 24 




Engineering 


1,244 48 




Printing 


62 90 




Inspection 


56 00 




Advertising 


50 08 


20,492 70 






Unexpended balance February 1, 1909 




$19,507 30 



6 City Document No. 16. 

Bridges. 

The annual inspection of all highway and foot bridges has 
been made, together with special examinations when notified 
by the Deputy Superintendent of Bridges of the progress of 
repairs. 

The management of all the bridges and draws between 
Cambridge and Boston, by the Acts of 1898, chapter 467, is 
vested in a board of two commissioners, which has charge of 
the following seven bridges, viz.: Brookline Street, Cam- 
bridge, Cambridge Street, Harvard, North Harvard Street, 
Prison Point, and Western Avenue to Cambridge; one-half 
the cost of the maintenance of these bridges is paid by each 
of these cities. 

Four bridges have been removed during the year: Elm- 
wood Street Bridge, Keyes Street Bridge, Linden Park 
Street Bridge, all over Stony brook, and Southampton 
Street, west of Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

In the list of bridges those marked with a star (*) are over 
navigable waters, and are each provided with a draw, the 
openings of which are shown in a table in Appendix A. 

I. — Bridges Wholly Supported by Boston. 

Agassi z road, in the Fens. 

Allston Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 

Arborway Bridge, in Ai-borway, over Stony brook. 

Ashland street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R., West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R.*R. 
* Atlantic avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Audubon road, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Baker street, at Brook Farm, West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to the Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bennington street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R., 

East Boston. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bernier Street Footbridge, in the Riverway. 
Berwick Park Footbridge, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 
Blakemore street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., West Roxbury. 
Bolton street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Boylston street, in the Fens. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bridle path, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 



Engineering Department. 7 

* Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brooks street, over Brooks street, Brighton. 

B}Ton street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 

* Castle Island Footbridge, from Marine Park, South Boston, 
to Castle Island. 

Charlesgate, over Boston & Albany R. R., in the Fens. 
Charlesgate, over Ipswich street, in the Fens. 

* Charlestown Bridge, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea Bridge, South, over South channel. Mystic river. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Circuit di'ive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin Park. 
Columbia road, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 
Columbia road, over Shoreham street. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

* Commercial point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 
Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens. 

* Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cottage Farm Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 
Cottage Street Footbridge, over flats. East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany R. R. and Providence 
Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

* Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 
EUicott arch, in Franklin Park. 

Fen Bridge, in the Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

Florence street, over Stony brook. 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin Park. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Providence Division, 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Gold street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook. 
Ipswich street, over waterway, in the Fens. 
Irvington Street Footbridge, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 

* L street, over Reserved channel. South Boston. 
Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park. 

* Maiden Bridge, from Charlestown to Everett. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 



8 City Document No. 16. 

* Mount Washington avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Newton street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 

Northern avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

Public Garden Footbridge. 

Scarboro' Pond Footbridge, in Franklin Park. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. and Provi- 
dence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Southampton street, east of Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. 
& H. R. R. 

Summer street, over A street, South Boston, 

Summer street, over B street. South Boston. 

Summer street, over C street. South Boston. 

* Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 

* Warren Bridge, Boston to Charlestown. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Providence Division, 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Winthrop Bridge, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 
Wood Island Park Footbridge, over Boston, Revere Beach & 

Lynn R. R. 

II. — Bridges of which Boston Supports the Part 
Within its Limits. 

Belle vue street, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Bemier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea Bridge, North, over North channel, Mystic river. 

* Granite Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Huntington avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Longwood avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway, and 

over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Milton Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset Bridge, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston Pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany R. R. freight tracks. 
Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony 

Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Austin street, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Bennington street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., Mattapan. 
Boston street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 
Brookline street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Brookline street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Cambridge Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 

Railroads. 
Chelsea Bridge, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 
Curtis street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 

* Harvard Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 

Harvard street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R., Dorchester. 
Maverick street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R., near Dorchester station. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R., near Mattapan station. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Oakland street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R., Mattapan. 
Perkins street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 

Railroads, Charlestown. 
Porter street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Prescott street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 

* Prison Point Bridge, Charlestown to Cambridge. 
Saratoga street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Southampton street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y,, N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Summer street, over freight tracks, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Sumner street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Webster Street Footbridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
West Fourth street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., South Boston. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge, 



10 City Document No. 10. 

IV. — Bridges Supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston & Albany R. R. 
Albany street, over passenger tracks. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads. 
Main street, Charlestown. 
Mystic avenue, Charlestown. 

3d. — Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Division. 
Wauwatosa avenue. East Boston. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Everett street, East Boston. 

5th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Midland 

Division. 
Broadway. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Fifth street. 
Fourth street. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Second street. 
Silver street. 
Sixth street. 
Third street. 
Washington street, Dorchester. 

6th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Old Colony 

Division. 
Adams street. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Freeport street. 
Med way street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Providence 

Division. 
Albany street. 

Baker street. West Roxbury. 
Beech street, West Roxbury. 



Engineering Department. 11 

Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 

Berkeley street. 

Broadway. 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 

Castle square. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue. 

Dartmouth street. 

Dudley avenue, West Roxbury. 

Gardner street, West Roxbury. 

Harrison avenue. 

Park street, West Roxbury. 

Washington street. 

V. — Bridge Supported by the Metropolitan Park 

Commission. 

Mattapan Bridge, Dorchester to Milton. 

VI. — Bridge Supported by the Charles River Basin 
Commission. 

* Craigie temporary bridge. 

Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston ... 75 
II. Number of which Boston supports that part 

within its limits 13 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the cost 

of maintenance 33 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany R. R 5 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany R. R., 2 

3. Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Div. . . 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. . . 1 

5. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Midland Div. . 10 

6. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Old Colony Div. . 5 

7. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Providence Div. . 16 
V. Number supported by the Metropolitan Park 

Commission 1 

VI. Number supported by Charles River Basin Com- 
mission 1 

Total 163 



12 City Document No. 16. 

Agassiz Road Bridge {in the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1887 of brick and stone masonry. 
It is maintained by the Park Department and is in good 
condition. 

Albany Street Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R. Freight 
Tracks). 
The original structure was built in 1856-57, and rebuilt 
in 1867-68. The present bridge was built in 1886-87, and 
is maintained in part by the City of Boston and in part by 
the Boston & Albany R. R. An entire new floor system should 
be built for this bridge during the coming season. The 
floor beams and their connections with the trusses are in 
very bad condition and it is probable that some of the lower 
chord bars and diagonals are sonlewhat reduced in section, 

Allston Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The ironwork above 
the floor should be cleaned and painted and the sidewalk plank- 
ing and boxing about the bottom chords should be renewed. 

Arborway Bridge {over Stony Brook, in Arborway, near Forest 
Hills Station). 

This is a wooden bridge resting on abutments of vulcan- ' 
ized spruce piles. The stringers and underplanking are of 
vulcanized hard pine. When this bridge was built, in 1893, 
it was assumed that within ten years the channel of Stony 
brook would be improved at this point, and a temporary 
structure was all that was deemed necessary. Some of the 
piles are now badly decayed and the tops of the stringers 
are poor. During the past year a new deck has been laid 
and some of the stringers have been strengthened. The 
bridge is maintained by the Park Department. 

Ashland Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., West Roxbury). 

The present structure is of iron and was built in 1875. With 
the exception of the fences the bridge is in fair condition. 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Old Colony 
Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a wooden bridge formerly maintained by the rail- 
road company. It was lengthened on the Boston side in 



Engineering Department. 13 

1895, and now the city maintains 75 feet of the northerly 
part. The bridge is in fair condition. 

Athens Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, New 
Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge built in 1874. The sidewalks and 
deck planking should be renewed and the bridge should be 
painted. 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge {over South Terminal Station Yard 
and Fort Point Channel). 

The bridge was completed and opened to travel August 12, 
1907. On the Boston approach is a steel viaduct about 450 
feet in length, consisting of a series of short plate girder and 
I-beam spans of the deck type. The bridge over the railroad 
yard consists of two steel plate girder spans and two steel 
truss spans, all except one plate girder span being through 
spans. Fort Point channel is crossed by one truss span, 
a plate girder span, an I-beam span and a draw span, all 
being deck structures built of steel. The draw span is a 
swing or turntable draw, 184 feet long on center line, operated 
by electricity and compressed air. On the approaches and 
across Fort Point channel the bridge is 50 feet in width; 
over the railroad yard the width is 60 feet. The bridge is 
in good condition. 

Audubon Road Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1893-94, and is 
maintained by the Park Department. The sidewalk plank- 
ing should be renewed and some of the roadway stringers 
should be replaced. The ironwork should be cleaned and 
painted at the same time. 

Austin Street Bridge {over Boston & Maine R.R., Charlestown) . 

This is a steel plate girder deck bridge with steel floor 
beams supporting a wooden flooring, built under the decree 
of the Superior Court abolishing the Austin street grade 
crossing. It was built in 1903-07 by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company and is over the railroad location. The 
bridge has fourteen spans resting on stone piers; it is 50 feet 
wide and has one 10-foot plank sidewalk and a roadway 
39 feet wide, paved with stone blocks. Part of this bridge 
was opened to travel May 6, 1903, being connected to the 
Cambridge end by temporar}^ structures. The entire bridge 



14 City Document No. 16. 

was opened to travel September 17, 1907. The surface of 
the bridge is maintained by the city, the remainder by the 
raih'oad company. The fences should be repaired and 
painted; otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 



Baker Street Bridge {at Brook Farm, West Roxhury) . 

This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet span. 
It is in fair condition. 



Beacon Street Bridge {over Outlet of the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1880-81, and had up to 1901 a 
wooden floor for the roadway. At the latter date a new 
floor was built, consisting of 18-inch steel I-beams incased in 
Portland cement concrete, and the roadway was paved with 
hard pine blocks, treated by the creo-resinate process. The 
bridge is now in good condition. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884-85, widened in 1887-88, 
and the central roadway further widened in 1890 for the con- 
venience and at the expense of the street railway company. 
Attention has been called for several years to the condition 
of this bridge, especially below the flooring. The wooden 
stringers are badly decayed and the underplanking is in 
very poor condition. An entire new flooring should be put 
on this bridge at once and the ironwork thoroughly cleaned 
and painted. When this is done the stringer seats should be 
carefully examined and strengthened where necessary. 

Bellevue Street Bridge {over Muddy River, in Riverway). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 44 feet span and 15 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the park departments of 
Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly by them. 

Bennington Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge built by the railroad 
company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The surface 
of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the 
structure by the railroad company. It is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 15 

Bennington Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & 
Lynn R. R.). 

This bridge is made up of two independent parts; the old 
part is of iron, built in 1889; the new part is of steel, built 
in 1902. The bridge should be painted, the boxing at the 
girder of the south roadway should be renewed and the 
deck planking needs repaii'ing. 

Berkeley Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R. and Provi- 
dence Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.). 

The bridge over the tracks of the Boston & Albany R. R., 
which is maintained by the city, was originally built for the 
Boston Water Power Company, and accepted by the city in 
1869. The present structure over these tracks is a through 
plate girder bridge and was built in 1891. 

Plans are now in preparation for the rebuilding of the floor 
system of this bridge, the Boston Elevated Railway Company 
joining in this work, and when the structure is rebuilt it 
will be of sufficient strength to carry the heavy street car 
traffic. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
was built in 1899 and is maintained by that company. It is 
expected that this bridge will be strengthened for heavy car 
traffic at the same time that the city bridge is rebuilt. 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Bridle Path, in Riverway). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 38 feet 4 inches 
span. It was built in 1893 and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Muddy River). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 52 feet span and 14 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the park departments of 
Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly by them. 

Berwick Park Footbridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1894. The iron stairs 
and piers were new, but the trusses and floor beams were 
those built for Franklin street in 1883. The woodwork has 
been renewed during the past year and the steel work cleaned 
and painted. 



16 City Document No. 16. 



Blakemore Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New York, 
New Haven & HartfordR. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82. New lower plank- 
ing should be put in and the whole bridge should be cleaned 
and painted. 

Blue Hill Avenue Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel bridge built by the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
in 1903 and is over the railioad location. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city, the remainder by the rail- 
road company. The steel work is very rusty in places, and 
the bridge should be painted and the sidewalk planking 
should be patched; othenvise it is in good condition. 

Bolton Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, New 
Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, originally built in 1889 and rebuilt 
in 1905. The upper woodwork needs renewal. 

Boston Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New York 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a plate girder bridge', built in 1900 in connection 
with the abolishment of the grade crossing on Dorchester 
avenue. The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city 
and the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
south sidewalk and the boxing around the girders need repair- 
ing, and the bridge should be painted ; otherwise it is in good 
condition. 

Boylston Street Arch Bridge {in the Fens) . 

^ This is a stone arch bridge, built in 1881. It is in good 
condition, with the exception of coping, which should be 
repointed without further delay. 

Boylston Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
(See page 45.) 

Bridle Path Bridge {over Muddy River, in the Riverway). 

This is a masonry bridge of three arches; the central arch 
is elliptical in form, with a span of 30 feet and a rise of 9 
feet 6 inches; the side arches are semicircular, 15 feet in 



J ^ 
Engineering Department. 17 

diameter. It was built in 1894 and is maintained by the 
Park Department. It is in good condition. 

Broadway Bridge {over Fort Point Channel) . 

The draw was built in 1874-75 and the supports for the 
draw landings are iron columns. The rest of the bridge is 
built of steel on masonry piers, and was rebuilt in 1901-04. 
The gates have been painted and ordinary repairs made. The 
steel work over Foundry street, the plate girders and part 
of the fencing should be painted. Some of the track and 
wheels below the draw need renewal and the planking on the 
pier, waterway and the boxing at the trusses need repairing; 
otherwise the main part of the bridge is in good condition. 
The draw is old and too light for heavy travel and should be 
rebuilt within two years. 

Broadway Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The old bridge, built in 1880-81, was replaced in 1900 by 
the present bridge. New sidewalks have been built during 
the past year, and the ironwork under the walks and the 
fences has been cleaned and painted. The whole bridge, 
however, should be painted and the lower planking of the 
roadways renewed. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884. The railings will 
need painting next year; otherwise the bridge is now in good 
condition. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge {over Muddy River, in the Riverway). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1892 by the park departments of Boston and 
Brookline and is maintained by them jointly. 

Brookline Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

This is a wooden trestle bridge, built on a pile foundation 
in 1906, and is in care of the Commissioners for Boston and 
Cambridge Bridges; the city pays one-half the cost of 
maintenance. It was built as a temporary structure, with 
the expectation that it would be replaced by a permanent 
bridge within ten years. As the bridge is now three years 
old the construction of the permanent bridge should be com- 
menced within a year or two. Additional scuppers are needed 
at both ends of the bridge. It is in good condition. 



18 City Document No. 16. 

Brookline Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, on steel trestles, with 
wooden floor and wearing surface, built in 1906. The sur- 
face of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of 
the structure by the railroad company. It is in good condi- 
tion. 

Brooks Street Bridge {near Faneuil Station, Brighton) . 

This is a steel bridge, with a concrete and asphalt floor, 
built in 1902. The fencing has been painted. The bridge 
should be painted and the roadway surface should be repaired. 

Byron Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. The sidewalks 
have been rebuilt. The stringers and bulkheads are in poor 
condition and the bridge needs a general overhauling. 

Cambridge Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge). 

The new bridge was completed in the fall of 1907, the 
formal dedication having taken place July 31. Since 
December 21, 1907, the bridge has been maintained by the 
Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and 
the city pays one-half of the cost of maintenance. The 
structure is in good condition and needs only the yearly 
cleaning and customary touching up of the paint, which has 
been made unsightly in spots on account of the seepage of 
water. It is of the utmost importance that this bridge 
should be kept properly painted in order that it may not be 
deteriorated by rust. 

Cambridge Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The Boston end was rebuilt in 1884. The draw, sidewalk on 
Boston end and the Cambridge end of the bridge were rebuilt 
in 1890. The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners 
for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The bridge is in poor 
condition and needs extensive repairing. The waterways 
need replanking, especially under the Boston leaf of the 
draw, where the piling needs additional securing; some 
of the piles are in poor condition and need renewal; the 
deck planking has been repaired in spots many times and 
should be entirely renewed and additional stringers added; 



Engineering Department. 19 

one draw arm needs renewal; the fender guards need repair- 
ing. The support to the drawtenders' house needs strengthen- 
ing, and a boat should be provided. Both channel caps and 
several stringers resting on them need renewal. 



Cambridge Street Bridge {over Boston & Maine and 
Boston & Albany Railroads, Charlestown) . 

This is a through steel truss bridge of four spans, built in 
1901 by the Boston & Maine R. R. The surface is maintained 
by the city, the remainder by the railroad company. The 
steel work is very rusty. The bridge should be painted and 
the sidewalk planking should be repaired. 

Castle Island Footbridge {from Marine Park to Castle Island). 

This is a temporary footbridge, built in 1892, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. It connects the Marine 
Park with Castle Island, and is furnished with a draw, so 
that if desired by the United States authorities the island 
can be cut off from the mainland. The draw has been painted 
and repairs have been made on the planking. The fences 
should be painted and more planking should be renewed. 
The bridge is in fair condition. 

Central Avenue Bridge {over Neponset River, Dorchester 
Lower Mills). 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1876. The city 
maintains the part -within its limits. The roadway planking 
and some of the stringers need renewal and the fences need 
painting. 

Charlesgate Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., in the Fens). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. The railings need painting and 
some slight repairing should be done at the end of one of 
them. 

Charlesgate Bridge {over Ipswich street, in the Fens). 

This is a deck plate girder bridge with a buckle plate floor, 
built in 1900-01. The roadway is paved with asphalt and 
the sidewalks with artificial stone. The bridge should be 
painted and the ornamental railings repaired. 



J 



20 City Document No. 16. 

Charlestoivn Bridge {from Boston to Charlestown). 

This bridge was opened to public travel November 27, 
1899, and superseded the old Charles River Bridge, which 
was built in 1785-86. 

The present bridge over the river consists of ten spans of 
the deck plate type, each 85 feet long, and a swdng or turn- 
table draw 240 feet 6 inches long. 

The bridges over Water street and over the railroad tracks 
each consist of two spans of steel I-beams, with brick arches 
turned between the beams. 

The entire bridge and the drawtenders' house should be 
painted, the floor of the draw repaired and new dolphins 
provided. 

Chelsea Bridge {over Boston & Maine R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built by the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road Company in 1894, and is over the railroad location. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, the 
remainder by the railroad company. Repairs have been 
made on the sidewalk planking. The wheel guard is too 
low and narrow; the fences and sidewalk planking need 
repairing and the bridge needs painting; some of the track 
stringers begin to show decay. Otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. 

Chelsea Bridge, North {over North Channel, Mystic River). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure was built in 1802-03. The piles under the main 
bridge were driven in 1880. The upper part of the bridge, 
the draw and draw foundations were built in 1895. The 
draw way was widened to 60 feet in 1900, the draw founda- 
tion being enlarged, the draw lengthened and the draw piers 
built. A new truck has been furnished and miscellaneous 
repairs made. The sidewalk and roadway planking on the 
draw need renewal and some stringers should be added. 
The steel floor beams should be strengthened and new machin- 
ery should be provided; several truck wheels need renewing; 
an additional bearing should be provided at the skew end; 
the sides of the waterway need extensive repairing; the 
entire bridge should be painted; the track stringers and the 
fences should be repaired; the old fender guards are in poor 
condition. 



Engineering Department. 21 

Chelsea Bridge, South {over South Channel, Mystic River). 
This is a pile bridge wdth an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-03. The piles of the present bridge 
were driven and the draw was built in 1877. That part of 
the bridge above the girder caps was rebuilt at a higher grade 
and the draw was raised in 1895. Repairs are needed on the 
track and draw rest. Where the rebuilding of 1895 joins the 
old work repairs are needed on both sides of the bridge. 
The draw is too light for the present travel; the bridge should 
be rebuilt. 

Chelsea Street Bridge {from East Boston to Chelsea). 
This bridge was destroyed by the Chelsea fire of April 12, 
1908, and foot travel is maintained over a temporary struc- 
ture. (See page 54.) 

Circuit Drive Bridge {over Scarboro' Pond, in Franklin Park). 
This is an elliptical masonry arch of 30 feet span and 6 
feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is maintained 
by the Park Department. 

Columbia Road Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a deck plate girder bridge of two equal spans, one 
over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., and the other 
over Old Colony avenue, and was built in 1902. The road- 
way is paved with Canton brick, cement grout joints, and 
laid on hard pine planking. The sidewalks are badly cracked 
and should be put in good condition. The whole bridge 
should be painted at once. 

Columbia Road Bridge {over Shoreham street) . 
This bridge was built in 1902. It is a two-span steel 
beam structure, with brick and concrete arches turned 
between the beams; the roadway is paved with Canton brick 
laid with cement grout joints. The sidewalk is of artificial 
stone. The girders and all the exposed steel work are rusting 
badly and should be painted this year not only for appearance 
but to prevent the corrosion of the structure. 

Columbus Avenue Bridges {over Boston & Albany R. R. and 
Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R. R.). 
The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was built in 
1876-77 and is maintained by the city. In 1899 the bridge 



22 City Document No. 16. 

was shortened 11 feet at its south end and a pier built in 
place of the old south abutment. Some painting has been done 
during the past year, and the bridge is now in fair condition. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
was built in 1899 and is maintained by that company. 

Commercial Point or Tenean Bridge {Dorchester) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The piles were driven in 1875. The draw and upper part of 
the bridge were rebuilt in 1901. The fencing should be 
repaired and painted. The bridge is otherwise in fair condi- 
tion. 

Commonwealth Avenue Bridge {in the Fens). 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1881-82. It has 
been sheathed during the past year and is now in good 
condition, with the exception of the paint; the whole bridge 
should be painted. It is maintained by the Park Depart- 
ment. 

Congress Street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron turntable draw 
on a stone foundation, and was built in 1874-75. The 
upper part of the bridge and the draw span have been 
repaired during the year and it is expected that the draw 
pier will be put in good condition the coming season. (See 
page 55.) 

Cottage Farm Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton). 

The present bridge was built in 1895-96. With the excep- 
tion of the plate girders on the outside lines of the bridge 
and some special construction under the sidewalks, the 
superstructure is composed of 20-inch steel beams, filled 
between with brick arches and Portland cement concrete, on 
which is a wearing surface of Sicilian rock asphalt. The 
intown girders should be painted. The bridge is in good 
condition. 

Cottage Street Footbridge {over Flats, East Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, built in 1889, for foot travel. 
It was extensively repaired in 1905. As the filling at the 
southeriy end of the bridge had been carried out for quite a 
distance, about 400 feet of the bridge have been removed. 
The sheathing needs repairing and the fences should be 
painted. 



Engineering Department. 23 

Craigie Temporary Bridge. 

This is a wooden pile bridge built by the Charles River 
Basin Commission to accommodate travel during the con- 
struction of the Charles River Dam. It was opened to travel 
July 2, 1905. It is in the care of the commission and is in 
good condition. 

Curtis Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R.R., East Boston). 

This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. It was 
opened to travel December 29, 1906. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. The bridge is in good condition. 

Dartmouth Street Bridges (over Boston & Albany R. R. and 
Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford R. R.). 

The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was built 
in 1878-79 and is maintained by the city. Very extensive 
changes were made in this bridge in 1899 by the railroad 
companies, necessitated by the new location of the tracks of 
the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. leading to the South Station and 
the abandoning of the tracks connecting this road with the 
Boston & Albany R. R. Some of the hangers and the 
bottom flanges of the floor beams over the main tracks have 
been reduced in section so materially by the corrosive action 
of the fumes from the locomotives that it will be necessary 
to rebuild portions of this bridge within the next two years. 
The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. was 
built in 1899 and is maintained by the railroad company. 
The asphalt surface at its northerly end is poor. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile iron 
draw, and was rebuilt in 1891-92. The entire bridge should 
be painted. The sidewalk planking and a few curb stringers 
on the draw should be renewed, the sills and planking on 
the wharves, waterway and piers need renewal and additional 
supports are needed under the house; some of the spurshores 
have begun to decay and should be refitted; the waterway 
should be repaired, the gates should be rebuilt and the wreck- 
age among the pihng should be removed. 



24 City Document No. 16. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1900, over the new location 
of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. The surface of the bridge is 
maintained by the city and the rest of the structure by the 
railroad company. The bridge should be painted; the side- 
walk planking and boxing around the girders need repairing; 
otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Dover Street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This was originally a wooden pile bridge, built in 1805, 
rebuilt in 1858-59, and again in 1876. In 1893-94, upon 
the abolition of the grade crossing of the Old Colony R. R., 
the present iron structure, resting on masonry piers, was 
built. Miscellaneous repairs have been made. The side- 
walk planking on the draw needs renewal; the bridge should 
be painted; some new track is needed for the draw; the rack 
should be adjusted in order that the draw may be reversed; 
the concrete of the draw foundation pier should be repaired 
and the other piers should be repointed; the planking on 
the wharves is in poor condition and the greater part should 
be renewed. The waterway needs repairing. The sidewalk 
needs resurfacing. 

EUicott Arch Bridge {in Franklin Park) . 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 17 feet 6 inches 
span. It was built in 1889 and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 

Everett Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1891 by the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company. The bridge has been cleaned and painted 
during the year. New floors have been laid on the roadway 
and sidewalks, and the bridge is now in good condition. 

Fen Bridge {in the Fens). 
This bridge was built in 1891-93. It is in good condition. 

Ferdinand Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. In 1899 this bridge 
was shortened about 3 feet at its southerly end and the 



Engineering Department. 25 

old south abutment replaced by a brick pier. The bridge 
has been cleaned and painted and new sidewalks built. The 
angle seats were found to be in so poor a condition that it 
was not deemed safe to rest the new stringers on them. By 
raising the surface of the walk about 2 inches the stringers 
were placed on the upper flanges of the sidewalk brackets. 



Florence Street Bridge {over Stony Brook). 

This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet span, and 
is in fair condition. 



Forest Hills Entrance Bridge (in Franklin Park). 

This bridge was built in 1894-95. It is maintained by 
the Park Department and is in good condition. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1904. It should be 
painted. 

Gold Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, New 
Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This bridge was built in 1895, replacing a footbridge which 
was built in 1890; the sidewalk planking should be renewed, 
the fences need repairing, the bridge should be painted and 
the walls need some pointing; otherwise the bridge is in good 
condition. 

Granite Bridge {fro?n Dorchester to Milton). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. The bridge 
was originally built in 1837. The draw and the adjoining 
bay were repaired in 1907; the remainder of the bridge is 
in poor condition and should be rebuilt, and the abutment 
should be repaired. 

Harvard Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge) . 

This is an iron bridge with an iron turntable draw, and 
was built in 1887-91. This bridge is in the care of the 
Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and 
the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. 



26 City Document No. 16. 

The roadway of the fixed spans was repaired in 1901-02 
and a wooden block paving laid. In 1905 the asphalt walks 
were replaced by 3-inch hard pine and the railings were 
painted. The roadway stringers on the draw span and the 
lower planking are in very bad condition. The stringers are 
those put in when the bridge was built, and only a small 
amount of patching has been done to the lower planking. 
Attention has been called to the condition of the floor for 
several years, and now it has reached a state where it is not 
safe for the heavy loads which pass over it. It is recom- 
mended that a new deck be put on at once. The draw 
fender pier should be replanked and the entire bridge painted. 
During the past year the masonry piers have been repointed. 

Harvard Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., Dorchester). 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1904, under an agreement 
between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. It 
needs painting, but is otherwise in good condition. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is one of the oldest bridges in the city, having been 
built in 1872. An appropriation has been made for building 
a new bridge and plans are in progress for a deck plate girder 
bridge incased in concrete. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge {over Muddy River). 

This is a semicircular masomy arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1893 and is maintained by the park depart- 
ments of Boston and Brookline. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge {over Stony Brook). 

This is a stringer bridge of 19 feet 9 inches clear span 
measured at right angles, and was built in 1904. It is in 
good condition. 

Ipswich Street Bridge {over Waterway, in the Fens). 

The bridge was built in 1898, and is in good condition, 
except the railings, which should be painted. 

Irvington Street Footbridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron footbridge and -was built in 1892. An 
examination of this bridge made in the spring of 1908 showed 



Engineering Department. 27 

that the diagonal truss members where they were connected 
with the bottom chord were so badly corroded as to render the 
bridge unsafe for travel. These were at once strengthened, 
a new floor laid and the whole bridge cleaned and painted. 
The bridge is now in good condition. 

L Street Bridge {over Reserved Channel, South Boston) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron retractile draw. 
It was built in 1892. Some of the piling in the fender guards 
and under the 6-foot walk needs renewal; the bridge should 
be painted; the draw should be redecked; the planking on the 
waterways, piers and wharves needs repairing; additional 
stringers are needed near the engine house and the asphalt 
walks need repairing. 

Leverett Pond Footbridge (in Leverett Park). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 24 feet span and 5 feet 
5 inches rise. It was built in 1894, and is maintained by the 
Park Department. 

Longwood Avenue Bridge {over Muddy River and Boston & 
Albany R. R.). 

The original wooden structure was built in 1857, and 
rebuilt in 1877. The present masonry arches were erected 
in 1899 by the park departments of Boston and Brookline, 
and are maintained jointly by them. 

Maiden Bridge {from Charlestown to Everett). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a retractile steel di-aw, 
and was rebuilt in 1900-01. The paving has been repaired 
and other ordinary repairs have been made; the planking on 
the di'aw needs renewal and about 50 feet of fence should 
be built on the wing of the abutment at the Charlestown 
end. The bridge should be painted, the w^alks resurfaced 
and some of the capsills on the pier renewed. The bridge is 
otherwise in good condition. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
(See page 66.) 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1876. The woodwork was 
renewed in 1901 and the ironwork cleaned and painted. 



28 City Document No. 16. 

The roadways carrying street cars have been strengthened 
durmg the year by the Boston Elevated Railway Company. 
The other roadway and the sidewalks should have new floors, 
and the whole bridge should be painted. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 

This is a three-arch bridge of Melan construction, with 
granite facing. It was built in 1902 by the Metropolitan 
Park Commission and is maintained by it. The arches are 
semicircular, two spans being 14 feet and one 50 feet; the 
bridge has one 56-foot roadway and two 12-foot sidewalks. 
It is in good condition. 

Maverick Street Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston). 

This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest 
of the structure by the railroad company. The fence should 
be painted. The bridge is in good condition. 

Meridian Street Bridge {from East Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a wooden turntable 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was built 
in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was widened 
and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, which was built in 
1875-76. The chords of the draw were rebuilt in 1896. The 
main part of the bridge was strengthened for the use of 
heavy electrics in 1906, and the draw was repaired and 
strengthened in 1907. The draw should be adjusted. The 
roadway planking, the waterways and the pier are in very 
poor condition. The bridge should be rebuilt within two 
years. 

Milton Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure is very old. It was widened in 1871-72. The 
older part of this bridge was built of stone, and the widening 
is an iron structure on stone columns. The westerly side- 
walk was rebuilt on new u-on girders and floor beams in 
1900. The old planking on the bridge should be uncovered 
and examined and it will probably need renewal. The 
bridge should be painted and the sidewalk planking on the 
downstream side of the bridge should be renewed, the fence 



Engineering Department. 29 

should be refastened, the fascia needs repah'ing and one of the 
capstones over the first waterway is cracked. 

Mt. Washington Avenue Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw. It was 
built in 1854, and rebuilt in 1870-71. It has been closed 
to travel since the summer of 1904 and will probably be 
entirely removed during the coming season. 

Neponset Bridge (frofr) Dorchester to Quincy) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The original 
structure was built in 1802, and the present one in 1877; 
the draw and upper woodwork of the bridge and piers are in 
poor condition; the bridge should be rebuilt at once. 

Neptune Road Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R.R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1887-88, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. The sidewalk planking needs 
patching and the bridge should be painted. 

Newton Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1872. It was cleaned and 
painted in 1902 and a new deck put on. The fences are 
poor and the angle seats for the roadway stringers are some- 
what reduced in section. This bridge is one of the oldest 
in the city but can probably be maintained in safe condition 
for five years longer if the deck is kept in good condition 
and the angle seats strengthened. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Dorchester Station). 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1905, under an agreement 
between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 
The bridge should be painted and the adjoining temporary 
fences should be replaced by permanent ones. The bridge 
is in good condition. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Mattapan Station). 

This is a through lattice girder bridge, and was built by 
the railroad company in 1902. The surface of the bridge is 
maintained by the city and the rest of the structure by the 



30 City Document No. 16. 

railroad company. The sidewalk planking needs repairing; 
otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

North Beacon Street Bridge {from Brighton to Watertown) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. The original 
structure was built in 1822, and the present one in 1884. 
The bridge is in poor condition. It should be rebuilt without 
a draw. 

North Harvard Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

This bridge was originally built in 1662, and was rebuilt, 
except the piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 1891. The 
bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for the Boston 
and Cambridge Bridges; the city pays one-half the cost of 
maintenance. The bridge is in very poor condition, and the 
building of a new bridge should be commenced at once. 

Oakland Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a new steel plate girder bridge, built by the railroad 
company in 1902 under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing the grade crossing at this point. The surface of 
the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the 
structure by the railroad company. The bridge should be 
painted and the sidewalk planking renewed. 

Perkins Street Footbridge {over Boston & Maine R. R. and 
Boston & Albany R. R., in Charlestown) . 

This bridge was built in 1900 and opened to travel Feb- 
ruary 2, 1901; it has two spans of wooden stringers and one 
of steel Pratt trusses. The surface is maintained by the 
city, the rest of the structure by the railroad companies. 
Some of the plate treads were very much worn and have 
been replaced by wood. The fencing should be repaired and 
the bridge painted; otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Porter Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston). 

This is a through steel truss bridge, built in 1906-07 by 
the railroad company under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. It is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 31 

Prescott Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston). 
This is a new through steel plate girder bridge, built by 
the railroad company in 1906-07 under the decree of the 
Superior Court abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the 
rest of the structure by tnts. railroad company. It is in good 
condition. 

Prison Point Bridge {from Charlestown to Cambridge). 

This bridge includes a steel draw and its landings and was 
built in 190^7 . The original bridge was built in 1833. The 
bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for the Boston and 
Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays one-half the cost of 
maintenance. The main shaft needs readjusting and the 
lower box should be held more securely in its proper position ; 
the machinery should be housed in, a new drawtenders' house 
should be provided and part of the old pier should be rebuilt. 

Public Garden Footbridge. 
This is an iron bridge and was built in 1867. The entire 
woodwork of this bridge should be renewed this season if it 
is proposed to keep the present structure in service. If 
nothing more is done at the present time, such of the stringers 
as are in poor condition should be replaced at once. 

Saratoga Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston) . 
This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built in 1907 by 
the railroad company under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. It is in good condition. 

Scarboro' Pond Footbridge {in Franklin Park). 
This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 feet span and 8 feet 
3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is maintained by the 
Park Department. 

Shawmut Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R. and 
Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford 
R.R.). 
The original bridge built in 1871 was removed and a new 

through plate girder bridge erected in 1904. The bridge is 

in good condition but should be painted. 



/ 



32 City Document No. 16. 

Southampton Street Bridge (over South Bay Sluice) . 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1875 as a temporary 
structure. It is in very poor condition and should be rebuilt. 

Southampton Street Bridge (over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1901-02. The 
surface is maintained by the city, the rest of the structure by 
the railroad company. The deck planking and boxing around 
the girders need renewal and the bridge should be painted; 
otherwise it is in good condition. 

Spring Street Bridge (from West Roxhury to Dedham). 

This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part within 
its limits. The piers and arches were pointed in 1905 and 
granite copings, surmounted by iron railings, built on both 
sides of the bridge. The part within the city's limits is now 
in good condition, but the railings should be painted the 
coming summer. 

Summer Street Bridges (over A, B and C Streets). 

These bridges were built in connection with the abolition 
of the grade crossing on Congress street, and were opened to 
travel in 1900. The bridge over A street is a steel deck plate 
girder structure, with a paved roadway of granite blocks and 
asphalt sidewalks. 

The bridge over B street is a through plate girder structure, 
with a paved roadway of granite blocks and asphalt side- 
walks. 

The bridge over C street is a two-span steel beam structure, 
with brick and concrete arches turned between the beams; 
the roadway is paved with granite blocks and the sidewalks 
with asphalt. 

Considerable painting has been done on these bridges during 
the past year and they are now in good condition. 

Summer Street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was built in 1899-1900, in connection with the 
abolition of the grade crossing on Congress street. It is a 
four-span deck plate girder bridge, resting on masonry piers, 
with two retractile draws over a 50-foot channelway. The 
roadway of the fixed spans has a granite block paving, and 
the sidewalks have asphalt wearing surfaces. The whole 



Engineering Department. 33 

structure is in good condition, but should be painted during 
the year and new lower deck laid on the draw spans. 

Summer Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven & Hartford 
R. R. Freight Tracks). 

This bridge was built in 1900, in connection with the 
abolition of the grade crossing on Congress street, and is 
maintained by the city and the railroad company, the former 
maintaining the wearing surface and the latter maintaining 
the rest of the structure. It has four spans, consisting of 
three through trusses each, and has a granite paved roadway 
and asphalt sidewalks. The whole bridge has been painted 
by the railroad company and is now in good condition with 
the exception of the sidewalks. New walks should be built 
or the present walks resurfaced. 

Sumner Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston). 

This is a new through steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1908 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The 
bridge was opened to travel of all kinds June 22, 1908. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest 
of the structure by the railroad company. 

Warren Bridge {from Boston to Charlestown) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile iron 
draw. The present structure was built in 1883-84. Half 
the draw has been redecked and miscellaneous repairs have 
been made. Some of the piles under the wharf are broken; 
the fender guards on the Charlestown side are in poor condi- 
tion, and repairs are needed on the deck planking of the main 
bridge; the planking on the waterway, wharves and in draw 
pit need repairing; the landing shoes should be set; the 
sidew^alk on the westerly side of the bridge, city ends, should 
be extended about twenty feet, and the concrete sidewalks 
should be repaired; the curb on the draw should be realigned, 
and some of the fence posts need renewal. 

Webster Street Footbridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston) . 

This is a new through steel truss bridge, built by the rail- 
road company in 1908 under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The surface 



34 City Document No. 16. 

of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the 
structure by the raih'oad company. 

West Fourth Street Bridge (over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R). 

In 1893-94 the grade crossing of the Old Colony R. R. on 
this street was abolished, and an iron bridge built, extending 
from the end of Dover Street Bridge, at the South Boston side 
of Fort Point channel, to the easterly Hne of Foundry street. 
The surface is maintained by the city, the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. The planking around the middle 
trusses needs renewal, the bridge needs painting and the 
sidewalk plank needs patching. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge {over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, built in 1882. It is now in fair 
condition, with the exception of the stair treads, which are 
badly worn. 

Western Avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

The present bridge was built in 1879-80 and the draw in 
1891. It is in the care of the Commissioners for the Boston 
and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays one-half the cost 
of maintenance. New stringers have been put beside the 
draw arms on the Cambridge side. The deck planking on the 
Cambridge side needs renewal. The Boston end is in poor 
condition, the channel cap and some of the piles and stringers 
need renewal, the draw needs adjusting, the side beams need 
refastening, the piers, fender-guards and waterways need 
repairing and the headers on both leaves of the draw need 
renewal. 

Western Avenue Bridge (Brighton to Watertown). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This is a 
wooden pile bridge, with an iron draw, and was rebuilt in 
1892-93. Only minor repairs have been made; the Boston 
end of the draw should be raised; the draw should be adjusted; 
and the bearings under the ends of the girders should be 
renewed; the planking and capsills on the piers and along 
the waterways should be repaired; some of the spurshores 
are broken and should be refitted; the sidewalk planking and 
deck planking on draw and main bridge need renewal, also 
some of the planking on the draw foundation, and the bridge 



Engineering Department. 35 

should be painted this year; some of the piles in the fender 
guard are in poor condition. 

Winthrop Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge without a draw. It was originally 
built in 1839; it was rebuilt in 1851, and was extensively 
repaired in 1870 and has been repaired many times since. 
The abutment at the Winthrop end needs pinning up, as 
there has been some settlement; the bulkhead at the Boston 
end, some of the outside bolsters and the roadway planking 
are in very poor condition. Some of the piles are somewhat 
eaten by worms; the piles in deep water should be examined 
by a diver, and additional piles may be needed. The water- 
way should be partially filled, and the bridge should be rebuilt 
of a shorter length. 

Wood Island Park Footbridge. 

This is a steel footbridge, built in 1898-99, and connects 
Prescott street, East Boston, with Wood Island Park, span- 
ning the tracks of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
The bridge has been painted and is now in good condition. 

Bridges wholly Supported by Railroad Corporations. 

Harrison avenue Bridge, over the Boston & Albany R. R. 
is in poor condition and should be rebuilt. The other high- 
way bridges maintained by the several railroad companies are 
in good or fair condition. 



36 City Document No. 16. 



SURVEYING DIVISION. 



The work of the Surveying Division during the past year 
has consisted of the making of such surveys and plans as have 
been required by the several city departments, and giving 
lines and grades of public streets when requested by abutters 
intending to build. 

* Forty-five petitions requesting that catch-basins should 
be constructed were reported upon to the Sewer Division. 

* Sixty-five plans of streets showing proposed locations for 
future catch-basins were furnished on request of the Sewer 
Division. 

* Fifty-three catch-basins were staked out on request of 
the Sewer Division and duplicate sketches showing locations 
of spikes, ties, etc., were furnished. 

* Measurements have been obtained on 106 streets for the 
Sewer Division, for the purpose of making sewer assessments. 

* One hundred and fifty-four plans of proposed under- 
ground pipes, conduits, etc., were examined for the Sewer 
Division, and locations for proposed future catch-basins were 
marked on plans. 

Two hundred and thirty-one notices of contracts to lay 
artificial stone sidewalks were received, lines and grades 
were marked, the work measured when completed and 
reported upon to the Street Department. In eighty-eight 
cases the Street Department was notified that the existing 
edgestones should be reset preparatory to the laying of arti- 
ficial stone. 

Fifty-nine notices of the completion of repairs to artificial 
stone sidewalks were received, the work measured and 
reported upon to the Street Department. 

Thirty petitions to make sidewalk openings for areas, bulk- 
heads, etc., were received from the Street Department and 
reported upon. 

One hundred and ten requests for edgestone were exam- 
ined and the amount required reported upon to the Street 
Department. 

Sidewalk grades for forty-one streets were furnished engi- 
neers and architects for plans of twenty-three new buildings. 

Six plans of streets were made for sidewalk assessments on 

* This work was performed jointly b> the Engineering and Street Laying-Out 
Departments. 



Engineering Department. 



37 



request of the Street Department. Data was also furnished 
the Street Department for sidewalk assessment on four estates. 

Fifteen hundred and seventy orders were attended to for 
the Paving Division; these consisted of staking out new 
streets for construction, giving lines and grades for repairs 
and reconstruction of old streets, testing lines and grades 
after completion of work, and measuring the amount of work 
performed and making plans showing quantities to be assessed 
upon abutting owners. 

Estimates for grade, land and building damages and cost 
of construction were furnished the Street Commissioners on 
thirty-five streets. 

The lines and grades of twelve streets, for which the Street 
Commissioners were petitioned for authority to open as 
private ways, were examined and reported upon. 

* Fifty-two miscellaneous reports were made to the Sewer 
Division. 

Twenty-nine miscellaneous reports were made to the Street 
Department. 

The following table gives the comparative annual amounts 
of paving work measured by the Surveying Division of the 
Engineering Department for fifteen years: 



Year Ending 
January 31. 






ll. 


■o'> 


ll 


hi 






o a 


|ii. 


£§> 


gl 




S-id 


£a> 




r- 


|«£ 


r 


r 


nS6 


r 


1895 


23,487 


12,007 


5,175 


6,168 


3,962 


11,738 


1.406 


1896 


129,383 


60,472 


32,940 


68,701 


12,296 


183 


1,297 


1897 


120,158 


64,952 


24,976 


68,178 


13,471 


2,971 


394 


1898 


154,718 


100,414 


36,658 


94,003 


13,599 


4,019 


27 










43,930 
48,946 


11,652 
14.221 


1,619 

789 




1900 


86,354 


60,803 


17,323 


16 


1901 


264,982 


161,428 


61,356 


147,863 


16,541 


489 


2,377 


1902 


245,410 


188,041 


30,324 


131,487 


15,565 


698 




1903 


104,133 


135,310 


5,077 


59,051 


14,119 


25 




1904 


60,555 


65,474 


4,815 


29,078 


12,806 


248 


62 


1905 


30,899 


54,455 


184 


16,268 


9,906 


196 




1906 


67,114 


65.132 


1,264 


27,544 


12,981 


3,551 




1907 


140,878 


101,118 


17,390 


82,044 


20,135 


3,716 




1908 


52,380 


76.216 


3 386 


30,339 


16,635 


1,926 




1909 


1,743 


6,706 


742 


1,423 


14,846 


83 





* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out 
Departments. 



38 



City Document No. 16. 



Table showing the amount of paving work measured by the 
Surveying Division for the year ending January 31, 1909, by 
districts : 





1 
•-5 


P- 


i 


o . 

pq M 


-a 
Pi bi 




1. 






<ji 


-§s 


o 


^•"> 


"o'> 


-S 


•ss 


■s 


Districts. 


i! 






s^ 


^'"I 


fe . 


c3 d 


s 




>*m 


^a 


>H^O 


tHg 




a 


li^ 


go 


§2 


£0 


11 


2i^ 


^^ 






3« ? 






3M 


30, 


r 


SH 




3 


^ 


1-1 


^' 


.^' 


s 


^ 




Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


OM. 


A^ew. 


Old. 


New. 






City Proper 




8 


10 


1 429 


79 


404 




41 








South Boston 








70 


788 


2,174 




671 
















96 














11,875 


Charlestown 








823 


2,453 




568 














398 


3,231 


53 


1,675 




65 


78 






Dorchester 


ioo 




383 


7,727 












47 


29,663 


West Roxbury. . . 








732 






742 






36 










26 


7,444 




































Totals 


100 


8 


817 


14,029 


1,743 


6,706 


742 


1,345 


78 


83 


41,538 



Table showing the amount of paving work measured by the 
Surveying Division for the year ending January 31, 1909, by 
months : 





"3 




k 


M 


"3 


.M 








1 


<co 


S 


L 


L 


PQ 


1.^ 




Months. 


II 


■0 rt 


o 


n 


^. 


-3 


^1 


-9 




Sso 


ill 


si 


-J 


£g 


£■> 


Is 


U 




acQ 


&«^ 


■^^ 


■^^' 


&^ 


Fi^ 


■^^ 






CO 
















Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


Old. 


New. 


OZd. 


New. 






1908. 
























March 








4 






















44 
416 


783 
2,816 


79 
45 


26 
387 




41 








July 






78 




29,663 








158 


1 016 


788 


1 740 




671 








September 

October 


100 




149 


1 638 


831 


4 119 


742 


633 












44 


2,908 
















November 




8 


4 


1,875 












47 




December 








2,864 




434 








36 


11,875 


1909. 






























2 


125 




































Totals 


100 


8 


817 


14,029 


1,743 


6,706 


742 


1,345 


78 


83 


41,538 



Engineering Department. 39 

Surveys and plans have been made for the taking of land 
for school purposes on Melrose street, Fayette street and 
Ferdinand street, city proper, where the Abraham Lincoln 
School is to be built; on Joy street and South Russell street, 
city proper; on Cedar street, Roxbury; on Pleasant street, 
Dorchester, an addition to the Edward Everett Schoolhouse 
site; on Grove street. West Roxbury; and on Walk Hill 
street, West Roxbury, an addition to the Francis Parkman 
Schoolhouse site. 

A plan was made for the Hospital Department, showing its 
property on the easterly side of Albany street. 

A plan was made for the Fire Department, showing a lot 
proposed to be purchased at the corner of Walk Hill street 
and Wenham street. West Roxbury. 

At the request of the Mayor plans were made of the Win- 
throp School property on Tremont street and of the School 
Committee headquarters on Mason street. 

Plans were made for the revision of the grades on Ash street 
and Bennett street, city proper, occasioned by the construc- 
tion of the new elevated structure. 

Plans were made for the revision of the grades of five 
streets, in connection with the abolition of grade crossings on 
the line of the Old Colony Railroad, between Harrison square 
and Neponset. 

Tw^o plans have been made for the Trustees of the Franklin 
Foundation relating to their property on Appleton street and 
Berkeley street, city proper. 

Petitions for the registration of land in the Land Court are 
referred to the Mayor whenever the City of Boston is an 
interested party. 

These cases are examined by the Law Department and the 
Surveying Division of the Engineering Department for the 
purpose of protecting the city's interests. 

During the year sixty-seven such cases have been investi- 
gated. 

There were 129 accident and other plans made for the Law 
Department. 

In connection with the Surveying Division there have been 
1,124 titles examined, 756 deeds and 342 plans copied from 
the Registry of Deeds. 

Thirty-four hundred and fourteen blue prints have been 
made during the year. 



40 



City Document No. 16. 



List of plans of takings for sewerage works filed during the 
year ending February 1, 1909: 

ROXBURY. 

Brookline avenue. Plans showing the takings from Brookline 
avenue to Avenue Louis Pasteur. 



West Roxbury. 



Anson street and Mark street. Plan showing taking between 
Anson and Mark streets at railroad land. 

Anson street and Mark street. Plan showing takings to be 
discontinued between Anson and Mark streets in rail- 
road land. 

Dale street brook. Plan showing takings from Beech street, 
across James street and Poplar street. 

Fairview street outlet. Plan showing takings from Fairview 
street, at Mendum street, across Boston & Providence 
Railroad to South street. 

Grew avenue. Plan showing taking in Grew avenue from 
Canterbury street southerly. 

Hewlett street brook. Plan showing takings from Farquhar 
street to Mozart street. 
The following sectional plans made under the Board of 

Survey Act have been filed during the year: 



T-31 
T-50 
T-51 



Roxbury 



W-51 ■ 
W-52 
W-68 
W-69 
W-70 
W-71 
X-91 
X-93 
Ee- 8 
Ee- 9 
Ee-10 



j^ Dorchester 



11 




West Roxbury 



Carried forward 



3 
17 



Engineering Department. 



41 



Brovght forward 
G-72~l 
G-89 
G-90 
G-91 
G-92 
G-93 
N- 8 
N- 9 
N-10 



> Brighton 



17 



Total 



26 



The following sectional plans made under the Board of 
Survey Act have been refiled during the year: 



U- 9 South Boston 



M-67 1 
M-98 i 


Roxbury 


T- 96 




T-lOO 




U- 91 




W- 10 




X- 1 




X- 21 


- Dorchester 


X- 52 


X- 53 




X- 54 




X- 68 




X- 69, 




N-29 ^ 




N-30 




N-32 




0- 6 




0-44 




0-45 \ 


Brighton 


0-56 




0-57 




0-58 




0-64 




0-65 J 





11 



11 



Total 



25 



42 City Document No. 16. 

Twenty-eight assessment plans were made for the Street 
Commissioners. 

Forty-seven plans and profiles, representing a total length 

of five miles, showing buildings, property owners' names, 
established grades, area of land taken, or to be taken, for 
street widenings, relocations, or to be laid out, were completed 
for the Street Laying-Out Department. 

The following list gives the number of orders attended to 
for property owners, builders and the various city depart- 
ments from February 1, 1908, to February 1, 1909: 

Street lines given 533 

Street grades given 251 

Street Department, Paving Division .... 1,570 

*Street Department, Sewer Division .... 369 
Street Department, Street Cleaning and Watering 

Division 4 

Building Department 2 

Law Department 194 

Street Commissioners 227 

Engineering Department 114 

Park Department 5 

Police Department 19 

Schoolhouse Commission 11 

City Messenger Department 2 

Cemetery Department 1 

Fire Department 1 

Wire Department 3 

Insane Hospital Department 2 

Transit Commission 10 

Hospital Department 1 

Mayor 2 

Trustees of the Franklin Foundation .... 2 



3,323 



There are on file with the Surveying Division 34,366 indexed 
plans. 

* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out 
departments. 



Engineering Department. 43 

There are also 3,692 lithographed i)lans in the office at Old 
Court House not included in the foregoing list, viz.: 

Lithographed maps of Dorchester, made in 1869 .... 33 

" 1880 .... 121 

" " West Roxbury, made in 1873 .... 8 

" Fort Hill, made in 1866-69 .... 77 

" " Church street district, made in 1868 . . 168 

" " Washington street widening (parts 1, 2, 3), 

made in 1860 1,186 

" " Washington street extension, made in 1869, 324 

" " North street, made in 1859 .... 44 

" " Stony brook, drainage area . . . . 10 

" " Boston, made in 1866-67 .... 98 

" " Boston, made in 1888 30 

" " Suffolk street district, made in 1869 . . 7 

" South Boston, made in 1880 . . . . 60 

" Roxbury, made in 1880 81 

" " burnt district 63 

" " Mt. Hope Cemetery 20 

" " Winthrop Farm 49 

" " Hanover avenue 44 

" " Muddy river 41 

" " Pemberton square, courthouse site . . 195 
" " East Newton street, lots on, sold by auction, 

made in 1888 42 

" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1885 82 

" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1888 8 

" " Boylston street, old Public Library lot . . 17 
" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1882 136 

" " Boston Directory map, made in 1886 . . 60 
" " Boston, scale 1,600 feet to an inch, made in 

1890 83 

" " Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, made in 

1891, colored plans 5 

" " Boston proper, scale 500 feet to an inch, 

made in 1894 10 

" Exhibit No. 1, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 35 

" Exhibit No. 2, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 65 

" " Exhibit No. 3, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 96 

" " High street, public lands sold by auction . 16 

" " Beacon Hill, State House site ... 38 
" " Harrison avenue. Savage Schoolhouse lot, 

auction plan 57 

" " Boston proper, showing changes in street 

and wharf lines from 1795 to 1895 . . 198 

3,607 



44 City Document No. 16. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION. 



Boston Consumptives' Hospital. 

Changes were made in the plan of the service road which 
was, at the beginning of the year, being graded under a 
contract with Peter F. Connolly, dated November 1, 1907, 
and a settlement was made with Mr. Connolly under which 
he was paid, on an estimate dated April 28, 1908, the sum of 
11,052.56 for work already done and his contract was closed. 

New plans and specifications were then prepared and on 
June 22, 1908, a contract was made with B. F. Carroll of 
Brookline for building the road, including subgrading, 
excavation for water pipe, building drains for surface water 
and surfacing the road. The work is not yet completed. 

A 12-inch water pipe has been laid in the service road and 
two fire hydrants set; connections were made for supplying 
the power house, the cottage and main hospital building. 
The excavation for the pipe and the backfilling of the trenches 
were done under Mr. Carroll's contract and the rest of the 
work was done by the Water Department. The length of 
the 12-inch pipe is 1,343 feet, including that laid in 1907. 

An 8-inch water pipe was laid from the main in River 
street, near the old mansion house, to supply the stables, 
the day camp and the cottage hospital. On account of this 
work there was laid 753 feet of 8-inch pipe and two fire 
hydrants at a cost for laying of $404.61. The work of laying 
the pipe was done by the Hub Construction Company under 
its contract dated July 27, 1908. The pipe was furnished 
by the city. This work was completed on August 13. 

A plan has been made for rebuilding the drain between 
River street and the Neponset river, which serves as an 
outlet for the new drain in the service road. The present 
drain is inadequate. 

Boylston Street Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

Boylston Street crosses the main line of the Boston 
& Albany Railroad at the extremely sharp skew of 71 degrees; 
that is, the angle made between the center lines of the street 
and the railroad location is only 19 degrees; and while the 
location is but 60 feet wide, the distance across the location. 



Engineering Department. 45 

measured along the center line of the street, is 176 feet, or 
nearly three times the width of the location. The street 
is SO feet wide. 

AYhen the first Boylston Street Bridge was built in 1888, 
no part of the railroad location was available for piers, nor for 
erecting false work, and it was necessary to make the bridge 
in one span and to provide for its erection by other than 
usual means. Furthermore, the extreme skew, the width 
of the street and the omission of a truss on the center line 
of the street prohibited the use of top lateral bracing. The 
problem was solved by the late John E. Cheney, then the 
Assistant City Engineer of Boston, who designed the struc- 
ture with two double pin-connected pony trusses of 216 feet 
span. Each part of the double truss was in reality a truss in 
itself; and the two parts, placed 6 feet apart on centers, 
were so connected together as to constitute a structure rigid 
in itself, requiring no outside bracing for its support. The 
design was notable in being one of the longest pony truss 
spans in existence. The span of 216 feet was divided into 
16 panels of 13 feet 6 inches each; the depths of truss varied 
from 9 feet 4 inches at the ends to 24 feet at the middle, 
the top chord being curved and the bottom chord being 
straight. 

The floor beams were double plate girders, tied together at 
the top and bottom flanges by latticing and tie plates, and 
having the webs connected at intervals by diaphragms. 
The floor beams extended beyond the trusses, forming brackets 
for the support of the sidewalks. The connections of the 
floor beams to the trusses were so designed as to distribute 
the loads from the beams equally to the two halves of each 
main truss, and were made by pins passing through the 
beams and through small girders connecting the double 
posts of the trusses. The principal floor beams were nearly 
80 feet long over all and had a span, between supporting 
pins, equal to the distance apart of the main trusses, center to 
center, viz., 54 feet 1 inch. The depth of these principal 
beams back to back of angles was 3 feet 8 inches. On account 
of the skew most of the floor beams were placed with one 
end on an abutment, some of these beams being so short as 
to require anchorage to the abutment masonry. 

All stringers were of hard or yellow pine ; the lower course 
of roadway planking was 3-inch hard pine, the roadway 
wearing surface was 2-inch spruce and the sidewalk plank 
was IJ-inch hard pine. 

In the trusses of the original bridge steel was used for 
main members for the first time in any bridge built for the 



46 City Document No. 16. 

City of Boston. The top chords, end posts, all eyebars 4 
inches wide and over, chord pins and rollers were made of 
Bessemer steel. All other parts of the trusses, the entire 
floor system and the bottom lateral bracing were made of 
wrought iron. 

The general design and detailed drawings for the bridge 
were prepared by the Engineering Department of the City 
of Boston under Mr. Cheney's direction. The construction 
of the bridge superstructure was let to the Boston Bridge 
Works, Inc., the price paid under the contract being 
$46,490.90. An account of the building of the original bridge 
will be found in the twenty-second annual report of the City 
Engineer (for 1888). 

In 1906 the Boston Elevated Railway Company received 
permission to strengthen the bridge to carry fifty-ton cars. 
The design made by Prof. Charles M. SpofTord for that 
company was to insert at each side of the bridge a truss 
between the city trusses, provide eleven new floor beams at 
mid-panel points and thus support a strip of floor to include 
the car tracks and extend nearly from parapet to parapet. 
The loads carried by this street railway bridge are completely 
separated from the loads carried by the city bridge, and the 
trusses of one bridge, with the portions of the floor carried 
by it, are perfectly free to deflect independently of the other 
bridge. Under contract with the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company the street railway bridge was built by the Boston 
Bridge Works, Inc., in 1907, the work being done under 
the supervision of the City Engineer. 

When the southerly half of the old bridge was stripped in 
October, 1907, preparatory to the erection of the street rail- 
way structure, the old metalwork was cleaned of scale and 
rust and its condition was found to be much worse than had 
been expected from an examination made in the summer of 
1906, and showed in a striking way that the usual examina- 
tion of such a bridge from below is by no means real inspec- 
tion and cannot be relied upon to determine the true condition 
of a bridge in which corrosion is well under way. The 
worst effects of corrosion were generally found at the easterly 
end of the bridge over and near track No. 1, which is the 
outward bound express track of the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road. This track is also used by switch engines in making 
up trains in the railroad yard just east of the bridge. The 
total train movements beneath the structure is between five 
hundred and six hundred on each week day, and about 
eighty on Sunday; and frequently the switch engines will 




FIG, 2.-BOYLSTON STREET BRIDGE. TYPICAL CORRODED DIAGONAL OF 
ORIGINAL TRUSSES. 



Engineering Department. 47 

stop underneath the bridge, discharging steam and smoke 
which hang for a considerable time just under the bridge 
floor. 

The floor beams at the east end of the bridge were 
the parts found to be in the most dangerous condition. 
Although built before the days of modern street cars and 
designed only for a uniform load of eighty pounds per square 
foot and a single twenty-ton wagon, these floor beams were 
called upon to support two car tracks, each carrying cars 
up to twenty-six tons in weight, in addition to the usual and 
frequent highway traffic at each side of the roadway. If these 
wrought-iron beams had been as good as new they would 
have been subjected, under this loading, to unit stresses of 
about 15,000 to 16,000 pounds per square inch in tension. 
It was found, however, that the beams in the worst condition 
had corroded to such an extent that their webs, originally 
f inch thick, were reduced to y^g of an inch, the outstanding 
legs of their flange angles were reduced from an original thick- 
ness of J inch to about | of an inch, and the lattice bars con- 
necting the flanges of the two halves of these double-webbed 
beams were either entirely eaten off or were so thin that they 
could be broken with the blows of a light hammer. The 
condition of one of these beams is shown in the accompanying 
view (Fig. 1) . The wooden stringers rested upon the top flanges 
of the beams, and in a number of cases the outstanding legs 
of the top flange angles were broken entirely off at the track 
stringers as a result of the pounding administered by the 
heavy street cars. In addition to the pounding, corrosion is 
more rapid at a point like this, as the continual bending of 
the metal under the passage of the street cars tends to flake 
off the rust-scale as fast as formed and expose fresh metal to 
corrosion. In at least one instance a diaphragm connecting 
the two halves of a floor beam was so badly rusted that it 
was broken entirely through, leaving either half of the floor 
beam to carry the load which should have been distributed 
over both halves. 

In the trusses the eastern portion naturally showed the 
greater corrosion. The bottom chord bars were some dis- 
tance below the flooring and were less subject to corrosion 
from locomotive fumes, although they showed the effect of 
blast action from the locomotives. These bars in most 
cases were corroded less than J of an inch on each exposed 
surface, and as they were originally thicker than the diag- 
onals the percentage of metal lost in the chord bars was on 
the whole considerably less than that of the diagonal bars. 



48 City Document No. 16. 

The locomotive fumes would rise to the underside of the 
floor planking and the stringers would keep the gases pock- 
eted there and prevent them from being blown away, con- 
sequently the worst condition of corrosion of the trusses was 
found in the web members just beneath the planking; here 
in a large number of cases from J of an inch to -^q of an inch 
of metal had been eaten away from the exposed surface. 
Post channels whose webs were originally nearly -^^ of an 
inch in thickness had been rusted until the webs were not 
more than | of an inch thick and their tie plates and lattic- 
ing were badly rusted also. Many eyebars having an orig- 
inal thickness of f of an inch were found with minimum 
thicknesses of -^q of an inch, f of an inch and even less, and 
as their edges as well as their sides were corroded the loss 
of section in a number of the diagonals was as high as 50 
per cent to 60 per cent, reaching in one case a loss of 70 per 
cent. (See Fig. 2.) 

In addition to the corrosion the city bridge had to be still 
further weakened by the cutting apart of some of the metal- 
work, and as its condition was such that it was deemed unsafe 
for further traffic the bridge was ordered closed to travel and 
extensive reconstruction was determined upon as an impera- 
tive necessity. 

In connection with the destruction of the original Boylston 
Street Bridge, it should be noted that the amount of head- 
room beneath such a bridge has an important influence upon 
corrosion. At this bridge, as is the case of many of our city 
bridges over railroads, the headroom from top of rail to clear- 
ance line of the bridge was only about 15 feet and with such 
low headroom the corrosive action of the locomotive fumes 
has generally been comparatively rapid. On the other hand, 
at many bridges where the headroom is 18 feet the effect of 
the gases under substantially similar conditions of time and 
railroad traffic have generally been less marked. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company desired to resume 
street car traffic across the bridge at the earliest possible 
moment and to put into service cars weighing forty-two tons; 
and as it would take some time to get an appropriation from 
the city for rebuilding the original structure, and still further 
time before the work of rebuilding could be begun in the field, 
the scheme of putting a permanent floor on the street rail- 
way bridge was abandoned and the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company proceeded to lay temporary tracks on its bridge as 
far as it extended. Near the abutments the tracks were to be 
carried by the city bridge and, as the old city floor beams were 



En'Gixeerixg DeparTxMent. 49 

insufficient to support these tracks, a temporary construction 
of I-beams was put in at each end of the bridge. 

The temporary track construction consisted of track string- 
ers and supplementary stringers of wood upon which was 
laid a 3-inch plank floor about 20 feet wide for the length of 
the bridge, a substantial fence being provided at each side of 
this floor. On top of this planking T-rails were laid at an 
elevation considerably above that of the rails in the former 
bridge, the rails being above the tops of the parapet stones. 
No attempt was made to provide for team travel by laying 
flooring up to the top of the rails. 

The street railway structure was completed and a temporary 
track was opened to travel on November 20, 1907, and during 
the whole work travel had been maintained upon both side- 
walks. From November 20, 1907, until the work of erecting 
the city structure was begun in July, 1908, foot travel was 
continued on both sidewalks and all of the car travel of 
Boylston street crossed the bridge on the temporary tracks, 
but no team travel was allowed, and the Elevated Railway 
Company maintained a flagman at all times to prevent teams 
from attempting to cross the temporary floor. 

In anticipation of the closing of the bridge to all travel 
during the work of reconstruction by the city, the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company secured a location, and in June, 
1908, laid temporary tracks from Boylston street to Massa- 
chusetts avenue through Hereford and Newbury streets. 
All car travel was diverted to this temporary route soon after 
July 1, 1908, just before the rebuilding of the old city bridge 
was begun. 

Rebuilding of the Citij Bridge. 

The old city bridge was condemned and closed to team 
travel in October, 1907. On April 2, 1908, the city govern- 
ment of Boston appropriated the sum of S60,000 for the 
rebuilding of the city's bridge. Meantime plans for the work 
had been prepared by the Engineering Department, and 
bids had been called for, to be received on April 3. On that 
date the contract for rebuilding was let to the Boston 
Bridge Works, Inc., the lowest bidder, for the sum of 
$52,800. The work of rebuilding provided for raising all 
trusses so that they should be well above the floor and should 
thereby be protected in the future from further destruction 
by locomotive fumes. The top chords of the old trusses 
which were in good condition were retained, but the posts, 
diagonals and bottom chords were entirely renewed. The 



50 City Document No. 16. 

floor beams of the street railway bridge were hung to their 
longitudinal girders by riveted hangers, while the new floor 
beams for the city structure were hung by eyebar hangers. 
The metal work for the city structure below the floor was 
protected, so far as possible, by concrete, although it was 
found to be impracticable to so protect the eyebar hangers 
and the bottom lateral bracing. Provision has been made 
for the easy renewal of these latter members when necessary. 
The new city floor beams are plate girders, 3 feet 11 inches 
deep back to back of angles, their ends being cantilevered to 
form brackets for the support of the sidewalks. Upon the 
top and bottom flanges of these beams were placed channels 
solely for the protection of the metal work of the beam, no 
dependence whatever being placed upon these channels as 
carrying stress. These channels are 12 inches wide and have 
a web ^ inch thick. As the bottom channels have to resist 
only the blast of the locomotives it is thought that they 
will last for a great many years, perhaps for the whole life 
of the present structure. The top channels, on the other 
hand, are in a position where they will be subjected to loco- 
motive fumes as well as to moisture which will work through 
the wooden flooring; these top flanges carry the wooden 
stringers of the bridge, which fact will hasten their destruc- 
tion; consequently, the top channels are not riveted to the 
floor beams, but are attached to the top flanges by brass bolts 
in such manner that they may be readily replaced by new 
channels when necessary. 

Figures 3 to 6 show the concrete protection of the floor 
beams while the same was being put in place at the yard 
of the Boston Bridge Works. In the first (Fig. 3) is seen part 
of a beam with the top channel bolted in place and with holes 
through the stiff'ener angles for the rods which are to support 
the reinforcing metal. 

Figure 4 shows the bracket end of one of these beams with 
its open web. 

Figure 5 shows the process of concreting the beams as 
well as the method of placing the reinforcing metal. One- 
half inch steel bars are run through the holes in the stiffener 
angles at the top, bottom and middle of the beam on each 
side of the web. To these J-inch bars are wired sheets of 
Kahn ribbed metal of 6-inch mesh. 

Concrete, consisting of one part Portland cement, two parts 
sand and four parts fine broken stone, is being placed on one 
side of the beam while the latter is lying on its side. Although 
not called for in the specifications, the surface of the concrete 
was finished practically as a granolithic surface and an excel- 



Engineering Department. 51 

lent job of concreting was obtained. In this view will be 
noticed castings projecting from the concrete at about mid- 
height of the web of the floor beams. These castings are to 
receive the bottom lateral bracing, which is to be attached to 
them by means of pins in order that the bracing may be 
readily renewed when corroded. It was desirable to have the 
castings made of some metal which would be noncorrosive, 
as the castings themselves could not be renewed without 
breaking into the concrete and exposing the web of the floor 
beam. Several types of composition castings were con- 
sidered and finally it was decided to use a casting consisting 
of aluminum, zinc and a small proportion of copper. This 
composition is patented, has a tensile strength equal to that 
of ordinary bronze and is probably less liable to corrosion 
on account of its small percentage of copper. This metal 
is known as macadamite and is made by the United States 
Macadamite Metal Company of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Figure 6 shows one end of a floor beam in which the 
concreting has been completed. Here will be seen two 
of the aluminum castings for the connection of the bottom 
lateral bracing as well as the iron casting which is to receive 
the pin of the eyebar hangers. As this latter casting is of 
relatively thick metal and projects only slightly beyond the 
concrete, it was thought unnecessary to make this casting of 
composition metal. 

The drawing marked Fig. 7 shows further details and a 
comparison of the methods used for the protection of the city 
and street railway floor beams with concrete. 

On the city floor beams the concrete protection was made 
4J inches thick on each side of the web. The steel reinforce- 
ment, consisting of Kahn rib metal of 6-inch mesh, was 
placed about 1^ inches in from the face of the concrete and 
was wired to the |-inch square bars running longitudinally 
through the top, bottom and middle of the stiffener angles. 
The stiffeners were spaced at regular intervals to accom- 
modate standard widths of reinforcing metal. At the 
tapered ends of the beams, acting as sidewalk brackets, the 
rods were continued but the Kahn metal omitted and a 
lattice web used which allowed good bond between the con- 
crete slabs on the two faces of the bracket. The bottom 
flange channel, used mainly to resist blast action of the 
locomotives, was riveted to the flange angles with counter- 
sunk rivets in the hope that the countersunk heads, being 
less exposed to the blast, would last longer than button- 
heads. The countersunk heads were not chipped. At the 
top flange the protecting channel was bolted to the flange 



52 City Document No. 16. 

angles with brass bolts before the concreting was clone. To 
guard against possible electrolytic action between the brass 
and steel, |-inch diameter bolts were used in ^f-inch 
diameter holes, the holes in the channel were countersunk 
on the top side, the space surrounding the bolts was filled 
with elastic cement and lead washers were used between 
the brass nuts and the top surface of the channel. The 
beams were concreted while lying on the side, as shown in 
Fig. 5. After the beams had been concreted they were 
allowed to stand for some time in the bridge shop yard in 
an upright position, as shown in Fig. 6, and while the 
moisture was drying out of the concrete the latter would 
shrink away from the top flange to a slight extent. This 
action had been foreseen and provision made for grouting 
the top flanges after the concrete had set. Holes 1 inch in 
diameter had been drilled every 4 feet near the outer edge 
of the channels and grout was poured in through a long- 
nosed funnel under a head of some 6 or 8 inches. Grout con- 
sisting of two parts Portland cement and one part sand was 
first tried, but without success, as it would not flow properly. 
Neat Portland cement grout was next tried and found to 
flow freely for a distance of 6 or 8 feet each side of the 
grouting hole. The top channel was removed from some of 
the beams while the latter were at the yards of the Boston 
Bridge Works, and in all cases where neat Portland cement 
grout had been used the grouting was successful, the voids 
in the concrete having been well filled. 

During the rebuilding of the city's bridge the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company decided to place a concrete 
protection upon the floor beams of the street railway struc- 
ture, and at the request of that company the design for 
the protection was made by the Engineering Department 
of the city, the details being shown in Fig. 7. In order 
not to add too much dead weight to these beams it was 
decided to make the concrete only 2 inches thick on each 
side of the web and to incase each stiffener angle. The 
whole of the top flange and the top side of the bottom flange 
was protected. No protection was provided for the under- 
side of the bottom flange, partly on account of limited head- 
room, but more especially because it was thought that the 
protection could not be held in place owing to the blast 
from locomotive stacks, the tops of which come within 
a few inches of the beams, and also because of the likelihood 
of the concrete or mortar cracking at the edges of the flange 
and exposing the reinforcing metal to corrosion. Slabs 
or pieces of mortar falhng upon passing trains would be a 




BoYLsroN Str££T Bridge 

d'C/T THE. Boston AiiO Albany /iAJi/tavx 

CoM:/fer£ Protection or TLOOf^ Qcams. 

Scales; one-half and oncfuarter s»zc 



O^CNtHG IN Street fiMLimr fioom Beam 

HECTiNS C/TY ^LOOft BeAMS 

\ _--__ . _ /^ - ,. (Qusffer Sizel 

-BOYLSTON STREET BRIDGE DRAWING SHOWING CONCRETE PROTECTION OF FLOOR BEAMS, 



Engineering Department. 53 

source of danger to passengers within the cars, as has been 
shown by experiences elsewhere. To hold the concrete pro- 
tection in place at the top flanges, rivets were cut from the 
outer gauge lines at intervals of about 2 feet and angles were 
bolted to the underside of the flange, a clearance of 1 inch 
being provided between the angles and the edges of the 
flange plates, and an equal or greater clearance being allowed 
at the underside of the flange. The concrete at each side of the 
web was held by Clinton wire cloth, 3-inch by 8-inch mesh, 
eight and ten gauge wires, held by |-inch bolts through the 
web, holes for the bolts being drilled in the field and the bolts 
being provided with threads, double nuts, clips and pipe 
washers at each end to hold the wire cloth in proper position. 
A wire cloth reinforcement was placed around each stiffener 
angle and wired to the reinforcement on the web. Wooden 
forms were provided on each side of the beams reaching 
from the bottom to the reinforcement angles at the top 
flange. Openings through which concrete was placed were 
left just under the top flange. 

The concrete protection of the street railway floor beams 
was really a mortar protection; mortar consisting of one 
part Portland cement and two parts sand being used for the 
web protection and a grout made of one to one Portland cement 
and sand being poured in and around the top flange after the 
web protection had been put in place. All of the work in 
connection with the protection of the street railway floor 
beams was necessarily done in the field as it was not feasible 
to remove these beams from the bridge. As their protection 
is of hghter construction than that of the city's beams, and 
was placed under considerable diflflculty owing to the constant 
passing of trains beneath the bridge, it may be less durable 
than that of the city floor beams. The results obtained 
upon the street railway beams were very satisfactory, how- 
ever; to all appearances the concrete is sound and con- 
tinuous, without cracks or serious voids, the contact with 
the steel is good and it is hoped that the protection will 
perform satisfactory service for many years. The only 
steel now exposed to corrosion anywhere beneath the floor 
is the lateral bracing and the channel-shaped stringers in the 
city's bridge and the track stringers on the railway bridge and 
the floor beam hangers of both bridges, none of which can be 
conveniently protected and all of which, except perhaps 
the hangers of the railway floor beams, are easily removed 
and renewed. 

The contract with the Boston Bridge Works, Inc., pro- 
vided for the erection of the new city bridge within a 



54 City Document No. 16. 

period of sixty days under a penalty of $100 for each day's 
delay, with a corresponding bonus for each day that the 
time of erection was shortened. The work of erection was 
completed in fifty days, the contractor earning thereby 
a bonus of SI, 000. In addition to the construction of the 
bridge superstructure, competitive bids were received and 
contracts made with Frank A. Foster for the reconstruction 
of the abutment parapets and with John T. Shea for paving 
and regulating the adjacent street. The work was com- 
pleted September 2, 1908. The total amount expended 
for construction, engineering and inspection was $60,000. 

Chelsea Street Bridge, East Boston to Chelsea. 

The bridge, with the exception of the Chelsea end, was 
destroyed in the Chelsea fire of April 12, 1908, and the Boston 
& Albany Railroad Bridge was also partially destroyed. 
The War Department ordered that both bridges when recon- 
structed should have waterways 60 feet in width. General 
plans were made for rebuilding the bridge and were approved 
by the War Department. Detail plans and specifications were 
made for building the ends of the draw pier and a temporary 
footbridge with a movable span, and a contract was made 
July 18 with W. H. Ellis, the lowest bidder, for doing the 
work for $6,831; this work was completed January 15, 1909. 
Another contract was made November 4, 1908, with W. H. 
Ellis, the lowest bidder, for building the draw foundation 
and the bridge at both ends of the draw; about 50 per cent 
of this work has been completed. Plans are being made 
for a new swing bridge. 

Congress Street Bridge. 

As soon as Northern Avenue Bridge was opened to travel 
the work of rebuilding Congress Street Bridge was begun, 
under a contract made with William L. Miller, dated Septem- 
ber 14, 1908. The paving and flooring of the fixed spans 
were removed and such of the main stringers and bolsters 
as were found to be in poor condition were also removed. 
A careful examination by a diver showed that the oak piles 
were generally in such good condition that it was unnecessary 
to drive but four new ones. Such of the main piles as were 
decayed at the top were spliced out with new material and 
all loose spurshores were refitted. A few bolsters, all of 
the sidewalk stringers and about 60 per cent of the road- 
way stringers were replaced with new hard pine timber of 
the same cross-section as in the old bridge; new 3-inch side- 



Engineering Department. 55 

walk planking and new 6-inch roadway planking were also 
laid and all curb and bulkhead timbers renewed, the cross- 
section of the bridge remaining substantially the same as 
before. All of the above hard pine timber was treated with 
two heavy coats of Cabot's Conservo. The flooring of the 
roadway was waterproofed with four thicknesses of roofing 
felt thoroughly mopped with pitch. 

The roadway was paved with new granite block laid with 
pitch and pebble joints, and while the best results cannot 
be expected from this kind of a joint laid in very cold weather, 
still it is believed that a much better surface has been obtained 
than if only gravel joints had been used. New hard pine 
fences and roadway gates have been built, and the old 
shelters on the sidewalks have been thoroughly repaired 
and painted. New asphalt sidewalks will be laid as early 
in the spring as the weather will admit. 

Under the same contract the temporary bridge, between 
Congress Street and Summer Street bridges, was removed, 
and the steel work of the sidewalk on the Summer Street 
Bridge was restored. The asphalt sidewalk will be relaid 
as early in the spring as satisfactory work can be done. The 
area covered by the temporary bridge has been carefully 
examined by divers and all material found above the surface 
of the bottom, as it existed at the time the temporary bridge 
was built, has been removed to the satisfaction of the engineer- 
ing officer representing the Secretary of War in this district. 

The moving machinery of the draw has been thoroughly 
repaired, new upper and lower tracks have' been cast and set 
in molten lead, the center pivot cleaned and adjusted and 
all parts of the turntable put in good working order. The 
upper and lower planking of the roadway of the draw has 
been renewed and the whole draw span left in such condition 
that with ordinary repairs it is believed that it can be kept 
in satisfactory working order for at least ten years. The 
bridge was closed to travel from October 28, 1908, to January 
26, 190.9. 

During the coming year the draw fender pier will be 
repaired, the balance of the appropriation remaining being 
sufficient for the purpose. 

Deer Island Boundary Wall. 

This work has been finished. The Atlas Construction 
Company completed the work under its contract on July 30. 
No settlement has as yet been made with the contractor. 

On June 30, 1908, a contract was made with the W. A. 



56 City Document No. 16. 

Murtfeldt Company, the lowest bidder, for building an 
extension of the wall at its westerly end to the half-tide 
contour. This extension is 90 feet in length and of the same 
character as the rest of the wall with a heavy post 4 feet 
square in plan at the end of the wall. It was completed 
on October 17, at a cost of $1,488. 

East Boston Grade Crossings. 

Mr. James Doherty completed the work to be done under 
his contract dated September 30, 1907, for paving on Sumner 
and Orleans streets and Murray court, on April 10, at a cost 
of Sl,971.16. 

Mr. Doherty also completed on April 10 the work to be 
done under his contract dated October 30, 1907, for paving 
on Sumner and Bremen streets, at a cost of $5,999.07. 

On April 22, 1908, a contract was made with Robert Eagar, 
Jr., for the completion of the grading and paving on Sumner 
street between Bremen and Orleans streets. This work was 
finished on July 9, at a cost of $3,766.34. 

The bridge on Sumner street and the paving were so far 
completed that the street was opened to travel of all kinds on 
June 22, 1908. 

The footbridge on Webster street was finished early in the 
summer. The approaches to this bridge on Webster street 
were repaved, the work being completed on July 9. 

This completed the work to be done by the city so far as 
authorized by the decree of the Superior Court. 

The following is a short history of the official action taken 
to carry out this improvement. 

The first official action looking towards the abolishment 
of grade crossings in East Boston was the passage of an order 
by the City Council on February 19, 1874, requesting the 
Mayor to petition the General Court for the passage of an 
act changing the location of the Eastern and Boston & Albany 
railroads so as to prevent the crossing at grade of Marion, 
Prescott, Porter, Maverick, Sumner and Webster streets 
by the tracks of said corporations. 

The petition was presented to the Legislature of that year 
and resulted in the passage of chapter 53 of the Acts of 1874, 
approved May 22, 1874. This act referred the petition of 
Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor of Boston, to the Board of Railroad 
Commissioners with instructions "to consider and report to 
the next General Court what change, if any, should be made 
in the locations of said railroads in the City of Boston, or 
what change, if any, should be made in any highway in said 



Engineering Department. 57 

city, or what measures of any kind whatever can or ought 
to be taken for the purpose of obviating the present crossing 
of the said streets in said city at grade by the tracks of said 
railroad corporations ; and also a plan for the equitable appor- 
tionment between any railroad corporations interested, the 
City of Boston, and any persons or corporations interested of 
the expense of any change of grade or location either of the 
railroads or any highway, or the carrying out of any measures 
which in the judgment of the Board may be required by 
considerations of pubhc safety and convenience." 

In compliance mth this act the Board of Railroad Com- 
missioners held hearings on October 14 and 23, 1874. A plan 
and estimate of cost prepared by the City Engineer, dated 
September 28, 1874, were submitted by the City of Boston; 
this plan provided for deflecting the lines of the two railroads 
at the crossing of Chelsea creek and relocating them on the 
easterly side of the island, so as to run along the water front 
and across the fiats to and around Jeffries' Point and then 
connect with the existing terminal grounds at their easterly end . 

The Board of Railroad Commissioners in its annual report 
of January, 1875, approved of the above plan and submitted 
an act which provided for carrying out the improvement in 
accordance with the plan. This act authorized the railroad 
companies to relocate their tracks on request of the Mayor 
and aldermen, the taking of land and the apportionment of 
the cost between the railroad companies and the city by a 
special commission to be appointed by the Supreme Judicial 
Court under chapter 372 of the Acts of 1874, which chapter 
was the general act relating to railroads; if the companies 
did not relocate within six months after such request of 
the Mayor and aldermen the latter could proceed under the 
general railroad law to compel them to do so. The proposed 
act also provided that the city might levy the amount assessed 
upon it upon the estates east of the existing location of the 
railroads in the same manner as betterments are assessed 
for highway improvements. 

The Legislature passed an act, chapter 214 of the Acts 
of 1875. This act was substantially the same as that 
recommended by the Railroad Commissioners except that the 
section of the latter was omitted which provided for action 
compelling the railroad companies to relocate in case they 
did not do so within six months after being requested to do 
so by the Mayor and aldermen. 

During the year 1875 the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad was built, which brought a further complication 
into the situation. 



58 City Document No. 16. 

On the 22d of November, 1875, the City Council passed 
an order appointing a special committee to confer with the 
Eastern, the Boston & Albany and the Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn railroad companies and ascertain upon what 
terms they were willing to co-operate with the city in changing 
the location of their tracks as provided by the recent act of 
the General Court-, and the committee was to also report 
whether any additional legislation is necessary in order to 
secure the relocation of the tracks. 

On December 13, 1875, the above committee recommended 
the passage of an order that the Mayor be authorized to 
request the three railroad companies to relocate their tracks 
in accordance with the plan made by Joseph P. Davis, City 
Engineer, dated September 28, 1874. The Mayor acted 
as requested. The Eastern Railroad Company on December 
27, 1875, and the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad 
Company on January 31, 1876, replied, declining to relocate. 
These communications were referred to the Committee on 
Paving, who reported on March 6, 1876, that further action 
was inexpedient, which report was accepted. 

Nothing further appears to have been done concerning 
these grade crossings for several years. 

On November 24, 1884, an order was passed by the City 
Council for the construction of a footbridge over the railroad 
tracks at Sumner street in accordance with a plan dated July 
14, 1884, filed in the office of the City Engineer. Nothing 
was done under this order. 

On February 3, 1887, the Common Council referred to its 
committee on legislative affairs an order requesting the Mayor 
to petition the Legislature for an act changing the location of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad (that company having acquired 
control of the Eastern Railroad) and the Boston & Albany 
Railroad in East Boston, so as to prevent the crossing of 
streets at grade. There is no further record of action under 
this order. 

Chapter 428 of the Acts of 1890, approved June 21, 1890, 
was a general act provided for the abolishment of grade 
crossings. 

On January 19, 1891, a committee was appointed by the 
City Council to consider and report on the question of the 
abolishment of grade crossings in East Boston. 

On October 5, 1891, the Board of Aldermen passed a 
resolution that in the opinion of the Board the Mayor and 
aldermen should petition for the appointment, under the 
general grade crossing act, of a commission to consider the 
abolishment of the grade crossings in East Boston. 



Engineering Department. 59 

On October 19, 1891, the Mayor communicated to the 
aldermen the opinion of the Corporation Counsel that the 
above order was informal and inoperative. No further 
action appears to have been taken that year. 

On January 14, 1892, a committee was appointed by the 
City Council to consider and report a plan for the abolition 
of grade crossings in East Boston. 

February 23, 1892, a petition was received by the City 
Council from the East Boston Trade Association for the 
abolishment of grade crossings. 

On October 31, 1892, the Board of Aldermen passed a 
resolution stating that in the opinion of the Board a petition 
should be presented by the Mayor and aldermen to the 
justices of the Superior Court for the appointment of a com- 
mission to proceed with the abolishment of grade crossings 
in East Boston. 

From this time until final action was taken the matter was 
constantly under consideration. 

A plan was made, dated November, 1893. This provided 
for carrying the streets over the Boston & Maine and the 
Boston & Albany railroads in the existing locations of the 
latter, with the exception of Marginal street, which was to 
be widened without change of grade; Bremen street was to 
be extended from Sumner street to Marginal street ; Webster, 
Sumner and Maverick streets were to be carried over the rail- 
roads; Neptune road was to be extended to Eagle square, 
passing over the railroads and over Bremen street. Eagle 
square and Chelsea street being raised to meet the new grade 
at Neptune road ; Benning-ton and Saratoga streets were to be 
discontinued where they crossed the railroad ; Curtis street was 
to be raised to go over the railroad and on the westerly side of 
the railroad the street was to be deflected to the north to run in 
a direct line to Chelsea Street Bridge ; Pope street was to be 
extended southerly to Bennington street. 

May 7, 1894, the East Boston Company petitioned the City 
Council for action. 

In 1894 the Mayor petitioned the General Court for author- 
ity to abohsh the crossings and his action was indorsed by the 
Board of Aldermen December 17, 1894. 

Chapter 491 of the Acts of 1895 provided for the abolish- 
ing of the grade crossings in East Boston upon petition of 
the Mayor and Board of Aldermen to the Superior Court 
prating for such action, and upon the submission of plans, 
profiles and estimates of the probable cost the court should 
give hearings and appoint a commission which should con- 
sider the matter and report a recommendation. The city 



60 City Document No. 16. 

was to do the work. The commission was to determine what 
portion of the cost should be paid by private parties, the 
balance to be paid, 65 per cent by the railroad companies, 
25 per cent by the Commonwealth and 10 per cent by the 
City of Boston. If any railroad company should decide to 
abandon its location it was not to be assessed. This act was 
approved June 5, 1895. 

In 1895 a plan was prepared by the City Surveyor of 
Boston for relocating the Boston & Maine and the Boston & 
Albany railroads. This plan provided for the railroads 
being deflected from their existing locations at Chelsea creek, 
between Curtis and Moore streets, by a location running to the 
flats and parallel to the latter, thence around the easterly end 
of Wood Island and southwesterly across the fiats in a line 
parallel to the existing Hne to Jeffries' Point at a point in 
line wdth Sumner street, thence curving northwesterly to the 
present terminal. The Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad was to be raised to pass over Saratoga street and 
then deflected to the south of its present location and run 
across the flats to meet the other roads and then to run in 
conjunction wdth them, but on the easterly side of them, to 
its present wharf. The City Engineer submitted an estimate 
of the cost of this plan on July 29, 1895, and on the same 
date the Board of Aldermen passed an order that the City 
Solicitor submit the petition of the Mayor and aldermen to 
the Superior Court for the abolishment of the grade crossings 
in accordance with chapter 491 of the Acts of 1895. 

The next plan prepared was dated April, 1896. By this 
plan the two westerly railroads were to be deflected just 
north of Curtis street, carried through Curtis and Harmony 
streets and under Pope, Chaucer, Saratoga and Bennington 
streets, which were to be raised for short distances, to the 
fiats, then curved southerly to the westerly side of the Boston, 
Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad near Neptune road, thence to 
run parallel to the latter. The Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad was to be deflected to the east for a short distance 
to give a better entrance to its tunnel, which was not to be 
changed. The other railroads were to be continued by 
another tunnel to their present terminal crossing, no street 
to be crossed at grade except Marginal street. It was neces- 
sary by this plan to raise Maverick and Everett streets so as 
to pass over all the railroads. 

A plan dated June 12, 1896, was the same as the last 
described, except that all the railroads were to be carried 
through an enlargement of the present Boston, Revere 
Beach & Ljun Railroad tunnel. This necessitated a long 



Engineering Department. 61 

curve south of Marginal street to enable the two westerly 
railroads to reach their terminal. 

On July 27, 1896, the Mayor sent a communication to the 
Board of Aldermen submitting the plans of April, 1896, and 
recommending their approval. The matter was referred to 
a committee, but nothing further appears to have been done 
that year. 

During 1897 no official action appears to have been taken 
except the appointment by the Board of Aldermen of the 
usual committee on March 22. 

January 13, 1898, the Common Council ordered its presi- 
dent to petition the Legislature for "such legislation as may 
be necessary for the abolition of the grade crossings in 
East Boston," and on February 24 the Common Council 
appointed a committee to appear before the committee of the 
Legislature and urge legislative action. No further action 
appears to have been taken that year. 

On January 30, 1899, the Board of Aldermen ordered 
"that the City Engineer be directed to prepare plans and 
estimates of the cost of such alterations of all the crossings 
of railroads and public ways in that part of Boston called 
East Boston as will avoid crossings at grade, in accordance 
with the provisions of chapter 491 of the Acts of 1895." 

March 13, 1899, the Board of Aldermen ordered that the 
Mayor be requested to instruct the Corporation Counsel to 
appear before the Legislature and favor such legislation as 
will provide for a commission to consider the abolition of 
grade crossings in East Boston. As a result chapter 390 of 
the Acts of 1899 was passed and approved May 23, 1899. 
This act provided that upon petition filed by the Mayor and 
aldermen of the City of Boston for the abolition of the grade 
crossings of the Boston & Maine and the Boston & Albany 
railroads in East Boston the Superior Court may appoint a 
commission to determine whether said grade crossings or 
any of them should be abolished or the use thereof changed 
or regulated. 

If the commission should determine that the public interests 
required the abolition of the grade crossings the commission 
was to prescribe the manner and limits within which alteration 
of the grades of Curtis, Saratoga, Bennington, Maverick, 
Sumner and Webster streets shall be made by lowering the 
tracks of the said railroads within the limits thereof and by 
carrying said streets over said tracks. Prescott and Porter 
streets were to be carried over the tracks or over the tracks 
and Bremen street; Saratoga and Bennington streets could 
be carried over the tracks on one bridge. The cost was to 



62 City Document No. 16. 

be apportioned, 20 per cent to the City of Boston, 30 per cent 
to be paid by the Commonwealth and 50 per cent to be paid 
by the railroad companies. 

Under this act either of the railroad companies might 
abandon its location by giving notice to the court within 
two months after the report of the commission, and the 
decision of the commission shall not be enforced against 
said company. 

Changes in the grades of the railroads required the approval 
of the Railroad Commission. 

On May 25, 1899, the Board of Aldermen passed an order 
petitioning the Superior Court for the appointment of a 
commission under the above act. 

On October 27, 1899, Messrs. George W. Wiggin, William 
B. French and Edward P. Bishop were appointed by the 
Superior Court as commissioners under the act. 

Numerous hearings were held but little was accomplished 
so far as the public was informed until the year 1901. 

There seems to have been some dissatisfaction with the 
hmitations of the Act of 1899, for on July 16, 1900, chapter 
462 of the Acts of 1900 was approved. This was an amend- 
ment of the previous act and provided that under certain 
conditions the commission might require the relocation of 
the Boston & Maine and the Boston & Albany railroads. 

During the year 1901 several plans were submitted. The 
first plan of which there is any record was dated July 9, 1901, 
and was substantially the same as the one finally adopted, 
the chief difference being that in the former the connection 
of Bremen street with Curtis street was not discontinued, 
and Prescott street was to be carried by a bridge over all of 
the tracks of the freight yard. This plan provided for lower- 
ing the grade of the railroad tracks to Grade 10 above city 
base from Curtis street to Sumner street and the carrying 
over the railroad by bridges and the raising of the grade of 
Curtis, Saratoga, Bennington, Prescott, Porter, Maverick 
and Sumner streets, and the raising of the grade of the 
approaches to those streets on Bremen and Orleans streets. 
Webster and Marginal streets were to be discontinued between 
the lines of the railroad locations. 

As a result of the amendment of the act passed in 1900 
several of the former plans were taken up again with modi- 
fications. 

The plan dated October 1, 1901, made some unimportant 
changes in that of April, 1896, before described. 

A plan dated November 11, 1901, differed from that of 
July 9, 1901, by providing for carrying Webster street over 



Engineering Department. 63 

the railroads and building a new street running diagonally 
through the block from the junction of Webster and Orleans 
streets to Marginal street. 

The plan of November 15, 1901, was the same as that of 
October 1, 1901, except for a slight change at Everett street 
in the length of street in which the grade was changed. 

In the same way the plan of November 22, 1901, was a 
slight modification of the plan of June 12, 1896. 

The plan dated December 1, 1901, followed that of June 12, 
1896, except that the point of departure of the proposed 
line from the existing one was just south of Curtis street and 
the line across the upland was in Swift street instead of 
Harmony street. 

The plan of January, 1902, provided for a relocation of 
the Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany railroads. The 
line ran through Harmony street as in the plan of April, 1896, 
crossed the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad, which 
was to be raised to pass over the other two railroads. The 
line cut through the high ground on Wood Island Park and 
ran across the flats to the shore at Jeffries' Point, then followed 
the shore outside of Marginal street to the existing terminal. 
The old locations of the two westerly railroads were to be 
abandoned between the point of deflection near Curtis street 
and Marginal street. The Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad was to be raised so as to pass over the other railroads 
at all crossings and also over Maverick, Everett and Marginal 
streets. 

The plan of February, 1902, provided for relocating through 
Harmony street as in previous plans, but by this plan the line 
was to pass under the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad 
near AA^ood Island Park and follow the location of the latter 
through its tunnel, while the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad was to curve westerly between Porter and Gove 
streets, pass under Cottage street, which was to be raised, to 
the location of the Boston & Maine Railroad, which it was 
to follow to a new ferry landing. All streets crossed were to 
be raised to pass over the railroad; Everett and Maverick 
streets were to be carried over the new location of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad. 

The next plan was dated January, 1903. The line was the 
same as on the plan of April, 1896, from Chelsea creek to a 
point south of Wood Island Park, where it curved to the west 
and ran diagonally across the marsh and flats to the existing 
location; Orleans, Maverick and Sumner streets were to be 
carried over the railroads. 

Fourteen plans differing more or less from each other have 



64 City Document No. 16. 

been briefly described, but the one finally adopted by the 
commission was the sixth in order of time with some slight 
modifications. 

The statute was further amended by chapter 144 of the 
Acts of 1903, approved March 10. This act extended the 
time during which the railroad companies might continue to 
use the old location, in case of relocation, from three to six 
years, and also removed the restriction as to the time in 
which the commission was required to report. 

The matter was under consideration by the commission for 
more than four years and during that time there was con- 
siderable impatience shown by the citizens of East Boston, as 
evidenced by numerous orders and resolutions of the City 
Council urging action or asking for reports of progress and 
reasons for delay. 

The commission finally submitted its report to the Superior 
Court on February 11, 1904, accompanied by a plan. 

The court issued its decree ordering the work to be done in 
accordance with the report of the commission on May 13, 1904. 

The plan called for the depression of the tracks of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad beginning at the southerly side of 
Chelsea creek and descending until the grade of the top of 
the rail is 10 feet above city base at a point a short distance 
south of Curtis street; this grade continues to near Maverick 
street where a further depression to Grade 9.75 is made, con- 
tinuing at that grade until Sumner street is passed. The 
grade then rises until it meets the old grade near Clyde street. 

The Boston & Maine Railroad Company abandoned its 
location. 

Curtis, Saratoga, Bennington, Prescott, Porter, Maverick 
and Sumner streets were all carried over the tracks by bridges 
of steel with concrete and asphalt floors, the bridges being 
supported by abutments of concrete masonry. The grades 
of these streets and the approaches to them on other streets 
were raised so as to leave a clear headroom above the rails of 
16 feet at all the bridges except at Maverick and Sumner 
streets where the headroom is 15 feet 6 inches. 

Those portions of Decatur, "Webster and Marginal streets 
within the location of the railroad were cUscontinued, while 
Prescott and Porter streets were laid out across the railroad 
from Bremen street to Frankfort street. 

A footbridge of steel was built on Webster "street, the 
approaches thereto being by stairs from the old grade of the 
street at each end of the bridge. 

Bremen street at its junction with Curtis street was not 
raised but instead a new street was laid out parallel with and 



Engineering Department. 65 

adjacent to Curtis street from Bremen street to Chelsea street. 
This street was later discontinued and to take the place of it 
another street named Beck street was laid out through land 
of the Standard Oil Company from Bremen street to Chelsea 
street a short distance south of Curtis street. 

All of the streets were constructed with granite curbstones 
and paved gutters; the roadways of Curtis street, Bremen 
street, except on the approaches to Maverick and Sumner 
streets, Saratoga street, except where previously paved, Ben- 
nington street, Orleans street, except on the approaches to 
Maverick and Sumner streets, Neptune road, Prescott street, 
Porter street, Everett street and Murray court were surfaced 
with Telford macadam 12 inches thick; the sidewalks of these 
streets were surfaced with broken stone, except that where 
brick sidewalks previously existed these were restored. 

The other streets changed were surfaced with granite blocks 
on gravel base for the roadways and brick pavement on the 
sidewalks. 

Fences were of cedar posts with three 2-inch by 6-inch 
spruce rails. 

Considerable changes in sewers, gas and water pipes and 
electric wire conduits were required. 

All work on the railroad and the building of the bridges was 
done by the Boston & Albany Railroad Company. That 
company under agreement with the city also did nearly all of 
the subgrading of streets. All other work on the streets was 
done by the city except that done by the various public service 
corporations on their own constructions. 

Work was begun soon after the issuing of the decree by the 
Superior Court and was continued without interruption until 
completed in July, 1908. 

Long Island Wharf. 

Plans and specifications were made for building a new 
wharf on the northwest side of Long Island, Boston Harbor, 
for the Pauper Institutions Department, and a contract was 
made June 12, 1908, by the Pauper Institutions Department 
with Lawler Brothers for building the wharf. The work was 
completed December 17, 1908, at a cost for contract work 
of $13,279.75. Another contract was made July 17, 1908, 
with Lawler Brothers for removing the old wharf and building 
part of the runway. This work was completed December 4, 
at a cost of $1,700. 

The old wharf was 142 feet long; the new wharf is 300 feet 
long and is 140 feet wide at its outer end. It is built of oak 



66 City Document No. 16. 

piles, hard pine lumber and kyanized spruce planking and 
has two Winter patent drops and a breakwater. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge, over the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. 

The original bridge was an iron structure built in 1876. 
In 1907, after thirty-one years' service, the metalwork had 
corroded to such an extent from the action of the locomotive 
fumes that the bridge was declared unsafe for heavy street 
car traffic and unsuitable for the highway traffic to which 
it was subjected. Its condition was such that the City 
Engineer recommended its immediate rebuilding, and in 1908 
the sum of $40,000 was appropriated for the purpose. Plans 
for a new bridge were prepared by this department. 

The letting of the contract for the rebuilding of the bridge 
was delayed to enable the work to be done under the 
legislative acts of 1906 and 1908, by which the street railway 
company and the Boston & Albany Railroad Company 
might be called upon to share in the expense of the work, 
and to this end a petition was presented by the city to the 
Board of Railroad Commissioners. In August an agreement 
was entered into between the City of Boston, the Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company, the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company and the West End Street Railway Company which 
permitted the city to do such work upon the bridge as the 
Board of Railroad Commissioners might direct, without wait- 
ing for the appointment by the Superior Court of a special 
commission to apportion the cost of the work and without 
waiving any of the rights of the city in the matter of the 
apportionment of cost between itself and the public service 
corporations named. 

Bids for rebuilding the bridge were received by the City 
Engineer, after public advertisement, on September 10, 1908, 
and a contract was made with the New England Structural 
Company of Boston, the lowest bidder, to do the work for 
the sum of $22,342. The contract provided for the comple- 
tion of the work on or before December 15, 1909, and stipu- 
lated that the erection of the work in the field should be done 
within a period of thirty calendar days under a penalty of 
$100 per day for each day that the period of erection exceeded 
thirty days, with a corresponding bonus for each day that 
the time of erection was shortened. The work of erecting 
the bridge was begun at noon of November 11, 1908, and was 
completed prior to noon of December 7, 1908, the time occu- 



Engineering Department. 67 

pied being twenty-six days, or four days less than the stip- 
ulated time, the contractor earning thereby a bonus of S400. 
Throughout the progress of the work foot travel was main- 
tained upon one sidewalk and street car travel was maintained 
upon one car track, the street railway company having laid 
and used a temporary track on the westerly side of the road- 
way until the easterly permanent track was ready for use; 
but team travel was shut off of the bridge from November 
11 to December 7, 1908. Street car travel was resumed on 
both permanent tracks on December 5, 1908. 

The new bridge, like the original structure, is a deck plate 
girder bridge, 90 feet wide by 70| feet long, and is built on 
a slight skew. It has two sidewalks each 15 feet wide and a 
roadway 60 feet in width carrying two car tracks. The new 
bridge is built upon the old abutments and its surface is at 
substantially the same elevation as the original bridge, 
sHght changes in grade having been made to offset settle- 
ments which had occurred in the abutments of the original 
bridge and in the street adjacent thereto. Some resurfacing 
of the street adjacent to the bridge and the reconstruction 
of the abutment parapets were thereby made necessary. 

The steel superstructure consists of eleven main girders, 
spaced 9 feet apart on centers, to which are framed trans- 
verse floor beams consisting of 12-inch I-beams, spaced 3 
feet 3 inches apart on centers. Throughout the work the 
steel was made of unusual thickness in order that it may 
still be strong enough after future loss by corrosion. As 
the bridge was to be erected in freezing weather it did not 
seem feasible to protect the steel work with concrete, and 
instead it was coated with a covering of special asphalt 
mopped over all metal surfaces to a thickness of about one- 
tenth of an inch. So far as known this is a new departure 
in the protection of steel. 

The underflooring of the bridge is long leaf yellow pine, 
6 inches thick in the roadway and 4 inches thick in the side- 
walks. The tops of the girders, which are slightly below the 
surface of the wooden underflooring, are covered to the floor 
level wdth asphalt mastic. The whole surface of the under- 
flooring is waterproofed with layers of roofing felt laid in 
asphalt. The roadway surface is creoresinate wood block 
pavement; the sidewalk surfacing is paving brick. Curbs 
are of cast iron and the sidewalk railings are the standard 
iron bridge railing. 

The total cost of the work, including the bridge structure, 
street resurfacing, engineering and inspection, was $28,059.82. 



City Document No. 16. 



Meridian Street Bridge. 

The work remaining to be done by Jones & Meehan under 
their contract of August 7, 1907, which, as mentioned in the 
last annual report, was postponed till the spring of 1908, 
was not done, as it would necessitate the closing of part of 
the bridge, which was not deemed advisable, as the Chelsea 
fire of April 12 had destroyed Chelsea Street Bridge, leaving 
Meridian Street Bridge as the only line of travel between 
East Boston and Chelsea. The contract was terminated 
October 17, 1908, the total payments to the contractor by 
the city being S6,724.66. 

Northern Avenue and Sleeper Street. 

The work of building Northern avenue and Sleeper street, 
as required by chapter 381 of the Acts of 1903, has been 
carried on during the year and the portion from Atlantic 
avenue across Fort Point channel and along Sleeper street 
was turned over to the care of the Superintendent of Streets 
and opened to pubhc travel October 26, 1908. 

During the past year the erection of the steel work of the 
draw and fixed spans of the bridge over Fort Point channel 
under the contract with the New England Structural Com- 
pany has been completed. The flooring of these spans, 
including the granite pavement of the roadway of the fixed 
spans, under a contract with Jones & Meehan, has also been 
completed. Under a contract dated August 31, 1908, Jones 
& Meehan have laid asphalt sidewalks on the bridge, but 
final payment on this work has not been made at the date 
of this report. The railings on the bridge and the roadway 
gates were built by the W. A. Snow Iron Works under two 
contracts dated April 15, 1908, and June 28, 1908, respec- 
tively, and final payments have been made. It was decided 
to operate the draw span of this bridge, weighing about 1,300 
tons, wholly by compressed air; the end lifts are operated at 
a pressure of 200 pounds and the turning engines at a reduced 
pressure of 80 pounds per square inch. February 15, 1908, a 
contract was made with the Ingersoll-Rand Company for 
furnishing two air compressors with automatic attachments 
for starting and stopping. These were subsequently installed 
by the Walworth Construction and Supply Company, which 
company on February 21 of the same year entered into a 
contract for the fabrication and erection of the turning and 
lifting mechanism of this span, and the work has been 
completed. 



Engineering Department. 69 

A contract for building a drawtenders' house and a power 
house combined was awarded to Jones & Meehan June 4, 
1908, and was completed about three months later. 

The portion of the avenue on the South Boston side for 
a length of about 500 feet easterly from Fort Point channel 
and the part of Sleeper street southerly from the avenue have 
been paved with granite blocks, edgestone set and brick 
sidewalks laid. This work was done under a contract with 
Jones & Meehan, dated September 30, 1907. The catch- 
basins and outlet drains required for the area paved have 
been built by the Sewer Division of the Street Department. 
As the lines of the tracks of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company have not been laid in the avenue 
this portion has not been opened to public travel. 

A contract was made with William L. Miller, dated April 
17, 1908, for building sea walls on the northerly hne of the 
avenue at the heads of docks Nos. 2 and 3 and for a timber 
bulkhead between the walls at pier No. 3. The work under 
this contract is so far advanced that it will be completed 
early in the spring. As soon as the water pipes are laid 
in the avenue a contract will be made for paving and doing 
the other work remaining to be done, so that the street can 
be opened to travel for its entire length before the close of 
the present year. 

Streets. 

Preliminary surveys, working plans and specifications 
were prepared and forwarded to the Street Department for 
the construction of 9 assessment streets, for repaving 18 
streets and for constructing artificial stone sidewalks in 9 
streets; surveys have been made, levels taken and pre- 
liminary plans prepared for 15 assessment streets and for 
repaving 8 streets; the necessary surveys were made and 
grades for street railway tracks determined in 19 streets. 

A survey was made, levels taken and study prepared for 
a flight of iron steps from the Charlestown Bridge to Water 
street; plans and specifications were made for a concrete 
retaining wall and board fence in Terrace street at the Park 
brewery ; a list was prepared giving the character, length and 
areas of the surfaces of 46 streets ; preliminary estimates have 
been made of the cost of repaving 34 streets and for con- 
structing 42 streets. 

The street book, giving lengths and areas of pavements in 
accepted streets and public alleys, has been corrected to 
February 1, 1908, and is now being brought up to February 1, 
1909. 



70 City Document No. 16. 



Waterworks. 



The amount of work clone by contract in the Water 
Department has largely increased during the past two years; 
this has added materially to the work of the Engineering 
Department, involving as it does not only the necessary 
studies, preparation of plans, specifications, etc., but the 
supervision of the work done and the making of estimates for 
payment. 

During the past year the number of these contracts num- 
bered thirty-seven. 

The 48-inch low service main laid last year from Tremont 
street through Prentiss street and Longwood avenue to 
Brookline avenue was extended in Longwood avenue to con- 
nect at Muddy river with the 48-inch line laid by the Met- 
ropolitan Water and Sewerage Board from Coolidge Corner, 
Brookline; this new feed greatly strengthens the supply to 
the city and will still further strengthen it when the Met- 
ropolitan Board extends the 48-inch pipe from Coolidge 
Corner to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, as it proposes to do early 
in the coming season. 

Two lines of flexible pipe were laid to improve the harbor 
service. One, between Long Island and Rainsford Island, 
a 4-inch pipe, 3,534 feet in length, to replace a pipe of the same 
size laid in 1895; and the other, between Moon Island and 
Long Island, a 12-inch pipe, 3,231 feet long, to supplement 
a 6-inch line laid in 1895, which for several years past has 
been too small to furnish a satisfactory supply for Long, 
Rainsford, Gallop's and Lo veil's islands and for Fort 
Warren; the effect of putting this 12-inch line into service is 
shown on opposite page by gauge dials from Long Island 
taken before and after the line was turned on. 

The flexible pipes were laid in a trench 5 feet deep by 
means of a long chute extending from the deck of a lighter to 
the bottom of the trench, the Hghter being pulled ahead as 
each pipe was jointed. The pipes were tested for leakage 
before the trench was refilled and again after refilling, and the 
actual leakage found, under 85 pounds pressure, in the two 
lines after the completion of the work was as follows: 

3,534 linear feet, 4-inch, Long to Rainsford, 0.086 cubic feet per minute. 
3,231 linear feet, 12-inch, Moon to Long, 0.036 cubic feet per minute. 

The 20-inch and 30-inch low service and 16-inch high 
service mains on Warren Bridge are in a very unsafe location, 
the 30-inch and 16-inch pipes being particularly a source of 
anxiety, as they have already failed several times by pulling 



GAUGE DIALS FROM LONG ISLAND SHOWING INCREASE PRESSURE 
DUE TO 12-INCH LINE LAID BETWEEN MOON AND LONG ISLANDS 




December 8, 1908. 




January 17, 1909. 



Engineering Department. 71 

apart. They are laid under the flooring of the bridge with 
six 90° bends, the unbalanced pressures from which can only be 
transferred by rods and struts to the wooden bridge structure, 
which was built in 1883-84. On account of the age of the 
bridge there is nothing sufficiently substantial to fasten to and 
the result is frequent and dangerous movements of the pipes. 
The low service pipes have not been in use under usual con- 
ditions since 1898, when the state began to supply water to 
the city and the pressure in Charlestown was raised about 
15 pounds above that in the city proper. It has, however, 
been necessary to put them in service a number of times when 
one or more of the regular supply mains have been out of 
commission. In the event of a very serious fire in the down- 
town district an effective head might only be maintained 
through their use, and the ability to obtain a supply from the 
northern low service of the Metropolitan waterworks by 
means of these pipes would be invaluable in time of con- 
flagration or serious accident by making available the large 
storage of Spot pond at a time when such help was 
vital. 

The 16-inch pipe on the Warren Bridge is the only feed for 
the high service district of Charlestown and its failure would 
destroy high service in that section. I recommend that a 
tunnel large enough to carry a 36-inch and a 16-inch pipe be 
built under the Charles river in the neighborhood of Warren 
Bridge; the approximate cost of this work is S100,000. 

East Boston is supplied by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board through two lines of 24-inch pipe crossing 
Chelsea creek from Chelsea to East Boston. These pipes, laid 
in 1871 and 1900, are laid on the bottom of the creek and are 
entirely exposed above low water mark on each shore; their 
location is particularly dangerous on the Chelsea shore, where 
the pipes lie in a dock about 200 feet long and 100 feet wide, 
closely built up on each side; at one point a brick building, 
62 feet high, is located within 43 feet of the nearest pipe, and 
on the opposite side of the dock a wooden building, 28 feet 
high, is 43 feet distant from the pipes. These buildings are 
very inflammable and in the event of their destruction by fire 
at a time when the tide was low the water pipes would be in 
great danger from falling walls and from heat. The safety 
of this supply is further imperiled by the weakened condition 
of the mains, owing to electrolysis ; the actual conditions found 
in the pipes are described as follows on page 136 of the sixth 
annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board: "Examination of the pipes showed that they were 
badly disintegrated; at one point a hole was cut clear through 



72 City Document No. 16. 

the pipe while making the examination, causing a leak which 
had to be plugged." 

A new and independent supply main for East Boston 
should be laid without delay. 

The ''double high" service of West Roxbury comprises 
substantially that part of the territory above grade 170. The 
supply for this service is pumped by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board at a pumping station formerly operated 
by the City of Boston, on Washington street, near Metropol- 
itan avenue. The water is delivered by the pumps directly 
into the mains and thence into a standpipe on Mt. Bellevue 
in the southerly end of the district ; from this standpipe the 
system extends about 1 J miles in a westerly and more than 4 
miles in a northerly direction and for about 2f miles of the 
distance through a single line of pipe. The water supply 
under these conditions is very unreliable. I recommend for the 
purpose of guarding the supply that a second standpipe be 
built in the northerly part of the system and that more 
storage be provided on Mt. Bellevue. 

The storage for the high service supply of the city is 
limited to Fisher Hill Reservoir, built by the city in 1887 and 
containing when full 15,000,000 gallons, and to a reservoir in 
Newton, on Waban Hill, containing 13,500,000 gallons, a 
total quantity of water sufficient for about a day's supply, 
while there is a high service storage reservoir containing 
41,400,000 gallons for the municipalities north of the city 
to safeguard a daily consumption of but 9,000,000 gallons 
daily. This condition of the City of Boston high service 
supply is not in accord with conservative practice; an acci- 
dent might occur to the pumping machinery at Chestnut 
Hill of such a nature that repairs could not be made in a 
day's time. I recommend that a storage reservoir or reser- 
voirs be built on the high service system, large enough to 
hold at least six days' supply for the entire high service of 
the city. This reservoir is of such importance to the city 
that if the Metropolitan Board for any reason cannot con- 
struct it the city should do so, especially as in the event of 
its construction by the state the city would have to pay for 
80 per cent of the cost of construction. 

The daily average consumption of water in the city during 
the past year was 98,379,300 gallons, or 158 gallons per cap- 
ita; of this amount at least one-third is preventable waste, 
due to leaks which it is possible to locate and to improper 
use of water. For several years past no serious attempt 
has been made to restrict waste, and the water takers have 
lost sight of the fact that water is a commodity of value and 









































Averag 




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City Base, to 


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Engineering Department. 73 

that its use should be restricted. Under the provisions of 
chapter 524 of the Acts of 1907 the city is required to meter 
annually 5 per cent of the unmetered services as well as all 
new ones. Assuming that eventually meters on every ser- 
vice will bring about a normal consumption, still other 
methods are necessary if the desii-ed result is to be had in a 
reasonable length of time; in fact, other methods must be 
employed in any event if the large waste in the main pipes 
and services is to be checked. 

The Deacon waste water meter is an instrument that 
records the rate of flow into any particular section of the pipe 
system and, when operated in connection with an efficient 
inspection service, it forms a most efficient means of detecting 
waste. The city now is equipped with eighty-five of these 
meters, or enough to cover the entire city; they should be 
operated in connection with a thoroughly efficient force of 
inspectors, and a rigid system of fines should be imposed in 
case of failui'e to repair leaks after reasonable notice. In 
addition, the water used in public buildings, schoolhouses, etc., 
should be at once metered and a charge made at least for all 
water wasted. Further, all city and state departments should 
be required to make daily or weekly returns to the Water 
Commissioner, giving data by which the water used from 
hydrants and standpipes may be (approximately) estimated. 
There seems to be no reason why the consumption should 
not be reduced at least to 100 gallons per capita. 



74 



City Document No. 16. 







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BOYLSTON STREET BRIDGE. FLOOR BEAM OF ORIGINAL BRIDGE, 
CORRODED AND BROKEN. 



Engineering Department. 



75 



General Statistics. 

Daily average amount used during year 1908 (gallons) 
Daily average amount used through meters during year 

1908 (gallons) 

Number of services February 1, 1909 .... 
Number of meters in service February 1, 1909 . 
Number of meters under supervision February 1, 1909 
Number of elevators under supervision February 1, 1909 
Length of supply and distributing mains, in miles, Feb 

ruary 1, 1909 

Number of public hydrants in use February 1, 1909 
Yearly revenue from annual rates (assessed) 
Yearly revenue from metered water (assessed) . 
Percentage of total revenue from metered water 
Yearly expense of maintenance .... 



98,379,300 

22,557,600 

95,045 

5,380 

118 

584 

753.17 

7,919 

$1,382,789.78 

$1,260,363.18 

47.7 

$551,773.02 



Miscellaneous. 



Estimates have been made for extending the bridge on 
Dorchester avenue at Ashmont and for pubHc convenience 
stations near the corner of Broadway and Dorchester avenue 
and at Roxbury Crossing. 

Plans have been prepared and estimates made for the 
aboHshment of the grade crossing of Saratoga street and the 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Raih'oad, for a fence on Paine 
street at Mount Hope Cemetery, for a wall and fence at 
North Dorchester burial ground, for the abohshment of the 
grade crossing of Welles avenue and the Shawmut branch of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad and for a 
bulkhead on Northampton street, adjoining the land of 
A. W. Cole. 

Reports have been made on the settlement of Charlesgate 
Bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad and Ipswich street, 
on the level of the ground water in the Back Bay district, on 
the grades of streets occupied by street railway tracks and 
on repairing a portion of the yard of the Wayfarers' Lodge. 

Grades were given for a driveway at the Parental School. 

A topographical survey of Mount Hope Cemetery is in 
progress. 

A survey of the Neponset Bridge and a plan of the present 
structure have been made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



76 City Document No. 16. 



CITY ENGINEERS, 
1850-1909. 



E. H. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 18, 1850, to October, 1855. 

(Died August 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died August 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to November 25, 1872. 

(Died June 14, 1908.) 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Resigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 

(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to the present time. 



Engineering Department. 77 



APPENDICES. 



Appendix A. — Table Showing the Widths of Openings for 
Vessels in all Bridges Provided with 
Draws in the City of Boston, January, 
1909. 

Appendix B. — Engineering Department Property Schedule. 

Appendix C. — Elevations and Datum Planes Referred to 
Boston City Base. 

Appendix D. — Engineering Department Annual Reports, 
1867-1907. 

Appendix E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordi- 
nances. 

Appendix F. — Meridian Line. 



City Document No. 16. 



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80 



City Document No. 16. 



APPENDIX B. 



Engineering Department Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 automobile. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as fol- 
lows : 

2 Temple transits. 

7 Buff & Berger transits. 
1 Berger & Sons transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

8 Gurley transits. 

1 Keuffel & Esser level. 

2 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 
7 Gurley levels. 

13 Boston rods. 

4 New York rods. 

10 Troy rods. 

4 Philadelphia rods. 

Apparatus for blueprinting. 

Cases for plans and books. 

Reference library, 1,492 volumes. 



1.5,071 plans engineering works, 

loose. 
14 volumes plans engineering works, 

bound. 
Photographs of engineering works. 
1 microscope. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holsteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pair field glasses. 
3 typewriters. 

2 dynamometers. 
1 pantagraph. 

3 calculating macliines. 
1 volt meter. 

1 comptometer. 

2 thermophones. 

2 cameras. 

3 planimeters. 

1 Bourdon pressure gauge. 
1 BiuTOUghs arithmometer. 
1 Steiger calculating machine. 
1 Egli calculating machine. 



Surveying Division. 



2 Temple transits. 

2 Moody transits. 

2 Buff & Berger transits. 

4 Berger & Sons transits. 

1 Buff & Buff transit. 

1 Stackpole transit. 

1 Troughton & Sims transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

7 Buff & Berger levels. 

1 Moody level. 



18 Boston rods. 
1 Troy rod. 
8 iron rods. 
32,669 plans. 
3,747 hthographed maps. 
1 pantagraph. 
3 planimeters. 

1 Federal blueprinting machine, 
No. 10. 



Engineering Department, 81 



APPENDIX C. 



Elevations and Datum Planes Referred to Boston City Base. 

Feet. 

*0.00 Boston city base. This base is used by the towns 
of Brookline and Watertown and the cities of 
Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Newton and Waltham. 
— 4.98 Cambridge city base. 
+0.64 Somerville city base. 

0.00 Metropolitan Park Commission base. 
+0.60 Harbor and Land Commission base. 
10.00 Metropolitan Water Board base. 
— 100.00 Metropolitan Sewerage Board base. 
— 100.00 Boston Transit Commission base. 
— 100.00 Charles River Commission base. 

15.62 Highest recorded tide, April 16, 1851. Charles 

Harris, Level Book 22 (15.10 above mean low 
water, United States Coast Survey Chart of Boston 
Harbor, 1857). 
15.45 Old bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 

Charlestown Navy Yard. 
15.11 New bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 
Charlestown Navy Yard, northwest end over 
crowfoot. 
5.00 Piles to be cut off for buildings. 
12.00 Minimum cellar bottom grade. 
9.82 South Boston base. Formerly in use, now aban- 
doned. 
99.40 Charles river flood elevation, at the Brookline 

pumping station, February 13, 1886. 
97.50 Charles river flood elevation, March, 1902. 
95.66 Charles river average flood elevation, 1886 to 1902, 

both inclusive. 
0.00 Mean low water about 1830.t 
+0.34 Mean low water, 1867.t 
+0.79 Mean low water, 1902.t 
+0.58 Navy yard base, 1902.} 

10.63 Mean high water, 1902.t 
5.71 Mean sea level, 1902.t 

9.84 Mean rise and fall of tide, 1902.t 

* Definition of Boston city base: "Boston city base is a datum plane 15 feet above 
the average height of the sill of the Charlestown dry dock." (Page 552, report of 
Committee on Charles River Dam, 1903.) 

t John R. Freeman, civil engineer, in report to Committee on Charles River 
Dam, 1903, pp. 562, 569, 570. 



82 



City Document No. 16. 



The following tidal records may be of interest : 



High Tides. 

[Plane of Reference, Boston City 



Feet. 


Date. 


Where taken. 


By Whom. 


15.62 


Apri 


,. iSC' 






14.94 


Nov. 


27, 1898 


Average of 15 observations. 




13 72 


Nov 


8 1900 


Maiden Bridge 


F. P. Spalding. 


14.19 


Nov. 


25, 1901 


Average of 10 observations. 




13.60 


Dec. 


14, 1902 


North Ferry, Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 


13.00 


Feb. 


17, 1903 


North Ferry, Bo.ston 


J. H. Edmonds. 


13.40 


Jan. 


14, 1904 


North Ferry, Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 


14.83 


Jan. 


25, 1905 


Average of 34 observations. 




14.70 


Jan. 


25, 1905 


Inner harbor, 10 observations. 




13 60 


Nov 


1 ?, 1 Qflfi 


Neponset Bridge . . 


M. F. Toomey. 


13.00 


April 19, 1907 


North Ferry 


J. H. Edmonds. 


13 00 


Dec. 


5, 1907 













Low Tides. 



5.60 


Nov. 27, 1898 


Deer Island, Met. sewer station 


Self-recording gauge 


—3.50 


Feb. 1, 1900 


Deer Island, Met. sewer station 


Self-recording gauge 


—2.94 


Feb. 3, 1900 


South Boston station, Edison Electric, 


D. A. Harrington. 


—3.00 


Feb. 4, 1904 


Deer Island, Met. sewer station 


Self-recording gauge 


—2.70 


Mar. 23, 1905 


Deer Island, Met. sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 



Engineering Department. 



83 



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84 City Document No. 16. 



APPENDIX E. 



(Revised Ordinances, 1898, Chapter 16.) Engineering 
Department. 

Section 1. The Engineering Department shall be under 
the charge of the City Engineer, who shall be consulted on all 
matters relating to public improvements of every kind in 
respect to which the advice of a civil engineer or architect 
would be of service; shall, unless otherwise specifically pro- 
vided, take charge of the construction of all public works of 
the city which properly come under the direction of a civil 
engineer; shall make such surveys, plans, estimates, state- 
ments and descriptions, and take such levels and prepare 
such specifications and contracts as the mayor, the board of 
aldermen, the common council, any committee of the city 
council or of either branch thereof, the board of street com- 
missioners, or any officer in charge of a department, may need 
in the discharge of its duties; shall, upon being notified by 
the superintendent of streets, supervise all repairs on the 
bridges of the city used as highways which affect the safety 
of the structures, and shall, when required by the mayor or 
any officer in charge of a department, measure the work done 
by contract for the city, and certify to the results of such 
measurement. Said engineer shall have the custody of all 
surveys and plans relating to the laying out, locating anew, 
altering, widening and grading of streets ; and his office shall 
be deemed to be the office of the surveyor of highways. 

Sect. 2. Said engineer shall, in his annual report, include 
a report upon the safety and completeness of all ponds, basins 
and reservoirs under the charge of the water department, and 
of all bridges within the citv limits used as highways. 

(Stat. 1870, chap. 337; Stat. 1895, chap. 449, par. 21.) 



Engineering Department. 



85 



APPENDIX F. 



Meridian Line. 

In 1870 an act was passed by the Massachusetts Legislature requiring 
each land surveyor in the state at least once in every year to adjust and 
verify his compass by the meridian line established in the county wherein 
his surveys were to be made. 

A meridian was marked by stone monuments and a book of record kept 
by a custodian designated by the County Commissioners. 

The law compelling surveyors to test their compasses annually was 
modified in 1875, so that surveyors who did not use the compass in turn- 
ing angles were relieved from the penalty attaching to the violation of the 
original act. 

The meridian posts for the County of Suffolk were placed on the south- 
erly portion of the "Parade Ground" on Boston Common. They are 
granite posts, three in number, placed 200 feet apart, are 18 inches square 
at the base, 1 foot square at the top, and 8 feet long, being firmly set in a 
bed of concrete with their tops originally just below the surface of the 
ground. 

A stone curb was placed even with the surface of the ground over the 
top of each post, with a metallic composition cover. 

The surface of that part of the Common where the posts are set was 
raised several feet in 1897, the posts being protected by building a brick 
manhole around each stone, the posts being accessible by the removal of 
the manhole cover. 

As the cover and cap of the manholes are made of iron it is now necessary 
to set up the compass in the production of the line marked by the monu- 
ment to avoid local attraction. The point selected has been 290 feet north 
of the northerly stone. 

The following table gives the number of tests for each year, with the 
average readings: 



Year. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 
Readings 

West of 
North. 


Year. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 
Readings 
West of 

North. 


1871 


9 


10-53-46 


1890 


y 


11-39-56 


1872 


8 


11-09-47 


1891 


4 


11-49-30 


1873 


3 


11-07-53 


1892 


- 




1874 


3 


11-11-40 


1893 


1 


12-32-20 


1875 


3 


10-58-33 


1894 


_ 




1876 


2 


11-13-00 


1895 


_ 




1877 


8 


11-12-35 


1896 


- 




1878 


13 


11-28-56 


1897 


8 


12-04-37 


1879 


4 


11-35-15 


1898 


6 


12-34-34 


1880 


7 


11-34-53 


1899 


_ 




1881 


3 


11-28-23 


1900 


8 


12-33-45 


1882 


5 


11-36-18 


1901 


- 




1883 


5 


11^2-04 


1902 


13 


12-44^4 


1884 


6 


11-46-13 


1903 


8 


12-43-42 


1885 


8 


11-43-12 


1904 


4 


12-48-45 


1886 


4 


11-39-58 


1905 


12 


12-56^2 


1887 


14 


11-51-54 


1906 


6 


13-19-20 


1888 


3 


11-40-57 


1907 


8 


13-16-35 


1889 


- 




1908 


12 


13-27-05 



CONTENTS 



REPORT ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT FOR 1908. 



General Index to Contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892, will be 
found in Report of February 1, 1892. 

PAGE. 

Engineering Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Abolishment of grade crossings: 

" " " Congress street 2 

" " " Dorchester avenue 3 

" " " Dudley street 3 

« " " East Boston 3 

" " " Freeport, Walnut and other 

streets 3 

" " " Atlantic Avenue Bridge 3 

« " " Boylston Street Bridge 4 

" " " Chelsea Street Bridge 4 

" " " Congress Street Bridge 4 

" " " BrookUne Street Bridge 4 

« " " Engineering Department 2 

« " " Hvmtington Avenue Bridge 5 

" " " Northern avenue and Sleeper street, 5 

" " " Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 5 

Bridges Inspected 6 

" wholly supported by Boston 6 

« " " " railroads 35 

" of which Boston supports the part within its Umits, 8 
« " " " pays a part of the cost of main- 
tenance 8 

" supported by railroad corporations 10 

" B. & A. R.R 10 

" B &M. R.R.andB. &A.R.R 10 

« « " B. & M. R.R., Eastern Div 10 

« " " B., R. B. & L. R.R 10 

« " " N.Y.,N.H.&H.R.R., Midland Div., 10 

" N.Y.,N.H.&H.R.R., Old Colony Div., 10 

« " " N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Prov. Div. . . 10 

« " " MetropoHtan Park Commission 11 

" " " Charles River Basin Commission .. . 11 

Total number (163) 11 

Bridges 6 

Agassiz road, in the Fens 12 

Albany street, over B. & A. R.R. freight tracks 12 

Allston, over B. & A. R.R 12 

Arborway, over Stony brook 12 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., West 

Roxbury 12 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 12 

Athens street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 13 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge 13 

Audubon road, over B. & A. R.R 13 

Austin Street Bridge, over B. & M. R.R., Charlestown 13 

87 



88 City Document No. 16. 



Bridges, continued. 

Baker street at Brook Farm, West Roxbury 14 

Beacon street, over outlet of the Fens 14 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R.R 14 

Belle vue street, over Muddy river, in Riverway 14 

Bennington street, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 14 

Bennington street, over B., R. B. & L. R.R 15 

Berkeley street, over B. & A. R.R. and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R.R 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Bridle path, Riverway 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river 15 

Berwick Park Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R.R 15 

Blakemore street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. ... 16 

Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. . 16 

Bolton street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 16 

Boston street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.. . 16 

Boylston street. Back Bay Fens 16 

Boylston street, B. & A. R.R 45 

Bridle path, over Muddy river, in Riverway 16 

Broadway, over Fort Point channel 17 

Broadway, over B. & A. R.R 17 

Brookhne avenue, over B. & A. R.R 17 

Brookhne avenue, over Muddy river, in Riverway 17 

Brookline street to Cambridge 17 

Brookline street, over B. & A. R.R 18 

Brooks street, Brighton 18 

Byron street, B., R. B. & L. R.R 18 

Cambridge bridge 18 

Cambridge street 18 

Cambridge street, over B. & M. and B. & A. R.R 19 

Canal, or Craigie's, temporary 23 

Castle Island Footbridge 19 

Central avenue, over Neponset river 19 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over B. & A. R.R 19 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over Ipswich street 19 

Charlestown 20 

Chelsea, over B. & M. R.R 20 

Chelsea (North) 20 

Chelsea (South) 21 

Chelsea street 21 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Frankhn Park 21 

Columbia road, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.. 21 

Columbia road, over Shoreham street 21 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R.R and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R.R 21 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 22 

Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens 22 

Congress street 22 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R.R 22 

Cottage Street Footbridge, East Boston 22 

Curtis Street Bridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 23 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R.R. and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R.R 23 

Dorchester avenue, over Port Point channel 23 

Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R.R 24 

Dover street 24 

Elhcott arch, in Franklin Park 24 

Everett street, over B. & A. R.R., Brighton 24 

Fen Bridge, in the Fens 24 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R.R 24 

Florence Street Bridge, over Stony brook 25 



Engineering Department. 89 



Bridges, continued. 

Forest Hills entrance in Franklin Park 25 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R.R 25 

Gold street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 25 

Granite to Milton 25 

Harvard to Cambridge 25 

Harvard street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 26 

Huntington avenue, over B. & A. R.R 26 

Huntington avenue, over Muddy river 26 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge, over Stony brook 26 

Ips'nich street, over waterway in the Fens 26 

Irvington Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R.R 26 

L Street Bridge 27 

Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park 27 

Longwood avenue, over Muddy river and B. & A. R.R 27 

Maiden 27 

Massachusetts avenue, over B. & A. R.R 66 

Massachusetts avenue, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R , 27 

Mattapan to Milton 28 

Maverick Street Bridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 28 

Meridian street 28 

Milton 28 

Mt. Washington avenue 29 

Neponset 29 

Neptune road, over B., R. B. & L. R.R 29 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 29 

Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., 

Dorchester 29 

Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., 

near Mattapan Station 29 

North Beacon street 30 

North Harvard street 30 

Oakland street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. . . 30 
Perkins Street Footbridge, over B. & M. R.R. and B. & A. 

R.R., Charlestown 30 

Porter Street Bridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 30 

Prescott Street Bridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 31 

Prison Point 31 

Pubhc Garden Footbridge 31 

Saratoga Street Bridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 31 

Scarboro' Pond Footbridge, Franklin Park 31 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R.R. and N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., 31 

Southampton Street Bridge, over South bay sluice 32 

Southampton street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R.R 32 

Spring street to Dedham 32 

Summer street, over A street 32 

" " " B street 32 

" " C street 32 

" " " Fort Point channel 32 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. freight tracks .... 33 

Summer street, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston 33 

Warren 33 

Webster Street Footbridge, over B. & A. R.R., East Boston . . 33 

West Fourth street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., 34 
West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. 

&H. R.R 34 

Western avenue to Cambridge 34 

Western avenue to WatertowTi 34 

Winthrop 35 

Wood Island Park Footbridge 35 



90 City Document No. 16. 

PAGE. 

Surveying Division 36 

Lines and grades given and paving work measured, 1908 37 

Plans in Surveying Division 42 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1908 : 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital 44 

Boylston Street Bridge 44 

Chelsea Street Bridge 54 

Congress Street Bridge 54 

Deer Island boimdary wall 55 

East Boston grade crossings 56 

Long Island Wharf 65 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 66 

Meridian Street Bridge 68 

Miscellaneous 75 

Northern avenue and Sleeper street 68 

Streets : 

Working plans, specifications and forms of contract were pre- 
pared and forwarded for assessment streets 69 

Water Works : 

Consumption of water 72 

Extension of mains 70 

Table showing monthly rainfall in inches during 1908 at 

various places in eastern Massachusetts 74 

General statistics 75 

City Engineers, 1850=1909 76 



Engineering Department, 91 



APPENDICES. 



PAGE. 

Appendix A. — Table showing the widths of openings for vessels 

in all bridges provided with draws 78 

B. — Engineering Department property schedule 80 

C. — Elevations referred to Boston city base 81 

D. — Engineering Department annual reports, 1867- 

1908 83 

E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordinances 84 

F. — Meridian Une 85 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Boylston Street Bridge, showing corrosion and method of rebuild- 
ing 44-54 

Waterworks, gauge dials from Long Island showing increased 

pressure due to 12-inch hne laid between Moon and Long Islands, 70 



\ 

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ill , 

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.4 1912