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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"

1 



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LE 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 

BOSTON 

FOR THE YEAR 1909 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1910 



Compliwentfi of 

youis |i llomhe, 

Actin6 City Engineer. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER 

BOSTON 

FOR THE YEAR 1909 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1910 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1909-10. 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, February 7, 1910. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — The following report of the expenses and 
operation of this department for the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1910, is submitted. 

The duties of the City Engineer include the designing 
and superintending of the construction of new bridges, 
retaining walls, city wharves and such other public 
engineering works as the City Council may authorize; 
the making of such survey plans, estimates, statements 
and descriptions and taking such levels as the city 
government or any of its departments or committees 
may require; the custody of all surveys and plans relat- 
ing to the laying out, locating anew, altering, widening 
or discontinuing of streets, and the new engineering 
construction for all departments of the city. He shall 
be consulted on all work where the advice of a civil 
engineer would be of service. The office of the City 
Engineer was established by ordinance on October 31, 
1850, and by chapter 449 of the Acts of 1895. 



2 City Document No. 14. 

The following is a statement of engineering expenses 
from February 1, 1909, to January 31, 1910: 



Amount of department appropriation for 1909-10, 
Amount expended for 1909-10 . . . . 

Unexpended balance 



$84,000 00 
83,950 45 

$49 55 



$6,000 00 

69,824 29 

$1,600 00 
751 11 



Statement of Expenditures, Department Appro- 
priation. 
(As per Auditor's Report, page 63.) 

Salaries : 

Engineer, William Jackson . 
Assistant engineers, draughtsmen 
and assistants 

Automobile .... 
Repairs, supphes and storage . 

Traveling expenses 
Instruments, tools and repairs 

Printing 

Telephone service 
Blueprinting and photographing 
Horse-keeping .... 

Stationery 

Books and papers 

Washing and small supplies . 

Expert services .... 

Binding and plans 

Furniture and office expenses . 

Postage 

Typewriting .... 
Messenger service 



$75,824 29 


2,351 11 


1,217 14 


1,026 99 


612 06 


571 98 


566 03 


450 75 


343 30 


315 58 


177 86 


147 00 


122 08 


99 60 


60 20 


35 28 


29 20 



$83,950 45 



Abolishment of Grade Crossings. 
Dorchester Avenue. 
Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 31, 1910: 
Items of expenditure : 

Land-taking $1,175 00 

Expended previous to 1909 1,056,107 27 

$1,057,282 27 



Engineering Department. 



East Boston. 






Expenditures from February 1, 


1909, 


to January 31 


1910: 


Items of expenditure : 








Land damages 






$6,091 15 


Expert services 






2,067 50 


Relocating water pipes 






1,492 81 


Personal damages . 






1,094 58 



Expended previous to 1909 



$10,746 04 
375,225 12 

$385,971 16 



Freeport, Walnut and other Streets. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 31, 
Items of expenditure : 



1910: 



Land damages 








$2,000 00 


Photographs of buildings 




96 00 


Copying records . 




2 63 




$2,098 63 


Expended previous to 1909 




35,855 50 
$37,954 13 


Chelsea Street Bridge. 




Appropriation and revenue 


. . $75,018 00 




Less amount transferred to 


Park 




Department May 20, 1909 . 20,000 00 








$55,018 00 


Expenditures from February ] 


L, 1909, to January 




31, 1910: 






Items of expenditure : 






Draw span 


. $16,155 43 




Draw foundation, etc. 






7,767 13 




Engineering . 






5,076 84 




Draw machinery . 






3,240 79 




East Boston approach 






1,737 00 




Inspection 






1,238 52 




Abutment 






667 00 




Gates 






552 50 




Drawi;enders' house 






535 50 




Printing . 






79 86 




Advertising 






77 17 








$37,127 74 




Expended previous to 1909 


10,295 22 










47,422 96 






Unexpended balance Febn 


nary 


l,ic 


)10 . 


$7,595 04 



City Document No. 14. 



Congress Street Bridge. 



Appropriation 






. . . $35,000 00 


Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 


31, 1910: 


Items of expenditure : 


Rebuilding bridge .... $11,727 65 


Draw fender pier . . 






3,944 79 


Draw machinery . 






1,006 39 


Draw repairs 






989 00 


Temporary bridge 






546 34 


Engineering . 






145 00 


Inspection 






66 50 


Printing 






39 20 


Advertising . 






37 17 


Drawtenders' house 






35 22 



Expended previous to 1909 



$18,537 26 
10,208 31 



Unexpended balance February 1, 1910 



28,745 57 
$6,254 43 



Huntington Avenue Bridge. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 

31, 1910: 
Items of expenditure: 

- - ■ ■ $47,802 45 

2,756 29 

698 60 

681 85 

57 49 

33 08 



Rebuilding bridge 

Engineering 

Inspection 

Paving . 

Printing 

Advertising 



Expended previous to 1909 



$52,029 76 
417 74 



Unexpended balance February 1, 1910 . 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge. 

Appropriation $40,000 00 

Less amount transferred to Park 
Department, May 20, 1909 . . 10,000 00 



$55,000 00 



52,447 50 
$2,552 50 



$30,000 00 



Carried forward $30,000 00 



Engineeking Department. 5 

Brought forward $30,000 00 

Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 

31, 1910: 
Items of expenditure : 
Rebuilding bridge .... $4,447 26 



Paving 

Relocating water pipes 

Engineering 

Advertising 



2,089 83 

913 29 

110 24 

6 50 



$7,567 12 
Expended previous to 1909 . . 20,492 70 



28,059 82 



Unexpended balance February 1, 1910 . $1,940 18 

Northern Avenue and Sleeper Street. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1909, to January 31, 1910: 

Items of expenditure : 

Paving, fences, etc $35,828 69 

Sea wall at docks 2 and 3 11,408 93 

Engineering 4,485 82 

Draw machinerv 3,112 46 

Inspection ." 1,472 04 

Draw span 867 04 

Rent of office 373 09 

Printing 69 27 

Drawtenders' house 68 20 

Telephone 59 62 

Advertising 32 20 

Piers and abutment 27 60 

$57,804 96 
Expended previous to 1909 762,179 69 

$819,984 65 



Bridges. 

The annual inspection of all highway and footbridges 
has been made, together with special examinations 
when notified by the Street Department of the progress 
of repairs. 

The management of all the bridges and draws between 
Cambridge and Boston, by the Acts of 1898, chapter 467, 
is vested in a board of two commissioners, which has 
charge of the following seven bridges, viz.: Brookline 
Street, Cambridge, Cambridge Street, Harvard, North 
Harvard Street, Prison Point and Western Avenue to 



6 City Document No. 14. 

Cambridge; one-half the cost of the maintenance of 
these bridges is paid by each of these cities. 

Mt. Washington Avenue Bridge has been removed 
during the year and the new bridge at the Charles 
River Dam was opened to travel January 27, 1910. 

In the list of bridges those marked with a star (*) 
are over navigable waters, and are each provided with a 
draw, the openings of which are shown in a table in 
Appendix A. 

I. — Bridges Wholly Supported by Boston. 

Agassiz road, in the Fens. 

Allston Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 
Arborway Bridge, in Arborway, over Stony brook. 
Ashland street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 

* Atlantic avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Audubon road, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Baker street, at Brook Farm, West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to the Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bennington street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

R. R., East Boston. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bernier Street Footbridge in the Riverway. 
Berwick Park Footbridge, over Providence Division, 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Blakemore street, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R., West Roxbury. 
Bolton street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R. 
Boylston street, in the Fens. 
Boyiston street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bridle path, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

* Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brooks street, over Brooks street, Brighton. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 

* Castle Island Footbridge, from Marine Park, South 
Boston, to Castle Island. 

Charlesgate, over Boston & Albany R. R., in the Fens. 
Charlesgate, over Ipswich street, in the Fens. 



Engineering Department. 7 

* Charlestown Bridge, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea Bridge South, over South channel, Mystic 

river. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin Park. 
Columbia road, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Columbia road, over Shoreham street. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

* Commercial point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 
Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens. 

* Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cottage Farm Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., 

Brighton. 
Cottage Street Footbridge, over flats, East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany R. R. and 

Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

* Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 
Ellicott arch, in Franklin Park. 

Fen Bridge, in the Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

Florence street, over Stony brook. 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin Park. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Providence Divi- 
sion, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Gold street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook. 

Ipswich street, over waterway, in the Fens. 

Irvington Street Footbridge, over Providence Division, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* L street, over Reserved channel, South Boston. 
Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park. 

* Maiden Bridge, from Charlestown to Everett. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Newton street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 

* Northern avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Public Garden Footbridge. 

Scarboro Pond Footbridge, in Franklin Park. 



8 City Document No. 14. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. and Prov- 
idence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Southampton street, east of Midland Division, N. Y., 
N.H.&H.R.R. 

Summer street, over A street, South Boston. 

Summer street, over B street. South Boston. 

Summer street, over C street, South Boston. 

* Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 

* Warren Bridge, Boston to Charlestown. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Providence Divi- 
sion, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Winthrop Bridge, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

Wood Island Park Footbridge, over Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn R. R. 



II. — Bridges of which Boston Supports the Part 
Within its Limits. 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Bernier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river, in the 

Riverway. 
Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea Bridge North, over North channel. Mystic 

river. 

* Granite Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Huntington avenue, over Muddy river, in the River- 
way. 

Longwood avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway, 

and over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Milton Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset Bridge, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 

III. — Bridges of which Boston Pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany R. R. freight 

tracks. 
Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony 

Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Austin street, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 
Bennington street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., Mattapan. 
Boston street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Brookline street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brookline street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Cambridge street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads. 
Chelsea Bridge, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 
Curtis street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 

* Harvard Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Harvard street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., Dorchester. 
Maverick street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., near Dorchester station. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., near Blue Hill avenue station. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Oakland street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., Mattapan. 
Perkins street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads, Charlestown. 
Porter street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Prescott street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 

* Prison Point Bridge, Charlestown to Cambridge. 
Saratoga street, over Boston & Albany R. R,, East 

Boston. 
Southampton street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 
Summer street, over freight tracks, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R. 
Sumner street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Webster Street Footbridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., 

East Boston. 
West Fourth street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R., South Boston. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



10 City Document No. 14. 

IV. — Bridges Supported by Railroad Corporations. 

1st. — Boston & Albany R. R. 
Albany street, over passenger tracks. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads. 
Main street, Charlestown. 
Mystic avenue, Charlestown. 

3d. — Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Division. 
Wauwatosa avenue. East Boston. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Everett street. East Boston. 

5th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Midland 

Division. 
Broadway. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Fifth street. 
Fourth street. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Second street. 
Silver street. 
Sixth street. 
Third street. 
Washington street, Dorchester. 

6th. ~ New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Old 

Colony Division. 
Adams street. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Freeport street. 
Medway street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Providence 

Division. 
Albany street. 

Baker street. West Roxbury. 
Beech street. West Roxbury. 
Bellevue street, West Roxbury. 



Engineering Department. 11 

Berkeley street. 

Broadway. 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury. 

Castle square. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue. 

Dartmouth street. 

Gardner street. West Roxbury. 

Harrison avenue. 

Park street. West Roxbury. 

Walworth street. West Roxbury. 

Washington street. 

V. — Bridge Supported by the Metropolitan Park 
Commission. 

Mattapan Bridge, Dorchester to Milton. 

VI. — Bridges Supported by the Charles River 
Basin Commission. 

* Charles River Dam Bridge. 

* Craigie temporary bridge. 

Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . 74 
II. Number of which Boston supports that part 

within its limits 13 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the 

cost of maintenance 33 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations: 

1. Boston & Albany R. R. ... 5 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 

Railroads 2 

3. Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Div., 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R., 1 

5. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Midland Div., 10 

6. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Old Colony 

Div 5 

7. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Providence 

Div . 16 

V. Number supported by the Metropolitan Park 

Commission 1 

VI. Number supported by Charles River Basin 

Commission 2 

Total 163 



12 City Document No. 14. 

Agassiz Road Bridge {in the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1887 of brick and stone 
masonry. It is maintained by the Park Department 
and is in good condition. 

Albany Street Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R. 
Freight Tracks). 
The original structure was built in 1856-57, and 
rebuilt in 1867-68. The present bridge was built in 
1886-87, and is maintained in part by the City of 
Boston and in part by the Boston & Albany R. R. 
An examination of this bridge made in August, 1909, 
showed that the floor beams, including connections, and 
the lower chords were in such condition as to be unsafe 
for a load covering the full width of the roadway. On 
recommendation of this department team travel was 
restricted to two roadways, each about 10 feet wide, 
adjoining the curb lines, a portion in the center of the 
roadway about 7 feet in width being thrown out of 
service. Plans are now in preparation for rebuilding 
the bridge this year. 

Allston Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R.R., Brighton). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The sidewalks 
have been rebuilt during the year. The ironwork 
above the floor should be painted this year. 

Arborway Bridge {over Stony Brook, in Arborway near 
Forest Hills Station). 
This is a wooden bridge resting on abutments of 
vulcanized spruce piles. The stringers and under- 
planking are of vulcanized hard pine. When this 
bridge was built in 1893 it was assumed that within 
ten years the channel of Stony brook would be improved 
at this point, and a temporary structure was all that 
was deemed necessary. The piles and some of the 
stringers are badly decayed and unless a permanent 
structure is to be built at once the bridge should be 
rebuilt within the next two years. The bridge is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Ashland Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., West Roxbury). 
The present structure is of iron and was built in 1875. 
With the exception of one of the fences the bridge is in 
fair condition. 



Engineering Department. 13 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Old 
Colony Division, New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R.). 
This is a wooden bridge formerly maintained by the 
railroad company. It was lengthened on the Boston 
side in 1895, and now the city maintains 75 feet of the 
northerly part. The deck and sidewalk planking have 
been patched. The deck planking and some stringers 
should be renewed. The bridge will soon be extended 
on the city side. (See page 46.) 

Athens Street Bridge (over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1874. The sidewalks 
and deck planking should be renewed and the bridge 
should be painted. 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge {over South Terminal Station 
Yard and Fort Point Channel). 
The bridge was completed and opened to travel 
August 12, 1907. On the Boston approach is a steel 
viaduct about 450 feet in length, consisting of a series 
of short plate girder and I-beam spans of the deck type. 
The bridge over the railroad yard consists of two steel 
plate girder spans and two steel truss spans, all except 
one plate girder span being through spans. Fort Point 
channel is crossed by one truss span, a plate girder span, 
an I-beam span and a draw span, all being deck struc- 
tures built of steel. The draw span is a swing or turn- 
table draw, 184 feet long on center line, operated by 
electricity and compressed air. On the approaches and 
across Fort Point channel the bridge is 50 feet in width ; 
over the railroad yard the width is 60 feet. Some 
painting should be done this year, otherwise the bridge 
is in good condition. (See page 88, Appendix G.) 

Audubon Road Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R.). 
This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1893-94, 
and is maintained by the Park Department. A new 
flooring for the roadway has been built during the 
year and new sidewalk planking laid. It was not 
deemed necessary to put in new stringers, although 
some of them were soft on upper edges. The top flanges 
of girders only were painted but the bridge, especially 
over main tracks, should be cleaned and painted this 
year. , 



14 City Document No. 14. 



Austin Street Bridge {over Boston & Mai?ie R. R., 
Charlestown) . 
This is a steel plate girder deck bridge with steel floor 
beams supporting a wooden flooring, built under the 
decree of the Superior Court abolishing the Austin street 
grade crossing. It was built in 1903-07 by the Boston 
& Maine Railroad Company and is over the railroad 
location. The bridge has fourteen spans resting on 
stone piers; it is 50 feet wide and has one 10-foot plank 
sidewalk and a roadway 39 feet wide, paved with stone 
blocks. Part of this bridge was opened to travel May 6, 
1903, being connected to the Cambridge end by tem- 
porary structures. The entire bridge was opened to 
travel September 17, 1907. The surface of the bridge 
is maintained by the city, the remainder by the railroad 
company. The fences should be repaired and painted; 
otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Baker Street Bridge {at Brook Farm, West Roxhury). 
This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet span. 
It is in fair condition. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Outlet of the Fens) . 
This bridge was built in 1880-81, and had up to 1901 a 
wooden floor for the roadway. At the latter date a new 
floor was built, consisting of 18-inch steel I-beams incased 
in Portland cement concrete, and the roadway was paved 
with hard pine blocks, treated by the creoresinate pro- 
cess. New sidewalks have been laid during the year and 
some painting done. The bridge is in good condition. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1884-85, widened in 
1887-88, and the central roadway further widened in 
1890 for the convenience and at the expense of the street 
railway company. During the year the two side road- 
/ ways have been rebuilt, new stringers put in where 
necessary and new planking for both courses put in; 
new sidewalks have been laid and the ironwork below 
the flooring has been cleaned and painted. Within a 
few weeks the Boston Elevated Railway Company will 
rebuild the flooring of the middle roadway which carries 
both of its tracks. When this work is completed the 
bridge will be in good condition, excepting the ironwork 
above the floor which should be painted this season or 
early next. 



Engineering Department. 15 

Bellevue Street Bridge (over Muddy River, in Riverway). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 44 feet span and 15 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the park departments 
of Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly by 
them. 

Bennington Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a steel plate girder bridge built by the railroad 
company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The sur- 
face of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest 
of the structure by the railroad company. The bridge 
should be painted, otherwise it is in good condition. 

Bennington Street Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach & 
Lynn R. R.). 
This bridge is made up of two independent parts; the 
old part is of iron, built in 1889; the new part is of steel, 
built in 1902. The intown roadway has been replanked 
and a small amount of painting has been done. The 
bridge should be painted, and the out of town roadway 
will soon need redecking. Otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. 

Berkeley Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R. and 

Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford 

R. R.). 

The bridge over the tracks of the Boston & Albany 
R. R., which is maintained by the city, was originally 
built for the Boston Water Power Company, and 
accepted by the city in 1869. The present structure 
over these tracks is a through plate girder bridge and 
was built in 1891. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. was built in 1899 and is maintained by that com- 
pany. Work is now in progress under a contract with 
the Boston Bridge Works for repairing and strengthening 
the bridges over both railroads, the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company joining with the city in this work. 
The work will be completed early in the spring. 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Bridle Path, in Riverway). 
This is a semicircular masonry arch of 38 feet 4 inches 
span. It was built in 1893 and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 



16 City Document No. 14. 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Muddy River). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 52 feet span and 14 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the park departments 
of Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly by 
them. 

Berwick Park Footbridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1894. The iron 
stairs and piers were new, but the trusses and floor beams 
were those built for Frankhn street in 1883. New treads 
have been put on all the stairways during the year and 
the bridge is in good condition. 

Blakemore Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82. The railings 
and the trusses above the floor have been painted the 
past year. The lower planking is poor and should be 
renewed and the ironwork below floor painted. 

Blue Hill Avenue Bridge {over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a steel bridge, built by the N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. in 1903 and is over the railroad location. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, the 
remainder by the railroad company. The steel work has 
been painted and the bridge is in good condition, excepting 
the sidewalk planking, which should be renewed. 

Bolton Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a wooden bridge, originally built in 1889 and 
rebuilt in 1905. The deck planking needs renewal. 

Boston Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a plate girder bridge, built in 1900 in connection 
with the abohshment of the grade crossing on Dor- 
chester avenue. The surface of the bridge is main- 
tained by the city and the rest of the structure by the 
railroad company. The south sidewalk and the boxing 
around the girders need repairing, and the bridge should 
be painted. The deck planking should be renewed 
within two years. 



Engineering Department. 17 

Boylston Street Arch Bridge (in the Fens). 
This is a stone arch bridge, built in 1881. It is in 
good condition, with the exception of coping, which 
should be repointed without further delay. 

Boylston Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The first bridge on this location was built in 1886-88 
and the present structure in 1907-08. A full descrip- 
tion of the new bridge was given in last year's report. 

Bridle Path Bridge (over Muddy River, in the Riverway). 
This is a masonry bridge of three arches; the central 
arch is elliptical in form, with a span of 30 feet and a 
rise of 9 feet 6 inches; the side arches are semicircular, 
15 feet in diameter. It was built in 1894 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. It is in good con- 
dition. 

Broadway Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 
The draw was built in 1874-75 and the supports for 
the draw landings are iron columns. The rest of the 
bridge is built of steel on masonry piers, and was *"^ 
rebuilt in 1901-04. The steel work over Foundry street, 
the plate girder section over the railroad, the gates 
and some of the fencing should be painted. The tracks 
and wheels below the draw are in poor condition. The 
stone piers should be repointed. The planking on the 
draw should be renewed and the planking on the water- 
way and pier needs repairing. The draw is old and too 
light for heavy travel and should be rebuilt within two 
years. The main bridge is in good condition except the 
painting. 



Broadway Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
The old bridge, built in 1880-81, was replaced in 
1900 by the present bridge. The examinations which 
have been made from ladders of the under side of this 
bridge show that the steel is badly corroded. The 
flooring should be stripped off, the steel work thoroughly 
cleaned and painted; while this is being done an oppor- 
tunity will be afforded for a more careful examination 
to be made than is now possible, which may reveal 
conditions requiring more extensive repairs. It is 
recommended that this work be done early this year. 



X 



18 City Document No. 14. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1884. With the excep- 
tion of the paint the bridge is in fair condition; it should 
be painted next year at the latest. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge (over Muddy River, in the 
Riverway) . 
This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. 
It was built in 1892 by the park departments of Boston 
and Brookline and is maintained by them jointly. 

Brookline Street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

This is a wooden trestle bridge, built on a pile founda- 
tion in 1906, and is in care of the Commissioners for 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges; the city pays one-half 
the cost of maintenance. It was built as a temporary 
structure, with the expectation that it would be replaced 
by a permanent bridge within ten years. As the bridge 
is now three years old the construction of the permanent 
bridge should be commenced within a year or two. 
Additional scuppers are needed at both ends of the 
bridge. It is in good condition. 

Brookline Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, on steel trestles, 
with wooden floor and wearing surface, built in 1906. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. 
It is in good condition. 

Brooks Street Bridge (near Faneuil Statioii, Brighton). 
This is a steel bridge with a concrete and asphalt 
floor, built in 1902. The bridge should be painted and 
the roadway surface should be repaired. 

Byron Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
R. R.). 
This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. The stringers 
and bulkheads are in poor condition and the bridge 
needs a general overhauling. 

Cambridge Bridge (from Boston to Cambridge). 
The new bridge was completed in the fall of 1907, 
the formal dedication having taken place July 31. 



Engineering Department. 19 

Since December 21, 1907, the bridge has been main- 
tained by the Commissioners for the Boston and Cam- 
bridge Bridges, and the city pays one-half of the cost 
of maintenance. The structure is in good condition 
and needs only the yearly cleaning and customary 
touching up of the paint, which has been made unsightly 
in spots on account of the seepage of water. It is of 
the utmost importance that this bridge should be kept 
properly painted in order that it may not be deteriorated 
by rust. 

Cambridge Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf 
draw. The Boston end was rebuilt in 1884. The draw 
sidewalk on Boston end and the Cambridge end of the 
bridge were rebuilt in 1890. The bridge is in the care 
of the Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge 
Bridges, and the city pays one-half the cost of main- 
tenance. The bridge is in poor condition and should 
be extensively repaired this year. 

Cambridge Street Bridge {over Boston & Maine and 
Boston & Albany Railroads, Charlestown). 
This is a through steel truss bridge of four spans, built 
in 1901 by the Boston & Maine R. R. The surface is 
maintained by the city, the remainder by the railroad 
company. The sidewalks have been repaired. The 
bridge is very rusty and should be painted. 

Castle Island Footbridge {from Marine Park to Castle 
Island) . 
This is a temporary footbridge, built in 1892, and 
is maintained by the Park Department. It connects 
Marine Park with Castle Island, and is furnished with a 
draw, so that if desired by the United States authorities 
the island can be cut off from the mainland. Repairs 
have been made on the planking. The fences should be 
painted and more planking should be renewed. The 
bridge is in fair condition. 

Central Avenue Bridge {over Neponset River, Dorchester 

Lower Mills). 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1876. The city 

maintains the part within its limits. The sidewalk 

planking has been repaired, and is in good condition. The 



20 City Document No. 14. 

roadway planking and some of the stringers are now 
being renewed. The fences should be painted. The 
ironwork is in good condition. 



Charles River Da7n 
This is a steel bridge in line with the roadway over 
Charles River Dam and is in charge of the Charles 
River Basin Commission. It was built in 1906-07 by 
the American Bridge Company and consists of a short 
fixed span 9 feet 2 inches in length on the westerly side 
and a movable portion 63 feet 10 inches in length. 
The movable portion is composed of two leaves of the 
Scherzer rolling lift type, 18 inches apart, each leaf 
having a roadway 30 feet 10 inches wide and a sidewalk 
10 feet wide, and being operated by a 35 horse power 
electric motor. The bridge was opened to travel 
January 27, 1910. 

Charlesgate Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., in the 
Fens). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. The railings have 
been repaired and painted, but the whole bridge should 
be cleaned and painted this year, and an opportunity 
given to make a careful examination of the ironwork. 
As the abutments are constantly settling, decreasing the 
head room over the railroad, the bridge should be raised 
to its former elevation at the time the stripping is done. 

Charlesgate Bridge {over Ipswich street, in the Fens). 

This is a deck plate girder bridge with a buckle plate 
floor built in 1900-01. The roadway is paved with 
asphalt and the sidewalks with artificial stone. The 
bridge should be painted as the portions under the side- 
walks are in very rusty condition. 

Charlestown Bridge {from Boston to Charlestown) . 

This bridge was opened to public travel November 27, 
1899, and superseded the old Charles River Bridge, 
which was built in 1785-86. 

The present bridge over the river consists of ten spans 
of the deck plate type, each 85 feet long, and a swing or 
turntable draw 240 feet 6 inches long. 

The bridges over Water street and over the railroad 
tracks each consist of two spans of steel I-beams, with 
brick arches turned between the beams. 



Engineering Department. 21 

The drawtenders' house has been painted during the 
year. The steel work for the whole length of the bridge 
should be thoroughly cleaned and painted. The railings 
already have been allowed to rust so badly that in some 
panels the bottom rail has been eaten entirely through. 
The surfaces of both sidewalks are badly worn, that on 
the downstream side has now reached a condition which 
calls for resurfacing at once. 

Chelsea Bridge {over Boston & Maine R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company in 1894, and is over the railroad loca- 
tion. The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, 
the remainder by the railroad company. Repairs have 
/ k.been made on the sidewalk planking. The wheel guard 
Ms too low and narrow; the fences and sidewalk planking 
need repairing and the bridge needs painting; some of 
the track stringers begin to show decay. Otherwise the 
bridge is in good condition. 

Chelsea Bridge North (over North Channel, Mystic River). 
y^ The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
j^ original structure was built in 1802-03. The piles 
under the main bridge were driven in 1880. The upper 
part of the bridge, the draw and draw foundations were 
built in 1895. The draw-way was widened to 60 feet in 
1900, the draw foundation being enlarged, the draw 
lengthened and the draw piers built. The draw has been 
strengthened, its flooring has been renewed, and the floor 
beams have been painted. The waterway has been 
extensively repaired. The upper part of the bridge 
should be painted; new machinery should be provided; 
several truck wheels need renewing; an additional bear- 
ing should be provided at the skew end; the sidewalk 
planking should be repaired; the track stringers and the 
fences should be repaired; the old fender guards are in 
poor condition. 

Chelsea Bridge South (over South Channel, Mystic River). 
This is a pile bridge with an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-03. The piles of the present 
bridge were driven and the draw was built in 1877. 
That part of the bridge above the girder caps was rebuilt 
at a higher grade and the draw was raised in 1895. The 
landings of the draw have been repaired. Where the 
rebuilding of 1895 joins the old work repairs are needed 



22 City Document No. 14. 

on both sides of the bridge. The draw is too Hght for 
the present travel; the bridge should be rebuilt. 

Chelsea Street Bridge {from East Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a steel swing draw. 
The original bridge was built in 1834. It was rebuilt in 
1848, 1873, 1894-95 and in 1908-09. The bridge is 347 
feet long, about 100 feet of the Chelsea end was built in 
1894-95 and strengthened in 1906; the rest of the bridge, 
including the draw, was built in 1908-09 and was opened 
to all travel January 3, 1910. (See page 48.) 

Circuit Drive Bridge (over Scarboro Pond, in Franklin 
Park). 
This is an elliptical masonry arch of 30 feet span and 
6 feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Columbia Road Bridge (over Old Colony Division, New 

York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., and Old Colony 

Avenue). 

This is a deck plate girder bridge of two equal spans, 

one over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 

and the other over Old Colony avenue, and was built 

in 1902. The roadway is paved with Canton brick, 

cement grout joints, and laid on hard pine planking. 

The sidewalks are badly cracked and should be put in 

good condition without further delay. Some painting 

has been done, but the whole bridge should be painted, 

the portion over the avenue being very rusty. 

Columbia Road Bridge {over Shoreham street). 
This bridge was built in 1902. It is a two-span steel 
beam structure, with brick and concrete arches turned 
between the beams; the roadway is paved with Canton 
brick laid with cement grout joints. The sidewalks are 
of artificial stone. The girders and all the exposed steel 
work are rusting badly and should be painted at once 
to prevent the further corrosion of the structure. 

Columbus Avenue Bridges {over Boston & Albany R. R. 

and Providence Division, New York, New Haven & 

Hartford R. R.). 
The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was 
built in 1876-77 and is maintained by the city. In 



Engineeeing Department. 23 

1899 the bridge was shortened 11 feet at its south end 
and a pier built in place of the old south abutment. 
In 1907 new plate girders were built on the center side 
of each roadway and the roadway floor strengthened. 
The bridge is now in good condition, except the side- 
walk floor beams which should be strengthened. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R. R. was built in 1899 and is maintained by that 
company. The asphalt pavement needs patching. 

Commercial Point or Tenean Bridge (Dorchester). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The piles were driven in 1875. The draw and upper 
part of the bridge were rebuilt in 1901. The fences 
should be repaired and painted and the blocking sup- 
porting the machinery should be renewed. Otherwise 
the bridge is in good condition. 

Commonwealth Avenue Bridge (in the Fens). 
This is an iron bridge and was built in 1881-82. It 
has had an entire new hard pine lower planking put on 
during the past year and the sidewalks have been patched. 
The railings should be painted, otherwise the bridge is 
in good condition. It is maintained by the Park 
Department. 

Congress Street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron turntable 
draw on a stone foundation, and was built in 1874-75. 
The part of the bridge above the caps was entirely 
rebuilt in 1908 and the machinery of the draw span 
put in good order. This year the draw fender pier was 
replanked, new stringers put in, new floor built in the 
drawtenders'' house and the house painted. The bridge 
is now in good condition and can probably be maintained 
so for the next ten years. 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 
Brighton) . 
The present bridge was built in 1895-96. With the 
exception of the plate girders on the outside lines of 
the bridge and some special construction under the side- 
walks, the superstructure is composed of 20-inch steel 



24 City Document No. 14. 

beams, filled between with brick arches and Portland 
cement concrete, on which is a wearing surface of Sicilian 
rock asphalt. The bridge should be painted and the 
asphalt roadways repaired; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

Cottage Street Footbridge {over Flats, East Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, built in 1889, for foot 
travel. It was extensively repaired in 1905. The 
sheathing and some of the stringers need renewal and 
the fences should be painted. 

Craigie Temporary Bridge. 
This is a wooden pile bridge, built by the Charles 
River Basin Commission to accommodate travel dur- 
ing the construction of the Charles River Dam. It 
was opened to travel July 2, 1905, and was closed to 
travel January 27, 1910, when the traffic was turned 
over the roadway at the dam. This bridge will soon 
be removed. 

Curtis Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 
Boston). 
This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by 
the railroad company in 1906 under the decree of the 
Superior Court abolishing the grade crossings in East 
Boston. It was opened to travel December 29, 1906. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge should be painted; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

Dartmouth Street Bridges {over Boston & Albany R. R. 

and Providence Division New York, New Haven & 

Hartford R. R.). 

The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was 

built in 1878-79 and is maintained by the city. Very 

extensive changes were made in this bridge in 1899 by 

the railroad companies, necessitated by the new location 

of the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. leading 

to the South Station and the abandoning of the tracks 

connecting this road with the Boston & Albany R. R. 

Some of the hangers and the bottom flanges of the floor 



Engineering Department. 25 

beams over the main tracks have been reduced in sec- 
tion so materially by the corrosive action of the fumes 
from the locomotives that it will be necessary to rebuild 
portions of this bridge next year. 

The bridge is now in fair condition and can be kept 
so the next two years. The question of building a new 
structure should, however, be considered this year. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile 
iron draw, and was rebuilt in 1891-92. The lower part 
of the draw has been painted. The fences and upper 
part of the draw should be painted. The sidewalk 
planking and a few curb stringers on the draw should 
be renewed; the track timbers should be repaired; the 
sills and planking on the wharves, waterway and piers 
need renewal; some of the spur shores have begun to 
decay and should be refitted; the waterway should be 
repaired and the wreckage among the piling should be 
removed. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Old Colony Division 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a steel bridge, built in 1900, over the new loca- 
tion of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the 
structure by the railroad company. The bridge should 
be painted. The deck planking will need renewal 
within a couple of years. The bridge is in fair condition. 

Dover Street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 
This was originally a wooden pile bridge, built in 
1805, rebuilt in 1858-59, and again in 1876. In 1893-94, 
upon the abolition of the grade crossing of the Old 
Colony R. R., the present iron structure, resting on 
masonry piers, was built. The sidewalks on the draw 
have been replanked. The planking on the wharves has 
been repaired and miscellaneous repairs have been made. 
The bridge should be painted this year; new track is 
needed for the draw; the rack should be adjusted in 
order that the draw may be reversed; the concrete of 
the draw foundation pier should be repaired and the 
other piers should be repointed; the end lifts need re- 
pairing and the draw should be raised. The waterway 
needs repairing. The upstream asphalt sidewalk needs 
resurfacing. 



26 City Document No. 14. 

Ellicott Arch Bridge {in Franklin Park). 
This is a semicircular masonry arch of 17 feet 6 inches 
span. It was built in 1889 and is maintained by the 
Park Department. 

Everett Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
Brighton) . 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1891 by the Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company. The bridge was cleaned 
and painted and a new floor built for roadway and side- 
walks in 1908. The bridge is now in good condition. 

Fens Bridge {in the Fens). 
This bridge was built in 1891-93. It is in good 
condition. 

Ferdinand Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. In 1899 this 
bridge was shortened about 3 feet at its southerly end 
and the old south abutment replaced by a brick pier. 
The bridge is now in fair condition except the fences; 
these should be repaired and painted. 

Florence Street Bridge {over Stony Brook). 
This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet span, 
and is in fair condition. 

Forest Hills Entrance Bridge {in Franklin Park). 
This bridge was built in 1894-95. It is maintained 
by the Park Department and is in good condition. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge {over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1904. New 
wooden treads have been put in on the stairways the 
past year. The bridge is in good condition except the 
paint; it is recommended that the bridge be painted this 
year. 

Gold Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 

New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge with a wooden flooring and was 

built in 1895, replacing a footbridge which was built 

in 1890. The sidewalk planking has been repaired. 



Engineering Department. 27 

The bridge is very rusty and should be painted this year 
and the fences should be repaired. The walls need a 
small amount of pointing, otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. 

Granite Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton). 
This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. The bridge 
was originally built in 1837. The draw and the adjoin- 
ing bay were repaired in 1907, and during the past year 
the rest of the bridge was entirely rebuilt. Four bents 
of oak piles were driven, new hard pine caps, stringers 
and lower planking were put in and spruce sheathing 
and sidewalk plank laid. The work was done under a 
contract with WiUiam H. Ellis at a cost of $2,743. The 
abutment was also repaired where the sewer outlet 
passes through it. 

Harvard Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge) . 
This is an iron bridge with an iron turntable draw, and 
was built in 1887-91. This bridge is in the care of the 
Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 
and the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. 
The roadway of the fixed spans was repaired in 1901-02 
and a wooden block paving laid. In 1905 the asphalt 
walks were replaced by 3-inch hard pine and the railings 
were painted. During the year the draw span has been 
thoroughly repaired and raised about 2 inches by the , 
insertion of metal shims between the girders and the^ 
drum. This raising was necessitated by the gradual 
shrinkage and compression of the timber work on which 
the draw rests. New hard pine roadway stringers and 
new roadway flooring have been laid, the end floor 
beams have been strengthened and the apparatus for 
lifting the ends of the draw has been thoroughly 
repaired. The draw span is now in good condition. 
The draw fender pier and the fender guards should be 
repaired and the whole bridge painted. It is recom- 
mended that this work be done this year. 

Harvard Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., Dorchester). 
This is a steel bridge, built in 1904, under an agree- 
ment between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
The steel work is very rusty and should be cleaned and 



28 City Document No. 14. 

painted this year, and the deck planking should be 
renewed within a couple of years. Otherwise the bridge 
is in good condition. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.) . 
The old bridge built in 1872 has been removed and a 
new bridge built during the year. (See page 50.) 

Huntington Avenue Bridge (over Muddy River). 
This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1893 and is maintained by the park depart- 
ments of Boston and Brookhne. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge (over Stony Brook). 
This is a stringer bridge of 19 feet 9 inches clear span 
measured at right angles, and was built in 1904. It is in 
good condition. 

Ipswich Street Bridge (over Waterway, in the Fens). 
The bridge was built in 1898, and is in good condition, 
except the railings, which should be painted this year. 

Irvington Street Footbridge (over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a steel footbridge and was built in 1892. It is 
in fair condition, but will need painting in another year. 

L Street Bridge (over Reserved Channel, South Boston). 
This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron retractile 
draw. It was built in 1892. A new spruce deck has been 
put on the draw, a few stringers have been renewed, part 
of the draw has been painted, and some work has been 
done on the pier and track stringers. The bridge should 
be painted, except the part done last year, the water- 
way and planking on the pier and the sidewalks should 
be repaired. The piling in the fender guards and under 
the 6-foot walk are in poor condition. The planking 
under the abutment and wing walls on the South Boston 
side is being eaten by the worms and additional gravel 
should be deposited about the planking. 

Leverett Pond Footbridge (in Leverett Park). 
This is a segmental masonry arch of 24 feet span and 5 
feet 5 inches rise. It was built in 1894, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. 



Engineering Department. 29 

Longivood Avenue Bridge {over Muddy River and Boston 
& Albany R. R.). 
The original wooden structure was built in 1857 and 
rebuilt in 1877. The present masonrj^ arches were 
erected in 1899 by the park departments of Boston and 
Brookline, and are maintained jointly by them. 

Maiden Bridge {from Charlestown to Everett). 
This is a wooden pile bridge, with a retractile steel 
draw, and was rebuilt in 1900-01. The planking on the 
draw has been repaired and is now in fair condition. 
The bridge should be painted, the walks should be resur- 
faced, the paving should be repaired and some of the 
capsills on the pier should be renewed; about 50 feet 
of fence should be built on the wing of the abutment. 
Otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R.R.). 
The original bridge was built in 1876 and the present 
structure in 1908. It is a deck plate girder bridge with 
steel floor beams, 6-inch hard pine roadway and 4-inch 
sidewalk planking. The roadway is paved with wooden 
blocks and the sidewalk with paving brick. It is in 
good condition. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge {over Providence Division 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge built in 1876. The roadways 
carrying street cars were strengthened in 1908, and new 
sidewalks were built last year. The middle roadway 
should be repaired and the whole bridge painted this year. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 
This is a three-arch bridge of Melan construction with 
granite facing. It was built in 1902 by the Metropolitan 
Park Commission and is maintained by it. The arches 
are semicircular, two spans being 14 feet and one 50 feet; 
the bridge has one 56-foot roadway and two 12-foot 
sidewalks. It is in good condition. 

Maverick Street Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior 



30 City Document No. 14. 

Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
fence should be painted. The bridge is in good con- 
dition. 

Meridian Street Bridge {from East Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden turntable 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was 
built in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was 
widened and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, which 
was built in 1875-76. The chords of the draw were 
rebuilt in 1896. The main part of the bridge was 
strengthened for the use of heavy electrics in 1906, and 
the draw was repaired and strengthened in 1907. Con- 
siderable work has been done on the waterways. The 
draw should be adjusted. The roadway planking, the 
waterways and the pier are in very poor condition. The 
bridge should be rebuilt within two years. 

Milton Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure is very old. It was widened in 1871- 
72. The older part of this bridge was built of stone, 
and the widening is an iron structure on stone columns. 
The westerly sidewalk was rebuilt on new iron girders 
and floor beams in 1900. The sidewalks have been 
rebuilt and the iron beams and girders painted. The 
old planking on the bridge should be uncovered and 
examined, and it will probably need renewal. One of the 
capstones over the first waterway is cracked. 

Mt. Washington Avenue Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was removed during the past year and 
the channelway dredged. 

Neponset Bridge {from Dorchester to Quincy) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure was built in 1802. The steel draw 
and the adjoining upper part of the bridge has been 
rebuilt. The Boston end of the bridge, built in 1877, 
is in poor condition and should be rebuilt; the piers are 
in very poor condition. 



Engineering Department. 31 



Neptune Road Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1887-88, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. The sidewalk plank- 
ing has been renewed; the bridge should be painted. 
Otherwise it is in good condition. 

Newton Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron bridge, built in 1872. A new lower 
planking has been laid this year and such stringers as 
were found in poor condition have been replaced by new 
timber; new fences have been built and the ironwork 
cleaned and painted. This bridge is one of the oldest 
in the city, but can probably be maintained in safe con- 
dition for two or three years longer if carefully watched 
and the deck is kept in good condition. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Blue Hill 
Avenue Station). 
This is a through lattice girder bridge, and was built by 
the railroad company in 1902. The surface of the bridge 
is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. The steel work has been 
painted and the bridge is in good condition except side- 
walk planking, which should be renewed or thoroughly 
repaired. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Dorchester 
Station). 
This is a steel bridge, built in 1905, under an agreement 

between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

The bridge is very rusty and should be painted and the 

boxing at the trusses should be repaired. Otherwise the 

bridge is in good condition. 

North Beacon Street Bridge {from Brighton to Watertown) . 
The city maintains the part within its limits. This 
is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. The 
original structure was built in 1822, and the present one 
in 1884. The bridge is in poor condition. It should 
be rebuilt without a draw. 



32 City Document No. 14. 

North Harvard Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge). 
This bridge was originally built in 1662, and was 
rebuilt, except the piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 
1891. The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners 
for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges; the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The bridge is in very 
poor condition, and the building of a new bridge should 
be commenced at once. 

Northern Avenue Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 
(See page 53.) 

Oakland Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a new steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1902 under the decree of the Supe- 
rior Court abolishing the grade crossing at this point. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
steel work has been painted and slight repairs made to 
the sidewalks during the year; the planking of both 
walks should be renewed this year. 

Perkins Street Footbridge {over Boston & Maine R. R. 
and Boston & Albany R. R., in Charlestown) . 
This bridge was built in 1900 and opened to travel 
February 2, 1901. It has two spans of wooden stringers 
and one span of steel Pratt trusses. The surface is 
maintained by the city, the rest of the structure by 
the railroad companies. The fence has been repaired 
and painted. The bridge should be painted. The 
smoke from locomotives is eating part of the steel of 
this bridge rapidly, and it will soon need repairing. 

Porter Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a through steel truss bridge, built in 1906-07 by 
the railroad company under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the 
rest of the structure by the railroad company. It is in 
good condition. 

Prescott Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a new through steel plate girder bridge, built by 
the railroad company in 1906-07 under the decree of the 



Engineering Department. 33 

Superior Court abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge should be painted. Otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

Prison Point Bridge {from Charlestown to Cambridge). 
This bridge includes a steel draw and its landings and 
was built in 1907. The original bridge was built in 1833. 
The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for the 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays one- 
half the cost of maintenance. The shafting has been 
adjusted and the machinery has been housed in. A 
drawtenders' house should be provided and part of the 
old pier should be rebuilt. 

Public Garden Footbridge. 
This is an iron bridge and was built in 1867. Some 
new wooden floor beams were put in during the year, but 
the entire woodwork should be renewed this year, as 
recommended in last year's report, if it is proposed to 
keep the present structure in service. 

Saratoga Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built in 1907 
by the railroad company under the decree of the Superior 
Court aboHshing grade crossings in East Boston. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and the 
rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge should be painted; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

Scarboro' Pond Footbridge (in Franklin Park). 
This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 feet span and 
8 feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Shawmut Avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R. 

and Providence Division, New York, New Haven 

& Hartford R. R.). 
The original bridge, built in 1871, was removed and a 
new through plate girder bridge erected in 1904. The 
bridge is in good condition, but should be painted in a 
thorough manner this year. 



34 City Document No. 14. 

Southampton Street Bridge (over South Bay Sluice). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1875 as a temporary 
structure. It is in very poor condition and should be 
rebuilt. 

Southampton Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1901-02. 
The surface is maintained by the city, the rest of the 
structure by the railroad company. The bridge has 
been redecked and the boxing at the girders renewed. 
The bridge should be painted. 

Spring Street Bridge (from West Roxhury to Dedham). 
This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part 
within its limits. The piers and arches were pointed in 
1905 and granite copings, surmounted by iron railings, 
built on both sides of the bridge. The part within the 
city's limits is now in good condition, but the railings 
should be painted the coming summer. 

Summer Street Bridges {over A, B and C Streets). 

These bridges were built in connection with the aboli- 
tion of the grade crossing on Congress street and were 
opened to travel in 1900. The bridge over A street is a 
steel deck plate girder structure, with a paved roadway 
of granite blocks and asphalt sidewalks. 

The bridge over B street is a through plate girder 
structure, with a paved roadway of granite blocks and 
asphalt sidewalks. 

The bridge over C street is a two-span steel beam 
structure, with brick and concrete arches turned between 
the beams; the roadway is paved with granite blocks 
and the sidewalks with asphalt. 

These bridges are in good condition, except that those 
over B and C streets should have some painting done on 
them. 

Summer Street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel) . 
This bridge was built in 1899-1900 in connection 
with the abohtion of the grade crossing on Congress 
street. It is a four-span deck plate girder bridge, resting 
on masonry piers, with two retractile draws over a 50- 
foot channelway. The roadway of the fixed spans has a 



Engineering Department. 35 

granite block paving, and the sidewalks have asphalt 
wearing surfaces. The whole structure should be 
painted this year and the draws and the draw founda- 
tions should be replanked. 

Summer Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R. Freight Tracks). 
This bridge was built in 1900 in connection with the 
abolition of the grade crossing on Congress street, and is 
maintained by the city and the railroad company, the 
former maintaining the wearing surface and the latter 
maintaining the rest of the structure. It has four spans, 
consisting of three through trusses each, and has a 
granite paved roadway and asphalt sidewalks. The 
whole bridge is now in good condition with the exception 
of the sidewalks. The walks laid on this bridge were 
made of an asphalt composition containing but a small 
percentage of asphalt; they are now in very poor con- 
dition and should be rebuilt or resurfaced this year. 

Sumner Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by 
the railroad compan}^ in 1908 under the decree of the 
Superior Court abolishing the grade crossings in East 
Boston. The bridge was opened to travel of all kinds 
June 22, 1908. The surface of the bridge is maintained 
by the city and the rest of the structure by the railroad 
company. It is in good condition. 

Warren Bridge {from Boston to Charlestown). 
This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retrac- 
tile iron draw. The present structure was built in 
1883-84. The downstream pier and wharf have been 
replanked and some stringers have been added ; some of 
the deck planking and the downstream corner of the 
waterway have been repaired; the lower part of the 
draw has been painted and miscellaneous repairs have 
been made. The fender guards on the Charlestown 
side are in poor condition; the sides of the waterway, 
the planking on the upstream wharf and in the draw pit 
should be extensively repaired ; the curbing on the draw 
should be realigned; the landing shoes need adjustment; 
the sidewalk and fencing on the westerly side of the 
bridge, city end, should be extended about 20 feet, and 



36 City Document No. 14. 

the concrete sidewalks should be resurfaced. The mid- 
way sections near the gates should be rebuilt; additional 
oak sleepers are needed on the track timbers, and a few 
sidewalk piles should be strengthened. 

Webster Street Footbridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 
This is a new through steel truss bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1908 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. It 
is in good condition. 

West Fourth Street Bridge (over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
In 1893-94 the grade crossing of the Old Colony R. R. 
on this street was abolished, and an iron bridge built, 
extending from the end of Dover Street Bridge, at the 
South Boston side of Fort Point channel, to the easterly 
line of Foundry street. The surface is maintained by 
the city, the rest of the structure by the railroad com- 
pany. The sidewalk planking has been put in fair con- 
dition. Some of the stringers near Dover Street Bridge 
and some of the boxing are in poor condition and need 
repairing and the bridge should be painted. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge (over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 
This is an iron footbridge, built in 1882. New treads 
have been built on all stairways during the past year 
and the bridge is now in fair condition. 

Western Avenue Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 
This bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for 
the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The draw and upper 
part of this bridge is now being rebuilt. The bridge 
was closed to team travel December 14, 1909, provision 
being made for foot travel across the channel by a 
temporary bridge. (See page 70.) 

Western Avenue Bridge {Brighton to Watertown). 
The city maintains the part within its limits. This 
is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw, and was 



Engineering Department. 37 

rebuilt in 1892-93. Only minor repairs have been made; 
the Boston end of the draw should be raised; the draw 
should be adjusted and the bearings under the ends of 
the girders should be renewed; the planking and capsills 
on the piers and along the waterways should be repaired ; 
some of the spur shores are broken and should be refitted ; 
the sidewalk planking and deck planking on draw and 
main bridge need renewal, also some of the planking on 
the draw foundation, and the bridge should be painted 
this year; some of the piles in the fender guard are in 
poor condition. 

Winthrop Bridge (from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge without a draw. It was origi- 
nally built in 1839; it was rebuilt in 1851; exten- 
sively repaired in 1870 and has been repaired many 
times since. The abutment at the Winthrop end needs 
pinning up, as there has been some settlement; the 
bulkhead at the Boston end, some of the outside bolsters 
and the roadway planking are in very poor condition. 
Some of the piles are somewhat eaten by worms; the 
piles in deep water should be examined by a diver, and 
additional piles may be needed. The waterway should 
be partially filled, and the bridge should be rebuilt of a 
shorter length. If this bridge is to be kept in service 
extensive repairs should be made at once. 

Wood Island Park Footbridge. 
This is a steel footbridge, built in 1898-99, and con- 
nects Prescott street. East Boston, with Wood Island 
Park, spanning the tracks of the Boston, Revere Beach 
& Lynn R. R. The bridge is in good condition. 

Bridges wholly Supported by Railroad Corporations. 
Harrison Avenue Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 
R. R. is in poor condition and should be rebuilt. The 
other highway bridges maintained by the several rail- 
road companies are in good or fair condition. 



38 City Document No. 14. 



SURVEYING DIVISION. 



The work of the Surveying Division during the past 
year has consisted of the making of such surveys and 
plans as have been required by the several city depart- 
ments, and giving lines and grades of public streets 
when requested by abutters intending to build. 

* Forty-two petitions requesting that catch-basins 
should be constructed were reported upon to the Sewer 
Division. 

* One hundred and two plans of streets showing pro- 
posed locations of future catch-basins were furnished 
on request of the Sewer Division. 

* Two hundred and fifty-five catch-basins were staked 
out on request of the Sewer Division, and duplicate 
sketches showing locations of spikes, ties, etc., were 
furnished. 

* Measurements have been obtained on twenty-five 
streets for the Sewer Division, for the purpose of making 
sewer assessments. 

* Two hundred and forty-four plans of proposed 
underground pipes, conduits, etc., were examined for 
the Sewer Division, and locations for proposed future 
catch-basins were marked on plans. 

Three hundred and forty-two notices of contracts to 
lay artificial stone sidewalks were received, lines and 
grades were marked, the work measured when com- 
pleted and reported upon to the Street Department. 
In one hundred and thirty cases the Street Depart- 
ment was notified that existing edgestones should be 
reset preparatory to the laying of artificial stone. 

Seventy notices of the completion of repairs to arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks were received, the work measured 
and reported upon to the Street Department. 

Twenty-nine petitions to make sidewalk openings for 
areas, bulkheads, etc., were received from the Street 
Department and reported upon. 

One hundred and sixty-nine requests for edgestone 
were examined and the amount required reported upon 
to the Street Department. 

* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out Depart- 
ments. 



Engineering Department. 



39 



Sidewalk grades for forty-one streets were furnished 
engineers and architects for plans of twenty-one new 
buildings. 

Eleven plans of streets were made for sidewalk assess- 
ments on request of the Street Department. 

Eighteen hundred and eighty-six orders were attended 
to for the Highway Division ; these consisted of staking 
out new streets for construction, giving lines and grades 
for repairs and reconstruction of old streets, testing 
lines and grades after completion of work, and measur- 
ing the amount of work performed and making plans 
showing quantities to be assessed upon abutting owners. 

Estimates for grade, land and building damages and 
cost of construction were furnished the Street Commis- 
sioners on thirty-one streets. 

The hues and grades of twelve streets, for which the 
Street Commissioners were petitioned for authority to 
open as private ways, were examined and reported upon. 

* Six miscellaneous reports were made to the Sewer 
Division. 

Nineteen miscellaneous reports were made to the 
Highway Division. 

The following table gives the comparative annual 
amounts of paving work measured by the Surveying 
Division of the Engineering Department for sixteen 
years : 



Year Ending 
January 31. 








s 

£.2 

1" 


J 

r 


pa 


ifi 


1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 


23,487 

129,383 

120,158 

154,718 

76,991 

86,354 

264,982 

245,410 

104,133 

60,555 

30,899 

67,114 

140,878 

52,380 

1,743 

5,161 


12,007 

60,472 

64,952 

100,414 

56,541 

60,803 

161,428 

188,041 

135,310 

65,474 

54,455 

65,132 

101,118 

76,216 

6,706 

2,061 


5,175 
32,940 
24,976 
36,658 
14,249 
17,323 
61,356 
30,324 

5,077 

4,815 
184 

1,264 
17,390 

3,386 
742 
944 


6,168 
68,701 
68,178 
94,003 
43,930 
48,946 
147,863 
131,487 
59,051 
29,078 
16,268 
27,544 
82,044 
30,339 
1,423 
2,277 


3,962 
12,296 
13,471 
13,599 
11,652 
14,221 
16,541 
15,565 
14,119 
12,806 

9,906 
12,981 
20,135 
16,635 
14,846 
21,547 


11,738 

183 

2,971 

4,019 

1,619 

789 

489 

698 

25 

248 

196 

3,551 

3,716 

1,926 

83 

23 


1,406 

1,297 

394 

27 


1900 

1901 


16 
2,377 


1902 . . 




1903 




1904 

1905 

1906 


62 


1907 




1908 




1909 




1910 









* Thia work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out Depart- 
ments. 



40 



City Document No. 14. 



Table showing the amount of paving work measured by the 
Surveying Division for the year ending January 31, 1910, by 
districts : 



Districts. 


•Eg 

CO 


11 

3 


1" 


If 

r 


(3 . 

¥ 


3 
3 


1 


1 

O 

1^ 


1 




Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


Old. 


New. 


iVet«. 


New. 


iVeto. 


Old. 




72 
134 
728 
523 


1,345 
487 
2,910 
12,245 
1,720 
1,383 
















































Roxbury 


2,441 
85 
137 

87 


580 
l,83i 


887 
29 
97 

215 


204 


21 


1,671 


684 


16 
142 

8 


















629 


"923 


22 




1,900 


1,104 


?3 
























Totals 


1,457 


20,090 


2,750 


2,411 


1,228 


833 


944 


1,693 


584 


166 


1,900 


1,104 


?S 







Table showing the amount of paving work measured by the 
Surveying Division for the year ending January 31, 1910, by 
months : 



Months. 


II 

>HCO 

p 


3 




fi 

¥ 


m 

1. 
rl 

r 


1 
3 


|a 


•3 

i 


! 


1909. Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


Oid. 


New. 


New. 


ATetz;. 


ATew. 


Old. 


March 




671 
1,041 
1,300 
6,125 

697 
2,238 
3,420 
4,500 

98 


137 

87 


1,831 


97 
215 


629 


■923 


22 






1,900 


1,104 




June 






10 




July 


233 
520 
56 
226 
7 
415 












August 


85 




29 










132 








































8 








November 


882 
1,559 


580 


311 

576 


204 


21 


567 
1,104 


584 










16 






?3 


1910. 






































Totals 


1,457 


20,090 


2,750 


2,411 


1,228 


833 


944 


1,693 


584 


166 


1,900 


1,104 


23 



Engineering Department. 41 

Surveys and plans have been made for the taking of 
land for school purposes on Fayette street and Knox 
street, city proper, for an addition to the Abraham 
Lincoln School lot; on Massachusetts avenue, city 
proper, of estate purchased for a girls' industrial school; 
on Webster street and Brigham street. East Boston; on 
Reed street, Hunneman street and Harrison avenue, 
Roxbury; on Ruggles street and Winthrop place, 
Roxbury; and on Hutchings street and Brookledge 
street, Roxbury. 

Plans were made for the Public Buildings Department 
of Central square, East Boston, for the proposed erec- 
tion of a courthouse; and of the primary schoolhouse 
site on Poplar street, West Roxbury, sold at public 
auction. 

A plan was made for the Water Department, showing 
the taking of land for the purpose of laying a water main 
from Long Island to Spectacle Island. 

A plan was made for the Fire Department of land and 
wharf on Lewis street, East Boston. 

Plans were made for the revision of grades of four 
streets, in connection with the abolition of grade cross- 
ings on the line of the Old Colony Railroad, between 
Harrison square and Neponset. 

Plans were made of Dover street and West Fourth 
street, showing revised grades occasioned by the aboli- 
tion of the grade crossing with the Old Colony Railroad. 

Surveys and plans have been made for the Park 
Department of land to be taken for park purposes; on 
Boardman street and Saratoga street. East Boston, 
for a playground; on West Third street, Bolton street 
and B street, South Boston, for a playground; on West 
Fifth street and Gold street. South Boston, for a play- 
ground; on Norfolk avenue and Proctor street, Roxbury, 
for a playground; and of Savin Hill Park, in Dorchester. 

A plan of the Dorchester lockup on Miller's lane 
was made for the purpose of showing the property con- 
veyed by the City of Boston to Walter Baker Company. 

Ninety-eight plans of interiors of schoolhouses, to 
be used for polling places, were made for the Election 
Department. 

A plan was made of a portion of Newton, proposed 
to be annexed to the City of Boston, embracing the 
property of Boston College and others. 

Among the more important plans made for the Street 



42 City Document No. 14. 

Laying-Out Department may be mentioned those 
showing the extension of Dix place to Tremont street; 
the widening of Hyde Park avenue from Ashland street 
to the Hyde Park line ; and studies for the development 
of the Park square property. 

Petitions for the registration of land in the Land 
Court are referred to the Mayor whenever the City of 
Boston is an interested party. 

These cases are examined by the Law Department 
and the Surveying Division of the Engineering Depart- 
ment for the purpose of protecting the city's interests. 

During the year seventy-five such cases have been 
investigated. 

There were 109 accident and other plans made for the 
Law Department. 

In connection with the Surveying Division there 
have been 1,242 titles examined, 415 deeds and 353 
plans copied from the Registry of Deeds. 

Thirty-six hundred and thirty-eight blueprints have 
been made during the year. 

List of plans of takings for Sewerage Works filed 
during the year ending February 1, 1910: 

East Boston. 

Ashley avenue, from Ashley avenue to Leyden street. 
Ashley avenue, from Ashley avenue to Leyden street, 

additional. 
Luhec street, from Prescott street southwesterly. 

ROXBURY. 

Lamont street, from Lamont street to Prentiss place. 

Marhury terrace, in railroad land at end of. 

Vila street, from Longwood avenue to Riverway. 

West Roxbury. 

Belgrade avenue. Three plans from Belgrade avenue to 

Birch street. Wood and Shepard land. 
Grew avenue, from Canterbury street to Hyde Park line. 
Stony brook, from Morton street northeasterly. 
Stony brook, additional at Morton street. 
Washington street, from Washington street to Stony 

brook. 
Wilfret street, from Wilfret street to Linnet street. 
Zellar street, from Hewlett street to Selwyn street. 



Engineering Department. 43 

Dorchester. 

Burt street, from elevated car barn to Burt street, rear 
of Ashmont street. 

Longfellow street, along line of No. 22 Longfellow street. 

Oakland Garden branch, from Greenwood street to rail- 
road. 

Wildwood street, additional taking from Hildreth street 
to Wildwood street. 

Brighton. 
Harvard avenue, in rear of Princeton avenue. 

The following sectional plans made under the Board 
of Survey Act have been refiled during the year: 

T- 77 1 
T- 81 
T-lOO 
U- 90 
U- 91 

Wr_ 69 '^Dorchester 12 

W- 70 
X- 22 
X- 36 
X- 45 

Y- 52 J 

2- 57 j West Roxbury 2 

N- 29 ) 

N- 30 \ Brighton 3 

N- 31 ) — 

17 



Forty-three assessment plans were made for the 
Street Commissioners. 

Sixty-one plans and profiles, representing a total 
length of seven and one-sixth miles, showing buildings, 
property owners' names, established grades, area of 
land taken, or to be taken, for street widenings, reloca- 
tions, or laying out, were completed for the Street 
Laying-Out Department. 



44 City Document No. 14. 

The following list gives the number of orders attended 
to for property owners, builders and the various city 
departments from February 1, 1909, to February 1, 1910: 

Street lines given 470 

Street grades given 318 

Street Department, Highway Division .... 1,886 

* Street Department, Sewer Division .... 839 

Law Department 210 

Street Laying-Out Department 184 

Engineering Department 80 

Schoolhouse Commission 22 

Transit Commission 11 

Park Department 7 

Police Department 7 

Charles River Dam Commission 6 

Building Department 5 

Public Buildings Department 4 

Cemetery Department 2 

Wire Department 2 

Water Department 2 

Assessing Department 2 

Fire Department 1 

Hospital Department 1 

Election Department 1 

Mayor 1 

4,061 

* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out 
Departments. 



Engineering Department. 45 

There are on file with the Surveying Division 34,948 
indexed plans. 

There are also 3,563 lithographed plans in the office 

at Old Court House not included in the foregoing list, 
viz.: 

Lithographed maps of Dorchester, made in 1869 .... 33 

« « " " 1880 .... 121 

« " West Roxbury, made in 1873 ... 8 

« " Fort Hill, made in 1866-69 .... 77 

« " Church street district, made in 1868 . 168 
" " Washington street widening (parts 1, 2, 3), 

made in 1860 1,186 

" " Washington street extension, made in 1869 . 324 

« " North street, made in 1859 .... 44 

" " Stony brook, drainage area .... 10 

« " Boston, made in 1866-67 .... 98 

« " Boston, made in 1888 30 

« " Suffolk street district, made in 1869 . . 3 

« " South Boston, made in 1880 .... 60 

« " Roxbury, made in 1880 81 

« " burnt district 62 

« " Mt. Hope Cemetery 19 

« " Winthrop Farm 49 

* " Hanover avenue 44 

" " Muddy river 41 

" " Pemberton square, courthouse site . . 195 

* " East Newton street, lots on, sold by auction, 

made in 1888 42 

" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1885 82 

" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1888 8 

" " Boylston street, old Pubhc Library lot . . 17 
" " public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1882 ..... 136 
" " Boston Directory map, made in 1886 . . 60 
" " Boston, scale 1,600 feet to an inch, made in 

1890 74 

" " Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, made in 

1891, colored plans 5 

" " Boston proper, scale 500 feet to an inch, 

« made in 1894 10 

« « Exhibit No. 1, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 34 

" « Exhibit No. 2, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 63 

« « Exhibit No. 3, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 96 

" " High street, pubUc lands sold by auction . 16 

" " Beacon Hill, State House site ... 38 

* " Harrison avenue. Savage Schoolhouse lot, 

auction plan 57 

** " Boston proper, showing changes in street 

and wharf hues from 1795 to 1895 . . 172 

3,563 



46 City Document No. 14. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION. 



Abolishment of Grade Ceossings on the Boston, 
Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

This matter has been under consideration throughout 
the year. Several plans and estimates have been made, 
especially those relating to the doing away with the 
grade crossing on Saratoga street. Careful surveys, 
plans and estimates have been made for the abolish- 
ment of this crossing. The subject is now being con- 
sidered by the Board of Railroad Commissioners, to 
whom it was referred by the Superior Court. Several 
hearings have been held but no report has as yet been 
made. 

AsHMONT Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge. 

In the autumn plans and specifications were prepared 
for extending this bridge northerly on the line of the 
railroad, and on November 11 a contract was made 
with Jones & Meehan for doing the work. Nothing has 
been- done upon the ground, but construction will begin 
as soon as the weather is favorable. 

Boston Common Survey. 
During the year, at such times as could be spared from 
other work, a topographical survey of the Common has 
been in progress and it is nearly completed. 

Boston Common Water Pipes. 

Plans have been made for a system of piping to supply 
water for irrigation. These provide for about 4,500 
lineal feet of 6-inch main pipe and 3,200 lineal feet of 
4-inch branch pipe for supplying hydrants. There 
are to be 34 hydrants, so placed that all parts of the 
grounds where there are trees can be reached by lines of 
hose not exceeding 125 feet in length. 

On December 6 a contract was made with the Florence 
Iron Works of Philadelphia, Penn., for furnishing the 
pipe required. The pipe has all been delivered on the 
Common at a cost of $3,225.68. 



Engineering Department. 47 

On November 29 a contract was made with the 
Lumsden & Van Stone Company of Boston for furnish- 
ing special castings for gates, hydrants, bends, etc. 
These have all been delivered at a cost of $479. 

The small supplies and the shop work on the gates and 
hydrants have been furnished by the Boston Water 
Department. 

On December 1 a contract was made with the Rowe 
Contracting Company of Boston for laying the pipe. 
Work was begun on December 2 but has not been 
completed. 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital. 

The work of building the service road under the con- 
tract with B. F. Carroll of Brookline, dated June 22, 
1908, was completed on August 13, and he was paid 
$7,404.18. 

The work included the completion of the grading of 
the road and adjoining slopes, excavation for water 
pipe, building drains for surface water and the surfac- 
ing of the road. The road is 1,373 feet in length and 
15 feet in width except in the rear of the hospital ward 
building where it is 25 feet wide. The road extends 
from River street along the easterly boundary of the 
hospital property to the service entrance to the first 
ward building. A paved gutter 3 feet wide is laid on 
the easterly side of the road; the remainder of the road 
surface is a telford macadam 12 inches thick. Drains 
were built for carrying the surface water from the road. 
On account of the large area of adjoining land draining 
on to the road, pipes varying in size from 12 to 24 inches 
in diameter were required; five catch-basins of the 
standard size of the Street Department were built; the 
drain discharges into a previously existing culvert under 
River street; this culvert has an inadequate outlet on 
the southerly side of the street and a larger pipe should 
be laid from this point to the Neponset river. Where 
the road is in excavation 6-inch agricultural tile drains 
surrounded by broken stone were laid on the easterly 
side of the road to take care of the ground water. 

On August 10 a contract was made with J. H. Fer- 
guson for doing work around the power house, including 
the building of a road from the service road to the coal 
pocket of the building, the grading of a road to the boiler 
room entrance and tlie building of a concrete area wall 



48 City Document No. 14. 

and steps at the entrance to the laundry; this contract 
also included the grading of the grounds between the 
service road and the new ward building. Work under 
this contract was completed on December 2 at a cost 
of $1,440.43. 

Chelsea Street Bridge, East Boston to Chelsea. 

The contract with W. H. Ellis for building the draw 
foundation and both ends of the bridge, mentioned 
in the last annual report, was so far advanced in 
May that the completion of the work was delayed until 
the new draw, built under another contract, could be 
swung into position. The entire work was completed 
January 10, 1910. 

A contract was made May 7, 1909, with the New 
England Structural Company for building a new steel 
draw, which was completed December 9, 1909. The new 
draw span is of the center bearing swing type, a riveted 
steel structure on a pile foundation. It is 30 feet wide 
between the centers of the main plate girders and 175 
feet in length. The outer ends of the four main girders 
are supported by a center tower with eyebar suspension 
rods. The floor beams and stringers are steel and the 
bridge surfacing, both of the roadway and sidewalk, is 
wood. The draw has a roadway 22 feet 2 inches wide 
between curbs, and one sidewalk 6 feet in width. It 
carries two street car tracks, and is designed for the 
heaviest passenger trolley cars used by the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company. The draw span is turned 
by electricity, the current being furnished, free of cost, 
by the street railway company. The ends of the 
draw span are raised and supported by steel wedges 
operated by hand gearing. The motor, controller and 
rheostat for operating the draw were furnished by the 
General Electric Company and installed by the Barnes- 
Pope Electric Company. The operating machinery was 
furnished and installed by the Walworth Construction 
and Supply Company, except the gearing, which was 
furnished by the Holyoke Machine Company. The 
draw was swung into position and opened to foot travel 
November 22, 1909, and was fully opened to team travel 
January 3, 1910. 

Kr' A drawtenders' house has been built on the pier by 
W. H. Ellis. The hot-water plant for the house was 
furnished by A. B. Franklin. 

The total cost of the work to January 31, 1910, was 



Engineering Department. 49 

$47,422.96, some of the work being still under construc- 
tion at the close of the fiscal year. 

Deer Island Shore Protection. 

Several studies were made to ascertain some method 
of preventing further encroachment of the sea upon 
that part of the northerly shore of the island between 
Shirley Gut and the North Head sea wall. From a 
comparison of former surveys with those made recently 
it was found that there has been a constant encroach- 
ment by the sea upon this part of the island; since 
1860 about seven acres have been washed away, the 
present high water line on a portion of this shore being 
now about 400 feet back of its location in 1860. This 
wasting has been partially offset by the deposition of 
material by the sea on the Shirley Gut side of the island 
to and above high water over a considerable area. 

Plans w^ere made for a riprap breakwater and bids 
were received on August 2 for its construction, but no 
award was made as the bids were considered to be too 
high. The matter was further considered and a plan 
was made for a concrete sea wall on the shore line. 
Alternative bids were advertised for, for a breakwater on 
either of two lines or for the concrete wall. A contract 
was made on September 22 with J. H. Ferguson for 
building the concrete wall. Work was begun on Sep- 
tember 29, and about 300 lineal feet of wall was practi- 
cally completed before the close of the season. 

Fire Station on Walk Hill and Wenham Streets. 

Surveys, plans and specifications were made for 
grading the grounds and building a retaining wall on 
the northerly side of the land upon which a building 
for the Fire Department was to be erected, and on June 
30 a contract was made with the Coughlan & Sheils 
Company for doing the work. The work was finished 
on September 7 at a cost of $3,325. 

The front part of the lot where the building was to 
be placed was graded to a level grade of 73 feet above 
city base with slopes of 2 to 1 from this grade up to the 
original surface of the rear part of the lot. A retaining 
wall of concrete was built just inside of the northerly 
property line to support the adjoining estate. The 
wall is 111 feet in length, of a height varying from just 
above the surface of the ground at the ends to a height 
of 14.5 feet above the new grade of the ground in front. 



50 City Document No. 14. 

The wall is of Portland cement concrete composed of 
one part of cement to two parts of sand and four parts 
of broken stone or gravel. Ballast of stone chips was 
placed in rear of the wall. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

A contract for rebuilding Huntington Avenue Bridge 
over the Boston & Albany Railroad was made with 
the Boston Bridge Works, Incorporated, the lowest 
bidder, on June 3, 1909. The work of reconstruction 
was begun at the bridge site August 16 and completed 
December 12, 1909. 

The original bridge was built in 1872, and in its 
thirty-seven years' service it had become badly cor- 
roded by the action of the locomotive gases. For 
several years prior to its removal, the iron girders 
carrying the street railway tracks had been supported 
at about mid-span upon a timber trestle placed between 
the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad. Upon 
removing the old bridge floor the very serious corrosion 
became apparent and the condition of the structure, 
as shown in the accompanying views, illustrates in a 
striking way the destructive effects of locomotive 
gases upon our metal bridges. 

While the original Huntington Avenue Bridge was 
used for more than thirty years, its long life was due 
to the fact that it was made of wrought iron. Experi- 
ence shows that steel corrodes much more rapidly under 
the action of locomotive gases, and a steel bridge as 
ordinarily constructed may be expected to last only 
fifteen to twenty years in a location such as this. 

A notable feature of the reconstructed bridge is the 
use of concrete for the protection of all steel work 
beneath the bridge floor; the concrete protection of 
the steel work being reinforced by steel in a manner 
similar to that used at the Boylston Street Bridge in 
1908. It is expected that the concrete protection will 
greatly prolong the life of this structure and reduce the 
cost of maintenance to almost nothing, so that not- 
withstanding the larger first cost this bridge should 
show considerable economy over a structure in which 
metal work is unprotected. 

The new bridge is a deck plate girder structure, 89 
feet 2 inches in length between faces of parapets by 
100 feet in width, and consists of sixteen heavy steel 



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F f^U!-'vAUUJ^^*U:t^:^^k ' iU '' ^l'n^tiJ . Ul i J,!JAn.i.!,L 




CONSTfiUOTION B£f^£ATH PoADWAY. 



Huntington Avenue Bridge. Tloor Construction and Encasement of Steel. 



Engineering Department. 51 

girders between which are placed steel floor beams. 
The concrete protection of the girders is about 4 inches 
in thickness, and the floor beams are encased in, and 
protected by, concrete floor arches. The roadway 
of the bridge is surfaced with a brick block pavement, 
beneath which there is a layer of waterproofing. The 
sidewalks have an asphalt surface on a concrete floor. 
Provision for water pipes and for structures of public 
service corporations is made beneath the bridge. Over 
the water pipes, which are beneath the sidewalks, the 
concrete floor has been constructed in the form of 
removable slabs so that access to the pipes may be had 
when occasion requires. 

In the middle of the roadway are laid two tracks for 
the surface cars of the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany. Additional strength was provided in this portion 
of the bridge so as to carry street cars of fifty tons 
weight instead of the standard highway wagon load of 
twenty tons. The parapets of the masonry abutments 
were rebuilt and the street approaches on each side 
were resurfaced to conform to the slightly altered 
grade. Typical features of the bridge are illustrated 
by the accompanying photographs and plates. 

During the work of reconstruction, street car travel 
was maintained at all times, upon one or both tracks 
and team travel and foot travel were also provided for. 

The reconstructed bridge represents the very latest 
type of construction for bridges over steam railroads and 
some of the features of the design are unique and, so far 
as is known, have not been previously used elsewhere. 

The cost of construction was as follows : 

The Boston Bridge Works, Incorporated: 
Total payments under contract for bridge 
superstructure and reconstruction of 
abutments and southerly approach . $47,802 45 

Simpson Brothers Corporation: Street re- 
surfacing 123 45 

Warren Brothers Company: Resurfacing 

northerly approach 558 40 

Engineering and inspection .... 3,810 70 

Printing, advertising and incidentals . . 152 50 

Total cost of the work . . . $52,447 50 

The work was done under sections 23 and 25, part 1, 
chapter 463 of the Acts of 1906, as amended by chapter 



52 City Document No. 14. 

542, Acts of 1908, and further amended by chapter 47, 
Acts of 1909, under which it is expected that the Boston 
& Albany Railroad and the Boston Elevated Railway 
Company will be called upon to share in the expense. 
The apportionment of the cost of the work by a special 
commission is yet to be made. 

Independence Square Walks. 

On September 29 a contract was made with the 
Warren Brothers Company for replacing about 2,000 
square yards of the old coal tar concrete walks with 
artificial stone and for repairing the remainder of the 
tar concrete walks. Work was begun on October 7 
and was completed on December 14 with the exception 
of a portion which was damaged by frost. Final pay- 
ment has not yet been made. 

Northern Avenue and Sleeper Street. 

The work of building Northern avenue and Sleeper 
street, as required by chapter 381 of the Acts of 1903, 
has continued during the year and on February 1, 1910, 
the part of the avenue and street required to be built 
by the City of Boston was completed and turned over 
to the care of the Superintendent of Streets. The portion, 
however, from Atlantic avenue across Fort Point 
channel and along Sleeper street was opened to public 
travel October 26, 1908, as stated in the last report of 
this department. 

The act of the Legislature authorizing the work, laid 
out Northern avenue from Atlantic avenue easterly to 
Fort Point channel, thence across the channel and thence 
across lands leased by the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad and lands of the Commonwealth ; it 
also laid out Sleeper street from Congress street over 
the private way known as Sleeper street and over lands 
of the above-named railroad company to Northern 
avenue. The act further required the City Engineer of 
Boston in the name and behalf of the city to construct 
the portion of the avenue from Atlantic avenue to the 
lands of the Commonwealth and the whole of Sleeper 
street as laid out. 

As the work authorized by the act of the Legislature 
to be done by the city has now been completed, the 
following description is given of the entire work. For 
convenience this description will be divided into two 



g 





Engineering Department. 53 

parts, one dealing only with the bridge across Fort 
Point channel and the other with the approaches from 
Atlantic avenue and from Congress street, and the ave- 
nue on the South Boston side of the channel. 

Northern Avenue Bridge. 

The bridge across the channel is 80 feet wide and 
consists of two through truss spans, each about 150 feet 
long, separated by a swing draw span about 283 feet 
long; also a short deck span of plate girders, of an average 
length of 55 feet, at the South Boston end. While the 
act required that the two channel ways should be "not 
less than 60 feet wdde, " as a result of the hearing before 
the Harbor and Land Commissioners these ways were 
made each 75 feet wide in the clear. 

Bridge Foundations. — The building of the substructure 
of the bridge began in September, 1905, the plans for 
the same having been approved by the Harbor and Land 
Commissioners July 18, 1904, and by the Secretary of 
War April 11, 1905. 

Borings made before the work of construction was 
begun showed that the bed of the channel was a layer 
of soft black silt, varying in thickness from 3 to 6 feet 
and overlaying a stratum of soft blue clay. The top 
of this clay was from 20 to 26 feet below city base, and 
extended to a depth of more than 60 feet below city 
base, gradually becoming harder from the admixture of 
sand and gravel until at 90 feet below city base there 
was very little clay remaining in the material. 

The fixed spans of the bridge are supported on masonry 
piers and abutments, the Boston abutment and one pier 
on the westerly side of the channel, and the South 
Boston abutment and two piers on the easterly side; 
the draw span rests on a masonry draw foundation pier 
at the middle of the channel. The two channel piers 
located on the shore sides of the channel ways are of 
the same form and dimensions and similar in design to 
those built at the Summer Street Bridge. They consist 
of a mass of concrete supported by spruce piles forming 
the foundation which extends from city base to an 
elevation of 25 feet below that base. Above the founda- 
tion the pier is of granite masonry laid solid in cement 
mortar, and differs in outline from the usual rectangle 
form in the fact that the center line of the pier follows 
approximately the arc of the end of the swing draw span 
which rests upon it when the draw is in position for 



54 City Document No. 14. 

travel. A material saving was effected in the amount 
of masonry used by the adoption of this design, not 
only in the pier itself but also in the foundation; the 
load on the piles and underlaying material was also very 
much reduced. The width of the foundation of the 
pier at elevation minus 25 is 18 feet 2 inches for the 
greater portion of its length, the last 1 5 feet at each end 
tapering to a width of about 14 feet 6 inches at the 
extreme end. 

The piles were driven in alternate rows of five and 
six piles each, spaced 15 inches on centers; the piles in 
the rows were spaced from 27 to 30 inches on centers, 
and staggered with the piles in adjoining rows. All piles 
except those on the center line of the pier were driven 
at an inclination of 1 in 12, spreading outward from the 
centers, thus increasing the area of the foundation over 
which the piles distribute the load coming on them. 
Seven hundred and fifty-four piles were used under each 
channel pier. 

The order of construction of this pier was substan- 
tially as follows: The mud and other material were 
excavated to a depth of at least 3 feet below the required 
bottom for the concrete; this was done to insure ample 
depth for the concrete after the clay had been forced up 
by the driving of the piles, clean gravel filling being 
deposited where necessary to bring the bottom to the 
elevation required for the concrete. The spruce piles 
used were not less than 6 inches in diameter at the point 
and were driven to a depth not less than 50 feet below 
city base. The average length of piles driven in the 
channel piers was 32| feet and, as they were driven by 
an apparatus which enables the full length of the piles 
to be utiUzed, the load on the piers was distributed on the 
underlaying clay at a depth of about 54 feet below city 
base. As soon as the piles in the pier were driven a 
cofferdam made of 6-inch splined hard pine sheeting 
was constructed to serve as a mold for the concrete in 
the foundation. Owing to the irregular form of the foun- 
dation, part of the sheeting was driven plumb and part 
at an inclination of 1 in 12, the sheeting being held in 
position during driving by double wale pieces attached 
to piles driven outside the sheeting for that purpose. 
To facihtate the laying of the masonry the top of the 
cofferdam was built at about half tide, but on completion 
of the work the sheeting was cut off at the top of the 
lower wale pieces approximately at mean low water. 



Engineering Department. 55 

After the cofferdam was in place the space inclosed was 
filled with Portland cement concrete composed of one 
part Portland cement, two parts of sand and four parts 
of sound broken stone or pebbles, all parts by measure. 
The concrete was mixed by a machine mixer and deposited 
through an iron chute or tube in the same manner as 
was followed at Summer Street, Charlestown and Cam- 
bridge Bridges, and is fully described in previous reports 
of this department. 

The piers above the concrete foundation are built of 
granite laid solid in Portland cement mortar; the exposed 
surfaces are quarry-faced, pitched to line, with no pro- 
jection of more than 3 inches. The ends and vertical 
joints were dressed to lay |-inch joints. The faces of 
the pier under the coping show six courses of 25-inch 
rise. The bottom course is composed entirely of 
headers approximately 4 feet square, the other courses 
being laid with alternate headers and stretchers, the 
headers showing a width of 2 feet on the face and extend- 
ing half way through the pier and the stretchers varying 
in length between 5 and 6 feet, but of a uniform width 
of 30 inches. The backing is Portland cement concrete 
of the same proportions as used in the foundations; 
the coping stones of the piers are 24 inches deep, quarry- 
faced on vertical face and pean-hammered on top, 
dressed for f-inch joints and laid solid in mortar, the 
stones on the ends being doweled to the course below. 
All face joints are pointed with mortar composed of 
equal parts Portland cement and fine sand. 

In cross section the channel piers are 8 feet 6 inches 
wide under the coping, increasing in width by a straight 
batter on each side to 9 feet 6 inches at the foundation, 
except for a length of 9 feet at each end where these 
widths are gradually reduced to about 7 feet at the 
extreme end. The coping in all cases projects 6 inches 
beyond the face of the body of the pier. The face of each 
end of the pier was built at right angles to the center 
line, and with a curved batter of 4 feet in 12 feet 6 
inches. 

The lengths of the channel piers measured at right 
angles to center line of the bridge are as follows: At 
coping 78 feet, under coping 77 feet and at top of founda- 
tion 85 feet. 

The pier near the abutment at the South Boston side 
is the same length as the channel pier, but is rectangular 
in form and of the following cross section: 7 feet wide 



56 City Document No. 14. 

under the coping and 8 feet at top of foundation; the 
coping is also 8 feet wide. The quaUty of materials 
and workmanship are the same as the channel piers, 
all headers, however, extend entirely through the pier 
and those of the bottom course are only 30 inches wide. 
The foundation of this pier extends to 20 feet below 
city base, and is 15 feet 10 inches wide at this elevation 
and 12 feet 6 inches wide at the top at city base; the 
length is 90 feet at both elevations. The piles were 
driven in alternate rows of four and five piles each and 
spaced substantially the same as in a channel pier and 
driven to the same depths. A total of 320 piles were 
driven in this pier. 

The westerly abutment on the Boston side of the 
channel is a composite masonry structure, consisting 
of a front pier whose face is located on the harbor line 
and five lines of longitudinal piers extending back to 
the face of the old dock wall; on these piers steel I-beams 
rest which support concrete arches. The foundation 
of the front pier is of Portland cement concrete supported 
by piles, the concrete extending to a depth of 20 feet 
below city base, the width of the foundation being 11 
feet at elevation and 12 feet 8 inches at elevation 
minus 20. The piles under the pier were driven in 
alternate rows of three and four piles each, the front 
piles being driven at an inclination of 1 in 12. The 
soft silt was dredged out to a depth of about 3 feet 
below the proposed bottom of the concrete and clean 
gravel filling was deposited the same as for the piers. 
After the piles were driven a cofferdam made of 6-inch 
splined sheeting was constructed to serve as a mold for 
the concrete foundation, the concrete being the same as 
used for the piers and deposited in the same manner. 
After the masonry was completed the sheeting was cut 
off at city base. 

The masonry of this abutment is similar in quality 
to that of the piers. In cross section the abutment is 
7 feet thick at its base at elevation and 6 feet 6 inches 
under the bridge seat at elevation 13. The bridge 
seat has a total width of 7 feet, of which 5 feet is pean- 
hammered on top to receive the shoe castings under 
the ends of the trusses. The parapet is 2 feet wide at 
the bridge seat and 12 inches at the top, which for the 
roadway is at the underside of the flooring of the bridge 
and for the sidewalk is at the surface of the walk. The 
face of the parapet and its top are rough pointed, 



Engineering Department. 57 

except the top at the sidewalk parapet which is pean- 
hammered. The upper course of parapet stones are 
doweled to course below. 

The foundations for the longitudinal walls were carried 
down about 5 feet below the surface of the existing 
bottom and built in three steps, the portions adjoining 
the front pier being at elevation minus 12, the middle 
portions at minus 7.5 and the portion near the old wall 
at minus 3. In cross section the foundations of the 
center and outside walls were 6 feet 6 inches wide and 
the other two 5 feet wide, the piles under the former 
being in rows of three piles and under the latter in rows 
of two piles, all rows being spaced 3 feet 6 inches on 
centers. The total number used in the abutment was 
348. The driving under the foundation was much 
harder than at any other location on the work, the aver- 
age length of pile used being about 20 feet. The con- 
crete used for these foundations was the same as for 
the other work and similar sheeting was used for molds. 

The longitudinal walls were carried up to about 17 
feet above city base to receive the reinforced concrete 
arches for supporting the surface of the street. The 
walls on the outside or street line were 4 feet thick, 
built of granite rubble masonry with concrete backing 
and capped by a granite coping 2 feet square, the top 
surface forming the outer edge of the sidewalk; the 
other walls were entirely of concrete, the one at the 
center of the street being 5 feet thick and the adjoining 
ones only 3 feet thick. As these inner faces are not 
exposed to the outer air and extreme changes in tempera- 
ture it was not deemed necessary to protect them with 
granite as was done on the outer faces. The chambers 
between the walls were connected with the water of 
the channel by 12-inch cast-iron pipes, discharging 3 feet 
below city base; this insures a change of water with 
each rise and fall of tide. By means of a manhole and 
openings through the inner walls provision is made for 
an examination of these chambers at any time. The 
chambers between the longitudinal walls are spanned by 
20-inch steel I-beams, weighing sixty-five pounds per 
foot, spaced 4 feet on centers and stayed by |-inch 
diameter rods, one every 30 inches; |-inch "Thacher 
bars" spaced 6 inches on centers being placed between 
the rods. The arches are trapezoidal in form, 14 
inches deep at the center and 24 inches deep at the 
beams. The beams and rods were surrounded by a 



58 City Document No. 14. 

Portland cement mortar composed of one part of cement 
and two parts sand, the mortar extending 2 inches 
below the bottom flange of the beams and held in place 
by expanded metal lathing, the rest of the arch being 
made of 1-2-4 Portland cement concrete. 

The abutment on the easterly or South Boston side 
of the channel was built on the location of the old sea 
wall which was erected in 1878, the face of the abutment 
coinciding substantially with the face of the old wall. 
The old wall was built on a pile foundation, the plank 
platform being about 12 inches below city base. This 
wall, which was built of granite rubble laid dry, was 
removed for the width of the bridge and the ballast 
and filling back of it was also removed to the level 
of the platform. The preliminary design for this abut- 
ment provided for increasing the width of the base of 
the old wall about seven feet and driving a sufficient 
number of new piles, both vertical and inclined, to carry 
the increased load and resist the pressure back of the 
abutment. It was found, however, that the filling back 
of the old wall and below low water was made up 
entirely of granite quarry refuse, most of it so large as 
to render its removal impossible, except by divers. 
As this mass of stone had been in position for more than 
thirty years, and only a slight increase in loading was 
to be provided for, it was decided to omit the piles and 
consolidate the mass by a generous use of concrete and 
grout. The abutment as built has a granite face and 
cement concrete backing. In section the abutment is 16 
feet 3 inches thick at the bottom, which is 20 inches below 
city base, 9 feet of this width resting on the pile platform 
of the old wall. At the bridge seat, at elevation 13.25, 
the abutment is 10 feet 7 inches thick, 8 feet of this being 
in front of the parapet, thus providing a very liberal 
bridge seat, which was considered advisable as it enabled 
the bearings of the girders to be set well back from 
the face. Provisions were also made to permit the abut- 
ment to move forward, not exceeding 12 inches, without 
necessitating any changes in the masonry or the steel 
work of the bridge. 

The concrete foundation for the draw pier is circular 
in form, approximately 69 feet in diameter, and was 
carried down 25 feet below city base, the material being 
dredged 3 feet lower as for the other piers of the bridge. 
The spruce piles were of the same dimensions as other 
foundations and were driven in the same manner, 872 



Engineering Department. 59 

piles being driven within the area covered by the foun- 
dation. The wooden curb which served to retain the 
concrete was of the same construction as used at the 
Charlestown Bridge, and consisted of 3-inch by 10-inch 
spruce planks laid flatwise, spiked and treenailed together, 
and stiffened, as the laying of the planks progressed, 
by vertical hard pine timbers placed about 10 feet apart 
inside the curbing and bolted to it. The curbing was 
built floating in the water and sunk in position as it 
was built. The curbing was 30 feet high and was 
carried up to elevation 4 feet above city base and filled 
with Portland cement concrete of the same consistency 
and deposited in the same manner as for the other 
foundations. 

As the bottom of the track castings and the center 
pivot pedestal was at practically half tide it was neces- 
sar}^ to protect the turntable and operating mechanism 
by a circular wall carried above extreme high tide. This 
wall is 3 feet in thickness and has a granite face and 
concrete backing, the concrete being a rich mixture of 
one part Portland cement, one and one-half parts sand 
and three and one-half parts of sea-washed pebbles, vary- 
ing in sizes from I inch to 2^ inches. The concrete was 
laid with especial care and a very smooth surface was 
obtained on the inside. The face joints in the masonry 
were ^ inch thick and were pointed in a very careful man- 
ner, the mortar being of equal parts of cement and sand, 
with an admixture of about 10 per cent, of very fine clay. 
The result obtained was very satisfactory, a practically 
water-tight wall having been secured. The wall was 
capped by a granite coping 18 inches thick and 3 feet 
6 inches wide, laid in cement mortar with |-inch joints, 
the top and, back of coping being pean-hammered and the 
front quarrj^-faced. Within the pit formed by the circu- 
lar wall the foundation for the turntable track and center 
pedestal was built. A four-ply waterproofing was laid on 
the concrete foundation, extending over the whole area, 
terminating at an annular gutter built just inside the 
wall, which was designed to collect any water that might 
reach this pit. This waterproofing was laid between 
tides in the most thorough manner and covered at once 
with sufficient concrete to withstand the pressure of the 
incoming tide. The bearing stones for the turntable 
track set in cement mortar were 21 inches in thickness, 
forming a ring 6 feet wide, the center line of which was 
40 feet in diameter. The surfaces of these stones were 



60 City Document No. 14. 

pean-hammered and set very carefully at elevation 5.90 
feet above city base. The rest of the floor of this pit 
was of concrete of rich proportions, having a smooth 
mortar finish 1 inch thick, which pitched from the center 
to the annular gutter, drains being provided through 
the bearing stones. Two lines of 6-inch cast-iron pipes 
with gates were built in the wall through which any 
water that might collect in the gutter could be discharged 
into the channel; but it is found that the floor of the 
bridge prevents rain water from gathering in the pit and 
the pipes have been cut out of service. 

The draw fender pier is the largest the city has ever 
built, its width being 88 feet and its length on the face 
of the channel from the center line of the bridge meas- 
ured downstream is 290 feet and upstream is 215 feet, 
to which should be added the two triangular ends of 
44 feet each measured on the center line, making the 
total length of the pier 593 feet. It is built of oak piles 
in bents at right angles to the channel, the bents being 
16 feet apart; the piles are capped with 7-inch by 14- 
inch hard pine girder caps, the stringers are 6-inch by 
12-inch hard pine, spaced 3 feet on centers, and the 
floor is of 3-inch hard pine; the piles are braced with 
rough oak or hard pine braces. On the channel faces 
the piles are spaced 4 feet on centers, braced with oak 
spurshores and capped with 7-inch by 14-inch hard 
pine girder caps and 12-inch by 12-inch hard pine 
stringers. The face has four lines of 8-inch by 12-inch 
hard pine wahngs, which are covered with 4-inch hard 
pine plank placed vertically, four additional lines of 
walings being used on the faces at the ends of the pier. 
The corners are all heavily ironed with f-inch plates 
and 26 heavy ringbolts are provided on the pier. The 
upstream portion of the pier has an area, in the middle, 
60 feet wide and 144 feet long which is not floored over. 
Heavy fender guards are built to protect the channel 
piers, and the faces on the waterways are built of the 
same design as the channel face of the draw fender 
pier, the angles at the ends being braced in the most 
substantial manner. 

Bridge Superstructure. — The bridge was designed to 
carry a freight railway track on the center roadway 
beside the usual city traffic. Spans 1 and 2 are through 
truss spans substantially alike, each having four pin- 
connected trusses about 150 feet long, spaced 22 feet 
8 inches on centers, supporting three roadways and two 



NORTHERN AVENUE 

BRIDGE 

1905 1908 




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-OTTT" 




Engineering Department. 61 

overhanging sidewalks; and span 3 is a deck plate 
girder span made up of six plate girders spaced 14 feet 
9| inches apart, with an average length of about 55 feet, 
carrying a freight railway track transversely across the 
span near the abutment end. 

The draw span is a symmetrical swing draw of the 
rim-bearing type, 283 feet long and 79 feet 1| inches 
between sidewalk fascias. It is made up of two inde- 
pendent spans about 125 feet 2 inches long, supported 
on a central tower. The outer trusses are carried by 
the inner ones by means of two cross trusses at the 
central tower. This tower carries the load to eight 
points on a circular drum, 40 feet in diameter, through a 
system of distributing girders. The whole draw weighs 
about 1,300 tons and rests on fifty-six steel wheels 
running between steel-faced tracks. 

In all spans the floor beams are of built-up sections 
with steel stringers. The roadways of spans 1, 2 and 
3 are paved with 6-inch granite blocks laid with pitch 
and pebble joints. These rest on 6-inch hard pine 
plank which is covered with waterproofing and sand. 
The sidewalks are of asphalt 4 inches thick laid on 
4-inch plank. The roadway of the draw span is 5-inch 
hard pine plank, sheathed with 2-inch spruce plank, 
and the sidewalks are of 2-inch hard pine. 

The power used for operating the draw is compressed 
air at a normal pressure of 200 pounds per square inch. 
This is generated by two double-stage air compressors, 
each geared to a 50 horse power motor using a 500-volt 
direct current. The compressors are arranged to start 
and stop by means of an automatic switch board when- 
ever the pressure varies 15 pounds from normal. These 
compressors pump into eight steel receivers in the power 
house, having a combined capacity of 1,500 cubic feet. 
From the receivers a 4-inch main carries the air down 
the pier through the draw center to a position directly 
under the operator's stand on the deck of the draw. 
From here it is delivered at 200 pounds pressure to the 
end lifts and also, at 70 pounds pressure, to the engines 
which turn the draw. 

The draw is revolved by two 6^-inch by 10-inch 
double-cylinder engines attached with their trains/;;of 
gears to the draw, the final pinion of each train acting 
on a rack attached to the track on the draw pier. 
These two sets of turning apparatus are independent 
and either can turn the draw if the other is out of order. 



62 City Document No. 14. 

There are eight end Hfts, one at the free end of each 
truss, operated by air at 200 pounds pressure. Each 
consists of a cylinder 16 inches in diameter operating a 
lever adapted in length to the load at this point and 
using as a fulcrum a cast-iron block on the stone pier. 
This mechanism raises the truss end about 5 inches to 
allow the bearing blocks to be slid beneath it. The 
four blocks at each end of the bridge are connected to 
a shaft, which the gateman operates by means of a 
lever from the deck of the fixed span. The truss ends 
are lowered about a half inch onto the bearing blocks 
and the end lifts are released before traffic passes onto 
the draw. In this position the span on one side of the 
central tower acts independently of the span on the 
other. 

The operator's stand is between two of the roadways 
near the center of the draw. From here he can watch 
the street traffic as well as the navigation, and controls 
by levers and valves all the turning and lifting mechan- 
ism. Automatic signals show the movement of each 
lifting lever and sliding block and sights enable him to 
close the draw to exact position. Hand apparatus is 
provided in case of emergency, both for revolving the 
draw and raising the ends. 

The Approaches and the Avenue. 

The layout of the avenue on the Boston side of the 
channel provided a street 80 feet in width with curves 
of short radii at the junction with Atlantic avenue, 
and covered a taking of 15,171 square feet west of the 
harbor line. The old buildings and wharves on this area 
were removed and filling deposited to bring the street 
to the required grade, concrete walls being built on 
both side lines for their entire length to support the 
filling. Catch-basins were built on the Atlantic avenue 
end and connected with the sewer in that avenue; the 
street was paved with granite blocks with gravel joints, 
granite edgestones set and the sidewalks paved with 
brick. The paved roadway is 64 feet wide, and side- 
walks are each 8 feet wide. Substantial board fences 
were built on both sides extending from the bridge to 
Atlantic avenue. 

The approach to Northern avenue from Congress 
street, as laid out by act of the Legislature, included a 
private way 40 feet wide, known as Sleeper street, 



ERRATA FOR ILLUSTRATIONS. 
Showing Northern Avenue Bridge, End Lifts. 



For " C. Bearing block slid beneath end" read " B, 
End raised by lever." 

For ''B. End raised by lever" read " C. Bearing 
block slid beneath end." 



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1 




1 


II 

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Engineering Department. 63 

which extended from Congress street to the railroad 
lands, a length of about 635 feet, and which had been 
in use for nearly twenty years. The land for this portion 
of the street was released to the city by the railroad 
company and the Boston Wharf Company without 
compensation. The other portion of Sleeper street 
was laid out by the act, 50 feet in width, over the lands 
of the railroad company for a length of about 433 feet ; 
the area of land taken was 21,964 square feet, for 
which a payment of $42,055.67 was made to the rail- 
road company. The construction work done on Sleeper 
street consisted of the repaying of the roadway of the 
portion 40 feet wide, and rebuilding the portion 50 feet 
wide. The latter portion was graded and paved with 
granite blocks, using gravel joints, granite edgestones 
were set and sidewalks were paved with brick; catch- 
basins were also built and connections laid for dis- 
charging the surface water directly into the channel. A 
single sidewalk, 7 feet wide, was built on the westerly 
side of this portion of the street. 

The avenue on the South Boston side of the channel 
was laid out by the act to a uniform width of 100 feet 
across the lands of the railroad company and the Com- 
monwealth, and the city was required to build the street 
as far as the division line between the lands of the 
Commonwealth and the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company, a total length on the 
northerly Hne of 2,031.45 feet and on the southerly Une 
of 2,042.10 feet, measured easterly from the harbor 
line on the west side of Fort Point channel. The area 
of land released by the railroad company for this portion 
of the avenue was 203,781.50 square feet. While the 
original act provided for this release without compensa- 
tion by the City of Boston, the New York & New 
England Railroad Company made a claim against the 
Commonwealth for compensation for a portion of the 
land, based on an agreement made in 1882. Under 
chapter 229 of the Acts of 1904 an adjustment of the 
claim of the railroad company was made by the Board 
of Harbor and Land Commissioners by which the Com- 
monwealth paid $22,595.60, or at the rate of 20 cents per 
square foot for 95,228 square feet of land and 50 cents 
per square foot for 7,000 square feet. The total amount 
paid the railroad company by the city and the Common- 
wealth for land for the avenue and the Sleeper street 
approach was $64,651.27. 



64 City Document No. 14. 

The most difficult feature of the work in connection 
with the building of this avenue was the construction 
of the sea walls at the ends of the docks of the railroad 
company, designated as docks Nos. 1, 2 and 3. At the 
first two of these docks it was necessary to provide 30 
feet of water at low water, and borings taken at the loca- 
tions of these walls showed that the material on which 
the}^ must rest was blue clay, extending to a depth of 
more than 100 feet below city base, and not until nearly 
that depth was reached was there even a small percent- 
age of sand found. 

The design adopted for the wall at the head of dock 
No. 1, and which received the approval of the Harbor 
and Land Commissioners, June 21, 1907, provided for a 
granite masonry wall on a pile and concrete founda- 
tion, with a relieving platform also supported on piles. 
The wall, which is 174 feet long, measured on the coping, 
was built between the old side walls of the dock. These 
walls were of dry rubble masonry, extending to low water, 
and rested on spruce piles. As timber wharves were 
built in front of these walls, 20 feet wide on the west 
side and about 40 feet wide on the east side, it was 
necessary to carry the foundation of the new walls 6 
feet below city base at the ends, sloping to 30 feet below 
at the faces of wharves. Heavy tongued and grooved 
sheeting, 8 inches in thickness, was driven, however, to 
a depth of 18 feet in front of the old walls, on both 
sides, to prevent any disturbance of the filling under 
or back of these walls during the construction of the new 
wall. The bottom of the dock on the line of the wall 
was dredged to 32 feet below city base, for a width 
sufficient to maintain a trench 15 feet wide during the 
driving of the piles. Spruce piles were then driven in 
the same manner as those in the foundation for the 
bridge. The piles were driven in alternate rows of six 
and seven piles each, the rows being 15 inches on centers 
and the piles in adjoining rows being staggered. All 
except the four back piles in each row were driven 
at an inclination of 1 in 12. Seven hundred and 
fifty-five piles were driven for the concrete foundation 
of the wall. For the main portion of the wall the width 
of the foundation between elevation minus 30 and eleva- 
tion minus 15 is 15 feet; at the latter elevation it steps 
back to a width of 10 feet and continues at this width to 
city base. The mold for holding the concrete was made 
of 6-inch hard pine tongued and grooved sheeting at both 



Engineering Department. 65 

front and back, and was carried up to 5 feet above city base 
for the purpose of construction, but finally cut off at about 
low water on the completion of the work. When the 
concrete had reached about elevation minus 17, a line 
of 4-inch hard pine sheeting was placed at the back 
to hold the concrete of the upper part of the foundation. 
The Portland cement concrete was of the same propor- 
tion and deposited in the same manner as that at the 
piers of the bridge, and was carried up to elevation 
city base. The sheeting at the front of the wall was 
anchored at the top by 1-inch rods screwed into each 
alternate piece of sheeting and bent down into the 
concrete. 

The wall above the foundation is coursed granite 
ashlar masonry, laid solid in cement mortar and backed 
with boulder concrete; its width at the foundation is 
9 feet 3 inches and the back is carried vertically to 
elevation 3.5 to form a step to receive the anchor of 
the relieving platform. Above this step the wall is 6 
feet 6 inches wide and narrows to a width of 3 feet 
under the coping at elevation 15. The coping is 2 feet 
deep and 2 feet 6 inches wide, pean-hammered on top, 
quarry-faced in front and dressed for f-inch joints. It 
is doweled to course below and further secured by 
galvanized wrought-iron cramps at each joint. 

Back of the wall a relieving platform was built 40 
feet wide, supported on spruce piles. The piles were 
especially long, ranging from 50 feet in length near the 
wall to 35 feet in length at the rear and were carefully 
driven in rows 3 feet on centers and spaced 2 feet 
6 inches in the rows, the total number driven being 941. 
They were capped with 10-inch by 10-inch hard pine 
caps, carefully fitted and secured to each pile by 1^-inch 
diameter oak treenails, 16 inches long, the caps being 
covered with 4-inch spruce plank forming a platform, at 
elevation 3 feet above city base, for supporting the 
filling back of the wall. The caps were designed to 
serve as a tie to anchor the wall to a line of batter 
piles driven at the rear of the platform. Batter piles 
were driven between the rows of bearing piles of the 
platform at an inclination to the perpendicular of 1 
to 2, and capped with a special 10-inch hard pine 
cap which was notched into the caps of the platform 
and securely fastened. At the wall end these caps were 
built into the concrete 18 inches and secured by two 
1^-inch diameter pins in each cap; these projected 7 



66 City Document No. 14. 

inches beyond the ends of the caps into the concrete. 
Before the planking was placed, the filling under the 
platform was deposited very carefully at a uniform 
slope of 2 horizontal to 1 vertical, extending from the 
under surface of the platform at its rear until it reached 
the back of the foundation of the wall. 

The filling was of good clean gravel, ashes or other 
materials, free from clay, silt or organic matter. After 
the wall was completed and ballasted good clean filling 
was deposited on the platform and in the portion of 
the old dock between the rear of the platform and the 
old wall, the material above elevation 14 being clean 
dredged gravel with no stones larger than 3 inches in 
diameter. A board fence having l§-inch square iron 
posts leaded into the coping was built for the full length 
of the wall at the head of the dock. 

The designs for the walls at the heads of docks Nos. 
2 and 3 and the bulkhead connecting them received 
the approval of the Harbor and Land Commissioners 
on May 1, 1908. Because of the fact that the distance 
between the old wall at the head of dock No. 2 and the 
new wall was much less than at dock No. 1, and because 
of arrangements made with the railroad company by 
which the foundation was not carried down so far as 
at dock No. 1 and was permitted to project 7 feet out- 
side the street line, it was not deemed necessary to 
provide a relieving platform for this wall; in all other 
respects the designs were very similar. The wall as 
built is 217 feet long measured on the street line, the 
westerly end connecting with the old side wall of the dock. 
As there was a timber wharf 45 feet wide in front of the 
old wall the same form of construction was used as at 
dock No. 1. 

The bottom of dock No. 2 at the location of the wall 
was dredged to 27 feet below city base, for such width 
as was necessary to maintain a trench 22 feet wide dur- 
ing the driving of the piles. The piles were driven the 
same as at the other wall, and in rows of 8 piles each, 
the rows being 2 feet 3 inches on centers, the two front 
piles being driven at an inclination of 1 in 6, the others 
being driven vertically; the tops of inclined piles were 
left at elevation minus 22 and the others at minus 15. 
A total of 711 piles were driven in the foundation of the 
wall, no pile being less than 35 feet long when left in 
place. Tongued and grooved 6-inch hard pine sheeting 
was driven at an inclination of 1 in 6 to form a mold 



Engineering Department. 67 

for the concrete foundation at the front, and as origi- 
nally designed no sheeting was to be provided at the 
back until elevation minus 11 should be reached, the 
concrete to be deposited without a mold below this 
grade. Owing to the fact that a portion of the old wall 
became undermined by the waves during a heavy storm 
and slid out into the trench dredged for the concrete, 
the design was slightly changed, 6-inch sheeting being 
driven at the back of the foundation the same as at 
the front. As built, the foundation consists of clean 
gravel deposited in a trench leaving a finished surface 
sloping uniformly at the rate of 2 horizontal to 1 vertical 
from elevation minus 25 at the front to elevation 
minus 15 at the back, and on this surface the concrete 
of the wall rests. 

The widths of the foundation at minus 25 and minus 
15 are respectively 22 feet and 18^ feet. The concrete 
used was of the same quality and deposited in the same 
manner as at dock No. 1. At elevation city base, 
where the foundation is 10 feet wide, the granite masonry 
wall begins and is carried up to elevation 15. The 
wall proper is 9 feet 1^ inches wide at base and 4 feet 
at top, built of coursed granite laid solid in cement 
mortar and backed with cement concrete, the quality 
of workmanship and materials being the same as at 
dock No. 1. At three locations in the front of the wall 
the granite face projects out 18 inches beyond the gen- 
eral face of the wall for lengths of 18 feet, forming but- 
tresses on which are to rest the steel posts for supporting 
the grain conveyor of the railroad company, long rods 
being built into these buttresses for anchors for the 
posts. It was in consequence of providing these 
buttresses that permission was given by the railroad 
company to build the foundations outside the street 
line. The wall carries a concrete parapet 14 inches 
wide and 21 inches high, which forms the back of the 
sidewalk and supports a board fence. 

The design for the wall at the head of dock No. 3 
was substantially the same as the old walls built at 
these docks, the only essential difference being the sub- 
stitution of a concrete cap for a plank grillage or granite 
levelers resting directly on the pile heads. The wall is 
171 feet long, 9 feet 6 inches thick at city base and 
4 feet 6 inches thick at the top, which is at elevation 14. 
It is built of good quality granite quarry stone laid dry, 
without pinners on the face, and no open joints of more 



68 City Document No. 14. 

than 2 inches. The concrete cap is 2 feet deep and 11 
feet 6 inches wide, resting on rows of spruce piles spaced 
2 feet 6 inches on centers, five piles in each row, the two 
front piles being driven on an inclination of one in six. 
A concrete parapet and a board fence of same design 
as at dock No. 2 are built on top of the wall for the 
entire length, except where provision is made for the 
railroad track leading to a landing bridge. 

Across the end of the location of the proposed pier 
No. 3, between the walls built at docks No. 2 and No. 3, 
a timber bulkhead was built 184 feet long. The surface 
of the ground was practically at city base, and the cap 
of the bulkhead at about 16f feet above city base. The 
bulkhead consists of a spruce pile and a spurshore 
spaced every 9 feet, with two lines of double 6-inch by 
12-inch hard pine wales bolted to the piles, one at 4 feet 
6 inches above the surface of the ground and the other 
within 14 inches of the top of the bulkhead; between 
these double wale pieces 6-inch hard pine, tongued 
and grooved sheeting was driven to a depth of 5 feet 
below the surface and securely bolted to the upper wale 
pieces by |-inch diameter screw bolts, one in each alter- 
nate piece of sheeting, and to the lower wale pieces by 
f-inch spike bolts, one in each piece. A 12-inch by 
14-inch hard pine timber was fitted to the top of the 
bulkhead and securely bolted, forming a cap to which 
a board fence, of same design as those on the walls, was 
attached. The bulkhead was anchored back into the 
filling by 1 f-inch diameter rods spaced 4^ feet on centers 
and secured to anchors made of 3-inch hard pine plank 
set vertically in the filling and located about 21 feet 
back from the face of the bulkhead. 

The act authorizing the building of the avenue 
reserved to the railroad company ''the right to lay and 
operate at grade two tracks along and others across the 
land owned by them included within said Northern ave- 
nue and two tracks diagonally across Sleeper street," 
and the Railroad Commissioners were given authority 
to determine the location of the tracks and to regulate 
the highw^ay traffic and travel on the avenue and street. 
Under date of December 16, 1908, the commissioners 
approved the location of tracks shown on a plan dated 
May 14, 1908, and determined the manner of construct- 
ing and operating the railroad tracks. The railroad 
company did not build the two longitudinal tracks for 
the entire length of the avenue, east of Sleeper street, 



Engineeeing Department. 69 

as it was authorized to do. It built a single track from 
the harbor line on the South Boston side of the channel 
across the end of Sleeper street, then a double track 
along the avenue as far as pier No. 1, then by a curve 
to the right joined the old tracks on the southerly line 
of the avenue. It also built all the cross tracks approved 
by the commissioners, two across Sleeper street and 
fifteen across Northern avenue, one of the latter being 
across span 3 of the bridge over Fort Point channel. 
The track construction determined by the commissioners 
required steel girder rails 9 inches deep laid on cross-ties 
and secured by tie rods. The top of the rail coincided 
with the finished surface of the street. The granite pave- 
ment betw^een the rails and 18 inches outside each rail 
was required by the commissioners to be laid by the 
railroad company, the blocks and methods of laying 
being the same as used by the city in paving the remain- 
der of the street. 

The filling required to raise the new street at the end 
near the channel was done by the railroad company 
under contract with the city, gravel being brought in 
by train and the tracks raised as the filling progressed. 
The cross section of the street provides a single sidewalk 
8 feet wide on the water or northerly side of the avenue, 
paved with brick and having granite edgestone; the 
rest of the street, 82 feet in width, was paved with 
granite blocks having gravel joints. At the southerly 
side line of the street the paving was dished, forming a 
gutter about 3 feet wide, across which easy access may 
be had to the railroad freight yards at any desired point. 

Surface drains with necessary catch-basins on both 
sides of the street have been provided for the entire 
length of the new street, the discharge in all cases being 
into tide water. 

Two lines of water pipe, 16-inch and 20-inch, were 
laid by the Water Department on the northerly side of 
the avenue and hydrants set in the sidewalks at proper 
intervals. 

Rainsford Island, Wharf and Bulkhead. 
The storm of December 26, 1909, destroyed the bridge 
connecting the shore with the head of the wharf, on 
which the coal shed stands and badly damaged the bulk- 
head on the northerly side of the island and washed 
away much of the filling and road surface. The trustees 
made contracts with W. H. ElHs for rebuilding the 



70 City Document No. 14. 

bridge for $3,300 and for repairing the bulkhead and 
furnishing fifteen fender piles in the head of the wharf, 
at a cost of $2,005.85. The work was supervised by this 
department and was completed January 31, 1910. 

Western Avenue Bridge to Cambridge. 

Plans and specifications were made for repairing this 
bridge and the Commissioners for the Boston and Cam- 
bridge Bridges made a contract December 8, 1909, with 
W. H. Elhs, the lowest bidder, for doing the work. The 
draw is to be rebuilt; the roadway is to be uncovered 
and the stringers examined, and new stringers will be 
put in where required, and the entire bridge will be 
replanked. Work was begun December 14, when the 
bridge was closed to team travel until the draw and 
approaches should be completed. A temporary bridge 
was erected across the channel to accommodate foot 
travel. About 40 per cent of the work has been done. 

Wharf and Pier for Fireboat. 

Plans and specifications were made at the request 
of the Fire Commissioner for building a wharf and pier 
for the fireboat, near the East Boston landing of the 
South Ferry. The work was ajvarded to George T. 
Rendle, the lowest bidder, for $3,500, and included 
dredging the dock to grade — 15 city base; the entire 
work was completed May 24, 1909. 

1909. — Streets. 

Preliminary surveys and plans were made; working 
plans and specifications prepared and forwarded to the 
Street Department for the construction of twenty-eight 
assessment streets, for repaving thirty-nine streets, and 
for constructing artificial stone sidewalks in eighteen 
streets; surveys have been made, levels taken and pre- 
liminary plans prepared for twenty assessment streets 
and for repaving ten streets ; the necessary surveys were 
made and grades for street railway tracks determined 
in twenty-seven streets. 

Preliminary estimates have been made of the cost of 
repaving thirty-four streets and for constructing forty- 
eight streets. 

Record plans are now being made of the work done 
during the year. The street book, giving the lengths 
and areas of pavements in accepted streets and public 



Engineering Department. 71 

alleys, has been corrected to February 1, 1909, and is 
now being brought up to February 1, 1910. 

Waterworks. 

The past year saw the completion of the improved 
low service supply for South Boston, work on which 
began in 1904 when the tunnel was built under Fort 
Point channel at the draw on Congress street. In 
this connection the following work was done during the 
past year: The 30-inch main in C street, South Boston, 
was extended in C street, C Street Extension, Northern 
avenue and Sleeper street to a junction with the 24- 
inch main in Congress street, a total distance of about 
5,750 feet; the 30-inch main in Congress street, City 
Proper, was extended from Atlantic avenue to Fort 
Point channel; 24-inch pipe was laid on the trestles 
built in 1907 over Fort Point channel from the ends 
of the tunnel to the Boston and South Boston shores, 
and connection was made with the 30-inch pipe pre- 
viously laid in the tunnel, thus completing the line 
between the City Proper and South Boston. At the 
same time 16-inch high service pipe was laid on the 
trestles and connected with the 20-inch high service 
pipe in the tunnel in anticipation of future extension 
of this service. This new low service line both greatly 
strengthens the supply to South Boston and affords 
a new "feed" for the city proper. 

The Deacon meters were operated to detect waste, 
from April 8 until November 24, in the residential 
districts of the City Proper, in Charlestown, South 
Boston, Roxbury and Jamaica Plain; the saving of 
water effected was approximately two and one-half 
million gallons per day, or about four gallons per capita 
for the entire population of the city. The cost of the 
work was S3,546. Of the waste found, 1,720,000 gal- 
lons per day was in service pipes in the streets; 430,000 
gallons per day in broken main pipe; 206,000 gallons 
per day in defective joints in main pipe, and about the 
same amount in hydrants and watering posts. The 
result represents a part only of the waste existing in 
the territory tested, as no inspection was made inside 
of buildings, while the outside inspection was incom- 
plete, the larger leaks only and those most easily found 
being located. Although the saving made was com- 
paratively small yet it is an earnest of what might be 
accomplished in restricting waste if the Deacon meter 



72 City Document No. 14. 

readings were followed up by thorough inspection both 
outside and inside of buildings. The meter simply 
locates waste within certain limits and measures its 
amount; to definitely locate that waste is the duty of 
the inspector, a duty demanding honest and intelligent 
work. 

On January 3 of this year a break occurred in the 
easterly 30-inch main in Tremont street, opposite Seaver 
place, with a large resulting damage to property in 
the vicinity. The cause of the break was the rigid 
bearing of the pipe at one point upon the concrete 
reinforcement of a pipe sewer built by the Transit 
Commission in 1897 immediately outside of the wall 
of the subway and directly under the water pipe; the 
sewer was rigidly supported upon piers extending down 
to the bottom of the side wall of the subway, and was 
evidently designed with a safe clearance between its 
concrete covering and the bottom of the pipe; where 
the break occurred this design had not been followed, 
the concrete being found hard up against the pipe for 
a distance of about six inches. The pipe, laid in 1847, 
was found to be in excellent condition, practically the 
only deterioration discovered being on the inside under 
the tubercles. The following is an analysis of the metal : 

Silicon 1 . 70 

Sulphur 0.094 

Manganese 0.82 

Phosphorus 0.79 

Combined Carbon . 60 

Graphitic Carbon 2 . 98 

This is the eighth break which has occurred in the 
large water pipes in Tremont street, between Boylston 
and Common streets, since the construction of the 
subway under them. The apparent cause in each case 
was identical with that of the recent break, viz., a 
rigid bearing at one point with opportunity for a slight 
settlement in the adjacent pipes. 

The following is a memorandum of the breaks that 
have occurred, with a statement of the condition found 
in each case : 

1897, May 12. Easterly, 30-inch main opposite Common street. Rigid 
bearing on subway roof. 

1898, August 11. Westerly, 30-inch main opposite Common street. 
Rigid bearing on manhole over subway. 

1899, September 1. Easterly, 30-inch main opposite Common street. 
Rigid bearing on subway roof. 

1900, August 8. Easterly, 30-inch main at Hotel Touraine. Rigid bear- 
ing on subway wall. 



Engineering Department. 73 

1900, September 5. Easterly, 30-inch main at Hollis street. Rigid 
bearing on wooden post supported from subway roof. 

1904, INIarch 23. Westerly, 30-inch main opposite Common street. 
Rigid bearing on subway roof. 

1907, May 13. 16-inch main at HolHs street. Rigid bearing on sub- 
way roof. 

1910, January 3. Easterly, 30-inch main opposite Seaver place. Rigid 
bearing on concrete over sewer. 

A gauge has been installed in the office of the Engi- 
neering Department in City Hall which registers the 
pressure in the low service system at a point about 
1,200 feet distant; it has not been possible heretofore 
to obtain such a record, the City Hall being situated 
in the high service area. The operating mechanism 
of the gauge is located in the basement of the Post 
Office, and consists of a diaphragm connected with the 
low service main in Milk street by a small pipe, a lever 
and transmitter; the varying pressure on the main is 
electrically registered at City Hall, where it is both 
indicated on a dial and recorded in permanent form on 
a chart. 

I renew the following recommendations made in last 
year's report, viz., that a standpipe be built on the 
northerly portion of the ''double-high" system in West 
Roxbury, and that additional storage be provided at 
Mt. Bellevue on the same service. That a storage 
reservoir or reservoirs be built on the high service 
system large enough to hold at least six days' supply 
for the entire high service of the city. That a tunnel 
be built under the Charles river at Warren Bridge to 
insure a safe connection between the large mains in 
Boston and Charlestown and to safeguard the high 
service supply of Charlestown. 

Miscellaneous. 
Examinations and reports have been made in reference 
to the southwesterly line of the Granary Burial Ground, 
the fences at the Bunker Hill Street Cemetery, the Marine 
Park pier head, the North End Park piers and the 
Thomas Park monument. A plan and specifications 
were prepared for a bulkhead at a vacant lot on North- 
ampton street, between Tremont street and Columbus 
avenue. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



74 



City Document No. 14. 



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Average Monthly Heights 


in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which Water Rose at Different Stations on the Boston Waterworlts 














Southern H 


iQH Service. 










Northern High Service. 


,^. 


City Hall. 


Engine Hou.e 
Roxbury. 


Engine House 

Walnut Street, 
Neponset. 


Norfo?k Street, 
Mattapan. 


Engine House 

Green Street, 
Jamaica Plain. 


Engine House 
No. 30, 




Engine House 

Cliestnut Hill 

B^IIuTn. 


Engine House 

Bunlcer Hill 
Street, 


Engine House 
No. 5, 




3 a. m. 


9 a. m. 


3 a. m. 


9 a. m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a. m. 




3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a. m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a. m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


January 














946 


239 
















944 


162 












233 


































150 












































142 






231 


242 


229 


241 


227 


244 


237 


247 


241 


247 


238 






246 


244 


162 


159 


154 


Ma^• 


246 


231 


242 


229 


242 


227 


245 


236 


248 


241 


247 


238 


246 


238 


246 


„, 


163 


158 


156 


144 


June 


247 


232 


244 


231 


244 


227 


246 


235 


248 


240 


247 


238 


247 


238 


246 


„ 


165 


159 


156 


144 


July, 


247 


232 


247 


234 


244 


229 


246 


237 


248 


241 


247 


238 


246 


238 


245 


242 


163 


156 


155 


142 


August. 


247 


234 


248 


237 


245 


231 


247 


239 


248 


242 


247 


239 


246 


239 


245 


242 


164 


158 


156 


144 


September 


247 


233 


249 


237 


245 


232 


247 


239 


248 


242 


247 


239 


247 


240 


247 


243 


163 


157 


158 


144 


October 


248 


234 


250 


239 


246 


233 


248 


239 


249 


243 


247 


240 


249 


240 


247 


244 


163 


156 


156 


144 


November. 


248 


236 


250 


240 


246 


234 


248 


240 


249 


244 


248 


240 


249 


241 


247 


241 


162 


156 


156 


145 


December 


247 


237 


249 


240 


245 


234 


247 


241 


248 


244 


247 


241 


247 


242 


246 


244 


162 


156 


154 


144 



Average Monthly Heights, in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which Water Rose at Different Stations 

Waterworks. 





Low Service. 


1909. 


Chestnut Hill 

ISn^ 
Brigliton. 


Engine House 
No. 34, 
Western 
Avenue, 
Brighton. 


Boston 
Common. 


Engine House 

No. 8, 
Salem Street, 
City Proper. 


EagineHouse 

East Street, 
City Proper. 


Engine House 

Congress and 

Farnsworth 

Streets, 

South Boston. 


Engine House 

No. 2, 

Fourth and 

Streets, 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard, 
710 Albany 
Street, 
Roibury. 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard, 

Gibson Street, 
Dorchester. 




3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3a,m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


•■■"■1-- 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


January 


141 


165 


134 


136 


131 


125 


126 


118 


128 121 


122 


113 


122 


112 


125 


119 


122 


113 


February- . 


141 


166 


133 


134 


131 


120 


126 


113 


127 


118 


121 


109 


123 


109 


125 


115 


124 


111 


Marcl: . . 


141 


165 


132 


134 


133 


127 


129 


121 


132 


124 


127 


118 


130 


119 


130 


124 


130 


120 


April 


141 


166 


131 


132 


134 


127 


131 


121 


133 


125 


128 


119 


132 


120 


130 


125 


130 


120 


May 


141 


165 


132 


132 


137 


129 


132 


124 


136 


128 


131 


120 


133 


121 


132 


128 


132 


122 


June.. 


140 


165 


132 


133 


137 


129 


133 


124 


136 


127 


131 


120 


133 


120 


133 


127 


131 


122 


Julj- 


141 


166 


135 


136 


137 


130 


133 


126 


136 


128 


131 


121 


133 


121 


133 


129 


132 


123 


August. . 


144 


166 


141 


139 


142 


133 


138 


127 


140 


131 


134 


123 


136 


124 


137 


132 


135 


126 


September. . 


141 


160 


139 


138 


140 


134 


139 


129 


139 


132 


133 


124 


135 


125 


141 


137 


135 


126 


October 


142 


158 


140 


143 


141 


136 


140 


130 


142 


135 


135 


126 


138 


127 


143 


139 


137 


128 


November. , 


145 


157 


144 


141 


145 


136 


141 


131 


145 


135 


138 


125 


141 


128 


147 


138 


140 


128 


December . 


141 


158 


139 


141 


140 


135 


136 


130 


139 


134 


132 


124 


134 


126 


141 


139 


133 


127 



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Engineering Department. 75 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Boston Water Department. 

Daily average amount used during 1909 (gallons) . . 94,029,900 
Daily average amount used through meters during 1909 

(gallons) 22,768,700 

Number of services February 1, 1910 97,194 

Number of meters in service February 1, 1910 . . 12,048 
Number of motors under supervision February 1, 1910 . 117 
Number of elevators under supervision February 1, 1910, 583 
Length of supply and distributing mains in miles Febru- 
ary 1, 1910 761.2 

Number of public hydrants in use February 1, 1910 . 8,024 

Yearly revenue from annual water rates (assessed) . $1,411,156.63 

Yearly revenue from metered water (assessed) . . . *$1, 285,477. 63 

Percentage of total revenue from metered water . . 47 . 7 

Yearly expense of maintenance S654,493.49 

* No revenue of any amount was received from the new meters set during the year 

1909, all of the services metered during 1909 being assessed on the annual rate. The 
number of meters from which this revenue was derived were 5,500. 



76 City Document No. 14. 



CITY ENGINEERS, 

1850-1910. 



E. H. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 18, 1850, to October, 1855. 

(Died August 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died August 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to November 25, 1872. 

(Died June 14, 1908.) 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Resigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E. 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 

(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to the present time. 



Engineering Department. 77 



APPENDICES. 



Appendix A. — Table Showing the Widths of Openings 
for Vessels in all Bridges Provided 
with Draws in the City of Boston, 
January, 1910. 

Appendix B. — Engineering Department Property 
Schedule. 

Appendix C. — Elevations and Datum Planes Referred 
to Boston City Base. 

Appendix D. — Engineering Department Annual Re- 
ports, 1867-1910. 

Appendix E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordi- 
nances. 

Appendix F. — Meridian Line. 

Appendix G. — Atlantic Avenue Extension; History of 
Legislation and Official Action. 



78 



City Document No. 14. 






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79 



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80 



City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX B. 



Engineering Department Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 horse. 

2 carriages. 

1 automobile. 

1 sleigh. 

2 harnesses. 

3 robes. 

Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as fol- 
lows: 

2 Temple transits. 

7 Buff & Berger transits. 
1 Berger & Sons transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

8 Gurley transits. 

1 Keuffel & Esser level. 

2 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 
7 Gurley levels. 

13 Boston rods. 

4 New York rods. 

10 Troy rods. 

4 Philadelphia rods. 

Apparatus for blueprinting. 

Cases for plans and books. 

Reference Ubrary, 1,572 volumes. 



16,044 plans engineering works, 

loose. 
14 volumes plans engineering works, 

bound. 
Photographs of engineering works. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holsteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 

1 pair field glasses. 
3 typewriters. 

2 dynamometers. 
1 pantagraph. 

3 calculating machines. 
1 volt meter. 

1 comptometer. 

2 thermophones. 

2 cameras. 

3 planimeters. 

1 Bourdon pressure gauge. 
1 Burroughs arithmometer. 
1 Steiger calculating machine. 
1 EgU calculating machine. 



Surveying Division. 



2 Temple transits. 

2 Moody transits. 

2 Buff & Berger transits. 

4 Berger & Sons transits. 

1 Buff & Buff transit. 

1 Stackpole transit. 

1 Troughton & Sims transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

7 Buff & Berger levels. 

1 Moody level. 



18 Boston rods. 
1 Troy rod. 
8 iron rods. 
34,948 plans. 
3,563 lithographed maps. 
1 pantagiaph. 
3 planimeters. 

1 Federal blueprinting machine, 
No. 10. 



Engineering Department. 81 

APPENDIX C. 



Elevations and Datum Planes Referred to Boston City Base. 
Feet. 

* . 00 Boston city base. This base is used by the 
towns of Brookline and Watertown and the 
cities of Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Newton 
and Waltham. 
— 4 . 98 Cambridge city base. 
+0 . 64 Somerville city base. 

. 00 Metropolitan Park Commission base. 
+0.60 Harbor and Land Commission base. 
. 00 Metropolitan Water Board base. 
— 100.00 Metropolitan Sewerage Board base. 
— 100.00 Boston Transit Commission base. 
— 100.00 Charles River Commission base. 

15.62 Highest recorded tide, April 16, 1851. 

Charles Harris, Level Book 22 (15. 10 above 
mean low water. United States Coast Sur- 
vey Chart of Boston Harbor, 1857). 
15.45 Old bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 

Charlestown Navy Yard. 
15.11 New bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 
Charlestown Navy Yard, northwest end 
over crowfoot. 
5 . 00 Piles to be cut off for buildings. 
12.00 Minimum cellar bottom grade. 
9 . 82 South Boston base. Formerly in use, now 
abandoned. 
99.40 Charles river flood elevation, at the Brook- 
line pumping station, February 13, 1886. 
97.50 Charles river flood elevation, March, 1902. 
95.66 Charles river average flood elevation, 1886 
to 1902, both inclusive. 
0.00 Mean low water about 1830. f 
+0.34 Mean low water, 1867. f 
+0,79 Mean low water, 1902. f 
+0.58 Navy yard base, 1902. f 

10.63 Mean high water, 1902. f 
5.71 Mean sea level, 1902. t 

9.84 Mean rise and fall of tide, 1902. f 

* Definition of Boston city base: "Boston city base is a datum plane 15 feet above the 
average height of the sill of the Charlestown dry dock." (Page 552, report of Committee 
on Charles River Dam, 1903.) 

t John R. Freeman, civil engineer, in report to Committee on Charles River Dam, 
1903, pp. 562, 569, 570. 



82 



City Document No. 14. 



The following tidal records may be of interest : 
High Tides. 

[Plane of Reference, Boston City Base.] 



Feet. 


Date. 


Where Taken. 


By Whom. 


15 62 


April 16, 1851 
April 16. 1851 
Nov. 27, 1898 






15 74 


Navy Yard, staff gauge 


Isaac Williams. 


14.94 


Average of 15 observations. 




13 72 


Nov 8 1900 


Maiden Bridge 


F. P. Spalding. 


14.19 


Nov. 25, 1901 


Average of 10 observations. 




13.60 


Dec. 14,1902 


Average of 11 observations. 




13 00 


Feb 17 1903 


North Ferry, Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 










14.83 


Jan. 25,1905 


Average of 34 observations. 




14.70 


Jan. 25,1905 


Inner harbor. 10 observations. 












13.00 
13 10 


April 9,1907 
Nov 24 1909 


North Ferry Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 


North Ferry. Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 




Nov. 25, 1909 
Nov 27 1909 




J. H. Edmonds. 


13.10 
13.00 
15.64 


North Ferry Boston 


J. H. Edmonds. 








Dec. 26, 1909 


Average of below, omitting Granite Bridge. 




15.70 


Dec. 26. 1909 


Nut Island, Metropolitan sewer station 


S. R. Gauge. 


15.75 
15.94 


Dec. 26, 1909 
Dec. 26,1909 






Granite Bridge, Dorchester, tide mark 


A. N. Colman. 


15.79 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Neponset avenue, No. 451, tide mark 


J. H. Edmonds.t 


15.82 
15.85 
15.85 
15.60 
15.65 
15.63 
15.50 


Dec 26 1909 


Neponset Bridge, tide mark 


F. P. Spalding. 








npp 9fi IQflQ 


Old Colony Yacht Club, Savin Hill 


Gustav Holmberg. 


Deo. 26, 1909 








J. E. Murray. 


Dec 26 1909 




J. F. Kinnaly. 


Dec. 26,1909 


Mt. Washington avenue, tide mark 


J. H. Edmonds. 


15.58 


Dec. 26, 1909 

Dec. 26,1909 
Dec. 26, 1909 
Dec. 26, 1909 
Dec. 26, 1909 


Roxbury canal at Massachusetts avenue, tide 


J. H. Edmonds. 


15.64 

15.64 

♦15.50 

15.50 




H. S. Adams. 




J. H. Edmonds. 




J. H. Edmonds. 




H. A. Bolan. 







* The observation at the North Ferry, Boston, was an actual reading made at high water on a 
staff gauge reading in tenths. ., , , t n- t-. i j 

tThe elevations of the tide of December 26. 1909, have been compiled by J. H. Edmonds 
principally from points put in by him for that purpose when in the Surveying Division. 



Engineering Department. 



83 



HIGH riHES.— Concluded. 



Feet. 


Date. 


Where Taken. 


By Whom. 


15.60 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Charles River Dam 


C. R. D. Comm. 


15 6'' 


Dec 26 1909 


Navy Yard 


S. R. Gauge. 










15.70 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Maiden Bridge 


H. H. McNerlin. 


15 50 


Dec. 26, 1909 
Dec. 26, 1909 


Meridian Street Bridge 


Daniel McFarland. 


15.54 


North Ferry, East Boston, tide mark 


J. H. Edmonds. 


15.74 


Dec. 26, 1909 


South Ferry, East Boston, tide mark 


J. H. Edmonds. 








W. J. Marshall. 


15.65 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad Station, 
East Boston, tide mark .... 


J. H. Edmonds. 




Dec. 26, 1909 






15.75 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Orient Heights Yacht Club, tide mark 


J. H. Edmonds. 










15.70 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Chelsea Street Bridge, East Boston 


F. P. Spalding. 


15.20 


Dec. 26, 1909 


Deer Island 


S. R. Gauge. 


Low Tides. 


5.60 


Nov. 27, 1898 


Deer Island, Metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—3.50 


Feb. 1, 1900 


Deer Island, Metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—2.94 


Feb. 3, 1900 


South Boston station, Edison Electric 




—3.00 


Feb. 4, 1904 


Deer Island, Metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—2.70 


Mar. 23, 1905 


Deer Island, Metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 



The High Tide of December 26, 1909. 

The morning tide of December 26, 1909, attending 
the severe storm of this date on the New England coast, 
was one of the highest ever recorded in Boston Harbor. 
At Boston Light the predicted time of high tide was 
10.20 a. m. The wind from the late afternoon of the 
25th until nearly noon of the 26th was from the east 
and northeast over Boston Harbor and Massachusetts 
bay, rapidly increasing in force during the evening of 
the 25th to very high velocities soon after midnight, 
which continued undiminished through the morning 
and day of the 26th. At Cape Cod, Highland Light, 
the velocity at 8 a. m. of the 26th was 48 miles north- 
east; noon, 72 miles; 2.15 p. m., 84 miles; at 5 p. m., 
66 miles, all from the eastnortheast, and at midnight 



84 City Document No. 14. 

it was 60 miles north. At Hull, Mass., the hourly 
movements on the 26th were as follows: Midnight to 
1 a. m., 37 miles; 1 to 2 a. m., 43; 2 to 3 a. m., 46; 3 to 
4 a. m., 63; 4 to 5 a. m., 58; 5 to 6 a. m., 60; 6 to 7 a. m., 
56; 7 to 8 a. m., 60; 8 to 9 a. m., 54; 9 to 10 a. m., 65; 
10 to 11 a. m., 55; 11 a. m. to noon, 48. During the 
afternoon the velocity ranged between 40 and 50 miles 
per hour. The maximum velocity at Hull was about 
72 miles per hour at 9.35 a. m. At Boston the hourly 
movements from midnight to noon of the 26th ranged 
between 25 and 39 miles, the hourly maximum rates 
between 32 and 45 miles per hour, the latter occurring 
at 5.10 a. m. from the northeast. The increasing and 
high wind occurring with the rising tide, together with 
a high run of tide, caused the water in Boston Harbor 
to reach approximately the record height of the tide of 
April 16, 1851, which at the United States Navy Yard 
was 15 to 15.1 feet, the height of the tide of December 
26, 1909, being, at the same station, 14.98 feet. In 
general, the tide in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts 
bay was approximately 3.5 feet above the predicted 
height. The actual height, as given by the United 
States Engineers and other reliable authorities at the 
following places, was as follows: Newburyport, Mass., 
Harbor, Black Rock Wharf, 12.68 feet; Sandy bay, Rock- 
port Harbor, 13.64; Boston Harbor, Deer Island, 14.56; 
Plymouth Harbor, 14.8; Barnstable bay, 13.25; Prov- 
incetown Harbor, 14.35. The tide at all of these sta- 
tions, with the exception of Plymouth and Barnstable, 
was approximately 5 feet above mean high water. 

The high water caused great damage to water front 
and shore property in many places by the flooding of 
cellars and by washouts. The greatest damage occurred 
in portions of Chelsea and Everett, Mass., where the 
breaking of a dike permitted the tide to cover a large 
residential section to a depth of several feet, causing the 
death of two persons and temporarily driving several 
thousand persons from their homes. — J. W. Smith, 
District Forecaster. (Climatological Service of the 
Weather Bureau. Report for January, 1910.) 



Engineering Department. 



85 






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86 City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX E. 



(Revised Ordinances, 1898, Chapter 16.) Engi- 
neering Department. 

Section 1. The Engineering Department shall be 
under the charge of the City Engineer, who shall be 
consulted on all matters relating to public improvements 
of every kind in respect to which the advice of a civil 
engineer or architect would be of service; shall, unless 
otherwise specifically provided, take charge of the con- 
struction of all public works of the city which properly 
come under the direction of a civil engineer; shall make 
such surveys, plans, estimates, statements and descrip- 
tions, and take such levels and prepare such specifica- 
tions and contracts as the mayor, the board of aldermen, 
the common council, any committee of the city council 
or of either branch thereof, the board of street commis- 
sioners, or any officer in charge of a department, may 
need in the discharge of its duties; shall, upon being 
notified by the superintendent of streets, supervise all 
repairs on the bridges of the city used as highways which 
affect the safety of the structures, and shall, when 
required by the mayor or any officer in charge of a 
department, measure the work done by contract for the 
city, and certify to the results of such measurement. 
Said engineer shall have the custody of all surveys and 
plans relating to the laying out, locating anew, altering, 
widening and grading of streets; and his office shall be 
deemed to be the office of the surveyor of highways. 

Sect. 2. Said engineer shall, in his annual report, 
include a report upon the safety and completeness of 
all ponds, basins and reservoirs under the charge of the 
water department, and of all bridges within the city 
limits used as highways. 

(Stat. 1870, chap. 337; Stat. 1895, chap. 449, par. 21.) 



Engineering Department. 



87 



APPENDIX F. 



Meridian Line. 



In 1870 an act was passed by the Massachusetts Legislature requiring 
each land surveyor in the state at least once in every year to adjust and 
verify his compass by the meridian line estabUshed in the county wherein 
his surveys were to be made. 

A meridian was marked by stone monuments and a book of record kept 
by a custodian designated by the County Commissioners. 

The law compelling surveyors to test their compasses annually was 
modified in 1875, so that surveyors who did not use the compass in turn- 
ing angles were reheved from the penalty attaching to the violation of the 
original act. 

The meridian posts for the County of Suffolk were placed on the south- 
erly portion of the "Parade Ground" on Boston Common. They are 
granite posts, three in number, placed 200 feet apart, are 18 inches square 
at the base, 1 foot square at the top, and 8 feet long, being firmly set in a 
bed of concrete with their tops originally just below the surface of the 
ground. 

A stone curb was placed even with the surface of the ground over the 
top of each post, with a metallic composition cover. 

The surface of that part of the Common where the posts are set ^yas 
raised several feet in 1897, the posts being protected by building a brick 
manhole around each stone, the posts being accessible by the removal of 
the manhole cover. 

As the cover and cap of the manholes are made of iron it is now necessary 
to set up the compass in the production of the line marked by the monu- 
ment to avoid local attraction. The point selected has been 290 feet north 
of the northerly stone. 

The following table gives the number of tests for each year, with the 
average readings: 



Year. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 
Readings 
West of 

North. 


Year. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 

Readings 

West of 

North. 


1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 . 


9 

8 
3 
3 
3 
2 
8 
13 
4 
7 

I 

5 
6 
8 
4 
14 
3 


10-53-46 
11-09-47 
11-07-53 
11-11-40 
10-58-33 
11-13-00 
11-12-35 
11-28-56 
11-35-15 
11-34-53 
11-28-23 
11-36-18 
11-42-04 
11-46-13 
11-43-12 
11-39-58 
11-51-54 
11-40-57 


1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 


7 
4 

1 

8 
6 

8 

13 
8 
4 

12 
6 
8 

12 
9 


11-39-56 
11-49-30 

12-32-20 


1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 


12-04-37 
12-34-34 


1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 


12-33-45 

12-44-44 
12-43-42 

12-48-45 


1886.. 


12-56-42 


1887 . . 


13-19-20 


1888 

1889 


13-16-35 
13-27-05 
13-30-46 



88 City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX G. 



Atlantic Avenue Extension Bridge. 

History of Legislation and Official Action. 

The first legislation authorizing the construction of 
the South Union Station, which involved changes in 
the existing streets in the vicinity of the proposed sta- 
tion, was chapter 516, Acts of 1896, which was approved 
June 9, 1896. 

This act provided for the widening and extension of 
Cove street to Summer street, no mention being made 
of the portion of old Cove street, between Kneeland and 
Furnace streets; this portion was not an accepted street, 
but most of the area was afterwards included in the 
extension of Atlantic avenue. 

Section 1 1 of the above act provides that the Terminal 
Company which was incorporated to carry out the pro- 
visions of the Act, 

"shall construct a bridge for the accommodation of foot pas- 
sengers or a subway from the end of the new Cove street to 
meet Dorchester avenue at a convenient place, as determined 
by the Railroad Commissioners and Street Commissioners, 
sitting jointly, whenever said commissioners deem it necessary." 

On January 18, 1897, the Board of Aldermen passed 
an order: 

"That the City Engineer be hereby requested to prepare 
plans and an estimate of the cost of a bridge 50 feet wide, 
with a 10-foot sidewalk on one side, from First street to Cove 
street, etc." 

The City Engineer, in answer to the above order, 
reported on February 1 that he had prepared a plan 
and estimate for a bridge, and that the estimated expense 
for a bridge 60 feet wide was $389,169. On the same 
date the Board of Aldermen passed an order : 

"That the Chairman of this Board petition the General Court 
at its present session for such legislation as may be necessary 
to enable the City of Boston to construct a bridge from Cove 



Engineering Department. 89 

street, City Proper, to a point near First street, South Boston, 
. . . said bridge to be 60 feet in width . . . ; also for 
authority to borrow, outside the debt limit, the sum of 
$390,000 for the construction of said bridge substantially 
in accordance with plans prepared by the City Engineer of the 
City of Boston." 

On February 18, 1897, the Common Council passed 
a resolve which the Board of Aldermen concurred in on 
February 20, approving of a proposed act of the Legis- 
lature to amend chapter 516 of the Acts of 1896, so as 
to pro\ide for the extension of Cove street by a bridge 
over the tracks of the Terminal Company and Fort 
Point channel to old Dorchester avenue, and ordered 
that the Mayor be requested to appear before the 
Committee on Railroads of the General Court at their 
hearing on February 23, and advocate the passage of 
the aforesaid bill. At a later date it was stated in 
debate in the Common Council that the Mayor failed 
to appear in behalf of the bill and an attempt was made 
to have the City Engineer instructed to appear at a 
subsequent hearing and advocate the bill; this failed of 
concurrent action, as, in the meantime, the committee 
of the Legislature had reported recommending that the 
petitioner have leave to withdraw. The friends of the 
bill did not allow the matter to rest, however, and 
the result was that chapter 388 of the Acts of 1897 
was passed and approved on May 11, 1897. 

This last act repealed that portion of section 11 of 
chapter 516 of the Acts of 1896, which related to the 
construction of a footbridge or a subway from the end 
of Cove street to Dorchester avenue, and inserted the 
following : 

" Cove street shall be extended by a bridge over the tracks of 
the Terminal Company and over Fort Point channel to Dorches- 
ter avenue at or near West First street in South Boston; and 
the said Terminal Company shall pay towards the cost of said 
bridge such sum as the Railroad Commissioners may determine 
to be equivalent to the cost of constructing for the accommo- 
dation of foot passengers a suitable bridge or a suitable sub- 
way from the end of the new Cove street, before its extension 
as herein provided, to meet Dorchester avenue at a convenient 
place: 'provided, however, that the extension of Cove street 
to West First street shall not be begun until such time after 
the first day of July in the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
eight as may be determined by the Railroad Commissioners 
and the Street Commissioners sitting jointly," 



90 City Document No. 14. 

On June 27, 1898, the Citizens Association of South 
Boston petitioned the Street Commissioners to lay out 
the extension of Cove street and to fix a date for begin- 
ning the construction of the bridge, as provided for by- 
chapter 388 of the Acts of 1897. This matter was taken 
up by the two commissions during the autumn of 1898. 

On March 8, 1899, a hearing was given by the two 
commissions sitting jointly, for determining what action 
should be taken by these Boards under chapter 388 of 
the Acts of 1897. The Street Commissioners presented 
a plan, entitled ''City of Boston, Cove Street Extension, 
City Proper, January 20, 1899, Wilham Jackson, City 
Engineer," and it was determined that the time when the 
extension of Cove street, according to said plan, should be 
begun should be the tenth day of March, 1899. 

On March 10, 1899, the Street Commissioners issued 
an order of notice of their intention to lay out an exten- 
sion of Atlantic avenue, formerly Cove street, and 
appointed a hearing on March 24, 1899; on that date, 
after hearing several parties, including the representatives 
of the Boston Terminal Company, who protested against 
any action, the Board laid out the street in accordance 
with the plan dated January 20, 1899, above mentioned. 
An attempt was made to have the General Court of 1899 
repeal the Act of 1897, but, instead, a new act was passed, 
being chapter 466 of the Acts of 1899, approved June 
2, 1899. This act provides that ''Atlantic avenue (for- 
merly Cove street), in the City of Boston, as extended 
and laid out by the Street Commissioners of said city on 
the 24th of March in the year 1899, from Kneeland street 
over land and tracks of the Boston Terminal Company, 
and with a draw over Fort Point channel and lands of 
the Old Colony and New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Companies, to Dorchester avenue, at the 
width and with the grades and by the method of con- 
struction as shown by a plan deposited in the office of 
the City Engineer of said city, marked ' City of Boston, 
Cove Street Extension, City Proper, January 20, 1899, 
Wilham Jackson, City Engineer,' shall, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Harbor and Land Commis- 
sioners in respect to structures in and over tide water, 
forthwith be constructed by the city, acting by its City 
Engineer, in accordance with said layout and plan, except 
as the same may be changed in details of construction 
by the City Engineer of Boston, with the consent of the 



Engineering Department. 91 

terminal company, and the action of the Street Com- 
missioners in laying out and extending said Atlantic 
avenue is hereby ratified and confirmed." 

Section 2 has the same provision as the previous act, 
for the payment by the terminal company of the esti- 
mated cost of a structure for the accommodation of foot 
passengers, and provides that the city shall pay the bal- 
ance of the cost, and that the City Treasurer shall at the 
request of the Mayor issue bonds to the amount required. 

A preliminary plan was accordingly prepared, dated 
June, 1899, for the portion of the bridge across Fort Point 
channel. This plan provided for a drawbridge of the 
"retractile" form; it was approved by the Harbor and 
Land Commissioners and submitted to the War Depart- 
ment. Under date of September 11, 1899, the Secretary 
of War informed the Mayor that 

In view of the protests in this case and the reports of Colonel 
Suter and the Chief of Engineers, the plan for the proposed 
bridge will not be approved. 

On September 21, 1899, the Common Council requested 
the City Engineer to prepare plans and specifications for 
a bridge to connect Atlantic avenue with Broadway 
bridge without crossing tide water. 

This last proposition did not prove popular and noth- 
ing further was done during 1899. Early in the year 1900 
the matter was again taken up, and on February 12 the 
Board of Aldermen appointed a committee to consider 
the subject and attend a meeting before the Secretary 
of War for the purpose of having the matter of the dis- 
approval of September 11, 1899, reconsidered. As a 
result, on July 10, 1900, the plan of June, 1899, was 
approved by the War Department. 

On July 26 an order of the City Council was adopted 
requesting the Mayor to order the City Engineer to 
proceed with the construction of the bridge. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for building 
the approaches to the bridge and work was begun on 
the northerly approach on March 6, 1901. Nothing was 
done during this year on that part of the bridge across 
the tracks owing to the failure of the city and the ter- 
minal company to agree upon the method of doing the 
work. 

On January 31, 1902, an agreement was made between 
the Mayor and the terminal company as to the method 



92 City Document No. 14. 

of carrying on the work of building the masonry piers 
between the railroad tracks. This agreement was rati- 
fied and confirmed by chapter 141 of the Acts of the 
General Court of 1902, approved March 4, 1902. 

A new plan of the part of the bridge across tide water 
was prepared, which substituted a pivot draw for a 
retractile draw as required by the plan of June, 1899, 
and also provided for a channel of 50 feet in width 
instead of 42 feet as originally planned; this plan was 
dated March 12, 1902, and was approved by the Harbor 
and Land Commissioners on March 26, 1902, and by 
the War Department on April 18, 1902. 

The work of building the masonry foundations for the 
bridge continued through 1902 and 1903, being practi- 
cally completed in 1903. 

Bids were received on July 2, 1903, for the erection 
of the steel work of the fixed portions of the bridge, the 
specifications leaving the matter of temporary occupancy 
of portions of the terminal company's grounds to be 
arranged by the contractor; the bidders, not being able 
to make such arrangements, made proposals which were 
rejected for informality. 

On March 12, 1904, an agreement was made between 
the Mayor and the terminal company by which the 
city was given facilities for the erection of the steel 
work; this agreement was ratified and confirmed by 
chapter 266 of the Acts of the General Court of 1904, 
approved April 25, 1904. 

On November 1, 1904, a contract was made for the 
erection of the steel work of the north approach and of 
all the fixed spans. 

No further legal obstacles to the prosecution of the 
work were encountered and the construction progressed 
during 1905 and 1906 under several different contracts 
and was completed, except as to a few minor features, 
so that the bridge was opened to all travel on August 
12, 1907. 



Engineering Department. 93 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



REPORT ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT FOR 1909. 

General Index to Contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892, will be 
found in Report of February 1, 1892. 

P.IGE. 

Engineering Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Abolishment of grade crossings : 

Dorchester avenue 3 

East Boston 3 

Freeport, Walnut and other 

streets 3 

Chelsea Street Bridge 3 

Congress Street Bridge 4 

Engineering Department 2 

Huntington Avenue Bridge 4 

Northern avenue and Sleeper street, 5 

" " " Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 4 

Bridges Inspected 5 

" wholly supported by Boston 6 

" " " " railroads 37 

" of which Boston supports the part within its limits, 8 
" " " " pays a part of the cost of main- 
tenance 8 

" supported bv railroad corporations 10 

" B. & A. R. R 10 

" B. & M. R. R. and B. & A. R. R. . . . 10 

" " " B. & M. R. R., Eastern Div 10 

" B., R. B. &L. R. R 10 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Midland 

Div 10 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Old Colony 

Div 10 

« N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Prov. Div., 10 

" " " Metropolitan Park Commission 11 

" " " Charles River Basin Commission ... 11 

" Total number (163) 11 

Bridges 5 

Agassiz road, in the Fens 12 

Albany street, over B. & A. R. R. freight tracks 12 

Allston, over B. & A. R. R 12 

Arborway, over Stony brook 12 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., West 

Roxbury 12 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. 

NYNTT<^^T-rRR 13 

Athens street, over Midland Div.N.'Y.,' N.' H.'& H.R. R /. ^ ^ 13 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge 13 

Audubon road, over B. & A. R. R 13 

Austin Street Bridge, over B. & M. R. R., Charlestown 14 

Baker street at Brook Farm, West Roxbury 14 

Beacon street, over outlet of the Fens 14 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R. R 14 



94 City Document No. 14. 



PAGE. 



Bridges, continued. 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, in Riverway .' . 15 

Bennington street, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 15 

Bennington street, over B., R. B. & L. R. R 15 

Berkeley street, over B. & A. R. R., and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Bridle path, Riverway 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river 16 

Berwick Park Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 16 

Blakemore street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R . . . 16 

Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . 16 

Bolton street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.' R 16 

Boston street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . 16 

Boylston street. Back Bay Fens 17 

Boylston street, B. & A. R. R . 17 

Bridle path, over Muddy river, in Riverway 17 

Broadway, over Fort Point channel 17 

Broadway, over B. & A. R. R 17 

Brookline avenue, over B. & A. R. R 18 

Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in Riverway 18 

Brookline street to Cambridge 18 

Brookline street, over B. & A. R. R 18 

Brooks street, Brighton 18 

Byron street, B., R. B. & L. R. R 18 

Cambridge bridge 18 

Cambridge street 19 

Cambridge street, over B. & M. and B. & A. R. R., Chs'n 19 

Castle Island Footbridge 19 

Charles River Dam Bridge 20 

Central avenue, over Neponset river 19 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over B. & A. R. R 20 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over Ipswich street 20 

Charlestown 20 

Chelsea, over B. & M. R. R 21 

Chelsea (North) . . . 21 

Chelsea (South) 21 

Chelsea street 22 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin Park 22 

Columbia road, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 22 

Columbia road, over Shoreham street 22 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R. R. and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R 22 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 23 

Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens 23 

Congress street 23 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R. R 23 

Cottage Street Footbridge, East Boston 24 

Craigie Temporary Bridge 24 

Curtis Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 24 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R. R., and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. &H. R. R 24 

Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel 25 

Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 25 

Dover street 25 

Ellicott arch, in Franklin Park 26 

Everett street, over B. & A. R. R 26 

Fens Bridge, in the Fens 26 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R. R 26 

Florence Street Bridge, over Stony brook 26 

Forest Hills entrance in Franklin Park 26 



Engineering Department. 95 



Bridges, continued 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. 

t M R R 26 

Gold street, over Midland Div.' N.' Y., N.' H." & H.' rVrV. '. '. '. '. 26 

Granite to Milton 27 

Harvard to Cambridge 27 

Harvard street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . 27 

Huntington avenue, over B. & A. R. R 28 

Huntington avenue, over Muddy river 28 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge, over Stony brook 28 

Ipswich street, over waterway in the Fens 28 

Irvington Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R 28 

L Street Bridge 28 

Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park 28 

Longwood avenue, over Muddy river and B. & A. R. R 29 

Maiden 29 

Massachusetts avenue, over B. & A. R. R 29 

Massachusetts avenue, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 29 

Mattapan to Milton 29 

Maverick Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 29 

Meridian street 30 

Milton 30 

Mt. Washington avenue 30 

Neponset 30 

Neptune road, over B., R. B. & L. R. R 31 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 31 

Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 

Dorchester 31 

Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 

near Mattapan Station 31 

North Beacon street 31 

North Harvard street 32 

Northern avenue 53 

Oakland street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 32 

Perkins Street Footbridge, over B. & M. R, R. and B. & A. 

R. R., Charlestown 32 

Porter Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 32 

Prescott Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 32 

Prison Point 33 

Pubhc Garden Footbridge 33 

Saratoga Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 33 

Scarboro' Pond Footbridge, Frankhn Park 33 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R. R., and N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 33 

Southampton Street Bridge, over South bay sluice 34 

Southampton street, over Old Colonv Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R ' 34 

Spring street to Dedham 34 

Summer street, over A street 34 

" B street 34 

" " " C street 34 

" " " Fort Point channel 34 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. freight tracks. .. 35 

Sumner street, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 35 

Warren 35 

Webster Street Footbridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston . . 36 
West Fourth street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 36 

West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H., & H. R. R 36 

Western avenue to Cambridge 36 



City Document No. 14. 



PAGE. 

Bridges, concluded. 

Western avenue to Watertown 36 

Winthrop 37 

Wood Island Park Footbridge 37 

Surveying Division 38 

Lines and grades given and paving work measured 1909 40 

Plans in Surveying Division 45 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1909: 

Abolishment grade crossings on the B., R. B. & L. R. R 46 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge 46 

Boston Common survey 46 

Boston Common water pipes 46 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital 47 

Chelsea Street Bridge 48 

Deer Island shore protection 49 

Huntington Avenue Bridge (over B. & A. R. R.) 50 

Independence Square walks 52 

Northern Avenue Bridge 53 

Northern Avenue and Sleeper street 52, 62 

Rainsford Island Wharf and bulkhead 69 

Western Avenue Bridge to Cambridge 70 

Wharf and pier for fireboat 70 

Miscellaneous 73 

Streets: 

Working plans, specifications and forms of contract were pre- 
pared and forwarded for assessment streets 70 

Water vi'orks: 

Extension of mains 71 

Table showing monthly rainfall in inches during 1908 at various 

places in Eastern Massachusetts 74 

General statistics 75 

City Engineers, 1850-1909 76 



Engineering Department. 



97 



APPENDICES. 



P.VQE. 

Appendix A. — Table showing the widths of openings for vessels in 

all bridges provided with draws 78 

B. — Engineering Department property schedule 80 

C. — Elevations referred to Boston city base 81 

D. — Engineering Department annual reports, 1867- 

1909 85 

E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordinances 86 

F.— Meridian hne 87 

G. — Atlantic Avenue Extension Bridge — History of 

legislation and official action 88 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Chelsea Street Bridge facing page 48 

Huntington Avenue Bridge: 

Trestle beneath old girders " 49 

Corrosion of old girder " 50 

Floor construction and encasement of steel (lithograph) . . " 50 

Forms for concrete " 50 

Erection of new bridge " 51 

Reinforcement for concrete " 51 

The sidewalk of removable slabs " 52 

Northern Avenue Bridge: 

General plan and elevation (Uthograph) " 52 

View from Congress street " 53 

Bird's-eye view, looking south " 58 

Draw landing " 59 

End Uf ts of draw in operation " 62 

Drawtender's house " 63 



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