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Full text of "Annual report of the City Engineer"


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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-FOURTH AND FINAL ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY Engineer 



BOSTON 



FOR THE YEAR 1910 



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CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-FOURTH AND FINAL ANNUAL REPORT 



City Rnhinrpr 



Compliments of 



f owTS i. iouriic, 



(Superintendent of Streets.) 

Acting City Engineer. 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1911 



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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



FORTY-FOURTH AND FINAL ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



BOSTON 



FOR THE YEAf^ i9;ioi 




CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1911 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-11. 



Engineering Department, City Hall, 

Boston, January 31, 1911. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgeeald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — The following report of the expenses and 
operation of this department for the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1911, is submitted. 

The duties of the City Engineer include the designing 
and superintending of the construction of new bridges, 
retaining walls, city wharves and such other public 
engineering works as the City Council may authorize; 
the making of such survey plans, estimates, statements 
and descriptions and taking such levels as the city 
government or any of its departments or committees 
may require; the custody of all surveys and plans relat- 
ing to the laying out, locating anew, altering, widening 
or discontinuing of streets, and the new engineering 
construction for all departments of the city. He shall 
be consulted on all work where the advice of a civil 
engineer w^ould be of service. The office of the City 
Engineer was established by ordinance on October 31, 
1850, and by chapter 449 of the Acts of 1895. 



2 City Document No. 14. 

On July 1, 1910, I received the following communica- 
tion from your Honor : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, July 1, 1910. 

Louis K. Rourke, Esq., 

Superintendent of Streets: 

Sir, — The death of City Engineer William Jackson occurred 
yesterday, and, under the provisions of section 12 of chapter 
486 of the Acts of 1909, I hereby designate you to discharge 
temporarily the duties of the office of City Engineer. 

Respectfully, 

John F. Fitzgerald, Mayor. 

Immediately on the receipt of the above I assumed 
charge of the Engineering Department, and with your 
approval appointed Mr. Frank A. Mclnnes, Assistant 
City Engineer, as Acting City Engineer. 

The following report of Mr. Mclnnes shows the 
work done by the Engineering Department while under 
my supervision. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis K. Rourke, 
Superintendent of Streets and 

Acting City Engineer. 



Engineering Department. 



Mr. Louis K. Rourke, 

Superintendent of Streets and Acting City Engineer: 

Sir, — The following report of the expenses and 
operations of this department for the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1911, is submitted. 

Statement of engineering expenses from February 1, 
1910, to January 31, 1911: 

Amount of department appropriation for 1910-1 1, $84,000 00 

Transfers • 2,301 04 

Revenue 708 00 

Total $87,009 04 

Amount expended for 1910-11 .... $87,009 04 



Statement of Expenditures, Department 
Appropriation. 



(As per City Auditor's Report, page 63.) 
Salaries : 

Engineer William Jackson to 

June 30, 1910, inclusive . 
Assistant engineers, draughtsmen 
and assistants to January 31, 
1911, inclusive .... 



$3,000 00 



76,502 82 



$79,502 82 

Traveling expenses 1,852 91 


Automobile expenses 






1,668 32 


Instruments, tools and repairs 






700 20 


Blueprinting and photographing 






660 08 


Stationery 






598 34 


Telephone service 








545 28 


Printing .... 








511 10 


Horse keeping 








241 25 


Books and papers 








238 53 


Binding and plans 








196 66 


Washing and small supplies 








102 12 


Typewriting 








66 09 


Furniture and office expenses 








60 40 


Postage .... 








46 56 


Messenger service 








18 38 


Total 


. $87,009 04 



City Document No. 14. 



Abolishment of Grade Crossings. 
East Boston. 



Expenditures from February 1, 1910, to January 31, 


1911: 


Land damages 


$1,386 76 


Apprizal services 


245 00 


Paving 


214 10 




$1,845 86 


Expended previous to 1910 


385,971 16 


^ 


$387,817 02 


Freeport, Walnut and Other Streets. 




Expenditures from February 1, 1910, to January 31 


1911: 


Land damages 


$9,300 00 


Sewer construction 


1,895 18 


Relocating water pipes 


481 29 


Apprizal services 


65 00 


Auditing 


50 00 




$11,791 47 


Expended previous to 1910 


37,954 13 




$49,745 60 


Chelsea Street Bridge, 




Appropriation and revenue . $75,018 00 




Transferred from Congress Street 




Bridge 1,500 00 




$76,518 00 




Less amount transferred to Park 




Department May 20, 1909 . 20,000 00 






$56,518 00 


Expenditures from February 1, 1910, to January 




31, 1911: 




Draw span $3,329 98 




Draw machinery .... 2,206 08 




Drawtenders' house . . . 1,239 50 




Engineering 1,002 25 




Gates 397 50 




Rebuilding bridge .... 387 16 




East Boston approach . . . 205 80 




$8,768 27 




Expended previous to 1910 . . 47,422 96 






56,191 23 


Balance transferred to Hyde Park avenue . 


$326 77 



Engineering Department. 



Chelsea South Temporary Bridge. 

Appropriation 

Expenditures from September 15, 1910, to Jan- 
uary 31, 1911: 
Engineering 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1911 . 



$80,000 00 

464 16 
,535 84 



Congress Street Bridge. 

Appropriation $35,000 00 

Less amount transferred to Chelsea 

Street Bridge 1,500 00 







$33,500 00 


Expenditures from February 1 


, 1910, to January 




31, 1911: 






Repairing sidewalks, etc. 


$852 18 




Draw machinery . 


451 24 




Repairing end lifts 


268 00 




Engineering 


255 00 




Repairing screw pillars . 


30 00 





Expended previous to 1910 
Unexpended balance 



$1,856 42 
28,745 57 



30,601 99 
$2,898 01 



Northern Avenue and Sleeper Street. 

Expenditures from February 1, 1910, to January 31, 1911: 

Paving, fences, etc $518 87 

Draw machinery 302 52 

Rent of office 37 58 

Engineering 24 00 

Sea wall at docks 2 and 3 8 78 



Expended previous to 1910 



$891 75 
819,984 65 



,876 40 



Meridian Street Bridge. 

Appropriation $125,000 00 

Expenditures from October 15, 1910, to January 
31, 1911: 
Engineering 434 00 



Unexpended balance February 1, 1911 . 



$124,566 00 



City Document No. 14. 



Bridges. 



The annual inspection of all highway and footbridges 
has been made, together with special examinations 
when notified by the Street Department of the progress 
of repairs. 

Craigie temporary bridge was removed during the 
year and Tollgate Way Footbridge has been built. 

The Metropolitan Park Commission undertook the 
management of Charles River Dam Bridge July 1, 
1910, under the provisions of chapter 524 of the Acts 
of 1909, which transferred to them the management of 
Charles River Basin. 

The management of all other bridges and draws 
between Cambridge and Boston, by the Acts of 1898, 
chapter 467, is vested in a board of two commissioners, 
which has charge of the following seven bridges, viz.: 
Brookline Street, Cambridge, Cambridge Street, Har- 
vard, North Harvard Street, Prison Point and Western 
Avenue to Cambridge; one-half the cost of the main- 
tenance of these bridges is paid by each of these cities. 

In the list of bridges those marked with a star (*) 
are over navigable waters, and are each provided with a 
draw, the openings of which are shown in a table in 
Appendix A. 

I. — Bridges Wholly Supported by Boston. 

Agassiz road, in the Fens. 

Allston Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 
Arborway Bridge, in Arborway, over Stony brook. 
Ashland street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., West Roxbury. 
Athens street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 
* Atlantic avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Audubon road, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Baker street, at Brook Farm, West Roxbury. 
Beacon street, over outlet to the Fens. 
Beacon street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bennington street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

R. R., East Boston. 
Berkeley street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bernier Street Footbridge in the Riverway. 
Berwick Park Footbridge, over Providence Division, 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 



Engineering Department. 7 

Blakemore street, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R., West Roxbury. 
Bolton street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R. 
Boylston street, in the Fens. 
Boylston street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Bridle path, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Broadway, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

* Broadway, over Fort Point channel. 
Brookline avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brooks street, over Brooks street, Brighton. 

Byron street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 

* Castle Island Footbridge, from Marine Park, South 
Boston, to Castle Island. 

Charlesgate, over Boston & Albany R. R., in the Fens. 
Charlesgate, over Ipswich street, in the Fens. 

* Charlestown Bridge, from Boston to Charlestown. 

* Chelsea Bridge South, over South channel, Mystic 
river. 

* Chelsea street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Circuit drive, over Scarboro pond, in Franklin Park. 
Columbia road, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Columbia road, over Shoreham street. 
Columbus avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

* Commercial point, or Tenean, Dorchester. 
Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens. 

* Congress street, over Fort Point channel. 

Cottage Farm Bridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., 

Brighton. 
Cottage Street Footbridge, over flats. East Boston. 
Dartmouth street, over Boston & Albany R. R. and 

Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel. 

* Dover street, over Fort Point channel. 
Ellicott arch, in Franklin Park. 

Fen Bridge, in the Fens. 

Ferdinand street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

Florence street, over Stony brook. 

Forest Hills entrance, in Franklin Park. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Providence Divi- 
sion, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Gold street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. 

Huntington avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 

Hyde Park avenue, over Stony brook. 



8 City Document No. 14. 

Ipswich street, over waterway, in the Fens. 
Irvington Street Footbridge, over Providence Division, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* L street, over Reserved channel. South Boston. 
Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park. 

* Maiden Bridge, from Charlestown to Everett. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Massachusetts avenue, over Providence Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Meridian street, from East Boston to Chelsea. 
Neptune road, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Newton street, over Providence Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 

* Northern avenue, over Fort Point channel. 
Public Garden Footbridge. 

Scarboro Pond Footbridge, in Franklin Park. 

Shawmut avenue, over Boston & Albany R. R. and Prov- 
idence Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Southampton street, east of Midland Division, N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. 

Summer street, over A street, South Boston. 

Summer street, over B street. South Boston. 

Summer street, over C street. South Boston. 

* Summer street, over Fort Point channel. 

ToUgate Way Footbridge, over Providence Division, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

* Warren Bridge, Boston to Charlestown. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Providence Divi- 
sion, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 

Winthrop Bridge, from Breed's Island to Winthrop. 

Wood Island Park Footbridge, over Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn R. R. 

II. — Bkidges of which Boston Supports the 
Part Within its Limits. 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Bernier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river, in the 

Riverway. 
Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway. 
Central avenue, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Chelsea Bridge North, over North channel, Mystic 
river. 

* Granite Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 
Huntington avenue, over Muddy river, in the River- 
way. 



Engineering Department. 9 

Longwood avenue, over Muddy river, in the Riverway, 

and over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Milton Bridge, from Dorchester to Milton. 

* Neponset Bridge, from Dorchester to Quincy. 

* North Beacon street, from Brighton to Watertown. 
Spring street, from West Roxbury to Dedham. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Watertown. 



III. — Bridges of which Boston Pays a Part of the 
Cost of Maintenance. 

Albany street, over Boston & Albany R. R. freight 

tracks. 
Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony 

Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Austin street, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 
Bennington street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., Mattapan. 
Boston street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Brookline street, over Boston & Albany R. R. 
Brookline street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 

* Cambridge street from Brighton to Cambridge. 
Cambridge street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads. 
Chelsea Bridge, over Boston & Maine R. R., Charlestown. 
Curtis street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 
Everett street, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 

* Harvard Bridge, from Boston to Cambridge. 
Harvard street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R., Dorchester. 
Maverick street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Mystic avenue, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads, Charlestown. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., near Dorchester station. 
Norfolk street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., near Blue Hill avenue station. 

* North Harvard street, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



10 City Document No. 14. 

Oakland street, over Midland Division, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R., Mattapan. 
Perkins street, over Boston & Maine and Boston & 

Albany Railroads, Charlestown. 
Porter street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East Boston. 
Prescott street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 

* Prison Point Bridge, Charlestown to Cambridge. 
Reservoir road, over Boston & Albany R. R., Brighton. 
Saratoga street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Southampton street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R. 
Summer street, over freight tracks, N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R. 
Sumner street, over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston. 
Webster Street Footbridge, over Boston & Albany R. R., 

East Boston. 
West Fourth street, over Old Colony Division, N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R., South Boston. 

* Western avenue, from Brighton to Cambridge. 



IV. — Bridges Supported by Railroad Corporations. 
1st. — Boston & Albany R. R. 

Albany street, over passenger tracks. 
Harrison avenue. 
Market street, Brighton. 
Tremont street. 
Washington street. 

2d. — Boston cfc Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads. 
Main street, Charlestown. 

3d. — Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Division. 
Wauwatosa avenue, East Boston. 

4th. — Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R. 
Everett street. East Boston. 



Engineering Department. 11 

5th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Midland 

Division. 
Broadway. 
Dorchester avenue. 
Fifth street. 
Fourth street. 
Morton street, Dorchester. 
Second street. 
Silver street. 
Sixth street. 
Third street. 
Washington street, Dorchester. 

6th.— New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Old 

Colony Division. 
Adams street. 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Freeport street. 
Medway street. 
Savin Hill avenue. 

7th. — New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., Providence 

Division. 
Albany street. 

Baker street, West Roxbury. 
Beech street. West Roxbury. 
Bellevue street. West Roxbury. 
Berkeley street. 
Broadway. 

Canterbury street. West Roxbury. 
Castle square. 

Centre and Mt. Vernon streets, West Roxbury. 
Columbus avenue. 
Dartmouth street. 
Gardner street. West Roxbury. 
Harrison avenue. 
Park street. West Roxbury. 
Walworth street. West Roxbury. 
Washington street. 

V. — Bridges Supported by the Metropolitan Park 

Commission. 

* Charles River Dam Bridge. 
Mattapan Bridge, Dorchester to Milton. 



12 City Document No. 14. 

Recapitulation of Bridges. 

I. Number wholly supported by Boston . . 75 
II. Number of which Boston supports that part 

within its limits 13 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the 

cost of maintenance 35 

IV. Number supported by railroad corporations : 

1. Boston & Albany R. R. ... 5 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 

Railroads 1 

3. Boston & Maine R. R., Eastern Div., 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R., 1 

5. N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R., Midland Div., 10 

6. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Old Colony 

Div 5 

7. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Providence 

Div 16 

V. Number supported by the Metropolitan Park 

Commission 2 



Total 164 

Agassiz Road Bridge {in the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1887 of brick and stone 
masonry. It is maintained by the Park Department 
and is in good condition. 

Albany Street Bridge {over the Boston & Albany R. R. 
Freight Tracks). 

The original structure was built in 1856-57, and 
rebuilt in 1867-68. The present bridge was built in 
1886-87, and is maintained in part by the City of 
Boston and in part by the Boston & Albany R. R. 
(See page 46.) 

Allston Bridge {over the Boston cfc Albany R.R., Brighton). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. The stringers 
and lower planking are in very poor condition and 
should be renewed this year. When this work is done 
the floor beams should be thoroughly cleaned and 
painted and the shelf angles for stringers should be 
replaced where found to be in bad condition. The 
ironwork above the floor should be painted this year. 



Engineering Department. 13 

Arborway Bridge {over Stony Brook, in Arhorway near 
Forest Hills Station). 

The bridge is maintained by the Park Department. 
A masonry culvert is now under construction to super- 
sede this bridge and it is expected that the work will 
be completed early in the spring. 

Ashland Street Bridge (over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., West Roxbury). 

The present structure is of iron and was built in 1875. 
With the exception of the fences the bridge is in fair" 
condition. 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge (over Old 

Colony Division, New York, New Haven & 

Hartford R. R.). 

This is a wooden bridge formerly maintained by the 
railroad company. It was lengthened on the Boston 
side in 1895, and again further lengthened last year, 
and now the city maintains 133 feet of the northerly 
part. After the bridge was lengthened, the older part, 
maintained by the city, was rebuilt. (See page 48.) 

Athens Street Bridge (over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1874. The deck 
planking and curb timbers should be renewed, the 
fence should be repaired, and the bridge painted. 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge (over South Terminal Station 
Yard and Fort Point Channel). 

The bridge was completed and opened to travel 
August 12, 1907. On the Boston approach is a steel 
viaduct about 450 feet in length, consisting of a series 
of short plate girder and I-beam spans of the deck type. 
The bridge over the railroad yard consists of two steel 
plate girder spans and two steel truss spans, all except 
one plate girder span being through spans. Fort Point 
channel is crossed by one truss span, a plate girder span, 
an I-beam span and a draw span, all being deck struc- 
tures built of steel. The draw span is a swing or turn- 
table draw, 184 feet long on center line, operated by 
electricity and compressed air. On the approaches and 
across Fort Point channel the bridge is 50 feet in width; 



14 City Document No. 14. 

over the railroad yard the width is 60 feet. Some 
painting should be done this year, otherwise the bridge 
is in good condition. 

Audubon Road Bridge (over the Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1893-94, 
and is maintained by the Park Department. The por- 
tion of the bridge over the main tracks of the railroad 
should be cleaned and painted, otherwise the structure 
is in good condition. 

Austin Street Bridge (over Boston & Maine R. R., 
Charlestown) . 

This is a steel plate girder deck bridge with steel floor 
beams supporting a wooden flooring, built under the 
decree of the Superior Court abolishing the Austin street 
grade crossing. It was built in 1903-07 by the Boston 
& Maine Railroad Company and is over the railroad 
location. The surface of the bridge is maintained by 
the city, the remainder by the railroad company. The 
fences should be repaired and painted, and the plank 
walk should be repaired, otherwise the bridge is in good 
condition. 

Baker Street Bridge {at Brook Farm, West Roxbury). 

This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet span. 
It is in fair condition. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Outlet of the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1880-81, and had up to 1901 a 
wooden floor for the roadway. At the latter date a new 
floor was built, consisting of 18-inch steel I-beams incased 
in Portland cement concrete, and the roadway was paved 
with hard pine blocks, treated by the creoresinate pro- 
cess. The bridge is in good condition. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884-85, widened in 
1887-88, "and the central roadway further widened in 
1890 for the convenience and at the expense of the street 
railway company. During the year the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway Company removed the flooring of the 
middle roadway carrying its tracks, cleaned the floor 
beams, strengthened them to carry its cars of the 42-ton, 



Engineering Department. 15 

semiconvertible type, painted them three coats of red 
lead paint, and rebuilt the flooring. During this work 
the Elevated Railway Company carried its cars on a 
temporary track on the northerly roadway. 

Bellevue Street Bridge {over Muddy River, in Riverway). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 44 feet span and 
15 feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the Park Depart- 
ments of Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly 
by them. 

Bennington Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge built by the railroad 
company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior Court 
abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The sur- 
face of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest 
of the structure by the railroad company. The bridge 
should be painted, otherwise it is in good condition. 

Bennington Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & 
Lynn R. R.). 

This bridge is made up of two independent parts; the 
old part is of iron, built in 1889; the new part is of steel, 
built in 1902. The out-of-town roadway should be 
redecked and the bridge should be painted. 

Berkeley Street Bridge {over Boston cfc Albany R. R. and 
Providence Division, New York, New Haven & Hartford 
R. R.). 

The bridge over the tracks of the Boston & Albany 
R. R., which is maintained by the city, was originally 
built for the Boston Water Power Company, and 
accepted by the city in 1869. The present structure 
over these tracks is a through plate girder bridge and 
was built in 1891. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R. R. was built in 1899 and is maintained by that com- 
pany. (See page 49.) 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Bridle Path, in Riverway). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 38 feet 4 inches 
span. It was built in 1893 and is maintained by the Park 
Department. 



16 City Document No. 14. 

Bernier Street Footbridge {over Muddy River). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 52 feet span and 14 
feet rise. It was built in 1893 by the Park Departments 
of Boston and Brookline and is maintained jointly by 
them. 



Berwick Park Footbridge (over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1894. The iron 
stairs and piers were new, but the trusses and floor beams 
were those built for Franklin street in 1883. This 
bridge should be painted the coming year. 

Blakemore Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82. The lower 
planking is poor and should be renewed and the iron- 
work below floor painted. 

Blue Hill Avenue Bridge {over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel bridge, built by the N. Y., N. H. & H. 
K. R. in 1903 and is over the railroad location. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, the 
remainder by the railroad company. The bridge is in 
good condition with the exception of the sidewalk 
planking, which should be renewed. 

Bolton Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, originally built in 1889 and 
rebuilt in 1905. The walks have been repaired. The 
fencing and deck planking need repairs. 

Boston Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a plate girder bridge, built in 1900 in connection 
with the abolishment of the grade crossing on Dor- 
chester avenue. The surface of the bridge is main- 
tained by the city and the rest of the structure by the 



Engineering Department. 17 

railroad company. The bridge should be painted and 
the deck planking should be renewed in about a year. 

Boylston Street Arch Bridge {in the Fens). 

This is a stone arch bridge, built in 1881. It is in 
good condition, with the exception of coping, which 
should be repointed without further delay. 

Boylston Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The first bridge on this location was built in 1886-88 
and the present structure in 1907-08. The bridge is 
now in good condition. 

Bridle Path Bridge {over Muddy River, in the Riverway). 

This is a masonry bridge of three arches; the central 
arch is elliptical in form, with a span of 30 feet and a 
rise of 9 feet 6 inches; the side arches are semicircular, 
15 feet in diameter. It was built in 1894 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. It is in good condi- 
tion. 

Broadway Bridge {over Fort Point Channel) . 

The draw was built in 1874-75 and the supports for 
the draw landings are iron columns. The rest of the 
bridge is built of steel on masonry piers, and was rebuilt 
in 1901-04. A new 4-inch spruce deck has been laid on 
the draw. The plate girder section over the railroad, 
the gates and some of the fencing have been painted. 
The tracks and wheels below the draw are in poor con- 
dition. The stone piers should be repointed. The plank- 
ing on the waterway and pier needs repairing. The 
draw is old and too light for heavy travel and should be 
rebuilt within a year. The main bridge is in good con- 
dition. 

Broadway Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The old bridge, built in 1880-81, was replaced in 
1900 by the present bridge. (See page 51.) 

Brookline Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1884. With the excep- 
tion of the paint the bridge is in fair condition; it should, 
however, be painted this j^ear. 



18 City Document No. 14. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge {over Muddy River, in the 

Riverway) . 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. 
It was built in 1892 by the Park Departments of Boston 
and Brookline and is maintained by them jointly. 

Brookline Street Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This is a wooden trestle bridge, built on a pile founda- 
tion in 1906, and is in care of the Commissioners for 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges; the city pays one-half 
the cost of maintenance. It was built as a temporary 
structure, with the expectation that it would be replaced 
by a permanent bridge within ten years. As the bridge 
is now four years old, the construction of the permanent 
bridge should be commenced within a year or two. 
It is in good condition. 

Brookline Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, on steel trestles, 
with wooden floor and wearing surface, built in 1906. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. 
It is in good condition. 

Brooks Street Bridge {near Faneuil Station, Brighton) . 

This is a steel bridge with a concrete and asphalt 
floor, built in 1902. The bridge should be painted and 
the roadway surface should be repaired. 

Byron Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

R. R.). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1889. The stringers 
and bulkheads are in poor condition and the bridge 
needs a general overhauling. 

Cambridge Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge). 

The new bridge was completed in the fall of 1907. 
It is maintained by the Commissioners for the Boston 
and Cambridge Bridges, and each city pays one-half of 
the cost of maintenance. The structure is in good condi- 
tion and needs only the yearly cleaning and customary 
touching up of the paint. It is of the utmost importance 
' that this bridge should be kept properly painted in order 
that it may not be deteriorated by rust. 



Engineering Department. 19 

Cambridge Street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf 
draw. This bridge is in the care of the Commissioners 
for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The draw and upper 
part of the bridge were rebuilt last year. (See page 52.) 

Cambridge Street Bridge (over Boston & Maine and 
Boston & Albany Railroads, Charlestown). 

This is a through steel truss bridge of four spans, built 
in 1901 by the Boston & Maine R. R. The surface is 
maintained by the city, the remainder by the railroad 
company. The sidewalks have been repaired. The 
bridge has been painted. 

Castle Island Footbridge (from Marine Park to Castle 

Island) . 

This is a temporary footbridge, built in 1892, and 
is maintained by the Park Department. It connects 
Marine Park with Castle Island, and is furnished with a 
draw, so that if desired by the United States authorities 
the island can be cut off from the mainland. Repairs 
have been made on the planking. The fences should be 
painted and more planking should be renewed. The 
bridge is in fair condition. 

Central Avenue Bridge (over Neponset River, Dorchester 
Lower Mills). 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1876. The city 
maintains the part within its limits. The roadway 
planking has been renewed, and additional stringers 
have been placed in the bridge. The fences should be 
painted. Otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Charles River Dam Bridge. 

This is a steel bridge in line with the roadway over 
Charles River Dam and is in charge of the Charles 
River Basin Commission. It was built in 1906-07 by 
the American Bridge Company and consists of a short 
fixed span 9 feet 2 inches in length on the westerly side 
and a movable portion 63 feet 10 inches in length. 
The movable portion is composed of two leaves of the 
Scherzer rolling lift type, each leaf having a roadway 
30 feet 10 inches wide and a sidewalk 10 feet wide, and 



20 City Document No. 14. 

being operated by a 35 horse power electric motor. 
The bridge was opened to travel January 27, 1910. It 
is in good condition. 

Charlesgate Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., in the 

Fens) . 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1881-82, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. The bridge should 
be cleaned and painted this year, and an opportunity 
given to make a careful examination of the ironwork. 
As the abutments are constantly settling, decreasing the 
head room over the railroad, the bridge should be raised 
to its former elevation at the time the stripping is done. 

Charlesgate Bridge (over Ipswich street, in the Fens). 

This is a deck plate girder bridge with a buckle plate 
floor built in 1900-01. The roadway is paved with 
asphalt and the sidewalks with artificial stone. The 
bridge should be painted as the portions under the side- 
walks are in very rusty condition. 

Charlestown Bridge {from Boston to Charlestown). 

This bridge was opened to public travel November 27, 
1899, and superseded the old Charles River Bridge, 
which was built in 1785-86. 

The present bridge over the river consists of ten spans 
of the deck plate type, each 85 feet long, and a swing or 
turntable draw 240 feet 6 inches long. 

The bridges over Water street and over the railroad 
tracks each consist of two spans of steel I-beams, with 
brick arches turned between the beams. 

On April 29, 1910, a fire in the power room destroyed 
part of the woodwork of the electric equipment and 
seriously damaged much of the operating machinery of 
the draw. This necessitated the stopping of all water 
travel that could not pass under the draw and it was 
out of commission completely for four days. A special 
appropriation was made to cover the cost of repairing 
the damage and to place the draw in good working 
order. It was necessary to completely rebuild the 
power room, substituting metal and asbestos for the 
former woodwork, to renew the electric equipment and 
overhaul all the operating machinery. This work has 
been completed, but it has been found necessary to 



Engineering Department. 21 

thoroughly clean and paint the draw, for which a con- 
tract has been made and the work is now in progress. 

Chelsea Bridge (over Boston & Maine R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built by the Boston & Maine 
R. R. Co. in 1894, and is over the railroad location. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city, the 
remainder by the railroad company. Repairs have been 
made on the sidewalk planking. The wheel guard is 
too low and narrow; the fences and sidewalk planking 
need repairing and the bridge needs painting; some of 
the track stringers begin to show decay. Otherwise the 
bridge is in good condition. 

Chelsea Bridge North (over North Channel, Mystic River) . 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure was built in 1802-03. The piles 
under the main bridge were driven in 1880. The upper 
part of the bridge, the draw and draw foundations were 
built in 1895. The draw-way was widened to 60 feet in 
1900, the draw foundation being enlarged, the draw 
lengthened and the draw piers built. The upper part 
of the bridge should be painted; new machinery should 
be provided; several truck wheels need renewing; an 
additional bearing should be provided at the skew end; 
the sidewalk planking should be repaired; the track 
stringers and the fences should be repaired; the old 
fender guards are in poor condition. 

Chelsea Bridge South (over South Channel, Mystic River). 

This is a pile bridge with an iron draw. The original 
bridge was built in 1802-03. The piles of the present 
bridge were driven and the draw was built in 1877. 
That part of the bridge above the girder caps was rebuilt 
at a higher grade and the draw was raised in 1895. 
Where the rebuilding of 1895 joins the old work repairs 
are needed on both sides of the bridge. The draw is 
too light for the present travel; the bridge should be 
rebuilt. 

Chelsea Street Bridge (from East Boston to Chelsea). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a steel swing draw. 
The original bridge was built in 1834. About 100 feet 
of the Chelsea end was built in 1894-95, and strength- 



22 City Document No. 14. 

ened in 1906. The remainder of the bridge, including 
the draw, was built in 1908-09. It is in good condition. 

Circuit Drive Bridge (over Scarhoro Pond, in Franklin 

Park) . 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 30 feet span and 
6 feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Columbia Road Bridge (over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., and Old Colony 
Avenue). 

This is a deck plate girder bridge of two equal spans, 
one over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 
and the other over Old Colony avenue, and was built 
in 1902. The roadway is paved with Canton brick, 
cement grout joints, and laid on hard pine planking. 
The sidewalks are badly cracked and should be put in 
good condition without further delay. 

Columbia Road Bridge (over Shoreham Street). 

This bridge was built in 1902. It is a two-span steel 
beam structure, with brick and concrete arches turned 
between the beams; the roadway is paved with Canton 
brick laid with cement grout joints. The sidewalks are 
of artificial stone. The bridge is in good condition. 

Columbus Avenue Bridges (over Boston & Albany R. R. 
and Providence Division, New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R.). 

The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was 
built in 1876-77 and is maintained by the city. In 
1899 the bridge was shortened 11 feet at its south end 
and a pier built in place of the old south abutment. 
In 1907 new plate girders were built on the center side 
of each roadway and the roadway floor strengthened. 

The bridge over the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R. R. was built in 1899 and is maintained by that 
company. The asphalt pavement needs patching. (See 
page 53.) 

Commercial Point or Tenean Bridge (Dorchester). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The piles were driven in 1875. The draw and upper 



Engineering Department. 23 

part of the bridge were rebuilt in 1901. The deck 
planking should be renewed. Otherwise the bridge is 
in fair condition. 

Commonwealth Avenue Bridge {in the Fens). 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1881-82. The 
railings should be painted, otherwise the bridge is in 
good condition. It is maintained by the Park Depart- 
ment. 

Congress Street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with an iron turntable 
draw on a stone foundation, and was built in 1874-75. 
The part of the bridge above the caps was entirely 
rebuilt in 1908 and the machinery of the draw span 
put in good order. In 1909 the draw fender pier was 
replanked and new stringers put in. The bridge is now 
in good condition and can probably be maintained so 
for the next ten years. 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 

Brighton) . 

The present bridge was built in 1895-96. With the 
exception of the plate girders on the outside lines of 
the bridge and some special construction under the side- 
walks, the superstructure is composed of 20-inch steel 
beams, filled between with brick arches and Portland 
cement concrete, on which is a wearing surface of Sicilian 
rock asphalt. The bridge should be painted and the 
asphalt roadways repaired; otherwise it is in good con- 
dition. 

Cottage Street Footbridge {over Flats, East Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, built in 1889, for foot 
travel. It was extensively repaired in 1905. The 
bridge is in poor condition, and should be repaired this 
year. A few piles need strengthening, the sheathing 
needs repairing, some stringers need renewal and the 
fences should be painted. 

Curtis Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built by the railroad 
company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior Court 



24 City Document No. 14. 

abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. The sur- 
face of the bridge is maintained by the city and the 
rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge should be painted and the railing repaired ; other- 
wise it is in good condition. 

Dartmouth Street Bridges (over Boston & Albany R. R. 
and Providence Division, New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R.). 

The bridge over the Boston & Albany R. R. was 
built in 1878-79 and is maintained by the city. Very 
extensive changes were made in this bridge in 1899 by 
the railroad companies, necessitated by the new location 
of the tracks of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. leading 
to the South Station and the abandoning of the tracks 
connecting this road with the Boston & Albany R. R. 

Some of the hangers and the bottom flanges of the 
floor beams over the main tracks have been reduced 
in section so materially by the corrosive action of the 
fumes from the locomotives that it will be necessary to 
renew them this year and rebuild the floorings of the 
roadways and sidewalks. When this is done the bridge 
will be in fair condition for a few years longer, but the 
question of a new structure at this location should be 
considered without further delay. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retractile 
iron draw, and was rebuilt in 1891-92. Both sections of 
the draw have been redecked, the sidewalks have been 
rebuilt and stiffeners have been placed on the floor 
beams. The fences and upper part of the draw should 
be painted. The track timbers should be repaired; 
the sills and planking on the wharves, waterway and 
piers need renewal; some of the spur shores have begun 
to decay and should be refitted, and the wreckage among 
the piling should be removed. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge (over Old Colony Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1900, over the new loca- 
tion of the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. The surface of the 
bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of the 
structure by the railroad company. The bridge should 



Engineering Department. 25 

be painted and the deck planking should be renewed 
this year, otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Dover Street Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This was originally a wooden pile bridge, built in 
1805, rebuilt in 1858-59, and again in 1876. In 1893-94, 
upon the abolition of the grade crossing of the Old 
Colony R. R., the present iron structure, resting on 
masonry piers, was built. On August 10, 1910, a fire on 
an adjoining wharf at the southwest corner of this bridge 
destroyed part of the sidewalk and necessitated exten- 
sive repairs. A contract has been made for repairing 
the draw machinery, tracks, etc., and the work will 
begin early in the spring. When this work is under way 
the draw span should be painted and a new flooring laid. 
(See page 54.) 

Ellicott Arch Bridge (in Franklin Park). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 17 feet 6 inches 
span. It was built in 1889 and is maintained by the 
Park Department. 

Everett Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 

Brighton) . 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1891 by the Boston & 
Albany R. R. Co. The bridge is in good condition. 

Fens Bridge (in the Fens). 

This bridge was built in 1891-93, and it is in good 
condition. 

Ferdinand Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1892. In 1899 this 
bridge was shortened about 3 feet at its southerly end 
and the old south abutment replaced by a brick pier. 
The bridge is now in fair condition except the fences; 
these should be repaired and painted. 

Florence Street Bridge (over Stony Brook). 

This is a wooden stringer bridge of about 15 feet 
span, and is in fair condition. 



26 City Document No. 14. 

Forest Hills Entrance Bridge (in Franklin Park) . ^ 

This bridge was built in 1894-95. It is maintained" 
by the Park Department and is in good condition. 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge {over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, erected in 1904. The 
bridge is in good condition except the paint; it is recom- 
mended that the bridge be painted this year. 

Gold Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge with a wooden flooring and was 
built in 1895, replacing a footbridge which was built 
in 1890. The fences should be repaired, and the bridge 
should be painted. The walls need a small amount of 
pointing, otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 

Granite Bridge {from Dorchester to Milton). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. 
The city maintains the part within its limits. The bridge 
was originally built in 1837. The draw and the adjoin- 
ing bay were repaired in 1907, and in 1909 the rest of 
the bridge was entirely rebuilt. 

Harvard Bridge {from Boston to Cambridge). 

This is an iron bridge with an iron turntable draw, and 
was built in 1887-91. This bridge is in the care of the 
Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 
and the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. 
The roadway of the fixed spans was repaired in 1901-02 
and a wooden block paving laid. In 1905 the asphalt 
walks were replaced by 3-inch hard pine and the raihngs 
were painted. The draw span is now in good condition. 
The draw fender pier and the fender guards should be 
repaired and the whole bridge painted. It is recom- 
mended that this work be done this year. 

Harvard Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., Dorchester). 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1904, under an agree- 
ment between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 



Engineering Department. 27 

The deck planking is in poor condition and the steel 
work is very rusty; the bridge should be stripped and 
painted and a new deck laid this spring. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The original bridge was built in 1872, and the present 
structure was erected in 1909. A full description of 
this bridge was given in last year's report. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge. (over Muddy River). 

This is a semicircular masonry arch of 15 feet span. It 
was built in 1893 and is maintained by the Park Depart- 
ments of Boston and Brookline. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge {over Stony Brook). 

This is a stringer bridge of 19 feet 9 inches clear span, 
measured at right angles, and was built in 1904 and it is in 
good condition. 

Ipswich Street Bridge {over Waterway, in the Fens) . 

The bridge was built in 1898, and is in good condition, 
except the railings, which should be painted this year. 

Irvington Street Footbridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel footbridge and was built in 1892. It is 
in fair condition, but will need painting this year. 

L Street Bridge {over Reserved Channel, South Boston). 

This is a wooden pile bridge with an iron retractile 
draw. It was built in 1892. The southerly face of the 
waterway has been rebuilt in part and miscellaneous 
repairs made. A few additional stringers are needed 
in the draw. The northerly face of the waterway 
should be repaired. The track timbers are in poor 
condition and should be renewed in part. The painting 
on the draw needs touching up. The fender guards 
need repairing. The sidewalks need repairs. The plank- 
ing under the abutment and wing walls on the South 
Boston side is being eaten by the worms and additional 
gravel should be deposited about the planking. 



28 City Document No. 14. 

Leverett Pond Footbridge (in Leverett Park). 

This is a segmental masonry arch of 24 foot span and 5 
feet 5 inches rise. It was built in 1894, and is maintained 
by the Park Department. 

Longwood Avenue Bridge (over Muddy River and Boston 
& Albany R. R.). 

The original wooden structure was built in 1857 and 
rebuilt in 1877. The present masonry arches were 
erected in 1899 by the Park Departments of Boston and 
Brookline, and are maintained jointly by them. 

Maiden Bridge {from Charlestown to Everett). 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a retractile steel 
draw, and was rebuilt in 1900-01. The bridge should 
be painted; the walks should be resurfaced, the paving 
should be repaired, some of the capsills on the 
pier should be renewed, and the bolts under the 
main bridge should be tightened; about 50 feet of fence 
should be built on the wing of the abutment. Other- 
wise the bridge is in good condition. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

The original bridge was built in 1876 and the present 
structure in 1908. It is a deck plate girder bridge with 
steel floor beams, 6-inch hard pine roadway and 4-inch 
sidewalk planking. The roadway is paved with wooden 
blocks and the sidewalk with paving brick. It is in 
good condition. 

Massachusetts Avenue Bridge (over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge built in 1876. The roadways 
carrying street cars were strengthened in 1908, and new 
sidewalks were built last year. The middle roadway 
should be repaired and the whole bridge painted this 
year. 

Mattapan Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 

This is a three-arch bridge of Melan construction with 
granite facing. It was built in 1902 by the Metropolitan 



Engineering Department. 29 

Park Commission and is maintained by it. The arches 
are semicircular, two spans being 14 feet and one 50 feet; 
the bridge has one 56-foot roadway and two 12-foot 
sidewalks. It is in good condition. 

Maverick Street Bridge (over the Boston & Albany R, R., 
East Boston). 

This is a through steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1906 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
fence should be repaired and painted. The asphalt on 
the roadway is in very poor condition and should be 
repaired at once. The main structure is in good con- 
dition. 

Meridian Street Bridge (from East Boston to Chelsea), 

This is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden turntable 
draw on a pile foundation. The original structure was 
built in 1858. It was rebuilt soon afterwards, and was 
widened and rebuilt in 1884, excepting the draw, which 
was built in 1875-76. The chords of the draw were 
rebuilt in 1896. The main part of the bridge was 
strengthened for the use of heavy electrics in 1906, and 
the draw was repaired and strengthened in 1907. The 
bridge is in poor condition and it should be rebuilt this 
year; owing to the poor condition of the draw, the tunnel 
cars ceased crossing it November 3. Plans are being 
made for a new draw and rebuilding the upper part of 
the main bridge. 

Milton Bridge (from Dorchester to Milton). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. The 
original structure is very old. It was widened in 1871- 
72. The older part of this bridge was built of stone, 
and the widening is an iron structure on stone columns. 
The westerly sidewalk was rebuilt on new iron girders 
and floor beams in 1900. Some repairs have been made 
on the flooring. The old planking on the bridge 
should be uncovered and examined, and it will probably 
need renewal. One of the capstones over the first water- 
way is cracked. 



30 City Document No. 14. 

Neponset Bridge (from Dorchester to Quincy). 

The city maintains the part within its Hmits. The 
original structure was built in 1802. The steel draw 
and the adjoining upper part of the bridge was rebuilt 
in 1909. With the exception of the draw fender piers, 
the bridge is now in good condition. The piers should 
be rebuilt at once. 

Neptune Road Bridge (over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 

R. R,). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1887-88, and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. The fence should be 
repaired, and the bridge should be painted. Otherwise 
it is in good condition. 

Newton Street Bridge {over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron bridge, built in 1872. This bridge is 
one of the oldest in the city, but can probably be main- 
tained in safe condition for two or three years longer if 
carefully watched and the deck is kept in good condition. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New York, 
New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Blue Hill Ave- 
nue Station). 

This is a through lattice girder bridge, and was built by 
the railroad company in 1902. The surface of the bridge 
is maintained by the city and the rest of the structure 
by the railroad company. The roadway planking and a 
few stringers should be renewed this year; the sidewalk 
planking is only in fair condition. Otherwise the bridge 
is in good condition. 

Norfolk Street Bridge {over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R., near Dorchester 
Station) . 

This is a steel bridge, built in 1905, under an agreement 
between the city and the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
The bridge is very rusty and should be painted and the 
boxing at the trusses should be repaired. The deck 
planking will need renewal in about a year. Otherwise 
the bridge is in good condition. 



Engineering Department. 31 

North Beacon Street Bridge (from Brighton to Watertown). 

The city maintains the part within its Hmits. This 
is a wooden pile bridge with a wooden leaf draw. The 
original structure was built in 1822, and the present one 
in 1884. The bridge is in poor condition, but if it is to 
be kept in service the older part should be redecked 
and some pile work should be done in the early spring. 
It should be rebuilt without a draw. 



North Harvard Street Bridge (from Brighton to Cambridge) . 

This bridge was originally built in 1662, and was 
rebuilt, except the piling, in 1879; the draw was built in 
1891. The bridge is in the care of the Commissioners 
for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges; the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The bridge is in very 
poor condition, and the building of a new bridge should 
be commenced at once. 



Northern Avenue Bridge (over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was opened to travel in 1908. A descrip- 
tion of this bridge was given in the last annual report. 

Oakland Street Bridge (over Midland Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a new steel plate girder bridge, built by the 
railroad company in 1902 under the decree of the Supe- 
rior Court abolishing the grade -crossing at this point. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge is in good condition but will require new side- 
walk planking next year. 

Perkins Street Footbridge (over Boston & Maine, and 
Boston & Albany Railroads in Charlestown). 

This bridge was built in 1900 and opened to travel 
February 2, 1901. It has two spans of wooden stringers 
and one span of steel Pratt trusses. The surface is 
maintained by the city, the rest of the structure by 
the railroad companies. The bridge has been repaired 
and painted. The stairs will soon need repairing. 
Otherwise the bridge is in good condition. 



32 City Document No. 14. 

Porter Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., East 

Boston). 

This is a steel bridge built in 1906-07 by the railroad 
company under the decree of the Superior Court abol- 
ishing grade crossings in East Boston. The surface 
of the bridge is maintained by the city and the rest of 
the structure by the railroad company. The bridge 
should be painted and the railings repaired, otherwise 
it is in good condition. 

Prescott Street Bridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built by the rail- 
road company in 1906-07 under the decree of the Supe- 
rior Court abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
bridge should be painted, and the raihngs repaired. 
Otherwise it is in good condition. 

Prison Point Bridge (from Charlestown to Cambridge). 

This bridge includes a steel draw and its landings 
and was built in 1907. The bridge is in the care of the 
Commissioners for the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, 
and the city pays one-half the cost of maintenance. A 
drawtenders' house should be provided, part of the old 
pier should be rebuilt, and the bridge should be painted. 

Public Garden Footbridge. 

This is an iron bridge and was built in 1867. The 
woodwork should be entirely rebuilt if it is proposed 
to keep the present structure in service. 

Reservoir Road {over Boston & Albany R. R.). 

This bridge was built by the Boston & Albany R. R. 
Company in 1906-07 under a decree of the Superior 
Court aboUshing the grade crossing at this point, con- 
firmed June 14, 1905. 

The bridge is about 40 feet wide and consists of seven 
lines of girders 39 feet 6 inches long. The outside girders 
are built beams 38 inches deep at the center and 34 



Engineering Department. 33 

inches deep at the ends, the other five beams being 
20-inch rolled beams, weighing 80 pounds per foot. 
The flooring consists of 3-inch yellow pine deck and 
a 2-inch spruce wearing surface, the sidewalk planking 
being 1| inches thick. 

The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city 
and the rest of the structure by the railroad company. 

Saratoga Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 

East Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1907 by 
the railroad company under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing grade crossings in East Boston. The 
surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. The 
painting on the bridge should be touched up; otherwise 
the bridge is in good condition. 

Scarhoro Pond Footbridge {in Franklin Park). 

This is an elliptical masonry arch of 40 foot span and 
8 feet 3 inches rise. It was built in 1893 and is main- 
tained by the Park Department. 

Shawmut Avenue Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R. 
and Providence Division, New York, New Haven 
& Hartford R. R.). 

The original bridge, built in 1871, was removed and a 
new through plate girder bridge erected in 1904. The 
bridge is in good condition, but should be painted in a 
thorough manner. 

Southampton Street Bridge {over South Bay Sluice). 

This is a wooden bridge, built in 1875 as a temporary 
structure. The bridge has been replanked with 3-inch 
hard pine and a wearing surface of 3-inch spruce; a few 
additional stringers were also put in. It is in very poor 
condition and should be rebuilt of a shorter length. 

Southampton Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built in 1901-02. 
The surface is maintained by the city, the rest of the 



34 City Document No. 14. 

structure by the railroad company. The bridge should 
be painted. Otherwise it is in good condition. 

Spring Street Bridge (fro7n West Roxhury to Dedham). 

This is a stone bridge. The city maintains the part 
within its limits. The piers and arches were pointed in 
1905 and granite copings, surmounted by iron railings, 
built on both sides of the bridge. The part within the 
city's limits is now in good condition, but the railings 
should be painted. 

Summer Street Bridges (over A, B and C Streets). 

These bridges were built in connection with the aboli- 
tion of the grade crossing on Congress street and were 
opened to travel in 1900. The bridge over A street is a 
steel deck plate girder structure, with a paved roadway 
of granite blocks and asphalt sidewalks. 

The bridge over B street is a through plate girder 
structure, with a paved roadway of granite blocks and 
asphalt sidewalks. 

The bridge over C street is a two-span steel beam 
structure, with brick and concrete arches turned between 
the beams; the roadway is paved with granite blocks 
and the sidewalks with asphalt. 

These bridges are in good condition, except the paint, 
which should be renewed this year. 

Summer Street Bridge {over Fort Point Channel). 

This bridge was built in 1899-1900 in connection 
with the abolition of the grade crossing on Congress 
street. It is a four-span deck plate girder bridge, resting 
on masonry piers, with two retractile draws over a 50- 
foot channelway. The roadway of the fixed spans has a 
granite block paving, and the sidewalks have asphalt 
wearing surfaces. The whole structure should be 
painted this year and the draws and draw fender piers 
replanked. (See page 57.) 

Summer Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R. Freight Tracks). 

This bridge was built in 1900 in connection with the 
abolition of the grade crossing on Congress street, and is 
maintained by the city and the railroad company, the 



Engineering Department. 35 

former maintaining the wearing surface and the latter 
maintaining the rest of the structure. It has four spans, 
consisting of three through trusses each, and has a 
granite paved roadway and asphalt sidewalks. The 
whole bridge is now in good condition with the exception 
of the sidewalks. The walks laid on this bridge were 
made of an asphalt composition containing but a small 
percentage of asphalt; they are now in very poor con- 
dition and should be rebuilt or resurfaced this year. 

Sumner Street Bridge {over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 

This is a steel plate girder bridge, built by the rail- 
road company in 1908 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city 
and the rest of the structure by the railroad company. 
It is in good condition. 

Tailgate Way Footbridge (over Providence Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

(See page 57.) 

Warren Bridge (from Boston to Charlestown) . 

This is a wooden pile bridge, with a double retrac- 
tile iron draw. The present structure was built in 
1883-84. The faces of the waterway have been 
repaired during the past year. The fender guards 
on the Charlestown side are in poor condition; the 
planking in the draw pit should be extensively repaired; 
the curbing on the draw should be realigned; the 
landing shoes need adjustment; the sidewalk and fenc- 
ing for the entire length of the bridge should be rebuilt 
and the track timbers put in good condition. 

Webster Street Footbridge (over Boston & Albany R. R., 
East Boston). 

This is a steel truss bridge, built by the railroad 
company in 1908 under the decree of the Superior 
Court abolishing the grade crossings in East Boston. 
The surface of the bridge is maintained by the city and 
the rest of the structure by the railroad company. It 
is in good condition. 



36 City Document No. 14. 

West Fourth Street Bridge {over Old Colony Division, New 
York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

In 1893-94 the grade crossing of the Old Colony R. R. 
on this street was abolished, and an iron bridge built, 
extending from the end of Dover Street Bridge, at the 
South Boston side of Fort Point channel, to the easterly 
line of Foundry street. The surface is maintained by 
the city, the rest of the structure by the railroad com- 
pany. The roadway decking, sidewalk planking and 
some of the stringers should be renewed this year, 
and the bridge painted. 

West Rutland Square Footbridge {over Providence Division, 
New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R.). 

This is an iron footbridge, built in 1882. The bridge 
should be painted this year. 

Western Avenue Bridge {from Brighton to Cambridge). 

This bridge is in the care of the Commissioners for 
the Boston and Cambridge Bridges, and the city pays 
one-half the cost of maintenance. The draw and upper 
part of this bridge have been rebuilt. The striking 
plates for the draw should be adjusted; the piers should 
be replanked, and the waterway repaired. (See page 59.) 

Western Avenue Bridge {Brighton to Water town). 

The city maintains the part within its limits. This 
is a wooden pile bridge with an iron draw, and was 
rebuilt in 1892-93. 

The bridge has been replanked and painted. The 
planking and capsills on the piers and along the water- 
way should be repaired; some of the spur shores should 
be refitted; some of the piles in the fender guard are in 
poor condition. 

Winthrop Bridge {from Breed's Island to Winthrop). 

This is a pile bridge without a draw. It was origi- 
nally built in 1839; it was rebuilt in 1851; extensively 
repaired in 1870 and has been repaired many times 
since. The bulkhead at the Boston end, some of the 
outside bolsters and the roadway planking are in very 
poor condition. The piles are somewhat eaten by 
worms; the piles in deep water should be examined by a 



Engineering Department. 37 

diver, and additional piles may be needed. The water- 
way should be partially filled, and the bridge should be 
rebuilt of a shorter length. If this bridge is to be kept 
in service, extensive repairs should be made at once. 

Wood Island Park Footbridge. 

This is a steel footbridge, built in 1898-99, and con- 
nects Prescott street, East Boston, with Wood Island 
Park, spanning the tracks of the Boston, Revere Beach 
& Lynn R. R. The steel work should be examined in 
the spring, the weaker members strengthened if neces- 
sary and the bridge should be cleaned and painted. 

Bridges wholly Supported by Railroad. 

Broadway Bridge over the Midland Division, N. Y., 
N. H. & H. R. R. has been rebuilt. Morton Street Bridge 
over the Old Colony Division, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 
should be rebuilt. The other highway bridges main- 
tained by the several railroad companies are in good or 
fair condition. 



38 City Document No. 14. 



SURVEYING DIVISION. 



The work of the Surveying Division during the past 
year has consisted of the making of such surveys and 
plans as have been required by the several city depart- 
ments, and giving lines and grades of public streets 
when requested by abutters intending to build. 

* Twenty-four petitions requesting that catch-basins 
should be constructed were reported upon to the Sewer 
Division. 

* One hundred and sixty plans of streets showing pro- 
posed locations for future catch-basins were furnished 
on request of the Sewer Division. 

* For twelve Dorchester streets, the Sewer Division 
were furnished with locations for catch-basins, made 
necessary by the abolition of grade crossings. 

* Two hundred and eighteen catch-basins were staked 
out on request of the Sewer Division and duplicate 
sketches showing locations of spikes, ties, etc., were 
furnished. 

* Measurements have been obtained on eighty-two 
streets for the Sewer Division, for the purpose of making 
sewer assessments. 

* Two hundred and sixteen plans of proposed under- 
ground pipes, conduits, etc., were examined for the 
Sewer Division, and locations for proposed future catch- 
basins were marked on plans. 

Three hundred and sixty-eight notices of contracts to 
lay artificial stone sidewalks were received, lines and 
grades marked, the work measured when completed 
and reported upon to the Street Department. In one 
hundred and thirty-five cases the Street Department 
was notified that the existing edgestones should be 
reset preparatory to the laying of artificial stone. 

Fifty-three notices of completion of repairs to arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks were received, the work measured 
and reported upon to the Street Department. 

On request of the Street Department the coal tar 
concrete sidewalks on thirty-six streets were inspected, 
and measurement returned of the amount of repair 

* This work performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out Departments. 



Engineering Department. 39 

work necessary. On notice of completion of repairs to 
coal tar concrete sidewalks, the work was measured and 
reported upon to the Street Department. New coal 
tar concrete sidewalks on four streets were measured 
and reported upon. 

Twenty-eight petitions to make sidewalk openings 
for areas, bulkheads, etc., were received from the Street 
Department and reported upon. 

One hundred and forty requests for edgestone were 
examined and the amount required reported upon to 
the Street Department. 

Sidewalk grades for sixty-seven streets were furnished 
engineers and architects for plans of new buildings. 

Plans of twenty-seven streets were made for sidewalk 
assessments on request of the Street Department. 
Data was also furnished the Street Department for side- 
walk assessment on nine estates. 

Two thousand and forty-one orders were attended to 
for the Highway Division; these consisted of staking out 
new streets for construction, giving lines and grades for 
repairs and reconstruction of old streets, testing lines 
and grades after completion of work, and measuring the 
amount of work performed and making plans showing 
quantities to be assessed upon the abutting owners. 

Estimates for grade, land and building damages and 
cost of construction were furnished the Street Com- 
missioners on sixty-four streets. 

The lines and grades of twenty-four streets, for which 
the Street Commissioners were petitioned for author- 
ity to open as private ways, were examined and reported 
upon. 

* Fifty-eight miscellaneous reports were made to the 
Sewer Division. 

Twelve miscellaneous reports were made to the Street 
Department. 

The following table gives the comparative annual 
amounts of paving work measured by the Surveying 
Division of the Engineering Department for seventeen 
years : 

* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out Depart- 
ments. 



40 



City Document No. 14. 



Year Ending 
January 31. 


1^ 


Square Yards 
Block Stone 
Paving and 
Crossings. 


■2° 

03 O 03 


hi 

m 9 

<i 03 

^S 

£.2 


6 

a 

Ih -4-3 

53 tH 

&^ 


to 

2-3 fl 

03 O O 


03^^ . 
^■^^ 

ill 

oi cn ra 

m 


1895 


23,487 

129,383 

120,158 

154,718 

76,991 

86,354 

264,982 

245,410 

104,133 

60,555 

30,899 

67,114 

140,878 

52,380 

1,743 

5,161 

6,845 


12,007 

60,472 

64,952 

100,414 

56,541 

60,803 

161,428 

188,041 

135,310 

65,474 

54,455 

65,132 

101,118 

76,216 

6,706 

2,061 

2,218 


5,175 
32,940 
24,976 
36,658 
14,249 
17,323 
61,356 
30,324 

5,077 

4,815 
184 

1,264 
17,390 

3,386 
742 
944 


6,168 

68,701 

68,178 

94,003 

43,930 

48,946 

147,863 

131,487 

59,051 

29,078 

16,268 

27,544 

82,044 

30,339 

1,423 

2,277 

618 


3,962 
12,296 
13,471 
13,599 
11,652 
14,221 
16,541 
15,565 
14,119 
12,806 

9,906 
12,981 
20,135 
16,635 
14,846 
21,547 
31,818 


11,738 

183 

2,971 

4,019 

1,619 

789 

489 

698 

25 

248 

196 

3,551 

3,716 

1,926 

83 

23 

1,173 


1,406 


1896 


1,297 


1897 


394 


1898 


27 


1899 




1900 ... . 


16 


1901 


2,377 


1902 




1903 




1904 


62 


1905 




1906 




1907 




1908 




1909 

1910 

1911 











Table showing the amount of paving work measured 
by the Surveying Division for the year ending January 
31, 1911, by districts: 



Districts. 


a 
ll 
3 


pn 3 o3 


few 


IS 


"o hi 
m « 

c3't- 


o 
•a 

ea o o 

CO 


1 

m 
03 




Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 




New. 


OZd. 


New. 


OZd. 


New. 


o 






221 


1,088 
126 


3,228 

2,996 

l,13o 

71 

4,436 

14,823 

949 

2,131 


































































































335 
500 


69 

3,514 

322 


1,275 

90 

1,575 


20 

1,143 

122 


360 

35 

538 


15 


601 


221 








14 






5 




2 




341 


568 
43 








420 


























Totals 


14 


641 


2,049 


29,769 


3,905 


2,940 


1,285 


933 


17 


601 


562 


611 


5 



Engineering Department. 



41 



Table showing the amount of paving work measured 
by the Surveying Division for the year ending January 
31, 1911, by months: 



Months. 


o 

a 
>_ o 

°^ 

'►3 


Square Yards of 
Artificial Stone 
Sidewalks. 


few 


"0 

X 


"o M 

si 

02 


"0 

oJ 03 -S 
(S 

§00 


a 


"3 
S 
w 

03 





Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Old. 


New. 


Oid. 


New. 


3 



February, 1910 








451 

205 

327 

787 

3,378 

2,368 

893 

4,832 

5,682 

6,855 

3,631 

360 














221 






March 
























April 






























420 


77 
378 
326 






































547 




July 






391 


2,850 


142 


898 


17 


601 




5 


A.ugust 


















297 

"399 

558 

14 


1,186 

2,200 

128 


■■■96 


361 

750 

32 


















221 


35 








43 
21 












341 






14 












January, 1911 












































Totals 


14 


641 


2,049 


29,769 


3,905 


2,940 


1,285 


933 


17 


601 


562 


611 


5 



Surveys and plans have been made for the taking of 
land for school purposes on Warrenton street and 
Common street, Boston proper, for a site for the High 
School of Commerce; Paris street, East Boston; Frank- 
fort street. Porter street and Lubec street, East Boston; 
Ashley street and Blackinton street. Breed's Island, an 
addition to the Blackinton Primary School; Polk street, 
Charlestown, for a boiler plant; Medford street and 
Polk street, Charlestown, an addition to the Medford 
Street and Polk Street Schools; Elm street, Charlestown, 
an addition to the Prescott School; Pearl street, Wesley 
street and Holden row, Charlestown; Walnut avenue 
and Paulding street, Roxbury; Parker street and 
Fisher avenue, Roxbury; Dacia street, Brookford street 
and Danube street, Dorchester; Dacia street and Danube 
street, Dorchester, in addition to the lot previously 
taken; Chestnut Hill avenue and Dighton street, 
Brighton, an addition to the Bennett School; Holmes 
avenue, Redford street and Harlan street, Brighton, 
and on Turner street, Brighton. 

A plan was made for the Fire Department showing 
the fire headquarters and repair shop at the corner 
of Albany street and Bristol street. 



42 City Document No. 14. 

A plan was made for the Park Department on Stratton 
street and Lyons street for an addition to Franklin 
Field, also a plan for the relocation of Bernier square. 

Surveys and plans were made for the Public Buildings 
Department of the schoolhouse lot sold at auction on 
North Margin street; the wardroom on Dudley street 
and Vine street; and the lot owned by the City on 
Wareham street and Plympton street. 

A plan was made showing the change in the boundary 
line between Boston and Cambridge in the Charles 
river and Miller's river from a point nearly opposite 
Berkeley street to the Somerville line. 

Among the important plans made for the Street 
Commissioners may be mentioned those for the widen- 
ing of streets around the old Museum of Fine Arts, and 
those connected with the change of the grade of Berkeley 
street between Columbus avenue and Boylston street. 

Plans were made for the revision of the grades of 
three streets, in connection with the abolition of grade 
crossings on the line of the Old Colony R. R., between 
Harrison square and Neponset. 

Petitions for the registration of land in the Land 
Court are referred to the Mayor whenever the City of 
Boston is an interested party. 

These cases are examined by the Law Department 
and the Surveying Division of the Engineering Depart- 
ment for the purpose of protecting the city's interests. 

During the year ninety-one such cases have been 
investigated. 

There were 125 accident and other plans made for the 
Law Department. 

* In connection with the Surveying Division there 
have been 2,022 titles examined, 1,202 deeds and 515 
plans copied from the Registry of Deeds. 

* Thirty-seven hundred and sixty-one blueprints 
have been made during the year. 

List of plans of takings for sewerage works filed 
during the year ending February 1, 1911: 

East Boston. 

Addison street. Plan showing taking at Boston & Maine 
R. R. 

* Fifty-eight plans and profiles, representing a total length of six and one-quarter 
miles, showing buildings, property owners' names, established grades, area of land taken, 
or to be taken, for street widenings, relocations, or to be laid out, were completed for the 
Street Laying-Out Department. 



Engineering Department. 43 

Dorchester. 

Ashmont street. Plan showing taking in rear of, to Elm 

avenue. 
Baker court. Plan showing taking in Baker court from 

Willow court to the marsh. 
Kimball street outlet. Plan showing taking from Free- 
port street to the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Kimball street outlet. Plan showing temporary taking 

outside above taking. 
Robinson court. Plan showing taking from Savin Hill 

avenue to the marsh. 
Tenean creek. Plan showing taking from Longfellow 

street to Westville street. 
Ufford street. Plan showing taking in Dyer avenue and 

Ufford street. 
West Selden street. Plan showing takings in rear of, 

opposite Halborn street. 

West Roxbury. 

Alder and Keith streets. Plan showing taking between 

Alder and Keith streets. 
Baker street. Plan showing taking in private land 

opposite. 
Guernsey street. Plan showing taking across N. Y., N. H. 

& H. R. R. 
Montclair avenue. Plan showing taking between Centre 

street and Montclair avenue. 
Spring street brook. Plan showing taking from Centre 

street to Summer street. 
Stony brook. Plan showing taking from Morton street 

to Tower street. 
Stony brook. Plan showing temporary taking along 

the above, near Tower street. 
Stony brook. Plan showing taking from Hyde Park 

avenue to West Roxbury branch, N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R. 

The following sectional plans made under the Board 
of Survey Act have been refilled during the year : 

0I30 j Brighton 2 

^~^^ j Dorchester _2 

Total 4 



44 



City Document No. 14. 



Thirty-five assessment plans were made for the Street 
Commissioners. 

The following list gives the number of orders attended 
to for property owners, builders and the various city 
departments from February 1, 1910, to February 1, 1911 : 



Street lines given 










510 


Street grades given .... 








308 


Street Department, Highway Division 








2,041 


*Street Department, Sewer Division 








383 


Building Department .... 








4 


Law Department 










218 


*Street Commissioners 










187 


Engineering Department . 










97 


Park Department 










3 


Police Department 










32 


Schoolhouse Commission . 










26 


Fire Department 










1 


Wire Department 










1 


Public Buildings Department . 










9 


Water Department 










1 


Election Commission 










2 


Transit Commission . 










1 


Charles River Dam Commission 










1 


Mayor 










3 




3,828 



There are on file with the Surveying Division 35,399 
indexed plans. 

There are also 3,523 lithographed plans in the office 
at Old Court House not included in the foregoing list, 
viz.: 



Lithographed maps of Dorchester, raade in 1869 .... 33 

" " " « 1880 .... 121 

" " West Roxbury, made in 1873 . -. . 8 

" " Fort Hill, made in 1866-69 .... 77 

" " Church street district, made in 1868 . . 168 
" " Washington street widening (parts 1, 2, 3), 

made in 1860 . . . . . 1,186 

" " Washington street extension, made in 1869, 324 

" " North street, made in 1859 .... 44 

" " Stony brook, drainage area 10 

" " Boston, made in 1866-67 .... 98 

" " Boston, made in 1888 30 

" " Suffolk street district, made in 1869 . . 3 

" " South Boston, made in 1880 . . . . 60 

Carried forward 2,162 

* This work was performed jointly by the Engineering and Street Laying-Out 
Department. 



Engineering Department. 



45 



Brought forward 

Lithographed maps of Roxbury, made in 1880 

burnt district 

Mount Hope Cemetery 

Winthrop Farm 

Hanover avenue 

Muddy river 

Pemberton square, courthouse site 

East Newton street, lots on, sold by auction, 
made in 1888 

public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1885 

pubhc lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1888 

Boylston street, old PubUc Library lot 

public lands in South Boston, sold by auc- 
tion, made in 1882 

Boston Directory map, made in 1886 . 

Boston, scale 1,600 feet to an inch, made in 
1890 

Boston, scale 800 feet to an inch, made in 
1891, colored plans 

Boston proper, scale 500 feet to an inch, 
made in 1894 

Exhibit No. 1, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 

Exhibit No. 2, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 

Exhibit No. 3, City Surveyor's Report, 1893, 

High street, pubhc lands sold by auction 

Beacon Hill, State House site 

Harrison avenue. Savage Schoolhouse lot, 
auction plan 

Boston proper, showing changes in street 
and wharf lines from 1795 to 1895 . 



2,162 
81 
57 
19 
49 
44 
41 
195 

42 

82 

8 
17 

136 
60 

57 

5 

10 
34 
63 

96 
16 
38 

57 

154 



3,523 



46 City Document No. 14. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK AND CONSTRUCTION. 



Abolishment of Grade Crossings on the Boston, 
Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad. 

This matter is still under consideration by the Massa- 
chusetts Railroad Commission. Several hearings and 
conferences have been held during the year and addi- 
tional plans and estimates have been made. 



Albany Street Bridge over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Freight Tracks. 

The present bridge as built in 1886-87 was a wrought- 
iron structure, about 130 feet long by 50 feet wide, with 
two through trusses 30 feet 6 inches apart, and with 
wooden flooring. The lower chords of the trusses were 
boarded over at the floor level and thus subjected to 
locomotive gases. The sidewalks were outside the trusses 
on overhanging brackets. At the beginning of 1910 
the iron above the floor was in good condition and prac- 
tically of its original strength. Below the floor, especially 
over the tracks where locomotives are apt to stand, the 
iron had corroded badly. Several floor beams were 
becoming dangerous; the hangers supporting the floor 
beams were badly weakened, and of the lower truss 
chords half a dozen panels had each lost 40 per cent or 
more of its original strength. The bridge was evidently 
in no condition to carry the heavy modern loads. (See 
report of last year.) 

Several methods of reconstruction were considered; 
first, an entirely new bridge; second, inserting a new 
truss on the center line of the bridge to act with the 
existing trusses; third, reinforcing the lower chords of 
the existing trusses. Finally it was decided not to 
attempt to reinforce . the existing trusses but to narrow 
the bridge and so reduce the amount of load that could 
be imposed at any one time while leaving ample capacity 
for a line of teams in each direction. This was done by 
placing the sidewalks inside the trusses and leaving the 



Engineering Department. 47 

roadway 18| feet between curbs. The entire old floor 
system was discarded. The trusses were raised till the 
roller bearings at the southerly end as well as the lower 
chords were above the bridge floor and shielded from 
further injury from locomotive gases; the new floor 
beams were hung at a greater distance below the chords 
and were protected with heavy asphaltic coatings of 
''Sarco." At the same time the entire bridge was raised 
at the southerly end and rebuilt on a slight slope, making 
a much better gradient for the street in connection with 
the bridge over the main line tracks of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad, and also giving drainage for the bridge 
floor. These changes in grade involved considerable 
masonry work on the bridge seat at each abutment and 
raising of the coping of the pier between the two bridges; 
concrete was used for this new masonry. The changes 
in grade also involved resurfacing the street from the 
bridge over the main line tracks of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad to Curve street. The arrangement of lateral 
bracing is somewhat novel. The system is attached at 
the bottom flange of the floor beams; at the southerly 
bridge seat it is anchored into the concrete; the swinging 
of the floor beams on the hangers allows the necessary 
expansion at the northerly end. 

On September 8, 1910, an itemized contract for the 
work was made with the New England Structural Com- 
pany, the lowest bidder. The cleaning and painting 
of the old iron which was to remain in the reconstructed 
bridge formed a considerable part of the work. The 
paint used was ''Government Waterproof Paint," 
black, made in Watertown, Mass. The use of the sand 
blast was prescribed for metal which had been below 
the bridge floor, and, as a matter of fact, the isand blast 
was largely used on all the metal. (Compare the account 
on page 51 of cleaning and painting Broadway Bridge.) 
Sand blasting began early in October, 1910, and all 
work was completed January 16, 1911. The work on 
the bridge itself, including the raising, was done without 
constructing supports from the railroad land beneath 
the bridge. A heavy duct belonging to the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, lying outside the westerly 
truss and containing thirty-six pipes inclosed in concrete, 
had to be raised independently of the bridge, and for 
this purpose the street railway company obtained per- 
mission to place trestles between the tracks of the Boston 
& Albany Railroad. 



48 City Document No. 14. 

Nine thousand four hundred and ninety-one dollars 
and fifty-one cents was paid the New England Structural 
Company under their contract. Engineering and inspec- 
tion cost $1,729.16. Other expenses brought the total 
to $11,268.18. Under an agreement already reached 
with the Boston & Albany Railroad Company, half of 
this sum, $5,634.09, was repaid to the city by the rail- 
road company; $45.29 was later spent in resurfacing 
the northerly end of the bridge over the main line tracks 
and charged to this appropriation. Of the original 
appropriation of $10,000 there then remained $4,320.62, 
which was transferred for repairs on Dover Street 
Bridge and West Fourth Street Bridge, respectively. 

AsHMONT Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge. 

Work was begun by Jones & Meehan on March 21, 
1910, under their contract dated November 11, 1909, 
and was finished on July 2 at a cost of $5,041.16. 

The work consisted of an extension northerly along 
the line of the railroad for a distance of 57.5 feet of the 
existing bridge which carries Dorchester avenue and 
Ashmont street over the Shawmut branch of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The existing 
retaining wall on the westerly side of the railroad was 
of such a height that the only masonry work required 
here was the removal of the old coping, the cutting 
down of the stone work to the grade of the bridge seat, 
the furnishing of a new coping and changing the curb- 
stone on the approach. 

On the easterly side of the railroad the existing retain- 
ing wall was not of sufficient height for an abutment and 
supported a sloping bank. The face of the wall was 
about 20 inches back of the face of the existing abutment 
and was of less thickness than was required. The earth 
was excavated from the front and rear of the wall, the 
old masonry thoroughly cleaned and concrete masonry 
of the required thickness was laid inclosing the old stone 
work; that portion of the concrete in front of the old 
wall was thoroughly clamped to the latter. The abut- 
ment is 11.5 feet thick at the bottom, which is about 4.5 
feet below the grade of the track; it is 11 feet thick at 
the level of the ground in front and 3.5 feet thick at the 
bridge seat. A return wall was built on the line of 
the street. Granite coping was provided for the top 
of the walls. All of the masonry, except the coping, was 
of Portland cement concrete. 



Engineering Department. 49 

The roadway and sidewalks in the rear of the abutment 
was graded and new curbstones and gutters laid. 

The bridge superstructure has a span of 32 feet; it is 
a simple floor of 8-inch by 16-inch hard pine stringers, 
spaced 2 feet apart on centers, and covered for the road- 
way with 3-inch hard pine plank with a 2-inch spruce 
wearing surface. The sidewalk is covered with a single 
thickness of 3-inch hard pine, matched. On the outside 
line of the bridge there is a tight board fence 5 feet in 
height. 

Berkeley Street Bridge. 

There are two Berkeley Street Bridges; the northerly 
bridge, built and maintained by the city over the tracks 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad, and the southerly 
bridge, built and maintained by the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad over its own tracks. As 
they exist to-day, each is a through plate girder bridge 
with six girders and wooden flooring. They join over 
the pier separating the railroads and are built together 
into one continuous structure 125 feet long and 80 feet 
wide. The northerly bridge, built in 1891 and shortened 
in 1898-99, is of iron; the southerly bridge, built in 1899, 
is of steel and is an exact duplicate of the northerly bridge 
as shortened. 

The tight plank floor and the scant headroom over the 
railroad tracks are producing the inevitable result on 
the metal below the floor. On the northerly bridge 
especially the outstanding leg of certain angles used as 
seats for the wooden stringers had in some cases entirely 
corroded and broken away, and the floor beam flanges 
were becoming dangerously weak. Meanwhile the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company wished to be 
able to run its heaviest cars along Berkeley street with 
safety. 

On June 22, 1908, after negotiations lasting nearly a 
year, the two steam railroads concerned, the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company and the City of Boston, 
made an agreement. This agreement stated what work 
was to be done; that the city should carry it out as 
regards the northerly bridge and pay $5,500 towards the 
expense; that the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad Company should carry it out as regards the 
southerly bridge and pay S3, 400 towards the expense; 
and that the Boston Elevated Railway Company 
should pay the rest of the expense, no v/ork being done 



50 City Document No. 14. 

and no bills being paid without its approval. This 
department did the engineering in office and field for 
both bridges, acting for the Street Department. The 
work was done by the Boston Bridge Works under one 
contract dated October 29, 1909, except that ten new 
sidewalk beams were provided under a separate bill 
which the city paid. A license for the work (made neces- 
sary by the trolley traffic) was obtained from the Rail- 
road Commission on September 28, 1909. 

Working on one side of the structure at a time, all the 
flooring was removed from the roadway with all planking 
from the sidewalks; the old floor system under the road- 
way was removed, and new floor beams and bracing struts, 
protected with heavy asphaltic coatings of "Sarco," were 
placed, the floor beams being stronger than those hereto- 
fore in use. The girders were thoroughly cleaned and 
each side of their webs protected by J-inch steel plates to 
above the level of the floor and they were painted three 
good coats of red lead to the same level. The wooden 
flooring was relaid mostly with new timber and using 
heavier track stringers. The metal above the floor was 
cleaned and painted. The above work was done under 
the contract. In addition, on the northerly bridge the 
ten I-beams supporting the sidewalk had corroded so 
badly that the city discarded them and placed ten new 
9-inch I-beams. To meet a slight change desired for 
their tracks, the Boston Elevated Railway Company 
readjusted the parapet stones to a slightly altered grade. 
The metal beneath the floor is now pretty thoroughly 
protected, and until it deteriorates the bridge will carry 
any loads likely to be imposed upon it, including 50-ton 
trolley cars. 

Work at the bridge began February 15, 1910. Car 
and team travel was excluded from the westerly road- 
way between February 15 and March 30, and from the 
easterly roadway between March 31 and April 27. All 
work was completed April 27, 1910. 

The total amount paid under the contract was 
$13,833.18. For the ten sidewalk I-beams the city paid 
$211. 

Blackwood Street Wall. 

A concrete retaining wall was built at the end of 
Blackwood street on the property line of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, under a contract 
with the Commonwealth Construction Company, dated 
October 18, 1910. 



Engineering Department. 51 

The wall is of the same design as others built at the 
ends of the streets abutting on the railroad, but a rein- 
forced concrete fence, 6 inches thick and 6 feet high, was 
built in place of the usual board fence. 

The amount paid the contractor was $1,200. 

Boston Common. 

The laying of water pipes for an irrigation system 
under the contract with the Rowe Contracting Company, 
dated December 1, 1909, was completed on March 31, 
1910, at a cost of $2,151.88. This work was described 
in the last annual report. Measurements were made of 
the tar concrete walks repaired during the year. 

The topographical survey which was in progress a 
year ago has been completed. All structures are shown 
on the plans and the location of each tree is indicated 
with a reference to an appended table giving the 
varieties. 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital. 

Considerable work of a miscellaneous nature has been 
done for this department during the year, such as giving 
lines and grades for various pipe trenches and for the 
extension of the service road. The 12-inch water main 
was extended a distance of 94 feet. 

Broadway Bridge over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Under a contract with George T. Rendle, dated 
September 1, 1910, this bridge has been cleaned and 
painted in the most thorough manner, the wooden 
flooring renewed and new hangers for the floor beams 
provided where necessary. This is the first bridge 
where the city has called for cleaning by the sand blast 
process before painting. The work has been satis- 
factory, but where heavy rust scales had formed, 
especially on the portions of the steel work below the 
floor, it was found necessary to use hammers and chisels 
to remove the thick scales before the sand blast would 
give satisfactory results. The combination of the two 
methods gave results which are much better than those 
obtained from the use of chisels, hammers and wire 
brushes alone. After the metal surfaces had been 
cleaned three coats of paint were applied, the first 
of red lead and the two others of the brand of paint 



52 City Document No. 14. 

known as ^'Ferox"; under the floor both coats were 
of black and above the floor the final coat was of green 
color. 

Such of the old hard pine floor stringers as were in 
poor condition were replaced by new timber, and new 
planking was put in for the entire surface of the bridge, 
the underplanking of the roadway being hard pine 
and the sheathing of spruce. The sidewalk planking 
was 2-inch hard pine. While the floor beams were 
slightly reduced in section it was not deemed necessary 
to strengthen them; a number of the hangers sup- 
porting these beams, however, were found to be in 
such condition that two additional hangers were put 
on at each chord pin at thirteen panel points, and at 
seven panel points the old hangers were replaced by 
new ones. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company at the time 
other work was in progress put new hard pine stringers 
under its rails, built new supports for its stringers 
and relaid its tracks with 7-inch girder rails. In the 
reconstruction of the floor the lower chord bars of 
the trusses, which had formerly been boxed in under 
the floor and directly exposed to the locomotive fumes, 
were kept above the floor, where they can be readily 
examined at all times. The work was completed on 
January 10, 1911, but final payment has not as yet 
been made. 

Cambridge-River Street Bridge over Charles 

River. 

Plans and specifications were made by this depart- 
ment for the Commissioners of the Boston and Cam- 
bridge Bridges for a general rebuilding of the upper 
part of this bridge, including the draw. Bids were 
received by the commissioners June 13, 1910, and a 
contract was made June 29 with A. A. Hersey, the 
lowest bidder, for doing the work, which was begun 
July 18, when the bridge was closed to car and team 
travel, foot travel being maintained. The bridge was 
reopened to all travel September 15 and the work was 
completed September 24 at a cost for contract work 
of $6,094.68, each city paying one-half the cost. In 
addition to this the Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany paid $1,241.61 for strengthening the part under 
their tracks. The steel header beams and locks were 



Engineering Department. 53 

furnished by H. P. Converse Company from drawings 
made by this department. 

The piles along the channel-way were recapped and 
some repairs were made on other caps; fifteen of the 
twenty-four drawarms, all stringers on the Boston 
side, except some of those under the sidewalk, about 
half those on the Cambridge side, the gudgeons and 
their boxes and the entire roadway and sideway plank- 
ing and some of the fencing are new. Repairs were 
made on the abutment and other work of minor 
importance made. The old machinery is still in use. 

Columbus Avenue Bridges over Boston & Albany 

Railroad. 

The sidewalk floor beams of Columbus Avenue Bridge 
over the main tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
were found to be so badly reduced in section from the 
corrosive action of the locomotive fumes that it was 
necessary to put in five new beams under the westerly 
sidewalk and six under the easterly sidewalk. 

The lateral angles and sway braces attached to these 
beams were also renewed. This work was done under 
a contract with the Boston Bridge Works at a cost of 
SI, 071. The sidewalk stringers and planking were 
renewed at the time this work was being done. 

Deer Island Shore Protection. 

The construction of the concrete sea wall under the 
contract with J. H. Ferguson, dated September 22, 1909, 
was completed on July 9, 1910, at a cost of $21,300.22. 
This included the cost of repairing a portion of the wall 
built in 1909, which was damaged by the storm of 
December 26, 1909. 

The wall extends along the northerly shore of the 
island from near the westerly end of the North Head 
sea wall, a distance of 1,334 feet toward Shirley Gut 
connecting with an old wooden bulkhead. Jetties 
extend (perpendicularly to the face of the main wall) 
to the line of mean high water; they are spaced 100 
feet apart. The face of the main wall was located on 
the line of grade 13 above city base. The total length 
of jetties built was 352 feet. 

The main wall is 5 feet 6 inches wide on the bottom, 
the bottom being at grade 8. The width on top is 3 
feet 6 inches, including a projection of 6 inches beyond 



54 City Document No. 14. 

the face of the wall which tends to deflect the waves 
striking the front of the wall. The main wall is 12 feet 
high, the top being at grade 20. 

The jetties are 3 feet wide on the bottom, 2 feet wide 
on top and 6 feet high. They were built with their 
tops 2 feet above the surface of the ground. 

The wall was built in sections of from 30 to 50 feet in 
length, each section being built complete in one work- 
ing period, so that there are no horizontal joints. The 
jetties were built at the same time as the adjoining 
sections of the main wall so as to form a part of it. 

The concrete was composed of one part of Portland 
cement, two parts sand and four parts of screened gravel 
or broken stone; the top of the masonry was finished 
with a wearing surface of one to one mortar; the exposed 
faces of the masonry were coated with three coats ol 
neat cement wash. 

Dover Street Bridge over Fort Point Channel. 

The steel work of the fixed spans of Dover Street 
Bridge has been thoroughly cleaned and painted three 
coats, one of red lead and two of ''Copper Ore" paint. 

This work was done under a contract with Bernard R. 
Coullahan, dated October 25, 1910, at a cost of $1,400. 

The asphalt sidewalk on the southerly side of the 
bridge has been resurfaced under a contract with Simp- 
son Brothers Corporation, dated September 15, 1910, 
at a cost of $684.12. 

*Eastern Avenue Wharf. 

Plans and specifications for rebuilding the wharf 
were made at the request of the Commissioner of the 
Penal Institutions Department, who, on August 17, 
awarded the contract for the work to Rendle & Stoddard, 
the lowest bidder. 

About 40 feet of the inshore end of the wharf was 
omitted from the contract and the area filled solid, a 
concrete sea wall being built to support the filling. 
This work was done by the Penal Institutions Depart- 
ment. 

Rendle & Stoddard began work on the wharf Sep- 
tember 6, 1910, and finished December 3 at a cost of 
$10,625.03. The wharf is built of oak piles with a hard 

*Thi3 wharf and slip are in the care of the Penal Institutions Department and is the 
landing place for the Deer Island and Long Island boats. 



Engineering Department. 55 

pine floor and has a Winter drop ; the crane was replaced 
on the wharf; an 80-foot extension to the wharf was 
built for the use of the Pauper Institutions Department 
and two piers were built for the slip. The fences and 
gates were built by Henry S. Clark. 

FiREBOAT Station at the North End Paving Wharf. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for dredging 
the dock, for building an extension of the present wharf 
to the harbor Une and for building a new wharf to 
serve as a foundation for a building for the Fire 
Department. These improvements are for the purpose 
of providing a dock for a fireboat and quarters for the 
fire company. 

On December 31, 1909, a contract was made with W. 
H. EUis for dredging the dock and building the wharves. 
The dredging was completed on January 30, 1910. 

Fireboat Temporary Slip. 

A temporary sHp for Fireboat 48 was built on property 
of the Boston & Maine R. R., adjoining the fireboat 
wharf near the end of Lewis street, East Boston. The 
contract for doing the work was awarded to W. H. Ellis, 
November 23, and the work was completed December 
14, 1910. The work was done under supervision of 
this department for the Fire Commissioner. 

Fire Engine Station at Walk Hill and Wenham 

Streets. 

In order to care for the surface drainage from the 
adjoining property a drain was laid from the rear of the 
building to the sewer in Walk Hill street, a catch-basin 
was built and a gutter paved across the lot at the rear 
end of the building; the gutter is a temporary provision 
to serve until a decision is reached as to the method of 
treating the land in the slope at the rear of the lot. The 
work was completed on November 17, 1910. 

Gallop's Island Wharf. 

At the request of the Board of Health, an examination 
was made of the damage done to the wharf by a storm, 
and specifications were written for repairing it. A con- 
tract was made February 21, 1910, with W. H. Ellis, the 



56 City Document No. 14. 

lowest bidder, for doing the work, which was completed 
March 10 at a cost of $486. The principal damage 
was near the inshore end of the wharf; the work done 
was to furnish some stringers and planking, clapboards, 
baseboard, new doors, sheathing, rebuild the fencing, 
steps, boxing around pipe, post under building, repair 
the concrete abutment, and build a concrete parapet 
and grout behind it. 

Neponset Bridge over Neponset River. 

A contract was made December 13, 1910, with Lawler 
Brothers for repairing the Boston end of Neponset 
Bridge. Under this contract a new deck of 6-inch hard 
pine was laid, new sidewalk, wheel guard and fences 
built and such of the stringers as were found to be in 
poor condition were replaced by new timber. The Old 
Colony Street Railway Company at the same time 
thoroughly repaired the portion of the flooring which 
it is required to maintain. 

The work was completed on January 24, 1911, and 
the total cost of the work, including inspection, was 
$1,641. 

The corner of the fender guard which protects the 
waterpipe box at the up-stream end of the waterway 
was rebuilt by the Water Department in July, 1910. 

Public Garden Survey. 

A topographical survey of the Public Garden has been 
completed; this included the locating of all structures 
and trees, the latter showing references to an appended 
table which gives the variety of each tree. 

Public Grounds Walks. 

The work under the contract with the Warren Brothers 
Company, dated September 29, 1909, for laying artificial 
stone walks on Independence square. South Boston, 
was completed on June 8, 1910. 

There were laid 2,145.2 square yards of new artificial 
stone walks and 94 square yards of old tar concrete 
walks were repaired. The whole cost was $3,145.49. 

On July 29, 1910, a contract was made with the 
Simpson Brothers Corporation for repairing the tar 
concrete walks on Telegraph Hill, South Boston; the 
work was completed on October 1, 1910, at a cost of 
$407.15. 



u 



Engineering Department. 57 

Summer Street Bridge. 

The floor of the draw pit of the Summer Street Bridge 
was relaid under a contract with George T. Rendle, 
dated October 31, 1910. The 4-inch spruce planking, 
laid when the bridge was built in 1899, had become so 
badly decayed that it was not safe for further use; it was 
therefore removed and 4-inch hard pine planking laid; 
the entire area was not covered, however, only such 
portions being laid as were believed necessary to afford 
convenient walks to reach the various tracks and other 
parts requiring inspection. Suitable railings were pro- 
vided on these walks to render them safe for use. 

The amount expended for this work was $1,811.16. 

ToLLGATE Way Footbridge over Providence Divi- 
sion, New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

This bridge is a new structure occupying nearly the 
entire length of Tollgate way. Tollgate way was laid 
out on January 31, 1910, by the Street Commissioners; 
it is 10 feet wide and extends from Hyde Park avenue 
to Washington street. West Roxbury, a distance of about 
375 feet. It passes over a strip of land abutting on 
Hyde Park avenue, 10 feet wide and about 117 feet 
long, which was taken for the purpose; then over the 
tracks of the Providence Division, New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, and then over the yard of 
the Washington Street Primary School. One of its 
chief functions is to provide the only direct route by 
which many of the pupils of the Washington Street and 
the Francis Parkman Schools can reach home without 
trespassing on the railroad tracks. Forest Hills, the 
nearest crossing, is a quarter of a mile away. A sub- 
way was considered instead of the bridge, but was not 
adopted. 

The main span over the tracks of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad is carried by two steel 
riveted through trusses, 93 feet long, placed 8 feet 
apart. The floor beams are 8-inch steel I-beams, the 
stringers and plank are yellow pine. There is a pipe 
railing carrying heavy wire fencing of the ''Wheelock" 
type. One end of this span rests on a riveted steel 
tower 9| feet by 8 feet center to center of columns; the 
other (expansion) end rests on a single trestle-bent, con- 



58 City Document No. 14. 

sisting of two riveted steel columns braced together, 
these columns bending slightly as the span expands and 
contracts. The tower and the trestle-bent rest on and 
are anchored to concrete foundations. 

As designed and contracted for, the bridge provided 
18 feet headroom over the tracks, but just before erec- 
tion, by arrangement with the railroad company, it was 
decided to increase this headroom to 20 feet, and the 
bridge was erected at the latter elevation. This was 
accomplished by providing at each end of the main span 
a footing of second-hand steel girders incased in con- 
crete; these footings were inserted between the columns 
and their concrete foundations. 

The two approaches to the bridge are timber struc- 
tures, 8 feet wide between hand rails. The posts are 
8-inch by 8-inch yellow pine, the bases set 4 feet into 
the ground and inclosed in concrete. The approach 
from Washington street is about 166 feet long, three 
flights of stairs alternating with two inclined stretches 
of footwalks; the highest point is about 33 feet 
above the school yard, and practically all the area 
beneath the structure remains available for playground. 

The approach from Hyde Park avenue is about 102 
feet long, an inclined footwalk ending in a flight of 
steps next the main span; the highest point is about 
21 feet above the ground. Between the timber struc- 
ture and Hyde Park avenue is a gravel footwalk 12 
feet long. 

A contract for the superstructure was made January 
26, 1910, with the Boston Bridge Works, Incorporated 
(the lowest bidder), at $5,865. The additional height 
given the bridge and other extra work raised the total 
sum paid under this contract to $6,786.26. On March 
11, 1910, a second contract was let to the same company 
for the foundations at $700. Work was begun in the 
field in the end of April. On Sunday, August 28, 1910, 
by the use of a derrick car the two trusses crossing the 
railroad tracks were lifted into place without interrupt- 
ing the trains. All steel was painted with one coat 
of red lead and two coats of "Government Water- 
proof Paint," black, made in Watertown, Mass. Work 
was completed September 30, 1910. W. H. Elhs was 
subcontractor for the timber and concrete work. 

On October 3, 1910, a contract was made with W. H. 
Ellis for the wire fencing, price $175. This work was 
completed October 10, 1910. 



Engineering Department. 59 

Damages to the amount of $920.95 were paid William 
Camfill for the land abutting on Hyde Park avenue. 
Advertising, printing, engineering and inspection, and 
payments to the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad Company for flagmen, bridge guards, etc., 
brought the total cost of the work up to $9,952.53. 
The appropriation was $10,000. The work was done 
for the Street Department under the direction of the 
Engineering Department. 

Warren Bridge from Boston to Charlestown. 

A contract was made August 10, 1910, with W. S. 
Rendle for repairing the faces of the waterway and 
draw piers on Warren Bridge. The vertical plank fac- 
ing of the upstream draw pier was removed and five 
lines of new hard pine wale timbers put on; such of 
the old wales as were found in poor condition were 
replaced with new timber, so that now there are eight 
lines of wale timbers below the girder caps. 

A new hard pine cap sill was put on for the entire 
face of the pier and the center stringers were renewed 
where found in poor condition. The vertical plank 
facing on the downstream draw pier was replaced where 
in poor condition with new 5-inch hard pine and some 
new wale timbers put on. 

Other repairs were made to the fender guards and 
waterways. The total cost of the work was $3,146.96. 

Western Avenue Bridge to Cambridge. 

A contract was made December 7, 1909, between the 
Commissioners of the Boston and Cambridge Bridges 
and W. H. Ellis, the lowest bidder, for a general rebuild- 
ing of the upper part of the bridge, including the draw. 
The work was begun December 14, 1909, when the 
bridge was closed to car and team travel. Foot passage- 
way was provided at all times. Car and team travel 
was resumed February 19, 1910, and the work was 
completed March 10 at a cost for contract work of 
$6,702.30, half of which was paid by Cambridge and 
half by Boston. The Boston Elevated Railway Com- 
pany paid an additional amount of $1,088.69 for strength- 
ening the bridge under their tracks. The steel headers 
for the draw were furnished by H. P. Converse Com- 
pany from drawings made by this department. 



60 City Document No. 14. 

Streets. 

Preliminary surveys and plans were made, working 
plans and specifications prepared and forwarded to the 
Street Department for the construction of thirty-two 
assessment streets, for repaying twenty-one streets, and 
for constructing artificial stone sidewalks in thirty-nine 
streets; surveys have been made, levels taken and pre- 
liminary plans prepared for fourteen assessment streets 
and for repaving eight streets; the necessary surveys 
were made and grades for street railway tracks deter- 
mined in nineteen streets. 

Preliminary estimates have been made of the cost of 
repaving sixty-six streets and for constructing forty- 
three streets. 

Record plans are now being made of the work done 
during the year. The street book, giving the lengths 
and areas of pavements in accepted streets and public 
alleys, has been corrected to February 1, 1910, and is 
now being brought up to February 1, 1911. 

Waterworks. 

The demands upon the Engineering Department in 
connection with the extension and maintenance of the 
waterworks system are yearly increasing, owing in 
part to the fact that contract labor is fast supplanting 
day labor. During the past year the laying and relay- 
ing of mains was done largely by contract, under the 
supervision of the engineering force, the city supplying 
all required materials. The results of this policy have 
proven satisfactory, both from the standpoints of econ- 
omy and workmanship. The following is a summary 
of the more important work done during the year: 

1. A 30-inch and 24-inch main was laid in Chelsea 
street, East Boston, from Addison street to Brooks 
street, the 30-inch main reducing to 24-inch at Prescott 
street; this line forms a second connection between 
the metropolitan supply mains in Chelsea and the 
distribution system in East Boston, notably improving 
and safeguarding the fire and domestic supply of the 
island. 

2. A 16-inch high service main was laid in Dudley 
street, from Warren street to Mt. Pleasant avenue, to 
improve the distribution system. 

3. A 16-inch low service main was laid in Granite 



Engineeeing Department. 61 

street and West Second street, from Mt. Washington 
avenue to Dorchester avenue; when this work was com- 
pleted the 20-inch main crossing at Binford street, 
under fifty-seven tracks in the freight yard of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, which 
had long been difficult to maintain owing to frequent 
leaks, was abandoned, 

4. A mile of 12-inch pipe was laid in Shirley street, 
Winthrop, northerly from Shirley gut, to replace the 
8-inch supply main to Deer Island, laid in 1870; the 
result of this work was an increased pressure at the 
island, which is now much better maintained than 
formerly. 

5. The Deer Island reservoir, put in service during 
the past year, will safeguard the water supply on the 
island in the event of failure of the long feed main 
which passes through Winthrop under Shirley gut; 
it will afford as well a much needed improvement in 
fire protection. The reservoir was built by prison 
labor, under the supervision of the Engineering Depart- 
ment. It is located on the top of a hill and is con- 
structed almost entirely in excavation; it is rectangular 
in shape, 43 feet wide and 138 feet long at the bottom, 
with side slopes of 2 to 1 on the inside and 2| to 1 on the 
outside; its top is at grade 114, high water mark at grade 
109; the bottom and entire sides were lined with 6 
inches of concrete and, in addition, stone paving laid 
upon 3 feet of ballast was placed from a berm formed at 
grade 103 to the top; a suitable gate chamber was con- 
structed of concrete; a 16-inch pipe at grade 110 was 
provided as an overflow in the event of failure of the 
regulating apparatus in the gate chamber; the capacity 
of the reservoir is 2,500,000 gallons. 

6. The Deacon meter system was operated for two 
months during the summer season with a small force; 
a total expenditure of $540 resulted in the detection of 
500,000 gallons of water going to waste. 

Miscellaneous. 

A report was made on a proposed tunnel under 
Sullivan and Cook streets, Charlestown, between Main 
and Medford streets. 

Levels have been taken on the masonry of the bridge 
over the Boston & Albany R. R. on Charlesgate 
West showing the progress of the settlement of the 



62 City Document No. 14. 

foundations; this settlement still continues but is 
growing less rapid. 

A report was made on the cost of public convenience 
stations in various localities. 

Plans and estimates have been made for a passage- 
way under the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. opposite Bay 
street, at Savin Hill. 

Examinations and a report have been made concern- 
ing the monument on Telegraph Hill, South Boston. 

An estimate was made of the cost of filling the pro- 
posed playground at Orient Heights. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank A. McInnes, 

Assistant City Engineer, 
Acting City Engineer. 



Average Monthly Heights, in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which Water Rose at Different Stations on the Boston Waterworks. 



January.. . 
February.. 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



Southern High Service. 



247 
247 
248 
248 
247 
247 
247 
246 
247 
248 
248 
246 



235 
235 
236 
235 
234 
234 
234 
237 
236 
237 
237 
236 



Engine House 

No. 24, 

Quincy and 

Warren Streets, 

Roxbury. 



248 
247 
250 
249 
248 
247 
248 
248 
249 
250 
250 
247 



238 
238 
239 
238 
237 
238 
237 
240 
239 
239 
240 
239 



Engine House 

No. 20, 

Walnut Street, 

Neponset. 



244 
244 
246 
246 
245 
245 
244 
246 
246 



233 
232 
232 
232 
231 
231 
233 
233 
236 



Engine House 

No. 19, 

Norfolk Street. 

Mattapan. 



246 
246 
248 
247 
246 
245 
245 
245 
246 
247 
247 
245 



240 
240 
240 



238 
237 
239 
238 
239 
239 
238 



Engine House 

No. 28, 

Centre, near 

Green Street, 

Jamaica Plain. 



3 a.m. 9 a.m. 



246 
245 
249 
249 
248 
247 
248 
248 
249 
249 
249 
248 



243 
244 
243 



242 
243 
243 

244 
244 
244 
244 



Engine House 

No. 30, 

Centre, near 

Bellevue Street, 

West Roxbury. 



246 
247 
248 
248 
247 
247 
248 
248 
249 
249 



240 
241 



240 
240 



240 
242 
241 



Engine House 

No. 46. 

Washington and 

Poplar Streets, 

Roalindale. 



242 
242 
240 
240 
240 



242 

242 



Engine House 
No. 29, 

Chestnut Hill 
Avenue, 
Brighton. 



247 
247 
245 
245 
246 
245 
247 
248 
248 
245 



243 
243 
245 
245 
244 
243 
243 
245 
245 
245 



Northern High Service. 



Engine House 
No. 32. 

Bunker Hill 
Street, 

Charlestown. 



Engine House 

No. 5, 
Marion Street, 
East Boston. 



Average Monthly Heights, in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which Water Rose at Different Stations on the Boston 

Waterworks. 





Low Service. 


1910. 


Chestnut Hill 
Pumping 
Station, 
Brighton. 


Engine House 
No 34, 
Western 
Avenue, 
Brighton. 


Boston 
Common. 


Engine House 

No 8, 
Salem Street, 
City Proper. 


Engine House 

No 7, 
East Street, 
City Proper. 


Engine House 

No 38, 
Congress and 
Farnsworth 

Streets, 
South Boston. 


Engine House 

No 2, 

Fourth and 

Streets, 

South Boston. 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard, 
710 Albany 

Street, 
South End. 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard, 

Gibson Street, 
Dorchester. 




3 a. m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a. m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a. m. 


3 a.m. 




3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a. m. 


January 

February. . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 


140 
140 
139 
146 
155 
153 
146 
146 
144 
150 
153 
140 


165 
163 
161 
158 
157 
158 
154 
156 
156 
155 
156 
156 


134 
136 
135 
143 
153 
151 
144 
144 
143 
150 
152 
136 


145 
144 
144 
140 
142 
142 
140 
140 
141 
141 
142 
138 


134 
133 
139 
145 
155 
153 
146 
146 
144 
150 
153 
137 


138 
134 
137 
132 
137 
136 
134 
135 
136 
136 
138 
134 


130 
129 
134 
141 
151 
148 
142 
143 
140 
164 
153 
136 


131 
129 
131 
126 
131 
130 
128 
129 
131 
136 
135 
130 


134 
132 
138 
144 
153 
151 
146 
145 
144 
150 
153 
136 


136 
133 
135 
131 
135 
135 
132 
132 
134 
134 
135 
131 


125 
127 
133 
139 
147 
146 
140 
140 
139 
144 
147 
130 


124 
126 
130 
126 
130 
129 
127 
127 
130 
129 
130 
124 


126 
128 
134 
142 
151 
149 
143 
143 
141 
147 
151 
133 


125 
127 
131 
127 
131 
130 
128 
128 
131 
130 
132 
125 


136 
136 
139 
144 
154 
152 
147 
147 
146 
152 
156 
139 


140 
139 
141 
134 
139 
139 
136 
137 
139 
138 
141 
135 


126 
127 
134 
141 
160 
147 
141 
140 
140 
146 
149 
132 


126 
126 
130 
126 
130 
130 
128 


August 

September.. . 

October 

November. . . 
December . . . 


126 
130 
129 
132 
125 



Engineering Department. 



63 



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64 



City Document No. 14. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Boston Water Department. 

Daily average amount used during 1910 (gallons) 

Daily average amount used through meters during 1910 

(gallons) 

Number of services February 1, 1911 

Number of meters in service February 1, 1911 . 
Number of motors under supervision February 1, 1911 
Number of elevators under supervision February 1, 1911, 
Length of supply and distributing mains in miles February 

1, 1911 

Number of public hydrants in use February 1, 1911 
Yearly revenue from annual water rates (assessed) 
Yearly revenue from metered water (assessed) . 
Percentage of total revenue from metered water 
Yearly expense of maintenance .... 



87,346,700 

26,938,800 

*97,156 

18,467 

116 

57» 

767. S 

8,106 

1,237,694.96 

[,527,192.80 

55.2 

^,591. 35 



* This number does not represent that actual number of services in use. Previous to 
1887 no deduction was made of the number of services abandoned. The number of serv- 
ices in use, connected to the system, is much less than the number published and there la 
no data available to determine the number correctly. 

t No revenue was derived from the meters set on existing services during the year 1910, 
all of the existing services metered during 1910 being assessed on the annual rate. The 
number of meters from which this revenue was derived was 13,000. 



Engineering Department. 65 



CITY ENGINEERS, 
1850-1911. 



E. H. CHESBROUGH, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 18, 1850, to October, 1855. 

(Died August 18, 1886.) 

JAMES SLADE, 

October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

(Died August 25, 1882.) 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

April 1, 1863, to November 25, 1872. 

(Died June 14, 1908.) 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
November 25, 1872, to March 20, 1880. 

(Resigned March 20, 1880.) 

HENRY M. WIGHTMAN, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 5, 1880, to April 3, 1885. 

(Died April 3, 1885.) 

WILLIAM JACKSON, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
April 21, 1885, to June 30, 1910. 

(Died June 30, 1910.) 

LOUIS K. ROURKE, M. Am. Soc. C. E., 
Superintendent of Streets. 

Acting City Engineer, July 1, 1910, to January 31, 
1911. 



66 City Document No. 14. 



WILLIAM JACKSON. 



William Jackson, for twenty-five years City Engineer 
of Boston, died at his home in Brighton, June 30, 1910. 

It is a remarkable tribute to Mr. Jackson himself and 
to the engineering profession, of which he was a leading 
and respected member, that from his appointment as 
city engineer, at the age of thirty-seven, until the day 
of his death he conducted the affairs of an exacting 
municipal office, charged with the expenditure of milUons 
of dollars of public funds, so honestly and so efficiently 
that he stood above politics, surviving all municipal 
political changes. He was universally regarded as an 
official whose services were invaluable to the city. 

WiUiam Jackson was born in Brighton, March 13, 
1848, the son of Samuel and Mary Wright (Field) 
Jackson. He received his early education in the Brighton 
public schools, and lived there the whole of his lifetime. 
His training for his Hfe-work as a civil engineer was 
obtained at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, where he took the full course with the Class of '68 
until May 4, 1868, when he left, without receiving a 
degree, in order to take a position in the City Engineer's 
office, Boston, on the staff engaged upon the construc- 
tion of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir of the Boston water- 
works. At that time no Institute degrees had been 
conferred — their value was not appreciated; and, no 
doubt, to the youth of twenty an engineering position, 
with assured remuneration, seemed more attractive 
than a piece of sheepskin of unproven worth. In after 
years it was one of Mr. Jackson's regrets that he had 
not remained for his degree, and throughout his life 
his interest in Technology and all that pertained to 
her welfare was most keen. 

From 1870 Mr. Jackson was engineer for the town of 
Brighton, and in private practice until Brighton was 
annexed to Boston in 1873, when he again entered the 
Boston City Engineer's office, where for three years he 
was engaged upon miscellaneous work, including sur- 




WILLIAM JACKSON. 



^Photo by Xotman.) 



Engineering Department. 67 

veys for the introduction of water into Brighton and 
West Roxbury. From 1876 to 1885 he was assistant 
engineer on the Boston main drainage works, a notable 
and difficult engineering undertaking. In April, 1885, 
upon the sudden death of City Engineer Henry M. 
Wightman, Mr. Jackson was appointed City Engineer, 
which position he held continuously until his death. 
In addition to his duties as City Engineer, Mr. Jackson, 
at different times, did other important engineering work. 
He was chief engineer for the Harvard Bridge Commis- 
sioners, 1887-91; chief engineer of Charlestown Bridge, 
1896-1900; and chief engineer, Cambridge Bridge Com- 
mission, 1898 until his death. In the fall of 1898, in 
company with Mr. Edmund M. Wheelwright (M. I. T., 
'75), consulting architect to the Cambridge Bridge Com- 
mission, he visited Europe to study notable bridges there 
preparatory to making designs for a monumental struc- 
ture for Cambridge Bridge. 

He was a member of the Rapid Transit Commission 
of Boston in 1891-92, and a member of the Boston 
Statistics Commission from 1898 until he died. From 
1902 to 1904 he was a member of the special commission 
on the abolition of grade crossings in Attleboro, Mass., 
and at his death had been for three years a member 
of similar commissions on the abolition of grade cross- 
ings in Foxboro, Westwood, Canton, Sharon and Mans- 
field, Mass. He served as consulting engineer to the 
Cambridge Water Board upon the construction of the 
Hobbs brook conduit, 1904; consulting engineer to 
the Shore Road Commission, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1896-97; 
and consulting engineer to the Massachusetts Harbor 
and Land Commission on the Commonwealth Dock, 
South Boston, in 1899. He was also a member of the 
Approving Board appointed under legislative act in 
1907 to pass upon plans for the development and exten- 
sion of the drainage systems of Boston. On several 
occasions, when a vacancy occurred at the head of 
another city department, Mr. Jackson was designated 
to temporarily fill the position until a permanent head 
could be selected. 

The breadth of Mr. Jackson's interest in general 
affairs, as well as in matters pertaining to his profession, 
is shown by the following list of organizations of which 
he was a member at the time of his death: Union, Art 



68 City Document No. 14. 

and Technology Clubs of Boston; Boston City Club, 
the Masonic Fraternity, Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
Technology Alumni Association, Society of Arts, Ameri- 
can Association for Advancement of Science, National 
Geographical Society, Bibliophile Society, National 
Municipal League, American Civic Alliance, American 
Civic Association, New England Historical and Genea- 
logical Society, Bostonian Society, Society of Colonial 
Wars. Of professional societies he had been a member 
of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers since 1874; a 
member of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
since 1884, and a director of that society in 1902-03-04; 
and a member of the New England Water Works 
Association since 1890. 

Mr. Jackson married, on April 27, 1886, Miss Mary 
Stuart MacCorry, of Boston. Mrs. Jackson died March 
27, 1905. He is survived by a son, William Stuart 
Jackson. 

William Jackson was a man of high ideals and notable 
ability, modest and unassuming, eminently fair in his 
dealings with others, and faithful to every trust imposed 
upon him. Of a retiring disposition, his circle of intimate 
friends was comparatively small, but to those privileged 
to come into close association with him he was a true 
friend and a lovable man. He won the regard and 
hearty support of his subordinates and inspired the 
confidence and respect of all who knew him. He was 
the last man to have willingly permitted words of 
eulogy to be spoken, and to the many who knew him no 
eulogy is needed to set forth his life in true perspective. 



Engineering Department. 69 



APPENDICES. 



Appendix A. — Table Showing the Widths of Openings 
for Vessels in all Bridges Provided 
with Draws in the City of Boston, 
January, 1911. 

Appendix B. — Engineering Department Property 
Schedule. 

Appendix C. — Elevations and Datum Planes Referred 
to Boston City Base. 

Appendix D. — Engineering Department Annual Re- 
ports, 1867-1911. 

Appendix E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordi- 
nances. 

Appendix F. — Meridian Line. 

Appendix G. — List of Special Documents and Reports 
Relating to and from City Engineer 
Other Than Those PubUshed in 
Annual Reports, 1848-1902. 



70 



City Document No. 14. 



X 

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Engineering Department. 



71 



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72 



City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX B. 



Engineering Department Property Schedule, Main Office. 



1 automobile. 
Instruments for drawing. 
Instruments for surveying, as fol- 
lows: 

2 Temple transits. 

7 Buff & Berger transits. 
1 Berger & Sons transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

8 Gurley transits. 

1 Keuffel & Esser level. 

2 Temple levels. 

4 Buff & Berger levels. 
7 Gurley levels. 
13 Boston rods. 
4 New York rods. 
10 Troy rods. 
4 Philadelphia rods. 
Apparatus for blueprinting. 
Cases for plans and books. 
Reference library, 1,597 volumes. 
16,366 plans engineering works, 
loose. 



14 volumes plans engineering works, 

bound. 
Photographs of engineering works. 
1 mercurial barometer. 
1 aneroid barometer. 
1 holsteric barometer. 
1 set hydrometers. 
1 hygrometer. 
1 pair field glasses. 
3 typewriters. 
Dynamometer. 
1 pantagraph. 
3 calculating machines. 
1 volt meter. 

1 comptometer. 

2 thermophones. 
Camera. 

3 planimeters. 

1 Bourdon pressure gauge. 
1 Burroughs arithmometer. 
1 Steiger calculating machine. 
1 Egli calculating machine. 



Surveying Division. 



2 Temple transits. 

2 Moody transits. 

2 Buff & Berger transits. 

4 Berger & Sons transits. 

1 Buff & Buff transit. 

1 Stackpole transit. 

1 Troughton & Sims transit. 

1 P. & R. Wittstock transit. 

7 Buff & Berger levels. 

1 Moody level. 



18 Boston rods. 

1 Troy rod. 

8 iron rods. 

35,399 plans. 

3,523 lithographed maps. 

1 pantagraph. 

3 planimeters. 

1 Federal blueprinting machine, 

No. 10. 
1 typewriter. 



Engineering Department. 73 



APPENDIX C. 



Feet. 




*0 


.00 


4. 


98 


+0.64 


0. 


00 


+0.60 





.00 


-100 


.00 


-100 


.00 


-100 


.00 



Elevations and Datum Planes Referred to Boston City Base. 

Boston city base. This base is used by the 
towns of Brookline and Watertown and the 
cities of Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Newton 
and Waltham. 
Cambridge city base. 
Somerville city base. 
Metropolitan Park Commission base. 
Harbor and Land Commission base. 
Metropolitan Water Board base. 
Metropolitan Sewerage Board base. 
Boston Transit Commission base. 
Charles River Commission base. 
15.45 Old bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 

Charlestown Navy Yard. 
15.11 New bench mark on coping of old dry dock at 
Charlestown Navy Yard, northwest end 
over crowfoot. 
5 . 00 Piles to be cut off for buildings. 
12.00 Minimum cellar bottom grade. 
9.82 South Boston base. Formerly in use, now 
abandoned. 
99 . 40 Charles river flood elevation, at the Brookline 

pumping station, February 13, 1886. 
97.50 Charles river flood elevation, March, 1902. 
95 . 66 Charles river average flood elevation, 1886 to 
1902, both inclusive. 
Mean low water about 1830. f 
Mean low water, 1867. f 
Mean low water, 1902. f 
Navy Yard base, 1902.t 
Mean high water, 1902. f 
Mean sea level, 1902. f 
Mean rise and fall of tide, 1902.t 

* Definition of Boston city base: "Boston city base is a datum plane 15 feet above 
the average height of the sill of the Charlestown dry dock." (Page 552, report of Com- 
mittee on Charles River Dam, 1903.) 

t John R. Freeman, civil engineer, in report to Committee on Charles River Dam, 
1903, pp. 562, 569, 570. 



0.00 


+0.34 


+0.79 


+0.58 


10.63 


5.71 


9.84 



74 



City Document No. 14. 



Highest Recorded Tides. 



Feet. 



15.62 April 16, 1851, average of seven observations, 
North Market street and vicinity, leveled on in 
1854 by Charles Harris, Surveying Division 
n. b. 22, p. 54 (15.10 above mean low water. 
United States Coast Survey Chart of Boston 
Harbor, 1857). 

15.64 December 26, 1909, average of twenty-nine obser- 
vations, on water front. Nut Island to Deer 
Island, elevations determined in most cases by 
John H. Edmonds, before January 1, 1910, 
from points put in for that purpose, 1902 
to 1905. 

15.50 Actual elevation at North Ferry, Boston proper, 
as observed on staff gauge, at high water. 
From comparison of contemporary diary and 
newspaper accounts the only tide of this class, 
prior to 1851, found by John H. Edmonds, 
was that of February 24, 1722-23, which was 
in all probability about 16.00. 

The following tidal records may be of interest: 



High Tides. 

[Plane of Reference, Boston City Base.] 



Feet. 



Date. 



Where Taken. 



By Whom. 



16.00 
15.62 
15.74 
14.94 
13.72 
14.19 
13.60 
13.00 
13.40 
14.83 
14.70 
14.70 
13.50 
13.00 



Feb. 24, 
April 16, 
April 16, 
Nov. 27, 
Nov. 8, 
Nov. 25, 
Dec. 14, 
Feb. 17, 
Jan. 14, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 25, 
Jan. 25, 
Nov. 15, 
April 9, 



1722-23 

1851.. 

1851.. 

1898.. 

1900.. 

1901.. 

1902.. 

1903.. 

1904 . . 

1905.. 

1905.. 

1905.. 

1906.. 

1907.. 



*By comparison 

*Average of 7 observations.. . . 

Navy Yard, staff gauge 

Average of 15 observations. 

Maiden Bridge 

Average of 10 observations. 
Average of 11 observations. 
North Ferry, Boston proper . . 
North Ferry, Boston proper . . 
Average of 34 observations. 
Inner harbor, 10 observations. 
North Ferry, Boston proper . . 

Neponset Bridge 

North Ferry, Boston proper . . 



J. H. Edmonds. 
Charles Harris. 
Isaac Williams. 

F. P. Spalding. 



J. H. Edmonds. 
J. H. Edmonds. 



J. H. Edmonds. 
M. F. Toomey. 
J. H. Edmonds. 



* See previous table. 



Engineeking Department. 



75 



Feet. 


Date. 


Where Taken. 


By Whom. 


13.10 


Nov. 24, 1909.... 


North Ferry, Boston proper 


J. 


H. Edmonds. 


13.35 


Nov. 25, 1909 . . . 


North Ferry, Boston proper 


J. 


H. Edmonds. 


13.10 


Nov. 27, 1909.... 


North Ferry, Boston proper 


J. 


H. Edmonds. 


13 00 


Nov. 28, 1909 . . . 




,T 


H. Edmonds. 


15.64 


Dec. 26, 1909.... 


♦Average of 29 observations. 






15.50 


Dec. 26, 1909.... 


North Ferry, Boston proper (a. m.) 


J. 


H. Edmonds. 


11.90 


Dec. 26, 1909.... 


North Ferry, Boston proper (p. m.) 


J. 


H. Edmonds. 


13 45 


Feb 12 1910 




,T 


H. Edmonds. 


13 35 


Oct. 21, 1910.... 




J 


H. Edmonds. 









* See previous table. 

Low Tides. 



5.60 


Feb. 27,1898.... 


Deer Island, metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—3.50 


Feb. 1,1900.... 


Deer Island, metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—2,94 


Feb. 3,1900.... 


South Boston station, Edison Electric 


D. A. Harrington. 


—3.00 


Feb. 4,1904.... 


Deer Island, metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 


—2.70 


Mar. 23, 1905.... 


Deer Island, metropolitan sewer station 


Self-recording gauge. 



76 



City Document No. 14. 



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Engineering Department. 77 



APPENDIX E. 



(Revised Ordinances, 1898, Chapter 16.) Engi- 
neering Department. 

Section 1. The engineering department shall be 
under the charge of the city engineer, who shall be 
consulted on all matters relating to public improvements 
of every kind in respect to which the advice of a civil 
engineer or architect would be of service; shall, unless 
otherwise specifically provided, take charge of the con- 
struction of all public works of the city which properly 
come under the direction of a civil engineer; shall make 
such surveys, plans, estimates, statements and descrip- 
tions, and take such levels and prepare such specifica- 
tions and contracts as the mayor, the board of aldermen, 
the common council, any committee of the city council 
or of either branch thereof, the board of street commis- 
sioners, or any officer in charge of a department, may 
need in the discharge of its duties; shall, upon being 
notified by the superintendent of streets, supervise all 
repairs on the bridges of the city used as highways which 
affect the safety of the structures, and shall, when 
required by the mayor or any officer in charge of a 
department, measure the work done by contract for the 
city, and certify to the results of such measurement. 
Said engineer shall have the custody of all surveys and 
plans relating to the laying out, locating anew, altering, 
widening and grading of streets; and his office shall be 
deemed to be the office of the surveyor of highways. 

Sect. 2. Said engineer shall, in his annual report, 
include a report upon the safety and completeness of 
all ponds, basins and reservoirs under the charge of the 
water department and of all bridges within the city 
limits used as highways. 

(Stat. 1870, chap. 337; Stat. 1895, chap. 449, par. 21.) 



78 



City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX F. 



Meridian Line. 



In 1870 an act was passed by the Massachusetts Legislature requiring 
each land surveyor in the state at least once in every year to adjust and 
verify his compass by the meridian hne established in the county wherein 
his surveys were to be made. 

A meridian was marked by stone monuments and a book of record kept 
by a custodian designated by the County Commissioners. 

The law compelling surveyors to test their compasses annually was 
modified in 1875, so that surveyors who did not use the compass in turn- 
ing angles were relieved from the penalty attaching to the violation of the 
original act. 

The meridian posts for the County of Suffolk were placed on the south- 
erly portion of the "Parade Ground" on Boston Common. They are 
granite posts, three in number, placed 200 feet apart, are 18 inches square 
at the base, 1 foot square at the top, and 8 feet long, being firmly set in a 
bed of concrete with their tops originally just below the surface of the 
ground. 

A stone curb was placed even with the surface of the ground over the 
top of each post, with a metallic composition cover. 

The surface of that part of the Common where the posts are set was 
raised several feet in 1897, the posts being protected by building a brick 
manhole around each stone, the posts being accessible by the removal of 
the manhole cover. 

As the cover and cap of the manholes are made of iron it is now necessary 
to set up the compass in the production of the line marked by the monu- 
ment to avoid local attraction. The point selected has been 290 feet north 
of the northerly stone. 

The following table gives the number of tests for each year, with the 
average readings: 



Year. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 
Readings 

West of 
North. 


Yeah. 


Number 

of 
Readings. 


Average of 

Readings 

West of 

North. 


1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 


9 
8 
3 
3 
3 
2 
8 

13 
4 
7 
3 
5 
5 
6 
8 
4 

14 
3 

7 


10-53-46 
11-09-47 
11-07-53 
11-11-40 
10-58-33 
11-13-00 
11-12-35 
11-28-56 
11-35-15 
11-34-53 
11-28-23 
11-36-18 
11-42-04 
11-46-13 
11-43-12 
11-39-58 
11-51-54 
11-40-57 

11-39-56 


1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 


4 
1 

8 
6 

8 

13 
8 
4 

12 
6 
8 

12 
9 

10 


11-49-30 
12-32-20 

12-04-37 
12-34-34 

12-33-45 

12-44-44 
12-43-42 
12-48-45 
12-56-42 
13-19-20 
13-16-35 
13-27-05 
13-30-46 
13-35-30 



Engineering Department. 79 

The geodetic position of the apex of the dome of the State House as 
determined by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey is latitude 
42 degrees 21 minutes 29.596 seconds; longitude, 71 degrees 3 minutes 
51.040 seconds. 

In making the survey of Boston by the Boston Board of Survey a 
system of rectangular coordinates was adopted, the zero of which ia 
50,000 feet south and 50,000 feet east of the geodetic position of the State 
House. 

In other words, the geodetic position of the State House was assumed 
50,000 feet north and 50,000 feet west of this zero. This value was 
assumed to avoid any minus positions. 



80 



City Document No. 14. 



APPENDIX G. 



Special Documents and Reports Relating to and from City 
Engineer, Other Than Those Published in Annual Reports, 
1848-1902. 



Yeah. 


Document. 


Subject. 


1848 


48 


Ordinance relating to. 


1856 


46 


Albany Street Bridge — estimate of cost. 


1856 


47 


Bridge, East Boston to Chelsea, — East Boston Free 
Bridge, — history and estimate of cost. 


1858 


47 


Expenses of department for five years preceding October 
31, 1858. 


1863 


26 


Ordinance establishing a committee on the department of. 


1866 


108 


Ordinance relating to. 


1868 


340 


Additional appropriation. 


1868 


110 


Ordinances relating to department of City Engineer and 
City Surveyor. 


1872 


11 


Report of the Joint Special Committee on commission to 
examine candidates for City Engineer. 


1872 


75 


Eastern Avenue and Northern Avenue Bridges, Boston 
proper to South Boston, — estimate of cost. 


1873 


128 


Broadway Bridge draw — report on proposed repairs. 


1874 


86 


Report of City Engineer on changing the locations of the 
Eastern and Boston & Albany Railroads in East Boston. 


1880 


143 
Appendix A. 


Charlestown New Bridge — estimate of cost. 


1884 


168 


Ordinances (chapter 23) concerning the salary of. 


1885 


120 


Report relative to sewerage of Dorchester district. 


1886 


127 


Report on carrying Cambridge street, Brighton, over the 
tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad. 


1887 


96 
Appendix C 


Tunnel under Beacon Hill, Tremont street to Derne street. 


1888 


117 


Report on the condition of the several bridges in Boston. 


1889 


134 


Report relative to the necessity for providing for an addi- 
tional supply of water. 


1891 


59 


Opinion of Corporation Counsel as to the power of the 
City Council to delegate duties of Water Board to. 


1892 


211 


Report on proposed tunnel to East Boston. 


1893 


145 


Report on values of property affected by Rapid Transit Bill. 


1894 


195 


Report relative to drainage of Charles river watershed in 
West Roxbury. 


1900 


82 


Communication relative to reconstruction of Old Court 
House. 


1901 


40 


Report relative to completion of Blue Hill avenue boulevard. 


1901 


139 


Report as to delay in construction of Cove Street Bridge. 


1902 


15 


Estimate of cost of rebuilding drawbridges over Fort Point 
channel. 



Engineering Department. 81 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

REPORT ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT FOR 1910. 

General Index to Contents Engineering Department Reports, 1867-1892, will be 
found in Report of February 1, 1892. 

Page 

Engineering Department 1 

Statement of Expenses, Abolishment of grade crossings: 

" " " East Boston 4 

" " " Freeport, Walnut and other 

streets 4 

" " " Chelsea Street Bridge 4 

" " " Chelsea South Temporary Bridge . . 5 

" " " Congress Street Bridge 5 

" " " Engineering Department 3 

" " " Northern avenue and Sleeper street, 5 

" " " Meridian Street Bridge 5 

Bridges Inspected 6 

" wholly supported by Boston 6 

" of which Boston supports the part within its hmits, 8 
" " " " pays a part of the cost of main- 
tenance 9 

" supported by railroad corporations 10 

« " " B. &A. R. R 10 

" " « B. & M. R. R. and B. & A. R. R. . . 10 

« " " B. & M. R. R., Eastern Div 10 

« " " B., R. B. &L. R. R 10 

« " " N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Midland 

Div 11 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Old Colony 

Div 11 

" « " N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., Prov. Div., 11 

" " " MetropoHtan Park Commission ... . 11 

" " " Charles River Basin Commission. . . 11 

" Total number (164) 12 

Bridges 12 

Agassiz road, in the Fens 12 

Albany street, over B. & A. R. R. freight tracks 12 

Allston, over B. & A. R. R 12 

Arborway, over Stony brook 13 

Ashland street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., West 

Roxbury 13 

Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 13 

Athens street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . . 13 

Atlantic Avenue Bridge 13 

Audubon road, over B. & A. R. R 14 

Austin Street Bridge, over B. & M. R. R., Charlestown 14 

Baker street at Brook Farm, West Roxbury 14 

Beacon street, over outlet of the Fens 14 

Beacon street, over B. & A. R. R 14 

Bellevue street, over Muddy river, in Riverway 15 

Bennington street, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 15 

Bennington street, over B., R. B. & L. R. R 15 

Berkeley street, over B. & A. R. R., and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. &H. R. R... 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Bridle path, Riverway 15 

Bernier Street Footbridge, over Muddy river 16 



82 City Document No. 14. 

Bridges, continued. Page 
Berwick Park Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 16 

Blakemore street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R.. . . 16 

Blue Hill avenue, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . 16 

Bolton street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 16 

Boston street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . 16 

Boylston street arch, Back Bay Fens 17 

Boylston street, B. & A. R. R 17 

Bridle path, over Muddy river, in Riverway 17 

Broadway, over Fort Point channel 17 

Broadway, over B. & A. R. R 17 

Brookline avenue, over B. & A. R. R 17 

Brookline avenue, over Muddy river, in Riverway 18 

Brookline street to Cambridge 18 

Brookline street, over B. & A. R. R : 18 

Brooks street, Brighton 18 

Byron street, B., R. B. & L. R. R 18 

Cambridge Bridge 18 

Cambridge street 19 

Cambridge street, over B. & M. and B. & A. R. R., Chs'n 19 

Castle Island Footbridge 19 

Central avenue, over Neponset river 19 

Charles River Dam Bridge 19 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over B. & A. R. R 20 

Charlesgate, in the Fens, over Ipswich street 20 

Charlestown 20 

Chelsea, over B. & M. R. R 21 

Chelsea (North) 21 

Chelsea (South) 21 

Chelsea street 21 

Circuit drive, over Scarboro' pond, in Franklin Park. ........ 22 

Columbia road, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 22 

Columbia road, over Shoreham street 22 

Columbus avenue, over B. & A. R. R. and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R 22 

Commercial Point, or Tenean 22 

Commonwealth avenue, in the Fens 23 

Congress street 23 

Cottage Farm, over B. & A. R. R 23 

Cottage Street Footbridge, East Boston 24 

Curtis Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 23 

Dartmouth street, over B. & A. R. R., and Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R 24 

Dorchester avenue, over Fort Point channel 24 

Dorchester avenue, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 24 

Dover street 25 

EUicott arch, in Franklin Park 25 

Everett street, over B. & A. R. R 25 

Fens Bridge, in the Fens 25 

Ferdinand street, over B. & A. R. R , 25 

Florence Street Bridge, over Stony brook 25 

Forest Hills entrance in FrankUn Park 26 

Gainsborough Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. 

t. XT T) "p 26 

Gold street, over Midland Div.' nV Y.,' N.' H.' & H.' R.R. ..... 26 

Granite to Milton 26 

Harvard to Cambridge 26 

Harvard street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . . 26 

Huntington avenue, over B. & A. R. R 27 

Huntington avenue, over Muddy river 27 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge, over Stony brook 27 



Engineering Department. 83 

Bridges, continued. Paob 

Ips^\dcti street, over waterway in the Fens 27 

Irvington Street Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R 27 

L Street Bridge 27 

Leverett Pond Footbridge, in Leverett Park 28 

Longwood avenue, over Muddy river and B. & A. R. R 28 

Maiden 28 

Massachusetts avenue, over B. & A. R. R 28 

Massachusetts avenue, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 28 

Mattapan to Milton 28 

Maverick Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 29 

Meridian street 29 

Milton 29 

Neponset 30 

Neptune road, over B., R. B. & L. R. R 30 

Newton street, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 30 

Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 

DorcliGst/Gr SO 
. Norfolk street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 

near Blue Hill avenue station 30 

North Beacon street 31 

North Harvard street 31 

Northern avenue 31 

Oakland street, over Midland Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . . 31 
Perkins Street Footbridge, over B. & M. R. R. and B. & A. 

R. R., Charlestown 31 

Porter Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 32 

Prescott Street Bridge, over B. & A. R, R., East Boston 32 

Prison Point 32 

PubUc Garden Footbridge 32 

Reservoir road over B. & A. R. R 32 

Saratoga Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 33 

Scarboro Pond Footbridge, Franklin Park 33 

Shawmut avenue, over B. & A. R. R., and N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 33 

Southampton Street Bridge, over South bay sluice 33 

Southampton street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R 33 

Spring street to Dedham 34 

Summer street, over A street 34 

" B street 34 

" C street 34 

" " " Fort Point channel 57 

" N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. freight tracks.. . 34 

Sumner street, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston 35 

Tollgate Way Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 35 

Warren 35 

Webster Street Footbridge, over B. & A. R. R., East Boston. . 35 
West Fourth street, over Old Colony Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 36 

West Rutland Square Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., 

N. H. & H. R. R 36 

Western avenue to Cambridge 36 

Western avenue to Watertown 36 

Winthrop 36 

Wood Island Park Footbridge 37 

Bridges wholly supported by railroads 37 

Surveying Division 38 

Lines and grades given and paving work measured 1910. . . .40, 41-44 
Plans in Surveying Division 44, 45 



84 City Document No. 14. 

Miscellaneous Work and Construction in 1910: paqe 

Abolishment grade crossings on the B., R. B. & L. R. R 46 

Albany Street Bridge, over B. & A. R. R. freight tracks 46 

Ashmont Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridge 48 

Berkeley Street Bridge 49 

Blackwood street wall 50 

Boston Common 51 

Boston Consumptives' Hospital 51 

Broadway Bridge, over B. & A. R. R 51 

Cambridge: River Street Bridge, over Charles river 52 

Columbus Avenue Bridge, over B. & A. R. R 53 

Deer Island shore protection 53 

Dover Street Bridge, over Fort Point channel 54 

Eastern Avenue Wharf 54 

Fireboat Station, North End paving wharf 55 

Fireboat temporary slip 55 

Fire Engine Station, Walk Hill and Wenhani streets 55 

Gallop's Island wharf 55 

Neponset bridge, over Neponset river 56 

Public Garden survey 56 

Public Grounds walks 56 

Summer Street Bridge 57 

ToUgate Way Footbridge, over Prov. Div. N. Y., N. H. & H. 

R. R 57 

Warren Bridge to Charlestown 59 

Western Avenue Bridge to Cambridge 59 

Miscellaneous 61 

Streets: 

Working plans, specifications and forms of contract were pre- 
pared and forwarded for assessment streets 60 

Waterworks: 

Extension of mains 60 

Average monthly heights, in feet, above Boston city base, to 
which water rose at different stations on the Boston water- 
works, northern high service 62 

Average monthly heights, in feet, above Boston city base, to 
which water rose at different stations on the Boston water- 
works, southern high service 62 

Average monthly heights, in feet, above Boston city base, to 
which water rose at different stations on the Boston water- 
works, low service _ . . . 62 

Table showing monthly rainfall in inches during 1910 at various 

places in eastern Massachusetts 63 

General statistics 64 

City Engineers, 1850=191 1 65 

William Jackson, obituary and portrait 66 



Engineering Department. 85 



APPENDICES. 



Page 
Appendix A. — Table showing the widths of openings for vessels 

in all bridges provided with draws 70 

B. — Engineering Department property schedule 72 

C. — Elevations referred to Boston City base 73 

D. — Engineering Department annual reports, 1867- 

1910 76 

E. — Engineering Department, Revised Ordinances 77 

F. — Meridian line 78 

G. — Special documents and reports relating to and from 

City Engineer other than those pubhshed in 

annual reports, 1848-1902 80 



•sj 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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B. P. L, _,,M^eFy, 

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