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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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City Document — tfo. 11. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



' COCHITUATE WATEK BOARD, 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1855. 




BOSTON: 

MOORE <fe CROSBY, PRINTERS,— 1 WATER STREET. 
185 6. 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

January 15, 1856. 
To the City Council. 

The Cochituate Water Board respectfully submit to 
the City Council, their annual report for the year 
1855. They also, in compliance with the city ordinance, 
transmit the Reports of the City Engineer and Water Reg- 
istrar relating to the same period. They would beg 
leave to refer the City Council to those reports for de- 
tailed statements of all matters relating to the condition 
and progress of the water works, during the year. 

The Water Board have the gratification of again 
being able to report, that the general condition of the 
water works, in every department, is entirely satisfac- 
tory. 

The supply of water at the Lake, has been most abun- 
dant for all the public, domestic and manufacturing 
uses, which were had in view on its introduction into 
the City ; and for which it could be required, not only 
by the present population, but by any probable increase 
of it for many years to come. Our means of conveying 



4 • WATER. [Feb. 

the same to the City, in any reasonable supply, are also 
at present, ample. Upon reference, however, to the re- 
port of the City Engineer it "will be apparent, so great has 
been the average daily consumption, that there must have 
been a failure of supply on the more elevated portions 
of the City, even now, in this early period of the his- 
tory of the works, whenever the draft much exceeded 
the average. The daily average drawn from Brookline 
Reservoir, for consumption in the City, is calculated to 
have been 10,346,300 wine gallons; near a half a mil- 
lion gallons more than that of the preceding year. 
Whenever, therefore, the draft exceeded the average, 
the means from Brookline Reservoir became insufficient 
for keeping up the supply for the high service, unless 
one of them was entirely devoted to that object ; this 
was accordingly done, when it was possible, but it could 
not be persisted in for any considerable time, without 
the most serious effects being felt in the Reservoirs at 
South and East Boston, which were at once drained, to 
supply the low service in the City proper. For the 
purpose, therefore, of equalizing in some degree, the 
supply to different parts of the City, it was necessary 
to keep continually opening and shutting the gates, by 
which the water was let on or shut off from the high 
service. 

During the past year we have also experienced 
not only the insufficiency of the mains to Brook- 
line, which, indeed, the experience of previous years had 
frequently taught us, but the brick aqueduct has, at 
times, been found inadequate for supplying the enormous 
draft made upon it. With a head of 7 1-2 feet of water 
at the Lake, the brick aqueduct is capable of deliver- 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 11. 5 

ing, at the Brookline Reservoir, fifteen million of gal- 
lons in twenty-four hours. So great, however, has 
been at times the consumption, that with that pressure, 
the head could not be kept up in the Reservoir, but, on 
one occasion, fell ten inches in the course of three days. 
There was a loss at the same time of four feet in the 
Beacon Hill Reservoir and five feet eight inches in the 
East Boston, both being nearly drained ; the gates in the 
South Boston Reservoir being shut. The consumption 
therefore must have been more than 15 million gallons 
in 24 hours. 

We have been brought, during the past year, still 
nearer, and in fact close upon the time anticipated in 
former reports, when it will be necessary, in order to 
keep up an equal supply over the whole territory, to 
provide some mode of introducing a further quantity ; or 
to restrict its use to merely domestic purposes, and thus 
lose the income, no inconsiderable amount, which we 
now derive from its use in manufactories and for other 
purposes. There does not seem to be any other alterna- 
tive, except indeed the almost hopeless one, of attempt- 
ing to produce a greater economy and care in the use 
of the water, and preventing the reckless waste which 
seems everywhere to prevail. If this could be done 
effectually, it would leave, of course, an ample supply 
of water for all the useful purposes for which it could 
be required ; as it is probable that at least one half of 
the whole quantity now used, is absolutely and unprofit- 
ably wasted. 

The Water Board will continue their efforts for this 
very important object, so intimately connected with the 
welfare and best interests of the City. For this purpose 



6 WATER. [Feb. 

they will adhere to the plan heretofore adopted, of 
examining periodically, all the water fixtures in use ; 
and of causing, at proper seasons, and whenever it is 
practicable, a daily and nightly inspection, to be made, 
of the mode of using the water throughout the City. 
Some good, it is believed, has been already done by this 
course, hi the detection of many cases of wanton and 
gross waste. They were cases, however, which being 
obvious to the sight or hearing of the police, were 
easily detected. The great mass of cases, in which 
almost the whole evil is involved, take place so secretly 
and so silently as to be entirely beyond the cognizance 
of the most sagacious inspector we can employ, and to 
be known in fact only to those who cause them. We 
fear that nothing but a more just and universal appre- 
ciation, than now prevails, of all the ill consequences 
which must necessarily follow the present wastefulness ; 
and a very general and serious determination to put a 
stop to it ; each one beginning, for this end, with his own 
household, will have much effect in correcting the evil. 

The foregoing suggestions as to our means of supply, 
must be understood, however, to have reference to the 
present population of the City, and its natural increase 5 
and not to an increase of territory and population by 
the annexation of other towns or parts of towns, as has 
been from time to time proposed in relation to Roxbury, 
Charlestown, and Chelsea. The first thing to be done 
in case of any such annexation, will be to lay at once, 
an additional main, of 30 or 36 inches to Brookline, at 
a probable cost of over $300,000, or the supply of the 
high service must entirely fail. 

And here, in reference to this subject, we deem it our 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 11. 7 

duty again to ask the attention of the City Council to 
some sources of great and unnecessary waste, which 
seem to be more peculiarly subject to the supervision 
of the Council, and which it is in the power of the 
Council alone to prevent. 

One is the large number of urinals and fixtures of 
similar character, in and about the Public Buildings, 
constructed generally without much reference to econ- 
omy in the use of water ; and where a continuous flow 
is kept up, night and day, at all seasons of the year ; to 
an extent probably not realized by any member of the 
government, and not at all required for any purposes 
of cleanliness. 

The other is the extravagant use of water for water- 
ing the streets, (an evil sufficiently obvious to all who 
have to walk the streets,) by which they frequently are 
so covered with mud as to be almost impassable, and a 
vast quantity of water worse than wasted. 

The Water Board would also respectfully ask the 
attention of the City Council to the entire inadequacy 
of the penalty which the present ordinance prescribes 
for any ivaste of ivater, no matter how gross and reckless 
it may be. It merely directs that the water shall be 
cut off from the premises and not let on again except 
on payment of two dollars. That sum will hardly be 
sufficient to pay the City the actual expense of shutting 
off and letting on under, the most favorable circum- 
stances ; of course, when the ground is frozen and the 
street encumbered with ice and snow, it becomes en- 
tirely inadequate. We would respectfully suggest that 
the penalty might vary, and be somewhat in proportion 



8 WATER. [Feb. 

to the difficulties which the different seasons of the 
year necessarily occasion. 

The gates at the outlet dam were closed April 28th, and 
the water retained being then 8 feet above the flume. 
It supplied the City during the su mm er and fall, and 
gradually fell until the 12th of November, when it 
stood 2 feet 4 1-2 inches above the flume, its lowest 
point during the season, and being 3 inches above the 
lowest point of the last year ; subsequently it rose in 
the lake, and was 7 feet 8 inches above on the 1st of 
January. 

There has been no complaint of any offensive change 
in the character of the water during the year, similar to 
that of the previous one. The impurities of that year, 
so obvious both to the taste and smell, gradually dis- 
appeared, and were not perceived any where about the 
middle of February ; leaving their cause and origin in 
entire obscurity. We still believe that the most plausi- 
ble suggestion was that made by the Water Board, and 
confirmed by the opinions and able researches of Drs. 
Horsford and Jackson, published with the report of 
last year, that the remote cause of the impurity was to 
be attributed to the long drought and heat of the 
summer of that year, and the unusually low state of 
the water in the Lake, and was the result of vegetable 
decomposition. If it be so, the evil was one which we 
must probably contend with again; and it becomes 
important that the water in different parts of the lake 
should be continually watched, particularly during the 
summer months, and the slightest deterioration traced, 
if possible, to its source. 

This has been" quite satisfactorily done during the 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 11. 9 

past season by the Superintendent of the Lake. We 
regret to state, that for a short period an impurity, 
similar in character to that of the previous year, but 
not so intense, was clearly and obviously distinguish- 
able in the Northern division and at the gate house. 
The water of other parts of the lake was, however, at 
once examined, and the cause of the impurity traced, 
without difficulty, to Whitney's meadow, in the South- 
ern division, where it was quite offensive. This 
meadow consists of about 65 acres, and was entirely 
separated by the Commissioners from the other parts of 
the lake by a permanent dam, from an apprehension 
then entertained, of the impurity of the water there ; 
a passage way had, however, been forced on top of the 
dam, through which the water could flow when at a suffi- 
cient height, and at the time mentioned it was running 
over. This passage way was at once closed, and 
shortly after, the peculiar taste of the water disap- 
peared. 

The water from Dug Pond was not admitted into the 
lake during the season. 

The water of Snake Brook, also, when raised to such 
a height as to show no evidence of impurity, was 
allowed to pass over the dam heretofore built, with- 
out any ill consequences. 

The extension of the works has been continued during 
the year, and distributing and service pipes have been 
laid in new streets, &c, wherever required, and when 
the water rate to be assessed was equal to the interest 
on the cost. In one instance, however, the latter 
requirement was necessarily departed from. The City 
Council having directed the : pipes to be laid in Wash- 
2 



10 WATER. [Feb. 

ington Village, lately annexed to South Boston, it was 
accordingly done, at considerable cost. It will be proba- 
bly some time before there will be a sufficient number 
of water tenants to pay a water rate equal to the 
interest of the expenditure. 

The length of Distributing pipes of 4, 6 and 12 
inches diameter, laid during the year, is 13,831 feet, 
being 4,817 feet more than the last year. 

The number of new Stopcocks is 19, including one 
in the branch to the State Prison. 

The ivliole length of ' distributing pipe now laid, in- 
cluding hydrant branches and bends, is about 113 2-5 
miles. The present number of stopcocks is 980. 

The number of Service pipes laid during the year is 
798, the length of which was 26,150 feet. The whole 
number being 18,797. 

The number of hydrants established during the year 
was 42. The whole number is 1,252. 

The number of leaks repaired in pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards, was 75. In those of less than 4 inches it 
was 219. 

The very important repairs made upon the upper end 
of the brick aqueduct recently, particularly in the use 
of English cement for stopping the leaks in the part 
which was laid over quicksands and had never been 
made tight, have been eminently successful ; and it 
is believed all those leaks are now permanently 
closed. Other leaks, which from time to time occur in 
other divisions, are more easily closed, and occasion 
little solicitude. 

The leak in the East Boston Reservoir is getting to be 
of serious importance, and complaints are made on the 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 11 

subject by the owners of the neighboring estates ; 
all attempts hitherto made to stop it have been inef- 
fectual. An earnest endeavor will be made the ensu- 
ing season, to make it tight, either by laying a brick 
lining in the interior, or in some other more effectual 
way, involving as we are afraid, considerable expense. 

Notice was received last summer from the Commis- 
sioners appointed by authority of the Commomvealth, that 
the part of the twenty inch main, laid under the Warren 
Bridge, between the draw and Charlestown, was in the 
way of the alterations and improvements about to be 
made in the bridge, and requesting the City authorities 
to remove the same at the expense of the city. As the 
main was placed in its present position under the super- 
vision of officers appointed by the Commonwealth and 
paid by the city, its authority to call upon the city to 
pay the expense of the removal seemed somewhat ques- 
tionable, and we refused to do it, and protested against 
the right of the commissioners to interfere with the box 
in which the main is placed, they having stated that 
they should remove it. The city solicitor, on applica- 
tion, afterwards gave an opinion as to the rights of the 
city, similar to that of the Water Board. The commis- 
sioners have since altered their plan so as not to inter- 
fere with the present arrangement of the city, and laid 
a plank sidewalk, stating, however, that an application 
would be made to the Legislature, at its present session, 
on the subject. The mam referred to, is laid on inde- 
pendent piles, directly under the sidewalk of the bridge, 
and in case repairs should be required, is in a very 
inconvenient position both for the public and those 
having the care of it. Perhaps, therefore, it would be 



12 WATER. [Feb. 

expedient for the city to be at part of the expense 
hereafter, of removing it outside of the bridge and plac- 
ing it upon independent piles, similar to the part on 
this side of the draw. 

The annual report of the Water Registrar contains, as 
required by the Ordinance, " a statement of the number 
of water takers, the number of cases where the water 
has been cut off, the number and amount of abate- 
ments, and the expenditures of his department." The 
list of water takers has been arranged, as usual, into 
different classes, and the amount of water rate paid by 
each class given, the water rate being as usual paid to 
the clerk of the Treasurer in the office of the Water 
Registrar. 

The whole amount received for zuater rates was $266,- 
302 77. In this is included receipts for Jamaica Pond, 
$2,280 74, and for water used in previous years, 
$6,551 97. 

The amount received for cutting off and letting on 
water, for non payment of water rates, $874. There 
was also received, for cutting off and letting on water 
for repairs and unnecessary zvaste, and also for laying 
service pipes by the service clerk, $3,872 20, making 
the whole amount received from every source during the 
year, $271,048 97, or $48,124 27 more than was 
received from the same Sources the year previous. The 
number of water takers entered for the present year, is 
19,998, being an increase of 805 over the last year. 

The water has been shut off in 2,405 instances, and has 
been let on in 2,716 instances. The estimated receipts 
for the present year are $280,000. 

The usual condensed classification of the various water 



1856.] 



CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 



13 



tenants has been prepared, and a statement of the 
amount of water rate paid by each class ; the whole, 
being collated with similar tables for the two preceding 
years, is here inserted. 



L853. 


1854. 


13,632 


14,073 


2,845 


3,031 


283 


299 


480 


518 


8 


7 


2 


3 


16 


21 


932 


811 


1 


1 


63 


67 


3 


4 



81 



14,483 Dwelling houses, - 
3,263 Stores, shops, offices, cellars, Ac, 
340 Hotels, restaurants, and saloons, 
551 Stables, ------ 

7 jRailroads, - 

3 i Ferry companies, - - - - 
31 ! Steamboats, - 

728 ^ose, ------ 

1 |Motive power, - 

{Sugar refineries, distilleries, \ 
breweries and bakeries, j 

4 Gas companies, 
Other manufacturing purposes, - 
City buildings and other city) 

uses, - - - - - j 
Public buildings, charitable in 

stitutions, <fec. 
Shipping contract with water 

men, - 
Street waterers, - 
Building purposes, 
Other purposes, - 



1853. 



1854. 



1855. 



$119,891.18 $124,977.06 $157,318.83 

16,006.93; 18,242.25 23,587.00 

6,459.57 10,302.09 10,S95.63 

6,515.38 6,869.14! 7,578.75 

6,527.20 5,912.28! 7,523.40 

1,006.53 2,115.64 2,608.28 

3,055.81 3,211.85 4,370.01 

2,829.00 2,452.00' 2,205.00 

535.51 783.44] 800.00 



6,635.93 

514.47 
16,247.23 



1,053.83 



7,303.49 11,237.20 

508.76 655.52 

18,738.22 18,272.51 



3,733.50 
1,627.92 



3,900.06 4,647.08 

655.88J 532.45 

609.931 917.40 

1,544.00; 1,479.50 



4,011.50 
1,834.40 

4,223.78 

973.72 
735.05 
920.17 



$193,9S8.44 $214.354.07 $259,750.80 



The expenditures in this department have been 
: the particulars are given in the report. 

A statement of the Receipts and Expenditures the 
past year, by the Clerk of the Water Board, is hereto 
annexed. The following analysis has been prepared : 
The whole amount of Expendi- 
tures was, $64, 617 01 

From which, deducting rents and sundries 
received and allowed at Marlboro' and 
at and near the Lake, amounting to - 750 68 



Leaves the amount draivnfrom the Treasury, 
Amounts carried forward. 



63,866 33 



>3,866 33 



U WATER. [Feb. 

Amount brought forward, $63,866 33 
Of this there was paid on account of the 

permanent extension of the works, - - 36,553 75 



Balance amount of current expenses, - - - 27,312 58 
The whole amount of Receipts paid into the 

City Treasury, was, 
Cash, and notes secured by mort- 
gage for land sold in Need- 
ham, 200 00 

Do. Brookline, ------ 3,270 05 

Do. Wayland - -v - - - - 1,400 00 

Cash for rents, grass, and sun- 
dries, - 1,248 13 

Cash for service pipe and laying, 1,797 20 

Cash for shutting off water, &c, 2,075 00 9,990 38 

Balance, $17,322 26 

The amount drawn from the City Treasury has been 
$16,316 02 less than the previous year. The amount 
considered as the current or ordinary expenses, has been 
$6,636 90 less, while the payments on account of the 
permanent extension of the works, owing principally to 
the laying the pipes for the supply of Washington Vil- 
lage, by direction of the City Council, have been 
$5,034 40 greater. 

If we add to the above saving of expense, $16,316 02 
the amount gained on the water rates, or 48,124 27 

the amount will be the actual gain to the 

treasury, or over the preceding year, 64,440 29 

The sales of land during the year have been small. 
They consist of an estate in Wayland, embracing of a 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 15 

small house and barn, for $1,400, a lot of land in 
Needham for $200, and land near the Brookline Reser- 
voir, for $3,270 05. In the latter sale an arrangement 
has been made by which part of the land adjoining the 
Reservoir is to be kept free from buildings, and merely 
cultivated for ornament. 

The Compensating Reservoir Estates at Hopkinton and 
Marlboro' have been advertised for sale or to be let, as 
yet without success. Negotiations are now making for 
the disposal of the Mill privileges, at Saxonville, and it is 
believed an arrangement will be made. And there is 
some prospect that the board will have to propose to 
the Board of Aldermen or City Council a sale of the 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct. It will continue to be the 
wish of the Water Board to dispose of any part of the 
property of the City under its control, which is not 
wanted for the purposes of the Water Works, as often 
as an opportunity may offer. 

The foregoing report is respectfully submitted, 

Thomas Wetmore, President. 
Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 
William Washburn, 
Thomas Sprague, 
Samuel Hatch, 
Charles Stoddard. 

Cochituate Water Board. 



1856.] 



CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 



17 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITUBES. 



Statement op all Expenditures made by the Cochituate 
Water Board, prom December 31st, 1854, to January 
1st, 1856. 



Blacksmith's Shop, for Stock, &c, 


- 


$160 52 


Plumbing, " " 


<( 


- 


62 01 


Cartage, Boston, - 


- 


- 


106 12 


" South Boston, - 


- 


- 


150 38 


" East Boston, - 


-' 


- 


3 25 


Traveling Expenses, 


.- 


- 


198 24 


Salaries, - 


- 


- 


8,255 57 


Office Expenses, for rent, i 


ixtures, 


&c, 


1,878 09 


Postages, - 


- 


- 


11 34 


Expresses, - 


- 


- 


1 27 


Stationery, - 


- 


- 


132 08 


Printing, - 


- 


- 


355 98 


Advertising, - 


- 


- 


10 00 


Eecording Deeds, &c, - 


- 


- 


4 31 


Miscellaneous Expenses, - 


- 


- 


65 57 


Taxes, - - - - 


- 


- 


1,123 12 


Oil and Wicking, - 


- 


- 


80 75 


Tools, - - 


- 


- 


213 84 


Fountains, -I.,-- 


- 


- 


372 64 


Beacon Hill Keservoir, for 


labor, &i 
trward, 


3., 


200 89 


Amount carried f< 
3 


$13,386 07 



18 



WATER. 



[Feb. 



Amount brought forward, 




#13,386 07 


South Boston, " " " 


100 15 




East Boston, " - " " 


91 03 




Brookline, " " " 


602 43 




Aqueduct Kepairs, for labor and 






materials, - 


1,646 69 




Lake Cochituate, for labor, &c., 


333 59 




Lanterns, - 


33 00 




Tolls and Ferriages, - 


85 38 




Service Pipes, - - . - 


1,157 28 




" " Boston, - - . 


2,691 58 




" " S. " 


1,166 85 




" " E. " 


• 2,030 80 




Water Pipes, - - 


17,753 97 




Hydrants, - - - - - 


628 83 




" Boston, - - - 


2 00 




Hydrant Boxes, - - - 


206 98 




" " Boston,- 


8 00 




Stop Cocks, - - - 


761 46 




" Boston, 


396 83 




. " S. « ... 


40 00 




" E. " - 


40 00 




Stop Cock Boxes, ------ 


225 10 




" " Boston, 


50 




Union Stop Cocks, 


933 58 




Laying Water Pipes, 


584 94 




" " " Boston, 


195 98 




« « i* S. " 


733 38 


, 


Water Meters, 


65 67 




Laying Service Pipes, Boston, - 


21 08 




Kepairing Streets, " 


342 37 




« a g « 


31 68 


■ 


Bepairing Water Pipes, - - 


5Q 63 




" Service " 


12 24 


32,980 00 


Amount carried forward, 


#46,366 Q7 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 19 

Amount brought forward, $46,366 07 

Marlboro' Reservoir, - - - 18 25 

Rents, 79 00 

Land Damages, - - - - 10 00 

Land and Water Rights, - - 704 00 

Water Works, East Boston, - - 389 57 

Boston, - 3 50 

Damages, Boston, - 38 00 

Jamaica Pond Aqueduct, - - 12 00 

Stable, for grain, &c, - 431 95 

Repair Shop, for stock, &c, - - 220 86 1,907 13 

Amount carried forward, $48,273 20 



Amount paid for Labor, viz. : 

Letting on and Shutting off Water, 
Blowing off Hydrants, - 
Laying Water Pipes, Boston, - 

« a a S. " - 

<< <« « E. " - 

Laying Service Pipes, Boston, - 

" « " S *' - 

" it a g_ ci _ 

Blacksmith's Shop, - 

Plumbing, " - 

Proving Yard, - 
Repairing Streets, Boston, 

" " S. " - - 

a it TJ <i _ 

" Water Pipes, 

" Service " - 



2,223 


92 


689 


31 


1,277 


16 


1,198 


84 


204 


62 


2,077 


14 


471 


32 


652 


87 


538 


37 


653 


01 


2,274 06 


758 03 


59 


37 


79 49 


802 


39 


1,211 


14 



Amounts carried forward, $15,171 04 $48,273 20 



20 WATER.. [Feb. 

Amount brought forward, ^15,171 04 #48,273 20 

Eepairing Hydrants, - - 687 09 

Stop 6ocks, - - 149 81 

Miscellaneous, - - - - 165 76 

Jamaica Pond Aqueduct, - 82 36 

Water Meters, - - - - 87 75 16,343 81 



#64,617 01 



Cr. 

Marlboro' Eeservoir, for rent, - 106 00 

Cash of H. Bichardson, for rents, &c, 608 68 



36 00' 750 68 



Amount of Expenditures, #63,866 33 



Cash, ^e., paid City Treasurer. 

Tor Grass at sundry places, - - 120 00 

" Land in Needham, -■--'■,'. 200 00 

« « " Brookline, - - - 3,270 05 

« « " Wayland, - ' -■ - 1,400 00 

" Eentsofland near the Lake, - 112 00 

" Labor, Materials, &c, - - 1,016 13 



6,118 18 



For Service Pipe and laying, 1,797 20 
" Shutting off and letting 

on water, - - 1,649 00 
" Shutting off water for 

waste, - - 426 00 3,872 20 9,990 38 



Balanee, #53,875 95 



Amount carried forward, #63,866 33 



1856.] CITY DOCUMENT— No. 11. 21 



Amount brought forward, 






$63,866 33 


Extension op the Work. 








Main Pipes, - 


- 


17,753 97 




Service " 


- 


7,046 51 




Hydrants, - 


- 


630 83 




Stop Cocks, - 


- 


1,238 29 




Labor Laying Main Pipes, 


- 


2,680 62 




Materials, " " " 


- 


1,514 30 




Labor laying Service Pipes, 


- 


3,201 33 




" at Proving Yard, 


- 


2,274 06 




Tools, ----- 


3ens< 


213 84 


36,553 75 


Amount of annual Ex] 


3S, 


$27,312 58 



Statement of the Expenditures and Receipts on account of the 
Water Works to January 1st, 1856. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners, $4,043,718 21 

" Water Board of 1850, 366,163 89 

" C. W. Board of 1851, 141,309 23 

" C. W. Board of 1852, 89,654 20 

" C. W. Board of 1853, 89,854 03 

" C. W. Board of 1854, 80,182 35 

" C. W. Board of 1855, 63,866 33 



t,874,748 24 



Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the Commissioners, - - 47,648 38 

Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the Water Board of 1850, - 8,153 52 



Amounts carried forward, $55,801 90 $4,874,748 24 



22 WATER. [Feb. 

Amounts brought forward, $55,801 90 $4,874,748 24 
Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the C. W. Board of 1851, - - 5,232 38 
Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the C. W. Board of 1852, - 15,869 12 

Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the C. W. Board of 1853, - - 4,621 40 
Amount paid into the City Treasury 

by the C. W. Board of 1854, - - 12,423 29 
Amount paid into the city Treasury 

by the C. W. Board of 1855, - - 9,990 38 103,938 47 



$4,770,809 77 
Sundry payments by the City, - -45,388 99 
Discount and interest on loans, 2,109,975 63 2,155,364 62 



$6,926,174 39 
Sundry credits by the City, - - 2,077 17 
Amount rec'd for Water Bents, &c., 1,192,925 08 1,195,002 25 



Amount due, January 1st, 1856, $5,731,172 14 



APPENDIX. 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Boston, January 5, 1856, 

Thomas Wetmorb, Esq., 

, President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir: — The annual report relative to the condition of the 
various structures of the Water Works, is herewith submitted. 

Lake Cocldtuate, ete. 

During the past summer and fall, the water in the Lake has 
been of its original purity, and no complaints have been made 
of bad water in the City, owing in a great measure to the unim- 
peded circulation of the water through all parts of the Lake and 
most of its tributaries, and to the care and attention which has 
been given to the removal of matters tending to impair its purity 
in the Lake and tributaries. The waters of Snake Brook, and 
of the meadow south of the Lake, were allowed to flow freely 
into it a few weeks last fall. 

The roads, bridges, dams, etc., connected with the Lake are in 
their usual good condition. 

The Gate Houses at the Lake, and at Brookline Eeservoir, 
the waste weirs and other structures along the line of the Brick 
Aqueduct, are all in very good condition, not having required 
repairs of any consequence since their erection. 



.-• 



2 APPENDIX. 

Brick Aqueducts and Tunnels. 

A personal examination of the interior of the Aqueduct was 
made during the latter part of December, 1855, in company of 
Mr. Knowlton. The tunnels have undergone no change since 
being finished, the rock through which they were made being of 
such firm texture that exposure to air and water has not had any 
perceptible effect upon it. 

There are still some leaks into the tunnels through seams in 
the rock, which are not objectionable, as the water is quite pure. 

The section of the conduit through the tunnels is somewhat 
larger than the brick portion, and, as the velocity of the water is 
less through them than through the other portions of the con- 
duit, more sediment deposits in them, requiring to be cleansed 
oftener than other parts of the work. The entire line of con- 
duit should be cleansed out early in the spring. 

A new crack was discovered last spring near a culvert in West 
Needham, one in Newton about 50 feet long, near station one ; 
and also another near Dedman's Brook, of about 100 feet in 
length. All these have, no doubt, been caused by heavy loaded 
teams passing over the conduit at nearly right angles to its 
direction, and up very steep grades. It is advisable to change 
the grades and directions of these roads to prevent more extended 
damage in future. Other cracks, which have been mentioned in 
previous reports, remain stationary, with the exception of two or 
three, which have slightly increased. None of the cracks are 
sufficient to cause any apprehension of trouble. There are also 
a few more leaks into the conduit which may be easily stopped at 
the spring cleansing. 

It will be advisable to repair the conduit near Webber's Barn, 
by taking out and relaying about 25 feet of the top arch. A 
crack has existed here for some time, and portions near this 
place have been before renewed. 

A piece also of the conduit, in the third division, near Newton 
Centre, should be coated on the bottom with cement, early in the 
season. 



APPENDIX. 3 

Those portions of the aqueduct, which have been repaired with 
English cement, remain perfectly tight. By comparing these 
portions, with others which have been repaired with American 
cement, the superiority of the English is so very apparent, that 
it would be advisable to use it in all the repairs to be made here- 
after. 

The heavy embankment of puddled gravel at Ware's Valley, 
near Charles Eiver, is, as it has been from the commencement, 
in excellent condition, never having settled enough to cause any 
crack in the conduit since the first season of the introduction of 
water into the City. 

But very few of the peculiar vegetable substances heretofore 
mentioned, were found in the conduit. 

Brookline Reservoir. 

This reservoir is in good order, the grounds and structures 
having been well attended to. It will be advisable, during the 
present year, to take the upright screens out of the gatehouse, 
and replace them with circular ones, similar to the one in the 
gatehouse at the Lake. The circular screens are very easily 
cleared of all leaves and rubbish which collect against them, and 
are not so liable to be broken as the others, and when broken on 
one side they may be turned on their centres, so as still to be as 
effectual as the upright single ones in keeping out leaves and 
fishes. 

The two large meters still remain, but have not been used 
during the past year in determining the amount of water con- 
sumed in the city. 

City Reservoirs. 

The usual attention has been paid to these Eeservoirs during 
the past year. Neither of them has had any repairs of conse- 
quence. The leakages spoken of in previous reports, in the 
Beacon Hill and East Boston Eeservoirs, have increased but 
little. The old wooden fence has been removed from the South 



4 APPENDIX. 

Boston Beservoir, and a substantial and ornamental iron one has 
been erected in its place. 

The lands belonging to tbe Water Works, the compensating 
reservoirs, and the Jamaica Aqueduct, have received all necessary 
care and attention during the year, and are all believed to be in 
as good condition as at any previous time. 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



Monthly Fall of Rain in Inches, in 1855. 





Places and Observers. 


Month 


■"•■a 

© . 


eg 

■gv§ 

go" 


>> 

a'S 

c3 O 


^3 




1 « 

o3 O 

Li 


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h5 


^ H 


dn 


January, - 


7.22 


7.26 


6.44 


7.81 


8.39 


4.52 


6.45 


February, ... 


4.67 


3.74 


3.56 


4.48 


5.51 


3.50 


4.05 


March, 


1.18 


1.16 


0.86 


1.12 


1.30 


1.91 


0.85 


April, ... 


4.28 


3.99 


4.34 


5.04 


4.99 


2.65 


2.50 


May, 


1.20 


1.50 


0.93 


1.07 


1.07 


0.82 


2.55 


June, - 


3.09 


3.58 


3.58 


3.81 


3.84 


1.98 


1.95 


July, 


4.15 


4.84 


5.40 


3.99 


4.76 


3.86 


3.25 


August, ... 


1.46 


.2.27 


2.08 


2.32 


2.42 


0.77 


2.02 


September, 


1.13 


1.22 


0.79 


0.63 


0.48 


0.75 


0.25 


October, ... 


4.61 


5.51 


4.48 


5.78 


5.89 


4.16 


5.33 


November, 


5.27 


5.33 


4.12 


3.90 


4.21 


4.84 


3.75 


December, 


5.93 


7.19 


4.05 


4.94 


5.55 


5.20 


6.10 


Totals, 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


34.96 


39.05 



The above table of Eain Fall has been kindly furnished, as hereto- 
fore, by the respective observers, and is inserted as a matter of present 
interest, and for future reference. The observations which were made 
in Hopkinton and Marlborough, for a few years, by persons in the 
employ of the city, have been discontinued. 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of the Location, Size, and Number of Feet of 
Distributing Pipes laid in the Year 1855. 



In what Streets. 


Between what Streets. 


".* ■ 1 
Diam.of pipe 

in inches. 


Feet laid. 


Clinton, 

Tremont, 

Tremont, 


BOSTON PROPER. 

Slow off extended, - 
Union Park and Chelsea, - 
Chelsea and Dedham, 

Total 12 inch in Boston Proper, 

Tremont and Suffolk, 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
Bond and Tremont, - 
Washington and Suffolk, - 
East of Commercial,^ 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
West of Tremont, - 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
Washington and Harrison Avenue, 
Shawmut Av. and Washington, 

Total 6 inch in Boston proper, 

Connecting with Harrison Av. 
From River street, West, 
South of Boylston street, - 
For French's Distillery, - 
West of Tremont, - 
Other places, - 

Total 4 inch in Boston proper, 

SOUTH BOSTON AND WASHINGTON 
VILLAGE. 

South Boston - 

Mercer and North, 

In Washington Village, - 

Total 12 inch in South Boston, etc. 


12 
12 
12 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

12 
12 
12 


22 
268 

222 




512 


Camden, 

Worcester, 

Milford, 

Chapman, 

Mercantile wharf, 

Union Park, 

Springfield, 

Milford, 

Springfield, 

Camden, 

East Chester, 

Lenox, 


627 
119 
119 

76 
267 

88 
406 
136 
289 
102 
578 
128 




2,935 


Lovering Place, 

Lime, 

Boylston Place, 

South St. Place, 

Van Rensselaer Place, 


266 
225 
90 
51 
48 
35 




715 


Second, 
Dorchester, 
Boston street, 


9 
621 
909 




1,539 



APPENDIX. 



Statement continued. 



In what Streets. 



Fifth street, 

Boston street, 

North street, 

Lewis street, 

Middle, 

Dorchester Avenue, 

Howard, 

Plymouth, 

Seventh, 

E, 

Old Harbor, 

Third, 



Telegraph, 
Oak, 
Liberty, 
Wendell, 



, Marginal, 
Bremen, 
Marginal, 
Prescott, 



Cunard wharf, 



Between what Streets. 



South Boston, - - - - 

Washington Village, 

Wash'n Village, Boston & Dor'r. 

Washington Village, 

Boston and Dorchester Avenue, 

Boston and Middle, - 

Dorchester Avenue and Oak, - 

Dorchester Avenue and Liberty, 

K and L, - 

Eighth and Railroad, 

Near the Reservoir, 

South of P, 

Total 6 inch in South Boston. 

Connecting with Dorchester, - 
Howard and Boston, 
From Plymouth, ... 
From Plymouth, ... 
Other places, --••-■-•- 

Total 4 inch in South Boston, 



EAST BOSTON. 

Orleans and Cottage, 

Decatur aud Porter, 

Jeffries' and Wise's machine shop, 

Chelsea and Bremen, 

Total 6 inch in East Boston, 

South of Marginal, - 



Diam. of pipe 


Feet laid. 


in inches. 




6 


68 


6 


1036 


6 


1027 


6 


467 


. 6 


656 


6 


527 


6 


331 


6 


935 


6 


455 


6 


552 


6 


577 


6 

4 


179 


6,810 


57 


4 


187 


4 


119 


4 


144 


4 


54 


'.. 




561 


6 


34 


6 


160 


6 


170 


6 


275 


639 



120 



Recapitulation. 



Section. 


1855. 


Diameter in Inches. 


12 


6 


4 


Boston proper, 
South Boston, 
East Boston, 


f Total number of feet laid, 
\ Stopcocks in the same, 
f Total number of feet laid, 
\ Stopcocks in the same, 
f Total number of feet laid, 
\ Stopcocks in the same, 

Sums of pipes, . - - 
Sums of stopcocks, - 

One 20 inch stopcock has been put in. 


512 

1,539 

1 


2,935 
7 

6,810 

7 

639 


715 

3 

561 

' 120 


Charlestown, 


2,051 
1 


10,384 
14 


1,396 
3 



10 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of the Length of different Sizes of Pipes laid, and 
the Number of Stopcocks put in, to January 1, 1856. 







DIAMETEE ( 


)F PIPE 


IN INCHES. 










36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


Aggre'te 


Feet of pipe ") 
laid in Brook- 
line, Roxbury - 
and Boston 


19,355 


30,332 


5,773 


— 


5,714 


49,036 


207,554 


71,136 




proper. 




















No. of stop- . I 
cocks in the > 


4 


7 


10 




12 


95 


421 


181 




same, J 




















Feet of pipe ] 
laid in and 
for South 
Boston and 
Dorchester, _ 








8,155 


.... 


12,461 


58,287 


18,310 




No. of stop- \ 
cocks in same J 





.... 


.... 


4 




26 


76 


24 


- 


Feet of pipe "j 
laid in and for V 
East Boston, J 




.... 


f .. . 


15,972 


1,523 


11,364 


59,525 


2,291 




No. of stop- \ 
cocks in same J 


.... 


.... 


.... 


6 


3 


"17 


i 81 


11 




Feet of pipe "1 
laid in New- 1 
ton and Need- j 
ham, J 


.... 


1,958 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 




No. of stop- \ 
cocks in same J 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


.... 


1 


1 






Totals. 


















578,746 ft 


Length of \ 
pipe laid, J 


19,355 


32,290 


5,773 


24,127 


7,237 


72,861 


325,366 


91,737 


miles 
and 3226 
feet. 


Number of "} 
stopcocks [• 
put in, J 


4 


7 


10 


10 


15 


139 


579 


216 


980 



Including one in branch for State Prison pipe. 

Adding to the above, the length of the 'hydrant tranches and 
tends, which is ahout 19,860 feet, or 3 4-5 miles, and we have 
113 2-5 miles, nearly, as the total length of pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards, in diameter, laid down in and for the City of 
Boston. 



APPENDIX. 



11 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1855. 





Boston proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


Diameter 
in inches. 


Number. 


Length 
in feet. 


Number. 


Length 
in feet. 


Number. 


Length 
in feet. 


Number. 


Length 
in feet. 


1 

3-4 

5-8 


10 

4 

485 


670 

154 

14,510 


1 
"]L48 


22 
5,364 


1 

2 

147 


74 

187 

5,169 


12 

6 

780 


766 

341 

25,043 




Aggregate 


798 


26,150 



During the year 1855, 798 service pipes were put in, as 
shown in the ahove table, making the total number to January 
1, 1856, 18,797. 



Repairs of Pipes during the year 1855. 





Diameter of Pipe in Inches. 




Where, 


36 


3024 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


iy 2 


1 


% 


% 


oa 
© 


Boston proper, 


2 


7 




3 


1 


10 


25 


16 


7 


4G 


17 2 


129 


265 


South Boston, 








1 






1 












9 


11 


East Boston, 








2 


1 


1 












1 


8 


13 


Brookline, - 


1 


























1 


Boxbury, - 


.2 


























2 


Chelsea, - - 








2 




















2 


Totals, 


5 


7 




8 


2 


11 


2616 


7 


46 


17 


3 


146 


294 



The above table gives the number of leaks and the sizes of 
the pipes in which they have occurred during the past year. 
They were caused as follows : 7 by flaws and defects, 4 by settling 
of earth, 59 by loosening of lead in the joints, 3 by frost, 1 by 
the firemen, and 1 by a cap blowing off. Total 75, in pipes of 
4 inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that occurred in service and two-inch pipes, 98 
were caused by flaws and defects, (81 in pipes, 17 in stop- 



12 



APPENDIX. 



cocks,) 27 by stiff connections, 5 by loosening of lead in joints 
38 by settling of earth, 13 by boxes settling and cutting the 
pipes, 1 by digging a cellar, 2 by stopcocks blowing out, 2 by 
bad pipes, 1 by a stopcock broken by a tenant, 2 by pipes broken 
by tenants, 1 by rust, 6 by rats knawing. the lead pipes, 5 by 
being struck by picks, 2 by sewers, 2 were opened to take out 
frogs, and 14 were opened to take out fish. Total, 219 in service 
and two-inch pipes. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850-55. 





Leaks in Pipes 


Df a Diameter of 




Year. 


4 Inches and upwards. 


Less than 4 Inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 


72 


104 


1851 


64 


173 


237 


1852 


82 


241 


323 


1853 


85 


260 


345 


1854 


74 


280 


354 


1855 


75 


219 


294 



Hydrants. 
During the year,. 18 new hydrants were established in the 
City proper, 22 in South Boston, (including Washington Village) 
and 2 in East Boston. Altogether there have been established 
up to the present time, — 

In Boston proper, - 856 

South Boston, - 216 

East Boston, ^157 

Brookline, ------- 1 

Boxbury, -- 4 

Charlestown, - - - - - ■ - - H 

Chelsea, ------- 7 



Total, 1,252 

53 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new, or 
repaired ones. The decayed hydrant boxes have been replaced 
by others made of Burnettized lumber, and the new boxes have 
also been made of the same kind of material. 



APPENDIX. 



13 



Stopcocks. 

18 new stopcocks have been set during the past year, and 23 
boxes have been renewed. The stopcocks are mostly in good 
order. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive 
of Tools, January 1, 1856. 







Diameter in Inches 


Jamaica 


Number of 






















Aqueduct. 




36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


1* 


10 


Pipes, - 


6 


72 


9 


10 


22 65 


36 


21 




36 


5 


Blow off Branches, - 


2 


4 




















Y Branches, 




1 








2 


1 










3 -Way Branches, 


2 


4 


1 




5 


12 


8 


5 


6 


1 




4-Way Branches, 




2 






1 


6 


1 










Flange Pipes, - 


8 


9 


3 


2 
















Sleeves, ... - 


4 


4 


8 


5 


2 










10 




Clamp Sleeves, 


1 


6i 


2 




4i 


9 


18 


25^ 






3 


Caps, - 










1 


9 


8 


22 








Beducers, ... 




1 


1 






2 


6 


4 








Bevel Hubs, ... 














8 


4 








Curved Pipes, - 


2 


3 




2 




3 












Quarter Turns, 








r» 




3 


6 


2 


^6 




2 


Double Hubs, - 








5 


9 




2 






630 




Offset Pipes, ... 












3 


1 


4 








Stopcocks, ... 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 


6 


1 


4 


6 




2 


Pieces of Pipe, 


4 


1 




1 


1 


14 


14 


18 






1 



Hydrants. 

3 Kingston, - 
10 Lowell, - 

1 Wilmarth, 

2 Hoopers, - 

4 long, New York pattern, 

3 Lowell, - 
1 Wilmarth, 

3 Ballardvale, - 



in good order, 



need repairs, 



14 APPENDIX. 

For Hydrants. 11 bends, 17 lengthened 12 nipples, 30 
Hooper nipples, 12 wastes, 14 valve seats, 4 Lowell composition 
screws, 12 old valves, 22 old caps, 256 lbs. rings, straps and 
washers, 2 wharf hydrants, 8 wharf frames and covers, 24 wharf 
cocks, 10 extra wharf covers. 

For Stopcocks. 20 4-inch cast iron caps, 3 4-inch spare sides, 
2 4-inch valves and screws, 3 6-inch composition screws, 2 6-inch 
composition valves, 1 12-inch composition valve, 2 12-inch copper 
caps, 2 16-inch copper caps, 2 36-inch composition screws, 1 
30-inch composition screw, 9 2-inch cast iron nuts, 6 4-inch cast 
iron nuts, 5 6-inch cast iron nuts, 1 20-inch composition nut, 4 
sets 36-inch rollers, 9 stands and gears for 36 and 30-inch, 
366 lbs. bolts, various sizes. 

For Service Pipes. 460 square boxes, 95 long boxes, 308 
tubes and caps, 20 3-inch flanges, tubes and caps, 10 1-inch air- 
cocks, 3 2|-inch connection couplings, 6 2|-inch connection 
couplings, 17 1-inch connection couplings, 21 f-inch, 12 5-8 
inch, 21 1-inch Union cocks, 27 f-inch, 70 5-8 inch, 40 5-8, 
extra large size, 30 various sizes, 25 1-inch T cocks, 12 f-inch, 
26 5-8 inch, 2 1-inch unfinished T cocks, 9 5-8 inch unfinished, 
8 5-8 inch Y cocks, 30 5-8 inch straight cocks, 50 f-inch 
flange cocks, 194 5-8 inch flange cocks, 38 unfinished castings, 3 
couplings for 1-inch eocks, 232 lbs. old composition couplings of 
various sizes. 

Water Meters. 28 large size, (2 out of order,) 24 small size 
(2 out of order,) one small size, (Philadelphia,) 2 large size 
power meters, 18 connections, 2 1-inch valve couplings. 

Lead Pipe. 1120 lbs. of 2^-inch, 690 lbs. of l|-inch, 171 lbs. 
of 1-inch, 2,943 lbs. of f-inch, 1,777 lbs of 5-8 inch. 

Bbch Tin Pipe. 220 lbs. of 3-4 inch, 104 lbs. of 5-8 inch, 
40 lbs. of 3-8 inch. 

Pig Lead, 419 lbs. Scrap Lead, 1026 lbs. Sheet Lead, 
145 lbs. 

Bbck Tin, 4 lbs. Solder, 25 lbs. Gasket, AH lbs. 

The box containing the pipes leading from Chelsea to East 
Boston, has been repaired, a portion of it having been destroyed, 



APPENDIX. 15 

most probably by the ice of last winter. The pipes had not 
received any damage. A careful inspection was . made of all of 
them which were uncovered. The amount of external corro- 
sion was much less than had been anticipated. 

The plans, showing the pipes in the City, are undergoing 
revision for the purpose of adding to them the pipes laid in 
.1855. 

An account of the expenditures in this department, will be 
furnished, as usual, by Mr. Holbroek, the Clerk of the Water 
Board. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

JAMES SLADE, 

City Engineer. 



16 APPENDIX. 



WATEK REGISTRAR'S REPOET. 



Water Office, 
Boston, January 1st, 1856 



.} 



Thomas Wetmore, Esq., 

President of the Qochituate Water Board. 

Sir:— 

In compliance with the 16th Section of the Water Ordinance, 
the Water Registrar has now the honor to submit to the Cochit- 
uate Water Board, his Annual Report for the year 1855. 

The total number of Water Takers now entered for the year 
1856, is 19,998, being an increase since January 1st, 1855, 
of 805. 

The total number of cases where the water has been shut off 
during the past year, is 2,405. Of these 1,415 were for repairs ; 
779 were for non-payment of water rates; and 211 were for 
unnecessary waste of water. 

The total number of cases where the water has been let on 
during the year is 2,716. Of these 1,268 were cases which had 
been previously shut off for repairs ; 468 were those which had 
been shut off for non-payment of water rates ; 181 were those 
which had been shut off for unnecessary waste of water ; and 799 
were let on for the first time. Repairs have been made upon 
the service-pipes, streets, sidewalks, &c, in 257 instances. 

There have been no abatements made during the year. 

The total amount received from December 31st, 
1854, to January 1st, 1856, is - $266,302.77 

Of the above, there was received for water used 
in previous years, the sum of - $6,551.97 

Leaving the receipts for water used 
during the year 1855, the sum 6T 259,750.80 



Amount of water rates, - - $266,302.77 



APPENDIX. 17 

Amount brought forward, - - - - $266,302.77 

A detailed statement of the receipts for the year 
1855, is included in this Report. 

In addition to the above, there has been received, 
for letting on water, in cases where it had been shut 
off for non-payment of water rates, - 874.00 

There was also received, and paid to the City 
Treasurer, by the Service Clerk, previous to August 
28th, 1855, — thai being the time at which the duties 
of this officer were transferred to the Olerh of the 
Water Board — the following sums, viz: — 

For shutting off and letting on water for 
repairs, - 1,130.25 

For penalties, and for shutting off, 
and letting on water for unnecessary 
waste, - - - - - - 280.00 

For service pipe, laying, &c, - 1,797.20 

Eeceived by Service Clerk, - - 3,207.45 

Total amount received during the year, in this 
office, $270,384.22 



The total amount received during the year for 
the use of Jamaica Pond Water, is - - - $2,280.74 

TMs amount is included in the general account. 

The amount of assessments already made for 
the year 1856, is - - - -'."'_- - $217,431.63 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 
of water, during the year 1856, is 280,000.00 

The expenditures in my department during the 
year 1855, have been ----- 3,360.92 

3 



18 APPENDIX. 

The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz : — 

Paid Chas. L. Bancroft, for services as clerk, - - $782.50 

" Wm. F. Davis, " " - 652.50 

" Stephen Badlam, for services as inspector, - 626.00 

" Peter H. Niles, " " - 626.00 

" Chas. E. Dunham, " " - 190.00 

" John H. Eastburn, for printing, - - - 135.35 

" Eayrs & Fairbanks for stationery, - - - 131,72 

" Moore $5 Crosby, for printing, - 117.01 

" W. A. Pierpont, for distributing bills, - - 30.00 

" Sam'l N. Dyer, for services, - - - 20.00 

" D. W. Dimmock, for distributing bills, - - 20.00 

" J. G. M. Taylor, " " " - 14.00 

" O. H. Davenport, " " " . - 12.00 

" Stephen Maddox, for services, - - 3.84 

Amount, $3,360.92 



appendix. 19 

Statement, showing the number oe Houses, Stores, Steam 
Engines, &c, in the City oe Boston, supplied with Co- 
chituate Water, to the first of January, 1856, with the 
Amount of Water Rates paid for 1855. 

$6.00 $7,944.00 

7.00 10,437.00 

8.00 14,960.00 

9.00 16,740.00 

10.00 16,920.00 

11.00 14,564.00 

12.00 10,692.00 

13.00 8,008.00 



1324 Dwelling 


Houses, 


1491 


n 


1870 


it 


1860 


tt 


1692 


ti 


1324 


it 


891 


it 


616 


a 


439 


a 


379 


a 


349 


n 


257 


<i 


163 


it 

I 


199 " 


a 


133 


a 


118 


a 


86 


tt 


57 


it 


61 


a 


60 « 


ti 


63 


it 


40 ; " 


tt 


28 


ft 


31 


a 


38 


ti 


212 


a 


677 


a 


14,458 




1 Model House, 



14.00 


6,146.00 


15.00 


5,685.00 


16.00 


5,584.00 


17.00 


4,369.00 


18.00 


2,934,00, 


19.00 


3,781.00 


20.00 


2,660.00 


21.00 


2,478.00 


22,00 


1,892.00 


23.00 


1,311.00 


24.00 


1,464.00 


25.00 


1,500.00 


26.00 


1,638.00 


27.00 


1,080.00 


28.00 


784.00 


29,00 


899.00 


30.00 


1,140.00 


31.00 


6,572.00 




3,924.88 




$156,106.88 


13.50 


13.50 



Amounts carried forward, 13.50 156,106.88 



20 



APPENDIX. 



1 Amounts brought forward, 



1 Model House, 
1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
* 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 



$15.00 
16.00 
17.00 
20.00 
27.50 
30.00 
31.50 
36.00 
39.00 
42.00 
48.00 
54.00 
60.00 
66.00 
72.00 
75.00 

195.00 



$13.50 

15.00 

16.00 

17.00 

20.00 

55.00 

60.00 

31.50 

72.00 

&9.00 

42.00 

48.00 

54.00 

180.00 

132.00 

72.00 

150.00 

195.00 



$156,106.88 



25 






1925 Stores and Shops, 


11,550.00 


1 " 


8.00 


8.00 


19 " 


8.50 


•161.50 


526 " 


9.00 


4,734.00 


4 « 


10.00 


40.00 


17 " 


11.00 


187.00 


8 " 


11.50 


92.00 


12 " 


12.00 


144.00 


1 " ' 


13.50 


13.50 


27 " 


14.00 


378.00 


4 " ' 


15.00 


60.00 


1 " 


< 16.00 


16.00 


6 " 


16.50 


99.00 



1,212.00 



2551 Amounts carried forward, 17,483.00 157,318.88 



APPENDIX. 



21 



2551 Amounts brought forward, $17,483.00 $157,318.88 



3 Stores and Shops, 
2 "• 



3 

1 

1 

263 



19.00 
20.00 
24.00 
30.00 

61.50 



57.00 
40.00 
72.00 
30.00 
61.50 
1,119.50 



2824 






111 Offices, 


6.00 


666.00 


38 " 


9.00 


342.00 


1 " 


10.00 


10.00 


1 « 


11.00 


11.00 


1 " 


11.50 


11.50 


3 " 


14.00 


42.00 


2 " 


15.00 


30.00 


24 " 




99.00 


181 






7 Banks, 


6.00 


42.00 


8 " 


9.00 


72.00 


1 " 


11.00 


11.00 


16 ■ 




3 Buildings, 


9.00 


27.00 


2 


10.00 


20.00 


1 


11.00 


11.00 


17 


15.00 


255.00 


1 


16.00 


16.00 


1 


17.00 


17.00 


1 


17.50 


17.50 


1 


18.00 


18.00 


1 

1 


19.50 

4 


19.50 



18,863.00 



1,211.50 



125.00 



28 Amounts carried forward, 



401.00 177,518.38 



6 Buildings, 


1 


« 


1 


it 


11 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


9 


it 


2 


a 



22 APPENDIX. 

28 Amounts brought forward, $401.00 $177,518.38 

$20.00 120.00 

21.00 21.00 • 

22.50 22.50 

25.00 275.00 

27.00 27.00 

28.00 28.00 

30.00 270.00 

35.00 70.00 

40.00 160.00 

44.00 44.00 

45.00 45.00 

49.00 49.00 

50.00 100.00 

55.00 110.00 

60.00 60.00 

62.00 62.00 

112.00 112.00 

137.50 137.50 

2,1 14.00 



2 


a 


2 


it 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


tt 


1 


n 


75 


1 


35 Churches^ 


1 


a 


1 


a 


2 


it 


39 




1 Hall, 


1 


it 


1 


it 


7 


<( 


2 Private Schools, 


2 


a a 



6.00 


210.00 


8.00 


8.00 


19.00 


19.00 


20.00 


40.00 


10.00 


10.00 


14.00 


14.00 


15.00 


15.00 




71.50 


6.00 


12.00 


9.00 


18.00 



277.00 



14 Amounts carried forward, 140.50 179,909.38 



APPENDIX. 



23 



14 Amounts brought forward, 



3 Private Schools, 

2 " 

1 " " 

1 " 



$12.00 

13.00 
14.00 
16.00 

17.50 



$140.50 
36.00 
13.00 
28.00 
16.00 
17.50 



$179,909.38 



22 






1 Theatre, 


10.00 


10.00 


1 


25.00 


25.00 


1 


108.75 


108.75 


1 Gymnasium, 


15.00 


15.00 


1 


16.00 


16.00 


1 Custom House, 


150.00 


150.00 


1 Hospital, 


21.84 


21.84 


1 


163.75 


163.75 


1 Institution for Blind, 


40.00 


40.00 


1 Eye and Ear Infirmary, 


40.00 


40.00 


1 Medical College, 


30.00 


30.00 


1 Post Office, 


25.00 


25.00 


1 State House, 


50.00 


50.00 


1 Library, 


9.00 


9.00 


1 Asylum, 


14.00 


14.00 


1 " 


15.00 


15.00 


2 " 


25.00 


50.00 


1 " 


35.00 


35.00 


1 " 


95,57 


95.57 


20 




1 Market Stall, 


5.00 


5.00 


45 " " 


6.00 


270.00 


5 " " 


9.00 


45.00 


5 " " 


11.00 


55.00 



251.00 



913.91 



56 Amounts carried forward, 



375.00 181,074.29 



24 APPENDIX. 

56 Amounts brought forward, $375.00 $181,074.29 
2 Markets, $25.00 50.00 

1 " 65.00 65.00 



59 490.00 



79 Cellars, 

9 " 

1 " 
10 " 



2 Hotels, 



6.00 


474.00 


9.00 


81.00 


12.00 


12.00 




35.50 


35.00 


70.00 


41.00 


41.00 


42.00 


126.00 


46.35 


46.35 


54.00 


54.00 


56.00 


56.00 


57.48 


57.48 


60.00 


180.00 


62.50 


62.50 


63.00 


63.00 


66.60 


66.60 


67.05 


67.05 


69.00 


69.00 


72.00 


72,00 


84.00 


84.00 


90.00 


180.00 


93.00 


93.00 


94.90 


94.90 


105.00 


105.00 


114.00 


114.00 


115.44 


115.44 


115.60 


115.60 



602.50 



28 Amounts carried forward, 1,932.92 182,166.79 



28 Amounts brought forward, #1,932.92 $182,166.79 

2 Hotels, 



APPENDIX. 




rward, 


$1,932.92 


120.00 


240.00 


125.00 


125.00 


133.80 


133.80 


134.30 


134.30 


137.60 


137.60 


140.00 


140,00 


156.00 


156.00 


172.00 


172.00 


210.00 


210.00 


261.00 


261.00 


284.00 


284.00 


330.00 


330.00 


354.00 


354.00 


385.00 


385.00 


465.00 


465.00 


535.00 


535.00 


672.00 


672.00 


790.00 


790.00 



25 



47 7,457.62 

1 Boarding House, 12.00 12.00 

1 " " 13.92 13.92 

1 " " 14.00 14.00 

2. " " 15.00 30.00 

3 " " 16.00 48.00 
1 " " 18.00 18.00 

4 " " 20.00 80.00 
3 " " 21.00 63.00 
1 " " 22.00 22.00 
1 " " 25.00 25.00 
1 " " 26.00 26.00 
3 " " 27.00 81.00 



22 Amounts carried forward* 432.92 189,624.41 

4 



26 



APPENDIX. 



22 Amounts brought forivard, 



$432.92 

1 Boarding House, 29.00 29.00 

2 « « 30.00 60.00 
1 «, * 35.00 35.00 
1 « « 36.00 36.00 
1 « * 39.00 39.00 
1 « « 45.00 45.00 
1 « « 54.17 54.17 



$189,624.41 



30 










19 Eestaurants & Saloons, 


6.00 


114,00 


1 


(< 


« 


7.00 


7.00 


141 


a 


« 


9.00 


1269.00 


3 


« 


<< 


10.00 


30.00 


15 


a 


u 


11.00 


165.00 


14 


It 


ci 


12.00 


168.00 


6 


« 


c< 


13.00 


78.00 


3 


H 


(« 


14.00 


42.00 


13 


<« 


(« 


15.00 


195.00 


6 


(« 


(« 


16.00 


96.00 


1 


(( 


«« 


17.00 


17.00 


7 


« 


a 


18.00 


126.00 


1 


« 


«« 


19.00 


19.00 


2 


(« 


«< 


25.00 


50.00 


1 


(« 


u 


26.00 


26.00 


1 


(« 


<( 


27.50 


27.50 


1 


(( 


it 


28.00 


28.00 


2 


a 


« 


35.00 


70.00 


1 


«« 


<( 


40.00 


40.00 


25 


<« 


(< 




139.42 



263 



1 CM) House, 13.00 

1 Amounts carried forward, 



13.00 



731.09 



2,706.92 



13.00 193,062.42 



APPENDIX. 



27 



1 Amounts brought forward, 
3 Club Houses, $15.00 

1 " " 50.00 



5 








1 


Bathing Houses, 


12.00 


12.00 


1 


<< tt 


15.00 


15.00 


1 


<< (i 


25.00 


25.00 


1 


<< «< 


40.00 


40.00 


2 


<« a 


50.00 


100.00 


1 


<< <« 


55.00 


55.00 


1 


« << 


135.00 


135.00 


8 




208 Stables, 


5.00 


1,040.00 


21 


(< 


6.00 


126.00 


30 


<« 


6.25 


187.50 


1 


(« 


6.50 


6.50 


1 


H 


6.56 


6.56 


28 


« 


7.50 


210.00 


12 


<( 


8.00 


96.00 


1 


«« 


8.33 


8.33 


20 


<( 


8.75 


175.00 


3 


(« 


9.00 


27.00 


1 


u 


9.33 


9.33 


28 


«« 


10.00 


280.00 


1 


« 


11.00 


11.00 


8 


« 


11.25 


90.00 


1 


11 


11.98 


11.98 


2 


<( 


12.00 


24.00 


16 


rt 


12.50 


200.00 


1 


«« 


12.67 


12.67 


1 


<« 


13.25 


13.25 



$13.00 $193,062.42 

45.00 
50.00 

108.00 



382.00 



384 Amounts carried forward, 2,535.12 193,552.42 



28 



384 Amounts brought forward 
4 Stables, 

1 " 

1 " 

11 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

4 " 

1 " 

3 " 

1 " . 

3 " 



455 Amounts carried forward. 



APPENDIX. 




'orward, 


$2,535.12 $193,552.42 


$13.75 


55.00 


14.00 


14.00 


14.17 


14.17 


15.00 


165.00 


16.00 


16.00 


16.25 


16.25 


17.25 


17.25 


17.50 


70.00 


18.00 


18.00 


18.75 


56.25 


19.50 


19.50 


20.00 


60.00 


20.83 


20.83 


20.84 


20.84 


21.25 


42.50 


22.00 


22.00 


22,25 


22.25 


22.50 


22.50 


23.75 


23.75 


24.00 


48.00 


24.75 


24.75 


25.00 


50.00 


26.00 


26.00 


27.50 


27.50 


28.00 


112.00 


30.00 


180.00 


30.54 


30.54 


31.25 


156.25 


32.00 


64.00 


32.50 


65.00 


34.00 


34.00 


35.00 


105.00 


'orward, 


4,154.25 193,552.42 





APPENDIX. 


2d 


:55 Amounts brought forward, 


$4,154.25 $193,552.42 


5 Stables, 36.00 


180.00 


1 


37.50 


37.50 


6 


40.00 


240.00 


1 


40.67 


40.67 


2 


42.00 


84.00 


1 


43.17 


43,17 


1 


43.75 


43.75 


1 


47.50 


47.50 


1 


48.00 


48.00 


2 


50.00 


100.00 


1 


« 53.00 


53.00 


1 


56.00 


56.00 


5 


60.00 


300.00 


5 


70.00 


350.00 


1 


72.00 


72.00 


3 


75.00 


225.00 


2 


90.00 


180.00 


4 ' 


100.00 


400.00 


1 


106.50 


106.50 


1 


110.00 


110.00 


1 


120.00 


120.00 


1 


130,00 


130.00 


1 


' 150.00 


150.00 


1 


' 160.00 


160.00 


47 




147.41 



551 



7,578.75 



1 Shop and Engine, 


8.00 


8.00 




1 « << 


11.65 


11.65 




5 " « 


12.00 


60.00 




1 « u 


14.00 


14.00 




2 " « 


15.00 


30.00 





10 Amounts carried forward, 



123.65_ 201,131.17 



30 



10 Amounts brought forward, 



1 ' 

1 

1 

1 .' 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 ' 

1 ' 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 ' 

1, 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



APPENDIX. 




orward, 


$123.65 $201,131.17 


16.20 • 


16.20 


18.00 


18.00 


19.68 


19.68 


20.08 


20.08 


20.40 


20.40 


21.03 


21.03 


21.55 


21.55 


22.68 


22.68 


23.18 


23.18 


25.00 


25.00 


27.70 


27.70 


28.20 


28.20 


29.40 


29.40 


29.58 


29.58 


29.70 


29.70 


30.00 


90.00 


30.60 


30.60 


31.18 


31.18 


31.50 


31.50 


31.92 


31.92 


32.86 


32.86 


• 38.40 


38.40 


38.82 


38.82 


42.36 


42.36 


44.16 


44.16 


45.54 


45.54 


46.00 


46.00 


46.62 


46.62 


47.40 


47.40 


48.50 


48.50 


48.75 . 


48.75 


50.52 


50.52 



44 Amounts carried forward, 1,221.16 201,131.17 



44 . Amounts brought forward, 



1 


tt 


1 


tt 


1 


it 


1 


(( 


1 


it 


1 


ti 


1 


tt 


1 


tt 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


.< 


1 


« 


1 


<< 


1 


<( 


1 


« 


1 


« 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


<i 


1 


u 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


tt 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


<( 


1 


tt 


1 


(( 



APPENDIX. 




31 


vrward, 


$1,221.16 


$201,131.17 


52.32 


52.32 




52.86 


52.86 




54.00 


54.00 




54.60 


54.60 




54.96 


54.96 




55.80 


55.80 




57.54 


57.54 




58.92 


58.92 




61.80 


61.80 




63.16 


63.16 




64.08 


64.08 




64.67 


64.67 




65.70 


65.70 




67.33 


67.33 




74.04 


74.04 




79.14 


79.14 




79.92 


79.92 




80.00 


80.00 




80.40 


80.40 


- 


81.00 


81.00 




84.84 


84.84 




91.50 


91.50 




94.04 


94.04 




97.38 


97.38 




102.00 


102.00 




103.98 


103.98 




105.90 


105.90 




107.00 


107.00 




107.04 


107.04 




110.28 


110.28 




112.56 


112.56 




119.70 


119.70 





76 Amounts carried forward, 3,759.62 201,131.17 



32 



76 Amounts brought forward, 

1 Shop and Engine, 

i « a 

J it « 

1 " " 

1 " » 

1 " 

<< c« 

^ (( « 

1 «< <( 

1 u <i 

1 << « 

1 <( << 

1 (i a 



89 



1 Foundry and Engine, 

i «< « 

i << < 

<< < 

<( (i 

1 " « 

1 " «' 

i << «i 

1 " " 



10 



1 Printing Office & Engine, 4.17 

i << <( 
i «< << 
i <« « 



APPENDIX. 




>rward, 


#3,759.62 #201,131.17 


131.64 


131.64 


138.37 


138.37 


159.80 


159.80 


169.50 


169.50 


171.32 


171.32 


174.66 


174.66 


175.22 


175.22 


232.78 


232.78 


274.02 


274.02 


274.92 


274.92 


345.60 


345.60 


392.76 


392.76 


1904.82 


1904.82 




8,305.03 


!, 11.00 


11.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.54 


12.54 


13.12 


13.12 


15.00 


15.00 


28.26 


28.26 


30.32 


30.32 


64.12 


64.12 


111.14 


111.14 


115.44 


115.44 




412.94 


ine, 4.17 


4.17 


18.28 


18.28 


20.00 


20.00 


21.00 


21.00 


23.62 


23.62 



5 Amounts carried forward, 87.07 209,849.14 



APPENDIX. 



33 



5 Amounts brought forward, 
1 Printing Office and 

Engine, 23.74 
24.96 



1 
1 
1 
1 
.1 
1 
1 



13 



1 Ship Yard & Engine, 
i « it << 



1 Factory & Engine, 

tt tt 

^ tt It 

(t a 

tt it 



1 Factory, 

1 

1 " i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

4 

1 



29.74 
32.78 
41.14 
45.62 
99.26 
112.50 







76.62 


76.62 


175.86 


175.86 


14.28 


14.28 


32.00 


32.00 


107.29 


107.29 


511.22 


511.22 


582.36 


582.36 


2.25 


2.25 


6.00 


6.00 


8.00 


« 8.00 


8.33 


8.33 


10.00 


10.00 


10.32 


10.32 


11.00 


11.00 


11.25 


11.25 


12.00 


24.00 


15.00 


60.00 


16.00 


16.00 



$87.07 $209,849.14 

23.74 
24.96 
29.74 
32.78 
41.14 
45.62 
99.26 
112.50 

• 496.81 



252.48 



1,247.15 



15 Amounts carried forward, 
5 



167.15 211,845.58 



4 




APPENDIX. 


• 


15 


Amounts brought forward, 


$167.15 $211,845.58 


1 Factory, 


20.00 


20.00 


1 


u 


21.15 


21.15 


1 


it 


22.50 


22.50 


1 


<< 


27.90 


27.90 


1 


« 


29.00 


29.00 


1 


tt 


30.00 


30.00 


1 


it 


30.54 


30.54 


1 


It 


40.00 


40.00 


1 


It 


44.13 


44.13 


1 


a 


45.00 


45.00 


2 


it 


46.44 


92.88 


1 


a 


47.36 


47.36 


1 


It 


48.00 


48.00 


1 


it 


50.00 


50.00 


1 


tt 


66.45 


66.45 


1 


ft 


72.00 


72.00 


1 


ft 


80.20 


80.20 


1 


t( 


86.28 


86.28 


1 


tt 


88.52 


88.52 


1 


tt 


102.66 


102.66 


1 


ft 


108.56 


108.56 


1 


ft 


111.78 


111.78 


1 


tt~ 


120.00 


120.00 


1 


tt 


125.30 


125.30 


1 


tt 


192.00 


192.00 


1 


tt 


173.28 


173.28 


1 


ti 


360.64 


360.64 


1 


a 


382.92 


382.92 


1 


a 


680.85 


680.85 


45 


3,467.05 


1 


Sugar Kefinery, 


3,123.60 


3,123.60 



1 Amounts carried forward, 3,123.60 215,312.63 



APPENDIX. 



35 



1 Amounts brought forward, $3,123.60 $215,312.63 



1 Sugar Kefinery, 
1 Soiling Mill, 

it M 

1 Grist Mill, 
1 " « 

1 MiU, 
1 " 

1 " 
1 Forge, 

10 



1 


Engine, 


2 


« 


1 


<< 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


ll 


1 


it 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


tt 


1 


a 


1 


a 


13 




1 


Printing Office, 


1 


ti a 


19 


a a 


16 


it a 


3 


u a 


1 


u tt 


1 


tt a 



$2,588.67 
717.03 
695.76 
370.72 
108.56 
181.22 
135.90 
131.00 
358.88 



2,588.67 
717.03 
695 ? 76 
370.72 
108.56 
181.22 
135.90 
131.00 
358.88 



7.56 


7.56 


15.00 


30.00 


15.48 


15.48 


17.34 


17.34 


18.00 


18.00 


21.80 


21.80 


48.45 


48.45 


70.56 


70.56 


79.62 


79.62 


89.22 


89.22 


89.66 


89.66 


91.68 


91.68 


4.50 


4.50 


5.50 


5.50 


6.00 


114.00 


9.00 


144.00 


13.00 


39.00 


13.92 


13.92 


14.00 


14.00 



8,411.34 



579.37 



42 Amounts carried forward, 



334,92 224,303.34 



36 



APPENDIX. 



42 Amounts brought forward, 

4 Printing Offices, $17.00 

23.00 

28.00 



1 


ii ii 


1 


ii ii 


48 




1 
1 


Distillery, 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 

2 


Brewery, 

a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


a 


19 




2 Bacon Works, 


1 


a a 


3 




4 Bleacheries, 


1 


a 


1 


Laundry, 



59.00 


59.00 


60.00 


60.00 


90.00 


90.00 


146.67 


146.67 


169.74 


169.74 


220.92 


220.92 


676,94 


676.94 


600.00 


600.00 


619.92 


619.92 


663.12 


663.12 


945.45 


945.45 


11.00 


11.00 


15.00 


30.00 


18.00 


18.00 


25.00 


25.00 


45.00 


45.00 


45.15 


45.15 


614.28 


614.28 


15.00 


30.00 


25.00 


25.00 


9.00 


36.00 


11.00 


11.00 


30.00 


30.00 



334.92 $224,303.34 

68.00 
23.00 
28.00 

453.92 



5,040.19 



55.00 



6 Amounts carried forward, 



77.00 229,852.45 



APPENDIX, 



37 



6 Amounts brought forward, 
1 Laundry, $74.04 

1 Pottery, 30.00 

1 Dye House, 30.15 



9 






2 Bakeries, 


5.00 


10.00 


43 


6.00 


258.00 


7 


9.00 


63.00 


1 


' 16.00 


16.00 


1 


21.00 


21.00 


1 


41.60 


41.60 


1 


55.14 


55.14 


4 




20.00 


60 




1 Ship Yard, 


6.25 


6.25 


a << 


'8.75 


8.75 


^ tt a 


12.50 


12.50 


ti M 


15.00 


15.00 


1 M <( 


20.00 


20.00 


2 Dry Docks, 


15.00 


30.00 


7 




725 Hose, 


3.00 


2175.00 


3 " 


10.00 


30.00 


728 




11 Fountains, 


3.00 


33.00 


4 


5.00 


20.00 


12 


6.00 


72.00 


1 


8.00 


8.00 


1 


8.50 


8.50 



$77.00 $229,852.45 
74.04 
30.00 , 
30.15 

211.19 



484.74 



92.50 



2,205.00 



29 Amounts carried forward, 



141.50 232,845.88 



38 



APPENDIX. 



29 Amounts brought forward, 
3 Fountains, $9.00 

1 " 12.15 

2 " 13.00 
1 " 15.00 
1 " 16.52 



37 



2 Packing Houses, 

1 



. IE 


ailroa 


d Co., 


1 


U 




1 


it 




1 


(I 




1 


(« 




1 


« 




1 


<< 











7 







9.00 
25.00 
30.00 



2,098.56 
1,277.70 
1,127.64 
950.34 
812.10 
725.66 
531.40 



1 Chelsea Ferry Co., 1,155.20 
1 E. Boston Ferry Co., 725.12 . 
1 People's Ferry Co., 727.96 



1 Cunard Steamship Co., 700.00 
1 Steamboat, 629.09 

1 " 416.74 

1 " 180.00 

2 " 168.70 
1 " 130.52 



$141.50 
27.00 
12.15 
26.00 
15.00 
16.52 



18.00 
25.00 
30.00 



2,098.56 
1.277.70 
1,127.64 
,950.34 
812.10 
725.66 
531.40 



$232,845.88 



1,155.20 
725.12 
727.96 



700.00 
629.09 
416.74 
180.00 
337.40 
130.52 



238.17 



73.00 



7,523.40 



2,608.28 



7 Amounts carried forward. 



2,393.75 243,288.73 



APPENDIX. 39 

7 Amounts brought forward, $2,393.75 $243,288.73 

1 Steamboat, $128.10* 128.10 

1 " 126.16 126.16 

1 " 121.11 121.11 

1 " 120.93 120.93 

1 " 120.67 120.67 

1 " 118.66 118.66 

1 " 117.04 117.04 

1 " 115.89 115.89 

1 " 113.97 113.97 

1 " 113.49 113.49 

1 " 101.25 101.25 

1 " 99.82 99.82 

1 " 95.00 95.00 

1 " 93.50 93.50 

1 " 87.15 87.15 

1 " 83.30 83.30 

1 " 56.25 56.25 

1 " 54.60 54.60 

1 ' " 41.80 41.80 

1 " 23.75 23.75 

1 " 21.90 21.90 

1 " 12.00 12.00 

1 " • 7.92 7.92 . ' 

1 " 2.00 2.00 



4,370.01 



31 






1 Latin School, 


16.00 


16.00 


1 English High School, 


16.00 


16.00 


1 Normal School, 


16.00 


16.00 


19 Grammar Schools, 


16.00 


304.00 


190 Primary Schools, 


6.00 


1,140.00 


3 " « 


11.00 


33.00 



215 Amounts carried forward, 1,525.00 247,658.74 



40 APPENDIX. 






• 

215 Amounts brought forward, 


$1,525.00 


$247,658.74 


13 Engine Houses, 


$16.00 


208.00 




5 Hose Carriage House, 


16.00 


80.00 




3 Hook & Ladder Houses 


i, 16.00 


48.00 




2 Police Station Houses, 


16.00 


32.00 




K u it a 


11.00 


55.00 




1 City Stable, (Harrison 








Avenue.) 


77.50 


77.50 




1 City Stable, (Commer- 








cial street,) 


27.50 


27.50 




1 Fire Alarm Moter, 


15.00 


15.00 




K (t it iC 


6.00 


30.00 




1 Court House, 


95.00 


95.00 




1 City Hall, 


50.00 


50.00 




1 Faneuil Hall, 


40.00 


40.00 




1 City Building, 


37.50 


37.50 




1 Probate Office, 


10.00 


10.00 




1 Office at City Scales, 


9.00 


9.00 




1 Dead House, 


9.00 


9.00 




1 Public Library, 


6.00 


6.00 


• 


1 House of Correction, 


462.00 


462.00 




1 Lunatic Hospital, 


225.00 


225.00 




1 Jail for Suffolk Co., 


225.00 


225.00 




1 House of Eeformation, 


50.00 


50.00 




1 Faneuil Hall Market 








(for Urinals, &c.) 


70.00 


70.00 




1 Street Sprinkling, 


400.00 


400.00 




1 Offal Station, 


150.00 


150.00 




1 Common Sewer (for 








making Mortar, &c.,) 75.00 


75.00 





267 4,011.50 

1 Proprietors Boston 

Traveller, 800.00 800.00 



1 Amounts carried forward, 800.00 251,670.24 



APPENDIX. 41 



1 Amounts brought forward, 


$S00.00 


#251,670.24 


1 Massachusetts State 






Prison, 392.49 


392.49 




1 Mill Dam Co., . 300.00 


300.00 




1 Boston Gas Light Co., 374.62 


374.62 




1 South Boston Gas Co., 150.90 


150.90 




1 East Boston Gas Co., 100.00 


100.00 




1 Brookline Gas Co., 30.00 


30.00 




7 




2,148.01 



Contrators for Supply- 
ing Shipping, 4,223.78 4,223.78 
Street Waterers, 973.72 973.72 
Building purposes, 735.05 735.05 



$5,932.55 
Amount of Water Rates, #259,750.80 

Respectfully Submitted, 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 
Boston, January 1st, 1856. 



SHELF No. 



BOSTON PUBLXO LXBBARY. 


Central Department, Boylston Street. 

One volume allowed at a time, and obtained only by 
card; to be kept 14 days without fine; to be renewed only 
before incurring the tine; to be reclaimed by messenger 
after 21 days, who will, collect 20 cents, beside line of 2 cents 
a day, including Sundays and holidays; not to be lent out 
of the borrower's household, and not to be kept by transfers 
more than one month; to be returned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced, are-expected to report it; aud also any undue de- 
lay in the delivery of books. 

*t*No claim can be established because of the failure of 
any notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 


Tie record Mow must not be made or altered by borrower. 


M9 








1 / 
















i 






























i