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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 12. 



REPORT f&&7!* 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 



TO THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1856. 




BOSTON: 
GEO. C. RAND & AVERY, CITY PRINTERS, 

No. 3, CORNHILL. 

1857. 



REPORT. 



Office of Cochituate Water Board, 

January 15, 1857. 

Agreeably to the provisions of the City Ordinance, 
the Cochituate Water Board beg leave to make their 
Annual Report to the City Council ; together with the 
Reports of the City Engineer, the Water Registrar, and 
the Clerk of this Board. To these very full and de- 
tailed Reports, the Board would refer for much informa- 
tion in relation to the state of the works and of the 
water, and of operations and doings in regard to the 
same, during the last year. 

The Board are happy in being able to state that all 
the works are in a satisfactory condition. 

Ever since the Water Board was originally organized, 
there has been entertained a desire to dispose of all the 
property owned by the City and connected with the 
Water Works, but not needed for the purposes of use 
or security in regard to them. A large amount of land 
lying near the Lake and its outlet, and also distributed 
along the line of the conduit, having served all the pur- 
poses for which their several portions were purchased, 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

has been generally unproductive, while the taxes upon 
them and their fencing have been, of course, a burden 
without any equivalent. And so of the mill privileges 
owned by the city below the outlet ; they have produced 
little, if any thing, to the city, above the taxes and 
repairs. 

Former Boards having failed to carry their often ex- 
pressed intentions into effect, the present Board took the 
matter seriously in hand. They had surveys made of 
the different parcels that could be disposed of without 
detriment to the works, (always reserving ample means 
and rights for the use of the City); and during the 
season, at private sale, and at two different public sales, 
they disposed of lots embracing 145 acres, at prices va- 
rying from $19 to $550 per acre — making a total 
amount of $13,632.12.. The result of this .effort was 
highly satisfactory to the Board. There still remains 
a considerable amount unsold, embracing the upper 
mill privilege, which should and probably will engage 
the early attention of the next Board. 

Among the parcels sold were those heretofore used 
for tlowage, and constituting what was called the lower 
privilege. The dam, by which this privilege was formed, 
was the causeway constituting a public road or highway. 
At very high water, breaches had been made over this 
highway, by the current, and accidents more or less 
serious had occurred — one at least which, on trial, re- 
sulted in a judgment against the Town of Framingham, 
of about $400. This amount the said town called upOn 
the City of Boston to pay, but the Board declined to 
pay it. At quite high water, the water in the lower 
privilege backed upon the wheels at the upper privilege, 



1857.] WATER. 5 

and thus diminished its value. Considering, therefore, 
the possibility of disputes in future with the town of 
Frarningham, as to who should keep the causeway in 
repair ; and considering the fact that the factory at this 
privilege was burnt, and the upjoer privilege would be 
enhanced in value by its use being discontinued, the 
Board deemed it expedient to abolish this lower privi- 
lege, and sell the land for farming purposes, on the con- 
dition that no mills should ever be constructed on the 
stream passing through or by it. It is believed that 
the City realized more money for it on this condi- 
tion, than could have been obtained for it as a mill 
privilege. Ample rights of flowage over these lands 
have been secured to the city, whether the same shall 
occur from accident or by design. 

In addition to land sold in the neighborhood of the 
Lake or works, there has been sold wood to the amount 
of near $500, mostly growing on the five rods belong- 
ing to the City, bordering upon the water. 

Besides these parcels of land near the Lake and line 
of aqueduct, the Board have disposed of Boon Pond 
and Ram's Horn Meadoiv, in the town of Stow. These 
were purchased with the view of forming a compensat- 
ing reservoir, auxiliary to the Marlborough reservoir. 
But nothing has ever been done with them. They 
embraced about 130 acres, nearly or quite half covered 
with water. The City's property consisted mainly in 
rights of flowage ; there being besides these only a nar- 
row margin of woodland that could be regarded as of 
much value. It was deemed best, therefore, to dispose 
of the whole to Mr. Arnory Maynard, (who owns a fac- 
tory below,) for the sum of $1,674. Mr. Maynard can 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

add value to his mill privilege by exercising these 
rights of flowing, but the City could derive no benefit 
from them whatever. 

Jamaica Pond, and the water works connected there- 
with, were purchased of the Boston Aqueduct Com- 
pany, in 1851. The reasons for this purchase were : 
1st, To be rid of rival water works. 2nd, To quiet 
claims already incurred by injury to their pipes, in lay- 
ing down our pipes ; and 3rd, To annul the privilege 
which that corporation possessed, of breaking up and 
injuring the streets, whenever and wherever they saw 
fit. The Board feel no hesitancy in expressing the be- 
lief that on all these accounts the purchase, at the price 
of $45,000, was a very favorable one to the city; and 
that a much larger benefit than the interest of that sum 
has annually accrued to the city from the purchase. 

The object of the original charter of that corpora- 
tion was to supply the City of Boston ivith ivater. It was 
somewhat loosely drawn ; and it was not clear what 
rights or privileges of supplying other places were em- 
braced in it, It gave no authority to break up pave- 
ments and injure highways, for the purposes of supply, 
except in Boston. Of late years there has been grow- 
ing up in the Roxbury part of the Tremont road a 
somewhat dense population, which has applied for the 
use of the water ; and the City of Boston has supplied 
it, without, however, attempting to exercise any right 
of opening streets, or laying service pipes, except along 
the line of the main pipe. This service, however, yield- 
ed a gradually increasing income, which in the last year 
amounted to $2,624.64, — being near the interest of 
the cost of the purchase. 



1857.] WATER. 7 

Although at the outset it was deemed probable that 
an income might be derived from the use of these 
works equal to or exceeding the interest on the cost of 
their purchase, yet it has been the constant desire of all 
the successive Water Boards to sell them, when a favor- 
able opportunity should occur. It was always felt that 
these works were a kind of excrescence upon the city 
system, being disconnected entirely with it. The con- 
dition of the works, their state of repair and prospective 
durability have not been very well understood ; while 
there has been reason to suppose that in certain places, 
at least, the pipes had become quite tender. 

Besides these reasons for effecting a sale, it was felt 
that there might some odium attach, or at least some 
ill feeling arise, from the circumstance of one city sup- 
plying the inhabitants of another with water, and taxing 
them therefor at its own discretion, without their having 
a voice or remedy in the matter. There can be no reason 
to suppose that the Legislature would grant the city 
such privileges, on an original application ; and, there- 
fore, it was deemed to be good policy to exercise them 
as short a time as practicable, while in possession for 
other purposes. 

The Board, therefore, voted to advertise for proposals 
to purchase these works ; and as a consequence, proposals 
were made, which resulted in a sale to George H. 
Williams, Esq., of Boxbury, for the sum of $32,000 — 
$5,000 cash, (which has been paid ;) the balance in nine 
annual payments of $3,000 each, interest annually, 
secured by mortgage of the works. Of course, the sale 
is conditioned that no water shall be supplied in the 
city of Boston from these works. 



8 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 12. [Jan. 

It is proper to add, that under a certain contingency 
of failing to obtain a legislative act, at the present ses- 
sion, which shall confirm certain doings under the 
charter and privileges conveyed by it, the purchaser 
may, in May next, annul the bargain. But, as even 
without that confirmation, the purchase is now, and 
prospectively will continue to be, a profitable invest- 
ment, there can be no reason to suppose that the pur- 
chaser will wish to exercise this right. 

Besides these sales, the Board have during this year 
leased the Hopkinton Reservoir, for a term of ten years, 
at a rental of $1,250 per annum. There are two old fac- 
tories attached to the privilege; but they are regarded by 
neither party as of any value, — the water being intend- 
ed for use as a reservoir, to be drawn off in dry times, 
for the benefit of mill owners below, who become joint 
lessees of the same. Should the Board have opportu- 
nity and inclination to sell, it has the power to annul 
the lease at any time, by relinquishing a year's rent. 
Though the amount received in the way of rent is small, 
considering the cost of this reservoir, it is to be regard- 
ed as all gain ; for the city has hitherto derived no 
benefit whatever from it. 

In regard to leasing the Marlborough Reservoir for 
like purposes, a negotiation is now going on. But what 
success may attend it cannot now be foretold. All the 
property owned by the city in Marlborough and its 
vicinity, is now but a bill of expense ; and should the 
efforts of the Board fail to lease the reservoir for some 
reasonable amount, the question whether it will not 
be good policy to sell off the whole at the most it 
will bring, will present itself under circumstances 
highly favoring an affirmative answer. 



1857.] WATER. 9 

The unnecessary ivaste of ivater is a topic which has 
been pressed upon public notice by this Board, every 
year since its organization, with what effect will shortly 
be seen. To those who are accustomed to regard the 
people of Boston as an orderly and brotherly community, 
it cannot but seem strange that a habit prevails, which 
not only involves an enormous and useless waste of water, 
but also involves the deprivation of this necessary of life 
to quite a large number of citizens, who have (in this 
respect, at least) the misfortune to dwell in costly houses, 
in the elevated portions of the City. This Board has 
done its duty, and spared no effort to check this evil. 
It is extremely desirable that a wholesome public sen- 
timent should be created on this subject, that would 
make water-takers ashamed of these wasteful practices. 
The consciousness of unnecessarily wasting water would 
then suffuse the cheek with a blush scarcely less deep 
than accusation of misdemeanor or crime. But, in spite 
of all that has been done, and all that has been said, 
the evil seems to increase. For it will be seen, by refer- 
ence to the Engineer's Report, that the average daily 
consumption in 1856, has been 12,048,600 gallons, while 
in 1855, it was 10,346,300, — i. e., an increase in con- 
sumption of nearly 20 per cent. The number of water- 
takers is now 20,806, and, at end of 1855, it was 19,998, 
— i. e., an increase of little more than 4 per cent. 
Thus, in 1855, (taking the number of inhabitants at 
163,000,) the daily average consumption for each in- 
dividual was near 63 £ gallons; while, in 1856, (taking 
the population at 168,000,) the daily average consump- 
tion for each individual has been nearly 72 gallons. 
Now all this increase can be nothing hut sheer waste ; (for 
2 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

among the new water-takers there are few great con- 
sumers) ; and, of course, the waste of 1856 was equal to 
8£ gallons (or 12 £ per cent.) per day, for each individual, 
more than it was in 1855. 

In this respect let 1855 be compared with 1854. In 
1855 the daily average consumption was, as before 
stated, 63 1-2 gallons for each individual. In 1854 the 
daily average consumption was 9,902,000 ; equal (cal- 
ling the number of inhabitants 158,000,) to near 63 
gallons to each individual. So that in that year the 
increase of Consumption was but a trifle more than 
what was indicated by the increase of population. 

The subject might be further illustrated by compar- 
ing other years embraced in the table. No doubt dif- 
ferent ratios of waste would be found to characterize 
the consumption of different years. But it is to be 
feared that in no year will the waste be found to bear 
a less ratio to the consumption, than in the year pre- 
ceding it ; while, as has been seen, it has increased dur- 
ing the last year 12 1-2 per cent. 

The greatly increased consumption of the past season 
has put it out of the power of the Board to allow any 
considerable playing of the fountains, except occasion- 
ally on public days, — thus depriving the citizens of one of 
their most valued pleasures. The continued draft upon 
the pipes and consequent tendency to reduction of the 
water in the reservoirs, has rendered the utmost watch- 
fulness and care necessary, on the part of the Sujoerin- 
tendent, to turn on and off the water at various points, 
so as to keep the water in all the reservoirs at a height 
suitable for the convenient supply of the neighborhood 



1857.] WATER. 11 

and also for an indispensable resource in case of fire * 
After effecting these objects properly, there has been 
little surplus that could be let on to the public foun- 
tains. 

A good deal of the waste undoubtedly results from 
the improper and imperfect manner in which the dis- 
tributing pipes are put into and carried through the 
houses. And it has occurred to the Board to suggest 
to the City Government, if it has the poiver, the propriety 
and utility of exercising more control than it has hith- 
erto done over the inserting and arranging the water 
fixtures within and upon the premises of the water- 
takers. The pipe should enter the house at a place 
secure from frost, and should be continued in the most 
secure places the premises afford ; and if the premises 
do not offer places reasonably secure, they should be 
made so by artificial means. No pipe should be carried 
in a horizontal direction, but at an angle of less or 
greater elevation, so that, by means of a cock in the 
cellar, all the upper pipes could be emptied as a pre- 
caution against frost. Again, it is believed that persons 
are often more nice than wise in putting their pipes 
behind the plastering and next to a thin, exposed wall, 
where the risk of freezing is very great. If they would 
carry their pipes within the plastering, through rear 
halls and kitchens, where they would partake of the 



* The importanee of keeping a supply in the reservoirs, in case of fire, it is feared, 
is not generally fully appreciated. At the recent fire in East Boston, (which has oc- 
curred since the date of this Keport,) more than 10,000 barrels of water were drawn 
from the reservoir, over and above what was drawn from the pipes constantly con- 
veying water outside the reservoir. Had the reservoir been empty, it would seem 
as if the damage must have been greatly increased. 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. —No. 12. [Jan. 

general warmth of the house, the liability to frost 
would be greatly diminished if not entirely obviated ; 
while paint or whitewash might be made to disguise 
them so that they would attract little or no notice. If 
arranged in this manner they would be always acces- 
sible when repairing should be necessary. 

But, to attain these objects, some person of judgment 
and skill should be consulted at the outset, and have 
power to direct and distribute the water fixtures in the 
best possible manner. Would it not, then, be well to 
consider the right and power of the City in the matter, 
and, if practicable, by ordinance or otherwise, to re- 
quire that in all new buildings, or insertion into old 
ones, the arrangement of the pipes should be superin- 
tended or directed by some person or persons ap- 
pointed or licensed by the City government. It is 
believed that we have among us many plumbers and 
other mechanics, who, if clothed with power to exercise 
their judgment in the matter, would carry and arrange 
the pipes through the houses in such a manner as to 
secure the works from liability to frost. Further pro- 
vision might and should be made, that the water should 
not be let on for the first time in any case till a certifi- 
cate should be received from some proper person that 
the fixtures were arranged in a satisfactory manner. 
Should such regulations be made to attach to all new 
cases, it is not to be doubted that a great many old 
water takers, whose fixtures are imperfect or improperly 
arranged, would willingly be at the expense and trouble 
of having them overhauled and made to conform to a 
safe system or plan. In this way, it is believed, that in 



1857.] WATER. 13 

a comparatively short period the whole city would be- 
come habituated to a much less consumption of water 
than now prevails, while the takers would enjoy all the 
luxury of a full supply for all domestic purposes. 

Unless these suggestions, or others having the same 
object, can be wrought out into practical results that 
shall effect a substantial diminution in the individual 
consumption of water in future, as the population in- 
creases, the Board is forced to admit that the necessity 
for obtaining additional supply is no longer to be disre- 
garded. If the lesson which experience has for years 
been teaching and impressing upon us is to be accepted 
as the future rule, it is no longer to be winked out of 
sight, that the enormous and constantly increasing 
yearly consumption is rapidly bringing the City to a 
period when the present source and mode of sup- 
ply will no longer satisfy the demands of the pop- 
ulation. 

Considering the intrinsic difficulty of deciding upon 
the most judicious method of obtaining and distributing 
an additional supply, it appears to be high time that 
competent minds should be investigating the subject. 
For example, if means can be devised to furnish East 
Boston from another source, and in a manner less haz- 
ardous and disadvantageous than the present mode, 
that would be regarded as the very first step for relief. 
But to determine whether this be practicable, investi- 
gation must be made, comparisons be instituted, and 
finally, details must be wrought out into results ; and 
these will require time as well as talent. 

In order to aid the Board and the City Council, in 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

forming opinions upon these matters, the City Engineer 
has, in his very clear and able Report, hereto annexed, 
collected many pertinent facts and observations, going to 
show the capabilities of Lake Cochituate to yield the 
additional supply, and has touched upon the additional 
works necessary to bring the same to the city, — all of 
which are worthy of attention. It appears from this 
Report, that during every year, when an account was 
kept, since the works have been constructed, there has 
been wasted or allowed to pass down the river, from the 
Lake, a greater quantity than has been brought to the 
city. Experience seems to have established, beyond 
doubt, that the capacity of the Lake, as a source of 
supply, was very much under-estimated by the early 
engineers who computed it ; and that instead of being 
capable of supplying ten or eleven millions of gallons 
daily, it might be relied on to supply sixteen millions. 
And so numerous and obscure are the causes operating 
unseen to mislead the judgment, and to render uncer- 
tain the data of calculation, that it would be no matter 
of surprise if experience should finally show that this 
Lake would yield twenty millions daily, by simply rais- 
ing the dam. 

But when this additional supply is talked of, the 
question of the ability of the conduit to bring it to 
Brookline, is immediately suggested. The conduit was 
intended originally to convey water as a channel, filled 
half or two thirds full. But the exigencies of the city 
have been such that much of the time it has been run- 
ning full, and a part of the time the water has been 
pressed through it under a head 1 1-2 and even more 
feet, — thus putting it to the use of a pipe, instead of 



1857.] WATER. 15 

simply a channel* This is putting the works to a very 
undesirable strain, and one which, of course, they were 
never intended to be subjected to. And should a breach 
occur, not only might much damage result, but the 
water takers might be subjected to much suffering and 
trouble for the want of water, before the breach could 
be repaired. It is known how much pressure the con- 
duit has sustained without giving way, but it is not 
known how much it can sustain without a breach. But 
it is certain that if it is to be relied upon to bring an 
average of sixteen millions of gallons daily, it must be 
subjected to a greater and more constant pressure than 
it has been yet. What may be the result, time alone 
can make manifest. As a first step towards obtaining 
an additional supply, the Board are of opinion that the 
clam at the Lake should be raised two or more feet ; 
and as it is doubtful whether the city now has author- 
ity to do it, the Board recommend that application be 
made to the Legislature for such authority. 

It will be seen by the Beport of the City Engineer, 
that the dam at the outlet has betrayed indications of 
weakness during the last season. In consequence, it 
has been deemed prudent to support it by constructing 

* Since the date of this Eeport, during one week of our coldest weather, the fol- 
lowing quantities have been forced through the conduit, under the annexed head of 
water, in feet and tenths. 

1857. January 20th, 16,576,000 gallons, 1.66 feet head. 



a 


21st, 17,203,000 


ii 


1.79 " 


it 


a 
ti 
u 

ii 


~22d, 16,765,000 
23d, 16,765,000 
24th, 16,765,000 
25th, 16,763,000 
26th, 16,961,000 


u 
u 

ii 
ii 


1.70 " 
1.70 " 
1.70 " 
1.70 " 
1.74 " 


ii 

u 
11 
11 


The circumstance that 


the earth covering 


the 


conduit was 


frozen, undoubtedly 


gave additional security to the works. 









16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

a new dam, 460 feet below the present one. This will 
back the water upon the present dam 6 feet or more, 
so that it will not be subject to pressure of more than 
4 feet, and ordinarily not so much ; while the new dam 
will be sustained by the dam at the upper privilege in 
such manner that it will be relieved from any danger- 
ous pressure. This system of supporting succesive dams 
by back water, is deemed to be safer than to attempt to 
construct a single impregnable dam. The soil is so 
loose, and the water, under high pressure, percolates so 
freely through the neighboring soil, that the difficulty 
and expense of a structure that should be perfectly 
reliable, especially if the pond should be raised, would 
be very great. 

The work of constructing the new dam, was com- 
menced too late in the season to allow of its completion 
this year. Its foundation, however, was laid, and it has 
been put in a condition to serve a temporary purpose 
until it can be completed in the spring. Most of the 
materials are on the spot, and paid for. The whole 
expense, it is expected, will be something less than 
$8,000. 

Since the last Annual Report, the sense of the 
citizens has been taken in regard the annexation of 
Chelsea to the city. The result was a decisive major- 
ity against such annexation. So far as the distribution 
of Cochituate water is concerned, that decision must be 
regarded as eminently wise. As in all applications for 
annexation to the city, a leading reason for the measure 
will always be a participation in the use of Cochituate 
water ; so it must continue to be the part of wisdom on 
the part of the citizens to reject such applications, so long 



1857.] WATER. 17 

as the proposed extension will endanger the sufficiency 
of their own supply. Certainly the benefits arising to 
the city from any annexation of foreign territory, ought 
to be very obvious and to be very great, before the cit- 
izens would be justified in sharing with others that sup- 
ply which has cost them so much, and which experience 
admonishes them may soon be too scanty for them- 
selves. 

By great watchfulness and care in the management 
of the stop-cocks, a sufficient supply for ordinary 
demand has been kept in the various city reservoirs 
during the year. But during the very severe weather 
of December 18th, and a few clays following, the reser- 
voir on Beacon Hill was entirely exhausted ; and many 
takers residing upon the high parts of the city, were 
entirely destitute of water. During twenty-four hours, 
the enormous sum of 17,894,000 gallons was used and 
wasted ; and if such consumption should continue for 
any number of days, much suffering would inevitably 
result. 

It may be well here to remark, that the attention of 
the Board has been called during the year to several 
kinds of newly' invented meters. A good, simple and 
cheap meter is a great desideratum ; and if one could be 
found that should be reliable, and come at a reasonable 
price, (twelve or fifteen dollars, or even cheaper,) it 
would undoubtedly be good policy to introduce their 
use to a certain extent. The Board is happy to say, 
that a model has been exhibited, which promises great 
advantages over any hitherto in use ; and if it shall 
appear on further trial that its promises are fulfilled, it 
will no doubt be well to procure a quantity for use. 
3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. [Jan. 

There has been no complaint made clnring the last 
year, of the quality of the ivater. 

The quantity at the Lake has been more than usually 
abundant. A good portion of the time there has been 
9 feet of water above the flume. Though there does 
not appear, from the annexed table, to have fallen more 
than an average quantity of rain during the year, (40 
inches,) yet the heavy rains falling in mid-summer, have 
served to keep the water unusually high during the 
period when it is usually quite low. 

The extension of the ivories has been continued through 
the season, on the principle which former Boards adopt- 
ed, of laying pipes wherever the income would cover 
the interest upon the cost. Of 12-inch pipe there has 
been laid during the year 2663 feet, against 2051 feet 
in 1855. Of 6-inch, 9789 feet, against 10,384 feet in 
1855. Of 4-inch, 1871 feet, against 1396 feet in 1855. 
In all, 14,323 feet in 1856, against 13,829 in 1855. 
The whole length of pipes of 4 inches and upwards, is 
now a little over 116 miles. 

The number of new Stop-cocks is 21 — making the 
whole number 1001. 

The number of Service Pipes laid during the year has 
been 832, the whole length of which is 29,754 feet — 
making the whole number 19,629. 

New Hydrants to the number of 30 have been added 
this year, making the whole number 1282. 

By far the heaviest job of Repairs (if this can be so 
called) undertaken during the year, was the raising of 
the pipe in Tremont road. Since the pipe was originally 
laid, the street has been raised, (twice or more.) And 



1857.] WATER. 19 

as buildings are now being erected along a large portion 
of the road, frequent calls for water were made. The 
supply of these demands was found to be both difficult 
and dangerous ; and it was deemed best to meet the 
difficulty at once by raising the pipe. 1852 feet of 12- 
inch, and 844 feet of 6-inch, (making more than half a 
mile of both) have been raised. 

The leak in East Boston Reservoir, which has always 
been troublesome, has not yet been repaired. But lia- 
bility to damages resulting from leakage upon the lands 
abutting upon it, it is believed, has been obviated for 
the present, by the construction of a trench filled with 
stones, between the reservoir and said lands. There - 
does not appear to be any urgent call for further repairs 
at present; but the time cannot be far distant when a 
very considerable outlay must be there made. 

The Annual Report of the Water Registrar contains, as 
required by the ordinance, " a statement of the num- 
ber of water takers, the number of cases where the 
water has been cut off, the number and amount of 
abatements, and the expenditures of his department." 
The list of water takers has been arranged, as usual, 
into different classes, and the amount of water rate paid 
by each class given, the water rate being, as usual, paid 
to the clerk of the Treasurer, in the office of the Water 
Registrar. 

The whole amount received for water rents during the 
year, has been $282,651.84, i. e., $2,651.84 more than 
was estimated at the beginning of the year. The esti- 
mate for 1857, is $295,000. 

The number of water takers is now 20,806 ; being an 
increase of 808 over 1855. 



20 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 



[Jan. 



The usual condensed classification of the various water 
tenants has been prepared, and a statement of the 
amount of water rate paid by each class ; the whole, 
being collated with similar tables for the preceding 
year, is here inserted. 



1855. 



14,483 


15,260 


3,263 


3,515 


340 


426 


551 


648 


7 


8 


3 


3 


31 


30 


728 


720 


1 


1 



81 



1856. 



Dwelling Houses, , 

Stores, Shops, Offices, Cellars, &c. . , 
Hotels, Restaurants, and Saloons, . . , 

Stables, 

Railroads, 

Ferry Companies, , 

Steamboats, ." , 

Hose, 

Motive Power, , 

Sugar Refineries, Distilleries, Brew 

eries, and Bakeries, , 

Gas Companies, 

Other Manufacturing Purposes, 

City Buildings and other City uses, 
Public Buildings, Charitable Institu 

tions, &c, 

Shipping Contract with Waterman, 
Street Waterers, (in Roxbury, 1856,) 

Building Purposes, 

Other Purposes, , 



$157,318 88 

23,587 00 

10,895 63 

7,578 75 

7,523 40 

2,608 28 

4,370 01 

2,205 00 

800 00 

11,237 20 



$169,129 69 

26,542 93 

11,065 53 

8,297 10 

8,681 68 

2,712 16 

4,865 71 

2,192 00 

516 23 

10,202 25 



655 52 


621 22 


18,272 51 


22,857 68 


4,011 50 


3,777 72 


1,834 40 


1,989 95 


4,223 78 


4,387 30 


973 72 


100 00 


735 05 


1,085 05 


920 17 


1,010 24 


$259,750 80 


$280,034 44 



A statement of receipts and expenditures, the last year, 
by the Clerk of the Water Board, or Service Clerk, is 
hereto annexed. The whole amount of expenditure 



1857.] WATER. 21 

has been $81,429.35. Of this, $52,588.21 was for 
Extension of the Works; leaving $28,841.14, as the 
amount of the expenses of this department. This is in 
excess of the expenses of 1855, $1,528.56, — just about 
the amount paid for surveying and selling the lands 
about the Lake and along the aqueduct. 

As this item covers all the expenses of repairs, and 
the salaries of those having charge of the works, &c, it 
must be expected to increase. The works are continu- 
ally being extended, and the older they grow of course 
they become more liable to breaks and leakage ; and 
from the nature of the case, more expense must be 
annually required to keep them in order. 

For the purposes of engineering, in relation to a sep- 
arate supply of East Boston, and also in relation to the 
damages that will result by raising the dam ' at the 
Lake, it is recommended that provision be made in the 
annual Appropriation Bill. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN H. WILKINS, 
SAM'L HATCH, 
TISDALE DRAKE, 
JONATHAN PRESTON, 
CHARLES STODDARD, 
THOMAS P. RICH, 
JOHN T. DINGLEY. 



NOTE. 

London is regarded as being exceedingly well supplied 
with water. The ten Water Companies supplied recently 
(probably in 1856), 81,025,822 gallons to 328,561 houses. 
Taking the individuals in each house at six, and the supply is 
41 gallons to each individual using the water. But if the con- 
sumption be averaged upon the whole ■population, (say 2,400,- 
000) the individual consumption is little less than 33 gallons. 
The gallons used are probably imperial gallons, which are 
larger than our wine gallons. 



1857.] WATER. 23 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement op Expenditures made by the Cochituate 
Water Board, from December 31st ; 1855, to January 
1st, 1857. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir, for labor, &c, $462 79 
South Boston " " " 

East Boston " " " 

Brookline " " " 

Marlborough " " ". 

Laying Main Pipe, for stock, &c, - 
Main Pipe, ----- 
Service Pipe, - - - - 

Stable, for a horse, wagon, hay, 

grain, &c, ... - 
Hydrants, ----- 

Stop-cocks, 

Backsmith Shop, for stock, &c, 
Plumbing Shop, " " 

Proving Yard, " " in 

repair shop, - - - - 107 75 
Pipe Yard, altering Counting Room, 

&c, ----- 180 92 

Aqueduct Repairs, for labor, &c, - 1,148 32 
Lake, on account of new dam at the 

outlet, labor, &c, - - - 6,732 04 



256 


92 


365 


61 


782 


12 


3 


75 


1,458 


88 


17,182 


22 


10,846 


61 


897 


24 


577 


71 


688 


04 


345 


51 


82 


72 



Amount carried forward, $42,119 15 



21 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 



[Jan. 



Amount brought forward, 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct, labor, &c, 
Hydrant and Stop-cock Boxes, 
Salaries, - 
Travelling Expenses, 
Office Expenses, rent, fixtures, &c, 
Taxes, ------ 

Miscellaneous Expenses, surveying 

and selling land, &c, 
Toils and Ferriage, 
Fountains, - 

Hose, for blowing off hydrants, &c, 
Carting, ----- 

Postage and Express, - 
Tools, - . 
Stationery, ----- 

Eents, 

Land and Water Eights, 

Off and On Water, - . - 

Damage, caused by laying the pipes 

through drains, &c, 
Oil, - - - - - 

Printing, 

Proving Press, .... 
Repairing Main Pipe, - 

" Service Pipe, 

" Streets, 

" Hydrants, 

" Stop-cocks, - 

" Meters, 
Wages, Proving Yard, - 
" Plumbing Shop, 
" Blacksmith Shop, 
" Laying Main Pipe, - 

Amount carried forward, 



42,119 


15 


273 


88 


792 


01 


7,015 


20 


159 


73 


1,950 


81 


628 


25 


1,664 


56 


288 


25 


101 


13 


287 45 


557 


01 


11 


62 


297 


27 


202 


20 


43 


10 


175 


00 


2,817 


08 


623 


68 


89 


90 


280 


14 


72 


64 


772 


05 


1,833 


28 


1,214 


08 


1,577 


87 


188 


77 


287 


62 


3,423 


77 


680 


29 


778 


71 


6,223 


93 



$77,430 43 



1857..] WATER. 25 

Amount brought forward, $77,4-30 43 

Wages, Laying Service Pipe, - 3,940 05 

" Miscellaneous, - - - 58 87 

$81,429 35 

Cash paid the City Treasurer. 

Amount paid by the former Clerk, - $965 43 

For Grass, at sundry places, - 186 00 

Wood, 108 00 

Land, 3,431 90 

Labor and Material, - - 238 26 

One Horse, - - - ■ 150 00 

Posts and Rails, - - - 108 70 

Shutting off and on Water, - 2,001 75 

Service Pipe and Laying, - 650 39 7,840 43 

Balance, $73,588 92 

Amount of Expenditures, 81,429 35 

Extension of the Wokk. 

Main Pipe, $17,182 22 

Service Pipe, .... 10,843 61 

Laying Main Pipe, - - - 1,458 88 

Wages, Laying Main Pipe, - - 6,223 93 

" " Service Pipe, - 3,940 05 

" Proving Yard, - - - 3,423 77 

Lake, on account of new Dam, - 6,116 80 

Stop-cocks, ..... 688 04 

Hydrant and Stop-cock Boxes, - 396 01 

Hydrants, - - - - - 577 71 

Tools, - - - - - - 297 27 

Land and Water Rights, - - 175 00 

Blacksmith Shop, Labor, &c, - 403 75 

Amounts carried forward, $51,730 04 $81,429 35 
4 



26 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 12. [Jan. 

Amounts brought forward, $51,730 04 $81,429 35 
Plumbing Shop, Labor, &c, - - 398 17 

Carting, — carting pipes, &c, - 460 00 52,588 21 

Amount of Annual Expense, $28,841 14 

(Including the expense of the Water Registrar's office.) 



Statement of the Expenditures and Receipts, on account of the 
Water Works, to Jan. 1st, 1857. 



Amount dr 


awn 


by 


the C( 


Dmmissioners, - 


- $4,043,718 21 


a 


it 


a 


Water Board, 


1850, 


366,163 89 


it 


('. 


a 


a 


a 


1851, 


141,309 23 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


1852, 


89,654 20 


a 


it 


a 


a 


it 


1853, 


89,854 03 


it 


a 


a 


a 


it 


1854, 


80,182 35 


a 


a 


u 


a 


n 


1855, 


63,866 33 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


1856, 


81,429 35 




$4,956,177 59 



Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners, . - $47,648 38 
Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1850, - 8,153 52 

Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1851, - 5,232 38 

Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1852, - 15,869 12 

Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1853, - 4,621 40 

Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1854, - 12,423 29 



Amounts carried forward, $93,948 09 $4,956,177 59 



1857.] WATER. 27 

Amounts brought forward, $93,948 09 $4,956,177 59 
Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1855, - 9,990 38 
Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Water Board, 1856, - 7,840 43 111,778 90 

$4,844,398 69 
Sundry payments by the City, - $46,860 44 
Discount and interest on loans, 2,368,838 99 2,415,699 43 

$7,260,098 12 
Sundry credits by the City, - $7,240 45 

Amount ree'd for Water Rates, 1,473,617 92 1,480,858 37 

Amount due, January 1st, 1857, $5,779,239 75 

SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Cleric Cochituate Water Board. 



APPENDIX. 

CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Boston, January 5, 1857. 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir : — The usual Annual Report of matters pertaining to 
the Water Works is herewith submitted. 

■ Lake Cochituate. Purity of the Water. 

During the entire year of 1856, the water in the Lake has 
been quite as pure as at any time since its introduction into 
the City. There has, also, been an abundant supply of water 
in it throughout the year. 

On the 28th of January, holes were cut through the ice in 
different parts of the Lake, and water was drawn from a 
depth of sixty feet, and from various lesser depths. There 
was no perceptible difference to the taste, in the water, but 
it all appeared pure and sweet. 

During the entire season the water has been allowed to 
flow freely over the meadows connected with the Lake, and 
with Snake Brook ; and it has, at all times, been perfectly 
good. 

June 20th, the outlet of Dug Pond was opened, and kept 
1 



2 APPENDIX. 

so until it had drawn the pond down two feet. The water 
was not needed for use, but it was thought best to keep up 
the circulation. This pond is invariably filled up in the 
winter. 

New Dam. 

The dam originally built at the outlet of the Lake, is un- 
derlaid by a bed of quicksand. Whenever the Lake was 
full, or nearly so, a great many springs boiled up through it 
outside of the dam ; some of them within thirty or forty feet 
of it, others at distances of one and two hundred feet from 
it. The amount of water thus lost from the Lake, has not, 
to the present time, been a matter of any moment, because, 
without it, the supply of water has been ample ; the time will 
soon come, however, when it will all be wanted. The 
springs, or a part of them, were constantly bringing out 
small quantities of sand, and to such an extent, that it was 
considered unsafe to keep the Lake full, unless back water 
could be kept on the dam. This has, accordingly, been done, 
during the greater part of the year. At one time, a very 
considerable leak occurred through the dam, about six feet 
below high water mark in the Lake. It was, with consider- 
able difficulty, stopped, and it became necessary to draw 
down the water from this part of the Lake to save the dam. 
The means of keeping up back water consisted in part of a 
very small temporary wooden dam, on the outlet stream, 
below the main dam, which had been used as an over-fall, for 
the measurement of the quantity of water wasted and leaking 
from the Lake. 

Still lower down the stream, the dam of the upper mill 
privilege backed the water up to the small dam. These 
dams having both become very much out of repair, they were 
in danger of breaking away at any moment; consequently 
they required close watching, in order that if either of them 
broke away, immediate measures might be taken to reduce 
the level of the water in the Lake. 



APPENDIX. 6 

The dam at the mill was particularly examined with refer- 
ence to its being repaired for the purpose of keeping water 
backed up to the main dam. Several other sites for new 
dams were examined; and it was finally concluded, by your 
Board, to commence the construction of a new dam near the 
present one. A point was chosen, at a distance of 460 feet 
outside of the present dam, because the soundings showed 
that the bottom was composed principally of gravel, whilst 
all other points nearer the Lake gave positive assurance of 
quicksand. Its construction was commenced on the twen- 
tieth day of October. A row of piling, eight inches thick, 
has been driven to depths of from fifteen to twenty feet in 
the gravel. They were tongued and grooved, each pile being 
ringed, and great care was taken to keep the joints close. 

The dam is to have an over-fall of eighteen feet in length, 
divided into three parts, by walls of heavy masonry, the over- 
fall of the dam being two feet below high water mark in the 
Lake. Stop-planks are to be inserted in the dam, from bot- 
tom to top, so that, in case of need, the Lake may be drawn 
down as low as by the present dam. When finished its over- 
fall will afford a ready means of measuring the surplus water 
hereafter. It is important, in view of the large increase in 
its use in the City, to know as accurately as possible the full 
amount which the Lake will afford, and it will be advisable 
to have constant measurements made. 

Consumption of Water in the City. 

Three days in the last week of July, the consumption of 
water exceeded 19,000,000 gallons per clay; the average of 
the last eight days in July, was 17,550,000 gallons per day, 
the mercury in the shade at noon ranging from 86 to 94 
degrees, whilst in the previous portion of the month, with 
comparatively comfortable weather, the average daily con- 
sumption was but 11,640,000 gallons. 

In the month of December, the average daily consumption 



4 APPENDIX. 

in moderate weather, was 12,500,000 gallons ; whilst on the 
18th, 15,287,000, and on the 19th, 17,894,000 gallons were 
used, the mercury on these two last clays having fallen eight 
degrees below zero. 

On the days of the greatest consumption, the residents on 
the higher parts of Beacon Hill and East Boston were en- 
tirely deprived of water. 

The increase of houses and buildings is almost entirely on 
the low grounds of the city, and this is constantly drawing 
more and more water from the higher parts of the city. 

New Main from BrooJcline to the City. 

As there does not appear to be any very effectual method 
of abating the waste of water in the City, it is best that the 
subject of laying another large main, from the Brookline 
Reservoir to the City, should receive your earliest attention. 
Should it be determined at once to lay it, so much time would 
be required in getting the pipes cast, and all the necessary 
labor of proving, trenching, and laying them, that it is 
scarcely possible that they could be ready for use before 
there would be actual suffering for the want of the water, in 
extreme hot, as well as in extreme cold weather, in East 
Boston, at least. Additional pipes may be laid in East 
Boston, which will, to some extent, relieve the low grounds 
there ; but even then there will be quite as much necessity 
for the new pipes by the time they can be laid. The streets 
in Brookline, through which they would most likely be laid, 
are already occupied with the two lines now in use, and they 
are laid in a trench, which is much of the way through rock, 
which required blasting. In laying other pipes in the rock, 
by the side of the present ones, great care would be required, 
and it is not likely that blasting could be resorted to, because 
of the great probability, not to say certainty, of breaking the 
pipes now laid. For these reasons it would take much more 



APPENDIX. 

time to lay another line of pipes than was originally re- 
quired to lay both of the present lines, which are in one 
trench. The Gate House in Brookline, when built, was ex- 
pressly prepared to receive the third pipe, and, therefore, 
very little expense would be required there to receive it. 

Some surveys and estimates would be necessary before 
determining the best route, as well as the most suitable size 
to be laid, and its cost. 

Lake Cocliituate. — Its Capabilities of Supply. 

Before determining what amount of expense should be 
incurred in laying new mains from Brookline Reservoir to 
the City, it is important to know the amount of supply 
afforded by Lake Cochituate. By knowing the amount used 
in the City in any one year, and also the amount wasted and 
lost by leakage from the Lake, we know its capability of 
supply for that year. If, for the same year, we know that 
the total annual fall of water, in the form of rain and snow, 
is just about the average annual amount for a series of years, 
we may rely upon it as the amount which we may derive 
from the Lake, provided we give it sufficient storage room. 

Loammi Baldwin, Esq., in 1834, made a gauge of this Lake, 
from which he obtained 16,156,800 gallons, as its flow in 
twenty-four hours. 

By the observations and computations made by the Com- 
missioners of 1837 and 1838, they concluded that the flow 
from the Lake was at the rate of 15£ cubic feet per second, 
equal to 9,909,500 gallons per day, from July 27th, 1837, to 
July 27th, 1838. (See City Document, No. 33, of 1838, p. 7.) 
This, with one exception, was a year of greater drought 
than any other for the preceding twenty years, according to 
the observations made by Dr. Hale, in Boston ; the total rain 
fall for 1837, being only 29.98 inches. From November, 
1837, to November, 1838, the discharge from the Lake was 
21.82 feet per second, equal to 14,101,600 gallons per day. 



b APPENDIX. 

The Commissioners of 1845, pp. 59 to 67, instituted a 
series of experiments, from July 30th to Nov. 1st, in that year 
— a period of three months — to determine the capabilities 
of supply of the Lake. By their observations, and com- 
parisons with previous gaugings, they estimated that the 
daily average which the Lake would afford, was equal to 
10,176,570 gallons per day. This estimate was made on the 
basis that the area of drainage into the Lake, 11,400 acres, 
equal to 496,584,000 square feet, would afford 4-10 of the 
30 inches (29.98) of rain fall in the year of great drought, 
1837. This, it will be observed, was given by them as an 
estimate of the least quantity to be obtained from the Lake. 

All the observations which have since been made show a 
much larger amount of rain fall in each year than that of 
1837, and, as a natural consequence, a much larger amount oF 
water has been afforded by the Lake. 

In the year 1850, water was wasted from the outlet dam 
at the Lake, from April 12th to the end of the year, but no 
estimate seems to have been made of the quantity thus 
wasted. The greatest quantity used in that year was in 
July, when the average daily amount was 8,514,200 gallons. 
The least amount used was in October, equal to 4,504,300 
gallons daily, whilst the average for the whole year was but 
5,837,900 gallons daily. 

In 1851, the greatest average amount used was 7,925,000 
gallons, in the month of June. The least was 5,365,200 gal- 
lons, in April. The daily average for the whole year was 
6,883,800 gallons. During the year water was wasted from 
the Lake, from January 1st to July 1st, equal to 182 days in 
succession. The total amount lost was estimated to be 
equal to 4,892,472,480 gallons, equal to 13,404,034 gallons 
for each day of the entire year. This, added to the amount 
used, shows the Lake to have been capable of affording a 
daily average of 20,287,834 gallons, for the entire year, had 
provision been made for its storage. The rain gauge was 
kept for only a few months at the Lake in this year. 



APPENDIX. 7 

In 1852, the greatest average amount used was 9,608,000 
gallons, in the month of July. The least was 6,637,900 gal- 
lons, in November. The daily average for the whole year 
was 8,,125,800 gallons. During the year water was wasted 
from the Lake, from January 1st to May 24th, equal to 144 
days in succession. The total amount lost was estimated to 
be equal to 4,020,566,885 gallons, equal to 11,015,251 gal- 
lons for each day of the entire year. This, added to the 
amount used, shows the Lake to have been capable of afford- 
ing a daily average of 19,141,051 gallons for the entire year, 
had it been stored. 

The rain gauge kept at the Lake shows a total fall of 
47.93 inches in the year. Taking the proportion of the rain 
fall (4-10) as used by the Commissioners of 1845, and we 
should have had a daily average supply, for this year, of 
16,258,766 gallons; but we have an excess over this of 
2,882,285 gallons per day. 

In 1853, the greatest average amount used was 9,228,400 
gallons, in December. The least was 7,903,600 gallons, in 
April. The daily average for the whole year was 8,542,300 
gallons. During the year water was wasted from the Lake, 
from Junuary 26th to June 18th, and at various other times 
throughout the year ; in all, 194 days. The total amount lost 
was estimated to be equal to 3,166,417,500 gallons, equal to 
8,675,117 gallons for each day of the entire year. This, 
added to the amount used, shows the Lake to have been 
capable of affording a daily average of 17,217,417 gallons for 
the entire year, had it been stored. 

The rain gauge kept at the Lake shows a total fall of 
55.86 inches in the year. Taking the proportion of the rain 
fall, (4-10) as in 1852, and we should have had a daily 
average supply, in that year, of 18,945,381 gallons. The 
measurements and estimates of quantities used and wasted 
being 17,217,417 gallons, show an average of 1,727,964 gal- 
lons, les3 than 4-10 of the entire rain fall. This is accounted 



APPENDIX. 



for by the fact that heavy storms occurred in November and 
December, and large quantities were stored and kept over 
until 1854, in which year there was an excess of water used 
and wasted over the amount stored. 

In 1854, the greatest average amount used was 11,745,200 
gallons, in June. The least was 8,030,200 gallons, in Novem- 
ber. The daily average for the whole year was 9,902,000 
gallons. During the year water was wasted from the Lake, 
from January 1st to May 30th, constantly, and for some days 
in June; in all 154 days. The total amount lost was 
estimated to be equal to 4,187,733,020 gallons, equal to 
11,473,241 gallons for each day of the entire year. This, 
added to the amount used, shows the Lake to have been 
capable of affording a daily average of 21,375,241 gallons 
for the entire year, had it been stored. 

The rain gauge kept at the Lake shows a total fall of 
43.15 inches in the year. Taking the proportion of the rain 
fall, (4-10) as before, and we should have had a daily aver- 
age supply, in that year, of 14,637,300 gallons; but we have 
an excess over this of 6,737,941 gallons per day. The excess 
of water this year was owing to the fact that much of the 
rain which fell in 1853, was wasted in large quantities early 
in this year, it having been stored over from 1853. 

In 1855, the greatest average amount used was 11,710,800 
gallons, in the month of September. The least was 8,540,000 
gallons, in April. The daily average for the whole year was 
10,346,300 gallons. Water was wasted from the Lake, from 
January 15th to March 5th, and at various other times ; in all, 
76 days during the year. 

The rain gauge kept at the Lake shows the total fall to 
have been only 34.96 inches during the entire year. 

There does not appear to have been any account kept of 
the amount wasted from the Lake during the year, owing, no 
doubt, to the fact that the temporary dam at which the gauge 
was kept, had become so out of repair as to be unreliable. 



APPENDIX. 9 

In 1856, the greatest average amount used was 13,284,007 
gallons, in December. The least was 10,377,865 gallons, in 
May. The daily average for the whole year was 12,048,964 
gallons. During the year water has been wasted from the 
Lake, in various months ; in all, 69 clays. 

The rain gauge kept at the Lake shows the total fall to 
have been 40.8 inches during the entire year. 

No account of the waste from the Lake has been kept, 
because the temporary dam before spoken of had become 
useless for this purpose, and because the arrangement of the 
outlet dam, as originally constructed, did not permit of 
measurements being kept with any degree of accuracy at it. 
The new dam, when finished, with its wide over fall, will 
obviate this difficulty. 

From the above observations and measurements, it would 
seem that there could be no doubt that Lake Cochituate 
could be made to furnish an average daily supply of 16,000,000 
gallons, or even a greater amount, by storing all its waters, 
one year with another. The precise amount of expense 
necessary to accomplish this, can only be determined by sur- 
veys to be made hereafter. The amount of supply which 
may be added to it, by taking other ponds and streams, is 
also a matter for determination hereafter. 

The Conduit. 

On the 4th of February a portion of the embankment, over 
the conduit, near Morse's Pond, was washed off by the pres- 
sure of the water through an old crack in the conduit. It 
was temporarily repaired at the time, and in April it was 
thoroughly repaired. 

In July, about four hundred feet in length, of the bottom 
of the conduit in Newton Centre, was repaired, and is now in 
good condition. 

During the coming season it will be necessary to repair 
about fifty feet in length, near Webber's barn, in the third 
2 



10 APPENDIX. 

section; about three hundred feet, near Knowles's road, in 
the same section; and about two hundred feet in length, near 
Morse's pond, in the first section. 

Several examinations of the conduit were made during the 
season. No new cracks were discovered. It was thoroughly 
cleansed in July, between Charles River and Brookline 
Reservoir. 

The form of the conduit is, as is well known, an egg-shaped 
oval, with a clear height of 6 feet 4 inches, and greatest 
width 5 feet, the largest end being down. The original esti- 
mates of its flow, as made by Robison's formulas, corrected by 
observations on the flow of the Croton Aqueduct, gave, for a 
depth of 3 feet 10 inches, 8,305,000 wine gallons in twenty- 
four hours ; and for a depth of 4 feet 4 inches, a flow of 
9,430,000 gallons in twenty-four hours. It will be observed 
that the greatest depth then calculated for the water in it, 
left two feet of clear space in the conduit, above the water. 
From all previous experience, it was judged that it would be 
unsafe to fill it any nearer full, and it, therefore, in its esti- 
mated flow, partook of the nature of a canal, covered over 
only for the purpose of keeping impure matters from the 
water, in its course to the City. The conduit was built with 
American hydraulic cement. It has been repaired in the 
quicksands, and some other portions, by the use of Portland 
(English) cement, and is now, in such places, quite as strong 
as in any other part of it. 

Instead of having water flowing in it, at a depth of only 4 
feet 4 inches, it has been filled entirely full, and it has had a 
head on it, at times, above its top, of over two feet, thus 
making it in effect a pipe. 

When the repairs are made, which are suggested above, 
with some additions to the thickness of some parts of the 
embankments, there can be no doubt that it can, with perfect 
safety, have such a head put on it as will cause it to deliver 
20,000,000 gallons daily, in Brookline Reservoir. 



APPENDIX. 1 1 

Charles River Pipes. 

The pipe chambers at Charles River were designed for 
three pipes. Two only have as yet been laid. These two have 
sufficed thus far; when the third is laid, with the additional 
head on the conduit, it is clear that we shall have an increase 
of more than fifty per cent, over the delivery of the present 
ones. If the incrustations still continue, they may be readily 
cleansed, and restored to their original capacities at slight 
expense. 

Meters. 

The two large meters have been removed during the past 
fall, from the Brookline Gate House. They were found not 
to answer the purpose for which they were designed. There 
is a small leak in the Gate House, which may be repaired in 
the spring, now that the meters are out of the way. 

Structures. 

There are some signs of settlement in the apron way of 
the small Gate House, at the end of the conduit, at Brookline 
Reservoir. With this exception, and the leak in the Gate 
House, all the structures on the line of the works are in good 
order. 

Raising Pipes on Tremont Street. 

When the pipes were first laid in the City, Tremont street, 
south of Dover street, was at a very low grade, and all the 
pipes laid there, at that time, were laid at the usual depth 
below the surface. Since then the grade has been raised 
several feet, and all the pipes laid there since, have been laid 
at the usual depth below the new surface. Many houses 
have been built, within the past year or two, on the street ; 
and, it appearing probable that it would very soon be all 
built upon, it became a matter of importance to raise that 



12 • APPENDIX. 

portion of the 12-iiich pipe which was at the lowest grade. 
In doing this it became also necessary to raise those 6-inch 
pipes branching from it to the side streets. All the 12-inch 
and part of the 6-inch pipes were at a depth, generally, of 
twelve feet below the surface. Whenever a service-pipe was 
laid, great trouble was experienced by caving in, endan- 
gering the lives of the workmen, as well as being extremely 
expensive. It was, therefore, determined by your Board to 
raise the pipes, and 1,851 feet of 12-inch, and 844 feet of 
6-inch pipes have been raised. 



APPENDIX. 



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14 



APPENDIX. 



Loss of Head from BrooJcline Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the City 
may be seen by reference to the table in this and previous 
reports of average annual heights of water in the Reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 





Heights of Water above Marsh Level in 


Loss of Head 

from 

Bookline 

to 

Beacon Hill 

Reservoir. 


Loss of Head 

from 

Brookline 

to 

East Boston 

Reservoir. 


Yeab. 


Brookline 
Reservoir. 


Beacon Hill 
Reservoir. 


East Boston 
Reservoir. 


1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 


123.16 
123.36 
123.67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 


119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 


105.06 

104.07 

104.91 

99.84 

97.49 

94.11 


4.12 
3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 


18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
29.55 



Extreme high water in Brookline Reservoir is 124.6 feet, 
and it will be seen that Brookline Reservoir has averaged, 
during the last three years, within one foot of high water 
mark in it ; that Beacon Hill Reservoir has averaged very 
nearly a uniform depth, in the same time ; whilst the water in 
the East Boston Reservoir is constantly decreasing in its 
average height. 



APPENDIX. 



15 



To show the effect on the head, occasioned by a few suc- 
cessive hot, as well as a few successive cold days, the follow- 
ing; table is inserted. 



1856 




Heights of Water above Marsh Level in 


Loss of Head 












from 
Brookline 


Loss of Head 




a 








from 




K_ O 


Brookline 


Beacon Hill 


East Boston 


to 


Brookline 


Date. 


5 * 








Beacon Hill 


to 




2 53 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


East Boston. 




B 












July 26, 


94° 


121.60 


111.78 


84.43 


9.82 


37.17 


July 28, 


91° 


123.10 


112.86 


84.43 


10.24 


38.67 


Dec. 19, 


-8° 


123.27 


Empty. 

Water in 

Pipe, 


Water in 
Pipe, 












105.36 


43.00 


17.91 


80.27 



Note. — For twenty-four hours, December 19, water did 
not run over the hill in East Boston. In anticipation of 
extreme cold weather water is shut in the East Boston 
Reservoir, to be let on the pipes in case of fire. 

The distance from Brookline Reservoir to Beacon Hill 
Reservoir is nearly 5.1 miles, and from Brookline to East 
Boston Reservoir it is over 8£ miles, by the lines of pipes. 



1857, January 10th. — During the last few days, with the mercury below zero, Don- 
ald McKay, Esq., has been, most of the time, entirely out of water, it rising in the pipes 
to about 75 feet above marsh level, showing a loss of head equal to 49 feet. 



16 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 
Monthly Fall of Rain, in inches, in 1856. 



17 



MONTH. 



January, 
February, . . . 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, . 
October, .... 
November, . . 
December, . . 



Average, 



PLACES AND OBSEKVERS. 



■a s 



1.44 
0.22 
0.66 
4.27 
7.81 
1.77 
1.76 
11.40 
3.13 
2.34 
1.43 
4.57 



6? «8 

- M 

8 Pt 

o i-s 



40.80 



5.32 

0.80 
1.33 
4.37 
7.10 
2.90 
4.02 
11.11 
4.90 
2.70 
3.33 
4.28 



* S 

S a 

>.M g 



52.16 



2.83 
1.07 
0.90 
3.48 
5.31 
2.09 
1.73 
12.31 
4.79 
2.03 
2.53 
3.42 



? g w 

O O ^ 
1-1 h} 



42. 49 



3.51 
1.26 
1.37 
3.49 
5.89 
2.18 
1.86 
12.42 
4.78 
2.52 
2.53 
4.16 



a -9 



45.97 



1.30 

0.63 
3.33 
5.17 
1.59 
4.27 
13.97 
4.79 
2.23 
3.09 
1.96 






42.33 



5.30 
0.57 
0.97 
3.44 
6.73 
2.87 
4.24 
14.98 
4.66 
3.24 
2.89 
3.90 



53.79 



f-. 



5.25 

0.80 
1.55 
2.80 
4.10 
2.47 
4.20 
5.75 
5.10 
1.15 
2.00 
5.80 



40.97 



The above table of rain fall has been again kindly fur- 
nished by the respective observers. By reference to the 
previous part of this Report, it will be seen that the record 
of the annual rain fall is important, as furnishing a means of 
estimating the supply to be derived from the Lake. 

Professor Caswell informs me that the average for the 
past 25 years, in Providence, has been 40.30 inches. 
3 



18 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of the Location, Size and Number of Feet of 
Distributing Pipes, laid in the Year 1856. 



In what Streets. 



Between what Streets. 



o o 



eg g 

5' 



Tremont, - 

Tremont, 

Waltham, 

Tremont, 

Milford, 

Indiana Place, 

Worcester, 

Chester, North side, 

South, 

Groton, 

East Chester, 

Camden, 

Concord, 

Lenox, 

Parker, 

Tremont, 

Groton, 

Avenue to People's Ferry, 

London, 

Shaving, 

Vernon, 

Ashland Avenue, North side, . 
Cumston, 

Midland, 

O 

Granite, 

Eighth, 

First, 

Third, 

Telegraph, 



"White, 

Meridian, 

Chelsea, 

Princeton, . . . 

Border, 

Prescott, 

Meridiau, 

Decatur, 

Marginal, . . . 
Havre, 

Chelsea Street, 
Border, 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Hanson and Milford, 

Concord and Worcester, 

Bradford and Harrison Avenue, 
Milford and Groton, 



Total 12-inch in Boston Proper, 



Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 

Connecting with Tremont, 

Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 

Connecting with Lehigh, 

Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 
Connecting at Harrison Avenue, . . 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 

Washington and Tremont, 

Tremont and Shawmut Avenue, . . . 
Washington and Harrison Avenue, 

Groton and Dover, 

Connecting with Tremont, 



Total 6-inch in Boston Proper, 



East of Commercial, 

Connecting with Indiana Place, 

Connecting with Federal, 

Connecting with Lowell, 

Washington and Harrison Avenue, 

Concord and Rutland, 

Total 4-inch in Boston Proper, 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

Baldwin and Munroe, 

To the North side of Broadway, 

Baldwin to Mount Washington Avenue, 

K and P 

WestofI 

I and K 

Total 6-inch in South Boston, 



Gates and Old Harbor, 

Total 4-inch in South Boston, 

EAST BOSTON. 

Marion and Brooks, 

White and Condor, 

Porter and Marion, 



Total 12-inch in East Boston, 



Brooks and Putnam, 

Eutaw and White, 

Chelsea and Bremen, 

Condor and the New Bridge, 

East of Bremen, 

Orleans and Cottage, 

Porter and Marion, 



Total 6-inch in East Boston, . 

Holden and Gallagher's Shipyard, 
Curtis's Shipyard, 



12 
12 
12 

12 



Total 4-inch in East Boston, 



APPENDIX. 



19 



RE CAPITULATION. 



Section. 


1856. 


Diameter in Inches. 


12 


6 


4 






1215 
4 

1448 
1 


3727 
7 

3523 
1 

2539 
2 


1337 






4 






100 












434 










2 




2663 
5 


9789 
10 


1871 






6 









20 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



21 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1856. 



g 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


s § 
5 


Number. 


Length 

in 
Feet. 


Number. 


Length 
in 

Feet. 


Numb'r. 


Length 

in 
Feet. 


Numb'r. 


Length 
in 

Feet. 


l 

3 

¥ 

5 
8 


16 

8 

512- 


616 

269 

18,607 


2 
124 


158 
4396 


1 
3 

166 


96 

237 

5375 


19 
11 

802 


870 

506 

28,378 


AcrOTP.crat 




832 


29,754 













Making the total number up to January 1, 1857, 19,629 

During the year, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one 
feet of 12-inch pipes, and eight hundred and forty-four feet 
of 6-inch pipes, have been taken up, and re-laid, on Tremont 
road. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1856. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



Where. 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 
1 


12 
9 


6 
25 


4 

17 

1 
2 

20 


2 
2 


li 
44 


1 

8 
1 


3 

6 

6 
12 


. 1 

130 
16 
19 

165 


"o 
H 




5 


3 


250 
20 
37 






2 
4 

6 










1 

2 


3 
12 


2 
27 






Totals, 


5 


3 





2 


44 


9 




30V 



22 



APPENDIX. 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches in 
diameter and upwards, fifty-nine were caused by the loosening 
of lead in the joints, six by the settling of the earth, seven 
by frost, and one by a flaw in the stop-cock, one by driving 
piles, and one by flaw in the pipe. Total, seventy-five, in pipes 
of 4 inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that have occurred in the service pipes, and 
two-inch pipes, fifty-seven were caused by settling of the 
earth, six by defective stop-cocks, twenty-four by defective 
couplings, nine by frost, forty-nine by flaws in pipes, thirty- 
one by stiff connections, two by leaks in joints, nine by 
settling of boxes, six by tenants, one by rats, one by stop- 
cocks blowing out, nine struck by picks, three by driving 
piles, three by digging drains, one by rust, one by defective 
packing, twenty opened to take out fish. Total, two hundred 
and thirty-two in service and two-inch pipes. 



Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850-56. 



LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 



Teak. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 



4 Inches and upwards. 

32 

....... 64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 



Less than 4 Inches. 

72 

173 

241 

260 

280 

219 

232 



Total. 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 



APPENDIX. 23 



Hydrants. 



During the year fifteen new hydrants were established in 
the City proper, eight in South Boston, six in East Boston, 
also one in Roxbury. Altogether there have been established 
up to the present date 

In Boston proper, ------ 871 

" South Boston, - - - - - - 224 

" East Boston, 163 

" Brookline, ..-.-- 1 

" Roxbury, ------- 5 

" Charlestown, 11 

" Chelsea, - - 7 



Total, - 1,282 

Fifty-five hydrants have been taken out and replaced by 
new or repaired ones. One hundred and twenty-seven de- 
cayed hydrant boxes were taken out and replaced by others 
made of Burnetized lumber, and the same material was used 
to cover thirty hydrants that have been established this year. 

The hydrants are all in good condition, and have been 
packed with salt hay, and every precaution taken to keep 
them in a working condition through the cold weather. 



Stop-cocks. 

All the stop-cocks have been cleansed and oiled the 
past season. Twenty-one new boxes have been put in to 
cover the stop-cocks put in this year, and forty-nine boxes 
have been renewed. The stop-cocks are, with two or three 
exceptions, in good order. 



24 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of 
Tools, January 1, 1857. 



Number of 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



3D 



24 



20 



16 



12 



li 



Jamaica 
Aqueduct. 



10 



Pipes, 

Blow-off Branches, 

Y Branches, 

3-Way Branches, . 
4- Way Branches, . 

Flange Pipes, 

Sleeves, 

Clamp Sleeves, 

Caps, 

Eeducers, 

Bevel Hubs, 

Curved Pipes, 

Quarter Turns, 

Double Hubs, 

Offset Pipes, 

Stop-cocks, 

Pieces of Pipe, 



38 



22 



41 



S3 



41 



GOO 



Hydrants. 

5 Wilmarth, 

5 Lowell, 

3 Kingston, 
2 Hooper, 

8 Ballardvale, 

4 Long N. Y. Pattern. 

For Hydrants. 15 lengtheners, 11 hydrant bends, 5 frames, 
10 covers, 4 boxes, 25 unfinished boxes, 30 second hand caps, 
3 wharf hydrants, 47 wastes, 309 lbs. composition castings, 
15 spare screws, 3 plungers, 10 stuffing boxes, 9 nipples, 25 
unfinished hydrants with screws, nipples, plungers, valves, 



APPENDIX. 25 

&c, belonging to same, 5 wharf hydrant boxes, 1 sample 
hydrant, 20 wharf hydrant cocks, 10 bands, 36 rings, 150 
straps, 150 washers. 

For Stop-cocks. 35 stop-cock braces, 8 sets of stands and 
gearing for 36 and 30-inch, 25 wrought iron nuts, 13 4-inch 
flanges, 739 lbs. of f-inch bolts, 197 lbs. ^-inch bolts, 164 
lbs. of finch bolts, 152 lbs. l£-inch bolts, 319 lbs. inch bolts, 
109 lbs. £-inch bolts, 2 36-inch composition screws, 1 12-inch 
valve, 8 cast iron nuts, 1 30-inch composition screw, 6 6-inch 
composition screws, 18 6-inch wrought iron screws, 8 4-inch 
wrought iron screws, 4 sets of friction wheels, 350 lbs. of old. 
bolts (various sizes), 2 2-inch stop-cocks (not in order), 3 
12-inch screws, 2 sample cocks, 11 4-inch gate caps, 2 6-inch 
gate caps, 1 30-inch valve. 

For Service Pipe. 450 square boxes, 46 long boxes, 6 Y 
boxes, 2 T boxes, 90 caps, 37 tubes, 3 4-inch cocks, 8 flanges 
and 2 caps for do., 10 inch air cocks, 2 1-inch union cocks, 8 
f-inch do., 45 f-inch do., 17 straight cocks, 14 inch T cocks, 
4 f-inch T cocks, 10 f-inch T cocks, 11 f-inch Y cocks, 189 
f-inch flange cocks, 14 lj-inch connection couplings, 11 inch 
connection couplings, 28 f-inch connection couplings, 9 2£- 
inch connection couplings, 214 lbs. of old couplings of various 
sizes, 334 lbs. of union cock castings, 36 composition flanges. 

Water Meters. 28 large meters, (2 are out of order), 27 
small meters, (2 are out of order), 2 power meters, 1 small 
Philadelphia meter, 600 lbs. of connection pipes, 40 connec- 
tion nipples, 16 connection couplings. 

Lead Pipe. 1,100 lbs. of 2^-inch, 1,120 lbs. of inch, 1,205 
lbs. off-inch, 322 lbs. of 1^-inch, 336 lbs. of f-inch. 

Block Tin Pipe. 84 lbs. of f-inch, 135 lbs. of f-inch, 68 
lbs. off-inch (old), 41 lbs. of f-inch (old), 16 lbs. of f-inch, 
53 lbs. of J-inch. 

Block Tin. 47 lbs., 60 lbs. of solder, 650 lbs. of gasket. 

Pig Lead. 1,445 lbs. 
4 



26 APPENDIX. 

Blacksmith Shop. 3,409 lbs. of working iron, 236 lbs. of 
cast steel, 700 lbs. of scrap iron. 

Miscellaneous. 15,000 feet of Burnetized 2-inch plank, 
1,000 feet of boards, 2 sets of stove box coverings, 1,900 lbs. 
of scrap cast iron, 1£ cords of pine wood, 2 large proving 
presses and apparatus, 1 small proving press, £ cask of rosin, 
£ cask of cement, 1 bbl. of oil, 2 tons of hard coal, £ ton of 
blacksmith coal, 30 baskets of charcoal, £ carboy of vitriol, 
J bbl. of black varnish, 2 dozen new shovels, 50 picks, 1 set 
of carpenter's tools, 1 bbl. of old composition (354 lbs.), 620 
lbs. of composition chips, 80 lbs. of cotton waste, 4 dozen 
new lanterns, 2 casks of nails, 1,100 lbs. of old scraps, bars, 
gas pipe, &c. ; miscellaneous lot of old bolts, cast-off drills, 
and tools of various kinds, a large lot of patterns for stop- 
cocks, hydrants, &c. 

Stable. 800 lbs. English hay, 1,500 lbs. salt hay, hay cut- 
ter, 2 horses, 3 sets of harnesses, 2 waggons, 2 pungs, 3 
hand-carts, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 hand-truck, 6 bushels of grain, 
stable utensils. 

At the Reservoir, Beacon Hill. I cast iron drinking foun- 
tain, 5 swivel pipe patterns, 1 copper ball from East Boston 
Reservoir, 38 feet of 3^-inch shafting and geering, 17 feet of 
2^-inch do., 14 feet of 2£ inch square do., lot of iron rods, 2 
sets of swing stage-irons, 2 sets of wall clamps, 1 swing stage 
with clamps complete, 1 stone block, 3 mast rings and rolls, 
1 capstan frame with levers, 6 hand-barrows, 3 hods, 2 dirt 
slides, 1 fall, 3 booms, rail carriages, 2 stone carts, 2 strainer 
frames, 115 feet of round iron, guys for derrick, 1 iron plate 
for do., 3 shaft hangers, 7 pedestals, 2 stone lewises, lot of 
old iron, 4 wrenches, 6 shovels, 2 hammers, 1 sledge, lot of 
small tools, 1 composition reducer, 4 jets (cast iron), 2 com- 
position jets, 6 waste cocks, 2 pieces of hose, piece of copper 
pipe, 1 composition cylinder, 6 composition jets, 1 composi- 
tion 6-inch plate, 1 4-inch do., 1 3-inch do., 5 cast iron jets, 2 
scythes, 2 rakes. 



APPENDIX. 27 

The flexible pipe between Chelsea and East Boston was 
tested four hours, in September, and found to be tight, no 
water leaking from it in that time. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES SLADE, 

City Engineer. 



28 APPENDIX. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Water Registrar's Office, ) 
Boston, January 1st, 1857. 5 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir:— 

I herewith submit the following Report, prepared accord- 
ing to the provisions of the Water Ordinance, passed Octo- 
ber 31st, 1850. 

The total number of Water Takers now entered for the 
year 1857, is 20,806, being an increase since January 1st, 
1856, of 808. 

During the year there has been 1,008 cases where the 
water has been shut off for non-payment of water rates, and 
unnecessary waste of water. Of these, 678 were for non- 
payment; 330 were for waste. 

The number of cases where the water has been turned on 
is 1,594. Of these, 583 were cases which had been previously 
shut off for non-payment of water rates; 286 were those 
which had been shut off for unnecessary waste of water ; and 
725 were let on for the first time. 

There have been no abatements made during the year. 

The total amount received, from December 
31st, 1855, to January 1st, 1857, is - - - $282,651 84 

Of the above, there was received for water 
used in previous years, the sum of $1,617 40 

Leaving the receipts for water used 
during the year 1856, the sum of 281,034 44 

Amount of water rates, «... $282,651 84 



APPENDIX. 29 

Amount brought forward, $282,651 84 

A detailed statement of the receipts for the year 
1856, is included in this Report. 

In addition to the above, there has been re- 
ceived, for letting on water, in cases where it 
had been shut off for non-payment of water rates, 1,140 00 

Total amount received during the year, in 
this office, - - - .- " - - -$283,791 84 



The total amount received during the year, for 
the use of Jamaica Pond water, is - - - $2,624 64 

This amount is included in the general account. 

The amount of assessments already made for 
the year 1857, is $237,628 03 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water, during the year 1857, is - - 295,000 00 

The expenditures in my department during 
the year 1856, have been .... 3,126 66 

The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz. : 
Paid Charles L. Bancroft, for services as clerk, 

" Stephen Badlam, « " 

" Peter H. Niles, for services as inspector, - 

" Chas. E. Dunham, " " 

" Rand & Avery, for printing, 

" Eayrs & Fairbanks, for books and sta- 
tionery, - - .... 

" W. A. Pierpont, for distributing bills, 

" H. M. Davis, " «'.''. 

" E. R. Jones, " " 

" J. Atkinson, " " - 

" J. W. Greenwood, " " 

" Stephen Maddox, for services, - 

" Moore & Crosby, for printing, 

Amount, 



$785 


00 


758 


00 


628 


00 


628 


00 


118 


97 


112 


49 


22 


00 


18 


00 


18 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


4 


72 


3 


48 


$3,126 


66 



30 appendix. 

Statement, showing the number of Houses, Stores, Steam 

Engines, &c, in the City of Boston, supplied with Co- 
chituate Water, to the first of January, 1857, with The 
Amount of Water Rates paid for 1856. 

1,314 Dwelling- Houses, $6 00 

1,453 " « 

1,835 

1,903 " 
1,711 

1,447 " " 

1,031 " " 

686 " " 

474 « " 

421 " » 

397 " " 

316 " " 

171 u u 

195 " " 

132. " " 

130 " " 

107 " " 

91 « « 

66 " " 

48 " " 

§7 « u 

29 » "■ 

40 u a 

34 " " 

36 " " 

236 " « 

817 " " 



15,207 



$6 00 


$7,884 


00 




7 00 


10,171 


00 




8 00 


14,680 


00 




9 00 


17,127 


00 




10 00 


17,110 


00 




11 00 


15,917 


00 




12 00 


12,372 


00 




13 00 


8,918 


00 




14 00 


6,636 


00 




15 00 


6,315 


00 




16 00 


6,352 


00 




17 00 


5,372 


00 




18 00 


3,078 


00 




19 00 


3,705 


00 




20 00 


2,640 


00 




21 00 


2,730 


00 




22 00 


2,354 


00 




23 00 


2,093 


00 




24 00 


1,584 


00 . 




25 00 


1,200 


00 




26 00 


2 7 262 


00 




27 00 


783 


00 




28 00 


1,120 


00 




29 00 


986 


00 




30 00 


1,080 


00 




31 00 


7,316 


00 






4,773 94 








$166,558 


94 


18 00 


$36 00 





2 Model Houses, 

2 Amounts carried forward, $36 00 $166,558 94 



APPENDIX. 



31 



1 

1 
4 
1 
4 
3 
2 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
12 



Amounts Drought forward. 

Model House, $20 00 

" « 21 00 

" " - 24 00 

" " 27 00 

" " 30 00 

" " 36 00 

« " 39 00 

" " 42 00 

a a 48 00 

" " 54 00 

" " 60 00 

" " 63 00 

" " 66 00 

" " 69 00 

" " 72 00 

" " 75 00 

" " 90 00 

" " 192 00 

" " 210 00 



$36 
20 
21 
96 
27 

120 

108 
78 

210 
48 
54 

120 
63 
66 



72 
225 

90 
192 
210 
364 



00 $166,558 94 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 



00 
00 

75 



50 


g House, 


57 


50 




1 Lodgin 


57 50 


1 " 


u 


65 


50 


65 50 


1 " 


and Shops, 


89 
6 


00 

00 


89 00 


3 




1,987 Stores 


11,922 00 


i—i 




8 


00 


8 00 


29 " 




8 


50 


246 50 


604 " 




9 


00 


5,436 00 


9 « 




10 


00 


90 00 


13 " 




11 


00 


143 00 


9 " 




11 


50 


103 50 



2,358 75 



212 00 



2,652 Amounts carrried forward, $17,949 00 $169,129 69 



32 APPENDIX. 

2,652 Amounts brought forward, $17,949 00 $169,129 G9 
14 Stores and Shops, $12 00 168 00 



1 


n 


30 


a 


8 


a 


6 


a 


5 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


3 


it 


1 


a 


1 


u 


264 


a 


2,987 




'142 


Offices, 


1 


it 


48 


ii 


2 


11 


1 


a 


3 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


a 


27 


a 


228 




5 


Banks, 


1.1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


2 


a 


20 





Amount carried forward 



13 00 


13 


00 


• 


14 00 


420 


00 




15 00 


120 


00 




16 50 


99 


00 




19 00 


95 


00 




20 00 


20 


00 




21 50 


21 


50 




24 00 


72 


00 




49 00 


49 


00 




73 95 


73 


95 






1,101 


54 


20,201 99 


6 00 


852 


00 




8 50 


8 


50 




9 00 


432 


00 




10 00 


20 


00 




11 50 


11 


50 




14 00 


42 


00 




15 00 


15 


00 




17 00 


17 


00 




19 00 


19 


00 




21 00 


21 


00 






135 


91 










1,573 91 


6 00 


30 


00 




9 00 


99 


00 




11 00 


11 


00 




14 00 


14 


00 






9 


25 








i 


163 25 


rward, 


5191,068 84 







APPENDIX. 




33 




Amount brought forwar 


d, 




$191,068 84 


i : 


Building, 


$10 00 


$10 


00 


3 


CC 


12 


00 


36 


00 


i 


a 


14 


00 


14 


00 


i 


u 


14 


16 


14 


16 


19 


a 


15 


00 


285 


00 


i 


ii 


16 


00 


16 


00 


3 


a 


17 


00 


51 


00 


1 


a 


17 


50 


17 


50 


8 


ii 


18 


00 


144 


00 


7 


a 


20 


00 


140 


00 


3 


CL 


21 


00 


63 


00 


1 


ii 


22 


50 


22 


50 


3 


ii 


23 


00 


69 


00 


8 


ii 


25 


00 


200 


00 


2 


a 


26 


00 


52 


00 


8 


a 


30 


00 


240 


00 


3 


a 


32 


00 


96 


00 


1 


a 


32 


50 


32 


50 


1 


a 


35 


00 


35 


00 


2 


a 


36 


00 


72 


00 


1 


a 


37 


00 


37 


00 


1 


a 


39 


00 


39 


00 


1 


a 


39 


50 


39 


50 


5 


a 


40 


00 


200 


00 


1 


a 


43 


00 


43 


00 


2 


a 


44 


00 


88 


00 


2 


a 


45 


00 


90 


00 


2 


a 


46 


00 


92 


00 


2 


a 


49 


00 


98 


00 


1 


a 


50 


00 


50 


00 


1 


a 


52 


50 


52 


50 


1 


a 


60 


00 


60 


00 


1 


Amounts 


62 00 
carried forward, 


62 


00 


98 


$2,560 66 $191,068 84 




5 











34 APPENDIX. 

98 Amounts brought forward, $2,560 66 $191,068 84 

1 Building, $65 00 65 00 

1 " 72 96 72 96 

1 " 73 00 73 00 

1 « 74 00 74 00 

1 « 82 00 82 00 

1 " 108 00 108 00 

1 « 130 00 130 00 

7 " 289 14 



112 










3,454 


76 


36 Churches, 


6 


00 


216 


00 






1 " 


8 


00 


8 


00 






1 


14 


00 


14 


00 






1 


15 


00 


15 


00 






2 " 


20 
6 


00 
00 


40 


00 


293 




41 


42 


00 


00 


7 Halls, 




4 « 


9 


00 


36 


00 






1 » 


12 


00 


12 


00 






1 " 


14 


00 


14 00 






2 " 






16 


25 






2 Private Schools, 


6 


00 


12 


00 






i—i 


9 


00 


9 


00 






2 " " 


14 


00 


28 


00 






1 " « 


15 


00 


15 


00 






i—i 


16 
10 


00 
00 


16 


00 


200 




22 


10 


00 


25 


1 Theatre, 




1 


25 


00 


25 


00 






1 » 


93 


75 


93 


75 






1 Gymnasium, 


5 


00 


5 


00 






1 Custom House, 


156 


00 


156 


00 






1 Hospital, 


40 


00 


40 


00 







6 Amounts carried forward, $329 75 $195,016 85 



1 Hospital, 
1 Medical Colle 
1 State House, 
1 Library, 

1 " 
1 

2 Asylums, 
2 " 

1 « 
1 » 
1 



19 



16 Market Stalls, 



5 


a 


1 


u 


1 


Market, 


1 


u 


1 


a 


48 




103 


Cellars, 


6 


n 


11 


a 


120 




1 


Hotel, 


7 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


it 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 



APPENDIX. 






35 


i forward, 


$329 75 $195,016 


85 


$163 75 


163 75 






30 00 


30 00 






134 50 


134 50 






6 00 


6 00 






9 00 


9 00 






43 95 


43 95 






15 00 


30 00 






25 00 


50 00 






35 00 


35 00 






■40 00 


40 00 






250 98 


250 98 


1,122 








93 


6 00 


216 00 






9 00 


27 00 






10 00 


50 00 
4 00 






47 00 


47 00 






74 00 


74 00 
15 27 










433 


27 


6 00 


618 00 






9 00 


54 00 
43 75 










715 


75 


14 00 


14 00 






15 00 


105 00 






16 76 


16 76 






18 00 


18 00 






20 00 


20 00 






21 00 


21 00 






24 00 


24 00 






25 00 


25 00 







14 Amounts carried forward, $243 76 $197 288 80 



36 APPENDIX. 

14 Amounts brought forward, $243 76 $197,288 80 

1 Hotel, $27 00 27 00 

2 « 30 00 60 00 
1 " 33 00 33 00 

1 " 35 00 35 00 

2 " 36 00 72 00 
1 " 38 00 38 00 
1 " 39 75 39 75 

1 " 40 00 40 00 

2 » 42 00 84 00 
2 » 44 00 88 00 

1 " 45 00 45 00 

2 " 48 00 96 00 
1 " 51 00 51 00 
1 " 56 00 56 00 

3 " 60 00 180 00 
1 " 69 00 69 00 
1 " 71 40 71 40 
1 " 72 92 72 92 
1 " 74 00 - 74 00 

1 " 84 00 84 00 

2 " 90 00 180 00 
1 " 96 00 96 00 
1 " 103 08 103 08 
1 " 105 00 105 00 
1 " 108 00 108 00 
1 " 113 70 113 70 
1 " 119 50 119 50 
1 " 122 80 122 80 
1 " 137 00 137 00 
1 " 140 00 140 00 
1 " 144 00 144 00 
1 " 150 00 150 00 
1 " 174 10 174 10 



55 Amounts carried forward, $3,253 01 $197,288 80 



APPENDIX. 



37 



55 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Amounts brought forward, 



Hotel, 



5175 10 
180 00 
193 10 
261 00 
289 00 
354 00 
357 00 
421 00 
465 00 
561 00 
672 00 
805 00 



67 






1 Boarding House, 30 


00 


30 00 


1 " " 31 


00 


31 00 


2 " « 35 


00 


70 00 


1 « » 36 


00 


36 00 


1 " « 42 


00 


42 00 


1 « » 54 


00 


54 00 


1 " « 60 


00 


60 00 


1 " " 109 


00 


109 00 


1 " « 284 


00 


284 00 


~ 10 




• 33 Kestaurants and Sa- 






loons, 6 


00 


198 00 


7 " "8 


00 


56 00 


192 " " 9 


00 


1,728 00 


6 " « 10 


00 


60 00 


35 « » 12 


00 


420 00 


23 » « 15 


00 


345 00 


1 " " 16 


00 


16 00 


1 « « 17 


00 


17 00 



5,253 01 $197,288 80 
175 10 
180 00 
193 10 
261 00 
289 00 
354 00 
357 00 
421 00 
465 00 
561 00 
672 00 
805 00 

7,986 21 



716 00 



298 Amounts carried forward, $2,840 00 $205,991 01 



38 



APPENDIX. 



298 Amounts oroi 


t gfit forward, 


$2,840 00 $2< 


35,991 


01 


1 Restaurant 


and 


S 


a- 










loon, 






$17 


50 


17 50 






2 " 




u 


18 


00 


36 00 






2 « ■ 




a 


20 


00 


40 00 






1 




a 


23 


00 


23 00 






2 . 




a 


25 


00 


50 00 






2 " 




u 


30 


00 


60 00 






1 « 




u 


35 


00 


35 00 






40 " 




a 






261 82 


3,363 




349 




32 


1 Club House 


? 




12 


00 


12 00 






2 u u 






15 


00 


30 00 






\ u a 






50 


00 


50 00 






]_ a « 










7 50 


99 




5 




50 


1 Bathing House, 




10 


00 


10 00 






1 " 


a 




15 


00 


15 00 






2 


u 




20 


00 


40 00 






1 " 


a 




40 


00 


40 00 






1 " 


u 




45 


00 


45 00 






1 " 


a 




50 


00 


50 00 






] » 


u 




55 


00 


55 00 






1 " 


u 




135 


00 


135 00 






1 •» 


a 








9 17 


399 




10 




17 


265 Stables, 






5 


00 


1,325 00 






23 " 






6 


00 


138 00 






42 " 






6 


25 


262 50 






29 " 






7 


50 


217 50 






16 " 






8 


00 


128 00 






21 " 






8 


75 


183 75 






30 " 






10 


00 


300 00 






13 " 


carr 


11 25 
'ed forward, 


146 25 


09,853 




439 Amounts 


$2 ; 701 00 $2 


00 



1 Stable, 

4 " 

15 » 
1 

8 " 

1 " 
13 " 

2 " 
1 » 
1 « 

1 « 

2 " 
7 " 
1 " 
6 »■ 
1 " 
1 « 

3 « 
1 

•t « 

4 » 
1 " 
1 " 
1 « 
1 " 



.PPENDIX. 




3y 


forward, 


$2,701 00 $209>853 


00 


$11 50 


11 50 




12 00 


48 00 




12 50 


187 50 




13 25 


13 25 




13 75 


110 00 




14 00 


14 00 




15 00 


195 00 




16 00 


32 00 




16 25 


16 25 




17 25 


17 25 




17 50 


17 50 




18 00 


36 00 




18 75 


131 25 




19 75 


19 75 




20 00 


120 00 


• 


21 00 


21 00 




22 00 


22 00 




22 50 


67 50 




23 75 


23 75 




24 00 


96 00 




25 00 


100 00 




26 25 


26 25 




27 50 


27 50 




28 50 


28 50 




28 75 


28*75 




30 00 


240 00 




31 25 


93 75 




31 50 


31 50 




32 00 


64 00 




32 50 


32 50 




34 00 


34 00 




36 00 


180 00 




38 00 


38 00 





543 Amounts carried forward, $4 ; 825 25 $209,853 00 



40 






APPENDIX. 






543 Amounts brought forward, 


$4,825 25 $209,853 00 


7 Stables, 




$40 00 


280 00 




1 






43 50 


43 50 




1 






44 00 


44 00 




1 < 






45 00 


45 00 




3 ' 






50 00 


150 00 




1 






53 00 


53 00 




3 






56 00 


168 00 




7 






60 00 


420 00 




1 






62 50 


62 50 




3 






70 00 


210 00 




1 






72 00 


72 00 




4 






75 00 


300 00 




1 






76 25 


76 25 




1 






90^00 


90 00 




" 4 






100*00 


400 00 




1 






110 00 


110 00 




1 






117 00 


117 00 




1 


' 




120 00 


120 00 




1 






130 00 


130 00 




1 






160 00 


160 00 


t 


1 






180 00 


180 00 




60 








240 60 




648 




8,297 10 


1 Shop and Engine, 9 00 


9 00 




1 " 




u 


10 20 


10 20 




6 " 




u 


12 00 


72 00 




1 " 




u 


13 56 


13 56 




1 " 




u 


13 61 


13 61 




1 " 




a 


14 00 


14 00 




1 " 




u 


14 55 


14 55 




2 « 




u 


15 00 


30 00 




1 " 




a 


15 66 


15 66 




1 « 




« 16 20 

carried forward, 


16 20 




16 . 


Amounts 


$208 78 $218,150 10 



APPENDIX. 41 

16 Amounts brought forward, $208 78 $218,150 10 

1 Shop and Engine, $16 55 16 55 

1 " « 18 60 18 60 

1 " » 18 78 18 78 

1 " " 19 68 19 68 

1 " " 20 18 20 18 

1 " " 20 88 20 88 

1 " " 21 56 21 56 

1 " « 23 34 23 34 

1 « « 28 62 28 62 

1 « « 28 96 28 96 

1 » « 29 82 29 82 

1 " " 30 00 30 00 

1 " " 30 10 30 10 

1 " « 31 08 31 08 

1 « " 31 92 31 92 

1 " " 32 22 32 22 

1 " » 33 90 33 90 

1 « » 34 74 34- 74 

1 " « 36 00 36 00 

1 '• " 42 84 42 84 

1 " « 49 74 49 74 

1 " " 49 86 49 86 

1 « " 52 86 52 86 

1 « " 53 04 53 04 

1 " " 53 32 53 32 

1 " " 56 04 56 04 

2 " " 58 20 116 40 
1 « " 59 22 59 22 
1 " " 59 52 59 52 
1 " " 60 54 60 54 
1 " « 61 12 61 12 
1 " « 61 49 61 49 
1 " « 63 16 63 16 



50 Amounts carried forward, $1,554 86 $218,150 10 
6 



42 APPENDIX. 

50 Amounts brought forward, $1,554 86 $218,150 10 

1 Shop and Engine, $64 38 64 38 

1 " " 66 66 66 66 

1 « « 66 78 66 78 

1 « " 67 33 67 33 

1 « « 68 44 68 44 

1 « « 73 26 73 26 

1 " " 74 88 74 88 

1 " " 76 80 76 80 

1 « « 80 52 80 52 

1 " « 89 15 89 15 

1 " " 91 10 91 10 

1 " » 92 10 92 10 

1 " « 95 34 95 34 

1 " " 97 75 97 75 

1 " " 97 78 97 78 

1 « " 102 00 102 00 

1 « « 103 50 103 50 

1 " " 103 75 103 75 

1 « « 105 90 105 90 

1 " " 106 30 106 30 

1 " « 106 74 106 74 

1 " " 107 00 107 00 

1 " « 111 00 111 00 

1 " " 126 61 126 61 

1 « « 129 7-8 129 78 

1 » " 133 04 133 04 

1 " " 135 00 135 00 

1 " « 135 33 135 33 

1 " " 139 38 139 38 

1 " " 142 37 142 37 

1 " " 149 94 149 94 

1 " » 155 70 155 70 

1 " « 169 50 169 50 

1 " " 180 24 180 24 



84 Amounts carried forward, $5,200 21 $218,150 10 



APPENDIX. 



43 



84 


Amounts broi^ 


%ht forward, 


$5,200 21 $218,150 10 


1 


Shop 


&I 


Inginc 


$184 20 


184 20 




1 






ti 


190 20 


190 20 




1 






a 


192 84 


192 84 




1 






tt 


211 88 


211 88 




1 






a 


306 82 


306 82 




1 






it 


326 00 


326 00 




1 






it 


369 72 


369 72 




91 




6,981 87 


1 Foun 


dry 


& Engine.. 9 00 


9 00 




1 


a 




tt 


10 00 


10 00 




1 


a 




a 


12 58 


12 58 




1 


a 




it 


15 00 


15 00 




1 


a 




a 


21 34 


21 34 




1 


it 




it 


28 20 


28 20 




1 


a 




a 


57 87 


57 87 




1 


it 




a 


58 92 


58 92 




1 


a 




a 


61 80 


61 80 




1 


a 




ti 


74 70 


74 70 




1 


a 




a 


115 44 


115 44 




1 


a 




tt 


133 16 


133 16 




• 1 


tt 




u 


338 48 


336 48 




13 




934 49 


1 


Printing 


Office 


and 












En 


gine, 18 25 


18 25 




1 


a 






24 96 


24 96 




1 


a 






< 27 10 


27 10 




1 


tt 






32 28 


32 28 




1 


tt 






36 18 


36 18 




1 


it 






" 39 50 


39 50 




1 


it 






'i 44 84 


44 84 




1 


it 






1 45 96 


45 96 




1 


tt tt 
Amounts carr 


< 78 20 
icd forward, 


78 20 




9 


$347 27 


$226,066 46 



44 APPENDIX. 

9 Amounts brought forward, $347 27 $226,066 46 
1 Printing Office and 

Engine, $81 81 81 81 

1 « « « 121 58 121 58 

1 « « « 151 40 151 40 

12 702 06 

"1 Ship Yard & Engine, 90 84 90 84 

1 « « " 178 86 178 86 



1 Factory & Engine, 8 83 8 83 

22 50 22 50 

' 22 68 22 68 

25 29 25 29 

28 20 28 20 

43 76 43 76 

49 50 49 50 

56 36 56 36 

66 31 66 31 

70 92 70 92 

88 98 88 98 

91 50 91 50 

114 12 114 12 

115 90 115 90 
• 116 80 116 80 
■ 119 50 119 50 

150 70 150 70 

< 215 40 215 40 
364 62 364 62 

< 568 24 568 24 

10 00 30 00 

11 25 22 50 

12 00 24 00 

13 00 13 00 



1 


a 


1 


(I 


1 


u 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


Li 


1 


a 


1 


tC 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


a 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


it 


1 


a 


20 




3 


Factories 


2 


a 


2 


a 


1 


a 



269 70 



2,340 11 



8 Amounts carried forward, $89 50 $229,378 33 







APPENDIX. 




45 


8 


Amounts brou 


ght forward, 


$89 50 $ 


229,378 33 


5 Factories, 


$15 00 


75 00 




1 


a 


21 00 


21 00 




1 


u 


22 50 


22 50 




1 


a 


25 00 


25 00 




1 


u 


25 80 


25 80 




5 


a 


30 00 


150 00 




1 


u 


31 25 


31 25 




1 


u 


38 53 


38 53 




1 


u 


41 70 


41 70 




1 


u 


50 00 


50 00 




1 


a 


51 00 


51 00 




1 


u 


51 45 


51 45 




1 


a 


65 19 


65 19 




1 


a 


66 95 


66 95 




1 


a 


72 16 


72 16 




1 


u 


124 35 


124 35 




1 


a 


128 15 


128 15 


• 


1 


u 


170 00 


170 00 




1 


a 


172 68 


172 68 




1 


a 


230 94 


230 94. 




6 


u 




47 25 




42 




1,750 40 


Ts 


iugar Refinery, 


2,367 15 


2,367 15 




i 


tt a 


3,442 26 


3,442 26 




1 Rolling Mill, 


793 92 


793 92 




1 


a u 


1,716 36 


1,716 36 




1 Grist Mill, 


413 75 


413 75 




1 Mill, 


108 00 


108 00 




1 


(i 


132 60 


132 60 




1 


u 


194 94 


194 94 




1 


a 


315 98 


315 98 




1 


a 


604 48 


604 48 




1 


u 


680 76 


680 76 




1 Forge, 


596 04 


596 04 




12 


Amount carrie 


d forward, 




11,366 24 




242,494 97 



46 




APPENDIX. 










Amount brought forward, 




$242,494 97 


2 Engines, 


$7 68 


$15 


36 




4 


a 


7 83 


31 


32 




1 


u 


12 00 


12 


00 




1 


u 


14 28 


14 


28 




1 


a 


15 00 


15 


00 




1 


it 


22 08 


22 


08 




1 


(i 


48 00 


48 


00 




1 


u 


75 24 


75 


24 




1 


u 


102 30 


102 


30 




1 


a 


108 06 


108 


06 




1 


a 


114 50 


114 


50 




1 


a 


126 66 


126 


66 




1 


i( 


135 12 


135 


12 




1 


u 


117 24 


117 


24 




1- 


a 


175 56 


175 


56 




1 


a 


188 04 


188 


04 




1 


» « 


1,904 82 


1,904 


82 




21 






3,205 58 


18 Printing Offices, 6 00 


108 00 




14 


« ' £ 


< 9 00 


126 


00 




2 


a < 


12 00 


24 


00 




3 


it I 


< 13 00 


39 


00 




2 


U l 


< 17 00 


34 


00 




1 


U l 


< 20 00 


20 


00 




3 


U I 


< 21 00 


63 


00 




1 


a ( 


< 25 00 


25 


00 




1 


U i 


< 28 00 


28 


00 




2 


U i 




7 


00 




47 










474 00 


"I 


Distillery, 


51 90 


51 


90 




1 


u 


144 80 


144 


80 




1 


(C 


175 84 


175 


84 




1 


Amounts c 


204 24 

irried forward. 


204 


24 




4 


$576 


78 $246,174 55 



APPENDIX. 47 



4 Amounts brought forward, 


$576 


78 $246,174 55 


1 Distillery, 


$278 76 


278 


76 




1 " 


417 20 


417 


20 




1 « 


436 24 


436 


24 




1 


514 00 


514 


00 




1 


721 50 


721 


50 




1 Brewery, 


11 00 


11 


00 




1 « 


12 00 


12 


00 




5 


15 00 


75 


00 




1 


25 00 


25 


00 




1 


31 30 


31 


30 




1 


903 73 


903 


73 




19 








4,002 51 


2 Bacon Works, 


15 00 


30 


00 




\ (l u 


25 00 


25 


00 




3 






55 00 


2 Bleacheries, 


9 00 


18 


00 




1 


10 00 


10 


00 




i— i 


19 00 


19 


00 




1 " 




6 


75 




1 Laundry, 


26 25 


26 


25 




1 Pottery, 


30 00 


30 


00 




7 






110 00 


54 Bakeries, 


6 00 


324 


00 




■ 6 


9 00 


54 


00 




3 




12 


33 




63 






390 33 


1 Bakery and Engine, 15 00 


15 


00 




1 11 u 


43 64 


43 


64 




1 " « 


55 00 


55 


00 




3 






113 64 


7 Ship Yards, 


15 00 


105 


00 




J u « 


11 25 

ied forward, 


11 


25 




8 Amounts car? 


$116 25 $250,846 03 



48 









APPENDIX. 


• 




8 


AmounU 


■ brou 


ght forward, 


$116 25 $250,846 03 


2 Dry Docks 


j 


$15 00 


30 00 




1 


a u 




53 18 


53 18 




1 


u u 




80 57 


80 57 




~12 










280 00 


714 Hose, 




3 00 


2,142 00 




2 


a 




5 00 


10 00 




4 


a 




10 00 


40 00 




720 




2,192 00 


13 Fountains, 




3 00 


39 00 




6 


(C 




5 00 


30 00 




7 


u 




6 00 


42 00 




2 


u 




7 81 


15 62 




1 


a 




8 00 


8 00 




2 


a 




9 00 


18 00 




1 


u 




12 00 


12 00 




1 


(C 




15 00 


15 00 




33 




179 62 


1 Packing H 


ouse, 


9 00 


9 00 




1 


a 


a 


10 00 


10 00 




1 


a 


a 


30 00 


30 00 




1 


a 


ic 


35 00 


35 00 




4 










84 00 


1 Railroad Co., 


195 00 


195 00 




1 


a 


u 


504 02 


504 02 




1 


a 


(C 


844 46 


844 46 




1 


a 


a 


876 66 


876 66 




1 


a 


u 


1,039 68 


1,039 68 




1 


a 


a 


1,120 26 


1,120 26 




1 


u 


a 


1,663 38 


1,663 38 




1 


a 


a 


2,438 22 


2,438 22 




8 


Am,ount 


cam 


led forward, 




8,681 68 


— 


$262,263 33 







APPENDIX. 




49 


1 


Amount broug 
Chelsea Ferry 


lit forward, 




$262,263 33 


1 


Co., 
East Boston 


$1,239 74 


$1,239 


74 




Ferry Co. 


, 691 94 


691 


94 


1 


People's Ferry 
Co. 


, 780 48 


780 


48 


3 








2,712 16 


1 


Canard Steams' 


hip 








Co. 


, 700 00 


700 


00 


1 


Steamboat, 


26 25 


26 


25 


1 


a 


30 00 


30 


00 


1 


a 


31 64 


31 


64 


1 


a 


41 80 


41 


80 


1 


ii 


42 42 


42 


42 


1 


a 


54 60 


54 


60 


1 


ii 


66 18 


66 


18 


1 


ii 


67 50 


. 67 


50 


1 


ii 


72 21 


72 


21 


1 


ii 


92 56 


92 


56 


1 


a 


108 60 


108 


60 


1 


a 


110 00 


110 


00 


1 


a 


112 80 


112 


80 


1 


a 


113 97 


113 


97 


1 


a 


127 75 


127 


75 


1 


a 


128 80 


128 


80 


1 


a 


130 52 


130 


52 


1 


a 


131 04 


131 


04 


1 


a 


133 54 


133 


54 


1 


a 


160 00 


160 


00 


1 


a 


165 00 


165 


00 


2 


a 


168 70 


337 


40 


1 


a 


192 56 


192 


56 


1 


202 50 

Amounts carried forward, 

7 


202 


50 


26 


$3,379 


64 $264,975 49 



50 


APPENDIX. 






26 Amounts orought forward, 


$3,379 


64 $264,975 49 


1 Steamboat, 


$212 


44 


212 


44 


1 


227 


80 


227 


80 


1 « 


416 


74 


416 


74 


1 


629 


09 


629 


09 


30 




4,865 71 


1 Latin School, 


16 


00 


16 


00 


1 English High School, 


16 


00 


16 


00 


1 Normal School, 


16 


00 


16 


00 


19 Grammar Schools, 


16 


00 


304 


00 


190 Primary Schools, 


6 


00 


1,140 


00 


3 " " 


11 


00 


33 


00 


13 Engine Houses, 


16 


00 


208 


00 


5 Hose Carriage 










Houses, 


16 


00 


80 


00 


3 Hook and Ladder 










Houses, 


16 


00 


48 


00 


6 Police Station Houses, 11 


00 


66 


00 


2 a u a 


16 


00 


32 


00 


1 City Stable, (Harrison 








Avenue,) 


77 


50 


77 


50 


. 1 City Stable, (Commerr 








cial street,) 


27 


50 


27 


50 


5 Fire Alarm Moters, 


6 


00 


30 


00 


1 u it u 


15 


00 


15 


00 


1 Court House, 


95 


00 


95 


00 


1 City Hall, 


50 


00 


50 


00 


1 Faneuil Hall, 


46 


00 


46 


00 


1 City Building, 


37 


50 


37 


50 


1 Probate Office, 


10 


00 


10 


00 


1 Office at City Scales 


h 9 


00 


9 


00 


1 Dead House, 


9 


00 


9 


00 


1 Public Library, 


6 


00 


6 


00 


1 House of Correctior 


i,436 22 
forward, 


436 

$2,807 


22 


261 Amounts carried 


72 $269,841 20 



APPENDIX. 51 

261 Amounts brought forward, $2,807 72 $269,841 20 

1 Lunatic Hospital, $225 00 225 00 

1 House of Reformation, 50 00 50 00 
1 Faneuil Hall Market 

(for Urinals, &c.,) 70 00 70 00 

1 Street Sprinkling, 400 00 400 00 

1 Offal Station, 150 00 150 00 
1 Common Sewer (for 

making Mortar, &c.,) 75 00 75 00 



267 3,777 72 

Proprietors of Boston 

Traveller, 516 23 516 23 

Mass. State Prison, 349 26 349 26 

Mill Dam Co., 300 00 300 00 

Boston Gas Light Co., 374 62 374 62 

SouthBostonGasCo., 122 60 122 60 

East Boston Gas Co., 94 00 94 00 

Brookline Gas Co., 30 00 30 00 

Contractors for sup- 
plying shipping, 4,387 30 4,387 30 
Street Waterers 

(inRoxbury,) 100 00 
Building Purposes, 1,085 05 
Proving Pipes, 31 95 

Mechanics' Fair, 24 51 



100 


00 






1,085 


05 






31 


95 






24 


51 


7,415 








52 




$281,034 44 



Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM F. DAYIS, 

Water Registrar. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

or THB 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
Books can be kept out 14 clays. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.