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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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City Document. — No. 7. 



REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON. 



FOR THE YEAR 1857. 




BOSTON: 
GEO. C. RAND & AVERY, CITY PRINTERS, 

NO. 3, CoENHILIi. 

1858. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofco1857bost 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

Boston, January 15, 1858. 

The Cochituate "Water Board beg leave to make 
their Annual Keport to the City Council, agreeably to 
the requirements of the City Ordinance 5 together with 
the Reports of the City Engineer, the Water Registrar, 
and the Clerk of the Board. These latter will be found 
to furnish in detail much useful and interesting inform- 
ation in regard to the operation and efficiency of the 
Water Works. 

The Board believe that the works were never in a 
more safe and efficient condition. 

Having in the year 1856 disposed of a large part of 
the land lying near the lake, and along the line of 
the conduit, the Board have disposed of no parcel 
during the last year. 

A proper disposition of the Marlborough Reservoir, 
has, however, been a subject of consideration and anx- 
iety with the Board. This reservoir covers 300 acres 
of land. As it is, it is and can be of no use whatever 
to the city, and is capable of yielding little or no 
income, while the damage done to the roads by rais- 
ing the water is a constant source of expense, besides 
the amount annually paid for taxes. Under these cir- 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 7. [Jan. 

curnstances, the Board arrived at the conclusion that 
the whole property attached to this reservoir should be 
sold. The Board were led last summer to suppose that 
if the water were drawn down entirely, the meadows 
and shore land could be disposed of for more money 
than could be realized from their sale as a mill privilege. 
The Board therefore ordered the water to be drawn 
down last autumn. But when the lands were laid bare,- 
and more particular examination made into the city's 
rights, it was deemed expedient to abandon the idea of 
selling in parcels, and orders have been given to raise the 
water again. It was found that of the 300 acres, about 
25 would still be covered with water ; and of nearly 
one-half the remainder, the city possessed only the right 
of nowage. So that there would be but about 130 or 140 
acres that the city could sell ; and the expense of fenc- 
ing these strips, and of obtaining a right of way to them, 
(which the city in most cases could not give,) would be 
so great and difficult, that the prospect of realizing any 
considerable amount from their sale seemed entirely 
hopeless. It is therefore the present purpose of the 
Board to sell in the spring this whole property for the 
most it will bring. 

There will probably be other lots near Lake Cochit- 
uate that it will be expedient to dispose of at an early 
day. 

The new dam at the outlet of the Lake, which was 
noticed in last Report as in progress of construction, 
has been completed to the entire satisfaction of the 
Board. It is of very neat and substantial workman- 
ship ; and gives promise of every degree of security that 
can be reasonably desired. It has cost but about 
$6,000 — considerably less than estimated. 



1858.] WATER. 5 

An additional pipe of 36 inches has been laid 985 
feet across Charles River valley. This was deemed 
to be important, in order to facilitate the passage of 
water from the lake to Brookline reservoir. The good 
effects of it are visible in the increased height to which 
the water is kept in all the reservoirs. It remains to 
line the Brookline reservoir with stone, H or 2 feet 
higher than it is now lined, (and gain thereby so much 
additional head,) to give full effect to the whole works, 
as they now exist. 

The unnecessary waste of water is an annual topic of 
remark. By reference to the Engineer's Report it will 
be seen that the daily consumption last year was 
12,726,000 gallons, against 12^048,600 in 1856— an 
increase of about two-thirds of a million daily. But 
during the first six months of the year the daily con- 
sumption was 13,429,500 — threatening to exhibit for 
the whole year a daily consumption of at least four- 
teen millions of gallons. But the consumption did not 
increase much during any of the later months over 
last year; while in the last three there appears to have 
been a considerable diminution, so that the average of 
the last six months was but 12,022,500. This was owing 
to two causes ; — first, the suspension of the works of large 
consumers ; and second, the absence of cold weather. 
But it will be unsafe to expect these causes to continue 
in operation. The works of great consumers will again 
be started, and cold weather will, in years to come as 
in years past, tempt consumers to let their taps run to 
prevent freezing. 

Although the daily consumption during the last half 
of the year, was less than the average of the whole 



6 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. [Jan. 

year 1856, yet taking the average of the whole of 1857, 
it exhibits evidence of waste over the waste of preced- 
ing years. For in 1856 the daily consumption was 
12,048,600 gallons, and in 1857, 12,726,000 gallons, 
being an increase (notwithstanding causes operating 
to reduce consumption in the last half of the year) 
of over 5i per cent., while the increase of the water 
takers was but 796 upon the gross number at the end 
of 1856, of 20,806, being an increase of near 3^ per 
cent., or less than the increase of consumption by 
1\ per cent. And if we average the consumption on 
the whole number of the inhabitants, the same result 
is exhibited. In 1856, reckoning the whole num- 
ber of inhabitants at 168,000, (being 5,000 more than 
was exhibited by the actual census of 1855,) the daily 
consumption for every individual was 72 gallons • and 
if we average the consumption of 1857 upon each 
inhabitant, reckoning the number at 173,000, (5,000 
more than in 1856,) the daily individual consumption 
will be 73 gallons. So that every individual used one 
gallon daily more in 1857 than in 1856, i.e., ivasted one 
gallon more. It seems therefore then that this last 
year, the most favorable in some important respects, 
for exhibiting a different result, only strengthens and 
confirms the uniform rule that the waste of water is and 
has ever been on the increase. There is, and has ever 
been (it is believed) no exceptional year. 

Now what shall be done ? This Board is far from 
wishing to sound any false alarm, but it requires no 
gift of foreknowledge to make it certain that the 
present supply will be exhausted soon at the present 
rate. "Were the same causes in full operation now, that 
were one year ago, it is believed that the city would 



1858.] WATER. 7 

have a short supply on the high service, and that it 
would be impossible to keep the water in the reservoirs 
at a suitable height for safety in case of fire. And in 
the nature of things it seems impossible that suffering 
and danger will not be soon upon us if some additional 
remedy be not found and applied. 

July 1, 1857, the City Council ordered "that the 
tvhole subject of laying a new main from Brooldine reservoir 
to this city be referred to the Water Board, ivith instructions 
to report to the Council their views and recommendations, 
and also estimates of cost in connection therewith, as they 
may deem expedient and necessary, and to report in print." 
The object of this order covered the whole ground of 
future supply; and this Board went into a full and 
careful examination of the whole subject, and reported 
its views to the City Council, August 13, in City Docu- 
ment No. 50. This Board would respectfully refer to 
that Document, and invite the attention of the pres- 
ent City Council to it as embracing the present views 
of this Board, and as containing much that might be 
appropriately introduced in this Report ; but as that 
Report was referred to this new City Government, it is 
deemed unnecessary to repeat it. It may be merely 
observed that there are no views there expressed, and 
no arguments there used which do not seem to have 
acquired additional force with the lapse of time, — unless 
they may have been slightly affected by the causes which 
have produced the recent diminished consumption, 
which cannot but be regarded as of a temporary nature. 
It is confidently believed that the coming season will 
be a remarkably favorable one for contracting a loan 
for the necessary funds, and that materials and labor 



8 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. [Jan. 

will be unusually low ; while the estimated income 
from water rents, ($300,000,) and the ordinary appro- 
priation for extensions, &c., will nearly or quite pay all 
the interest on the old loan and the prospective one ; 
so that no fear need be entertained that the people will 
be loaded with a debt beyond what the proceeds of 
the works themselves will carry. 

Before taking leave of this subject of waste, it may 
be proper to remind the City Council that there has 
been referred to them a new ordinance to increase the 
penalty of waste, which it is desirable should receive 
action before cold weather comes on. 

One other fact is worthy of notice. The Water Reg- 
istrar's Report gives a table showing the kind and 
number of water fixtures in 1853 and 1857. This 
whole table is worthy of examination ; but the point 
to which attention is asked is the item of Hopper water 
closets. In 1853 there were 698, and in 1857, 3,215. 
The Hopper closets have increased near five fold, while 
the other kind have not doubled. This Board has 
always regarded the use of the Hopper closet as very 
objectionable, as offering inducements and facilities 
for great waste. In the general revision of the water 
rates in 1854, made by this Board, in obedience to order 
of the City Council, (see City Doc. No. 25, 1854,) it is 
stated in the Report that, " in order to make the rate 
for certain descriptions of water closets (Hopper, &c.) 
bear some proportion to the quantity of water used 
and uselessly wasted, and in the hope that they may 
be hereafter abandoned, they (the Water Board) 
recommend that a very high rate be established for 
them when they are used." The rate recommended 



1858.] WATER. 9 

was $12. But it was not the pleasure of the City 
Council to ordain this high rate ; but all water closets 
were put at an uniform rate, and the consequence is that 
this one, deemed to be by far the most injurious to the 
city, is working into almost universal use. The Board 
renews the expression of opinion that this kind of 
water fixture ought to be subjected to a much in- 
creased taxation. 

About two years ago the Supreme Court decided 
that all the land and property taken under the water 
act, or purchased for the purpose of carying out the 
act, and which was necessary and proper for the pur- 
pose, were exempt from liability to taxation. This 
decision excited some feeling in the towns bordering 
on the pond or lake, which deemed themselves 
aggrieved by this restriction of right of taxation, and 
especially by the exemption of the five rods border- 
ing upon and surrounding the whole lake. 

When, therefore, the city applied to the Legisla- 
ture last year for authority to raise the water in the 
lake, some of these towns appeared and opposed the 
granting of the petition, unless a proviso was inserted 
that the land formerly taken should be subject to 
taxation, and also that the land then proposed to be 
taken, should also be subject to the same. And the 
bill reported by the Committee contained these two 
provisos. It was not so much the amount as the 
principle involved in these provisos, that made them 
objectionable ; and in the House the city succeeded 
in having the ex post facto proviso, relating to the lands 
taken under the former act, stricken out. But in the 
Senate that proviso was restored ; and each branch 
2 



10 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. [Jan. 

adhering to its action, the bill was lost. Application 
has been made again this year ; and it is hoped it 
will be crowned with better success. 

One of the roads in Natick, crossing the lake, was so 
low that last year it was occasionally badly washed and 
even overflowed. As it did not seem desirable to 
draw down the water merely for the sake of avoid- 
ing injury to the road — water which it was not desir- 
able to lose for city use — it was deemed expedient to 
raise the road ; and while about it, instead of raising 
it one foot, which would have been sufficient under 
the former taking, it is now raised near four feet, so 
as to make it secure when the water shall be raised. 
This has been executed at a cost of a little over six 
hundred dollars. It is also understood that a license 
to raise the only road in Wayland which will be affect- 
ed by raising the water, has been obtained. This will 
require but a small outlay. 

The quantity of land which will be taken in raising 
the water but two feet, will be so small that it will not 
perhaps be" good policy to refuse an act which shall 
subject it to taxation. But any act which shall take 
away rights which the city has possessed for ten years, 
(though it has hardly yet come into the exercise and 
enjoyment of them,) ought unhesitatingly to be re- 
jected. 

The constant daily draft made upon the supply has 
been too exhausting to allow the playing of the public 
fountains, except on a few public days. It would, no 
doubt, be highly* gratifying to the people to be able 
more frequently to enjoy this innocent pleasure, but 
the alternative is imposed upon them of giving up this 



1858.] WATER. 11 

enjoyment, or of imposing a scarcity upon some parts 
of the city. 

In the Report of this Board last year, some remarks 
were made upon the importance of having water fix- 
tures properly inserted in the houses ; and suggesting 
to the City Council the expediency of taking some 
measures to effect the object. This Board would again 
invite the attention of the new government to the sub- 
ject, as stated on pages 11, 12 and 13, of Report of 1857, 
being City Document No. 12. 

A proposition has been started again to annex Rox- 
bury to Boston, but with what prospect of success is not 
known. But all questions of annexation, from what- 
ever quarter they may come, have so important a bear- 
ing upon the Boston Water Works, that the citizens 
should be anything but apathetic in relation to such 
propositions. On this matter the attention of the City 
Council and of the citizens in general, is invited to the 
following extract from the Report of 1857 : 

" Since the last Annual Report, the sense of the citizens 
has been taken in regard to the annexation of Chelsea to the 
city. The result was a decisive majority against such annex- 
ation. So far as the distribution of Cochituate water is con- 
cerned, that decision must be regarded as eminently wise. 
As in all applications for annexation to the city, a leading 
reason for the measure will always be a participation in the 
use of Cochituate water, so it must continue to be the part 
of wisdom on the part of the citizens to reject such applica- 
tions, so long as the proposed extension will endanger the 
sufficiency of their own supply. Certainly the benefits aris- 
ing to the city from any annexation of foreign territory, ought 
to be very obvious and to be very great, before the citizens 



12 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. [Jan. 

would be justified in sharing with others that supply which 
has cost them so much, and which experience admonishes them 
may soon be too scanty for themselves." 

The subject of meters has engrossed a good share of 
attention during the last year. Some samples have 
been presented to the Board, which promised, or the 
owners promised for them, satisfactory results. So im- 
portant is it deemed that a good, reliable meter of mod- 
erate cost shall be invented and brought into use in 
cases of large consumption, that the Board have author- 
ized the purchase of twenty-four meters, twelve each 
of two different kinds, for the purpose of giving them 
a fair trial. Though it was expected that they would 
be finished and delivered before this time, but few 
have been received, and none yet tested. 

It is deemed to be bad policy to allow taps or 
hydrants for water-takers outside of houses. It is re- 
garded as a source of much waste, in the first place • 
and it is supposed that many persons obtain their sup- 
ply from them free of expense, in the second place. 
The Board has ordered them to be discontinued, and 
pipes to be carried into the premises of all water-takers, 
as fast and as far as it may be practicable and ex- 
pedient. 

The extension of the tuorks has been continued through 
the season, on the principle which former Boards adopt- 
ed, of laying pipes wherever the income would cover 
the interest upon the cost. Of 12-inch pipe there has 
been laid during the year 4,068 feet, against 2,663 feet 
in 1856. Of 6-inch, 10,623 feet, against 9,789 feet in 
1856. Of 4-inch, 2,274 feet, against 1,871 feet in 1856. 
Besides, 985 feet of 36-inch pipe has been laid across 



1858.] WATER. ^ 13 

the valley of Charles Eiver ; in all, 17,950 feet in 
1857, against 14,323 feet in 1856. The whole length 
of pipes of 4 inches and upwards, is now a little over 
119 1-2 miles. 

The number of new Stop-cocks is 24 — making the 
whole number 1,025. 

The number of Service Pipes laid during the year has 
been 855, the whole length of which is 30,033 feet — 
making the whole number 20,484. 

New Hydrants to the number of 26 have been added 
this year — making the whole number 1,308. 

In East Boston a 12-inch pipe has been laid round 
through Border street, near the ship-yard, extending 
3,302 feet. This will greatly facilitate a copious supply 
to the low streets ; as all the water before had to be 
carried over a high elevation in passing near the west- 
erly side of the reservoir. 

The Animal Report of the Water Registrar contains, as 
required by the ordinance, " a statement of the num- 
ber of water takers, the number of cases where the 
water has been cut off, the number and amount of 
abatements, and the expenditures of his department." 
The list of water takers has been arranged, as usual, 
into different classes, and the amount of water rate paid 
by each class given, the water rate being, as usual, paid 
to the Clerk of the Treasurer, in the office of the Water 
Registrar. 

The whole amount received for u'ater rents during the 
year, has been $289,328 83 ; i.e., $5,671 17 less than 
was estimated at the beginning of the year. The esti- 
mate for 1857, is $300,000. 

The number of water takers is now 21,602 — being an 
increase of 796 over 1856. 



14 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. 



[Jan. 



The usual condensed classification of the various water 
tenants has been prepared, and a statement of the 
amount of water rate paid by each class ; the whole, 
being collated with similar tables for the preceding 
year, is here inserted. 



1855 


1856 


1857 




1855 


1856 


1857 


14,483 


15,260 


15,645 


157,318 88 


169,129 69 


176,118 49 


3,263 


3,515 


3,618 


Stores, Shops, Offices, ~\ 


23,587 00 


26,542 93 


27,983 78 


340 


426 


520 


Hotels, Restaurants, Saloons, 


10,895 63 


11,065 53 


12,224 90 


551 


648 
8 
3 


687 
9 
2 




7,578 75 
7,523 40 
2,608 28 


8,297 10 
8,681 68 
2,712 16 


8,929 10 


7 




7,532 05 


3 




1,931 68 


31 


30 
720 

1 

84 


31 

740 

84 




4,370 01 

2,205 00 

800 00 

11,237 20 


4,865 71 

2,192 00 

516 23 

10,202 25 


4,666 81 


72S 




2,260 00 


1 


Motive Power, 




81 


Sugar Refineries, Distilleries, ] 
Breweries and Bakeries, ) 


9,622 73 


4 


4 


3 




655 52 


621 22 


538 34 








Other Manufacturing \ 


18,272 51 


22,857 68 


20,618 10 








City Buildings and other ) 


4,011 50 


3,777 72 


4,165 78 








Public Buildings, Charitable \ 


1,834 40 


1,989 95 


2,109 84 








Shipping Contract with \ 


4,223 78 


4,387 30 


3,898 24 








Street Waterers, (in Rox- } 
bury, 1856, j 


973 72 


100 00 












735 05 


1,085 05 


1,039 96 










920 17 


1,010 24 


4,924 75 




$ 






259,750 80 


280,034 44 


288,564 55 



1858.] WATER. 15 

A statement of Receipts and Expenditures during the 
last year, by the Clerk of the Water Board, or Service 
Clerk, is hereto annexed. The whole amount of ex- 
penditure has been $96,931 25. Of this, $66,753 35 
was for extension of the works; leaving $30,177 90 
as the amount of the expenses of this department. 
This is in excess of the expenses of 1856, $1,336 80. 

As this item covers all the expenses of repairs, and 
the salaries of those having charge of the works, &c, it 
must be expected to increase. The works are continu- 
ally being extended, and the older they grow of course 
they become more liable to breaks and leakage ; and 
from the nature of the case, more expense must be 
annually required to keep them in order. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JNO. H. WILKINS, 
SAMUEL HATCH, 
SAMUEL HALL, 
CHARLES STODDARD, 
THOMAS P. RICH, 
TISDALE DRAKE, 
EBENEZER JOHNSON. 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 7. Jan. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expendituees made by the Cochituate Water 
Board, prom December 31st, 1856, to January 1st, 1858. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir, for labor, &c, $546 82 

South Boston « « " 300 54 

East Boston " " » 889 26 

Brookline « " " 2,603 49 

Laying Main Pipe, for stock, &c, 3,233 58 

Main Pipe, .... 28,145 20 

Service Pipe, .... 11,193 76 

Stable, 759 05 

Hydrants, 844 02 

Stop Cocks, .... 1,471 90 

Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c, - 345 41 

Plumbing Shop, « « . 39 91 

Proving Yard, " " in repair shop, 197 51 

Pipe Yard, Painting, &c, - - 21 00 

Aqueduct Repairs, for labor, &c, 1,230 96 

Lake, labor finishing dam, &c, - 2,415 99 

Hydrant and Stop Cock Boxes, - 990 73 

Repairing Main Pipe, - - 1,679 42 

Do. Service Pipe, - - 2,212 71 

Do. Streets, - - - 2,085 18 

Do. Hydrants, - - - 1,914 95 

Do. Stop Cocks, - " - 1,041 68 

Do. Metres, - - - 294 60 



Amount carried forward, $64,457 67 



1858.] WATER. 






17 


Amount brought forward, 






$64,457 67 


Salaries, - 


$6,675 


16 




Travelling Expenses, 


150 


84 




Office Expenses, (including rent, fuel, 








gas, &c. for Engineers' office,) - 


1,921 


71 




Taxes, ..... 


626 


33 




Miscellaneous Expense, Surveying 








land, &c. .... 


1,254 


17 




Tolls and Ferriage, 


283 


87 




Fountains, .... 


128 


20 




Carting, ..... 


1,404 


09 




Postage and Express, 


17 


62 




Tools, 


427 


03 




Stationery, (including Stationery for 








Water Registrar and Superin- 








tendents,) - - 


170 


68 




Rents, for Tool Chest and Tools, 


39 


00 




Oif and on Water, 


3,049 


11 




Damage, Laying Pipe through Drains, 


&c. 127 


21 




Oil, ------ 


117 48 




Printing, - 


239 


76 




Proving Press, - - - - 


111 


26 




Repairing Boxes on Bridges, 


1,324 


17 




Wages, proving yard, 


2,808 


64 




Do. plumbing shop, 


544 


25 




Do. blacksmith shop, 


735 


04 




Do. laying Main Pipe, 


7,075 


01 




Do. do. Service Pipe, 


3,242 


95 


32,473 58 



Amount carried forward, $96,931 25 

3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 7. [Jan. 

Amount brought forward, $96,931 25 

Cash paid the City Treasurer. 
Received for Grass, - - - $261 00 

" " Jamaica Pond Aqueduct, 5,000 00 



u 


" Land, 


2,428 92 






a 


" Labor and Material, 


1,059 83 






a 


" Wood, - 


461 96 






is 


" Service Pipe and Laying, 668 01 






u 


" Off&onWater, 1877 28 








u 


" Do. waste, &c. 523 00 


2,400 28 






u 


" Rent of Hopkinton Re- 
servoir, 


1,250 00 






u 


" Rent of Arches under 
B. H. Reservoir, - 


150 00 






li 


" Iron Wheel, - 


30 00 






a 


" Old Shanty, - 
Balance, .... 

t of Expenditures, 


40 00 


13,750 00 




$83,181 


25 


Amoum 


$96,931 


25 




Extension of the 


Work. 






Main Pipe, .... 


$28,145 20 






Service 


Pipe, .... 


11,193 76 






Laying 


Main Pipe, 


3,233' 58 






Carting, Carting Pipes to Newton 








Lower Falls, &c, - 


1,300 00 






Hydrants, 


884 02 






E. Boston Reservoir, Drain, &c. - 


300 00 






Brookl 


ine Reservoir, Screens, Pas- 








sage 


way, &c, - - 


1,800 00 






Lake, ( 


)n account of Dam, &c. 
mounts carried forward, 


2,000 00 
$48,856 56 






A 


$96,931 


25 



1858.] WATER. 




Amounts brought forward, 




$48,856 56 


Blacksmith Shop, Labor, &c, 


- 


$725- 00 


Plumbing Shop, " " 




425 00 


Proving Yard, Crane, &c. 


- - 


150 00 


Wages, Laying Main Pipe, - 


- 


7,075 01 


Do. do. Service Pipe, 


- 


3,242 95 


Do. Proving Yard, 


- 


2,808 64 


Oil, - - - 


- 


60 00 


Proving Press, - 


- 


111 26 


Miscellaneous Expense, Surveying to 




Raise the Lake, <fec. 


- 


800 00 


Hydrant and Stop Cock Boxes, 


- 


600 00 


Tools, .... 


- 


427 03 


Stop Cocks, 


- 


1,471 90 


Amount of Annual Expense, 







19 
,931 25 



66,753 35 
$30,177 90 



Statement op the Expendituees and Receipts on account 
op the Water Works, to January 1st, 1858. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners, 



a 


u 


a 


a 


u 


u 


u 


a 


u 


it 


iC 


a 


u 


a 



Amount carried forward, 



oners, 


-$4,043,718 21 


iard, 1850, 


- 366,163 89 


" 1851, 


- 141,309 23 


" 1852, 


89,654 20 


» 1853, 


89,854 03 


" 1854, 


80,182 35 


» 1855, 


63,866 33 


" 1856, 


81,429 35 


« 1857, 


96,931 25 




$5,053,108 84 



20 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 7. [Jan. 1858. 



Amount brought forward, 
Amount paid to the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners, - - $47,648 38 
Water Board, 1850, paid to the City 



$5,053,108 84 



Treasurer, 



1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 



8,153 52 
5,232 38 

15,869 12 
4,621 40 

12,423 29 
9,990 38 
7,840 43 

13,750 00 



Sundry Payments by the City, - $48,520 26 

Discount and Interest on Loans, 2,624,629 63 

Sundry Credits by the City, - $11,886 70 

Amount rec'd for Water Rates, 1,762,946 75 
Amount due January 1st, 1858, - 



125,528 


90 


$4,927,579 


94 


2,673,149 


89 


$7,600,729 


83 


1,774,833 


45 



$5,825,896 38 



SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



APPENDIX 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Boston, January 5, 1858. 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir : — The usual Annual Report of matters pertaining to 
the Water Works is herewith submitted. 

Lake Cochituate, fyc. 

All the structures, roads, and the new dam connected with 
the lake, are in excellent condition. 

Owing to the unusual quantity of rain in the spring, work 
was not commenced on the new dam until July 21st. It was 
finished August 20th. Since that time it has been very thor- 
oughly tested, and found to be very tight. 

The quality of the water is now very good, and has been 
throughout the year, except for a few days in the fall, just after 
some very heavy rains, when a slight vegetable taste, similar 
to what has been before observed, was found in it. 

During the year an unusual large quantity of snow and 
rain has fallen. At the commencement of the year, the water 
in the lake was within one foot of high water mark. It was 
gradually drawn down, until on the 7th of February it stood 



2 APPENDIX. 

at 5 feet 4 inches, this being 2 feet 8 inches below high water 
mark. The weather moderating and rain falling about this 
time, thawed the snow and ice so fast that the surface of the 
lake was raised so suddenly that in a little over two weeks 
it had risen to high water mark. It afterwards fell a few 
inches, but on the 5th of March it was again up to high water 
mark. From that time until the 10th of October, the lake 
continued full, notwithstanding the large use of water in the 
city, and the unprecedented amount wasted from the lake. 
From the 10th of October to the 25th, the water fell to 9 
inches below high water mark, when it again commenced ris- 
ing, and on the 31st again reached high water mark, since 
which time it has kept full. For 288 days in the year the 
lake has been kept full, and only 77 days hrthe year has it 
been below high water mark. 

Water has also been wasted from the lake 296 days in the 
year, in all 10,625,900,000 gallons, this being an average per 
day for the entire year of over 29,000,000 gallons, it being 
more than double the average quantity used in the city 
throughout the year ; and if it could have been stored up, 
would have lasted the city for the two succeeding years, even 
if no rain had fallen in that time. 

The lake having been kept so full, slightly damaged one of 
the roads leading across it. This was repaired, and since, by 
order of your Board, a contract has been made with Mr. Hor- 
ace T. Hildreth, of Natick, to cart on gravel to raise it some 
four feet in height. Stone walls were also needed at the sides 
of the road to retain the earth. These are now being con- 
structed under the immediate superintendence of Mr. Knowl- 
ton. Permission to raise the road was obtained from the 
Selectmen of Natick, before commencing the work. 



APPENDIX. 6 

Conduit Line. 

The Conduit is generally in good condition. It was re- 
paired early in the season near Webber's barn. The waste 
weir at this place will require some repairs the coming season. 

The strength of the Conduit has been thoroughly tested 
during the past year. The following table shows the differ- 
ent heights at which the water has been running, and the num- 
ber of days in each month at the different heights. It being 
understood that the Conduit is but six feet four inches in 
height. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 




5.0 


5.6 5.8 


5.10 6.0 


6.4 


6.8 


7.0 


7.4 


7.8 


8.0 


9.0 




NUMBER OF DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 














4 




12 
10 






7 
5 


8 


February, 










13 
1 








March, 










6 
18 

8 


30 
13 
























7 
2 


4 


May, 










5 


6 
21 


















1 

26 

24 


















5 








5 




1 
30 












1 




















31 






















November, 




1 


13 
2 


12 

26 












4 
1 








2 
























. ... 






36 


2 


32 


15 


57 


36 


43 


49 


51 


5 


27 


12 



. It will be seen by this table that in 142 days the conduit 
has been run less than full, in 36 days just full, and in 187 
days it has been running with a head on it varying from four 
inches, to two feet eight inches. The tabic also shows that the 
great pressures have been put on it in all seasons of the year. 



4 APPENDIX. 

The original design was to keep the water running at a 
depth not exceeding 4 feet 4 inches. Had we been compelled 
to keep the flow down to this point, there would not have 
been a single day in the year in which the city would have 
had a full supply. 

With very trifling additions to the eonduit, there is no 
doubt it is strong enough to have a head of at least two feet 
on it continuously. 

Since the third main has been laid across Charles River, 
the water has been run at an average of about one foot less 
in that portion of the conduit west of Charles River, than 
would have been necessary had it not been laid. 

Charles River. 

A third main pipe was laid across this river in the summer. 
Work was commenced early in July. The pipes were all laid 
and water let through them on the 9th of September. The 
new main is 36 inches in diameter. The two originally laid 
are 30 inches in diameter. 



BrooTdine Reservoir. 

This reservoir is in good condition. In the early part of 
the year the new circular screens were put into the gate house 
and have worked perfectly well during the entire season. 
Leaves, rubbish, and fish, are much more easily removed from 
them than from the upright ones. They are also more 
easily repaired when necessary. 

The sale of some useless land at the westerly end of the 
Reservoir made it advisable to remove a fence to the new 
line of property. At the same time a road was changed in 
direction. These two changes have improved the appearance 
of this part of the Reservoir. 



APPENDIX. 



Beacon Hill Reservoir. 



This reservoir leaked last October a little more than at any 
previous time during the last four years. 

"When the water was first let into it, there were more leaks 
and worse ones than at present ; but being mostly through the 
crown of the inside arches, the water ran off through the 
drains originally built for that purpose under the reservoir, 
in anticipation of the leaks. 

All structures of stone and brick built to contain water 
above ground, if of any great magnitude, leak more or less. 
Beacon Hill Reservoir leaks as little as any one in the 
country. 

After the water was first let into it, the leaks gradually de- 
creased, occasioned by the sediment in the water being depos- 
ited in the minute crevices of the masonry. 

Once in each year the water is all drawn off, and the reser- 
voir cleansed out. This was done in October last. There is 
generally from one to three inches of deposit on the bottom. 
The leaks are worse soon after it is cleaned out than at any 
other time. They gradually decrease as the sediment collects. 

The main cause of increase of the leaks in the fall, was 
owing to the fact that last winter during the severe cold 
weather, the little water that could be kept in it froze up 
solid, and its expansion caused very minute seams to open in 
the crowns of the arches, through which the water percolated. 
The increase of leakage was noticed very early in the spring, 
although at that time there was not so much show of it outside 
as now. 

Many attempts have been made to stop the leaks, but noth- 
ing has yet been successful, nor is there much prospect of their 
abatement until another main from Brookline is laid, or some 
other means adopted to increase the quantity of water in the 
city in extreme cold and extreme hot weather. 

The new pipe would do much towards preventing the leaks, 
because the reservoir could then be kept so full of water that 
4 



6 APPENDIX. 

it would not freeze up solid, and therefore any such great ex- 
pansion of the reservoir as occurred last winter would be 
prevented. 

The leaks are not a cause of danger to the structure, 
because the foundations were laid unusually deep and with 
great strength, and because the principal part of the water 
from the leaks is carried off in the drains, thus preventing the 
ground under the walls from becoming soft. The reservoir 
is now every way as strong and substantial as ever, no settle- 
ment having taken place in any part of it. 

The leaks can only be kept from sight by an expenditure 
of some thousands of dollars, which expenditure I would not 
advise to be incurred at the present time. 



Consumption of Water in the City. 

The excessive cold of last winter caused an extraordinary 
use of the water. During the month of January an average 
of over 15,000,000 gallons was used daily, it being near 2£ 
millions per day more than was used in January of 1856. In 
the months of July and August, as usual, larger quantities 
were used than in the spring and fall months. In October, 
the use of water fell off very much, the stagnation in business 
at that time reducing the quantities used in manufactories, an 
average of one million gallons per day. The average quan- 
tity used during the year was about 12f millions of gallons 
per day. 

The decrease of consumption of water can only be tem- 
porary, and should not be permitted to delay action in regard 
to raising the surface of the lake, nor in making preparations 
for the new main line of pipes from Brookline Reservoir to 
the city. 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



Loss of Head from BrooMine Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city 
may be seen by reference to the table in this and previous 
reports of average annual heights of water in the Reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 





Heights of Water above Marsh Level in 


Loss of Head 
from 


Loss of Head 
from 










Brookline 

to 
Beacon Hill 


Brookline 


Year. 


Brookline 


Beacon Hill 


East Boston 


to 
East Boston. 




Eeservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


Reservoir. 


1850 


123.16 


119.04 




4.12 





1851 


123.36 


119.39 


105.06 


3.97 


18.30 


1852 


123.67 


116.60 


104.07 


7.07 


19.60 


1853 


122.86 


114.89 


104.91 


7.97 


17.95 


1854 


123.65 


115.69 


99.84 


7.96 


23.81 


1855 


123.82 


117.79 


97.49 


6.03 


26.33 


1856 ........ 


123.66 


116.15 


94.11 


7.51 


29.55 


1857 


124.11 


114.77 


94.18 


9.34 


29.93 



Extreme high water in Brookline Reservoir is 124.6 feet. 



APPENDIX. 



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10 



APPENDIX. 



Monthly Fall of Rain, in inches, in 1857. 



Month. 



PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 



1 * 

"S fl 

.a i> 

8 " 

■a s 

Hi 






a 3 

si 

£ a 1-5 
l-I s 



*■» *d fa 

a" a « 

Is -g t-s 

o o 

^ h! 



2 M 



■a s 



^ 



1 £ 



fa 



January, 
February 
March, 
April, . 
May, . . 
June, . . 
July, . . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November 
December, 



Totals, 



2.51 
1.30 
1.72 
10.23 
7.15 
4.02 
8.85 
6.62 
4.27 
7.06 
3.07 
6.30 



63.10 



5.36 
2.45 
3.09 
10.83 
5.57 
2.02 
5.53 
7.18 
2.56 
4.50 
2.52 
5.26 



56.87 



3.86 
1.63 
2.58 
8.02 
3.58 
3.16 
5.67 
5.68 
2.29 
5.52 
2.26 
5.13 



49.38 



3.42 
3.45 
2.75 
8.77 
3.76 
2.98 
5.35 
5.33 
3.01 
5.77 
2.39 
5.04 



52.02 



2.68 
1.40 
2.03 
7.78 
4.56 
1.88 
6.99 
4.77 
2.20 
4.60 
2.04 
3.11 



44.04 



7.87 
3.72 
3.49 
8.99 
5.16 
1.71 
6.32 
6.67 
2.93 
3.67 
2.56 
4.83 



57.92 



5.50 
2.35 
3.35 
6.29 
4.33 
1.90 
3.45 
4.80 
2.27 
2.90 
2.40 
5.20 



44.74 



Professor Caswell informs me that the average quantity 
of rain fall in Providence the past 26 years is nearly 40.5 
inches. 



APPENDIX. 



11 



Statement of the Location, Size, and Number of Feet of 
Distributing Pipes, laid in the Year 1857. 



In what Streets. 



Harrison Avenue, 



West Springfield, 
West Chester, 

Troy, 

Worcester, 

East Chester, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Worcester, 

Union Park, 

Chester Square, . . 

New Fiiend, 

Northampton, 

Lenox, 

Brookline, 

Concord, 

Village, 



Pleasant Street Court, 

Tremont, 

Curve, 



Fourth, 



Fifth, 

Midland, 

Broadway, 

Sullivan, 

In Seventh and C, 

Broadway, 

Seventh, 

Sixth, 

Seventh, 



Gates, . 
Gold, . . 
Ellery, 



Border, , 



Maverick, 
Saratoga, 
Princeton, 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPER, &C. 
Chester and Springfield, 

Total 12-inch in Boston Proper, 



Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 
Shawmut Avenue and Washington, 

Harrison Avenue and Albany, 

Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 
Washington and Harrison Avenue, 
Washington and Harrison Avenue, 
Washington and Shawmut Avenue, 

Tremont and Washington, 

Shawmut Avenue and Washington, 
Tremont and Harrison Avenue, 

Union and Hanover, 

West of Tremont, 

Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, . . . 

West of Tremont, 

West of Tremont, 

Lucas and Castle, 



Total 6-inch in Boston Proper,. 



West of Church, 

Cunard and Buggies, in Roxbury, 
Hudson and Albany, 



Total 4-inch in Boston Proper and Koxb'y, 
SOUTH BOSTON. 



I and K, 

Total 12-inch in South Boston, 



I and K, 

First and Baldwin, 

K and L, 

Dorchester and E, . 



L and M, . 
L and M, , 
D and E, 
I and K, . 



Total 6-inch in South Boston, 



Dorchester and Telegraph, 

D and E, 

Dexter and Dorchester, . . . 



Total 4-inch in South Boston, 

EAST BOSTON. 

Central Square and Meridian, . . . 

Total 12-inch in East Boston, 



Cottage and Orleans, . 
Brooks and Putnam, . 
Putnam and Prescott, 



Total 6-inch in East Boston, 



12 



12 



12 



227 

227 

147 
222 
264 
60 
284 
492 
437 
811 
445 
569 
456 
126 
368 
264 
281 
204 

5430 

275 
754 
126 

1155 



380 




3302 

3302 

554 
502 
512 

1568 



12 



APPENDIX. 



RECAPITULATION. 



SECTION. 


1857. 


Diameter in Inches. 




36 


12 


6 


4 


Boston Proper, &c. 


C Total number of feet laid, . . 




227 


5,430 

10 

3,625 

5 
1,568 

2 


1155 
1 


South Boston, .... 


( Total number of feet laid, . . 




380 

1 

3302 

3 

159 
1 


1119 
1 




( Total number of feet laid, . . 
/ Stop-cocks in the same, . . . 








( Total number of feet laid, . . 


985 










Sums of Pipes, 








985 


4068 
5 


10,623 
17 


2274 






2 











APPENDIX. 



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14 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1857. 



a 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


S a 

cj M 

5 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 
in 

Feet. 


Numb'r. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Numb'r. 


Length 

in 
Feet. 


l 

3 

4 

5 
8 


12 

12 

478 


786 

505 

14,948 


3 

3 

171 


354 

101 

6381 


2 
3 

171 


41 

248 

6669 


17 

18 

820 


1,181 

854 

27,998 






855 


30,033 








bo a 







Making the total number up to January 1, 1858, 20,484 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1857. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



WHERE. 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


H 


1 


3 

4 


h 
8 


TOTAL. 




1 


5 




2 
4 
6 


1 


14 

4 


20 
1 
3 


21 
1 
2 


7 
1 


45 
1 


9 
1 


4 

1 


163 
26 
20 


291 
33 










39 












Totals, 


1 


5 




12 


1 


18 


24 


■21 


8 


46 


10 


5 


209 


363 







APPENDIX. 



15 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches in 
diameter and upwards, sixty-seven "were caused by the loosen- 
ing of lead in the joints, seven by the settling of the earth, 
seven by frost, one by a cap blowing off, two by flaws in the 
pipes, one struck by a pick. 

Total eighty-five in pipes of four inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that have occurred in the service pipes, and 
two-inch pipes, sixty-nine were caused by the settling of the 
earth, thirty-eight by stiff connections, thirty by defective 
couplings, twenty by settling of boxes, twelve by frost, thirty- 
five by flaws in pipes, thirteen by defective stop-cocks, eleven 
by tenants, one stopped by a piece of sponge, twenty-eight 
stopped by fish, four by stop-cocks blowing out, one by a 
joint, ten struck by picks, four by digging drains, one by 
driving piles, one stopped by rust. 

Total, two hundred and seventy-eight in service and two- 
inch pipes. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850—57. 



Year. 


LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 


Four Inches and upwards. 


Less than Four Inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 


72 


.... 104 


1851 


64 


173 


.... 237 


1852 


82 


241 


323 


1853 


85 


260 


.... 345 


1854 


74 


280 


.... 354 


1855 


75 


219 


.... 294 


1856 ... 


75 . 


232 


307 


1857 


85 


278 


. . . . 363 











16 v APPENDIX. 



Hydrants. 



During the year twenty-six new hydrants have been estab- 
lished, as follows : eight in the City proper, eleven in South 
Boston, five in East Boston, and two in Koxbury. 

Altogether there have been established up to the present 
date : 

In Boston proper, 879 

'« South Boston, 235 

« East Boston, - - - - - 168 

" Brookline, ..... 1 

" Eoxbury, ...... 7 

" Charlestown, - - - - - 11 

" Chelsea, 7 



Total, 1,308 

Sixty-nine hydrants have been taken out and replaced by 
new or repaired ones. One hundred and seventy-six decayed 
hydrant boxes were taken out and replaced by others made 
of Burnetized lumber, and the same material was used for 
the twenty-six that have been established. 

The hydrants were all cleaned and oiled in the fall, and 
packed with hay for the winter. 



Stojp-CocJcs. 

The stop-cocks have been cleaned and oiled the past sea- 
son, and a number have been repacked. Twenty-three new 
boxes have been put in to cover the stop-cocks put in this 
year, and seventy-three have been renewed. The stop-cocks, 
with but one exception, are in good working order. 



APPENDIX. 



17 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1858. 



Number of 



Pipes, 

Blow-off Branches, 

Y Branches, 

3-Way Branches, . 
4- Way Branches, . 
Flange Pipes, 

Sleeves, 

Clamp Sleeves, . 

Caps, 

Keducers, , 

Bevel Hubs, .... 
Curved Pipes, . . . 
Quarter Turns, . 
Double Hubs, . . . 
Offset Pipes, . . . 

Stop-cocks, 

Pieces of Pipe, . . 
Yoke Pipes, .... 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



36 



15 



30 

70 
3 , 
1 , 
4 
2 
9 
4 
6 
2 
1 



24 



20 



16 



21 



81 117 



1 

9 

24 

2 



:)5 



18 



U 



31 



450 



18 APPENDIX, 

i 

Hydrants. 

7 Wilmarth, 
15 Lowell, 

3 Kingston, 
5 Hooper, 

14 Ballardvale, 

4 Long N. Y. Pattern. 

For Hydrants. 27 lengtheners, 5 hydrant bends, 4 frames 
and covers, 6 unfinished boxes, 25 second-hand caps, 4 wharf 
hydrants, 133 lbs. composition castings, 1 nipple, 16 spare 
screws, 3 plungers, 2 wharf hydrant boxes, 36 rings, 11 
bands, 152 straps, 100 washers, 7 rods. 

For Stop-cocks. 35 braces, 8 sets of stands and gear for 
36 and 30-inch stop-cocks, 20 wrought iron nuts, 157 lbs. 1£ 
inch bolts, 150 lbs. 1^-inch bolts, 160 -lbs. f-inch bolts, 241 
lbs. f-inch bolts, 87 lbs. ^-inch bolts, 2 36-inch composition 
screws, 1 30-inch valve, 1 12-inch valve, 6 cast iron nuts, 5 
6-inch composition screws, 4 wrought iron screws, 4 sets 
friction wheels, 180 lbs. old bolts, various sizes, 4 unfinished 
6-inch stop-cocks, 6 unfinished 4-inch stop-cocks, 9 unfinished 
2-inch stop-cocks, 260 lbs. unfinished composition castings, 
2 sample cocks, 2 12-inch plungers. 

For Service Pipes. 430 square boxes, 41 long boxes, 4 
Y boxes, 56 caps, 48 tubes, 7 air cocks, 19 1-inch union 
cocks, 440 f-inch union cocks, 11 f-inch T cocks, 117 1-inch 
T cocks, 27 f-inch T cocks, 65 straight cocks, 6 f-inch Y cocks, 
180 f-inch. flange cocks, 6 2i-inch connection couplings, 55 
1-inch do., 121 i-inch do., 7 f-inch do., 94 f-inch do., 40 second 
hand f-inch union cocks, 80 lbs. old connection couplings, 200 
unfinished f-inch union cocks. 

Water Meters. 28 large size, (2 out of order,) 27 small 
size, (2 out of order,) 2 power meters, 1 small Philadelphia 
meter, 783 lbs. connection pipes with couplings, 40 connec- 
tion nipples, 8 connection couplings. 



APPENDIX. 19 

Lead Pipe. 1,100 lbs. 2£-inch, 163 lbs. li-inch, 378 lbs. 
1-inch, 672 lbs. f-inch, 605 lbs. 1-inch, 1,000 lbs. pieces f, f, 
and 1-inch, 159 lbs. f-inch, (light.) 

Block Tin Pipe. 230 lbs. inch and f-inch, 132 lbs. f-inch, 
(old.) 

Block Tin. 7 lbs. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 584 lbs. bar iron, 1,868 lbs. working 
pieces, 414 lbs. steel, 1,700 lbs. scrap iron. 

Miscellaneous. 75 lbs. spikes, 6 loads cracked stone, 115 
tons paving gravel, 2 sets box curbs, 5 man holes for large 
pipes, ^ cord wood, lot of old lumber, 2 tons old cast iron, 
175 lbs. old composition, miscellaneous lot of old bolts, cast 
off drills, parts of stop-cocks, &g., large lot of patterns for 
stop-cocks, hydrants, proving presses, meters, &c, 500 feet of 
spruce boards, lot of old machinery from Marlboro', 1 stove 
and cooking utensils, 46 lbs. solder, 360 lbs. gasket, 400 lbs. 
sheet lead. 

Stable. 1,200 lbs. English hay, hay cutter, 2 horses, 3 sets 
of harnesses, 4 bushels of grain, stable utensils. 

Tools, fyc. 3 wagons, 2 pungs, 3 hand carts, 6 wheelbarrows, 
1 hand truck, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom derrick, 4 crank 
derricks, and 2 pairs of shears with apparatus, 3 proving 
presses with apparatus, complete lot of tools for laying main 
pipes and service pipes. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 3,000 feet of old lumber, lot 
of old iron, tool house, swing stage and irons, capstan frame 
and levers, 3 boom carriages, 1 large copper ball, 5 large 
swivel pipe patterns, 1 cast iron drinking fountain, lot of 
machinery from Marlboro', hand hose, 4 composition cylinders, 
9 composition jets, 1 6-inch reducer jet, 3 plate jets, 2 compo- 
sition caps with hose-cocks, 1 4-inch copper pipe, 3 composi- 
tion reel jets, 9 cast iron jets. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMBS SLADB, 

City Engineer. 



- 



APPENDIX. 21 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Water Registrar's Office, ) 
Boston, January 1st, 1858. 5 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir:— ■ 

I herewith submit the following Report, as required by the 
16th Section of the Ordinance providing for the care and 
management of the Boston Water Works, passed October 
31st, 1850. 

The total number of Water Takers now entered for the 
year 1858, is 21,602, being an increase since January 1st, 
1857, of 796. 

During the year there has been 1,055 cases where the water 
has been shut off for non-payment of water rates, and un- 
necessary waste of water. Of these, 851 were for non-pay- 
ment; 204 were for waste. 

The number of cases where the water has been turned on, 
is 1,474. Of these, 632 were cases which had been pre- 
viously shut off for non-payment of water rates; 163 were 
those which had been shut off for unnecessary waste of water ; 
and 679 were let on for the first time. 

There have been no abatements made during the year. 

The total amount received, from December 
31st, 1856, to January 1st, 1858, is - - $289,328 83 

Of the above, there was received for water 
used in previous years, the sum of - $764 28 

Leaving the receipts for water 
used during the year 1857, - - 288,564 55 

Amount of water rates, - - - - $289,328 83 
6 



22 APPENDIX. 

Amount brought forward, $289,328 83 

A tabular statement of the receipts for the year 
1857, is included in this Report. 

In addition to the above, there has been re- 
ceived for letting on water, in cases where it 
had been shut off for non-payment of water 

rates, 1,226 00 

Total amount received during the year, in 
this office, - - $290,554 83 



The amount of assessments already made for 
the year 1858, is *- ," $247,012 86 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water, during the year 1858, is - - 300,000 00 

The expenditures in my department, during 
the year 1857, have been - - - - 3,213 14 

The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz. : 

Paid Chas. L. Bancroft, for services as clerk, 

" Stephen Badlam, « " 

" Peter H. Niles, for services as inspector, 

" Charles E. Dunham, " " 

" George C. Eand & Avery, for printing, 

" Eayrs & Fairbanks, for stationery, 

" T. H. Badlam, for distributing bills, 

" J. C. Phelps, " " 

" Geo. C. Phelps, " " 

" Charles E. Dodd, " " 

" Benj. P. Hollis, " " 

" Stephen Maddox, for washing towels, - 

" People's Ferry Co., for tickets, 

Amount, ..... 



$782 50 


782 50 


626 00 


626 00 


168 24 


116 14 


24 00 


23 00 


22 00 


22 00 


12 00 


5 76 


3 00 


$3,213 14 



appendix. 23 

Statement showing the Number of Houses, Stores, Steam 
Engines, &c, in the City of Boston, supplied with 
Cochituate Water, to the 1st of January, 1858, with 
the Amount of Water Rate, paid for 1857. 



1,287 Dwelling ] 


Houses, 


$6 00 


$7,722 


00 


1,399 


u . 


a 


7 00 


9,793 


00 


1,750 


It 


a 


8 00 


14,000 


00 


1,955 


IC 


a 


9 00 


17,595 


00 


1,749 


a 


a 


10 00 


17,490 


00 


1,445 


u 


u 


11 00 


15,895 


00 


1,141 


a 


a 


12 00 


13,692 


00 


768 


u 


a 


13 00 


9,984 


00 


564 


u 


a 


14 00 


7,896 


00 


446 


u 


u 


15 00 


6,690 


00 


471 


u 


a 


16 00 


7,536 


00 


360 


a 


u 


17 00 


6,120 


00 


243 


u 


a 


18 00 


4,374 00 


227 


u 


u 


19 00 


4,313 


00 


144 


u 


u 


20 00 


2,880 


00 


139 


u 


u 


21 00 


2.919 


00 


132 


u 


a 


22 00 


2,904 


00 


80 


a 


a 


23 00' 


1,840 


00 


84 


a 


u 


24 00 


2,016 


00 


62 


a 


u 


25 00 


1,550 


00 


84 


a 


a 


26 00 


2,184 


00 


32 


a 


u 


27 00 


864 


00 


42 


a 


a 


28 00 


1,176 


00 


38 


u 


a 


29 00 


1,102 


00 


45 


a 


a 


30 00 


1,350 


00 


256 


a 


a 


31 00 


7,936 


00 


702 


u 


u 




4,297 


49 


15,645 


! oar ding 


House, 


$30 00 


$30 


$176,118 49 


1 I 


00 



Amounts carried forward, $30 00 $176,118 49 



24 






APPENDIX. 






1 


Amounts iron 


ght forward, 


$30 00 $176,118 49 


1 Boarding House, 


$33 00 


33 


00 


2 






35 


00 


70 


00 


1 






42 


00 


42 


00 


1 






60 


00 


60 


00 


1 






63 


00 


63 


00 


1 






64 


00 


64 00 


1 






98 


00 


98 


00 


1 


/tod 


el Houses, 


284 
15 


00 
00 


284 
45 


00 


10 


744 00 


31? 


00 


9 


a 


u 


18 


00 


162 


00 


3 


a 


a 


19 


00 


- 57 


00 


2 


a 


u 


21 


00 


42 


00 


9 


a 


a 


24 00 


216 


00 


1 


a 


n 


27 


00 


27 


00 


7 


a 


a 


30 


00 


210 


00 


2 


a 


a 


33 


00 


66 


00 


1 


a 


a 


35 


00 


35 


00 


2 


a 


a 


36 


00 


72 


00 


4 


a 


a 


39 


00 


156 


00 


7 


ii 


a 


42 


00 


294 


00 


1 


ii 


a 


45 


00 


45 


00 


4 


ii 


a 


48 


00 


192 


00 


1 


ii 


a 


51 


00 


51 


00 


3 


ii 


a 


54 


00 


162 


00 


1 


ii 


a 


57 


00 


57 


00 


4 


ii 


a 


60 


00 


240 


00 


1 


a 


a 


63 


00 


63 


00 


2 


a 


a 


66 


00 


132 


00 


1 


a 


a 


69 


00 


69 


00 


1 


a 


a 


72 


00 


72 


00 


1 


a 


a 


75 


00 


75 


00 


1 


a 


« 96 00 
Amounts carried forward, 


96 

$2,636 


00 


71 


00 $176,862 49 



APPENDIX. 25 

71 ' Amounts brought forward, $2,636 00 $176,862 49 

1 Model House, $129 00 129 00 

1 « " 192 00 192 00 

1 « " 210 00 210 00 

1 « " 15 75 



75 3,182 75 



1 Lodging House, 9 50 9 50 

2 " « 27 00 54 00 
1 " « 30 00 30 00 
1 " " 45 00 45 00 
1 " " 60 00 60 00 



6 198 50 



2,020 Stores and Shops, 6 00 12,120 00 

1 « " 8 00 8 00 
31 " " 8 50 263 50 

700 " " 9 00 6,300 00 

7 " " 10 00 70 00 
10 « " 11 00 110 00 
14 " " 11 50 161 00 
16 « " 12 00 192 00 
31 « " 14 00 434 00 

3 " " 15 00 45 00 

2 « « 16 00 32 00 

8 « « 16 50 132 00 
1 " " 17 00 17 00 

1 " " 18 00 18 00 

4 " " 19 00 76 00 

2 » " 20 00 40 00 

1 " " 21 50 21 50 

2 « « 24 00 48 00 
1 " " 41 75 41 75 
1 " " 49 00 49 00 

213 » « 896 83 



3,069 21,075 58 

Amount carried forward, $201,319 32 



Amount brought forward, 




$201,319 32 


135 Offices, 


$6 


00 


$810 00 




1 » 


8 


00 


8 


00 




2 " 


8 


50 


17 


00 




43 « 


9 


00 


387 


00 




1 « 


11 


00 


11 


00 




1 » 


11 


50 


11 


50 




1 » 


14 


00 


14 


00 




1 " 


15 


00 


15 


00 




1 " 


24 


00 


24 


00 




22 " 






88 


25 




208 


1,385 75 


2 Banks, 


6 


00 


12 


00 




11 " 


9 


00 


99 


00 




1 » 


11 
10 


50 
00 


11 

20 


50 
00 




14 " 


122 50 


2 Buildings, 




1 " 


11 


25 


11 


25 




9 » 


12 


00 


108 


00 




2 " 


12 


50 


25 


00 




1 " 


14 00 


14 00 




41 


15 


00 


615 


00 




3 " 


17 


00 


51 


00 




1 " 


17 


50 


17 


50 




7 


18 


00 


126 


00 




13 


20 


00 


260 


00 




2 " 


21 


00 


42 


00 




1 " 


22 


50 


22 


50 




2 " 


23 


00 


46 


00 




14 


25 


00 


350 


00 




1 " 


28 


00 


28 


00 




1 


29 


00 


29 


00 




8 " 


30 00 
carried forward, 


240 


00 




109 Amounts 


$2,005 


25 $202,827 57 



1 Building, 

2 " 
1 " 

1 « 

2 " 
1 " 
1 

6 

1 " 
1 

1 

2 » 

3 " 
2 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 « 

1 » 

1 » 

1 « 

1 " 

1 » 

1 ". 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

2 " 
"l49 



37 


Churches, 


1 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 



APPENDIX. 




27 


forward, 


$2,005 25 $202,827 57 


$30 50 


30 


50 


32 00 


64 


00 


32 50 


32 


50 


35 00 


35 


00 


36 00 


72 


00 


36 50 


36 


50 


37 00 


37 


00 


40 00 


240 


00 


44 00 


44 


00 


45 00 


45 


00 


48 00 


48 


00 


49 00 


98 


00 


50 00 


150 


00 


52 50 


105 


00 


55 00 


55 


00 


57 50 


57 


50 


60 00 


60 


00 


62 00 


62 


00 


70 00 


70 


00 


73 00 


73 


00 


73 95 


73 


95 


74 00 


74 00 


78 00 


78 


00 


86 00 


86 


00 


120 00 


120 


00 


130 00 


130 


00 


142 50 


142 


50 




14 


00 

4,138 70 


6 00 


222 


00 


8 00 


8 


00 


9 00 


9 


00 


10 00 


10 


00 



40 Amounts carried forward, $249 00 $206,966 27 



28 





APPENDIX. 








40 Amounts hi 'ought forvow 


>'d, 


$249 00 $206,966 27 


1 Church, 


$14 00 


14 


00 




1 " 


15 


00 


15 


00 




2 " 


20 


00 


40 


00 




44 










318 00 


7 Halls, 


6 


00 


42 


00 




6 " 


9 


00 


54 


00 




1 " 


14 


00 


14 00 




2 " 


15 


00 


30 


00 




3 " 






15 


67 




19 










155 67 


3 Private Schools, 


6 


00* 


18 


00 




2 " " 


9 


00 


18 


00 




2 « " 


14 00 


28 


00 




i— i 


15 


00 


15 


00 




i— i 


18 


00 


18 


00 




1 " " 


30 


00 


30 


00 




10 










127 00 


1 Theatre, 


10 


00 


10 


00 




1 


25 


00 


25 


00 




1 " 


93 


75 


93 


75 




1 Green House, 


11 


25 


11 


25 




1 Custom House, 


156 


00 


156 


00 




1 Hospital, 


160 


75 


160 


75 




1 Medical College 


, 30 


00 


30 


00 




1 State House, 


134 


50 


134 


50 




1 Library, 


9 


00 


9 


00 




1 " 


43 


95 


43 


95 




1 Asylum, 


15 


00 


15 


00 




2 


25 


00 


50 


00 




2 " 


40 


00 


80 


00 




1 « 


96 


13 


96 


13 




1 « 


242 80 
forward, 


• 242 


80 




17 






1,158 13 


Amount earned 


1208,725 07 









APPENDIX. 




29 




Amount broup 


'lit forward, 




$208,725 07 


38 


Market Stalls, 


$6 00 


$228 00 


5 


a 


a 


10 


00 


50 


00 


1 


u 


a 


4 


00 


4 00 


2 Markets, 




25 


00 


50 


00 


1 


a 




47 00 


47 


00 


1 


a 




64 00 


64 00 


1 


a 




69 


00 


69 


00 


49 




512 00 


112 


Cellars, 




6 


00 


672 


00 


2 


a 




9 


00 


18 


00 


15 


it 








59 


25 


129 




749 25 


7 


Hotels, 




15 


00 


105 


00 


1 


a 




16 


00 


16 


00 


1 


a 




18 


00 


18 


00 


1 


u 




20 


00 


20 


00 


1 


it 




21 


00 


21 


00 


2 


a 




24 


00 


48 


00 


1 


a 




27 


00 


27 


00 


2 


a 




30 


00 


60 


00 


1 


it 




33 


00 


33 


00 


1 


a 




35 


00 


35 


00 


1 


a 




36 


00 


36 


00 


2 


it 




42 


00 


84 00 


2 


a 




44 00 


88 


00 


1 


it 




48 


00 


48 


00 


1 


it 




51 


00 


51 


00 


1 


a 




56 


00 


56 


00 


1 


it 




58 


00 


58 


00 


2 


it 




60 


00 


120 


00 


1 


it 




66 


99 


66 


99 


2 


Amounts 


69 00 
carried forward, 


138 


00 


32 


$1,128 99 $209,986 32 




7 













30 APPENDIX. 

32 Amounts hrought forward, $1,128 99 $209,986 32 

1 Hotel, $70 45 70 45 

1 « 74 00 74 00 

1 « 84 00 84 00 

1 « 87 00 87 00 

1 « 94 32 94 32 

1 « 102 00 102 00 

2 " 111 00 222 00 
1 " 124 85 124 85 
1 « 127 00 127 00 
1 « 129 60 129 60 
1 « 134 60 134 60 
1 « 138 00 138 00 
1 « 140 00 140 00 
1 « 144 00 144 00 
1 « 153 80 153 80 
1 « 175 00 175 00 
1 « 213 80 213 80 
1 « 230 00 230 00 
1 " 261 00 261 00 
1 « 271 00 271 00 
1 « 289 00 289 00 
1 « 354 00 354 00 
1 « 385 00 385 00 
1 « 411 00 411 00 
1 « 465 00 465 00 
1 « 536 00 536 00 
1 « 672 00 672 00 
1 « 790 00 790 00 



61 8,007 41 



11 Restaurants and Sa- 
loons, 6 00 66 00 
1 u « 8 00 8 00 

236 « " 9 00 2,124 00 

^48 Amounts carried forward, $2,198 00 $217,993 73 



APPENDIX. 



31 



248 


Amounts broug 


•ht forward, 


$2,198 00 $21 


7,993 73 


5 Restaurants and S 


&■ 








loons, 




$10 00 


50 00 




1 


it 


a 


11 00 


11 00 




2 


a 


a 


11 50 


23 00 




38 


a 


a 


12 00 


456 00 




1 


it 


u 


13 00 


13 00 




28 


a 


a 


15 00 


420 00 




2 


a 


a 


17 00 


34 00 




1 


a 


a 


17 50 


17 50 




4 


it 


a 


18 00 


72 00 




2 


u 


a 


20 00 


40 00 




1 


11 


a 


23 00 


23 00 




2 


a 


a 


25 00 


50 00 




4 


it 


a 


30 00 


120 00 




1 


(i 


a 


35 00 


35 00 




1 


a 


a 


40 00 


40 00 




33 


a 


a 




186 49 




374 




3,788 99 


1 


Club House, 




15 00 


15 00 




1 


it it 




50 00 


50 00 




1 


a tt 




53 00 


53 00 




1 


tt a 




60 00 


60 00 




4 




178 00 


1 


Bathing House 


} 


19 00 


19 00 




1 






20 00 


20 00 




1 






25 00 


25 00 




1 






30 00 


30 00 




1 






40 00 


40 00 




1 






50 00 


50 00 




1 






55 00 


55 00 




1 






135 00 


135 00 




8 




374 00 




Amount carried^ 


forward, 


$2 


22,334 72 



32 APPENDIX. 

Amount brought forward, $222,334 72 

290 Stables, $5 00 $1,450 00 

28 " 6 00 168 00 

48 " 6 25 300 00 

1 « 6 75 6 75 

32 " 7 50 240 00 

24 " 8 00 192 00 

1 « 8 50 8 50 

22 " 8 75 192 50 

1 " 9 00 9 00 

1 9 75 9 75 

26 " 10 00 260 00 

11 « 11 25 123 75 

1 « 11 50 11 50 

6 12 00 72 00 

16 " 12 50 200 00 

1 , " 13 25 13 25 

8 « 13 75 82 50 

1 « 14 00 14 00 

10 " 15 00 150 00 

1 « 16 00 16 00 

2 « 16 25 32 50 
1 - » 16 50 16 50 

4 « 17 50 70 00 

3 « 18 00 54 00 

5 » 18 75 93 75 

6 « 20 00 120 00 
1 « 21 25 21 25 

7 « 22 50 157 50 
1 « 23 75 23 75 

3 « 24 00 72 00 

4 « 25 00 100 00 
1 it 26 00 . 26 00 
1 u 27 50 27 50 



556 Amounts carried forward, $4,334 25 $222,434 72 







APPENDIX. 




33 


556' 


Amounts brought forward, 


$4,334 25 $222,334 72 


1 


Stable, 


29 


50 


29 


50 


10 


it 


30 


00 


300 


00 


2 


a 


31 


25 


62 


50 


2 


a 


32 


00 


64 


00 


1 


a 


34 


00 


34 


00 


1 


it 


35 


00 


35 


00 


3 


it 


36 


00 


108 


00 


2 


a 


38 


00 


76 


00 


6 


u 


40 


00 


240 


00 


2 


a 


45 


00 


90 


00 


4 


u 


50 


00 


200 


00 


1 


a 


52 


00 


52 


00 


1 


a 


54 00 


54 


00 


4 


a 


56 


00 


224 


00 


6 


a 


60 


00 


360 


00 


1 


a 


66 


00 


66 


00 


2 


u 


70 


00 


140 


00 


1 


it 


72 


00 


72 


00 


3 


a 


75 


00 


225 


00 


1 


a 


76 


00 


76 


00 


2 


a 


90 


00 


180 


00 


2 


it 


100 


00 


200 


00 


1 


a 


101 


25 


101 


25 


1 


u 


110 


00 


110 


00 


1 


(t 


112 


00 


112 


00 


1 


a 


117 


00 


117 


00 


1 


it 


120 


00 


120 


00 


1 


a 


130 


00 


130 


00 


3 


it 


141 


00 


423 


00 


1 


a 


142 


50 


142 


50 


1 


tt 


160 


00 


160 


00 


52 


a 






291 


10 


687 










8,929 10 




Amount carried forward, 




1231,263 82 



34 



APPENDIX. 



Amount brought forward, 

5 Shops and Engines, $12 00 

1 " " 14 00 

4 " " 15 00 

1 " " 15 35 

1 « " 15 66 

1 " » 17 16 

1 " " 20 16 

1 " " 20 42 

1 « " 20 88 

1 " « 23 34 

1 « •« 28 62 

1 « " 30 66 

1 « " 31 92 

1 » " 33 90 

1 « " 34 74 

1 " " 36 00 

1 « « 38 34 

1 « " 42 42 

1 » « 48 24 

1 « " 52 12 

1 « » 53 20 

1 « " 54 50 

1 « " 58 20 

1 « " 66 66 

1 « « 66 78 

1 « " 67 33 

1 « « 68 16 

1 « « 73 68 

1 « " 74 58 

1 « « 88 28 

1 « » 89 15 

1 « « 89 20 

1 « " 102 00 

40 Amounts carried forward, 



$231,263 82 



$60 00 

14 00 
60 00 
15' 35 

15 66 
17 16 
20 16 
20 42 
20 88 
23 34 
28 62 

30 66 

31 92 

33 90 

34 74 
36 00 
38 34 
42 42 
48 24 

52 12 

53 20 

54 50 
58 20 
66 66 

66 78 

67 33 

68 16 

73 68 

74 58 

88 28 

89 15 
89 20 

102 00 



,595 65 $231,263 82 



40 


Amounts brought forward, 


$1,595 


65 $231,263 


82 


1 Shop 


and Ens: 


;ine 


$102 90 


102 


90 




1 


a 




u 


102 96 


102 


96 




1 


a 




it 


103 50 


103 


50 




1 


a 




u 


123 06 


123 


06 




1 


a 




a 


125 52 


125 


52 




1 


u 




a 


125 53 


125 


53 




1 


u 




a 


128 04 


128 


04 




1 


a 




a 


135 33 


135 


33 




1 


a 




a 


139 56 


139 


56 




1 


a 




a 


150 00 


150 


00 




1 


a 




a 


155 70 


155 


70 




1 


a 




a 


159 00 


159 


00 




1 


a 




u 


163 38 


163 


38 




1 


Cl 




u 


164 34 


164 


34 




1 


a 




(C 


172 44 


172 


44 




1 


a 




u 


192 84 


192 


84 




1 


a 




a 


205 56 


205 


56 




1 


u 




a 


226 88 


226 


88 




1 


a 




a 


275 46 


275 


46 




59 












4,547 


65 


1 Foui 


ldry & E 


ngine, 12 58 


12 


58 




1 






tc 


20 00 


20 


00 




1 






u 


33 20 


33 


20 




1 






u 


35 18 


35 


18 




1 






11 


57 87 


57 


87 




1 






a 


59 52 


59 


52 




1 






a 


62 80 


62 


80 




1 






a 


74 70 


74 


70 




1 






a 


115 44 


115 


44 




1 






a 


133 16 


133 


16 




1 






a 


136 12 


136 


12 




1 






a 


367 60 


367 


60 




12 












1,108 


17 




Am 


ount carried forward, 




$236,919 


64 



36 




APPENDIX. 










Amount brought ft 


irward, 






1236,919 64 


1 Printing Office anc 
















Engine, 


$17 


74 


$17 


74 




1 


a t 


a 


19 


00 


19 


00 




1 


it I 


a 


24 


96 


24 


96 




1 


11 i 


a 


27 


10 


27 


10 




1 


a i 


a 


29 


12 


29 


12 




1 


a t 


t a 


34 


28 


34 


28 




1 


it I 


' it 


41 


14 


41 


14 




1 


a t 


a 


42 


18 


42 


18 




1 


ti I 


a 


44 


50 


44 


50 




1 


a ( 


( a 


56 


28 


56 


28 




1 


a e 


i a 


90 


20 * 


, 90 


20 




1 


it i 


a 


121 


58 


121 


58 




1 


a i 


a 


137 


98 


137 


98 




1 


a t 


a 


150 


96 


150 


96 




14 






837 02 


1 Ship Yard <! 


k Engine 


,119 


24 


119 


24 




1 














119 24 


i: 


factory & 


Engine, 


12 


00 


12 


00 




i 


a 




13 


56 


13 


56 




i 


a 




20 


18 


20 


18 




i 


a 




28 


20 


28 


20 




i 


a 




53 


88 


53 


88 




i 


a 




63 


00 


63 


00 




i 


a 




63 


16 


63 


16 




i 


a 




78 


48 


78 48 




i 


a 




84 


24 


84 


24 




i 


a 




89 


20 


89 


20 




i 


a 




91 


56 


91 


56 




i 


tt 




91 


98 


91 


98 




i 


a 




97 


37 


97 


37 




i 


a 

Amounts 


" 99 00 
carried forward, 


99 

$885 


00 

81 \ 


, 


14 


£237,875 90 



APPENDIX. 37 

14 Amounts brought forward, $885 81 $237,875 90 

1 Factory & Engine, $99 78 99 78 

1 « « 114 12 114 12 

1 » " 116 80 116 80 

1 « « 121 92 121 92 

1 " « 124 12 124 12 

1 " " 132 60 132 60 

1 " » 134 38 134 38 

1 « « 145 50 145 50 

1 « " 154 56 154 56 

1 « " 180 24 180 24 

1 " " 189 31 189 31 

1 " " 190 20 190 20 

1 " " 232 96 232 96 

1 « " 246 12 246 12 

1 » « 327 12 327 12 

1 « » 360 64 360 64 

1 « « 469 00 469 00 



31 4,225 18 

3 Factories, 10 00 30 00 

1 « 10 75 10 75 

3 « 12 00 36 00 

1 " 14 00 14 00 

8 « 15 00 120 00 

1 « 18 00 18 00 

2 " 20 00 40 00 

1 " 21 00 21 00 

2 « 25 00 50 00 
2 " 30 00 60 00 
1 " 37 50 37 50 
1 " 39 08 39 08 
1 " 51 00 51 00 
1 «" 51 79 51 79 



:8 Amounts carried forward, $579 12 $242,101 08 



38 







APPENDIX. 








28 Amounts 


brought forward, 


$579 12 $242,101 


08 


1 Factories, 




$68 07 


68 07 






1 " 




129 32 


129 32 






1 " 




149 04 


149 04 






1 " 




6 75 


6 75 






32 








932 


30 


1 Gas Light Co., 


57 60 


57 60 






1 u u 


u 


94 00 


94 00 






]_ u a 


u 


386 74 


386 74 


538 




3 




34 


1 Sugar Refinery, 


2,385 27 


2,385 27 






1 " 


u 

Engine, 


3,036 48 

57 89 


3,036 48 


5,421 




2 


57 89 


75 


1 Mill and I 




1 " 


u 


68 43 


68 43 






1 " 


a 


72 96 


72 96 






1 " 


u 


73 26 


73 26 






1 « 


u 


132 00 


132 00 






1 " 


a 


361 28 


361 28 






1 « 


u 


408 30 


408 30 






1 " 


a 


695 66 


695 66 






1 " 


u 


842 40 


842 40 






1 " 


it 


1,916 42 


1,916 42 






1 " 


a 


1,904 82 


1,904 82 






11 








6,533 


42 


4 Engines, 




7 83 


31 32 






1 " 




9 00 


9 00 






i—i 




12 00 


12 00 






7 




15 00 


105 00 






1 




18 00 


18 00 






1 




18 08 


18 08 






1 




18 78 


18 78 







16 Amounts carried forward, $212 18 $255,526 89 



APPENDIX. 



39 



16 Amounts brought forward, 



1 Engine, 
1 
1 

1 « 

1 " 

1 » 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 « 

1 " 

1 " 



$25 56 

36 06 

58 92 

58 98 

62 37 

76 80 

95 46 

103 62 

117 24 

126 66 

187 18 

188 04 



28 


■inting Offices, 6 


00 




15 Pi 


90 00 


13 


U I 


' 9 


00 


117 00 


2 


It i 


' 10 


00 


20 00 


3 


11 t 


< 12 


00 


36 00 


3 


(I i 


< 13 


00 


39 00 


1 


u t 


17 


00 


17 00 


3 


a i 


< 21 


00 


63 00 


1 


u t 


' 25 


00 


25 00 


1 


a i 


< 28 


00 


28 00 


2 


a c 

stillery, 


72 


00 


6 50 


44 




1 Di 


72 00 


1 


u 


75 


00 


75 00 


1 


u 


79 


20 


79 20 


1 


u 


108 


36 


108 36 


1 


a 


113 


40 


113 40 


1 


a 


166 


90 


166 90 


1 


u 


218 


96 


218 96 


1 


a 


229 


68 


229 68 



$212 18 $255,526 89 

25 56 

36 06 

58 92 

58 98 

62 37 

76 80 

95 46 

103 62 

117 24 

126 66 

187 18 

188 04 

1,349 07 



441 50 



8 Amounts carried forward, $1,063 50 $257,317 46 



40 



) 


APPENDIX. 








8 Amounts brought forward, 


$1,063 50 $257,317 46 


1 Distillery, 


$292 08 


292 


08 




1 " 


476 72 


476 


72 




1 


610 14 


610 


14 




11 






2,442 44 


5 Breweries, 


15 00 


75 


00 




1 " 


18 00 


18 


00 




1 " 


25 00 


25 


00 




1 « 


66 95 


66 


95 




1 " 


75 00 


75 


00 




1 « 


1,005 36 


1,005 


36 




1 « 




5 


83 




11 






1,271 14 


1 Bacon Works, 


15 00 


15 


00 




J a a 


25 00 


25 


00 




2 








40 00 


2 Bleacheries, 


9 00 


18 


00 




2 " 


10 00 


20 


00 




1 " 


12 00 


12 


00 




1 Laundry, 


25 00 


25 


00 




1 Pottery, 


30 00 


30 


00 




~~7 








105 00 


43 Bakeries, 


6 00 


258 


00 




12 " 


9 00 


108 


00 




1 " 


10 00 


10 


00 




1 " 




3 


00 




57 








379 00 


1 Bakery and Engine, 18 00 


18 


00 




1 " 


« 36 76 


36 


76 




1 " 


" 53 64 


53 


64 




~~ 3 








108 40 


Amount carried forward, 




i 


1261,663 44 





APPENDIX. 






41 


Amount brought 


forward, 




$261,663 44 


5 Ship Yards, 


• $15 


00 


$75 


00 




\ u a 


10 


00 


10 


00 




1 u a 






7 


50 




2 Dry Docks, 


15 


00 


30 


00 




J 11 u 


53 


18 


53 


18 




J a a 


65 


87 


65 


87 




11 






241 55 


733 Hose, 


3 


00 


2,199 


00 




1 » 


5 


00 


5 


00 




1 " 


6 


00 


6 


00 




5 « 


10 


00 


50 


00 




740 










2,260 00 


9 Fountains, 


3 


00 


27 


00 




10 " 


5 


00 


50 


00 




6 


6 


00 


36 


00 




1 " 


7 


00 


7 


00 




2 " 


8 


00 


16 


00 




1 " 


12 


00 


12 


00 




4 


15 


00 


60 


00 




1 " 


25 


00 


25 


00 




1 « 


26 


00 


26 


00 




35 






259 00 


2 Packing Houses, 


9 


00 


18 


00 




3 " " 


15 


00 


45 


00 




]^ « u 


30 


00 


30 


00 




\ it it 


35 


00 


35 


00 




7 










128 00 


1 Railroad Co. 


148 


70 


148 


70 




1 " 


205 


00 


205 


00 




1 


361 


00 


361 


00 




1 " 


459 


00 


459 


00 




1 


893 


94 


893 


94 




1 


911 


75 


911 


75 




6 Amounts carriec 


I forward, 


$2,979 


39 $264,551 99 



42 







APPENDIX. 








6 


Amounts broug 


•lit forward, 


$2,979 39 $264,551 99 


1 


Railroad Co. 


$1,011 


26 , 


1,011 


26 




1 


a 


1,613 


22 


1,613 


22 




1 


u 


1,928 


18 


1,928 


18 




9 












7,532 05 


1 Chelsea Ferry Co. 1,239 


74 


1,239 


74 




1] 


^.Boston Ferry 


Co. 691 


94 


691 


94 


* 


2 






1,931 68 


1 Cunard St'mship 


Co.700 


00 


700 


00 




1 


Steamboat, 


10 


00 


10 


00 




1 


a 


13 


25 


13 


25 




1 


u 


25 


75 


25 


75 




1 


a 


28 


00 


28 


00 




1 


u 


30 


00 


30 


00 




1 


u 


35 


00 


35 


00 




1 


a 


35 


69 


35 


69 




1 


a 


38 


08 


38 


08 




1 


u 


57 


12 


57 


12 




1 


a 


62 


62 


62 


62 




1 


a 


62 


70 


62 


70 




1 


a 


62 


84 


62 


84 




1 


a 


63 


27 


63 


27 




1 


u 


67 


42 


67 42 




1 


it 


82 


50 


82 


50 




1 


a 


92 


56 


92 


56 


, 


1 


a 


116 


80 


116 


80 




1 


a 


124 


78 


124 


78 




1 


it 


127 


07 


127 


07 




1 


u 


130 


52 


130 


52 




1 


a 


131 


04 


131 


04 




1 


u 


140 


00 


140 


00 




1 


it 


149 


92 


149 


92 




2 


a 


.168 


70 


337 


40 




1 


« 171 50 
Amounts carried forward. 


171 

$2,895 


50 

83 $ 




27 


274,015 72 



APPENDIX. 


43 


27 'Amounts brought forward, 


$2,895 83 $274,015 72 


1 Steamboat, 


219 


00 


219 00 


i—i 


293 


80 


293 80 


2 " 


629 


09 


1,258 18 


31 


4,666 81 


1 Latin School, 


16 


00 


16 00 


1 English High School 


,16 


00 


16 00 


1 Normal " 


16 


00 


16 00 


17 Grammar " 


16 


00 


272 00 


202 Primary " 


6 


00 


1,212 00 


13 Engine Houses, 


16 


00 


208 00 


5 Hose Carriage 








Houses, 


16 


00 


80 00 


3 Hook and Ladder 








Houses, 


16 


00 


48 00 


6 Police Station 








Houses, 


11 


00 


- 66 00 


2 Police Station 








Houses, 


16 


00 


32 00 


1 City Stable (Harri 








son Avenue,) 


77 


50 


77 50 


1 City Stable, (Com- 








mercial Street, 


) 27 


50 


27 50 


5 Fire Alarm Motors, 


6 


00 


30 00 


\ a u u 


15 


00 


15 00 


1 Court House, 


95 


00 


95 00 


1 City Hall, 


50 


00 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall, 


40 


00 


40 00 


1 City Building, 


37 


50 


37 50 


1 Probate Office, 


10 


00 


10 00 


1 Office at City Scales, 9 


00 


9 00 


1 Dead House, 


9 


00 


9 00 


1 Public Library, 


6 


00 


6 00 


1 House of Correc- 








tion, 


374 


72 


374 72 



268 Amounts carried forward, $2,747 22 $278,682 53 



44 APPENDIX. 



268 Amoun ts brought forward, 


$2,747 22 $278,682 53 


1 Lunatic Hospital, $225 00 


225 00 




1 House of Reforma- 






tion, 50 00 


50 00 




1 Faneuil Hall Mar- 






ket, for Urinals, &c. 70 00 


70 00 




1 Street Sprinkling, 400 00 


400 00 




1 Offal Station, 150 00 


150 00 




1 Common Sewer (for 






making Mortar, &c.) 75 00 


75 00 




1 Store, (Faneuil Hall,) 6 00 


6 00 




1 House, (Vine St.) 7 00 


7 00 




1 Steamer, (Henry 






Morrison,) 192 56 


192 56 




1 Jail for Suffolk 






County, 243 00 


243 00 




278 




4,165 78 


Mass. State Prison, 478 04 


478 04 




Mill Dam Co. 300 00 


300 00 




Contractors for sup- 






plying shipping, 3,898 24 


3,898 24 




Building purposes, 1,039 96 


1,039 96 


5,716 24 




$288,564 55 



APPENDIX. 



45 



Statement showing the number and kinds op Water Fix- 
tures, CONTAINED WITHIN THE PREMISES OF WATER TAKERS, 

in the City of Boston, in 1853 and 1857, and is designed 
to show the increasing demand upon the works, rather 
than the revenue. 



1853 


1857 




3,968 


4,434 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


19,287 


25,207 


Sinks. 


3,149 


6,573 


Wash-hand Basins. 


1,838 


2,941 


Bathing Tubs. Most of these have shower baths 
attached. 


1,622 


2,765 


Pan Water Closets. 


698 


3,215 


Hopper Water Closets. 


218 


573 


Urinals. 


476 


1,566 


Wash Tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
buildings. 


14 


20 


Shower Baths. In houses where there is no tub. 


9 


9 


Rams. 


315 


585 


Private Hydrants. 


31,594 


47,888 


Totals. 



All of the above, with the exception of the 4,434 Taps, are connected 
by drains with the common sewers. 



Respectfully submitted. 



WILLIAM F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



/ 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

O? TBI 

CITY OF BOSTON 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume caD be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
' Books can be kept out 14 clays. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will- be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond'the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the deliver}' and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.