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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofco1858bost 



City Document. — No. 8. 



REPORT 



COCHITITATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1858. 




BOSTON: 
GEO. C. RAND & AVERY, CITY PRINTERS. 

No. 3, CORNHILL. 

18 5 9. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Common Council, Jan. 6, 1859. 
Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board have leave to 
make their Annual Report in print. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

J. P. BRADLEE, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 10, 1859. 
Concurred. 

SILAS PEIRCE, Chairman. 

Approved. Jan. 12, 1859. 

F. W. LINCOLN, Jr., Mayor. 

A true copv. Attest, 

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



REPORT 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

Boston, January 15, 1859. 
To the City Council. 

The Cochituate Water Board respectfully submit to 
the City Council their Annual Eeport for the year 1858. 
In compliance, also, with the City Ordinance, they sub- 
mit the Reports of the City Engineer, the Water 
Registrar, and the Clerk of this Board — all of which 
contain valuable information for those who wish to keep 
well informed upon matters relating to the Water 
Works. 

It is believed that the Water Works were never in a 
more safe and efficient condition. 

The past season has been deemed to be a favorable 
one to make sales of such property appurtenant to the 
Water Works, as was not needed for practical use. 
The Board have sold to Mr. Amory Maynard, the Marl- 
borough Reservoir, and all the land and privileges be- 
longing to the city and lying in said Marlborough, for 
the sum of $8,000 — $2,000 down, and the balance on 
a credit of five years, with interest semi-annually. The 
cost to the city of this property in the gross was near 
$40,000; but it was acquired under great disadvan- 
tages, and it was subject to the cost of keeping in repair 
extensive causeways passing over or near the same ; so 
that, upon very full consideration of the matter, it was 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

deemed advisable to accept the offer of Mr. Maynard 
in preference to retaining the property for a better 
offer, or to risk the sale of it at auction. As all this 
property was conveyed to the city by Mr. Maynard, 
who acted in behalf of the city in its purchase, (except- 
ing what he owned before,) the city gives only a quit 
claim deed. 

The Board have also sold at auction during the last 
year, a number of lots lying in Framingham and 
Natick, among which is the Upper Mill privilege. This 
privilege, with the factory and houses on the land 
appurtenant, sold for a little over $2,000 ; and the 
whole amount of the sales came to $3,811.75. Ample 
rights were reserved to the city for flowage and for 
passage over lands to the Works. Wood also has been 
sold to the amount of $500. 

Two years ago this Board reported that it had leased 
the Beservoir at Hopkinton for ten years, at $1,250 
per annum, and taxes, with power to terminate the 
lease on the part of the city, by forfeiting one year's 
rent. Two parties signed the lease, upon the verbal 
promise of several others to pay certain specific pro- 
portions. When the severe pressure came upon the 
community, one of the parties to the lease and one or 
more of the verbal promisors became bankrupt, and 
other promisors refused to pay their portion of rent. 

In these circumstances, the remaining party to the 
lease urged upon the Board the equity of a compro- 
mise upon the terms of the lease; and the Board, 
knowing all the facts in the case, thought it would be 
equitable to compromise for $625 per annum, and all 
taxes, with the privilege on the part of the city to ter- 



1859.] WATER. 5 

minate the lease at any time, on giving three months 
notice. And the lease was altered accordingly. 

During the last summer the proprietors of Sudbury 
Meadows memorialized the City of Boston for damage 
done to their property by letting clown water from the 
Eeservoirs at unseasonable times. That memorial has 
been referred to this Board, but has not been yet acted 
upon. Should it appear at the hearing that said pro- 
prietors are entitled either in law or equity to consid- 
eration by way of damages, the entire and free control 
of these Works may afford the readiest and most effec- 
tual means of repairing said damages and quieting said 
claim. 

Last winter an act was obtained from the Legislature 
authorizing the city to raise the water at the Lake two 
feet, with the consent of the towns of Framingham, 
Natick and Wayland. Their consent has not yet been 
obtained ; but it is still hoped it may be. In the mean- 
time, the proper steps have been taken to obtain 
authority from the present Legislature, unencumbered 
by conditions, to raise the Lake as before proposed. In 
the hope that the act of last year would be accepted, 
and as a preparation to raise the level of the Lake, 
most of the land damages that would result from such 
raising have been adjusted and paid for — it being 
deemed a mere matter of time when said authority to 
raise the Lake should be obtained. Extensive improve- 
ments have also been made upon the roads in Natick, 
preparatory to the same object — the city having ex- 
pended for that purpose on roads that might be flooded 
or damaged by such raising of the Lake, nearly or quite 
$3,000. 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

As a necessary preparation for the same object, the 
dam at the outlet has been overhauled, and to some 
extent been reconstructed, with a wide overflow at the 
proposed elevation to facilitate and make safe the dis- 
charge of all superfluous water. A new road has been 
built from the Superintendent's house across the city 
land and by the borders of the Lake to the dam ; thus 
facilitating access thereto for the purpose of repair and 
inspection. The cost of these improvements has been 
about $3,000. 

The only matters remaining to be done preparatory 
to raising the Lake will be the raising of the gate house 
and the sea wall contiguous thereto ; and the adjust- 
ment of a very few individual claims for damage, few 
in number and small in amount. It is very much to be 
hoped that the current year will see these all accom- 
plished ; and that next winter the Lake will be raised 
to ten feet above Knight's flume. 

The new main which the City Government has 
authorized this Board to lay, connecting the reservoir 
at Brookline with the city, is in good progress of con- 
struction. A contract for about four miles of 40-inch 
pipes, deliverable in Boston, has been made with Messrs. 
J. W. & J. F. Starr, of Camden, N. J., (who were the 
lowest bidders therefor,) for $33 per gross ton. This 
contract is deemed to be very favorable, and the con- 
tractors are deemed to be entirely responsible ; and the 
very low price of pig iron which prevailed at the time 
the contract was made, will without doubt enable the 
contractors to realize a handsome profit on the job. 

The Board have been in expectation of receiving a 
portion of this pipe before the harbors would be closed; 



1859.] WATER. 7 

but the season is now so far advanced, and the cold has 
been so severe, that little hope can now be entertained 
of receiving any considerable quantity before spring. 
Six members of the Board visited the works of Messrs. 
Starr about the 20th of November, and inspected the 
casting of one pipe. Something over thirty pieces 
were then cast, and one of the Board on a subsequent 
visit reported the completion of over one hundred, and 
probably now more than two hundred are cast. The 
pipes seen by the members of the Board, and by the 
City Engineer, exhibited a very satisfactory appearance ; 
and the whole establishment of the Messrs. Starr seemed 
to be one of great activity and apparent efficiency. 

Application has been made to the Legislature for 
power to lay the new main on a route offering some 
advantages over the old one, which will probably be 
granted. 

In preparation for the reception and proving the new 
pipe when it shall come to hand, a portion of the Bos- 
ton Wharf has been rented, and suitable hoisting appa- 
ratus and proving press have been obtained ; and when 
the pipe shall be supplied, no time will be lost in pro- 
ceeding to put it in position, and the work will be 
prosecuted with as much vigor and force as can be 
advantageously applied. It can hardly be expected 
that the work can be completed in this coming season, 
but it is hoped that a small portion only will be left for 
the following year. 

A portion of main 20-inch pipe has been laid dur- 
ing the year, rendered necessary by the reconstruc- 
tion of the bridge in Dover street. For a more minute 
notice, see the Beport of the City Engineer, annexed 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

hereto. The cost of this portion thus rendered neces- 
sary, is $5,752. It would seem to be right that this 
amount should be charged to some different appro- 
priation, as it was not necessary for the improvement 
of the Water Works. 

The daily consumption of water during the last year, 
has been (as appears from the Engineer's Report) 
12,847,000 wine gallons, or 121,000 gallons daily more 
than in 1857, when it was 12,726,000 gallons. Last 
year, estimating the number of inhabitants at 173,000, 
the daily individual consumption averaged 73 gallons. 
The average annual growth of the city has been esti- 
mated at 5,000; and if the number of inhabitants be 
now taken at 178,000, the average daily consumption 
would be about 72'i gallons for each individual. But 
it is hardly to be supposed that the increase of the 
population during the last year has come up to 5,000 ; 
and it will be a safer estimate to regard the individual 
consumption as having kept up to the standard of 1857, 
than to suppose it to have lowered by the augmenta- 
tion of 5,000 inhabitants. 

Inasmuch, then, as there does not appear to have 
been in the last year any individual increase in waste 
or consumption, the Board very gladly omit to dwell 
upon the annual topic of unnecessary waste. 

A petition is now before the Legislature, (as it was 
last year,) for the annexation of Eoxbury to Boston. 
This matter has an important bearing upon the supply 
of water; and although a new main will give an addi- 
tional supply, the cautions suggested by this Board in 
their report of last year, (p. 11,) are deemed to be 
worthy of renewed attention. As that report is acces- 



1859.] WATER. 9 

sible, it is not deemed necessary to repeat the matter 
here. 

The subject of meters has received a good share of the 
attention of the Board ; and it is a pleasure to state that 
Worthington's meters, which have been tested to a con- 
siderable extent, bid fair to be reliable. Made of iron, 
they are subject to corrosion ; but made of composition, 
they are thought to be unexceptionable. Their cost is 
higher than is desirable, but it is deemed best to use 
the most expensive. As the Hewes meters, which have 
been in use for several years, are found to be imperfect 
and unreliable, the Board have ordered (in addition to 
12 now in use on trial,) 63 new composition meters of 
Worthington, the cost of which will be near $5,000. 
The use of meters in several cases appears to be indis- 
pensable, and it is thought best, in replenishing the 
stock of the city, that an article worthy of confidence, 
both in accuracy and durability, should be obtained. 

Extension of the Works. Besides about 400 feet of 
20-inch pipe inserted in the main crossing Dover Street 
Bridge, there have been laid during the last year 2,689 
feet of 12-inch against 4,068 laid in 1857 ■ 6,877 feet 
of 6-inch against 10,623 in 1857; and 1,991 of 4-inch 
against 2,274 in 1857; — in all (besides the 20-inch) 
11,557 feet against 17,950 feet in 1857. The whole 
length of pipe of 4-inch and upwards, laid in the city, 
is now a little over 122 miles. 

By reference to the Engineer's Report, it will be seen 
that 501 feet of 4-inch, and 379 feet of 6-inch, have 
been taken up and relaid in different localities, owing 
to the grades of the streets or other causes rendering 
them insecure or inefficient. 
2 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

The number of new stopcocks is 21, making the whole 
number 1,046. 

The number of service pipes laid during the year is 
842, making the whole number 21,326. 

New hydrants to the number of 23 have been estab- 
lished in the different parts of the city, making the 
whole number 1,331 ; for other interesting information 
in regard to these items of extension and improvement, 
reference is made to the Engineer's Report. 

The Annual Report of the Water Registrar appears to 
contain all the information required of him by the 
ordinance. 

The whole amount received for ivater rents during the year 
has been $303,934.73 ; i e. $3,934.73 more than the 
estimate at the beginning of the year. The estimate 
for 1859 is $310,000. 

The number of ivater takers is now 22,414, being an in- 
crease during the year of 812 — a greater increase 
than has occurred in any of the last four years. 

The usual classification of the various water tenants has 
been prepared in a condensed form, and a statement of 
the amount paid by each class, the whole being col- 
lated with similar tables for the preceding year, is here 
inserted. 



1859.] 



WATER. 



11 



1856 

15,260 
3,515 

426 
648 



30 

720 

1 



1857 

15,645 
3,618 

520 

687 

9 

2 

31 

740 
1 



1858 

16,553 
3,744 

404 

702 

8 

3 

32 



Dwelling Houses, 

Stores, Shops, Offices, Cellars, 
etc., 

Hotels, Kestaurants, Saloons,. 

Stables, 

Kailroads, 

Ferry Companies, 

Steamboats, 

Hose, 

Motive Power, 

Sugar Keflneries, Distilleries, 
Breweries and Bakeries, . . . 

Gas Companies, 

Other Manufacturing Purposes, 

City Buildings and other City 
uses, 

Public Buildings, Charitable 
Institutions, etc., 

Shipping Contract with Water- 
man, 

Street Waterers, 

Street Waterers (in Koxbury), 

Building Purposes, 

Other Purposes, 



1856 

SI 69,129. 69 

26,542.93 
11,065.53 
8,297.10 
8,681.68 
2,712.16 
4,865.71 
2,192.00 
516.23 

10,202.25 

621.22 

22,857.68 

3,777.72 

1,989.95 

4,387.30 

100.00 
1,085.05 
1,010.24 



$280,034.44 



1857 

176,118.49 

27,983.78 
12,224.90 
8,929.10 
7,532.05 
1,931.68 
4,666.81 
2,260.00 



9,622.73 

538.34 

20,618.10 

4,165.78 

2,109.84 

3,898.24 



1,039.96 
4 924.75 



288,564.55 



1858 

189,620.87 

30.047.13 
12,274.07 
8,704.94 
7,162.32 
1,966.90 
4,839.39 
2,132.00 



9,231.76 

641.44 

20,069.33 

4,158.81 

2,813.15 

3,832.93 
422.00 

1,727.95 

1,495.49 



301,140.48 



A statement of receipts and expenditures during the 
last year, by the clerk of the Water Board, or service 
clerk, is hereto annexed. The whole amount of ex- 
penditures appears to be $76,006.01, including cost of 
laying pipes over the Dover Street Bridge, $5,752.70, 
which should properly go to appropriation for Bridges. 
Of this, $47,561.41 was for the extension of the Works, 
leaving $28,444.60 as the amount of the expenses of 
this department for the last year — being less than the 



12 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 8. [Jan. 

expenses of 1857 by $1,733.30. This is quite an 
auspicious circumstance, that while the Works have 
been extended, the expense of taking care of them is 
diminished. 

It has been noticed that the City Auditor has for 
several years been accustomed to regard, in his annual 
report, the cost of the Water Works as the amount of the 
water debt. And this has continually increased, because 
there has been no surplus receipts from water rents to 
diminish it. It is respectfully submitted that this is 
confounding two quite distinct things. The water 
debt is contracted under provisions of the acts author- 
izing the city to bring the water into the city, which 
has some special provisions in relation thereto. By 
sections 11, 12 and 13 of the water acts, as condensed 
in the City Ordinances, the city was authorized to issue 
water scrip to meet the whole cost of the enterprise. 
In section 14, it is further provided, that " the said 
City Council may, whenever and so far as deemed ne- 
cessary, issue and dispose of notes, scrip, or certificates 
of debt, to meet all payments of interest which may 
accrue upon any scrip by them issued : provided, however, 
that no scrip shall be issued for payment of interest as 
aforesaid, after the expiration of two years from the 
completion of said aqueducts and other works; but 
payment of all interest that shall accrue after that time ? 
shall be made from the net income, rents, and receipts 
for the use of the water, if they shall be sufficient for 
the purpose ; and if not, then the payment of the defi- 
ciency shall be otherwise provided for by the City 
Council." That is, "otherwise" than by disposition "of 
.notes, scrip or certificates of debt." So that it seems 



1859.] WATER. 13 

as if the city was prohibited after two years from paying 
the accruing interest by loans in any shape whatever. 

In conformity with the provisions of this act limit- 
ing the water scrip (which is regarded as synonymous 
with water debt) to the cost of the Works, and interest 
thereon for two years after their " completion," the 
Water Board passed an order March 20, 1851, " that 
the construction account of the Water Works be closed 
on the 30th April (then next ensuing), and the Works 
be then considered as finished, and all expenditures 
made after that time be charged to the current ex- 
penses of the year." 

From this action it would appear that the cost of the 
Works, as it should appear to be on the 1st of May, 
1851, with two years' interest added to the same, would, 
under the act, constitute the water debt, whether it 
should be sufficient to cover the cost of the Works or 
not; and if there should subsequently occur a defi- 
ciency, it should " be otherwise provided for " than by 
loan. 

Now it appears from the Auditor's account, distrib- 
uted to the citizens, that the water debt, or cost of 
the Works at that time, May 1, 1851, was $4,948,363.97 ; 
add two years' interest at $4.85, (the average rate on 
the scrip,) viz., $239,995.65 x2=$479,991.30, and the 
water debt is obtained, viz., $5,428,355.27. And this 
is a maximum sum, not liable to increase under any 
circumstances contemplated by the act, unless by what 
will be noticed presently. Now if that sum be, as repre- 
sented, the water debt, the interest upon it for the last 
year is $263,275.23, and the expenses of the Water 
Department, as above stated, are $28,444.60, making a 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

total of the interest and expenses $291,719.83, while 
the water receipts have been $303,931.73, or $12,211.90 
more than interest and expenses. 

It is not pretended that the sums here used are 
entirely accurate — there is not time or opportunity to 
make them so- — but they are sufficiently accurate to 
illustrate the principle involved. 

The scope and intent of the act (the Board admit) 
would justify and require the amount of the cost of the 
Works, as exhibited May 1, 1851, to be augmented by 
the cost of Jamaica Pond aqueduct, which was subse- 
quently paid for, and by such damages as were subse- 
quently paid, but previously incurred. Then on the 
other hand, that sum should be diminished by the 
amount of sales since made, say of the Jamaica Pond 
works, the reservoir and lands in Marlborough, Boon 
Pond, and appendages, buildings, privileges, land and 
wood, in neighborhood of the Lake and along the line 
of aqueduct to Brookline. If these items were properly 
made up, added and subtracted, it is believed that the 
cost would be diminished by an amount varying from 
$25,000 to $50,000. 

And further, if the amount spent for new pipe over 
Dover Street Bridge were carried to its proper account, 
there would be $12,213.18 + $5,752.70 = $17,965.88 
more, as the result of this year's receipts, to go as an 
off-set for so much of the water debt. 

If the principle here developed be regarded as the 
true one (and it certainly seems to be so, taken in con- 
nection with other parts of the act,) this Board would 
respectfully suggest to the most excellent City Auditor 
the propriety of making up the amount of water debt 



1859.] WATER. 15 

upon it, and exhibit the same in his annual report. If 
he thinks besf, he can also exhibit the cost of the Works 
as he has hitherto done ; though it is not very obvious 
why the delinquency of the City Council in providing 
adequately for the expense of this department of the 
city service should be more prominently exhibited 
than that for any other branch of city expenditure. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

JNO. H. WILKINS, President 
SAM'L HATCH, 
THOMAS P. RICH, 
SAM'L HALL, 
TISDALE DRAKE, 
EBENEZER JOHNSON, 
BENJAMIN JAMES. 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the Cochituate Water 
Board, prom December 31st, 1857, to January 1st, 1859. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir, for labor, &c, - - $461 94 

South Boston « " » - - 287 00 

East Boston " « , ... £ fj - - 270 07 

Brookline " " " - - 573 59 

Marlborough " " " - 20 63 

Laying Main Pipe, for stock, &c, - - 4,949 91 

Main Pipe, ...... 16,608 46 

Service Pipe, ------ 9,043 86 

Stable, - - - - - - - 932 17 

Hydrants, ' 1,125 37 

Stopcocks, -, ----- 306 93 

Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c, - - - 166 42 

Plumbing Shop, ". <•' - 40 94 

Proving Yard, " " in repair shop, - 65 63 

Pipe Yard, for painting buildings, &c, - - 65 30 

Aqueduct Repairs, for labor, &c, - - . 1,151 21 
Lake, labor and stock, finishing dam, raising 

road, &c, - 5,750 57 

Hydrant and Stopcock Boxes, - - - 794 25 

Repairing Main Pipe, 913 98 

Laying Service Pipe, - - - - - 5 50 

Repairing Service Pipe, - - - 1,638 40 

Do. Streets, 1,340 95 

Do. Hydrants, 1,750 72 

Do. Stopcocks, - 682 46 

Amount carried forward, $,48,946 26 



1859.] 



WATER. 



17 



Amount brought forward, 


$48,946 26 


Meters, 


630 93 


Salaries, ....--- 


6,738 68 


Travelling Expenses, - 


55 04 


Office Expenses, including rent, fuel, gas, &c, 




for City Engineer's office, 


1,878 56 


Taxes, 


262 47 


Tolls and Ferriage, 


124 36 


Fountains, ...... 


37 50 


Carting, ....... 


262 25 


Postage and Express, 


21 22 


Tools, 


330 04 


Stationery, (including Stationery for "Water 




Registrar and Superintendents,) 


136 37 


Rents, ....... 


65 00 


Land and Water Rights, .... 


850 00 


Off and on Water, 


2,747 39 


Wages, Proving Yard, 


2,581 21 


Do. Plumbing Shop, .... 


535 72 


Do. Blacksmith Shop, .... 


515 47 


Do. laying Main Pipe, .... 


3,688 33 


Do. do. Service Pipe, . - - 


3,613 52 


Do Miscellaneous 


46 05 


Damage, (flowing land in Newton,) - 


25 00 


Oil, 


94 81 


Printing, (including Water Registrars and Su- 




perintendents,) ..... 


265 43 


Miscellaneous Expense (Surveying Land around 




the lake and in Marlborough, &c, 


1,554 40 


New Main, , 


3,093 41 




79,099 41 


Less amount drawn for New Main, 


3,093 41 



Amount expended for the year, - - $76,006 01 

($5,752 70 of this amount was paid for mov- 
ing the main pipe, in consequence of lowering 
the Dover Street Bridge.) 

Amount carried forward, $76,006 01 

3 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 



Amount brought forward, 






$76,006 01 


Cash paid the C 


ity Treasurer. 




Received Rent for Arches under B. 






H. Re se voir, 


- 


300 00 




Received for Old Building, - 


- 


100 00 




" " Land, 


• 


2,595 92 




" » off & on Water, 1329 00 






" " " waste, &c, 522 00 


1,851 00 




" " the Marlboro' Reservoir, 


2,000 00 




" ' " Wood, 


- 


42 50 




" " Pipe, Laying, &c, 


- 


885 58 




" " Grass and Pasture, 


- 


175 00 




" " Rent of Hopkinton ] 


Res- 






ervoir, 


- 


1,250 00 


9,200 00 


Balance, 


$66,806 01 


Extension of 


THE 


Work. 




Laying Main Pipe, 


- 


4,949 91 


$76,006 01 


Main Pipe, - - - 


- 


16,608 46 




Service Pipe, 


- 


9,043 86 




Hydrants, - - 


- 


1,125 37 




Stopcocks, 


- 


306 93 




Lake, finishing Dam, &c, 


- 


2,823 28 




Hydrant and Stopcock Boxes, 


- 


400 00 




Tolls and Ferriage, 


- 


100 00 




Carting, .... 


- 


225 00 




Tools, .... 


- 


330 04 




Land, - - - 


- 


850 00 




Wages, Proving Yard, 


r 


2,581 21 




" Plumbing Shop, 


- 


400 00 




" Blacksmith Shop, 


- 


450 00 




" laying Main Pipe, - 


- 


3,688 33 


i 


" " Service Pipe, &c, 


- 


3,619 02 




Oil, - - - - - 


- 


60 00 


47,561 41 



Amount of Annual Expense, - - $28,444 60 



1859.] 



WATER. 



19 



Expenditures and Receipts on account op the Water 
Works, to January 1st, 1859. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners, 



rs, - 


-$4,043,718 21 


1850, 


- 366,163 89 


1851, 


141,309 23 


1852, 


89,654 20 


1853, 


89,854 03 


1854, 


80,182 35 


1855, 


63,866 33 


1856, 


81,429 35 


1857, 


96,931 25 


1858, 


76,006 01 




$5,129,114 85 



Amount paid the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners, - - $47,648 38 

Amt. paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 

1851, 5,232 38 

1852, 15,869 12 

1853, 4,621 40 

1854, 12,423 29 

1855, 9,990 38 

1856, 7,840 43 

1857, 13,750 00 

1858, 9,200 00 134,728 90 

$4,994,385 95 
Sundry Payments by the City, $50,114 84 

Discount and Interest on Loans, 2,861,880 04 2,911,994 88 

$7,906,380 83 
Sundry Credits by the City, - $21,374 47 
Amount rec'd for Water Rates, 2,065,356 48 2,086,730 95 

$5,819,649 88 

SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Clerk of Cochituate Water Board. 



APPENDIX. 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Boston, January 5, 1858. 
Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir : — ■ The usual Annual Report of matters connected 
with the Water Works is herewith submitted. 

Lake Cochituate, the Conduit, all the structures on the line 
of the Works, and all the Reservoirs and the pipe work in the 
city, are in as good condition as they have ever been since 
the introduction of water into the city. 

The water has been of the very best quality throughout the 
year. 

The total amount wasted from the Lake during the year 
has been 1,934,500,000 gallons, it being a daily average of 
5,300,000 gallons of water. 

New Pipes on Dover Street Bridge. 

The 20-inch main, originally laid to supply South Boston 
with water, was laid under the roadway of this bridge, and at 
just about the level of mean high water, or grade 12.50. The 
bridge floor, at Harrison avenue, was at grade 16.50, and at 
the draw at grade 21.50. 

High water varies from grade 12 to grade 16, grade 15 
being the level of the coping of Dry Dock, Charlestown. 

This bridge having become very much out of repair, it was 
decided by the Committee on Bridges to rebuild it, and lower 



& APPENDIX. 

its surface so as to be level with, or but little above, the 
grade of Harrison avenue. 

The water way between the Harbor Commissioners' lines 
on the Boston and South Boston sides, is about 450 feet in 
width. It was decided by the Committee to rebuild this por- 
tion, and about one hundred feet in addition, of wood. 

Lowering the surface of the bridge made it necessary 
either to lower the pipes under the wooden portion, or to 
remove them and re-lay them under the sidewalk. Had they 
been lowered, they would have been in danger of being 
broken by the ice which would have jammed against them 
whenever a thaw took place in South Bay. 

A break of the pipes at such a time, and in such a place, 
would have deprived the whole of South Boston of water for 
several days, as it would have been very difficult to repair. 

To prevent any dangers of this sort, it was decided not to 
lower the pipes, but to remove those on the south-westerly 
side of the draw to a new position under the sidewalk. This 
has been done by driving new piles for their foundations, and 
so arranging the bridge that the sidewalk where the pipes 
are laid should be built of wood, although the sidewalk on the 
north side of the bridge was to be of brick. 

The height required for the draw and its counterbal- 
ance, made it necessary, however, to lower about 150 feet in 
length of the pipes, on the South Boston side, otherwise the 
draw could not be opened or shut. The pipes here may be 
troubled by the ice ; if so, additional piles will have to be 
driven to secure them. A row of fender piles will have to be 
driven on the south-westerly side of the bridge and draw, to 
protect that portion of the pipes from being broken by vessels. 
They are now more exposed to this danger than formerly, 
because being then full nine feet from the edge of the bridge, 
the pipe box was protected by it. 

Instead of removing the old pipes laterally, it was decided 
to lay a new line, and not draw the water off the old ones 
until both ends of the new were ready to be connected with 



APPENDIX. d 

the old. By doing the work in this way, the water was shut 
off from the pipes but a few hours at a time, and the inhab- 
itants of South Boston were not put to any inconvenience for 
the want of water, as they would have been had the old pipes 
been removed laterally. 

The old line of pipes was laid in 1849, or about nine years 
ago. When taken up, it was found that some of them had 
been covered, internally, with tubercles which measured about 
two inches in area on their surfaces, by about three quarters 
of an inch in height, whilst others had scarcely a lump raised 
in them. 

An examination showed that those which were corroded 
the least, had, in casting, been covered with the sand used in 
the molds, which had, in part at least, become vitrified and 
burned into the metal of the pipes. It would seem that this 
was the cause of their non-corrosion. 

Those which were covered with the tubercles were cor- 
roded to a depth of about one-sixteenth of an inch; the iron 
to that depth cutting with the knife very much like plumbago. 
Plaster casts of several portions of the pipes have been taken 
to show their corrosion, which are preserved in the office. 
This matter was very fully treated of in the report of the 
Water Board for the year 1852. In comparing these pipes 
with the descriptions of the tubercles found in the pipes 
examined at that time, it would seem that the corrosion 
is very energetic at first, but that it gradually decreases in 
energy year by year. A still longer time will be required, 
however, before this can be established as a fact. 

Most of the new pipes laid on this bridge are Scotch pipes, 
coated with Dr. Smith's patent preparation, which is found in 
Great Britain to answer an excellent purpose. It was thought 
advisable by your Board to use these pipes here, — ■■ although 
their cost was a little more on account of the coating, — 
becauss it gave the best opportunity to test the value of an 
internal coating in preserving the pipes, as all the water 
used in South Boston must pass through them. 



4 APPENDIX. 

Manholes were also put in this line of .pipes, so that at any 
time the water may be drawn off for the purpose of their 
examination, and to clean out the syphon, which has never 
been done since it was laid. The probability is that the 
syphon has partly filled up by deposits, and it will be proper 
to examine it and clean it out during the coming season. 

Conduit. 
The following table shows the different heights at which 
the water has been running, and the number of days in each 
month at the different heights. It being understood that the 
Conduit is but six feet four inches in height. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 


1858. 


5.10 


6.0 


6.4 


6.6 


6.8 


7.0 


8.0 




NUMBER OF DATS IN EACH MONTH. 




6 


25 

10 

3 

12 














5 
4 




• 


12 
21 


1 






3 








18 
31 
13 


















14 


3 
29 
31 
30 
17 














2 


































9 

30 
5 








4 


















24 




2 
















68 


108 


143 


3 


4 


33 


5 



It will be seen by this table that in 176 days the Conduit 
has been run less than full, in 143 days just full, and in 45 
days it has been running with a head on it varying from two 
inches to one foot eight inches. 

The least water that has been run through it has been one 
foot six inches more than originally designed. 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



Loss of Head from Brookline Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city 
may be seen by reference to the table in this and previous 
reports of average annual heights of water in the Reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 



YEAR, 



1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
^1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 



Average annual heights of Water 
above Marsh Level in 



Brookline 
Reservoir 



123.16 
123.36 
123.67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 
124.11 
124.63 



Beac'n Hill 
Reservoir 



119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 
114.77 
116.00 



E. Boston 
Reservoir. 



105.06 
104.07 
104.91 
99.84 
97.49 
94.11 
94,18 
94.42 



3 ca '~ 
2X9 



a> 



a> 



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n ° S 



4.12 
3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 
9.34 
8.63 



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18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
29.55 
29.93 
30.21 



Extreme high water in Brookline Reservoir is 124.6 feet. 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



Monthly Fall of Rain, in inches, in 1858. 





PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 








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2.61 
3. 32 


3.28 
2.30 


2.58 
1.78 


1.88 
1.49 


2. CO 
1.53 


3.44 
1.86 


3.33 




2.80 




3.87 
4.39 
2.23 
10.17 
3.46 
6.42 


2.18 
5.18 
3.89 
8.09 
4.56 
7.03 


1.52 
4.21 
3.53 
5.40 
3.24 
3.42 


1.47 
4.11 
3.32 
5.07 
3.42 
3.18 


0.86 
4.10 
3.22 
6.42 
4.02 
4.02 


1.77 
3.81 
3.71 
7.55 
4.36 
5.57 


2.05 




3.63 


May, 


2.35 




5.55 




4.90 


August, 


8.20 




5.17 
2.12 ■ 
2.91 
1.99 


5.02 
3.03 
3.38 
4.73 


3.58 
3.10 
1.26 
4.11 


3.10 
3.13 
2.01 
3.62 


3.86 
2.21 

2.08 
3.08 


5.11 

2.87 
2.37 
3.04 


3.05 




2.80 




2.40 




3.45 








48.66 


52.67 


37.73 


35.80 


37.40 


45.46 


44.51 







APPENDIX. 



Statement of the Location, Size, and Number of Feet of 
Distributing Pipes, laid in the Year 1858. 



In what Streets. 



Between what Streets. 






Harrison Avenue 

North Charles, . . 

Poplar, 

East Chester, 
East Chester, 
West Chester,. . . . 

"Worcester, 

Parker, 

New Devonshire, 
West Canton,. . . . 
Northampton, . . . 
Concord, 

Edgerly Place,. .. 
Goodwin Place,. . 

Washington, 

Washington, 



D, 

Fourth, 



Eighth, . . . 
Seventh. . 
Sixth, .... 
Foundry,- 

g, .:. 

Sixth, .... 

Fifth, 

Ninth, ... 
Sixth, . . . 
First, 



Quincy, 

Ward, 

Gifford Place,. 

Granite, 

First 

Athens, 

Telegraph, . . . 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Springfield and Newton, 



Total 12-inch, Boston. Proper, 



Poplar and the Bridge, 

North Charles and the Dock, 

Washington and Harrison Avenue,. 

Harrison Avenue and Albany, 

West of Tremont, 

West of Tremont, 

Washington and Harrison Avenue,. 

Franklin and Milk, 

West of Tremont, 

East of Harrison Avenue, 

West of Tremont, 



Total 6-inch, Boston Proper, 



South Cedar and Fayette,. 

From Revere street, 

For Metropolitan Stable, . 
Rear of No. 1187, 



Total 41-inch, Boston. Proper, 

SOUTH BOSTON.. 

Sixth and Eighth, 

G and K, 



Total 13-inch, South Boston,. 



D and E, 

D and E, 

D andE, 

Fourth and Swan, 

Opposite the Reservoir, 

K and L, 

L and M, 

K and D, 

Dorchester and F, 

AandB, 



Total 6-inch, South Boston, 



F and Dorchester, 

Dorchester and Preble, 

From Ward street, 

For Proving Yard, 

For Downer's Oil Factory,. 

C and D, 

Gates and Old Harbor, 



Eagle, ., 
Knox, .. 
Everett, 
Bremen, 



Total 4-inch, South Boston, 

EAST BOSTON. 

Trenton and Knox, 

Eagle and Condor, 

Orleans and Cottage, 

North of Glendon, 



Total 6-inch, East Boston, 



950 



950 



145 
65 
326 
325 
500 
268 
225 
229 
150 
350 



.2672 



139 
150 
183 
138 



610 



328 
1411 



.1739 



206 
575 
223 
132 
50 
425 
350 
233 
234 



.2476 



183 
310 
173 
113 
100 
340 
162 



.1381 



416 
310 
723 

280 



.1729 



10 



APPENDIX. 



RECAPITULATION 



1858. 



Diameter in inches. 



12 



Boston Proper, 
South Boston, 
East Boston, . 



Total number of feet laid, 
Stop-cocks in the same, . . 
Total number of feet laid, . 
Stop-cocks in the same, . . 
Total number of feet laid, 
Stop-cocks in the same, . . 



Sums of Pipes, . . . . 
Sums of Stop-cocks, . 



950 



1739 
1 



2689 
1 



2672 
7 

2476 
4 

1729 
1 



6877 
12 



610 

3 

1381 

5 



1991 



APPENDIX. 



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12 



APPENDIX. 



During the year, two hundred and ninety-three feet of 4- 
inch pipe has been taken up and relaid on the north side of 
Central Wharf, and two hundred and eight feet taken up and 
relaid on Worcester street, west of Washington street. Two 
hundred feet of 6-inch pipe has been taken up and relaid 
on Lenox street, between Washington street and Shawmut 
avenue, and one hundred and seventy-nine feet taken up and 
relaid on Broadway, between L and M streets. 

Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1858. 



o 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


a 

s 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


1 , 

3. 
5 


15 

10 
524 


927 

393 

15,316 


3 

2 

195 


237 

84 

6,083 


2 
2 
89 


189 

95 

2,978 


20 
14 

808 


1,353 

572 

24,377 


Aggi 




842 


26,302 













Making the total number up to January 1, 1859, 21,326 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1858. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



WHERE. 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


U 


1 


3 


5 

s 


Total 




8 


8 




1 

6 
6 




10 


19 


14 
3 
2 


5 


54 


11 
1 


9 


201 
21 
19 


340 
31 












3 








30 




















Totals, 


8 


8 




13 


.... 13 


19 


19 


5 


54 


12 


9 


241 


401 











APPENDIX. 



13 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches in 
diameter, and upwards, sixty-five were caused by the loosen- 
ing of lead in the joints, three by flaws in the pipes, and nine 
by settling of the earth. 

Total, seventy-seven in pipes of four inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that have occurred in service pipes and two- 
inch pipes, seventy-eight were caused by the settling of the 
earth, thirty-five by stiff connections, thirty-one by defective 
couplings, twenty by frost, thirty-one by flaws in pipes, five by 
defective cocks, six by tenants, seventy-four stopped by fish, 
nine by cocks blowing out, twelve struck by picks, sixteen 
stopped by rust, five gnawed by rats, one by driving piles, 
one pipe corroded by the soil. 

Total, three hundred and twenty-four in service and two- 
inch pipes. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850-1858. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 



LEAKS IN PIPES OP A DIAMETER OF 



Four Inches and upwards. Less than Four Inches 



32 
64 
82 
85 
74 
75 
75 
85 
77 



is 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 



Total. 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 



14 APPENDIX. 



Hydrants. 

During the year, twenty-three new hydrants have been 
established as follows : eight in the City proper, thirteen in 
South Boston and two in Bast Boston. 

Altogether there have been established up to the present 
date, 

In Boston proper, .... - 887 

" South Boston, 248 

'•' East Boston, - - - - - 170 

" Brookline, 1 

" Roxbury, ? 

" Charlestown, - - - - - 11 

" Chelsea, 1 

Total, 1,331 

Eighty hydrants have been taken out, and replaced by new 
or repaired ones. One hundred and forty-eight decayed 
hydrant boxes have been taken out and replaced by others 
made of Burnetized lumber, and the same material was used 
for those that have been established. 

The usual precautions have been taken to keep the 
hydrants in order during the winter. They have all been 
cleaned and oiled, also well packed with salt hay. They are 
all examined once, and sometimes twice a day, during the 
coldest weather, to keep them free from ice. 

Stop-Cocks. 

The stop-cocks are all in good working order, and have 
been cleaned and oiled the past season. Only one, the thirty- 
inch stop-cock on the Common, has broken during the year. 
Twenty-one new stop-cocks have been put in and covered 
by new stop-cock boxes, and sixty-seven boxes have been 
renewed. 



APPENDIX. 



15 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1859. 



NUMBER OF 



Pipes, 

Blow-off Branches,. 

Y Branches, 

3- Way Branches, . . . 
4- Way Branches, . . . 

Flange Pipes, 

Sleeves, 

Clamp Sleeves, 

Caps, 

Reducers, 

Bevel Hubs, 

Curved Pipes, 

Quarter Turns, 

Double Hubs, 

Offset Pipes, 

Stop-cocks, 

Pieces of Pipe, 

Yoke Pipes, 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



30 24 20 16 12 



21 



160 



15 



11 
13 
3 
2 
8 
3 
6 

2 
1 
15 



2 1A 



30 



25 



416 



Hydrants. 

9 Wilmarth. 
70 Lowell. 

9 Hooper. 
14 Ballardvale. 

4 Long N. Y. Pattern. 

For Hydrants. 39 lengtheners, 11 frames, 12 covers, 18 
valve seats, 11 nipples, 48 stuffing boxes, 18 plungers, 14 
screws, 20 caps, 40 lbs. composition castings, 30 straps, 11 
rings, 14 boxes, 16 partly finished boxes, 8 bends, 5 bands 



16 APPENDIX. 

For Stop-Cocks. 35 braces, 8 sets of stands and gear for 
36 and 30-inch stop-cocks, 1 frame and cover, 2 wooden 
boxes, 1 30-inch valve, 145 lbs. 1-inch bolts, 137 lbs. l^-inch 
bolts, 171 lbs. -f-inch bolts, 44 lbs. nuts, 12 composition 
screws for 6-inch stop-cocks, 2 composition screws for 
36-inch, 1 for 30-inch, 2 composition screws and nuts for 
24-inch, 1 composition screw and plunger for 12-inch, 2 scews 
and plungers for 6-inch, 5 iron screws for 6-inch, 7 compo- 
sition plungers for 6-inch, 12 iron screws for 4-inch, 42 body- 
rings for 4-inch, 15 composition valves for 4-inch, 200 lbs. 
composition castings for 4-inch, 16 plungers for 4-inch, 6 
plungers for 2-inch, also 3 iron screws for 2-inch stop-cocks, 
2 strings nuts, 25 lbs. packing rubber. 

For Service Pipe. 5 air cocks, 66 straight boxes, 34 Y 
boxes, 4 T boxes, 400 square boxes, 43 tubes, 19 caps, 11 
flanges, 17 1-inch union cocks, 19 f-inch union cocks, 65 f-inch 
union cocks, 975 unfinished f-inch union cocks, 9 1-inch T 
cocks, 19 f-inch T cocks, 26 unfinished f-inch T cocks, 21 
f-inch T cocks, 63 unfinished f-inch T cocks, 6 2J-inch coup- 
lings, 21 1-inch connection couplings, 12 lj-inch do., 16 f-inch 
do., 42 unfinished f inch do., 38 straight cocks, 2 Y cocks, 30 
unfinished Y cocks, 60 f-inch second-hand union cocks, 130 
lbs. second-hand connection couplings various sizes. 

Water Meters. 2 large power meters, 28 large Huse, 26 
small Huse, 6 small Worthington, 6 large do., 6 small Scotch, 
1 large do., 1 small Philadelphia meter, 40 composition con- 
nections, 1,114 lbs. connection pipes. 

Lead Pipe, <|c. 661 lbs. 1-inch, 980 lbs. 2f inch, 684 lbs. 
f-inch, 1,562 lbs. f-inch, 950 lbs. pieces of various sizes, 350 
lbs. sheet lead, 1,600 lbs. pig lead, 250 lbs. gasket. 

Block Tin Pipe. 67£ lbs. f-inch, 239 lbs. f-inch, 15 lbs. 
^-inch, 200 lbs. old, 50 lbs. block tin, 15 lbs. solder. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 1,509 lbs. bar iron, 1,272 lbs. working 
pieces, 145 lbs. sheet iron, 500 lbs, scrap iron, 613 lbs. steel. 

Stable. 3 horses, 4 wagons, 1 sleigh, 2 pungs, 4 sets of 



APPENDIX. 17 

harness, 3 robes, 1 ton English hay, 1,000 lbs. salt hay, 500 
lbs. straw. 

Miscellaneous. 2 sets old curb stones, 4 derricks and ap- 
paratus, 2 large boom derricks and apparatus, 1 large crane 
derrick, 150 feet oak lumber, 8 proving heads, 97 tons gravel, 
4 loads cracked stone, lot of old lumber, 1,800 lbs. old cast 
iron, 4 cords wood, 300 feet of hose, 200 pick handles, 1 cask 
cement, £ carboy vitriol, 400 lbs. pipe clay, £ ton blacksmith's 
coal, 1£ tons hard coal, 4 bushels charcoal, 600 feet lumber, 
67 new picks, 60 lbs. old composition, 40 lbs. composition 
chips, 1 stove and cooking utensils, lot of old machinery from 
Marlboro', lot of old bolts, cast-off drills, parts of stop-cocks, 
&c, large lot of patterns for proving presses, stop-cocks, 
hydrants, &c, 3 proving presses and apparatus, complete lot 
of tools for laying main and service pipes, and repairs of 
same, also tools for machine shop, backsmith's shop, reser- 
voirs and fountains, office and watchroom furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 3,000 feet of old lumber, lot of 
old iron, tool house, swing stage and irons ; capstan, frame 
and levers ; 3 boom carriages, 1 large copper ball, 5 large 
swivel patterns, 1 drinking fountain, lot of old machinery, 50 
feet of hand hose, 4 composition cylinders, 9 composition 
jets, 3 plate jets, 1 6-inch reducer jet, 2 composition caps 
with hose cocks, 1 4-inch copper pipe, 3 composition reel jets, 
9 cast iron jets. 

The new yard for proving the 40-inch pipes has been fitted 
up, a shed built, and the derrick set up. Everything is now 
ready to receive the pipes. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES SLADE, 

City Engineer. 



APPENDIX. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Water Registrar's Office, ) 
Boston, January 1st, 1859. $ 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board. 
Sir: — 

In conformity with the 16th section of the Ordinance pro- 
viding for the care and management of the Water Works, 
passed October 31st, 1850, the following report is made. 

The total number of Water Takers now entered for the 
year 1859, is 22,414, being an increase since January 1st, 
1858, of 812. 

During the year there have been 1,248 cases where the 
water has been shut off. Of these, 1,084 were for non-pay- 
ment of water rates, and 164 were for unnecessary waste of 
water. 

The number of cases where the water has been turned on, 
is 1,607. Of these, 767 were cases which had been shut off 
for non-payment of rates, 138 were shut off for unnecessary 
waste, and 702 were turned on for the first time. 

The total amount received from December 
31st, 1857, to January 1st, 1859, is - - $302,409 73 

Of the above, there was received for water 
used in previous years, the sum of - $1,269 25 

Leaving the receipts for water 
used during the year 1858, the 
sum of 301,140 48 

The usual tabular statement of the receipts for the 
year 1858 is contained in this Report; also, a 
statement showing the number and hind of water 
fixtures within the premises of water takers. 



Amount carried forward, $302,409 73 



APPENDIX. 19 

Amount brought forward, $302,409 73 

In addition to the above, there has been re- 
ceived for letting on water, in cases where it 
had been shut off for non-payment of water 

rates, - 1,522 00 

Total amount received during the year, in 
this office, ..-..- 

The amount of assessments already made for 
the year 1859, is 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water during the year 1859, is - 

The expenditures of my office during the year 
1858, have been ...... 

The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz 
Paid Chas. L. Bancroft, for services as clerk, - 

" Stephen Badlam, " « 

" Chas. E. Dunham, for services as inspector, 

" N. P. Burgess, " " 

" P. H. Niles, " " 

" Rand & Avery, for printing, - 

" Eayrs & Fairbanks, for stationery, - 

" George West, for distributing bills, 

" Stephen Russell, " « - - 

" M. Lyon, " «.■_■•. 

" Samuel Gilman, " " 

" Theodore Badlam, " » - 

" E. C. Bailey, for advertising, - 

" Stephen Maddox, for washing towels, 

Amount, ----- 



$303,931 73 


$243,105 


93 


310,000 


00 


3,061 


13 


1Z. ' 

$782 


50 


782 


50 


626 


00 


494 


00 


52 


00 


104 


89 


89 


64 


26 


00 


26 


00 


24 00 


24 


00 


14 


00 


15 


00 


6 


60 


$3,067 13 



20 APPENDIX. 



Statement showing the Number op Houses, Stores, Steam 
Engines, &c, in the City op Boston, supplied with 
Cochituate "Water to the 1st of January, 1859, with 
the amount of water rates paid for 1858. 



1,452 


Dwelling Houses, 


$6 


00 


18,712 00 


1,481 


a 


a 


7 


00 


10,367 00 


1,745 


u 


a 


8 


00 


13,960 00 


1,977 


u 


a 


9 


00 


17,793 00 


1,678 


n 


a 


10 


00 


16,780 00 


1,432 


a 


a 


11 


00 


15,752 00 


1,164 


a 


a 


12 


00 


13,968 00 


793 


a 


a 


13 


00 


10,309 00 


641 


it 


a 


14 


00 


8,974 00 


548 


u 


a 


15 


00 


8,220 00 


470 


a 


tt 


16 


00 


7,520 00 


455 


a 


a 


17 


00 


7,735 00 


305 


a 


a 


18 


00 


5,490 00 


253 


ti 


a 


19 


00 


4,807 00 


181 


a 


a 


20 


00 


3,620 00 


136 


a 


a 


21 


00 


2,856 00 


136 


a 


a 


22 


00 


2,992 00 


71 


it 


u 


23 


00 


1,633 00 


90 


a 


a 


24 


00 


2,160 00 


65 


a 


tt 


25 


00 


1,625 00 


74 


a 


it 


26 


00 


1,924 00 


41 


a 


a 


27 


00 


1,107 00 


40 


a 


a 


28 


00 


1,120 00 


21 


a 


a 


29 


00 


609 00 


52 


a 


a 


30 


00 


1,560 00 


298 


a 


a 


31 


00 


9,238 00 


862 


a 
a 


a 
a 






4,805 37 


16,461 


$185,636 37 


Amount carried forward, 




$185,636 37 



Amount brought forward, 

1 Boarding House, 

2 U CI 

2 u a 

\ a u 

2 a u 

2 it u 

2 u u 

2 u a. 

2 u u 

2 a a 

2 " " 



11 



2 Model Houses, 

9 " " 

6 " " 

•j « a 

2 « " 

3 " " 
8 « " 

3 " « 

4 « « 

2 " " 

3 " " 

2 a a 

6 " » 

2 « « 

2 « « 

3 " " 

2 « « 

2 « «, 

1 « «. 



APPENDIX. 




Zl 


mrd, 




$185,636 37 


28 00 


$28 


00 


30 00 


30 


00 


31 00 


31 


00 


33 00 


33 


00 


35 00 


35 


00 


42 00 


42 


00 


65 00 


65 


00 


68 00 


68 


00 


77 00 


77 


00 


82 00 


82 


00 


98 00 


98 


00 

589 00 


15 00 


30 


00 


18 00 


162 


00 


21 00 


126 


00 


24 00 


168 


00 


25 00 


25 


00 


27 00 


81 


00 


30 00 


240 


oa 


33 00 


99 


00, 


36 00 


144 00. 


39 00 


78 


00 


42 00 


126 


00 ; 


45 00 


45 


00, 


48 00 


288 


00 


51 00 


51 


00, 


54 00 


108 


00 


60 00 


180 


00 


63 00 


63 


00. 


66 00 


66 


00 


69 00 


69 


00 


70 00 


70 


00 



65 A?n<m?s., carried forward, $2,219 00 $186,225 37 



22 






APPENDIX. 










65 


Amounts brought 


forward, 


$2,219 00 $186,225 


37 


1 Model House, 


71 00 


71 


00 






1 




it 


72 00 


72 


00 






1 




a 


75 00 


75 


00 






2 




it 


84 00 


168 


00 






1 




it 


96 00 


96 


00 






1 




it 


129 00 


129 


00 






1 




tt 


192 00 


192 


00 






1 




a 


210 00 


210 


00 






1 




tt 




13 


50 


3,245 




75 






50 


1 Lodgin 


g House, 


12 00 


12 


00 






2 


tt 


a 


25 00 


50 


00 






1 


it 


a 


27 00 


27 


00 






1 


it 


a 


28 00 


28 


00 






1 


tt 


tt 


33 00 


33 


00 


150 




6 






00 


1,892 Stores 


and Shops, 


6 00 


11,352 


00 






2 


tt 


a 


8 00 


16 


00 






26 


it 


a 


8 50 


221 


00 






772 


it 


a 


9 00 


6,948 


00 




- 


6 


it 


a 


10 00 


60 


00 






7 


it 


a 


11 00 


77 


00 






10 


It 


it 


11 50 


115 


00 






38 


« 


it 


12 00 


456 


00 






1 


It 


a 


13 00 


13 


00 






34 


a 


a 


14 00 


476 


00 






6 


a 


a 


15 00 


90 


00 






2 


a 


a 


16 00 


32 


00 






6 


it 


a 


16 50 


99 


00 






2 


it 


tt 


17 00 


34 00 






1 


it 


a 


18 00 


18 


00 






7 


a 


a 


19 00 


133 


00 






2 


a 


a 


20 00 


40 


00 







2814 Amounts carried forward, $20,180 00 $189,620 87 



APPENDIX. 23 

2814 Amounts brought forward, $20,180 00 $189,020 87 
6 Stores and Shops, 24 00 144 00 

1 " " 25 00 25 00 

1 « « 31 50 31 50 

1 " « 73 95 73 95 

306 " « 1,313 26 

21,767 71 



3,129 




128 


Offices, 


1 


a 


29 


a 


3 


a 


1 


■ a 


3 


a 


1 


u 


31 


a 


197 




1 Bank, 


12 


a 


1 


a 


' 2 


a 


16 




5 Buildings, 


12 


it 


2 


it 


46 


u 


1 


a 


1 


a 


15 


it 


2 


a 


10 


a 


5 


a 


2 


a 


4 


a 


9 


tt 



6 00 


768 00 


8 50 


8 50 


9 00 


261 00 


11 00 


33 00 


11 50 


11 50 


14 00 


42 00 


15 00 


15 00 




151 28 


6 00 


6 00 


9 00 


108 00 


11 50 


11 50 




14 21 


10 00 


50 00 


12 00 


144 00 


14 00 


28 00 


15 00 


690 00 


17 00 


17 00 


17 25 


17 25 


18 00 


270 00 


19 00 


38 00 


20 00 


200 00 


21 00 


105 00 


22 00 


44 00 


23 00 


92 00 


24 00 


216 00 



1,290 28 



139 71 



114 Amounts carried forward, $1,911 25 $212,818 57 



114 


Amounts br 


ought forward, 


U1A., 


$1,911 


25 $212,818 51 


1 Building, 


24 


50 


24 


50 


6 


u 


25 


00 


150 


00 


1 


tt 


25 


50 


25 


50 


1 


a 


26 


00 


26 


00 


3 


u 


27 


00 


81 


00 


2 


a 


26 


00 


52 


00 


5 


it 


30 


00 


150 


00 


1 


u 


30 


50 


30 


50 


1 


a 


31 


92 


31 


92 


1 


it 


32 


50 


32 


50 


1 


it 


32 


92 


32 


92 


3 


a 


33 


00 


99 


00 


1 


a 


35 


00 


35 


00 


2 


it 


36 


00 


72 


00 


1 


tt 


36 


50 


36 


50 


1 


u 


37 


00 


37 


00 


1 


u 


40 


00 


40 


00 


1 


a 


41 


00 


41 


00 


1 


u 


42 


00 


42 


00 


2 


a 


44 


00 


88 


00 


2 


u 


45 


00 


90 


00 


1 


a 


46 


50 


46 


50 


1 


a 


47 


00 


47 


00 


2 


a 


48 


00 


96 


00 


1 


u 


49 


00 


49 


00 


1 


it 


50 


00 


50 


00 


1 


tt 


51 


00 


51 


00 


1 


a 


52 


00 


52 


00 


1 


tt 


56 


00 


56 


00 


1 


a 


57 


00 


57 


00 


3 


it 


60 


00 


180 


00 


1 


It 


62 


00 


62 


00 


1 


it 72 
Amounts carried forward, 


00 


72 


00 


167 


$3,947 09 $212,818 5 







APPENDIX. 






25 


167 


Amounts brought forivard, 


$3,947 09 $212,818 57 


1 Building, 


74 00 


74 00 




1 


u 


76 00 


76 


00 




1 


u ' 


78 00 


78 


00 




1 


u 


81 00 


81 


00 




1 


(C 


82 00 


82 


00 




1 


a 


86 50 


86 


50 




1 


iC 


87 00 


87 


00 




1 


u 


91 50 


91 


50 




1 


(I 


103 00 


103 


00 




1 


u 


108 00 


108 


00 




1 


u 


120 00 


120 


00 




1 


a 


122 50 


122 


50 




1 


u 


135 00 


135 


00 




1 


a 


139 00 


139 


00 




1 


a 


142 50 


142 


50 




3 


u 




31 


42 




185 






5,504 51 


38 Churches, 


6 00 


228 


00 




1 


a 


8 00 


8 


00 




2 


« 


9 00 


18 


00 




1 


u 


15 00 


15 


00 




2 


Ealls, 


20 00 
6 00 


40 


00 




44 


48 


00 


309 00 


8J 




13 


(C 


9 00 


117 


00 




3 


a 


14 00 


42 


00 




1 


u 


15 00 


15 


00 




3 


3 rivate Schools, 


6 00 


8 


21 




28 


18 


00 


230 21 


31 




2 


(l u 


9 00 


18 


00 




2 


It iC 


14 00 


28 


00 





7 Amounts carried forward, $64 00 $218,862 29 



26 


APPENDIX. 




7 Amounts brought fo, 


rward, 


$64 00 $218,862 29 


1 Private School, 


15 00 


15 00 


1 u a 


18 00 


18 00 


][ u u 


30 00 
14 17 


30 00 


10 


127 00 


1 Theatre, 


14 17 


1 


22 50 


22 50 


1 " 


25 00 


25 00 


1 " 


93 75 


93 75 


1 Green House, 


15 00 


15 00 


1 Custom House, 


156 00 


156 00 


1 Post Office, 


25 00 


25 00 


1 Hospital, 


160 75 


160 75 


1 Marine Hospital, 






(at Chelsea,) 


178 00 


178 00 


1 Medical College, 


30 00 


30 00 


1 State House, 


134 50 


134 50 


1 Library, 


9 00 


9 00 


1 


35 00 


35 00 


1 Asylum, 


15 00 


15 00 


2 " 


25 00 


50 00 


1 


35 00 


35 00 


3 


40 00 


120 00 


1 


50 00 


50 00 


1 " 


96 13 


96 13 


1 


242 48 
3 00 


242 48 


23 


1,507 28 


16 Market Stalls, 


48 00 


34 


6 00 


204 00 


5 " 


10 00 


50 00 


1 a a 




4 50 


1 Market, 


33 00 


33 00 


1 " 


44 00 


44 00 


1 " 


49 00 


49 00 



59 Amounts carried forward, 



$432 50 $220,496 57 







APPENDIX. 




27 


59 


Amounts br> 


ought forward, 




$432 


50 $220,496 57 


1 Market, 


67 


00 


67 


00 


60 










499 50 


116 Cellars, 


6 


00 


696 


00 


4 


iC 


9 


00 


36 


00 


1 


u 


15 


00 


15 


00 


26 


it 






98 


42 


147 










845 42 


2 Hotels, 


15 


00 


30 


00 


2 


u 


20 


00 


40 


00 


1 


ic 


21 


00 


21 


00 


1 


u 


24 00 


24 


00 


2 


a 


27 


00 


54 00 


3 


a 


30 


00 


90 


00 


1 


u 


32 


00 


32 


00 


1 


u 


33 


00 


33 


00 


1 


u 


35 


00 


35 


00 


2 


u 


36 


00 


72 


00 


1 


a 


42 


00 


42 


00 


2 


u 


44 


00 


88 


00 


1 


n 


45 


00 


45 


00 


1 


a 


48 


00 


48 


00 


1 


it 


49 


65 


49 


65 


1 


a 


55 


00 


55 


00 


1 


a 


57 


00 


57 


00 


2 


u 


60 


00 


120 


00 


1 


a 


69 


00 


69 


00 


1 


it 


75 


00 


75 


00 


1 


a 


77 


10 


77 


10 


1 


a 


78 


00 


78 


00 


1 


u 


101 


24 


101 


24 


1 


a 


102 


00 


102 


00 


1 


cc 


108 


00 


108 


00 


1 


a 


110 


00 


110 


00 


1 


« 111 

Amounts carried forward, 


00 


111 


00 


35 


$1,766 


99 $221,841 49 



28 




APPENDIX. 






35 


Amounts brought fo? 


'ward, 




$1,766 99 $221,841 49 


1 Hotel, 


114 


60 


114 


60 


1 


a 


115 


08 


115 


08 


1 


a 


114 


80 


114 


80 


1 


a 


117 


84 


117 


84 


2 


a 


120 


00 


240 


00 


1 


a 


135 


00 


135 


00 


2 


a 


138 


00 


276 


00 


1 


a 


143 


00 


143 


00 


1 


it 


153 


70 


153 


70 


1 


a 


194 


70 


194 


70 


1 


a 


232 


41 


232 


41 


1 


tc 


240 


00 


240 


00 


1 


a 


267 


00 


267 


00 


1 


a 


278 


00 


278 


00 


1 


a 


289 


00 


289 


00 


1 


a 


354 


00 


354 


00 


1 


ti 


400 


00 


400 


00 


1 


a 


408 


00 


408 


00 


1 


it 


435 


00 


435 


00 


1 


a 


553 


00 


553 


00 


1 


it 


662 


00 


662 


00 


1 


a 


790 


00 


790 


00 


1 


a 

Restaurants and Sa- 






14 


50 


60 


8,294 62 


9] 






loons, 


6 


00 


54 00 


1 


a tc 


8 


00 


8 


00 


231 


a a 


9 


00 


2,079 


00 


6 


a it 


10 


00 


60 


00 


2 


a a 


11 


50 


23 


00 


51 


a a 


12 


00 


612 


00 


2 


a a 


13 


00 


26 


00 


21 


a a 


15 


00 


315 


00 


2 


a a 


17 


00 


34 


00 



325 Amounts carried forward, 



5,211 00 $230,136 11 



APPENDIX. 



29 



325 Amounts brought forward, 
4 Restaur'ts & Saloons, 18 00 



^3,211 00 $230,136 11 

72 00 



1 


a 


a 


20 


00 


20 00 


2 


a 


a 


22 


50 


45 00 


1 


a 


a 


23 


00 


23 00 


1 


a 


a 


24 


00 


24 00 


4 


a 


a 


25 


00 


100 00 


1 


a 


n 


30 


00 


30 00 


1 


a 


a 


35 


00 


35 00 


1 


a 


a 


37 


50 


37 50 


1 


it 


tt 


40 


00 


40 00 


2 


a 

31ub House, 


u 


15 


00 


341 95 


344 




1 I 


15 00 


2 


It It 

Bathing Houses, 


50 

25 


00 
00 


100 00 


3 




2 ] 


50 00 


2 


a a 




30 


00 


60 00 


1 


it u 




40 


00 


40 00 


2 


tt a 




50 


00 


100 00 


1 


11 it 




55 


00 


55 00 


1 


It it 

Stables, 




135 

5 


00 

00 


135 00 


9 




340 I 


1,700 00 


25 


tt 




6 


00 


150 00 


40 


a 




6 


25 


250 00 


26 


a 




7 


50 


195 00 


16 


a 




8 


00 


128 00 


1 


a 




8 


50 


8 50 


11 


a 




8 


75 


96 25 


1 


a 




9 


75 


9 75 


24 


10 

Amounts carried forward, 


00 


240 00 


"484 


$2,777 50 






7 









3,979 45 



115 00 



440 00 



30 APPENDIX. 

484 Amounts brought forward, $2,777 50 $234,670 56 

1 Stable, 10 75 10 75 

18 " 11 25 202 50 

6 « 12 00 72 00 

23 " . 12 50 287 50 

1 " 13 25 13 25 

4 " 13 75 55 00 

2 « 14 00 28 00 
8 " 15 00 120 00 

1 « 16 00 16 00 

5 " 16 25 81 25 

3 " 16 50 49 50 

2 " 17 50 35 00 
5 " 18 00 90 00 
1 « 18 50 18 50 
5 « • 18 75 93 75 

12 » 20 00 240 00 

1 " 20 75 20 75 

1 « 21 25 21 25 

2 " 22 50 45 00 

2 " 23 75 47 50 

5 " 24 00 120 00 

3 " 25 00 75 00 
1 « 27 50 27 50 

6 " 30 00 180 00 

1 « 31 25 31 25 

2 " 32 00 64 00 
1 « 33 00 33 00 

3 « 34 00 102 00 
3 " 36 00 108 00 
1 « 39 00 39 00 
6 « 40 00 240 00 
1 u 44 00 44 00 
1 « 46 50 46 50 
1 if 48 00 48 00 



622 Amounts carried forward, $5,483 25 $234,670 56 







APPENDIX. 




31 


622 Amounts brought forward, 


$5,483 


25 $234,670 56 


3 Stables, 


50 00 


150 


00 


1 


a 


52 00 


52 


00 


1 


a 


54 00 


54 00 


2 


a 


56 00 


112 


00 


5 


u 


60 00 


300 


00 


1 


u 


64 50 


64 


50 


1 


u 


66 00 


66 


00 


3 


u 


70 00 


210 


00 


2 


u 


75 00 


150 


00 


1 


u 


80 00 


80 


00 


1 


a 


81 00 


81 


00 


4 


u 


90 00 


360 


00 


1 


a 


100 00 


100 


00 


1 


u 


101 25 


101 


25 


1 


a 


103 00 


103 


00 


2 


a 


120 00 


240 


00 


1 


u 


140 00 


140 


00 


1 


u 


148 00 


148 


00 


1 


u 


160 00 


160 


00 


1 


u 


408 00 


408 


00 


46 


a 




141 


94 


702 








8,704 94 


1 Shop and En 


gine, 10 50 


10 


50 


2 < 




i 12 00 


24 


00 


6 < 




< 15 00 


90 


00 


1 < 




' 16 56 


16 


56 


1 < 




' 18 00 


18 


00 


1 ' 




' 18 16 


18 


16 


1 < 




18 42 


18 


42 


1 < 




18 49 


18 


49 


1 < 




' 19 00 


19 


00 


1 < 




< 20 88 


20 


88 


1 < 


Amounts car 


1 24 00 
ried forward, 


24 


00 


17 ^ 


$278 01 $243,375 50 



32 APPENDIX. 

17 Amounts brought forward, $278 01 $243,375 50 

1 Shop and Engine, 24 36 24 36 

1 « « 25 00 25 00 

1 « « 26 18 26 18 

1 « « 33 62 33 62 

1 « << 33 90 33 90 

1 « ft 34 74 34 74 

1 « " 36 00 36 00 

1 « « 38 34 38 34 

1 « « 38 70 38 70 

1 « « 42 42 42 42 

1 « " 45 00 45 00 

1 « « 45 42 45 42 

1 « » 53 20 53 20 

1 u « 54 62 54 62 

1 « » 58 20 58 20 

1 a « 63 12 63 12 

1 ft « 63 50 63 50 

1 u u 66 66 66 66 

1 « " 66 78 66 78 

1 u a 68 16 68 16 

1 a a 69 00 .69 00 

1 « « 69 06 69 06 

1 a it 70 92 70 92 

1 a a 93 39 93 39 

1 a a 95 36 95 36 

1 a a 96 02 96 02 

1 a a 97 86 97 86 

1 a a 98 04 98 04 

1 u u 100 78 100 78 

1 « " 102 00 102 00 

1 « a 102 96 102 96 

1 u a 103 50 103 50 

1 a a 108 90 108 90 

50 Amounts carried forward, $2,403 72 $243,375 50 





APPENDIX. 






66 


50 Amounts brought forward^ 




$2,403 


72 $2 


43,375 50 


1 Shop and Engine, 125 


00 


125 


00 




1 < 


126 


96 


126 


96 




1 ' 


136 


02 


136 


02 




1 ' 


140 


33 


140 


33 




1 < 


145 


20 


145 


20 




1 < 


149 


06 


149 


06 




1 ' 


< « 150 


72 


150 


72 




1 < 


158 


88 


158 


88 




1 < 


163 


38 


163 


38 




1 ' 


170 


16 


170 


16 




1 < 


176 


40 


176 


40 




1 < 


' « 180 


24 


180 


24 




1 < 


< " 186 


84 


186 


84 




1 < 


< « 188 


04 


188 


04 




1 < 


' » 204 00 


204 


00 




1 < 


« » 256 


12 


256 


12 




1 ' 


279 


24 


279 


24 




1 • 


< « 353 


75 


353 


75 




1 < 


' " 472 


08 
00 


472 
20 


08 
00 




69 


)imdry and Engine, 20 


6,166 14 


1 Fc 




1 33 


20 


33 


20 




1 " " 59 


52 


59 


52 




1 « " 64 


29 


64 


29 




1 « " 115 


44 


115 


44 




1 123 


20 


123 


20 




1 


" « 136 


12 


136 


12 




7 


551 77 


1 Printing and Engine, 20 


02 


20 


02 




1 « « 27 


10 


27 


10 




1 29 


12 


29 


12 


t 


1 


« " 29 
Amounts carried forivard, 


96 


29 


96 




4 . 


$106 


20 $250,093 41 



34 APPENDIX. 

4 Amounts brought forward, $106 20 $250,093 41 

1 Printing and Engine, 34 28 34 28 

1 " " 44 50 44 50 

1 " " 45 18 45 18 

1 " " 93 20 93 20 # 

1 " " 142 98 142 98* 

1 " " 163 96 163 96 



10 630 30 



1 Ship Yard and Engine, 40 77 40 77 
1 " " 159 83 159 83 



2 200 60 



1 Factory and Engine, 17 96 17 96 

1 « ■ " 19 06 19 06 

1 « « 25 56 25 56 

1 « " 28 14 28 14 

1 « " 32 78 32 78 

1 « " 36 08 36 08 

1 « » 63 16 63 16 

1 « « 64 80 64 80 

1 ■ » 69 12 69 12 

1 « ". 78 42 78 42 

1 « " 81 05 81 05 

1 « " 84 24 84 24 

1 « « 88 53 88 53 

1 « « 102 30 102 30 

1 « " 109 92 109 92 

1 " " 110 50 110 50 

1 " 114 23 114 23 

1 " ?< 116 80 116 80 

1 " " 118 68 118 68 

1 " " 123 84 123 84 

1 " " 147 22 147 22 

1 « « 200 28 200 28 



22 Amounts carried forward, $1,832 67 $250,924 31 



APPENDIX. 



35 



22 Amounts brought forward, $1,832 67 $250,924 31 
1 Factory and Engine, 204 80 204 80 

1 « " 360 64 360 64 

1 « « 446 48 446 48 

1 « « 534 28 534 28 



26 












3,378 


87 


2 Factories, 


10 


00 


20 


00 






5 


u 


12 


00 


60 


00 






1 


a 


14 


00 


14 


00 






6 


u 


15 


00 


90 


00 






1 


a 


20 


00 


20 


00 






1 


u 


21 


00 


21 


00 






1 


a 


24 00 


24 


00 






1 


u 


27 


00 


27 


00 






1 


it 


30 


00 


30 


00 






1 


u 


36 


00 


36 


00 






1 


it 


41 


40 


41 


40 






1 


u 


43 


02 


43 


02 






1 


a 


99 


45 


99 


45 






1 


a 


118 


96 


118 


96 






1 


u 


156 


80 


156 


80 






1 


u 


170 


56 


170 


56 






26 












972 


19 


1 Gas Light Co., 


66 


24 


66 


24 






1 


u u a 


94 00 


94 00 






1 


u a a 


481 


20 


481 


20 


641 




3 






44 


1 S 


ugar Refinery, 


2,562 


51 


2,562 


51 






1 


u u 


3,477 


54 


3,477 


54 


6,040 




2 


05 


1 Mill & Engine, 


17 


20 


17 


20 






1 


u u 


84 


12 


84 


12 







2 Amounts carried forward, $10132$261,956 86 



i*5 








APPENDIX. 








2 


Amounts brought 


forward, 




$101 32 $261,956 86 


1 


Mill and Engine, 


90 


64 


90 


64 




1 


u 




95 


99 


95 


99 




1 


it 




132 


00 


132 


00 




1 


a 




133 


07 


133 


07 




1 


a 




148 


82 


148 


82 




1 


a 




409 


67 


409 


67 




1 


a 




761 


70 


761 


70 




1 


it 




1,850 


43 


1,850 


43 




1 


it 




1,904 


82 


1,904 


82 




11 














5,628 46 


IEdj 


?ine, 


10 


00 


10 


00 




7 




a 


12 


00 


84 


00 




1 




it 


13 


14 


13 


14 




2 




a 


15 


00 


30 


00 




1 




a 


18 


09 


18 


09 




1 




a 


33 


84 


33 


84 




1 




a 


39 


78 


39 


78 




1 




a 


44 40 


44 


40 




1 




a 


48 


00 


48 


00 




1 




it 


126 


66 


126 


66 




1 




a 


136 


32 


136 


32 




18 


584 23 


13 


Printing Offices, 


6 


00 


78 


00 




10 




a l 




9 


00 


90 


00 




1 




a i 




10 


00 


10 


00 




4 




it i 




12 


00 


48 


00 




3 




a t 




13 


00 


39 


00 




2 




a t 




17 


00 


34 


00 




1 




a i 




18 


00 


18 


00 




2 




a t 




21 


00 


42 


00 




1 




a t 




28 


00 


28 


00 




1 




a i 




29 


00 


29 


00 




1 


A 


it t 




20 
oriva rd, 


83 


20 


83 




39 


mount carried ) 


436 83 




$268,606 38 



_ 


APPENDIX. 






m 


Amount brought forward, 








1268,606 38 


1 Distillery, 


65 


10 


$65 


10 




u 


73 


35 


73 


35 




a 


147 


40 


147 


40 




u 


161 


50 


161 


50 




1 " 


301 


04 


301 


04 




it 


410 


40 


410 


40 




it 


451 


44 


451 


44 




1 " 


528 
9 


72 
00 


528 
9 


72 
00 






2,138 95 


1 Brewery, 




3 " 


15 


00 


45 


00 




1 " 


18 


00 


18 


00 




it 


20 


00 


20 


00 




2 " 


25 


00 


50 


00 




it 


66 


95 


66 


95 




1 u 


75 


00 


75 


00 




1 " 


227 


84 


227 


84 




11 


511 79 


1 Bacon Works, 


15 


00 


15 


00 




it a 


25 
9 


00 
00 


25 


00 




2 


18 


00 


40 00 


2 Bleachcries, 




2 


10 


00 


20 


00 




1 (' 


12 


00 


12 


00 




1 « 






4 


50 




1 Laundry, 


25 


00 


25 


00 




1 Pottery, 


30 


00 


30 


00 




8 


6 


00 


162 


00 


109 50 


27 Bakeries, 




8 


7 


00 


56 


00 




10 


8 
ed forward, 


00 


80 


00 




45 Amounts earn 


$298 00 $271,406 62 



38 


APPENDIX. 






45 Amounts brought forward, 


$298 00 $271,406 62 


4 Bakeries, 


9 00 


36 00 




3 " 


10 00 


30 00 




1 


11 00 


11 00 




2 


12 00 


24 00 




1 


lgine, 20 00 


4 00 




56 


20 00 


403 00 


1 Bakery and Er 




\ u u 


53 64 


53 64 




]_ u a 


64 33 
ngine, 22 02 


64 33 

22 02 




3 


137 97 


1 Building and E 




1 


'< 74 96 


74 96 




1 


' 95 78 


95 78 




1 


144 06 


144 06 




1 


< 158 08 


158 08 




1 


« 181 44 


181 44 




1 


190 20 


190 20 




1 « 


205 56 
15 00 


205 56 




8 


60 00 


1,072 10 


4 Ship Yards, 




4 « « 




38 75 




2 Dry Docks, 


15 00 


30 00 




1 " " 


35 00 


35 00 




]_ « a 


44 84 
3 00 


44 84 




12 


2,067 00 


208 59 


689 Hose, 




5 « 


5 00 


25 00 




4 " 


10 00 
3 00 


40 00 




698 


30 00 


2,132 00 


10 Fountains, 




10 " 


5 00 


50 00 




5 


6 00 

ed forward, 


30 00 




25 Amounts carri 


$110 00 $275,360 28 



APPENDIX. 39 

25 Amounts brought forward, $110 00 $275,360 28 

1 Fountains, 8 00 8 00 
3 " 10 00 30 00 

2 « 15 00 30 00 

31 178 00 



1 Packing House, 9 00 9 00 

1 " " 12 00 12 00 

2 " « 15 00 30 00 
1 " " 25 00 25 00 
1 " " 13 75 



6 




1 Railroad Co 


1 


u 


1 


it 


i—i 


it 


1 


u 


i—i 


u 


1 


it 


1 " 


a 


8 





75 00 75 00 

205 00 205 00 

555 00 555 00 

'804 18 804 18 

854 82 854 82 

1,006 56 1,006 56 

1,536 24 1,536 24 

2,125 52 2,125 52 



1 Chelsea Ferry Co., 948 56 948 56 

1 E.Boston « " 691 94 691 94 

1 People's " " 326 40 326 40 



89 75 



7,162 32 



_3 1,966 90 

1 Cunard St'mship Co. 700 00 700 00 

1 Steamboat, 9 04 9 04 

1 " 10 00 10 00 

1 " 15 00 15 00 

1 « 32 88 32 88 

1 " 35 00 35 00 

1 " 38 72 38 72 

1 " 43 56 43 56 

1 " 44 84 44 84 



9 Amounts carried forward, $929 04 $284,757 25 



40 



APPENDIX. 



Amounts brought forward, 
Steamboat, 



32 



50 00 
53 20 
55 61 
57 12 
63 00 
74 62 
76 69 
78 25 
96 96 
125 06 
127 75 

130 52 

131 04 

132 21 

149 92 

150 00 
157 80 
179 40 
206 58 
231 00 
325 44 
629 09 



1 Latin School, 16 00 

1 English High School, 16 00 

1 Normal " 16 00 

18 Grammar " 16 00 

213 Primary " 6 00 

13 Engine Houses, 16 00 

6 Hose Carriage Houses, 16 00 
3 Hook & Ladder « 16 00 
3 Police Station " 15 00 
3 Police Stations, 20 00 

262 Amounts carried forward, 



50 

53 

55 

57 

63 

74 

76 

78 

96 

125 

127 

130 

131 

132 

149 

150 

157 

179 

206 

231 

325 

1,258 



04 1284,757 25 

00 

20 

61 

12 

00 

62 

69 

25 

96 

06 

75 

52 

04 

21 

92 

00 

80 

40 

58 

00 

44 

18 



16 
16 
16 

288 
1,278 

208 
96 
48 
45 
60 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



4,839 39 



5,071 00 $289,596 64 



APPENDIX. 41 

262 Amounts brought forward, $2,071 00 $289,596 64 

1 Police Station, 25 00 25 00 

1 " « 80 00 80 00 

1 City Stable (Harrison 

Avenue,) 75 00 75 00 

1 City Stable (Commer- 
cial Street,) 33 75 33 75 
5 Fire Alarm Motors, 10 00 50 00 
1 " " « 15 00 15 00 
1 Court House, 95 00 95 00 
1 City Hall, 50 00 50 00 
1 Faneuil Hall, 40 00 40 00 
1 City Building, 37 50 37 50 
1 Probate Office, 10 00 10 00 
1 Office (at City Scales,) 9 00 9 00 
4 " (atNiles'Block,)27 00 27 00 
1 Dead House, 10 00 10 00 
1 Public Library, 50 00 50 00 
1 House of Correction, 462 00 462 00 
1 Lunatic Hospital, 225 00 225 00 
1 House of Reforma- 
tion, 50 00 50 00 
1 Faneuil Hall Market, 

(for Urinals, &c.) 70 00 
1 Street Sprinkling, 400 00 
1 Offal Station, 150 00 

1 Common Sewer, (for 

making mortar, &c.) 75 00 
1 Store (Faneuil Hall,) 6 00 
1 House (Vine Street,) 7 00 
1 Steamer (Henry Mor- 
rison,) 192 56 
1 Jail for Suffolk Co., 243 00 



70 


00 


400 


00 


150 


00 


75 


00 


6 


00 


7 


00 


192 


56 


243 


00 



295 Amounts carried forward, $4,558 81 $289,596 64 



42 APPENDIX. 

Amounts brought forward, $4,558 81 $289,596 64 

Mass. State Prison, 639 66 639 66 

5,198 47 
Mill Dam Co., 300 00 300 00 

Contractors for sup- 
plying Shipping, 3,832 93 
Filling Gasometers, 462 49 
Sprinkling Streets, 22 00 
Building Purposes, 1,727 95 



3,832 


93 






462 


49 






22 


00 






1,727 


95 


6,345 








37 




$301,140 48 



APPENDIX. 



Statement showing the number and kinds of Water Fix- 
tures, CONTAINED WITHIN THE PREMISES OF WATER TAKERS, 

in the City of Boston, in 1857 and 1858. 



1857 


1858 




4,434 


4,326 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


25,207 


26,631 


Sinks. 


6,573 


7,729 


Wash-hand Basins. 


2,941 


3,334 


Bathing Tubs. Most of these have shower baths 
attached. 


2,765 


3,327 


Pan Water Closets. 


3,215 


3,845 


Hopper Water Closets. 




173 


Self-acting Closets. 


573 


654 


Urinals. 


1.566 


2,015 


Wash Tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
buildings. 


20 


12 


Shower Baths. In houses where there is no tub. 


9 


9 


Rams. 


585 


612 


Private Hydrants, 




77 


Slop Hoppers. 


47,888 


52,744 





Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

or THB 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ABBREVIATED PECULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.