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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 13. 



REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1859. 




BOSTON: 
GEO. C. RAND & AVERY, CITY PRINTERS, 



No. 3 COENHILL. 



1860, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Common Council, Jan. 5, 1860. 
Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to make their Annual Report in print. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

J. P. BRAD LEE, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 9, 1860. 
Concurred. 

OTIS CLAPP, Chairman. 

Approved, Jan. 10, 1860. 

P. W. LINCOLN, Jr., Mayor. 

A true copy. Attest, 

S. P. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



E P E T. 



Office of the Cociiituate Water Board,"! 
Boston, January 15, 1860. ] 

To the City Council. 

The Cociiituate Water Board respectfully submit 
to the City Council their Annual Report for the year 
1859. In compliance, also, with the City Ordinances, 
they submit also the Reports of the City Engineer, 
the Water Registrar, and the Clerk of this Board, all 
of which are worthy of attention from those who are 
interested to know the condition and workings of this 
department. The Water Registrar's Report is pub- 
lished in a more condensed form than heretofore ; but 
is still deemed to be sufficiently classified for popular 
use. More minute details can always be learned at his 
office. 

It is believed that the Works were never in a con- 
dition so safe and efficient as at the present time. 

The past year, 1859, has been crowded with import- 
ant events and undertakings relating to the subject 
matter of the Water Works. The breach in the 
aqueduct at Needham, the raising of Lake Cochituate, 
the quieting of the claim of meadow owners on Sud- 
bury River, and the laying of the new main from 
Brookline to Boston, all important transactions, and 
worthy special notice in this Report. 



4 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 13. [Jan., 

1. Of the Needham Breach. 

On the 29th of March last, the aqueduct at its 
connection with the pipes crossing Charles River, 
on the westerly side in Needham, gave way early in 
the morning, and the great volume of water which 
was passing through the same, in a very short time 
produced the most destructive havoc upon the prem- 
ises, — carrying pipes, gravel, brick and stone masonry 
and other materials away, and precipitating them 
into Charles River, choking up its current, and caus- 
ing it to overflow its banks and throw back water 
upon the meadows and mills above. The sight of this 
devastating outbreak was truly appalling. A young 
man, son of Mr. Reuben Ware, living near at hand, 
had the presence of mind to mount and ride with all 
speed to the Lake to apprise Mr. Knowlton of the 
breach ; and the water was instantly turned off, so that 
in probably two hours from its occurrence the water 
ceased to flow injuriously at the breach. This prompt 
and highly meritorious act of young Mr. Ware, by 
which further incalculable injury was seasonably pre- 
vented, was deemed worthy of special notice by this 
Board, and w^as rewarded by them by the gift of a 
gold watch, of Waltham manufacture, and a suitable 
gold chain. 

By this untoward occurrence the stone gate-house 
and near 100 feet of the brick conduit were carried 
away, and with several of the connecting pipes, were 
precipitated into the river to the distance of from 75 
to 150 feet. What was the cause of this occurrence is 
only matter of conjecture, as all the traces of weakness 
and of failure were entirely obliterated in the accom- 
panying ruin. 



I860.] WATER. 5 

Though the gap was truly frightful, and the work of 
repair was impeded by a violent rain storm, yet the 
work was commenced and prosecuted with the utmost 
vigor, and by as many men as could work to advantage, 
both by day and by night. It was by no means an 
easy task to find in a village like that the shelter and 
the food necessary for the comfort and supply of so 
many workmen ; and it became necessary to send many 
into the city at night, and to return there in the morn- 
ing. It providentially came to pass that we had on 
hand a stock of both 36 and 30-inch pipes, sufficient to 
connect the old pipes in the valley with the new gate- 
house, now to be constructed far inward from its former 
position. Had this not been the case, it is quite prob- 
lematical how Ions; the breach would have remained 
open before new pipes could have been cast and in- 
serted. It seems as if great suffering must have 
occurred in such circumstances. Such was the speed, 
activity, skill and strength applied to this work, that on 
Saturday evening, April 2d, (within five days and four 
nights,) connection was made through one of the pipes, 
and on the following night through another, and on the 
following Thursday through the last. 

This was a consummation exceedingly creditable to 
those having charge of the work, and whose eyes were 
ever watchful during its progress. 

Having completed the connection, and insured to the 
cit}^ its former supply, a new and somewhat improved 
gate-house was constructed. The sand, gravel, masonry, 
&c., which obstructed the river, was allowed to remain, 
to a considerable extent, until the water was reduced 
in the summer months. Mr. Curtis, who owned the 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

land upon the opposite bank of the river, gave permis- 
sion that we might spread the dehris upon his intervale 
on removing the loam and replacing it over the gravel. 
This work of clearing out the river was an arduous and 
disagreeable one. But the weather proved very favor- 
able, and the low stage of the water added facility to 
the operation ; so that in less than four weeks' working 
time, the job was completed, covering three acres of 
land to the depth of three feet. 

It was also found that the gate-house, on the easterly 
side of the valley, was in an unsafe condition. Water 
was oozing from it, and danger of undermining was 
apparent. The occasion was taken to strip the founda- 
tion, cover the same with cement and concrete, raise 
the surrounding embankment, and add considerable to 
the width and stability of the same. It is believed that 
the Works on both sides the valley are now in a much 
better state and condition than before the breach 
occurred. 

The whole expense of what was done at the valley, 
adding nothing for the worth of the new pipe, was 
$15,380 73. 

It is worthy of remark, that the citizens of the vil- 
lage, as a general thing, were accommodating, and dis- 
posed to facilitate, in any way they could, the operations 
of the city. Some persons who suffered some damage, 
and who, without impropriety, might have presented a 
claim on the city, have forborne to do so. And, as a 
general thing, those who have claimed damages, have 
done so in a spirit of moderation. Such conduct is the 
more worthy of notice and commendation, from its 
strong contrast with what is often experienced under 



I860.] WATER. 7 

like circumstances, where a misfortune or accident is 
looked upon as a windfall for every one to make the 
most of 

Allow us here to repeat, what we have in a former 
communication made known to the City Council, our 
proceedings in the contingency. 

" When the breach took place, the first order was to 
have the water turned off for all purposes but domestic 
supply; beginning with the largest consumers. But 
this was a work of time. Beginning with the larger 
and proceeding to the smaller consumers, the work was 
not completed before the pipe was repaired, and the 
work of letting on was commenced ; and shortly all 
was restored. 

" But this process exhibited an enormous consumption 
on the part of those cut off. At the time the breach 
occurred there was brought daily to the city about 
13,000,000 gallons, and in the course of repairs, the 
amount fell gradually to 10, 8, 6, 4 and 3j millions. 
This shows that the domestic supply, and some of the 
mechanical, did not exceed three or four millions. It 
is to be observed, however, that, beyond all doubt, the 
domestic supply was curtailed by the consumers to an 
inconveniently low average. The conduct of the citi- 
zens in this respect, when there was danger that a por- 
tion of the city would be entirely deprived of water, 
was worthy of all praise, and should be highly 
commended." 

2. The raising of Lake Oochituate. 

From the experience of two previous years in faihng 
to obtain an acceptable act of the Legislature, author- 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

izing the raising of the waters of the lake, it was 
deemed by this Board, in its application at the last ses- 
sion, to be the best policy to agree upon a form of bill 
with the adjoining towns, so as to avoid the opposition 
that for two years had thwarted our efforts. We there- 
fore proposed to pay the town of Framingham $4,500, 
and the town of Natick $3,000, and the town of Way- 
land $1,000, — $8,500 in all ; and the act thus agreed 
upon went through the Legislature without note or 
comment, and is chap. 184 of the Blue Book of 1859. 
On the principle that there was any justice in the 
notion that said towns were aggrieved or injured by the 
exemption of the property taken for the Water Works, 
from taxation, the sums at which they were disposed to 
waive all objections to the new act, were deemed to be 
reasonable ; and it was thought better to pay them at 
once than to renew our former efforts with the certainty 
of encountering the same opposition which had been 
successfully used against the project for two years. 
This has accordingly been done. 

As stated in the last report of this Board, much, 
indeed, most, of the preHminary and preparatory work 
of this project had been before executed. Nearly all 
the roads had been raised ; many owners of lands to 
be flooded, had been settled with. Scarce anything 
remained to be done but to take down, re-construct, 
and elevate the gate-house, and raise the sea wall in 
different places, for a distance of over 100 rods. The 
gate-house has been re-constructed on the same original 
plan and foundation, and its floor and walls have been 
raised 4f feet above their former | position. The sea 
wall has been raised 3 feet. These operations secure 



I860.] WATER. 9 

the premises from all inconvenience from freshets and 
high water from any cause in future. The sea wall 
near the gate-house, is back filled from the adjoining 
gravel hill, and the gate-house is surrounded with a 
suitably graded sloping bank. All the premises are 
now in a neat and becoming condition ; and with a 
trifling annual expenditure, they can be made quite 
ornamental and attractive. The whole expenditure at 
the lake has been 1 18,630 45, besides the amount paid 
to the towns,— $8,500, — in all, $27,130. 

3. The quieting of the claims of meadoiv owners. 

In last year's report, after stating that this Board 
had acquired the control of the lease of the reservoir 
at Hopkinton, it was further stated that "During the 
last summer the proprietors of Sudbury Meadows 
memorialized the City of Boston for damage done to 
their property by letting down water from the reser- 
voirs at unseasonable times. That memorial has been 
referred to this Board, but has not been yet acted upon. 
Should it appear at the hearing that said proprietors 
are entitled either in law or equity to consideration by 
way of damages, the entire and free control of these 
works may afford the readiest and most effectual means 
of repairing said damages and quieting said claim," 
and practically, this was found to be the case. 

This Board gave a good deal of time, attention, and 
consideration to the subject matter of these petitions 
We gave a public hearing to the parties, in which 
opportunity was given for every one interested to state 
any and all facts bearing on the question. 

This Board also visited such of the premises as lay 
2 



10 CITY DOCUilENT. — No. 13. [Jan. 

in Waylancl, and which were visible from the various 
roads and causeways in said town, and observed their 
state and condition, and held free intercourse with 
many of the proprietors on the spot. The quantity of 
intervals thus cursorily inspected, amounted, probably, 
to thousands of acres. 

After hearing all that could probably be said, and 
seeing a very considerable portion of all that could be 
seen, this Board embodied the results of their conclu- 
sions in a report which was printed, and constitutes City 
Document No. 49 for 1859. By that report, it appears 
that this Board made the following proposition : that 
the City of Boston will convey to some responsible 
agent or committee, authorized to act in behalf of the 
proprietors, by quit-claim deed, all the right, title, and 
interest which the city possesses in and to the reservoir 
at Hopkinton, with its dam, gate-house, and flume, to 
have and to hold, and lawfully manage and control the 
same as they please. 

To this proposition no direct reply was made ; but 
Judge Mellen, the solicitor of the meadow owners, ^ 
called upon the president of this Board, and after stat- 
ing that the proposition was not acceptable to the 
owners, suggested that if we would add all the real 
estate and personal property owned by the city, in con- 
nection with the reservoir in Hopkinton, he thought it 
would be satisfactory. To this the president replied, 
that the city had made its proposition, and he was not 
authorized to make a new one ; but if the meadow 
owners had one like that proposed, to make to the city, 
it would be received and considered, and perhaps 
accepted, as the additional property asked for was not 
regarded as of great value. 



I860.] WATER. U 

In due time, a formal proposition was made to us, 
based upon that suggested by Judge Mellen. This 
proposition was signed by 136 meadow owners, obli- 
gating themselves to forbear all claims for damages, on 
condition that the city would convey to Col. David 
Heard, of Wayland, the property of the city in and to 
the reservoir and other real and personal property appur- 
tenant to and connected therewith. The Board accepted 
the proposition ; and as all the owners had not signed 
the obligation, and there might arise some difficulty 
with some who had, it was deemed prudent to require 
a good and sufficient bond to secure the city from all 
claims of everybody interested, — those who had, as 
well as those who had not signed the release. Messrs. 
David Heard and his brother Horace executed a bond 
to that effect, in the sum of $10,000, for the considera- 
tion of two hundred dollars. And thus the matter was 
settled. 

Thus has terminated a controversy which has caused 
this Board much anxiety, in a manner apparently mutu- 
ally satisfactory. Not that it is to be supposed that the 
damages done by the city were nearly so great as the 
sufferers thought them ; nor that their grievances will 
end with this addition to their means of security ; but 
because appearances were against us ; and if in a 
single case, out of 150 owners, a single one could estab- 
lish even a small damage, the aggregate would be fright- 
fully large. 

We think the city, and, indeed, all parties, are to be 
congratulated on the final happy settlement of this 
irritating controversy, — the city, that it has amicably 
disposed of all the quasi claims at so moderate a cost — 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan. 

and the meadow owners, that they have got restored to 
them all their natural rig-hts. and more too, forever, in 
lieu of grievances which it would have cost much labor 
and money to have got into the form of claims, and 
then very equivocal ones. 

Much of the success of this amicable arrangement is 
beheved to be due to the wise counsels and judicious 
conduct of Judge Mellen. 

4. The laying of the neiu main from BrooJdine to Boston. 

In the last year's report it was stated that a contract 
for this pipe was made with Messrs. J. W. & J. F. Starr, 
of Camden, N. J. This contract was for " 20,000 feet 
when laid," and the price $33 per gross ton. After- 
wards 3,000 feet more were ordered, at |37 per ton, — 
making 23,000 feet which will complete the job. The 
contractors have given us an excellent quality of pipe, 
smooth and strong, standing remarkably well the pre- 
scribed test of 300 lbs. to the square inch. With the 
exception of some delay in shipments occasionally, 
resulting in the outset from incomplete arrangements 
for freighting, the job has been executed, and the con- 
tract on their part fulfilled with remarkable fidelity, 
honor and promptness. Our negotiation and intercourse 
with them have been of the most agreeable kind ; and 
though we have not yet closed up the contract, and 
made the final payment (though all the pipe is re- 
ceived), we know of no misunderstanding or difference 
of opinion that can arise to mar the good feeling, and 
diminish the very great res^DCct which this Board enter- 
tains towards those gentlemen. 



I860.] WATER. 13 

Some circumstances connected with the execution of 
this great and important work, seem to render it proper 
to allude to some early steps taken by this Board in 
relation to it. 

By vote of the City Council, this Board were author- 
ized to construct this new main of such size as it should 
deem best, and to bring it into the city in the way they 
should deem best. Before proceeding to make a con- 
tract for pipe, or making any preparation for exercising 
their authority, it was deemed prudent to learn exactly 
what was practicable for us to do under existing acts of 
the Legislature. Certain questions were therefore asked 
of the City Solicitor, which are stated, with his answers, 
in the accompanying document : 

City Solicitor's Office, 
Boston, July 20, 1858. 

Sir : — I have considered the questions which you 
recently submitted to me. They are as follows : 

1. May the City of Boston bring water from the 
Brookline reservoir into the latter city by a new line of 
works, and take lands for that purpose, without the con- 
sent of the owners thereof? 

2. May the city lay an additional water-pipe along 
the line of the present works, for the purpose of bring- 
ing a larger supply of water from the reservoir into the 
city?^ 

It is my opinion that the authority does not exist 
in the city to take lands for a new line of pipe, except 
by purchase; that when the line of the works was 
originally selected, the lands therefor taken, and record 
made thereof as the statute requires, the power which 



14 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 13. [Jan., 

was conferred upon the city in this respect, was 
exhausted. If this be not the proper construction of 
the water act, then the city may build as many new 
lines of work as it may now, and at all times hereafter, 
see fit, and take private property to any extent, for 
the purpose. 

The Legislature could not have intended to confer 
upon the city a power so unlimited ; and indeed it may 
well be doubted whether they could constitutionally 
make such a grant. 

The laying of a new pipe along the line of the pres- 
ent works, it seems to me, is within the limits of the 
authority conferred upon the city by the water act. 
The easement originally taken included not only the 
right to lay the pipes, but the right to dig up the soil 
for the purposes of repair, and to do all other things 
necessary to the preservation and maintenance of the 
works. I do not doubt, therefore, that the city may 
rightfully substitute new and larger pipe for the old, or 
lay new pipe along the same line, to any extent the 
public convenience may require. 

Very respectfully your obt. serv't, 

J. P. Healy. 

To John H. Wilkins, 

Chairman of the Cochihiate Water Board. 

From this opinion we felt confident that there was a 
luay, and for anything we knew, the hest ivay, by which 
the pipe could be laid, viz., to follow the line of the old 
pipes ; and we did not hesitate to proceed and make 
contracts for the necessary pipe, as before stated. Still 
the engineer, in making his estimates, had devised a 



I860.] WATER. 15 

diiferent route ; and in the uncertainty of what might 
finally prove the most desirable route, it was deemed 
prudent to give seasonable public notice that applica- 
tion would be made to the next Legislature for power 
to lay the pipe over any route deemed best; which 
notice was given, and the application duly made. 

The result of this application was the passage of the 
act being chapter 222 of the Blue Book of last year. 
This act gave the most unlimited freedom to the city 
in selection of the route, " and for this purpose (said city) 
may take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, any lands 
or real estate necessary therefor." In the passage of this 
bill there was very much conversation with the author- 
ities of Brookline and Roxbury. To follow the old pipe 
through Roxbury, would require severe rock cutting in 
passing over Bumstead Hill. The trench would not 
only be necessarily very deep, (near or quite 12 feet) 
but would have to be most of the way in dangerous 
poximity to the old pipes, including the hazard of 
breaking them by the new explosions. And besides, 
the old jDipes were laid in such a ziz-zag manner as to 
require them to be crossed probably three times by the 
new pipe. On all these accounts, besides some saving 
in distance, it was deemed desirable to find a route that 
would pass to the northward of this hill ; and a portion 
of this Board went out and selected what appeared to 
them at the time the most desirable line, which was to 
come over the Mill-dam road from the Punch Bowl, so 
called, to near Appleton Place, and thence at near right 
angles, follow a projected new street across land of Eben. 
Francis and others, by Ward's Soap Factory, to the 
Tremont Road. Tn all the conversations with the 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

authorities of Brookline and Roxbnry, and before the 
Committee hearing the case, this was the route pressed 
upon their attention as the one desirable for the hue of 
our pipe; and none other was suggested. But still no 
scientific and accurate measurement of this route had 
been made, and no vote adopting it had heen passed, and 
nothing was said that could or should limit the city to 
this location, if a still better one should suggest itself; 
and the language of the bill as before quoted, and the 
additional authority to " lay said pipe over or under 
any water course, or any streets, turnpike roads, rail- 
roads, highways, or other ways," was allowed to remain 
and constitute a portion of this act. 

This bill was reported in the House. An attempt 
was made to engraft upon it a right for the town of 
Brookline to tax the property of the city lying in that 
town, which had formerly been taken for the Water 
Works. But this effort, after full discussion, failed, the 
bill passed and was sent to the Senate in the form it 
was reported in to the House. In the Senate the bill 
was taken up in a very busy day — believed to have 
been the last of the session. A proviso in these words 
was moved by a Senator from Brookline, viz. (follow- 
ing the words first quoted above), ''■Provided, all lands 
so taken and held, or that are now held by virtue of 
any former act, shall be liable to taxation." Without 
opportunity for discussion, this amendment was adopted, 
the bill hurried through its stages under suspension 
of the rules, and returned to the House. Here it came 
up in the evening session, the speaker's table being 
loaded with papers pressing for action, the amendment 
was hastily put, and as hastily and impatiently passed, 



I860.] WATER. 17 

thus reversing the decision of the House, when the 
question was fairly up before. Before this act could 
take effect, it was requisite that it should be accepted 
by the City Council of the City of Boston. 

It will be noticed that this proviso not only author- 
ized the town of Brookline to tax the land originally 
taken for the Water Works in that town, but empow- 
ered all the towns on the line up to the lake to do the 
same thing — not restraining even Pramingham, Natick 
and Wayland, to each of which towns we had just before 
engaged to pay a substantial compensation for exemp- 
tion from precisely this taxation. By accepting this 
act, the City of Boston would have laid itself at the 
mercy of the towns to tax on property which had cost 
more than $200,000. Of course such acceptance was 
not to be thought of 

Such being the result of legislation on this matter, 
we abandoned all idea of taking any but the old route 
as the only lawful one open to us. But from some 
cause not well understood by this Board, and for rea- 
sons to which this Board did not attach much impor- 
tance, an unquiet feeling was engendered in the City 
Government in relation to this route, and an order 
making inquiry of this Board why the originally con- 
templated route was abandoned, was passed and sent to 
this Board. An appropriate answer was returned, 
stating in substance that we could go lawfully in no 
other way. 

About this time the idea that we might make a pri- 
vate arrangement with the Mill-dam Corporation to 
pass under their road, received attention ; and in order 
to see what could be accomplished in that direction, the 
3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

president took occasion to sound the agent of that 
company on the subject. His first reply was of a char- 
acter to inspire no hope that an arrangement satisfac- 
tory to us could be expected. On a subsequent meet- 
ing, the agent said he would consult the directors, and 
name their deliberate price. In a few days we received 
a proposal in writing, to sell the City a ivarranted right 
of way or easement to lay our pipes from Washington 
street in Brookline to Charles street in Boston for 
$25,000. This Board then went into some calculations 
upon the distance that would be saved, and the probable 
saving in rock-cutting, by adopting this route, and con- 
cluded that it would be advisable to commence a ne- 
gotiation on this basis. It was finally agreed that the 
Mill-dam Corporation should give a warrantee deed 
authorizing the City to pass under their road for $20,000, 
the title to be made satisfactory to the City Solicitor. 
But it was at once discovered by the City Solicitor that 
the Corporation could give no valid title. It had already 
deeded away to the Commonwealth all its interest and 
fee in the road, reserving only the franchise of using 
it and taking toll thereon till May 1st, 1863. On learn- 
ing this, the bargain was given up, and the offer of war- 
rantee was withdrawn by the Corporation. The plan 
was abandoned, and men were set to work laying pipe 
on the Tremont road in Roxbury. About 100 feet 
having already been laid at the other end near Rox- 
bury line in Brookline. 

Still the matter was one of deep solicitude to this 
Board. We were satisfied that much saving would be 
made by passing over the Mill-dam, and also much 
time. It was manifest also, that popular sentiment was 



I860.] WATER. 19 

strongly in favor of this route. We also considered 
the probability of interference from the State, when it 
should be found that we were trespassing on her rights ; 
and for reasons which will be alluded to in the sequel, 
we did not think this circumstance worthy of great 
weight. It was concluded therefore that a fresh ne- 
gotiation should be opened with the Mill-dam Corpora- 
tion to give us such privileges and powers as they could 
give by quit claim deed ; and for this we proposed to 
give $10,000. This was at once refused, and it was 
supposed the matter was ended. But by this time, 
several persons became interested in the question, — 
some who felt very averse to our going over Bumstead's 
Hill to Koxbury ; some interested in the Mill-dam, were 
desirous that that route should be taken, and others, 
purchasers of Back Bay lands, thought that this route 
would give popularity to the Back Bay project, and 
give impetus to the sale and occupancy of the premises. 
At this point of dead-lock, when we had made our last 
offer, and it had been promptly declined, a mutual 
friend passed between the parties, and it was finally 
agreed to take the right with a quit claim deed, and 
pay therefor the sum of twelve thousand five hundred 
dollars. An additional $500 was paid the Water Power 
Company for drawing down the water so as to accom- 
modate the laying of the pipes. Thus ended this ne- 
gotiation, and decided the route to be over the Mill- 
dam. In the mean time, nearly or quite 800 feet of 
pipe had been laid under Tremont road, and 100 at the 
other end of the route, all which had to be taken up. 

At this point, a new question came up, viz., whether 
we should proceed and lay the pipe, or break off and get 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

authority from the Commonwealth to use this road-bed 
before proceeding with it. In the first place, it would 
cost a large sum to break off and disperse the employees 
and violate engagements for the season. Probably 
$10,000 was a low estimate for this. Then if the con- 
tract with Messrs. Starr should be broken, untold dam- 
ages might be claimed by them. If the pipe came 
forward and were not used, they would have to be 
stored, and twice carted. So that in all it was supposed 
$20,000 or $25,000, would be a low estimate of dam- 
ages from delay. And as to the length of this delay, it 
was entirely problematical. Though the Legislature was 
to assemble in a few months to revise the Statutes, it was 
supposed that it would not attend to other business ; 
and if deferred to next Legislature it was doubtful 
what turn the matter might take, and the delay might 
be interminable. We therefore determined, with a great 
degree of unanimity, to proceed with the work with all 
convenient dispatch. 

The laying of this new pipe was commenced late in 
March, a few days only before the breach in Needham, 
and was completed so far as to connect with the old 30 
inch pipe on the Common, on the 24th day of December. 
Adverse storms and winds keeping back two or three 
freights late in the season, retarded the work for a 
week or two, and those very severe ones. When the 
water was let on, a leakage discovered itself in a deep 
stone-cutting in Brookline, — nearly in the very worst 
place in which it could occur. On Christmas day and 
the two following nights and days, the labor of uncov- 
ering the pipes, finding and repairing the leak, was ex- 
tremely severe and trying. The cold was intense and 



I860.] WATER. 21 

unceasing ; and the exposure of the men to the cutting 
wind was almost unendurable. It was very difficult to 
make the lead run and to drive the joints so as to make 
them perfectly tight. This, however, was finally ac- 
complished, and with the exception of a very small 
leak upon the Mill-dam, easily repaired. The whole 
work appears to be sound and tight. The further ex- 
tension of this will be accomplished in the spring ; all 
the pipes necessary therefor have been obtained. 

The length of this pipe is 22,418 feet, or a few rods 
short of 4:^ miles. About 6 inches were lost in each 
pipe by overlapping at the joints. The whole cost thus 
far has been only $270,276 26 — estimated at $e500,000, 
and $400,000, were appropriated. 

In this connection, perhaps better than in any other, 
it may be stated that the Water Works are divided into 
two great divisions : 1st. The eastern, embracing the 
pipe-yard, reservoirs, and all the pipes laid in the city 
and out of it, as far as the Brookline Reservoir, and also 
at Newton ; 2d. The western division, embracing the 
Brookline Reservoir, and the conduit extending to the 
lake, the lake, gate-house, dams, and all matters apper- 
taining to the Water Works in that locality. Of the 
first, Mr. Stanwood is the employee of this Board as 
superintendent, and has been the practical operator in 
the job of laying all the new pipe, both large and small, 
of the season. Of the second, Mr. Knowlton has been 
the superintendent, and has been the practical operator 
in the work done at the lake and at Newton Lower 
Falls, except the laying of the pipe. It is but matter 
of the simplest justice for this Board to state, that these 
gentlemen have executed their respective trusts with 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

singular fidelity, assiduity, promptness and success dur- 
ing the past season ; that this Board has derived much 
aid from the practical knowledge and skill possessed 
by them in all matters relating to their respective trusts. 
It is not obvious how their places could be adequately 
and satisfactorily supphed. Mr. Jones, also, Mr. Stan- 
wood's assistant in laying the new main, exhibited traits 
of skill, judgment, and efficiency, which gained for him 
the high regard of the Board. He appears to be wor- 
thy of a better position than this Board has at its dis- 
posal. 

Permit us here again to revert more particularly to 
the interests and rights of the Commonwealth in rela- 
tion to the right of way which we have taken under 
the Mill-dam. 

In the published fifth Annual Report of the Commis- 
sioners of the Back Bay lands, being Senate Document 
No. 17, 1857, there are several appended documents 
which appear to exhibit the full relations of the Com- 
monwealth to the Mill-dam Corporation and to the pub- 
lic. In the paper marked F, which purports to be a 
copy of Indenture, Dec. 30, 1856, between the Com 
monwealth and Boston and Roxbury Mill Corporation, 
(which latter is the Mill-dam Corporation) it is stated 
that by a previous indenture (a copy of which is not 
given) "made and concluded June 9, A. D. 1854, be- 
tween the parties hereto," it was stipulated that said 
(Mill) Corporation shall and will surrender to the said 
Commonwealth, its franchise of toll, together with its 
right of way over the Mill-dam and Cross-dam, and over 
all bridges and reads, as said roads are now constructed, 
connected with or leading to either of said dams, when- 



I860.] WATER. 23 

ever certain events therein occur ; or at the expiration 
of ten years from the first of May, 1853," — that is, after 
the 1st of May, 1863. We have not the means of know- 
ing precisely what the " certain events " here alluded 
to as contingent really were, but we suppose them to 
be of no importance ; and that the period of surrender 
is absolutely fixed May 1, 1863. 

"We proceed to quote stipulations of the indenture, F. 
"It is agreed by and between the parties hereto, 
that said above described dams and roads, and the 
bridges connected therewith, shall be forever open as 
public highways, free from all toll from and after May 1, 
1863." Again: 

" Now in consideration of the covenants, agreements 
and releases herein set forth, the said Boston and Eox- 
bury Mill Corporation doth hereby release, remise and 
forever quit claim to the said Commonwealth and its 
assigns, all the right, title and interest of said Corpora- 
tion in and to the foregoing described dams and roads, 
with all its rights in and to the land, flats and channels, 
with the bridges as above defined and described, and 
appertaining in all or either of said dams and roads, with 
and in either of the cities of Boston or Roxbury, or 
either of the towns of Brookline', Brighton or Water- 
town. It being expressly understood, however, that said Mill 
Corporation retains and expressly reserves all the rights which 
it now has hy its charter, and under the indenture of June 
9, 1854, relative to its right of way and franchise of toll, and 
rights necessary and convenient to the full enjoyment of said 
rights of franchise of toll, in, upon, and over the several 
dams, roads and bridges herein before described'' ... To have 
and to hold, &c. 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

From these extracts it appears that a stipulation was 
entered into as early as June 9, 1854, that the Mill-dam 
would surrender its property to the Commonwealth as 
early as May 1st, 1863; and that said surrender was 
actually accomplished by indenture Dec. 30, 1856, re- 
taining and expressly reserving to said Corporation all 
the rights which it now has by its charter relative to 
its right of way and franchise of toll, up to that period. 
From this it would appear that the Commonwealth can- 
not interfere rightfully in this matter until that time 
comes ; and if the charter of the Corporation were a 
perpetual one, the easement granted by that Corpora- 
tion would also be perpetual. Up to that period, there- 
fore, it would seem to be plain, that under our contract 
with the Mill-dam Corporation we are in rightful pos- 
session of the road-bed for the purpose of laying the 
pipe. But after the expiration of that time, it would 
seem that we may be found trespassing upon the abstract 
rights of the State. 

What then may be the consequence of this trespass, 
four years hence, when the Commonwealth comes into 
the full exercise of its rights in the Mill-dam for a pub- 
lic highway, forever to be kept open and free from 
tolls? 

"We have stated under what urgent circumstances the 
trespass was made. It was done under the pressure of 
a great public exigency — an exigency which has hith- 
erto appealed successfully to the Legislature for the ex- 
ercise of its power of eminent domain. It was for an 
object having the most useful ends in view — the very 
best interests of society and of humanity were within 
its embrace. The trespass was a measure that could 



I860.] WATER. 25 

injure no one, but was the means of benefit to multi- 
tudes, and to no one interest more than to that pertain- 
ing to the Commonwealth itself. 

To show that this Board were not unmindful of its po- 
sition, and the proprieties pertaining to it, the President 
took occasion to consult the Commissioners on the Back 
Bay lands, as the body having the most direct charge 
of the State's interest in the matter. He spoke to Mr, 
Hale on the subject, who requested him to meet the 
Board who were to hold a session on the next day. 
He did so, where he found Mr. Hale and Mr. Purdy, a 
quorum of the Board. The point was brought up 
and very freely discussed, whether there could be any 
reasonable objection on the part of the Commonwealth. 
The opinion of both Commissioners was fully ex- 
pressed, that so far from there being on the part of the 
State any objection, in the view that a leading object 
of taking this particular route was to supply the lands 
of the Commonwealth and others, it was thought that 
this should and would find favor with the Legislature. 
They both spoke as encouragingly as they ought to 
have done in their office. 

The President was also desirous of consulting the At- 
torney-General on the subject ; and for this purpose 
called four several times, at least, at his public or private 
ofiice. But he was not in, and the time of deciding 
the question pressing upon us, no further effort to see 
him was made. 

In the worst aspect of this case what may be the 

result of this trespass if the State object to it ? We do 

not see but two results, either a claim for damages, or 

a mandamus to take up the pipe. If damages are 

4 



26 CITY DOCUMExNT. — No. 13, [Jan., 

claimed, and if they are assessed as is usual, by a jury, 
it is not obvious why the City should not pay them. 
But the idea of claiming compensation for using a street 
under which pipes are lawfully laid is a novel one, 
and it is believed has never been thought of Though 
of late years the City of Boston has been in the habit 
of acquiring the fee of the streets it has laid out or 
widened, yet there are doubtless scores of miles of 
streets in this city where the water pipes are laid, the 
fee of which is in the abutters. And the same is doubt- 
liess true of other cities and towns in the Commonwealth, 
where water pipes or gas pipes, or both are laid under 
legislative authority. But did ever a man suppose that 
an abutter was entitled to damages, because he was the 
owner of the fee under the street where a pipe was 
lawfully laid ? That is exactly the position of the 
Commonwealth in relation to the Mill-dam. It is the 
owner of the fee of a public highway, and nothing else ; 
for the condition that it owns it all is, that it shall for- 
ever remain a highway But the damage 'per se to the 
owner of the fee in such cases, is just the same whether 
the pipe be laid hivfiilly or unlawfully ; and if in lawful 
cases a claim for damage never was made, it surely is 
not to be expected that such a claim will be made and 
sustained merely because the laying was a trespass, but 
no injury done. 

The second visible result of this trespass may be 
a mandamus, or injunction to take up the pipe. The 
Commonwealth being hypothetically above all law, may 
undoubtedly exercise such a power, unenlightened and 
unguided by rational ends and useful purposes, and 
may adopt such a measure. But it is not to be ex- 



18t>0.] WATER. 27 

pected. It is hardly possible in the full blaze of the 
civilization of the age. 

Feeling desirous that this technical trespass should 
be healed as quickly and quietly as practicable, the 
President of this Board introduced into the last Legisla- 
ture an order " that the Committee on the Back Bay 
Lands be instructed to inquire into the expediency of 
further legislation in order to supply the Back Bay 
Lands with pure water." That Committee was made 
acquainted with the object of the order, and the actual 
condition of the work, and was satisfied with it, and re- 
ported the annexed bill, which was prepared by the 
City Solicitor, to the Senate ; which was printed, had 
its several separate readings, and passed without any 
opposition. 

AN ACT 

Relative to supplying the Back Bay Lands with the 
CocHiTUATE Water. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as 
follows : — 

Section 1. For the purpose of enabling the city of Boston 
to supply the Back Bay Lands, and other parts of said city, 
with pure fresh water, the said city of Boston is hereby au- 
thorized to lay and maintain all water pipes that may be 
necessary or convenient, under the road-bed of the Mill-dam, 
and the Brookline branch thereof, from Charles street, in the 
city of Boston, to Washington street, in the town of Brook- 
line, and to connect said pipes with the other water pipes and 
conduits of said city, in such manner as may be convenient : 
provided, however, that the said city of Boston shall not, by 
virtue of this act, take or use any land or easement not 



28 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

belonging to the Commonwealth, without the consent of the 
owner thereof. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect from and after its 
passage. 

Tt will be noticed that no more harmless bill could 
be framed, as it particularly excluded all power to in- 
terfere with private or corporate rights. When this 
bill came up in the House, a motion was made, without 
any reason assigned, that it be laid on the table. And 
in a short time after, it was taken from the table and 
recommitted without any instructions and without any 
declared object. The gentleman representing Brook- 
line, subsequently met the Committee at a hearing on 
the subject, and objected to it on the ground that the 
requisite power was already given in the act of the 
previous session, which authorized the towns on the line 
to impose taxes ; and that all the city had to do was to 
accept that act. Whether this representation had 
weight with the Committee, is not known. But the 
Committee retained the bill more than two months 
in its hands, and then without note or comment recom- 
mended that the subject be referred to the next Gen- 
eral Court — which report was accepted. 

Such a disposition of sach a matter, after such delay, 
is an inauspicious circumstance. A case so plain, would 
seem to be disarmed of all opposition. The Committee 
saw its bearing and its importance, and promptly re- 
ported the bill. Why it should subsequently get into 
any doubt about it, is unaccountable. 

As such legislation, or want of legislation, may indi- 
cate an unfriendly and unfavorable state of feeling in 
regard to the subject matter, it seems now to be of 



1860.J WATER. 29 

some importance that the pohcy of the State in regard 
to it should be developed at an early day. In seeking 
legislation on this subject, the interests of the State 
should be pressed quite as strongly as those of the city. 
It will be noticed that the title of the bill is for supply- 
ing the Back Bay Lands with Cochituate water- 
Some objection has been made to this, that it seems 
to be attaining city ends by cover of State interests. 
But a moment's consideration will divest the subject of 
this overt character. The Back Bay Lands are not 
only the lands of the Back Bay owned by the State, 
but they are also all the lands that were ever covered 
by the waters of the Back Bay, and would be now so 
covered if the Mill-dam were removed. Instead of the 
patch owned by the Commonwealth merely, the term 
properly embraces thousands of acres, belonging to 
the Water Power Company and sundry individual ri- 
parian proprietors. And when it is considered that in 
all probability all this region of both flats and marshes 
is destined to be filled and builded upon, and that the 
same will be supplied with water from this identical 
main pipe, it surely cannot be regarded as in any sense 
an inappropriate title to a bill so pregnant with future 
benefit to such a vast region that it is entitled a bill 
for that very purpose. 

So intimately however are the immediate interests of 
the Commonwealth bound up in the matter of laying 
this pipe, that its policy in regard to it ought at once 
to be indicated, especially as the matter has been 
brought to its notice. If the State manifest a disposi- 
tion to withhold such action as will legalize this laying, 
it would seem to be time for the city to consider what 



3 , CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

course it would be proper to take in such a contin- 
gency. The city has laid these pipes in good faith with 
a view of supplying, among others, the lands owned by 
the State, and thus giving value to those lands. If she 
does not approve of this method, surely she cannot be 
so unreasonable as to expect that the old works will 
be tapped for that object ; and the alternative may 
fairly be anticipated of receiving water for her lands 
from this pipe exclusively or going without any. And 
it may be well for both buyers and sellers of Back 
Bay Lands, whether belonging to the State or to indi- 
viduals to at once consider the effect of this alternative 
upon the lands they are buying or selling, and be gov- 
erned in their transactions accordingly. It seems to 
this Board to be too much for the Commonwealth to 
ask of -the city to supply this region with water from 
any other and far more inconvenient main ; and can 
hardly with reason expect that the city will eventually 
distribute to these lands any of the Cochituate water 
which does not pass through this new main. 

We have been particular in going into the doings of 
the Board in this matter, and the reasons which have 
governed us. Perhaps it may appear to others use- 
lessly and tediously so. But as it is an unfinished mat- 
ter, the result of which cannot be foreseen, we were 
desirous of putting ourselves right before both the city 
and the State ; and of stating the facts of the case while 
they were fresh in the memory, even at the risk of 
tediousness. We therefore now gladly revert to other 
topics of this report. 

The daily consumption of water during the last year 
has been (as appears by the City Engineer's Report) 



I860.] WATER. 31 

13,175,000 wine gallons — last year 12,847,000; differ- 
ence, 228,000. Last year the consumption was esti- 
mated at 721 gallons for each individual, estimating the 
number at 178,000. If the number be taken for last 
year at 183,000, the number of gallons consumed by 
each individual is 72, scarcely varying from that of 
1858 and 7. It seems as if we might now fairly con- 
clude that the individual consumption had come to its 
maximum, — the variation in three years not exceed- 
ing one gallon. 

We notice that a petition is before the Legislature 
for the annexation of Charlestown. Again w^e would 
warn the city against any annexation of municipalities, 
that would or might subject it to a scarcity. It is to be 
hoped that the great additional supply brought to the 
city, and the cheap rate at which it is supplied for me- 
chanical purposes, will give a new impetus to mechanic 
arts and employments — thereby not only making sub- 
stantial contributions to annual income, but in other 
respects contributing to the welfare and prosperity of 
the city. 

Meters have been purchased and applied in the last 
year more numerously than in any previous one. Those 
of Worthington's construction are deemed, when made 
of composition, to be accurate, reliable, and therefore 
satisfactory. And it is proposed to use them still more 
extensively. 

Extension of the Works. Besides the new main and its 
appendages, there have been laid 1,395 feet of 12 inch 
pipe against 2,689 inlaid in 1858 ; 12,015 feet of 6 inch 
against 6,877 in 1858 ; and 1,630 feet of 4 inch against 
1,991 in 1858; — in all 15,040 feet against 11,557 in 
1858. So that besides the heavy jobs previously noticed^, 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

the works have been largely extended in the past 
year over the previous one. The whole length of pipe 
now laid is equal to about 130 miles. 

The number of new stop-cocks is 39, making the whole 
number now 1,085. 

The number of new service pipes is 938, making the 
whole number 22,264. 

New Hydrants to the number of 32 have been estab- 
lished during the year, making the whole number now 
1,363. 

Many other interesting details in relation to these 
matters will be found in the Report of the City Engi- 
neer, annexed. 

The Annual Report of the Water Registrar is annexed, a 
concise document, well worthy of reference. 

The ivhole amount of Receipts is $316,290 97, or $6,290 97 
over the estimate at the beginning of the year. The 
estimate of the Water Registrar for 1860 is $325,000 ; 
but under the increased use of meters, and the newly 
raised tariff of water-rates, we shall be disappointed if it 
do not exceed $330,000. 

The table containing the usual classification of water- 
takers is here omitted, as the condensed manner in 
which the Registrar's Report is made up, renders all 
information therein contained readily accessible. 

The tvhole number of imter-takers is now 23,271, being 
an increase over January 1, 1859, of 1,057. 

The report of the Clerk of this Board, or the service 
clerk, is hereto annexed, exhibiting the whole receipts 
and expenditures of the year. The whole expenditure is 
$385,652 47. Of this $266,682 95 was for the new 
main, and for the extension of the works $74,500 52 — 
$341,183 47; leaving $44,469, as the expenses of the 



I860.] WATER. 3^ 

year. But out of this is to be taken for repairs at the 
lower Falls $15,380 73, leaving |29,088 27 as the actual 
current expenses of the department, which is only 
$643 67 more than the year previous. 

In the extension of the works is embraced all the 

money spent at the lake, embracing the sums paid Fra- 

mingham, Natick and Wayland, - - $8,500 00 

Cost of raising gate-house, building sea wall, 

digging down the hill, and raising the land, 

and all land damage, _ . - 16,610 43 

$25,110 43 
The expense of this improvement was greater than 
was expected ; but it seemed to be required, and after 
all has cost no more than it was worth. Taking this sum 
of $25,110 43 from $74,500 52, the whole cost of exten- 
sion of the works, and the remainder $49,390 09 is but 
$1,828 68 more than was expended for extension of the 
works in 1858, though near 4,000 feet of pipe were laid 
in this year more than in last. 

In our last Report we took the occasion to point out 
what we regarded as an erroneous mode of putting the 
Water debt in the Auditor's Annual Report. We still 
think our remarks were correct, and that the Water 
debt should be stated in conformity to the mode there 
pointed out. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

JNO. H. WILKINS, President. 
EBENEZER JOHNSON, 
JOHN T. DINGLEY, 
SAM'L HALL, 
EBENEZER ATKINS, 
TISDALE DRAKE, 
GEORGE P. FRENCH. 
5 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITUEES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the Cochituate Water 
Board, from December 31st, 1858, to January 1st, 1860. 

Laying Main Pipe, for stock, &c. - 
" Service Pipe, for stock, &c., 

Hydrants, 

Stopcocks, - 

Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c.. 

Plumbing, ....... 

Proving Yard, for stock in repair shop, - 
Pipe Yard, for painting buildings, &c., 
Hydrant and Stopcock Boxes, 

Repairing Stopcocks, 

" Meters, 

Travelling Expenses, 

Taxes, 

Tolls and Ferriages, 

Fountains, ....... 

Carting, - - 

Postage and Express, 

Tools, - - 

Stationery, (including stationery for Water Reg- 
istrar, and Superintendents,) 
Rents, ........ 

Laud and Water Rights, 

Damage in streets, &c., 

Oil, 

Amount carried forivard, 



$1,267 


04 


5 


50 


473 


15 


1,107 


89 


489 


50 


16 


52 


363 


98 


16 


62 


714 


34 


642 


00 


193 


87 


122 


38 


703 


29 


74 


36 


133 


74 


223 


72 


49 


70 


294 


06 


213 


55 


52 


00 


8,500 


00 


22 


25 


136 


90 


$15,816 36 



284 


09 


6,450 


12 


266,682 


95 


508 


98 


2,172 


87 


1,964 


31 



I860.] WATER. 35 

Amount brought fonvard, $15,816 36 
Printing, (including Water Registrar and Super- 
intendents,) 235 47 

Miscellaneous Expense, (counsel in case of Sud- 
bury meadows, expenses of the Board, &c.,) 

Meters, - - 

New Main. Whole am't drawn for 269,776 36. 
Less the am't drawn for in 1858, 3,093 41. 

Repairing Main Pipe, 

" Service Pipe, 

" Streets, ..... 

Aqueduct Repairs, (repairing break at Newton 

Lower Falls, 15,380 83,) ... - 16,391 44 
Lake, (raising the Gate-house, land around the 

Lake, and building sea walls,) - - - 18,630 45 

Repairing Hydrants, 1,428 79 

Salaries, 7,861 55 

Office Expenses, (including rent, fuel, and gas 

for City Engineer's Office,) - - - 1,917 20 

Off and on Water, 2,475 46 

Wages, Proving Yard, 2,084 00 

" Blacksmith Shop, .... 948 47 

" Laying Main Pipe, - - - - ^ 3,955 58 

" " Service Pipe, - - - - 3,740 40 

" Plumbing Shop, 517 62 

Beacon Hill Reservoir, (for labor, &c.,) - - 425 54 

So. Boston, " " u a . . 236 50 

East Boston, " " « a . . 423 47 

Brookline, " (resetting steps, &c.,) 1,701 74 

Service Pipe, 9,887 61 

Main Pipe, 17,630 24 

Stable, 1,281 26 

$385,652 47 

Less this amount drawn for new Main, - - 266,682 95 

Amount carried forward, $118,96952 



36 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 



Amount brought forward. 


$118,969 


52 


CASH PAID THE CITY TEEASURER. 




Received rent for arches under B. 






H. Reservoir, .... 


$300 00 




Received for Land, <fec., - ... 


946 95 




" '•' " Wood, 


635 98 




•' " Pipe, and Laying, &c., 


1,850 12 




" " Off & on Water, 1,378 00 






" " " « Waste, 270 00 






" " '' " nonpay- 






ment, 1,482 00 






$3,130 00 




Less this amount for Non 






Payment, which was 






paid the Treasurer, 1,482 00 


1,648 00 




Received for Old Shanty, &c., - 


104 40 




" " Pasture, 


29 00 




" " Stone, 


40 00 5,554 45 


Balance, - - - - 


- $113,415 07 


EXTENSION OF THE 


WORK. 




Main Pipe, 


17,630 24 $118,969 


52 


Service Pipe, 


9,887 61 




Laying Main Pipe, - - - - 


1,267 04 




Hydrants, 


473 15 




Stopcocks, 


1,107 89 




Lake, (raising the Gate-house, land 






around the Lake, and building sea 






walls,) 


16,610 43 




Hydrant and Stopcock Boxes, - 


350 00 




Carting, . . . . . 


150 00 




Tools, 


294 06 




Amounts carried forward, $47,770 42 $118,969 


"52 



I860.] WATER. 37 

Amounts brought forward, $47,770 42 $118,969 52 

Oil, - - - . - - - 50 00 

Wages, Proving Yard, - - - 2,084 00 

" Plumbing Shop, ... 350 00 

« Blacksmith Shop, . . 700 00 

" Laying Main Pipe, - - 3,955 58 

" " Service Pipe, - - 3,740 40 

Land and Water Rights, - - - 8,500 00 

Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c., - 300 00 

Proving Yard " " " - 200 00 

Meters, 6,050 12 

Brookline Reservoir, Screens, and 
fitting in, preparing for new Main, 

&c., 800 00 74,500 52 

Amount of this Year's Expense, - - - $44,469 00 
From this should be deducted the amount paid 
for repairs of the Aqueduct at Newton Lower 
Falls, 15,380 73 

Leaving the usual Annual Expense, - - $29,088 27 



Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water 
Works, to January 1st, 1860. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners, - - $4,043,718 21 
" '' " Water Board, 1850, - 366,163 89 



Amount carried forward, 



1851, 


141,309 23 


1852, 


89,654 20 


1853, 


89,854 03 


1854, 


80,182 35 


1855, 


63,866 33 


1856, 


81,429 35 


1857, 


96,931 25 


1858, 


76,006 01 


1859, 


- 385,652 47 




$5,514,767 32 



38 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 13. [Jan., 

Amount brought forward, $5,514,7.67 32 

Amount paid the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners, - - $47,648 38 

Am't paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 

'' " " 1851, 5,232 38 

'^ " " 1852, 15,869 12 

" •' '' 1853, 4,621 40 

" '< ■' 1854, 12,423 29 

" " " 1855, 9,990 38 

" " " 1856, 7,840 43 

« '' " 1857, 13,750 00 

'' '' '■ 1858, 9,200 00 

" '^ '^ 1859, 5,554 00 140,282 90 

Sundry Payments by the City, $52,065 94 $5,374,484 42 
Discount and Interest on Loans, 3,098,797 82 3,150,863 76 

$8,525,348 18 
Sundry Credits by the City, $52,384 84 

Amount rec'd for Water Rates, 2,380,165 45 2,432,550 29 

$6,092,797 89 

SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Cleric of Cochituate Water Board. 



APPENDIX. 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Boston, January 9th, 1860. 
Hon. John H. Wilkins, Pres. of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir: In accordance with the requirements of the Water 
Ordinance, the following annual report of the general condi- 
tion of the Water Works is herewith submitted. 

Everything connected with the line of conduit was, at the 
commencement of the year, and until the latter part of 
March, in its usual safe and reliable condition ; frequent 
examinations having been made of the whole line by Mr. 
Knowlton. 

On the 29th of March, early in the morning, a break was 
discovered in the pipes and conduit on the westerly side of 
Charles River. Mr. Ware, a resident of one of the nearest 
houses, on seeing it, immediately started on horseback for 
the lake, a distance of about eight miles, to notify Mr. 
Knowlton, who immediately shut off the water at the lake. 
As the break occurred before daylight, the water was not 
shut off" until the gate-house or pipe chamber, a portion of the 
conduit, and nearly all the pipes on the sloping side of the 
hill, had been broken down or washed away. 

Notice having been brought to the office, the City Engineer 
immediately started for the scene of the accident, and, acting 
under that clause in the rules and regulations of the Water 



2 APPENDIX. 

Board, in which the City Engineer is required to " take imme- 
diate measures for the repair of any damage which may happen 
to the aqueduct, pipes, reservoirs, dams, gate-houses, and all other 
structures or property belonging to the Water WorJcs,'' the City 
Engineer immediately took very energetic measures for mak- 
ing the necessary repairs. 

Persons were sent in various directions for laborers, 
teams, and all the necessary materials of bricks, cement, 
pipes, and all the various tools requisite for the repairs. 

As would naturally be expected at the sight of the hole in 
the hill, of perhaps one hundred feet long, some thirty feet 
wide, and thirty to forty deep, very serious misapprehen- 
sions would arise as to the time necessary for making, the 
repairs, and the time that the city would be deprived of 
water. 

The pipe chamber was originally constructed very nearly 
on the verge of a bluff, composed principally of sand and fine 
gravel, and the pipes were laid down a very steep inclined 
plane, formed of this material, to the bridge crossing Charles 
Eiver. 

From the appearance of such of the broken pipes as could 
be found after the accident, there can be no doubt that it 
was first caused by a slight leak, probably a crack, in one of 
the pipes. A little water running down by the pipes would 
very soon wash down enough sand and gravel to undermine 
them, when, having nothing to support them, they must, of 
necessity, break, and, one of them once broken, such a torrent 
of water would flow from it as to wash out, in a very short 
time, a very large hole in such material as the hill was com- 
posed of. 

As the hill was washed away, first went the pipes, then the 
pipe chamber, and, lastly, portions of the conduit, until the 
water was shut off at the lake. 

The surface of the ground being frozen, and the water from 
the leak following down by the side of the pipes, without 



APPENDIX. 6 

showing on the surface, would be suflScient cause of the leak 
not having been discovered the previous afternoon, when the 
spot was passed over for inspection by Mr. Knowlton. 

Most probably, the leak in the pipes did not commence 
until some time during the night. 

Instead of restoring the hill to its original shape, the new 
pipe chamber was set further back in the hill, a distance of 
about ninety feet, and the hole filled up by puddling in the 
gravel and sand to a much flatter slope than formerly. This 
process of puddling in was chosen in preference to building 
up piers of masonry under the pipes, because, in this way, the 
pipes could be laid, and the water could be set running to 
the city again, in a great deal less time than it would have 
taken to build up brick or stone piers. The filling is 
now quite as firm and solid as the hill ever was previous to 
the break ; and, because of the greater flatness of the slope, 
it is now much less likely to break away than formerly. 

The break occurred on Tuesday, the 29th day of March, 
early in the morning. On the next Thursday morning, the 
trench was filled in enough to receive the pipes. On the 
next Saturday night, at nine o'clock, one line of pipes was 
laid, and water passed through it to the city. At six, P. M., 
on Sunday, the second line of pipes was connected, and water 
passed through it to the city ; and on the succeeding Thurs- 
day, at half past five, P. M., the third and last line of pipes 
was connected, and the water was flowing through all the 
lines of pipes to the city. The whole time from the break 
to the full restoration of the pipes, conduit, and g^te cham- 
ber, having been nine and one-half days. 

A very great amount of gravel and sand was washed into 
the river, and, for a short time, it was entirely dammed up, 
and had it not been for the presence of mind of some of the 
neighbors, who set themselves immediately at work to open a 
channel through it, it is probable that the river would have 
broken through the line of pipes laid in the valley or around 
6 



4 APPENDIX. 

the abutments of the bridge. In either case, the damage 
would have been vastly greater than it was, and would have 
taken a much longer time to repair. All those gentlemen 
who aided in opening the river, deserve the heartfelt thanks 
of all the inhabitants of the city. 

Messrs. Knowlton and Stanwood, Mr. Bird, the Chief 
Engineer of the Fire Department, and many other persons, 
aided very efficiently in the repairs of the break. 

During the summer, a large force of men was employed, 
under the personal supervision of Mr. Knowlton, in clearing 
out the river, so that no obstruction would be made to the 
flow of water to the mills, by the accumulation of anchor ice 
during the present or any succeeding winter. 

Waste Water at the Lake. 

On the 23d of January, the lake being at the then high 
water mark, the waste gate was raised, and water flowed 
over the outlet dam at a depth of six inches. It was kept 
running at heights varying up to nine inches, until early in 
March, when the gate was raised to allow a flow of from 
twenty to twenty-four inches over the outlet dam ; and water 
was allowed to waste constantly from the lake, from the 23d 
of January until the 8th of July, when the gate was shut 
down. 

During this time, a period of 167 days, the total waste 
amounted to 7,569,000,000 gallons. Had we the means of 
saving it for use when wanted, it would have supplied the 
city with an average of 20,700,000 gallons daily, for the 
whole year, in addition to the daily average of 13,175,000 
gallons, which was used in the city. 

At the time of shutting the gate, the water in the lake 
was eleven inches above original high-water mark. The 
water has at no time during the year been more than one 
foot eight inches below this mark, and then only for about 
three days. On the 1st of January, 1860, it was only six 
inches below original high-water mark. 



APPENDIX. 

Raising the Gate-house at the Lake. 

The Legislature passed an act authorizing the raising of 
the dam at the lake in April last. 

During the past season, by direction of your Board, the 
gate-house at the lake has been raised a height of four feet 
eight inches. As part of it stood over the lake, it was con- 
sidered best, and cheapest to take it down, and after raising 
the floor to the required height, to re-lay the stones of the 
building as originally constructed, instead of endeavoring to 
raise it on screws. 

The roads near the gate house have been raised two feet, 
so that we can now keep the water in both divisions of the 
lake at a height of ten feet above the floor of " Knight's 
flume." 

New forty-inch Main. 

The laying of the new 40-inch main was commenced early 
in the spring, and a junction was made in the latter part of 
December with the 30-inch main crossing the Common. 

Its continuation to join with the other 30-inch main at the 
corner of Boylston and Tremont streets will be made the 
ensuing season. 

The junction with the 30-inch main on the Common, has so 
much increased the supply in the city, that, although the 
weather has been extremely cold for some ten or twelve days 
past, yet there has been very little lack of water in the higher 
parts of the city. In previous winters such a long spell of 
cold weather has deprived the higher portions of the city of 
water, and has. entirely drained the reservoirs. 

The length of this 40-inch pipe as laid the past season, is 
22,414 feet. To make suitable blow-offs and connections with 
the other pipes in the city, and also to make arrangements for 
other connections hereafter, it has been necessary to put in 
three 40-inch stop-cocks ; one 30-inch do. ; one 20-inch do. ; 
seven 16-inch do.; one 12-inch do.; and four of 4-inch do. 



6 APPENDIX. 

Also 382 feet of IG-inch pipes. Other stop-cocks will be 
required when the final connection is made next year. 

Corrosion of Pipes. 

Making the connection of this line of pipes with the 30-inch 
has given us another opportunity to examine the amount of 
corrosion in the pipes. 

In the report for 1858 the corrosion was spoken of in con- 
nection with the pipes re-laid on Dover street bridge. The 
corrosion in these 30-inch pipes did not appear to vary essen- 
tially from the description given of those on Dover street 
bridge; except that the 30-inch pipes were the most uniformly 
covered. 

I am still of the opinion as then expressed, " that the cor- 
rosion is very energetic at first, hut that it gradually decreases in 
energy, year by year." 



APPENDIX. 1 

Conduit. 
The following table shows the diflferent heights at which 
the water has been running, and the number of days in each 
month at the different heights. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 




0.0 


2.6 


3.0 


4.2 


5.0 


5.10 


6.0 


6.4 


6.8 


7.0 


8.0 




NUMBER OF DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 


















8 


5 


16 
23 
13 
13 


7 






















2 

5 












2 

6 

18 

30 


6 
1 


8 


Anril 


2 




1 


1 


1 
13 




Mav 
























Julv, 














26 
26 
30 
19 
20 
9 

145 




5 
4 














1 






September, 














October, 






2 








9 

r 




1 






3 
2 










December, 












12 

ir 


8 
83 






2 


2 


1 


2 


14 


72 






12 


15 



It will be seen by this table that in 105 days the conduit 
has been empty, or run less than full; in 145 days just full, 
and in 115 days it has been running with a head on it varying 
from four inches to one foot eight inches. 

Six feet four inches is the full height of the conduit. It was 
originally intended to carry but four feet four inches of water. 
Should we keep it down to this point, we should come far 
short of a full and sufficient supply. 



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APPENDIX. 



9 



Loss of head from the BrooMine Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city 
may be seen by reference to the table in this and previous 
reports of average annual heights of water in the reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 



YEAR. 



Average annual heights of Water 
above Marsh Level in 



Brookline 
Reservoir 



Beac'u Hill 
Reservoir. 



E. Boston 
Reservoir. 



H 0! .=; 

OHO 

'Cog 
0) £ 

H- 1 0) Ph 

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tn 3 ^5 

m O " 
'U O a 

o t, 3 



^ > 
ca -►- « 

"H — q 



1850, 
1851, 
1852, 

1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 
1859, 



123.16 
123.36 
123.67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 
124.11 
124.63 
124.07 



119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 
114.77 
116.00 
115.24 



105.06 
104.07 
104.91 
99.84 
97.49 
94.11 
94.18 
94.42 
94.05 



4.12 
3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 
9.34 
8.63 
8.83 



18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
29.55 
29.93 
30.21 
30.02 



Extreme high water in Brookline Reservoir is 124.6 feet. 



10 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



11 



Monthly Fall of Rain, in inches, in 1859. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

Noyember, 

December, 

Totals, 

_ 









5.64 
2.91 
10.95 
1.37 
3.46 
3.16 
0.99 
7.69 
4.56 
0.33 
3.55 
4.41 



49.02 



PLACES AND OBBEEVEKS. 



o . 
o 

a. 



5.93 
4.05 
7.64 
3.36 
3.63 
7.89 
1.58 
4.72 
4.40 
8.28 
3.75 
6.47 



56.70 



o <1> 



5.62 
2.86 
6.24 
2.76 
3.80 
5.83 
1.58 
3.98 
3.80 
2.32 
3.25 
5.47 



47.51 



o o 

1-1 h^ 



4.99 
8.80 
6.66 
2.90 
3.43 
6.19 
1.20 
8.43 
3.94 
2.18 
.3.08 
6.61 



48.41 






83 
36 
32 
84 
03 
59 
64 
.96 
.80 
.05 
.18 



03 

O 

8.23 
6.48 
8.44 
2.36 
2.98 
6.81 
1.50 
5.39 
3.11 
3.68 
4.99 



_2 o 

1^ 
u 
P-l 

5.75 
1.85 
8.00 
2.28 
8.40 
7.06 
1.14 
3.69 
3.65 
2.62 
2.40 
3.45 



45.29 



12 



APPENDIX. 



Besides the iO-inch pipes laid, the following is a statement of the location, size and num- 
ber of feet of distributing pipes laid in the year 1859 : 



In what Streets. 



Arlington, 

Upton, 

West Chester, 

New Devonshire, . 
North Charles,.... 

Northfield, 

Boylston, 

West Canton, 

Worcester Square, 

Lenox, 

Lehigh, 

Newton, 

Pembroke, 

Fuller, 

East Concord, ... . 
New Devonshire, . 
Arlington,. 

Worcester Place, . 
Jones' Wharf, .... 
Half Moon Place,. 
North Charles,.... 



D, 

Eighth, 

Mercer, 

Seventh 

Ninth, 

Goddard, 

F, 

Sixth, 

Fifth, 

Seventh, 

Eighth, 

Bolton, 

B, 

Seventh, 

Woodward, 

O, 

Sixth, 

Athens, 

Dorchester Av., 

Leeds, 

(jlover Court. . 



Bremen, 



Between what Steeets. 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Boylston and Beacon, 



Total IS-inch, Boston. Proper, 



Shawmut Avenue and Tremont, 

West of Tremont, 

Franklin and Milk, 

Poplar and Leveret, 

Tremont and Camden, 

West of Public Garden, 

West of Tremont, 

Washington and Harrison Avenue,. 
Tremont and Shawmut Avenue, . . . . 

Federal and South, 

West of Tremont, 

West of Tremont, 

South of Church, 

Washington and Harrison Avenue,. 

Franklin and Winthrop Place, 

For Public Garden, 



Total G-incIi, Boston Proper, 



From 1198 Washington street. 

From Commercial street, 

From Broad, 

Connected with Leveret, 



Total 4r-incli, Boston Proper, 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

Seventh and Eighth, 



Total 1^-iucIi, Soutli Boston, 



Dorchester and Mercer, 

To connect with Eighth, 

I and iv 

K and L, 

D and E, 

Seventh and Goddard, 

D and Dorchester, 

L and N, 

E and F, 

DandE, 

DandE, 

First and Second, 

I and K , 

Dorchester street and Dorchester Avenue, 

Broadway and First, 

I and K, 



Total 6-incli, Soutla Boston, 



C and D, 

For Norway Iron Co., . 

From Woodward, 

Prom Woodward, 



Total 4:-inch, South. Boston, 

EAST BOSTON. 
Porter and Brooks, 



Center,. 



Total 6-inch, Slast Boston, 

East of Orleans, 

Total 4;-iMich, East Boston,. 



12 



12 



1327 



.1327 



669 
567 
220 
192 
845 
130 
92 
1248 



256 
292 
816 
234 

283 



.6168 



200 
361 



60 

651 



726 

68 

127 

36 

163 

436 

1017 

590 

550 

127 

400 



366 

557 
267 

.5757 

243 
267 
200 
148 



858 



90 
90 



126 
126 



APPENDIX. 



13 



RECAPITULATION. 



Boston Proper, . . . 
South Boston, . . . 
East Boston, . . . . 



1859. 



( Total number of feet laid, 
( Stop-cocks in the same, . . 
f Total number of feet laid, 
( Stop-cocks in the same, . . 
( Total number of feet laid, 
( Stop-cocks in the same, . . 



Sums of Pipes, . . . . 
Sums of Stop-cocks, . 



Diameter in inches. 



12 6 



1327 
1 



1395 
1 



6168 
11 

5757 
9 
90 



12015 
20 



651 
2 

853 
2 

126 



1630 
4 



During the year 700 feet of 6-inch pipes has been taken up 
and re-laid on Plymouth street, south of Northampton street. 



14 



IX. 



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APPENDIX. 



15 



Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1859. 



1 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


"a 
S 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number, 


Length 
in 

Feet.,, 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


1 . . 


4 
10 
538 


142 

424 
15,909 


4 

3 

318 


498 

72 

9,318 






8 

15 
915 


640 


1 

1 


2 

59 


820 
2,035 


816 

27,262 




Aggr 










938 


28,718 















Making the total number up to January 1, 1860, 22,264 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1859. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



WHERE. 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


^ 


1 


1 


.5 
S 


Total 


Boston Proper, 
South Boston,. . 


1 


2 


4 








6 
1 
8 


19 

1 
2 


38 


24 


61 


36 
2 
1 


12 
2 
1 


255 
34 
17 


458 




1 
1 


1 


41 


East Boston, . . . 










2 


2 


2 


32 














Totals, 


1 


2 


4 




2 


1 


10 


22 


40 


26 


63 


39 


15 


306 


531 







Of leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches in diame- 
ter and upwards, sixty-one were caused by the loosening of 
lead in the joints, two by frost, thirteen by settling of earth, 
one by boxing, one by fish, and four by flaws in pipes. 

Total eighty-two in pipes of four inches and upwards. Of 
the leaks that have occurred in service-pipes and two-inch 
pipes, ninety-four were caused by settling of earth, twenty- 
eight by defective pipes, one hundred and fifty by fish, seven 
by rats, thirty-six by stiff connections, fifteen by rust, seven- 
teen by frost, fourteen by joints, thirty-eight by defective coup- 



16 



APPENDIX. 



lings, eight by digging drains, one by driving piles, six by 
tenants, seven by defective cocks, four by cocks blowing out 
one stopped by gasket, three by boxing cellars, and twenty 
struck by picks. 

Total, four hundred and forty-nine in service and two-inch 
pipes. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850—1859. 





LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 


YEAK. 


Four inches and upwards. 


Less than four inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 


72 


104 


1851 


64 


173 


237 


1852 


82 


241 


323 


1853 


85 


260 


345 


1854 


. . 74 


280 


354 


1855 


75 


219 


294 


1856 


75 


232 


307 


1857 


85 


278 


363 


1858 


77 


324 


401 


1859 


82 


449 


531 











Hijdrants. 
During the year, thirty-two new hydrants have been estab- 
lished as follows : fifteen in the city proper, thirteen in South 
Boston, two in Roxbury, and two in Brookline. 

Altogether there have been established up to the present 
date, 

In Boston proper, - - - - - 902 

'' South Boston, 261 

" East Boston, 170 

" Brookline, ------ 3 

'' Roxbury, ------ 9 

" Charlestown, . . - - - 11 

" Chelsea, ^ 

Total, ------ 1,363 



APPENDIX. 17 

Fifty-eight hydrants have been taken out, and replaced by 
new or repaired ones ; eighty-three decayed hydrant-boxes 
have been renewed. The hydrants are in good condition. 

The unusual cold weather in the present month of January 
has made it necessary to keep an extra force of men employed 
to keep the hydrants free from ice, and in good order for use 
in case of fire. 

Stop-cocks. 
The stop-cocks are all in good working order, and have 
had the usual cleaning and oiling. Twenty-five new stop- 
cocks have been put in and covered by new stop-cock boxes ; 
and thirty-two stop-cock boxes have been renewed. 



w 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1860. 







DIAMETER IN INCHES. 


NUMBER OF 




























40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 
13 


6 
131 


4 

7'i 


2 


li 


Pipes, 


58 


?3 


24 


8 


77 


45 


28 


Blow-ojff Branches, 






2 

1 
5 
3 

r 

10 
2 


















Y Branches, 










1 

7 


2 

12 

5 


3 
9 
4 








3-Way Branches, 


11 


4 
1 
8 
6 


1 
3 

10 


1 


6 






4- Way Branches, 






Flange Pipes, 


6 
13 


11 

4 
1 










Sleeves, 


2 


4 
4 


9 
6 


12 
I'' 


10 




Clamp Sleeves, 




Caps, 


9, 


4 


5 




1 




11 


97 


11 






Reducers, '. 




3 


1 




1 


2 


3 


3 


4 
1 






Bevel Hubs, 








Curved Pipes,. 


1 


1 


4 




3 


3 


2 


4 






Quarter Turns, 










<^ 


1 


/) 


5 








Double Hubs, 










7 


9 










340 


Offset Pipes, 










1 


3 


9 






Stop Cocks, 


2 


4 


1 


2 


1 




5 


1 


fi 


4 




Yoke Pipes, 














? 


9, 










21 
3 


5 


3 
2 


1 


6 




10 


24 


10 
































Hydrants. 




13 Wilmarth. 




41 Lowell. 




9 Hooper. 




12 Ballardvale. 




4 Wharf. 




3 New York. 




1 


San 


iple 





















APPENDIX. 19 

For Hydrants. 7 bends, 24 frames, 25 covers, 40 caps, 14 
lengtheners, 100 weight of composition castings, 24 valve 
seats, 8 nipples, 42 stuffing boxes, 15 screws, 20 plungers, 7 
unfinished hydrants, 9 wooden boxes, 10 unfinished do., lot of 
old rods and parts of hydrants, 76 straps, 10 rings, 1 band. 

For Stop Cocks, 10 4-inch plugs, 4 frames, 5 covers, 10 
stands and gear for 36 and 30-inch, 4 composition screws for 
6-inch, 11 plungers for do., 1 composition screw and 3 
plungers for 12-inch do., 5 iron screws for 6-inch, 25 cast 
iron nuts, 13 rings, 2 screws for 24-inch, 1 for 30 and 2 for 
36-inch, 12 unfinished stop cocks, 6-inch, 1 wooden box, 8 
unfinished do., 4 boxes flange bolts, 2 screws for 30-inch 
(old,) 157 lbs. ^-inch bolts, 588 lbs. 1-inch bolts, 113 lbs. |- 
inch do., 169 lbs. of l|-inch do., 140 lbs. l-^-inch do. 

For Service Pipe. 22 1-inch air cocks, 5 1 -inch union do., 
21 1-inch T do., 3 |-inch union do., 5 f-inch T do., 102 |-inch 
union do., 12 f-inch Y do., 9 f-inch straight do., 4 f T do., 9 
flanges, 7 tubes, 10 caps for 1-inch do., 40 caps, 25 boxes, 25 
tubes, 370 straight boxes, 6 2i-inch couplings, 7 li-inch con- 
nection couplings, 7 1-inch do., 50 f-inch do., 65 lbs. old f 
and f-inch do., 12 1^-inch flanges, 876 lbs. |-inch union cock 
castings, 300 lbs. castings for couplings, various sizes, 112 
lbs. castings for 1-inch cocks, 252 lbs. castings for |-inch do., 
160 f-inch flange cocks. 

Meters. 51 composition 1-inch Worthington, 4 2-inch do., 
10 |-inch do., 6 1-inch iron do., 6 f-inch iron do., 1 1-inch 
Scotch, 4 f-inch do., 44 Huse's, 40 lbs. composition nipples 
for 1-inch, 7 connection couplings for 2-inch, 4 6-inch flanges 
for 2-inch. 

Lead Pipe. 525 lbs. 2Hnch, 150 lbs. l^-inch, 135 lbs. 1- 
inch, 1,150 lbs. f-inch, 1,650 lbs. f-inch, 345 lbs. pieces f. 

Pig Lead. 3,150 lbs., 714 lbs. sheet lead, 55 lbs. block 
tin, 9 lbs. solder. 



20 APPENDIX. 

Blacksmith'' s Shop. 392 lbs. cast steel, 170 lbs. working 
pieces do., 2,590 lbs. bar iron, 3,181 lbs. working pieces do., 
131 lbs. truss bolts, 88 lbs. boiler iron, 700 lbs. scrap iron. 

Stable. 300 lbs. English kay, 3 horses, 3 sets of harness, 
4 wagons (1 old,) 1 pung, 22 bushels grain, stable utensils ; be- 
side the above, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom derrick, 4 prs. 
crank derricks and 2 prs. shears, with apparatus belonging. 
4 proving presses and apparatus, complete lot of tools for 
laying main and service pipes and repairs of same, also tools 
for machine, blacksmiths, plumbers' and carpenters' shops, for 
reservoirs and fountains, office and watchroom furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 1 cast iron drinking fountain, 2 
composition reel jets, 2 4-inch cylinder jets, 1 6-inch do., 1 
composition reducer, 5 waste cocks, 1 composition cylinder, 6 
jets, 3 plates, 6 jet plates, 9 cast iron jets, lot of old lumber, 
capstan, frame and levers, large copper ball, 5 swivel pipe 
patterns, 3 boom carriages, 1 swing stage and irons. 

Miscellaneous. 1 bbl. oil for lanterns, 8 tons of old cast 
iron, large lot of old lumber used on new main, large lot of 
patterns for proving presses, pipes, branches, stop cocks, 
hydrants, &c., lot of old bolts, cast oif drills, drilling machines 
and clamps, lot of machinery from Marlboro', 1 cask of spikes, 
f cask sperm oil, 1 bag cotton waste, 250 lbs. composition 
chips, 223 lbs. old composition cocks, 60 pipe plugs, 25 
baskets charcoal, 1 ton hard coal, ^ ton soft coal, 50 tons 
paving gravel, 5 man-hole frames and plates for large pipes. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES SLADE, City Engineer. 



APPENDIX. 21 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

Water Registrar's Office, 

Boston, January 1st, 1860. 

Hon. John H. Wilkins, Pres. of the Cochitiiate Water Board : 

Sir : I herewith present my annual report, containing the 
usual classification of water takers, and the amount of water 
rate received from each class, together with such other mat- 
ters as are required by the 16th section of the ordinance. 

The total number of water takers, now entered for the 
year 1860, is 23,271, being an increase since January 1st, 
1859, of 1,057. 

During the year, there has been 1,023 cases where the 
water has been shut off. Of these, 977 were for non-payment 
of water rates, and 46 were for unnecessary waste of water. 

The number of cases where the water has been turned on, 
is 1,413. Of these, 643 were cases which had been shut off 
for non-payment of rates ; 30 were shut off for unnecessary 
waste, and 740 were turned on for the first time. 

The total amount received from December 
31st, 1858, to January 1st, 1860, is - - $314,808 97 

Of the above, there was received for water 
ised in previous years, the sum of - $471 46 

Leaving the receipts for water 
3ed during the year 1 859, the sum 
of 314,337 51 

In addition to the above, there has been 
receive(f for letting on water, in cases where it 
had been turned^ off for non-payment of rates, 1,482 00 

Total amount received during the year, in 
this office, $316,290 97 



22 APPENDIX. 

The increased amount of receipts in 1859, 
over the previous year, is - - - - $12,359 24 

The amount of assessments already made 
for the year 1860, is 255,760 80 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water during the year 1860, is - - 325,000 00 

The expenditure for meters during the past year has 
been $5,580 50. The increased charges for the use of water, 
against the establishments to which these meters have been 
attached, have already equalled, if not exceeded, this expendi- 
ture. By reference to schedules A and B, will be seen the 
result of the meters in some of the largest establishments. 

Schedule contains the usual statement, showing the num- 
ber and kind of water fixtures within the premises of water 
takers. 

The expenditures of my department during 
the year 1859, have been . . . . $3,055 94 

The items of this expenditure are as follows : 
Paid Chas. L. Bancroft, for services as clerk, - 
Stephen Badlam, " " 

Chas.B. Dunham, for services as inspector, 
N. P. Burgess, " " 

Eayrs & Fairbanks, for stationery, - 
George West, for distributing bills, 
Theodore Badlam, " " - 

M. Lyon, " " - - 

N. B. Allen, " " - - 



$782 50 


782 


50 


626 


00 


626 


00 


124 


94 


32 


00 


32 


00 


30 


00 


20 


00 


$3,055 94 



APPENDIX. 



23 



Schedule A. 

Of the sixty meters purcliased last year, twenty-three have 
been attached, and are now in operation at the following 
hotels, and show the average daily consumption of water, 
also the amount of water rate charged to each, as compared 
with the amount received in 1858. 



Eevere House, 

Parker House, 

Tremont House, 

American House,. . . 

Marlboro' Hotel, 

United States Hotel, 

Adams House, 

Coolidge House, 



Totals,. 



Gallons per day. 



17,838 
14,557 
14,142 

12,538 
8,856 
8,854 
5,991 
5,681 



88,457 galls. 



Water Rate, 1859. 



1,116 85 
897 80 
846 51 
808 17 
635 21 
678 80 
485 32 
426 56 

5,895 22 



Water Eate, 1858, 



. $571 00 . 

. 240 00 . 

. 475 00 . 
. 810 00 . 

. 267 00 . 

. 672 00 . 

. 354 00 . 

. 281 00 . 

$3,670 00 



24 



APPENDIX. 



Schedule B. 

The following comprise some of the largest establishments 
to which meters have been affixed, and show the average daily 
consumption of water, together with the amount of water rate 
paid by each. 



Boston and Worcester Railroad Co., . 
Boston and Maine Railroad Co., . . 

Old Colony Railroad Co., 

Eastern Railroad Co., 

Fitchburg Railroad Co., 

Bay State Rolling Mill, 

Norway Iron Co., 

Pembroke Iron Co., 

Kerosene Oil Co., East Boston, . . . 
Kerosene Oil Co., South Boston, . . 

J. Trull, distillery, 

Jno. T. Heard, distillery, 

W. E. French & Co., distillery, . . . 
J. M. Barnard & Co., distillery, . . . 
Sylvester Bowman, distillery, for 5 mos. 
Lovis & Hodges, Chemical Works, . . 



Gallons per 




day. 


Paid. 


25,097 


$1,886 64 


24,673 


1,585 38 


13,484 


884 04 


11,530 


909 90 


12,777 


861 52 


25,125 


1,507 20 


14,709 


882 54 


6,480 


518 40 


12,503 


859 20 


11,959 


771 54 


7,740 


619 52 


7,589 


607 12 


11,525 


691 50 


5,380 


430 40 


12,799 


319 94 


7,230 


578 40 



APPENDIX. 



25 



Schedule C. 

Statement, showing the number and kind of water fixtures 
contained within the premises of water-takers in the city, in 
1857, 8 and 9. 



1857 


1858 


1859 




4,434 


4,326 


4,475 


Taps ; these have no connection 
with any drain or sewer. 


25,207 


26,631 


29,190 


Sinks. 


6,573 


7,729 


9,358 


Wash hand basins. 


2,941 


3,334 


3,498 


Bathing tubs. 


2,765 


3,327 


3,699 


Pan water closets. 


3,215 


3,845 


4,476 


Hopper water closets. 




173 


409 


Self acting water closets. 


573 


654 


910 


Urinals. 


1,566 


2,015 


2,450 


Wash tubs ; these are perma- 
nently attached to the build- 


20 


12 


21 


Shower baths in houses where 
there is no tub. 


9 


9 


10 


Rams. 


585 


612 


612 


Private Hydrants. 




77 


110 


Slop hoppers. 


47,888 


52,744 


59,218 





26 APPENDIX. 



Statement, showing the Number of Houses, Stores, Steam 
Engines, &c., in the City of Boston, supplied with 
Cochituate "Water to the 1st op January, 1860, with 

THE AMOUNT OP WaTER RaTES PAID FOR 1859. 

17,001 dwelling houses, from |6 00 to $31 00, $193,231 25 



13 boarding " 


u 


33 00 to 


98 00, 


715 16 


97 model " 


u 


14 00 to 


210 00, 


3,619 50 


8 lodging " 


u 


15 00 to 


78 00, 


272 00 


3,298 stores and shops 


u 


6 00 to 


81 54, 


24,105 99 


229 offices, 


a 


6 00 to 


20 50, 


1,510 92 


18 banks. 


Cl 


6 00 to 


16 50, 


189 08 


200 buildings, 


a 


15 00 to 


207 50, 


6,671 96 


47 churches, 


ii 


6 00 to 


20 00, 


324 50 


31 halls. 


u 


6 00 to 


26 50, 


289 00 


16 private schools, 


li 


6 00 to 


30 50, 


203 25 


3 theatres. 


11 


15 00 to 


93 75, 


126 25 


1 green house. 








5 00 


1 Custom House, 








156 00 


1 Post Office, 








25 00 


3 hospitals, 


from 


21 67 to 


178 00, 


353 42 


1 medical college. 








30 00 


1 State House, 








134 50 


4 libraries, 


from 6 00 to 


35 00, 


59 00 


7 asylums, 




35 00 to 


242 48, 


568 61 


5 markets. 




30 00 to 


64 00, 


220 00 


52 market stalls. 




6 00 to 


10 00, 


330 00 


156 cellars. 




6 00 to 


12 00, 


908 25 


51 hotels, 




15 00 to 


865 05, 


9,904 49 


352 restaurants & saloons " 


8 00 to 


41 00, 


3,945 62 


4 club houses, 


a 


15 00 to 


50 00, 


112 00 


7 bathing houses. 


a 


15 00 to 


130 00, 


327 50 


Amount carried fort 


vard, 






$248,338 ,25 



APPENDIX. 




27 


Amount brought forward, 






$248,338 25 


759 stables, from 


$5 00 to 


$420 00, 


8,941 57 


68 shops and engines, " 


10 00 to 


284 42, 


5,381 84 


8 foundries & engines," 


12 58 to 


462 00, 


875 10 


1 forge & engine, 






518 40 


11 printing & engines, 


15 00 to 


93 20, 


445 82 


22 factories & engines, " 


25 50 to 


578 40, 


3,638 47 


30 factories, " 


9 00 to 


859 20, 


2,485 47 


3 gaslightcompanies," 


79 68 to 


481 20, 


654 88 


2 sugar refineries, 






4,192 26 


16 mills and engines, " 


20 00 to 1,507 20, 


4,513 12 


16 engines, '* 


12 00 to 


150 72, 


708 41 


47 printing offices, " 


6 00 to 


28 00, 


536 25 


9 distilleries, " 


46 95 to 


691 50, 


2,987 34 


11 breweries, '' 


10 00 to 


264 00, 


725 42 


2 bacon works, 






40 00 


6 bleacheries, " 


9 00 to 


10 00, 


56 00 


1 laundry, 






25 00 


1 pottery. 






30 00 


54 bakeries, from 


I 6 00 to 


12 00, 


390 83 


3 " & engines," 


20 00 to 


63 12, 


136 76 


8 buildings & engines," 


29 90 to 


205 56, 


1,125 18 


1 ship yard and engine. 






92 76 


9 ship yards, " 


10 00 to 


18 00, 


108 00 


4 dry docks, " 


15 00 to 


57 00, 


117 00 


607 hose, " 


3 00 to 


10 00, 


1,878 00 


30 fountains, " 


3 00 to 


15 00, 


158 50 


9 packing houses, " 


9 00 to 


30 00, 


125 00 


8 railroad companies," 


75 00 to 1,886 64, 


6,978 58 


3 ferry companies. 






2,004 96 


30 steamboats, " 


15 00 to 


700 00, 


5,145 26 


232 schools, " 


6 00 to 


16 00, 


1,592 00 


22 engine, hose, & hook 








& ladder houses, 




16 00, 


352 00 


Amount carried forward, 
9 






$305,298 43 



28 



Amount brought forward, 


$305,298 43 


8 police stations, from $15 00 to $80 00, 


215 00 


2 city stables, 


108 75 


6 fire alarm motors, " 10 00 to 15 00, 


65 00 


1 Court House, 


95 00 


1 City Hall, 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall, 


40 00 


1 City Building, 


37 50 


1 Probate Office, 


10 00 


1 office at City Scales, 


9 00 


4 offices, Niles' block, 


27 00 


1 Dead House, 


10 00 


1 Public Library, 


50 00 


1 House of Correction, 


462 00 


1 Lunatic Hospital, 


225 00 


1 Faneuil Hall Market, urinals, &c., 


70 00 


1 street sprinkling. 


400 00 


1 offal station. 


150 00 


Common Sewer Dept., (for making mortar. 


&c.) 75 00 


1 house in Vine street, 


7 00 


1 steamer Henry Morrison, 


192 56 


1 Jail for Suffolk County, 


243 00 


1 Massachusetts State Prison, 


639 66 


Mill Dam Company, 


300 00 


Contractors for supplying shipping, 


4,012 39 


Pilling gasometer, 


251 42 


Sprinkling streets, 


12 00 


Building purposes, 


1,281 80 




$314,337 51 



B,espectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM P. DAVIS, Water Registrar. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

or THB 

CITY OF BOSTON 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, wiU be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower HaU ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., untU one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates HaU. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shaU be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book-