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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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Document. — No. 8. 



REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1860. 




BOSTON: 

GEO. C. RAND & AVERY, CITY PRINTERS, 

3STo. 3 Cornhill. 

1861. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



In Common Council, Jan. 10, 1861. 

Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to make their Annual Report in print. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

J. H. BRADLEY, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 14, 1861. 
Concurred. 

SILAS PEIRCE, Chairman. 

Approved January 15, 1861. 

J. M. WIGHTMAN, Mayor. 



11 EPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, January 15, 1861. 

To the City Council. 

The Cochituate Water Board respectfully submit to 
the City Council their Annual Report for the year 1860. 
In compliance, also, with the City Ordinances, they 
submit the Reports of the City Engineer, the Water 
Registrar, and the Clerk of this Board, all of which are 
worthy of attention from those who are interested to 
know the condition and workings of this department. 

It is believed that the works were never in a con- 
dition more safe and efficient than at the present 
time. 

The first important work of the year 1860 was the 
completion of the New Main, left over from 1859. 
This was finished entirely in May last ; and so im- 
portant was the conclusion of this undertaking deemed 
to be by this Board, that a Special Report on the sub- 
ject was submitted to the City Council. It is not 
therefore deemed necessary to allude any further to 
that subject. 

Early in the season the Board gave attention to the 
condition of the lake and its surroundings. It was 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

found that many of the original stakes marking the 
angles of the five rods owned by the City around the 
pond, had become decayed or been removed ; and it was 
deemed advisable that new stone ones should be ob- 
tained and substituted for the old wooden ones, — and 
this before the means of knowing their exact position 
should become obliterated. Mr. Knowlton was there- 
fore instructed to obtain suitable split stones, and have 
one placed at every angle around the pond, thus mark- 
ing the bounds of the City property in a permanent 
manner. This order has been mainly executed. Some 
places where the land was soft and boggy have been 
left to be attended to when they could be approached 
better on the ice. The expense of this job has been 
thus far $200. 

The condition of the borders of Snake Brook has 
been long deemed unsatisfactory, both to the credit of 
the city and to the health of Cochituate Village. 
Especially since the raising of the dam, the water on 
its margin where it backs up for a long distance, has 
been so variable in depth, and the mud so alternately 
flooded and drained, that it seemed necessary to do 
something for its more creditable appearance, as well 
as for the health and comfort of the citizens. After 
mature consideration by the whole Board on the spot, 
it was deemed best to make only one job of it, and 
Mr. Knowlton was directed to fill in from the neigh- 
boring bank, so as to cover all the objectionable por- 
tions of the margin of the brook, and thus secure from 
all exhalations of a noxious character the whole neigh- 
borhood. This has been done, and the citizens appear 
to be highly pleased with the considerate and liberal 



1861.] WATER. 5 

policy of, the City. The cost of this improvement has 
been $2,701.54. 

The next important undertaking was the raising the 
pipes on Tremont Street. Operations were commenced 
on the 20th clay of August, and the two lines of 30- 
inch pipes, between Castle and Waltham streets, have 
been successfully raised; also the 20-inch pipe on 
Dover Street, between Tremont and Emerald streets, 
and the Service Mains of Tremont and Dover streets. 
Two 36-inch, one 24-inch, and two 12-inch stoj)-cocks 
have been renewed ; and six hundred and thirty-six 
feet of 30-inch pipe have been taken out, and the same 
number of feet of 36-inch pipe laid in place of it. The 
36-inch line is now complete to the north line of Dover 
Street. 2,486 feet of 30-inch, 528 feet of 20-inch, 100 
feet of 12-inch, and 1,784 feet of 6-inch pipe, have been 
raised so as to conform to the new grade of Tremont 
and Dover streets. The Service Pipes have not all 
been renewed this fall, as the houses would not be 
occupied during the winter ; they will be put in early 
in the spring. The work was carried on to a disad- 
vantage by so many parties being at work at the same 
time. 

There remain on hand stock and tools to the amount 
of $5,377. The importance of raising the remainder 
of the pipes out to the Gate Chamber, while we have 
everything in order for the purpose, is earnestly recom- 
mended to the incoming Board. The whole cost of 
the operation has been $17,398.26, thus far. 

In relation to this matter of raising the pipes, it 
must be ajoparent to every one that it is a work of 
great delicacy, requiring great skill, judgment, and 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

attention. It was successfully executed by Mr. Stan- 
wood, Superintendent of the Eastern Division, to the 
entire satisfaction of this Board. 

The late severe fire in Beacon Street developed the 
total inadequacy of suitable means to meet such an 
emergency. The pipe there laid was 6-inch diameter, 
hydrants few and far between, and it was impossible 
for the Steam Fire Engine to obtain a supply of water. 
It was deemed by this Board of the utmost importance 
that no time should be lost in placing that valuable 
portion of the city in as secure a position as possible 
against the occurrence of a similar calamity. Imme- 
diate order was given to lay down 12-inch pipes in 
place of 6, and 1,670 feet have been laid, and the con- 
tinuance of the same should have early attention in 
the spring. The cost of this extension has been 
$4,491.27, thus far. 

By reference to the Water Registrar's Report, it will 
be seen that nine of the leading hotels have paid no 
water rents for the last year, and a part none for the 
last quarter of the year before. The amount thus 
assessed, and not paid, is $9,526.60. This has been 
assessed by meters, and payment is resisted on the 
ground of illegal assessment. The case is not yet 
decided, but it is much to be desired that it may be 
shortly. When this is paid, and one equal sum for this 
year, it will at once carry the receipts of the current 
year beyond the estimate of the Water Registrar. 

The Consumption of Water. In the last Annual Report, 
the following language was indulged in : " It seems as 
if we might now fairly conclude that the individual 



1861.] WATER. 7 

consumption had come to its maximum, — the variation 
in three years not exceeding one gallon ; " say 72 h to 
73 gallons. But the present year is a fearful example 
of the fallacy of such calculating. By the Report of 
the Engineer, hereto annexed, it appears that the 
average daily consumption of water has been 17,238,- 
000 gallons. By the census returns, it appears that 
the„ number of inhabitants is 177,902. This shows a 
consumption of 97 gallons for each individual; an 
amount believed to be without parallel in the civilized 
world. Of course there is nothing in the sales of the 
water that could lead to the expectation of such a 
monstrous increase ; and we must again resort to the 
old story of extravagant and inordinate waste. 

The past year has afforded the first opportunity ever 
enjoyed to test the capacity of the Lake. During the 
year, not a pint has been allowed to escape that could 
be retained. It has been impossible to fill the Lake to 
the height of the dam, so the whole has been drawn to 
the city. The fall of rain has been unusually large ; say 
55i inches; while the average of nine years has been 
48! . The actual daily delivering of water has been 
17,238,000 gallons, and the water in the Lake, January 
1, this year, being ten inches higher than a year ago, 
would give an additional supply of about one half a 
million gallons daily, or about 17,700,000 gallons. It 
would seem to be a safe inference that, in years when 
we have 55 h inches of rain, the maximum yield of the 
Lake will be 17,700,000 gallons, and no more. But as 
in the average of years only 48 f inches fall, we can 
safely rely upon only a proportional diminished supply. 

In bringing this enormous quantity of water to the 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 8. [Jan. 

city, the Board can but express the opinion that the 
capacity of the aqueduct has been put to the severest 
test that ought ever to be applied to it. To work it 
under any increased head, must be attended with the 
utmost hazard. 

Two conclusions seem to this Board now to be 
reached, of a practical character. The first is that the 
Lake can be relied on for no greater supply of water 
than has been drawn from it this year ; and the second 
is that the aqueduct can convey no more water than it 
has done this year. 

These conclusions are of a nature to arrest public 
attention, and to induce inquiry what is to be done ? 
What use shall we make of the present quantity, in 
view of the great difficulty and expense of increase ? 
Every effort should be made to guard against waste. 
The people can economize in its use, for they have 
done so. When the break took place at Needham, the 
consumption was reduced near three fourths. 

This Board was in hopes that some latitude might be 
indulged in in playing the public fountains and in 
supplying opportunity for skating. But nothing of 
these indulgences can be entertained. Any consider- 
able quantity drawn for skating, must put in jeopardy 
the supply on Beacon Hill and all the high service. 
If at all, and under any circumstances, this object is to 
be thought of, it should be done with the greatest 
care not to interfere with the regular and necessary 
supply. 

When all the unnecessary uses of the water are 
stopped, then, in case of insufficient quantity, it would 
become the policy of the City to cut off, one after 



1861. J WATER. 9 

another, the classes of takers for mechanical purposes. 
It is to be hoped, however, that the time is not near at 
hand when this will be necessary ; it is only alluded to 
as indicating what would undoubtedly become the 
policy of the City, at all times, in order to supply a 
full and needful quantity of pure water for domestic 
use. 

This state of facts would seem to settle all idea of 
annexing other municipalities to the City of Boston. 

Meters of Worthington's construction continue to 
give entire satisfaction, and will be more extensively 
used. 

Details of hydrants, stop-cocks, and extension of the 
work will be found in the Report of the City Engineer, 
annexed. 

By reference to the Report of the Clerk of this 
Board, it will be seen that the expenditure for the 
year has been $146,304.55. Of this amount, $34,880.71 
was for the new main, $17,398.26 for raising pipes on 
Tremont and Dover streets, $4,491.27 for extending 
the 12-inch pipe on Beacon Street, and for extension 
of the work $59,120.98 ; leaving $30,413.33 as the 
expenses of the year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EBENEZER JOHNSON, President. 

SAMUEL HALL, 

GEORGE P. FRENCH, 

CLEMENT WILLIS, 

G. E. PIERCE, 

GEORGE DENNIE, 

L. MILES STANDISH. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the Cocliituate Water Board, 
from December 31, 1859, to January 1, 1861. 

Hopkinton Reservoir, for services - 

Laying Service Pipe ..... 

Plumbing Shop, for stock, &c. 

Taxes -------- 

Pipe Yard, for stock, &c. 

Fountains ------- 

Hose -------- 

Stationery (including stationery for Water 

Registrar and Superintendents) - 
Rents -------- 

Damage, in streets, &c. ----- 

Wages, Miscellaneous ----- 

Oil 

Printing (including Water Registrar's, and 

Superintendents) .... 537 05 

Miscellaneous Expense, expenses of the Board, 

Engineering, &c. - 

Meters 

New Main, whole amount paid, $304,657 07 
Deduct previous payments, 269,776 36 
Repairing Main Pipe ----- 
Aqueduct Repairs at Snake Brook, &c. - 
Lake, finishing wall, banks, &c. 
Repairing Service Pipe ----- 

Amount carried forward 



$35 


00 


5 


50 


22 


50 


167 


27 


321 


05 


225 


86 


201 


24 


156 


53 


52 


00 


211 


25 


41 


50 


89 


10 



497 


26 


2,206 


75 


34,880 


71 


1,179 


50 


4,368 


60 


1,982 


93 


2,375 


06 


$49,556 


66 



12 



CITY. DOCUMENT. — No. 8. 



[Jan. 



Amount brought forward 
Repairing Streets ------ 

" Hydrants - - - ■ 
Salaries ------- 

Office Expense --.-.. 

Off and on Water 

Wages Proving Yard - 

" Plumbing Shop - 

" Blacksmith Shop 

u Laying Main Pipe - 

" " Service Pipe - 

Beacon Hill Reservoir, for labor, &c. 
South Boston, " " " - - 

East Boston, " " << - 

Brookline, " " " - - 

Service Pipe ------- 

Main Pipe ...... 

Stable -------- 

Laying Main Pipe, for stock, &c. - 
Blacksmith's Shop, «.«.<. 
Hydrant and Stop-cock Boxes 
Repairing Stop-cocks ----- 

Travelling Expenses ..... 

Tolls and Ferriage ..... 

Postage and Express - 

Tools 

Raising Water Pipes, on Tremont and Dover 
streets ...... 

Carting 

Hydrants ....... 

Proving Yard, for stock, &c. - - - . - 

Stop-cocks - - 

Laying Pipe on Beacon Street 

Amount carried forward 



,556 66 

1,639 31 

1,754 56 

8,212 08 

1,718 50 

2,907 73 

3,256 81 

529 99 

911 03 

5,259 86 

3,837 57 

597 29 

115 74 

304 46 

1,218 08 

11,162 92 

21,854 21 

1,366 98 

2,246 56 

207 96 

549 95 

1,167 01 

160 18 

165 47 

49 47 

322 28 

17,398 26 

467 25 

1,083 35 

296 21 

1,495 55 

4,491 27 

$146,304 55 



1861.] WATER. 13 

Amount brought forward - - - $146,304 55 

Less this amount drawn for New 

Main $34,880 71 

Less this amount drawn for Rais- 
ing Pipes on Tremont and Dover 
streets 17,398 26 

Less this amount drawn for Laying 

Pipe on Beacon Street - - 4,491 27 56,770 24 

,534 31 



CASH PAID CITY TREASURER. 


Received Rent for Arches under 




Beacon Hill Reservoir 


$300 00 


Received for Wood 


146 80 


" " Grass and Pasture - 


35 00 


" « Old Hose 


50 00 


" " Pipe, laying, &c. 


1,107 66 



1,639 46 
Received for off and on Water, for 

Repairs - - - 1,450 05 
Received for off and on 

Water, for Waste - 198 00 
Received for off and on 

Water, for non-paym't 1,517 50 

$3,165 55 
Less this amount for 
non-payment, which 
has been paid City 

Treasurer - - 1,517 50 1,648 05 3,287 51 

Balance $86,246 80 



EXTENSION OF THE WORK. 

Main Pipe $21,854 21 89,534 31 

Service Pipe - - - - 11,162 92 

Amounts carried forward, $33,017 13 $89,534 31 



14 CITY DOCUMENT 


\— No. 


8. 


[Jan. 


Amounts brought forward ', 


$33,017 


13 


$89,534 31 


Laying Main Pipe 


2,246 


56 




Hydrants 


1,083 


35 




Stop-cocks - 


1,495 


55 




Hydrant and Stop-cock Boxes 


275 


25 




Carting ..... 


300 


00 




Tools 


200 


00 




Oil 


89 


10 




Wages, Proving Yard - 


3,256 


81 




" Plumbing Shop 


370 


00 




" Laying Main Pipe - 


5,259 


86 




" " Service Pipe - 


3,837 


57 




" Blacksmith Shop 


711 


03 




Proving Yard, for stock, &c. 


200 


00 




Meters 


1,950 


00 




Laying Service Pipe 


5 


50 




Stable (for carting) 


1,000 


00 




Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c. • 


150 


00 




Toils and Ferriage 


100 


00 




Aqueduct Repairs, covering the 








Aqueduct at Snake Brook 


2,701 


54 




Lake, finishing Wall, Banks, &c. - 


871 


73 


59,120 98 



,413 33 



Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works, 
to January 1, 1861. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners - 
" -" " Water Board, 1850 

1851 



1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 



Amount carried forward, 



$4,043,718 21 
366,163 89 
141,309 23 
89,654 20 
89,854 03 
80,182 35 
63,866 33 

$4,874,748 24 



1861.] 



WATER. 



15 



Amount brought forward, 

Amount drawn by the Water Board, 1856 - 

« u u u .< 1857 - 

u u u u .< |858 . 

1859 - 

u a « u I860 - 

Amount paid the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners - - $47,648 38 
Am't paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 

1851 



1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 
1859, 
1860, 



5,232 38 

15,869 12 

4,621 40 

12,423 29 

9,990 38 

7,840 43 

13,750 00 

9,200 00 

5,554 00 

3,287 51 



Sundry Payments by the City - 63,359 51 
Discount and Interest on Loans 3,443,617 61 



Sundry Credits by the City $55,833 08 

Am't received for Water Rates 2.714,710 31 



1,874,748 24 

81,429 35 

96,931 25 

76,006 01 

385,652 47 

146,304 55 

5,661,071 87 



143,570 41 
$5,517,501 46 



3,506,977 12 
9,023,478 58 



2,770,543 39 
56,253,935 19 



SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Clerk of Cochituate Water Board. 



APPENDIX 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Office of City Engineer, 
Boston, January 



[EEE, ) 

, 1861. 5 



Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., Pres. of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir: The usual Annual Report of matters connected witli 
the Water Works is herewith submitted. 

Lake Cochituate, fyc. 

During the past year the borders of the Lake have been 
improved in part, by slope walls in places where the banks 
were in danger of being washed so much away as to approach 
very near to the five-rod line. 

Snake Brook has been much improved, partly by filling in 
some portions of it which contained stagnant water, the filling 
being obtained on its banks ; and partly by clearing out the 
dirt which had accumulated in some parts of it. All the lands 
and structures about the Lake are in good condition. 

liaising the Dam at the Lake. 

During the past year Mr. Knowlton has kept a record, as 
hitherto, of the daily heights of water at the Lake. By con- 

3 



I APPENDIX. 

densing and summing up these heights, we find that during 4 
days the water stood at a level of only Jive feet in the Lake. 
29 days it stood above Jive and less than six feet. 64 days it 
stood above six and less than seven feet. 173 days above seven 
and less than eight feet. 42 days above eight and less than 
nine feet. 54 days over nine feet, and 7 days it has been up to 
nine feet seven inches in the Lake. 

Until the latter part of 1859 when the dam and roads 
about the Lake had been raised two feet, the extreme depth 
of water which could be made available from the Lake by 
gravitation, was only eight feet. Two feet being then added 
would give us an available depth of ten feet when the Lake is 
full, provided we used no more water than originally expected. 
But as our increase of consumption has been largely over 
what was expected when the works were constructed, we 
must deduct the difference in depth required to keep up such 
a supply as we now require, which leaves but about six and a 
half feet of really available depth when the Lake is full. 
During the past year we have been benefited by the raising 
for the full period of 103 days. To this we may add a few 
days when the water was so nearly up to eight feet that we 
should have been compelled to waste the water from the Lake 
to avoid the danger of its breaking over the dams, had there 
been a sudden freshet. We have therefore been benefited 
nearly one third of the year, because the dam, roads, and 
gate-house were raised. The extra amount of water which 
we have been enabled to save on this account equals about 
1,500,000,000 gallons, which would have supplied the city 88 
days at the rate of 17,000,000 gallons per day. It is also 
equal to a depth of about seven feet over the entire surface 
of the Lake. 

Waste water i consumption of water, and capacity of the hake. 

In my report for the year 1859, it was shown that during 
the early part of that year, and up to July the 8th, a large 



APPENDIX. O 

amount of water was wasted from the Lake into Sudbury 
River. 

From July 8, 1859, to January 1, 1861, there has not 
been any water wasted in that direction. All the water 
drawn from the Lake has been brought to the city. 

By reference to the table of consumption of water it will be 
seen that the amount used during the past year has averaged 
over 17,000,000 gallons daily, an average increase of more 
than 4,000,000 daily, over the amount used in 1859, and 
about twice as much as was brought to the city in 1853. 

Much of this additional increase of consumption is owing, 
no doubt, to the increased effective head on the pipes caused 
by the new 40-inch main. This new main was connected 
with the 30-inch main crossing the Common in the latter part 
of December, 1859. The consumption of water in that month 
was a little rising of 14,500,000 gallons daily. In January 
following, the amount used averaged nearly 18,000,000 gallons 
daily, and in February nearly 19,000,000 gallons were used 
daily, it being in January over 3,000,000 gallons, and in Feb- 
ruary over 4,000,000 gallons more than had ever been used 
in any previous month since the introduction of the Cochitu- 
ate water. 

On the first of January, 1860, the water stood at the height 
of 7 feet 6 inches in the Lake. On the first of January, 1861, 
the water stood at the height of 8 feet 4 inches in the Lake, 
a depth of 10 inches gain, equal to 187,000,000 gallons over 
and above the total consumption in the year ; equal to a daily 
average of about 500,000 gallons. Adding this to the daily 
average amount used, we have a trifle over 17,700,000 
gallons as a total daily amount afforded by the Lake during 
the past year. 

The average annual rain-fall at the Lake during the past 
nine years has been 48 T 7 7 (j inches. For the year 1860 the 
total rain-fall was 55 T %\ inches, at the Lake. For 1853 the 
total rain-fall was 55^% inches. The rain-fall in 1853 and 
in 1860 being very nearly the same, and the amounts of water 



4 APPENDIX. 

afforded by the Lake in these two years being also very 
nearly the same. 

The commissioners of 1845, after a very careful series of 
observations, estimated that the daily average which the Lake 
would afford, was equal to 10,176,570 gallons per day, and 
this was the basis on which the works were built and the 
money expended for them. 

By reference to the Report for 1856, pages 5 to 9 inclusive, 
of the appendix (the City Engineer's Report), the amount of 
water used and wasted from the Lake will be seen. The con- 
clusion then arrived at was, that the Lake could be relied on 
to furnish an average daily supply of over 16,000,000 gallons 
of water by storing its waters one year with another. 

In the year 1853 the Lake afforded a daily average of 
17,217,417 gallons: one half of this amount only having been 
brought to the city. 

In 1855 we used 10,346,300 gallons daily, and wasted an 
unknown amount directly from the Lake, having no use for it. 
In 1860, as previously shown, the daily use and reserve 
amounted to a little over 17,700,000 gallons. 

The original expectation was that 250,000 inhabitants 
would use 7,250,000 gallons daily. At this time 180,000 in- 
habitants actually use 17,238,000 gallons daily. At the last 
rate of consumption 250,000 inhabitants will use 24,000,000 
gallons of water daily, an increase of about 230 per cent, 
over what was supposed sufficient when the works were 
built. 

There will be occasional years when we shall have a still 
larger amount of water afforded by the Lake, and very proba- 
bly there will also be years when the amount will fall short 
of the past year's supply. 

I do not consider it safe to rely on any more increase of 
supply to be obtained from the Lake, unless other large 
storing reservoirs are made in which to store the water in 
unusual wet seasons, or some other additional source is added 
to it. 



APPENDIX. 



Conduit. 



During the past year, although the water has been kept 
running through the Conduit in unprecedented quantities, there 
has been no break in it, neither has it required any unusual 
repairs. The banks over it have been strengthened in a few- 
places. It is now as strong as ever, but it will be extremely 
dangerous to undertake to run more water through it than we 
now do. 

The following table shows the different heights at which 
the water has been running, and the number of days in each 
month at the different heights. 

The height of the Conduit is six feet four inches. 







HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 








These heights show a head on the Conduit. 




0.0 


6.4 


7.0 


7.4 


7.6 


7.7 


7.8 


7.10 


8.0 9.0 




NUMBER OF DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 








31 
29 

4 








































27 
30 
17 




































1 


13 

15 


















15 
2 
9 
5 














2 
] 






21 
19 




6 
1 










1 






18 
31 
30 
11 

182 


7 














































7 


14 
45 


1 

1 


2 
42 


3 
3 










74 


7 






4 


1 







APPENDIX. 



It will be seen by this table that the Conduit has been 
empty only four days during the year. It has been just full 
74 days, and for 287 days, being the remainder of the year, 
with one day's exception, it has been running with a head on 
it varying from eight inches to one foot eight inches. 

In 1859 the Conduit was empty 12 days. It was run less 
than full 93 days; just full 145 days; 17 days with a head 
on it of four inches, and only 98 days with a head on it 
varying from eight inches to one foot eight inches ; running 
in 1860, 190 days more than in 1859, with the large head 
upon it. 

Reservoirs. 

The stone wall outside of Brookline Reservoir has been 
repaired and pointed ; the wooden fence has also been very 
generally repaired, and the whole otherwise put in complete 
order. 

All the reservoirs in the city remain in much the same 
condition as they have been the past few years. 

Pipes Laid and Raised. 

Early in the spring work was resumed on the 40-inch main, 
and everything connected with that line was finished by the 
15th of May. 

It was connected with the 30-inch at the corner of Tremont 
and Boylston streets, — it having been previously connected 
with the 30-inch main crossing the Common, — thus forming 
a connection with the two original lines of 36 and 30-inch 
pipes from Brookline Reservoir through Tremont Street ; 
doing away in a great measure with the liability of being 
entirely out of water in case of a break in either of the 
original mains. 

The two lines of 30-inch pipes in Tremont Street, between 
Waltham and Castle streets, and the 6-inch pipes, also the 
24 and 6-inch pipes in a portion of Dover Street, have been 



APPENDIX. 7 

raised in accordance with the new grades of those streets. 
That portion of the 36-inch line of pipes, between Waltham 
and Dover streets, which was finished out with 30-inch pipes 
when the works were built, has been taken up and relaid with 
36-inch pipes. These lines of pipes were raised and relaid 
under the especial direction of Mr. Stanwood. The whole 
work was done in a very substantial and careful manner. 
Other pipes, of various sizes, in about the usual annual quan- 
tities, have been laid the past season. 



APPENDIX. 



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"•a 8 






10 



APPENDIX. 



Loss of head from the BrooJcline Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city 
may be seen by reference to the table in this and previous 
reports of average annual heights of water in the reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 



YEAR, 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 



Average annual heights of Water 
above Marsh Level in 



Brookline 
Reservoir 



Beac'n Hill 
Reservoir. 



123.16 
123.36 
123,67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 
124.11 
124.63 
124.07 
123.29 



119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 
114.77 
116.00 
115.24 
117.13 



E. Boston 
Reservoir. 



105.06 
104.07 
104.91 
99.84 
97.49 
94.11 
94.18 
94.42 
94.05 
96.01 



° 3. ° 
-dog 



8 2 g 



4.12 
3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 
9.34 
8.63 
8.83 
6.16 






18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
29.55 
29.93 
30.21 
30.02 
27.28 



Extreme high water in Brookline Eeservoir is 124.6 feet. 



APPENDIX. 



11 



Monthly Fall of Rain, in inches, in 1860. 







PLACES AND 


OBSERVERS. 




• 






6 














to 














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"3.S5 








a (S 




a O 


2 2 




>-> . 




a 
a a 

" 


"3 




3 
£-g£ 


j= a 
_ 

bo 


-° 3 
of ^ 

a 


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O fe 


a^ 


saw 


-"° 3 « 


t. I ~ l 


£<-> 




" r-i 


S *"5 


i'Ei-s 




a ^ 


S^ 




cS 


O 


« 











rf 


89 


^s 


0.80 





Ph 




1.24 


1.89 


0.66 


1 00 


80 




3.80 


3.85 


2.06 


2.44 


2.21 


3 54 




1.98 
2.25 
1.98 


2.19 
1.73 
2.35 


2.08 
1.02 
1.91 


2.14 
1.09 
1.85 


1.73 

1.32 

2.26 


1.80 




1.55 




1.65 




11.16 

6.82 


8.01 
5.90 


4.87 
6.87 


4.84 
6.55 


7.37 
5.65 


4 02 




3.09 




4.89 
9.92 


4.30 
7.35 


5.03 
9.44 


4.30 
9.96 


5.24 
9.33 


5 70 




5 38 




1.72 
5.97 
3.71 


2.66 
5.37 

5.86 


2.46 
4.65 
5.86 


2.50 
3.71 
6.49 


1.86 
4.23 
4.75 


2 10 




3 95 




4 66 








55.44 


51.46 


46.91 


46.67 


46.95 


38 24 







Note. -** The melted snow is, as usual, included in the above amounts of 
rainfall. 



12 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of Location, Size, and number of Pipes laid in 1860. 



In what Streets. 



Between what Streets. 



Tremont 

Tremont 

Albany : 

Boylston 

Arlington 

Beacon 

Chapman 

Commonwealth Avenue 

East Concord 

Canton 

Plympton 

Lehigh 

Camden 

Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, 

Public Garden 

Dedham 

Montgomery 

Metropolitan Place 

North Grove 

Marlboro' 

Porter 

Long Wharf 

Newland 

India Wharf 

Bromfield 



H 

Fourth 

Dorchester 

First 

O 

Fifth 

Old Harbor 

Old Harbor Place 

Broadway 

Second 

M 

Seventh 

Eighth 

First 

Dorchester 

K 

Third 

C 



BOSTON PROPER. 

To the connection on Common . 



Total, 4rO inches in Boston. , 

Dover and Waltham 



Total, 36 inches in Boston 



Plympton and Norwich . . 
Arlington and Berkeley . . 
To connect with Boylston. 
Charles and Berkeley 



Total, 12 inches in Boston 



Washington and Suffolk 

Arlington and Berkeley 

Washington and Harrison Avenue. 

Harrison Avenue and Albany 

Harrison Avenue and Albany 

Federal and South 

West of Tremont 

Arlington and Berkeley 

West of Tremont. . . : 

From Boylston 

West of Tremont 

West of Tremont 



Total, 6 inches in Boston. 



From Washington 

For City Stables 

Washington and Bradford.. 
Pleasant and Indiana Place. 

For Steamer 

Rutland and Concord 

For Steamers 

For Music Hall 



Total, 4t inches in Boston. 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

Fourth and Eighth 

K and P 

Near First, for Blow-off. 



Total, 12 inches in So. Boston. 



N and O 

First and Second 

I anclK 

Seventh and Eighth 

From Old Harbor Street 

N and O 

Pand Q 

Fourth and Fifth 

G and K 

HandK 

Band C 

Dorchester Avenue and Ellery. 

Below Ninth. 

Dorchester and H 

First and Second 



40 



36 



670 
670 
636 



567 

48 

1,732 



2,437 



56 
614 

17 
187 
824 
223 
350 
612 

70 
461 
350 
327 

4,091 



350 

181 
55 
95 
47 

128 
75 

133 

1,064 



1,228 

2,827 
27 

4,082 



Amount carrttd forward. 



395 
328 
241 

82 
220 
270 
140 
304 
1,201 
483 
338 
540 
312 

70 
160 

5,184 



APPENDIX. 

Statement of Pij)es, continued. 



13 



In what Streets. 



Sixth 

Broadway. . . . 

Sullivan 

First 

M 

1 

E 

Seventh 

Seventh 

Highland 

Eighth 

Fifth. '.'.". '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Sullivan 

Broadway 

Old Eoad 

Brewster 

Gold 

Gates 

Saratoga 

Bremen 

Porter 

Condor 

Central Square 
Eutaw 

Saratoga 

Centre 



Between what Streets. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Amount Drought forward 

B and C 

and P 

DandE 

OandP 

Eighth and Ninth 

Seventh and Eighth 

First and Second 

C and D 

Land M 

South of Eighth 

G and H 

Fifth and Sixth 

1 and K. 

Highland and Old Harbor 

L and M , 



Total, 6 incites in South Boston 



K andM 

Seventh and Eighth. . . 

D andE 

Telegraph and Eighth. 



Total, 4 inches in South Boston 

EAST BOSTON. 

Putnam and Prescott 

Decatur and Porter. 

Chelsea and Bremen 

Prescott and Putnam 

Fountain 

Marion and Brooks 



Total, '6 inches in East Boston 



Junction of Chelsea Street , 
Orleans and Cottage 



5.184 
276 
575 
158 
287 
210 
3(10 
125 
270 
108 
624 
450 
160 
32 
371 
310 

9,340 



674 
298 
112 

28 

1.112 



200 

50 

90 

104 

240 

1,070 



Total, 4 inches in East Boston | 



50 
106 



156 



RECAPITULATION 





1860. 


Diameter in inches. 




40 


36 


12 


6 


4 






670 
1 


636* 
1 


2,437 

8 

4,082 

3 


4,091 
7 

9,340 
18 

1,070 
2 


1,064 
4 


Boston Proper ... 








1 112 


South Boston . . . 






4 








156 


East Boston .... 


1 P 
























670 
1 


636 
1 


6,519 
11 


14,501 
27 


2 332 






g 















During the year one hundred and ten feet of 6-inch pipe and one hundred and fifty feet 
of 4-inch pipe have been taken up in the City proper. 
2:827 feet of 6-inch and 101 feet of 4-inch in South Boston. 



* This was laid in place of 30-inch pipe, which was taken up. 



14 



APPENDIX. 



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APPENDIX. 



15 



Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1860. 



a> 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


a 

g 

OS 

5 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


i 


9 


448 


2 


247 


1 


107 


12 


802 


3 


5 


93 


6 


348 


1 


113 


11 


554 


1 


546 


16,336 


301 


11,456 


111 


4,115 


958 


31,907 




Aggi 












981 


33,263 

















Making the total number up to January 1, 1861 23,245 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1860. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



WHEHE. 


40 
6 


36 
5 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


i* 


1 


3 


8 


Total. 


Boston Proper . 


5 






3 


15 

1 
8 


32 
4 


41 
4 
5 


25 
2 
1 


52 


21 
4 
3 


3 


280 
40 
27 


488 




2 
3 


53 










51 


I 












6 


5 


5 




5 


3 


24 


36 


50 


28 


52 


28 


3 


347 


592 







Of leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches in 
diameter and upwards, one hundred and four were caused 
by the loosening of lead in the joints, ten by settling of earth, 
four by frost, nine by defective stop-cocks, six by defective 
pipes, and one struck by a pick. Total, one hundred and 
thirty-four in pipes of four inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that have occurred in service pipes and two- 
inch pipes, sixty-five were caused by fish, forty by defective 
pipes, twenty-five by frost, fourteen by defective cocks, thirty- 
one by stiff connections, eighteen by rust, one hundred and 



16 



APPENDIX. 



twenty-seven by the settling of earth, seventeen struck by 
picks, two destroyed by the soil, thirty-nine by defective 
couplings, thirty by builders and drain diggers, one stopped 
by paper, nine by cocks blowing out, three by rats, four by 
boxing cellars, one stopped by gasket, three by tenants, two 
by driving piles, three stopped by dirt, and twenty-four by 
defective joints. 

Total, four hundred and fifty-eight in service and two inch 
pipes. 



Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850—1860. 





LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 


TEAR. 


Four inches and upwards. 


Less than four inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 


72 


104 


1851 


64 


173 


237 


1852 


82 


241 


323 


1853 


85 


260 


345 


1854 


74 


280 


354 


1855 


75 


219 


294 


1856 


. 75 


232 


307 


1857 


85 


278 


363 


1858 


77 


324 


401 


1859 


82 


449 


531 


I860 


134 


458 


592 











Hydrants. 

During the year fifty-two new hydrants have been estab- 
lished, as follows : Twenty-one in the City Proper, twenty- 
six in South Boston, and five in East Boston. Altogether 
there have been established up to the present time — 



APPENDIX. 11 

In Boston Proper 923 

" South Boston 287 

" East Boston 175 

" Brookline ------ 3 

" Roxbury ------ 9 

" Charlestown - - - • • H 

" Chelsea --.---- __J_ 

Total 1,415 

Ninety-two hydrants have been taken out and replaced 
by new or repaired ones. One hundred and twenty-three 
hydrant boxes have been renewed this year. There are some 
hydrants in the city that are connected directly with the 
stop-cocks, which cannot be used when the stop-cocks are 
shut, this being often the case when repairs are being made. 

It would be a great improvement to connect the hydrants 
directly with the main pipes, independently of the stop-cocks. 
One at the corner of Bedford and Washington streets has 
been changed in this way during the past year. Two im- 
portant hydrants have been taken out to make way for build- 
ings on Otis and Winthrop places. As a substitute, in part, for 
the loss of these two hydrants, a pipe has been laid, connect- 
ing the six-inch pipe in new Devonshire Street with the old 
fire reservoir in Franklin Street. This reservoir being kept 
full, in case of fire, the Steam Fire Engines would have the 
advantage of the water in it, in addition to the water ob- 
tained from the hydrants in Franklin Street. 

In case of fire, the Steam Fire Engines require a larger 
supply of water than the small hydrants can deliver for their 
use. 

In order to remedy this, and to keep up a sufficient supply 
for the Steam Fire Engines, larger hydrants should be put 
in. Pipes should also be laid to connect the main pipes with 
all the old brick reservoirs under the streets, so that the 
reservoirs can be kept full, and whenever a fire occurs in 
5 



1 8 APPENDIX. 

any locality where the hydrants cannot give the Steam Fire 
Engines a full supply, this difficulty would be remedied or 
partially so, by these Reservoirs. 

The usual care has been taken with the hydrants. At the 
present time they are in good order for the winter, having 
been packed with salt hay. 

Stop-cocks. 

The stop-cocks are in a good condition, with but three 
exceptions, one 16-inch on Milk Street, one 16-inch on Brooks 
Street, East Boston, and one 6-inch in Dover Street, that 
should be renewed in the spring. During the year all the 
stop-cocks have been cleaned and oiled; two 36-inch stop- 
cocks, one 24-inch, and three 12-inch have been renewed. 

Forty-eight new stop-cocks have been put in and covered 
by new boxes, and seventy stop-cock boxes have been 
renewed. 



APPENDIX. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1861. 





DIAMETER IN 


INCHES. 




NUMBER OF 


























40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 
50 


6 
93 


4 
39 


2 
36 


li 




18 
2 


25 


96 


8 


67 


40 


30 












1 
5 

ft 






1 
6 
1 


7 
7 


2 
6 










9 


2 






6 


6 


















3 




2 
















6 


1 


9 
4 


8 
91 


2 


5 

1 


7 
1 


12 

7 


7 
3 


4 










?, 


3 


4 




1 


2 


8 


19 


14 








3 


2 




2 




2 


4 


2 
5 

8 


4 
2 
1 














1 


2 


10 


1 


4 


3 


2 
















1 




2 


10 


4 
















6 


9 










250 










2 
2 


2 
2 
4 


8 
9 
6 


6 
3 








1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


5 










9 

2 


6 


5 

2 


2 




3 


10 


22 


9 
















• 












Hydrants. 






16 Wilrnarth. 






20 Lowell. 






50 Ballardvale (old ones). 






4 Wharf. 






3 New York pattern. 






1 Sample pattern. 






31 Lowell 


pal 


iter 


o. (r 


tear 


lyfi 


nis' 


led 


). 









20 APPENDIX. 

For Hydrants. 6 bends, 12 lengtheners, 5 frames, 9 covers, 
13 nipples, 13 valve-seats, 43 stuffing-boxes, 12 caps, 11 
wharf hydrant covers, 25 unfinished hydrants, 40 lbs. com- 
position wharf hydrant castings, 70 lbs. hydrant do., 80 
straps. 

For Stop -cocks. 6 friction wheels, 19 clamps, 7 stands and 
gears for 36 and 30-inch stop-cocks, 3 36-inch composition 
screws, 2 30-inch do., 2 24-inch do., 126 lbs. composition 
castings for 6-inch, 18 composition rings for 12-inch, 13 
plungers and 19 screws for 6-inch, 6 screws for 4-inch, 8 
4-inch stopcocks partly finished, 3 flanges for 12-inch, 7 
screws for 12-inch, 51 lbs. composition plungers for 6-inch, 
3 plungers for 16-inch, 2 do. for 12-inch; 4 boxes bolts 1 
|-inch, 1 box f-inch do., 1 box £-inch do., 1 40-inch valve ring, 
13 frames and covers, 7 caps. 

For Service Pipe. 19-inch air cocks, 11 1-inch union do., 
5 1-inch T do., 40 f-inch union do., 6 f-inch T do., 219 f-inch 
union do., 17 f-inch T do., 7 f-inch Y do., 160 f-inch flange 
do., 5 f-inch straight do., 75 short f-inch do., 235 lbs. com- 
position castings for 1-inch cocks, 70 lbs. composition cast- 
ings for f-inch do., 833 lbs. composition castings for f-inch 
do., 200 lbs. cocks of various kinds for repairs, 6 2 J inch 
hose couplings, 59 1-inch union do., 52 f-inch do., 131 f-inch 
do., 260 lbs. couplings for various kinds of connections, 150 
couplings, various sizes, 42 uprights, 27 straight boxes, 15 
Y do., 7 T do., 50 square do., 30 caps, 3 1-inch flanges, 5 

1 J-inch connections, 10 1-inch connection couplings, 31 |-inch 
do., 15 f-inch do. 

Meters. 4 2-inch composition meters, Worthington's pat- 
tern, 54 1-inch do., 14 f-inch do., 1 3-inch iron do., 6 1-inch 
iron do., 6 f-inch iron do., 1 Scotch (1-inch capacity) iron, 6 
do. f-inch iron, 44 Huse's pattern, condemned. 

Stock for Meters. 933 lbs. lead, 40 lbs. composition caps, 

2 reducers (26 lbs. composition), 192 lbs. composition cast- 



APPENDIX. 21 

ings, 2 1-inch cocks, 1 do. 1 J-inch, 2 composition flanges, 4 
1-inch nipples, 14 f-inch do., 4 sets 2-inch couplings, 22 sets 
1-inch couplings, 18 sets f-inch do., 3 lbs. brass wire, 2 re- 
ducers, 4x3, cast iron. 

Lead Pipe. 525 lbs. 2£- inch, 1,668 lbs. 1-inch, 1,835 lbs. 
f-inch, 1,445 lbs. f-inch, 198 lbs. block tin pipe, 148 lbs. 
block tin pipe for thawing purposes. 

Pig Lead, §c. 4,000 lbs. pig lead, 700 lbs. sheet lead, 37 
lbs. solder, 13 lbs. block tin. 

Blacksmith Shop. 1,272 lbs. bar iron, 6,776 lbs. working 
pieces, 332 lbs. bar steel, 186 lbs. pieces do., 1,419 lbs. old 
bolts, 700 lbs. scrap iron, ^ ton Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. 8 hydrant boxes, finished, 15 do. unfin- 
ished, 14 top pieces, 2,000 feet spruce lumber, 300 feet oak 
plank, 1 cask spikes, 300 feet boards, 1 cask nails, 1 set 
carpenter's tools. 

Stable. 1,200 lbs. English hay, 14 bushels grain, 3 horses, 
3 sets of harness, 4 wagons (1 old), 1 chaise, 1 pung, stable 
utensils, &c. 

Tools, fyc. 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom derrick, 4 pairs 
crank derricks and 2 pairs shears with apparatus belonging 
to same, tools for laying main and service pipes and the 
repairs of the same, the usual tools for machine shop, black- 
smith's and plumber's shop, for reservoirs, fountains, &c. ; 
also the office furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 1 large proving press, 5 swivel 
patterns, 1 swing stage and irons, capstan frame and levers, 
1 large copper ball, 1 composition cylinder and 2 jets, 1 
6-inch do. and 2 jets, 1 reducer and 2 sets 12-inch plates, 2 
4-inch do., 3 composition reel jets, 6 cast-iron jets, 1 drink- 
ing fountain. 

Miscellaneous. 5 man-hole plates, 6 covers for do., 3,500 
lbs. old cast iron, 3,000 feet old lumber, 1,000 bricks, £ cord 
wood, 14 bundles gasket, 1 barrel oil, 25 baskets charcoal, 



22 APPENDIX. 

300 lbs. composition chips, lot of old machinery from Marl- 
boro', lot of patterns for stop-cocks, hydrants, proving presses, 
fountain jets, pipes, <fec, lot of old bolts, drills, screws, &c, 
£ carboy vitriol, 14 heads for proving press. 

There are a great many things stored at Beacon Hill 
Eeservoir that are of no use to the Water Department, and 
might be sold whenever an opportunity occurs. 



Respectfully submitted. 



JAMES SLADE, 

City Engineer, fyc. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Office of Water Registrar, City Hall, 
Boston, January 1, 1861. 

E. Johnson, Esq., Pres. of the Cocldtuate Water Board : — 

Sir : I herewith submit the following Report, prepared 
according to the 16th section of the ordinance, passed Oct. 
31, 1850. 

The total number of Abater takers, now entered for the 
year 1861, is 24,316, being an increase, since January 1, 1860, 
of 1,045. 

During the year there has been 1,085 cases where the 
water has been shut off; of these, 1,067 were for non-pay- 
ment of water rates, and 18 were for unnecessary waste of 
water. 

The number of cases where the water has been turned on 
is 1,661; of these, 759 were cases which had been shut off 
for non-payment of rates; 11 were shut off for unnecessary 
waste, and 891 were turned on for the first time. 

The total amount received from December 31, 1859, to 

January 1, 1861, is $334,544 86 

Of the above there was received for water 

used in previous years the sum 

of - - - - - - $1,041 91 

Leaving the receipts for water 

used during the year 1860, the 

sum of $333,502 95 

Amount carried forward, $334,544 86 



24 APPENDIX. 

Amount brought forward - - - $334,544 86 
In addition to the above, there has been 
received for letting on the water, in cases 
where it had been turned off for non-pay- 
ment of rates, the sum of - - - - 1,517 50 

Total amount $336,062 36 



The increased amount of receipts in 1860, 

over the previous year, is - 
The amount of assessments now made for the 

present year is - 
The estimated amount of income from the 

sales of water during the year 1861 is 
The expenditures of my Department during the 

year 1860 have been 

The items of this expenditure are as follows : — 

Paid Chas. L. Bancroft, for services as clerk 

" Stephen Badlam, " " 

" Chas. E. Dunham, for services as inspector 

" Noah P. Burgess, " " 

" Rand & Avery, for printing - 

" Eayres & Fairbanks, for stationery 

" M. Lyon, for distributing water bills 

« J. R. Barry " " - - - 

" Geo. S. Carpenter " " - • 



$19,771 


39 


278,389 


20 


350,000 


00 


3,429 


75 


$867 


50 


867 


50 


743 


50 


678 


50 


110 


50 


94 


25 


24 


00 


22 


00 


22 


00 



Amount - $3,429 75 



APPENDIX. 



25 



Statement showing the number of Houses, Stores, Steam Engines, 
fyc, in the City of Boston supplied with Cochituate water to 
the 1st of January, 186 1, with the amount of Water Rates 
paid for 1860. 



7,890 dwelling-houses, 


from 


$6 


00 to 


$31 


00 


$205,524 50 


14 boarding-houses, 


a 


33 


00 to 


98 


00 


774 57 


• 104 model-houses, \ 


rom 


14 


00 to 


210 


00 


3,678 68 


5 lodging-houses, 


a 


15 


00 to 


78 


00 


145 00 


3,318 stores and shops 


a 


6 


00 to 


81 


54 


26,407 67 


265 offices, 


a 


6 


00 to 


20 


50 


, 1,856 00 


17 banks, 


it 


6 


00 to 


16 


50 


194 50 


198 buildings, 


u 


15 


00 to 


207 


50 


6,816 11 


48 churches, 


a 


6 


00 to 


20 


00, 


361 50 


29 halls, 


i: 


6 


00 to 


26 


50 


328 67 


17 private schools, 


ti 


6 


00 to 


30 


50 


191 50 


3 theatres, 


U 


15 


00 to 


93 


75 


151 25 


4 greenhouses, 












34 50 


1 custom-house, 












156 00 


1 post-office, 












25 00 


2 hospitals, 


a 


21 


67 to 


178 


00 


408 26 


2 medical colleges, 












82 00 


1 State house, 












134 50 


3 libraries, 


it 


6 


00 to 


35 


00, 


51 00 


7 asylums, 


a 


35 


00 to 


242 


48, 


531 13 


5 markets, 


a 


30 


00 to 


64 


00, 


236 75 


48 market stalls, 


a 


6 


00 to 


10 


00, 


319 50 


156 cellars, 


a 


6 


00 to 


12 


00, 


923 29 


43 hotels, 


a 


15 


00 to 


863 


05, 


5,190 81 


386 restaurants & saloom 


, § 


00 to 


41 


00, 


4,647 06 


2 club-houses 


a 


15 


00 to 


50 


00, 


100 00 


8 bathing-houses, 


a 


15 


00 to 


130 


00, 


371 67 


789 stables, 


it 


5 


00 to 


420 


00, 


9,584 29 


76 shops & engines, 


a 


10 


00 to 


284 


42, 


7,668 47 



Amount carried forward, 
6 



,894 18 



APPENDIX. 

Amount brought forward, $276,894 18 

9 fo 'dries & engines, " 12 58 to 462 00, 1,150 08 

1 forge, 453 62 
12 print'g & engines. " 15 00 to 93 20, 917 63 
30 factories & engines," 25 50 to 578 40, 5,601 13 
28 factories, 513 82 

3 gaslight co's, « 79 68 to 481 20, 985 44 

2 sugar refineries, 3,698 26 
17 mills and engines,from 20 OOto 1,507 20, 4,691 13 
22 engines, " 12 00 to 150 72, 697 17 
49 printing offices " 6 00 to 28 00, 648 04 

9 distilleries, " 46 95 to 691 50, 3,204 68 

11 breweries, " 10 00 to 264 00, 1,262 88 

4 bleacheries, " 9 00 to 10 00, 46 00 
1 laundry, 25 00 

1 pottery, 20 42 
58 bakeries, " 6 00 to 12 00, 530 50 

2 bak'ies & engines, " 20 00 to 63 12, 118 40 

7 build'gs& engines, « 29 90 to 205 56, 1,397 10 

1 ship yard & engines, 127 50 
11 ship yards, from 10 00 to 18 00, 132 00 

4 dry docks, " 15 00 to 57 00, 149 23 

564 hose, " 3 00 to 10 00, 1,744 00 

26 fountains, " 3 00 to 15 00, 154 33 

13 packinghouses, " 9 OOto 30 00, 211 00 

8 railroad comp's, " 75 00 to 1,886 64, 5,618 61 

3 ferry companies, " 2,392 76 
36 steamboats, « 15 00 to 700 00, 6,715 20 

234 schools, " 6 00 to 16 00, 1,624 00 
20 engine, hose, and 

hook &ladder houses, 16 OOto 21 00, 350 00 

8 police stations, from 15 00 to 80 00, 367 00 

2 city stables, 103 75 
6 fire alarm motors, « 10 00 to 15 00, 65 00 

Amount carried forward, $322,609 86 



APPENDIX. 



27 



Amount brought forward. 


$322,609 86 


I Court House, 


95 00 


1 City Hall, 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall, 


40 00 


1 City Building, 


37 50 


1 Probate Office, 


31 00 


1 office (at City Scales), 


9 00 


2 offices (Niles Block), 


30 00 


1 Dead House, 


10 00 


1 Public Library, 


50 00 


1 House of Correction, 


462 00 


1 Lunatic Hospital, 


225 00 


1 Faneuil Hall Market (urinals, &c), 


70 00 


1 street sprinkling, 


400 00 


1 offal station, 


150 00 


1 Common Sewer Dept. (making mortar, 


&c), 75 00 


1 house (in Vine Street), 


7 00 


1 steamer Henry Morrison, 


192 56 


1 Jail for Suffolk County, 


243 00 


Massachusetts State Prison, 


817 74 


Milldam Company, 


300 00 


Contractors for supplying shipping, 


3,431 45 


Filling gasometer, 


59 46 


Sprinkling streets, 


121 86 


Building purposes, 


1,575 88 


Skating park, 


1,500 00 


Steamboat hose, 


283 50 


Filling boilers, &c, 


11 64 


City of Charlestown, 


470 00 


Mass. Mechanics Charitable Association Fair, 25 00 


1 Aquarial Garden, 


25 00 


1 United States Court House, 


94 50 




$333,502 95 



28 



APPENDIX. 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received 
from the sales of Cochituate water, since its introduction into 
the city, Oct. 25, 1848: — 



From October 25, 1848, to January 1, 1850 



luary 1, 1850, to 


" 


a 


1851 


" " 1851, to 


u 


a 


1852 


" " 1852, to 


u 


u 


1853 


" " 1853, to 


a 


a 


1854 


" " 1854, to 


" 


u 


1855 


" " 1855, to 


u 


u 


1856 


" " 1856, to 


a 


a 


1857 


" " 1857, to 


u 


cc 


1858 


" " 1858, to 


a 


a 


1859 


" " 1859, to 


a 


u 


1860 


" " 1860, to 


u 


u 


1861 



$72,043 20 
98,367 90 
161,299 72 
179,486 25 
196,352 32 
217,007 51 
266,302 77 
282,651 84 
289,328 83 
302,409 73 
314,808 97 
334,544 86 

2,714,603 90 



Statement showing the average daily consumption of Cochituate 
water in the leading hotels, together with the amount of water- 
rate charged to each respectively. 





Galls, per 


day. 


Amount. 


Tremont House, from October 1, 1859, to January 1, 1861 


25,230 




$1,740.93 


Revere House, " " " " 


24,410 




1,728.54 


Parker House, " " " " . . . . 


20,515 




1,459.79 


American House, from January 1, 1860, " " . . . . 


16,448 




981.92 


United States Hotel, " " " " . . . . 


11,725 




979.74 


Winthrop House, from October 1, 1859, " " 


7,537 




862.23 


Marlboro' House, from January 1, 1860, " " 


8,261 




711.30 


Coolidge House, " " " " .... 


4,462 




606.66 


Pearl St. House, " " " " .... 


3,131 




454.49 


Totals 




$9,525.60 





This amount of $9,526.60 for the use of Chchituate water 
in the above-named hotels, remains uncollected, owing to an 



APPENDIX. 



29 



injunction having been procured by the proprietors of these 
establishments to prevent the water being shut off from their 
premises. Sept. 15, 1860, the case was argued in the Su- 
preme Court, but as yet no decision has been made known. 



Statement showing the number and kind of water fixtures con- 
tained within the premises of water-takers in the city in 1858, 
1859, and 1860. 



1858 


1859 


1860 




4,326 


4,475 


4,714 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or sewer. 


26,631 


29,190 


31,098 


Sinks. 


7,729 


9,358 


10,141 


Wash-hand basins. 


3,334 


3,498 


3,910 


Bathing-tubs. 


3,327 


3,699 


4,210 


Pan water-closets. 


3,845 


4,476 


5,071 


Hopper water-closets. 


173 


409 


583 


Self-acting water-closets. 


654 


910 


1,070 


Urinals. 


2,015 


2,450 


3,006 


Wash tubs. These are permanently attached to the buildings. 


12 


21 


13 


Shower-baths in houses where there is no tub. 


9 


10 


10 


Rams. 


612 


612 


594 


Private hydrants. 


77 


110 


106 


Slop hoppers. 


52,744 


59,218 


64,526 





PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF TBI 

CITY OF BOSTON 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates HalL 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than H days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.