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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"



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City Document, — No. 9. 



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REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF EOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1861. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



In Oommon Council, January 9, 1862. 
Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized to 
make their Annual Eeport in print. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

JOSHUA D. BALL, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 13, 1862. 

Concurred. 

THOMAS P. EICH, Chairman. 

Approved. 

J. M. WIGHTMAN, Mai/ar. 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, ) 
Boston, January 15, 1862. j 

To THE City Council : 

The Cochituate Water Board, in submitting to the 
City Council their Annual Report for the year 1861, 
regard it as a matter of congratulation that the Works 
are in a safe and efficient condition ; that the various 
subordinate officers connected with the administration 
of this important department have been faithful in 
the discharge of their respective duties ; and that the 
quantity and quality of water supplied to the citizens 
have been entirely satisfactory. 

The expenditures and receipts on account of the 
Water Works to January 1, 1862, may be stated as 
follows : — 

Amounts paid by the original Commissioners, and by 
the Water Boards from the time the Works came under 
the control of the latter . . ^5,580,860 64 

Sundry payments by the City and dis- 
count and interest on loans, 3,682,295 65 



Amoun t carried forward^ ^9, 26 3, 156 29 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

Amount brought forward^ ^9,263,156 29 

From which there should be deducted 
sundry credits by the city, and 
amounts received for Water rates . 3,138,835 65 

^6,124,320 64 

Leaving the actual cost of the Works on January 1, 
1862, the sum of ^6,124,320.64. 

The receipts for Water used in the year 1861 was 
^342,138.75, being an increase over the income of the 
previous year of more than thirty thousand dollars, 
and being about five and one half per cent, on the cost 
of the Works, as above stated. 

The assessments for the year 1862, payable in Janu- 
ary, amount to ^298,755. 19. 

The estimated amount of income from sales of Water 
during the year 1862, is ^375,000.00. 

By reference to the Report of the Clerk, hereto an- 
nexed, it will be seen that there has been drawn from 
the treasury by the Board, during the year, the sum 
of ^73,977 29 

Of this, there was drawn for 

the new main pipe, ^334 76 

For raising the pipes on Tre- 

mont and Dover Streets, 601 50 
For laying pipe in Beacon 

Street ... 506 78 

For extension of the Works 38,615 50 40,058 54 



Leaving as the ordinary expenses of 

the year §33,918 75 



KEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 7 

The increase of expense for the year was caused by 
repairs upon the line of pipe to East Boston, and upon 
Beacon tlill Reservoir, which together amounted to 
the sum of g 4,200. 

The embankments, culverts, waste weirs, and bridges 
connected with the aqueduct in the Western Division, 
have all been thoroughly repaired during the year, and 
are now in good condition. 

The Superintendent of this Division has several 
times thoroughly examined the interior of the aque- 
duct, and on one occasion was accompanied by mem- 
bers of the Board. 

In August last the interior received a thorough 
cleansing throughout its whole extent. No new cracks 
were discovered, but the Superintendent reports that 
some of the old ones have enlarged. One in Brighton 
will require particular attention, but it is obvious that 
repairs of this sort are attended with great difficulty, 
as the Brookline Reservoir is not large enough to keep 
the City supplied while the water is shut off from the 
aqueduct for the purpose of repairing the same. 

The Superintendent of the Eastern Division has 
presented his Annual Report, which is annexed. The 
usual amount of iron pipe has not been laid in this 
division, owing to the limited amount of building in 
the city, while the repairs have been more than usual. 
At Chelsea Creek it was discovered that the worms had 
destroyed the woodwork that supports the pipes, to a 
considerable extent, and immediate repairs were deemed 
necessary, and were made. At Warren Bridge a new 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

outside fender has been put on the entire length, and 
made secure. 

Repairs on the Beacon Hill Reservoir were com- 
menced, but have been postponed on account of the 
difficulty of procuring cement. They will probably be 
resumed in the spring. 

The aggregate length of pipes laid from the com- 
mencement of the Works, to January 1, 1862, is over 
one hundred and thirty-one miles. 

The line of pipe to East Boston has been repaired. 
The bridges and the box across the creek between 
Chelsea and East Boston were very much decayed, and 
the Board desire to call particular attention to the sub- 
ject of the East Boston supply. If this pipe across 
the creek should give out from any cause, the citizens 
of this portion of the city would be wholly deprived 
of water, for the pipe which is under water cannot be 
repaired. We recommend the laying of another pipe 
across Meridian Street bridge, of a larger size than 
the present one. 

By the Act of the Legislature of this Common- 
wealth of 1860, (ch. 184,) the City was authorized to 
raise the dam at the outlet of Lake Cochituate to the 
height of 4we feet above the floor of Knight's flume 
(so called). In accordance with this Act the dam was 
raised, and in the judgment of this Board, we have 
now reached the greatest capacity of Lake Cochituate 
for the supply of water. In case the supply is insuffi- 
cient, recourse should be had to other sources, which 
may or may not be connected with this lake. 

To raise the lake any higher will require legisla- 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 9 

tive action, and would be attended with such expense, 
and with difficulties so great and so numerous that the 
Board are decidedly of the opinion that it will be a mis- 
taken policy to attempt it. 

The Board have visited the lake and made a careful 
examination, with the view of obtaining more water ; 
and after the most careful consideration of the whole 
subject, decided to connect Dudley Pond with the lake 
by an iron pipe about eight hundred feet in length. 
It was thought that a portion of the distance could be 
tunnelled, but upon examination this was found impos- 
sible, there being so much coarse gravel ; and it was 
found necessary to dig a trench, the deepest part of 
which is sixty feet. The estimated cost of this con- 
nection is less than ^14,000. 

With this addition to the source of supply there 
ought to be water enough for this City without any 
additional expense, and the Board are confident there 
would be, were it not for the wasteful use of the water 
in the city. This has been a topic of discussion in the 
various Water Reports for several years. The present 
Board have adopted energetic measures, by the aid of 
the police, in preventing this evil, and these measures 
have been attended with marked success. ' At the same 
time, the only efficient remedy must be found in the 
citizens themselves in the use of water, and in giving 
information of any wasteful use by others, or by the 
general adoption throughout the city of water-meters, 
and an entire change in the assessment and collection 
of water rates. 

The Board are satisfied that some methods of using 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

the water, heretofore allowed, are highly objectionable, 
and should be changed at once. One of these is the 
use of hopper water-closets. In order to test this 
manner of using the water, a meter was attached to a 
pipe that supplied five hopper water-closets at the 
Boston and Maine Railroad station, and in twenty-two 
days the meter indicated 543,187 gallons as the quan- 
tity consumed, or 24,690 gallons per day, which, at the 
tariiF-rate of two cents for each one hundred gallons 
per day for three hundred and sixty-five days, would 
amount to S 1,802.37. The amount actually charged 
in the tariff" now adopted for five hopper closets, in 
1861, was ^25! 

The Board have not hesitated to adopt a rule that 
no more water shall be supplied to hopper closets 
made on and after January 1, 1862. 

The Board also caused two meters to be attached to 
the factory of Messrs. Grover & Baker, with the fol- 
lowing results : In thirty-five days, the meter that 
supplied the engine of twenty-eight horse-power con- 
sumed 124,657 gallons, or 3,561 gallons per day, which, 
at the tariff"-rate of two cents for each one hundred 
gallons for one year, amounts to ^213.66. The amount 
paid for this engine in 1861 was ^217.76. 

The meter that supplied nine water-closets and six 
sinks, in the same establishment, indicated in thirty-five 
days, 698,565 gallons to have been used, or 19,959 gal- 
lons per day, which, at the tariff"-rate of two cents for 
each one hundred gallons for one year, amounts to 
S 1,197.36. The amount actually paid for these clos- 
ets and sinks for the year 1861, was $80 ! 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. H 

A meter was placed during the year in the house of 
the President of the Board, in Chestnut Street. The 
family consisted on an average of six persons, and the 
quantity of water used was the same as before the 
meter was placed there ; that is, no change was inten- 
tionally made in this respect. The result was, that for 
two hundred and forty-five days the quantity of water 
used was 20,670 gallons, — an average of eighty-four 
gallons per day, or 30,660 per annum, which, at the 
tariff-rate of six cents per one hundred gallons, amounts 
to ^18.39. The rate charged and paid for this house 
was ^21. From which it appears that the occupant 
actually paid more by the rate than he would have 
paid by actual measurement. 

These results speak for themselves, and show that 
some radical change in this enormous disparity be- 
tween the amount of water used, and paid for, is desir- 
able ; and it is quite certain that the most just, satis- 
factory, and equitable method of charging for the 
water, would be by actual measurement, so that each 
citizen may pay for just the quantity he uses. Hence 
many are ready to advocate the immediate introduction 
of water-meters over the whole city. Perhaps this 
may be the result in time. But there are practical dif- 
ficulties in this matter that deserve serious considera- 
tion before any such radical change is made ; and such 
a plan would require the expenditure of something 
like half a million of dollars at the present cost of 
water-meters. In certain cases, however, where a meas- 
urement of water seemed absolutely indispensable, the 
Board have caused meters to be introduced ; and 
during the year they have procured forty-two meters. 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

and have expended about three thousand dollars for 
this purpose. 

The Board are happy to be able to state that the 
change which was made in the tariff in regard to 
hotels, has been sustained by a decree of great impor- 
tance, made by the Supreme Judicial Court. The case 
was brought before the Court by the proprietor of the 
Parker House, in a bill in equity to restrain the City of 
Boston from cutting off the supply of Cochituate Water 
therefrom, or otherwise enforcing against the plaintiffs 
the water rates assessed upon them in the year 1859. 
The facts in the case were, that, under the provisions 
of the City Ordinance, the Water Board and Registrar 
put into a portion of the hotels of the city, including 
that of the plaintiffs', a water-meter, for the purpose of 
determining the quantity of water used therein ; that 
the water used in plaintiffs' hotel exceeded ten thou- 
sand gallons a day ; and the Water Registrar, under the 
direction of the Water Board, made an assessment 
thereon, for the quarter ending December 31, 1859, at 
the rate of two cents for each one hundred gallons ; 
that the amount of the assessment so made was 
^206.19; while, if made according to the provisions 
of the City Ordinance, applicable to hotels into which 
no meters have been put, it would have been only 
^57.40, and that the plaintiffs were notified, Decem- 
ber 27, 1859, that unless the amount assessed was paid 
within three days the water would be cut off. 

The counsel for the plaintiffs contended — 1. That 
the power to fix the price and rents of water was in 
the City Council alone, and could not be delegated to 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 13 

the Water Board or any other city officer. 2. That 
the citizens using water had a right to have the judg- 
ment and discretion of the City Council upon the price 
to be paid. 3. If the Ordinances were otherwise within 
the authority of the City Council, they were uncertain, 
unreasonable, and therefore void. 4. But the plaintiffs 
were charged several times as much under these pro- 
visions as under the price fixed by the City Council. 
5. Hotelkeepers using the same quantity might, under 
these provisions, be charged at rates differing as one to 
four, at the will of the Water Board or Water Regis- 
trar. 6. Even if the Ordinance was valid, this spe- 
cific water rate should have been assessed by the Reg- 
istrar, and not by the Water Board. 7. It should have 
been assessed on the last of January, for the year, and 
not quarterly. 

In the elaborate opinion of the Court, all these 
points were overruled, and it was decided, that upon 
a proper interpretation of the provisions of the stat- 
utes and ordinances bearing upon the subject, none of 
the objections urged by the plaintiffs against the pro- 
ceedings of the Water Board m fixing the price or 
rent to be paid for water taken by them, could be 
sanctioned. Judgment was accordingly rendered for 
the City. As this was a test case, the other hotel pro- 
prietors who had refused to pay the rates assessed, 
subsequently paid them, amounting to ^9,526.50. 

In concluding this Heport, the Board desire to call 
attention to a subject which has been alluded to in for- 
mer Reports, and that is the annexation of more terri- 
tory to the limits of the city. Of course this Board 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

have no right to refer to this subject in any other point 
of view than the one aiFecting the water supply. They 
believe the present Water Works are sufficient to sup- 
ply the present limits of this city and any population 
we are likely to have within our present territory ; but 
there will not be sufficient for the people in case other 
cities should be annexed ; and, in such an event, it will 
be indispensable to look to other sources of supply. 

It will be false economy and a great municipal error 
to obtain more service from the present Works than 
they will bear. They have been constructed with the 
view of performing a certain amount of supply. If an 
attempt is made to increase this amount, it will cer- 
tainly be attended by a disarrangement of the system, 
and to constant difficulties which may seriously impair 
the whole character of the Works. It will be far more 
economical for the citizens in case more territory is an- 
nexed, to consider at the same time what measures be 
taken for a further supply of water, than it will be to 
impair a system which now works to general satisfac- 
tion, and which is believed to be as good as any in the 
world. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EBENEZER JOHNSON, President. 
SAMUEL HALL, 
SAMUEL HATCH, 
GEORGE P. FRENCH, 
JABEZ FREDERICK, 
GEORGE DENNIE, 
L. MILES STANDISH. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the CocMtuate Water Board, from 
December 31, 1860, to January 1, 1862. 

Laying service pipe . . . . . . ^5 50 

Pipe yard, painting buildings, &c. . . . 52 19 

Taxes 218 59 

Fountains 303 98 

Stationery, (including stationery for Water Register 

and Superintendents) . . . . . . 189 79 

Damage to drains, in streets, &c. . . . 193 02 

Oil 159 80 

Printing, (including "Water Registrar's and Superin- 
tendent's) 526 64 

Miscellaneous expense, flowing skating grounds, pond 
on Public Garden, plans, &c., and expense of the 

Board 560 98 

New main pipe, cost of . . 304,991 83 

Deduct previous payments . 304,657 07 

334 76 
Repairing main pipe . . . . . 3,287 95 

Aqueduct repairs ....... 1,862 45 

Lake, raising lower dam and other repairs, 1,551 18 
Paid on account of connecting Dudley 

Pond with the lake . . . 2,757 02 

4,308 20 



Amowit carried forward, $ 12,003 85 



16 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



Amount hrought fm'ward, 


)$5 12,003 85 


Eepairing service pipe . . . 


2,094 40 


Eepairing streets . . . . . ' . 


. 2,357 63 


Eepairing hydrants ..... 


2,102 50 


Salaries 


. 8,405 33 


Office expenses 


1,758 05 


Off and on water . . ... 


. 2,848 76 


Wages proving yard ..... 


1,801 81 


Wages plumbing shop 


502 25 


Wages blacksmith shop .... 


776 48 


Wages laying main pipe . . . . 


. 2,993 63 


Wages laying service pipe .... 


2,729 97 


Beacon Hill Eeservoir, for labor, &c. 


. 1,900 14 


South Boston Eeservoir, for labor, &c.. 


97 24 


East Boston Eeservoir, for labor, &c. 


207 64 


Brookline Eeservoir, for labor, &c. 


712 45 


Service pipe ...... 


. 8,007 83 


Main pipe 


. 11,491 63 


Stable . . . . 


533 81 


Laying main pipe, for stock, &c. . 


1,327 79 


Blacksmith shop, for stock, &c. 


118 35 


Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 


. . 648 93 


Eepairing stop-cocks .... 


. 1,156 60 


Travelling expenses ..... 


344 53 


Tolls and ferriage .... 


140 03 


Postage and express 


38 34 


Tools 


540 67 


Eaising water pipes, on Tremont and 




Dover Streets .... 17,9 


99 76 


Deduct previous payments . . 17,3 


98 26 




601 50 


Carting 


146 00 


Hydrants 


722 06 


Proving yard, for stock, &c. 


957 7Q 


Stop-cocks 


955 11 


Amount carried forward, 


$71,023 07 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 17 

Amount hrov^ht forward, fj, 71,023 07 

Laying main pipe, on Beacon Street . 4,998 05 

Deduct previous payments . . 4,491 27 

^ ^ ^ 506 78 

Eents, for tool chest 39 00 

Meters 2,408 44 



73,977 29 



Less this amount drawn for new main . 334 76 
Less this amount drawn for raising pipe on 

Tremont and Dover Streets . . 601 50 

Less this amount drawn for laying pipe on 

Beacon Street ... . 506 78 



1,443 04 
72,534 25 



CASH PAID CITY TREASURER. 

Eeceived rent for Arches under Beacon Hill Eeser- 
voir 300 00 

Eeceived for account of land sold . . 130 00 
" " wood, $ 87 ; grass and pasture, 
^81 168 00 

Eeceived for old wagon . . . . 7 00 
'■ " Main pipe and laying (for 
Fire Department, &c.,) service pipe and 
laying, repairing, «&c., &c. . . 7,228 36 

Eeceived for off and on water for re- 
pairs 1,434 75 

Eeceived for off and on water for 

"Waste and fines . . 1,350 00 

Eeceived for off and on water for 

non-payment . . . 1,431 50 

4,216 25 
Less this amount for non-pay- 
ment, which was paid City 
Treasurer . . . 1,431 50 

2,784 75 

10,618 11 

^^^^''^^ 2 ^61,916 14 



18 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



Amount of expenditures 



^72,534 25 



EXTENSION 

Oil 

Laying service pipe . 
Wages, proving yard . 
Wages, plumbing shop 
Wages, blacksmith shop 
Wages, laying main pipe . 
Wages, laying service pipe . 
Service pipe 

Main pipe .... 
Stable .... 
Laying main pipe 
Blacksmith shop, stock, &c. 
Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 
Tolls and ferriage 

Tools 

Carting .... 
Hydrants .... 
Proving yard . 
Stop-cocks .... 
Meters .... 
Lake, Dudley Pond . I 
Lower dam, &c. 

Aqueduct repairs 

Amount of annual expense 



OF THE WORK. 

. ^159 80 
5 50 
. 1,801 81 
360 00 
550 00 
2,993 63 
. 2,729 97 
8,007 83 
. 11,491 63 
350 00 
. 1,327 79 
118 35 
200 00 
65 00 
150 00 
120 00 
722 06 
. . 800 00 
955 11 
1,800 00 
; 2,757,02 
950.00 

3,707 02 

200 00 



38,615 50 
$33,918 75 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



19 



Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works, to 
January 1, 1862. 

Amount drawn by the Commissioners 



3 


. , ^4,043,718 21 


1850 


366,163 89 


1851 


141,309 23 


1852 . 


89,654 20 


1853 


89,854 03 


1854 


80,182 35 


1855 


63,866 33 


1856 . 


81,429 35 


1857 


96,631 25 


1858 


76,006 01 


1859 . 


385,652 47 


1860 . 


146,304 55 


1861 


73,977 29 




5,735,049 16 



Amount 


paid the City 


Treasurer 






"by the Commissioners 


^47,648 38 




Am't paid by Water Board, 1850, 


8,153 52 












' 1851, 


5,232 38 












' 1852, 


15,869 12 












' 1853, 


4,621 40 












' 1854, 


12,423 29 












' 1855, 


9,990 38 












' 1856, 


7,840 43 












' 1857, 


13,750 00 












' 1858, 


9,200 00 












' 1359, 


5,554 00 












' 1860, 


3,287 51 












' 1861, 


10,618 11 








154,188 52 




J. 


^.m(nmt c 


arried 


forward, 




^5,580,860 64 



20 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 9. 

Amount h'ouglit forward, ^5,580,860 64 

Sundry payments by tlie City, 65,758 02 

Discount and interest on loans, 3,616,537 63 

3,682,295 65 

9,263,156 29 
Sundry credits by tbe City, 58,907 79 

Amount received for water rates, 3,079,927 86 

3,138,835 65 
36,124,320 64 



SAMUEL N. DYEK, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, January 5, 1862. 
Ebenezbr Johnson, Esq., Pres. of the Qochituate Water Board: 
Sir : In compliance to the Rules and Regulations of the Water 
Board, I present the Annual Report of the general condition of 
matters connected with the Eastern Division. There has not 
heen the usual numher of pipes laid the past year, OAving to the 
small amount of building that has been going on. Tliere has 
also been less call for the extension of the main and service 
pipes. The repairs for the past season have been more than 
usual. Having time to attend to it, all of the small matters that 
have been deferred have been brought up and put in good condi- 
tion. Among the most important repairs were those at Chelsea 
Creek. Upon examination in the spring, it was found that the 
worms had destroyed the woodworlc that supported the pipe, to 
such an extent that immediate repairs Avere required. Piles were 
driven by the side of the old ones, and sawed off low enough to 
put in timber 12 X 1^ as caps, and then wedged up to the pipes, 
and properly secured. The old bearings were not disturbed. A 
new plank box has been built on both sides of the creek, and ad- 
ditional piles have been driven to protect it from vessels and the 
ice. At the Warren Bridge the outside fender was so much de- 
cayed as to be unsafe, and a new one has been put on the entire 
length of the bridge, together with new piles and braces to make 
it perfectly secure. 



22 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



Meservoirs. 

Eepairs on the Beacon Hill Eeservoir were commenced this 
fall. Not being able to procure suitable cement, it has been 
postponed until spring. A very favorable result was shown by 
the work done on it. The reservoirs at South and East Boston 
remain the same as they were last year. A drain has been laid 
on Brooks Street to take the waste water from the banks of the 
East Boston Eeservoir. An average of sixteen feet of water 
is kept there, that being as much as is prudent to retain. The 
water is confined in the three reservoirs at the present time as a 
reserve in case of accident to the pipes, or an extensive fire. 

Everything connected with this division of the works is in good 
condition, so far as it is possible to know. 

Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Pipes laid in 1861. 



In what Streets. 



Berkley. 



Rutland 

Sharon 

Public Garden. 

Newbury 

Montgomery .. 

Charles 

Jay 

Fruit 

Albion 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPEE. 
Tremont and 



Total 12 inches in Boston , 



West of Tremont 

Harrison Avenue and Albany. 

From Beacon 

Arling-ton and Berkley 

West of Tremont 

Cambridge and Fruit 

Berkley and 

North Grove and Charles 

Dover and Chapman 



Total 6 inches in Boston , 



Camden Place East of Washington 

Walnut Place East of Washington 

Tennyson Street jWest of Church 

Public Garden i For Fountains 

Public Garden | From Arlington 

Worcester From Harrrison Avenue. 

For 20 Fire Reservoirs... 



Sixth 

J'irst O and P 

Second IK and L. 



Total 4 inches in Boston 

SOUTH BOSTON. 
C and D 



Amotmt carried forward. 



430 
430 



612 
672 
550 
320 
87 
224 
600 
328 
300 

3,693 



255 
255 

18 
217 
104 
300 
252 

1,401 



275 
331 

72 



Remarks. 



This was renewed. 



For Hospital. 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 23 

Statement of Pipes, continued. 



In what Streets. 



O 

N 

James 

K 

Third 

Ei'g'htii 

Dorchester Avenue 

Tudor 

First 

Tudor 

Glover Court 



Border . . 
Marginal , 



Between what Streets. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Amount brought forioard 

Fourth and Sixth 

Fourth and Fifth 

Fourth and Thomas 

Second and Tliird 

K and L 

First and Second 

Gandl 

Dorcliester St. and Dorchester Line. 

Total 6 inches in South Boston. 



C and D 

O andP 

DandE 

From Ward Street . 



Total 4 inches in South Boston. 



EAST BOSTON. 

Sturtevant's Wharf 

Eastern Railroad Wharf . . 
For 4 Fire Reservoirs 



Total 4 inches in East Boston. 



678 
482 
136 
118 
319 
673 
150 
272 
820 

3,648 



150 

550 

53 

753 



Remarks. 



For Crystal Gl. Co. 



For Eastern R. R. 



EECAPITULATION. 



Section. 


1851. 


Diameter in inches. 




12 


6 


4 






430 


3,693 

6 

3,648 

11 


1,401 


Boston Proper 




26 








644 


South Boston 






3 








753 


East Boston 








3 














430 


7,341 
17 


2,798 
35 




Sums of Stop-cocks 



24 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



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EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 25 

Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1861. 





Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


a 




Length 




Length 




Length 




Length 


i 


Number. 


in 


Number. 


in 


Number. 


in 


Number. 


in 


5 




Feet. 




Feet. 




Feet. 




Feet. 


1 


8 


370 


2 


246 


1 


6 


11 


622 


I 


7 


370 


2 


111 


1 


51 


8 


532 


1 


284 


10,337 


136 


3,935 


45 


1,649 


465 


15,921 


3 


21 


072 


89 


2,628 


13 


433 


123 


3,733 




-A-gg'i 








607 


20,808 











Making the total number up to January 1, 1862 23,852 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1861. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



WHERE. 40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


6 


4 


2 


u 


1 


5 


h 


f 


Total 


Boston Proper. 


4 


4 


2 




4 


2 


9 
2 
3 

14 


35 
4 
1 

40 


28 
1 
3 


25 


47 


15 
6 


3 


1 


240 
44 
10 


419 
57 








1 
3 





5 
9 


1 
3 


1 




1 




32 




4 


4 








Totals 


32 


26 


47 


21 


4 


1 


300 


508 



Of leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches in diame- 
ter and upwards, eighty-five were caused by the loosening of 
lead in the joints, seven by defective pipes, seven by defective 
stop-cocks, eight by settling of earth, two by frost. Total, one 
hundred and nine in pipes of four inches and upwards. 

Of the leaks that have occurred in service and two-inch pipes, 
are as follows : One hundred and twenty-two were caused by the 
settling of earth, thirty-eight by stiff connections, nineteen stopped 
by rust, twenty by frost, forty-one by defective pipes, twenty-six 
by defective couplings, sixty-four stopped by fish, fifteen by de- 
fective cocks, eleven gnawed by rats, twelve struck by picks. 



26 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



fourteen defective joints, nine by digging drains, four stopped by 
gasket, three by cocks blowing out, one by tenants. Total, three 
hundred and ninety-nine, in service and two-inch pipes, showing 
a decrease in the whole number of leaks for the past year of 
eighty-four. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850^1861. 





LEAKS IN PIPES OP A DIAMETER OF 


YEAR. 


Four inches and upwards. 


Less than four inches. 


Total. 


1850 


32 


72 


104 


1851 


64 


173 


237 


1852 


82 


241 


323 


1853 


85 


260 


345 


1864 


74 


280 


354 


1855 


75 ... 


219 


294 


1856 


75 


232 


307 


1857 


85 . 


278 


363 


1858 




rt?>4 


401 


1859 


! 

82 449 


531 


I860 


134 458 


592 


1861 


109 i 399 


508 







Hydrants. 
During the year thirty-six new hydrants have been established, 
as follows : Fifteen in the City proper, fourteen in South Boston, 
four in East Boston, and three in Roxbury, 

Total number of hydrants established up to January 1st, 
1862: — 

In Boston Proper . . . • . 938 

" South Boston 301 

" East Boston 179 

" Brookline . . . . . . 3 

" Eoxbury 12 

*' Charlestown ...... 11 

" Chelsea 7 

Total 1,451 



KEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 27 

Seventy hydrants have "been taken out for repairs, and replaced 
by new or repaired ones. One hundred and twenty -nine hydrant 
boxes have been renewed. Two important hydrants at South 
Boston, (corner of 4th and A Streets, and 4th and D Streets,) that 
was taken from the 12-inch stop-cocks, have been changed, so as 
to come direct from the pipes, thus doing away with the necessity 
of shutting off the 20-inch main line on 4th Street, to make 
any repairs on them. 

The hydrant in May Place has been taken out at the request 
of the owner of the property where it was located. A change 
has been made in the hydrants, so as to adapt them to the Steam 
Fire Engines, as was recommended last year, and all the 
hydrants set in future will be of the improved pattern. In con- 
nection with the hydrants, additional precaution has been taken 
to insure an abundance of water in case of fire, by connecting the 
following Fire Keservoirs with the main pipes : — 

Devonshire, corner of Franklin Street. 

Franklin, " " Hawley " 

State, " " Congress " 

Southac, " " West Cedar Street. 

Bowdoin Square. 

Sudbury, opposite Adams Street. 

Tremont Street, opposite Pemberton Square. 

Tremont " corner of School Street. 

Tremont " " " Park " 

Washington, corner of Milk " 

Washington, " " Franklin " 

Washington, " " Avon Place. 

Liberty Square " " Kilby Street. 

Broad, " " State " 

Batterymarch, " " Broad " 

Clinton, " " Fulton " 

South Market, opposite centre of Quincy Market. 

Hanover Street, " No. 96. 

Haymarket Square, opposite No. 6. 



28 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

Endicott, at the j unction of Salem Street. 

Maverick Square. 

Liverpool, corner of Maverick Street. 

Central Square. 

Lexington Street, opposite Lexington Place. 

Stop-Cocks. 
The stop-cocks are all in order, and have been properly cleaned 
and oiled. Fifty-two new stop-cocks have been put in and 
covered by new boxes, and seventy-three stop-cock boxes have 
been renewed. There are some important lines that need addi- 
tional stop-cocks put in. Not having them on hand it was de- 
ferred until next season. 

The work at the shop has been delayed the past season by not 
having sufficient power to carry our machinery. This has been 
remedied by putting in a steam engine, suitable to carry all of 
the works, and w^e now shall now be enabled to build the stop- 
cocks and hydrants without any delay. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOxlED. 



29 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1862. 



NUMBER OP 



Pipes 

Blow-off Branches. 

Y Branches 

3-Way Branches... 
4- Way Branches... 

Flange Pipes 

Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves 

Caps 

Eeducers 

Bevel Hubs 

Curved Pipes 

Quarter Turns 

Double Hubs 

Offset Pipes , 

Stop-Cocks , 

Yoke Pipes 

Man-hole Pipes ... 
Pieces of Pipes 



DIAilETER IN INCHES. 



40 36 30 24 20 16 



18 1 25 

2 i.... 



1 3 



2 I.... 
I 

1 ! 6 



67 



2 3 



12 6 



53 I 85 



* Twelve 6-inch Stop-cocks are now being- made at the shop, and will soon be finished. 



Hydrants. 

Eighteen Wilmarth, eighteen Lowell, one sample, three NeAv 
York patterns. 

For Hydrants. 4 bends, 4 lengtheners, 14 frames and covers, 
25 wharf hydrant couplings, 10 Nipples, 12 valve-seats, 43 caps, 
41 stuffing boxes, 49 washers, 20 screws, 57 wastes, 7 wharf 
hydrant covers. 

For Stop-cochs. 5 frames and covers, 1 36-inch valve, 19 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

clamps, 3 12-incli plungers, 3 6-incli do., 2 36-incli composition 
screws, 1 30-incli do, 2 24-incli do., 1 16-inch do., 1 12-incli do., 
11 6-inch do., 15 6-inch iron do., 5 4-inch composition do., 44 
bushings, 2 valve-rings, 5 sets of stands and geering for 36 and 
30-inch gates, 12 6-incli stop-cocks and 6 4-inch do., partly 
finished. 

Meters. 2 3-inch iron Worthington pattern, 1 do. 3-inch com- 
position do., 4 2-inch composition do., 71 1-inch do., 35 f-inch 
do., 6 1-inch iron do., 6 f-inch iron do., 1 1-inch, Scotch pattern, 

6 f-inch iron do., 44 of the Huse pattern, worthless except for 
old metal. 

Stock for Meters. 10 1-inch connection couplings, 2 2-inch do., 

7 clock covers, 93 lbs. composition castings, 14 lbs. rubber pack- 
ing, 8 1-inch nipples, 4 sheets packing paper. 

For Service Pipe. 6 1-inch Union cocks, 37 f-inch do., 109 
f-inch do., 98 |-inch do., 13 1-inch air cocks, 13-inch T cocks, 
23 f-inch do., 28 f-inch do., 6 2J-inch couplings, 8 1-inch do., 14 
l|-inch do., 30 f-inch do., 87 f-inch straight cocks, 115 lbs. old 
Union cocks, 57 lbs. f-inch Y cocks, 82 lbs. 1-inch Union cocks, 
101 lbs. ^-inch do., 334 lbs. f-inch do., 110 lbs. f-inch do., un- 
finished, 407 lbs. cock -castings of various kinds, 112 flange cocks, 
45 uprights, 30 extension do., 45 caps and boxes, 8 upright caps 
and flanges for inch cock. 

Lead Pipe. 525 lbs. 2J-inch pipe, 1828 lbs. 1-inch do., 1854 
lbs. f-inch do., 6013 lbs. f-inch do., 2768 lbs. |-inchdo., 105 lbs. 
block tin pipe, 121 lbs. J-inch block tin pipe for thawing pur- 
poses. 

Pig Lead. 4054 lbs. pig lead. 57 lbs. sheet lead. 

Blacksmith'' s Shop. 2671 lbs. bar iron, 5826 lbs. pieces, 235 
lbs. steel, 2800 lbs. scrap iron. 

Carpenter's Shop. 900 feet spruce plank, 4 hydrant boxes, 4 
stop-cock do., 9 hydrant boxes unfinished, 6 stop-cock do., 100 
lbs. spikes and nails, 100 feet boards. 

Stable. 3 horses, 3 sets of harnesses, 3 wagons, 1 sleigh, 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 31 

1 chaise, 1 pung, 1500 lbs. English hay, 700 lbs, salt do., 
800 lbs. straw, 15 bushels grain. The wagons are in a poor 
condition, and are not worth repairing in the spring. 

Tools. One steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom der- 
rick, 4 pair geered derricks, 2 pair shears with all the rigging 
for the same, tools for laying main and service pipes and for re- 
pairs of the same, 2 engine lathes, 1 Fox lathe, 1 hand lathe, 1 
upright drilling machine, 2 grindstones, with the necessary 
amount of small tools to carry on the shop, also the usual tools 
of the Carpenter, Blacksmith and Plumber, also the office furni- 
ture, &c., 3 large street tool houses, 1 small do. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 1 large proving press, 5 swivel 
pipe patterns, 1 swing stage, capstan frame and levers, 1 large 
copper ball, 1 composition cylinder, 2 jets, 1 6-inch cylinder and 

2 6-inch jets, 1 reducer and 2 sets of 12-inch plates, 2 4-inch do., 

3 composition reel jets, 6 cast-iron jets, 1 drinking fountain, also 
all of the patterns belonging to this department, some of which 
are stored at the foundries where we obtain the castings. 

Miscellaneous. 5 man-hole frames and covers, lot of old lum- 
ber, 7 large granite flagging stones, lot of old machinery from 
Marlboro', 98 tons paving gravel, 700 bricks, 5 casks Portland 
cement, 1 barrel rosin, half-cord wood, 3 tons coal, 3 bundles 
gasket, 6 kegs old bolts of various kinds, 3 tons old cast-iron, 75 
lbs. rubber packing, 130 lbs. old composition, 100 lbs. cotton 
waste, I barrel oil, 4 dozen lanterns, 14 heads for proving press, 
lot of old hose, 1 proving press for 36-inch pipe, 1 do. for small 
pipes. 

No opportunity has occurred the past season to dispose of the 
old materials as was recommended last year, the present prices 
of old iron and composition would warrant the disposal of them 
as soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT STANWOOD, 
Superintendent Eastern Division B. W. W. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Natick, January 5, 1862. 
Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., Pres. of the Cochituate Water Board. 

6iR : In compliance with the Rules and Regulations of the 
Board, the Superintendent of the Western Division respectfully 
submits the following Report of the condition of the work in his 
Division : 

The gate house, outlet dams, roads, culverts, and the grounds 
around the lake, are all in good condition. 

Agreeably to your order, I have raised the lower dam, and 
strengthened the upper one ; and have huilt a dam across Wash- 
burn's meadow, at the south end of the lake, to keep back the 
stagnant water. 

About eleven hundred feet of slope wall has been laid, at places 
where it was most needed, to keep the banks of the lake from 
washing away ; and I would recommend a continuation of this 
work to some extent another year, or the purchase of more land, 
in order to retain the five rods around the lake. 

The embankments, culverts, waste-weirs, and bridges, con- 
nected with the aqueduct, have all been thoroughly repaired 
during the past year, and are now in good condition. 

The seventh of last May, some person or persons, — thinking, 
perhaps, to obtain employment during part of the dall season, — 
attempted to make a breach in tlie aqueduct, about one hundred 
feet east of the east pipe chamber at Charles River. I immedi- 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 33 

ately notified you, and, accompanied by the Mayor and memlDers 
of the Water Board, you proceeded to make an examination of 
it, and ordered a strict watch to be kept on the whole line, I 
immediately employed men to guard it, and they were kept on 
duty until November 19th, when I was ordered by the Board to 
discontinue their services. 

During the year I have several times thoroughly examined 
the interior of the aqueduct, and on one occasion was accompa- 
nied by members of the Board. In August last, the interior 
received a thorough cleansing throughout its whole extent, as is 
usual during each year ; no new cracks were discovered, but 
some of the old ones appear to have enlarged. The crack at the 
clay-bank at Bennett's land, in Brighton, in particular, has shown 
the past season that it would not be safe to allow it to remain 
much longer without being repaired ; but repairs are attended 
with great difficulty, as Brookline Eeservoir is not large enough 
to keep the city supplied, while the water is shut off' from the 
aqueduct. I was ordered by the Board to point these cracks this 
fall, so that any settling of the work would be discovered ; but 
it has been impossible to shut off" the water even for one day, it 
being so low in the lake it was necessary to have it running con- 
stantly through the aqueduct, to keep up the head at Brookline 
Reservoir. 

Brookline Eeservoir has received the usual amount of atten- 
tion during the year. The grounds and walks have been kept 
in good condition, and it still continues to be a place of consid- 
erable attraction to the public generally. 

Agreeably to your order, the work connecting Dudley Pond 
with the lake, has been commenced, and will be completed in a 
few weeks. 

You will find annexed a schedule of the tools, &c., belonging 
to the city, and used in this division. 
Respectfully submitted. 

E. F. KNOWLTON, 
Superintendent Western Division. 
3 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

The following property is in charge of, and used by, the 
Superintendent of the Western Division : — 

1 express wagon. 

1 horse cart and harness. 

3 boats and 4 oars. 

77 wheelbarrows, and 1 handcart. 
113 shovels, and 24 picks. 

2 crowbars, and 2 pinchbars. 

4 iron rakes, 2 rammers. 

2 grindstones, 8 water pails. 
6 pairs rubber boots. 
8 lanterns, 2 aqueduct lamps. 
2 hammers, 1 level. 

1 hand saw, 2 grass hooks. 

2 iron wrenches at gate house. 
2 brick and 2 pointing trowels. 
2 hoes, 4 axes, 1 hand axe. 

32 old shovels, 12 old wheelbarrows. 

1 fluid can and oil filler. 

1 pair hedge shears, 1 bush scythe, and 1 scythe snaith, 

15 hundred feet plank. 

1 stove and 1 desk. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



OFFICE OF WATEE EEOISTEAE, CITY HALL. 

Boston, January 1, 1862. 
E. Johnson, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water Board. 

Sir : The foUowiiig Report is made in obedience to the ordi- 
nance regulating this department, passed October 31, 1850 : 

The total number of water takers, now entered for the year 
1862, is 25,486, being an increase since January 1, 1860, of 
1,170. 

During the year there has been 980 cases where the water 
has been shut off, all of which were for non-payment of water 
rates. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
on, is 1,336. Of these, 686 were eases which had been shut off 
for non-payment of water rates, and 650 were turned on for the 
first time. 

The total amount received from December 31, 1860, 

to January 1, 1862, is . . . . . ^ 365,323 46 

Of the above, there was received for water used in 
previous years, the sum of ^18,184.71, leaving 
the receipts for water used during the year 1861, 
the sum of $ 347,138.75. In addition to the above, 
there has been received for letting on the water, in 
cases where it had been turned oflF for non-payment 
of rates, the sum of 1,43150 

Total amount ^66,754 96 



36 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

The increased amount of income in 1861, over tlie 

previous year, is ...... ^30,69460 

The amount of assessments now made for the pres- 
ent year, is ^298,755 19 

The estimated amount of income from the sales of 

water during the year 1862, is . . . p7 5, 000 00 

The expenditures of my department during the year 

1861, have been ^3,776 40 

The items of this expenditure are as follows : — 

Paid Chas. L. Bancroft for services as clerk, 

Stephen Badlam " * " " . . 

Chas. C. Badlam " " " inspector, 

Edwin Jennings " " " " . 

Chas. E. Dunham " " " " . . 

Farwell & Co., for printing .... 

J. L. Fairbanks for stationery 

William Souther, for distributing bills 

E. G. Eichardson " " " 

G. S. Carpenter " " *' . 

Mr. Lyon '' " " 

^3,776 40 

Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam engines, 
&c., in the city of Boston, supplied with Cochituate water to the 
1st of January, 1862, with the amount of water rates paid for 
1861. 

18,130 Dwelling Houses, ^211,846 44 

14 Boarding, ",.... 806 00 

103 Model, " 4,011 50 

8 Lodging, '' . . . . 169 00 

34 Hotels, 3,480 00 

3,842 Stores and Shops, .... 32,118 46 

189 Buildings, 7,173 08 

285 Offices, 2,007 92 

Amount carried forward, ;$261,112 40 



. poo 00 


900 00 


. 769 00 


525 00 


. 257 50 


200 75 


. 130 15 


30 00 


28 00 


28 00 


8 00 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



37 



Amount Irought forward, 


^261,112 40 


49 Printing Offices, 


635 55 


18 Banks, .... 


221 42 


25 Halls, .... 


328 00 


3 Theatres, .... 


151 25 


17 Private Schools, 


177 33 


1 Library, . . 


9 00 


5 Asylums, 


286 13 


4 Green Houses, 


37 00 


1 Hospital, .■* 


226 26 


1 Catholic College, 


159 00 


1 Medical College, 


51 00 


59 Churches, .... 


447 08 


7 Markets, 


544 50 


161 Cellars, .... 


981 50 


388 Eestaurants and Saloons, 


4,692 15 


8 Cluh Houses, 


183 00 


7 Bath Houses, . . . 


345 00 


12 Packing Houses, 


219 50 


822 Stables, .... 


. 10,165 77 


9 Factories, .... 


232 50 


8 Breweries, 


209 67 


2 Bleacheries, 


20 50 


59 Bakeries, 


470 50 


6 Ship Yards, 


90 00 


1 Dry Dock, . . ' . 


15 00 


2 Dry Docks and Engines, 


60 00 


74 Shops and Engines, 


6,085 63 


8 Mills and Engines, 


1,099 60 


10 Eoundries and Engines, . 


665 17 


13 Factories and Engines, 


2,159 66 


11 Printing and Engines, 


854 60 


3 Bakeries and Engines, 


180 40 


3 Ship Yards and Engines, 


125 00 


8 Buildings and Engines, 


1,013 87 


Amount carried forward. 


^294,254 94 



38 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



Amount hrought forward, 


^294,254 94 


26 Engines, 


1,261 40 


1 Aquarial Garden, . . . 


65 00 


1 Laundry, . . . . . . 


25 00 


1 Pottery 


35 00 


3 Armories, ...... 


55 50 


1 G-ymnasium, ..... 


24 50 


29 Fountains, 


162 50 


663 Hose, 


2,020 00 


2 Gas Light Companies, 


815 15 


1 Mill Dam Company, .... 


300 00 


1 State House, 


134 50 


1 Massachusetts State Prison, . 


817 74 


1 McLean Asylum, .... 


205 00 


1 Marine Hospital, .... 


189 00 


3 Ferry Companies, .... 


2,393 68 


39 Steamboats, 


5,523 92 


3 Kailroad Companies, 


760 00 


1 House, (Vine St., City), 


7 00 


2 Offices, (Niles Block), . , . 


42 00 


1 Office, (City Scales), .... 


9 00 


6 Fire Alarm Motors, 


65 00 


20 Engines, Hoses, & Hook & Ladder Houses 


365 00 


266 Public Schools, . . . . 


1,836 00 


8 Police Stations, 


447 00 


2 City Stables, 


112 50 


1 Offal Station, 


150 00 


1 Steamer, Henry Morrison, 


192 56 


1 Court House, ..... 


250 00 


1 Probate Building, .... 


40 00 


1 Dead House, ..... 


10 00 


1 House of Correction, 


462 00 


1 Jail for Suffolk County, 


243 00 


1 Lunatic Hospital, .... 


225 00 


1 Public Library, 


50 00 


Amount carried forward, 


g; 313,548 89 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 



39 



Amount brought farivard, 


g; 313,548 89 


1 Faneuil Hall, . . . . 


40 00 


1 City Hall, 


50 00 


1 City Building, .... 


37 50 


Common Sewer Dept., (making mortar), 


75 00 


Urinals, &c., F. H. Market, 


70 00 


Contractors for Supplying Shipping, 


3,709 25 


Street Sprinkling, .... 


410 00 


Skating Purposes, .... 


75 00 


Building Purposes, .... 


1,374 33 


Filling Tanks, (Navy Yard), 


250 00 


Custom House, .... 


156 00 


Measured Water, .... 


27,342 78 



^347,138 75 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. —No. 9. 



Statement shoioing the Number and Sizes of Water Metres noiv in use, and 
wJiere applied, to January 1, 1862. 



Eevere House 

Parker House . 

American House . 

Adams House . 

Coolidge House . 

Marlboro' House 

Tremont House 

United States Hotel 

Winthrop House . 

Bromfield House 

City Hotel . 

Sailors' Home . 

Mariners' House . 

Pearl Street House 

Boston Hotel 

Young's Hotel . 

New England House 

Hotel de Pelham 

I. Adams (boarding bouse) 

Boston Sugar Eefinery 

Soutb Boston Sugar Eefinery 

Boston and Worcester Eailroad Company 

Boston and Maine Eailroad Company 

Old Colony Eailroad Company . 

ritcbburg Eailroad Company 

Eastern Eailroad Company 

South Boston Gras Company . 

East Boston G-as Company . 

Norway Iron Company, wire manufactory 

J. Trull & Co., distilleiy . 

J. M. Barnard, distillery 

S. Bowman, distillery 

Bay State Eolling JVIill . 

Hodges & Sillsbee, distillery 

Henry N. Hooper & Co., foundry 

Lutber Felton, distillery . 

Amounts carried forward, 



Sizes of Meters. 



finch 



1 inch '2 inch 

I 



14 48 



3 inch 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



41 







finch 


1 inch 


2 inch 3 inch 


Amounts brought forward, . 


u 


48 


3 


1 


Henry Souther, brewery .... 










Oriental Oil Company 










William Carleton, lamp manufactory . 


3 








Millitt & Smith, sugar house 










Boston Crystal Glass Company, glass manufactory. 


1 








Boston Gasometer (Charles Street) . 










Dexter, Lambert & Co., tassel factory . 










Sanborn, Kichardson & Co., pipe manufactory. 


1 








Grover, Baker & Co., sewing machines 




2 






Lee, Woodman & Co., oil mill 


1 


2 






Graves & Hoyt, distillery . 


. 


1 


1 






Cunard Steamship Company . 










1 


J. H. Hazleton, paper manufactory 


. 


1 








Chelsea Ferry Company 










1 


East Boston Ferry Company 


. 






1 




Chickering & Sons, piano manufactory 






3 






Mount Washington Glass Works, glass r 


aanuf. 




1 






American Grist Mill .... 






1 






W. K. Lewis, pickle manufactory 












W, H. Davis, pickle manufactory . 












J. B. Hamblen, pickle manufactory . 


. 










Stephen Jenny, distillery 












Stephen Jenny, oil factory . 












Ambrose Louis, chemicals 












W. D. Philbrick, chemicals 












Shawmut Oil Company . 












Downer Kerosene Oil Company . 


, 






1 




Henry Howland, distillery . 






1 






John Felton, distillery 


. 




1 






Ketridge & Co., turpentine factory 




30 


1 

66 






Total 


5 


3 



42 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from the 
sales of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the city, October 
25, 1848: — 



om Octobc 


3r 25, 1848, to Janu 


ary 1, 1850 . 


. $ 72,043 20 


" January 1, 1850, " ' 


1851 


98,367 90 




1851, •' 


1852 . 


. 161,299 72 




1852, " 


1853 


179,486 25 




1853, " 


1854 . 


. 196,352 32 




1854, " 


1855 


217,007 51 




1855, " 


1856 . 


. 266,302 77 




1856, " 


1857 


282,651 84 




1857, " 


1858 . 


. 289,328 83 




1858, " 


1859 


• . 302,409 73 




1859, " 


1860 . 


. 314,808 97 




1860, " 


1861 


334,544 86 




1861, " 


1862 . 


. 365,323 46 




$3,079,927 36 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOAED. 



43 



Statement showing the Number and Kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the Premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston, to January 
1, 1862, as compared with 1853. 



1853 


1861 




3,968 


4,680 


Taps ; these have no connection with any sewer. 


19,287 


34,503 


Sinks. 


3,149 


12,046 


Wash-hand basins. 


1,838 


6,373 


Bathing-tubs. 


1,622 


4,831 


Pan water-closets. 


698 


6,373 


Hopper water-closets. 


159 


256 


Self-acting water-closets. 


218 


1,383 


Urinals. 


476 


3,868 


Wash tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


14 


13 


Shower-baths. These are in houses where there is 
no tub. 


9 


10 


Hydraulic rams. 


312 


709 


Private hydrants. 




171 


Stop-hoppers. 


31,750 


75,216 


Total. 



Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, ^Yater Registrar, 



CITY ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Office of City Engineer, Boston, January, 1862. 

Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., PresH of the Cocliituate Water Board: 
Sir : I submit the following Eeport of matters connected with 
the Water Works : — 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

High-water mark in the lake is ten feet ahove Knight's old 
flume. 

On the first of January, 1861, the water in the lake stood at 
eight feet four inches ahove the flume. It kept gradually rising 
until the middle of February, when it stood at extreme high- 
water mark, — that being as high as the water ever was in the 
lake. It stood at this height one week, after which it fell down 
to nine feet nine inches. On the ninth of March it again rose to 
ten feet above the flume, and from this time until the twelfth of 
May it stood clear up to high-water mark in the lake with the 
exception of only eight days ; and in those eight days it was at 
no time more than four inches below high-water mark. 

Since the twelfth of May the water in the lake has been grad- 
ually falling, and on the first of January, 1862, it had fallen 
seven feet eleven inches below high-w&ter mark, leaving only two 
feet and one inch depth of water in the lake above Zow-water 
mark. 

The daily average quantity of water brought to the city during 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOAED. 45 

tlie past year has been 951,000 gallons over and above the daily 
average quantity of water brought in in 1860. 

It will be seen by the above statement that in the early part 
of the year there was an ample quantity of water in the lake, 
owing to the fact that large quantities of rain and snow fell in 
the latter part of 1860 and early in 1861. 

The lake being full, and the falls of rain and snow being 
heavy, made it necessary to allow the surplus amount of water to 
waste from the lake into Sudbury Eiver, The amounts thus 
wasted were, in 

January 40,277,184 gallons. 

February 1,129,034,368 " 

March 623,304,033 " 

April 1,197,621,508 " 

May 373,844,763 " 

June 12,587,070 " 

July 890,040 " 

Total amount wasted . . 3,377,558,966 gallons. 

Making an average daily waste for each of the three hundred 
and sixty-five days in the year of 9,253,586 gallons, nearly all 
of which we might now have on hand had we any place to store 
it in. The amounts shown above as having been wasted in July, 
June, and about ten millions of gallons of the amount in May, 
were lost because of leakages through the dam. 

It will be seen by this, and by reference to previous reports, 
that there is a much larger amount of water falling at and 
around the lake, taking one year with another, than the lake 
can hold ; and I now renew my advice given some years since, 
that the lake should be raised at least two more feet in height. 
Had it been raised four feet, as suggested by the City Engineer, 
at the time when it was raised but two feet, we should now have 
two feet more water in depth in the lake, and consequently 
should not now be short of water, nor should we be menaced 
with the danger of portions of the city suffering for the want of 
it, should the winter be a severe one. 



46 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 

As the consumption of water increases very fast, and as tlie 
lake supply will very soon all be used in the city, I most respect- 
fully suggest that no time he lost in having the necessary sur- 
veys made to determine a new source of supply for the city, as 
recommended by the Mayor in his Inaugural Address of the 
present year. 



EEPORT or THE WATEE BOARD. 



47 





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48 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 









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^ 9 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



49 



Loss of Head from the Brookline Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city may 
be seen hy reference to the table in this and previous reports of 
average annual heights of water in the reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 



YEAK. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 



Average annual heig-hts of Water 
above Marsh Level in 



Brookline 
Keservoir. 



123.16 
123.36 
123.67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 
124.11 
124.63 
124,07 
123.29 
123.52 



Beacon Hill 
Reservoir. 



119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 
114.77 
116.00 
115.24 
117.13 
116.98 



East Boston 
Reservoir. 



105.06 
104.07 
104.91 
99.84 
97.49 
94.11 
94.18 
94.42 
94.05 
96.01 
96.05 



a ^ 

2 i 

c3 o O 

" § s 

■"So 

DG O ^^ 

, o tj 3 

hj M a 



4.12 

3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 
9.34 
8.63 
8.83 
6.16 
6.54 



§ 2 § 
iJ pq pq 



18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
29.55 
29.93 
30,21 
30.02 
27.28 
27.47 



# 



50 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 9. 



Monthly Fall of Rain in Inches, in 1861. 



MONTH. 



January . . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . ■ 
September . 
October. • . 
November. 
December . 

Totals 



PLACES AND OBSEKVEES. 






2.51 

3.81 
2-75 
6.44 
3.12 
2.64 
1.62 
7.79 
2.76 
3.20 
6.20 
2.60 



46.44 













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8. 


57 


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5 


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2 


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3 


64 


2 


76 


6 

1 


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1 


77 


2 


66 


4 


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2 

1 


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2.89 
4.67 
4.52 
4.07 
1.84 
2.98 
5.12 
2.11 
3.67 
4.57 
1.87 



cs 3 



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5.15 
2.53 
4.57 
4.39 
4.06 
1.94 
3.09 
4.77 
2.04 
3.79 
3.62 
3.00 



43.32 42.95 



2 if 



o 



8.93 
2.79 
6.56 
5.89 
3.19 
2.56 
3.59 
5.57 
1.77 
2.68 
3.. SO 
3.31 



50.14 



Note. — Melted snow is, as usual, included in the above amounts of rainfall. 



REPORT or THE WATER BOARD. 



51 



Conduit. 

By a comparison of the folloAving table of heights of water in 
the conduit with the similiar table in last year's report, it will be 
seen that there has been a much greater number of days this 
year during which there has been a large head of water on the 
conduit. 

The table shows the different heights at Avhich the water has 
been running, and the number of days in each month at the dif- 
ferent heights. 

The height of the conduit is six feet four inches : -r- 









HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 






These heights show a head on the Conduit. 




0.0 


6.0 


6.2 


6.4 


6.6 


6.10 


7.1 


7.4 


7.6 


7.8 


8.0 


8.2 8.6 


9.0 




NUMBER or DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 


















3 
3 

27 
30 
23 
20 


16 


7 

18 
4 


4 


1 
4 






















3 
















































1 














7 


























5 


5 

29 
9 








July 


2 

1 








































21 
30 
5 




September 
























October 












4 

13 




4 


11 
















8 
19 

27 


1 
10 

11 


8 














2 
2 






















8 






11 


117 


77 


72 


4 


5 






4 


17 


7 


3 



It will be seen by this table, that the conduit has been empty 
only four days during the year. It has been just full eleven 



52 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 9. 

days ; less than full twenty-nine days; and for 321 days it has 
been running with a head on it, varying from two inches to two 
feet eight inches. 

Eespectfully submitted. 

JAMES SLADE, City Engineer. 



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