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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

PRESENTED TO Tl 



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City Document. — No. 10. 



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EE PO RT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOAED 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



rOR THE TEAR 1862. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 12, 1863. 

Oedeeed : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to report in print. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

THOMAS C. AMOEY, Je., Chairman. 

In Gammon Council, January 15, 1863. 
Concurred. 

GEORGE S. HALE, President. 

Approved, January 17, 1863. 

F. W. LINCOLN, Jr., Mayor. 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
119^ "Washington Street, Boston, January 15, 1863. 

To THE City Council : 

The Cochituate Water Board herewith present for your con- 
sideration their Annual Report for the year 1862, together with 
the Reports of the Clerk of this Board, the Superintendents, 
Water Registrar, and City Engineer, to which we invite your 
attention for detailed accounts of the general management and 
finances of the Works. 

From the Report of the Clerk of this Board it will be seen 
that the expenditures and receipts, on account of the Water 
Works, from the commencement of the Works to January 1, 
1863, are as follows : — 

Amounts paid by the Commissioners, and by 

the Water Board from the time the Works 

came under the control of the latter, $5,663,829 '^^ 

Sundry payments by the City, and discounts 

and interests on loans, 3,862,291 43 



$9,526,121 29 
From which there should be deducted sundry 
credits by the City, and amounts received for 
Water Rates, 3,515,303 23 



$6,010,818 06 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

Leaving the actual cost of the Works, January 

1, 1863, $6,010,818 06 

There has been drawn from the treasury by the 

Board, during the year, the sum of $86,264 22 

Of this amount there is charged for extension 

of the Works, 55,838 72 



Leaving the expense of the year, $30,425 50 

By this it will be seen that the expenses have been less than 
the previous year, and had it not been for the great advance in 
price of all materials used on the Works, the reduction would 
have been still greater. 

By reference to the Report of the Water Registrar, it appears 
that the total amount received for Water used during the year 
ending January 1, 1863, is $364,036.37; being an increase 
over the previous year of $ 8,599.42. 

The total number of Water-takers now entered for the year 
1863, is 26,289 ; being an increase over last year of 803. 

The estimated income from the sales of Water, in 1863, is 
$385,000. 

All the Works under the care of the Superintendent of the 
Eastern Division are in their usual good condition. 

From the Report of the Superintendent, it appears that there 
has been about the same number of feet of Main Pipe laid this 
year as last; the total number of feet laid in 1862 was 10,429, 
being 140 feet less than the previous year. 

The number of feet of Service Pipe laid, in 1862, was 18,292 ; 
being a slight decrease this year. 

The total number of feet of Main Pipe laid, from the com- 
mencement of the Works up to January 1, 1863, Is 702,793 ; 
being a little over one hundred and thirty-three miles. 

The total number of Service Pipes laid, to January 1, 1863, 
is 24,340. 

The number of new Stop Cocks is 48 ; making the whole 
number 1,236. 



WATKR. 7 

The number of new Hydrants established is 22, making the 
whole number 1,473. 

The number of leaks during the year was not so large as the 
previous year; being 490, in 1862, against 508, in 1861 ; and 
most of them were caused by digging for sewers and drains, 
over which this Board have no control. 

31 Fire Reservoirs have been connected with main pipes 
during the year, (nine in the city proper, thirteen in South 
Boston, and nine in East Boston,) making the whole number 
now connected, 55- The expense of this work is charged to 
the Fire Department. 

The repairs on Beacon Hill Reservoir, commenced last season 
and postponed on account of the difficulty of procuring suitable 
cement, were resumed the latter part of September, when the 
remainder of the bottom was cemented, and the whole surface 
washed over with cement. The result of this work is entirely 
satisfactory. 

The attention of the incoming Board is called to the condition 
of the main pipes in some of the streets where the grade has 
been changed since the pipes were laid, in some cases the pipes 
are buried nine feet deep, which makes it very expensive to re- 
pair them, or to lay service pipes ; and, in other streets, where 
the grade has been lowered, they are not deep enough to protect 
them from frost. 

The lake, reservoir, and structures in the Western Divisio7i 
are in good condition, and have been properly attended to by 
the Superintendent. 

The most important work of the year, in this division, was 
the completion of the work connecting Dudley Pond with the 
lake. The City Engineer was requested to make a survey- of 
this pond, which has been completed. The area of the pond 
is 81 acres, and the amount of water it will contain, which is 
available to the City, is about 250,000,000 gallons. The entire 
capacity of the pond is much greater, as the water in the deepest 
part measures thirty feet, but as the pipe connecting with tlie 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

lake is laid twelve and one half feet below high-water mark, 
the pond can only be drawn down to that depth. The distance 
round the pond, measuring at the verge at high- water mark, is 
three miles. The waters of the pond were let into the lake on 
January 31, 1862 ; being less than two months from the com- 
mencement of the undertaking. 

The abutters, and all others in any way damaged by the 
drawing down of this pond, have been amicably settled with, 
excepting two or three, (some of them being absent,) and 
these, no doubt, will be adjusted in a short time. 

The successful completion of this work is highly gratifying to 
the Board, more than realizing our expectations, and is regarded 
by us as a matter of congratulation, having thus secured for 
the use of the City a valuable reservoir. 

Improvements have been made during the year on the borders 
of the lake. The bank on the north side of the road, east of 
the Superintendent's house, has been cut down nearly level with 
the road, graded, and a slope wall laid, which has made a great 
improvement in the appearance of this part of the lake. Slope 
wall has also been laid on the borders of the lake in other 
places, which was rendered necessary by the washing of the 
banks ; some of the banks have been sodded, and other im- 
provements made. 

The condition of the meadow opposite the Superintendent's 
house has long been unsatisfactory to the Board, and, during 
the year, a portion of it has been filled up, thereby strengthen- 
ing the dam, and presenting a much more creditable appearance. 

The interior of the aqueduct has been examined and thor- 
oughly cleansed by the Superintendent during the year. No 
new cracks were discovered. Some of the old ones were pointed, 
so that any further settling would be discovered. 

Those portions of the aqueduct built upon quicksands will 
need particular attention, when the frost leaves the ground in 
the spring. 

The rods in some of the waste weirs have been repaired, and 



WATER. 9 

the iron screws replaced by composition ; the remainder of them 
will be repaired and changed as soon as circumstances will 
admit. 

The Selectmen of the town of Brookline notified the Board 
of their intention to grade Boylston Street, in front of the res- 
ervoir, in doing which it was necessary to alter somewhat the 
grade of the bank of the reservoir, and to relay a portion of the 
drain wall outside of it. Also on the opposite side of the 
reservoir, they laid out a highway, and, in grading, they filled 
in some portion of it, and excavated others, which caused the 
banks to cave, and the fence to be continually getting out of 
repair, and the Board concluded to have the land adjoining 
graded, and the fence rebuilt where it will be much more likely 
to stand. This work has much improved the appearance of the 
reservoir and the street, and the Selectmen appear to be well 
pleased with it. It is hoped, at some future time, an iron fence 
will be placed round this reservoir. 

The Superintendent of this Di". ision notified the Board that 
the iron rod attached to the gate of the 40-inch main pipe in 
this reservoir, was out of order, and that the gate could not 
be raised. Upon considering the matter, it was found that 
either the water Must be drawn from the reservoir, (which 
would be a serious loss to the city at this season of the year,) 
or that the services of a diver, with submarine armor, be pro- 
cured to go down and find out, if possible, what the trouble 
was ; this last course was deemed the most advisable, and, 
upon descending to the depth of twenty-five feet, he found the 
nut was off of the bottom of the rod, after considerable time 
spent in searching for it, in different parts of the pipe-chamber, 
the nut was found, screwed on, and the gate hoisted up and 
taken out, and is now being repaired. The Board are entirely 
satisfied with the result of the undertaking. 

By the Report of the City Engineer, hereto annexed, it ap- 
pears that the average daily consumption of water during the 
year has been sixteen million six hundred thousand gallons, 
2 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

which daily consumption Is one million five hundred and eighty- 
nine thousand three hundred and four gallons less than In the 
year 1861. This Is very gratifying to the Board, for not only 
has the consumption decreased over one million gallons per day, 
but the receipts for water used during the year have consider- 
ably increased. This saving, or non-use of water. Is mainly 
owing, no doubt, to the number of water-meters placed In es- 
tablishments where large quantities of water Is used, and the 
Board would recommend a more general use of them In all such 
cases. 

There was no need of, neither would there have been any, 
water wasted from the lake, had not some evil-disposed person 
taken out the stop-plank in the dam of the brook, on the east side 
of Dug Pond, thereby turning the waters into the lake, which 
prevented the filling of Dug Pond as usual. By the Superin- 
tendent's Report this pond, or reservoir, lacked four feet of be- 
ing full ; the contents of this four feet would be about fifty- 
seven million gallons ; If this quantity had run into the pond 
we should now have It stored, rather than loosing thirty-two 
million two hundred thousand gallons of It by running into the 
lake, and wasting over the outlet dam. There is some question 
about the right of the City to divert the waters of this brook to 
fill the pond, but negotiations have been commenced to acquire 
a perpetual right, which it Is expected will be satisfactorily con- 
summated. 

Through the liberality of S. T. Tisdale, Esq., of East Ware- 
ham, the Board have been enabled to procure some black bass, 
to stock the lake and Brookline Reservoir, for the purpose of de- 
stroying the eels and other small fish which get into our pipes, 
and cause much trouble and expense. The experiment has been 
successfully tried by Mr. Tisdale in some of his ponds. 

It is the opinion of this Board that it will be for the interest 
of the City, at some future time when the aflTalrs of our country 
are In a more prosperous condition, to build a new reservoir, 
somewhere near this end of the aqueduct, for the storage of all 



WATER. 11 

the surplus water which the lake can furnish ; it would also be 
of great importance in case of any accident to the acqueduct, 
for we should then be better able to furnish the city with water 
while repairing. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

EBENEZEE JOHNSON, President. 

GEOEGE P. FRENCH, 

GEORGE DENNIE, 

JABEZ FREDERICK, 

JOHN F. PRAY, 

GEORGE HINMAN, 

J. C. J. BROWN. 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Stateme7it of Expenditures made by the Cochltuate Water Board, 
from December 31, 1861, to January 1, 1863. 



Main pipe 

Service pipe 

Wages laying main pipe 

Wages laying service pipe 

Wages blacksmith shop 

Wages plumbing shop 

Wages proving yard 

Off and on water 

Salaries 

Lake. Paid on account of Dudley Pond, grading 

and other repairs around the lake 
Aqueduct repairs 

Brookline Reservoir, for labor, &c 
Beacon Hill " " " 

South Boston " " " 

East Boston " " " 

Laying main pipe, for stock, &c. 
Laying service pipe 
Plumbing shop, for stock 
Blacksmith shop, " 
Office expense 
Fountains 

Amount carried forward, 



114,287 


85 


6,014 


77 


3,280 


02 


2,447 


33 


640 


72 


403 


30 


2,765 


14 


2,706 


79 


8,383 


08 


13,616 


78 


1,453 


04 


1,752 


43 


1,420 


40 


222 


69 


162 


24 


1,764 


49 


5 


50 


27 


00 


315 


45 


1,003 


25 


297 


79 


I 62,970 


06 



WATER. 

Amount brought forward, 

Miscellaneous expense, flowing skating grounds, 
pond on the Public Garden, expense of the 
Board, &c. 

Meters .... 

Stop-cocks 

Proving yard, for stock, &c. 

Hydrants 

Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 

Stable .... 

Travelling expenses 

Tolls and ferriages 

Damage in streets, and to land caused by raising 
the lake, &c. ..... 

Stationery (including stationery for Water Reg- 
istrar and Superintendents) . 

Pipe yard, repairing buildings, &c. 

Oil 

Printing (including Water Registrar's and Super 
intendents') ..... 

Postage and express 

Tools .... 

Rents, for tool chest . 

Carting 

Taxes 

Repairing main pipe 

Repairing service pipe 

Repairing hydrants 

Repairing streets 

Repairing stop-cocks 

Amount carried forward, 





13 


62,970 


06 


695 


82 


5,679 


34 


2,156 


77 


1,023 


85 


1,654 


92 


1,193 


50 


1,035 


04 


78 


92 


120 


35 



752 00 



110 


06 


93 


38 


89 


63 


464 


81 


22 


29 


449 


76 


13 


00 


182 


63 


375 


18 


1,125 


01 


2,520 


77 


1,319 


46 


1,570 


35 


567 


32 


$86,264 22 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

Amount brought forward, ' $86,26422 

CASH PAID CITY TREASURER. 

Received rent of arches under Beacon Hill Res- 
ervoir $300 00 

Received for land sold . . . 279 53 

Received for wood, grass, pasture, and 

old material .... 311 84 

Received for pipe laying, repairing, &c., 687 63 

Received for off and on water, for 
repairs . . . $1,242 00 

Received for off and on 

water, waste, and fines, 474 00 

Received for off and on 

water, for non-payment, 1,548 00 



3,264 00 
Less this amount paid to 

the City Treasurer . 1,548 00 



1,716 00 



3,295 00 



Balance $82,969 22 

Amount of expenditures . . . . .$86, 2 64 22 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 

Wages laying main pipe . . $3,280 02 

Wages laying service pipe . . 2,447 33 

Wages proving yard . . . 2,765 14 

Wages plumbing shop . . . 202 00 

Wages blacksmith shop . . 430 72 

Main pipe 14,287 85 

Service pipe .... 6,014 77 

Laying main pipe, &c. . , , 1,769 99 



Amounts carried forward, $31,197 82 $86,264 22 



WATEK 






15 


Amounts brought forward. 


$31,197 


82 


186,264 22 


Blacksmith shop 


315 


45 




Plumbing shop 


27 


00 


• 


Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 


800 


00 




Stable .... 


. 518 


00 




Oil 


89 


63 




Hydrants .... 


. 1,654 


92 




Stop-cocks .... 


2,156 


77 




Carting .... 


100 


00 




Tolls and ferriage 


60 


35 




Tools . 


150 


00 




Proving yard, for stock, &c. 


723 


85 




Meters 


. 5,163 


37 




Lake and Dudley Pond 


12,881 


56 


55,838 72 








Amount of annual expense 


$30,425 50 



Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works ^ to 
January 1, 1863. 



Am 



t drawn by Commissioners, $4,043,718 21 





' Wat' 


rB'rd,1850, 


366,163 


89 






1851, 


141,309 


23 






1852, 


89,654 


20 






1853, 


89,854 


03 






1854, 


80,182 


35 






1855, 


63,866 


33 






1856, 


81,429 


35 






1857, 


96,931 


25 






1858, 


76,006 


01 






1859, 


385,652 


47 






1860, 


146,304 


55 






1861, 


73,977 


29 






1862, 


86,264 


22 


Anun 


mt carriec 


i forward, 




$5,821,313 38 



16 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Ammmt brought forivard, 
Amount paid the City Treasurer by the Com- 
missioners, $47,648 38 



$5,821,313 38 



Ai 



t paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 
1851, 5,232 38 



1852, 


15,869 12 






1853, 


4,621 40 






1854, 


12,423 29 






1855, 


9,990 38 






1856, 


7,840 43 






1857, 


13,750 00 






1858, 


9,200 00 






1859, 


5,554 00 






1860, 


3,287 51 






1861, 


10,618 11 






1862, 


3,295 00 


157,483 


52 






tj tid 




5,663,829 


86 


'J^ 


$68,194 57 






ms, 3,794,096 86 


3,862,291 


43 






Ttt-* 




9,526,121 


29 



Sundry credits by the City, $ 61,453 04 

Am't rec'd for water rates, (as per 

the City Treasurer's account,) 3,453,850 19 



SAMUEL N. DYER, 

Clei-k CocJdtuate 



3,515,303 23 
$6,010,818 06 

Water Board, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, January 8, 1863. 
Ebenezee Johnson, Esq., Tres. Cochituate Water Board: 

Sir : The usual annual report of matters connected with the 
Eastern Division of the Cochituate Water Works, is herewith 
submitted. The amount of work done during the past year 
does not vary materially from that done in the year 1861. The 
aggregate number of feet of main pipe laid the past year, is one 
hundred and forty less than that laid in the previous year. The 
number of service pipes laid is one hundred and nineteen less 
than during the previous year. The total number of leaks is 
eighteen less than -the number in the year 1861, showing a 
slight improvement. 

The cost of laying new pipes and of repairs has increased in 
consequence of the introduction of so many horse railroad tracks 
in the public streets ; and the prices of all the materials used in 
this department have advanced so much that it is impossible to 
show the reduction in the expense anticipated at the commence- 
ment of the year. I beg leave to call your attention to the 
12-inch pipe in Chelsea Street, between Decatur and Marion 
Streets. This pipe was laid previous to the establishment of 
the present grade ; it is now covered to the depth of nine feet, 
and as it lays on soft ground, it is constantly settling, thus 
starting the joints and causing them to leak. I would recom- 
mend raising the pipe to the proper grade ; or that a new line 
be laid, and the use of the old pipe discontinued. 



18 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



There are two short bends in the 24-inch line of pipe in Char- 
don Street, — I would recommend that these be taken out and 
the line straightened. 

The iron box on the Tremont Street Bridge is so constructed 
that it is impossible to get at the pipes contained therein, to 
drive the joints ; and as one or more of the joints are now 
leaking slightly, I would urge the necessity of reconstructing 
the box upon some plan which will allow repairs to be easily 
made. 

Reservoirs. 

The repairs on the Beacon Hill Reservoir have been com- 
pleted during the past year, and the reservoir is now compara- 
tively tight. No changes have been made at the South Boston 
or East Boston Reservoirs, during the past year. It will be 
necessary, however, early in the present year to repair or replace 
the wooden fence around the East Boston Reservoir. 

Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Pipes laid in 1862. 



In what Streets. 



Boylston 

Boylston 

Albany 

Berkley 

Albany 

Marlborough . 

Appleton 

Clarendon . . . . 
Marlborough. . 

Worcester 

Newton 

Third Avenue 
Third Avenue 

Sharon 

Albany 

Pembroke 

Canton 

Marlborough. , 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPEE. 

West of Arlington 

Pleasant and Arlington 

Sharon and Newton 

Appleton and W. Railroad 

Total 12 inches in Boston. 



Newton and Worcester . 
West of Berkley 



Total 8 inches in Boston. 



Berkley and Clarendon 

Appleton and Tremont 

Arlington and Berkley 

West of Tremont 

West of Tremont 

South of Clarendon 

Berkley and Clarendon 

Harrison Avenue and Albany. 

South of Worcester 

West of Tremont 

West of Tremont 

Arlington and Berkley 



Total 6 inches in Boston. 



335 

876 
228 
122 

1,561 



350 



23 
472 
205 
122 
100 
518 
195 
116 
155 
148 

43 
431 

2,528 



The 6-inch pipe is 
taken up. 



WATER. 



19 



Statement of Pipes, continued. 



In what Streets. 



Gloucester Place. . . 
Albany 



H 

Third.. 
Ninth.. 
Second 

O 

Sixth . . 
Fourth 

Bolton, 
Athens 
Fourth 



Putnam.. 

Paris 

Marginal 
Breman., 
London . . 



Between what Stkeets. 



From Harrison Avenue 

For City Stable 

For 9 Fire Reservoirs , 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

Eighth and Ninth , 

Total 8 inches in South Boston 

East of P 

HandK 

Oand P 

Fifth and Sixth 

OandP 

Foundry and the Bridge 

Total 6 inches in South Boston 

CandD 

Band C 

For Alger's Foundry 

For 13 Fire Reservoirs 

EAST BOSTON. 

Princeton and Lexington 

Decatur and Porter 

Cottage and Jeffries 

Bennington and Prescott 

Bennington and Porter 

Total 6 inches in East Boston. . 

For 9 Fire Reservoirs 

Total 4 inches in East Boston. . 



*- i 


i 


° a 


a. 














g.S 




ns 


k 






4 


220 


4 
4 


100 
130 




450 


8 


300 


6 


300 


139 


6 


243 


6 


291 


6 


144 


6 


160 


6 


400 


4 


1,377 


284 


4 


208 


4 


83 


4 


198 








773 


6 


256 


6 


700 


6 


570 


6 


463 


6 


430 


4 


2,419 


63 




63 



Remarks. 



EECAPITULATION. 




Section, 



1862. 



Diameter in inches. 



Boston Proper 
South Boston. 
East Boston . . 



Total number of feet laid , 
Stop-cocks in the same.. . . 
Total number of feet laid . 

Stop-cocks in the same 

Total number of feet laid.. 
Stop-cocks in the same.. . . 



Sums of Pipes 

Sums of Stop-cocks. 



1,561 
4 



958 
1 

300 
1 



2,528 
4 

1,377 
1 

2,419 
2 



1,561 
4 



1,258 
2 



6,324 

7 



450 
10 

773 
16 
63 



1,286 
35 



20 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



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o 






































a 




o 




? 


' 






1 I 




^ 




^ 




C 




c 


3 

3 


: ; 




ft 




t>^ 




c 


3 









i '. 

i . _ 


M 




2= 
o 


a 




5 a 
3 £ 


: c 

3 ? 


5 


1 ^ 


me. 

ilaic 

l-COC 




M 






3 


: ' 


i ' 


5 ^ S S 




gT 


C 


c 


5 " 

2 a 


J ii 


5 a 


i ' 


p-cocks in the i 
■ Length of Pip 
Number of St( 




3 

o 
o 

M 
d 


1 

c 

Ci 


1 
3 


3 f 




■< s 

3 •' 

2 f 






c 




3 C 


3 _£ 


3 C 


I ^ 


« o 




S 






H + 




-* + 




■* -H ' 




c/ 




J » 


3 "c 


J a 


2 "c 






a> 


t4- 


£ 


1* V 


£ 


2. V 


H (: 




ft 

S 


c 




5 


3 •* 


< 

■< i 


= P 

3 «t 


mber o 

TOTAl 




Vi 


^ 


3 C 


> ^ 


2 < 


5 .£ 


3 < 




o 


s 




3 1 


a t 


D 1 


a 




^J 




< 




i c 




3 


5 P 




f- 


^ 


;! 


5 f' 


H ^ 


5 ^ 


" i 


5 p. 


H |2i 1 




\ 



WATER. 



21 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1862. 







Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


TotaL 


.3 

i 
s 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 

of 

Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


1 


5 

1 

275 

20 


372 

195 

11,220 

633 


3 

2 
81 
34 


83 

147 

2,619 

1,093 






8 

3 

393 

84 


455 


3 






342 


5 


37 
30 


1,031 
899 


14,870 
2,625 




Aggr 












488 


18,292 















Making the total number up to January 1, 1863 24,340 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1862. 



DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 



Where. 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


8 


6 


4 


2 


Ih 


1 


I 


1 


5 


i 

o 
H 


Boston 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 
3 
4 


1 


12 
2 
6 




23 
5 
2 


47 
1 
2 


6 


43 


14 
6 

1 


2 


220 
45 
29 


1 

6 


377 
67 


East Boston. 










1 




46 














Totals... 


1 


4 


1 


1 


9 


1 


20 




.30 


60 


7 


43 


21 


2 


294 


6 


490 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches and 
upwards, eighty-three was on the joints, six by defective pipes, 
eleven by frost, thirteen by settling of earth, two by caps blow- 
ing off, two by defective stop-cocks. Total, one hundered and 
seventeen. Of the leaks in service and two-inch pipes, one 
hundred and thirteen were caused by settling of earth, forty-two 
■stopped by fish, thirty-eight by stiff connections, sixty-two by 
defective pipes, thirty-five by frost, six by turning off water, 
twelve by defective joints, nine stopped by rust, four by tenants. 



2.2 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



six gnawed by rats, twenty-three by defective couplings, one 
stopped by a sponge, four by digging drains, seven by defective 
cocks, one stopped by a stone, nine struck by picks, one by 
cock blowing out. Total, three hundred and seventy-three, 
showing a decrease of eighteen, for the past year ; it will be 
seen that the most of the leaks are occasioned by the settling of 
earth caused by the digging of sewers and drains, and as that 
is a matter which we have no control of, I cannot see any way 
to prevent it. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850 — 1862. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 



LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 



Four inches 
and upwards^ 



32 
64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 



Less than 
four inches. 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 



Total. 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 
531 
592 
508 
490 



Hydrants. 
During the year twenty-two new hydrants have been estab- 
lished, as follows : eleven in the city proper, six in South 
Boston, five in East Boston. 



WATER. 23 

Total number of hydrants established up to January 1, 1863 : 
In Boston proper ..... 949 

South Boston 307 

■' East Boston . . . . . 184 

Brookline ...... 3 

•' Roxbury . . . . . . 12 

Charlestown . . . . . .11 

Chelsea ...... 7 



Total 1,473 

Sixty-three hydrants have been taken out and replaced by 
new or repaired ones. Sixty-eight hydrant boxes have been 
renewed the past year. The hydrants are all in good working- 
order, and have been kept free from frost, although it was re- 
ported at the fire that occurred in Pearl Street on the night of 
December 23, 1862, that the delay was on account of the 
hydrants being frozen ; such was not the fact, as I was informed 
by the engineers. During the extreme cold weather, two men 
are put upon each fire district, whose duty it is to make a daily 
examination of each hydrant, and I am well satisfied that the 
duty is faithfully performed. 

FIRE RESERTOIRS. 

The following list of Fire Reservoirs have been connected 
with the main pipes during the year : 

Boston proper. 

Court Square, opposite City Hall. 

Washington Street, corner Northampton Street. 

Washington " corner Union Park. 

Washington " at Engine House No. 3. 

Washington " at Castle Street. 

Summer " at the junction of Bedford Street. 



24 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Channing Street corner of Federal Street. 
Union " opposite North Street. 

Brattle " opposite Brattle Square. 

South Boston. 

D Street, corner Broadway. 

Broadway, near corner C Street. 

A Street, near corner Broadway. 

Broadway, near corner B Street. 

Broadway, near corner Dorchester Avenue. 

Dorchester Avenue, at Fourth Street. 

Dorchester Avenue, at Fifth Street. 

E Street, between Broadway and Athens Street. 

Broadway, opposite Hawes School House. 

Broadway, corner Dorchester Street. 

Broadway, opposite car house of B. E,. E. Co. 

Old Eoad, half way between Broadway and K Street. 

Second Street, corner Dorchester Street. 



East Boston. 
Chelsea Street, near Decatur Street. 



Meridian ' 


' opposite Lyman School House. 


Sumner ' 


' " Primary School House 


Webster ' 


' " Mr. Lamson's house. 


Saratoga ' 


" No. 29 


Meridian ' 


' " Old Engine House. 


Trenton ' 


" No. 67. 


Monmouth ' 


' corner Marion Street. 


Cottage ' 


' " Sumner Street. 



The stock and labor for the above reservoirs, amounting to 
2,757.54, is charged to the Fire Department. 



WATEE. 25 

Stop Cocks. 

In April the water was shut off from the 40-inch line, in 
order to ascertain the trouble with the 40-inch gate, on the 
Common. It was found that the valve was fitted too close ; 
that was easily repaired, and the water was off of the line about 
fifteen hours. That has been the only occasion that required 
the water to be shut off from either of the main lines the past 
year. Forty-eight new stop-cocks have been put in, and cov- 
ered by new boxes, and eighty-eight stop-cock boxes have been 
renewed. Four 6-inch stop-cocks have been taken out and 
condemned, and others put in their places. All of the stop- 
cocks have been cleaned and oiled during the year. 

Everything connected with the shop has been kept up this 

season, as there has been power enough at all times to do the 

work. 

4 



26 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1863. 



NUMBER OF 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



40 



Pipes 

Blow-off Branches. 

Y Branches 

•3-Way Branches... 
4-Way Branches. . . 

Flange Pipes 

Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves 

Caps 

Eedueers , 

Bevel Hubs 

Curved Pipes 

Quarter Turns 

Double Hubs 

Offset Pipes 

Stop Cocks 

Yoke Pipes 

Man-hole Pipes 

Pieces of Pipes 



43 



Hydrants. 37 Lowell, new, 13 ditto, old ; 11 Wilmarth, 
old ; 1 sample ; 3 New York Pattern. 

For Hydrants. 17 screws, 10 plungers, 46 nipples, 17 valve 
seats, 38 packing boxes, 9 bends, 59 lengtheners, 9 frames, 9 
covers, 24 nipples for wharf hydrants, 90 lbs. castings for 
wharf hydrants. 

For Stop Cocks. 3 3 6 -inch screws, 2 30-inch ditto, 1 16-inch 
ditto, 6 12-inch ditto, 11 6-inch ditto, 3 12-inch plungers, 9 
6-inch ditto, 12 4-inch screws, 5 screws for waste-gates, 8 
6-inch rings, 11 4-inch ditto, 308 lbs. composition castings for 



WATKR. 27 

4-inch, 6 4-inch plungers, 6 6-inch iron screws, 4 4-inch iron 
ditto, 9 frames, 3 covers. 

Meters. 2 3-inch Worthington, 1 3-inch composition ditto, 
8 2-inch ditto, 100 1-inch ditto, 54 f-inch ditto, 6 1-inch iron 
ditto, 6 f-inch ditto, 1 1-inch Scotch, 6 f-inch ditto. 

Stock for Meters. 24 male 1-inch couplings, 11 female ditto, 
97 female f-inch ditto, 22 male f-inch ditto, 52 1-inch connec- 
tion nipples, M f-inch ditto, 4 2-inch ditto, 52 lbs. unfinished 
composition castings, 4 2-inch composition pieces, 4 1-inch ditto, 
3 f-inch ditto, 3 2-inch female couplings, 3 2-inch male ditto, 
56 meter glasses, 1 gross screws, 13 meter clocks, 4 1-inch stop- 
cocks, 10 feet hose, 21 frames and covers. 

For Service Pipes. 13 1-inch union cocks, 51 f-inch ditto, 
25 f-inch ditto, 58 ^-inch ditto, 8 1-inch T cocks, 21 f-inch 
ditto, 20 f-inch ditto, 69 f-inch straight ditto, 70 f-inch cock 
couplings, 400 f-inch ditto, 94 J-inch ditto, 220 tubes for^-inch 
ditto, 6 25-inch connection couplings, 44 l^-inch ditto, 43 J-inch 
ditto, 15 1-inch air-cocks, 638 f-inch unfinished cocks, 335 lbs. 
castings for various sizes cocks, 30 upright tubes, 41 extension 
ditto, 7 flanges, caps, and tubes for 1-inch cocks, 37 caps, 29 
straight boxes, 25 T ditto, 1 Y ditto. 

Lead Pipe. 148 lbs. 2-inch, 4164 lbs. l^-inch, 160 lbs.. 
1-inch, 375 lbs. f-inch, 3408 lbs. f-inch, 337 lbs. pieces, 106 
lbs. f-inch block tin, 633 lbs. sheet lead, 2080 lbs. pig lead. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 2857 lbs. bar iron, 2288 lbs. working 
pieces, 274 lbs. cast steel, 3200 lbs. scrap iron. 

Carpcnter''s Shop. 1500 feet of pine plank, 100 feet of spruce 
boards, 100 feet pine ditto, 200 lbs. spikes, 100 lbs. nails, 3 
hydrant boxes, 40 unfinished ditto, 3 stop-cock ditto, 3 meter 
ditto, 14 tops for ditto. 

Stable. 3 sets of harness, 3 horses, 1 buggy, 1 chaise, 3 
wagons, 2 pungs, 2200 lbs. English hay, 1000 lbs. salt hay, 
12 bushels corn and oats, stable utensils. 

Tools. 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom der- 
rick, 4 geered hand derricks, 2 sets of shears and all the rigging 



28 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 10. 

for the same, tools for laying main and service pipes and for re- 
pairs of same, 2 engines, 1 fox and 1 hand lathe, upright drill- 
ing machine, 3 grindstones, and the necessary tools for carrying 
on the machine, blacksmith's, carpenter's, and plumber's shops, 
3 large tool houses, 2 small ditto, also office furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 1 large proving press for 40-inch 
pipes, 5 swivel pipe patterns, 1 swing stage, capstan frame and 
levers, 1 large copper ball, 1 composition cyhifder, 2 jets, 1 
6-inch cylinder, 2 6-inch jets, 1 reducer and 2 sets oi 12-inch 
plates, 2 4-inch ditto, 3 composition reel jets, 6 cast-iron jets, 
1 drinking fountain, also all the patterns belonging to this de- 
partment, some of which are stored at the foundries where we 
obtain the castings. 

Miscellaneous. 5 man-holes, 6 plates, large lot of old lumber, 
7 large flagging stones, lot of machinery from Marlboro', 70 
tons paving gravel, 900 bricks, ^ bbl. rosin, 8 bundles gasket, 
5 kegs old bolts of various sizes, 4 tons of old cast-iron, 30 lbs. 
rubber packing, 14 proving heads, lot of old hose, 1 large prov- 
ing press for 36-inch pipes, 1 small press. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALBEET STANWOOD, 
Superintendent Eastern Division B. W. W. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Natick, January 5, 1863. 

Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water 
Board : 

Sir : In compliance with the Rules and Regulations of the 
Board, the following Report of matters connected with the West- 
ern Division of the Water Works is respectfully submitted : 

The gate house, outlet dams, and other structures, together 
with the roads and grounds around the lake, are all in good 
order. 

During the year the borders of the lake have been improved 
by laying about fourteen hundred feet of slope wall, and sodding 
the banks. This work had been rendered necessary by the 
washing away of the banks, and in this connection I would 
state that there are many places around the lake where the 
banks are being washed away to such an extent that a few years 
will bring the borders of the lake to the five rod line, and ren- 
der necessary the purchase of more land. This action of the 
water in these places could be stopped at a comparatively small 
expense, and I recommend the subject to the attention of the 
Board. 

By order of the Board the meadow in front of the house 
occupied by me has been much improved by filling up portions 
of it, (which, during the warm weather contained stagnated 
water,) and thereby strengthening the dam between this meadow 
and the lake. 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

In April I commenced filling up the cut between Dudley 
Pond and the lake to the level of the adjoining land, and it was 
left in as good, if not better condition, than before the cut was 
made. The owners of the land were satisfied, and the residents 
of the town much pleased, at the improvements made in the 
highway. 

The survey of Dudley Pond, ordered by the Board, has been 
completed by Henry M. Wightman, from the City Engineer's 
office, and the surveys for the re-location of old bounds are pro- 
gressing satisfactorily. When the proper locations for the 
bounds are fixed, stone monuments are put down instead of 
stakes, and in future there will be no difficulty in finding them. 

Dug Pond, last spring, lacked four feet of being full. This 
deficiency was caused by some person or persons destroying the 
dam across a brook leading into the lake. Mr. Knight ac- 
quired the right to divert the water from this brook , through an 
artificial channel, into Dug Pond, to insure the filling of the 
pond by spring ; this right Mr. Knight- conveyed to the City, 
but it is disputed by the owners of land on the brook, both 
above and below the dam, and although the City, during the 
life of Mr. Knight, has undoubtedly the right to divert the 
water of this brook, still I would recommend to the Board a 
settlement with these owners to avoid difficulty in future, and 
secure to the City the perpetual right to divert the brook. 

The bridges, culverts, waste-weirs, and embankments on the 
line of the aqueduct, are all in good condition. The iron screws 
and rods connected with the gates in the waste-weirs, having 
become insecure by rust, were replaced by composition screws 
and new iron rods. 

The interior of the aqueduct during the year has been exam- 
ined a number of times, and thoroughly cleansed. No new 
cracks have been discovered, and no alteration is perceptible in 
the old ones, with the exception of the one at Bennet's land in 
Brighton, mentioned in my report of last year. At this place 
one side of the top arch had settled an inch or more below the 



WATER. 31 

other; I shored it to prevent its settling any more, and upon 
examination this year, the other side was found to be even with 
it, and the crack seemed to be in better condition than it was a 
year ago. I removed the shores, and pointed the crack, so 
that any further settling would be discovered. This portion of 
the conduit should be thoroughly repaired, but it is impossible 
to do it, as the Brookline Reservoir is not large enough to keep 
the city supplied while the work is being done. If any accident 
to the conduit should occur at this place, great inconvenience 
would ensue before the damage could be repaired. 

Everything connected with Brookline Reservoir is in good 
condition, with the exception of the gate to the 40-inch main in 
the gate house, which will be repaired as soon as circumstances 
will permit. The town of Brookline having laid out a new 
road back of the reservoir, and altered the grade of the road in 
front of it, a number of alterations were rendered necessary, 
which by order of the Board have been satisfactorily completed, 
and the reservoir has again resumed its usual neat and orderly 
appearance, which during the progress of the work, it was im- 
possible to maintain. 

Annexed is a schedule of tools, &c., belongmg to the City, 
and used on this Division. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. F. KNOWLTON, 
Superintendent of Western Division. 



The following property is in charge of, and used by the 
Superintendent of the Western Division : — 

1 Horse Cart and Harness. 

1 Express Harness. 

2 Boats and 2 oars. 

39 Wheelbarrows and 1 Handcart. 
73 Shovels and 18 Picks. 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 

4 Crowbars, 4 Eammers. 

2 Grindstones, 6 Water Pails. 

1 Pair Rubber Boots. 

6 Lanterns, 2 Aqueduct Lamps. 

2 Hammers, 1 Level. 

2 Handsaws, 2 Grass Hooks. 

2 Iron Wrenches at Gate House. 

2 • '* " " Brookline Reservoir. 

4 Trowels, 2 Hoes, 4 Axes. 

1 Fluid Can and Oil Filler. 

1 Pair Hedge Shears. 

2 Scythes and 1 Scythe Snaith. 

1 Stove, 1 Desk. 

2 Whitewash Brushes. 
1 Gravel Scow. 

1 Rain Guage. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Office of Watek Eegistrae, City Hall, 
Boston, January 1, 1863. 

E. Johnson, Esq., President of the Gochituate Water Board: 

SiE : The undersigned respectfully presents to the Gochituate 
Water Board his Annual Report for the year 1862, in compli- 
ance with the sixteenth section of the Ordinance passed October 
31, 1850. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1863, is 26,289, being an increase since Jan. 1, 1862, of 803. 

During the year there has been 1,204 cases where the water 
has been shut off, all of which were for non-payment of water 
rates. 

The total number of cases were the water has been turned on 
is 1,248 ; of these 774 were cases which had been shut oiF for 
non-payment of water rates, and 474 were turned on for the 
first time. 

The total amount received from December 31, 

1861, to January 1, 1863, is . . .$373,922 88 
Of the above, there was received for water us^d 

in previous years the sum of $9, 886. 51; leav- 
ing the receipts for water used during the year 

1862, the sum of $364,036.37. In addition 
to the above there has been received for letting 
on water, in cases where it had been turned off 

for non-payment of rates, the sum of . . 1,548 00 



Total amount $375,470 ^^ 



34 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10 



The increased amount of income in 1862, over 

the previous year, is ..... $8,599 42 
The amount of assessments now made for the 

present year, is 298,775 89 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 

of water during the year 1863, is . . 385,000 00 
The expenditures of my department during the 

year 1862, have been .... 3,615 51 

The items of this expenditure have been as follows : — '■ 

Paid Charles L. Bancroft, for services as clerk . $ 900 00 

" Stephen Badlam, " " . 900 00 

" Edwin Jennings, for services as inspector . 782 50 

" Charles C. Badlam, " " . 782 50 

" J. L. Fairbanks, for books and stationery . 158 51 

" E. D. Child, for distributing bills . . 32 00 

♦« William Souther, for distributing bills . . 30 00 

" Stephen Eussell, for " " . 30 00 

Amount $3,615 51 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam en- 
gines, &c., in the city of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the 1st of January, 1863, with the amount of water 
rates paid for 1862 : — 



18,523 Dwelling-houses 
15 Boarding " 
105 Model " 

5 Lodging " 
25 Hotels 
3,791 Stores and shops 
187 Buildings . 



$218,559 55 

856 00 

4,314 75 

124 50 

2,741 00 

32,075 47 

7,617 09^ 



Amount carried forward, 



$266,288 36 



WATER. 



35 



Amount brought forward, 
296 Offices 
53 Printing offices 
22 Banks 
20 Halls . 

3 Theatres 
22 Private schools 

8 Asylums 

5 Green houses 

1 Catholic College 

1 Medical College 
60 Churches . 

8 Markets 
121 Cellars 
404 Restaurants and saloons 

11 Club houses 

7 Bath houses . 
13 Packing houses 
958 Stables . 
15 Factories . 

3 Breweries 

5 Beer factories 

7 Bleacheries 

60 Bakeries 

5 Ship yards 
1 Dry dock . 
3 Dry docks and engines 

61 Shops and engines 

9 Stores and engines . 

6 Mills and engines 

7 Foundries and engines 
9 Factories and engines 
9 Printing offices and engines 



$266,288 36 
2,204 88 
721 17 
255 50 
299 50 
146 50 
203 50 
391 63 

39 00 
197 00 

50 00 
554 37 
879 00 
746 34 
5,045 26 
234 50 
310 00 
203 00 
10,462 93 
355 83 

67 50 
159 25 

73 50 
475 00 

54 25 

15 00 
113 75 
4,306 93 
748 39 
697 53 
283 80 
522 87 
759 67 



Amount carried forward, 



$297,865 71 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Amount hrought forward 
Bakeries and engines 



Ship yards and engines 
Bindery and engine 
Buildings and engines 
42 Stationary engines 

1 Pottery 

5 Armories . 
3 Gymnasiums . 

712 Hose 
27 Fountains 

2 Gas light companies 
1 Milldam company . 
1 Post office . 
1 State House . 
1 Massachusetts State Prison 

27 Steamboats 

3 Railroad companies 

1 House, First Street (city) 

2 Offices (Niles Block) . 
1 Office (City Scales) 

1 Office (Harbor Master) 

6 Fire-alarm motors .... 

22 Engines, hose, and hook and ladder houses 
271 Public schools .... 

8 Police stations ..... 

2 City stables ..... 

1 Offal station ..... 

1 Steamer Henry Morrison 

1 Court House 

1 Probate Building .... 

1 Dead House ..... 

1 House of Correction 



$297,865 71 

117 40 

120 83 

67 91 

940 17 

1,515 90 

35 00 

57 25 

61 50 

2,159 00 

163 00 

1,028 91 

300 00 

61 50 

134 50 

817 74 

4,153 69 

850 00 

6 00 

42 00 

9 00 

6 00 

65 00 

397 00 

1,847 00 

625 00 

112 50 

150 00 

192 56 

262 50 

47 50 

10 00 

462 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$314,684 07 



WATER. 


37 


Amount brought forward. 


$314,684 07 


1 Jail for Suffolk County 


243 00 


1 Lunatic Hospital . . 


225 00 


1 Public Library ..... 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall 


40 00 


1 City Hall 


50 00 


1 City Building . . . . . 


37 50 


Common Sewer Depart. , (making mortar) , 


75 00 


Urinals, &c., F. H. Market . 


70 00 


Contractors for supplying shipping 


4,376 93 


Street sprinkling . . . . . 


410 00 


Building purposes . . . 


1,609 70 


Navy Yard (Charlestown) 


634 98 


Custom House ..... 


156 00 


Measured water . . . . . 


41,374 19 


Total .. 


$364,036 37 



38 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Statement showing the number and sizes of Water Meters now in 
use, and where applied, to January 1, 1863. 



Eevere House . 

Parker House 

American House 

Marlboro' Hotel . 

Adams House . 

Coolidge House 

Tremont House 

United States Hotel 

Winthrop House 

Bromfield House . 

Hotel Pelham . 

Sailors' Home 

City Hotel 

Mariners' House . 

Pearl Street House . 

Boston Hotel 

Young's Hotel . 

New England House 

Merrimac House 

Wildes' Hotel 

Massachusetts Hotel 

J. Adams (Boarding House) 

Boston Sugar Eefinery 

Boston and Worcester Eailroad Company 

Boston and Maine Railroad Company 

Old Colony Railroad Company 

Pitchburg Railroad Company 

Eastern Railroad Company 

South Boston Gas Company 

East Boston Gas Company 

Norway Iron Company 

Bay State Rolling Mill . 

Boston Gas Light Company 

J. Trull & Co. (Distillery) 

J. M. Barnard " 

S. Bowman, " 

Pelton & Waters " 

Stephen Jenney " 

Stephen Jenney (Oil Mill) 

W. E. French (Distillery) 

John Pelton, " 

Hodges & Silsbee (Chemicals) 

W. D. Philbrick, " 

Downer's Kerosene Oil Company 

Shawmut Oil Company 

Amounts carried forward, 



SIZE OF METERS. 



f inch. 1 inch. 2 inch. 3 inch 



31 



53 



WATER. 



39 



f inch. 1 inch. 2 inch. 3 inch 



Amounts hroiight forward, 
Oriental Oil Company .... 
Lee, Woodman, & Co. (Oil Mill) . 
Pembroke Forge Company . 
G. & W. Smith (Brewery) 
Henry N. Hooper & Co. (Foundry) 
William Carleton (Foundry) . 
Ambrose Louis (Chemicals) . 
W. K. Lewis (Pickle Manufactory) 
W. H. Davis, " " . . 

J. B. Hamblen & Co. (Pickle Manufactory) 
American Grist Mill .... 
Mount Washington Glass Company . 
Chickering & Sons (Piano Manufactory) 
Boston Crystal Glass Company 
Dexter, Lambert, & Co. (Tassel Manufactory) 
Sanborn, Richardson, & Co. (Iron Pipe Manf.) 
Grover, Baker, & Co. (Sewing Machine Manf.) 
Cunard Steamship Company . 
East Boston Ferry Company 
Chelsea Ferry Company . 
People's Ferry Company 
Hazelton & Locke (Paper Manufactory) 
Henry Souther (Brewery) . 
Evans & Hoyt (Distillery) 
G. S. Evans (Sugar Manufactory) 
Albion Building .... 

McLean Asylum .... 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Globe Locomotive Works 
Aquila Adams (Machine Shop) 
William Evans, " " 

Torreys & Co. (Marble Works) 
Hill, Dwinell, & Co. (Spice Mill) 
Hinckley, Williams, & Co. (Foundry) 
Aquarial Gardens 
M. Grant (Marble Works) 
Briggs & Robinson (Steam Engine) 
Banker & Carpenter (Paint Mill) 
F. Alger (Powder Mill) 
United States Marine Hospital 
Loring, Bangs, & Co. (Chemicals) 
Bowker, Torrey, & Co. (Marble Works) 
Houston & Pierce (Planing Mill) . 
E. H. Maxwell (Brewery) 
Atlantic Works (Machine Shop) . 
A. Wentworth & Co. (Marble Works) 
Cutting's Aquarial Garden 
Kittredge & Co. (Turpentine Works) 
William Rutledge (Brewery) 
Hart, Baldwin, & Co. (Packing House) 
E. L. Gowen (Marble Works) 

Total 



31 



63 



53 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



84 



10 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sales of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848 : — 



Fro 



m October 25, 1848, to January 1, 1850, 



January 1, 1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 
1859, 
1860, 
1861, 
1862, 



1851, 

1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 
1859, 
1860, 
1861, 
1862, 
1863, 



Total, 



$72,043 20 

98,367 90 

161,299 72 

179,486 25 

196,352 32 

217,007 51 

266,302 77 

282,651 84 

289,328 83 

302,409 73 

314,808 97 

334,544 86 

365,323 46 

373,922 88 

$3,453,850 24 



WATER. 



41 



Statement showing the number and kind of Water Fixtures con- 
tained within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Bus- 
ton, to January 1, 1863, as compared with 1861. 



1861. 


1862. 


REMARKS. 


4,680 


4,766 


Taps ; these have no connection with any drain or sewer. 


34,503 


36,255 


Sinks. 


12,046 


13,127 


Wash-hand basins. 


4,331 


4,660 


Bathing- tubs. 


4,831 


5,216 


Pan water-closets. 


4,298 


6,252 


Hopper water-closets. 


256 


816 


Self-acting water-closets. 


1,383 


1,408 


Urinals. 


3,868 


4,390 


Wash-tubs ; these are permanently attached to the 
building. 


13 


16 


Shower-baths ; these are in houses where there is 
no tubs. 


10 


12 


Hydraulic rams. 


709 


714 


Private hydrants. 


171 


211 


Slop-hoppers. 


71,099 


77,843 


Total. 



Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, Water Registrar. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, Boston, January, 1863. 
Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., President of the Cockitiiate Water 
Board : 

Sir : The following report of matters connected with the 
Water Works is respectfully submitted. 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

During the past year the water in the lake has fluctuated in 
the following manner : — 

On the 1st of January, 1862, the water stood at the depth of 
six feet and one inch above the bottom of the conduit, this being 
three inches too low to fill the conduit, — its height being six 
feet and four inches, — and being seven feet and eleven inches 
below high-water mark. The water kept gradually falling until 
January 25, when it stood at a depth of five feet above the bot- 
tom of the conduit. It then commenced rising, and continued 
to rise until the 7th of February, when it had again risen to six 
feet above the bottom of the conduit, at which height it stood 
one week. It afterwards fell only a few inches below this 
height, and again, on the 5th of March, it stood at six feet 
above the bottom of the conduit. From this time it gradually 
rose until the 4th of May, when it reached high-water mark, 
equal fourteen feet above the bottom of the conduit. It kept 
full ten days and again commenced falling, and fluctuated be- 
tween the heights of thirteen and fourteen feet, until the 1st of 
August. It afterwards fluctuated, but gradually fell down to 
eight feet ten inches, on the 27th of October. It then com- 



WATER. 43 

mencecl rising again, and on the 18th of December it had risen 
to eleven feet and two inches. On the 1st of January, 1863, it 
stood at eleven feet one inch above the bottom of the conduit. 

During three days and a half in the month of May, water was 
wasted from the lake into Sudbury River, amounting in all to 
33,200,000 gallons, equal to about two days' supply for the 
city. This was the total amount of waste for the whole year. 

During the year it will be seen that we have gained a depth 
of five feet of water in the lake, equal to about sixty days' sup- 
ply, — nearly one fifth of the number of days in the year, — but 
we have also had about one fifth more than the average annual 
rain fall, showing that we used an amount equal to the average 
annual rain fall, and also showing that we are now using all 
that the lake can be relied on to furnish us annually. 

We need more storage room with the present means of sup- 
ply, as well as a new source of supply. 



44 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 10. 



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46 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Loss of Head from the Broohline Reservoir to Beacon Hill and 
East Boston Reservoirs. 

The effect of increased consumption of water in the city may 
be seen, by reference to the table in this and previous reports 
o^ average annual heights of water in the reservoirs. 

A synopsis is given in the following table. 



Average Annual Heights of Water 
above Marsh Level, in 



Brookline 
Reservoir. 



Beacon Hill 
Reservoir, 



East Boston 
Reservoir. 



^ k U 

t>- M £ 

-d o S 

H d ^ 

>w s :a 

o 2 g 



W § W 



1^ ffi M 



1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1868. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 



123.16 
123.36 
123.67 
122.86 
123.65 
123.82 
123.66 
124.11 
124.63 
124.07 
123.29 
123.52 
123.56 



119.04 
119.39 
116.60 
114.89 
115.69 
117.79 
116.15 
114.77 
116.00 
115.24 
117.13 
116.98 
117.21 



105.06 
104.07 
104.91 
99.84 
97.49 
94.11 
94.18 
94.42 
94.05 
96-01 
96.05 
95.29 



4.12 
3.97 
7.07 
7.97 
7.96 
6.03 
7.51 
9.34 
8.63 
8.83 
6.16 
6.54 
6.35 



18.30 
19.60 
17.95 
23.81 
26.33 
^9.55 
29.93 
30.21 
30.02 
27.28 
27.47 
28.27 



WATER. 



47 



Conduit. 

The following table shows the different heights at which the 
water has been running, and the number of days in each month 
at the different heights. 

The heio-ht of the conduit is six feet four inches. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 






These heights show a 
bead on the Conduit. 




0.0 


5.0 


5.2 


5.3 


5.6 


5.9 


5.H 


6.0 


6.4 


6.6 


6.9 


7.0 


7.6 


8.0 




NUMBER OF DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 






1 


9 


7 


6 


5 
9 

4 


1 

9 


2 
10 
2 










































17 
29 
24 


1 


3 




4 






1 




























7 












2 

2 

1 
1 
















5 


23 
27 
30 
29 
31 
15 
7 






July 




















2 


















































































1 
















1 
17 




13 






















5 


2 


























Total ■. 


8 


1 


9 


7 


6 


18 


10 


14 


88 


8 


21 


162 


11 


9, 








' 





It will be seen by this table that the conduit has been empty 
only eight days during the year. It has been just full eighty- 
eight days ; less than full sixty-five days ; and for two hundred 
and four days it has been running with a head on it, varying 
from two inches to one foot and eight inches. 



48 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 10. 



Monthly Fall of Rain in Inches, in 1862. 





PLACES AND OBSEKVBRS. 


MONTH. 


11 

Hi H 


a a 

1 - 


Lowell, by 

Merrimac Manufac. Co. 

J. B. Francis. 


Lowell, by 

Locks and Canals Co. 

J. B. Francis. 


>> 

hn d 
•73 o 

S ^ 

6 6 


January 

February 

March . - , 

April 

May 


, 7.82 
1.08 
4.18 
1.85 
2.71 
6.58 
6.54 
1.43 
2.62 
4.83 
7.69 
2.36 


8.30 
3.29 
4.70 
1.97 
2.70 
6.78 
7.33 
4.20 
5.61 
4.85 
8.32 
3.01 


6.86 
3.27 
4.85 
1.75 
1.99 
6.04 
5.20 
2.29 
1.87 
3.92 
4.60 
1.62 


6.02 

2.68 
5.20 
2.22 
1.90 
5.77 
5.20 
2.55 
2.18 
3.62 
5.08 
2.29 


7.70 
2.79 
6.21 
1.73 
2.32 
6.29 


July 

August 

September 

October 

November . — 
December 


5.05 
6.29 
4.66 
5.24 
6.73 
2.20 


Totals 


49.69 


61.06 


44.26 


44.61 


57.21 



Note. — Melted snow is, as usual, included in the above amounts of rain-fall. 



WATER. 



49 



Annual Amount of Rain-Fall, in Inches, in Lake Cochituate, Boston, 
and vicinity, 1852 to 1862, inclusive. 





PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 


TEAR. 


1 ^ 
a i 

1-5 H 


« a 

1 ^. 
ffl Hi 


6 ^ 


1 t 
^ f4 


Lowell, by 

Merriniac Manufac. Co. 

J. B. Francis. 


Lowell, by 

Looks aud Canals Co. 

J. B. Francis. 


« 1 


1852.. 
1853.. 
1854.. 
1855.. 
1856.. 
1857.. 
1858.. 
1859.. 
I860.. 
1861.. 
1862.. 


43.15 
34.96 
40.80 
63.10 
48.66 
49.02 
55.44 
46.44 
49.69 


47.94 
48.86 
45.71 
44.19 
52.16 
56.87 
52.67 
56.70 
51.46 
50.07 
61.06 


40.51 
53.83 
45.17 
47.59 
53.79 
57.92 
45.46 

46.95 
50.14 


42.24 
45.04 
41.29 
40.63 
42.83 
44.04 
37.40 
48.49 


42.78 
43.92 
42.08 
44.89 
42.49 
49.38 
37.73 
47.51 
46.91 
43.32 
44.26 


48.41 
45.97 
52.02 
35.80 
48.41 
46.67 
42.95 
44.61 


38.58 
53.27 
46.25 
39.05 
40.97 
44.74 
44.51 
45.29 
38.24 



According to Mr. J. P. Hall's measurements of rain-fall in 
Boston, the average annual amount for twenty-nine years pre- 
vious to 1852 was 42.24 inches ; and for one third of that time 
the annual amount was less than the average of 41 inches. In 
1828 it was only 32.41 inches. 

The above table gives the average annual amount in Boston, 
for the past eleveu years, — 1852 to 1862, inclusive, — as 
7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 10. 

51.61 inches, or an increase over the average for the previous 
twenty-nine years of 22 per cent. A similar increase has taken 
place, to a greater or less extent, at all the places mentioned in 
the above table ; showing that since the construction of the 
Water Works the annual rain-fall has been much larger than 
we have a right to expect or calculate on for any series of 
years. 

In Providence, R. I., Prof. Caswell makes the average an- 
nual rain-fall, for twenty-nine years previous to 1861, equal 
40.7 inches. 

Respectfully submitted. » 

JAMES SLADE, City Engineer. 



w^ 



':^^:-<^l,!^'^i^ 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One Tolume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates HalL 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 

than 14: days. 

• 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates HaU. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.