(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"





-/A' 



.y/rrr.^^ _ljyM.^MlMl cAfMifi. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiiye 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofco1863bost 



City Document, — No, 20. 



(pa^^ ®iF iB®§^(DKr( 




REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOB THB TEA! 



1863. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 11, 1864. 

Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to make their Annual Report in print. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

OTIS NORCROSS, Chairman. 

In Common Council, January 14, 1864. 
Concurred. 

GEORGE S. HALE, President. 

Approved, January 16, 1864. 

F. W. LINCOLN, Jr., Mayor. 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochittiatb Water Boasd, 

Boston, January 15, 1864. 

To THE City Council : — 

The Cochituate Water Board, in conformity with 
the City Ordinance, respectfully submit their Annual 
Report of matters connected with the important Works 
entrusted to their care and management, together with 
the Reports of the Clerk of this Board, Superintendents, 
Water Registrar, and City Engineer, which contain 
statements of the finances and general condition of the 
Works. 

The Receipts and Expenditures during the past year, 
it appears from the Report of the Clerk of the Board, 
hereto annexed, are as follows : — 

There has been drawn from the Treasury during the 

year, $98,545 64 

Of this amount there is charged for extension of the 

Works, . . . . . . . 65,613 33 



Making the amount of Current Expenses^ . $32,932 31 



6 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 20. 

Showing that the expenses have been about twenty- 
jfive hundred dollars more than the previous year ; this 
increased expense has been caused chiefly by the great 
advance in price of all materials and labor. 

The receipts and expenditures on account of the 
Water Works, from the commencement, to January 1, 
1864, it appears, have been as follows : — 

Amounts paid by the Commissioners and by the 
Water Boards, from the time the Works came 
under the control of the latter, . . $5,919,859 02 

Sundry payments by the City, and discounts and 

interest on loans, .... 4,068,350 84 



$9,988,209 Se 
From which should be deducted 

sundry credits by the City, $ 63,797 76 

Amounts received from the Com- 
missioners and Water Boards, 167,483 98 
Amounts rec'd for Water Eates, 3,848,356 49 

4,079,637 23 



Leaving the cost of the Works, January 1, 1864, $5,908,572 63 



There is charged this year to the account of the 
Waterworks, by the City Treasurer, g 72,364.20, paid 
for exchange and premium on gold, which was required 
to pay the interest on the Water Loan. 

The Annual Report of the Water Registrar shows 
that the total amount received for Water was ^394,- 
506.25, of which $381,509.10 w^as for Water used 
during the year 1863, being an increase over the pre- 
vious vear of $20,583.37. The whole number of 



WATER. 7 

Water-takers now entered for the year 1864, is 26,581, 
an increase of 292 over last year. The estimated in- 
come from sales of Water in 1864, is $430,000. 

There has been 93 new Metres connected during the 
year, making the whole number now in use 254 ; as 
follows: 3 4-inch, 7 3-inch, 12 2-inch, 115 1-inch, and 
117 f-inch. 

The more general use of meters, where large quan- 
tities of Water are consumed, has proved very satisfac- 
tory, and has greatly increased the receipts ; in places 
where a large number of hands are employed they are 
liable to be careless, and a great deal of water is 
wasted, but when the proprietors are obliged to pay 
for it by the gallon, they find it for their interest to do 
what they can to prevent this waste. 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

The Works in this Division are in good condition. 

The number of feet of Main Pipe laid the past year 
is 12,150, exceeding that of the previous year by about 
1,700 feet. The total number of feet laid from the 
commencement of the Works, to January 1, 1864, is 
714,943 feet, being a little more than 135 miles. The 
Main Pipe in Chelsea Street, East Boston, between 
Decatur and Marion streets, has been taken up and 
relaid on the east side of the street, and, together with 
the Service Pipes, have been raised to conform to the 
change of grade of the street. 

At the request of the Board there was appropriated, 
during the past year, by the City Council, the sum of 
835,000, for raising the Main Pipe on Tremont Street, 



^ CITY DOCUMENT- — No. 20. 

between Waltham and Springfield streets, but on ac- 
count of the high price of all materials, as before stated, 
together with the great scarcity of men at the present 
time, it has been thought best by this Board to defer 
this work till a more favorable opportunity. 

On Beacon Street, between Berkley and Dedham 
streets, 1109 feet of 6-inch iron pipe has been taken 
up, and 12-inch laid in place of it, and Hydrants of our 
largest patterns established at proper distances ; this 
was rendered necessary on account of the great number 
of new buildings erected on that street, requiring more 
Water than the 6-inch pipe could deliver, and also in 
case of fire in that vicinity. 

The 30-inch Main, on the Common, has been con- 
nected with the Main running through Boylston Street. 
There being no connection between these pipes except 
at Chester Park, it was thought best to have them all 
connected on the Common in case of accident or 
break. 

The 40-inch Main has been shut off once during 
the year, to niake the above connection. The 36-inch 
twice, for repairs, and the 30-inch once, to make the 
connection, and once, to renew a Hydrant on the 
Common. 

The number of feet of Service Pipe laid during the 
year was 19,241, being a slight increase over last year. 
The whole number of Service Pipes laid, to January 1, 
1864, is 24,835. 

The number of new Stop Cocks is 46, making the 
whole number 1282. 

The number of new Hydrants established is 29, mak- 
ing the whole number 1502. 



WATEU. 9 

The whole number of leaks which occurred and were 
repaired, in the iron pipes of 4 inches and upwards, 
was 97 ; last year 117 ; in those of less than 4 inches, 
including service pipes, 397 ; the previous year it was 
373. The causes of these leaks are stated in the Eeport 
of the Superintendent. 

Twenty-six Fire Reservoirs have been connected with 
Main Pipes, the expense of which is charged to the 
Fire Department. The whole number now connected 
is 81. 

The several Reservoirs in this Division are in excel- 
lent condition. The repairs made last year on Beacon 
Hill Reservoir prove satisfactory, no leaks are to be 
seen, and it is believed to be in as good condition as it 
ever was ; the iron and wood work has been painted, 
which has improved its appearance very much. Those 
at East and South Boston show no appearance of leak- 
ing, with the head of water with, which we can supply 
them at the present time ; both have been cleansed 
during the year, the fence around the East Boston 
Reservoir has been put in good repair, and the grounds 
arouni these Reservoirs are in good condition. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

All the Works in charge of the Superintendent of 
this Division, are in their usual ^ood condition. The 
slope wall on the banks of the Lake has been some- 
what extended, and it is thought best to continue it in 
all exposed places around the Lake, and also on the 
banks of the roads crossing the southern portion of 
it, to prevent them from being washed by the Spring 
freshets or extreme high water, 

2 



10 CTTY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

Early in the season the water in Dug Pond was one 
foot above high-water mark ; soon after a leak was 
discovered in the drain leading from the Pond to the 
Lake ; in order to repair it the Superintendent was 
obliged to draw the Water from it ; the drain was then 
thoroughly repaired, and the Pond is now full. The 
Board have not yet been able to effect a settlement for 
a perpetual right to divert the waters of a brook on 
the east side of this Pond, to fill it, but feel confident 
of doing so very soon. 

Last Spring a leak was discovered in the gate-cham- 
ber at Dudley Pond, which was caused by the frost. 
The leak was stopped, but the masonry cannot be 
permanently repaired until the water is drawn down. 
The Pond is now full again, and wasting from the 
outlet. 

The Pipe-Chambers, Bridges, and Culverts are in good 
order. During the year the interior of the Aqueduct 
has been thoroughly cleansed, and has been examined 
a number of times by the Board, City Engineer, and 
Superintendent of this Division. Some new cracks 
were found and repaired. One in the bottom of the 
Aqueduct at Ware's Valley was four hundred feet in 
length, through which the water had filtered and satu- 
rated the earth, causing it to settle from the brick-work 
and leaving quite a large cavity, in some places eighteen 
inches deep, and from eight to twelve inches wide. It was 
repaired by cutting out a number of courses of brick, 
and filling the cavity with concrete, replacing the brick- 
work, and plastering the inside with English cement. 
It is considered to be in good condition at the present 
time ; but if the embankments continue to settle, it may 



WATER. 11 

cause a break in the Aqueduct which might be far 
more disastrous than the one which occurred in 1859, 
and would probably cause at any rate a much greater 
amount of damage. 

The City Engineer recommends to " strengthen those 
portions of the Aqueduct resting upon embankments by 
concrete foundations, and backing of the same niaterial 
as high as the top of the invert." When the Works are 
in condition to do this, it might be well to consider, in 
this particular case, whether it would not be better to 
move the pipe-chamber on the west bank of Charles 
E-iver to nearly the west end of the embankment, and 
extend the pipes or larger ones over the bridge that 
crosses the road to it ; then, in case the bank settled, it 
would start the lead in the joints only, which could be 
driven in very readily. 

The grounds around Brookline Reservoir are in good 
condition, six iron screws have been taken out and 
replaced by composition, and the wood and iron work 
have been painted. 

It appears by the Report of the City Engineer, that 
there is a difference of opinion with regard to the 
quantity of water actually consumed by the City for a 
number of years past, caused probably by taking meas- 
urements at different places, and different modes of 
computing it. The Board have considered the esti- 
mated consumption too high, judging from the quantity 
drawn from Brookline Reservoir, when the water has 
been shut off at the Lake. It is desirable that some 
method may be devised to determine the quantity cor- 
rectly. The estimated daily consumption of water 
during the past year is less than in 1862, and the 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

receipts have been more ; which is gratifying to the 
Board. It will be seen also that 2,165,696,470 gallons 
have been wasted from the Lake, during the year, all 
of which might have been saved if we had a reservoir 
of sufficient capacity to store it, and would have sup- 
plied the City for a number of weeks ; and in case of a 
break in the Aqueduct would have given ample time to 
repair it. During the year the water has been shut off 
at the Lake eleven times, to examine and repair the 
Aqueduct. After it is off, it takes twelve hours to 
draw the water from it sufficiently to commence work ; 
and but once has it been off more than twenty-four 
hours at any one time ; then it was off thirty-seven 
hours to repair the leak before mentioned at Ware's 
Valley ; but so grave were the complaints from the high 
service of short supply of water, that an express was 
sent to the Lake to have it let on. After it was let bn, 
il took a week to fill Brookline Reservoir, so that when 
the water is let on a week must elapse before it can be 
shut off again. By this it will be seen that, if there 
should be a bad break at this season of the year, the 
City would be entirely out of water before it could be 
repaired. In the Eeport of last year, the attention of 
the City Council was called to the importance of having 
another reservoir. During the year this subject has 
received the serious consideration of this Board, and a 
number of places within a few miles of the City have 
been examined, which are well adapted by nature for 



WATER. 13 

this purpose ; and we again respectfully call your 
serious attention to this very important subject. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

EBENEZER JOHNSON, President. 

GEORGE P. FRENCH, 

GEORGE DENNIE, 

JABEZ FREDERICK, 

L. MILES STANDISH, 

GEORGE HINMAN, 

NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the Cochituate Water Board, 
from December 31, 1862, to January 1, 1864. 



Laying main pipe, for stock, &c. 


. $2,475 82 


Laying service pipe 


23 87 


Plumbing Shop, for stock 


49 75 


Blacksmith Shop, for stock, &c. 


336 72 


Pipe Yard, building shed and repairs 


217 31 


Stationery (including stationery for Watei 


Regis- 


trar and Superintendents) . . . 


281 91 


Oil .... 


111 84 


Travelling expenses 


96 56 


Tools . . . 


511 18 


Carting . . . . 


490 51 


Meters .... 


7,884 27 


Fountains . ' . , 


185 54 


Taxes . • . 


228 63 


Stable . . . . 


1,355 57 


Proving Yard, for stock, &c. 


642 81 


Wages laying main pipe 


3,772 93 


" laying service pipe . 


7,127 98 


" blacksmith shop 


533 43 


<' plumbing shop 


177 81 


" proving yard 


2,540 59 


Amount carried forward 


. $29,045 53 



WATEK. 



15 



Amount brought forward 

Miscellaneous Expense. Binding Reports, filling 
pond on the Public Garden, annual visit of the 
City Grovernment to the Lake, and expenses of 
the Board, &c., &c, . 

Repairing hydrants 
" streets 

" service pipe 

" main pipe 

'* stop-cocks 

Stop-cocks .... 

Salaries (including Superintendent's and Clerk'i 
in Water Registrar's office) 

Off and on water 

Maintaining meters 

Printing (including Water Registrar's and Super- 
intendent's.) . . . 

Postage and express 

Lake .... 

Aqueduct repairs 

Office expense . 

Beacon Hill Reservoir 

East Boston " 

South Boston " 

Brookline " 

Hydrants . 

Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 

Main pipe . 

Service pipe 

Tolls and ferriag-es . 

Amount carried forward 



$29,045 53 



1,048 


04 


1,323 


95 


2,309 


85 


2,820 


60 


1,191 


78 


213 


Q6 


. 3,005 


01 


8,790 


08 


2,968 


09 


732 


04 


403 


66 


38 


99 


4,918 


27 


2,293 


64 


1,082 


72 


1,059 


10 


492 


26 


280 


20 


1,805 


04 


1,057 


05 


1,834 


74 


19,835 


44 


9,827 


17 


168 


73 


. $98,545 


64 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

Amount brought forwird . . . $98,545 64 



CASH PAID CITT TREASURER. 

Received rent of arches under Beacon Hill Reser- 
voir . . . . $ 300 00 
Received for land sold . . 600 00 
Received for pipe, laying, repairing, &c. 7,342 46 
Received for grass . . . 40 00 
Received for off and on water, for 
repairs . . . $1,437 00 
Received for off and on wa- 
ter, for waste and fines . 281 00 
Received for off and on wa- 
ter, for non-payment . 1,330 00 



$3,048 00 
Less this amount paid to 

the City Treasurer . 1,330 00 

1,718 00 

10,000 46 



Balance . . . • $88,545 18 



Amount of expenditures . . . . $98,545 64 



EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 



"Wages laying main pipe . . $3,772 93 

«< laying service pipe . 7,127 98 

** blacksmith shop . . 533 43 

*< plumbing shop . 177 81 

'« proving yard . . 2,540 59 



Armunts carried forward . $14,152 74 $98,545 64 



WATE 


R. 




17 


Amounts brought forward 


. $14,152 


74 $98,545 


64 


Main pipe 


19,835 


44 




Service pipe 


9,827 


17 




Laying main pipe, &c. 


2,475 


82 




Laying service pipe 


23 


87 




Blacksmith shop 


336 


72 




Plumbing shop 


49 


75 




Hydrant and stop-cock boxes . 


1,700 


00 




Stable 


1,100 


00 




Oil . 


111 


84 




Hydrants . 


1,057 


05 




Stop-cocks 


3,005 


01 




Carting 


440 


00 




Tolls and ferriage 


120 


00 




Tools . . . 


300 


00 




Proving yard for stock, &c. 


600 


00 




Meters . . . 


7,884 


27 




Lake and Dudley Pond 


2,393 


65 




Pipe yard for new shed 


200 


00 








fi^ R1 ^ 


33 




• 




Amount of annual expense . 


. $32,932 


31 



Expenditures and Receipts on Account of ike Water WorJcs, to 
January 1, 1864. 

Am't drawn by Commissioners , $4, 043, 718 21 
Am't drawn by Water Board, 1850, 366,163 89 

1851, 141,309 23 



1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 



89,654 20 
89,854 03 
80,182 35 
63,866 33 



Amount carried forward 
8 



$4,874,748 24 



18 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amount brought forward $ 4,874,748 24 

Am't drawn by Water Board, 1 85 fi, $81,429 35 

1857, 96,931 25 

1858, 76,006 01 

1859, 385,652 47 

1860, 146,304 55 

1861, 73,977 29 

1862, 86,264 22 

1863, 98,545 64 



5,919,859 02 



Amount paid the City Treasurer by the Commis- 

$47,648 38 
8,153 52 
5,232 38 

15,869 12 
4,621 40 

12,423 29 
9,990 38 
7,840 43 

13,750 00 
9,200 00 
5,554 00 
3,287 51 

10,618 11 
3,295 00 

10,000 46 



sioners 

Am't paid by Water Board, 1850, 

" *' ♦« '* 1851, 

" ** '* " 1852, 

" *« «* '♦ 1853, 

<( it ti «« IS54:, 

*' " " '< 1855, 

(( «t it a 1856, 

cc « a << 1857^ 

«' «' " «« 1858, 

it it a ti 1859, 

" «« «« " 1860, 

it a a a 1861, 

it <« a a 1862, 

<( ti a a 1863, 



167,483 98 



$5,752,375 04 



Sundry payments by the City, $ 69,925 82 

Discount and interest on loans, 3,998,425 02 



4,068,350 84 



Amount carried forward 



$9,820,725 88 



WATER. 19 

Amount hr on ght forward . . $9,820,725 88 

Sundry credits by the City . $ 63,796 76 ■ 

Amount received foi' water-rates 
(as per City Treasurer's ac- 
count) . . . 3,848,356 49 

3,912,153 25 



$5,908,572 63 



SAMUEL N. DYER, 
Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, January 4, 1 864. 
Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., Pre*. Coddtuate Water Board: — 

Sir : In compliance with the requirements of the Water 
Board, I here present the Annual Report of the Works under 
my supervision. The amount of main and service pipes laid 
the past year is shown in the tables hereto annexed. ' 

The main pipe on Chelsea Street East Boston, between 
Decatur and Marion streets, has been taken up and relaid on 
the east side of the street. The relaying of this pipe has not 
been added to the length of main pipe laid the past year, as it 
adds nothing to its extent, although it took a large number of 
men three months to do it. I believe the whole Works in this 
Department to be in as good condition as heretofore. I have 
but little to suggest beyond what has appeared in former Re- 
ports. The increased number of water-takers, and consequently 
an increased waste, notwithstanding the addition of the new 
main, makes the supply still feeble on the high grounds, es- 
pecially in East and South Boston, these latter places being- 
connected with the low service where there is the most waste. 
I know of no way this can be remedied unless it be that a sec- 
tion of each place be set off and supplied by a separate pipe. 
There is now but one pipe to each of these localities, and in 
case of a breakage, aside from the inconvenience of being de- 



WATER. 



21 



prived of water for domestic use, there might be great damage 
done in case of a fire. I would suggest the propriety of 
continuing the pipe now in Federal Street, or laying a larger 
one over Federal Street Bridge and connecting it with the one 
now on Fourth Street. In case of an accident to the Works by 
night, or of a Sunday, a great inconvenience is felt, in getting 
together in suitable season a sufficient number of workmen to 
attend to it. The men from their limited means now reside in 
different parts of the City. It would be of great advantage to 
the City, if the Board would lease one or more buildings in the 
neighborhood of the pipe-yard, and rent it to the workmen, 
even though the income did not meet the expense. I would 
earnestly ask your early consideration of this»raatter. 

Statement of Location, Size, a7id Number of Feet of Pipe laid in 1863, 
(The 6-inch pipe in Boylston Street is taken up.) 



In what Street. 



Beacon ............ 

Albany 

Berkley 

Marlborough. 

Avenue TIT 

Commouwealth Av 

Clarendon 

Concord . . , 

West Canton 

West Newton 

Rutland Square — 

Avenue III 

Clarendon 

Tremont ...... — 

Revere 

St'^vcns Place . 

Albany 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Berkley and Dedham 

Plympton and Maiden 

Boylston and Providence Railroad Bridge 

Total 12 inches in Boston 

Berkley and Clarendon 

Total 8 inches in Boston 

Dodham and Clarendon 

Berkley and Clarendon 

Beacon and Boylston 

Washington anid Harrison Avenue 

Tremont and Avenue III 

Tremont and Avenue III 

West of Tremont 

Dedham and Canton 

Avenue TIT. and Tremont 

Lenox and Kendall 

Total C inches in Boston. 

Charles and the River 

East of Shawmnt Avenue 

At South City Stables 

Eor 21 Fire Reservoirs 

Total 4 inches in Boston 



lameter ot 
le in inches. 


Feet of pipe. 


12 


1,109 


12 


4iU 


12 


305 




1,878 


8 


153 




isa 


6 


80 


6 


1,099 


6 


1,30(5 


G 


155 


G 


40 


6 


220 


G 


22(i 


6 


246 


6 


272 


C 


GG 




3,7G0 


4 


no 


i 


244 


4 


36 


i 


2.30 



22 



CrrY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
pipe in inches. 



Feet of pipe. 



Dorchester Avenue 



Dorchester Avenue 



G 

Linden 

First 

Broadway. 

B 

Seventh .. 
First 



First.. 
First. 



Bremen. 
Brooks.. 
London. 



Border. 



Chelsea. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 
Sixth and Seventh , 

Total 12 inches in South Boston. 



Seventh and Washin^on Village.. 
Total 8 inches in South Boston. 



Sixth and Seventh... 
Fourth and Thomas. 

Band C 

Mand N 

Sixth and Seventh... 

C and D 

A and B 



Total 6 inches in South Boston. 



At Bay State Rolling Mill.. 
At Aquila Adams's Wharf. 
For yFire Reservoirs 



Total 4 inches in South Boston . 



EAST BOSTON. 



Marion and Putnam — 

Chelsea and Bremen 

Bennington and Porter , 



Total 6 inches in East Boston. 



McKay's Shipyard 

Total 4 inches in East Boston. 

CHARLESTOWN, 
Opposite Navy Yard 



208 
208 

2,571 
2,571 



130 

248 
53 

2S9 
50 

279 

400 

1,452 



502 

.345 

60 



429 

24 



633 

23 

23 



EECAPITULATIOK 





1S63. 


Diameter in inches. 


Section. 


36 


12 


8 


6 


■ 4 


.„..., I 




1 


1,878 

1 

208 

36 
2 


156 

2,571 

1 


3,760 
9 

1,452 

3 

633 

1 


626 


Boston Proper... J 




22 


i 




907 


South Boston j 




6 


East Boston j 


Total number of feet laid 


23 








Charlestown ] 
















1 


2,122 
3 


2,727 

1 


5,745 
13 


1,556 






28 













WATER. 



23 






■<s> 



^ 
^ 



i 

J3 



.5^^ 
^ 
^ 



^ 



^ 
^ 

^ 



'k. 



I 



!-.n 




















toC 






O 


















«""~-S 




k, 


















■* ':2 ■^ - 




bo 






















bo 


















iT 3 J2 


< 
























c 


t^ Cs -■ 


to oo 




t? "= 






cv 




\ Cs CO rrf O^ 




t^ ^ 




-* 


5 


, ^ 1 


CO 






■* TO 






X 




^ 


CO 






rC 






t^ 


CI 










s 




o (M ir 


> 00 TOW 


w 1 TO iM 1 








00 GO C>^ i^ 


. o 




'i => 




CO 


t^ 'ti "^ ^ "^ 






to_ l^ 






fiT 


Ci 


o> 






iti" 










00 


to 






o 






cj 














TO 




•.ri <-i -H cj 








lO OT 










t^ 














00 


T- 




CO 










C^ 






"^ 


cf 










TO 




rt-n co-H oro oojIoo ol 






O T-l O 00 iO C^ 1^ 




O l^ 


s 


eq 


o rt a> 






TO iH 


ja 


T-l 


oT 


oo" 


o" 






T)?~ 


"o 




o 












C3 


a 










































a 




o CS 




i M M 




O N 














-^ e^ 


"m 


o 








o_ 






o 




rH 


o" 












; tC 


S< 












































a, 






















^ 








J ■^ 


H C-l to 




r^ th 


o 


















(M T^ 


O 










Ci_ 








s 


(M 








" 


lo" 






^ 




















C! 


a 

C3 
























C" 


o 












TO O 


















tN »-* 


s 




Is 

IT 




















^ 


O) 








C 




o 00 


















'i 




TO 




O 


















00^ 




CO 


IN 












(M 


" 


TO 




^ 


lO 








-^ 




»o to 


















IN 




o 




«> 














c 




o. 




CO 



















Ol 




~~^ 


<n 












N •* 


























o 






















-* 


?; 
















?5 






s 


























« 


























e 


























o 


























u 


























O 


























a 


























o 


























-^ 


















a 










p 








£ 






3 






«a 




c 




c 










Pt 






^t> 




c 








•g 












o 




p: 


£ 


c 


£ 




4 


of ripes laid 
• of Stop-coc 








c 


1 




tr 


a: 

1 


p 
o 


^ 
t 








_r 






k 

■s 










o 






"■ 


"C 


a 
^ 


"- 


r< 3 






o 








c 


1 




bD fi 






-c 


e 


Ic ^ 


C 


!< 2 


e 


S 


c 






c 




c 


r 


c 


n 


c 


" 1 






|c 
















1 






5 


J a 


5^ 


i " 


y 


i c 


3^ 


CO 






a 


tt- 


. C 


ll <*■ 


C 


Ic <t- 


c 


-> t^. 


^ 






C 


!. C 


' £ 


c 


£ 




£ 


c 








S 


:i 


3 V 


f. 


' ti- 


c 


tf. 




H 
O 






tf. 


£■ 


1 c 


^ 


! = 




) c 


^ 






c 


\ 




> : 


■I. 


1 


■1- 










tt 


c 


t 




a 














' a 


s 


> a 




' «. 


.s 








^ 


i 


5 U 


< ^ 


; b 


4 1 


E. 


te 






1 



24 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1863. 



o 
■3 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Total. 


■■ 5 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 

of 
Pipes. 


Length 

in 

Feet. 


Number 
of 

Pipes. 


Length 
in 

Feet. 


11- 


3 

7 
5 

287 
7 


194 

427 

277 

10,861 

'202 










3 

11 

G 

436 

39 


194 


1 
i 

S 


3 


105 


1 

1 

* 69 

7 


87 

45 

3,336 

285 


619 
322 


SO 
25 


2,093 
009 


16,890 
1,216 




Aggr 










495 


19,241 













Making the total number up to January 1, 1804 24,835 



WATER. 



25 
















12 


o 




S 


1 


o 


^ 






If 


H 












mKI 


« 


M 




■* 






« 




EN 


o 




«» 


S 




CJ 


§ 




^ 


to 




m 




- 


I^ 


■* 


P- 


-*i 










w 




^ht 


■* 






Tti 




'"' 












-w 


o- 






CO 




"-I 


us 






m 


02 












S 















iM 


o 






» 


a 












•^ 












g 


•* 


00 •- 

CO 


e>i 


5: 
























o 


M T- 


C" 


t>. 


S 


o 






« 


fc 












o 














Cj 


00 












H 




































S 


C! 


oc 




CJ 





<: 


*^ 








■^ 


a 


























to 














*"* 














o 








CO 




OJ 












■* 








c 




CJ 












o 


o. 






N • 




m 












o 


a 






00 




cc 












o 


■* 






■* 




1^ 










© 








1 




L, 












O 


















1 




















c 


> C 






c 


f' 


, ^ 


1 




« 


1 c 


J 
* 


H 








^ iS 


I 


I 



26 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and 
upwards, 77 were on the joints; 9 by settling of earth; 7 by 
defective pipes ; 1 by pile driving ; 1 by defective cock ; 1 by 
steam fire engine ; 1 by frost ; total (97) ninety-seven. Of the 
leaks in two inch and service pipes, 151 were caused by set- 
tling of earth ; 5 by defective joints ; 15 stiff connections ; 26 
stopped by rust ; 2 by tenants ; 53 defective pipes ; 54 stopped 
by fish ; 2 by boatmen ; 26 by sewer diggers ; 1 by boys ; 25 
defective couplings ; 10 defective cocks ; 6 by rats ; 1 by pile 
driving ; 8 by frost ; 8 cocks pulled out ; 1 by boxing ; 2 by 
cellar diggers; 1 cock blcAV out. Total 397. Showing an 
increase of four over the past year. 

Statement of the Number of Leaks, 1850-1863. 



TEAK. 


LEAKS IN PIPES OF A DIAMETER OF 


Total. 


Four inches 
and upwards. 


Less than 
four inches. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 


104 


1851 .. 


237 


1852 


323 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363 


1858 


401 


1859 


531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 


1863 


494 







WATEE. 27 

Hydrants. 

During the year twenty-nine new hydrants have been estab- 
lished as follows : fifteen in the City proper, ten in South Boston, 
and four in East Boston. 

Total number of hydrants established up to January 1, 1864 : 
In Boston proper . . . . .964 

" South Boston 317 

" East Boston 188 

" Brookline - . . . . . 3 

" Koxbury 12 

" Charlestown ..... 11 

" Chelsea 7 



Total 1,502 

Fifty hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new 
or repaired ones, and seventy-six hydrant boxes have been 
renewed. The hydrants have had the usual attention this year, 
having been oiled twice, and other necessary repairs done to 
keep them in good order. Two men are detailed for each dis- 
trict, in cold weather, as formerly, and those hydrants most 
subject to frost are visited at morning and at night. 



FIRE EESERVOIES. 

The following list of Fire Reservoirs have been connected 
with the main pipes during the year : — 

Boston proper. 

East Street, opposite the School House. 
Chauncy Street, opposite No. 18. 
High " corner of Congress Street. 

Hudson " " Beach " 

Edinboro' " near Essex Street. 



28 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 30. 

Fort Hill, In Belmont Street. 
Warren Street, near Eliot Street. 
Kneeland, corner of Washington Street. 
Harrison Avenue, opposite Curve Street. 
Church Street, opposite the Church. 
Essex Street, near Washington Street. 
Washington Street, opposite Boston Theatre. 
Federal " " Piper's Wharf. 

Pearl " " Sturgis Place. 

Mt. Vernon " " Louisburg Square, 

Mt. Vernon " rear of the State House. 
Myrtle " opposite Irving Street. 

Tremont *' " Mason " 

Pleasant " " Carver " 

Pleasant '* corner Washington Street. 

Anderson " near Pinckney Street. 

South Boston. 

C Street, opposite Bolton Street. 
Fourth Street, near E Street. 
E Street, corner of Eighth Street. 
Dorchester Street, near Fourth Street. 
Fourth Street, near B Street. 

The stock and labor for the above reservoirs, amounting to 
$2,539.21, is charged to the Fire Department. 

Stop- Cocks. 

Forty-six new stop-cocks have been established during the 
past year, with the same number of boxes over them, and sixty- 
seven boxes renewed. All the stop-cocks have been oiled, and 
the usual attention paid them. 



WATER. 



29 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
January 1, 1864, 



NUMBER OF 


DIAMETER 


IN INCHES. 




40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


8 


6 


4 


3 


2 




15 
1 


18 


91 
1 
1 
3 
2 
4 
6 
6 
5 
1 


8 


62 


39 


135 


81 


22 


12 


3 


11 


Blow-oflf Branches 










1 
6 
3 


1 
13 

8 


8 
8 


6 
12 
3 










7 


4 


1 
5 

8 


3 

2 
5 


8 






4- Way Branches 






2 
5 


4 

4 
2 
2 


4 
6 
23 
18 
13 
3 








3 
2 

3 


4 
3 

8 

7 


8 


10 






Clamp Sleeves. 






2 
3 


1 
2 


1 

2 

2 
2 

4 


8 
6 


9 
3 












Bevel Hubs 










3 


9 




2 
1 
9 


3 

2 














2 


S 


















Offset Pipes 














8 
4 


5 




















3 










2 
1 
4 
1 




4 














One-Eighth Turns.... 




1 
16 
2 


3 
2 


3 

7 
8 


7 


12 

7 
4 


10 






Pieces of Pipes 


7 
2 


4 

1 


3 

2 






6 




2 







Hydrants. 8 Lowell, new, 5 ditto, old; 14 Wilmarth, old, 
3 New York pattern. 

For Hydrants. 32 plungers, 18 screws, 16 valve seats, 35 
stuffing-boxes, 18 nipples, 12 wharf hydrant cocks, 20 wharf 
hydrant nipples, 17 lbs. unfinished wharf hydrant castings, 128 
lbs. unfinished composition castings, 82 lbs. iron castings, 9 
bends, 40 lengtheners, 16 frames, 18 covers. 

For Stop-Cocks. 3 36-inch screws, 2 30-inch ditto, 2 24-inch 
ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 4 6-inch ditto, 15 6-inch iron ditto, 10 
4-inch ditto, 1 unfinished composition ditto fur waste-gate, 1 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

unfinished composition for reservoir gate, 3 12-inch flanges, 8 
6-inch plungers, 15 4-inch ditto, 2 6-inch rings, 20 4-inch ditto, 
1 36-inch valve, 291 lbs. 6-inch ditto, 168 lbs. 6-inch composi- 
tion castings, 230 lbs. 4-inch ditto, 1,471 lbs. 4-inch iron cast- 
ings, 9 ribs for 36-inch, 4 ditto for '30-inch, 8 sets of gearing 
for 36 and 30-inch, 7 frames, 52 covers, 3 kegs of bolts. 

Meters. 1 4-inch Worthington, 3 3-inch ditto, 14 2-inch 
composition ditto, 117 1-inch composition ditto, 6 1-inch iron 
ditto, 142 |-inch composition ditto, 6 f-inch iron ditto, 1 2-inch 
composition New York, 1 1-inch Scotch, 6 f-inch Scotch. 

Stock for Meters. 14 1-inch nipples, 3 f-inch ditto, 20 1-inch 
male connection couplings, 14 1-inch female ditto, 4 2-inch 
male ditto, 28 f-inch female ditto, 7 f-inch male ditto, 6 2-inch 
flanges, 6 3-inch reducers, 2 2-inch ditto, 1 3-inch flange, 4 
2-inch connection pieces, 6 1-inch ditto, 8 f-inch ditto, 9 1-inch 
rough stops, 9 f-inch ditto, 191 lbs. unfinished composition 
castings, 14 clocks, 38 glasses for ditto, 5 fish boxes, 70 rubber 
nipples, 8 lbs. rubber packing, 15 frames and covers. 

For Service Pipes. 7 1-inch union cocks, 38 f-inch ditto, 
36 f-inch ditto, 15 ^-inch ditto, 10 air cocks, 10 1-inch T cocks, 
14 |-inch ditto, 8 f-inch ditto, 14 f-inch Y cocks, 47 f-inch 
straight cocks, 35 |-inch cock couphngs, 138 f-inch ditto, 272 
i-inch ditto, 6 2J-inch connection couplings, 251 |^-inch ditto, 
6 1-inch ditto, 6 |-inch ditto, 25 f-inch ditto, 17 l|-inch con- 
nection nipple, 80 1-inch union tubes, 13 f-flanges, 132 f-inch 
unfinished cocks, 248 |-inch ditto, 343 lbs. unfinished cock 
castings, various sizes, 162 lbs. unfinished couphng castings, 
various sizes, 21 upright tubes, caps, and flanges, for 1-inch 
cocks, 79 upright tubes, 135 caps, 49 long boxes, 26 T boxes, 
18 y boxes, for f-inch cocks. 

Lead Pipe. 616 lbs. 2^-inch, 735 lbs. 2-inch 1,940 lbs. 
1^-inch, 637 lbs. 1-inch, 1,130 lbs. f-inch, 1,176 lbs. f-inch, 
2,257 lbs. i-inch, 102 lbs. f block tin, 730 lbs. sheet lead, 
4458 lbs. pig lead. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 1,447 lbs. bar iron, 2,571 lbs. working 
pieces, 249 lbs. cast steel, 1340 lbs. scrap iron. 



WATER. 31 

Carpenter's Shop, 1000 feet pine plank, 200 feet oak ditto, 
60 lbs. spikes and nails, 3 hydrant boxes, 4 stop-cock ditto, 

3 meters ditto, 1 dozen top pieces. 

Stable. 4 sets of harness, 3 horses, 1 buggy, 1 chaise, 3 
wagons, 2 pungs, 1 sleigh, 1,300 lbs. English hay, 700 lbs. 
salt ditto, 20 bushels grain, stable utensils. 

Tools. 1 steam-engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom derrick, 

4 geared hand derricks, 2 sets of shears, and all the rigging 
for the same, tools for lying main and service pipes, and for 
repairs of the same, 1 steam-engine, 2 engine laths, 1 fox ditto, 
1 hand ditto, 1 upright drilling machine, 3 grindstones, and the 
necessary tools for carrying on the machine, blacksmith's, car- 
penter's, and plumbers shops, 3 large tool houses, 2 small ditto, 
1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch ditto, 2 small ditto, also 
office furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 5 swivel pipe patterns, 1 swing 
stage, capstan frame and levers, 1 composition cylinder, 1 
6-inch ditto, 4 jets, 1 reducer, and 2 sets of 12-inch plates, 
and 2 4-inch plates, 3 composition reel jets, 6 cast-iron jets, 1 
drinking fountain, also a large lot of patterns stored at the 
pipe yard and at the founderies where we obtain castings. 

Miscellaneotis. 5 man-holes, 6 plates, large lot of old lumber, 
4 large flagging-stones, lot of machinery from Marlboro', 30 
tons paving gravel, 850 bricks, a barrel rosin, 715 lbs. of 
gasket, 5 kegs, old bolts, various sizes, 4,700 lbs. old cast-iron, 
30 lbs. rubber packing, 14 proving heads, 375 feet of hose. 
Respectfully submitted, 

EZEKIEL E. JONES, 
Superintendent Eastern Division B. W. W, 



EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION, 



Natick, January 5, 1864:. 
Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., President Cochituate Water Board: 

Sir : The Annual RejDort of the condition of the Western 
Division of the Water Works, is herewith submitted. 

The grounds, walks, and structures around the Lake have 
been kept in good condition and repair during the year. The 
roads which cross the Lake require constant watching in the 
Spring of the year, on account of the freshets ; the City being 
liable for aJl damage occurring from any defect in the road 
from such cause. To avoid this expense, I would recommend 
the laying of slope walls at those places. 

Last Spring the pressure of water on Mr. Knight's old drain, 
leading from Dug Pond to the Lake, was so great that it broke 
through the road. I was immediately notified by Mr. Messen- , 
ger, of Natick, and arrived in season to prevent a large breach 
being made in the road. 

The Gate Chamber at Dudley Pond was moved by the ice 
last winter, making a leak in the masonry ; the leak was stopped, 
but cannot be permanently repaired until the water is drawn 
down, which it would not be advisable to do till the water is 
needed. 

The Water has been shut off from the Conduit a number of 
times, to make examinations and repairs ; at the large puddled 



WATEE. 33 

bank in Ware's Valley, about 400 feet of the Conduit has been 
repaired by cutting out four or five courses of the inverted arch, 
and filling the cavity under it with concrete. 

The usual attention has been given to the grounds and walks 
around the Brookline Reservoir. The leak through the masonry 
at the Gate Hquse has been stopped, and the exterior joints 
newly pointed, the stairway where the plastering was stained 
has been scaled with chestnut boards, and the walls, roof, and 
all the wood work at the Gate House have been repainted. 

Annexed is a schedule of tools, &c. belonging to the City, 
and used in this Department. 

Respectfully submitted, ■' 

E. F. KNOWLTON, 

Superintendent Western Division. 



The following property is in charge of and used by the 
Superintendent of the Western Division : — 

1 Horse Cart and Harness. 
1 Express Wagon. 

1 Express Harness. 

2 Boats and 4 Oars. 

26 Wheelbarrows and 1 Handcart. 
62 Shovels and 10 Picks. 

4 Crowbars, 4 Rammers. 

2 Grindstones, 10 Water Pails. 

4 Pairs Rubber Boots. 

6 Lanterns, 2 Hammers. 

1 Level, 2 Handsaws. 

2 Grass Hooks. 

2 Iron Wrenches at Gate House. 

2 " " at Brookline Reservoir. 

4 Trowels, 2 Hoes, 2 Axes. 

5 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

1 Fluid Can and Oil Filler. 
1 Pair of Hedge Shears. 
1 Stove, 1 Desk. 
1 Gravel Scow. 
1 Eain Gauge. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Office op Water Eegistear, City Hall, 
Boston, January 1, 1864, 

E. Johnson, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir : The Annual Report of the Water Registrar, for the 
year ending December 31, 1863, is hereby submitted in con- 
formity to the 16th section of the ordinance. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1864, is 26,581, being an increase since January 1, 1863, 
of 292. 

During the year there has been 727 cases where the water 
has been shut off, all of which were for non-payment of water- 
rates. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
on, is 1,182 ; of these, 665 were cases which had been shut off 
for non-payment of water-rates, and 517 were turned on for the 
fii'st time. 

The total amount received from December 31, 1862, to 
January 1, 1864, is .... $394,50625 

Of the above, there was re- 
ceived for water used in 
previous years, the sum of $12,997 15 
Leaving the receipts for water 
used during the year 1863, 
the sum of . . . $381,509 10 



Amount carried forward, . . . $394,506 25 



36 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amount brought forward^ 
In addition to the above, there 

has been received for letting 
■ on water in cases where it 

had been turned off for 

non-payment of rates, the 

sum of . 

Total amount 



$394,506 25 



1,330 00 



$395,836 25 



The increased amount of income in 1863 over 

the previous year, is . . . . . $ 20,583 37 

The amount of assessments now made for the 

present year, is . . . . . . 310,945 96 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 

of water during the year, 1864, is . . 430,000 00 
The expenditures of my office during the year 

1863, have been 3,930 51 



The items of this expenditure are as follows : 



Pa 



d Chas. L. Bancroft for services 


as 


clerk 


$900 00 


Stephen Badlam 


(( a 


(( 


(( 


900 00 


Edwin Jennings 


ti a 


(( 


inspector 


782 50 


Chas. C. Badlam 


(( n 


«( 


(( 


782 50 


J. L. Fairbanks 


" stationery 


. 


179 46 


R. D. Childs 


" distributing 


bills . 


28 00 


G. E. Richardson 


C( (( 




(( 


28 00 


William Souther 


(( (( 




a 


26 00 


• L. H. Russell 


cc (( 




it 


26 00 


' J. T. Bus well 


(e a 




a 


16 00 


J. E. Farwell 


" printing 
• • 




• • 

• • 


262 05 


Amount . 


$3,930 51 



WATEiR. 



37 



Statement showing the number of houses, 
gines, &c. in the City of Boston, supplied 
Water to the 1st of January, 1864, with the 
rates paid for 1863 : — 

19,069 Dwelling-houses 
18 Boarding " 
102 Model 
11 Lodging " 
23 Hotels . 
4,095 Stores and shops . 



202 Buildings 


346 Offices 


50 Printing offices 
21 Banks 


26 Halls . 

4 Theatres 
22 Private schools 


10 Asylums 

4 Greenhouses . 

1 Catholic college . 

1 Medical college 
67 Churches 


7 Markets . 
118 Cellars 


410 Restaurants and saloons 

10 Club houses 
6 Bath houses 

16 Packing houses . 
949 Stables . 


19 Factories 


1 Brewery 

4 Beer factories 

6 Bleacheries 



Amount carried forwariy 



stores, steam 


en- 


with Cochituate 


amount of water- 


. $223,488 97 


1,047 


00 


4,366 


00 


266 


00 


1,979 


00 


35,275 


78 


8,109 


84 


2,464 


32 


694 


95 


251 


50 


348 


43 


155 


00 


212 


00 


335 


96 


27 


00 


197 


50 


30 


00 


625 


38 


829 


50 


767 


50 


5,091 


12 


231 


00 


305 


00 


281 


00 


10,152 


41 


402 


33 


10 


00 


55 


75 


73 


50 


. $298,073 


74 



38 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amount brought forward J . . . ^298,073 74 

64 Bakeries 503 75 

4 Shipyards ..... 78 00 

4 Dry docks and engines . . . 192 03 

56 Shops and do. ... . 3,157 17 

14 Stores and do. . . . 971 56 

2 Mills and do. ... 281 64 

7 Foundries and do. . . . 336 85 

10 Factories and do. . . . 674 56 

10 Printing and do. . . . 687 97 

1 Bakery and do. ... 33 00 

4 Shipyards and do. . . . 221 30 

4 Binderies and do. . . . 316 91 

4 Buildings and do. . . . 520 25 

1 Potteries and do. ... 35 00 
42 Stationary engine . . . 1,433 73 

6 Armories . . . . . 61 25 

5 Gymnasiums . . '. . 77 25 
779 Hose 2,343 00 

26 Fountains .... 130 00 

2 Gaslight companies . . . . 922 39 
1 Milldam company . . . 104 25 
1 Postoffice . . . . . 61 50 
1 Statehouse .... 134 50 

23 Steamboats 4,312 34 

3 Railroad companies ... 847 00 
3 Offices, Niles Block ... 36 00 
1 Office, City Scales ... 9 00 
1 Office, Harbor Master ... 6 00 
1 Old State House .... 27 00 

6 Fire-alarm moters . ... . 65 00 
22 Engines, hose and hook and ladder houses. 397 00 

270 Public schools .... 1,840 00 



Amounts carried forward, 



$318,890 94 



WATER, 


39 


Amount brought forward j 


$318,890 94 


8 Police stations 


625 00 


2 City stables ..... 


108 75 


1 OfFal station .... 


150 00 


1 Steamer, Henry Morrison 


192 56 


1 Courthouse .... 


262 50 


1 Probate building .... 


47 50 


1 Dead bouse .... 


10 00 


1 House of Correction 


462 00 


I Jail for Suffolk County 


243 00 


1 Lunatic hospital .... 


225 00 


1 Public library .... 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall .... 


40 00 


1 City HaU . . . . 


50 00 


1 City building .... 


37 50 


Common Sewer Department, making 


mortar, 75 00 


Urinals, &c. F. H. Market 


70 00 


Contractors for supplying shipping 


4,144 93 


Street sprinkling 


558 32 


Building purposes 


1,710 88 


Custom House .... 


156 00 


U. S. Court House . 


102 00 


Measured water .... 


53,230 05 


Water Power Company 


67 17 




$381,509 10 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Staternent showing the number and sizes of Water Meters now in 
use, and where applied, to January 1, 1864. 



Eevere House 

Parker House . 

American House . 

Adams House . 

Coolidge House . 

Mai'lboro House 

Tremont House . 

United States Hotel . 

Winthrop House . 

Bromfield House 

City Hotel . 

Sailors' Home . 

Mariners' House . 

Boston Hotel . 

Young's Hotel 

New England House 

Hotel Pelham 

Merrimac House 

Wildes' Hotel 

Massachusetts Hotel 

Montgomery House 

Quincy House . 

Elm Street House 

National House 

Central House 

Webster House 

Hancock House . 

J. Adams (Boarding House) 

Evans House 

Dooley's Hotel . 

Berkley Hotel 

Pavilion Hotel . 

Boston Sugar Refinery 

Boston and Worcester Railroad Co. 

Boston and Maine Railroad Company 

Old Colony Railroad Company 

Fitchburg Railroad Company 

Eastern Railroad Company 

Navy Yard .... 

United States Marine Hospital 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

McLean Asylum 

State Prison 

Bay State Rolling Mill . 

Norway Iron Company 

Amounts carried forward. 



SIZE OF METEES. 



4: inch. 



3 inch. 2 incli 



1 inch. 



f inch. 



62 



S5 



WATER. 



41 



Amounts hrought forward 
Pembroke Forge Company 

D. Dyer (Rice Mill) . 

Farrar, Follett, & Co. (Rolling Mill) 

Boston Gaslight Co. (Gasometer) 

South Boston Gas Company 

East Boston Gas Company . 

Cunard Steamship Company 

East Boston Ferry Company 

People's FeiTy Company . 

Chelsea Ferry Company 

J. Trull (Distillery) 

J. M. Barnard (Distillery) 

S. Bowman 

Felton & Waters 

F. H. Jenney 

W. E. French 

Henry Rowland 

John Felton 

Graves & Hoyt 

Torreys & Co. (Marble Works) 

Bowker, Torrey, & Co. " 

E. L. Gowan " 
J. Foote " 
M. Grant " 
Gushing & Beach " 
A. Wentworth " 
Houston & Pierce (Saw Mill) 
Chauncy Page 
Benjamin Pope 
J. A. Robertson 
Bennett & Bro. 
Manson, Peterson, & Co 
J. F. Keating 
J. J. McNutt 
J. R. Cooledge 
J. F. Paul 

H. N. Hooper & Co. (Foundry) 
William Carleton " 

Cyrus Alger (New Foundry) . 

do. (Old " ) 

do. (Powder Mill) 

Hinckley, Williams, & Co. (Foundry) 
Downer's Kerosene Oil Works . 
Fulton Iron Foundry . 
Shawmut Oil Company 
Oriental Oil Company . 
H. Richardson (Oil Mill) 
Lee, Crocker, & Co. " 
Hodges & Silsbee, (Chemicals) 
W. D. Philbrick " 

A. Levis " 

Amotmts carried forward . 
6 



4 inch. 3 incli. 2 inch, 1 inch. S inch 



10 



62 
1 
1 

1 

1 



35 

1 
1 



72 



42 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 20. 



Amounts brougJit forward . 
W.D. Philbrick (E. B.) (Chemicals) 
Loring, Bangs, & Co. " 

Henry Souther (Brewery) 
W. T. Van Nostrand " 
William Kutledge " 
E. H. Maxwell 

Fairbanks & Beard (Beer Manf.) . 
Mt. Washington Glass Works . 
Boston Crystal Glass Company . 
W . K. Lewis' (Pickle Manf.) . 
W. H. Davis' " 

J. B. Harablin's " 

H. M. Eichards (Jewelry Manf.) 
Chickering & Sons (Piano Manf.) 
J. L. Ross (School Furniture) 
Dexter, Lambert, & Co. (Tassel Manf.^ 
Sanborn, Kichardson, & Co. (Pipe Manf.) 
Grover. Baker, & Co. (Sewing Machines) 
E. G. Evans (Sugar Mill) . 
Thomas Oxnard "... 
Hazelton & Bailey (Paper Manf.) 
Globe Locomotive Works 
H. A. Breed & Co (Milk) . 
Hill, Dwinell, & Co. (Spice Mill) . 
S. C. Taylor (Hat Manufacturer) 
Warren, Color, & Co. 
S. C. Davis (Building) 
Aerated Bread Co. . . . 
J. B. Fowle & Co. (Bakery) 
Kittredge & Co. (Turpentine Works) 
Aquila Adams (Machine Shop) . 
William Evans " 

Atlantic Works " 

R. Hoe & Co. 
G-'orge McLaughlin " 
J. J. Walworth " 

Edwards & Kershaw " 
Denio & Roberts " 

Briggs & Robinson (Engine) . 
Schenkl & Dana " 

Banker, Carpenter, & Co. " 
Stimson, Valentine, & Co. " 
Jarvis & Hall " 

Albion Building .... 
Hart, Baldwin, & Co. (Packing House) 
Aquila Adams (Shipyard) "^ . 
Donald McKay " . • 

T. R. B irnham (Photographer) 
Suffo k Salt Works 
Boston Music Hall (Power for Organ) 
Second Church Society " " 

Amounts carried forward . 



i inch. 3 inch. 2 inch. 1 inch, i inch 



10 



85 



12 115 104 



72 
1 



Amounts brought forward 
R. B. Brigham (Restaurant) 
E. W. Johnson 
Peter Brigham 
Charles Copeland 
B. S. Wright & Co. 
W. F. White 
Buckley's Minstrels (Aquarium, &c.) 

Total . 



WATER. 








43 




4 inch. 


3 inch. 


2 inch. 


1 inch- 


1 inch. 


• 


3 


7 


12 


115 


10-i 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 


&c.) 










2 




3 


7 


12 


115 


117 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sales of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the 
City, October 25, 1848 : — 



From October 25 


, 1848, 


to January 1 


, 1850, 


$72,043 20 




' January 1 


, 1850, 






1851, 


98,367 


90 






1851, 






1852, 


161,299 


72 






1852, 






1853, 


179,486 


25 






1853, 






1854, 


196,352 


32 






1854, 






1855, 


217,007 


51 






1855, 






1856, 


266,302 


77 






1856, 






1857, 


282,651 


84 






1857, 






1858, 


289,328 


83 






1858, 






1859, 


302,409 


73 






1859, 






1860, 


314,808 


97 






1860, 






1861, 


334,544 


86 






1861, 






1862, 


365,323 


46 






1862, 






1863, 


373,922 


88 


<( K( 


1863, 






1864, 


394,506 


25 




Total 


13,848,356 


49 



44 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 20. 



Statement showing the number and kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the premises of water-takers in the City of Boston, to January 
1, 1864, as compared with 1862. 



1862 


1863 


EEMAKKS. 


4,766 


4,789 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 

sewer. 


36,255 


37,289 


Sinks. 


13,127 


14,100 


Wash-hand basins. 


4,660 


4,921 


Bathing-tubs. 


5,216 


5,788 


Pan water-closets. 


6,252 


6,529 


Hopper water-closets. 


816 


846 


Self-acting water-closets. 


1,408 


1,548 


Urinals. 


4,390 


4,967 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


16 


17 


Shower-baths. These are in houses where there are 
no tubs. 


12 


12 


Hydraulic rams. 


714 


729 


Private hydrants. 


211 


216 


Slop-hoppers. 


77,843 


81,726 


Total. 



EespectfuUy submitted, 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, Boston, January, 1864. 

Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water 
Board : — 
SiE : In compliance with the 13th Section of the Water 
Ordinance, of October 31, 1850, the following Report is re- 
spectfully submitted : — 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The Gate House and other structures, as well as the grounds 
around the Lake, have been kept in excellent condition by the 
efficient Superintendent of the Western Division. 

The Water in the Lake, during the past year, has stood at 
a higher average level than it has since 1859. On the 1st of 
January, 1863, the surface of the Lake was 11 feet above the 
bottom of the Conduit, or about three feet below high- water 
mark. On the second of March it had reached high-water 
mark, and remained at about that level till May 24. It then 
began to lower, and on the twelfth of July had fallen two feet, 
three inches. July 25, the Lake was again full, and remained 
so till August 5, when it began to lower, and fell one foot four 
inches in about two months. On the twentieth of November 
it stood at high- water mark again, and has remained full to the 
present time. It will thus be seen that at no time during the 



46 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



year has the water in the Lake been more than three feet below 
high-water mark, and that for about one third of the year it has 
been at its maximum level. 

Water has been wasted from the Lake, during the past year, 
as follows, viz : — 



In March, for 23 days, . 


678,960,997 


gallons. 


" April, " 10 " 


. 936,245,503 




«' May, " 5 " . 


82,187,674 




♦' July, " 2 " 


. 117,791,194 




'* August, " IJ " . 


64,381,357 




" Nov'r, " 9 " 


. 73,169,814 




" Dec'r, " 17 " . 


212,959,931 




Total, " 671 ;. 


2,165,696,470 





Thus it appears that Water has been wasted to an amount 
equal to nearly 6,000,000 gallons for each day in the year, or 
more than one third of the daily consumption. 



CONSUMPTION. 

By the tables of consumption herewith submitted, it appears 
that the daily average amount consumed for the past year is 
somewhat less than for the year 1862 ; about 2,000,000 gallons 
per day less than for 1861, and about 1,000,000 gallons per 
day less than for 1860. But, had the methods employed for a 
few years past, for estimating the consumption, been used this 
year, the daily average would have been 18,625,000 gallons, 
instead of 16,238,500, and this year's consumption would have 
been the greatest of any year-. The estimates for a number of 
years past have been made from calculations of the discharge 
through the three pipes crossing Charles River, and it must be 
evident that tables of discharge computed years ago, whether 
based upon actual observations and measurements, or calculated 
by the usual formula, must give an error of excess now, when 



WATER. 47 

the accretions In the pipes have increased so much. And again, 
this method to be reliable, requires great nicety in the observa- 
tions at the two pipe-chambers ; for the average head is only 
about six inches, and an error in observation of a quarter of an 
inch would make a difference of over 360,000 gallons in twenty- 
four hours. These observations, as kept and returned, are made 
to the nearest inch, and, in fact, from the eddying motion of the 
Water, it is hardly practicable to attain greater accuracy with 
the present appliances. 

The method which I have employed this year is the same 
used by Mr. Chesbrough, and is based upon actual observations 
which determined the mean velocity of the water in the conduit 
for different declivities of surface. 

The observations at the East Pipe Chamber and at the 
Brookline Reservoir furnish the declivity of surface and depth 
of water In the Conduit, and from these data the calculations 
are made. 

I have employed this method because I consider it more reli- 
able than the one based on the discharge through the pipes over 
Charles River ; but even this method, in my opinion, gives too 
large an estimate. For the velocities obtained by experiment 
were those due to a flow of water when the Aqueduct was used 
as a canal, whereas for the past few years it has been used as a 
pipe. And, in fact, if the usual formula for the flow of water 
through pipes where the velocity is less than two feet per second 
be applied to the Aqueduct, the result will be considerably less 
than that derived from the method which I have used. The 
only true measurement of the consumption is obtained by the 
lowering of the water in the Brookline and City Reservoirs 
when the flow from the Lake is cut off. 

During the past year the water has been shut off from the 
Aqueduct a number of times, and the amount consumed on 
those days is invariably less by nearly 2,000,000 gallons than 
the estimates for the day previous. For instance ; on the 23d 
of June, the estimated consumption by the method used for the 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

past few years would be . . . 18,600,000 gallons. 

By Mr. Chesbrouo-h's method it would be 16,500,000 '* 
The water was shut off on the 24th, and the amount drawn 
from the reservoirs during the day was 14,450,000 gallons. 

I think it must be apparent that the estimates of the past few 
years are much too large, and that even the estimate as made 
for the last year (1863) is greater than it should be, by nearly 
1,000,000 gallons per day. 

It is hoped that before the close of the present year a more 
satisfactory method may be found of determining the consump- 
tion of water. 

The largest estimated amount consumed in any one day du- 
ring the year was nearly 23,000,000 of gallons, on the 4th of 
February, when the temperature was from six to ten degrees 
below zero during the whole twenty-four hours. 

THE LAKE AS A SOURCE OF SUPPLY. 

It has been estimated that .the available supply of Lake Co- 
chituate is equal to four tenths of the annual rain-fall upon its 
water-shed, and that in case of a year of great drought, like 
that of 1837, when the total rain-fall was only about thirty 
inches, the supply would amount to a little over 10,000,000 
gallons per day. The results of twelve years' experience and 
observation have been compiled, and are herewith submitted in 
a tabular form, showing the annual rain-fall, amount of water 
consumed, amount wasted, total available amount received into 
the Lake, available percentage of rain-fall received into the 
Lake, &c. 

From this statement it will appear that the average percent- 
age of rain-fall available is about five tenths, and that, could 
all the water received into the Lake be retained there or else- 
where, the average daily supply would be equal to about 23,- 
700,000 gallons. But during ten years of the twelve there was 
an average daily waste of 10,153,500 ; so that, for want of ade- 



WATER. - 49 

quate storage, the actual available supply amounts to about 
14,000,000 gallons daily. The effect of increasing the storage 
capacity of the Lake is shown by the fact that, while the aver- 
age daily waste for six years previous to 1859 (the year follow- 
ing the raising of the Lake two feet) was 14,378,876 gallons, 
the daily avei'age for the last four years is only about 3,800,000 ; 
thus increasing the available supply from 11,000,000, the daily 
average for six years previous to 1860, (not including 1855 
and 1856,) to 17,600,000, the daily average for the past four 
years, or since the raising of the Lake. The importance, 
therefore, of providing additional storage room to meet the 
future requirements of the City, must be apparent, and its 
desirability furnishes an additional reason to those urged else- 
where in this Report in favor of a large receiving reservoir at 
this end of the Aqueduct. 

CONDUIT. 

The Conduit between the Lake and Charles Eiver was thor- 
oughly examined, in company with the Superintendent, in July, 
and was found to be quite clean, with the exception of a small 
section between the Lake and Station 100, where there was a 
considerable accumulation of the peculiar vegetable spongy 
matter referred to in previous reports. This matter has been 
entirely removed, and the whole line thoroughly cleansed. At 
the examination above referred to, two new cracks in the Aque- 
duct were discovered ; one near the end of the first division, 
about station 275, — not a very serious one, — and one about 
four hundred feet in length, between Station 100, second divi- 
sion, and the West Pipe Chamber at Charles Eiver. This last 
occurring in that part of the Aqueduct crossing Ware's Valley, 
was a most serious one, both as to locality and size ; and had 
it not been discovered as it was, and immediately repaired, the 
results would have been most disastrous. 

The difficulty resulting from cracks in the brick Aqueduct ia 
7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT.— Ko. 20. 

a serious one, and, from the additional duty imposed upon the 
Aqueduct, by using it as a pipe, under a head, is liable to in- 
crease with the increase in the consumption of water, unless 
measures be taken to strengthen those portions of the Aqueduct 
resting upon embankments by concrete foundations, and back- 
ing of the same material as high as the top of the invert. 

This would be attended with considerable expense, but would 
be the most economical way of remedying an original error of 
construction, — an error which would not have been made had 
the designs of the Chief Engineer been carried out, ov had the 
Commissioners foreseen that the Conduit, which was designed to 
be used as a covered canal, -was to be run full and tasked as a 
pipe, under a head of from one foot to two feet eight inches 
during the greater part of the year, in order to furnish an 
adequate supply. 

The question of strengthening the Aqueduct in all places 
where it rests upon embankments, is one that should receive 
the early attention of your Board, as breaks are liable to occur 
whicli would require more time to repair than could be Avell 
afforded with our limited storage room at this end of the line. 

The water has been shut off from the Aqueduct for examina- 
tions, cleansing, and repairs ten days in all during the year, 
and the repairs which have been made, It is believed, have put 
the Conduit in as good condition as possible, considering the 
limited time available. 

PIPES ACEOSS CHARLES RIVER. 

The accretions on the interior of these pipes are undoubtedly 
as large as in 1853, when the pipes were thoroughly scraped 
and cleaned ; the effect of which, as determined by careful 
observations, was to increase the discharge under the common 
head of six inches upwards of twenty per cent. 

The effect of these accretions is obvious from the gradual 
increase of head required to deliver an equal amount of water ; 



WATES. 51 

for since 1858, this increase is found to be nearly thirty per 
cent. 

The cost of cleaning out these pipes would be small, prob- 
ably not over $ 300, and it would be well to have the work done 
the coming season. The effect of these accretions in all our 
City pipes in producing a loss of head must be very great, and 
the importance of preventing such formations in any pipes laid 
in future by some kind of coating, is sufficient to warrant ex- 
periments looking to that result, 

BROOKLINE RESERVOIR. 

The Gate Houses and Grounds about the Eeservoir have re- 
ceived the usual attention of the Superintendent, and are in 
good condition. 

The storage capacity of this Reservoir at the present rate of 
consumption is much too small. Its area is about twenty-three 
acres at its maximum water level, and its capacity above the 
bottom of the Conduit is 119,496,000 gallons. 

Althouoh this amount seems laroe and sufficient for several 
days' supply in case of accident, yet great inconvenience is 
experienced in the high service of the City if one quarter part of 
this amount be drawn from the Reservoir. During the past 
year the water was shut off at the Lake for thirty-seven hours, 
to make repairs, during which time only 24,000,000 gallons 
were drawn from the Brookline Reservoir, and yet the com- 
plaints were so numerous that special word was sent to the 
Lake to let on the water. The importance, therefore, of ad- 
ditional storao'e room in the neig-hborhood of this Reservoir is 
obvious, considering the immense consumption of water and the 
liability of accident to the Conduit, requiring a week or more 
to repair. What is needed is a reservoir of one hundred acres, 
if such can be obtained, and then the water could be shut off at 
the Lake for ten days without reducing the level of the water 
so as to cause any sensible inconvenience to any of our citizens. 



52 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



CITY EESERYOIRS AND WORKS. 

These have received the usual attention of the Superintendent, 
and are in good condition generally. 

The usual table of the average monthly heights of water in 
the Reservoirs at Brookline, Beacon Hill, South and East Bos- 
ton, has been prepared, and is herewith submitted ; but it is of 
little or no use as indicating the loss of head during the year, 
as the several City Reservoirs have been more or less discon- 
nected from the general circulation, — the Beacon Hill having 
been shut off for nearly one third of the year, and the South 
Boston and East Boston nearly all the year. For this reason 
the usual table exhibiting the loss of head from Brookline to 
the several City Reservoirs has been omitted. 

It is certainly desirable to know each year what the actual 
loss of head is from Brookline to different parts of the City ; 
and if in future it is found necessary to disconnect the reservoirs 
from the general circulation so much as they have been during 
the past year, a more reliable method of observation than the 
present would be to place either stand-pipes or gauges at differ- 
ent points in the several parts of the City, the same to be con- 
nected directly with the principal mains. The cost would be 
little, the trouble of observation a trifle more than at present, 
and the result, it is believed, much more reliable. 

The fact of increased consumption, together with the filling 
up by accretions of the mains to South and East Boston, pro- 
ducing a great loss of head, will before long necessitate an 
additional line of mains to both of these places ; and it is 
hoped that some simple and effectual means of preventing the 
formation of these accretions, which have so seriously affected 
the capacity of our whole system of distribution, will be found 
before the laying of these mains. 



WATER. 



53 



G^ 



^ i 

§ 














i 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


cr. 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o. 




o 


O 


o 


o^ 


q^ 


c^ 


CO 


ZC> 




























^ 


ci" 


f— t 


■^ 


d 


oo' 


CO 


t~ 


-* 


oj 


f-H 


i-T 


-* 


00 


oo 


o 


05 


o 


o 


1^ 


(M 


o 


CO 


oq 


c^ 


05 


CO 


'*! 




«o_ 


t~ 


lO 


00 


CO 


0-1 




CO 


iCi 


00 


CO 


0^ 


o 
































c<i 


cq 


i^f 


d 


O 


^ 


CO 
1-H 


N 


^ 


^ 


^ 


CO 


iM 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




t^ 


CO 


to 


o 


CO 


"^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C-l 


Ol 


<M 


CO 


Id 




























c^' 


o 


lb 


d 


CO 


-* 


d 


d 


c 


r— 


co" 


l--^ 


CO 


CO 


o 


-* 


cq 


-# 


o 


CO 


lO 


c^ 




t- 


00 


o 


-* 




t- 


CO 


I—" 


»o 




o 


o 


»— ' 


t- 


b- 


M 


CO 


CO^ 




as 


c 


c 


CO 


Cb 


d 


^ 


r- 


^ 


c 


d 


r- 


d 

1-H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




<>q 


0^1 


1—1 


lO 


CO 


c< 


CO 




^ 


CO 


w 


CO 


o 


-^ 




























lO 


lO 


-* 


c^n 


CO 


lb 


lb 


CO 


CO 


I^" 


d 


S 


t-^ 


<^^ 


00 


C3 


"O 


CO 


CO 


CO 


-* 


1-H 


CM 




CO 


CO 


C3 


o 




o 


^ 


lO 


t-; 


w 


t- 


o 


o 


t- 


t-- 


O^ 


lO 


c: 
































o 


d 


C5 


CO 


d 


1— t 


d 


d 


C5 


co 


00 


c 


Oi 




^~' 


rH 








'"' 


















Q 


o 


O 


c 


c 


o 


c; 


c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 




o 


o 


o 


c:: 


c 


o 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 




lO 


'^. 


(^ 


■^ 


^ 


C2 


c^ 


C2 


t- 




t~ 


-* 


CO 


CO 




























lO 


o 


CO 


(M 


CO 


eo 


lO 


c; 


r- 


c 


r-H 


-* 


oc 


<M 


CO 


ICI 


'tl 


O 


c 


(M 


-* 


c 


CC 


^ 


b- 


<M 


O'l 


-* 




o 


'^ 


(N 


c: 


i-^ 


Ol 


oc 


^ 


CO 


oc 


CD 


o 


IC 
































CO 


00 


00 


t- 


OC 


CO 


00 


OO 


a: 


oc 


CO 


c: 


CO 




o 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


O c 


o 


c 


o 




o 


c 


<Z: 


c:: 


c 


c 


o c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


o 




C5 


CO 




t- 


^ 




c 


CC 


c 


c 


o 


oc 


00 


i ^ 

1 t^ 




























c 


c 




CC 


c 


CC 


oc 


C" 


d c 


t~ 


ic: 


l-O 


■ CO 


00 


02 


S 


-* 


ir- 


CC 


c 


c 


Ov 


CC 


CO 


cr 


oq 




oq 


t^ 


iC 


c 


CC 


c 


CC 


o 


<y 


c- 


CO 




1— 1 
































CC 


oc 


00 


oc 


oc 


oc 


cr 


cr- 


(>• CO 


CO 


t- 


CO 




c 


c 


c 


o c 


c 


O C 


o c 


o 


c 


(_, 




c 


c 




o o c 


O C 


o o o 


c: 


o 




t- 




? 




-* 


c 


l^ 


c: 


CO c; 


lO_ 


^ 


00 






























lis 


CC 


.— 


t~. 


ir 


oc 


ir 


d ir 


d CC 


CO 


o- 


CO 


00 


CC 


•M 


CC 




c<- 


C-l 


CO cr 


CO 1- 


t- 


cc 


CO 




c- 


IM 


I— 


cr 


Cv 


o- 


.-H o 


c> 


^ t-- -^ 


CC 


00 
































t~ 


t~ CC 


IT 


r£ 


c- 


t- tr- 


O- CC 


CO 


t> 


CO 




ooooooooooo 


c 


o 




ooooooooooo 


c 


o 


o 


t-^ O 0^ 


o •— 1 lo s~i t; 


lO CO lO 


c 


C5_ 


-4~ ^ 




— T d 'd~ -*" -*' lb" -*" d' 


t- 


i>r 


00 


00 .- 


-^ 


O-t<O'-iO00OO 


cr 


CO 




»— f ?■ 


CC 


C3 CO c- 


io O lO lO C5 




CO 
































lb ir 


-* 


•^lOOOOCOO-^-* 


IT 


lO 




o 


C5 


O O O O O O O 


c 


o 




o 


o 


O O O O O O O 


c 


o 




o 


o 


o o o o o o o 


c 


o 






























o 


o 


o o o o o o o 


c 


d 


00 


o . 


lO 


O O O O O lO o 


c 


CO 


1-H 


t~ 


lO 




CO oo '— 1 CO O CO 


CC 


o 




































CO ■*■<*<■*-*-* CO 


Cf 


eo 




























i 

•a 


s5 


























u 
o 


8^ 
O 


t> 


•^ 1- 


■» 














a 
I C 




a 


Cm 


a 


a 

e 

s 


' 1 


i 


C 


: i 


- i 

^ 




> < 


E 


a 

e 


a 
c 


c3 
u 

i 



54 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



f^ 



^ 



^ 









^ 



1^ 



no 

8 



6 



■5*1 




























<» 




























00 


























































^ 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o- 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


CD 


no 


CO 




























o 


c^r 


oc~ 


T— « 


lo" 


t^ 


CO 


-+ 


o 


lO 


cT 


CO 


lo" 


00 


CO 


f— I 


(M 


CO 


CM 


o 


OO 


lO 


<x> 


CO 


t^ 


C^l 


c:i 


CO 




1—1 


CO 


CD 


1— t 


'^ 


r-H 


o 


OT 


o 


Ir^ 


o^ 


<M 


iri 
































o 


c^ 


CD 
.—1 


1— i 


iC 


CD 


lO 


cd' 


!>. 


o 


CD 


CD 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 




























o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<=.■ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


-^ 


o 


o 


CO 




o 


CD 


































t^ 


t^ 


lo" 


-* 


CD 


CD 


t- 


I— 1 


1—1 


l^ 


t^ 


CD 
1— t 




o 


^ 


^ 


CO 


C<J 


■H^ 


C5 


»o 


C5 


CO 


o 


N 


-tl 




CD 


CO 


':*< 


o 


CO 


CO 


O 


CD 


in 


C^l 


t^ 


CD 


o 




t- 




C0_ 


lO 


ao_ 


C3_ 


OD 


CO 


(M 


1— i 


o^ 


CO 


co_ 






























CO 


CD 


■* 


co" 


I— < 


t-^ 


T-H 


t-^ 


cf 


00 


t^ 


-* 


CD 


c^ 


O 


o 


lO 


)0 


CO 


CO 


O 


t^ 


C2 


CO 


o 


(^ 


00 


i~> 


CO 


-* 


1— < 


o 


(M 


CO 


cq 


o_ 


o 


CD 


o 


1— ( 
































tH 


o 


o 


t- 


CD 


t^ 


00 


00 


CO 


b- 


o 


o 


CO 




<M 


<M 


^"^ 


*"* 


'"' 


^^ 


'"' 


'~' 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


*"* 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c:3 


CD 


o 


o 


o^ 


o 


q_ 


o_ 


o 

CD 
00 




























N 


rH 


cT 


r— t 


o 


CO 


cT 


t-T 


t- 


00 


(M 


1—1 


co" 


CD 


o 


o 


<M 


Ci 


CO 


CO 


Ci 


lO 


CO 


CD 


>o 


CO 


00_ 


°1 


-* 


CD 


t- 


OO 


C^l 


03 


o 


c^ 


CO 


F— 1 


w 
































l>^ 


OO 

t-l 


lO 


-* 


-*~ 


l>^ 


t~ 


ci' 


t-T 


cd" 


CD 


o 


t~ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


<_, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




c^^ 


o_ 


c:j^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C5 

m 

CO 




























s^i" 


cv~ 


o 


CD 


CvT" 


o 


c^ 


tH 


CI 


o 


IC 


CD 


o 




CD 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 




o 


00 


IM 


1— ( 


00 


t^ 


lO 


l-;^ 


■^^ 


t~ 


CO 


CD 


'>^ 


t^ 


CO 


o 


t^ 


o 


t— i 






























■^ 


-5i<" 


-*~ 


CO 


^ 


^ 


CO 
I— i 


C<4 


(>i 


<M 


I— 1 


'tl 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 

ITS 
CO 




























o 


cT 


'dT 


io~ 


CO 


t^ 


l-H 


I— 1 


lO 


C5 


CO 


lO 


t~ 


CD 


o 


lO 


CD 


<M 


CD 


C^l 


-* 


rH 


o 


'd^ 


l~- 


^ 




CO 


t— ( 


'^ 


"*„ 


00 


o 


T-H 


t- 


C5 


1— i 


o 


00 
































(M 


-*" 


-* 


CO 


- 


o 


CO 


CO 


CI 

1—1 


CSI 


■M 


CO 


r-l 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 




























Cl" 


>o 


T-H 


'*" 


-^^ 


'dT 


T— 1 


t- 


o 


■* 


Ol 


1—1 


CD 


00 


t^ 


-* 


lO 




o 


o 


t- 


CO 


CD 


t^ 


^ 


C^l 


o 


1—1 


"1 


-* 


-* 


liO 


lO 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


(M 


t- 






























in 


^ 


CO 


(m" 


s<r 


(M 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


o 
I— 1 


I— 1 


^ 


C-l 
























































in 




























c3 




























0/ 




























p»i 


a 




























H 


















c 




t^ 


^^ 




o 


>» 


6 
















u 




0/ 


Average 




c3 
3 


CJ 


< 


^ 

S 


C 




1 

< 


a 

Oh 


o 


s 

Ol 

o 


s 

o 



WATER. 



55 



O — ' T-< 



o o o o 



C-! O CS 

O CO In. 

lO to Ol 

O O 00 

00 O IN. 

-^ CO U3 



t>^> 



OJ Oi X 00 



i-( IN. 00 



CO CO CO 00 



In. CO *0 



O Cs CO Ci 



00 O IN, 



N O O C-. 



O) 00 — 



CO CO CO CO 



O'OOTMOJ'r-lOCi 



O O iO O CO 7; 



io f n 

lO O IN. 

o o o 

"iN^ O 0~ 

o o cc 

O (nI 00 

O O CS 

O In l^ 

CO CO T-^ 

o o o 



O i-l o 
C-( O CO 

■* o o 



pa 
r o 

P3o 



S b 

09 ?: 



'« "^ 



g o 
p p 



ic 






~0 00 ^N 00 cE 00 iO io~ 



.* CO CO CJ il 



r-. -. W .-. O 



ci^oD a 



"-< O OJ CO ■* CO 



C040000UOOOO 



•^ rH Ci lO CO -.*< 



"a 



— CO O .-' 



CS 00 00 



OJ -o — ' 



■+) CO CO Irt (Tf 

to O! OJ 00 O 



o '-^ r^ T-< 
o o o ^^^ 



cocococococo^^JcocO(^Jco7■^ 

CM O! OJ O) O! CJ <>! OJ C( O) OJ IN 



CO CO M CO 



O) O «+i 

CO ^ CO 
IN (M (N 



■^ 00 (N '-' 



CO <N CO CO 



<N(NC^«<MlN(NO< 



— 1 O 3> O O 
I^ I^ In. 00 O 

CO •* 



IN O! IN 



CO CQ CO CO CO 
IN !N N IN N 



OJ <N IN 



00 CO O IN 00 
In. o? iO 'O O 

CO CO IN 



CJ <N IN 



o o . 

> > 1 

d :-, , I 

■2 S §1 

^ o a I 



□ !U s =s 

I.Sol 

=" I^ ™ bl 

— ' r= -^ •- fl 
(3 oim_i cs Q 

ly 'S O P. ^ 
>_g w 9 2 

£•5 --5 =2 2 

o!' bDOfe a 

+2.2^ o a 
"r," a ■» ti 



.a^s S 3 5 






-3 S;S 



00 OO 00 IN 



CO I^ Cs lO o 

'^ CO o! la o 

■^ T)H -H CO CO 

IN OJ IN (N <N 



cs".2 > g 
g g Q o § 

.o /s a e^ 5 

C3 !« w " ■^ 



fe S •< 



" a s a "a 

>> fcij ^ 2 g g 
t-j < oo O H Q 



I ^"'aa 
• o S g a> 

^ cS ►J g*. 

o « 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Conduit. 

The following Table shows the different heights at which the 
water has been running, and the number of days in each month 
at the different heights. 

The height of the Conduit is six feet four inches. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 






These heights show a head on the Conduit. 




0.0 


6.0 


6.4 


6.6 


7.0 


7.4 


7.6 


7.8 


8.0 


9.0 




NUMBER OF DAYS IN EACH MONTH. 








9 
2 




17 
23 
24 
21 
8 
6 


7 


3 

1 


2 
































4 


3 


2 
23 


























1 
3 








3 

10 
16 

28 
8 
6 
8 


20 
16 
15 
2 
3 

8 






July 








2 






































4 
1 
1 










3 


13 

15 
14 












8 
















1 










Total 


10 


4 


14 


25 


107 


10 


83 


66 


44 


2 







From this Table it appears that the Conduit has been empty 
ten days ; partly full only four days ; and for the rest of the 
year — three hundred and fifty-one days — it has been run full, 
and with a head varying from nothing to two feet eight inches. 



WATER. 



57 



Monthly Fall oj Bain in Inches, in 1863. 



January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November. 
December. 



Totals. 



PLACES AND OBSEKVEES. 



o r 



k1 W 



4.10 
4.38 
3.57 

11.34 
2.66 
1.98 

14.12 
5.61 
3.39 
4.56 
8.54 
5.05 



69.30 



M 



4.51 
4.54 
6.42 
9.08 
2.82 
2.56 
12.38 
5.64 
3.12 
3.83 
6.48 
6.34 



67.72 



g « 

a g 

« % 

5? bo 
•= fi . 

T^ 5 '§ 



3.93 
2.91 
4.69 
4.37 
1.91 
1.59 
9.77 
6.07 
3.07 
3-66 
6.02 
4.38 



52.37 



•3 M 



o a 

O ci 



§ g 2 
hj U m 



4.03 
3.20 
4.96 
6.75 
1.96 
1.61 
10.23 
6.66 
2.90 
3.98 
6.31 
5.22 



57.81 



4.43 
1.63 
2.46 
7.39 
1.67 
2.47 
12.43 
5.57 
2.98 
3.40 
6.53 
5.46 



56.42 



t? ° ■ 
P= H >^ 



2.34 
4.06 
2.64 
7.82 
2.23 
2.40 
11.66 
4.39 
2.16 
3.04 
5.93 
5.00 



53.66 



Note. — Melted snow is, as usual, included in the above amounts of rain-fall. 

Mr. J. P. Hall, who has kept a record of the Rain-fall for 
forty-one years, reports the amount according to his record for 
this year (67.72) as the largest which has fallen in any year 
during that period ; and that the amount which fell In July of 
this year (12.38 inches) as the largest monthly fall during the 
same period. 

8 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Annual Amount of Ham-Fall, in Inches, in Lake CocMtvate, Boston, 
and vicinity, 1849 ^o 1863, inclusive. 









PLACKS 


AXn OBSICRVKRS. 








fc 




-3 


1 1 X 


s c^ 


K 




YEAR. 


p4 

a 
ll 

1 3 


"3 

a 
o 

1 

n 


a 


S 6 S 
S M a 

^^1 


S § 

5 O E 

o ;5 i: 
41.90 


1 i 


a 

o" 

o 
•p 

p 


1849 


.... 


40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


.... 


34.69 


1850 


— 


53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


51.09 


.... 


51.48 


1851 


.... 


44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


45.68 


.... 


43.30 


1852 


* 47.98 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 


.... 


38.58 


1853 


* 55.86 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


.... 


53.27 


1854 


43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 


.... 


46.25 


1855 


34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 


1856 


40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 


1857 


63.10 


, 56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 


1858 


48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 


1859 


49.02 


56.70 


.... 


48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 


18G0 


55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


.... 


46.91 


46.67 


38.24 


1861 


46.44 


50.07 


50.14 


.... 


43.32 


42.95 


.... 


1862 


49.69 


61.06 


57.21 


.... 


44.26 


44.61 


.... 


1863 


69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


.... 



* By J. Yannevar. 



WATER. 



59 



B 
ft 



'^ 



•t^ 


S 


«a 


■■^i 


P 


. 


6.-; 


o-.i 


*s 


^ 


K 


00 



=!r^ 












S ^ 
^ I 

Cm g 



<^ 



"1 




























t4 




g's . 




























t- 






























C3 






w 














^J 


4* 4J 




^ 




fe "•^ 


15 


d PS 


13 






n 


fl a 


a 


a a 


rt 




o 


(y o 








o 


a o 




o o 


<u 


s 




„[2 o 


^ 


C3 O 








o 




o 


o o 


u 




S != c 


d 


r 


) o 








o 


o o 


3 


c 




o 










& ft 


& 






p. 


a p. 


c 


ft a 


ft 


ft 




'« ^ 




Oti 1^ 


fO 






-^^ 


O CO 


o 


t- 


5 O 


o 


o 




■^"S 




tH CC 


o 








^ r. 


CO 


o •*> 


CO 


o ■ 




^^■^ 






























= ^l 




r^ o 


Ci 






iM 


CO (N 


ja 


r- CO 


00 


o 








o o 


w 












o 


-H CO 


o 


o 




|i|| 




00 00 


lO_ 








o r^ 


o 


O CJ 


•^ 






o 






























to « 


oT 






f^ 


o r^ 


-i5" 


tH -h 


o 






■^ §r^hJ 


O J^ 


rs. 






M 


O CO 




"* CI 


o 










^ CO 


rs. 






o 




o 


I^ 






r-^ 




laS§ 


































CX) JN. 


o" 








7>. -li 


rC 


CO o 


-t^ 


CO 






d 




<M 






■* 




CO 




o> CI 


CI 


01 




































<H 




























u 




c^ 
































oil 




O O 


o 






o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 




OD O 


o? 








o o 


o 


o o 










o o 


o_ 






o 


o o 




O) o 


o 


o 








































o r^ 










1.0 lO 


Oj 


-H O 


CO 








-fl CO 








o 




-n 


o o 


-H 


u 


















o o 


co_ 


CO o 


o 


o 






























(^ 






^ 


-T"? CO 


-t1 








o'l — ' 


co" 


f^ s 


lo 










O C 


CO 






o 


-« o 


CO 


o o 










Ci 






»o 






CO 


-t|_ o 


tl^ 




) CO 


oq_ 










cT o 


r-T 






s" 


<S o7 


o" 


00 rC 


oo" 


ft 

ft 




tl 




o 


o 


c 




, 


o 




o 








o 


o 








o 




o 




o 




'^ a 




o 


o 


c 




• 






o_ 










>5 


o* ; 


o~ 


c 






cT : 








o 








o 


c 






i- 






o 










o 

-J 




00 


1> 














3 




•"■^ 




• 






" 




^ 


" 




o • 




o 






< 


o 










-n ; 












c to 


o 


c 




CI 


c- 














ci 




^ ■- 






^ 








I 










• 




































C3 




tn 
































^^ 






O 


, 




c 


o 




o 


o 




o 


o 










o 








o 




o 


o 




o 








""^ b 






o 






c 


s. 




o 


o^ 




c^ 


o^ 


h! 






« 




cT 






c 


o 




<d" 


cT 




o 


crT 


v- 




^ ^ 




GO 


















c 


o 


o 






o 




O 








o 






CJ^ 




00 


CO 






-) 


























>^ 










cT 






c/- 


or 




CO 


-H 
























C" 






CO 






o 








C fcD 


d 




cJ 


; 




ir 








'-' 






1^ 


Ji 




.s"" 








' 
















" 




ft 

C3 

o 




o^ 




ir 


o 


o 






o 


c 


o 


o 




o 


p 








(>' 


o 








o 


c 


o 






o 


1^ 






o « 






o_ 


o_ 






o_ 


c: 


o_ 


o 


a 


G3^ 


Ci^ 


'3 






^, 


c 




co" 






o" 




o 


CO 


-t 


cd" 


of 








c 


'O 














o 


ir 


o 








c'^ 


o 






o 






So 




cc 






C!^ 


tN-_ 


H, 




s i 


^ 


-t 


-h 








o 


« 


tC 


c^ 


tc 


if 


& 


to 




^ — 






CO 


o 












o 




o 


S? 






o 


c^ 










ot^ 


^ 


fO_ 


co_ 


c 


o 


o 


>■ 




H S 






o 


ic 






iS 


"^ 


c" 


ti 


c 


o 


00 


< 



































o o 






o 


o 






o 


c 


o 






o 


p 


o 


o o 


? o 




or 


o 


i-l 




o 


c 


o 






o 




o 


o o 










o 


c 


' ^ 


o 


c 


o 




c- 


o_ 


T^ 


o^ 


^ c^ 




c 




r. 


CO 






o 


c: 


o 


d 




o~ 


o 




CO cT 


e*- H 






CO 






o 


c 


o 




o 


CI 


o 


r^ S 




ir 




is. 








iT 


o^ 






c^ 


o 




CO 00 






















o 




















rC 


c 




o 




cT 




CO 


"O 


o 


■+" CO 








o 


a> 






C( 


C' 




(?; 


?^ 


CO 


tc 








o 


c 






ci 




o 


c- 






C^ 








































1 1 






rj- 


" « 


•f 


c 




o 




£^ 




0- 




CI 




< i 










_>c 


















i 


3 






o 


o 


c 


C 


o 


C 


o 


o 


"^ 


o 


o 








o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 














o^ 


ic: 


t= 


o 


c 


o 


o 


e 


o 


o 


o 




































q 




o 


o" 


o 










CO 




o 


CI 


i>^ 














CO 




ir 


r^ 


o 


ti- 


o 




o 






C 


o 


c'(_ 


c- 




o 




CO 






o 


CO 


































■+I 






-i- 


tC 


'f 




c 




c- 


CO 


Ci 


er 


c:^ 




(h 














o 


•^ 


CC 


o 


o 


c- 


>to 




■2 


4^ 


c S 


O 


o 








•r 




tc 


CO 






o 


o 


O 2 
































s 

< 




^ 


CO 


CO 


co 


•* 


■*! 


•+ 


■*< 


o 




o 


o 


cS 


"^ 


































c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 










c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


c 


o 


o 












o^ 


c= 


c 


o 


^ 




s. 


<:>_ 




c> 


o 


t>. 


































<«iS- s 


6 


IN 




O' 


c~ 


c 




o 


oT 




c- 










° ccl 


c 


o 


CD 




cr- 


o 




o 


r^ 




o 


CO 


"6 








i-O 


IN 


oc 


o 


o 


o 


-1^ 


C7 


CO 


<-o 








c~ 






-f 




iC 


c 


In. 


czT 




















CO 


cr 






CT 








CO 


CO 






o c'? " 


o 




CO 




'd- 


•i^ 




c- 




6)^ 






1^ 


o 
































<; " 




- 


crj 


-t< 




r^ 


o 


ir 


o 


CO 


ir 


o 


CI 


^ 


' ' 








































































o 


■o 




o 


o 


tr 






•*■ 


Cj 


o 


o 




'^ 


^ 


c 


CO 




c 






tc 


o 


tH 


rf 


o 


CO 


CO 




c 


o 


ts 


JO 


CO 


-* 


c 


CO 


oc 


ci 


o 




ci 


ci 


o 




i 


f<; 


-f 


o 


T* 






CI 


-i^ 


T* 


o 


^ 


•*! 


ts 


o 

u 
o 




fi 




jr 














^_ 










-< 




c 


CO 


-^ 




o 


r^ 


oc 


o 


o 




rvi 


CO 


t> 










lO 


O 


ui 






in: 


o 




tr 


o 




•< 




W 




«. 


CO 


CO 




c< 


00 






CO 


5 


CO 


5) 





60 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

To Messrs. J. P. Hall, Esq. of Boston, J. B. Francis, Esq. 
of Lowell, Prof. George P. Bond, of Cambridge, and J. R. 
Scott, Esq. of Waltham, I desire to express my acknowledg- 
ments of indebtedness for the favor of their respective records 
of the Rain-FaU during the past year. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

City Engineer, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

or THB 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For rene^ving a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.