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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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City Document, — No. 20. 



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REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1864. 



CITY OF BOSTON, 



In Common Council, January 5, 1865. 
Ordered : That the Cochltuate Water Board be authorized 
to make their Annual Report in print. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

WM. B. FOWLE, Jr., President. 

In Board of Aldermen, January 9, 1865. 
Concurred. 

G. W. MESSINGER, Chairman. 

Approved January 10, 1865. 

F. W. LINCOLN, Jr., Mayor. 



, \ 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, January 15, 1865. 

To THE City Council : — 

The Cochituate "Water Board respectfully submit their Annual 
Report for the year 1864, together with those of the Clerk of the 
Board, the Superintendents, City Engineer, and Water Regis- 
trar, to which they would refer you for the more minute details 
of the several departments. 

The Works are divided into two divisions, the Western and 
Eastern ; the former embracing that portion of the line from the 
Lake to the Brookline Reservoir, and is under the superin- 
tendence of Mr. E. F. Knowlton, who resides at the Lake ; 
and the latter embracing that portion of the line East of the 
Brookline Reservoir, including all the works in the city, and is 
under the superintendence of Mr. E. R. Jones. 
( 

western division. 

During the last year there have been sold several tracts of land 
near the Lake, and distributed along the line of the conduit, 
which were of no use to the city, while the taxes on the same 
were a burden, without any equivalent ; these lots embraced 
about 43 acres, and were sold at prices varying from $40 to 
per acre, the sum total received being $3,596.24. 



Q, CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

At the Lake, there has been laid during the year some fifteen 
hundred feet of slope wall to protect the banks from washing 
awaj, and above this wall the banks have been sloped and 
sodded ; there has also been erected a filtering dam, which has 
proved very satisfactory to filter the water of Pegan Brook, 
which passes through the village of Natick and empties its 
waters into the Lake. 

During the year the water has been shut off from the conduit 
four times, in order that it might be examined, cleaned, and re- 
paired. During such time it was visited by members of the 
Board, and we regret that we cannot report favorably as to its 
present condition ; several cracks were discovered and repaired 
as well as could be during the short time the water could remain 
shut off, but the entire conduit requires a thorough examination, 
cleaning, and repairing, which cannot be done effectually until a 
new reservoir is completed ; as we have at present no means of 
supplying the city during such repair, which would take several 
days if not weeks to complete. 

We cannot but feel gratified that such active steps have al- 
ready been taken by the city in regard to the construction of a 
new reservoir, covering an area of 100 acres, the land for which 
the sum of $50,000 has been already appropriated, and applica- 
tion made to the Legislature for an Act to enable the same to 
be constructed ; and we feel that we cannot press the importance 
of the undertaking too forcibly upon the City Council ; for in 
our opinion it is of vital consequence, for the safety of the entire 
line of the conduit from the Lake to the Brookline Keservoir, 
that it should be completed in the shortest possible time, and we 
earnestly request that you will give the subject your early at- 
tention. 

The water at the Lake was at its highest point on June 3, 
when it reached fourteen feet above the bottom of the conduit, 
but from that time it gradually fell oiF until December 26, when 
it was but four feet ten inches above the bottom and one foot 
six inches below the top of the conduit. During the latter part 



KEPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD." 7 

of November and the first of December the water in the Lake 
was falling so rapidly that the Board had under consideration, 
and was making investigations, as to the best artificial means 
to be adopted for raising the water to a sufficient height to flow 
into the conduit ; but before any method was decided upon, the 
water began to rise and has continued to gain, and they were 
relieved from this serious subject. 

It gives us great pleasure to be able to report that all out- 
standing claims of every description, which the Board have any 
knowledge of, have been satisfactorily adjusted.* 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

Ever since 1859, when the new 40-inch main was laid over 
the Milldam, there has been an unsettled question as to the 
right of the city to maintain this pipe ; for several years petitions 
have been made to the Legislature for an Act to enable the city 
to hold the same, but parties adverse to our interest have been 
able to defeat us or postpone the subject until this year, and 
we are now able to report that the matter has been settled and 
the right given for the city to maintain the same forever ; there 
will now be no question about our being able to supply the 
Back Bay lands, which might have arisen, had we been com- 
pelled to remove this pipe. 

The fender, which protects the main pipe that supplies East 
Boston as it passes under the Warren Bridge, having been 
broken away, has been thoroughly repaired, in such a manner 
that we believe it will last for many years. 

All the pipes and works in the city are in good condition, and 
there have been fewer leaks than usual, the only one of any 

* Dug Pond. — In our last Annual Report we stated that we had been unable 
to eifect a settlement for a perpetual right to divert the waters of Broad Brook 
on the east side of this Pond, since which time we have accomplished the 
object, and secured the right forever, by the payment of the sum of five 
hundred dollars. 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

consequence being the breakage of one of the large gates on 
Tremont Street near Dover ; this was so well managed by the 
Superintendent, that no one was interrupted in their supply of 
water, although the old gate was removed and a new one sub- 
stituted. During the past year 6,634 feet of new pipe have 
been laid, making a total to January 1, 1865, of 136 miles 
3,497 feet. 

WASTE OF WATER. 

This subject, which has been brought to the notice of the City 
Council in the Annual Eeports of this Board for many years, 
has been and will continue to be a source of great anxiety, and 
one that will require active measures to prevent. The last 
two months the Lake was at such a low point that the Board 
believed it to be their imperative duty to use every means in 
their power to put a stop to the enormous waste which they 
felt sure was taking place, and they commenced by issuing a 
Circular to the citizens, calling their attention to the fact ; this 
had a very good and marked effect, but still a great waste con- 
tinued, and as the Lake was still falling a second notice was 
issued, and persons having hand hose were requested to dis- 
continue its use, and it was also decided to employ a suitable 
number of persons to examine all the water fixtures throughout 
the city and to report each day at the office any waste that 
might be discovered, and also all leaks ; this was immediately 
carried out by the Water Registrar, and the result has proved, 
that nearly one half of the water that has been brought into 
the city has been wasted; for the first ten days, which included 
about one third of the city, there were reported 531 cases 
where water was running to waste, and 1,353 cases where the 
fixtures were out of order and water was leaking on that account. 

We have no doubts whatever but that the supply of water is 
ample for years to come if used in a liberal but proper manner. 

The active measures which the Board has adopted have al- 
ready greatly reduced the consumption, or we should say waste 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOAED. 9 

of water, and our reservoirs are now nearly full. According 
to the estimate of the Engineer, the average amount of water 
brought into the city daily is 16,681,000 gallons ; to bring this 
enormous quantity we have been obliged to run our conduit to 
its utmost capacity, and thereby endangering the Works ; and as 
we know that a large part of this is wasted, we shall continue 
to use every* means in our power to find out and prevent the 
same. 

METERS. 

Each year we are adding to the number of meters ; at the 
present time we have 312 in use, and 35 are ordered but not yet 
received ; nothing but their great cost prevents our applying 
them to all consumers, as it is the only sure way to prevent a 
continual waste, as consumers give their fixtures more attention 
when they are paying for any leakage. 

COST OF THE WORKS. 

Amount paid by the Commissioners, and by the Water 
Board from the time the Works came under the control of the 
latter $6,001,676 68 

Sundry payments by the city, $73,025 82 

Interest on loans, 4,472,453 31 



4,545,479 13 

• $10,551,155 81 

Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by the Commissioners 
and Water Board, $184,513 98 

Sundry credits by the city, 66,384 36 

Amount received for Water 

Eates, , 4,279,067 25 



$4,529,965 59 
Total cost of the Works, January 1, 1865, $6,021,190 22 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

Making the cost of the Works $112,617.59 more than it 
was on January 1, 1864. 

EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

There has been received from the Treasury during 

the year, ..... $85,817 66 

Of this amount there is charged to the extension 

of the Works, 48,000 59 



Amount of current expenses, $37,817 07 

It will thus be seen that the amount drawn from the Treasury 
is $12,727.98 less than last year, although the current expenses 
are $4,884.76 more than last year, the difference being more 
tlian made up by the falling off in the expense of the extension 
of the Works. 

The total number of water-takers entered for 1865 is 
27,046, being an increase over last year of 465. 

The total amount received for the year 1864 for water-rates 
was $431,986.76, being an increase over the previous year of 
$36,204.51. The estimated amount of receipts for the year 
1865 is $450,000. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

EBENEZER JOHNSON, President. 

GEORGE DENNIE, 

L. MILES STANDISH, 

NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE, 

ALEXANDER WADSWORTH, 

JONAS FITCH, 

JOHN H. THORNDIKE. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Statement of Expenditures made by the Cochituate Water Board, 
from December 31, 1863, to January 1, 1865. 



Wages laying service pipe 

" " main " 

" Blacksmith shop 

' ' Plumbino; ' ' 

" Proving yard 
Repairing hydrants 

" streets 

" service pipe 

" stop-cocks 

" main pipe 
Main pipe 
Service pipe 
Lake 

Aqueduct repairs 
Stable . 

Brookline Reservoir 
East Boston Reservoir 
South " " 

Beacon Hill '* 
Miscellaneous expense, annual visit of the City 
Government to the Lake, expenses of the Board, 
binding Reports, &c. . . . . 

Amount carried forward, 



13,544 50 

4,007 98 

1,085 79 

719 93 

2,625 02 

1,717 02 

2,365 32 

3,190 94 

460 79 

1,433 22 

11,179 26 

10,855 69 

4,001 14 

1,069 67 

986 45 

648 29 

415 12 

464 15 

596 80 



2,071 04 
$53,438 12 



12 



CITY DOCUMENT, — No. 20. 



Amount brought forward, 






$53,438 12 


Stop-cocks 


. 




' 1,778 05 


Proving yard, for stock, &c. . 


• 




1,479 76 


Hydrant and stop-cock boxes 


. 




2,600 31 


Off and on water . 


. 




3,636 75 


Hydrants .... 


. 




1,540 26 


Taxes ..... 


. 




1,051 37 


Salaries, (including Clerks and 


Inspectors in 


the 




Water Registrar's Office,) 


. 




8,981 22 


Meters .... 


. 




6,412 75 


Travelling expenses 


. 




217 50 


Carting .... 


. 




147 49 


Fountains 


. 




124 18 


Office expense 


. 




96 00 


Printing, (including Water Registrar's and Superin- 




tendent's) 


. 


. 


740 02 


Maintaining meters 


. 




811 29 


Tolls and ferriages 


. . 


. 


147 03 


Blacksmith shop, for stock, &c. 


. 




414 08 


Postage and express 


. 


. 


20 87 


Tools .... 


. . 




278 09 


Laying main pipe, (for stock, &c 


•) • • 


. 


790 12 


Oil 


. 




138 10 


Stationery, (including stationery 


for Water Re 


gis- 




trar and Superintendents,) 


. 


. 


323 67 


Plumbing shop, for stock, &c. 


. 




15 00 


Laying service pipe 


. 


. 


4 10 


Damage .... 


. 




15 99 


Watching Water Works 


/ 


• 


615 54 




$85,817 66 



• EEPORT or THE WATER BOARD. 13 

Amount brought forward^ 185,817 QQ 

CASH PAID CITY TREASURER. 

Eeceived for rent of Arches under Beacon Hill Eeser- 

voir $300 00 

Eeceived for land sold . . . 3,596 24 

" pipe, laying, &c. . 5,838 41 

" " mortgages sold . . 4,461 60 

" " pasture and grass . . 47 00 

Eeceived for off and on water for non- 
payment . . . $1,276 00 
Eeceived for fines and waste . 1,601 00 
" repairs . . 1,185 75 



4,062 75 
Less this amount paid City 

Treasurer . . . 1,276 00 



2,786 75 
17,030 00 



Balance . . . . . $68,787 QQ 

Amount of expenditures . . . $85,81766 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 

Wages laying main pipe . . $ 4,007 98 

" " service pipe • . 3,544 50 

" " blacksmith shop . 600 00 

" " plumbing . . . 500 00 

" " proving yard . . 1,400 00 

Main pipe 11,179 25 

Service pipe .... 10,855 69 

Laying main pipe . . . . 790 12 

Laying service pipe ... 4 10 

Blacksmith shop .... 250 00 



Amounts carried forward, $33,131 64 85,817 QQ 



14 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amounts hr ought forward, 

Plumbing shop 

Hydrant and stop-cock boxes . 

Stable .... 

Oil 

Hydrants 

Stop-cocks 

Carting . . . . 

Tolls and ferriage 

Tools 

Proving yard . ... 

Meters .... 
Lake .... 

Amount of annual expense 



$33,131 64 85,817 QQ 

15 00 

1,900 00 

380 00 

85 00 

. 1,540 26 

1,778 05 

75 00 

75 00 

. 200 00 

700 00 

6,412 75 

1,707 89 

48,000 59 



$37,817 07 



Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works , to 
January 1, 1865. 



ount drawn by Commissioners 


$4,043,718 21 




Water Board, 1850, 


366,163 89 








' 1851, 


141,309 23 








' 1852, 


89,654 20 








' 1853, 


89,854 03 








' 1854, 


80,182 35 








' 1855, 


63,866 33 








' 1856, 


81,429 35 








1857, 


96,931 25 








' 1858, 
1859, 
' 1860, 
' 1861, 
1862, 
' 1863, 
' 1864, 


76,006 01 
385,652 47 
146,304 55 
73,977 29 
86,264 22 
98,545 64 
85,817 66 

$6,005,676 68 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOAED. 



15 



Amount 


brought forward, 


16,005,676 


68 


Amount paid 


the City Treasurer 








by 


the Coi 


umlssioners 


. 


$47,648 38 






Am't 


paid by 


Water Board 


1850, 


8,153 52 








C( 






1851, 


5,232 38 








(( 






1852, 


15,869 12 








il 






1853, 


4,621 40 








ii 






1854, 


12,423 29 








il 






1855, 


9,990 38 








a 






1856, 


7,840 43 








i i 






1857, 


13,750 00 








a 






1858, 


9,200 00 








i i 






1859, 


5,554 00 








a 






1860, 


3,287 51 








ti 






1861, 


10,618 11 








(< 






1862, 


3,295 00 








( ( 






1863, 


10,000 46 








a 






1864, 


17,030 00 
















184,513 


98 




$ 




5,821,162 


70 


Sundry payments by the city, ^ 


73,025 82 






Interest on loans, 


4,472,453 31 
















4,545,479 


13 






1 




0,366,641 


83 



Sundry credits by the city . 66,384 36 

Amount received for water-rates 
(as per City Treasurer's ac- 
count) . . . 4,279,067 25 



4,345,451 61 

$6,021,190 22 

SAMUEL^. DYER, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OE THE EAST- 
ERN DIVISION. 



Boston, January 4, 1865. 

Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., Pres. Cochituaie Water Board: — 

Sir : I beg leave to submit this, my Annual Report. I 
believe the works under my charge to be in as good condition as 
in any year heretofore. The whole number of feet of main 
pipe laid the past year is 6,634, being but about one half that 
of the year previous. This small amount, as you are aware, is 
owing to the fact of so few buildings having been erected on 
new lands. The number of men employed in this part of our 
work during the year, has been less than one half; yet the cost 
of all material has been more than double that of former years. 
In addition to the main pipe laid, I have raised, to correspond 
with the present grade of the streets, six hundred and twelve 
feet of pipe on Brookline Street, one hundred and fifty-six feet 
on Fifth Street, six hundred and seventy feet on Pembroke 
Street, and two hundred and five feet on Paris Street. I would 
here observe that there are eighteen other streets, or parts there- 
of, where the mains are in the same condition as these were 
before they were raised, and I recommend that they should be 
raised. The mains were originally laid at a proper depth, but 
the grade of the streets have been altered by the city so much, 
that, in some cases, they are six feet below our usual grade. 
The expense of raising has been borne by this Department, and 
it is a question with me, which I leave for your consideration, 
which Department it should be charged to. 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 17 

The whole number of service pipes put in during the year is 
four hundred and twenty- four ; length, fourteen thousand and 
one hundred and forty-two, being seventy-one in number, and 
about six thousand in feet, less than last year. 

There has been no leak In the forty-inch main the past year, 
and the most in large pipes have been in the thirty-inch and 
thirty-six inch on Tremont Street. The large mains have been 
shut off only three times during the year ; twice on Tremont 
Street and once on Washington Street. On the sixteenth of 
November a leak was reported at the corner of Dover and 
Tremont streets, which proved to arise from the breaking of 
the flange from the body of one of the thirty-six inch gates. 
This was temporarily repaired at the time, and on the Saturday 
night following the gate was taken out and replaced by another. 
The injured gate was taken to the yard for inspection, and a 
crack, three feet in. length, was found in the body, held together 
only by the clamps. It was deemed advisable to break it up. 
By direction of the Board, I have ordered drawings to be made 
for one of an improved pattern, which will soon be ready for 
inspection. 

All the hydrants are now made in the workshop of the De- 
partment, and of a size to correspond with the requirements of 
the steam engines of the Fire Department. A good part of the 
original hydrants were so defective in their construction that I 
have not considered it economy to repair them, and when taken 
out are replaced by new ones and are condemned. This makes 
this part of my Department more expensive that that of former 
years. Those hydrants that will admit of repairs, I propose, 
this year, to insert nipples sufficiently large to make them equal 
in size to the new ones. I think that all that are now in 
can be increased this way to nearly the requisite size, but the 
cost will be so great that I cannot do It without the sanction of 
the Board. 

The reservoirs have had the usual attention this year. The 
Beacon Hill Is tight, the South Boston shows no sign of leakage, 
and the East Boston shows about the same as formerly. 
3 



18 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



The subject of accretions in the iron mains has been under 
consideration many years. In 1858, a line of twenty-inch pipes, 
coated with bitumen as an experiment, was laid under Dover 
Street Bridge. As soon as the height of water in South 
Boston Reservoir will admit, I propose to open these pipes for 
the inspection of the Board. 

• 
Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe laid in 1864. 



In what Sti-eet. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
pipe in inches. 



Feet of pipe. 



Berkley. 
Albany . 



Newton 

Canton , 

Clarendon 

St. James 

Eutland Square. 
Montgomery.. .. 

Chestnut , 

Warren Avenue . 
Brookline 



Harrison Avenue 
Concord Square. 
Unknown street 

Lawrence 

Albany 

Various streets . 



Broadway 

Dorchester Avenue 

Dove 

Quincy 



Maverick. 
Condor . . 



Marginal. 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Appleton /ind Lawrence 

Sharon and Plympton 

Total 12 inches in Boston 

West of Tremont 

Appleton street and Columbus Avenue 

Berkley and Clarendon 

West of Tremont 

Canton and Dedham 

Messenger and Otter 

Dedham and Canton 

West of Tremont 

Total 6 inches in Boston 

For Hinckley, Will'ams, & Co 

West of Tremont 

Messenger and Otter .■ 

Berkley and Clarendon 

For City Swill House 

Connections with Fire Reservoirs 

Total 4 inches in Boston 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

MandO 

For Norway Iron Works 

Dorchester and F 

C and D 

Total 4 inches in South Boston .... 

EAST BOSTON. 

McKay & Aldus's Shipyard 

Brooks and Putnam 

CHELSEA. 
North of Meridian Street Bridge 



19 

921 



940 



52 

171 
5?2 
178 
72 
368 
261 
120 
325 

2,119 



288 
306 
400 
682 
206 
1.35 

1,917 



670 

142 

264 

90 

496 



547 
20 



25 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



19 



KEOAPITULATIOK 





1864. 


Diameter in inches. 


Section. 


36 


12 


8 


6 


4 


^ . ^ ( 






940 

1 


1 


2,119 

8 

570 

20 


1,917 
19 


Boston Proper... J 




/ 


Total number of feet laid 


49(3 


South Boston.... j 






East Boston | 


Total number of feet laid 


547 


^^ , < 




25 


Chelsea J 




1 














940 
1 


1 


2,709 
8 


2 9'^5 















20 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 






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o 








.9 


9 
p 
o 




p 
o 


2 


ft 
o 


-a 










cc 


a; 


1» 


a) 


^ 


<u 


CO 










o 


<M 


ft 


'n 


P. 


tw 


p, 


tM 








p. 


o 


S 


O 


s 


O 


'^ 


o 


< 








S 


tH 


<(-i 


fe 


IlH 


s 


!(H 


CD 


H 

O 








v. 


X 


O 


.Q 


o 


^ 


O 


^ 








o 






a 


1 


a 

3 


CD 










1^ 


12; 


f-H 


"A 


p=. 


|Z3 


^ 


'(^i 






II 



KEPOET OF THE WATEE BOAED. 



21 



Statement of Service Pipes laid in 1864. 





Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston, 


TotaL 


a 
a 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


i 


of 


in 


of 


in 


of 


in 


of 


in 


as 
S 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet, 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


1| 


1 


22 


1 


19 






2 


41 


1 


8 


308 


2 


86 


3 


85 


13 


479 


1 


6 


670 


2 


92 






8 


762 


1 


149 


5,547 


60 


2,613 


46 


1,320 


255 


9,480 


i 


59 


1,392 


67 


1,361 


20 


627 


146 


3,380 




Aggre 








424 


14,142 















Maldng' the total number up to January 1, 1865 25,259 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1864. 





DIAMETER OF PIPES IX INCHES. 


"^ 


* WHERE. 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


8 


6 


4 


2 

9 
1 

1 

11 


1^ 
29 

29 


U 
5 

5 


1 

21 
5 
1 

27 


i 

1 
1 


1 

246 
43 
21 

310 


k 

3 

7 
1 

11 


o 






9 


3 


1 


3 
4 




6 


- 


23 
3 
5 

31 


36 

2 

38 


391 






64 












34 














Totals 




9 


3 


1 


7 




6 


4SQ 









Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and up- 
wards, 79 were on the joints, 8 by settling of the earth, 3 by- 
defective cocks, 2 by frost, 3 by defective pipes; total, 95. 
Of the leaks of 2 inches and in service pipes, 132 were caused 
by settling of earth, 29 stopped by rust, 1 eaten by rust, 44 



22 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



stopped bj fish, 57 by defective pipes, 16 stiff connections, 5 
defective cocks, 1 by drain digger, 1 stopped by nails, 12 by 
defective joints, 22 by defective couplings, 27 by frost, 5 by 
boxing, 13 by being struck with picks, 3 by cocks blowing out, 
7 by cocks being pulled out, 10 knawed by rats, 3 stopped by 
gravel, 3 by gasket, 2 by pile driving, 1 by drawbridge. 
Total, 394. 



Statement of the numher of Leaks, 1850-1864. 



DIAMETER OF 



Four inches 
and upwards. 



Less than 
four inches. 



Total. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
186't 



32 
64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 
531 
592 
508 
490 
494 
489 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



23 



Hydrants. 

During the year twenty-eight new Hydrants have been estab- 
lished, as follows : Nineteen in the City proper, five in South 
Boston, three in East Boston, and one in Chelsea. 



Total number of Hydrants established up to January, 1865 

983 
322 



In Boston proper 
South Boston 



East Boston 

Brookline 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Chelsea 

Total 



191 

3 

12 

11 



1,530 



Thirty-five Hydrants have been taken out and replaced by 
new or repaired ones, and fifty-nine boxes have been renewed. 
The Hydrants have had all the attention of former years paid 
them. 



FIRE RESERVOIES. 

The following Fire Reservoirs have been connected with the 
main pipes during the year : — 

Derne Street, corner of Temple Street. 
Somerset Street, opposite Allston Street. 



Walnut 


( (( 


Chestnut " 


Chestnut 


( a 


West Cedar Street. 


Irving ' 


' corner of Cambridge ' ' 


Chambers ' 


i a 


Poplar *' 


Green 


( ( ( 


Leverett, " 


Hancock ' 


( (( 


Cambridge ' ' 


Blossom ' 


' opposite 


McLean " 



24 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Auburn Street, corner of Livingston Street. 



opposite Spring " 

* ' Merrimac ' ' 
" the Schoolhouse. 

corner of Traverse Street. 
' ' Salem ' ' 



Leverett 
Causeway- 
Hawkins 
Friend 
Cooper 

The stock and labor for the above connections, amounting to 
1 1,855, is charged to the Fire Department. 



Sto'p-Cocks. 

Thirty new stop-cocks have been established this year, and 
fifty-one boxes over old ones have been renewed. All the 
cocks have been oiled and the usual attention paid them. 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



25 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, Jan- 

uary 1, 1865. 



NUMBEK OF 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



40 36 30 24 20 16 12 



6 4 3 2 



Pipes . 

Blow-off Branches. 
Y. Brandies 

3 Way Branches . . . 

4 Way Branches . . . 

Flange Pipes 

Sleeves 

damp Sleeves 

Caps 

Keducers 

Bevel Hubs 

Curved Pipes 

Quarter Turns 

Double Hubs 

OflFset Pipes 

Yoke Pipes , 

Man-Hole Pipes . . . 
One eighth Turns . 

Pieces of Pipes 

Stop-Cocks 



38 



Hydrants. 7 new Lowell, 2 Wilmarth (old), 1 Lowell 
(old). 

For Hydrants. 25 bends, 36 lengtheners, 3 framesi, H 
covers, 65 plungers, 55 screws, 50 wastes, 73 nipples, 33 
valve seats, 56 stuffing boxes, 2 goose-neck couplings, 4 hose 
couplings, 212 lbs. composition castings, 2,611 lbs. iron cast- 
ings, 32 lbs. iron castings for wharf hydrants, 24 comp. coup- 
lings for ditto, 4 wharf hydrants. 



26 CITY DOCUMENT, — No. 20, 

For Stop-CocJcs. 3 36-inch screws, 1 30-mch ditto, 2 24- 
incli ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 3 12-inch ditto, 17 6-inch ditto, 11 
4-inch ditto, 6 4-inch unfinished ditto, 1 ditto for waste weir, 
1 ditto for Brookline Reservoir, 3 12-inch plungers, 6 6-inch 
ditto, 6 4-inch ditto, 4 6-inch rings, 23 4-inch ditto, 2,447 lbs. 
Iron castings for 6-inch, 1,125 lbs. ditto for 4-inch. 

Meters. In the shop, 1 2-inch, 4 1-inch, 7 f-inch composi- 
tion, 6 1-inch iron, 6 f-inch ditto, and 6 -|-inch Scotch, in use, 
1 4-inch, 4 3-inch, 15 2-inch, 120 1-inch, 159 |-inch. Besides 
the above there are 8 f-inch, 1 1-inch, 1 2-inch, and 2 4-inch 
meters belonging to private individuals, under the care of this 
department. 

StocJc for Meters. 249 lbs. composition castings^ 3 2-inch 
male couplings, 48 |-inch ditto, 23 1-inch female ditto, 30 1- 
inch nipples, 51 f-inch ditto, 13 f-inch connecting pieces, 6 1- 
inch ditto, 5 2-inch ditto, 4 2-inch nipples, 5 1-inch stop -cocks, 
4f-inch ditto, 16 clocks, 20 glasses, 77 rubber nipples, 11 
brass spindles, 10 feet leather hose, 10 iron bolts, 4 sheets straw 
board, 2 lbs. rubber packing, 8 platforms, 18 covers, 8 frames. 
For Service pipes . 9 1-inch union cocks, 28 f-inch ditto, 79 
•|-inch ditto, 35 ^-inch ditto, 9 1-inch T cocks, 10 f-inch ditto, 
4 f-inch ditto, 6 Y cocks, 5 air cocks, 31 straight f-inch cocks, 
6 2i-inch connection couplings, 12 1^-inch ditto, 43 1-inch ditto, 
50 1-inch ditto, 110 |-inch ditto, 18 i^inch ditto, 173 f-inch 
female couplings, 150 |-inch ditto, 8 2-inch flanges, 8 1-inch 
ditto, 25 1-inch ditto, 8 f-inch unfinished union cocks, 102 ^- 
inch ditto, 13 unfinished T cocks, 10 ditto Y cocks, 34 lbs. J- 
inch coupling castings, 23 lbs. 1-inch ditto, 101 tubes, 11 ditto 
and flanges for 1-inch cocks, 35 long boxes, 13 T boxes, 6 Y 
ditto. 

Lead Pipe. 511 lbs. 2-inch, 616 lbs. 2i-inch, 545 lbs. 1 
i-inch, 535 lbs. 1-inch, 1,036 lbs. 1-inch, 1,037 lbs. f-inch, 
662 lbs. i-inch, 36 lbs. f-inch block tin, 48 lbs. f ditto, 600 
lbs. sheet lead 3,191 lbs, pig lead, 63 lbs. solder. 

Blacksmith's Shop. 695 lbs. square iron, 1,400 lbs. round 



REPORT or THE WATER BOARD. 27 

ditto, 675 lbs. flat ditto, 211 lbs. cast steel, 977 lbs. working 
pieces iron, 1,040 lbs. scrap iron. 

. Carpenter''s Shop. 5,000 feet of pine plank, 200 feet of oak 
ditto, 300 feet of spruce boards, 4 hydrant boxes, 5 stop-cock 
boxes, 1 large meter box, 1 small ditto, 2 wharf hydrant ditto, 
38 top pieces, 50 unfinished hydrant boxes, 3 unfinished meter 
ditto, 50 lbs. spikes. 

Stable. 3 horses, 3 wagons, 1 buggy, 1 chaise, 4 sets 
harness, 1 pung, 2 sleighs, 800 lbs. English hay, 1,000 lbs. 
salt hay, 2(5 bushels grain, stable utensils. ^ 

Tools. 1 steam-engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom der- 
rick, 4 geared hand derricks, 2 sets of shears, and all the rig- 
ging for the same, tools for lying main and service pipes, and 
for repairs of the same, 1 steam-engine, 2 engine lathes, 1 fox 
ditto, 1 hand ditto, 1 upright drilling machine, 3 grindstones, 
and the necessary tools for carrying on the machine, black- 
smith's, carpenter's, and plumber's shops, 3 large tool houses, 2 
small ditto, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch ditto, 2 small 
ditto, also office furniture. 

At Beacon Hill Reservoir. 5 swivel pipe j)atterns, 1 swing 
stage, capstan frame and levers, 1 composition cylinder, 1 
6-inch ditto, 4 jets, 1 reducer, and 2 sets of 12-inch plates, 
and 2 4-inch plates, 3 composition reel jets, 6 cast-ii"on jets, 1 
drinking fountain, also a large lot of patterns stored at the pipe 
yard and at the founderies where we obtain castings. 

Miscellaneous. 100 tons paving gravel, 500 bricks, 325 lbs. 
gasket, 5 keg-bolts, 375 feet of hose, 1^ cords wood, 35 gal- 
lons oil, 200 lbs. old composition, 1 load sand, 17 reservoir 
gate covers, 5 man holes, 6 plates, lot of old lumber, lot of 
machinery from Marlboro. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. E. JONES, 
Superintendent Eastern Division B. W. W. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WESTERN 

DIVISION. 



Natick, January 5, 1865. 
Ebenezer Johnson, Esq., President Cochituate Water Board. 
Sir : in compliance with the Rules of the Water Board the 
Superintendent respectfully submits a statement of the work 
done on the Western Division. 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

All necessary repairs at the gate house, dams, bridges, roads, 
walks, fences, and grounds, around the Lake, have been made. 
Agreeably to your order I have laid five hundred and fifteen 
yards of slope wall to protect the banks of the Lake from wash- 
ing. The banks have been sloped and sodded down to the top 
of the wall, which has much improved the appearance of the 
borders of the Lake. 

A dam has been built as ordered by the Board to filter the 
water of Pegan Brook, which passes through the village of 
Natick, and empties its waters into the Lake. 

From January 1, 1864, to June 1, water was wasted from 
the Lake at the outlet dam eighty-one days ; the quantity wasted 
will be given you by the City Engineer, Mr. Crafts. The gates 
at the outlet dam were closed June 1 , the Lake being at that time 
14 feet above the bottom of the conduit, from that time to the 1st 
of August it was drawn down 4 feet to supply the city, the 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOAED. 29 

gates of the outlet of Dug Pond were then opened, which kept the 
water in the Lake from falling any lower, until the 13th of August, 
at which time Dug Pond was all drawn off except what it afforded 
by springs and rain fall, which by careful measurement amounted 
to nearly a million of gallons per day. Since the 13th of Aug- 
ust it gradually fell till on the 24th of December it was but 4 feet 
10 inches above the bottom of the conduit, lower than it has 
ever been since the water was introduced into the city. 

In accordance with your order, on the 24th of December the 
waters of Dudley's Pond were let into the Lake, and have been 
kept running from that time ; this by the aid of the late rain 
storms, has caused the waters of the Lake to rise, and to day it 
is six feet three inches above the bottom of the conduit. 



BRICK CONDUIT AND LINE OF AQUEDUCT. 

All the bridges, waste- weirs, pipe chambers and culverts are 
in good condition ; the banks of the aqueduct have been repaired 
in a number of places and sodded to prevent them from being 
washed by the heavy rains. The water has has been drawn off 
from the conduit four times during the past year for examina- 
tion, repairs, and cleaning, by order of the Board. First, it 
was shut off above Charles River on the 8th day of April, at 6 
o'clock P. M. and let into the conduit again on the 9th at 12 M. 
the vvater being off eighteen hours ; during this time it was 
cleaned and examined from the Lake to Charles River. There 
are a number of places on this section which need repairs, but 
in the limited time which the water could be kept off it was im- 
possible to make them, and they were temporarily repaired for 
the season. The water was again shut off the 13th of June at 
6 o'clock P. M. and let on ao;ain at 12 M. on the 14th eighteen 
hours ; during this time the pipe chamber on the east side of 
Charles River was repaired, and swing gates placed in the 
chamber to prevent the water from wasting from the Brookline 
Reservoir and conduit east of Charles River, in case of a break in 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

the aqueduct west of Charles River ; and also to examine the 
conduit from the River to the Brookline Reservoir, w^hich it has 
been impossible to do farther than the waste-vreirs at Newton 
Centre, owing to the great quantity of water in the conduit. On 
arriving at the reservoir, I found the gate at the upper gate house, 
which shuts the water from the conduit at the reservoir, broken. 
It had been repaired and a set of stop plank made and placed 
in the gate house to guard against another accident of the kind. 
The third time the water was shut off was on the 7th of Sep- 
tember, and the water was drawn off to examine a leak. A 
large crack was discovered in the conduit near the waste-weir 
in the 13th Section, and the water had forced its way through the 
bank of the aqueduct. After the reservoir had been filled with 
water the gates at the Lake were again closed for the 4th time 
September 16, at 4 o'clock P. M. the conduit emptied and the 
leak repaired. The conduit was also examined from the reservoir 
to Newton Centre ; the water was let on the 17th at 12 M. hav- 
ing been off twenty hours and causing the water in the reservoir 
to fall two feet nine inches, equal to twenty million gallons. 
There are other places in the conduit this side of Charles River 
which need repairs, but it would require more time than could 
be given, as the conduit contains when full fifteen million gal- 
lons ; and to do the necessary repairs would require the conduit 
to be emptied at least six times, causing a waste of ninety mil- 
lion gallons, which could not be spared when the Lake is low. 

Nothing of importance has been done to Brookline Reservoir 
during the year except to keep the banks and walks in order. 

You will find annexed a schedule of tools, &c. belonging to 
the city and used in this Department. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. F. KNOWLTON, 

Superintendent Western Division. 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 31 



The following property is in charge of and used by the 
Superintendent of the Western Division : — 

1 Horse Cart and Harness. 
1 Express Wagon. 

1 Express Harness. 

2 Boats and 4 Oars. 

19 Wheelbarrows and 1 Handcart. 
49 Shovels and 10 Picks. 

4 Crowbars, 4 Rammers. 

2 Grindstones 4 Water Pails. 

4 Pairs Rubber Boots. 

6 Lanterns, 2 Hammers. 

1 Level, 2 Handsaws. 

2 Grass Hooks. 

2 Iron Wrenches at Gate House. 

2 " " at Brookline Reservoir. 

4 Trowels, 2 Hoes, 2 Axes. 

1 Fluid Can and Oil Filler. 

1 Pair of Hedge Shears. 

1 Stove, 1 Desk. 

1 Gravel Scow, and Screen. 

1 Rain Gauge. 

f Cask Nails. 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Water Eegistrar's Office, 
Boston, Dec. 31, 1864. 

E. Johnson, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir : In conformity with the 16th section of the Ordinance, 
the following Report is herewith submitted : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1865, is 27,046, being an increase since January 1, 1864, of 
465. During the year there has been 745 cases where the 
water has been turned off for non-payment of water-rates. 
Of this number 630 havg been turned on, leaving a balance of 
115 still remaining off. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
on for the first time, is 472. 

The total amount received from December 31, 1863, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1865, is . . .' . . $430,710 76 
Of the above, there was re- 
ceived for water used in 

previous years, the sum of $ 17,807 98 
Leaving the receipts for water 

used during the year 1864, 

the sum of . . . 1412,902 78 
In addition to the above, there 

has been received for letting 

on water in cases where it 

had been turned off for 

non-payment of rates, the 

sum of . . . . . . . 1,276 00 

Total $431,986 76 



EEPOKT or THE WATEE BOAED. 33 

The increased amount of income in 1864 over 

the previous year, is ..... $36,204 51 
The total amount of assessments now made for 

the present year, is .... 309,627 58 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 

of water during the year 1865, is . . . 450,000 00 

The expenditures of my office during the year 

1864, has been 4,200 34 

The items of this expenditure have been as follows, viz: — 

Chas. L. Bancroft for services .... $ 975 83 

Stephen Badlam " " . 

Edwin Jennings " » 

Chas. C. Badlam '^ " . 

William Souther " distributing bills 

A. D. Child " '« " . . 

G. E. Eic'hardson " " " 

Chas. W. Little " " " 

J.E. Farwell&Co. " printing . 

J. L. Fairbanks " stationery 



The order which passed your Board December 21, 1864, 
directing the Water Registrar to employ twenty men to exam- 
^e and report all places where the water fixtures were out of 
order, and the water found running to waste, has been com- 
plied with, and the result shows the necessity of the order. 
The total number of cases reported during the past ten days, is 
1,808. Of these 1,353 were cases of fixtures out of repair, 
and 531 were reported for wasting water. 



975 


83 


849 


81 


849 


81 


24 


00 


24 


00 


24 


00 


10 


00 


283 


52 


183 


54 


$4,200 


34 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



METERS. 

The meter system continues to grow in favor, and witli few- 
exceptions gives general satisfaction. The total number of 
meters now in use is 312, being an increase since January 1, 
1864, of 58. During the past 60 days a series of experiments 
have been commenced by attaching meters to the premises of a 
variety of establishments, embracing Club Houses, Restaurants, 
Confectioners, Oyster Saloons, and buildings occupied by sev- 
eral tenants, and the result proves the benefit of their appli- 
cation ; and I am convinced that with the aid of meters similar 
results would follow with almost every class of consumers. 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



35 



STATEMENT " • 

Showing the Numhej- and Sizes of Water Meters now in Use, and 
where applied, to January 1, 1865. 



Revere House 

Parker House 

American House 

Marlboro House 

Adams House 

Coolidge Hoiise 

Tremont House 

United States Hotel 

Bromfield House 

Hotel Pelham 

Sailors' Home 

City Hotel 

Mariners' House. 

Boston Hotel .. 

Young's Hotel 

New England House 

Merrimac House 

Wilde's Hotel 

Massachusetts House 

J. Adams's Boarding House 

Quincy House 

Elm Street House 

National House 

Central House 

Webster House 

Hancock House 

Evans House 

Dooley's Hotel 

Berkley House 

Trimountain House 

Appleton's Hotel 

Merchants' Hotel 

Boston Sugar Refinery 

Worcester Railroad Company 

Maine Railroad Company 

Old Colony Railroad Company 

Fitchburg Railroad Company 

Providence Railroad Company 

Eastern Railroad Company 

Midland Southern Railroad Company . 
Navy Yard 



Amounts carried forward 42 





SIZE 


OF METERS. 




I inch. 


1 inch. 


2 inch. 


3 inch. 


4 inch. 




3 










4 










2 










1 








2 


1 
4 
4 
3 








2 










2 


1 








1 










2 










1 










1 


2 
1 








1 










1 










1 










1 










2 


2 

1 








1 










2 


2 

2 








1 


2 








1 










1 








' 


2 










2 










1 






1 




5 


2 








2 


1 


1 






4 


3 

2 








2 




2 






1 


5 


1 
1 




2 


42 


48 


5 


1 


2 



36 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amounts brought forward. . . . 

United States Marine Hospital 

Massachusetts General Hospital. . . 

McLean Asylum 

Massachusetts State Prison 

Bay State EoUing Mill 

Norway Iron Company 

Pemhroke Forge Company 

D. Dyer (Rice Mill) 

Farrar, FoUett, & Co 

Boston Gas Light Company 

South Boston Gas Light Company. 
East Boston Gas Light Company . . 

Cunard Steamship Company 

East Boston Ferry Company 

Chelsea Ferry Company 

Torreys & Co 

Bowker, Torrey, & Co 

E. L. Gowan 

A. Wentworth 

J. Trull & Co 

J. M. Barnard 

S. Bowman 

Felton & Waters 

F. H. Jenny 

W. E. French 

John Felton & Son 

Graves & Hoyt 

J. Foote 

Gushing & Beach 



S. H.L.Pierce 

Chauncy Page 

Benjamin Pope & Co 

J. A. Robertson 

Bennett & Co 

Manson, Peterson, & Co 

J. J. McNutt 

J. R. Coolidge 

J. F. Paul 

Henry N. Hooper & Co 

William Carleton 

South Boston Iron Company 

C. Alger (Powder Mill) 

Hinckley, Williams, & Co 

Downer's Kerosene Oil Company 

Shawmut Oil Company 

Oriental Oil Company 

H. Richardson 

Lee, Crocker, & Co 

Hodges & Silsbee 

Philbrick & Parsons 

Loring, Bangs, & Co 

Henry Souther (Brewery) 



Amounts carried forward 80 



I inch. 1 incli. 2 inch. 3 inch. 4 inch 



42 
1 



80 



13 



BEPOET OF THE WATER BOAED. 



37 



Amount l7~oug'ht forward 

William T. Van Nostrand 

George W. Smith 

S. H. Litchfield 

Fairbanks & Beard 

Howard Theatre 

Mount Washington Glass Company 
Boston Crystal Glass Company . . . . 

W. K. Lewis 

W. H. Davis 

J. G. Hamblen 

H. M. Richards 

Chickering & Sons 

J. L. Ross 

Dexter, Lambert, & Co 

Sanborn, Richardson, & Co 

Grover, Baker, & Co 

G. E. Evans 

Thomas Oxnard 

Hazleton & Bailey 

Globe Locomotive Company 

Boston Milling Manf. Company 

Hill, Dwinell, & Co 

S. C. Taylor 

Warren Color Company 

Aerated Bread Company 

J. B. Fowle & Co 

Kittridge & Co 

Aquilla Adams 

William Evans 

Atlantic Works 

R. Hoe & Co 

George McLauthlin 

J. J. Walworth & Co 

Edwards & Kershaw 

Briggs & Robinson 

Schenkl & Dana 

Banker, Carpenter, & Co 

Stimpson, Valentine, & Co 

Jarvis & Hall 

Albion Building 

Hart, Baldwin, & Bothume 

Aquilla Adams 

Donald McKay 

T. R. Burnham 

SuflFolk Salt Works 

Boston Music Hall 

Second Church Society 

R. B. Brigham 

Carter, Mann, & Co 

Fulton Iron Company 

Pavilion 

Denio & Roberts 

J. Hobart 

Amount carried forward 



I inch. 1 inch. 2 inch. 3 inch. 4 inch 



80 



111 



80 
1 



110 



13 



13 



3S 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Amount hrought forward 

E. S. Wright & Co. . 

Charles Copeland 

Peter Brigham 

E. W. Johnson 

Atlantic Works 

Leavitt & Co 

G. H. Dickerman 

H. Atwood 

Globe Works 

Eagle Sugar Company 

Eowler & Co 

Bay State Sugar Company 

Campbell & Coverly 

Underhill & Brother 

Stebbins & Anderson ■. . 

Mason & Hamlin • 

Sanborn & Parker 

Watson & Bisbee 

Ereeman & Sears 

G. H. Fox &Co 

Simpson Dry Dock Company 

Paul Curtis 

Eichard Price . <. 

Commercial Wharf Company 

St. Mary's College 

Union Club House 

McKay & Aldus 

P. Doane 

Vinton & Copeland 

Medical College 

W. D. Parks .". 

Suffolk Lead Works 

George W. Vinton 

S. D. &H. W. Smith 

Union Building 

Somersett Club House 

E. F. Porter 

Merchants' Exchange 

New England Life Insurance Company . 

Haley, Morse, & Co 

Jonathan Cottle 

E. S. Higgins 

J. Higgins 

E. Perkins 

J. M. Learned 

Thomas Jameson 

Curtis & Tilden 

Studio Building 

Monks Building 

Phcenix Building 

City Exchange 

Niles Building 



I inch. 1 inch. 2 inch. 3 inch. 4 inch 



Total 163 



111 

2 



110 



128 



13 



U 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 



39 



The following Table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sales of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the 
city, October 25, 1848 : — 



From October 25 


1848 


to January 1 


, 1850, 


172,043 20 


' ' January 1 , 


1850 


J 


1851, 


98,367 90 




1851 


if, 


1852, 


161,299 72 




1852 


it 


1853, 


179,486 25 




1853 


i i 


1854, 


196,352 32 




1854 


, (, i 


1855, 


217,007 51 




1855 


(( 


1856, 


266,302 77 




1856, 


ii 


1857, 


282,651 84 




1757, 


i i 


1858, 


289,328 83 




1858, 


a 


1859, 


302,409 73 




1859, 


li 


1860, 


314,808 97 




1860, 


a 


1861, 


334,544 8Q 




1861, 


ti 


1862, 


365,323 46 




1862, 


a 


1863, 


373,922 88 




1863, 


ii 


1864, 


394,506 25 


a a 


1864, 


Total 


1865, 


430,710 76 




14,279,067 25 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam en- 
gines, &c. in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the 1st of January, 1865, with the amount of water- 
rates paid for 1864 : — 



19,309 Dwelhng-houses 


. $232,384 04 


27 Boarding " . 


1,544 00 


101 Model " ., . 


4,345 00 


9 Lodo'ina: " . 


233 00 


17 Hotels ..... 


1,142 00 


4,315 Stores and shops 


. 38,673 62 


217 Buildings .... 


9,325 78 


368 Offices .... 


2,832 58 


46 Printing offices 


685 50 


24 Banks .... 


292 50 


35 Halls .... 


515 50 


2 Theatres 


44 50 


22 Private schools 


197 00 


9 Asylums 


361 13 


4 Greenhouses 


30 00 


67 Churches 


657 33 


7 Markets .... 


804 50 


110 Cellars .... 


706 00 


379 Restaurants and saloons 


4,609 05 


9 Club houses 


240 50 


3 Bath houses 


220 00 


14 Packing houses 


232 34 


957 Stables .... 


10,914 86 


16 Factories 


513 37 


1 Brewery .... 


6 m 


1 Beer manufactory 


50 00 


6 Bleacheries . . . 


76 00 


1 Laundry .... 


25 00 


Amount carried forward, 


$311,661 76 



EEPORT or THE WATER BOARD. 



41 



Amount hronght forward, 


1311,661 76 


1 Dyehouse 


. 


54 00 


63 Bakeries . 


. 


520 00 


4 Shipyards 


. 


51 67 


2 Dry docks and 


engines 


. ' . 34 00 


56 Shops and 


do. 


3,328 50 


15 Stores and 


do. . 


1,103 80 


1 Mill and 


do. 


169 20 


7 Foundries and 


do. . 


287 43 


4 Factories and 


do. 


403 2Q 


11 Printing arid 


do. . 


803 79 


1 Bakery and 


do. 


33 00 


3 Shipyards and 


do. . 


264 06 


1 Bindery and 


do. 


93 50 


4 Buildings and 


do. . 


. , . 746 94 


1 Pottery and 


do. 


35 00 


36 Stationery engines 


1,492 64 


6 Armories 


. 


60 00 


3 Gymnasiums 


. 


. . 56 50 


941 Hand-hose 


. 


2,831 00 


19 Fountains 


. . . 


124 00 


2 Gaslight companies 


801 15 


1 Milldam company 


122 00 


1 Postoffice 


. 


67 00 


1 Statehouse 


. 


134 50 


28 Steamboats . 


, , 


5,395 18 


3 Offices, Niles Block . 


36 00 


1 Office, Harbor Master . 


6 00 


1 Office, City Scales 


9 00 


1 Old State House . 


27 00 


6 Fire-alarm meters . , 


65 00 


22 Fire engine, hose, and hook a 


nd ladder 


houses . 


• • > 

wardf 


350 00 


Amount carried for 
6 


$331,166 88 



42 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 




Amount brought forward, 


$331,166 88 


278 Public schools 


1,888 00 


8 Police stations .... 


719 00 


2 City stables .... 


135 00 


1 Offal station .... 


200 00 


1 Steamer, Henry Morrison . 


192 56 


1 Court-house .... 


262 50 


1 Probate building 


47 50 


• 1 House of reception 


10 00 


1 House of correction . 


462 00 


1 Jail for Suffolk County . ... 


243 00 


1 Lunatic Hospital 


225 00 


1 Public Library .... 


250 00 


1 Free City Hospital . 


50 00 


1 Faneuil Hall .... 


40 00 


1 City Hall .... 


51 00 


1 City building .... 


37 50 


Common Sewer Department, making 




mortar 


50 00 


Public urinals .... 


145 00 


Contractors for supplying shipping 


2,618 35 


Street sprinkling .... 


400 00 


1 Deer park . . . ' . 


10 00 


Hydrants, Boston Common 


50 00 


Building purposes 


1,217 98 


1 Custom-house .... 


153 00 


1 U. S. Court-house 


102 00 


Measured water .... 


72,176 51 


\ 


$412,902 78 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



43 



Statement showing the Number and hind of Water Fixtures con- 
tained within the Premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston 
to January 10, 1865, as compared with previous years. 



1862 


1863 


1864 


KEMAEKS. 


4,766 


4,789 


4,831 


Taps. These haA^e no connection with 
any drain or sewer. 


36,255 


37,289 


38,844 


Sinks. 


13,127 


14,100 


15,488 


Wash-hand basins. 


4,660 


4,921 


5,262 


Bathing-tubs. 


5,216 


5,788 


6,286 


Pan water-closets. 


6,252 


6,529 


7,117 


Hopper water-closets. 


816 


846 


935 


Self-acting water-closets. 


1,408 


1,548 


1,644 


Urinals. 


4,390 


4,967 


5,535 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently at- 
tached to the building. 


16 


17 


12 


Shower-baths. These are in houses 
where there are no tubs. 


12 


12 


12 


Hydraulic rams. 


714 


729 


708 


Private hydrants. 


211 


216 


275 


Slop-hoppers. 


77,843 


81,751 


86,949 


Total. 



Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, Boston, January, 1864. 

Ebenezer Johnson, ^^q.. , President of the CocUtuate Water 
Board : — 

Sir : The following Report of matters connected with the 
Water Works is respectfully submitted. 



LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The condition of the structures and grounds at the Lake and 
the improvements made during the past year, being fully set 
forth in the Report of the Superintendent of the Western Di- 
vision, it is only necessary to refer to his Report for information 
upon this subject. 

The water in the Lake, at the beginning of the year was, ac- 
cording to the reports of the Superintendent, 13 feet 11 inches 
above the bottom of the conduit, and remained at about this 
height — rising at one time to 14 feet — until June 3. 

On the first of July it had fallen to 12 feet 7 inches. Dur- 
ing the month of July it fell from 12 feet 7 inches to 10 feet, 
or at the rate of one inch per day. It then continued to lower, 
with slight fluctuations, until the 26th of December, when it 
had reached a level of only 4 feet 10 inches above the bottom 
of the aqueduct, — a fall since July 3, when the Lakewas full, 
of 9 feet 2 inches. Since December 26, it has been gradually 



EEPORT or THE WATEE BOAED. 45 

rising, and on the 1st of January stood at 5 feet 8 inches, a gain 
in -five days of 10 inches, or at the rate of 2 inches per day 
with every prospect of a steady increase. It would now seem 
that the danger which has been apprehended of being obliged to 
resort to artificial means of raising the water from the Lake 
into the aqueduct, in order to supply the usual great consump- 
tion incident to the winter months, has now passed. 

A Table of the average monthly and yearly heights of water 
in the Lake above the bottom of the aqueduct for the past four- 
teen years has been prepared and is herewith submitted"; from 
which it appears that the yearly average height of the Lake for 
the past year has been 10,x%*o feet, being a trifle lower than for 
years 1860, 61, 62. It will also be seen, that the monthly 
averagfe height for December last, — the lowest since the works 
were constructed, varies only -y^^js of a foot from the average for 
January, 1862, and, in fact, that the present low stage of the 
water is 9,lmost exactly paralleled in the winter of 1861, 2. 

We should be admonished by the experience of the past year, 
when, — with a rain-fall of 42x®ff inches, our supply ran so low, 
— of the danger that we should incur, if the rain-fall should 
happen to be as small as in 1822, which was only 27tV inches. 
The want of adequate storage room has probably been more 
forcibly exemplified in this year's experience than ever before. 
We began the year with the Lake full, and during the first five 
months there was wasted at the outlet dam 1,368,746,000 
gallons or enough to supply the city for 82 days at the rate of 
consumption for the past year. All this amount, however, 
could not have been retained even if the dam had been two feet 
higher, as was recommended in the Report of the former engi- 
neer, as the capacity of the additional two feet would have 
been not over one-half the amount wasted. Although the pro- 
posed new Reservoir will furnish storage room for an amount 
equal to the capacity of an additional two feet at the Lake ; 
nevertheless, it must be apparent that the storage capacity of 
the Lake itself should be increased unless the obstacles in the 



46 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

form of damages should be found to be insuperable. We must 
either make the total capacity of the Lake, as a receptacle of the 
rain-fall on its water shed, available by increasing its storage ca- 
pacity, or, in a few years, seek an additional source of supply. 

By reference to the statement herewith submitted of the rain- 
fall on the water shed of the Lake, the amount consumed and 
wasted, the available amount received into the Lake, and the 
available percentage, it will be seen that the daily average 
amount received into the Lake for a term of eleven years was 
about 23,000,000 gallons, while the capacity of the aqueduct to 
deliver, even if thoroughly strengthened, cannot safely exceed 
20,000,000 gallons per day, an amount, "which, if storage room 
could be provided, would adequately supply, even at the prsent 
rates of consumption, a population of 235,000. 

Water has been wasted from the Lake, during the past year 
as follows, viz : — 

In January, for 22 days, 266,420,604 gallons. 
" February," 6 " 7,120,452 " 

" March, " 101 " 582,656,370 " 

" April, '' lOi " 373,482,932 " 

" May, " 25 " 139,065,713 " 

5 months, 73J 1,368,746,071 " 

PEGAN BROOK. 

The water of the stream known as Pegan Brook, which 
passes through the centre of the village of Natick and empties 
into the Lake at its southeast corner, receives in its flow a great 
deal of offensive matter, so much, in fact, as to render its diver- 
sion or purification a matter of great desirability if not of neces- 
sity. 

A personal examination of the premises, in company with 
your Board was made last summer, when it was determined to 
make a survey of the most practicable route for an aqueduct or 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOAED. 47 

drain to divert this water to Bannister's Brook, and thence into 
Sudbury River, and to estimate the cost thereof. In view of 
the known great cost of such a work, especially at the present 
high rates of labor and materials, an expedient was suggested 
which it was thought might serve to mitigate temporarily at 
least, the nuisance. This plan was to build across the meadow, 
which is from 80 to 100 feet wide at the mouth of the brook, 
a dam of such materials that the waters of the brook, under a 
slight head, should filter through, thus arresting much of the 
filth which would otherwise pass into the Lake. A plan was 
proposed for a dam to be built of common field-stone, except a 
space three feet in width in the centre of the embankment ex- 
tending its whole length, to be filled with fine pebbles or 
screened gravel, which may be replaced whenever the filter be- 
comes foul or clogged, without disturbing the rest of the dam. 
To provide for unusual flows of water, as in case of spring 
freshets, a flume, five feet in width, provided with stop-plank 
was to be built through the dam. 

This plan was adopted by the Board and has been executed 
in a thorough manner under the direction of the Superintendent, 
Mr. Knowlton. Its cost was only about $ 500, and, thus far, 
has worked admirably. A very recent examination showed the 
water issuing in a perfectly clear state along the whole outer 
line of the dam under a head of only one foot three inches, thus 
showing that the filter was working quite as satisfactorily as 
was expected. 

Several routes for an aqueduct to divert this brook have been 
reconnoitred, and the one deemed the most feasible has been 
surveyed. The length of brick aqueduct to be built on this 
route would be about 2 J miles, with cuttings for nearly one 
mile, averaging 22 feet, and fillings for the rest of the distance, 
varying from one to twelve feet. By this route the aqueduct 
would commence about 1,000 feet east of the present filter dam, 
at a point on the brook which is about 7 feet above high-water 
mark in the Lake ; thence, following the course of the brook 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

to near the border of the southeastern part of the Lake, about 
1,000 feet; thence along the southern border of the Lake and 
by the northerly side of the Worcester railroad, about 3,000 
feet ; thence in a northwesterly and northerly direction, along 
the shore of the Lake about 3,600 feet, crossing land of Mrs. 
Sally Walker and land of Willard Morse ; thence in a north- 
erly direction, leaving the edge of the Lake, through land of 
said Morse, of Martin Badger, and of Caroline Morse about 
2,400, to a road known as Speen Street; thence, following 
this road, about 2,000 feet; thence leaving the road on the 
easterly side thereof and passing through land of Aaron Train 
and others, about 1,000 feet, and thence by an open ditch about 
700 feet to the present ditch, which leads from the meadow op- 
posite the Superintendent's house to Bannister's Brook. 

The size of aqueduct required has not been determined, as 
no opportunity has yet occurred for gauging the maximum flow 
of the brook.* It is probable, however, that a diameter of 
three feet, which, with a fall of three feet per mile would dis- 
charge over 8,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, would be 
sufficient to carry off the large quantities which the brook brings 
down in spring freshets. 

An aqueduct of this size, built on the route above described, 
would cost, at present prices, not less than | 70,000, a sum 
which nothing less than absolute necessity should justify the 
expenditure of. At all events, before incurring such an ex- 
pense, it would be well to exhaust all other expedients for pre- 
venting the filth from entering the brook, and for the purifica- 
tion of its waters before entering the Lake. The Board should 
control, by purchase or otherwise, the borders of the brook as 
far as possible, say from its mouth to the culvert under Wal- 
cott's Block ; then, if the sewage from Fay's Factory, which 
appears to be the chief source of impurity, could be diverted, 



* Since this was written, and during the recent rain, the flow of the brook has been 
gauged, and though not a maximum flow, was found to be 1,060,000 gallons in twenty-four 
hours. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 49 

and the present filter dam maintained in its present efficiency, 
it is quite certain that the evil would be effectually cured, and 
at a moderate cost compared with the expense of an aqueduct. 
We should also save the water, which, although not very 
great in amount, helps to make up the total supply, which, even 
at the present rate of consumption, is not over abundant. I 
would also suggest that an analysis of the water of this brook, 
taken at several points above the dam in its present condition, 
and compared with the same water after it has passed the filter, 
also with the water at the gate-house, which is about three miles 
distant, would determine whether the impurities, gross as they 
appear, are of that nature to deleteriously affect the quality of 
the water. 

CONSUMPTION OF WATEE. 

The usual statement of the daily average amount of water 
consumed, for the past and previous years since 1849, is here- 
with presented, and it appears that the average for the year is 
16,681,000 gallons per day, being an increase over last year of 
442,500 gallons per day. It will be seen that the average 
daily consumption for the months of November and December 
is about 2,000,000 gallons less than for the corresponding 
month of last year, — a fact that is gratifying, and is undoubt- 
edly owing to increased vigilance and care on the part of our 
citizens, inspired by fears of a short supply, and by the extra 
exertions of the Board and its officers in tracing out sources of 
waste. 

The estimates of consumption for the past year have been 
made according to the method employed the year previous. 
Some comparisons have been made of this method with various 
formulas for obtaining the discharge of canals and pipes under 
similar conditions, and all the investigations I have made this 
year confirm the opinion expressed in my last Report, that the 
estimates for a number of years past have been too large. 

The greatest amount consumed on any one day during the 
7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 

winter months of 1864, was about 23,700,000 gallons on the 
nineteenth of February, and greatest amount for any one day 
In the summer, was 20,300,000 on the 24th of June. 

CONDUIT. 

A statement of the condition of the conduit and the repairs 
made during the year, will be found in the Report of Superin- 
tendent of the Western Division. 

The importance of a thorough strengthening of the conduit 
in its weak places, especially on embankments, is, I doubt not, 
fully appreciated by the Board ; and I have nothing further to 
add to the suggestions in my last lieport upon this topic, except 
it be to urge the importance of putting the conduit in condi- 
tion to deliver the water for the new Reservoir when completed. 
In its present condition it is hardly safe to exceed the daily re- 
quirements of the city, whereas if it were thoroughly strength- 
ened it could be made to deliver at least 20,000,000 gallons 
daily. 

PEOPOSED NEW EESERVOIE. 

Some additional surveys and rough estimates have been made 
during the past year in connection with this project ; but, as 
yet, the surveys have been too imperfect to form a reliable esti- 
mate of its cost. If it should be decided to go on with this 
work, a complete and minute survey must be made, which will 
require some months to finish. I would therefore suggest the 
expediency of commencing the survey as soon- as possible. The 
importance of this work has been so fully set forth in former 
reports, and the Board is so well satisfied of its necessity, that 
any arguments In its favor would be entirely superfluous at this 
time. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 51 



EASTERN DIVISION. 

The Board is referred to the detailed Report of the Superin- 
tendent of this Division for a statement of the general condi- 
tions of the works in his Department. 

I have prepared, and herev^^ith submit, the usual tabular 
statement of the average monthly heights of water in the reser- 
voirs at Brookline, Beacon Hill, South and East Boston, above 
tide-marsh level, for the past five years. 

By this Table it will be seen that, notwithstanding the low 
state of the water at the Lake, the average height of the water 
in Brookline Reservoir for the whole year has been well main- 
tained, being only -^^^ of a foot less than last year, and only 
xV^ of a foot less than in 1862 — the highest average of the 
five years. It also appears that the height of water in the 
several City Reservoirs has been well maintained, — at Beacon 
Hill being only tVtt of ^ foot less than last year ; at South Bos- 
ton 1.09 feet less ; while at East Boston there has been a gain 
of 1.88 feet. 

The yearly average loss of head from Brookline to tlie City 
Reservoirs for the past five years is shown by the following 
table, in feet and hundredths : — 

I860. 1861. 1862. 1863. 1864. 

Loss from Brookline to Beacon Hill 6.16 0.54 6.35 6.27 6.10 

" " " "S.Boston 11.43 9.66 8.93 11.05 11.82 

" " " "E.Boston 27.28 27.47 28.27 30.24 28.04 

It will thus be seen that the loss of head to Beacon Hill has 
been less the past year than for the four previous years ; to South 
Boston it has been greater, while at East Boston it has been 
less than for the two previous years. 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT, — No. 20. 



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o 


CO 


-* 


t- 


tM 


oq 


^ 


o 


CO 


CM 


cr 




"1 


00 


'^ 


CD 


co 


CO 


(M 


»o 






























00 


CC 


00 


«> 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CS 


00 




o 


c 


o 


c 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


c 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




as 


CC 


T— ( 


t- 


o 


1—1 


o 


CO 


CD 


o 


OS 


CO 


OO 


OO 




























o 


c 


I— t 


oc 


o 


CO 


00 


Oi 


d" 


d" 


t^ 


lO 


»o 


00 


cr 


<M 


■d 


lO 


CO 


o 


o 


<M 


CO 


CO 


as 


(?q 


K) 


l> 


lO 


c 


CO 


o 


CO 


t- 


Oi 


C5_ 


CO 


1— 1 


r—* 
































00 


CC 


00 


00 00 


00 


05~ 


05 


t- 


co" 


CO 


t- 


00 




O 


c 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 




o 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




t- 




05_ 


M ■* 


o 


(M 


(^ 


CO 


CD^ 


lO 


-^ 


00 


f_( 




























»o 

00 


CO 




t-T 


»0 00 


irT 


o 


lO 


o 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


s 


CO 


CO CO 


tM 


00 


CO 


CO 


rH 


t- 


CO 


00 


I?! 


(T^ 


I— 1 


CO IM 


oi_ 


1—1 


(M 


<KI 


t^ 


-* 


CO 


00 
































t^ 


1>1 CO 


lb CO 


t-T 


t- 


t- 


t- 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


CD 




o 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


J-, 


o 


O 




o 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




t-^ 


o c^ 


O .-1 


»o_ 


<M 


CO 


lO^ 


CO 


>o 


o 


OS 


o 

00 




























r~i 


-<!tl rH 


T-l CO 


CD 


-* 


■* 


lO 


•^ 


CD 


t- 


t- 


OO 


r-l -^ 


CO ^ 


O 


1—1 


o 


OO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 




(M CO 


Oi CO 


^ 


lO 


o 


la 


»o 


as 


o 


00 
































lO 


lO '^l 


■* »o 


co" 


00 


00 


CO 


-^ 


^ 


la 


lO 




O 




era 




^ 


C-, 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




O 




O 




<3 


^ 


(3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




O 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


05 
00 




























o 




o" 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


d" 


o 


o 


o 


o 




lO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


IC 


o 


o 


00 


t- 




»o 




CD 


co^ 


00 




00 


lO 


00 


CD 


CO 
































t-< 




I-H 




CO 


'd?^ 


'^ 


'^ 


'^ 


■>* 


CO 


CO 


CO 




























(K 

>> 


H 

■o 


13 

a 

cS 


a 


4 


< 




1-s 


1-5 


p 


ft 
CO 


1 

o 


O 


S-l 

CO 

o 

<D 


eg 



EEPOET OF THE WATEE BOAED. 



53 





O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 

00 




























^ 


CD 


i-T 


CD~ 


■>*" 


o 


c<r 


co' 


co' 


oT 


Oi" 


t-^ 


1—1 


>o 


-* 


^ 


o 


05 


CO 




CO 


05 


t- 


t^ 


'^ 


00 


CD 


ao_ 


CO 


lO 


o 


t^ 


I-l 




t- 


"^ 


o 


lO 


CO 
































00 


00 


CD 
rH 


CD 
rH 


CO 




00 


CO 


CO 


lO 


^ 


r-l 


CD 
r-l 




o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 




o 




O 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




(^ 


o 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


CO 

CD 
OO 




























cq 


00 


y—i 


icT 


t- 


CO 


-* 


o 


lO 


cT 


00 


»o 


00 




o^ 


CO 


<M 


o 


CO 


»o 


00 


CO 


t- 


(M 


C5 


CO 


1— ( 


CO 


CO 




^ 




Gi 


05 


o 


t^ 


o 


<N 


<M 
































CO 

1—1 


t— 1 


CD 
I— 1 


rH 


1— I 


CD 
1—1 


)0 

I— 1 


CD 


t- 


in 


CO 

I-l 


CO 

1— 1 


CD 
r-l 




o 


^ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


00 




























o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o" 


o 


o 


CD 


o" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


■* 


o 


o 


OO 




o 


o 


































I— 1 


I-l 


I— 1 


-* 


CO 


CD 
1—1 


1—1 


t- 




»^ 


r-l 


CO 


« 


C5 


^ 


■* 


CO 


c^ 


^ 


o 


»o 


05 


CO 


CO 


(N 


'^l 




CO 


CO 


'i^ 


C5 


CO 


CO 


o 


CD 


la 


!M 


t^ 


CO 


o 




t- 




CO 


»o 


00 


o 


00 


CO 


w 




o 


CO^ 


co^ 


CO 
CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


i-T 


t>r 


i—T 


t-T 


C<f 


00 


t-^ 


'^^ 


CO 


cT 


o 


o 


lO 


lO 


00 


CO 


Ol 


t- 


o 


OO 


o 


l^ 


CO 


I— 1 


OO 


•* 




CD 


IM 


CO 


cq 


o 


CS 


CO 


Ol 


T—l 
































T-l 


o 


CI 


t^ 


CO 


t- 


00 


00 


OO 


t- 


CD 


lO 


00 




<M 


<M 


I-( 


'"' 


I— 1 


1—1 


t-t 


rH 


I— 1 


'"' 


'"' 


T-l 


1— 1 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 




q^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 

CO 




























<N 


T—H 


05 


I— 1 


o 


OO 


cT 


t-^ 


t-T 


CO 


c^ 


T— ( 


00 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


<M 


Gi 


CO 


CO 


C5 


lO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


00 


05 


■* 


CD 


t- 


00 


<N 


<M 


05 


Oi_ 


00 




(M 
































t- 


00 


»o 


^ 


^ 


t- 


t-T 


Oi 


t-^ 


CD 


CO 


Ci 


t- 




.—1 


'"' 


r-f 


I-l 


rH 


'"' 


'"' 


T-i 


I— 1 


'"' 


'~' 


rH 


T-< 




o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


^ 


o 


^ 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C5 
00 

1— 1 




























(N 


at 


o 


o 


C3 


m 


Ol 


^ 


cT 


co" 


lO 


CD 


itT 


>— 1 


CO 


00 


CO 


O 


CO 


I— 1 


o 


OO 


(M 


rH 


00 


t^ 


lO 


t- 


^ 


t-^ 


CO 


CD 


c^ 


t--^ 


CO 


CD 


t-;^ 


lO 


r-l 




r-l 


1—1 


I-H 


CO 

I-l 


1—1 


1—1 


CO 
1-1 


rH 


rH 


t-l 


1-1 


rH 


CO 
T-l 




O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


^ 




O 


o 


O 


o 


o 




o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


(^ 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


CD 


o 


o 


o^ 


OO 




























iO 


o 


oT 


-* 


lO 


CO 


t- 


I— 1 


1—1 


>o 


m 


CO 


io~ 


t-^ 


00 


CO 


C5 


lO 


CO 


<M 


o 


(M 


^ 


■^ 


CD 


-* 


t~ 


M< 


r—i 


rH 


CO 


I— 1 


■*_ 


'^^ 


CO 


CO 




t- 


O 


T-t 


CD 


00^ 
































CM 


Hh" 


-* 


CO 


1—1 


o 


co" 


CO 


<M 


oq" 


iM 


C0~ 


CvT 




'"' 


1— ( 


I-l 




""* 




1—1 


T-l 


'"' 


rH 


'~' 


rH 


r-l 




o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<_, 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD 


q_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 




























iO 


■ 05 


iO 


T— 1 


hT 


-*" 


-* 


1—1 


i>r 


o 


■*~ 


CN 


1— ( 


CO~ 


OD 


00 


t~ 


■* 


lO 




o 


lO 


t- 


CO 


CD 


t- 


■*! 


(M 


rH 


o 


1-i 


Ol 


■* 


-* 


>o 


lO 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


<M 


t-^ 
































lO 


■* 


CO 


<M 


CO 


(M 


CO 


CO 


oq 


o 


y-t 


1— 1 


C^ 




rH 


I— 1 


I-l 




1-1 






T-l 


^-^ 


r-i 


1—1 


""• 


rH 






























to 


























U 


a 


















u 




u 


^ 
dj 


c2 


K 




>i 














(U 




HI 


9 


O 


>> 


t-r 














r^ 


^ 


.^ 


^ 


bO 


g 






'3 


5h 
< 




q3 
t-o 


'3 

1-5 


Sjd 

1=1 


a 

m 
ft 
W 


S 

o 

o 


a 

0) 

i> 
o 


a 

CJ 





54 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



^tg 



■^ 
^ 



is 

"iS> 

S 

s 



s 

to 



§ 






<3 


cs 


o 


<>o 




■*o 




^ss: 


-^ 


•12* 








•« 


©> 






u 


•^ 


s 


to 


■^^^ 


►J? 


to 


b^ 






CO 


«o 


O 


«; 


'^ 


to 


«^ 


-^ 






t-!^ 




.« 


^ 


b^ 


£i 


^ 


S 


•ii 


•T^ 


s 




^^? 


>-<: 


'7^ 


■*** 


•< 


e 


« 







CO 

a 

32 

o 

Q 

H 

m 

C^ 

M 

03 
H 

a 
2 
« 


■3 
C 

O 

a 

1 
g 


CO 


B 

la 
O 

W 

S 

CO 

Q 

O 

« 
P5 




; ro 


: 


















t CO 




00 


O O — 1 00 
CO (^J CO r-l 


00 00 . 








3 




00 


-H 














1 -" 




o 








: --o 


'. >^ ', '. 








1 CO 




T^ 








la r-l y^ CO y-< i>. 

CO 11 CO N 






1 s 




2 


















Ti la 




to 




o 




















-- 




1 






















rH 




-. 




00 

o 




















-H 




^ 






















N 




a 




o 

50 




















C5 




a 
























N 




N 






o 

CO 

o 




















M 




« 






















N 




N 




!0 




















-H 








to 




















-> 




^ 




o 




















-^ 




w 




lO 




















rH 




^ 




o 




















IN 




W 




U5 






















vH : 


*H 




00 






















; w o !% 


























; <N tH CO 




o 






















: rH CO r^ 
























^ : 
























U5 CO 00 


























CO • CO 




«5 






















00 >-l 03 


























CO . CO 




CO 
«5 






















rt CO ■* 
























rH . tH 




CO 
























^ 




























CO CO 




























CO CO 




o 
























<M (M 




o 
























tH r-( 




-H 
























(M N 




o 
























N Ci 




o 
o 








-^ : 


-^ : 




<N r 




: ■* 








z; 

D 

n 




►-5 


a 


1 


< 


< i" 
S 


s 


a 

>-5 


s 
a 


a) 
02 


U 
di 

1 

o 


> 
O 

|2; 




3 
o 



EEPOKT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 55 

From the foreffoino^ statement it will be seen that the conduit 
has been empty only four days during the past year ; partly full, 
with a depth of water varying from four feet ten inches to six 
feet three inches, for sixty-nine days ; just full, (six feet four 
inches in depth,) two days ; and for the remainder of the year, 
(two hundred and ninety-one days,) it has worked under a head 
of from one inch to two feet. 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 






^ 



S 



^ 






S>4 
J?4 



't?. 







CO 


^ 


CO 


OJ 


o 


^_^ 


CO 


ta 


^_, 


to 


00 


^ 


s 




s 






CO 


CO 


(N 


lO 


CO 










•* 




s 


CO 


CO 


^ 


^ 


•* 


CO 


rH 


o 


t^ 


to 


lO 


la 


o 






<m 


iO 


lO 


C3 


,_, 


c» 


















s 


CO 


00 


o 


lO 


O 


w 










IN 




lO 




l-i 


^ 


N 


CO 


3 


•*! 


CO 
r-t 


IM 


CO 


CO 


N 


CO 


Tt< 


CO 






o 


r^ 




o 






















o 




JO 




■* 


^ 


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O 


C5 


CO 


CO 


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t^ 






s 


«2 


o 


00 


OJ 


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3 


Tt< 


N 


s 


o 


o 


rH 


rH 






c-. 


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CO 


c» 


o 


r^ 


^ 


CS 










jr^ 




I^ 


C! 




CO 


Ga 


lO 


(N 


I^ 






00 


CS 






,_) 


CJ 


CO 


■* 


CO 


C! 


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o 


00 


Is. 


t^ 


to 


o 




"^ 












^ 


















cn 


o 


rs. 


CJ 




CO 






o> 




tH 








§ 










»o 




•* 


^ 


■*! 


CO 


tH 


rH 


CS 




s 


O 


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M 


IN 


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o 


o 


OS 


CS 


o 


o 










'^ 






^ 


tH 


















^ 


O 






o 






















CS 






^ 


o 


o 


o 


w 


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00 




CS 


m 


o 




S 


o 


(N 


o» 


N 


N 


,^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 






J^ 






'"' 










'"' 








"^ 






'-' 






iO 


LO 


o 


to 


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o 


o 


IN 


^ 








OT 






CO 


CO 




t^ 




CO 


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t^ 


o 








s 




o 




o> 


o 


i-( 


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^_4 


o 






















"^ 


'^ 


^ 


















CO 




o 


ta 


■* 


^ 


o 


c^ 


o 


to 


(N 


o 




1 






o 




o 








l^ 












o 


o 


o 


M 


OJ 


(N 


;:; 


T-( 


1— ( 


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rl 


;=; 


































































o 


o 






lO 


00 


r^ 


CS 


M 


o 


o 








g 














o 


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00 






CS 






00 


t^ 


to 


o 




1-1 


o 


rH 


o 


o 


o 


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o 




















^ 










OS 




«5 




o 


to 


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CO 


to 


00 




o 


•* 


IN 


IN 


(N : 




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o 




f_4 


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o 


o 


OJ 


t^ 


to 


to 














^ 


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s 


^ 




00 






g 


lO 


o 


<y> 


to 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


CS 


o 


CO 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 


to 


o 


to 


00 


OS 






^_, 




^ 


00 


00 


(M 


lO 


tH 


00 








o 




S 


lO 


I^ 




o 


to 




to 








iO 


i> 




05 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


OS 


00 


t>. 


t^ 


CS 


o 


o 












.m 




00 


4: 


o 


CO 












W 


to 


CJ 


■*! 














tN, 


* 






S 


o 


o 


o 


3 


o 


o 


CS 


00 


lO 


to 


J^ 


00 


OS 








^ 


CO 


t~. 


CJ 


o 


to 


^ 


o 


1(5 


l^ 




r^ 




.^ 


lO 


c^ 


tH 






Tf* 


t^ 






lO 


o 


o 


lO 




s 


o 


o 


o 


- 


- 


o 


© 


OS 


00 


r^ 


00 


CS 


CS 












to 


00 


o 


(T. 


O) 


o 


CS 










o 


00 






•* 






o 










lO 


to 




c2 




o 


rH 


,_, 


,_, 


,_, 


,_^ 


o 


,_, 


CS 


CS 


Cs 


o 




■^ 






^ 


"^ 




"^ 


^ 




^ 












a 










•: 


















































t5 
























































bB 




S 


















u 




;-, 




> 








c3 


3 


*1^ 
<«1 




1-5 


»-5 




a 

Ol 


o 
,o 
o 
o 

o 


B 

> 
o 


tu 

1 

o 





REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



57 



>^ 


a| 




























U 




"<Si 

































e 


l| 


























> 




Si 


























C3 




e 


o ?J oj 














■ti 






+£ 










fe ■^ 




fl 


a 


d 


'. '. a 


a 


a 


a 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 










0^ 





<y 


• a> 


Q 










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u 





u 




























^ 


oh o 




ki 


&4 


^i^ 


t4 


t. 


t^ 


t4 


tH 


b 


S-i 


tH 


;-< 




■iS 






c; 


OJ 


CD 


'. ' 


(U 


<u 


Oi 


ty 


01 








a> 




so 


cj.g.a 




ft 


a 


& 


• P. 




ft 


0. 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 


ft 




e . 


i« 




CO 


w 


CO 


I I -^ 





00 


10 


to 


10 


05 





en 






-5'S 




^ 


CO 


in 


• tN. 


tH 


In 


CO 





-* 


CO 


■* 


■<t( 




































:= °.^ 




r^ 


^ 





N 


CO 


M 


"9 


IN 


CO 


s 


e-i 


CO 












w 


• > 











CO 













izi 




1 


oc 


in_ 


0. 
10 


tN 

S5 



■4 


Oi 


IN 




§ 


co~ 




"5^ 'eis 




CO 


00 


r-^ 


• • °1 


?C 


to 


IN 


rri 


0, 


c: 




Cs 




S -^ 




s 


OG 


r^ 


s 


'. '• "** 


rC 


^ 


t^ 


CO 
10! 




C! 


3 


in 


gl 




SCD. 


-* -^ fl ■" 


























oT 




a CO 




























3 






s-ii 




00 


"^ 





: : 


1 









§ 









l«; 



>-] 






c 
IN 


C 

CO 






« 





00 
IN 






2 


tN 

10 


;^ . 




1:* CM 


§°ll 


S. 


c 

0^ 




. . «= 


c-j 


c 


-tH 






CI 


-r 


lO 


IC 


E-i 

c2 




^ 00 


ll-^ 


-<J 


0: 


Cv 


00 


' 


00 


t£ 




1^ 




itt 




>i 




I— 1 





r^ 


s 


io 


: ; co_ 


tH 








CO 


cc 


to 


"3. 




>s 






to 


tc 


t^I 


10 


to 





to 


00 


In 


X 


ir. 


ft 

d 


§ 






3 . 


» 
^ 


c 







c 




S„ : 

cT ! 














§ 










C3 
IN 




M >, 









, 




IN. 












IN 


u 




^S 


CO 




r^ 



















10 

00 


s 





1 


««- "^ 


■< 


^ 






(M 




Tt 












-IH 






-Kg 


O &D 


a 


CJ 







CO I 










•i 






X 


=s 




•1 s 


































s 


























oi 

— Z) 




t; 






c 




• 




G 


> G 




c 


> G 




M 




S . 






G 









G 






c 


> G 




cs 




^•§ 


'^ rf 


s 






C 

c 


~ 






C 
C 


r G 




c 


3 G 

r c 




ttH 






Cm "*^ 

o to 

<B.S 




2 




> 


: 00 or 

• CO 

: «5 




T 

0( 




I ? 

J T- 




1 


3 c 









-^ so 




















*" 






ft 




e &i 


a 


























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SI'S 




IT 


c 


5 ;_ 





C 


c 


C 


to 


c 


c 


c 


>, 




oS 




oc 






• • 




c 






G 




c 






1^ 


a 


o- 


i^ 


r c; 


GTS 


IT 


c 
ic 


; 1 


oc 

' 1 


G 


> c 

5 T 


s IN 

" 


'3 










c^ 


1 § 


• • '^ 




0( 






(^ 


I> 


c 


0) 






1! 


•^ 




T 




; ; cT 


« 


r~ 


c 


tc 





r £ 


f ! 


" .^ 









cr 




\ I 


ifT 


t£ 





^ t£ 


i_ c 

r c 


c 
t: 


" 0( 


> •* 
r IN 


" ^ 






t- s 






























S5 » 






G 


> c 




C 


^ 




tc 


G 


5 C 




CO 


rK 


■3 -3 
^3 






c 


L c 


g 


G 




§ 


g 


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i c 


to 


§ ^ 




i 


g 


r- 




M 


C 




; a 
> 1: 


; a 


G 


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r tc 


cT 


oo" ^'" 






^ c^ 





c 






C 


3 C 


^ -^ 


to 


In 


oS 


J 




5 




*5 "^ 


ir 


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«■ 


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3 IN 


io_ 


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f-.*;i (iT 


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1^ 




t: 




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•^ 


C 


= ^ 


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r «■ 


r ot 


cT 


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S'o 


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3 OC 


? 








3 t: 


= s 






3 





Tt 




r ■* 


~ " 

55 


G 


" ^ 




■' C' 







■1 o* 


" 


ca' -tH 

10 to 

i? to 


•s^ 


t. 




C 


G 


5 (- 


000 


C 


c 


> c 


5 C 


c 




3 c 


u 






c 


C 










> c 


> c 


c 


3 G 


3 C 


^ 




s s 


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a 


3 ir 




__ io_ to 


C 




>_ c 


2, "^ 


c 




5. ^ 


0) 






'^'? 







G 


f c 


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" If 


5" a 


D u- 


G 


r 


i" ;= 


>i 




a 
3 


T 




c 


3 Cs 00 






G 




G 




5 G 






c 


C 


5 2 


^ CO £n ca_ 

r to cT -H 

< tN 4i 


C 


a 

c 


§ I 


" a 


G 

r c 


3 G 


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lO 


■K. t^i 


s 








;^ 1- 


1 s 


> r^ -*i to 


tl 




D_ C 


5_ t; 


>_ c 


3_ C 


^ ^ 


<« 


=0 'f 




a 




5- 


r 


5 C 


5 CO Tl5' tH 


•<* 


" "" 


h" t. 


5" t; 


r « 


3" « 


3 t£ 


> 
4^ 




























c^ 


fO io 


a 1 i 




C 


> <: 


5 C 


> 


c 


> c 


> G 


5 c 


> G 


3 C 


3 C 


? ^ 






! 1 




G 


> c 


2 G 


> 


G 


> G 


3 G 


5 G 


3 G 


3 C 


3 C 







C 

^ 




»^ C 


>, o_ o_ o_ 

" cT c^r c^r 


C 


~ 


5_ G 


3_ G 


3 G 


3 G 
3" J. 


3^ G 


" >> 




o 




> 5 


3 5: 


3 -H lO 




: c 


5 r 


Z C 


> c 


■s 





^ '3 




*i i 




L " 


u 


5_ i> 00 0_ 


C- 


;_ t. 


3 - 


H C 


^ 


0^ li 


i^ 


r "^ 








c 




S ^ 


- "^ ■* r^ 


C 




C 


0" C 






t; 






1^ 






5 t. 


5 0( 


D S 3 it* 








! t: 







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* 


^ 


r 


r- 
J 


H* rH CO* gT 
H rt rt O^ 




r t. 


£' a 


1 "^ 

Kf 


L c 


r 


r -1 

-} r- 


i. 3 


- - 


^ e 


1:2 









































S u 


to 


t. 


5 c 


<> 


« 


H C 


■> c 


c 


3 to 




<o 


b< 


c 


1 '■ 


r- 


■< 0» 00 rH 


t. 


5 C 


T 


t< 


H t 


c 


t 


3 tN 




s 


fl 




r 


^ ^ 


CO 


■*! CO 




D C 


4 1, 





3 C 


n c 


■> 


J 




1 


g 


^ 


H I 


T 


H « •* 


^ 


h - 


tl 1. 


•; 


H 


t< t 


3 r 


N tH 




^ 


fij 




i 












>_ 










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iS 


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^ < 


■0 ■! 


)H 10 to r^ 





« 


n c 





H e 


■^ c 







■^ 











11 


10 10 10 




1 


to t 




s t 


t 


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00 00 c 





C 


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5 'c 


c 


c 

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58 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



Monthly Fall of Rain in Inches, in 1864. 



January . . 
February . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October... 
November 
December . 

Totals 



:iM 



3.37 

0.98 
8.44 
4.02 
2.84 
0.58 
1.06 
3.56 
1.52 
6.50 
5.45 
4.28 



PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 



3.87 
1.43 
11.75 
4.72 
3.31 
1.47 
1.90 
4.17 
2.60 
4.80 
4.00 
5.28 



49.30 



BE 



2.79 
1.13 
9.86 
3.65 
2.70 
1.64 
1.4G 
3.09 
2.51 
4.37 
4.36 
4.69 



42.25 



go 



2.44 
0.89 
8.03 
2.56 
2.56 
1.25 
1.62 
3.22 
2.91 
3.79 
3.93 
4.91 



38.11 



JO 



2.64 
0.98 
8.42 
3.59 
2.81 
1.07 
1.82 
3.64 
2.90 
3.84 
4.09 
4 94 



o 



3.34 

0.89 
6.59 
7.81 
2.91 
0.78 
1.20 
2.55 
1.68 
4.60 
3.52 
4.59 



.39.46 



si. 



fe-o-g 



^ SO! 



3.00 
0.90 
6.84 
4.44 
2.20 
0.70 
1.16 
2.51 
2.30 
4.97 
4.04 
3.50 



30.56 



ft4 : 



4.66 
1.53 
4.74 
2.46 
3.15 
1.22 
1.46 
4.05 
2.. 36 
2.85 
3.42 
4.93 

36.83 



Note. — Melted snow is, as usual, included in the above amounts of rain-fall. 



REPOllT OF THE WATER BOAED. 



59 



Annual Amount of Rain-Fall, in Inches, in Lake Gochituate, Boston, 
and vicinity, 1849 ^o 1864, inclusive. 









PLACES 


AND OBSERVERS. 






YEAR. 


oT 
ttf 
3 


"3 


T3 
C 
O 
CQ 


by E. Hobbs and 
, Ag-ent, Boston 
ring Company. 


a a 

la 

li o 


"S 


< 




ll 


a 

o 

o 
M 


2 o 


Waltham, 
J. R. Scott 
Manufactu 


Lowell, by 
ufacturing- 
Erancis. 


II 
o a 


8 
g 
2 


1849 


.... 


40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


41.90 




34.69 


1850 





53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


51.09 




51.48 


1851 


.... 


44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


45.68 


.... 


43.30 


1852 


* 47.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 





38.58 


1853 


* 55.86 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


.... 


53.27 


1854 


43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 





46.25 


1855 


34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 


1856 


40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 


1857 


63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 


1858 


48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 


1859 


49.02 


56.70 


.... 


48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 


1860 


55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


.... 


46.91 


46.67 


38.24 


1861 


46.44 


50.07 


50.14 




43.32 


42.95 


44.25 


1862 


49.69 


61.06 


57.21 


.... 


44.26 


44.61 


50.09 


1863 


69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


54.17 


1864 


42.60 


49.30 


.... 


36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.88 



* By J. Vannevar. 



It appears from the foregoing Table that in only one year since 
the works were completed (1855) has the annual rain-fall at 
the Lake been so small as for the past year. 



60 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 20. 



I 

o 



•to - 
CO 

i 

s 






cq 



.s 

I 



1^ 










OJ 


00 


o 


to 


OD 


























o 






to 


CM 




00 


o 


lO 




CM 


00 






o 


c^ 


CO 


to 


!>. 




OJ 




lO 




00 










'"' 




o 




en 


CJ 


CJ 






OS 


C-. 




OS 








-* 


to 


C-. 




r^ 


o 


CO 




o 


CM 












S 














tH 


CM 








JN, 


OS 




|z; 














,_, 




y-t 


,_, 












O 

o 




G> 


o 


C5 


o 


o> 


o 


ro 


OS 


OB 


OS 


o 


00 


o 






O 


s 


in 


f_i 


05 


m 


CO 


to 




O 






OS 




to 






is. 


OJ 


OS 




OS 






w> 


I^ 


d 




n 










to 










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rH 


C5 


ai 




O 


o 


c» 


Oi 


OS 


OS 


05 


OS 


OS 


OS 






r« 


lO 


o 


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iC 


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o 


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to 


to 


o 


t^ 






< 


O 


CO 




to 




00 


o 




r^ 




■* 


CO 






W 








00 




to 
































CI 




OS 








































,— ( 






i 


CM 


CM 




00 


to 


CM 


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OS 


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to 


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s 


CO 


to 


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to 




00 


to 






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GS 


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ro 


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to 




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g 








o 


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ra 




o 




o 




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1 




























































































m 




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1—1 




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to 


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CM 


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to 






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tH 




tH 


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to 


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r-< 


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l-l 


















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to 


on 


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to 




p 




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o 






00 


«: 


















O 






lO 




«5 


CO 


IN 


O 


CM 


CM 


Ttl 


■* 


CO 


CO 








































r-t 


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l-« 


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o 


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to 




to 


ns 


QC 




to 






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6 


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to 




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'. o M o o 



EEPOET OF THE WATEE BOARD. 61 

I desire to return my thanks to the several gentlemen who 
have so kindly furnished me with their annual records of the 
rain-fall for the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

City Engineer. 



n: 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THB 

CITY OF BOSTON 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates HaU. 
Books can be kept out 14 days. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, wiU be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent; out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., untn one half hour before 
sunset m the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book.