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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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'ity Document. — No. 88. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 




REPORT 



COCHITUATE "WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OP BOSTON. 



YEAR ENDING APRIL 30; 1875. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In compliance with the provisions of the City Ordinance 
the Cochituate Water Board respectfully submits its annual 
report for the year ending April 30th, 1875, together with 
the report of the Clerk of the Board, the City Engineer, the 
"Water Registrar, and the Superintendents of the Eastern 
and Western Divisions. To these reports the Board would 
refer the City Council for all detailed statements relating to 
the condition and progress of the works during the year. 

The Board has the pleasure of reporting the works in ex- 
cellent condition, with the exception of the conduit, which, 
however, is apparently in no worse condition than last year. 
The water has been drawn off twice during the year, and 
such examinations and repairs made as the limited time 
would allow. 

The question of a further supply of water from the 
Sudbury river, which has been advocated by this Board dur- 
ing the past four years, has at last been settled by the action 
of the City Council at the very close of the municipal year. 
Owing to this delay the whole of last season and the early 
part of the present one has been lost, and nothing has been 
done towards obtainiug an additional supply of water, with 
the exception of the construction of the rock tunnel through 
the Chestnut-Hill ridge. Immediately upon the passage of 
the order authorizing the Board to take the Sudbury river, 
the old sluiceway between the river and Farm pond, and 
between Farm pond and Lake Cochituate, was put in order, 
and the water from the river turned into the lake, and the 
Board hope with this additional supply to keep the lake at 



4 City Document. — No. 88. 

high-water mark throughout the year. During the months 
of June and July of the present year a fourth pipe (40 in. 
diam.) will be laid across Charles river, enabling the present 
conduit to deliver into the reservoir from one to two millions 
of gallons more per diem than it can at the present time. 

This, when completed, will make four pipes across the 
river, connecting the two parts of the conduit, viz. : two 
of 30 inches, one of 36 inches, and one of 40 inches in 
diameter. It is thought that with the addition of this 40-inch 
pipe, a supply of water can be brought to Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir sufficient to supply the city until the new works 
are completed. 

The year opened with a full lake, which high point was 
maintained remarkably well during the spring and early 
summer months, but the extreme drought during July, 
August and September made it apparent that the supply for 
the city would fail unless it could be augmented from some 
source. 

In October application was made to the Mystic Water 
Board for assistance, which was granted, and that water was 
turned into the Cochituate pipes ; 57,000,000 gallons having 
been furnished, Mystic Lake became so greatly reduced that 
it was feared that a sufficiently large supply of water for its 
own legitimate purposes would not be left, should the drought 
continue. 

During the winter every effort was made to check the 
waste and extravagant use of water by the citizens, by means 
of notices issued in the public papers, and by causing self- 
closing fixtures to be put on in all places where the waste was 
most apparent. During the month of October it became 
evident that pumping at the lake would have to be resorted 
to, the water having fallen below the top of the conduit. 

The pumps and engines that had been used in 1871-72, 
having been carefully housed, were ordered to be put in 
readiness for use. They were set upon the platforms that 



Report of the Water. Board. 5 

had been used in 1871-72, and pumping was begun on 
December 4th, 1874, the water at that time being at the 
height of 4 feet 8 inches in the conduit, from which point it 
continued to fall until January 30th, 1875, when it was 9|- 
inches below the bottom of the conduit, — the lowest level of 
the lake since its first use as a source of supply for Bos- 
ton. 

The sluiceway was opened and the water from Sudbury 
river turned into the lake", January 21st, 1875, but pumping 
was continued until March 4th, 1875. 

From January 21st until May 1st, over 1,300,000,000 
gallons were diverted from the river into the lake, equal to 
about 72 days' supply for the city, and during this time none 
had been wasted by running over the dam. 

The total income received for water rates 
(including the amount received for shutting 
off and letting on water for non-payment of 
rates) , for the year ending April 30, 1875, as • 
per report of the Water Registrar, is . . $1,005,117 10 

Less amount paid Mystic Water Board as 
per contract . . . . . . 71,497 51 



Balance $933,619 59 



Showing an increase of income over the 
previous year, of .... $98,686 62 



The total amount credited to Water Works 
by the City Treasurer for the year ending 
with April 30, 1875, is .... $1,013,48327 

The total amount charged to Water Works 
for the year ending with April 30, 1875, is 
as follows, viz. : — 



Amount carried forward, $1,013,483 27 



6 City Document. — No. 88. 

Amount brought forward, $1,013,483 27 

To current expenses . 462,876 65 

To interest and premium on 
water debt . . . 540,858 77 1,003,735 42 



Excess of income over expenditures . $9,747 85 



The amount expended for construction 
during the past year was . . . $321,975 21 

Amount expended on account of Parker- 
Hill reservoir 106,106 23 

Amount expended on account of additional 
supply 224,956 68 

Amount expended on account of water- 
pipes, Wards 17 and 19 ... . 2,388 59 

$655,426 71 
Less amount of income over expenditures 9,747 85 



$645,678 86 



Add cost of works to May 1, 1874, as 
per previous report ..... 10,141,060 33 

Net cost of water works to May 1, 1875 $10,786,739 19 



Owing to the imperfect system of keeping the books, the 
expense and construction accounts have not been properly 
separated, much that should have been charged to con- 
struction account having been charged to expense 
account. 

This system has been changed, and in future the two 
accounts will show more correctly. 

From this statement it will be seen that the works have 
earned $9,747.85 during the past year, after paying for 
Mystic water for the City Proper, $7,652.19 ; over $10,000 



Keport of the Water Board. 7 

for pumping water at the lake, and fully $20,000 for thawing 
out service pipes and replacing main pipes that were burst 
by the extreme cold of the past winter. 

Notwithstanding the large amount added to the cost of the 
works (fully one-third being for additional supply) , the in- 
creased receipts compare very favorably with the increased 
expenditure for interest and premium, as, leaving out of 
account the amount expended on the Chestnut-Hill tunnel 
and expenses of surveying, the two accounts would just 
about balance each other. 



EASTERN DIVISION. 

This division is in charge of Mr. E. E. Jones, and em- 
braces all that part of the work lying east of the Brookline 
reservoir. 

Owing to the extreme cold of the past winter the work of 
the Superintendent has been much more laborious than usual. 
A large number of main and service pipes were frozen, over 
13,000 feet of main pipe (some as large as 20 inches in 
diameter), and over 1,000 service pipes having been frozen 
solid, and, although a large force of men was employed day 
and night, many consumers were without water for weeks. 

During the past year about 23 1 miles of pipe have been 
laid as follows : — 

185 feet, 36-inch; 109 feet, 30-inch; 8,294 feet, 24-inch; 
11,531 feet, 20-inch; 2,718 feet,16-inch; 48,934 feet, 12- 
inch; 680 feet, 9-inch ; 17,364 feet, 8-inch; 33,424 feet, 
6-inch; and 1,111 feet, 4-inch. 

During the same period 358 stopcocks were put in. 

The total length of pipe laid from the beginning of the 
works until May 1, 1875, was 285 miles 4,016 feet, the 
total number of stop-cocks 3,125, and hydrants up to the 
same date, 3,246. 



8 ' City Document. — No. 88. 

The number of service-pipes laid during the year was 
1,245, making a total to May 1st, 1875, of 40,088. All the 
gates and stop-valves used during the year, up to the size of 
12 inches, have been made at the Federal-street shop, and 
preparations are being made for the construction there of 
gates of a larger size. 

The work of enlarging the distribution pipes throughout 
the "burnt district" and other portions of the city has 
been nearly completed, so that very little pipe-laying 
will be called for, for some years, in the old part of the 
city; but much remains to be done in Wards 13, 14, 15 
and 16, and in Wards 17 and 19 nothing has been done as 
yet; but an appropriation of $300,000 having been granted 
in December last, for extending the pipe service in these 
two wards, the work will be prosecuted with vigor during the 
present season, and it is probable that they will be supplied, 
to some extent, during the present year. 

This continued extension of main and service pipes over 
so large a territory greatly increases the duties of the 
Superintendent of the Eastern Division and all of his 
subordinates ; and, being so far from the centre of supply, 
makes it much more expensive to carry it on, as all the 
material must be carted from the Federal-street or Albany- 
street yards. 

During the early spring serious complaints came pouring 
in from all parts of East Boston of the impurity of the 
water furnished the citizens hj the Mystic Works, and the 
Board felt constrained to change the supply from the MystiG 
to the Cochituate . This change was effected April 2 1 , and since 
that time the citizens of East Boston have been supplied en- 
tirely by the Cochituate Works, though, under the contract 
made with Charlestown in 1869, the Mystic Water Board is 
receiving its • pay, just as though it was supplying the water 
as usual. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



THE CITY RESERVOIRS. 

Of the three low-service reservoirs, that in East Boston is 
the only one which will be needed for the future. The one at 
South Boston has been very little used for some years, and 
with two lines of low-service pipes, each 20-inch, and one of 
12-inch for the high-service, it seems scarcely possible that 
it will be required again. The Board would therefore 
recommend that it be taken from their charge. In respect 
to the Beacon-Hill reservoir, it is the recommendation of 
the Board that it be sold as early as practicable, it having 
ceased to be useful since the completion of the high-service 
reservoir on Parker Hill. 

This last reservoir was completed and the water let into it, 
November 2d, 1874, and is intended for the high-service only, 
Its capacity is about 7,000,000 gallons, and its elevation 
about 219 feet above tide marsh levei. It has been in con- 
stant use during the winter and spring and proved to be 
perfectly tight, reflecting much credit upon the contractors 
Messrs. Tarbell and Hayes, who have executed their work in 
a very satisfactory manner. 

The total cost of the reservoir, including gate-house and 
fence, but exclusive of the cost of the land, which has not 
yet been settled, is $138,797.01. • 



THE WESTERN DIVISION. 

The Western Division comprises all that part of the 
works lying west of the gate-house of the Brookliue reservoir, 
and is under the charge of Mr. Desmond FitzGeralcl. All 
the works belonging to this division are in good condition, 
with the exception of the dwelling-house occupied by the 
attendant who has the care of the lake and surroundings. It 
was the intention of the Board to have built a new house 



10 City Document. — No. 88. 

during the last year, and an appropriation for that purpose 
was asked for and granted ; but upon further consideration it 
was thought better to await the action of the City Council 
on the question of a further supply of water. It will be 
necessary, however, during the present season to make some 
repairs on the old house ; but it is not deemed advisable at 
present to erect a new one, as the building of the new works 
will probably necessitate a change of locality for the 
house. 

The duties of the Superintendent of this division have 
been considerably increased, during the past winter, in con- 
sequence of the continued pumping, day and night, for about 
three months, a detailed account of which, together with 
much other valuable information, will be found in his report. 



THE DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIRS. 

The Chestnut-Hill reservoir is iu a very satisfactory con- 
dition. The level is 1.37 inches higher than at this time last 
year ; the roadway has been covered in the best manner with 
broken stones during the past season, and it is hoped that 
the expense of repairs will be considerably lessened in the 
future. 

The Brookline reservoir needs a thorough cleaning, but as 
it will be a work of some weeks, during which the water must 
be drawn off, it cannot be done safely until another pipe for 
supplying the city can be laid from the Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir, — there being only one pipe at present, a break oc- 
curring in which while the Brookline reservoir was empty 
would deprive the city of water. 

This second main will be necessary very soon, and would 
have been recommended this year had not so much work, that 
seemed more pressing, been called for. 



Eepoet of the "Water Board. 11 



NECESSITY OF LEGISLATION TO MAINTAIN THE PURITY OF 

WATER. 

There is a growing feeling in that portion of the com- 
munity that has been called upon to consider the matter, 
that further legislation is needed to enable cities and towns 
to protect the purity of waters used for domestic purposes. 
As most of our cities and many of the the principal towns 
of the State are supplying themselves with public Water 
Works, it seems absolutely necessary that some measures 
should be taken to prevent the 'pollution of the water-courses 
of the State by sewage. 

As the case now stands, a city or town gets permission and 
proceeds to erect Water Works, with very little thought of 
future sewerage ; but as it becomes necessary to dispose of 
the increased amount of water used, it is emptied into the 
nearest brook or river, to be pumped up and used by some 
neighboring city or town for domestic purposes. Heretofore, 
in this State, water has been principally used for manufac-" 
turing purposes, which use legislation has been shaped to 
encourage. Now, its use for domestic purposes has become 
of great importance, and new legislation is required. The 
experience of the past year, in endeavoring to obtain an act 
for diverting Pegan Brook from Lake Cochituate, shows that 
the question has not yet fully impressed itself upon the minds 
of those not directly affected. 

It is hoped that another year will not be allowed to pass 
without some measures being taken with a view of protecting 
all the water-courses of the State. 



12 City Document. — No. 88. 

WATER REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT. 

By reference to the report of the "Water Registrar it will 
be seen that the number of water-takers for the year 1875 is 
44,676, being an increase of 2,331 since January 1st, 
1874. 

The number of cases where the water was turned off for 
non-payment of dues during the year ending January 1st, 
1875, was 1,112, of which number 231 still remain shut off, 
the balance having had the water turned on upon payment of 
dues. The total number of meters now in use is 1,092. 

The daily average consumption of water from January 1st, 
1874, to January 1st, 1875, was 18,231,590 gallons, against 
17,842,700 during the previous year. Thus while the number 
of consumers increased during the past year 2,331, against 
1,567 for the previous year, the amount consumed has increased 
but 388,890 gallons per day, against 2, 779, 300 for the previous 
year, showing a much greater percentage of increase of 
consumers than of the amount consumed, resulting princi- 
pally from the new style of fixtures that have been placed 
upon hopper closets and urinals throughout the city. This 
saving could be considerably increased by placing self- 
closing faucets upon many other fixtures used in private 
dwellings. 

The number of water-fixtures of all kinds on the premises 
of water-takers January 1st, 1875, was 186,874, showing an 
increase of 16,593 during the year. 

Under the present ordinance the Water Board has no con- 
trol over the water rate's, with the exception of some 
discretionary power in the charges for hand hose and other 
trifling matters. The ordinances have been changed during 
the past year, giving the Board authority to charge extra for 
hopper closets and urinals, unless provided with self-closing 
fixtures , and discretionary power over the charges for hand 
hose. This is well so far as it goes, but the Board, having 



Report of the Water Board. 13 

charge of the Water Works, should have full authority over 
the rates, and also over the fixtures that are put into the 
premises of water-takers. This can be accomplished only 
by some act compelling all plumbers to be licensed, which 
would cause no hardship to anyone, but would simply enable 
the Water Board to keep itself informed of any changes 
being made upon the premises of water-takers. Under the 
present system changes can be made without being reported 
to the Water Registrar, and discovered only by a visit of the 
inspector. 

THOS. GOGIN, President. 
EDW'D A. WHITE, 
L. MILES STANDISH, 
CHAS. J. PRESCOTT, 
CHAS. R. McLEAN, 
WM. G. THACHER, 
AMOS L. NOYES. ' 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1875. 

Thomas Gogin, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — The following is a statement of the expenditures 
and receipts of this department for the year commencing 
May 1, 1874, and ending April 30, 1875: — 



EXPENDITURES. 






Carting $530 00 


Damage .... 






504 82 


Advertising . 






251 41 


Stable 






4,944 6Q 


Taxes ..... 






453 96 


Tools 






7,395 77 


Travelling expenses of the Board . 






157 50 


Fountains .... 






1,475 87 


Postage and express 






31 85 


Aqueduct repairs .... 






2,392 95 


Printing for all departments - 






2,016 25 


Eastern avenue wharf (rent and salary of agent) 


2,999 97 


Telegraph, repairing instruments and wire 


164 25 


Stationery for all departments 


308 81 


Salaries ...... 


21,346 93 


Shutting off and letting on water for repairs . 


13,184 31 


Inspectors ....... 


8,001 05 


Amount carried forward, 


$66,160 36 



16 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Amount brought forward , 



eet) . 

including $7,652.19 
by the Mystic Water 



Upper yard (Albany sti 
Miscellaneous expenses 

for water furnished 

Board 
Lake Cochituate 
Maintaining meters 
Meters . 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
Blacksmith shop . 
Main pipe 
Laying main pipe . 
Service pipe . 
Proving yard 
High-service 
Chestnut Hill reservoir 
Beacon " " 

East Boston " 

South Boston " 
Brookline " 

Repairing stopcocks 
Stopcocks 
Repairing hydrants 
Hydrants 

Repairing main pipe 
" service pipe 

" streets . 

Wages, laying main pipe 

" " service pipe 

" blacksmith shop 

" proving yard . 

" high-service 
Laying service pipe 
Pumping works at Lake Cochituate 

Amount carried forward, 



,160 36 
10,467 45 



10,433 84 

2,203 21 

1,685 50 

3,685 74 

4,593 89 

209 59 

256,123 77 

38,972 13 

12,759 68 

1,475 28 

12,672 43 

16,819 26 

813 59 

618 38 

274 15 

1,104 27 

50p 97 

23,653 42 

6,783 16 

43,219 85 

17,879 19 

. 17,728 93 

14,677 25 

68,355 58 

11,739 56 

1,840 13 

9,098 30 

4,688 87 

4,451 65 

11,388 55 

$677,172 93 



Report of the Water Board. 



17 



Amount brought forward, $677,172 93 

High-service, South Boston ..... 1,028 04 
Wards 13 to 16, and Extension to Wards 17 

, and 19 104,250 89 

Chestnut Hill driveway ..... 13,096 13 

Parker Hill reservoir 106,106 23 

Water pipes, Wards 17 and 19 2,388 59 

Additional supply of water .... 224,956 68 

Total amount drawn for by Water Board $1,128,999 49 



And which is charged as follows : — 

To Water Works . . $678,200 97 

" Chestnut Hill driveway . 13,096 13 

" Wards 13 to 16, and Ex- 
tension to Wards 17 and 

19 . . . . 104,250 89 
» Parker Hill reservoir . 106,106 23 
" Water pipes, Wards 17 

. and 19 . . . 2,388 59 

" additional supply of 

water . . . 224,956 68 



$1,128,999 49 
Amount charged to Water Works . : $1,115,903 36 



receipts. 

Fire Department, for use of hy- 
drants $36,024 00 

Fire and elevator pipes, repairs, 

etc. . . . • • 37,923 66 



Amounts carried forward, $73,947 66 

2 



18 City Document. — No. 88. 

Amounts brought forward, $73,947 66 $1,115,903 36 

Off and on water . . . 2,455 00 

Fines 324 00 

Sale of old material . . . 1,708 97 

Kent of part of E. ave. wharf . 300 00 

Sale of hay at reservoirs .- 343 80 

Rent of land .... 91 00 
Three months' rent of house, No. 

7 Waverly place . . ._ _ 186 00 
Sale of horse at Lake Cochitu- 

ate 50 00 
Sale of clay mill at Chestnut Hill 

reservoir .... 25 00 



79,431 43 
Net amount to Water Works . . $1,036,471 93 

Amount drawn for the Water Works, not in- 
cluding Chestnut Hill driveway, additional 
supply of water, Parker Hill reservoir, 
Wards 13 to 16, and extension to Wards 
17 and 19, or Water pipes, Wards 17 and 
19 . . . . . . . $678,200 97 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 

Main pipe, laying, etc. . . $181,990 74 
Hydrants and stopcocks and 

boxes . . . 35,733 58 

$217,724 32 



Amount of expenses from April 

30, 1874, to May 1, 1875 . . . $460,476 65 



Report or the Water Board. 19 



Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works 
to May 1, 1875. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . . $4,043,718 21 
" Water Board in 1850 . 366,163 89 
" " " Cochituate Water Board 
from January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1874 . 7,874,427 92 
Amount drawn from April 30, 1874, to May 

1, 1875, for Water Works . . , 1,115,903 36 



$13,400,213 38 



Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by Commissioners . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by the Water 

Board, 1850 . . . 8,153 52 

Amount paid by Cochituate 

Water Board to May 1, 1874 434,330 87 

Amount paid from April 30, 

1874 to May 1, 1875 . . 79,431 43 

569,564 20 



Net amount drawn from Treasurer . $12,830,649 18 

Gross payments (including interest, pre- 
miums, etc.) for account of the Water 
Works to May 1, 1874 . $22,743,169,99 

Gross payments from April 

30, 1874, to May 1, 1875 1,659,162,13 

24,402,332 12 



Gross receipts to May 1, 

1874 .... $12,602,109 6Q 



Amounts carried forward, $12,602,109 66 $24,402,332 12 



20 City Document. — No. 88. 

Amounts brought forward, $12,602,109 66 $24,402,332 12 

Gross receipts from April 

30, 1874 to 

Mayl,1875 1,084,980 78 
Less amount 

paid Mystic 

Water Board 

for supplying 

East Boston, 

as per contract 71,497 51 

1,013,483 27 

$13,615,592 93 



Net cost to May 1, 1875 . . . $10,786,739 19 

Eespectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 

Clerk of the Cochituate Water Board. 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, City Hall, 

Boston, May 1st, 1875. 
Thomas Gogin, Esq., 

President of the Gochituate Water Board : — 
Sir, — In compliance with the ordinance relating to the City 
Engineer's Department, the following report is respectfully 
submitted : — 

SUDBURY RIVER AND LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The Sudbury river has not been made of service in main- 
taining the supply during 1874, as authority to take its 
waters had not been granted by the City Council at the close 
of the year. The entire supply (with the exception of about 
57,000,000 gallons from the Mystic works) has therefore 
been obtained from Lake Cochituate. 

The monthly average heights of the water surface of the 
lake, above the bottom of the conduit, will be found in the 
table on page 45. 

On Jan. 1st, 1874, the water in Lake Cochituate stood 9 
feet 8|- inches above the bottom of the conduit. January 
29th it had risen to 12 feet 6| inches ; and from that date it 
was allowed to waste over the dam, until February 14th, 
when it stood at 12 feet ?>\ inches. 

During March, April, May and June, it was kept at" very 
near high-water mark. 

Waste has been allowed during the following intervals : — 

From January 29th to February 14th ; from February 
22d to March 3d ; from April 23d to May 6th ; from May 



22 City Document. — No. 88. 

16th to May 28th ; and from June 6th to June 10th. The 
total waste over the clam for the year has been 1,145,852,000 
gallons, equal to an average daily supply of 3,139,320 
gallons. 

June 2 2d the water stood at high- water mark, and since 
that time it has gradually fallen, standing, September 1st, 10 
feet 2| inches ; November 1st, 6 feet 4^ inches ; and on 
December 31st, 2 feet 2\ inches above the bottom of the 
conduit. 

In September a severe drought began, which lasted till 
February of this year. Early in November it became evident 
that it would soon be necessary to resort to pumping water 
from the lake, in order to keep up a sufficient supply to the 
conduit, and on the 11th of that month the Water Board 
ordered the pumps and engines to be put in readiness for 
operation at as early a day as practicable. At this time, and 
during November and a portion of December, the Mystic 
works were supplying the city proper with from two to two 
and a half million gallons per clay, which, as the consumption 
for those months was much below the average, enabled the 
conduit, though running but partially full, to slowly increase 
the depth of water in Chestnut Hill reservoir. 

December 3d the water was drawn from the conduit, to 
allow stop-planks to be put in at the gate-house. On the 
evening of that clay the pumps were started-, and were kept 
in constant operation, — with short stoppages for repairs, — 
till March 3d, 1875. From January 21st till February 10th 
the water surface was drawn below the conduit bottom, 
reaching the lowest point (9| inches below) Jan. 30th. On 
May 1st of this year the lake stands at 12 feet 4 inches ; 
1,303,600,000 gallons from the Sudbury river having been 
turned into it since January 21st. 

Both Dug and Dudley ponds have been drawn down to 
low-water mark. Dug pond was full in July, and on the last 
day of that month was emptied by the Water Commissioners 



Report of the "Water Board. 23 

of Natick, to facilitate the construction of the pump well and 
engine foundations for the town works. Dudley poud, which 
has a small drainage area compared with its storage capacity, 
had only filled to within 4 feet of high-water. 

The town of Natick has erected pumping works, and taken 
a supply for public use from Dug poud during the past year. 
As this pond is a tributary of Lake Cochituate, and has been 
used as a storage-basin (capacity 150,000,000 gallons), the 
supply for Boston will be somewhat diminished ; but this is a 
matter of small consequence compared with the injury to the 
quality of the supply that will be caused by a sewerage sys- 
tem for the town, which is likely to be built when the use of 
water from the town works becomes general. 

This subject has been reported upon (City Doc. No. 85, 
Appendix A) , and various methods of diverting the sewage 
from the lake have been suggested. 

Application was made to the Legislature, during the present 
session, for authority to divert Pegan brook (the natural 
outlet to a large portion of the sewerage of Natick) into 
Charles river, and, upon the refusal to grant this authority, a 
bill was introduced to divert it into Sudbury river, which has 
been referred to the next Legislature. 

Conduit. — A thorough examination of the interior of the 
conduit was made December 3d, by Mr. Wightman and Mr. 
Cunningham, the latter passing through from the lake to 
Charles river ; and the former from the river to the ventilator 
near Newton tunnel. 

It was found to be in about the same condition as at the 
time of the previous examination, April 14th. The springs 
spoken of in the last report to the Water Board, found within 
1,500 feet of the lake, seem to have increased somewhat in 
strength and volume of flow. During the time the water was 
drawn ofl", they brought in large quantities of fine sand. An 
attempt was made to stop their flow, but it met with little or 
no success. To make proper repairs in this portion of the 



24 



City Document. — No. 



conduit, considerable time will be required, as short sections 
must be dammed off, and the water kept down by bailing or 
pumping. 

The following table, extracted from Mr. Cunningham's 
report, gives a detailed statement of the condition of the con- 
duit from the lake to the syphon chamber on the west bank 
of Charles river. 





Measurements 
of Conduits. 




Station. 






Remarks. 




Height. 


Width. 




Gate House. 






Entered at 8.50 a.m. 


0.50 






Sand 4 in. deep. 


1.50 






Springs on right running into conduit. 


2.00 






Large spring hringingin sand ; probe passed 
easily through joint at this place, 2 feet 
deep into spaces. Cut 26 ft. deep. 


7.25 


6.03 


5.17 


Hole in bottom ; probed 4 in. ; cutting 24 ft. 


7.20 






Crack top and bottom. 


7.30 


6.03 


5.22 


Two cracks in top from 7.10. 


7.50 






End of crack in top. 


8.05 


6.20 


5.04 




10.12 






Sponge growth bottom and sides . 


17.50 






Large spring in bottom. Cutting 12 ft. deep. 


17.70 


6.30 


4.94 


Bottom below grade. 


20.50 






Loose brick in bottom at manhole. 


20.25 






One inch sand in bottom. 


66.10 






Spring enters on right. Cutting 37 ft. deep. 


71.40 


6.22 


5.12 




71.60 


6.28 


5.02 




71.72 






Large springs in several places. Cutting 
27 feet deep. 


73.65 


6.13 


5.12 


Large springs at left. Cutting 14 ft. deep. 


88. 






Slight springs at right. Cutting 18 ft. deep. 


96.80 






Spring in bottom. Cutting 16 ft. deep. 


97.80 






Sand in bottom, brought in from springs 
above. 


100. 


6.32 


5.08 


Brick out of bottom near Oak-st. crossing 
and a manhole. 



Eepoet of the Watee Boaed. 



25 



Station. 



121. 

122. 

134+ 

141 to 144 
142. 
147. 
150.80 
152. 

153. 
- 154. 
154.50 

155+20 

157. 

167.70 

168. 

168.20 

169. 

169. to 170.20 

170. 
171.30 to .65 
173.40 to +70 

178. 
178.65 
179. 
180. 
181. 
181.75 
to 183.50 



Measurements 
of Conduit. 



Height. 



6.31 



6.32 



6.34 
6.31 



6.33 



6.34 



6.33 



6.35 



6.35 



Width. 



5.05 



5.14 



5.04 



5.01 
5.05 



5.08 



5.02 



5.07 



5.00 



Remarks. 



Spring at left in bottom 21 ft. cut. 

Sand in bottom brought in from spring 
above. 

One in. of sand in bottom. Cutting 21 ft 
deep. 

Old crack pointed last year has not started. 

Sand in bottom. 

Sand in bottom. 

Old crack top has not started. 

Old crack top has not started. 

1 Cracks from 154 to 
155.20 were pointed 
Nov., 1873, and have 
Crack at top begins. J- not started. 

J Conduit built on top 
of 5 feet of embank- 
ment. 

Arrived at Dedman's Brook, Waste Weir, 
11.45 A.M. 

Started on at 12.35 p.m. 

Old crack unaltered from 156 to 15S.50. 

Old crack unaltered. 



Old crack in top started a little. Embank- 
ment 11 feet high. 

Crack top and bottom. Bottom at right, 
loose a little at the crack ; bricks may be 
sprung by pressure with the foot. 



Slight crack, left in top, right in bottom. 

Crack top, started again; 5 or 6 feet of 
embankment. 



Crack top and hot- - ) 
torn I in. wide. 

Crack top and bot 
torn J in. wide. 

Crack top and bot 
torn J in. wide. 

Crack ends. 



-d Crack by manhole. 

| Crack § by top and 
I bottom. 



Embankment 15 ft. 

extreme height, 
extendingfromSta. 

178.50 to 183.50. 
Natural surface was 

3 or 4 ft. below the 

grade line. 
There seems to be 

no change in these 

cracks. 



26 



City Document. — No. 







Measurements 
of Conduit. 






Station. 






Remarks. 




Height. 


Width. 






206.60 to 208.20 






Slight crack at top. 




207. 


6.3 


5.04 






222.70 






Crossing under B. & A. R. R. 




240.50 to 241.70 






Small crack in top, has been partly pointed ; 
no change. 




245. to 246. 






Old crack, not started; 245 is opposite 
Wellesley depot. 




247.30 
247.50 


6.27 


5.15 


Crack top and bottom - ) Embankment opp. 

£ in. wide. 1 Wellesley depot, 
Crack top and bottom | from 246 to 247.20 ; 

J in. wide. J height 9 ft. 




247.70 






Crack ends. 




248.50 to 249. 






Crack top and bottom I to \ in. wide. 




[ 252.50 to 253. 






Crack J in. wide in top' 




4J 

u m 
la 

Ss 

p 9 


254. 

255. 

255.40 

256. 

256.20 


6.24 
6.34 
6.27 
6.33 


5.22 
5.07 

5.06 


unaltered. 
Mudin bottom and roots 

top and bottom. 
Slight crack top and 

bottom. 
Wide crack in top. 

Slight crack in top. 

End of crack. 


Embankment from 
Sta. 251.30 to Sta. 
256. SO. Extreme 
> height 14 ft. The 
* natural surface is 
below grade from 
Sta. 253.10 to 
255.20. 




259 to 






Slight crack in top. 




260.80 






Slight crack in top. ♦ 




272 to 






Old crack pointed, and 


Embankment (14 
ft. extreme height) 
from Sta. 271.90 to 
275. The natural 




274.50 
283.50 
to 284 






has not started. 
Old crack unaltered. 

An error in numbering 


surface below 
grade from 271.80 
to 274.10. Em- 
bankment 5 or 6 
ft. high from 275 
to 290. 

282 in place of 289. 



SECOND DIVISION. 



13.10 






Slight crack top and bottom. 


to 13.40 






J in. wide at top. Cutting 23 ft. deep. 


to 13.50 


6.09 


5.08 


Large spring in bottom, brings in' sand. 


to 14. 






Crack ends. 


16. 






Crack top and bottom. (In Grantville.) 


to 16.40 








17.30 






Crack at top. Crosses road to Natick. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



27 



Station. 



Measurements 
of Conduit. 



Height. "Width 



17.50 
to 18. 
to 18.40 

18.70 

19. 

23.50 

42.20 
49.50 

53. 
to 53.50 

54. 
to 54.60 

56.70 
to 57. 

59 to 

59.80 

63 to 

63.80 
64. 
64.50 
76. 
77 to 
77+30 
to 77.60 
80.90 
to 81. 
105.30 
107. 

107.50 

108. 

108.50 

109. 

109.50 



6.15 
6.21 
6.14 



6.27 
6.19 

6.04 
6.04 
6.07 
6.15 
6.22 



5.13 
5.03 
5.21 



5.12 



5.05 
5.21 

5.24 
5.42 
5.38 
5.21 
5.15 



Two cracks in top. 

Slight crack. 

J inch at top. 

§ inch at top. 

Crack ends. 

Cross "Worcester Turnpike. Cutting 25 ft. 
deep. 

At Sta. 42.20 cutting is 39 ft. deep. 

Grantville Waste "Weir; arrived at 3.35, 
p. m., left at 3.45, p.m. 

{ Crack top and bottom, embankment from 
) Sta. 53 to 54.80. Maximum height 13 ft. 

Crack in top l-16th in. to J in. 
Crack ends. 
Slight crack top °J 
Slight crack top 
Siight crack top 



Slight crack top 
ends. 



Embankment 10 ft. max- 
imum height from Sta. 
56.10 to 58.50. 
"Embankment from 58.50 
to 59.80, 11 ft. maximum 
height. 



J 

Slight crack in top. 
Slight crack in top. 
Slight crack in top l-16th inch. 
Slight crack in ends. 
Road crossing near school-house. 
Slight crack top. 
Slight crack top 3 in. wide. 
Slight crack, top ends. 
Slight crack, top ends. 
Slight crack, top ends. 



106+20 crosses arched road bridge ; road to 
Upper Falls. 



Started slightly at top") The very bad crack 
and more' at bottom. that was repaired 

Started slightly at top in November, 1873, 
and more at bottom. J- has started very 

Top and bottom start- slightly, showing 
ed slightly. a crack in all the 

Crack not started. J new pointing. 



28 



City Document. — No. 





Measurements 
of Conduits. 






Station. 




Remarks. 






Height. 


Width. 




110. 


6.33 


5.01 






110.70 






Slight crack, more at top. 




to 111. 










111.20 






West pipe chamber Charles river, 
out at 4.35 p.m. 


came 



In the last annual report it was recommended that a gate be 
placed in the Grantville waste weir to allow the conduit to be 
emptied by sections, and to afford a ready means of stoppingthe 
flow of water, should any accident happen near Charles river, 
the point where the greatest danger of accident exists. 

With authority from the Water Board, Mr. Fitz Gerald, 
Superintendent of the Western Division, made changes at 
the waste weir during the time the conduit was emptied in 
December, which will allow the use of stop-planks at that 
point. 

It was also recommended, in case the Sudbury river were 
used for the next few years to supplement the Cochituate 
supply, that a new siphon pipe be laid across Charles river. 
Authority to do this work has been given by the City Coun- 
cil ; the pipes (40 inches diam.) have been contracted for, and 
the work of laying them, and the building of new chambers, 
will soon be begun. 



LOW-SERVICE RESERVOIRS. 

The tables on pages 38, 39 and 40 give the monthly and 
yearly average heights above tide-marsh level of the water 
in the several reservoirs. 

The average height, for the year, of the water in Chestnut 
Hill reservoir has been 120.58 feet, or 0.18 foot higher than 
in 1873. 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 29 

The average height, in the Brookline reservoir has been 
119.96 feet or 0.05 foot higher than last } r ear, and 0.62 foot 
less than in Chestnut Hill reservoir. 

The Beacon Hill, South Boston and East Boston reser- 
voirs, though partially filled with water, have been almost 
constantly disconnected from the street pipes for the past 
year. 

Experiments have been begun at the Beacon Hill reservoir 
to determine the amount of the daily and } 7 early evaporation 
from water surfaces, but have not been continued for a suffi- 
cient length of time to give definite results. 

DISTRIBUTING SYSTEM AND PIPE PLANS. 

The work of enlarging the capacity of the pipe distribut- 
ing system, which was commenced in the "Burnt District" in 
1873, has been continued during the past season, and impor- 
tant changes have been made by replacing small pipes by 
larger ones, in laying sub-mains or feeders, and in setting 
Lowry hydrants, the details of which will be found in Mr. 
Jones' report. The new high-service mains for supplying 
South Boston and Beacon Hill have been completed, and the 
old 30-inch pipe on Tremont street, and the 20-inch pipe 
from Dorchester to South Boston, lately used for this pur- 
pose, have been returned to their original use as low-service 
mains, with a marked improvement in the pressure at the 
north and west ends, and in South Boston. 

The enlargements and changes that have been made have 
very greatly increased the supply for fire purposes ; in fact, 
at no time since water was introduced into the city have 
the works, in this respect, been in so good a condition as 
now. 

In June an appropriation was made by the City Council, 
for surveying the West Roxbury and Brighton divisions of 
the city, with reference to a system of pipe distribution. 
The survey of Brighton is finished, and that of West Rox- 



30 City Document. — No. 88. 

bury nearly so, and the pipe systems for such portions 
of those places as can be piped this season have been de- 
cided upon. 

An appropriation of $200,000 for the pipes and appurte- 
nances was made early this season (1875), and the pipes were 
at once placed under contract and are now being delivered ; 
in fact, the work of laying the low service has begun. 

Four new plans, on a scale of 100 feet to an inch, showing 
the sizes and location of the pipes in South Boston, have 
been made during the past year. We now have the whole 
distribution of the city, with the exception of East Boston, 
shown on this scale. 

A large plan, giving, in skeleton, the distribution of the 
entire city, is practically completed. This will be found very 
serviceable in showing the relations that the mains and other 
portions of the pipe system hold to one another, and as an 
aid in fixing upon the diameter and location of pipes in future 
extensions. 

HIGH-SERVICE RESERVOIRS AND PUMPING WORKS. 

Parker Hill Reservoir. — At the time of the last annual 
report the work of building a high level reservoir on Park- 
er Hill had begun, under a contract with Messrs. Tarbell and 
Hayes. On Nov. 2d it was so far completed that water was 
let in, and the process of filling commenced. Since that date 
it has been in daily use. The work is of very substantial 
character, and has been very faithfully carried out, under the 
direction of Mr. Wilbur F. Learned, one of the assistant en- 
gineers of this department, by Messrs. Tarbell and Hayes, 
contractors for the reservoir proper ; Messrs. J. W. Coburn 
and Co., contractors for the gate-house, and the Boston Ma- 
chine Co., contractors for the gates. 

The reservoir will hold 7,200,000 gallons above a plane 
2\ feet above the bottom of the outflow pipe. The area of 
the water surface, when at high-water mark, is 1.47 acres, 



Keport of the Water Board. 31 

and its elevation is 219 feet above tide-marsh level. The 
elevation of the top of the bank is 222 feet ; of the bottom 
of the out-flow and in-flow pipes, 197.50 ; of the sills for the 
stop plank, 196.25 ; and of the lower floor of the gate-cham- 
ber, 196 feet. 

The chamber, gates and pipes have been proportioned and 
designed for the use of the reservoir when it shall form part 
of a general high-service system for the supply of all the 
high lands of the city, as explained in City Doc. No. 38, 
1873- 

Pumps. — The pumping engines have worked very satis- 
factorily during the past year, and are now in good condi- 
tion. 

The following table shows the total and monthly work done 
by the engines during the year, and the quantity of coal con- 
sumed in doing it : — 



32 



City Document. — No. 



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Beport of the Water Board. 



33 



Total. number of revolutions .... 9,790,545 

" *? gallons pumped . . . 460,155,615 

" amount of coal used, lbs. . . . 1,248,734 

" '.' ashes and clinkers, lbs. . . 155,855 

Average pressure on force main, lbs. . . 73 

" • " " supply " " 35 

Pressure used in computing duty on engine, lbs. 38 

Approximate duty per pound of coal (no deduction for 
clinkers or ashes), 269,387 foot lbs. 



COST OF PUMPING. 



Salaries ..... 


. $4,830 25 


Fuel 


. 3,669 30 


Miscellaneous repairs 


846 61 


Gas 


356 40 


Small supplies .... 


116 56 


Total . . . 


. $9,819 12 



Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 24.4 cents. 

During November and a part of December the reservoir 
was filling, which fact accounts, in part, for the large quanti- 
ties of water pumped in those months. 

The average daily quantity pumped for the year has been 
1,260,700 gallons, an increase of 23£ per cent, above the 
quantity in 1873. 

CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The table on pp. 41 and 42 gives the average daily consump- 
tion of water for each month since 1849. The figures for 
1874 give the consumption from the Cochituate works alone ; 
the average from these works for the whole year is 18,074,900 
gallons daily. During November and December, 57,191,258 
gallons were supplied to the city proper, from the Mystic 
3 



34 City Document. — No. 88. 

works, equivalent to an average daily supply of 156,690 
gallons for the year. This quantity should be added to that 
given above, for comparison with the consumption of previous 
years; 18,074,900 + 156,690 = 18,231,590 gallons, or 
388,890 gallons (2£ per cent.) in excess of the average for 
1874. The greatest consumption was in July, when the v 
daily average was 21,386,200 gallons. 

The divisions of the city supplied by the Cochituate works 
are : Boston proper, South Boston, Dorchester, and the 
greater portion of Roxbury. (A small portion of Roxbury is 
supplied by the Jamaica pond Aqueduct Co.) Those supplied 
from the Mystic works are Charlestown and East Boston. 
The West Roxbury and Brighton divisions are not yet pro- 
vided with a public supply. 

The Jamaica pond works supply from two to three hundred 
thousand gallons per day (say 250,000 gallons) to its con- 
sumers in Roxbury ; hence the average daily consumption for 
the year, in the four first-named divisions of the city, has 
been about 18,482,000 gallons. 

ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 

A number of reports upon additional supply, with estimates 
of cost of various schemes of works for bringing water from 
several different sources, have been made and presented to the 
City Council during the past year. 

The reports of Messrs. Kirkwood, Francis, and Horsford, 
upon the quantity and quality of the water to be obtained 
from the Mystic valley, together with one from Mr. W. F. 
Davis, Water Registrar, upon waste of water (City Doc. No. 
134, 1873), were presented by the Water Board in January. 

On February 3d, two orders were passed, one requiring 
the Joint Standing Committee on Water to " report upon 
the possibility arid expense of adding to the waters of the 
Mystic pond a supply sufficient for the use of the city, by 
connecting said pond with Shawshine, Concord, and Mer- 



Keport or the "Water Board. 35 

rimac rivers, or either of them ; " the other requiring the 
committee " to consider the expediency of making a perma- 
nent water connection between Farm pond and Lake Cochit- 
uate, build a conduit from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill 
reservoir," etc. On February 17th, it was ordered, "that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Water ascertain, by analysis 
or otherwise, the purity of the water of Charles river, at the 
most expedient point of taking the same for the use of the 
City of Boston ; "'and on March 27th, it was further ordered 
that the same committee " be requested to have accurate sur- 
veys made, under the direction of the City Engineer, to as- 
certain the water-shed of Mystic pond. " 

In the latter part of April the committee transmitted to 
the City Council the report of the City Engineer upon the" 
above subjects, and presented with it majority and minority 
reports ; also a report of a sub-committee upon mill damages 
on the Sudbury and Charles rivers. (City Doc. No. 38, 
1874.) 

In May a preliminary report upon the cost of works to 
bring the waters of Charles river to the city was made to 
the Committee on Water, by the City Engineer, in obedience 
to an order passed by City Council May 4th. 

On June 16th it was ordered "that the Joint Standing 
Committee on the Water Department ascertain and report 
whether the present source of our water supply from Lake 
Cochituate and Mystic lake combined can be so utilized as 
to give an adequate water supply to the city in a season of 
drought," etc. ; and on July 3d it was ordered that the com- 
mittee " be requested to examine the Charles river, and report 
in print, upon its availability as a source of supply," etc. 
The report of the City Engineer upon these subjects was 
made Oct. 10th (City Doc. No. 85), and was transmitted to 
the City Council by the committee in the latter part of that 
month. 

In obedience to an order passed June 16th, a report (City 



36 City Document. — No. 88. 

Doc. No. 102) was presented in December to the City Coun- 
cil by the commission of three physicians, appointed by His 
Honor the Mayor " to examine and report upon the compara- 
tive desirability on sanitary grounds of the Sudbury, Mystic, 
Shawshine and Charles river waters." 

An order, approved June 23d, requesting the Water Com- 
mittee to report on the expediency of using Lake Cochituate 
as a storage-basin for the Sudbury river water, etc., was 
referred by that committee to the medical commission, and 
the report upon this subject will be found in the above men- 
tioned City Doc. No. 102. 

In November an order was passed, requesting His Honor 
the Mayor to petition the Legislature for the right to take a 
supply of water from Charles river. 

The request of the Water Board, made during the latter 
part of 1873, that it be authorized to take land and water 
rights, under the provisions of the Sudbury-river act, was 
refused by a vote of the Common Council, December 23d ; 
but on December 31st the vote was reconsidered, and the 
Board was authorized to take the waters of the river, and 
also lands for building storage-basins, but was prohibited 
from incurring new liabilities for the construction of a conduit 
from the river to Chestnut Hill reservoir. This action was 
approved Jan. 2d, 1875. 

On February 26th of this year an order was approved, which 
authorized the Water Board to construct the entire works, 
with the exception of a number of storage-basins on the upper 
branches of the river, on the plan and scale recommended in 
March, 1873 (City Doc. No. 29), and appropriated $1,500,000 
to cover the estimated expenses of this year. 

It being afterwards decided by the City Solicitor that the 
above order did not authorize the Board to place the whole 
work under contract this year, application was again made to 
the City Council, and the requisite authority was granted in 
an order approved April 12th. 



Report of the Water Board. 37 

Active preparations for placing the work under contract 
are making, and it is expected that advertisements for bids 
for building the greater portion of the conduit will be made 
early this month. 

The work upon Beacon-street tunnel has progressed very 
favorably, and at the present rate of progress the various 
headings will meet in about three months. 

At the date of this report 3,634 lin. feet of tunnel have 
been excavated, and 280 lin. feet of conduit at the west end 
have been built. 

The two headings west of the shaft are still worked by 
hand drills. 

FLAX POND, AND JAMAICA POND AQUEDUCT CO. 

On November 21st, an order passed the City Council di- 
recting the City Engineer to make surveys and measure- 
ments to ascertain the actual amount of water that can be 
furnished from Flax, Sluice and Cedar ponds. 

The measurements were taking during December, and a 
report was submitted Dec. 21st. (City Doc. No. 110.) The 
order grew out of an offer of the Flax-pond Water Co. to 
supply East Boston with water. 

On December 21st, another report (City Doc. No. 108) was 
submitted, in answer to a vote of the Joint Standing Com- 
mitittee on Water, referring "the petitions of John C. Pratt, 
and G. Winthrop Coffin, that the city would purchase 
Jamaica pond, to the City Engineer, with request that he 
report the facts as to the value of the property in question, 
and the best method of supplying West Roxbury and 
Brighton with water." 

RAINFALL. 

The usual tables, giving the rainfall at various points for 
the year 1874, will be found appended. 

(Signed,) JOS. P. DAVIS, 

City Engineer. 



38 



City Document. — No. 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the 
several Reservoirs above " tide-marsh level" 1864-1874. 

BROOKLINE. 
Maximum high-water line, 124.60. 



Month. 


1864. 


1865, 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.* 


1874- 


January 

February .... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November .... 
December . . . 


122.37 
122.61 
123.62 
123.82 
123.62 
122.66 
122.87 
122.64 
122.03 
123.19 
122.78 
122.29 


123.31 
122.82 
123.26 
123.38 
122.65 
123.23 
123.33 
123.39 
123.29 
123.29 
123.38 
123.24 


122.28 
122.47 
123.19 
123.45 
123.04 
123.29 
122.97 
122.80 
122.81 
123.03 
122.75 
122.64 


122.00 
123.12 
123.05 
123.00 
123.07 
122.34 
122.98 
122.23 
122.52 
122.65 
122.89 
122.37 


123.29 
122.79 
122.33 
123.04 
123.04 
122.77 
122.77 
122.75 
122.12 
122.31 
122.56 
122.00 


122.58 
122.64 
122.48 
122.60 
122.77 
121.85 
122.10 
122.19 
122.50 
122.58 
122.46 
122.92 


122.83 
122.60 
122.77 
122.56 
122.75 
122.64 
122.50 
122.23 
122.35 
122.64 
122.60 
122.50 


121.89 
122.54 
122.08 
122.00 
121.79 
121.98 
122.19 
122.06 
121.50 
119.54 
116.94 
117.71 


118.64 
120.48 
122.04 
122.10 
122.29 
122.25 
121.25 
122.14 
123.44 
122.96 
120.98 
121.06 


120.46 
119.86 
119.71 
121.36 
121.84 
120.90 
118.79 
118.48 
119.04 
119.09 
119.69 
119.71 


121.06 
119.52 
119.27 
119.59 
121.70 
121.83 
121.08 
120.50 
118.65 
117.60 
118.43 
120.17 


Yearly Average . 


122.87 


123.21 


122.89 


122.69 


122.65 


122.48 


122.58 


121.02 


121.63 


119.91 


119.96 



BEACON HILL. 
Maximum high-water line, 121.53. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 

May . . . 

June . . . 

July . . . 

August . . 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



1864. 1865. 1866. 1867. 1868. 1869. 1870. 1871. 1872. 1873. 1874 



117.72 
117.54 
116.38 
117.21 
116.53 
115.31 
115.32 
115.19 
115.91 
118.17 
118.55 
117.35 



119.18 
118.91 
120.58 
121.28 
120.31 
120.56 
121.23 
119.83 
119.03 
118.43 
120.14 
120.50 



119.20 
119.65 
120.72 
120.70 
119.53 
118.53 
119.51 
119.17 
119.39 
119.50 
119.78 
119.37 



119.11 
118.59 
119.45 
119.86 
118.50 
118.34 
119.00 
117.70 
120.46 
120.46 
120.84 
120.02 



Yearly Average . . 116.77 120.00 119.59 119.36 119.11 118.13 118.49 116.51 117.19 118.90 119 



120.20 
120.11 
120.57 
120.57 
118.65 
118.45 
120.24 
117.11 
118.20 
118.61 
119.03 
117.78 



118.51 
118.72 
118.30 
118.82 
119.68 
117.13 
117.20 
117.63 
117.45 
118.36 
118.45 
118.36 



118.63 

117.78 

118.07 

118.34 

118.63 

118.03 

119.30 

119.59 

117.72 

117 

118.61 

119.38 



119.26 
118.95 
119.38 
119.59 
119.09 

109.63 
109.68 



116.20 
116.38 
116.49 
116.72 
116.70 
116.99 
116.95 
117.11 
117.65 
118.20 
118.36 
118.51 



119.01 
119.32 
119.63 
119.01 
120.28 
119.99 
118.05 
115.93 
116.20 
118.11 
120.59 
120.68 



120.88 
121.01 
121.13 
120.95 
120.26 
119.72 
119.55 
119.63 
119.40 
119.07 
118.99 
119.15 



* New gauge put in, with a zero point .08 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



Keport or the "Water Board. 39 

Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, etc. — Continued. 

SOUTH BOSTON". 
Maximum high-water line, 122.86. 



Month. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 
111.30 


1874. 


January 










110.63 


114.21 


114.38 


112.46 


111.15 


111.15 


114.46 


112.51 


109.34 


114.28 


February 










110.94 


113.42 


114.44 


111.36 


111.15 


111.34 


114.80 


112.61 


109.42 


111.69 


112.38 


March . 










111.13 


113.64 


113.51 


111.74 


111.11 


111.63 


114.51 


112.74 


109.38 


112.01 


113.69 


April . . 








. 


112.07 


114.82 


114.99 


111.88 


111.55 


111.96 


113.57 


112.63 


109.67 


112.74 


113.65 


May . . 










111.64 


115.44 


114.90 


111.63 


111.61 


111.78 


113.53 


112.71 


109.32 


113.40 


113.94 


June . . 








. 


109.06 


114.91 


114.32 


111.19 


112.15 


111.51 


113.36 


112.44 


109.24 


110.69 


113.53 


July . . 








. 


108.57 


114.36 


113.96 


111.53 


111.53 


111.19 


112.21 


115.32 


109.05 


109.40 


112.92 


August . 










109.53 


113.80 


114.07 


111.90 


111.53 


110.65 


110.78 


114.03 


108.82 


110.21 


112.51 


September 






. 


110.21 


113.69 


113.41 


111.70 


111.44 


108.76 


110.15 


113.13 


106.49 


110.84 


112.03 


October . 






. 


112.49 


112.89 


112.74 


111.29 


111.44 


113.15 


110.01 


112.80 


109.34 


111.21 


111.44 


November 








112.49 


112.74 


112.03 


111.26 


111.44 


113.76 


111.86 


112.76 


110.61 


111.30 


111.51 


December . 








113.89 


113.78 


112.62 


111.08 


111.11 


113.88 


112.61 


109.26 


110.71 


114.40 


111.49 


Yearly Average . . 


111.05 


113.97 


113.78 


111.59 


111.44 


111.74 


112.65 


112.74 


109.28 


111.60 


112.78 



EAST BOSTON. 
Maximum high-water line, 107.60. 



Month. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869, 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


January 








90.22 


96.12 


93.61 


91.89 


92.81 


99.72 


104.45 


101.18 


103.47 










February 








92.88 


97.00 


96.61 


92.06 


92.10 


100.56 


104.20 


104.33 


102.56 








103.33 


March . 








93.50 


94.83 


94.22 


91.69 


91.14 


100.60 


100.89 


106.12 


100.41 








102.58 


April . . 








96.16 


96.52 


96.47 


90.91 




u 


104.93 


107.14 


100.10 








104.77 


May . . 








97.68 


96.04 


95.85 


89.63 




fan 

O C3 


105.91 


106.50 


101.54 








104.37 


June . . 








94.22 


93.91 


93.71 


91.82 


u 


*2 


106.00 


106.43 


106.83 








103.56 


July . . 








92.34 


96.82 


95.35 


94.60 


ft 

03 

u 


100.60 


103.87 


106.47 










105.06 


August . 








92.84 


95.78 


93.85 


94.16 


u 


95.08 


104.25 


105.22 










105.52 


September 






95.00 


94.52 




99.40 


• o 


94.87 


102.77 


104.91 










105.25 


October . 






97.55 


93.38 


O C3 


96.85 


3 


96.97 


105.20 


104.81 










105.27 


November 






98.14 


92.23 


5 B 


93.47 




101.12 


104.75 


104.56 










103.93 


December 






97.27 


94.34 


92.29 


92.57 




102.06 


105.18 


104.58 










102.87 


Yearly Average . . 


94.83 


95.12 


94.66 


93.25 


92.02 


99.06 


104.37 


105.18 






104.23 



40 



City Document. — No. 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, etc. — Continued. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 
Maximum high --water line, 125.00. 



January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 
May . . . 
June . . . 
July . . . 
August . . 
September 
October . . 
November 
December . 



Yearly Average 



100.80 
101.29 



1871. 



102.00 
102.81 
105.19 
110.48 
116.21 
121.46 
122.40 
122.02 
121.44 
119.67 
117.08 
115.35 



114.67 



116.90 
120.46 
122.29 
122.52 
122.54 
122.35 
121.77 
122.15 
122.77 
122.08 
122.42 
121.40 



1873.* 1874 



120.76 
120.26 
120.11 
121.55 
122.03 
121.24 
119.65 
119.32 
119.74 
119.-70 
120.21 
120.21 



121.32 
120.19 
119.95 
120.16 
121.93 
122.11 
121.50 
121.00 
119.75 
119.15 
119.32 
120.61 



120.58 



* New gauge put in, with a zero point .18 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



Kepoet or the Water Board. 



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cc 


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1 




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CO 








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c 
c 


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o 

o 


CD 


o 

CO 


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o 


s^rH 

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1 


CO 












c 


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a 

o 


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rp 


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o 






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CO 


to 


t- 


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eo 




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CN 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


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CD 




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p 




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a 


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t- 


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o 


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a 
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CI 


© 


CD 




b- 


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If 


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CO 


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o 


CM 


CD 


o 


iro 


iO 


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CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 








CO 


G3 


o 


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o 




CO 


Cl 


© 


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a 


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cT 


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of 


l~^ 


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rn" 


co" 


r^ 








fc- 


o 




a 


3 O 


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CO 




Cl 


o 


Cl 


CD 


iO 


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CO 




-* 


CO 




3 CO 




to 


o 


en 




CD 


rP 


en 




cf 


co" 


co" 


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" 


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to" 


to" 


CD 


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co" 


•cf 


tf 


rjf 


rain- 
ater- 
lke 
te. 




o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


c 


5 O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


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CO 


o 


o 


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o 




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o 


o 


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o 


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o 




o 


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o 


q 


c 


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o 


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o 




o 


O 


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o 




































BB°S 




1- 




of 




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5 (M 






o 


CD 


CD 


CO 


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vO 


a 
© 


o 


CO 






C5 


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C 


3 O 




o 




CO 




CO 


ia 


CT3 


oT 




t-T 


t- 


CO 


cq 


c 
c 


1 CD 


co" 


CO 

en 


CO 


IO 


CD 


CM 




-p 


1 


iQ 


CO 




CD 




-* 


c 


■3 r-i 


CI 


CO 




00 


o 


CO 


C3 


C3 


moil 
11 
shed 
Coc 


iO 


CO 

co' 


TfT 


"^ 


CO 


o" 


c 


s ccT 


co" 


CN 


or 

co" 


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o 
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CM 

co" 


o" 


co" 




rH 








H 


11 




H I-I 


rH 






Cl 


r-t 




CI 


T-l 


^<2 




































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*3 






CO 


iO 


CO 


o 


p 


u 


5 IM 


^r 


-1< 


C3 


o 


o 


CD 


Cl 


IO 


«S 


CJ 


CI 


t- 


H 


CD 


CO 




a 


3 q 


<* 


"t 


CO 


co 


CO 


"* 


CO 


CM_ 


fl 




irt 


CO 


-t" 


o 


co" 


o 


3 OS 




IO 


o> 


o 


ci 


ci 


ci 


CD 


'3 


^ 


■<* 


iO 


*tf 


CO 


«* 






l< ■* 


■O 


tf 


■m 


to 


^* 


•* 


CO 


IO 


« 




CI 


CO 


-+ 


iO 


(O 







O 






Cl 


CO 


i 


«D 


CO 


t- 


r* 




in 


iO 




iO 


in 


iO 




o »o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 




CD 




oo 


oo 




00 


CO 


CO 




00 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




I-i 


H 


IH 




rH 


rH 


T 


H rH 


rH 


rH 




r-l 


rH 


rH 


rH 


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44 



City Document. — No. 88. 









3 



"S? 




















a 




o a °" 




-u 















Mfn'-g 




a 


□ 
CD 


a 



a a 

0) CD 


a c 

CD CD CD 


"3 
> 




1-^ 













CD O 


CD O O 








f- 


u 




;- -~ 


•-. u u 


h 




o sS o 




CO 


a 


CD 


O CD 




) CD CD 


CD 






ft 


ft 


ft 


ft ft 


ft ft ft 






l"S' s 







CD 


£. 


CO 10 


O tK CO 




CD 






10 


CO 


>* 


CO CO 


tO UO TJC 




S> i.*3 . 






















taoc 5 jj 










O 





c 




i 1 




"5) 'es >M 
C3<„ S^ 


00 
8 


s 


CD 
CO 


O 

OS 


■* to 

CO CO 


to c 
t^ c 
CO c 









CO 




10 


CM r-< 


CM ^ 




1 


in 


CO 


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to ^ 


-* «■ 


CO 


C8 ■£ 






Ol 




O) 


CO 
CM 


CO lO 


CM >- 


to 



cm" so 
10 

2 




"H rrt 






















o 35 










O 





c 


CM 


n to 

CD tO 




+3 > ■ 










O 





c 






§8.3 


« 


CO 



co" 


O 

to" 


O C0__ 

t-^ co" 


°v c£ 




CD "3, 




OmCi 









OS 


CO CO 


<— c 


cd 






s 2h1 

cc~ o 





ITS 

csT 


cn 




CO 




10 -^ 
cm" cm* 


CO^ I- 


CD 


a K - 








CM 


to 




-* 


I-H C 






"3<S £3 


to 


c^ 


co^ 


^ 


OS CO^ 


a 


■^ 


N 


8 <N " 








cc" 




CO 


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00 c 


In 






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CD CO 




Bf4 


















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rt ^S c 




|- 














c 


: 1 


















c 






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CO 









co^ . 


c 


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s 








CO 


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CO • 
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CO r- 


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to 





10 I- 


rt 


c3^: 3 

Hi ^ ^ 
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■a f 3 


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CO 


CN 


1-1 CC 
lO CV 


CD 




CD 









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3 




C5,3 







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^-+3 02 




i-l" C 


g 


r-H* 


of 






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cs 








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to 


CO 

ci 


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2 

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++ 






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c3 


S _>rt "D 








CO 








c 





c 




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a "31 

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c 





CO 


CO 








g 


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CO 

c 


CN_ 




c- 


CO 


Si 

c3 


£ a " 3 

O E CD 
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CO 


01 
OS 


CO 

to 


c 
K 


10 


c 

CO 


C?J 
CC 

CT 


s 




to 


os 


CO 


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CM 





I— 





CO 

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t- 


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O 




10 


CT 


l> 




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3 




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c 


CM 




















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t- 




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CO 


CO 


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CO 


CO 
















CO^ 






CO 


l> 






























s i> ta 

all 




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d. 


CD 








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to 


CO 




U3 

CO 


ccT 


c 

c 


a 



CT 


l£ 


t-" 


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to 




CM =5 










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c 





CO 





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CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


5 3 




£ 





to' 




0" 


c 
c 


CM 


cr 


cr 
01 


J CD 
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S^R 











c 


UO 





r- 


^ 








*n 


to 


CO 


If 




CO 


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CM c 






























a ° a 


e 


in 





t- 




>o 




CO 


fe . 






1"S| 


to 


o 










t- 






<2 






-T 




■* 









CO 




cS 






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0" 


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to 



























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, , 


















te 




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O 








c 


















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CO 




CO 





_>> 








o_ 


0^ 





c 





CO 





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°^J 


e 


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CO 




-* 




c 

CO 


to 





tO 


s 







in 




CO 


CO 


CO 




cs 


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c a °3 
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co" 


IT 









60 






1 


in 





Ol 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


03 






■* 


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CO 


CO 




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; 




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to" 
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CM 


00 


H 


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> 






j 


CO 






















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$ 


OS 


cr 




K 


ec 


s 






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CO 


IT 


•* 


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cr 


CO 






a 




os 


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00 


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CO 


10 


Tl 


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-* 


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CD 
























bo 






i 5 




CO 










CN 


g 


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Si 
CD 






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to 


to 


l~ 




t- 






> 






1 fl 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CC 


00 


CO 


X 


<1 







Keport or the Water Board. 



45 



S3 



s 



•3> 



5> 

© 

S 



•fe 






^ 



s 





•* 


' 


00 CI 


co eft 


»o 


m 


t- 


o 


CM 


S 1 


o 


•* 


t- 


OS rH 


CO Ol 


CM 


o 


co 


lO 


"^ 


o 




c~ 






C* CO 


CO CO 


oi 


d 


d 




■d 


CO 


o 

1-H 


00 






rH i-H 


1-H rH 


1-H 


rH 










i-H 
































t- H< 


in 


t^ 


o 


o 


o 


00 


O 


CO 


o 


CO 


O rH 


•H O 


CM. 


CO 


CD 


CM 


CO 






t~ 




ci 


c* CO 


co •c<i 


d 


CO 


t-^ 






OS 


O 


oo 






T-l I-H 




rH 












r-t 1 




























Ol 


Oi C7> 


O Oi 


CO 


^H 


CM 


CD 




O 




oq 


CM 


"^ 






co_ 


o 


O 


TP 








00 


■* 


CN 


rn «# 


id o 


d 


•*- 


d 


!-H 


rH 


CM 

rH 


CO 


i-t 






























CO i-H 


lr- t- 


CO 




o 




O 


CO 


o 


i-i 


C* 


■* 


OS CO 


CO CM 


DO 


c; 


o 








c~ 






*-"• OS 


O d 


t-^ 


d 


id 


co' 


CO 


CO 


d 


00 
























i-H 






























rH CO 


CM CM 


-M 




b- 


O 


o 


o 




© 


°i 




CO CO 


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CO 


IO 


rH 


H 


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c~ 


CO 


CO 


ci CO* 


CO CO 


ci 


CD 


00 


CO 




d 


o 


00 








rH rH 




ri 










1-1 






























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lO CO 


CM 


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M 








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00 


<M 


en 


oi ** 


CO CN 




O 


t- 


in 


Ol 






CD 






CO CO 


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ci 




d 


d 


1-i 




CM 


oo 


rH 






1-H IH 




1-H 




rH 








p-l 


























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1^ tr- 


CD 


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ltd 


CO 


cm 


00 




OS CN 


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co 


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CO CO 


cq 












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t- O 


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CM 




o 


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CO 




CO 
CO 


C- 


r* 




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o 




p 




CO 


CM 






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cm' 


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o 


cm' 


00 












ri 


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i-H 
























CO 




CO 


co to 


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CO 


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uo 


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CO 


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to 


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ci 


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CO 




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d 


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CD i-H 


CO 


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rH 


CO 


CO 




■* 


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00 




CO CO 


CM O 


CO 


CO 


05 


-* 


«* 


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CD 


CO 


CO 


•** -h" 


rji CO 


i-i 


d 




d 


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id 


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00 






















i-H 






























lO Ol 


rH O 


CI 


CO 


CO 


-t 


.CD 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


00 


OS vO 


O CM 


CO 




-1" 


ca 


Ol 


CD 




CO 




Ol 


CO "=* 


■<* CO 


ci 


ed 


CO 


ci 


CO 


t* 


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00 


r-t 


rH 


r~i rH 




rH 


rH 








rH 




r-H 


























Oi 

o 




in O 


iO CO 


<n 




CO 


o 


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o 


oq 


to 


CO rtf 


rji ■* 


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co 


Ol 


t- 


r-l t 


co 






CO O* 


■^1 ^i 


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d 




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d 




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r-l T-< 


rH 








rH 






rH 






























i-H "* 


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05 


Ol 


CO 


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oo a 


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rH r-l 














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co to 


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CO CO 


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in 


© 


d 


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d 


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d 


00 




rH 


rH rH 


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rH 










































9-1 


iH 


> 
C3 

>» 
03 


S3 
O 


>> 

s 

s 

e! 

rj 


►a 

a 

a 
2 

CO 
rH 


rO -, 

2 -a 

C3 P- 




>5 

3 
1-5 


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CD 


IP 

o 

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a 

CO 

> 
o 


a 

o 

ft 



46 



City Document. — No. 



Table showing the height of water in the conduit at the gate-house, 
Lake Cochituate, the number of days it was running at those 
depths, and the average depth for each month. 



1874. 


d 


4 

ft 


u 
a 


ft 
< 


C3 


a 

p 


1-3 


s 

<] 


ft 

0Q 


o 
O 


o 
fe5 


ft 


3& 

O 03 


























1 


1 










1 
1 
















1 


























1 
























2 
1 


?, 
























3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 


3 
























2 
























3 




















1 




4 




















2 
























2 
























1 
























4 
























? 
























1 


5-8 . 








1 














? 






















1 
























2 


6-0 . 


31 


28 


31 










12 


29 


1 

1 


134 












? 


6-2 . 








1 












? 




















1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
17 


1 


























1 












21 


19 

1 




1 






1 

2 


44 










6 


11 
















1 


6-8 . . . 








1 














1 


f 












1 








•t 


6 10. . . 








1 












1 


f 




















5 


7-0 .. . 








16 
1 




9 


1 

1 

29 








10 


5: 


7-1 .. . 












i 














18 








1 


4S 



Beport of the Water Board. 47 

Table showing the height of water, etc. — Continued. 



1874. 


n 


J2 
0) 
ft 


03 

3 


■'in 
ft 


S3 

3 


3 
>-3 


>-3 


3 


ft 

CD 


»o 


o 

to 


o 

ft 


-3 QQ 


7-4 . . . 








1 


1 
1 

8 














5 

4 
2 


7 


7-5 . . . 




















5 


7 6... 






















10 



























Average Monthly Depths. 



























h 






























1874. 


a 

S3 


,o 


C3 


ft 


>> 


o 

a 

1-5 


£> 


bo 

3 • 


ft 




> 
o 


o 

o 


k; rt 




ft 


H 


<1 


a 


>-s 


<} 


GQ 


O 


fc 


A 


<1^H 




6-0 


6-0 


6-0 


6-6| 


6-9 


6-7| 


7-3 


6-9 


5-11J 


6-9 


5-3| 


6-7| 


6-4| 



48 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Oochituate, Boston 
and vicinity, 1849 to 1874, inclusive. 



TEAR. 



1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 



Places and Observers. 






*47.93 
*55.73 
43.15 
34.96 
40.80 
63.10 
48.66 
49.02 
55.44 
45.44 
49.69 
69.30 
42.60 
49.46 
62.32 
56.25 
49.71 
64.34 
55.89 
45.39 
48.47 
45.43 
35.93 



a 



40.30 
53.98 
44.31 
47.94 
48.86 
45.71 
44.19 
• 52.16 
56.87 
52.67 
56.70 
51.46 
50.07 
61.06 
67.72 
49.30 
47.83 
50.70 
55.64 
64.11 
66.28 
59.73 
48.33 
58.04 
54.94 
41.09 



40.97 
54.07 
41.97 
40.51 
53.83 
45.17 
47.59 
53.79 
57.92 
45.46 

46.95 
50.14 
57.21 
56.42 
39.46 
43.59 

41.71 
39.89 
47.98 
41.53 
40.56 
52.73 
46.81 
38.73 



40.74 
62.13 
41.00 
42.24 
45.04 
41.29 
40.63 
42.33 
44.04 
37.40 
48.49 
45.97 
36.51 
46.42 
53.66 
36.56 
35.84 
43.46 
41.40 
44.65 
47.30 
39.40 
36.82 
45.80 
42.58 
32.32 



51.09 
45.68 
41.00 
42.78 
43.92 
42.08 
44.89 
42.49 
49.38 
37.73 
47.51 
46.91 
43.32 
44.26 
52.37 
38.11 
37.38 
38.18 
45.54 
47.96 
47.30 
46.30 
44.45 
44.32 
39.86 
35.68 



48.41 
45.97 
52.02 
35.80 
48.41 
46.67 
42.95 
44.61 
57.81 
40.64 
38.82 
41.36 
45.87 
49.58 
48.96 
48.71 
44.17 
48.67 
45.05 
41.75 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



49 



Table showing the Rainfall in Boston for the year 1874, and the 
days on which it occurred, from observations by Win. H. Bradley, 
Esq., Superintendent of Sewers. 



Days of 
Month. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




















































.02 




























4. . . . 


.03 




.33 


.05 




.15 


























































7. . . . 


.48 


.08 




.29 


.20 














.40 


8. . . . 


.79 




.42 






.32 




~1.44 








. . . 


















2.33 


. . . 


.26 


























.32 


.02 


. . . 


























.02 


12 ... . 












.34 


.49 


























































.29 






















































17 ... . 












.35 














18 ... . 






.29 
.01 


.38 








.41 


.12 


.16 




19. . . . 




. . . 


.18 


.05 








20. . . . 


.37 


. . . 


. . . 


1.02 




.02 




. . . 




. . . 


.33 




21. . . . 


.20 


.06 






1.34 




.10 


. . . 


.08 


.02 




.38 


22 ... . 




.36 












1.54 










23 ... . 


.02 
















1.46 


.14 


24 ... . 








.53 














.19 


25 ... . 








.96 


























































































.26 






















.01 


.56 




30 ... . 


















1.00 


.03 






















































Monthly j 
Totals ( 


4.30 


4.02 


1.64 


8.36 


3.72 


2.91 


2.70 


6.48 


1.66 


1.02 


2.58 


1.70 



Total for the year 41.09 inches. 



EEPOET OF SUPEEINTENDENT OF WESTEEN DIVISION. 



Western Division Boston "Water Works, 

May 1st, 1875. 

Hon. Thomas Gogin, 

President Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the rules of the Board, I sub- 
mit herewith my report for the past year : — 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

May 1st, 1874, found us with a full lake, viz., 13 feet 
4 inches above the bottom of the aqueduct. This height 
was held, with alternate loss and gain, until June 23d, from 
which time the surface lowered continuously and rapidly. 

On the 30th of January, 1875, the water reached its low- 
est point, 9^ inches below the bottom of the aqueduct, or 
14 feet 1£ inches below high-water mark. The middle 
division of the lake was at this time 1 foot 8 inches above 
the bottom of the aqueduct, and in the southern division 
3 feet 10 inches. These divisions being connected by arched 
bridges under a highway and railway, the water overflowed 
from one basin to the next. The effect of the scour on the 
stability of the structures was a source of some anxiety. 
They were closely watched, protected by rip-rap, and no ac- 
cident happened. Jan. 21st water from Sudbury river was 
turned into the lake, and the surface rose rapidly, some- 
times as much as 5 or 6 inches in a day, and now the lake is 
again nearly full. 

July 11th Dug pond was let into the lake, to allow Natick 
to get in the foundation of their pump-house. This pond is 



Report of the Water Board. 51 

now controlled by that town under the act of 1873, and ne- 
gotiations are pending to sell the entire interest of the 
city in that pond. January 8th, Dudley pond was turned 
into the lake^ it being then 4 feet below high- water mark, 
and on the 26th the water was drawn clown to the level of the 
bottom of the pipe. 

November 1st, 1874, the lake having fallen to the top of 
the aqueduct, I received orders to get the pumps and en- 
gines, used during the drought of 1871-2, in readiness ; and 
on Dec. 3d the stop planks were put in and the pumps 
started. For three months the supply to the city was kept 
up by pumping. On March 3d, 1875, the pumps were 
stopped. I am much indebted to Mr. Geo. Taylor and the 
enginemen under his charge for the success with which the 
engines were run day and night without accident. When 
the temporary character of the machinery is considered, the 
poor shelter from the extreme cold of the past winter, and 
the exposure incident to the many changes which we were 
obliged to make in the suction pipes, it seems to me a fitting 
place to say this word in their praise. 

The pumps were run 90 days. The average consumption 
of coal in 24 hours was 5.85 tons. Steam was kept at about 
75 lbs. A side track was built at the Cochituate crossing, 
so that we were enabled to land our coal near to the works. 

THE AQUEDUCT. 

Up to the 18th of August the aqueduct was run under a 
foot head. On that day a leak was reported on the high bank 
at Newton Lower Falls. I had the brick-work laid bare at 
the point, and found two cracks and an open space of about 
a cubic foot in the embankment above them. A buttress of 
concrete, one foot thick, was laid up against the conduit, and 
the brick-work well plastered down with cement. No further 
leakage has been noticed. At the same time, with the assist- 
ance of Mr. George S. Rice, I took a series of cross sections 



52 City Document. — No. 88. 

25 feet apart, the whole length of this bank referred to two 
stone bounds for line, and to a bench in the pipe-chamber for 
level, so that any future change in the form of. the bank can 
be detected. 

From the middle of August to Oct. 5th, 6 feet of water were 
run in the aqueduct, and from that time to the present about 
8 inches head has been kept up. An examination of the 
aqueduct was made Dec. 3d, Avhen we started the pumps. 
Efforts were made to stop a bad spring at Station 7, near the 
lake, which brought in a large amount of sand. The attempts 
were ineffectual, and it was thought best to fill the aqueduct 
as soon as possible, so that little time was left for any repairs. 
On February 23d a large volume of water broke into a man- 
hole in the deep cut near the lake. The valley of Snake 
brook being clogged all the way to Cochituate village, with 
several feet of ice, a sudden freshet was turned into the cut, 
and lifting the ice with the manhole cover, left an opening for 
the water into the aqueduct. So good was the old brick- 
work, that since the breaking up of the ice, we found it 
undisturbed, with the exception of the cover. 

The aqueduct has been cleared of timber from Wellesley 
to the lake. The bounds from Wellesley to the reservoir 
have not yet been set. There are a number of property 
lines which should be run during the coming summer, not 
only on the aqueduct, but at the lake, and I would ask the 
Board for the services of a small surveying party for that 
purpose. 

A set of stop-planks have been so arranged at Grantville 
that the water can be shut off, in case of accident to the 
aqueduct below that point. 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR 

Is in good condition. In December we put in a new revolv- 
ing screen in the effluent gate-house. This was accomplished 



Report of the Water Board. 53 

successfully without pumping, to which I feared at one time 
we should have to resort. Distance pieces a few feet apart 
have been added to the new screen, also two wire ropes firmly 
bound to the edges to prevent the wire from tearing. The 
new screen works well, and I would recommend that the 
other old one be replaced as soon as possible. The driveway 
is in good order ; that portion of it repaired with finely 
crushed stone is smooth and free from mud and dust. 

A row of maples was planted last fall along Beacon street, 
on the south side of the reservoir. The Webber claim for 
damages for flowage from the waste weir near the reservoir 
has been settled. A permanent right to empty into this 
brook will have to be secured, or else a connection put in 
between the conduit and the sewer near Beacon street. 

brookline reservoir 

Is in the same condition as usual, It needs cleaning badly. 
The gate-houses are in thorough order. Annexed is 
the usual schedule of property and a table of examinations 
of the conduit, which I have compiled from various sources, 
hoping it may be of use in any extended examinations in the 
future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Superintendent. 



54 City Document. — No. 88. 

SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT CHESTNUT-HILL 
RESERVOIR. 

1 two-horse express-wagon, 1 single ditto, 1 water-cart, 
2 two-horse water carts, 2 iron road rollers, 1 single horse 
pung, 1 two-horse ditto, 1 horse truck, 1 horse power, 
1 horse cart, 1 hay wagon, 2 hand carts, 1 pair large 
wheels, 2 clay mills, 1 tank, 6 gravel screens, 20 ox-tie 
chains, 1 7-inch pump, 2 5-inch ditto, 1 house force-pump, 

4 clay knives, 1 stone-crushing machine and castings, 1 
blacksmith's forge and tools, 1 derrick and rigging, 1 man 
head, 2 grub axes, 30 picks, 17 shovels, 13 spades, 4 hoes, 
27 iron bars, 16 iron rakes, 9 stone hammers, 2 striking 
hammers, 24 wooden rakes, 4 border knives, 1 root-puller, 

5 snaiths, 15 scythes, 18 scythe stones and rifles, 3 lawn- 
mowers, 1 garden engine, 2 Johnson's pumps, 5 hay forks, 

6 lanterns, 6 oil cans, 3 reflectors, 8 peat knives, 7 tin dip- 
pers, 37 drills, 11 tin candlesticks, 18 barrels cement, 18 fire 
buckets, 7 pails, 9 rattan brooms, 5 wooden rammers, 10 
ladders, 7 wheelbarrows, 2 grindstones, 1 jack-screw, 1 win- 
dow brush, 5 paint brushes, 1 whitewash brush, 1 telegraph 
battery, 7 rubber coats and caps, 15 pair rubber boots, 1 four- 
bushel basket, 1 bushel basket, 2 hay ropes, 12 feet 18-inch 
Scotch pipe, 25 feet 15-inch ditto, 12 feet 30-inch cement 
pipe, 5 galls, raw linseed oil, 6 galls, varnish, 100 lbs. green 
paint, 1 sand pump, 25 lbs. candles, 2 doz. padlocks, 1 set 
scales, 1 safe, 1 clock, 2 horses, 1 Concord wagon, 1 carry- 
all, 3 harnesses, 1 sleigh, 1 20 h. p. engine, 1 12 h. p. ditto, 
1 6 h. p. ditto. 



PROPERTY AT LAKE COCHITUATE. 

1 extension dining-room table, 18 chairs, 1 map, 1 table, 
1 mirror, 1 stove, 1 oil-cloth carpet, 1 wash-bowl, 1 range. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 55 

1 telegraph instrument, 1 horse, 1 carriage, 1 wagon, 2 har- 
nesses, 1 cart and harness, 1 pung, 1 robe, 1 blanket, 5 
shovels, 1 coal shovel, 6 wheelbarrows, 8 picks, 4 crowbars, 

2 sledge hammers, 6 drills, 1 hand saw, 1 hammer, 2 screens, 
1 sieve, 4 stop plank hooks, 1 scale, 1 rain gauge, 3 ox- 
chains, 3 pulley blocks, 1 spirit level, 2 25 h. p. engines, 
1 boat, 3 large pumps, 3 small pumps, 2 hay forks, 1 dung 
fork, 1 pair hedge shears, 9 pieces copper pipe, 2 spades, 6 
hoes, 4 axes, 2 rakes, 7 pair rubber boots, 10 buckets, 3 
baskets of classified articles belonging to engines, 4 belts, 

3 whitewash brushes, 1 scythe. 



PEOPEETY AT BEOOKLINE EESEEVOIE. 

1 desk, 2 settees, 1 large stove, 1 spittoon, 1 lamp, 1 pair 
rubber boots, 1 scythe, 1 iron rake, 1 wooden rake, 1 sickle, 
1 hoe, 1 pick, 2 shovels, 1 scuffle hoe, 1 pair clipping shears, 
1 spade, 1 border knife, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 step-ladder, 2 
long ladders, 3 scrubbing-brushes, 1 corn broom, 1 rattan 
broom, 1 water-pot, 1 water-pail, 1 sponge, 1 bushel basket, 
1 dust-pan and brush, 1 coal-hod, 1 fire shovel, 1 stove- 
brush, 1 screen brush, 4 iron rods, 2 mats, 2 towels. 



56 



City Document. — No. 



Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct.* 



Station. 





1 

1 + 50 



3 
5 

5 + 60 
6 

6 to 7 

6 + 70 
7toS 

7 + 15 

7 + 20 
7 + 25 
7 + 30 

7 + 50 

8 + 5 
10 

12 + 80 
13 

15 
17 + 30 

171 
17 + 50 

17 + 50 
17 + 70 
17 + 80 



Date. 



April, '74. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 

April, '74. 



April, '71. 
" '74.. 
" '68. 
" '74. 

Dec, '74. 



April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 

April, '68. 
Dec, '74. 
Nov., '73. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 



SrZE. 



6.24 X 5.04 
6.15 X 5.02 



6.15 X 5.02 



6.30 X 5.03 
6.23 X 5.07 



6.25 X 5.05 



6.05 X 5.19 

6.03 X 5.17 
6.03 X 5.22 

6.20 X 5.04 
6.33 X 5.02 

6.28 X 5.00 

6.29 X 4.92 

6.21 X 5.04 



6.30 X 4.94 
6.45 X 4.92 



Remarks. 



Springs on right , 



Large spring bringing sand. Probe 
passed easily through joint, 2 feet 
deep into space 



Remains of cement dam 1|" high 



Crack in top 

Remains of cement dam 1" high . . 
Fine crack in top arch 



Spring bringing in sand, crack in top 
25 feet long, | " wide 



Crack top and bottom . . . . , 
Hole in bottom, probed 4" . . 
Two cracks in top from 7 + 10 , 
End of crack in top 



Snake brook valley excavation . . . . 

From to 13, sides covered with moss 
and spongy substance 



Large spring , 

Fissure with water and sand . . 

Large spring in bottom 

Bottom below grade 3" for 25 feet , 

Bottom below grade 

Conduit very much distorted . . , 



Authority. 



Stearns. 

Cunningham. 
Stearns. 

Cunningham. 
Stearns. 



Mains. 

Stearns. 

Crafts. 

Stearns. 
Cunningham. 



Stearns. 

Cunningham. 
Stearns. 

Crafts, 
Cunningham. 

Stearns. 



*The later and more careful examinations have been furnished me in manuscript by Mr. 
Davis and Mr. Fteley, under whose directions they were made. — D. F. 



Keport or the Water Board. 57 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


19 


April, '74. 


6.24 X 5.13 




Stearns. 


20 + 50 


Dec, '74. 




Loose brick in bottom at manhole . . 


Cunningham. 


20 and 21 
22 + 50to ) 


April, '69. 
" '74. 




Are several places where cement used 
in repointing has fallen out .... 


Crafts. 

Stearns. 


24 + 50 ) 






25 


" 


6.12 X 5.05 




a 


25 + 10 


" 


5.92 X 5.00 




tt 


26 


" 


6.22 X 5.07 




tt 


26 


Nov., '73. 


6.28 X 5.10 


Bottom apparently 3" above grade for 


Cunningham. 


26 + 50 


April, '74. 


6.31 X 5.02 




Stearns. 


27 + 70 


" 


6.25 X 5.16 




it 


29 


a 


6.18 X 5.01 




(< 


SI 


a 


6.25 X 5.07 




" 


33 


a 


6.25 X 5.08 




« 


40 


a 


6.24 X 5.03 




• i 


40 to 41 


tt 






« 


50 


a 


6.22 X 5.14 




" 


51 


" 


6.24 X 5.04 




" 


51 + 20 


a 


6.20 X 5.05 




■f 


52 + 50 to 53 


•' 






<< 


52 to 53 


April, '71. 
" '74. 


6.28 X 5.05 




Mains. 


55 + 20 




Stearns. 


56 and 57 


" '69. 




Small place where cement has dropped 
out and brick settled a little .... 


Crafts. 


57 to 58 


" '71. 




3 small fissures need pointing .... 


Mains. 


57 


" '74. 


6.28 X 5.00 




Stearns. 


57 + 70 


tt 


6.25 X 5,00 




(i 


60 


" '69. 






Crafts. 


64 + 40 


" '74. 


6.25 X 5.07 




Stearns. 


66 


" 


6.25 X 5.11 




" 


66 + 10 


Dec, '74. 




Spring enters on right. Cutting 37 


Cunningham. 


66 + 20 


April, '74. 
" '71. 




k" stream coming in at side bringing a 


Stearns. 


66 and 67 




Mains. 



58 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


68 + 20 


April, '74. 


6.31 X 5.04 




Stearns. 


70 + 50 


" 


6.27 X 5.02 


Water running in at several places . 


" 


71 + 40 


Dec, '74. 


6.22 X 5.12 




Cunningham. 


71+60 


<« 


6.28 X 5.02 


a 


CI 


71 + 72 


u 




Large springs in several places, 27 feet 


ci 


72 


April, '74. 


6.22 X 5.06 


Large number of springs at sides . . 


Stearns. 


Near 73 


" '69. 




Place about 2 feet square where joints 
need repointing. A little below on 


Crafts. 


73 + 65 


Dec, '74. 


6.13 X 5.12 


Large springs at left, 14 feet cutting . 


Cunningham. 


74 


April, '74. 


6.19 X 5.10 




Stearns. 


74 and 75 


" '69. 




Stream and considerable sand .... 


Crafts. 


75 and 76 


1866. 




Fissure bringing in sand and water . 


u 


80 


April, '74. 


6.21 X 5.12 




Stearns. 


85 


« 


6.30 X 5.07 




«' 


88 


Dec, '74. 






Cunningham. 


90 


April, '74. 


6.30 X 5.01 




Stearns. 


95 + 70 


ct 


6.19 X 5.07 




" 


96 


April, '68. 






Crafts. 


96 + 80 

97 + 20 


Dec, '74. 






Cunningham. 
Stearns. 


April, '74. 


6.35 X 5.10 




97 + 50 to 98 


ci 






ii 


97 + 50 


April, '68. 

" '69. 

Dec, '74. 






Crafts. 
it 


97 + 80 


Sand in bottom from spring above . . 


Cunningham. 


98 


1866. 




Fissure bringing in sand and water . 


Crafts. 


100 (about) 


April, '69. 






cc 


100 


Dec, '74. 


6.32 X 5.08 




Cunningham. 


101 + 70 


April, '74. 


6.22 X 5.05 




Stearns. 


102 + 30 


" 


6.33X5.05 


- 


" 


112 


" 


6.37 X 5.10 




it 


115 


April, '69. 






Crafts. 


115 and 116 


" '71. 






Mains. 


116 + 20 


" '74. 


6.51 X 5.08 




Stearns. 



Keport of the Water Board. 59 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authoritf. 


116 + 50 to I 


April, '74. 


6.39 X 5.08 
6.32 X 5.08 




Stearns. 


117 j 
119 + 10 




<< 


120 


" 






ct 


121 


Dec, '74. 


6.34 X 5.05 


Spring in bottom, at left, 21 ft. cut . . 


Cunningham. 


122 


« 




Sand in bottom from spring above . . 


tc 


122 


Nov., '73. 




Water springs in with fine sand . . . 


" 


122 + 20 


April, '74. 


6.35 X 5.37 




Stearns. 


122 + 30 to I 


CI 






CI 


123 1 
134 


cc 


6.38 X 5.02 




cc 


134 


Dec, '74. 






Cunningham. 
Mains. 


140 


April, '71. 




Large willow root. Crack |" wide 


141 


April, '74. 


6.36 X 5.03 




Cunningham. 


141 


" 


6.26 X 5.05 




Stearns. 


141 + 50 


fc 


6.28 X 5.15 


Wide crack top and bottom, \" . . . 


Cunningham. 


141 + 75 
141 to 144 


,, 


6.33 X 5.13 




CI 


Dec, '74. 
April, '69. 


Old crack, pointed last year, has not 


u 


141 to 142i 


Are several small cracks in top . . . 


Crafts. 


141 to 1421 


Nov., '73. 


6.3 X 5.13 


Crack in top g" to \", probably new • 


Cunningham. 


141J to 142| 


April, '70. 






Crafts. 


142 


" '71. 






Mains. 


142 


April, '74. 


6.29 X 5.15 




Cunningham. 


142 


" 


6.30 X 5.14 




Stearns. 


142 + 50 
143 


(( 


6.31 X 5.05 

6.32 X 5.02 




Cunningham. 


« 


Embankment at Stevens's Brook . . . 


145 


" 


6.33 X 5.06 




" 


147 


" 


6.33 X 5.08 




" 


to 148 


* S 


6.85 X 5.01 




ci 


149 




cc 


150 + 80 


Dec, '74. 




Old crack in top has not started . . . 


Cunningham. 


151 and 152 


April, '69. 
Dec, '74. 






Crafts. 


152 


6.32 X 5.04 


Old crack not started. Embankment. 


Cunningham. 



60 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



152 
152 and 153 

152 and 153 

153 

153 

154 

154 

154 + 50 

154 + 50 

154 + 50 

154 to 155 

154 and 155 

154 to 155 

154 to 155 ) 

+ 20 i 

154 to 155 \ 
+ 20 I 

155 

155 

155 + 20 

156 to 158 ) 
+ 50 \ 

157 

157 and 158 

157 + 60 



Date. 



April, '74. 
" '71. 

Dec, '73. 

" '74. 

April, '74. 

Dec, '74. 



Dec, '74. 

April, '68. 

April, '69. 

" '70. 



Size. 



6.31 X 5.04 



6.34 X 5.06 
6.34 X 5.05 
6.34 X 5.01 
6.31 X 5.06 

6.30 X 5.10 

6.31 X 5.05 



Remarks. 



Authority. 



Dec, 


'73. 


" 


'74. 


April, 


'74. 


Dec, 


'73. 


« 


'74. 


April, 


'68. 


" 


'74. 



6.33 X 5.13 



6.37 X 5.11 
6.35 X 5.08 



6.3 X 5.04 
6.33 X 5.08 



Small crack in top extending to waste 
weir 

Light crack in top •. • • 

Roots at left 

Crack in top from 154 to waste weir . 
Crack at top begins 

Slight crack 

Fine crack in top of arch 

Crack in top all the way |" 

Fine crack in top 

Cracks in top and bottom 

Cracks from 154 to 155+20 were point- 
ed Nov., 1873, and have not started. 
Conduit built on 5 ft. of embankment 



dedman's brook waste weir. 

Old slight crack, no change 

Old crack unaltered, from 166 to 158.50 



Crack which has been repaired and is 
in good condition 



15S 


" '70. 




158 


•i ) 74- 


6.35 X 5.05 


160 


Oct, '72. 




160 


April, '74. 


6.33X5.0 


160+95 


" 


6.35 + 4.95 


161 + 20 


" 





6.3 X 4.94 Slight crack in top arch. Between 157 
and 158 are several small cracks . . 

Small crack in top 

Roots growing through top. Crack 
widens slightly 



Crack in top arch 



Small crack in invert . 
Slight crack in top arch 



Stearns. 

Mains. 
Cunningham. 

Stearns. 

Cunningham. 



Crafts. 
Crafts. 

Cunningham. 



Stearns. 
Cunningham. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Thompson. 
Crafts. 

Thompson. 
Wiggin. 

Thompson. 



Keport or the Water Board. 61 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


161 and 162 


April, '74. 






Thompson. 


162 


" 


6.35 X 5.00 


Crack top |". Number of slight 


a 


163 


'•' 


6.35 X 5.05 


From here to 165, several slight cracks, 
one short one, J" wide. Long one 
in top \", in some places apparently 




165 


» 


6.35 X 5.00 




<£ 


167 + 20 


" 




Crack J" wide, 10 ft. long, continues 


„ 


167 + 50 


Dec, '73. 


6.4 X 5.17 


Crack in top \" , 10 feet long, old one. 


Cunningham 


167 + 70 
167 and 168 


Dec , '74 






« 


April, '74. 






Thompson. 


168 


(i 


6.35 X 5.15 




' " 


168 


1866. 




Where repairs were made, pointing 


Crafts. 


168 


Dec, '74. 


6.34 X 5.02 




Cunningham. 


168 to 169 


April, '68. 




Is a repaired crack, in good order . . 


Crafts. 


168| to 170 


'« '69. 




Is a crack in top, cement falling out; 
should be repointed. Several places 
that have been repointed show no 




169 


" '74. 




Crack near 169, which has been re- 


Thompson. 


169 + 2ft 


" 




Crack in top from manhole !" wide . 


a 


169 to 170 


" '70. 




Small crack in top, part of which has 
been pointed and stands well .... 


Crafts. 


169 to 170 


" '71. 




Several small cracks in top, which 
have been repointed and have not 


Wiggin. 


169 


Oct '72 






169 


April, '68. 




Short crack ; should be pointed . . . 


Crafts. 


169| to 170 


" '68. 






a 


169 


Dec, '74. 


6.30 X 5.07 


Old crack started in top. " Embank- 


Cunningham. 


169 to 170.20 


" 




Crack top and bottom. Bricks at bot- 
tom may be sprung with foot . . . 


171 to 172 


April, '74. 




Crack in top J " wide ; appears new . 


Thompson. 


171 + 30 to f 
171 + 65 J 


Dec, '74. 






Cunningham. 


171 + 60 ( 
to 175| i 


April, '70. 






Crafts. 


172 


" '74. 


6.30 X 5.15 




Thompson. 



62 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examininations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



172 to 175£ 

173 +40 to 
173+70 

174 

+ 10 
174 to 177 

178 to 181 
178 

178 and 181 

178+65 
178£ to 180 

179 
179 
179 

179 to 181 
180 
180 
•180 

, 181 
181 + 75 
182 

182 to 183.50 

182 to 184 
182 to 183+ 



190 
191 to 193 



Date. 



April, '68. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 



Dec, '73. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '71. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '69. 

Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '70. 
Oct., '72. 
Dec, '74. 

Oct., '72. 

April, '74, 

and 
Dec 



ril,'74, ) 

Mid > 

c, '74. ) 



April, '70. 
" '71. 



Size. 



6.35 X 5.00 



6.35 X 5.03 



6.35 X 5.02 



6.35 X 5.05 



Repaired crack, in good order, except 
a small portion near 174, -which was 
not pointed 



Crack top started again 5 or 6 feet 
of embankment 



Slight crack in top 
Crack top J ' . . 

Roots , 

Old crack J" . . . 



Authority. 



Crafts. 

Cunningham. 
Thompson. 



Several cracks in top, some of them 
\" wide, others quite fine 



Crack top and bottom J" wide 



Crack little below top on right, in 
some places very fine, but in no place 
over I". This crack continues' at 
intervals to about 184 



Slight crack • . . . . 

Small crack in top 

Crack top and bottom § " wide . . 
Crack in top I ' ' wide in places . . 
Crack top and bottom J "wide . . 

Fine crack for 50 feet 

Slight crack 

Crack ends 

Crack by manhole 

At 182 and 183 is a crack . 

Crack in top J" 

Crack J ' ' top and bottom • 
Fine crack at intervals . . 



" > 



Several cracks, one of which has 
been repointed 



§2 



There seems to be no change from 
these cracks 



Between 189 and 190 crack in top \" 
wide 



Several small cracks in side, settled 
slightly on top arch 



Cunningham. 

Wiggln. 
Cunningham. 

Crafts. 
Wiggin. 
Thompson. 
Cunningham. 
Thompson. 
Cunningham. 
Crafts. 
Wiggin. 
Cunningham. 

Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

"Wiggin. 

Crafts. 

Thompson. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 63 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



205 to 206 

206 + 60 to ) 
208 + 20 j 

207 

207 to > 
208 + 20 i 

207 to 208 

207 to 208 

207 to ) 
208 + 30 J 

207| to 208J 

209 

214 to 215 

219 + 25 

221 + 85 

222 to 223 

222 + 70 
228 to 230 

228 + 5 

228 and 229 

240 to 

241 

C40 + 50to I 
241 + 70 j 

241 
245 to 246 

245 

245 to 245 

245 to be- j 
yond 246 j 

245! 

245! to 247! 

246| to 248! 



Date. 



April, '74. 
a 

Dec, '74. 
(i 

Nov., '73. 

April, '69. 
" '70. 

" '74. 



Dec, '74. 
Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



Dec, 


'74. 


April, 


'70. 


Nov., 


'73. 


April, 


'74, 


Dec, 


'74. 


April, 


'69. 


■' 


'70. 


« 


'68. 



Size. 



6.35 X 5.02 



6.3 X 5.04 
6.3X5.12 



6.30 X 4.S 



6.20 X 4.97 



6.30 X 5.05 



6.3 X 5.17 



'70. 



Remarks. 



Crack in top 



Slight crack at top 



Slight crack in top 



Fine crack in top, whole distance 
Fine crack at intervals 



Small crack top arch . 

Fine crack in top arch . 
Slight crack top . . . . 
Slight crack in top . . 
Diagonal crack started 



Old settling of right side of upper 
arch. Slight crack top. General 
condition about here seems poor . . 



Slight crack in top 
B. & A. R. R. cr 

Slight crack . . 



Slight crack 

Crack in top partially repointed . 
Opposite "Wellesley Depot .... 



Small crack top, partly pointed, not 
started 



Fine crack 

Old crack £" .... 
Slight crack top . . . 
Old crack not started 



Fine crack alongside of an old re- 
paired crack 



Cemented 



Repaired cracks in good order, but 
there are several small cracks un- 
pointed 



Fine crack 



Authority. 



Thompson. 
« 

Cunningham. 
u 

a 

Crafts. 

Thompson. 

Crafts. 
Thompson. 



Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 

Thompson. 



Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Cunningham. 

Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 



64 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



247 and 248 
247 and 248 

247 + 30 
247 + 50 

247 + 70 
248 to 

249 

248 + 50) 
to 249 \ 

252 to 253 

252 + 50 

252 + 50 ) 
to 253 j 

253 to 254 

253 to 254 

254 

254 to 256 
254 
254 

254 to 256 
2541 to 256 

255 

255 to 256 
255 

255 + 40 
255 to 257^ 

256 

256 + 20 
259 



Date. 



April, '71. 

Oct., '72. 
April, '69. 

Dec, '74. 
it 

April, '74. 
a 

Dec, '74. 

April, '74. 
Nov., '73. 

Dec, '74. 

April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '70. 
Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 



Nov., 73. 
Dec, '74. 

Oct., '72. 
Dec, '74. 
u 

Oct., '72. 



Size. 



6.27 X 5.15 



6.30 X 5.05 



6.24X5.22 



6.25 X 5.22 



6.34 X 5.07 
6.27 



6.33 X 5.06 



From near 247 and extending about 
50 ft. is a crack on top arch, left 
side, in some places nearly |" wide 

Quite large crack in top arch .... 

Between 247 and 248 is a short crack, 
worse than any seen yet; appears 
again at intervals, a little beyond 
248 

Crack top and bottom I ' ' wide . . . 

Crack top and bottom ^ " 

Crack ends 

Bad crack in top 



Crack top and bottom |" to \" . 

Slight crack top ; bottom settled . 
Slight crack in top 

Crack I" wide on top unaltered . 

Roots. Slight crack grows larger 
to 254 — \" wide — near manhole 
3" to 6" of mud 

Quantity of roots and small crack 
in top 

Mud in bottom and roots .... 

Fine crack in top 

Bottom quite muddy 



)■ 5 

' o 



Crack in top, part of way J ' ' wide 

Very fine crack in top 

An old crack, pointed, remains 
sound 

Wide crack top and bottom . . . 

Slight crack top and bottom . . . 

Wide crack in top 

Crack 

Slight crack in top 

End of crack 

Crack 



Authority. 



Cunningham. 
Wiggin. 

Crafts. 
Cunningham. 



Thompson. 



Cunningham. 

Thompson. 
Cunningham. 



Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 

Thompson. 

Crafts. 

Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 
Cunningham . 

Wiggin. 



Keport of the Water Board. 65 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



259 to 260 

259 to I 

260 + 80 J 

260 
260 to 264 

264 to 265 
272 to 274| 

272 and 272^ 

272 to 273 

272 

272 to 274.50 
272 and 276 
2721 to 275 
272 to 2741 

274 
275 

282 

283 
283 to 284 
283J to 284 

283 + 50) 
to 284 j 

284 + 90 
284£ to 285| 

285 + 50 
289 

292 to 296 

293 + 30 
293 + 40 
293 + 75 



Date. 



April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 



" '68. 



Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 

Dec, '74. 

April, '71. 

" '70. 

Nov., '73. 

Oct., '72. 

1864. 
April, '69. 

" '70. 
« > H# 

Nov., '73. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 
Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 
" '71. 
Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



Size. 



6.32 X 5.07 



6.26 X 5.13 



6.24 X 5.12 



Remarks. 



Slight crack in top 

Slight crack in top . . 

Several slight cracks; mud hetween 
263 and 264 

Water leaks through 

A little past 272 is a crack, part of 
which is cemented, extending to 
about 274| 

Is an old crack in top, which has been 
bridged at intervals with Portland 
cement, which remains unbroken . 

Large crack which has been pointed 
not started «... 

Bad crack repointed, cracked again, 
extends to 273 + 50 

Old crack not started 

Is large crack, pointed and not started 

Fine crack 

Old crack in top quite wide, not 
started since last year 

Quite a crack in several places . . . 

Not very serious crack 

Figures wrong to sta. There should 
be a 2 in place of a 9 

Fine crack 

Cracks in top most of the way .... 
Slight crack in top (old) 

Old crack unaltered 

Crack I" wide , 

Slight crack in top, left hand .... 

End of crack 

What should be 289 is numbered 282 . 

Small cracks 

Cement out around one brick .... 

II (I li U (I 

14 (i II K (< 



Authority. 



Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Thompson. 



Crafts. 



Wiggin. 

Thompson. 
Cunningham. 
Wiggin. 
Crafts. 

Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 

Crafts. 



Thompson. 
Cunningham. 

C( 

Thompson. 
Cunningham. 
Thompson. 
Wiggin. 

Thompson. 



6Q City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



297+25 
297 to 

298 
298 + 10 

300 
1 and 2 
3 and 4 
12|tol3 

12 to 14 

13 to 14 



13 to 14 

14 

15 and 17 
15| to 17 

15i to 16£ 

16 

16 to 16 +40 

16 to 17 

16 to 17 

16 to 18| 

17 to 18 
17 to 18 



Date. 



April, '74. 



Nov., 73. 
April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 



13 to 14 


April, '70 


13 and 14 


" '74 


13 + 10 


Dec, 74. 


+ 40 


IC 


+ 50 


« 



Oct., '72. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '69. 
Nov., '73. 

Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 
April, '68. 
" '74. 

" '71. 
Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73. 



Size. 



Remarks. 



6.10 X 5.05 



Bottom uneven, leaks badly from out- 
side, old dams 



2 small streams on right 

! Bricks loose on right side 2 feet up 

6.16 X 5.13 I END OF DIVISION 1. 

I 

Bad place in top, 2 dams 

Dams 



Fine crack in top opposite GrantviUe 
depot 

Several large cracks which have been 
repointed, but think have started a 
little in places 



6.14 X 5.21 i Old crack in top pointed and cracked 
agaiu 



6.09 X 5.08 



Fine crack in top 

Bad crack in top, leaks badly on side ; 
brick sunk in bottom 



6.12 X 5.17 



6.12 X 5.0 



6.11 X 5.15 



Slight crack top and bottom 

V wide at top, cut 23 feet deep . . . 

Large spring in bottom, brings in 
sand 



Crack, which looks as if it had spread 
and water drips through; sand in 
bottom 



Crack ends 

Old crack patched but not started . . 

Old crack in top quite wide, pointed 
and started again 



Quite a crack in top 

Large crack in top commences 

Crack top and bottom 

Fine crack in top 



5 streams from inside, largest \" 
diameter ; brick gone in bottom . . 



Quite muddy . . . 
Large crack, sandy 



Authority. 



Old crack in top quite large, pointed 
and started again; springs at bot- 
tom • 



Thompson. 



Crafts. 

Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 
Crafts. 

Thompson. 
Cunningham. 



Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 

Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Thompson. 
Wiggin. 



Cunningham. 



Keport of the Water Board. 67 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



17 + 30 

17 + 50 
18 

18 + 40 
18 to 19 

18 + 50 
18+70 

19 

20 
21 + 50 
27 + 80 
30 + 25 

30! 

32 
34 to 36 
40 to 45 

49 

49 + 50 

51 and 52 

52 to 54| 
52 to 53 

53 



53 and 55 


Oct., '72. 


53 


Dec, '74 


54 


u 


54 + 60 


ic 


56+70 


(i 


59 + 80 


(i 


63 


(• 


63! to 64^ 


Nov., '73 



Date. 



Dec, '74. 



April, '74. 

« '70. 
Dec, *74. 



'April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 

1866. 
April, '74. 
u 

« '70. 

Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 

" '71. 



Size. 



1.15 X 5.13 
.21 X 5.03 
..14 X 5.21 



6.35 X 4.95 



6.28 X 5.12 



6.3 X 5.05 



Remarks. 



Crack at top 

Two cracks in top 

Slight crack 

Crack V a t top 

Bad crack in top 60 feet long, leaks 
badly 

Fine crack in top 

II " at top 

Crack ends 

Fissure repaired 

Appears to be lead pipe in top . . . 

Slight crack top 

Mud bottom 

Mud and roots in bottom 

Fissure repaired 

Some small cracks, cement gone . . . 

Numerous small cracks in top . . . . 

From 49 to east pipe-chamber all 
good 

WASTE WEIR AT GRANTVILLE. 

Slight crack 

Slight crack in top 

Small crack in top, somewhat in- 
creased from 53 to 54 

To a little beyond 54 are two cracks 
in top, in some places quite fine, 
and in others \" wide 

Slight crack 

Crack top and bottom 

Crack in top 1-16" to §" 

Crack ends 

Slight crack in top to ") 

59 + 80 \ embankment. 

Crack ends J 

Slight crack 



Authority. 



Cunningham. 



Thompson. 
Crafts. 
Cunningham. 
« 

Crafts. 
Thompson. 



Cunningham. 
Crafts. 
Thompson. 
u 

Crafts. 

Wiggin. 
Cunningham. 

Thompson. 

Wiggin. 
«< 

Cunningham. 



68 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



63 + 80 to> 
64 +'40 \ 

"64 

64+50 

64 and 65 

77 

77 + 30 

77 + 60 

77 to 78 

77 and 78 



77 and 78 

78 

80 + 90 

81 

82 

100 

100 to 101 

101 

105 + 

105 + 30 
106 

106 + 75 
107 
107 
107 

107 + 40 
107 + 50 
107 + 50 
107 + 50 



Date. 



April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 

Oct., "72. 
Dec, '74. 



Nov., '73. 
April, '71. 

Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 
Dec, '74. 
i< 

April, '74. 
1864. 

April, '74. 



Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 

Dec, '74. 



Dec, '74. 



Size. 



6.34 X 5.00 



6.38 X 5.03 

6.27 X 5.05 
6.27 X 5.05 
6.27X5.14 
6.19 X 5.21 
6.19 X 5.22 
6.19 X 5.21 

6.06 X 5.30 
6.10 X 5.22 
6.04 X 5.33" 
6.04 X 5.24 



Remarks. 



Large crack in top 

i 

1-16 ' crack 

Ends 

Slight crack 

Slight crack in top . > 

1-8" wide 

Ends 

Several cracks 

Are 3 quite large cracks in top, but 
they look as if they had been in the 
condition they are now in for some 
time 

Several cracks 

Slight crack, top . 

Ends 

Slight crack, top 

Crack between 100 and the west pipe- 
chamber 400 feet in length ; serious 
crack, repaired 

Small crack top 

Dam 



Patching commenced 

This crack was plastered over in 
Nov. '73, but has again opened 
both top and bottom nearly \" . 



The very bad crack repaired in 
Nov. '73, has started very slight- 
ly; showing a crack in all the new 
pointing 



Authority. 



Thompson. 
Cunningham. 

(C 

Wiggin. 
Cunningham. 



Wiggin. 

Thompson. 
Cunningham. 

(I 

Thompson. 

Crafts. 
Thompson. 



Cunningham. 

CI 

Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Thompson. 

Cunningham. 
Thompson. 
<< 

Cunningham. 



Report op the "Water Board. 69 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


107 + 60 


April, '74. 


6.02X5.40 






Thompson. 


107 + 85 


« 








« 


107 + 85 


« 


5.98 X 5.44 






Cunningham. 


107 + 95 


CI 


6.00 X 5.45 






Thompson. 


108 


Nov., '73. 


6.00 X 5.48 


Worst place wide crack top and 
bottom, in a very dangerous con- 




Cunningham. 


108 


April, '74. 


6.05 X 5.45, 






108 


Dec, '74. 


6.04 X 5.42 


Started slightly at top and bottom 




cc 


107 to 1091 


Oct., '72. 




Crack that was repointed has 
started, especially at 109 .... 




Wiggin. 


107 to 109| 


April, '71. 




Is a crack in top which has been 
repointed, but think it is open- 






107 to 109 \ 


Nov., '73. 


6.18 X 5.30 


Bad cracks top and bottom, very 
wide in many places; has been 
pointed and started again; con- 
duit badly out of shape. A probe 
was pushed through bottom crack 
2 feet into the gravel below . . 


W 

CD 

5 
a 1 

p 
s 


Cunningham. 


108 + 25 


April, '74* 


6.05X5.40 


Larger crack in bottom, cement 
repointing stops. Crack in top 
continues. In some places there 
are 3 cracks, some apparently 


3 
a 

CD 

< 


Thompson, 
cc 


108 + 40 


« 




Crack in bottom goes to R. side of 


O 

o 


108 + 50 


Dec, '74. 


6.09 X 5.35 
6,07 X 5.38 


Crack in top continues and in- 


'< 

CD 


cc 


108 + 50 




Cunningham. 


108 + 50 


April, '74. 


6.07 X 5.37 


Several bricks near the top are 
cracked from settlement. There 
appears to be motion in the con- 
duit, and as I thought some loose 






109 


Dec, '74. 


6.15 X 5.21 






Cfi 


109 


April, '74. 


6.15 X 5.28 






Thompson. 


109 + 15 


i. 

CC 


6.20 X 5.15 


Two cracks in bottom each side of 




cc 


109 + 25 


Crack in bottom varies from side 


cc 


109+50 




« 


109 + 50 


Dec, '74. 


6.22 X 5.15 






Cunningham. 


110 


April, '74. 


6.33 X 5.03 






Thompson. 


110 


cc 


6.33 X 5.01 






Cunningham 



70 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



110 + 50 

110 + 70 
111 

111 + 50 



Date. 



April, '74. 

Dec, '74. 
April, '74. 



Size. 



Remarks. 



Old crack repointed in top Dot" 
started 



Slight crack to 111 . 



6.35 X 5.05 
6.35X 5.05 



West pipe-chamber of Charles 
river siphon 



}a 



Authority. 



Thompson. 

Cunningham. 

Thompson. 



FROM EAST PIPE-CHAMBER TO THE RESERVOIRS. 



123 
138 + 50 
142 to 143 
143 + 25 

145 

151 

155 

160 

160 
160 

163 to 164 

165 

169£ to 170 

169 + 30 j 
to 170 j 

170 

174 to 180 

175 

175 to +40 

176 to 179 

178 + 15 ) 
to 178+95 j 

179 + 40 j 
to + 60 J 

180 + 50 

182 + 83 

183 + 40 



April, '74. 

Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73. 

Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 
Nov., '73. 

April, '74. 

<< 
Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



6.36 X 5.00 
6.33 X 5.06 

6.36 X 5.03 
6.36 X 5.06 
6.36 X 5.00 
6.35 X 5.03 
6.28 X 5.13 



6.34 X 5.05 

6.33 X 5.07 
6.38 X 5.03 

6.34 X 5.03 

6.33 X 5.04 
6.33 X 5.06 

6.32 X 5.09 
6.37 X 5.04 



Little sandy , 



Crack in top, beginning 16 ft. west of 
a manhole; total length, 40 ft. . . . 

Each side of manhole is a crack . . . 

Crack 50 ft. long in top both sides 
manhole 

Sandy 

Roots first observed in sides 

Slight crack in top ; roots side .... 

Slight crack at top 



Moss on each side 

Slight crack in top 

Large roots growing both sides 

Cracks at top 

Slight crack in top 

Slight crack in top, 2 ft. long . . 
Roots 

Manhole cracked on both sides 



Rice. 

Li 

Wiggin. 
Rice. 



Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 
Wiggin. 
Rice. 
Cunningham. 

Rice. 

w 
Wiggin. 
Rice. 



Keport of the Water Board. 71 

Table of oil Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. Date 



185 

190 

193 to 194 

195 

195 + 30 ) 

to 196+80 J 

195| to 196i 
195J to 197 

196 and 197 
196 and 197 
196 and 197 

196 to 197 

197 + 50 

198 + 25 ) 
to 198+55 J 

198 to 199 

200 

205 

205 + 70 

206 

210 

215 

216 + 25 ) 
to 218 +42 \ 

216 to 218| 

216 + 25 ) 
to 218£ J 



Size. 



April, '74. 6.33 X 5.09 
" ! 6.33X5.05 
" '71. 



" '74. 
ii 

Nov., '73. 
April, '71. 

" '70. 

1867 

1869 
Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



6.37 X 5.02 
6.33 X 5.07 
6.35 X 5.03 



April, '71. 
" '74. 



April, '69. 
" '74. 



Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73. 



6.31X4.97 

6.32 X 5.00 

6.33 X 5.03 



6.29 X 5.00 
6.33 X 5.01 



6.31 X 5.06 



217 + 50 I April, '74. ) 6.31 X 5.C 
217i to 218^ 1867 

217J to 218| April, '69. 
217| to 2181 « J7o. 

217£ to 218^ " '71. 

I 

218 I Nov., '73. I 6.28X5.06 



Remarks. 



Crack on right side of upper arch 
ahout 3 ft. long, diagonally to corners 



Authority. 



Slight crack in top 

Slight crack in top 

Fine crack in top 

Fine crack in top 

Is a small crack in top 50 ft. long 

Small crack in top arch 

Crack 

Manhole cracked . 

Slight crack in top 

Fine crack in top 



Sand at hottom 



Small crack in hottom which lets in 
sand : Crafts. 



Rice. 



Manley. 
Rice. 



Cunningham. 
i Manley. 

! Crafts. 

I 

iWightman. 
, Wiggin. 
i Rice. 



Manley. 
Rice. 



Crack in top and sides , 

Several cracks in top and on left . 



Rice. 



Wiggin. 



Several bad cracks in different joints, 
left hand, top and bottom 1-8" to 
1-4" I Cunningham. 



Rice. 
Crafts. 



Crack top and bottom 

Crack top and bottom, and sand . . . 

Bad crack in top, nearly 1-4" wide 
in places • . . . 



Bad cracks in top arch, part of the 
way two cracks 



Manley. 
Cunningham. 



72 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



218 

220 

221 + 25 ) 
to 222 +12 j 

221 to 222 



223 + 50 i 
to 224 ] 

223 + 55 | 

to 223 +85 I 

223 + 85 j 
to 224 j 

224 to 225 



224 to 225 
224 to 225 

224 to 225 

224 to 225 

224 to 225+5 

224 + 50 

225 

226 + 47 to; 
228 + 45 j 

226^ to 228§ 

227 to 228' 

227 + 50 

228 

230 

232 + 40 to | 
234 j 

232 + 50 I 
and 234 j 

232 + 50 to I 
234 j 

2321 to 234 



Date. 



232J to 234 Oct., '72 



April, '74. 

it 

April, '71. 

Nov., '73. 

April, '74. 

" '74. 
Nov., '73. 

1867 
April, '69. 

" '70. 

" '71. 

April, '74. 



Nov., 73. 
April, '71. 

April, '74. 



Size. 



6.28 X 5.07 

6.29 X 5.04 



April, '69. 

1867. 
April, '70. 



6.30 X 5.01 



6.26X5.13 



Remarks. 



Slight crack in top and sides . . 

Fine crack in top, part of the way- 
two cracks 



Slight crack in top . . 
Slight crack in top . . 
Slight crack in left sid« 



6.27 X 5.08 
6.29 X 5.10 



6.29 X 5.08 
6.31 X 5.06 
6.31 X 5.06 



Several large cracks in top, left \ 
hand, and one in bottom, proba- 
bly new one 

A double crack in top arch . . . 

Double crack in top arch and bot- 
tom also 

Two cracks in left top, some places 
1-4" wide, and others very fine 

Two cracks in top arch, same as 
last year; worst crack in the 
section ' 

Large crack in top and sides . . . 

Roots to 225 ' 



Authority. 



Slight crack in top . . 

Slight crack in top . . 
Fine crack in top arch 



Manhole 

Large crack in tcp 

Small crack in top and bottom arches 
Slight crack in top 



Several cracks in top, some of the way 
very fine, some 1-8 ' to 1-4" wide . 

Several bad cracks in top and on left 



Rice. 



Manley. 
Cunningham. 

Rice. 



Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Wightman. 
Crafts. 

Manley. 
Rice. 



Cunningham . 

Manley. 

Rice. 



Wightman. 
Crafts. 

Wiggin. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 73 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



232£ to 234 

232| to 238| 

233 + 50 

237 

240 

242| to 2442 

241 and 244£ 

242J to 244 
242 to 244 

242| to 244 

242 + 60 to; 
244 ( 

242 + 60 

245 

247 + 40 ) 

to 248 + 20 i 

247£ to 248 

248 

250 

253 + 30) 
to 254 + 50 J 

253£ to 254| 

253| to 254£ 
254 and 255 
254 and 255 

254 
254 to 262 

255 

260 

263 + 35/ 
to + 30 J 



Date. Size 



April, '71. 

Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 

(i 
1867. 
Apr., '69. 

" '70. 

" '71. 

Oct., '72. 
Nov., '73... 

April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 
April, '71. 
" '74. 
if 

" '71. 

Nov., '73. 

1867. 
April, '69. 

" '74. 



6.28 X 5.14 



6.29 
6.31 
6.29 



X5.31 
X5.01 
X5.04 



6.21 X 5.21 

6.27 X 5.09 

6.31 X 5-06 
6.38 X 5.06 

6.82 X 5.06 

6.30 X 5.15 

6.29 X 5.13 

6.37 X 5.06 

6.32 X 5.07 



Remarks. 



Several cracks in top, some of the way 
fine, but part of it from \" to \ 
wide ; no change from last year . . 

Bad cracks top and bottom, \" wide, 
and crack in bottom, south side . . 



Serious crack, 65 feet in length . . . 

Bad crack in bottom and top, and con- 
siderable sand 

Several cracks on both sides of top, 
some quite bad, nearly \" in places 

Several bad cracks in both sides of 
top arch 

Several bad cracks and mossy .... 

Near manhole and in embankment, 
two of the worst cracks we have 
seen; also two bad ones in bottom, 
\" to !", large roots in top .... 

Slight crack in top • 

Slight crack in top 

Very slight crack top 

Fine crack in top 

Slight crack in top . 

Several fine cracks, top and right side 
of arch 

Slight crack in top 

Small crack 

Small crack top 

Springs both sides, large root left side 
Springy on right side 

Large crack in top 



Authority. 



Manley. 
Cunningham. 



Crafts. 

Wightman. 

Crafts. 

Manley. 
Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 
Rice. 



Cunningham. 

Manley. 

Rice. 



Manley. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 

Wightman. 

Rice. 



74 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


263| to 264 


186T. 
April, '69. 
" '71. 
" '74. 


6.29 X 5.07 






263£ to 264 




Wightman. 

Manley. 

Rice. 


264 


Fine crack in top and right side . . . 



THIRD DIVISION. 



+ 93 i 

to 2 + 80 ] 

land 2 

land 2 

1 and 1\ 

lto2 

2 

5 

6 + 50 i 
to 7 + 15! 

6|to7 



11 + 40 ) 
to 12 + 30 j 

11| to 12| 

12 

12 + 60 

13 + 86) 
to 17 + 20 j 

14 

16 

18 

18 + 86 ) 
to 19 + 70 j 

19£ to 20 

20 

20 + 85 j 
to 21 + 38 j 



April, '74. 

1867. 
April, '69. 
Nov., '73. 
April, '71. 
April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 

April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 



6.29 X 5.06 

6.31 X 5.08 
6.38 X 5.03 

6.30X5.07 



6.39 X 5.07 



.34 X 5.03 
.34 X 5.06 



.30 X 5.04 
i.30 X 5.04 



Large crack in top 

Slight crack 30 ft. long 

Small crack in top 

Slight crack in top 

Fine crack in top 

Slight crack 

Small crack in top 

NEWTON CENTRE WASTE WEIR. 

Slight crack in top 

Very slight crack in top 

Slight crack top 5 ft 

Very slight crack 

Manhole cracked both sides for a few 
feet 

Very slight crack in top 

Very slight crack in top 

Very slight crack in top 



Rice. 

Crafts. 

Wightman. 

Cunningham. 

Manley. 

Rice. 



Cunningham. 



Rice. 

Cunningham. 
Rice. 



Cunningham. 
Rice. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 75 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


21 to 21J 


Nov., '73. 






Cunningham. 


22 


" 


6.26 X 5.13 




u 


25 


April, '74. 


6.30 X 5.06 




Rice. 


27 + 75 
30 


it 






ii 


« 


6.34 X 5.09 




CI 


30 + 50 


" 




Very small stream right side .... 


" 


33| 


Nov., '73. 




Old cement dam 5" or 6" high . . . 


Cunningham. 


35 


April, '74. 


6.32 X 4.99 




Rice. 


+ 9 


a 






<i 


35| 


May, '70. 




Cement dam should be cut out . . . 


Crafts. 


35J 


Nov., '73. 






Cunningham. 


37! 


1867. 




Large fissure in bottom, through 
■which a large volume of water and 


Crafts. 


37 + 50 


April,.'74. 
Nov., '73. 




Spring as large as man's 'wrist in bot- 


Rice. 


37! 


Copious spring in bottom, smells of 


Cunningham. 


37! 


' 1866. 






Crafts. 


39 


Nov., '73. 






Cunningham. 


40 


1866. 






Crafts. 


40 


April, '74. 


6.34 X 5.09 




Rice. 


41+40 


" 






« 


45 


" 


6.32 X 5.02 




" 


46 + 50 


ii 






" 


50 


" 


6.29 X 5.11 




ii 


50 + 50 to \ 


II 






i< 


52 + 50 | 






50 + 75 


" 


6.26 X 5.20 




ii 


51 


" . 


6.25 X 5.08 




ic 


+ 13 


" 




Four large springs in bottom .... 


" 


52 


" 


6.24 X 5.20 




" 


51 


1867. 




East of 51 is a slight crack and small 
fissure in the bottom bringing in 


Crafts. 


50! to 52! 


Oct., '72. 






Wiggin. 


50! to 52! 


Nov., '73. 




Cracks 1-8" and 1-4" top and bottom 


Cunningham. 



76 City Document. — No. 88. 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authority. 


51| 


Nov., '73. 


6.20 X 5.10 




Cunningham. 


51 


" 






(i 


52 


" 






tt 


53 + 65 


April, '74. 






Rice. 


53 + 85 

54 + 38 


u 






CI 








CI 








Copious springs from 10 to 20 feet 


« 








NEWTON TUNNEL. 






Nov., '73. 




From 3" to 9" of mud in tunnel . . . 


Cunningham. 




April, '74. 




Several inches of mud whole length . 


Rice. 


84 


" 






CI 


85 


" 


6.24 X 5.04 




" 


86^ 


Oct., '72. 






Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 
Rice. 


86| to m 


Nov., '73. 




Quite a crack on right near top ; also 


86 + 65 to) 

87 + 45 ) 

87 


April, '74. 






6.29 X 5.15 






88 to 90 


Oct., '72. 






Wiggin. 
Rice. 


89 


April, '74. 


6.30 X 5.04 




89 to 89+30 


Nov., '73. 




Crack in middle, top, and hottom . . 


Cunningham. 


90 


April, '74. 


6.35 X 5.03 




Rice. 


90 to 90| 


Nov., '73. 


6.4 X 5.12 




Cunningham. 


90 + 10to> 


April, '74. 






Rice. 


90 + 90 i 
90 + 60 


6.36 X 5.03 




it 


91 + 60to ) 

92 + 97 j 


" 






,, 






92 


" 


6.33 X 5.07 




ti 


93 


Oct., '72. 






"Wiggin. 
Cunningham. 


94 


Nov., '73. 




Slight crack on right side near top . . 


94 


April, '74. 


6.32 X 5.09 


Slight crack in right side and top . . 


Rice. 


95 


" 


6.36 X 5.07 




" 


100 


" 


6.37 X 5.06 




" 


103 to \ 


" 






ti 


103 + 24 S 







Eeport or the Water Board. 77 

Table of all Recorded Examinations of the Aqueduct. — Con. 



Station. 



103 + 15 

103+50 

105 

106+55 to \ 
107+40 j 

107+40 to \ 
107+87 J 

107 + 50 

107| to 108 

108| to 110 

108+58 to \ 
110+50 ( 

109 to 110 

110 

115 

115 to 117 

115+20 to ) 
118+40 | 

115| to 116J 

116 
117| to 118| 

118 

118+65 to 
126+75 

118| to 119^ 

119| to 126 

119 to 124 
119J to 124 

119 to 124 

119 + 50 
120 
120 

120 + 50 



Date. 



April, '74. 
Oct., '72. 
April, '74. 



Nov., '73. 
Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 

Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 
April, '74. 
Nov., '73. 
Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 

Nov., '73. 



1S67. 
Nov. , '73. 

Oct., '72. 

April, '74. 



Size. 



6.35 X 5.07 
6.35 X 5.07 



6.30 X 5.09 



31 X 5.05 
30 X 5.07 
40 X 5.01 



6.33 X 5.17 



.37 X 5.04 
.36 X 5.01 
. 37 X 5.07 



Remarks. 



Crack in top 

Slight crack in top and right side . . 
Slight crack in top 

Slight crack in top 

Several cracks, been repointed, not 
started 

Crack right side and top 

Two cracks at right of top 1-8" . . . 

Crack 

Slight crack in top 

Slight crack in top 

Two slight cracks 

Crack on right side 

Large crack in top. Bottom rough . 

Slight crack in top 

The cracked portion of the Bennett 
meadowextends about 650 feet; re- 
paired during the year 

Old cracks do not show much change 

Bad cracks top and bottom, \" and 
more 

Several bad cracks on each side and 
top ; repointing is all right 

Bottom rough 

From here to Intermediate Grate- 
house is by the side of the Lawrence 
Basin 



Authority. 



Rice. 

Wiggin. 

Rice. 



Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 

Rice. 

Cunningham . 
Rice. 

Wiggin. 

Rice. 

Cunningham. 
Rice. 

Cunningham. 
Wiggin. 

Rice. 

Cunningham. 

Crafts. 



Cunningham. 

Wiggin. 
Cunningham. 

Rice. 



78 



City Document. — No. 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 


Authoritt. 


120 to 121 


April, '70. 




Crack, and to 125 are several ; some of 
them large; but haven't increased 


Crafts. 


120 to 125 


" '71. 






Stanwood. 


121 


" '74. 


6.23 X 5.24 




Cunningham. 


121 


Nov., '73. 


6.20X5-27 




a 


121 + 50 


April, ; 74. 


6.20 X 5.21 


This cracked portion measures about 
the same as last year; crack \" wide 


n 


122 


Nov., '73. 


6.24 X 5.22 


Rough bottom ; remains of dams . . 


" 


122 


April, '74. 


6.21 X 5.22 


Some places there are two cracks . . 


U 


122 + 50 


" '74. 


6.24 X 5.18 




u 


123 


a 


6.28 X 5.12 




•< 


+ 50 


it 


6.33 X 5.10 




it 


124 


ti 


6.31 X 5.07 




<< 


+ 50 


■( 


6.36 X 5.08 




u 


125 


(< 


6.19 X 5.22 


Crack ends a little below this .... 


(C 


125 


Nov., '73. 




Old crack been pointed; not started . 




125 


April, '74. 


6.21 X 5.21 




II 


125£ to 126| 


Oct., '72. 






"Wiggin. 

Cunningham. 
a 


125J to 126 




6.3 X 5.15 




127 


Nov., '73. 
Oct., '72. 






128 to 129 




Wiggin. 


128 + 30 to ) 


April, '74. 








129 + 20 J 
130 


6.35 . 5.07 




if 


1331 to 138| 


1866. 






Crafts. 


133£ and ) 
138£ ] 


1867. 




Old cracks do not show much change. 
Those portions pointed remain per- 


CI 


134 




Rice. 




April, '71. 




2 feet south of Webber waste-weir is 


Stanwood. 


156 and 157 


" '69. 
May, '70. 




For about 20 feet, slight crack on top, 
where sewer was carried under con- 


it 


157 




Wightman. 


171 



















WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT 



FOB 



1874-75 



WATEE EEGISTEAE'S EEPOET FOE 1874-75. 



Water Kegistrar's Office, 

Boston, May 1, 1875. 
Thomas. Gogin, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 

Sir, — The following report is made in accordance with 
the requirements providing for the care and management of 
the Cochituate Water Works. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1875 is 44,676, being an increase, since January 1, 1874, of 
2,331. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates during the year ending January 
1, 1875, is 1,112. Of this number, 881 have been turned on, 
leaving a balance of 231 still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates 

received from April 30, 

1874, to May 1, 1875, is . $1,001,177 10 

Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used in 

previous years the sum of $61,271 75 
Leaving the receipts for water 

furnished during the year 

ending April 30, 1875, the 

sum of. . . . .$939,905 35 



Amount carried forward, $1,001,177 10 

6 



82 City Document. — No. 88. 

Amount "brought forward, $1,001,177 10 

Amount paid Mystic Water 
Board for the year ending 
April 30, 1875, as per con- 
tract $71,497 51 

In addition to the above there 
has been received for turn- 
ing on water in cases where 
it had been turned off for 
non-payment of rates, the 
sum of 1,876 00 



$1,003,053 10 
The increased amount of income for the year 

ending April 30, 1875, over the previous 

year is $96,622 62 

The total amount of assessments now made 

for the present year is ... $804,338 67 

The estimated amount of income from the 

sales of water during the financial year 

1875 and 6 is $1,081,271 26 

The expenditures of my office during the year 

1874 have been $24,183 31 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises of 
water-takers is 1,092. Of this number 729 are |-inch, 307 
1-inch, 44 2-inch, 10 3-inch, 2 4-inch, all of which are the 
Worthington pattern. 

DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

There are 31 drinking-fountains now established within the 
city limits. They are located as follows : — 
* Common (6.) 

Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Washington street, near Blackstone square. 






Report of the Water Board. 83 

Charles street, near Boylston street. 

" " between Boylston and Beacon streets.' 
" " opposite jail. 

Commercial street, junction Atlantic avenue. 

Albany street, opposite City Hospital. 

Mt. Washington avenue, near the bridge. 

Foundry street, near First street. 

Fourth street, near Foundry street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 

Telegraph hill, South Boston. 

Eustis street, corner Washington street. 

* Eliot square, opposite Norfolk House. 

Pynchon street, opposite Roxbury street. 

Tremont street, junction of Cabot street. 

Beacon street, junction of Brookline avenue. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street, Dorchester. 

Upham's corner, Dorchester. 

Glover's corner, " 

Grove Hall, " 

Maverick square, East Boston. 

Central square, " 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street, East Boston. 

Those marked * are arranged for a continuous flow of water. The balance have auto- 
matic fixtures, operating the flow of water when required. 



84 



City Document. — No. 



The following table exhibits the class of premises to which 
meters are attached, together with the amount of revenue 
received during the year 1874 : — 



Name. 



Revere House . . 
American House 
Parker House . . 
U. S. Hotel . . . 
Tremont House . 
Young's Hotel . 
Adams House . . 
Hotel Berkeley . 
Marlboro House . 
Albion Building . 
W. D. Park . . . 
Hotel Pelham . . 
Hotel Boylston . 
La Grange House 
St. Cloud .... 
Hotel Clarendon . 
Seaver House . . 
Evans House . . 
Wm. Pfaff . . . 
Hotel Kempton . 
Hotel Hamilton . 
Hotel Vendome . 
Coolidge House . 
City Hotel .... 
Hancock House . 
Merrimac House 



Amount carried forward . 



Class. 



Gallons. 



10,003,346 

8,024,144 

11,625,817 

5,051,969 

8,405,346 

3,784,042 

3,161,244 

2,868,036 

3,094,837 

745,695 

375,08' 

2,756,542 

1,077,833 

427,514 

608,579 

1,457,392 

351,441 

1,177,680 

292,184 

1,294,792 

1,647,059 

1,982,789 

1,358,091 

127,027 

123,786 

445,477 



Revenue. 



$3,000 98 

2,407 22 

3,487 74 

1,515 56 

2;521 58 

1,135 19 

948 35 

860 39 

928 43 

223 69 

112 51 

826 95 

323 34 

128 24 

182 55 

437 20 

105 40 

353 29 

87 64 

388 42 

494 09 

594 81 

407 40 

38 10 

37 12 

133 63 



72,267,749 $21,679 82 



Keport of the Water Board. 



85 



Name. 


Class. 


o 

3 

00 


a 

c 


■a 

c 




fl 

3 
«* 


o 

03 
a 

S3 


o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 


















72,267,749 


$21,679 82 






3 












3 


468,832 


140 64 








1 












1 


264,839 


79 43 








1 












1 


184,499 


55 33 


New England House . . . 








1 










1 


593,407 


178 00 








1 












1 


401,377 


120 38 








1 












1 


131,406 


39 41 


Commercial House .... 






2 












2 


497,824 


149 36 










1 










1 

3 


449,886 
459,742 


134 95 






3 


137 90 










3 










3 


1,457,391 


437 21 










1 

2 










1 
2 


236,302 
776,526 


70 87 


Metropolitan House .... 






232 95 










2 










2 
1 


3,034,575 
78,270 


910 35 


Thomas L. Robinson . . . 




1 


23 48 










4 










4 
1 


5,687,826 
88,326 


1,706 33 


Massachusetts House ... 




1 


26 48 








1 


1 










2 


662,700 


198 78 








1 












1 


172,530 


51 74 








2 












2 


310,776 


93 21 








3 












3 


699,532 


209 84 








2 












2 


864,915 


259 45 










2 










2 
1 


767,177 
346,657 


230 13 






1 


103 99 








2 


2 










4 


2,924,856 


877 43 








1 












1 


857,332 


257 18 


Stumcke & Goodwin . . . 






3 












3 


3,013,316 


903 98 










1 










1 
1 


550,117 
769,740 


165 01 






1 


230 91 








1 












1 


261,059 


78 30 










1 








fl 


3 


1,259,519 
87,630 


377 84 






1 




- 


- 


- 




1 


26 27 










100,626,633 


$30,186 95 



86 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Hotel Marion 

Dio Lewis 

Old Col. & Newp't R.R. Co. 
Boston & Albany R. R. Co. 
Boston & Maine R. R. Co. . 
Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 

Fitchburg R. R. Co 

Eastern R. R. Co 



New York & New Eng. R. R. 
Co 



Boston & Providence R. R. 
Co 



Boston Gas Ligbt Co. . . . 
South Boston Gas Light Co. 
East Boston Gas Light Co. 
Roxbury Gas Light Co. . . 
Dorchester Gas Light Co. . 



Standard Sugar Refinery, 
Granite street 



Standard Sugar Refinery, 
Eastern avenue 



Continental Sugar Refinery. 
Bay State Sugar Refinery . 
Oxnard Sugar Refinery . . 
Boston Sugar Refinery . . 
American Sugar Refinery . 
Bay State Rolling Mill . . 
Norway Iron Works . . . 
Highland Spring Brewery . 

Edward Habich 

Wheat &Carberry. Vacant. 

H. & J. Pfaff 

A. J. Houghton & Co. . . . 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Hotel 



Brewery 



Gallons. 



100,626,633 

162,210 

1,547,368 

22,509,003 

36,022,207 

4,076,376 

6,079,082 

4,851,321 

12,515,421 

6,761,406 

10,721,091 
39,792,749 
1,522,394 
1,334,969 
1,420,641 
1,808,953 

38,749,650 

13,403,4S9 

20,647,425 

9,676,800 

4,118,886 

21,345,600 

685,327 

17,457,402 

22,601,678 

9,172,004 

3,221,478 



2,694,551 
766,132 



Revenue. 



$30,186 95 

48 65 

464 20 

6,752 70 

10,806 66 

1,222 90 

1,823 71 

1,455 38 

3,754 62 

2,028 41 

3,216 20 
11,937 81 
456 70 
400 48 
426 14 
542 67 

11,624 89 

4,021 03 
6,194 21 
2,903 03 
1,235 65 
6,403 66 

205 59 
5,237 20 
6,780 49 
2,751 58 

966 43 



808 34 
229 82 



416,292,246 $124,886 10 



Keport or the Water Board. 



87 



Name. 



Amount brougM forward 
Gottlieb Burkhardt . 
John Roessle .... 
Christian Jutz .... 
Henry Souther & Co. 
Boston Beer Co. . . 
Conrad Decker . . . 
Suffolk Brewing Co. 
Burton Brewery . . 
Standard Brewery . 
Vincent & Hathaway 
Moses Fairbanks & Co 
Coburn, Lang & Co 
Comstock, Gove 85 Co 
Leonard & Co. . . . 
"Wesleyan Association 
Tremont Temple . . 
S. S. Houghton & COi 

P. McAleer 

Smith & Porter . . . 
T. H. Carter .... 
Boston Journal . . . 
John L. Gardner . . 
Joseph Byers .... 



Western Union Teleg: 
Co 



N. E. Mut. Life Ins. Co 
State st 



N. E. Mut. Life Ins. Co 
State st 



Horticultural Hall . 
Suffolk National Bank 
Benjamin Leeds . . . 
Stone, Bier & "Weiss 



aph 
39 



Amount carried forward , 



Class. 



Brewery 



Beer Factory 



Building 



Gallons. 



416,292,246 

1,453,507 

3,316,019 
389,167 
911,182 

5,371,814 
738,554 

3,642,750 
946,530 

1,210,986 
868,544 
742,551 
432,951 
288,411 

1,081,882 
930,630 

1,049,486 
307,619 
546,096 

1,223,302 
846,321 

1,938,277 
119,536 
793,364 

391,439 

726,854 

183,337 
318,406 
417,441 
362,339 
205,919 



Revenue. 



$124,886 10 
436 03 
994 78 

116 73 
273 34 

1,611 53 

221 54 
1,092 81 

283 94 
363 27 
260 55 

222 75 
129 87 

86 50 
324 55 
279 17 
314 83 

92 27 
163 81 
366 98 
253 88 
581 47 

35 84 
237 99 

117 42 

218 04 

54 98 

95 48 

125 22 

108 68 

61 75 



448,047,460 $134,412 10 



88 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

John Rayner, heirs . . . 

Otis T. Ruggles 

B. B. Appleton, hefts . . 

J. W. Merriam . 

R. H. Spaulding . 

Mrs. Ellen Brooks 

Oriental Tea Co. 

S. D. Hicks . . . 

John Stetson . . 

Macullar.Williams & Parker 

E. H. Furber .... 

Joshua Sears' Estate 

Lilly .Young, Pratt & Brack 
ett 



A. T. Brown 

Hogg, Brown & Taylor . 

A. Wentwenth 

William Ropes' Estate . 

A. D. Puffer 

Eastern Express Co. . . 
Grand Lodge of Masons 
James W. Rollins . . . . 



Haley, Morse & Co., 411 
"Washington st. . . . 



Mass. Inst, of Technology 

S. N. Brown, Jr 

A.H.Vinton 

J. W. Pierce 

B. F. Bradbury 

Shepard, Nor well & Co. . 
D. J. Hastings 

C. U. Cotting, 456 Wash st 



Class. 



Building 



Amount carried forward 466,465,322 $139,936 92 



Gallons. 



448,047,460 
463,641 
208,116 
541,139 
508,146 
349,536 
177,569 
293,256 
1.253 009 
873,088 
482,421 
203,309 
411,359 

822,446 

83,609 

1,099,425 

1,075,882 

3,790,259 

383,654 

771,501 

200,984 

487,821 

341,451 
1,134,509 
269,654 
221,084 
389,414 
378,268 
328,558 
234,344 
640,410 



$134,412 10 
139 07 

62 41 
162 33 
152 42 
104 84 

53 26 

87 96 
375 88 
261 91 
144 71 

60 98 
123 40 

246 72 

25 07 

329 82 

322 75 

1,137 05 

115 08 
231 43 

60 27 
146 32 

102 42 

340 34 

80 87 

66 31 

116 80 
113 47 

98 54 

70 28 

192 11 



Keport of the Water Board. 



89 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Parsons & Stoddard 

W. H. Mann . 

Ilallett & Davis 

Galvin & Currio 

P. Donahoe . . 

Jonas Fitch . . 

Samuel A. Way, estate 

H. C. Stephens .... 

Jordan, Marsh & Co 
Washington street . 

G. T. Burnham & Co. . 

G. D. Dowes & Co. . . 

Stephen H. Bennett, heirs 

J. P. Dimond . 

Taylor Page . 

Franklin Evans 

J. Zane & Co. . 

Metropolitan R. R. Co. 

Art Garden . 

Allen & Woodworth 

Merchants' Exchange 

C. U. Cotting, 7 Court sq 

J. J. Stevens . . 

J. T. Brown & Co 

J. C. Gray . 

C. F. Hovey . 

John Foster . 

R. B. Brigham 

M. M. Ballou , 

J. M. Smith & Co 

Charles Rollins . 

Adams Express Co. 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Building 



Gallons. 



466,465,322 
225,958 
465,014 
119,351 
886,794 
738,359 
187,941 
191,047 
1,175,331 

870,666 
616,612 
128,324 

1,413,734 
451,926 
227,774 
393,996 
483,749 
66,261 
233,827 
177,510 

4,460,601 
348,276 
212,189 
322,810 
837,580 
988,477 
495,479 
38,084 
560,721 
29,931 
743,452 

1,797,287 



$139,936 92 

67 77 
139 48 

35 79 
266 03 
221 49 

56 37 

57 30 
352 59 

261 18 
184 97 
38 48 
424 10 
135 56 

68 32 
118 17 
145 11 

19 85 

70 14 

53 23 

1,338 16 

104 47 

63 64 

96 83 

251 25 

296 52 

148 62 

11 41 

168 20 

8 96 

223 02 

539 17 



456,354,383 $145,903 10 



90 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., King- 
ston street 



H. S. Lawrence . 

J. M. Beebe 

F. Tudor 

Studio Building 

Bost'n Post B'ding^ater st. 

" " Milk st. 

Traveller Building .... 

Union Building 

Wentworth Building . . . 

Rice Building 

Carter Building 

Edmands Building .... 
"Washington Building . . . 

Niles Building 

Palmers Building 

Joy's Building 

Sears Building 

Advertiser Building .... 

Charity Building 

Codman Building 

Transcript Building .... 
Chauncy Hall School . . . 
Mass. General Hospital . . 

City Hospital 

Lunatic Hospital 

New England Hospital . . 
Notre Dame Academy . . . 
St. Mary's Institute .... 
House of the Angel Guardian 
Home for Catholic Children 



Class. 



Building . 



Amount carried forward ' 517,370,504 $155,207 37 



Gallons. 



486,354,383 

367,911 
225,516 
560,857 
515,902 
903,614 
496,529 
69,300 
773,700 
925,650 
312,479 
849,779 
293,616 
306,847 
615,081 

1,119,336 
422,144 
345,022 

1,359,374 
807,427 
135,119 

1,410,420 
385,462 
35,130 

3,751,109 

7,947,231 

3,335,421 
6S5,829 
184,972 
102,990 
635,626 

1,136,737 



$145,903 10 

110 35 

67 63 

168 23 

154 76 

271 06 

148 94 

20 79 

232 10 

277 67 

93 72 

254 91 

88 07 

92 03 

184 51 

335 78 

126 62 

103 49 

407 80 

242 21 

40 51 

423 10 

115 62 

10 53 

1,125 32 

2,384 14 

1,000 61 

205 74 

55 47 

30 88 

190 67 

341 01 



Kepoet of the Watek Board. 



91 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Church Home 

Temporary Home 

Somerset Club House . . . 

Union Club House 

Temple Club 

Boston Music Hall 

City Hall 

State of Massachusetts . . 
United States of America . 
Howard Athenasum .... 

Boston Theatre 

Boylston Market 

"Washington Market .... 

Suffolk Market 

Franklin Market 

Williams Market 

Tremont Market ..... 

Union Market 

Medical College 

Boston College 

Mary Stearns 

Mrs. J. R.Hill 

Mrs. R. W. Prescott .... 

J. H. Baker 

Mrs. W. A. Colson .... 

F. B. Ruggles 

Mrs. A. A. Tower 

A. Carr 

"W. A. Prescott 

Geo. Odin, heirs 

James F. Goodwin .... 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



State House 
Post Office . 



Boarding , 



Gallons. 



517,370,504 
774,689 
270,697 

1,311,951 
640,530 
292,994 
730,162 

1,194,658 

1,021,514 
247,725 
167,526 
650,355 
293,691 

1,075,867 
666,642 
366,502 
709,851 
92,527 
66,750 
297,539 
537,679 
251,805 
382,935 
158,204 
138,051 
203,437 
233,654 
96,719 
131,587 
243,598 
220,543 
291,405 



Revenue. 



$155,207 37 

232 39 

81 19 

393 56 

192 14 

87 88 
219 03 
358 38 
306 44 

74 31 
50 24 

195 10 

88 09 
322 74 
199 98 
109 93 
212 94 

27 75 
20 02 

89 25 
161 28 

75 52 
114 86 

47 45 
41 40 
61 02 
70 07 
29 00 
39 46 
73 05 
66 15 
87 40 



531,132,291 $159,335 39 



92 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Mrs. A. P. Cleverly .... 

D. C. Knowlton 

Mrs. C. Farley " 

Mrs. C. Cumraings .... 

James Knowlton 

Ruel Philbrick 

E. F. "Whitman 

S. V. Loring 

Mrs. N. F. Chapin 

William Evans 

E. Cutler, 147 Kneeland st.. 

E. Cutler, 146 Kneeland st.. 

Michael Doherty 

Job A. Turner, 17 Webster 
avenue 

Job A. Turner, 6 Melrose pi. 

Peter McFarland 

J. Collins 

D. L. "Webster 

Thomas Cantlon 

"W. B. Mendum 

Brown & "Wilcox 

Jacob J. Storer, vacant . . 

Joseph Nickerson & Co. . . 

J. Morrill, jr., & Co 

Pearson Bros. & Co 

J. Morse 

L. "Whittaker 

C. Wright & Co. ...... 

Howard Watch and Clock Co 

Haley, Morse & Co 



Class. 



Model 



Amount carried forward 



Factory 



o 

a 

00 


1 inch. 

2 inch. 

3 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 








531,132,291 


$159,335 39 


2 




. . 2 


266,548 


79 95 


1 




. . 1 


301,851 


90 54 


1 




. . 1 


151,019 


45 28 


1 




. • 1 


305,579 


91 65 


1 




. . 2 


963,681 


289 09 


2 




. . 2 


246,267 


73 86 






. . 1 


105,381 


31 60 


1 




. . 1 


187,927 


56 35 


1 




. • 1 


277,634 


83 27 


3 




. . 3 


731,234 


219 34 


2 




. . 2 


180,809 


54 22 


2 




. . 2 


434,834 


130 43 


5 




. . 5 


496,304 


148 87 


1 




. . 1 


24,600 


7 38 


1 




. . 1 


266,766 


80 01 


1 




. . 1 


384,531 


115 35 


2 




. • 2 


536,729 


161 01 


1 




. . 1 


550,664 


165 17 


1 




. • 1 


271,750 


81 50 


2 




. . 2 


204,637 


61 38 


3 




. . 3 


1,044,501 


313 32 


1 




. • 1 








r . . 


. . 1 


1,630,649 


489 18 


1 




. • 1 


180,645 


54 17 




1 . . 


. • 1 


1,641,067 


492 31 


1 




• • 1 


142,911 


42 85 


1 




• • 1 


138,667 


41 58 


1 




• . 1 


355,559 


106 64 




2 • . 


• . 2 


1,315,146 


394 52 


1 




• . 1 


559,529 


167 84 




: J. . 




545,029,710 


$163,504 05 



Eeport or the Water Board. 



93 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Roxhury Carpet Co. . . 
George C. Pearson . . 
Back Bay Woolen Co. . 

S. S. Putnam 

John Preston 

Union Elastic Goods Co 
Mason & Hamlin . . . 
William Carleton . . . 
Boston Star Collar Co. 
Murphy, Leavens & Co 
H. M. Richards .... 
Charles E. Kershaw . 
E. Strain & Co. . . 
Hasse & Pratt . . . 
H.F.Miller. . . . 
Stephen Smith & Co 
Chickering & Sons 
Mace & Reyes . . 
Bagnall & Loud . . 
Boston Car Spring Co 
Wassineus & Whittle 
A. Folsom & Sons . 

Dwinell & Co 

Standard Vinegar Works 
J. M. Cook, estate . . . 
Hallett & Davis .... 

W. Wolf & Co 

S. D. & H. W. Smith . 
James W. Vose & Co. . 
Daniels, Harrison & Co. 
William Underwood & Co 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Factory 



Gallons. 



545,029,710 

3,380,172 
500,459 
593,444 

1,380,509 
196,491 
192,781 

1,609,234 
488,369 
239,100 
397,446 
711,082 
704,767 
53,181 

1,221,029 
165,367 
450,404 
230,849 
210,209 
290,204 
836,535 
248,267 
394,026 
479,609 
37,094 
628,717 
321,561 
862,252 
746,257 
80,730 

1,320,554 
305,024 



Revenue. 



564,305,433 $169,286 27 



94 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 


Class. 


a 

00 

in 


1 inch. 

2 inch. 

3 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


GrAIiLONS. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 













564,305,433 


$169,286 27 


Cummings & Carlisle . . . 


Factory 




■ • 


1 . . 


. . 1 


746,279 


223 86 


Leigh Manufacturing Co. . 


" 






1 . . 


. . 1 


988,499 


296 53 


Walworth Manufact'ing Co. 


" 




1 




. . 1 


280,544 


84 15 


Newton, Morton & Co. . . 


tt 




1 




. . 1 


136,634 


40 96 




" 




2 




. . 2 


321,157 


96 32 


Seth "W. Fowle & Son . . 


" 




1 




. . 1 


47,000 


14 09 




" 




1 




. . 1 


21,975 


6 59 




tt 




1 




. . 1 


397,294 


119 18 




it 




1 




. . 1 


458,413 


137 49 


"W. P. Emerson Piano Co. . 


" 




1 




. . 1 


584,616 


175 37 


Hallett & Cuniston .... 


" 




1 




. . 1 


378,778 


113 61 




(i 






1 . . 


. . 1 


778,972 


233 67 




u 




1 




. . 1 


19,620 


5 88 


S. D. & H. W. Smith . . . 


" 




• ■ 


1 . . 


. . 1 


876,711 


262 99 




" 




1 




. . 1 


527,302 


158 17 


Am. Moulded Collar Co. . 


" 




1 




. . 1 


529,056 


158 70 




" 






1 . . 


. . 1 


25,267 


7 57 




II 




1 




. . 1 


421,656 


126 49 


Christopher Blake .... 


" 




1 


.... 


. . 1 


705,809 


211 72 




II 




1 




. . 1 


330,989 


99 27 




tt 




2 


1 • . 


• • 3 


270,825 


81 23 




" 




1 




. . 1 


140,811 


42 23 




" 




1 


.... 


. . 1 


44,692 


13 40 




" 




1 




. . 1 


376,590 


112 96 




Machinist. 




1 




. . 1 


950,819 


285 23 




" 




1 




. . 1 


128,572 


38 55 




" 




2 




. . 2 


578,563 


173 55 




c« 




2 


1 . . 


. . 3 


437,939 


131 36 




<< 




1 




. . 1 


692,565 


207 75 


Holmes & Blanchard . . . 


it 






1 . . 


. . 1 


89,160 


26 74 


George F. Blake & Co. . . 


" 






1 . . 


. . 1 


1,501,345 


450 38 


Amount carried forward . 






578,093,885 


$173,422 26 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



95 



Name, 



Amount brought forioard 

E. H. Ashcroft 
L. M. Ham . • 
Eyelet Tool Co 
Shorey&Co. . 
L. A, Bigelow 
"William Evans 
Smith & Lovett 
Am. Tool and Machine Co 
J. Souther & Co. . 
Boston Machine Co 
Hersey Brothers . 
Hinkley Locomotive Works 
U. S. Manufacturing Co. . 

H. S. Robinson 

Atlantic Works ..... 
Geo. T. McLaughlin . . 
South Boston Iron Co. . 

Boston Iron Co 

Holmes & Blanchard . . 

Dyer & Gurney 

"William Blake & Co. . . 
Whiting Foundry Co. . . 
Tremont Foundry Co. . . 
Fulton Iron Foundry Co. 
Chelmsford Iron FoundryG 

John Lally 

Downer's Kerosene Oil Co 

F. H. Jenny 

"Wilkinson, Carter 85 Co 
Farrar, Pierce & Canterbury 
Kidder, Vaughan & Co. 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Machinist 



Foundry 



Boiler Maker 
Oil Works 



Gallons. 



578,093,885 

597.636 

562,852 

78,959 

673,095 

729,757 

966,389 

324,411 

848,722 

281,782 

1,393,904 

399,906 

3,21S,452 

1,569,382 

173,549 

1,976,100 

627,059 

2,248,589 

687,854 

438,659 

211,970 

1,339,180 

358,496 

88,584 

228,824 

130,694 

278,414 

5,687,039 

1,328,376 

424,934 

1,423,836 

144,764 



Revenue. 



$173,422 26 
179 26 
168 85 

23 67 
201 92 
218 91 
289 89 

97 30 
254 59 

84 52 
418 16 
119 95 
965 51 
470 79 

52 05 
592 82 
188 10 
674 56 
206 35 
131 57 

63 57 
401 73 
107 53 

26 56 

68 63 
39 20 

83 50 
1,706 09 
398 49 
127 46 
427 14 
43 40 



607,536,053 $182,254 33 



96 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Co., 



Bowker, Torrey 
Bowker st. . . 



Bowker, Torrey & Co., 
Foundry st 

Torreys & Co 

C. E. Hall & Co 

W. C Taylor & Co. ... 

A. Wentwortk & Co. . . . 
Richard Power & Son . . . 

Jeremiah Carew 

E. F. Meaney 

Geo. F. Chapin & Co. . . 

C. D. Brooks 

Blake, Gage & Co 

W. K. Lewis & Bros. . . • 

B. M. Clark 

E. T. Cowdry & Co 

Francis Baker 

Fohes, Hay ward & Co. . . 

Chase & Co 

Charles Copeland 

Messenger Bros 

Mrs. G. F. Harrington . . 

Marston & Cunio 

Edward B. Pierce .... 

J. Brown & Co 

I. F. Kendall 

Kendall & Dearborn . . . 
Geo. Fera 

D. T. Copeland 

F. E. Weber 

R. B. Brigham 



Class. 



Marble Works 



Stone Yard . . 
a 

Vinegar Works 
Pickle Factory 



Saltworks . . 
Confectionery . 



Restaurant 



Amount carried forward 644,021,851 $193,199 43 



Gallons. 



607,536,053 

3,538,131 

2,296,746 

5,413,312 

3,504,084 

829,972 

3,566,962 

1,201,402 

773,759 

1,876,804 

149,136 

385,896 

189,389 

223,957 

205,117 

530,655 

255,427 

481,791 

1,307,834 

2,259,576 

448,859 

498,494 

459,562 

1,000,596 

304,042 

458,354 

470,504 

678,434 

1.070,571 

400,746 

1,705,6S6 



Revenue. 



$182,254 33 

1,061 42 

689 00 

1,623 96 

1,051 21 

248 96 

1,070 08 

360 40 

232 10 

563 02 

44 72 

115 75 

56 80 

67 18 

61 51 

159 17 

76 61 

144 51 

392 33 

677 85 

134 63 

149 53 

137 85 

300 16 

91 19 

137 48 

141 12 

203 51 

321 15 

120 21 

511 69 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



97 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
W. S. Mathews .... 

Pearson & Tibbetts . , 
Brock & Coy ...... 

W. C. Cahoon & Son . 
Durgin, Park & Co. . . 
Morrill & Ontbank . . 
Smith & Under-wood . 

J. M. Learned 

Wm. Englehardtj . . . 
Tibbetts 8s Russell . . 

J. D. Oilman 

R. R. & J. S. Higgins . 
Atwood & Bacon . . . 

B. S. Wright 85 Co. . . 
Felton & Stone .... 
Jonas H. French . . . 

C. H. Graves ..... 
J.A.Whipple .... 
James Edmands & Co. . 
E. L. Perkins 

A. Hale & Co 

Suffolk Wood Preserving Co 
W. H. Swift 85 Co. . . 
W. L. Bradley .... 

B. Randall 

Committee on Bathing . 

C. W. Blodgett .... 
W.A.Holland .... 



Boston Dye Wood 8s Chem 
ical Co 



Hodges, Coolidge 8c Co. 



Amount carried forward 

7 



Class. 



Restaurant 



Saloon . . 



Distillery 



Distillery 
Photographer 
Fire Brick 
Card Factory 
Rubber Works 



Fertilizers 



Baths 



Chemicals 



Gallons. 



644,021,851 
468,636 
94,987 
701,002 
447,171 
471,299 
641,257 
935,140 
564,014 
456,911 
336,000 
498,839 
749,511 
261,816 
972,862 
853,972 
1,687,963 
294,906 
136,095 
295,064 
586,641 
619,102 
255,096 
459,944 
2,448,607 
568,349 
960,150 
943,573 
705,636 

10,555,987 
2,037,607 



Revenue. 



$193,199 43 

140 58 
28 49 

210 28 
134 13 

141 37 
192 36 
280 53 
169 20 
137 05 
100 78 
149 64 
224 83 

78 52 
291 84 
256 17 
506 38 

88 45 

40 82. 

88 50 
175 97 
185 71 

76 52 
137 97 
734 57 
170 49 
288 04 
283 05 
211 68 

3,166 77 
611 26 



675,C29,988 $202,501 



98 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

M. Crocker & Co 

G. W. & F. Appleton . . . 

Preston & Merrill 

George Gill & Co 

P. S. Merritt 

Guild, "White & Co 

R. "W. Ames & Son .... 

Boston Forge Co 

Boston Lead Co 

National Bridge Co 

American Steam Safe Co. . 

Suffolk Glass Co 

"Washington Pipe Works . 
East Boston Pottery . . . . 
Curtis, Knowles & Co. . . . 
Simpson's Dry Dock Co. . 
Cunard Steamship Co. . . 

Munson & Co 

Union Freight Railway Co. 

J. B.Croshy 

Farrar, Follett & Co. ... 
Metropolitan Railroad Co. . 
So. Boston Railroad Co. . . 
Highland Railroad Co. . . 

Draper 85 Hall 

Martin Hayes 

Draper Bros 

"Wilbur & Locke 

J. Austin Rogers 

Norfolk House Stable . . . 
Northend & Foster .... 



Class. 



Chemicals 



Extracts 
Tannery 



Bacon Works 



) Supply Loco- 
i motives . . 



Carving . . 
Wire Works 
Stable . . . 



Amount carried forward [ • 1 . . 714,966,459 $214,481 75 



Gallons. 



675,029,988 

2,434,312 

154,117 

. 852,750 

317,054 

511,754 

525,794 

223,199 

1,728,141 

2,248,386 

679,901 

417,741 

890,729 

857,323 

280,309 

109,186 

586,026 

9,148,932 

1,686,172 

481,500 

348,817 

1,558,506 

6,165,172 

2,526,831 

1,492,390 

1,765,146 

555,546 

66,391 

295,603 

299,512 

250,214 

479,017 



02,501 38 
730 28 
. 46 20 
255 SO 

95 09 
153 50 
"157 73 

66 93 
518 42 
674 50 
203 95 
125 31 
267 20 
257 17 

84 09 

32 73 

175 79 

2,744 66 

505 84 

144 44 
104 63 
467 53 
1,849 54 
758 04 
447 71 
529 52 
166 65 
19 90 

88 66 

89 83 
75 04 

143 69 



Keport of the Water Board. 



99 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Jennings & Noyes 

Robert H. Douglass . . . . 

T. H. Seavey 

C. & J. F. Baker 

W. P. Pierce 

J. Pratt 

L. E. Hartshorne 

J. P. Barnard, 108 Chestnut 
street 

J. P. Barnard, cor. Brimmer 
and Chestnut streets . . . 

J. P. Barnard, Joy street . 

A. Garcelon 

C. S. Godfrey 

G-. W. Sherburne 



J. E. Maynard, 834 Shaw- 
mut avenue 



A. Goss . , 

Adams Express Co. . , 
John Eaton, jr. . . . , 

F. S. Merritt . . . • , 
L. W. Porter & Co. . 
"Warner & Richardson , 
Geo. M. King .... 
Milo Whitney .... 
Daniel Wood .... 
T. D. Sullivan . . . , 

Ham & Co 

E. E. Russell . . . . 
Blanchard & Snow . 

G. D. Pattee . . . ' . 
James Jellison . . . 
John Miller 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Gallons. 



714,966,459 
380,593 
257,031 
218,782 
195,093 
100,710 
142,124 
59,451 

405,036 

912,727 
1,013,736 
228,472 
194,369 
145,304 

113,782 
244,259 
403,183 
197,511 

61,132 
366,584 
878,527 
585,704 
202,093 
361,476 
166,0S6 
185,893 
234,914 
123,510 
328,437 
257,399 

73,326 



Revenue. 



$214,481 75 
114 17 
77 09 
65 61 
58 49 
30 19 

42 62 

17 82 

121 49 

273 80 

304 10 

68 52 

58 29 

43 57 

34 12 

73 26 

120 94 

59 23 

18 32 
109 96 
263 55 

-175 69 

60 61 
108 41 

49 81 
55 75 
70 46 
37 04 
98 51 
77 20 
21 98 



724,003,703 $217,192 35 



100 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

J. N. Harwood 

H. C. Nims, Mason Ct. 
J. A. Riedell & Co. . . . 
E. W. Murray, Berkeley st 
E. W. Murray, Stanhope st, 
A. B. Atherton & Co. 



George S. Johnson & Co. 680 
Washington st. 



George S. Johnson & Co. 774 
Washington st. 



T. Thaxter .... 
James Monroe . . 
Miller & Robinson 
L. L. Holland . . 
P. E. Murray . . 
J. E. Maynard . . 
John Rice .... 
Geo. S. Fogg & Co 
J. M. Dow .... 
New York Express Co. . 
Moses Coleman & Son . 
Boston Hotels Coach Co, 
U. S. and Canada Express 
Eastern Express Co. . . 

J. O. Barnard 

Riverside Club Stable . 
Club Stable, Chardon st. 
Beacon Club Stable 
F. A. Phelps .... 
C. W. Dean .... 
V.H. Covill .... 
Dean & Burgess . . 



Class. 



Stable 



Amount carried forward 



Gallons. 



724,003,703 
409,296 
565,305 
471,884 
151,454 
319,462 
687,817 

479,488 

131,564 
132,637 
181,920 
652,762 
184,731 
185,362 
538,653 
735,629 
982,972 
344,534 
665,380 
166,521 
1,223,159 
110,797 
370,371 

84,142 
126,794 
181,642 
192,742 
441,831 
218,654 
242,511 

87,698 



$217,192 35 

122 77 

169 57 

141 55 

45 42 

95 83 

206 32 



735,171,415 $220,542 13 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 



101 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Sumner & Dickinson . 

J. B. Cassidy & Bro. . 

L. C. Chase . 

Peck & Hall . 

T. H. Ayres . 

J. Hale . . . 

J. M. Smith . 

E. R. Webster 

Club Stable, 75 Chestnut st 

B. F. Wrightington - 

Clark & Brown . . 

H. C. Nims, 8 Lime 

JohrrSawyer .... 

Cilley & Stimson . . 
Club Stable, 44 Joy st 
Gray, Bell & Bailey 
Joel Gray ....... 

Asa Critchett .... 

Patrick Morrison . . , 
L. A. Noyes ..... 

Met. R. R. Co., Meridian st 
A. S. Eaton % . . . . 

Geo. D. Brown . . . 
J. H. Hathorne .... 

Henry K. Wing . . . 
National Tube Works 
Globe Nail Works . . 



Grover & Baker S. M. 
Albany st 



Grover & Baker S. M. 
Washington st. . . . 



Farrington & Hunnewell 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Silversmith 



Gallons. 



735,171,415 

182,076 

247,004 

174,179 

53,729 

77,834 

75,337 

47,684 

379,425 

144,666 

234,494 

301,627 

100,432 

137,406 

266,175 

180,374 

36,952 

64,478 

185,467 

70,419 

173,219 

94,258 

112,589 

152,609 

862,431 

330,546 

1,960,364 

1,539,450 

249,066 

2,400,585 
272,910 



Revenue. 



),542 13 
54 61 
74 08 
52 24 
16 11 
23 34 
22 59 
14 30 
113 81 
43 38 
70 34 
90 47 
30 10 
41 21 
79 84 

54 10 
11 08 
19 34 

55 62 
21 11 
51 94 
2S 26 
33 77 
45 77 

258 70 
99 15 
588 09 
461 83 

74 70 

720 16 
81 85 



746,279,200 $223,874 2 



102 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . 
Boston Wheat and Bread Co. 

B. M. Cunningham 

Byam, Carlton & Co 

Manley Howe 

L. Prang & Co 

Cook, Jordan & Morse . . . 

E. Brooks 

"Walworth Manufact'ing Co. 

H G. Denney 

Briggs & Robinson 



Carpenter, Woodward & 
Morton 



8. B. Stebbins 

L. W. Pickens 

C. E. Folsom 

Boston City Flour Mills 

J. J. McNu.tt 

Glendon Co 

Man son & Peterson . . 
W. W. Bennett . . . . 
Cross & Gilman . . . . 
MeQuesten & Fogg . . . 

J. F. Paul & Co 

Bugbee & Spooner . . . 
J. A. Robertson . . . . 

R. Meagher 

Chauncey, Page 8c Co. . 

S. H.L.Pierce 

A. J. Stearns & Son . . 

H. Parker & Co 

J. F. Keating 



Class. 



Laundry . . . 
Match Factory 
Chemist . . . 
Chromos . . . 
Engine . . . . 



Amount carried forward 768,973,004 



Gallons. 



746,279,200 
216,285 
757,446 
74,677 
252,651 
458,864 
345,014 
288,717 
322,46S 
150.584 
648,156 

1,406,489 

585,936 

288,427 

408,180 

3,151,754 

2,661,238 

1,518,276 

881,489 

936,689 

560,144 

392,587 

1,022,481 

781,994 

930,021 

308,459 

1,059,367 

1,137,0S9 

90,112 

638,451 

419,759 



Revenue. 



:,874 02 
64 88 

227 22 
22 38 
75 78 

137 64 

103 48 
86 59 
96 72 
45 16 

194 42 

421 93 
175 76 

86 52 
122 44 
945 51 
798 35 
455 47 
264 43 
280 99 
168 03 
117 76 
306 73 
234 58 
278 98 

92 52 
317 80 
341 11 

27 02 
191 51 
125 91 



0,681 64 



Kepoet of the Watee Boaed. 



103 



Name. 



Amount brought forward . . 

8. C.Caleff 

"Watson Ss Bisbee 

D. A. Reed 

Laming & Drisko 

Cressey & Noyes 

Smith & Jacobs 

B. D. "Whiteomb 

F. R. Jenkins 

H. C. Hopkins 

R. S. Gilmore 

Glover & Jones ...... 

Whitney Dye Wood Mill . 

David Snow, Jr. & Co. . . . 

White, Frame & Co 

Rnowles, Freeman & Co. . . 

Curtis, Knowles & Co. . . . 

Bond, Blanchard, Worthen & 
Co 



H. A. Hall 

J. H. Chadwick 

Horatio Harris 

W. P. Hutchings 

S. A. Way Estate. Not used. 
J. C. Nichols ......... 

House of Correction .... 

Suffolk County Court House. 
Suffolk County Jail .... 



Directors of Public Institu- 
tions 



South Ferry .... 
North " . . • . 
Police Station No. 1 



Amount carried, forward, 



Class. 



Mill 



Fish Store , 



Bacon Market . 

Bakery .... 
Fountain . . . 
House & Fo'nt'n 
a H 

Fountain . . . 
<■ 

"Wharfpurposes 



Gallons. 



768,973,004 

304,824 

295,199 

567,621 

904,761 

1,979,804 

811,828 

1,593,990 

355,777 

85,192 

207,119 

804,216 

1,385,946 

65,257 

102,577 

324,568 

17,370 

279,171 
216,472 
618,539 

422,872 
89,204 



203,602 

13,120,237 

5,347,242 

1,406,115 

3,464,377 

8,628,733 

6,971,175 

306,126 



Revenue. 



$230,681 64 
91 45 
88 53 
170 27 
271 40 
593 92 
243 52 
478 18 
106 72 

25 54 
62 12 

241 24 

415 78 

19 57 

30 77 

97 36 

5 21 

83 73 
64 93 
185 55 
126 85 

26 74 



61 07 

3,936 05 

1,604 15 

421 82 

1,039 30 

2,588 60 

2,091 35 

91 84 



819,852,918 $245,945 2 



104 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Police Station No. 2 . . , 

" " 3 . . , 



Cedar Grove Cemetery . . 

First Church 

Bang's Chapel 

St. Mary's Church .... 

Tremont st. M. E. Church 

South Cong'l Church . . . 

Church of the Advent . . 

First Universalist Church 

Columbus av. Univ. Church 

Shawmut Cong'l Society . 

Church of the Holy Redeemer 

Church of the Immaculate 
Conception 



Class. 



Organ 



Clarendon st. Baptist Church 
Second Church Society . . . 

St. James Church 

Brattle st. Church Society . 

•Bancroft & Boyden 

John L. Gardner 

Job F. Bailey 

George O.Hovey 



Amount carried forward . 



Elevator 



Gallons. 



819,852,918 
390,885 
402,645 
434,542 
631,965 
125,001 
522,644 
160,057 
220,245 
397,117 

41,932 
1,196,625 
151,360 
141,427 
211,964 
172,882 
121,543 
257,962 
204,740 

61,402 
179,250 
104,466 

103,759 
19,864 
24,014 
381,231 
217,956 
597,502 
62,175 
604,8S1 
30,900 



Revenue. 



828,025,854 



$245,945 20 

117 27 

120 78 

130 36 

189 58 

37 48 

156 77 

48 02 

66 08 

119 15 

12 58 

358 98 

45 40 

42 41 

63 57 

51 85 

36 45 

77 38 

61 41 

18 40 

53 77 

31 32 

31 12 

5 95 

7 20 

114 36 

65 38 

179 23 

18 64 

181 45 

9 27 



$248,396 81 



Keport of the Water Board. 



105 



Name. 


Class. 


.2 

00 


o 

a 

r-i 


o 

.s 

1 
1 


a 

S 

05 


a 


o 
a 

'•3 


H 

1 
1 

2 


"a 
o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


i 
William Claflin, 6 mos. . . .. " ... 

Goldthwait, Snow & Knight " ... 


1 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


828,025,854 '$248,396 81 

283,552 85 05 

1 
71,250, 21 36 

1 
46,334 1 13 88 

i 

67,125 20 13 
44,5791 13 35 
20,8571 6 25 


Chiekering 8s Sons, 3 mos. . 
Odd Fellows Building, 1 mo. 


a 

a 


425,2501 127 57 

38,250 11 47 

346,000 103 80 


Boston Rubber Shoe Co. . . 

Field, Thayer & Co., 9 mos. 
McConnell & Gardner, 9 mos. 
F. Shaw & Bro., 9 mos. . . . 
W. E. Putnam & Co., 9 mos. 
Henry Bond & Co., 7 mos. . 

Mrs. Goddard, 3 mos. . . . 
W. H. Mawhinney & Co., 


« ... 

•< 

(1 

CI 

U 

. . . 

K 

u 

it 
(1 
u 
u 

It 
ci 
ic 
II 
II 

II 

IC 


608,100 
484,200 
175,756 
589,300 
603,300 
500,812 
713,000 
583,100 
72,000 
454,900 
1,318,500 
713,250 
173,835 
551,851 
579,180 
291,750 
312,000 
54,750 

699,054 
418,500 


182 43 

145 26 

52 72 

176 79 

180 99 

150 24 

213 90 

174 92 

21 60 

136 47 

395 54 

213 97 

52 14 

165 55 

173 75 

87 52 

93 59 

16 42 

209 71 


R. H. White & Co., 3 mos. . 


125 55 












839,266,189 


$251,768 73 



106 



City Document. — No. 



Name. 


Class. 


o 

.9 

CO 


o 

a 


B 


a 

to 

3 




Q 

a 

H 

1 
1 
1 

1 

'1 


"3 
o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Talbot, Wilmarth & Co., 6 


Elevator . . . 

Factory . . . 
Marine w'rmen 


1 




1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
3 


839,266,189 

177,000 
39,750 


$251,768 73 
53 09 


John Shepard, 3 mos. • . . 
S. R. Spalding, vacant . . . 
F. Upton & Co., 6 mos. . . . 
Perry, Wendall, Fay & Co., 


11 92 


258,000 
121,500 


77 40 
36 45 


Barker Bros. & Gardner, 




Paul Knowles & Others . . 


2,000,996 
at 8 cts. per 
100 gallons. 


1,600 73 


Total •• . . . 










841,863,435 


§253,548 32 





















Eeport of the Water Board. 



107 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city 
October 25th, 1848 : — 



Eeceived 


by Water Commissioners, as per 




Auditor's Eeport, in 1848, 


. 


$972 81 


From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850, . 


71,657 79 






* 1850, 


« 1851, . 


99,025 45 






1851, < 


1852, . 


161,052 85 






1852, 


1853, . 


179,567 39 






1853, 


1854, . 


196,352 32 






1854, 


< 1855, . 


217,007 51 






1855, 


1856, . 


266,302 77 






1856," 


1857, . 


282,651 84 






1857, 


1858, . 


289,328 83 






1858, 


1859, . 


302,409 73 






1859, 


1860, . 


314,808 97 






1860, . < 


1861, . 


334,544 86 






1861, < 


1862, . 


365,323 96 






1862, 


1863, •. 


373,922 33 






< 1863, 


« 1864, . 


394,506 25 






1864, 


1865, . 


430,710 76 






1865, 


1866, . 


450,341 48 






< 1866, 


1867, . 


486,538 25 






1867, 


1868, . 


522,130 93 






1868, 


< 1869, . 


553,744 88 






1869, 


1870, . 


597,328 55 






1870, 


1871, . 


708,783 68 






1871, 


1872, . 


774,445 70 






1872, 


1873, . 


806,102 51 






1873, 


1874, . 


859,436 55 






1874, < 


< 1875, . 


914,748 73 






1875, to Ma 


yl, 1875, . 


693,512 31 




$11,647,259 99 



108 



City Document. — No. 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1875, with the amount of water-rates 
paid for 1874: — 



29,078 Dwelling-houses 






. $4,62,137 94 


39 Boarding-houses 






1,829 50 


890 Model-houses . 






25,949 48 


13 Lodging-houses . 






449 00 


16 Hotels 






924 50 


5,817 Stores and shops 






59,960 80 


448 Buildings . 






21,054 17 


630 Offices 






5,147 05 


41 Printing offices . 






847 29 


32 Banks 






432 04 


28 Halls 






500 75 


2 Museums . 






241 00 


35 Private schools . 






557 33 


17 Asylums . . j 






1,048 67 


4 Hospitals . 






230 00 


47 Greenhouses 






1,020 00 


108 Churches . 






1,580 55 


6 Markets .... 






1,099 83 


108 Cellars . 






712 00 


795 Kestaurants and saloons 






16,651 34 


12 Club-houses 






290 83 


38 Photographers . 






1,069 12 


10 Packing houses . 






412 00 


1,656 Stables .... 






13,338 17 


52 Factories .... 






1,499 62 


7 Bleacheries 






157 50 


1 Brewery .... 






125 00 


Amount carried forward, 


$619,265 48 



Keport or the "Water Board. 



109 



Amount brought forward, 

4 Beer factories 
109 Bakeries . 

1 Boat-house 
10 Freight-houses 

4 Gasometers 
7 Ship-yards 
1 Cemetery . 
3 Dry docks and engines 

53 Shops and engines 

59 Stores and engines 
17 Factories and engines 

1 Foundry and engine 

5 Printing and engines 
3 Bakeries and engines 
1 Ship yard and engine 

5 Buildings and engines 
1 Packing-house and engine 

12 Stationery engines 
90 Hoisting and pile-driving engines 
14 Armories . 

725 Hand-hose 

13 Fountains . . . 
66 Tumbler- washers 

60 Water-pressures 

6 Laundries . 
1 Commercial college . 
1 Laboratory 
1 Milk Company . 

Custom-House . » 
Post-Office 

Branch Post-Offices . 
5 Aquariums 

Amount carried forward. 



$619,265 


48 


237 


50 


1,198 


92 


49 


00 


218 


17 


59 


00 


130 


33 


10 


00 


125 


00 


* 2,482 


36 


4,382 


57 


1,026 


49 


69 


38 


708 


00 


109 


00 


35 


00 


1,150 


50 


78 


00 


1,090 


95 


1,075 


00 


257 


00 


4,260 


00 


148 


75 


990 


00 


300 


00 


146 


42 


42 


00 


50 


00 


55 


00 


150 


00 


80 


00 


61 


00 


45 


00 


$640,085 82 



110 



City Document. — No. 



Amount brought forward, 


1640,085 82 


Filling tanks 


44 34 


Filling cisterns .... 


99 34 


1 Ice company (washing ice). 


30 00 


1 Gymnasium .... 


12 50 


1 Depot ..... 


34 00 


4 Eailroad stations . 


59 50 


75 Steamboats .... 


13,076 94 


Office (City Scales) . 


11 00 


Lockup (Ward 16) . 


6 00 


Municipal Court (Ward 16) 


14 00 


Probate building 


75 00 


House of Reception . 


10 00 


40 Fire-engines, hose and hook and laddei 




houses ..... 


890 00 


2,918 Fire hydrants ... 


52,524 00 


98 Reservoirs . ... 


1,764 00 


Insurance Brigade 


25 00 


Fire-boat "¥m. Flanders" . ■ 


200 00 


368 Public schools . . . 


3,214 00 


City stables .... 


226 25 


Washing-carts .... 


125 00 


Offal station .... 


225 00 


Faneuil Hall . 


40 00 


Public Library .... 


50 00 


2 Branch Libraries 


43 50 


Paving Department . 


271 50 


Common Sewer Department 


250 00 


Deer park . . . . 


10 00 


Public urinals .... 


120 00 


Street sprinkling 


500 00 


Public Garden .... 


25 00 


Drinking fountains 


920 00 


Amount earned forward. 


$714,981 69 



Keport of the Water Board. 



Ill 



Amount brought forward, 


$714,981 69 


Steamer " Henry Morrison " 


200 00 


Steamer " Samuel Little " . 


100 00 


Small-pox Hospital . 


25 00 


House of Industry (Deer Island) 


83 75 


Northampton-street District 


108 50 


Building purposes 


6,215 91 


Metered water (9 months) 


192,981 88 


Hippodrome .... 


15 00 


Mass. Charitable Mechanics' Association 25 00 


Office, Surveyor's Department . 


12 00 




$914,748 73 



112 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Statement showing the number and kind of Water Fixtures con- 
tained within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston 
to January 1, 1875, as compared with previous years. 



1873. 


1873. 


1874. 


Remarks. 


6,452 


6,768 


7,266 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


64,454 


67.0S9 


72,310 


Sinks. 


30,632 


32,690 


36,141 


"Wash-hand hasins. 


10,289 


11,580 


12,040 


Bathing'tubs. 


14,863 


16,222 


18,877 


Pan water-closets. 


14,891 


17,081 


18,765 


Hopper water-closets. 






201 


" " automatic. 


278 


248 


291 


" " pull. 


213 


223 


188 


" " self-acting. 


503 


589 


606 


" " waste. 


602 


590 


648 


" " door. 


2,755 


2,445 


2,851 


Urinals. 






459 


'• automatic. 


11,826 


12,779 


14,300 


"Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


714 


734 


680 


Shower-baths. 


445 


419 


363 


Private hydrants, 


641 


712 


754 


Stop-hoppers. 


96 


112 


134 


Foot-baths. 


159,654 


170,281 


186,874 







Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 






EEPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



OF THE 



EASTERN DIVISION. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1875. 
Thos. Gogin, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 
Sir, — I hereby respectfully submit my report for the year 
ending with April 30th. 

MAIN PIPE. 

Most of the labor for the year was in relaying streets 
within the city proper, East and South Boston, with pipes 
of enlarged sizes, according to the plans of the City Engineer. 
The lengths, in what streets, and the sizes, may be 'found in 
the tables below. The whole length is 124,400 feet, equal 
to a little more than 23^ miles. The required number of 
stop-valves and hydrants have been established at their 
proper distances and localities. Included in this estimate of 
pipes laid are the following important lines : a 24-inch 
high-service pipe from Centre street in Koxbury, through 
Heath and Parker streets and Fisher avenue, to the Parker 
Hill reservoir; a 20-inch from Heath street, through Pynchon, 
Tremont and Northampton streets, to Columbus avenue, and 
through the avenue to Berkeley street ; a 16-inch from Berke- 
ley street, through the avenue, to and into the Common, there 
connecting with the 16-inch laid last year, that supplies the 
Beacon Hill district; a 12-inch from Columbus avenue, 
through Berkeley and Dover streets, and on the Dover-street 
bridge, to the siphon at the draw*;- a continuation of the same 
through Fifth, Old Harbor and Thomas streets, for the high- 
service supply of South Boston. 



116 City Document. — No. 88. 

Preparations are being made to lay the 40-inch siphon 
pipe at Newton Lower Falls. About one half of the pipes 
have been received ; the remainder are nearly all made and 
will soon be delivered. By the 5th of the present month I 
shall commence to lay pipes in the West Roxbury and 
Brighton districts, and hope to continue without interruption 
to the close of the season. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

The whole number of services put in is . . 1,245 
Length of feet 33,699 

LEAKS AND BREAKS. 

The number of leaks this year has been greater than in any 
year previous ; many of them were owing to the extreme 
cold of the last winter. Three breaks in the large mains 
have occurred. The first was on September the 8th, in the 
40-inch line on Brookliue avenue. This was the largest 
break since the introduction of the Cochituate water ; the 
cause of it was the resting of the pipe on the stone capping 
of a culvert, and the weight of the earth of the street, that 
had just then been filled to a depth of five feet, caused the 
pipe to separate through its entire length, and making a full 
opening of the 40-inch pipe. The break was repaired and 
the water let on the day following. It was fortunate this 
occurred at this locality, as the water flowed into the wide 
creek that runs parallel with the street, and no damage was 
done to the buildings or property surrounding, nor harm 
other than the washing away a portion of the street, and a 
temporary short supply of water in the city. 

On November the 2d the 20-inch pipe on Tremont street 
near Chickering's factory broke. This is the new high-service 
line, and was shut off just below, forming a dead end. At 
the time of the break there was an exhibition of the working 



Report of the "Water Board. 117 

of the two pumps, at the same time, at the pumping works, 
in presence of your Board. 

The extra pressure, with the line being shut off, was proba- 
bly the cause of the break ; possibly by damage to the pipe 
in its transportation, as it was one of a lot that came by rail- 
road. 

The third break occurred on the night of the 23d of Jan- 
uary, on the Dover-street bridge, near Albany street, in one 
of the old 20-inch pipes. Both of the above were repaired 
at once. 

There was also a break in the north 36-inch gate onTremont 
street, at Dover street. This gate was one of the first pattern 
introduced, and, as has been proved by the breaking of a 
number of the same kind, defective in its design. It was 
replaced by one of the latest improved pattern. 

STOP-VALVES OR GATES. 

The order of the Board to discontinue what was known as 
the "chamber" on Tremont street, opposite Chester square, 
was attended to early this spring. Two 36-inch and two 
30-inch gates of the old pattern were taken out, and one 
36-inch of the newest pattern put in. Suitable brick boxes 
or chambers were made round them, and the old large cham- 
ber filled up, and paved over. 

A new 48-inch gate was this spring put into the line on the 
Goddard estate, near the foot of Bradley's hill. A 36-inch 
and a 30-inch established in Tremont street, with blow-offs 
connecting, near the dividing line of Roxbury and Brookline, 
and one in the 40-inch line on Brookline avenue, opposite 
the gas-works in Brookline, will be completed before this 
report appears in print. . . , 

By the introduction of proper machinery at our works on 
Federal street, I have been able to make all of our stop-valves 
from 3 to 12 inch inclusive, and am now making the 16-iuch. 
The machinery is suitable for making as large as 24-inch, and 



118 City Document. — No. 88. 

I can make them, if you think the number wanted will justify 
the cost of the patterns. The number of stop-valves estab- 
lished this year is 358. 

HYDRANTS. 

Your Board granted the request of the Fire Commissioners 
to change the existing system of the kind and locality of hy- 
drants to establishing., when new pipes are laid, the " Lowry " 
at the intersections of streets, and the "Post " between these 
intersections. With the assistance of the City Engineer, I 
prepared a design, which promises to overcome all the objec- 
tions heretofore urged against them. The design was adopted 
by your Board, and an order passed to construct 50 of them. 
The patterns are made, and two hydrants made and set. I 
have tested them under the greatest pressure of water we 
have, and under the most unfavorable circumstances, and am 
pleased with the result. I shall be able to make them all at 
our works, and at much less expense than they can be fur- 
nished by outside parties. The number of hydrants estab- 
lished this year is 433. 

RESERVOIRS. 

The Parker Hill reservoir was so far completed as to allow 
the water to be let in November 2d, which was done in pres- 
ence of your Board. I have kept it full this winter. It is 
perfectly tight. The slope banks are nearly graded, and 
sowed with grass seed, and the driveway will soon be com- 
pleted. The whole was enclosed with a fence. The East 
Boston, South Boston and Beacon Hill reservoirs are in as 
good condition as when I last reported. 

By request of the inhabitants the Cochituate water was 
turned on to East Boston in place of the Mystic ; but the 
pipes on the Charlestown side, between the connection of the 
Mystic pipes and Warren bridge, were found to be frozen. 
This line, since the introduction of the Mystic water, with 



Keport of the Water Board. 119 

three or four exceptions, has been shut off, and the water drawn 
out of the pipes under the bridge in the winter season, to 
prevent its being frozen. 

Not only has the water been drawn out, but that in the 
siphon under the draw has been pumped out to below low- 
water mark. 

It was found, on examination, that where it was frozen, the 
pipes were deflected so as to retain the water for about 200 
feet. Two of the pipes were burst, and, as all were old ones 
and might be weakened by the ice, I thought it advisable to 
take them out, and replace them with new ones. The new 
pipes were laid properly, and a blow-off gate put in at the 
lowest point, which will prevent a damage of like nature in 
the future. The water was turned on again April 21st, and 
has continued without intermission since. 

FROST. 

The extreme and continuous cold of last winter made seri- 
ous trouble with the main and service pipes throughout the 
entire city. In the whole of my service on water-works, 
commencing in 1840, I have never known anything like this 
season. Coming, as the cold did in the early part of the win- 
ter, with no snow to protect the ground, and continuing till 
the spring opened, with scarcely an intermission, it pene- 
trated to a depth unknown to any one I know or have con- 
versed with. The coldest winter I have known was 
that of 1871-72. In my report for that year, it will be seen 
that the number of services frozen was 338. In my ac- 
count for this year, you will find 1,090. This does not in- 
clude all. Permission was given the plumbers to thaw as 
many as they might ; how many they thawed is unknown to 
me. The original depth which pipes were laid was 4 feet. 
In 1865 I altered this grade to 41- feet, and in 1872 to 5 
feet. To this depth, I continue to lay them. I estimate the 
average depth of frost this season to be about 4 feet 3 inches, 



120 City Document. -*- No. 88. 

though it was found in some places 5 and 6 feet, and even 
more. I cannot say how correct this estimate is, for I only 
measured it by the depth of the pipes that were frozen . The 
frost was oftentimes below the pipes. How much, I cannot 
say. 

The following are the lengths and sizes of main-pipes 
frozen, all dead ends. 



20 inch on Charlestown bridge, 


200 feet. 


12 " 


1,269 " 


8 " 


400 « 


6 " 


8,565 « 


4 « 


2,681 « 



Total length, 13,115 " 



Report of the Water Board. 121 



Of the relaying of mains of enlarged sizes with Lowry 

Hydrants connected throughout the City proper, South 
and East Boston, the following table shows the changes in 
the sizes : — 

Size No. of Size 

now. feet, formerly. 

Tremont st. — between Mason and Boylston, 16 and 12 inch. 366 6 inch. 

Hanover st,— Court to Union 12 " 923 6 " 

Albany st. — from Harvard to Curve 12 " 790 6 " 

" " at Chester Park 12 " 66 6 " 

" " from Dover to Way 12 " 1,177 6 " 

Merrimac street 12 " 900 6 " 

Cornhill 12 " 550 6 " 

East Chester Park 12 " 678 -6 " 

Beacon st. — Somerset to Joy 12 " 1,050 6 " 

Beach st. —Federal st. to Harrison ave 12 " 1,411 6 " 

Commercial st. — Eastern ave. to Prince 12 " 3,075 6 " 

Lehigh st.. 12 " 993 6 " 

South st. — Lehigh to Beach 12 " 1,350 6 " 

Curve st. — Albany to Hudson 12 " 200 4 " 

Temple Place.. 12 " 524 4 " 

Sudbury st. — Court to Portland 8 " 700 6 " 

Portland st. — Hanover to Chardon 8 " 975 6 " 

Salem st. — Hanover to Charter 8 " 1,900 6 " 

Charter st. — Foster and Henchman 8 " 200 6 " 

Long Wharf 8 " 737 6 " 

North st. — Commercial and Fleet 8 " 728 6 " 

Blossom 8 " 915 6 " 

Allen 8 " 775 6 " 

Richmond 8 " 988 6 " 

Pemberton sq 8 " 600 6 " 

Somerset st. — Pemberton sq. to Beacon 8 " 182 6 " 

Lincoln st. — Kneeland and Harvard 8 " 280 6 " 

Cove " " " Furnace 8 " 350 6 " 

Henchman 8 " 275 4 " 

Furnace 8 " 275 4 " 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Dorchester ave. — Woodward to Boston 12 inch. 2,896 8 inch. 

Dorchester ave. — Boston to Woodward 12 " 400 6 " 

Granite 12 " 1,650 6 " 



No. 
of feet. 


Size 
formerly 


1,562 


6 inch. 


2,700 


6 " 


4,547 


6 " 



1,200 


6 inch 


975 


6 " 


800 


6 " 


466 


6 " 


194 


4 " 



122 City Document. — No. 88. 



Size 
now. 

First st. —I and M 12 inch. 

Seventh st. — B and Dorchester 12 " 

Eighth st. — Dorchester and L 12 " 



EAST BOSTON. 

Maverick st. — Chelsea to Cottage 12 inch. 

Maverick st. — Lamson to Jeffries 12 " 

Lamson st. — Maverick and "Webster 8 " 

Clyde st 8 " 

Marion st. — Bremen and Chelsea 6 " 



RAISED. 

Newton st., between James and Harrison ave 12 inch. 258 feet. 

Harrison ave., between Newton and Dedham 12 " 900 " 



LOWERED. 

Second St., between O and P. 6 inch. 280 feet. 

Everett st., between Cottage and Lamson 6 " 800 " 



TAKEN UP AND ABANDONED. 
8 inch iron pipe 2,S96 feet. 



6 
4 
2 
1 
lh 

u 



" " 36,862 

" " 2,538 

lead 34 

« 102 

iron 2, 145 

« 192 

lead. - 79 

pipe extended . . , 225 



Report of the Water Board. 



123 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1874. 

BOSTON. 



In ■what Street. 



Columbus av. 
Northampton and Trem- 
ont 



Columbus av. . . . 

Tremont 

Hanover 

Curve 

Albany 

Dover 

East Chester Park 

Merrimac 

Cornhill 

Columbus av. . . 
Atlantic av. . . . 
u it 

Temple pi. ... 

Beacon 

Beach 

Commercial ... 

Lehigh 

South 



Between what Streets. 



Berkeley and Hammond Park , 
Total 20-inch - 



Berkeley, and 16-inch pipe on Boston Common 
Total 16-inch 



Mason and Boylston 

Union and Court 

Hudson and Albany 

Harvard and Curve 

North and south line of East Chester Park 

Dover and Way 

Albany and Draw of Bridge 

Albany and Harrison ave 

Chardon and Causeway 

Devonshire and Court 

Pleasant and Ferdinand 

Long Wharf and South Market st. ... 
Lewis Wharf and Commercial Wharf . . 

Washington and Tremont 

Somerset and Joy 

Federal and Harrison av 

Eastern av. and Prince 

Albany and South 

Lehigh and Beach 



5 S 



Total 12-inch 



5,730 



5,730 

2,741 

2,711 

366 

923 

' 200 

790 

66 

1,177 

460 

678 

900 

550 

928 

84 

375 

524 

1,050 

1,411 

3,075 

993 

1,350 

15,900 



124 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In wnAT Street. 



Tremont 

East Chester Park . . . 

Herrimac 

"Worcester sq 

Rutland 

Albany 

Salem 

Henchman 

North 

Wellington 

Claremont Park 

Concord sq 

Blossom 

Allen 

Richmond 

Lenox 

South 

Sudbury 

Washington 

Portland 

Salem 

Charter 

Henchman ' 

Long Wharf 

North 

Commercial Wharf . . . 

Bloesom 

Allen 



Between what Streets. 



Boylston and School 

Albany and Harrison av. . . 
Chardon and Causeway . . . 
Harrison av. and Washington 
Shawmut av. and Tremont . 

Dover and Troy 

Endicott and Charter .... 
Charter and Commercial . . . 
Fleet and Commercial .... 
Columbus av. and Pro v. R. R. 



Cambridge and Allen .... 
Blossom and Charles .... 
Commercial and Hanover . . 
Shawmut av. and Washington 
Lehigh and Beach 



Total 9-inch , 



Court and Portland 

Cornhill and Hanover 

Hanover and Merrimac 

Endicott and Charter 

Foster and Henchman 

Charter and Commercial 

Atlantic ave. and end of wharf . . . . 

Commercial and Fleet 

Atlantic ave. and North cor. of wharf . 

Cambridge and Allen 

Blossom and Charles 



Amount carried forward 



AS. 
£P4 



Kfpoet of the Watee Boaed. 



125 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Richmond . . . 
a 

Pemberton sq. . 
Somerset . . . 
Mercantile . . 
Lincoln .... 
Boylston . . . 
u 

Cove 

Furnace .... 

Waltham . . . 
Westfield . . . 

Pearl 

Newland . . . 
Coburn place . 

Heed 

Appleton . . . 
Boylston . . . 
Marlboro . . . 
Hereford . . . 
Yarmouth . . . 

Liverpool wharf 
Newbury place 
Boylston . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward .... 
Commercial and Hanover . . . 
Commercial and Mercantile . . 
Tremont and Somerset .... 
Pemberton sq. and Beacon . . 
Clinton and Richmond .... 
Kneeland and Harvard .... 
Park sq. and Tremont .... 
Public Library and Head place 
Kneeland and Furnace . . . . , 
Federal and Cove , 



Total, S-inch 



Harrison ave. and Union Park st. . . 
Tremont and Providence R. R. . . , 

Milk and Water 

Dedhani and Upton 

From Reed st '. . . 

Northampton st. and Coburn place . 

Berkeley and Tremont 

Public Library and Head place . . . 

Gloucester and Hereford 

Beacon and Marlboro 

Columbus ave. and Providence R. R. 



Total 6-inch 



Atlantic ave. and end of wharf , 

From Carver st 

Public Library and Head place 

Total 4-inch 



II- 

5^ 



8,413 
825 
163 
600 
182 
416 
280 
518 
268 
350 
275 

12,290 

15a 

17C 
314 
246 
142 
187 
250 
91 
76 
47 
72 

1,750 

404 
84 



126 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 
SOUTH BOSTON. 



In what Street. 



Dorchester avenue 



Granite 

H 

L 

N" 

First 

Fourth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Eighth 

Second 

Fifth 

Seventh 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Dorchester avenue . . . . 

Dorr 

First 

House of Correction and 

Tudor r 

Springer court 



Between what Streets. 



Boston and Dorr 

Dorr and B 

Sixth and Seventh . 

Mt. Washington avenue and Second 

Second and Emerson 

Eighth and First 

Seventh and Eighth 

I and M 

Foundry and draw of Bridge .... 

B and Dorchester 

Dorchester and L 

N and M 



Total 12-inch 



O and P 

K and L 

Hand I 

G and H 

Dorchester and L 
Dorr and B . . . . 



Total 9-inch 



Dorchester avenue and Earl 
C and D 



Total 8-inch 



Insane Hospital yards 
D and E 

Seventh and Eighth . 



Amount carried forward 






Keport of the Water Board. 127 

Statement of Location, Size, etc-. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between that Streets. 


a 
2d 

MM 

<4-, a 
c .rt 

a'l 


5 

cm 
O 








2,165 






6 


253 






238 




H and I 


472 




C and D 


270 
60 






181 






175 


Athens street Bridge . • • 




33 

90 






1,390 




H and I 


321 


Fifth 




662 




N" and 


394 




T> and C 


87 






6,791 
119 






4 




Dorchester avenue and 0. C. and N. R. R. . . 


48 








167 











128 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 
EAST BOSTON. 



In what Street. 



Maverick 

Paris ...... 

Byron 

Wads-worth 

Bremen 

Maverick 

Lamson 

Clyde 

Grand Junction wharf . 

Bremen 

«< 

Marion 

Paris 

Grand Junction wharf . 



Between what Streets. 



Lamson and Chelsea 
Lamson and Jeffries 



Total, 12-inch 



Brooks and Putnam . . 
Saratoga and Bennington 
Saratoga and Bennington . 
Brooks and Marion . . . , 
Lamson and Chelsea . . . 



Total, 9-inch 



Maverick and Wehster . . . 
Marginal and Cunard wharf 
Clyde and Marginal .... 



Total, 8-inch 



Bennington and Prescott , 
Brooks and Marion . . . 
Bremen and Chelsea . . 
Brooks and Putnam . . 
Clyde and Marginal . . 



Total, 6-inch 






2,090 
985 

3,075 

10 
12 
12 
12 

44 

90 

800 

466 

1,624 

2,890 

360 
413 
194 
, 457 
966 

2,390 



Report of the Water Board. 



129 



Statement of Location, Size, Etc. — Continued. 
BOSTON" HIGHLANDS. 



In what Street. 



Parker Hill Reservoir , 



Parker Hill Reservoir , 



Centre 

New Heath 

Parker 

Fisher ave 

Parker Hill Reservoir 

Pynchon 

Tremont 

/ 

Centre 

Parker Hill Reservoir 

Tremont 

Brookline ave. . . . 

Magazine 

Norfolk ave 

Centre 

Tremont 

"Washington 



Between what Streets. 



Fisher ave. and Reservoir 
Total, 36-inch . . . . 



In Reservoir 



Total, 30-inch 



Cedar and New Heath . . 
Centre and Parker .... 
New Heath and Fisher ave. 
Parker and New Heath . . 
Fisher ave. and Reservoir 



Total, 24-inch 



New Heath and Tremont . . 
Pynchon and Hammond park , 



Total, 20-inch . 

Linwood and Cedar 

Total, 16-inch . 



Fisher ave. and Reservoir . . . 

Burke and Benton 

Burlington ave. and Beacon . . 

Howard and Dudley 

Magazine, N. Y. and N. E. R. R. 
Parker and Sheridan ave. . . . 
Wigglesworth and Hillside ave. 
Pynchon and Gardner 



Amount carried forward 



a, 



30 



24 



12 



185 

185 

109 

109 

632 
919 
274 
1,759 
225 

3,S09 

1,987 
3,814 

5,801 

27 

27 

308 



977 

613 

1,480 

536 

42 

4.824 



130 City Document. — No. 88. 

Statement of Location, Size, Etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Day 

Heath 

Lamartine 

Westminster ave. . . 

Dearborn pi 

Halleck 

Centre 

Halleck 

"Westminster ave. . . 

Terrace 

Beech Glen ave. . . . 

New Heath 

Parker Hill Reservoir 
Dearborn pi. .... 

Fisher ave 

Perry court 

Short 

Central ave 

Tremont 

Woodville sq. . ... . 

Eustis 

Wyman 

Sheridan ave 



Between what Streets. 



Amount brought forward . 

Heath and Creighton , 

Tremont and Fisher ave 

Centre and West Roxbury line , 



Total, 12-inch 



Shawmut ave. and Walnut ave. 

From Dearborn 

Ruggles and Ward 

Houghton pi. and Bowe . . . 



Total, 9-inch 



Ruggles and Prentiss , 
Total, 8-inch . , 



Shawmut ave. and Walnut ave. 

From New Heath 

Fort ave. and Highland .... 
Pynchon and Terrace .... 

In Reservoir 

From Dearborn 

Parker and New Heath . . . 

From Hampden 

Brookline ave. and Maple ave. 

From Blue Hill ave 

Culvert and Pynchon 

Dennis and Blue Hill ave. . . 
Hampden and Magazine . . . 

From Centre 

Centre and Curtis 



Amount carried forward 



Bo, 
P 2 " 



12 



4,824 

729 

1,373 

1^00 

8,026 

10 

7 
20 
14 

51 

1,042 

1,042 

380 
193 
647 

23 
6 
189 
1,848 
206 
317 
450 

40 
412 
164 

28 
965 

6.868 



Report of the Water Board. 131 

Statement of Location, Size, Etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



New st. . . . 
Thornton . . 
Hartopp pi. . 
Chadwiok . . 
Gaston . . . 
Clay 

Milford pi. . 
Wilmont . . 
Duncan . . , 
Billings pi. . 

Tolman pi. , 
Blanchard pi 
Lewis park , 
Quincy . . , 



Between what Streets. 



Amount brought forward 
Longwood ave. and Francis . 

Vale and Ellis 

Dearborn and Chadwick . . . 
Yeoman and Hartopp pi. . . . 
Warren and Blue Hill ave. . . 
Hampshire and Elmwood . . 

From Tremont 

Bainbridge and Elmore . . . 

From Ruggles 

From Parker 



Total, 6-inch 



From Warren 

Bartlett and Norfolk . . . . 
Highland and Highland ave. 
Blue Hill ave. and Warren . 

Total, 4-inch 






133 

109 

29 

82 

117 

67 

342 

308 

210 

337 

7,602 

51 

55 
127 
38 

271 



132 



City Document. — No. 88. 



Statement of Location, Size, Etc. — Continued. 
DORCHESTER. 



In what Street. 



Pleasant . . . 
Stoughton . . . 
Commercial . . 
Dorchester ave, 

Dorchester ave, 
Hamilton ave. . 
Milton ave. . . 

Norfolk . . . . 
Euclid . . . . 
Withington . . 
Wentworth . . 
Chipman . . . 
Learned . . . . 
Thetford . . . 
Dorchester ave, 
Fuller 

Washington pi. 
Water . . . . 
Fulton . . . , 
Franklin . . . 
Swan court . , 
Harbor View , 



Between what Streets. 



Stoughton and Commercial . 
Boston and Pleasant .... 
Pleasant and Dorchester ave. 
Commercial and East .... 



Total, 24-inch 



Codman and Washington , 
Bowdoin and Mt. Everett , 
Evans and Fuller 



Total, 12-inch 



Washington and Nelson . . 
Washington and Withington 

Euclid and Norfolk 

Torrey and Norfolk 

Torrey and Norfolk 

Torrey and Norfolk 

Evans and Norfolk 

Washington and Codman . . 
Milton ave. and Capen . . . 



Total, 9-inch 



From Minot 

Fuller and High 

Franklin and Water . . . 
Fulton and Walnut . . . 

From Richmond 

Sidney and Spring Garden 



Amount carried forward 



12 



1,886 
1,545 

866 
188 

4,485 

2,669 

1,541 

803 

5,013 

56 
9 
9 
10 
11 
11 
39 
39 
10 



357 
19 
127 
560 
174 
121 

1,358 



Keport or the Water Board. 133 

Statement of Location, Size, Etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Sidney 

Shelberne ...'.-'. 
New 

Taylor ave 

Plain 

Norfolk 

Euclid. 

"Withington . . . . 
Wentworth . . . . 
Cliipman . . . . . 

Learned 

Alexander ave. . . 
Howard ave. . . . 
Boston Building Co 
Buttonwood . . . . 

Garden 

Thetford ave. . . . 

Newport 

Midland 

Frederica 

Evans 

Mt. Everett . . . . 

"Winter 

Fuller 

Selden 

Church 

New Seaver '. . . . 
Pleasant 

Humphrey pi. . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Amount brought forward . 
Harbor View and Crescent ave. 

From Buttonwood 

From Taylor 

From Dudley 

Oak and Pierce avenues .... 
"Washington and Nelson .... 
Washington and Withington . . 

Norfolk and Torrey 

Norfolk and Torrey ...... 

Norfolk and Torrey 

Norfolk and Torrey 

Dudley and Lebanon , 

Sargent and Howard , 

From Harvard 

Garden and Locust 

Dorchester ave. and Buttonwood , 

Norfolk and Evans 

From Savin Hill ave , 

From Savin Hill ave , 

From Adams , 

Thetford ave. and Milton ave. . . 

Quincy and Hamilton ave 

Hancock and Church , 

Milton ave. and Capen 

Milton ave. and Capen 

Winter and High 

Merrill and Erie ave 

Commercial and Savin Hill ave. 

Total, 6-inch 



From Humphrey . 
Total, 4-inch 



a — i 

ft" 



1,358 

252 

267 

158 

81 

6 

4,249 

45S 

364 

309 

492 

473 

175 

636 

812 

143 

262 

1,389 

398 

398 

237 

277 

503 

129 

270 

346 

341 

50 

78 

14,891 

87 
87 



134 



City Document. — No. 88. 



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136 



City Document. — No. 






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Eepoet of the Water Board. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1874. 



137 



"Where. 


Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


40 


36 
4 

4 


30 

15 

15 


24 
2 

1 

3 


20 

19 
2 

11 
2 

34 


16 
7 

1 

8 


12 

31 
9 
1 
3 

58 


10 
1 

1 


8 
2 
1 

3 


6 

67 

17 
18 
12 
43 

157 


4 

85 
14 
17 
20 
8 

144 


3 

11 

11 


2 

8 
3 

11 


116 
116 


Ik 
12 

12 


1 

20 
6 

2 
3 

31 


1 

5 
4 
2 
1 
1 

13 


6 
H 

863 
371 
326 
231 

65 

1856 


s 

40 
19 

12 
2 
3 

76 


Totals. 




1,307 

442 
392 
276 
137 


Boston Highlands . . . 


1 
1 


Totals 


2,554 





Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 
4-inch and upwards, joints, 183; settling of 
earth, 25 ; defective pipe, 18 ; defective packing, 
1 ; defective gate, 1 ; struck by pick, 4 ; cap blown 
off, 7 ; burst by frost, 90 ; blasting, 2. 

Total, 331 

Stoppages, by frost, 102; fish, 1. . . . . 103 

Of 3-inch and on service pipes, joints, 17 ; settling 
of earth, 170 ; setting of wall, 2 ; settling of boxing, 
3 ; defective pipes, 59 ; defective packing, 16 ; de- 
fective faucet, 11 ; defective coupling, 14 ; stiff 
connections, 115 ; faucet punched out, 5 ; faucet 
loose at main, 3 ; faucet blown out, 1 ; gnawed by 
rats, 18 ; blasting, 1 ; struck by pick, 53 ; parties 
digging drains, 7 ; pipes not in use, 13 ; frost, 43 ; 
burnt off by parties trying to thaw, 3. 

Total, 554 

Stoppages, by fish, 183; rust, 84; gasket, 7; 
dirt, 4. 

Frost from inside of house, 198 ; frost outside, 1,090. 

Total, 1,566 



Total, 2,554 



138 



City Document. — No. 



Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1874. 





Diameter of. 




Tear. 


Four Inches and 
upwards. 


Less than Four 
Inches. 


Totals. 


1850 


32 
64 
82 
85 
74 
75 
75 
85 
77 
82 
134 
109 
117 
97 
95 
111 
139 
122 
82 
82 
157 
185 
188 
153 
434 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
769 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 


323 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363 


1858 


401 




531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 


1863 


494 


1864 


489 


1865 


607 




675 


1867 


609 


1868 


531 


1869 


489 


1870 


926 


1871 


1,565 
1,647 

1,229 


1872 


1873 


1874 


2,554 





Report or the Water Board. 



139 



HYDRANTS. 



During the year 433 hydrants have been established, and 
194 abandoned, as follows : — 



Established. 
Lowry. Boston. Post. 




Abandoned. 
Lowry. Boston 




In Boston proper 163-f- 6= 


169 


2+ 114=116 53 


South Boston 100+ 7= 


107 


1+ 57= 58 49 


East Boston 38+ 2= 


40 


— 13= 13 27 


Boston Highlands 47+ 3 +1= 


= 51 


2+ 4= 6 45 


Dorchester 59+7= 


QQ 


— 1= 1 65 


Totals 407+25 +1= 


=433 


5+ 189=194 239 


Total Number of Hydrants 


up tc 


May 1, 1875. 


Boston Proper . 




1,256 


South Boston 












465 


East Boston 












272 


Boston Highlands 












693 


Dorchester 












518 


Brookline . 












9 


Charlestown 












11 


Chelsea 












8 


Deer Island 












14 



3,246 
63 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 181 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual atten- 
tion paid them. 

STOPCOCKS. 

358 new stopcocks have been established this year. 72 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. All 
the stopcocks have had the attention of former years paid 
them. 



140 



City Document. — No. 



Statement of Pipes and other stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
May 1st, 1875. 





Diameter in Inches. 




48 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


18 


16 


12 


10 


9 


8 


6 


4 


3 


2 




11 

1 

7 
3 


56 

2 
8 
1 
9 
2 
2 
3 

1 

1 

1 
2 
1 

1 


13 
3 

1 
2 
1 
11 
4 
3 
3 

3 
2 

2 

2 


75 

1 
2 
6 
2 
1 
14 

29 
10 

1 

10 

1 

2 
2 


32 
2 
1 

10 
9 
3 

30 
2 
1 
5 

5 
2 

8 
3 

1 


10 
1 

1 

7 

5 

7 

7 

14 
3 

9 
18 

2 




874 
4 
1 

19 
4 
2 

11 
5 
5 
1 

16 
10 

7 

10 
3 

3 


399 
15 

66 
89 

2 
78 

2 
23 
99 

72 
75 

53 

28 

87 
12 

30 

54 


48 

6 

16 

9 
10 


51 


4,980 
20 

30 
114 

57 

21 
20 

78 
68 

50 
20 

89 
16 

14 

52 


628 

3 

15 
17 

24 
16 
42 
34 
9 
44 
27 
13 
42 
39 

14 
16 

30 
5 


149 

1 

21 
1 

46 

8 

39 

17 

1 

27 

16 
4 

30 

9 

12 
19 
21 


4 

28 
8 

2 

8 
6 




Blow-off Branches . . 

T Pipes 

4 "Way Branches . . . 
3 Way Branches . . . 

Clamp Sleeves .... 




1 


] 


7 

L4 

9 


3 

48 

200 






Double Hubs 

One-eighth Turns . . . 
Pieces of Pipes .... 
Blow-offs and Manholes 


5 

2 
1 


Manhole Branches . . 





Hydrants. — 102 Lowiy, 21 Lowry extension, 7 Lowry 
chucks, 15 Lowry frames and covers, 39 Lowry barrels, 15 
Lowry caps, 12 round covers, 24 Wiltnarth, 4 Lowell old. 

For Hydrants. — 8 bends, 40 lengtheners, 38 covers, 121 
wastes, 2 wharf hydrant cocks, 16 nuts, 11 valve seats, 45 rub- 
ber valves, 124 screws, 18 heavy frames, 12 heavy covers, 38 
frames, 22 old covers, 315 pounds composition, 40 pairs straps. 



Eepoet or the "Water Boaed. 141 

For Stopcocks. — 2 36-inch screws, 1 30-iuch do., 2 24- 
inch do., 1 16-inch do., 3 12-inch do., 4 8-inch do., 36 6- 
inch do., 36 4-inch do., 1 4-inch do., for waste weir, 1 ditto 
for Brookline reservoir, 34 3-inch do., 1 16-inch check valve, 
12 12-inch valves, 1 8-inch do., 34 6-inch do., 27 4-inch do., 
31 3-inch do., 12 8-inch rings, 67 6-inch do., 85 4-inch do., 
20 3-inch do., 2 stuffing boxes for 8-inch stopcocks, 22 do., 
for 6-inch, 40 do. for 4-inch, 6,200 pounds iron casting for 
16-inch, 12 inch, 6-inch and 4-inch stopcocks, 5 16-inch un- 
finished, 6Q rings for stuffing-boxes, 610 pounds malleable 
nuts, 75 pounds |— inch bolts, 200 pounds f-inch washers, 860 
pounds f-inch bolts, 80 pound lead washers. 

Meters in Shop. — 3 3-inch, 3 2-inch, 6 1-inch, 35 |-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 9 2-inch nipples, 12 1-inch do., 201- 
inch do., 5 2-inch connection pieces, 4 1-inch do., 12 |-inch 
do., 24 1-inch cocks, 45 |-iuch do., 1 4-inch clock, 1 3-inch 
do., 8 1-inch do., 30 |-inch do., 30 brass spindles, 325 rub- 
ber nipples, 7 fish boxes, 21 covers, 11 frames, 13 glasses. 

For Service Pipe. — 157 1-inch union cocks, 113 |-inch 
do., 155 f-inch do.,511 unfinished do., 16 1-inch air cocks, 
38 4-inch T cocks, 9 1-inch do., 38 |-inch do., 8 f-inch do., 
12 f-inch Y do., 38 f-inch thawing do., 12 li-inch tubes, 
70 1-inch do., 185 f-inch do., 12 2-inch couplings, 35 1-inch 
do., 1,700 f-inch do., 200 l-inch do., 120 f-inch thawing 
tubes, 1,000 boxes, 50 T do., 34 Y do., 149 extension tubes, 
316 tubes, 1,000 caps, 470 pounds unfinished composition 
castings, 7 4x2 iron reducers, 18 composition hose reducers, 
2 l X 2-inch. 

Lead Fijpe. — 3,201 pounds 2-inch lead pipe, 2,475 lbs. 
li-inch do., 1,240 lbs. l^-inch do., 397 lbs. 1-inch do., 
2,275 lbs. l-inch do., 425 lbs. 1-inch tin-lined do., 504 lbs. 
|-inch do., 50 lbs. f block tin do., 255 pounds block tin 
do. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 1,050 pounds round iron, 975 lbs. 
flat iron, 450 lbs. square do., 150 lbs. working pieces, 1,980 



142 City Document. — No. 88. 

cast steel, 4 dozen pick blanks, 311 lbs. spring steel, 5,200 
lbs. Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. — 117 Lowry hydrant boxes, 232 
stopcock boxes, 71 do. unfinished, 54 hydrant boxes, 23 do. 
unfinished, 6 meter boxes, 1,200 lbs. spikes and nails, 
9,000 feet 2-inch spruce plank, 19,500 l|-inch spruce bat- 
ting, 37 1-foot pieces for raising hydrant boxes, 50 1-foot do. 
for stopcock boxes, 13 do. for Lowry hydrant boxes. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 7 hand-geared derricks, 5 sets shears and rigging 
for same, 7 tool-houses, 3 tool-boxes, 2 platform scales, 1 
portable blacksmith shop, 1 portable cover for Brewer 
fountain, 1 hand roller, 1 horse do., tools for laying main 
and service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot do., 1 hand do., 1 
Pratt and Whitney taper do., 1 planer, 1 boring mill,.l chain- 
hoisting gear, 1 upright drilling machine, 4 grindstones, 1 
trip hammer, the necessary tools for carrying on the machine, 
blacksmith, carpenter and plumbing shop, 1 circular saw, 1 
fan-blower, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch do., 1 
small do., 7 wheelbarrows, 1,650 feet hose, also a lot of 
patterns where Ave obtain castings. 

/Stable. — 14 horses, 12 wagons, 2 buggies, 6 pungs, 1 sled, 
2 carts, 20 sets harness, 13 blankets, 2 buffalo robes, 2 sleighs, 
40 bales hay, 180 bushels grain, 3 tons straw, 1 jigger. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder 
16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 
9 cast-iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 
patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for 
small fountains. 

Miscellaneous. — 8 tons pig lead, 81 gallons linseed oil, -2 
barrels kerosene oil, 45 tons furnace coal, 180 tons gravel, 
500 brick, lot of paving stones, 11 reservoir covers, 9 cords 
wood, 6 plates, 1 iron fountain-basin, 4 stone troughs for 
drinking-fountains, 3 drinking-fountains, 1 hose carriage, 16 
bales gasket. 

E. R. JONES, 
Superintendent of Eastern Division. 



CIYIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1875. 



Water Commissioners. 



Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Cuktis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbkough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbkough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to Octo- 
ber 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, to 
July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 
1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to Novem- 
ber 25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April!, 1863, to De- 
cember 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. From 
February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, to 
present time. ' 



144 



City Document, — No. 



After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whit- 
well, and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, subject 
to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City Council, by 
an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in 
force one year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was estab- 
lished. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 

7, 1856 * * Five years.' 

John H. Wilklns, elected in 1856, and resigned June 

5, 1860 * * Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 

3, 1865 Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 

15, 1867 One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike elected in 1867, term expired April 

6, 1868 One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and re- 
signed January 4, 1871 . . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 1871, to 
May 4, 1873 Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874 One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, to present time. 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 55 * * . 

John H. Wilklns, 1851, 52, 53, * 56, 57, 58 and 59 * * 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, * 54 and 55 . 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 

James W. Seaver, 1851 * * . 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851 * * . 

John T. Heard, 1851 . . ' . 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54 and * *55 



Five years. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Four years. 

One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 



Report of the Water Board. 



145 



Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 * * . 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 * * . 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56 and 57 * * 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 * * . 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58 . 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 

Joseph Smith, 1856 .... 

Ebenezkr Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61 * * 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 * * . 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 

Clement Willis, 1860 * * . 

G. E. Pierce, 1860 * * . 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 * * 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Prat, 1862 . 

J. C.J.Brown, 1862 . 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 

Otis Norcross, * 1865 and 66 

John H. Thorndike, 1S64, 65, 66 and 67 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 

William S. Hills, 1867 

Charles R. Train, 1868 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 . 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68 and 69 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870 

John O. Poor, 1870 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 . 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 

70 and 71 ..... 
George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70 and 71 
Sidney Squires, 1871 . 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71 and 72 
Alexander Wads worth,* 1864, 65, 66, 67, 
Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73 and 74 . 
Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 . 
Jno. A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73 and 74 . 
10 



63 and 64 



67, 68, 69 



,69 and 72 



Two years. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Six years. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

Four years. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Two months. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Five years. 

One year 

Six years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Four years. 

Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Two years. 

Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

Nine years. 

Four years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Four years. 

Seven years. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Five years. 



Present Board. 



146 City Document. — No. 88 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74 and 75 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74 and 75 . . ... 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74 and 75 . 

Wm. G. Thacher, 1873, 74 and 75 

Amos L. Notes, 1871, 72 and 75 ... . 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 
74 and 75 ....... 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 



* Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. 
Mr. Wilkins was re-elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, 
which office he held until his resignation, June 5, f 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer 
Johnson was elected President, and July 2, Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Nor- 
cross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected Mayor of the city. Ben- 
jamin James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 1868. Alexander 
Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. 

* * Deceased. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 1875. 



Thomas Gogin, President. 
Charles J. Prescott, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Wm. G. Teacher,^ 

> Of the Common Council. 
Amos L. Notes, ) 

AT LARGE. 
For Two Years. For One Year. 

Leonard R. Cutter, L. Miles Standish, 

Thomas Gogin, Edward A. White. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 



Kepoet of the "Watee Boaed. 



147 



Superintendent of the Western Division. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Water Registrar. 
, William F. Davis. 

City Engineer. 
J jseph P. Davis. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 



Eastern Division. 

Edward A. White, Chairman. 

Wm. G. Thacher, L. Miles Standish. 

Western Division. 

Leonard R. Cutter, Chairman. 

Charles J. Prescott, Amos L. Notes. 

Water Registrar's Department. 

L. Miles Standish, Chairman. 

Wm. G. Thacher, Amos L. Notes. 

On New Supply. 

Thomas Gogin, Chairman. 

Leonard R. Cutter, L. Miles Standish. 



Bh r. l. Bi 



SHELF No. 



[Sept., 1882, 20,000.] 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



One volume allowed at a time, and obtained only by 
card ; to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction 
and juvenile books, published within one year,) without fine; 
not to be renewed; to be reclaimed by messenger after 21 
days, who will collect 20 cents, besides fine of 2 cents a day, 
including Sundays and holidays; not to be lent out of the 
borrower's household, and not to be transferred; to be 
returned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
defaced, are expected to report it; and also any undue de- 
lay in the delivery of books. 

***No claim can be established because of the failure of 
any notice, to or from the Library, through the mail. 



Tie record Mow must not be lade or altered by borrower. 

























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