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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



APRIL 30, 1874. 



BOSTON: 

ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS, 
122 Washington Street. 



18 7,4. 




£ 3 5-f.y 
CITY Or BOSTON. 



City Document No. 80. 



REPORT OF THE COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1876. 

Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

May 20, 1876. 
To the City Council of the City of Boston: — 

The Cochituate Water Board, in compliance with the- 
provisions of the City Ordinance, respectfully submits, its. 
animal report for the year ending April 30, 1876, together' 
with the reports of the Clerk of the Board, the City Engi- 
neer, the Water Registrar and the Superintendents, of the 
Eastern and Western Divisions of the Water Works. To. 
these reports the Board would refer the City Council for the 
detailed statements of the condition and progress, of the- 
works during the year. 

The Board has the pleasure of reporting that the general! 
condition of the works is entirely satisfactory. 

In the previous report of the Board it was mentioned 
that an additional 40-inch siphon pipe was to. be laid across. 
Charles river at Newton Lower Falls. This pipe has been 
successfully laid, and proves to be of great service, not 
only giving great relief to the conduit above, but also 
permitting the height of the water to be kept up in the 
Chestnut Hill and Brookline reservoirs. While this pipe 
was being laid'an opportunity was afforded to examine the 
conduit, the water being drawn out July 27th to make the 
siphon connections, and it was found to be apparently in no> 
worse condition than when examined in 1874. The Boardf 
hopes that, with care, it may perforin its work until the new 
conduit is completed, when it should be thoroughly re-- 
paired. 

The supply of water during the past year has been ample- 
to meet all the requirements for which it was introduced, 
the average height above the bottom of the conduit having 
been 10 T y ¥ feet. 

In March, 1875, upon application of the residents, the- 



2 City Document No. 80. 

Mystic water was shut off" from East Boston, and the 
Cochituate water was turned on to supply that section of 
the city. It was thus supplied until December 2d, at which 
time the weather being extremely cold, and, in consequence, 
the consumption and waste of water in the city proper very 
great, the head in East Boston was so reduced that parties 
living on the high lands of that district were unable to get 
water except at certain hours of the day ; for these reasons 
the Mystic water was again let on, and has remained on up 
to the present time, making about five months' supply by 
the Mystic, and about seven months' by the Cochituate, for 
East Boston during the year. Application has since been 
made to have the Cochituate water let on, provided the 
head would be sufficient for fire purposes in the high sec- 
tions ; but the change has not been made. 

The total receipts from all sources for the year ending 
April 30, 1876, are as follows, viz. : — 

Erom sales of water $1,036,187 98 

Erom turning off and on water and fees . 15,093 25 

Sundry receipts by Water Board . . 75,678 96 
Instalment on land, received by Collector 

and paid to Treasurer .' . . . 386 00 



The total amount charged to Water 
Works for die year ending April 30, 1876, 
is as follows, viz. ; — 

To current expenses . . $269,576 65 
To interest and premium on 

water debt . . . 833,364 81 
Amount paid the Mystic Water 

Board for water furnished 

East Boston . . . 31,246 75 



,127,346 19 



1,134,188 21 



Showing an excess of expenditures over in- 
come of ..... $6,842 02 

The total amount charged to construction 

during the year ending April 30, 1876, is $1,326,230 90 

The actual cost of the Water Works to May 
1, 1876, as shown by table prepared by 
the clerk, with the approval of the 
Auditor, is $11,994,579 78 



Re poet of the Watee Boaed. 3 

The interest charged by the Treasurer to Water Works 
interest account is largely increased for the past year over 
the actual amount paid during the year, by the discovery of 
the fact that the remittances of interest to London on the 
City Water Loan for two previous years were charged by 
the late Treasurer to the general interest account, instead 
of to the Water Works account. 

The amount thus paid was $164,104.72, which has been 
transferred to its proper account, and is included in the 
$833,364.81 charged to interest and premium for the year 
ending April 30, 1876. 

Had it not been for this mistake in a previous year the 
works would have shown an excess of income over expendi- 
tures of $157,262.70 for 1875. 

Easteen Division. 

This division is under charge of Mr. E. R. Jones, and 
embraces all that portion of the works lying east of the 
Brookline and Chestnut-Hill reservoirs, and also the iron 
pipes of the Western Division. During the past year some 
34£ miles of pipe have been laid, the largest part of which 
was in the West Roxbury and Brighton districts. This is a 
much larger amount than has been laid in any one year since 
the introduction of the water. 

The length and size of pipe laid were as follows : — 

1 ,435 feet of 40-inch ; 16,164 feet of 16-inch ; 74,714 feet 
of 12-inch ; 670 feet of 9-inch ; 40,670 feet of 8-inch ; 43,987 
feet of 6-inch and 3,455 feet of 4-inch; and 314 stopcocks 
have been put in during the same time. 

The total length of pipe laid from the commencement of 
the works up to May 1, 1-876, is 320 miles .311 feet; the 
total number of stopcocks is 3,439, and the total number of 
hydrants 3,653. 

The number of service-pipes laid during the year is 1,237, 
making a total to May 1, 1616, of 41,325. 

A detailed statement of the pipes laid and other particu- 
lars accompany the report of the Superintendent. 

Distributing Reseevoies. 

The three low-service reservoirs, the East Boston, the 
South Boston and Be;icon Hill, are in good condition; they 
are kept partially filled with water in case of an emergency, 
but usually are not in -ervice. 

The high-service reservoir on Parker Hill is in excellent 



4 City Document No. 80. 

condition, and has been in constant service during the year. 
Since the last report the land account has been settled for 
the sum of $86,928.91, making the total cost of the reservoir 
when completed, $228,246.17. 

Western Division. 

This division comprises the lake and all that portion of the 
works lying between the lake and the gate-house of the 
Brookline reservoir, and is under the charge of Mr. Desmond 
FitzGerald. All the works belonging to this division are in 
as good condition as usual. 

With the help of the temporary connection with Sudbury 
river, the lake has been kept well filled during the whole 
year, 2,171,000,000 gallons having been run into it from 
Sudbury river, from time to time. 

A new cast-iron weir has been put in at the lower dam to 
measure the waste at the lake, a full description of which 
will be found in the report of the Superintendent. 

The lands owned by the city about Dug pond have been 
sold to the town of Natick for the sum of $3,644.13, which 
was the amount the land cost the city originally. 

Keceiving Eeservoirs. 

Chestnut-Hill reservoir and its surroundings are in a very 
satisfactory condition. 

In October, 1875, the water in this reservoir was shut off 
on account of the bad taste, and remained shut off until 
April 1st, 1876, when it was again turned on for distribution, 
having gradually purified itself. 

The Brookline reservoir is in good condition, except that 
it needs cleaning out ; but it is unsafe to attempt it at pres- 
ent, or until another 48-inch main is laid from the Chestnut- 
Hill reservoir around the Brookline, connecting with the 
main pipes leading to the city. 

Water Eegistrar's Department. 

This department is under the charge of Mr. William F. 
Davis, who has held the position of Water Registrar since 
the year 1855, at which time the total number of water-takers 
was 19,998, and the receipts $266,302.77. 

The present number of water-takers is 46,885; being an 
increase of 26,887 in 20 years, and 2,209 over the previous 
year. 



\ 






Refort of the Water Board. 5 

The total amount of water-rates received for the past year 
was $1,036,187.98. 

The total number of cases where the water was turned off 
for non-payment of dues during the year ending January 1st, 
1876, is 1,888 ; of this number, 1,435 have been turned on, 
leaving a balance of 453 still remaining off. 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 1,120 ; of this number, 731 are f-inch, 329 
1-inch, 44 2-inch, 14 3-inch, and 2 4-inch. 

Additional Supply. 

During the past year much progress has been made towards 
obtaining an additional supply of water from Sudbury river. 
The conduit from Farm pond, in South;. Framingham, to 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, about 15^ miles long, was divided 
into twenty sections, each forming the basis of a contract, 
and early in May, 1875, the Board commenced to advertise 
for proposals to build the various sections, with the exception 
of Section No. 1, which was reserved to build by days' labor. 
Section No. 20, which includes the Beacon-street tunnel, and 
which was placed under contract in August, 1873, was com- 
pleted last December, the amount paid the contractors, 
Messrs. Lobdell & Phelps, being $336,630.70. Sections 2 
to 19, inclusive, were placed under contract at intervals 
from June 12th to December 30th, 1875. The proposals 
were all publicly opened and read at the office of the Board, 
and in all cases the contracts were awarded to the lowest 
responsible bidders. 

A table showing the time at which the contracts were 
executed, the names of the contractors, the range of bids, 
etc., will be found in the report of the Engineer. 

The papers prepared for the seizure of lands on the line of 
the conduit were signed June 26th, and the Engineer was 
authorized to set the stakes, and give the contractors for the 
sections then ready, the necessary information to proceed at 
once with the work. 

The work upon the whole line of the conduit has pro- 
gressed very favorably, thirty-one per cent, of the work on 
all the sections Under contract being done on the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1876, and the contractors are now fairly under way 
for another season's work. The time allowed for the com- 
pletion of the contracts expires August 1st, 1877, and from 
present prospects there is no reason to doubt but that they 
will all be finished within the required time. By an order 
of the City Council approved October 30th, 1875, the Board 
was authorized to build Section No. 1, and the foundations 



6 City Document No. 80. 

of the dams for Basins Nos. 1, 2 and 3, by days' labor, and 
on November 11th the Engineer was. authorized to proceed 
with the work under the direction of the Committee on New 
Supply. Section No. 1 crosses the Boston and Albany Rail- 
road at South Framingham. The piles for supporting the 
tracks over the trench for the conduit have been driven, and 
considerable progress has been made in constructing ■ the 
coffer dam for the gate-house, and the portion of the conduit 
which extends into Farm pond. 

Active preparations are also being made to commence 
work on the foundations of the dams for Basins 1, 2 and 3, 
at an early day. 

A contract was made October 21st, with John Brown, of 
Mohawk, New York, for building a road in Framingham, 
made necessary by the proposed flowing of a portion of the 
old county road, known as the "Worcester Turnpike, lead- 
ing from Framingham to Southboro'. This road is in a fair 
way to be completed within the time specified in the con- 
tract (July 1st, 1876). 

In constructing the above road it became necessary to 
place a bridge across Stony Brook in Framingham. The 
building of the abutments was included in the contract for 
the road, and a contract was made February 3d, 1876, with 
Thomas Leighton, of Rochester, New York, for building 
and erecting the iron-work of the superstructure for the sum . 
of $1,150. This bridge is now nearly completed. 

On December 30, 1875, the Board adopted plans for the 
seizure of lands for Basins Nos. 1 and 3, and signed, the 
necessary papers for the seizure. 

Owing to the construction of a portion of the conduit in 
the town of Ncedham, it became necessary to change the 
location of Wellesley avenue in that town. This change 
was made by the city, and a settlement effected with the 
town for the sum of $900 damages, and the release of a 
small strip of land between the old and new locations. 

The Committee on New Supply have devoted much time 
during the past year to the consideration of damages on the 
line of the new works. Long and protracted meetings have 
been held for the purpose of hearing claimants and adjusting 
claims, and many visits have necessarily been made to view 
the premises of the land-owners to ascertain the actual 
amount of damage done. In all cases of settlement the 
committee has endeavored to obtain the fee of the land. In 
many cases the demands made appeared so exorbitant to 
the committee that no settlement could be effected. Not- 
withstanding the difficulties which the committee has had to 



Report of the Water Board. 7 

contend with, quite a number of important claims have been 
adjusted. 

On December 30, 1875, a settlement was made with the 
Wameset Power Co., of Lowell, for damages in full by the 
taking of the water of Sudbury river, for the sum of $55,000. 
This amount also includes the retainer for the personal legal 
services of General Benj. F. Butler for any and all suits 
which may be brought against the city on account of the 
taking of the water of the Sudbury river. 

A 'number of other claims for water damages have also 
been made, but the above is the only case that has been set- 
tled up to this date. 

On January 13, 1876, the Board, on recommendation of 
General Butler, engaged the services of Linus M. Child, as 
junior counsel in the defence and care of all suits against 
the city, relating to the taking of the water of Sudbury 
river under the Act of the Legislature. 

.On March 22d, 1876, "An Ordinance to establish the 
Boston Water Board" was passed by the City Council. 
This action was in accordance with the views and recommen- 
dations of the Board, which has felt for some time that the 
varied and widely extending interests connected with the 
WaterWorks demanded more time and a closer supervision 
in their administration. The adoption of this Ordinance by 
the City Council practically abolishes the Cochituate Water 
Board, and this will probably be the last of the annual 
reports of that organization . 

The first meeting of the Cochituate Water Board was held 
January 2d, 1851, and it is a matter of just pride to the 
present Board, in turning over the Works to its successors, 
to be able to feel in reviewing the twenty-five years that the 
care of the Water Works has been entrusted to its keeping, 
that the city's interests have been guarded, the growing 
demands of the people promptly met, and the works of main- 
tenance and enlargement executed in a manner to reflect 
honor upon the city. 

L. MILES STANDISH, President, 
LEONARD R. CUTTER, 
EDWARD A. WHITE, 
CHAS. E. POWERS, 
S. B. STEBBINS, 
N. M. MORRISON, 
AUGUSTUS PARKER. 



City Document No. 80. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 

Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 

Boston, May 1, 1876. 

L. Miles Standish, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 
Sir, — The following is a statement of the expenditures 
and receipts of this department for the year commencing 
May 1, 1875, and ending April 30, 1876 : — 



Expenditures. 

Damage 

Advertising 

Stable . 

Taxes . 

Tools . 

Fountains 

Postage and express 

Aqueduct repairs 

Printing for all departments 

Stationery for all departments 

Eastern-avenue wharf (rent and salary of 

agent) 
Telegraph, repairing instruments and wires 
Salaries 

Shutting off and letting on water for repairs 
Inspectors . 

Upper yard (Albany street) 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Lake Cochituate . 
Maintaining meters > 
Meters 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes (repairs) . 
Blacksmith shop 
Service pipe 
Proving yard 
Hi<jh service 



$264 50 

22 75 

5,764 42 

545 94 

5,563 84 

1,154 69 

25 00- 

4,404 05 

1,412 14 

716 39 

2,999 98 

484 99 

24,284 00 

12,797 20 

7,612 98 

8,261 40 

4,008 77 

6,701 46 

1,502 75 

3,871 19 

1,515 85 

138 41 

13,919 72 

1,909 65 

6,730 38 



Carried forward . 



.16,612 45 



Report of the Water Board. 



Brought forward 


. 








$116,612 45 


Chestnut-Hill reservoir 


. 








8,835 19 


Beacon " " 


. 








477 11 


Parker " " 


, . 








8,610 95 


East Boston " 


, 








1,366 23 


South " " 


, . 








360 25 


Brookline ' ' 


. 








1,949 20 


Repairing main pipe 


, . 








16,620 84 


' ' hydrants 


. 








10,489 67 


' \ stopcocks 


. 








970 11 


" service pipe 


• . 








18,762 27 


* ' streets ' . 


. 








13,916 61 


Wages laying service pipe 








10,485 15 


" blacksmith shop 








3,573 10 


' ' proving yard 








11,003 47 


" high service 


. 








4,508 54 


Laying service pipe 


. 








7,894 34 


Relaying main pipe 


• . 








33,141 17 


Main pipe 


. 








56,863 92 


Laying main pipe 


. 








61,914 59 


Hydrants 


. 








10,173 18 


Stopcocks . 


. 








6,642 44 


Hydrant and stopcock boxes . 








3,002 74 


Charles-river siphon 








26,532 35 


Parker-Hill reservoir (constructioi 









89,449 16 


Chestnut-Hill driveway 








7,233 14 


Waterworks, Wards 17 and 19 








288,039 03 


Additional supply 








783,613 49 


Total amount drawn for by Water Board 


$1,603,040 69 


And which is charged as follows : — 






To Water Works . . . $408,173 


5$ 


\ 


" Charles-river siphon . . 2(5,532 


35 




". Parker-Hill reservoir . . 89,449 


K 




" Chestnut-Hill driveway . 7„233 


U 




" Water Works, Wards 17 






and 19 .... 288,039 


02 




" additional supply 


. 783,613 


4S 




$1,603,040 


6£ 




Amount charged to Wa 


;er Works 






. 


$1,595,807 55 



10 



City Document No. 80. 



Details of Expenditures on Additional Supply for the year 
ending April 30, 1876. 



Temporary connection with Lake Cochituate 
Maintaining " " " " . 

Engineering 
Engineering expenses 
Engineers' instruments and repairs 
Land damages 
Water damages 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Storage basins 
Office expenses . 
Advertising 
Printing 
Stationery . 
Travelling expenses 
Sudbury-river Conduit, Section No. 1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
Beacon-street tunnel, ". "20 

Contract No. 21, roadway in Framingham 
Additional work on conduit . 



$878 75 

3,847 13 

51,862 49 

3,566 83 

2,633 04 

45,506 34 

55,525 00 

5,391 87 

2,56L 56 

3,082 25 

3,064 50 

2,167 04 

1,336 34 

2,429 52 

3,037 19 

6,388 00 

37,810 51 

38,055 35 

19,263 72 

34,525 38 

44,520 27 

35,790 24 

26,129 60 

2,257 60 

16,907 27 

66,635 16 

17,092 91 

22,721 32 

3,402 12 

24,499 98 

30,161 36 

7,956 98 

13,461 64 

139,354 41 

7,999 26 

1,790 56 

$783,613 49 



Report of the Water Board. 11 



Details of Expenditures in the West Roxbury and Brighton 
Districts, for the year ending April 30, 1876. 

Main pipe .... . $155,069 24 
Laying main pipe ... . 100,746 71 

Hydrants . . . . 21,220 54 

Stopcocks .... - 9,089 64 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes . 1,912 90 

$288,039 03 



The total amount expended for construc- 
tion for the year ending April 30, 1876, is as 
follows, viz. : — 



WaterWorks . 

West Roxbury and Br 

Districts 
Additional supply 
Parker-Hill reservoir 
Charles-river siphon 



ffhton 



$138,596 87 

288,039 03 

783,613 49. 

89,449 16 

26,532 35 



1,326,230 90 



The total amount expended for maintaining 
the Chestnut-Hill driveway, in care of the 
Water Board but not chargeable to the 
Water Works, for the year ending April 30, 
1876, is $7,233 13 

Amount charged to Water Works . . .1,595,807 55 
Receipts by Water Board. 



Fire Department, for use of hy- 




drants ..... 


$39,540 00 


Fire and elevator pipes, repairs, 




etc., ..... 


14,927 23 


Off and on water 


2,582 75 


Fines for waste 


126 00 


Sale of old material . 


13,376 48 


Rent of part of Eastern-avenue 




wharf ..... 


300 00 


Sale of grass at Chestnut Hill . 


187 50 


Carried forward 


$71,039 96$1, 595,807 55 



12 City Document No. 80. 



Brought forward 


$71,039 9611,595,807 55 


Sale of coal at Lake Cochituate 


140 00 




" " stone bounds 


7 00 




" " land about Dug pond, to 






the town of Natick 


3,644 13 




Rent of pastures at Lake Cochit- 






uate . . 


91 00 




Rent of house, No. 7 Waverley 






place, from Feb. 1, 1875, to 






Feb. 1, 1876 


731 87 




Rent of house in Wellesley for 






Feb. 1876 .... 


25 00 


75,678 96 




iter Works $ 


Net amount charged to Wi 


1,520,128 59 



Amount charged to "Water Works, not' in- 
cluding additional supply, " Water Works, 
Wards 17 and 19," Parker-Hill reservoir, 
Charles-river siphon, or Chestnut-Hill drive- 
way 408,173 52 

The amount expended for construction on 
Water Works is as follows, viz. : — 

Main pipe .... $56,863 92 

Laying main pipe . . . 61,914 59 

Hydrants . . . . 10,173 18 

Stopcocks . ... 6,642 44 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes . 3,002 74 

Current expenses for the year 

ending April 30, 1876 . . $269,576 65 



138,596 87 



^Expenditures and Receipts on account of the Water Works 
to May i, 1876. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . . $4,043,718 21 

Amount drawn by Water Board in 1850 . 366,163 89 
Amount drawn by Cochituate Water Board 

from Jan. 1, 1851, to May 1, 1875 . 8,990,331 28 
Amount drawn from May 1, 1875, to May 1, 

1876, for Water Works . . . ' . 1,595,807 55 



Carried forward .... $14,996,020 93 



Repoet of the- Water Board. 13 

Brought forward . $14,996,020 93 

Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by Commissioners . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by the Water 

Board, 1850 . . . 8,153 52 

Amount paid by the Cochit- 
uate Water Board to May 
1, 1875. . . . 513,762 30 

Amount paid from May 1, 

1875, to May 1, 1876 . 75,678 96 



645,243 16 



Net amount drawn from 



Treasurer . . . • $14,350,777 77 



Gross payments (including 

interest, premiums, etc. ) , 

for account of Water 

Works to May 1, 1875 . $24,402,332 12 
Gross payments from May . 

1, 1875, to May 1, 1876 2,429,172 36 



26,831,504 48 



Total earnings of the Water 

Works to May 1,1875 . $12,263,592 93 
Amount raised by taxation 

on outstanding loans from 

May 1, 1860, -to May 1, 

1871, and heretofore 

charged under the gross 

income of the Water 

Works .... 1,352,000 00 
Total earnings from May 

1, 1875, "to May 1, 

1876 . $1,127,346 19 
Less amount 

paid Mys- 
tic Water 

Board for 

water fur- 
nished E. 

Boston . 31,246 75 



1,096,099 44 



14,711,692 37 



Net cost to May 1, 1876 , . . .$12,119,812 11 



14 



City Document No. 80. 



Cost of the Works to May 1, 1876. 

Cost of Water Works to January 1, 1850, 
as per final report of Water Commis- 
sioners . . . . . $3,998,051 83 

Extension to East Boston .... 281,065 44 

Jamaica-pond Aqueduct .... 45,237 50 

New dam at Lake Cochituate ... 10,940 08 

Raising lake two feet, including damages . 28,002 18 

Dudley pond, Lower clam and making con- 
nections with lake . . .. . . 18,982 23 

New main from Brookline reservoir . . 304,991 83 

Land and water rights, since January 1, 

1850 58,331 40 

Land damages since January 1, 1850 . . 15,511 62 

New pipe yard and repair shop . . . 25,666 51 

Upper yard, buildings, etc., . . . 9,165 63 

New water-pipes East Boston .. . . 20,999 43' 

New main East Boston .... 24,878 08 

Water to Deer Island .... 75,00000 

Pumping works at Lake Cochituate . . 15,000 00 

High service, stand-pipe, engine-house and 
engines . . . . . . 

High service, South Boston 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, including land 
Parker-Hill reservoir, " " 

Charles-river siphon . . . . 

Additional supply of water, including land 

damages and all expenses 
Cost of main pipe, since January 1, 1850 



laying main pipe since January 1 

1850 . ' . 
Cost of hydrants, stopcocks and boxes, and 

setting same 
Cost of main pipe for extension in Roxbury, 

Dorchester, Brighton and West Roxbury 

Districts . . . . . . 

Cost of laying main pipe for extension in 

Roxbury, Dorchester, Brighton and West 

Roxbury Districts . 
Cost of hydrants, stopcocks and boxes, and 

setting; same in above districts 



83,829 53 

27,*60 29 

2,449,982 07 

228,246 17 

26,532 35 

1,186,254 58 
830,310 96 

454,233 70 

251,376 63 

877,197 81 

358,429 04 
344,859 74; 



Carried forward 



$12,050,936 63 



Report of the Water Board. 15 

Brought forward .... $12,050,936 63 

Cr. By sale of Jamaica-pond 

Aqueduct . . . .$32,000 00 
By sale of land to May 1, 1876 24,356 85 

56,356 85 



$11,994,579 78 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. SWAN, 
Clerk of the Cochituate Water Board. 



16 City Document No. 80. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

Office of the City Engineer, City Hall, 

Boston, May 1, 1876. 

L. Miles Standish, Esq., 

President of the Gochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the terms of the ordinance 
relating to the City Engineer's Department, the following 
report is respectfully submitted. 

Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate. 

An order of the City Council authorizing the Water 
Board to take the waters of the Sudbury river was approved 
Jan. 20, 1875. 

On the 21st of that month water from the river was 
turned into the lake (its water surface at that date standing 
below the conduit bottom, and the supply to the conduit 
being kept up by pumping) and allowed to flow till March 
18th. The connection between the two sources has been 
kept open during the year, from January 21st to March 
18th, from March 26th to April 4th, from April 6th to 14th, 
from May 3d to 10th, from June 3d to 10th, from July 14th 
to August 26th, and from October 2d to 11th, or 143 days in 
all; the total flow being 2,555,800,000 gallons, equal to a 
supply of 7,000,000 gallons per day for the whole year. It 
has been open this year (4876) from January 12th to 18th, 
and from January 21st toFeb. 19th. 

No water was wasted at the overflow of the lake during 
1875. 

On January 1st, 1875, the lake surface stood at 2 feet 
^ inch above the bottom of the conduit, and on January 
30th, it stood i)^ inches below in the northern division ; in 
the middle division, at the latter date, it stood at 1 foot 8 
inches above; and in the southern division, at 3 feet 10 
inches above. These differences of level were controlled 
by the heights and widths of the channels connecting the 
various divisions. 

From January 30th, the surface rose steadily, till it 
reached high-water mark on May 11th, previously to which 






Keport of the Water Board. 17 

date, 1,506,700,000 gallons had been turned into the lake 
from the river. 

From May 11th to September 1st the water stood at or 
near high-water mark ; June 1st, it was 12 feet 8| inches 
above the bottom of the conduit; July 1st, 12 feet 111 
inches; August 1st, 12 feet 5 inches ; September 1st, 12 
feet 21 inches. From this date it slowly fell till the 1st of 
January, when it stood at 9 feet \ inch. The water turned 
into the lake during January and February of this year, and 
the very severe storms which occurred in March, brought 
the surface to high-water mark again on March 26th ; and 
since that date there has been a large waste over the lake- 
dam. 

No water has been drawn either from Dug or Dudley 
ponds. 

Mr. Fitzgerald has set a cast-iron weir at the overfall of 
the lower dam, that the waste water may be measured more 
accurately than it has been possible to measure it hereto- 
fore. 

In the last report it was stated that upon the refusal of the 
Legislative Committee upon Water Supply and Drainage, to 
report a bill for diverting the waters of Pegan brook into 
Charles river, a bill to divert it into the Sudbury river, 
below Saxonville, was introduced and referred to the suc- 
ceeding Legislature. 

This bill was also rejected, and in its place the following 
act was passed : — 

"Chapter 228 or the Acts of 1875. 

w An Act to preserve the purity of the Water of Lake Cochit- 

uate. 

"Section 1. It shall be lawful for the Supreme Judicial 
Court, upon the application of the City of Boston, to grant 
an injunction against the discharge of any drainage or sew- 
age matter, or pollution of any kind, into Lake Cochituate, 
or Pegan brook, or any waters flowing into said lake or 
brook ; provided, that this shall not be held to destroy the 
prescriptive right of any person or persons to discharge such 
matter into said lake or brook. 

"Sect. 2. The town of Natick shall have the right to 
divert the waters of any brook, rivulet or stream now run- 
ning into Lake Cochituate, into which the sewerage or drain- 
age of Natick now empties ; provided, that nothing in this 
act shall be construed so as to give any right to said town 
to divert such brook, rivulet or stream into Charles river. 



18 City Document No. 80. 

"Sect. 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
"Approved May 19, 1875." 

Nothing has yet been done to divert the brook. 



Conduit. 

The table on page 49 will show the depths of water for 
the year at the head of the conduit. The clear height of the 
conduit is 6 feet 4 inches. It will be seen that it has been 
run under a head, or as a pipe, 338 days. 

During the past year the capacity of the conduit has been 
materially increased by the laying of a 40-inch siphon pipe 
across Charles river, at Newton Lower Falls. 

The work of laying the pipes was commenced May 10th, 
that of building the pipe chambers, June 14th, and on July 
28th the whole was so far completed that the siphon was 
put into constant service. The new chambers are located 
some 75 or 100 feet further away from the river valley than 
the old ones. To build them a section of the conduit on 
each side of the river was stripped bare of its earth cover- 
ing, and suspended by chains from strong overhead beams ; 
the masonry of the chambers was then laid to enclose these 
sections, which were afterwards cut out. The conduit was 
flowing nearly full while suspended, and although the mortar 
of the section on the east side of the river had never 
properly set, and was of little service except as a packing 
to the joints between the bricks, it was found that the leak- 
age could be easily controlled, or entirely stopped, by driv- 
ing wedges between the chains and masonry. While the 
sections were being cut out the water was shut off for one 
day, which was the only interruption to the flow during the 
time of construction. 

It is estimated that the new pipe increases the capacity 
of the conduit, when flowing under a 4-feet head, nearly 
2,000,000 gallons per clay. The advantage of this increase 
was felt last winter during the colder days, when much water 
was wasted to prevent freezing in the pipes ; the consump- 
tion at such times often being even greater than the en- 
larged capacity of the conduit could furnish. 

An examination of the interior of the conduit from the 
lake to Chestnut-Hill reservoir was made July 27th, when 
the water was drawn out to make the siphon connections. 
It was found to be in about the same condition as at the 
times of the examinations in 1874. There has been no 
opportunity to repair the leaks in the bottom through which 






Report of the Water Board. 19 

the copious springs in the vicinity of the lake find their 
way. . 

Low-service Reservoirs. 

The tables on page 44 give the monthly and yearly 
average heights above tide-marsh level of the water in the 
Chestnut-Hill and Brookline reservoirs. 

The average height in Chestnut-Hill reservoir has been, 
for the year, 122.23 feet or 1.65 feet higher than in 1874. 
Owing to a bad taste in the water of this reservoir, it was 
shut off from the distributing pipes late in October and the 
gates were not again opened till about a month since. 

The average height in the Brookline reservoir was 121.72 
feet, or 1.76 feet higher than last year, and 0.51 foot lower 
than in Chestnut-Hill reservoir. 

The Beacon Hill, South Boston and East Boston reser- 
voirs are kept partially filled with water, to be used in ana 
emergency, but usually are not in service. 

Distributing System, Pipe Plans, etc. 

Plans for the high and low service system of pipes ir*. 
Brighton and West Roxbury were prepared early in the- 
year, and as soon as the pipes were received from the 
foundries the work of laying was begun, and was continued 
till the close of the season. 

About 19 miles of pipes have been laid and 240 hydrants, 
have been set in those districts, at a cost of about $265, 000. 
The principal streets of Jamaica Plain and Brighton, with, 
the exception of those in the latter district, which are too- 
high to be reached by the low service, are now piped. 

The Brighton low-service main (16 inches dia.) passes, 
from the mill-dam, through Brighton ave. to Union square,, 
passing over the Boston and Albany R. R. at Cottage Farm.. 
Plans for a pipe bridge at that point were prepared early in? 
the season, but the work of building was delayed in various, 
ways, and was not completed till near the close of the year. 
In the mean time the supply to Brighton was carried over 
the railroad in an 8-inch pipe temporarily laid on the road 
bridge. 

The superstructure of the new bridge consists of two 
plate girders, each 137^ feet long, continuous over the centre 
pier. The girders are 5 feet deep, and are placed 5 feet 6. 
inches apart, and are fitted with wood-work in such manner 
that the pipe is surrounded by a double boxing to prevent 
freezing. The stone pier and northerly abutments were- 
built by the Boston and Albany R. R. Co., and the iron- 
work by the National Bridge and Iron Works. The retain- 



20 City Document No. 80. 

ing wall of the road bridge was used for the southerly 
abutment, and by agreement with the railroad company this 
wall is to be maintained at the joint expense of the company 
and the city. 

A bridge has also been built to carry a pipe over the New 
York and New England R. R. at Washington street, in 
Dorchester. This bridge is a box, the sides of which are 
iron girders 42 feet long, and 2 feet 6 inches deep, the pipe 
being laid between the girders on a plank flooring supported 
by the lower flanges, and covered by planking laid on top 
of the girders. 

In the older districts of the city, principally in Roxbury 
Highlands and Dorchester, a little over 12 miles of pipes 
have been laid. 

In the new districts of the city it has been decided to 
place Lowry hydrants at the intersections of street and post 
hydrants at intermediate points. The post hydrants are 
made in the machine shops of the Water Works, under the 
direction of Mr. Jones, and are of superior strength and 
workmanship. 

There are now 170 plans showing the locality and size of 
pipes, hydrants, stopcocks, etc., in the streets. These have 
been corrected from time to time during the year, and new 
plans have been made, showing the pipes as laid in West 
Roxbury and Brighton, copies of which have been furnished 
•to the Water Board and to the Superintendent of the Eastern 
Division of the Water Works, who has also been furnished 
with working plans of the streets where pipes were to be 
laid, showing the sizes of pipes, proposed location of gates 
and hydrants, etc. 

In reply to an order of the City Council, a report upon a 
new low-service main from Chestnut-Hill reservoir was 
made last November, and will be found embodied in this 
report on following pages. 

High-service Reservoir and Pumping Works. 

Parker-Hill reservoir has been in constant service through 
the year, and the average height of the surface of the water 
in it has been 216.75 feet above tide-marsh level. 

The roadway leading around it has been paved and 
gravelled, and the slopes of the banks have been dressed 
and seeded. 

Pumps. — The pumping-engines have worked satisfac- 
torily during the year, and are now in good condition. 

The following table will show the total and monthly work 
done by the engines, and the quantity of coal consumed in 
doing it : — 



Report of the Water Board. 



21 



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22 City Document No. 80. 

Total amount pumped . . . 463,516,585 gals. 

" number of revolutions . . . 9,862,055 

" amount of coal used . 1,376,095 lbs., — 614.3 tons. 
" " ashes and clinkers . . 213,617 lbs. 

Average pressure on force main, lbs. . 80.7 

" " supply main, lbs. , 35 



Pressure used in computing duty of engines, lbs. 45.7 
Approximate duty per pound of coal (no deduction for 
clinkers or ashes), 295,781 lbs. feet. 

Cost or Pumping. 

Salaries $4,416 50 

Fuel 4,730 33 

Gas 356 70 

Miscellaneous repairs ..... 981 73 

Small supplies ...... 249 57 



Total $10,734 83 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 22 cents. 

The average daily quantity pumped has been 1,269,908 
gallons, an increase of | per cent, above the quantity in 
1874. 

Brighton is not yet furnished with a supply from the high 
service, although a large portion of its territory and popula- 
tion is above grade 60. 

A very long and expensive main would be required to 
bring water from Parker-Hill reservoir, and as it is ex- 
pected the high-service pumps will be removed to Chestnut 
Hill within a few years, and that a new high-service reservoir 
will be built in that vicinity, when the main from Parker Hill 
would be of no service, it was recommended that a tem- 
porary reservoir (or tank) and pumps be provided for the 
supply of Brighton. An appropriation of $10,000 for this 
purpose has been made by the City Council, and the work 
of building has already begun. 

An order was passed by the City Council, in May of last 
year, requiring the City Engineer to report upon a now 
high-service system of works, and upon a new low-service 
main. The report was made in November, and as it gives 
the outlines of the scheme of works which it is expected 
will be eventually adopted, and which will be kept in view, 
as far as practicable, in making the pipe extensions in the 



Report of the Water Board. 23 

high-service districts, it is thought best, for easy reference, 
to reproduce it in this, the annual report. 

"REPORT ON HIGH-SERVICE SYSTEM. 

" City Hall, Boston, Nov. 17th, 1875. 

" Office of City Engineer. 

"L. Miles Standish, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water 

Board : — 

"The following order of the City Council was referred to me 
by 3-our Board on the 13th of May last, — 

" ' Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board he requested to con- 
sider and report to the City Council what changes are necessary in 
the system of high-service works to meet the present and prospec- 
tive wants of those depending upon that service for a water-supply ; 
also to consider and report upon the subject of laying a new main 
from Chestnut-Hill reservoir.' 

" In explanation of the late date of this report, I may be permit- 
ted to say that a large amount of work has been required of this de- 
partment during the past season, which has so fully occupied the 
time of myself and assistants that none could well be spared for the 
consideration of subjects which would bear postponement. 

" HIGH SERVICE. 

" Before suggesting any changes in the high-service system of 
water-supply, a brief description of it, as it now exists, will be in 
place. 

"The 30 and 36 inch low-service mains, leading from the Brook- 
line reservoir to the city, pass along Boylston street in Brookline, 
anclTremont street in Boston, to the Common. 

" The water for the high-service supply is taken from these mains 
at the corner of Tremont and Pynchon streets, and is conducted in 
a 16-inch pipe to the pumping-station on Elmwood street, and 
thence pumped through 16 and 24 inch mains to the stand-pipe on 
Fort Hill, and the reservoir on Parker Hill, from which points it is 
distributed over the high-service territory by a sj r steni of cast-iron 
pipes. 

"The pumping machinery consists of two engines, each with a 
rated capacity of 2,400,000 gallons in 24 hours. They are non- 
condensing, horizontal, fly-wheel engines, with the pump and steam 
pistons on the same rod. The steam is supplied by two vertical 
tube boilers, each rated at 100 horse-power. 

" The duty of the engines is about 260,000 ft.-lbs. per pound of 
coal, that is to say, for each pound of coal burnt in the boilers the 
engines will lift 260,000 lbs. of water to a height of one foot. 

"Allowing for leakage of valves, the speed required to obtain a 
delivery of 2,400,000 gallons per day is 36 or 37 revolutions per 
minute ; but it is not considered safe to run continuously at a speed 
of more than 26 or 27 revolutions per minute, which will effect a 
delivery of about 1,800,000 gallons per day. 



./ 



24 City Document No. 80. 

" The engines are supplied from a single line of pipes 16-inches 
in diameter, and the force mains immediately after leaving the en- 
gine-house are brought by a Y-brauch into a single line of pipes, 
also 16 inches in diameter. It is found impracticable to work the 
engines together at much more than half speed, as the}' - react 
through the pipes, one upon the other ; in fact, the working 
capacity of the main itself is but little greater than that of a single 
engine. 

"The capacity of the existing works is then about 1,800,000 
gallons per day. 

"If new suction and deliver} 7 mains are laid, so that both engines 
may be operated at the same time, the capacity of the works will 
be about 2f- million gallons. This is assuming that no accident 
will happen to either engine which will require more than five or 
six daj's to repair, the supply during the time of such repair being 
kept up by the delivery from the other engine and the water in 
store in the reservoir. 

" The cost of the new mains would be about $6,500.00. 

" These works were built to supply the highlands of Roxbury 
alone, and they were designed with a capacity amply sufficient to 
provide, for years to come, for the wants of that rapidly-growing 
section ; but they were not intended and are entirely inadequate to 
supply the demand for water that will arise, in the near future, from 
the extension of the distribution to Beacon Hill and the high grounds 
of South Boston, and the rapid increase of the population living 
upon the large areas of elevated lands in Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury and Brighton. 

" The area which the works were designed to supply is about 
760 acres ; the area of high-service territoiy now within the limits 
of the city is about 10,720 acres, and the population of this terri- 
tory, as approximately estimated from the census of this year, is 
36,600, divided as follows : — 

Beacon Hill High Service .... 6,000 

South Boston " " .... 3,000 

Roxbury « " .... 12,000 

Dorchester " " .... 5,800 

West Roxbury "■• " .... 7,400 

Brighton " " 2,400 

" The average daily rate of consumption from the Cochituate 
works last year was about 70 gallons per head, and the rate dur- 
ing the months of maximum consumption (July, August and Sep- 
tember) was nearly 80. If we allow for the high-service supply a 
rate of 70 gallons per head for the months of maximum consump- 
tion it will be seen that, were the street pipes extended through the 
whole high-service territory, the required supply would be a little 
over 2,500,000 gallons per day, — a quantu^y which is in excess of 
the present capacity of the works. 

" As has been before stated, if new force and supply mains be 
laid, the capacity of the works will be increased to about 2,750,000 
gallons per day ; but, with the rate of increase of population which 



Keport of the Water Board. 25 

obtains in the high-service districts, the maximum consumption 
will reach this quantity in two or three years. 

" It is evident, therefore, that in a few years the present works 
must be either enlarged or replaced by a new system of greater 
capacity and better adapted to fulfil the new. conditions that will 
then exist ; and when it is considered that the high-service terri- 
tory includes more than half the area of Boston lying south of the 
Charles river, and contains a yet larger proportion of the vacant 
land desirable for residences, it is further evident that this new 
system must be designed on a scale to provide for the wants of a 
very large population. 

"The cost of extending the distributing mains and pipes, and 
the cost of new reservoirs, if equal storage capacity be provided in 
each case, will be practically the same whether new works are built 
or the old ones are enlarged. 

" The chief difference of cost will be in the pumping machinery, 
its buildings, and supply and delivery mains. The pumping ma- 
chinery and its location are, therefore, the points to be considered 
in deciding what changes it is best to make. 

"There are a number of forcible reasons why no considerable 
enlargement of the pumping capacity should be made at the pres- 
ent location of the engines on Elmwood street. 

"There is want of room at this point. The present buildings 
are fully occupied by the machinery now in them, and new engines 
will necessitate new buildings. The ground needed for this pur- 
pose can be obtained by the removal of a dwelling-house ; but the 
vicinity is thickly built over, and in part with wooden houses, ren- 
dering the engine-houses liable to destruction by fire originating 
on neighboring premises. The burning of these buildings, and the 
consequent injury to the machinery, would deprive the high-service 
territory of its water-supply for a considerable time. 

"The situation is such that a satisfactory arrangement of new 
supply and delivery mains cannot be had ; also the cost of oper- 
ating the present engine is much too great. Engines are now in 
use in other cities that are doing the same amount of work with 
an expenditure of only one-third the quantit}" of coal. 

' ' Parker-Hill reservoir has not the proper elevation for the 
principal reservoir, or as a source of supply to other reservoirs 
located at distant points. 

" The location is an unfavorable one, on account of the cost of 
supplying the pumps with water. It will be necessary to convey 
it to them from the Brookline reservoir, a distance of over two 
miles, at a large cost for mains, and with a considerable loss of 
head, that will occasion additional expense for pumping. With the 
amount of water that is now used the average loss of head is about 
10 feet during the day hours, and after the water is pumped a por- 
tion of it is to be conve}'ed back, with an equal or greater loss, in 
the direction of, and in the case of Brighton to points beyond, 
the reservoir. 

" The location is also objectionable from the fact that it is so 
low that the water is received in the pumps under a pressure of over 
30 lbs. per square inch, which causes a harsh action of the ma- 



26 Cits Document No. 80. 

chinery and greatly impairs its efficiency, To have a smooth ac- 
tion of the pumps the water should be drawn from a well or basin 
of still water through a short suction main ; this condition cannot 
be secured at Elmwood street, without destroying the head of 70 
or 80 feet under which the water is received, and thus increasing, 
b}' an equal amount, the height to which it is afterwards to be 
raised. 

" These reasons, and others of less importance, make it desir- 
able to choose another site for the new engines when they shall be 
required, and the best site is near the Chestnut-Hill reservoir, on 
land now owned by the city. 

" At this point the buildings will be isolated, and maj^ easily be 
protected from fire ; there is plenty of room for future extensions ; 
the water may be received in an open well, without appreciable 
loss of head, and the coal can be delivered in the coal-house di- 
rectly from the cars, as the site is on the line of the Woonsocket 
division of the New York and New England R. R. 

" The general character of the distributing system should be the 
same, wherever the pumping machinery may be located. 

" The territory to be supplied consists of various districts, more 
or less isolated, and with the extreme ones at distances of about 
six miles from one another, measured either in a westerly or 
southerly direction. That is, the west end of Brighton and the 
south end of Dorchester are about six miles from Beacon Hill, and 
also about six miles from each other. 

" Distinct S3 7 stems of distribution are required for these various 
areas, involving the use of long connecting mains ; and unless 
reservoirs are used as the centres of distribution these mains 
should be in duplicate, to prevent any interruption to the supply 
from accidents, or while repairs or additions are being made. 

"A considerable reservoir capacity is essential for security in 
case of accidents to the machine^, for furnishing a prompt and 
liberal supply during large fires, etc., and if this capacity be pro- 
vided in a number of small reservoirs, rather than in one of larger 
size, a notable saving will be effected in the cost of the connecting 
and distributing mains. 

" The reservoirs will also maintain a more uniform head or pres- 
sure, and will admit of the use of somewhat smaller pipes in the 
distributing S3 r stem. 

" The scheme of works that I would recommend may be briefly 
described as follows : — 

" A pumping-station near Chestnut-Hill reservoir, provided with 
two engines, each of capacity to raise 10,000,000 gallons in twentj- 
four hours, to a height of about 120 feet. 

" The water for the supply of the engines to be received in an 
open well, and to be drawn from the 5-feet pipe which it is pro- 
posed to lay around the reservoir to join the Sudbury-river conduit 
with the 48-inch delivery mains. This pipe can be supplied either 
from the reservoir, from the Cochituate conduit, or from the Sud- 
bury-river conduit, as may be desired. 

"A 30-inch force main leading to a reservoir (No. 1) located 
upon one of the hills in the vicinity of the pumping-station. This 



Report of the Water Board. 27 

reservoir to have its water surface at an elevation of about 240 feet 
above tide level, and a capacity of about 15,000,000 gallons. 

" A 30-inch supply main from the reservoir passing through 
Brookline to the corner of Prince and Perkins streets, in West 
Roxbuiy, and there branching into two lines of pipes, one 20 inches 
in diameter running to the Parker-Hill reservoir (No 2), the other 
24 inches in diameter passing to a reservoir (No. 3) so located as 
to command the supply to Dorchester and neighboring portions of 
West Roxbuiy. 

" Also a 16-inch supply main running from the main reservoir 
(No. 1) to Brighton, for the supply of the high lands of that 
division of the city. 

" Reservoir No. 3 to have its water surface at an elevation of 
about 220 feet, or level with that of Parker Hill, and a capacity of 
8 or 10 millions of gallons. From this reservoir a 20-inch main to 
lead to the Dorchester District. 

" The 24-inch main is to supply Jamaica Plain and the western 
and southern portion of West Roxbuiy as well as reservoir No. 3. 

" This sj^stem will command all the lands below elevation 170, 
giving to each house an ample pressure, and will furnish a supply 
to the lower stories of houses at elevation 200 or 210. 

" In West Roxbury there are about 630 acres of land (the sum- 
mits of various hills) situated above elevation 200, and about 1,250 
acres above grade 170. 

"Until the exact locations of the reservoirs are decided upon, 
and surveys and estimates of quantities have been made, it is 
impossible to give more than a roughly approximate estimate of 
the cost of the proposed works. 

" The following estimate is based upon liberal prices and allow- 
ance for contingencies, and will rather exceed than fall short of a 
more exact one : — 

" ESTIMATE OF COST. 

Engine buildings, wells, engine foundations, supply 

pipe, etc $120,000 00 

Two engines, capacity 10,000,000 gals, each . 210,000 00 

Lands and reservoir (No. 1) capacity 15,000,000 

gallons 200,000 00 

Lands and reservoir (No. 3) capacity 10,000,000 

gallons 150,000 00 

Pipe mains 340,000 00 



$1,020,000 00 
Superintendence and contingencies . . . 80,000 00 



Total $1,100,000 00 

" If thought advisable the first outlay may be somewhat reduced 
by omitting one engine, a portion of the mains, and the building 
of reservoir No. 3, though the land for it should be taken at once. 

" The estimate thus reduced amounts to $825,000. 



28 City Document No. 80. 

" It should be understood,, however, that the expenditure of the 
balance can be dehiyed for a few 3'ears only ; that by the time the 
work represented bj* the estimate of $825,000 is completed, that 
which is at first omitted should be begun. 

"With the extension of the high-service supply pipes that will 
be made, and the increase of population in the territory supplied 
that it is fair to suppose will take place, the existing works, even 
after their enlargement by the laying of new mains, as before 
indicated, cannot be safely relied upon to furnish an adequate 
supply for more than three years longer. 

" The maximum safe capacity of the old works after the laying 
of the new mains will be about 2% million gallons daily, equal to a 
supply during the months of greatest consumption for a population 
of about 40,000. There are to-day over 36,000 people living in 
the territory to be supplied, and the yearly increase of this pop- 
ulation has been about 6 per cent, during the last few years. At 
this rate the total increase, including the growth of 1875, would 
be over 8,000 before the new works would be put in operation. 

"It will require two working seasons to construct new works, 
and their construction must be authorized by act of Legislature. 

" After the act is obtained there is required a great deal of pre- 
liminary work, in the way of survey, plans and specifications, etc., 
before the work can be put under contract ; so that very little can 
be done in actual construction during the following season. 

"It will be seen, therefore, that it is important that an early 
decision should be made as to what shall be clone ; and, if the plan 
for new works be adopted, that the necessary legislative action be 
applied for this winter. 

"Even if it should not be decided to begin the preliminary work 
during the coming } T ear, it is still important as a matter of 
economy in the work now going on, that a decision as to what is 
to be done should be reached at an early day, for the pipes are 
being rapidly extended through the new districts, and it is impossi- 
ble to determine what sizes should be used, and through what 
streets mains and sub-mains should be laid, until some design for 
the works of the future is adopted. 

" At present there are no means of supplying the high lands of 
Brighton. A long and expensive main is required to connect 
them with Parker-Hill reservoir, which main would become useless 
should the proposed new works be built. 

"As at best it will be some time before these works can be 
available it is necessary to resort to temporary means for the sup- 
ply of that territory. 

" A small masonry reservoir, to be located on Academy Hill, in 
the school-house yard, can be cheaply built, which may be supplied 
by small steam-pumps placed at some convenient point, as, for 
instance, in the fire-engine-house on Chestnut-Hill avenue. 

" The reservoir to have a capacity of 30 or 40 thousand gallons, 
or sufficient for ordinary fires, and an elevation of about 170 feet 
above tide. The pumps to be two in number, each with a capacity 
of 200,000 gallons. 

" The estimated cost of this work is $5,500 ; and I would rec- 



Ke^ORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 29 

ommend that it be done early next season, as a large proportion of 
the most valuable buildings in Brighton are situated above the 
reach of the low-service supply. 

"new low-service main. 

" All the water supplied b} T the Cochituate works is brought to 
the city from the distributing reservoirs (Brookline and Chestnut 
Hill) by three supply mains, 30, 36 and 40 inches in diameter. 
The only pipe laid from the Chestnut-Hill reservoir is one 48 
inches in diameter, which terminates at a point a few hundred feet 
north of the Brookline reservoir, and is there connected with the 
30, 36 and 40 inch mains. 

"These mains pass through Bo3'lston street in Brookline, and 
as far as Brookline avenue together ; at this point they separate, 
the 40-inch passing through Brookline avenue, the Mill-dam, and 
Beacon street, and across the Common, to near the corner of Tre- 
mont and Boylston streets. The 30 and 36 inch mains continue 
on together through Tremont street in Boston (the 36-inch re- 
ducing to 30-inch at Dover street), until the}' unite with the 40- 
inch on the Common. The distance from Brookline reservoir to 
the point of junction of the mains on the Common is 4 T 1 TJ 5 <y miles 
by the 40-inch pipe route, and 4^ miles by the 30-inch and 36- 
inch pipe route. 

" The 30 and 36 inch mains were laid at the time the Cochituate 
works were built, and being uncoated pipes are badly tuber- 
culated ; the 40-inch was laid in 1859 with coated pipes, and 
probably is not much obstructed by tubercles. 

" Near the Roxbury station of the Providence Railroad a 24- 
inch branch main connects with the 30 and 36 inch suppby mains, 
and passes through short portions of Pjmchon and Roxbury streets, 
and along Dudley, Stoughton, Pleasant and Commercial Streets to 
Dorchester avenue in Dorchester. This branch-main supplies the 
low service of Roxbury, Dorchester, and a part of South Boston, 
being connected with the South Boston reservoir b} r a 20-inch pipe 
laid through Boston, Dorchester and Telegraph streets. Another 
sub-main, 20 inches in diameter, laid through Dover and West 
Fourth streets, and passing over Dover-street bridge, aids in the 
low-service supply of that section of the city. 

" The sectional area of the supply mains that should be provided 
for a given population varies between wide limits, depending upon 
a variety of circumstances. 

" In the case of Boston, where the mains are long and the dis- 
tributing reservoirs at a rather low elevation, a large capacity is 
needed. An area that will give an initial velocity of a now of 2 
feet per second, for the average consumption of the day hours, 
would usually be considered a large one. 

" The average daily consumption from the Cochituate works 
may be taken in round numbers at 19,000,000 gallons. The con- 
sumption during the day hours is about one-fourth greater than the 
average for the whole day, or saj r at the rate of 37 cubic feet per 
second. With a velocity of 2 feet per second, the sectional area 



30 



City Document No. 80. 



of mains that is required to provide for this rate of consumption is 
18.5 square feet. The combined sectional area of the 30, 36 and 
40 inch is 20.7 square feet, or 12 per cent, greater. 

" To ascertain what the actual losses of head due to friction in 
the mains and sub-mains are, I have had observations taken at a 
number of points, the results of which will be found in the follow- 
ing table. 

" The slight discrepancies that are noticeable between the losses 
at the same hours, at different points, are due to the facts that the 
gauges could not be read to small fractions of pounds, and that the 
readings of all the gauges observed in one day were not taken 
at exactly the same moment. 



" Table showing Loss of Head due to Friction in Mains and Sub- Mains. 

1875. 





Tuesday, Oct. 12. 


Wednesday - , Oct. 13. 


Thu 


RSDAY, Oct. 14. 






Water in Reservoir, 


W T ater in Reservoir, 


Water in Reservoir, 


Oct 18 




122.80. 




122.80. 




122.80. 








o g 2 
S S 
« - a 


£ 9 

V Ml 

O Z. 

fiPQ 


fo 


g r « 

O fc, jz 

S §5 


si 

% a 

D O 

WO 


c . 

a v 

S3* 


Se 


Commercial 
St., near 
Glover's 
Corner. 


C "- 1 


s 

o S 
m a 

o o 

pao 


A.M. 
7.30 






. . 










, , 


§ t 


15.3 


8. 


15.6 


16. 


17.5 


13.3 


13. 


15.8 


15.4 




. . 


17.6 


8.30 


17.9 


17.2 


17.5 


15.6 


15.3 


19.2 


15.4 




. . 


19.9 


9. 


17.9 


18.3 


17.5 


15.6 


15.3 




15.4 


17.1 


. . 


18.7 


9.30 


16.8 


17.2 


19.8 


15.6 


15.3 


17. 


15.4 


14. 


. . 


17.6 


10. 


15.6 


18.3 


17.5 


16.6 


13. 


17. 


13.1 


16. 


23.4 


18.7 


10.30 


15.6 


17.2 


19.8 


13.3 


13. 


14.7 


14.2 


16. 


16.5 


19.9 


11. 


15.6 


17.2 


17.5 


13.3 


13. 


17. 


13.1 


16. 


21.1 


17.6 


11.30 


16.8 


16. 


17.5 


13.3 


13. 


15.8 


12. 


13.7 


21.1 


16.4 


12. 


12.2 


16. 


12.9 


13.3 


13. 


15.8 


10.8 


11.4 


16.5 


15.3 


12.30 


12.2 


13.7 


12.9 


12.2 


10.7 


11.2 


10.8 


10.2 


16.5 




. 


P. M. 
1. 


13.3 


13.7 


15.2 


11. 


10.7 


13.5 


12. 


11.4 


16.6 






1.30 


13.3 


14.8 


12.9 


11. 


10.7 


14.7 


10.8 


11.4 


18.8 






2. 


133 


14.8 


15.2 


11. 


10.7 


17. 


10.8 


11.4 


14.2 




• 


2.30 


12.2 


14.8 


15.2 


11. 


10.7 


15.8 


10.8 


11.4 


18.8 




• 


3. 


13.3 


14.8 


12.9 


11. 


10.7 


15.8 


10.8 


12.5 


16.5 






3.30 


11. 


11.4 


12.9 


11. 


10.7 


12.5 


13.1 


13.7 


16.5 






4. 


9. 


12.5 


12.9 


9.8 


• • 


13.5 


10.8 


12.5 


18.8 




• 


4.30 


11. 




12.9 












14.2 




• 



Report of the "Water Board. 



31 



" The greatest loss of head during a week is ordinarily between 
the hours of 8 and 10 of Monday morning. 

" It will be seen from the table that the loss on Monday, Oct. 
18th, at the junction of the mains on the Common, was from 17 to 
20 feet. (During the summer months this loss is somewhat 
greater.) 

" On Wednesday, the 13th, the loss at the same hours and place 
was about 15 feet ; at Warren bridge it was from 17 to 19 feet, and 
at the corner of Waltham andTremont streets about 15^ feet. On 
Tuesday, the 12th, at the corner of Waltham and Tremont streets 
it was from 15 to 18 feet ; at Dover-street bridge, from 17 to 18 
feet, and at fourth street, between O and P streets, in South Bos- 
ton, from 17£ to 20 feet. On Thursday, the 14th, at the Roxbury 
crossing, it was about 15^ feet ; at Commercial street, near Glover's 
corner, from l\ to 17 feet ; and at Milton Lower Mills, 23 J- feet (one 
observation at JO A.M.). 

" It will be noticed, first, that the losses of head are practically 
the same at all points along the line of the 30 and 36 inch pipes 
from the Roxbury crossing to the Common. This is due to the 
effect of the 40-inch main which joins them at the latter point. 
Second, that nearly the whole loss at any point where observations 
were taken, except at Milton Lower Mills, takes place in the large 
supply mains, or, in other words, only a small portion of the loss 
is due to friction in the sub-mains. 

' ' Thus the loss at the northerly part of South Boston is very 
little greater than at the corner of Tremont and Waltham streets in 
Boston proper. So at Warren bridge, the loss is only from 2 to 4 
feet greater than on the Common. 

"It becomes evident from these figures that, to reduce the loss 
of head due to friction to any large extent, a new supply main must 
be laid from the reservoir, as not much can be gained by enlarge- 
ment of the sub-mains. 

" The following table, which gives the results of daily observa- 
tions extending over a long period of time, will show the day and 
night losses at a number of points in the city, where the pressures 
have been taken on the small street pipes. 



" Table showing Night and Day Loss of Head due to Friction in Mains and 
the Smaller Street Pipes. 

The figures given are the monthly averages of daily observations. 

MAX, 1874. 



Brooklink Reservoir, 121.70. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 


10, P.M. 






6.3 
1.3 


16.7 
17.4 


12.8 
11.2 ' 











32 



City Document No. 80. 



J FIVE, IS 74. 



Brookline Reservoir, 121.83. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 


10, P.M. 


12, P.M. 




5.3 

2.1 

7.2 


20.1 

22.4 

21. 

28.4 

29.8 

22.2 


15.7 
15.3 
13.2 
16.6 
21.5 
20.6 


5.7 




Dorchester St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House . . . 


3.6 



JTJXiY, 1874. 



Brookline Reservoir, 121. 



3, A.M. 



9, A.M. 



3, P.M. 



10, P.M. 



Federal St. Pipe Yard 

Water Board Office 

Wall St. Engine House . . . . 
Salem St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester St. Engine House . 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House 



2. 
5.5 



21.9 

23.6 

21.9 

23.3 

27. 

26.8 



16.09 
16.3 
14.4 
17.5 
21.9 
22.1 



4.8 
8.3 



AUGUST, 1874. 



Brookline Reservoir, 120.50. 



Federal St. Pipe Yard 

Water Board Office 

Wall St. Engine House .... 
Salem St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester St. Engine nouse . 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House 



3, A.M. 



2.3 

7.2 



9, A.M. 



21.3 
22.5 
19.2 
24.3 

27.8 
29.7 



3, P.M. 



15.5 
15.7 
12.9 
17.8 
23.1 
15.6 



10, P.M. 



12, P.M. 



SEPTEMBER, 1874. 



Brookline Reservoir, 118.65. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 


10, P.M. 


11, P.M. 


Dorchester St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House . . . 


2.4 

2.1 

7.9 


22.6 
22.5 
18.7 
22.9 
28.7 
15.7 


15.9 
16.4 
14.5 
18.7 
20.4 
18.1 


6.1 


6.3 



Eeport or the Water Board. 

OCTOBER, 1874. 



33 



Brookline Reservoir, 117.60. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 


10, P.M. 


11, P.M. 


Dorchester St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House . . . 


1.3 

.63 
5.9 
16.8 


17.7 

20.3 

17.7 

21.2 

21. 

15.7 


13. 
14.5 
9.6 
15.2 

16.4 


2.5 


4.3 



NOVEMBER, 1874. 



Brookeine Reservoir, 118.43. 


3, A.M. 




.54 








.77 




4.7 


Dorchester St. Engine House .... 




Dorchester Ave. Engine House . . . 





9, A.M. 



9.5 
12.3 
15.7 
13. 
16.7 
13.5 



3, P.M. 



7.4 
7.9 
8.3 

10. 

13. 
6.1 



10, P.M. 



11, P.M. 



2.2 



DECEMBER, 1874 



Brookline Reservoir, 120.17. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 


10, P.M. 


11, P.M. 


Dorchester St. Engine House .... 
Dorchester Ave. Engine House . . . 


1.5 

4.5 


5.5 
11.1 
12. 
12.7 

27.8 


6.3 

7.6 

8.7 

10.6 

6.7 




2.5' 



JANUARY, 1875. 



Brookeine Reservoir, 121.41. 



Federal St. Pipe Yard .... 

Water Board Office 

Salem St. Engine House . . . 
Dorchester St. Engine. House 



3, A.M. 



2.1 



9, A.M. 



9.1 
13.3 
13.7 
20. 



3, P.M. 



7.6 



12.5 
16. 



11, P.M. 



34 



City Document No. 80. 



FEBRUARY, 18 7 5, 



Brookline Reservoir, 120.17. 



Federal St. Pipe Tard .... 
Water Board Office . . . . . 
Salem St. Engine House . . . 
Dorchester St. Engine House 



3, a.: 



8.7 



9, A.M. 



3, P.M. 



12.4 


10.1 


16.1 


10.8 


17.3 


14. 


18.7 


17.7 



11, P.M. 



MARCH, 1875. 



Brookline Reservoir, 118.! 



Federal St. Pipe Yard .... 

Water Board Office 

Salem St. Engine House . . . 
Dorchester St. Engine House 



3, A.M. 



8.7 



9, A.M. 



10.1 
14.5 

15.4 
18.2 



3, P.M. 


11, P.M. 


9.6 


. . . 


9.9 




13.5 




14. 


6.4 



APBIL. 1875. 



Brookline Reservoir, 121.45. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 








5.1 

9.6 


11.9 

15.4 
15.6 


7.7 

9.8 

. 12.8 




. . . 



MAT, 1875. 



Brookline Reservoir, 122.84. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 








6.57 


11.6 
15.1 


9.3 

10.7 







JUNE, 1875. 



Brookline Reservoir, 


122.82. 


3, 


A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, 


P.M. 






Federal St. Pipe Yard 


2.1 


10.9 
13.5 


7.4 
9.3 











Report of the Water Board. 

JUIT, 1875. 



35 



Brookxine Reservoir, 121.64. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 










16.5 


11.4 






AUGUST, 1875. 

1 




Brookxine Reservoir, 121.69. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 








1.2 


14.6 
16.3 


10. 
10. 






SEPTEMBER, 1875. 




Brookeine Reservoir, 122.45. 


3, A.M. 


9, A.M. 


3, P.M. 








2. 


16.3 
15.2 


11.4 

14.7 


. . . 







" It will be observed that as a rule the loss of head during the 
night is inconsiderable, and that the losses at 9 A. M. during 1875, or 
since important changes have been made in the pipe system, have 
been not very different from those given in the first table for the 
mains and sub-mains. 

"With few exceptions, all houses situated above grade 60 are 
supplied from the high-service works ; and as the water in the Brook- 
line reservoir is now kept at an elevation of at least 1 20 feet, the 
pressure, without loss by friction, would be equivalent to a head of 
60 feet on the highest grounds of the low-service territoiy. The 
loss by friction at the hour of maximum consumption varies from 10 
to 20 feet, as shown by the foregoing tables ; hence the actual pres- 
sure on the higher grounds, at that hour, is from 40 to 50 feet, or 
sufficient for the supply of ordinary dwelling-houses. During the 
night-hours tanks at elevations less than about 10 feet lower than 
the reservoir, or below grade 110, would be filled. 

" About one and a quarter million gallons per day on an average 
are now required to supply the high-service pumps, and this quan- 
tity will be largely increased during the next two or three years on 
account of the recent annexations. 

" The removal of the high-service machine^ to the vicinity of 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, as proposed, will admit of an increase in, 
the low-service consumption equal to the quantity required for the 
high-service supply, without further loss of head. 

" From the foregoing the conclusion is reached that there is at 
present ample capacity of mains and sub-mains for the domestic 



36 City Document No. 80. 

supply ; and I find, by estimate, there is also sufficient capacity to 
deliver a large quantity for extinguishing fires in addition to this 
supply. 

"' The completion of the Sudbury -river works will, however, give 
the city an abundant, instead of its present limited, supply, and a 
considerable increase of consumption is probable. Increase of con- 
sumption will necessitate a new main, the route and cost of which 
are questions to be considered. 

"An examination of the map of the city suggests two routes. 
The first follows Beacon street, from the reservoir to West Chester 
Park street, where the new main would join with the 40-inch ; from 
here a 30-inch branch main would pass along West Chester Park 
street to Tremont street, joining there the 80 and 86 inch pipes, 
and eventually be extended to South Boston through Hammond 
and Swett streets. 

' w The second follows Beacon street to Harvard street in Brook- 
line, and thence passes through Harvard street, Longwood avenue, 
Parker and Prentiss streets, to Tremont, where the new main 
would join the 30 and 86 inch. 

" It has already been pointed out that the loss of head is practi- 
cally the same at all points on Tremont street from the Roxbury 
crossing of the Providence R. P. to the Common, from which it 
follows that if any increase of capacity of mains is needed it should 
be made between the reservoir and the crossing. 

"The rebuilding and widening of Dover-street bridge (with 
probably a change in the position of the draw-opening) may require 
a temporary discontinuance of the South Boston 2U-inch low-ser- 
vice and 12-inch high-service supply pipes, and consequently 
necessitate the laying of a new main to that section. This new 
main will naturally pass through Swett street, and ma}' have its 
point of beginning near the Roxbury crossing, and follow Vernon, 
Washingtpn, Hammond and Albany streets to Swett street. This 
will relieve the Tremont-street mains, from the crossing to Dover 
street, of about one-half the supply of South Boston, or say of a 
supply for 30,000 people. 

11 ' With this relief it is not probable that any increase of the 
capacity of the mains north of the crossing will be needed for the 
supply of the city proper for many } T ears, if ever. 

' k The following estimate is for a 48-inch pipe laid on the second 
route above described, which, from what precedes, appears to be 
the better of the two : — 

18,000 feet of 48-ineh pipe laid, at $16.80 . . $302,400 00 

4,000 cubic yards of rock, at $3.00 . . . 12,000 00 

Extra for sheeting and pumping .... 9,000 00 

Stop-valves, specials, bridge crossing, etc., . . 20,000 00 

$343,400 00 
Add 10 per cent, for contingencies . . . 34,340 00 



7,740 00 



Say $375,000.00. 



Report of the Water Board. 37 

" I add an estimate of cost of a 30-inch main from the corner of 
Vernon and Tremont streets to the corner of Dorchester and 
Fourth streets, in South Boston : — 

15,200 lin. feet of 30-inch pipe laid, at $8.30 . . $126,160 00 
Stop-valves, specials, bridge crossing, etc. . . 8,500 00 



$134,660 00 
Add 10 per cent, for contingencies . . . 13,466 00 



Say $150,000.00.' 



$148,026 00 



Consumption or Water. 

The table on page 45 gives the average daily consumption 
of water from the Cochituate works for each month for 
several years. 

The average daily consumption for the year has been 
19,267,700 gallons. 

During the latter part of the year, East Boston (till Dec. 
2) and portions of West Roxbury and Brighton were sup- 
plied from the Cochituate works, these being in addition to 
the divisions of the city supplied in 1874. West Roxbury 
and Brighton have 'had no public supply heretofore, and as 
the laying of pipes was begun only last season they had 
little effect in increasing the consumption. 



Quality of Water. 

Early in October complaints began to be made, at the 
office of the Water Board, that the Cochituate water tasted 
badly, and was unfit for use. The taste was variously 
described ; some persons thought it like cucumbers, others 
like fish oil, still others like dead leaves, etc. ; but as a rule 
it was spoken of as a " cucumber taste." 

At first the complaints came from persons living at the 
South End and on the Back Bay lands, later they came from 
the West and North Ends as well, and finally from South and 
East Boston. Even after the taste became very wide-spread 
people living where there was little circulation of water in 
the pipes, as in some parts of Dorchester, reported that the 
water supplied to them was unusually clear and sweet. 

On Oct. 23 the lake was visited, and samples of water 
were taken at various points and at all depths, but not the 
slightest trace of the peculiar taste could be discovered. 
Samples taken where the water was shallow, and some from 



38 City Document No. 80. 

points near the bottom in deep water, had the earthy taste 
which usually accompanies pond water, but the greater 
portion of them were clear and tasteless. 

On Oct. 26 the Brookline and Chestnut-Hill reservoirs 
were visited, but the cucumber taste could not be detected 
in the water contained in them. Water taken in front of 
the screens of the efflux gate-house of the Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir was tasteless, but a sample taken from behind 
them, or at the mouth of the outlet pipe, was found to have 
the cucumber taste in a slight degree. 

At that date the taste may be said to have been confined 
to the water in the pipes, but on the next day it was dis- 
covered in all parts of the Bradlee basin of Chestnut-Hill 
reservoir, having spread through that large volume of about 
500,000,000 gallons of water in one night apparently. 
During the night there was a thunder-shower accompanied 
with violent winds, and agitation of the water may have 
aided in developing the taste. 

The reservoir was immediately shut off from the distribu- 
tion and in a short time no taste could be detected in the 
water delivered in the city, indicating that the trouble 
originated in this reservoir, or at least showing that the 
conditions necessary to develop the taste existed there. 

On the night of Dec. 3 the gate was opened about one 
foot and some three or four million gallons of water let into 
the distributing pipes, but such an exceedingly disagreeable 
effect was produced that the gate was closed on the follow- 
ing- morning. At this time the Brookline reservoir was 
lowering rapidly, owing to the excessive night waste to 
prevent freezing of service-pipes. 

The taste in the Chestnut-Hill reservoir gradually dis- 
appeared, and on April 1 the gate was again opened and 
the water let on to the city, without causing any noticeable 
change in the water delivered to the consumers. The 
reservoir has been in constant service since that date. 

Prof. Wm. E. Nichols, of the Mass. Institute of Tech- 
nology, was requested to make thorough investigations to 
ascertain the cause of the trouble, that its recurrence might 
be prevented if possible ; and he engaged Mr. Edward 
Burgess, Secretary of the Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory, and Dr. W. G. Farlow, Assistant Prof, of Botany in 
Harvard University, to aid him. 

These gentlemen have made a very complete study of the 
matter, but are unable to assign any cause for the taste. 
Their reports will be found appended to this. 






Keport of the Water Board. 39 



Additional Supply. 

Early in 1875 the necessary orders were passed by the 
City Council to enable the Water Board to take the waters 
of Sudbury river, and to proceed with the building of the 
Sudbury-river works, as originally designed. On Jan. 21 
the papers for the taking of the river were signed by the 
Mayor and by the members of the Water Board. A large 
portion of the work has been placed under contract, and 
considerable progress in construction has been made. 

The conduit from Farm pond to Chestnut-Hill reservoir, 
about 15| miles long, was divided into 20 sections, each 
section forming the basis of a contract. 

Section 20, which includes the Beacon-street tunnel, was 
put under contract in August, 1873, and was completed last 
December. 

The following table shows the times at which the contracts 
for the various sections were executed, the names of the 
contractors, the range of bids, etc. : — 



40 



City Document No. 80. 





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Eepoet of the Water Board. 41 

On Oct. 21 a contract was made with Mr. John Brown, 
of Mohawk, New York, for building a road in Framingham, 
This road was laid out by the County Commissioners, and 
was made necessary by the proposed flowing of a portion of 
the old county road leading from Framingham to Southboro'. 

On Oct. 30 an order of the City Council was approved, 
authorizing the Water Board to build Section 1, and the 
foundations to Dams Nos. 1, 2 and 3, by day labor. Sec- 
tion 1 crosses the Boston and Albany Railroad at Framing- 
ham, and includes the gate-house in Farm pond. The piles 
for supporting the tracks over the trench for the conduit 
have been driven, and considerable progress has been made 
in constructing the coffer-dam for the gate-house and the 
portion of the conduit which extends into the pond. 

The following table will show, among other things, the 
value of the contracts, and the cost of the work done, and 
materials delivered up to. Dec. 31, 1875, the date of the 
last estimate for that year : — 



42 



City Document No. 80. 



Table showing the Amount of Work done from the beginning up to Decem- 
ber 21, 1875. 



No. of Section. 


3 

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O 

gl 

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*$100,000 00 


$1,750 00 


0.0175 


" 2 . „ . . 






3,450 




108,500 00 


4,122 00 


0.038 


" 3 . . . . 


1,525 ft. 


. . . 


5,300 


1 


146,270 00 


40,125 00 


0.274 


" 4 . . . . 


1,600 " 


. . . 


4,120 


1 


90,060 00 


43,581 00 


0.484 








3,050 
2,146 
5,475 


1 

2 


99,540 35 
112,488 00 
139,725 00 


17,275 00 
25,779 00 


0.1735 


" 6 . . . . 




415 


0.228 


" 7 . . . . 


957 " 




3 


47,014 00 


0.336 


" 8 . . . . 


512 " 


609 


1,560 


2 


82,551 80 


27,966 00 


0.338 


" 9 . . . . 


1,035 " 




4,555 


2 


112,537 00 


25,760 00 


0.228 


" 10 ... . 










170,990 00 
114,800 00 












3,950 


1 


18,879 00 


0.164 


" 12 ... . 


2,950 " 


. . . 


7,700 


5 


165,400 00 


73,472 00 


0.444 








4,000 
4,800 


1 


96,090 00 
141,705 00 


12,830 00 


0.133 








1 


21,197 00 


0.149 








100 
2,725 


2 


198,722 50 
90,372 50 


70 00 
22,990 00 


0.0003 


" 16 ... . 


1,145 " 


. . . 


0.255 


" 17 ... . 


1,320 « 


. . . 


4,225 


2 


88,057 50 


33,123 00 


0.376 


«' 18 ... . 


50 '« 


243 


100 


1 


20,067 00 


5,229 00 


0.261 


" 19 ... . 


535 " 


. . . 


1,400 


1 


72,015 00 


15,201 00 


0.211 


" 20 ... . 


510 " 


4,635 


510 




336,630 70 


336,631 00 


100. 




12,139 ft. 


5,902 


59,166 


26 


$2,486,522 00 


$772,994 00 


. . . 


Road in Framing- \ 






5,300 


4 


17,760 00 


5,179 30 


























64,466 


30 


$2,504,282 00 


$778,173 30 













31 per cent, of the work on all the conduit sections is done. 

The total length of the conduit line from Farm Pond to Chestnut-Hill Reservoir is 
83,200 feet. 



* Estimated. 



Report of the Water Board. 43 

During the summer the average number of men em- 
ployed on the work, by the contractors, was 1,200, and the 
average number of horses 175. 



Rainfall. 

The usual tables, giving the rainfall at various points for 
the year 1875, will be found appended. 

JOS. P. DAVIS, 

City Engineer. 



44 



City Document No. 80. 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the Reservoirs 
above " tide-marsh level," 1865-1875. 

BROOKLINE. 
Maximum high-water line, 124.60. 



Month. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.* 


1874. 


1875. 


January . . . 


123.31 


122.28 


122.00 


123.29 


122.58 


122.83 


121.89 


118.64 


120.46 


121.06 


121.41 


February . . . 


122.82 


122.47 


123.12 


122.79 


122.64 


122.60 


122.54 


120.48 


119.86 


119.52 


120.17 


March .... 


12.3.26 


123.19 


123.05 


122.33 


122.48 


122.77 


122.08 


122.04 


119.71 


119.27 


118.95 




123.38 


123.45 


123.00 


123.04 


122.60 


122.. 56 


122.00 


122.10 


121.36 


119.59 


121.45 


May 


122.65 


123.04 


123.07 


123.04 


122.77 


122.75 


121.79 


122.29 


121.84 


121.70 


122.84 




123.23 


123.29 


122.34 


122.77 


121.85 


122.64 


121.98 


122.25 


120.90 


121.83 


122.82 




123.33 


122.97 


122.98 


122.77 


122.10 


122.50 


122.19 


121.25 


118.79 


121.08 


121.64 


August .... 


123.39 


122.80 


122.23 


122.75 


122.19 


122.23 


122.06 


122.14 


118.48 


120.50 


121.69 


September . . 


123.29 


122.81 


122.52 


122.12 


122.50 


122.35 


121.50 


123.44 


119.04 


118.65 


122.45 


October .... 


123.29 


123.03 


122.65 


122.31 


122.58 


122.64 


119.54 


122.96 


119.09 


117.60 


122.81 


November . . 


123.38 


122.75 


122.89 


122.56 


122.46 


122.60 


116.94 


120.98 


119.69 


118.43 


123.03 


December . . . 


123.24 


122.64 


122.37 


122.00 


122.92 


122.50 


117.71 


121.06 


119.71 


120.17 


121.38 


Yearly Average 


123.21 


122.89 


122.69 


122.65 


122.48 


122.58 


121.02 


121.63 


119.91 


119.96 


121.72 



*New gauge put in, with a zero point .08 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 
Maximum high- water line, 125.00. 



Month. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873.* 


1874. 


1875. 


January . . 
















102.00 


116.90 


120.76 


121.32 


121.79 


February . 


















102.81 


120.46 


120.26 


120.19 


120.86 


March . . . 


















105.19 


122.29 


120.11 


119.95 


119.90 


April . . . 


















110.48 


122.52 


121.55 


120.16 


121.80 


May .... 


















116.21 


122.54 


122.03 


121.93 


123.11 


June .... 


















121.46 


122.35 


121.24 


122.11 


123.19 


July .... 


















122.40 


121.77 


119.65 


121.50 


122.13 


August . . 


















122.02 


122.15 


119.32 


121.00 


122.03 


September . 
















1 . . 


121.44 


122.77 


119.74 


119.75 


122.70 


October . . 


















. 119.67 


122.08 


119.70 


119.15 


123.09 


November . 














100.80 


117.08 


122.42 


120.21 


119.32 


123.24 


December . 














101.29 


115.35 


121.40 


120.21 


120.61 


122.95 


Yearly Average . . . 


101.04 


114.67 


121.64 


120.40 


120.58 


122.23 



*New gauge put in, with a zero point .18 of a foot higher than that of the old gauge. 



Eeport or the Water Board. 



45 



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Keport of the Water Board. 



49 



Table showing the depths of water in the conduit at the gate-house, Lake 
Cochituate, the number of days it was running at those depths, and the 
average depth for each month : — 



1875. 


a 

a 




-' 

3 




3 


a 

3 


'a 

1-5 


bb 

3 
< 


ft 
m 


a 

© 


> 

o 


o 

ft 


rt 2. 

O o! 


0-0 .. . 


1 
1 


i 










1 












2 


3-11. . . 




















1 


4-3. . . 


i 
i 
i 

2 






















1 


4-4. . . 






















1 


4-6 .. . 






















1 


4-8 .. . 






















2 


5-4. . . 






















1 


5-6 .. . 




2 

3 

8 
2 




















2 


5-9 .. . 












1 












1 


5-10. . . 












3 


5-11. . . 




















8 


6-0 .. . 




















2 


6-1 .. . 


1 

1 

27 






















1 


6-3 .. . 


1 
20 

1 










1 
1 
1 












1 


6-4 .. . 












1 


6-5 .. . 












2 


6-6 .. . 


1 

14 


















2 


6-11. . . 


30 


7 

2 

1 

10 


15 
1 


1 

25 












1 


7-0 .. . 


3 










141 


7-1 .. . 










3 


7-2 .. . 














1 


















10 


7-4 .. . 






1 

9 
18 










2 




1 




11 


14 












34 


7-7 .. . 


30 


31 


30 


2 
2 
1 
20 
1 
5 


112 
















2 
1 
20 
1 
5 
365 















Average Monthly Depths. 










1875. 


c 
OS 

1-5 


& 

£ 


a 


ft 
-3 


03 
3 


a 

3 
►5 


3 
1-5 


< 
7'-6" 


ft 
m 


O 


> 
o 


6 
A 






6'-9" 


6'-6" 


6'-6" 


7'-0" 


7'-3" 


7'-3" 


6 '-11" 


7'-7" 


7'-7" 


7'-7" 


8'-0" 


7'-2£" 

X 



50 



City Document No. 80. 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Cochituate, Boston and 
vicinity, 1849 to 1875, inclusive. 









Places and Observers. 








> > 


2 "* 


£ . 

t- u 
M a 


CD o 
c bo 

O M 

M>E 


C a 


CI . 

s ~ 


O 


Year. 


+3 

<P - 


cT - a 

So a 


MI'S 

S o 


e o 3 


&3 

" 2 


i-3 c 
E 

^O . 

s|.| 

i<3£ 


>> 

a 

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2* 




h-H 


pq 


O 


i-i 


M 


Ph 






40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


41.91 




34.69 


1850 ....... 




53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


51.09 




51.49 


1851 




44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


45.68 




43.38 


1852 


*47.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 




38.58 




*55.73 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


. • 


53.27 




43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 




46.25 




34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 




40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 


1857 


63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


62.02 


44.75 




48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 " 


35.80 


44.51 




49.02 


56.70 




48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.16 


1860 


55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


45.97 


46.91 


46.67 


38.44 


1861 


45.44 


50.07 


50.14 


36.51 


43.32 


42.95 


44.25 




49.69 


61.06 


57.21 


46.42 


44.26 


44.61 


50.14 


1863 


69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


55.17 


1864 


42.60 


49.30 


39.46 


36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 




49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38.82 


44.69 




62.32 


50.70 




43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.02 




66.25 


65.64 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 




49.71 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


49.58 


53.62 




64.34 


66.28 


47.98 


47.30 


47.30 


48.96 


47.70 




55.89 


59.73 


41.53 


39.40 


46.30 


48.71 


49.02 




45-39 


48.33 


40.56 


36.82 


44.45 


44.17 


47.91 




48.47 


58.04 


52.73 


45.80 


44.32 


48.67 


48.71 




45.43 


54.94 


46.81 


42.58 


39.86 


45.05 


52.56 




35.93 


41.09 


38.73 


32.32 


35.68 


41.75 


43.39 




45.49 


51.01 


51.00 


40.30 


40.29 


43.63 


52.22 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



51 



Table showing the Rainfall in Boston for the year 1875, and the days on 
which it occurred, from observations by Wm. H. Bradley, Esq., Superin- 
tendent of Sewers. 



Day. 


>> 

C3 

3 

a 
ci 
1-3 


>> 

u 

a 


1 1 

5 1 

3 






c 

a 
s 


3 
>-5 


3 
60 

3 
< 


1 

m 


u 

X! 
O 

O 


S 

> 

O 


S 

CJ 

CD 




1 . . . . 




.21 
.12 

.02 


1.18 
1.24 

.03 














.03 --- 




3 . . . . 




.36 
.02 








1.42 










4 . . . . 


.76 
.02 


2.53 

.18 
.02 


.48 

.42 
5.30 


1.50 

.22 


.24 
.08 


.03 
.08 








6 . . . . 








7. . . . 

9 . . . . 


2.53 




.06 


10 ... . 






.45 


.14 


.53 
1.57 

.28 




13. . . . 


.16 




.02 
.04 


.56 

.72 

.40 




.24 






.35 


.04 


16 ... . 










.12 
.08 


.40 


.12 
1.44 


.21 
.05 


.44 
.52 


.03 












.15 


18 ... . 












.48 
.29 


.30 


.48 
.02 








19 ... . 


.04 


.02 
.36 






.22 


.17 




.02 




20 ... . 


.70 






21 ... . 














.20 








23 ... . 














1.32 








.30 

.99 


.04 


24 ... . 






.16 








.45 


25 ... . 


.48 


1.01 




























.03 


02 
.08 




.36 


.30 


.62 
.35 


.13 








.03 


29 ... . 


.34 
















.12 


.01 




30 ... . 












.02 


.20 






.04 














Total . 


3.24 


3.62 


5.76 


4.46 


3.89 


7.73 


3.84 


3.50 


3.32 


5.06 


5.62 


0.97 



Total for the year 51.01 inches. 



52 City Document No. 80. 



REPORT ON A PECULIAR CONDITION OF THE 
WATER SUPPLIED TO THE CITY OF BOSTON. 

By Prof. Nichols, Dr. Farlow, and Mr. Burgess. 

Jos. P. Davis, Esq., City Engineer : — 

Dear Sir, — In the latter part of October, 1875, I was 
requested by you to investigate the condition of the water 
supplied to the city, with reference to which there were 
numerous and well-founded complaints, and to ascertain, if 
possible, the cause of the peculiar taste then affecting the 
water. On October 27th, in company with Mr. FitzGerald, 
I visited the lake and the several reservoirs, and found that 
the bad taste was entirely confined to the Bradlee basin of 
the Chestnut-Hill reservoir. The water of the lake and 
that in the Brookline reservoir were free from the peculiar 
"cucumber " taste which was so strongly marked in the city 
and at Chestnut Hill. As far as I was able to observe, the 
taste was nearly uniformly diffused throughout the Bradlee 
basin ; the Lawrence basin, separated at the connecting gate- 
house by an embankment only 100 feet wide, was perfectly 
free. On,, Saturday, October 30, the gates were closed and 
no water was supplied to the city from the Bradlee basin 
until April 1, 1876. For some time after the reservoir was 
thus isolated there seemed to be no change, but after some 
weeks the taste became less marked, and then gradually 
passed away. The taste seemed to pass away first from the 
surface near the office, and to remain the longest in the 
coves on the north side. On February 21 it had disap- 
peared from the water in the neighborhood of the gate- 
house and about the margin of the basin, and on the 1st of 
April the water was let into the pipes. 

The taste to most persons seems like that of "cucum- 
bers ; " other persons, and indeed the same persons at other 
times, have pronounced it a "fishy" taste. At Brookline 
reservoir, especially at the screens, a " fishy " taste may 
usually be noticed ; at Chestnut Hill I never distinguished 
anything but the " cucumber " taste. 

When the water was allowed to stand in an open vessel, 
the taste soon passed away; when boiled an unpleasant odor 
was perceived, and the water when cold was found to have 
lost the peculiar taste. When the water was distilled some- 
thing of the same taste was observed in the condensed water, 
but it was almost overpowered by the disagreeable earthy 






Krport of the Water Board. 53 

taste which is always to be perceived in water produced by 
distilling a soft water containing vegetable matter. Filtra- 
tion through bone-black did not remove the taste completely, 
although even a sponge-filter would retain some odorous and 
unpalatable matter. 

I must frankly confess that as yet I am quite in the dark 
as to the cause of the trouble, although I have made a care- 
ful examination of the circumstances which would seem able 
to throw any light on the subject. Various theories have 
been proposed to account for the occurrence, most of which 
are untenable. It may be well to allude to some of them 
and to point out the bearing of our observations upon them. 
I may say, however, what is well known to those who have 
professionally to do with the water-supply of cities, that 
many reservoirs, perhaps most reservoirs of considerable 
size, are liable at times to be affected in some way, by which 
the water for a longer or shorter period is rendered un- 
pleasant and sometimes absolutely unfit for use. In the fall 
and winter of 18*>4, Lake Cochituate itself was affected by 
a trouble, the cause of which was never satisfactorily 
ascertained, but which manifested itself by a " cucumber " or 
"fishy" taste, precisely similar, as far as I can learn, to that 
which has been observed the present winter. 

In many cases where examination has been made of an 
affected water, certain things have been regarded as causes 
which are probably accidental accompaniments, or which 
would be found also, if sought for, in the water when un- 
affected ; and the individual observer, considering only the 
conditions of his particular case, conceives that he has, 
without doubt, discovered the cause of the trouble, and in 
some instances the theories advanced are not unreasonable. 
It is not necessary to suppose that the cause is the same in 
every case. 

I have had correspondence and personal intercourse with 
a number of persons in charge of water works, and am now 
examining other cases where trouble has occurred. At' 
some future time I hope to communicate to the Board the 
results of my efforts to collect all available information in 
the matter, together with the results of experiments now in 
progress, and others planned for the summer months when I 
have more time at my command. 

Theories that have been suggested. 

First. Many persons are confident that the dead body of 
some animal decaying in the pond is the cause of the bad 
taste. I am convinced that this solution of the problem is 



54 City Document No. 80. 

out of the question. Repeated chemical examination of the 
water could hardly have failed to detect an abnormal amount 
of ammonia and of nitrogenized animal matter, if such were 
the case, even supposing that nothing either sooner or 
later was noticed by those employed about the works. If 
dead fish were the cause they would also be discovered at 
the screens and at the borders of the reservoir. None such 
have been observed. 

Second. — Some assign the cause to decaying vegetable 
matter. This was the theory to which some who investi- 
gated the question in 1854 seemed to lean. While it is not 
impossible that this may be directly or indirectly the cause, 
it is to be considered that the Bradlee basin is the most free 
of all the reservoirs from vegetable deposit, and that its bed 
was prepared with great care ; and if this water was bad from 
this cause, we should expect to find that of the Lawrence 
basin and the Brookline reservoir much worse. Moreover, 
I have been unable to produce any similar taste from the 
leaves of the various species of trees which grow in the 
neighborhood, from the mud taken from the bottom of the 
reservoir, or from rotten wood, by soaking these various 
articles in water. 

In some cases, as at Holyoke, Mass., where the muck bot- 
tom of the pond has been recently disturbed, and at Keene, 
N. H., where there is a large amount of shallow water resting 
on ground somewhat recently cleared from growing trees and 
shrubs, and where, consequently, much vegetable matter is 
undergoing decay, it is not unnatural to assign the cause to 
vegetable decomposition. In these instances, the taste and 
odor are distinctly " fishy," and not those of cucumbers. 
But even here I am not prepared to say that vegetable decay 
is the actual cause. 

Third. — It was firmly believed by some that the trouble 
in 1854 was caused by an abnormal condition of the minute 
Crustacea (principally cyclops) which was then observed.* 
Whatever may have been the case then, this is certainly not 
the cause of the recent trouble, as these little creatures were, 
if anything, less abundant th m usual, and in no abnormal 
condition. In order that any statement on this point might 
be made with authority, I requested Mr. Edward Burgess, 
Secretary of the Boston Society of Natural History, who has 
made a special study of Crustacea, to investigate the matter, 
which he kindly consented to do. His statement of the 

♦Rankine's Civil Engineering (edition of 1874), page 737, refers to such a 
case (this same case of Cochituate lake?), which was examined by H. D. 
Rogers. It is said that the remedy was to stock the lake with fish. I am 
informed that there is no deficiency of fish in the Bradlee basin. 



Keport of the Water Board. 55 

results of his examination of the water and of various deposits 
collected from the bottom of the pond, from the screens and 
the gate-house, and from sponge-filters, through which a 
quantity of water had been passed, will follow this report. 

Fourth. — It has been suggested that the cause was the 
abnormal growth of some low order of vegetable life. This 
opinion has considerable weight, as there are a number of 
places where the bad taste has been accompanied by, and by 
many believed to be caused by, an abundant growth of 
microscopic plants. Such has been the case at the Ludlow 
reservoir (Springfield water supply), where a copious growth 
of a member of the Nostoc family was accompanied by a 
marked odor and taste of " green corn." Such is the case on 
the filter-beds at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where certain oscilla- 
toriae develop in the heat of the summer to a great extent ; 
such is the case at New Britain, Conn., where the trouble 
occurs periodically; at Albany, N. Y., and in some of the 
reservoirs^ in London, England. In fact, I do not remember 
to have encountered a case, except our own, where the 
" cucumber " taste has been distinctly noticed, without some 
such accompanying growth. In the case of Jamaica pond, 
there was a disagreeable taste and odor to the water (not 
that of cucumbers, however), with reference to which, it is 
stated by Mr. S. Dana Hayes,* who examined the water : 
" By filtration through paper, the water becomes clear and 
brilliant, the odor and taste of the filtered water being natu- 
ral ; and it is possible in this way to separate the offensive 
matter from the water, and retain it for examination. This 
substance, which gives odor, taste, and additional weight to 
the impurities, consists of organized and vegetating bodies, 
which, as seen with the lens, are short, white threads, some- 
what like conferva in form ; but the threads are very short 
and perfectly white, differing in these respects from the green 
or brown confervoid growth of the summer months. 

. " Crustaceous animalculaB, common in the water 
usually, are not to be found, while there is an extraordinary 
growth of subaqueous vegetation, of a low order of organized 
forms, emitting a repulsive odor." In this case, boiling did 
not remove the offensive odor and taste. 

In order that the present investigations on this point might 
be perfectly conclusive, application was made to Dr. W. (x. 
Farlow to conduct the observations. Dr. Farlow is Assistant 
Professor of Botany in Harvard University, and is acknowl- 
edged to be one of the first authorities in the United States 
on the lower order of plants, to which he has specially devoted 

* American Chemist, II. (1872), p. 323. 



56 City Document No. 80. 

himself. His report, which follows, shows that nothing was 
discovered either in the water or in the sediment from the 
bottom and sides of the reservoir, or in the slime which col- 
lects on the screens, which can be accused of being the cause 
of the evil. I may say, also, that since the conclusion of the 
trouble I have collected some more of these slimy deposits, 
and had them submitted to Dr. Farlow. No essential differ- 
ence was discovered between the slime in its present tasteless 
condition, and that previously examined. 

Other theories than those which I have mentioned have 
been proposed, to which it is not necessary to allude. I do 
not feel that we possess sufficient evidence as yet to lead to 
the adoption of any theory. In conducting the chemical 
examinations I have, as a rule, compared, in every point, the 
water possessing taste, from Bradlee basin, with tasteless 
water from the lake, or from the Brookline reservoir, or with 
the water delivered in Boston. With the exception of the 
very volatile or easily decomposed matter which gives the 
"cucumber" taste, and which we have not succeeded in 
isolating, there is nothing in which the water of the Bradlee 
basin has been inferior to the water delivered in Boston. I 
have examined, at various times, the water itself, samples of 
the deposit from the bottom of the reservoir taken at different 
points, as well as the material collected on sponge-filters and 
on the screens. I have been able to detect no essential differ- 
ence which could be regarded as the cause of the trouble. 
I have made experiments on the oily matter referred to in 
the reports of Dr. Farlow and Mr. Burgess, but I have not 
discovered any difference between the two waters in this 
respect, unless possibly there has been a trifle more in the 
Bradlee basin than in the Brookline reservoir (and even this 
I doubt) . I have extracted the oil by various means from 
the water, and for comparison, from several species of plants 
growing in the reservoir, also from the deposit on the bottom 
and on the sponge-filters. I cannot see any reason to regard 
it as the cause of the trouble, nor when isolated does it have 
the taste in question. The oil is certainly in part of vege- 
table origin ; no doubt some comes from animal sources, but 
what proportion it is impossible to tell. I have also com- 
pared the two reservoirs with reference to the dissolved 
oxygen in the water, but no marked difference exists. 

I do not regard it as at all impossible that the taste may 
have been due to some cause which had passed away before 
systematic observations were begun, and as there was no 
discharge of the water from the Bradlee Basin after October 
30, it required considerable time for so large a body of water 



Eeport of the Water Board. 57 

to lose the taste, although a small amount of the water in a 
pitcher or other vessel became tasteless after a short time. 

In comparing my first observation of the water in the 
basin with your observation of the water in the pipes on the 
preceding day, there would seem to be no doubt that 
the trouble originated in the pipes themselves, and that 
the impregnation (if I may use the word) of the whole 
basin required not more than twenty-four hours. It was a 
consideration of this sudden development, which made me 
think that the trouble might be due to the rapid multiplica- 
tion of some low order of animal or vegetable life ; but 
when the microscopical examination began, nothing was 
discovered to bear out this idea. 

It would seem desirable to watch the reservoirs rather 
closely during the coming summer and fall, in order that if 
the trouble should occur again, we might be able to inves- 
tigate it in its early stages. In addition to collecting such 
further data on the subject as I may be able, I propose to 
keep such a watch myself. . I may further state that Dr. 
Farlow has promised, during the coming spring and summer, 
to make some experiments on the taste communicated to 
water by different varieties of microscopic plants, a matter 
of great interest, and one about which we know very little. 
I shall be very glad to lay before the Water Board such 
information as we may be able to obtain. 

As there is yet no certainty as to the cause of the trouble, 
it is not, of course, possible to suggest any means either of 
prevention or cure. There is no proof that the water 
would be actually injurious to a healthy person, although it 
was certainly very unpalatable. It is a matter of congrat- 
ulation that the whole water-supply was not affected, and 
that it was possible to avoid using the affected water. 
Yours, very respectfully, 



WM. RIPLEY NICHOLS. 



Mass. Institute of Technology, 
April 3, 1876. 



58 



City Document No. 80. 



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Report of the Water Board. 59 



REPORT OF DR. FARLOW. 

To Prof. W. R. Nichols : — 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to transmit the results of 
the examinations made by me at your request, by order of 
the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Boston. 
The object of the examination was to ascertain, if possible, 
whether the peculiar taste of the Cochituate water, known as 
the " cucumber" taste, arose from any vegetable matter or 
organism, which could be detected by the microscope. 
Having been informed by you that the taste was confined to 
the water of the Bradlee basin, I went to Chestnut Hill to 
examine that basin. The arrangements for surface drainage 
were explained to me by Mr. FitzGerald, and it seemed 
highly improbable that anything could have been washed 
into the reservoir from the surrounding land ; and, as the 
taste was not found in the water of the aqueduct above, it 
was evident that the cause of the trouble must be looked 
for in the Bradlee basin itself. I tasted of the water at the 
surface, and at the bottom in different parts of the basin. 
It seemed to me that the taste was decidedly stronger on 
the surface than at the bottom ; but this opinion was not 
confirmed by Mr. FitzGerald, who was with me at the time. 
I took away with me a quantity of water and some of the 
deposit at the bottom for examination. Since, I have 
examined two cloths which had been allowed to remain 
some hours on the gratings of the Bradlee basin and the 
Brookline reservoir [i. e., on the wire-screens in the gate- 
houses, av. r. n.] ; a number of bottles containing speci- 
mens of water, and the deposit from the last-named reser- 
voir ; and, finally, material collected on sponge-filters at 
Brookline and at Chestnut Hill. As would naturally be 
supposed, the largest amount of floating material was col- 
lected by the sponge-filters, but, except as regards quantity 
of material, the results were the same. It will be borne in 
mind that I am speaking only of the vegetable matter in the 
water. 

First. In neither reservoir, the Bradlee basin nor Brook- 
line, was there found any peculiar vegetable organism such 
as might not be expected in any fresh-water pond of this 
region. 

Second. The plants found in both reservoirs were practically 
the same, consisting mainly of unicellular and filamentous 
algse and fragments of higher plants. The algae belonged, 
principally, to the orders Palmellaceoe, Diatomacece and 



60 City Document No. 80. 

Conjugate®. Of the diatoms, which were more numerous 
than any other plants, I need mention only Stephanodiscus 
Niagaras, Asterionella formosa and a small Melosira, which 
were much more abundant than any other species, both 
floating, and in the deposits of the Brookline reservoir as 
well as of the Bradlee basin. The Conjugates, were prin- 
cipally desmids belonging to the common genera Desmid- 
ium, Sphcerozosma, Xanthidium, Olosterum, Micrasterias, 
besides a species of Spirogyra, the largest alga found, 
which occurred in small quantities in the water of both 
reservoirs, but which was found, at one time, in a consider- 
able mass by Mr. FitzGerald in the Bradlee basin. Of 
flowering plants, with the exception of a Potamogeton 
found in the Bradlee basin, only fragments were seen. 
From the enumeration just given, it will be seen that there 
is nothing which, under ordinary circumstances, could pro- 
duce the cucumber taste. The algae which most commonly 
produce disagreeable odors and tastes belong to the order 
Nostochineae, but none of these were seen in the water 
examined microscopically, nor have they been observed in 
any part of the reservoir. The alga vulgarly called " frog- 
spawn," Batrachospermum moniliforme, being unusually 
abundant in brooks in the town of Newton, it occurred to 
me that there might be a quantity of this plant growing 
concealed in the Bradlee basin. Experiments with the 
frog-spawn, however, show that when decaying, the plant 
gives to water a peculiar taste, but not that complained of 
in the Cochituate water. 

Third. — Looking at the relative quantity of vegetable 
matter, much more was found in the Brookline reservoir 
than in the Bradlee basin. This is accounted for by the fact, 
of which I was not aware at the beginning of my observa- 
tions, that the Brookline reservoir has not been cleaned out 
for quite a number of years, and has a large deposit on the 
bottom. The water of the Bradlee basin is unusually clear 
and free from vegetable matter, particularly fragments of 
leaves. 

Fourth. — Although the species of plants in the Bradlee 
basin are not such as would naturally produce any "cucum- 
ber " taste in the water, the question arose whether it might 
not be caused by them when in a state of decomposition. 
It was, principally, for the purpose of settling this point 
that comparative examinations were made of the water in the 
Bradlee basin and that in the Brookline reservoir. The veg- 
etable matter in both cases was often far advanced in decom- 
position, as was shown by the presence of oil in the cells of 
the algae. Some of the oil in the water was undoubtedly 



Report of the Water Board. 61 

due to other causes than vegetable decomposition but some 
must certainly be attributed to that cause. The quantity of 
oil seemed to me somewhat greater in the Bradlee basin than 
in the Brookline reservoir, but on the supposition that the 
oil causes the cucumber taste, how are we to account for the 
lack of taste in the Brookline reservoir? 

In conclusion, I would give it as my opinion that the 
cucumber taste is not caused by the presence of any living 
plant nor by any plant undergoing any form of decomposi- 
tion which can be detected by the microscope.' Repeated 
examinations of the water and deposit have shown practi- 
cally the same result in the case of the Bradlee basin where 
the taste is very marked and in the the Brookline reservoir 
where it is entirely wanting. As no additional light seems 
likely to be thrown upon the subject by further botanical in- 
vestigation, I should hardly think it advisable to spend more 
money in that direction. Certainly, if any further investi- 
gations are to be made, there is no probability of obtaining 
any definite results from the botanical side of the question, 
unless a long time — several months, or even years — is de- 
voted to the subject. 

Respectfully submitted. 

(Signed) W. G. FARLOW. 

Dec. 14, 1875. 



REPORT OF MR. BURGESS. 

To Professor W. R. Nichols : — 

Dear Sir : — I beg to present the following report in 
answer to the question you have asked me to consider, viz. : 
" Is there any reason to attribute the disagreeable taste of 
the water in the Bradlee basin at Chestnut Hill to its animal 
inhabitants ? " 

As nothing abnormal in the condition of the fishes of the 
basin is known, my attention has been wholly devoted to the 
smaller animals and, chiefly, to the Crustacea, since in 1854 
some of the gentlemen busied with the solution of the so- 
called "cucumber taste" question asserted that a species of 
cyclops, a very common genus of Entomostraca, was the 
cause of the trouble. They believed that the cyclopses in 
the Cochituate water then examined, contained an unusual 
amount of oily matter, and they stated that if a few of these 
animals were crushed and placed in distilled water, the " cu- 
cumber taste " was produced. VYithout opening the question 



62 City Document No. 80. 

as far as concerns that time, the following examinations show 
that this theory fails to adapt itself to present facts. 

Specimens of Entomostraca were collected between No- 
vember 6 and November 8 in both the Bradlee basin, to 
which the cucumber taste is confined, and in Lake Cochitu- 
ate, whose water is tasteless, and sent to me in bottles of 
their respectives waters for comparison. It may be observed 
here that Entomostraca are scarce in our water-supply this 
season, while I have known seasons when it was impossible 
to draw a glass of water without obtaining some of these 
little animals. In the bottle of lake water I found Ento- 
mostraca belonging to the genera Latona, Bosmina, Daphnia, 
Diaptomus and Cyclops, while the water from the Bradlee 
basin contained the last two genera only : in later specimens 
from the basin, however, Latona and Daphnia were also 
found. The species of these genera were alike from both 
localities and the individual specimens showed no distin- 
guishing peculiarities while the cyclops from the lake were 
quite as oily* as those from the basin. I crushed several of 
the latter and placed them on my tongue but could detect 
no taste of any kind. It is interesting also to note that the 
water sample from the basin, although tasting strongly when 
given to me, had, by December 20, become perfectly taste- 
less, while living specimens of cyclops and diaptomus were 
quite as numerous as at first. 

For the sake of further comparison, I have also examined 
specimens of water and sediment from the bottoms of the 
Bradlee basin and the Brookline reservoir. The former 
sample (i'. e. from the Bradlee basin) contained cyclops, 
fairiy abundant, and a few infusoria. The sediment con- 
sisted chiefly of inorganic matter with a small amount of 
vegetable matter, for the most part in a state of decompsi- 
tion. The sample from the Brookline reservoir contained 
an equally large number of cyclops and swarmed with a 
small species of Cypris (also a genus of Entomostraca), 
besides containing various infusorians, insect larvae, etc. : in 
short, the amount of animal life was very large in comparison 
with the basin sample. The sediment was chiefly vegetable 
matter and contained common desmids, diatoms and other 
algse living and dead, but of which it is unnecessary to speak, 
as I understand the botany of our water-supply is being 
investigated by Dr. Farlow. This sediment also contained 
plenty of entomostracan remains. 

I have also examined the following material from the 
Bradlee basin with similar negative results. 

*AU Entomostraca contain oil, the amount varying with supply of food. 



Report of the Water Board. - 63 

November 10. Sample of surface water containing a large 
quantity of ciuders and tasting strongly. Latona, daphnia, 
and cyclops were present, but of perfectly normal appear- 
ance. A sample of bottom sediment of about the same date 
seemed to contain little besides vegetable matter with a very 
few infusoria and a very few remains of Entomostraca. 

A quantity of slime, collected by a sponge-filter, Novem- 
ber 20, was also found to be almost exclusively vegetable 
matter, which seemed to me, I may observe, rather unusually 
oily. A few living cyclops, rotifers and infusoria were 
found here, as well as a small amount of entomostracan 
remains, but neither living or dead Entomostraca were as 
abundant as I have usually found them while collecting these 
animals by filters from our water in previous years. 

Samples of slime scraped, November 29, from the wooden 
burs crossing the screens in the gate-house and which gave 
an extremely strong cucumber taste, like the last sample, 
contained little ehe than desmids, diatoms and other vegeta- 
ble organisms; while of animals a few infusoria, rotifers, a 
worm or two, and portions of latona shells were alone 
noticed. 

Besides the samples already referred to, pieces of cloth 
which had been placed over the screens at the outlets of the 
Brookline reservoir and Bradlee basin were also given me, 
but these had already become dry before I saw them, and a 
soaking revealed only a small quantity of entomostracan 
remains, with a few insect larvse, etc. , and showed no difference 
between the cloths from the two localities in these respects. 

I should state that repeated examinations have been made 
of each sample referred to, in order to be sure of a fair aver- 
age result. 

It will, therefore, be seen that all examination, so far, has 
been unable to detect either the presence of unusually large 
numbers of microscopic animals of any kind, or any abnor- 
mal appearances in those which have been noticed. The 
theory that a peculiarly oily condition of any species of 
Entomostraca is correlated with the " cucumber taste " is, in 
this case at least, entirely without foundation. 

To your question, heading this report, I am obliged to 
give a decided negative answer. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) EDWARD BURGESS. 

Boston, Dec. 29, 1875. 



64 



City Document No. 80. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Western Division Boston Water Works, 

May 1, 1876. 
Hon. L. Miles Standish, 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — In compliance with the rules of the Board, I re- 
spectfully submit the following report for the past official 
year. 

Lake Cochituate. 

Owing to the temporary connection with Sudbury river, 
we have had practically a full lake during the whole year. 
On May 1st, 1875, the water stood at 12 feet 4 inches ; but 
before the middle of the month it had risen to high-water 
mark. This level was held till the 1st of July, from which 
time a gradual decline carried the water to 8 feet 9 inches on 
January 13, 1876, the lowest point reached during the 
year. 

An inspection of the following table of the quantity of 
water received from the Sudbury will show that if it 
had not been for this source of supply, the city would have 
been in as bad a position during the past winter as it was 
the year before, when pumping was resorted to for three 
months. 

Water was run into the lake from the Sudbury river 



during — ' 




8 days in May . 


203,100,000 gallons 


8 " " June . 


144,300,000 « 


18 " " July . 


323,100,000 " 


25 " " August 


393,100,000 « 


10 " " October 


158,800,000 " 


18 " " January 


435,200,000 « 


19 " " February . 


491,400,000 " 


4 " " March 


22,000,000 " 


Total . . . 


2,171,000,000 " 



Report of the Water Board. 65 

On the 21st of March, 1876, occurred the first of a series 
of freshets. The amount of rain and snow at the lake was 
only 2.27 inches, but the water ran off the surface of 
the ground so rapidly, that it rose from 11 feet 1 inch on the 
the 21st, to 12 feet 10 inches on the 25th; a gain of 21 
inches in four days. During a part of this time the lake 
filled thirteen inches in twenty-four hours. The succeeding 
large rainfalls, which caused so much damage throughout 
the country, passed over our dams without doing any injury. 
The amount of waste at the lower dam varied from 10 inches 
to 21 inches, covering a period of eighteen days. 

The lake now stands five inches below high-water. 

In the autumn of 1875, an iron weir was put in at the 
lower dam to measure more accurately the waste from the 
Cochituate water-shed in times of flood when we are unable 
to store the water. 

The weir is cast in one piece, 23 feet in length. A brass 
bushing at the top forms the overflow. The work was done 
in a most creditable manner by the Boston Machine Com- 
pany. The weir was carefully levelled and straightened 
before bolting to the masonry. A gate was added in the- 
centre compartment of the dam. It is worked from a 
bridge spanning the opening, and is arranged to travel on a 
screw without interfering with the flow over the weir. We 
were not obliged to open it during the recent floods. 

The negotiations for the sale of the lands around Dug 
Pond to Natick, which were pending last year, were consum- 
mated February 19, 1S76, by the payment of $3,644.13. 

Some slight improvements have been made at the lake in 
the way of fences and the setting out of trees. 

The Aqueduct 

has been run under a head during nearly the whole year to 
keep up with the increased consumption. The head has 
varied from 14 inches during the summer and autumn to 26 
inches during the winter. 

The water has been shut off for examination and repairs 
but twice : on July 13, the gates were closed for six hours, 
at which time the water was wasted only between Grantviile 
and Newton Lower Falls ; on July 27, the connections were 
made with the siphon-chambers of the new 40-inch pipe, 
and a careful examination made of the whole aqueduct. 

The following reports from Messrs. Stearns and Rice, 
who made the examinations, will show that there has been 
no material change in the brick-work since the previous* 
inspection : — 

5 



66 



City Document No. 80. 



Examination, by 3fr. F. P. Steams, of Cochituate Conduit from Dedman's 
Brook to Grantville Waste Weir, July 27, 1875. 



Station. 



157 
158 



164 
167 + 10 



172 
173 

173 + 75 

174 

174 + 10 
175 
177 
179 
180 
182 
183 
184 
194 

196 + 15 

200 
207 
208 
216 
223 
241 

242 

246 

247 + 05 



6.33 
6.34 

6.35 

6.32 

6.36 
6.31 

6.30 
6.32 
6.21 
6.18 
6.21 
6.26 
6.33 
6.31 
6.35 
6.33 
6.32 
6.31 
6.31 

6.38 
6.34 
6.30 
6.31 
6.33 
6.32 
6.31 

6.39 
6.29 

6.27 



Width. 



5.07 
6.05 

5.04 

5.09 
5.16 
5.13 

5.23 
5.14 
5.23 
5.31 
5.30 
5.18 
5.05 
5.10 
5.07 
5.05 
5.06 
5.02 
5.00 

5.02 
5.00 
5.06 
5.11 
5.03 
6.10 
5.03 

4.99 
6.17 
5.15 



Remarks. 



Entered Conduit, at Dedman's, at 10.20 A.M. 



Slight crack in top from Station 157 + 05 to 
158 + 40. 



Slight crack in top from 163 + 50 to 163 + 75. 

Crack in side 10 feet long. 

Slight crack in top from 169 + 05 to 170. + 65. 



Cracks in top and hottom from 173+ 20 to 174 
+ 40. Widest at 174 + 10. 



There are cracks in the top from 177 -[-85 to 
181 + 50, but the form is good. 



Slight crack in top from 182 + 55 to 183 + 50 



Piles of mud and telegraph wire between 194 
and 195. 



Slight crack in top from 206 + 60 to 208 + 20. 



Slight crack in top from 240 + 70 to 241 + 40. 
Slight crack in top from 245 + 40 to 245+ 70. 



Eepoet of the' Water Boaed. 



67 



Examination by Mr. F. P. Stearns. — Continued. 



Station. 


Heig.it. 


Width. 


Remarks. 








Slight crack in top from 247+30 to 247 + 80. 








Slight crack from 248 + 40 to 249. 


249 


6.33 


5.04 




253 


6.28 


5.05 




254 


6.24 


5.21 




255 


6.33 


5.09 




255 + 40 


6.27 


5.16 




256 


6.33 


5.07 




257 


6.32 


5.04 




258 


6.32 


5.02 




273 


6.32 


5.16 




297 


6.23 


5.11 




298 


6.33 


5.06 


SECOND DIVISION-. 


1 


6.17 


5.05 


Large springs, bringing in but little sand, from 
to 1. 


2 


6.19 


5.02 




3 + 35 


6.19 


5.06 


Spring. 


5 


6.28 


5.03 




12 + 60 


6.20 


5.15 


Large springs. 


13 


6.15 


5.19 




13 + 55 


6.13 


5.20 


Large spring. 

Crack in top from 13 + 10 to 13 + 80. 


16 


6.13 


5.19 


Crack in top from 15+90 to 16 + 40. 


16 + 50 


6.18 


5.13 




17 + 50 


6.19 


5.15 


Large crack in top from 17 + 50 to 18. 


18+50 


6.13 


5.19 


Crack in top from 18 to 18 + 70. 


20 


6.33 


5.00 


Arrived at Grantville Waste Weir at 3.50 P.M. 



68 City Document No. 



Newton Centre, Mass., July 27, 1875. 
Mr. D. Fitz Gerald, Supt. Western Division: — 

Dear Sir, — At your request have made an examination 
of the Cochituate conduit from the east siphon chamber, 
Newton Lower Falls, to the intermediate gate-house at 
Chestnut-Hill reservoir, and find the conduit in about the 
same condition as at a previous examination in April, 1874. 

The only noticeable changes are the more cleanly condi- 
tion of the conduit, and the comparatively small amount of 
water running in from the outside through the joints, cracks, 
etc. 

Entered the east siphon chamber with two assistants at 
10| o'clock, A.M., there being about nine inches of water in 
the conduit. Commenced to take readings (with same rod 
used in 1874) of the maximum depths and widths of the 
conduit, at Station 145, and made the following notes of the 
changes, etc., not previously reported : — 



Report or the Water Board. 



69 



Station. 


Date. 


Size. 


Remarks. 




July 27 


6.36 X 5.05 




176 to 182 + 83 






Roots. 






6.32 X 5.00 








6.29 X 4.99 




224 






Roots. ^ 






6.31 X 5.00 




231 + 63 ... 






Crack in top for 20 feet. 








Cracks north and south of manhole. 






6.32 X 5.06 










Crack has increased in width. 


254 to 262 .. . 






No water running in from outside. 






6.32 X 5.07 


Arrived at Newton Centre Waste "Weir at 2.10 
P. M. Re-entered Conduit at 3 p. m. 






6.30 X 5.04 








6.34 X 5.09 




35 + 85 ... . 






Small stream left side. 






6.34 X 5.09 




41 + 40 . . . . 






No water from manhole. 

Newton Tunnel. — No springs from manhole west 
of tunnel. Several inches of mud whole length 
of tunnel ; more than at previous examination 
in 1874. 








Roots. 






6.35 X 5.03 


- 


100 




6.37 X 5.06 




118 to 129 + 20 




Cracked the whole length. 







Arrived at the intermediate gate-house at 6 P.M. 



Yours truly, 



GEORGE S. RICE. 



70 City Document No. 80. 

The flap-gates at the east-pipe chamber were repaired 
while the water was shut off. They were in bad order. 
The joints on the inside of the chamber were thoroughly 
filled and pointed. Pipe-gauges corresponding to that at 
the lake were put in at the same time, and lead pipes con- 
ducted to points beyond the junctions of the 40-inch main, 
giving the levels of the water at those places. During the 
summer the boundary lines on the aqueduct, between Welles- 
ley and Brookline reservoir, were run out and stone bounds 
set at all the corners. A list of encroachments on the city 
property has been presented to the Board. 



Chestnut-Hill Eeservoir. 

This reservoir has been shut off from the city for five 
months. On Oct. 30, the bad taste to the water, which had 
caused some annoyance, was located at Chestnut Hill. The 
water was shut off, and the bad taste, resembling cucumber, 
ceased. During the time that the gates at the reservoir 
remained closed a trial was made of the water by letting a 
small amount pass into the pipes, but it was quickly noticed 
in the city and the gates were again closed. The water in 
the reservoir gradually purified itself, and on April 1 it was 
turned on permanently to the distribution. 

On July 8, a heavy plank platform was sunk, by a diver, 
over the reservoir inlet to the drain-pipe chamber of the 
lower basin. It is so arranged as to be readily found and 
dragged off whenever it becomes necessary. A heavy ox- 
chain loop 11 feet long is attached to one end, and a 4-inch 
by 4-inch pole, 15 feet long, fastened to the other. There is 
an iron ring 12 inches in diameter at the extremity of the 
pole. 

Another of the revolving screens has been replaced in the 
effluent gate-house. 

The outfall to the large sewer has been improved by dig- 
ging out the brook channel and walling up the sides for a 
short distance. The fence around the reservoir grounds 
needs rebuilding. Lengths of it are blown down every 
little while by the wind. It is built of spruce posts 4 inches 
by 4 inches, sharpened, and driven into the ground 18 inches 
with a maul. 

Some preparations have been made this spring for a sys- 
tematic course of tree-planting in certain portions of the 
grounds, both at Chestnut Hill and the lake. I am much 
indebted to Prof. C. S. Sargent, for valuable advice on this 
subject, and also for the present of a thousand rare trees 



Report of the Water Board. 71 

and shrubs for this purpose. More than six thousand trees 
have been set out, at very little cost to the city. A row of 
centennial elms has been set out around the county road. 

Brookline Eeservoir 

is in as good condition as usual. Nothing in the way of 
improvement has been done to this reservoir, except by 
removing some trees which were injuring others and plant- 
ing handsomer ones in better locations. 
The usual list of property is added. 

Very respectfully yours, 

DESMOND FITZGERALD, 

Sujpt. West. Div. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT LAKE 
COCHITUATE. 

1 parlor-table, 1 looking-glass, 1 stove, 1 extension-table, 
18 chairs, 1 map, 1 oil-cloth carpet, 1 cooking-range, 1 
marble-slab and wash-bowl, 1 horse, 1 buffalo-robe, 1 carry- 
all, 1 express-wagon, 1 pung, 1 express-harness, 1 light 
harness, 1 tipcart harness, 1 rain-gauge, 1 scale, 3 lanterns, 
5 pair rubber boots, 5 bars, 5 hand drills, 6 steel points, 2 
sledge-hammers, 2 hand-hammers, 7 picks, 2 grub-hoes, 2 
iron rakes, 6 hoes, 1 coal-shovel, 2 spades, 2 square-point 
shovels, 2 long-handle shovels, 4 stop-plank hooks, 2 ice- 
hooks, 8 buckets, 8 brooms, 7 wheelbarrows, 2 gravel- 
screens, 2 sieves, 2 boats, 2 pump-frames, 1 double pulley, 
3 ox-chains, 1 telegraph battery, 1 hand-saw, 1 manure-fork, 
2 hay-forks, 1 stone-roller, 1 grindstone, 1 scythe, 2 brushes, 
1 spirit-level, 3 axes, 1 drain-mould, 2 engines, 3 18-inch 
pumps, 3 12-inch pumps, 1 7-inch pump, 1 pair of hedge- 
shears, 2 ice-chisels, 7 lamps, 14 chimneys, 4 lamp tops, 2 
reflectors, 4 carriage-lamps, 14 glass oil-cups, 1 pair lamp- 
shears, 1 bitt-punch, 4 doz. wicks, 2 steam-gauges, 8 lamp- 
brackets, 2 lamps, 9 reflectors, 6 engine-belts. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT CHESTNUT-HILL 
RESERVOIR. 

1 two-horse express-wagon, 1 single ditto, 1 water-cart, 2 
two-horse water-carts, 2 iron road-rollers, 1 single horse 



72 City Document No. 80. 

pung, 1 two-horse pung, 1 horse truck, 1 horse power, 3 
horse carts, 1 hay-wagon, 2 hand-carts, 1 pair large wheels, 
1 two-horse sled, 1 two-horse plow, 1 drag, 1 Concord 
wagon, 1 carryall, 1 top-buggy, 10 harnesses, 9 blankets, 
1 rubber horse-covering, 7 horses, 1 tank, 7 gravel-screens, 
15 ox-tie chains, 1 7-inch pump, 2 5-inch pumps, 1 house 
force-pump, 1 raking-pump, 1 feed-pump, 1 force-pump, 1 
garden-engine, 2 Johnson's pumps, 4 clay-knives, 1 stone- 
crushing machine and castings, 1 blacksmith's forge and 
tools, 1 derrick and rigging, 1 man-head, 2 grub-axes, 35 
picks, 42 shovels, 13 spades, 6 hoes, 27 iron bars, 12 iron- 
rakes, 9 stone-hammers, 18 wooden rakes, 4 border-knives, 
1 root-puller, 7 snaiths, 2 scythes, 10 scythe-stones and 
rifles, 3 lawn-mowers, 8 hay-forks, 6 lanterns, 6 oil-cans, 3 
reflectors, 8 peat-knives, 6 tin dippers, 35 drills, 9 tin candle- 
sticks, 18 tire-buckets, 10 pails, 12 rattan-brooms, 6 wooden 
rammers, 8 wheelbarrows, 8 ladders, 2 grindstones, 2 jack- 
screws, 1 window-brush, 10 paint-brushes, 1 telegraph bat- 
tery, 7 rubber coats and caps, 11 pairs of rubber boots, 1 
rain-gauge, 1 set scales, 1 safe, 1 clock, 2 bushel baskets, 1 
4-bushel basket, 2 hay ropes, 1 20 h. p. engine, 1 12 h. p. 
engine, 1 6 h. p. engine and pump, 6 ft. 18 in. Scotch pipe, 
42 ft. 15 in. ditto, 9 ft. 30 in. cement pipe, 30 gals, of raw 
linseed oil, 1 gal. of varnish, 150 lbs. of green paint, 1 gal. 
of Japan, 1 sand pump, 21 lbs. of candles, 10 padlocks, 2 
boats, 9 ice-hooks, 3 ice-chisels, 6 brooms, 1 ice-saw, 25 
gals, of asphaltum. Carpenter tools as follows : 15 bitts, 2 
chisels, 5 planes, 2 saws, 1 hand ax, 6 augers, 1 cross-cut 
saw, 3 kegs of nails. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY AT BROOKLINE 
RESERVOIR. 

1 writing-desk, 1 book, 1 pen-stand, 1 ink-bottle, 1 pitcher 
and glass, 1 spittoon, 1 lamp, 1 stove, 1 coal-hod, 1 fire- 
shovel, 1 poker, 1 stove-brush, 2 settees, 4 iron rods, 2 
towels, 2 floor-mats, 1 scythe, 2 shovels, 1 pick, 1 lawn- 
mower, 1 iron rake, 1 wooden rake, 1 hoe, 1 sickle, 1 
scuffler, 1 pail, 2 ladders, 1 sponge, 1 pair clipping shears, 1 
dust pan and brush, 1 bushel basket, 1 border-knife, 1 wheel- 
barrow, 1 dusting-brush, 1 spade, 1 common broom, 1 coarse 
broom, 3 scrubbing-brushes, 1 sprinkler, 1 axe, 1 chair. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 73 



WATEE EEGISTEAE'S EEPORT, 1875-76. 



Water Registrar's Office, 

Boston, May 1, 1876. 
L. Miles Standish, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 

Sir, — The undersigned, in compliance with the provis- 
ions of the ordinance providing for the care and management 
of the Cochituate Water Works, respectfully report : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1876 is 46,885, being an increase since January 1, 
1875, of 2,209. 

The total number of cases where the water has been 
turned off for non-payment of rates during the year ending 
January 1, 1876, is 1,888. 

Of this number, 1,435 have been turned on, leaving a 
balance of 453 still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates 
received from April 30, 
1875, to May 1, 1876, is $1,036,187 98 

Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used in 
previous years the sum of ' $67,320 42 

Leaving the receipts for water 
furnished during the year 
ending April 30, 1876, the 
sum of . . . . 968,867 56 

Amount paid Mystic Water 
Board for the year ending 
April 30, 1876, as per con- 
tract .... 31,246 75 

In addition to the above there 
has been received for turn- 
ing on water, in cases where 
it had been off for non-pay- 
ment of rates, the sum of 2,900 00 



Carried forward .... $1,039,087 98 



74 City Document No. 80. 

Brought forward .... $1,039,087 98 
Received for summons from 
April 30, 1875, to May 1, 
1876 . . . " . 2,197 25 

Received for summons issued 
in previous years, the sum 
of . . * . . . 9,996 00 

12,193 25 



$1,051,281 23 



The increased amount of income for the year 

ending April 30, 1876, over the previous 

year is . 48,228 13 

The total amount of assessments now made 

for the present year is ... 855,080 69 

The estimated amount of income from the 

sales of water during the financial year 

1876 and 1877 is 1,075,000 00 

The expenditures of my office during the 

year 1875 have been . . . . 24,328 17 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 1,120. Of this number 731 are |-inch, 
329 1-inch, 44 2-inch, 14 3-inch, 2 4-inch. 



Drinking Fountains. 

There are 34 drinking-fountains now established within 
the city limits. 

* Common (6). 

Tremont street, near Clarendon street. 
Beacon street, near Charles street. 
Washington street, near Blackstone square. 
Charles street, near Boylston street. 

" " between Boylston and Beacon streets. 

" " opposite jail. 

Commercial street, junction Atlantic avenue. 
Albany street, opposite City Hospital. 
Mt. Washington avenue, near the bridge. 
Foundry street, near First street. 

Washington Village, junction Dorchester avenue and Dor- 
chester street. 
Telegraph hill, South Boston. 



Report of the Water Board. 75 

Eustis street, corner Washington street. 

*Eliot square, opposite Norfolk House. 

Pynchon street, opposite Roxbury street. 

Tremont street, junction of Cabot street. 

Beacon street, junction of Brookline avenue. 

Commercial street, opposite Beach street, Dorchester. 

Upham's Corner, Dorchester. 

Glover's Corner, " 

Grove Hall, " 

Maverick square, East Boston. 

Central square, " 

Bennington street, junction Chelsea street, East Boston. 

Albany street, junction of Dearborn street. 

Washington street, near Elm street. 

Neponset avenue, corner Walnut street. 

Those marked thus * are arranged for a continuous flow of water. The 
balance have automatic fixtures, operating the flow of water when required. 



76 



City Document No. 80. 



The following table exhibits the class of premises to 
which meters are attached, together with the amount of 
revenue received during the year 1875 : — 



Name. 



Revere House . . 
American House 
Parker House . . 
U. S. Hotel . . . 
Tremont House . 
Young's Hotel . 
Adams House . . 
Hotel Berkley . . 
Marlboro' House 
Albion Building . 
Central House . . 
Hotel Pelham . . 
Hotel Boylston . 
La Grange House 
St. Cloud . . . . 
Hotel Clarendon 
Seaver House . . 
Evans House . . 
William Pfaff . . 
Hotel Kempton . 
Hotel Hamilton . 
Hotel Vendome . 
Coolidge House . 
Hancock House . 
Merrimac House 
Temple House . 
Hotel Belmont . 
Hotel Alexander 
Hotel Brunswick 
Park's Hotel . . 
Derby House . . 



Amount carried forward. 



Class. 



Hotel 



Gallons. 



11,016,997 

7,325,382 

11,329,079 

3,969,749 

9,978,749 

3,054,581 

3,033,671 

3,502,326 

1,716,674 

695,361 

224,587 

1;405,417 

1,991,863 

319,806 

573,794 

2,616,007 

259,393 

1,2S8,491 

274,057 

1,113,312 

1,743,847 

2,721,127 

1,042,754 

133,626 

433,709 

727,334 

790,754 

183,757 

243,007 

417,294 

494,009 



Revenue. 



$3,305 08 

2,197 57 

3,398 71 

1,190 91 

2,993 61 

916 35 

910 09 

1,050 68 

514 99 

208 60 

67 37 
421 60 
597 54 

95 91 
172 11 
784 78 

77 81 
386 52 

82 20 
333 99 
523 14 
816 31 
312 81 

40 07 
130 10 
218 17 
237 21 

55 12 

72 90 
125 17 
148 18 



74,620,514 $22,385 60 



Kepokt of the Water Board. 



77 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Merchants' Hotel . 

M. J. Flatley . . . 

New England House 

Winthrop House • 

Dooley's Hotel . . 

Commercial House 

Job A. Turner . . 

Milliken House . . 

Sherman House . . 

Everett House . . . 

Metropolitan House 

Commonwealth Hotel 

Thomas L. Robinson 

St. James Hotel . . . 

Massachusetts House 

Bay State House 

Mariners' House . 

Robertson House 

Boston Hotel . . 

Creighton House . 

Van Rensselaer . 

Quincy House . . 

Marston House . 

Stumcke & Goodwin 

Pavilion House . 

Norfolk House . 

National House . 

Hotel Agassiz . • 

Phillips House . 

Stinson House . . 

Rutland House . 

John D. Miller . 

Hotel Marion . . 

Moody Merrill . . 

Old Colony and Newport 
Railroad Co. . 



Amount carried forward . 



Class. 



Hotel 



Gallons. 



74,620,514 
198,179 
180,007 
556,709 
451,859 
69,112 
408,157 
425,369 
526,401 

1,586,894 
222,209 
936,783 

2,083,962 
25,244 

5,173,681 
81,486 
447,411 
166,003 
237,193 
780.3S9 
667,079 
438,809 

2,307,089 
755,526 

3,345,764 
449,478 
872,347 
466,605 

1,617,801 
103,177 
103,596 
530,746 
184,262 
314,819 

1,182,682 



11 23,401,176 



Revenue. 



$22,385 60 

59 44 

53 98 

167 00 

135 53 

20 72 

122 43 

127 60 

157 90 

476 04 

66 64 

281 01 

625 18 

7 57 

1,552 08 

24 42 

134 20 

49 79 

71 14 

234 10 

200 10 

131 62 

692 11 

226 63 

1,003 71 

134 82 

261 69 

139 96 

485 32 

30 94 

31 07 
159 20 

55 27 
94 44 
354 79 

7,020 31 



125,918,518 $37,774 35 



78 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Boston and Albany Rail 
road Co 



Boston and Maine Railroad 
Co 



Boston and Lowell Rail 
road Co 



Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Eastern Railroad Co. . 



New York and New Eng. 
land Railroad Co. . . 

Boston and Providence 
Railroad Co 



Boston, Revere Beach and 
Lynn Railroad Co. . 



Boston Gas Light Co. . 

South Boston Gas Light Co 

East Boston Gas Light Co. 

Roxbury Gas Light Co. . 

Dorchester Gas Light Co. 

Standard Sugar Refinery 
Granite street 



Standard Sugar Refinery 
Eastern Avenue .... 



Continental Sugar Refinery 
Bay State Sugar Refinery 
Oxnard Sugar Refinery . 
Boston Sugar Refinery . 
American Sugar Refinery 
Bay State Rolling Mill . 
Norway Iron Works . . 
Highland Spring Brewery 
Edward Habich 



Crystal Spring Brewery 
Vacant 



; J. Pfaff 



A. J. Houghton & Co., Hal 
lock st 



A. J. Houghton & Co., Sta 
tion st 



Boylston Brewery , 



Class. 



Brewery 



Amount carried forward 424,700,364 $127,408 45 



Gallons. 



125,918,518 

31,837,260 

4,853,287 

5,888,817 
3,997,469 
8,957,204 

9,618,997 

13,527,419 

871,290 
37,362,734 
2,852,549 
1,312,303 
1,767,042 
1,070,064 

53,693,295 

948,165 

23,7S6,700 

11,697,375 

4,286,774 

21,525,300 

991,336 

17,272,149 

25,112,238 

6,780,642 

3,503,116 



4,486,050 

668,151 

38,205 
75,915 



Revenue. 



$37,774 35 

9,561 17 

1,455 97 

1,766 63 
1,199 23 
2,687 16 

2,885 68 

4,058 20 

261 38 
11,208 81 
855 75 
393 68 
530 07 
321 00 

16,107 96 

284 44 
7,136 00 
3,509 20 
1,286 01 
6,457 57 

297 38 
5,181 62 
7,533 65 
2,034 17 
1,050 91 



1,345 81 
200 42 

11 46 

22 77 



Keport of the Water Board. 



79 



Name. 



Amount brought fonoard 
Gottlieb Burkhardt . . 

John Roessle 

Jones, Johnson & Co. . 
Boston Beer Co. .... 
Conrad Decker .... 
Suffolk Brewing Co. . , 
Burton Brewery . . , 
Standard Brewery . , 
Vincent & Hathaway 
Moses Fairbanks & Co. 
Coburn, Lang & Co. . 
Comstock, Gove & Co. 
Isaac Pratt, Jr. . . . 
Wesleyan Association 
Tremont Temple . . 
S. S. Houghton & Co. 
P. McAleer . . 
Smith & Porter 
T. H. Carter . . 
Boston Journal 
Joseph Byers . 



N. E. Mut. Life 
39 State st. 



N. E. Mut. Life 
70 State st. 



N. E. Mut. Life 
Milk st. . . 



Ins. Co 
Ins. Co 
Ins. Co 



Horticultural Hall . .. , 
Suffolk National Bank 
Benjamin Leeds . . . , 
Stone, Bier 8s Weiss 
John Rayner, heirs . 
Otis T. Ruggles . . . 
B. B. Appleton, heirs 
J. W. Merriam . . . 
R. H. Spaulding . . . 



Class. 



Brewery 



Beer Factory 



Building 



Amount carried forward 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



424,700,364 
871,342 

3,253,364 

4,430,556 

5,082,547 
698,556 

3,157,575 
935,782 

1,370,431 
695,602 
604,281 
443,737 
249,037 

1,018,987 
596,797 

1,641,336 
847,349 
394,457 

1,332,667 

886,304 

1,598,737 

839,609 

648,217 

126,389 

166,935 
294,472 
348,607 
434,204 
277,777 
527,488 
222,232 
208,506 
372,291 
308,309 



$127,408 45 
261 39 
975 99 
1,329 14 
1,524 74 
209 55 
947 26 
280 73 
411 12 
208 66 
181 26 
133 11 
74 69 
305 68 
179 01 
492 39 
254 18 
118 31 
399 78 
265 87 
479 61 
251 87 

194 44 

37 90 

50 08 
88 32 

104 57 

130 24 
83 32 

158 24 
66 65 
62 54 

111 66 
92 47 



459,584,844 $137,873 22 



80 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Mrs. Ellen Brooks . . . 

Oriental Tea Co 

S. D. Hicks 

John Stetson 

Macullar, Williams & Parker 

John F. Mills 

Joshua Sears, estate . 

Lilly, Young, Pratt & Brack 
ett 



J. I. Brown & Son . . . 
Hogg, Brown & Taylor . 

A. "Wentworth 

William Ropes, estate . 

A. D. Puffer 

Eastern Express Co. . . 
Grand Lodge of Masons . 
James W. Rollins .... 



Haley, Morse & Co., 615 

Washington St. . . . 



Mass. Inst, of Technology 
S. N. Brown, jr 

A. H. Vinton 

J. W. Pierce 

B. F. Bradhury 

Shepard, Norwell & Co. . 
D. J. Hastings 

C. U. Cotting, 628 Wash, st 
C. U. Cotting, 7 Court sg, 

W. H. Mann , 

Hallett & Davis . . . . 

P. Donahoe 

Jonas Fitch 

Samuel A. Way, estate 
H. C. Stephens .... 



Jordan, Marsh & Co. 
Washington st 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Building 



Gallons. 



459,584,844 
159,960 
255,119 
1,344,045 
1,155,356 
458,612 
323,819 
763,087 

1,019,714 
320,616 

3,054.254 
270,667 

2,608,986 
329,369 
539,820 
305,752 
573,209 

211,371 
1,285,552 
290,992 
259,379 
279,435 
319,881 
440,510 
299,871 
479,879 
326,699 
424,424 
157,342 
616,379 
79,206 
121,499 
905,032 

584,947 



$137,873 22 
47 97 
76 51 
403 19 
346 59 
137 56 
97 12 
228 91 



480,149,627 $144,042 03 



KepOrt of the Water Board. 



81 



Co. 



Amount brought forward 
G. T. Burnham & Co. . . 
G. D. Dowes & Co., vacant 
Stephen H. Bennett, heirs 
J. P. Dimond . 
Taylor Page . . 
Franklin Evans 
J. Zane & Co. . 
Metropolitan R. R 
Art Garden . 
Allen & Woodworth . 
Merchants' Exchange . 

J. J. Stevens 

J. T. Brown & Co. . . 

J. C. Gray 

C. F. Hovey 

Adams, Taylor & Co. • 
Globe Publishing House 
J. M. Smith & Co. . . . 
Charles Rollins .... 
Adams Express Co. . . 
"Wright & Potter . . . 
"W. Blenkinsop .... 
Boston Gas Light Co. . 
Bellows & Wilson . . . 

L. P. Ober 

R. T. Boardman .... 



Young Men's Christian As 
sociation 



A. A. Miner ....... 

Henry F. Miller .... 

Art Building 

Equitable Life Ins. Co., 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., King 
ston st 



H. 8. Lawrence 
J. M. Beebe . . 



Class. 



Building 



Amount carried forward 
6 



Gallons. 



480,149,627 
286,532 



734.271 
364,990 
193,499 
331,207 
436,094 
50,459 

2,033,939 
157,326 

2,095,019 
166,282 
327,434 
587,721 
911,684 
457,184 
499,822 
30,052 
627,824 

1,949,449 

1,516,565 
491,032 
112,341 
286,282 
467,692 
120,993 

150,845 
200,022 
102,922 
8,655 
102,096 

431,624 

266,257 

84,847 



,042 06 
85 94 



220 27 
109 48 

58 02 
99 34 

130 82 

15 12 

610 16 

47 18 

628 49 

49 86 

98 18 

176 29 

273 49 

137 13 

149 93 

9 00 

188 32 

584 82 

454 95 

147 30 

33 68 

85 86 

140 29 

36 29 

45 23 

59 98 
30 87 

2 59 
30 62 

129 46 
79 86 
25 44 



496,732,588 $149,016 32 



82 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward. . 

F. Tudor 

Studio Building 

Boston Post Building . . . 
Traveller Building .... 

Union Building 

Wentivorth Building . . . 

Rice Building 

Carter Building 

Edmands Building .... 
Washington Building . . . 

Niles Building 

Palmer's Building 

Joy's Building 

Sears Building 

Advertiser Building .... 

Charity Building 

Codman Building 

Transcript Building .... 
Merchants' Bank Building . 
Paine Memorial Hall . . . 
Chauncy Hall School . . . 
Mass. General Hospital . . 

City Hospital 

Lunatic Hospital 

New England Hospital . . 
Notre Dame Academy . . . 
St. Mary's Institute .... 
House of the Angel Guardian 
House of the Good Shepherd 
Home for Catholic Children 

Church Home 

Sailors' Home 

Temporary Home 

Somerset Club 



Class. 



Building 



Amount carried forward | 527,240,346 



Gallons. 



496,732,588 

308,196 

639,014 

418,019 

618,906 

767,181 

331,791 

658,109 

275,053 

278,167 

650,504 

897,449 

419,361 

270,502 

847,799 

877,859 

175,536 

862,335 

517,694 

1,627,770 

69,082 

147,157 

4,268,901 

6,611,219 

2,569,919 

584,369 

281,002 

106,192 

361,207 

178,455 

1,021,214 

852,104 

500,917 

328,439 

1,186,336 



Revenue. 



$149,016 32 
92 43 
191 69 
125 38 
185 66 
230 13 
99 53 
197 41 

82 49 

83 44 
195 13 
269 21 
125 80 

81 14 
254 32 
263 34 

52 64 
258 69 
155 28 
488 31 

20 71 

44 12 

1,280 66 

1,983 35 

770 96 

175 29 

84 28 
31 85 

108 35 

53 52 
306 35 
265 61 
150 26 

98 51 
355 88 



$158,168 04 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



83 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
Union Club . . . 
Temple Club . . 
Central Club . . 
Boston Music Hall 
Beethoven Hall . 
City Hall .... 
State of Massachusetts 
United Stales of America 
Howard Athenaeum 
Boston Theatre . . 
Globe Theatre . . 
Boylston Museum . 
Boylston Market . 
Washington Market 
Suffolk Market . . 
Franklin Market . 
Williams Market . 
Tremont Market . 
Medical College . . 
Boston College . . 
Mary Stearns . . . 
Mrs. C. C. Annable 
Mrs. R. W. Prescott 
Mrs. M. E. Sawyer 
Mrs. W. A. Colson 
F. E. Ruggles . . . 

A. Carr 

George Odin, heirs 
James F. Goodwin 
Mrs. A. P. Cleverly 
M. E. Knowlton . . 
Mrs.' C. Farley . . 
Mrs. C. Cummings 
James Knowlton . 
Ruel Philbrook . . 



Amount carried forward. . 



Class. 



State House 
Post Office 



Boarding 



Gallons. 



527,240,346 
538,574 
369,764 
111,914 
986,316 
58,529 

1,010,609 
618,667 
990,000 
104,924 
319,701 
350,925 
623,179 
294,884 
926,134 

. 777,228 
207,711 

1,480,566 
138,389 
188,541 
291,277 
79,650 
251,631 
281,282 
220,837 
285,854 
329,512 
103,664 
247,251 
312,936 
165,907 
284,767 
419,119 
272,901 

1,049,939 
254,077 



Revenue. 



$158,168 04 
161 55 
110 91 
33 55 

295 88 
17 53 

303 17 

185 58 

296 98 
31 45 
95 88 

105 25 

186 94 
88 45 

277 82 
233 15 
62 30 
444 15 
41 50 
56 55 
87 37 
23 89 

75 47 

84 37 
66 23 
S5 74 
98 83 
31 08 
74 15 
93 86 
49 75 

85 40 
125 73 

81 85 
314 96 

76 21 



542,187,505 $162,651 52 



84 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 


Class. 


J 

00 
lA 


Jl men. 

2 inch. 

3 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 


Boarding 




1 

1 

3 

2 

2 

5 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 • • 

1 • • 

1 . • 
1 • • 

. 2 . 
1 . . 
1 . . 


. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 

. . 2 
. . 2 
. . 5 

. . 2 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 2 
. . 1 
. . 3 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 2 
1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 2 
. . 1 
. . 2 
. . 3 
. . 3 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 


542,187,505 
254,842 
190,568 
320,488 
911,864 
218,534 
449,724 
495,051 
239,377 
285,741 
234,367 
490,634 
213,051 
180,374 
135,915 
807,719 


$162,651 52 
76 44 




57 14 


Mrs. N. F. Chapin .... 


96 13 
273 55 


E. Cutler, 147 Kneeland st. 
E. Cutler, 146 Kneeland st. 


Fa 


ctory 

u 


65 54 
134 90 
148 49 






71 79 






85 71 






70 29 


D. L. Webster . . 




147 17 






63 89 






54 09 


Henry B. Williams 
William A. Brown 




40 77 
242 30 


Joseph Nickerson & Co. . . 
J. Morrill, Jr., & Co. ... 
Pearson Bros. & Co. . . . 


a 
u 

ii 

(< 

If 


1,233,303 
176,437 

1,889,136 
112,288 
310,049 
446,369 

1,368,884 
526,604 

3,570,000 
524,285 

2,124,832 
55,095 
8,790 
261,397 
449,054 
357,402 
565,575 
749,000 
57,959 


369 97 
52 91 

566 72 
33 67 


L. Whittaker 


93 00 


C. Wright & Co 


133 89 


Howard Watch and Clock Co 


410 64 
157 96 




1,070 98 


George C. Pearson .... 


157 26 
637 43 




16 52 


Union Elastic Goods Co. . 


2 63 
78 41 




134 71 


Murphy, Leavens & Co. . . 


107 23 
169 65 


Charles E. Kershaw .... 
E. Strain & Co 


224 .63 
17 37 








Amount carried fori 
















562,402,211 


$168,715 35 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



85 



Name. 


Class. 


00 


1 inch. 

2 inch. 

3 inch. 


4 inch. 
Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 





. 


. • . 




562,402,211 


$168,715 35 


Hasse & Pratt 


Factory . . . 


1 






619,484 


185 83 


Byam, Carlton & Co. ... 


<• 


1 


. . . 




59,384 


17 79 


H. F. Miller 


» 


1 






106,552 


31 95 


Stephen Smith & Co. . . . 


« ... 


1 






342,142 


102 63 


Chickering & Sons .... 


" 




3 . . 




300,329 


90 08 


Mace & Reyes 


" 


1 






214,424 


64 31 


Bagnall & Loud 


" 


1 






246,352 


73 89 


Boston Car Spring Co. . . 


... 




1 . . 




996,149 


298 82 


Wassineus & "Whittle . . . 


u 


1 






157,694 


47 30 


A. Folsom & Sons 


" ... 




1 . . 




488,699 


146 59 


Dwinell & Co 


" 


1 






530,204 


159 05 


Standard Vinegar Works . 


" 


1 






46,528 


13 94 


J. M. Cook, estate ..... 


« 




1 . . 




707,550 


212 25 


Hallett & Davis ...... 


" ... 




1 . . 




374,699 


112 38 


W. Wolff & Co 


" 


1 


. . . 




650,902 


195 26 


S. D. & H. W. Smith, Mont- 
gomery St. ....... 


" ... 


. 


1 . . 




845,115 


253 52 


S. D. & H. W. Smith, Al- 
bany st 


" ... 


. 


1 . . 




982,154 


294 63 


Harrison, Beard & Co. . . . 


" ... 


1 






1,007,241 


302 16 


William Underwood & Co. 


II 


2 






500,064 


150 00 


G. D. Dowes & Co 


it 




1 . . 




545,497 


163 64 


D. Wilcox 


CI 


. 


1 . . 




426,554 


127 95 


George & Proctor 


" ... 


1 






255,157 


76 54 


Boston Belting Co 


it 




1 . . 




33,572 


10 06 


C. H. Bacon 


CI 


2 






77,534 


23 26 


Morton & Chesley 


ft 




1 . . 




196,380 


58 91 


A. Zeigler 


" ... 


1 


. . . 




43,282 


12 98 


Cummings & Carlisle . . . 


<< 


. 


1 . . 




1,390,037 


417 00 


Leigh Manufacturing Co. . 


" 




1 . . 




1,377,479 


413 22 


Walworth Manufact. Co. . 


II 


1 






431,917 


129 56 


Newton, Morton & Co. . . 


" ... 


1 


. . . 




211,709 


63 50 


A. J. Morse 85 Co 


(1 


2 






398,000 


119 40 


Seth W. Fowle & Son . . . 


•< ... 


1 






47,370 


14 19 


Oscar Foote & Co 


« ... 


1 






935,271 


280 57 


A. R Whittier 


" ... 


1 






248,685 


74 59 


Amount carried forward . 










578,196,321 


$173,453 10 



86 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 
W. P. Emerson Piano Co. 
Hallett & Cumston . . . 

P. Lally 

8. G. Underhill 

Amer. Moulded Collar Co. 

Kittredge 8s Co 

John Clark 

Christopher Blake .... 
G. H. Dickerman .... 

J. L. Ross 

R. Estahrook & Son . . . 

A. D. Mchols 

F. King & Co 



Grover & Baker Sewing 
Machine Co., Albany st. 

Grover & Baker Sewing 
Machine Co., Wash. st. 



C. F. Whittemore .... 

Peet Valve Co 

G. F. Waldron 

A. K. Young 

Harrison Loring ... . 
S. A. "Woods & Co. ... 

George F. Blake 

E. H. Ashcroft 

L. M. Ham 

Eyelet Tool Co 

L. A. Bigelow 

William Evans 

Smith & Lovett 

Am. Tool and Machine Co 

J. Souther & Co 

Boston Machine Co. . . . 
Hersey Brothers .... 
Hinckley Locomotive Works 
Atlantic Works, Chelsea st 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Factory 



Machinist 



Gallons. 



578,196,321 
391,694 
312,029 
749,692 
531,059 
538,147 
41,414 
356,841 
570,089 
292,379 
239,361 
149,586 
168,202 
509,857 

208,116 

2,172,654 
47,512 
884,324 
160,537 
504,029 
362,834 
937,716 

1,106,489 
624,555 
448,784 
43,671 
623,677 
825,780 
302,271 
777,607 
353,054 

1,130,273 
279,464 

1,213,378 

1,159,439 



Revenue. 



1,453 10 
117 47 
93 59 
224 89 
159 30 
161 42 

12 42 

107 04 
171 01 

87 80 
71 79 
44 85 
50 44 
152 93 

62 41 

651 78 
14 25 

265 28 
48 14 

151 20 

108 83 
281 29 
331 92 
187 35 
134 61 

13 08 
187 08 
247 71 

90 66 
233 27 
105 90 
339 06 

83 83 
364 00 
347 82 



597,212,835 $179,157 52 



Keport of the Water Board. 



87 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Atlantic Works, Border st 

H. S. Robinson . . . 

Geo. T. McLaughlin . 

South Boston Iron Co 

Holmes & Blanchard 

Dyer & Gurney . . . 

William Blake & Co. 

Whiting Foundry Co. 

Tremont Foundry Co. 

Fulton Iron Foundry Co. 

Chelmsford Iron Foundry 
Co. ! 



John Lally 

Downer Kerosene Oil Co. 

F. H. Jenney 

Wilkinson, Carter & Co. 

Farrar, Pierce & Canterbury 

Kidder, Vaughan & Co. . 

Bowker, Torrey & Co. 
Bowker street . 



Bowker, Torrey & 
Foundry street 



Torreys & Co. . . . 
C. E. Hall & Co. . . 
A. Wentworth & Co, 
Richard Power & Son 
Jeremiah Carew . 
E. F. Meaney . . 
John Lynch . . . 
Geo. F. Chapin & Co 
C. D. Brooks . • 
Horace H. Lewis 
W. K. Lewis & Bros 
B.M.Clark. . . . 
E. T. Cowdry & Co, 
Warren & Freeman 



Co. 



Class. 



Machinist 



Foundry 



Boiler Maker 
Oil Works . 



Marble Works 



Stone Yard . 



Vinegar Works 
Pickle Fact'y . 



Salt Works 



Amount carried forward 635,345,958 $190,596 



Gallons. 



597,212,835 

1,596,975 

446,826 

723,764 

1,378,274 

336,501 

155,474 

1,233,494 

495,367 

63,847 

171,726 

408,029 

266,894 
6,645,000 
1,108,839 

450,637 
1,442,661 

103,222 

3,508,747 

2,199,636 

4,067,624 

3,508,004 

3,159,922 

688,446 

618,877 

1,052,902 

115,687 

149,181 

365,226 

229,559 

228,202 

199,364 

548,804 

465,412 



Revenue. 



$179,157 52 
479 08 

134 03 
217 10 
413 47 
100 93 

46 63 

370 03 

148 60 

19 13 

61 49 

122 38 

80 05 

1,993 48 

332 63 

135 17 
432 78 

30 95 

1,052 61 

659 87 

1,220 26 

1,052 38 

947 96 

206 51 

185 65 

315 85 

34 70 

44 74 

109 56 

68 85 

68 45 

59 79 

164 63 

139 60 



88 



City Document No„ 80. 



Name. 


Class. 


D 
00 


| 1 inch. 
| 2 inch. 
| 3 inch. 


| 4 inch. 
| Indicator. 

Total. 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 




. . 






635,345,958 


$190,596 86 


Fobes, Hayward & Co. . . 


Confectionery 


1 




. . 1 


569,744 


170 90 


Chase & Co 


" 


2 




. . 2 


1,657,754 


497 31 


Charles Copeland 


'« 


4 




. . 4 


2,866,304 


859 86 


Messenger Brothers . . . . 


Restaurant . 


. 1 






393,855 


118 14 


Mrs. G. F. Harrington . . . 


'« 


. 1 






393,389 


118 00 


Marston & Cunio 


" 


. 1 






421,994 


126 59 


Adams & Chapman . . . . 


" 


. 1 






182,512 


54 73 


W. L. Egerton 


" 


. 1 






406,919 


122 06 


Kendall & Dearborn . . . . 


" 




1 . . 




483,419 


145 01 


Geo. Fera 


it 


. 2 






550,749 


165 21 


D. T. Copeland 


(1 




1 . . 




1,125,404 


337 61 


F. E. Weber 


it 


. 1 






425,218 


127 54 


R. B. Brigham ...... 


" 




1 . . 




2,024,226 


607 25 


J. Q-. Pennyquick 


it 








74,755 


22 41 


John Kleasa 


" 








46,106 


13 83 


C. A. Belia 


«' 








126,959 


38 07 


J. L. Reichardt 


" 








157,170 


47 14 


W. F. Bacon 


" 








414,763 


124 40 


A. "W. Fisher 


" 








207,800 


62 34 


Phillips 8c Co 


IC 








142,867 


42 84 


Ingalls & "Wesley 


" 








222,414 


66 71 


Campbell & Coverly .... 


it 








666,450 


199 92 


Severance & Co 


it 








345,164 


103 54 


W. Rosendale 


a 








82,282 


24 68 


0. A. Jones 


<■ 








301,491 


90 43 


O. S. Edgerly 


" 




. . . 




163,872 


49 14 


A. E. Nash 


a 








63,304 


18 97 


C. H. Bailey 


it 








177,282 


53 17 


R. M. Waitt 


ti 








176,336 


52 90 


C. E. Bacon 


•' 






• 4>. 1 


310,681 


93 19 


G. A. Pollard 


" 








124,099 


37 21 


Mrs. Miranda Fogg .... 


<< 








277,325 


83 18 


N. C. Severance 


ti 








44,797 


13 43 


J. C. Murphy 


CI 








105,787 


31 73 


J. Gallagher 


" . . 








139,116 


41 71 


Amount carried forward . 








| 


651,218,2651 


$195,358 01 



Report of the Water Board. 



89 



Name. 



Amount broxight forward 

V. Stahl 

M. C. Clark & Co. . . 
M. Pearson & Co. . . 
Bartlett & Embree . . 



Stumcke & Goodwin, 5 
eter Place 



Ex- 



Walter Grieve . . , 
A. Dunning (3 mos.) 

A. F. Copeland . . . 
Marston, "Woodbury & Co 
W. S. Mathews .... 

Brock & Coy 

W. C. Cahoon & Son . 
Durgin, Park & Co. . . 

James Brown 

Smith & Underwood . . 

J. M. Learned 

Wm. Englehardt . . . 
Tibbetts & Russell . . . 

J. D. Gilnian 

R. R. & J. S. Higgins . 
Atwood & Bacon . . . 

B. J. Wright & Co. . . 
Felton & Stone .... 
Jonas H. French . . . 

C. H. Graves 

James Edmond & Co. . 
E. L. Perkins 

A. Hale & Co 

Suffolk Wood PreservingCo 
W. H. Swift & Co. . 
W. L. Bradley . . . 

B. Randall 

Committee on Bathing 

C. W. Blodgett . . . 



Class. 



Restaurant 



Saloon 



Distillery . 

Rectifier . 
Fire Brick 
Card Factory 
Rubber Works 



Fertilizers 



Baths . . 



Amount carried forward . | 671,119,795 $201,327 



Gallons. 



651,218,265 
207,672 
237,895 
226,419 
243,366 

361,734 
141,148 
33,532 
537,050 
350,480 
327,164 
451,251 
381,786 
360,944 
481,619 

1,188,157 
733,327 
374,722 
407,399 
682,536 
758,467 
262,867 
625,919 
926,999 

2,385,249 
258,351 
259,176 
584,002 
233,219 
131,384 
333,209 

3,038,226 
396,794 

1,228,425 
751,042 



Revenue. 



$195,358 01 
62 29 
71 36 
67 91 
73 00 

108 51 

42 32 

10 05 

161 09 

105 13 

98 13 
135 36 
114 53 
108 26 
144 46 
356 42 
219 98 
112 39 
122 19 
204 75 
227 52 

78 84 
187 75 
278 07 
715 56 
77 49 
77 74 
175 18 
69 95 
39 40 

99 94 
911 45 
119 02 
368 52 
225 29 



90 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward. 

Boston Dye Wood 8c Chem 
ical Co 



W. H. Whitmore . . 
M. Crocker & Co. . . 
G-. W. & F. Appleton 
Preston Ss Merrill . . 
Quirin & Edwards . . 
F. S. Merritt .... 
Guild White & Co. . 
R. W. Ames 8c Son . 
F. Frampton .... 
Boston Forge Co. . . 
Boston Lead Co. . . 
National Bridge Co. . 
American Steam Safe Co 
Suffolk Glass Co. . . 
Washington Pipe Works 
East Boston Pottery . . 
H. W. Knowles & Son . 
Simpson's Dry Dock Co 

Munson & Co 



Cunard Steamship Co. . 
Hingham Steamboat Co 
Portland Steam Packet Co 
Union Freight Railway Co 

J. B. Crosby 

Farrar Follett & Co. . . . 



Butchers' Slaughtering & 
Melting Association . . 



Metropolitan Railroad Co. 
So. Boston Railroad Co. . 
Highland Railroad Co. . 

Draper and Hall 

Martin Hayes 

T.F. McHugh 



Class. 



Chemicals , 



Extracts 
Tannery 



Bacon Works 



| Supplying 
I Locomotive. 



Carving . 
Wire Works 



Stables 



Stable 



Amount carried foncard 719,592,022 $215,868 98 



Gallons. 



671,119,795 

10,744,734 

1,138,724 

1,414,229 

19,424 

1,071,525 

643,005 

239,929 

244,515 

171,505 

24,500 

1,974,529 

1,687,192 

393,040 

162,510 

848,287 

1,139,294 

165,967 

6,585 

559,732 

563,985 

3,510,009 

4,076,100 

1,033,504 

684,375 

330,209 

445,492 

136,890 

8,041,048 

3,964,576 

1,573,865 

920,092 

460,109 

82,747 



Revenue. 



$201,327 86 

3,223 40 

341 59 

424 25 

5 82 

321 45 

192 89 

71 96 

73 32 

51 44 

7 35 

592 34 

506 14 

117 91 

48 74 
254 46 
341 77 

49 78 
1 97 

167 91 

169 19 

1,052 98 

1,222 S2 

310 04 

205 29 

99 05 

133 64 

41 06 

2,412 30 

1,189 34 

472 10 

276 00 

138 01 

24 81 



Keport of the Water Board. 



91 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Smith & Porter 

J. Austin Rogers . . . . 
Norfolk House Stable . . 
Northend & Foster . . . 

Henry Hunt 

Robert H. Douglass • . . 

T. H. Seavey 

C. & J. F. Baker .... 

W. P. Pierce 

J. Pratt 

L. E. Hartshorne .... 



J. P. Barnard, 108 Chestnut 
street 



J. P. Barnard, cor. Brimmer 
and Chestnut street . . 

J. P. Barnard, Joy street 

A. Garcelon .... 

C. S. Godfrey . . . 

G. W. Sherburne . 

Northend & Foster 

A. Goss 

Adams Express Co. 

John Eaton, jr. . . 

F. S. Merritt . . . 

L. W. Porter & Co. 

Warner & Richardson 

Geo. M. King . 

Milo Whitney . 

Daniel Wood . 

T. D. Sullivan 

Ham & Co. . . 

F. E. Russell . 
Edgar Snow . . 

G. D. Pattee . 
James Jellison 
William Carey 



Class. 



Stable 



Amount carried forward 



Gallons. 



719,592,022 
265,994 
317,543 
157,607 
355,656 
211,612 
274,499 
128,856 
124,897 
82,026 
100,717 
42,209 

526,911 

659,985 
765,367 
183,254 
202,872 
153,899 
207,847 
173,174 
363,261 
235,402 
44,054 
320,572 
597,006 
473,474 
129,727 
334,686 
145,446 
161,759 
220,357 
116,804 
215,692 
229,513 
161,622 



Revenue. 



$215,868 98 
79 77 

95 25 
47 26 

106 67 
63 47 
82 33 
38 65 

37 46 
24 59 
30 19 

12 66 

158 05 

197 97 
229 59 
54 96 
60 84 
46 16 
62 33 
51 93 
108 95 
70 61 

13 19 

96 16 
179 08 
142 03 

38 90 
100 39 

43 61 
48 50 
66 09 
35 03 
64 69 
68 84 
48 47 



728,276,322 $218,473 65 



92 



City Document No. 80. 



Class. 



Amount brought forward 

Shorey & Co 

J. N. Harwood 

H. C. Nims, Mason ot. . 

J. A. Riedell & Co. ... 

E. W. Murray, Berkeley st 

E. W. Murray, Stanhope st, 

A. B. Atherton & Co. 

Geo. 8. Johnson & Co., 9: 
Washington street 

Geo. 8. Johnson & Co., 1046 
Washington street 

T. Thaxter 

James Monroe . . . 

Miller & Robinson . 

L. L. Howland . . . 

P. E. Murray .... 

J. E. Maynard . . . 

John Rice 

Geo. P. Eogg & Co. . 

J. M. Dow 

New York Express Co 

Moses Coleman & Son 

Boston Hotels Coach Co 

W. Hutchings .... 

Eastern Express Co. . 

J. O. Barnard .... 

Riverside Club Stable 

Club Stable, Chardon st 

Beacon Club Stable 

F. A. Phelps . 
V. H. Covill . . 
Dean & Burgess 
Parker Bryant . 

G. H. Hayden . 
A. P. Wheelock 
F. Davis & Son, 609 Fifth 



Stable 



Amount carried forward 



Gallons. 



Revenue. 



728,276,322 
658,057 
328,671 
458,428 
332,354 
52,956 
290,297 
627,262 

262,506 

108,164 
111,501 
158,774 
356,570 
124,514 
193,124 
589,672 
820,185 
672,547 
241,627 
426,327 
118,686 
1,275,471 

90,397 
247,911 

67,194 
112,169 
135,547 
125,227 
437,398 
176,024 
111,502 
145,686 

76,664 
182,838 

80,879 



738,463,451 $221,529 19 



Keport of the Water Board. 



93 



Amount brought forward 

F. Davis & Son, 125 Emer 
son fit. . . . 

S. F. Draper 

J. Rice . . . 

M. & "W. Ham 

John Quinn . 

J. H. Pote . . 

Sumner & Dickinson 

J. B. Cassidy & Bro. 

L. O. Chase . 

Peck & Hall . 

T. H. Ayres . 

J. Hale . . . 

J. M. Smith . 

C. R. Webster 

Club Stable, 75 Chestnut st 

B. T. Wrightington . . 

Clark & Brown .... 

H. C. Mms, 8 Lime st. , 

John Sawyer . , 

Cilley & Stimson 

Club Stable, 44 Joy st. 

Asa Critchett . . 

Patrick Morrison 

L. A. Noyes . . 

A. 6. Eaton . . 
Geo. D. Brown 
J. H. Hathorne 
Henry K. Wing 
National Tube Works . 
Globe Nail Works . . . 
Farrington & Hunnewell 

B. M. Cunningham 
Manley Howe . . . 
L. Prang & Co. . . 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Stable 



Silversmiths 
Laundry 
Chemist 
Chromos 



Gallons. 



738,463,451 

115,273 
202,639 
290,631 
176.378 
279,847 
280,691 
251,977 
159,532 
128,962 

87,000 

34,670 
270,554 

97,240 
337,926 
128,699 
152,625 
280,679 
188,302 
184,694 
223,765 
151,327 
173,249 

47,256 
.116,954 
137,977 
130,394 
821,212 
457,038 
666,741 
1,562,009 
162,801 
655,326 
519,974 
459,667 



Revenue. 



$221,529 19 

34 56 

60 77 
87 18 
52 90 

83 93 

84 19 
75 58 

47 83 
38 67 
26 08 
10 40 
81 14 
29 15 

101 36 

38 59 
45 77 
84 19 
56 47 
55 39 
67 11 
45 38 
51 96 
14 17 

35 06 
41 37 

39 11 
246 34 
137 09 

•200 01 
468 58 

48 81 
196 59 
155 98 
137 88 



748,397,460 $224,508 78 



94 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 



Amount brought forward 

Morse & Jordan . . . 

E. Brooks ...... 

Walworth Manuf. Co. 

H. Gt. Denny .... 

Porter & Co. (6mos.) 

C. TJ. Cotting (6mos.) 

Moses B. Wilde (3 mos.) 

John Foster (3 mos.) 

Briggs & Robinson 

Carpenter, Woodward 
Morton . . . 

8. B. Stebbins . 

L. W. Pickens 

C. E. Folsom . 

Boston City Flour Mills 

J. J. McNutt .... 

G-lendon Co 

Manson Peterson . . 

W. W. Bennett . . . 

Cross & Gilman . . . 

McQuesten & Fogg . 

J. F. Paul & Co. . . . 

Bughee & Spooner . 

J. A. Robertson . . . 

Stetson & Pope . . • 

Chauncy, Page & Co. 

B. H. L. Pierce . . . 

A. J. Stearns & Son , 
Palmer, Parker & Co 
J. F. Keating . . 
Watson & Bisbee 
Laming & Drisko 
Cressey & Noyes 
Smith & Jacobs . 

B. D. Whitcomb 



Amount carried forward 



Class. 



Engine 



Mill 



Gallons. 



748,397,460 
442,702 
289,597 
906,892 
193,484 
172,440 
259,070 
81,067 
113,667 
568,679 

1,198,027 
764,969 
510,967 
313,649 

2,219,564 

1,333,709 

1,757,107 
748,312 
784,465 
531,329 
315,269 

1,592,166 
703,371 
777,216 
129,599 
861,307 

1,188,141 
71,804 
642,809 
442,766 
392,811 
610,454 

1,149,967 
141,750 

1,567,035 



Revenue. 



$224,508 78 

132 79 

86 86 

272 05 

58 03 

51 72 

77 71 

24 32 

34 10 

170 58 



772,173,621 $231,641 06 



Report of the Water Board. 



95 



Name. 



Amount brought forward. . 

F. R. Jenkins 

A. C. Hopkins 

R. S. Gilmore 

Glover & Jones 

Whitney Dye Wood Mill . 

Knowles, Freeman & Co. . 

Curtis, Spaulding & Co. . . 

Bond, Blanchard, Worthen 
&Co 



G. H. Withington 

J. H. Chadwick 

Horatio Harris 

W. V. Hutchings 

J. C. Nichols 

House of Correction .... 

Suffolk County Court House 

Suffolk County Jail . , . . 

Directors of Public Institu- 
tions 



South Ferry . . . 
North Ferry . . 
Board of Health 
Police Station No. 



Cedar Grove Cemetery 

First Church 

King's Chapel 



Class. 



Mill, 



Fish Store . . . 
Bacon Works . 

Bakery .... 

House ScFount'n 

Fountain . . . 
Wharfpurposes 



Public Urinals 



Organ 



Amount carried forward 629,188,377 $248,745 05 



Gallons. 



772,173,621 
288,209 
81,412 
127,911 
804,007 
1,571,129 
648,194 
623,842 

557,114 

666,256 

234,217 

• 751,725 

72,292 

35,579 

14,884,940 

5,788,372 

1,610,617 

4,203,547 

8,272,650 

9,665,850 

876,688 

348,937 

787,439 

402,262 

361,740 

690,015 

205,928 

320,467 

107,844 

181,838 

286,678 

74,654 

1,103,400 

323,661 

155,342 



Revenue. 



$231,641 06 
86 44 
24 41 
38 35 
241 18 
471 32 
194 44 
187 13 

167 11 

169 86 

70 24 

225 50 

21 67 
10 66 

4,465 47 

1,736 51 

483 17 

1,261 05 

2,481 78 

2,899 75 

262 98 

104 68 

236 23 

120 67 

108 52 

207 01 

61 76 

96 12 
32 34 
54 57 
86 02 

22 39 
331 00 

97 08 
46 58 



96 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 


Class. % 


1 


a -a 
c a 


o 

c ns 
,H a 

T* 1— | 


J 
•< 
H 
O 

H 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward. . 








829,188,377 


$248,745 05 


St. Mary's Church .... 


Organ . 




1 








228,936 


68 67 


Tremont-st. M. E. Church . 








1 








127,072 


38 10 


South Cong'l Church . . . 












. 2 




72,493 


21 73 


First Universalist Church . 












. 1 




104,516 


31 33 


Columbus-av. Univ. Church 








1 








66,284 


19 86 


Shawmut Cong'l Society . . 










1 . 






236,392 


70 90 


Church of the HolyRedeemer 








1 








74,520 


22 34 


Church of the Immaculate 












. 1 




441,008 


132 28 


Clarendon-st.Baptist Church 












. 1 




137,462 


41 22 


Second Church Society . . 












. 1 




63,381 


18 99 














. 1 




78,303 


23 47 














. 1 




39,606 


11 87 


Boston Soc'y Ne w Jerusalem 












. 1 




80,595 


24"l6 


Second Hawes Unit. Soc'y . 








1 . 




. . 




47,948 


14 37 


Old South Church Society . 












. 1 




56,340 


16 90 


Bancroft & Boyden .... 


Elevator . . . 


1 




• . 




644,234 


193 24 




it 




1 . 






48,525 


14 54 




ti 


1 








609,217 


182 75 




II 




If. 






26,550 


7 96 




l< 






. 1 




112,500 


33 74 




II 


1 








242,549 


72 74 




II 






. 1 




38,242 


11 46 




» 




1 . 






53,025 


15 90 




» 


1 








47,278 


14 16 


Goldthwait, Snow & Knight 


» 


1 . 








31,635 


9 48 


Thomas Richardson, heirs 
















« 






. 2 




1,671,750 


501 51 


Odd Fellows' Building . . 


« 






. 1 




207,750 


62 32 




<( 






. 1 




420,650 


126 19 




« 






. 1 




587,950 


176 38 




II 






. 1 




579,650 


173 89 




" 






. 1 




133,350 


40 00 


James Tucker & Co. . . . 


« 






. 1 




780,900 


234 27 


Boston Rubber Shoe Co. . 


11 






. 1 




510,750 


153 22 


Amount carried forward. . 










837,789,738 


$251,324 99 



Report of the Water Board. 



97 



Name. 



Amount brought fonoard 
Skilton Dole & Co. . . . 
Lamkin & Foster .... 

E. H. Sampson 

J. A. Bacon 

J. C. Haynes , 

Lewis, Brown & Co. . . 
Field, Thayer & Co. ... , 
McConnell & Gardner . . , 

F. Shaw & Bro , 

W. E. Putnam & Co. . . 
Henry Bond & Co. . . . 

J. S. Stone ........ 

Dennison & Co. (9 mos.) . , 
W. H. Mawhinney & Co. , 
R. H. White & Co. . . . , 

Clement & Colburn . . . , 
Jewett & Bush , 



Smith, Richardson & Cor- 
son (6 mos.) 



Henry A. Gould 

F- H. Dodge, vacant . . . 

Mitchell, Green & Stevens 
(6 mos.) 



R. W. Kendall (6 mos.) . . 
Mrs. Harris (3 mos.) ... 
S. C. Bixby & Co. (6 mos.) 
A. A. Pope & Co. (3 mos.) . 
Dale Bros. & Co. (1 mo. ) . 
Abram French & Co. (lmo.) 
Talbot, Wilmarth & Co. . . 
John Shepard (6 mos.) . . 
Geo. Plaisted & Sons . . . 

F. Upton & Co 

Perry, Wendall, Fay & Co. 
Continental B'kB'ld'g(6mo.) 
C. D. Swain & Co 



Amount carried forward 
7 



Class. 



Gallons. 



837,789,738 

465,750 

625,850 

639.750 

90,400 

457,450 

1,414,125 

793,698 

514,500 

258,000 

801,750 

674,250 

534,750 

780,000 

1,291,500 

1,896,750 

821,616 

631,500 

147,750 
571,575 



747,750 

63,250 

46,500 

30,000 

108,000 

26,234 

25,584 

309,750 

28,500 

168,000 

383,250 

413,250 

633,225 

180,000 



Revenue. 



$251,324 99 
139 71 
187 73 
191 92 

27 11 
137 23 
424 22 
238 09 
154 34 

77 40 
240 52 
202 27 
160 42 
234 00 
387 44 
569 01 
246 48 
189 45 

44 32 

171 46 



224 32 
20 47 
13 95 

8 99 
32 40 

7 87 

7 67 
92 92 

8 54 
50 39 

114 97 

123 97 

189 96 

54 00 



854,368,995 $256,298 53 



98 



City Document No. 80. 



Name. 


Class. 


c 

GO 
1 


o 


CI 


o 
3 


,4 
o 
c 


o 

a 

'■5 

H 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Eh 

o 


Gallons. 


Revenue. 


Amount brought forward . 

Minot, Hooper & Co. . . . 

Miss C. D. Brewer .... 
J. M. Beebe (3mos.) . . .. 
Barker Bros. & Gardner, 


« 
(i 

(i 

Factory . . . 

Marine Water- 
men, as per 
contract . . . 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
3 


854,368,995 

1,303,500 

959,700 

113,250 

11,355 

17,107 


$256,298 53 

391 05 

287 90 

33 97 

3 40 

5 13 


Paul Knowles and Others . 


1,933,917 


1,547 13 








858,707,824 


$258,567 11 























Report of the Water Board. 



99 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25th, 1848 : — 



Rec 


reived by 


Water Commissioners, as per 




Auditor's Report, in 1848, 


$972 81 


From January 


1, 1849, to 


January 1, 1850, . 


71,657 79 




c cc 


1850, 




1851, . 


99,025 45 




c cc 


1851, 




1852, . 


161,052 85 




( cc 


1852, 




1853, . 


179,567 39 




c cc 


1853, 




1854, . 


196,352 32 




( u 


1854, 




« 1855, . 


217,007 51 




t it 


1855, 




1856, . 


266,302 77 




t cc 


1856, 




1857, . 


282,651 84 




c cc 


1857, 




1858, . 


289,328 83 




c cc 


1858, 




1859, . 


302,409 73 




c cc 


1859, 




1860, . 


314,808 97 




c cc 


1860, 




1861, . 


334,544 86 




c cc 


1861, 




1862, . 


365,323 96 




c cc 


1862, 




1 1863, . 


373,922 33 




< <( 


1863, 




1864, . 


394,506 25 




c . (( 


1864, 




1865, . 


430,710 76 




i cc 


1865, 




1866, . 


450,341 48 




( cc 


1866, 




4 . 1867, . 


486,538 25 




c cc 


1867, 




« 1868, . 


522,130 93 




c cc 


1868, 




1869, . 


553,744 88 




c cc 


1869, 




« 1870, . 


597,328 55 




c cc 


1870, 




1871, . 


708,783 68 




c cc 


1871, 




' . 1872, . 


774,445 70 




c cc 


1872, 




1873, . 


806,102 51 




c cc 


1873, 




< 1874, . 


859,436 55 




c cc 


1874, 




1875, . 


914,748 73 




c cc 


1875, 




1876, . 


944,680 94 




c cc 


1876, to 


May 


1, 1876, . 


717,698 93 




$12,616,127 55 



100 



City Document No. 80. 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with water to 
the 1st of January, 1876, with the amount of water-rates 
received for 1875 : — 



30,056 Dwelling-houses 








$480,234 00 


46 Boarding-houses 






2,112 6Q 


1,021 Model-houses . 






29,588 13 


12 Lodging-houses 








389 67 


15 Hotels 








1,119 00 


5,856 Stores and shops 


. 






62,905 24 


449 Buildings . 








21,554 6Q 


696 Offices 








5,973 56 


45 Printing offices ■ 








944 92 


37 Banks 








584 72 


28 Halls 








514 50 


1 Museum 








45 50 


30 Private schools 








590 67 


17 Asylums . 








1,118 00 


4 Hospitals . 








249 50 


48 Greenhouses 








1,144 33 


113 Churches . 








1,808 00 


7 Markets . 








1,1-87 50 


94 Cellars . 








657 50 


831 Restaurants and 


saloons 






18,083 60 


14 Club-houses 








307 84 


36 Photographers 








1,077 37 


33 Packing-houses 








1,327 83 


1,647 Stables . 








i3,087 74 


41 Factories . 








1,436 62 


5 Bleacheries 








117 50 


1 Brewery . 








105 00 


3 Beer factories 








172 50 


112 Bakeries . 








1,261 75 


1 Boat-house 








49 00 


10 Freight-houses . 








242 50 


4 Gasometers 








54 00 


3 Ship-yards 








51 00 


1 College 








40 00 


1 Mill . 








50 00 


1 Cemetery . 








10 00 


1 Bath-house 








10 42 


63 Shops and engines 






3,222 76 


49 Stores and engines 






4,229 29 


Carried forward . . . . 


$657,658 78 



Report of the Water Board. 



101 



Commercial colleges 



Brought forward 
18 Factories and engines 
• 1 Foundry and engine . 

6 Printing and engines . 
3 Bakeries and engines . 
3 Ship-yards and engines 
1 Dry dock and engine . 

11 Buildings and engines 

24 Stationery engines 

78 Discharging and pile-driving engines 

15 Armories . 
741 Hand-hose 

16 Fountains . 
58 Tumbler-washers 
52 Water-pressures 
15 Laundries . 

2 

1 Laboratory 

1 Milk Company . 

Custom-House . 

Branch post-offices 
11 Aquariums 

Filling gasometers 

Filling cisterns . 
1 Ice company (washing ice) 
1 Gymnasium 
1 Depot .... 

7 Railroad stations 
67 Steamboats 

Office (City Scales) . 
Lockup Ward 24 
District Court-Houses 
Probate Building 
House of Reception . 
44 Fire-engines, hose and .hook and 
houses . 
3,197 Fire-hydrants 
98 Reservoirs 

Fire-boat " Wm. M. Flanders " 
385 Public schools 
City stables 
Washing-carts 
Offal station 
Faneuil Hall 
Public Library 



ladder 



Carried forward 



$657,658 78 

1,111 25 

92 50 

745 38 

124 00 
81 25 
34 00 

983 00 

1,667 43 

914 00 

249 92 

5,070 00 

237 00 

870 00 

260 00 

288 54 

99 00 

50 00 

55 00 

85 00 

88 00 

135 00 

178 26 

8 50 

30 00 

50 00 

36 00 

92 92 

11,979 62 

11 00 

6 00 

67 50 

75 00 

10 00 

940 00 

57,546 00 

1,764 00 

200 00 
3,364 00 

226 25 

125 00 
225 00 

40 00 
50 00 

. $747,924 10 



102 



City Document No. 80. 



Brought forward 
Branch Libraries . 
Paving Department 
Common Sewer Department 
Lamp Department 
Public urinals 
Street sprinkling • . 
Street watering 
Drinking fountains . . 
Steamer " Samuel Little " 
Small-pox Hospital . 
Building purposes 
Metered water (9 months) 









$747,924 10 








43 50 








327 75 








250 00 








17 25 








170 00 








500 00 








73 05 








455 00 








100 00 








25 00 








2,440 27 








192,355 02 




$944,680 94 



Report of the Water Board. 



103 



Statement showing the number and hind of Water Fixtures contained within 
the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston to January 1, 1876, as 
compared with previous years. 



1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


Remarks. 


6,768 


7,266 


7,271 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


67,089 


72,310 


72,897 


Sinks. 


32,690 


36,141 


37,611 


"Wash-hand basins. 


11,580 


12,040 


12,725 


Bathing-tubs. 


16,222 


18,877 


20,575 


Pan water-closets. 


17,081 


18,765 


2,584 


Hopper water-closets. 




201 


17,569 


" " automatic. 


248 


291 




" " pull. 


223 


188 




" " self-acting. 


589 


606 


564 


" " waste. 


590 


643 




" " door. 


2,445 


2,851 


1,636 


Urinals. 




459 


1,693 


" automatic. 


12,779 


14,300 


15,055 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


734 


680 


633 


Shower-baths. 


419 


363 


330 


Private hydrants. 


712 


754 


805 


Slop-hoppers. 


112 


134 


113 


Foot-baths. 


170,281 


186,874 


192,061 ' 





Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



104 City Document No. 80. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF THE EAST- 
ERN DIVISION. 

May 1st, 1876. 
L. Miles Standish, Esq., 

President of the Cochituaie Water Board: — 

Sir, — My report for the year ending with April 30th, I 
hereby submit. 

Main Pipe. 

The whole number of feet of main-pipe of the various 
sizes laid and relaid during the past season is 181^095 feet, 
equal to 34|||| miles, a much larger amount than has been 
laid since the introduction of the water, the largest part of 
which was laid in the Brighton and West Roxbury districts. 
The lengths, sizes, and in what streets, may be found in the 
tables below. 

The additional line 40 inches diameter across the Charles 
river, at Newton Lower Falls, was laid early in the season and 
up to to the present time no leak has been discovered. 

Service-Pipes. 

The whole number of services put in is . . . 1,237 
Length in feet ....... 35,362 

Upwards of two hundred of those frozen the previous 
winter were lowered to the now established depth, — five 
feet. 

Leaks. 

There have been fewer leaks this season than in the past 
four years. The only ones of any magnitude were, one, the 
30-inch main (old) on Boylston street, Brookline, and one 
on the 16-inch high-service pipe (new) on Centre street, 
Roxbury. The one in Brookline was caused by a crack in 
the bell which loosened the lead packing so the pressure of 
the water forced it out. The one on Centre street was 
caused by the breaking out of about six feet in length and 
one-third of the circumference of the pipe. But little dam- 
age was done however, other than the expense of the repairs 
of the pipe and street. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



105 



Of the relaying of mains of enlarged sizes with Lowry hy- 
drants connected throughout the city proper, South and East 
Boston, the following table shows the changes in sizes : — 



Street. 



Beacon 

Beach 

Gloucester ... 
Somerset . . . . , 
Merchants' row . , 
Commercial wharf 
Hamburg . . . . , 
East Lenox . . . , 
Newcomb 

First 

Athens 

White 

Meridian 

Lewis 

Bennington . . . . 

Lansing ...... 

Putnam 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON. 

Dartmouth and Parker 

Washington st. and Harrrison ave, 

Beacon and Marlboro 

Pemberton sq. and Ashburton pi. 

State and North 

From Atlantic ave .* 

Harrison ave. and Mystic st. . . 
Washington st. and Harrison ave. 
Washington and Reed 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

D and Dorchester 

BandC 

EAST BOSTON. 

Marion and Brooks 

Maverick sq. and White st. . . . 
Marginal st. and the Ferry . . . , 
Brooks and Chelsea , 

BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

Warren and Sherman , 

Roxbury and Dudley , 



Size now. 


No. of 
feet. 


12 


2,459 


12 


459 


12 


260 


8 


150 


8 


680 


8 


658 


6 


373 


6 


273 


6 


242 


8 


1,143 


6 


17 


12 


87 


12 


3,900 


12 


460 


8 


1,600 


8 


293 


6 


125 



Size 
formerly. 



106 



City Document No. 80. 



MAIN PIPE RELAID. 



Boston Proper. 

Harrison ave., between Union Park and B. & A. R. R. 

Bridge 12 inch. 2,550 feet. 

South Boston. 

Dorchester ave., between Sixth and Seventh streets 12 inch. 48 feet. 

Athens st., between B and C 4 " 42 " 



East Boston. 
Putnam St., between Bennington and Chelsea. 



6 inch. 



159 feet. 



Boston Highlands. 

Parker st., between Centre and Bromley Park 6 inch. 

Bromley Park, between Albert and Parker 4. " 

Raised. 
Harrison ave., between Dedham and Union Park st 12 inch. 

Lowered. 

Third st., between N and P 6 inch. 

Athens" " B and C '• 4 

Lexington st., between Eagle and Putnam 6 

Clifford St., between Blue Hill ave. and Warren 6 

Gore ave., between 'Fremont and Parker 4 

Blanchard place, between Bartlett and Norfolk 4 

Parker place, from Parker 4 



600 feet. 
440 " 



568 feet. 



240 feet. 
130 
380 
250 
212 
75 
150 



Taken up and Abandoned. 



6 inch iron pipe. . 

4 " " " .. 

lh " " " •■ 

li " lead " .. 

Extended § pipes. 



11,448 feet. 

2,064 " 

1,316 " 

314 " 

161 " 



Report of the Water Board. 



107 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Pipe 
laid in 1875. 



In what Street. 



Across Charles river 



In Valley for 'blow-offs 



Exeter . . . 
Beacon . . • 
Exeter . , . 

Columbus ave, 
Beacon . . . 
Berkeley . . 
Beach .... 
Exeter . . . 
Gloucester . 
Harrison ave. 
Atlantic ave. 
Tremont . . 
Albany . . . 

Stoughton . . 
Mason .... 
Columbus ave. 
Beacon . . . 
Albany . . . 
Lenox . . . 



Between what Streets. 



NEWTON LOWER FALLS. 
North and South Chambers 



Total 40-inch 

North and South Chambers 
Total 12-inch 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Marlboro' and Newbury 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Beacon and Marlboro' 



Total 16-inch 



Berkeley and Grenville place 

Dartmouth and Parker 

Chandler and Cortes 

Washington and Harrison ave 

Beacon and Charles river 

Beacon and Marlboro' 

Union Park st. and B. and A. R. R. bridge 

Oliver and Purchase 

Springfield and Worcester 

Bristol and Brookline 



Total 12-inch 



Harrison ave. and Albany . . 

West and Avery 

Berkeley and Ferdinand . . . 
Dartmouth and Parker . . . . 
Bristol and Brookline . . . . 
Washington and Harrison ave. 

Total 9-inch 



II 
AS 



16 



12 



1,435 



1,435 
130 



130 

670 
41 
12 



623 

665 

2,459 

108 

454 

200 

260 

2,550 

3 

3 

25 



6,727 

12 

7 

24 

70 
48 



108 City Document No. 80. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Somerset 

Merchants' row . . . 

Richmond 

Harrison ave 

Beach 

Stoughton 

Commonwealth ave. . 

Auburn . 

West Chester park . 

Rutland sq 

Hamburg 

Lenox 

Newcomb 

N. T. and N. E. R. R 

Clinton 

Haverhill 

Charlestown . . . . 

Albany 

Berkeley 

Russia wharf . . . . 

Atlantic ave 

Willow 

Exeter 

Tremont 

Tremont 

Harrison ave 

Long wharf 



Between what Street. 



BOSTON PROPER. — Continued. 

Pemberton sq. and Ashburton pi 

State and North 

Mercantile and Atlantic ave 

Union Park st. and B. and A. R. R. bridge 
Washington and Harrison ave 



Total 8-inch , 



Albany and Harrison ave 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Livingston and Leverett 

Columbus ave. and Providence R. R. 
Columbus ave. and Providence R. R. 

Harrison ave. and Mystic 

Harrison ave. and Washington . . . 

Washington and Reed 

From Federal st. in depot 

Mercantile and Atlantic ave 

Charlestown and Travers 

Stillman and Cooper 

Bristol and Brookline 

Appleton and Cortes 



Total 6-inch . 



Atlantic ave. and bridge . . 
Oliver and Purchase . •. . . 
Leverett and Lowell .... 
Marlboro* and Newbury . . 
Junction of Concord .... 
Northampton and Camden . 
Dedham and Union park . . 
Commercial and Atlantic ave. 

Total 4-inch 



o c 

6 <D 

.2 ft 



1,082 

320 

128 

106 

254 

180 

373 

273 

242 

546 

255 

3 

3 

20 

6 

2,709 

420 
4 
3 

12 
4 
6 

12 
4 

465 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 



109 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



D 

S! 

Dorchester ave 

First 

Athens . . . . 
Third 

Athens . . . . 
D 

White 

Meridian . . , 
Lewis . . • . . 

Meridian . . . 
Bennington . . 

Bennington . . 

Putnam . . . . 

Prescott . . . . 
Bremen . . . . 
Sumner . . . . 
Lexington . . . 



Between what Streets. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

First and Second 

Second and Third 

Sixth and Seventh 



Total 12-inch 

D and Dorchester 

Total 8-inch . 



B and C 
NandP 



Total 6-inch , 



B and C . . . . , 

First and Second . 

Total 4-inch , 



EAST BOSTON. 

Marion and Brooks 

Maverick sq. and White .... 
Marginal and Ferry 



Total 12-inch 



Maverick sq. and White 
Brooks and Chelsea . . 



Total 9-inch . . 

Brooks and Chelsea 

Total 8-inch . . 



Bennington and Chelsea . . . 
Trenton and Lexington .... 
Bennington and Glendon alley 

Border and New 

Putnam and Prescott 



.2 ft 
fi'S 



233 

300 
48 

581 

1,143 

1,143 

17 

600 

617 

42 
12 



87 

3,900 

460 

4,447 

36 
36 

72 

1,600 

1,600 

159 
100 
720 



Total 6-inch 



110 City Document No. 80. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Streets. 



Eutaw place 
Glendon alley 

Parker • . . 
Centre . • . 

Lamartine . 
New Heath . 
"Walnut ave. 
Hunneman . 
Pynchon . . 
Warren . . 
Blue Hill aye. 
Ruggles . . 
Parker . . . 
Edgewood . 
Egleston sq. . 
St. James . . 
Egleston eq. . 

Palmer . . . 
Hunneman . 
Fellows . . . 
Blue Hill ave 
Edgewood . 
"Walden . . . 
Quincy . . . 
Cabot . . . . 



Between what Streets. 



EAST BOSTON.— Continued. 

Marion and Meridian 

Junction Chelsea 



Total 4-inch 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

New Heath and Centre 

Parker and West Roxbury line . . . 



Total 16-inch 



Centre and West Roxbury line 

Day and Tremont 

Seaver and Walnut park . . . 
Albany and Harrison ave. . . 
Cedar and New Heath .... 
Edgewood and Bower .... 
Edgewood and Woodbine . . 

Halleck and Parker 

Ruggles and Greenleaf .... 
Warren and Blue Hill ave. . . 
Weld ave. and Walnut ave. . . 

Regent and Warren 

Walnut ave. and Washington . 



Total 12-inch 



Eustis and Winslow 

Fellows and Harrison ave. . , 
Hunneman and Northampton , 
Woodbine and Maywood . . , 
Warren and Blue Hill ave. . , 

Heath and Centre 

Cherry and Blue Hill ave. . , 
Weston and Windsor . . . . 



Afii 



16 



Total 9-inch 



180 
2 



182 

1,372 

2,285 

3,657 

665 
565 

71 
678 

18 
390 
395 
460 
842 
1,143 
566 
127 
688 

6,608 



144 



Eeport op the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



Ill 



In what Streets. 



Alaska . . . 
Lansing . . 
Warren . . . 
Blue Hill ave, 
Walden . . . 
Quincy . . . 
Dove . . . . 

Atherton ct. . 
Atherton . . 
Palmer . . . 
Vine . . . . 
Dale . . . . 
Catawba . . 
Bainbridge . 
Bowe . . . . 
Fellows . • . 
Downer . . 
Douglass ave, 
Sheridan ave. 
Ballard . . . 
Band . . . . 
Rand sq. . . 
Greenleaf . . 
Peabody . . 
Putnam . . . 
Cherry . . , 
King . . . . 
Cabot . . . 
Huckins ave. 
Parker . . , 



Between what Streets. 



h a 

a q. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS.— Continued. 

Perrin and Blue Hill ave 

Warren and Sherman 

Edgewood and Dale 

Edgewood and Quincy 

Heath and Centre 

Blue Hill ave, and Dorchester Line .... 
Blue Hill ave. and Cherry 



Total 8-inch 



From Atherton 

Arcadia and Washington . . , 
Eustis and Winslow . . . . , 
Forest and Mt. Pleasant ave. , 
Bainbridge and Rockland . . 
Laurel and Sherman . . . . , 
Wilmont and Walnut ave. . , 

From Centre 

Hunneman and Northampton 

From Tremont , 

Webber and Hall 

From Centre 

From Schuyler , 

Blue Hill ave. and Rand sq. . 

From Rand 

From Parker . 

Binney and Brookline ave. . 
Roxbury and Dudley . . . . , 

From Quincy , 

Roxbury and King-st. pi. . . 
Ruggles and Sterling . . . . , 
Dennis and Blue Hill ave. . 
Fisher ave. and Billings pi. . 



Amount carried forward. 



425 
380 
657 
1,002 
1,214 
500 
296 

4,474 

161 
36 
499 
323 
510 
146 
427 
602 
1,093 
263 
289 
30 
174 
362 
76 
398 
250 
302 
539 
184 
646 
143 
657 

7,830 



112 City Document No. 80. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



IN WHAT STRE3T. 



Rockland . . 
Egleston sq. . 
Fisher ave. . 
Parker . . . 
Parker . . . 
Bower .... 

Newman pi. . 
Chadwick pi. 
Culvert . . . 
Forest court . 
Copeland pi. . 
Way pi. . . . 
Bromley park 
Regent court 

Ashmont . . 
Howard . . . 
Bowdoin . . 
"Washington . 
Hancock . . 

"Welles ave. . 
Harley . . . 
Roslin .... 
Ocean .... 
Alban .... 
Austin . . . 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

Walnut ave. and Rockland ave 

Weld ave. and Walnut ave 

From Parker 

New and Old Heath 

Centre and Bromley park 

Laurel and Sherman 



Total 6-inch 



From D.dley 

From Chadwick . . . 
Tremont and Ruggles 

From Forest 

From Copeland . . . . 
From Copeland . . . . 
Albert and Parker . . 
From Regent 



Total 4-inch 



DORCHESTER. 

Ocean and Train . 

Howard ave. and Hartford . . . 
Green and Bowdoin sq. . . . , 

Euclid and Welles ave , 

Commercial and Winter . . . , 



Total 12-inch 



Washington and Harley . . 
Welles ave. and Roslin ... 

Harley and Ocean . 

Roslin and Ashmont .... 
Ashmont and Welles ave. . , 
Commercial and Downer ave. 



.2 .a, 



Amount carried fatwiard 



Eeport of the Water Board. 113 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Charles 

Howard ave. . . 
Aehmont .... 

Howard 

Train 

Boutwell ave. . . 
Quincy 

"Welles ave. . . . 

Alban 

Charles 

Howard ave. . . 
Ashmont .... 

Howard 

Train 

Boutwell ave. . . 

Quincy 

Wheatland ave. . 
Savin Hill ave. . 

Sagamore .... 
Moseley ave. . . 
Buttonwood court 

Leonard 

Harley 

Boslin 

Ocean 

Avondale pi. . . 

Austin 

Upham ave. . . . 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. — Continued. 
Amount brought forward .... 

Dorchester ave. and Freeman 

Sargent and Howard 

Carruth and Train 

Howard ave. and Hartford 

King and Boutwell ave 

Train and Neponset ave 

Howard and Roxbury Line 



Total 9-lnch , 



Washington and Harley . , 
Ashmont and Welles ave. . , 
Ditson and Dorchester ave. , 
Sargent and Howard . . . . 
Train and Neponset ave. . 
Quincy and Howard ave. . , 
Ashmont and King . . . . , 
Train and Neponset ave. . , 
Howard and Roxbury Line , 
Washington and Millet . . 
Midland and Spring . . . , 



Total 8-inch 



Elton and Belfast 

From Crescent ave 

From Buttonwood 

Clayton and Duncan .... 
Welles ave. and Roslin . . . 

Harley and Ocean 

Roslin and Ashmont .... 

From Richmond 

Commercial and Downer ave. 
Hancock and New 



Amount carried forward 



OS 



94 
22 
21 
77 
10 
30 
10 
21 

285 

50S 
482 
926 
780 
242 
215 

1,588 
400 
537 

1,328 
15 



7,016 

310 
128 
179 
181 
657 
330 
697. 
325. 
363; 
259 



3,429 



114 City Document No. 80. 

Statement rf Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



New 

Wood-st. court 
Myrtle .... 

Clark 

Sargent .... 
Cook ..... 
Minot pi. ... 
Wheatland ave. 
Whitfield . . . 

Millet 

Bowdoin sq. . 



Court ...... 

Stoughton-st. pi. 
Holden pi. . . . 



Centre 



Lamartine . , 
New Boylston , 
Green ... 
Washington . , 



Walnut 
Centre 
South . 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. — Continued. 
Amount brought forward . . . . 

From Upham ave 

Walnut and Wood 

Quiney and Myrtle place 

Bellevue and Hamilton ave 

Hartford and Howard ave 

From Washington 

From Minot . . . . 

Washington and Whitfield 

Washington and Park 

Washington and Park 

From Bowdoin 



Total 6-inch 



From Hancock . 
From Stoughton 
From Dudley . 



Total 4-inch 



WEST ROXBURY. 
Perkins and Pond 



Total 16-inch 



Roxbury Line and Green . , 
Lamartine and Washington , 
Lamartine and Washington - 
Green and New Boylston . , 
School and Atherton . . . , 
Walk Hill and South . . . 
School and Seaver .... 

Pond and South 

Centre and Jamaica ... 
Jamaica and Morton . . . , 



.2 a 



3,429 
83 
253 
56 
267 
757 
174 
389 
9 
201 
157 
367 



187 
180 
160 



Amount carried forward ' . . . 17,802 



2,916 

3,058 
1,854 
1,311 
1,921 

451 
3,695 

407 
1,911 
1,289 
1,905 



Report or the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



115 



In what Street. 



Pond 

Starr 

Keyes 

Walk Hill. . . 

Green .... 
Elliot ...•. . 
Greenough ave. 
Elm 

Chestnut . . . 
Spring park . . 
Jamaica . . . 
Boylston ave. . 
Curtis 

Lamartine . . 
Boylston . . . 
New Boylston . 
Green .... 
Washington . . 

a 

Beethoven . . 
Arcadia . . . 
Chemical ave. . 
School . . . . 
Centre . . . . 

South 

Elliot 

Greenough ave, 



Between what Streets. 



WEST ROXBURY. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

Centre and May ' 

Green and Keyes 

Starr and South 

Morton and Washington 



Total 12-inch 



Lamartine and Centre . . 

Centre and Pond 

Centre and Elm 

Walker and Revere . . , 
Boylston and Cedar ave. , 
Centre and Chestnut . . , 

From South , 

Green and New Boylston , 
Boylston and Wyman . , 



Total 8-inch , 



Boylston and Lamartine sq. . , 
Lamartine and Chestnut . . . , 
Boylston ave. and Bismarck . , 
Lamartine and Washington . . , 
Green and New Boylston . . . , 
Atherton and School ...... 

Walk Hill and South , 

Washington and Arcadia . . . , 

School and Atherton , 

Washington and Brookside ave. 

Walnut and Arcadia , 

Perkins and South , 

Centre and Jamaica 

Centre and Poud 

Centre and Elm 



CPh 



Amount carried forward 



17,802 

2,700 

1,970 

1,103 

651 

24,226 

1,626 
1,849 
1,121 

785 
1,505 
1,661 

286 
2,476 

907 

12,216 

43 

459 

10 

25 

36 

22 

15 

553 

404 

553 

1,881 

54 

37 

16 

15 

4,123 



116 City Document No. 80. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Streets. 



Elm 

Pond 

Chestnut . . . . 
Cedar ave. . . . 
Spring park . • . 

Starr 

Keyee 

Boylston ave. . . 
Burroughs • . . 
Harris ave. . . . 
Seaverns ave. . . 
Alveston . . . . 
Brewer . . . . . 
Thomas . . . . 

"Walker^ 

B 

Gordon 

"Weld ave . . . . 

Revere 

John A. Andrew 
Brookside ave. . 

Orchard 

Jamaica 

Curtis 

South 

Walk Hill. . . . 

Green 

Court 

11 

Washington . . . 



Between what Streets. 



WEST ROXBURY. — Continued. 

Amount brought forward 

Greenough ave. and Revere 

Centre :md May 

Green and Cedar ave 

Chestnut and Lamartine 

Centre and Chestnut 

Green and Caroline ave 

Starr and South 

Porter and Green 

Centre and Pond 

Centre and Alveston 

Centre and Alveston 

Seaverns ave. and Greenough ave. . . . 

Elliot and Burroughs 

Centre and' Brewer 

Elm and John A. Andrew 

Boylston and Spring park 

Starr and Depot 

School and Egleston sq 

Alveston and Elm 

Walker and Newherne 

Green and Chemical ave 

Centre and Pond 

From South 

Boylston and Wyman 

Keyes and Morton 

Morton and Washington 



Total 6-inch 



Lamartine and Union ave. 
From Lamartine . . . . , 

From Curtis 

Walk Hill and South . . . 



S & 
.2 o< 
AS 



Total 4-inch 



4,123 

9 

54 

729 

352 

26 



1,568 

698 

595 

912 

625 

508 

333 

594 

341 

471 

678 

36 

629 

1,612 

8 

14 

16 

237 

15,154 

20 
161 
206 

30 

417 



Eeport of the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



117 



In what Street. 



Brighton ave. . . 
North Beaeon . . 

North Beacon . . 
Harvard ave. . . 
Cambridge . . . 

M 

Market 

Washington . . . 
in 

Foster 

North Harvard . 
Chestnut Hill ave 

Chester 

Cambridge . . . 

Market 

Lincoln 

Franklin . . . . 
North Harvard . 
"Winship . . . . 
Rockland . . . . 
Union 

Brighton ave. . . 
North Beacon . . 
Harvard ave. . . 

Allston 

Cambridge . . . 
Market 



Between what Streets. 



BRIGHTON. 
St. Mary's and Cambridge . . 
Cambridge and Everett . . 



Total 16-inch . 

Everett and Parson . . 

Cambridge and Brookline line 
North Beacon and Washington 
Harvard ave. and Beacon park 
Western ave. and Hill .... 
Cambridge and Nonantum . . 
Cambridge and Union .... 
Washington and South .... 
Cambridge and Western ave. . 
Washington and the Ledge . . 



Total 12-inch 



Brighton ave. and Gardner 

Brighton ave. and Harvard ave. . . 

Washington and Hill 

Cambridge and Market 

Lincoln and North Harvard .... 
Western ave. and Cambridge bridge 

Union and Chestnut Hill ave 

Vernon and Chestnut Hill ave. . . . 
Winship and Lexington 



Total 8-inch , 



Essex and Webster 

Cambridge and Lyman .... 
Farrington and Holmes ave. . 
Brighton ave. and Allston sq. 
Washington and Beacon park 
Washington and School . . . 



B v 
.2 <=< 

OS 



12 



Amount carried forward 



B.589 
379 



4,422 
2,596 
3,942 
2,357 
3,277 
2,977 
1,245 
2,158 
2,390 
2,072 

27,436 

461 
1,419 
1,706 
4,651 
1,764 
2,431 

224 
58 

425 

13,139 

111 

60 

42 

1,020 

123 
55 

1,411 



118 City Document No. 80. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Lincoln 

Franklin . . . . 
Washington . . . 

Gardner . . . . 

Foster 

Winship . . . . 
Chestnut Hill ave 
Rockland . . . . 
Shepard . . . . 
Pleasant . . . . 

Vernon 

Oakland . . . . 
Waverley . . . . 
North Harvard . 

Brighton ave. . . 
Harvard ave. . . 



Between what Streets. 



BRIGHTON. — Continued. 
Amount brought forward . . . 

Cambridge and Market 

Pearl and Vernon 

"Winship and Nonantum 

Cambridge and Union 

Chester and Harvard ave 

Washington and South 

Washington and Union 

Washington and The Ledge .... 
Washington and Chestnut Hill ave. . 

Washington and Union 

Franklin and Everett 

Franklin and Everett 

Washington and Faneuil ...... 

Market and Western ave 

Cambridge and Willard pi. .... . 



Total 6-inch 

St. Mary and Norfolk . . 
Washburn and Holmes ave. 

Total 4-inch 



.2 p< 



1,411 

50 

7 

62 

19 

1,122 

41 

1,145 

36 

21 

943 

971 

1,202 

533 

1,250 

114 

8,927 

50 
15 



Keport of the Water Board. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



121 



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122 



City Document No. 80. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1875. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


Where. 


86 
2 


30 
4 


24 
1 


2u 

9 
7 
2 
1 
1 

20 


16 
10 

2 
12 


12 

19 
5 
3 
2 
2 

31 


9 

3 

6 

9 


8 
6 

1 

8 


6 

36 
4 
3 
6 
4 

53 


4 

52 
1 
1 
5 

59 


3 
3 

3 


2 

6 
5 
1 

12 


IS 

80 
80 


11 

3 

2 

5 


1 

15 
7 
2 
1 

25 


1 

15 
2 

17 


i 

361 
65 
50 
65 
12 
6 

559 


i 

5 

8 
11 
3 
2 

24 


Totals. 




630 




109 


East Boston 


1 




2 
1 

4 


65 
91 

26 




3 


4 


7 




928 



Of the leaks that have occurred on pipes of 4-inch 
and upwards — joints, 135; settling of earth, 11; 
defective pipe, 16 ; defective packing, 11 ; defective 
gate, 5 ; blasting, 1 ; burst by frost, 2. 

Total 

Stoppages — by fish, 21; by frost, 1. Total . 

Of 3-inch and on service pipes — joints, 23 ; settling 
of earth, 139 ; settling of wall, 2; settling of box- 
ing, 1 ; defective pipe, 58 ; defective packing, 13 ; 
defective coupling, 23 ; defective gate, 1 ; defective 
faucet, 6 ; stiff connections, 80 ; faucet pulled out, 
7 ; faucet loose at main, 6 ; faucet broken at main, 
2 ; faucet punched out, 5 ; gnawed by rats, 15 ; 
struck by pick, 50 ; burst by frost, 25 ; pipes not 
in use, 9 ; nail-hole, 1 ; blasting, 6. 

Total . 

Stoppages — fish, 110; rust, 92; dirt, 9; gasket, 1. 

Frost from inside of house, 17 ; frost outside, 24. 

Total 



181 

22 



472 



253 



Total , 



928 



Keport or the Water Board. 



123 



Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1875. 





Diameter of. 




Tear. 


Four inches and 
upwards. 


Less than Four 
Inches. 


Totals. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

185 

188 

153 

434 

203 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
636 
487 
449 
407 
769 
1,380 
1,459 
1,076 
2,120 
725 


104 


1851 


237 


1852 


323 


1853 


345 




354 


1855 


294 


1856 


807 


1857 


363 


1858 


401 


1859 


531 


I860 


592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 




494 


1864 


489 


1865 


607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 


1868 


531 


1869 


489 


1870 


926 


1871 


1,565 
1,647 
1,229 


1872 


1873 


1874 


2,554 


1875 


923 







124 



City Document No. 80. 



Hydrants. 

During the year 484 hydrants have been established, and 
77 abandoned, as follows : — 





E'stablishec 
Lowry. Boston 


Post. 


Abandoned. 
Lowry. Boston. 




Dif. 


Boston 


57 


7 




64 


48 


48 


16 


South Boston 


6 






6 


4 


4 


2 


East Boston 


24 


6 




30 


1 18 


19 


11 


Boston Highlands 45 


10 


2 


57 


3 2 


5 


52 


Deer Island 






2 


2 






2 


Dorchester 


45 


13 


2 


60 


1 


1 


59 


West Roxbury 


54 


3 


77 


134 






134 


Brighton 


47 


1 


83 


131 






131 




278 


40 


166 = 


484 


4 73 = 


= 77 


407 



Total amount up to May 1, 1876. 



Boston 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Boston Highlands 
Dorchester . 
Brookline . 
West Roxbury 
Brighton . 
Charlestown 
Chelsea 
Deer Island 



1,272 

467 

283 

745 

577 

9 

134 

131 

11 

8 

16 

3,653 



51 Hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new 
or repaired ones, and 134 boxes have been taken out and 
replaced by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 



Stopcocks. 

314 new stopcocks have been established this year. 99 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. All 
the stopcocks have had the attention of former years paid 
them. 



Report of the Water Board. 



125 



Statement of Pipes and other stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, May 1st, 1876. 









Diameter in Inches. 




48 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


18 


16 

14 
8 
1 

20 
35 

9 

4 

12 
2 

2 
15 
5 

15 
2 

5 
2 


12 

609 

7 

1 

70 

24 

3 

11 

3 

12 

58 

38 
65 

36 
18 

83 
32 

29 
24 

4 


10 
5 

6 

14 

2 

6 


9 
45 


8 


8 


4 


3 

23 

19 
8 

2 
16 


2 




10 

1 

7 
3 
1 

5 
2 


33 
2 

3 
7 
1 
6 
2 
1 
3 

2 

3 

1 

3 

10 


33 
2 

4 
1 

11 
6 
2 
5 

3 

2 

7 

1 
1 
2 


74 
3 
1 
2 
6 
1 

11 

12 

2 

20 
10 

2 

6 

5 

I 30X12 

2 
1 
4 
13 


4 

1 
9 
9 
1 

29 
1 
.3 

4 

19 
3 

9 
5 

1 

1 
2 


24 
' 3 

5 

8 

1 

14 

4 
11 

8 
15 
3 

20 

2 
6 


3 


2,315 
18 

45 

71 

13 

44 
12 

57 
60 

57 
18 

72 
78 

13 

36 

6 


3,028 

11 

92 

56 
20 
43 
18 

4 
29 

7 
13 
11 
27 

8 
9 

25 
62 


121 

1 

13 
1 

46 
7 

26 

17 
3 

71 
7 

44 
2 

8 

20 
21 
10 




Blow-off Brand 
T Pipes . . . 
4 Way Branches 
3 Way Branches 


ies 




3 

19 


Clamp Sleeves 








Quarter Turns 

Manhole Pipes 
One-eighth Turr 
Pieces of Pipes 

Blow-offs and M< 

Thawing Clamp 
Manhole Branch 
Branch Opening 


s 
mh 

es 
s . 


oles 


127 



Loiory Hydrants. — 60 Lowry hydrants, 29 pots, 12 iron 
extensions, 8 screw extensions, 12 chucks, 2 caps, 16 frames 
and covers, 6 frames, 18 round covers, 1 sidewalk cover, 
11 screws, 4 valve seats, 8 rubber valves, large, 23 do. small, 
57 lbs. composition castings, 33 wastes. 

Post Hydrants. — 16 post hydrants, 65 barrels, 10 pots 
with valve connected, 26 common pots, 17 halves of pots, 
40 frames and covers, 136 post hydrant castings, 101 screws 



126 City Document No. 80. 

and nuts, 23 wrought-iron rods, 83 large nipples, 43 21-inch 
nipples, 30 stuffing-boxes, 46 rings for same, 111 "valve 
seats, 133 rubber valves, 154 packing rings, 159 bottom 
rubber rings, 637 lbs. composition castings, 50 cast-iron 
valves and crossbars, 24 iron tops, 30 large caps, 58 small 
do., 53 wrenches, 200 6^ X f-inch bolts, 12 barrels unfin- 
ished, 8 pots with valves unfinished. 

Boston Hydrants. — 18 Boston hydrants, 40 extensions, 
7 6x4 hydrant bends, 7 4-in.ch do., 40 frames and covers, 
1 extra heavy frame, 7 heavy frames and covers, 18 covers, 
109 screws, 20 nuts, 7 valve seats, 70 nipples, 22 rods, 8 
caps. 

For Stopcocks. — 2 36-inch screws, 1 30-inch do., 2 24- 
inch do., 20 12-inch do., 36 8-inch do., 24 6-inch do., 19 4- 
inch do., 1 4-inch do. for waste weir, 1 do. for Brookline 
reservoir, 12 3-inch do., 1 16-inch check valve, 1 12-inch 
valve, 2 8-inch do., 13 6-inch do., 21 4-inch do., 7 3-inch 
do., 12 30-inch rings, 26 8-inch do., 106 6-inch do., 50 4- 
inch do., 6 3-inch do., 67,512 lbs. iron castings for 16-inch, 
12-inch, 8-ineh and 6-inch stopcocks, 1 12-inch unfinished, 
24 8-inch do., 90 lbs. lead washers, 520 lbs. malleable nuts, 
78 lbs. composition castings for 8-inch gates, 30 do. for 
4-inch do., 4 heavy frames and covers, 19 frames and covers, 

14 blow-off covers, 15 elevator covers, 19 fire-pipe covers, 
32 reservoir covers, 20 high-service covers, 160 1-inch X 5^- 
inch bolts, 404 f-inch X 3|-inch do., 250 |-inch X 3-inch 
do., 150 |-inch X 2-inch do., 339 f-inch X 2^-inch do., 
1,325 f-inch by 3^-inch do. 

Meters in Shop. — 1 4-inch, 3 3-inch, 9 2-inch, 3 1-inch, 
21 f-inch. 

Stock J or . Meters. — 6 2-inch nipples, 4 1-inch do., 8 
f-inch do, 2 2-inch connection pieces, 4 1-inch do., 8 f-inch 
do., 10 1-inch cocks, 26 f-inch do., 1 4-inch clock, 3 3-inch 
do., 4 2-inch do., 3 1-inch do., 40 f-inch do., 60 brass spin- 
dles, 50 rubber nipples, 5 fish-boxes, 13 covers, 15 frames, 

15 glasses for clocks. 

For Service Pipe. — 75 1-inch union cocks, 29 |-inch do., 
568 f-inch do., Ill f-inch unfinished do., 12 1-inch air 
cocks, 8 1-inch T cocks, 38 |-inch do., 53 f-inch do., 60 
|-inch do , 12 f-inch Y cocks, 38 f-inch thawing cocks, 37 
inch crooked cocks, 22 f-inch do., 103 f-inch do., 39 |-inch 
do., 63 ll-inch tubes, '62 1-inch do., 415 f-inch do., 14 
2-inch couplings, 70 1-inch do., 122 f-inch do., 30 
^-inch do., 37 f-inch thawing do., 1,500 boxes, 
38 T do., 36 Y do., 145 extension tubes, 860 tubes, 
2,000 caps, 30 4 X 3 flanges, 20 sets 1-inch tubes, caps 
and flanges, 18 4X2 iron reducers, 20 composition hose 



Report of the "Water Board. 127 

reducers, 14 4x2 composition reducers, 36 2x1 do., 
36 2x | do. 

Lead Pipe. — 273 pounds 3-inch lead pipe, 350 lbs. 2-inch 
do., 2,016 lbs. l|4nch do., 695 lbs. l|-inch do., 892 lbs. 
1-inch do., 1,575 lbs. |-inch do., 27,995 lbs. f-inch do., 
4,895 lbs. i-inch do., 716 lbs. 1-inch tin-lined do., 195 lbs. 
|-iuch do., 70 lbs. |-inch block tin do., 650 lbs. old 2-inch 
lead pipe, 55 lbs. solder. 

Blacksmith Shop.— 1,510 pounds round iron, 783 lbs. 
flat do., 900 lbs. square do., 60 lbs. working pieces, 1,180 
lbs. cast steel, 20 lbs. spring steel, 100 lbs. calking steel, 
150 shoe shapes, 2 boxes horsenails, 200 lbs. shoes, 3|- 
dozen pick blanks, 1,000 lbs. Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. — 105 Lowry hydrant boxes, 121 Post 
do., 28 Lowry do. unfinished, 15 Post do. unfinished, 87 
stopcock boxes, 20 do. unfinished, 5 hydrant boxes, 3 meter 
boxes, 1,300 lbs. spikes and nails, 1,500 feet pine plank, 
1,500 feet 1^-inch spruce batting, 40 1-foot pieces for raising 
hydrant boxes, 38 1-foot do. for raising stopcock boxes, 10 
do. for Lowry hydrant boxes, 70 feet maple, 400 feet spruce 
joist. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 7 hand-beared do., 8 sets shears' and rigging for 
same, 7 tool-houses, 3 tool-boxes, 7 nozzles, 2 platform 
scales, 1 portable blacksmith shop, 1 portable cover for 
Brewer fountain, 1 hand roller, 2 horse do., tools for laying 
main and service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot do., 1 hand 
do., 1 Pratt and Whitney taper do., 1 planer, 1 boring mill, 
1 chain-hoisting gear, 1 upright drilling machine, 4 grind- 
stones, 1 trip hammer, the necessary tools for carrying on 
the machine, blacksmith, carpenter and plumbing shops, 1 
circular saw, 1 fan-blower, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch 
do., 1 small do., 9 wheelbarrows, 3 handbarrows, 1,600 feet 
hose, also a lot of patterns at foundries where we obtain 
castings. 

/Stable. — 15 horses, 12 wagons, 2 buggies, 6 pungs, 1 
sled, 2 sets runners, 2 carts, 20 sets harness, 32 blankets, 3 
buffalo robes, 2 sleighs, 30 bales hay, 87 bushels grain, 9 
bales straw, 1 jigger, 4 lap robes. 

Beacon-Hill lieservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder, 1 
16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 

9 cast-iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 
patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for 
small fountains. 

Miscellaneous. — 43 tons pig lead, 30 gallons linseed oil, 

10 gallons tallow oil, 10 gallons asphaltum, 1 barrel kerosene 
oil, 80 tons furnace coal, 2 tons paving stones, 130 tons 



128 City Document No. 80. 

gravel, 600 brick, 86 cords wood, 1 iron fountain-basin, 3 
stone troughs for drinking-fountains, 2 drinking- fountains, 
1 hose-carriage, 34 bales gasket, 3 iron lamp-posts, 5 fountain- 
bottoms, 2 lawn-cutters, 1 garden-pump, 6 manhole covers, 
5 bbls. cement, lot of old iron. 

Kespectfully submitted. 

E. E. JONES, 

Superintendent of Eastern Division. 



Keport or the Water Board. 129 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1875. 

Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From 

May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to 
October 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailet, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 
1851, to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to 
October 1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 
1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, 
to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
November 25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, 
to December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. 
From February 14, 1866, to November, 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, 
to present time. 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury- 
river conduit, from May 10, 1873, to present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. 
Whitwell, and J. Avery Richards were elected a Water Board, 
subject to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City 
Council, by an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, which was 
limited to keep in force one year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate 
Water Board was established. 



130 



City Document No. 80. 



Cochituate Water Board. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned 

April 7, 1856 ** Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned 

June 5, I860** Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired 

April 3, 1865 Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned Jan- 
uary 15, 1867 .... One year and nine months. 

JohnH. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired 

April 6, 1868 . . . . One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and 

resigned January 4, 1871 . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 1871, 

to May 4, 1873 . . . Two years and four months. 

John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to Dec. 17, 

1874 ** . . . . . One year and seven months. 

Thomas Gogin, elected Dec. 17, 1874, and re- 
signed May 31, 1875 Six months. 

L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to 
present time. 

Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 55 ** . Five years. 
John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 and 

59 ** Eight years. 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55 . Five years. 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 . . Four 3'ears. 

James W. Seaver, 1851 ** . . . . . One year. 
Samuel A. Eliot, 1851 ** . . ' . 

John T. Heard, 1851 One year. 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, 55 ** . . Four years. 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 .... Two years. 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 ** One } r ear. 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 ** . . . Three years. 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 . Six years. 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56 and 57 ** . . Four years. 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 Two years. 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 ** . . Four years. 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58 Three years. 

John T. Dinglet, 1856 and 59 . . . Two years. 

Joseph Smith, 1856 ...... Two months. 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 

and 64 Eight years. 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61** . . Five years. 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 . Five years. 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 ** . . . . . One year. 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 . Six years. 



Report of the Water Board. 



131 



Clement Willis, I860** . 

G. E. Pierce, 1860 ** . 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 ** 

Gteorge Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Prat, 1862 . 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 . 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 

Otis Norcross, * 1865 and 66 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 67 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 

William S. Hills, 1867 

Charles R. Train, 1868 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 

Benjamin James, * 1858, 68 and 69 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870 . 

John O. Poor, 1870 . 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 6 

69, 70 and 71 . 
George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70 and 71 
Sidney Squires, 1871 . 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 . 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71 and 72 
Alexander Wadsworth, * 1864, 65, 66, 67, 

69 and 72 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73 and 74 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74 

Jno. A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73 and 74 ** 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74 and 75* 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72 and 75 . 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74 and 75 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875 . 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74 and 75 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74 and 75 

L. Miles Standish,1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 

67, 74 and 75 . 
Charles E. Powers, * 1875 
Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876 
Nahum M. Morrison, 1876 
Augustus Parker, 1876 



7,68, 



68, 



One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Two years. 
Three j-ears. 
One year. 
One } r ear. 
One year. 
One year. 

Nine years. 
Four years. 
One year. 
One year. 
Four years. 

Seven years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Five years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
Three years. 
One year. 



Present Board. 



* Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. 
Mr. "Wilkins was re-elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, 
which office he held until his resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer 
Johnson was elected President; and July 2, Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Nor- 
cross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected Mayor of the city. Ben- 
jamin James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 1868. Alexander 
Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. Thomas 
Gogin resigned May 31, 1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15 to fill 
the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Gogin. 

** Deceased. 



132 City Document No. 80. 



Cochituate Water Board, 1876. 

L. Miles Standish, President. 
Solomon B. Stebbins, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Nahum M Morrison, j Q Common Council. 

Augustus Parker, ) 

At Large. 
For One Year. *Terms expired May 1. 

Leonard R. Cutter, L. Miles Standish, 

Charles E. Powers, Edward A. White. 

Clerk. 
Walter E. Swan, 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 

Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division. 

Desmond Fitz Gerald. 

Superintendent on Additional Supply of Water. 
Albert Stan wood. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

City Engineer. 
Joseph P. Davis. 

Rasideiit Engineer on Additional Supply. 
A. Fteley. 



Standing Committees of the Board. 

Eastern Division. 

Edward A. White, Chairman. 

Nahum M. Morrison, L. Miles Standish. 

Western Division. 
Leonard R. Cutter, Chairman. 
Solomon B. Stebbins, Augustus Parker. 

Water Registrar's Department. 
Nahum M. Morrison, Chairman. 
Augustus Parker, L. Miles Standish. 

On New Supply. 

L. Miles Standish, Chairman. 

Leonard R. Cutter, Charles E. Powers. 



* Holding office until the "Boston Water Board " is appointed and organized. 



B> P, L Binder 

mn m m: 



SHELF No. 



[Sept,, 1882, 20,000.] 

B08T0N PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

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card ; to be kept 14 days (or seven days in the case of fiction 
and juvenile books, published within one year,) without fine ; 
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including Sundays and holidays; not to be lent out of the 
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returned at this Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or unwarrantably 
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' ***No claim can be established because of the failure of 
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Tie record Mow must not be made or altered by borrower. 



















































































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