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Full text of "Annual report of the Commissioner-General of Immigration"

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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

JAMES J. DAVIS. SecniUT 

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL 
OF IMMIGRATION 

TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30 

1921 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFHCE 

1921 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

JAMES J. DAVIS. Secretory 

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL 
OF IMMIGRATION 

TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR 



« 



FISCAL YEAR 

ENDED JUNE 30 



1921 




cJ 



WASHINGTON 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

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5 



CONTENTS. 



Report of the Commissioner General of Immigration 5 

The passport-control regulations 6 

Mexican agricultural laborers 7 

Contract labor 7 

Alien stowaways 7 

Oriental immigration 8 

Seamen 10 

Smuggling and surreptitious entry of aliens 11 

Head tax collected and administrative fines imposed 13 

Deportation of aliens 14 

The per centum limit act 16 

Appendix I. — Statistics of immigration, 23 

A — General immigi-ation and emigration 23 

B — Japanese immigration and emigration 25 

C — Chinese immigration and emigration 25 

Appendix II. — Report on seamen 'a work 159 

3 



)^1 ^^,/L,i cj v3 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



United States Department of Labor, 

Bureau of Immigration, 

WasMngton, June 30, 1921. 

Sir: It will not be the purpose of this report to place before you, 
Mr. Secretary, a detailed statement of the minor transactions which 
were necessarily incidental to the major activities of the Bureau of 
Immigration during the past year. Rather, the purpose will be to 
present, in expressive tabulated form, the sum total of the year's 
work of the Immigration Service, from which tables you will be able 
readily to visualize the extent of the task which has been performed. 
But certain introductory comment on the figures and certain obser- 
vations of a general character appear to be a necessary prelude to the 
report. 

The fiscal year 1921 has added a particularly interesting chapter to 
the history of immigration to the United States and its insular terri- 
tories and possessions. With the cessation in 1918 of general hostili- 
ties in war-spent Europe, speculation became rife among those inter- 
ested in the immigration question as to the quantity and character of 
immigration this country would draw from that continent after it 
became apparent that peace was really established and something like 
normal conditions of ocean travel were restored. Some predicted 
that the stupendous task of reclaiming Europe from the devastation 
and waste of years of war would appeal to the patriotic motives and 
claim the time and attention of the vast majority of those who, at a 
time other than extraordinary, might be expected to find their way 
here. Others were of the view that an irresistible spirit of unrest in 
the post-war period, disturbed political and economic conditions, and 
the reopening of the lanes of travel after a closed period of some five 
years would, if unchecked by restrictive legislation, bring upon us an 
unprecedented flood of immigration. 

The steadily increasing numbers of arrivals in the closing months of 
the fiscal year 1920 suggested the probable accuracy of the view of the 
last-mentioned school of thought. The press of arriving aliens in the 
succeeding months and until emergency legislation, drastic in its 
restrictive measures, began to stay the tide demonstrated with start- 
ling clearness the accuracy of this view. 

The total number of alien arrivals in the fiscal year 1921 was 
991,942. After examination 13,779 of these were found to be unac- 
ceptable for various reasons and deported. The number of alien ad- 
missions for the year was, therefore, 978,163, as against 621,576 in 
the previous year and 237,021 in the fiscal year 1919. Of the total 

5 



6 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

number of aliens admitted during the past ;7ear 172,93.5 were nonim- 
migrant (i. e., not coming for permanent residence). Our true immi- 
gration for the year was, therefore, 805,228, as compared with 430,001 
for the previous year — an increase of 375,227. The emigrant depar- 
tures were 247,718, a decrease of -40, 597 from the previous year. The 
permanent addition to our ahen popuhition was, therefore, 557,510. 

The number of aliens accorded immigration inspection for the year 
(which includes 1,139,339 seamen) aggregated 2,131,281, exceeding by 
564,829 the alien inspections of the previous year, and by 679,748 the 
total inspections in 1907, when there occurred the heaviest immigra- 
tion in the history of our country (at which time, however, aliens 
engaged regularly in the calling of seamen were not required to be 
examined) . 

It is a peculiar fact that nearly all of the additional alien arrivals 
was at the port of New York, the total for all of the other ports 
(including the Canadian and Mexican borders) having been but 
339,450, as compared with 301,102 during the preceding year. There 
was an actual decrease in the number of such arrivals across the land 
borders, accounted for on the southern border by more or less de- 
pressed industrial conditions which had a tendency to discourage 
immigration from Mexico, and on the northern by the high rate of 
currency exchange, the material advances in railway and sleeping car 
rates, economic conditions comparable to our own, and a wa^e scale 
not materially lower than that which prevails on this side of the line. 
Our border officers, however, have had a busy and trying year in 
endeavoring to prevent the surreptitious entry of unvisaed and other- 
wise inadmissible aliens from certain of the countries of Europe who 
chose this indirect route of travel because of the knowledge, or belief, 
which they had that they would certainly be rejected at our seaports 
or any other port or place where they might apply for admission in 
regular manner. The situation with respect to this class of aliens has 
become particularly serious on the southern border and comment 
thereon will be made in another part of this report. 

THE PASSPOKT-CONTROL REGULATIONS. 

There have been some important modifications of the passport- 
control regulations. Immigration officers continue to act as control 
officers at our ports for and on behalf of the Department of State. 
The permit system has been abandoned, so that it is no longer 
necessary for resident aliens to obtain special permits before depart- 
ing from the countr}^. Our own citizens also may depart from and 
return to the country without special permits, although the presenta- 
tion of such passports is quite generally required by the foreign 
Governments before travel through the respective countries is per- 
mitted. With but few exceptions all aliens coming to the United 
States, either as immigrants or nonimmigrants, are required to have 
passports and consular visas. These exceptions are: Citizens of 
Canada, Newfoundland, Bermuda, and the Bahama Islands, or 
subjects domiciled therein; citizens of St. Pierre and Miquelon, or 
citizens of France domiciled therein; with certain exceptions, aliens 
who have been residents of Mexico within the 40-mile border zone 
for at least one year prior to the date upon which they start upon 
their trip to the United States; aliens, regardless of nationality^ 



RKPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 7 

regularly domiciled in the United States who return thereto, after an 
absence not exceedino; six months, from Canada, Newfoundland, 
Bermuda, the Bahama Islands, or St. Pierre and Miquelon; aliens mak- 
ing round-trip cruises from American ports without transshipment 
from the vessel on which departure occurred; and aliens who are 
passengers on vessels which touch at United States ports while 
enroute to foreign destinations. 

MEXICAN AGRICULTURAL LABORERS. 

At an early stage of the war it became apparent that in certain 
parts of the country there was a serious shortage of agricultural 
laborers essential to the production of foodstuffs and cotton. Strictly 
as a matter of war policy, and by virtue of the authority of the ninth 
proviso to section 3 of the general immigration act. it was determined 
to waive certain provisions of the immigration requirements and admit, 
temporarily and conditionally, a limited number of such laborers from 
Mexico. Authority for the admission of this class of aliens was 
terminated on March 2, 1921, and the importers were called upon to 
return to Mexico all such aliens then in their employ. The return 
movement is still under way, extensions having been granted by the 
department, upon application, in certain especially meritorious cases. 

The total number of aliens admitted under the department's ex- 
ceptions during the years 1917 to 1921, inclusive, was 72,862. Of 
this number, 34,922 have returned to Mexico; 414 died; 494 were 
examined for permanent residence, found eligible for admission under 
the immigration laws, paid head tax, and were admitted; 21,400 
deserted their employment and disappeared; and, so far as can be 
ascertained, 15,632 are still in the employ of the original importers. 
Of those who deserted their employment and disappeared, it is likely 
that a considerable percentage have found their way back to Mexico, 
owing to the present slight demand for that class of labor in the 
border States. 

CONTRACT LABOR. 

Ordinarily, an interesting and important phase of the bureau's 
work is that which pertains to the enforcement of that clause of the 
law which was designed to protect our workmen from an invasion 
of foreign laborers induced to come here under contract or agree- 
ment for their services. There are but few transactions under this 
provision of the law to report, for there has been, during the major 
portion of the year at least, an oversupply of domestic labor in most 
of the branches, and, except in a few special lines, there has been no 
occasion for employers of labor to call upon the foreign labor markets. 

ALIEN STOWAWAYS. 

This anomalous type of immigrant, or intending immigrant, has 
continued to arrive in our ports in increasing numbers, choosing to 
come in this manner because of having been rejected as a " poor risk" 
by the steamship companies, because of lack of funds with which to 
purchase transportation, lack of a passport or consular visa, encour- 
agement by organizations, or because of other and varied reasons. 



8 EEPOET OF COMMISSIO^^ER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

The total arrivals of this class for the year was 3,539 as compared with 
2,392 in the preceding year. At the port of New York alone there 
was recorded the arrival of 1,545 aliens of this class. Some of the 
steamships plying to that port have brought as high as 25 to 30 stowa- 
ways on each trip. A certain vessel which recently arrived there 
had 57 stowaways on board. The vast majority of such aliens are 
promptly and properly deported, although occasionally some of 
them are found to be admissible. All are examined as to their ad- 
missibility under the immigration laws. 

ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION. 

There were admitted during the year 4,017 Chinese immigrant 
aliens. The total number of immigrant aliens of this race admitted 
in the fiscal year 1920 was 2,148 — an increase for the year of 1,869. 
In addition to those admitted, 404 Chinese arrived at our ports of 
entry for aliens of that race and were deported after examination 
had established their ineligibility for admission. Additionally, 5,815 
Chinese were examined for return privilege, on applications made by 
them, and 5,754 return certificates were issued. 

The number of Chinese emigrants departing from the United States 
was 5,253. A majority of these left only after securing certificates 
which, prima facie, entitled them to readmission upon return. The 
searching investigations which it is necessary to conduct, with a view 
to the prevention of imposition and fraud, in the cases of Chinese 
seeking the return privilege consume a great deal of the time of our 
officers and affords Chinese who are unlawfully in the country an 
inexpensive, easy, and comparatively safe means of establishing a 
"lawful" status upon which they can depart from and return to the 
country, and even bring in their wives and offspring. Possibly the 
whole plan of preinvestigation, except in the cases of departing 
laborers who are entitled to a predetermination of their status as a 
matter of law, should be abolished. 
" A not inconsiderable number of Chinese, not carried in the statisti- 
cal returns, succeeded in entering the United States by deserting 
from vessels upon which they arrived as crew members, in addition 
to which there has been perhaps the usual number of surreptitious 
entries across our land borders. A plan to refuse shore leave to 
Chinese seamen unless and until a bond to insure ultimate departure 
is furnished is now being devised, and the bureau will have a defi- 
nite recommendation to make as to this in the near future. 

Seventy-tliree Chinese stowaways were cUscovered on a vessel 
which recently arrived at the port of San Francisco from the Orient. 
It was ascertained that these stowaways had for years been crew 
members of different vessels plying between this country and ports 
in China; that on their previous return to Hongkong on the vessel 
on which they arrived as stowaways they refused to sign the vessel's 
articles for the return trip to this country, ostensibly abandoning 
their calling; that an equal number of their countrymen, inexperi- 
enced as seamen, were thereupon signed on the articles of the ship 
in their stead; and that the 73 old crew members then stowed away 
on the vessel and actually performed the customary duties aboard 
the vessel up to the time of her arrival at San Francisco, when they 
again stowed away. This was no mere prank that the Chinese 



RKPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 9 

were playing; on the vessel authorities. On the contrary, it was a 
deliberately planned scheme, which possibly had worked without 
detection on previous occasions, to assist (undoubtedly for a satis- 
factory consideration) 73 of their countrymen to gain surreptitious 
and unlawful admission to the United States. Measures the pur- 
pose of which was to effectually stop practices of this character 
have been taken. 

A noteworthy increase in the numbers of Chinese arriving at our 
ports and seeking the privilege of transit across United States terri- 
tory also occurred. In this connection the figures show that the 
privilege of transit under bond was granted on behalf of 17,907 
Chinese. Of this number,. 8,269 were admitted at San Francisco, 
with destinations (principally) Cuba and Mexico; and 6,677 were 
admitted at Montreal, across the land border, with destinations 
Cuba, Mexico, South America, etc. 

Some months ago the Government of Mexico announced that the 
further admission of Chinese transits to that countiy would be 
prohibited. This announcement had the immediate effect of stop- 
ping the transit movement of Chinese to that country via United 
States ports. Since that time the bulk of Chinese transits have gone 
to Cuba. This heavy transit of Chinese coolie laborers to that coun- 
try had its origin during the war period, wiien their services were 
utilized very largely in the raising of sugar cane and in the sugar 
industry. It is understood that for the past two years or more 
there has been no demand for the services of Chinese laborers in 
Cuba, that there is nothing for them to do, and that there are now 
thousands there virtually idle, with no work in prospect. Yet the 
transit movement there continues — has even sho\\'7i an increase 
during the past year. The return transit movement from Cuba for 
the past year has been rather inconsequential. Unfortunately the 
exact figures are not readily available. 

It is interesting to speculate as to just what the motive which 
impels these Chinese laborers to proceed to Cuba in such large 
numbers may be. It is equally interesting to speculate as to what 
eventually becomes of them. Some have been detected in endeavors 
to smuggle into this country at points on the Atlantic coast. Others 
have been apprehended after having successfully smuggled, or been 
smuggled, ashore. Doubtless many others have gained entry in this 
manner and their presence here has not been discovered. 

As the matter of granting transit to Chinese aliens is a privilege 
to be exercised in the discretion of the department, rather than a 
requirement, the bureau has recently given serious consideration to 
the question of stopping it so far as those with destination to Cuba 
is concerned. It will be appreciated, however, that the Chinese 
affected could still reach their destination by sailing direct to Habana, 
through the Panama Canal. 

The number of Japanese aliens admitted to continental United 
States decreased from 12,868 in the fiscal year 1920 to 10,675 for the 
present year. There was a slight increase in the present year in the 
number of Japanese aliens admitted in Hawaii, the figures showing 
the admission there of 3,599, as compared with 3,306 in 1920. The 
Korean alien admissions in Hawaii for the past year totaled 56. 

In past years a considerable number of women of the Japanese race 
were admitted at continental ports, destined to husbands whom they 



10 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

had married in accordance with the so-called "picture," or "proxy," 
system. In its last report the bureau called attention to the fact 
that, after due consideration of the subject, the Japanese Government 
fixed by decree the 29th day of February, 1920, as the last day upon 
which passports would issue to so-called "proxy" brides, and 
announced that September 1, 1920, would be the last day that pass- 
ports so issued would be considered valid. This decree of the 
Imperial Government of Japan has had the effect of stopping the 
coming to mainland ports of the United States of "proxy" brides. 

There have been some desertions from arriving vessels of Japanese 
crew members; but apparently the number who have thus deserted 
and remained in the United States has not been large. 

SEAMEN. 

More alien seamen have been accorded examination (immigration and 
medical) in ports of the United States during the present year than 
during any other year since the examination of such seamen was made 
compulsory. That the examination of arriving alien seamen imposes 
upon the Immigration Service a huge volume of work will be made 
readily apparent by an inspection of the figures. The number of 
vessels boarded by the immigration officials and representative of the 
Pubhc Health Service is reported as 26,470; 1,139,339 inspections 
were conducted on board of said vessels; 118,967 seamen's identifi- 
cation cards were issued; 6,331 seamen were certified to be afflicted 
with loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases (most of them 
venereal) ; and 4,878 of this number were removed to hospital for 
treatment at the expense of the vessels' interests, pursuant to the 
authority of the immigration act approved December 26, 1920. 

Numerous vessels engaged in the freight business have tied up in 
United States ports during the past year, and, of course, a majority 
of the seamen employed thereon have been paid off and discharged. 
The vast number of destitute and virtually destitute alien seamen 
now in our principal seaports seeking an opportunity to reship for- 
eign or to obtain passage to their home countries has created a situa- 
tion as embarrassing to the Government as it is to the local municipal 
and charitable authorities and the seamen themselves. In the very 
nature of things, employment of the character these men are accus- 
tomed to can not be had until such time as the period of enforced 
idleness of the boats which brought them thither is over with. In the 
meantime, thousands of these aliens, who have never been legally 
admitted to the United States, are crowding our seaports, without 
means, and without immediate prospect of obtaining employment. 
Some of the foreign Governments are now giving earnest consideration 
to the question of ways and means of repatriating their subjects who 
are here in the status of stranded seamen. 

The seamen work has continued to be under the general super- 
vision of the bureau's special representative, designated for this par- 
ticular duty, Inspector J. J. Hurley, and attention is called to his 
report on the subject, which forms Appendix II hereto. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 11 

SMUGGLING AND STJRREPTITIOUS ENTRY OF ALIENS. 

In its annual report for last year the bureau called attention to an 
organization which had been established and was operating for the 
purpose of preventing the smuggling and surreptitious entry of aliens 
into the United States. This organization has not operated as a 
unit during the present fiscal year, but the work has been handled by 
the various immigration districts affected, both singly and in coopera- 
tion, one with the other. The results have been all that could be 
expected with the limited number of officers who could be assigned to 
smuggling-prevention work. There has been a number of prosecu- 
tions, particularly along the land boundaries, for entry in violation of 
the passport-control regulations and for unlawfully bringing aliens 
into the United States m violation of the immigration and Chinese 
exclusion acts. In a great many instances where the smuggler was 
not apprehended, the alien has merely been arrested in deportation 
proceedmgs and deported, usually to the country of his nativity, 
whether such country was foreign contiguous or in a remote quarter 
of the globe. 

Withm the past year the restrictions of the visa system have begun 
to be felt in certain of the European countries from which a com- 
paratively large immigration has been received m past years, the re- 
sult being that hundreds of aliens — who, for one reason or another 
(usually because of some inherent disability on their part) , have been 
unable to obtam consular visas entitling them to come to the United 
States — have gone to either Canada or Mexico with the purpose firmly 
in view of ultimately gaining surreptitious entry to the United States 
across the land borders, in violation of both the passport-control 
regulations and the immigration laws. A majority of these aliens 
have sailed for ports in Mexico (either Vera Cruz or Tampico), due, 
doubtless, to the restrictions which Canada imposes upon aliens de- 
sirous of entering that country. It is not a matter of great difficulty 
at the present time for aliens of this class to obtain admission to 
Mexico, where economic conditions are such as to offer a sufficient 
guaranty that they will not remain there and that that country was 
not their actual destination when they sailed therefor, vSeveral 
hundred European aliens of the class referred to have been arrested 
on this side of the line by our immigration authorities, and in most of 
these cases the department has issued its warrants directing their 
deportation from the country. All of these aliens entered the United 
States in a surreptitious manner, usually with the aid of professional 
smugglers, and it has been only by the exercise of extreme patience 
and eternal vigilance that our officers have been able to detect their 
presence here. 

While the stories related by these arrested aliens have varied as to 
the reasons which impelled them to come to the United States in this 
roundabout way at a very considerable cost and to steal into the 
country, with the aid of professional smugglers, the conclusion may 
well be reached from the circumstances and from their stories, col- 
lectively, that they either knew or had good reason for believing that 
they would not and could not be admitted if they applied in regular 
manner. Some of these aliens have been found to be afflicted with 
loathsome and dangerous contagious diseases, others to be illiterate, 
and all either without passports or consular visas entitling them to 



12 EEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

enter. Some representations have been made to the eifect that this 
movement has been fostered and encouraged by unscrupulous steam- 
ship agencies abroad and by representatives of alleged "welfare" 
societies. How much truth these reports may have for their founda- 
tion the bureau does not know. It does know, however, that this 
movement is on the increase and that it has reached such a stage as to 
occasion alarm. There will soon be added to the numbers of Euro- 
pean aliens not able, for one reason or another, to obtain passports or 
consular visas countless aliens in certain of the European countries 
not able to come to the United States because of the restrictive 
features of the emergency legislation recently passed by Congress, 
which received the approval of the President under date of May 19, 
1921, and became operative on the third day of this month. Judging 
from the numbers of immigrants of certain nationalities which have 
crowded over during the present month, it is altogether apparent 
that the countries of which they are nationals will very soon have 
exhausted the quotas allotted to them, after which time further 
immigration therefrom for the fiscal year 1922 will not be permissible. 

As the restrictive measures of this act begin to be felt it may be 
expected that there will be a large increase in the exodus of admissible 
European and other aliens for Mexican ports, the ultimate destina- 
tion of whom will be the United States. Without a special border 
patrol composed of a sufficient number of mounted officers to be 
really effective, it can not be expected that a complete check can 
be put upon the surreptitious crossing of this anticipated horde of 
aliens determined to effect entry. In this connection it should be 
borne in mind that there is some 2,000 miles of border hne to guard, 
that settlements are comparatively few and far between, and that, 
with the limited force of officers available, the Immigration Service 
is able to maintain stations at only about twenty places along the 
line. Afiens desirous of entering surreptitiously quite naturally 
avoid endeavoring to cross in the immediate vicinity of one of our 
stations, the line on each side of which for as great a distance as 
possible is guarded as closely as the circumstances will permit. 

The Immigration Service has been allotted such a small appropria- 
tion for the coming fiscal year as to preclude the appointment of addi- 
tional officers on either border. Therefore it would seem to be essen- 
tial, if any endeavor whatever is to be made to cope with the situation 
above described, to devise some means of making it as unprofitable as 
possible to the smuggler, the smuggled, and the surreptitious entrant. 
The smuggler, when he actually crosses the line and is captured, can 
be prosecuted either under the passport-control regulations or the 
immigration act, or both, the penalties prescribed in these acts being 
quite severe. The aliens themselves, when apprehended, will be 
subject to prosecution for a violation of the passport-control regula- 
tions, but the punishment usually meted out in cases in wliich con- 
victions occur is generally insufficient to deter others of this class 
from taking a chance and entering in like manner. It would seem 
to be of the utmost importance, in this connection, for the depart- 
ment to do all that it can to discourage the unlawful coming of this 
class of aliens. It is befieved that this can best be done by deporting 
the offending aliens with as much celerity as is possible, not to Mexico, 
where they doubtless would rather go in order to be in an advanta- 
geous position to repeat the performance, but to the European 



KKPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 13 

country whence they embarked on their irregular journey to the 
United" States. 

The majority of the aliens who have been arrested in deportation 
proceedings after having entered in the manner inchoated were of the 
Hebrew race, although there was a sprinkling of other races and 
nationalities among the arrested. But so far few of these aliens have 
been actually deported from the country, although arrangements to 
carry a considerable number of them to the seaboard for return to 
Europe have been perfected. It is hoped that nothing will transpire 
to interfere with the prompt execution of the warrants for the depor- 
tation to Eiu-ope of these aliens. 

HEAD TAX COLLECTED AND ADMINISTRATIVE FINES 
IMPOSED. 

Section 2 of the act of February 5, 1917, provides that a head tax 
of SS shall be collected on every alien, including alien seamen regu- 
larly admitted for the purpose of residence, entering the United 
States. Children mider 16 years of age, traveling with a parent, are 
not subject to the payment of the head tax, and certain other classes 
are exempted. 

Under tliis provision of law there was levied and collected during 
the 3'ear the sum of $5,697,528, which was covered into the general 
funds of the Treasury. Formerly these collections \Vere credited to 
a special fund which was utihzed for the conduct of the Immigration 
Service — administering the law^s committed to it for enforcement, etc. 
The law authorizing the establishment of this fund was repealed 
by the act of March 4, 1909, since which time yearly estimates of the 
costs of operating the service have been submitted to Congress and 
appropriations made in the usual manner. 

Administrative fines have been assessed against transportation 
companies or the masters, owners, or agents of vessels entering 
United States seaports, in the sum of $324,340. This is by far the 
the largest sum ever collected in any one year as administrative fines 
for infractions of the immigration laws by transportation companies, 
exceecUng the amount collected in the fiscal year 1920 (the second 
largest amount thus collected in the history of the Immigration 
Service) by $170,130. Other collections in the fiscal year totaled 
$46,528. 

The entire cost of operating the Immigration Service for the fiscal 
year 1921, including the payment of salaries, maintenance and repair 
of immigration stations, etc., was $4,011,233. The net revenue to 
the Government for the year, on account of the enforcement of the 
immigration laws was, therefore, $2,057,163. The sum of 
$3,000,000 has been appropriated by Congress for the conduct of the 
Imniigration Service and the administration of the various laws per- 
taining to immigration for the fiscal year 1922. As the act approved 
May 19, 1921, which limits the admission of aliens of any nationality 
to 3 per cent of the number of foreign-born persons of such nationality 
resident in the United States when the 1910 census was taken, will be 
in operation throughout the entire fiscal year 1922, there is every 
re'ason to believe that the expenditures for the year will exceed the 
collections by a considerable sum. The official computation shows 
that the permissible immigration for the year from the countries 
affected bv the act will not exceed 360,000. 



14 



EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



DEPORTATION OF ALIENS. 

The figures for the year show a hirge increase in the number of aliens 
deported from the United States for various causes under the immi- 
gration law over those deported for like causes in the fiscal year 1920, 
the figures for the two years being 4,517 and 2,762, respectively. The 
following table will serve to show the numbers deported, by races: 



African (black) 


99 


Japanese 


71 


Armenian 


8 


Lithuanian 


20 


Bohemian 


17 


Magyar 


32 


Bulgarian 


28 


Mexican 


1,268 


Chinese 


.... 341 


Polish 


138 


Croatian and Slovenian 


65 


Portuguese 


46 


Cuban 


3 


Rumanian 


16 


Dalmatian 


5 


Russian 


380 


Dutch and Flemish 


43 


Ruthenian 

Scandinavian 

Scotch 


28 


East Indian 


19 


93 


English 


.... 389 


105 


Finnish 


56 


Slovak 


16 


French 


.... 179 


Spanish 


94 


German 


.... 252 


Spanish-American 


15 


Greek 


82 


Svi-ian 


33 


Hebrew 


. . . . 134 


Turkish 


6 


Irish 


.... 139 


Welsh 


7 


Italian (north) 


30 


West Indian 


8 


Italian (south) 


. . . . 216 


Other peoples 


36 



Considerable difficulty has been experienced in effecting the deporta- 
tion of aliens of the anarchist and kindred classes. The majority of 
the aliens ordered to be deported because of their beliefs or activities 
along these lines were of Russian nationality. Between the time of 
the sailing of the Buford on December 21, 1919, which carried a large 
number of Russian deportees of this class, and December, 1920, it was 
impossible to effect any deportations whatever to that country. 
Arrangements were finally perfected to get aliens being deported 
through to Russia by sending them through Latvia. In the neighbor- 
hood of 350 were subsequently deported by way of this route before 
the Soviet regime closed the borders of Russia to all Russian deportees 
from the United States in April last. Altogether, there were 446 
aliens, of all nationalities, who were arrested under the anarchist 
provisions of the immigration law and actually deported in the 
present fiscal year. 

Section 23 of the immigration act of February 5, 1917, makes it 
the duty of the Commissioner General of Immigration to detail 
officers of the Immigration Service from time to time to secure 
information as to the number of aliens detained in the penal reform- 
atory and charitable institutions of the several States, Territories, 
and the District of Columbia, and to inform the officers of such 
institutions of the provisions of law in relation to the deportation of 
aliens who have become public charges. The inability to effect 
deportation to the various countries of Europe during the process 
of the war and for many months thereafter, owing to the laclv of 
transportation facilities, resulted in the accumulation in eleemosy- 
nary institutions in the United States of in the neighborhood of 
3,000 aliens, mostly insane, who were being maintained and supported 
by the public funds of the various States. With the improvement 
in sailing conditions in the fiscal years 1920 and 1921 these accumula- 
tions have been practically cleared up by the deportation of the aliens 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 15 

SO hold. Of those left in these institutions who were under orders of 
deportation the majority are of Russian nationality and can not be 
deported so long as the borders of that country remain closed. The 
lack of a sufficient appropriation to carry on the work will prevent 
a systematic or extensive combing over of the penal reformatories 
and charitable institutions in the present year, although as much 
work will be done in this direction as our limited financial resources 
will permit. 

The existing passport requirements of virtually all the nations 
are such as to require the obtaining of a passport for every alien who 
is deported from the United States. These passports are obtained 
from the diplomatic or consular representatives of the country of 
which the alien happens to be a citizen or subject. In almost every 
instance these representatives require the presentation of documen- 
tary evidence of the citizensliip of the alien before they will issue a 
passport to or for him. All too frequently the alien has lost his 
documentary evidence of citizenship, which fact renders it necessary 
to enter into correspondence with the country concerned, through 
the Department of State, in an endeavor to obtain such evidence. 
All of this entails a vast amount of work, and the results are usually 
quite uncertain. In the present fiscal year it has been necessary to 
proceed in this manner to obtain passports in more than six hundred 
cases. 

During the fiscal year there have been 9 ''coast to coast" deporta- 
tion parties, which conveyed a total of 1,176 aliens from all parts of 
the United States to the several coast and border ports for return to 
the respective countries whence they came. This system has been 
found to be the most satisfactory and economical of any yet devised 
for the deportation of considerable numbers of aliens from the country. 
A brief description of the system will, it is believed, be of interest. 
A party of aliens, under departmental orders of deportation, is 
formed at New York City under the immediate direction of the 
bureau's deporting officer. This party then proceeds to New Orleans, 
where it is joined to another party arriving from Chicago. Wlien 
these two parties meet at New Orleans they have gathered up all 
aliens in the eastern section of the United States who are being 
returned to Mexico by way of the Mexican border or to the Orient 
by way of San Francisco. The party then proceeds along the Mexi- 
can border, leaving aliens who are being deported to Mexico in the 
hands of the appropriate immigration authorities along the border to 
be placed across the line, and receiving from these officers aUens for 
later delivery farther along the line, for return to Mexico or for 
delivery at San Francisco for deportation to China, Japan, and other 
sections of the Orient. At San Francisco are assembled all aliens 
in the coast States who are to be deported to Europe. Whereupon the 
party turns eastward, the deportation train being met at several 
points by parties gathered from north and south of the line of travel, 
so that upon the arrival of the train at New York a complete sweep 
of the country has been made. Of course, aliens who are arrested 
along the borders and are subject to return to either Canada or 
Mexico, as the case may be, and who may be placed across the line 
at a point not too far remote from where apprehended, are not joined 



16 KEPOI^T OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

to these parties. Neither are ahens joined to it who have been appre- 
hended within a reasonable distance of the seaport from which their 
deportation is to occur. 

THE PER CENTUM LIMIT ACT. 

The important event in the immigration record of the year, and 
in fact one of the most radical and far-reaching events in the annals of 
immigration legislation, -was the enactment of the law of May 19, 
1921, entitled "An Act to limit the immigration of aliens into the 
United States." This law went into effect June 3, 1921, and, there- 
fore, was in operation 28 days during the fiscal year under considera- 
tion. As this is the first strictly immigration law which provides 
for actually limiting the number of aliens, other than Asiatics, who 
may be admitted to the United States, a brief review of the legislation 
may not be out of place in this report. 

On December 13, 1920, the House of Representatives, b}^ a vote of 
295 to 41 passed a bill which provided for the temporary suspension 
of all immigration into the 'United States, with the exception of 
certain exempt classes. The Senate amended this act by substituting 
the so-called per centum limit plan of restriction and this prevailed, 
but executive approval was withheld and the compromise measure 
failed to become a law prior to the final adjournment of the Sixty- 
sixth Congress on March 4. The proposed measure was immediately 
introduced in both Houses at the beginning of the present Congress, 
and, as already stated, became a law on May 19, 1921. 

The act is a brief one, its essential provisions being as follows : 

Sec. 2. (a) That the number of aliens of any nationality who may be admitted under 
the immigration laws to the United States in any fiscal year shall be limited to 3 per 
centum of the number of foreign-born persons of such nationality resident in the 
United States as determined by the United States census of 1910. This provision shall 
not apply to the following, and they shall not be counted in reckoning any of the 
percentage limits provided in this act: (1) Government officials, their families, 
attendants, servants, and employees; (2) aliens in continuous transit through the 
United States; (3) aliens lawfully admitted to the United States who later go in transit 
from one part of the United States to another through foreign contiguous territory; 

(4) aliens \dsiting the United States as tourists or temporarily for Jnisiness or pleasure; 

(5) aliens from countries immigration from which is regulated in accordance with 
treaties or agreements relating solely to immigration; (6) aliens from the so-called 
Asiatic baiTed zone, as described in section 3 of the immigration act; (7) aliens who 
have resided continuously for at least one year immediately preceding the time of 
their admission to the United States in the Dominion of Canada. Newfoundland, the 
Republic of Cuba, the Republic of Mexico, countries of Central or South America, or 
adjacent islands; or (8) aliens under the age of eighteen who are children of citizens of 
the United States. 

(b) For the purposes of this act nationality shall be determined by country of bii-th, 
treating as separate countries the colonies or dependencies for which separate enumera- 
tion was made in the United States census of 1910. 

(c) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Secretary of Labor, 
jointly, shall, as soon as feasible after the enactment of this act, prepare a statement 
showing the number of persons of the various nationalities resident in the United 
States as determined by the I'nited States census of 1910, which statement shall be 
the population basis for the purposes of this act. In case of changes in political 
boundaries in foreign countries occurring subsequent to 1910 and resulting (1) in the 
creation of new countries, the Governments of which are recognized by the United 
States, or (2) in the transfer of territory from one country to another, such transfer 
being recognized l)y the United States, such officials, jointly, shall estimate the 
number of persons resident in the United States in 1910 who were born ^xithin the 
area included in such new countries or in such territory so transferred, and revise 



EKPOET OF CO:\[MIS^I()XHH (IHNKUAL OF IMAIIOHATION. 17 

the population kisis as to each country involved in such change of i)olitical boundary. 
For the jnirposo of such re\-ision and for the purposes of this act generally aliens born 
in the area included in any such new country shall be considered as having been born 
in such country, and aliens born in any territory so transferred shall be considered 
a.*^ having been born in the country to which such territory was transferred. 

(d^ Wiien the maximum numl)er of aliens of any nationality who may be admitted 
in any fiscal year irnder this act shall have been admitted all other aliens of sue h 
nationality, except as otherAvise pro\'ided in this act, who may apply for admission 
during the same fiscal year shall be excluded: Provided, That the number of aliens 
of any nationality who may be admitted in any month shall not exceed 20 per centum 
of the total number of aliens of such nationality who are admissible in that fiscal 
year: Provided further, That aliens returning from a temporary visit abroad, aliens 
who are professional actors, artists, lecturers, singers, nurses, ministers of any religious 
denomination, professors for colleges or seminaries, aliens belonging to any recognized 
learned profession, or aliens employed as domestic servants, may, if otherwise admis- 
sible, be admitted notxx'ithstanding the maximum number of aliens of the same 
nationality admissible in the same month or fiscal year, as the case may be, shall 
have entered the United States; but aliens of the classes included in this proviso- 
who enter the United States before such maximum numlier shall have entered shall 
(unless excluded by subdi\ision (a) from being counted) be counted in reckoning' 
the percentage limits proAdded in this act: Provided further , That in the enforcement 
of this act preference shall be given so far as possible to the wives, parents, brothers, 
sisters, children under eighteen years of age, and tiancees, (1) of citizens of the United 
States, (2) of aliens now in the United States who have applied for citizenship in 
the manner proAdded by law, or (3) of persons eligilile to United States citizenship 
who served in the military or naval forces of the United States at any time between 
April 6, 1917, and November 11, 1918, both dates inclusive, and have been separated 
from such forces under honorable conditions. 

It will be noted that immigration from certain countries and areas 
does not come within the provisions of the law, and, eliminating- 
these, it is found that it is applicable only to aliens coming from 
Europe, including Trans-Caucasia, tne region comprising prewar 
Turkey in Asia, Persia, Africa, Australasia, all islands of the Atlantic, 
and certain minor islands of the Pacific. The immigration of aliens 
who are natives of countries of the New World is not at all subject 
to the provisions of the act nor are aliens born elsewhere who have 
resided in New World countries for at least one year affected. Asiatic 
immigration, bein^ otherwise regulated by laws, treaties, or agree- 
ments, is also outside the provisions of the per centum law. 

It will be noted further that the law provides for adjusting the 
foreign-born population resident in the United States in 1910 to 
the various countries of Europe as they exist at the present time, 
and this necessitated assigning immigration quotas not only to 
countries whose boundaries had remained unchanged but also to 
countries and areas hitherto unknown in immigration statistics. 
Moreover, it was necessary under the terms of the act to determine 
the number of aliens who might be admitted from such countries 
between June 3, when the law went into effect, and June 30, the end 
of the fiscal year, as well as during the fiscal year. 1922 and any 
month thereof. 

70112—21 2 



18 



EEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



The task imposed upon the Secretary of State, the Secretary of 
Commerce, and yourself in this respect was completed on June 2, 
one day before the law went into effect, and the quotas were allotted 
as follows: 



Number of aliens admissible under the act of May 19, 1921, entitled*"' An act to limit the 
immigration of aliens into the United States." 



Country or place of birth. 


Quota 

June 3-30, 

1921. 


Quota 

fiscal year 

1922. 


Limit 
per month, 
fiscal year 

1922. 


Albania 


22 

571 

- 119 

23 

1, 095 

22 

433 

298 

5 

437 

5,219 

252 

432 

3, 224 

491 

7 

276 

930 

1,528 

451 

177 

569 

2,627 

51 

1, 531 

2S7 

5,923 

6 
122 

4 
34 
69 
16 

6 
9 

"i 

5 

2 


287 

7,444 

1, 557 

301 

14, 209 

2S5 

5, 644 

3,890 

71 

5,692 

68, 039 

5; 6.35 
42, 021 

6, 405 
92 

3,602 
12,116 
20, 019 

5 781 

2,269 

■ 7,414 

34, 247 

663 

19, 956 

3,745 
77,206 

86 

1,588 
56 
438 
905 
215 

78 
120 
271 

50 

60 
22 


57 

1,489 

311 

60 

2,854 

57 

1,129 

778 


Austria 


Belgium 


Bulgaria 


Czechoslovakia 






Finland 




France 


1 138 


Germany 


13, 608 

657 

1 127 


Greece 


Hungary 


Italy.... 


8 404 




1^281 




Netherlands 


720 


Norway 




Poland 




Eastern Galicia^ 


1 156 


Portugal (including Azores and Madeira Islands) 


'454 






Russia (including Siberia) 


6,849 
133 


Spain 




3,991 
749 




United Kingdom 


15,441 


Other Europe (including Andorra, Gibraltar, Lichtenstein, Malta, 






Palestine. . . 


11 






Syria 


181 


Other Turkey (Europe and Asia). 


43 


Other Asia (including Persia and territory other than Siberia wliicli 
is not included in the Asiatic Barred Zone. Persons born in 
Siberia are included in the Russia quota) 


16 


A frica 


24 










Atlantic islands (other than Azores, Madeira, and islands adjacent 
to the American continents) 


12 


Pacific Islands (other than New Zealand and islands adjacent to 
the American continents) 


4 






Total 


27,298 


355, 825 


71,163 







» Given up by Austria and Hungary, and therefore can not be included in either of thesecountries. 

* As Eastern Galicia was given up by Austria, according to the treaty of St. Germain, but is not yet 
allotted to any other country (the eastern boundary of Poland being not yet defined), the quota of Eastern 
Galicia will be 5,781 (Poland 20.019) for the fiscal year 1922. 

3 The Smyrna District is under Greek military administration; no treaty had gone into effect detaching 
this district from Turkey or placing it under Greek administration or under local parliament; the quota 
for the Smyrna District will be 438 (Turkey 215) for the fiscal year 1922. 

It will be noted that the per centum limit law was enacted May 
19, 1921, and that, so far as its principal provisions were concerned, 
it became effective June 3. Evidently the Congress considered that 
15 days was a sufficient warning to transportation companies, but 
notwithstanding the warning, somewhat more than 10,000 aliens 
of various nationalities were brought to the United States during the 
month of June in excess of the cjuota allotted for that month. These 
aliens were, of course, entirely innocent and were, indeed, the helpless 



BEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 19 

victims of the transportation companies which brought them. 
Each of the aliens involved was, of course, entitled to a full examina- 
tion under the immigration law and also to an appeal to the Secretary 
of Labor. The situation thus created was an utterly impossible 
one and, after due consideration, you took the only practicable 
action when on June 10 you directed that such aliens in excess of the 
quota should, if otherwise admissible, be admitted temporarily on 
bond until October 1. In this connection you held that an extraor- 
dinary emergency existed, and that the action taken was necessary 
in the interests of humanity. Subsequent events fully justified the 
wisdom of your practical and humane act, and much confusion to 
the immigration service and hardship to the aliens involved were 
thereby averted. 

The total number admitted in excess of the June quota was 11,741, 
the nationalities chiefly represented being Czechoslovakia, 1,689; 
Greece, 353; Hungary, 747; Italy, 2,320; Jugoslavia, 1,133; Poland 
2,367; Portugal, 517; Rumania, 1,438; Spain, 274. 

Notwithstanding these excess admissions, the total number 
admitted in June from all sources coming within the scope of the 
per centum act was 28,398, which was only slightly in excess of the 
quota of 27,298 who were admissible from such sources during the 
month named. It is of course impossible to predict concerning the 
future operations of the law, but experience during the month of 
June indicates that the number coming from certain sources, par- 
ticularly southern and eastern Europe, during the coming fiscal 
year will be only a fraction of the number who would come were it 
not for the restrictive provisions of the law. 

In conclusion, it is my desire to thank you on behalf of the bureau 
for the splendid and sympathetic cooperation which you have given 
the service during the brief weeks of your administration of the 
department. 

W. W. Husband, 
Commissioner General of Immigration. 

Hon. James J. Davis, 

Secretary of Labor. 



APPENDIX I 



STATISTICS OF IMMIGRATION 



21 



APPENDIX I. 
STATISTICS OF IMMIGRATION. 

The following tables present the immigration statistics for the past 
year in comparison with previous years, beginning with 1820, and so 
arranged as to furnish information upon practically all sides of the 
immigration question that can be represented statistically. 

In the classification of aliens the terms (1) immigrant and emi- 
grant and (2) nonimmigrant and nonemigrant, respectively, relate 
(1) to permanent arrivals and departures and (2) to temporary 
arrivals and departures. In compiling the statistics under this 
classification the following rule is observed: Arriving aliens whose 
permanent domicile has been outside the United States who intend 
to reside permanently in the United States are classed as immigrant 
aliens; departing aliens whose permanent residence has been in the 
United States who intend to reside permanently abroad are classed 
as emigrant aliens; all alien residents of the United States making 
a temporary trip abroad and all aliens residing abroad making a tem- 
porary trip to the United States are classed as nonemigrant aliens on 
the outward journey and nonimmigrant aliens on the inward. 

A.— GENERAL IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES I TO XXIV-A). 

Page. 

Table I. — Aliens admitted, departed, debarred, and deported, and United 

States citizens arrived and departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921 26 

Table II.— Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure of 

aliens, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921, by months 27 

Table III. — ^Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure of 

aliens, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921. by countries 28 

Table IV. — Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure of 

aliens, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples 30 

Table V. — Intended future permanent residence of aliens admitted and last 
permanent residence of aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 
States and Territories 31 

Table \l. — Occupations of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1921 32 

Table VII. — Sex. age, literacy, financial condition, etc., of immigrant aliens 

admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921 , by races or peoples 34 

Table VII-a. — Sex, age, and length, of residence in the United States of emi- 
grant aliens depxrted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples. . 37 

Table VII-b. — Conjugal condition of immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1921", by races or peoples 38 

Table VII-c. — Conjugal condition of emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples 40 

Table VII-d. — Sex, age, and length of residence in the United States of natural- 
ized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June .30, 1921, by races or peoples. . 42 

Table VII-e.— Sex. age, and length of residence in the United States of native- 
born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples. . 43 

Table VIII. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

countries of last permanent residence and races or peoples 44 

Table VIII-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

countries of intended f Jture residence and races or peoples 48 

Table VIII-b. — Naturalized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 

by countries of intended future residence and races or peoples 52 

23 



24 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF I M. MIGRATION". 

Page. 
Table VIII-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 

by countries of intended future residence and races or peoples 56 

Table IX. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

States of intended future residence and races or peoples 57 

Table IX-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 60 

Table IX-b. — Naturalized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 

by States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 63 

Table IX-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30. 1921, 

by States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 66 

Table X. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

occupations and races or peoples 67 

Table X-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

occupations and races or peoples 72 

Table X-b. — Naturalized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

occupations and races or peoples 76 

Table X-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

occupations and races or peoples 80 

Table XI. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

States of intended future residence and occupations 82 

Table XI-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by 

States of last permanent residence and occupations 88 

Table XI-b. — Immigrant aliens admitted during fiscal year ended June 30, 

1921, by States of intended future residence and ports of entry 94 

Table XII. — Immigrant aliens admitted during specified periods, Jan. 1, 1920, 

to June 30, 1921, by races or peoples and sex 98 

Table XII-a. — Emigrant aliens departed during specified periods, Jan. 1, 

1920, to June 30, 1921, by races or peoples and sex 99 

Table XIII. — Sex, age, literacy, financial condition, etc.. of nonimmigrant 

aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples 100 

Table XIII-a. — Sex, age, and length of residence in United States 6f non- 
emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples 103 
Table XIV. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 

1921, by races or peoples 104 

Table XIV-a. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 

to 192] , by countries 106 

Table XIV-b. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 

1921, l)y races or peoples 108 

Table XIV-c. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 

1921, bv countries 110 

Table XV.— Total immigration each year, 1820 to 1921 112 

Table XV-a. — Net increase of population by arrival and departure of aUens, 

fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 1921 112 

Table XVI. — Aliens debarred from entering the United States, fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples and causes 113 

Table XVI-a.— Aliens debarred, and aliens deported after entering, 1892 

to 1921, by causes 117 

Table XVI-b. — Permanent residents of contiguous foreign territory appljdng 
for temporary sojourn in the United States refused admisfdon, fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1921, by causes 119 

Table XVII. — Aliens deported to countries whence they came, after enter- 
ing the United States, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples 
and causes 120 

Table XVIII. — Appeals from decisions under immigration law, applications for 
hospital treatment, and applications for transit, fiscal year ended June 30, 
1921, by causes :■--.-•• 124 

Table XVIII-a. — Appeals from decisions under immigration law, applications 
for hospital treatment, and applications for transit, fiscal year ended June 
30, 1921, by ports 125 

Table X ! X. — Deserting alien seamen, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by ports. 126 

Table XX. — Alien stowaways found on board vessels arriving at ports of the 

United States, fiscal year ended June 30, 1 921, by ports 126 

Table XXI. — Comparison between alien arrivals and head-tax settlements, 

fiscal year ended June 30, 1921 127 

Table XXII.— Aliens admitted in continental United States from insular 

United States, 1908 to 1921, inclusive, by ports 128 



EEPORT OF C'O-MMISSIONEK GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 25 

rage. 

Table XXI I-a. — Imniitrnmt aliens admitted in continental Taiited States 
from insular Ignited Sta1(>s ajid in insular United States from other insulars 
and from mainland U'ontiiuMital United Statea\ by ports, liscal vear ended 
June 30, liVJl 129 

Table XXll-n. — Xonimmi.^rant aliens admitted in continental United States 
from insular United States and in insular United States from other insulars 
and from mainland (continental United States"), by ports, fiscal year ended 
June 30. 1021 129 

Table XXI II. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally defec- 
tive, liscal year ended June 30, 1921, showing sex, age, class of defect, and 
disposition, l)y diseases or defects 130 

Table XXI II -a". — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally de- 
fecti^"e. fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, showing races or peoples, by diseases 
or defects 132 

Table XXIII-b. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally de- 
fective, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, showing organ or portion of body 
affected, by diseases or defects 136 

Table XXIV. — Aliens granted hospital treatment under sections 18 and 22 of 

the immigration law, fiscal year ended June 30,1921. by races 140 

Table XXIV-a. — Aliens granted hospital treatment under sections 18 and 22 

of the immigration law, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921. by races 141 

B.— JAPANESE IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES 
A TO F). 

Table A. — Japanese aliens applied for admission, admitted, debarred, deported, 

and departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921 142 

Table B. — Increase or' decrease of Japanese population by alien arrivals and 

departures, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921, by months 142 

Table C. — Occupations of Japanese aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1921 143 

Table D. — Statistics of immigration and emigration of Japanese, collected by 

the United States Government, compared with those reported b\ the Japanese 

Government, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921 143 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year ended 

June 30. 1921, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. . . ' 144 
Table F. — Japanese alien arrivals in Hawaii, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 

showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement 148 

C— CHINESE IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES 
1 TO 8). 

Table 1. — Summarv of Chinese seeking admission to the United States, fiscal 

years ended June 30, 1916 to 1921, by classes . 150 

Table 2. — Chinese seeking admission to the United States, fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1921, by classes and ports 151 

Table 3. — Chinese claiming American citizenship by birth, or to be the wives 
or children of American citizens, admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921; 
by ports 153 

Table 4. — Appeals to department from excluding decisions under Chinese- 
exclusion laws, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by ports 153 

Table 5. — Dispo.sition of cases of resident Chinese applying for return certifi- 
cates, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921 153 

Table 6. — Action taken in the cases of Chinese persons arrested on the charge 
of Vieins: in the United States in violation of law, fiscal year ended June 30, 
1921 . . ■; 154 

Table 7. — Chinese arrested and deported, fiscal years ended June 30, 1917, to 

1921, by judicial districts " 155 

Table 8. — Miscellaneous Chinese transactions, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 
by ports 156 



26 



EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 









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30 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table IV. — Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure of aliens, 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or people&._ 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


Increase 
(+) or 
decreapo 


Race or people. 


Immi- 
grant. 


Nonim- 
migrant. 


Total. 


Emi- 
grant. 


Nonemi- 
grant. 


Total. 


African (black) 


9,873 
10,212 

1,743 

7,700 
4,017 
11,035 
1,523 

930 

12,813 

353 

54,627 

4,233 

24, 122 

24, 168 

31,828 

119,036 

39,056 

27,459 

195, 037 

7,531 

61 

829 

9,377 

29,603 

13 

21,146 

18,856 

5,925 

2,887 

958 

25,812 

24,649 

35,047 

27,448 

3,325 

5,105 

353 

1,748 

1,553 

3,237 


5,112 
360 

145 

995 

18,974 

246 

7,605 

50 

4,064 

108 

30,655 

343 

7,203 

3,333 

1,407 

2,190 

5,045 

2,656 

19,620 

6,743 

^ 24 

31 

351 

17. 191 

13 

4,616 

764 

721 

494 

157 

9,565 
6, 579 

822 
7,035 
4,048 

723 
30 

644 
1,884 

429 


14,985 
10,572 

8,695 
22,991 
11,281 

9,128 

980 

16, 877 

461 

85,282 

4,576 

31,325 

27,501 

33,235 

121,226 

44,101 

30,115 

214,657 

14,274 

85 

860 

9,728 

46,794 

26 

25,762 

19,620 

6,646 

3,381 

\,m 

35,377 
31,228 
35,869 
34,483 
7, 373 
5,828 
383 
2,392 
3,397 
3,666 


1,807 
605 

564 

9,940 
5,253 
3,306 
1,059 

909 

2,405 

137 

11,622 

2,480 

3,836 

6,770 

13,470 

483 

2,535 

11,447 

37,032 

4,352 

33 

4,507 

12,457 

■ 5,519 

42,207 
5,144 
8,603 

11,085 
465 

6,944 

2,027 

17,625 

4,961 

1,536 

1,599 

713 

167 

656 

1,457 


3,122 
168 

136 

1,104 

19,455 

165 

8,639 

215 

5,264 

71 

38,686 

1,477 

6,855 

3,577 

2,001 

1,227 

3,786 

4,659 

11,035 

11,193 

62 

278 

773 

2,383 

40 

2,594 

2,026 

975 

1,318 

18 

11,605 

4,571 

1,441 

18,532 

5,157 

654 

129 

339 

1,986 

597 


4,929 
773 

700 

11,044 
24,708 
3,471 
9,698 

1,124 

'208 
50,308 

3,957 
10,691 
10,347 
15,471 

1,710 

6,321 
16, 106 
48,067 
15,545 
95 

4,785 
13,230 

7,902 

41 

44,801 

7; 170 

9,578 

12,403 

483 

18,549 
6,598. 
19,066 
23,493 
6,693 
2,253 
842 
506 
2,642 
2,054 


+ 10,056 
+ 9,799 

+ 1 188 


Armenian 


Bohemian and Moravian 
(Czecli) 


Bulgarian, Serbian, and Monte- 
negrin 


— 2, 349 


Chinese . 


- 1,717 
+ 7,810 

— 670 


Croatian and Slovenian 


Cuban 


Dalmatian, Bosnian, and 
Herzegovinian 


— 144 




+ 9,208 




English 


+ 34,974 




French 


+ 20,634 
+ 17,154 




Greek 

Hebrew . ... 


+ 17,764 
+ 120,516 
+ 37,780 
+ 14,009 
+ 166,590 
1 271 


Irish 


Italian (north) 




Japanese 




10 




- 3,925 

- 3; 502 


Magyar 




Pacific Islander - 


15 


Polish.. 


19 039 




+ 12)450 
- 2; 932 


Rumanian 




Ruthenian (Russniak) 


+ 632 


Scandina\'ian (Norwegians, 


+ 16,828 
+ 24,630 
+ 16,803 
+ 10,990 
+ '680 
+ 3,575 
459 


Scotch 


Slovak 




Spanish American.. 






Welsh 




West Indian (except Cuban). . . 
Other peoples 


+ '755 
+ 612 






Total 


805,228 
10,652 


172,935 
7,129 


978, 163 
17,781 


247,718 
1,724 


178,313 
14,4.55 


426,031 1 +552,132 
16 179 ' -'- i '^'^' 


Admitted in and departed from 
Philippine Islands . 






' 



REPORT OF CO-AI-MISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 31 

Table V. — InU^nded future permanent residence of aliens admitted and last permanent 
residence of aliens departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1921, by States and Territories.^ 



state or Territory, 



Imniigrant 
aliens. 



Non- 
immigrant 
aliens. 



Departed. 



Emigrant 
aliens. 



Non- 
emigrant 
aliens. 



Alabama. 
.\lasUa... 



Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

lova 



Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Miimesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 



Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New .Tersey 

New Jilexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma , 

Oregon , 

Pennsylvania 

l^hilippine Islands 

Torto Rico 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

T.xas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Virgin Islands 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Outside United States. 



Total. 



78 

50 

1,098 

32 

5,732 

286 

1,839 

122 

264 

2,600 

94 

1,761 

93 



417 

468 

158 

44 

446 

486 

294 

5,169 

2,454 

912 

51 

391 

223 

267 

94 

290 

3,317 

209 

18,048 

41 

99 

2,859 

118 

472 

5,485 

29 

638 

741 

26 

103 

56 

13,430 

218 

127 

261 

14 

1,598 

502 

653 

75 

93,234 



172 

185 

1,236 

65 

13,272 

650 
7,754 

387 

401 
2,266 

127 
1,434 

197 
17,652 
2,630 



95 

670 

563 

1,143 

15,753 

12,771 

2,792 

62 

1,695 

724 

637 



13,269 

153 

72,626 

64 



34,171 

3 

• 536 

2,650 

52 

186 

87 

3,677 

583 

220 

318 

9 

3,530 

2,029 

4,052 

292 



172,935 



16 

39 

53 

16 

4,668 

141 

705 

31 

133 

631 

52 

3,866 

128 

3,159 

259 

456 

91 

22 

162 

79 

183 

2,990 

1,666 

1,005 

15 

381 

229 

204 

50 

93 

1,231 

25 

10, 398 

12 

112 

1,511 

33 

845 

2,402 

2 

417 

503 

18 



2,321 
64 
419 



135,'; 



' For permanent residences of aliens arriving in and departing from the Philippine Islands i 
IX, IX-A, XIV, and XIV-a. 



32 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table VI. — Occupations of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921.^ 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


Occupations. 


Immigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
immigrant 
aliens. 


Emigrant 
aliens. 


Non- 
emigrant 
aliens. 


PROFESSIONAL. 

Actors 


1 

687 

268 

1,204 

95 

1,427 

1,533 

181 

490 

959 

732 

597 

365 

3,172 

2,882 


830 
223 

1,209 
197 
273 

1,984 
091 
554 
584 

1,668 
872 
227 

1,2:?S 

1,678 


208 
57 
578 
44 
136 
229 
57 
141 
218 
230 
198 
113 
414 
799 


630 


Clerev 


1 228 


Editors 

Electricians 


'l52 

180 

1,279 






Literary and scientific persons 


567 


Musicians 


349 


Officials (fJovernraent) 

Physicians 


1,093 




189 


Teachers 

Other professional . 


1,028 
1 479 






Total 


14,592 


12,234 


3,422 








SKILLED. 

Bakers 

Barbers and hairdressers . . 


2,862 

3,439 

2,477 

155 

11 

1,895 

341 

9, 257 

36 

329 

84 

17,815 

9,404 

2,555 

305 

804 

340 

1,451 

321 

488 

13; 221 

5,957 

4,814 

549 

289 

751 

5,448 

1,746 

73 

419 

163 

502 

812 

133 

4,589 

9,280 

897 

432 

12,427 

98 

303 

330 

31 

150 

474 

2,009 

19 

168 

8,145 


509 
461 
427 
20 
13 
308 
44 
1,866 


532 
439 
343 
13 
22 
391 
155 
1,666 
1 
49(i 
15 
2,264 
347 
366 
25 
252 
8 
185 
69 
10 
1,345 
621 
366 
771 
80 
35 
42 
4,145 
350 
16 
47 
50 
75 
87 
10 

918 

146 

84 

960 

17 

808 

24 

2 

18 

37 

475 

4 

36 

2,195 


305 
190 


Blacksmiths 


ISO 

27 


Brewers 

Butchers . 


16 
192 




06 


Carpenters and joiners 


1,495 


Cigarette makers 






914 

62 

5,465 

611 

1,239 

33 

283 
23 

345 

105 

18 

1,059 

4,025 

790 
1,180 

110 
42 

104 
1,082 

394 
28 
97 
41 
97 

163 
23 

287 

906 

493 
73 

840 
20 
51 
45 
54 
17 
60 

400 

3 

27 

2,886 


469 


Cigar packers. .. 


8 




4,771 




381 


Engineers <locomotive, marine, and stationary) 


1,417 
21 


Gardeners 

Hat and cap makers . 


188 
If. 




156 




84 


Locksmiths 


1 
952 




2,053 


Masons ... « 


289 




728 




78 


Millers.. . . 


15 


Milliners 


71 




1,118 


Painters and sjlai^iers 


282 


Pattern makers 


10 




53 


Plasterers 


44 


I'lum bers . . . 


78 




111 


Saddlers and harness makers 


7 


Seamstresses 


130 




343 


Stokers 


192 


Stonecutters 


54 




454 


Taimers and curriers . 


10 




108 




26 




11 


Upholsterers 


12 




20 




373 


Wheelwrights " 


3 


Woodworkers (not specified) 


23 


Other skilled 


1,789 






Total 


131,774 


28,043 


21,451 


19,491 



1 For occupations of aliens arriving and departing from Philippine Islands 



see Tables X and X-a. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



33 



Table VI. — Occupations of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 
1921— Continued. 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


Occupations. 


Immigrant 
aliens. 


Non- 

immigiant 

aliens. 


Emigrant 
aliens. 


Non- 
emigrant 
aliens. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

Agents 


1,107 

167 

881 

32,400 

22,282 

1,491 

275 

100,564 

354 

14,803 

102,478 

20,859 


1,405 

825 

164 

5,850 

5,067 

239 

197 

30,646 

947 

21, 173 

8, .399 

10, 532 


419 

127 

44 

2,073 

10,505 

159 

124 

135,207 

132 

4,415 

5,512 

6,397 


1,325 




700 




88 




1,991 




4,543 




205 




161 




46,902 




840 




20,907 




0,445 




11,618 






Total 


357,721 


85,504 


105,114 


95,875 






No occupation (including women and children) 


301,141 


47, 154 


57,731 


53,212 


Grand total 


805,228 


172,935 


247,718 


178 313 







70112—21- 



34 EEPORT OF COMMISSIOZSTER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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36 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





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38 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table VII-b. ^Conjugal condition of immigrant aliens 
[Abbreviations: S., single; M., married; 



Race or people. 



Males. 



Under 
16 years 
(total). 1 



16 to 44 years. 



45 years and over. 



W. D. Total 



African (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Mora- 
vian (Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, 
and Montenegrin... 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slove- 
nian 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, 
and Herzegovinian . 

Dutch and Flemish . . 

East Indian 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

ItaUan(south) 

Japanese 

Korean 

Lithuanian 



Mexican , 

Pacific Islander 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Rumanian 

Russian 

Ruthenian (Russ- 
niak) 

Scandinavian (Nor- 
wegians, Danes, 
and Swedes) 

Scotch 

Slovak 

Spanish , 

Spanish American.... 

Syrian , 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except 
Cuban) 

Other peoples 



Total. 



1,063 
152 



78 

1,544 

4 

5,018 

327 

2,063 

2,431 

2,277 

17,616 

1,671 

1,714 

15, 523 

814 

3 

120 

1,243 

3,492 



2,660 

1,044 

740 

348 

122 



1,322 
2,242 
3,531 
1,059 
314 
785 



2,981 
2,500 



550 

271 
2,892 
259 
11,330 
849 
6,174 
5, 563 
9,117 
21,847 
12,304 

56,' 982 

1,026 

7 

102 

7,' 056 
8 
3,065 
6,643 
1, 255 
715 

121 



1,186 



1,232 
911 



115 

2,107 

70 

7,918 

330 
2,874 
2,407 
7,810 
8,382 
2,352 
5,483 
45,506 

952 



974 
5,510 



1,232 
5,236 

818 
420 



11,288 


2,084 


5,448 


3,239 


6,275 


4,503 


12,753 




1,513 


'256 


1,401 


458 


169 


57 


441 


272 


377 


101 


1,313 


668 



4,183 
3,635 



2,920 
2,720 



3,313 
644 



5,030 

331 

19, 408 

1,183 

9,170 

8,008 

16, 991 

30, 359 

14,745 

16, 172 

102, 827 

1,985 

15 

172 

2,257 

12,788 

8 

4,329 

11,917 

2,085 

1,146 

218 



13,416 
8,753 
10, 818 
21,314 
1,776 

'228 
718 



17 

481 

4 

2,420 

75 

1.071 

910 

2,052 

4,039 

734 

732 

7,199 

315 

3 

33 



35 


565 


124 


1,091 


20 


72 


11 


97 


4 


10 


19 


85 


5 


24 


14 


116 



2,758 



27,254 



279 
233 

181 
76 

19 

>638 

4 

3,228 

113 

1,494 

1,180 

2,283 

4,735 

1,179 

900 

8,178 

348 

4 



1,425 
677 

1,279 
100 
130 
16 
119 

34 
139 



1 None divorced; 1 widowed, Polish; and 83 married, as follows: Italian (south), 23; Hebrew, 12; 
Greek and Scotch, 6 each; Croatian, 5; English and Mexican, 4 each; German, Irish, and Slovak, 3 each; 
Italian (north), Lithuanian, and Spanish, 2 each: and African (black), Bulgarian, Finnish, French, 
Polish. Portuguese, Syrian, and West Indian, 1 each. 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



39 



admitted, fiscal year ended June SO, 1921, by races or peoples. 
W., widowed; D., divorced. | 



Females. 


Single females. 


Under 
16yearb 


16 to 44 years. 


45 years and over. 


16 to 
21 


22 to 
29 


30 to 
37 


38 to 






















44 


(total)' 


S. 


M. 


\V. 


D. 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


746 


2,655 


971 


137 


2 


3,765 


64 


114 


117 


1 


296 


1,264 


1,040 


274 


77 


1,021 


1,775 


1,554 


388 




3,717 


6 


195 


287 




488 


1,181 


527 


62 


5 


141 


581 


173 


21 


1 


776 


10 


44 


39 




93 


311 


202 


53 


15 


717 


1,660 


1,074 


108 




2,812 


4 


130 


82 




216 


894 


677 


78 


11 


64 


69 


553 


2 




624 


3 


20 


2 




25 


41 


22 


5 


1 


1,145 


2,763 


1,963 


184 


3 


4,913 


7 


199 


114 


.... 


320 


1,502 


1,110 


138 


13 


187 


125 


114 


12 


2 


253 


13 


31 


26 .... 


70 


66 I 37 


14 


8 


75 


191 


138 


5 




331 


5 


13 


18 




36 


70 


93 


27 


1 


1,413 


1,366 


2,142 


56 


'ii 


3,578 


60 


375 


169 


"e" 


610 


527 


564 


210 


65 


5,174 


6 
8,605 


7 
8,163 






13 
17,378 












2 
3.013 


2 
3,321 


1 

1,559 


1 


■ "595" 


'is' 


■■662" 


■2,'i.57' 


■i,'596' 


"& 


'4,"42i' 


712 


377 


1,542 


452 


39 




2,033 


26 


106 






200 1 '813 


542 


149 


38 


2,022 


4,522 


2,881 


242 


'34' 


7,679 


279 


831 


581 


"3 


1,694 1,774 : 1,750 


704 


294 


2,414 


4,965 


2.9.53 


337 


29 


8,284 


173 


850 


803 1 25 


1,851 


2,180 ! 1,993 


621 


171 


1,604 


4,961 


2,704 


134 


1 


7,800 


13 


416 


444 |.... 


873 


2,584 


2,088 


259 


30 


17,059 


24,596 


15,210 


1,0.52 


52 


40,910 


145 


5,093 


3,107 12 


8,. 357 


16,046 


7,730 


725 


95 


1,879 


15,626 


2,159 


226 


9 


18,020 


3.59 


560 


642 ! 1 


1,562 


7,770 


6,058 


1,410 


388 


1,450 


3,051 


2,S59 


169 


2 


6,681 


22 


282 


237 , 1 


542 


1,514 


1,737 


332 


68 


14,242 


24,463 


21,864 


969 


7 


47,303 


155 


3,523 


3,285 1 


6,964 


13,259 


9,423 


1,521 


260 


413 


310 


3,471 


12 




3,793 


3 


155 


20 





178 


261 


32 


10 


7 


3 
103 


3 

199 


32 
137 


...... 




35 
340 


...... 


1 
24 






49 


"'iii' 


2 

70 


1 
9 








...... 




3 


1,250 


2,015 


1,571 


261 


'19' 


3,866 


21 


246 


209 


"3 


479 


1,193 


648 


138 


36 


3,661 

4 

2,671 


2,505 

1 

6,924 


3,967 


778 


1 


7,251 
10, 123 


97 


402 


645 


1 


1,145 


1,351 

1 
4,151 


784 


263 


107 


■3'6i2" 


■■i82' 


■■5' 


■■"si' 


'"497" 


■■'sii' 


.... 


""876' 


"2,'582' 


■■"ies" 


■■■■23 


1,114 


1,774 


1,985 


82 


5 


3,846 


22 


207 


188 




417 


1,202 


449 


100 


23 


666 


928 


948 


90 


1 


1,967 


4 


160 


96 


.... 


260 


576 


303 


44 


5 


351 


333 


409 


27 


3 


772 


13 


84 


41 






208 


100 


19 


6 


147 


254 


166 


9 


.... 


429 


1 


9 


13 




23 


191 


58 


5 




1,330 


5,701 


1,888 


120 


15 


7,724 


239 


435 


389 


5 


• 
1,068 


2,335 


2,128 


916 


322 


2,251 


4,940 


3,022 


245 


9 


8,216 


320 


780 


660 


2 


1,762 


1,677 


2,003 


944 


316 


3, .569 


10,414 


4,332 


465 


18 


15,229 


54 


571 


593 


5 


1,223 


6,. 591 


3,284 


453 


86 


794 


1,250 


1,437 


59 


1 


2,747 


16 


160 


79 




255 


544 


528 


140 


38 


282 


437 


249 


40 


4 


730 


17 


48 


58 




123 


165 


182 


61 


29 


642 


744 


615 


87 


1 


1,447 


5 


93 


135 




233 


510 


211 


21 


2 


15 


21 


29 


1 


1 


52 




6 


4 




10 


10 


9 


1 


1 


143 


234 


232 


9 


1 


476 


■■■2i' 


48 


49 




118 


85 


93 


42 


14 


J84 


420 


189 


18 




627 


11 


47 


20 




78 


193 


151 


61 


15 


192 


179 


362 


28 


.;;! 


569 


3 


58 


37 




98 


122 


48 


7 


2 


71,516 


143,708 


95,987 


7,193 


255 


247,143 


2,885 


18,970 


15,218 


"tT 


37,147 


76,294 


52,581 


11,545 


3,288 



' None divorced: 5 widoived, as follows: Italian (south), 2; and French, Slovak, and Syrian, 1 each; 
and 92 married, as follo.vs: Hebrew, 20; Italian (south), and MeKican, 10 each; English and Polish, 6 each; 
French and Japanese, 5 each: Magj'ar, Scotch, and Syrian, 3 each: African (black), Armenian, Bulgarian, 
German, Greek, Irish, Rumanian, and Russian, 2 each; and Chinese, Dutch, Scandinavian, Spanish 
.American, and other peoples, 1 each. 



40 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table VII-c. — Conjugal condition of emigrant aliens 
[Abbreviations: S., single; M., married; 





Males. 


Race or people. 


Under 
16 years 
(total). 


16 to 44 years. 


' 45 years and over. 




S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 1 Total. 


African (black) 


113 

1 

16 

124 

27 

44 
86 

13 

129 

1 

520 

40 
150 
133 
159 

17 

64 
218 
745 

25 
1 

55 
208 
656 


456 
204 

80 

1,516 

828 

602 
317 

180 

407 

45 

1,683 

559 

706 

1,271 

4,003 

81 

407 

3,560 

9,646 

1,005 

11 

916 

780 

1,396 

3, 157 

1,334 

892 

2,662 

78 

1,934 
287 
1.042 
2,011 
072 
416 
225 
27 

114 
328 


446 
278 

161 

4,903 
831 

1,438 
243 

316 
532 
29 

'722 

595 

1,.509 

4,880 

125 

266 

3,551 

12,022 

1,272 

10 

1,631 

4,448 

867 


4 
1 

8 

36 
1 

22 
3 

3 
11 


1 


906 
483 

249 

6,455 
1,660 

2,063 
563 

499 

951 

74 

3,661 

1,289 

1,309 

2,801 

8,894 

208 

683 

7,211 

22,859 

' 21 
2,563 
5,271 
2,309 
1 
23,333 
2,964 
4,230 
8,405 

311 

2,966 

9,176 
3,602 
8.59 
971 
606 
63 

204 
766 


7 
12 

9 

96 
543 

47 
4 

18 
72 
27 
364 
75 
165 
232 
291 
7 
105 
260 
554 
107 

•-96- 
180 
70 


101 
97 

95 

1,950 
2,877 

753 
63 

169 
304 
33 

1,111 
227 
392 
800 

3,055 
103 
132 

1,571 

6,145 

831 

7 

779 

2,927 
312 


2 

2 

6 

1 

20 
4 

5 
18 

1 
97 

2 
35 
61 

7 

8 
17 
93 
245 

3 


1 

"2 
1 

1 
1 

"i' 


no 
111 

110 

2,095 
3,425 

820 
71 

192 

394 

61 

1,574 

305 

593 

1,094 

3,353 

118 

254 

1,925 

6,944 

944 

7 

892 

3,183 

4.56 


Bohemian and Mora- 
vian (Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, 
and Montenegrin. . . 

Chinese 


Croatian and Sloven- 
ian 


Cuban 


Dalmatian, Bosnian, 

and Herzegovinian. 

Dutch and Flemish.. 


English 

Finnish 


36 
8 
8 
21 
11 

9 

99 

291 

3 


4 

.... 
1 




German 


Greek 


Hebrew 


Irish . 


Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 

Japanese 




Lithuanian. .. . 


16 
43 
46 




17 
75 
74 


""i" 


Magyar 




Pacific Islander.. . 


Polish 


718 
123 
170 
103 

1 

115 
75 
250 

'S 

26 
3 
6 


20,029 
1,609 
3.316 
5,722 

226 

1,020 
295 
7,438 
1,576 
182 
547 
380 
36 

90 
437 


i47 
21 
21 

20 

7 

12 


;i 

5 
8 
1 


1 
.... 


422 
56 
124 
141 

6 

325 
82 
163 
113 
10 
19 
8 
6 

6 
17 


8,343 

523 

1,982 

1,253 

101 

384 

176 
4,445 

452 
53 

279 
73 
17 

36 
113 1 


125 
17 
26 
26 

2 

37 
26 


"?,' 


8,890 

596 

2,132 

1,420 

109 

746 

286 
4,694 

577 
67 

305 
81 
26 

42 
134 




Rumanian. . 


Russian 

Ruthenian (Russ- 
niak) 


Scandinavian (Nor- 
wegians, Danes, 
and Swedes) 

Scotch 


Slovak 


12 '.'.'.'. 
4 .... 

7 .... 


Spanish.. 


Spanish American.... 




Welsh 


3 .... 


West Indian (except 






Other peoples 


1 




4 .... 


Total 


5,690 


46,439 


86,816 


1,042 


11 


134,308 


4,839 


43,067 1 


1,220 , 10 


49, 136 





' None wido ved or divorced; 45 married, as follows" Polish, 7; Bulgarian and Magyar, 6 each; Mexican, 
5; Italian (siath), Spamsh, and other people, 3 each: Croatian, Rumanian, and Slovak, 2 each: and Dutch, 
Greek, Italian (north), Russian, Scandinavian, and Spanish American, 1 each. 



REPORT OF COINtiMlSSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



41 



departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by races or peoples. 
W., widowed; D., divorced.] 



Females. 


Single females. 


j Under 


16 to 44 years. 


45 years and over. 


16 to 
21 


22 to 
29 


30 to 
37 


38 to 
44 






















(total).* 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


80 


130 


375 


9 


2 


516 


16 


48 


18 




82 


37 


53 


26 


14 


21 


1 
34 


97 






8 
134 


3 


2 
25 






2 
. 34 


7 


1 
17 






3 




6 




6 


4 


90 


91 


8.56 


16 




963 


12 


180 


21 




213 


26 


36 


21 


8 


10 
29 


15 
29 


87 
253 


1 

5 




103 
287 


8 


27 

48 






28 
63 


3 

6 


11 


' 


2 


.. 


• 




W 


59 


141 


1 


3 ] 204 


4 


48 


19 


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24 


25 


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39 


96 


4 


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6 


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112 


121 


462 

1 

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8 




591 

1 

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26 


181 


21 




228 


33 


33 


38 


17 


588 


1,605 


73 


3 


383 


-875 


247 


2 


1,507 


218 


589 


511 


287 


35 


231 


481 


7 




719 


30 


54 


8 




92 


9 


121 


75 


26 


148 


570 


627 


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2 


1,229 


89 


258 


59 


1 


407 


114 


211 


153 


92 


173 


599 


1,303 


22 


1 


1,925 


143 


414 


87 




644 


66 


245 


182 


106 


77 


116 


693 


5 




814 


7 


156 


10 




173 


48 


46 


14 


8 


20 


37 


59 


3 




99 


3 


15 


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21 


10 


16 


6 


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49 


923 


299 


7 




1,229 


132 


97 


27 




256 


34 


483 


301 


105 


175 


214 


1305 


37 


1 


1,557 


28 


292 


41 




361 


52 


94 


46 


22 


636 


579 


3,929 


88 


1 


4,597 


66 


1,009 


174 


2 


1,251 


184 


248 


97 


50 


23 


55 


856 


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312 


2,419 


54 


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32 


571 


64 




667 


55 


142 


90 


25 


581 


343 


827 


75 


1 1,246 


23 


134 


114 




271 


197 


92 


35 


19 


611 


461 


7,187 


69 


1 ! 7,718 


38 


824 


75 




937 


88 


222 


107 


44 


136 


320 


788 


33 


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19 


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27 




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109 


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32 


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867 


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25 


49 


24 


5 


1 
117 


2 
1,319 


33 

1,185 


1 
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36 


199 


206 






7 
463 


1 

91 






1 


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2,537 


58 




590 


411 


227 


83 


356 


332 


17 


2 


707 


80 


164 


43 




287 


32 


117 


125 


82 


261 


342 


2,271 


52 




2,665 


29 


469 


80 


1 


579 


45 


197 


69 


31 


124 


112 


H(K) 


7 




419 


10 


61 


19 




90 


48 


29 


24 


11 


100 


171 


171 


8 




350 


10 


45 


8 




63 


87 


49 


27 


8 


25 


24 


154 


2 




180 


5 


84 


3 




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7 




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165 


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22 


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172 


44 


132 


3 




179 


7 


16 


4 




27 


2 


21 


17 


4 


5,130 


9,659 


33,095 


717 


19 


43,490 


1,461 


7,181 


1,315 


7 


9,964 


1,764 


4,034 


2,565 


1,298 



• None widowed or divorced; 19 married, as follows: English, 7; Italian (south), and Magyar, 3 each; 
Mexican, 2; and French, Greek, Polish, and Slovak, 1 each. 



42 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OE IMMIGRATION. 



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44 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF TAIMIGRATION 



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46 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GESTERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

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70112—21- 



50 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•moj, 


1,399 
12, 153 
1,430 
2,923 
15,452 
922 

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13,423 
48, 192 
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residence. 


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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



51 





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EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





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: : : :S : I : : : : : : 


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BKPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



53 









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54 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Fmland 


France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, including SicUy and Sardinia 

Netherlands 

Norway 


Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azores 

Islands 

Rumania 

Russia 

Horho r.rnatQ and Sinvonfis K'iniidnm ni . 


Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 


3 :t 


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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



55 



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5G REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table VIII-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June^SO, 1921, by coun- 
tries of intended future residence and races or peoples. 



Country of intended future residence. 


African 
(black). 


Cau- 
casian. 


Chinese. 1 j^^^an. jTapanesc. 


Total. 






77 

1,727 

149 

31 

2,432 

141 

278 

294 

527 

668 

6,696 

132 

353 

10,912 

582 
1,150 
1,720 
1,104 

238 
253 
84 
13 

809 
133 
136 
68 
64 


1 


77 






1 i 


1,727 






::::::::::i:::::::::: 




149 












31 


Czechoslovakia 










2,432 












141 


Finland 










278 


France including Corsica 










294 












527 


Greece 










668 


Italy including Sicily and Sardinia 




1 




6 696 












132 












353 


Poland 










10, 912 


Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azores 
Island"' 








582 










1,1.50 










1,720 


Serbs Croats and Slovenes Kingdom of 








1,104 
238 


Spain, including Canary and Balearic 








Sweden 






1 


263 










84 










13 


United Kingdom: 








3 


812 


Ireland 








133 








:::::::::::::;:::;:: 


136 


Wales 








68 


Other Europe 








64 












Total Europe 




30,771 







3 


30, 774 












China . 


1 


1,917 
614 
436 

197 


1,080 




2,998 


Japan 




737 


1,351 


India 






1 


437 


Turkey in Asia 








186 


Other Asia 








197 













Total Asia 


1 


3,350 


1,080 


1| 737 


5,169 






Africa 




48 

136 

29 

20, 137 

3,236 

1,686 

523 

1,953 






48 


Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand 






' 


136 








1 


29 


British North America 


167 
9 
8 
1 

290 






1 


20,305 


Central America 






3,245 








4 


1,698 


South America - . 


2 

1 




526 


West Indies 







2,244 









Grandtotal 


476 


61,869 


1,083 


' 


745 


64,174 







EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



57 



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58 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



,iOeO«OOOt>-Ot^i-I^Ht*c 



(N '•-< I-H 



(M-«iN ■« -i-Hco • M>ntoiorO'*(>.M-*TX .m 



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tDO>-H Nt^NC 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 59 



>0-Ht 



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u,c2-g5 : "=1 :§222gSgS?S 



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£ p. f^ 



60 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 67 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 69 



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CDCC^ ■ O .-1 '(fi O I 
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O ■«?' Oi CO lO t^ CO 1-1 '^ 00 Oi .-H 
OiCO CD lO CO CD (N CD t^ O 00 'J 
CO i-iiO-*'^ '* lOcDCO 



t^ 0> t^ i« t^ t^ r-H -^ lO lO CD 



-H CON 'COC-t 



'g-'Si^c 



U5 ■ .ooiracoc 



! ro -^ t^ -H -< ; i^; g f 






p C c3. 






go O 
O 03 



70 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•spuBisi 9mdd} 
■md ai P9;«nipv 



--I j 1 'oo 



Cfl Oi t^ lO »-< »o .-f t* «o Oa -^ lO Tt< U5 lO •'^ O »-< ^ 
o CO t2 "O i-H oi ^ >n CO (M 00 .-1 o >noo')">n(No 

CO-^TfrH OOCOC^ CO OO-^J* lO CO CO CO Tf« CO -^ 



•saidoad leq^o 



>«OiOCO(MlO 



;:! :S : : :S2 2 



-(neqno 



NtPMCO •;oim 



IM.-l(NCO T-l 



.-IN (N .(M 



•UBIiSs 



•nsouenrv qsniBds 



|iONCOOQ(N05COOB5COr^^ 



CO -eoN o • ■eoNO 



•qsni«ds 



05COCO(NCOiOTt<<MiOO>(NiO.-lcD 



feS" ' ■?32'5 'SiSSSS'* to ^ CD U5 CO ■* 00 



IOCCI>OWDCO^O^COCT>OCOt^t^ 
(N .-KM <M (N Tf .-< -ct* CO 



5CO.-ICO.-l»C05CO^r 



OlM 000>C 



(NCoS COIM ININ Tf 



tD(Mt~lO-!»< O-HCO 



kOr^iOTf 



^ N 02 r-( •* rH t» t^ (M O ^< 



•(s9p8Mg pac 
-son) UBiABnipnBOS 



lO,-HCOCCllM--^<MCO(Nr-Ht^Tt*— I 

.-KNCO CO CO .-H (M IN CO (N (N t^ .-I 



SSS^KSS 



•(31EIU 

-ssriH) nBniaq;n'5j 



5(MCO,-IO.-i(Nt)<00.-ICOCO<M^ 



O IOC 

>o 

"I 



1 t~r~coco 



t^r-1-* • ira •* .-( O CO t^ CO lO •> 



•as9n3npoj 



iCOOcO-^-^OCDOt^^ 



(MCO 00 •iO<N C^-H 



?5^ 



lOiOOOiCOOCOCOh-i-tCOOO 



CO (MrH ^ M 



g2°°SS 



;2S^^^2g 






•J9pUBlSI OgiOB J 



5C0OJrt't<.-lcDC<<>O05t^r~l 



•JEiSGH 



''**'*(NCDi-fiOOCOr-^iOt^iO-t* 






c C3.-S : 



"a g^g 









c=1 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAI^ OF IMMIGRATION. 71 



;ac 




o 
















































?? 


s 


c 






i 








■"C 




5 


:2 


2 


! 


i 


i 


3,176 
13,221 
5,957 
4)814 

549 

289 

751 

5,448 

1,746 

73 

419 

163 

502 

812 

133 

4,589 

9,280 

897 

432 

12,427 

303 
330 
31 

150 
474 

2,009 
19 
168 

8,145 


1 




g 
s 


2 


1 


«S§S cw-^^ 






^^CONOOCOOO^ 


'-' 


-^^CO 


-"S 




-^-^ sss: 




rȤ^ 


! ! 


COOlMff 
COgOCJO 






o 












^(NgOO(N 


o 










-' 






S 


i 


^ 




s?^s 


s 


^§2 


i 


i 


!- 


o,.«g« 


^-H^O 


U5C>5"5COt>. 


-Hlfl 




:« 




5 


1 


oo 


"'SSS'^ 


si-^sgs 


1 


S 


?. 


-HOC 


^ 
























^ 




M. 










'^ 






^ 


S 


(N 




CO 






B 


2;s2 


s 


2 


i 


t»lNtD2 OO 




(NO 


-*• 




"=-g5g«"g 


tWN 




jS 


-^S 


^ 


m« cogg 




r^§- 


5 


1 


1 


-r- 




COrtlC 


" 




«-s;::s 


c5 
















g 


^ 


CO-. 


^gc 


s 


§sgi 1 


1 


^gSS ^"SI^'^^^'^S'^SgSgFi^^^S 


lOOO 


"S 


1 


2^ o,|g^«g^g|g^ g 


1 


SS5SS SJ:SS5'^«=^"'»'"^gS"g'" 


O^M.M.^C.COg|| 




S 


1 


1 


5|?2S §25|SSSSSig=°8^gSS 


t0 05 


--§ 


?5| 


!■ 




co" 




1 


g|sg ss^gg^gj^^assssss^s^^s-^s^s^ 


^§ 




^-^ -lai^i^agi 


1 




i 


c 


-HC. W 




<o 










- 


<NCO 




CO 
















<N 


. 






-^ss 




2 


-gs 


§ 


§ 


Sg"?5 •- 


U5 •»<«0 


O 


^^ 


coot>--<-«< 








(M-H 




-J3 


i 


CON c^i 




i-^Sa 


g 


i 


1 


2gSg ^-SSS 


-^ 




C<Ng{;5M. 


g 




CO —1 COM" 






S 


s 


ooco -sitgoMcoor-c^go t-| 


1 


1 


2|3g ";: 


00 CO 


-hW 


= 


^S!^ 


s" 








com 




§ 


I 


— 3§" 


l-gg2 


^- 




1 


srsss '-'^^iss^ 


o> 


"=2^gS 


S 


^.co 


»SS! 




s 




oo. ..g.oogsgp 


1 


2 
2~ 


3 

c5~ 


jlO 




















































O 




















^,H : 


(N 


lO 


CO 


£Sgg 


-"gS 


^"^'SSSg^-g" 


-' 




•0(N 


"§ 


|,. 


^s 


oo" 


1 


2 


i 


^"" -"-" 


>o 


-"-gs-'°s^-"-^'°" 


«» 


i 








1 


il 


*^-„ ^ 


-a 




« 




- 


oct,.^ 


^ 










^^ 




t^ 


§ 








2S 




S^2§^ 


g 


^ 


i 


1, 

II 


15 


i 

1 
1 

1 

a 
5 


£ 

i 

ii 


1 

1 


1 

ii 


i 

ii 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 

pi 


1 


fe 
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^ 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


fe 
^ 

5 


1 


1 


1 

fc 

1 

I 


1 

i 


i 

I 


1 

1 


1 
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1 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 

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1 


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i 


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1 

1 

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a 

§ 
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c 

i 


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1 
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1 
1 


1 

1 


r 
1 


1 
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1 


a '. 

h 
1 : 

Ii 

1 

O c8 


3 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 
•neajox 



•asoncder 



<uoNeoNiocorte<iE--c5e<5t>-e 



lO — ejiNi^ .CO-* 



•(qjnos) u^ii 11 



tOr-lO'-t 00 'H t^ CO N 0> -H 



^§5! 



•(il5J0n) ufiWOii 



i-HCOr-nraoowc^oot-i 



2'^S 



lO •«— I W 'NO 



'S§ 



-^ :S 



"gS 



< lO .-' to Ol -^ « c 



o>noioi«cn-»<-*i-(co-Ho> 



•u^nijao 



3S^"^2?3 o. 



•qonaj^ 
•qsjnmj 



<O^^iCT-HMt^C0O00t^M»0O 

ll 



c 


« 


^« 










^^t- 



-Nt^ ■N^IMO -"tllN- 




EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 73 







































-* 




















: 


'^ 


: 




: 




cs 






3 




CO 




CO 


SI 


Tl 


K 


<D 


^ 




- 




>o 


-" 




« 




^ 










-^ 






. 


§ 


2§ -^gSSSI Jl 




CO 


ggg """-SS 


««coao-^|2«5g^g« 


^=°s 


"g 


" s~ """s Hp 


^^^^ '^'^ 


g" 


^„-H 




2S^?5S 


CSC. 


-- 


s 


-"f^ 


S ^- -^2S-|-ggg 


1 1 


5 


^O.^^ ^N^^.-, 




CO.O(M 


t^uoo 


M 


-^ 






o\t~ 




J§ 


,l.-^.. 




1 

cf 


e» 


"* 




•-H ^ 








CO 






P5 




s 


— (^ 












00 


c^ ocs 


— CO 




g-^s-^ 


2 




§ 


O OM^- 




3- 


n 




N 


(Nr-(N 


;2; 




'^ 






CO 




S'sll ^'^ '-=°2^S|'-'=Sg^ 


i 


i 


co 


SSSS '^^•05-c.--«o 


o«o^c.^c. 




„^o 


^2 


1 s- "Sg-I3g§5 


cf 






- |tDO«) 


^-.-ro 


cocD^^w^;:;^ 


^-^s 


-"SIS S5-" -S§ 


-s°§ii 


1 


si 


00 : 


SS 


^ 




-^ 




^^co 




c 






2 




5 


1 






^53 


1 


-=;2!8 


1 1 


g 


ggg 2'-^§g»^i2::J:;-^2SS2S^2 




CO --co 


^g 


C._ ^ CO o cot.o^,« 


2 1 




" 


- 


















































11 








3 




S 


C»<Nf. 


s 


« 


2 


CM 


a-^a 


^^»o 




-Hf^T}- 


«t--( 


^ 


'-' 








s 


cor~ 


oil ^CO CSWCO 


"^-SSSg 


i| 




c.« 


•-H aort 














co^ 


ot 




N 


^c. 






2 


g -^ 




.o-..g 


°^?5S 


i 


2 


i 


^ 


•"f 






N 














-^ 




N 










-^ 






2 


8|" 






CO 




S"S°!^ 


2 


s 


1 




«-H 




§ 










<N 




CJpH 


CO 


















^ 


2 1 "^ 




§§« 


ef 


«=S^ 


g- 


§ 


i 

CO" 


o 


-^ 






<M 






C^ 




-^ 






u. 










-^ 






§ 


i "^ -^-^a" 


S- "- "U- 


§ 


!« 


l-T 0» lO rt r-1 


22 








- 




Ol-H 


t~ 


















s 


i - 


-2§--|-5Sf2 


2 


^1 


--«« 


-^ 


t-M 








- 




« 




o 












- 


CJO 


s -^-^ 


^s 


-S-'??2| 


g| 








'^ 










-^ 




-• 




2 




2 










-.^ 




""is? -^ 

1 


^oc. 




r^ 


coco-H 


i 


2 o 


^ 


2"" 










CO-l-H 


ao-« 


Ol 


-"-< 












1^ 




"S°^ 


2 


""ss 


i 


il 


1 


1 


i 
1 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

■1 
1 

is * 

1^ 


i 

§5 


Z 

1 




=1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


'2 


pi 


1 

11 


I 

J' 

c 
i 

i: 
1 


2 


1 
1 


s 

? 


1 
1 

5 


E- 


1 

■z 

I 

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c 

1 


:1 

■1 

1 


i 

i 

: 


il 

i 


I 

I 


i 

i 


1 
ll 


1 
1 


ll 

ISA 

i 


1 

o 


i 


s 

is 

1 

1 

< 


1 

"1 


a 

t 

i 

ll 


i 

1 


1 


1 


1 

a 
tl 


= 


2 

1 


1 
1 

1 

2 


z 

e 


1 

1 

O 


i 


1 . 

1 

u 

o ^ 
eg 


i 

o 



74 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF- IMMIGRATION. 



-nqjtnojjpajJBdea 


pj 




^ 






CO 








coco 








s 
















s 




y 


s 


















■mojj 


i^i^ii^S^isSSI 


1 


gigssgsj-isp |ss-ffiss 


•S9id09d J9q;o 


-^ 


?? 




^c.^ 


■n 00 (N 00 CO 


s 


<N-H 






^«^ 






CD 


^ 


-< 


•^ 




•(HBqno 
?d90X9)nBTpnns9A\. 


'^ 


c 


■«HN-H 


-co^ 


lOiO 


. 


-IINCN 








2 


- 


S?2 '^ 


-- 




<N \ 


•qsi9M 






CO 




CO 












^^ 


- ^ 












-■ 






u. 


rH 






-* 




•qsTJijnx 






















-- 






-^ 




-" 














- 


CO 
















■UBTJjig 






CO 


-H^ 


(M-H 


-^ 


INrt 


2 


coin-H 




^ 


U3 






- 




-^ 






-^ \ 


•neou9uiv rjsinBdg 


^^co 


t^coco>o->j<iraoii-nrao|o 


^^ 








^oo 






s^ § 


'^ 


-^ 




•qb'iutidg 


iOrt«Oi-ii-ieo'*<Di-io»co>ot~oo 


s 


coco^ 




CQ 


s 


i^s 


^ 


"^ 


-<c< j 


•:qBAOis 


cD(N cocoes 1-1 <Meot^(NOice 


■<»< 


ssg 


"«s^ 


o>-*oco cocot- 


CD(N • 


•qoioos 


■«<-<HO-Ht-CtiC^CDCOC<l(N-HOOg 


s 


■<f<(N00rt 


CO 


s 






S" s 


CDrH-* 




•(S9p9AiS puB 
-ION) UBTABUTPUBOS 
•(JtBTU 

-ssna) TiBTuemna 


ooo.^co«o^^O;:h3cdcoo 


^ 


g^'^^'^ 


..^ 


(N 


|SS R 


;3 


•^■fll I 


. 












































-^ 
























•uBTssna 


■"-s 


^r- 


co^coco^goo 


s 


co^r. 




t^ 


g 


c 


oo> co^c, 


°" \ 


•uBniBnma 






CO 


^ 




^co 






CD j 


2 


■=^ss 




O.CDCO 


" 


com CO'-J'CO 


^^ : 


■9S9nSn?jOd 






cDr^MCO 






COtK 


"-r 


2g 










t^ 






-HCO CO 


CO 


IC»-1 I 


•qsnoj 


(N^jHMtOOO-Ht-^rtlO-Hr-Ht^ 


5 


sss-^ 




TJ. 


gs ^^'"^ 


00 c.^ 


•jgpnBisi ogiOB J 








































































•UBOTxaH 


U5 


CD (M cq CO o> N g 00 o 


CO 00 


sll »-»" 




CO 


;? 


u. 


--.CO Ol 






rHrt 1 


•iB^BR 






OJrH 


■"■ 




rt(M(NrtrtiO 


g5 


-HOON 


-^3°^^ 


rt 


t^t^ 


^^jrHCO 


IN 


•nuinBnq^tT: 






■*"^ 




-HTK 






'^ : 


Is 


UOIOO 




3"°^ 


(N 


2^ -^ 


'^ 


<o 




1 


a; 
o 

1 




1 


1 


c 

1 

1 


1 

t 

■t 

c 


i 


"^1 




I 

c 

1 

c 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 

o 


1 




1 

1 
1 


1 

5 


1 

PC 


1 


1 

1 


t 
1 


1 

1 

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c 


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tt 

1 


1 

t 


1 

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J 


l 
p. 




1 

i: 

1 


1 




1 

6 

1 


0- 

1 


1 



BEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 75 





CO 




" 
































(N 























" 






S 


0<N 


:S 


1 


^ 


5S 




gg 






1 


fe 


i 


<N — 









^-H 














-* 


-<N 












"^ 




s 


s 


M^ 


'^S^-'g^gJ^JS 


g 


s 




■«<o-.r- ■ 








<N 








'^ 


N^^ 






















-l§ 


-- ^'°;^«-^?3"2S?§ 


1 


S 


1 


-<-HN<N .H 




S'' 




i-H 


^ 






'-' 






















":§? 


<N 


-H-KOl ■ 


is 


ct-cgl^ 


g 


«-, 


^ 


















'- 




(N 




«-H 
















u. 


?5 


CO 




rH<N ; 


ji 


CO coo 


i 


S5 


M 


C«(N 


>n 






--^ 














«; 




<D 


-^ . 








t- 




02 


s 







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is'S^^s 





!- 


«s-?? 




-KNira 












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« 


-" 


- . 






-^ 






■* 


S 


S" 


cog^-Hjo 


•S5§ 


i 


S 


2§"f5 






S-N 


■^---HM 




MM 


2 






'^ 




(N 




§ 


' 


00^ 


-1 




S 


i 


1 


-^"" =-§2 






NiortTi.joio(NOira(Ni« 




^S 




S 


5 


S'^ 


^1" 


Id y 


CO- 


i 


cjoMco n 


ccgco 


,H^;2<N 


U^^^t-f, 


Mrt 


'^ 


s-sg 


CO^ (NJ-jCgrH 


:§^§m 


i 


i 

<N- 


ssss ^ 


t,gg«^ 


.«.-,»., 


,^-H 




coo 


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^, 


00 tK 


§|S.-§-S|5 


1 


i 


1 

CO 


^ 




« - 




s 






















^ 


















'- 


s 


(M 




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p«-l 


s 


i 


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1 


1 


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s -" 


-g-" 


-" 


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2 








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i 


„. .«g 1 




0- 


Si! 


^-5^« 


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(N 








-^ 


JS'- 


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i 






-s 




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CO 


j -^f^o^ 








3 
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|«=5!S s2'^|^-'^""-'"-S3^^^«" 


1- 


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1 


1 












































































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u 


1 


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Mr- 




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jtC jOO* 


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t- 




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p. 


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i : 

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e : 

s ; 

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0" 


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i 


ii 

^ : 
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3 j 

II 

II 

ii 


■a 
3 

'3 

• 



76 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





•jbXSbk 






irnn 


.cq . ; ^^- 










•nBniBnq;i'i 




: : 1 : :'^ : '^ 


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78 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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III 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



79 



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80 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL, OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table X-c. — Native-horn citizens departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1921, by occupa- 
tions and races or peoples. 



Occupation. 


African 
(black). 


Cau- 
casian. 


Chinese. 


East 
Indian. 


Japanese 


Total. 


PROFESSIONAL. 

Actors 




39 
23 
684 
7 
170 
242 
28 
37 
99 
78 
121 
13 
551 
301 








39 


Architects 










23 




3 










Editors 








7 


Electricians 










170 














Lawyers 










28 


Literary and scientific persons 










37 




7 








106 


Officials (Government) 








78 


Physicians . . 


1 


1 




122 




1 
3 








Teachers 








552 


Other professional.. 


1 






305 










Total 


12 


2,393 


5 






2,410 








SKILLED. 


1 
5 

1 


28 
74 
49 
29 
3 
343 








29 


Barbers and hairdressers . . . 


1 






80 








50 




3 






32 










3 




5 








348 


Cigarette makers 










Cigar makers. 




17 

6 

1,297 

19 

457 
1 

10 

5 

179 

11 
547 
126 

41 
353 

59 
10 
12 
169 
100 
11 

9 
18 
78 
43 

2 

8 
30 
59 
20 
32 

2 
10 

9 

I 

3 

02 
19 
.530 








17 


Cigar packers ... 










6 




10 


10 






1,317 








19 


Engineers (locomotive, marine, and sta- 










457 


Furriersand fur workers. 










1 






2 






12 










5 


Iron and steel workers 


2 








181 




1 






12 


Machinists 








547 


Mariners 










126 




3 
4 








44 










357 


Metal workers (other than iron, steel, and 
tin) 








59 


Millers 










10 


Milliners* 










12 












169 












100 


Pattern makers 










11 


Photographers 










9 













18 












78 


Printers 










43 


Saddlers and harnessmakers.. 










2 




1 








9 










36 


Stokers 










59 


Stonecutters 










20 




2 


2 






36 


Tanners and curriers . . . 







2 


Textile workers (not specified) 










10 












9 












2 


Upholsterers . . 










2 


Watch and clock makers 










3 












62 












19 


Other skilled. 


2 


98 






630 














36 


4,900 


117 






5,053 








MISCELL.\NEOUS. 

Agents 


4 


393 
49 
48 

975 

4,015 

12 

35 


1 






398 








49 


Draymen, hackmen, and teamsters 

Farm laborers. . 


3 
4 
2 








51 


6 
47 

1 




1 


986 


Farmers 




4,064 
13 








Hotel keepers 








35 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



81 



Table X-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1921, by occupa- 
tions and races or peoples — Continued. 



Occupation. 


African 
(black). 


Cau- 
casian. 


Chinese. 


East 
Indian. 


Japanese. 


Total. 


MISCELLANEOUS— continued . 


36 


• 1,378 
42 


485 




1 


1,900 






42 


Merchants and dealers 


53 
22 


423 


85 




2 


511 




512 34 
2, 975 148 




599 






1 


3,146 








Total 


125 


10,857 807 




5 


11,794 


Mo occupation (including women and 
children) 


303 


43,719 154 


1 


740 


44,917 


Grand total 


476 


61,869 1 1.083 


1 


745 


64,174 













r0112— 21- 



82 



EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 







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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



83 



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II 



84 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



.s 




2 


s 


lO 


§ 


g 


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ll 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



85 









(N .rt-*.-! .lO .rt 



r-l • 'O 



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II 



86 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 


, ^ii^ 


1,427 

1,533 

181 

490 

959 

732 

597 

3r.5 

3,172 

2,882 


1 


2,862 

3,439 

2,477 

155 




84 

17,815 

9,404 

2,555 

305 

804 

340 

1,451 

321 

488 




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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



87 



549 
289 
751 
5,448 
1,746 
73 
419 
163 


502 
812 
133 
4,589 
9,280 
897 
432 


12,427 
98 
303 
330 
31 


150 
474 

2,009 
19 
168 

8,145 

131,774 


22 


S81 

32,400 

22,282 

1,491 

275 

160,564 

354 

14, 863 

102,478 

20,859 


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88 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



89 





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'"' 




















CO 


s§ 








(NTT to 


s 


C^CMOi 


K 


s 


2 




CJ 
















N 
























CM 


2 


•^ 




rtrj. 




§ 


t>.rH in 


2 


s 


s 


1 
5 


1 

i 


1 




1 


•2: 


p. 




1 

J: 

.a 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 




1 

1 


i 

1 


c 
c 

1 


1 

1 

c 

i 


P 


E- 




£ 

5 

i 


a. 


is 

1 


1 

1 

c 

1 


O 


1 
El 




i 

■< 

a 

g 

<1 


1 

5 

Ph 


1 
1 

> 


1 


1 


£ 


j 

ti 


s 

►- 


1 


■a 
1 

J 


c 


a 

o 


1 


1 

1 

= 

a 

1 
1 

o 


1 

2 

a 





90 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL. OF IMMIGRATION. 



.2 
o 




o 


'S-^ 


00 r^ 


' 


.„. 


' 


^" 


g 


SS?? 


"Nggg 








^ooa 


.1-- 




^ 


o. 




2" 




' 


,. 


1 

d 
12 





-l(N j 


— 


r 










'^ I 


M 




" 










CO 






."* 






'^ 


" 




















-^ 






coco 


S 






'^ 
















-' 




















'- 








g?3S?35!2;;SgSSKSS 




1 gSg"'"'§^§'^S'-§g2SS''??5?"||gg3^ 


i 










I'^ 
















"^ 


'^ 








'^ 










CO 


















'^'^'^ 






^^s-^s-^^^s^^^ss? 


§ 


§23 




S^g 


.•« 


■gOOOCOM 


u,CO 


gsss'" 


I? 












-^ 








MM 


CO 
















- 


" 


o« 














r~ 


^^^ . 


i! 


















































^ 


-' 












-^ 




^ 


-^ 


1 






2 : 


N 














10>0 


g 


^ 








t-M„ 






<NM 








'^ 






COMM 




1 






CO : 


^ 




MM 








'-' 


o 






'^ 








^ 






t^ 










" 




<^ 


(NCO 




6 






o 1 


MM 


NMMM 


TfCO 


s 


05fl< 


^00 


r~ 






CO COM 






^ 




2 


M^N _ 


S 


























fq 


<N 
























-* 


^ 














'^ 








1 






::; ". 


"^ 


'^ 


^ 


t-M^M 


s 


tOC^O! 


MCO-*tJj 






CO CO CO 






^^ 


McoTi-r- 


M 


1 
s 


MM in • 

i 


^j-HiNu:,aiMOMcc|0 


s 


sss-^ 


SSg 


C<,C.C.O«MO.M««,M|«^|2 


^ 


a 


oc^c.^,.M.or-r-2^»5 


s 


ggS^ 


;^"g 


00 




i5?3S== 


§ 






"^ : 


N 








<N^ 


coco 


2 


1 OU5tO 




CO(NOO 


Ol 


0>M 




'- 








C2««o 




1 






" : 
















CM 


00 


i --^ 




'^ 


MCO 






(N 


c^ 












MC^ 


N 




i 


c 


'^ : 


MMM^, 


2"^ 


o 


S 


^''^ 








S 


-^ 


s 


<M 


^ 








■■°S"£3 


'^ 


1 

1 


1 
1 

-< 


S 

S 

1 

■< 


3 


1 


11 

11 


i 

5 


1 

1 

3 


1 


o 

O 

i 
o 


1 
> 


1 

1 


1 


1 

si 
O 




2 


i 
1 


1 

1 

PC 


1 


i 

£ 

P5 


(2 


1 

i 


1 
1 

1 


1 

t 

1 

s 


I 
3 


1 

1 


y 

O 


q 


> 

i 
s 

j 

i 

i 

pi 


1 

I 

1 


1 


1 

1 

w 


1 

1 


1 


1 

1 


.1 

1 


1 

1 


1 


1 

i 
1 


1 

1 

c 

c 

1 
o 

I 





EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



91 





|2" 




es 


•«t 


« 


^ 


s^ 


'" 


"^i 




.. 






s 


I 


' 


If IT 


Si-- 


r-2g 


1 


5: 


S~ 


-H<N-H 












rt-lrt 














..-< 




M 


S 








■?5?2 


-S8 


coooo> 


1 


s 


1 














-^ 










-^ 


















j. 


lO 


-< 




m-H 


--S 


eo 


w 


s 


r~ 


s 


gjg^^ssss^jsssa^-s'- 


»-g-Sg 


i 




^ 


i 




2 












































g5 








-foo 




Is 


(N 


CO 


^ 


s 


B 


"^r^-^-ineo-i 


.^^o^co^c. 






^gg 


«2 


S 


O«c0g|>«C.2OJ«|2 


1 


1 


1 














^^ 




•* 


-H^ : 










S 




S 


2 








°°« 




1 


^ss 


i 


S 


i 




= 
















'^ 






















« 


S 


-^ 




CO to 




3 




CO. ^ 


s 


1 




^rt 








'" 




CO 


rHN 1 
















- 


s 


<Nrt 


25 




S" 


2S 


i 


s 


3 




§ 




(Nrt 








'^ 






















^ 


s 


"^ 


-:^g 


...... 


s 


s 


g 




g^ 


'-' 






'^ 


s 




^ : 


i'^ 










"^S 


s 


M. 




^5 


-g-c^SS 


i 


1 


1 




-^ 












































^ 










-^ 




S 


t~ 


CO 


^ 


N 


§ 




32-^ 


" 


(N 




m 


com ! 








'^ 






?5 


i 


■" 


""S 


^2-g^S 




£ 


^. 




go=cc.ocr:50c,-g50c.>2-H 


;CO 




NM 


»8 


1 






1 




MCO-9<'-HlOMMIO 


ss-ss-s- 




^S 


"i 




2-"g|S-|-g|| 


§ 


1 


1 




«'^ 






'^ 






t~c^ 


^ 1 














^« 


s 


-^ 




J^K-^ 




2SS 1 


i 


§ 






'^ 












-HT). 


CC-I '■ 


N-^ 






3 




(N 


■* 










g 




S 


c^. 


i 


§ 


i 




f-ieo 














c. 






















to 


1 


C^(N 


^?5 




s 


^"" i 


§ 


i 


i 

c 

1 


'i 


1 
t 

5 
1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


1 

E 


1 


1 
f 

i 


1 


1 

5 


m 


1 

1 

1 


1 
1 


S2^ 

■fc- 

f 


3 
3 

= i 
3| 




1 
1 


1 

1 

■s 

J 


1 

1 


J 
1 


1 

i 

1 


1 

1 




1 




1 

s 

1 

< 


1 


1 

1 
1 

J 

1 




I 


1 


i 
1 
1 


1 


1 


1 

1 

c 

I 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 




i 

^ 




& 

i 

1 
1 


2 


3 








92 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 

Eh 


i 


&S4 


g 


i-s 


2| 


1 


c; 


5 


I 




i 


i 


%Y- 


?5 


1 


S 


i 




' 


«5 


1 


.^ 


1^ 


w 


S8 


10 

1,315 

621 

771 


1 ! 




•H 
























'^ 




-^ 










>o 






CO 




-^ 


'- 


- 




-' 




1 


IMNCJ 


co^ 


^^ 


-H-HNm 


?3 


S »H 


c^r^ocg 


^ 


O.OM< 


CO 


CO 


»CO«CJ 


^$ 






-^ 




-" 












C^ 


« 


^^co 








CO 






« 


(N 


« 


N 




■^ 


00 \ 


1 




(NCT,-*COCOM 


•* e<3 cc -H o 11 


S 


OSMOO 




«^g 






^(Ncn 


>o---o^ 


^O^CO 


> 
















































































> 






lO 












^ 




-'-' 


o> 












-^ 


-* 










CO 


^ 








■* 






> 






-- 








-^ 






^^c 


» 




^N 




-^ 










- 


















xa \ 


-2 








-^ 


^ 












-^ 




^ 
















<o 


-^ 


^co^ 






" 




^ 


^^ 


2 
H 






^ 


rtlN 




^« 




tOM 


s 


tOTt-UJ 




o 


^ 






C5^« 


c 




-H 


t^ CO CO to 


i 






(N 




-H 






-< 






CO 


^ 
























<N 




























m 
























CO 


■^ 








(M 


o 






'^ 


'^ 


























^ 
























(N 


rt 












-^ 






























i-i 


'H 


^ 


^^-^ 










•-tia 


s 


S3 






«-s 






r-jNiM 


'- 




•* 


ocoiom 




2 


o. 






^CO^CN 


^c. 


g 


-H 


"' 












-^ 


- 


^ 














'* 


2 


P^' 
















































































05 1 "^S 


„2C.U,O^J^C.O^ 


§ 


^gS'""'5!2| 


lO 


83S 


«-S""S??5:5 


O 






w 










-■ 






^^ 


en 


c. 








CO 


2 






«^^ 


- 




-^ 


CO ■* 


'- 


.2 

o 






CO 








rH^rH 










to 
















c. 


-< 


^ 














^ 


^ : 


1 


i 


1 


3 


1 


1 
1 

3 


1 

1 

1 

1 




J 

03 

3 


£ 
1 


1 
£ 

c 

i 

c 


1 


1 

! 

2 

P 

1 


t 


1 

p 

1 

O 




1 


d 

1 


1 

i 


1 

i 

1 


J2 
1 

s 

8 




t 


i 
1 


S2 

1 

.2 

1 

1 


1 


1 
1 




i2 

1 
\ 

1 




1 

C3 

05 
.1 

a. 
*^ 

|i 

li 

11 

■at 

a s 


c 


I 

E 
p 

s 

13 

cs 

c 


1 

1 


S 

1 


1 
1 


1 


J2 


1 


I 
S 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 93 



ss? 




z 


s 

m 


- 


t- 


g 


^ 


5 


o 


s 


IS 


3 


Ol^ 


i^ 


<N 


cc 


Si 


s 


' 


s§ 


2 


cf 


1 


t- 


§5 


si 

-2 


sg 


1 


2 


5! Sco 


i 


s ^ 

-" s 










s 














^^ 
























" 


is 






"g 


"i 


CO 


2 


2 


SS 1 


— 


s=> 




---^ 




r-MC<5 0S(N 


(N 






^ 




S 


i ■" 






3S^ 


(M- 


00 








i^ 














«-^r^ 












N 




2 


i 






2g 


-£ — gS 


!- 


Hi 




-^ 


^-^ 




-.«-. 




M-4 


00 








"^ 


<N 


"^s 


i 




1 


% \ 
































-" 




















•^ 
















'-' 




^^ 


2 


11 




l-H 


?? 










- 




« 
























CO 


in 


^ 




''^l 


"s 


?3'*'2 




















~ 






-" 


2- 












CO 




ca 


?? 


'-' 


-<^<- 




gcc^^ 


2 


^ i 


" 




t~ 


N 








^^-. 




















^ 


o 


<N 




^g 


^i 


00 cot- 


§ 


2 § 








S'--' 


--" 






t~^ 


>o 


















z 


t^ 




^^f^5 


-|-g?3^ 


1 


II 










- 




















- 




















^ 










Ol 




S 


2 


CO 


s 


S ss 








- 






















" 


















(N 


2 








'' 




s 




;Deo 


i 


" g 




















































'-' 


1 










'-' 




;5 


N.NCO 


g? 


2 S 




« 


^-^ 




-"-- 


-s 




00 


o> 








g 




2 


i 


<N-. 


O«00 


|-Sg?3 


s 


1 i 










- 








-* 


^" 
























U5 


1 


CO 




"-2 




co^^oo 


s 


i § 








































































'-' 


-^ 




.N 


^ CO 


2-"g?5 


«---t- 


xgjqi^ug>nc>i-H 


'^^S 


=^s 


r- 




s 


1 s 








••=■* 






- 






'^ 




•^ 








rH<N 




C^ffl 


S 


CO 




.og2«2 


225 


£ 


^li 








s 




- 










CM 


















M 




CO 


g 








coo 


-s 


COC^O 


s 


^ % 


1 
1 

c 
1 

i 

3 

1 

•a 

1 


1 




1 


1 

1 

1 


2 

1 


1 

a 




t 

i 

£ 

a 


1 
1 


1 

\ 
1 

1 


1 


1 

^ 


1 

7 


1 


1 


1 

E 

E 

1 

1 


1 

i 

1 




1 


1 


I 

I 

1 


\ 

1 

i 

i 

> 


1 

1 


1 
1 
1 

i 

1 


1 






■< 

s 

1 




1 

1 

1 


I 

(2 


1 

1 


ii 


1 
1 




1 


1 
1 


1 


1 

5 




£ 

2 

11 

.2 r 

1 "^ 






94 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGEATION. 



•Bi^ 'BQipn^njaj 












.; 














•BO '3ioiM.snaig: 


-^ ::::::: p 














■'^ . 










•0 -s 'nojS9[jBqo ] I [ [ '• [ ■ • 


; ; :^ : : ; : ; i'^" 










' • 00 


:S5 • 










•j-N'no}3niaiiLVV \\\\\\\\\\ 


i ; : : ! i : : i i'^ 












:-' 










■uaoj 'pjojinBjs i ;::::;:::; 
























•traoj 
'nopno^I M3>i 


























•ssBK 'Jaisaanoio 




:;::;;:::: ;2 






















•SST3K 'jaAiH ll^i 
















;« 










•«M'lsa.\S.^aji 


" i- js- i^i 


t ;-Sg^ >5'-°?55?^^-'2 




T^ 


--P 


g-- 


•BIJ 'tlUtilK 


-^ 1 N M N II 


• • 'CO • 1 j-i ; ; j-H 


rr -H '■ 






\ :^ 


;^ 










■BO 'qBmiBABs : : : : : : : : : 


2 • ■ ; ; ; : • ■ ■ •-' 












it^ 










j ::: lu, :-.:■- : 


1 j jto •_ ■; • ';(N jooo-nM '• 


-"-' : 


: ;"' 


•2 




CO 


« 


'SM8JSI 5J0dM8N 


:; ;:;;;: '."^ 


. . .,r . ■ • ; ; ;0<N 












:£J 








" 


•I -a 'aonapiAOJd 


— Mrs-^ 


•>C(NM32C0 • 1^ t^M rr igcocoo 


C^^Mg 




- 


1 


lO 


•SSBH 


M N^ ;s i r 


: : :S :^ : : p :| 










•.■^^ 




•apj 'pncujoj 


: ; : ;^~'m'^'^"' 


i : :-" r : \^ :- 


?:2 ; 


<r-Hco 


ps-g 


coco 




•sjjod 
onnBiiv ntJipBUBj 




•PK 'aJoniiJiBa 


; : ; ;2 i'^ ;'^'^ 


: :---- : :« :^^^ 








: :" 


„g^ 


CO 




•Bd 'BiqdiapBiiqd 


S l^^l'cgRSS::^ 


: :'-|SS32^gg2S|S225?5'^g:::52S|2S 


•ssBK 'no;sog 


2 i-"y|Si^^ 




•A -N 'VOA AiSN 


619 

36 

361 

220 

16,434 

1,858 

20, 462 

891 

1,613 

796 

638 

33 

495 

39,030 

5,045 

3,714 

849 

452 

760 

1,051 

3,146 

35, 438 

22, 706 

6,049 

437 

3,954 

1, 169 

1,944 

554 

1,235 

36,013 

379 

215,916 

449 

816 

36,521 

496 

1,444 


§ 

.g 
1 


Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

-Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 


''•eorgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 


i : 
? : 

111 


1 




i 

.2; 


1 

ill 


II 

III 


1 

2 


1 


1 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 95 





































- 




" 


- 


- 






























» 


05.-H 








^ 












SS 






















:: 












"^ 




































'-' 






















'-' 












« 




































o 






















-' 












<o 


2 






O 


05 0> 




=0 


^2«^ 


s 


(N 


















N 












1 


"- 






'^ 










CO 










1° 

1 


- 










w^ 




N 




_- 




s 


" 




-^ 












5- 


-■ 








i 


i 




r 




OJt-TTM 


''JSS 


ji 


§ 




i 












- 


M-a- 






S- 


= 




C: 






CON-J-M 


>OM 






B 


^- 


S^2g:5|S§ 


llgS 


2 


5 












-- 




3 


-^ 


" 




i 


S 

r^ 




^■"'-SJSSSEi 


is" 


2 


ss::§2§g^s 


13 


68,984 

11 

25 

5,810 

329 

850 

450 

1,843 

980 

555 

1,605 

13 

3,080 

4,542 

7,173 

560,971 


"i 

I 

1 


1 
J 

J 


J 




1 


^2 




t 




t 


.2 
> 


1 
1 


5 

1 

1 


> 

1 


c 


1 





1 





96 



EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



890 
186 
894 
298 
242 
759 
137 
134 
032 
724 
841 
632 
074 
358 
039 
567 
259 
590 
927 
773 
917 
053 
649 
202 
653 
268 
006 
387 
739 
168 
777 
849 
640 
582 
578 

718 
153 


1 " 


= ««o-«^ C.-»0^-H ^COCJgO. .,C«N ^« « -« ^ 


•ootHdJoj [ 






: ;' 


" i i 




! ''"' ' 




; M i 1^ 1 1 




•H -X 'ninpnoH 






. p 1 




: : is :* : : 


: i'-' : 




•■•••oil 




•SJJOdBOS 

japjoq uBDixapi 






i is i 








: :-' : 




i i i i r 1 1 




•snoijBjs 
japjoq uBoixaj^ 




~"" 


:-|Sgg'-| : = 


°SS=°«'|"22 :2^| : :S5:§? 


•snoije^s 
japjoq TreipmiBa 


no 

30 

82 

33 

8,293 

286 

855 

51 

77 

824 

55 

47 

420 

2, 033 

315 

341 

144 

61 

56 

5,438 

232 

11,384 

8,613 

1,846 

15 

296 

552 

259 

40 

2,759 

771 

47 

10,000 

61 

630 

1,566 

117 

1,887 


•t!:!is«iv 




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:ii 



REPOET OF COxMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 97 



1- 


Iffi 

2" 


1,075 

562 

21,898 

1,790 

2,956 

6 745 

20 

10,688 

5,406 

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98 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 






rico o <N r- 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



99 






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100 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 103 




104 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV .—Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899^ to 1921, 
races or peoples. 



Race or people. 


1899 


1900 1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


African (black) 


412 

674 

- 2,526 

94 
1,638 
8,632 
1,374 

367 

1,860 

15 

10,712 

6; 097 

2,278 

26,632 

2,395 

37, 415 

32,345 

13,091 

65,639 

3,395 

22 

6,858 

5,700 

163 

172 

28,466 

2,096 

96 

1,774 

1,400 

23, 249 

1,752 

15, 838 

996 

110 

3,708 

28 

1,359 

144 

193 


714 


5P4 


832 
1,151 
5,590 

1,291 
1,631 
30,233 
2,423 

1,004 

4,117 

84 

14,942 

^4; 122 

8^115 

29; 001 

27,620 

1.52,915 

14, 455 

28 

11,629 

23,610 

715 

160 

69,620 

5,309 

2,033 

1,551 

7,533 

55,780 

2,432 

36,9.34 

1,9.54 

496 

4,982 

165 

760 

137 

147 


2,174 
1,759 
9,591 

6.479 
2,192 
32,907 
2,944 

1,7.36 
6,496 

28,451 
18,864 
7,166 
71, 782 
14, 376 
76,203 
35,366 
37,429 
196.117 
20,041 
564 
14, 432 
27, 124 
486 
185 
82,343 
8, 433 
4,740 
3,608 
9,843 

79,347 
6,219 
34,427 

'■Z 

5,551 

449 

1,278 

1,497 

89 


2,386 
1,745 
11,911 

4,577 
4,327 
21,242 
4,811 

2.0.36 
7,8:32 
258 
41, 479 
10, 157 
11,557 
74,790 
12.625 
106,2.36 
37,076 

159; 32C 
14,382 
1,907 
12, 780 
23, 883 
447 
41 
67, 757 
6,338 
4, .364 
.3,961 
9,592 

61,029 
11, 4&3 
27,940 
4,662 
1,666 
3,653 
1,482 
1,820 
1,942 
668 


3,598 
1,878 
11, 757 

5,S23 
1,971 
35, 104 
7,2,59 

2,6.39 

8,498 

145 

50,865 

17,012 

11,347 

82,360 

12,144 

129,910 

54,266 

39,930 

186, 390 

11,021 

4,929 

18,604 

46,030 

227 

22 

102,437 

4,855 

7,818 

3,746 

14, 473 

62,284 
16,144 
52,367 
5,590 
1,658 
4,822 
2, 145 
2 531 
1,548 
361 


3,786 
1,895 


Armenian 


982 
3,060 

204 
1,250 
17,184 
2,678 

675 


1,855 
3,766 

611 
2,452 
17,928 
1,622 

732 


Bohemian and Moravian (Czech) . 
Bulgarian, Serbian, and Monte- 
negrin 


12,958 
11.548 


Chinese 


1,485 


Croatian and Slovenian 


44,272 


Cuban 


,5,591 


Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herze- 


4,568 


Dutch and Flemish -. 


2,702 


3.299 


9,7.35 


Eastlndian 


9 20 


271 


English 


10, 897 
12,612 

2,095 
29,682 

3,773 


13,488 
9,999 
4,036 

34, 742 
.=; 019 


45,079 




14, 136 


French 


10,379 


German 


86,813 


Greek.. 


23,127 


Hebrew 


60,764i 58' 098 

35,6071 30,404 

17.316 22,103 

84,346, 115,701 

12,628 5,249 

71| 47 

10,3111 8,815 

13,777 13,311 

261 1 350 

1881 167 

46,938 43,617 

4,24l| 4,176 

398j 761 

1,200 672 

2,832 5,288 

32,952 40,277 
1,757: 2,004 

29,243 29,343 
1,111 1.202 


1.53, 748 


Irish 


40,959 


Italian (north) 


46,286 


Italian (south) 


240,528 


Japanese 


14, 243 




127 




14, 257 


Magvar 


44,261 




141 


Pacific Islander 


13 


PoKsh. . . . 


95,835 




81729 


Rumanian 


11,425 


Russian. . 


5,814 


Ruthenian (Russniak) . . . 


16,2.57 


Scandinavian (Norwegians, 


58, 141 


Scotch.; ' 


16,463 


Slovak 


38, 221 


Spanish 


5,3.32 


Spanish American 


97 


276 


1,585 


Syrian . . . 


2,920 

184 
762 
78 
73 


4,064 
136 
674 
82 
35 


5,824 


Turkish 


2 033 


Welsh 


2 367 


West Indian (except Cuban) 


1476 
1,027 






Total 


311,715 


448,572 


487,918 


648,743 


857,046 


812,870 


1,026,499 


1,100.7.35 






Race or people. 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


African (black).... 


5,235 
2 644 


■ 


4,626 
3,299 

10, 164 

18,246 
1,263 

20,472 
3,323 

3,747 
9,526 
1,710 
49,056 
6,746 
12,881 
73 038 
28, 808 
03,387 
36, 427 
24,700 
10, 547 

13,720 
24,378 
5,682 


4,307 
3,108 

6,850 

6,214 
1,841 
20, 181 
3,380 

1,888 
8,114 




4,966 
5,508 

8,462 

15,130 
1,770 

39,562 
3,331 

4,911 
13,012 

i;7S2 
.53,498 
15,736 
21, 107 
71, 380 
39, 135 
84,260 
38, 382 
30, 780 
192,673 

2,798 
19 
22, 714 
27,302 
17,760 


6,721 
3,092 

9,223 

10,222 
1,.307 

18,982 
3,914 

4,400 

13,862 

517 

57, 258 

9,779 
18, 132 
66, 471 
37,021 
91,223 
40,246 
.30,312 
159,638 

4,575 
8 
17,027 
19,996 
18,784 


6,759 
5,222 

8,439 

10,657 
1,608 

24,366 
3,155 

3,672 

10,9:35 

'165 

49,689 

6,641 
18,382 
65,343 
31,566 
80, .595 
33,922 
26,443 
135, 830 

6,172 
33 
14,078 
23, 599 
22,001 


6,634 
9,353 

11,091 

9,087 
2,022 
42, 499 
3,099 

4, ,520 
14,507 
188 
55,522 
12, 7.56 
20,6.52 
80, 865 
38,644 

101,330 
37,023 
42, ,534 

231,613 

24,647 
30,610 
10,954 


8.447 


Armenian. 


7,785 


Bohemian and Moravian 
(Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, and 
Montenegrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian 

Cuban 


12,554 

27, 174 

770 

47, 826 

5,475 

7,393 
12, 467 

1,072 
51,126 
14,860 

9,392 


9,928 

1.5,084 
2,354 

37,284 
3,539 


Dalmatian, Bosnian,^ and 
Herzegovinian 


5,14f 
12,56t 


East Indian 


'337 
39,021; 
11,687 


m 


English 

Finnish . . 


51,746 
12,805 


French 


19, 423 
58, .534 
20,262 
57, 551 
31,185 




18, 166 


German 


92,926 
46,283 

149, 182 
38,706 
51, 564 

242, 497 


79,871 


Greek 


45,881 




138, 051 


Irish 


33 898 


Italian (north)... 


125, 150; 
6.5,248' 
3, 275! 

1.5,254 
28,704 
15, 591 1 


44.802 


Italian (south) 


251,612 


Japanese 

Korean 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 


30,824 

39 

25,884 

60,071 

91 


8,941 
152 

21,584 
44,538 
13,089 



lexican ai o,d».s io,o»ii 1/, /du lo, /i>-t 

I Ahen arrivals previous to July 1, 1898, were nflt recorded by race or people 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



105 



Table XIY .—Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 1921, hy 
races or peoples — Continued . 



Race or people. 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


Pacific Islander 


, 


2 


7 


61 


12 


3 


11 


1 


Polish 


138, 033 


68, 105 


77,565 


128,348 


71,446 


85, 163 


174,365 


122,657 




9,648 


6, SOS 


4,606 


7,657 


7,469 


9.403 


13,566 


9,647 




19,200 


9,62S 


8,041 


14,199 


5,311 


8,329 


13,451 


24,070 


Russian 


16, 807 


17,111 


10,038 


17, 29-1 


18,721 


22,558 


51,472 


44, 957 


Ruthenian (Russniak) 


24,081 


12,361 


15,808 


27,907 


17, 724 


21,965 


30,588 


36,727 


Scandinavian (Norwegians, 


















Danes, and Swedes^ 


53, 425 


32, 789 


34 996 


52, 037 


45, 859 


31,601 


38,737 


36,053 




20,516 
42,041 
9, 495 


17,014 
16,170 
6,636 


16,446 
22,586 
4,939 


24,612 
32,416 
5, 837 


25,625 
21,415 
8, 06S 


■20,293 
25,281 
9,070 


21,293 
27, 234 
9,042 


18,997 


Slovak 


25,819 


Spanish 


11,064 


Spanish American 


1,060 


1,063 


890 


90C 


1, 153 


1,342 


1,363 


1,.544 


Syrian 


. 5,880 
1,902 


5, 520 
2, 327 


3,668 
820 


6,317 
1,283 


5,444 
918 


5, 525 
1,336 


9,210 
2,015 


9, 023 


Turkish 


2,693 


Welsh 


2, 754 
1,381 


2,504 
1,110 


1,699 
1,024 


2,244 
1,150 


2,248 
1,141 


2, 239 
1, 132 


2,820 
1,171 


2,558 


West Indian (except Cuban) . 


1,396 


Other peoples 


2,058 


1, 530 


1,537 


3,330 


3,323 


3,660 


3,038 


3,830 


Total 


1, 285, 349 


782,870 


751,786 


1,041,570 


878,587 


838, 172 


1,197,892 


1,218,480 







Race or people. 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


Total. 


African (black) 


5,660 

932 

1,651 

3,506 
2,469 
1,942 
3,402 

305 
6,675 
82 
38,062 
3,472 
12,636 
20, 729 
15, 187 
26,497 
23, 503 
10,660 
46,557 
8,609 
146 
2,638 
3,604 
10,993 
6 
9, 065 
4,376 
1,200 
4, 4.59 
2,933 

24,263 
14,310 
2,069 
5,705 
1,667 
1,767 
273 
1,390 
823 
1,877 


4,576 
964 
642 

3,146 

2,239 

791 

3,442 

114 

6,443 

80 

36, 168 

5,649 

19,518 

11,555 

26, 792 

15, 108 

20,636 

4,905 

33,909 

8,711 

154 

599 

981 

17, 198 

5 

4,502 

12,208 

953 

4,858 

1,365 

19, 172 

13, 515 

577 

9,259 

1,881 

676 

216 

948 
3,388 


7,971 

1,221 

327 

1,134 

1,843 

305 

3,428 

94 
.5,393 

32, 246 

5,900 
24,405 

9,682 
25,919 
17,342 
17,462 

3,796 
35, 154 

8,925 
194 

3,109 

3,711 

19,596 

13,350 

244 

15,019 

2, 587 

976 

454 

793 

1,369 

2,097 


5,706 
221 
74 

150 

1,576 

33 

1,179 

15 

2,200 

61 

12,980 

1,867 
6,840 

2*602 

3,672 

4,657 

i;074 

5,234 

10, 168 

149 

135 

32 

17,602 

17 

■ 668 

2,319 

155 

1, 513 

49 

8,741 

5,204 

35 

7,909 

2,231 

210 

24 

278 

732 

314 


5,823 
282 
105 

205 

1,697 

23 

1,169 

4 

2,735 

68 

26,889 

968 

12,598 

1,837 

813 

3,055 

7,910 

1,236 

2,137 

10,056 

77 

160 

52 

28,844 

732 

1,574 

89 

1,532 

103 

8,261 

10,364 

85 

4,224 

3,092 

231 

18 

608 

1,223 

247 


" 8,174 

2; 762 

415 

1,064 
2,148 

1,51c 

63 

12, 730 

160 

58, .366 

1,510 

27,390 

7,338 

13,998 

14,292 

20, 784 

12,918 

84, 882 

9,279 

72 

422 

252 

51,042 

17 

2,519 

15, 174 

2,378 
258 

16,621 
21,180 
3,824 
23, 594 
3,934 
3,047 
140 
1,462 
1,546 
1,345 


9,873 
10,212 
i;743 

7,700 
4,017 
11,035 
1,523 

930 

12.813 

'353 

54,627 

4,2.33 

24,122 

24, 168 

31,828 

119,036 

39,056 

27, 459 

19.5,037 

7,531 

61 

829 

9,377 

29,603 

13 

21, 146 

18, 856 

5,925 

2,887 

958 

25,812 
24,649 
35,047 
27, 448 
3,325 
5,105 
353 
1,748 
1,553 
3,237 


109,974 


Armenian 


68,544 


Bohemian and Moravian (Czech).. . 
Bulgarian, Serbian, and Monte- 
negrin 


143,827 
159,346 


Chinese 


45,870 


Croatian and Slovenian . . . 


473,396 


Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herze- 


73, .571 
50,962 


Dutch and Flemish 


188,517 


East Indian 


7,701 


English 

Finnish 


882,767 
217,354 


French 


318,624 




1, 124, 226 


Greek 


487, 213 


Hebrew 

Irish....... 


1,684,643 
718, 821 


ItaKan (north) 

ItaUan (south) 

Japanese 

Korean 

Lithuanian 


578,807 

3,093,-536 

239,998 

8,900 
257, 856 
471,626 
278,462 

1,122 


Magyar 

Mexican ; :.". 

Pacific Islander 


Polish 


1,444,436 
177,683 
143 607 


Portuguese 

Rumanian . . 




242*622 


Ruthenian (Russniak) . . . 


261, 256 


Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes, 


861,022 




325,622 


Slovak.. 


519 157 


Spanish 

Spamsh American 


181^453 
34, 898 
98 123 


Syrian 


Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except Cuban) 

Other peoples 


21^394 
37, 879 
24,603 
37,394 


Total 


326,700! 


298,826 


295,403 


-110,618 


141, 132 


430,001 


805,228 


16,096,712 



106 RF^PORT OF COMMISSIONER GETs^ERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV-a. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 1921, 

by countries.^ 



Austria 

Hungary 

Belpium 

Bulgaria 

Denmark 

France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, includuig Sicily and Sar- 
dinia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal, including Cape Verde 

and Azores Islands 

Rumania 

Russia 

Spain, includingC'anary and Bale- 
aric Islands 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 

England , 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

Other Europe 

Total Europe 

China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia 

Other Asia 

Total Asia , 

Africa 

Australia, Tasmania, and New 

Zealand 

I'acific Islands (not specified) — 

British North America , 

Central America , 

Mexico , 

South America , 

West Indies 

Other countries 

G rand total 



62,491 114,847 

1,101 1,196 

52 108 

2,690 2,926 

1,694 1,739 

17,476, 18,507 

2,333 3,771 



113,390] 171,989 206,011 
2, 577 
851 



1.579: 
6571 
3,655 
3,1.50! 
21,651 
5,910! 



3,117 
28,304 
8,104' 



3,4.50 
1,761 

7, 158 
5,578 
40,086 
14,090 



,156i{ 



177 
3,976 
1,325 
8,5251 
9,406i 
46,380 
11,343 



111,990 
163,703' 
5,302i 
2,043 
8,970 
10, 168 
40,574 
10,515 



77,419 
1,029 
6,705 

2,054 
1,606 



385 
12,797 
1,326 



45, 123 



1,660 
2,844 

17 
4,436 

15 



8,972 



2,585 
217 



100,135 135,996 178,375' 230,622] 193,296: 221,479 
1,735 2,319| 2.284 3,9981 4,916 4,954 

9,575 12,248: 17; 481 24,461 23,808, 25,064 



4,234 
6,459 
90,787 



4,165| 5,307 
7, 1551 7, 196 
85,257 107,347 



355 5921 975 

18,650 23,331 30,894 

1,152 2,201 2,344 

285 387 187 



13,575 

29, 138 

2,560 

763 

37 



9,951 


12,214 


35 730 


30,561 


1,792 


2,070 


764 


701 


21 


18 



9,317 

9; 310 

136,093 

2,080 
46,028 
3,983 
1,529 

26,219 
35,310 
6,143 
1,275 
5 



6,715! 5, 

7,087; 4,437, 

145,141 184,897j 



111,598 

153,540 

5,099 

4,666 

7,741 

37^564 
19,489 

273,120 
4,946 
21,730 

8,517 

4,476 

215,665 



27,763 
5,023: 
4,.344i 

38,626' 
36,1421 
11,092 
1,730| 
143' 



2,600 1,921 

26, .591 23,310 

4,269j 3,846 

4,542' 9,510 



64,709 
52,945 
16,977 
2,503 
13 



49,491 
34,995 
15,866 
1,841 

. 48 



424,700 469,237 619,008 814,507: 767,9.33 



l,247i 2,459] 

12,635| 5,269; 

9; 22: 

3,962! 5,782: 

93 61 



14,270 
6,223 



17.946i 13.593] 22,271 



2,209; 

19,968 

94 

7,118 

577 



4,309 
14,264: 
261; 
5.235 
2; 1171 



2,166, 
10,3311 
190: 
6,157; 
5, 081 I 



1,.554 

13,835 

216 

6,354 

351 



26,186' 23,925; 22.300 



214 
214 
396 

42 

237 

124 

4,656 

13 



448,572 



325' 
1731 

540 
150| 

347 



384 
182 
636 
305 
709 
337 
,711 



487,918 648,743 857,046 



1,461 

94 

2,837 

714 

1,009 

1,667 

10,193 

90 



812,870 



,091 

75, 
, 168' 

,195; 

,637 
,576 
,6411 
161 



712 

1,682 
51 
5,063 
1,140 
1,997 
2,757 
13,656 
33,012 



,499 1,100,735 



Countries. 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 




144,992 
193,460 
6,390 
11,3.59 
7,243 
9,731 
37,807 
36,580 

285,731 
6,637 
22, 133 

9,608 

4,384 

258,943 

5,784 
20,589 

3,748 
20,767 

56,637 
34,530 
19,740 
2,600 
107 


82,983 

85, .526 
4,162 

10,827 
4,954 
8,788 

32,309 

21,489 

128, .503 
5,946 
12,412 

7,307 

5,228 

1.56,711 

12; 809 
3,281 
11,290 

47,031 
30,556 
13,. 506 
2,287 
97 


80,953 
89,338 
3.692 
1,054 
4,395 
6,672 
25,540 
14,111 

183,218 
4,098 
13,627 

4,956 

1,590 

120,460 

2,616 
14,474 
2.694 
9,015 

32,809 
25,033 
12,400 
1.584 
46 


135,793 
122,944 
5,402 
4 737 
6,984 
7,383 
31,283 
25,888 

215,537 
7,534 
17, ,538 

8,229 

2,145 

188,792 

3,472 
23,745 

3,533 
18,405 

46,706 
29,855 
20,115 
2,120 


82,129 
76,928 
5,711 
4,695 
7,5.55 
8,022 
32,061 
26,226 

182,882 
8,358 
13,950 

8.374 

2,522 

15.8,721 

5,074 
20,780 

3, 458 
14,438 

52,426 
29,112 
18.796 
2,162 
377 


85,854 
93,028 
4,169 
4,447 
6,191 
8,628 
27,788 
21,449 

157,134 
6,619 
8,675 

10,230 

1,997 

162,395 

6,327 
12,688 

3,505 
14,481 

40,408 
25,879 
14,578 
2,162 
243 


137,245 
117,580 
7,405 
1,753 
6,478 
9,675 
34,329 
22,817 

265,542 
6,902 
8,587 

14,171 

2,155 

291,040 

6,167 
17,202 

4,104 
14,128 

43,363 

27,876 

14,220 

2,745 

371 


131,831 




143,321 


Belgium 


5,763 








6,' 262 


France, including Corsica 


9,296 
35,734 




35,832 


Italy, includuig Sicily and 


283,738 


Netherlands 


6,321 


Nor IV av 


8,329 


Portugal, including Cape 
Verde and Azores Islands.. 
Rumania 


10,898 
4,032 




255,660 


Spain, including Canary and 


7,, 591 




14,800 


Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom- 
England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

Other Europe 


4,211 
8,199 

35;864 
24,688 
10,682 
2,183 
967 


Total Europe 


1,199,. 566 


691.901 


654,875 


926,291 


764.7.57 


718,875 


1,0.55,8.55 


1,0,58,391 



See footnote Table in. 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



107 



Table XIV-a. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 1921, 
hv countries — Continued. 



China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia. 
Other .Vsia 



Total -Vsia. 



8,053 
3S6 



.Africa 

-Vnstralia, Tasmania, and 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (not specified). 

British North .\merica 

Central America 

Mexico 

South America 

West Indies 

Other countries 



Grand total - 



l,48t 

1,947 
42 
19,918 
970 
1,406 
2,779 

' 22 



1,943 
3,111 

203 
7,506 

141 



2S,365| 12,904 



1,098 
81 
38,610 
1,217 
6,067 
2,315 
11,888 
17 



82,870, 



51,941 
930 
16,251 
1,906 
11,180 
49 



751,786 



1,968 
2,720 
1,696 
15,212 
1,937 



23,533 



56,, 555 



18,691 

2, 151 

11,244 

43 



1,460, 

4,. 520 

524 

10,229 



1,765 

6,114 

175 

12,788 

607 



2,105 

8,281 

179 

23,955 



17,428 21,449! ,35,358 



56,830 
1,193 

3' 049 
13, 403 I 

39 



1,009 

794 
104 

55,990 
1,242 

23,238 

12^467 
15 



878,587 838,172 



1,409 

1,229 
111 
73,802 
1,473 
11,926 
4,248 
12,458 
23 



1,197, J 



2,502 
8,929 

221 
21,716 

905 



34,273 



1,336 
110 
86, 139 
1,622 
14,614 
5,869 
14,451 
136 



,218,480 



Countries. 



1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 



1921 Total. 



-Austria 

Hungary 

Belgium 

Biilparia 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, including Sicily and Sar- 
dinia , 

Netherlands 

Norway , 

Poland 

Portugal, including Cape Verde 
and .\zores Islands , 

Rumania 

Russia , 



9,215 
9,296 
2,399 
1,403 



3,312 



22 
'i'352 



4,811 
7,799l 
12,5921 

49 
3,144 

7 ■■" 



4,907 

481 

26,187 



Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, King- 
dom of 



Spain, including Canary and 

earic Islands 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

Other Europe 



2,762 
6,585 
1,742 



21,562 
14,185 
4,668 
1,007 
1,180 



Total Europe. 



197,919 



China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in .\sia. 
Other Asia 



Total Asia. 



-Mrica 

-Vustralia, Tasmania, and 

Zealand 

Pacific Islands (not specified). 

British North America 

Central America 

Mexico 

South .\merica 

West Indies 

Other countries 



2, 
8,613 

161 
3,543 

234 



15,211 



Grand total. 



934 

1,282 

117 

82,215 

1,252 
12, .340 

3," 
11, 



2,877 
27,034 



33,665 
2,910 
5,191 



3,187 
1,857 
23,974 

34,596 
2,235 
4, 



1,7(8 

4-7 

1,910 

5,250 
944 

2,578 



3,379 

52 



268 

84l 

6,574 

901 

3,426{ 

3,137| 

7561 

8,945' 

l,0fl 

11,981 



4,947 

7,702 

6,166 

585 

40,884 
6,260 
3,795 
9,552 
6,803 

28, 502 



h 



12,259 
^ on 



12,716 



1,222 

19 

1,403 



2,655 

512 

1,717 



10,232 

6,368 

911 

152 

8,354 
5,406 
1,868 
513 
1,463 



4,295 

2,298 

331 

15 



1,573 
2,343 



95,1451 222, 
5,187! 6,493 
4,445 7,423 
4,813 95,089 

19,195 
25,817 



23,536 

23,818 
9,171 
7,106 
6,391 



3,785 
1,933 

27,871 
9,591 
9,347 
1,253, 
l,735l 



,231,595 
83,844 
62, .558 
44,310 

119, 144 
4,551 

148,261 

528,229 



3,555,215 
101,237 
280,603 
99,902 

184,364 

100,201 

2,676,674 

25,424 

121,104 
385,226 
67,, 597 
141,409 



33,431 
,435 
,954 
,757, 



^M35|L_,,.,,, 



31,063! 24,6271 246,2951 652,36413,^ 



2,460| 

8,6801 

1121 

1,670 

282 



2,237 

8,991 

109 

393 

1,026 



1,795| 

10,213i 

130 

43 

520 



13,204 12,756 



1,484 

90 

101,551 

1,135 

18,425 

4,286 

12,027 

31 



298, 682 



566 

1,014 

128 

105,399 

2,073 

6' 931 
15,507 

77 



295,403 



12,701 



925 
165 
32,452 
2,220 
18,524 
3,343 



2,330 
9,432 

300 
5,033 

410 



17,. 505 



46t 



648 

2,066 
119 
90,025 
2,360 
52,361 
4,112 
13,808 
702 



141,132 430,001 



4,009 

7,878 

511 

11,735 



48,799 

236,991 

7,332 

176,915 

18,041 



25, 034 1 488.078 



,301 17,193 



2,191 



72,3171 
2,2541 

30,7.58 
5,0151 

13, 774 1 
130 



27, 184 

2,786 

995,446 

27,806 
299,802 

64,407 
251,987 

35,030 



805,228:16,096,712 

I 



» The totals for Austria and Hungary, respectively, for the 17 years in which they were separated, are 
as follows- Austria, 1,126,805: Hungary, 1,258,906. 

3 The totals for England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, respectively, for the 22 years in which they w ere 
separated, are as follows: England, 681,343; Ireland, 529,411; Scotland, 216,572: Wales, 33,092. 



108 REPOET OF COMMISSIONEK GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV-b. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years 



Race or people. 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 




234 
1,051 
5, 965 

28; 589 
2; 089 
1,046 
1,198 
124 
5,320 
3,463 
3,063 

14,418 
6,763 
7,702 
2,441 

19,507 

147,828 

5,323 

188 

29; 276 
173 

898 

5,264 

7,507 

3,310 

5,801 

1,596 

23,573 

1,977 

333 

1,700 

1,276 

163 

375 

630 


1,104 

561 

746 

2,422 

3,397 

9,014 

1,243 

515 

903 

48 

5,061 

1 427 

2,862 

13,541 

6,275 

6,105 

2,059 

16,658 

69,781 

3,903 

114 

1,990 

11,507 

158 

4 

19,290 

816 

1,352 

5,125 

1,672 

7,257 

1,618 

8,894 

1,834 

305 

1,204 

725 

171 

394 

1,874 

11,873 


926 

521 

943 

2,720 

2,383 

7,133 

1,556 

432 

1,192 

80 

6,508 

1,276 

4,029 

13,303 

8,814 

5, 689 

2,472 

13,431 

41, 772 

4,377 

137 

1,812 

10,533 

210 

1 

16,884 

906 

1,834 

i;719 

5,032 

1,992 

9,259 

2,323 

387 

1,077 

1,058 

195 

388 

806 

20,644 


913 
999 
1,208 
6,472 
2;.716 
13, 735 
2,234 
935 

9,432 
4,219 
3,400 
15,243 
11,134 
6,401 
3,300 
14,209 
62,009 
3,351 
41 
2,430 
18,975 
319 

31,952 

1,388 

5,230 

8,439 

3,838 

8,036 

3,083 

15,561 

2,518 

374 

1,173 

1,633 

255 

344 

862 

25,540 


1,288 

718 

1,149 

7 349 

2,549 

13,963 

1,963 

927 

1,816 

164 

10, 341 

4^148 

4,189 

15,026 

13,323 

7,418 

4,086 

13,006 

96,881 

1,501 

55 

4,141 

17,575 

325 

4 

37,764 

1,747 

5,824 

9,744 

5,521 

10,380 

3,456 

12,526 

2,569 

343 

972 

1,366 

301 

530 

1,113 

15,201 






Bulgarian Ssrbian and Montenegrin 


Chinese. ' 




Cuban 


Dalmatian Bosnian and Herzegovinian 




R ast Indian 


R nglish 




French 




Greek. 


Uebrew 


Irish . . 




Italian (south) 


Japanese . . ... 






Magyar 






Polish 






Russian 

Ruthenian (Russniak) 


Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes, and Swedes) 

Scotch 


Slovak 






Syrian 


Turkish 


Welsh 


West Indian (except Cuban) . 


Other pjoples 








Total 


30o;073 


225,802 


202,436 


295, 666 


333,262 



Alien departures previous to July 1, 1907, were not recorded by race or people. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 
ended June SO, 1908^ to 1921, by races or peoples. 



109 



1913 



1^671 

*676 

871 

13, 525 

2,250 

10,209 

1,204 

S49 

2. 145 

213 

10, 794 

3,053 

4.019 

li;S71 

31,556 

4"45S 

10, 995 

79, 057 

733 

44 

3,276 

11,496 

910 

4 

24, 107 

1,583 

3,156 

10, .548 

5,327 

9,291 

4,118 

9,854 

3,181 ! 

457 

1,297 

'298 

5S4 

1,118 

19,838 

308, 190 



1,805 
1,250 
1,011 
5.780 
2,059 

14,440 

947 

878 

2,252 

143 

11,187 
2,941 
2,930 

11,977 

11,266 



12,663 

72, 767 

794 

43 

5,522 

14,254 

1,670 

2 

35,028 

1,848 

3,837 

17, 491 

5,049 

8,073 

3,923 

11,786 

3,214 

542 

1,200 



677 
1,470 
17,819 



1,644 

444 

219 

2,354 

1,959 

2,381 

2,536 

105 

1.340 

162 

10,372 

845 

i2'749 
9,767 
1,524 
2,948 
7,539 
89,969 
825 
47 

2,262 
573 

7,912 
2,526 

899 
11,256 

860 
3,473 
2,714 
1,398 
4,347 

560 



1,684 

659 

42 

290 

2, 148 

76 

1,454 

4 

742 

91 

7,826 

543 

2,297 

873 

4,855 

199 

1,851 

4,020 

68,981 

780 

29 

394 

559 

3 

358 

2,185 

138 

4,716 

17 

3,954 

2,096 

74 

2,792 

516 

120 

41 

214 



10,744 
129,765 



1917 



1,497 

133 

59 

325 

1,799 

24 

2,395 

6 

742 

136 

6,316 

1,256 

2, 829 

767 

2,082 

329 

1,736 

3,478 

10,016 

722 

45 

38 

123 

759 

4 

119 

1,313 

61 

6,393 

21 

4,550 

1,618 

34 

3,524 

612 

110 

54 

130 

520 

504 



1918 1919 



1,291 

1,238 

455 

918 

2,239 

31 

1,141 

13 

698 

154 

12, 810 

1,596 

5,427 

563 

2,952 

687 

3,071 

1,041 

8,135 

1,558 

77 

45 

41 

25,084 

6 

1,035 

2,016 

61 

4,926 

25 

4,665 

3,307 

453 

4,182 



58 

263 

426 

1,001 



976 

11 

412 

3,241 

2,062 

154 

898 

2 

1,356 

106 

9,406 

497 

5,472 

343 

15,562 

373 

1,934 

1,195 

36,980 

2,127 

23 

6 

10 

17, 793 

2 

153 

3,525 



1,717 

2 

4,865 

1,687 
1,150 



1921 



1,275 

584 

2.59 

23,844 

2,961 

7,481 

1,598 

1,533 

3,016 

162 

11,659 

1,447 

7,026 

4,178 

20, 319 

358 

4, 635 

8, 159 

80, 955 

4,238 

14 



4,859 
21,490 
1,151 



8,246 
2,577 
11,568 
5,144 
1,126 
1,652 
1,340 
195 
626 
1,802 



1,807 

605 

564 

9,940 

5,253 

3,306 

1,059 

909 

2,405 

137 

11,622 

2,480 

3,836 

6,770 

13,470 

483 

2,535 

11,447 

37,032 

4,352 

33 

4,507 

12,457 

5,519 

42,207 

5,144 

8,603 

11,085 

465 

6,944 

2,027 

17,625 

4,961 

1,536 

1,599 

713 

167 

656 

1,457 



18,770 

8,633 

8,989 

85, 145 

37,673 

110, 536 

22,377 

8,154 

21,494 

1,795 

128, 6.54 

29, 191 

57, 178 

111,622 

158,138 

50,791 

42,215 

137,348 

902,163 

34,584 

890 

28, 890 

143, 522 

60, 464 

47 

281,928 

30,754 

57, 809 

105,780 

28,519 

90, 567 

35,812 

123, 755 

50, 055 

8,626 

12,329 

10,934 

3,156 

6,939 

14, 152 

147,645 



110 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV-c. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal 



Austria 

Hungar>' 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Finland 

France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Poland 

Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azores Isli 

Rumania 

Russia 

Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, Kingdom of 

Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands. . 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

Other E urope 



64,607 

65,590 

853 

3,280 



27,782 

21,631 

431 

1,594 



460 



26,424 

20,866 

655 

1,566 



45, IGO 
41, 182 
1,017 
3,154 



433 ! 



■169 



46, 137 
42,123 
1,103 
3,577 



665 



3, 107 
6,770 
6, 131 
166,733 
330 
2,275 



2,817 
4,905 



4,025 
6,216 
8,144 
52,323 
463 
1,028 



3,148 
6,042 
9,376 
72,640 
461 
1,400 



3,473 
5,785 
11,461 
108,388 
564 
2,310 



Total Europe. 



China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia. 
Other Asia 



Total Asia . 



Africa 

Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand . 

Pacific Islands, not specified 

British North .'Vmerica 

Central America 

Mexico 

South America 

West Indies 

Other countries 



Grand total . 



'See footnote Table III. 



1,056 
1,267 
37,777 



1,116 

2, 574 

684 

3,084 

5,019 
2,023 
1,499 I 



1,025 

434 

19,707 



1, 082 

445 

17,362 



1,079 

1,159 

658 

1,267 

3,076 

1,380 

743 

51 



1,463 

1,006 

759 

4,554 

1,7M 

1,099 

84 

16 



376,566 I 180,747 153,755 



3,923 
3,431 

128 
1,847 

221 



9,550 



3,411 

3,819 

48 

1,650 

205 



2,371 

4,366 

09 

1,548 

160 



9,133 



,514 



225,802 



215 

345 

31 

34, 194 



1,073 

3,519 

37 



1,459 

669 

27,053 



1,396 

1,615 

667 

5,441 

1,984 

1,528 

145 

10 



2,762 
3,354 



8,172 



275 

474 

30 

49,373 

347 

463 

1,183 

4,584 

61 



295,666 



1,916 

550 

31,681 



1,581 

2,490 

510 

5,926 

6,700 

3,082 

2,195 

185 

22 



2,609 
1,485 



1,551 
104 



5,931 



266 

645 

43 

33,506 

328 

605 

1,319 

4,864 

31 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. Ill 
nrs ended June SO, 1908 to 1921, by countries.^ 



1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


Total. 


28,760 


35,013 


6,776 


230 


126 


5 


201 


2,274 


1,399 


284,894 


29,904 


39,987 


5,059 


592 


112 


1 


100 


14,233 


12, 153 


293, 833 


803 


1,149 


333 


24 


15 


41 


634 


1,846 


1,430 


10,334 


9,664 


2,553 


1,964 


250 


191 


700 


2,891 


3,587 
11, 147 


2,923 
15,452 


37,894 
26,599 


608 


629 


412 


513 


489 


304 


599 


1,477 
1,473 


922 
2,386 


8,669 
3,859 


3,430 


2,927 


5,751 


2,231 


2,064 


3,176 


3,792 


4,477 


3,026 


47,444 


4,759 


5,136 


1,419 


439 


315 


28 


26 


3,069 


5,263 


50, 172 


30,603 


11, 124 


9,775 


4,829 


2,034 


2,986 


15, 482 


20, 314 


13,423 


151,288 


SS,02I 


84,351 


96,903 


72, 507 


12,542 


8; 645 


38,245 


88,909 


48, 192 


1,021,699 


599 


690 


612 


351 


227 


139 


596 


1,017 


849 


7,206 


1,710 


2,797 


1,211 


1,359 


1,633 


1,730 


1,952 


3,022 
18, 190 
4,728 


2,406 
42,572 
5,167 


26, 161 
60,762 
32,286 


1,965 


2,055 


2,661 


2,396 


1,353 


1,976 


3,447 


319 


348 


244 


49 


16 


7 


39 


21,506 


9,297 


35, 190 


26,923 


47,451 


18,297 




5,947 


4,983 


1,868 


1,933 

28,474 
3,841 


15,229 
13, 034 
3,966 


264,470 
41, 508 


2,029 


2,254 


3,042 


1,816 


2,491 


3,250 


6,280 


35,604 


1,989 


2.240 


953 


1,412 


969 


1,169 


1,738 


3,109 


2,913 


25,336 


449 


432 


349 


201 


159 


172 


403 


1,103 


900 


7 446 


4,809 


2,528 


164 


18 


24 


24 


47 


1,812 


405 


26,784 


5,%9 


7,275 


7,715 


5,130 


2,798 


1,239 


4,482 


8,099 


7,839 


75,336 


2,894 


3,632 


2,218 


1,304 


1,027 


280 




3,735 


1,905 


28,206 


2,179 


2,464 


1,847 


1,332 


678 


141 


569 


1,488 


1,187 


18,949 


157 


234 


169 


118 




24 


54 


141 


180 


1698 


16 


26 


80 


49 


88 


480 


98 


1,429 


827 


3,152 


248, 559 


257,295 


167,954 


102,409 


35,367 


31, 500 


84, 531 


256,433 


215,245 


2,626,779 


2,303 


2,112 


2,011 


2,203 


1,871 


2,352 


2,199 


3,102 


5,451 


38,680 


731 


756 


840 


770 


750 


1,583 


2,195 


4,249 


4,375 


32,704 


240 


164 


179 


123 


176 


229 


161 


189 


281 


2,261 


1,313 


2, 243 


593 


14 


8 


5 


26 


1,731 


2,534 


16,968 


103 


167 


214 


867 


■ 356 


212 


79 


170 


246 


3,163 


4,690 


5,442 


3,837 


3,977 


3,161 


4,381 


4,660 


9,441 


12, 887 


83,776 


209 


196 


85 


93 


108 


100 


74 


121 


197 


2,212 


645 


745 


608 


445 


382 


36 


362 


490 


742 


6,602 


29 


30 


17 


10 


35 


418 


19 


29 


50 


812 


46,981 


31,818 


23, 225 


15, 712 


18,994 


27, 170 


10, 726 


7,668 


5,456 


337,930 


482 


437 


436 


495 


530 


489 


413 


602 


703 


6,459 


991 


1,724 


651 


532 


812 


25, 515 


18,000 


6,606 


5,705 


62,551 


1,367 


1,376 


988 


997 


993 


1,071 


914 


1,398 


1,647 


16, 131 


4,223 


4,237 


6,243 


5,059 


5,891 


3 891 


3,806 


5,502 


5,050 


64,422 


14 


38 


30 


36 


4 


14 


17 


25 


36 


349 


308, 190 


303,338 


204,074 


129,765 


66,277 


94, 585 


123,522 


288,315 


247,718 


3,218,023 



112 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 
Table XV. — Total immigration each year, 1820 to 1921,. 



Period. 


Number. 


Period. 


Numher. 


Year ended Sept 


30- 




8,385 

9,127 

6,911 

6,354 

7,912 

10. 199 

10, 837 

18,875 

27,382 

22,520 

23,322 

22,6.33 

60,482 

58,640 
65,365 
45, .374 
76,242 
79, 340 
38,914 
68,069 
84,066 
80,289 , 
104,565 
52,496 i 

78,615 ' 
114,371 ! 
154,416 
234,968 
226,527 , 
297,024 1 
310,004 

59,976 

379,466 
371,603 
368,645 i 
427,833 1 
200,877 
195,857 
112, 123 '< 

191,942 
129,571 
133, 143 
H2,877 ' 
72,183 
132,925 
191,114 
180,3.39 
332,577 
303,104 
282,189 
352,768 


Year ended June 30— Continued. 
1870 


387,203 
321, 350 




1871 


1822 


1872 






404, 806 


1823 


1873 






459,803 
313, 339 




1 1874 






1825 


1875 ■ 






227, 498 




1 1876 


169, 986 


1827 


I 1877. 


141, 857 


1828 


1 1878 


138,469 




1879. 


177,826 
457, 257 


1830 


1880 




1881 


669, 431 


Oct 1 1831 to Deo. 31. 1832 


1882 


788,992 
603, 322 


Year ended Dec. 


31- 




1883 


1833 


1884 


518,592 


1834 


1885 


395,346 


1835 


1886. 


334,203 
490, 109 


1836 


1887 


1837 




546, 889 


183S 


1889 


444,427 
455,302 
560,319 
579,663 
439,730 
285,631 


1839 


1890. ... 


1840 


1891 


1841 


1892 


1842 


1893 


.Ian. 1 to Sept. 30, 


1843 




1894 




30— 




1895 


258, 536 


1844 


1896 


343,267 


1845 


1897 


230,832 
229,299 
311,715 
448 572 


1846 




1847 


1899 


1848 


1900 


1849 


1901. ... 






487,918 
648 743 


1850 


1902 






Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 


1850 




1903 






857,046 
812,870 


year ended Dec. : 


1- 




1904 






1S51 








1,026,499 










1853 


1907 






1,285,349 
782,870 
751,786 


1854 


1908 






1855 


1909 






1856 1 


1910 






1,041 570 




1857 




1911 






878, 587 


Year ended June 


50- 




1912 






838, 172 


1858 


1913 






1,197 892 


18.59 








1, 218, 480 

- 326,700 

298, 826 


1860 








1861 


1916 






1862 




295,403 
110,618 


1863 


1918 


1864 ; 




1865 


1920 


4.30,001 
805,228 


1866 




1867 


Total 




1868 


34 435 332 


1869 










Table XV-a.- 


—Net increase of pojmlation 
years ended June 


by arrival and departure of ah 
SO, 1908 to 1921. 


ens, fiscal 






Admitted. 




1 


Departed. 








Iminigrant. 


Nonimmi- 
grant. 


Total. 


Emigrant. 

1 


Nonemi- 
grant. 


Total. 


Increase. 




782,870 

751,786 

1,041,570 

878,587 

838, 172 

1,197,892 

1,218,480 

326,700 

298,826 

295,403 

110,618 

141, 132 

430,001 

805,228 


141,825 
192,449 
156,467 
151,713 
178,983 
229, 335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 
95,889 
191,575 
172,935 


924,69 

944,23 

1,198,03 

1,030,30 

1,017,15 

1,427,22 

1,103,08 

434,24 

366,74 

362,87 

211,85 

237,02 

621,57 

978, 16 


5 395,073 
5 1 225,802 
7 202,436 

295,666 

5 333,262 

7 308,190 

1 : 303,338 
1 204,074 

8 : 129,765 
7 ' 66,277 
3 94,585 
1 123, 522 

6 288,315 
3 247,718 


319,755 
174,590 
177,982 
222, 549 
282,030 
303,734 
330, 467 
180, 100 
111,042 
80,102 
98 683 
92,709 
139,747 
178,313 


714,828 
400,392 
380,418 
518,215 
615,292 
611,924 
633,805 
384, 174 
240,807 
146,379 
193,268 
216,231 
428, 0C2 
426,031 




1909 - - 


543 843 






1911 . . . 


512,085 
401,863 




1913 


815,303 
769,276 


1914 




50,070 
125, 941 


1916 


1917 


216, 498 




18,585 


1919 


20,790 
193 514- 


1920 




552, 132 






Total. 


9,117,265 


2,039,947 


11,1.57,21 


2 , 3,218,023 


2,691,803 


5,909,826 1 


5,247,386 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 113 



1 


Coming 

in 
conse- 
quence 

of 
adver- 
tise- 
ments. 


















As- 
sisted 
aliens. 


"5 






: '- 






2 l^oo 


:ig^-« : 


1, il|i 


= " 1 


"* 


- 


s^^essssss" 


Pro- 
fes- 
sional 
beg- 
gars. 


'^ 












<N • .00 


;-HC» ;-. ; 


Pau- 
pers. 












; ;CO ; 




Likely 
to be- 
come 

a 
public 
charge. 


S^ 2 SS S3 -g-gSSIgllggSS 


Chron- 
ic 
alco- 
hol- 
ism. 














M .rH . 


: i"^ • : : : 


Surgeon's 
certificate 
of physical 

defect 
which may 
affect 
alien's 
ability 
to earn a 
living, 
other than 
loath- 
some or 
dangerous 
contagious 
diseases 
or non- 
contagious 
tuber- 
culosis. 

10 
5 


t^.-i m 






^•"?:2SSgS| : : 


II 

i ^ 


2 

O 


00 oo 


-5 ■" 




CO -^ O -H TJ. CO O «0 CO lO CO (N '■ 


1 


: 


"* 








: : : ; : ;'*o»-"-i=o ; ; 


^1 


j 


3 


"S *^ 




: :«-! :■«.■* to '^^''g'-'' • 


Tuber- 
culosis 
(conta- 
gious). 


"^ 




M 


. r-lt-l . 


. ;M |CO«Oe 


ocor^ -o • • 


Tuber- 
cu- 
losis 
(non- 
conta- 
gious). 










■* : 


::■"'::: 




Surgeon's 
certiflcateof 
mental de- 
fect which 
may affect 

alien's 
ability to 
earn a liv- 
ing, other 
than idiots, 
imbeciles, 
feeble- 
minded, 
epileptics, 
insanity, 
or consti- 
tutional 
psycho- 
pathic 
inferiority. 












i i"^ :"* : 


• -i-i -co • • 


Con- 
stitu- 
tional 
psy- 
cho- 
pathic 
infe- 
rior- 
ity. 








-" • 




•0 jcj :.Hcoe 


^^CO ; ; I : 


Epi- 
lep- 
tics. 


'^ 






: -" 




j ;,H jco ; 


■^'^ l^ : : 


In- 
sane 

or 
have 
been 

in- 
sane. 


<N 






■^ -^ 




-( •C^i-^00-<)'C^IOOJCOCO "-H 


1 Hii 


^-. ; 








'. [o ieort- 


Hooioeo^ '• I 


Im- 
beciles. 










" : 


[ jto [^ '•- 


^^r^r^t, : : 


Idiots. 












: : ; '.'^ : 


jco ::.»;: 


1 


> Race or people. 


1 


ii; 

•a : 

i p 

II 

m 


If 
ft 


U i 

JO c 


;.fi 

:w o- 

i 


East Indian 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 


Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 

Japanese 

Lithuanian 



70112—21- 



114 



EEPORT (JF COMMISSIONER (GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 


Coming 

conse- 
quence 

of 
adver- 
tise- 
ments. 


























<. 
















As- 
sisted 
aliens 


^^c. 






" -2 


00 


^ 










2 


-- 


llli , 


coTOiraiONOO ocoiNcoMMco-a> 






i 


Pro- 
fes- 
sional 
beg- 
gars. 
















(N-. 




-^ 






— 


o 


S 




Pau- 
pers. 


































« 




Likely 
to be- 
come 

public 
charge. 


s?sgssss gs^il^jS'-g? --'g 


■o 


Chron- 
ic 
alco- 
hol- 
ism. 






































« 




Surgeon's 
certificate 

which may 
aflect 
alien's 
ability 
to earn a 
living, 
other than 
loath- 
some or 
dangerous 
contagious 
diseases 
or non- 
contagious 
tuber- 
culosis. 

5 

27 
3 
6 
2 
2 


o^^grj 






i 




II 
g| 

<B-2 

1' 


Others. 


•^S^S-"- 


CiTOQCLOK 




(N -v 


$ 




1 


-HN-. 












"^ 




IN 










g 


- 


Tra- 
choma. 




g«=°- 


N 




=^" 


M 






^ 


g 


Tuber- 
culosis 
(conta- 
gious). 


-H« — 


" 




MMCO.-I 














s 




Tuber- 
cu- 
losis 
(non- 
conta- 
gious). 










"^ 










'"' 














rj. 




Surgeon's 
certificateof 
mental de- 
fect which 
may affect 

alien's 
ability to 
earn a liv- 
ing, other 
than idiots, 
imbeciles, 
feeble- 
minded, 
epileptics, 
insanity, 
or consti- 
tutional 
psycho- 
pathic 
inferiority. 
































2 




Con- 
stitu- 
tional 
psy- 
cho- 
pathic 
infe- 
rior- 
ity. 




«-< 








nrr 














"^ 


S 




Epi- 
lep- 
tics. 




C« 
































;3 




In- 
sane 

or 
have 
been 

in- 
sane. 


^-HCO 




^^„^ 


-' 


-^ 


'^ 


§ 




Fee- 

ble- 

mind- 

ed. 


MC* 












lo 


















S . 


- 


4- 






n^ 








NN 
















" 


Idiots. 




















""" 














o 






1 


1 


C 

i 
1 


I 


i 
1 




1 


1 

"E 
1 
a. 


III 


C 


1 


1 

I 


1 

B 

< 

1 


1 
7- 


1 


1 


1 


1 

1 
5 




1 


S 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAI OF IMMIGRATION. 115 



De- 
barred 
from 
Philip- 
pine 
Islands. 










1 












in 


































Total 
de- 
barred. 


|§ S g| SS 2SS§2pSSJS:|'^§S|-Sgg 


<°s 




























CO 




















(N 




EX. 

ceed- 

ed 

quota, 

act 

of 

May 

19, 

1921. 


























" 


























With, 
out 
prop- 
er 
pass- 
port 
under 
State 
De- 
part- 
ment 
regu- 
la- 
tions. 

1 
1 


^M to 


N.-.-CO 


cooc<2'^j:;5;^'-'" 






■WIN 


Under 

last 
pro- 
viso 
sec- 
tion 
23. 






-" 


-co 










tO'T 


M. 


CO» 






-" 


IN 




Under 
provi- 
sions 
Chi- 
nese 
exclu- 
sion 
act. 










S 












































Under 

pass- 
port 
provi- 
sion, 
sec- 
tion 3. 








CO 


tO-H 


M 




to -ICO 


-a>g 








iNiO ; 


Geograph- 

Icllly 
excluded 

classes. 

(Natives 
of that 
portion 
of Asia 

and 
islands 

adjacent 
thereto 

described 
in sec- 
tion 3.) 

1 
















































Unable 
to read 
(over IC) 
years of 
age). 

64 
15 

25 
17 


'^g5''S-|S?gS:5^|"'°='"S5 


3g?j 


Had 
been 

ported 

within 

one 

year. 


■* 


















e» 




lO 












cN-^ : 


Aliens 

who 

procure 

or 
attempt 
to bring 

in 
prosti- 
tutes or 
females 
for any 
immoral 
purpose. 


















0= — to -H -.< rt IC 








^ 






Aliens 
who 
are 
sup- 
ported 
by or 
receive 
pro- 
ceeds 

of 
prosti- 
tution. 






















CO 


N 






M 




■ 














Prosti- 
tutes 
and 
aliens 
coming 
for any 

im- 
moral 
pur- 
pose. 


«5 








(N-H 


'-' 


2-2 




-HCO 


IN,^ 




s? 


■^ 


"^ 


Anarch- 
ists or 
aliens, 
enter- 
taining, 
or affili- 
ated 
with an 

advo- 
cating, 
anarch- 
istic 
beliefs. 
























































Polyga- 
mists. 




















" 


















<N 




(N 








Crim- 
inals. 


00 


— ^ 


M 




«5 


S'^s?-' 


-Ht^ 


t~-H 




5 


•<r 


IN 


Under 

16 
years 
of age 
unac- 
com- 
panied 
by 
par- 
ent. 


2 










■^ 






^-u,co«c. 


^ 






s 


coro '• 


Ac- 
com- 
pany- 

ing 
aliens 
(under 
sec- 
tion 
18). 


.. 








« 






2 


»M^-HC»C02 


-«g 


-V 


'^ 




Race or people. 


1 

i 


'1 
1 


1 

a. 2 
Is 


a c 

i 


j 


4 

CO 

■a 
§ 

5 


c 

1 

C 


is 


i 


c 

c 

1 

i 


1 
1 




•g 


c 


1 


1 

1 


.c 


c 


J 

.2 




1 


> 


J 

:5 


1 


P-. 


^ 


.1 



116 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 






COtO-H 00-Hr 



iilsiSlisllfei 



iH: 



|llli|i 



a o o -Q Q) « .2 ' 



a « 2 S.2 I o 



= v- o.-. =9r 






<C«5 0>01 



a-g' 



;S|is|s.SoS|2|| 






as 



llllis 



ilW 









r^^iiF^^ 












Sg : : :^ 



=3-2 & 






r 



t 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 117 



! 




As- 
sisted 
aUens. 

23 




"^ 




"g 


g 


IN 


s 




05 


^ 


2 






s 


^ 


w2 


Sg 


i 


i 


S 


|gS§§ 




III i iS§ig§5gsBg|g|iSSgg^^^^ 




«piiiitiimis 




















































22SS 




silii 




















































S*g?3 


^ 1 






















































'^ 




(N 


^1 




















































CM 


M : 


P"' 


































SS°'°'S225??S2°'"^S5 


1 


a 
1 

1 




-i i-l(M .-( CA (M IN (N CO lO Ml t~ t^ to CO •<)• >0 IN 00 t^ in >0 O t~ CS T)< lO lO 




















































2^2""= 


i 
















































■| 


lllllllllilliiil 














































isiiSli 






goSS 




i 


































tDooiomioc^'a'i-icct't-co-^'* 


< 


fiPil#f|H|i 














































g^«o»o.«3 




















































"SKSS 


> 

X 


. I'll 
































SggS§g?5^^i5SS2SS 


1 

e3 


'Siii 


^ 


2^32S2?5g3?S§|gg2i52SS^BS""^" 


Bii 
































S22§§§iiii2a5» 




u 
































5^SS5Sgf3E:;2"'^SS 




i ! 

1 1 


^„^^^^^^^^^^g^ggo«ojjo=oS«"«».''-'<»2 




fl 








-oe 3xmr papng jb9a 




1 


i 


i 


i 


1 


i 


1 


i 


1 


i 




i 


1 


1 


i 


i 


c 


5 


5 


5 


a 


5 


2 


5 


5 


nil 



118 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



5 

1 

! 


li 
Si 
II 


By 

United 
States 
mar- 
shals. 


1 : : :-§§i§ilSlgssiSiii»|2S2-- 


S2S 










: :gSS2^355 


1* 


sS5g§iSi 


356 
363 
465 
547 
779 
845 
676 
995 
069 
124 
695 
788 
456 
461 
610 
435 
590 
771 
551 
021 
751 
517 


CJC^C^llNC^MTj-MC^rtr-imN-S. J 


1 




sii§gsifi§siiiiii5ii8iis§iiigs 


(Nrt— IWCM^OOCO-^M^OOt^—ilMCOOO^N tO Oi M •*"» «> t~ GO -< « 


III 








: : :==?§-'" 


With- 
out 
proper 
pass- 
port 
under 
State 

Depart- 
ment 

regula- 
tions. 










Mg 


«W Imml 








1 1"^ 


puh 










"gJS 




i •; ■; i :iH§i^2|||g2^gs|sg 


^'«|n£-i"-B'^ 




;•:::;: :§gs3S?5SSgi8S$SSS88 










1 1 iijiii 


AUens 

who 

procure or 

attempt to 

bring in 
prostitutes 

and 

females for 

any 

immoral 

purpose. 




: : i |«-«^c5Sg2SSSgSgSSSS 








->Or--,.u:t~OTa5 ; 


■^oo 


Prosti- 
tutes 
and 
aliens 
coming 
for any 

im- 
moral 
pur- 
pose. 


° :" i i : : 


-""2-S;g2g^2S|5|||2SS5S 






; : : j^^,-. )c^ 


o j(NN 


-lO ''r^co 


N ;- 


21 




: : :- ;""=2^Si|5^§S2^^^^'-3 




ggooM. :-.^.cc 


--^^"^ii^giliiggigssig 


Un- 
der 16 
years 
of age 
unac- 
com- 
panied 
by 
par- 
ent. 


M N M i i^§iiiis§igi§si 






M i M igssiai^giissgsgg 


li 






■ : : '^'■=^'~ 


Year 

ended 

June 30- 


I'i'iiddii 


iiiiiiiiii 


O-h'c^'m 


Th'-o'coVodc 


»'2z^' 


2222222S222S 1 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 119 

Table XVI-b. — Permanent residents of contiguous foreign territory applying for tem- 
porary sojourn i?i the United States refused adm.ission, fiscal year ended Jiine SO, 1921, 
by causes. 



Canadian Mexican Ai„ska Tofal 
! border. 1 border. -*'asKa. lotai. 



Idiots 

Imbeciles 

Feeble-minded 

Epileptics 

Insane persons 

Constitutional psychopathic inferiority 

Tuberculosis (noncontagious) 

Loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases 

Professional beggars 

Paupers, or likely to become public charges 

Surgeon s certificate 

Chronic alcoholism 

Contract laborers 

Accompanying aliens (under sec. 18) 

Under 16 years of age and unaccompanied by parent 

Assisted aliens 

Criminals 

Anarchists 

Prostitutes and females coming for any immoral purpose 

Aliens who are supported by or receive proceeds of prostitution. 
Aliens who procure or attempt to bring in prostitutes and fe- 
males for any immoral purpose 

Unable to read (oyer 16 years of age) 

Geographically excluded 

Under passport provision, section 3 

Under pro^•isions Chinese-exclusion act 

Under provisions of section 23 



Total. 



2 . 
2 

16 I 
11 

20, 
22 

6 '. 
105 1 



2 
3 

18 

13 

22 

25 

6 

267 

1 

3,588 

195 

4 

282 

116 



42 

1,290 

11 

13 

20 

6,341 



120 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 

p< 

i 

a 
1 


§ 

■s 

1 


jc sassBp 


•^j»n9;o9nnj 
pgpnioxa ;o sj9qni9ni ibjox 


S 


« 00 ««»« c^g^ggggg 


•(93b ;o sivsA. 9t j3ao) peaj o% eiqcnxi 


S 




j <N(NN j ; j^t- 


JwN : 


•g uoijoesjo noiSTAOJd jjodssed japun 












•(e noijoas m paquosgp oiajam ^naoBf : 
-pe spueisi puE Bisv JO uoiiJod jeqj jo : 
s.3Anra) sassBp papnpxa XnBoiqdcjgoaD : 






! • '. I"^ ■ 




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ma£ T niqjm sajeig pajran 9q» p9J9»na 


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0} p9jdni9ijB JO p9jnoojd oqA sn9iiv • 




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JO sp9900jd 9qi P9AI909J JO iq p9?J0ddng 










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III 

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Cuban 

Dahnatian, Bosnian, and Her- 

zegovinian 

Dutch and Flemish 

Eastlndian 

EngUsh 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 121 



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122 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•spneisi auiddinqj tnoj; paijodaa 



•po^jodap (cjoj pncjo 



•jitnji 9UIT} jnomiM lejox 



S : ^"^ IS-^SSS 



•Xjjuo oj joud siBniuiiJO 



•(AJJU9 jajjc aran Xue panjnitnoD atniio joj 
pouad jBinnis jo; aono u^^i aaotn paoua^aas 
JO 'si^sB/i g uiqim pawrannoo atniia jo; ajoui 
JO jBa^ I JOJ paona^nas) ^jj^na ja^jB sieinnnj-j 



Xjjua ja};e siSTqojeuv 



•f- no^oas 
JO uojjciotA JOJ panosTjdtnj puB pajoiAUoo 



■sasodjnd iBJonnni jamo jo 
uoijnjijsojd joj noi^Bjjodnii jo uoi}n}T:>sojd 
jo ssamsnq am qjUY pa^oauiioo uaa'q SinAEq 
SB JO jajnoojd b jo ajnjijsojd b sb pajjodap 
uaaq gniABq ja^jB sa^E^g pa^pifi am m ptmo j 



•sainjijsojd jiq pa^uanbajj in'^niiq^ 
aoBid jaq;o io uoTjn;ijsojd jo asnoq q;m 
pa^oamioo jo uoi^njiitsojd jo spaaaojd saAiaoaa 



sajrunsojd iaa:jojd oj sasiraojd jo sjoajojd 
JO 'sjisTSSB JO 'jjodini o^ s'^dmaj^B jo s^jodmi 



•noijnij^sojd 
JO sasnoii jo sajBunn jo A^ua jajjB sajini}soj<i 



lO-HN^ 



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uoijBjJodaa •siBiDijjo noi}Bj3nnini iq ' pajBuSisap i 
ion aoBid jo anin" ^b jo 'uoipadsm ^noq^iAv pa"ja;n^| 



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-asamqo jo uojibiota uf sajB^g pajran aqi ui 



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noiiBj3rarniT JO uoiibioia m sajBjg pairafi aqj nj 



sasnBO joijd mojj saSjBqo ojiqnd ibjox 



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• ^jniBsni 



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NN -Ol* 



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RKPORT OF C'OMAnSSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 123 















: 








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124 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•lejox 


1 1? 


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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 125 



•mox 


7,422 

1,610 

1,544 

100 


533 

94 

3,541 

147 


« C*<D 


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S *-- : 


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= "r 


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2 " : : 


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4,459 

995 
1,486 
75 
478 
88 
1,337 

124 

28 


o 


a 

1 


1 

i 
S 

< 


Disposition on appeal: 

Admitted without bond 

Admitted on public-charge bond 

Admitted temporarily without bond 


i '. '. '. 

i : : : 
s : : 

i-^ if i 

!1 iS ; 

§ ;S : 

m 


IS 1 

11 





126 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table XIX. — Deserting alien seamen, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, hy ports. 



New York 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md 

Portland, Me 

Norfolk, Va 

Savannah, Ga 

Miami, Fla 

Key West, Fla... 
Charleston, S. C 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Brunswick, Ga... 

Tampa, Fla 

Pensacola, Fla 

Mobile, Ala 



8,149 

779 

1,388 

1,794 

121 

4,234 

202 

3 

37 

197 

87 

15 

196 

129 

165 



New Orleans, La 1, 406 



Galveston, Tex 


. . 1, 286 


Port Arthur, Tex 


493 


Gulfport Miss. 


88 


Pascacoula Miss 


21 


Fernandina, Fla 


58 


San Francisco, Calif 


842 


Portland, Oreg 


90 


Seattle, Wash 


28 


Mexican border seaports 


14 


Alaska 


2 


San Juan, P. R 


15 



Total. 



21, 839 



Table XX. — Alien stowaways found on board vessels arriving at ports of the United 
States, fiscai year ended June 30, 1921, by ports. 



New York, N. Y.... 

Boston, Mass 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 

Baltimore, Md 

Portland, Me 

New Bedford, Mass. 
Providence, R. I — 

Norfolk, Va 

Savannah, Ga 

Tampa, Fla 

Charleston, S. C... 

Miami, Fla.l 

Key West, Fla 

Fernandina, Fla . . . 
Jacksonville, Fla... 



1,545 

184 

211 

245 

10 

35 

4 

444 

17 

11 

50 

2 

16 

5 

13 



Pensacola, Fla 

Brunswick, Ga 

Mobile, Ala 

New Orleans, La 

Galveston, Tex 

Port Arthur, Tex 

Pascagoula, Miss 

Gulfport, Miss 

San Francisco, Calif 

Seattle, Wash 

Mexican border seaports. 
San Juan, P. R 



Total. 



17 

1 

37 

215 

97 

29 

3 

1 

279 

51 

16 

1 

3,539 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 127 

Tabi.k XXI. — Comparison between alien arrivals and head-tax settlements, fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1921 . 

Imini,2;rant aliens admitted 805, 228 

Noniiumigrant aliens admitted 172, 935 

Aliens debarred 13, 779 

Aliens from Porto Rico, Hawaii, Virgin Islands, Philippine 

Islands, and mainland 4, 694 

Died 100 

Erroneous head-tax collections 3, 042 

Head-tax payments pendin^: from preWous vear 82, 484 

1,082,262 

Exempt from head-tax payments, as follows: 

In transit (groups) 2, 341 

Other transits (includes 17,907 Chinese in transit under bond 

across land territory of the United States) 49, 316 

One-year residents of British North America, Mexico, and 

Cuba, coming for temporary stay 6, 220 

Domiciled aliens returning (rule 1, subd. 3 (d), (e), and (h)) . 34, 905 

Government officials 2, 983 

Alien residents of the Philippine or Virgin Islands 196 

Aliens from Porto Rico and Hawaii who reached said islands 

prior to July 1, 1907, or subsequent to May 1, 1917 1, 674 

Aliens from the mainland 1, 836 

Under 16 years of age, accompanied by parents 143, 681 

Exemptions on account of aliens debarred 12, 225 

Citizens erroneously manifested 2, 342 

Returned alien soldiers (public resolution No. 44) 3, 432 

Deserting alien seamen (not apprehended at end of 60 days, 

put in statistics) 6, 006 

Total 267, 157 

Head -tax payments pending at close of year 102, 345 

; 369,502 

Aliens on whom head tax was paid ' 712, 760 

Amount of head tax collected during year $5, 697, 528 

> 1,138 aliens were taxed at 44 each and 7U,622 at $8 each. 



128 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

TaBle XXII. — Aliens admitted in continental United States from insular United States, 
during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 1921, inclusive," by ports. 







Num- 
ber. 


Year of arrival. 




1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


New York NY 


10,876 

1 
2 

\ 

15 

6? 

8 
20,806 

7^ 
1,408 

11 


440 


423 


579 


616 


548 


610 


694 


756 






Baltimore, Md 

Newport News, Va 

Norfolk, Va 

r,har1p<!ton S f! 




































































Jacksonville, Fla 

New Orleans, La 






















2 


2 


3 


7 


11 
3 

2,268 


12 


12 


San Francisco, Calif 

Portland, Oreg 




912 


896 


1,591 


1,076 


1,402 


2,595 


1,610 


6 


7 


17 
9 


28 
63 


99 
24 


460 
59 


14 
36 


10 






40 






























9 






















Total 


33,962 


1,358 


1,328 


2,198 


1,786 


2,080 


3,411 


3,351 


2,437 




Year of arrival. 


From 
Ha- 
waii. 


From 
Porto 
Rico. 


From 
PhiUp- 

pine 
Is- 
lands. 


From 
Vir- 


Port. 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


lands. 


New York, N. Y 


726 


1,138 


• 
1,285 


909 


1,058 

1 


1,094 
2 


2 

1 


10,316 




558 




















2 








1 
2 
15 












1 


Norfolk Va 






2 








2 
15 

2 
61 

8 


2 


























2 

"■935' 

2 

19 

179 

5 












10 






1 

3 

814 

1 

50 
616 

1 
1 


1 

1 

1,384 

...... 

123 
3 

1 


26,"292" 

5 

130 

1,281 

8 

10 








1 
1,824 
1 
4 
63 


■i,'826" 

2 

3 

134 








1,673 


514 






1 


Seattle, Wash 


2i 
62 




622 
127 

1 
1 




Canadian Pacific ports 
























Xotal 


2,492 


3,031 


3,268 


2,398 


2,201 


2,623 


21,729 


10,404 


1,267 


562 







REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL 0¥ IMMIGRATION. 



129 



Table XXII-a. — Tmmiqranf. aliens admitted in continental United States frovi insular 
United States and in insular United States from other insulars and from mainland 
{continental United States), by ports, Jiscal year ended June SO, 1921. 



Port. 


From 
Hawaii. 


From 
PhiUp- 

pine 
Islands. 


From 
Porto 
Rico. 


From 
Virgin 
Islands. 


From 
main- 
land. 


Total. 


New York N Y 






1 


aa 




121 










1 




65 


11 

1 
1 






76 










1 


Honolulu Hawaii 








114 


115 








33 


33 
















65 


13 


89 


66 


114 


347 







Table XXII-b. — Nonimmigrant aliens admitted in continental United States from 
insular United States and in insular United States from other insulars and from 
mainland (continental United States), by ports, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921. 



Port. 


From 
Hawaii. 


From 
Philip- 
Islands. 


From 
Porto 
Rico. 


From 
Virgm 
Islands. 


From 
main- 
land. 


Total. 


New York, N.Y 


2 




864 


107 
2 




973 


Baltimore Md 






2 








1 




1 




1,270 


38 
14 
49 






1,308 


Seattle Wash 








14 


Canadian Pacific ports 


74 
3 


■ 






123 










3 


Honolulu Hawaii 


8 






700 
1,022 


708 








193 


1,215 












Total 


1,349 


109 


865 


302 


1,722 


4,347 













70112—21- 



130 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XXIII. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally defective, fiscal year 





i 
1 


Sex. 






A 


ge. 






Disease or defect. 


i 
1 


1 
1 


2i 

I 

CO 

1 


1 
to 


1 

2 


1 


1 


i 

1 


Idiot 


17 
47 
98 
46 
96 
15 
79 
555 
116 
2 
931 
357 
119 

333 
86 

250 
19 

14,850 

794 
12 

1,660 

485 

403 
20 

2,618 
621 
319 

3,504 

185 

112 

2,067 

494 
1,649 
303 
11 
22 


7 
29 
42 
27 
47 
13 
63 
390 
75 
2 
453 
334 
84 

155 

89 
11 

4,653 

504 

8 

403 

311 

248 
14 

1,465 
546 
209 

2,252 

100 

78 

2,039 

420 

"m 

10 
17 


10 
18 
56 
19 
49 
2 
16 
165 
41 


17 
35 
33 
5 
3 

1 

118 

82 












5 
18 
5 
8 
1 
16 
141 
13 
1 
423 
98 
46 

45 
2 
39 


'I 

25 

6 

25 

179 

7 


13 
11 
27 
2 

18 

'7 


4 

5 
1 
8 
32 
3 


1 

10 
12 

28 
2 
10 
14 

; 

36 
20 
8 

II 

91 
19 

14800 

352 
9 

637 

37 

77 
6 

499 
106 
60 

729 

49 

11 

1,463 

103 
5 




Psychopathic inferiority (not specified) 


Epilepsy 












478 
23 
35 

178 
33 
161 

8 

10, 197 

290 
4 

1,257 

174 

155 
6 

1,153 

75 
110 

1,252 

85 
34 
28 

74 

1,649 

125 

1 
5 


144 
6 
30 

98 
2 
22 


216 
163 
20 

58 
6 
35 


86 
56 
11 

33 
10 
40 


26 
14 
4 

16 
13 
23 




Parasitic disease (not specified) 


Contagious, transmissible, or communica- 


Rheutnatism, arthritis, gout, neuritis 

Debility, anemia, marasmus, malnutrition. 


Senility (physical degenera;tion incident to 


70 


85 


9 
140 


8 

1 

208 

58 

55 
3 

373 
130 
31 

587 

29 
14 
189 

32 
230 


32 

59 
2 

130 

28 

39 

2 

211 

68 
22 

375 

11 

10 
136 

30 
42 


Organicdisease(notspecified); general, sys- 
temic, or constitutional disease (not 
specified) 




Nonmalignant tumor, hypertrophy, new 
growth , di latation, localized collection of 
fluid not due to cardiac or kidney disease . . 

Acute inflammatory or suppurative condi- 
tion 


85 

131 

74 
2 

448 
39 

84 

364 

39 
9 
32 

121 

5 

303 

""3 


103 

1 

419 
70 
49 

499 

24 
33 
59 

124 
384 


3„ 

128 

87 
6 

208 
73 

950 

33 
35 

188 

84 
983 


Chronic inHaramatory or suppurative con- 
dition . . . 




Deformity, malformation, ankylosis, cica- 
trix, permanent injury (not specified) 

Loss of member 


Paralysis (partial or complete), atrophy... . 
Less than normal function, disordered func- 
tion (not specified) 


Complete loss of function of organ (not 
specified) 


Undersized... . . . 




Poor development, lack of development 
(not specified) 


Pregnancy 


Infancy 


Alcoholism 


1 
1 


2 

8 


3 

7 


3 


2 
3 


Not stated 




Total 


33,295 


15,324 


17,971 


2,409 


3,044 


4,714 


2,432 


1,358 


19340 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 131 
e)ided Jane SO, 192 1, showing sex, age, class of defect, and disposition, by diseases or defects. 



Class of defect. 


Disposition. 


Class 
A(l). 


Class 
A (2). 


Class 
B. 


Class 
C. 


>> 
P. 

i 

a 

•a 
< 


o 

1 


i! 
II 

o 

III 


03 
g 

jli 

1 


2 

1 

1 

•< 


d . 

■" 03 

II 

1^ 


■2 


1 

a 

1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

IS 

li 


1 
1 
I 
1 




Idiocy, imbecility, feeble- 
minded, epilepsy, in- 
sanity, tuberculosis, and 
chronic alcoholism. 


il 

% 
III 

I.I 


Q 


1 
o 


i 

1 

■0 


1 

1 17 
47 
98 
46 
96 
15 
79 




j 


1 

1 
1 

1 


2 

2 

1 
1 


.1 

48 
40 
59 
10 
46 
285 
4 

8 
175 


:::::: 


6 
15 
24 

1 

11 
2 
6 
8 
7 


2 
5 
10 
2 
4 
...... 

4 
1 

1 
1 
8 








7 

19 
27 

4 
13 

4 
11 
142 
90 






:■;■";■ 




5 
13 


1 

"i' 

1 

"2 

1 


28 












42 






2 

ii4 

70 


20 
1 
21 
124 
21 


83 




1 








[ 




1 
11 




555 

116 

2 




5 
11 


413 




1 














931 






9 
4 





3 
3 


905 


2 
128 


3 


920 
46 


l\ 




357 
89 




1 














333 






4 
31 

187 
6 


6 
34 
45 
11 


13 

1 


1 
1 


13 

1 


2 
9 
5 
1 


215 


67 


..... 


239 
67 

232 
17 






67 
85 
14 


19 

165 

5 














18 
















2 






14 674 


176 


5 769 


8 872 


75 


18 


74 


41 






1 


14,734 

652 
9 

1,618 


116 






776 
11 

725 


18 
1 

935 


102 
5 

941 


434 
3 

673 


1 

27 


3 
1 


110 



4 


78 

1 

14 


3 


6 




142 






8 








1 




42 






68 


























3 


196 
10 

2,053 
457 


204 
10 

164 
30 


218 
6 

980 
294 


135 
12 

1,467 
260 


27 
1 

79 
36 


3 


8 


9 
1 

38 
12 


2 


1 




366 
18 

2,500 
573 


37 










5 
6 


47 
13 


1. 


1 




118 
























1 749 


1 755 


2 015 


1,305 

97 
31 

1,576 


85 


5 


54 


40 








3,379 

164 

109 

1,909 


125 






154 

48 
2,023 


31 
64 
44 


39 

77 
253 


14 
1 
80 


11 
1 
11 


17 
"68 


7 
2 
75 








21 












3 






i 


3 




158 






473 
45 
6 
10 
8 


21 

1,604 

297 

1^ 


96 
1,321 

1 


339 
251 
221 


29 
43 
68 
9 
5 


2 
3 


18 
17 
3 


10 
12 
10 
2 
1 








455 

1,594 

225 


39 






2 
















78 












11 




2 


14 


2 












16 


















398 


1,457 


24,884 


6,556 


12,823 


16,116 


1,493 


81 


551 


435 


1,372 


414 


10 


JO, 953 : 


,3« 



132 






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•UB8J02I 



■asancdef 



•(qinos) OBJicy 



•(mion) nBiiBji 



10«OC0.-< 1-1 



3- :SS § 



^ aii-< 00 ■>(i ,-1 



JS-"' 



■52 



nBTHjeo ' 



rt -StTjl .lO Tfl 



•qsn3na 



qsimeij PiB qojna 



•UBraiAoSezjaH 



-ojg pnc nBi;BOJO 



•nuSanajnoK 
nciqieg 'nBijeSing 



•(qoezo) neiABJ 
OH pne Treiraeqoa 



•(^oBiq) neoijjv 



m(N«(M.-iNr 



» o 



-■3 a 



CO 0> ■ -H 



2 g 



.rt ^»a<o-H 



§ ^-^ 



OJCOC^ 0> t^ . O !K 



l^rH t^ <N . O (N O 



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1=^3 



5rt lO .<N 






g-3 



3 S M 5 "_ 






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S d S ° • o 

28§| :i 

» »3 ft " ^ 
-« S S ,_ t; 

S o i; b : o 
|.2oo -s 



o^aS: 






sfelt^igMi'ialail^sl'il 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 133 















• c^ 




: °>-^ S j 


:" 


^c* : 


i g 


^ SS^ i ^^§ ^s" : 


- §• 




: 55=°" !s ""2 "?5 : ; 


" § 


^ 


, 253 S -"^^ S^!-^" 


'^ § 


^ §Sg 8 52§ |g- I 


i s 

: 00- 


- SS^ g ^"8 ^3 i : 


1 1 


- Sg--^ g <»^S 2^" : 


^ S 


» SS2 g S 


jo ^j^^cO 


-^ g 




S^^ S -^-"^ : 


•^ 1 ; 


: 3 


^ gss g s-^s ssa^ 


i 1 






' : '^ : 






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is "Ji : : 


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• era 




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HO. ; 


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S- : " : 


joo -■« ; : 


^ i 




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is "N* : : 


i - 




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is ^3 i i 


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II 

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5 : 

1 

I-; 


: :§ : 
i i"^ : 

i ii i 

ilff 


>i. i Bi 


jl 





134 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



s 
s 


moi, 


t- 




g 


^S 


12 


^sr 


i^2 


i^ 


i^ 


1 ^ 


^ 




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2 
S 


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^^ 




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C^^-H 


00 . 


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o>. 


•(OTqno jdao 

-X9) neipui !>S9A\. 
























« 








'-' 










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^ 












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:- r~-H 


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t^rt 














00 




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'-* 


■OBII^S 










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00 .rt 




coo miNco 


1 "" 


r~o=^ 


S'^ 


•DBOTjainv-qsiuEds 


'^ 






-^ 


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«^ 


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cq . 


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coco 


•qsiuBdg 


CO 






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t- 


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•3IBA0IS 


^««^« 


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mio-* 00 


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^^ 


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in 1-1 CO 


COIN 


'UBinBTima 














<NN 






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•esetiSniJoj 




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■qsnoj 




o,^^„^^^o 




« 


3 


2 


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SE^S-^ ^'- 


•japncisi oyiOBj 
















































•UBOTxepi 






"^ 


^^S 






32 


tD-H 


tj .. oomco 


SS 


■jvS2m 


'^ 


<N 


rt 


'^ 


'^ 




CO 


^ 


(N 


12; 


gcoc 


g" 


■umu^nnin 










-* 






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^. : 


g -^ 


.-H . 


>o 




1 

5 




1 

1 


1 


1 

c 

1 

i 


1 


1 

c 




1 




1 

1 


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1 


T 


1 

i 

1 
1 

1^ 


1 
3 

1 

a 

1 

11 

l2 


1 

1 

1 

'E 

5 

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1 

s 
a 
1 

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it 

■3gl 
c S c 

ifl 
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ii 

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1! 

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1 

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1 

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1 

1! 

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Ii 

ll 
1^ 


'1 

e 




REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



135 





2,067 

494 

1,649 

303 


^ 


sf 


o 2; 




TX MN 






s 


-. ^ 
















00 


'- " 






- 








s? 


-H O 




^ -« 






« 


-H JO-^^O ^g^ 




i 


OS - 


-^ 


-* 


-^ 






5 


^-^53 ^a"' 


-^ 


1 


S ^1.-1 Sg 






1 


" go,«g 02 






g 


*" 5^ 


g -"S 






s 


^ ■* 




"^ 









s 




ira.H 


-• 


« 






g 




^^ 


2 


2 






1 




gc^Nm oio> 




CO 


s 

CO 


-■' g^^S -*2 






1 


























r. gr. 


. .2«. : 


i 


'^ S-"-"?? "S 






B 




« 




N 


« 






s 


> 

1 

1 

c 
E 



> 

1 


1 
5 

1 

3 

°1 


1 

= 

1 

"0 

% 
J 

1 


1 


1 


1 

1 


1 




1 


E 

■""c 

X 

< 


1 

1 


1 





136 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



I 

1 

"o 

1 


•Silenpix 


:::::: 




... U3 

: > : 




■s "u '%oBj% 8Ai}S83i(i : ; : : : 1 


IIM^h M 


1 j j NN Ct 1 


- -quBuiojs 






: : : ^^ :?» 


•s -u 'xBJoqx ::;:'.: 








•jaAn j i i : i j j 




','•'. c* 


: '^ : 


•s -u '?OBJj i£jo)ejTdsaH 




'*:.';::: "^ i 


iW^" 3"^ 


leiqouojq 'ejneid 's3imi [ :::::; 


;:::::: : : 


: j j S 


: :S 


•pioiXqi 








: gc. 


•S'n'ra9iSi£ssnoAJ9N 


•;••■• 


. : i • : i : :" 


- : : a 


: :* 


•qoaadsjosiiBajo 






: i i i' 


: i 


•snB3joXioiOBjio 










•auueaqjosuBaJO 






: : : "^ 


: ;S 


•jq3Tsjosue3jo 




sMMI M 




i S3 


•pnnn 'trrcja 


&53;g5g^2 






! "^ : 


•s -u 'spsno) 3uT j :::•:•- 

-pnioui 'spnBi3 on^qduLiT: | • j j : j j 


:;:::: "= i 




j §2 


•supA 








i §! 


•S91I9:MV 






is ! - 




•»«9H 




•:!:::: i"^ 


::: § 




•pooia 




ijijr ii 


^ i i i 






1 


Idiot 

Imbecile 

Feeble-mi nded 

Psychopathic inferiority (not specified ) 

Insanity 


Trachoma 

Favus 

Tinea tonsurans 

Parasitic disease (not specified) 

Contagious, transmissible, or communicable disease 


jJCDUiiy, anemia, marasmus, mainutntion 

Sclerosis 

Senility (physical degeneration incident to age) 

Organic disease (not specified), general systemic, or 
constitutional disease (not specified) 


:i| •: •: 

ly 

iiiil 

iilil 

ill 

m 

m 

3g2S3 
3Z < 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 137 



t» • 








j 


"1 1 


: : '^ 


:::'': 




8 


O ; j 








2 




: : "^ 








« 












» 


C 


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• ^ 






2 






• "'':::: 




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i 


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g 


g : SS? 


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% 












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: 52 






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" 1 


i 

1 
1 

n 


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m 

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tl ^■ 
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af'S • 

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lllfll 

n il n 

MilM 
Nlfl 


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: 1 
I 1 

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J O c. c o o3 0/ to ojrJ 



138 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





■moj, 


J5'^s 


^gSSSS^^I^S g^.|2| g 


^ i 


S 
































•pgjBls iON 
























•^ ■ ^r-,cr 










•IBJ8U90 








; : ? 


:g_ -^ 






•ipoq JO uoTj 
-jod JO nBgjo euo u^m aJOH 








'.'.'. ; « 






























. . , . 


; : : :^ 




I r-ICO 




•apiuB '?oo^ 


























rlCO 




•xi3m% '391 














?. 






























I 


•j[OonTiq 'diH 




:::"::; 


iii :" 




i '^ 




•siiBu 'sjaSni^ 






: i"^ 


\r § I 






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1 


•JSUM 'pUBH 




















: 1 :-H : 1 : 


: : : -H : 






^ 


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•niaB8J0j 'rtuy 














•j9pinoqs 












i " 




•s-u'umniooiBmdg 








•^ i i i 














• • • 


: :^ ^rt 








•s -n 'Jioau 'eoBj 'ptoh 














■s -u 'senior 
puB 93bi!;jbo 'nmaijsGiJad 
Surpnioui 'mejsis sno9sso 




: : i-^ i : : 


i ; i is 


: : 3 




-■ 
















•s -n 'auBjqraera snoonm 








; ; . ^^ 




puB onssij j«inn90 Sujpnp 
-UT 'saS^puaddB puB upjg 




















•s -u 'suoBuei 
Saipnioni 'ni9;sis jBinosnjv 








iii i" 








•s-u 












: o 






's^BAV iBuimopqB 'naraopqy 
















•s "u 'niajs^s iiaBuun-ojiugo 








Si -i- 


: : '" 


i 2 


IM 












: :■§ : ; : 


' '.^. '' 


• s"- • 


















lS-o : 














' '■ o '• '• '■ 


: :g : 


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'■ ''i'- '■ I 


• :o : 


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: ;''5 : : : 

i il i i i 




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il.|i 


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i i§ i=^i 


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g 




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^ : : : 

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1 








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m 


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III "If 


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5 






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3 



REPORT OF CX)MMISSIONER GENERAL OT IMMIGRATION. 



139 



cf Pt" cf -h" 



s§l" 



'^-' o«ra(NC 



I CO MOf-Ttlr 



i-^ i 



'3-^?? 



;3 5 

' d 9 d 

i|.2 

3 § 



is-gs. 



asgs 






'^ a -a 



140 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 


3 SgS 


II gsi"- § 


S2gg-g 20 


Mis si g 


i2 


l1ll 


00 oot-<N-«<r~ N Jpjco 00O5 '.c^ 


-, .OC « ; 


\Ka> 2^ 22'^ 


u 


lO eo J- 

: 


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M ;<N 


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JMC^ (NM -.<N<N 


m 


21 2'^'^ 


jrt t~. j« 


>^ ,^rt(NN 


>» i<o -H : 


|t,o t^.^ ccj 




k 


'"' ; I 


.rt 1-1 • 


; ; "^ 








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1 

i 


2 '^'-'^ 


i"** 2 :"■ 


: WM ;-..< 


v) jus I : 


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«' 


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: «« '.n 


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.' lO U5 <0 ■♦ to ■* 




ii 


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Ii i r 


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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 141 





1 


|g^ 


g'- 


1 


g 

a 

1 

If 


Still 
under 
treat- 
ment, 
length 
of time 

not 
stated. 


g-^^g : 


1 




" 






" 


«5 g 


K" 1 




S 


If 


S"- 




g 






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o 


if 


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11 


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1 


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g 


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1 
O 


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if 






isi 


1 


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s 


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i 




roocoot- 


s 




o 

Ph. 


1 

1 


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1 

1'' 


a 03 


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1 





142 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table A. — Japanese aliens applied for admission, admitted, debarred, deported, and 
departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1920 and 1921^^ 



Continen- I ' Continen- 

tal United 1 Hawaii. , tal United 
States. ; States. 



Applications for a'Jmission . 

Admitted 

Debarred from entry . . . 

Deported alter entry 

Departures 



13,013 

'l45 

46 

11,662 



3,355 

3,306 

49 



10, 783 

10,675 

110 

63 

11,638 



56 Koreans were admitted in Hawaii, and 66 departed therefrom. 

29 Koreans were admitted in continental United States, and 29 departed tlierefroni. 

Table B. — Increase or decrease of Japanese population by alien arrivals and departures, 
fiscal years ended June SO, 1920 and 1921, by months. 





Continental United States. 


Hawaii. 


Month. 


Admitted. 


Departed. 


Increase(+) 

or de- 
crease (-). 


Admitted. 


Departed. 


Increase! 4-) 

or de- 
crease (-). 


1919-20. 
Julv . . ... 


692 

693 

1,092 

1,2&3 

656 

1,388 

645 

931 

1,038 

1,982 

907 

1,561 


913 

763 

1,065 

891 

1,916 

1,207 

1,226 

589 

705 

1,0.56 

820 

511 


- 221 

; S 

+ 392 
-1,260 
4- 181 

- 581 
+ 342 
4- 333 
+ 926 
+ 87 
4-1,050 


225 
221 
318 
256 
528 
215 
569 
215 
248 
94 
301 
116 


562 
266 
322 
236 
285 
294 
145 
321 
184 
422 
584 
370 


—337 


AUCMlSt 


— 45 






October. 


4- 20 




4-243 




- 79 


January. 


-f-424 




-106 


March 


4- 64 


April 


—328 


^y :;;;::::::::::::::;::;::: 


-283 






Total 


12,868 


11,662 


4-1,206 


3,306 


3,991 


-685 






1920-21. 
Julv 


1,035 

1,064 

655 

857 

944 

732 

578 

752 

907 

1,.345 

1,087 

719 


589 

673 

875 

747 

1,530 

2,165 

881 

859 

710 

1,051 

998 

560 


4- 446 
4- 391 

- 220 
f 110 

- 586 
-1,433 

- 303 

- 107 
4- 197 
4- 294 
4- 89 

+ 4- 159 


354 
246 
374 
175 
425 
3.56 
392 
313 
246 
113 
438 
167 


240 
239 
324 
325 
372 
191 
123 
224 
324 
587 
191 
767 




Aucust 


4- 7 


September 


+ 50 




-150 


November 


4- 53 


December 


4-165 






Febniary 


-f 89 


March 


78 


April 


-474 


May 


•\-^>^'! 


June 


600 






Total 


10,675 


11,638 


- 963 


3,599 


3,907 


—308 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



143 



Table C. — Occupations of Japanese aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1921. 





Continental 
United 
States. 


Hawaii. 


1 

Occupation. 


Continental 
United 
States. 


Hawaii. 


Occupation. 


i 

a 
< 


1 

1" 


1 
1 

< 


1 


1 
1 

< 


t 
« 

8 
2 
15 

1 
2 

1 
7 


1 
< 


i 

1 


PROFESSIONAL. 

\ctors 


6 
14 
46 
37 

2 

'"? 

267 
52 

15 
77 

77 


12 
21 
29 
46 
3 
145 
10 

38 
3 
180 
66 
14 
61 
97 


11 


2 


SKILLED— continued. 

Miners 

Painters and glaziers 

Photographers 


6 
1^ 






Architects 


""2 

2 
1 
19 


2 


Clergy 


25 
1 
2 

1 
1 

8 
1 
4 
6 

'"ie" 

151 


17 
5 

■■"■4 

J 

66 


4 


Electricians 

Engineers (professional) - 


Printers 


7 




Shoemakers 

Stokers 

TaUors 

Textile workers (not 




17 








13 


persons 

Musicians 

Officials (Government).. 
Physicians 

Sculptors and artists 

Teacners 


16 

7 


11 


9 


Watch and clock makers. 
Weavers and spinners 


1 


2 
2 
2 


1 


Other skiUed 


167 


137 


6 


Other professional 


Total 




694 


677 


149 

1 
2 

.5 

1,599 
25 
62 
9 
52 

••ii5- 
130 
52 




Total 

SKILLED. 


744 

4 
37 


725 

3 
34 


227 

3 
11 

8 


128 

— 

3 
11 
3 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

Agents 

Bankers 




f. 


15 




Barbers and hairdressers. 


Draymen, hackmen, and 


9 5 
1, 150 198 
845 2,642 
55 1 56 
104 t 89 
527 2,340 
23 1 14 
989 ! 1,161 
59 1 74 
1,141 768 

4,989 7,450 


13 






13 






Brewers 


1 






Farmers 


51 




2 

8 

223 

3 

77 
64 








10 


Carpenters and joiners. .. 


8 

109 

1 

60 
56 


38 
26 
2 

6 
3 
2 


23 
60 

5 








1,967 








Engineers (locomotive, 
marine and station- 


Merchants and dealers. . . 
Servants . . . 


150 
20 




Other miscellaneous 

Total 


64 








2,072 


2,283 


Iron and steel workers. . . 
Jewelers 


1 
3 
3 

168 


1 
1 
6 
37 

8 


No occupation (includ- 
ing women and chU- 




....„ 

2 

1 
4 

1 


i 

3 
1 

3 


4,248 


2.786 


1,151 










1,347 




Grand total •. 




Mechanics (not specified) 
Metal workers (other 


12 


10,675 11,638 

i 
1 


3,599 


3,907 




1 







Table D. — Statistics of immigration and emigration of Japanese, collected by the United 
States Government, compared with those reported by the Japanese Government, fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1921. 



From Japan. 


Reported 
Japan. 


Reported 

United 
States. 


To Japan. 


Reported 
Japan. 


United 
States. 


To Hawaii 


3,806 
9^642 


3,886 
9,067 


From Hawaii 


6,702 
14,397 


3,906 


To continental United States. 


From continental United 
States 


9 815 




113.448 


U2,953 


Total 




Total 


» 21, 099 


' 13,721 









Embarked within the year. 
Debarked within the year. 



144 REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year 





Came from— 


In possession of proper passports. 






1 


6 
.2 


H 


1 
1 

O 


Entitled to passports under Japanese 
agreement. 




Former residents of 
the United States. 


Parents, wives, 
and children of 
United States 
residents. 




1 


j 


i 


1 


j 


1 


Total admitted and de- 
barred . 


9,982 


46 


113 


539 


105 


2,607 


2,547 


5,154 


3,286 


147 


3,433 




Admitted: 

Male 


6,059 
3,834 


31 

7 


96 
15 


499 
32 


91 
11 


1,589 
1,017 


2,514 
31 


4,103 
1,048 


683 


67 


750 
2,676 


Female 


2,598 78 




Total 


9,893 


38 


111 


531 


102 


2,606 


2,545 


5,151 


3,281 


145 


3,426 




Debarred: 

Male 


86 
3 


8 


' 


8 


2 

1 


1 


2 


3 


2 
3 


2 


4 

3 


















Total 


89 


8 


2 


8 


3 


1 


?. 


3 


5 


2 


7 






Housewives without other occu- 


3,186 
884 


5 


8 
9 


16 
5 


4 
7 


929 1 

299 1 


929 
299 


2,230 
577 





2,230 
577 


Cmldren under 16 without occu- 






Came from: 


9,982 










2, 519 2. 536 


5,055 3,281 
8 2 


147 


3,^ 


Canada 


46 








' 4 
19 
17 

48 


4 

3" 

4 


Mexico 




113 






19 
20 










539 


"ios" 


1 




1 

2 


Other countries 








52 2 












Resided in continental United 
States: 
After Jan 1, 1907 


5,056 
2 


11 


19 
9 


18 
4 


54 
2 


2,599 

8 


2,544 


5,143 
























Total former residents 


5,058 


11 


28 


22 


56 


2,607 


2,547 


5,154 



















How related to resident: 
Parents .... 


164 

2,389 

880 
















121 

2,314 

851 


43 
75 
29 


164 

2,389 

880 


Wives 


2 




1 




































Total parents, wives, and 


3,433 


2 




1 










3,286 


147 


3,433 












Kind of passport: 

Limited to United States 

Limited to United States and 


9,141 
573 


4 
27 


24 

10 
9 


69 

299 

1 
144 


28 

58 
1 
9 


2,510 

84 
3 
10 


2,537 
10 


5,047 

94 
3 
10 


3,269 
17 


147 


3,416 
17 




Unlimitivl 




























. . . . 




' 




■ 















1 Improper passports for admission to continental United States are those held by laborers and limited 
' Of the 388 without proper passports, 79 held passports not entithng them to enter the United States 
laborers with passports limited to Canada or Mexico; 1 nonlaborer with passport limited to Peru; 4 laborers 
not his own; 9 nonlaborers were born in Mexico; 2 nonlaborers with passports issued by Japanese Consul in 
composed of 27 nonlaborers and 16 laborers claiming to have lost passports held at time of departure from 
sorting seamen; 5 nonlaborers were wives of United States citizens; 1 nonlaborer was a subject of Holland; 
Islands; 3 nonlaborers and 56 laborers were stowaways; 1 laborer was a seaman, reshipped foreign; 1 non- 
wife of a subject of Norway; 1 nonlaborer enUsted in the United States Na\'y; 1 nonlaborer claimed to have 
and 71 laborers are unknown. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 145 
ended June SO, 1921, shoiving various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. 



In possession of proper passports. 


Without proper 
passport.' 


With and without 
proper passport. 


Entitled to passports under 
Japanese agreement. 


.. > " 
ri. 

till 
iPl 


Total with 
passports. 


,2 
1 


2 


■i 


i 

§ 


i2 

.a 
2 




Settled agri- 
culturists. 


Pl 

ill 

z 


1 

s 
1 

a 
« 

1 




1 
1 




1 


j 


i 


3 


3 

H 


1 


3 




3 


1,768 


10,358 


39 


7,664 


2,733 


10,397 


69 


319 


»388 


7,733 


3,052 


10, 785 


3 




3 


1,637 
131 


6,493 
3,855 


21 
16 


3,912 
3,746 


2,602 
125 


6,514 
3,871 


33 

28 


229 


262 
28 


3,945 
3,774 


2,831 
125 


6,776 
3 899 








3 




3 


1,768 


10, 348 


37 


7,658 


2,727 


10,385 


61 


229 


290 


7,719 


2,956 


10,675 










7 
3 


2 


3 

3 


6 


9 
3 


8 


89 


97 

1 


11 
3 


95 

1 


106 






























10 


2 


6 1 6 


12 


8 


90 


98 


14 


96 


110 






















42 
20 


3,201 




3,201 

896 




3,201 
896 


18 
9 





,8 
9 


3,219 
905 




3,219 
905 








1 










1,210 
21 
21 

478 
38 


9,693 
31 
43 
499 
92 


20 
1 

U 

4 


7,010 
27 
43 
496 

88 


2,703 

5 

...... 

8 


9,713 
32 
43 
513 

96 


26 
3 
35 

1 
4 


243 
11 
35 
25 
5 


r, 

70 
26 


7,036 
30 
78 
497 
92 


2,946 
16 
35 
42 
13 


9 982 






' 46 


3 


3 


113 
539 




■ 




105 


















5,143 
11 




2,599 


2,544 


5,143 
11 


10 
4 


5 
2 


15 
6 


2,609 


2,549 
5 


5,158 
























5,154 




2,607 2,547 


5,154 


14 


7 


21 


2,621 


2,554 


5,175 








. i 


1 


164 
2,389 

880 




121 

2,314 

851 


43 
75 
29 


164 
2,389 






121 

2.317 

851 


43 
75 
29 






I 


3 


3 


2,392 

880 


1 


1 


1 














1 




3,433 

9,248 

947 
10 
153 


18 

20 

1 


3,286 

6,564 

937 
10 
153 


147 

2,702 

30 

1 


3,433 

9,266 

967 
11 
153 


3 


^^ 


3 


3,289 


147 


3,436 


2 




2 


783 

836 
6 












1 




1 














143 



























' 






to countries or places other than contimntal United States. 

and 309 were without any kind of passport. The 79 holding improper passports were composed of 55 
with passports not genuine; 1 laborer and 1 nonlaborer held British passports; 1 nonlaborer with passport 
United States; and 4 laborers and 1 nonlaborer were Canadian citizens. The 309 without passport were 
Japan; 3 nonlaborers and 11 laborers claiming to have left Japan without passports; 100 laborers were de- 
6 nonlaborers were survivors of wrecked ship; 1 nonlaborer, passport not required for visit to the Bahama 
laborer was a steward in the United States Navy; 1 nonlaborer was a British subject; 1 nonlaborer was the 
his passport stolen in Hawaii; and the circumstances regarding nonpossession of passports by 3 nonlaborers— 



70112—21- 



-10 



146 EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year ended 





Came from— 


In possession of 


proper passports. 




s 
1 


a 


^ 


f^ 


O 


Entitled to passports under Japanese 
agreement. 




Former residents of 
the United States. 


Parents, wives, 
and children of 
United States 
residents. 




1 


s 


i 


1 


i 




Passports dated during: 
Month of arrival 


1,597 
4,965 
1,690 
649 
335 
245 
187 

45 


1 

10 

2 

3 
1 


3 

1 

1 

30 

7 


6 

. 

11 
20 

29 
42 
41 

339 

1 


5 
20 
3 
6 
2 
3 
2 

52 
3 


403 


.■isfi 


959 
2,676 
795 
319 
161 
100 
57 

80 
7 


533 
1,689 
599 
186 
90 
97 

n 

18 


13 

60 
23 
9 
6 
4 
26 

6 


546 
1,749 
622 
195 
96 
101 

24 


First month preceding ar- 
rival 


1,197 ' 1.479 


Second month preceding ar- 
rival 

Third month preceding ar- 
rival 

Fourth month preceding ar- 
rival 

Fifth month preceding ar- 
rival 


476 
227 
110 
76 
43 

70 


■ 

319 
92 
51 
24 
14 

10 


Sixth month preceding ar- 


Prior to sixth month preced- 
ing arrival, but not before 
Mar 14, 1907 




1 1 * 


5| 2 










Occupations mentioned in pass- 
ports: 
Nonlaboring occupations 


644 

178 


23 
3 

5 


7 
36 


399 
14 

100 


81 
5 

10 


230 

151 

2,377 2,396 


230 
151 

4,773 


37 
3,249 


""27" 
120 


37 
27 

3,369 


Occupations not mentioned 
in passports 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 147 
June SO, 1921, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement — Continued. 



In possession of proper passports. 


Without proper 
passport. 


With and without 
proper passport. 


Entitled to passports under 
Japanese agreement. 


Not entitled to passport: Not former 
residents, parents, wives, or chil- 
dren of residents, nor settled agri- 
culturists—laborers. 


Total with 
passports. 




^ 


i 


1 


ij 




Settled agri- 
culturists. 


if 


2 
■a 
S 


§ 

2; 


2 

1 


1 

Eh 




1 
1 


J 


j 


i 










100 


1 fins; 


4 
17 
3 

1 
1 
1 

". 


1,036 
3,466 
1,360 

576 
309 
265 
190 

451 
11 


573 

1,556 

345 

101 
58 
29 
41 

28 
2 


1,609 
5,022 
1,705 

677 
367 
294 
231 














1 




580 5,005 
285 1,702 
163 677 














....|.. - 




















































92 


,„, 




















1 
73 230 

361 467 
5 ' 13 














2 




2 
1 


479 
13 














i| 




























! 




887 1 1.'>4 


17 


1,154 
6,510 


■■"266' 
2,533 


1,154 
200 

9,043 






















178 
9,026 














3 




3 


881 




























148 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table F. — Japanese arrivals in Hawaii, fiscal year ended June 



Came 
from— 



In possession of passports. 



Entitled to passports under Japanese agreement. 



Former residents 
of Hawaii. 



Parents.wives, and 
children of Ha- 
waiian residents. 



Total entitled to 
passports. 



Total admitted and de- 
barred 



Admitted: 
Male.-.. 
Female. 



1,810 
1,777 



1,333 
790 



Debarred: 
Male.... 
Female. 



Housewives without 
occupation. 



Children under 16 without 
occupation , 



Resided in Hawaii: 

After Jan. 1, 1907 

Prior to Jan. 1, 1907. 



649 I 392 1,041 
508 I 593 1,101 



Total former residents.. 
How related to resident: 

Parents 

Wives 

Children 



1, 157 ! 985 i 2, 142 



Total parents,wives,and 
children of residents. . 
Kind of passport: 

Limited to Hawaii 

Limited to United States. 

Limited to other countries 
Passports dated during: 

Month of arrival 

First mouth preceding 
arrival 

Second month preceding 
arrival 

Third month preceding 
arrival 

Fourth month preceding 
arrival 

Fifth month preceding 
arrival 

Sixth month preceding 
arrival 

Prior to sixth month pre- 
ceding arrival, but not 
before Mar. 14, 1907 

Prior to Mar. 14, 1907 



1,322 



1,309 

1,711 

400 



Occupations mentioned in 
passports: 
Nonlaboring occupations. 

Laboring occupations 

Occupations not men- 
tioned in passports 



1,323 
1,323 



210 


317 


527 


240 


400 


640 


53 


49 


102 


14 


11 


25 


9 


7 


16 


9 


2 


11 


2 





2 



> The 5 apphcants without passports consisted of 1 nonlaborer claiming to be a diplomat; 2 nonlabo'ers, 
members of diplomatic party; and 1 nonlaborer, the circumstances regarding nonpossession of passpo rt 
aro unknown; and 1 laborer with passport not genuine. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 149 
SO, 19? 1, shomng various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. 



In possession of passports. 


Without passports. 


W ith and \«thout pass- 
ports. 


Not entitled to pass- 
ports: Not former res- 
idents, nor parents, 
wives, or children 
of residents. 


Total with passports. 


1 


J 




c3 
'A 


^ 




^ 


1 


1 


i 


1 


, 


1 



145 


9 


154 


i 

1,839 i 1,780 


3,619 


4 


1 » 5 


1,843 


1,781 


3,624 


109 
36 


9 


118 
36 


902 
928 


915 
850 


1,817 
1,778 


2 
2 




2 
2 


904 
930 


915 
850 


1,819 
1,780 


145 i 9 i 154 


1,830 1,765 


3,595 


4 


4 


1,834 


1,765 


3,599 




1 


2 5 

7 j 10 


7 
17 


' ' 


2 

7 


6 
10 


8 






17 












I 


9 15 


24 


1 1 


9 


16 










5 




5 
8 


496 
785 




496 
785 


1 


j 1 


497 

785 




497 




785 














1 
649 392 
508 593 


1,041 
1,101 






649 
508 


392 
593 


1,041 
1,101 




























1,157 1 985 


2,142 






1,157 


985 


2,142 








16 1 29 
225 1 570 
296 187 


45 
795 
483 




1 
1 i 1 


16 
225 
296 


30 
570 
187 










795 












483 




















537! 786 


1,323 




1 


1 


537 


787 


1,324 


118 
3 
24 


9 


127 
3 
24 


1,812 1.780 


3,592 
3 

24 












3 

24 


















:.::: 








19 

71 
36 
7 


8 


19 
79 
36 

7 


604 
833 
253 
83 


710 

882 
148 
2fi 


1,314 
1,715 
401 
109 
38 
26 
9 

6 
1 




















































29 9 














10 

1 

1 


1 


10 
2 


24 

8 

4 
1 


2 

1 

2 



















































78 
67 


9' 


78 
9 

67 


289 




289 
70 

3,260 




1 








70 
1,710 














1,550 



























150 RKPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table 1. — Summary of Chinese seeking admission to the United States, filcal years ended' 
June 30, 1916 to 1921, by classes. 





1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


Class alleged. 


i 

1 
< 


1 


Died. 
Admitted. 


1 


i 

1 

•a 

< 


1 


i 

i 


i 
1 

.. 
1 


1 -8 
1 1 

955j 29 

91 5 
418 2 
512 28 
138 25 

305 47 
443 1 


i 
5 

1 
:: 


i 
ft 

1 


i 
•I 

•a 


Q 

27 

1 
2 
21 


i 
s 

2 


i 
"1 


i 
1 

47 

"'6 
4 
4 

38 
4 


i 
5 

4 
1 

•- 
3 


I 

i 


U ni ted St ates 


1,932 

108 
690 
859 
242 

741 
301 
86 
28 
105 
101 


128 

6 
11 
11 

5 

145 
4 
1 

'"'3 
123 


1 
2 2,018 

... 110 

... 618 

1 691 

... 180 

... 694 
... 223 


129 

6 
6 
18 
13 

121 
4 


946 

132 
491 
520 
129 

390 
225 
41 
17 
128 
147 

'34,977 


143 

7 
6 

7 
8 

91 
4 
3 

! 

36 


1,761 

141 
320 
525 
105 

644 
512 
131 
28 
146 
377 

10,917 


3,239 

290 
568 
702 
287 

1,316 

lie 

33 
223 

717 

17 907 


T: 


Wives of United States 




Returning laborers 

Returning merchants. . 


1 


Members of merchants' 


47 
2 

"i 

2 

22 

43 












52 - - 


48 
16 
134 

280 

5,041 


1 

■"2 
11 

21 




Teachers 


... 19 

... 72 

1 97 


17 








Officials 

Miscellaneous 

Granted the privilege 
of transit in bond 
across land territory 
of the United States. 


1 
192 

108 


'2 


'i' 


















■■-'-- 




Total 


5.193 


437 


4'4,774 

1 


.. 


38,143 


„ 


1 


' 


8,381 


172 


1 


115,607 


168 


.;26,« 


404 


10 


3^ 



Of these, 28,838 were destined to France for war work. 



REPOKT OF COM.MISSIONEK GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 151 

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152 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 153 

Table 3. — Chinese claiming American citizenship by birth, or to be the tvives or children 
of American citizens, admitted, fiscal year ended June SO, 1921, by ports. 



Foreign- 
born 
wives 
of 

natives. 



Foreign- 
born 
children 

of 
natives. 



No record 

of 
departure 
(known as 

"raw 
natives'"). 



Record of departure 
(known as "returning 



Status as 
native born 
determined 

byU. S. 
Government 
previous to 

present 
application 
for admis- 
sion. 



Status not 
previously 
determined 



Total. 



San Francisco, Calif. 

Seattle, Wash 

New York, N. Y.... 

Mexican border 

Montreal, Canada. . . 
Boston, Mass 



1,264 

237 

3 

1 
532 



Total continental United 

States 

Honolulu, Hawaii 



BY WHOM ADMITTED. 



Inspection officers. 

Department 

Courts 



276 



1,900 

161 

6 



2,027 

516 

4 

29 

632 

3 



3,493 



3,290 
192 
11 



Table 4. — Appeals to department from excluding decisions under Chinese-exclusion laws, 
Jiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by ports. 



Action taken. 


Sao 
Fran- 
Calif! 


Seattle, 
Wash. 


Hono- 
lulu, 
Hawaii. 


Boston, 
Maas. 


Mon- 
treal, 
Canada. 


New 
York, 
N.Y. 


New 

Orleans, 

La. 


Total. 




266 


63 


20 

14 

6 


7 
7* 


32 

23 
9 


1 
1 


1 
1 


390 


Disposition: 

Sustained (admitted) 


226 1 50 
40 1 L^ 


315 


Dismissed (rejected) 


75 















Table 5. — Disposition of cases of resident Chinese applying for return certificates, fiscal 
year ended June SO, 1921. 



Class. 


Applica- 
tions 
submitted. 


Primary disposition. 


Disposition on appeal. 


Total 

certificates 

granted. 


Total 
certificates 


Granted. 


Denied. 


Sustained. 


Dismissed. 


finally 
refused. 


Native bom 

Exempt classes... 


2,972 
1,560 
1,283 


2,916 
1530 
1,269 


56 
30 
14 


23 
14 
2 


-33 
14 

8 


2,939 
1)544 
1,271 


33 
16 

12 


Total 




5,815 


5,715 100 


39 


55 


5,754 ; 61 



154 



REPOBT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table 6. — Action taken in the cases of Chinese persons arrested on the charge of being in 
the United States in violation of law, fiscal year ended Jun^SO, 1921. 



CASES BEFORE UNITED STATES COMMISSIONERS. 

Until order of deportation or discharge: 

Arrests 2 

Pending before hearing June 30, 1920 1 



Total. 



Disposition- 
Discharged 

Pending before hearing June 30, 1921 . 
Ordered deported 



After order of deportation: 

Order deported 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June 30, 



[ After order of deportation— Continued. 
Disposition- 
Escaped 2 

Deported 14 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June 

30, 1921 3 

Appealed to higher courts 8 

CASES BEFORE fflGHER UNITED STATES COURTS. 

Until order of deportation or discharge: 

Appealed to higher United States courts. 8 
Pending before trial June 30, 1920 6 



Total. 



Disposition — 

Deported ! 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June 

30,1921 

Appealed to district courts i 

CASES BEFORE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS. 

Until order of deportation or discharge: 

Appealed to district courts ; 

Pending before trial June 30, 1920 6' 



Total. 



Disposition- 
Died 

Discharged 

Pending before trial June 30, 1921.. . 
Ordered deported 



After order of deportation: 

Ordered deported 

Awaiting deportation or appeal to higher 
courts June 30, 1920 



Total. 



Total. 



Disposition— 

Discharged 

Pending before trial June 30, 1921. 
Ordered deported 



After order of deportation: 

Ordered deported 

Awaiting deportation June 30, 1920. 



Disposition — 

Deported 

Awaiting deportation June 30, 1921 . . 



RECAPITULATION OF ALL CASES. 

Arrests 24 

Pending, June 30, 1920, including those await- 
ing deportation or appeal 102 



Total. 



126 



Disposition- 
Died, escape 

Discharged 25 

Deported 25 

Pending, June 30, 1921, including 
those awaiting deportation or ap- 
peal 72 



SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN IN THE CASES OF CHINESE ARRESTED, FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30. 1921. 





3 


< 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


ft 
< 


i 


6 
1 


1 




2 


2 


3 




2 


.... 

11 
3 


2 
3 

4 
9 


1 


3 


3 


6 




24 


Died, escaped, and forfeited bail 


4 


Discharged 


1 
1 


1 




1 
1 


2 


....i 2 
....1 3 


4 

1 






?5 


Deported 


2 


3 


?5 




1 









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



155 



Table 7. — Chinese arrested and deported, fiscal years ended' June SO, i917 to 1921, by 
jxtdicial districts. 





1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1931 


Judicial district. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar. 

rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Delaware 














1 








Maine 






4 




1 


2 




1 
















Massachusetts . 


1 
1 


3' 

1 
3 
1 
8 
4 
5 


1 

1 
3 


2 

1 
1 




1 




1 




Rhode Island 


...... 


1 
3 















Northern New York . 


1 

18 
3 
7 

1 
4 


7 


3 






Southern New York 


44 
...... 


13 
2 

1 


15 
3 


4 


2 


1 
























34 


8 


3 




1 




Western Pennsylvania 

Middle Pennsylvania . 


2 


3 
















New Jersey 


8 

1 


2 


7 


3 


1 


1 




















District of Columbia 













1 


1 


J 


Southern W est Virginia 




























1 












Middle \labama 










































1 


1 


3 


3 












Southern Mississippi 












Eastern Louisiana 


2 









"Yi 


2 


















^ 










Eastern Kentucky 
























2 


1 


2 










1 












1 






Indiana 


2 
23 


1 
9 


3 

8 


1 
6 










1 




15 


3 


' 


5 


5 


11 










1 


1 


i 


3 


1 


1 


2 




















1 










Northern Iowa 


4 
2 


2 


















1 






























Nebraska 










1 


1 












1 
3 
4 


:::::::: 














Wyoming 


2 
2 














1 


J 


Western Washington 






3 


2 






















Oregon 


2 

1 
3 
16 

1 


1 

1 

3 
13 

1 


1 


1 


1 













Utah.. 















5 

8 


2 
6 


2 

9 


2 

4 






1 
4 
2 


t 


Southern California 


....„ 


3 

i' 






2 
























1 








Western Texas 


^ 


1 




3 




1 

















1 
1 


I 


Colorado.. 


















1 








1 
1 








2 

1 






Hawaii 


4 


3 






1 




2 


2 
































Total 


115 


69 


104 


i\ 


96 


35 


31 


15 


24 


25^ 







156 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table 8. — Miscellaneous Chinese transactions, fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, by ports. 



Class. 


a 

03 
CO 


4 

1 


1 
■3 


J 


i 


1 


s 
1 

o 

1 


i 

1 

n 

3 
3 
18 


OS 

> 

M 

o 

1 


> 
1 

a 


1 

a 
1 


i 

1 


i 
t 

1 


i 


i 
1 





1 


United States citizens (Chinese) 
admitted 


1,846 
2,615 

'i J 
8,269 

94 
1,364 


484 
921 
20 

32 


269 
397 

7 


605 
170 
12 

6,677 

12 


4 
288 
32 

1,244 


28 
26 

1,119 


"5 
10 

90 


3 239 


Alien Chinese admitted 

Alien Chinese debarred 


138 
37 


292 

1 


8 


"4 


201 
7 


"4 


13 




5:084 
296 


Chinese granted the privilege 
of transit in bond across land 
territory of the United States. 

Chinese denied the privilege of 
transit in bond across land 
territory of the United States. 

Chinese granted the privilege 


508 












































Chinese denied the privilege of 
































Chinese laborers with return 
certificates departing 

Chinese merchants with return 
certificates departing 

Chinese merchants' wives with 


257 
834 


474 

266 

4 

36 

2 

376 


555 
59 

7 

1 
315 


1 


1 
9 






9? 


















1 379 


7 
1 


1 


120 
1 

1 


















1,297 
13 


















Chinese merchants' minor chil- 
dren with return certificates 




1 
9 






















Chinese students with return 
certificates departing 

Chinese teachers with return 
certificates departing 

Native-born Chinese with re- 
turn certificate departing. .. . 


26 

2 

1,470 


5 






















76 


2 
26 


1 




















g 




11 


223 


















2,421 

















APPENDIX II 



REPORT ON SEAMEN'S WORK 



157 



APPENDIX II. 

KEPORT ON SEAMEN'S WORK. 

U. S. Department of Labor, 

Bureau of Immigration, 

Washington, June 30, 1921. 

Sir: As the special representative of the Bureau of Immigration 
in the supervision of all work relating to alien seamen, I wish, in 
submitting my report for the past fiscal year, to devote considerable 
space to a discussion of the facts, circumstances, and conditions 
which made it necessary to promulgate special regulations for apply- 
ing the immigration act of 1917 to the cases of aliens arriving not 
as passengers but as employees of vessels engaged in the foreign 
trade. This seems to me desirable for several reasons. Almost 
immediately upon the practical termination of the war there arose 
throughout the country, and especially in governmental circles, a 
demand for a return to normal conditions and normal methods. 
The impression seems to have gone abroad to some extent, and even 
to have prevailed somewhat within the service itself, that the enforce- 
ment of special regulations in the case of alien seamen was a war- 
time measure and, with the close of the war, should be abolished. 
This impression is not altogether unnatural, since the regulations in 
question were adopted just about the time that the United States en- 
tered the World War; but it is, nevertheless, utterly erroneous. Be- 
cause the special regulations failed in some respects to accomplish their 
purposes, due to the fact that they were largely of an experimental 
nature and had to be evolved gradually through experience into a 
more complete system, the opinion has been repeatedly expressed 
that such regulations ought to be abandoned altogether — that they 
are more trouble to enforce than the results accomplished are worth; 
that especially useless is that part of the rule which requires that 
alien seamen shall be furnished with cards of identification. The 
considerable expense involved in enforcing the regulations has also 
been cited as a reason why they should be abandoned altogether or 
materially changed. Other angles of attack upon the regulations 
might be stated if space permitted. 

All of this criticism of tne seamen's rules overlooks the fact that 
there are two distinct laws upon the statute books which directly 
and importantly affect the cases of alien seamen, and that it is made 
the duty of the Department of Labor so to enforce one of these 
laws as to give it the best effect possible and at the same time not 
to interfere with the enforcement of the other. 

The first of these laws, known as the ''seamen's act," was intended 
to encourage the establishment of an American merchant marine 
by raising the standard of wages and of living among seamen. One 
of the principal ways in which this was to be brought about under 
the theory of the law was to make the standard of living and wages 
obtaining in the United States the standard of the entire world. 

159 



160 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

This was to be accomplished, the Lawmakers said, first by aboHshing- 
old laws and treaties under which the practice had obtained of 
arresting and punishing deserting seamen and compelling them under 
certain conditions to return to the vessel from which they deserted; 
and, secondly, by making it possible for all seamen, American and 
alien alike, to leave one vessel and contract for another, freely and 
fully, in the ports of this country. 

The other law to which I have referred is contained in certain 
sections of the immigration act, and relates specifically to alien 
seamen. This law is intended to prevent aliens of the inadmissible 
classes from using the occupation of seamen as a side door for enter- 
ing the country, as has been the practice for years, in spite of exist- 
ing immigration laws. 

Congress realized, when passing the immigration act a few months 
after the passage of the seamen's act, that the situation was one of 
great difficulty; one which could not be met successfully by legis- 
lation passed in advance, but one which would have to be solved' 
in the light of experience. Therefore Congress conferred upon the- 
administrative branch a very broad authority to promulgate r^u- 
lations. Those regulations became rule 10 of the immigration rules, 
which have been modified from time to time, in accordance with the 
teachings of experience. There have also been several amendments 
to the law itself, and a number of others are still needed to make the- 
system satisfactory. But the point which I wish to make is this: 
Here are two laws. To a certain extent their purposes conflict, but 
the two laws were enacted, and of course are to be enforced; and 
regulations or rules are necessary to assist in giving the fullest pos- 
sible efi^ect to each law that the provisions of the other will permit, 
and of reducing occasions of possible conflict to a minimum. When 
the war got under way and the adoption of passport regulations 
became an absolute necessity, the Departments of State, Justice, and 
Labor, working together, found that rule 10 furnished a very solid 
basis on which to build so much of those regulations as would be 
applied to seamen. It soon became apparent also that the seamen's 
occupation was being used, perhaps more extensively than any other 
channel, to violate the passport requirements and to bring into the 
United States dangerous enemy aliens. Although the war is over, 
and although certain laws have been passed having in view the repeal 
of war time legislation, the Attorney General has recently held that a 
part of the passport regulations is still in effect, including those 
requirements of the passport act and regulations which relate to 
incoming seamen as distinguished from those sailing out of our ports. 

Of course the time may come, and perhaps very soon, when all 
passport requirements will be abolished. But neither that circum- 
stance nor the fact that many of those requirements have already 
been abolished makes it practicable or desirable to return to a situa- 
tion in which no special regulations would be enforced against alien 
seamen. The result, on the contrary, will be simply to place the 
Immigration Service exactly where it stood when the existing im- 
migration law became operative on May 1, 1917, and the provisions 
of that law relating to alien seamen must be enforced as fully as 
possible, while at the same time the operation of the seamen's act 
must not be unduly interfered with. It is conceded that this is a 
difficult but not an impossible situation. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 161 
CREW LISTS. 

In the preceding year administrative fines amounting to $74,5G0 
wore imposed on tlie various steamship Unes by reason of the failure 
of the masters of arriving vessels to present proper crew lists, and 
for negligence in reporting changes in the personnel of alien crews 
prior "to departure. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1921, 
administrative fines imposed on the various steamship lines for viola- 
tions of section 36 amounted to $45,700. 

The decrease in the number of fines imposed during the present 
fiscal year as compared with the preceding year indicates a rnarked 
improvement in the observance of the law and can be attributed 
largely to the following reasons: (a) The instructions issued by the 
State' Department to American consuls to withhold bills of health 
until such time as the masters presented crew lists form 680 for visa, 
this form to contain the names of all- aliens ernployed on board ; (6) 
the additional notation printed on the reverse side of form 680 advis- 
ing masters that in no instance should the lists be taken from the 
vessel; and (c) finally, a systematic effort on the part of the various 
lines to furnish the masters in their employ with all available infor- 
mation regarding the requirements of the law as to the entrance and 
clearance of vessels to and from ports of the United States. 

In view of the foregoing, it is apparent that the steamship com- 
panies, realizing that the department intended to adhere to a strict 
enforcement of the law, found it would be to their interests to insist 
that the masters of arriving vessels observe the provisions of the 
immigration law, with the result that the penalties for the present 
fiscal year have been greatly reduced by their improved cooperation 
with the officers of the Immigration Service at the various ports. 

ISSUANCE OF SEAMEN'S IDENTIFICATION CARDS, 

It was recognized from the beginning that means must be found 
whereby alien seamen who might be entitled under the immigration 
laws to remain here permanently should be distinguished from those 
entitled to enter the United States merely in pursuit of their calling 
and who, if they attempt to remain here permanently, should be 
arrested and deported if either the immigration or Chinese-exclusion 
laws are to be given practical effect. Experience repeatedly has 
demonstrated that the seamen's occupation is a wide-open door 
through which unlawful entries can be effected. The immigration act 
of 1917 placed in the law for the first time a literacy test, and it was 
realized that this feature of the law alone, without considering other 
additional restrictions, would greatly increase the number of aliens 
seeking to enter through this wide-open door. Now that the quota 
method of exclusion is in operation, the temptation to seek the wide- 
open door is again multiplied. The trouble with the card system does 
not, it is believed, arise out of any inherent defect, but arises rather 
from the fact that the method has not been fully applied — that the 
scheme has not been carried out in its entirety. This has been due 
in part to the lack of appropriation and an inadequate force of offi- 
cers, and in part to the fact that the passport regulations were en- 
grafted in rule 10 of the immigration regulations. 

With the discontinuance of the passport regulations and with an 
adequate force of inspectors, the card method can be put into effect 
70112—21 11 



162 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

as originally intended, in which event it is believed that the results 
will clearly demonstrate the desirability and practicability of this 
system of seaman control. 

The argument in favor of the card system is as follows : Alien sea- 
men who are not entitled to enter the United States permanently 
are nevertheless entitled to enter temporarily in pursuit of their call- 
ing; those seamen must be identified in some clear manner, and their 
identification must be made a matter of official record if they are to 
be prevented from doing more than the law allows by remaining here 
permanently; no other method of identification has ever been sug- 
gested or seems feasible; therefore a card of identification bearing a 
complete description has been used; and a duplicate of that card 
must be kept in such manner as to be available in the event that 
the alien holding the original destroys it, hoping thereby to destroy 
the means the Government has adopted for his identification if he 
violates the law. It must be obvious to anyone familiar with the 
immigration and Chinese-exclusion acts that alien seamen should not 
be allowed to enter this country in pursuit of their calling unless some 
method is adopted for their identification whereby their cases can 
be followed up and violators of the law expelled from the country. 
As soon as someone devises a better method than the identificatioii 
card system contemplated by rule 10 such method should be adopted, 
but uiitil it is devised and adopted the existing method should be 
kept in full force and effect. 

Another beneficial result of the identification card system, is the 
simplification of examination under the immigration law of alien sea- 
men. It was believed when the system was adopted that the vast 
majority of seamen coming regularly to ports in this country would 
carry upon their persons the identification cards and could be passed 
by the immigration inspectors instantly on board the vessels. The 
abnormal conditions arising out of the war have interfered somewhat 
with the realization of these expectations. With the return to a 
normal situation now being effected there is no reason why a con- 
tinuance of the system should not produce the effect mentioned. 
When the great rnajority of seamen coming to our ports liold iden- 
tification cards, the labor of issuing cards will be confined practi- 
cally to seamen entering the vocation for the first time. The writer 
has suggested in previous reports that supplies of blank cards be 
placed in the hands of American consuls for delivery to masters of 
vessels at the time of clearance so that much of the detail prepara- 
tion of cards and photographs might be attended to before the vessel 
arrives in the United States. 

In view of the fact that a doubt existed as to whether the act of 
March 3, 1921, repealing certain war-time measures, included within 
its scope the act of May 22, 1918, and the Executive order of August 
18, 1918, the Attorney General rendered an opinion, reading in part 
as follows: 

While neither passports nor permits are required for the departiire of aliens from 
the United States, executive regulations governing the entry of aliens which were 
prescri])ed pTirauant to the act of Mav 22, 1918, are in force, including the provisions 
of section 10 (a) of the Executive order of August 8, 1918, concerning the issuance of 
identity cards to alien seamen entering the United States 

It is therefore obvious that the practice which now prevails should 
be continued. 



KEPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 163 
EEMOVAL OF DISEASED SEAMEN TO HOSPITAL FOR TREATMENT. 

l^arlior in this report it has been shown that tlie law is in some 
respects not adequate to meet the serious possibihties for evasion 
and violation of the immigration regulations through the use of the 
seamen's occupation. The law has already been amended in one 
very important respect, to wit, with regard to the removal and treat- 
ment of diseased alien seamen at the expense of the vessel on which 
they are employed at the time of arrival. This was accomplished in 
the act of December 2t), 1920. This act provided the service with 
the absolutely essential authority to compel the hospitalization of 
alien seamen who by reason of their phj^sical condition are a menace 
to the public health. 

It is just as much a menace to the health of this country for dis- 
eased aliens to land even temporarily from freight vessels as it is for 
them to land from passenger vessels. An alien who enters the 
country unlawfully in the guise of a seaman is just as obnoxious as 
one who enters in any other unlawful manner, and the methods of 
accomplishing and. the time allowed in which to accomplish his 
arrest and expulsion should be the same as in the cases of other 
aliens. The only exception relates to such cases as are apprehended 
within the period of three years from the date of their entry on the 
ground of entry without inspection, which should be handled in the 
special manner indicated in paragraph (a) of subdivision 9 of rule 10. 

Since the passage of the act approved September 26, 1920, the 
department and the bureau have experienced no serious difficulty in 
applying the provisions of the act in cases of vessels of American 
registry, except those operated under the control and direction of 
the United States Shipping Board. But if these vessels are to be 
excepted diseased alien seamen may sail in and out of ports of the 
UnitQd States with impunity, while the medical examination of such 
seamen will serve no sufficient purpose and may as well be abandoned. 

The department has construed the act in question as applicable 
to all vessels that are engaged in foreign commerce, and neither 
shipping-board vessels nor vessels of American registry privately 
owned are exempt from the payment of all hospital expenses incurred ■ 
on account of diseased alien seamen employed on such vessels at the 
time of arrival. The broad and inclusive language of the act so 
indicates and the Acting Solicitor of the Department of Labor has 
recently rendered an exhaustive opinion on the subject, his con- 
clusion being that the act applied to all aliens who are seamen, the 
registry of the vessel on which the alien arrives being wholly imma- 
terial. It is to be noted also that the department's construction of 
the term "alien seaman" has been upheld in two recent decisions of 
the United States District Courts. The department's construction 
is in effect that the term applies to alien seamen employed on vessels 
of American registry as \vell as those employed on foreign vessels. 

But, after all is said, we can not escape the conclusion that the 
proper and satisfactory enforcement of the law is contingent upon 
two factors, to wit, the provision of adequate hospital facilities at 
the various ports, and the employment of a sufficient number of 
medical officers to permit of the visual inspection of all arriving alien 
seamen. These are the conditions which must be met if the law is 
to have reasonable force and. effect. That the public welfare de- 
mands such enforcement of the law is not to my mind open to question. 



164 BEPORT OF COMMISSIONER (JENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 
ALIENS EMPLOYED ON COASTWISE VESSELS. 

Section 4511 of the Revised Statutes makes it compulsory to sign 
on crews before United States shipping commissioners on vessels 
proceeding from an Atlantic coast port to a Pacific coast port or 
vice versa. 

Under section 4504 of the Revised Statutes owners, agents, con- 
signees, or masters of vessels are granted the privilege of signing on 
their own crews when the vessels are engaged in coastwise trade. 

With a view to preventing so far as possible the practice of alien 
seamen, temporarily landed for the purpose of reshipping foreign, 
being signed on coastwise vessels and thereby gaining unlawful 
admission to the United States, the writer held a conference with 
representatives of the Department of Commerce, as the result of 
which that department addressed a circular letter of instructions to 
United States shipping commissioners to the following effect: 

Until otherwise instructed, yon may refrain from signing Chinese on vessels destined 
from an Atlantic port to a Pacific port or vice versa, unless they have Iwen duly 
admitted, pursuant to the laws and treaties of the United States regulating the immi- 
gration of aliens, the evidence of such admission to lie a document duly signed by an 
immigration oflicial that they have been examined under the Chinese-exclusion 
and immigration laws and have been lawfully admitted into the United States. 

Since the instructions above quoted apparently referred only to 
Chinese and not to other alien seamen, the matter has again been 
taken up with the Department of Commerce to have the above 
instructions made to include all aliens who are not in possession of 
a document duly signed by an immigration official showing that 
they have been regularly examined and have been admitted into the 
United States on the payment of head tax. 

SOME INTERESTING STATISTICS. 

Although shipping like other business has been at low ebb during 
the year, still the figures concerning the seamen's work are large and 
significant. Seamen employed on vessels engaged in foreign trade 
have been examined at our ports to the number of 1,139,339. Of 
these 18S,967 were furnished with identification cards; 6,331 were 
certified by the Public Health surgeons to be afflicted with one of 
more of the diseases or disabilities enumerated in section 35 of the 
act of February 5, 1917, and fines amounting to $48,725 were 
imposed against the vessels for violations of sections 32, 35, and 36. 
Important details with regard to the figures are shown in the 
following tables: 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 165 



New York.... 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 

Norfolk 

Jacksonville 

New Orleans 

Galveston 

San Francisco 

Portland, Oreg 

Seattle 

Southern California ports. . . 

Chicago 

Cleveland 

Montreal (other lake ports) . 

Porto Rico 

Honolulu 



Total. 



Vessels 
boarded. 



Alien 

seamen 

examined. 



26, 470 1, 139, 



Seamen's 
cards 
issued. 



men cer- Alien sea- 
tified for I men re- 
loathsome I moved to 



or dan- 
gerous con- 
tagious 



hospital 
for treat- 
ment. 



68,000 
11,279 I 
12,360 
13,500 ! 
26,5S6 : 
8,057 I 
14,223 I 
18,526 I 
7,824 
1,932 
3,525 
865 
197 
56 
1,431 
575 
31 



872 

207 

409 

521 

2,327 

596 

951 

336 

39 

5 

48 

2 



610 

177 

405 

323 

1,418 

596 

951 

301 

24 

5 

48 

2 



188,967 



Administrative fines against transportation lines on account of violation of sections of 
immigration act relating to alien seamen. 



Disrict. 


Section. 


Number 
assessed. 


Amount 
of fine. 


Total 
amount 


Cause of assessment. 




36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
35 
36 
36 
36 
36 


915 

98 

166 

167 

1,931 

411 

334 

6 

95 

393 

45 

8 


$10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
50 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


«9, 150 
980 

1^670 

19,310 

4,110 

3,340 

300 

950 

3,930 

450 

80 

70 






Do. 


Philadelphia 


Do. 




Do. 


Norfolk 


Do. 




Do. 


New Orleans 

Do 


Do. 
Bringing diseases aUen seamen. 




San Francisco 

Seattle 


Do. 
Do. 


Alaska 




Porto Rico. 


36 j 7 


Do 






Total 


4. 576 




46,000 













FINES IMPOSED IN COURT PROCEEDINGS FOR VIOLATIONS OF SEC. 32. 



Baltimore 

New Orleans 

Galveston 


32 i 
32 1 
32 


11 

1 1 

2 ; 


$200 1 
275 i 
250 1 


$2,200 
275 
250 


Failure to detain diseased seamen. 
Do. 
Do. 


Total . . 




14 ^.. 


1 


2,725 











The duties incidental to tlie enforcement of those provisions of law 
relating to alien seamen call for a high degree of intelligence, tact, 
and judgment on the part of the individual officer, and a practical 
degree of cooperation on the part of all concerned. That these con- 
ditions have in general been met is a matter of record. I wash to 
express my appreciation of the good work performed both by the 
medical officers of the Public Health Service and by the officers of 
the Immigration Service. 

Jeremiah J. Hurley, 
Special Representative on Seamen's Worlc. 
Hon. W. W. Husband, 

Commissioner General. 



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