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Full text of "Annual report of the Commissioner-General of Immigration"

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U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

JAMES J. DAVIS. SeaetMy 

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL 
OF IMMIGRATION 

TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30 



922 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1922 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 

JAMES J. DAVIS. Secietaiy 

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL 
OF IMMIGRATION 

TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR 



^ 



FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED JUNE 30 



922 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1922 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Department of Labor, 
Bureau of Immigration, 

Washington, July 1, 1922. 

Sir : I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the operations 
of the Bureau of Immigration during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1922. As has been the custom in the past, statistical data will be 
inserted as an appendix (Appendix I, pp. 21 to 148), and wliile no 
extended discussion of the statistical tables will be attempted a few 
figures covering the more important items and transactions follow: 

During the past fiscal year 309,556 immigrant aliens Avere ad- 
mitted, being less than the number for the fiscal year 1921 by 495,672. 
During this same period 122,949 nonimmigrant aliens (i. e., those 
not coming for permanent residence) entered, as compared with 
172,935 in the past fiscal year — a decrease of 49i)S6. The marked 
decline in immigration is undoubtedly attributable to the operation 
of the act of May 19, 1921, popularly known as the per centum 
limit act. 

During the year 13,731 aliens were rejected for all causes, a de- 
crease from the preceding year of only 48, and 4,345 were arrested 
after entry and deported, as compared with 4,517 in the fiscal year 
1921. 

The number of aliens accorded immigration inspection for the year 
(which includes 973,804 seamen) aggregated 1,420,040. The total 
nmnber of aU classes inspected in the year 1921 was 2,131,281, or 
711,241 more than during the fiscal year just closed. 

OPERATIONS UNDER THE PER CENTUM LIMIT ACT. 

The per centum limit act, which, as ^^xlready stated, resulted in a 
material reduction of immigration in the year under discussion, 
went into effect May 19, 1921, and therefore was in operation during 
the entire period covered by this report. 

The principal provisions of the per centum limit act are as follows: 

1. The number of aliens of any nationality who may be admitted 
into the United States in any fiscal year shall be limited to 3 per cent 
of the number of foreign-born persons of such nationality resident in 
the United States as shown by the census of 1910; and not more than 
20 per cent of the annual quota of any nationality ma}^ be admitted 
in any month. 

2. Nationality is determined by country of birth, provision being 
made for population and quota adjustments in the case of new coun- 
tries and countries the boundaries of which were changed subsequent 
to 1910; such adjustments to be made by the Secretary of State, 
the Secretarv of Commerce, and the Secretarv of Labor. 



4 REPORT or COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

3. In effect the law is applicable only to immigration from Europe, 
Persia, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, the territory formerly com- 
prising Asiatic Turkey, and certain islands of the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans. Immigration from countries of the New World and the 
major part of Asia is, generally speaking, not within the scope of 
the act. 

4. The law does not apply to aliens of the following classes: Gov- 
ernment officials, their families, attendants, servants, and employees; 
aliens in transit through the United States, or from one part of the 
United vStates to another through foreign contiguous territory; 
tourists or temporary visitors for business or pleasure; aliens under 
the age of 18 who are children of citizens of the United States. 

5. The following classes of aliens are counted against a quota so 
long as the quota exists, but may be admitted after such quota is 
exhausted: Aliens returning from a temporary visit abroad, aliens 
who are professional actors, artists, lecturers, singers, nurses, minis- 
ters of any religious denomination, professors for colleges or semi- 
naries, aliens belonging to any recognized learned profession, or aliens 
employed as domestic servants. 

6. Preference shall be given as far as possible to the wives, parents, 
brothers, sisters, children under 18 years of age, and fiancees (1) of 
citizens of the United States, (2) of aliens now in the United States 
who have applied for citizenship, or (3) of persons eligible for United 
States citizenship \Yho served in the military or naval forces of the 
United States at any time between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 
1918, both dates inclusive, and who have been separated from such 
forces under honorable conditions. 

7. The Commissioner General of Immigration, with the approval 
of the Secretary of Labor, shall prescribe rules to carry the provisions 
of the act into effect, and shall publish each month a statement 
showing the status of the quotas of the various nationalities, which 
statement shall be issued weekly after 75 per cent of the annual quota 
of any nationality is exhausted. 

8. The provisions of the act are in addition to and not in substitu- 
tion for the provisions of the immigration laws. 

The act of May 19, 1921, expired by limitation on June 30, 1922, 
but under a joint resolution approved May 11, 1922, its operation 
was extended to June 30, 1924. The joint resolution further amended 
the law by imposing on transportation companies a fine of $200 for 
each alien brought to the United States "in violation of the act and, 
as an additional penalty, it is required that the offending company 
shall refund the passage money of each alien unlawfully brought in 
excess of the quota. The original act imposed no penalty for its 
violation and it is certain that a considerable part of the difficulties 
which have arisen during the past year would have been avoided 
had violations of the law resulted in monetary loss to the carriers 
concerned. Under the original act aliens were exdmpt from the 
quota provisions after one year's residence in a country of the New 
World, but as amended a five years' residence is now required. 
This amendment was prompted by the fact that several thousand 
Europeans, who because of ciuota limitations and other obstacles 
could not come to the United States, emigrated to Cuba, Mexico, 
and South America with the obvious intention of coming here at 
the expiration of one year. The law, however, does not prohibit 
the entrance of such aliens within five years but only that they shall 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

be subject to the quota law if they apply for admission within that 
period. 

The operation of the quota law has necessitated the introduction of 
a new, although fortunately limited, series of immigration statistics, 
which are not comparable with existing statistics. This is due to 
two principal causes: 

1. In the quota law figures countr}^ of birth rules, whereas country 
of last permanent residence is regarded as country of origin in our 
ordinary immigration tables. 

2. Both immigrant and nonimmigrant aliens may appear in quota- 
law statistics, or, by reason of exemptions already referred to, arriving 
aliens of both classes may not be considered in such statistics at all. 

The statistical record of operations under the quota law, however, 
is a very simple one, the story of the fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 
being shown in a single table as follows : 

Text Table 1. — Immigration of aliens into the United States under the per centum 
limit act of May 19, 1921, during the fiscal year 1921-22. 



Country or place of birth. 





Number 




Total 


admitted 




admissible 


and charge. 


Per cent 


during 


to quota 


of quota 


fiscal year 


during the 


admitted. 


1921-22. 1 


fiscal year 
1921-22. 2 




288 


280 


97 


7, 451 ' 


4,797 


64.4 


1,563 


1,581. 


101.2 


302 


301 


99.6 


14, 282 


14,^8 


99.8 


301- 


85 


28.2 


5,69% 


3,284 


57.6 


3.921 
^ 71 


3,038 


77.5 


18 


25.3 


5,729 


4,343 


75.9 


68, 059 


19,053 
Sr^447 


28 


8,294 


104.7 


5,638 


6,035 


107.2 


42,057 


42, 149 


100.2 


92 


93 


101.1 


3,607 


2,408 


66.8 


12, 202 


5,941 


48.7 


25, 827 


26,129 


101.1 


2,520 


2,486 


98.6 


7,419 


7,429 


100.1 


34,284 


28,908 


84.4 


912 




97.4 


20,042 


8,766 


43.8 


3,752 


3,723 


99.2 


77,342 


42,670 


55.2 


6,426 


6,644 


103.5 


86 


144 


167.4 


1,589 


1,574 


99 


56 


214 


382.1 


906 


1,008 


111.2 


656 


1,096 


166.9 


81 


528 


651.9 


122 


195 


159.8 


279 


279 


100 


54 


75 


138.9 


65 


83 


127.7 


26 


13 


50 


356,995 


243,953 


68.3 



Albania 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Czechoslovakia 

Danzig 

Denmark 

Finland 

Fiume 

France 

Germany 

Greece 

Hungary 

Italy..; 

Luxemburg 

Netherlands 

Norway ^ 

Poland (including eastern Galicia) 

Portugal (including Azores and Madeira IskHids) 

Rumania 

Russia (including Siberia) 

Spain ., 

Sweden 

Sw-itzerland 

United Kingdom 

Yugoslavia 

other Europe (including Andorra, Gibraltar, Liechtenstein, Malta, 

Memel, Monaco, -San Marino, and Iceland) 

Armenia 

Palestine 

Syria 

Turkey (Europe and Asia, including Smyrna District) 

Other Asia (including Persia, Rhodes, Cyprus, and territory other 

than Siberia, which is not incli^ded in the Asiatic barred zone. 

Persons born in Siberia are included in the Russia quota! 

Africa f. 

Australia 

New Zealand 

Atlantic islands (other than Azores, Madeira, and islands adjacent 

to the American continents) 

Pacific islands (other than New Zealand and islands adjacent to 

the American continents) 

Total 



' The quotas here given differ in some instances from the figures as originally pubUshed. 
eing due to the inclusion of the foreign-born population of Alaska, Hawaii, and Porto Rico in a revision 



i. the differences 

being due to the inclusio- -'""-- '-— =— ^ '— • ' •.--!— " ■= -- j ^-.- x, ■ , .-._ 

of the basic population. 

> Subject to possible slight revision due to pending cases in which additional admissions chargeable to 
the quotas of the fiscal year 1921-22 may occur. 



6 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



The admissions in excess of quotas shown in the above table, the 
total number being 2,508, represent a theoretically "temporary dis- 
position of cases in which absolute and immediate rejection would 
have inflicted great hardship on innocent immigrants. Reference 
to the sources of the principal excesses — Other Asia, Turkey, Hun- 
gary, Poland, and Yugoslavia — is probably sufficient to explain and 
also to justify the action of the Secretary of Labor in exercising len- 
iency in these cases. Nearly all of the excess admissions occurred 
during the first six months of the fiscal year, before the seriousness of 
the law had been fully realized, and the arrival of these aliens after 
their respective quotas were exhausted represents in part the eager- 
ness of the aliens themselves to get in before the gates were closed, 
and in part the efi^orts of competing steamship lines to carry as much 
as possible of the limited immigrant business of the year. The latter 
seems to have been by far the more important factor. The last 
group admission in these excess cases occurred under a departmental 
order of December 23, 1921, known as the Christmas order, which 
saved upward of 1,000 immigrants from immediate deportation. Fol- 
lowing this a more rigid application of the law was inaugurated, and 
a considerable number of aliens were rejected and deported, with the 
result that comparatively few excess-quota cases arose during the 
latter months of the fiscal year. 

The administration of the quota law during its initail year developed 
many problems, and, especially, during the first six months of its 
operation, greatly overtaxed the machinery of the service and par- 
ticularly the facilities at Ellis Island; but now that it is possible to 
review its accomplishments, unaffected by its discouragements, I do 
not hesitate to say that the per centum limit law has accomplished 
the purpose for w'hich it was obviously enacted with a degree of suc- 
cess which few anticipated. 

A glance at the foregoing table will clearly show that while the 
countries of southern and eastern Europe, including Asiatic Turkey 
and the new nations created out of Turkish territory since the World 
War, have in the main exhausted, and in several instances exceeded, 
the quotas allotted to them, the opposite is true of nearly all of the 
countries of northern and western Europe, which, for the purpose of 
this discussion, include the British Islands, Scandinavia, Germany, 
Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and France. The status of 
these two areas, as well as that of all other countries which are within 
the scope of the quota law, are interesingly shown in the table which 
follows : 

Text Table 2. — Immigration of aliens into the United States under the per centum limit 
act of May 19, 1921, during the fiscal year 1921-22, by specified areas . 



Northern and western Europe 

Southern and eastern Europe and Asiatic Turkish territory 
other 



Total num- 
ber admissi- 
ble during 
fiscal year 
1921-22.1 



198, 082 

158,200 

713 



Number 

admitted 

and charged 

to quota 
during the 
fiscal year 

1921-22.2 



91, 862 

150,774 

1,317 



Per cent 
of quota 
admitted. 



46.4 
95.3 
184.7 



See note 1, Table : 



note 2, Table 1. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 7 

This table needs little comment, but it is interesting to note that 
the older sources of immigration, in northern and western Europe, 
have exhausted less than one-half of their quotas during the fiscal 
year, wliile on the other hand Russia is the only country of southern 
and eastern Europe for which any considerable part of a quota 
remained on June 30. In other words, the movement of the year 
from the older sources is apparently a perfectly normal one, although 
considerably smaller than it was prior to the World War, but it is 
impossible to say how many aliens would have come from southern 
and eastern Europe and Turkey had it not been for the limitation 
afforded by the per centum limit act. Reference to Table 1 will show 
that the large percentage of the excess admissions coming from 
"Other sources" is in the main due to the influx from "Other Asia," 
528 being admitted from this source temporarily and otherwise, 
whereas the total quota for the year was only 81 . It may be explained 
that the excess in this instance is for the most part attributable to the 
coming of the groups of so-called Assyrian refugees, who were forced 
to take refuge in Mesopotamia after fleeing from their homes in 
Persia during the war and who later applied for admission at various 
Atlantic and Pacific ports. 

As already explained, the per centum law directed the Secretary 
of State, the Secretary of Commerce, and the Secretary of Labor to 
allot quotas to countries concerned on a population base established 
by the United States census of 1910, and m so doing to take into 
account countries that were created and boundaries that were changed 
subsequent to that year. To assist in this task an advisory board was 
created, consisting of the following officials of the three departments 
'Concerned: Representing the Secretary of State, Harry A. McBride 
and Col. Lawrence Martin; representing the Secretary of Commerce, 
Dr. Joseph A. Hill, Assistant Director of the Census, and William C. 
Hunt, chief statistician; representing the Secretary of Labor, W. W. 
Husband, Commissioner General of Immigration, and Ethelbert 
Stewart, Commissioner of Labor Statistics. 

The difficulties attending this task will be appreciated when it is 
■considered that among the countries and areas in Europe and Asiatic 
Turkey to which quotas were allotted only 8 had emerged from the 
war period with the same boundaries, while 9 had been newly created 
and the boundaries of 13 others changed. The problem, of course, 
"Was to redistribute the European-born population of the United States 
as shown by the census of 1910 to the credit of the various countries 
and areas of Europe as they existed in 1921. For example, it was 
necessary to transfer parts of the German-born population to France, 
Belgium, Denmark, Poland, the free city of Danzig, and Memel 
region, while a basic population for newly created Poland was drawn 
from resident natives of Austria and Russia, as well as from Germany. 

The partition of the Turkish-born population in the United States 
among the various countries which participated in that Empire's dis- 
memberment was the most complex of the many problems under- 
taken, and the task of establishing a basic population for such 
countries as Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia was also a very difficult 
one. Fortunately Congress provided for estimates only in such cases, 
and while every effort was made to insure a fair and equitable distri- 
bution of the available quotas, it is realized that in many cases the 
results could be nothing out estimates. 



O EEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

BEVISED QUOTAS FOB 1922-23. , 

When the quota law, which, as before stated, expired by limitation 
on June 30, 1922, was extended for two years, certain changes which 
had occurred during the year necessitated some revision of the basic 
population of various countries. Germany's quota was somewhat 
reduced and Poland's correspondingly increased through the partition 
of Upper Silesia. Separate quotas were established for areas known 
as Pinsk, Esthonian, Lithuanian, Latvian, and Bessarabian regions, 
all of which territory was included with Russia in the quota allotment 
of 1921-22. A separate quota was given to Russian Armenia, and 
Turkish Armenia and the Smyrna region were merged with Turkey. 
Iceland and the Memel region, which were included with "Other 
Europe" last year, now have separate quota allotments. The quotas 
of New Zealand and Pacific Islands were merged and other minor 
changes made. The following table and map B show revised quotas 
and also the number admissible per month, under the provision that 
not to exceed 20 per cent of the annual quota of any country may 
enter in any month : 

Text Table 3. — Number of aliens admissible under the act of May 19, 1921, entitled 
"An act to limit the immigration into the United States," as extended by Public Reso- 
lution 55, Sixty-seventh Congress, approved May 11, 1922. 



Country or region of birth.' 


Number ad- 
missible an- 
nually. 


Highest num- 
ber admissible 
in any month. 


Albania... 


288 

230 

7,451 

1,563 

302 

14,357 

301 

5,619 

3,921 

71 

5,729 

67,607 

3,294 

5,638 

75 

42,057 

92 

150 

3,607 

12,202 

21 . 076 

5, 786 

4,284 

2,465 

7,419 

2,792 

21,613 

1,348 

1,540 

2,310 


58 




46 






Belgium 


313 


Bulgaria . 


61 




2 871 


Danzig, free city of 


60 


Denmark 


1 124 


Finland 


'784 


Fiume, free State of 2. . . 


14 


France 


1 146 




13; 524 

659 




Hungary. 


1 128 




' 15 


Italy . . . . 


8,411 


Luxemburg . 


19 




30 




721 


Norway. ... , 


2,440 


Poland . 


4 215 
1,157 




Pinsk region * . . . . 


857 


Portugal (including Azores and Madeira Islands) 


493 




1,484 




558 


Russia (European and Asiatic) ' 


4,323 


Esthonian region 8 


270 




308 


Lithuanian region w 


462 



1 The immigration quotas assigned to the various countries and regions listed below should not be 
regarded as having any political significance whatever, or as involving recognition of new Governments, 
or of new boiuidaries, or of transfers of territory, except as the United States Government has already made 
such recognition in a formal and official manner. 

2 Given up by Hungary and by Austria, and therefore can not be included in the quota of either of these 
countries. 

' Given up by Germany but not yet allotted to any other country. 
* Given up by Austria but not yet allotted to any other country. 

5 Th« area bounded by the so-called (a) Curzon line, (6) treaty of Riga line, (c) Polish-Lithuanian neutral 
zone northwest of Vilna, and (d) eastern Galicia. 

6 The land area bounded by (o) the Pruth and Dniester Rivers and the eastern boundary of Bukovina. 
' Excluding the barred zone, and without the Bessarabian, Esthonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, and Pinsk 

regions, which are special immigration areas. 

8 The land area, with adjacent islands, bounded by the so-called (a) Russian-Esthonian boundary, and 
(6) Esthonian-Latvian boundary. 

9 The land area bounded by the so-called (0) Esthonian-Latvian boundary, (6) Russian-Latvian bound- 
ary, and (c) Latvian-Lithuanian boundary. 

"> The land area bounded by the so-called (a) Latvian-Lithuanian boundary, (6) Polish-Lithuanian 
neutral zone northwest of Vilna, (c) German frontier, and (d) boundary of Memel region. 



REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. V 

Text Table 3. — Number of aliens admissible under the act of May 19, 1921, entitled 
"^n act to limit the immigration into the United States,'^ as extended by Public Reso- 
lution 55, Sixty-seventh Congress, approved May 11, 1922 — Continued. 



Country or region of birth. 


Number ad- 
missible an- 
nually. 


Highest num- 
ber admissible 
in any month. 




912 
20, 042 

3,752 
77,342 

6,426 

86 
57 
928 

2,388 

81 

122 

121 
279 

80 




Sweden 


4 008 




'750 






Yugosla\'ia 


1 285 


Other Europe (including Andorra, Gibraltar, Liechtenstein, Malta, 


17 


Palestine.. . 


12 


Syria 


186 


Turkey (European and Asiatic, including Smyrna region and Turkish- 




Other Asia (including Cyprus, Hedjaz, Iraq (Mesopotamia), Persia, 
Rhodes, and any other" Asiatic territory not Included in the barred 
zone. Persons born in Asiatic Russia are included in the Russian 
quota) ' . . 


^ 16 


Africa 


25 


Atlantic islands (other than Azores, Canary Islands, Madeira, and 




Australia 


56 




16 






Total ... 


357, 803 


71 561 







HEAD TAX COLLECTED AND ADMINISTRATIVE FINES IM- 
POSED. 

Under that provision of the immigration act of February 5, 1917, 
which reads "That there shall be levied, collected, and j)aid a tax of 
S8 for every alien, including alien seamen regularly admitted as pro- 
vided in this act, entering the United States" the total sum of $2,- 
503,096 was collected during the year and turned into the general 
funds of the United States Treasury. The head tax collected from 
aliens who entered the United States forms the principal revenue 
derived from the operation of the immigration laws, and usually it 
is in excess of the amount annually appropriated by Congress for 
the conduct of the Immigration Service and the enforcement of the 
immigration and Chinese exclusion laws. Owing to the sharply 
reduced immigration during the year, however, the appropriation 
which was allotted exceeded the head-tax collections by $796,904. 
The deficit was partly made up by other collections (administrative 
fines assessed, bond forfeitures, etc.), amounting to S489,781, which 
made the total revenue for the year $2,992,877. 

ALIENS PHYSICALLY, MENTALLY, OR MORALLY DEFECTIVE. 

The Chinese exclusion acts exclude on grounds purely racial. 
The act of May 19, 1921, as amended and extended, restricts immi- 
gration here on a basis wholly numerical, is devoid of selective feat- 
ures, and its administration is largely an arithmetical problem. But 
the general immigration act (act of February 5, 1917) applies a test 
of physical, mental, moral, and, in a limited way, educational 
fitness, and, to this extent, is a selective law. Its purpose is to 
exclude from admission all aliens who, upon examination at our 
ports, are found to fall below the prescribed physical, mental, or 
moral standard, those who are diseased, and (with some excep- 
tions) those who can not read in the English language or some other 
language or dialect. 



10 EEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table 16 (pp. 110-113) shows, in an illuminating way, the numbers 
of aliens refused admission under the several general headings above 
mentioned, as well as of those debarred for other causes, including 
economic. Of those debarred because physically defective, it will 
be observed that 672 were afflicted with loathsome or dangerous 
contagious diseases (tuberculosis, trachoma, favus, etc.). Included 
in the list of those rejected for mental deficiencies were 70 feeble- 
minded, 82 insane, 7 idiots, and 35 imbeciles. In the morally de- 
ficient were 113 prostitutes P4 nrocurers, and 176 criminals. 

The figures given above with regard to those of the sexually im- 
moral class indicate the degree of success which has attended the 
efi^orts of the immigration officials to enforce those provisions of the 
law which had as their purpose the suppression of the traffic in alien 
women and girls for immoral purposes. In addition to the mere 
act of exclusion, however, prosecutions, particularly of the pro- 
curers, were attempted wherever practicable, and a number of con- 
victions were secured. 



ALIEN CONTRACT LABORERS. 

During the year 809 alien contract laborers were debarred, as 
compared with 993 in 1921. During this same period 71 aliens of 
this class were arrested and deported after having unlawfully entered 
the country. The number arrested and deported in 1921 for like 
cause was 152. 

The fact that, owing to depressed industrial conditions, there was 
a plentiful supply of domestic labor of nearly all kinds throughout 
the year tended to lessen the temptation to employers of labor to 
endeavor to resort to the overstocked foreign labor markets, most 
of the violations in this particular having been by small employers 
sending abroad for relatives or friends, offering as an inducement to 
their coming to provide them with employment. For this reason 
but few prosecutions under this provision of the law were attempted. 
However, the economic value of this provision of the law has in no- 
wise been overlooked or its enforcement slighted, as the figures 
covering rejections and deportations will serve to indicate. 

ALIEN STOWAWAYS. 

There have been fewer arrivals of this class during the past year 
than for several years past, the figures being 1,719 for the year, as 
compared with 3,539 in 1921 and 2,392 in 1920. The bureau does not 
know just how to account for the reduced stowaway arrivals, for 
usually the more stringent the general laws in force the greater the 
endeavors which are made to evade them. Possibly, however, the 
reduction is due, in part, to the vigorous manner with which the law 
has been applied to stowaways and the exercise of greater vigilance 
on the part of the steamship companies. These aliens not only steal 
their passages to the ports of this country but come with the fixed 
purpose of stealing their way into the country because (with few 
exceptions) of their inadmissibilit}^ under our laws 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 11 

ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION. 

The number of aliens of the Chinese race admitted to the United 
States for the purpose of residence was shghtly in excess of last year, 
the fio;ures being 4,465 and 4,017, respectively. In addition to those 
admitted. G04 Chinese arrived at ports of this country and, after fail- 
ing to establish that they were entitled to admission under our laws, 
were deported. The number thus debarred and deported last year 
was 404. During the year 6,700 persons of that race were granted 
the return privilege after investigation in each instance. A great deal 
of time and effort on the part of oiu" officers was necessarily consumed 
in conducting these investigations, many of which necessarily were 
quite extensive. 

The inspector in charge at Ketchikan, Alaska, in submitting his 
annual report, has furnished the following interesting comment inci- 
dent to the seasonal movement of Chinese laborers to Alaska for 
employment in the salmon canneries, such movement having been 
of considerable proportions in past years : 

As has been stated in previous reports, the permanent Chinese population is very 
small, probably 75 in the whole of Alaska, and fewer of this nationality are coming 
to the Territory each spring with the horde of seasonal workers. Formerly, practi- 
cally all of the common labor about the salmon canneries was performed by Chinese, 
but the old coolies are fast dying off or are returning tp China and the younger Chinese 
do not follow this work. 

There has been a great decrease in the number of persons of the 
Chinese race that have sought to be admitted at Unites States ports 
for the purpose of proceeding in transit to other countries or places 
and. consequently, of the number granted the privilege of transit 
under bond. The number granted such privilege, the figures show, 
was 7.239, as compared with 17,907 in 1921. The majority of these 
transits were destined to Cuba and other islands of the West Indies 
group. Comment relative to this movement will be found under 
the subheading "Smuggling and surreptitious entry of aliens" (pp. 13 
to 17). 

The number of Japanese aliens admitted to continental United 
States for the year was 8,981, or 1,694 fewer than were admitted 
in 1921. There was also a slight increase in the number admitted 
to Hawaii, the figures for the two years being 3,856 and 3,599, re- 
spectively. A not inconsiderable number of these new arrivals 
were the wives of Japanese aliens already domiciled here and in the 
Hawaiian Islands. 

SEAMEN. 

General supervision of the seamen work for the year has continued 
under the bureau's special representative, whose report forms Ap- 
pendix II hereto (pp. 151 to 154). As this report contains a com- 
prehensive presentation of the subject, but little additional comment 
appears to be necessary. 

Effective September 1 last, there was put into operation a regulation 
requiring that Chinese seamen shipped in foreign parts or places 
furnish bonds, in the penalty of $500 each, as a condition precedent 
to their landing, for any purpose, in ports of this country, such bonds 
to indemnify the Government against their remaining liere in excess 
of 60 daj^s. The promulgation of such a regulation was deemed 
to be necessary because of the very large numbers of such aliens 



12 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

who, taking advantage of this wide-open doorway, were abandoning 
their calUng, by deserting their vessels or being discharged there- 
from under the seaman's act, and remaining here with but shght 
risk of being detected and deported. At one time there were from 
three to five thousand such seamen in the port of New Yofk alone, 
having been discharged from vessels on which their arrival occured 
while such vessels were laid up awaiting an improvement in shipping 
conditions. The presence of so many idle and (in many instances) 
destitute Chinese seamen in New York at one time was a matter of 
grave concern not only to the bureau but to the local State and city 
authorities. Now that, according to reports, many of these Chinese 
have drifted into employment in neighboring manufacturing plants 
the problem has become even more acute. While many of these Chi- 
nese have been able to return to their calling of seamen, and some, with 
financial assistance from friends and relatives, have returned to China, 
it is estimated that there are still between two and three thousand of 
them in New York and vicinity. While these Chinese are proper sub- 
jects for deportation, both under our Chinese exclusion laws and our 
general immigration act, it would cost probably as much as half a mil- 
lion dollars to deport them, and the funds are not available. Had an 
enforceable bonding arrangement been in operation at the time of the 
arrival of these . seamen their landing could, of course, have been 
prevented. 

It should be asserted in connection with the foregoing that our 
destitute alien seamen problem was not confined to the port of New 
York, nor were such seamen all of the Chinese race. It will be re- 
called that upon the advent of depressed shipping conditions com- 
merical vessels by the hundred were laid up in all of our principal 
ports to await a resumption of activities. A fair complement of the 
crews of these vessels were aliens of various nationalities, and they 
were, of course, discharged, as permitted by our navigation laws, 
when the vessels were placed out of commission. Many of these sea- 
men afterwards became destitute, some were repatriated by the con- 
suls of their Governments, some have now returned to their seaman 
calling, and others are still here, to the aggravation of the unemploy- 
ment problem. 

While the application of the bonding regulation has not stopped the 
practice which Chinese seamen have long followed of deserting as a 
means of obtaining entry to this country in defiance of its laws, it has 
served to very materially check such practice, as shown by the figures 
from our San Francisco office, at which port the greatest number of 
reported desertions have occurred in the past. These figures show 
697 such desertions in 1921 and 340 for the present year. A majority 
oi these deserters had furnished bonds in the penal sum above men- 
tioned, which bonds were promptly declared breached and the pen- 
alties thereof collected and turned into the general funds of the 
Treasury. 

Every justification for a continuation of the bonding policy would 
appear to exist. On June 15 last the regulation was somewhat 
broadened and was made to also apply to alien seamen from the so- 
called Asiatic "barred zone," referred to in section 3 of the immigra- 
tion act of February 5, 1917. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 13 

ALIEN ANARCHISTS. 

There were no debarments for this cause at our ports during; the 
year, although a considerable number of aliens of this most undesir- 
able type were sifted out by our consular officials abroad and refused 
yises upon which to come, for which reason they were unable to sail 
for this country. This does not mean that none such came here durin^ 
the year, howeyer. for doubtless a number did come and succeeded 
in gaining admission, despite the endeayors of the port immigration 
officials to detect them. The number of anarchists and radicals of 
other classes arrested and deported during the present year was 64. 
This number is not large, due, in a measure, to a reduction in alien 
radical actiyities and to an inability to deport aliens to Russia at the 
present time, although a number of the subjects of that country 
of established radical tendencies haye been placed under orders of 
deportation during the year. 

SMUGGLING AND SURREPTITIOUS ENTRY OF ALIENS. 

From both our northern and our southern land borders discon- 
certing reports of smuggling operations throughout the year have been 
receiyed. No less disconcerting haye been the reports from our 
Florida district of smuggling operations at points on the Atlantic and 
Gulf coasts of that State. While many of the inadmissible aliens 
who haye obtained entry in this manner haye been arrested and 
deported, undoubtedly many others haye succeeded in their endeav- 
ors and now, haying become merged in the alien population of our 
large cities, run little risk of detection. Of course, smuggling across 
our land borders has not been confined to the year just passed, as 
previous annual reports of the bureau will show; but the stringency of 
the existing passport regulations and of the immigration laws has 
served to accentuate it, for those who have been unable to obtain 
consular vises on which to come to the United States and others who 
have desired to evade the restrictions of the "quota" act have pro- 
ceeded to both Canada and Mexico in large numbers, and it is these 
who have endeavored, and are endeavoring, to gain admission by 
stealth, usually with the aid of hired smugglers. 

The following general observations made by the Commissioner of 
Immigration at Montreal relative to Canadian-border smuggling 
operations will, I believe, prove of interest : 

The past year has been the foremost in the histroy of this district in the matter of 
smuggling, to cope viiih. which our officers were constantly on the alert, and it is believed 
that no small amount of commendation is due the inspectors involved in the detec- 
tion of smuggling operations and the apprehension and prosecution of the guilty 
parties, particular mention being made of the credital^le work of inspectors located at 
Newport, and Island Pond, Vt., Rouses Point and Ogdensburg, N. Y., and Detroit, 
Mich. 

The difficulties met with abroad in obtaining x\merican consular passport vises and 
the exhaustion of quotas tended to deflect many aliens to Canada whose real inten- 
tion was to reach the United States, and the natural results were the increased attempts 
to smuggle from Canada into the United States, necessitating additional activities on 
the part of our officers, not a few of whom devoted considerable overtime to this 
feature of the inspection work and oftentimes assumed risks of imminent danger. 

It is fully appreciated that dope, liquor, Chinese, and alien smuggling has become 
a lucrative business and is being carried on by international gangs in which there 
have been found the hardest, most daring, and cleverest criminals, backed by no 
limit of funds and possessed of the highest powered vehicles, boats, etc., the automo- 
bile predominating as a means of traveling. 



14 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENEBAl, OF IMMIGRATION. 

The ways of the smuggler to defeat the law are devious, cunning, and many, and 
while the greater number of attempts are made by night via places not designated 
as ports of entry, there are many attempts to smuggle detected, during the day at 
regular ports of entry, where efforts are made to take advantage of crowds, such as 
obtain at Detroit, and there has been found a growing practice to transfer identifi- 
cation documents, including United States citizenship certificates. 

The situation on our southern land boundary is succinctly stated 
in the following excerpt from the annual report of the supervising 
inspector of the Mexican border district: 

During the early part of the present calendar year a number of Hindu aliens were 
apprehended in the vicinity of El Paso after they had entered without inspection, 
and investigation disclosed what appeared to be carefully devised plans for the 
importation on a large scale of contrabands of that race, who were thereafter to be 
employed by fellow countrymen operating ranches in <jalifornia. Certain of these 
domiciled Hindus came to the border from California and in El Paso, Tex., and 
Juarez, Mexico, perfected arrangements with several Mexican smugglers whereby the 
contrabands were unlawfully brought into the United States and thereafter trans- 
ported by automobile and train toward their interior destination. These were arrested 
and deported, and evidence was secured which resulted in the successful prosecution 
of the ringleaders of the conspiracies as well as of the Mexican smugglers, the former 
being sentenced to serve penitentiary terms. 

Apparently the celerity with which the Government acted to prosecute those 
criminally implicated and to deport the aliens has caused at least a temporary aban- 
donment of the plan. Information has recently been received that a number of 
Hindus now in Panama will attempt to enter the United States across the southern 
California border, and the officers of this service will, of course, put forth every 
effort to cope with that problem should it in fact eventuate. 

In the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920, there was a very marked influx across the 
Mexican border of European aliens who for one reason or another, maiidy because 
of stringent passport regulations, were unable to proceed to continental United States. 
Hundreds of these aliens were apprehended by the immigration patrols on the Mexi- 
can border, and their appropriate disposition Isecame such a problem that the bureau 
and department early recognized that only the adoption of the most positive measures 
would prevent future serious consequences. It is unnecessary here to narrate the 
various and successive steps adopted to mitigate the evil. Suffice it to say that with 
the close of the fiscal year 1921 the traffic had all but ceased. There is no doubt' 
that the activities of certain benevolent Jewish organizations in the United States 
who sent representatives to Mexico to make known the futility of efforts upon the 
part of the newly arrived European aliens to effect clandestine entry into the United 
States contributed in no small degree to the improvement in the situation. How- 
ever, in the spring of 1922 and until the close of that fiscal year there was a noticeable 
resumption of the efforts upon the part of aliens of the class referred to to surrepti- 
tiously enter this country. The most energetic measures were immediately revived 
to put a atop to this new movement and, though the patrols were somewhat v/eakened 
by unfilled vacancies due to a threatened deficit in our apiaropriation, the movement 
was apparently checked for the time being. The experience of the past two years 
in dealing with Europeans unable to secure entry at our seaports who look to the 
back door of this country as a favorable means of ingress has demonstrated as nothing 
else could the ever-existing and increasing need of a strong border patrol. 

The inspector in charge at Jacksonville, Fla., has reported as follows 
concerning smuggling operations in his district during the past year: 

Owing to the large movement of Chinese laborers arriving from China and passing 
through the United States in transit to Cuba, annual reports from this office for several 
years have suggested the strong probability that the ulterior purpose of the majority 
of such Chinamen coming to Cuba was to subsequently gain surreptitious entry into 
the United States. Those suggestions have now developed into a reality, for the year 
just closed has been a succession of repeated attempts on the part of Chinese laborers, 
frequently in considerable numbers, to smuggle into this district. 

From the statistical figures furnished in this report it will be noted that warrants 
were issued for the arrest of 128 Chinamen, practically all of whom were apprehended, 
either in the act of smuggling or immediately after having been smuggled into the 
United States. The largest number captured at one time was a party of 43 in the vicin- 
ity of St. Andrews, Fla. The number of Chinamen who have been successful in gain- 
ing entrance to the United States from Cuba is, of course, unknown, but there is no use 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 15 

in denying the fact that a considerable number have succeeded in eluding our officers, 
as there have been a number of instances in which reports of groups of Chinamen 
having entered the country upon investigation have been found to be correct, the 
Chinamen in the meantime ha\dng reached the interior. 

All indications are that smuggling activities in the district are on the increase and, 
if present indications are borne out, the coming year will require strenuous work to 
keep the situation in hand. 

This subject has been presented to the bureau in detail in various reports. With the 
increased allotment of funds and additions to the personnel of the district which have 
been promised it is believed it \vill soon be in much better shape to cope with the 
situation. It will be understood, of course, that the smuggling of aliens is to a large 
extent in connection with other contraband, such as liquors and drugs. 

In addition to Chinese smuggling, there is a constant effort to smuggle European 
aliens into the United States from the West India Islands, especially Cuba. This is 
due, of course, to the three per cent act, as a great many aliens during the past 12 
months migrated to Cuba on the assumption that when they had lived there one year 
they would be exempt from the quota act. Since the new law requires a residence of 
five years in Cuba to gain exemption from the act, aliens are now making every effort 
to get into the United States by any means. 

On the whole it is believed the officers in this district have been very successful in 
apprehending aliens, and they should be commended for their strenuous work and 
vigilance in this connection. Personally, I do not think that I can speak too highly 
of the work that has been accomplished by officers in this district. They have been 
faithful, vigilant, and persistent. 

Smuggling operations between Cuba and points on the Florida 
coast, according to a number of reports (which reports were, in a 
measure, repeatedly being verified by the capture by local immigra- 
tion officials of aliens who have been smuggled in or were in process 
of being smuggled in), having assumed alarming proportions, in the 
month of May the bureau selected and sent two experienced ofiicials 
to Florida and Cuba for the purpose of making a thorough investi- 
gation into and study of the situation in order that the most effective 
measures possible might be adopted to cope with it. These officials 
have now returned to Washington after having conducted a very 
searching aud complete investigation. I have already placed in 
your hands a copy of the very comprehensive report which they 
submitted upon their return. Some of the recommendations made 
in the concluding portion of this report are already in process of 
adoption and others will be adopted as rapidly as the circumstances 
will permit. 

Briefly, it may be stated that the bureau's investigators found 
that there are now in Cuba some 30,000 young Chinese aliens, many 
of whom have proceeded there in the past two or three years because 
of the known facility with which admission to that coimtry could be 
obtained and with the fixed purpose in mind of later, as opportunity 
might seem to offer, making their way to near-by inaccessible and 
unguarded points on the Florida coast and entering surreptitiously; 
that these Chinese in Cuba, for the most part, are unemployed, are 
not seeking employment, and, in fact, there is no employment there 
for them; that, notwithstanding these conditions, young Chinese in 
relatively large numbers are still proceeding to Cuba, with no fixed 
intention of remaining there; that a not inconsiderable number of 
persons resident in Habana are engaged in the smuggling of aliens of 
all classes, narcotics, and whisky to points on the Florida coast, and 
even to points on our coast line more distant, as far north as New 
York and west as far as New Orleans; that a considerable number of 
power launches, of good speed and capable of canying from 20 to 40 
or 50 aliens, are available at all times in Habana and neighboring 



16 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

harbors; that Chinese aliens are wilUng to pay anywhere from S500 
to $1,000 to be smuggled across and into the United States, and aliens 
of other nationalities from $100 to $200; that a well-organized ring, 
or rings, for the smuggling in of Chinese exists, with ramifications 
throughout this country and extending to Cuba; and tliat, as a 
matter of fact, the smuggling of aliens from Cuba is virtually 
rampant. 

The investigators also ascertained that a number of European 
aliens (7,000 or more, according to apparently authentic information 
furnished them), have proceeded to Cuba in the past year, the 
real and ultimate destination of most of whom was the United 
States; and that there are now probably not exceeding 2,500 or 3,000 
such aliens in Cuba, the remainder having "disappeared." It is 
known that some of these aliens have gone to Mexico, apparently in 
the hope of working their way to the border and smuggling across, 
some few have gone to South America; and the remainder — where? 
The answer may well be inferred from our hundreds of miles of nec- 
essarily (by reason of our lack of officers and funds) unguarded coast 
line within easy reach of Cuba, with its numerous islands and all 
but inaccessible bays and natural harbors for small craft, and the 
fact that even with our few officers, placed at widely scattered places 
on this immense water frontage, a considerable number of such aliens 
have been apprenheded after having been smuggled in. Needless to 
say the aliens so apprehended were in each instance deported (at 
considerable cost to the bureau's meager appropriation, it is true), 
and, wherever possible, those identified with the smuggling ventures 
have been vigorously prosecuted. 

To the uninitiated it may seem strange that aliens not subject to 
the operation of special exclusion legislation (as are the Chinese) 
would adopt this roundabout, expensive, and somewhat uncertain 
method of reaching their objective — the United States. The an- 
swer is found in the existing passport-vise regulations and the 
"quota" immigration act. Many of the aliens have chosen this 
route of travel because, for one reason or another, usually by reason 
of being inadmissible under our immigration laws, they have been 
unable to secure a consular vise entitling them to come here, and 
others for the purpose of acquiring a residence in Cuba of one year 
which would have entitled them to exemption under this act (i. e., 
the act of May 19,1921) as it existed up to June 11, 1922. On that 
date, however, the joint resolution extending the act for two years 
from June 30, 1922, and increasing the time limit to acquire exemp- 
tion in contiguous and neighboring countries and adjacent islands 
to five years became operative, making impossilbe a realization of 
plans on the part of those who had proceeded to Cuba for the purpose 
of there living out the one-year period. That the lengthening of 
this period from one to five years will serve as a stimulant to smug- 
gling activities is doubtless a fact. 

If the service is to cope with this smuggling problem with the 
desired degree of success, obviously it must garner all the resources 
at its command and throw them into that field where smuggling 
operations are most rampant, and that it must seek the cooperation 
of the police organizations of other branches of the Government, 
and of Congress in the matter of appropriations, to enable it to carry 
on the work. The forces of the other side are well organized and 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



17 



financed; the Government's should be, else its efforts will be pitiably 
weak and ineffective. 

During the year there have been a total of 4,366 aliens deported 
from the United States for all causes. The following table shows 
the nuriflber of such deportations by races: 

DEPORTATION OF ALIENS. 



African 99 

Armenian 19 

Bohemian and Moravian (Czech). . 6 
Bulg^arian, Serbian, and Montene- 
grin 18 

Chinese 411 

Croatian and Slovenian 47 

Dutch and Flemish 45 

East Indian 70 

English 461 

Finnish 29 

French 292 

German 170 

Greek 96 

Hebrew 214 

Irish 155 

Italian (north) 31 

Italian (south) 373 

Japanese 113 

Korean 2 

Lithuanian 17 



Magyar 32 

Mexican 879 

Polish 81 

Portuguese 35 

Rumanian 33 

Russian 75 

Ruthenian (Russniak) 13 

Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes, 

and Swedes) 95 

Scotch 127 

Slavok 39 

Spanish 156 

Spanish American 36 

Svrian 42 

Turkish 9 

Welsh 7 

West Indian (except Cuban) 4 

Other peoples 35 

Total 4,366 



It is an absolute requirement of nearly all of the countries of 
Europe that passports be obtained for their citizens, or subjects, 
before their repatriation will be permitted, and a number of these 
countries will not receive them at all, as deports from the United 
States, if they have been without the realm in excess of a specified 
time. Needless to say, this attitude on the part of the foreign 
Governments has served very materially to complicate the problem 
of deporting indigent and undesirable aliens and greatly to increase 
the expense of conducting this branch of the bureau's activities, 
for, in many instances, it is necessary to hold aliens in institutions 
at public expense during the usually long-drawn-out process of 
obtaining passports for them. In some cases the foreign consuls 
here located will not grant passports until communication has been 
had with their home Governments and investigations conducted — 
a process which necessarily consumes many weeks time, during which 
time the alien is being maintained at the expense of the public. 
Efforts to simplify this procedure are continually being made, but 
so far they have borne little or no fruit. 

Lack of funds has prevented the bureau from conducting an active 
campaign against aliens unlaM^ully resident here, and many such 
who were proper subjects for deportation under our laws have been 
permitted to remain for this reason. In fact, it may be stated that 
the bureau has been careful to see that the activities in this direc- 
tion of its field officers have been confined to the more extreme cases 
where, for peculiarly good cause, deportation should be accomplished. 

10656—22 2 



18 KEPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAIi OF IMMIGEilTION. 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing this report, the bureau desires to make grateful and fitting 
acknowledgement of the efficient cooperation and assistance which 
it has received from employees of the service, and also of the most 
valuable aid rendered by the officials of the Public Health Serv- 
ice who have so ably and efficiently performed the important task 
of medically inspecting aliens seeking the privilege of entering this 
country. 

Respectfully, 

W. W. Husband, 

Commissioner General. 
Hon, James J. Davis, 

Secretary of Labor. 



APPENDIX 1 



STATISTICS OF IMMIGRATION 



19 



APPENDIX I. 
STATISTICS OF IMMIGRATION. 

The following tables present the immigration statistics for the past 
year in comparison with previous years, beginning with 1820, and so 
arranged as to furnish information upon practically all sides of the 
immigration question that can be represented statistically. 

In the classification of aliens the terms (1) immigrant and emi- 
grant and (2) nonimmigrant and nonemigrant, respectively, relate 
(1) to permanent arrivals and departures and (2) to temporary 
arrivals and departures. In compiling the statistics under this 
classification the following rule is observed: Arriving aliens whose 
permanent domicile has been outside the United States who intend 
to reside permanently in the United States are classed as immigrant 
aliens; departing aliens whose permanent residence has been in the 
United States who intend to reside permanently abroad are classed 
as emigrant aliens; all alien residents of the United States making 
a temporary trip abroad and all aliens residing abroad making a tem- 
porary trip to the United States are classed as nonemigrant aliens on 
the outward journey and nonimmigrant aliens on the inward. 

A. GENERAL IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES I TO XXIV-A). 

Page 

Table I. — Aliens admitted, departed, debarred, and deported, and United 
States citizens arrived and departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 
1922, by ports 24 

Table II. — Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure of 
aliens, fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 1922, by months 25 

Table ill. — Net increase or decrease of population by arrival and departure 
of aliens, fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 1922, by countries 26 

Table IV. — Net increase or deicrease of population by admission and departure 
of aliens, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 28 

Table V. — Intencled future permanent residence of aliens admitted and last 
permanent residence of aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 
States and Territories 29 

Table VI. — Occupations of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1922 30 

Table VII. — Sex, age, literacy, financial condition, etc., of immigrant aliens 
admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 32 

Table VII-a. — Sex, age, and length of residence in the United States of emi- 
grant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30. 1922, by races or peoples 35 

Table VII-b. — Conjugal condition of immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 36 

Table VII-c. ^Conjugal condition of emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 38 

Table VII-d. — Sex, age, and length of residence in the United States of natural- 
ized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples. . 40 

Table VII-e. — Sex, age, and length of residence in the United States of native- 
born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922. by races or peoples. . 41 

Table VIII. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 
countries of last permanent residence and races or peoples 42 

Table VIII-A. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 

countries of intended future residence and races or peoples 46 

Table VIII-b. — Naturalized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 
1922, by countries of intended future permanent residence and races or 
peoples 50 

21 



22 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table VIII-c. — ^Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended J-une 30, 1922, 

by countries of intended future permanent residence and races or peoples ... 53 
Table IX. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 

States of intended future residence and races or peoples 54 

Table IX-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 

States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 57 

Table IX-b. — Natiu-alized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

by States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 60 

Table IX-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

by States of last permanent residence and races or peoples 63 

Table X. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by oc- 

ctipations and races or peoples 64 

Table X-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by oc- 
cupations and races or peoples 68 

Table X-b. — Natiu-alized citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

by occupations and races or peoples 72 

Table X-c. — Native-born citizens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

by occupations and races or peoples 76 

Table XI. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 

States of intended future residence and occupations 78 

Table XI-a. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 

States of last permanent residence and occupations 84 

Table XI-b. — Immigrant aliens admitted during fiscal year ended June 30, 

1922, by States of intended futm-e residence and ports of entry 90 

Table XII. — Immigrant aliens admitted during specified periods, January 1, 

1921, to June 30, 1922, by; races or peoples and sex 94 

Table XII-a. — Emigrant aliens departed during specified periods, January 1, 

1921, to June 30, 1922, by races of peoples and sex 95 

Table XIII. — Sex, age, literacy, financial condition, etc., of nonimmigrant 

aliens admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 96 

Table XIII-A. — Sex, age, and length of residence in United States of nonemi- 

grant aliens departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples 99 

Table XIV. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 

1922, by races or peoples 100 

Table XIV- a.— Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899, 

to 1922, by countries 102 

Table XIV-b. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 
1922, by races or peoples 104 

Table XIV-c.^Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 

1922, by countries 106 

Table XV.— Total immigration each year, 1820 to 1922 108 

Table XV-a. — Net increase of population by arrival and departure of aliens, 

fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 1922 109 

Table XVI. — Aliens debarred from entering the United States, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples and causes 110 

Table XVI-a. — ^Aliens debarred, and aliens deported after entering, 1892 to 

1922, by causes 114 

Table XVI-b. — -Permanent residents of contiguous foreign territory applying 
for temporary sojourn in the United States refused admission, fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1922, by causes 116 

Table XVII. — Aliens deported to countries whence they came, after entering 
the United States, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples and 
causes 117 

Table XVIII. — Appeals from decisions under immigration law, applications 
for admission on bond without appeal, applications for hospital treatment, 
and applications for transit, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by causes 121 

Table XVIII-a. — Appeals from decisions under immigration law, applica- 
tions for admission on bond without appeal, applications for hospital treat- 
ment, and applications for transit, fiscal year ended Jime 30, 1922, by ports. . . 122 

Table XIX. — Deserting alien seamen, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by ports. 123 

Table XX. — Alien stowaways found on board vessels arriving at ports of the 

United States, fiscal year "ended June 30, 1922, by ports 123 

Table XXI. — Comparison between alien arrivals and head-tax settlements, 

fiscal year ended June 30, 1922 123 

Table XXII. — Aliens admitted in continental United States .from insular 

United States, 1908 to 1922, inclusive, by ports 124 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL, OF IMMIGRATION. 23 

Page. 

Table XXII-a. — Immigrant aliens admitted in continental United States 
from insular United States and in insular United States from other insulars 
and from mainland (continental United States), by ports, fiscal year ended 
June 30. 1922 124 

Table XXII-b. — Nonimmigrant aliens admitted in continental United States 
from insular United States and in insular United States from other insulars 
and from mainland (continental United States), by ports, fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1922 125 

Table XXIII. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally defective, 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, showing sex, age, class of defect, and dis- 
position, bv diseases or defects 126 

Table XXIII-a. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally 
defective, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, showing races or peoples, by diseases 
or defects " 128 

Table XX 1 1 I-b.— Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally defec- 
tive, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, showing organ or portion of body affected, 
by diseases or defects 130 

Table XXIV. — Aliens granted hospital treatment under sections 18 and 22 of the 
immigration law, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races 132 

Table XXIV-a.— Aliens granted hospital treatment under sections 18 and 22 of 
the immigration law, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races 133 

B. JAPANESE IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES A TO F). 

Table A. — Japanese aliens applied for admission, admitted, debarred, deported, 

and departed, fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 1922 134 

Table B . — Increase or "decrease of Japanese population by alien arrivals and 

departures, fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 1922, by months 134 

Table C. — Occupations of Japanese aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year 

ended June 30, 1922 135 

Table D. — Statistics of immigration and emigration of Japanese, collected by 

the United States Government, compared with those reported by the Japanese 

Government, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922 135 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1922, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. . . 136 
Table F. — Japanese alien arrivals in Hawaii, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement 140 

C. CHINESE IMMIGRATION AND EMIGRATION (TABLES 1 TO 8). 

Table 1. — Summary of Chinese seeking admission to the United States, fiscal 

years ended June 30, 1917 to 1922, by classes 142 

Table 2. — Chinese seeking admission to the United States, fiscal year ended June 
30, 1922, by classes and ports 143 

Table 3. — <^hinese claiming American citizenship by birth, or to be the wives or 
children of American citizens, admitted, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by 
ports 145 

Taole 4. — Appeals to department from excluding decisions under Chinese- 
exclusion laws, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by ports 145 

Table 5. — Disposition of cases of resident Chinese applying for return certifi- 
cates, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922 145 

Table 6. — Action taken in the cases of Chinese persons arrested on the charge 
of being in the United States in violation of law, fiscal year ended June 30, 
1922 146 

Table 7. — Chinese arrested and deported, fiscal years ended June 30, 1918, to 
1922, by judical districts 147 

Table 8. — Miscellaneous Chinese transactions, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 

by ports 148 



24 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 






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Table IV. — Net increase or decrease of population by admission and departure of aliens, 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples. 



Race or people. 



Immi- 
grant. 



Nonim- 
migrant 



Departed. 



Nonemi- 
grant. 



Increase 
(+)or 
decrease 



African (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Moravian(Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, and Monte- 
negrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Her- 
zegovdnian 

Dutch and Flemish 

East Indian 

EngUsh , 

Finnish , 

French , 

German , 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 

Japanese 

Korean 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 

Pacific Islander 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Rumanian 

Russian 

Ruthenian (Russniak) 

Scandinavian (Norwegians, 
Danes, and Swedes) 

Scotch 

Slovak 

Spanish 

Spanish American 

Syrian 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except Cuban).... 

Other peoples 



1,370 
4,465 
3,78.3 



307 
3,749 
223 
30, 429 
2,506 
13,617 
31,218 
3,821 
53,524 
17, 191 

35^056 

6,361 

88 

1,602 

6,037 

18, 246 

7 

6,357 

1,867 

1,520 

2,486 

698 

16,678 

15, 596 

6,001 

1,879 

1,446 

1, 334 

40 

956 

976 

743 



Total 

Admitted in and departed from 
Philippine Islands 



309, 556 
6.537 



4,041 
175 
453 

282 
8, 755 

361 
4,590 



26,361 

407 

6,622 

6,228 

804 

1,&32 

3,510 

1,933 

7, 034 

6,476 

54 

88 

449 

12, 049 

13 

1,857 

838 

257 

507 

7,110 

5,701 

292 

5,064 

2,788 



532 

1,540 

351 



2,424 
3,539 

1,652 
13, 220 
4,144 
5,288 

377 
6,265 
281 
56,790 
2,913 
20,239 
37,446 
4,625 
55,356 
20, 701 
8,031 
42,090 
12,837 
142 
1,690 
6,486 
30, 295 
20 
8,214 
2,705 
1,777 
2, 993 
815 

23, 788 
21,297 
6, 293 
6, 943 
4,2:^ 
2,103 
105 
1,488 
2,516 
1,094 



2,183 

253 

4,246 

5,877 
6,146 
3,997 



549 
2,157 

218 
9,668 
1,254 
3,464 
.5, 715 
7,649 

830 
2,485 
7,448 
46,562 
4,353 
50 
4,606 
4, 7.58 
5,770 
5 
31,004 
6,052 
4,219 
2,891 

448 

4,417 
1,659 
3,451 

7, 838 
1,791 



272 

154 

820 

1,148 



2,970 

146 

1,059 



347 

3,665 

62 

31,590 

1,499 

7,637 

8,002 

1,668 

1,089 

4,512 

3,960 

13,867 

10,925 

86 

582 

962 

1,730 

6 

3,285 



7,816 

4,029 

508 

9,742 

3,282 

696 

113 



5,153 

399 

5,305 



4,336 
6,748 



o, s;5z 

280 

41,258 

2,753 
11,101 
13,717 

9,317 



11,408 

60,429 

15,278 

1.36 

5, 188 

5,720 

7,500 

11 

34,289 

7, 820 

5,067 

3,746 

502 

12, 233 
5,688 
3, 959 

17,580 
5, 073 
2,092 
385 
463 
2,684 
1,485 



122, 949 
9,237 



432, 505 
15.774 



198,712 
16,861 



146,672 
1,105 



345,384 
17,966 



-t-4, 136 
-f2,025 
-1,766 

-5,011 
-764 
-192 

-1,460 

-519 

+443 

+ 1 

-1-15,532 

4-160 

-1-9, 138 

+23,729 

-4,692 

+53,4.37 

+ 13,704 

-3,377 

-18,3.39 

-2,441 

+6 

-3, 498 

+766 • 

+22,795 

+9 

-26,075 

-5,115 

-3,290 

-753 

+313 

+ 11,555 

+ 15,609 

+2,334 

-10,637 

-839 

+ 11 

-280 

+ 1,025 



+ 87, 121 
-2,192 



REPORT OF C0MMISSI0:N^ER GENERAL OF I M MIGRATION. 



29 



Table V. — Intended future permanent residence of aliens admitted and last permanent 
residence of aliens departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922, by States and Territories.^ 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


State or Territory. 


Immigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
immigrant 
aliens. 


Emigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
emigrant 
aUens. 


Alabama 


419 

163 
2,034 

180 
23,624 
1,193 
5,719 

.398 
1,446 
2,399 

373 
2,800 

529 
22,410 
2,487 
2,174 

976 

361 

964 
4,557 
1,790 
21,715 
12, 187 
5,152 

258 
2,774 
1,007 
1,469 

207 
1,926 
15,327 

601 
91,543 

236 
1,009 
11,606 

504 

2,320 

27,539 

9 

316 
3,208 

163 

618 

365 
14,421 

837 
1,479 
1,264 
15 
6,109 
1,460 
4,374 

542 


58 

22 

1,185 

21 

5,078 

175 

897 

33 

231 

1,294 

82 

2,182 

77 

2,510 

254 

276 

168 

32 

359 

449 

224 

3,228 

1,297 

564 

376 
161 
183 
46 
230 
2,280 
248 
13,642 
39 

1,127 

84 

381 

2,351 

22 

545 

474 

39 

34 

81 

8,676 

185 

100 

117 

12 

1,043 

161 

329 

108 

69,057 


121 

99 

1,080 

51 

13,375 

592 

5,701 

343 

411 

1,976 

124 

1,342 

177 

14,039 

1,841 

742 

318 

95 

824 

418 

986 

16,798 

6,998 

1,850 

1,211 

405 

501 

180 

447 

9,736 

240 

65,886 

85 

238 

10,203 

191 

852 

25,634 


17 




48 


Arizona . 


21 


Arkansas 


9 




4,999 




149 


■Connecticut 


610 


Delaware 


21 




110 


Florida. . 


377 


Georgia 


35 




3,911 


Idaho 


64 


Illinois 


3,049 




263 




367 


Kansas... . . . .... .... 


76 


Kentucky 


22 




148 


Maine 


71 


Maryland 


227 




3,217 


Michigan 


1,308 


Minnesota 


668 


Mississippi 


18 


Missouri. 


476 


Montana . . . 


145 


Nebraska 


161 


Nevada 


42 


New Hampshire 


130 




1,101 




42 


New York 


15,096 


North CaroUna 


19 


North Dakota 


85 


Ohio 


1,396 
35 


Oklahoma ... . . 




555 


Pennsylvania 


2,681 




12 


Porto Rico. 


303 

1,824 

47 

152 

90 

2,602 

369 

157 

243 

9 

2,551 

1,778 

2,145 

244 


550 


Rhode Island 


263 


South Carolina 


18 


South Dakota. 


48 




47 


Te.xas 


163 


Utah 


154 




30 


Virginia 


51 


Virgin Islands 


25 


Washington. 


1,953 


West Virginia 


139 


Wisconsin 


376 




95 


Outside United States 


100,979 










Total 


309,556 


122, 949 


198, 712 


146,672 







1 For permanent residences of aUens arriving in and departing from the PhiUppiiie Islands see 
and IX-A . 



30 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table VI. — Occupations of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended JuneSO. 1922.^ 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


Occupations. 


Immigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
immigrant 
aliens. 


Emigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 

emigrant 

aliens. 


PROFESSIONAL. 

Actors 


704 
127 

1,204 
66 
713 

1,103 
131 
392 
714 
744 
458 
164 

2,118 

2,317 


826 
177 

1,151 
221 
209 

2,004 
548 
561 
467 

2,062 
710 
174 

1,503 

1,735 


158 
63 
526 
23 
131 
379 
57 
154 
229 
258 
157 
111 
456 
611 


631 

162 

1,224 

116 


Architects.. 


Clergy 


Editors 


Electricians.. 


193 






457 
618 
447 
1,400 
721 


Literary and scientific persons .... 


Musicians . 




Physicians 


Sculptors and artists . 


237 
1,258 
1 406 


Teachers 


Other professional 






Total .. 


10,955 


12,348 


3,313 


10,464 




SKILLED. 

Bakers. . 


1,629 
1,168 

97 

35 

1,059 

160 

3,930 

39 

147 

7 

9,444 

3,726 

931 

131 

431 

165 

751 

146 

540 

1,291 

2,845 

1,411 

'l87 

177 

600 

2,227 

881 

54 

198 

170 

219 

409 

96 

1,972 

2,287 

348 

162 

4,331 

99 

131 

176 

20 

78 

290 

1,262 

7 

89 

2,472 


581 

315 

222 

17 

12 

228 

52 

1,350 

8 

242 

9 

4,734 

477 

665 

34 

302 

23 

182 

103 

31 

559 

2,071 

719 
66 

i 

346 
12 
84 
49 
84 

132 
20 

215 

397 

187 
46 

499 
19 
29 
34 
23 
25 
46 

198 

5 

30 

1,232 


547 

375 

302 

18 

21 

373 

146 

1,184 

5 

215 

7 

2,027 

387 

215 

38 

221 

20 

195 

86 

40 

948 

1,224 

359 

709 

58 

79 

52 

3,257 

346 

12 

54 

39 

65 

77 

21 

134 

826 

195 

93 

981 

28 

67 

40 

1 

19 

34 

532 

8 

28 

1,250 


397 




Blacksmiths 


149 


Bookbinders... 


15 




Butchers 


259 


Cabinetmakers . 


72 




Cigarette makers 


4 


Cigar makers 


358 




Clerks and accountants 


4,472 
357 


Dressmakers 


Engineers (locomotive, marine, and stationary) 

Furriers and fur workers 


622 
29 


Gardeners 


208 














Locksmiths 


11 


Machinists 


6^5 






Masons 


'278 


Machanics (not specified) 




Metal workers (other than iron, steel, and tin). . 


49 


MiUers 


28 


Milliners 


90 


Miners 


1,350 
263 


Painters and glaziers 


Patternmakers 


15 










Plumbers 


89 


Printers 


98 










Shoemakers 


304 


Stokers f. ». 


174 


Tailors 




Tanners and curriers 


20 


TextUe workers (not specified) 


35 


Tinners „ 




Tobacco workers 


15 


Upholsterers 


15 




38 




285 


Wheelwrights 


2 


"Woodworkers (not specified) 


25 


Other skilled :. 


1,364 






Total 


51,588 


17,866 


17,958 


17 352 







' For occupations of aliens admitted and departed from Philippine Islands see Tables X and X-a. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



31 



Table VI. — Occupation of aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended June JO, 
1922— Continued. 





Admitted. 


Departed. 


Occupations. 


Immigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
immigrant 
aliens. 


Emigrant 
aUens. 


Non- 
emigrant ■ 
aliens. 


MISCELLAKEOUS. 


611 
125 
308 

10,529 

7,676 

640 

165 

32,726 

202 

7,278 

44,531 

11,172 


1,269 

645 

84 

3,687 

2,952 

270 

228 

11,751 

965 

15,335 

7,652 

9^546 


5,036 

154 

97 

100,058 

152 

4,328 

5,212 

4; 343 


1,070 




712 


Draymen hackmen and teamsters . . 


115 




1,827 




3,160. 


Fishermen 


261 


Hotel keepers 


172 




31,349 




867 


Merchants and dealers 


15,330 




7,207 




10,043 






Total . 


115,963 


64,384 


122,497 


72, 113 






No occupation (including women and children) 


131,050 


38,351 


54,944 


46,743 




309, 556 


122,949 


198,712 


146,672 







32 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL. OF IMMIGRATION. 



33 



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34 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGR.\TION. 



Is 






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IIHPOKT OF COMMISSIONER CJENEKAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



35 



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II 



36 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OE IM-MIGRATION. 



Table VII-b. — Conjugal condition of immigrant aliens 
[Abbreviations: g., single; M., married; 



Race or people. 



Males. 



^ , 16 to 44 years. 
Under i "' 

16 years 

(total).! ^ M. W. 



A Mean (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Mora- 
vian (Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, j 
and Montenegrin. . . 

Cliinese j 

Croatian and Slove- 
nian \ 

Cuban ! 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, | 

and Herzeerovinian.i 

Dutch and Flemish. ., 

Fast Indian i 

English j 

Finnish 

French ' 

Oerman I 

<^reek 

Hebrew i 

Irish ; 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 



Korean 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 

Pacific Islander 

Polisli 

Portuguese , 

Rumanian 

Russian , 

Ruthenian (Russ- 
niak) 

Scandinavian (Nor- 
wegians, Danes, 
and Swedes) 

Scotch 

Slovak 

Spanish 

Spanish American. . . 

Syrian 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except 
Cuban) 

Other 



375 

7 

2,912 

132 
1,229 
2,250 

334 
9,073 
1,071 

475 
3,236 



Total . 



S70 
1,448 
448 
155 
157 
203 
1 



1,023 
372 



1,186 
619 



73 

784 

134 

5,005 

512 

3,079 

7,608 

554 

7,760 

3,a38 

1,880 

8,433 

765 

14 

91 

923 

4,310 

2 

598 

508 

213 

521 



6,155 
2,810 
1,199 



31,980 M.423 



204 
1,618 



68 i 

22 i 
457 ! 
64| 
4,040 

254 I 

1,5£1 I 

3,080 I 

519 i 

2, .599 I 

1,149 

972 

6,190 

959 

11 

63 

831 

4,081 

3 

456 



,583 i 



227 
106 ! 
163 

V I- 
154 i 

79 I 



3 1 




12, 


5 


121 


1 


11 1 




8 • 




1 


i 


3 


... 



45 years and ( 



448 
2,813 



1,017 



97 . 
1,252 

199 I. 
9,133 I 

769 

4,712 I 

10,753 ! 

1,077 ' 

10,404 I 

5,031 

2,870 I 

14,690 I 

1,736 I 

25 . 

157 ! 

1,771 I 

8,513 1 

5 i- 

1,065 1 

792 

481 ; 



7,771 

4,844 

2,595 

1,028 

690 

426 

32 

.318 



184 
134 

12 
30 I 

12 1 



102,479 ' 1,579 11,670 2,000 ! 33 



D. Total. 



2,018 
50 
852 



2,739 
749 



319 I 
3 
37 
204 
946 



1 None divorced; 2 widowed, as follows: Italian (south) and Rumanian, 1 each: and 12 married, as fol- 
lows: EngUsh, Hebrew, Italian (south), and Japanese, 2 eadti; and ItaUan (north), Mexican, Scandina- 
vian, and other peoples, 1 each. 



HKPOKT OF COMMISSIONSJR GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



37 



m/initted. Ji^irnl i/cir cndtd Jiiik ■!(). Ifh'J. hij raves or peoples. 
W., widowed; D., divorced. 1 







Pemales 










Single females. 


1 
Under 


16 10 44 years. 






45 years and over 




16 to 
21 


22 to 
29 


30 to 


38 to 


























(total).' 


S. 1 M. 


W. 


I- 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


570 


1,870 561 


97 




2,528 


25 


74 


87 




186 


879 


727 


197 


67 


258 


406 1 436 


107 


.... 


949 


1 


52 


80 




133 


264 


121 


17 


4 


224 


945 312 


4:j 


1 6 


1,306 


9 


50 


71 




1.30 


557 


299 


74 


15 


143 


257 i 236 


17 ' 1 


511 


6 


30 


15 


i 


5, 


140 


93 


18 


6 


57 


79 678 
1,193! 540 




757 
1.802 


1 3 
4 


26 
53 






29 
113 


43 

58.5 


31 

496 


5 

101 




401 


68 i 1 


56 




11 


96 


49 54 


9 2 


114 


; 8 


8 


16 




32 


30 


13 


4 




24 


108 ! 37 




145 


1 


3 


7 




11 


49 


42 


12 




436 


533 1 570 


18 13 


1,134 


32 


155 


80 


7 


274 


194 


210 


97 


32 


2 


6 5 
5,433 4,625 


!.... 

367 20 


11 
10,445 


■522' 


1 
1,350 






1 

2,996 


■i,'834' 


6 
2,111 






2,925 


1,114 


10 


991 


497 


151 


1,025 249 


35 3 


1,312 


1 19 


33 


40 




92 


461 


387 


120 


57 


1,401 


2,640 1,616 


1.35 i 18 


4,409 


. 179 


474 


356 


5 


1,014 


1,127 


958 


385 


170 


2,352 


8,671 : 3,071 


409 1 95 


12,246 


. 372 


837 


930 


40 


2,179 


3,674 


3,380 


1,214 


403 


286 


1,163 i 466 


34 1 1 


1,664 


1 


80 


111 




192 


497 


.594 


69 


3 


9,040 


9,857 ! 6,402 


499 . 28 


16,786 


49 


3,007 


2,418 


8 


5,482 




2,564 


277 


48 


1,046 


6,940 1,283 


131 3 


8,357 


225 


317 


392 


3 


937 


3,390 


2,584 


730 


236 


471 


989 1 849 


33 ..... 


1,871 


1 17 


91 


78 




186 


357 


497 


110 


25 


3,183 


5,441 1 4,521 


257 '.... 


10, 219 


66 


927 


934 


1 


1,928 


2,776 


2,126 


446 


93 


421 


257 i 2,832 


17 . 3 


3,109 




130 


17 




148 


215 


29 


8 


5 


6 

184 


8 1 42 
703 1 214 




50 
933 


""z 


40 






1 

99 


7 
.365 


1 
302 






16 !.... 


56 




33 


3 


694 


1,290 i 875 


130 i 33 


2 328 


6 


132 


166 


3 


307 


721 


452 


90 


27 


1,959 

"i,hW 


1,222 ; 2.459 

111 

1,753 1 1,115 


491 ...... 


4,172 

2 

2,941 


43 


2.50 


354 




647 


654 

1 

1,139 


385 


128 


55 


72 [ 1 


5 


134 


126 


I 


266 


526 


73 


15 


162 


242 ' 260 


12 4 


518 


12 


37 


61 




110 


143 


67 


22 


10 


216 


198 259 


21 5 


483 




39 


27 


1 


72 


100 


74 


19 




301 


327 390 


30 2 


749 


10 


96 


54 


1 


161 


184 


109 


28 


6 


m 


164 ^ 124 


3 .... 


291 





16 


6 




22 


121 


35 


5 




1 867 


4,244 1,354 


83 1 21 


5,702 


198 


294 


265 


11 


768 


1,654 ; 


1,650 


706 


234 


1,557 


3,484 1,902 


165 i 7 


5,558 


238 


550 


475 


3 


1,266 


1,169 - 


1,428 


626 


261 


438 


1,522 599 


94 


2 


2,217 


7 


73 


103 


'^ 


186 


959 


480 




15 


129 


183 , 151 


13 


2 


349 


8 


35 


43 


1 


87 


72! 


84 


20 


7 


129 


230 121 


10 




361 


9 


19 


21 


1 


50 




93 


33 


11 


188 


182 


194 


20 





396 


1 


36 


28 




65 


131 41 


9 


1 


1 

108 


146 


3 
119 






4 
275 












1 ! 
44 








9 


1 


10 


5:5 


24 




87 1 


59 


27 


16 


101 


328 


103 


18 




449 


6 


19 


15 




40 


146 ' 128 


37 


17 


85 


69 


153 


10 




232 




26 


26 




52 


46 t 16 


6 


1 


31,730 


64,159 


39,781 |3,473 


272 


107,685 


2,101 


9,548 


8,652 


99 


20,400 


31,793 '23,198 


6,805 


2,363 



* None divorced; 6 widowed, as follows: Slovak and other peoples, 2 each; and African (black) and 
Armenian, l each; and 43 married, as follows: Hebrew, 10; Japanese, 8; Mexican, 7; Italian (south), 4; 
Greek and other peoples, 3 each; and Bulgarian, Cuban, English, French, German, Portuguese, Slovak, 
and Spanish, l each. 



38 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



Table Vll-c.—Cnnjngal rondition of emignnit aliens 
[Abbreviations:"s., single; M., married; 





Males. 


Race or people. 


Under 
16 years 
(total) .1 


S. 


16 to 44 years. 


45 years and over. 




M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


African (black) 


104 
3 

77 

58 
18 

27 
86 

16 

100 
2 

446 
15 

129 

122 
66 
27 
51 

148 

1,052 

27 

i 

100 
592 


424 

83 

440 

1,671 
1,028 

957 
321 

135 

475 

70 

1,408 

294 

605 

1,118 

1,880 

132 

542 

2,055 

10,067 

981 

19 

870 

342 

1,654 

3 

3,233 

'549 
631 

36 

1,412 
250 
280 

3,232 
798 
358 
128 
34 

179 

217 


483 
83 

1,250 

1,980 
1,177 

1,470 
129 

123 

427 

65 

1,637 

292 

479 

1,039 

2,527 

198 

280 

2,134 

17,300 

1, 190. 

13 

1,514 

1,371 

876 

1 

11,872 

2,545 

1,522 

1,214 

.563 
247 
1,149 
3,002 
194 
412 
81 
24 

110 
168 


4 




911 
166 

1.716 


12 
4 

>2 

134 

609 

80 
10 

16 

88 

22 
283 

45 
173 
311 
202 

17 
142 
227 
731 

90 

3 

133 

95 

93 


115 
55 

767 

974 
3,098 

740 

ea 

76 

227 

44 

890 

111 

392 

589 

2,246 

'258 

148 

1,056 

7,782 

790 

5 

594 

907 

» 


' 




132 
59 


Bohemian and Mora- 
vian 


2) 




54 

32 
10 

31 

1 

4 
13 

2 
92 

5 
34 
61 
13 

5 
30 
61 
302 

3 


1 


904 


Bulgarian, Serbian, 

Montenegrin 

Chinese . 


28 1 i 3,680 
3 .... 2,208 

32 i....l 2,459 

1 I....1 451 


1 1 1,141 

.... 3,717 

1 852 

....' 76 

1 

96 

2 ! 330 
....i 68 

3 1 1,268 

161 

1 600 

1 962 

1 2,462 

...: 280 

..... 320 

....! 1,344 

3 1 8,818 

.... 883 


Croatian and Slove- 


Cuban 


Dalmatian, Bosnian, 
and Herzegovinian . 
Dutch and Flemish... 
East Indian 


2 

7 




1 


261 

910 

135 

3,078 

588 

1,099 

2 176 




32 

i 

19 
6 


1 
"2 




French 




Greek 


2 1 4.415 


Hebrew 


3 ;.... 333 
8 1 1 831 


Irish 


Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 


57 

285 
5 


.... 4,246 

3 27,655 

.... 2:176 






32 
2,400 
1736 
2,576 

15,252 
3,619 
2,085 
i;862 

216 

1,982 

504 

1,459 

775 
209 
59 

290 
388 




8 


Lithuanian 

Magyar 


16 
23 
45 


.... 


is 

52 
66 




742 

1,054 

448 






Polish 


472 
215 
69 
29 

3 

71 
83 
64 
175 
129 
21 
1 
3 

48 

288 


145 

38 
13 
17 

3 

6 
7 
30 
11 
3 
5 


2 

"i" 

1 


350 
35 
59 
55 

3 

246 
68 
36 
120 
9 
24 
12 
8 

5 

8 


4,138 
648 
646 
347 

91 

248 
158 

537 
64 

235 
31 
20 

35 
91 


136 
36 
21 
15 

5 

21 
20 


i ! 4,62.5 

....i 719 

...., 726 

417 

....| 99 

1 516 
1 247 




Rumanian 


Russian 


Ruthenian (Russ- 
niak)... . 


Scandinavian (Nor- 
wegians, Danes, 
and Swedes) 

Scotch . 


Slovak 


30 1.... 754 1 
10 1 668 1 




Spanish American.... 


3 
6 


....1 76 
.... 265 1 


Turkish 




43 


Welsh. . 


1 
3 


;;;; 


6 
3 


1 


31 


West Indian (except 
Cuban) 


46 

..... 102 


Other peoples 




4,982 


39,947 


61,318 


900 


17 


102, 182 


4,640 


30, 195 


1,205 


19 36.059 









Nolo widowed or divorced; S married, as follows: Italian (south), 4, and English and Mexican, 2 each . 



REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



39 



departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by races or peoples. 
W., widowed; D., divorced.] 



Females. 


Single females. 


Under 
16years 


16 to 44 years. 


45 years and over. 


16 to 
21 


22 to 
29 


30 to 
37 


38 to 
44 






















(total).* 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


S. 


M. 


W. 


D. 


Total. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


years. 


109 


245 


,.4 


22 


1 


782 


14 


101 


30 




145 


78 


81 


60 


26 


2 
99 


2 
226 


14 
942 






16 
1,186 


20 


5 

188 


2 
56 




7 
264 


37 


2 

89 






16 


2 


82 


18 


58 


71 


m 


20 




773 


11 


139 


16 




166 


15 


25 


18 


13 


13 


.36 


99 


1 




136 


1 


51 


2 


.... 


54 


11 


23 


2 




31 


34 


449 


12 




495 


7 


106 


20 




133 


5 


15 


5 


9 


59 


83 


107 


6 


1 


197 


3 


32 


5 




40 


36 


26 


15 


6 


9 


40 


83 


2 




125 


11 


23 


8 




42 


9 


10 


13 


8 


95 


129 


373 


9 




511 


23 


160 


28 




211 


47 


51 


18 


13 


1 
445 


3 
1,133 


8 
2,030 






11 
3,246 


"OAk' 


1 
760 






1 
1,185 


1 
196 


••■444" 


2 
307 




79 


4 


176 


1 


186 


21 


142 


255 


4 ].... 


401 


18 


40 


10 




68 


5 


64 


57 


16 


128 


416 


559 


32 3 


1,010 


185 


248 


64 


1 


498 


77 


174 


98 


67 


112 


562 


1,073 


37! 1 


1,673 


1.W 


397 


114 


1 


670 


85 


199 


187 


91 


46 


68 


446 


4 




518 


7 


129 


6 




142 


34 


29 


3 


2 




48 


7?. 


2 


1 


123 


2 


33 


9 





44 


10 


29 


7 


2 


41 


677 


302 


14 






109 


106 


34 




249 


46 


350 


205 


76 


131 


144 


1,100 


29 




1,273 


14 


245 


45 


2 


306 


49 


46 


32 


17 


890 


647 


5,476 


97 


3 


6,223 


62 


1,640 


220 


2 


1,924 


230 


226 


127 


64 


26 


58 


1,006 

6 

1,150 


4 




1,068 

6 

1,249 


4 
"'\2 


169 

2 

125 






173 

2 

153 


21 


19 


11 


7 








19 


88 


11 




16 




14 


24 


38 


12 


93 


162 


1,183 


43 


3 


1,391 


35 


298 


51 




384 


38 


72 


38 


14 


578 

1 

421 


304 






3 


1 270 

1 
9,074 


25 


154 


127 




306 


162 


100 


29 


13 


568 


8,423 


82 


1 


."53 


958 


149 




i,i66 


118 


271 


134 


45 


176 


145 


924 


21 


2 


1,092 


11 


186 


34 




231 


69 


51 


20 


5 


57 


77 


945 


16 




1,038 


14 


200 


30 


....i 244 


24 


26 


18 


9 


35 


42 


436 


7 




485 


7 


50 


6 


...J 63 


13 


14 


9 


6 


7 
77 


4 

782 


107 

591 






111 
1,392 


1 

158 


11 
157 






12 


70 


2 
351 


1 
254 


1 


19 




64 




.,™ 


107 


87 


238 


281 


10 




529 


49 


117 


43 




209 


25 


68 


90 


55 


68 


98 


769 


28 




895 


11 


166 


34 




211 


19 


59 


15 


5 


128 


129 


379 


7 




515 


11 


86 


10 




107 


67 


36 


16 


10 


98 


217 


172 


10 


1 


400 


13 


65 


15 




93 


111 


71 


19 


16 


24 


31 


186 


1 




218 


3 


79 


U 




93 


11 


11 


7 


2 


2 
7 


3 
16 


11 
22 






14 
40 


1 
1 


2 
11 






3 

14 


2 
5 


§■ 


1 
6 




2 




2 


.... 


2 


54 


147 


164 


8 




319 


10 


41 


12 




63 


32 


58 


45 


12 


246 


14 


85 


1 




100 


1 


19 


3 


1 


24 


6 


5 


1 


2 


4,517 


7,829 


32,305 


739 


26 


40,899 


1,313 


7,300 


1,452 


8 


10,073 


1,778 


3,124 


1,990 


937 



» None widowed; 1 divorced, Portuguese; 21 married, as follows: Mexican, 8; Polish, 3; Italian (south) 
and other peoples, 2 each; and Enghsh, ItaUan (north), Japanese, Portuguese, Rumanian, and Syrian, 1 
each. 



40 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAIv OF IMMIGRATION, 



2 1 



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c^f-iws-^co CO Oi CO cs CO t^ i-< CO lo 00 CO r^ 00 os coo osoot^wco^ T^tyi 

rt CO ■* N >0 1-1 rH 0» (N N (M .1 COl-l •* 






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41 







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42 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•nBiuemon 


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572 

1,093 

172 

16 

1,665 

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420 

600 

147 

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35 

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22,373 

49 
7,107 
14,415 

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nil 

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Rufisia 

Spain, including Canary and 

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Sweden 


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5"i 







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 43 



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44 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•IBIOI 


isSsSi 


1,220 
17,931 

3,457 
40,319 

1,990 

.5,292 
28,635 

1,950 
10,287 
17, 143 
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1 
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fill 


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France, including Corsica 

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Netherlands 


: is : 

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Yugoslavia (Serb, Croat, and Slovene King- 
dom) 

Othfir Enrone 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONRR GENERAT. OF I^f MIGRATION. 45 



W¥ 


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46 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



47 





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48 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•IGJOX 


579 
4,307 
1 203 

660 
7,846 

690 
1,179 
2,557 
4 362 
7 506 
53,651 

860 
1,427 
33.581 


.o 


»i mi 

ceo- o--r 


201 

• 6,434 

2,182 
915 


8 m 




1 


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'^S : is :'n«>t-«g Jwg 


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, ; ^.O- 


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ptre 'satrea 'suciSaM 
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ll 


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! r M >| "-^ ;- 




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1'° : : j 1 


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i i '^"* 


: : : 




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: : t-oo^ 


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i i i i i i i- 










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1 




Country of intended future perma- 
nent rpsidenee 


Austria 

Czechoslovakia! '.!!!!!!!!.'!!!!;!!!!!!!! 

Denmark 


France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia . . . 

Netherlands 

Norway 


3 

a. 
o 

i 

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1 

g 


:'2 : : 
! 5 ! : 

1 M ! ! 
ilii 




Mii 

: :| i 
• ilig 

i-m 


i 
1 





REPORT OF COMMISSIONER (?KNERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



49 





So 


133 

645 

34 

4,480 

955 

6,285 

1,787 

5,252 

30 


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10656—22- 



50 



REPORl OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





UBracnq'jiq 




i i i i i i i ! i^ 






s i i ; i i -; 




•(q^nos) uetiBii 


: I : is : : 


"" !§ i i : " M 


i : : "^ i 


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1 

1 1 


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Jn : -.(N 




i Ml^i" 


•^isw ' Mi:::: 


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i i i "s 




fll- 


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" is i i : i : :" 


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o : : jw 1 rt 


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f^ JMo-^ : ; : : 


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&«:-::" 


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: : : :^ ; : 






i ^ 


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i r ji 1 1 


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liiiiiiiir 
1 n|j ni n 

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03 • • • 

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111 

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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 51 

















f 


- 


•l«JOx 


? 


SS 


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22 


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to 




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jrt. 








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52 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



! 

•IBJOX 


2- 




|S?25- i 


II 


2^-1 


162 

57 

142 

1,082 

' 9,072 




•sajdoad iaqjo i [ 


CC gOO-O-H olio : joe, ; ;2; g 


•(tteqno j : 


1-n- 


- ; O 1" • i 




i : 


^ : : : 




> :2 


i ':" Nl" 


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:" 


|o - : ;, 


*■ : ■" : : ; : 


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1 : 
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Tx II o ; rt ^ 


2 : '^ "^ : ;2 


: : > 5 


1 




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llHii 


S-S'^ S 


•qsiuBds : : 


2 : : : 




l|-n" 


_«oco « 


j o 

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§ Mi 




llLn= 


nnii^ 


1 : 

1 -qo^oas i 


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:- ?3 :"-5 


^«oo||2 


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pue'sauBQ 'sweiSBM. 
-JON) uBLVBinpnBOS 




g S"^ 


j 1 S - :^ 


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■(3[Biiissna)UBTU9qjnH 




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: : ;" 


; ': ; : '^ 


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1 " ^N 


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: : : : : 


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i : 


: ^ 11 ': : : 




1 




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i i i-^i 


1 I "" 


: i :5 


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illni 








-HON CO II O 


•iBlSEK 


■ S 1 : ; ; 






i ; ;s 


;-=^- g 


S 

1 
1 

1 


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1! 
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: : ; 

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ri 
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Central America 

Mexico 

South America 

West Indies 





IIEPOHT OF I'O.MMISSIONKH GKNERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



53 



Tahi.k \III-c. — Nativc-honi citizens departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922. by coun- 
tries of intended future permanent residence and races or peoples. 



Country of intended future permaneni residence. 


Afritau j 
(black). 


Cauca- 
sian. 


Chinese. 


Japanese. 


Total. 


Austria 


1 


162 

1,529 

211 

70 

S,406 

85 

220 

469 

949 

655 

11,305 

98 

225 

18,062 

464 

884 

2,2-20 

283 

217 

97 

24 

872 
244 

10 

1,988 
81 






162 










1 529 




1 






211 


lUilgaria 








70 




1 






3 406 




:::::::::i 






85 




...1 






220 




M 






470 








949 


(Ireece 








655 


Italy including Sicily and Sardinia 








11 305 


Netherlands 








98 










225 


Poland" 


1 






18 062 










464 










884 










2 220 










28:1 


Sweden " 








217 










97 










24 


United Kingdom: 


s 






880 


Ireland. 






244 












Wales 1 






10 










1,988 


Other Europe 








81 














9 


44,928 






44,937 










China 




1,640 
575 
254 
349 
111 


1,170 
2 




2,810 
1 447 


Japan . . 




870 


India 




254 










349 






















Total Asia 




2,929 


1,172 j 870 


4,971 








Vfrica 


8 


130 

69 

25 

12,960 

2,8.51 

1,802 

478 

1,642 






138 


















25 


British North \merica 


81 
3 
11 
2 
140 


^ 




13 042 






2,855 




7 


1,820 


South America 




480 


West Indies 


' 7 




1,789 




' 1 






Grand total 


254 


67 814 1 1-lSl 1 877 


70 126 






1 







54 F.EPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



;C v--; « -- "5 04 « ■ -s 



-t •XMrCt^l-O-4"-' 



5: :2g' 



C^ • (M ■■£ T-i 



M u? !D O -• 0> -< ?J • -OOP 



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CO .^ C^ . t^ r-^ 00 -^ »0 00 5D CJ "5 ?0 



CO ■ cot~ 



lMOt-0>00 



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a> •.— to^ Oi 00 



•n e<5 1-1 T-H -^ to oc .T< ?S c« 



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-- M <N O^O 



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S3 



sl-^ 




:;oQaH!3 



3 -a .§3 






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION 



55 



e* • .CO .Nccrt^^ooN 



s"??!*?;^;'^' 



OlN-^WM — lONCM'O 



-HI.-; .o .t^ . .(N 






sSiis iliigissgg 



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a I 



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to t-« ecco-< ■ 

u5050-fO (M j^ ■* -H ■* rt in IM -H eq 
>o Tf .-I OS .-I josccn-HC mi-*5D 



)-*OjeoNt^ 



aoo'* .t^ ..-I .10 .lOotocMct^oio 



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' IM IM IN t^ t~ rt lO 



JOtOCMC 
jOJCCf^t 



S"2§" SS^^S^'' 



SS^' 



t^c<)r>.t^coco«i-i'o<»HC 



•igillllllilliillii^ 

<:<i c; M oooQ 2 ^ atHfe -j; o has; 



'i2S2 






II 



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^a^tfWtfw 



rMHs^psc 



56 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



li 


! 


i 


i 


!l 




% 


3,749 

223 

30,429 

2,506 
13,617 
31.218 


s 


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s 


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64 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 65 



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67 



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68 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





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s 


— CCt-N 


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s 


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1 


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1 


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1 

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1 

1 

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i 


1 

c 


c 
■1- 


1 


1 



REPORT OF rOMMTSSIONER GENERAI. OF IMMIGRATION. 71 



: : : :" 










: : : :2 ^ 


^ 






■;§ 


:S"Sg SS 










i 1'°'^ i 




;^«- III; 


:" : i*^ : : : : : 


MN-IM 


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ps pi 


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: :- :« :-- 


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^\\^^ \ 


eo 


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:^ 


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: :^ ::::«: : 


; i ; ":- ^ 1 i 




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:--' 










:- : i*^ ; ; : : : 


in MM 






•o 


^=-gjj.g 


— N—C^CD <NM 


:" 




|« ;;«;-:; I 


:2 : :=°S "^ 


i -^•^-rrs-"! ii 


-"S-S 




;«-. :», ;«^ 


N-«<t- 1^ : : : : :, 


: : :°l| 
: : : 1 


: :2 i 


i-^'s^si gj 




^gcrj ^- 


jcr- :« : :- 


-«?3 > \r \ \' 


..||og p. 






M 


• ra -< eou5 


3=^ :-" : : : 


j-^-c,^ :" :- 


rm\ 


: -^SS^ 


:5 






go^HC. ^ — goo. ;,.;.- 


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■.'^ : 




ci 






: : : : is : 




2S : 


il 


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: : : " 




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o,^^ jc^ :- : : :- 


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:- 












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: ; : :si|2|| ^- 


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^r^^ 






sr^l 


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1 i g 
i •"" ^" 




««^- «" : 


2^ :" : ;- : 


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': '.'^ ^ 


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11 -H TiT 


1 

1 




s 


Its 

111 

ill 


is 

II 

is 


i| 

I'd 

P 
II 


Pattern makers 

Photographers 

Plasterers 

Plumbers 

Printers 

Saddlers and harness makers. . . 


beamstresses 

Shoemakers 

Stokers 

Stonecutters 

Tailors 

Tanners and curriers 

Textile workers (not specified) . . 

Tinners 

Tobacco workers 

Upholsterers 

Watch and clnnV makfirs . 


Weavers and spinners 

Wheelwrights 

Woodworkers (not specified) . . . 

Other skilled 

Total 


m : 

§ i 

< '■ 

3 : 

Si 

MO 

<3 


t. 

• a • 

■M ■ 
il; 




31 


1 

g 

■d 

II 


1 \ 

o 


6 : : 

^ : : 

^ i i 

1i i 

m 
III 

HI 

o 9 



72 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





•aBiSSBK 










ev 




























•^ 






























•uBinBnqin 






'^ 














- 






1i 










"^ 


CO 


-^ 


'^ 










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•1 

1 

00 


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^■^ 




M^rtOO '• 


_^^ ; 


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— in,-ij-j 






t^M 






-• 


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'^^ 


co^ 










c^^ 




(NrH-* 






00 








-^ 


C. 


1 


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o 


M^^ 






^-(NOO 


?3 














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05N «5 


'- 


CO ; 


•MOjqaH 




M^ 






^rt : 


"^ 


M<N 


« - 








f< 






—1 


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•^ 






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C4 : 


^r^rt-l 


IN-^'HCO^QOtJ. 


S 


b-;NO 


-o^t^o- 




g 


M 


"* 


U5r-4 


•iionaji 






TO 


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'^ 


je^toN 


CO 


'^ 


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M 






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■^ 


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1 
1 


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5 


.. 


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-* 






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2 


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•qsraiaM puB qoina 






M 


















« 


<» 




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9 


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rt '• 














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1 


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s 


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rt-HM 




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'^ : 






N 


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— to 






2 


^ 




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1 


t 






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1 


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1 


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1 


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1 


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1 


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1 

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1 

1 

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1 
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t 


1 


1 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



73 





M 






c^ 








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' 






N 




















g 














'-" 




-- 


S 


s 


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55 


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i 


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n 


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^ 








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TX 




t^ 


g 


CO 


^MCO 


cag 


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is; 




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CO ^^ 


«(N 






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MU5 


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(N 






o 


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388 


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SS 




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to 


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3 




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wco 




2 


T«Ot- 


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s 


i 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 


1 

1 
1 

1 

5 


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1 

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1 

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1 


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1 

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1 

1 


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i 


1 

1 

1 


1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


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z 

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1 


1 

t 

1 

1 




1 
1 


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1 


1 


1 
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1 

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1 
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13 

i 

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1 


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1 

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1 


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1 

1 




1 


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1 


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1 

1 





74 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•IE»0X 




" 


c 


. 


2.50 


2S 


01 


^ 


^ 


s 


s 


^ 


r 


K 


?5 




c^ 


ssg 









t 


2 


3 




2'^ 


Ǥ 


' 


•saidoad jg^o 


■'- 














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I3 

1 














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^^^ 










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*N : 






^ 


«« 


1 


r- 










1'° 


CO 


Ocoeo 








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1 
































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-* 








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i 


















«^ 












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"^ 




1^ : 


-' 








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1 




















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1 










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- 






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r- 


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■ a 


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■qojoas 


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■"^ : 


j-,-H^ 


c^to 


§ 


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— o \ 


IiCrt 






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coco 


s 


r 


^^ 


• 


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(MCO-<-< 


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;« : 


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^ 




^ 


« 


" 


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.— ... 


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- : 


^ 




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;« 






-* 








■^ 




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'^ 






•qsTio.1 




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— -HS^ 


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CO.HCO-- 


^ 


"^■^ 


-' 


2-^ 






i"^ : 


■UB9IX8K 






























































1 
1 

3 


•< 
1 

1 


1 


1 


2I 




i 


i 

2 

I'i 
II 


ii 




1 


! 
3 
5 


1 

1 




•3 
1 


(X 


■5 




1 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


1 


1 

1 


II 


1 

■1 


1 


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eg 


1 

z 


2 

i 


1 


I 

1 


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11 

n- 

11 

Si 


1 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



75 



-M»M^t~«o-»'M'<J<^Je-)»-;-<'*;;; 



,5^f.«o.-2«'°^22S 



liiB:zr~^-^^^g?^^ 



.^ . .:o •O-cl' 



.-*■*» t^ >--3 



?3 h? 



. -J CO • >o W 00 



ir: ^ w • Tf 



> 



s s S 



II 

si 

So 



111 



p3 



Ji||||||l|iPisslilfHI 






• o -co • i< 



'S-^S^S 



s hs 



:3 



76 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



Table X-c. — Native-born citizens permanently departed, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922, 
by occupations and races or peoples. 



Occupation. 


African 
(black). 


Cau- 
casian. 


Chinese. 


Japanese. 


Total. 


PROFESSIONAL. 

Actors .. 




30 

706 
10 
96 
238 
40 
74 
61 
146 
136 
16 
436 
266 






30 










^ 




4 






710 


Editors 






10 






i 

1 




97 


Engineers (professional) 






239 


Lawyers 






40 






1 




75 




10 




71 


Officials (G overnmeiit) . 






146 






1 




137 








16 


Teachers 




1 
5 


1 


438 






271 












Total . 


14 


2,277 


10 1 


2,302 




SKILLED. 

Bakers 




22 

'I 

133 
1 
3 
1 
954 
15 
209 
4 
14 

66 

5 

2 

182 

144 

36 

226 

17 

1 

10 
97 
40 
15 
9 
10 
26 
15 
1 
3 
11 
22 
13 

1 

6 

2 
2 
1 

18 

3 

207 






17 










22 


Blacksmiths 








17 


Bookbinders 








3 






1 




15 


Cabinetmakers 






i 










133 










1 


Cigar makers 









3 










1 




3 

1 


6 




963 








Engineers (locomotive marine and stationary) 






209 












Gardeners . . . 


1 






15 








2 




2 


1 




69 


Jewelers 




i 










2 










182 


Mariners 




1 




145 




1 
1 




37 








231 


Metal workers (other than iron steel and tin) 






17 


Millers 






1 


Milliners 






10 


Miners. . . 


1 




98 




1 


40 








U 


Photographers ... 






9 










10 











26 


Printers 








15 


Saddlers and harness makers 








1 











3 


Shoemakers 


1 




12 


Stokers 


' 


22 








13 
21 

1 
1 
6 
2 
2 
I 
18 

281 


Tailors ... . 




3 




Tanners and curriers 
















Tobacco workers . . ... 










I 








Weavers and spinners 






Woodworkers (not specified) 






Other skilled 


3 


71 






Total 


17 


2,624 


84 1 1 2.725 











REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



77 



Table X-c. — Native-born citizens permanently departed, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, 
by occupations and races or peoples — Continued. 



Occupation. 


African 
(black). 


Cau- 
casian. 


Chinese. 


Japanese. 


Total. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




249 
51 
18 

884 
3,086 

17 
681 

70 

378 

414 

1,935 


1 
1 




250 










Draymen hackiuen and teamsters 


3 
7 
4 




21 




1 
22 
1 




892 








Fishermen . 




6 


Hotel keepers 






17 




11 


525 


1 




Manufacturers . 


70 


Merchants and dealers 


7 
13 
12 


157 
13 
144 




542 








Other miscellaneous 


3 


2,094 




Total 


57 


7,788 


865 


4 


8,714 




No occupation (including women and children) 


166 


55, 125 


222 


872 


56,385 


Grand total 


254 


67,814 


1,181 


877 


70,126 





78 



REPORT OF COMMISSIOXEK GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





>> 
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- 


« ; 


• wo 


^ 














^ 






■2»-H 


-' 










-.« 




^ 
^ 


1 


;D 


2 l::?^-'''-^ 


ic -s-cj r- 


B 


1 as:?!" 


53"^-'^ : 


2g=:^'^'";3^=^S2j???'= 


1 


6 

8 






o> [nt- 


m 


" ; 


ii-H .ra 









"-"=""" 




S£5^ 


— ■ ro 




M - X ..- 




^ 
g 


1 




i 


Sftg-^ 


•?^!^"^'* ; 


5gS::'^~^22gS§52 


^ 


•a 






'^ : 


- 


- 






:" : 


^ 






'^ 














t,^_ 


-^ 


•* 


-,^ 




CO 




! 


< 




•" >-»•" 


X X M 


|iCO 


'u? 


ai-K'j" 






?S 






^2- 


■"■ 


-Hrt 


■^ 


xcc- 


1 








CO ;«W 




"^ 


~ 







s 


cqfi-, 






<N 






..- 










■ 


-_. 




1 

1 
1 

n 


C9 

< 


-^ 


w .; 


^ 


- 






jiOCO 


tn 


CJi-cN 








« 






-HC^N 






- 




«!t-.-i-<r 




1 

I 
1 

1 

! 


«; 


i 


r 


Iii 


^1 


1, 


1 

1 


^1 


1 
i 

|1 


li 
IS 


f1 


1 

1 


1 


a 

i 


i 

£ 
S 
J 


it 

ii 


i 




1 

I 


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i 

11 


l 


1 


1. 




ll 

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c 
■B 
(I 


] 


i 
=1 


a 


si 

I # 

y 




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1 


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1 


1 

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1 

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1 

i 

i 

l 

1 





BEPORT OF COMMTSSIOXER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 79 



' 


M 


- 


^ 
















^ 






!M 






~ 






" 






' 


•^ 








■" 









tj 







^ 


S 


g 


to 


g 




— C^j^ — 


-^ 




M CC C^» — C^ — 1 02 




"^ 




-IN 


- 


2 


<N 


-Sto 




s 


■'gs 




!^ 


8 




.-o.«-« 


""2"' 


--r« 


-• 


— (N^!N» 


i 


" 


"gS^'^S"^!^ 


5 

OS 


i 


i\ 




^gO 






■*«s 


NON 


C» 


-- 




"5 "5 


» 


i 


1 




-8S 




r^i- 


i 


1 


"" i 


i::;|fc=^22S?;'°§^?3:j|»"J:: 


^SS'-Jg 


«- 


°'"-i0-"ri|s 


1 


lo 


J '• 






CO 




— — 


- 






— — 






-^ 






N 


i<5 


g 






-^ss- 


s 


■-^fog 


£ 


§ 


- \ 




-MM 








"" 


c5- 


— — 










MO 


= 


-K 




S5!S 


! 


S 


1^ 






-M 


" 




"■ 


CO-CO) 


"3 












" 


" 


s 


l- 




-J-« 




^ 


— u; — 


g 


1 


- 




(Nt^CJ — "^^^ 




too 




OJ 




INOSINM- 


X 


g 


1 ^ 




^S'^^S 


"Ss 


i 


§ 


S- ! 




^MCO 


-« 




-^ 


.0-.-c.5J- 


M 




-C. 


f^ 


i 


-- 


xr- 




3-:;|g 


1 


^ 


^ i 






-- 








-' 


c^)^^ 




s 




- 






" 


O) 


s 


ro 




rf:: 




;? 


==5^ 


1 


1^ 




^^2g 


.-„.„-...„.„„ 






S-^: 


i 


•c 


f-^g«-|^K§^ 


2 
or 


II 


OS 


-~S§ — 




es-j" 




to 












* 


o> 


2 


« 


''SS-'^g-SS^ 


!5 


i 


§ \ 


^&'2^^^^^^^S^^°'Si — '^-'-2§5'| 


2 


SS??2|.^SS^2|§g 


1 


1 


to 

?3 ■ 


^ 


























« 












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s 


-' 


— rooc 




en 


xooo 


5 


i 


1 . 


«-.-- 


m 


— IN 


xco- 



















2 


g 


0. 


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— 


S;S^ 


:: 


! 


s 






§ 














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N 












" 


CO 


S2 








(M«ac 


— 


-u^.« 


?? 


t^ 








'^ 












■^-^ 




00 
















<N 


s 


-^ 




'°» 




s 


*E::2 


s 


s 


2 
5< 


1 


1 


i 

i 


1 

c 

1 


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E 


1 
1 

a. 




1 


1 

c 


1 

i 
1 


1 

1 


1 

/2 




1 


1 


z 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
■: 

- 

1 


1 

C 


1 

c 

1 


1 
1 


£ 


1 

1 
1 

> 


1 

c 
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1 

i 

1 


1 

1 



s 
H 


1 
i 


1 


1 
£ 

1 


1 


£ 

^ 
g 
1 


c 


i 

1 

1 

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s 

1^ 


1 

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1 

2 
1 


1 


1 
S 

1 




c 


2 

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1 

a 

I 

1 

1 









JH 



80 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 


"-"g- 


f5?5'- 


SfJ'-SJ'^gS 


i 


1 £5^5;- 


^^ 


!5:" 


'^ 


3- 


" 


iil"^ 


.«: 




"gggSSS'' 


i 




.o 




. 




. 


" 


0OU3 


M CO.. 




eg 






■gM. 


. 


...MM., j 


15 


-^ 






-^ 




'- 








t~. 


. 


-^ 






- 


-' 






=;- 
















. 


'-' : 




S^|j;;§SgSK§gS5g2 


1 i§^"?^i^F^-p^B»g^iiii^^ 


;? 






. 


'^ 






' 


"^ 




" 


«) ... 








" 






. 


^ 






" 








CO.. 


^ 


2'-5^g,i:"§?5*S'"S§ 


^ ^E.g"-5-S-- 


g|S"?5=°g3^SKS§SS 






.to 


00 to 


.. 


..J.« 


^ ..« 




'^ 


TO 


« 


... 


. 


<£> 


....O ; 


z 






-^ 












- 




.. to 




"' 








M 


-' 


... 
















-^ 




1 




^3 


id. 


. 






.Olio 




r-t^.. 


c5'^2 






;g2-* 


>o 


..OiiOiOOO. 


1 


.-1 


o 


MU3 




. 






.t- 


^ 


1 '=-" 




..o> 


'^ 


g.o. 


'- 




..to CO CO.. 


1 


^"2 


.05...U10 


1 


1 221°"^ 


r^eo... 


^??^ 


....o.'O'noj. 


1 


-^ 


. 












.. 


"- 11 -- 










>0 






«.. 


.. 


.CO. CO 


'^ : 




........... 


Sc5 t 

r 




oo«..2«^ 






SS32 


o.o 


=°3S=3?3« 


1 


"'S^i^SS^SS^^^SS 


? 


1 is^^^^'^SS^ 


OJ 


g§5"2"§="S|SS2°' 


1 


1 


SSS^ 


^"i 


--g|S»S-Sr522Sggc5 








OJ. 


t,...oc«> 


?33 


?^ 


1 .000..50.M. 




o«t^.. 


.COtOffl^iOtD . 


S 


« 


- 


ooo 


.... 


^" 


S 


t-o. 




..OC. 




§^=« 


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. 




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^ 




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.. 


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CD. 


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s 


1 - 




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JO... 










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< 


1 


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1 

5 


1 

■5 

W 


i 


1 

j 

1 


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1 

1 

i 
1 


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1 




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1 


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s 


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1 


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1 


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1 


1 


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1 


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1 


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1 

1 

I 

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a 

1 
1 


1 


1 

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1 


1 

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1 

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1 
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1 



REPOKT OF COMMISSIONER (VENERAL OF IMMIGRATIOTST. 

i2M00|g<NCO|«g|g III 



•^ .— X- ?« o >.-; X — N M -r X -■ - 
— ^ f? •— c< cc t>- ^t 



MIMCJ .CO 



(N •«• 



J^S'" 



81 



^gg|22E^^Sg??||§g§g5S§"'fic 






— ^C<»0^ ^^ i-( ^^ OS ^ •-i 



"0>ec««o •» 



N —IN »«— I c 



'2g 



c^ ■ •« .o — o 



'2^^^«52g|| 



^ss^ 



c^cow 



'SS 



2 :3?S; 



OOC^X'5<bOT)<rttOT)IOC 
1— ( lO »o C^ ^H <o 5 



«c;5CJXCa.^XO — C^O»CX(M^ 



)X?) .(M (M 






,;*5jgxt,.,=cgog^«2|055C 



OSCOC^i-iOiroOC 



O C3 C^ -^ • • rt M . 0> O 



to .o »OCI 



Ill 

•2 s '3 



■5.5 • • 

illil 

ChCLiP-i^ 



sis 

» ® K c 

■S-o 3 o 



S S o I 

Ilii 






'S-^ 



<NOM 






10656—22 6 



82 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGEATION. 



1 


s 


s 


! 


g 


t- 


IS 




«- 


5; 


1 


i 


« 


1 


0" 


i 


si 


S^l 


1 




"S"^ 


Z 


CO 


i 


K 


«i 


t~ 


I 


Is 


i 


5 


1 


^ 

^ 


^^^ 




'^ 


-^ 








" : 


a 




t^l-H 








Oi 






00 CO 




f. 






-^CCO^ 


s 


0^55 


gj^^coooc^^^rcjD 


s 


rjccS — J^c* 


'^ 


§^^•-22 


CT) 


sssss 


^•^ 






to 


^ro 


'^ 




^(NW© 


s 


OtOMrt 


CO 





'^ 


^0.^ 


'-' 


<a 


COCO-* J->« 


1 


„«^^„^^<^<««««^o 


i 


« ;^ -H ^ <» g ""^ 


B?J5- 


s--ss-g 


l. 












^ 
















-' 
























-' 






















-' 


^' 






■* 


<N^ 


cocq'X 




00 


3; 


(M'^'lN 




co-^ 






^0«-H 


^^ 


.eog.o 


> 






3 


-H^ 




^ 


-""^" 


g 


^C,CO 




^ 


S;-- 


S^" 


c. 


CO 




^ 


TftC 


1 






U5 


COIN 


'-' 




'- 


(N-* 


2 


r-cv<T« 




COOCO 






^«o. 


« 


^ 


O.-lr-(C0C0 


1 


«-^«t--"=^-g3'oc,t53 


i 


51S3?5^ 


°"a 


^^|g5«c,co^^«^j5^C5g 






« 


-< 




o. 




'^ 


lOIN 


to 






- 




c,^^ 






t^CO 




C^ffJ 






--^ 


- 


ft 
03 






CO 


<NCO 












C^(N 


t^ 


■«< 


>c 




" 


;^ 






g-a.^ 


c^ 






(N'i'rtCOtO 








-^ 






-^ 


'^ 






^CC 


2 






'^ 








CJ 






05.-I 




-- 










^^ : 


2 


•* 


«5 


a« 




O^N-nr-w 


i 


gcg 




s^s 






s^;^^" 


g^c.go«2 




t~ 


?5 




(N^rtcOO.-i 


«^ 


S 
















-^ 


-^ 


s 






^ 


^rt 




^ 


CO 


d^' 












^ 
















'^ 
























^ 
















r-1 






i 


SJ28-??g'"g§2S"g5 


i 


3|§-"Si5g 





§2g-SS3-2g|gg 


1 


r-,^-^ 




";5S 


s 


;:.^^-. 


'-'"S? 


"' 


E^HiS 


t,-i»c^«cg^2: 


1 




-HM 


^^ 


^^ 






'^ • 


!:: 


(MNN 








-^ 






?3"- 






N 


««COC.^ 


1 

1 

o 


i 
1 




g 
^ 
t 


& 


i 


1 

1 

8 
1 


2 


t: 


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1 

i 


1 

C 




1 

1 


J 
1 


-i 

"i 

p. 




1 


d 

i 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 

13: 


2 

1 
1 


2 

PC 


1 


1 

1 

c 


1 

i 

i 

c 

1 


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i 
1 

'C 


t 


1 







1 
J 

£ 
1 

1 

■E 
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■1 
1 

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1 


1 

c 


1 


c 
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c! 


1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


•£ 

1 

IS 


1 

IS 


1 


1 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



83 



2 


1^ 


i§J^§ggl 


i 




f 


ss 


§ 


Si 


r^ 


g^ 


1 


cc 


s 


i|ii 


s 


Si 


1 




B 




i 

u- 




s 


% 








-g- 


- 




- 


-^ : 




•9 




'- : 


:—<N 




U5 


So 


-^^is- 


S-'-SS 


n 


8ll§ 


r-^^002- 


'^ 


^-5^S^-3 




(N : 


;"2 


"m 


i 


■* 


"§5'^'-rsgs 


A 


III 


n 


-g- 










==fi- 





--'- 




M 




05 


i 






•^^s-^ 


r-i- 


1 


i 1 


-"^-i-^^^tt-toc^t^ 


2;cco=:«-. 


"^ ; 


-.■«-c» 


''s 


2 


5-S2^??3|-|£2 


8 

(N 


^1 


2 

5- 
















































M 














-^ 




•no 1 00 




2 


• 






00 -H 


C) 








-j-a;^ 





- 


-^ 


l'^ 









i 


^ 


--2— :§^'3gt:j 1 






- 


<N 


— — ro 




f<ICt--*M 


^« : 




Cl 




" 


§ 


« 


og-„ 


g--gE; g 


s 


s 


<N 


^g^ 




-HCO^ — (N«0 




«; 


-^ 











^ 


" 


i-" 


•-S-2g5 


s 


10 


s 


"— §:: 


w c<5 r- -H f< ^ « Tj. 


s 


IMCO j 


•CCiJ" 




K 


i 


to 1 t-" 




1 


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■J5 
















^ 


^ 


^ 


(NOOO 


-55 


--- - 


1 


i 




' 


(-(M 


■ 








N cc C( cc -. 


"' : 


;-(« 




"* 


§ 






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?? 


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i 


i 


s 
























;-' 




N 








i-"- 




M 


^ 






■;MN 




x 


n?J=^ is 


s 


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„^«,,^^e,0«^0^u,^t5C._; 






O-l^h- 


i 


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5 


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en 

1 




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-r 




— (Nh--* 


C<>C<5— !■* 


^^^^^ 




-" : 


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III 




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IN 


--- 




"■* 
















■* 


j2 


c 


■^as; 




S 


2gS is 


s|s 


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a 
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t 

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e 




1 

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r 5 
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d 
1 

1 

1 


£ 


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84 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



& 
































' 














































' 


" 






14 


'^ 






- 














N 




■* 






-^ 




" 


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■>1< 






N 






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;:5 




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c^ ■»• 


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= 




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-< 




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CON 




i 






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t- 


^^(N 




C^-OO-H 


« 


-' 


f. 


« 


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«« 


" 


s 


OCIM- 


2?!- = 2-^^23SS 


t2 


S5^;?-"2?a2'^ 


2S2-:2-S''»g:!:gg«==° 


1 






















"^ 








■^ 


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'' 










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— -(MCSC-)f(N;C|-H 




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-f 


?.^-S :- 








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o 






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09 






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c-i 








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s 


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1 
1 


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86 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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87 



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88 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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90 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



•■B15 'euipUBUJ95 




:;;:::::: :■::":;: : 


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168 

2,171 

451 

1,226 

126 

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14, 424 

99 

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166 

514 

10,257 

274 


Destination. 


Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

IlUnois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 


Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 91 



.JO-* • •» •-I- 



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92 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



•IBIOJ, 


419 

163 
2, l«4 

180 
23,624 
1,193 
5,719 

398 
1,446 
2, 399 

373 
2,800 

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976 

361 

964 
4, 557 
1,790 
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12, 187 
5,152 

258 
2,774 
1,007 
1,469 

207 
1,926 
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100 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table XIV. — Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 '' to 1922, hy "■ 
races or peoples. 



Race or people. 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 




412 

674 
2,526 

94 

8^632 
1,374 

367 

1,860 

15 

10,712 

6,097 

2,278 

26,632 

2,395 

37,415 

32,345 

13,091 

65,639 

3,395 

22 

6,858 

5,700 

163 

172 

28,466 

2,096 

96 

1,774 

1,400 

23,249 
1,752 

'996 
110 
3,708 
28 
1,359 
144 
193 


714 

982 

3,030 

201 
1,250 
17,184 
2,678 

675 

2,702 

9 

10, 897 
12,612 
2,095 

3! 773 
60,764 
35,607 
17,316 
84,346 
12,628 

10,311 

13,777 

261 

188 

46, 938 

4,241 

398 

1,200 

2,8.32 

32, 952 

1,757 

29,243 

1,111 

97 

2,920 

184 

762 

78 

73 


591 
1,855 
3,766 

611 
2,452 
17,928 
1,622 

732 

3,299 

20 

13,488 

9,999 

4,036 

34,742 

5,919 

58, 098 

30,404 

22, 103 

115,704 

5,249 

47 

8,815 

13,311 

350 

167 

43,617 

4,176 

761 

672 

5, 288 

40, 277 
2,004 

29,313 

1,202 

276 

'I 

35 


832 
1,151 
5,590 

1,291 
1,631 
30,233 
2,423 

1,004 

4,117 

84 

14, 942 

13, 868 

4,122 

51,686 

8,115 

57; 688 

29,001 

27,620 

152,915 

14,455 

28 

11,629 

23,610 

715 

160 

69,620 

5,309 

2,033 

1,551 

7,533 

55,780 

2,4.32 

36,9.34 

1,954 

496 

4,982 

165 

760 

137 

147 


2,174 
1,759 
9,591 

6,479 
2,192 
32,907 
2,944 

1,736 
6,496 

83 
28,451 
18, 864 
7,166 
71,782 
14,376 
76,2a3 
35,366 
37,429 
196, 117 
20,041 
564 

486 

185 

82,343 

8, 433 

31608 
9,843 

79,347 
6,219 
34,427 
3,297 
978 
5,551 
449 
1,278 
i;497 


2,386 
1745 
11,911 

4,577 
4,327 
21,242 
4,811 

2,036 

7,832 

258 

41,479 

10, 157 

11,557 

74,790 

12,625 

106,236 

37,076 

36,699 

159,329 

14,382 

1,907 

12,780 

41 
67, 757 
6, 338 
4,364 
3,961 
9,592 

61,029 
11,483 
27,940 
4,662 
1,666 
3,653 
1,482 
1,820 
1,942 
668 


3,598 
1,878 
11,757 

5,823 
i;971 
35,104 
7,259 

2,6.39 

'•SI 

50,865 

17.012 

. 11,347 

82,360 

12, 144 

129, 910 

54,266 

39,930 

186,390 

11,021 

4,929 

18,604 

46,030 

227 

22 

102,437 

4,855 

7,818 

3,746 

14,473 

62,284 
16, 144 
52,36H 
5,590 
1,658 
4,822 
2,145 
2,531 
1,548 
351 


3,786 




1,895 


Bohemian and Moravian (Czech). 
Bulgarian, Serbian, and Monte- 


12,958 
11,548 


Chinese 


1,485 




44,272 


Cuban 


5,591 


Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herze- 


4,568 




9,735 


East Indian 


271 




45,079 




14, 136 




10,379 




86,813 


Greek 


23, 127 




1,')3,748 




40,959 




46,286 


Italian (south) . 


240, 528 




14,243 


Korean 


127 




14, 257 




41,261 


Mexican 

Pacific Islander . . . 


141 
13 




95,835 




8,729 




11,425 




5 814 




16,257 


Scandinavian (Norwegians, 


58, 141 




16,463 


Slovak 


38,221 




5,332 




1,585 




5,824 




2,033 




2,367 


West Indian (except Cuban) 


1,476 
1,027 






Total 


311,715 


448,572 


487,918 


648,743 


857,046 


812,870 


1,026,499 


1,100,735 







Race or people. 



1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


5,235 


4,626 


4,307 


4,966 


6,721 


6,759 


6,634 


2,644 


3,299 


3,108 


5,508 


3,092 


5,222 


9,353 


13,554 


10, 164 


6,850 


8,462 


9,223 


8,439 


11,091 


27, 174 


18,246 


6,214 


15,130 


10,222 


10,657 


9,087 


77C 


i;263 


1,841 


1,770 


1,307 


1,60S 


2,022 


47,826 


20,472 


20, 181 


39,562 


18,982 


24,366 


42,499 


5,475 


3,323 


3,380 


3,331 


3,914 


3,155 


3,099 


7 393 


3,747 


1,888 


4,911 


4,400 


3,672 


4, ,520 


12,467 


9,526 


8,114 


13,012 


13,862 


10,935 


14,507 


1,072 


1,710 


337 


1,782 


517 


165 


188 


51, 126 


49,056 


39, 021 


bi,m 


57, 258 


49, 689 


55, 522 


14,860 


6,746 


11,687 


15, 7.36 


9,779 


6,641 


12,756 


9,392 


12,881 


19,423 


21,107 


18,132 


18,382 


20,652 


92,936 


73,038 


58,534 


71,38C 




65,-343 


80,865 


46,283 


28,808 


20, 262 


39, 135 


37,021 


31,566 


38,644 


149, 182 


103,387 


57,551 


84,26C 


91, 22s 


80,595 


101,330 


38,706 


36.427 


31,18,5 


38,382 


40,246 


33,922 


37,023 


51,564 


24,70C 


125, 15C 


30,78C 


30,312 


26,443 


42,534 


242,497 


110,517 


65,248 


192,673 


159,638 


135,8:30 


231,613 


30, 824 


16,418 


3,275 


2,79J 


4,575 


6,172 


,v,302 


3£ 


26 


11 


U 


8 
17,027 


33 


6-! 


25,884 


1.3,720 


15, 25-! 


22,714 


14, 078 


24,647 


60, 071 


24; 378 


28,70^ 


27,302 


19,996 


23,599 


30,010 


91 


5,682 


15, ,591 


17,760 


18,784 


22,001 


10,9.54 



African (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Moravian 

(Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, and 

Montenegrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and 

Herzegovinian 

Dutch and Flemish 

East Indian 

English 



French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) . 
Italian (south) . 



Korean . 
Lithuanian. 

Magyar 

Mexican — 



44,802 
251,612 
8.941 
152 
21,584 
44,538 
13, 089 



1 Alien arrivals previous to July 1, 



were not recorded by race or people. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION- 



101 



Tablk XIW— Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 1922, 
races or peoples — Continued. 



Race or people. 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


Pacific Islander 


3 

138,033 
9,048 
19,200 
16,807 
24,081 

53,425 
20,516 
42,041 
9,495 
1,060 
5,880 
1,902 
2,754 
1,381 
, 2,058 


2 
68, 105 
6,809 
9,629 
17,111 
12,361 

32,789 
17,014 
16, 170 
6,636 
1,063 
5,520 
2 327 
2,504 

1^530 


7 
77,565 
4,606 
8,041 
10,038 
15,808 

34,996 
10,446 
22,586 

'890 
3,668 
820 
1,099 
1,024 
1,537 


61 
128,348 
7,657 
14,199 
17,294 
27,907 

52,037 
24,612 
32,416 
5,837 

6,317 
1,283 
2,244 
1,150 
3,330 


12 
71,446 
7,469 
5,311 
18,721 
17,724 

45,859 
25,625 
21,415 
8,068 
1,153 
5,444 
918 
2,248 
1,141 
3,323 


3 
85,163 
9,403 
8,329 
22,558 
21,965 

31,001 
20,293 
25,281 
9,070 
1,342 
5,525 
1,336 
2,239 
1,132 
3,660 


11 

174,365 
13,566 
13,451 
51,472 
30,588 

38,737 
21,293 
27,234 
9,042 
1,363 
9,210 
2,015 
2,820 
1,171 
3,038 


1 


Polish 


122,657 


Portuguese 


9,647 
24,070 
44,957 
36,727 

36,053 
18,997 
25,819 
11,064 
1,544 


Rumanian 




Ruthenian (Russniak) 

Scandinavian (Norwegians, 

Danes, and Swedes) 

Scotch 


Slovak 




Spanish American 


Syrian 


9,023 
2,693 
2,558 
1,396 
3,830 




Welsh 


West Indian (except Cuban). 




Total 


1,285,349 


782,870 


751, 786 


1,041,570 


878,587 


838, 172 


1,197,892 


1,218,480 



Race or people. 



African (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Moravian | 

(Czech) ! 

Bulgarian, Serbian, and | 

Montenegrin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian — 

Cuban 1 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and j 

Herzcgovinian ! 

Dutch and Flemish j 

East Indian \ 

EngUsh ! 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

ItaUan (north) 

Italian (south) j 



1,651 



Korean. 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 

Pacific Islander. 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Rumanian 



Ruthenian (Russniak). 
Scandina%-ian (Norwegians, 

Danes, and Swedes) 

Scotch 

Slovak 

Spanish 

Spanish American 

Syrian 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except 

Cuban) 

Other peoples 



Total 326,700 



3,506 
2,469i 
1,942 
3,402 



6,675 

82! 

38,662 

3,472, 
12,636 
20,729! 
15,187! 
26,4971 
23,503 
10,660 
46,557 

8,609 
146 

3;604 
10,993 



4,376 
1,200 
4,459 
2,933 

24,263 
14,310 
2,069 
5,705 
1,667 
1,767 
273 
1,390 



4,576 
964 



3,146 
2,239 
■ 791 
3,442 

114 
6,443 

36, 

5,649 
19,518 
11,555 
20,792 
15, 108 
20,636 

4,905 
33,909 

8,711 
154 



17, 198 
5 
4,302 
12,208 
953 
4,858 
1,365 

19, 172 

13,515 

577 

9,259 

1,881 

676 

216 

983 



1917 


1918 


7,971 


5,706 


1,221 


221 


327 


74 


1,134 


150 


1,843 


1,576 


305 


35 


3,428 


1,179 


94 


15 


5,393 


2,20C 


69 


61 


32,246 


12,980 


5,900 


1,867 


24,405 


6,84C 


9,682 


1,992 


25,919 


2,602 


17,342 


3,672 


17,462 


4,657 


3,796 


1,074 


35, 154 


5,234 


8,925 


10, 168 


194 


149 


47£ 


135 


434 


32 



16,438| 
10 
3,109 
10, 194 
522 
3,711 
1,211 

19,596 

13,350 

244 

15,019 

2,587 

976 

454 



2,097 



2,319 

155 1 

1,513 

49 

8,741 

5,204 

35 

7,909' 

2,231i 

210i 

24 

278 

732 
3141 



105 

t 

205! 

l,697l 

23! 

l,169l 

*\ 
2,735 

68' 

'968' 
12,598 
l,837i 
813 
3,055! 
7,910 
1,236 
2,137 
10, 056 ! 
77: 

leoi 

52 
28,844 

o' 

7321 

1,5741 

89' 

1,532 

103l 

I 

8,2611 

10,364 

85 

4,224' 

3,0921 

2311 

181 



1,223 

247! 



8,174 
2,762 

415 

1,064 

2,148 

493 

1,510 

63 

12, 730 

160 

58,366 

1,510 

27, 

7,338 

13,998 

14,292 

20,784 

12,918 

84,882 

^,279 

72 

422 

252 

51,042 

17 

2,519 

15, 174 

898 

2,378 

258 

16,621 
21,180 

3,824 
23,594 

3,934 

3,047 
140 

1,402 

1,546 
1,345 



295,403 110,618! 141,132, 430,001 805,228 



9,873 
10,212 

1,743 

7,700 
4,017 
11,035 
1,523 

930 

12,813 

353 

54,627 

4,233 

24,122 

24, 168 

31,828 

119,036 

39,056 

27,459 

195,037 

7,531 

61 

829 

9,377 

29 

13 
21,146 
18,856 
5,925 
2,887 



25,812 
24,649 
35,047 
27,448 
3,325 
5,105 
353 
1,748 

1,553 
3,237 



1922 Total. 



5,248 
2,249 



3,086 



115,222 
70,793 



146,913 



1,370 160,716 

4,405 50,335 

3,783i 477,079 

698! 74,269 



3o: 

3,749 

223 

30,429 

2,506 
13,617 
31,218 

3,821 
53,524! 
17,191 

6,098^ 
35,056 

6,301 



51,269 
192,266 
7,924 
913,196 
219,860 
332,241 

1,155,444 
491,034 

1,738,167 
736,012 
584,905 

3,128,592 
246,359 



l,602i 259,458 

6,037, 477,663 

18,246 296,708 

7 1,129 

6,357 1,450,793 

1,8071 179,550 

l,520l 145,127 

2,486! 245,108 

698, 261,954 



16,678. 
15,5961 
6,001i 
1,879 
1,446 
1,334, 
40! 
956 

976| 
743 



877,700 
341,218 
525, 158 
183,332 
36,344 
99,457 
21,434 



25,579 
38,137 



309,55616,406,268 



102 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table XIV-a.- 



-Immigrajit aliens admitted, fiscal years ended June 30, 1899 to 1922, by 
countries.^ 



Countries. 



Austria 

Hungary 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Denmark 

France, including Corsica. 
Germany 



Italy, including Sicily and Sar- 
dinia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal, including Cape \'erde 
and Azores Islands 

Bumania 



Spain, including Canary 

Balearic Islands 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Wales 

Other Europe 



Total Europe . 



-China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia . 
Other Asia 



Total Asia. 



Africa 

Australia, Tasmania, and New 

Zealand 

Pacific Islands (not specified) . . . 

British North America 

Central America 

Mexico 

South America 

West Indies 

Other countries 



Grand total. 



62,491 

1,101 
52 
2,690 
1,694 
17,476 
2,333 

77,419 
1,029 
6,705 

2,054 
1,606 
60,982 



12,797 
1,326 



45,123 
6 



297,349 



2,844 
17 

4,436 
15 



8,972 



51 

456 
354 
1,3221 
159i 
16li 



1,196 
108 
2,926 
1,739 
18,507 
3,771 



113,390 
1,579 
657 
3,655 
3,150 
21,651 
5,910 



100,135 135,996 
1,735 2,349 
9,575 12,248 



4,234 
6,459 
90, 787 



1,152 
285 

9,951 

35,730 

1,792 

764 

2 



424,700 



311,715i 448,572 



592 
23,331 
2,201 



12,214 

30,561 

2,070 

701 



173 

325 
173 
540 
150 
347 
203 
3,176 
1 



171, £ 
2, 577 
Sol 
5,660 
3,117 
28,304 
8,104 

178,375 
2,284 
17,484 

5,307 
7, 
107,347 

975 
30, 894 
2,344 



13, 575 

29,138 

2, .560 

763 

3 



619,068 



14,270 

93 

6,223 



22,271 



487,918 648,743 



206,011 
3,450 
1,761 
7,158 
5,578 
40,086 

230, 622 
3,998 
24,461 

9,317 

9,310 

136,093 

2,080 
46,028 
3,S83 
1,529 

26, 219 
3.5,310 
6,143 
1,275 



1,150 

199 

1,058 



177, 1.56 
3,976 
1,325 
8,525 
9,406 
46,380 
11,343 

193,296 
4,916 
23, ■" 



5,023 
4,344 



36,142 

11,092 

1,730 

143 



767,933 



4,309 
14,264 
261 
5, 2:35 
2,1 



5281 1, 

589! i: 

, 170 lo: 

25: 



1905 



111,990 
163,703 
5,302 
2,043 
8,970 
10, 168 
40, 574 
10,515 

221,479 
4,954 
2.5,064 

5,028 

4,437 

lai, 897 

2, 

26,591 
4, 
4)542 

64,709 
52 
16)977 
2, .503 
13 



974,273 



2,166 

10,331 

190 

6,157 



1906 

111,598 
153,540 
5,099 
4,666 
7,741 
9,386 
37,564 
19,489 

273,120 
4,946 
21,730 

8,517 

4,476 

215,665 

1,921 
23,310 
3,846 
9,510 

49,491 
34,995 
15,866 
1,841 

48 



,018,365 



1,544 
13,835 

216 
6,354 

351 



857,046 812,870 



75' 
2, 168i 
1, 195. 
2,637 
2, .576' 
16,641 
161| 



712 

1,682 
51 
5,063 
1,140 
1,997 
2,757 
13,656 
33,012 



Countries. 



1907 



Austria 

Hungary 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Denmark 

France, including Corsica 

Germany 

Greece 

Italy, including Sicily and 

Sardinia 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Portugal, including Cape 

Verde and Azores Islands.. 
Rumania 



144,992 

193,460 

6,396 

11,359 

7,243 
9,731 
37, 807 1 
36,580' 



8.5, .526 
4, 162 

10,827 
4,954 
8,788 

32,309 

21,489 



Spain, including Canary ; 
Balearic Islands 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe 

United Kingdom: 

England 

Ireland , 

Scotland , 

Wales 

Other Europe 



285,7311 128,503 

6, 6371 5,946 

22, 133 12, 412 

9,608' 7,307 

4, 3S4 5, 228] 

2.58,943 156, 711 1 



1910 



80, S53 
89, 338 

3,692 

1,0.54! 

4,395! 

6, 672| 
25, .5401 
14,llll 

183,2181 



4,956 

1,590, 

120,460 



135, 793 
122,^44 
5,402 
4,737 
6,984 
7,383 
31,283 
25,888 

215, 5;i7 
7,534 
17,538 



1911 



82, 129| 
76,928! 
5,71li 
4,695 
7, 5551 
8,022l 
32,061, 
26,226! 



85, 854 

93,028 
4,169 
4,447 
6,191 
8,628 

27," 

21,449 



182,882' 157,134 
8,358i 6,619 



8,374 10,5 

2,522 1,£ 

1.58,7211 162,5 



1913 



137,245 
117,580 
7,405 
1,753 
6,478 
9,675 
34,329 
22,817 

265,542 
6,902 
8,587 

14,171 

2,155 

291,040i 



1914 

134,831 

143,321 

5,763 

9,189 

6,262 



6.321 



10,898 

4,032 

255.660 



Total Europe 

See footnote Table III. 



5,784 
20,589 

3,748 
20,767 


3,899, 2,616i 
12,809; 14,474 

3,28l! 2,694 
11,290; 9,0151 


3,472 
23,745 

3,533 
18,405 


5,074i 
20,780i 

3,458| 
14,438l 


6,327 
12,688 

3,505 
14,481 


6,167 
17,202 

4,104 
14,128 


7,591 
14,800 
4,211 
8,199 


56,637 
34,530 
19,740 
2,660 
107 


47,03l' 32,8091 
30,5561 25,033 
13,506! 12,400i 
2,287 1,584: 
97 46, 


40,706 
29, 855 
20,115 
2 120 
151 


52,426! 
29,112! 
18,796; 
2, 1621 
377: 


40,408 
25,879 
14, 578 
2,162 
243 


43,363 
27,876 
14,220 
2,745 
371 


35,864 
24,688 
10,682 
2,183 
967 


1,199,566 


691,901 654,875 

=' =: = 


926,291 


764,757 


718,875 


1,055,855 


1,058,391 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



103 



Table XIV-a. 



-Immigrant aliens admitted, fiscal years 
by countries — Continued. 



ended June 30, 1899 to 1922, 



China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia. 
Other Asia 



Total Asia... 



.\fnca 

.Vustralia, Tasmania, and 

New Zealand 

Pacific Islands (not specified) 

British North America 

Central America 

Mexico 

South America 

West Indies 

Other countries 



Grand total. 



961 
30,226 



1,947 
42 
19,918 
970 
1,406 
2,779 

' 22 



1, 
15,803 
1,040 
9,753 
372 



1,943 
3,111 

203 
7,506 

141 



2S,365i 12,904 



1,098' 
81! 
38,5101 
l,217l 
6,067i 
2,315 
11,888 
17| 



8;39 

53 
51,941 
930 
16,251 
1,906 
11, 180 
49 



782,870] 751,786 



1910 



1, 
2,720 
1,696 
15,212 
1,93" 



23,533 



998 
56, 555 



2,151 

11,244 

43 



,041,570 



4,520 

524 

10, 229 

695 



17,42 



56,830 
1,193 



3.049 
13,403 



1912 



1913 



1,765 
6,114 

175 

12,7S8J 
6071 



2, 105 
8,281 

179 
23,95. 

838 



21,449] 35,358 



794 
104 
55,990 
1,242 
23, 238 
2,989 
12,467 
15 



1,409 

1,229 
111 
73,802 
1,473 
11,926 
4,248 
12,458 
23 



838,172 1,197,892 



1914 

2,502 

8,929 

221 

21.716 



1,539 

1,336 
110 
86, 139 
1,622 
14,614 
5,869 
14,451 
136 



Countries. 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Total. 




9,215 
9,296 
2,399 
1,403 


3,171 

2,020 

986 

764 


857 
401 
398 
151 


53 
8 
73 
19 


26 
27 
268 
22 


84 

6,574 

90 

3,426 

3,137 

7.56 

8,945 

■ 1,001 

11,981 

95, 145 
5,187 
4,445 
4,813 

15,472 

1,890 

995 

18,821 

3^785 
l'933 

27,871 
9,591 
9,347 
1,253 

1.888 
1,735 


4,947 

7,702 

6,166 

585 

40,884 
6,26t 
3,795 
9,552 
6,803 

28,502 

222,260 
6,493 
7 423 
95,089 

19,195 
25,817 
6,398 

23,818 
9,171 
7,106 
6,391 

.33,431 
28,435 
15,954 
1,757 

23, 536 
4,894 


5,019 

5,7.56 

1 541 

297 

12, 541 
2,709 
2,767 
4,220 

17,931 
3,457 

40,319 
1,990 
.5,292 

28,635 

1,950 
10,287 
17,143 

665 
6,624 

1>60 

15, 249 
10,579 
9,018 

886 

6,047 
405 


|23,242,370 


Hungary .... 


BelRiuni 


85,385 




62,855 




56,851 




3,312 


3,322 


2,744 


1,630 


1,352 


121,853 


Finland 


7,318 


France, includmg Corsica. . 
Germany 


4,811 
7,799 
12,592 

3^144 

7; 986 


4,156 

2,877 
27,034 

33,665 
2,910 
5,191 


3,i87 
1,8.57 
23,974 

34,596 
2,235 
4,659 


1,798 

447 

1,910 

5,250 

944 

2,578 


3,379 

52 

1,884 
1,098 
1,995 


152,481 
546, 160 




389,783 


Italy, including Sicily and 
Sardinia . 


3,595,534 


Netherlands 


103,227 




285,895 


Poland.. 


128,537 


Portugal, including Cape 
Verde and Azores Islands 
Rumania . . 


4,907 

481 

26,187 

2,762 
6,585 
1,742 
1,008 

21, 562 
14,185 
4,668 
1,007 


12, 259 

90 

7,842 

5,769 

6,248 

663 

313 

8^639 

2,655 

512 


9,975 

66 

12,716 

10,232 

'911 
152 

,S,354 
5,406 

1,868 
513 


2,224 

59 

4,242 

4,295 
2,298 

15 

2,037 
331 
260 
219 


1,222 

19 

1,403 

1,.573 

2,243 

381 

10 

5,163 

'474 

1,283 

351 


186,314 
110,488 


Russia . 


2, 693, 817 


Spain, including Canary 

• and Balearic Islands 

Sweden 


121,769 
391,850 
70,995 


Turkey in Europe 


143,069 


United Kinedora: 




Ireland.... 




Scotland 




Wales 




Yugoslavia (Serb, Croat, 
and Slovene Kingdom) 


31,471 




1,180 


1,717 


1,463 


42 


16 


14,083 






Total Europe 


197,919 


145,699 


133,083 


31,063 


24,627 


246,295 


6,52,364 


216,3.85 


14,103,378 


China 


2,660 
8,613 

161 
3,543 

234 


. 2,460 

8,680 

112 

1,670 

282 


2,237 

8,991 

109 

393 

1,026 


1,795 

10,213 

130 

43 

520 


1,964 

10,064 

171 

19 

456 


2,330 
9,432 

300 
5, 033 

410 


4, 009 
7,878 

511 
11,7.35 

901 


4,406 
6,716 

360 
1,998 

783 


53,205 


Japan 


243,707 




7,692 


Turkey in Asia. 


178,913 


Other Asia 


18,824 






Total Asia. 


15,211 


13,204 




12,756 


12,701 


12,674 


17,505 


25,034 


14,263 


502,341 






Africa 


934 

1,282 

117 
82,215 
1,252 
12, 340 
3,801 
11,598 
31 


894 

1,484 

90 
101,551 
1,135 
1.8,425 
4 286 
12,027 
31 


566 

1,014 

128 
105,399 
2,073 
17,869 
6,931 
15,507 
77 


299 

925 

165 
32, 452 
2,220 
18,524 
3,343 
8,879 
47 


1,234 

76 
57,782 

2,589 
29,818 

3,271 

' 46 


648 

2,066 

119 
90,025 
2,360 
52,361 
4,112 
13,808 
702 


1,301 

2,191 

90 
72,317 
2,254 
30,758 
5,015 
13,774 
130 


520 

855 

60 
46,810 
970 
19,551 
2,668 
7,449 
25 


17,713 


Australia, Tasmania, and 
New Zealand 


28,039 


Pacific Islands (not speci- 
fied) ... 


2,846 


British North America 


1,042,256 
28,776 


Mexico 


319.353 


South America. 


67.075 


West Indies 


259,436 




35,055 






Grand total . 


326,700 


298,826 


295,403 


110,618 


141,132 


430,001 


805,228 


309,556 


16,406,268 





» The totals for Austria and Hungary, respectively, for the 18 years in which they were separated, are 
as follows: Austria, 1,131,824; Hungary, 1,264,662. 

' The totals for England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, respectively, for the 23 years in which they were 
separated, are as foUows: England, 696,592; Ireland, 559,990; Scotland, 225,.590; Wales, 33,978. 



104 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV-b. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal years 



Race or people. 



1910 1911 1912 



African (black) 

Armenian 

Bohemian and Moravian (Czech) 

Bulgarian, Serbian, and Montenegrin — 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herzegovinian. 

Dutch and Flemish 

East Indian 

English 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 



Korean. 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 

Pacific Islander 

Polish 

Portuguese , 

Rumanian 

Russian 

Ruthenian (Russniak) 

Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes, and 

Swedes) 

Scotch , 

Slovak 

Spanish 

Spanish American 

Syrian 

Turkish 

Welsh 

West Indian (except Cuban) , 

Other peoples 

Not specified 



234 

1,051 

o,%5 

3,898 

28,589 

1^046 
1, 198 
124 
5,320 
3,463 
3,063 

14, 418 
6,763 
7,702 
2,441 

19, 507 

147, 828 

5,323 



29, 276 

173 

7 

46,727 

5,264 
7,507 
3,310 

5,801 

1,596 

23,573 

1,977 

333 

1,700 

1,276 

163 

375 

630 



1,104 

561 

746 

2, 422 

3,397 

9,014 

1,243 

515 

903 

48 

5,061 

1,427 

2,862 

13,541 

6,275 

6,105 

2,059 

16,658 

69,781 

3,903 

114 

1,990 

11,507 

158 

4 

19, 290 

816 

1,352 

5,125 

1,672 

7,257 
1,618 

i'834 
305 

1,204 
725 
171 
394 

1,874 
11,873 



521 

943 

2,720 

7,' 133 
1, 556 
432 
1,192 
80 
6,508 
1,276 
4,029 
13,303 
8,814 

2^472 

13, 431 

41,772 

4,377 

137 

1,812 

10, 533 

210 

1 

16,884 

906 

1,834 

5,682 

1,719 

5,032 

1,992 

9, 259 

2,323 

387 

1,077 

1,058 

195 

388 

806 

20, 644 



913 

1,208 
6,472 
2,716 

13, 735 
2,234 
935 
1,689 
75 
9,432 
4,219 
3,400 

15, 243 

11,134 
6,401 
3,300 

14,209 

62,009 

3, 351 

41 

2, 430 

18, 975 

319 

1 

31, 952 
1,388 
5,230 
8,439 
3,838 

8,036 

3,083 

15, 561 

2,518 

374 

1,173 

1,633 

255 

344 

862 

25, 540 



718 

1,149 

7,349 

2,549 

13,963 

1,963 

927 

1,816 

164 

10,341 

4,148 

4,189 

15, 026 

13,323 

7,418 

4,086 

13,006 

96, 881 

1,501 

55 

4,141 

17, 575 

325 

4 

37, 764 

1,747 

5,824 

9,744 

5,521 

10,380 
3,456 
12, 526 
2,569 
343 
972 



530 
1,113 
15,201 



Total. 



225.802 



1,671 

676 

871 

13,525 

2,250 

10,209 

1,264 

849 

2,145 

213 

10,794 

3,053 

4,019 

11,871 

31,556 

6,697 

4,458 

10,995 

79,057 

733 

44 

3,276 

11,496 

910 

4 

24,107 

1,583 

3,156 

10,548 

5,327 

9,291 
4,118 
9,854 
3,181 
457 
797 
1,297 



1,118 
19,838 



308, 190 



Alien departures previous to July l, 1907, were not recorded by race or people. 



KEPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAI. OF IMMIGRATION. 
ended June SO, 1908 ' to 1922, by races or peoples. 



105 



191J 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Total. 


1,805 


1,644 


1, 684 


1,497 


1,291 


976 


1,275 


1,807 


2,183 


20, 953 


1,250 


444 


659 


133 


1,238 


11 


584 


605 


253 


8,886 


1,011 


219 


42 


59 


455 


412 


259 


564 


4,246 


13,235 


5,780 


2,354 


290 


325 


918 


3,241 


23, 844 


9,940 


5,877 


91, 022 


2,059 


1,959 


2,148 


1,799 


2,239 


2,062 


2,961 


5,253 


6,146 


43, 819 


14,440 


2,381 


76 


24 


31 


154 


7,481 


3,306 


3,997 


114,533 


947 


2,536 


1,454 


2,395 


1,141 


898 


1, 598 


1, 059 


909 


23,286 


878 


105 


4 


6 


13 


2 


1,533 


909 


549 


8,703 


2,252 


1,340 


742 


742 


698 


1, 356 


3,016 


2,405 




23, 651 


143 


162 


91 


136 


154 


106 


162 


137 


"■'218 


2,013 


11, 187 


10, 372 


7,826 


6,316 


12, 810 


9,406 


11, 659 


11,622 


9,668 


13S, 322 


2,941 


845 


543 


1 256 


1596 


497 


1,447 


2,480 


i;254 


30,445 


2,930 


5,799 


2,297 


2,829 


5,427 


5,472 


7,026 


3,836 


3,464 


60,642 


11,977 


2,749 


873 


767 


563 


343 


4,178 


6,770 


5, 715 


117, 337 


11,266 


9,767 


4,855 


2,082 


• 2,952 


15,562 


20, 319 


13,470 


7,649 


165,787 


6,826 


1,524 


199 


329 


687 


373 


358 


483 


830 


51, 621 




2,948 


1,851 


1,736 


3,071 


1,934 


4,635 


2,535 


2,485 


44, 700 


12,663 


7,539 


4,020 


3,478 


1,041 


1,195 


8, 159 


11,447 


7,448 


144,796 


72,767 


89, 969 


68, 981 


10, 016 


8,135 


36,980 


80, 955 


37, 032 


46,562 


948. 725 


794 


825 


780 


722 


1,558 


2,127 


4,238 


4,352 


4,353 


38, 937 


43 


■ 47 


29 


45 


77 


23 


14 


33 


50 


940 


5,522 


988 


28 


38 


45 


6 


719 


4,507 


4,606 


33,496 


14, 254 


2,262 


394 


123 


41 


10 


14,619 


12, 457 


4,758 


148, 280 


1,670 


573 


559 


759 


25, 084 


17, 793 


6,412 


5, 519 


5,770 


66, 234 


2 


5 


3 


4 


6 


2 


3 


1 


5 


52 


35, 028 


7,912 


358 


119 


1, 035 


153 


18, 392 


42,207 


31, 004 


312,932 


1,848 


2, 526 


2. 1S5 


1,313 


2,016 


3,525 


4,859 


5,144 


6, 052 


36, 806 


3,837 


899 


138 


61 


61 


60 


21, 490 


8,603 


4,219 


62, 028 


17, 491 


11.256 


4,716 


6,393 


4,926 


1,717 


1,151 


11,085 


2,891 


108,671 


5,049 


860 


17 


21 


25 


2 


693 


465 


448 


28,967 


8,073 


3,473 


3,954 


4,550 


4,665 


4,865 


8,246 


6,944 


4,417 


94,984 


3,923 


2,714 


2,096 


1,618 


3,307 


1, 687 


2,577 


2,027 


1,659 


37, 471 


11,786 


1,398 


74 


34 


453 


1,150 


11, 568 


17,625 


3, 451 


127, 206 


3,214 


4,347 


2,792 


3,524 


4,182 


7,489 


5,144 


4,961 


7,838 


57, 893 


542 


560 


516 


612 


736 


799 


1,126 


1,536 


1,791 


10, 417 


1,200 


433 


120 


110 


160 


132 


1,652 


1,599 


1, 396 


13, 725 


890 


20S 


41 


54 


58 


275 


1,340 


713 


272 


11,206 


395 


253 


214 


130 


263 


156 


195 


167 


154 


3,310 


677 


480 


603 


520 


426 


336 


626 


656 


820 


7,759 


1,470 


511 


769 


504 


1,001 


235 


1,802 


1,457 


1,148 


15, 300 


17, 819 


16,888 


10, 744 


9,098 












147,645 












303, 338 


204, 074 


129, 765 


66, 277 


94, 585 


123, 522 


288, 315 


247, 718 


198, 712 


3, 416, 735 



106 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table XIV-c. — Emigrant aliens departed, fiscal 



Countries. 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Austria 


64,607 

65,590 

853 

3,280 


27,782 

21,631 

431 

1,594 


26,424 

20,866 

655 

1,566 


45, 160 
4i; 182 
1,017 
3,154 


46, 137 
42,423 
l,10:i 
3,577 


28,760 

29,904 

803 

9,664 


Hungary 


Belgium. . 






Denmark 


689 460 


433 


469 


665 


608 


Finland 




3,107 
6,770 
6,131 
166, 733 
330 
2,275 


2,817 
4,905 
5,606 
83, 300 
308 
1,328 


4,025 
6,216 
8,144 
52,323 
463 
1,028 


3,148 
6,042 
9,376 
72,640 
461 
1,400 


3,473 
5, 785 
11,461 
108, 388 
564 
2,310 


3,430 
4,759 
30,603 
88,021 
599 
1,710 


Germany 


Greece. . . 


Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia 

Netherlands 


Norway 


Poland 


Portugal, including Cape Verdeand Azores 
Islands 


1,056 
1 267 
37,777 

1,116 

2,574 

684 

3,084 

5,019 
2, 023 
1,499 

87 


1,025 

434 

19, 707 

1,079 

1,159 

658 

1,267 

3,076 

1,380 

743 

51 


1,082 

445 

17,362 

1,463 

1,006 

759 

4,554 
1,754 
1,099 

84 


1,459 

669 

27,053 

1,396 

1,615 

667 

5,441 

1 984 

1,528 

145 


1,916 

550 

34,681 

1,581 

2,490 

510 

5,926 

6,700 

3,082 

2,195 

185 


1,965 

319 

26,923 

2,029 

'449 
4,809 

5,969 

2,894 

2,179 

157 






Spain, including Canary and Balearic 
Islands. 








United Kingdom: 


Ireland ... 


Scotland 


Wales 


Yugoslavia (Serb, Croat, and Slovene 
Kingdom) . 




'^ 


6 


16 


10 


22 


16 




Total Europe 


376, 556 


180, 747 


153, 755 


230, 704 


285, 724 


248,559 






3,923 
3,431 

128 
1,847 

221 


3,411 

3,819 

48 

1,650 

205 


2,371 

4,366 

69 

1,548 

160 


2,762 
3,354 

92 
1,905 

59 


2,609 
1,485 

182 
1,551 

104 


2,303 

'731 

240 

1,313 

103 


Japan 


India 




Other Asia 




Total Asia 


9, 550 


9,133 


8,514 


8,172 


5,931 


4,690 




Africa 


133 

241 

33 

2,629 

505 

295 

880 

4,247 

4 


140 

442 

38 

30, 478 

302 

289 

925 

3,306 

2 


215 

345 

31 

34, 194 

390 

363 

1,073 

3,519 

37 


275 

474 

30 

49, 373 

347 

463 

1,183 

4, 584 

61 


266 

645 

43 

33,506 

328 

605 

1,319 

4,864 

31 


209 

645 

29 

46,981 

482 

991 

1,367 

4,223 

14 


Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand.. . 


British North America 




Mexico 

South America 


West Indies 






Grandtotal . . 


395,073 


225, 802 


202,436 


295,666 


333,262 


308, 190 





1 See footnote Table III. 



KKPOHT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 107 
years ended June SO, 1908 to 1922, by countries.^ 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Total. 


35,013 


6,776 


•230 


126 


5 


201 


2,274 


1,399 


579 


285,473 


39,987 


5,059 


592 


112 


1 


100 


14,233 


12, 153 


4,307 


298, 140 


1,149 


333 


24 


15 


41 


634 


1,846 


1430 


1,203 


11,537 


2,553 


1,%4 


250 


191 


700 


2,891 


3,587 
11,147 


2,923 
15, 452 


660 

7,846 


38.554 
34,445 


629 


412 


513 


489 


304 


599 


1,477 
1,173 
4,477 


922 
2, .386 
3,026 


690 
1,179 

2,557 


9,359 
5,038 
50,001 


2 927 


5,751 


2,231 


2,064 


3,176 


3,792 


5,136 


1,419 


439 


315 


28 


26 


3,069 


5,263 


4,362 


54,534 


11,124 


9,775 


4,829 


2,034 


2.986 


15.482 


20,314 


13,423 


7,506 


158,794 


84,351 


96,903 


72,507 


12,542 


8,645 


38, 245 


88,909 


48, 192 


53,651 


1,075.350 


690 


612 


351 


227 


139 


596 


1.017 


849 


860 


8,066 


2,797 


1,211 


1,359 


1,633 



1,730 


1,952 


.3,022 
18, 190 


2,406 
42,572 


1,427 
33,581 


27,588 
94,343 


2,055 


2,661 


2,396 


1,353 


1,976 


3,447 


4,728 


5,167 


5,877 


38, 163 


348 


244 


49 


16 


7 


39 


21,. 506 


9,297 


3,795 


38,985 


47,451 


18,297 


5,259 


5,947 


4,983 


1,868 


1,933 


15,229 


6,407 


270,877 


2,254 


3,042 


1,816 


2,491 


3,250 


6,280 


3,841 


3.966 


6,793 


42, ,397 


2,240 


953 


1,412 


969 


1,169 


1,738 


3,109 


2,913 


1,903 


27,239 


432 


349 


201 


159 


172 


403 


1,103 


900 


886 


8,332 


2,528 


164 


18 


24 


24 


47 


1,812 


405 


201 


26,985 


7,275 


7,715 


5, 130 


2,798 


1,239 


4,482 


8,099 


7,839 


6,434 


81,770 


3,632 


2,218 


1,304 


1,027 


280 


988 


3,735 


1,905 


2,182 


30,388 


2 464 


1,847 


1,332 


678 


141 


569 


1,488 


1 187 


915 


19,864 


234 


169 


118 


69 


24 


54 


141 

28, 474 


180 

13,034 

827 


60 
9,733 


1,758 
51,241 


26 


80 


49 


88 


480 


98 


i;429 


703 


3,855 


257,295 


167,954 


102,409 


35,367 


31,500 


84,531 


256,433 


215, 245 


166,297 


2,793,076 


2,112 


2,011 


2,203 


1,871 


2,352 


2,199 


3,102 


5,451 


6,362 


45,042 


756 


810 


770 


750 


1,583 


2,195 


4,249 


4,375 


4,368 


37,072 


164 


179 


123 


176 


229 


161 


189 


281 


267 


2,528 


2,243 


593 


14 


8 


5 


26 


1,731 


2,534 


1,731 


18,699 


167 
5,442 


214 


867 


356 


212 


79 


170 


246 


86 


3,249 


3,837 


3,977 


3,161 


4,381 


4,660 


9,441 


12,887 


12,814 


106,590 


1 196 


85 


93 


108 


100 


74 


121 


197 


133 


2,345 


745 


608 


445 


382 


36 


362 


490 


742 


645 


7,247 


30 


17 


10 


35 


418 


19 


29 


50 


34 


846 


31,818 


23, 225 


15,712 


18,994 


27, 170 


10,726 


7,668 


5,456 


4,480 


342,410 


437 


436 


495 


530 


489 


413 


602 


703 


955 


7,414 


1,724 


651 


532 


812 


25,515 


18,000 


6,606 


5,705 


6,285 


68,836 


1,376 




997 


993 


1,071 


914 


i;398 


i;647 


i;787 


17,918 


4,237 


6,243 


5,059 


5,891 


3,891 


3,806 


5,502 


5,050 


5,252 


69,674 


38 


30 


36 


4 


14 


17 


25 


36 


30 


379 


j 303,338 


204,074 


129,765 


66,277 


94,585 


123,522 


288,315 


247,718 


198,712 


. 3,416,735 



108 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 
Table XV. — Total immigration each year, 1820 to 1922. 



Period. 


Number. 


Period. 


Number. 


Year ended Sept. 30— 
1820 


8,385 
9 127 
6,911 
6,354 
7 912 
10,199 
10;837 ! 
18,875 . 
27,382 I 
22,520 
23,322 
22 633 
60,482 

58,640 
65,365 
45,374 
76 242 
79,340 
38,914 
68,069 
84,066 
80,289 
104,565 
52,496 

78,615 
114,371 
154,416 
234,968 
226,527 
297,024 
310'004 

59,976 

379,466 
371,603 
368,645 
427,833 
200 877 
195,857 
112,123 

191,942 
129,571 
133, 143 
142,877 
72,183 
132,925 
191,114 
180,339 
332,577 
303, 104 
282,189 
352,768 


Year ended June 30-Continued. 

1870 


387, 203 


1821 


1871 

1872 

1873 


321,350 


1822 


404,806 


1823 


459 803 


1824 . .. 


1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 


313 339 


1825 


227, 498 




169,986 


1827 


141 857 




138, 469 


1829 


1879 


177 826 


1830 


1880 


457, 257 




1881 


669 431 




1882 


788, 992 


Year ended Dec. 31-' 


1883 


603,322 
518,592 


1884 




1885 


395 346 


1835 


1886 


334,203 


1836 


1887 


490, 109 






546 889 




1889 


444,427 


1839 


1890 


455, 302 




1891 


560,319 




1892 


579 663 


1842 


1893 


439, 730 


Tan 1 in "^onf ^n 1S4T 


1894 . . 


285,631 


Year ended Sept. 30— 

1844 


1895 


258 536 
343 267 


1896 


1845 


1897. 


230,832 




1898 


229,299 




1899 


311 715 


1848 


1900 


448, 572 




1901 


487,918 


1850 


1902 


648,743 


opr 1 tn npf> %\ issn 


1903 


857,046 


Year ended Dec. 31— 


1904 


812, 870 


1905 


1,026,499 


1852 


1906 


1, 100, 735 




1907 


1,285,349 




1908 


782, 870 


1855 


1909 


751,786 


1856 


1910. . 


1,041,570 




1911 


878,587 


Year ended June 30— 

1858 


1912 


838, 172 


1913 


1, 197, 892 




1914 


1,218,480 


1860 


1915 


326,700 


1861 


1916 


298,826 




1917 


295,403 




1918 


110,618 


1864 


1919 


141,162 




, 1920 


430,001 




' 1921 


805,228 


1867 


! 1922 


309,556 


1868 


Total.. 






34,744,888 









EEPORT OF COMMISSIOlSrER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 109 

Table XV-a. — J\V/ increase of population by arrival and departure of aliens, /Iscul 
years ended June SO, 1908 to 1922. 



Immigrant 



Noiimur 
grant. 



Departed. 



Emigrant. 



Nonemi- 
grant. 



1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

Total 



782, 870 

751, 786 

1,041,570 

878,587 

838, 172 

1, 197, 892 

1, 218, 480 

326,700 



110,618 
141, 132 
430,001 
805,228 
309,556 



141, 825 
192, 449 
156, 467 
151,713 
178,983 
229,335 
184,601 
107,544 
67,922 
67,474 
101,235 

191^575 
172, 935 
122,949 



924, 695 

944, 235 

1,198,037 

1,030,300 

1,017,155 

1,427,227 

1,403,081 

434,244 

366, 748 

362,877 

211, 853 

237, 021 

621, .576 

978, 163 

432, 505 



395, 073 
225, 802 
202, 436 
295,666 
333, 262 
308, 190 
303,338 
204,074 
129, 765 
66,277 
94, 585 
123,522 
288,315 
247,718 
198,712 



319,755 
174,590 
177,982 
222,549 
282,030 
303,734 
330,467 
180, 100 
111,042 
80, 102 



139,747 
178,313 
146,672 



714, 828 
400,392 
380, 418 
518, 215 
615, 292 
611,924 
633, 805 
384, 174 
240, 807 
146,379 
193, 268 
216,231 
428,062 
426,031 
345,384 



209, 867 
543, 843 
817,619 
512,085 
401, 863 
815,303 
769, 276 

50, 070 
125,941 
216, 498 

18,585 

20,790 
193, 514 
552, 132 

87, 121 



,717 



2,838,475 



, 255, 210 



110 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



1 


Com- 
ing in 
conse- 
quence 

of 
adver- 
tise- 
ments 












































m 


a 


- 




^. 




" 


S 


g5-^::2 


- 




Con- 
tract 
labor- 
ers. 


<o^ -1 c< 




'^ •^2--fe"|c:;"SS::5S 




Va- 
grants. 


























« 
















Pro- 
fes- 
sional 
beg- 
gars. 




























-^ 














Pau- 
pers. 




















- 


- 
















Likely 
tobe- 
come- 

a 
public 
charge. 


g?J °' g-- 5^2 "g"ggggS'|SS|S : 


Chron- 
ic 
alco- 
hol- 
ism. 


























Surgeon's 
certificate 
of physical 

defect 
which may 
affect 
alien's 
ability 
to earn a 
living, 
other than 
loath- 
some or 
dangerous 
contagious 
diseases 
or non- 
contagious 
tuber- 
culosis. 

14 
2 

6 
9 




.3" 


i3C;''gS?22? 




Loathsome or dangerous 
contagious diseases. 


1 
o 


2- - "^ - 




(M 


t^-t 


^o«c.=oog«>^ 


1 








" 








~* 


"" 




04-Ht- 




CO 




Tra- 
choma. 


00 ^ 


5 






" 






rjo 


= ^00- : 


Tuber- 
culosis 
(conta- 
gious). 


— CJ 
















to- 


-.^-c;J<N 


■*l-l • 


Tuber- 
cu- 
losis 
(non- 
conta- 
gious). 










^ 




















r-.-< 








Surgeon's 
certificate of 
mental de- 
fect which 
may affect 

alien's 
ability to 
earn a liv- 
ing, other 
than idiots, 
imbeciles, 
feeble- 
minded, 
epileptics, 
insanity , 
or consti- 
tutional 
psycho- 
pathic 
inferiority. 

2 


















o 




OCO-H 






Con- 
stitu- 
tional 
psy- 
cho- 
pathic 
infe- 
rior- 
ity. 


"^ 


















co 


<N<N 




^ 


"•^ 




M ! 




















5^ 


--. 


--' 


-^ 




In- 
sane 

or 
have 
been 

in- 
sane. 

3 




— .oi 






-^ 


(N CI I^ lO — t- IC — I.-5 C^i . 


Fee- 
ble, 
mind- 
ed. 


-^ 


" 


-^ 










CO 


05M 


§=* 


oo 




Im- 
be- 
ciles. 












-^ 








IN 


-- 


..HOi^ 


CO 




Idiots. 




























CO 


Nrt 


"^ 




1 


1 

K 


I 


'I 

< 


6 

11 

ll 

PQ 


-si 
» 


i 


6 

3 

d ~ 

II 


C 


is 

CO o 

m 


1 

1 

c 


C 
1 


(i 


1 

£ 


1 




1 


't 

i 

s 


1 


J 


1 
1 


1 


j 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. Ill 































M 




l„ : 


;(N « «=» ;^ 








(N 


S 




- 


is 


is-^ 


jc « 2S > 


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ca 


























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si 5 

coxry 




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"111 





112 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



De- 
barred 
from 
Philip- 
pine 
Islands. 






p 


• ::"";: 






^,"2 

m 


m - 3iS" *5"i-gMiSsii-"-sri^- 


Ex- 
ceed- 
ed 
quota, 
act of 
May 
19, 
1921. 


S| ^ g? :| : jS'-S \^ 


iir^s i il^'^ 1 


SS* 


With- 
out 
proper 
pass- 
port 
under 
State 
De- 
part- 
ment 

tions. 


a 


- ^^-H : :« jCO^SOSJ^OgJCO^^C^ : ^C,^ ; 


<D-HCO 


Under 
last 
pro- 
viso 
sec- 
tion 
23. 






■rtC- 


4CO I 1 IlO 't^ 


^^^^^^C, \^ ;^ ; 


•.-4 • 


Under 
provi- 
sions 
Chi- 
nese 
exclu- 
sion 
act. 






is 








Under 
pass- 
port 
provi- 
sion, 
sec- 
tions. 








: : :::"':' 


:;:;;:"*:::: 




Geograph- 
ically 
excluded 
classes. 
(Natives 
of that 
portion 
of Asia 

and 
islands 
adjacent 
thereto 
described 
in sec- 
tion 3.) 








• : : :^ : : 






Unable 
to read 
(over 16 
years of 
age). 


§2 - ;3 := 


2 ; —5 i^ 


14 
15 
55 
31 
4 
133 
1 
1 
9 
5 
384 
1 
28 
10 
18 


Had 
been 
de- 
ported 
within 
one 
year. 


"^ 






; ! ! ! 1^' '. '^ 


r-( • . Tj< .-1 . ,-1 . . . ,-1 


CO ; I 


Aliens 

who 

procure 

or 
attempt 
to bring 

in 
prosti- 
tutes or 
females 
for any 
immoral 
purpose. 


" 




: ik. 


" ': '.'^ ':^ ':Z 


^ :-^ :- : : : ;^ 


'\\ 


Aliens 
who 
are 
sup- 
receive 
pro- 
ceeds 

of 
prosti- 
tution. 


" 












Prosti- 
tutes 
and 
aliens 
coming 
for any 
im- 
moral 
pur- 
pose. 


CO 






: : i" :?^ :- 


CO jcoo^w \\\\^ 


(M 1 1 


Anarch- 
ists or 
aliens, 
enter- 
taining 
or amii- 

ated 
with an 
organi- 
zation 
advo- 
cating 
anarch- 
istic 
beliefs. 




















f 










eO^ -H ; ; 


-- ;- is-^ 


'■'"22^'" ; ;- ;» 


'.'^'^ : 


Under 

16 
years 
of age 
unac- 
com- 
panied 
by 
par- 
ent. 


lO^ 




: i '^ :-"" 


.O. ;=0^^=0 : ;-H :r; 


■^ : : 


Ac- 
com- 
pany- 

ing 
aliens 
(imder 
sec- 
tion 
18). 

4 
1 

1 
2 


" '; : ': •'^ : 


:2^'S^ :2 : :" :S 


• ^ .-^ 


ft 




Race or people. 


1 
3 

c 
1 
< 


if 


; <s : ; 


Croatian and Slovenian. 

Cuban 

Dalmatian, Bosnian, 
and Herzegovmian . . . 

Dutch and Klrmish 

East Indian 

English 

Finnish 


German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 

Japanese 

Korean 

Lithuanian 

Magyar 

Mexican 


fill 
an 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 113 





:;;::'.: :" 


8 




§S llSaSg"!? 2S 




..-5«5 lOiNOg ;•«-* ; ;g 


1 i 


_ ^.-.. ^^p ^^ 


§ 




: : ; : ; ; 




; : : : ; : : ; : " 


1 




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1 i 




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S i 


: 1 '^'^ 1 ! 1 I 1 ! I 


CO ; 




rt^<N-< ; ;-- l^- 


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; ; ; : : : 


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' 1 i 


■■pi 


: ; : : ! M :| : 
'. ; ". ! fe ; ; '. 3 1 




■A '■ 

ill 

1" 



1065&-52- 



114 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



i§§|gi5gi^si§2SisS«iiiggisss§ii 



°as||li||l|l|.i| 



si^liii 









i^^^^gii 



16! 



^.-i i-io>^i-<^,-i^.-<^c<iMe^» 



TO^'SSc 



SS^^^'gJSS^SSS^^^S 



<(M-HCqC-»(NC^M'0->1<t-.t-tOC<3'>J<>OC100t^u:nOOt^d'*U5>OU3 






illi|isl||l|li|| 

!- o-Vi a la c-M o'« ©a a-w^ 



i (B d 3 






MSS?W=«feoS-- od" S.9 






5§|§ 






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O00i0«O»CW'^^P0t^t 



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5SSSI?5?5Sg?5^S2fj; 



otoiNoe^tor 









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5RS£?SS3SE::ESS^SSo§f2SS5S{oS^S5ggSS2Si 






— 08 atmr papua jca^ g? 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENER^VL OF IMMIGRATION. 115 



1 

1 


ii 
II 


By 

United 
States 
mar- 
shals. 








s 


§g§§g 


ISIgsei 


$ii 


ii2 


2:i 


s 


SKS 


12 


ss 


























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m 




1 

1 

1 

I 

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II { 

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r 

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lis 




























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ii|ii|l|lil 




































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^liliil^M 1 i \ 














i«§iSiigi3giigi§ 


iPiil 














ii22i^iigi^§iS2^^§ 


, • 1 : : 

1 ^ 1 ": ; 

S| 1 :: 






















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1 


Hi 


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y 


^i 


^! 


fe 


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^||i 


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ii! 


ii^ 


y^5 


BOO 


b 


5 


« 


c 


ii 


igi 



116 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table XVI-b. — Permanent residents of contiguous foreign territory applying for tem- 
porary sojourn in the United States refused admission, fiscal year ended June 30. 1922, 
by causes. 



Causes. 



Canadian- Mexican rp_i„, 
border. | border. ^°''^'- 



Idiots 

Feeble-minded 

Epileptics 

Insane persons 

Constitutional psychopathic inferiority 

Tuberculosis (noncontagious) 

Loathsome or dangerous contagious 

Professional beggaVs 

Paupers, or likely to become public charges 

Surgeon's certificate of mental or physical defect 

Chronic alcoholism 

Contract laborers 

Accompanying aliens (under sec. 18) 

Under 16 years of age, unaccompanied by parent 

Assisted aUens 

Coming in consequence of advertisements 

Criminals 

Anarchists 

Prostitutes and aliens coming for any immoral purpose 

Aliens who are supported by or receive proceeds of prostitution 

Aliens who procure or attempt to bring in prostitutes and females for any 

immoral purpose 

Had been deported within one year 

Unable to read (over 16 years of age) 

Geographically excluded classes (natives of that portion of Asia and 

islands adjacent thereto described in section 3) 

Under passport provision, section 3 

Under last proviso of section 23 

" E xcess quota,' ' act of May 19, 1921 

Without proper passport under State Department regulations 

Total 



23 
'226' 



1,331 

6 
5 

34 
17 
221 



REPOKT OF COMMISSION KH OKNERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 117 



-S 
■>? 

■I 
c 



1 




1 Xaiua ;o emTi 

1 }B sesscp papnpxa jo sjaqmaiu it!?ox 


, 82-^ ^£;?a 


SSE2§S?S82| 


§-=! 


j -(aSc JO sjtso.C 91 iaAO) proa oi aiqt^nn ^ 


: i :""'' 


o« :^ ;^«^ :2 


; :- 


1 •£ "oas JO noisTAOid jjodssud Japu^i : 






S-^ : 


\ 


•(l; -oas ut paquosap oiajoqi juaoBt : 
-pn spm^si puB OTsy JO uoii-iod jcqi JO 1 : 
saAitiJUjsa'ssBio papnpxa X'liBOiqdtJjSoao : 


M'm 


"'::::::::: 




i 

1 


a 

o 

1 

1 

1 
"S 

1 

s 


•nono jodap snouvajd jo 
Ji:aA I rnqjiltt. sajBjs V^mn ^m pa-iaittg 


1 : 


: : : ■'^^ 


l^oo^^cr,^ 1^ 


: ;" 


!' 


•asodjiid iBJomrai 
Auv. joj soaiiT? ao sajnjTj«ojd m 3nuq 
oj pajdma^^c jo pajrwojd oq^ suaixv 




; ; jiNTO 


■;°° ;^'-'«^(N .-1 




1! 


•asorlmd icjonrrai j ^ 
Suv. 10) gnuuoj suaqE puc "sainjiisojd: ] 


• : : :-- 


:3 >«"^" j : 




1 i5 

1 ! 
! 


•sjsTqojBuv 1 ; 




; : '.^^ :^ : : ': 




•siKinreSXioj '-' 




•-::::::::; 




•siBniunJoj : 


" ;- :- 


:^ :-o, :c.-.-H : 




•sjcSSaq xBuoissajojj : 








•s^najud Xq paniBduioaatjnn ^ 
'jLnna JO atmi jb aSB jo sjtjal gj japufi ! 


: :';'": 


I'M Jwco,-. :^-.IN 




•sjajoq^i lo^jjuoo | : 


: : :'^ : 


jt^ jiguj irtTf ;« 




•suaipj pajsTssv j : 




:^ :::::;: : 




•snanB SmXuBdraoDov 1 : 




: i i ; i i- ; i i 




•sX^Avp.uo^s : 


- : : : : 


•^ : :^' : : : : : 




^•Bjonbssaoxa,, '1Z6T ■ 
'61 A^Vi JO i^^- JroiTl nmjuao jad Japuxi 






■■Mi""!:: 




•Xjiua JO araTjit! a.uioajap .{iiBoiSitqa: 1 : 


•^ : : : : 






1: 


•agjeqa oqqnd B araooaq o; Apjjiq j "^ 


: -|e5S"g^|!S?3SJi;2g 


to • 00 


1 
i 


•uisi[oqoDiB oiuoaqo 1 ; 








B i 3 « i ■i!«mo 1 " 


-^ i" M 


:-.s jrH irow ; JM 




^d5i ' -Btcioqcreix j -^ 




i ; : i ; ; ; ; ;- 




J t. i"^ j •(snoiS'Bjnoo) sisoinojaqnx 1 " " 


: : i'^''^ 


.::::„;„ :^ 




•ji^uouajui aiq;cdonaiisd iBnoijn^nsnoo 1 




i- i : :— i i i 




•sondaiidg | : 




jcQ : :^ I---H :« 




•anc-sui uaaq aAcq ao anesni j : : 




:„ :-u: ; :- :- 




•papuiui-aiqaaj 


-^ : 




Ici j-. : '■<DCi jo 




i 

i 






2 c 

'C c 
<< 


Bohemian and Moravian (Czech). .. 
Bulgarian, Serbian, and Montene- 
grin 

Chinese 

Croatian and Slovenian 

Dutch and Flemish 


Ent'lish 

Finnish 

French 

German 

Greek 

Hebrew 

Irish 

Italian (north) 

Italian (south) 


■ ■ O 

3 2^ 

1^3 



118 REPOET OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



■JU'\u9 JO atnii 
%'e sasscjo papnpxa jo siaquiani i^^ox 



-H o> in C-l rt c 



•(a3B JO sxeaA. gx j3ao) peaj o; aiq^nn. ' '. « 



•£ •09S JO noisiAOJd ^jodssBd japn/i 



•(e -oas UT peqijosap o^ajain juaoct 
-pB spnBjsi pnB Bisy Jo noiijod 5Bm j6 
saAi^En) sassBjo papnpxa X'uBomdejSoao 



nopcijodap snoiAajd jo 
JB3^ X tnq'jiM sa^Bjs pairafl. ^m pajajug 



•asodjnd xBJOinnn 
iJuB joj snaiiB JO sajn^iisoJd ut Suuq 
0% paidma^iB jo pajnooad oqA suaixv 



•asodjnd iBjonnni 
it ire JOJ guinioo snaixB pnB "sa^mnsojj 



•s^siniBSjiioj 



•sjBSSaq iBooissajojj 



•sjnajBd ;^q paiuBdraoooBun 
'iijjna JO auiij ib aS^ jo sjea^C gx japnfi 



•sjajoq^i ;DBj;noo 



•snenB pajsTssy 



•suaiiB SntXnBdtaooov 



•SABMBMOIS 



„-B5onb ssaDxa „ '\Z6X 
jiepf JO ^OB ^TOin nmjoao jad japnn. 



•iCj'jna JO aun; ;b aA^oajap /^nBDis^qd^ 



•a3jBqo onqnd b eraooaq o:j j^iasiiT: 



•rasnoqooiB oraojqo 



)UDt^-HO 






>oo»mi^<Ntom ocN0Gu5t~05 



ii3, 






■sjaqjo I 



■BraoqoBJX 



•(snOT3BiTioa) sisopiojaqnx 



•iS^uouajut ojqjBdoqoiCsd iBnoprnijsnoo i 



•soiadaiida 



•euBsm naaq aABq jo auBsni 



•papnira-aiqaa^ 



S.3 



1° 



iWillliiiiliil^^i 



REPORr OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



119 



spntiisi ouTddinq,! raojj p9)Jod9(i 



■p9}jodap ]B}0} puBJO 



;$2S; 



•jimn eoiu inomjAv ib^ox 



I r-^ 



•Xjjuo oj joijd siBuiniuo 



•(Xjina j3yB 9raTi Xdb poiiininioo aoiTjo joj 

pouod jcjinits JOJ anno UBqi gjora p90U9}U9s 

JO 'sjtiaX o Tini5TA\ paj^Tmuioo ouitjo joj ajom 

I JO j«9X T JOJ paouajuQs) Xjiua ja'jjB siButmiJO 



■Xjura jayB sjsmojBuy 



•sesodJtid i^jouirai jaqjo JO 
I uoianjHSojd joj uoiiBiJodrai jo uoTinjiisojd 
; JO ssariisnq am qjiM papauiioo uaaq Suiabij 
'■ SB JO j9jnoojd E JO a^njijsojd b sb pajjodap 
: naaq guiABq jo)jb sa}B]g' pa^mfi am ui pu noj 



•sajnujsojd Xq pajuanbajj XnBn^iqBq 
aoBid jaqjo Jo uoiinjijsojd jo asnoq qjiA\ 
pa^oanuoo jo uoTiniigsojd jo spaaoojd saAtaoaji 



'SS- 



.-HI CO >-( to ■oeoNiOrtrtio 



•8 :2 



Mt-lrlM . 00 M i-i IM O 0> ^ « « •* iH 



o -jsajjBraojj 

® I sa^njnsojd io9jojd oj sastmojd jo spojojd 
O 1 jo 'sjstssb jo '^jodrai 0% sjdniaj^B jo sjjoduii 



■noiin^Tjsojd 
I JO sasnoq jo sa^Bmuf jo itJiua jaijB sa^nji^soJcC 



•sjBa^i 8 uiqiTM pannbaj i «, 
noHB^jodao; •siBioyjo uoijBjSTinniT Xq pa}Bu3isap > 
joii aoBid JO aniTt'^B jo 'uoTjoadsuT ;(noq;TM paja}ua 



•sjBajJ s uiqjiAV Xjosindmoo ib;ox 



) iC CO C^ ICO c 



•sA\Bi noTsnpxa 
-asaujqo jo uotibjoia ut sa^Bjg paiinfi aqi ui 



•payioads asiA\jaq'io jon 'a\bi 
uoijBjSitmn] jd uouBpiA ui sa;Bjs paj!«n. aqi ^l 



iMtC N05 -.-I 



3t 

^9 



•sasnBD joud raojj saSjBqo oixqnd iBpx 



: C^lMNtOt^C 



•sasTiBO jaqio 



•suoijipuoo iBOiSiiq J 



•XouBuSajj 



fegi 



•(snoT3B;uoo) siso^nojaqnx 



•suonipuoo jB:>u9Tn J9qjo 



•XlIUBSUI 



) T(i o5 lO .-< O 



CO •(NO>.-( - 



jrHTjH ntor- -oo 



;2;:;S2S 



2-C^i 



,^.Ǥ 






120 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



spuBisi ouiddiimd uioij paijodaa 



jo 3 



•pa^jodap jBjo^ pucjo 



S??gSS»??S2 §S?§S5§S^ 



-S3 I 



•JUnji ann; ^noqiiA ib^ox 



UNO-HrHTOE^ 



St>M N-^rt 



■Xjjua 0} jOTjd sxEnimiJO : :2 : 



■(Xjjua jayB am:; Auv. pajlTnroioo arauo joj 
pouad jBiiuiis JOJ aaiio uBqj ajora paariajuas 
JO 'sj^a .iotit'mi.n paijniraioo aniTja joj ajoni 
JO jBaX I joj paouajuas) Xjitia ja)jB siBunuiJO 






AJiua jaijc sisiqajBiiy 



l-H—l MO 



•saaodjnd itjjouiuii jaqio jo [ 

nonrnijsojd joj uoijejjoduiT jo uoiinji^sojd i 

JO ssauTsnq aqj q^iM pajaauiioo uaaq SiiiABq j 
SB JO jajnaojd b jo ajnjijsojd b sb paijodap 

naaq guiABq jaijB sajBts patron am "T ptmo j i 



■sa;nij5S0jd Aq pajuanbajj AnBnjiqBq 
aoBjd jaqio jo noiiniijsojd jo asnoq qjiM 
pajoauuoo jo nonnjnsojd jo spaaoojd saAiaaan 



■jsajjB inoj; 
sainji^sojd pajojd oj sasiiiiojd jo s^aajojd 
JO 'sj'sTssB JO '^joduii 01 sjduianB jo s;jodnii 



•iioTinjijsojd 
JO sasnoq jo saiBtnui jo Xjitia jaijB sajrvjTlsojj 



•sjBaX f: iiiqijAV pajinbaj i ^ .^„. . .c^i-. ^c 
uojiBjjodacr -siBiaujo uoijBjgiunni £q pajBii'Sisap i 
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122 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 





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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 123 

Table XIX. — Deserting alien seamen, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922, by ports. 

New York, N. Y 3, 292 ! New Orleans, I>a 310 

Boston, Mass 421 I Galveston, Tex 149 

Philadelphia, Pa 324 Port Arthur, Tex 77 

Baltimore, Md 156 Gulfport, Miss 16 

Portland, Me 30 j San Francisco, Calif 402 

Norfolk, Va 411 i Portland, Orep 40 

Savannah, Ga 23 Seattle, Wash 117 

Miami. Fla 13 Alaska 1 

Key West. Fla 1 Mexican border seaports 41 

Jacksonville, Fla 2 San Juan, P. R 9 

Tampa, Fla 7 • 

Mobile, Ala 37 I Total 5, 879 

Table XX. — Alien stowatvays Jound on hoard vessels arriving at ports oj the United 
States, fiscal year ended June 30, 1922, by ports. 

New York, N. Y 977 1 Pensacola, Fla .1 

Boston, :Mass 55 Mobile, Ala 14 

Philadelphia, Pa 91 i New Orleans, La 96 

Baltimore, Md 148 i Galveston, Tex 42 

Portland, Me 8 j Port Arthur, Tex 14 

Norfolk. Va 132 I Gulfport, Miss 3 



Savannah, Ga 4 San Francisco, Calif. 

Miami. Fla 1 Seattle, Wash 8 

Key West, Fla 16 Mexican border seaports 2 

Charleston. S. C 14 [ San Juan, P. R 7 

Jackson\TLlle, Fla 6 j 

Tampa, Fla 14 | Total 1, 719 

Table XXI. — Comparison between alien arrivals and head-tax settlements, fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1922. 

Immigrant aliens admitted 309, 556 

Nonimmigrant aliens admitted 122, 949 

Aliens debarred 13, 731 

Aliens from Porto Rico, Hawaii, Virgin Islands, Philippine 

Islands, and mainland 3, 749 

Died 85 

Erroneous head-tax collections 3, 470 

Head-tax payments pending from pre\ious year 102, 345 



555, 885 



Exempt from head-tax payments, as follows: 

In transit (groups) 645 

Other transits ''includes 7, 239 Chinese in transit under bond 

across land territory of the United States) 30, 366 

One-year residents of British North America, Mexico, and 

Cuba, coming for temporary stay 4, 826 

Domiciled aliens returning (rule 1, subd. 3 (d), (e), and (h)). 10, 733 

Government officials 3, 473 

Alien residents of the Philippine or Virgin Islands 215 

Aliens from Porto Rico and Hawaii who reached said islands 

prior to July 1, 1907, or subsequent to May 1, 1917 1, 462 

Aliens from the mainland 1, 613 

Under 16 years of age, accompanied by parents 63, 464 

Exemptions on account of aliens debarred 10, 495 

Citizens erroneously manifested 2, 496 

Returned alien soldiers (public resolution No. 44) 124 

Deserting alien seamen (not apprehended at end of 60 days, 

put in statistics ) 656 

Total 130, 568 

Head-tax pavments pending at close of year 112, 341 

242, 909 

Aliens on whom head tax was paid ' 312,976 

Amount of head tax collected during year $2, 503, 096 

1 178 aliens were taxed at $4 each and 312,798 at $8 each 



124 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table XXII. — Aliens admitted to continental United States from insular United Slates, 
during the fiscal years ended June 30, 1908 to 19 22,, inclusive, by ports. 



Port. 


Num- 
ber. 


Year of arrival. 


1908 j 1909 


1910 1911 


1912 


1913 1 1914 

i 


1915 


1916 


New York N Y 


11,823 
2 
2 


440 1 423 


579 i 616 


548 


010 694 


756 


726 


Philadelphia, Pa 




Baltimore, Md 


h; -----|------- 














, 












Norfolk, Va • 
















Charleston, S. C. 


15 

2 

61 

8 

21,712 

6 

778 

1,485 

9 


















Jacksonville Fla 












1 










2 


2 


3 


7 


ii n 


12 






3 
2,268 






San Francisco Calif 


912 


896 


1,591 


1,076 


1,402 


•2 HQH 


1,610 


1,673 




. '. .1.7.:::. 




Seattle, Wash 


6 


' 


17 
9 


28 
63 


99 
24 


460 14 
59 ! 36 


io 

40 


21 


Canadian Pacific ports 


62 












Mexican border seaports 
















9 




















Total 


35,919 


1,358 


1,328 


2,198 


1,786 


2,080 


3,411 


3,351 


2,437 


2,492 






■ 











Year of 


arrival. 




From 
Ha- 
waii. 


From 
Porto 
Rico. 


From 
Philip- 


From 
Vir- 


Port. 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 

1 


1922 


pme 
Is- 
lands. 


lands. 


NewYork, N. Y 


1,138 


1,285 


909 


1,058 


1,094 

2'! 


947 
1 


4 ill. 125 




694 


Philadelphia Pa 




' 




Baltimore Md 










2 






1 
2 
15 














1 


Norfolk Va 




2 








2 
15 

2 
61 

8 


2 




Charleston S C 






1 












2 
19 
179 

5 














1 
3 

S14 
1 
50 

(.16 


i ! 

1,384 










Galveston Tex 


1 
1,824 
1 
4 
63 


1,826 

2 

3 

134 












906 


21, 147 

5 

130 


565 






1 


Seattle, Wash 


14 

123 
3 


26 




648 
141 

1 
1 




Canadian Pacific ports 

Canadian border ports . 


^'^1j:::;::: 

10 1 
















. 




Total 


3,031 


3,268 


2,398 


2,201 


2,623 [ 


1,957 


22,650 


11,213 


1,358 


698 







Table XXII-a. — Immigrant aliens admitted to continental United States from insular 
United States and to insular United States from other insulars and from mainland 
{continental United States), by ports, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922. 



Port. 


From 
Hawaii. 




From 
Virgin 
Islands. 

« 


From 
main- 
land. 


Total. 








32! 19 




51 


San Francisco, Calif 


73 


6 








79 






52 
2 


52 










7 


9 














73 


*^ 


32 


26 


54 


191 









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



125 



Table XXII b.- Aon immigrant aliens admitted to continental United States from 
insidar United States and to insidar United States from other insulars and from main- 
land {continental United States), by ports, fiscal year ended June SO, 1922. 



Port. 


From 
Hawaii. 


From 
Philip- 
pine 
Islands. 


From 
Porto 
Rico. 


From 
Virgin 
Islands. 


From 
main- 
land. 


'I'otal. 


New York, N. Y 


2 
1 




777 


117 




8% 


Philadelphia, Pa 








San Francisco, Calif 


782 


45 

26 
14 
11 








827 


Seattle Wash 








26 




63 










Honolulu, Hawaii.. . 






755 
804 


766 


Porto Rico 






iei- 


965 










Total.... 


848 9fi 


_,^ 




1,559 


3,558 













126 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL, OF IMMIGRATION. 
Table XXIII. — Aliens certified by surgeons as physically or mentally defective, fiscal year 



Disease or defect. 



Age. 






Acute injuries 

Acute iaflammatory or suppurative condi- 
tion 

Alcoholism 

Chronic inflammatory or suppurative con- 
dition 

Complete loss of function of organ (not spec- 
ified) 

Contagious, transmissible, or communicable 
disease (not specified) 

Constitutional psychopathic inferiority (not 
specified) 

Debihty, anemia, marasmus, malnutrition. . 

Deformity, malformation, ankylosis, cica- 
trix, permanent injury (not specified) 

Epilepsy 

Favus 

Feeble-minded 

Hernia 

Idiot 

Imbecile 

Infancy 

Insanity 

Less than normal function, disordered 
function (not specified) 

Loss of member 

Malignant tumor 

Nonmalignant tumor, hypertrophy, new 
growth, dilatation, localized collection of 
fluid not due to cardiac or kidney disease. . 

Not stated 

Organic disease (not specified); general, sys- 
temic, or constitutional disease (not speci- 
fied) 

Paralysis (partial or complete), atrophy 

Parasitic disease (not specified) 

Poor development, lack of development 
(not specified) 

Pregnancy 

Rheumatism, anthritis, gout, neuritis 

Sclerosis 

Senility (physical degeneration incident to 

„age) 

Tmea tonsurans 

Trachoma 

Tuberculosis 

I'ndersized 

Uncinariasis 

Venereal diseases 

Total 



217 I 165 

808 ! 

76 41 
30 20 

7,532 2,442 

3 1 2 

248 I 178 

75 I 54 

129 102 

655 I 402 

308 280 



76 i 25 



14 1 


2 


82 1 


11 


864 


2S^ 


H 


4 


77 


28 


51 


15 


42 1 


43 


4 ' 


7 


21 1 


2,5 


18 


40 


42 


1 



26 



1,099 I 166 283 
143 1 45 89 
10 I 



2.230 i 124 I 668 

4 ; 1 I 2 



52 I 33 I 47 

808 4 185 

35 t 2 

10 1 1 



21,316 |9,551 11,765 '1,425 2,648 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 127 
ended June 30, 1922, showing sex, age, class of defect, and dispositio7i, by diseases or defects. 



Class of defect. 


Disposition. 


Class 
A(l). 


Class 
A (2). 


Class 
B. 


Class 
C. 


i 
1 

.S 
>. 

a 

§ 

1 
a 

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"1 

■< 


ii 
ii 

III 


P 

! 


s 

ll 

H 
§•« 

1 

a 




1 i 

11 

|! 

1 


Deported after hospital treatment. 

ApplicatlorTfor admission on bond 
granted and alien admitted. 


it 

a c 

P 
¥ 

< 


i 

1 




Idiocy, imbecility, feeble- 
minded, epilepsy, in- 
saiiity,tubercuIosis,and 
chronic alcoholism. 


S2 

§§> 
|| 

III 


II 

ill 


1 
"5 

Is 

5 


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1 




9 

1 

100 


15 
51 


8 

19 j 


13 
36 


2 

5 
2 

25 

4 

62 

32 
11 

70 
14 
17 
62 
81 
5 
14 
22 
63 

81 
43 
3 

21 
3 

46 
24 
135 

12 
42 
11 
3 

53 

172 
55 
5 
7 

234 






1 

5 
1 

18 

13 

5 




1 




21 

58 


3 


1 




1 




2 


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10 


21 




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3 


173 
61 


99 
56 
1 

26 

854 


104 
59 
11 

1 

82 


3 

8 
3 


s 

20 
3 


• 






215 

143 

222 

2 
112 

1,839 

84 
7 
1,015 
2 
5 
13 
11 

1,982 
824 
14 

2,545 
7 

423 
196 

188 
727 
56 
22 

7,421 
2 

10 
121 

637 
45 


43 






1 


1 


18 




296 


204 


7 
1 






74 


34 










32 




72 
999 


59 
973 


1 

42 

2 
3 
43 

1 
1 
1 
4 

52 
IS 
1 

29 


3 

57 

4 
54 
1 
3 
...... 

76 
14 
1 

26 


8 

63 

1 

"is' 

102 
4 
19 
5 
6 

74 
23 

40 








19 






1 


.... 2 


.... 


133 


16 




15 


102 








4 


77 


1 1 






IS 


87 








.... 


2 


80 




1,146 


52 


166 


751 


183 


11 








9 




1 




1 

1 

599 

539 

2 

1,729 
2 

45 
53 
4 

522 
34 
9 

j 2,238 

2 
4 
64 


6' 

1,255 
253 
10 

761 
4 

271 
124 
47 

148 
182 
19 
11 

4,873 
1 
5 
2 

49 
13 
14 








33 




1 13 


27 




I 


1 


27 


84 






3 1 


1 1 

1 

1 ' 


73 




1 
1,343 
318 
19 


795 
572 

2,144 
3 

34 
35 
46 

23 

, 773 

13 

6 

246 


156 










66 








1 




1 


5 






462 

7 

1 547 

202 

1 




! 


61 










1 


.... 
1 


3 






25 
3 

1 

9 
10 

2 

167 


i 82 
141 


112 
17 
6 

17 
39 
9 
5 

56 








158 












1 


41 




1S4 


1 




^ 


2 


143 






29 




35 
63 
24 

7,286 
1 3 


2 








81 










1 . 


20 












S 






1 




1 


!^ 


111 






1 




248 


..... 
3 


2 
5 


12 
10 
3 
5 
12 


46 


8 




1 1 


193 


75 






65 




.' 28 


101 








1 


8 




655 
306 


621 


6 
17 


3 


,... 


18 




9. 




2 


4 


2 


263 










347 


1,791 12,976 


6,202 


7,109 


9,992 


1,442 


441 


582 


707 


979 


44 


10 1 10 

1 


19, 113 


2,203 



128 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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KKPORT OF CO.MMISSIO^'ER GKNERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 129 



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10656—22 9 



130 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 131 



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132 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



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134 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Table A. — Japanese aliens applied for admission, admitted, debarred, deported, and 
departed, fiscal years ended June SO, 1921 and 1922. 



Applications for admission 

Admitted 

Debarred from entry. . 

Deported after entry 

Departures 



Continen- 
tal United 
States. 



10, 785 

10,675 

110 



3,624 

3,599 

25 

8 

3,907 



Continen- 
tal United 



41 

109 

11,173 



3,862 

3,856 

6 

4 

4,105 



104 Koreans were admitted in Hawaii, 1 was debarred, and 73 departed therefrom. 

3H Ivoreans were admitted in continental United States, 2 were debarred, and 63 departed therefrom. 



Table B. 



-Increase or decrease of Japanese population by alien admissions and departures, 
fiscal years ended June 30, 1921 and 1922, by months. 





Continental United States. 


Hawaii. 


Month. 


Admitted. 


Departed. 


Increase(-l-) 

or de- 
crease (-). 


Admitted. 


Departed. 


Increase(+) 

or de- 
crease (—). 


1920-21. 
July 


1,035 

1,064 

655 

857 

944 

732 

578 

752 

907 

1,345 

1,087 

719 


589 

673 

875 

747 

1,530 

2,165 

881 

859 

710 

1,051 

560 


+446 
+391 
-220 
+ 110 
-586 
-1,433 
-303 
-107 
+ 197 
+ 294 
+ 89 
+ 159 


354 
246 
374 
175 
425 
356 
392 
313 
246 
113 
438 
167 


240 

324 
325 
372 
191 
123 
224 
324 
587 
191 
767 


+ 114 




+7 


September . 


+ 50 


October 


-150 




+53 


December 


+ 165 




+269 




+89 


March 


-78 


Anril 


-474 


May 


+ 247 




-600 






Total 


10,675 


11,638 


-963 


3,599 


3,907 


-308 






1921-22. 
July . . 


1,037 
463 
685 
924 
518 
475 
523 
563 

1,128 
376 
982 

1,307 


819 
538 

1^797 

1,439 

1,007 

568 

922 

1,079 

553 

333 


+ 218 
-75 
-144 
-365 
-1,279 
-964 
-484 
-5 
+ 206 
-703 
+ 429 
+974 


377 
505 
277 
294 


505 
346 
500 
401 


-128 


August 


+159 




-223 




-107 




(') 








(') 








W 




672 
497 
377 


557 
135 

248 


^ +115 


March.. 


+362 


AprU 


+ 129 


Mav 


W 


June 


857 


1,413 


^ -556 






Total 


8,981 


11,173 


-2,192 


3,856 


4,105 


-249 







Figures included with those for later months. 



RKPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



135 



Table C. — Occupations of Japanese aliens admitted and departed, fiscal year ended 
June SO, 1922. 





Continental 
! United 
, States. 

1 


Hawaii. 


Occupation . 


Continenta 
United 
States. 


Hawaii. 


Occupation. 


<! 


I 


1 


} 


Admitted. 
Departed. 


j 


1 
1 


PROFESSIONAL. 


6 
1 20 
34 
30 
5 
129 
6 

34 
5 
639 
63 
10 
86 
84 

1,151 

6 
16 
2 


6 
14 
52 
36 

3 
120 

7 

38 
5 
354 
57 
21 
94 
59 

866 
3 


7 


7 


SKILLED — continued. 
Miners 


1 5 
1 3 
13 14 


3 
3 
3 






Painters and glaziers. . . . 




Clergv 


6 

2 

8 
4 
4 
8 
2 
9 
63 

134 

5 
6 
9 
1 


14 
5 

2 
2 
5 

' 

ih 

60 
119 

1 
12 

1 

2 


7 


Editors 






Electricians 


Plumbers 


1 1 
4 8 

2 1 

3 11 


2 
2 
18 


1 


Engineers (professional) . 


Printers. 
















Stokers. 




1 


Musicians 






1 
10 




Officials (Government). . 


Tailors ;.. 


14 22 


14 


Phj^icians 


Textile workers (not 




Teachers 


Watch and clock makers. 


1 1 


. l 




Total 


Woodworkers (notspeci- 
fled; .. 


1 






Other skilled 


112 110 
498 537 

12 20 
60 72 

5 3 
908 229 
6.56 2,149 

76 80 

91 82 
335 2,3.59 

17 7 
928 1,075 

64 67 
900 794 

4,052 6,9.37 
3,280 12,833 


3 


5 


SKILLED. 






196 


166 


Bakert 


MLSCZLLANEOUS. 

Agents 




Barbers and hairdressers. 

Blacksmiths 

Bookbinders 


5 
3 

19 
1,.567 
92 
26 
6 
58 




Butchers 




5 




3 




1 
10 


Draymen, hackmen, and 

teamsters. . 




Carpenters and joiners. . . 


14 

1 

171 

31 
64 


45 

""'45" 
2 

9 

1 
1 
1 

1 


45 
"■■59 

1 


20 


Cigarette makers . . 


Farm laborers 






118 

31 
64 




10 


Dressmakers , 


Fishermen 


18 


Engineers (locomotive, 
marine, and station- 


Hotel keepers 

Laborers 

Manufacturers 

Merchants and dealers. . . 

Servants \ 

Other miscellaneous 

Total ' 

No occupation (includ- 
ing women arid chil- 1 
dren) ! 

Grand total j 


6 
2,078 


Gardeners . . 


125 
75 
99 


82 




.33 


Iron and steel workers.. . 


1 


2 


64 


Machinists 


5 

68 


3 
25 


2,07.5 
1,451 


2, 315 


Mariners 


5 
1 

7 

1 


io 

6 




Masons . . 




Mechanics (not specified) 
MiUers 


21 


9 


1,505 


V{i]1iner<; 




1 












8,981 11,173 


3,856 


4,105 



Table D. — Statistics of immigration and emigration of Japanese, collected by the United 
States Government, compared uith those reported by the Japanese Government, fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1922. 



From Japan. 


Reported 
Jajln. 


Reported | 

uSed 1 To Japan. 
States. ]l 




Reported 


Reported 

United 
States. 


To Hawaii .. . . 1 3.641 


3,456 From Hawaii 




4,870 
12,050 


3,974 


To continental United Sta'tes. 
Total 


7,969 


7, 651 From continental 


United 


9 127 


111,610 


Ml,107 "■'■ 

Total 




» 16,920 


I 13, 101 



Embarked within the vear. 



' Debarked within the year. 



136 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year ended 





Came from— 


In 


possession of proper passports. 




1 


.3 

5 


1 

1 


1 


1 

i 
1 

o 


Entitled to passports under Japanese 
agreement. 




Former residents of 
the United States. 


Parents, wives, 
and children of 
United States 
residents. 




2 

1 

1 


3 


i 


1 

1 


42 


1 


Total admitted and de- 
barred 


8,163 


63 


168 


536 


92 


2,386 


1,830 


4,216 


2,401 


2,443 




Admitted: 
Male. 


5,234 
2,909 


47 
5 


153 
12 


508 
24 


75 
14 


1, 551 
835 


1,817 
10 


3,368 
845 


436 
1,957 


33 
9 


469 
1,966 


Female 




Total 


8,143 


52 


165 


532 


89 


2,386 


1,827 


4,213 


2,393 


42 


2,435 




Debarred: 
Male. 


9 


10 
1 


3 


4 


3 






3 








Female 


8 




8 














Total 


20 


^.*11 


3 


4 


3 


1 3 


3 


8 




8 




Housewives without other occu- 
pation 


2,474 
596 


8 


4 
7 


14 
2 


3 


703 
185 




703 
185 


1,723 
399 




1,723 
399 


Children under 16 without occu- 
pation. . 




Came from: 
Japan.. 


8,163 










2,297 
3 
26 
25 
35 


1,810 
4 
9 
4 
3 


4,107 
7 
35 
29 

38 


2,401 


42 


2,443 


Canada 


63 








Mexico 




168 












Europe 






536 


■■92" 






1 


Other countries 






























Resided in continental United 
States: 


3,843 
265 


12 

1 


19 
33 


25 

5 


35 
5 


2,260 
126 


1,659 
171 


3,919 
297 






















Total former residents 


4,108 


13 


52 


30 


40 


2,386 


1,830 


4,216 












How related to resident: 
Parents 


53 

1,726 

671 
















41 

1,712 

648 


12 53 
7 1,719 
23 671 


Wives 












1 


Children 




















Total parents, wives, and 


2,450 








1 


2,401 

2,386 
15 


42 2,443 

42 2,428 

15 

















1,823 

6 

1 


4,129 

82 
3 
2 


Kind of passport: 

Limited to United States.... 

Limited to United States 

and other countries 


7,408 
655 


10 

23 

5 


67 

1 

8 




44 

31 
1 
12 


2,306 

76 
2 
2 


Unlimited 






1 






























1 Improper passports for admission to continental United States are those held by laborers and limited 
to countries or places other than continental United States. 

2 Of the 228 without proper passports, 93 held passports not entitling them to enter the United States 
and 135 were without any kind of passport. The 93 holding improper passports were comno.sed of 18 non- 
laborers and 62 laborers admitted m transit under bond from Mexico; 2 nonlaborers were born in Mexico; 
3 nonlaborers and 1 laborer held passports not properly visaed; and 4 nonlaborers and 3 laborers were 
citizens of Canada. The 135 without passports were composed of 22 nonlaborers and 25 laborers claimmg 
to have lost passports held at time of departure from Japan; 2 laborers claimed to have left Japan with- 
out passports; 65 laborers were deserting seamen; 8 nonlaborers were wives of United States citizens; 5 
laborers were stowaways; 1 laborer claimed to have had his passport taken from him by the captain of 
the ship; and the circumstances regarding nonpossession of passports by 2 nonlaborers and 5 laborers 
are unknown. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 137 

June .30. 1922, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. 



In possession of proper passports. 


Without proper 
passport.! 


With and without 
proper passport. 


Entitled to passports under 
Japanese agreement. 


m 

2; 


Total with 
passports. 


1 


3 


1 


1 




1 




Settled agri- 
culturists. 


Not former residents, parents, 
wives, or children of resi- 
dents, nor settled agricul- 
turists— nonlaborers. 

Total entitled to passports. 


2 


3 








! 


■i 





3 16 


19 


1 
2,094 1 8,772 


22 


6,884 


1,910 


8,794 


59 


169 


»228 


6,943 


2,079 


9,022 


3!,e 


19 


1,976 1 5,832 
117 2,928 


9 
12 


3,966 
2,909 


1,875 
31 


5,841 
2,940 


29 
24 


147 


176 
24 


3,995 
2,933 


2,022 
31 


6,017 
2,964 


3 i 16 




19 


2,093 8,760 


21 


6,875 


1,906 


8,781 


53 


147 


200 


6,928 


2,053 


8,981 










3 

Q 






3 

1 


3 
10 


5 
1 


21 

1 


26 
2 


5 
10 


24 
2 


29 








< 


i 


9 


12 


















ll 12 


1 


9 


4 


13 


6 


22 


28 


15 


26 


41 




■ 












56 ' 2,4S2 
22 606 




2,482 
606 




2,482 
606 


17 
10 




17 
10 


2,499 
616 




2,499 








616 













. 


1,498 ' 8,048 
33 40 
23 75 
495 524 
45 85 


14 

4 
3 


6,196 
36 
50 
520 

82 


1,866 
4 
26 
8 
6 


8,062 
40 
76 
528 


19 
14 
24 
2 


82 
9 

68 
6 
4 


101 
23 

92 

8 
4 


6,215 
50 
74 
522 


1,948 
13 
94 
14 
10 


8,163 








63 


1 


16 


17 


168 
536 


2 




2 


92 










3,919 
297 




2,260 
126 


1,659 
171 


3,919 

297 


8 
5 


7 

7 


15 
12 




1.666 


3,934 










'131 178 


309 













i 




4,216 




2,386 


1,830 


4,216 


13 


14 


27 


2, 399 1 . 844 


4,243 




■ " 




' 










53 

1,719 

671 




41 

1 712 


12 

7 


53 

1,719 
671 








41 

1,719 

648 


12 

T 
23 


53 






7 




7 


1,726 






648 ! 23 


671 


1 












1 




2,443 




2,401 42 


2,443 


7 




7 


2,408 


42 


2,450 






2 


16 18 S78 


7,553 

1,058 
13 

148 


9 

12 

1 


5,672 j 1,890 

1,052 i 18 
12 ! 2 
148 1 


7,562 

1,070 
14 
148 
















1 9an 
















10 
146 



































_= 
















-_;:^=; 


=;= 


. 



138 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table E. — Japanese alien arrivals in continental United States, fiscal year ended 





Came from— 


In possession of proper passports. 




i 




1 


1 


1 

1 
O 


Entitled to passports under Japanese 
agreement. 




Former residents of 
the United States. 


Parents, wives, 
and children of 
United States 
residents. 




£ 

1 


s 


^ 


g 


1 

7 
25 
4 


1 


Passports dated during: 
Month of arrival . . 


1,430 
4,432 
1,269 
447 
239 
132 
77 


1 
17 

4 

2 

1 


3 

2 
5 
3 


17 
7 
20 
19 
40 
50 

367 

1 


7 
13 
6 
2 
6 
9 
5 

39 


364 
1,221 
433 
155 
71 
46 
26 

58 
12 


439 
1,062 
173 
64 
40 
28 
9 

12 
3 


803 
2,283 
606 
219 
111 
74 
35 

70 
15 


423 
1,323 
394 
120 
79 


430 
1,348 
398 
120 
79 
29 
18 

21 


First month preceding ar- 
rival 


Second month preceding ar- 
rival 


Third month preceding ar- 
rival 

Fourth month preceding 
arrival. 


Fifth month preceding ar- 


1 


Sixth month preceding ar- 


17 
16 


1 

5 


Prior to sixth month pre- 
ceding arrival, but not 
before Mar. 14, 1907 

Prior to Mar. 14, 1907 . 


37 


10 

1 


37 
17 















Occupations mentioned in pass- 
ports: 
Nonlaboring occupations. . . . 

Labormg occupations 

Occupations not mentioned 


650 
39 

7,374 


35 
3 

1 


8 
68 


399 
8 

1?1 


67 
3 

18 


159 

2,227 


...... 

1,7% 


159 
34 

4,023 


25 
2,376 


36 


25 1 
6 

2,412 











REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 139 

June SO, 1922, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement — Continued. 



In possession of proper passports. 


Without proper 
passport. 


With and without 
proper passport. 


Entitled to passports under 
Japanese agreement. 


Pi 

i 

Z 


Total with 
passports. 


1 


i2 

£ 


H 


1 

1 


i 




Settled agri- 
culturists. 


m 

1 

lip 


1 
1 

s 


i 
•I 


£ 

1 


E^ 




1 


1 


1 


1 

E- 








213 
846 
281 
135 
80 
81 
79 

378 

1 


1,446 
4,477 
1,285 
474 
270 
185 
132 

483 
20 


2 
9 
3 

1 
7 


1,000 
3,390 
1,108 
410 
230 
157 
122 

454 
13 


448 
1,096 

180 
64 
41. 
28 
10 

36 

7 


1,448 
4,486 
1,288 
474 
271 
185 
132 

490 
20 




















































' 






























1 




1 






















2 


12 


14 
4 


































1 




1 


974 


1,159 
40 

7,573 


is" 

9 


1,159 
5,725 


""hz 

1,857 


1,159 
53 

7,582 






















2 


16 


18 


1,120 










1 










i 



140 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table F.— Japanese arrivals in Hawaii, fiscal year ended June 



■ . 


Came from— In possession of passports. 




1 




Entitled to passports under Japanese 
agreement. 




1 


Former residents of 
Hawaii. 


Parents, wives, 
and children of 
Hawaiian resi- 
dents. 






$ 


i 


1 


i 


1 




3,855 


7 


1,320 


1,100 


2,420 


581 


728 


1,309 




Admitted: 

Male 


1.38 


7 


681 
638 


812 
283 


1,493 
921 


216 
365 


132 
596 


348 
961 


Female 


1,911 


Total 


3,849 


7 


1,319 


1,095 


2,414 


581 


728 




Debarred: 


3 
3 






3 
2 


3 
3 












1 
















Total 


6 




1 


5 


6 
















Housewives without other occupation 


589 
912 




314 
602 




314 

602 


269 
304 





269 
304 






Resided in Hawaii: 

Aftpr Tnnnarv 1 IQO? 


1,122 
1,294 


2 
2 


876 
444 


248 
852 


1,124 
1,296 


























2,416 


4 


1,320 


1,100 


2,420 
















How related to resident: 


24 
827 
458 











8 
269 
304 


16 

558 
154 


24 

827 
458 


Wives 






























Total parents, wives, and children of resi- 


1,309 










581 


728 


,,» 












Kind of passport: 


3,855 


5 
2 


1,319 

1 


1,100 


2,419 


581 


728 


1,309 














Passports dated during: 


1,575 

1,877 
272 
70 
28 
29 
4 


2 
2 

...... 


537 
627 
98 
31 
16 
9 
2 


478 
568 
36 
11 
5 
2 


1,015 
1,195 
134 
42 
21 
11 
2 


250 

268 
38 
12 

4 
8 

1 


300 
382 
34 
6 
2 
3 
1 


550 
650 
72 
18 
6 
11 
2 














Prior to sixth month preceding arrival, but 


Prior to Mar. 14, 1907 
















Occupations mentioned in passports: 


398 1 5 1 290 


""65 
1,035 


290 

65 

2,065 


16 

"m 


...... 

727 


16 

1 

1,292 




66 


. ..! 


Occupations not mentioned in passports 


3,391 


' 


1,030 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 141 
SO, 1922, showing various details bearing on the Japanese agreement. 







In possession of passports. 






With and without passport. 


Entitled to passports un- 
der Japanese agreement. 


Not entitled to 
passport. 


Total with passports. 


1 


i 




Total entitled to 
passports. 


Not former resi- 
dents, nor par- 
ents, wives, or 
children of resi- 
dents. 


i 

1 


3 






Nonlaborers. 
Laborers. 




Nonlaborers. 


i 


i 


1,901 1 1,828 


3,729 


133 


133 


2,034 


1,828 


3,862 


2,034 


1,828 


3,862 


897 944 
1,003 j 879 


1,841 
1,882 


104 
29 


104 
29 


1,001 
1,032 


944 
879 


1,945 
1,911 


1,001 
1,032 


944 
879 


1,945 
1,911 


1,900 1,823 


3,723 


133 


133 


2,033 


1,823 


3,856 


2,033 


1,823 


3,856 


3 

1 2 


3 
3 








3 
2 


3 
3 




3 
2 


3 






1 


1 


3 








1 5 


6 






1 


5 


6 


1 


5 


6 








583 
906 




583 
906 


6 
6 


6 
6 


912 




589 
912 


589 
912 




589 








912 










876 
444 


248 
852 


1,124 
l'296 






876 
444 


248 
852 


1,124 
1,296 


876 
444 


248 
852 


1,124 






1,296 








1,320 


T inn 


2,420 






1,320 


1,100 


2,420 


1,320 


1,100 


2,420 










8 1 16 
269 I .558 
304 1 154 


24 

827 
458 






8 
269 
304 


16 
558 
154 


24 

827 
458 


8 
304 


16 

558 
154 


24 






827 






458 








1 
581 1 728 


1,309 






581 


728 


1,309 


581 


728 


1,309 








1,900 1,828 
1 


3,728 


132 


132 

1 


2,032 


1,828 


3,860 
2 














'. 











787 i 778 


1,565 
1,845 
206 
60 
27 
22 
4 


12 
34 
66 
10 
3 
7 
1 


12 
34 
66 
10 
3 
7 


799 
929 
202 
53 
23 
24 
4 


778 
9.50 
70 
17 
7 
5 


1,577 
1,879 
272 
70 
30 
29 




1 


895 
136 
43 
20 
17 


950 
70 
17 

7 
5 




i 




















I 
















1 


















306 




306 

66 

3 357 


97 


97 


403 




66 








66 
1,762 


66 
1,762 








1,595 


36 


36 


1,631 



















142 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table 1. — Summary of Chinese seeking admission to the United States, fiscal years ended 
June 30, 1917 to 1922, by classes. 



Class alleged. 



United States citi- 
zens 

Wives of United 
States citizens... 

Returning labor- 
ers. 



Returning mer- 
chants 

Other merchants.. 

Members of mer- 
chants' families. 

Students 

Travelers 

Teachers 

Officials 

Miscellaneous 

Granted the privi- 
lege of transit in 
bond across land 
territory of the 
United States... 



Total. 



2,018 
110 



134,977 



5,041 



1,761 

141 

320 

525 
105 

644 
512 
131 



10,917 



702 

287 

1, 316 
838 
110 
33 
223 
717 



1,467 



Of these, 28,838 were destined to France. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 143 



1 

1 






•S9SB0 IB^OX 


4,530 
438 

1,488 
682 
824 
328 

1,385 
626 
66 
109 


-ss-ii 1 


IM 


^i"^ 


3- 


h 

1 
1 


•Wox 


SSSSSSSg"-^ : 


r r- s 


l-n 


iri 


-s)Jiio3 ojojeg 


^m^ :'^ :2 : : ; 


: : i i" " 


1 "";: 


i i i" 


•^TOunjBdap ojojgg 


S-"- ..-H^o-H : ; 


: : ;-^ « 


1 rii 


i :-g 


•sjojoodsm gjojag 


l^-^^^B- \ 


r r'^ % 


i-n 


IMi 


•sjtreAJ9s pepnog 




• • 1 •(» o> 




; ! !oi 


•podBosa 


-;:::::::: 


: ; : : ; - 


1 -i:i 




•paia 


CO . . . . .c^ . . 


: : : : ; "^ 


1 iiii 


: : :* 


' 


1 


•IBtOX 


g'-::?5^=°g'^- : 


j r is 3 


ii^M 


j-l 


•91Bni9^ 


;«^ : : •."^'^ : : ; 


M : i i " 


1 MM 


: : :3 


■aim 


g ::3g5^'^§^- : 


i r is i 


83 .; : 


l^.g 


1 

< 


•mox 




2~ 


1 |g«S8S-| 


•aiBinaj 


S|^-|^S-^ 


j" :SS § 


-oj : : 


pis 


•aiBK 


1 iiii :|S§S 


00 




■s^jnoo j£g 


m ; ■ • ; ;tO j j • 


: ; : :- S 




; • •■* 


•jnanijJBdap i:g 


^tot»cqeo«>tg JN '■ 


Wr ^ 


\-\\ 


: : 3 


•sjo^oadsm j£g 


|i|sgii§ss 




1 8S"SSS'| 


.9 


i 


•njnoo ^q 
pgssnnsrp s^uav 


§^ : : :-2 : : : 


: : : : • g 


1 ;;;: 


: '. '.^ 


•^uaniiJBdgp Xq 
passinisTp si^addy 


g- :«-«g^ ; j 


i i i i" § 


l-Hi 


iiia 


•sjojDadsm .^g 


|23»=3SSg— 


i r"H i 


§" •: :' 


r-i 


1 
1 


•IB?0X 




"^"11 1 




•I26I 'T ^inr Suipued 


i^-"^"-^-- j 


: : :2S ^ 


; ; i i i ri 


•SnOHBDllddB A19N 


p^^ig^p^s 




ll"^^s«| 






1 
1 




i 


Wives of United States citizens 

Returning laborers 

Section-6 merchants 

Returning merchants 

Merchants' wives 

Merchants' children 

Section-6 students 

Returning students 

Section-6 travelers 


Section-6 teachers 

Returning teachers 

Officials :.: 

Miscellaneous 

Total 


n 


■ ' 05 

m 


iJl 
Mi 



144 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



<N .1 



•SJjnOO 9J0J8a 



•^aannjBdep ejojog 



•sjojoadsni ajojag 



•SJUBAJ9S papuog 



•padBDsg: 



•aiBinQ^ 



•sjjtiOD Xg 



•jnetmjBdap Aq 



^^::j 



•siojoadsni Aq 



pessitnsip s;iJA\. 



•inetnjJBdep Aq 
pessnnsip siBaddy 



•sio^oadsm Aq 



•126T 'T A]n£ 3mpu8j 



•snonBonddB M9j<r 



(N .-I 



25iSS 



S?5^K 



i«^: 






;S5SS 



CO CO Tt< M< 00 ":> 



;g5SSg? 



bc.St3, 



Ex:' 



t.a £ 5 o SS >>£ 









BKPORT OF COMMISSIONEB GENERM. OF IMMIGRATION. 



145 



Tahi k ;•>. — (^hinese claiming Amcricdn ritizmship by hirth, or to he the wives or childrrn 
of American citizens, admitted, fiscal year ended June -iO, 1922, by ports. 





Foreign- 
born 
wives 
of 

natives. 


Foreifin- 

born 
children 

of 
natives. 


Native born. 






No record 
of 

departure 
(known as 

"raw 
natives"). 


Record of departure 
(known as"returniMg 
natives"). 




iPort. 


Status as 
native born 
determined 

by U. S. 
Government 
previous to 

present 

application 

for admis- 

.sion. 


Status not 

previously 

detor- 

niined. 


Total. 


New York, N. Y 


1 
6 


's5 


6 
3 


20 
42 

551 
319 
23 
116 




195 
136 






Key West, Fla. 




San Francisco, CaKJ 


210 

58 


1,221 

2S7 


2 
4 

I 
4 


99 

1 

6 


2,083 
669 
25 
640 


Seattle WasJi 




Canadian border stations 


4i' 


473 






Total f on tinental United States 


316 

80 


2,234 

58 


20 
5 


1,072 


107 


3,749 
481 






Grand total 


396 


2,292 


25 


1,239 j 278 


4,230 




BY WHOM ADMITTED. 

Inspection officers 

Department 

Courts 


390 

6 


2, 154 
130 

8 


24 


1,234 


267 
10 

1 


4,069 

152 

9 









Table 4. — Appeals to department from excluding decisions under Chinese-exclusion lav:s, 
fiscal year ended June SO, 1922, by ports. 



Action taken. 


New 
York, 
N.V. 


Boston, 
Mass. 


New 

Orleans, 

La. 


San 
Fran- 
cisco, 
Calif. 


Seattle, 
Wash. 


Cana- 
dian 
border. 


Hono- 
lulu, 
Hawaii. 


Total. 


Number of appeals 


3 
2 


4 
4 


2 
2 


292 

137 
155 


51 

27 
24 


84 

.')4 
30 


25 

17 

8 


461 

243 

218 


Disposition: 

.Sustained (admitted) 

Dismissed (rejected) 







Table 5. — Disposition of cases of resident Chinese applying for return certificates, fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1922. 



Class. 


Applica- 
tions 
submitted. 


Primary disposition. 


Disposition on appeal. 


Total 
certificates 
granted. 


Total 
certificates 


Granted. 


Denied. 


Sustained. 


Dismissed. 


finaUy 
refused. 


Native born 

E-\empt classes... 
Laborers 


3,233 
1,443 

1,580 


3,109 
1,398 
1,568 


124 
45 
12 


63 
24 


53 

8 
2 


3,172 
1,422 
1,569 


61 
21 






Total 


6,2.56 


6, 075 


181 


88 


63 


6, 163 


93 



10656—22- 



-10 



146 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



Table 6. — Action taken in the coses of Chinese persons arrested on the charge of being ire 
the United States in violation of laiv, fscal year ended June SU, l'J22. 

After order of deportation— Continued. 
Disposition- 
Deported 2 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June 

30, 1922 2 

Appealed to higher courts 2 



CASES BEFORE UNITED STATES COMMISSIONERS. 



Until order of deportation or discharge: 
Arrests 

Pending before hearing June 30, 1921. 



Total. 



Disposition — 

Discharged 

Pending before hearing June 30, 
Ordered deported 



After order of deportation: 

Ordered deported 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June : 



CASES BEFORE HIGHER UNITED STATES COURTS. 



Total. 



Disposition — 

Died 

Deported 

Awaiting deportation or appeal June 

30, 1922 

Appealed to district courts 



Until order of deportation or discharge: 

Appealed to higher United States courts. 
Pending before trial June 30, 1921 



Disposition — 

Pending before trial June :J0, 1922. . . . 
Ordered deported 



After order of deportation: 

Ordered deported 

Awaiting deportation June 30, 1921 . 



CASES BEFORE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS, j 

10 ' 



Until order of deportation or discharge: 

Appealed to district courts , 

Pending before trial June 30, 1921. . 



Disposition- 
Deported ,. 2 

Awaiting deportation June 30, 1922 . . 14 

RECAPITULATION OF ALL CASES. 



Total. 



Disposition- 
Died 

Discharged 

Pendhig before trial June :10, 1922. 
Ordered deported 



i Arrests 33 

Pending, June 30, 1921, including those await- 
ing deportation or appeal 72 



Total. 



After order of deportation: 

Ordered deported 

Awaiting deportation or appeal to higher 
courts June :50, 1921 

Total 



Disposition — 

Died, escaped, and forfeited bail 

Discharged .' 

Deported 

Pending, June 30, 1922, mcluding 
those awaiting deportation or ap- 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 147 

Table 7. i hincse arrested n7ui deported, fiscal years ended June 30, I'JIS to 19 i2, by 
judicial districts. 





1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


Jiidi<iiil.iis(rii>t. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


.Vr- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


Ar- 
rests. 


Depor- 
tations. 


PehNVire 


■•■ 4- 




1 


2 


1 
















1 






















1 
1 
3 


2 
. 1 




1 




1 




2 




Rhode Island 


'h' 


3 




















7 


3 






1 


1 


Southern Xe\v York 


44 


13 
2 
1 


15 
3 


4 


2 


1 
















9 


















34 


8 


3 




1 




2 






2 


3 


2 
















New lersev 


7 


3 


1 


1 






1 














1 
















1 


i 


1 




























1 
















MiHHlp Mah-imQ 
































: 








3 


3 















3 






















2 

1 




2 











































Northern Ohio 


1 


2 












1 






Southern Ohio 








1 






1 




3 

8 


I 










1 






Northern Illinois 


I'l 


3 


' 


5 


5 






Southern Illinois 


-' 






Eastern Michigan 


1 


1 




1 


3 


1 


i 2 


4 


1 
















1 

1 






























1 












' 
















j 










1 


1 






1 1 














] j 


















i I i 












' 


2 




















j 






1 


1 1 1 










1 






















5 


2 


2 
9 


2 
4 






"■"i'! i' 

4 

^.! '. 








.1 


""2 


3 

i' 


2 


1 
























1 










Western Texas 




3 




1 






5 


3 












i i 

1 1 






















Western Oklahoma 


1 








2 















1 




2 2 
1 


' 


2 








1 



















. 




Total 


104 


51 


96 


35 


31 i 15 i 24 ! 25 


21 



















148 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 

Table 8. — Miscellaneous Chinese transactions, fiscal year ended June JO, 1922, hy ports. 



Class. 


1 

1 


i 


1 

i 


> 


1 

12; 


i 

1 


1 

o 

1 


s 

1 


1 
1 

00 


1 


03 
t 

5 


! 


i 


United States citizens (Chinese) 


194 i 130 
309 1 106 
100 ' 19 








1 


1 

2 
455 


1,873 
2,626 

1,425 

5 
1,007 


636 


0, 


599 


585 
750 
16 


4,044 




3 


24 


26 


22 
2 

323 




Alien Chinese debarred 


42 1 Si S2 


515 


Chinese granted the privilege 
of transit in bond across land 
territory of the United States 


1,657 












876 


2,503 

84 


7 239 


Chinese denied the privilege of 
transit in bond across land terri- 
tory of the United States 


■ 








89 


Chinese granted the privilege of 








1 




80 




1,087 


Chinese denied the privUege of 








1 












Chinese laborers with return 
certificates departing 


90 111 

161 77 






1 




433 
809 


753 
250 
20 

1 
33 

517 


■ 

18 
4 

2 

2 
22 


5 

4 
4 


528 
47 
13 

3 

6 

514 


1,916 


Chinese merchants with return 






i 




1,367 


Chinese merchants' wives with 










i 




38 


Chinese merchants minor chil- 
dren with return certificates 










j 






4 


Chinese students with return 
certificates departing 


5 












25 

5 

1,801 


74 


Chinese teachers with return 










14 


Native-born Chinese with return 


182 


247 










3,287 








1 







APPENDIX II 



REPORT ON SEAMEN'S WORK 



149 



APPENDIX II. 
SEAMEN'S WORK. 

Attention was invited in last year's report to the multiplied temp- 
tations of aliens to seek admission through the wide-open door pre- 
sented by the seaman's occupation. For years, as it is well known, 
inadmissible aliens have entered the country in the guise of seamen 
who promptly deserted their vessels upon arrival at American ports, 
and to the ilUterate and criminal classes who formerly monopolized 
this open-door has now been added the large class of aliens from 
countries the quotas of which have been exhausted. 

In support of the latter contention I wish to invite attention to a 
•case of an attempted violation of the percentage limit act which 
occurred at Providence, K. I., where the American barkentine Amos 
Pegs arrived with a crew of 45 men and 1 woman, all of the so-called 
Brava type, Portuguese xVfricans, from the Cape Verde Islands. The 
excessively large crew aroused suspicion and a board of special in- 
quiry was directed to consider the case of each alleged seaman as 
though an applicant for admission in order, if possible, to determine 
whether some were not actually passengers instead of seamen. The 
board was successful in obtaining direct evidence in the case of two 
of the alleged members of the crew, a man and his wife, who paid 
their passage and held receipts therefor. The master of the vessel, 
on advice of counsel, finally confessed that sixteen of the alleged 
crewmen had paid their way as passengers. A compromise was 
effected involving a pajonent of SI, 000 for violation of section 31 of 
the general immigration law and administrative fines were imposed 
amounting to -5785. Although appeals were filed in behalf of the 
16 alleged seamen, the department affirmed the excluding decision 
of the board in each of these cases and directed the deportation of the 
aliens involved. 

Since the regulations amending rule 10 and rule 7 of the Chinese 
rules have been in operation the desertions of Chinese and ''barred 
zone" seamen have been reduced to a minimum, which fact demon- 
strates that no mistake was made in the requirement of bonds for 
temporary shore leave of such seamen conditioned on their departure 
from and out of the United States within 60 days. 

After a careful consideration of the many perplexing problems con- 
stantly arising in connection with the seaman's work, it is apparent 
that unless the existing laws are strengthened in several respects it 
will be ph3'sically impossible for the Immigration Service to have 
proper control of incoming alien seamen. 

CREW LISTS. 

Owing to the issuance of instructions to the various commissioners 
and inspectors in charge at seaports relative to the institution of 
proceedings looking; to the imposition of fines in all cases where 
masters fail to furni.sh proper crew lists, it has been brought rather 

151 



152 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGR-^TION. 

forcibly to the attention of the steamship lines and the masters that 
these lists must be in proper order at the time the immigration officer 
boards the vessel, and a great improvement has been noted in this 
respect, especially during the closing months of the fiscal year, so 
that the number of fines imposed for such failures has steadily 
increased. 

SEAMEN'S IDENTIFICATION CARDS. 

Almost immediately upon the practical termination of the war and 
on several subsequent occasions the bureau conferred and corre- 
sponded with the State Department regarding the wisdom of dis- 
continuing the issuance of seamen's identification cards (Forms 
K and L) , but no definite action was taken in the premises. 

In view of the numerous reports received from sources apparently 
authentic that unlawful traffic in seamen's identification cards in 
foreign countries was being indulged in, the bureau, under date of 
June 8, last, addressed a circular letter of instructions to all com- 
missioners and inspectors in charge at seaports rescinding so much 
of the provisions of Rule 10 as pertained to the issuance of seamen's 
identification cards and directed that hereafter identification cards 
were to be issued only to alien seamen who are lawfully admitted to 
the United States, and who intend to follow their calling as seamen, 
such cards being evidence of the holder's right to engage in domestic 
commerce. 

BEMOVAL OF DISEASED SEAMEN TO HOSPITAL FOR TREATMENT. 

One of the outstanding dangers which threatens the public health 
of this country is the possibility of the introduction of epidemic and 
loathsome and contagious diseases brought by seamen who, in the 
very nature of things, visit most of the ports of the world and there- 
fore are more likely than immigrants to be carriers of disease. The 
act of December 26, 1920, vests the service with authority to compel 
the hospitalization of alien seamen who by reason of their physical 
and mental condition are a menace to the public health, and the 
courts in several of the Federal districts have held that this is appli- 
cable to all vessels whether of American or foreign registry. 

SIGNING OF ALIENS ON COASTWISE VESSELS. 

With a view to preventing so far as possible the employment on 
coastwise vessels of aliens who have not been la\vfully admitted to 
the United States, arrangements have been made with the United 
States shipping commissioners at several of the Atlantic coast ports 
to notify such aliens that unless they voluntarily apply to the immi- 
gration officials for examination they are liable to be taken into cus- 
tody at any port in the United States and deported to the countries 
from which they came. 

Rather than run the risk of being deported and thrown out of 
employment a considerable number of alien seamen, who were 
landed temporarily for the purpose of reshipping foreign, have 
voluntarily applied for examination under the immigration laws and 
have been regularly admitted and furnished with seamen's identifica- 
tion cards (Form 685) , such cards being evidence of the holder's right 
to engage in domestic (commerce. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION, 



153 



Since the above plan has been in operation, head tax amounting to 
several thousand doHars has been collected at the several seaports of 
the I'nitod States. 

UNEMPLOYED ALIEN SEAMEN LEFT STRANDED IN PORTS OF THE 
UNITED STATES. 

As the result of the tying up of millions of tons of shipping, including 
a large number of Shipping Board vessels, during tne past year, 
thousands of alien seamen were left stranded in almost all of the 
Atlantic and Gult coast ports. 

In view of the fact that these alien seamen were unable to either 
reship or obtain employment on shore, they were compelled, in many 
instances, in order to provide themselves with the necessaries of life, 
to appeal to various charitable and kindred organizations for relief. 

The bureau was deluged w4th requests for formal applications for 
warrants of arrest as well as petitions from interested persons to 
deport or return these aliens to the countries from which they respec- 
tively came, but on account of the depleted state of its appropriation 
it found it impracticable to institute deportation proceedings except 
in a few of the really meritorious cases. 

SOME INTERESTING STATISTICS. 

Although shipping, like other business, has been at low ebb during 
the year, still the figures concerning the seamen's work are large and 
significant. Seamen employed on vessels engaged in foreign trade 
have been examined at our ports to the number of 973,804. Of 
these 101,893 were furnished with identification cards; 1,523 were 
certified by the Public Health surgeons to be afflicted with one or 
more of the diseases or disabilities enumerated in section 35 of the 
act of February 5, 1917, and fines amounting to $10,480 were imposed 
against the vessels for violations of sections 31, 32, 35, and 36, 
Important details with regard to the figures are shown in the following 
tables : 



DLstricl. 


Vessels 
boarded. 


Alien 

seamen 

examined. 


Seamen's 
cards 
issued. 


Alien sea- 
men cer- 
tified for 
loathsome 

or dan- 
gerous con- 
tagious 
diseases. 


Alien sea- 
men re- 
moved to 
hospital 
for treat- 
ment- 


New York 


5.a35 
1,222 
1,126 
1,023 
157 


449, 278 
48, 148 
40, 185 
39,336 

7,161 
55, 307 
26,780 
93,234 
74,618 
28,459 
13,7.55 
82,202 
12,983 

2,. 358 


43,000 
7,062 


202 
164 
151 


398 


Boston 


121 




121 




3,329 
2 070 
6,443 
3,484 
8,420 
13,066 
6,779 
4,918 




Portland Me 


1" 


9 


Norfolk 


496 




2,789 
2,176 
2,163 

281 
2,193 
1,596 


129 
481 
189 
78 
16 
94 
2 


129 


New Orleans 


481 


Galveston 


149 




61 


Portland Oree 






94 


Southern California ports 


1,702 
1,620 


6 


Montreal 






535 
















Total 


21,219 


973, 804 


101,893 


1,523 


2,065 







] 06 56— 21 



154 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 



Administrative fines against transportation lines on account of violation of sections of 
immigration act relating to alien seamen. 



District. 


Section. 


Number 
assessed. 


Amount 
of fine. 


Total 
amount 
assessed. 


Cause of assessment . 


New York 


36 
35 
36 
36 
35 
36 
36 
36 
36 
35 
36 
36 


214 

65 
45 
2 
140 
358 
35 
48 
3 
3 
3 


$10 
50 
10 
10 
50 
10 
10 
10 
10 
50 
10 
10 
10 


.2,,„ 

650 
450 
100 
1,400 
3,580 
350 
480 
150 
30 
30 
70 




Boston 


Bringing diseased alien seaman. 


Philadelphia . . 


Norfolk 


Do. 


JacksonviUe 


Bringing diseased aUen seaman 
Failure to furnish crew list 


Do... 


New Orleans 


Do 




Do. 


San Francisco 


Do. 


Seattle 


Bringing diseased alien seaman. 


Do 




Do. 


Southern California ports . . 


Do. 


Total 




924 




9,480 













Jeremiah J. Hurley, 

Special Representative on Seamen^ s Work. 



o