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Full text of "Annual report of the Commissioners of Inland Fisheries made to the General Assembly"

HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



MUSEUM or OOMPAEATIVE ZOOLOGY. 



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j^tate 0f gbade gslaud and WviivUUntt Hantationis 
FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND 
FISHERIES 

MADE TO THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

AT ITS 

January Session, 1914 



PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

E. L. FREEMAN COMPANY, STATE PRINTERS 

1914 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

Charles W. Willard, Westerly, President. 
Daniel B. Fearing, A. M., Newport, Vice President. 
William H. Boardman, Central Falls, Secretary. 
Adelbert D. Roberts, Woonsocket, Auditor. 
Theophile Guerin, Woonsocket, Treasurer. 
William P. Morton, Providence. 
Isaac H. Clarke, Jamestown. 



DEPUTY COMMISSIONERS. 

William T. Luth, Newport, Chief Deputy. 
James Harrington, Newport. 
Jeremiah B. Allen, New Shoreham. 
Andrew V. Willis, New Shoreham. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF HATCHERY AND EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Earnest W. Barnes, Wickford. 



REPORT 



To the Honorable the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island and 
Providence Plajitations, at its January Session, 1914: 

The Commissioners herewith present their forty-fourth annual 
report, for the year 1913, which contains, as required by law, data 
and statistics with respect to the fisheries under their jurisdiction 
and such recommend,ations as they deem expedient. 

The fisheries in general have been in a quite prosperous condition. 
Especially can this be said of the lobster industry. Not only has 
there been a marked increase in the number of pounds taken from 
the waters of the state, but there has also been a great increase in 
the average number of pounds per lobster pot. This gain is due 
largely to the persistent enforcement of the lobster laws and to the 
rearing of young lobsters at the State Hatchery at Wickford. 

It is the sincere hope of your Commissioners that the laws regu- 
lating the general fisheries may be put in the same effective condition 
as those relating to the lobster industry. At present they are 
ambiguous, difficult to enforce and in many cases obsolete. Your 
Commission recommends that a committee be appointed from your 
honorable body to assist them in drawing up new laws which shall 
give the proper protection to these fisheries. 

Considerable interest has been shown by" sportsmen in this section 
of the country in the possibility of establishing rod and reel fishing for 
tuna in Block Island. Your Commission is very much interested 
in the matter and is doing all in its power to encourage it. More 
extended references to this valuable fishery is made on page 30 and 
following. 



6 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

The work of the Commission has followed the usual lines as outlined 
below, more detailed statements will be found in the body of the 
report. 

The stocking of fresh-water ponds and streams. 

The enforcement of the laws relating to fresh-water fishes. 

The purchase of egg-bearing lobsters. 

The employment of deputies to enforce the lobster laws. 

The rearing of lobsters to the bottom-seeking stages. 

The gathering of data and statistics with respect to the food-fishes. 

The cooperation with fisheries authorities of neighboring states 
and abroad. 

Occasion is here taken to thank the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad Company for its courtesy in granting free trans- 
portation of fry and messengers. 

The financial statement for the year 1913 is as follows: 

State of Rhode Island in account with the Commissioners of Inland 

Fisheries. . 

DEBIT. 

1913. 
Dec. 31. To expenses of the Commissioners from 

January 1, to December 31; 1913 $838 20 

To expenses and services of deputies under 
the law from January 1, to December 31, 
1913 3,491 80 

To purchase of boat for deputies, 1913 1,000 00 

To expenses at the Wickford Hatchery and 
Experiment Station, January 1, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1913 9,020 54 

To purchase of Egg Lobsters 1,707 40 

$16,057 94 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 7 

CREDIT. 
1913. 

Dec. 31. By received from the State Treasurer $16,057 94 



Amount received for 295 lobster licenses, at $5.00 each, 

as per receipts from the State Treasurer . . . $1,475 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. W. WILLARD, 

DANIEL B. FEARING, 

WILLIAM H BOARDMAN, Secretary. 

ADELBERT D. ROBERTS, 

THEOPHILE GUERIN, 

WILLIAM P. MORTON, 

ISAAC H. CLARKE, 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

STOCKING FRESH-WATER PONDS AND STREAMS. 

The number of brook trout distributed by your Commission in 
1913 was somewhat under normal owing to the extremely low state 
of the ponds and streams. The continuance of dry seasons accom- 
panied by extensive deforestation has made it necessary for the 
Commission to exercise great care in distributing fish. Streams 
which were formerly well adapted for brook trout have become 
unsuitable because of high temperatures and low waters during the 
summer season. 

In addition to brook trout a considerable number of white perch 
were put in suitable places last year. The majority of the fish were 
well filled with spawn and were liberated a short time prior to the 
spawning period. 

The fishing in streams previously stocked by your Commission 
was quite successful in 1913, especially for large-mouthed black bass 
and trout. The latter owing to the abuses of excessive fishing and 
unfavorable seasons were not very plentiful, but those caught were 
unusually large. Fishing for large-mouthed black bass in the 
Pawcatuck and its tributaries was continued with increasing success. 



THE COLLECTION OF DATA AND STATISTICS RELATING 
TO THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES. 

Every effort has been made to make this branch of the Commis- 
sion's work reliable and trustworthy, but as mentioned in previous 
reports, the absence on our statute books of laws making returns 
compulsory has prevented us from making this data complete. 

GENERAL CONDITIONS OF THE FISHERIES IN 1913. 

In general, the fishing in Narragansett Bay in 1913 was a little 
better than that of the previous year, but not above the average. 
Small scup and small butterfish were quite plentiful as in 1912. Trash 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 9 

fish, such as are used as bait, were also quite abundant. Especially 
noteworthy was the fact that striped bass and young pollock were 
caught well up the Bay, a quite unusual thing for recent years. 

Hand-line fishing, both within the Bay and off Newport, was well 
above the average , especially the tautog fishing off Newport. The 
first catch of these fish in Rhode Island waters was made in the 
fyke nets on April 2nd, but there were none caught by hand lines 
until April 19th. 

In the off-shore traps the general fishing was excellent. This 
statement is especially true with reference to the scup fishing which 
was far ahead of any recent year, both in the length of run and the 
number of fish caught. 

The following tables of the shipment of sea products from Newport 
are submitted as heretofore. The large gain in the number of fish 
shipped is due almost entirely to the extraordinary run of scup. 



10 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



Table I. 



Table Showing the Amount of Fish, Lobsters, and Other Sea Products Shipped 

Monthly from Newport by the Principal Transportation Companies 

During the Year WIS. 







£ 






§ 
























-i< 






T3 




1913. 


s 


1 






5 






a 





02 


3 




F 






'o 


^ 


a 






X! 






tj 


i: 






bi 


i-.B 




fi 


^ 






m 


ei 


cS 


3 






oi 


3 






m 


m 


m 


« 


^ 


:< 


m 


P3 


^ 


« 




1,4813^ 






3'> 












13 




1,959 






94 












75 




1,074 
2,244H 






21 
15 








3 

2M 
7 




2Q]4 




2 


1 


1 






1 


Mav 


15,878 


1^2 


?. 


2 


fi 




5 






June 


12,7863^ 


177H 


R 


2 


3 


1 


7 


14 


13 




July 


3,904 


796 


4 




1 




6 


34 


36 






2,8703^ 


766 


8 


1 


1 




3 


6 


11 






4,649 


115 




30 






29 


6 








3,854 
6,303 
3,049 


107 
16 

2M 


4 
2 


30 

41 

495 


2 
3 


1 
3 


4 


4 










1 






3 




34 






Total, year 1913. 


60,053 


1,9831-2 


27 


693 


17 


6 


54 


79H 


60 


U4H 







COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



11 



Table II. 

Table Showing Shipment of Fish, Lobsters, and Other Sea Products from Newport 
for the last Twenty-Seven Years. 





pq 


1 

on 

1 

u 
03 
M 


3 
03 

03 


1 

o 


a 

OS 

O 
m 

03 

eq 


a 

CO 

pq 


i 

a 

"O 
CQ 

1 
o3 

pq 


i 
1 

ll 

2 


a 
o 

3 
05 

G 

3 


k 
II 

ii 

•z 


3 

H 
1 

u 

03 

pq 


03 

ja 

a 

3 


'3 
n 
S 

PL* 

a 

3 

■z 


"3 
W 

OJ 

pq 


1 
.2 

03 


JS 
a 

§ 


1 

3 


1887 


16,657 
15,033 
19,306 
8,933 
18,032 
26,832 
24,452 
17,769 
24,622 
20,425 
52,098 
34,065 
34,917 
38,184 
50,500 
53,986 
54.384 
62,106 
50,127 
60,955 
59,674 
48,814 
46,031 
53,154 
39,141 
56,325 
60,053 


834 
1,161 
2,047 
2,650 
2,204 
2,123 
1,399 
2,392 
2,119 
1,728 
2,039 
1,163 
4,143 
4,793 
4,393 
4,342 
1,474 
1,921 

977 
l,306i 
1,529 
2,517i 
3,252i 

427 
2,281 J 
1,465 
l,983i 


1 




























1888 
































1889 
































1890 
































1891 
































1892 . . . 
































1893 
































1894 
































1895 
































1896 












143 

45 

74 

162 

166 

21 

179 

164 

554 

723 

811 

263 

198 

61 

38 

509 

321 

60 




















1897 






























1898 






























1899 






























1900 






























1901 






























1902 


233 


1 

84 

45 

122 

17 

322 

287 

145 

112 

50 

38 

27 


























1903 








11 

26 
11 
13 
3 
6 
17 
56 
14 
17 


79 
336 
91 
40 
112 
93 
21 
47 
79 
67 
54 








18 








1904 


8 
80 
15 
12 
23 
14 
58 
29 
33 
79 J 

351i 


3 

2 
8 

13 


23 

6 

24 

21 

29 

5 

4 














1905 . . 


2 
1 
5 

5 

2 


1 

12 

12 

3 

5 

37 

32 

16 

5 


1 

1 










1096 . 




112 
18 






1907... 
1908 . . . 






1909 . . . 
1910... 
1911... 
1912... 
1913... 






673 
794 
726 
980 
693 


42 

71 

255 


5 

1 
38 
144^ 


Total . . 


1,046,575 


58,664J 


233 


1,250 


112 


4,492 


174 


1,019 


19 i 


123 


2 


18 


3,996 368 


188^ 



12 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



THE LOBSTER INDUSTRY. 

The early part of the lobster season was poor and continued so 
until the latter part of July, when remarkable catches were made. 
The total number of pounds of lobsters caught in Rhode Island waters 
in 1913 was, 1,210,094 pounds, nearly double that of 1912, and the 
average number pounds per pot increased from 43 to 69. This 
extraordinary increase in a well established fishery is attributed to 
the enforcement of the lobster laws and to the rearing of lobsters 
at the Wickford Hatchery. The fishermen have continued to report 
a great abundance of small lobsters, especially in those parts stocked 
by the Wickford Hatchery. 

The following tables have been compiled from data furnished for 
the greater part by William T. Luth, Chief Deputy Lobster Com- 
missioner. At the conclusion of these a list of the licensed lobster 
men is given as prescribed by law : 



Table III. 

Table Comparing the Number of Pounds of Lobsters, Number of Pots, and Average 
Number of Pounds Per Pot, for the Years 1904-1913. 



Year. 


Total 
Catch in 
Pounds. 


Newport. 


Number 
of Pots. 


Average 

Number of 

Pounds 

Per Pot. 


1904 


376,994 

448,300 

671,914 

929,423 

1,471,344 

1,342,983 

833,683 

891,886 

745,257 

1,210,094 


226,994 
301,659 
353,573 
581.189 
665,009 
757,837 
489,815 
513,076 
372,726 
520,962 


7,935 
9,180 
11,355 
12,104 
20,011 
23,220 
22,091 
23,294 
17,259 
17,335 


45 


1905 


48 


1906 


59 


1907 


76 


1908 


73 


1909 


57 


1910 


37 


1911 


38 


1912 

1913 


43 
69 







COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



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14 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



Table V. 

Number oj Pots, Boats and Men Engaged in Lobster Fishing in the State of Rhode 

Island for 1913. 



Location. 


Men. 


Boats. 


Pots. 


Block Island 


72 

8 

5 

2 

10 

10 

5 

27 

79 

3 

4 

4 

7 

10 

13 

2 

8 

13 

2 

11 


38 
7 
3 
2 

10 

10 
5 

23 

66 
2 
4 
4 
5 

10 
8 
2 
6 

11 
2 
9 


5,450 


Bristol 


480 


Charlestown 


150 




140 


Jamestown 


410 


Little Compton 


384 


Middletown 


260 




1,361 




4,680 


Peacedale 


110 


Portsmouth 


175 




205 




287 


Tiverton 


462 


Wakefield 


626 


Watch Hill 


52 




666 


Westerly 


880 


Wickford 


50 


Other Places 


502 






Total 


295 


227 


17.330 







*In addition to these a few boats were fishing just beyond the three-mile limit. The bulk of 
their lobsters were brought into Rhode Island. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 15 

List of Lobster Licenses Granted in 1913. 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

1. Joseph L. Eaton Saunderstown. 

2. Joseph L. Eaton, Jr " 

3. Henry K. Littlefield Block Island. 

4. Victor D. Gray Tiverton. 

5. Samuel E. Gray 

6. William H. Dodge Block Island. 

7. Louis E. Smith 

8. Earle A. Smith " 

10. Arthur E. Dodge : " 

11. Prentice A. Lanphear Westerly. 

12. Wilbur E. Dodge Block Island. 

14. Nicholas Pnematikos Newport. 

15. Albert W. Smith Block Island. 

16. George E. Smith 

17. Simon A. Littlefield " 

18. Alfred C. Littlefield 

19. Samuel R. Littlefield, 2nd " 

21. John E. Littlefield 

22. Rouse B. Dodge 

23. Simon R. Sands " 

24. Simon A. Ball 

25. Vernice Wilhs " 

26. Johannes Jacobson " 

30. Howard Fisher " 

31. George Nelson Peacedale. 

36. Samuel B. Dickens Block Island. 

38. Albert S. Hayes 

39. Edgar Littlefield 

40. S. Martin Rose 

42. Harry B. Hoxsie Westerly. 

43. Albert L. Anderson Block Island. 



16 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



License 

No. Name. Location. 

44. Herbert Greenwood Westerly. 

45. Gus Anderson Block Island. 

46. John A. Anderson " 

47. William N. Ball 

48. R. D. Lamb Westerly. 

50. Elmer Babcock Wakefield. 

53. Stannos Janitos Newport. 

54. Park A. Slate Block Island. 

55. Irving T. Latham " 

56. Ralph E. Dodge " 

57. William P. Dodge .• " 

58. Edward Evensen " 

59. Dimitrios Kodilis Newport. 

60. Millard F. Mitchell Block Island. 

6L Hector McCormick East Providence. 

62. Irving M. Ball Block Island. 

63. Thaddeus A. Ball 

64. Chester A. Littlefield 

65. Walter R. Littlefield 

66. Harold L. Duim 

67. Stanton C. Allen Block Island. 

68. Emery A. Dickens 

69. Joshua P. Smith 

70. Ulysses E. Westcott 

71. Abel E. Allen 

72. Eleazer Allen 

73. Parker Mitchell 

75. Barzilla B. Dunn 

76. John F. Hayes 

77. Amanuel Allen 

79. Roswell Mitchell 

80. Lineas Dodge 

81. Nicholas Skapanakes Newport. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



17 



License 

No. Name. Location. 

82. Lyman Hall Westerly. 

83. Walter Converse Block Island. 

84. Richard Steadman " 

85. Silas C. Hall 

86. Charles Hall 

87. Frank M. Gross Prudence Island. 

88. Dimitrios Damacus Newport. 

90. Oscar T. Dykstra • Wakefield. 

91. Adrian Dykstra 

92. Bernal H. Dodge Block Island. 

93. John A. Papa Newport. 

94. George F. Tew. 

95. Andrew J. Tew 

96. Eugene A. Tew 

97. Edward Roy 

99. Peter Andrews 

100. John Linehan 

101. Perkiles Booras 

102. John Conisotas 

103. Raftikis Raftikis 

104. Restcom E. Peabody Middletown. 

105. Beck Anderson " 

106. Daniel A. Jordan Apponaug. 

107. Nicholas Alexander NeAvport. 

108. Anthony Mathinos " ' 

109. Harry Violet 

111. John H. Sherman Jamestown. 

112. Jerome Blount Newport. 

113. James P. Hennessey Peacedale. 

116. R. G. Burdick Narragansett Pier. 

117. Nicholas B. Herline Bristol. 

119. Nicholas Trocotas .' Newport. 

120. George Lathrop Prudence Island. 



18 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

121. George A. Carpenter Saunderstown. 

122. R. R. Matterson 

124. Archie C. H. Matterson 

125. George Frank Narragansett Pier. 

126. Ernest Littlefield Jamestown. 

127. Thomas F. Nickerson Little Compton. 

129. Constantine Mataronas Newport. 

130. Edgar F. Grinnell 

131. Anastacio Angelo Ne"WT)ort. 

134. Nicholas Julias 

135. Lazaras Brown 

136. Nicholas Mataronas 

137. Stamox Domotaris 

139. Frank Parlenas 

140. John Giones 

141. John Violet 

143. George Prokopios 

146. Richard E. Currie Charlestown. 

148. Adelard Fournier Newport. 

150. Edward N. Lawton " 

151. Nicholas K. Card 

152. Henry C. Bush Bristol. 

153. Demetrios Giones Newport. 

154. Vasilas Paris " 

155. Benjamin A. Kimiecom Narragansett Pier. 

156. Constantine Conomus Newport. 

161. Angelo Maniotis . . .^ 

162. William Holt 

163. George I. Hargraves Narragansett Pier. 

164. George S. Johnston Block Island. 

165. Stamos Salonikas Newport. 

168. Patrick McCann Bristol. 

169. Roland E. Crowell Conimicut. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 19 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

170. Walter Chace Newport. 

172. William H. James 

175. Domotaris Domotaris 

177. James E. Roche., Westerly. 

178. Jesse E. Crowell Bristol. 

179. Manuel Kristodolo " 

180. Herbert A. Warner " 

181. Marcus L. Huftalen Warren. 

182. Fotis Tregonis Newport. 

183. William C. Allen Narragansett Pier. 

184. Isaac A. Allen 

185. Edward E. Littlefield Block Island. 

187. Oder S.Dunn 

193. Irving T. Wilcox Tiverton. 

194. Earl C. Clark Narragansett Pier. 

196. Everett Willis Block Island. 

199. Amanuel Jacobs " 

201. LangAvorthy H. Pearce, Jr Narragansett Pier. 

203. Joseph Silvia Little Compton. 

204. H. Hilly er Burdick Narragansett Pier. 

205. Walter H. Munro Warren. 

209. Walter Smith Narragansett Pier. 

210. Fred B. Tucker 

211. Edward D. Taylor 

212. Floyd Huftalen Warren. 

213. Jared W. Miner Prudence Island. 

214. Manuel Silviera Little Compton. 

215. Frank Brown 

217. Eldores Sprague Block Island. 

218. Ernest E. Streeter Wakefield. 

221. Freeman Milliken Block Island. 

222. Langworthy H. Pearce Saunderstown. 

227. Arthur J. Beauchamp Newport. 



20 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

228. John Taylor Jamestown. 

230. Keriakos Paris Newport. 

231. Antonio R. Medeiros Middletown. 

233. JohnG. Sousa 

234. Thomas Mann Narragansett Pier, 

235. Procopios Mataronas Newport. 

236. George Mataronas " 

239. Robert P. Hall Westerly. 

241. Elvin M. Scott 

244. John Whitford 

245. Horace E. Sisson 

246. Asahel B. Larkin 

247. Adolphas Taylor Narragansett Pier. 

249. Thomas T. Saunders Westerly. 

250. Edward Andrews Wickford. 

253. 0. C. Manchester Little Compton. 

254. John Espanolia Newport. 

258. Seabury Mitchell Block Island. 

259. John Hall 

260. E. M. Slate 

261. Fred A. Slate 

262. Harry S. Champlin Narragansett Pier. 

263. Reuben McKenney 

264. Thomas W. Rhodes 

265. Joshua G. Champlin " 

266. Henry C. Whaley 

267. Alvin O. Gould 

268. Ottowell S. Dodge Block Island. 

272. Conrad Seibel Tiverton. 

273. Hem-y C. Johnson, 2d Hamilton. 

274. Manuel Mello Little Compton. 

275. Johns. Wilcox 

276. Frank W. Johnson Hamilton 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 21 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

277. John S. Petritis Jamestown. 

278. Constantine Frank Narragansett Pier. 

280. Alfred Peckham Tiverton. 

281. George A. Martin Newport. 

283. Charles J. Swanson Pawtucket. 

284. Ellis B. Wilbour Little Compton. 

285. William F. Freeborn Portsmouth. 

286. Leman Wardsworth Wickford. 

287. Charles W. Cowles Newport. 

288. Walter W.Weld 

289. Michael Frank Narragansett Pier. 

290. Joseph C. Silvia Little Compton. 

291. Willard F. Borden Tiverton. 

292. Clarence H. King Jamestown. 

293. John A. James Newport. 

294. George A. Babcock Peacedale. 

295. Nicholas Batilas Newport. 

296. Martin Thompson Prudence Island. 

297. Marcus M. Wilcox Tiverton. 

298. Edward Deconing Bristol. 

299. Albert H. Porter Dutch Island 

300. George E. Harris Jamestown. 

301. Manuel Silva 

302. Fred J. Buenzle Newport. 

303. Charles G. Galloway " 

304. Benjamin Johnson " 

306. Rudolph Schade Jamestown. 

309. Bernard Murphy Newport. 

313. Wilham P. Briggs Narragansett Pier. 

315. J. B. Urquhart Newport. 

315. John 0. Mowat 

316. Joshua F. Clarke Narragansett Pier. 

317. Harry D. Clarke 



22 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

320. Horace K. Webster Wakefield. 

321. Nicholas Petritis Jamestown. 

322. Arthur L. Bliven Westerly. 

323. William E. Smith Oakland Beach. 

324. Herbert Wilcox Charlestown. 

325. Howard P. Wilcox 

326. Stephen C. Peckham 

328. A. S. Dunn Block Island. 

329. Percy R. Brownell Portsmouth. 

330. Thomas P. George Jamestown. 

332. Anthony Axiotes Newport. 

333. Jacques A. Biastre " 

336. Max H. Rubendunst Bristol. 

337. Joseph E. Champlin Charlestown. 

338. Otis Hathaway .' Block Island. 

339. John Vreira Middletown. 

340. Ebenezer Crowell Conimicut. 

343. Everett A. Ball Block Island. 

344. Patrick H. Dillon Wakefield. 

347. Sidney C. Thomas Portsmouth. 

348. L. C. Luth Newport. 

349. Charles E. Larkin Westerly. 

350. John F. Council Newport. 

351. George G. Douglass Block Island. 

357. Walter S. H. Bliven Newport. 

360. Edwin W. Nash Watch Hill. 

361. William S. Webster Wakefield. 

363. Lycurgus G. Negus Block Island. 

364. Manuel Ramos NeA\'port. 

365. Arnold James " 

366. Royal B. Tingley Cranston. 

367. J. Attmore Wright • Wakefield. 

368. Odessas Booras Newport. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 23 

License 

No. Name. Location. 

369. William Christiansen Gooseberry Island. 

374. Edward A. Fitzgerald Wakefield. 

376. Charles A. James Newport. 

377. Alton H. Negus Tiverton. 

378. Edward M. Harvey Portsmouth. 

379. Ernest Andrea Newport. 

380. John Cauldfield Tiverton. 

381. Wilham H. Dickerson Warren. 

384. William E. Tefft Providence. 

386. Leon M. Champlin Narragansett Pier. 

387. Leland 0. Jeffers Warren. 

388. Christian Luth Newport. 

389. James Collins 

391. Joseph Rainey Warren. 

392. Guy Avalone Newport. 

393. Roy Bush Bristol. 

394. Joseph E. Holloway Richmond. 

395. George E. Hull Warren. 

398. James E. Dewey Block Island. 

399. Henry F. Weaver Newport. 

400. Frank E. Trask Warren. 

401. George L. Hoxsie Newport. 

405. Daniel W. Lasell Narragansett Pier. 

407. Louis Miller Saunderstown. 

410. John Coffinas Newport. 

413. August Weber " 

416. Erik Gustafson Tiverton. 

418. Leroy C. Wilbour Little Compton. 

419. Henry Bannister, Jr Wakefield. 

422. E. A. Larkin 

423. J. R. Larkin 

424. Josephine L. Towle 

425. Anest Vatikitocs Newport. 



24 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

FISH-TRAPS, SET IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 

A table giving the number and distribution of the fish-traps in 
Rhose Island waters for the past sixteen years is given below. 

In this table the following arbitrary divisions have been made for 
the sake of convenience. 

I. Providence River.- — South to a line joining Warwick Point and 
Popasquash Point. 

II. Greenwich Bay. — The West Passage south of Providence 
Eiver division and north of a line drawn east and west, touching 
the southern part of Hope Island. 

III. West Passage. — The West Passage south of the Greenwich 
Bay division, north of a line drawm due west from Beaver Tail and 
west of a line connecting the south pomt of Prudence Island and 
North Point, Conanicut Island. 

IV. Mount Hope Bay. — North of Railroad Bridge, Tiverton, and 
a Ime connecting Bristol Ferry and Mussel Shoal Light. 

V. East Passage. — South of Providence and Mount Hope Bay 
divisions and north of a line from Beaver Tail to Brenton's Point. 

VI. Sakonnet River.- — The Sakonnet River south of Railroad 
Bridge to a line connecting Flint Point and the Breakwater, Sakonnet 
Point. 

VII. Off Shore. — Traps south of above divisions and east of 
Point Judith, not including those off Block Island. 

VIII. Block Island. — Traps set off this island. 

IX. Watch Hill. — Traps set along the mainland of Rhode Island,, 
west of Point Judith. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



25 



Table VI. 
Table Showing Number and General Distribution of Fish-Traps Since 1898. 





0) 

s 

a 

o 
CM 


m 
'% 

a 
6 


1 


ffl 
(p 
§• 
K 
-t-» 
a 

3 
O 


<0 

-.J 

a 
a 
c 


6 

-.J 
IS 


o 

O 


5 

5 




"5 
o 


1898 


4 
3 

4 

7 

6 

7 

6 

6 

6 

7 

7 

7 

9 

10 

10 

10 


6 
10 
16 
15 
22 
21 
27 
26 
35 
37 
38 
31 
29 
30 
18 
18 


26 
23 
24 
24 
27 
32 
33 
33 
27 
30 
32 
32 
26 
20 
17 
17 


9 
11 
16 
13 
13 
13 

7 
11 
11 
12 
12 
12 
14 
13 
12 
13 


34 
35 
34. 
52 
52 
72 
78 
82 
80 
87 
87 
88 
92 
93 
90 
92 


15 
15 
12 
14 
14 
16 
14 
20 
20 
22 
22 
26 
20 
21 
21 
22 


25 
24.. 






119 


1899 






121 


1900 


29 
26 
27 
30 
40 
56 
64 
70 
73 
73 
71 
66 
68 
69 






135 


1901 






151 


1902 






161 


1903 






195 


1904 






220 


1905 


6 
6 
6 




240 


1906 


249 


1907 


271 


1908 


271 


1909 


8 
8 
10 
11 
11 


14 
14 
14 
15 


277 


1910 


283 


1911 


277 


1912 


261 


1913 


265 



DEEP WATER FISHING OFF NEWPORT, 1913. 

In general, the deep water fishing off Newport was not above the 
average. A noteworthy exception to this was the scup fishmg which 
was far ahead of that of 1912 and has not been equalled in a great 
many years. The first deep water trap was set off Newport about 
April 17, although about a week earlier a stub trap was set in shoal 
water near Price's Neck. Below Point Judith m the Watch Hill 
District traps were put in the latter part of March. No storms of 
any consequence were experienced during the best part of the season. 



26 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

Scwp. — (Stenotomus chrysops). — The first reported catch of scup 
in Rhode Island waters in 1913 came as usual from traps off Point 
Judith and consisted of about a bushel. These were brought into 
Newport on April the 14th. Four days later, April 18, the first of 
these fish were taken off Newport. The catch of scup reached the 
"barrel-lot" stage off Point Judith April 20th, and about the same 
date one firm off Newport caught two barrels. From this time on the 
number of scup increased rapidly and by May 9th, the usual empound- 
ing began. Good catches continued throughout the month of May, 
and a few were being caught as late as the latter part of June. The 
main run was over about May 31 and by June 18 there was little 
shipment except from pounds where thousands of barrels were still 
retained. The most conspicuous points about the 1913 season were 
the number of days in which the run continued, the large size of 
the fish and also the presence of great quantities of small ones. One 
firm was obliged to dump two traps to get rid of the small scup and 
thus make room for the market sized ones. An mteresting item and 
one which bears on the question as to where the scup go at the 
approach of cold weather was the takmg of a good sized scup off 
Jamesto\sTi in February and also one at High Hill Pomt m the 
Sakonnet River in the month of March. The extent of the run of 
scup as compared with that of previous years may be seen in Table 
VII on page 28 of this report. 

Mackerel (Scomber scombrus).- — The first catch of mackerel on 
the Atlantic Coast was made off Chincoteague, Virginia, on April 11. 
The first in near-by waters were taken m traps off Cuttyhunk on 
April the 27th. On April 28th, four large ones were taken in traps 
off Newport. Around May the 5th, large ones rmming from four 
to five and one-half pounds each were taken in nearly all places on 
our shore, but in small lots. May 26th, the first large catch in a 
trap was made and consisted of 21 barrels. The mackerel season in 
local waters was very poor. June the 8th seems to have been the 
record day for shipments from Newport, when twelve thousand 
mackerel, running about 45 to the barrel, were shipped. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 27 

Tinker Mackerel, appeared outside in great numbers May 15th. 

Squiteague. — (Cynoscion regalis.) — The catch of squiteague or 
weakfish, in the traps off Newport in 1913 was very poor. The 
earhest reported was made on April 23rd in the scup traps but not 
until May 14th in the traps off Third Beach, Newport. The best 
catches were made about June 23rd, although no large catches were 
made this year. A comparison with other years will be seen in Table 
X on page 29. 

Butter fish (Poronotus tricanthus). — A few butterfish were caught 
around April 22nd, mixed m with other fish. The large rmi however 
did not occur until considerable later. The first big catch of the 
season occurring June 3rd. There were large quantities of small 
fish all through the season. For the comparison of the first appear- 
ance for a number of years of these fish and others mentioned below 
see Table XI on page 30. 

Striped Bass (Roccus lineatus). — The first catch of striped bass 
in Rhode Island waters in 1913 was on April 14th. By the 21st of 
April the catches had increased to barrel lots. Some large catches 
were made the first of November, when one day's haul amounted to 
eleven thousand pounds. Good average catches were made bj'- all. 
One factor of the season was the large catch of these fish by the 
Gray Brothers as far up as Prudence Island, a greater distance inland 
than these fish have been caught in recent years. 

Sea Bass (Centropristes striatus). — Sea bass were first taken 
in the traps on April 26th. The majority of these fish taken durmg 
the season were unusually large. 

Sea Robins (Prionotus carolinus). — There were not enough of 
these fish caught to supply the demands of the market and the 
majority were small. The first catch was on April 26th. 

Squid. — The demand for this species of mollusk was very poor, 
and the catch was nothing extra. They were first noticed in the 
traps about April 23rd, and at that time were exceptionally large, 
some measuring eighteen mches in length. 



28 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



The first Swordfish was captured on June the 18th. 

On May 7th a Drunifish (Pogonias cromis) which is quite rare in 
these waters was caught in the traps. 

April 16th, four barrels of young Pollock were caught off the Training 
Station at Newport. This is farther inland than these fish usually 
come. 



Table VII. 
Calendar of S cup Season off Newport, 1906-1913. 



1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


First appearance. . . 
Run commences . . . 
Run ends 


April 20. 

May 1. 

June 15. 

May 5 

to 
June 4. 


May 2. 

May 10. 

June 24. 

May 21 

to 

June 10. 


April 23. 

April 29. 

June 9. 

April 29 

to 
June 1. 


April 19. 

May 1. 

June 14. 

May 10 

to 
June 7. 


April 24. 

May 8. 

June 22. 

May 13 

to 
June 5. 


April 26. 

May 12. 

June 20. 

May 14 

to 
June 1. 


April 24. 

May 1. 

June 10. 

May 14 

to 
June 1. 


April 14. 
April 25. 
June 18 


Most abundant. . . . 


April 29 

to 
May 31. 



Table VIII. 

Calendar of Mackerel Season off Newport, 1906-1913. 





1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


First caught in trap. 

First large shipment 

from Newport. . . 


May 4. 
May 14. 


May 2. 
May 17. 


April 27. 
May 14. 


April 17. 
May 4. 


April 23. 
May 16. 


May 6. 
May 27. 


May 3. 
May 22. 


April 28. 
May 26. 


Most abundant. . . . 


June 4 


June 11 


May 25 


May 16 


May 16 


May 27 


May 22 


May 26 




to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 




June 30, 


July 5. 


July 1. 


July 1. 


July 25. 


June 21.; June 20. 


June 20. 


Record day 


June 4. 


July 1. 


June 20. May 24. 


June 10. 


May 27. 


June 12. 


June 8. 


Season ends at New- 


Near end 
of 


Near end 
of 


Near end 
of 


Near 
middle 


Near end 
of 


Near 


Near end 


July 29. 




Aug. 1. of 






July. 


July. 


July, 


of July. 


July. 


July. 





COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



29 



Table IX. 
Appearance of Tinker Mackerel, 1905-1913. 



Year. 


First 
Appearance. 


1905 


June 25. 


1906 . 


June 4. 


1907 


June 10. 


1908 


May 27. 


1909 


June 17. 


1910 


July 1. 


1911 


July 15. 


1912 . . . 


June 10. 


1913 ; 


May 15. 







Table X. 
Catch of Squiteague in Scup Traps off Newport, 1906-1913. 



1906. 



1907. 



1909. 1910. 



1911. 



1913. 



"Stragglers" first 
appearance 



Commencement of 



May 4. 
June 10. 



May 21. 
June 20. 



May 7. 
June 6. 



May 19. 
June 17. 



April 9. 
June 20. 



May 15. 
June 15. 



May 13. 
June 7. 



April.22. 
June 23. 



30 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

Table XI. 
First Appearance of Various Marketable Fish in Traps off Newport, 1906-1913. 



1906. 



1909. 



1910. 



1911. 



Butterfish 

Horsemackerel . 

King Fish 

Mackerel 

Sea Bass 

Sea Robins. . . . 

Scup 

Squid 

Squiteague . . . 
Striped Bass. . 



April 16. 



May 10. 



May 4. 



April 30. 
April 20. 
May 4. 
May 4. 
April 31. 



May 2. 
May 8. 
May 9. 
May 2. 
May 10, 
May 21, 
May 16. 



April 28. 
June 25. 
May 8. 
April 27. 
May 5. 
April 27. 
April 23. 
April 27. 
May 7. 
April 24. 



April 21. 
June 17. 
May 4. 
April 17. 
May 4. 
May 1. 
April 19. 
May 1. 
May 19. 
April 21. 



April 22. 
July 16. 
May 4. 
April 23. 
May 1. 
April 2*1. 
April 24. 
April 20. 
April 9. 
April 20. 



May 2. 

July 15. 

! May 13. 

\ May 6. 

j May 4. 

\ April 27. 
1 
April 26. 

April 28. 

May 13. 

April 22. 



May 21. 



May 10. 
May 3. 
April 30. 
April 24. 
April 24. 
May 1. 
May 13. 
April 24. 



April 22. 
July 18. 
May 6. 
April 28. 
April 25. 
April 26. 
April 14. 
April 23. 
April 22. 
April 13. 



TUNA FISHING. 

For more than a year your Commission has considered the possibil- 
ity of developing the tmia fishing off Block Island. No one who has 
witnessed in the latter part of the summer off Block Island the 
magnificent leaps of the fish locally called the horse-mackerel can 
doubt its identity with the famous leaping tuna of Southern Cali- 
fornia. Not alone an identity of species, which is easily established, 
but also an identity in game qualities. For there the fish leaps in 
pursuit of the flymg fish, while here, the fish which is pursued rarely 
if ever leaves the water even when closely pressed. To such an 
extent has this idea of the importance of the tuna fishery near Block 
Island grown in the mmds of your Commissioners that this past 
summer investigations were begun as a result of which it is con- 
fidently expected that this year the initial steps will be taken in the 
establishment of such a fishery. This industry brings thousands of 
dollars each year to Catalina Island, in California, and why not here 
where conditions are similar? In order that the possibilities lying 
at our door may be knovMi some facts which were brought out in 
the investigation are here given. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 31 

THE TUNA 

This famous game fish of the mackerel family is known along the 
Atlantic seaboard as the horse-mackerel, on the Pacific Coast, as the 
leaping tmia, and to scientists as Thunnus thynnus, tunny, or tuna 
fish. 

In New England waters, particularly at Block Island, this fish 
has in the past two or three years attained considerable prominence 
not only as a food fish for the markets, but as a game fish for the ardent 
sportsman who enjoj^s the taking of large fish with the lightest 
possible tackle. 

For the past five years these fish have been fairly plentiful at Block 
Island and vicinity. While many specimens have been taken in 
traps and by harpoon that have weighed upwards of six hundred 
pomids each, the average weight is much less. Large numbers have 
been caught with hook and line during the past two seasons weighing 
from fifteen to seventy-five pounds each. Nearly all of these fish 
have been taken by the native Block Island fishermen and have been 
caught with wood jigs painted with aluminum and attached to stout 
hand lines. It is the smaller sizes only that are caught with hand 
lines, it bemg almost impossible to handle the large sizes without 
breakmg either line or jig or tearmg the mouth of the fish. The 
method of capturing the large sizes with harpoon is by "chummmg" 
around the boat with small fish and pieces of fish mitil a large Tuna, 
attracted b}^ the bait, ventures sufficiently near to be harpooned in 
the same manner as the swordfish. 

During the past season the price paid in the markets for the Tuna 
or horse mackerel has been sufficiently remunerative to induce the 
hand-lme fishermen to devote a large proportion of their time to 
this industry. At four to five cents per pound, which has bee i the 
average market price, the smaller sizes would average more than one 
dollar each and while the fish were runnmg, twenty-five fish per day 
to a boat has been no unusual catch. 

As a game fish the fame of the Tuna has spread throughout the 
world. At Catalina Island, on the California Coast, large hotels 



32 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

are supported, hundreds of fishermen with their boats are annually 
employed by the army of sportsmen who visit the island each year 
for the purpose of angling for the Tuna and other smaller game 
fishes, with rod and reel and light tackle. So popular has the sport 
become that the boatmen do no fishmg themselves, and will not 
permit a hand-line to be used from their boats. 

In the year 1898 the fishing for the Leaping Tuna (so named on 
account of its high leaps when pursuing its prey, the flymgfish), 
resulted in the formation by many of the leading sportsmen of this 
country and Europe, of the Tuna Club, with headquarters and 
beautiful club house at Avalon, Catalina Island. With its motto, 
"fair play to game fishes" strictly lived up to, this club has by precept 
and example, established a high standard of sport, not only at Catalina 
Island, but all over this country. , Its tournaments have been partici- 
pated in. by enthusiasts from Maine to California, who have gladly 
accepted the rules and regulations laid down by the club, restricting 
the size and weight of rods and length and caliber of line. Valuable 
prizes are offered at these annual tournaments, thereby increasing 
the mterest in sea angling and adding to the membership of the club. 

Your Commission believes that what has been accomplished in 
California may, in a measure at least, be done in Rhode Island. The 
Tuna are here in large numbers. The shoals in the vicinity of 
Block Island and Point Judith appear to furnish natural feeding 
grounds for the immense schools of the fish that congregate there 
during the months of early autumn. The hand-line fishermen have 
proven beyond doubt their readiness to rise to the bait. Surely 
the Tuna will not refuse the same bait simply because the line is 
attached to rod and reel instead of bemg held in the hand. As a 
matter of fact, though not generally kno^^•n, several Ehode Island 
sportsmen and even one or two from more remote points have tried 
them out with rod and reel with sufficient measure of success to 
demonstrate that with proper tackle and equipment, experienced 
boatmen, and some practical experience, the sport should be in every 
way equal to that in California waters. That interest in the sport is 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 33 

growing is evidenced by many inquiries received by this Commission 
during the past season from sportsmen Uving in other states as well 
as Rhode Island. If this interest can be maintained and increased 
and the sport popularized to the extent of inducing the Tuna 
fishermen to visit our shores, an entirely new source of income for 
our native fishermen and boatmen should result. Thousands of 
dollars are annually paid to the boatmen of Catalina Island, and many 
more thousands paid to the proprietors of hotels and vendors of 
supplies and fishing tackle. 

As evidence of the magnitude of this industry from a commercial 
standpoint we append a statement furnished by Mr. Andrew V. 
Willis, Deputy Lobster Commissioner at Block Island. 

Block Island, January 12, 1914. 
INIr. Charles W. Willard, 

President, Commission of Inland Fisheries, 
Westerly, R. I. 

Dear Sir: — . . . (In regard to) the report on Tuna fishing 
at Block Island that you asked me to look up and send to you, 
would say, that it has been quite a job to get the true account, but 
at last I thmk I have it and am sending it to you according to the 
best of my knowledge and (that of) the best Tima fishermen here. 

From the 25th of July to 20th of October, 10,000 were caught by 
hook and Ime, averagmg from 15 to 30 lbs. In (the) same period 500 
in traps, averaging 500 to 800 lbs., and caught with swordfish iron 
around 150 from September 10th to October 10, averaging from 
400 to 900 lbs. 

This report is verified by, 

Rep. H. K. LITTLEFIELD, 
N. B. ROSE, Tuna Fisherman, 
M. S. BARBER, Tuna Fisherman. 

Yours verj'- truly, 

(Signed) ANDREW V. WILLIS, 

Deputy Lobster Commissioner. 



34 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

Your Commission believes that the sportsmen of the United 
States should be told of the possibilities suggested by the facts above 
enumerated, and that it is the duty of the Rhode Island Commission 
to encourage and foster this possible new industry for the citizens 
of the State. 

Another phase of this same industry is the possibility of more 
effectually preparing the products of this fishery for the market. 
In California as may be seen from the following quotation from an 
article written by Mr. Wiseman for the Fishing Gazette, there is 
a very considerable industry established in canning tuna. 

"Perhaps at no time in the history of the fish business has a new 
canned fish met with such instant public favor, in so comparatively 
short a time, as has tuna fish. Considering the very little advertising 
that has been done by the Pacific Coast packers, it is really remarkable 
the rapid growth the hidustry has enjoyed. The deliciousness and 
the wholesomeness, together with its economical features (packed 
without skin, bones or water) , has in a great measure been the cause 
of its popularity, and the advertising has been done mainly by word 
of mouth. 

"The industry is in reality about three years old, although tima 
was put up ten years ago, but was not forced on the market, owing 
to many objectionable features which had to be eliminated in order 
to produce a finished palatable product. The principal objection 
was an excess of fish oil, which at that time they had no Imowledge 
of a process for removing. This has been overcome, however, and 
now 95 per cent, of the fish oil is extracted before the product goes 
into the cans. 

"The American tuna fish must not be confused with the Italian 
tunny, caught in the Mediterranean Sea, which possibly belongs to 
the same family, but weighs on an average of 1,000 pounds, so 
naturally is a tougher, darker, coarser-grained meat, resembling veal, 
while the American tuna resembles more the white meat of chicken. 

"The tmia caught on the Pacific Coast belongs to the mackerel 
family, and the average weight is about 30 or 35 lbs. There are four 
species of tuna which inhabit the waters of the Pacific Coast, princi- 
pally north of San Diego and south of Santa Barbara, between the Cal- 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 35 

ifornia mainland and Catalina Island. This seems to form a basi n 
in which they live from May mitil the later part of November, du e, 
no doubt, to the even temperature of the water. After they leave 
these waters we have no definite knowledge as to their whereabouts. 

"The four varieties are known as the Leaping Tuna, Bonita, 
Skipjack and Albacore, the latter being the one preferred by the 
packers, owmg to the tenderness and larger quantity of white meat. 
The name Albacore is derived from two Latm words, Alba (White) , 
and Cor (Heart). Though if the four above-mentioned fish were 
of even size and laid side by side, no one but the experienced could 
denote any particular difference. There is very little difference in 
the shape, but the fin of the Albacore is blue, while the Leaping Tuna 
has a yellow fin. 

"The Leaping Tuna has probably done more to make Catalina 
Island famous as a resort than anything else. Anglers from all 
over the world visit Catalina to fish for tuna. The fish is an unusually 
game one, and the tuna clubs offer a gold button to the angler who 
catches a 20-lb. or larger tmia, on a regulation rod and reel. The 
possessors of these buttons are not numerous, and it is considered 
an honor to own one of them, at least it is so considered by men who 
enjoy fishhig for tmia. Flying fish is preferred as a bait by tuna 
anglers. 

"This brings me to the subject of baiting for tuna. We have 
no known fish in these waters that are more particular as to their 
eating. They are not scavengers in the slightest sense of the word, 
but, on the contrary, are unusually particular regarding their diet. 
They prefer sardines, small mackerel, herring and anchovy. This 
must be live bait, nothing dead will tempt them. The tuna boats 
are therefore all equipped to carry live bait, and, although fishermen 
sometimes school the fish by attractmg their attention with com- 
meal, all of the tuna that is caught for the tuna canneries of the 
Pacific Coast is caught with hook, line and live bait. 

"Up to this time the Japanese have rather monopolized the fishing 
end of the industry. I know of no reason why this should be so, as 
any thrifty fisherman of any other nationality would receive con- 
siderable encouragement from the tuna packers, if he cared to come 
into this lucrative field. It is nothing miusual for one of these fishing 
boats to brmg in five or six thousand pounds of tuna after fishing 
several hours. 



36 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

"The fish are all cleaned at sea, heads severed and entrails removed, 
then they are brought to the cannery, and are ready for the first 
cooking, which takes place immediately. During this process of 
cooking the fish is deprived of the objectionable fish oil. After 
this cooking the skin, bones and dark meat are removed, being used 
in the manufacture of fertilizer, yielding about seven miits of organic 
nitrogen. The second cookmg is required to complete the process, 
this being done after the tuna is sealed in the cans. 

"For the buyers of tuna fish who are not so familiar with the 
proper appearance of a perfect pack, it might be well to add that a pure 
olive oil pack has not met with the same degree of approval as a 
blend of salad and olive oils. The straight olive oil pack seems to 
have a tendency to grow stronger with age, which has not been the 
case with blended oils. 

"This pack should be a solid pack of large chunks of white meat 
only, without an excess of oils, but with the proper amomit to saturate 
a given quantity of fish. A pinkish cast to the contents is quite 
an objection, masmuch as it shows a presence of blood, due to improper 
drainage and cooking. A certain amomit of salt is necessary for 
seasoning, but this could be very easity overdone and requ ires extra 
care in packmg. 

"Tuna fish has a distinct place of its own, and is not a substitute 
for salmon, or any other fish. On the contrary, being a game fish 
of superior quality, we predict it is destined to be known in all the 
markets of the world." 



ENFORCEMENT OF STATE LAWS. 

Four deputies were employed in 1913 to enforce the lobster laws. 
Two for the entire year, and two additional ones stationed at Block 
Island during the open season. 

The following prosecution was made and fine imposed and paid 
under the lobster laws (the names of those fined are omitted) : 

Newport, June 21, 46 short lobsters 20 lobsters $100.00 

(Suspended sentence on 26 lobsters.) 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 37 

In the enforcement of the laws relating to the fresh-water fisheries, 
your Commission has employed a nmnber of deputies m various 
sections of the State who serve without compensation. 

The general fisheries laws of the State are hi an almost hopeless 
tangle. Beginning in the early part of the eighteenth century for 
two hundred years laws have been enacted seekmg to correct local 
and often temporary conditions. Later, the greater part of these 
were repealed and replaced by others. Some however were not 
repealed, but rendered ineffective through the passage of other and 
different laws relatmg to the same subject. In many causes it is 
doubtful if convictions could be obtained from laws existing on our 
statute books today. It is the sincere desire of this Commission that 
at some early date these laws may be thoroughly overhauled. 



BIOLOGICAL RECORDS. 

Physical and Biological records of various kmds have been con- 
tinued at the Wickford Hatchery and Experiment Station. 



AN EXHIBIT OF SEA FARMING. 

Under the above heading your Commission prepared as in years 
past an exhibit of marine and fresh-water fishes at the Washhigton 
County Fair which was viewed as usual by large crowds. The 
expenses of operating this exhibit is borne almost entirely by the 
Agricultural Society, and inasmuch as it furnishes a means of interest- 
ing a large number of people in the fisheries of the State your 
Commission has readily assented to contmue it. 



CO-OPERATION WITH FISHERIES AUTHORITIES. 

In accord with the duties as prescribed by the General Assembly, 
your Commission has been in touch with the fisheries boards both 



38 COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 

ill this country and abroad and occasion is here taken to thankfully 
acknowledge the courtesies received. 

The meeting of the American Fisheries Society in Boston was 
attended by the members of your Commission. Two of their number 
were elected to important offices. 



THE PROPAGATION OF LOBSTERS AT THE WICKFORD 
HATCHERY AND EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The lobster rearing at Wickford in 1913 in point of numbers was 
not as successful as in the previous year owing to the lack of egg 
lobsters during the rearing season. The unusually warm winter had 
caused the eggs to hatch before the egg lobsters were taken which 
resulted m a fewer number of spawners in the earlier part of the year. 
No miusual features are to be noted in reportuig on the season's work, 
although it should be stated that all the fry were reared beyond the 
fourth stage before they were liberated. The season opened May 
31st, and closed in the earlier part of August. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 



39 



Table XII. 
Total Number of Fourth atid Fifth Stage Lobsters Reared Each Year Since 1900. 



Year. 


IV. 


V. 


1900 . 


3,425 

8.974 

27.300 

13,500 

50,597 

103,572 

189,384 

294,896 

322,672 

178,542 

511,274 

*299,042 

*521,861 

*469,344 




1901 




1902 




1903. 




1904 




1905 




1906 


24,800 


1907 . 


4,900 


1908 


5,481 


1909. 




1910 


28,372 


1911 




1912 




1913 










Total 


2,986,383 


63,553 









*The entire number of lobsters liberated in 1911, 1912 and 1913 were in the latter part of the 
fourth stage and beyond. 



TITLES OF SPECIAL PAPERS PUBLISHED IN THE ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES 

OF THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND. 



1. Mead, A. D. The Starfish. (First paper.) Twenty-eighth Annual Report. 1898. 

2. Mead, A. D. The Starfish. (Second paper.) Twenty-ninth Annual Report. 1899. 

3. Tower, R. W. Improvementsin the Methods of Preparation of Fish for Shipment. Twenty- 

ninth Annual Report. 1899. 

4. BuMPUS, H. C. The Extension of the Commercial Fisheries of the State. Twenty-ninth 

Annual Report. 1899. 

5. Kellog, J. L. The Life History of the Common Clam. Twenty-ninth Annual Report. 

1899. 

6. Mason, N. R. A List of the Diatoms Found in the Water over the Clam, Mussel, and Oyster 

Beds in Narraganaett Bay. Thirtieth Annual Report. 1900. 

7. Mead, A. D. Observations on the Soft-shell Clam. Thirtieth Annual Report. 1900. 

8. Mead, A. D. Observations on the Soft-shell Clam. (Second paper.) Thirty-first Annual 

Report. 1901. 

9. RissER, J. R. Habits and Life History of the Scallop. Thirty-first Annual Report. 1901. 

10. Mead, A. D. Habits and Growth of Young Lobsters and Experiments in Lobster Culture. 

Thirty-first Annual Report. 1901. 

11. Mead, A. D. Observations on the Soft-shell Clam. (Third paper.) Thirty-second Annual 

Report. 1902. 

12. Mead, A. D. Habits and Growth of Young Lobsters and Experiments in Lobster Culture. 

(Second paper.) Thirty-second Annual Report. 1902. 

13. Mead, A. D. and Williams, L. W. Habits and Growth of the Lobster and Experiments 

in Lobster Culture. (Third paper.) Thirty-third Annual Report. 1903. 

14. Mead, A. D. and Barnes, E. W. Observations on the Soft-shell Clam. (Fouith paper.) 

Thirty-third Annual Report. 1903. 

15. Mead, A. D. and Barnes, E. W. Observations on the Soft-shell Clam. (Fifth paper.) 

Thirty-fourth Annual Report. 1904. 

16. Barnes, E. W. Prehminary Inquiry into the Natural History of the Paddler Crab (Calli- 

nectes hastatus) with Remarks on the Soft-shell Crab Industry of Rhode Island. Thirty- 
fourth Annual Report. 1904. 

17. Mead, A. D. Experiments in Lobster Culture. (Fourth paper.) Thirty-fourth Annual 

Report. 1904. 

18. Mead, A. D. Experiments in Lobster Culture. (Fifth paper.) Thirty-fifth Annual Report. 

1905. 

19. Hadley, p. B. Changes in Form and Color in Successive Stages of the American Lobster. 

Thirty-fifth Annual Report. 1905. 

20. Emmel, V. E. The Regeneration of Lost Parts in the Lobster. Thirty-fifth Annual Report. 

1905. 

21. Tracy, H. C. A List of the Fishes of Rhode Island. Plates I-XII. Thirty-sixth Annual 

Report. 1906. 

22. Tracy, H. C. The Common Fishes of the Herring Family. Plates VII-XII. Thirty- 

sixth Annual Report. 1906. 



COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES. 41 

23. Barnes, E. W. Methods of Protecting and Propagating the Lobster, with a Brief Out- 

line of its Natural History. Plates XIII-XXVI and XXVIII, XXXI, XXXII, XXXVI. 
Thirty-sixth Annual Report. 1906. 

24. Hadley, p. B. Regarding the Rate of Growth of the American Lobster. Plates XXVI- 

XXXVII, and XL. Thirty-sixth Annual Report. 1906. 

25. Hadlet, p. B. Observations on Some Influences of Light upon the Larval and Early Adoles- 

cent Stage of Homarus Americans. Plates XXXVIII-XL. Thirty-sixth Annual Report. 
1906. 
27. Emmel, V. E. The Relation of Regeneration to the Molting Process in the Lobster. Plates 
XL-XLI. Thirty-sixth Annual Report. 1906. 
■ 28. Tract, H. C. The Fishes of Rhode Island, III. The Fishes of the Mackerel Family. 
Thirty-seventh Annual Report, 1907. 

29. Tracy, H. C. A List of Rare Fishes taken in Rhode Island in the year 1906. Thirty- 

seventh Annual Report, 1907. 

30. Williams, Dr. Leonard W. List of the Rhode Island Copepoda, Phyllopoda, and Ostra- 

coda, with new species of Copepoda. Thirty-seventh Annual Report. 1907. 

31. Emmel, V. E. Regenerated and Abnormal Appendages in the Lobster. Thirty-seventh 

Annual Report. 1907. 

32. Williams, L. W. The Stomach of the Lobster and the Food of Larval Lobsters. Thirty- 

seventh Annual Report. 1907. 

33. Hadley, P. B. Regarding the Behavior of the Larval and Early Adolescent Stages of the 

American Lobster. Thirty-seventh Annual Report. 1907. 

34. Barnes, E. W. Lobster Culture at Wickford, Rhode Island, in 1906. Thirty-seventh 

Annual Report. 1907. 

35. Barnes, E. W. Lobster Culture at Wickford, Rhode Lsland, in 1907. Thirty-eighth Annual 

Report. 1908. 

36. Tract, H. C. The Fishes of Rhode Island, V. The Flatfishes. Thirty-eighth Annual 

Report. 1908. 

37. Tracy, H. C. The Fishes of Rhode Island, VI. A Description of two young Specimens 

of Squeteague {Cijnoscion reijalis) , with Notes on the Rate of their Growth. Thirty-eighth 
Annual Report. 1908. 

38. Emmel, V. E. The Problem of Feeding in Artificial Lobster Culture. Thirty-eighth Annual 

Report. 1908. 

39. Tract, H. C. The Fishes of Rhode Island, VII. The Life History of the Common Eel. 

Thirty-ninth Annual Report. 1909. 

40. Sullivan, W. E. Notes on the Crabs Found in Narragansett Bay. Thirty-ninth Annual 

Report. 1909. 

41. Mead, A. D. A Method of Fish Culture and of Transporting Live Fishes. Thirty-ninth 

Annual Report. 1909. (Paper Presented Before the Fourth International Fishery Con- 
gress, Washington, 1908.) 

42. Mead, A. D. A Method of Lobster Culture. Thirty-ninth Annual Report. 1909. (Paper 

Presented Before the International Fishery Congress. Washington, 1909.) 

43. Tract, H. C. Annotated List of Fishes Known to Inhabit the Waters of Rhode Island. 

Fortieth Annual Report. 1910. 

44. Barnes, E. W. Notes on the Spring and Summer Fishing in Deep Water off Newport 

During the Years 1905-1909. Fortieth Annual Report. 1910. 

45. Barnes, E. W. The Plague of Sea Clams at Easton's Beach, Newport. Fortieth Annual 

Report. 1910. 

46. Hadley, P. B. Additional Notes Upon the Development of the Lobster. Fortieth Annual 

Report. 1910. 

47. Barnes, E. W. Revised Edition of Methods of Protecting and Propagating the Lobster 

with a Brief Outline of its Natural History. Plates IV-XXIV. Forty-first Annual 
Report. 1911. 
6