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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

PRESENTED TO THE ^ QJ ^ 








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City Document, — No. 88. 



CITY OF BOSTON 




REPORT 



OF THE 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



TO THE 



CITY COUNCIL OP BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR 1866-67, 



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/ 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Board of Aldermen, April 29, 1867. 

Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to submit their Annual Report in print. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

CHAS. W. SLACK, Chairman. 

In Common Council, May 2, 1867. 
Concurred. 

WESTON LEWIS, President. 

Approved May 3, 1867. 

OTIS NORCROSS, Mayor7 



REPORT. 



Office of the Cochituate "Water Board, 
Boston, May 21, 1867. 

To THE City Council. 

The Cochituate Water Board respectfully present this their 
report for the year ending April 30th, 1867. The ordinance 
which passed the City Council in December 1865, authorizing 
the Water Board to change their financial year to correspond 
with that of other departments of the City Government, has fully 
answered the anticipations originally formed by the Board, in 
remedying former apparent discrepancies between their accounts, 
and those of the Treasurer and Auditor. 

The tables submitted by the City Engineer, giving quantities 
consumed, levels of the lake and reservoirs, rain fall, etc., are 
made up for the calendar year as heretofore. 

The Income for the year 1866, as appears by the report of 
the Water Registrar, was $487,576.25, being $36,196.77, in 
excess of that of the previous year. " 

During the four months from January 1, 1867 to 
May 1, 1867, there was received in advance, 
for water to be delivered during the year . $362,674 12 

And for water used in previous years . . 43,205 62 

Total water rates received in the four months . $405,879 74 
And to this the Registrar estimates will be added 

from new customers and meter bills . . 94,120 26 



Anticipated income for the year 1867 . . $500,000 00 



b CITY DOCUMENT. —No. 88. 

The expenditure for the year ending May 1, 1867, was: — 
For current expenses . . . . . $122,207 37 

Interest and premium on the water debt . . 483,451 82 

Whole amount paid out . . . . $605,659 19 
The Treasurer has credited the Water Works for 
the same year, out of the amounts received as 
above . $530,526 80 

The balance of the receipts having been credited 
to the Water Works, in his accounts of the pre- 
vious year^ shows an expenditure over and 
above our income, for the financial year of 
1866-7, of 75,132 39 

Which, with . 267,601 60 

expended on the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, in the 

same year, adds to the cost of the works . $342,733 99 

Cost of the Water Works to May 1, 1866, includ- 
ing interest and premium on debt, less received 
for water rates, rents, etc. .... 6,771,975 15 



Making the net cost. May 1, 1867 . . .$7,114,709 14 

The improvement made by the amendment to the water ordi- 
nance in December 1865, suggests the propriety of still further 
alterations. The annual accounts of this department are now 
made up for the financial year, — as are those of the Trea- 
surer and Auditor, — but our bills, excepting only to those who 
draw through meters, are made for the calendar year, thus com- 
plicating our statements and reports. If the ordinance be further 
changed, so as to permit the bills to be made for the four months 
commencing January 1, and ending April 30, and thereafter be 
made for the year commencing on the first day of May in each 
year, this inconvenience will be avoided. 

It was intended to complete the raising of the Tremont Street 



EEPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD. i 

mains last summer, those requiring it lying between Newton 
and Lenox streets, but the time and attention of the Board and 
its oflQcers being constantly needed elsewhere, and especially 
at the new reservoir, it was delayed until this season. Arrange- 
ments have lately been made to proceed with the work forth- 
with, and it is expected that the last section will be raised and 
the street put in good condition for travel by the first of Octo- 
ber next. 

The improvement by the city of Tremont Street and Chand- 
ler Street at and near the bridge over the Worcester Railroad, 
made it necessary to erect anew bridge outside of the travelled 
bridge, for the purpose of carrying the two mains over the rail- 
road J and at the request of the Committee on Streets, it was 
erected and the pipes removed from fhe old to the new bridge, 
under the direction of this Board, and the expense thereof 
charged to the account of Widening Streets, etc. The bridge 
was built of iron, and is in no way connected with the bridge for 
travel ; thus avoiding any jar there would otherwise be. Thus 
far it has given entire satisfaction. It may be found expedient 
to cover it with an iron roof, to protect the pipes from the rays 
of the sun. 

To avoid any large and unnecessary expenditure upon the 
East Boston reservoir, frequent examinations and discussions 
have been had as to the cause of the leaks and the best way of 
remedying them ; and last fall experiments were commenced and 
have been continued until this time, with a view to discover 
if possible the weak points. We find that it will hold water 
to the height of ten feet, but leaks if carried above that. This 
reservoir was built by contract in 1850, and has always leaked 
when filled ; and we not yet having discovered through our experi- 
ments, as was hoped we might, any particular point in the pud- 
dle bank defective ; and with the further uncertainty before us 
as to whether or not the banks yield to a greater pressure than 
a head of ten feet, — it has been concluded to continue the inves- 



o CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 88. 

tigations and find the cause of the leak if possible before 
deciding upon the remedy. 

The system of inspection instituted in the fall of 1864, with 
a view to check wastes, has more than answered the expecta- 
tions of the Board, and will be continued in operation. As 
soon as it was fully understood by consumers, the inspectors 
were cheerfully admitted by all those whose fixtures were in 
good condition, and others who intended to have theirs so ; but 
they were not always welcomed by the few who are generally 
improvident, and do not look beyond their own immediate wants. 
The often-repeated statement made in former reports 
of waste through hopper closets, it is necessary here again 
to reiterate. There exists to a considerable extent the 
mistaken idea that a continuous dribbling stream running 
through them purifies and keeps them clean, whereas a dash of 
one or two quarts of water is more effectual than such a stream 
running for hours. That this wasteful fixture may be improved 
in construction, as it easily can be, it is intended to apply to 
the City Council more formally than we now do to authorize 
the Board to fix such prices for difierent kinds of water closets 
as they may from time to time deem equitable and expedient. 

As appears by the table of the levels of the Lake, the supply 
for 1866 was nearly equal to the average supply for the previous 
five years; and by the table of the daily average draft from the 
Brookline Reservoir in 1866, the consumption, including waste, 
averages 12,229,000 wine gallons daily, l)eing an average of 
3,845,160 gallons less each day than the average draft for the 
previous five years. 

To the ready acquiescence by the consumers generally, in the 
course taken by the Board, and their observance of the appeals 
made to them in the fall of 1864, — to stop wastes and all 
unnecessary drafts of water, — may fairly be attributed the fact, 
that they had a constant supply during the two last months of 
that year and the two first of the year following. It may appear 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 9 

upon the first glance at the tables giving the levels of the Lake, 
that there was no probability of the supply failing, there being in 
December 1864, five and iVtr feet of water above the bottom of 
the Conduit; the lowest point reached since the works were con- 
structed, but it must be borne in mind, that the quantity contained 
in a foot in depth at that point is not equal to one half of that 
in a foot in depth at the surface when the Lake is full, and as it 
is further drawn down, so in a compound ratio is the decrease of 
water. Beside if drawn down much below five feet above the 
bottom of the Conduit, the quantity daily required, supposing 
it to be no more than in 1866, cannot be supplied, as the aver- 
age depth run in that year was nearly four feet and eleven inches. 
Had the Lake so fallen off that only three feet could have been 
run, it would have been necessary to restrict the use of the water 
for a time, to domestic purposes only ; and consequently a large 
proportion of our factories and workshops would have been 
stopped in their operations, causing no little pecuniary distress 
among the industrial classes, and thereby materially affecting the 
growth and prosperity of the city. 

Since the death of Mr. Knowlton, Superintendent of the 
Western Division, in March 1866, the especial charge thereof 
has been intrusted to the Chairman of the Committee on that 
division, —assisted by Mr. A. Stanwood, our Superintendent at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, who has lately been chosen Superin- 
tendent of the Western Division. 

In the year 1865 the Lake was full — that is thirteen feet and 
four inches above the bottom of the conduit at the Lake — and 
the water continued to run over the dam and waste into the 
Sudbury river from March 31st to June 1st, The highest level 
in 1866 was in June, when it reached to a level of twelve feet 
ten inches, being six inches short of high water mark, — and of 
course no water ran to waste during that year. In this year, 
1867, the heavy rain on the 9th and 10th of February, with the 
melting snow, raised the Lake from twelve feet four inches to high 

2 



10 CITY DOCNMEFT. — No. 88. 

water at noon of the latter day, and at six o'clock in the 
afternoon it stood at thirteen feet five inches, and one inch in 
depth was running to waste over the dam. The highest level 
reached was on the 12th of February, it then being fourteen feet 
one inch, and remaining at that level for a few days it gradually 
fell about half an inch daily until the 23d, and from that time 
until the middle of April, it varied from thirteen feet four 
iiiches to thirteen feet nine inches. 

On those occasions when the water attains a level above high 
water mark, and there are prospects of freshets from rains and 
melting snow, the precaution is taken to remove some of the 
stop-planks at the dam, to permit a greater flow of water than 
can otherwise pass over the dam, above high water mark, for 
the purpose of avoiding any unnecessary wash of the banks of 
the Lake, and overflow of the roads in the vicinity. 

In the afternoon of the 27th day of July, there was at the 
Lake and in the immediate vicinity a very heavy shower, when in 
a few hours, there fell the unprecedented quantity of seven and 
yVcr inches of rain, washing the roads badly, carrying away a 
portion of the road against the Course Brook culvert and dama- 
ging the filter dam on Pegan Brook. The level of the Lake 
was carried up in twenty-four hours, eight inches. Since then 
we have been so blessed with an abundance of water, that the 
culvert and filter dam could not be improved to advantage ; but 
as soon as the water is suflQciently low to permit of the work 
being done well, they are to be taken in hand. 

From experience already had of the good service of the fil- 
ter dam on the Pegan Brook, it is evident that by repairing and 
improving it, and erecting another dam parallel with it, the 
impurities on this brook may be effectually stopped from flow- 
ing into the lake. 

The dwelling house and gate house at the Lake are to be 
painted the coming season, and the fences propped up so as to 
answer a little while longer. The cobble-stone slope walls, for 



KEPORT OE THE WATER BOARD. 11 

protecting the banks of t^e Lake, have only partially answered 
the purpose, they being too light; good and suitable stones 
are scarce in the immediate neighborhood, but we have some 
ledges on the lands of the City, which it may be expedient 
to work, for the purpose of making substantial slope walls to 
those banks most exposed to wash when high winds prevail. 

Negotiations have been had with the Rev. Mr. Walsh, for a 
portion of the Catholic burying ground, in Natick, bordering on 
Dug Pond, which it is desirable for the City to own, for the 
better protection of the pond against any wash that otherwise 
might affect the water. The disposition to accommodate the 
City is so evident, that we are confident of arranging this mat- 
ter to our entire satisfaction. 

The Brookline Reservoir requires a thorough cleansing, and at 
the first practicable moment must be attended to, as also the 
gate house, which leaks badly when the water is more than six 
feet and four inches above the bottom of the conduit ; until one of 
the basins of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir is completed, it is 
utterly impossible to do this properly, and at the same time 
keep the City supplied with water. The grounds around this 
reservoir require enriching, and this autumn there will be spread 
over it a large quantity of the muck and manure obtained from 
the new reservoir. 

The construction of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir has progressed 
as rapidly as we could have reasonably expected, yet it is not 
so near to completion as we had hoped it would be at this time. 
There has been quite as much to do, — and some of it has been 
better done, — than was at first contemplated. As large a force 
has been constantly 'employed as could work to advantage, and this 
force will be increased from time to time, to an extent that will be 
limited only by judicious economy. It has been our policy to 
pay our employes fair wages for their services, and have them 
well treated ; and with but few exceptions they have rendered 
a fair equivalent. On the second of March of this year the 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

laborers, two hundred and twenty-five in number, without any 
previous intimation of their intentions or of a desire for any 
change, virtually proposed to supersede those in authority, and 
fix their own wages to suit themselves. They were then 
receiving one dollar and fifty cents per day. Not feeling dis- 
posed to thus resign the duties intrusted, to us, directions were 
given to pay off and discharge them all, and not employ any of 
them again. We have since been informed that a few restless, 
rambling men were the leaders in the affair, and misled the better 
men, who were largely in the majority, and became the real suf- 
ferers, as many of them resided near the works with their families. 
In three days we had as many men employed as before. Their 
wages were raised on the fourth day of May to one dollar and 
seventy-five cents per day. 

On the fifth day of June sixteen masons employed on the 
large sewer which is to receive the drainage of the roads, 
declined, to work, unless certain good men, who had been for 
sometime employed on the ledges, were stopped from laying 
bricks in the puddle trench, which happened to be only a tem- 
porary arrangement, to last only until such time as we had 
ledgework for them. 

Having no doubt as to the impropriety of such dictation, the 
masons were paid off, and discharged forthwith, since which 
time we have had as many good and faithful masons in our 
employ as we have needed. 

In the beginning of March as many of the Board as could 
leave home, accompanied by Mr. Crafts, City Engineer, and 
Mr. Wightman, Resident Engineer at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
visited New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore and 
Washington, for a partial examination of the water works of 
those cities. The councils of Philadelphia and Baltimore enter- 
tained us in the most hospitable manner, and the ofiicials of all 
the places we visited proffered every facility for the accom- 
plishment of our purpose in the shortest possible time, and by 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 13 

them all we were treated with the greatest courtesy. This tour 
of inspection, although necessarily hurried, was very instructive, 
and the information obtained by the board and engineers will 
prove of great advantage to the City, especially in constructing 
the new reservoir. 

Whenever any populated territory, unsupplied with water is 
annexed to the City of Boston, it will be necessary to look for a 
further supply than we now have, as it is very clear that our 
present resources will be needed for our present territory 
when peopled, unless the city of Charlestown should first be 
annexed. It is well understood that that city has water far 
exceeding her anticipated wants, but we have not been able to 
obtain a specific estimate of the extent of the supply though we 
have been given to understand that its able engineer, Mr. 
Baldwin, has instituted measures for gauging it accurately. 

For further information and details, we present herewith the 
several reports of the City Engineer, Superintendent of the 
Eastern Division, Water Registrar and Clerk of this board.. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN H. THORNDIKE. 
L. MILES STANDISH. 
NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE. 
ALJBXANDER WADSWORTH. 
CHARLES R. McLEAN. 
BENJ'N F. STEVENS. 
WILLIAM S. HILLS. 



14 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 88. 



OEriCE OF THE COCHITUATE WATER BOAED, 
BOSTON, May 5, 1867. 



To the President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 
Sm, — 

The following is a statement of the Expenditures and Receipts 
of this department for the year commencing May 1, 1866, 
and ending April 30, 1867. 



EXPENDITTJRES. 

Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. 

Plumbing shop, u u ^ _ 

Raising water pipes on Tremont Street in 1865 

Land and water rights 

Stable 

Hose . . . 

Damage . 

Repairing boxes at bridges 

Taxes 

Tools . . ■ . 

Travelling expenses 

Fountains 

Office expense 

Laying main pipes, etc., for stock, etc. 

Postage and expresses 

Amount carried forward, 



281 


90 


55 


50 


626 


13 


120 


00 


603 


11 


564 00 


185 


00 


741 


56 


235 


12 


438 


53 


25 


00 


466 


15 


20 


00 


699 


25 


45 


33 


$5,106 


58 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



15 



Amount brought forward, . 


$5,106 58 


Reservoirs — Beacon Hill 


1,022 98 


" East Boston 


1,531 87 


'' South Boston 


323 43 


" Brookline .... 


1,299 98 


Aqueduct repairs . . . . 


721 82 


Printing, (including water registrar's and superin 




tendent's) 


653 12 


Stationery, (including water registrar's and super 




intend ent's) 


489 18 


Salaries, (including clerks and inspectors in watei 




registrar's department) . . . 


10,436 92 


Main pipe 


18,540 25 


Service pipe 


8,832 04 


Off and on water . . . 


4,688 78 


Extra inspectors . •. 


6,176 53 


Wages — laying main pipe '. . . 


3,861 70 


" " service pipe, etc. . . . 


4,451 13 


" blacksmith shop 


1,268 41 


" plumbing shop .... 


185 38 


" proving yard .... 


4,395 58 


Upper yard, finishing buildings, etc. . 


2,168 92 


Miscellaneous expenses 


514 22 


Meters 


16,399 60 


Maintaining meters 


1,437 30 


Repairing main pipe . . 


4,054 84 


" service pipe .... 


4,067 12 


" hydrants . . . . . 


2,442 72 


" streets 


2,107 94 


" stopcocks . . 


436 11 


Stopcocks ....... 


1,840 76 


Hydrants 


3,280 60 


Amount carried forward, . . . . 


$112,735 81 



16 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 88. 

Amount brought forward, . . . . $112,73581 



Lake 

Proving yard, stock, etc. . 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
Tolls and Ferriage . 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir . 



3,040 72 

1,599 52 

3,123 70 

107 62 

267,601 60 



Amount drawn for the Water Works . . 388,208 97 

" " " " driveway around Chestnut 

Hill Reservoir . . . . . . 13,694 41 



Total drawn for by the Board . . $401,903 38 

And which is charged as follows : 

To Chestnut Hill Reservoir . ', . . 267,601 60 

Waterworks . . ; .. . . 120,607 37 

Driveway . . . . . . . 13,694 41 



TotalfromApril30, 1866, to May 1,1867 401,903 38 
Total amount charged Water Works . . . 388,208 97 

KECEIPTS. 
Cash Paid City Treasurer. 



Received for meters sold 


$100 00 




" " fines for waste, etc. 


1,309 00 




" " Off and on water, 




. 


for repairs 


1,668 00 




" " Pipe, laying, repair- 






ing, etc. 


8,923 00 




" " wood sold Chestnut 




' 


Hill Reservoir 


326 95 


12,326 95 




$375,882 02 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 17 
THE ABOVE IS CREDITED TO 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir $326 95 

Water Works 12,000 00 



12,326 95 



Total amount drawn for $401,903 38 

EXTENSION OP THE WORKS. 

Main pipe . . . . . $18,540 25 

Wages laying main pipe . . 3,861 70 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc. . 699 25 

Upper yard, finishing shed, etc. . 1,018 92 24,120 12 



$377,783 26 



Less amount charged C. H. Reser- 
voir . 267,601 60 
« •' " Driveway . 13,694 41 281,296 01 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1866, to 

May 1, 1867 $96,487 25 

Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, to 

May 1, 1866. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . . . $4,043,718 21 

« " Water Board, in 1850 . 366,163 89 

" " CocMtuate Water Board, from \ 

January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1866 . . 1,864,231 23 

Amount drawn from April 30, 1866, to May 1, 

1867, for Water Works .... 388,208 97 



$6,662,322 30 



Amount paid the City Treasurer by 

the Commissioners . . . $47,648 38 



Amounts carried orward, $47,648 38 $6,662,322 30 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

Amount hroughts forward, $47,648 38 $6,662,322 30 

Amount paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 

« " Cocliituate Water 

Board, to May 1, 1866 . . 149,112 08 

Amount paid from April 30, 1866, 

to May 1, 1867 . • • 12,326 95 

— . 217,240 93 



Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by the 
Commissioners and Water Boards, for the 
Waterworks 6,445,081 37 



Gross payments (including interest, premium, 

etc.), for ac't of the Water Works . .13,026,195 73 

Gross receipts . ... . . • 5,911,486 59 

Net cost to the City, May 1, 1867 . . 7,114,709 14 



SAM'L N. DYER, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



REPOKT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 19 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE EASTERN 

DIVISION. 



Boston, May 7, 1867. 
John H. Thorndikb, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir: — I herewith submit my Report for the year ending 
May 1, 1867. 

Below, in the usual form, you will find the amount and location 
of main pipes, service pipes, etc., laid during the year. In 
addition to this, considerable labor has been performed in 
repairs that come under no particular heading. The following 
is a portion of it : 

The coating of the bottom of the East Boston Eesevoir, com- 
posed of paving stones and cement, has been removed prepara- 
tory to repairs necessary to stop the leakage. 

This was done in September last. Water to the depth of 
two feet was then let in, and allowed to remain a sufficient time 
to ascertain, if possible, the point of leakage; this was con- 
tinued, but showed no leak until it reached the height of ten 
and one half feet. At this point it showed at the different 
places as before. 

This would naturally indicate the weak place, but whether 
the reservoir below this point would stand the pressure of an 
increase of fifteen feet in height or not, I leave the City Engi- 
neer to decide. 

The fender on Warren Bridge has been repaired twice during 
the year. That portion on the Boston side of the draw is very 
rotten, and should be made new. 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

A portion of the support for the 20-inch pipes under the 
bridge broke awaj last October, leaving the pipes in a danger- 
ous condition. It was repaired. 

The box over the pipes by the side of Chelsea Bridge was 
repaired last fall, and one coat of paint put on and another will 
be added this spring. 

The work of changing the location of the large mains at the 
railroad bridge on Tremont Street was completed during the 
winter. 

This work, as you are aware, was performed under many 
difficulties. The many kinds of work going on at the same 
time, the nature of the foundation, and the extreme cold 
weather (including the great snow storm), made it arduous, 
uncomfortable and perplexing. On the south side the foundation 
for the support of the pipes was made as good as circumstances 
and my knowledge would admit, but I shall be surprised if some 
leaks do not occur. 

Up to the present time, however, with the exception of the 
sweating of two or three joints, there has been but one leak. 
On the north side, there is, and has been, no signs of a leak. 

The wood and iron work at the Beacon Hill Reservoir has 
been thoroughly painted, and is much improved in appearance. 

The South Boston Reservoir showed a small leakage during 
the year, only enough however to prevent the laying of a 
portion of the sidewalk on the south side. A blind drain 
remedied the difficulty. At the upper yard, work of building, 
grading, etc., has been carried on at such intervals as there was 
help to spare, and I hope before long to have it in an acceptable 
condition. 

I would also mention that this department has, since April 
1, 1866, done the practical part of establishing three hundred 
and thirty-one meters. 

Raised 150 feet 6-inch Pipe on Albany Street. 
Taken up 137 feet 6-inch Pipe on Lehigh Street. 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



21 



Taken up 1532 feet 6-inch Pipe on Belmont Street and Wash- 
ington Square. 
Taken up 155 feet 4-inch Pipe on Western Avenue. 
215 « 2-inch « 
503 " IJ-inch « 

95 " li-inch Lead Pipe. 
232 " 1-inch « 

329 " 1-inch « 

2173 « f-inch « 

15 " J-inch « 

Lowered 350 feet 12-inch Pipe on Boylston Street, west of 

Berkeley Street. 
Extended 1-inch Pipe 10 feet. 
« 1-inch " 44 " 
« 1-inch " 85 « 



22 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 



Statement of Location^ Size and Number of Feet of Pipe laid in 1866. 



In what Street. 



Mt. Vernon . 
Berkeley . . 



Marlboro' . 



Newton. 



War eh am .... 

"West Chester Park 

River 

Dartmouth . . 
Albany. . . . 
Newbury . . . 
Springfield . . 
Marlboro' . . . 
West Newton . 
Cortes .... 
Bast Brookline 
Stanhope . . 
West Penabroke 
Warren Ave . 
(( (( 

West Canton . 
Rutland 8q. . 
West Brookline 
Pinckney . . 
North Charles 
Brimmer . . 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Below River 

Cortes and Stanhope 

Total 12 inches in Boston . . 

Berkeley and Clarendon .... 

Across Clarendon 

Harrison Avenue and Albany . . 

Total 8 inches in Boston . . . 

Harrison Avenue and Albany . . 

West of Tremont 

North of Mt. Vernon 

Montgomery and Warren Avenue 

Oak and Curve 

Arlington and Berkeley 

West of Tremont 

Across Clarendon 

West of Tremont 

From Ferdinand to Berkeley . . 
Albany and Harrison Avenue . '. 

Berkeley and Clarendon 

West of Tremont 

South of Pembroke 

Canton and " 

West of Tremont 

" " (south side) . . 

it It 

Below Charles 

Cambridge and Poplar 

Pinckney and Mt. Vernon .... 

Total 6 inches in Boston . . . 



Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 



Feet of Pipe. 



285 
340 

625 

132 

24 
750 



6 


350 


6 


106 


6 


132 


6 


200 


6 


43 


6 


80 


6 


97 


6 


87 


6 


150 


6 


600 


6 


273 


6 


532 


6 


212 


6 


215 


6 


533 


6 


63 


6 


64 


6 


92 


6 


286 


6 


308 


6 


288 



:,711 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD, 23 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In lyhat Street. 



River . . . 
Lagrange . 
Temple Place 
Meander . . . 

Park 

Chapman . . 
Battery Wharf 
Park Square . 
Central Wharf 



First. . 
Alger . 
I St. . 
Sixth . , 
Ninth . ' 
Middle . 
Foundry 

Alger . 
Quincy . 
Dove . . 

Chelsea 



Paris Court 
Chelsea St . 



Between what Streets. 



Pinckney and Mt. Vernon 

Washington and Tremont 

(( H 11 

Norwich and Dedham 

Court in rear of No. 8 

West of Tremont 

Boylston and Eliot . . ' ■ 

Total 4 inches in Boston .... 

SOUTH BOSTON. 

E and D , . 

Federal and Dorchester 

Fourth and Broadway 

H and O 

I and K 

Dorchester and Federal 

Swan and O. C. Ss N. R. R . . . . 

Total 6 inches in South Boston 

Federal and Dorchester 

C and D • 

F and Dorchester 

Total 4 inches in South Boston 

BAST BOSTON. 
North of G-lendon 

Total 6 inches in East Boston . 

Paris and Chelsea 

For Farrar's Oil Works 

To al 4 inches in East Boston . 



Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 



Feet of Pipe. 



113 
141 
147 
210 
114 
241 
225 
250 
23 

1,464 

105 
34 
214 
323 
517 
50 
396 



23 

118 
36 

177 

309 

309 

180 
156 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 


Feet of Pipe. 




ROXBUET. 






Texas Avenue . . 




12 


45 




Total 12 inches in Roxbury 




45 


Tremont 


Opposite Culvert 


6 


387 










Total 6 inches in Roxbury ...... 




387 


Tremont 


Opposite Culvert ............ 


4 


100 




Total 4 inches in Roxbury 




100 



EECAPITULATION. 



SECTION. 








DIAMETER IN INCHES. 




36. 


12. 


8. 


6. 


4. 


Boston Proper . . • 
South Boston .... 

East Boston 

Roxbury 


Total number of feet laid 
Stopcocks in same .... 

Total number of feet laid . 
Stopcocks in same .... 

Total number of Feet laid 
Stopcocks in same .... 

Total number of Feet laid 
Stopcocks in same .... 










625 

2 

45 
1 


9 


06 
3 




4,711 
11 

1,639 
3 

309 
1 

387 


1,464 
6 

177 
336 
100 




Sums of Pipes . . . 
Sums of Stop-cocks . 










670 
3 


906 
3 


7,046 
15 


2,077 
6 



REPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



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26 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 
Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1866. 



1 


BOSTON PKOPER. 


SOUTH BOSTON. 


EAST BOSTON. 


TOTAL. 


.a 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


2 


1 


41 


... 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 


1 


41 


1 


7 


275 


2 


45 


1 


18 


10 


338 


1 


2 


84 


3 


177 


. . . 


. . . 


5 


261 


1 


268 


9,743 


75 


2,556 


45 


1,644 


388 


13,943 


i 


63 


1,772 


55 


2,626 


48 


1,597 


166 


5,995 




Aggregate 








570 


20,578 














Making the 1 


otal number up to M 


iy 1, 1867 . 






26,201 



Mepairs of Pipes during the Year 1866. 





DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 


WHERE. 


40. 


36. 


30. 


24. 


20. 
3 
10 


16. 


12. 

25 

2 


8. 


6. 

29 
5 
3 


4, 

45 
3 

4 


3. 

1 


2. 

6 
1 


li. 1%. 


1. 

7 
4 
11 


1- 

8 
1 

9 


f. 

335 
54 
37 

426 


h 

7 
5 
2 

14 


1 


Boston 

South Boston .... 
East Boston 


4 


2 


4 


68 


• 


544 
69 
62 


Totals 


4 


2 


4 




13 


• 


27 




37 


52 


1 


7 


63 


• 


675 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and 
upwards, 97 were on the joints, 17 by settling of earth, 4 by 
defective pipe, 18 by frost, 2 by defective packing, 1 broken 
by pile driving. Total, 139. 

Of 2 and 3 inches and in Service Pipes : 9 were on the joints, 
163 by settling of earth, 85 by defective pipe, 31 by defective 
coupling, 10 by defective faucet, 6 by defective packing, 61 by 
rust, 60 by frost, 23 stopped by fish, 60 stiff connection, 7 by 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



27 



faucet loose at main, 1 by faucet broken at main, 7 struck 
by pick, 5 stopped by gasket, 1 stopped by dough, 2 stopped 
by dirt, 1 by nail, 1 broken by settling of wall, 1 by boxing, 1 by 
faucet blown out, 1 by settling of drain. Total, 536. 



Statement of Number of Leaks^ 1850-1866. 



Tear. 



1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 



Diameter of 



Four Inches and 
Upwards. 



32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

16 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 



Less than Pour 
Inches. 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 



Total. 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 
631 
592 
508 
490 
494 
489 
607 
675 



28 



CITY DOCUMENT.^ No. 88. 



Hydrants. 

During the yeiEir thirty-three (33) new Hydrants have been 
established as follows : 

Twenty (20) in Boston proper, five (5) in South Boston, five 
5 in East Boston, and three (3) in Eoxbury. 

Total number of Hydrants established up to May 1, 1867: 



n Boston proper . . . , 


. 1,011 


South Boston . . * 


332 


East " 


196 


Brookline .... 


3 


Roxbury . . . . 


16 


Charlestown 


• . 11 


Chelsea .... 


8 


Total 


. 1,577 



Thirty-three (33) Hydrants have been taken out and replaced 
by new or repaired ones, and one hundred and forty-nine (149) 
boxes have been renewed. The Hydrants have had the atten- 
tion of former years paid them. 



Stopcocks. 

Twenty-seven (27) new Stopcocks have been established 
this year, and sixty-one (61) Boxes have been renewed. All 
the Stopcocks have had the usual attention paid them. 



EEPOET OF THE WATEE BOAED. 



29 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 

Jfay 1,1867. 



NUMBER OF 


DIAMETER IN INCHES. 






























40. 


36. 


30, 


24. 


20. 


18. 


16. 


12. 


8. 


6. 


4. 


3. 


2. 


Pipes 


17 


17 


84 


6 


40 


3 


30 


43 


3 


223 


242 


2 




Blow-off Branches 


1 




2 


. . 


. . 




. . 


. . 


. • 


• . 


. . 


• ■ 










1 

1 


• • 


3 




1 
5 


1 

11 


2 


5 

28 


5 


1 




Three Way-hranches 


6 


4 


14 








3 


1 






•> 


S 


Y 


1 










<> 


•^ 


5 


'>, 


4 






-1 




7 










5 


3 

3 


3 

5 


8 

9, 


3 




3 

3 


7 
3 


3 


18 
.5 


18 
1^3 


12 

9, 


33 






Caps 


2 


2 


5 


1 






2 


19 


3 


22 


18 








3 


2 




2 






3 


6 


3 


4 
6 
1 


14 
3 
1 


' 












s 


11 


1 


6 




3 


5 
















1 






6 


f, 


<? 


? 




7 












4 




9 






2 

8 


1 






O^set Pipes 






. . 






















5 




q 








Man-hole Pipes 


2 




2 




. . 




. . 




. . 










One-eiglitli Turns 


1 




• • 










1 


3 




9 


1 




Pieces of Pipe . ....... 


1 


10 


22 


3 


13 




1 


13 


2 


16 


16 


1 




Stopcocks . . . 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 




2 


4 


1 


16 


14 


7 





Hydrants. 32 New Lowell, 6 Wilmarth (old), 7 Lowell (old). 

For Hydrants. 38 bends, 47 lengtheners, 21 frames, 95 
covers, 30 plungers, 24 screws, 1 waste, 19 nipples, 28 valve 
seats, 36 stuffing boxes, 3 hose couplings, 143 lbs. composi- 
tion castings, 3,800 lbs. iron castings, 5 wharf hydrants. 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

For Stopcocks. 2 36-iiich screws, 1 SO-inch ditto, 2 24-inch 
ditto, 1 20-inch ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 11 6-inch ditto, 5 4-inch 
ditto, 6 4-inch unfinished ditto, 1 ditto for Waste Weir, 1 ditto 
for Brookline Reservoir, 3 12-inch plungers, 4 6-inch ditto, 
6 4-inch ditto, 8 6-inch rings, 12 4-inch ditto, 16 frames, 6 
covers. 

Meters. In the shop, 3 2-inch meters, 51 1-inch ditto, 18 
f-inch ditto, 1 1-inch and 1 |-inch ditto condemned. 

StocTcfor Meters. 68 1-inch nipples, 8 2-inch ditto, 32 |--inch 
ditto, 8 2-inch connection pieces, 14 1-inch ditto, 38 |-inch ditto, 
ditto, 2 3-inch meter clocks, 3 2-inch ditto, 17 1-inch ditto, 13 
|-inch ditto, 15 1-inch meter cocks, 23 |-inch ditto, 36 1-inch 
ditto unfinished, 94 |-inch ditto, 18 sheets strawboard, 15 
glasses, 15 brass spindles, 320 rubber nipples, 25 platforms 
10 feet leather hose, 900 washers and thimbles, 1 4-inch fish pot, 

6 3-inch ditto, 1 2-inch ditto (old). 

For Service Pipe. 14 1-inch union cocks, 10 f-inch ditto, 238 
■|-inch ditto, 84 |--inch unfinished ditto, 106 J-inch unfinished 
ditto, 24 |-inch straight cocks, 36 1-inch T cocks, 15 |-inch 
ditto, 27 |-inch ditto, 8 |-inch Y cocks, 11 |-inch flange cocks, 8 
1-inch air cocks, 40 l|-inch nipples, 11 2-inch male couplings, 22 
li-inch ditto, 26 1-inch ditto, 42 |-inch ditto, 36 |-inch ditto, 22 
J-inch ditto, 12 2-inch female couplings, 4 l;^-inch ditto, 152 
1-inch ditto, 34 ^-inch ditto, 220 |-inch ditto, 216 ^-inch ditto, 
12 I -inch double-headers with flanges and pipes, 4 6-inch flanges, 

7 4-inch ditto, 5 2 -inch ditto, 65 f-inch ditto, 200 lbs. composition 
castings for straight cocks, 61 lbs. composition castings for 
f-inch couplings, 200 ^-inch long boxes (iron), 554 tubes, 16 T 
boxes, 28 Y boxes, 7 1-inch flanges, 7 1-inch tubes, 60 extension 
tubes. 

Lead Pipe. 625 lbs. 2-inch pipe, 711 lbs. U-iuch ditto, 2129 
lbs. 1-inch ditto, 1115 lbs. f -inch ditto, 3278 lbs. f-inch ditto, 1211 
lbs. ^-inch ditto, 870 lbs. IJ-inch, old pipe 69 lbs. f-inch tin 
lined lead pipe, 86 lbs. f-inch block-tin pipe, 725 lbs. sheet 
lead, 30 lbs. solder, 9 lbs. block-tin. 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 31 

Blacksmith Shop. 575 lbs. square iron, 668 lbs. flat ditto, 
650 lbs. round ditto, 170 lbs. cast steel, 1500 lbs. working 
pieces, 5000 lbs. Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. 2000 feet spruce boards, 15,000 feet 
spruce plank, 250 feet oak plank, 17 hydrant boxes, 7 stopcock 
ditto, 34 top pieces, 130 hydrant boxes unfinished, 94 stopcock 
boxes unfinished, 18 meter boxes unfinished, 500 lbs. spikes and 
nails. 

Wharf Hydrants. 5 complete, 6 cocks. 

Stable. 3 horses, 3 wagons, 2 buggies, 1 pung, 5 sets har- 
ness, 2 sleighs, 1 ton English hay, 300 lbs. salt hay, 30 bushels 
grain. 

Tools. 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 1 boom der- 
rick, 4 geared hand ditto, 2 sets of shears, and all the rigging 
for the same, tools for laying and repairing main and service 
pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 fox ditto, 1 hand ditto, 1 upright dril- 
ling machine, 3 grindstones, and the necessary tools for carry- 
ing on the machine, blacksmith, carpenter's and plumber's shops, 
1 circular saw, 2 large tool houses, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 
36-inch ditto, 1 small ditto, also office furniture, and a large lot 
of patterns stored at pipe yard and at the foundries where we 
obtain castings. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. 5 swivel pipe patterns, 1 swing stage, 
capstan frame and levers, 1 10-inch composition cylinder, 1 
6-inch ditto, 1 4-inch ditto, 6 composition jets, 8 cast-iron plates, 
3 composition reel jets, 1 drinking fountain. 

Miscellaneous. 30 gallons linseed oil, 25 gallons tallow oil, 
90 lbs. white lead, 28,000 lbs. hard coal, 48 lbs. leather, 1 
freight of gravel, 50 bricks, 858 lbs. gasket, 5 kegs bolts, 375 
feet of damaged hose, 300 feet new hose, 1 cord wood, 12 
reservoir gate covers, 5 manholes, 6 plates, lot of old iron, lot of 
old lumber, lot of old machinery from Marlboro. 
Respectfully submitted. 

E. R. JONES, 

Supt. Eastern Division. 



32 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

Schedule of Property on the Western Division — May 15, 1867. 

1 extension table, 6 chairs, 1 cooking range, 1 marble top 
wash stand, 1 horse, 1 carriage, 2 sets single harness, 1 express 
wagon, 1 cart, 1 cart harness, 1 buffalo robe, 1 pung, 6 wheel- 
barrows, 2 spades, 22 shovels, 14 picks, 3 bars, 6 pean ham- 
mers, 5 small steel drills, 3 trowels, 2 double blocks, 1 single 
do., 1 drain mould, 1 freight truck, 1 stone do., 4 wrenches, 
2 stop-plank hooks, 1 iron grapnel, 1 grindstone, 1 sand screen, 
1 sand sieve, 1 scythe and snath, 2 hoes, 1 boat and awning, 4 
rammers, 2 hammers, 3 water pails, 1 rain gauge, 1 pair steel- 
yards, 1 pair hedge shears, 2 pairs ice tongs, 1 small stone 
roller, 1 manure fork, 1 map of Boston and its environs, 1 
hand saw, 1 iron square, 4 white-wash brushes, 1 axe, 7 barrels 
Portland cement. 

Rejected as worthless, — 23 shovels, 6 axes, 2 hay rakes, 2 
hoes, 3 iron rakes, 2 pairs rvibber boots. 

A. STANWOOD, 

Supt.W.B.B.W.W. 



REPORT OP THE WATER BOARD. 33 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Water Registrar's Office, 
Boston, May 1, 1867. 

John H. Thorndike, Esq., President Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir, — I herewith submit the following Report as required by the 

ordinance providing for the care and management of the Boston 

Water Works, passed Oct. 31, 1850. 

The total number of water takers now entered for the year 

1867, is 27,754, being an increase since January 1, 1866 of 

265. 

During the year 1866 there have been 643 cases where the 

water has been turned off for non-payment of water-rates. Of 

this number 519 have been turned on, leaving a balance of 124 

still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates received from December 31, 

1865, to January 1, 1867, is ... . $486,538 25 

Of ihe above there was received for 
water used in previous years the 
sum of $27,165 06 

Leaving the receipts for water fur- 
nished during the year 1866 the 
sum of 459,373 19 

In addition to the above there has 
been received, for turning on water 
in cases where it had been turned 
off for non-payment of rates, the 
sum of 1,038 00 



Total . . . • $487,576 25 



Amount carried forward, .... $487,576 25 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

Amount brought fo7'ward, .... |487,576 25 
The amount received for water rates 

from Jan. 1, 1867, to May 1, 

1867, is ..... 405,879 74 

Of this amount there was received 

for water used in previous years 

the sum of 43,205 62 

Leaving the receipts for water (as- 
sessed for the year 1867,) to May 
1, 1867, the sum of . . $362,674 12 

The total amount received from 
January 1, 1867, to May 1, 1867, for 
turning on water in cases where it 
had been turned off, for non-payment 
of rates is 658 00 



$894,113 99 



Total receipts from January 1, 1866, to May 
1,1867 ........ $894,113 99 

The increased amount of income in 1866 over 
the previous year, is ..... 36,196 77 

The total amount of assessments now made 
for the present year, is .... . 382,508 35 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 
of water during the year 1867, is . . . 500,000 00 
The expenditures of my office for the year end- 
ing May 1, 1867 have been 14,285 46 



The items of this expenditure are as follows : 

Paid Wm. F. Davis, Registrar .... 2,200 00 

Chas. H. Little, Treasurer's clerk . . 1,600 00 

Charles L. Bancroft, clerk . . . 1,163 32 

Amount carried forward, . , . . $4,963 32 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



35 



Amount brought forward, . 






• $4,963 32 


Paid Stephen Badlam, 


u 




1,163 32 


Edwin Jennings, 


(i 




1,163 32 


Jacob F. Mayo, on meters 




966 96 


Chas. C. Badlam, 


Inspector 




480 36 


R. D. Child, 


u 






775 00 


C. M. Thompson, 


u 






775 00 


F. W. Fay, 


« 






775 00 


T. L. Kelley, 


« 






775 00 


J. Hayward, 


u 






775 00 


0. A. Ramsdell, 


u 






775 00 


F. C. Hogan, 


u 






50 00 


H. T. Beal, 


11 






47 50 


J. L. Fairbanks, stationery 






406 10 


J. E. Farwell & Co., printing 






7 30 


A. Mudge &, Son, 


(I 






387 28 






$14,285 46 



36 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 88. 



METERS. 



The total number of meters now applied to the premises of 
water-takers is 879. Of this number 681 are |-inch, 176 1-inch, 
18 2-inch, 3 3-inch, and 1 4-inch size. 

They are attached to a variety of establishments, embracing 
hotels, raih^oads, manufactories, stables, confectionery, oyster 
saloons, and buildings occupied by several tenants. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



37 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sale of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848: 

Received by Water Commissioners, as per Audi- 
tor's Report, in 1848 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850, 
" " 1850, " 

" , " 1851, 

*' " 1852, '* 

" " 1853, « 

" « 1854, " 

" " 1855, '< 

'• « 1856, 

« « 1857, <' 

" " 1858, " 

« 1859, 

" " 1860, " 

" 1861, « 

« 1862, " 

^' 1863, '' 

1864, « 

^•' 1865, " 

'' '' 1866, " 

" ^' 1867, to May 1, 1867, 



3 per Au 


Ul- 

$972 81 


1850, 


71,657 79 


1851, 


99,025 45 


1852, 


. 161,052 85 


1853, 


. 179,567 39 


1854, 


. 196,352 32 


1855, 


. 217,007 51 


1856, 


. 266,302 77 


1857, 


. 282,651 84 


1858, 


. 289,328 83 


1859, 


. 302,409 73 


1860, 


. 314,808 97 


1861, 


. 334,544 86 


1862, 


. 365,323 96 


1863, 


. 373,922 33 


1864, 


. 394,506 25 


1865, 


, 430,710 76 


1866, 


. 450,341 48 


1867, 


. 486,538 25 


7, , 


. 405,879 74 




15,622,905 89 



38 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the first of January 1867, with the amount of water 
rates paid for 1866: 



19,642 Dwelling-houses 
6 Boarding " 










.■ $244,428 90 
198 00 


69 Model 










1,921 62 


3 Lodging 
5 Hotels 










55 00 
412 00 


4,457 Stores and shops 
138 Buildings . 
412 Offices 










39,867 03 
4,530 71 
3,239 55 


36 Printing offices 
20 Banks 










524 12 

257 50 


27 Halls . 
1 Theatre . . 










311 50 

25 00 


25 Private schools 










235 50 


12 Asylums 
5 Green-houses 










595 00 

47 00 


64 Churches 










688 25 


4 Markets 










752 00 


119 Cellars 










759 50 


335 Restaurants and sa 


loons 








4,142 12 


5 Club-houses . 










99 00 


1 Bath-house . 










55 00 


45 Photographers 
12 Packing-houses 










1,248 58 
315 75 


1,020 Stables 










7,512 40 


18 Factories 










529 09 


2 Breweries 










39 00 


Amount carried forward, 


$312,789 12 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD 



Amount brought forward, . 






. $312,789 12 


6 Bleacheries . 






80 00 


1 Laundry 






25 00 


67 Bakeries 






557 00 


5 Ship-yards . 






65 00 


3 Dry docks and engines . 






84 00 


44 Shops " " 






2,515 63 


32 Stores « « 


, 




1,625 25 


4 Foundries " " 






146 30 


7 Factories " •' 






348 82 


3 Printing " '« 






181 76 


1 Bakery " " 






33 00 


1 Ship-yard " " 






28 00 


2 Binderies " « 






37 50 


2 Buildings " " 






100 00 


1 Pottery and engine 






35 00 


1 Laundry " " 






36 00 


1 Mill « « 






132 96 


43 Stationary " 






1,738 49 


4 Armories 






39 75 


2 Gymnasiums 






41 50 


527 Hand-hose . 






2,990 00 


12 Fountains .... 






89 00 


Gas Light Co. (filling tank) . 






27 18 


Mill-dam Co. ... 






266 75 


Custom House 






150 00 


50 Steam-boats 






9,650 14 


Office (Harbor Master) 






6 00 


" (City Scales) 






9 00 


Old State House . 






27 00 


Court House 






262 50 


Probate Building . 






47 50 


Amount carried forward, .... 


$334,165 15 



39 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 



Amount brought forward, 

House of reception 
5 Fire-alarm motors 
22 Fire-engines, hose and hook and ladder 
houses 
277 Public Schools 
2 City stables 
Offal station 
Steamer Henry Morrison 
House of Correction 
Public Library 
I'aneuil Hall 

Shop (paving department) 
Common sewer department (making 

mortar) . 
Public urinals 
Street sprinkling 
Deer park . 
Boston Common 
J. F, Paul (contract pipe) 
Building purposes 
Contractors for supplying shipping 
Metered water .... 



1334,165 


15 


10 


00 


50 


00 


553 


50 


1,882 


00 


200 


75 


150 


00 


192 


56 


462 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


9 


00 


50 


00 


145 


00 


400 


00 


10 


00 


50 


00 


16 


70 


1,674 


63 


2,017 16 


117,244 


74 



$459,373 19 



REPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



41 



Statement showing tJienumber and kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston, to 
January 1, 1867, as compared with previoiis years. 



1864r. 


1865. 


1866. 


REMARKS. 


4,831 
* 


4,797 


4,774 


Taps. These have no connection with 
any drain or sewer. 


38,844 


40,184 


40,496 


Sinks. 


15,488 


16,767 


17,204 


Wash-hand basins. 


5,262 


5,475 


5,499 


Bathing tubs. 


6,286 


6,752 


7,398 


Pan water-closets. 


7,117 


7,317 


7,563 


Hopper water-closets. 


.... 


181 


312 


" " " pull. 


935 


815 


239 


" " " self-acting. 


.... 


213 


226 


" . " " waste. 


.... 


498 


536 


" " " door. 


1,644 


1,741 


1,790 


Urinals. 


5,535 


6,087 


6,365 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently 
attached to the building. 


12 


737 


756 


Shower-baths. 


12 


13 


13 


Hydraulic rams. 


708 


715 


773 


Private hydrants. 


278 


334 


350 


Slop-hoppers. 


.... 


28 


33 


Foot-baths. 


86,952 


92,154 


93,327 





Respectfully submitted. 

WM. F. DAYIS, 

Water Registrar. 



42 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, 
Boston, May 5, 1867. 

John H. Thorndike, Esq., President Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir, — In compliance with the ninth section of the ordinance 
relating to the department of engineering and surveying, the 
following report is respectfully submitted : 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

The details of the condition of the works in this division will 
be found in the Report of the Superintendent. 

A table of the average monthly heights of the water in the 
Brookline and City Reservoirs above tide marsh level for the past 
five years will be found on page 60. It will be noticed that the loss 
of head from Brookline to Beacon Hill and to South Boston varies 
but little from last year, although the average level was a trifle 
lower. 

The water was shut off from the Bast Boston Reservoir last 
fall for examinations, with a view to discover in what manner to 
remedy its leaky condition. Certain experiments were made by 
the Superintendent, which, I am informed, tend to show that 
there is no leakage below a line ten feet above the bottom. I 
think it would be well, before making any expensive alterations^ 
to make sure, if possible, of the exact cause of the defects, and 
with this view I propose still further observations of the amount 
of leakage and the localities where the leakage is apparent. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 43 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

With the exception of the Course Brook culvert, the filter 
dam at Pegaii Brook, certain portions of the slope-walls, and the 
fences in the vicinity of the Superintendent's house, the struc- 
tures, etc., at the Lake are in good condition. The high stage 
of the water in the Lake during the year has prevented the 
re-building of the Course Brook culvert as recommended in 
last year's report. When it is rebuilt, the slopes of the road 
on either side should be protected with a substantial wall, and 
paved gutters made to carry off the surface water which in heavy 
rains does so much damage to the road. During the severe 
thunder storm in the month of July, when, in the space of a 
few hours, over seven inches of rain fell in the vicinity of the 
Lake, a small portion of the southerly end of the filter dam was 
washed away. The water behind the dam rose so rapidly that 
the flume, being partially choked with drift-wood, weeds, grass, 
etc., was inadequate to carry off the flood, and it soon overtopped 
the dam and worked its way through the light sandy soil on the 
southerly end of the dam, and carried away about fifteen feet in 
width of the bank and a small portion of the stone work. No 
repairs have been made, owing to the high state of the water, 
and consequently the dam has been inoperative since then. 

Had this dam been located by the late Superintendent where 
I advised, and built into the bank in the manner proposed, this 
accident, I think, would not have occurred. The object of the 
Superintendent in changing the location was to save about 
twenty feet in the length of the dam, the expense of which 
would have been trifling. 

The slope-wall in various places at the Lake, especially where 
laid on slopes too steep, has been undermined, and with portions 
of the bank slid into the Lake. These portions cannot be 
repaired until the water is considerably lower, and when the 



44 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

time comes the slopes should be reduced, and if possible larger 
stone used. I would suggest that, instead of using small field 
stone which have to be hauled a considerable distance, we 
should get out from some of the ledges and large bowlders on 
our own premises stone more suitable for such work. 

The fences along the road, in the vicinity of the City's house, 
are in bad condition ; the posts are nearly all rotten, and have 
had to be braced to hold them up. The repairs that have been 
made this spring will probably make the fences answer for this 
year, but in another year they should be re-built. 

January 1, 1866, water at the lake was 8 feet, 11 inches above 
the bottom of the conduit; on the 12th of February it had fallen 
to 7 feet 3 inches, the lowest point reached during the year ; it 
then began to rise, and continued, with slight fluctuations, until 
April 30, when it was 12 feet, 3 inches. On May 27 it had fallen 
to 11 feet 11 inches, and by the 18th of June had risen again 
to 12 feet 10 inches. On the 28th of July it stood at 12 feet, 
and continued to fall, with slight fluctuations, until the 15th of 
November, to 11 feet, 3^ inches, when it began to gain, and on 
the 31st of December was 12 feet and 2 inches. 

By reference to the table on page 56, it will be seen that 
the average height of the water in the Lake for the year 1866, 
was 11 i^'V feet above the bottom of the conduit, being a higher 
average than for any year since the Lake was raised in 1859, 
except in 1863, when the average was 13 ^%\ feet. 

On page 55 will be found a statement of the rain-fall on the 
water-shed of the Lake, the amount of water consumed and 
wasted, the percentage of rain-fall received into the Lake each 
year for a term of thirteen years, and the average per year for 
the whole term. It will be seen that only 25 per cent of the 
rain-fall of 1866 was received into the Lake, being the smallest 
percentage for thirteen years, and the average percentage for 
the whole term was forty-seven. 



HEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 45 

CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The tables on pages 52 and 53 show the daily average number 
of gallons of water consumed for each month and year from 1849 
to 1868, inclusive. The record for 1866 shows an average 
daily consumption of 12,229,000 gallons, being a decrease of 
433,000 gallons from the average daily consumption of 1865. 
Although a comparison of the amount used daily for the past 
year with that of 1861 shows the enormous decrease of 33 per 
cent; yet if we take into account the increase of population, in 
the mean time, the result is still more gratifying. For instance 
in 1861 the population was in round numbers 180,700; the 
consumption for that year was 18,189,304 gallons per day, or 
100| gallons per day for each inhabitant; in 1866 the popula- 
tion is estimated at 200,000, the consumption per day, 12,229,- 
000 gallons, and the daily amount per head 61xVb- gallons. So 
that the actual decrease since 1861 is 39 per cent, instead of 
33 per cent, as above stated. 

In my report last year I contended, and I think proved, that 
all the present legitimate wants of the city could be abundantly 
served with a supply of 8,000,000 gallons per day. I see no 
reason to change that statement. The population of Boston is 
estimated at 200,000, and for all domestic uses, the records of 
the meters in the houses of the members of your Board show 
that 25 gallons per inhabitant is an ample supply. At this 
rate, the domestic uses of water would require a daily supply of 
5,000,000 gallons. The amount consumed by large manufac- 
tories, hotels, etc., as measured by meters during the last year, 
was about 2,000,000 gallons per day, and if we estimate the 
miscellaneous consumption at 1,000,000 gallons per day, we 
have a total of 8,000,000 gallons, which is unquestionably a 
liberal supply. If an increase in the number of meters, a more 
rigid inspection of the premises of water-takers with a view to 
detect cases of waste, and a special tax on hopper closets, will 



46 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

reduce our consumption to 8,000,000 gallons per day, let it be 
done. 

CONDUIT. • 

Since the date of the last report, those portions of the conduit 
considered in the worst condition have been examined several 
times. The section at Ware's Yalley, in Needham, near the 
West Pipe Chamber, which has been alluded to in former reports 
as in a most dangerous condition, was repaired last summer with 
Portland cement, and a recent examination showed it to be in 
very fair condition. At the same examination the whole line, 
from Charles river to the Brookline timnel, was carefully in- 
spected. On the Second Division, between Stations 196 and 
197, is a small crack in the top arch, about fifty feet in length; 
from Station 21 7 J to 218 J, is a crack in the bottom and top 
arches, which needs attention; from 224 to 225, is a double 
crack in the top arch; and from 232 J to 234, a very slight one 
in the top. The worst place in this division is a portion about 
sixty-five feet in length, between Stations 242f and 244J; the 
crack at this place is quite a serious one, and should be repaired 
at once. A small crack was discovered between Stations 254 
and 255 ; and this section is very dirty and needs a thorough 
cleaning. Only one more crack was found in this division, and 
that was a very slight one, between Stations 263^ to 264. , 

The condition of the conduit below Newton Centre, on the 
Third Division, was in better general conditioUj as to cleanliness 
and freedom from cracks, than the portion between Charles river 
and Newton Centre. A slight crack about thirty feet long was 
found in the top arch, between Stations 1 and 2 ; at Station 37^ 
was found a large fissure in the bottom arch, through which a 
large volume of water, and some sand, was flowing into the 
aqueduct — this is the same fissure alluded to in my last report, 
and was then reported as plugged up; east of Station 51 is a 
slight crack and a small fissure in the bottom, bringing in water ; 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



47 



the old cracks, between Stations 119^ and 124, and between 
133^ and 138^, do not show much change — those portions that 
were pointed with Portland cement remain very perfect ; from 
138^ to the western end of the Brookline tunnel, the conduit is 
in excellent condition. 

At the time of the examination above referred to, a trial was 
made of the magnesium light for illuminating the interior of the 
conduit, and, with the exception of certain mechanical defects in 
the apparatus, it wqis a decided success, and a vast improvemeat 
over the ordinary lights hitherto used. 



CHESTNUT HILL RESERYOIR. 

. This work has progressed since the date of the last report 
quite as satisfictorily as was expected. The first work with- 
teams was begun on the 25th of April of last year, the number 
at that time being only eight, and the whole number of men 
employed about 200. Operations with the teams were com- 
menced on the southerly side of the Lawrence meadow in 
removing the soil preparatory to building the embankment. 
The number of teams was increased before the close of May 
last to 20 — that is, 40 horses and carts — by the middle of 
August to 30, and the number now employed is 50. 

The following statement shows the average daily number of 
men employed in this work in each month, commencing with 
April 1866: 





' April 


182 


1 8fifi 5 NovGDiber 
\ December 


319 




May 


327 


270 




June 


385 


["January 


257 


866 <( July . 


400 


February 


240 




August . 


424 


1867 <; March . 


222 




September 


396 


April 


373 




^ October 


386 ■ 


I May . 


406 



Besides the horses and carts, which, with the drivers, are 
ftirnished by contract, the city has now in use fourteen yoke of 
cattle of its own, employed in hauling stone, removing stumps and 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 

such kinds of work as they are better adapted for than horses. 
The bank on the Lawrence meadow was begun May lf)th, 1866, 
and since that time there has been 5,463 feet in length built in 
that section, or all but about 600 feet, and in the lower section 
about 1,200 feet, making 6,663 feet in all. Of this there has 
been 3,622 feet covered with a substantial protection wall of 
stone, 1,649 of which was laid by the day and 1,973 by contract. 
The whole number of square yards of slope-wall now laid is 
7,074. The work on the wall was begun May 24th, 1866, and 
stopped on the 6th of November. On the 22d of April, 1867, it 
was resumed, and is now rapidly progressing. 

About one-half (2,100 feet) of the new location of Beacon 
Street has been graded and made ready for travel, and it is 
expected that the remainder will be completed and opened to 
public travel in a few weeks. 

Considerable progress has been made in preparing the foun- 
dations for the main embankment or dam on the easterly end of 
the Reservoir across the mouth of the basin. A trench has been 
opened in the natural soil under the centre of the bank, about 
1,500 feet in length, and of an average width and depth of ten 
feet ; for a distance of 750 feet the bottom of this trench is solid 
rock, and the indications are that we shall find the same bottom 
entirely across the meadow. As this embankment is to be the 
dam to retain the water, the utmost care will be taken in its 
construction, both as to the material used and the manner of 
compacting it, in order that it shall be a water-tight structure. 

The work during the winter months, from the middle of 
November to the middle of April was confined chiefly to the 
removal of the muck from the Lawrence Meadow, work on the 
ledges, and the construction of a retaining wall on the southerly 
side of the driveway on the north side of the lower section of 
the Reservoir. This is a very substantial structure, varying in 
height from seven to twenty feet, and is about 410 feet in length. 
This wall is not yet completed, and work thereon has been 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOAED. 49 

suspended, the workmen being now employed in laying the 
slope-wall. As this work can be done in the winter, when the 
work on the slope-walls must cease, it is not proposed to 
complete it until another winter. 

In June last it was found necessary to procure an engine 
and pump to keep the trench free of water near the proposed 
location of the effluent gate-house while removing the sand 
The pump commenced working on the 5th of July, and was 
kept in operation most of the time until August 27th, when an 
accident occurred which brought its operations to an abrupt 
termination. The engineer who had charge of the engine and 
pump had gone to dinner, and had not been absent more than 
fifteen minutes, when the boiler exploded, tearing the crown- 
plate, directly over the fire almost off, and sending the engine 
and boiler some fifty feet into the air, and about one hundred 
and fifty feet horizontally. Fortunately no one was injured, 
although one of the foremen on the work and a laborer had 
just left the side of the boiler, not liking a peculiar hissjng 
sound, and were not more than fifty feet from it when the explo- 
sion occurred. 

Upon the return of the engineer, he was closely questioned 
as to the condition of the boiler when he left, the state of the 
water, and the condition of the fire. His statements at this 
time and at a subsequent investigation were such that, if true, 
an explosion would have been impossible. He insisted that the 
height of the water in the boiler was tested immediately before 
leaving for dinner, and was found to be so high that it would 
discharge mixed with steam from the upper cock, and run freely 
from the lower one; that the pressure-gauge indicated only 
thirty lbs. per square inch' and that the fire was low; and fur- 
thermore that, as an additional precaution he left the door of 
the fire-box open. The boiler was examined by Messrs, 
McLauthlin and Dutemple, experienced mechanics of this city, 
and by the Superintendent, Resident Engineer, and myself, and we 

7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 88. 

all agreed that the explosion was caused by the low state of the 
water in the boiler, and that the accident was due entirely to 
the carelessness of the engineer, who was promptly discharged. 
A new engine was procured with all possible despatch, but it was 
thought advisable to locate it at a pit' in the Lawrence meadow, 
which had been sunk about nine feet below the level of the meadow, 
and into which the water in the soil of the meadow was led by 
a system of open ditches. By this means the soil and muck of 
the meadow became drained and in a fit condition to be removed 
during the winter. This pump was found to be inadequate, and 
a larger one substituted which is now in operation at the same 
place. It is intended to remove a portion of the present 
aqueduct at and near the site of the proposed intermediate gate- 
house, for the purpose of building said gate-house and making 
the embankment, which, at this place divides the reservoir into 
two sections, water-tight ; when this is done, a twenty-inch pipe 
will be laid at such a level as to drain the Lawrence meadow 
without the aid of the pump, and the engine and pump will be 
replaced at the point where the explosion occurred. 

On the 10th of February occurred the greatest freshet known 
in this vicinity for years, and it furnished an excellent opportu- 
nity to determine the maximum run of surface water through 
the meadows, and which must be provided for with artificial 
canals or brick drains when the reservoir is completed. It was 
found that the four feet stone culvert built by Mr. Knowlton, in 
the fall of 1865, was inadequate in size, the water backing up 
four feet from the top on the upper side. This culvert will be 
replaced by a brick drain 233 feet in length, and 6 feet 4 inches 
high, by 6 feet wide in the clear. This will connect with 
another 5 feet high by 4 feet 8 inches wide, and 532 feet in 
length ; then it is reduced again to 4 feet 4 inches high by 4 
feet wide, of which dimensions there will be 1,926 lineal feet. 
This reduction in size continues at intervals as follows: 1,697 
feet of 3 feet 8 inches by 3 feet 4 inches; 1,561 feet of 3 feet 4 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



51 



inches by 3 feet, and 1,790 feet of circular drain of an internal 
diameter of 2 feet and 6 inches; making a total length of all 
sizes of 7,739 feet. Work on this drain will be commenced at 
once and finished this season. 

The work is now progressing well, and by the date of another 
annual report will be far advanced towards completion. 

The expenses of my department in connection with this work 
during the year ending April 30, have been as follows, viz : 



Salary of Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer 

" " S. C. Horn, Assistant Engineer 

" " W. P. Learned, rodman 

« " D. C. Sanger 

" " Jeremiah Sullivan, axeman . 
Incidental expenses 



$1,895 52 
810 50 
328 50 

51 00 
506 31 

70 51 



$3,662 34 

The above amount was paid from the appropriation for 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 



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oo CO 


0^ 


io_ 
































OOOOOOt-ODOOOOCXDOO 


00 00 


oT 


GO 




Q^^^^^^(_,^ 


o o 


o 


o 




OOOOOOOOO 


o o 


o 


o 


• 


<35C0rHt-O'-IOC0O 


o o 


OD_ 


00 


c? 




























tn 




o t- 


lO 


lO 


oo 




CO CO 


05 


iM 


H 


(Nt-100COOOt-C5 


05 CO 




1-H 






























o6o0000000000105t~ 


CO CO 


t^ 


CO 




OOOOOOOOO 


o o 


o 


o 




OOOOOOOOO 


o o 


o 


o 


pH 


t--i-ICi(M->+IOC<10CO 


CO lO 


-* 


00 




























IB 


COi-(t~»0001«lO»00 


CO CO 


CO" 


co" 


« 


COC<)C0COC0<>100C<iCO 


I-H l^ 


o 


CO 


H 


C<l<Mi-IC0iMO>>-ioq(N 


t- '^ 


CO 


00 
































t^«>CDJA«5t-t-t~t^ 


O CD 


t- 


CO 




OOOOOOOOO 


o o 


o 


o 




ooooooooo 


o o 


o 


o 




t-^OO^Or-llOC^CDlO 


CO lO 


o 


o 


>-r-^T-ri-H"«o"co~-*~-^io" 


^ o 


t-^ 


t-^ 


00rH-*«5-*OT-IO00 


O CO 


CO 


CO 


.-H(NOOOeOC5100lO 


lO Ci 


o 


00 
































»OlO-^-.*lOCO0000C£> 


■^ -* 


lo" 


»c 




o 


05 


o o o o o 


o o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o o o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


OS 


o 


o 


o o o o o 


o o 


o 


o 




























^ 


o 


o 


o o o o o 


o o 


o 


o 


OD 


o 


iO 


o o o o o 


lO o 


o 


00 


H 


t- 


"? 


CO CO 00 I-H 00 


lO 00 


CD 


CO 
































I— f 


i-H 


CO "^ ^^ ^^ "^ 


•^ CO 


CO 


CO 


ta 
§ 


























CD 


t 

o; 

1- 


i 




1 


> 

^ 1 


^ ^ 

^ 


^ 1- 


< 


' 1 

« p. 

CO 


;■ 
a 
j: 
c 

c 

c 


' g 

I > 

) o 


g 

o 

CD 

ft 


CD 

> 

< 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



53 



0^ 



o 
o 



'fi^ 






'^ 



CS5 



O 

'A 
O 



O 





o 


<-, 


o 


o 


^ 


<-, 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


^ 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(^ 




• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 






























o 


Ifll 


T« 


I-( 


CO 


00 


CO 


r-T 


of 


CO 


oT 


of 


C5 


lO 


CO 


CO 


)0 


t^ 


l- 


CO 


-* 


^ 


Ol 


o 




CM 


00 


CO 


c^ 


<N 


o 


00 


CO 


■^ 


00 


CO 


cq 


'^ 


C^ 




rH 


co" 


c<r 


i-T 


I-l 




c4" 




I-l 


rH 


rH 


rH~ 

I-l 


of 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


Q 


o 




O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




O 


<3 


o 


• 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(^ 


o 


o 


o 


ift 




























00 


<7q 


CO 


t^ 


»o 


o 


rH 


t-- 


CO 


'TtT 


CO 


o 


t>r 


0^ 




1-1 


<M 


t^ 


CO 


05 


o 


(M 


<N 


t^ 


lo 


t~ 


CO 


^ 


eo 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


(M 


-* 


CO 


'^1 


t--^ 


00 


CO 






























CO 


CO 


<M 


T-l 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


(M 


r-T 


rH 


o 


of 




r-l 


1—1 


'"' 


1—1 


'"' 


^^ 


1-1 


1—1 


'"' 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r-i 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


<!H 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 




























o 


tH 


CO 


rH 


CO 


-^^ 


o 


(?f 


00 


CO 


cT 


Ci 


t-T 


r^ 


QO 


lO 


-* 


-+I 


o 


o 


CO 


-H 


00 


CI 


t^ 


t- 


-^ 


CO 


H 


Oi_ 


00 


OO 


lO 


o 


t~ 


1— 1 


1— t 


l>;^ 


^ 


o 


lO 


CO 






























CO 

1-1 


CO 


CO 
rH 


co" 


CO 
rH 


1—1 


c6' 


CO 

1-1 


CO 
rH 


1—1 


I-l 


7-t 


CO 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<-, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


« 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


lO^ 




























«0 


(N 


00 


rH 


lO 


t~ 


00 


-*~ 


CD 


lo" 


m 


CO 


>S 


00 


GC 


r~i 


C<) 


GO 


(M 


o 


CO 


»o 


00 


CO 


t- 


(N 


CS 


CO 


H 


1—1 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


■<tl 


rH 


o 


"i. 


o 


t-^ 


o 


(N^ 


Oj^ 
































CO 


t- 


CO 


lO 


»o 


CO 


icT 


co~ 


l>r 


»o" 


CO 


CO 


co' 




1— 1 


tH 


1—1 


1—1 


1—1 


1—1 


tH 


1-1 


1-1 


1-1 


1—1 


1—1 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


91 




























«D 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


QD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


H 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■*! 


q_ 


o 


CO 


T-i 


o 


CO 
































t- 


t^ 


1— ( 


rH 


rH 


CO 
rH 


CO 

rH 


1-1 


rH 


rH 


1-1 


1—1 


CD 
rH 




o 


1-1 


-* 


CO 


<M 


'^l 


C5 


to 


o 


CO 


CO 


<M 


-* 




(O 


CO 


-5t< 


C5 


CO 


00 


o 


CD 


IC 


<M 


t- 


CO 


o 


H 


t- 




CO 


lO 


00 


Ci_ 


00_ 


CO^ 


*1 




o 


CO 


CO 


© 


Co" 


^ 


CO 


1-H^ 


t-T 


T-^ 


t-T 


of 


cc 


t-T 


^ 


co" 


gT 


00 


o 


o 


»o 


lO 


OO 


CO 


o 


t- 


a 


OO 


o 


t^ 


00 


H 


T— 1 


00 


-* 


T-l 


CO 


C<1 


00^ 


(T^ 


o 


Ci^ 


CO 


05^ 


































T-H 


o 


Oi 


t- 


CO~ 


t- 


co~ 


00 


Co" 


t-^ 


CO 


icT 


CO 




cq 


cq 


rH 


rH 


rH 


'"' 




rH 




I-l 










o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


<^ 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C3_ 


o 


o 


o 


o^ 


CD 


o 


o 




























CD 


cq 


r—i 


05 


1—* 


o 


CO 


o 


t^ 


t-T 


CO 


irf 


1—1 


00 


X 


o 


o 


o 


IM 


OS 


CO 


CO 


C5 


»o 


CO 


CO 


in 


CO 


H 


00 


C5 


■* 


CO 


t^ 


00 


(M 


"^ 


o 


o 


00 




o» 
































t- 


CO 


lO 


^ 


^ 


t- 


t^ 


oT 


t-^ 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


t- 




1— 1 


'"' 


I-l 


T-i 


rH 


1—1 


1—1 




rH 


rH 


rH 


1—1 


rH 




o 


o 


^ 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


0) 




























10 


<M 


oT 


o 


o 


cq 


oT 


cT 


^ 


oT 


CO 


»c 


CO 


lo" 


00 


1—1 


CO 


00 


CO 


o 


CO 


1-1 


o 


00 


C<1 


1—1 


00 


t- 


1-i 


lO 


t-^ 


■^ 


»> 


CO 


CO 


'^ 


t-^ 


CO 


o 


t^ 


»c 


rH 




T-H 


1— ( 


I— 1 


co" 


1—1 


rH 


CO 


1-1 


« 


1—1 


1—1 


rH 


CO 
1—1 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


Q 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 






^ 


o 


o 


^ 


o 


Q 


o 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




























K5 


o 


era 


^ 


Iffl 


CO 


b- 


rH 


rH 


us" 


C5 


co" 


»o 


t>r 


00 


CO 


05 


lO 


CO 


(M 


CO 


(M 


-* 


^ 


CO 


-* 


t~ 


^ 


H 


I— ( 


CO 


1— ( 


'^ 


"^ 


00 


CO 




t~;^ 


en 


1—1 


o 


CO 




c^ 


'^ 


-* 


CO 


t-^ 


o 


CO 


co" 


c4" 


oT 


of 


CO 


of 




'"' 


1—1 


1— 1 


'"' 


<-( 


'"' 


'-' 


'"' 


rH 


'"' 


1-1 


rH 


<-l 






: 














: 




'. 






D3 




t>j 














« 




—1 
a> 






O 


& 


S3 


ra 










CO 

fee 


a; 


rH 


(-^ 


g 




a 


1 

(-3 


0) 










r3 


o 
o 


> 

o 


o 


> 




l-» 


ph 


< 


l-I 


< 


CD 


O 


^ 


p 


< 



54 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 



Conduit. 

The following tabic shows the different heights at which the 
water has been running, and the number of days in each month 
at the different heights. 

The height of the conduit is six feet four inches. 









HEIGHTS IN FEET AKD INCHES. 


1866. 


0.0 


4.5 


4.6 


4.7 


4.8 


4.9 


4.10 


4.11 


5.0 


5.1 


5.2 


5.4 


5.6 6.0 


6.2 


6.4 




NUMBER OF DAYS EST EACiS MONTH. 


January . . . 
February . . . 
March .... 
April. . . . 






1 
1 
1 
2 


9 
21 
6 
3 

1 


1 
6 


3 
3 






10 

2 
1 

13 
5 
2 
7 

12 

52 


12 
30 
10 

1 
4 

16 
4 
8 
5 

90 


1 

1 
2 


6 

18 
12 

1 

12 

2 

3 

2 
3 

59 


1 
1 


4 

1 

• 
1 
1 

7 


1 

2 

1 

4 


6 

7 

1 

• 
3 

1 

1 
19 


19 
3 

4 
3 
7 
2 
3 

41 


1 

2 

3 










1 


















September . . 






5 

15 
6 
6 




November . . 
December . . 








Total 


5 


40 


6 


3 


2 


1 



EEPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



55 



'« 



'S 



S to 



5* 






<5-) 


,« 


« 


k 


S 


S 








^ 




^^ 


Co 


't^ 


>4J 




rV 


<i) 


« 


C5^ 


H 


C 


'^ 





CO iJi 



f~ 


rO 




c 


i 




s 


« 


o 


<ji 


^^ 


rii 


!^ 


c 


fes 


KJ 


S 


O 


?^ 


S 


f^ 


'^ 


't^ 








t^ 


<51 


s 


O 




g: 


g 




^ 


o 


^ 






^ 






o 


« 


CO 





^ 



w 


































c 




a ■ 


















^ 
















> 












-t-4 
























■•.9 


C3 




a-l 




« 


a 


S 






a 


a 


□ 


« 


^ 


a 


fl 


a 


a 


a 


-^ 








1) 




a) 









<a 


CU 




0) 





a> 








0) 


a 




S-l^ 




" 


" 













































^ 


u 








u 


b 


t< 






tH 




u 


u 


b4 


u 

ft 




S.Sb 




aj 


















4) 


<D 




33 




0) 








ft 


a 



CO 











00 


UO 


ft 

to 


ft 

ire 


t^ 


ft 




ft 

CO 


ft 

ire 




^"s 




Tfl 


CO 


U5 








T*( 




CO 




^ 


CO 


rll 


■^ 


IM 


•5)1 








t- 





PJ 








CO 


(N 


>n 








(M 








03 




Stilus 


o 


i^ 




<3 






to 






'O 















05 




;s" 


00 
co" 


00" 


1 




tO_ 


0^ 


'"^ 


■*" 


•*" 


2" 


Tl<_ 


cT 


<M_ 

CO* 


IM_ 

in" 


&_ 




s 















CO 




^ 








IM 


to 






co^ 


^ 


>":, 


• 




°v 


t-^ 


to_ 


t-;. 


^„ 


IM_ 


IM 


co_ 


"„ 


S_ 


0, 






00 















•^ 


t-^ 


co" 


0" 


^ 


ire" 


OS 


■^ 


IM 




a 


IH 


r-) 


(N 


• 




^ 


IH 


CO 




IM 


IM 


I-H 




T-t 




































2" 




«c2 




in 





S 












^ 





to 











■^ 





115 









(N 






• 










to 















CO 






2" 


0^ 



C0~ 






' 0" 


0, 

>o" 


>a 


o_ 


"^ 


to_ 
to" 


Oi_ 


ire" 


co" 


ire__ 






o 


SS 


25 


to 












'J- 


Ul 





T* 






<M 






hJ 


=2" 


Ci ■ 

S2~ 


r-j_ 


. 




10 
co" 


IM~ 


0^ 

r-i" 


co_ 
co'" 


2" 






in" 


10 


(m" 


00__ 


u 

tS 




< 


CO 


C<l 











00 


to 






01 


10 


IM 









"o c-- 


^ 


>o_ 


*^ 


' 




co_ 


■* 


to 


^__ 


"I, 


CO 


oo__ 


to_ 





IM__ 


>> 






to 


to" 


t- 


' 




r-i 


to 


eq" 


to" 


CO 


»>r 


00" 


Its' 


t-^ 


in" 


"ft 
ft 

3 




^ 




































3 . 

13 § 

































Q 






t^ 




o 

.J 
-< 










































S>, 


0^ 






0" 


0" 






0, 
0" 






0" 


. 




2- 






© 




cu 


to 














t- 






to 
















•^s 


co_ 




00_ 


t^ 






in^ 






(M^ 


• 




in_ 






5 




<+-+* 








to" 






i-T 






oT 

















•^ bD 


to 






"N 






•^ 






iO 






■^ 












O 


<M 




(N 


CO 






T-) 






't. 












ca 




l'~ 






















r4" 






T-i 






C3 






3 . 










































'd rt 


o 

















CO 


























0^ 






c 


o_ 




o_ 


0, 




o_ 


o_ 






in 




.^ >> 




s" 




• 


c 


0" 




0" 


0" 




0" 


to" 




im" 


■m" 




^ f13 




CO 






u- 






■* 














■* 


**i 


tfH 




kj_g 




"i 






o- 


to_ 






IM^ 




00 


CO 




IM^ 


fq 









<< 




































° ^ 




oT 






oc 


o<r 




CO 


-*" 






IM 




CO* 


03" 


>> 






^ 






a 


CO 












to 




"^ 


5* 








o 




(N 




• 


IT 






rq 


I-) 




co^ 






W 


S 


*o 




|-- 
























r-l 










CS 




































ft 




eg 










S 


















CD 











-* 












cq 

















to 















>3 




tc 


to_ 












o_ 


o_ 


o_ 


0. 




o_ 


°L 




co_ 


0^ 






il 


z; 


oT 


^ 


co" 






0" 


in 




00" 


■^ 


0" 


00" 


<m" 


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56 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 






'^ 






"^ 






"« 
s 
c 

>> 



!3i 



'^ 



^ 



CO 


te 


CO 00 CD rH (M -)l C5 


OS 


eq 


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i^ 


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c^ 


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IM. <N O CD -Til (M rH 


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d 


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o 


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00 


rH CO C- 


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^ 


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00 


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-5); •* 




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in in 


d 


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00 


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tH 


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g 




















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CD 


O 


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C3 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



57 



Monthly Fall of Bain in Indies, in 1866. 











PLACES AND 


OBSERVERS 








MONTH. 


"S 
-2*. 

ll 


=3 
a 

1-5 

S3 


^ . 

§1 


g 

it 


•i 

o 

r3 

a 

— -a 

■32 

Hi 


b 

a 
O 
1 

t 


1 o* 


S 

s 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


1.44 
5.80 
3.92 
1.94 
6.46 
4.80 
13.35 
8.98 
8.36 
3.43 
4.52 
4.32. 






3.73 
5.28 
4.70 
2.03 
5.04 
3.41 
5.42 
3.87 
5.90 
2.72 
3.74 
4.86 


1.66 
4.68 
3.50 
2.56 
4.22 
2.64 
4.54 
3.52 
3.92 
1.62 
2.32 
3.00 


1.92 
4.70 
3.61 
2.85 
4.48 
2.66 
5.56 
3.68 
3.81 
1.64 
2.71 
3.74 






1.20 
4.78 
3.50 
1.36 
5.50 
3.49 
5.70 
3.42 
6.86 
1.94 
2.60 
3.11 


2.35 
5.64 
4.29 
2.02 
5.29 
4.42 
2.03 
3.54 
5.75 
2.78 
3.97 
3.96 


Totals 


62.32 






50.70 


38.18 


41.36 






43.46 


46.04 




Note, — Melted sno^v 


is, as us 


ual 


,inc 


uded in t 


he above 


amounts 


of r 


ain 


-fall. 





* Rain-gauge at the Lake kept by E. F. Knowlton until March ; since then by Richard 
Carroll, under the direction of the Chairman of the Western Division. 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 



Table sJiowing the days in 1866 upon which rain fell, and the 
amount in inches and hundredths, compiled from observations 
made by W. H. Bradley, Superintendent of Sewers. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Apr. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept. 1 Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



1. 
2. 
3, 
4. 
5. 



.64 



.69 



44 



.08 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



.08 



.61 



.21 



.27 



.89 



.36 



.65 



3.73 



5.28 



:.70 



;.87 



2.72 



3.74 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



59 



Annual Amount of Rain-Fall, in Inches, at Lake CocJiituate, 
Boston and vicinity, 1849 to 1866, inclusive. 



PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 



1849. 

1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857, 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 



^1 



* 45.93 

* 55.86 
48.15 
34.96 
40.80 
63.10 
48.66 
49.02 
55.44 
46.44 
49.69 
69.80 
42.60 
49.46 
62.32 



« 



40.30 
58.98 
44.81 
47.94 
48.86 
45.71 
44.19 
52.16 
56.87 
52.67 
56.70 
51.46 
50.07 
61.06 
6-7.72 
49.30 
47.83 



D-d 

i °» 
o 



40.97 
54.07 
41.97 
40.51 
58.83 
45.17 
47.59 
63.79 
57.92 
45.46 

46.95 
50.14 
57.21 
56.42 

43.59 



•?» 






40.74 
62.18 
41.00 
42.24 
45.04 
41.29 
40.63 
42.38 
44.04 
37.40 
48.49 



53.66 
36.56 
35.84 
43.46 



.go 



1^ 
1-1 



51.09 
45.68 
41.00 
42.78 
43.92 
42.08 
44.89 
42.49 
49.38 
37.73 
47.51 
46.91 
43.32 
44.26 
52.37 
38.11 
37.38 
38.18 



0.2 
— . 'o 

.a • 
§« 

>> - 

■^ o 



48.41 
45.97 
52.02 
35.80 
48.41 
46.67 
42.95 
44.61 
57.81 
40.64 
38 82 
41.36 



Pi 

84.69 
61.48 
43.30 
38.58 
58.27 
46.25 
89.05 
40.97 
44.74 
44.51 
45.29 
38.24 
44.25 
50.09* 
54.17 
86.83 
44.69 
46.04 



* By J. Vannevar. 



60 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 88. 



pq 



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=71 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OP THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 



ABBREVIATED RECULATJONS. 

One volume can be taken at a time from the 
Lower Hall, and one from the Bates Hall. 
Books can be kept out li days. 

A line of 2 cents for each volume will be 
incurred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14: days. 

Any book detained more than a week be- 
yond the time limited, will be sent for at the 
expense of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lemj out of the household 
of the borrower. 

The Library hours for the delivery and re- 
turn of books are from 10 o'clock, A. M., to 
8 o'clock, P. M., in the Lower Hall ; and from 
10 o'clock, A. M., until one half hour before 
sunset in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dol- 
lar, be returned to the Library at such time 
in August as shall be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a 
book is returned. For renewing a book the 
card must be presented, together with the 
book, or with the shelf-numbers of the book;