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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 78. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



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REPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



rOE THE YEAR 1867-68. 



/.^ J 






CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Common Council, May 14, 1868. 

Oedeeed : That the Cochituate "Water Board be authorized 
to report in print. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

CHAELES H. ALLEN, President. 



In Board of Aldermen, May 18, 1868. 
Concurred. 

G. W. MESSINGER, Chairman. 



Approved May 19, 1868. 

NATH'L B. SHURTLEFF, Mayor. 



REPORT. 



CocHiTUATE Water Board Office, May 19th, 1868. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston : 

The Cochituate Water Board, in compliance with the provi- 
sions of the City Ordinance, respectfully submit their annual 
report for the year ending April 30th, 1868, together with the 
reports of the Clerk of the Board, City Engineer, Water Regis- 
trar, and the Superintendents of the Eastern and Western Divi- 
sions of the Water Works to which they would refer the City 
Council for the detailed statements of all matters relating to 
the condition and progress of the Water Works during the year. 

It gives us pleasure in being able to report that the general 
condition of the works in every department is entirely satis- 
factory. 

The supply of water has been ample to meet all the require- 
ments for which it was introduced, the average level of the 
water at the Lake having been '^^^'h ^^^^ above the bottom of 
the Conduit, which is the highest average (with one exception) 
since the water was introduced in 1848. On February 10th, 
the Lake was at high-water mark, and the water commenced to 
run over the dam into the Sudbury River, and continued to do 
so until the 13th of June; wasting during that time, accord- 
ing to the estimate of the City Engineer, 2,482,041,363 gal- 
lons : by another year, however, we shall require a portion of 
the water that is usually wasted in the spring to fill the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir. 



EBPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 

The income, as it appears by the report of the Water Registrar 

has been, $522,130 93 

Being a gain over the previous year of 35,592 68 

The estimated incomes from water rates for the 

year 1868, 550,000 00 
The expenses have been as follows : — 

For current expenses, . . . 148,462 79 

Interest and Premium on the Water debt, . 515,245 33 



,708 12 
The Treasurer has credited the Water Works 

for the same year, . . . 551,839 36 

The balance shows an expenditure over and 

above our receipts of . . . 111,868 76 

Which with ..... 451,124 65 

Expended on the Chestnut Hill Reservoir during 

the year, adds to the cost of the Water Works, 562,993 41 
Cost of the Water Works to May 1st, 1867, in- ■ 

eluding interest and premium on debt, less 

amounts received for water rates, rents, etc. 7,114,709 14 



Making the total cost, May 1st, 1868, . . $7,677,702 55 

Eastern Division. 

This division is under the charge of Mr. B. R. Jones, and 
comprises that portion of the works lying east of the Brookline 
Reservoir, including the distributing pipes and reservoirs in the 
city. During the year, the last section (1,900 feet in length) of 
the Tremont Street 30 and 36 inch main has been successfully 
raised, at an expense of $15,929.06; there has been also 2,866 
feet of 12-inch, 7,778 feet of 6-inch, and 1,952 feet of 4-inch 
pipe laid, making the total amount of pipe laid since the com- 
mencement of the works to May 1st, 141 miles 5,142 feet, to 
which are connected 1,370 gates and 1,604 Fire Hydrants. The 



6 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 78. 

number of service pipes laid has been 723, making a total to 
May 1st of 26,924. The repairs on the pipes have been ten 
per cent less than the previous year, but as usual the largest 
number of breaks have been caused by the frost, and from the 
settling of the earth. 

The most important vs^ork in this division is the laying of the 
main and service pipes in Wards 13, 14, and 15. An appropri- 
ation of $200,000 for this purpose having been made by the 
City Council on April 20th, specifications were immediately sent 
to the several foundries where such work is performed, and the 
proposals were received soon after, and the contracts awarded 
as follows : for the 24 and 12 inch pipe, to R. D. Wood 
& Co., at $3,331 per hundred for the 24-inch and $3.40 
per hundred for the 12-inch; the 6-inch pipe to S. Fulton & 
Co., at $3.50 per hundred. The pipes are to be coated with 
coal pitch varnish, to prevent rust and ochreous accretions, 
and to be delivered as required. 

For the general supply of this district, it is proposed to con- 
nect with the present 36-inch main, at the junction of Lowell 
and Washington streets, near the Providence Eailroad crossing, 
a 24-inch main, and carry the same through Washington and 
Dudley streets to Hampden street (formerly East street), and 
then to branch off from this main with smaller pipes extending 
into the several streets on the high grounds where water is 
most needed ; the principal avenues running north and south are 
to have 12 -inch mains, and the intermediate streets 6 and 4-inch. 
The required gates, hydrants and service pipes will be put in 
as the mains are laid ; considerable progress has already been 
made in this work. 

The repairs on the East Boston Reservoir is another impor- 
tant work now under way. The plan adopted is thus described 
in the Report of the City Engineer : — "To remove the entire 
stone lining of the reservoir, and a sufficient amount of the 
subjacent soil to permit a lining eighteen inches thick of tern- 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 7 

pered clay to be placed over the entire interior surface. This 
clay lining to be covered with from twelve inches to three feet 
of gravel, and the protection wall and paving to be replaced." 
This method was decided upon, after careful investigation of 
over two years, to ascertain the cause of the leaks. 

Western Division. 

This division is under the charge of Mr. Albert Stanwood, 
and includes the Lake, and that portion of the works lying be- 
tween the Lake and the Gate-house at the Brookline Reser- 
voir. 

The surroundings of the Lake are in good condition, with the 
exception of the embankment near the Saxonville Branch Rail- 
road, which is washing away, and orders have been given to 
have a slope wall built to prevent further injury. 

The Filter Dam at Pegan Brook has been re-built in the 
most thorough manner ; and it is proposed to build another dam 
of like construction, a short distance above the present one, as 
soon as the water is sufficiently low to permit it to be done. 
This, we believe, will effectually prevent the impurities of this 
brook from flowing into the Lake. 

As encroachments had been made upon the land owned by the 
city around Lake Cochituate and on the line of the Conduit, 
Mr. Joseph Crafts was employed last summer to obtain releases 
from the several parties, and over one hundred were obtained, 
many of them covering two and three parcels of land, a few 
of the abutters only having objected to signing a release, and in 
a very few instances the parties who might claim they have 
possession cannot be found. These cases will be settled by 
setting fences on the boundary lines. 

The marginal land around Dug Pond has been purchased 
and secured by deeds to the city, with the exception of a small 
piece where an ice-house now stands : as by courtesy of the 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

City this is used for its present purpose, it is not considered 
really necessary that the city should own it. By thus control- 
ling the shore, the water is secured against impurities that might 
otherwise be carried into it, and it gives an opportunity for 
raising the water to a level five feet higher than the present 
high-water mark. 

The Brookline Eeservoir has not been cleaned out for over 
ten years, and is now in such a state that, were it possible to 
keep up the supply in the city, we should consider it our im- 
perative duty to do so ; but until the Chestnut Hill Eeservoir 
is completed, it cannot be done without depriving the city of 
water for several days, as the small conduit around the reser- 
voir is only sufficient to keep one of the mains supplied. The 
Gate-house is in a leaky condition, and cannot be repaired for 
the present; for the same reason. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The work on this reservoir has been pushed forward with 
great energy during the past year, and considerable progress 
has been made towards its completion. Contracts have been 
made for the stone work for the three Gate-houses, — the whole 
to be delivered before October 1st. Nearly all the stone for 
the intermediate gate-house are already on the ground. The 
contract for the 48-inch main to connect the reservoir with 
the present mains at the Brookline Reservoir has been 
made with the Messrs. J. W. & J. F. Starr, of Camden, N. J., 
at 3.y5_2_c. per lb., and they have commenced on the work and 
will deliver a portion before 1st of July, and the whole be- 
fore December 1st. The route for this main has been laid out 
and surveyed, and possession will be taken as soon as the pa- 
pers can be prepared. The large drain, seven thousand nine 
hundred and eighty feet in length, for carrying off the surface 
water, has been built during the year ; this drain commences on 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 9 

the northerly side of the Lawrence meadow, and extends entire- 
ly around the westerly, southerly and easterly sides of the reser- 
voir and continuing down Beacon Street to a short distance be- 
yond Rockland Street, and varies in size from two to six feet in 
diameter, requiring in its construction 1,367,500 brick, and over 
4,000 barrels of cement. In the City Engineer's report will be 
found a full description of the magnitude of this work. 

The foundation for the intermediate gate-house has been 
successfully laid ; to enable this to be done, it became necessary 
to remove a portion of the present conduit#fn order to keep up 
the supply of water 0uring its construction, a wooden flume 
was carried around the opening, so put together that it can be 
taken apart and used again in the event of any accident to the 
conduit. 

An account of the amount of work done, and what remains 
to be finished, will be found in the very full report of the City 
Engineer. 

Water Registrar Department. 

By reference to the report of the "Water Registrar, it will be 
seen that the total number of water takers for the year 1868 
is 28,104, being an increase over the previous year of 350; of 
this number, 19,854 are for dwelling-houses, 4,395 for stores 
and shops, and 1,047 are for stables, the remaining 2,808 are for 
various purposes. There were 610 cases where the water was 
turned off for non-payment, being 33 less than the previous 
year ; of this number, 116 are still remaining off. The num- 
ber of meters now applied is 895 ; these meter accounts, al- 
though a continual source of trouble to the Board, are undoubt- 
edly of great advantage to the city in increasing the income, 
and checking the waste. The great danger of waste can be 
readily perceived when it is borne in mind that on the first of 
January there were 100,352 water fixtures in use in this city, 

2 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

being an increase of 6,025 over the previous year, and this will 
undoubtedly be largely increased by the annexation of Rox- 
bury. As many of these fixtures require two taps, it would be 
fair to estimate that at the present time there are 150,000 
places where there is liability of waste from carelessness or by 
the fixtures being out of order. 

The average daily consumption of water during the year has 
been 13,565,000 gallons, being an increase over the previous 
year of 1,336,000 gallons. The least average in any one 
month was 12,301,000 gallons, in the month of May; and the 
largest average was 15,434,000 gallons in the month of Decem- 
ber. 

Respectfully submitted. 

NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE. 
BENJ. JAMES. 
BENJ. F. STEVENS. 
ALEXANDER WADSWORTH. 
CHARLES R. TRAIN. 
JOSEPH M. WIGHTMAN. 
GEORGE LEWIS. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



11 



OEEICE OF THE COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 
BOSTON, May 5, 1868. 



To the President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 

Sir, — 
The following is a statement of the Expenditures and Receipts 
of this department for the year commencing May 1, 1867, and 
ending April 30, 1868: 



EXPENDITURES. 

Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. 

Plumbing shop " " 

Raising water pipes on Tremont Street 

Land and water rights 

Stable 

Taxes 

Tools 

Travelling expenses 

Fountains 

Laying main pipes, etc., for stock, etc 

Postage and expresses 

Reservoirs — Beacon Hill 

" East Boston 

" South Boston 

" Brookline 

Aqueduct repairs 
Printing (including "Water Registrar's and Super 
intendent's) ..... 

Carried forward, 



$331 63 

87 60 

15,929 06 

2,619 37 

1,198 50 

234 23 

764 82 

9 50 

308 54 

982 51 

56 98 

1,081 49 

1,431 51 

340 75 

1,394 65 

343 01 

939 69 

$28,053 84 



12 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Brought fojLward^ 
Stationery (including Water Registrar's and Super^ 

intendent's) 
Salaries (including clerks and inspectors in "Water 

Registrar's department) 
Main pipe 
Service pipe 
Off and on water 
Extra inspectors 
Wages, — laying main pipe 

" " service pipe, etc 

" blacksmith shop 

" plumbing shop 

" proving yard 
Upper yard, finishing buildings, etc. 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Meters .... 
Maintaining meters 
Repairing main pipe 
" service pipe 
" hydrants 
" streets 
" stopcocks 
Stopcocks 
Hydrants 

Lake .... 
Proving yard, stock, etc. 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
Tolls and ferriage 
Oil .... 

Carting 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir . 

Amount drawn for the Water Works 



$28,053 84 
402 24 

10,619 18 

36,960 64 

11,457 05 

4,852 94 

8,625 55 

2,922 99 

5,502 12 

1,308 70 

126 00 

4,712 30 

1,855 22 

2,030 64 

627 80 

1,964 78 

2,908 40 

5,350 39 

3,863 72 

3,135 56 

646 83 

2,878 61 

924 27 

2,023 10 

1,379 17 

1,498 25 

75 00 

61 50 

96 00 

451,124 65 

,987 44 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 13 

Brought forward, $597,987 44 
Amount drawn for the drive-way around Chestnut 

Hill Eeservoir ...... 71,368 13 



Total drawn for by the Board . . $669,355 57 

And which is charged as follows : 

To Chestnut Hill Reservoir .... 451,124 65 

Waterworks . .... 146,862 79 

Drive-way ; 71,368 13 



Total from April 30, 1867, to May 1, 1868, $669,355 57 
Total amount charged Water Works . . $597,987 44 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash Paid City Treasurer. 

Received for grass and pasture, $140 00 

" " fines for waste, etc., 2,867 00 

" " off and on water, 

for repairs, 1,528 00 

" " Pipe, laying, repair- 
ing, etc., 6,765 00 

" " wood, oxen, etc. sold 
Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir, 615 70 11,915 70 



,071 74 



THE ABOVE IS CREDITED TO 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir . . . . . $615 70 

Water Works 11,300 00 



.1,915 70 



Amount drawn for Water Works not including 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir .... $146,862 79 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

EXTENSION OE THE WOEKS. 

Main pipe $36,960 64 

Wages laying main pipe . . 2,992 99 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc. . 982 51 $40,936 14 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1867, to 

May 1, 1868 $105,926 65 

Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, to 

May 1, 1868. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . . .$4,043,718 21 
« « Water Board, in 1850 . . 366,163 89 

" " Cochituate Water Board, from 

January 1,1851, to May 1, 1867 . . .2,252,440 20 
Amount drawn from April 30, 1867, to May 1, 

1868, for Water Works 597,987 44 

$7,260,309 74 
Amount paid the City Treasurer by 

the Commissioners . . . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by Water Board, 1850, 8,153 52 
" " Cochituate Water 

Board, to May 1, 1867 . . 161,439 03 
Amount paid from April 30, 1867, 

to May 1, 1868 .... $11,915 73 

$229,156 66 



Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by the 
Commissioners and Water Boards, for the 
Water Works $7,031,153 08 



Gross payments (including interest, premium, 

etc.), for ac't of the Water Works . . 14,141,028 50 
Gross receipts 6,463,325 95 



Net cost to the city, May 1, 1868 . . . $7,677,702 55 



SAM'L N. DYER, 
Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARB. 15 

Office of City Engesteer, 
Boston, May 5th, 1868. 

N. J. Bradlee, Esq., President Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir, — The following Report relating to the Water Works is 
presented in compliance with the ninth section of the ordinance 
relating to the Department of Engineering and Surveying : 

Eastern Division. 

The Report of the Superintendent will furnish the details of 
operations and the general condition of affairs in this division. 

On page 33 will be found the usual table of the average 
monthly heights of the water in the Brookline and City Reser- 
voirs above " tide-marsh level." 

The East Boston and South Boston Reservoirs have been shut 
off from general circulation during the entire year, and the 
heights of water do not indicate the average head. 

The condition of the East Boston Reservoir has been such, 
that it was not deemed safe to raise the water above fifteen feet. 

During the months of September and October, observations 
were made to determine the amount of leakage and the exact 
localities where it occurred. The result showed that, with four- 
teen feet of water, the leakage amounted to 19,000 gallons per 
day, and, with twenty feet, nearly 50,000 gallons. 

The places where the water made its appearance on the out- 
side indicated that the leakage was not confined to that portion 
of the bank which was built above the natural surface ; but that 
a very large portion found its way through veins of sand and 
gravel in the natural soil, and below the bottom of the puddle- 
trench, which was built only three feet below the natural surface. 

These observations confirmed my previously expressed opin- 
ions, and the plan which I had suggested the year before was 
adopted. This plan was, to remove the entire stone lining of 
the reservoir, and a sufficient amount of the subjacent soil to 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

permit a lining, eighteen inches thick, of tempered clay, to be 
placed over the entire interior surface, this clay lining to be 
covered with from tvs^elve inches to three feet of gravel, and the 
protection wall and paving to be re-placed. 

The work of repairs is now being executed in accordance with 
the aforesaid plan. 

Extension of the Woeks in Roxburt. 

In the early part of last year, the question of supplying the 
City of Roxbury with water, in case of annexation, was consid- 
ered, and certain estimates of the cost of distribution were then 
made and submitted to your Board at the request of the Com- 
missioners on Annexation. Although those estimates were hur- 
riedly made, and the details of the system of distribution were 
not very fully considered, yet it is believed the actual cost will 
not vary materially from those figures. 

Since the consummation of annexation, surveys, levels, and 
plans, have been made, and a general plan of distribution decided 
upon, as follows, viz : 

The supply main is to be twenty-four inches in diameter, to 
be connected with the thirty-six-inch main in Tremont Street, 
near the Providence Railroad crossing, and to be laid through 
"Washington and Dudley streets, as far as Hampden Street. 
This main will connect with twelve-inch distribution pipes at 
Tremont and Pynchon streets, at Shawmut Avenue and Washing- 
ton street and at Hampden Street and Grove Hall Avenue. 
The principal avenues running North and South will be supplied 
with twelve-inch pipes, and the smaller intermediate streets "with 
six and four inch pipe. It was originally proposed to make the 
supply main sixteen inches in diameter ; but, for various reasons, 
it was finally deemed to be more prudent to make it twenty-four 
inches. This increase of size, while involving no additional loss 
of head in other sections of the city, will be a positive gain in 



EEPOET OF THE WATEE BOAED. 17 

this respect to the Highland District. It will form, eventually, 
part of a new line to South Boston, and one that is really needed 
now, to secure a greater head and to provide a much needed safe- 
guard in case of accident to the single line, which is now the 
only reliance of the citizens of that rapidly growing section. 

Specifications and drawings of the pipes and special cast- 
ings required for this district have been made, and contracts 
for furnishing the same, and also the hydrants and gates 
have been awarded, — all the pipes, etc., to be delivered 
before December first. 

Work has been commenced by the Superintendent, in the 
vicinity of Mt. Pleasant and also in Highland Street and 
will be prosecuted with all possible despatch. In those sec- 
tions where ledge occurs, the progress will be necessarily 
slow. 

All the pipes contracted for will be coated with coal 
pitch varnish, prepared and applied substantially according to 
Dr. Smith's process, which is described as follows in the 
specifications, viz : 

a. Every pipe and casting must be entirely free from dust, 
sand or rust when the varnish is applied. 

h. The varnish or pitch is to be made from coal tar, dis- 
tilled until all the naphtha is removed, the material deodorized, 
and the pitch reduced to about the consistency of wax or very 
thick molasses ; pitch which becomes hard and brittle when cold 
will not answer for this use. 

c. Pitch of the proper quality having been obtained, it must 
be heated in a suitable vessel, to a temperature of three hun- 
dred degrees Fahrenheit, and must be maintained at not less 
than that temperature during the dipping. As the material will 
deteriorate after a number of pipes have been dipped, fresh 
pitch must be frequently added, and at least eight per cent of 
heavy linseed oil must be added daily with the fresh pitch, and 
the vessel must be entirely emptied of the pitch and refilled with 
3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

fresh material as often as may be necessary to insure the per- 
fection of the process. 

d. Each casting shall be kept immersed from thirty to forty- 
five minutes, or until it attains the temperature of three hun- 
dred degrees Fahrenheit, and, if required by the engineer, shall 
be heated to such temperature as he may designate before it is 
dipped. 

e. After the bath is completed, the castings will be removed 
and placed in such a position to drip that the thickness of the 
varnish shall be uniform. 

f. The coating on the pipes and castings must be tenacious 
when cold, and not brittle, nor disposed to scale off, and when 
it shall appear to the inspector that the coating has not been 
satisfactorily applied, the pipe or casting shall be thoroughly 
scraped and cleaned and re-coated. 

This process is generally adopted by engineers of Water 
Works in this country, where cast-iron is the material used for 
water pipes. It has been tested for over ten years, and pipes 
laid on our own works in 1858 are found to be almost entirely 
free from rust or ochreous accretions. 

The hydrant adopted for the extensions is the one known 
as the "Lowry Hydrant," which, from observation and fron^ 
inquiries made in localities where it has been tested, I believe to 
combine more advantages with fewer defects than any other. 
A contract for any number we may require, — from 100 to 300, 
has been made with the Boston Machine Co. 

A contract has also been made with the aforesaid company 
for all the stop-gates required, the pattern being the kind called 
the " swing-valve," upon which the company has a patent. 
These gates, manufactured in the thorough style of workman- 
ship characteristic of this company, are vastly superior to our 
old styles, and will, undoubtedly, supersede them eventually. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 19 

Lake Cochituate. 

For details of the condition of affairs on the "Western Divi- 
sion and at the Lake, see the report of the Superintendent. 

Surveys have been made by this Department of the land con- 
tiguous to the shore of Dug Pond, which it wcis desirable that 
the city should own and control j and, during the Winter, sound- 
ings were taken of the depth of water in all parts of the Pond. 

The annual examination of the interior of the Conduit from 
the Lake to Charles River was recently made, and it was found 
to be in excellent condition as to cracks and fissures, but very 
dirty and slimy, and should be cleaned before hot weather. 

The following notes of the examination will give a good idea 
of the state of the Conduit : 

First Division. 

At Station 7 to 8 is a fine crack in top arch. 

At Stations 17|-, 96 and 97|-, fissures with considerable water 
and sand running in. 

At Stations 154 to 155 is a fine crack in top arch. 

Between Stations 157 and 158 is a crack which has been re- 
paired, and is now in good condition. 

From Station 168 to 169, a repaired crack, in good order. 

Near Station 169, a short crack, which should be pointed. 

Stations 169|- to 170, small crack in top arch. 

Station 172 to 1 15^, repaired crack, in good order, except a 
small portion near 174 which was left without pointing. 

Stations 182-^- to 183, a fine crack in top arch. 

Stations 2071 to 20 8^, a fine crack in top arch. 

Stations 2451 to 247|^, cracks that have been repaired are all 
in good order ; but there are several small cracks that have not 
been cemented. 

Stations 254-|- to 256, a very fine crack in top. 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

A little past 272 is a crack, — part of which has been ce- 
mented, — extending to about 274^. 

Second Division. 

At Stations 121 to 13, is a fine crack in top; also between 
16 and 17. 

This division is in better condition as to repairs and cleanli- 
ness than the first ; and the repairs which were made of the very 
bad portion on the Ware's Yalley embankment have stood re- 
markably well. 

On the 1st of January, 1867, the water at the Lake was 12 
feet 2 inches above the bottom of the Conduit and remained, 
with slight fluctuations, at about that height, until February 9th, 
when it began to rise; and on the 12th it had reached a level 
of 14 feet 1 inch, and we were obliged to run 17 inches in 
depth over the Outlet Dam. The Lake continued full until the 
13th of June. August 1st, it stood at 11 feet 7 inches; August 
24th, at 12 feet 8 inches; October 29th, at 10 feet 81 inches; 
December 25th, at 10 feet 1^ inches, — the lowest point reached 
during the year, — and on the last day of the year it stood at 
10 feet 5 inches. 

It will be seen by reference to the table on page 30, that the 
average level of the water in the Lake during the past year 
was 12^3q^q- feet above the bottom of the Conduit, the highest 
average on record, except in 1863. 

The statement on page 27 shows that 35 per cent of the rain- 
fall was actually received into the Lake, and that the average 
daily capacity of the Lake, as a source of supply for a period 
of fourteen years, is 21,716,700 gallons, and deducting the 
average daily waste for the same period, it will be seen that the 
supply actually available is about 18,000,000 gallons per day. 

The following statement shows the amount of water wasted 
at the Outlet Dam during the year 1867 : 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 21 

February, 20 days .... 956,216,492 gallons. 

March, 26 days .... 562,377,743 " 

April, 25 days .... 678,461,904 '^ 

May, 21 days .... 284,985,224 " 



Total, 92 days . . . 2,482,041,363 " 
Being about one-half the amount actually consumed. 

Consumption of Water. 

On pages 28 and 29 will be found the usual tables of the 
Consumption of Water ; from which it appears that the average 
daily amount consumed in 1867 was 13,565,000 gallons, an in- 
crease over the previous year of 1,336,000 gallons. The least 
average in any one month was 12,301,000 gallons per day, in 
May, and the largest average was in December, amounting to 
15,434,000 gallons. 

Probably one-quarter of the water drawn from the Brookline 
Reservoir is wasted ; and, if every one paid for water as they 
pay for gas, by meter measurement we should see my statement 
verified, and the consumption reduced to 10,000,000 gallons. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Since the date of the last report, this work has been pushed 
with all possible energy, and as large a force of men and teams 
has been employed as could work to advantage. 



22 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



The following is a statement of the average number of men 
and teams employed since the commencement of the work : 



1866. April 

" May 

" June 

" July 

" August.... 

" September 

" October . . . 

" November. 

" December . 

1867. January . . . 
" February.. 
" March .... 
" April .^... 



MEN. 


TEAMS. 


182 


9 


327 


18h 


385 


23 


400 


27 


424 


S2h 


396 


S9h 


386 


40 


319 


40 


270 


40 


257 


40 


240 


40 


222 


40 


373 


45^ 



1867. May . 
" June 



" July 

" August . . . 

" September, 

" October .. 

" November, 

" December, 

1868. January .. 

" February . 

'• March.... 

" April 

" May 



MEN. 



406 
611 
734 
755 
652 
594 
522 
[413 
355 



TEAMS. 



49 

49 

59 

59 

64^ 

65 

65 

65 

65^ 

66 

66 

66 



The work on the banks and slope wall was prosecuted from 
April 15th to Nov. 16th, and was resumed May 6th, and is now 
progressing well. The total number of lineal feet of bank com- 
pleted amounts to about 10,250, of which about 8,820 feet is 
covered with the protection wall. There remains to be built 
about 4,065 feet, 375 of which is in the Lawrence meadow sec- 
tion, and can easily be finished the present summer. About 
1,100 feet of the balance, in the lower section, will be very 
heavy embankment, being from 20 to 40 feet in height. 

The drain alluded to in last year's report was commenced on 
the 10th of May, and completed on the 27th of November. The 
following is a statement of the lengths of the various sizes, 



EEPOET OF THE WATEE BOAED. 23 

which vary somewhat from the lengths as proposed to be built, 
and as stated in last year's report : 

283 ft. of 6 ft. X 6 ft. 4 inches. 



482 




4 ft. 8 in. 


X 5 ft. 


1,820 




4 ft. 


X 4 ft. 4 


1,803 




3 ft. 4 in. 


X 3 ft. 8 


1,561 




3 ft. 


X 3 ft. 4 


1,200 




2 ft. 6 in. 


X 3 ft. 


605 




2 ft. 6 in. 


barrel 


154 




2 ft. 


u 


60 




3 ft. 


X 1 ft. 6 


12 




4 ft. 


X 4 ft. 4 



" rectangular. 



Total, 7,980 feet. 

This drain commences on the northerly side of the Lawrence 
meadow, and extends entirely around the westerly, southerly and 
easterly sides of the reservoir, and continues down Beacon 
Street, to a point a few hundred feet east of Rockland Street-. 
It was a very important and costly portion of the work done 
during last year, requiring 1,367,500 brick, and. about 4,300 
barrels of cement in its construction. Being underground, and 
out of sight, it contributes nothing towards a visible show of 
progress. This drain intercepts the surface drainage, which 
would otherwise flow into the reservoir. A considerable portion 
of this drain is laid from 15 to 20 feet below the surface, and 
several hundred feet of it in solid rock. It passes under the Con- 
duit which leads to Brookline Reservoir, where it crosses the new 
location of Beacon Street ,' and, as the excavation at this point 
was in solid ledge, upon which the Conduit itself rested, the ut- 
most care was requisite to avoid injury by blasting. Workmen 
were employed night and day upon this particular spot, and 
every precaution was taken to avoid any casualty, which might se- 
riously interrupt the supply of water to the Brookline Reservoir. 
The work was successfully accomplished, and the entire trench 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

around the drain and Conduit, for a length of about 50 feet, and 
as high as the top of the invert of the Conduit, was filled solid 
with concrete. 

The new portion of Beacon Street has been graded, and, 
although not in complete order, will probably be open to public 
travel, and the old portion discontinued before the first of June. 
About 400 feet of the Conduit, in the vicinity of the intermediate 
gate-house, has been removed, and is to be rebuilt upon a 
masonry foundation carried down to solid rock about eight feet 
below the bottom of the reservoir. This section was originally 
built on a clay embankment, and has been badly cracked. It is 
located across the narrow gap which divides the upper and 
lower reservoirs, and hence the care and expense requisite at 
this point, in order that the dam may be tight and strong and no 
injury result to the Conduit, in case of one section of the reser- 
voir being empty and the other full. While this work and that 
of building the intermediate gate-house is being prosecuted, 
the water is carried around the gap in a wooden flume, so con- 
structed that it can be taken apart, and used again in a similar 
emergency. The foundations are already in for the interme- 
diate gate-house, the cut granite is nearly all delivered, and a 
contract has been made for its erection, work upon which will 
soon commence. 

The bank upon the upper section being nearly completed, 
there only remains, to complete this section ready to receive the 
water, the removal of about 40,000 cubic yards of muck and sur- 
plus material, the building of the influent and intermediate gate- 
houses, and the building of less than 400 feet of bank and slope- 
wall, all of which the Superintendent intends to do before winter. 

The retaining wall, containing 2,380 cubic yards of stone, 
referred to in last year's report, has been finished, ready to 
receive the coping stone, and the filling in the rear for the drive- 
way nearly finished. Other parts of the drive-way have been 
graded and ballasted, and a portion graded and pai'tially bal- 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



25 



lasted, amounting in all to 5,450 feet graded, and about 4,700 
feet ballasted. A considerable portion around the Lawrence 
meadow has been covered with broken stone and a temporary 
coating of gravel, so that people who desire can form a tolerable 
idea of the quality of roadway which we intend to have. 

Contracts have been made for furnishing all the cut granite 
for the gate-houses, and for the erection of the same. 

A contract has also been made with J. W. and J. F. Starr, of 
Camden, N. J., for the 48-inch pipe, about 7,400 feet in length, 
to connect the reservoir with the present mains in Brookline ; 
said pipes and castings to be all delivered before December 1. 

A contract has also been made with the Boston Machine 
Company for all the gates for our gate-houses and for regula- 
ting the connection with the present mains. 

A route for the 48-inch main has been surveyed and staked 
out, and the amount of land to be taken from the several owners 
has been surveyed. Possession will be taken as soon as the 
papers can be prepared, and the work of grading commenced. ■ 

The following statement shows the amount expended from the 
appropriation for Chestnut Hill Reservoir for engineering, dur- 
ing the year ending April 30, 1868, viz : 

Salary of Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer, . $1,938 00 

S. C. Horn, Assistant Engineer . . 891 00 

W. F. Learned, Rodman ... 52 00 

D. C. Sanger, « . . ... 336 00 
A. Chester, " . . . , 72 00 
J. Sullivan, Axeman . . . . 594 00 

E. R. Brown, Architect .... 1,818 00 

$5,701 00 
Incidental expenses . . . . 132 83 

Total $5,833 83 

i 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

Besides the tables already aUuded to in tMs report; there mil 
be found appended the usual tables relating to the amount of 
rainfall ; and to the several gentlemen who have kindly furnished 
materials for these tables I desire to express my thankM 
acknowledgments. 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOARD. 



27 





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CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 






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-* 


lO 


lO 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


IM 


t- 
































w 




CO 
i-H 


i-H 


rH 


0^ 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


o 

rH 


r-l 
r-l 


r-l 


IM 

rH 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


(~, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 1 






























U3 


OS 


rH 


■* 


o 


00 


CO 


t^ 


■* 


<M 


1—1 


I-H 


-* 


00 


09 


to 


a 


o 


o 


t^ 


C<l 


CO 


CO 


(M 


05 


05 


00 


-* 


r-l 


CO 


t~ 


>o 


CO 


CO 


IM 


rH 


CO 


ta 


CO 


CD 


<M 


o 




T-H 


(M 




o 


o 

1-1 


^ 


CO 

rH 


r-< 


r-l 


T-l 


rH 

rH 


CO 
r-l 


I-H 




o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 




00 


CO 


o 


00 


-*< 


CO 


00 


CO 


(M 


<M 


IM 


CO 






























lO 


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o 


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o 


CO 


-* 


CO 


o 


o 


rH 


CO 


l^ 


CO 


CO 


O 


'tl 


0-1 


-* 


o 


00 


la 


(M 




t^ 


CO 


o 


-* 


r-l 


b- 


CO 


T— 1 


lO 




05 


o 




t- 


t- 


CO 


CO 


CO 
































CS 


o 


o 


00 


o 


Ci 


^ 


^ 


T-l 


o 

rH 


o 

rH 


rH 


o 

r-l 




O 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


• 


<M 


c<» 


1-H 


lO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


rH 


■* 


00 


(M 


CO 


o 






























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m 


•* 


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00 


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o 


1^ 


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lO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


-* 


r-l 


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rH 


CO 


CO 


05 


o 


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CD 


CO 


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t- 


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t^ 


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o 


t- 


t- 


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O 


o 


05 


00 


03 


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o 


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00 


CO 


o 


Oi 






r-l 








'-' 












r-l 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 


ta 


CO 


tM 


o 


-f 


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N 


05 


t- 


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CO 


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CO 


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CO 


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05 


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o 


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^ 


00 


IM 


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la 


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o 


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CO 


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CO 


t- 


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o 


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05 


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o 


o 


f-H 


00 


o 


CO 


00 


05 


o 


o 


t- 


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CO 


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00 


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00 


00 


CO 


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t- 


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o 




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t- 


no 


00 


JO 


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CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


C-J 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


t- 


CD 


CO 




w 


(M 


T— ■ 


CO 


(M 


o 


r-l 


(M 


(M 


t- 


1*1 


CO 


00 
































1:^ 

O 


t- 


CO 


lO 


CO 


t- 


t- 


t~ 


t- 


CD 


CO 


t- 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(-, 


i~, 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 




t:^ 


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CI 


o 




lO 


cq 


CD 


lO 


CO 


iO 


o 


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s 




























rH 


-* 


r-l 


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CO 


CD 


■^ 


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t^ 


t^ 


00 


OO 


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^ 


CO 


-* 


o 


rH 


o 


00 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


(N 


00 


05 


CO 


05 


W5 


o 


lO 


lO 


05 


o 


00 






























lO 


Ui 


■* 


^ 


»« 


CD 


00 


00 


CO 


■* 


1** 


ta 


w 




O 




o 




o 


O 


f~, 


(-, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








o 




o 


O 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






























o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


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lO 




o 


o 


o 


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o 


lO 


o 


o 


00 


t- 




la 




CO 


CO 


00 




CO 


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00 


CO 


CD 






























i-H 




I-H 




CO 


■* 


•* 


-* 


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'^ 


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CO 


05 


























tH 


w 


























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a 


1 


g 

(U 


1 








Irs 


s 




u 

<u 

1 

o 


u 

4> 

Q 
> 

o 


u 

1 

o 
Q 


c2 

a; 
u 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



29 





00 
































CO 
































00 
































rH 


































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o 


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o 


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• 


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o 


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to 


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^ 


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1-H 


Ifll 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


-* 


to 






00 


i-H 


CO 


o 


t^ 


o 


IM 


to 


-* 


00 


r-l 


o 


eo 


CO 






i-i 


ta 


CO 


1-H 


b- 


eo 


CO 


IM 


to 


rH 


to 


b- 


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to 








































CO 


i-H 


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r-l 


cq 

l-H 


IM 


CO 


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r-l 


CO 


IM 

rH 




eo 








o 


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^ 


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o 


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o 


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o 








o 


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^ 


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o 


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o 


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S 


o 


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00 


CO 


ymm^ 


IM 


CO 


IM 


w 


OS 








Iffl 


00 


00 


ta 


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-* 


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05 




r-l 


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r-l 


oo 


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w 


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00 


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00 


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iH 


I-H 


r-l 


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r-t 


r-l 
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rH 


rH 
r-l 


rH 


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r-l 








O 


o 


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^ 


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(-, 








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o 


o 


o 


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00 
































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00 


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r-l 


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05 


o 


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to 


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■* 


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o 


05 


CO 


eo 


(M 


-* 


CO 


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b- 


00 


CO 








































eo 

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I-H 

I-H 


eo 

rH 


y-t 


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CO 

rH 


IM 
r-l 


I-H 
rH 


r-l 


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rH 


IM 

I-H 








t~, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<r> 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


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, 


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05 


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o 




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05 


t- 


t^ 


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to 


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00 


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1-H 


00 

rH 


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r-l 


»o 

rH 


r-l 


rH 


CO 








o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


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o 


o 


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o 


o 


o 


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o 


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o 


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o 


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to 






s 
































cq 


00 


l_4 


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eq 


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ta 


CO 


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t-H 


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CO 




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o 


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o 


b- 


O 


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IM 






































CO 
l-H 


I-H 


CO 
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ta 


)0 


CO 
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to 


CO 
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b- 

rH 


to 

rH 


CO 
rH 


o 

r-l 


CO 

r-l 








o 


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O 








o 


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o 


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I-I 


1:^ 

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-* 


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rH 


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r-l 








a 


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a 


to 


cs 


CO 


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-* 








CO 


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00 


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CO 


to 


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b- 


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o 








I- 




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1— 


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o 


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ta 


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t-H 


o 


c?s 


b- 


CO 


1:- 


CO 


CO 


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CO 


to 


00 








IM 


cq 


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r-l 


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r-i 


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Q 








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w 


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30 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



•^ 



CM 



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1^ 



V 



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. 


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>> 





REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



31 



Annual Amount of Rain-Fall, in Inches, at 
vicinity, 1849 to 1867, 



Lake Cochituate, Boston 
inclusive. 



and 



YEAR. 



) 1849., 
1850 . 
1851., 

1852 . 

1853 . - 

1854 . 

1855 . ■ 
1856., 

' 1857., 

1858 . , 

1859 . , 

1860 . , 

1861 . 

1862 . 

1863 . 

1864 . 
1865. 
1866 . 
1867. 



PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 



>>'3 






* 45.93 
*55 86 
43.15 
34.96 
40.80 
63.10 
48.66 
49.02 
55.44 
46.44 
49.69 
69.30 
42.60 
49.46 
62.32 
56.25 






'^ ■ 



moo.a 



pq 



40.30 
63.98 
44.31 
47.94 
48.86 
45.71 
44.19 
52.16 
56.87 
52.67 
56.70 
51.46 
50.07 
61.06 
67.72 
49.30 
47.83 
50.70 
55.64 



O? 



bt,0 



40.97 
54.07 
41.97 
40.51 
53.83 
45.17 
47.59 
53.79 
57.92 
45.46 



46.95 
50.14 
57.21 
56.42 



43.59 



41.71 






5«i 



^ 



40.74 
62.13 
41.00 
42.24 
45.04 
41.29 
40.63 
42.33 
44.04 
37.40 
48.49 



53.66 
36.56 
35.84 
43.46 
41.40 



0) O 



S 3 

(J 



51.09 
45.68 
41.00 
42.78 
43.92 
42.08 
44.89 
42.49 
49.38 
37.73 
47.51 
46.91 
43.32 
44.26 
52.37 
38.11 
37.38 
38.18 
45.54 






^3 



48.41 
45.97 
52.02 
35.80 
48.41 
46.67 
42.95 
44.61 
57.81 
40.64 
38.82 
41.36 
45.87 



' By J. Vannevar. 



32 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Conduit. 

The following table shows the dififerent heights at which the 
water has been running, and the number of days in each month 
at the different heights : 

The height of the Conduit is six feet four inches. 





HEIGHTS IN FEET AND INCHES. 


1867. 


o 


£ 
^ 




00 


OS 

Til 


O r 
■4 •. 


H 

-> o 




a 


■0 






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<o 


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to 


s 

to 


o «\ 


•* 


to 




NUMBER OF DATS IN EACH MONTH. 


January, 
February, 
March . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . 
August . 
Septembr. 
October . 
Novembr. 
Decembr. 

Total, 


11 


1 

'\ 
1 

1 

3 


1 
1 


2 

1 
3 


2 
2 


12 

3 
18 
27 
13 
3 
4 

1 
19 
9 

109 


11 
1 

1 

3^ 


3 1 
6 1 
3 . 

5 . 
3 . 

1 . 

6 . 
1 . 

7 . 
3 . 

Va 2 


14 

21 

* 
51 


2 
3 

8 
13 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
5 


1 
1 

2 


1 

8 

1 

5 
24 
3 

2 

1 
45 


3 
4 

1 

5 
13 


1 

1 
2 


1 

1 

2 


1 

1 

2 


3 
2 

1 

9 
3 
6 
1 
5 

29 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 

3 


1 
1 


1 

1 

2 


1 
1 


1 

3 

2 
2 

1 

9 


1 
1 


1 
1 


• 
1 

1 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



33 



Average monthly Heights of Water in Reservoirs at Broohline, Beacon Hill, 
South and East Boston, 1861—67 inclusive. 





BROOKLINE. 


BEACON HILL. 


Month. 


1S61. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 1866. 


1867. 


\ January 


122.81 


122.46 


123.64 


122.37 


123.31 


122.28 


122.00 


116.61 


117.48 


118.36 


117.72 


119.18 


119.20 


119.11 


Febru'ry 


122.68 


122.85 


123.23 


122.61 


122.82 


122.47 


123.12 


118.93 


119.46 


118.18 


117.54 


118.91 


119.65 


118.59 


March . 


123.32 


123.52 


123.23 


123.62 


123.26 


123.19 


123.05 


119.05 


119.18 


118.03 


116.38 


120.58 


120.72 


119.45 


AprU . . 


124.01 


124.18 


123.85 


123.82 


123.38 


123.45 


123.00 


118.91 


117.91 


117.27 


117.21 


121.28 


120.70 


119.86 


May . . . 


124.04 


124.00 


123.52 


123.62 


122.65 


123.04 


123.07 


119.06 


117.59 


116.33 


116.53 


120.31 


119.53 


118.50 


June . . 


123.68 


123.25 


123.17 


122.66 


123.23 


123.29 


122.34 


117.32 


116.39 


115.40 


115.31 


120.56 


118.53 


118.34 


July . . . 


122.68 


123.73 


122.76 


122.87 


123.33 


122.97 


122.98 


116.48 


116.46 


116.34 


115.32 


121.23 


119.51 


119.00 


August . 


123.71 


123.70 


123.11 


122.64 


123.39 


122.80 


122.23 


114.18 


116.22 


116.05 


115.19 


119.83 


119.17 


117.70 


Sept. , . 


123.76 


123.64 


123.36 


122.03 


123.29 


122.81 


122.52 


113.14 


116.22 


116.12 


115.91 


119.03 


119.39 


120,46 


October 


123.79 


123.85 


122.26 


123.19 


123.29 


123.03 


122.65 


115.91 


. . 


115.87 


118.17 j 118.43 


119.50 


120.46 


Nov. . , 


123.80 


124.07 


123.63 


122.78 


123.33 


122.75 


122.89 


116.74 


117.20 


116.85 


118.55 


120.14 


119.78 


120.84 


Dec 


124.00 


123.46 


122.53 


122.29 


123.24 


122.64 


122.37 


117.45 


115.23 


118.30 


117.35 


120.50 


119.37 


120.02 


Average 


123.52 


123.56 


123.19 


122.87 


123.21 


122.89 


122.69 


116.98 


117.21 


116,92 


116.77 


120.00 


119.59 


119.33 





SOUTH BOSTON. 






EAST BOSTON. 






Month. 


1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


January 


115.03 


113.66 


115.73 


110.63 


114.21 


114.38 


112.46 


95.37 


96.26 


95.64 


90.22 


96.12 


93.61 


91.89 


Febru'ry 


115.07 


114.08 


115.54 


110.94 


113.42 


114.44 


111.36 


93.05 


94.94 


93.85 


92.98 


97.00 


96.61 


92.06 


March . 


115.12 


114.12 


115.36 


111.13 


113.64 


113.51 


111.74 


94.60 


95.75 


94.29 


93.50 


94.83 


94.22 


91.69 


April . . 


115.32 


114.93 


114.73 


112.07 


114.82 


114.99 


111.88 


98.07 


96.71 


95.65 


96.16 


96.52 


96.47 


90.91 


May . . . 


113.83 


115.74 


112.71 


111.64 


115.44 


114.90 


111.63 


97.85 


96.99 


93.07 


97.68 


96.04 


95,85 


89.63 


June . . 


112.58 


114.22 


111.39 


109.06 


114.91 


114.32 


111.19 


96.22 


95.99 


91.10 


94.22 


93,91 


93.71 


91.82 


July . . . 


110.91 


114.23 


109.75 


108.57 


114.36 


113.96 


111.53 


95.00 


96.13 


90.43 


92.34 


96.82 


95.35 


94.60 


August. 


112.92 


114.03 


109.80 


109.53 


113.80 


114.07 


111.90 


97.34 


93.96 


91.23 


92.84 


95.78 


93,85 


94.16 


Sept. .. 


112.96 


114.04 


109.64 


110.21 


113.69 


113.41 


111.70 


95.76 


95.57 


91.96 


95.00 


94.52 


* 


99.40 


October 


114.68 


114.24 


109.90 


112.49 


112.89 


112.74 


111.29 


95.56 


91.80 


95.02 


97.55 


93.38 


* 


96.85 


Nov. .. 


114.14 


115.94 


111.25 


112.49 


112.74 


112.03 


111.26 


96.40 


93.57 


93.36 


98.14 


92.23 


* 


93.47 


Dec. . . . 


113.79 


116.35 


109.90 


113.89 


113.78 


112.62 


111.08 


97.37 


95.77 


89.79 


97.27 


94.34 


92.29 


92.57 


Average 


113.86 


114.63 


112.14 


111.05 


113.97 


113.78 


111.59 


96.05 


95.29 


92.95 


94.83 


95.12 


94.66 


93.25 



Note. The above average heights are given in feet and parts above marsh level. Maximum high water in the 
Brookline Reservoir is 124.6 feet above marsh level. By deducting the heights in the City Reservoirs from the 
heights ill the Brookline Reservoir, in each month, we tind the loss of head in the different sections of the city 
at that time. 

* East Boston Reservoir was shut off for repairs twenty-seven days in September, the month of October, and 
three days in November, 1866. Its average height is for nine months only. 

Respectfully submitted. 

N. HENRY CRAFTS, 

City Engineer. 



34 CITY DOCUMENT. No. 78. 



Boston, May 1, 1868. 

N. J. Bradlee, Esq., President of the Cochituate Water Board: 

Sir: — My report for the year ending with the 30th of April, 
is herewith respectfully submitted. An account of the extensions 
of the main pipes, service pipes, stock in store, etc., may be 
found in the tables below, in the usual form. 

The raising of the last section of the large mains on Tremont 
Street was completed during the year. The other sections were 
raised, one in 1860, and the other in 1865. 

The raising last year was quite successful. With the ex- 
ception of the breaking in of the sewer at the terminus of the 
line, no accident occurred. This sewer was a large one, but 
was only four inches in thickness. It was repaired and 
strengthened by an additional course of brick. In replacing the 
earth at this point, I thought it would be more economical to put 
it back as well as the circumstances would permit, and repave it 
when fairly settled. It will be repaved soon as the weather 
will admit. 

Last fall, by an arrangement between the "Water Boards of 
Charlestown and Boston, the box over the pipes by the side of 
Chelsea Bridge was removed ; the line of pipes that supply the 
City of Chelsea was laid on the same capping with ours, and 
both lines housed over. The size of this covering being suf- 
ficiently large to admit two or more men removed a serious 
difficulty in the way of making repairs. 

The work of repairing the East Boston Reservoir was com- 
menced this spring. The bad weather has thus far been quite 
unfavorable to the progress of this work, but everything is now 
arranged so that nothing but the weather, that I know of, will 
interrupt its speedy completion. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 35 

The work of laying the mains in the newly annexed territory 
"was commenced some three weeks since, and I hope soon to re- 
port to the Board of a more rapid progress. 

From year to year this department performs a great deal of 
work of a nature that cannot be inserted in the tables below. 
As you are conversant with these labors, and as they would be 
of no interest to the City Government or the public, I will not 
describe them here. 



36 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Statement of Location^ Size and Number of Feet of Pipe 
Laid in 1867. 



In ■what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter 
of Pipes 
in Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe, 



Columbus Ave. 



Berkeley 



East Canton . . . 
" Brookline 
" Dedham.. 

Union Park. ... 

Concord 

West Brookline 

Concord Sq. • • • 
" "... 

Chapman 

Eutland Sq. . • • 

Kendall 

West Canton . . 

Newbury 

Chandler 

Tremont 

North Charles . 

Appleton 

Albany 

South 

Albany 

Prescott Place . 
Concord Sq. . . . 

Lawrence 

James 

Park 



I 

Sixth , 
Third . 
O 

Sixth . 
Middle 



BOSTON PROPER. 



Dartmouth and Warren Ave. . . 
Eutland Sq. and Chester Park . 

Canton and Rutland Sq 

Lawrence and Chandler 



Total 12 inches in Boston. 



Harrison Ave. and Albany. 



" " " James 

Tremont and Warren Ave 

" " Columbus Ave., N. Side. 



" " Emerald 

" " Columbus Ave 

" " Shawmut Ave 

Warren Ave. and Columbus Ave. 
Berkeley and Clarendon 



Kendall and Hammond Ave. 

Cambridge and Poplar 

Clarendon and Canton 

Oak and Curve 



Total 6 inches in Boston. 



Opposite Harvard 

At Upper Yard 

East of Washington 

Tremont and Columbus Ave., N. 

Clarendon and Dartmouth 

Newton and Concord 

On Boston Common 



Side, 



Total 4 inches in Boston. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 



Broadway and Fourth . . . 

N. and O 

Dorchester and Emerson 

Sixth and Seventh 

N. and O 

Dorchester and Federal. . 



12 
12 
12 
12 



Total 6 inches in South Boston. 



434 
329 

784 
119 

1,666 

148 
465, 
207 
380 
280 
121 

95 

69 
400 
156 

61 
471 
458 
173 
180 
840 
1,060 

65 

5,629 

100 
221 
264 
30 
370 
144 
108 

1,237 



156 
267 
231 
249 
363 
250 

1,51« 



REPOET OF THE WATER BOARD. 



37 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. Continued, 



In what Stkeet. 


Between what Streets. 


Diameter 
of Pipes 
in Inches. 


Feet of 
Pipe. 




SOUTH BOSTON, {Continued.) 
E and F 


4 
6 


715 


Saratoga 


Total 4 inches in South Boston. 
EAST BOSTON. 


715 
273 




273 


East 


ROXBURY. 
Northampton and Foundry ..••••.i... 


12 


1,200 

1,200 

360 




Total 12 inches in Roxbury .... 


Tremont 


Kendall and Cabot 


6 






360 











S8 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 78. 



Raised. 

1,900 feet 36-mcli pipe on Tremont Street, between Newton and 

Northfield streets. 
1,900 feet 30-incli pipe on Tremont Street, between Newton and 

Northfield streets. 

Changed. 

2*77 feet 6-incli pipe on Richmond Street, between Hanover and 

Salem streets. 
158 feet 4-inch pipe on Adams, between Sudbury and Chardon 

streets. 

Taken Out. 
498 feet Ig-inch Iron Pipe. 



40 


u 


l^inch Lead 


il 


297 


a 


1-inch 


u 


11 


445 


li 


|-inch 


li 


11 


638 


u 


|-inch 
Extended 


u 


11 


180 feet 11-inch Lead 


Pipe 


25 


u 


1-inch 


u 


11 


44 


a 


|-inch 


li 


li 


176 


u 


•1-inch 


11 


li 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



39 



Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1867. 



•i 


BOSTON PROPER. 


SOUTH BOSTON. 


EAST BOSTON. 


TOTAL. 


.3 
S 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Number of 


Length in 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


Pipes. 


Feet. 


1 


6 


426 


. , 


. . 


, , 


. . 


6 


426 


I 


3 


110 


. . 


. . 


. . 




3 


110 


i 


352 


11,414 


208 


6,902 


41 


1,488 


601 


19,804 


I 


47 


931 


43 


1,530 


23 


1,018 


113 


3,479 




Aggregate 








723 


23,819 














Jjlgtino. fha T 




ay let, 1868 






26,924 



















Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1867. 



WHERE. 


DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 


40 


36 


30 


24 


20 


16 


12 


8 


6 

23 
7 
8 

38 


4 

54 

1 
1 

56 


2 
6 

6 


IK 
50 

50 


1 

15 
1 

2 

18 


K 

6 

1 

7 


% 

271 
79 
40 

390 


9 
6 
1 

16 


i 


Boston . . • 
South Boston, 
East Boston . 


■ 


6 


10 


• 


5 


— 


7 

7 


457 
95 
57 


Totals . . 


• 


6 


10 


• 


5 


609 



40 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 78. 



RE CAPITULATION 



SECTION. 


1867. 


DIAMETER IN INCHES. 






36 


12 


8 


6 


4 


Boston Proper. 


Total number of feet laid. . . 




1666 

1 




5629 
15 

1516 
2 

273 


1237 


Stopcocks in same ......... 




3 


South Boston . . 


Total number of feet laid. . . 




715 




Stopcocks in same 








2 


East Boston. .. 


Total number of feet laid. . . 












Stopcocks in same ......... 










Roxbury ....... 


Total number of feet laid. . . 




1200 




360 
1 






Stopcocks in same 
























2866 
1 


.... 


7778 
18 


1952 




" " Stopcocks 















EEPOET or THE WATER BOAED. 



41 












J3 






QQ 






CSS 



'l^ 



6q 

























"S^iiS 
























«S':::|iNo 
























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to "3 "o T-T 
























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to 


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V 


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o 


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ngth of Pipe 1 
ber of Stopco 








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1 

02 


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1 


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5 


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42 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 78. 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and 
upwards, 65 were on the joints, 21 by settling of earth, 2 by 
defective pipe, 33 by frost, 1 stopped by rust. Total, 122. 

Of 2 inches and in service pipes, 2 were on the joints, 127 
by settling of earth, 1 by settling of boxing, 2 by settling of 
wall, 1 by settling of drain, 41 by defective pipe, 9 by defective 
coupling, 4 by defective faucet, 1 by defective packing, 77 by 
rust, 137 by frost, 15 stopped by fish, 49 stiff connections, 9 by 
faucet loose at main, 3 by faucet broken at main, 3 by faucet 
pulled out at main, 3 struck by pick, 2 by pipes not in use, 1 
exposed and pulled out by some person unknown. Total, 487. 



Year. 



DIAMETEH OF 



Four Inches and 
Upwards. 



Less than Four 
Inches. 



TOTAt. 



1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864, 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 



32 
64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 



72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
401 
631 
692 
508 
490 
494 
489 
607 
675 
609 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



43 



Hydrants. 

During the year, thirty (30) new Hydrants have been estab- 
lished as follows : 

Twenty-one (21) in Boston proper, six (6) in South Boston, 
one (1) in East Boston, two (2) in Roxbury. 

Total number of Hydrants established up to May 1, 1868. 

In Boston proper 1,029 



South Boston 

East " . 

Brookline 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Chelsea 



338 

197 

3 

18 
11 



1,604 

Thirty-five (35) Hydrants have been taken out and replaced 
by new or repaired ones, and one hundred and ten (110) boxes 
have been renewed. The Hydrants have had the attention of 
former years paid them. 

Stopcocks. 

Twenty-four (24) new Stopcocks have been established this 
year, and 24 Boxes have been renewed. All the Stopcocks have 
had the usual attention paid them. 



i 



u 



CITY DOCUMENT. — If o. 78. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 

May 1, 1868. 



NUMBER. 



DIAMETER IN INCHES. 



36 



24 



20 



18 



Pipes 

Blow-off Branches . . 

T Branches 

Three Way Branches 
Four Way Branches 
Flange Pipe . . . 

Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves . . 

Caps 

Reducers 

Bevel Hubs . . . 
Curved Pipes . . 
Quarter Turns. . 
Double Hubs . . 
Offset Pipes . . . 
Yoke Pipes . . . 
Man-hole Pipes . 
One-eighth Turns 
Pieces of Pipes . 
Stopcocks . . . 



520 288 50 

4 

19 

1 



Hydrants, 18 new Lowell, 4 new Wilmarth, 14 Lowell (old), 6 
Wilmarth ditto. 

For Hydrants, 18 Bends, 35 Lengtheners, 14 Frames, 52 Covers, 
50 Plungers, 55 Screws, 37 Wastes, 43 Nipples, 32 Valve Seats, 
65 Stuffing Boxes, 5 Hose Couplings, Male ends, 4 Wharf Hy- 
drants, 50 Composition Couplings for ditto. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 45 

For Stopcocks. — Two 36-incli screws, one SO-incli ditto, two 
24-mch. ditto, one 1 6-inch ditto, four 6-incli ditto, six 4-inch ditto, 
nine 6-inch, unfinished; one 4-inch screw for waste weir, one 
ditto for Brookline Eeservoir (old) ; four 12-inch plungers, four 
6-inch ditto, six 4-inch ditto; thirty 6-inch rings, sixty 4-inch 
ditto ; nine frames ; twenty-three covers ; 6,045 pounds iron 
castings, for 6-inch gates; 4,456 pounds ditto, for 4-inch gates; 
613 pounds of composition castings for 6 and 4 inch gates, un- 
finished ; nine 6-inch flanges, seven 4-inch ditto. 

Meters. — In the shop: one 2-inch, thirty 1 -inch, five |-inch 
(old). 

Stock for Meters. — Twenty-eight 1-inch nipples, thirty- 
eight -g-inch ditto, thirty rubber ditto ; eight 2-inch connection- 
pieces, eleven 1-inch ditto, twenty-five |-inch ditto ; thirty 1-inch 
meter cocks, thirteen |-inch ditto, seventy-five |-inch ditto, un- 
finished ; twenty-two clocks, twenty-two glasses, twenty-one spin- 
dles, ten feet leather hose, twelve sheets straw board, seven metre 
frames; six 3-inch fish pots, one 2-inch ditto (old); four 2-inch 
flanges. 

For Service Pipe. — Forty-nine 1-inch union cocks, fifty-five 
|-inch ditto, four hundred and twenty |-inch ditto, eighty |^-inch 
ditto; fifteen 1-inch air cocks; twenty-six f-inch Y cocks, thirty- 
three 1-inch T ditto, eighteen |^-inch ditto, twelve |-inch ditto, 
twelve |-inch straight ditto ; nine 2-inch male couplings, twenty- 
five 1^-inch ditto ; thirty 1-inch female couplings, three hundred 
and sixteen |-inch ditto; nine 1^-inch connection couplings; 
nine 1-inch male couplings, twenty-five |-inch ditto, eighty-four 
|-inch ditto, ten |^-inch ditto ; one hundred and fifty i-inch unfin- 
ished couplings, fifty |-inch ditto ; seventy-five |-inch long boxes 
(iron) ; two hundred and seventy tubes, twenty-four T boxes, 
fifteen Y boxes, thirty extension tubes. 



46 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

Lead Pipe. — 1,864 pounds 2-mch pipe, 555 pounds l^inch 
ditto, 1,986 pounds 1-inch ditto, 63 pounds ^-inch ditto, 7,600 
pounds |-inch ditto, 3,920 pounds ^-inch ditto ; 1,195 pounds old 
pipe, 946 pounds 1-inch tin-lined lead pipe, 615 pounds -l-inch 
ditto, 1,220 pounds |^-inch ditto ; 44 pounds solder, 47 pounds 
|-iQch block tin pipe. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 250 pounds square iron, 300 pounds flat 
ditto ; 750 pounds Norway iron, 700 pounds round refined iron, 
1,100 pounds working pieces, 297 pounds cast-steel, 2,500 
pounds Cumberland coal. 

Caepentee's Shop. — 300 feet spruce boards, 6,200 feet 
spruce plank, 110 feet oak plank, 100 feet pine sheathing, 8 
hydrant boxes, 7 stopcock ditto; 204 top pieces, 18 hydrant 
boxes, unfinished, 300 pounds spikes and nails. 

Wharf Hydrants. — Four, forty-five nipples, five 2-inch male 
couplings for hose. 

Tools. — One steam engine, one large hoisting crane; two 
boom derricks, four hand-geared ditto ; two sets of shears, and 
all the rigging for the same ; tools for laying and repairing main 
and service pipes ; two engine lathes, one Fox ditto, one hand 
ditto ; one upright drilling machine, three grindstones ; the ne- 
cessary tools for carrying on the machine, blacksmith, carpen- 
ter's, and plumber's shops ; one circular saw, three large tool 
houses ; one 40-inch proving press, one 36-inch ditto, one small 
ditto ; also office furniture, and a large lot of patterns stored at 
pipe yard, and at the foundries where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — Four horses, three wagons, two buggies, two pungs, 
five sets harness, two sleighs, two hundred pounds English hay, 
twenty-four bushels grain. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — One large composition cylinder, 
16-inch jet, one 6-inch composition jet; three oopoposition 



EEPOET OP THE WATEE BOAED. 47 

plates, nine cast-iron plates ; two 4-incli composition jets, five 
swivel pipe patterns, one 2-inch copper straight jet, six composi- 
tion jets for small fountains, six large composition cylinders. 

Miscellaneous. — 20 gallons linseed oil, 25 gallons tallow 
oil, 25 pounds white lead, 2,000 pounds furnace coal, 33 pounds 
leather, 1 freight gravel, 500 bricks, 1,010 pounds gasket, 5 kegs 
bolts, 375 feet damaged hose, one-half cord wood, 12 reservoir 
gate covers, 5 manholes, 6 plates ; lot of old iron, lot of old 
lumber, also old machinery from Marlboro'. 

Respectfully submitted. 

B. E. JONES, 

Superintendent East Division. 



48 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

May IStli, 1868. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee^ Esq., Pres. Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir, — In presentiog you with the report of the condition of 
inatters connected with the Western Division, I must say that 
many things that were proposed last spring to be done have 
been left undone, owing to more pressing wants at the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir. Everything at the Lake has been kept in its 
usual good order. The culverts and waste-weirs are in a good 
condition. I would call your attention to the embankment near 
the Saxonville Branch Railroad. It is washing away rapidly, 
and steps should be taken at once to protect it. Stone were got 
out and hauled to the point oppo-ite the grove, for the purpose 
of building a substantial wall ; but the unfavorable weather the 
past winter has prevented the work being done. New stop- 
plank have been made for the dam and for the division of the 
Lake. They are painted, and stored in the boat-house, ready 
for use. The willows that were set out for the purpose ot 
making a hedge have not done as well as was expected. Those 
on the east side of the road have done very well, and will be 
large enough by another year to have the fence in front of them 
removed. Slips have been set out on the west side of the road 
this spring, and it is hoped that they may yet be a success. The 
Filter Dam at Pegan Brook has been re-built in a thorough 
manner. Stone were taken from the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
for that purpose, as it was impossible to get them at the time 
they were wanted in a more convenient locality. Owing to the 
rapid rise of the water at the Lake this spring, nothing was 
done towards building the second dam that was ordered to be 



EEPORT OF THE WATEE BOAED. 49 

built. Should a favorable time occur this season, it will be 
attended to. The trees and bushes over the line of conduit 
have been cut down and disposed of. Above Nevrton Centre 
the embankment was made use of as a road to haul off the wood 
cut in that neighborhood. To prevent such use being made of 
it, posts have been set at different points so as to prevent the 
passage of teams. At the Brookline Eeservoir, but little has 
been done, except to top-dress the banks. Muck and manure 
were hauled on to the ground last fall from the Chestnut Hill 
Eeservoir, and this spring it has been spread over all the grass- 
land. The gate-house and embankment wall remain the same 
as last year, still needing repairs that cannot be made until the 
completion of the new reservoir. The annual examination of 
the conduit has been made between the Lake and Charles River. 
Several sections require cleaning, which will be attended to at 
an early day. As Mr. Crafts will make a full report of the 
same, I need say no more. With the exception of some fences 
that are to be built, and some that need repairing, I believe all 
connected with this division to be in good order. The follow- 
ing is a list of tools, etc., belonging to this division, stored at 
the Lake: 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT STANWOOD, 
Supt. Western Division B. W. W, 



Schedule op Property on Western Division. 

One horse, one carriage, one express wagon, one single har^ 
ness, one cart, one cart harness, one buffalo robe, one pung, two 
spades, six wheelbarrows, six shovels, twelve picks, one axe, one 
hand saw, one iron square, one grindstone, three water pails, two 
hammers, one pair hedge shears, two pair ice tongs, one gravel 

7 



50 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 

screen, one sand sieve, one stone drag, one drain mould, two 
hoes, one iron rake, two bars, one stone hammer, two hay forks, 
one dung fork, three trowels, four rammers, four wrenches, two 
stop-plank hooks, one stone roller, one boat (needs repairing), 
one boat awning, one rain-gauge, one pair steel-yards, one cook- 
ing range, one extension table, six chairs, one wash-stand, marble 
top, one map of Boston and its environs. 

A. STANWOOD, 
Supt. Western Division B. W. W. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 51 



Water Registrar's Office, 
BOSTON; May 1, 1868. 

N. J. Bradlee, Esq., Pres. of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir, — The Water Registrar, in compliance with the provi- 
sions of the ordinance, respectfully presents to the Cochituate 
Water Board his Annual Report for the year 1867, together 
with the amount of income received to May 1, 1868. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1868 is 28,104 ; being an increase, since January 1, 1867, of three 
hundred and fifty. 

During the year 1867, there have been six hundred and ten 
cases where the water has been turned off for non-payment of 
water rates. Of this number, 494 have been turned on, leaving 
a balance of 116 still remaining off. 
The total amount of water rates received from 

Dec. 31, 1866, to Jan. 1, 1868, is . . $522,130 93 
Of the above, there was received 
for water used in previous years 
the sum of . . , . |43,390 98 
Leaving the receipts for water fur- 
nished during the year 1867 the 
sum of . . . . $478,739 95 
In addition to the above, there has been received, 
for turning on water in cases where it had 
been turned off for non-payment of rates, the 
sum of 988 00 



Total, $523,118 93 

The amount received for water rates from Jan. 1, 

1868, to May 1, 1868, is . . . . 422,625 72 



Carried forward, $945,744 65 



52 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Brought forward, 
Of this amount, there was received 

for water used in previous years 

the sum of . . . . 143,200 22 

Leaving the receipts for water 

(assessed for the year 1868) to 

May 1, 1868, the sum of . $379,425 50 
The amount received from Jan. 1, 1868, to May 

1, 1868, for turning on water in cases where it 

had been turned off for non-payment of rates, is 

Total 



$945,744 65 



714 00 



1946,458 65 



Total receipts from January 1, 1867, to May 1, 

1868, is $946,458 65 

The increased amount of income in 1867 over the 

previous year is 35,592 68 

The total amount of assessments now made for 

the present year is 392,157 18 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 

of water during the year 1868 is 550,000 00 

The expenditures of my office for the year 1867 

have been 14,279 25 



The items of this expenditure are as follows 
Paid Wm. F. Davis, Registrar, 

" Chas. H. Little, Treasurer's Clerk, 

" Chas. L. Bancroft, " 

" Stephen Badlam, " 

" Edwin Jennings, " 

" Jacob F. Mayo, services on meters, 

" R. D. Child, Inspector, 

Carried forward, 



2,200 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 93 

849 50 

19,250 43 



EEPOET OF THE WATER BOAED. 53 



Brought forward, 
Paid C. M. Thompson, Inspector, 
" F. W. Fay, « 

« T. L. Kellej, « 

" J. Hayward, Jr., " 
" 0. A. Ramsdell, " 

" J. L. Fairbanks, stationery, 
" A. Mudge & Son, printing, 



$9,250 43 


849 


50 


849 


50 


- 849 


50 


849 


50 


849 


50 


282 


60 


498 


72 


$14,279 25 



54 CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 78. 



Meters. .; 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises of f '.| 

water-takers is 895. Of this number, 679 are |-inch, 189 1-inch, ' 

23 2-inch, 3 3-inch, 1 4-inch size. | 

They are attached to a Tariety of establishments, embracing 
hotels, railroads, manufactories, stables, confectionery, oyster sa- 
loons, and buildings occupied by several tenants. 



EEPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 55 



The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sale of Cochituate water, since its introduction into the city, 
Oct. 25, 1848: 

Eeceived by Water Conunissioners, as per Au- 



ditor's Report 


, in 1848, 






$972 81 


'om 


I January 1 


,1849, to 


January 


1, 1850, 


71,657 79 


ii 


ii 


1850, 


a 


1851, 


99,025 45 


i 


ii 


1851, 


a 


1852, 


161,052 85 


u 


a 


1852, 


li 


1853, 


179,567 39 


ii 


.1 


1853, 


a 


1854, 


196,352 32 


u 


a 


1854, 


ii 


1855, 


217,007 51 


a 


li 


1855, 


11 


1856, 


266,302 77 


li 


ii 


1856, 


it 


1857, 


282,661 84 


ti 


a 


1857, 


li 


1858, 


289,328 83 


li 


li 


1858, 


a 


1859, 


302,409 73 


u 


li 


1859, 


ti 


1860, 


314,808 97 


11 


a 


1860, 


li 


1861, 


334,544 86 


a 


li 


1861, 


u 


1862, 


365,323 96 


It 


li 


1862, 


it 


1863, 


373,922 33 


u 


11 


1863, 


a 


1864, 


394,506 25 


u 


li 


1864, 


li 


1865, 


430,710 76 


u 


a 


1865, 


ti 


1866, 


450,341 48 


it 


li 


1866, 


ii 


1867, 


486,538 25 


u 


li 


1867, 


li 


1868, 


522,130 93 


u 


a 


1868, to 


May 1, ] 


L868, 


422,625 72 




$6,161,782 80 



56 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the first of January 1868, with the amount of water 
rates paid for 1867. 

19,854 Dwelling-houses, 

7 Boarding " 
78 Model " 

4 Lodging " 

8 Hotels 
4,395 Stores and shops, 

172 Buildings, . 

394 Offices, 

35 Printing offices, 

19 Banks, 

18 Halls, 

1 Theatre, 

28 Private schools, 

15 Asylums, 

4 Green-houses, 

63 Churches, . 

3 Markets, 
119 Cellars, 
286 Eestaurants and saloons, 

4 Club Houses, 
1 Bath-house, 

40 Photographers, 
10 Packing-houses, 
1,047 Stables, 
12 Factories, . 

Carried forward, 



$252,776 


41 


253 


25 


2,061 


25 


83 


00 


480 


00 


41,106 


57 


5,942 


39 


3,079 


88 


478 


75 


248 


50 


258 


00 


9 


75 


243 


75 


772 


25 


38 


00 


699 


50 


697 50 


773 


75 


3,926 


97 


102 


00 


55 


00 


1,115 


50 


339 


00 


7,898 


23 


391 


00 


•$323,830 20 



EEPOKT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



57 



Brought forward, 


$323,830 20 


7 Bleacheries, 114 50 


72 Bakeries, 


560 50 


5 Ship-yards, 


70 00 


3 Dry docks and engines. 


64 00 


59 Shops " " . . - 


3,639 89 


20 Stores « « . . 


1,378 22 


5 Foundries " « . . 


200 94 


5 Factories « « , . 


260 42 


5 Printing « « . . 


200 76 


1 Bakery u a ^ ^ 


33 00 


1 Ship-yard " « . . 


34 00 


3 Buildings " « . . 


528 31 


1 Pottery « « . . 


35 00 


2 Mills u u ^ ^ 


222 91 


44 Stationary " . . 


1,520 18 


4 Armories, ..... 


53 50 


2 Gymnasiums, .... 


41 50 


510 Hand hose, .... 


2,865 00 


13 Fountains, 


103 00 


Gas Light Go's., (filling gasometers), . 


434 41 


Mill-dam Co. . . . . 


266 75 


Custom House, . . . 


150 00 


54 Steamboats, 


10,300 09 


Office, (Harbor Master), 


6 00 


" (City Scales), 


9 00 


Court House, .... 


262 50 


Probate Building, .... 


47 50 


House of reception, .... 


10 00 


5 Fire-alarm motors. 


50 00 


23 Fire-engines, hose, hook and ladder houses, 553 50 


280 Public Schools, 
Carried forward. 


1,970 00 


$349,815 58 



58 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 78. 



rought forward, 


$349,815 58 


City Stables, . . . . . 


200 75 


Offal Station, 


150 00 


Steamer " Henry Morrison " . 


192 56 


House of Correction, 


462 00 


Public Library, .... 


50 00 


Faneuil Hall, 


40 00 


Shop (paving department), . 


9 00 


Common (sewer department, making 




mortar, etc.,) .... 


56 00 


Public urinals, .... 


145 00 


Street sprinkling, .... 


400 00 


J. P. Paul & Co., (contract pipe), . 


40 08 


Building purposes, 


2,263 94 


Contractors for supplying shipping. 


1,889 53 


Metered water. 


. 123,025 51 


• 


$478,739 95 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



59 



Statement showing the number and hind of Water Fixtures con- 
tained within the premises of Water-taJcers in the City of Boston, 
to January 1, 1868, as compared with previous years. 



1865. 


1866. 


iser. 


REMARKS. 


4,797 


4,774 


5,074 


Taps. These have no connection with any 
drain or sewer. 


40,184 


40,496 


42,099 


Sinks. 


16,767 


17,204 


18,910 


Wash-hand basins. 


5,475 


5,499 


5,929 


Bathing-tubs. 


6,752 


7,398 


7,789 


Pan water-closets. 


7,317 


7,563 


8,394 


Hopper " 


181 


312 


246 


" " pull. 


315 


239 


297 


" " self-acting. 


213 


226 


357 


" " waste. 


498 


536 


571 


" " door. 


1,741 


1,790 


1,968 


Urinals. 


6,087 


6,365 


6,806 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached 
to the building. 


737 


756 


759 


Shower-baths. 


13 


13 


14 


Hydraulic rams. 


715 


773 


711 


Private hydrants. 


334 


350 


388 


Slop-hoppers. 


28 


33 


40 


Eoot-baths. 


92,154 


94,327 


100,352 





Eespectfully submitted. 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar.