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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"


BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 1 1 1 i i 1! 1 1 1 ' 1 

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City Document. — No. 55. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



NATH'L J. BRADLBE. 



H.BPOB.T 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



EOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30, 1869. 






\/i 






CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Common Council, May 6, 1869. 

Ordered: That the Cochituate Water Board be authorized 
to report in print, and that the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for printing. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

WM. G. HARRIS, President. 

In Board of Aldermen, May 10, 1869. 
Concurred. 

BENJ. JAMES, Chairman. 

Approved May 10, 1869. 

NATH'L B. SHURTLEFF, Mayor. 

A true copy. 

Attest : 

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



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CITY OF BOSTON. 



City Hall, Cochituate Water Board Office, 

May 28, 1869. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston: 

In compliance with the provisions of the City Ordinance, the 
Cochituate Water Board herewith submit their Annual Report for 
the year ending April 30, 1869, together with the reports of the 
Clerk of the Board, City Engineer, Water Registrar, and the 
Superintendents of the Eastern and Western Divisions, to which 
they would refer the City Council for the detailed statements of 
the condition and progress of the water works during the year. 

The average height of water at Lake Cochituate above the 
bottom of the aqueduct has been 11.92 feet, being ■ 3 ^ less than 
the previous year, and the rainfall 50.06 inches, being 6.19 less; 
and although the consumption of the water has been much 
larger than the previous year, there has been ample to meet all 
the requirements for which it was introduced. The lake was 
at high water mark on April 5th, when the water commeuced to 
run over the dam into Sudbury River, and continued to do so 
until June 18th, with the exception of a few days between April 
26th and May 6th, wasting during that time, according to the 
estimate of the City Engineer, 2,507,684,384 gallons, being 
25,000,000 in excess of the previous year. On the completion 
of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, a large portion of the water that 
usually runs to waste at this season of the year, will be saved 
for use during the dry season. 

The average daily consumption has been 14,769,167 gallons, 
being an increase over the previous year of 1,204,107 gallons. 



6 City Document. — No. 55. 

The least average in any one month was 12,636,000 gallons, in 
the month of April ; and the largest average was in the month of 
February, when it reached 16,927.000 gallons. 

The income from water rates, as it appears by the report of 
the Water Registrar, has been $553,744.88; being a gain over 
the previous year of $31,613.95. 

The estimated income from water rates for the year 1869, is 
$600,000. 

The expenses have been as follows : — 

For current expenses ...... $164,390 89 

Interest and premium on the water debt . . 605,045 92 



$769,436 81 



The treasurer has credited the water works for 
the same year ....... $609,030 49 



The balance shows an expenditure over and 

above our receipts of $160,406 32 

Which, with $737,770.00 expended on the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir during the year, and $280,- 
808.84 expended for laying the main and 
service pipes in the Highland District, adds 
to the cost of the Water Works . . $1,178,985 16 

Cost of the works to May 1, 1868, including 
interest and premium on debt, less amounts 
received for water-rates, rents, etc. . $7,677,702 55 

Making the total cost to May 1, 1869, . $8,856,687 71 

It will be seen by the above figures that the income has not 
been sufficient to meet the interest on the debt and the current 
expenses, by a little over $160,000, being over $48,000 in 
excess of the deficiency of the previous year. Under these cir- 
cumstances, the Board would recommend that a charge be made 



Report of the Water Board. 7 

for the use of the fire hydrants, as is done in other cities. In 
this way the income can be increased nearly sufficient to meet 
the interest and expenses, and that any further deficiency should 
be made up by an increase of the water rates, or by direct tax- 
ation. The amount already added to the water debt by the 
excess of interest and expenses over the receipts has been 
$1,445,331.72. 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

This Division comprises that portion of the works lying east 
of the Brookline Reservoir, including the distributing pipes and 
reservoirs in the city. 

More work has been performed in this department during 
the past year, than in any other year since the introduction of 
the water in 1848, and the Superintendent, Mr. Jones, deserves 
credit for the manner in which he has executed the same. 

MAIN AND SERVICE PIPES. 

During the year there have been laid fifty-three thousand five 
hundred and sixty-seven feet of main pipe, being forty thousand 
nine hundred and seventy-one feet more than was laid the pre- 
vious year; making the total amount of pipe laid since the 
commencement of the works a little over one hundred and fifty- 
two miles, to which are connected fifteen hundred and eleven 
gates, and seventeen hundred and fifty-five hydrants, one hun- 
dred and eight of the latter being of the " Lowry " patent, 
which have been used in the Highland District to test their 
efficiency. 

The number of service pipes laid, has been thirteen hundred 
and forty-two, being a gain over the previous year of six hun- 
dred and nineteen. Total to May first, twenty-eight thousand 
two hundred and sixty-six. 

The number of repairs made during the year has been but 
five hundred and thirty-one, being seventy-eight less than the 



8 City Document. — No. 55. 

previous year ; this is rather remarkable when we consider the 
large amount of pipe which has been added to the works, the 
number being less than in any year since 1864. 

HIGHLAND DISTRICT. 

The most important work in this division, has been the laying 
of the main and service pipes in the Highland District, which 
has been pushed forward as fast as the work could be done to 
advantage. Over eight miles of main pipe were laid, and over 
two miles of service pipe, to which were attached the necessary 
gates and fire hydrants. The water was introduced into these 
pipes for the first time on 26th of October, 1868. The 
question as to the best method of supplying the high service 
of this district, has been unanimously decided by the Board in 
favor of the stand-pipe system; this decision was arrived at 
after a thorough examination of the whole subject. The Com- 
mittee of this Board who had it in charge visited Philadelphia, 
in company with the City Engineer, where this method is 
adopted in several of its districts, and were very kindly 
received by the Chief Engineer of the Fairmount Water Works, 
Frederick Graff, Esq., who gave them much valuable informa- 
tion in relation to stand-pipes, and explained the advantages 
as well as the disadvantages of the system. On their return 
from Philadelphia, the Committee visited the location for the 
stand-pipe now erecting for the Croton Water Works in New 
York, and through the kindness of the Resident Engineer of the 
work, William L. Dearborn, Esq., they were enabled to inspect 
the plans for this structure, which, when completed, will be one 
of the finest in the country, as a large amount will be expended 
for architectural effect. 

The location for the stand-pipe in the Highland District is 
to be on the lot known as the " Old Fort," situated on Beech 
Glen Avenue on the south, and Fort Avenue on the north ; the 
base of the shaft will be about one hundred and fifty-eight feet 



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STAND PIPE 
I STON HIGHLANDS. 



Report op the Water Board. 9 

above tide marsh level; the interior pipe is to be made of 
boiler-iron, five feet in diameter, of equal size throughout its 
length of eighty feet ; between the pipe and the exterior walls 
will be a space of about three feet, in which there will be a 
spiral iron staircase leading to a lookout at the top. The exte- 
rior walls are to be of brick, with granite trimmings; the lower 
portion or base of the shaft is finished with four pediments, with 
buttresses at the angles; above this it is circular to within ten 
feet of the roof, when it projects and is octagonal in form, the 
whole being crowned with a steeple. The total height from 
the sidewalk which surrounds it is one hundred and seventy 
feet. The contract for the iron work was awarded to the 
Boston Machine Company, and the masonry to Messrs. Standish 
& Woodbury. The whole structure will be completed by the first 
of October next, at a cost of not exceeding $20,000. 

The location for the engine-house and pumps is on Pynchon 
and Elmwood Streets, the lot having a frontage of about forty 
feet, running back to the new station-house, and contains 5,563 
square feet. The contract for the pumping engines was also 
awarded to the Boston Machine Company, their bid being the 
lowest received. Before deciding, however, their plans were 
submitted to competent experts, whose reports were perfectly sat- 
isfactory. The cost of the pumping works in complete running 
order, will be $37,000; the building in which it is to be located 
is to be a plain brick building without any architectural pre- 
tensions ; the contracts for this building have not as yet been 
awarded; the total cost of the high service system will not 
probably exceed $80,000. The arrangement, size and location 
of the pipes for this service are fully described in the annexed 
report of the City Engineer. 

DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIRS. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — The maximum high water line of 
this reservoir is 121.53 feet, and the average height of water 



10 City Document. — No. 55. 

has been 119.11 feet, being -^ less than the previous 
year. 

South Boston Reservoir. — The maximum high water line is 
122.86 feet, and in the East Boston Reservoir, 107.60. 

The City Engineer in speaking of these says : " The water 
is let into these reservoirs only at long intervals, and is then 
shut in, to be drawn out only in case of an extreme emergency, 
such as an accident to the main, or a destructive conflagration. 
In the original plan it was intended that these reservoirs should 
be connected with the general circulation, thus increasing the 
efficiency of our whole system of distribution, but this result, 
however desirable, must be postponed until an independent 
supply for East Boston shall have been procured, and an addi- 
tional main pipe laid to South Boston, both of which measures 
are of far more importance to those localities than even the 
extension of the reservoirs themselves." 

The water was drawn off from the East Boston Reservoir on 
the 4th of April, for repairs, as spoken of in our last annual 
report, and the work was continued until December 24th, when 
the weather put a stop to further progress. At this time it was 
so far completed that the water was let in to the depth of twenty 
feet; this amount of water having been kept in during the 
winter, without the least indication of leakage, the work was 
again resumed this spring and the whole will be completed 
before the 1st of July. On its completion, the Board propose 
to re-grade the slopes and erect an iron fence on the street lines 
and a suitable wooden fence on the boundary lines, between 
adjoining estates. 

An act of the Legislature, authorizing the widening of the 
draw of Warren Bridge, will make it necessary to enlarge the 
syphon-pipe at this place. The box enclosing the twenty-inch 
main under the sidewalk of this bridge will have to be renewed 
before the close of another year, as it is now very much decayed. 



Report of the Water Board. 11 

western division. 

This Division comprises the lake and that portion of the 
works lying between the lake and the gate-house at Brookline 
Reservoir. Owing to the high state of the water at the lake 
the past year, it has been impossible to continue the construc- 
tion of the slope walls on the margin of the lake, or to build 
the second filter dam at Pegan Brook ; the work will be con- 
tinued this year if the water should be sufficiently low during 
the summer or fall to permit it to be done. 

The great freshet of February 15th, washed away a portion 
of the embankment over the conduit on the " Collins Farm," in 
Newton, and we cannot but return our thanks to Mr. Collins, 
who, on discovering the accident, immediately telegraphed the 
fact to the Board, and thus prevented what might have been a 
very serious damage. 

During the year the work of putting down stone posts to pre- 
vent encroachments on the land owned by the city, and for per- 
petuating our bounds on the margin of the lake and on the line 
of the conduit, has been continued, two hundred and fifty-nine 
having been set, and this year we are in hopes that the rest of 
the bounds will be permanently marked. 

On April 23d, the annual examination of the conduit was 
made, and for the first time since the construction of the works, 
the whole line, a little over fourteen miles, was examined in one 
day ; this was accomplished by three parties. The City Engi- 
neer and three others entered at the lake, and came through to 
Charles River, a distance of nearly eight miles. Mr. Wightman, 
the Resident Engineer of Chestnut Hill, examined that portion 
between Newton Centre and Charles River, a distance of about 
three miles. Mr. Stan wood examined from the Brookline 
Reservoir to the Waste Weir, in Newton Centre, a distance of 
three and three-fifths miles. In that portion between the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir and Newton Centre, a distance of nearly 



12 City Document. — No. 55. 

three miles, he was accompanied by His Honor the Mayor, 
several members of the Board of Aldermen, the Committee on 
Water of the City Council, and six members of this Board ; the 
general condition of the conduit was found to be the same as at 
the last examination. The full particulars of the various cracks 
will be found in the Engineer's report. 

The Brookline Reservoir, as we stated in our last annual 
report, needs a thorough cleaning out. But it cannot be done 
until the Chestnut Hill Reservoir is completed, as it would take 
several days to accomplish the work, there being no means of 
keeping up the supply in the city during that time, the capacity 
of the Beacon Hill, South and East Boston Reservoirs not being 
sufficient to supply the city for one day, as the total capacity 
when full is but 15,779,023 gallons. The gate-house at the 
reservoir needs repairs, which cannot be done, for the same 
reason. 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

During the past year considerable progress has beeu made 
towards the completion of this reservoir. During the months 
from May to October, nearly the whole force were employed 
upon the upper or Lawrence Meadow section, as it was decided 
to complete that basin in order to fill it, and have it ready for 
use during the dry season of this year ; and on Monday, the 
26th of October, the water was let in and continued to flow for 
sixteen days when it was half filled ; the gates were then closed, 
as a leak was discovered in the dam which separates the upper 
from the lower basin. After several experiments were tried to 
prevent this leak, it was decided to build a new water-tight 
dam outside of the present embankment ; work was immediately 
commenced on this dam, and we are happy to state that it is 
perfectly tight as far as it is finished ; and we are now in hopes 
that the whole will be completed within six weeks, so that the 
upper basin can be immediately used as a source of supply ; 



Report of the Water Board. 13 

this work was not calculated upon, and of course has added 
greatly to the cost of the reservoir. 

The influent and intermediate gate-houses, have both been 
completed and have fully met our expectations, and the gates 
work to our entire satisfaction. The labor of obtaining a 
foundation for the effluent gate-house has been much more 
than we anticipated, being obliged to remove a very large body 
of quicksand, the quantity as estimated by Engineer, being 35,- 
000 cubic yards. Considerable damage was done to this por- 
tion of the work by the great freshet of February 15th, the tem- 
porary flume which carries off the surface water from the basin 
having been washed away, and the trench was soon filled with 
twenty feet of water. Several days were occupied by the steam 
fire engines and a Gwynn pump in pumping it out, before the 
work could again be renewed. 

During the winter, the roadway was all graded and is now 
nearly completed. Rockland Street has also been widened 
nearly its entire length, that portion in front of our land 
having been done at the expense of the City, and the rest by 
the Town of Brighton. 

This road has already become a favorite place of resort. The 
number of visitors varies from five to ten thousand a week ; on 
some pleasant Sunday afternoon it has been estimated that 
nearly three thousand carriages have driven over it. On the 
completion of this great work it will undoubtedly be the most 
beautiful drive in this vicinity. 

The gateway at the main entrance to the driveway on Rock- 
land Street, has been contracted for and will be completed by 
the first of October. 

On the eleventh day of January the excavations were com- 
menced on the pipe route for the forty-eight inch main to con- 
nect the Chestnut Hill Reservoir with the iron mains at Boyls- 
ton Street, a short distance from the Brookline Reservoir, and 
before the first of April, 6,350 feet had been laid. The remain- 

2 



14 City Document. — No. 55. 

ing portion will be completed, and the connections made before 
the first of September. An account in detail of the amount of 
labor performed on this reservoir will be found in the very full 
report of the Resident Engineer. 

WATEE EEGISTEAE'S DEPAETMENT. 

By reference to the report of the Water Registrar, it will be 
seen that the total number of water takers for the year 1869, is 
twenty-nine thousand seven hundred and thirty-eight, being an 
increase over the previous year of sixteen hundred and thirty- 
four ; of this number twenty thousand six hundred and forty- 
four are for dwelling houses, forty-six hundred and twenty-six 
for stores and shops, ten hundred and eighty-two are for 
stables, and the remaining thirty -three hundred and eighty-six 
are for various purposes. 

There have been six hundred and eighty cases where the 
water has been turned off for non-payment of the water rates, 
being seventy more than the previous year; of this number 
ninety-five are still remaining off, being twenty-one less than 
last year. 

The number of meters now applied, is ten hundred and 
twenty-one, being an increase over the previous year of one 
hundred and twenty-six; and it gives us pleasure to state that 
we have had fewer complaints from the meter system this year 
than in any year since their application. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE, 
BENJAMIN JAMES, 
ALEXANDER WADSWORTH, 
FRANCIS A. OSBORN, 
GEORGE LEWIS, 
JOSEPH M. WIGHTMAN, 
CHARLES H. ALLEN. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, May 5, 1869. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : 
Sir: The following is a statement of the Expenditures and 
Receipts of this department for the year commencing May 1, 
1868 ; and ending April 30, 1869 : 



EXPENDITUKES 

Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. 

Plumbing shop " " 

Raising water pipes on Tremont Street 

Land and water rights 

Stable 

Taxes 

Tools 

Travelling expenses 

Fountains 

Laying main pipes, etc., for stock, etc. 

Postage and expresses 

Reservoirs — Beacon Hill 

" East Boston 

" South Boston 

" Brookline . 

Aqueduct repairs 

Amount carried forward, 



$471 


90 


84 75 


1,772 


12 


2,728 


16 


2,746 


31 


236 


86 


1,569 


69 


114 


78 


457 


42 


358 


18 


66 


09 


607 


75 


39,139 


86 


•427 


43 


1,699 


63 


354 


76 



$52,835 69 



16 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Amount brought forward, 
Printing (including Water Registrar's and Super 

intendent's) ...... 

Rent of Eastern Avenue Wharf for tow-boats 
Telegraph to the reservoirs and lake 
Repairing boxes on bridges 
Stationery (including Water Registrar's and Su 

perintendent's) 
Salaries (including clerks and inspectors in 

Water Registrar's department) 
Main pipe 
Service pipe . 
Off and on water 
Extra inspectors 
Wages, — - laying main pipe 

" " service pipe, etc. 

" blacksmith shop 

" plumbing shop 

" proving yard . 

Upper yard, finishing buildings, etc. 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Meters * 

Maintaining meters . 
Repairing main pipe 
" service pipe 
" hydrants 
" streets 
" stopcocks 
Stopcocks 
Hydrants 
Lake 
Proving yard, stock, etc. 



$52,835 69 

2,570 17 

2,000 00 

1,320 00 

1,563 03 

487 38 

13,738 66 
7,193 21 
15,271 73 
6,581 37 
9,140 25 
3,044 23 
6,850 90 

862 00 

44 25 

3,515 39 

943 36 

884 38" 
8,443 94 
2,035 20 
1,234 00 
4,965 07 
1,572 19 
5,396 99 

578 05 
1,797 65 
2,101 79 
2,463 35 
1,614 31 



Amount carried forward, 



$161,048 54 



Report of the Water Board. 



17 



Amount brought forward, 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
Tolls and ferriage . 
Oil ... 

Carting . 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
Wards 13, 14, 15 . 

Amount drawn for the drive-way around Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir .... 

Total drawn for by the Board 



. $161,048 54 


986 


78 


46 


07 


93 


00 


216 


50 


. 737,770 00 


. 280,808 


84 


37,388 43 


$1,218,358 


16 



And which is charged as follows : 

To Chestnut Hill Reservoir . $737,770 00 

Water Works . . . 162,390 89 

Drive-way . . . 37,388 43 

Wards 13, 14, 15 . . 280,808 84 

$1,218,358 16 

Amount charged Water Works . . . 1,180,969 73 



Received for grass and pasture, 
" " fines for waste, etc., 
" " off and on water, 

for repairs . 
" " pipe, laying, repair- 
ing, etc. 

Net amount to Water Works . 
Amount carried forward, . 

2* 



RECEIPTS. 
Cash paid City Treasurer. 

$150 00 
1,176 00 



1,514 25 
11,959 75 $14,800 00 



.$1,166,169 73 
. $l,166,lb9 73 



18 City Document. — No. 55. 

Amount brought forward, . . . .$1,166,169 72 
Amount drawn for Water Works not including 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir or Wards 13, 14, 15, 162,390 89 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 

Main pipe .... $7,193 21 

Wages laying main pipe . . 3,044 23 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc. . 358 18 $10,595 62 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1868, to 

May 1, 1869 $151,795 27 

Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, to 

May 1, 1869. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . . . $4,043,718 21 
Water Board, in 1850 . 366,163 89 

Cochituate Water Board, 
from January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1868 . 2,850,427 64 

Amount drawn from April 30, 1868, to May 1, 

1869, for Water Works .... 1,180,969 73 



u a 

a a 



5,441,279 47 



Amount paid the City Treasurer 

by the Commissioners . . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by Water Board, 

1850 8,153 52 

Amount paid by Cochituate Water 

Board, to May 1, 1868 . . 173,354 76 

Amount paid from April 30, 1868 

to May 1, 1869 . . . 14,800 00 

$243,956 66 

Balance $8,197,322 81 



Report op the Water Board. 



19 



Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by the 
Commissioners and Water Boards, for the 
Water Works 



5,197,322 81 



Gross payments (including interest, premium, 

etc.) for account of the Water Works . .$15,929,044 15 
Gross receipts 7,072,356 44 



Net cost to the city, May 1, 1869 . . $8,856,687 71 

SAM'L N. DYER, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board. 



COST OF THE WORKS TO MAY 1, 1869. 
WESTERN DIVISION. 

Amount paid William H. Knight for the lake . $100,000 00 

Amount paid William H. Knight for the facto- 
ries, $50,000 ; less amount on account of the 
sale of land and machinery, and insurance at 
the time of the fire 20,818 22 

Expense of raising the lake two feet, including 

damages . 28,002 18 

Cost of roarls, bridges and swamps . . . 38,332 48 

Gate-house at the lake . . . . . 29,907 12 

Dam at the outlet of the lake .... 8,458 20 

Dudley Pond, lower clam, and making connec- 
tions with the lake 18,982 23 

New dam, and improvements at the lake . . 12,647 97 

Total cost of lake dep't, not including Land, $257,148 40 
Amount carried forward, .... $257,148 40 



20 City Document. — No. 55. 

Amount brought forward, . . . $257,148 40 

Land and land damages, less 

credit for land sold . $226,010 97 

Constructing the Brick Conduit 817,717 73 
Brookline Reservoir, 

Land . $58,418 93 

Brookline Reservoir, 077 , 

Construction . 108,301 92( 
Brookline Reservoir, 

Gate-House . 33,356 36 
Compensating Reservoirs, less 

amount received when sold, 66,859 80 

Engineering Expenses on the 

Western Division . 69,570 56 

Miscellaneous Expenses on the 

Western Division . 31,474 41 

Payment on account of the 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir . 1,563,778 27 2,975,488 95 



Total Cost of Western Division . . $3,232,637 35 



EASTERN DIVISION. 

Main and Service Pipes . . $2,751,869 21 

Beacon Hill Res- 
ervoir, Land . $145,107 10 

Beacon Hill Reser- 
voir, Construct, 368,426 11 513,533 21 

South Boston Res- 
ervoir, Land . 55,103 23 

S. Boston Reser- 
voir, Construct, 35,804 87 90,908 10 



Amount carried forward, $3,356,310 52 



Report of the Water Board. 21 

Amount brought forward, $3,356,310 52 

East Boston Res- 
ervoir, Land . $23,862 50 

East Boston Res- 
ervoir, Construc'n, 42,240 59 66,103 09 

Engineering Expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . 31,403 02 

Machine Shop and Pipe Yards, 40,811 49 

Hydrants and Stopcocks . . 61,935 00 

Proving Pipes . . . 35,983 96 

Meters 103,973 79 

Miscellaneous Expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . 201,388 93 

Payment on account of Wards 

13, 14, 15 . . . . 280,808 84 



Total Cost of Eastern Division $4,178,718 64 

Total Cost of Western Division, $3,232,637 35 
Total Cost of Eastern Division, 4,178,718 64 



Total Eastern and Western . 7,411,355 99 

Expenses of Carrying on the 

Works .... $1,115,313 58 
Interest paid, after deducting 

total Income received . . 330,018 14 



Excess of Expenses and Inter- 
est over Income . . . 1,445,331 72 



Total cost on May 1, 1869, over and above the 
• Income $8,856,687 71 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEEE. 



Office of City Engineer, 
City Hall, Boston, May 5, 1869. 

N. J. Bradlee, Esq., 

President Cochituate Water Board. 

Sie : In compliance with the Ordinance relating to the De- 
partment of Engineering, I respectfully present the following 
report relative to the Water Works. 

EASTEKN DIVISION. 

On page 52 is presented the average monthly heights oi 
water in the Keservoir at Brookline, and in the Beacon Hill, 
South Boston and East Boston Reservoirs, from 1861 to 1868 
inclusive; said heights being expressed in feet and decimals 
above " tide marsh level," or ordinary high tide. This table is 
presented now more as a matter of form than for any purpose 
of practical utility, as it does not present, by comparison of the 
relative heights of the water in the Brookline Reservoir with 
that of the water in the City reservoirs, the actual loss of head 
in the various parts of the city, except in the very limited sec- 
tion connected with the high service and supplied through the 
Beacon Hill Reservoir. The reservoirs at South Boston and at 
East Boston are not of any value for two of the objects for 
which they were designed, viz : the equalization of the head or, 
pressure and the maintenance of a more steady and uniform 
flow of water through the pipes. The water is let into these 
reservoirs only at long intervals (in the case of South Boston, 
only once during the year 1868), and is then shut in to be 



Report of the Water Board. 23 

drawn out only in case of an extreme emergency, such as an 
accident to the main, or a destructive conflagration. The aver- 
age depth of water stored in these reservoirs for the past eight 
years has been thirteen feet ten inches in the East Boston, and 
eight feet three inches in the South Boston ; these depths being 
equivalent to a supply of 2,157,000 gallons in the former, and 
3,132,950 gallons in the latter, or less than two days supply for 
each place in case of a serious break in the main line leading to 
each place. 

If it is desirable to record and publish annually, a table 
exhibiting the loss of head from Brookline Reservoir to various 
parts of the city, the most reliable method would be to establish 
pressure-gauges at various points connected with the principal 
mains. These gauges would indicate the exact head at the sev- 
eral points of connection at all hours of the day or night. They 
could readily be made to be self-recording, and would not there- 
fore require a daily personal examination at stated times. 

The importance of returning to the original plan of keeping 
the several City reservoirs connected with the general circula- 
tion, thus increasing the efficiency of our whole system of distri- 
bution, is undoubtedly fully appreciated by your Board; but 
this result, however desirable, must be postponed until an inde- 
pendent supply for Bast Boston shall have been procured, and 
an additional main pipe laid to South Boston, both of which 
measures are of far more importance to those localities than 
even the existence of the reservoirs themselves. 

BEACON HILL HIGH SERVICE. 

The question of supplying the high service of Beacon Hill 
has frequently engaged the attention of former Boards and 
Engineers, and the present system seems to be the best that 
could be devised without resort to pumping ; but it is, neverthe- 
less, far from being efficient or reliable. As now arranged, the 
exclusive use of Beacon Hill Reservoir, and about five miles of 



24 City Document. — No. 55. 

thirty-inch pipe are devoted to the high service section, which 
strictly comprises not over fifty acres, and about fifty acres more 
of the contiguous low service. The population now supplied 
by the thirty-inch main does not exceed 15,000, and, as the 
requirements are almost, if not quite, exclusively domestic, it 
would appear that this entire line of pipe and the costly reser- 
voir structure are used to furnish a supply of less than a mil- 
lion gallons per day, or about one fifteenth of the entire demand. 
It must be evident that the present system of keeping up the 
head or pressure on Beacon Hill is not only, as before said, 
unreliable and imperfect, but about as extravagant a system as 
could be devised. As stated before, the high service proper of 
Beacon Hill does not cover an area of over fifty acres ; and, as 
this area is already fully covered with dwellings, the population 
may be said to have reached its highest limit, and its require- 
ments may be safely computed. 

The plan which your Board has adopted for the high service 
in Roxbury, and which is subsequently described in this report, 
would seem to furnish the true solution to all the difficulties in 
this section. 

For a very moderate outlay, small pumping engines, a stand- 
pipe, and all the necessary connections could be furnished, which 
would deliver the requisite amount of water for this section, at 
such an elevation as would supply the most elevated houses in 
as thorough and efficient a manner as in any part of the city, 
and at the same time enable the thirty-inch pipe and the Beacon 
Hill Reservoir to be chiefly devoted to the general service, thus 
greatly relieving the other . mains, and increasing the head or 
pressure in the other sections of the city. 

Connections could then be made between the thirty and thirty- 
six inch mains at various points, which would be of great advan- 
tage to South Boston and the southerly wards of the city. 

The improvements above suggested are so intimately con- 
nected with the whole question of the future supply and distri- 



Report of the Water Board. 52 

bution of water, that I beg leave to call the attention of your 
Board to the importance of giving to them an early consideration. 

EAST BOSTON EESEKVOIR, ETC. 

The East Boston Reservoir has been empty during most of the 
past year. The water was drawn out April 4th, and repairs to 
prevent the leakage which has been so troublesome in years 
past, were at once commenced according to the plan described 
in my last report. It was confidently anticipated that the entire 
work would be finished before the close of the year 1868, but 
the limited and confined space in which the work had to be done, 
and the consequent shifting of material, hindered the progress 
of the work very materially. The work was prosecuted until 
December 24th, when it was abandoned on account of the cold 
weather. The entire bottom and the slide-slopes to within a 
few feet of high-water mark were then finished, the rubbish from 
the interior removed, and, on the 25th of December, water was 
let in to the depth of 20 feet. Since that time, and until the 
resumption of the work of repairs, the water has been kept at 
about that height, and no sign of leakage was manifest. In 
fact, instead of the water subsiding, as was previously the case, 
the additional accumulation from the rain fall has made it neces- 
sary to draw it down on several occasions. 

Work has already been resumed and the interior will be 
finished probably by July. 

Great credit is due to the Superintendent of the Eastern 
Division, Mr. Jones, and to his efficient assistant on this work, 
Mr. Tucker, for the very faithful manner in which the plans for 
the repairs for this reservoir, adopted by your Board, have thus 
far been executed. 

When the present repairs of the interior are finished, it will 
be found necessary to re-grade a portion of the outer slopes, 
and rebuild the fence. The present wooden structure was 
erected in 1850, and is in quite a dilapidated condition. The 



26 City Document. — No. 55. 

new fence should be of iron, and placed upon our true boundary 
Hues. The present fence does not enclose our whole lot, there 
being about an acre and a quarter outside. 

Surveys are now being made to fix the exact boundaries of 
the lot, and levels taken to determine the best manner of grad- 
ing the same, and the adjoining streets. 

Repairs are needed on that part of the structure at the 
Warren Bridge, which covers the twenty-inch main to East 
Boston ; but it will be desirable to await the action of the city 
of Charlestown, in making their portion of repairs in the 
vicinity, as the work can be done more advantageously by co- 
operation. In view of the proposed widening of the draw at 
this bridge, and the consequent necessity of enlarging the 
syphon pipe at this place, it will become necessary to make 
some arrangement by which a supply for East Boston may be 
obtained, by a connection with either the Charlestown or 
Chelsea main. The present contingency would seem to afford 
a convenient opportunity for perfecting arrangements with the 
city of Charlestown for a permanent supply to East Boston. 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS IN EOXBURY. 

The extension of the works in Roxbury has progressed as 
well as could be expected, considering the difficult nature of the 
ground to be opened. At the date of the last annual report, 
work had been commenced by the Superintendent in the vicin 
ity of Mount Pleasant, and in Highland Street, and, until the 
close of the season, the prosecution of it was uninterrupted, 
though somewhat delayed in certain quarters by tardiness in 
the delivery of the larger sizes of pipe and branches. 

The Superintendent's Report will show the amount of pipe 
laid, the location and size; also the number of gates and 
hydrants set. The general plan of distribution for this district, 
as sketched in my last report has been followed with slight 



Report of the Water Board. 27 

modification. The twenty-four inch main, and the twelve-inch 
distribution pipe alongside, have been laid from Tremont Street 
through Washington Street, Eliot Square, and Dudley Street, to 
the junction of Dudley and Hampdeu Streets, connecting there 
with the twelve-inch pipe in Hampden Street. A connection 
has also been made between the twenty-four inch main and the 
twelve-inch pipe which was laid last year in Washington Street 
and Guild Row; thus linking the old distribution with the new 
at three points — Tremont Street, Guild Row and Hampden 
Streets. 

HIGH SERVICE [IN ROXBURY. 

It was determined by surveys made during the previous year 
that a very considerable area of this district was entirely above 
the reach of the Oochituate water by gravitation delivery, and, 
as a matter of course, a portion of the contiguous territory is so 
situated that the supply would be necessarily intermittent and 
imperfect. 

During the past year levels were taken to determine the 
elevation of all the door-sills above a plane of eighty feet above 
"tide marsh level," with a view of ascertaining the location 
and extent of the districts requiring a special supply. It was 
found that there were four separate districts requiring a special 
high service which may be designated respectively as the 
"Highland Street, or Fort district;" the "Tommy's Rocks dis- 
trict;" the "Parker Hill district;" and the "Seaver Hill 
district." 

The first-named district comprises about eighty acres, the 
centre of which is very near the junction of Highland and Cedar 
Streets, and includes within its limits Norfolk Street, Lambert 
Street and Avenue, Millmont Street, Dorr Street, Cedar Street 
from Centre Street to Shawmut Avenue, Cedar Square, Haw- 
thorne Street, part of Thornton Street, Ellis Street, Beech Glen 
Avenue, Fort Avenue, Linwood Street and Square, Highland 



28 City Document. — No. 55. 

Avenue, and Highland Street from Norfolk Street to near 
Marcella Street. 

The highest door-sill in the above-described district is that of 
Mr. Hunnewell's house on Beech Glen Avenue, which is about 
149 feet above "tide marsh level." 

The second district has an area of about thirty acres, and 
includes within its limits Regent Street, Alpine Street, Akron 
Street, Fountain Street, Summit Street, Buena Vista Avenue, 
portions of St. James and Circuit Streets, and sundry small 
courts and places. The highest door-sill in this district is that 
of D. M. Nichols, on Alpine Street, which is 117.80 feet above 
"tide marsh level." 

The third district has an area of about one hundred acres, 
and comprises the bulk of the territory South of Tremont Street, 
West of the Providence Railroad, and North and East of Heath 
Street. 

The highest door-sill in this district is that of the house of 
Nathan Brown, on the summit of Parker Hill, which is 224.60 
feet above " tide marsh level." 

The fourth has an area of about three hundred and ninety 
acres, and includes nearly all the territory bounded by Shaw- 
mut Avenue, Munroe Street (including the same), Warren 
Street, Grove Hall Avenue, and Seaver Street, which last forms 
the boundary line between Boston and West Roxbury. 

The highest door-sill in this district is that of the house of 
Mr. Charles Davenport, on Maple Street, which is 174.20 feet 
above " tide marsh level." 

Although the boundaries of these districts include some houses 
which can be reached by our present service, yet they are not 
thoroughly served, and the lines, as drawn, avoid, as much as 
possible, a duplication of pipes, and the consequent expense. 

It having been decided by your Board that it was both expe- 
dient and necessary to furnish an adequate supply for these high 
sections, — a portion at once, and the whole before many years 



Report of the Watee Board. 29 

— and as pumping works were, of course, decided to be essen- 
tial, the only questions to be decided were, first, whether we 
should have a reservoir or use a stand-pipe, and then the loca- 
tion of whichever should be decided upon ; the question of the 
location of the purapiug-engine not being very material. 

It was found that the only location where a reservoir could 
be built, and be at a sufficiently high level, was upon the very 
summit of Parker Hill. This was deemed too much upon the 
outskirts of the districts, and the probability, not to say neces- 
sity, of reducing the height of the hill to render it accessible and 
convenient for dwelling purposes, seemed to settle the question 
of a reservoir, unless the stand-pipe system should be found to 
be inefficient or undesirable. 

A visit to Philadelphia, and the examinations and inquiries 
there made, satisfied a committee of your board, and myself, 
that the stand-pipe system would be both efficient and economi- 
cal, and it was thereupon decided to adopt it. The lot known 
as the " Old Fort lot," which had already been purchased by 
the city as a probable site for a reservoir, was deemed the most 
central and eligible location for the stand-pipe, and was accord- 
ingly adopted. This lot is located between Beach Glen Avenue 
on the south, and Fort Avenue on the north ; the highest point 
of the natural ground, which is mostly rock, of the formation 
known as " Pudding stone," is about one hundred and fifty -seven 
feet above " tide marsh level " ; the highest point of the earth- 
work of the old fort is one hundred and sixty-three feet above 
the same datum. 

The location of the engine-house and pumps was, after con- 
siderable investigation and an examination of several localities, 
finally fixed on the rear portion of the new Station-house lot on 
Pynchon Street, between Washington and Tremont Streets, a 
small parcel having been purchased and added to the rear of 
the Station lot so as to give a frontage on Elmwood Street of 
about forty feet. 
3* 



30 City Document. — No. 55. 

The portion transferred from the Station-house lot was 3,431 
square feet, and the additional parcel purchased of Nancy Shove 
contained 2,132 square feet, making 5,563 square feet in all, an 
area amply sufficient for the engine-house, boiler-house and coal 
shed. 

Several designs for a stand-pipe were made and presented to 
the Board, and estimates were procured on each. The one 
finally adopted was a single tube or cylinder, five feet in diame- 
ter, to be made of boiler plate, and to be in height about eighty 
feet above the ground. This pipe is to be enclosed in a brick 
tower resting upon a quadrangular buttressed base. Between 
the pipe and the interior wall of the tower is a space of about 
three feet, in which is a spiral staircase leading to a lookout at 
the top. 

The proposed grade of the ground at the base of the tower 
will be one hundred and fifty-eight feet above "tide marsh 
level," and the floor of the lookout, which is about three feet 
below the top of the stand-pipe, will be two hundred and thirty- 
five feet above the said datum line. 

Contracts have been made for the iron work, and also for the 
masonry. The iron work is to be furnished and erected by the 
Boston Machine Company, and the masonry by Messrs. Standish 
& Woodbury. The soil has already been stripped from the rock 
foundation, and everything will soon be in readiness for the 
contractors, whose work, by agreement, is to be finished by the 
first day of October. 

The pumping-engines finally adopted for this work are from 
designs furnished by the Boston Machine Company. It was the 
original intention to use the " "Worthington Duplex Engine," 
which has so justly earned for itself a reputation ranking among 
the very best of those now iu use in this country, and a very 
decided indisposition existed, in my own mind — and I think I 
may say in that of the Committee in charge — to the trial Of 
experiments in a matter of so much importance. The request, 



Report op the "Water Board. 31 

however, of the Boston Machine Company to be allowed to fur- 
nish and submit designs at their own expense was granted, and 
they were invited to submit a proposal for furnishing and erect- 
ing the engines. H. R. Worthington & Co. were also invited 
to submit proposals for furnishing and erecting their engines ; 
the engines in both cases to be of the capacity prescribed in the 
instructions furnished each party. The proposal of the Boston 
Machine Company, being some ten thousand dollars lower than 
that of Worthington & Co., would probably have been at once 
accepted, but for the indisposition above alluded to in regard to 
experimenting. The propositions, therefore, were held in abey- 
ance until the designs furnished could be thoroughly examined, 
and their merits or demerits determined. After a thorough 
examination by myself and the committee, and a casual exami- 
nation by Mr. Chesbrough, the City Engineer of Chicago, which 
failed to detect any faults, it was decided to follow the advice 
of Mr. Chesbrough, and refer the plans to a competent practical 
mechanical engineer. 

Mr. Albert Betteley having been selected as a competent 
judge in such matters, the plans were submitted to him with a 
memorandum of the required duty, etc., and his report submitted 
March 26, 1869, being favorable in all respects, the contract 
was awarded to the Boston Machine Company, who are to fur- 
nish and erect the engines in good running order, on or before 
the first day of October, 1869, and also guarantee the perform- 
ance of the required duty, for the sum of Thirty-seven Thousand 
Dollars. 

Plans are now being prepared for the engine-house and 
appurtenances, and it is expected to be ready to receive the 
engines as soon as they are in condition to be erected. 

The plan for receiving the water at the pumps and its con- 
veyance thence to the stand pipe and the several districts to be 
supplied may be thus briefly described : — A sixteen-inch pipe 
leads from the twenty-four inch main, near its junction with the 



32 City Document. — No. 55. 

thirty-six, and passes through the station-house yard, under the 
coal-shed and boiler-house to the engines, the distance being 
about 225 feet. A three-way branch and two sixteen-inch gates 
regulates the flow so that either or both engines may be supplied 
at will. 

A sixteen-inch pipe leads from each engine, and, by means of 
a Y branch, connects with the single force-main which leads to 
the stand-pipe, just outside the engine house. Each of these pipes 
between the engine and the Y is provided with a check-valve 
to prevent the backward flow of the water into the engine house 
in case of a breakage of the pumps. The single force-main, 
sixteen inches in diameter passes from the Y through Elmwood 
Street, across Washington Street, passing under the twenty-four 
and twelve-inch pipes, through Gardner and Centre Streets, and 
Fort Avenue to the lot where the stand-pipe is located; and 
thence to the stand-pipe itself. The length of this main is 
about 2,500 feet and is provided at two points with check- 
valves. The arrangement of branches and gates in the vicinity 
of the stand-pipe is such that, in case of any accident to the 
stand-pipe requiring repairs, it may be disused and the engines 
pump directly into the distribution pipes of either or all the 
districts. 

The general plan of distribution may be briefly described as 
follows, viz : A sixteen-inch main leads from the stand-pipe, in 
a southerly direction, to Beech Glen Avenue ; thence through 
said avenue to Highland Street; thence across Highland Street 
to Ellis Street; thence through Ellis, Thornton and Oakland 
Streets to Shawmut Avenue ; thence across Shawmut Avenue to 
Dale Street, and thence through Dale Street, across Walnut 
Avenue to Warren Street. 

From this main a twelve-inch branch is taken at Beech Glen 
Avenue, one at Walnut Avenue, and one at Warren Street; 
while at Highland Street, a six-inch branch is taken, and also 
one at Walnut Avenue. The twelve-inch branch at Beech Glen 



Report of the "Water Board. 33 

Avenue, leads in a westerly direction, through said avenue to 
Fort Avenue; thence through Fort Avenue to Centre Street; 
thence through Centre Street to New Heath Street; thence 
through New Heath Street to Parker Street, and thence through 
Parker Street to Parker Hill. 

The twelve-inch branch at Walnut Avenue leads southerly 
through Walnut Avenue, and the one at Warren Street leads 
southerly through Warren Street; the lateral streets between 
said Walnut Avenue and Warren Street, and on either side of 
the same, to be supplied with six-inch pipes. These last men- 
tioned twelve-inch pipes supply what is before described as the 
" Seaver Hill District." The six-inch branch at Highland 
Street connects with the six-inch pipe already laid, and is to 
supply the " Highland Street " or " Fort District." The six- 
inch branch at Walnut Avenue, leads northwardly through 
Walnut Avenue to Buena Vista Avenue and Circuit Street, and 
supplies the " Tommy's Rocks District." 

It is not proposed to do anything this season in laying the 
mains on the routes above described ; but, as a temporary meas- 
ure for supplying the " Highland Street " and " Tommy's Rocks 
Districts," a return sixteen-inch pipe will lead from the stand- 
pipe back to Fort Avenue, there connecting with a twelve-inch 
pipe which leads through said avenue to Highland Street, and 
there connects with the present six-inch pipe. 

A temporary connection between this district and the 
" Tommy's Rocks District " will be made in Circuit Street 
either from the six-inch pipe to be laid in Guild Street, or the 
one in Cedar Street. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

The report of the Superintendent of the Western Division 
will furnish all the required information as to the condition 
of the grounds and property at the lake and at Brookline 
reservoir. 



34 City Document. — No. 55. 

During the past year considerable progress was made in the 
work of marking the bounds of the city's property around the 
lake and along the line of the conduit, by means of permanent 
stone posts. This is an important work, and should be finished 
this year. 

The annual examination of the interior of the conduit was 
made last month throughout its whole length. The portion 
between the lake and Charles River was examined by myself, 
accompanied by Mr. Wiggin, the Clerk at Chestnut Hill reser- 
voir, and two laborers. The lower sections from Charles River 
to Brookline reservoir, was examined by Mr. Wightman, the 
Resident Engineer at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and Mr. Stan- 
wood, the Superintendent, accompanied, for a portion of the 
way, by a corps of distinguished assistants, representing your 
Honorable Board and the two branches of the City Council. 

The general condition of the conduit between the lake and 
Charles River is very much the same as at the last examination 
a year ago. The dirt and slime in the section near the lake 
should be removed at once, and those fissures which are alluded 
to in the notes of examination below, should be plugged up. 

The following is a transcript of the notes of the examination : 

FIRST DIVISION. 

April 23, 1869. Entered conduit at Lake at 8.55 a. m. 

The conduit is verv dirty from about Station 3 to Station 9. 

Between Stations 17 and 18 is a fissure in the bottom bring- 
ing in water and sand. 

Between Stations 20 and 21 are several places where the 
cement used in repointing has fallen out. 

Between Stations 56 and 57 a small place where the cement 
has dropped out and the bricks have settled a little. 

At Station 60 the figure 6 is wrong side up, reading 90 
instead of 60. 

Near Station 73 is a place about two feet square where the 



Report of the Water Board. 35 

joints need repointing. A little below, on the left, quite a 
stream coming in. 

Between Stations 74 and 75 another stream; also consider- 
able sand along the bottom. 

At 97|- another stream with sand. 

At about Station 100 is still another stream. The bottom is 
very sandy. 

Reached Station 106, 40 feet over two miles, in just an hour 
and a half. 

Man hole at Station 115 leaks badly. 

From Station 141 to 142| are several small cracks in top arch. 

Between Stations 151 and 152, fine crack in top. ' 

Between Stations 154 and 155 is a crack in top all the way, 
open a quarter of an inch. 

Reached Dedman's Brook, waste weir, Station 155, at 11 
o'clock. 

Re-entered conduit at 11.45 o'clock. 

Between Stations 168£ and 170 is crack in top. Cement 
fallen out. Should be repointed. 

Several places that have been repointed show no signs of 
weakness. 

Between Stations 178 £ and 180 there is a crack a little below 
the top on the right, in some places very fine, but in no place 
over an eighth of an inch. This crack continues at intervals to 
about Station 184. 

The conduit this side the water weir is very clean. 

Between Stations 207 and 208 is a fine crack in top the 
whole distance. 

From Station 245 to a little beyond 246 is a fine crack 
alongside of an old repaired one. 

Between Stations 247 and 248 is a short crack, worse than 
any seen yet ; appears again at intervals a little beyond 248. 

At Station 255 is an old crack that has been repointed, and 
the cement remains perfectly sound and unbroken. 



36 City Document. — No. 55. 

From Station 272 to 2 72 J is an old crack in top, which has 
been bridged at intervals with Portland cement, to determine if 
the crack increased. The cement bars or bridges have not 
broken in a single instance. 

At this place there is a corresponding crack in the bottom 
arch. These cracks should be pointed up. 

The figures at Station 282 are wrong, there should be a 2 in 
place of the 9. 

At half past one o'clock reached end of First Division, which 
is Station 298. 

SECOND DIVISION. 

Between Stations 15 and 17 an old crack has been patched, 
as above described, to test it, but it has not opened any more. 

From the last mentioned point to the West Pipe Chamber — 
Station 112 — the conduit is in very good condition. The 
repairs at " Ware's Valley " stand remarkably well. 

Keached the West Pipe Chamber, at Charles River, at 2.50 
o'clock. 

The following memoranda of the condition of the Conduit 
between Charles River and the Waste Weir at Newton Centre 
is furnished by Mr. Wightman : — 

Between Stations 196 and 197 is a small crack in top arch. 

At Station 206, small crack in bottom arch which lets in some 
sand. 

Between Stations 217£ and 21 8 J crack in bottom and top 
arches and some sand in bottom of Conduit. This crack should 
be pointed. 

Between 224 and 225 double crack in top arch, and also 
crack in bottom arch. 

Between 232 \ and 234 small crack in bottom and top arches. 

Between 242 and 244J is a bad crack in bottom and top 
arches, with considerable sand in bottom of Conduit. This 
crack should be attended to. 



Repoet of the Water Board. 37 

Between 254 and 255 small crack in top arch. 
Between 263£ and 264 small crack in top arch. 

THIRD DIVISION. 

Between Stations 1 and 2 small crack in top arch. 

The Conduit is in good condition as to cleanliness, and the 
cracks enumerated above are in about the same condition they 
were in 1867, as well as I could judge. 

The following is Mr. Stanwood's memoranda of the condition 
of the remaining section of the Conduit, from the Waste Weir 
at Newton Centre to Brookline Reservoir : — 

That portion of the Conduit that was examined by me April 
23, was found in good condition with but few exceptions. 
Between Brookline and Chestnut Hill Reservoirs, — between 
Stations 156 and 157, for about 20 feet, a slight crack is shown 
on the top ; this occurs at the point where the sewer was carried 
under the Conduit. Between the Intermediate and Influent Gate 
Houses (or what is better known as the " Bennett Field "), the 
old cracks have enlarged a little and need repairs, which can be 
done as soon as the Lawrence Meadow basin is filled. Between 
the " Bennett Field " and the Newton Centre Waste Weir the 
Conduit is in good condition. The tunnel section should be 
cleaned out as soon as the Conduit can be spared for that 
purpose. 

WATEE AT THE LAKE. 

The water in the lake, on the first of January, 1868, stood at 
10 feet 51 inches above the bottom of the conduit; on the eighth 
of January it had risen to 10 feet 7 inches, and then gradually 
fell off to 10 feet 1 inch on the twenty-first, at which level it 
stood until the thirty-first. On the eighth of March it had fallen 
to 9 feet 3 inches, which was the lowest point reached during 
the year. It then began to rise, and on the fifth of April was 
at high water mark, or 13 feet 4 inches above the bottom of the 

4 



38 City Document. — No. 55. 

conduit, and still continued to rise until the eleventh, when it 
had reached 13 feet 9 inches and was running to waste seven- 
teen inches deep over the outlet dam. On the twenty-eighth of 
April it had fallen to 12 feet 11^ inches, and the waste had 
stopped. It then began to rise again, and on the eighth of May 
was 13 feet 8J inches, and stood at that height for three days, 
with six inches of water running to waste. On the eighteenth 
it had risen still higher, to 13 feet 11 1 inches, when the waste 
was increased to 17 inches, which brought the water down to 
13 feet 8 J inches again on the twentieth. Another rise then 
commenced and by the twenty-fourth it had reached the highest 
point of the year, 14 feet above the bottom of the conduit, and 
at this time 24 inches in depth was running over the outlet dam, 
wasting the water at the rate of 140,000,000 gallons per day. 
In a week the water was reduced 13 feet 4 inches, when still 
another rise occurred, and on the twelfth of June it was up to 
13 feet 9i inches, with 12 inches running to waste at the outlet. 
June twenty-first it was 13 feet 31 inches and remained about 
so until the twenty-fifth when it began to fall, and on the ninth 
of August was at 11 feet 10 inches and remained so until the 
fifteenth, when a further decline commenced and continued until 
the fourth of September, reducing the water to 11 feet 5| inches. 
It then rose to 11 feet 8^ inches on the fourteenth, and fell off 
again to 11 feet 5| inches on the twenty-third. In a week it 
had gained 7 inches and remained stationary until October 
eleventh, between which time and the first of November it fell 
off 8 inches, to 11 feet 4 inches. November thirtieth it had 
risen to 12 feet 4 inches, at which height it remained until De- 
cember seventh. On the thirtieth it had risen to 12 feet 7 
inches, and then declined gradually to 12 feet on the thirty-first 
of December. 

On page 41 will be found the usual table of the heights of 
water at the lake above the bottom of the conduit averaged for 
each month and for the year, from 1851 to 1868 inclusive. It 



Report of the Water Board. 39 

will be seen that the average for 1868 is among the highest for 
the period of eighteen years, being 11.92 feet, while that of last 
year was 12.33, and the highest of all, in 1863, was 13.52. The 
table on page 44 shows the varying depths of the water as run 
into the conduit at the lake, the number of days in each month 
that the water was run at those depths, and also the average 
depths for each month and for the whole year. It will be seen 
that the conduit has been empty (water shut off), four days dur- 
ing the year; that it has been run full and more than full (6 
feet 4 inches to 7 feet), for seventy-two days, and that the aver- 
age for the whole year was 5 feet 8 inches. 

On page 38 will be found a statement of the annual rainfall 
at the lake ; the amount which fell on the water-shed, in gallons, 
the amounts consumed and wasted, the total amounts and the 
daily average amounts received into the lake, and the available 
per centage of rainfall collected from 1852, to 1868, inclusive. 

From this table it appears that although the rainfall of the 
past year was six inches less than in the previous year, yet, 
the per centage received into the lake was fifteen per cent 
greater. The average daily capacity of the lake as a source 
of supply for the last year was 22,567,160 gallons, and deduct- 
ing the average daily waste, which was 6,851,600 gallons, we 
find the net capacity was 15,715,560 gallons. If we take the 
whole period of fifteen years it will be found that the net ca- 
pacity was 17,628,440 gallons per day. 

The following statement shows the months in which the water 
was wasted at the lake, the number of days in each month and 
the amount : 

April, 20 days .... 767,138,993 gallons. 
May, 24 " . . . 1,555,152,329 « 

June, 6 « . . . . • 185,393,062 " 



Total, 50 days . . . 2,507,684,384 " 

Daily average for whole year . " 6.851,600 " 



40 City Document. — No. 55. 

CONSUMPTION OF WATEE. 

The usual statement of the daily average amount of water 
consumed for each month and year since 1849, may be found on 
pages 39-40. The amount for the past year was 14,769,167 
gallons per day, an excess over last year of 1,204,167 gallons 
per day. 

The highest average for any one month was 16,927.000 gal- 
lons in February, and the lowest was 12,636,000 gallons in 
April. 

EAINFALL. 

On page 43 will be found the usual tables of the rainfall at 
Lake Cochituate, Boston, Cambridge, Lowell, Walthatn and 
Proviclenee, from 1849 to 1868 inclusive. There will also be 
found on page 42 a table showing the days in each month on 
which rain or snow fell, and the several amounts. To the sev- 
eral gentlemen who have furnished the material for the aforesaid 
tables, I desire to express my best thanks. 

CHESTNUT HILL EESEEYOIE. 

The following statement in regard to the progress of the 
•work at this locality during the past year has been furnished me 
by the resident engineer, Henry M. Wightman, Esq. As it is 
quite a full and detailed report, I have thought it best to incor- 
porate it entire, as being substantially what I should have writ- 
ten myself, though perhaps more in detail. 

"EEPOET ON CHESTNUT HILL EESEEVOIE. 

"The work on this reservoir has steadily progressed since the 
date of the last annual report, and every exertion has been 
made to complete it in the shortest possible time. 

" The following is a table showing the average number of men 
employed since the commencement of the work. 



Report of the Water Board. 



41 



1866, April . 
" May . 
•• June . 
" July . 
" August 
" September 
" October . . 
" November 
" December 

1867, January 
" February 
" March 
" April . 
" May . 
" June . 
" July . 
" August 
" September 
" October . . 



Men. 



182 
327 
385 
400 
424 
396 
386 
319 
270 
257 
240 
222 
373 
406 
611 
734 
755 
652 
594 



9 
18* 

23 

27 

32>£ 

39^ 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

49 

49 

59 

59 

64^ 

65 



November 
December 

1868, January 
" February 
" March 
" April . 
" May . 
" June . 
" July . 
" August 
" September 
" October . . 
" November 
" December 

1869, January . 
February . 
March . . 
April . . . 



Men. 



522 
413 
355 
357 
346 
373 
477 
602 
580 
536 
527 
'536 
500 
527 
621 
705 
558 
531 



65 

65 

65^ 

66 

66 

66 

69 

77 

85 

87 



84 

75 

75K 

75>£ 

76 

76 



" This table shows the varying character of the work by the 
increase and decrease of the men and teams. 

" The principal portion of last season's work was on the Law- 
rence Meadow section of the reservoir, as it was deemed of im- 
portance to complete that basin in order to fill it and have it 
ready for use by the spring of 1869. Every available team and 
man that could be spared from work which it was not absolutely 
necessary to complete on the lower basin, was employed on this 
section, and it was completed at the time appointed and ready 
for the reception of the water, October 26, 1868. 

u The work done on the lower basin was the excavation of 
about 35,000 cubic yards of quicksand for the foundation of the 
effluent gate-house, and the water bank at this place, and the 



42 City Document. — No. 55. 

building of about 1000 lineal feet of bank on the northerly side 
of the basin. 

" The building of the bank was continued until cold weather, 
when the grading of the driveway was commenced, and is now 
completed, with the exception of a small section at the easterly 
end. 

" The work during the winter has been stripping the soil in 
the lower basin, loaming the banks and ballasting the walks 
around it, excavation and back-filling on the pipe-route, and 
excavation of puddle trench. 

11 On the eleventh of January work was commenced on the 
pipe route for laying the 48-inch main from this reservoir to the 
pipes from the Brookline Reservoir, on Boylston Street, near the 
Goddard Estate. The weather being very favorable it was con- 
tinued, with but slight interruption, until April first, and 6,608 
feet of trench have been dug, and 6,350 feet of pipe laid and 
back-filled up to the present time. The balance of the trench 
will be excavated, and the pipe laid, when the culvert at the 
brook near Beacon Street is completed, and the Superintendent 
of the Eastern Division can spare his men to make the connec- 
tion with the three lines of pipe from Brookline reservoir. 

" About one-third of the foundation of the effluent gate-house 
was built last fall, from September to December, and work was 
commenced upon it again about the first of May, and is now 
rapidly progressing. It was ascertained in excavating for the 
foundation of this structure that it would be necessary to take 
out twenty-eight feet in depth of quicksand, in addition to the 
depth already excavated, if the wing walls upon the water front 
were carried to a gravel or rock stratum. This expense was 
not deemed advisable and a pile foundation has been put in for 
them. A row of close piling lias also been driven the entire 
length of the bank, where this quicksand will underlie it, to 
keep the weight of the bank, when built, from pressing it out 
from beneath it. The foundation for this gate-house has been 



Report of the Water Board. 43 

a much more expensive work than was anticipated, not only on 
account of the greater depth of quicksand than was shown by 
the soundings, but also from the difficulty of keeping the pit free 
from water during the progress of the work. During the severe 
rain-storm of the fifteenth of February the water accumulated 
with such rapidity that the brook did not carry it away fast 
enough to prevent its breaking through the dam which sur- 
rounded the excavations for this foundation. The flume which 
conveyed the water across the pit, and into which the water 
was pumped from it, broke, and notwithstanding the most 
strenuous exertions to prevent it the pit was soon completely 
full, burying the engine and pump in water. Steam fire engines 
and a Gwynn pump were obtained from Boston, and it then 
took a week to lower the water so that the engine and pump 
located there could resume their work. 

"In November, 1868, it was ascertained that the new piece 
of conduit was cracked, and the bank seemed weak at the dam 
between the upper and lower basins. A plan was submitted to 
your Board for strengthening the dam by means of a puddle 
trench, and by widening the bank to 80 feet, instead of keeping 
it 60 feet in width, as was originally intended. This plan was 
adopted and the work of excavating for the puddle trench com- 
menced the sixteenth of November, 1868. This trench is 10 
feet in width, and was carried to a depth of 15 to 17 feet to 
rock bottom. In the centre of this trench, and upon the rock, 
was laid a tooth wall of brick, 18 inches thick and 18 inches 
high, the whole length of the trench, 400 feet, and the trench 
was then filled with clay puddle. This puddle trench will prove 
an effectual barrier to the passage of any water through the 
bank, and by the widening of the bank a driveway can be 
obtained to the front of the intermediate gate-house. 

" The cut granite for the effluent gate-house is nearly all 
delivered, and the building of it will be commenced as soon as 
the foundation is in. 



44 



City Document. — No. 55. 



" The embankment at this place is very heavy, in length about 
1,100 feet, and varying in height from 20 to 40 feet. 

" The following statement shows the amount expended from 
the appropriation for Chestnut Hill reservoir for engineering 
during the year ending April 30, 1869, viz : 

Salary of Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer $2,276 00 
W. H. Learned, Assistant Engineer . . 
Wm. Jackson, Leveler and Draughtsman 
Daniel C. Sanger, Rodman 
James A. Hildreth, " 
J. Sullivan, Axeman 
E. R. Brown, Architect 
John Day . 



Total 



799 


00 


383 


50 


321 


50 


47 


00 


584 


00 


786 


00 


43 


75 



5,241 25" 



Report of the Water Board. 



45 



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Report of the Water Board. 



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48 



City Document. — No. 55. 



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Bepokt of the Water Board. 



49 



Table showing the Rainfall in Boston, for the year 1868, and 
the days on which it occurred, from observations by Wm. H. Brad- 
lee, Esq., Superintendent of Sewers. 





MONTHS. 


Day of Month. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




INCHES. 




























2 






1.60 




.72 






.03 




.16 


.16 


. • 






































































.15 


1.64 




.12 


.88 






























































2.41 


1.06 






.42 


.13 


.05 


.52 
























































.40 


.40 




.24 
























































































































.48 
















.82 






























































.32 


















3.18 


.40 






















































.15 




. .. 










































































































27 


.45 


.32 


• . 


.68 










3.84 


. . 




.16 




















































.04 
























































6.09 


1.88 


5.04 


6.94 


10.38 


3.79 


1.10 


7.53 


11.95 


1.78 


5.31 


2.32 



Total for the year, 64.11 inches.. 



50 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Cochituate, Bos- 
ton and vicinity, 1849 to 1868 inclusive. 





PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 


Year. 


3 - 

•j. a 

IS 


•ill 


U 

O 

h 

<o o 

11 

m 

■|| 


11° 
H*s to 

41 

"en 3 


a 

go 

a 

•=.3 

I 


•73 '3 

a* 

>> r 

.= 6 

|| 

o O 


OS 

< 

>> 
.Q 

a 
•73 _: 

"P <o 

2* 
Ph 




. . 


40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


51.09 


. . 


34.69 




. . 


53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


45.68 


. . 


51.48 






44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


41.00 


. . 


43.30 




*45.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 




38.58 




*55.86 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


. . 


53.27 




43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 




46.25 




34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 


1856 


40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 




63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 




48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 




49.02 


56.70 


. . 


48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 




55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


. • 


46.91 


46.67 


38.24 




46.44 


50.07 


50.14 




43.32 


42.95 


44.25 




49.69 


61.06 


57.21 




44.26 


44.61 


50.09 




69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


54.17 




42.60 


49.30 


. . 


36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 




49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38.82 


44.69 




62.32 


50.70 


. . 


43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.04 




56.25 


55.64 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 




50.06 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


49.58 


53.52 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Report of the Water Board. 



51 



CONDUIT AT THE LAKE. 

The following table shows the varying depths of the water in 
the Conduit at the Gate-House, the number of days in each 
month that the water was running at those depths, and the 
average depth for each month. 



Depths. 
Ft In. 


Jan. 
Days. 


Feb. 
Days. 


Mar. 
Days. 


Apr. 
Days. 


May. 
Days. 


June. 
Days. 


July. 
Days. 


Aug. 
Days. 


Sept. 
Days. 


Oct. 
Days. 


Nov. 
Days. 


Dec. 

Days. 


Total 
Days. 


0-0 
4-6 
4-8 

4-10 
6-0 
5-2 
5-3 
6-4 
5-6 
5-8 

5-10 
6-0 
6-2 
6-4 
6-6 
6-8 
7-0 


2 
16 

1 
12 


4 
1 
7 
2 
13 
2 


15 
6 

2 
S 


1 
1 

21 

7 


1 

3 

15 

2 

1 

6 
2 
1 


6 

19 

5 


15 
13 

3 


3 

25 

3 


2 

1 

12 
2 
6 

2 
5 


1 

15 

2 
2 
2 

9 


12 
1 

5 
12 


1 

10 
1 

7 
12 


4 

2 
24 
37 
26 

2 
15 
10 
21 
98 

7 
46 

2 
28 

4 

1 
38 



Average Monthly Depths. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May, 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Average 
for the Year. 


5f.9 


6f.2 


5f.2S 


4f.8£ 


5f.3| 


5f.7§ 


5f.7 


5f.8 


6f.0J 


5f.ll 


5f.ll 


6f.l| 


5f. 8in. 





52 



Cut Document. — No. 55. 



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M 



WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Water Registrar's Office, 
Boston, May 1, 1869. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir : The following report is made iu compliance with the 
requirements of the ordinance regulating the Boston Water 
Works. 

The total number of water takers now entered for the year 
1869, is 29,738, being an increase since January 1, 1868, of 
1,634. 

During the year there have been 680 cases where the water 
has been turned off for non-payment of rates. Of this number 
585 have been turned on, leaving a balance of 95 still remain- 
ing off. 

The total amount of water rates received from December 31, 
1867, to January 1, 1869, is .... $553,74488 
Of the above there was received 

for water used in previous years, 

the sum of ... $43,306 35 

Leaving the receipts for water fur- 
nished during the year 1868, 

the sum of . . . . 510,438 53 

Amount carried forward .... $553,744 88 



Report op the Water Board. 55 

Amount brought forward, $553,744 88 

In addition to the above there has 
been received for turning on 
water in cases where it had 
been turned off for non-payment 
of rates, the sum of . . 1,170 00 



Total $554,914 88 

The amount received for water 
rates from January 1, 1869, to 
May 1, 1869, is 562,031 33 

Of this amount there was received 
for water used in previous years, 
the sum of . . . $45,901 98 

Leaving the receipts for water as- 
sessed (for the year 1869) to 
May 1, 1869,' the sum of . . 416,129 35 

The amount received from Jan- 
uary 1, 1869, to May 1, 1869, 
for turning on water in cases 
where it had been turned off for 
non-payment of rates, is . 624 00 



Total receipts from January 1, 1868, to May 
1, 1869, is ....... $1,117,570 21 



The increased amount of income in 1868 over 
the previous year, is ..... $31,613 95 

The total amount of assessments now made 
for the present year is . . . . . 435,123 65 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water during the year 1869, is . . 600,000 00 

The expenditures of my office during the 
year 1868 have been 17,769 46 



56 



City Document. — No. 55. 



The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz : 

Paid Wm. P. Davis, Registrar . . . $2,500 00 

Charles H. Little, clerk . . . 1,966 67 

Charles L. Bancroft, clerk . . . 1,375 00 

Stephen Badlam, "... 1,375 00 

Edwin Jennings, " . . . 1,375 00 

J. F. Mayo, services on meters . . 1,070 00 

R. D. Child, Inspector .... 930 00 

C. M. Thompson, » . . . . 930 00 

T, L. Kelley, " . . . . 930 00 

Josiah Hay ward, Jr. Inspector . . 930 00 

T. H. Badlam, " . . 702 00 

O. A. Ramsdell, "... 540 00 

Extra Inspectors 2,440 00- 

J. L. Fairbanks, for stationery . . 248 46 

A. Mudge & Son, for printing . . . 457 33 

$17,769 46 



METERS. 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises of 
water takers is 1,021. Of this number, 782 are f-inch, 211 
1-inch, 24 2-inch, 3 3-inch, 1 4-inch size ; they are attached to a 
variety of establishments, embracing hotels, railroads, manufac- 
tories, stables, confectionery, oyster saloons, and buildings occu- 
pied by several tenants. 

The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received from 
the sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city, 
October 25, 1848. 

Received by Water Commissioners, as per Audi- 
tor's Report, in 1848 . . . . . $972 81 

Amount carried forward . . . . $972 81 



Report of the Water Board. 



57 



Amount brought forward . 

From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850, 

» " 1850, « 

« « 1851, " 

" « 1852, " 

« " 1853, " 

» « 1854, " 

" « 1855, « 

» « 1856, " 

« " 1857, " 

» "-•■ 1858, " 

« " 1859, ". 

« " 1860, " 

« " 1861, " 

" « 1862, « 

« « 1863, « 

" " 1864, « 

« » 1865, " 

« « 1866, " 

« « 1867, " 

« « 1868, " 

« « 1869, to May 1, 1869, 



. 


$972 81 


1850, 


71,657 79 


1851, 


99,025 45 


1852, 


. 161,052 85 


1853, 


179,567 39 


1854, 


196,352 32 


1855, 


217,007 51 


1856, 


266,302 77 


1857, 


. 282,651 84 


1858, 


289,328 83 


1859, 


302,409 73 


1860, 


314,808 97 


1861, 


334, 1 44 86 


1862, 


365,323 96 


1863, 


. 373,922 33 


1864, 


. 394,506 25 


1865, 


430,710 76 


1866, 


. 450,341 48 


1867, 


486,538 25 


1868, 


522,130 93 


1869, 


. 553,744 88 


9, . 


. 562,031 33 




$6,854,933 29 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam-, 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the first of January, 1869, with the amount of water 
rates paid for 1868 : 

20,644 Dwelling-houses .... $268,833 62 

4 Boarding-houses . . . . 129 00 

105 Model-houses 2,630 00 

1 Lodging-house . . . . . 36 00 



Amount carried forward 



$271,628 62 



58 



3 City Document. - 


-No. 


55. 




Amount brought forward .... $271,628 62 


6 Hotels .... 






479 00 


4,626 Stores and shops 






42,772 05 


200 Buildings 






6,952 84 


422 Offices .... 






3,289 00 


28 Printing-offices 






285 47 


18 Banks 






239 50 


27 Halls 






312 34 


1 Theatre .... 






58 50 


33 Private schools 






340 17 


18 Asylums .... 






906 00 


9 Greenhouses 






77 50 


63 Churches . 






702 21 


3 Markets . 






889 00 


128 Cellars . 






857 50 


318 Restaurants and saloons 






4,508 89 


5 Club-houses 






116 00 


2 Bath-houses 






210 00 


38 Photographers . 






983 13 


10 Packing-houses 






311 00 


1,082 Stables . 






7,792 45 


12 Factories 






426 08 


6 Bleacheries 






105 00 


72 Bakeries . 






547 25 


5 Ship-yards 






69 50 


3 Dry docks and engines 






59 00 


60 Shops " 






2,794 16 


18 Stores « 






875 86 


2 Foundries " 






98 30 


6 Factories " 






326 40 


5 Printing " 






249 60 


1 Bakery " 






33 00 


Amount carried forward . 


. $349,295 32 



Report of the Water Board. 



59 



Amount brought forward . 


$349,295 32 


2 Ship-yards " . 


55 00 


4 Buildings " . 


324 14 


1 Pottery " . . . 


50 00 


2 Mills "... 


245 52 


50 Stationary " ... 


1,314 02 


4 Armories . . . . . 


47 75 


2 Gymnasiums .... 


44 00 


569 Hand-hose 


3,205 00 


14 Fountains .... 


101 00 


Gas Light Co. (filling gasometer). 


372 90 


Milldaoi Co 


370 80 


Custom House . . . 


150 00 


2 Ice Companies (washing ice) 


75 00 


59 Steamboats .... 


11,370 34 


Office (Harbor Master) 


6 00 


" city scales 


9 00 


Probate Building 


47 50 


House of reception . 


10 00 


3 Fire-alarm meters 


30 00 


23 Fire-engines, hose and hook and laddei 




houses * 


500 00 


282 Public Schools .... 


1,932 00 


City Stables .... 


185 00 


Offal Station .... 


150 00 


Steamer " Henry Morrison " 


192 56 


House of Correction 


462 00 


Public Library .... 


50 00 


Faneuil Hall .... 


40 00 


Shop (paving department) . 


9 00 


Common Sewer Department, (making 


i 


mortar, etc.) .... 


56 00 


Amount carried forward . 


. $370,699 85 



60 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Amount brought forward . 

Deer Park .... 

Common and Squares 

Public Urinals .... 

Street sprinkling 

Building purposes 

Contractors for supplying shipping 

Metered water (9 months) . 



$370,699 85 

10 00 

150 00 

145 00 

400 00 

3,088 97 

1,628 29 

134,216 42 

$510,338 73 



Statement sJwwing the number and kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston to Jan- 
uary 1, 1869, as compared with previous years. 



1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


REMARKS. 


4,774 


5,074 


5,129 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain 
or sewer. 


40,496 


42,099 


44,939 


Sinks. 


17,204 


18,910 


20,555 


"Wash hand-basins. 


5,499 


5,929 


6,506 


Bathing tubs. 


7,398 


7,789 


8,702 


Pan water-closets. 


7,563 


8,394 


9,319 


Hopper water-closets. 


312 


246 


233 


" " " pull. 


239 


297 


292 


" " " self-acting. 


226 


357 


381 


" " " waste. 


536 


571 


554 


" " " door. 


1,790 


1,968 


2,128 


Urinals. 


6,365 


6,806 


7,686 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to 
the building. 


756 


759 


782 


Shower-baths. 


13 


14 


17 


Hydraulic ranis. 


773 


711 


703 


Private hydrants. 


350 


388 


391 


Slop-hoppers. 


33 


40 


46 


Foot-baths. 


94,327 


100,352 


108,363 





Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE EASTERN 

DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1869. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Esq., 

President Cochituate Water Board : 

My report for the year ending April 30th, I hereby respect- 
fully submit. 

The tables below show that during the year, 53,567 feet of 
main pipes, equal to about 101 miles, have been laid in the city 
proper, South and East Boston, and the Southern, District and 
1,342 service pipes, measuring 45,367 feet. 

The number of leaks during the past season, notwithstanding 
the extensions, were not so great as during the previous year. 
The repairing of the East Boston Reservoir was commenced 
early last season, and abandoned at the close of the year, to be 
resumed at the opening of the present season. Late in the fall, 
the water was let in to test the efficiency of our operations, and 
I am pleased to say that with twenty feet of water, retained all 
winter, there was not the slightest indication of leakage. The 
work was resumed this spring as early as the weather would 
permit, and I have no doubt that in five weeks from the date of 
this report we will be able to fill again the reservoir to its over- 
flow. 

With the City Engineer, I examined, this spring, the box 
under the sidewalk of the Warren bridge, in which is the 
twenty-inch main that supplies East Boston, and found it much 
decayed, so much so as to require immediate attention, and 
learning that alterations and repairs of the bridge were in con- 
6 



62 City Document. — No. 55. 

teinplation, we songht an interview with the Mayor of Charles- 
town, with a favorable result. 

I have nothing to add to this report that I have not presented 
to the Board from time to time as the exigencies required. 

One subject, however, let me urge to your notice — that of 
providing suitable departments in the immediate neighborhood 
of our works, for two or more workmen, that may be called 
upon with the least delay to attend to breakages and leaks that 
almost nightly occur. The nearest available workmen live up- 
wards of a mile away, and the delay in getting them together to 
the locality required, may cause serious damage, to say nothing 
of the inconvenience. 

Raised on Dedham Street, 422 feet 6-inch iron pipe, between 
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont Street. 

Re-laid on Dedham Street, 237 feet 6-inch iron pipe, between 
Shawmut Avenue aud Tremont Street. 

Taken up 54 feet 4-inch iron pipe on Marion Street. 
" 30 " 2-inch " " 

« 590 " lj-inch " " 

" 199 " 1-inch lead pipe, " 

" 31 " f-inch " " 

Lowered 5 feet |--inch lead pipes to usual depth to avoid 
post. 

Extended 4-inch pipe 566 feet. 



Report of the Water Board. 



63 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Pipe laid in 1868. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 


Feet of Pipe, 




BOSTON PROPER. 






Columbus Ave. . . 




12 


413 


(i (i 




12 


229 


Dartmouth .... 




6 


522 


Marlboro . . . . 




6 


216 


E. Dedham .... 




6 


254 


Union Park Street . 


« ti <i 


6 


519 




Village and Suffolk 


6 


395 


E. Brookline . . . 




6 


42 






6 


72 






6 


180 






6 


250 






6 
6 


230 






197 






6 
6 


108 


ct 


" Columbus Avenue .... 


74 






6 


263 


u 


Columbus and Huntington Avenue .... 


6 


117 






6 


273 






6 


27 






6 
6 


772 


a (C 






5,276 






4 
4 
4 
4 


183 
176 
165 
164 








Dartmouth " . . 




Derby " . . 










837 



64 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Wareham 
Jefferson , 
Bay. . . . 



D Street 



Fifth . 
G. . . 
Sixth . 
H. . . 

M. . . 
Eighth 
Ninth. 
Ellery 
Sixth . 



Wadley Court 
Lark 



Saratoga 
London . 



Marion 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 
Albany and Harrison Avenue 
Tremont and Fayette .... 
Church and Ferdinand .... 



SOUTH BOSTON. 
Dexter and Ninth , 



O and P , 

Thomas and Seventh , 

L and M , 

Fourth and Foundry , 
Fifth and Sixth . . . 
E and D 



Dexter Street and Wadley Court . 
L and M 



E and Dorchester 



EAST BOSTON. 

Prescott and Chelsea 

Porter and Marion 



Chelsea and Bremen ; 



Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 


Feet of Pipe. 




837 


4 


27 


4 


118 


4 


118 



1,100 

270 

270 

412 
100 
473 
168 
175 
120 
134 
86 
400 

2,068 

114 

222 

336 

333 
113 

446 

160 

160 



Rpport op the Water Board. 



Q5 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 



Feet of Pipe. 



Tremont . . . . . 
Dudley 

Tremont 

Hampden 

Grove Hall Ave . . 
Dudley 

"Washington . . . . 
Shawmut Avenue . 

Warren 

Dearborn 

Hampden 

Grove Hall Avenue 
Mt. Pleasant . . . 

Culvert 

Cabot 

Forrest 

Cedar 

Highland 

Centre 

Williams 

King Street . . . . 

Elmwood 

Hawthorne . . . . 

Lambert 

Shirley 

6* 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

Through Washington to Eliot Square. 
" Dudley Street to half way be- 
tween Adams and Mt. Pleasant Ave . . 



Dearborn and Hampden 



Through Washington to Eliot Square. 
" Dudley Street to half way be- 
tween Adams and Mt. Pleasant Ave . . 



Chadwick and Dudley . 

Dudley and Winthrop 

Hampden Street and Dorchester line . . 

Dearborn and Hampden , 

So. Guild Row. Guild Row to Dudley , 

Dudley and Cedar 

Dudley and Moreland , 

Dudley and Albany , 



Chadwick and Dudley , 

Dudley and Winthrop , 

" and Grove Hall Ave , 

Tremont and Cabot . , 

Culvert and Vernon , 

Mt. Pleasant Ave. and Mt. Pleasant Ave , 

Centre and Shawmut Ave , 

Eliot Square and Hawthorne , 

Washington and Cedar , 

" Shawmut Ave 

Elmwood and Nawn Place 

King and Washington 

Cedar and Ellis 

Highland and Lambert Ave 

From Dudley Street 



5,080 
1,141 

6,221 



12 


5,030 


12 


1,910 


12 


467 


12 


1,374 


12 


1,216 


12 


2,159 


12 


2,062 


12 


980 


12 


957 




16,155 


6 


156 


6 


12 


6 


2,118 


6 


636 


6 


190 


6 


1,418 


6 


2,284 


6 


1,627 


6 


1,544 


6 


508 


6 


81 


6 


529 


6 


300 


6 


604 


6 


164 



Carried forward , 



12,171 



66 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 





In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Diameter of 
Pipe in Inches. 


Feet of Pipe. 








12,171 
210 






6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

3 






953 




Washington and Shawmut Avenue . . . 
Washington and Harrison Avenue .... 


500 
377 
360 
203 




760 






773 
1,038 


"Washington . . . 




1,794 




19,139 






142 




" King 


108 


Highland Place . . 
Guild Street . . . 




161 
476 






299 








Willow Park . . . 


1,516 

238 






238 



Report op the Water Board. 



67 



RECAPITULATION. 





1868. 


DIAMETER IN INCHES. 




24. 


12. 


6. 


4. 


3. 


Boston Proper . . „ 
South Boston .... 
East Boston .... 
Boston Highlands . . 




6,221 
5 


642 
1 

2T0 

16,155 
26 


5,276 
14 

2,068 
6 

446 
3 

19,139 
54 


1,100 

8 

336 
6 

160 
1 

1,516 
15 


238 
2 






6,221 
5 


17,067 
27 


26,929 

77 


3,112 
30 


238 
2 



68 



City Document. — No. 55. 



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c 


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m 

g 


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a 
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a 


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c 


of Pipe 
' of Stop 






pqft 


'a 


OQ 


M 


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52- 


* 


Length 
Number 






." O 
•dm 
"3 o 


C 
C 

c 


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C3 


o 
o 
ft 
o 


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o 
o 

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ft 


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ft 


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M 


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Report of tee Water Board. 



69 



Statement of Service Pipe laid in 1868. 



a 


Boston Proper. 


South Boston. 


East Boston. 


Boston Highl'ds. 


Totals. 


.H 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


Number 


Length 


s 


of Pipes. 


in Feet. 


ofPipes. 


in Feet. 


of Pipes. 


in Feet. 


of Pipes. 


in Feet. 


of Pipes. 


in Feet. 


2 


1 
14 


116 
693 














1 

23 


116 


1 


2 


55 


. . . 


. . . 


7 


609 


1,357 


X 


5 


113 










8 


639 


13 


752 


% 


489 


17,861 


214 


6,590 


62 


2,088 


239 


8,541 


1,004 


35,080 


% 


66 


1,760 


117 


2,813 


55 


1,697 


63 


1,792 


301 


8,062 




Aggregate 




1,342 


45 367 










Making the 


total number up to May 1, 1869 . 



















Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1868, 





DIAMETER OF PIPES IN INCHES. 


WHERE. 


40. 
1 

1 


36. 

5 

5 


30. 
2 

; 2 


20. 

2 
2 
2 

6 


12. 

10. 
1 
1 
2 

14 


6. 

22 
1 
1 
1 

25 


4-. 
29 

1 
30 


2. 
5 

5 


1*. 

57 

3 
60 


1. 

7 

2 

9 


I- 
5 

1 
6 


6 

s- 

269 
41 
34 
4 

IIS 


i- 

7 
9 
2 
2 

?0 


Total. 




421 
56 
44 
10 










Totals 


531 











Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and 
upwards, 72 were on the joints, 6 by settling of earth, 3 by 
frost, 1 struck by pick. Total, 82. 

Of 2 inches and in service pipes, 1 was on the joint, 108 by 
settling of earth, 6 by settling of wall, 33 by defective pipe, 5, 
by settling of drains, 33 by defective couplings, 1 by defective 
faucet, 7 by defective packings, 59 by stiff connections, 16 stopped 



70 



City Document. — No. 55. 



by fish, 15 by frost, 117 by rust, 6 by boxing, 9 by faucet broken 
at main, 5 by faucet loose at main, 3 by faucet pulled out, 16 
struck by pick, 2 gnawed by rats, 3 by pipes not in use, 1 by 
digging of coal hole, 1 cut by chisel, 1 by driving pile, 1 by dirt 
in pipe. Total, 449. 

Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1868. 





• 

Diameter of 




Tear. 


Four Inches and 
Upwards. 


Less than Four 
Inches. 


Total. 




32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 
134 
109 
117 

97 . 

95 
111 
139 
122 

82 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 


104 




237 
323 




345 




354 




294 




307 




363 


1858 


401 




531 




592 


1861 


508 


1862 


490 




494 




489 




607 


1866 


675 


1867 


609 


186S 


531 







HYDEANTS. 



During the year, one hundred and fifty-one (151) new hy- 
drants have been established, as follows : 
In Boston Proper, Wilmarth, nineteen (19). 



Report of the Water Board. 



71 



In South Boston, Wilinarth, seven (7). 

" East Boston, " one (1). 

" Boston Highlands, " sixteen (16). 

" " " Lowry, one hundred and eight (108). 

Total number of hydrants established up to May 1st, 1869 : 



South Boston . 


...... i,vrto 

345 


East Boston 


... . .198 


Boston Highlands 


142 


Brookline 


3 


Charlestown 


11 


Chelsea . . . 


.... 8 



1,755 

Twenty-three (23) hydrants have been taken out and replaced 
by new or repaired ones, and sixty-nine (69) boxes have been 
renewed. The hydrants have had the attention of former years 
paid them. 



STOPCOCKS. 

One hundred and forty-one (141) new stopcocks have been 
established this year, and forty-one (41) boxes have been re- 
newed. All the stopcocks have had the usual attention paid 
them. 



72 



City Document. — No. 55. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 
May 1, 1869; 













DIAMETER IN INCBCES. 












48. 
101 


40. 
17 


36. 
15 


30. 

80 

1 

5 
2 
3 
2 
15| 
5 

14 

2 


24. 

27 
4 

2 
2 
3 
11 
2 

2 

11 


20. 
41 

3 

2 
2 

1 

5 
5 
4 

12 

4 


18. 
3 


16. 

28 

1 
5 
2 

3 
31 

2 
3 

3 

9 

3 

8 


12. 

938 

7 

36 

22 
2 

38 
5 

18 
2 

7 

5 
8 

16 
23 


8. 
3 

4 
7 

2 

6 

2 
1 
2 


6. 
940 

4 
36 

7 
46 
17 
22 

8 

7 

22 

18 

21 
5 

18 

21 

124 


4. 
288 

12 

1 

50 
9 

34 

5 

2 

28 

12 

27 
7 

3 
22 

S7 


3. 

21 

4 

10 
3 

1 

5 
9 

2 
2 
5 


2. 




30 








4 


8 


2 
1 
2 
4 
13 
2 
2 

3 
2 


8 






2 
5 
4 
2 
S 

1 






10 
9 


8 




100 




3 

5 


^ 








50 






2 

4 
2 
1 


2 
3 


2 

10 
3 

2 


12 
2 






1 




Blow-off and Man-hole . . 


1 





Hydrants. 207 Lowry hydrants, 88 Lowry hydrant frames 
and covers. 

Hydrants. 16 new Wilmarth, 7 old Wilmarth, 11 old Lowell. 

For Hydrants. 5 bends, 30 lengtheners, 7 frames, 40 covers, 
32 plungers, 51 screws, 32 valve seats, 40 nipples, 31 socket 
nuts, 931 lbs. iron castings, 79 lbs. composition castings, 30 
wastes, 6 wharf hydrants, 4 heavy frames and covers. 



Report of the Water Board. 73 

For Stopcocks. 2 36-inch screws, 1 30-inch ditto, 2 24-inch 
ditto, 1 20-inch ditto, 1 16 -inch ditto, 1 4-inch screw for waste 
weir, 1 ditto for Brookline Reservoir (old), 37 composition 
screws, for 4 and 6-inch gates, 31 6-inch valves, 26 rings, 4 
4-inch valves, 6 rings, 7,670 lbs. composition castings for 4 and 
6 gates, 51 frames, 53 covers. 

Meters. In shop, 1 3-inch, 8 2-inch, none 1-inch, 28 |-inch. 

Stock for Meters. 18 2-inch nipples, 38 1-inch ditto, 110 
|-inch ditto, 8 2-inch connecting pieces, 10 1-inch ditto, 24 |-inch 
ditto, 20 1-inch locks, 28 f-inch ditto, 34 ditto unfinished, 3 
3-inch clocks, 1 2-inch ditto, 2 1-inch ditto, 3 |-inch ditto, 8 brass 
spindles, 350 rubber nipples, 92 glasses, 42 lbs. composition 
castings, 16 fish boxes. 

For Service Pipe. 17 1-inch union cocks, 18 -|-inch ditto, 
38 | unfinished ditto, 205 f-inch cocks, 40 J-inch ditto, 21 
1-inch T cocks, 112 |-inch thawing couplings, 10 2 -inch coupling 
nuts, 26 2-inch female couplings, 5 male ditto, 6 2-inch hose 
couplings, 15 Y cocks, 69 1^-inch male couplings, 7 female ditto, 
31 1-inch female ditto, 7 male ditto, 36 f-inch female and 12 
male ditto, 170 boxes, 5 T boxes, 9 Y boxes, 25 extension tubes, 
639 tubes, 70 caps. 

Lead Pipe. 2,108 pounds 2-inch pipe, 1,920 pounds 11-inch 
ditto, 329 pounds 1^-inch ditto, 1,045 pounds 1-inch ditto, 472 
pounds |-inch ditto, 633 pounds of light |-inch ditto, 15,810 
pounds f-inch ditto, 4,080 pounds |-inch ditto, 845 pounds old 
pipe, 75 pounds f-inch tin lined pipe, 172 pounds 1-inch ditto, 
1,413 pounds ^-inch ditto, 340 pounds f inch ditto, 50 pounds 
solder, 30 pounds f-inch block-tin pipe, 25 pounds banca tin. 

Blacksmith Shop. 310 pounds square iron, 881 pounds flat 
ditto, 731 pounds round ditto, 1,400 pounds working pieces, 
335 pounds cast steel, 13,500 pounds Cumberland coal, 180 
Pick blanks. 

Carpenter's Shop. 100 feet of spruce boards, 300 feet pine 
ditto, 1,200 feet l|-inch spruce plank, 200 feet oak ditto, 2,300 

7 



74 City Document. — No 55. 

feet 2-inch plank, 400 feet sheathing, 200 feet joist, 25 Lowry 
hydrant boxes, 75 hydrant boxes Wilmarth, 61 stopcock boxes 
3 meter boxes, 25 meter boxes unfinished, 114 hydrant boxes 
unfinished, 8 stopcock boxes unfinished. 

Tools. One steam engine, one large hoisting crane, two 
boom derricks, four hand geared ditto, four sets of shears, and 
rigging for same, five tool houses, tools for laying and repair- 
ing main and service pipes, two engine lathes, one fox ditto, 
one hand ditto, one upright drilling machine, three grindstones, 
the necessary tools for carrying on the machine, blacksmith, 
carpenter's and plumber's shops, one circular saw, one 40-inch 
proving press, one 36-inch ditto, one small ditto, also office fur- 
niture, and a large lot of patterns at the foundries where we 
obtain castings. 

Stable. Five horses, four wagons, two buggies, two pungs, 
five sets harness, two sleighs, three tons English hay, twenty- 
six bushels grain. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. One large composition cylinder 16- 
inch jet, one 6-inch composition jet, three composition plates, 
nine cast-iron plates, two 4-inch composition jets, five swivel 
pipe patterns, one 2-inch copper straight jet, six composition 
jets for small fountains, six large composition cylinders, twenty 
drinking fountains. 

Miscellaneous. 30 tons pig lead, 10 gallons linseed oil, 20 
gallons tallow oil, 16,000 pounds furnace coal, 1 freight of 
gravel, 980 pounds gasket, 500 feet damaged hose, 2 kegs bolts, 
10 reservoir gate covers, 5 manholes, 5 plates, lot of old iron, 
lot of old lumber, also old machinery from Marlboro'. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. R. JONES, 

Supt. Eastern Division. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE WESTERN 

DIVISION. 



Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
Boston, May 14, 1869. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Esq., 

President Cochituate Water Board: 

Sir: During the past year no extensive repairs have been 
made on this division ; the water has not been low. enough to do 
any of the stone work that was proposed to be done, and the 
embankments and culverts remain in the same condition as last 
season. Some repairs have been made on the house at the lake, 
and the barn has been re-shingled, also repairs made on the 
fences so that they will answer this season. During the extra- 
ordinary freshet of February fifteenth, the embankment was 
washed away from the conduit on the Collins' Farm at Newton ; 
no damage was done to the brick works, and a few hours' work 
with men and teams replaced the earth removed by the water, 
as the culvert at Course Brook was sufficient to take away the 
water without any trouble during the freshet; it will not be 
necessary to enlarge it at present; everything connected with 
the lake is in good order. No repairs have been made at the 
Brookline Reservoir the past year; the report of the annual 
examination of the conduit will be given by the City Engineer. 

The following list of tools, etc., are used on this division, and 
stored at the Lake, and at Brookline Reservoir. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT STANWOOD, 

Supt. Western Division. 



76 City Document. — No. 55. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY ON WESTERN DIVISION. 

1 horse, 1 carriage, 1 express wagon, 1 harness, 1 cart, 1 
cart harness, 1 buffalo robe, 1 pung, 2 spades, 12 picks, 6 
shovels, 6 wheelbarrows, 2 iron rakes, 2 hoes, 2 hay rakes, 2 
bars, 4 rammers, 1 stone hammer, 2 claw hammers, 1 hand saw, 
1 iron square, 1 drain mould, 1 manure fork, 2 hay forks, 1 pair 
hedge shears, 1 gravel screen, 1 axe, 2 pair rubber boots, 2 
water pails, 1 stop-plank hook, 1 grindstone, 2 pair ice tongs, 4 
wrenches, 1 stone roller, 1 sand sieve, 2 boats, 1 boat awning, 
1 rain gauge, 1 cooking range, 1 extension table, 6 chairs, 1 
wash stand, 1 map of Boston and its environs ; the above named 
property is at the lake, and in charge of Mr. Richard Carroll. 

AT BROOKLINE RESERVOIR. 

2 manure forks, 2 iron rakes, 2 sledge hammers, 2 picks, 2 
bars, 1 hay rake, 1 scythe, 1 knife for cutting borders, 1 shovel, 
1 bushel basket, 1 half-bushel ditto, 1 lantern, 1 stove, 1 wheel- 
barrow, 2 ladders. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1869. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

ENGINEERS EOR THE CONSTRUCTION. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From 
May 1846, to November 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. 
From May 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. WhitweLl, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Divis- 
ion. From May 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

CITY ENGINEERS HAVING CHARGE OF THE WORKS. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to 
October 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 
1851, to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to 
October 1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 
1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 
1855, to April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
the present time. 

7* 



78 City Document. — No. 55. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, 
to December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. 
From February 14, 1866, to the present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. 
Whitwell and J. Avery Richards, were elected a Water 
Board, subject to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee 
of the City Council, by an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, 
which was limited to keep in force one year; and in 1851 the 
Cochituate Water Board was established. 



COCHITUATE water board. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE BOAED. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned 

April 7, 1856 Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned 

June 5, 1860 Four Years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired 

April 3, 1865 Five Years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned 

January 15,1867 . . One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired 

April 6, 1868 . . . One year and three months. 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected from April 6, 

1868, to present time. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54, and 55 . Five years. 
John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 

and 59 Eight years. 



Report op the Water Board. 



79 



Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 

James W. Sever, 1851 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851 . 

John T. Heard, 1851 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54, and 55 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 53 . 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 .... 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 . 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 

Charles Stoddard,* 1854, 55, 56 and 57 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58 . 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 

Joseph Smith, 1856 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 

and 64 ..... 
Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61 
George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 
Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 . 
George Denny, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 
Clement Willis, 1860 
G. E. Pierce, 1860 
Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 
George Hinman, 1862 and 63 
John F. Pray, 1862 
J. C. J. Brown, 1862 
Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 . 
Otis Norcross* 1865 and 66 . 
L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66 and 

67 



Five years. 
Four years. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 
Four years. 
Two years. 

One year. 
Three years. 

Six years. 
Four years. 
Two years. 
Four years. 
Three years. 
Two years. 
Two months. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Five years. 

One year. 

Six years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Seven years. 



80 City Document. — No. 55. 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 67 . Four years. 

Charles R. McLean, 1867 .... One year. 
Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 . . Three years. 

William S. Hills, 1867 One year. 

Charles R. Train, 1868 . . . . . One year. 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67/ 

68, 69, 
Alexander Wadsworth, 1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 

69, 
Benjamin James* 1858, 68 and 69, y Present Board. 

George Lewis, 1868 and 69, 
Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69, 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 
Francis A. Osborn, 1869, / 

*Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned November 15, 1854, and Charles Stod- 
dard was elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oc- 
tober 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re-elected February 1856, and chosen 
President of the Boardf which office he held until his resignation on June 
5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson, was elected President ; and on July 
2d, Mr. Miles Stanclish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the 
resignation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned January 15, 1S67, hav- 
ing been elected Mayor of the City. Benjamin James served one year in 
1858, and was re-elected in 1868. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 1869. 



Nathaniel J. Bradlee, President. 
Benjamin James, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Alexander Wadsworth, ) ' , _ ~ 

>• Of the Common Council. 



Francis A. Osborn, 

AT LARGE. 

For One Year. For Two Years. 

George Lewis, Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 

Joseph M. Wightman. Charles H. Allen. 



Report of the Water Board. 81 

CLERK. 

Samuel N. Dyer. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE EASTERN DIVISION. 

Ezekiel R. Jones. 

superintendent of the western division. 

Albert Stanwood. 

water registrar. 

William F. Davis. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

N. Henry Crafts. 

RESIDENT ENGINEER, CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

Henry M. Wightman. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 



EASTERN DIVISION. 

George Lewis, Chairman. 
Joseph M. Wightman, Francis A. Osborn. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

Alexander Wadsworth, Chairman. 
Charles H. Allen, Benjamin James. 

WATER REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph M. Wightman, Chairman. 
Benjamin James, Charles H. Allen. 

ON CONSTRUCTION OF CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Chairman. 
Alexander Wads worth, George Lewis. 

clerk of committees. 
William C. Phelan. 



EULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE COCHITUATE 
WATER BOARD. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 

The persons chosen by the City Council to constitute the 
Cochituate Water Board shall meet on the first Monday in 
April, in each year, and organize themselves by the choice of a 
President from their own number, and of a Clerk by ballot, 
and shall make such rules and regulations for their own govern- 
ment, and in relation to all subordinate officers, as they may 
deem expedient. 

DUTIES OE THE PRESIDENT. 

The President shall preside at all meetings of the Board 
and in his absence a President pro tern shall be chosen. He 
shall exercise a general supervision over all the water works, 
and the materials and property connected therewith, and over 
all subordinate officers and agents of the Board. He shall 
sign all contracts, deeds and other instruments authorized by 
the Board. He shall sign the monthly draft on the treasury, 
and deliver it, with the vouchers, to the Auditor, previous to the 
20th of each month. 

At the annual, or the next meeting thereafter of the Board, 
the President shall appoint the following standing Committees, 
consisting of three members each, who shall have the special 
care and control of the several departments to which they are 
appointed, viz : 

Committee on the Western Division. 

Committee on the Eastern Division. 



Report op the Water Board. 83 

Committee on the Water Registar's office, and the office of 
the Water Board. 

Also, such special committees as may be required or deemed 
advisable. 

COMMITTEES. 

All petitions and subjects presented to the Board, shall (un- 
less they are prepared to act thereon) be referred to a com- 
mittee, to be reported upon at the next regular meeting, or at a 
special meeting called for the purpose. All bills and accounts 
incurred by direction of the several committees must be exam- 
ined and approved by the Chairman, or, in his absence, by a 
member of the committee. Committees shall report upon all 
matters referred to them at the next succeeding meeting of the 
Board, unless full powers are conferred by vote of the Board. 
All business referred by the Board to any standing or special 
committee shall be acted upon and disposed of only at a meet- 
ing of the committee. 

MEETINGS. 

Stated meetings of the Board shall be held semi-monthly, 
at such day and hour as they may direct. Special Meetings 
may be called by the President, or by any two members. A 
majority of the Board shall constitute a quorum. The order of 
business shall be as follows : 

Reading the record. 

Reports of Committees. 

Examination of Claims. 

Motions and Resolutions. 

All meetings of the Board shall be notified, by the Clerk 
sending a notice to the residence of each of the members, un- 
less otherwise directed. When requested by a member of the 
Board the vote shall be taken by yeas and nays, and recorded 
by the Clerk. 



84 City Document. — No. 55. 



DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The Clerk shall be chosen by ballot, and be duly sworn to 
the faithful performance of the duties of his office. He shall 
give his whole time to the service of the Board, attend their 
meetings, and keep a record of their proceedings. He shall re- 
ceive all bills and accounts incurred by the Board, examine 
them in detail, and when indorsed by the authorized person and 
Chairman of the Committee as correct, shall present them, with 
a schedule thereof, to the President for his approval, after which 
he shall enter them in their proper books and upon the monthly 
draft. He shall receive all applications for extension of service 
pipes, and for water to be let on or shut off, and keep a re- 
cord of the same, specifying the time and reasons therefor; 
cause the water to be let on when the rates or fines are paid, 
and when notified by the Registrar of non-payment, at once 
cause it to be shut off. He shall have charge of the books, 
plans, and documents, belonging to the Board, and shall also 
perform such further services as, from time to time, may be re- 
quired by the President or the Board. 

CLEEK OF COMMITTEES. 

The Clerk of Committees shall be chosen by ballot, and it 
shall be his duty to notify all meetings of committees ; be pres- 
ent at the meetings and keep a record of their proceedings, in 
separate books for each committee. He shall keep a list of, 
and the papers relating to, the business referred to each com- 
mittee by the Board, for the information and use of the com- 
mittee. He shall also copy in proper books all contracts, 
deeds of land, claims allowed for damages, leases and other im- 
portant papers on business connected with the Board ; and per- 
form such other clerical duties as may be required by the Pres- 
ident or Committees. 



Repoet op the Water Board. 85 

ofeiceks. 

On the first Monday in April 7 or within thirty days there- 
after, the following subordinate officers shall be elected by 
ballot, to hold their offices during the pleasure of the Board, 
and they shall receive such compensation as the Board may 
from time to time deem proper, viz : 

A Superintendent of the Western Division. 

A Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 

The Board may also elect or appoint, from time to time, 
such clerks, agents, and assistants as they may deem necessary. 

WESTEEN DIVISION. 

The Superintendent, under the direction of the President and 
the Committee on the Western Division, shall have the charge 
of Lake Cochituate, Brookline and Chestnut Hill Reservoirs, 
gate-houses and pipe-chambers at Charles River, and of all 
the lands and property of the city in this division. 

It shall be his special duty to attend to the protection of the 
above lands and property ; the waste weirs at Dedman's Brook 
in Needham, Webber's Barn in Brookline, at Newton Centre 
and East Needham ; to the prevention of all nuisances and tres- 
passes upon all the said works or lands, or upon the waters of 
the lake; keep the grounds and walks in good order, and 
forthwith report to the Committee, and at the office, all cases of 
damage or casualty; make an accurate record of the water 
levels at the lake every morning, specifying therein the depth 
of the water in the conduit, the height of the surface of the 
lake above the conduit, the temperature of the water in the 
gate-house, of the air in the shade, and the height of the water 
on the 23-feet gauge below the outlet dam; also at the Brook- 
line and Chestnut Hill Reservoirs, specifying therein the depth of 
the water above the bottom of the conduit in the reservoirs, 
the depth in the gate-houses, the temperature of the water 



86 City Document. — No. 55. 

and of the air in the shade ; ascertain the height of water at 
the pipe-chambers at Charles River daily, every morning, 
above the bottom of the aqueduct, and report the same to the 
Board weekly, and to the City Engineer monthly ; employ such 
assistants and laborers as may be required, first obtaining the 
consent and approval of the Committee on this division. He 
shall annually, on the first of May, return to the Board a full 
report of the work and labor performed, and materials used in 
his department, and a correct statement of all the tools and 
other property in his possession belonging to the city, and per- 
form such further services as may be required. 

EASTEEN DIVISION. 

The Superintendent, under the direction of the President and 
the Committee on the Eastern Division, shall have the special 
charge of the machine shop, pipe yards, all the reservoirs, and 
of the public fountains in the city, and of all the iron mains 
and pipes in both divisions ; and it shall be his duty to protect 
them from all nuisances and trespasses, and attend to the pro- 
tection of all other property in this division belonging to the 
Water Works. He shall keep an account of the pipes, machin- 
ery, and other property in the machine shop and yards, and in 
case of accident to the mains or other pipes, forthwith repair 
them, distributing suitable notices before the stoppage of water, 
except in cases of emergency; give immediate notice at the 
office and to the Committee of any accident which may happen to 
the mains, pipes, or anything connected therewith ; put in such 
service pipes, and lay such mains and other pipes, as may from 
time to time be directed ; repair any injuries to the streets or 
sewers caused by the Water Works ; employ such assistants and 
laborers as may be required, first obtaining the consent and 
approval of the Committee ; whenever any street, highway, or 
place is liable to be obstructed or rendered dangerous by the 
laying of pipes or making repairs, cause a sufficient fence to be 



Report of the Water Board. 87 

erected, and light and guard the same; make a full report 
annually to the Board of the work and labor performed, and 
materials used in his department ; measure the quantity of water 
in the reservoirs ; take the temperature of the water in the Bea- 
con Hill Reservoir, and of the air in the shade, every morning, 
noon and night, and keep a record and make a return thereof 
to the Board weekly, and to the City Engineer monthly ; duly 
return to the Board, on the first of May in each year, and as 
much oftener as they may require, a correct statement of the 
quantity of pipes and other materials in the yards, and all the 
property belonging to the city which is under his care, and per- 
form such further services as may be required. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

It shall be the duty of the City Engineer to carefully inspect 
the aqueduct and all other structures belonging to the Water 
Works, in person, previous to making his annual report to the 
Board, and at such other times as they may require j make such 
surveys, plans, and estimates, connected with the works, as the 
Board may direct ; when requested, give his opinion, in writing, 
of the best mode of constructing or repairing any portion of 
the works ; keep in his office the returns of the Superintendents 
in relation to the water levels at the lake, the reservoirs, and 
the pipe-chambers at Charles River, and report them to the 
Board on the first day of May in each year. 

WATER REGISTRAR. 

It shall be the duty of the Water Registrar, under the direc- 
tion of the Board and the Committee on this department, to 
assess the water rates, according to the tariff established by the 
City Council ; make out and distribute all bills for the same j 
exercise a constant supervision over the use of the water, and 
attend to the enforcement of all regulations relative thereto ; 



88 City Document. — No. 55. 

keep suitable books, in which shall be entered the names of all 
persons who take water, the kind of building, the name and 
number of the street, the nature of the use, the number of taps, 
and the amount charged, which shall always be open to the 
inspection of the Board ; make returns to the Clerk of the 
Board, of all places where the water is to be let on, and where 
to be shut off for non-payment, with full particulars as to the 
location of the premises ; make monthly returns to the Board 
of the receipts and expenditures of his department, and as much 
oftener as they may require. He shall annually, on the first of 
May, report to the Board the number of water-takers ; the 
amount received for water-rates ; the number of meters used 
and applied during the year; the number and kind of water- 
fixtures ; and a classified list of the buildings and the purposes 
for which the water is used. He shall employ such assistance 
as may be necessary in his department, first obtaining the 
approval of the Committee, and perform such other services as 
may be required. 

He shall make no abatement of water rates after a bill has 
been rendered, nor apply any meter, or discontinue the use of 
any, without the approval of the President or the Committee. 

BILLS AND ACCOUNTS. 

All bills and accounts authorized by this Board, after being, 
approved by the Chairman of the Committee ordering the same, 
shall be presented to the President by the Clerk, previous to 
the twentieth of each month; and after the same shall have 
been approved by the President, they shall be entered by the 
Clerk in the proper books ; and a monthly draft for the amount 
shall be signed by the President, and delivered with the vouch- 
ers to the City Auditor. 

All bills and accounts to be entered in the monthly draft must 
be delivered to the Clerk on or before the fifteenth day of that 
month. 



Repoet op the Water Board. 89 



AMENDMENTS. 

The foregoing Rules and Regulations may be suspended by- 
vote of a majority of the members present, and they may be 
amended by a majority of the whole Board ; notice of the pro- 
posed amendments having been given at the previous meeting of 
the Board. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be had at a time, in home 
use, from the Lower Hall, and one from the 
Bates Hall. 

Books can be kept out 14 days, and Tenewed 
once, if application for renewal is made before 
the fourteen clays elapse. 

A fine of 2 cents for each volume will be in- 
curred for each day a book is detained more 
than 14 days, and no book can be obtained until 
all fines are settled. 

Any book detained more than a week beyond 
the time limited, will be sent for at the expense 
of the delinquent. 

No book is to be lent out of the household of 
the borrower ; nor is it to be kept by transfers 
in one household more than one month, and it 
must remain in the library one week before it 
can be again drawn in the same household. 

The Library hours for the delivery and return 
of books are from 9 o'clock, A. M., to 8 o'clock, 
P.M., in the Lower Hall; and from 9 o'clock, 
A. M., until 6 o'clock, P. M., from October to 
March, and until 7 o'clock, from April to Septem- 
ber, in the Bates Hall. 

Every book must, under penalty of one dollar, 
be returned to the Library at such times as shall 
be publicly announced. 

The card must be presented whenever a book 
is returned. . For renewing a book, a new slip 
giving the shelf numbers of the book must be 
made, and the card must be presented with the 
sli P- Makcii, 1869.