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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 57. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 




EEPORT 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOB, THE TEAR ENDING APRIL SO, 1871, 



L/ /1 



'p^t 



CITY OF BOSTOI:^. 



In Common Council^ April 20, 1871. 
Ordered : That the Cochituate Water Board be author- 
ized to submit their annual report in print, and that the 
expense connected therewith be charged to the appropriation 
for printing. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

MATTHIAS EICH, President. 



In Board of Aldermen^ April 24, 1871. 
Concurred. 

CHAS. E. JENKINS, Chairman. 



Approved April 25, 1871. 

WILLIAM GASTON, Mai/or. 

A true copy. 

Attest : 

S. F. McCLEARY, City CUrlz. 



CITY OF BOSTO]Sr. 



City Hall, Cochituate Water Board Office, 

May 18, 1871. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston : 

The Cochituate Water Board, in compliance with the pro- 
visions of the City Ordinance, herewith submit their annual 
report for the year ending April 30, 1871, together with the 
reports of the Clerk of the Board, City Engineer, Water 
Eegistrar, and the Superintendents of the Eastern and 
Western Division, to which they would refer the City Coun- 
cil for detailed statements of the progress and condition of 
the Water Works during the year. 

It gives us pleasure to say that the works are in a very 
satisfactory condition. The average level of the water of 
the lake for the year ending January 1, 1871, having been 
lOxmj feet above the level of the bottom of the conduit, 
shows a loss of l^S^^ feet from the previous year. 

The levels during the latter part of the year show the sup- 
ply to have been far below the usual average. In the month 
of January the Board were so much alarmed by the long- 
continued drought and the consequent low state of the water, 
that they purchased an Engine and two Andrews' Pumps 
and placed them in position for use in forcing water from the 
lower and deeper parts of the lake into the conduit. The 
citizens, realizing the importance of the subject, adopted a 
rigid system of economy, and we were thus enabled to con- 
tinue the requisite supply without resorting to the use of the 
pumps. The lowest point (4|f feet) was reached on the 
18th day of February, 1871. That the twelve months end- 
ing April 30, 1871, was remarkable as a year of short sup- 



6 



City Docibient. No. 57. 



ply of water will be the more fully realized by comparison. 
The average depth of the water at the lake for the year 
ending April 30, 1870, was 12^2__o^ feet above the bottom of 
the conduit, while the average for the year ending April 30, 
1871, was only S^%% feet. 

The average daily consumption has been 15,007,700 gal- 
lons, being a decrease of 62,700 gallons as compared with 
the previous year. This decrease can only be accounted for 
by the fact that the citizens were fully aware of the dimin- 
ished supply, and regulated its use accordingly. 

The income from water rates has been $734,790yV(7J being 
an increase over the previous year of $105,339^0%^, and the 
estimated income for year ending April 30, 1872, is 
$750,000. 



The expenses have been as follows : — 

For the current expenses 

Interest and premium on the water debt 



The Treasurer has credited the Water Works 
for the same year . . . . 

The balance shows an expenditure over and 
above receipts of .... . 

Add expended on Chestnut Hill reservoir 
during the year . . $329,957 80 

Less receipts .... 6,513 37 



Add expended in laying main and service 
pipes in Wards 13, 14, 15, and 
16 .... $342,387 09 

Less receipts .... 983 03 



$238,431 80 
685,266 48 

$923,698 28 
$782,610 00 

$141,088 28 
$323,444 43 



$341,404 06 



Amount carried forward. 



505,936 77 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 7 

Amount brought forward, . . . $805,936 77 
Cost of works to May 1, 1870, including in- 
terest and premium on the water debt, less 
amounts received for water rates, rents, 
sales of land, etc $9,765,959 87 



G-ross cost to May 1, 1871 . . . $10,571,896 64 

Deduct amount transferred from water debt 

to City debt to May 1, 1871, namely, three 

per cent, on the outstanding loans of each 

year, with compound interest . . .$1,352,000 00 

Making the net cost to May 1, 1871 . . $9,219,896 64 

By the figures it will be seen that the income has not been 
sufficient to pay the interest on the water debt and the cur- 
rent expenses by the sum of $141,088 28, which exceeds the 
deficiency of the previous year by the sum of $62,221 56. 

During the past year changes have been made in the man- 
ner of arranging the Sinking Fund of the city, and the sum of 
$1,352,000 has been credited to the Water Works. 

By the transfer of this sum, the interest account for this 
department will be considerably reduced, and the works be- 
come more nearly self-supporting. 

EASTEEN DIVISION. 

This Division comprises that portion of the works lying 
east of the Brookline reservoir, including the distributing pipes 
and reservoirs in the city, and is under the superintendence 
of Mr. E. E. Jones. 

During the year there has been laid one hundred and twen- 
ty-nine thousand and forty feet of main pipe, equal to about 
twenty-four and one half miles, being thirty -nine thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-one feet more than was laid the 
previous year, and making the total amount laid since the 



8 City Document. — No. 57. 

commencement of the work, one hundred and ninety-four 
and one half miles. 

There are connected with these mains one thousand nine 
hundred and thirty-seven gates, and two thousand one hun- 
dred and seventy-four fire hydrants ; seven hundred and 
twenty-four of the latter are of the Lowry pattern. 

The number of gates added during the year has been two 
hundred and twenty, and the number of fire hydrants two 
hundred and seven, of which one hundred and fifty-three 
were of the Lowry pattern. 

The number of service pipes laid has been two thousand 
two hundred and twenty -four, — an increase of nineteen over 
the previous year. 

The total number of service pipes, on May 1, was thirty- 
two thousand six hundred and ninety-five. 

The repairs during the year show a large increase over 
the year preceding, when there had been a marked reduction. 
The greater portion of the increase of leaks was from frost 
and rust, and of the expense the increase has been in repairs 
on the main pipe and streets. 

The work has been pushed forward in the Highlands and 
in the Dorchester district as rapidly as the circumstances 
and the means at the disposal of the Board would permit. 
Hindrances were met with in the delivery of the pipes, the 
nature of the soil, and in the delay in making the appro- 
priation. Yet it appears that in the seven weeks making 
the close of the year more than six miles of pipe was laid. 
The pipe of the larger sizes has all been laid, including the 
twenty-inch main from Upham's Corner, Ward 16, to the 
reservoir in South Boston. Nearly three-fifths of the whole 
amount of pipe laid was in Wards 13, 14, 15 and 16. 

The length of main pipe laid to Deer Island was twenty- 
seven thousand four hundred and eighty-eight feet. The 
Mystic water was let into this line of pipes on the 29th of 
April, and when the new mains in East Boston are laid and 



Report of the Water Board. 9 

the coiiuectious are made, an abimdaut supply of water 
will be furnished to the Island. 

To provide a better supply and more direct conmiunica- 
tiou with the low service in the western part of the city, 
a sixteen-iuch main has been laid through a portion of 
Charles street, connecting with the forty-inch main at the 
foot of the Common, and to connect with the twelve-inch on 
Cambridge street ; and a thirty-inch gate has been established 
for the same purpose in Hancock street, near Derne street. 
The Frog pond is also connected with the forty-inch main 
by a line of twelve-inch pipes for the supply of the fountain 
at low service. 

HIGH SEEVICE. 

The high-service supply, which worked so well in the 
Highland district, was made applicable to the supply on 
Beacon Hill, and the water was let on the 4th of Jujie, last 
year. Since the 6th of June the water has been in use, and 
has proved adequate to the supply of the dwellings in their 
upper stories. 

DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIRS. 

The Beacon Hill reservoir having been superseded in the 
supply of that section of the city, b}'^ the high service, will 
no longer be needed, and the Board will recommend its sale 
at a proper time. Its capacity is only that of one-tifth of a 
day's supply to the city, and with the laying of the proposed 
forty-eight inch main to the city direct from the Chestnut Hill 
reservoir, the supply of water it is believed will be equal 
to any emergency which would require the use of this 
reservoir for reserve purposes in storage of water. The 
sale of this property it is anticipated will realize a sum suf- 
ficient to pay the cost of lajnng the new main from the 
Chestnut Hill reservoir. 

The repairs on the East Boston reservoir prove to have 



10 City Document. — No. 57. 

been thorough, the reservoh' having been fully tested by 
filling it to its greatest capacity without causing any leak- 
age. The ffraclino- of Brooks and White streets having been 
completed, the embankments were graded to conform to the 
streets, and an iron fence erected, which appears to be in 
good condition. 

The improvements around the stand-pipe have been com- 
pleted, a retaining wall built on Fort Avenue and the 
driveway gravelled and rolled. 



WESTERN DIVISION. 

This division comprises the Lake and that portion of the 
works lying between the Lake and the gate-house at the 
Brookline reservoir, and is under the charge of Mr. Albert 
Stanwood, as superintendent. 

A favorable opportunity was afforded by the low state 
of the water at the lake during the past season, to make 
the repairs which were needed ; and nearly eight hundred 
feet of slope wall, to protect the banks, was constructed, 
new timber put in at the upper and lower dam, and other 
repairs were made. An engine-house for use, in case of 
necessity for pumping, has been constructed on the north 
side of the gate-house. The house and the other buildings 
are in good condition. More than thirty-five hundred feet 
of fence has been put up, and nearly as much more will be 
required the present j^ear. Additional bank wall will also 
be constructed by the side of the Saxonville Branch Eail- 
road . 

The new dam at Pegan brook has been constructed and 
the brook cleaned out. The gate-chamber at Dudley pond 
has been reconstructed, and the Willow bridge culvert re- 
paired satisfactorily in the removal of obstructions to the 
free flow of the water. Examinations of the conduit show 
that its condition does not change materially, the water 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 11 

having been shut off but twice during the past year for 
repairs, etc., namely, once to repair a leak and once to change 
the screens at the lake. The waste weirs are all in good 
condition, but the east pipe chamber at Newton Lower 
Falls requires attention. 

CHESTNUT HILL EESERVOIE. 

The Bradlee basin was completed, and a formal letting on 
of water took place on the 25th October last, the twenty- 
second anniversary of the introduction of the Cochituate 
water into the city. The water was allowed to flow in a 
portion of each day until November 2d, when the low stage 
of water in the lake required its cessation until March, From 
the 14th March to 1st May all of the water not needed for 
the daily supply of the city was allowed to flow into the 
basin. On the first of May the depth of water was about 
fourteen feet. The capacity of the Bradlee basin is 
550,583,485 gallons, and of the Lawrence basin 180,888,- 
944 gallons. 

Much work has been done the present season in grading 
the ground where the old stables stood, in fencing, com- 
pleting the sidewalk, and putting the grounds in order 
around the reservoirs. The land damages have all been 

settled. 

BEOOKLINE EESERVOIE. 

Eepairs have been made at this reservoir in repointing the 
walls, painting the gate-house, pruning the trees, etc., and 
proper care taken of the grounds. It is proposed to clean 
out the basin when the water can be drawn off, which will 
probably be done the present season. 

WATEE EEGISTRAE'S DEPAETMENT. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year, 
is thirty-six thousand one hundred and thirty-two, showing 



12 City Document. — No. 57. 

an increase since January 1, 1870, of four thousand six 
hundred and thirty-two. The number of cases in which the 
water was turned off for non-payment of rates, was seven 
hundred and forty. Of this number six hundred and two 
have been turned on again, the numbers turned off and re- 
maining off being about the same as those of last year. 

The number of meters now applied to the premises of 
water-takers is one thousand and seventy-six, being a de- 
crease from last year of thirteen. 

The number of the various kinds of water-fixtures on the 
premises of water-takers January 1, 1871, was 130,234, 
being an increase over the previous year of 11,962. 

CHARLES H. ALLEN, PresH. 
NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE. 
GEORGE LEWIS. 
JOHN A. HAVEN. 
LEONARD R. CUTTER. 
AMOS L. NOTES. 
SYDNEY SQUIRES. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, May 5, 1871. 

Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

JP?'esident of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir : The following is a statement of the Expenditures and 
Eeceipts of this department for the year commencing May 1 , 
1870, and ending April 30, 1871 : — 



EXPENDITUEES 



Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. 






$356 09 


Plumbing shop, ♦' " 
Stable 






105 00 
3,716 42 


Taxes .... 






266 86 


Tools . . . 






2,940 78 


Travelling expenses . 
Fountains 






457 50 

2,222 00 


Laying main pipes, for stock, etc. 
Postage and expresses 
Eeservoirs — Beacon Hill . 






2,127 33 

40 49 

650 63 


" East Boston . 






7,686 06 


" South Boston 






236 50 


<« Brookline 






1,458 39 


Aqueduct repairs 

Printing (including Water Eeg 

Superintendent's) . 
Eent of Eastern Avenue wharf foi 


istrar' 
• tow- 


s anc 
boats 


818 46 
[ 

1,681 67 
2,000 00 


Amount carried forward, 


$26,764 18 



14 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Amount brought forivard , 
Telegraph to the reservoh-s, machine shop 
and lakes .... 



Stationery (inclnding Water Eegistrar 

Superintendent's) 
Salaries (including clerks in Water 

trar's department) . 
Main pipe ..... 
Service pipe .... 
Off and on water 
Inspectors .... 

Wages, — laying main pipe 

" " service pipe, etc. 

" blacksmith shop 

<' plumbing shop . 

" proving yard 

Upper yard, finishing buildings, labor. 
Miscellaneous expenses 

Meters 

Maintaining meters 
Kepairing main pipe . 
" service pipe 
" hydrants . . . 

" streets 
" stopcocks . 
Stopcocks . . . 
Hydrants . . . . • 
Lake ..... 

Proving yard, stock, etc. . 
Raising pipes .... 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
Tolls and ferriage 
Carting ..... 



s and 



Eegis 



etc. 



$26,764 18 

83 76 

617 31 

17,450 09 

25,428 40 

27,035 00 

8,023 40 

8,490 00 

12,395 99 

13,610 72 

1,317 50 

51 00 

6,180 49 

2,965 88 

2,426 78 

1,869 20 

2,606 10 

5,567 32 

8,735 96 

3,195 98 

7,869 35 

813 48 

10,767 17 

1,915 73 

9,288 58 

11,121 54 

531 48 

2,438 58 

70 50 

*393 50 



Amount carried forward, 



$220,024 97 



Report of the Water Board. 



15 



Amount brought forivard, 
Chestnut Hill reservoir 
Wards 13, 14, 15 
Amount drawn for the driveway around 

Chestnut Hill reservoir 
Water to Deer Island . 
Ward 16 , . , 
High service 
Wao;es hioh service 
Pumping works at lake 
New main, East Boston 
Damage 
Advertising 

Total drawn for by the Board 



$220,024 97 
329,957 80 
105,088 38 

24,751 02 

30,895 15 

237,298 71 

9,006 22 

2,347 75 

3,940 86 

^30 33 

667 81 

444 19 

$965,053 19 



And which is charged as follows 

To Chestnut Hill reservoir 
" Water Works . 
" Driveway 
" Wards 13, 14, 15 . 
' ' Water to Deer Island 
«' Ward 16 . 

" New main, East Boston 



,957 80 

236,431 80 

24,751 02 

105,088 38 

30,895 15 

237,298 71 

630 33 



1965,053 19 



Amount charg-ed Water Works 



,776 69 



RECEIPTS. 
Cash paid Oity Treasurer. 
Received for grass and pasture $180 00 



' " fines for waste, etc. 
Amount carried forward^ 



828 00 



$1,008 00 $908,776 69 



16 City Document. — No. 57. 

Amount brought forward, $1,008 00 $908,776 69 
Received for off and on water, 

for repairs . 2,476 25 

*' " pipe laying, re- 
pairing, etc. . 20,436 19 

" " stones sold . . 75 00 

'' «« land sold . . 487 82 

*' " old iron, oxen, 
etc, , sold on ac- 
count of C. H. 
reservoir . 6,513 37 

•' " hydrants and main- 
taining same for 
Fire Departm't 21,996 00 



$52,992 63 



Net amount to Water Works . . . $855,784 06 

The above is credited to 

Chestnut Hill reservoir . . 6,513 37 

Waterworks . . . 46,479 26 



$52,992 63 
Amount dravv^n for Water Works, not includ- 
ing Chestnut Hill reservoir. Wards 13, 14, 
15, water to Deer Island, Ward 16, new 
main. East Boston, or Chestnut Hill drive- 
way . $236,431 80 

EXTENSION OF THE WOEKS. 

Main pipe .... $25,428 40 

Wages laying main pipe . . 12,395 99 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc. . 2,127 33 

39,951 72 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1870, to 

May 1, 1871 $196,480 08 



Eeport of the Water Board. 17 

Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, 
to May 1, 1871. 

Amount drawn by Commissioners . , $4,043,718 21 

Water Board, in 1850 . 366,163 89 
" " Cochitnate Water Board, 

from January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1870 . 5,053,661 08 
Amount drawn from April 30, 1870, to May 

1, 1871, for Water Works . . . 908,776 69 



$10,372,319 87 

Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by the Commissioners . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by Water Board, 

1850 .... 8,153 52 

Amount paid by Cochituate 
Water Board, to May 1, 
1870 . . . . . 210,531 92 

Amount paid from April 30, 

1870, to May 1, 1871 . 52,992 63 

. 319,326 45 



Balance $10,052,993 42 



Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by 
the Commissioners and Water Boards, for 
the Water Works . . . . $10,052,993 42 

Gross payments (including interest, premium, 

etc.) for account of the Water Works $19,087,530 34 
Gross receipts 9,867,633 70 



Net cost to the city, May 1, 1871 . . $9,219,896 64 

SAM'L N. DYER, 
Clerk CocJiituate Water Board. 



18 City Document. — No. 57. 

COST OF THE WORKS TO MAY 1, 1871. 
WESTEEN DIVISION. 

Amount paid William H. Knight for the lake $100,000 00 

Amount paid -William H. Knight for the fac- 
tories, $50,000 ; less amount on account of 
the sale of land and machinery, and insur- 
ance at the time of the fire - . . 20,818 22 

Expense of raising the lake two feet, including 

damages ....... 28,002 18 

Cost of roads, bridges and swamps . . 38,332 48 

Gate-house at the lake 29,907 12 

Dam at the outlet of the lake . . . 8,458 20 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making connec- 
tions with the lake 18,982 23 

New dam, and improvements at the lake . 19,610 90 

Total Gost oi lake de-p't, not including land $264,111 33 

Land and land damages, less 

credit for land sold . . $225,523 15 
Constructing the brick conduit 817,717 73 
Brookline reservoir, 

land . . $58,418 92 

Brookline reservoir, f ^qq A77 21 

construction 108,301 92 

Brookline reservoir, 

gate-house . 33,356 37 
Compensating reservoirs, less 

amount received when sold . 66,859 80 
Engineering expenses on the 

Western Division . . . 69,900 31 
Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Western Division .. . . 44,227 80 



Amounts carried forward, $1,424,306 00 $264,111 33 



Keport of the Water Board. 



19 



Amoimts brought forioard, $1,424,306 00 $264,111 33 
Payment on account of the Chest- 
nut Hill reservoir . . 2,423,771 95 

3,848,077 95 



Total cost of Western Division 



:,112,189 28 



EASTERN DIVISION. 

Mam and service pipes . $2,932,830 72 

Beacon Hill res- 
ervoir, land . $145,107 10 

Beacon Hill reser- 
voir, construct'n, 368,426 11 513,533 21 

South Boston res- 
ervoir, land . 55,103 23 

South Boston reser- 
voir, construc'n, 35,804 87 90,908 10 

East Boston res- 
ervoir, land . $23,862 50 

East Boston reser- 
voir, construc'n, 46,328 59 70,191 09 

Engineering expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . . 81,403 02 

Machine shop and pipe yards . 69,887 96 

Hydrants and stopcocks . . 93,392 61 

Proving pipes . . . . 35,983 96 

Meters 114,366 48 

Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . . 353,656 65 

Payment on account of Wards 

13, 14, 15 . . . . 686,266 78 

Payment on acct. Ward 16 . 237,298 71 



Total cost of Eastern Division 



.,229,719 29 



20 City Document. — No. 57. 

Total cost of Western Division $4,112,189 28 
Total cost of Eastern Division 5,229,719 29 



Total Eastern and Western $9,341,908 57 

Expenses of carrying on the 

works .... 11,119,801 40 

Interest paid, after dednctiug to- 
tal income received . . 110,186 67 



Excess of expenses and interest over income $1,229,988 07 

Total cost on May 1, 1870, over and above the 

income $10,571,896 64 

Deduct amount transferred to the Water Works 

from Sinking Fund .... $1,352,00000 

Net Cost . . . . . . $9,219,896 64 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



City Hall, Boston, May 5, 1871. 
Office of City Engineer. 
Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Gochituate Water Board: 

Sir : In compliance with the ordinance relating to the 
City Engineer's department, I have the honor to present 
the following report : — 

EASTEEN DIVISION. 

On pages 58-59 will be found the usual tables of the 
average monthly and yearly heights of the water in the 
Brookline and City reservoirs, from 1861 to 1870 inclusive, 
said heights being expressed in feet and decimals of feet 
above "tide marsh level," or mean high water. 

By reference to the Brookline table it will be seen that 
the average level for the entire year was yL of a foot higher 
than for the previous year; -^-^-^ of a foot lower than the 
highest average (in 1862), and -^-^^^ of a foot lower than the 
average for the whole ten years. 

The average level of the water in the Beacon Hill reser- 
voir the past year has been a trifle higher than the year 
previous ; but it would, undoubtedly, have been considerably 
lower, had the reservoir been connected with the high-ser- 
vice distribution during the entire year ; but, since the sup- 
ply for this district has been furnished by the pumping 
engines, this reservoir has been disconnected from both the 
high and low service for the greater part of the time. 

The averaofe level of the water in the South Boston reser- 



22 City Document. — No. 57. 

voir has been higher the past year than it has since 1866. 
The water in this reservoir, as in the Beacon Hill, is shut in 
for the greater part of the time. The completion of the 
new main and a separation of the high and low service 
districts will produce a marked difference in the level of the 
water in this reservoir; but the highest houses can be 
thoroughly served only by a supply from the pumping 
engines. 

It will be seen by reference to the East Boston table that 
the average level during the past year was SiVo- feet higher 
than for the previous year, aud 9yVo feet higher than the 
average for the nine years previous. 

High-water mark in this reservoir is 107.60 feet above 
"tide marsh level." So that it will be seen the average 
level since the reservoir has been supplied from the Mystic 
works was ^^q\ feet below high-water mark. During most 
of the year all the water used by East Boston has passed 
through the reservoir, and the average pressure has, there- 
fore, been that due to a height of 104^5/^ feet above "tide 
marsh level ; " but, when the reservoir is disconnected from 
East Boston and the supply is direct from the Mystic pipes, 
the pressure would be equivalent to a height of ld2j^j^-^ feet 
above the same level. 

ENLARGEMENT OF WATER PIPES IN EAST BOSTON'. 

For the details of the propositions relating to an enlarge- 
ment of the pipes in certain streets in East Boston, I respect- 
fully refer you to my annual report to the Cit}^ Council 
(City Document, 'No. 15, 1871, p. 82), aud to the several 
reports and estimates therein referred to. 

Independently of the expediency or necessity of the en- 
largement of the water pipes in certain streets for the pur- 
pose of affording an adequate or a better fire supply, there 
are certain changes which should be made for the benefit of 
the fourth section and of Deer Island, and which would be 



Eeport of the Water Board. 23 

of some advantage in other districts. The sixteen-inch pipe 
in Brooks street should be extended to Chelsea street and 
connected with a twelve-inch pipe which should be extended 
south-westwardly to connect with the present twelve-inch 
pipe at Marion street, and also north-eastwardly to connect 
with the present twelve-inch pipe at Saratoga street, which 
supplies the north-easterly section of East Boston and Deer 
Island. 

NEW MAIN WATER PIPE ACROSS CHELSEA CREEK FROM 
CHELSEA TO EAST BOSTON. 

The necessity for this work which is still uncompleted, 
and the action of the Water Committee of your Board and 
of the City Council in relation thereto, is given in full in 
City Document, No. 99, 1870, and is also incorporated in 
my annual report to the City Council (City Doc. No. 15, 
1871, pp. 33-39). 

The flexible jointed pipe, as stated in the aforesaid report, 
was all put together upon the East Boston flats and one of 
the adjacent wharves in January, ready to be launched as 
soon as the ice should clear away. The length of this sec- 
tion is about 650 feet. Before launching it, the water was 
drawn out at low tide and the ends plugged. A sufiicient 
number of empty kerosene barrels were lashed to the top 
of the pipe, — being placed in couples along the entire 
length, — to float the pipe when not filled with water. The 
pipe was then filled with water, the ends plugged again, 
and the joints all tested by connecting the twenty-inch main, 
now in use, with the new pipe. Everything was found to 
be tight and secure, and the pipe was kept sunk for several 
days awaiting a seasonable tide and a calm day. 

The first trial was not successful, owing to a slight open- 
ing of one of the joints, which permitted the tide water to 
partially fill the pipe and cause it to sink at the middle of 
the line and drag on the flats. The difficulty was subse- 



24 City Document. — No. 57. 

queiitly remedied, and upon the next favorable opportunity, 
which occurred on Tuesday the 18th of April, the pipe was 
successfully launched and sunk in the trench which had been 
excavated for it. The work of extending the line at each 
end and of making the connections is still in progress, and 
until this is completed the new line cannot again be tested. 
The method devised by Mr. Norman, the contractor, of put- 
ting the pipe together in one entire line, and then floating it 
into position and sinking it by admitting the water to fill the 
pipe, is entirely novel, and, considering the various nnfor- 
seen contingencies which have arisen since the work was 
commenced, the result thus far has been quite a success. 

DEER ISLAND WATER PIPE. 

In my annual report to the City Council, I presented an 
abstract of the report which I had made to your Board, 
recommending the laying of a larger pipe, etc. ; and I also 
stated the plan which your Board agreed upon as to the 
sizes of the pipes and the lengths of the several sizes, and 
the general terms of the contract made with Mr. Geo. H. 
Norman for furnishing the pipes and doing the work. You 
will find the aforesaid abstract and statement on pages 21, 
22, 23, and 24, of City Document No. 15, 1871. 

In addition to what is therein stated I beg leave to say 
that, since the date of that report, the work has been en- 
tirely completed except such further extensions upon the 
Island as the Board of Directors of Public Institutions may 
authorize. 

The following is a statement of the work done by Mr. 
Norman, viz. : — 

2,052i feet of 12-inch pipe. 
9,310^ " 10 " " 
11,870 " 8 " " in Winthrop. 
3,173 " 8 " " on Deer Island. 



■ Eeport of the Water Board. 25 

GOof feet of 8-inch pipe across Shirley Gut. 

150a " 4 " " for Blow-oifs. 

One 12-inch gate set. 

One 10 " " " 
Eight 8 " " " 

Six 4 " " " 
Three air-cocks. 
Seven post-hydrants. 

The water has been let on, for the purpose of testing the 
pipes. Both lines of submerged pipe across the Gut were 
found perfectly tight ; but on the main line in Yf inthrop and 
East Boston four leaks were found, which were subsequently 
repaired. Since then the water has been let on to the Island 
permanently, and the hydrants tested in the presence of your 
Board and the Board of -Directors of Public Institutions, giv- 
ing entire satisfaction. 

SOUTH BOSTON HIGH SERVICE. 

On pages 19, 20, and 21, of my Annual Report to the 
City Council (City Doc. No. 15, 1871), you will find a 
statement which embodies substantially the action of the 
Water Board, the City Council and myself upon this subject. 

The plans then proposed and estimated upon, contem- 
plated an independent line of 8-inch pipe, either from 
Tremont street through Dover to the high district, or from 
Upham's Corner, in Dorchester, through Boston and Dor- 
chester streets to the same district. By using the present 
new line of 20-inch pipe, which is all laid from Upham's 
Corner to Telegraph Hill, and connecting the same by means 
of a 12-inch pipe with the proposed high-service pipe in 
Washington street, in Ward 16, an ample high-service sup- 
ply for South Boston can be obtained at a moderate cost, and 
the high ground on Meeting House and Jones' Hills be sup- 
plied at the same time. 



26 City Document. — No. 57. 



EXTENSION OF THE WOEKS IN DOECHESTEE, WAED 16. 

For the action of my department, aud a general statement 
of the whole matter relating to the extension of the works 
in Ward 16, I respectfully refer you to my annual report to 
the City Council (City Document No. 15, 1871, pp. 26, 27, 
28, 29, 30, 31, 32). And the superintendent's report will 
furnish you all the details of the work accomplished. 

Since the date of my annual report, above referred to, the 
surveys of the high-service districts in Dorchester have been 
continued as rapidly as possible by Mr. W. F. Learned, con- 
sistently with the discharge of the current duties appertain- 
ing to the present extensions of the works in that section. I 
hope before long to be able to lay before yoii a map, showing 
the location of the several high-service districts, their con- 
tours and areas ; also the elevation of all the highest hills 
above our datum line of "tide marsh level." 

HIGH-SEEVICE PUMPING WOEKS. 

The pumping engines for the high-service supply, built by 
the Boston Machine Company, from designs by Mr. Charles 
Carr, the superintendent, were put in operation February 
25, 1870, and have been in constant service since. 

They have done their work to general satisfaction thus 
far ; though some diiSculty has been experienced in attaining 
the guaranteed maximum rate of speed of 35 revolutions per 
minute, owing, in part, to the rear pressure, which amounts 
to nearly 40 pounds per square inch, and in part to the small 
size of the supply pipe, which is 16 inches in diameter, and 
the velocity of the current through it, when the pumps are 
making 35 revolutions per minute, is at the rate of 156 feet 
per minute. The shock produced by the stoppage of this 
long column of water at the end of every stroke — 70 times 
a minute — when moving at so high a velocity, Avas not fully 



Eeport of the Water Board. 27 

appreciated in designing the arrangement of the supply 
pipes. 

The engines are very simple in construction, substantially 
built, and of excellent finish ; and a brief description of 
them may be of interest to many by whom this report will 
be read. 

The engines, two in number, are non-condensing and 
direct-acting, working double-acting pumps, whose capacity 
is 47 gallons per revolution. The steam cylinders are 20 
inches in diameter, and have a stroke of 36 inches. The 
pumps are of the same stroke, and 14 inches in diameter. 
The engines are furnished with heavy fly-wheels, 15 feet in 
diameter. The distance from the centre of the fly-wheel 
shaft to the centre of the steam cylinder is 13 feet 2^ 
inches ; from centre of steam cylinder to centre of pump, 
the distance is 8 feet 8 inches. One of the chief peculiari- 
ties of these engines is the arrangement of Mr. Carr's varia- 
ble cut-ofi" and valve-gear, which is readily adjusted to 
govern the height of the water in the stand-pipe, the height 
being always indicated by a mercurial gauge and miniature 
model of the stand-pipe placed in the engine-room. 

Each engine is supplied with steam by a vertical tubular 
boiler, 7 feet in diameter, with tubes 2} inches in diameter 
by 10 feet long, all radiating from a common centre. One 
of the peculiarities of these boilers is a plate, dividing the 
water space between the fire-box and shell of the boiler, 
within 4 inches of the bottom, to cause continuous circula- 
tion. Another peculiarity is the introduction of air into the 
fire-box through perforated cast-iron pipes placed within and 
around said box, to insure a more perfect combustion. Thus 
far they have required no repairs, and have no appearance of 
needing any at present. 

As before stated, the engines were first started February 
25, to supply the Highland district. On the 4th of June 
the Beacon Hill high-service district was connected to test 



28 City Document. —No. 27. 

the pipes, and play the fountain on the Common. On the 
6th of June the supply was regularly commenced, and, ex- 
cept for occasional repairs, has continued to the present 
time. From the engine record I have compiled the following 
table, which exhibits the operations of the pumps from 
March to December, 1870, both inclusive : — 



Ebport of the Water Board. 



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30 City Document. — No. 57. 

This table presents some interesting and rather important 
facts relative to the amount of water pumped, either to sup- 
ply waste or leakage. From June 6th to January 1st there 
has not been a single hour of the day or night (except when 
the water was shut off for repairs) that it has not been found 
necessary to keep the pumping engine working to maintain the 
proper level in the stand-pipe ; and the least draught in any 
single hour during the aforesaid period of over six months 
was 11,066 gallons on the 13th of July, between the hours 
of 1 and 2 A. M., an amount equal to 40 per cent, of the 
hourly average for the entire month. But a fairer com- 
parison would be, to take the average of the smallest hourly 
draughts in each month, and compare that with the hourly 
average for the whole term of nearly seven months. From 
this comparison it will appear that the average of the small- 
est hourly draughts in each month is 17,810 gallons, and the 
average hourly draught for the whole term is 27,280 gallons. 
In this case the percentage is increased from 40, as before 
stated, to 65 J. It is manifestly impossible that such an 
amount of water can be required for legitimate uses, and that 
it must be attributed to careless or wanton Avaste, or to leak- 
age in the gates which separate the high and low service 
districts. I am of the opinion that both causes contribute 
to the unparalleled results of night consumption indicated by 
the foregoing figures ; but that the leakage above referred to 
is the chief cause. If this be so, then we have not abso- 
lutely lost or used the water, but have pumped, probably, 
double the amount required to amply supply the entire high 
service. 

The daily average amount of water pumped for the high 
service since Jime 6th, when the Beacon Hill district was 
connected, was 650,200 gallons to supply a population of not 
over 10,500 at a liberal estimate, and where the require- 
ments are almost exclusively for domestic uses. Compare 
this' rate of consumption with that of East Boston as deter- 



Eeport oy the Water Board. 31 

mined by observations recorded in the following table, which 
I transcribe from my annual report to the Cochituate Water 
Board in May last (City Doc. JSTo. 51), — bearing in mind 
that the East Boston observations were made in severely 
cold weather, when there would naturally be some waste to 
prevent freezing ; and remembering also that the East Bos- 
ton district requires a very considerable amount of water for 
manufacturing and shipping interests. 



32 



City Document. — No. 57. 



" Consumption of toater in East Boston, from observations taken at 
East Boston reservoir, from 9 o'clock A. If., Dec. 24, 1869, to 
9 o'clock A. M., Dec. 25, 1869. 



December 24. 
9 o'clock A.M. , 

10 •' " . 

11 " " . 

12 " M. . 

1 " P.M. . 

2 " " . 

3 " *•' . 



M. 



December 25. 

1 o'clock A.M. . 

2 " " . 

3 " " . 

4 " " . 
6 " " . 

6 " " . 

7 " " . 



Time. 



Depth. 


Consumption 
Galls, per hour 


Total Con- 
sumption. 


ft. in. 






20 11 






20 8 


68,233 


68,233 


20 5 


67,642 


135,875 


20 3 


44,769 


180,644 


20 1 


44,509 


225,158 


19 11 


44,250 


269,403 


18 9 


43,989 


313,392 


19 7 


43,731 


357,123 


19 6 


21,769 


378,892 


19 3 


64,921 


443,813 


19 2 


21,512 


465,325 


19 1 


21,448 


486,773 


18 11 


42,704 


529,477 


18 9 


42,448 


571,925 


18 8 


21,129 


593,054 


18 7 


21,065 


614,119 


18 5 


41,940 


656,059 


18 4 


20,875 


676,934 


18 4 




676,934 


18 4 




676,934 


IS 2 


41,561 


718,495 


18 


41,307 


759,802 


17 9 


61,489 


821,291 


17 7 


40,679 


861,970 


17 6 


20,245 


882,215 



Total. 882,215 



" It appears, from the foregoing table, that the average hourly night draught 
from 9 o'clock P. M. the 24th, to 4 o'clock A. M., the 25th, was 15,000 gal- 
lons ; that there were only two hours during the whole twenty- four when the 



Report of the Watee Board. 33 

observation indicated no draught ; that tlie average hourly draught diiring the 
seventeen hours, not reckoned above as night hours, was nearly 46,000 gal- 
lons, and the maximum hourly draught was from 9 to 11 A. M., and from 5 
to 6 P. M., the 24th, and from 6 to 7 A. M. the 25th — the average of the 
four hours being 65,571 gallons. 

"The total for the twenty-four hours was 882,215 gallons, and, calling 
the population 25,000, the consumption per head would be about 35 gal- 
lons." 

By reference to the preceding table of operations at the 
high-service pumping works, it will be seen that the daily 
average amount pumped in December was 735,274 gallons, 
an amount equivalent to 70 gallons per inhabitant, or just 
double the rate per head actually used in East Boston, as per 
the foregoino- table. ' 

Observations, continued for more than a year, of the 
amount of water actually used, as determined . by meter 
measurement, in seven different families (members of the 
Water Board) , show an average consumption of 25 gallons 
per head in 24 hours. In the estimates which I submitted to 
the Water Board in May last of the probable requirements 
of the Beacon Hill high service, I mapped out the pro- 
posed district, and procured from the Water Registrar a 
schedule of all the establishments within the district using 
the water,' and the number of occupants in each dwelling- 
house, tenement house, hotel, etc. The population of the 
district as thus determined was called, in round numbers, 
6,000, and I allowed 40 gallons per day to each inhabitant, 
making the daily requirements 240,000 gallons. 

The district was subsequently enlarged, but to a very 
limited extent, and if I were to revise that estimate to con- 
form to the enlargement, I should simply add to that amount 
(240,000 gallons) the amounts actually used by all the 
hotels, restaurants, club-houses, tenement-houses, and j)ub- 
lic buildings, using large quantities, as determined for the 
past year by meter measurement. This amount, as kindly 
furnished by the Water Registrar, amounts to 68,200 gal- 



34 City Document. — No. 57. 

Ions per day. The amount would then be 308,200 gallons 
per day. If to this we add the average amount actually 
pumped per day for the Highland high service, as shown by 
the records for May, before the Beacon Hill district was 
added, which was 82,640 gallons; the total requirements 
would then be, 390,840 gallons per day, by a most liberal 
estimate, and only 53 per cent, of the average daily amount 
actually pumped in the month of December. There are 
probably fifty gates in all, required to separate the high 
and low service, with a difference in pressure on the two 
faces of 40 pounds and upwards per square inch ; and, 
unless all these gates are perfectly tight, it is evident that, 
with such a pressure, the leakage must be very large from 
the high to the low surface ; and it is this, in my judgment, 
and not a wasteful use, that causes the enormous require- 
ments of the high service. 

The pumping records show that the hour of greatest 
draught generally falls between 8 and 9 o'clock A. M., and 
that the hour of least draught, between the hours of 2 and 
3 o'clock A. M. Thinking it might be interesting to know 
the relative consumption on diffe'rent days of the week, 
I have taken considerable pains to compile the following 
statement : — 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



35 



Statement of the average daily nwnber of gallons of loater pumped for 
the high-service supply on each day of the loeek from June to 
December inclusive^ arranged to illustrate the comparative draught 
on the several days of the lueeJc. 



Month. 


Monday. 


Tuesday. 


Wed'sday 


Thursday 


Friday. 


Saturday. 


Sunday. 


June, 


745,479 


687,234 


706,661 


678,977 


654,786 


726,683 


543,731 


July, 


692,948 


661,949 


624,600 


644,927 


662,916 


640,528 


603,872 


August, . 


697,554 


650,037 


657,276 


661,854 


677,322 


700,084 


593,043 


September, 


703,837 


676,603 


667,870 


668,592 


650,756 


687,680 


608,007 


October, . 


674,927 


630,176 


643,465 


625,271 


630,166 


660,488 


582,132 


November, 


733,435 


647,908 


668,926 


656,801 


647,378 


683,296 


598,915 


December, 


791.826 


729,510 


732,213 


711,101 


725,097 


765,788 


692,345 


Averages, 


720,001 


669,600 


671,573 


663,932 


664,060 


694,935 


603,149 



From the foregoing statement it appears that the days of 
the week arranged in the order of the greatest average con- 
sumption stand as follows : — 



'No. 1. — Mondays, average 
No. 2. — Saturdays, " 
No. 3. — Wednesdays, " 
No. 4. — Tuesdays, " 
No. 5. — Fridays, " 

No. 6.— Thursdays, " 
No. 7. — Sundays, «' 



720,001 g 

694,935 

671,573 

669,600 

664,060 

663,932 

603,149 



alls. 



The average consumption on Mondays is 19i*o- per cent, 
greater than on Sundays, and about 8 per cent, greater than 
the average of the Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and 
Fridays, which do not vary much from each other. 

Before the Beacon Hill high-service district was connected, 
the night consumption (from 12 o'clock midnight to 5 A. 
M.) was found to average 10 per cent, of the day con- 
sumption. Since the Beacon Hill district was connected, the 



36 City Document. — No. 57. 

proportion of night to day consumption has increased to 
20 per cent. 

In January, owing to the low state of the water at the lake, 
and the consequent fears of a scarcity of water, it was de- 
cided to reduce the hours of pumping ; therefore, from the 
13th of January to the 1st of May the pumps have averaged 
only 18 hours per day, and the amount pumped has 
averaged 493,250 gallons per day, — equal to an average of 
27,403 gallons per hour of pumping time. The daily average 
amount pumped in December was 735,274 gallons. It thus 
appears that the reduction of the pumping time one quarter 
has reduced the amount pumped from 735,274 gallons per 
day to 493,250, — a saving of 242,024 gallons, or d2^\ per 
cent. ; or, more concisely, a reduction of 25 per cent, in the 
pumping time reduced the amount pumped 33 per cent. 
This result does not appear reasonable ; for the reduction in 
the pumping time takes place during that portion of the night 
when the draught is lightest, and it would be naturally supposed 
that, if there were any difference between the percentage of 
the reduction of the amount pumped and the percentage of 
the reduction in the pumping time, it would be the other 
way, — that is, the amount pumped should be reduced by a 
smaller percentage than that of the reduction of the pumping 
time. But the fact is, without doubt, that a considerable 
portion of the percentage of reduction in the amount 
pumped is attributable to other causes independent of the 
mere reduction of the pumping time : such as a general 
economy in the use of the water caused by fears of a water 
famine, and the stoppage of the leak on the 30-inch gate 
in Tremont street, which finally broke on the 28th of Janu- 
ary, and the supply to Beacon Hill was cut off for three days. 
That there must have been considerable leakage at this point 
is evident from the records of the amount pumped before the 
break was discovered, and the amount pumped immediately 
afte;i: the repairs were made. For instance, the pumping 



Report or the Water Board. 37 

time was reduced on the 13th of January, and the break was 
discovered on the 28th, durhig which interval the amount 
pumped per day averaged 511,000 gallons; while, for the 
eleven days immediately succeeding the repairs, the average 
amount pumped per day was only 461,000 gallons, a reduc- 
tion of nearly 10 per cent., and, undoubtedly, attributable 
to the stoppage of a leak which may have existed for a long 
time. 

WBSTBRlsr DIVISION. 

The Superintendent's Report will furnish all information 
relative to the condition of the grounds and various struc- 
tures on this division. 

The work of marking the bounds of the city's property on 
this division still remains incomplete, and should be finished 
as soon as possible. 

The annual examination of the interior of the conduit was 
made last month. The section from the Lake to the Waste 
Weir at Dedman's Brook was examined by J. Mains ; from 
Dedman's Brook to West Pipe Chamber, in Needham, by J. 
A. W^iggin ; from the East Pipe Chamber to Newton Centre 
Waste Weir, by Henry Manley ; and the remainder to Brook- 
line by Albert Stauwood, Superintendent of the Western 
Division. 

The following is a transcript of the records made by the 
several examiners, from which it appears that the conduit is 
generally in a cleaner condition, and that no essential changes 
in its stability have occurred : — 

Report of J.. Mains, from the Lake to Dedman's Brooh 
Waste Weir. 

Entered the conduit at 8.50 A. M. 

Between the entrance and Station 1 is muddy. 

" 6 and 7 is a crack in top. 

" 8 and 9 muddy ; thence to 47 all right. 



38 City Document. — No. 57. 

Between 52 and 53 is a man-hole, at which is a bad leak. 
" 57 and 58 are three small fissures, which need to 

be pointed. 

Between 66 and 67 needs repointing on the right. 
"■ 71 and 72 is muddy. 

" 97 and 98 is muddy. 

<' 115 and 116 is muddy, then clean to 136. 

Near 140 is a large willow root growing. 
Crack about i inch wide near last man-hole. 
At 142 is considerable mud. 

Between 152 and 153 is a small crack in top, extending 
to Dedman's Brook Waste Weir, which we reached at 11 
A.M. 

Report of J. A Wiggin, fivm Dedman's Brook Waste Weir 
to Newton Lower Falls. 

Entered the conduit at 9.45, April 14, 1871. 

From 169 to 170 are several small cracks in top, some of 
which have been repointed, and have not started. 

Between 178 and 181 are several cracks in top, some ot 
them being nearly or quite ^ inch wide, others quite fine. 

From 182 to a little beyond 183 are several cracks, one 
of which has been repointed. 

A little this side of 247, and extending about 50 feet, is 
a crack on top arch, left side, which in some places is 
nearly ^ an inch wide. 

Between 272 and 276 is a large crack, which has been re- 
pointed, which has not started any. 

There is considerable sand along here. 

What should be numbered 289 is numbered 282. 

(From 12 to 14 are several large cracks, which have been 
repointed, but I think have started a little in places.) 

Conduit quite muddy on bottom, from 16 to 18^^. 

From 53 to a little beyond 54 are two cracks in top, in 
some places quite fine, and in others about ^ inch wide. 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 39 

Between 77 and 78 are three quite large cracks in top, but 
they look as if they had been in the condition they are now 
in for some time. 

(From 107 to about 109^- is a crack in top, which has 
been repointed, but think it is opening some.) 

With the exceptions of the mud and sand before mentioned, 
the conduit is very clean, being free from the roots and 
sediment which I saw on my last year's examination. 

Arrived at Newton Lower Falls at 12.40 P. M. 



Boston, April 15, 1871. 
Mr. a. Stanwood, Su;pt. Western Division B. W. W. : 

Dear Sir, — The following is a transcript of my notes on 
the portion of the aqueduct examined by me yesterday. 

Entered conduit at Eastern Pipe Chamber at 10.50 A. M. 
April 14, 1871. 

Stations 193 to 194, crack on right side of upper arch, 
about 3 feet long running diagonally to the courses. 

195| to 197, fine crack in top. 

198 " 199 " " <' 

217^ to 218^, bad crack in top arch, the same as reported 
last year, except that part of the way there are two cracks. 

221 to 222, fine crack in top arch, part of the way there 
are two cracks. 

224 to 225, two cracks in top arch, same as last year. 
This is the worst crack in the section. 

227 to 228, fine crack in top arch. 

232^^ to 234, several cracks in top, some of the way fine 
but part of it from l to I inch wide ; this has not changed 
from last year. 

242 to 244, several bad cracks on both sides of top arch, 
but no worse than they were described last year. 

248, fine crack in top arch. 



40 City Document. — No. 57. 

253i to 254i-, several fine cracks on top and right side of 
arch. 

264, fine cracks in top and right side. 

THIRD DIVISION. 

Stations 1 to 2, fine crack in top. 
Arrived at Newton Centre, Station SJ-, at 2.08 P. M. 
Yours truly, 

(Signed) HENRY MANLEY, 

Chestnut Hill Eeservoie, 
April 27, 1871. 

N. Henry Crafts, Esq., Qity Engineer: 

Dear Sir : The third division of the conduit was exam- 
ined in company with the President- — Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 
and Messrs. Haven, Noyes and Squires (of the Board), 
Niles, Brown and Taylor (of the Water Committee), and the 
Water Registrar. 

April 14. Entered the conduit at the Newton Centre 
Waste Weir at 12.35. There was a decided improvement in 
the condition of this section from last year ; but very little 
dirt was found, and the most of that was in the tunnel. No 
new defects were seen, and no change could be seen in the 
cracks, as before reported. Between 120 and 125 they 
should be repaired as soon as practicable. As the joints 
require to be cut out, so much time will be required to do 
the work it cannot be done until the city can be supplied 
from the "Bradlee Basin." 

April 22. From the Intermediate gate-house to Brook- 
line reservoir. This part of the conduit was examined to- 
day. Found no change in the appearance of the conduit 
from what it was in 1869, or from Mr. H. M. Wightman's 
report of last year, with this exception : about 20 feet 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 41 

south of the Waste Wier at Webber's, and extending for 
30 feet, is a bad crack that will require attention this 
season. While the water was off men were sent in and this 
part of the conduit cleaned. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

A. STAN WOOD, 

Sup't W. D. B. W. W. 

WATER AT THE LAKE. 

On page 54 will be found the usual table exhibiting the 
average monthly and yearly heights of the water in the lake 
above the bottom of the conduit, from 1851 to 1870, both 
inclusive. It will be seen by inspection of this table that the 
average height of the surfiice of the water above the bottom 
of the conduit for the whole year was lOy^ou^ feet, which 
varies but very little from the averages of 1860, '61, '64 and 
'65, being a trifle higher. The lowest monthly average, 
since the raising of the dam in 1859, w^as 5tV(T feet in 1864. 
The lowest point reached since 1859 was in December, 1864. 

The following statement exhibits the fact that the fears 
entertained in January of a short supply had no better foun- 
dation than those that were experienced in 1862-64 ; but the 
experience of those years and the last clearly demonstrated 
the importance of early action to either increase the storage 
capacity of the lake, or to seek an additional source of sup- 



42 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Month and Yeak. 


Average height of 
water in lake 
above the bottom 
of conduit. 


Least height of wa- 
ter in lalvC above 
the bottom of con- 
duit. 


it 

'« O 

■sag 


-So.- 

o >> 


1862. January 

1864. December .... 

1870. December .... 

1871. January 14th .... 


6.09 
5.41 
6.39 


5.00 
4.83 

5.87 
5.00 


17,000,000 
14,547,000 
14,094,000 


46.69 
42.60 
55.89 



The table on page 57 shows the varying depths of the 
water let into the conduit at the lake. The average depth 
for the whole year was 5 feet 8;^ inches, precisely the same 
as for the year 1869. The conduit has been vun just full 
(6 feet 4 inches) 77 days in the year, mostly in the months 
of July, August, September and October ; it has been run 
more than full (6 feet 6 inches) for 14 days, in the months 
of July, August and September. The water has been shut 
off from the conduit five days. 

From the table on page 51 it appears that the rain-fall at 
the lake amounted to SS^-^g^o inches, being 4j|Ty inches 
more than the average of the last 19 years. The amount of 
water drawn from the lake to the Chestnut Hill and Brook- 
line reservoir was 5,477,810,000 gallons against 5,503,751,- 
000 gallons in 1869. The amount of water wasted during 
the year was 4,818,971,000 gallons, equal to an average of 
13,202,660 gallons per day, being nearly equal to the amount 
consumed. The average daily waste for the last 11 years 
was 5,000,600 gallons. The amount of rain-fall received into 
the lake available for use if it could have been stored was 
equal to a daily supply of 23,453,900 gallons, while the 
average for 17 years was 21,821,300 gallons. The net 
capacity of the Cochituate basin, deducting the amount 
wasted at the outlet dam, was for the last year only 10,- 



Report of the Water Board. 43 

251,240 gallons per day: that is to say, only 10,251,240 
gallons per day of the actual rain-fall was actually available 
for the use of the city. This unusual fact was owing to a 
very large proportion of the rain collected, falling at a time 
when the lake was full. 

CONSUMPTION OE WATEE. 

On pages 52-53 may be found the statement of the daily 
average amount of water consumed for each month and year 
since 1849. The average for the year was 15,007,700, being 
62,700 gallons per day less than the previous 3'ear. 

EAIN-FALL. 

The usual tables of the rain-fall at Lake Cochituate, Bos- 
ton, Cambridge, Lowell, Waltham and Providence will be 
found on page 56, and I desire to express my thanks to the 
several gentlemen to whose kindness I am indebted for the 
information therein presented. 

An interesting table prepared by Wm. H. Bradley, Esq., 
Superintendent of Sewers, will be found on page 55. This 
table shows the days on which rain or snow fell during the 
year in Boston, and the amount. 

CHESTNUT HILL EESEEVOIE. 

The report under this head, which is contained in my 
annual report to the City Council in January last, ought, I 
think, to have a place in this report, and I therefore take the 
liberty of inserting it here : — 

" This great work, which has so largely exceeded in mag- 
nitude and cost the original designs and estimates, was so 
far completed on the 25th of October last as to be ready for 
the reception of water in the lower, or, as it is now called, 
the ' Bradlee Basin.' The engineering operations connected 
with this work, and extending over a period of seven years, 



44 City Document. — No. 57. 

may, it seems to me, be appropriately recorded and described 
in this report, and be found of sufficient interest to warrant 
the occupation of the required space. 

" Surveys for a suitable site for this reservoir were made 
in 1863, and in November of that year three plans were sub- 
mitted to the Water Board. The first was a plan for a reser- 
voir on the southerly side of the Woousocket division of the 
Boston, Hartford and Erie railroad; the second was a plan 
of the site of the present Lawrence basin, and the third was 
a plan of the present Bradlee basin, but only included the 
portion on the northerly side of Beacon street, which then 
divided what is now the Bradlee basin. To this last plan 
was afterwards added the other portion of this basin, which 
was on the southerly side of Beacon street. 

" By the first plan a water area of but 41 acres could 
be obtained, and that only by building a dam parallel to and 
adjoining the railroad, and this dam would, at the easterly 
end, have been 24 feet above the track, and the founda- 
tion for nearly the entire length of the dam was of the 
worst description, being of quicksand. B}^ the second plan 
the water area was 44 acres, but the depth of water 
would have been but 12 feet, which is not sufiicient to 
prevent the growth of subaqueous vegetation. An excava- 
tion of five feet in depth, over nearly the whole extent of this 
reservoir^ was necessary, and this was considered and after- 
wards proved to be a very expensive work. 

"By the third plan a water area of 52^ acres could be 
obtained on the northerly side of Beacon street, and on the 
southerly side, an area of 41^- acres, the two forming a 
basin 94 acres in extent ; this third plan was the one adopted 
by the Water Board, upon my recommendation. 

"During the following year but little was done by this 
department in connection with the reservoir, with the excep- 
tion of some further rough surveys and approximate esti- 
mates of the cost of doino; the work. 



Eeport of the Water Eoard. 45 

"In 1865, the City Council having made in 1864 an appro- 
priation for the purchase of land for a site for the reservoir, 
and having procured an act of the Legislature authorizing the 
construction of the same, a party was detailed from this 
office, under the charge of Henry M. "Wightman, who had 
made the previous preliminary surveys, to make an accurate 
survey of the whole territory and plans for the building of the 
reservoir. During the progress of these surveys, it was de- 
cided by the Water Board to connect the Lawrence basin with 
the site already adopted. The expense of draining this basin 
in a new direction, as its natural drainage would have been 
prevented by the construction of the reservoir upon the site 
selected ; the difficulty of making the dam between the two 
perfectly tight so that no claim should arise for damages from 
its owner ; the question of damages which would probably 
arise for diverting the natural drainage, and beyond all these 
considerations, the desire of the Board and myself to con- 
struct a reservoir which should be ample to meet the future 
wants of the city, were the reasons for the addition of this 
basin to the original plan. 

"The area surveyed was about 300 acres in extent. 
The property lines were carefully determined, and a 
complete topographical survey made of the whole territory. 
The plans were made with great accuracy, and contour lines 
for every two feet in height were traced upon them. These 
plans w^ere the basis for all the subsequent work upon the res- 
ervoir. The location of the banks was determined by means 
of profiles made at right angles to its proposed direction, 
upon which the most favorable position for the banks was 
fixed ; these points were then transferred to the plans, and 
connected by straight lines and curves which formed the lines 
for the reservoir banks. These lines were of course subject 
to alterations should the material in cutting or the foundation 
in filling prove them to be not the most economical. All the 



46 City Document. — No. 57. 

curves of this reservoir are regular, beiug either simple, com- 
pound or reversed, connected by straight lines. 

"The accuracy of these surveys and plans may be judged 
by the fact that the lines of the banks, driveway, etc., as laid 
out from the base lines of the survey and by scale measure- 
ments from the plans, rarely varied a foot. 

"These plans were not fully elaborated upon the com- 
mencement of the work upon the reservoir in the spring of 
1866, as the party employed upon the work Avas small, and 
they were interrupted by the bad weather and the necessity of 
making plans and descriptions of the land bought, and by the 
sickness of the superintendent of the work, Mr. Knowlton, 
which rendered the presence of the Resident Engineer neces- 
sary at the site of the reservoir where arrangements were 
being made for constructing the necessary buildings, such as 
grading for the stables, and boarding-house for the men, 
draining, and clearing the land of trees. 

" By working night and day upon the plans, they were 
completed so that no delay was occasioned in prosecuting 
the work on the reservoir. The plans for the location of the 
banks having been completed, the question of disposing of 
the surface-water drainage remained to be settled, there being 
considerable diversity of opinion upon the subject. Two 
plans were finally submitted, embodying the different views. 
By one of these plans it was proposed to divide the drainage 
at the Lawrence brook, and to convey one portion in a north- 
erly direction in an open catch-water drain a distance of 
2,100 feet, from which point a brick drain was to conduct it 
under the conduit a distance of 200 feet, and then an 
open catch- water drain a further distance of 1,235 feet to 
Chandler's ice pond. 

" The other portion of the drainage was to be conveyed in 
an easterly direction and on the same route occupied by the 
present drain, but was to have been an open catch- water 
drain for a distance of 2,200 feet, and a brick drain for the 



Kepoet or THE Water Board. 47 

balance of the distance (about 3,800 feet) to the brook near 
the intersection of Beacon and Rockland streets. 

" By the other plan submitted, the drain was to con- 
mence at the influent gate-house and continue entirely 
around the reservoir on the westerly, southerly and easterly 
sides, to the brook near the intersection of Beacon and Rock- 
land streets, a distance of 7^754 feet. It was to be built of 
brick, underground the entire distance, and varying in size from 
two feet six inches in diameter to six feet four inches diam- 
eter, with suitable catch basins and inlets for the water. 
This latter plan, although much the more expensive, was 
after careful consideration of the subject adopted, and the 
work commenced on the 10th of May, and the entire drain 
was completed on the 27th of November, 1867. 

" The building of a driveway around the reservoir having 
been agitated during the summer of 1866, and proving to be 
very popular with the citizens, several plans and estimates 
were submitted to the Water Board by the engineer. There 
was great diversity of opinion upon the subject in the Board, 
some of the members being opposed to the project, and 
others differing in their views as to the proper width to con- 
struct it. The engineer was finally directed to prepare a 
plan and estimate upon the best location that could be se- 
lected, and of a width not less than 80 feet. In preparing 
this plan the engineer ascertained that in some places the 
width of 80 feet would greatly add to the expense of the 
driveway, and having represented to the Board that a width 
of 60 feet in some places would greatly lessen the ex- 
pense, a committee of the Board, consisting of Messrs. Nor- 
cross and Bradlee, were appointed to go over the proposed 
location, which had been staked out, and decide upon the 
width at these places. 

"This committee having attended to their duty, a plan 
and estimate was made, and submitted to the Board, and by 
them recommended to the City Council, who, on the 9th of 



48 City Document. — No. 57. 

October, 1866, passed the necessary orders for its construc- 
tion. 

" Tliis driveway is constructed upon the plan of the Cen- 
tral Park roads, but differs from them in having a greater 
thickness of rough stone for the lower stratum, and a less 
thickness of crushed stone and gravel for a top dressing. 

" Plans showing all the details of the gate-houses were 
made in this office, and the specifications for the cut granite 
and for building the gate-houses were made in 1867, and the 
intermediate gate-house was commenced. Before the work 
upon this gate-house began, it was necessary to remove 400 
feet of the conduit, and convey the water around the gap 
thus formed, that there should be no interruption of the 
supply to the city. 

"This object was accomplished by the construction of a 
wooden flume, the plans for which were made by the engi- 
neer, and so built as to be readily taken apart and put 
together again in any place where needed. Some difficulty 
was experienced in making its connection with the conduit 
perfectly tight, but by a liberal usie of puddling clay, this 
object was accomplished, and the flume was in constant use 
for about two years, and was then taken apart and is now 
stored at the reservoir. 

" Surveys and plans for the main pipes from this reservoir 
were made during the fall and winter of 1867 and spring of 
1868. In order to select the most favorable route, and to 
show the various routes proposed, a tract of country was 
surveyed from Kockland street in Brighton, to Cypress street 
in Brookline, and between Boylston street, and Tappan 
street, and the Woonsocket Division of the' Boston, Hartford 
& Erie E. R., and Beacon street, an area about one and one- 
half miles long by one-quarter of a mile wide, all of which 
was levelled over, and a topographical plan made, upon 
which Avas laid out no less than five distinct routes. Profiles 
and cross-sections of these were made and submitted to the 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 49 

Water Board, and the route No. 5, on the general plan, 
showiug the routes, was finally decided upon. Some addi- 
tional surveys were made to show the feasibility of con- 
structiug a road over this route, and several propositions 
were made by the Water Board to the town authorities of 
Brooldine ; but the project was finally abandoned, and the 
land necessary for the pipe route was taken, under the act 
of the Legislature, giving the city authority to lay the pipe. 

"In addition to these special surveys, the current work at 
the reservoir was continued without intermission. Lines 
and grades were given for every piece of embankment, for 
the drain, the main pipe, the gate-houses, driveway, etc., 
and a constant supervision exercised by the engineer over 
the work, that no unsuitable material should be used in the 
embankments or gate-houses, and that the construction 
should in all cases conform to the plans. Monthly estimates 
were made of the amount of slope wall built, the amount of 
clay delivered for puddling, and of coping stone for the 
slope wall. Estimates, involving a great amount of labor, 
Avere made at three difierent times, of the cost of completing 
the reservoir. Levels were taken over the bottom of both 
basins, and their capacity calculated for each inch in depth, 
and tables made containing the length of water line, area 
and capacity for each inch in depth, and the total capacity 
for each inch in depth. 

"Li addition to the work done at the reservoir, plans, 
specifications, and contracts were drawn in this office for 
building the gate-houses, for the main pipe and its connec- 
tions, for the stables and other temporary buildings at the 
reservoir. 

" The engineering force at this reservoir consisted for the 
larger portion of the time of the resident engineer, one 
assistant engineer, two rodmen, and one axeman, which 
was, I think, smaller than any force ever emploj^ed on a 
work of its size and importance. 



50 City Document. — No. 57. 

"The resident eno-iueer was twice oblisfed to chans^e his 
assistant, once by the ilhiess and subsequent death of his 
assistant, Samuel C. Horn, and the second time by a severe 
accident to his assistant, Wilbur F. Learned, who, while 
giviui,^ a line for the building of the effluent gate-house, fell 
from the wall, a distance of about twenty feet, causing such 
injuries that he was disabled for a period of six or seven 
months. 

" The lower or Bradlee basin of this reservoir was com- 
pleted and the water let into it on the 25th of October, 1870, 
and the branch office of this department at the reservoir, 
for five years under the charge of Henry M. Wightman, 
the resident engineer, was discontinued on the 10th of 
November." 

As before stated the water was let into the "Bradlee 
basin" on the 25th of October, and on November 26th 
there was a depth of 1 foot 9^ inches of water above the 
lower floor of the effluent gate-house. Owing to the low 
stage of the water at the lake the quantity admitted from the 
conduit was very small until after the danger of a scarcity at 
the lake was over. The depth, however, gradually increased 
from springs and rain-fall, and no signs of leakage have even 
yet appeared. On the 1st of January, the depth of water 
was 2 feet 8 inches ; on the 1st of February, 3 feet 4^ inches : 
on the 1st of March, 4 feet 5^ inches ; on the 1st of April, 9 
feet 10 inches, and on the 1st of May, 14 feet 2 inches. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



51 



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c*^ 


5 1 






o 


o 


lo" 


^ § ^ 


t-T of 




00 00 I7; 
CO 00 rH 


of t-^ 




00' 




S'd 


CD 




=3 


C3 


IM 


t- CO 


CD 


00 


00 






o!.<i 
^0 


5 a 






iH 






CD 


05 ^o 


CO 


rH_ 


00^ CO_^ 


-* lO^ 


CD 


CO^ 








^" 


C-f 


^ 


^ 


O 


0" 


r-T t-^ 


co" 


of 


r-T rn" 


of of 


rH 


^ 




>s ^ 
































S| 


u 


o 


o 


o 


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o 





000 








000 








^ 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 





000 








000 










CD cS*- 


^i 






o 




o 





o_ 0^ 0^ 


°i, '-L 




1>;^ 0^ 0^ 


° '-i. 










































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o" 






0^ 


irf icT oo" 


•a 0" 


01 








o" 


o s 


CO 


00 


Gl 




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lO t- 










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rH 


ts o^ 


ai_ 


=1 


co^ 




°i. 


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o_ 







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r-^i ?^ 


p s 




-^ 


cd" 






oT 0(f dT 


csT cjf 


t— 


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CO 




^StS^ 


r-^ K 






tH 






-* 




CO 


01 


Ol CD 


lO 





t— 




o S 


cs 


T-i 


o 




•^ 


CO 




co^ 0. 


°i. 


rH^ CO^ ^ 


03^ -cf^ 


its^ 


^r 
































s 


of 


CO 


co" 


CO 


-^ 


■*" 


'a' ■* CO 


CO~ CO 


>a 


to Tt< -* 


•*■ lo" 





lO" 




SI 


-^tt-i . 




























■S °S 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





000 








000 











>a 




g-a c3 


o 


o 




o 


o 





000 








000 













!s^-2 


. o_ 


o^ 


o_ 


o^ 


o^ 


o_ 


000 


0^ o_ 





0^ 0^ 0^ 








o_ 


'ci' ^ 


^■"3 




r-T 


c-f 


oT 






of of rH 


co^ o' 


td^ 




urT rjT 


Olf 


-^^ 




o S o 


o O 


CO 


CD 




Oi 




CO t- 


Ol 


00 


0<1 CO 10 


OS ^ 





Ci 




PS c^^ 










0^ 


cq_ CO^ ^__ 


CO^ 00^ 


10^ 


t-^ 0<1^ T|H^ 


^ l!0 


CO 


CO 


V 


=i § 




























^ ^ 


IS 




t- 


-^' 


Tjl 




of b^ co" 


C^ tr^ 




cd" of cT 


rjT c^ 


(35 


ocT 




CO 


o 




-* 


C35 rH Oq 


CO CO 


QO 


CD C3i 


05 




05 


O hSi 


t-;. 


CO^ 




-* 


-* 


t- 


Oi rH oq 


0^_ CO_^ 




0^ 01^ -# 


^ Tjl 


0^ 


C0_, 


3 ' '' 


§ 5S 








-* 


r-T' 


co" 


0" 


lo' cd" oo" 


>o" CO 


of 


^ co' 0" 


Off co" 






> 


i^ 


^s^ 


I-l 


r-i 


1-1 


rH 


r-^ 








01 


rH rH Ol 


rH rH 


oq 


r-l 


^ 


S^-S 






























g 


§ g 


a 

a 


(O CO 


CD 


in 


CD 


1^ 





CO 01 Tt< 


-* ro 





CD 01 


CD 




cn 




^^ 


« ® 




CO 


^ 


O 


CO 


CD C3 ^ 
GO oi >-0 


CD d 


05 


CO ■=!; 0: 
01' OJ cf 


oq 

CD d 


CO 


g 


o'^ 


S 


1 ^ 




^ 


CO 


^ 


CD 


T)< Ttl 


•* ^ 




•sf ^ CO 




CD 







21 


rt 
























































of 
































W) 


g 


(H 


* 


CT 


-# 


ift 


cc 




00 oT 


r-l 01 


CO 


•« 10 CD 


I- 00 


cn 





S 




u- 




o 


O 


ir 






CD CD 




CO CO CO 


CO CC 


CC 








cc 




00 


CO 




en 


00 c» 00 


CO CO 






00 CO 


» 


00 




3§ 






rH 


rH 


" 


ri 


rH rH rH 


r-i T-< 


T-i 


rH rH I- 


rH r-l 


rH 


rH 


-H 





52 



City Document. — No. 57. 



ft^ 



pq 



^ 
g 






g 

^ 



^ 






?> 
^ 



53 



I 

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o 






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o 


o 


o 


o 




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o^ 


o^ 




o_ 


o^ 


o^ 


o^ 


o^ 


o^ 


in 




























o" 




■* 




co" 






r^ 




oT 


co" 


uo" 




o 






o 


<M 


CD 


<M 


^ 


'^ 


CO 


-* 




^ 


00 


T-H^ 


05^ 


rH 


^„ 


^ 




CD_^ 






CT 


^^ 


o^ 




iH 




























of 


^■^ 


^ 


co" 




o 


co" 




c-f 


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^^ 




'~' 


tH 




rH 




r^ 


Ti 


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o 


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o^ 


o^ 


o 




o 


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lO 




























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^ 


^ 


Tlj 


r-f 




o 


^ 


CJ 








t- 


^ 


lO 




o 


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CO 


CO 




^ 




oo 


o 


r-t 


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^ 


^ 


lO 


>o 


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o^ 


oo 


CO 


0^^ 




T-{ 






























-hT 


m 


(m" 


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cf 


00 


co" 


c-f 


o 


rH 


T-^ 


(M 




rH 


tH 




T-t 




rH 


rH 




r-t 






rH 


r-t 




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o 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 




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o 


o 




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o 


o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 




o 


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CO 


o^ 


o^ 




CO 




























in 


c^ 




^"^ 




cc 


CO" 




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(m" 


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T^' 


^" 




o 


c: 


o 


o 




<M 


CD 


CD 




Ci 


a 


oo 


-* 


oo 








00 


CO 


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CD__ 




CO_^ 


CD^ 


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o^ 


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IM 


cq 


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o'' 


rT 


CO 


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rH' 




co" 


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r^ 


rH 




rH 


rH 


tH 


rH 


tH 


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rH 


rH 




o 


^ 


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^ 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


^ 


J-, 


o 


o 








o 




o 


O 


O 




o 




o 




o 








CD 


o 


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^ 


CO 








(N 




00 


m 




























in 




CI 




o" 




TtT 


co" 


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o 


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co" 




co" 


o 


^ 


(M 


^ 


o 




ira 


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t~ 




o 


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r-f 




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co^ 


CO 


CO 


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r-i 








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in 






























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t-^ 




o 






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^ 




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CO 






00 


o^ 


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CO 


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o^ 




o 


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a. 


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05 


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rH 


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r-f 








rH 






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o 


o 


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o 


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o 


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o 


o 


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^ 


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^ 


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in 




























o 


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^ 


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cf 


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^ 


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di' 


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o 




o 


o 


o 


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o 






o 




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in 




























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co" 






o 


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^ 


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c^^ 


t-; 




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co_ 


t- 


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iH 




























cc 


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cT 


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co" 


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c» 




^ 


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o 


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^„ 


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o 


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^ 


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^ 


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t-^ 


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cq^ 


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in 






























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-* 


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7~i 






o 






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oo 


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o^ 


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rH 


o' 


la' 


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53 






a 


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3 


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a 


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p 




<1 



Repoet of the Water Board. 



53 






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1-1 


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rH 


rH 


i-H 


r-t 


tH 


rH 


1-i 






r-i 


r^ 


rH 








o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 





J5 






o 




o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


O 














o 




o 


O 




o 


o__ 


o^ 


O^ 


O^ 


O^ 


0^ 






CO 






























ci^ 




T-T 




t- 


oo" 


-*" 


o" 




co" 






^ 




CO 




CI 




CN 


o 








CO 








CiO 




oo 




co^ 


co^ 




"*„ 


r-< 


°i 


02 


o 




O^ 


(M 


(M 




rH 






























to 




co" 






to 


lO' 


CD 




lO 


co" 


to 


to 






tH 


y^ 




r-* 


rt 


rH 


rH 




'"' 














o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


j3 









o 


O 




O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 













o 


o 




o 


o 


O 




o 


o 


o 






0^ 




C<] 






























CD 


o 


cT 


o 




cT 




O 


o" 


cT 


co" 


o 





0" 




o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 









OO 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


co_ 




^ 


o. 


CO_ 


"„ 


rH_^ 


0^ 






r-i 






























t- 






lO" 


-*" 


to" 


co" 


t^ 


t^ 














iH 


tH 


'"' 










1~i 


T-i 


r-i 


'"' 


"^ 


'"' 






C5 


iH 


3 


CO 


cq 


^ 


Oi 


o 


a 


<X> 


CD 


(M 


^ 






CO 


CO 


05 


CO 




o 






IM 




CD 















io^ 


00^ 


°i. 




co^ 




rH 


O 


CO 


CO 


































CO 
C30 


CO 


-* 


CO 






r-T 




of 






^ 


to 


■5 




o 


o 


>o 




00 


CO 


en 




en 




O 




00 






00^ 


^ 


rH 


CO 


C^ 


oo^ 


^ 


CO 


CO^ 


CO_^ 


°i. 






rH 
































cT 


cT 




CD~ 




oiT 








co" 










<M 


c^ 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r-{ 


rH 


■"* 


'"' 


'"' 




rH 


rH 






o 


o 


o 


^ 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


Q 












o 


o 


o 


O 




O 


o 


o 


o 
















o 


o 


o^ 


O^ 


o_ 


O^ 


o^ 


o^ 


o^ 


o_ 







o_ 


































CO 


c^ 




oT 




cT 












C-l 














<>» 


03 


CO 








CO 










CO 


Oi 


-^ 




t-;^ 






<M^ 


OJ^ 


°i. 






0|^ 




iH 




































-* 


-*" 


t- 




cT 




to" 




Oi 








H 


■^ 


r-l 


r-i 






rH 


rH 


r-i 


r^ 


'"' 




'"' 






o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


^ 


O 


O 


O 


o 


Q 


J-, 






o 






o 


o 


o 




O 




O 


o 










o^ 






o^ 


o^ 


o^ 


o_ 


O^ 


O^ 


O^ 


o 








































CO 


c-f 


C5 


o 


c^ 


<>r 




oT 


-Hh" 




to" 


irT 


CO 


10" 






CO 


oo 


CO 


o 






O 


















'^^ 




co^ 




c^L 




CO 


o 






rH 




pH 






























-Til 


-* 


"^ 


CO 




rH 


co" 




(m" 


cq" 


IM 


'^ 


CO 








iH 






T-i 






rH 


r-i 


r-< 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 






























>> 




s 




>s 


















3 










s 




9 

3 


ft 


^ 


s 


>. 


60 


1 


CD 
1 


1 
> 
O 


,0 

3 


=2 

§3 






a 


<1 


^ 


1^ 


>^ 


^ 


tc 


o 


|2i 


ft 


■^ 



54 



City Document. — No. 57. 









^ 
s 



^ 






B 



^ 



^ 



o 


« 


O: 


^ 


00 


C-1 


cq 


cq 


^ 


j_ 


o 








CO 


cq 




c» 


CO 


r-l 


o 


tH 


00 


CO 


rH 




"* 


p 


00 


CO 


CO 


ci 


00 


CO 


oo' 


cq' 


d 


CO 


00 


t-^ 


d 


d 


i-H 


'"' 


1-1 




"^ 


rH 




rH 


rH 












CD 


^ 


CO 


r^ 


o 


lO 


CO 


cq 


^ 


CO 


OD 


^ 


Ir- 


■0 


■^^ 


<n 


IM 


'^ 


CO 


cq 




O 




lO 


cq 






00 


<>i 


ci 


CO 


CO 


OO 


CO 


cq 


^ 


d 


,3' 


rH 


r-H 


cq' 


i-I 


r-i 




rH 




r-l 


r-l 




rH 




'"' 


rH 


'"' 


rH 


oo 

CO 


O 


lO 


CO 


a, 


^ 


j^ 


CD 


O 


rH 


CO 


la 


03 


cq 


C<I 




Ol 


"^ 


CO 


CO 


"* 


t-; 


CO 




t-^ 


CO 


p 


oo 


o 


d 


d 


00 


CO 


oo 


cq' 


^ 


f_i 


T-H 


th 


cq 


rH 


r-l 








r^ 




r-i 


rH 


■^ 


rH 


tH 


rH 


r-l 


rH 


[>. 


•* 


^ 


!f- 


O 


^ 


O 


cq 


^ 


O 





00 


^ 


CO 


CO 




i-i 






cq 


r-l 


r-i 


CD 


rH 


p 


iCO 


00 


00 


oi 


co' 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


cq' 


cq' 


cq 


rH 


rH 


d 


cq' 


I-H 


'"' 


rH 


'"' 


rH 


'"' 


r-l 






rH 


^ 


'"' 


rH 


r^ 


CD 
CO 


t- 


CO 


00 


CD 


^ 


cq 


^ 


Cl 


Ol 


cq 


^ 


CO 





co 






ca 


o 


t-; 








^ 


CD 


cq 


00 


CO 


00 


d 


T-H 


cq 


cq 


rH 


^ 


^ 


rH 


j-^ 


rH 


rH 


r— 1 






rH 


'"' 


r-l 




r-l 


""* 


'"' 


r-l 


r-l 


rH 


'"' 


lO 


^ 


-Tt( 


CO 


^ 


O 


ri 


c» 


CO 


C5 


cq 


r>l 


<K 


CO 


CO 


"* 


05 


<M_ 


o 


O 


'^ 


cq 


7— ( 


O 


p 




-* 




00 


1:^ 


CO 


oi 


^ 


•* 


CO 


cq 


r-H 


d 


d 


00 


00 


d 


l-t 








rH 




rH 




rH 












CO 


CO 


rH 


00 


cq 


CO 


r-l 


CO 


lO 


^ 


CD 


00 


^ 


•* 


<» 




CO 


oo 


C-1 




CO 


CO 


°5 


^ 




^ 




00 


CO 


CO 


^ 


-:)H 


-* 


03 


Y-i 


d 


t^ 


d 


d 


d 


d 


I-( 


T-i 


rH 


^ 


"^ 




rH 


'"' 














CO 
CD 


CO 


ira 


lO 


05 


^ 


Ol 


cq 


CO 


oo 


-* 


CD 


CD 


cq 


CO 


CO 


Oi 


o 


o 


cq 






'*. 


p 


cq 


p 




oo 


rH 


c4 


oo 


'^ 


•* 


oo 


cq' 


CO 


co' 


cq 


05 


Tf 


co' 


I-H 


rH 


""^ 


rH 


"^ 


'"' 




'"' 


rH 




r-i 




rH 




c5 
CO 


OJ 


^ 


lO 


o 


>o 


oo 


o 


^ 


00 





-* 








O 


"^ 


CO 


^ 


^ 


-* 


o 


o> 


CO 


00 


cq 






00 


o 


d 


a5 


ci 


•* 


-* 


-* 


cq 


jj^ 


d 


d 


,-^ 


rH 


r-< 












r-l 




rH 


'"' 


rH 




'"' 


r-l 


I-H 
CO 
00 


CO 


j^ 


iH 


-!ll 


CO 


a 


o 


^ 


^ 


Ol 


cq 


CO 


■* 


o 


Jt-; 


(M 


r-l 


CO 


a> 


la 


cq 


t^ 




cq 


00 


p 


r-i 


c<i 


CO 


■* 


CO 


si 


rH 


d 


CO 


t-I 


^ 


d 


d 


i-I 


r~f 




r-l 








rH 












rH 


o 

CO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


cq 


cq 


CO 


cq 


cq 


cq 


.0 


-* 


^ 


CO 


00 


CO 


to 






CO 


-* 


^ 


^ 


oo_ 


Tj; 


r-l 


p 


0^ 


<2 


^ 


ci 


ci 


rH 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


rH 


d 


I-) 


r-l 


'"' 


T-t 


rH 


r-l 




rH 








rH 


rH 




*. 


O 


J_ 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


C-1 


•* 


tK 


i-O 


CO 


•* 


^ 


Oi 




r-i 


'^ 


O 


O 


0-- 


cq 


cq 






p 





p 


lO 


O 


c-i 


ci 


ci 


ci 


rH 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


rA 


CO 




rH 


T~< 


rH 


rH 


rH 




rH 








rH 




r-i 




























GO 
CO 


■O 


«0 


^ 


CD 


^ 


cq 


^ 


O 


o 


cq 


^ 


uo 


•* 


t-^ 


o 


00_ 


CO 


CO 


t-^ 


t- 


CO 


'^ 







00 


cq 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


T-H 


rA 


ri 


d 


c» 


d 


d 


d 


r^ 










rH 


'"' 


r-i 


''* 












lO 
00 

1-H 


CO 


00 


^ 


O 


O 


■* 


^ 


O 


cq 





CO 


cq 


CO 




<M 


CO 


00 


O 




-* 


t-; 


t-; 


rH 




p 


cq 


oi 


d 


d 


cq 


oi 


cq 


T-A 


rA 


rH 


rH 


^ 


r-i 


^ 




r-i 






r-l 




r-l 


^ 


''' 


rH 


tH 




'"' 


CO 
00 


o 


a 


CO 


-* 


O 


~<x~ 


^ 


03 


cq 








,^ 


^ 


o 




Ci 


Cl 


O 


Ir- 


CD 




00 




00 


Ci 




co' 


^ 


d 


d 


c-i 


rH 


d 


r-i 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 








rH 




'"' 


r-l 




rH 






rH 


rH 


in 

to 
00 


CO 


o 


00 


^ 


lO 


CI 


CD 


^ 


cq 


cq 


OS 


Ci 





rM 


CD 


CD 


HO 


CO 


CD 




O 




^ 


cq 


cq 


cq 


d 


d 


d 


I-i 


T-H 


d 


d 


d 


^ 


d 


d 


j^ 


d 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r-l 


"^ 


rH 
















lO 
OO 


^ 


O 


CO 


CD 


^ 


CO 


j_, 


1^ 


'^ 





cr> 


00 


^ 




C5 


Ol 


CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


CD 


CD 


Ol 


p 


CO 





d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


OD 


d 


1-H 


rH 




rH 






















CO 

in 
oo 
1-1 


^ 


oo 


^ 


CO 


CO 


cq 


urs 


-* 


00 


■* 


00 


It- 





O 


ir- 


^ 


cq 


en 




T|H 




t- 


CO 






t~; 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


00 


t^ 


t-^ 


d 


^ 


d 




rH 


T-i 


rH 


rH 














■^ 




o5 

lO 

00 


oo 


O 


C5 


CO 


-* 


CO 


•* 


o 


oo 





-* 


Oi 


^ 


CO 


« 


^ 


N 


CK 


cq 


-^ 


^ 


CD 


ICO 




-* 


r-l 


d 


d 


d 


iH 


d 


d 


d 


00 


d 


d 


j>l 


06 


d 


r-l 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


r-l 


















in 

CO 
r-l 


O 


^ 


OO 


t^ 


cq 


o 


CO 


^ 


o 


10 


^ 


^ ' 


^ 




C-1 


■* 




CO 


•* 




o 


p 







p 


>iO 


d 


d 


d 


^ 


,-^ 


o 


d 


d 


c» 


t-I 


oo' 


d 


d 




rH 




^ 


■"* 


'^ 
















S 




t>i 














^ 




tn' 


t^ 


> 


^ 


>i 














Si 


CI* 


^ 


^ 


^ 


oi 


2; 
o 


3 

S 
1-2 


s 




ft 




1-3 


>. 





s 

(* 



i 

CJ 


3 

0) 




S 


<1 


S 


1^ 


<1 





'^ 


« 


t« 



Report of the Water Board. 



55 



Table shoiving the Rainfall in Boston for the year 1870, and the 
days on ivhich it occurred, from observations by Wm. H. Bradley, 
Esq., /Superintendent of Sewers. 





MONTHS. 


Day of 
Month. 


Jan. 


Feb. 1 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 1 


June. July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




INCHES. 


1. . . 

2 . , . 


3 05 


.84 










1.44 






1.36 






3 . 




07 
















.73 


' .40 




4 






.04 


2.36 














5 


















.08 




6. . . 

7 . . . 


.16 
.32 

.08 


1.68 


.24 


.95 
1.42 




.79 
.30 








.12 




.04 


8. . . 

9. . . 
10. . . 
11 . . . 


.32 
.11 

.64 
.46 


.08 
.24 

.44 
.08 


1.61 

.08 
.40 
.11 


.04 
.53 


.08 


1.28 
.40 


.35 
.08 


.76 

.08 


12. . . 
13 


.10 
.16 

.64 

.20 


.88 

.72 

1.44 


1.54 


1.37 


14 . 












15 


.20 










16. . . 

17. . . 
18 . 


.88 
.28 








.16 


. 


.17 




.35 




19 . 




2 50 


















20. . . 
21 




.60 


.16 


.32 
.31 


16 


3.84 


.04 


.14 




1.84 




.48 


22 












23 . . . 


08 




















2.41 


.15 


24 . . . 










.18 














25 . . .■ 

26 . . . 


1.53 






.20 




.24 




.35 


.42 








.19 


.73 




27 












36 










28 




.80 


1.64 
.10 


.36 


.71 
















29. . . 
30 


1.68 


.50 


.17 


.31 




.08 




.59 


31 . . . 


.16 
8.16 


















.80 
6.80 




.15 






4.88 




2.58 












Totals, 


7.03 


8.42 


7.59 


4.01 


1.57 


0.67 


4.40 


3.62 



Total Rainfall, 59.73 inclies. 



56 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at LaTce Oochituate, Boston 
and vicinity, 1849 to 1870, inclusive. 









PLACES 


AND OBSERVERS. 








Yeae. 


A a 

|S 


•S >, 
.eg 


k 


¥■ 


i 

li 


6.2 

o p 


1 

.'Sd 
S ^ 


1849 




40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


51.09 






34.69 


1850 




53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


45.68 






51.48 


1851 




44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


41.00 






43.30 


1852 


*45.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 






38.58 


1853 


*55.86 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 


• 




53.27 


1854 


43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 






46.25 


1855 


34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 


1856 


40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 


1857 


63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 


1858 


48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 


1859 


49.02 


56.70 




48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 


1860 


55.44 


51.46 


46.95 




46.91 


46.67 


38.24 


1861. .... 


46.44 


50.07 


50.14 




43.32 


42.95 


44.25 


1862 


49.69 


61.06 


57.21 




44.26 


44.61 


50.09 


1863 


69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


54.17 


1864 


42.60 


49.30 




36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 


1865 


49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38.82 


44.69 


1866 


62.32 


50.70 




43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.04 


1867 


56.25 


55.64 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 


1868 


50.06 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


49.58 


53.52 


1869 


64.34 


66.28 


47.98 


47.30 


47.30 


48.96 


47.70 


1870 


55.89 


59.73 


41.53 


39.40 


46.30 


48.71 


49.02 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



57 



CONDUIT AT THE LAKE. 

The following table shows the varyhig depths of the water 
in the conduit at the gate-house, the number of days in each 
month that the water was running at those depths, and the 
average depth for each month. 



Depths 
Ft. lu. 



0-11 

i^h 

1-1 

2-8 

3-3^ 

4-9S 

5-0 

5-1 

5-1^ 

5-3 

5^ 

5-4J 

5-5^ 

5-6 

5-6| 

5-7 

5-8 

5-9^ 

5-10 

6-0 

6-U 

6-23 

6-3J 

6-4 

6-6 



Jan. 
Days. 



Feb. 
Days. 



Mar. 
Days. 



April. 
Days 



May. 
Days. 



June. 
Days. 



July- 
Days. 



Aug. 
Days. 



24 



Sept. 
Days. 



Oct. 
Days. 



Nov. 
Davs. 



Dec. 

Days. 



Ton 
Dys. 



Average Monthly Depths. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Average 
for the year. 


5-0 


5-4| 


5-83 


5-4i 


5-41 


5-8| 


6-l| 


6-2^ 


6-3^ 


6-21 


5-6| 


5-5 


5-81 



58 



City Document. — No. 57. 






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CO 


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00 


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00 


cq 


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tH 


t» 


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^ 


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to 


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CD 


CO 


t- 




t— 


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o 








cq 


cq 


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^ 


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oi 


CO 


co' 


CO 


CO 


-rtl 


CO 






IM 


oq 


cq 


cq 


cq 


cq 


c> 


cq 


cq 


cq 


c-1 


cq 


(M 






pH 




rH 




rH 




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r-t 




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1 



































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S 


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tu 


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O 


> 

o 




c3 





Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 



59 



\ 




iri 


o 


Oi 


« 


^ 


o 


t- 


in 


t- 


CO 


J^ 






o 


■*. 


IN 


oo 


CB 


Oi 


o 


00 


IN_ 




rH 


CO 






c^ 


-^ 


-* 


O 


'^ 


lO 


CO 


ci 


■^ 


ci iti ■* 


in 


-* 






00 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


000 


c^ 









rH 


I-I 












rH 


rH T-l rH 


^ 


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oi 

CD 
00 

i-i 


<n 


CD 


o 

CO 


■s 


.irecla.1 


o 

CD 


00 
CO 


J- ^^- CI 





° 






O 


O 

s 


o 

o 


.TOj 50 ;nqg 


O 

3 


Ci 


-Tj4 ' CO rH 
Oi Oi 




rH 


ci 
Oi 




00 

CO 

00 
i-H 


1-4 


O 


~* 
















CI 






00 


r~\ 


y-^ 





















o 




IN 

03 


s 






•s.iredaj 


joj 50 :^Tlqg 




ci 

Oi 




CO 


CB 


CD 


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CO 


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CD 


in 1— 


^ 


in 




fe 


00 


O 
IN 


CO 
r-i 


O 


CD 


rH 


■* 


rH 


^ 00 Ti; 

ci CD CO 


in 


cq 




^ 1 
of 


1-H 


05 


cn 


Oi 


Oi 


CO 


CJi 




Oi 


Ci C3i Ci 


Oi 


Oi 




CO 

CD 
CO 


CO 


CD 


C<1 


^ 


« 


Ji 


CO 


s 


•s.ireda.i 


cq 


§ 




CO 


Ol 


Oi 


§ 


Oi 


co" 

Oi 


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co" 

Ci 


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ci 


3; 

Ci 




PI 1^ 






















































05 .^ 

.3 


CO 

00 


<M 


o 


CO 


IN 


•* 


^ 


IN 


00 


d 00 CO 


•^ 


cq 




CD 


o 


CO 


co' 


o 

CO 


Oi 
CO 


OO 
CO 


in 


in CO cq 
-* CO ci 


CO 


rH 

in 




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O) 


Ol 


Oi 


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Oi 


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Ci 


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Oi 


Ci 




CD 


IN 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


IN 


^ 


^ 


in -* 


^ 


CO 




1 


IN 


Oi 






CD 


C<1 


CO 


t» 


in rH 


CI 


0(3 




oo 


O* 


IN 


oo' 


CD 


W 


Tli 


ci 


oi 


t- CO 


t^ 


rti 




(^ 


iH 


Ol 


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Oi 


Ci 


C5i 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


CJi Oi Oi 


Oi 


Oi 




CO 
CO 


^ 


CD 


Oi 


lO 


^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO CI CD 


Oi 


in 






CO 


CO 


(N 


CD 


CD 




^ 


IN 


Oi CO 




Ci 






00 


lO 


CO 


Tli 


UO 


CO 


rH 


o 


jJi 


rH 16 Q<i 


oi 


ci 






1-1 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 




Oi 


Oi a> ai 


00 






c5 

CD 
CO 


CD 


^ 


lO 


rH 


C3i 


Oi 


CO 


CO 


I- t- 


^ 


Oi 






IN 


en 






Oi 


Oi 






in oti in 


!>; 


cq 






CD 


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1^ 


CD 


CD 


in 


CO 


CO 


r-i CO 





IC^ 






03 


Oi 


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Oi 


cn 


Oi 


Oi 


Oi 


Ci Oi Oi 


Oi 


Oi 




r-H 
CO 


^ 


VO 


o 


^ 


in 


IN 


o 


•cX 


CO CD 


J_ 


in 






CO 


a 


CO 


O 




IN 


o 


CO 




CO 









id 


CO 


^ 


00 


1-^ 


CD 


in 


]^ 


10 in CD 


t^ 


CO 






an 


Oi 


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Oi 


Oi 


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WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Water Registrar's Office, 
Boston, May 1, 1871. 

Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

Pi^esident of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir : The undersigned Water Registrar, in conformity to 
the ordinance providing for the care and management of the 
Boston Water Works, has the honor of presenting to the 
Cochituate Water Board his annual report. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1871 is 36,132, being an increase since January 1, 1870, of 
4,632. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates during the year is 740. Of this 
number 602 have been turned on, leaving a balance of 138 
still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates received from April 30, 
1870, to May 1, 1871, is ... . $773,722 92 
Less amount paid to the City 

of Charlestown for Mystic 

water as per contract .... 38,932 18 



$734,790 74 



Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used in pre- 
vious years the sum of . 150,876 64 



Amount carried forward, $734,790 74 



Eepoet or THE Watee Board. 



61 



Amount brought forivard, . 

Leaving the receipts for water 
furnished during the financial 
year 1870 and 1871, the sum 
of . . 

In addition to the above there 
has been received for turning 
on water in cases where it 
had been turned off for non- 
payment of rates, the sum of 



$734,790 74 



,914 10 



1,340 00 
$736,130 74 



The increased amount of income for the finan- 
cial year ending April 30, 1871, over the 
previous year, is .... o $118,505 63 

The total amount of assessments now made 

for the present year, is ... . 543,454 49 

The estimated amount of income from the sales 

of water during the year 1871, is . . 750,000 00 

The expenditures of my office during the year 

1870, have been . . . . . 17,543 78 



The items of this expenditure are as follows, viz. : — 

Paid William F. Davis, registrar . . . $2,500 00 

Charles H. Little, clerk . . . 2,000 00 

Charles L. Bancroft, «' . . . 1,500 00 

Stephen Badlam, " . . . 1,500 00 

Edwin Jennings, " ... 1,500 00 

E. D. Child, inspector ... 936 00 

J. Hayward, Jr., inspector . , . 936 00 

T. L. Kelley, " ... 936 00 

C. M. Thompson, " ... 936 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$12,744 00 



62 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Amount brought forward, . . . $12,74400 

T. H. Badlam, inspector . . . 936 00 

J. G. McCawley, " . . . 936 00 

F. G. Coffin, " East Boston 936 00 

Charles Burcham, '« " . 126 00 

J. F. Mayo, services on meters . . 1,099 00 

J. L. Fairbanks, for stationery . . 278 73 

A. Muclge & Son, for printing . . 488 05 

$17,543 78 



METEES. 

The total number of meters now applied to the premises of 
water-takers is 1,076. Of this number 808 are |--inch, 234 
1-inch, 30 2-inch, 2 3-inch, 2 4-inch size; they are attached 
to a variety of establishments, embracing hotels, railroads, 
manufactories, stables, confectionery, oyster saloons, and 
buildings occupied by several tenants. 

The following table exhibits the yearly revenue received 
from the sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into 
the city, October 25th, 1848 : — 



Received by Water Commissioners, as per 

Auditor's Eeport, in 1848 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850, 



1850, 
1851, 
1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 



1851, 

1852, 
1853, 
1854, 
1855, 
1856, 
1857, 
1858, 



$972 81 
71,657 79 
99,025 45 
161,052 85 
179,567 39 
196,352 32 
217,007 51 
266,302 77 
282,651 84 
289,328 83 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,763,919 5Q 



Eepoet or THE Watee Boaed. 



63 



Amount brought forivard , 
From January 1, 1858, to January 1, 1859, 



1859, 
1860, 
1861, 
1862, 
1863, 
1864, 
1865, 
1866, 
1867, 
1868, 
1869, 
1870, 



1860, 
1861, 
1862, 
1863, 
1864, 
1865, 
1866, 
1867, 
1868, 
1869, 
1870, 
1871, 



1871, to May 1, 1871, 



51,763,919 56 
302,409 73 
314,808 97 
334,544 86 
365,323 96 
373,922 33 
394,506 25 
430,710 76 
450,341 48 
486,538 25 
522,130 93 
553,744 88 
597,328 55 
708,783 68 
584,879 31 



Total 


. 


• 


• 




$8,183,893 


50 


Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 


engmes 


etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochitu 


ate 


water to the 1st of January, 1871, with the amount of water- 


rates paid for 1870 : — 




22,846 


Dwelling-houses .... $342,270 


<0<d 


11 


Boarding-houses 








521 


00 


371 


Model-houses . 








10,601 


95 


4 

1 


Lodging-houses 








116 


00 


10 


Hotels . 








680 


00 


4,969 


Stores and shops 








50,267 


50 


258 


Buildings 








9,406 


90 


439 


Offices 








3,855 


36 


27 


Printing-offices 








382 


00 


25 


Banks 








344 


92 


29 


Halls 






421 


17 


1 


Theatre . 








36 


50 



Amount carried forward, 



$418,903 96 



64 



City Document. — No. 57 



Amount brought foriom^d , 


31 


Private schools 


16 


Asylums 


12 


Greenhouses . 


82 


Churches 


4 


Markets 


124 


Cellars . 


398 


Eestaurants and saloons 


5 


Club-houses 


2 


Bath-houses 


38 


Photographers 


8 


Packing-houses 


1,262 


Stables . 


24 


Factories 


9 


Bleacheries . . 


84 


Bakeries 


3 


Ship-yards 


3 


Dry docks and engines 


53 


Shops and engines . 


21 


Stores and engines . 


2 


Foundries " . 


6 


Factories ' ' 


5 


Printing ' ' 


1 


Bakery, " 


2 


Ship-yards * ' 


6 


Buildings ' ' 


1 


Pottery 


1 


Mill 


51 


Stationary engines . 


7 


Armories 


2 


Gymnasiums . 


827 


Hand-hose . . 


16 


Fountains 


2 


Gasometers 



Amount carried foriDcird, 



$418,903 .96 
409 41 
827 00 
137 17 

1,129 96 
851 50 
815 50 

7,725 19 

150 00 

67 42 

969 42 

265 00 

9,455 71 
772 62 
127 00 
674 16 
62 00 
100 00 

2,673 44 

1,105 03 

103 00 
414 80 
314 35 

33 00 

70 00 

650 m 

50 00 

152 72 

1,634 10 

104 00 
48 50 

4,805 00 

126 00 

22 00 

$455,749 62 



Keport of the Water Board. 



65 



Amount brought forward. 


$455,749 62 


1 


Laundry . . 


11 25 




Ciistom-House 


150 00 


1 


Ice Company (washing ice) 


30 00 


57 


Steamboats . . . . 


9,515 49 




Office (Harbor Master) . 


6 00 




" (City Scales) 


11 00 




Probate building 


50 00 




House of Reception 


10 00 


28 


Fire-engines, hose and hook and lad- 






der houses .... 


605 00 


1,737 


Fire-hydrants .... 


81,266 00 


96 


Eeservoirs .... 


1,728 00 


343 


Public schools 


2,666 00 




City stables .... 


234 75 




Offal station .... 


175 00 




Steamer " Henry Morrison " 


200 00 




Faneuil Hall .... 


40 00 




Public Library 


50 00 




Suffolk county Court House 


300 00 




Paving department . 


167 00 




Common Sewer department 


225 00 




Deer Park . . . . . 


10 00 




Public urinals . . . 


145 00 




Street sprinkling . . . . 


500 00 




Public Garden . . . . 


25 00 




Public fountains . . . . 


450 00 




Drinking fountains . 


300 00 


1 


Hospital . . . . . 


75 00 




Steam-shovel .... 


212 50 




Mount Warren Water Co. 


192 39 




Building purposes . 


3,644 69 




Contractors for supplying shipping 


1,606 57 




Metered water (9 months) 

5 


150,576 58 




$660,927 84 



66 



City Document. — 'No. 57. 



Statement showing the number and kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1871, as compared with previous years. 



1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


Remarks. 


5,129 


5,321 


5,893 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


44,939 


47,476 


53,010 


Sinks. 


20,555 


23,113 


23,961 


"Wash-hand basins. 


6,506 


7,256 


8,013 


Bathing-tubs. 


8,702 


9,971 


11,319 


Pan water-closets. 


9,319 


10,686 


12,235 


Hopper water-closets. 


233 


220 


250 


" « « pull. ^ , 


292 


263 


216 


" " " self-acting. 


381 


406 


433 


" " " waste. 


554 


580 


. 607 


u u u ^oor. 


2,128 


2,336 


2,447 


Urinals. 


7,686 


8,750 


9,615 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


782 


736 


879 


Shower-baths. 


17 


17 


13 


Hydraulic rams. 


703 


608 


547 


Private hydrants. 


391 


468 


723 


Slop-hoppers. 


46 


65 


73 


Foot-baths. 


108,363 


118,272 


130,234 





Respectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Eegistrar, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1871. 

Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: 

Sir, — I respectfully submit the following report. 

The labor of extending the pipe in the newly adopted terri- 
tories has been pushed as rapidly as circumstances admitted ; 
the tables below show but a small amount compared to what 
might be expected from so favorable a season for work. 

The delay in getting the appropriation, in the delivery 
of pipes by the contractors, added to the rocky nature of 
the soil, the irregularity in which the gas pipes are laid, the 
numbers of large culverts, and other similar obstructions, all 
have kept my operations to the limit of this report. I can- 
not but think, had inordinate hindrances been removed, that 
both the Eoxbury and Dorchester districts would to-day 
be well supplied with water. 

The tables below show that there has been laid, of main 
pipe of all sizes, in length 129,040 feet, equal to 24 and 
nearly ^ miles, and of service pipes 70,318 feet, equal to 
13^ miles. 

Included in the length of main pipe given, is 27,488 feet 
laid by contract, to Deer Island. 

Since the commencement of this season, however (which 
is the closing of our year's work), we have been more suc- 
cessful ; having laid in the space of a little over 7 weeks, 
33,413 feet, equal to about 6^ miles, a portion of Avhich was 
20 and 24-inch pipes. 



68 City Document. — No. 57. 

These large'sizes are all now laid, 12-iDcb pipes being the 
largest required for the present year. 

The 20-inch main from Upham's Corner, in Dorchester, to 
the South Boston reservoir, is laid to the point of connec- 
tion on Telegraph Hill ;. this connection will be made in a 
few days. 

A 16-inch main has been laid through a portion of Charles 
street, connecting with the 40-ineh main at the foot of the 
Common, and to connect with the 12-inch main on Cam- 
bridsre street. This will give a more direct communication 
with the low servioe in that locality, and a better supply. A 
30-inch gate has been established on Hancock street, near 
Derne street, for the same purpose. A line of 12-inch pipes 
has been laid on the Common, from the 40-inch main to the 
Frog pond, to supply the fountain from the low service. 

The plan suggested last season of supplying the high part 
of Beacon Hill by the pumping engines of Roxbury, I am 
pleased to say, has succeeded admirably. The water was 
let on to the fountain on the Common on the 4th of June, in 
presence of the Board, the City Government, and numerous 
spectators, and forced a jet in h-eight beyond all expectations. 
The increased pressure on the pipes, however (the gates that 
give the opening to that section being shut), opened what 
was evidently an old erack in the 30-inch main, on Joy 
street ; consequently the high service was not in use until 
Monday the 6th inst. The pipes of this district, and of the 
line to the engines, old as they are, made and laid with no 
expectation of their being used for other than the first pres- 
sure, have stood remarkably well. Two large gates of the 
original pattern burst during the season, and a few minor 
leaks have occurred ; with these exceptions, the water has 
fowled to the tops of the highest dwellings, and, as far as I 
have learned, has given general satisfaction. 

For particulars of the working of the pumping engines I 
refer you to the City Engineer's report. 



Report of the Water Board. 69 

Twenty street drinking fountains of the Nash pattern have 
been established ; 12 of them in the city proper, 3 in East 
Boston, 3 in South Boston, and 2 in Roxbury. From 
these fountains the water runs continually, wasting it in 
large quantities. It is also badly constructed, having but 
one bowl for horses, and that much too smalL I think the 
best one we have is located in Eliot Square ; was formerly in 
Haymarket Square. It has a circular trough, and will sup- 
ply 4 horses and more if needed, consuming no more water 
than the smaller ones. There are 2 long troughs on the Mill 
Dam, and well adapted for a locality like that where herds of 
cattle frequent. I have nearly ready to be set up one of 
Woods' Philadelphia pattern, having 4 basins, aud a self- 
closing delivery, which I shall set in the rear of the Old 
State House, in a few days. This fountain promises well, 
both for economy in water and convenience in use. 

On account of the excavations on the Fort Hill territory, 
the pipes have been taken up, and a few have been relaid. 
The Suffolk street district will no doubt have to be repiped 
this season. 

A full account of the leak in the submerged pipes across the 
Chelsea Creek appeared in the City Engineer's annual report 
to the City Government, and no doubt will appear in his 
report to you. The laying of the new line by Mr, Norman 
is nearly completed. 

The water was let into the line of pipes to Deer Island on 
the 29th day of April of the present year, in presence of the 
Board and a portion of the City Government, giving a fair 
supply, which will no doubt be increased when the 16-iuch 
main on Brooks and the 12-inch main on Chelsea street are 
continued to their proper connections. 

The East Boston reservoir has been tested by filling it to 
its utmost capacity during the year, and continues tight. 
When the new line across the creek is completed the reser- 
voir can be kept full as a reserve for the supply of the East 



70 City Document. — No. 57. 

Boston section, in case of accident to any of the lines leading 
thereto. By closing the gates leading to the reservoir, the 
section will have the whole pressure of the Mystic water, and 
consequently a greater supply in case of fire. 

The Brooks street end, and the White street side of the 
embankment has been graded to conform to the altered 
grades of those streets, and a new and substantial iron fence 
erected. This fence has stood well the frost test ; no percep- 
tible change to be seen. The slope banks were sowed well 
with grass seed, but the hot season spoiled the most of our 
labors ; this spring, however, it looks well, and I hope it will 
soon be in a satisfactory condition. The surroundings of the 
stand-pipe have been sodded, and a portion sowed, but, like 
the grass at the East Boston reservoir, the season was too 
hot for it to do well. A retaining wall has been built on 
Fort Avenue and the driveway gravelled and rolled. 

JRelaid. 
526 feet 6-inch pipe in Chatham street. 
150 " 4 " " " Pearl place. 

liaised. 

524 feet 12-inch pipe in Dorchester street, between 8tb 

and O. C. & N. R. R. bridge. 
600 feet 6-inch pipe in Canton street, between Newland 

and Tremont streets. 
420 feet 4-inch pipe in Fabiu street, between Newland and 

Ivanhoe streets. 
260 feet 4-inch pipe in Trumbull street, between Newland 

and Ivanhoe streets. 

Taken Up, 

579 feet 6-inch pipe in Tremont street, between Phillips 

and Weston streets. 
526 feet 6-inch pipe in Chatham street. 



Eepoet of the Watee Boaed. 71 

240 feet 6-inch pipe in Lehigh street, at B. & A. E. K. 

Round House. 
324 feet 6-inch pipe at Fort Hill. 
393 feet 4-inch pipe at Fort Hill. 
57 feet 4-inch pipe in Tremont street, between Philips and 

Weston street. 
64 feet 4-inch pipe in Central Court. 
779 feet li inch iron. 
214 " 1 " lead. 
187 " f " " 
1,365 *« f " " 



Extended. 



1-inch pipe, 68 feet. 
81 " 
1,887 feet. 



I '« " 81 



72 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe laid in 1870. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Charles 

Berkeley 

Albany 

Boston Common , 

Chandler .... 
East Chester Park 

"West " " 
Dartmouth . . . 

« 

Sawyer 

Piedmont .... 
Shawmut .... 
Tennyson .... 
Tremont .... 
Fairfield .... 

Newton 

Holyoke .... 

Canton 

Clarendon . . . 
Warren Avenue 
Washington . . 
Stoughton . . . 



BOSTON PROPER. 
Beacon and Pinckney 



Total, 16-inch 



Cortes and Boston and Albany R. R. 

Maiden and Dover 

40-in. Main and Erog Pond . . . . . 



Total, 12-inch 



Berkeley and Coliunbus Avenue .... 

Albany and Harrison Avenue 

Columbus Ave. and Boston and Prov. R. R. 
Marlboro' and Commonwealth Avenue . . 

" " Beacon 

" " Newbury 

Commonwealth Ave. and B. and A. R. R. . 
Columbus Avenue and B. and A. R. R. . . 

Shawmut Avenue and Lenox 

Pleasant and Church 



" " Warrenton 

Beacon and Marlboro' 

Columbus Ave. and Boston and Prov. R. R. 



" " Chandler . . . 

Berkeley and Clarendon 

At Boston and Albany R. R. bridge 
Harrison Avenue and Albany . . . 



Carried forward 



16 



12 



92 

1,660 

610 



2,362 

600 

637 

60 

120 

184 

494 

1,032 

472 

164 

60 

60 

90 

25 

297 

138 

50 

200 

100 

432 

65 

417 



5,697 



Repoet of the Water Boaed. 



73 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Street. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Hamilton . 

Stuigis Place 

Camden 

Berwick Park 

Marlboro' 

Commonwealth Avenue 

Albany 

Maiden 

Union Park Street . . 

Troy 

Bristol 

Chestnut 

Village 

Worcestei: 

Hancock 

Avon 

Arnold 

Greenwich Park . . . 
Gray ......... 

Ivanhoe 

Albany 

Harrison Avenue . . . 
No name 



Brought forward 

Batterymarch and "Wendall 

Pearl and OUver 

Tremont and Boston and Providence R. R. 
Columbus Ave. & Boston & Providence R. R. 

Fairfield and Gloucester 

Clarendon and Dartmouth 

Dover and Troy 

Albany and Wareham 

" " Harrison Avenue 



Brimmer and the water . . . . . 

Dover and Chapman , 

Tremont and Columbus Avenue , 



Total, 6-inch 



Cambridge and Derne 

Washington and Chauncey 

Shawmut Avenue and Washington . . . 
Columbus Ave. and Boston & Prov. R. R. 

Berkeley and Clarendon 

Trumbull and Canton 

To main Sea Wall 

Perry and Bristol 

West Newton and Berwick Park .... 



5,697 

122 

80 

266 

220 

367 

1,418 

460 

31 

29 

27 

635 

50 

352 

300 

10,054 

30 
190 
64 
36 
210 
113 
92 
45 
181 



Total, 4-inch 



74 City Document. — No. 57. 

Statement of Location^ Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -n-hat Street. 



Thomas 

Telegraph 

Dorchester 

Emerson 

"Woodward 

Pacific 

Thomas 

Second 

Third 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

I 

L 

M 

Frederick 

Vinton 

Dorchester Avenue . . 

Gates 

Bowen 

Colony 

Emmet 

Tudor 

(C 

Chestnut Place . . . . 
Place from D Street . . 



Between what Streets. 



SOUTH BOSTON". 
Atlantic and Old Harbor . , • 
Dorchester and Old Harbor . . 
Telegraph and Dorchester Line 



Total, 20-inch 



Broadway and I 

Glover and Dorchester . 
Fourth and Thomas . . , 
London and Pacific . . . 
OandP 

]sr " o 

N " p 

B " Dorchester Avenue 

M " N 

" D 

Fifth and Seventh .... 
Second and Third .... 
Fifth and Sixth 



Total, 6-inch 



Ninth and O. C and N. R. R 

Dorchester and Preble 

Foundry Street and B. H. & E. R. R. Bridge 

Eighth and Telegraph 

DandE 

Swan and Sixth 

Second and Third 

C and D 

E " Dorchester 

B street and B. H. and E. R. R 

Eighth and Ninth 



Total, 4-inch 



Diameter of 

Iron 
Pipe in Inches 



20 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



387 

864 

3,629 

4,880 

170 
223 

320 
196 
294 
250 
290 
167 
158 

72 
400 
155 

96 

2,791 



4 


236 




300 




26 




155 




440 




172 




318 




400 




317 




207 




170 



2,741 



Eeport or THE Water Boaed. 



75 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Saratoga 



Shirley- 



Princeton 
White . 



Trenton 
White , 



Union Place . 
In Winthrop 



Between what Streets. 



EAST BOSTON. 
Chelsea and Byron 

Moore and Culvert, bet. E. B. & Breed's Is'd 



Total, 12-inch 

End of 12-inch above Beach St., on Winthrop 
Total. 10-inch 



Beach and Shirley Gut 
Across " " 

On Deer Island .... 



Total, 8-inch 



Prescott and Eagle . 
Brooks " Eutaw . 
Putnam " Trenton 
Eagle " White . 
Trenton " Putnam 
On Deer Island . . . 



Total, 6-inch 



From Princeton 

Between Shirley Gut and E.B. 



Total, 4-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



12 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



2,776 
2,052 

4,828 

9,311 

9,311 

11,870 

603 

3,173 

15,646 

33 

236 
258 
686 
100 
329 

1,642 

121 
150 

271 



76 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Dudley 

Tremont 

Thornton 

EUis 

Hawthorne .... 

Townsend 

Highland 

Highland Park . , 
Beech Glen Avenue 

Parker 

Washington .... 
Longwood Avenue 
Tremont 

Pynchon 

Warren 

Shawmut Avenue . 

Ruggles 

Munroe 



BOSTON HIGHLAISTDS. 
Hampden and Dorchester line . , . 
Providence Railroad Crossing . . . 



Between what Streets, 



Total, 24-inch. 



ElUs and Shawmut Avenue- 

Thornton and Hawthorne 

EUis and Highland 

Shawmut Ave. and Walnut Ave 

Hawthorne and Fort Avenue 

Tubular Reservoir and Beech Glen Ave. 
Highland and Fort Avenue 



Total, 16-inch 



Conant and Longwood Ave 

Gardner and Tremont • , . . . 

Parker and Bianey 

Parker and Bumstead Lane 

Cabot and Providence Railroad Crossing 

Cedar and Centre 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue 

Townsend and Cobden ......... 

Auburn and Parker 

Wan-en and Walnut Avenue 



Total, 12-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



24 



12 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



1,322 
75 

1,397 

676 
47 

145 
1,149 

104 
97 

600 

2,818 

247 
605 

1,622 
766 

3,496 
25 

4,100 
858 
541 

2,237 

14,497 



Report of the Water Board. 



77 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets, 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe in 
Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



George 

Norfolk Avenue . . . 

Cabot 

Thornton ....... 

Yeoman 

Ellis 

Hawthorne 

Highland 

Townsend 

Beech G-len Avenue . . 

Factory . . . ' 

Culvert ........ 

Pahner 

Winslow , 

Bower , 

New Heath 

Waverly 

Centre 

Ball 

Trask Avenue . . . 
Hammond Park . . . 

Marcella 

Eustis 

New 

Copeland 

Maywood 

Shawmut Avenue . . 

Philip 

Dennis 

Linwood ...... 

WoodviUe Square . . 

Parker 

Wabon 

Mindoro 



Hampden and Langdon 

" " Magazine 

Tremont and "Weston 

ElUs and Shawmut Avenue 

Albany and Hampden 

Thornton and Hawthorne 

Ellis and Highland 

Marcella and Fort Avenue 

Shawmut Avenue and Walnut Avenue 

Highland and Fort Avenue 

Tremont and Hampshire 



Warren and Winslow • . 

Palmer and Zeigler 

Laurel and Walnut Avenue .... 

Centre and Parker 

Perrin and Blue Hill Avenue . . . 

New Heath and Cedar 

Washington and Shawmut Avenue 

From Yeoman 

Tremont and Shawmut Avenue . . 
Highland and " ... 

Hampden and Harrison Avenue . . 

From New Heath 

Moreland and Warren 

Blue HiU Avenue and Warren . . 

Ruggles and Washington 

Tremont and Smith 

Stafford and Blue Hill Avenue . . 

Highland and Centre 

Dennis and Blue Hill Avenue . . . 
New Heath and Billings Place . . 

From Warren . . . . 

Station and Prentiss 



Total, 6-inch 



1,345 

1,308 

204 

676 

945 

73 

159 

1,050 

673 

63 

239 

46 

165 

98 

223 

882 

651 

556 

471 

274 

748 

1,169 

1,295 

406 

1,139 

476 

934 

137 

217 

698 

194 

61 

469 

506 

18,550 



78 



City Document. — No. 57. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In ■what Street. 



Kearsarge Avenue . . 

Parker Place 

Webber 

Stafford 

Taber 

Beech Glen Avenue . . 

Walnut Park 

Alaska 

Adams Place 

Elmwood Court . . . . 

Cliff • . . . 

Montrose Avenue . . . 

Myrtle Place 

Orchard 

Glenwood 

DeUe Avenue 

Nawn 

Cottage Place 

Forest Avenue . . . . 
Rockingham Place . . 

Codman Park 

Putnam 

Lansing 



Between -what Streets. 



Warren and Winthrop 

From Parker 

Albany and Harrison Avenue 

Dennis and Blue HiU Avenue 

Winslow and Washington ........ 

Highland " Fort Avenue 

Shawm ut Avenue and Walnut Avenue 

Perrin and Blue Hill Avenue 

Washington and Williams 

From Elmwood 

Glenwood and Shawmut Avenue . , . 
From Warren 

" Glenwood 

Adams and Eustis . . . . • 

cuff and Warren 

From Parker 

Washington and Harrison Avenue . . 
From Tremont 

" Warren 

Cabot and Lindall Park 

From Shawmut Avenue .... • . . . 

Washington and Dudley 

Warren and Sheiinan 



Total, 4-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 

365 
369 
659 
328 
575 
495 
980 
40 
539 
238 
340 
427 
115 
557 
262 
166 
169 
270 
400 
286 
616 
150 
293 

8,639 



Report of the Water Board. 



79 



Statement of Location^ Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Stoughton 



Boston 



Hancock 



StougMon .... 

Pleasant 

Savin Hill Avenue 

Boston 

Dorchester Avenue 

Hancock 

Adams 



Brook Avenue 
North " 
Hudson . . , . 
W. Cottage . . 
Mount Vernon 
Sumner . . . . 



Dorchester Avenue 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. 

Roxhury Line and Boston Street 



Total, 24-inch 



Stoughton and Dorchester line 
Total, 20-inch 



Stoughton and Columbia 
Total, 16-inch . . . 



Roxbury Line and Pleasant Street . 
Stoughton and Savin Hill Avenue . 
Pleasant " Dorchester Avenue 
Stoughton " Boston line . . . . 
Savin Hill Avenue and Adams . . 
Columbia and Commercial . . . . 
Dorchester Avenue and Park . . . 



Total, 12-inch 



Stoughton and "West Cottage . 

" " Brook Avenue . 

" " Clifton 

" " Brook Avenue . 
Boston and Dorchester " . . 
Stoughton and AUbright Court 



Total, 6-inch 

Savin HUl Avenue and Adams 
Total, 4-inch 



Diameter 

of Pipe 

in Inches. 



24 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



3,299 

3,299 

3,698 

3,698 

456 

456 

4,855 

826 

453 

2,731 

4,172 

1,810 

299 

15,146 

901 
466 
513 
544 
1,022 
591 

4,037 

36 

36 



80 



City Document. — No. 57. 



























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1—1 




^ 


05 












ra *^" 


O 
















© 


^ g 




• 


eo' 


o 










O 


g 1^ 
1-1 


















m 














^ 




































1 1 


. <M 


• 


-n 


CO 




rH 




H 




• • 


• 








• i 


















^W 






j5 












5=^ 






• rH 


t- 


^ 


(M 


,_t 




" o 




la 


-t-* d) 




•* 




c^ 




-2 




o 








1-1 

7-1 


cf 




& 




o 


yA 












^ 




K 














• 1 




K 


^ i^ 
















1 -s^ 


CO 


1- 


CO 


iH 




3 




O 

m 


• • 








C 


3 
; s 






^ 


























J 4-* 








OO . rH 


ffi 


o 


t- 












<N O 


iH 


co_^ 




c 


i M 






tiO O 






■^ 










}i 


g f^ 


• 








i 


^ 




o 


hJ 












1 S 
















o 


1 1 


I-H . CO 


CO 




s 










^ =5 


















M 




















o 




















o 
















g 


9 "^ 
















a 


a 
















s 


M 


-I'c. -W 


B» 


ISM 


-w 












r-l i-l 1-1 















Repoet of the Watee Boaed. 



83 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1870. 





Diameter of Pipes in Inches. 


WHERE. 


40 

2 


36 
4 


30 
6 


24 


20 

4 

2 

6 


12 

12 

1 
2 

5 
20 


6 

30 
5 
4 
2 

41 


4 

64 
1 

4 
69 


3 
3 

3 


2 
13 

13 


1^ 
90 

90 


1 
1 


1 
9 
1 

10 


3 

7 

7 


i 

487 

41 

40 

47 

1 

616 


21 

5 
2 
2 

30 


'(3 
O 


Boston 


749 
57 








4 

10 


1 
1 


5f> 


Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 


•2 


3 

7 


64 
1 


Totals 


926 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of four inches 
and upwards, joints, 90 ; settling of earth, 18 ; settling of 
boxing, 2 ; defective pipe, 11 ; defective gates, 2 ; defective 
packing, 3 ; frost, 10 ; parties building, 2 ; cap blown off, 1 ; 
struck by pick, 2. Total, 141. 

Stoppages by frost, 16. Total, 16. 

(3f three inches and on service pipes, joints, 1 ; by settling 
of earth, 151; by settling of boxing, 6 ; by settling of drain, 
1 ; by defective pipe, 37 ; by defective packing, 13 ; by de- 
fective coupling, 16; by defective faucet, 3; by frost, 27 ; 
by faucet broken at main, 15; by faucet loose at main, 8; 
by stiff connections, 90 ; struck by pick, 12 ; gnawed by 
rats, 10; by blasting, 2; by pipes not in use, S.; by nail- 
hole, 2 ; twisted off, 1. Total, 400. 

Stoppages in service pipes, by frost, 209 ; by rust, 97 ; by 
fish, 46 ; by gasket, 10 ; by dirt, 5.; by paper, 2. Total, 369. 



84 



GiTY Document. — No. 57, 



Statement of Numter of Leaks, 1850-70. 





Diameter of 




Teak. 


Four Inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
inches. 


TOTAX. 


1850 


32 

64 

82 

85- 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 


72 
173 
241 
260 
280 
219 
232 
278 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
769 


104 


1851 


237' 


1852 


323' 


1853 


345 


1854 


354 


1855 


294 


1856 


307 


1857 


363^ 


1858 '.....- 

1859 


401 
531. 


1860 


592. 


1861 - . . . . 


508 


1862 


490- 


1863 


494 




489 


1865 


607 




675, 


1867 


609 
531 


1869 


' 489 




926 







HYDEANTS. 

During the year 207 new hydrants have been established, as 
follows : — 

In Boston proper — Wilmarth 24, Lowell, 3, Lowry, 1 . 2% 
^' South Boston, " 7, "2, . . 9 



Qarried forward^ 



37 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



85 



Brought forward. 
In East Boston — Wilmarth 5, Lowry 1 
*' Boston Highlands, Lowell 6, Lowry, 
" Dorchester, Lowry 48 
Deer Island, Port Hydrants, 7 

Total, . . . 

Total number of hydrants established n 

Boston proper 

South Boston 

East " -. .. 

Boston Highlands 

Dorchester .. 

Brookline . 

Charlestown 

Chelsea 

Leer Island 

Total, 



37 
6 

103 . - 109 

48 

7 

, • 207 

ptoMay 1,1871 : — 

. 1,106 

362 

210 

419 

48 

3 

ii 



2,174 



11 hydrants have been discontinued in Boston Highlands ; 
6 on Fort Hill territory. These are deducted from the total 
number. 

18 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 119 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. 

The hydrants have had the usual attention paid them. 



STOPCOCKS. 

220 new stopcocks have been established this year. 

3 have been discontinued and are deducted from the total 
number. 49 boxes have been taken out and replaced by 
new ones. 

All the stopcocks have had the attention of former years 
paid them. 



86 



City Document. — JSTo. 57. 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on Jiaiid, exclusive of Tools, 

May 1, 1871. 



Number of 












Diameter iis 


Inches. 


^ 










48. 


40. 


36. 


30. 


24. 


20. 


18. 


16. 


12. 


8. 


6. 


4. 


3. 


2. 


11. 






12 


10 
3 


64 

1 
2 
3 
5 

m 

4 

22 
10 

2 

7 

21 

3 

2 


19 

4 

6 
3 
5 

3 

7 

5 

2 

4 
9 
2 


18 

7 
7 

4 

5 
3 

15 
13 

3 


3 
1 


83 

5 

2 
27 
121 

■ 
2 

7 
3 
9 

2 
5 
3 

1 


1677 
9 

29 

3 
50 

1 
24 

9 

16 
19 

8 

59 
8 
3 


3 

7 

5 
3 

2 
1 


4906 

2 
10 

8 
40 
14 
34 
18 

5 
16 
50 
32 
39 

2 

23 

158 
17 
73 

18 
20 


784 

1 

l' 

54 
12 
40 
10 
2 
20 
48 

38 
5 

45 
48 
14 
11 

37 
14 


34 

9 
2 

8 

^ 1 
1 

7 


22 
6 
9 




Blow-off Branches 






4 Way-Branches . 




2 
2 

2 

2 
3 

1 

2 

7 
4 
1 

1 


1 

2 
6 
9 
1 
2 

3 

2 

4 
6 

2 




Sleeves 

Clamp Sleeves . . 


2 










Bevel Hubs .... 






Quarter Turns . . 
Double Hubs . . . 
Offset Pipes . . , 
Yoke Pipes .... 
Manhole Pipes . . 
One-Eighth Turns 
3 Way-Branches . 
Pieces of Pipes . . 




60 


Blow-off and Man- 






Plugs 

Thawing Clamps . 







Hydy^ants. — 51 Lowry, 9 Lowiy bases, 8 Lowiy exten- 
sions, 3 Lowiy chucks, 2 Lowry frames and covers, 39 "Wil- 
marth, 11 Lowell, 2 Wilmarth, and 8 Lowell, old. 

For Hydrants. — 16 bends, 38 lengtbeners, 133 covers, 8 



Keport of the Water Board. 87 

old bends, 52 wastes, 5 nipples, 45 socket nuts, 6 wharf 
hydrants, 68 washers, 25 rods, 2 wharf hydrant cocks, 10 
heavy frames, 1 heavy cover, 1,550 lbs. iron castings, 2,003 
lbs. bolts, nuts and washers, 314 lbs. composition castings, 
10 lbs. Babbitt metal, 74 pairs straps, unfinished. 

For Stopcocks. — 2 36-inch screws, 1 30-inch ditto, 2 
24-inch ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 1 4-inch ditto for waste 
wier, 1 ditto for Brookline reservoir (old), 20 composition 
screws for 6 and 4 inch gates, 1 6-inch valve, 6 6-inch rings, 
6 6-inch stuffing boxes, 2,995 lbs. iron castings for 6 and 4 
inch gates, 1 2-inch globe valve, 243 frames, 256 covers. 

Meiers in Shop. — 3 3-inch, 5 2-inch, 9 1-inch, 15 -|-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 10 2-inch nipples, 74 1-iuch ditto, 77 
l-iuch ditto, 5 2-inch connection pieces, 7 1-inch ditto, 24 
f-iuch ditto, 92 1-inch cocks, 21 |-inch ditto, 2 3-inch clocks, 
2 2-inch ditto, 100 |--inch ditto, 6 brass spindles, 160 rubber 
nipples, 75 glasses, 9 fish-boxes, 6 covers. 

For Service Pipe. — 5 2i-inch union cocks, 97 1-inch ditto, 
52 f-inch ditto, 469 |-iuch ditto, 404 ditto unfinished, 56 
|--inch union cocks, 151|^-inch T cocks, 50 1-inch ditto, 14 
f-inch ditto, 9 f-inch Y ditto, 43 |-inch thawing ditto, 37 
2-inch couplings, 58 l^-inch ditto, 46 1^-inch tubes, 47 1-inch 
male couplings, 29 1-inch female ditto, 26 |-inch male ditto, 
SQ |-inch tubes, 126 |-inch couplings, 580 |-inch female 
ditto, 400 f-inch tubes, 96|-inch couplings, 169 ^-inch tubes, 
1,042 boxes, Q'd T ditto, 14 Y ditto, 43 extension tubes, 
2,410 tubes, 1,650 caps, 765 lbs. unfinished castings (compo- 
sition), 85 lbs. old composition, 9 4x2 composition flange 
reducers, 13 3x2 ditto, 37 2xi-inch ditto, 2 4x2 Y ditto, 3 
4-inch tunnel pipe. 

Lead Pipe. — 800 pounds 2-inch lead pipe, 340 pounds 
li-inch ditto, 1,340 pounds l^^-inch ditto, 960 pounds 1-iuch 
ditto, 5,499 pounds |-inch ditto, 17,400 pounds |-iuch ditto, 
7,800 pounds ^-inch ditto, 80 pounds 1-inch tin-lined ditto, 
65 pounds f-inch ditto, 2,014 pounds |-iuch ditto, 420 



88 City Document. — No. 57. 

pounds -|-iucli ditto, 80 pounds f-inch block-tin pipe, 98 
pounds 14^-inch waste pipe, 60 pounds |-inch block-tin pipe, 
716 pounds old pieces, 30 pounds solder. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 1,305 pounds round iron, 852 pounds 
flat ditto, 225 pounds square ditto, 1,640 pounds working 
pieces, 682 pounds cast steel, 1 case pick-handles, 14 dozen 
pick-blanks. 

Carpenter's Shop. — 131 Lowry hydrant boxes, 94 stop- 
cock boxes, 8 ditto unfinished, 35 hydrant boxes, 95 ditto 
unfinished, 3 meter boxes, 33 ditto unfinished, 125 feet 
3-inch hard-wood plank, 900 pounds spikes and nails, 200 
feet bottom boards. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom- 
derricks, 5 hand geared ditto, 4 sets shears and rigging for 
same, 5 tool-houses, 3 tool-boxes, 2 platform scales, 1 porta- 
ble blacksmith shop, 1 portable covering for Brewer fountain, 
1 hand roller, 1 horse ditto, tools for laying and repairing 
main and service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot ditto, 1 hand 
ditto, 1 Pratt & Whitney's taper ditto, 1 upright drilling 
machine, 3 grindstones, the necessary tools for carrying on 
the machine, blacksmith, carpenter, and plumbing shops, 1 
circular saw, 1 40-inch proving press, 1 36-iuch ditto, 1 small 
ditto, 6 wheelbarrows, 300 feet new hose, 200 feet old ditto ; 
also, office furniture, and a large lot of patterns at the foun- 
dries where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — 9 horses, 8 wagons, 2 buggies, 3 pungs, 1 sled, 
1 cart, 9 sets of harness, 10 blankets, 2 sleighs, 2 tons Eng- 
lish hay, 25 bushels grain. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder 
16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 9 
cast-iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 
patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for 
small fountains, 6 large composition cylinders. 

Miscellaneous. — 1 Wood's Philadelphia four-basin foun- 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 89 

tain, 55 tons pig lead, 3 gallons linseed, 2 barrels kerosene 
oil, 160 tons furnace coal, 1 freight gravel, 4,092 pounds 
gasket, 1 keg old bolts, lot j)aving stones, 52 reservoir 
covers, 20 cords wood, 6 manholes, 5 plates, lot of lumber; 
also, old machinery from Marlboro. 

Eespectfiilly submitted, 

E. E. JONES, 

Su.])l. Eastern Division. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut Hill Reseevoir, 

Brighton, May 1, 1871. 

Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the CocJiituate Water Board: 

Sir : lu compliance with the rules and regulations of 
the Water Board, I submit the following report : — 

LAIO: COCHITUATE. 

The low state of the water at the lake the past season has 
given an opportunity to make the repairs that were needed ; 
new timbers have been put in at the lower dam, and the stone 
work repointed ; at the upper dam, the outlet gate has been 
repaired, and a new composition screw substituted for the 
iron one, and the stone work repointed. 780 feet of wall 
have been laid to protect the banks from washing away, as 
they were exposed to the west and north-west winds ; as 
soon as the stone can be obtained, it will be necessary to 
protect the banks by the side of the Saxonville Branch Eail- 
road, as the water is washing it away quite fast. The house 
and outbuildings are in very good condition, the ice-house 
has been repaired, and filled with ice. An engine-house 
has been built, and connected to the north side of the gate- 
house to be used in case of resorting to pumping. 

FENCES. 

During the year 3,536 feet of fence has been built ; it will 
require nearly as much more to be made this season. Posts 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 91 

are already on the ground, and work "will be commenced on 
it at an early day. 

DUG POND. 

The stop plank were removed so as to let the water into 
the lake from this pond September 16, 1870 ; they Avere put 
in again, March 2, 1871 ; all the water that was available was 
drawn from this pond. 

DUDLEY POND. 

The stop plank were taken out September 17, 1870, and 
the water drawn down to the lowest point as rapidly as pos- 
sible, in order to repair the gate-chamber. The ice had moved 
the stone so much that the stop plank could not be put in or 
taken out ; it was found necessary to take the stone work all 
down and rebuild it again. The stop plank were put in 
December 2, 1870. 

PEGAN BROOK. 

Early in the fall, work was commenced on the new dam at 
Pegan Brook ; the mud was removed and a good foundation 
put in, and a good substantial dam built; 597 cubic yards of 
stone were used. The mud in front of the dam was removed, 
also that between the two dams, and the brook cleaned out. 
This will allow the water to settle and pass into the lake in a 
purer state than before. 

CULVERTS. 

Work was commenced to remove the obstructions in the 
culverts as soon as the water was low enough for the men to 
go through them, in order to get rid of the complaints that 
had been made by the Selectmen of Natick. It was found 
that the most of the trouble was at the Willow-bridge cul- 
vert ; that not being enlarged at the time the additional 2 feet 
was given to the lake, its original capacity was not large 
enough, and that has decreased from year to year, by the 



92 CiTr Document. — No. 57. 

growth of the willow roots that had formed in it, until it was 
obstructed so much as to dam the water back into the lower 
section of the lake. The old culvert was taken out, and an 
open passage or sluice-way made 18 feet wide, with a space 
of 18 inches from the high-water mark, to the floor timbers 
of the bridge built by the consent of the Selectmen of Natick, 
and was done to the satisfaction of the Chairman of the 
Board. 

CONDUIT. 

The water has been shut off from the conduit three times 
the past year for the following purposes : August 25, to repair 
a leak in the conduit at Wellesley, water was off for 24 
hours. Nov. 17, to change the screens at the lake, the 
water was not drawn entirely out of the conduit. April 14, 
1871 J for the annual examination between the lake and 
Chestnut Hill reservoir. The condition of the conduit does 
not change materially ; notes were taken of the different 
sections, and will be given by the City Engineer in his 
report. 

WASTE WEIES AND PIPE CHAMBERS. 

The waste weirs are all in good condition ; new stop plank 
have been put m at Grantville, and the gate repaired ; the 
west pipe chamber at the Lower Falls is in good condition, 
but the east chamber requires attention as soon as the con- 
duit can be spared long enough to make a c'hange in its 
location. 

CHESTNUT HILL EESERVOIR. 

The Bradlee basin was completed, and the water was let 
in October 25, 1870. On November 1, all of the shanties, 
stables, and old materials were sold at auction, and were at 
once removed. A lot was laid out, 500 feet front on Beacon 
street, with a depth of 144 feet, running back to the line of 
the railroad, to be used as a repair yard for the Western 
division. Work was at once commenced, to grade and fence 



Report of the Water Board. 93 

it; some of the old buildings were removed on to it, to be 
used until more suitable ones could be erected ; suitable 
slieds have been built for the storage of the water carts, 
rollers, etc. The embankments have been dressed this 
spring, and the ground where the stables and the oiEce stood 
graded and seeded down ; the sidewalk, on Beacon street, is 
nearly completed, and a part of the fence built. Work will 
be continued in clearing up and putting the grounds sur- 
rounding the reservoir in order as soon as possible. The 
water was let into the Bradke basin every day from 2 
P. M., to 7 P. M., from October 25 until November 2 ; the 
low state of the water at the lake at that time would not 
allow any more to be run in. All that the basin gained 
from that date until March was from the rain and snow. On 
the 14th of March, the water was again let in, and has been 
continued to this date (May 1), all that could be spared 
over and above the supply required for the city. 

BEOOKLINE EESERVOIR. 

The walls surrounding this reservoir have been repointed, 
the gate-house painted inside, the trees pruned and thinned 
out, and the usual care taken of the grounds. Nothing 
more can be done until the water is drawn off, and the 
basin cleaned out, which will be done without doubt this 
season. 



94 



City Docuivient. — No. 57. 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin above the loiver floor at the 
Effluent Gate-House. 



Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 
of 

Water. 


1870. 


Ft. In. 


1870-71. 


Ft. In. 


, 1871. 


M. In. 


November 26 . 




1 Qk 


December 28 . 




2 63 


January 29 . 




3 33 


" 27. 




1 9^ 


" 29. 




2 7 


" 30. 




3 3i 


« 28. 




1 9| 


" 30. 




2 7 


" 31. 




3 4 


" 29. 




1 95 


" 31. 




2 8 


February 1 . 




3 41 


« 30. 




1 93 


January 1 . 




2 8 


" 2. 




3 5| 


December 1 . 




1 10 


" 2. 




2 8^ 


« 3. 




3 6 


" 2. 




1 10^ 


« 3. 




2 S^ 


" 4. 




3 6 


« 3. 




1 10^ 


" 4. 




2 8| 


" 5. 




3 6 


" 4. 




1 lOJ 


" 5. 




2 8^ 


« 6. 




3 6J 


" 5. 




1 10| 


" 6. 




2 83 


" 7. 




3 6^ 


" 6. 




1 10^ 


« 7. 




2 10 


" 8. 




3 6J 


" 7. 




1 lOj 


" 8. 




2 10 


" 9. 




3 T 


" 8. 




1 11 


" 9. 




2 10 


" 10. 




3 7 


« 9. 




2 0^ 


" 10. 




2 10 


« 11. 




3 7 


" 10. 




2 03 


« 11. 




2 10 


« 12. 




3 7J 


" 11 . 




2 1 


« 12. 




2 10 


" 13. 




3 7^ 


" 12. 




2 li 


" 13 . 




2 lOJ 


" 14. 




3 8 


« 13. 




2 5 


" 14. 




2 10| 


" 15. 




3 8| 


" 14. 




2 51 


" 15. 




2 11 


" 16. 




3 9 


" 15. 




2 6 


" 16. 




3 00 


" 17. 




3 9| 


" 16. 




2 6 


" 17. 




3 1 


« 18. 




3 9J 


" 17. 




2 53 


" 18. 




3 1^ 


" 19. 




4 1 


" 18. 




2 51 


" 19. 




3 2 


" 20. 




4 IJ 


« 19. 




2 51 


" 20 . 




3 2 


" 21. 




4 13 


" 20 . 




2 6 


« 21. 




3 2i 


" 22. 




4 2 


" 21. 




2 6| 


" 22 . 




3 2i 


« 23. 




4 2 


" 22. 




2 61 


« 23. 




3 2^ 


" 24. 




4 2^ 


" 23. 




2 61 


" 24. 




3 21 


" 25. 




4 3| 


" 24. 




2 63 


" 25 . 




3 21 


" 26. 




4 4i 


« 25. 




2 63 


" 26 . 




3 21 


" 27 . 




4 43 


" 26. 




2 63 


" 27. 




3 23 


« 28. 




4 5 


" 27 . 




2 63 


" 28 


3 Zk 


March 1 . 




4 5J 



Eepoet of the Watee Board. 



95 



Height of Water at Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 



Date. 



18T1. 
March 2 . , 

3. , 

4. , 

5. , 



Height 

of 
Water. 



Ft. In. 



5k 



lOi 

H 

111 

3 

53 



Date. 



1871. 
March 22 . 
" 23. 
« 24. 
" 25. 
" 26 . 
" 27. 
" 28. 
" 29. 
" 30. 
" 31. 
1. 



April 



Height 

of 
Water. 



Ft. In. 

7 1 

7 5i 

7 10 

8 li 
8 5 

8 9 

9 1 
9 4 
9 6i 
9 8 

L9 10 

9 lOi 



10 
10 
10 

10 

10 8^ 

10 lOi 

10 111 

10 111 



1871. 

April 11 . 

" 12, 

" 13, 

" 14, 

" 15, 

" 16, 

" 17. 

" 18. 

" 19, 

" 20. 

" 21, 

" 22, 

" 23, 

" 24, 

" 25, 

" 26, 

" 27, 

" 28. 

" 29. 

" 30, 



Height 

of 
Water. 



Ft. In. 

10 113 

10 111 
11 



11 10 

12 I 



Schedule of Property at Ohestnut Hill Reservoir. 

1 two-horse express wagou. 

1 single" " " (poor). 

1 water cart, with shafts. 
2Jtwo-horse water carts. 
4 " " iron rollers. 

25 new castings, for rollers. 

3 ox carts. 



96 City Document. —No. 57. 

1 single horse pung. 

1 two " "■ 

2 horse tracks. 
1 horse power. 

1 hay wagon. 

2 hand carts. 

1 two-wheel ox dray. 

1 ox truck. 

1 ox sling. 

1 pair large wheels. 

3 clay mills and shafting. 

1 laroe water cistern. 

4 new stone drags. 
6 screens. 

50 ox tie chains. 

2 7-inch rotary pumps. 

2 4" a <( 

3 Joyce force " 
1 house " " 
1 steam engine. 

1 stone-crushing machine and castings. 

2 blacksmiths' forges and tools. 
1 portable forge. 

1 derrick and rigging. 

4 clay knives. 

2 manheads. 
36 grub axes. 

157 picks. 
189 shovels. 

12 spades. 

11 new shovels. 

3 hoes. 

46 iron bars. 
9 stone hammers. 

13 striking hammers. 



Keport of the Water Board. 97 



15 iron rakes. 

6 new iron rakes. 
5 scuffling hoes. 

4 border knives. 
1 root-puller. 

1 pair grass shears. 

5 scythes and snaiths. 

2 lawn-mowers. 

1 garden engine. 

3 hay forks. 

4 manure forks. 

14 lanterns. 

8 peat knives. 
13 tin dippers. 

23 tin candlesticks. 
4 reflector lanterns. 

2 bags grass seed. 

1 barrel cement. 

15 short drills. 

2 long «' 

7 birch brooms. 

3 rattan brushes. 

9 wooden rammers. 

45 new hammer handles. 
54 " pick " 

36 grub axes. 
2 grindstones. 

4 jack screws. 
1 iron pump. 

88 feet 4-inch iron flange pipe. 
38 " 8 " " " • " 

1 12-inch quarter turn. 
12 feet 18-iuch Scotch pipe. 
42 feet 15 '« " " 
15 . " 30 " cement pipe. 



98 City Document. — No. 57. 



5 feet 9-inch cement pipe. 


4 


pieces rubber hose. 




2 


" belting. 




2 


whitewash brushes 


(old). 


5 


new whitewash brushes. 


.0 


new paint brushes. 




1 


window brush. 




3 


telegraph batteries. 




2 


horses. 




1 


Concord wagon. 




1 


covered " 




1 


iron safe. 




3 


stoves. 





12 pair rubber boots. 

OFFICE AND STABLE FURNITURE. 

Property at Lake Cochituate. 

1 extension table. 
1 parlor table. 



18 


dining-room chairs 


1 


mirror. 


1 


wash-bowl. 


1 
1 


map. 

oil-cloth carpet. 


1 


straw carpet. 


1 


cooking range. 


1 
1 


telegraph battery, 
horse. 


1 


single harness. 


1 


beach wagon. 


1 


cart. 


1 


cart harness. 


1 
1 


express wagon, 
sleigh. 



Eepoet of the Water Boaed. 99 



1 


bufialo robe. 


1 


pair steelyards. 


1 


rain gauge. 


2 


boats. 


1 


haycutter. 


12 


picks . 


6 


shovels. 


2 


long-handle shovels. 


2 


spades. 


2 


iron rakes. 


6 


iron bars. 


1 


hand saw. 


1 


axe. 


2 


hatchets. 


1 


spirit level. 


1 


grindstone. 


2 


hoes. 


6 


fang hoes. 


1 


manure fork. 


2 


hay forks. 


2 


hay rakes. 


2 


sc3''thes. 


1 


hedge shears. 



2 grass hooks. 
6 wheelbarrows. 

1 gravel screen. 

2 stop-plank hooks. 
2 ice tongs. 

2 stone hammers. 

3 whitewash brushes. 

4 ox chains. 

1 twenty-horse power engine. 

2 12-inch pumps. 



100 



City Document. — No. 57. 



At Brookline Reservoir. 



3 settees. 

1 desk. 
3 pails. 

2 picks. 

3 scuffle hoes. 
2 hay rakes. 

2 iron rakes. 
1 iron bar. 

1 broom. 

2 towels. 
1 scythe. 
5 shovels. 

1 wheelbarrow. 

2 ladders. 
1 brush. 

1 



large stove. 



Eespectfully submitted, 

ALBERT STAN WOOD, 

SwpH Western Division. 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1870. 



Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. 
From May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for the Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. 
From May, 1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Divis- 
ion. From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern 
Division. From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 
1850, to October 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 
27, 1851, to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 
1852, to October 1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 
1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 



102 City Document. — No. 57. 

K Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, 
to the present time. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 
1863, to December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Eesident Engineer at C. H. Keser- 
voir. From February 14, 1866, to the present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. 
S. Whitwell, and J. Avery Eichards, were elected a 
Water Board, subject to the direction of a Joint Standing 
Committee of the City Council, by an ordinance passed 
December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force one 
year; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was estab- 
lished. 



cochituate water board. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and re- 
signed April 7, 1856** . . . . Five years. 

John W. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and re- 
signed June 5, 1860 * * . . . . Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term 

expired April 3, 1865 .... Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned 

January 15, 1867 . . One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term 

expired April 6, 1868 . One year and three mouths. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, 

and resigned Jan. 4, 1871 . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 
1871, to present time .... 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



103 



Memhers of the Board. 

Thomas "Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 

55 * * . . . • . 
John H. TVilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 

and 59 * * 

Henry B. Kogees, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 

James W. Sever, 1851 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851 * * . 

John T. Heard, 1851 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54 and 

55 * * . 
Sajmpson Reed, 1852 and 1853 
Ezra Lincoln, 1852 * * 
Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 
Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 
Charles Stoddard,* 1854, 55, 56 and 57 
William Washburn, 1854 and 55 
TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 * * 
Thomas P. Eich, 1856, 57 and 58 
John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 . 
Joseph Smith, 1856 .... 
Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61 

62, 63 and 64 .... . 
Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61 * * 
George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 
Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 * * 
George Denney, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 
Clement Willis, 1860 
G. E. Pierce, 1860 .... 
Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 * * 
George Hinman, 1862 and 63 
John F. Pray, 1862 . . 
J. C. J. Brown, 1862 



Five years. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Fonr years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Six years. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

Four years. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Two months. 

Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 

One year. 

Six years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

One 3^ear. 

One year. 



104 



City Document. — No. 57. 



63, 64 



, 65 

67 



Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and GQ 
Otis Norcross,* 1855 and QQ 
L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61 

66 and 67 . . . 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 
Charles E. McLean, 1867 
Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 
William S. Hills, 1867 . 
Charles R. Train, 1868 
Alexander Wadsworth, 1864, 65, 66, 67 

68 and 69 . . . . 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 
Benjamin James,* 1858, 68 and 69 
Francis A. Osborn, 1869 . 
Walter E. Hawes, 1870 . 
John O. Poor, 1870 . 
HoLLis E. Gray, 1870 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64 

65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70-71 . 
George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70-71 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70-71 
John A. Haven, 1870-71 . 
Leonard E. Cutter, 1871 . 
Sidney Squires, 1871 
Amos L. Noyes, 1871 



* Mr. Jolin H. "Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1854, and Claries Stoddard was elected to fill the 
vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. Mr. WilMns was re-elected Feb- 
ruary, 1856, and chosen President of the Board, which ofB.ce he held untU his resignation on 
June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected President; and on July 2d, Mr. Miles 
Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. WiUdns. Otis 
Norcross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected Mayor of the City. Benjamin JameS' 
served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 1868. 

* * Deceased. 



Three years. 
Two years. 

Seven years. 
Four years. 

One year. 
Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Six years. 
Two years. 
Three years. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 
One year. 



Present Board. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 105 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 1871. 



Charles H. Allen, President. 

Leonard R. Cutter, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Sidney Squires, ) ^ . ^, ^ ^ ., 

V Of the Common Council. 
Amos L. Noyes, j 

AT LARGE. 

For Two Years. For One Year. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, George Lewis, 

Charles H. Allen. John A. Haven; 

Joseph A. Wiggin. 

Assistant Clerk and Clerk of Committees, 
Samuel N. Dyer. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division, 
EzEKiEL R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division, 
Albert Stan wood. 

Water Registrar, 
William F. Davis. 

City Engineer, 
N. Henry Crafts. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 



Eastern Division. 

George Lewis, Chairman. 

John A. Haven, Sidney Squires. 



106 City Document. — No. 57. 

Western Division. 

Chas. H. Allen, Chairman. 
Leonard E. Cutter, Amos L. Noyes. 

. Water Registrar's Department. 

John A. Haven, Chairman'. 
Sidney Squires, Chas. H. Allen. 

On Construction of Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Chairman. 
George Lewis, Charles H. Allen. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

CENTRAUJIBRARY. 

ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be had at a time, in home 
use, from the Lower Hall, and one from the 
Bates Hall, and this volume must always be 
returned with the applicant's library card, 
within such hours as the rules prescribe. No 
book can be taken from the Lower Hall of this 
Library, while the applicant has one from any 
Branch. 

Books can be kept out 14 days, but may be 
renewed within that time, by presenting a new 
slip with the card; after 14 days a fine of two 
cents for each day is incurred, and after 21 days 
the book will be sent for at the borrower's coat, 
who cannot take another book until all charges 
are paid. 

No book is to be lent out of the household of 
the borrower; nor is it to be kept by transfers 
in one household more than one month, and it 
must remain in the Library one week before it 
can be again drawn in the same household. 

The Library hours for the delivery and return 
of books are from 9 o'clock, A. M., to 8 o'clock, 
P. M., in the Lower Hall; and from 9 o'clock, 
A. M., until 6 o'clock, P. M., from October to 
March, and until 7 o'clock, from April to Septem- 
ber, in the Bates Hall. 

Borrowers finding; this book mutilated or 

iiAvrarrantably defaced, are expected to 

report it; and also any undue delay in the 
delivery of boolcs. 

***No claim can be established because of the 
failure of any Library notice to reach, through 
the mail, the person addressed. 

[50,000, Nov., 1870.]