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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 78. 



ITT OF BOSTON 




REPORT 



COCHIIUATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



APRIL 30, 1872. 



■■ .1 



CITY OF BOSTON 



In Board of Aldermen, June 4, 1872. 

Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board be and hereby 
are authorized to submit their annual report in print ; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for print- 
ing. 

Passed in Common Council. 

Came up for concurrence. 

Read and concurred. 

Approved by the Mayor June 5th, 1872. 
A true copy. 

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofco7172bost 



CITY OF BOSTON 



City Hall, Cochituate Water Board Office, 

May 20th, 1872. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston : — 

In compliance with the provisions of the City Ordinance, 
the Cochituate Water Board herewith submit their annual 
report for the year ending April 30, 1872, together with the 
reports of the Clerk of the Board, City Engineer, Water 
Registrar, the Superintendents of the Eastern and Western 
Divisions, and the Engineer especially employed by this 
Board upon the question of New Supply, to which they would 
refer the City Council for detailed statements of the progress 
and condition of the Water Works during the year. 

A perusal of these reports will show the works to be in a 
very satisfactory condition. The average level of the water 
in the Lake for the year ending January 1st, 1872, was 6 t 6 q^ 
feet above the level of the bottom of the conduit, showing 
an average loss of 4^-^ feet from the previous year. 

The short supply of water for the year ending May 1, 1871, 
and the remarkable drought during several succeeding months, 
caused great anxiety, and the means for securing an additional 
supply engaged the time and attention of the Board. In the 
month of October last, it was determined to employ an En- 
gineer to make surveys, prepare plans and estimates for a 
scheme of works to furnish an additional supply of pure 
water. 



6 City Document. — No. 78. 

The Board were especially fortunate in securing for this 
work the services of Mr. Joseph P. Davis, an engineer of 
large experience and acknowledged ability. 

Mr. Davis entered upon the discharge of the duties as- 
signed in the month of November, and as the result of his 
investigations it was decided to petition the Legislature for 
the passage of an act authorizing the city to take water 
from Sudbury River. The Legislature gave early attention 
to the application, passed an act, which received the approval 
of the Governor on the 8th day of April, 1872. A copy of 
the act will be found on page 129. 

The City Council immediately made an appropriation to 
enable us to commence the work, and it is confidently ex- 
pected that within thirty days from this date we may be able 
to make a temporary connection between Sudbury River and 
Lake Cochituate, which will relieve our present needs. 

After making this connection, the engineer will proceed 
with the work of surveys for permanent works to connect 
Sudbury River, not only with Lake Cochituate, but also with 
Chestnut Hill reservoir. t 

The augmented territory of the city, and the constantly-in- 
creasing demand for pure water, renders it imperative that a 
new conduit to convey water from Sudbury River, or Lake 
Cochituate, to Chestnut Hill reservoir, should be constructed 
at any early day. The capacity of the present (and original) 
conduit has been nearly, if not fully, reached. 

In constructing a new conduit we should recommend that 
its capacity be much greater than that of the one now in use. 

The engineer has made a detailed report of his labors up 
to this time, which may be found on pages 114 to 122. 

The plan showing the proposed temporary connections has 
been lithographed, and is submitted herewith. 

(See pages 122-123.) 



Keport of the Water Board. 7 

consumption of water. 

The average daily consumption of water for the year 
ending December 31, 1871, was 13,945,500 gallons; a de- 
crease, as compared with the previous year, of upwards of one 
million gallons per day. 

With a city rapidly increasing in population, and growing 
daily in business both of mercantile and mechanical character, 
this statement may seem strange, but it is easily accounted for 
in the fact that the community were fully aware of the dimin- 
ished supply of water, and regulated its use accordingly. 

The income from water rates has been $788, 252^, being 
an increase over the previous year of $53,461 T 3 -^, and the 
estimated income for the year ending April 30th, 1872, is 
$800,000. 

The expenses have been as follows : — 
For the current expenses .... $277,120 11 
Interest and premium on the water debt . 536,876 00 

$813,996 11 
The Treasurer has credited the Water Works 

for the same year $840,707 45 

The balance shows an excess of receipts over 

expenditures of ..... $26,711 34 

Expended on Chestnut Hill reservoir 26,210,12 
Less receipts .... 1,265,37 



,944 75 

Expended in Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16, 345,372 58 

" on New Main and Pipes in East Boston 37,145 30 

on additional Water Supply . . 2,302 81 

$409,765 44 
Deduct excess of receipts over expenses this year 26,711 34 



Amount carried forward , . . . $383,054 10 



8 City Document. — No. 78. 

Amount brought forward, , . . $383,054 10 

Cost of works May 1, 1871 10,571,896,64 

Less amounts transferred May 

1, 1871, from water debt to ' 

city debt 1,352,000,00 

$9,219,896 64 



Making the net cost to May 1, 1872 $9,602,950 74 

The amount transferred from the water debt to the city 
debt as noted above materially diminished the sum of in- 
terest which has usually been charged annually to the cost of 
the works, and as the result of operations, the net gain of 
receipts over expenditures for the current year has been 
$26,711 34, which is very satisfactory when compared with 
former years. 

EASTEBN DIVISION. 

This division comprises that portion of the works lying 
east of the Brookliue reservoir, including the distributing 
pipes and reservoirs in the city, and is under the superinten- 
dence of Mr. E. E. Jones. 

During the year there has been laid one hundred and thirty 
three thousand eight hundred and thirty feet of main pipe, 
equal to twenty-live and one third miles (about one mile more 
than was laid the previous year) , making the total amount 
laid since the commencement of the work two hundred and 
nineteen and three-fourths miles. 

Connected with these mains are two thousand four hundred 
and thirty-three fire hydrants ; of this number nine hundred 
and seventy-seven are of the Lowry pattern. 

The number of service pipes laid during the year has been 
two thousand two hundred and seventy-five, measuring 
seventy-three thousand five hundred and fifteen feet, or about 
14 miles. 

Total number of service pipes, May 1st, thirty-four 
thousand nine hundred and seventy. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 9 

In June last water was turned into the forty-eight-inch 
pipes, connecting Chestnut Hill reservoir with the main 
lines. A few defects have been discovered in this line of 
pipe, only one of which was of a serious character. This 
was no doubt attributable to an imperfect casting ; for- 
tunately the breakage was early discovered, the water shut 
off at the Chestnut Hill gatehouse, and comparatively small 
damage sustained. 

Pipes are now being laid from Washington street, Ward 
16, through Bowdoin and Church streets, to connect with 
pipes already laid in Hancock street ; when completed this 
line of pipes will be supplied with water from the stand-pipe 
at the Highlands, and thus houses upon and in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Telegraph Hill, South Boston, will be con- 
nected with the "his;h service." 

During the coming season connections will be made by 
means of large-sized pipes through which the Mystic water 
(by the opening of gates in Charlestown) can be carried to 
the top of Beacon Hill, if any emergency should arise which 
would render it temporarily desirable. 

This arrangement will be mutually beneficial to the City 
of Charlestown as well as ourselves. 



HIGH SERVICE. 

The high-service supply, which was last year connected 
with Beacon Hill, proves entirely satisfactory. 

A considerable portion of territory in Ward 16 will need 
to be supplied by a connection with the high service ; and at 
a day not far distant it will be necessary to add to our pump- 
ing facilities. 

DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIRS. 

The Beacon Hill reservoir has not been in use during the 
past year, as the district which it formerly supplied is now 



10 City Document. — No. 78. 

connected with the high service, and the Board are of the 
opinion that its sale can safely be made without detriment to 
the works. 

The East Boston reservoir is in good condition. The 
South Boston reservoir is not in perfect order, and within 
two or three years will need extensive repairs unless its use 
should be suspended by the introduction of high service in 
that locality. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

This division comprises the Lake and all that portion of 
the works lying between the Lake and the gate-house at the 
Brookline reservoir, and its superintendence is in charge of 
Mr. Albert Stan wood. 

The low stage of the water in the Lake revealed the fact 
that the sea-wall adjoining the gate-house was starting from 
its position ; a portion of the Avail has been rebuilt in a 
thorough and substantial manner, and the balance will be 
rebuilt at an early day. 

In order to keep up the supply during several months of 
the past year it has been necessary to pump the water from 
the Lake into the conduit ; this has been done by the use of 
two eighteen-inch pumps driven by two twenty-five horse- 
power engines. 

The usual annual examination of the conduit has been 
omitted, on account of the scarcity of water. 



CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

This reservoir has been thoroughly tested during the past 
year, and fully meets the most sanguine expectations of its 
projectors ; as a storage reservoir it is invaluable. Its cost 
was large, viz., $2,449,982.07; but we believe it to be one 
of the most essential features of the water works. The 
combined capacity of the two basins is 731,472,429 gallons. 



Report of the Water Board. 11 



BROOKLINE RESERVOIR. 

The building and lands about this reservoir are in good 
order. 

The importance of keeping our storage reservoirs full has 
prevented the cleaning out of the basin, as was contemplated. 



WATER REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT. 

The number of water-takers now entered for the year 
1872 is 38,716 ; an increase of 2,584 over the previous year. 

The number of cases in which the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates, during the year, is 936 ; of 
this number 734 have been turned on again, and a balance of 
202 still remain off. 

Meters are attached to a variety of establishments, em- 
bracing hotels, railroad stables, manufactories, saloons and 
buildings occupied by. several tenants. 

Whole number of meters, now in use, 1,091. 

The number of the various kinds of water-fixtures, on the 
premises of water-takers, January 1, 1872, was 145,786 ; 
an increase of 17,552 during the year. 

CHARLES H. ALLEN, Pres% 
NATHANIEL J. BRADLEE, 
GEORGE LEAVIS, 
JOHN A. HAVEN, 
LEONARD R. CUTTER, 
AMOS L. NOYES, 
CHARLES H. HERSEY, 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, May 6, 1872. 

Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 

Sir : The following is a statement of the Expenditures and 
Receipts of this department for the year commencing May 1, 
1871, and ending April 30, 1872 : — 



EXPENDITURES. 

Cartino- . . 

Plumbing shop ..... 

Damage ...... 

Taxes ...... 

Upper yard 

Main pipe ..... 

Service pipe ..... 

Rent of Eastern Avenue wharf and salary of 
Agent ...... 

Telegraph ..... 

Hydrants ...... 

Stopcocks ..... 

Tolls and ferriage .... 

Lake ...... 

Proving yard, for stock, etc. 

Stable 

Raising main pipes .... 



Amount carried forward, 



$276 25 

32 47 
1,616 17 
1,289 69 
1,557 08 

63,380 55 
16,478 27 

2,684 79 

218 20 

1,874 15 

7,266 64 

33 74 
8,602 72 
3,199 51 
3,100 04 

565 16 

$112,175 43 



14 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Amount brought forward, 
Laying main pipes .... 
" " " across Chelsea Creek 

" service " 
Reservoir — East Boston 
Beacon Hill 
" South Boston 

' ' Brookline 

Meters 

Repairing stopcocks . 
" main pipe . 

" service pipe 

' ' streets 

" hydrants 

Travelling expenses . 
Fountains 

Postage and expressage 
Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. 
Tools 
Salaries (including clerks in Water 

trar's Department) 
Inspectors 
Off and on water 
Printing (including Water 

Superintendent's) . 
Miscellaneous expenses 
Stationery (including Water Registrar 

Superintendent's) . 
Wages, — plumbing shop 
" proving yard 

" blacksmith's shop 

" l a y m g' main pipe 

" " service pipe 

Amount carried forward, 



Registrar 



Regis 



s and 



's and 



$112,175 43 

289 72 

13,897 77 

117 04 

407 21 

566 41 

216 50 

932 37 

3,050 02 

801 38 

3,882 58 

8,513 90 

4,206 04 

4,356 13 

253 50 

970 62 

30 97 

155 06 

3,396 41 

22,575 10 

10,065 50 

9,079 38 

981 56 

2,280 07 

706 38 

64 50 

8,715 00 

905 32 

5,188 32 

13,465 47 

$232,245 43 



Report of the Water Board. 



15 



Amount brought forward, 
Wages, — high service 
Maintaining meters . 
Aqueduct repairs 
Advertising 

Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
High service 

Repairs at Chestnut Hill reservoir 
Pumping works at Lake Cochituate 
Chestnut Hill driveway 
Water to Deer Island 
Wards 13, 14, and 15 
Ward 16 . 

Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16 . 
Additional supply of water 
Chestnut Hill reservoir 
New water pipe, East Boston 
New main, " " 

Total amount drawn for by the Board 

And which is charged as follows : — N 
To Water Works . 

Chestnut Hill reservoir 
" " driveway 

Wards 13, 14, and 15 
Water to Deer Island 
Ward 16 . 
New main, East Boston 

" water pipe, E. Boston 
Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16 
Additional supply of water 



.720 11 

26,210 12 

5,000 00 

14,716 25 

40,656 34 

137,701 29 

24,247 75 

12,267 22 

192,955 04 

2,302 81 



$232,245 6Q 

3,742 25 

3,748 44 

1,404 88 

576 48 

2,800 70 

4,256 88 

3,442 36 

22,502 46 

5,000 00 

40,656 34 

14,716 25 

137,701 29 

192,955 04 

2,302 81 

26,210 12 

12,267 22 

24,247 75 

$730,776 93 



$730,776 93 
Amount charged to Water Works 



$685,120 59 



Amount carried forward, 



$685,120 59 



16 City Document. — No. 78. 

Amount brought forward, $685,120 59 

RECEIPTS. 

Received for hydrants and 
maintaining same for Fire 
Department . . . $23,892 00 

Received for rollers, old iron, 
cement pipe, 
etc. , sold on ac- 
count of C. H. 
reservoir . 1,265 37 

" " stone sold by E. 

R. Jones . 20 00 

" " horse sold by A. 

Stanwood . 40 00 

" " pasturage and 

rent of land . 187 00 

" " rent of part of 

Eastern Ave. 
Wharf . . 300 00 

" " off and on water, 

for repairs . 2,313 00 

" fines for waste . 2,008 00 

" " pipe laying, re- 
pairing, etc. . 22,240 00 



The above is credited to — 

Chestnut Hill reservoir . 1,265 37 

Waterworks . . . 51,000 00 



$52,265 37 



Net amount to Water Works . . . $632,855 22 



$52,265 37 



Keport or the Water Board. 17 

Amount drawn for the Water Works, not 
including C. H. reservoir, Wards 13, 14, 
and 15, Ward 16, water to Deer Island, 
new main, East Boston, new water pipe, 
East Boston, additional supply of water, 
for Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16 . . $274,720 11 

EXTENSION OF THE WORKS. 

Main pipe .... $63,380 55 
Wages laying main pipe . 5,188 32 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc. 14,187 49 

$82,756 36 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1871, to 

May 1, 1872 $191,963 75 

Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, 
to May 1, 1872. 

Amount drawn by. Commissioners . . $4,043,718 21 

" Water Board, in 1850 . 366,163 89 
" " " Cochituate Water Board, 

from January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1871 . 5,962,437 77 
Amount drawn from April 30, 1871, to May 

1, 1872, for the Water Works . . 685,120 59 



$11,057,440 46 



Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by Commissioners . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by Water Board, 

1850 .... 8,153 52 

Amount paid by Cochituate 
Water Board, to May 1, 
1871 .... 263,524 55 



Amounts carried forward, $319,326 45 $11,057,440 46 



18 City Document. — No. 78. 

Amounts brought forward, $319,326 45 $11,057,440 46 
Amount paid from April 30, 

1871, to May 1, 1872 . 52,265 37 

371,591 82 



Balance $10,685,848 64 



Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by 
the Commissioners and Water Boards, for 
the Water Works $10,685,848 64 



Gross payments (including interest, pre- 
mium, etc.) for account of the Water 
Works . . . . . . $20,312,557 26 

Gross receipts . . . . . . 10,709,606 52 



Net cost to the city, May 1, 1872 . . $9,602,950 74 

Eespectfully submitted, 

J. A. WIGGIN, 

Clerk Cochituate Water Board, 



Beport or the "Water Board. 19 



COST OF THE WORKS TO MAY 1, 1872. 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

Amount paid Wm. H. Knight for the lake $100,000 00 

a a a a a a a fac- ^ 

tories, $50,000 ; less amount on account of 
the sale of land and machinery, and insur- 
ance at the time of the fire . . . 20,818 22 
Expense of raising the lake two feet, including 

damages 28,002 18 

Cost of roads, bridges and swamps . . 38,332 48 

Gate-house at the lake ■ . . . . 29,907 12 

Dam at the outlet of the gate . . . 8,458 20 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con- 
nections with lake ..... 18,982 23 
New dam, and improvements at the lake . 19,610 90 



Total cost of lake dep : t, not including land $264,111 33 

Land and land damages, less 

credit for land sold . . $225,523 15 
Constructing the brick conduit 817,717 73 
Brookline reservoir, 

land . . $58,418 92 
Brookline reservoir, 

construction 108,301 92 

Brookline reservoir, 

gate house . 33,356 37 

. 200,077 21 

Compensating reservoirs , less 

amount received when sold . 66,859 80 
Engineering expenses on the 

Western Division . . 69,900 31 



Amounts carried forward, $1,380,078 20 $264,111 33 



20 City Document. — No. 78. 

Amounts brought forward, $1,380,078 20 $264,111 33 
Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Western Division . . 83,180 22 
Payments on account of "new 

supply of water" . . 2,302 81 

Payments on account of " Chest- 
nut Hill reservoir" . 2,449,982 07 

— — 3,915,543 30 



Total cost of the Western Division $4,179,654 63 



EASTEKN DIVISION. 

Main and service pipes . $3,058,044 34 

Beacon Hill res- 
ervoir, land . $145,107 10 

Beacon Hill reser- 
voir, construc- 
tion . . 368,426 11 513,533 21 

South Boston res- 
ervoir, land . 55,103 23 

South Boston res- 
ervoir, construc- 
tion . . 35,804 87 90,908 10 

East Boston res- 
ervoir, land . 23,862 50 

East Boston reser- 
voir, construc- 
tion . . 46,328 59 70,191 09 

Engineering expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . 31,403 02 

Machine shop and pipe yards . 84,516 90 

Hydrants and stopcocks . 113,176 40 

Proving pipes . . . 35,983 96 



Amount carried forward, $3,997,757 02 



Eeport of the Water Board. 21 

Amount brought forward, $3,997,757 02 

Meters 121,164 94 

Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . 422,999 53 
Payment on account of Wards 

13, 14, and 15 . 700,983 03 
Payment on acc't of Ward 16 375,000 00 

a a a a a ^3 

14, 15, and 16 . . . 192,955 04 
Payment on acc't 

of new main, 

East Boston . 24,247 75 
Payment on acc't 

of new main, E. 

Boston (last year) 630 33 24,878 08 
Payment on account of new 

water pipe, E. Boston . 12,267 22 

Total cost of Eastern Division $5,848,004 86 



» « « Eastern Division $5,848,004 86 
" " " Western " 4,179,654 63 



Total Eastern and Western $10,027,659 49 

Expense of carrying on the 

works . . $1,230,388 07 

Deduct income received above 

interest paid . . . 305,096 82 

925,291 25 



Total cost on May 1, 1872, over and above 

income $10,952,950 74 

Deduct amount transferred to the Water 

Works from the Sinking Fund . . $1,350,000 00 



Net Cost of Water Works to May 1, 1872 . $9,302,950 74 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of City Engineer, City Hall, 
Boston, May 6th, 1872. 

Charles H. Allen, E^q., 

President Gochituate Water Board : — 

Dear Sir : In conformity with the ordinance relating 
to the Engineer's Department the following report is 
respectfully presented : — 

EASTERN division. 

On pages 32-33 the usual tables of the average monthly 
and yearly heights of water in the several reservoirs, from 
1861 to 1871 inclusive, are given, and expressed in feet and 
decimals of feet above "tide marsh level," or mean high 
water. 

The Brooldine record shows the average level during the 
year to have been l^W feet lower than in 1870 ; ly^ feet 
lower than in 1869 ; 2 t 5 q 4 ^ feet lower, than the highest average 
in 1862, and lj 9 ^- feet lower than the average for the 
previous ten years. 

The Chestnut Hill records are given from November, 1870, 
to December, 1871, both inclusive, the measurements being 
taken at the lower gate-honse and indicating the level of the 
water in the "Bradlee basin" only until June, 1871, when 
it had become filled to s ame level as the " Lawrence meadow 
basin." By comparison of the Chestnut Hill levels since 
July, 1871, with those of the Brooldine reservoir, it will be 
seen that, during the months of July, August, September, 
Octob er and November, the average level of the water in 



Beport of the Water- Board. 23 

the Chestnut Hill reservoir was -j-^ of a foot higher than in 
the Brookline. 

The level of the water in the Brookline reservoir stood, on 
the 1st of January, 1871, at 4 feet 11 inches above the bottom 
of the conduit ; January 31st, at 6 feet 2 inches ; and the 
highest level reached during the year was 6 feet 4 inches, 
on the third of February; from March 1st, 1871, to Septem- 
ber 1st, the highest level was 5 feet 10|- inches, and it stood 
on the first day of each month, as follows : — March 1st, 5 
feet 101 inches; April 1st, 5 feet; May 1st, 5 feet 2 
inches ; June 1st, 5 feet 1 inch ; July 1st, 5 feet 7 
inches ; August 1st, 5 feet 6 inches ; September 1st, 5 feet 2 
inches. Then began a marked fall, and on the 1st of October 
the water stood at 3 feet 9 inches ; November 1st, 1 foot 3 
inches ; November 7th the bottom of the conduit was reached ; 
November 9th — the lowest point ever reached — was 
6| inches below the bottom of the conduit; November 17th 
the water stood again level with the bottom of the conduit, 
and gradually gained to the end of the year, standing at 1 
foot 6 inches on the 31st of December. 

The Beacon Hill records are given, but are of little value, 
as the reservoir has been in virtual disuse throughout the 
year. From January 1st to May 22d, it appears from the 
returns that the water was almost constantly shut in. On 
the 22d of May the water was all drawn out for the purpose 
of cleaning out the reservoir, and it was not let in again 
until July 11th, from which time until August 26th there 
was not over 1 foot 8 eight inches of water in depth. From 
August 26th to December 28th no observations were made, 
and on that day it appears the filling commenced. On the 
31st of December there was 6 feet 8 inches in depth in the 
reservoir. 

The average level of the water in the South Boston 
reservoir was about the same as for the previous year, and 
for the greater part of the time the reservoir was discon- 
nected from the geueral circulation. 



24 City Document. — No. 78. 

The East Boston reservoir has been kept nearly full 
throughout the entire year, — the average level being only 
2 t 4 q 2 ^ feet below the waste weir, making the average depth 
of water 24^-g- feet. 

NEW MAIN PIPE TO EAST BOSTON. 

This work, which was in progress at the date of the last 
year's report, has been successfully completed and the leak in 
the old line stopped. The new main was continued to the 
main land on each side before being connected with 
the old 20-iuch line, and is supported by pile work on the 
flats. 

The entire length of the new line is 1,463| feet, 650 feet 
of which was laid by contract, for the sum of $24,000. The 
remainder, from the channel, over the flats to the shore con- 
nections, which is supported on pile work, was laid by Mr. 
George H. Norman, the contractor for the flexible portion, 
and the cost was about $13,000. The leak in the old pipe, 
as before stated, was successfully stopped by Mr. Norman. 
The earth was first dredged and dug away, leaving the pipe 
exposed, when it was found that the crack extended nearly 
half round the pipe and close to the flange. This crack was 
filled with pine wedges and covered with an India-rubber 
band, secured by iron clamps to the pipe and the flange on 
each side of the crack. The whole work was done by a diver, 
and about three weeks were occupied in performing it. 

Both lines were tested by meters after the completion of 
the new one, and the repair of the old one, and they were 
found to be substantially tight. 

SOUTH BOSTON AND DORCHESTER HIGH-SERVICE WORKS. 

At the date of my last annual report to your Board the 
surveys of the high-service districts in Dorchester were in 
progress, under the direction of Mr. W. F. Learned, the as- 
sistant bavins; charge of the current work of the extensions 
in Dorchester, and who had also made the surveys and plan 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 25 

of the proposed high-service system for South Boston. It 
was then expected that the surveys would be completed and 
a map prepared, within a few weeks, showing the location of 
the several high-service districts, their contours and areas ; 
also the location of all houses in said districts with the eleva- 
tion of their door-sills ; but the work was so much in- 
terrupted *by the regular duties of Mr. Learned, who had 
charge of several important works in progress of construc- 
tion, that the surveys and maps were not finished until the 
first of October. On the fourth of October I submitted the 
maps and a report to your Board, and to this report and one 
previously made (Sept. 7th, 1870), also to one dated March 
12th, 1872, I respectfully refer you for my action relative to' 
the South Boston and Dorchester high service. 

The work of connecting the South Boston high service 
with the Dorchester, in accordance with my suggestions, has 
been commenced, and the 12-inch pipe from Washington 
street through Bowdoin street to connect with the present 12- 
inch pipe in Hancock street is nearly completed, and in a few 
weeks the circuit from the stand-pipe to Telegraphic Hill 
will be complete. 

Sectional plans of Dorchester, on a scale of 100 feet to an 
inch, have been made by reducing from plans on a scale of 40 
feet to an inch, furnished by the City Surveyor and prepared 
from actual survey. Upon these plans are delineated the 
location and sizes of all pipes, and the position of the gates 
and hydrants established up to date. 

Tracings of these plans have been furnished Mr. Jones, 
Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 

NEW-48 INCH MAIN. 

Levels were taken last season over the route proposed for 
a new line of 48-inch pipe from Chestnut Hill reservoir to the 
city via Beacon street. The distance from the Chestnut Hill 
reservoir to Charles street is 24,070 feet, or about 4- 1 5 6 q miles 



26 City Document. — No. 78. 

and the deepest cut, on the summit near the junction of Bea- 
con and Washington streets, in Brookline, is 15 feet. The 
plan or route which I proposed in my communication to you 
dated October 10th, 1871, of following Beacon street only as 
far as Harvard street in Brookline ; thence through Harvard 
street, Longwood Avenue, Parker and Prentiss streets, to con- 
nect with the present mains in Tremont street, is, I am more 
fully than ever satisfied, far preferable to the plan of following 
Beacon street straight to Charles street, both as regards ef- 
ficiency and economy. The estimate submitted in the afore- 
said communication shows that the Longwood avenue route 
is 6,910 feet shorter than the other, and that the saving in ex- 
pense on this 6,910 feet would defray the cost of a new line 
of 16-inch pipe from the pumping engines to Beacon Hill, and 
leave a surplus of over $86,000. By laying a new line of 16- 
inch pipe for the Beacon Hill high service, the present 30-inch 
main, 14,000 feet in length, extending from the Tremont- 
street crossing of the Providence Railroad to Beacon Hill, 
would then be available to reinforce the low-service supply of 
the 36-inch pipe, and all the lateral branches through the 
very heart of the city. 

Although the present necessities of the city may not ur- 
gently demand the laying of this new main, yet the rapid 
growth of the city, the constant extension of our works in 
the Highland and Dorchester districts, and the very probable 
annexation of additional territory, will soon create a demand 
upon our works that will make a new main an imperative ne- 
cessity. As before stated, the records of the Beacon Hill 
reservoir for the past year show that it was practically a use- 
less piece of property, and although it may be deemed safer 
to retain it a while longer, yet I think no one will argue in 
favor of its usefulness after the laying of a new line of 48- 
inch pipe, and it would seem, on the whole, to be sound 
policy and true economy to have the new main laid as soon 
as may be, and the reservoir property disposed of, or, in some 



Beport of the Water Board. 27 

manner, made of practical value. The only time during the 
past year when this reservoir could have been of any prac- 
tical service was on the first of December, when the screens 
at the Chestnut Hill reservoir were clogged with ice, and at 
that time it was nearly empty, and had been so for six months. 
When full, its total capacity is not more than equivalent to 
three hours' supply during the hours of ordinary consump- 
tion. 

HIGH-SERVICE PUMPING WORKS. 

The following statement exhibits the operations of the 
high-service pumping engines for the past year : — 



28 



City Document. — No. 78. 





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Report of the Water Board. 



29 



From the foregoing statement it appears that the total 
running time of the engines was 285 clays, 20 hours, an ' 35 
minutes ; the average running time per day was 18 hours 
and 45A- minutes; the average number of revolutions of the 
engine per minute was 10 t 6 q° ¥ ; the total amount of water 
pumped was 205,083,297 gallons, the daily average being 
557,634 gallons ; the average number of gallons pumped per 
hour of pumping time was 29,708 ; the average of the max- 
imum hourly drafts was 38,232 gallons; the average of the 
minimum hourly drafts was 19,194 gallons; the greatest 
hourly draft during pumping hours was 77,200 gallons; the 
smallest hourly draft during pumping hours was 13,300 
gallons : the total amount of coal consumed during the year 
was 618,587 pounds ; the average amount consumed per day 
was 1,695 pounds; the average percentage of loss by ashes 
and clinkers was 20 T 7 ^ per cent ; and the average number of 
gallons pumped per pound of coal was 333. 

From the daily records I have compiled the following 
statement : — 

Statement of the average daily number of gallons pumped for the 
high-service supply on each day of the loeek during the year 1871, ar- 
ranged to illustrate the relative draft on the several days of the week. 



Month 



January . 
February- 
March . 
April . 
May . . 
June . 
July. . 
August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 

Averages 



693,391 
522,645 
563,243 
579,002 
604,793 
602,596 
64S,143 
619,628 
631,739 
684,124 
582,298 
645,811 

614,784 



Tuesdays. 



610,236 
472,620 
495,227 
512,796 
549,767 
579,472 
575,268 
585,408 
600,320 
629,753 
529,985 
557,209 

558,172 



Wedn'sdays 



624,479 
453,098 
494,153 
518,429 
536,625 
553,696 
621,963 
598,554 
583,176 
618,955 
579,628 
568,103 

562,572 



Thursdays. Fridays. 



597,810 
457,087 
496,969 
508,106 
532,424 
559,751 
592,012 
584,116 
587,559 
612,064 
563,953 
570,874 

555,227 



559,772 
447,161 
501,105 
525,695 
547,867 
572,140 
605,348 
615,159 
580,422 
614,5S4 
563,941 
565,222 

558,201 



Saturdays. 


Sundays. 


599,015 


585,079 


487,672 


432,835 


537,135 


451,329 


560,550 


461,615 


599,485 


479,922 


598,615 


471,581 


62S,080 


512,740 


621,093 


517,787 


622,524 


513.27S 


660,467 


559,720 


614,055 


532,501 


592,055 


513,369 


593,395 


502,638 



30 



City Document. — No. 78. 



From the foregoing statement, and a similar one presented 
in my last annual report to your Board covering the last 
seven months of 1870, the following arrangement of the days 
of the week in the order of the greatest average consumption 
in each year is presented as a matter of interest and curious 
coincidence : — 



Statement showing the days of the week arranged in the order of the 
greatest average consumption, and the average consumption for 
those days, for seven months in 1870, and for the whole of the 
year 1871. 



Seven last months of 1870. 


Gallons. 


Whole of year 1871. 


Gallons. 




720,001 
694,935 
671,573 
669,600 
664,060 
663,932 
603,149 




614,784 
593,395 
562,572 
558,201 
558,172 
555,227 
502,638 



It will be seen by the foregoing statement that the order 
of relative consumption on the several days of the week is 
the same for 1871 as for 1870, with the single exception that 
Tuesdays and Fridays change places ; but observe that there 
is only a difference of 29 gallons between the Tuesdays and 
Fridays of 1871, and that if 30 gallons only were added to 
the Tuesdays of 1871, the relative order of the days would 
then correspond precisely for both years. 

It also appears that the average consumption on Mon- 
days in both 3^ears is about 3^ percent, greater than on Sat- 
urdays ; the Monday consumption in 1870 exceeds the aver- 
age of the Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays 
by about 8 per cent., and in 1871 it exceeds the average of 
the same days about 10 per cent. The average of Mondays 



Keport of the Water Board. 31 

exceeds the average of Sundays in 1870 by 19^ per cent., 
while in 1871 the excess of Monday over Sunday is 22-^ per 
cent. 

Another agreeable fact is apparent from a comparison of 
the averages of the two years, viz., that, notwithstanding our 
high-service works have been considerably extended during 
the past year, yet there has been an average reduction of the 
amount of ivater pumped of nearly 16 per cent. This reduc- 
tion dates from the thirteenth of January, 1871. For the 
first twelve days of January the average daily amount pumped 
was 747,588' gallons ; for the last fourteen days of the same 
month the average amount pumped was 593,240 gallons, — an 
average daily reduction of 154,348 gallons, or nearly 20 per 
cent. The increased consumption in the Highland and Dor- 
chester districts is apparent from the fact that, in May, 1870, 
before the Beacon Hill district was added, the average supply 
for the Highlands was 82,640 gallons per day, while in Jan- 
uary, 1870, the average daily amount pumped for the High- 
lands was 160,006 gallons, being the average of three days, 
pumping when the Beacon Hill service/ was disconnected for 
repairs. 

The engines have worked well during the year, and have 
shown a range of speed quite unusual for pumps of this char- 
acter, varying from a minimum of four to a maximum of over 
forty revolutions per minute. The standard maximum 
requirement was thirty-five revolutions per minute. 

The following is a statement of the cost of pumping for the 
year 1871. It will be seen that the item of salaries is more 
than half the whole cost, and that this item would remain 
the same if the quantity of water pumped were equal to the 
maximum capacity of the pumps. The cost of pumping per 
million gallons raised one foot high is, as appears below, 37 
cents ; which appears large as compared with the cost in 
other large works in this country. The cost in Philadelphia 
varies from 23 cents to 11 cents. This variation is not due 



32 City Document. — No. 78. 

to the character of the pumps or engines alone ; but depends 
upon the relative amount of work done as compared with the 
capacity of the engines. If our pumps were to work to 
their full capacity, the cost per million gallons would be very 
materially reduced. 

COST OF PUMPING, 1871. 

Salaries ....... 

Fuel . 

Oil 

Cotton waste ...... 

Tallow 

Packing . . . . 

Other small supplies . . . . 

Cost per million gallons, raised one foot high . 

WESTERN DIVISION. 

The report of Mr. Stanwood, Superintendent of this divis- 
ion, will furnish you all information as to the condition of 
the structures and grounds under his care. 

The usual annual examination of the conduit has been 
postponed, so that no report of its present condition can be 
presented at this time. 

On page 46 will be found a statement of the average 
monthly and yearly heights of the water in the lake above 
the bottom of the conduit, from 1851 to 1871 inclusive. 

It appears that the average height tor the past year was 
6.50 feet, beiug 4.46 lower than the average of 1870, and 
2.50 feet lower than any year since the works were com- 
pleted. 

The tables on pages 38-39 will show the various depths 
of the water in the conduit at the lake, the number of days 



;3,612 


50 


2,319 


70 


. 82 


15 


. 41 


14 


. 16 


08 


. 25 


37 


. 5 


28 


16,102 


22 




37 



Keport of the Water Board. 33 

in each month that the water was running at those depths, 
and the average depth for each month and for the entire year. 

It will be seen that for forty -five days, mostly in May and 
June, the conduit was run full, and with a head varying from 
to 1 foot. This was at the time when the lake had reached 
its highest level and a surplus was run through the conduit 
to fill the Chestnut Hill reservoir. The average depth for 
the month of November was the smallest, being only 3 feet 
7£ inches. The average for the whole year was 5 feet 2\ 
inches, or just six inches lower than the average for the past 
two years. 

The fluctuations of the water at the lake during the year 
1871 have been of a most marked character, and during no 
year since the works were built has there been greater soli- 
citude on account of a threatened water famine than the past. 

On the 1st of January, 1871, the surface of the water at 
the lake stood at 5 feet 9|- inches above the bottom of the 
conduit ; Jan. 14, it had fallen to 5 feet ; Jan. 24, it had risen 
to 5 feet 3|- inches ; Feb. 18, it had fallen to 4 feet 10 inches ; 
May 11, it stood at the highest point during the year, — 10 
feet 9 \ inches ; Nov. 10, it had fallen to the lowest point of 
the year, — 3 feet 2 inches ; Nov. 30, 4 feet 4 inches ; Dec. 
25, 3 feet 7 inches, and on Dec. 31, 4 feet 3 inches. This 
completes the record for the year 1871 ; but since January, 
1872, the level of the lake has receded to the lowest point 
ever reached, — 9| inches above the bottom of the conduit; 
this was on the 29th of March. 

Since that time the water has gained, and on the first of 
May it stood at 5 feet 3^ inches. 

PUMPING AT LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The 12th of January, 1871, the water in the lake being then 

very low, with a prospect of its being much lower, the Water 

Board were anxious to make some provision for a supply for 

the city, in case the water level should continue to fall. As 

5 



34 City Document. — No. 78. 

I was at the time confined to the house by sickness, Mr. 
Wightman, the Asst. City Engineer, advised the Board to 
procure pumps, to be located in the gate-house, and run by 
an engine from the outside. The Board thought favorably 
of the proposition, and requested Mr. Wightman and Mr. 
Jones, Supt. of the Eastern Division, to examine two pumps 
owned by the Salem Water Commissioners, which it was 
thought might be suitable for this purpose. 

After obtaining all the information that could be procured, 
and making; a careful examination of the condition of the 
pumps, a verbal report was made to the Board that they 
would undoubtedly be of sufficient capacity to lift 14,000,000 
gallons in 24 hours, to a height of 4 feet, with a 20-horse 
power engine. 

The pumps were purchased on the 14th of January, and 
sent to the lake, arriving there the 15th. The 16th, an en- 
gine to run pumps was purchased at Lawrence and forwarded 
to the lake. This machinery was put in running order, but as 
the water in the lake increased instead of diminishing in 
height, there was no necessity for using it, and it remained 
idle until November. 

The 4th of November Mr. Wightman was requested by the 
President of the Water Board to take charge of the pumps 
and the operation of them. A test of the capacity of the 
pumps was made on the 7th and 8th, and found to be 11,500,- 
000 in 24 hours, with a lift of 7 ft. 6 in. 

The lift was reduced to 6 ft. 3 in., improved discharge 
pipes attached to the pumps, and on the 11th they commenced 
pumping the supply for the city. These pumps would have 
furnished a sufficient quantity for the daily consumption, ex- 
cept in extremely cold weather, but as the reservoirs had 
been reduced to a very low level, it was deemed necessary 
to increase the quantity in them to render the supply certain, 
in case of an accident to the pumps or conduit. A third 
pump was therefore procured, and the engine at Chestnut 



Eeport of the Water Board. 35 

Hill reservoir, used on the stone crusher, sent to the lake to run 
it. The three pumps were started on the 9th of December, 
and on the 13th they commenced to run continuously night 
and day, and not only pumped the supply for the city, but 
increased the depth of water in the Chestnut Hill reservoir 
2 feet. 

While these pumps were running, preparations had been 
made to meet another contingency. The pumps being lo- 
cated inside the gate-house could be used only as long as the 
water was at sufficient height in the chamber to cover them, 
and as they were not suction pumps, would be useless in case 
the water level should fall 3 feet. Piles had therefore been 
driven in front of the gate-house, platforms constructed, and 
contracts made for the building and delivery of two twenty- 
five horse-power engines and two pumps of greater capacity 
than those in use. One of the engines arrived on the 7th of 
December, was placed on the platform, and a building erected 
over it. The first pump did not reach the lake until the 
25th of December ; on the 30th it was run for the purpose of 
testing it, and a trial of its capacity in comparison with the 
three pumps was made January 6th, 1872, and found to be 
equal to the three. It was not, however, deemed advisable to 
start this pump until the second one was in position. 

The second engine arrived the 14th, the second pump the 
15th of January ; on the 26th the buildings were completed, 
the engines and pumps in running order, and they com- 
menced pumping the supply for the city. The pumps which 
had been in use were stopped, but were left in position ready 
for service in case of accident to the others. All the pumps 
used were of the kind known as the " Perry Centrifugal," the 
ones first run having 12-inch discharge pipes, and the others 
having 18-inch discharge and 22-inch suction pipes. The 
latter, with a velocity of 120 revolutions, were each capable 
of lifting 14,000,000 gallons in 24 hours. This amount 
could be largely increased by increasing the speed of the. 



36 City Document. — No. 78. 

pumps. The supply was furnished by these pumps until the 
2d of April, when one of them was stopped ; the other one 
was run until the loth, at which time, the water having 
reached a sufficient height to furnish the daily consumption 
by gravitation, pumping was suspended. 

The citizens were saved by this machinery great inconven- 
ience and suffering, as without it the city must have been 
on an extremely short supply, the water at one time reaching 
a point but 9|- inches above the bottom of the conduit, and 
the quantity which would have been furnished by gravitation 
was less than one half the amount consumed. When it is 
considered that this machinery was but temporary in its 
character, hurriedly put up in the depth of winter, and run 
without cessation four months and a portion of a fifth, fur- 
nishing the entire supply for the city, and raising the level 
of Chestnut Hill reservoir 7 feet 9f inches, and the Brook- 
line reservoir 3 feet 2 inches, making the quantity pumped for 
the supply from Dec. 13th, 1,936,654,000 gallons, and that 
stored in the reservoir 330,000,000 gallons, a total of 2,266,- 
654, 000 gallons, its performance of this amount of work, with 
but a single accident, and that a slight one, may well reflect 
credit upon its arrangement, and the careful maimer in which 
it was run. 

On page 45, the usual table exhibiting the rain-fall 
at the lake, and the proportion collected is given. It ap- 
pears that the rain-fall at the lake was 45 i 3 q 9 q- inches, — the 
least since 1864, and 6 i 1 q 4 q- inches less than the average for 
twenty years. The amount of water drawn from the lake 
during the year was 5,090,107,000, gallons, none of which 
was wasted over the dam. The percentage of the rain-fall 
collected was 32 per cent., amounting to a daily supply of 
13,197,800 gallons. The average percentage for the past 
twenty years collected in the lake has been 45 per cent. 



Report of the Water Board. 37 

consumption of water. 
On pages 43 and 44 will be found the table giving 
the consumption of water by daily averages for each 
month since 1849. The average daily consumption for the 
entire year 1871, was 13,945,500 gallons. The greatest 
daily average of the year was in September, — 16,512,000 
gallons; and the least was in December, — 12,564,000 gal- 
lons. 

RAIN-FALL. 

The usual table of the annual amount of rain-fall at Lake 
Cochituate, Waltham, Lowell, Cambridge, Providence and 
Boston is to be found on page 40 ; also, on page 41 
is the usual table prepared by Mr. William H. Bradley, 
Superintendent of Sewers, showing the days upon which 
snow or rain fell during the year, and the amount on such 
days. 

For the information presented in these tables I desire to 
express my thanks to the several gentlemen who have so 
kindly furnished it. 

From the records in this office I have prepared tables 
exhibiting the monthly and annual rain-fall, also the average 
for each month for the whole term covered by the records. 
The places of observation were Providence, R. I., Boston, 
Cambridge, Waltham, Lowell and Lake Cochituate. The 
Providence observations cover a term of forty years, — from 
1832 to 1871 inclusive. The Lake Cochituate records are 
from 1852 to 1871 inclusive, — twenty years. All the rest 
cover a term of thirty years, — from 1842 to 1871 inclusive. 
These tables will be found on pages 52 to 58. On 
page 59 may be found a table in which the monthly 
rain-fall from 1842 to 1871 is given, covering all the 
places of observation embraced in the other tables. This 
monthly rain-fall is the average of the monthly rain-falls, as 
given in the preceding tables, at each of the places of obser- 



38 City Document. — No. 78. 

vation, and may be assumed to represent a fair average of 
the rain-fall for quite a large district, extending from Prov- 
idence to Lowell in one direction, and from Boston to the 
lake in the other, covering an area of over 1,000 square 
miles. From this table it appears that the average annual 
rain-fall in this large district for thirty years was 45 t 5 q 7 q- 
inches. The least annual rain-fall was 29-j 5 ^- inches in 1846 ; 
the greatest annual rain-fall was 59yU_ inches in 1863. The 
monthly averages for the whole term show that August is 
the wettest month, and February the dryest. 

For several years I have published the statement hereinbe- 
fore alluded to (page 45), showing the amount of rain-fall 
on the. water-shed of Lake Cochituate ; amount of water con- 
sumed and wasted ; rise or fall of the lake expressed in gal- 
lons ; total amount of water collected in the lake from its 
water-shed ; average daily amount collected, and the avail- 
able percentage of the rain-fall collected. This statement is 
based on the rain-fall of the entire year, and, as it frequently 
happens that, in the consideration of questions relating to 
water supply as derived from the rain-fall on a given district, 
it is desirable to know what proportion of the rain-fall is col- 
lectable at different seasons of the year, I have prepared a 
series of tables (pages 60 to 68), in the same form as the 
annual statement above referred to ; but these tables are 
monthly statements, and cover the whole term of my official 
connection with the water works, as City Engineer, from 
1863 to 1871 inclusive. 

The column in these tables giving the percentage of rain- 
fall collected each month, presents some apparent absurdities, 
such as may be found, for instance, in the statement for 1864, 
where the amount collected in the month of February is 
greater than the rain-fall, being 159 per cent. ; but it must 
be remembered that the amount falling in one month may be 
very large, and may be in the form of snow, which does not 
affect the lake until it melts, which may be in the following 



Eeport of the Water Board. 39 

month ; thus, in the instance cited, the precipitation of rain 
and snow in December and January was 8.42 inches, and it 
was a portion of this that was received into the lake in the 
following February, when the rain -fall was very small, only 
t 9 q 8 q of an inch. It thus appears that it is not possible to 
determine the proportions correctly, for terms so short as 
monthly periods ; but a careful inspection of these monthly 
statements will show that the year may be divided into two 
periods, which represent the seasons of the maximum and 
minimum productiveness of any water-shed. I find that 
these seasons are as follows : from December 1st to June 
1st represents the season of maximum productiveness, and 
the balance of the year, the season of minimum productive- 
ness. From the preceding tables I have deduced the 
statements, which appear on pages 69 and 70, showing 
the several years (1863 to 1871) divided into the seasons 
of maximum and minimum productiveness. From this table 
it appears that the law is invariable throughout the whole 
term, and that it is perfectly safe to assume that the propor- 
tion of rain-fall collectable in the six months from December 
1st to June 1st will be more than double that collectable 
from June to December. The average percentage for the 
whole term, collected between December 1st and June 1st, 
was 58 per cent. ; for the remaining six months it was 22 per 
cent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. HENEY CEAFTS, 

City Engineer. 



40 



Crrr Document. — No. 78. 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the 

Chestnut Hill Reservoirs above 



BROOKLLNE. 

Maximum high-water line, 124.G0. 



Month. 




1861. 


1862, 


1863. 


1864. 


1865, 


1866, 

122.28 
122.47 
123.19 
123.45 
123.04 
123.29 
122.97 
122.80 
122.81 
123.03 
122.75 
122.64 


1867, 


1868, 

123.29 
122.79 
122.33 
123.04 
123.04 
122.77 
122.77 
122.75 
122.12 
122.31 
122.56 
122.00 

122.65 


1869. 

122.58 
122.64 
122.48 
122.60 
122.77 
121.85 
122.10 
122.19 
122.50 
122.58 
122.46 
122.92 

122.48 


1870. 


1871, 


February 
April . . 

July . . . 

September 

November 
December 








122.81 
122.68 
123.32 
124.01 
124.04 
123.68 
122.68 
123.71 
123.76 
123.79 
123.80 
124.00 


122.46 
122.S5 
123.52 
124.18 
124.00 
123.25 
123.73 
123.70 
123.64 
123.85 
124.07 
123.46 


123.64 
123.23 
123.23 
123.85 
123.52 
123.17 
122.76 
123.11 
123.36 
122.26 
123.63 
122.53 


122.37 
122.61 
123.62 
123.82 
123.62 
122.66 
122.87 
122.64 
122.03 
123.19 
122.7S 
122.29 


123.31 
122.82 
123.26 
123.38 
122.65 
123.23 
123.33 
123.39 
123.29 
123.29 
123.3S 
123.24 


122.00 
123.12 
123.05 
123.00 
123.07 
122.34 
122.98 
122.23 
122.52 
122.65 
122.89 
122.37 


122.83 
122.60 
122.77 
122.56 
122.75 
122.64 
122.50 
122.23 
122.35 
122.64 
122.60 
122.50 

122.58 


121.89 
122.54 
122.08 
122.00 
121.79 
121.98 
122.19 
122.06 
121.50 
119.54 
116.94 
117.71 


Yearly Ave 


rag 


e 




123.52 


123:56 


123.19 


122.87 


123.21 


122.89 


122.69 


121.02 



BEACON HILL. 
Maximum high-water line, 121.53. 



Month. 



January . 
February 
March . . 
April . . 
May . . 
June . . 
July . . . 
August . 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



Yearly Average 



1861, 1862, 1863. 1864. 1865, 1866, 1867. 1868. 1869. 1870. 1871. 



116.61 
118.93 
119.05 
118.91 
119.06 
117.32 
116 .48 
114.18 
113.14 
115.91 
116.74 
117.45 

116.98 



117.48 
119.46 
119.18 
117.91 
117.59 
116.39 
116.46 
116.22 
116.22 

117.20 
115.23 



117.21 



118.36 
118.18 
118.03 
117.27 
116.33 
115.40 
116.34 
116.05 
116.12 
115.87 
116.85 
118.30 



116.92 



117.72 
117.54 
116.38 
117.21 
116.53 
115.31 
115.32 
115.19 
115.91 
118.17 
118.55 
117.35 



119.18 
118.91 
120.58 
121.28 
120.31 
120.56 
121.23 
119.83 
119.03 
118.43 
120.14 
120.50 



120.00 



119.20 
119.65 
120.72 
120.70 
119.53 
118.53 
119.51 
119.17 
119.39 
119.50 
119.78 
119.37 



119.59 



119.11 
118.59 
119.45 
119.86 
118.50 
118.34 
119.00 
117.70 
120.46 
120.46 
120.84 
120.02 



120.20 
120.11 
120.57 
120.57 
118.65 
118.45 
120.24 
117.11 
118.20 
118.61 
119.03 



117.78 118.36 



118.51 
118.72 
118.30 
118.82 
119.68 
117.13 
117.20 
117.63 
117.45 
118.36 
118.45 



119.11 118.13 



118.63 
117.78 
118.07 
118.34 
118.63 
118.03 
119.30 
119.59 
117.72 
117.80 
118.61 
119.38 



119.26 
118.95 
119.38 
119.59 
119.09 

109.63 
109.68 



118.49 116.51 



Keport of the Water Board. 



41 



Water in the Brookline, Beacon Hill, South and East Boston, and 
" tide marsh level," 1861-71. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Maximum high-water line, 122.86. 



Month. 


1861. 

115.03 


1862. 

113.66 


1863. 


1864, 


1865. 

114.21 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 
114.46 


1871. 


January . . . 




115.73 


110.63 


114.38 


112.46 


111.15 


111.15 


112.51 


February . . 




115.07 


114.08 


115.54 


110.94 


113.42 


114.44 


111.36 


111.15 


111.34 


114.80 


112.61 


March .... 




115.12 


114.12 


115.36 


111.13 


113.64 


113.51 


111.74 


111.11 


111.63 


114.51 


112.74 


April 




115.32 


114.93 


114.73 


112.07 


114.82 


114.99 


111.88 


111.55 


111.96 


113.57 


112.63 


May 




113.83 


115.74 


112.71 


111.64 


115.44 


114.90 


111.63 


111.61 


111.78 


113.53 


112.71 


June 


. . 


112.58 


114.22 


111.39 


109.06 


114.91 


114.32 


111.19 


112.15 


111.51 


113.36 


112.44 


July 




110.91 


114.23 


109.75 


108.57 


114.36 


113.96 


111.53 


111.53 


111.19 


112.21 


115.32 


August . . . 


. . 


112.92 


114.03 


109.80 


109.53 


113.80 


114.07 


111.90 


111.53 


110.65 


110.78 


114.03 


September . . 




112.96 


114.04 


109.64 


110.21 


113.69 


113.41 


111.70 


111.44 


108.76 


110.15 


113.13 


October .... 




114.68 


114.24 


109.90 


112.49 


112.89 


112.74 


111.29 


111.44 


113.15 


110.01 


112.80 


November . . 




114.14 


115.94 


111.25 


112.49 


112.74 


112.03 


111.26 


111.44 


113.76 


111.86 


112.76 


December . . 




113.79 


116.35 


109.90 


113.89 


113.78 


112.62 


111.08 


111.11 


113.88 


112 61 


109.26 


Yearly Average . 


113.86 


114.63 


112.14 


111.05 


113.97 


113.78 


111.59 


111.44 


111.74 


112.65 


112.74 


EAST BOSTON. 
Maximum high-water liDe, 107.60. 


Month. 


1861, 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


January . . 




95.37 


96.26 


95.64 


90.22 


96.12 


93.61 


91.89 


92.81 


99.72 


104.45 


101.18 


February . . 




93.05 


94.94 


93.86 


92.98 


97.00 


96.61 


92.06 


92.10 


100.56 


104.20 


104.33 


March . . . 




94.60 


95.75 


94.29 


93.50 


94.83 


94.22 


91.69 


91.14 


100.60 


100.89 


106.12 


April .... 




98.07 


96.71 


95.65 


96.16 


96.52 


96.47 


90.91 




t* 

£* 


104.93 


107.14 


May .... 




97.85 


96.99 


93.07 


97.68 


96.04 


95.85 


89.63 




13 P< 


105.91 


106.50 


June .... 




96.22 


95.99 


91.10 


94.22 


93.91 


93.71 


91.82 


U 


3 u 


106.00 


106.43 


July .... 




95.00 


96.13 


90.43 


92.34 


96.82 


95.35 


94.60 


ft 


100.60 


103.87 


106.47 


August . . . 




97.34 


93.96 


91.23 


92.84 


95.78 


93.85 


94.16 




95.08 


104.25 


105.22 


September . 




95.76 


95.57 


91.96 


95.00 


94.52 


52 r„- 


99.40 


o 


94.87 


102.77 


104.91 


October . . 




95.56 


91.80 


95.02 


97.55 


93.38 


o g 

13 P< 


96.85 




96.97 


105.20 


104.81 


November . 




96.40 


93.57 


93.36 


98.14 


92.23 


"S2 


93.47 




101.12 


104.75 


104.56 


December 




97.37 


95.77 


89.79 


97.27 


94.34 


92.29 


92.57 




102.06 
99.06 


105.18 
104.37 


104.58 


Yearly Averag 


e . . 


96.05 


95.29 


92.95 


94.83 


95.12 


94.66 


93.25 


92.02 


105.18 



42 City Document. — No. 78. 

Average monthly and yearly heights, etc. — Continued. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 
Maximum high-water line, 125.00. 


Month. 




1870. 


1871. 








102 00 








102 81 








105 19 








110 48 








116.21 
121 46 






























121.44 












100.80 
101.29 

101.04 


117.08 
115 35 












Yearly Average 




114 67 









Report of the Water Board. 



43 



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60 

u 





46 



City Document. — No. 78. 



S3 

S3 



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8 



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d 


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O 

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ci 


CO 

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CO 


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O 


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: 


§ 


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a 


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CD 


1 


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P 


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02 


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fi 


rH 



Report of the Water Board. 



47 



CONDUIT AT THE LAKE. 

The following table shows the varying depths of the water 
in the conduit at the gate-house, the number of clays in each 
month that the water was running at those depths, and the 
average depth for each month. 



Depths 
Ft. In. 


Jan. 
Days. 


Feb. 
Days. 


Mar. 
Days. 


April. 
Days. 


May. 
Days. 


June. 
Days. 


July. 
Days. 


Aug. 1 
Days. 


Sept. 
Days. 


Oct. 
Days. 


Nov. 
Days. 


Dec. To'l. 
Days. Dys. 


2-7| 
3-1 








1 


















1 




















1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
5 

2 




1 


3-2 






















1 


3 3 






















2 


3 4 






















1 


3-41 






















2 


3 5 






















5 


3-51 
3-6 
3 61 






















2 




















1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
























2 


3 7 




















3 

1 
1 




6 


3 71 




















2 


3-8 




















2 


3 81 




















2 


3-9 




















1 




3 


3 91 




















1 


3-10 




















2 
2 
1 
1 
3 


1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
4 
1 

2 


8 


3 101 




















4 


3-11 




















6 


3-111 




















3 


4-0 




















7 


4-01 




















2 


4-1 




















6 


4-11 




















2 


4-2 


















1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


g 


4-21 


















1 


4-3 
























2 


4-31 

4-4 
























1 
























1 


4-41 
4-51 
4-6 
























1 
























1 






















12 


12 





























48 



City Document. —No. 78. 



Conduit at the 



Depths 
Ft. In. 


Jan. 
Days. 


Feb. 
Days. 


Mar. 
Days. 


April. 
Days. 


May. 
Days. 


June. 
Days. 


July. 
Da}'s. 


Aug. 
Days. 


Sept. 
Days. 


Oct. 
Days. 


Nov. 
Days. 


Dee. 
Days. 




4-6 * 


















1 
1 
1 
1 








1 


4-7i 
























1 


4-8 






18 
















1 


?,0 


4-9 \ 




















1 


4 10 


2 
1 

2 
1 

4 
4 
2 
5 
2 
2 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
3 

2 












1 






3 


5 


4-10! 












1 
1 






?, 


4-11 




















?, 


4 ll 1 




















3 


6 


4 












2 








10 


5 l 


















1 


5-0| 
5 1 


1 
3 
1 
3 
3 






















1 














1 
1 








6 


5-4 
5-1J 
5-2 
5 2 1 




















3 




















a 






















7 














1 








5 


5-2| 

5-3 

5-3^ 

5-3J 

5-4 

5-4* 

5-5 

5-5| 

5-6 

5-6| 

5-7| 

5-7J 

5-8 

5-8! 






















?, 
























5 
























2 
















1 








3 














10 








11 


1 












1 








9, 




















?, 
















1 








2 




9 


15 






31 


20 








76 






1 








?, 






1 
















1 
















1 
1 
1 








1 




1 




5 
















7 
















1 



























Eepoet of the Water Board. 

Lake — Continued. 



49 



Depths 
Ft. In. 


Jan. 
Days. 


Feb. 
Days, 


Mar. 
Days 


April. 
Days. 


May. 
Days. 


June. 
Days. 


July. 
Days. 


Aug. 
Days. 


Sept. 
Days. 


Oct. 
Days. 


Nov. 
Days. 


Dec. 
Days. 


eg ;£, 


5 9 


















1 








1 










1 
















i 


5 9£ 
















1 
1 
1 








l 


5 10 




1 




7 


11 














20 


5-11 














i 


5 11£ 




1 




















i 


6-0 








8 














8 


6-0£ 




1 
1 




















1 


6-2 h 






















1 


6 4 






5 
















5 


6 6 




1 




















1 


6 7 






1 
1 
















1 


6 8 
























1 


6-8J 




1 




















1 


8 9 






1 

1 
















1 


6 10 
























1 


6 11 




1 




1 
















? 


7-0 


2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
















?, 


7-0^ 
























1 


7-1 
























1 


7-lJs 
























1 


7-2 










1 














1?! 


7 1\ 






















1 


7-3 
























1 


7 3^ 










1 

20 














?, 


7-4 






















?I1 



























Average Monthly Depths. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June- 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Average 
for the year. 


5-2| 


5-43 


4-11J 


5-6$ 


6-5| 


6-113 


5-6 


5-5 


5-0 


3-9J 


3-7i 


4-3J 


5-2$ 



50 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Annual amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Cochituate, Boston 
and vicinity, 1849 to 1871, inclusive. 









PLACES 


AND OBSERVERS. 








Cm. ■ 


S". 


£ 


■a a . 
§■§ a 


a 
a 


S3 

o 




YEAR. 


>> - 

"P 

3.5 

=30 


>4M 


►J 

,0 o 


oi O (j 

.a a 
-° o -3 


eg, 


25 

JSph 
J" 


1 

at 
O 

>> 




>§ a 


£« 
& 


So 

2 0) 




■°".9 


a 
■a 




*£ 


o& 


1=8 


■!? M ' H 


ll 




o 




tl 


m 


Q 


p 


hi 


h) 


Ph 


1849 . . 




40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


51.09 






34.69 


1850 




53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


45.68 






51.48 


1851 




44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


41.00 






43.30 


1852 


*47.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 






38.58 




*55.86 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 






53.27 


1854 . . 


43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 






46.25 




34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


44.89 


48.41 


39.05 




40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 


1857 


63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 


1858 


48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 


1859 


49.02 


56.70 




48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 




55.44 


51.46 


46.95 




46.91 


46.67 


38.24 




46.44 


50.07 


50.14 




43.32 


42.95 


44.25 


1862 


49.69 


61.06 


57.21 




44.26 


44.61 


50.09 




69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


54.17 




42.60 


49.30 




36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 




49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38.82 


44.69 


1866 


62.32 


50.70 


. . 


43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.04 




56.25 


55.64 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 




50.06 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


49.58 


53.52 




64.34 


66.28 


47.98 


47.30 


47.30 


48.96 


47.70 


1870 


55.89 


59.73 


41.53 


39.40 


46.30 


48.71 


49.02 


1871 


45.39 


48.33 


40.56 


36.82 


44.45 


44.17 


47.91 



* By J. Vannevar. 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



51 



Table showing the Rainfall in Boston for the year 1871, and the 
days on ■which it occurred, from observations by Wm. II. Bradley, 
Esq., Superintendent of Sewers. 



Days. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May. 


June 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1 . . . . 




.08 


.06 






















\ . 














































4 . . . . 




.02 


.12 


.03 






.05 


.70 


























7. . . . 


.26 








.66 




.10 






.40 




.03 






















































































.05 
.16 


.33 




.06 
.33 


.08 






.56 


1.52 




12 ... . 








13 ... . 




1.22 




14 ... . 




















43 




























16 ... . 


.82 




.17 


.24 




.06 






1.11 




.28 






























18 ... . 




.42 


.12 


















24 


19 ... . 








.81 












27 




.03 


.02 


2.32 


.08 




.56 


.08 












21. . . . 






































23 ... . 










.32 














.56 


























.58 




























26 ... . 


1.04 


.16 

.05 


.93 








.58 
.05 
.16 
1.36 
.17 


.03 
.10 

.52 
.32 










27 ... . 


.18 


.60 
.03 


.24 


.54 


28 ... . 










29 ... . 


.28 






1.87 








30 . . . . 








06 


31 ... . 














.24 


1.28 
































M'nthly ) 
Totals, j 


2.77 
1 


3.72 


4.68 


4.23 


5.69 


5.67 


2.87 


3.31 


1.37 


5.51 


5.38 


3.13 



Total for the year 48.33 inches. 



52 



City Document. — No. 78. 



PROVIDENCE RAINFALL. 

Table showing the monthly and annual rainfall at Providence, from 
1S32 to 1871, inclusive; also the average for each month for the 
whole term. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. Total. 


1832 


3.87 


4.25 


3.20 


3.33 


4.14 


0.33 


1.82 


3.92 


3.50 


2.01 


3.46 


5.63 


39.46 


1883 


1.71 


1.55 


1.97 


3.17 


0.99 


4.11 


1.11 


2.15 


1.53 


5.98 


4.50 


4.67 


33.44 


1834 


1.57 


1.13 


1.43 


3.13 


5.61 


5.10 


7.53 


1.15 


3.81 


4.64 


3.80 


2.97 


41.92 


1835 


3.50 


1.20 


4.60 


4.06 


1.50 


1.95 


2.84 


2.25 


0.83 


3.26 


1.72 


3.25 


30.95 


1836 


5.63 


3.45 


5.00 


2.30 


2.51 


3.25 


1.53 


0.72 


1.03 


2.35 


5.25 


4.85 


37.87 


1837 


1.40 


2.65 


3.17 


4.65 


7.28 


2.82 


1.33 


2.00 


0.48 


1.29 


1.95 


2.55 


31.62 


183S 


2.70 


2.32 


2.70 


2.70 


3.88 


3.30 


0.63 


3.55 


6.76 


4.61 


3.65 


1.08 


37.88 


1839 


0.76 


1.50 


1.50 


3.63 


3.79 


2.31 


5.26 


5.00 


1.83 


3.75 


2.30 


5.12 


36.75 


1840 


2.S9 


2.05 


3.50 


3.45 


3.35 


2.89 


3.38 


3.20 


2.95 


5.17 


5.35 


3.10 


41.19 


1841 


6.45 


1.50 


2.86 


7.78 


2.18 


0.98 


5.13 


5.12 


2.35 


3.20 


4.45 


5.86 


47.86 


1842 


1.30 


4.05 


2.07 


2.10 


3.40 


9.65 


1.48 


3.35 


1.40 


1.16 


3.82 


3.93 


37.71 


1843 


0.60 


5.27 


5.58 


4.34 


3.50 


2.12 


1.83 


6.23 


2.20 


0.45 


1.35 


3.03 


42.50 


1844 


4.32 


1.95 


4.75 


0.67 


1.95 


1.15 


4.42 


1.11 


2.83 


5.80 


3.30 


2.75 


35.00 


1845 


3.20 


2.70 


3.53 


2.34 


2.75 


2.32 


3.10 


5.63 


1.63 


3.40 


9.08 


3.48 


43.16 


1846 


1.82 


2.08 


2.86 


1.75 


4.58 


1.30 


1.44 


2.73 


2.33 


1.85 


4.62 


3.15 


30.51 


1847/ 


2.13 


2.71 


3.17 


1.72 


2.02 


6.93 


2.28 


5.50 


8.35 


1.95 


5.72 


5.97 


48.50 


1848 


4.82 


3.80 


2.40 


0.95 


5.00 


3.80 


1.85 


3.73 


2.45 


4.05 


3.80 


3.83 


40.48 


1849 


0.80 


0.60 


5.99 


1.82 


3.43 


1.23 


2.00 


3.39 


3.14 


6.55 


2.42 


3.52 


34.69 


1S50 


5.60 


3.38 


5.19 


4.67 


5.00 


2.60 


2.35 


7.65 


5.00 


2.10 


2.10 


5.85 


51.49 


1851 


1.93 


3.87 


2.00 


7.80 


3.58 


1.90 


5.19 


3.77 


2.47 


3.20 


5.05 


2.62 


43.38 


1852 


2.70 


2.00 


3.55 


6.65 


2.00 


1.00 


1.68 


8.00 


1.40 


1.30 


4.60 


3.70 


38.58 


18o3 


4.27 


5.75 


1.3S 


5.05 


4.95 


0.90 


6.37 


8.38 


8.80 


4.15 


4.40 


3.90 


53.27 


1854 


1.80 


4.85 


2.85 


6.30 


3.60 


3.60 


2.45 


0.30 


6.10 


1.90 


9.15 


3.35 


46.25 


1855 


6.45 


4.05 


0.85 


2.50 


2.55 


1.95 


3.25 


2.02 


0.25 


5.33 


3.75 


6.10 


39.05 


1856 


5.25 


0.80 


1.55 


2.80 


4.10 


2.47 


4.20 


5.75 


5.10 


1.15 


2.00 


5.80 


40.97 


1857 


5.50 


2.36 


3.35 


6.29 


4.33 


1.90 


3.45 


4.80 


2.27 


2.90 


2.40 


5.20 


44.75 


1858 


3.33 


2.80 


2.05 


3.63 


2.35 


5.55 


4.90 


8.20 


3.05 


2.80 


2.40 


3.45 


44.51 


3 359 


5.75 


1.85 


8.00 


2.28 


3.40 


7.06 


1.14 


3.69 


3.65 


2.62 


2.27 


3.45 


45.16 


1860 


1.00 


3.54 


1.80 


1.55 


1.65 


4.02 


3.09 


5.70 


5.33 


2.10 


3.95 


4.66 


38.44 


1861 


4.87 


2.95 


4.62 


7.T5 


3.22 


4.61 


2.21 


4.50 


2.75 


2.17 


3.20 


1.40 


44.25 



Report of the Water Board. 53 

PR VIDENCE BA INF ALL. — Continued. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dee. 


Total. 


1862 


6.06 


3.13 


4.12 


1.60 


2.60 


6.75 


3.52 


1.27 


7.35 


4.77 


6.85 


2.10 


50.14 


1863 


4.61 


4.04 


4.88 


5.52 


2.33 


1.90 


9.42 


4.59 


1.74 


2.97 


7.51 


5.66 


55.17 


1864 


4.66 


1.53 


4.74 


2.46 


3.15 


1.22 


1.46 


4.05 


2.36 


2.85 


3.42 


4.93 


36.83 


1865 


5.29 


5.45 


5.56 


2.98 


6.23 


1.55 


3.91 


0.74 


0.27 


4.60 


4.03 


4.08 


44.69 


1866 


2.35 


5.64 


4.27 


2.02 


5.29 


4.42 


2.03 


3.54 


5.75 


2.78 


3.97 


3.96 


46.02 


1867 


5.72 


6.80 


5.32 


2.24 


3.94 


1.56 


3.15 


8.23 


0.62 


4.07 


2.59 


2. SO 


47.04 


1S6S 


4.56 


1.71 


4.63 


7.02 


10.57 


4.42 


2.09 


4.55 


5.95 


1.23 


4.39 


2.40 


53.52 


1S69 


2.92 


5.19 


6.04 


2.07 


5.20 


5.63 


0.88 


1.58 


5.08 


5.92 


2.19 


4.70 


47.70 


1870 


6.22 


3.34 


5.47 


5.50 


2.55 


8.22 


2.48 


1.71 


2.11 


5.62 


2.83 


2.97 


49.02 


1871 


2.35 


3.80 


5.25 


3.81 


3.80 


5.57 


3.63 


5.73 


1.00 


6.68 


3.35 


2.94 


47.91 


Av. 


3.56 


3.09 


3.70 


3.65 


3.71 


3.36 


3.05 


3.99 


3.07 


3.52 


3.92 


3.87 


42.49 



54 



City Document. — No. 78. 



BOSTON RAINFALL. 

Table showing the Monthly and Annual Rainfall in Boston, from 
1842 to 1871, inclusive; also the averages for each month for the 
whole term. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


Total. 


1842 


0.80 ' 


3.20 


3.35 


3.50 


2.90 


5.30 


1.82 


4.44 


3.25 


0.80 


4.45 


5.30 


39.11 


1843 


2.20 


6.08 


6.17 


3.88 


1.60 


4.61 


2.15 


6.88 


0.98 


4.82 


3.40 


3.92 


46.69 


1S44 


3.68 


2.42 


6.00 


0.20 


2.72 


1.40 


2.17 


2.62 


3.53 


5.80 


3.15 


3.85 


37.54 


1845 


4.58 


4.25 


3.83 


1.23 


2.82 


2.05 


3.28 


1.82 


2.23 


4.00 


10.25 


5.98 


46.32 


1S46 


3.12 


2.95 


2.73 


1.23 


2.02 


2.25 


2.51 


1.80 


1.30 


1.35 


4.17 


4.52 


29.95 


1S47 


3.2S 


4.70 


4.77 


2.20 


2.03 


4.09 


2.65 


6.45 


6.64 


1.05 


5.12 


3.95 


46.93 


1848 


2.30 


3.90 


4.05 


1.40 


6.30 


1.73 


1.35 


3.10 


3.55 


5.10 


2.25 


5.95 


40.98 


1849 


0.35 


1.15 


7.35 


0.90 


3.10 


1.45 


0.85 


6.25 


1.25 


8.10 


5.50 


4.05 


40.30 


1S50 


4.59 


2.52 


5.32 


4.82 


6.63 


2.77 


2.70 


5.30 


7.15 


2.10 


3.32 


6.76 


53.98 


1851 


1.30 


4.20 


3.88 


9.37 


3.31 


1.80 


3.09 


1.27 


3.50 


4.43 


5.51 


2.65 


44.31 


1852 


4.85 


2.85 


4.45 


10.18 


1.95 


2.35 


3.28 


7.63 


1.65 


2.19 


3.47 


3.09 


47.94 


1853 


2.44 


5.30 


2.27 


3.78 


5.63 


0.30 


3.64 


9.40 


3.80 


3.92 


4.43 


3.95 


48.86 


1854 


2.01 


4.87 


2.S4 


6.63 


4.33 


2.47 


3.70 


0.58 


3.86 


2.08 


6.80 


4.64 


45.71 


.855 


7.22 


4.67 


1.13 


4.28 


1.20 


3.09 


4.15 


1.46 


1.13 


4.61 


5.27 


5.93 


44.19 


1856 


5.32 


O.SO 


1.33 


4.37 


7.10 


2.90 


4.02 


11.11 


4.90 


2.70 


3.33 


4.28 


52.16 


1857 


5.36 


2.45 


3.09 


10.83 


5.57 


2.02 


5.53 


7.18 


2.56 


4.50 


2.52 


5.26 


56.87 


1858 


3.23 


2.30 


2.18 


5.18 


3.89 


8.09 


4.56 


7.03 


5.02 


3.03 


3.38 


4.73 


52.67 


1859 


5.93 


4.05 


7.64 


3.36 


3.63 


7.89 


1.58 


4.72 


4.40 


3.28 


3.75 


6.47 


56.70 


1860 


1.89 


3.85 


2.19 


1.73 


2.35 


8.01 


5.90 


4.30 


7.35 


2.66 


5.37 


5.86 


51.46 


1861 


6.04 


3.57 


7.48 


5.89 


2.97 


3.64 


2.76 


6.C4 


1.77 


2.66 


4.90 


2.35 


50.07 


1862 


8.30- 


3.29 


4.70 


1.97 


2.70 


6.78 


7.33 


4.20 


5.61 


4.85 


8.32 


3.01 


61.06 


1863 


4.51 


4.54 


6.42 


9.08 


2.82 


2.56 


12.38 


5.64 


3.12 


3.83 


6.48 


6.34 


67.72 


1864 


3.87 


1.43 


11.75 


4.72 


3.31 


1.47 


1.90 


4.17 


2.60 


4.80 


4.00 


5.28 


49.30 


1865 


4.47 


5.0S 


4.83 


2.57 


6.90 


2.83 


4.26 


1.42 


0.62 


6.21 


4.46 


4.18 


47.83 


1S66 


3.73 


5.28 


4.70 


2.03 


5.04 


3.41 


5.42 


3.87 


5.90 


2.72 


3.74 


4.86 


50.70 


1867 


6.06 


6.55 


6.12 


2.52 


4.11 


2.74 


4.76 


10.78 


0.44 


6.76 


2.32 


2.48 


55.64 


1868 


6.09 


1.88 


5.04 


6.94 


10.38 


3.79 


1.10 


7.53 


11.95 


1.78 


5.31 


2.32 


64.11 


1869 


4.03 


9.98 


8.74 


2.05 


6.S8 


4.44 


S.30 


2.19 


5.18 


6.71 


3.74 


9.04 


66.28 


1870 


8.16 


7.03 


4.88 


S.42 


2.58 


7.59 


4.01 


1.57 


0.67 


6.80 


4.40 


3.62 


59.73 


1S71 


2.77 


3.72 


4.68 


4.23 


5.69 


5.67 


2.S7 


3.31 


1.37 


5.51 


5.33 


3.13 


48.33 


Av. 


4.11 


3.96 


4.80 


4.32 


4.08 


3.65 


3.63 


4.80 


3.5S 


3.97 


4.62 


4.59 


50.11 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



55 



CAMBRIDGE RAINFALL. 

Table showing the Monthly and Annual Rainfall at Cambridge, 
from 1842 to 1871, inclusive; also the average for each month for 
the whole term. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


1842 


0.78 


3.18 


2.24 


3.36 


2.33 


5.84 


1.42 


5.60 


3.34 


1.36 


4.14 


6.64 


40.13 


1843 


1.60 


• 5.64 


5.77 


4.17 


2.17 


5.38 


2.47 


8.74 


1.52 


5.81 


4.20 


3.34 


50.81 


1S44 


4.29 


2.03 


5.84 


0.34 


1.96 


1.77 


2.90 


3.35 


4.50 


3.27 


1.50 


4.23 


35.98 


1845 


1.97 


2.73 


3.67 


1.48 


2.63 


3.15 


4.07 


2.53 


2.58 


4.28 


10.43 


S.04 


47.56 


1846 


2.60 


1.50 


1.56 


1.50 


3.59 


2.68 


3.19 


2.37 


2.01 


1.63 


2.55 


5.19 


30.87 


1847 


3.67 


3.34 


5.91 


2.83 


1.94 


5.49 


2.53 


5.22 


6.54 


1.44 


4.94 


4.37 


48.22 


1848 


2.89 


4.00 


2.50 


1.20 


7.68 


2.81 


2.58 


3.50 


5.18 


6.31 


1.16 


3.23 


43.04 


1849 


0.72 


1.46 


6.90 


1.18 


2.75 


1.37 


1.17 


6.52 


2.13 


7.56 


5.43 


3.78 


40.97 


1850 


3.86 


2.51 


3.27 


4.79 


7.22 


2.97 


2.62 


7.64 


9.82 


2.51 


3.52 


3.34 


54.07 


1851 


1.03 


4.22 


2.01 


9.16 


3.92 


1.62 


3.21 


1.20 


3.98 


4.67 


4.96 


1.99 


41.97 


1852 


2.22 


0.62 


2.10 


7.94 


2.30 


4.03 


1.86 


7.51 


2.01 


2.92 


3.83 


3.17 


40.51 


1853 


3.88 


5.70 


3.31 


3.69 


6.45 


0.55 


3.02 


8.59 


5.95 


3.49 


4.91 


4.29 


53.83 


1854 


1.87 


3.97 


2.95 


4.84 


5.45 


3.58 


3.24 


0.35 


4.36 


2.11 


7.98 


4.47 


45.17 


1855 


7.26 


3.74 


1.16 


3.99 


1.50 


3.58 


4.84 


2.27 


1.22 


5.51 


5.33 


7.19 


47.59 


1856 


5.30 


0.57 


0.97 


3.44 


6.73 


2.87 


4.24 


14.98 


4.66 


3.24 


2.89 


3.90 


53.79 


1857 


7.87 


3.72 


3.49 


8.99 


5.16 


1.71 


6.32 


6.67 


2.93 


3.67 


2.56 


4.83 


57.92 


185S 


3.44 


1.86 


1.77 


3.81 


3.71 


7.55 


4.36 


5.57 


5.11 


2.87 


2.37 


3.04 


45.46 


1859 


8.23 
1.00 


6.48 
2.21 


8.44 
1.73 


2.36 
1.32 


2.98 
2.26 


6.81 
7.37 


1.50 
5.65 


5.39 
5.24 


3.11 
9.33 


3.68 
1.86 


4.99 
4.23 






1860 


4.75 


46.95 


1861 


8.93 


2.79 


6.56 


5.89 


3.19 


2.56 


3.59 


5.57 


1.77 


2.68 


3.30 


3.31 


50.14 


1862 


7.70 


2.79 


6.21 


1.73 


2.32 


6.29 


5.05 


6.29 


4.66 


5.24 


6.73 


2.20 


57.21 


,1863 


4.43 


1.63 


2.46 


7.39 


1.67. 


2.47 


12.43 


5.57 


2.98 


3.40 


6.53 


5.46 


56.42 


1864 


3.34 


0.89 


5.59 


7.81 


2.91 


0.78 


1.20 


2.55 


1.68 


4.60 


3.52 


4.59 


39.46 


1865 


4.87 


4.31 


.4.25 


2.88 


6.24 


2.20 


3.67 


1.76 


1.00 


5.71 


3.68 


3.02 


43.59 


1866 






3.60 

4.22 


1.60 
2.08 


3.91 
2.96 


2.74 
1.75 


3.32 
5.45 


1.73 

7.95 


5.71 
0.50 


0.96 
5.02 


2.38 
1.84 






1867 


4.36 


4.10 


1.4S 


41.71 


186S 


2.53 


0.95 


1.85 


4.73 


7.32 


2.50 


0.78 


4.93 


7.07 


1.18 


4.31 


1.74 


39.89 


1869 


3.43 


5.80 


5.33 


2.03 


4.94 


3.64 


2.65 


1.55 


5.92 


5.18 


2.43 


5.08 


47.98 


1870 


5.69 


4.22 


4.66 


6.13 


1.97 


3.83 


1.20 


2.03 


1.81 


3.76 


3.52 


2.71 


41.53 


1871 


1.45 


2.63 


3.70 


3.03 


3.60 


5.35 


2.96 


3.10 


1.08 


5.70 


4.78 


3.18 


40.56 


Av. 


3.83 


3.09 


3.80 


3.86 


3.79 


3.51 


3.45 


4.88 


3.81 


3.72 


4.16 


4.02 


45.92 



56 



City Document. — No. 78. 



WALTHAM RAINFALL. 

Table shoiving the monthly and annual rainfall at Wdltham, from 
1842 to 1871, inclusive; also the averages for each month for the 
whole term. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


Total. 


1842 


1.04 


3.38 


2.51 


3.16 


2.54 


5.90 


2.20 


4.70 


2.86 


0.96 


3.67 


5.32 


38.24 


1843 


2.76 


1.64 


5.78 


4.30 


0.82 


3.73 


2.77 


8.60 


1.02 


5.54 


3.50 






1844 


4.14 




4.20 


0.24 


3.30 


1.26 


2.44 


2.85 


4.20 


5.86 


3.14 


2.46 


. . . 


1845 


3.44 


1.70 


2.84 


1.76 


2.62 


2.63 


3.84 


3.30 


2.55 


3.80 


10.28 


4.28 


43.04 


1846 


2.58 




4.38 


1.57 


3.66 


2.44 


2.38 


2.18 


0.82 


1.09 


2.04 


3.76 




1847 


3.08 


3.84 


3.26 


3.10 


2.36 


5.94 


2.36 


4.18 


6.88 


1.72 


4.16 


3 02 


43.90 


1848 


3.24 


1.56 


4.08 


1.56 


5.96 


3.10 


1.92 


2.28 


3.32 


4.60 


1.68 


2.93 


36.23 


1849 


1.36 


0.40 


6.66 


1.32 


3.62 


2.00 


2.16 


5.36 


1.94 


8.00 


4.60 


3.32 


40.74 


1850 


4.96 


2.96 


4.12 


5.45 


7.56 


3.72 


3.48 


9.64 


9.92 


2.64 


3.36 


4.32 


62.13 


1851 


1.36 


3.92 


1.20 


8.98 


3.60 


1.64 


3.23 


0.99 


3.64 


4.85 


5.34 


2.25 


41.00 


1852 


1.83 


2.27 


4.04 


7.70 


1.68 


3.26 


2.11 


7.69 


2.08 


2.10 


4.15 


3.33 


42.24 


1853 


2.18 


5.36 


2.33 


3.34 


6.29 


0.95 


2.72 


7.78 


4.50 


2.30 


5.43 


1.86 


45.04 


1854 


1.82 


4.25 


2.80 


4.88 


4.03 


1.87 


2.16 


0.57 


4.36 


3.68 


6.62 


4.25 


41.29 


1855 


6.44 


3.56 


0.86 
0.63 


4.34 
3.33 


0.93 
5.17 


3.58 
1.59 


5.40 
4.27 


2.08 
13.97 


0.79 
4.79 


4.48 
2.23 


4.12 
3.09 


4.05 
1.96 


40.63 


1856 


1. 


30 


42.33 


1857 


2.68 


1.40 


.2.03 


7.78 


4.56 


1.88 


6.99 


4.77 


2.20 


4.60 


2.04 


3.11 


44.04 


1858 


2.00 


1.53 


0.86 


4.10 


3.22 


6.42 


4.02 


4.02 


3.86 


2.21 


2.08 


3.08 


37.40 


1859 


5.89 


2.83 


7.36 


2.32 


3.84 


5.03 


1.59 


5.64 


3.96 


2.80 


3.05 


4.18 


48.49 


1860 


1.46 


1.58 


1.76 


1.06 


2.21 


6.01 


5.08 


7.52 


7.96 


2.01 


4.82 


4.50 


45.97 


1861 


2.56 


3.24 


3.07 


4.60 


2.54 


2.20 


2.83 


5.13 


2.14 


1.91 


4.31 


1.98 


36.51 


1862 


5.11 


2.15 


3.66 


1.00 


2.45 


6.10 


7.09 


3.65 


2.89 


4.35 


5.72 


2.25 


46.42 


1863 


2.34 


4.06 


2.64 


7.82 


2.23 


2.40 


11.66 


4.39 


2.16 


3.04 


5.92 


5.00 


53.66 


1864 


3.00 


0.90 


6.84 


4.44 


2.20 


0.70 


1.16 


2.51 


2.30 


4.97 


4.94 


3.50 


36.56 


1865 


1.40 


2.63 


4.25 


2.25 


6.28 


1.36 


3.52 


2.45 


0.82 


5.01 


3.91 


1.96 


35.84 


1866 


1.20 


4.78 


3.50 


1.36 


5.50 


3.49 


5.70 


3.42 


6.86 


1.94 


2.60 


3.11 


43.46 


1867 


2.50 


2.22 


4.88 


2.49 


3.84 


2.15 


5.30 


8.78 


0.74 


5.16 


1.98 


1.36 


41.40 


1868 


3.14 


0.70 


2.43 


591 


10.00 


2.06 


2.07 


4.45 


7 12 


2.04 


3.67 


1.12 


44.65 


1869 


6.44 


1.00 


5.26 


2.03 


5.03 


3.60 


2.90 


2.06 


6.45 


5.95 


2.08 


4.50 


47.30 


1870 


4.60 


4.94 


3.72 


6.58 


1.37 


4.46 


1.90 


0.92 


1.40 


4.83 


2.98 


1.70 


39.40 


1871 


1.76 


2.64 


3.86 


3.39 


3.28 


4.02 


2.17 


2.52 


1.08 


5.28 


4.70 


2.12 


36.82 


Av. 


2.98 


2.65 


3.53 


3.74 


3.76 


3.18 


3.58 


4.61 


3.52 


3.66 


3.97 


3.12 


42.30 



Report of the Water Board. 



5T 



LOWELL RAINFALL. 

Table showing the monthly and annual rainfall at Lowell, from 
1842 to 1871, inclusive; also the average for each month for the 
whole term. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


1842 


0.97 


3.99 


2.89 


2.87 


2.38 


5.19 


1.03 


5.43 


4.31 


1.36 


4.95 


3.24 


38.61 


1843 


2.14 


2.04 


5.44 


3.14 


2.10 


4.49 


2.39 


8.16 


1.36 


3.68 


3.28 


1.25 


39.47 


1844 


0.93 


1.07 


3.45 


0.29 


3.64 


1.87 


3.50 


6.90 


3.55 


5.18 


2.25 


3.08 


35.71 


1845 


1.20 


1.80 


3.64 


1.68 


2.75 


2.68 


3.40 


2.58 


3.05 


3.36 


7.97 


4.89 


39.00 


1846 


2.44 


1.82 


3.27 


1.31 


4.21 


2.40 


3.59 


2.79 


0.64 


1.61 


2.70 


1.25 


28.03 


1S47 


5.42 


3.14 


3.46 


2.26 


2.15 


6.75 


3.01 


3.81 


4.85 


3.01 


3.70 


4.70 


46.26 


1848 


2.83 


2.10 


3.54 


1.60 


7.41 


4.01 


2.16 


3.15 


4.06 


5.00 


2.68 


3.75 


42.29 


1849 


1.13 


0.83 


5.07 


2.06 


4.04 


1.70 


2.20 


5.53 


2.51 


7.34 


5.70 


3.80 


41.91 


1850 


3.32 


4.38 


2.75 


4.22 


7.12 


2.23 


2.78 


7.65 


6.21 


2.61 


2.92 


4.90 


51.09 


1851 


2.07 


4.43 


1.76 


7.88 


3.29 


2.00 


4.26 


3.29 


2.86 


6.51 


5.30 


2.03 


45.68 


1852 


1.44 


2.96 


3.06 


8.86 


1.22 


3.33 


2.31 


8.07 


1.64 


2.14 


4.78 


2.97 


42.78 


1853 


1.52 


6.06 


2.05 


3.45 


5.40 


0.60 


2.36 


8.37 


4.32 


4.30 


3.79 


1.70 


43.92 


1854 


2.36 


3.53 


3.34 


4.68 


4.31 


3.49 


2.12 


0.78 


4.67 


4.28 


6.28 


2.84 


42.08 


1855 


7.81 


4.48 


1.12 


5.04 


1.07 


3.81 


3.99 


2.32 


0.63 


5.78 


3.90 


4.94 


44.89 


1856 


2.83 


1.07 


0.90 


3.48 


5.31 


2.09 


1.73 


12.31 


4.79 


2.03 


2.53 


3.42 


42.49 


1857 


3.86 


1.63 


2.58 


8.02 


3.58 


3.16 


5.67 


5.68 


2.29 


5.52 


2.26 


5.13 


49.38 


185S 


2.58 


1.78 


1.52 


4.21 


3.53 


5.40 


3.24 


3.42 


3.58 


3.10 


1.26 


4.11 


37.73 


1859 


5.62 


2.86 


6.24 


2.76 


3.80 


5.83 


1.58 


3.98 


3.80 


2.32 


3.25 


5.47 


47.51 


1860 


0.66 


2.06 


2.08 


1.02 


1.91 


4.87 


6.87 


5.03 


9.44 


2.46 


4.65 


5.86 


46.91 


1861 


5.01 


2.S9 


'4.67 


4.52 


4.07 


1.84 


2.98 


5.12 


2.11 


3.67 


4.57 


1.87 


43.32 


1862 


6.86 


3.27 


4.85 


1.75 


1.99 


6.04 


5.20 


2.29 


1.87 


3.92 


4.60 


1.62 


44.26 


1863 


3.93 


2.91 


4.69 


4.37 


1.91 


1.59 


9.77 


6.07 


3.07 


3.66 


6.02 


4.38 


52.37 


1864 


2.44 


0.89 


8.03 


2.56 


2.56 


1.25 


1.62 


3.22 


2.91 


3.79 


3.93 


4.91 


38.11 


1865 


3.61 


3.29 


4.24 


1.80 


5.71 


2.54 


2.39 


2.42 


0.56 


5.86 


2.08 


2.88 


37.38 


1866 


1.66 


4.68 


3.50 


2.56 


4.22 


2.64 


4.54 


3.52 


3.92 


1.62 


2.32 


3.00 


38.18 


1867 


4.34 


3.32 


4.38 


2.60 


4.53 


3.95 


4.28 


10.30 


0.62 


3.32 


2.48 


1.42 


45.54 


1868 


3.54 


1.83 


3.04 


5.06 


7.64 


3.62 


1.18 


4.00 


10.96 


0.80 


4.78 


1.46 


47.96 


1869 


2.30 


5.62 


6.26 


1.38 


4.92 


4.28 


1.52 


1.60 


5.32 


6.80 


2.80 


4.50 


47.30 


1870 


6.41 


4.36 


4.49 


5.94 


1.96 


6.17 


1.41 


3.07 


3.02 


3.64 


2.92 


2.91 


46.30 


1871 


1.80 


2.42 


3.93 


3.06 


3.68 


4.50 


3.25 


6.65 


1.22 


4.48 


7.00 


2.46 


44.45 


Av. 


3.10 


2.92 


3.67 


3.48 


3.75 


3.48 


3.21 


4.90 


3.47 


3.77 


3.92 


3.36 


43.03 



58 



City Document. — No. 78. 



LAKE GOCHITUATE. 

Table showing the monthly and annual rainfall at Lake Cochituate 
from 1852 to 1871 inclusive; also the average for each month for 
the whole term. 





Jab. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dee. 


Total. 


1852 


5.80 


1.76 


4.42 


9.60 


2.60 


2.00 


2.16 


8.27 


2.04 


3.40 


2.76 


3.12 


47.93 


1853 


3.68 


6.56 


2.92 


3.80 


6.32 


0.56 


2.84 


7.20 


5.44 


4.56 


5.26 


6.59 


55.73 


1854 


2.45 


5.16 


4.16 


5.60 


3.92 


2.08 


2.32 


0.28 


3.68 


3.37 


7.79 


2.34 


43.15 


1855 


4.52 


3.50 


1.91 


2.65 


0.82 


1.98 


3.86 


0.77 


0.75 


4.16 


4.84 


5.20 


34.96 


1856 


1.44 


0.22 


0.66 


4.27 


7.81 


1.77 


1.76 


11.40 


3.13 


2.34 


1.43 


4.57 


40.80 


1857 


2.51 


1.30 


1.72 


10.23 


7.15 


4.02 


8.85 


6.62 


4.27 


7.06 


3.07 


6.30 


63.10 


1858 


2.61 


3.32 


3.87 


4.39 


2.23 


10.17 


3.46 


6.42 


5.17 


2.12 


2.91 


1.99 


48.66 


1859 


5.64 


2.91 


10.95 


1.37 


3.46 


3.16 


0.99 


7.69 


4.56 


0.33 


3.55 


4.41 


49.02 


1860 


1.24 


3.80 


1.98 


2.25 


1.98 


11.16 


6.82 


4.89 


9.92 


1.72 


5.97 


3.71 


55.44 


1861 


2.51 


3.81 


2.75 


6.44 


3.12 


2.64 


1.62 


7.79 


2.76 


3.20 


6.20 


2.60 


45.44 


1862 


7.82 


1.08 


4.18 


1.85 


2.71 


6.58 


6.54 


1.43 


2.62 


4.83 


7.69 


2.36 


49.69 


1863 


4.10 


4.38 


3:57 


11.34 


2.66 


1.98 


14.12 


5.61 


3.39 


4.56 


8.54 


5.05 


69.30 


1864 


3.37 


0.98 


8.44 


4.02 


2.84 


0.58 


1.06 


3.56 


1.52 


6.50 


5.45 


4.28 


42.60 


1865 


4.99 


4.45 


5.48 


2.18 


8.25 


0.91 


3.10 


3.36 


1.66 


6.99 


4.78 


3.31 


49.46 


1866 


1.44 


5.80 


3.92 


1.94 


6.46 


4.80 


13.35 


3.98 


8.36 


3.43 


4.52 


4.32 


62.32 


1867 


2.76 


5.40 


5.65 


2.43 


6.46 


2.95 


5.36 


12.36 


1.08 


7.27 


2.63 


1.90 


56.25 


1868 


3.70 


1.18 


2.51 


5.61 


8.12 


2.95 


2.16 


7.38 


7.69 


1.19 


6.77 


0.45 


49.71 


1869 


3.71 


7.07 


7.52 


2.57 


7.59 


3.68 


2.63 


2.34 


8.49 


9.50 


3.26 


5.98 


64.34 


1870 


7.85 


4.68 


6.04 


8.81 


3.14 


4.05 


3.10 


2.03 


0.64 


7.96 


4.40 


3.19 


55.89 


1871 


1.31 


2.30 


5.02 


2.29 


5.66 


5.96 


2.20 


3.56 


1.46 


5.38 


7.01 


3.24 


45.39 


Av. 


3.67 


3.48 


4.38 


4.68 


4.67 


3.70 


4.42 


5.35 


3.93 


4.49 


4.94 


3.75 


51.46 



Report of the Water Board. 



59 



Table showing the average Monthly Rainfall in the vicinity of 
Boston, from 1842 to 1871, inclusive. The Rainfall given for 
each month is the average of the monthly falls in Waltham, Cam- 
bridge, Boston, Lowell, and Providence, till 1852, and since then 
includes Lake Cochituate. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total. 


1842 


0.98 


3.56 


2.61 


3.00 


2.71 


6.38 


1.59 


4.70 


3.03 


1.11 


4.21 


4.88 


y 38.76 


1843 


1.86 


4.13 


5.75 


3.97 


2.04 


4.07 


2.32 


7.72 


1.41 


5.26 


3.15 


2.88 


44.56 


1844 


3.47 


1.87 


4.85 


0.35 


2.71 


1.49 


3.09 


3.37 


3.72 


5.18 


2.67 


3.27 


36.04 


1845 


2.88 


2.64 


3.50 


1.70 


2.71 


2.57 


3.54 


3.17 


2.41 


3.77 


9.60 


5.33 


43.82 


1846 


2.51 


2.09 


2.96 


1.47 


3.61 


2.22 


2.62 


2.37 


1.42 


1.51 


3.22 


3.57 


29.a 


1847 


3.52 


3.55 


4.11 


2.42 


2.10 


5.85 


2.57 


5.03 


6.65 


1.83 


4.73 


4.40 


46.76 


184S 


3.22 


3.07 


3.32 


1.34 


6.47 


3.09 


1.97 


3.15 


3.71 


5.01 


2.31 


3.94 


40.60 


1849 


0.S7 


0.89 


6.39 


1.42 


3.39 


1.55 


1.68 


5.41 


2.19 


7.51 


4.73 


3.69 


39.72 


1850 


4.47 


3.15 


4.13 


4.79 


6.70 


2.86 


2.79 


7.58 


7.62 


2.39 


3.04 


5.03 


54.55 


1851 


1.54 


4.13 


2.17 


8.64 


3.54 


1.79 


3.80 


2.10 


3.29 


4.73 


5.23 


2.31 


, 43.27 


1852 


3.14 


2.08 


3.61 


8.49 


1.96 


2.66 


2.23 


7.86 


1.S0 


2.34 


3.93 


3.23 


43.33 


1853 


2.99 


5.79 


2.37 


3.85 


5.84 


0.64 


3.49 


8.29 


4.64 


3.79 


4.70 


3.72 


50.11 


1854 


2.20 


4.44 


3.16 


5.49 


4.27 


2.S5 


2.66 


0.3S 


4.50 


2.90 


7.44 


3.65 


43.94 


1855 


6.62 


4.00 


1.18 


3.80 


1.35 


3.00 


4.25 


1.S2 


0.79 


4.98 


4.53 


5.57 


41.89 


1856 


4.03 


0.69 


1.01 


3.61 


6.04 


2.28 


3.37 


11.59 


4.56 


2.2S 


2.54 


3.99 


45.99 


1S57 


4.63 


2.14 


2.71 


8.69 


5.06 


2.45 


6.14 


5.95 


2.75 


4.71 


2.48 


4.97 


52.68 


1858 


2.87 


2.26 


2.04 


4.22 


3.15 


7.20 


4.09 


5.78 


4.30 


2.69 


2.40 


3.40 


44.40 


1859 


6.18 


3.50 


8.10 


2.41 


3.52 


5.96 


1.40 


5.18 


3.91 


2.50 


3.48 


4.00 


50.14 


1860 


1.21 


2.84 


1.92 


1.49 


2.06 


6.91 


5.57 


5.45 


8.23 


2.13 


4.83 


4.89 


47.53 


1861 


4.99 


3.21 


4.86 


5.85 


3.19 


2.91 


2.67 


5.69 


2.22 


2.71 


4.41 


2.25 


44.96 


1862 


6.97 


2.62 


4.62 


1.65 


2.46 


6.42 


5.79 


3.19 


4.17 


4.66 


6.65 


2.26 


51.46 


1863 


3.99 


3.59 


4.11 


7.59 


2.27 


2.15 


11.63 


5.31 


2.74 


3.58 


6.83 


5.32 


59.11 


1864 


3.45 


1.10 


7.57 


4.33 


2.83 


1.00 


1.40 


3.34 


2.23 


4.59 


4.06 


4.58 


40.48 


1865 


4.11 


4.20 


4.77 


2.44 


6.60 


1.90 


3.47 


2.03 


0.82 


5.73 


3.82 


3.24 


43.13 


1866 


2.08 


5.24 


3.92 


1.92 


5.07 


3.58 


5.73 


3.34 


6.08 


2.24 


3.25 


3.85 


46.30 


1867 


4.29 


4.73 


5.09 


2.39 


4.31 


2.52 


4.72' 


9.73 


0.66 


5.27 


2.31 


1.91 


47.93 


1S68 


3.93 


1.38 


3.25 


5.88 


9.01 


3.21 


1.56 


5.47 


8.46 


1.37 


4.87 


1.58 


49.97 


1S69 


3.80 


5.78 


6.58 


2.02 


5.76 


4.21 


2.31 


1.89 


6.07 


6.68 


2.75 


5.63 


53.48 


1870 


6.49 


4.76 


4.88 


6.90 


2.26 


5.72 


2.35 


1.89 


1.61 


5.43 


3.51 


2.85 


48.65 


1871 


1.91 


2.92 


4.41 


3.30 


4.29 


5.18 


2.85 


4.14 


1.20 


5.50 


5.37 


2.84 


43.91 


Av. 


3.51 


3.21 


4.00 


3.85 


3.91 


3.49 


3.45 


4.76 


3.57 


3.81 


4.24 


3.77 


45.57 



60 



City Document. — No. 78. 



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Report or the Water Board. 



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70 



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Fh 







WATER REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 



Water Registrar's Office, 
Boston, May 1, 1872. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — I herewith present nay annual report, containing the 
usual classification of water-takers and other matters required 
by the ordinance providing for the care and management of 
the Boston Water Works. 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1872 is 38,716, being an increase since January 1 , 1871, 
of 2,584. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates during the year is 936. Of this 
number 734 have been turned on, leaving a balance of 202 
still remaining off. 
The total amount of water- 
rates received from April 30, 

1871, to May 1, 1872, is ... $836,287 09 

Less amount paid to the City 

of Charlestown, as per contract $47,697 84 
Less amount paid to Mt. Warren 

Water Company . . . 337 20 



48,035 04 

$788,252 05 
Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used in pre- 
vious years the sum of . $49,657 75 

Amount carried forward, $788,252 05 



72 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Amount brought forward. 
Leaving the receipts for water 
furnished during the financial 
year 1871 and 1872, the sum 
of ..... 

In addition to the above there 
has been received for turning 
on water in cases where it had 
been turned oiF for non-pay- 
ment of rates, the sum of 



$788,252 05 



$738,594 30 



. 1,500 00 

$789,752 05 



The increased amount of income for the finan- 
cial year ending April 30, 1872, over the 



previous year, is ..... 


$62,564 17 


The total amount of assessments now made for 




the present year, is . 


$600,036 43 


The estimated amount of income from the sales 




of water during the year 1872, is 


$800,000 00 


The expenditures of my office during the year 




1871, is 


$20,687 96 


The items of this expenditure are as follows : 


— 


Paid for Salaries ..... 


$19,557 79 


" " Printing, ..... 


600 71 


" " Stationery ..... 


439 61 


" " Horse and Buggy 


84 50 


" " Postage Stamps .... 


4 00 


" " Advertising' . . . . 


1 35 




$20,687 96 



Report of the Water Board. 



73 



METERS. 

The* total number of meters now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 1,091. Of this number 798 are |-inch, 
250 1-inch, 36 2-inch, 5 3-inch, 2 4-inch size ; they are at- 
tached to a variety of establishments, embracing hotels, rail- 
roads, manufactories, stables, confectionery, oyster saloons, 
and buildings occupied by several tenants. 

The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city 
October 25th, 1848 : — 

Received by Water Commissioners, as per 



:t, in 1848 


. 


. 


$972 81 


1849, to J 


anuary 


1, 1850, 


71,657 79 


1850, 


a 


1851, 


99,025 45 


1851, 


a 


1852, 


. 161,052 85 


1852, 


t i 


1853, 


. 179,567 39 


1853, 


i t 


1854, 


. 196,352 32 


1854, 


it 


1855, 


. 217,007 51 


1855, 


a 


1856, 


. 266,302 77 


1856, 


i i 


1857, 


. 282,651 84 


1857, 


i i 


1858, 


. 289,328 83 


1858, 


a 


1859, 


. 302,409 73 


1859, 


a 


I860, 


. 314,808 97 


1860, 


1 1 


1861, 


. 334,544 86 


1861, 


a 


1862, 


. 365,323 96 


1862, 


n 


1863, 


. 373,922 33 


1863, 


t i 


1864, 


. 394,506 25 


1864, 


i i 


1865, 


. 430,710 76 


1865, 


t i 


1866, 


. 450,341 48 


1866, 


a 


1867, 


. 486,538 25 


1867, 


1 1 


1868, 


. 522,130 93 


1868, 


t i 

'd, 


1869, 


. 553,744 88 


ied fovwm 


$6,292,901 96 



74 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Amount brought forward, 
From January 1, 1869, January 1, 1870, 

1870, " 1871, 

1871, " 1872, 

1872, to May 1, 1872, 



1,292,901 96 
597,328 55 
708,783 68 
774,445 70 
641,068 53 

),014,528 42 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the 1st of January, 1872, with the amount of water- 
rates paid for 1871 : — 

$375,215 70 

464 50 

14,509 95 

240 92 

931 00 

53,092 59 

13,861 33 

4,168 37 

366 75 

390 67 

532 43 

36 50 

600 08 

1,157 00 

30 00 

249 92 

1,226 21 

739 00 

900 25 

9,980 86 

159 33 



25,294 


Dwelling-houses 


10 


Boarding-houses 


518 


Model-houses 


8 


Lodging-houses 


15 


Hotels 


5,263 


Stores and Shops 


355 


Buildings 


532 


Offices 


23 


Printing-offices 


27 


Banks . . . 


32 


Halls 


1 


Theatre . 


34 


Private Schools 


19 


Asylums 


1 


Hospital - . 


23 


Greenhouses . 


88 


Churches 


3 


Markets 


131 


Cellars . 


504 


Kestaurants and Saloons 


7 


Club-houses . 



Amount carried forward 



$478,853 36 



Keport of the Water Board. 



75 



Amount brought forward, 

2 Bath-houses 
41 Photographers 
8 Packing-houses 
1,393 Stables 
25 Factories 
8 Bleacheries 
Brewery 
Bakeries 
Boat-house 



1 

92 
1 
9 
2 
3 
3 



Freight-houses 



Gasometers 

Ship-yards 

Dry docks and engines 
63 Shops and engines . 
17 Stores and " 

Foundries " 

Factories ' ' 



Printing 
Bakeries 
Ship-yards 
Building 



Mill 

16 Stationary engines . 
45 Hoisting and Pile-driv 
13 Armories 

1,203 Hand-hose 

17 Fountains 
12 Tumbler- washers . 

2 Laundries 

Custom-house 
1 Ice Company (washing ice 
52 Steamboats 

Office (Harbor Master) 

Amount earned forward, 



engines 



$478,853 36 

60 00 

1,075 83 

290 00 

10,455 15 

948 25 

148 00 
75 00 

729 33 
49 00 

149 00 
22 00 
35 75 

110 00 

3,102 41 

994 78 

113 00 

602 39 

324 60 

60 00 

70 00 

443 89 

152 72 

954 72 

475 25 

142 50 

6,945 00 

180 00 

157 58 

63 75 

150 00 
30 00 

10,270 22 
6 00 

$518,239 48 



76 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Amount brought forward, 

Office (City Scales) 

Probate building 

House of Eeception 
28 Fire-engines, hose and hook and lad 
der houses . 
1,895 Fire-hydrants . 
96 Reservoirs 
349 Public Schools 

City Stables . 

Washing-carts 

Offal Station . 

Steamer " Henry Morrison " 

Faneuil Hall . 

Public Library 

do. E. Boston Branch 

Paving Department 

Common Sewer Department 

Deer Park 

Public Urinals 

Street sprinkling 

Public Garden 

Drinking-fountains 

Building purposes 

Marine watermen 

Metered water (9 months) 



$518,239 


48 


11 


00 


75 


00 


10 


00 


605 


00 


34,110 


00 


1,728 


00 


2,958 


00 


188 


75 


100 


00 


175 


00 


200 


00 


40 


00 


50 


00 


8 


50 


228 


00 


250 


00 


10 


00 


175 


00 


500 


00 


25 


00 


750 


00 


5,591 


71 


819 


50 


157,586 


77 


$724,434 


71 



Keport of the Water Board. 



77 



Statement shoiving the number and kind of Water Fixtures contained 
within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1872, as compared with previous years. 



1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


Kemakks. 


5,321 


5,893 


6,041 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


47,476 


53,010 


58,946 


Sinks. 


23,113 


23,961 


27,856 


"Wash-hand basins. 


7,256 


8,013 


9,130 


Bathing-tubs. 


9,971 


11,319 


13,077 


Pan water-closets. 


10,686 


12,235 


14,104 


Hopper water-closets. 


220 


250 


241 


" " " pull. 


263 


216 


258 


" " " self-acting. 


406 


433 


434 


" " " waste. 


580 


607 


619 


" " " door. 


2,336 


2,447 


2,470 


Urinals. 


8,750 


9,615 


10,743 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


736 


879 


741 


Shower-baths. 


17 


13 


1 


Hydraulic rams. 


608 


547 


468 


Private hydrants. 


468 


523 


578 


Slop-hoppers. 


65 


73 


79 


Foot-baths. 


118,272 


128,234 


145,786 





Kespe-ctfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
EASTERN DIVISION. 



Boston, May 1, 1872. 
Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Gochituate Water Board: 

Sir, — My report for the year ending with April 30th is 
here respectfully submitted. 

Last year was a very favorable one for the laying of main 
and service pipes, as well as for the care and management of 
those already laid. The weather was remarkably good ; we 
had a large supply of pipes and special castings on hand 
in the spring, and there was but little delay from such causes 
as hindered us the few past years. From the commencement 
of the season to its close, 30^ miles of main pipes were laid, 
and 2,431 service pipes put in. This amount does not ap- 
pear in the tables of this report, which shows the record 
from May to May, whilst that is from March to December. 
The difference will be accounted for by the fact that this sea- 
son commenced some five weeks later than last. 

Last winter was a long and a severely cold. one. I have 
never in my experience known the frost so deep in the 
ground and so many pipes frozen. Even now (April 23d) 
the frost is deep, and hard in many streets and main and 
service pipes continue to freeze. The record below will give 
you the number we have thawed out, but the number of 
those not reported to us must be imagined. The depth the 
pipes were originally laid was 4 feet ; a few years ago 6 inches 
more was added to that depth. We found last winter the 
frost in many places from 4 to 5 feet deep, and in some places 
even more than 5 feet. 



Kepoet of the Water Board. 79 

The warning I have had will force me to give particular 
attention to the laying of all new pipes to a proper depth. 
The whole length of main pipes of all sizes laid from the 
date of my last report is 133,830 feet, equal to 251 miles, 
2,275 service pipes measuring 73,515 feet or about 14 miles. 
This includes 1,463 feet main pipe laid by Mr. George H. 
Norman across Chelsea Creek, and 3,162 feet laid by me on 
Deer Island. The new 20-inch main from Upham's Corner 
in Dorchester to Telegraph Hill in South Boston was con- 
nected with the old line near the reservoir with proper gates 
in May last, and has given a little better supply to that neigh- 
borhood. 

The laying of the 12-inch main in Bowdoin street, Dor- 
chester, which is to give the high-service supply, was com- 
menced as early this year as the season would allow, and is 
still in progress. In the early part of the season the new sub- 
merged main across Chelsea Creek, extending on the flats to 
Condor street, was completed, and at each end the proper con- 
nections were made with the old main. The leak on the old 
pipe was repaired. Twice during the cold weather of last 
winter the 10-inch pipes that supply Deer Island froze on 
Winthrop Bridge. The first time 7 of them burst, and the 
second time 9 of them. In a few days a plan for their 
better protection at this point will be submitted to the board. 
The water was let into the line of 48-inch pipes which con- 
nect Chestnut Hill reservoir with the mains leading to the 
city in June last. Two leaks were soon discovered, which 
proved to be occasioned by two of the pipes being split at 
the end. I cannot account for these defects, unless it be 
from the fact of their being laid in the winter ; the frost was 
in the pipes and the ground very uneven and frozen. The 
pipes are coated, and a check in them not easily seen. 
On the 15th of March of this year there was a breakage in 
this line near the railroad. This made the largest leak I 
have ever known in an iron pipe. A piece of the pipe was 



80 City Document. — No. 78. 

thrown out some 4 feet in length and nearly one half the 
circumference of it. An examination of the break was 
made, which showed the pipe to be perfectly sound, 
except what appeared to be an old check in the bead 
of the bell, about 2 inches deep. This, however, was so 
slight as to be hardly perceptible. The probability is, there 
being a leak in the joint of the pipe next to the one broken, 
and the gravel washed from under it, made a lever of this 
pipe that pried out the large piece of the other. Work was 
commenced this spring, as soon as the frost was out of the 
ground, of lowering the three large mains on Bradley's Hill, 
in Brookline. Owing to the scarcity of laborers the work is 
not progressing as rapily as I could wish. The necessity of 
lowering these mains is occasioned by the cutting down the 
grade of Boylstoii street by the town. 

The high service of Beacon Hill still works well, a few 
leaks have occurred, two of them were in 30-inch gates. 
These gates were of the original construction and hardly 
strong enough to stand the pressure of the low service. They 
have been replaced by new and stronger ones, but there are 
5 more of them still in, one on the Common, two in the 
Beacon Hill reservoir, and two in the gate chamber on Tre- 
mont street. I have three new ones on hand to replace the 
one on the Common and the two in the chambers. 

A little more than half of the drinking fountains only were 
in use last summer, owing to the scarcity of water. The 
Philadelphia fountain set up last season, that promised so well, 
proved too fragile for the locality. Shortly after it was set, 
a teamster drove his breast team against it and broke it down. 
This accident showed the necessity of some device strong 
enough to resist any blow that might be made, and I submit- 
ted to the board a plan which they allowed me to try as an 
experiment, — that of a heavy granite trough. This trough is 
placed in front of one of the Nash pattern fountains, the 
bowl being taken off, and is supplied through a self-acting 



Report of the Water Board. 81 

faucet enclosed in the fountain, out of sight and danger of 
being damaged. The trough is large enough to accommo- 
date four horses at once, and the supply of#pater kept up 
without waste. As this trough and fountain has worked 
so well, and is nearest to the requirements, I would recom- 
mend the board to make a similar change in as many of the 
old ones as the surroundings will allow. 

The pipes in the Fort Hill district have all been taken up. 
There has been no order from the City Government to lay 
new ones. The new pipes for the Suffolk-street district 
have mostly been laid. I am still at work there and shall 
finish in a few days. 

Before the closing of last season, I commenced to lay 12- 
inch pipes in some of the streets of East Boston to take the 
place of the 6-inch pipes, for the better supply in case of fire. 
The cold setting in so early forced me to close without ac- 
complishing much. I shall resume operations in a few days. 
My report of the reservoirs and stand pipes does not differ 
from last year's report. 

The whole number of hydrants now in is 2,433. It has 
been the custom to add in our reports the number estab- 
lished in each year to the totals of those of former years. Last 
winter I made a careful examination of the city, and find 
the above number, which I believe to be correct. The dif- 
ference between the figures in this year's report and that of 
last year is accounted for by the fact that many hydrants 
have been taken out and others abandoned, as the case in the 
different districts — Fort Hill, Suffolk street and Church 
street. 

Raised. 

150 feet 12-inch pipe in Second street, between Dorchester 

avenue and Athens. 
324 feet 6-inch pipe in Dorchester avenue, between First 

and Second streets. 

50 feet 4-inch pipe in Carney place, 
n 



82 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Lowered. 
50 feet 6-inch pipe in Purchase street, between Pearl and 

Oliver streets. 
300 feet 4-inch pipe in Cliff street, in Boston Highlands. 

Taken Up. 

136 feet 6-inch pipe in Dorchester avenue, between Dor- 
chester street and Water Wheel Co.'s works. 

100 feet 6-inch "pipe in Commercial street, between Fleet 
and North streets. 

968 feet 6-inch pipe in Border street, between Sumner 
street and Central square. 

212 feet 6-inch pipe in Purchase street, between Oliver 
street and Belcher lane. . 

136 feet 6-inch pipe in Minot street. 



349 < 


t << a a a Andover street. 


10 < 


' " " " " Broad, street, opposite Purchase. 


26 < 


' " " " " Washington avenue, Fort Hill. 


72 ' 


' 4 " " " Belcher lane, Fort Hill. 


183 « 


' 1^-inch lead. 


942 


,i a a i r ou. 


65 


" 1 " lead. 


40 


a 3 a a 
4 


487 


a 5 a a 

8 



214 feet 4 inch lead. 



Extended. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



83 



Statement of Location, Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe Laid in 1871. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Atlantic Avenue . . . 

Beacon 

Commercial 

Gloucester 



Albion 

Olaremont Park . . 
Commonwealth Avenue 
Dartmouth .... 

Dover 

Eastern Avenue . . 

Emerald 

Gloucester . . . . , 

Hereford 

Holyoke , 

Maiden 

Middlesex , 



BOSTON PROPER. 

Long Wharf and T Wharf 

Western Avenue and Brighton Avenue 
Fleet and North side Eastern Avenue . , 
Beacon and Marlboro' , 



Total, 12-inch , 



Chapman and Castle 

Columbus Avenue and Providence R. R. . 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

St. James Ave. and Boston and Alb. R. R. 

Harrison Avenue and Albany 

Commercial and E. Boston Ferry 

Dover and Castle 

Beacon and Marlboro' 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Marlboro' 



Newbury .... 

Oliver 

Purchase . . . . , 
Randolph . . . . , 
Shawmut Avenue , 



Sawyer 



Columbus Avenue and Providence R. R. . 
Albany and Harrison Avenue ....... 

Dover and Chapman 

Chapman and Castle 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Fairfield and Hereford 

Berkeley and Clarendon 

Broad and High i 

Pearl and Oliver 

Harrison Avenue and Albany 

Dover and Chapman 

Chapman and Castle 

Shawmut Avenue and Lenox 



Carried forward 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



100 
56 



244 
48 
166 
.36 
500 
418 
887 
225 
225 
200 
490 
422 
460 
321 
550 
171 
153 
50 
275 
378 
337 
238 



84 



Citt Document. — No. 78. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -what Street. 



Sturgis 

"Village 

"Wellington .... 

Wareham 

Yarmouth ..... 
Northampton . . . 
Indiana Place . . . 
Shawmut Avenue . 
Wheeler's Court . . 
Kirkland 

Eastern Avenue . . 
Tremont Row . . . 

Garland 

Carney Place . . . 

Gray 

Leverett 

T Wharf 

Passage Way . . . 

Cherry 

Smith Avenue . . . 

Paul 

Lucas 

St. Charles . . . . 
Greenwich Park . 
Ohio Place . . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Pearl and Oliver 

Chapman and Castle 

Columbus Avenue and Providence R. R. 

Albany and Harrison Avenue 

Columbus Avenue and Providence R. R. 

Tremont and Providence R. R 

Tremont and Washington 

Indiana Place and Pleasant 



Total, 6-inch 



At twin Hydrants 

Pemberton Square and Howard . . 
Washington and Shawmut Avenue 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Berkeley and Clarendon 

North Charles and Bridge 

Atlantic Avenue and end of Wharf . . . . 
Rear Tremont, bet. Concord and Wor'ster 
Washington and Shawmut Avenue . . . . 

Kendall and Hammond Park 

Emerald and Village 

Washington and Shawmut Avenue . . . . 
Chandler and Boston and Albany R. R. . . 
Columbus Avenue and Providence R. R. . 
Shawmut Avenue and Washington . . . . 

Total, 4-inch 



Report of the Water Board. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



85 



In what .Street. 



Thomas 

Dorchester Avenue . . 
Thomas 

Atlantic 

Broadway 

Dorchester Avenue . . 

Granite 

M 

Ninth 

O 

Sixth 

Third 

Fifth 

Beckler Place 

Bay State Place . . . . 

Gates 

Gold 

Newman 

Second 

Vinton 



Between what Streets. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 

Atlantic and the Reservoir . . 

Total, 20-inch ........ 



Preble and Dorchester Line 

Pacific and National 

Total, 12-inch , 



Fourth and Thomas .... 
Dorchester Avenue and A . 

First and Silver 

First and Second 

Sixth and Seventh 

H and I 

Seventh and Ninth .... 

IandK . 

Emerson and I 

GandH 

Total, 6-inch 



K and L 

First and Second 

Eighth and Telegraph ....... 

A and B ...... 

Lowland and Dorchester 

At Jenny's Oil Works 

Dorchester and O. C. and N. E. R. 
Total, 4-inch . 



Diameter of 
Iron pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



"140 
140 

1,780 

290 

2,070 

40 
178 
350 
240 
300 
200 
359 
110 
347 
190 
2,314 

250 
150 
180 
160 
228 
138 
222 
1,328 



86 City Document. — No. 78. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



In' Channel . 



Border . 



Deer Island , 

Deer Island . 
Bremen . . . 
Eagle . . . . 
Havre . . . . 



Deer Island , 



Between what Streets. 



EAST BOSTON. 

East Boston and Chelsea . . . 

Total, 24-inch 



Sumner and Lexington 
Total, 12-inch . . . 



Total, 8-inch . 



Glendon and Saratoga . . 

Knox and Putnam . . . . 

Marion and Bennington , 

Total, 6-inch . . . . . 



Total, 4-inch . 



Diameter of 
Iron p;pe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



2.3S4 

2,384 

2,938 
2,938 

139 
193 
626 
400 
1,358 

85 
85 



Report of the Water Board. 87 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Blue Hill Avenue . . . 
Shawmut Avenue . . . 
Longwood Avenue . . . 

Parker 

Warren . . . . • ... 

Centre 

Fort Avenue 

Tremont. ....... 

"Wyoming * ..... . 

Quincy ........ 

Westminster Avenue . 

Dale 

New Heath 

Sterling 

Vernon 

Highland Park Avenue. 

Laurel 

Bowers 

Catawba 

Atherton 

Bickford 

tiire 

Windsor 

Palmer 

Mall 

Dorr 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 
Stafford and Warren 

Walnut Avenue and Egleston Square 

Bumstead Lane and Binney 

Longwood Avenue and Prentiss . . . 
Blue Hill Avenue and Washington . 
Lamertine and Houghton Place . . . 
Cedar and Highland Avenue .... 
Bumstead Lane and Wigglesworth . 



Total, 12-inch 



From Warren 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue 

Walnut Avenue and Shawmut Avenue 

Wakulla and Rockland 

Parker and Day 

Shawmut Avenue and Westminster . . 

Hampshire and Simmons 

From Fort Avenue 

Catawba and Ottawa 

Warren and Walnut Avenue 

Laurel and Sherman 

From Shawmirt Avenue 

From New Heath 

Clay and Vernon 

Westminster and Cabot 

Harrison Avenue and Washington . . . 

Fremont and Dayton Avenues 

Lambert Avenue and Highland .... 



Total, 9-inch . 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



545 
405 
721 
149 
666 
954 
12 
718 

4,170 

9 
29 
10 

9 

43 
11 
11 

8 
10 
28 
10 
11 
11 
10 
12 
10 
11 
10 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Dennis 

Crawford 

Cobden 

New Heath 

Parker 

Belmont 

Mendora 

Prentiss 

Oriole 

Vale 

Wyoming 

Quincy 

Hammond Park . . . 

"Westminster Avenue. 

Dale 

Harrison Avenue . . 

Maywood 

Sterling 

Francis 

Vernon , 

Port Avenue 

Highland Park Avenue 

Thornton 

Oodman Avenue . . . . 

Laurel 

Sherman 

Bowers 

Catawba 

Atherton 

Bickford 

Wise Place 

Clay 



Between what Streets. 



Woodville Square and Blue Hill Avenue 

Prom Warren 

Walnut Avenue and Shawmut Avenue . 

Parker and Day 

New Heath and Centre 

Ruggles and Vernon 

Station and Prentiss 

Tremont and Parker 

Prom Walnut Avenue 

Marcella and Marcella 

Prom Warren 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue 

Shawmut Avenue and Warwick 

Walnut Avenue and Shawmut Avenue . 

Walnut Avenue and Rockland 

Dudley and Eustis 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue 

Shawmut Avenue and Westminster . . . 
Western Avenue and Binney 

Hampshire and Cabot 

Cedar and Highland Park Avenue .... 

Prom Port Avenue 

Ellis and Vale 

Shawmut Avenue and Amory 

Dale and Bowers - 

Ottawa and Bowers 

Warren and Walnut Avenue , 

Laurel and Sherman , 

Prom Shawmut Avenue , 

From New Heath 

Prom Centre 

Tremont and Hampshire 



Carried forward . 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



16,54S 



Keport of the Water Board. 



89 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Hampshire. 
"Windsor . . 
Palmer . . 
Mall. . . . 
Eustis . . . 
Roslin . . . 
Mareella . . 
Circuit . . . 



Dorr . . . 
Mareella . 



Lewis Place ... 
Gore Avenue . . , 
Walnut Park . . , 
Maiden Lane . ■ . , 

Lent Park 

Pickering Place . . 
Hartopp Place . . . 
Harrison Avenue . 
Smith-street Court . 
Reed Court . . . . 
Thornton Place . . 
Delle Avenue . . . 
Codman Park . . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward .... 

Clay and Vernon 

Shawmut Avenue and Cahot. . 
Washington and "Winslow . . . 

Dearborn and Eustis 

Winslow and Harrison Avenue 

From "Warren 

Highland and Centre , 

Shawmut and Regent 

Regent and Fountain 

Lambert Avenue and Highland . 
Centre and Highland 



Total, 6-inch . 



From Dudley 

Tremont and Parker 

Walnut Avenue and Shawmut Avenue 

Hampden and Reed 

From Parker 

From Walnut Avenue 

Albany and Chad wick 

Dudley and Warren 

From Smith 

From Yeoman 

From Thornton 

From Parker . 

From Shawmut Avenue 



Total, 4-inch . 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



16,548 
641 
1,040 
407 
723 
164 
278 
315 
893 
293 
299 
150 

21,751 

199 
514 
325 
245 
873 
200 
311 
173 
184 
267 
110 
236 
200 

3,837 



12 



90 City Document. — No. 78. 

Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Hancock 

Commercial . . . . 

Adams . 

Neponset Avenue . 

"Walnut 

Dorchester Avenue 

Minot 

"Washington . . . . 

Columbia 

Bowdoin 

Savin Hill Avenue . 

Dix Place 

Centre Avenue . . . 

Thornley 

Pearl 

Park 

Buttonwood . . . . 

Bird 

Exchange 

Newport 

Spring Garden . . . 



Between what Streets. 



DORCHESTER. 

Commercial and Adams 

Dorchester Avenue and South . . 

Hancock and Centre 

Adams and "Walnut 

Neponset Avenue and Ericsson . 
Boston Line and Centre Avenue , 
Neponset Avenue and Adams . . 

"Warren and "Welles 

Hancock and Bird 

"Washington and Green 



Total 12-inch 



Dorchester Avenue and Grampian "Way , 

From Adams . 

Dorchester Avenue and Centre 

Dorchester Avenue and Pleasant . . . . 



Dorchester Avenue and Adams . . . 

Mt. Vernon and Gardner 

Columbia and Myrtle 

Park and Mill 

Crescent Avenue and Spring Garden 
Harbor View and Crescent Avenue . 

Total 9-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



12 


1,435 


it 


4,750 


tt 


5,394 


a 


5.757 


" 


2,731 


a 


8,009 


" 


2,406 


it 


7,842 


a 


679 


a 


2,293 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



41,296 

114 
10 
9 
11 
10 
11 
10 
33 
21 
19 



Eeport of the Water Board. 



91 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Lincoln 

Park 

Neponset Avenue 

Union 

Pleasant 

Beach 

Myrtle 

Ashland 

"Water 

Ericsson 

Mill 

High 

Taylor 

"Wood 

Chickatawbut . . 

Plain 

Humphrey .... 

Albion 

Clifton 

Clapp Place . . . 
Crescent Avenue . 
Moseley Avenue . 

Carlton 

Pleasant 

Savin Hill Avenue 
Dix Place .... 

Elm 

Centre Avenue . . 
Thornley .... 

Pearl 

Mt. Vernon . . . 
Buttonwood . . . 
Bird 



Between what Streets. 



Dorchester Avenue and Adams .... 
Dorchester Avenue and Commercial . . 

"Walnut and Neponset Bridge 

Commercial and Pleasant . 

Union and Smith 

Commercial and Park 

Stoughton and Bird 

Park and Mill 

Taylor and Fulton . , 

Walnut and Fulton 

Commercial and Preston , 

Water and Ericsson , 

"Water and Neponset Avenue 

From Walnut 

Neponset Avenue and Clyde , 

Chickatawbut and Plain 

Stoughton and Cottage 

Stoughton and Clifton 

Albion and Cottage 

From Boston 

Dorchester Avenue and Spring Q-arden , 
From Crescent Avenue , 



Savin Hill Avenue and Creek 

Dorchester Avenue and Grampian Way 

From Adams 

Exchange and Everett 

Dorchester Avenue and Centre 

Dorchester Avenue and Pleasant . . . . 



Boston and Buttonwood 

Dorchester Avenue and Gardner 
Columbia and Myrtle 



Carried forward. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



33 

1,911 

922 

699 

664 

1,202 

240 

808 

708 

395 

1,378 

1,063 

1,171 

495 

1,033 

631 

661 

510 

125 

790 

872 

631 

662 

826 

4,868 

572 

819 

548 

454 

798 

413 

390 

1,555 

28,847 



92 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Exchange . . . , 
Newport . . . . 
Spring Garden . 
Wesley Avenue 
Erie Avenue . . 
Harbor View. . 
Howard Avenue 



Neponaet Avenue . 

Union 

South 

Humphrey Court . . 
Tileston Place . . . 
Bird-street Place . . 
Oakman Place . . . 
Taylor Avenue . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward 

Park and Mill 

Crescent Avenue and Harbor View 



From Savin-Hill Avenue , 
From "Washington .... 

From Newport 

Stoughton and Howard . 



Total 6-inch , 



Near Neponset Bridge . . 

From Pleasant 

From Commercial . . . . 
From Humphrey . . . . 
From Neponset Avenue 

From Bird 

From Walnut 

From Stoughton 



Total 4-inch , 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet of 
Pipe. 



28,847 
839 
680 
294 
46 
270 
352 
1,195 

32,523 

79 
297 
223 
248 
249 
191 
159 
336 

1,782 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



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96 



City Document. — No. 78. 

Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1871. 



"Where. 










Diameter 


or 


Pipes in 


Inches. 






48 
3 


40 
2 


36 
1 


30 
5 


20 

1 

10 

1 

12 


12 

10 
1 
6 

4 

7 

28 


10 
3 
3 


6 

32 
7 
2 
7 
3 

51 


4 

58 
5 
3 

13 

79 


3 
3 

5 
8 


2 
13 

5 

IS 


Is 
80 

2 

82 


1 

21 

7 

1 
1 

30 


5 

8 
2 

1 

11 


s 

s 


1 
2 

17 
7 

1 
7 

32 


Total. 




788 
166 
135 
107 
3 


1,041 
196 










1 


163 










151 


Dorchester 


3 


2 


1 


6 


14 


Totals 


1,199 


1,565 







Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches 
and upwards, joints, 98 ; settling of earth, 13 ; defective 
pipe, 7 ; defective gates, 6 ; frost, 4 ; blasting, 1 ; struck 
by pick, 3 ; doubtful, 3. Total, 135. 

Stoppages by frost, 49; fish, 1. Total, 50. 

Of three inches and in service pipes, joints, 22 ; settling 
of earth, 156 ; defective pipe, 49 ; defective gate, 1 ; defec- 
tive packing, 15 ; defective coupling, 20 ; defective faucet, 9 ; 
frost, 27 ; faucet pulled out, 2 ; faucet broken at main, 
2 ; faucet blown out, 6 ; faucet loose at main, 9 ; faucet 
knocked out, 18 ; stiff connections, 82 ; struck by pick, 31 ; 
cut by drain diggers, 5 ; gnawed by rats, 11 ; blasting, 2 ; 
pipes not in use, 17. Total, 484. 

Stoppages by frost in street, 338 ; frost from inside house, 
198 ; fish, 221 ; dirt, 4 ; rust, 130 ; gasket, 5. Total, 896. 



Report or the Water Board. 



97 



Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1871. 







Diameter of 




Year. 


Four Inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
Inches. 


Total. 


1850 . 


32 

64 

82 

85 

74 

75 

75 

85 

77 

82 

134 

109 

117 

97 

95 

111 

139 

122 

82 

82 

157 

1S5 


72 
173 
241 
260 
2S0 
219 
232 
27S 
324 
449 
458 
399 
373 . 
397 
394 
496 
536 
487 
449 
407 
769 
1,380 


104 


1851 ... 

1852 

1S53 ' 


237 
323 
345 


1854 . 


354 


1855 


294 


1S56 


307 


1857 


363 


185S 


401 


1859 


531 


1860 


592 • 


1S61 


508 


1862 


490 


1863 


494 


1S64 

1865 

1866 


4S9 
607 
675 


1S67 

1868 


609 
531 


1S69 


489 


1S70 

1871 


926 
1'565 









HYDRANTS. 

Daring the year 344 hydrants have been established, as 
follows : — 

In Boston proper — Wilmarth, . . . . 37 

South Boston, " ... . . 14 

East Boston, " .... 17 

Boston Highlands, " 7, Lowell 6, Lowry 53, 6Q 



Carried forward , 
13 



134 



98 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Brought forward, 
Dorchester, Lowell 3, Lowry 200, 
Deer Island, Port hydrants, 

Total, . 



134 
203 

7 

344 



Total Dumber of hydrants established up to May 1, 1872 : — 
Boston proper ....... 1,058 

South Boston 
East Boston 
Boston Highlands 



Dorchester . 
Brookline . 
Charlestown 
Chelsea 
Deer Island 

Total, 



382 

221 

485 

251 

3 

11 

8 

14 



2,433 



44 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new or 
repaired ones, and 116 boxes have been taken out and re- 
placed by new ones. 

The hydrants have had the usual attention paid them. 



STOPCOCKS. 

224 new stopcocks have been established this year. 80 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. 

All the stopcocks have had the attention of former years 
paid them. 



Report of the Water Board. 



99 



Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 

Mag 1, 1872. 



Number of 


Diameter in Inches. 


48 
18 


40 
14 


31 

10 
3 


30 

57 

1 

2 

7 

1 
12 
14£ 

4 

22 
10 

2 

14 
2 

4 


21 

37 
4 

6 
10 
2 

8 

2 
5 

8 
3 

3 

6 

2 


21 
33 

5 

14 

11 

4 

2 
5 
3 

6 
2 


18 
3 


16 


12 


10 
21 

7 


9 
233 

210 


S 
11 

6 
5 

7 
1 

6 

1 


6 


4 


3 2 
7 10 

2 6 

2 20 

1 . 

2 4 
1 . 

[ . 


t| 




81 

4 

2 

2 
22 
131 

1 

11 
3 

8 

3 

5 

2 


2,711 

20 

25 
247 

22 

2 
-11 

42 

6 
6 

9 
19 


" 5,803 

2 

8 

83 

6 

91 

12 

41 

4 

6 

42 

70 

27 

45 

13 

12 
14 

8 

18 

125 


1,996 

1 
24 ] 

2 
35 1 
10 
47 
17 

2 
16 
19 

33 

4 

42 
12 . 

24 . 

49 . 
60 ' 












2 
7 
2 
4 

2 

3 

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2 

2 

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1 


1 
4 
1 
11 
9 
1 
2 

2 
2 






1 






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1 
















• 






40 








Blow-offs and Manholes . 







Hydrants. — 87 Lowry, 22 Lowry extensions, 3 Lowry 
chucks, 70 Lowry frames and covers, 25 Lowry barrels, 
12 Lowry caps, 12 round covers, 16 Wilmarth, 5 Wilmarth 
and 13 Lowell, old. 

For Hydrants. — 39 bends, 381engtheners, 21 covers, 8 old 
bends, 70 wastes, 52 nipples, 35 socket nuts, 36 rods, 3 wharf 
hydrants, 17 wharf hydrant cocks, 61 brass tubes, 56 nuts, 45 



100 City Document. — No. 78. 

stuffing boxes, 47 valve seats, 49 rubber valves, 222 leather 
rings, 47 screws, 12 plungers, 21' caps, 29 ditto for rods, 14 
heavy frames, 31 heavy covers, 26 frames, 34 old covers, 3,999 
pounds iron castings, 78 pounds composition ditto, 13 pairs 
straps, 21 pounds Babbitt metal. 

For Stopcocks. — 2 36-inch screws, 1 30-inch ditto, 2 24- 
inch ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 1 4-inch ditto, for waste weir, 
1 ditto, for Brookline reservoir (old), 28 composition 
screws for 4-inch gates, 25 4-inch valves, 10 6 -inch rings, 38 
4-inch ditto, 50 rings for valve seats, 4 6-inch stuffing boxes, 
33 4-inch ditto, 2 2-inch globe valves, 2,790 pounds iron 
castings for 6 and 4-inch gates, 36 frames, 42 covers. 

Meters in Shop. — 3 3-inch, 5 2-inch, 1 1-inch, 22 |-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 22 2-inch nipples, 44 1-inch ditto, 75 
|~inch ditto, 2 2-inch connection pieces, 7 1-inch ditto, 28 
|-inch ditto, 24 1-inch cocks, 20 |-inch ditto, 3 3-inch clocks, 
1 2-inch ditto, 10 1-inch ditto, 40 -|-inch ditto, 12 brass 
spindles, 15 rubber nipples, 13 fish boxes, 36 covers, 24 
glasses. 

For Service Pipe. — 5 2-|-inch union cocks, 67 1-inch 
ditto, 122 |-inch ditto, 659 -|-inch ditto, 534 unfinished ditto, 
348 ^-inch ditto, 30 1-inch air cocks, 15 l|-inch T cocks, 19 
1-inch ditto, 47 |-inch ditto, 72 |-inch ditto, 24 -|-inch Y cocks, 
48 -g-'inch thawing cocks, 35 -|-inch angle cocks, 25 2-inch 
male couplings, 6 3-inch tubes, 45 2-inch ditto, 19 2-inch nuts, 
39 1-inch tubes, 59 |-inch nuts, 44 1^-inch couplings, 17 
|-inch tubes, 16 -|-inch male couplings, 1,665 |-inch female 
ditto, 65 |-inch thawing couplings, 350 ^-inch couplings, 8 
1-inch tubes, 2,500 boxes, 43 T ditto, 12 Y ditto, 7 extension 
tubes, 2,316 tubes, 2,500 caps, 385 pounds unfinished com- 
position casting, 10 4x 2 composition reducers, 3 3x2 ditto, 
42 2x| ditto, 2 4x2 Y ditto, 3 4-inch tunnel pipe, 5 3x2 
iron reducers, with 2-inch composition nipples, 50 1-inch 
plugs, 70 f-inch ditto, 41 |-inch ditto. 

Lead Pipe. — 1,390 pounds 2-inch lead pipe, 1,625 pounds 
llpinch ditto, 1,120 pounds ll-inch ditto, 425 pounds 1- 



Report of the Watee Board. 101 

inch ditto, 381 pounds f-inch ditto, 56,722 pounds |-inch 
ditto, 26,607 pounds l-inch ditto, 698 pounds 1-inch tin lined 
ditto, 108 pounds f-inch ditto, 1,864 pounds. |-inch ditto, 
420 pounds |~inch ditto, 198 pounds f-inch block tin pipe, 
60 pounds |-inch ditto, 75 pounds solder. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 1,327 pounds round iron, 797 pounds 
flat ditto, 247 pounds square ditto, 1,035 pounds working 
pieces, 450 pounds cast steel, 40 dozen pick blanks, 4,500 
pounds Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. — 87 Lowry hydrant boxes, 10 ditto 
unfinished, 140 stopcock boxes, 12 ditto unfinished, 23 hy- 
drant boxes, 82 ditto unfinished, 2 meter boxes, 15 ditto 
unfinished, 600 pounds spikes and nails, 1,600 feet 2-inch 
spruce plank, 13,000 feet 1^-inch spruce batting, 25 1-foot 
pieces for raising hydrant boxes, 30 1 foot ditto for stopcock 
boxes, 20 ditto for Lowry hydrant boxes. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 4 sets shears and rigging for same, 5 tool houses, 3 
tool boxes, 2 platform scales, 1 portable blacksmith shop, 
1 portable covering for Brewer fountain, 1 hand roller, 1 
horse ditto, tools for laying and repairing main and service 
pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot ditto, 1 hand ditto, 1 Pratt and 
Whitney taper ditto, 1 chain hoisting gear, 1 upright drilling 
machine, 3 grindstones, 1 trip hammer, the necessary tools 
for carcying on the machine, blacksmith, carpenter and 
plumbing shops, 1 circular saw, 1 fan blower, 1 40-inch 
proving press, 1 36-inch ditto, 1 small ditto, 4 wheelbarrows, 
700 feet old hose, also a large lot of patterns at the foun- 
dries where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — 11 horses, 8 wagons, 2 buggies, 3 pungs, 1 sled, 

1 cart, 9 sets harness, 10 blankets, 1 buffalo robe, 2 sleighs, 

2 tons of English hay, 60 bushels grain. 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder 16- 
inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 9 
cast iron plates, 2 4-inch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 



102 City Document. — No. 78. 

patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets 
for small fountains, 6 large composition cylinders. 

Miscellaneous — 1 Wood's Philadelphia four-basin foun- 
tain (broken), 24 tons pig lead, 30gallons linseed oil, 2 barrels 
kerosene oil, 300 tons of furnace coal, 1 freight gravel, 3,700 
pounds gasket, 200 paving brick, 500 pounds bolts, 1 keg 
old ditto, 54 pounds lead washers, 66 pounds iron ditto, 49 
set screws for 12-inch caps, lot paving stones, 50 reservoir 
covers, 26 cords wood, 6 manholes, 5 plates, lot of lumber, 
lot of wooden pavement, also old machinery from Marlboro'. 
Respectfully submitted, 

E. R. JONES, 

jSupt. ^Eastern Division. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Chestnut Hill Resevoir, 

Brighton, May 1, 1872. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Gochituate Water Board : 

Sir : The following report is respectfully submitted : — 
No changes have been made around the lake the past year, 
with the exception of completing the fences, and rebuilding 
the wall at the gate-house. The wall had started out so much 
that there was danger of its going over into the lake. The 
low water was favorable to take up the old wall, and rebuild. 
It was rebuilt on the north side of the gate-house as far as 
the old wall extended, and on the south side about fifty feet. 
The capstones on the wall from the road, to the point, fifty 
feet from the gate-house on the south-east side, need reset- 
ting, and as soon as an opportunity occurs it will be done. 
The stumps that could be got at have been taken out, and 
the shores of the lake cleared up. Men have been employed 
during the winter in deepening the channel between the 
northern and southern sections of the lake, to enable the 
water to pass freely into the northern section, as the culvert 
under the Saxonville Branch Railroad would not admit of 
the channel to be dug deep enough to keep them on a level, 
without injury to the foundation, and the water has stood 
higher in the southern section on that account. The gate- 
house has been lined with face-brick the past season, as was. 
ordered. The using of soft coal, and the oil from the 
pumps, have defaced it so much that it will require painting 



104 City Document. — No. 78. 

as soon as the pumps are removed. The engine-house on 
the north side of the gate-house has been covered with iron 
plating to protect it from fire. On the 4th of October the 
tw 12-inch pumps were started. It was very evident that 
hey were not of sufficient capacity to keep up the supply, 
and on the 9th of October I reported it to the Board and 
urged the necessity of at once procuring larger pumps and 
more power. The Assistant City Engineer, Henry M. 
"VVightman, Esq., decided that the two 12-inch pumps could 
be made to deliver the amount of water that the city was 
using and the pumps were put under his direction. In 
November a third 12-inch pump was put in and the engine 
that was used at the stone-crusher sent up to drive it. In 
January two 18-inch pumps were started, driven by two 
twenty-five horse power engines, and they have kept up 
the supply for the city, and filled up the Chestnut Hill Res- 
ervoir. April 13th, the pump was stopped, aud the supply 
is sufficient by gravitation. The water was let into the lake 
from Dug and Dudley ponds, August 19th, 1871, and the 
stop plank have not been put in this spring. The water has 
not been drawn out of the conduit during the year between 
the lake and Chestnut Hill Reservoir ; the water has been 
shut off at the lake several times to enable them to set 
the pumps, but in no case has any been wasted. Between 
the intermediate gate-house at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
and the Brookline Reservoir, the conduit has been drawn 
off, and that section repaired and the Brookline tunnel 
cleaned out. The line of conduit has been examined, and 
the waste weirs, new steps put up at the lower falls, and 
a new fence built on the line of the road. The annual exam- 
ination of the conduit has been deferred until later in the 
season. At the Chestnut Hill Reservoir a repair-shop has 
been built, suitable for a carpenter's shop, blacksmith, etc. 
The engine is placed in this building that is used in pumping 
the water for sprinkling the driveway. The ledge on the 



Report of the Water Board. 105 

north side of the gate-way has been removed, and a part of 
the hill on the south side should be removed in order to com- 
plete the improvement. No leak has been seen, or anything 
to indicate that the basin is not perfectly tight. The drive- 
way needs a covering of gravel, and as we have none on the 
premises, I would recommend that a gravel bank be pur- 
chased on the line of the railroad, and that a turn-out and 
side-track be put in, as that would be the cheapest way the 
gravel could be procured. A part of the wall and fence on 
Dudley street, on the back line of the Brookline Reservoir, 
has been done, as the men were taken off to excavate for the 
pipes on Bradley's Hill. It will not be completed until the 
last of May. The works are in as good condition, as far as 
it is in my power to know, as they have been for the past 
two or three years. Yet the section of conduit that was re- 
paired this season was in a very unsafe condition, probably 
not more so than in many parts of the line, and I would urge 
the necessity of a new conduit being built, as in my judg- 
ment the present one is in an unsafe condition, and cannot be 
relied upon. 

14 



106 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin, above the tower floor, at the 
Effluent Gate-House. 



Date. 


Height 

of 
"Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


May 1 . . . 


14 2 


June 1 . . . 


20 5| 


July 1 . . . . 


23 9$ 


August 1 . . 


23 33 


" 2. . . 


14 3 


" 2. . . 


20 7 


" 2 . . . . 


23 8| 


" 2. . 


23 3$ 


" 3. . . 


14 4 


«' 3. . . 


20 81 


" 3 . . . . 


23 9 


" 3. . 


23 3$ 


" 4. . . 


14 &\ 


" 4. . . 


20 10$ 


" 4. . . . 


23 8| 


" 4. . 


23 3 


" 5 . . . 


15 


" 5. . . 


21 0| 


" 5 . . . . 


23 9 


" 5. . 


23 3$ 


" 6. . . 


15 5 


" 6. . . 


21 2$ 


" 6 . . . . 


23 81 


" 6. . 


23 3 


" 7. . . 


15 10 


" 7 . . . 


21 3$ 


" 7. . . . 


23 8 


" 7 . . 


23 3 


" 8. . . 


16 1 


" 8 . . . 


21 5| 


" 8. . . . 


23 7 


" 8. . 


23 23 


" 9. . . 


16 5 


" 9 . . . 


21 7$ 


" 9. . . . 


23 6! 


" 9. . 


23 2 


" 10 . . . 


16 71 


" 10 . . . 


21 83 


" 10 . . . . 


23 6 


" 10. . 


23 1! 


" 11 . . . 


16 9| 


" 11 . . . 


21 10| 


" 11 . . . . 


23 53 


" 11. . 


23 1 


" 12 . . . 


17 


" 12 . . . 


22 


" 12 . . . . 


23 6 


" 12. . 


23 1 


"13. . . 


17 2 


" 13. . . 


22 2 


" 13 . . . . 


23 53 


" 13. . 


23 1 


" 14 . . . 


17 4 


" 14. . . 


22 2| 


" 14 . . . . 


23 5 


" 14. . 


23 03 


" 15 . . . 


17 6 


" 15 . . . 


22 43 


" 15 . . . . 


23 4! 


" 15 . . 


23 0! 


" 16 . . . 


17 8 


" 16 . . . 


22 6 


" 16 . . . . 


23 4! 


" 16. . 


23 


" 17 . . . 


17 10$ 


" 17. . . 


22 8 


" 17 . . . . 


23 43 


" 17. . 


23 


" 18 . . . 


18 1 


" 18 . . . 


22 10$ 


" 18 . . . . 


23 4$ 


18. . 


22 11! 


" 19 . . . 


18 3 


" 19. . . 


23 2 


" 19 . . . . 


23 2$ 


" 19 . . 


22 11J 


" 20 . . . 


18 5! 


" 20 . . . 


23 5 


" 20 . . . . 


23 2$ 


" 20 . . 


22 103 


" 21 . . . 


18 8 


" 21 . . . 


23 6J 


" 21 . . . . 


23 1$ 


" 21. . 


22 103 


" 22 . . . 


18 10| 


" 22 . . . 


23 7| 


" 22 . . . . 


23 2 


" 22. . 


22 10 


" 23 . . . 


19 2 


" 23 . . . 


23 8$ 


" 23 . . . . 


23 1J 


23 . . 


22 10! 


" 24 . . . 


19 4J 


" 24. . . 


23 8! 


" 24 . . . . 


23 2 


" 24. . 


22 10$ 


" 25 . . . 


19 6$ 


" 25 . . . 


23 8| 


" 25 . . . . 


23 13 


" 25 . . 


22 10! 


" 26 . . . 


19 8$ 


" 26 . . . 


23 9! 


" 26 . . . . 


23 2 


" 26 . . 


22 10 


" 27 . . . 


19 10 


" 27 . . . 


23 93 


« 27 . . . . 


23 U 


" 27. . 


22 10$ 


" 28 . . . 


19 10| 


" 28. . . 


23 9| 


" 28 . . . . 


23 13 


" 28 . . 


22 103 


" 29 . . . 


19 11| 


" 29 . . . 


23 10 


" 29 . . . . 


23 1! 


" 29. . 


22 10! 


" 30 . . . 


20 1 


" 30 . . . 


23 93 


" 30 . . . . 


23 3$ 


" 30 . . 


22 9$ 


" 31 . . . 


20 3! 






" 31 . . . . 


23 33 


" 31 . . 


22 103 



Report of the Water Board. 



107 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 



Date. 


Height 

of 
"Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


1871. 


Ft. In. 


Sept. 1 . . . 


22 9£ 


October 1 . 


21 6 


Nov. 1 . 




19 5i 


Dec. 1 . 




17 


" 2. . . 


22 9 


"2. 


21 6 


" 2. 




19 4| 


" 2. 




16 11 


" 3. . . 


22 9 


" 3. 


21 5 


" 3. 




19 3 


" 3. 




16 10 


" 4. . . 


22 9 


" 4. 


21 4 


" 4. 




19 2 


" 4. 




16 10| 


" 5. . . 


22 % 


" 5. 


21 %\ 


" 5. 




19 03 


" 5. 




16 10 


" 6. . . 


22 8* 


" 6. 


21 Ik 


" 6. 




19 


" 6. 




16 8 


" 7. . . 


22 8 


" 7. 


21 2 


" 7. 




18 10| 


" 7. 




16 6 


" 8. . . 


22 7£ 


" 8. 


21 1 


" 8. 




18 9k 


" 8. 




16 4| 


" 9 . . . 


22 7| 


" 9. 


21 0| 


" 9 . 




18 71 


" 9. 




16 4 


" 10. . . 


22 7J 


" 10. 


20 11 


" 10. 




18 5k 


" 10. 




16 3 


" 11 . . . 


22 7 


" 11. 


20 10 


" 11. 




18 4$ 


" 11 . 




16 2k 


" 12. . . 


22 7| 


" 12. 


21 0J 


" 12. 




18 2£ 


" 12. 




16 1 


" 13. . . 


22 6| 


" 13. 


21 


" 13. 




18 


" 13. 




16 


" 14. . . 


22 6£ 


" 14. 


21 


" 14. 




17 103 


" 14. 




16 


" 15. . . 


22 6 


" 15. 


20 11 


" 15. 




17 9£ 


" 15. 




15 11£ 


" 16 . . . 


22 6 


" 16. 


20 101 


" 16. 




18 


" 16. 




15 11 


" 17. . . 


22 7 


" 17. 


20 9£ 


" 17. 




17 11| 


" 17. 




15 11J 


" 18. . . 


22 6J 


" 18. 


20 %\ 


" 18. 




17 10£ 


" 18. 




16 


" 19 . . . 


22 6 


" 19. 


20 n\ 


" 19. 




17 9 


" 19. 




16 1 


" 20. . . 


22 5 


" 20. 


20 61 


" 20. 




17 8 


" 20. 




16 2 


" 21. .. 


22 4k 


" 21. 


20 h\ 


" 21. 




17 6 


" 21. 




16 2 


" 22. . . 


22 3| 


" 22. 


20 4\ 


" 22. 




17 5 


" 22. 




16 1 


" 23 . . . 


22 3 


" 23. 


20 3 


" 23. 




17 4 


" 23. 




16 


" 24. . . 


22 3 


" 24. 


20 2 


" 24. 




17 3J 


" 24. 




16 2 


" 25. . . 


22 %\ 


" 25. 


20 1 


" 25. 




17 3£ 


" 25. 




16 31 


" 26 . . . 


22 1 


" 26 . 


20 


" 26 : 




17 3k 


" 26. 




16 5 


" 27 . . . 


22 0i 


" 27. 


19 10£ 


" 27. 




17 4 


" 27. 




16 6 


" 28 . . . 


21 10 


" 28. 


19 10 


" 28. 




17 33 


" 28. 




16 6 


" 29 . . . 


21 8J 


" 29. 


19 9 


" 29. 




17 2§ 


" 29 . . . 


16 6 


" 30 . . . 


21 7} 


" 30 . 


19 7| 


" 30. 




17 


" 30. . . 


16 7 






" 31. 


19 61 






'.' 31. . . 


16 8 



108 



City Document. — No. 78. 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 



Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


Date. 


Height 

of 
Water. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


January 1 . 


16 94 


February 1 . 


19 7 


March 1 . . . 


22 8 


April 1 . . . 


23 8| 


" 2. 


16 10i 


" 2. 


19 9 


" 2. . . 


22 84 


" 2. . . 


23 9| 


" 3. 


16 11 


" 3. 


19 104 


" 3. . . 


22 104 


" 3, . . 


23 8£ 


" 4. 


17 04 


'• 4. 


20 2 


" 4. . . 


22 11 


" 4. . . 


23 74 


" • 5. 


17 2 


" 5. 


20 44 


" 5 . . . 


23 1 


" 5 . . . 


23 6J 


" 6 . 


17 3 


" 6. 


20 54 


" 6- . . 


23 04 


" 6 . . . 


23 5| 


« . 7# 


17 4 


" 7. 


20 7 


" 7 . . . 


23 0| 


" 7 . . . 


23 5 


" 8. 


17 5 


" 8. 


20 84 


" 8. . . 


23 04 


" 8. . . 


23 54 


" 9. 


17 44 


" 9. 


20 94 


" 9 . . . 


23 1 


" 9. . . 


23 5 


" 10 . 


17 44 


" 10. 


20 11 


" 10 . . . 


23 1 


" 10. . . 


23 54 


" 11. 


17 5 


" 11. 


21 14 


" 11 . . . 


23 3 


" 11. . . 


23 5 


" 12 . 


17 6 


» 12. 


21 24 


" 12 . . . 


23 4 


" 12. . . 


23 44 


" 13. 


17 7 


" 13. 


21 4 


" 13. . . 


23 5| 


" 13. . . 


23 4 


" 14. 


17 8 


« 14 : 


21 6 


" 14 . . . 


23 6| 


" 14. . . 


23 44 


" 15. 


17 9 


" 15. 


21 8 


" 15 . . . 


23 64 


" 15. . . 


23 44 


" 16. 


17 9 


« 16. 


21 94 


" 16. . . 


23 54 


" 16 . . . 


23 44 


" 17. 


17 94 


" 17. 


21 11 


" 17 . . . 


23 54 


" 17. . . 


23 5 


" 18. 


17 101 


" 18. 


22 


" 18. . . 


23 6 


" 18. . . 


23 '5k 


" 19. 


17 11 


" 19. 


22 14 


" 19. . . 


23 6 


" 19. . . 


23 54 


" 20. 


18 1 


" 20. 


22 3 


" 20. . . 


23 6 


" 20. . . 


23 6 


" 21. 


18 24 


« 21. 


22 4i 


" 21. . . 


23 55 


" 21. . . 


23 6 


" 22. 


18 44 


" 22. 


22 44 


" 22. . . 


23 5£ 


" 22. . . 


23 6| 


" 23. 


18 54 


" 23. 


22 34 


" 23. . . 


23 5 


" 23 . . . 


23 7 


" 24. 


18 6£ 


" 24 . 


22 34 


" 24. . . 


23 5} 


" 24. . . 


23 7J 


" 25. 


18 7 


" 25. 


22 5 


" 25 . . . 


23 6 


" 25 . . . 


23 74 


•' 26 . 


18 74 


" 26. 


22 6 


" 26 . . . 


23 6 


" 26 . . . 


23 8 


" 27 . 


18 8 


" 27. 


22 7 


" 27. . . 


23 6 


" 27 . . . 


23 8\ 


28. 


18 9 


" 28. 


22 7 


. " 28. . . 


23 6i 


" 28 . . . 


23 84 


" 29. 


18 11 


" 29. 


22 74 


" 29. . . 


23 64 


" 29. . . 


23 8 


" 30. 


19 2 






" 30 . . . 


23 7 


" 30 . . . 


23 5 


'•' 31 . 


19 44 






" 31 . . . 


23 74 







Keport of the Water Board. 109 

Schedule' of Property at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

1 two-horse express-wagon. 
1 single " " " 

1 water cart, with shafts. 

2 two-horse water carts. 

2 " " " (new). 

2 . " iron rollers. 

1 single horse pung. 
1 two " ' " 
1 horse truck. 
1 horse power. 

1 hay wagon. 

2 hand carts. 
1 ox truck. 

1 ox sling. 

1 pair large wheels. 

3 clay mills and shafting. 

1 large water cistern. 
6 screens. 

40 ox tie chains. 

2 7-inch rotary pumps. 

2 4" <« <« 

3 Joyce force ' ' 
1 house " " 

1 stone-crushing machine and castings. 

2 blacksmiths' forges and tools. 
1 portable forge. 

1 derrick and rigging. 

DO O 

4 clay knives. 
1 manhead. 

32 grub axes. 
139 picks, 
shovels. 
10 spades. 

3 hoes. 



110 City Document. — No. 78. 

39 iron bars. 

9 stone hammers. 
11 striking hammers. 
15 iron rakes. 

5 scuffling hoes. 

4 border knives. 

1 root-puller. 
Impair grass shears. 

5 scythes and snaiths. 

2 lawn-mowers. 

1 garden engine. 
4 hay forks. 

2 manure forks. 
8 lanterns. 

8 peat knives. 
13 tin dippers. 
23 tin candlesticks. 

4 reflector lanterns. 

1 bushel grass seed. 

8 barrels cement. 
15 short drills. 

3 long " 

5 birch brooms. 

2 rattan brushes. 

9 wooden rammers. 

2 grindstones. 

3 jack screws. 

12 feet 18-inch Scotch pipe. 
42 " 15 " " " 
15 " 30 " cement pipe. 

2 new whitewash brushes. 
8 " paint brushes. 

1 window brush. 

3 telegraph batteries. 

2 horses. 



Report of the Water Board. Ill 

1 Concord wagon. 
1 covered " 

1 safe. 

6 stoves. 

2 harnesses. 
1 rain gauge. 
1 set scales. 

Property at Lake Cochituate. 

1 extension table. 
1 parlor table. 
18 dining-room chairs. 
1 mirror. 
1 wash-bowl. 
1 map. 

1 oil-cloth carpet. 
1 straw carpet. 
1 cooking range. 
1 telegraph battery. 
1 horse. 

1 single harness. 
1 beach wagon. 
1 cart. 

1 cart harness. 
1 express wagon (new). 
1 " " (old). 
1 sleigh. 
1 buffalo robe. 
1 pair steelyards. 

1 rain gauge. 

2 boats. 

1 haycutter. 
12 picks. 

6 shovels. 

2 long-handled shovels. 



112 City Document. — No. 78. 

2 spades. 
2 iron rakes. 
6 iron bars. 
1 hand saw. 

1 axe. 

2 hatchets. 

1 spirit level. 

1 grindstone. 

2 hoes. 

6 fang hoes. 

1 manure fork. 

2 hay forks. 
2 hay rakes. 
2 scythes. 

1 hedge shears. 

2 grass hooks. 

6 wheelbarrows. 

1 gravel screen. 

2 stop-plank hooks. 
2 ice tongs. 

2 stone hammers. 
2 whitewash brushes. 
4 ox chains. 

1 twenty-horse power engine. 

2 12 -inch pumps. 
2 18-inch pumps. 

2 twenty-five horse power engines. 



At Broohline Reservoir 



3 settees. 

1 desk. 
3 pails. 

2 picks. 

3 scuffle hoes. 
2 hay rakes. 



Report of the Water Board. 113 



2 iron rakes. 
1 iron bar. 

1 broom. 

2 towels. 
1 scythe. 
5 shovels. 

1 wheelbarrow. 

2 ladders. 
1 brush. 

1 large stove. 



Respectfully submitted. 

ALBERT STANWOOD, 

Sup't Western Division. 



15 



ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. ENGINEER'S REPORT, 
MAY 1st, 1872. 



Engineer's Office, Water Department, 

Boston, May 1, 1872. 

Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : 

Sir : Your instructions of the 22d November last (at which 
elate I began my duties as Engineer of your Board) required 
me to make surveys and prepare plans and estimates for a 
scheme of works to furnish an additional supply of pure 
water to the city of Boston. 

Although the work required for a full compliance with 
your orders is not yet completed, it seems proper that now, 
— the time of your annual report to the City Council, — 
there should be presented a statement of the progress made. 

The first point to be determined was the best source of 
supply, and in deciding upon this, I was instructed to exam- 
ine all the feasible sources within 50 miles of the city, and to 
have in view : 

First, — The quality or purity of the water. 

Second, — The probable growth of the city and its future 
wants. 

Third, — The cost of the requisite works for storing, puri- 
fying and conveying the water either to the Chestnut Hill or 
Brookline reservoir. 

Fourth, — The immediate need of a temporary additional 
supply to avert the threatened deficiency of the coming 
season. 

This last requirement involved the obtaining of an act of 



Report of the Water Board. 115 

the Legislature during the winter session, authorizing the 
city to take such additional water, and to build the necessary, 
works for conveying it to the reservoirs, and therefore 
demanded the selection of a source of supply at an early 
day. 

As the season of the year was unfavorable for field work, 
the time brief, and the emergency pressing, it was decided 
to forego the usual preliminary surveys, and to make the 
selection by the consideration of such data as could be 
obtained by simple reconnoissance of the grounds and col- 
lected from maps, existing surveys, and the testimony of per- 
sons acquainted with the various localities. 

The following sources have been examined : — 

Flax and Sluice ponds, in Lynn. 

The Ipswich and Saugus rivers, in Essex Co. 

Mystic lake, in MedfieW;^ ^ 

Merrimac river, at and below Lowell. 

Nagog pond, in Acton and Littleton. 

Sudbury river, at and above Framingham. 

Assabet river. 

Nashua river, in Boylston. 

Lake Quinsigamond, in Worcester. 

Charles river, at and above Newton. 

Neponset river, Dorchester. 

Monponset and other ponds in Halifax and Hanson. 

Taunton river. 

Long, Assawampset and Great and Little Quittacus, in 
Middleton. 

Other sources were considered in connection with the 
above, but were treated as auxiliary only. 

For such sources as were not rejected, either for insuffi- 
ciency or impurity of supply, approximate estimates of cost 
of works required in each case for collecting and conveying 
the water were prepared, which were sufficiently accurate for 
the object in view. 

On February 13th a verbal report was made to your 



116 City Document. — No. 78. 

Board, and it was then decided to ask for a charter granting 
the right to take water either from the Charles or the Sud- 
bury river, as might thereafter be thought preferable. 

The considerations that led to the choice of these two 
sources will be given in detail in a future report, but may be 
briefly stated in this. 

The works required for the introduction of the water 
were cheaper for these than for any other sources that would 
furnish anything like an adequate supply. 

Being convenient to the existing works, they offered 
opportunities for relieving the pressing want of the city for 
an early addition to the present supply. 

The Charles river works could be built at a comparatively 
small cost, or at least, at a somewhat less cost than the 
others, and would be situated near to the city, which last 
condition, while always one of value, is more especially so 
where, as in this case, pumping is required. 

At certain seasons of the year the water in this river has a 
decidedly objectionable color, that renders it unsuited for 
many purposes for which its use would be required, but 
reasons existed for the belief that this color might be 
destroyed either by exposure to the air in large storing 
basins, or, as a last resort, by filtration. 

The Sudbury river would furnish water of the desired 
purity, which could be conveyed to the city by gravitation. 
The relief from pumping thus afforded would, in great part, 
offset the large cost of works due to greater distance from 
the city as compared with the Charles river. 

The Sudbury works would be in the direct line of further 
extensions, should they ever be needed, and the conduit can 
now be built of sufficient capacity to meet the requirements 
of such extensions, without greatly increasing its cost. 

It was thought best to leave the choice between these two 
sources, until careful surveys and more accurate estimates 
should be made ; but during the hearing before the Legisla- 



Report of the Water Board. 117 

tive Committee, to which was referred the petition of the 
city for a charter, a strong opposition to granting authority 
to Boston to take water from the Charles river (at least 
without conditions that were considered very objectionable) 
was made by various towns and proprietors of mills upon 
this stream, and by request of the committee, and to insure 
the early passage of the bill the petition was limited to the 
Sudbury alone. 

An act was passed, April 6, authorizing the city to take 
water from the Sudbury river and Farm pond, in Framing- 
ham, and to convey the same into Lake Cochituate, or into 
any of the city's reservoirs, and at that date you instructed 
me to begin at once upon the work of turning the waters of 
the river and pond into the lake. 

This work is now progressing, under the direction of Mr. 
Albert Stanwood, as rapidly as the attending circumstances 
will admit, and it is expected that it will be so nearly com- 
pleted by the middle of June that it will then be of use in 
maintaining the supply to the city. 

The Sudbury river — the new source of supply to the 
city — rises in the town of Westboro', and from thence flows 
through Southboro', Hopkinton, Framingham and other 
towns to Concord, where it joins the Assabet. The union of 
these two rivers forms the Concord, which flows in a north- 
erly direction to Lowell, and there discharges into the 
Merrimac. 

A little over a quarter of a mile to the south of the Sud- 
bury, in the village of South Framingham, lies the body of 
water known as Farm pond. It has a water surface of nearly 
200 acres in area, and empties into the river through an 
outlet brook which flows in a northwesterly direction. 

From the south end of the pond, after crossing the Boston 
and Albany Railroad, a low swamp extends to the Guinea 
Meadows, and through these meadows flows the principal 
tributary to Lake Cochituate, namely, Beaver Dam brook. 



118 City Document. — No. 78. 

In the summer season, the surface of water in the pond 
stands two to three feet higher than that in the river, but 
during the fall and spring freshets the river rises sufficiently 
to reverse the flow in the outlet, which then becomes a feeder 
to the pond ; and in times of great floods the water from the 
river has been known to pass through the pond, overflow the 
swamp, and find its way to Lake Cochituate through various 
ditches and the before-mentioned tributary brook. 

It is evident, therefore, that by building a dam of mod- 
erate height in the river below the pond outlet, and by cutting 
a ditch or water-course through the swamp, the river may at 
all seasons be made to discharge into the lake. 

This is the work that is now in progress. 

An examination of the accompanying map will show the 
positions of the river, pond and lake, and the course of the 
ditch and Beaver Dam brook. 

Preparations are being made to build a dam across the 
river at a point a few hundred feet below the bridge of the 
Boston and Clinton Railroad (see A on the map). This dam 
will be constructed entirely of wood. It is to have an over- 
fall of about 120 feet in length and a flume 20 feet wide at 
its north end. The body of the clam above the foundation 
will consist of strong frames, set 6 feet apart across the 
river, with the spaces between filled with stop-planks 4 
inches thick. This part is 8 feet high, but- can readily be 
lowered 2\ feet by the removal of the upper stop-planks. 

The width of the river in this part of its course rarely 
exceeds 60 feet, but at times the water overflows its banks 
from 2 to 4 feet in depth, and the rate of flow is increased to 
2,000 cubic feet per second, and upwards. It is in view of 
this fact that the great length of the dam and its somewhat 
peculiar construction has been decided upon. 

The bed of the river is composed of a layer of gravel and 
sand from two to three feet thick, underlaid by a deep 
stratum of fine sand. The buildin<r of a clam on such a 



Report of the Water Board. 119 

foundation is always attended with more or less risk, but a 
location where the conditions in this respect were more favor- 
able was not discovered. 

In preparing the foundation unusual precautions will be 
taken to prevent the water from reaching the underlying 
sand, in a manner that will tend to wash it out. The bed of 
the river will be covered with a floor of closely laid plank 
for a width up and down stream of about 30 feet, and three 
rows of sheet piling will be placed or driven across stream, 
to as great a depth as practicable. The tendency to wash 
will be further guarded against by earth filling on the up 
stream side, extending some distance alone: the river 
bottom. 

It is the usual practice to hold wooden dams in place by 
loading them with stones and earth, but the design of this is 
such, that it can be only in part thus secured, and to make 
good the deficiency in holding power, three rows of round piles 
will be driven from ten to twelve feet into the bed of the 
river, to which the plank flooring and upright frames will be 
securely fastened. 

The dam will raise the water in the river sufficiently to 
cause it to flow into the pond and reverse the current in its 
outlet brook. This brook requires to be widened and 
deepened to meet the new conditions ; also, to be provided 
with a dam (to be built at the point marked B on the map,) 
for the purpose of controlling the level of water in Farm 
pond. 

This dam will have an overfall of 30 feet in length, and 
be of similar construction to that already described, omitting 
the round piling. It will be used to prevent freshets from 
filling the pond to a height that would do damage in South 
Framingham, and that might cause trouble in regulating the 
flow through the new water-course leading to the lake. 

The swamp to the south of the pond consists of a thick bed 
of peat and muck, varying in depth from a few feet at the 



120 City Document. — ■ No. 78. 

edges to perhaps 40 feet at the centre, covered with a dense 
growth of bushes, cedars, and other trees. 

The new water-course is to be cut through this swamp for 
a distance of about 2,000 feet, and here will be in the shape 
of a ditch varying in depth from five to nine feet, and nine feet 
wide, with its sides closely planked to prevent caving or 
falling in. 

It is to start from the pond at a point on the western shore 
a few rods to the north of the Boston and Albany Railroad, 
where the bottom is gravelly and clean, and from thence will 
run along the shore of the pond to the railroad, under which 
it will be conducted in a wooden flume, provided with gates 
or stop-planks to regulate and control the flow. The piles 
for supporting the track at this point have been driven and 
the caps and stringers will soon be in place. This part of 
the work is done under the direction, and according to the 
plans, of Mr. Fitz Gerald, Engineer of the Boston and Albany 
Railroad. 

A short distance to the south of the railroad the water- 
course passes under the Ashland road, and here a wooden 
culvert will be built. After passing through the swamp it 
will cross the Milford road in a stone culvert, and the Mil- 
ford Railroad in a wooden flume. At this point an old ditch 
is reached, which leads to Beaver Dam brook. This ditch, 
as well as the brook, for a distance of about 2 \ miles, is to 
be deepened and widened, and where the latter passes under 
the Sherborn road and a highway in Natick, new stone cul- 
verts will be required. 

Below the Milford Branch Railroad the work, except the 
rebuilding of the culverts, is nearly completed ; that required 
to support the track of the railroad is finished, and, as in the 
case of the Albany road, was done under the direction of Mr. 
Fitz Gerald. 

Some progress has been made on the new ditch in the 
swamp, but work here cannot proceed much further till a 



Beport of the Water Board. 121 

steam pump is obtained, to lower the water level. This 
pump will soon be in place. 

The water-course, when flowing three feet deep, will pass 
thirty millions of gallons daily, and with a depth of four feet 
its capacity is forty- five millions. 

When completed, it practically will increase the water-shed 
of Lake Cochituate from 19 square miles to 90, but only a 
small part of the benefit to be derived from this increase can 
be realized until capacious storage basins or reservoirs are 
built upon the Sudbury river. 

A few remarks on this question of storage basins may not 
be out of place here, although it is intended to give it a more 
thorough consideration in the report upon a scheme for a 
permanent additional supply. 

The drainage area of the Sudbury, above the proposed site 
for the dam, is, as computed from the State map, 73 square 
miles. Its slopes are steep and of a character that will 
insure a quick access to the streams of the rains fallino- 
upon them, hence it will be safe to assume that a large per- 
centage of the rainfall will be drained off by the river. 

These conditions, while favorable for the collection of a 
large quantity of water, render the flow of the river very 
unequal from month to month. 

During an average year the flow must be at the rate of 
fully seventy millions of gallons per day, but it will be very 
unequally distributed through the year. In March and April 
it will be at the rate of several hundred millions of gallons 
daily, while in August and September it usually will not 
exceed from twelve to fifteen millions, and in a season of light 
rains may be reduced to even one-half this amount. 

It will be seen, therefore, that some means must be pro- 
vided for holding back the surplus waters of March and 
April, and other wet months, for use in the summer season. 
This can only be done by building immense storage basins, 
or in other words, by forming artificial lakes. 



122 City Document. — No. 78. 

Fortunately in the case of the Sudbury and its tributaries, 
this can readily be done by constructing dams across the 
narrow valleys in which they run, and if a capacity to store 
from one hundred and thirty to one hundred and forty days' 
supply be given them, the daily flow will be very nearly 
equalized throughout the year. 

Were it practicable to secure a capacity for these basins 
that would equalize the daily flow, not only for a single year, 
but also for a series of dry and wet years, then the available 
daily yield of this river might safely be placed at seventy 
millions gallons ; but as this is not the case, the conditions that 
exist during a year of drought must be taken as the basis for 
estimating the supply to be derived. 

The rainfall of this district, while averaging about 44 inches 
per year, is sometimes as low as 30. Of this it is found that 
under the most unfavorable distribution of the rains, about 
12 inches will reach the streams, and may be made available 
in a water-shed of the character of that of the Sudbury. 

A yearly collection of 12 inches of rain upon 70 square 
miles of area, gives a daily yield of a little over forty millions 
of gallons ; and it is this quantity only, that should be con- 
sidered in estimating the value of the Sudbury river as a 
source of water supply. 

Nothing has yet been done towards making the surveys 
for the permanent additional supply, but a party for that 
purpose will be organized by the 1st of June. 

I am indebted to Mr. Wilbur Learned and party, of the 
City Engineer's Department, for the surveys and instru- 
mental work that have been required in connection with the 
work for the temporary supply. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOS. P. DAVIS. 



MAP SHOWING 

THE TEMPORARY CONNECTION 
OF SUDBURY RIVER WITH 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

Scab 2 inches to I mill, May MK 




CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WOBKS EEOM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1872. 



Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. 
From May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

Engineers for. the Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. 
From May, 1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western 
Division. From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern 
Division. From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 
1850, to October 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 
27, 1851, to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 
1852, to October 1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 
1, 1855, to April 1, 1863. 



124 City Document. — No. 78. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, 
to the present time. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 
1863, to December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Eesident Engineer at C. H. Reser- 
voir. From Febuary 14, 1866, to the present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. 
S. Whitwell, and J. Avery Richards, were elected a 
Water Board, subject to the direction of a Joint Standing 
Committee of the City Council, by an ordinance passed 
December 31, 1849, which was limited to keep in force one 
year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was estab- 
lished. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and re- 
signed April 7, 1856 * * . . . . Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and re- 
signed June 5, I860** . . . . Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term 

expired April 3, 1865 .... Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned 

January 15, 1867 . . One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term 

expired April 6, 1868 . One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, 

and resigned Jan. 4, 1871 . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 
1871, to present time. 



R 13 PORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



125 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 

55** 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 

and 59 * * 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 

James W. Sever, 1851 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851** . 

John T. Heard, 1851 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54 and 

55** 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 * * 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 

Charles Stoddard,* 1854, 55, 56 and 57 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 * * 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58 

John T. Dingle y, 1856 and 59 . 

Joseph Smith, 1856 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61 

62, 63 and 64 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58,- 59, 60 and 61 * * 

George P. French, 1859, 69, 61, 62 and 63 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 * * 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 

Clement Willis, 1860 

G. E. Pierce, 1860 . 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 * * 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Pray, 1862 



Five years. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Four years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Six years. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

Four years. 
Three years. 

Two years. 
Two months. 

Eight years. 
Five years. 
Five years. 

One year. 

Six years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

One year. 



126 



City Document. — No. 78. 



65 



67 



66 



J. C. J. Brown, 1862 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 

Otis Norcross,* 1865 and 66 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64 

66 and 67 .... 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, .65, 66 and 
Charles R. McLean, 1867 
Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68 
William S. Hills, 1867 
Charles R. Train, 1868 
Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 
Benjamin James,* 1858, 68 and 69 
Francis A. Osborn, 1869 
Walter E. Hawes, 1870 
John O. Poor, 1870 . 
Hollis R. Gray, 1870 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 6. 

67, 68, 69, 70, 71 . 
George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, 71 . 
Sidney Squires, 1871 
Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, 72 
Alexander Wadsworth,* 1864, 65 

66, 67, 68, 69, 72 . 
John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72 
Edward A. White, 1872 . 
Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72 
Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72 . 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 . 

* Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B 
Mr. Wilkins was re-elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, 
which office he held until his resignation on June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer 
Johnson was elected President, and on July 2, Mr. Miles Standish was elected 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Nor- 
cross resigned Jan. 15, 1S67, having been elected Mayor of the city. Benjamin 
James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 1868. Alexander 
Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. 

* * Deceased. 



One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Seven years. 
Four years. 

One year. 
Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Two years. 

Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

Nine years. 

Four years. 

One year. 



Present Board. 



! 

1854, and Charles Stoddard was 
Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. 



Report of the Water Board. 127 



COCiTITUATE WATER BOARD, 1872. 



Charles H. Allen, President. 

Leonard R. Cutter, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Amos L. Notes, j 

> Of the Common Council. 
Chas. H. Hersey, J 

AT LARGE. 

For One Year. For Two Years. 

Charles H. Allen, John A. Haven, 

Alexander Wadsworth. Edward A. White. 

Clerk. 
Joseph A. Wiggin. 

Assistant Clerk and Clerk of Committees. 
Samuel N. Dyer. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division. 
Albert Stanwood. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

City Engineer. 
N. Henry Crafts. 

Engineer on New Supply. 
Joseph P. Davis. 



128 City Document. — No. 78. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOAED. 



Eastern Division. 

John A. Haven, Chairman. 
Chas. H. Heesey, Edwaed A. White. 

Western Division. 

Alexandee Wadswoeth, Chairman. 
Leonard K. Cuttee, Amos L. Noyes. 

Water Registrar's Department. 

Edwaed A. White, Chairman. 
Chas. H. Heesey, Chas. H. Allen. 

On Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Leonaed K. Cuttee, Chairman. 
Amos L. Noyes, John A. Haven. 

On Neiv Supply. 

Chas. H. Allen, Chairman. 
John A. Haven, Alexandee Wadswoeth. 



Keport of Water Board. 129 



LEGISLATIVE ACT. 

[Chap. 177.] 

An Act to authorize the City of Boston to obtain an additional 
Supply of Pure Water. 

Be it enacted, &c, as follows: — 

Sect. 1. The City of Boston is hereby authorized, by and 
through the agency of the Cochituate Water Board, to take, hold, 
and convey to, into and through said city, all the water of Sudbury 
River, so called, said water to be taken at any point or points 
within the town of Framingham, or higher up on said river, and 
the water of Farm Pond, so called, in said town of Framingham, 
and the waters which may flow into and from said river and pond, 
and to take any water rights in or upon said river or pond, in or 
above the town of Framingham, or connected therewith. 

Said city may also take and hold, by purchase or otherwise, in 
connection with the said sources of supply, any lands and real 
estate necessary for increasing or preserving the purity of the 
water, or for laying, building and maintaining aqueducts, water- 
courses, reservoirs, dams, buildings, machinery and other structures 
and appliances, with their accessories, for conducting, elevating, 
purifying, storing, discharging, disposing of and distributing water ; 
and may also take and hold any land, excepting any in the town of 
Framingham heretofore taken or purchased by any railroad com- 
pany, on the margin of said sources of supply, not exceeding five 
rods in width from the high-water line of said river, storage, reser- 
voirs or pond, so far as may be necessary in the opinion of said 
Cochituate Water Board, for the preservation and purity of the 
same, for the purpose of furnishing a supply of pure water for the 
City of Boston. 

Sect. 2. For the purposes of this act, the said city may make 
and build one or more permanent aqueducts from the aforesaid 
water sources to Chestnut Hill reservoir, so called, or to any other 
reservoir owned by said city, and secure and maintain the same by 



130 City Document. —No. 78. 

anj r works suitable therefor ; may connect the said water sources 
with Lake Cochituate ; may erect and maintain dams, or may 
increase the height of, and strengthen and maintain existing dams 
to raise the water above the same, or to form storage reservoirs ; 
may make and maintain reservoirs within and without said cit}^ ; 
may erect and maintain buildings and machinery for elevating the 
water, and lay down pipes for conducting the same ; may build and 
maintain filters, or other means of purifying the water. And the 
said city may, for the purposes aforesaid, carry and conduct airy 
aqueduct, or other work, by it to be made and constructed, under 
or over any water-course, or any street, turnpike road, railroad, 
highway or other way, in such manner as not to unnecessarily ob- 
struct or impede travel thereon ; and may enter upon and dig up 
any such road, street or way, for the purpose of laying down pipes 
beneath the surface thereof, and for maintaining and repairing the 
same ; and, in general, may do any other acts and things neces- 
sary or convenient and proper for the purposes of this act. 

Said City of Boston, in entering upon and digging up any such 
road, street or way of public travel, shall be subject to such reason- 
able regulations as shall be made by the selectmen of the towns 
wherein such work shall be performed, for the protection of their 
rights of drainage and sewerage therein. 

Sect. 3. The City of Boston is hereby further authorized, by and 
through the agency of said Cochituate Water Board, if said Board 
shall deem expedient, to store and distribute water for maintaining 
and equalizing the flow of water in the river selected by said city 
as its source of supply, or in the rivers into which said river may 
discharge, and for this purpose said city may take and hold such 
land and real estate as may be necessary for building and main- 
taining dams, reservoirs or other structures and appliances for 
storing and discharging water. And the said city may, through 
the same agenc}^, make and build such dams, reservoirs and other 
structures and appliances, at any point or points upon the Sudbury 
River, and upon any and all streams flowing into the same. 

Sect. 4. Nothing contained in this act shall be so construed 
as to authorize the Citj- of Boston to reduce the water in Sudbury 
River below a sufficient height to maintain at all times a running 
stream therein, which shall flow at least one and one-half million 



Eeport of the Water Board. 131 

gallons a day for each and eveiy day in the year, or to draw from 
Farm Pond or Sudbury River into Lake Coehituate when the 
water runs over the dam at Lake Coehituate, or to prevent the 
inhabitants of the towns of Framingham, Ashland, Southborough, 
Hudson and Westborough from taking from the Sudbury or Assabet 
Rivers or Farm Pond so much of the water hereby granted as shall 
be necessary for extinguishing fires, and for all ordinary domestic 
and household purposes, and for the generation of steam, or from 
cutting and carrying away ice from said pond, or as to prevent .the. 
Boston and Albany Railroad Company, or the Mansfield and Fram- 
ingham Railroad Company, or the Boston, Clinton and Fitchburg 
Railroad Company from taking water from Farm Pond, for use in 
locomotive or other engines, or for other railroad purposes, under 
such regulations of the City Council of the City of Boston as may 
be essential for the preservation of the purity of the same. 

Sect. 5. The City of Boston shall be liable to pay all damages 
that shall be sustained by any persons in their property, by the 
taking of or injury to any land, real estate, water or water rights, 
or by the flowage of the lands of any persons, or by the interference 
with or injury to any use or enjoyment of the water of said river 
to which any person, at the time of such taking, is legally entitled, 
or by any other doings under this act ; and in regard to such taking, 
injury, interference and flowage, and the ascertainment and pay- 
ment of all such damages, the said City of Boston, and all persons 
claiming damages, shall have all the rights, immunities and reme- 
dies, -and be subject to all the duties, liabilities and regulations 
which are provided in the one hundred and sixty-seventh chapter 
of the Acts of the year eighteen hundred and forty-six, and the 
three hundred and sixteenth chapter of the Acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and fifty. 

Sect. 6. Whenever the City of Boston shall dig up any street or 
way, as aforesaid, it shall restore the same in as good order and 
condition as the same shall be in when such digging commenced ; 
and the City of Boston shall, at all times, indemnify and save 
harmless the several towns within which such street or way may 
be, against all damages which may be recovered against them 
respectively, and sball reimburse to them all expenses which the}' 
shall incur by reason of any defect or want of repair in any street 



132 City Document. — No. 78. 

or way caused by the construction of any of said works, or laying 
of said pipes, or by the maintaining or repairing the same : pro- 
vided, that said city shall have due and reasonable notice of all 
claims for such damages or injury, and opportunity to make a legal 
defence thereto. 

Sect. 7. If any person or persons shall wantonly or maliciously 
divert the water, or any part thereof, of any of the rivers, ponds, 
streams or water sources, which shall be taken b}^ the city, pursuant 
to the provisions of this act, or shall corrupt the same, or render 
it impure, or destroy or injure an}' dam, aqueduct, pipe, conduit, 
hydrant, machinery or other property held, owned or used by the 
said city, by the authority and for the purposes of this act, every 
such person or persons shall forfeit and pay to the said city three 
times the amount of the damages that shall be assessed therefor, 
to be recovered by any proper action. And every such person or 
persons majr, moreover, on indictment and conviction of either of 
the wanton and malicious acts aforesaid, be punished by fine not 
exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisonment not exceeding 
one year, or by confinement to hard labor in the state prison for a 
term not exceeding ten years. 

Sect. 8. The City of Boston is authorized, if said city shall deem 
it expedient so to do, to supply the towns of Framingham, New- 
ton, "West Eoxbury, Brighton and Brookline, or either of them, 
with water, in such quantities, under such conditions, and upon 
such terms as may be agreed upon between said city and said 
towns, or either of them ; and such towns shall respectively have 
power to distribute the water so supplied among the inhabitants of 
said towns. 

Sect. 9. The Commonwealth may take and convey water from 
said Sudbury River, or any of the reservoirs to be constructed by 
said city, to and for the use of the State Normal School buildings, 
in said town of Framingham. 

Sect. 10. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
April 5, 1872.] 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

CENTRAUJBRARY. 

ABBREVIATED REGULATIONS. 

One volume can be had at a time, in home 
use, from the Lower Hall, and one from the 
Bates Hall, and this volume mast always be 
returned with the applicant's library card, 
within such hours as the rules prescribe. No 
book can be taken from the Lower Hall of this 
Library, while the applicant has one from any 
Branch. 

Books can be kept out 14 days, but may be 
renewed within that time, by presenting a new 
slip with the card; after 14 days a fine of two 
cents for each day is incurred, and after 21 days 
the book will be sent for at the borrower's cost, 
who cannot take another book until all charges 
are paid. 

No book is to be lent out of the household of 
the borrower ; nor is it to be kept by transfers 
in one household more than one month, and it 
must remain in the Library one week before it 
can be again drawn in the same household. 

The Library hours for the delivery and return 
of books are from 9 o'clock, A. M., to 8 o'clock, 
P. M., in the Lower Hall; and from 9 o'clock, 
A. M., until 6 o'clock, P. M., from October to 
March, and until 7 o'clock, from April to Septem- 
ber, in the Bates Hall. 

Borrowers finding this book mutilated or 
unwarrantably defaced, are expected to 
report it; and also any undue delay in the 
delivery of books. 

%*No claim can be established because of the 
failure of any Library notice to reach, through 
the mail, the person addressed. 

[50,000, Nov., 1870.]