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Full text of "Annual report of the Cochituate Water Board"

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City Document. — No. 103. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



V 




REPORT 



COCHITIJATE WATER BOARD 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE TEAK ENDING 



APRIL 30, 187 3. 



1 <* A 
/ 
/ / / 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



In Board of Aldermen, May 5, 1873. 

Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board be and hereby 
are authorized to submit their annual report in print ; the ex- 
pense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for Printing. 
Passed in Common Council. 
Came up for concurrence. 
Read and concurred. 
Approved by the Mayor May 6, 1873. 
A true copy. 

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



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v \ 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



City Hall, Cochituate Water Board Office. 

May, 1873. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston : — 

In accordance with the requirements of the City Ordinance, 
the Cochituate Water Board herewith submit their annual 
report for the year ending April 30th, 1873, together with 
the reports of the Clerk of the Board, the" Superintendent 
of the Eastern and Western Divisions, Water Registrar, 
and City Engineer, to which they would refer the City 
Council for detailed statements of the progress and condition 
of the Water Works during the year. 

An examination of these reports will show the works to be 
in a very satisfactory condition. 

At the date of the last annual report, the Board were 
especially engaged in the construction of a temporary connec- 
tion between Sudbury River and Lake Cochituate ; the chan- 
nel was completed in June, 1872, and on the 19th day of 
that month, the water from Sudbury River was let in, and 
(with sundry interruptions) continued to flow into Lake Co- 
chituate until the 17th day of September, when the channel 
was closed, and has not since been used. The amount of 
water thus conveyed into Lake Cochituate cannot be accurately 
stated, but is computed by rough gauging to be 1,676,600,- 
000 gallons ; a sufficient quantity to supply the city for more 
that one hundred days. 

After the completion of this temporary connection, the City 
Engineer engaged in making surveys and plans for the loca- 



6 City Document. — No. 103. 

tion and construction of a permanent conduit of great capacity 
to convey the water from our new source of supply (Sudbury 
Eiver) to Chestnut Hill Reservoir — a distance of about six- 
teen miles. 

His report upon this subject was made to this Board in 
January last, and duly transmitted to the City Council, and 
by them approved. 

An appropriation of five hundred thousand dollars has been 
made for the commencement of the work. A force will at 
once be put into the field, and portions of the work got under 
contract at an early clay. 

To render the supply from Sudbury River the most efficient, 
it is necessary to build two or more storage reservoirs, of lib- 
eral dimensions, upon the river, and, by means of a conduit, 
divert the water into Farm Pond at Framingham, thence by 
a second conduit to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. To reach the 
reservoir, and by the most desirable route, will involve the 
construction of two or more tunnels through solid rocks. The 
distance to be tunnelled will probably amount to seven or eight 
thousand feet. 

The size of the conduit will be eight and one-half feet di- 
ameter, — over two feet larger than the conduit which connects 
Lake Cochituate with Chestnut Hill. 

It is estimated that this work, when complete, will cost 
nearly five million dollars, — a vast sum iu itself considered ; 
but the advantages to be derived from its expenditure can be 
appreciated in the fact that it will ensure the City of Boston 
an ample water supply for the next half century. The 
work will be pursued with energy, but much time (three 
vears and perhaps more) will be required for its completion. 

The temporary connection between Sudbury River and 
Lake Cochituate will be kept intact until the permanent 
works are constructed. 

The present supply of water at the lake renders it probable 



Report of the Water Board. 7 

that no demands will be made upon Sudbury River during 
the year 1873. 

The average level of the water in the lake for the year 
ending January 1st, 1873, was 6^-g- feet above the level of 
the bottom of the couduit ; the average of the previous year 
was f>YQ ^. The level of the water would have fallen far below 
the previous year except for the introduction of Sudbury River. 



CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The average daily consumption of water for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1872, was 15,063,400 gallons; an increase of 
1,117,900 per day, as compared with the previous year. 

The rapid growth of the city in population and mechanical 
pursuits increases the demand for water, and the wisdom of 
securing au additional supply is daily made more apparent. 

The largest consumption of water was in the month of 
November, averaging nearly eighteen million gallons daily. 
This large demand was materially increased by the great con- 
flagration which occurred on the 9th and 10th days of 
November. 

By the records in the office of the City Engineer, it appears 
that the quantity of water used, during the thirty-five hours 
of the fire, was sufficient to flood the entire area of the " burnt 
district" (estimated at 60 acres) to a depth of 10|- inches ; and 
would cover the area occupied by the buildings burned, to a 
depth of nearly 14 inches. 

The income from water rates has been $851,474.31, being 
an increase over the previous year of $63,222,26, and the 
estimated income for the year ending April 30, 1874, is 
$875,000. 



8 City Document. — No. 103. 

The expenses have been as follows : — 

For the current expenses .... $253,963 58 
Interest and premium on water debt . . 702,177 21 



,140 79 
The Treasurer has credited the Water Works 

for the same year $901,799 18 



The balance shows an excess of expenditures 

over income ...... $54,341 61 

Expended in Wards 13, 14, 15 and 16 . 107,044 10 
on New Water Pipe, East Boston . 8,732 21 

" High- Service, South Boston . 26,832 25 

" Add'l Water Supply $61,278 83 
Less income . . 223 50 

_ $61,055 33 



$258,005 50 
Cost of the works May 1, 1872 . . . 9,602,950 74 



Net cost to May 1, 1873 .... $9,860,95624 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

This division comprises all the works lying east of the 
Brookline Eeservoir, including the distributing pipes and 
reservoirs in the city, and is uuder the care of Mr. E. R. 
Jones. 

During the year there has been laid ninety-four thousand 
and forty-six (94,046) feet of main pipe, equal to about 
eighteen miles ; total length of main pipes laid from the 
commencement of the works to present time is two hundred 
and thirty-seven miles. 

Connected with the mains are two thousand six hundred 
and fifty-eight fire hydrants, — an increase of two hundred and 
twenty-five during the year. Of the hydrants now in use 
eleven hundred and forty are of the Lowry pattern, and this 



Report or the Water Board. 



pattern is now exclusively used, wherever new mains are 
laid or alterations made. 

The hydrants are located as follows : — 

Boston proper 
South Boston . 



East Boston . 

Boston Highlands 

Dorchester 

Brookline 

Charlestown . 

Chelsea 

Deer Island . 

Total 



. 1,105 
. 394 
. 236 
. 561 
. 320 
9 

11 

8 

14 

. 2,658 



The number of service pipes laid during the year is (2,195) 
two thousand one hundred and ninety-live, measuring three 
thousand two hundred sixty -six feet, or about twelve miles. 

The work of connecting a portion of South Boston with 
the "high-service" system, and mentioned in our last report, 
has been completed, and is very satisfactory to the water- 
takers in that section of the city. 

The connection between the Mystic (Charlestown) Water 
Works and Beacon Hill has been made by means of large- 
sized pipes, and, in case of any emergency or disablement of 
works in Boston, or Charlestown, great benefits would be 
derived. 

The relaying of main lines through the " burnt district " 
has commenced, and will be continued as fast as new lines of 
streets are determined, and other circumstances permit. 

In most cases the new mains will be of increased capacity, 
and all new hydrants will be of the Lowry pattern. 

The City Engineer has been called* upon to examine the 
present mains, by which the easterly section of the city is 
supplied, and his report indicates a need of greater capacity 



10 City Document. — No. 103. 

in the branch mains feeding that section. This subject will 
receive the early attention of the Board. 

HIGH-SERVICE. 

In our last report, allusion was made to the satisfaction 
which the more elevated portion of our city derived from this 
branch of the service, and that the day was not far distant 
when it would be necessary to increase our pumping facilities. 

The demands upon this service have exceeded any expec- 
tations ; the average amount pumped daily for the year 1872 
was 633,499 gallons, — an increase of more than thirty per 
cent, over the previous year. 

The best method for the increase of our facilities has been 
considered by the City Engineer, and his views submitted to 
the City Council through this Board, and may be found in 
City Document No. 38 of the current year. 

His plans contemplate the erection of a reservoir on Park- 
er's Hill (Boston Highlands), and application has been made 
to the Legislature for authority to take laud necessary for its 
erection. 

DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIRS. 

The Beacon Hill Reservoir is only useful for the storage of 
a quantity of water for use in case of fire, or accident to the 
mains in its immediate vicinity ; and the same is substantially 
the fact with the reservoirs at East and South Boston. 

If a reservoir should be erected on Parker's Hill for the 
benefit of the high-service, there is no reason why the Beacon 
Hill Reservoir could not be abandoned with entire safety, as 
the establishment of a reservoir, at the point named, would 
command and amply protect the Beacon Hill District, both 
for fire and domestic purposes. 



Report of the Water Board. 11 



WESTERN DIVISION. 

This division comprises the lake and all that portion of 
the work lying between the lake and the gate-house at the 
Brookline Reservoir, and is under the care of Mr. Albert 
Stanwood as Superintendent. 

The new source of supply from Sudbury River has added 
greatly to the importance of this division, and will materially 
increase the duties of the Superintendent and others con- 
nected with the works. 

The annual examination of the conduit (omitted last year 
on account of the low stage in the lake) was made on the 
12th and 13th days of October last, and was found to be in 
good general condition ; it appeared that some repairs were 
required, which have been made. 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

This reservoir is in excellent condition, and one of the most 
valued features of the works. Its immense storage capacity, 
731,472,429 gallons, affords ample protection to the city in 
case of accident to the conduit, and is at all times kept at 
such height as to answer all demands that are likely to be 
made upon it. 

BROOKLINE RESERVOIR. 

The land and buildings are in good order. This reservoir 
should be thoroughly cleaned out at an early day. 

WATER REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT. 

The number of water-takers now entered for the year 1873 
is 40,688, — an increase of 1,972 over the previous year. 

Number of cases in which the water has been turned off 
for non-payment of rates, during the year, is 933 ; of this 
number 751 have been turned oil again, and 182 still remain 
off. 



12 City Document. — No. 103. 

Meters still continue in use in quite a number of establish- 
ments, embracing hotels, railroads, stables, manufactories, 
saloons, and buildings occupied by several tenants. 

Whole number of meters now in use, 955. 

The number of the various kinds of water fixtures, on the 
premises of water-takers, January 1, 1873, was 159,654, — 
an increase of 13,868 during the year. 

CHARLES H. ALLEN, President, 
JOHN A. HAVEN, 
ALEXANDER WADSWORTH, 
EDWARD A. WHITE, 
LEONARD R. CUTTER, 
EDWARD P. WILBUR, 
WILLIAM G. THATCHER. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Boston, May 1, 1873. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 

Sir, — The following is a statement of the Expenditures and 
Receipts of this department for the year commencing May 1, 
1872, and ending April 30, 1873 : — 



EXPENDITURES. 

Carting .... 

Plumbing shop . 

Damage .... 

Taxes .... 

Upper yard 

Main pipe 

Service pipe 

Rent of Eastern avenue wharf and salary of 

agent .... 
Telegraph .... 
Hydrants .... 
Stopcocks . 
Tolls and ferriage 
Lake .... 

Proving yard, for stock, etc. 
Stable . ... 

Amount carried forward, 



$810 00 


62 


50 


3,232 


54 


1,431 


13 


4,593 


03 


36,416 


81 


8,526 


18 


3,222 


33 


1,457 


11 


4,453 


37 


5,668 


82 


26 


00 


3,260 


58 


2,373 


06 


4,628 


80 


$80,162 


26 



14 



City Document. — No. 103, 



Amount brought forward, 


$80,162 26 


Laying main pipes . 


375 08 


" service " 


90 00 


Eeservoir — East Boston . 


126 50 


" Beacon Hill . 


578 47 


" South Boston . 


197 75 


" Brookline 


3,002 08 


" Chestnut Hill . 


14,612 31 


Meters . . . 


5,594 00 


Maintaining Meters . 


2,779 39 


Repairing stopcocks . 


1,857 62 


" main pipe . 


16,350 45 


" service pipe 


11,881 19 


" streets . 


6,510 25 


" hydrants . 


9,037 42 


Travelling expenses . 


177 40 


Fountains ..... 


1,585 36 


Postage and expressage 


29 48 


Blacksmith shop, for stock, etc. . 


189 41 


Tools 


3,134 55 


Salaries (including clerks in Water Reg 


strar's 


Department) .... 


21,999 99 


Inspectors . . 


8,824 50 


Off and on water 


11,221 95 


Printing (including Water Registrar 


's and 


Superintendent's) . 


1,275 42 


Miscellaneous expenses 


2,030 22 


Stationery (including Water Registrai 


•'s and 


Superintendent's) . 


341 86 


Wages — proving yard 


6,912 50 


" blacksmith's shop 


816 57 


" laying main pipe. 


12,567 35 


" " service pipe 


10,408 08 


Amount carried forward, 


$234,669 41 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



15 



Amount brought forward, 
Wages — laying high-service 
Aqueduct repairs 
Advertising .... 
Hydrant and stopcock boxes 
High-service .... 
Pumping works at Lake Cochituate 
Chestnut Hill Driveway 
Water to Deer Island 
Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16 . 
Additional supply of water 
New water pipe, East Boston 
High-service, South Boston 

Total amount drawn for by the Board 

And which is charged as follows : — 
To Water Works . . . $251,563 58 



Chestnut Hill Driveway 
Water to Deer Island 
New water pipe, E. Boston 
Wards 13, 14, 15, and 16 
Additional supply of water 
High-service, South Boston 



Amount charged to Water Works 



4,891 19 

3,289 31 

8,732 21 

107,044 10 

61,278 83 

26,832 25 

,631 47 



$234,669 41 

4,148 50 

1,240 69 

46 23 

3,117 61 

4,646 44 

3,694 70 

4,891 19 

3,289 31 

107,044 10 

61,278 83 

8,732 21 

26,832 25 

,631 47 



$455,450 97 



RECEIPTS 

Received for hydrants and 
maintaining same 
for Fire Depart- 
ment 
" " pasturage and 
rent of land 



,652 00 
137 00 



Amounts carried forward, 



,789 00 $455,450 97 



16 



City Document. —No. 103. 



Amounts brought forward, $29,789 00 


$455,450 


97 


Received 


for sale of old Tool 

House . 
44 sale of hay at C. H. 

Reservoir 


15 00 

50 00 






<( 


44 sale of grass at E. 
B. Reservoir . 


20 00 






1 1 


44 sale of coal at lake, 
not used for pump- 
ing engines . 


100 00 






(< 


44 use of engine loaned 
E. Boston Improve- 
ment Co. i 


75 00 






t i 


44 sale of old junk, etc., 
at yard . . 


57 87 






a 


4 ' rent of part of East- 
ern Ave. Wharf 


300 00 






<< 


44 sale of old mat- 
tresses, etc., at So. 
Framingham . 


223 50 






a 


44 off and on water 
for repairs 


1,990 00 






a 


44 fines for waste 


379 00 






a 


44 pipe laying, repair- 
ing, etc., etc., 


15,979 00 








Net amount to Wa 




48,978 


37 




ter Works, 






$406,472 


60 



Which is credited to — 

Additional supply of water, $223 50 

Water Works, . . . 48,754 87 



48,978 37 



Keport of the Water Board. 



17 



Amount drawn for the Water Works, not 
including Chestnut Hill Driveway, Water 
to Deer Island, Wards 13, 14, 15, and 
16, new water pipe to East Boston, High- 
Service, South Boston, or additional sup- 
ply of water ...... 



$251,563 58 



EXTENSION of the works. 



Main pipe 

Wages laying main pipe 

Laying main pipe, stock, etc 

Service pipe 

Wages laying service pipe 

Laying service pipe 



$36,416 81 

12,567 35 

375 08 

18,526 18 

10,408 08 

90 00 



68,383 50 



Amount of expenses from April 30, 1872, to 

May 1, 1873 $183,180 08 



Expenditures and Receipts on Account of the Water Works, 
to May 1, 1873. 



Amount drawn by Commissioners . . $4,043,718 21 

" Water Board, in 1850 . 366,163 89 
" " " Cochituate Water Board, 

from January 1, 1851, to May 1, 1872 . 6,647,558 36 
Amount drawn from April 30, 1872, to May 

1, 1873, for Water Works . . . 455,450 97 



Amount carried forward, 

3 



$11,512,891 43 



18 City Document. — ISo. 103. 

Amount brought forward, $11,512,891 43 

Amount paid the City Treas- 
urer by the Commissioners . $47,648 38 

Amount paid by Water Board, 

1850 . . . 8,153 52 

Amount paid by Cochituate 
Water Board to May 1, 
1872 . . . ■" . 315,789 92 

Amount paid April 30, 1872, 

to May 1, 1873 . . 48,978 37 

420,570 19 

Net amount drawn from the Treasurer, by 

the Commissioners and Water Boards, for s 

the Water Works . . . .$11,092.32124 



Gross payments (including interest, pre- 
mium, etc.) for account of the Water 
Works ....... 21,472,585 44 

Gross receipts 11,611,629 20 



Net cost to the city, May 1, 1873 . . $9,860,956 24 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. WIGGIN, 
Cleric of the Cochituate Water Board. 



Report of the Water Board. 19 



COST OF THE WORKS TO MAY 1, 1873. 

western division. 

Amount paid Wm. H. Knight, for the lake $100,000 00 
< < a a a a a fac- 

tories, $50,000, less amount on account of 
the sale of land and machinery, and insur- 
ance at the time of the fire . . . 20,818 22 

Expense of raising the lake two feet, includ- 
ing damages 28,002 18 

Cost of roads, bridges and swamps . . 38,332 48 

Gate-house at the lake .... 29,907 12 

Dam at the outlet of the lake . . . 8,458 20 

Dudley pond, lower dam, and making con- 
nections with the lake .... 18,982 23 

New dams, and improvement at the lake . 19,610 90 



Total cost of lake dep't, not including land . $264,111 33 

Land and land damages, less 

credit for land sold . $225,523 15 

Constructing brick conduit . 817,717 73 
Brookline Reservoir, 

laud . . $58,418 92 

Construction . 108,301 92 

Gate-house . . 33,356 37 

200,077 21 

Compensating reservoirs, less 

amount received when sold . 66,859 80 
Engineering expenses on the 

Western Division . . 69,900 31 

Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Western Division . . 112,715 58 



AmHs carried forward, $1,492,793 78 $264,111 33 



20 City Document. — No. 103. 

Am'ts brought fonoard, $1,492,793 78 $264,111 33 
Payments on account of the 

" new supply of water " . 63,581 64 

Chestnut Hill Keservoir, land 

construction . . 2,449,982 07 



4,006,357 49 



Total cost of Western Division . . . $4,270,468 82 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

Main and service pipes . $3,102,987 33 
Reacon Hill Kes- 
ervoir, land . $145,107 10 

Construction . 368,426 11 

513,533 21 



South Boston Res- 
ervoir, land . 55,103 23 
Construction . 35,804 87 



East Boston Res- 
ervoir, land . 23,862 50 
Construction . 46,328 59 



90,908 10 



70,191 09 



Engineering expenses on the 

Eastern Division . . 31,403 02 

Machine shop and pipe yards . 99,463 97 

Hydrants and stopcocks . . 123,298 59 

Proving pipes . . . 35,983 96 

Meters 126,758 94 

Miscellaneous expenses on the 

Eastern Division, . . 569,421 50 
Payment on account of Wards 

13, 14, and 15 . . . 700,983 03 

Payment on account of Ward 16 375,000 00 



AmH carried forward, $5,839,932 74 



Report of the Water Board. 21 

Am't brought forward, $5,839,932 74 

Payment on account of Wards 

13, 14, 15, and 16 . . 299,999 14 

Payment on account of new 

main to East Boston . . 24,878 08 

Payment on account of new 

water pipe, East Boston . 20,999 43 

Payment on account of high- 
service, South Boston . . 26,832 25 



Total cost of Eastern Division . . $6,212,64164 



Total cost of Eastern Division $6,212,641 64 
Western " 4,270,468 82 



u a a 



Total cost of Eastern and Western Divis- 
ions $10,483,110 46 



Net cost after deducting income from all 

sources $9,860,956 24 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, City Hall, 
Boston, May 1st, 1873. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Oochituate Water Board: — 

Sir, — lu compliance with the requirements of the ordinance 
on Engineer's Department, the following report, upon matters 
pertaining to water supply, is respectfully submitted : — 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

The monthly average heights of the water surface of the 
lake, above the bottom of the conduit, will be found in the 
table on page 52. 

On May 1st, 1872, the height was 5 feet 3|- inches; on 
May 28th, it was 4 feet 10 inches ; and from that date it rose 
continuously till April 3d, of this year, when the lake was 
full and wasting largely at the outlet-dam, the waste-gate 
being open. On May 1st, the surface had been drawn down 
to 13 feet 1 inch above the conduit bottom. 

At the beginning of last year there was no water in store, 
— in fact, at that time and until April 13 the conduit was 
supplied by means of pumps, — and as very little snow fell 
during the winter and the under-ground water-table had 
been very much lowered by the drought of the preceding 
season, great apprehension was felt that the Cochituate Dis- 
trict alone would prove insufficient to maintain the supply to 
the city during the following summer. 

Application to the Legislature was therefore made for an 



Report of the Water Board. 23 

act authorizing the city to take water from a new source, and 
to build works for immediate relief. 

An act was passed, early in April, granting the right to 
take water from the Sudbury River and to turn it into Lake 
Cochituate, and the work required for this purpose was at 
once begun. 

In a report to your Board, made last May, a full descrip- 
tion of this work (then in progress) was given. Its chief 
features are a wooden dam across the river, and a ditch from 
Farm Pond to Beaver Dam Brook, passing through swamp 
and meadow lands of a nature that requires the sides of the 
ditch to be sustained by planking and bracing. With the 
exception of a bridge over the outlet of Farm Pond, it is now 
finished. It is of a temporary character, intended, with proper 
attention and repairs, to last four or five years, or until a 
new conduit may be built connecting the river with Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir. 

Water was first let into the ditch June 19th, and was run 
each night till June 25th, to draw down the level of the pond 
and permit the deepening of the mouth of the ditch. On 
June 25th, water from the river was turned into the pond, 
and from thence let into the lake, and the flow was continued 
uninterruptedly until August 7th, when it was stopped to 
finish the side planking of the ditch. August 16th, the com- 
munication was again- opened, and was kept open till Septem- 
ber 17th, when it was closed for the season. 

The quantity of water received from the river during the 
summer cannot be very accurately ascertaiued, as during the 
time of flow, a number of changes were made in the section 
and capacity of the water-course. Rough gaugings were 
made, however, and the quantity computed from them is 
1,676,600,000 gallons; or equal to the supply required in 
the city taken at the average for the year, for 110 days. 

On page 50 will be found a table giving as has been cus- 



24 City Document. — No. 103. 

tomary, the rainfall on the lake water-shed, amount of water 
consumed and wasted, rise or fall of the lake-surface, total 
available amount of water and available percentage of rain- 
fall received into the lake. 

The figures of this table are but roughly approximate, 
owing to the want of accurate data for the calculations. 
Although it would cost a considerable sum to provide the 
means for properly measuring the flow in the conduit, the 
waste at the dam, the average rainfall for the entire water- 
shed, etc., yet the value of the results to be obtained from 
reliable measurements would fully warrant the necessary ex- 
penditure. 

The figures for 1872, in columns 4, 6 and 7 of the table, in- 
clude the quantity of water received from the Sudbury River, 
but those in the last three columns refer to the water-shed of 
the lake alone. 

It will be noticed that had no water been received from the 
river, the lake-surface, instead of rising, would have stood at 
the end of the year somewhat lower than at the beginning. 



CONDUIT. 

A thorough examination of the interior of the conduit, from 
the lake to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, was made October 12th 
and 13th. 

It was found in a better condition than had been antici- 
pated, but a number of new cracks were discovered, and many 
of the old ones had widened. 

The following transcript of the record made by Mr. Wig- 
gin, clerk of the Water Board, will show the number and 
position of the cracks ; those marked with an asterisk being 
the new ones, or the ones never before recorded. 



Report of the Water Board. 25 

Joseph P. Davis, Esq., City Engineer: — 

Dear Sir: Entered, the conduit at lake at 9.15 A. M., 
Oct. 12th. 

For a long distance the bottom is very sandy, and the sides 
are covered with a substance resembling sponge. There are 
no cracks, however. 

We reached Dedman's Brook at 11.45, and re-entered the 
conduit at 1.15. At station *160 is a crack in top arch. 1G9 
slight crack, also at 179 and 180. 

The conduit so far from Dedman's Brook is very clean. 

At 182 and 3 is a crack about ^ inch wide. 

*228 to 230, slight crack. 

247 and 8, crack in top arch quite large. 

254, bottom quite muddy. 

*255 to 571, cr ack, also at *259. 

Between 272 and 3 is a large crack, that has been repointed, 
but has not started. 

274, quite a crack in several places. 

284, muddy again. 

*292 to 6, small cracks. 

298, muddy. 

13 to 14, crack, which looks as if it had spread where it 
was repointed, and water drips through ; sand in bottom, 
also. 

*15| to 16^, quite a crack in top. 

*17 to 18, large crack; also sandy. 

Reached Grantville Waste Weir at 4.05, which is Station 
49 \ . Conduit very clean. 

Between *51 and 2, slight crack. 
" 53 and 5, " " 

*64 and 5, " " 
" 77 and 8, several cracks. 

107 and 9^, crack that was repointed; has started, espe_ 
cially at 109. 

Reached Lower Falls, Station 111^, at 5.10. 



26 City Document. — No. 103. 

Sunday, Oct. 13th. 

Entered conduit at 10.35. 

142-3, little sandy. 

*160, each side of man-hole is a crack. 

163-4, sandy. 

Between 174 and 80, some moss on each side of conduit. 

196-7, crack. 

216 to 218|, several bad cracks in top and on left. 

232i- to 34, " " " " 

242^ to 44, " " " " " also mossy. 

Reached Newton Centre, Station 9, at 12.50 ; left again at 
1.20. 

*50^ to 52^, bad cracks. Conduit very clean. 

Beached ventilator at 2.17 ; left again 2.40. 

*86l, crack on right. 

88 to 90, considerable fungus. 

93, crack on right. 

*1031, crack in top. 

108^-110, several cracks, been repointed, not started. 

*115 to 117, crack. 

118, crack on right. 

119-124A-, several bad cracks on each side and top. Re- 
pointing is all right. 

Bottom of conduit very rough. 

1251- to 21]^, slight crack. 

* 128-9, crack in top. 

Reached intermediate gate-house, 3.15. 
A statement of the condition of the grounds and structures, 
pertaining to the lake and conduit, will be found in the 
report of Mr. Stanwood, Superintendent of the Western 
Division. The keeper's house at the lake is in a bad state, 
and either it should receive thorough repair, or a new one 
should be built. 



Report of the "Water Board. 27 



RESERVOIRS. 

The monthly and yearly average heights above tide marsh 
level of the water, in the several reservoirs, are given in the 
accompanying tables on pp. 44-46. 

It will be seen that the average height for the year has 
been the same in the Chestnut Hill, as in the Brookline 
Eeservoir, and greater by y 6 ^ of a foot, than the heights in 
the latter during 1871. 

The Beacon Hill and South Boston Reservoirs are not now 
kept in open communication with the distributing system, and 
therefore the heights of water in them no longer indicate the 
pressure upon the street mains in their vicinities. The only 
useful purpose these reservoirs serve at present is to store a 
quantity of water for use in case of fire, or of accident to 
the mains which supply the districts about them. 

The Beacon Hill Reservoir has too hig-h an elevation to be 
of use in connection with the low-service distribution, and 
there appears to be no good reason why it should not be 
abandoned, provided the proposed one upon Parker Hill be 
built, as the latter will command the Beacon Hill district, and 
insure an adequate supply for fires. 

The South Boston Reservoir is also located too high to be 
of much use in connection with the low-service of its district, 
but as it stands upon a common or park, and its maintenance 
is inexpensive, and as it will serve to hold in store a consid- 
erable quantity of water, for use in emergencies, — such as a 
break in the supply main leading to South Boston, — it 
probably will be thought best not to remove it. / 

The East Boston Reservoir has been thrown out of service 
during the latter half of the year, and that section of the 
city, supplied under the much greater head of the Charles- 
town works. 



28 City Document. — No. 103. 



DISTRIBUTING SYSTEM. 

The distributing pipes have been largely extended during the 
past year, more especially in Dorchester and Roxbury. The 
total amount of cast-iron pipes laid in 1872 is 17.8 miles. 

The work of connecting Telegraph Hill, in South Boston, 
with the 12-inch high-service main in Washington street, 
Dorchester, was finished early in the year. The connection 
consists of a line of 12-inch pipes, laid through Bowdoin 
and Hancock streets, and of the new 20-inch low-service 
main, leading through Dorchester avenue and Dorchester 
street to Telegraph Hill. 

The use of the 20-inch main for this purpose requires the 
supply to the South Boston low-service to be kept up through 
the single line of 20-inch pipe in Dover street. These pipes 
were laid when the Cochituate works were built, and are not 
protected by the tar coating now used. 

Beyond question they are badly tuberculated, and are 
probably reduced in capacity of delivery, so as to be not 
much more than equivalent to 16-inch coated pipes. 

The population of South Boston is not far from 40,000, 
and that it may be properly supplied with water, and as a 
safeguard in case of accident to or repairs upon the Dover- 
street pipes, a new main should be laid, or the Dorches- 
ter-avenue main should be returned to its original purpose, 
and a new main, of smaller diameter, provided for the high- 
service. 

Pressures recently observed during the morning hours, at 
the hydrant near the corner of E and Seventh streets, show 
a loss of head, of about 28 feet, between that point and the 
Brookliue Reservoir, and a large portion of this loss must be 
due to the friction in the Dover-street main. 

In the report of this department for last year, Mr. Crafts 
recommended that a new hi^h-service main be laid from the 



Report or the Water Board. 29 

pumping works to Beacon Hill, and the old 30-inch main, 
now supplying the Beacon Hill high-service, be used to aid in 
the supply of the low-service of the city proper. I fully en- 
dorse his recommendation, and would urge that it be acted 
upon at an early day. 

To ascertain the losses of head at the end of the large sup- 
ply mains, and in the business portion of the city, Mr. Jones, 
Superintendent of the Eastern Division, has taken gauge 
readings from the 40-inch main near its junction with the 36- 
inch main (reduced to 30 inches) on the Common, and also at 
the hydrant corner of Broad and Milk streets. 

From these it appears that during the morning hours — or 
from 8 to 11 o'clock — the loss of head on the Common is from 14 
to 17 feet; and that at the corner of Broad and Milk streets, 
during the same hours, is from 30 to 37 feet. It will be noticed 
that the loss between the two points at which the readings 
were taken (the observations were simultaneous) is nearly 
20 feet, or greater than that between Brookline Reservoir 
and the Common. This indicates the need of greater capacity 
in the branch-mains feeding the easterly portion of the city. 

All the territory lying to the north and east of Cambridge, 
Court, Tremont, and Essex streets is chiefly supplied from 
the single 30-inch main, in Boylston street ; now the applica- 
tion of the 30-inch high-service main to the low-service distri- 
bution, as recommended, will give a new and very important 
connection between the Common and that territory, and mate- 
rially, improve the pressure where improvement is much 
needed. 

If it should not be deemed advisable to now incur the ex- 
pense of laying the new high-service main the entire distance 
between the pumping station and Beacon Hill, that portion 
of it between the Common, near Boylston street, and the 
hill, can be laid this season, and thus release enough of the 
SOMnch main to give the desired connection between the 
Common and Haymarket square on the low-service. 



30 City Document. — No. 103. 

The Engineers of the Fire Department, holding the opinion 
that hydrants of much greater capacity than those now in use, 
and of a kind that will allow of the concentration of a number 
of engines at one point, are essential for proper protection 
against fire, especially in districts covered with high and val- 
uable buildings, have recommended that either the Lowry or 
Hill hydrant be adopted. In conformity to this recommenda- 
tion, your Board has decided to substitute the Lowry for the 
old hydrants in the "burnt district." To furnish these 
with a full supply of water requires that the existing street 
mains should be replaced by new pipes of greater capacity. 

Plans and estimates for this work have been submitted and 
accepted, and an appropriation has been made by the City 
Council to carry it out. 

It is desirable that these hydrants be used at all points, 
where tall and expensive buildings are found, or where there 
are buildings filled with materials of a very combustible 
character, such as the large wood- working shops, piano and 
organ manufactories, etc. ; and to make their full capacity 
available, it will, in many instances, be necessary to make 
some modifications in the distributing system of pipes that 
will effect a more rapid delivery of water than is now possi- 
ble. 

Sectional plans of Roxbury, four in number, on a scale of 
two hundred feet to an inch, showing the water pipes as laid, 
with the location of gates and hydrants, have been made for 
the Superintendent of the Eastern Division, and similar plans 
of Boston proper and of Roxbury and Dorchester, on a scale 
of one hundred feet to an inch, are in preparation. The 
plans of Boston proper, thirteen in number, are practically 
completed, and those of Roxbury, twenty-two in number, are 
nearly so. 

PUMPING WORKS. 

The following table shows the total and monthly work 
done by the engines during the past year, and the amouut of 
coal consumed in doing it : — 



Report of the Water Board. 



31 





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32 City Document. — No. 103. 

The average daily amount pumped for the year has been 
733,499 gallons; the daily average for 1871 was 557,634 
gallons ; the increase is about 31 per cent. 

Owing to this increase, and to the necessity of furnishing 
an abundant supply of water for fires within the high-service 
area, the existing pumping machinery is unable to perform 
the duty required of it. I was therefore directed by your 
Board, early in the season, to report upon the best means for 
securing an adequate supply for all purposes ; and in obedi- 
ence to those orders the following report was presented. 



ITY OF BOSTON". 



w Office of the City Engineer, City Hall. 

"Boston, March 4, 1873. 

"Chas. H. Allen, Esq., President Gochituate Water 
Board : — 

" Sir, — The following report relating to the best method of 
Increasing the effective capacity of the high-service system of 
water supply is made by request of Mr. Haven, Chairman 
of the Committee on Eastern Division. 

"The districts included within the limits marked out on the 
map for the high-service distributing system constitute more 
than one-third of the present area of the city. 

" They are : Beacon Hill in Boston Proper, Telegraph Hill 
in South Boston, Parker's Hill, Fort Hill, Tommy's Rock and 
the Seaver Hill Territory in Roxbury, and the range of high 
lands which forms the greater portion of Dorchester ; making 
in all an area of about 3,500 acres. 

" A part of this area is not now supplied with water, in fact 
has scarcely any population, and a large portion of that which 
is supplied is not thickly populated ; but both parts contain 
some of the most desirable land for residences within the city 
limits, and evidently are destined to be rapidly occupied. 

" Future annexations will greatly increase the high-service 
area, both absolutely and relatively, and if all the territory 
extending to Mother Brook, between Ihe Charles and Neponset 
rivers, shall form the future city, or one metropolitan district, 
then the area to be supplied from your high-service system will 



34 City Document. — No. 103. 

be very much larger than that to be furnished with water by 
the low-service. 

" It is therefore evident that the high-service works will in a 
few years form one of the most important divisions of the entire 
system of water supply, and it is particularly desirable that 
their general character and outline shall be determined upon 
at as early a day as the necessary data for this purpose can be 
obtained, that whatever extensions are made in the existing 
system may, if possible, be so made that they will form parts 
of, or be available for, the system of the future. 

" Although the data are not now at command from which even 
a general outline of this system can be determined, neverthe- 
less, there are certain features which it must or should have, 
that can be pointed out, and which have a bearing on the ques- 
tion that is the more immediate subject of this report. 

" The water must be raised by machinery to an elevation that 
will give the requisite head upon the distributing pipes, and 
it is of great importance that at the point where this machin- 
ery is located there shall be a large store of water, that no 
interruption may occur to the supply in case the aqueduct or 
pipe which furnishes the water to the pumps is temporarily 
thrown out of use for examination, or repairs, or by accident 
to it. 

" This condition requires the eventual abandonment of the 
location of the engines which now supply the high-service, 
for a new one either at the Chestnut Hill or the Brookline 
Keservoir, or at some new reservoir that may be built, specially 
for the purpose, at a more favorable point. 

" There are other reasons than that of a want of a store of 
water, why the present location on Elmwood street, of the 
high-service machinery, is not the proper one for the ma- 
chinery of a system of works that is to supply an extensive 
territory and a large population. There is a want of room at 
this point ; the engine buildings would be exposed to the at- 
tacks of fires originating on neighboring premises ; the ioca- 



Report of the Water Board. 35 

tion is on the outskirts of the territory to be supplied, or is 
not sufficiently central for an economical system of distribu- 
tion ; it would require the water to be brought to it in pipes, 
at great cost, and a considerable loss of head ; and it is so 
low that a pressure of over thirty pounds per square inch is 
created on the suction side of the pump piston, which pro- 
duces a harsh action of the machinery, and to some extent 
impairs its efficiency. 

" The new works should be of a kind that have reservoirs 
as centres for the distributing pipe systems. 

"The area to be supplied consists of various districts, more 
or less isolated, for each of which there should be, as a mat- 
ter of economy, a distinct system of distribution, and to se- 
cure to them an uninterrupted supply under a nearly constant 
head, and that the supply mains leading to the districts may 
be of the minimum size and cost, reservoirs should be estab- 
lished at convenient points. 

"The existing high-service works were designed to supply 
a limited area only, and were not constructed upon a scale 
to meet the requirements of the large territory even now 
depending upon them, much less to provide for further 
extensions due to annexation. 

" The pumping machinery consists of two engines, each of a 
capacity to pump 2,400,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, 
when making thirty-five revolutions per minute. These en- 
gines are supplied from a single line of pipes, sixteen inches 
in diameter, under a head which gives about thirty-three 
pounds of pressure upon the pump piston ; and to enable the 
latter to work at the guaranteed speed, it was found neces- 
sary to connect the supply line with a large air-chamber. 
The pump force mains, immediately after leaving the engine 
building, are united by a Y branch into a single line of pipes, 
sixteen inches in diameter, which leads to the stand-tower on 
Fort Hill, and is about 2,500 feet long. On account of the 
connection of the engines, through the supply and force 



36 City Document. — No. 103. 

pipes, they are found to react, one upon the other, when 
working: together, and it is not considered safe to thus use 
them at a speed which will give a much greater discharge 
of water than will one engine alone, run at its safe maximum 
velocity. 

" As the capacity of one engine is less than that of four 
steam fire-engines, it will be seen that the power to supply 
water in times of fire is very inadequate. The laying of in- 
dependent supply and force mains would nearly double the 
available capacity of the engines for emergencies, and would 
provide a safeguard against stopping the supply in case of a 
burst. 

" Under the existing arrangement, a burst in either the sup- 
ply or force line would deprive the high-service district of 
water until repairs could be made, and should such an acci- 
dent occur during a fire, the consequences would be serious. 

" The steam parts of the engines having sufficient power to 
drive larger pumps than are now in use, it has been sug- 
gested that these pumps may be replaced by others of greater 
capacity. Such a change would be somewhat of an experi- 
ment, and unless much more valve area, or a better passage- 
way for the water than the pumps now have, can in some 
way be provided, I doubt whether it would effect much gain. 
But even if it can be successfully made, sufficient pumping 
capacity would not be secured, under adverse circumstances, 
— such as one engine being under repair, or dismantled for 
cleaning, — to meet the demand for water in case of a large 
fire within the high-service limits. 

" The pumps now in use are fourteen inches in diameter, and 
have a stroke of three feet, and a capacity of forty-eight gal- 
lons per revolution of the engine. The diameter that has been 
proposed for the new pumps, to replace the old ones, is six- 
teen inches, which gives a capacity of sixty-two gallons per 
revolution, or 130,000 gallons per hour, when the engine is 



Keport of the Water Board. 37 

running at its guaranteed speed of thirty-five revolutions per 
minute. 

" The average maximum hourly consumption of each day, 
during the coming season, will not fall short of half of this 
amount, or say 65,000 gallons, and will much exceed it in the 
following years. If, in addition to this consumption, there be 
required a supply for six steam fire-engines (which number the 
Chief Engineer of the Fire Department says should be pro- 
vided for), each throwing 450 gallons per minute (the aver- 
age amount), the delivery must be at the rate of 227,000 
gallons per hour. 

"Both engines, running together, would meet such a de- 
mand, but perfect safety is not secured when it is necessary 
that all the machinery shall be put in operation to meet an 
emergency that is likely to arise without previous warning. 
There should always be a reserve engine, to admit of repairs 
and cleaning at any time. Setting aside the domestic con- 
sumption, one engine alone, even if provided with a sixteen- 
inch pump, could not supply more than five fire-engines ; it 
is clear, therefore, that, to secure proper safety, some special 
provision must be made to keep up the supply in times of 
large fires. 

" This provision may consist either in the erection of a third 
engine, or in the building of a reservoir and connecting it with 
the stand-pipe. 

" If the engine be erected, it should have a capacity to pump 
about five million gallons per day, that when in use it alone 
may furnish all the water required both for extinguishing 
fires and for domestic supply. Owing to the comparatively 
small draft at night, such an engine would be larger than can 
now be conveniently used for keeping up the daily supply ; 
but, for the present, it can be kept in readiness for service 
in emergencies, and, as the consumption increases, can be 
gradually brought into more constant use. 

" There are now two boilers in service, each rated at one hun- 



38 City Document. —No. 103. 

drecl horse-power, or of sufficient capacity to drive the new 
engine; nevertheless, a third boiler, of somewhat greater 
power, should be provided. 

" The arrangement proposed is, then, two small engines (the 
existing ones) , each of a maximum capacity of about two and 
a half million gallons per day, and a new engine and boiler 
having a capacity of about five million gallons, and supply 
and force mains twenty-four inches in diameter. 

"The two small engines, when run together, or the large 
engine alone, will furnish any supply that is likely to be 
required from them within the next few years. 

"The chief objection to this plan is, that a large expendi- 
ture will be necessary for machinery, buildings, mains, etc., 
Avhich probably will be thrown out of use at the end of a 
few years. 

"A reservoir can be built on Parker's Hill, at an elevation 
that will give sufficient head on the high-service pipes, or 
with a wat'3r-surface about two hundred feet above tide- 
marsh level. 

"If this reservoir be connected with the stand-tower on 
Fort Hill, it will be put in good communication with the high- 
service distributing system, and will instantly respond to 
any demand for a sudden increase of supply. 

" The ratio between the average and maximum quantities of 
water pumped in an hour, during each month, has varied in 
the past year from 1|^ to ^||, as shown in the following 
table : — 



Eeport of the "Water Board. 



39 



" Table showing the average and maximum quantities of mater 
pumped in an hour, and the ratios between them, for each month 
of 1872. 



Month. 



January . . 
February . . 
March . . . 
April .... 
May .... 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . . 
September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December . . 

Averages 



Average. 



Gallons. 



Maximum. 



Gallons. 



31,474 
31,118 
32,681 
31,068 
32,391 
35,240 
36,615 
35,190 
34,515 
34,216 
35,696 
40,008 



34,184 



80,370 
52,640 
78,255 
51,700 
52,640 
50,525 
58,515 
68,620 
62,510 
66,035 
75,905 
76,375 



Ratio. 



64,508 



As 1 to 2.55 
As 1 to 1.69 
As 1 to 2.39 
As 1 to 1.66 
As 1 to 1.63 
As 1 to 1.43 
As 1 to 1.60 
As 1 to 1.95 
As 1 to 1.81 
As 1 to 1.93 
As 1 to 2.13 
Asl to 1.91 



As 1 to 1.8 



"From the above it will be seen, that an engine which has 
to vary its speed as the consumption of water varies, is re- 
quired to be about double the capacity of one doing the same 
work under a uniform speed ; that is to say, to furnish a 
given supply, an engine pumping into a stand-pipe should 
have twice the capacity of one pumping into a reservoir. 

" Hence it follows that the building of a reservoir, besides 
insuring an ample supply of water for the extinguishment 
of fires, would, by virtually doubling the pumping capacity, 
be equivalent to the addition of a new engine having twice 
the power of each of the existing ones. 

"If it be built to serve a temporary purpose only, its con- 
nection with the stand-tower may be made with a line of 
twenty-inch pipes, but as its proposed location is the proper 
one for one of the auxiliary reservoirs of the future high- 
service system, its pipe connections should be proportioned 



40 City Document. — No. 103. 

for future use, and this use should be kept in view in deter- 
mining upon the capacity of the reservoir, the design of the 
chambers, and the character of the work. 

"Its office, in the works of the future, will be to regulate 
the supply to Beacon Hill, Roxbury Highlands, and a portion 
of Dorchester. 

"Estimates are hereinafter given, first, for a new engine 
with its buildings, and supply and force mains ; second, for 
a new reservoir, designed to serve a temporary purpose, and 
having a capacity of 4,500,000 gallons ; third, for a new 
reservoir, designed to form a part of the future high-service 
system, and having a capacity of about 6,000,000 gallons. 

" It will be noticed that the land damages are the most im- 
portant items of the last two estimates, but it should be borne 
in mind that the value of this land is increasing from year to 
year, and that if not now taken for the purpose proposed, it 
probably will be eventually. 

"In conclusion, I would recommend that a new reservoir, 
having a capacity of at least six millions of gallons, be built 
on Parker's Hill, and connected with the stand-tower by a 
twenty-four inch line of pipes, and would suggest that, until 
this work is completed, the following precautionary measures 
be taken : — 

"First, to make such connections at the Beacon Hill and 
South Boston reservoirs as will permit of quickly putting 
them in communication with the high-service pipe mains. 

"Second, to keep these reservoirs well filled with water. 

" Third, to employ men familiar with the location of the gates 
and street mains, whose duty shall be to attend every alarm 
of fire in the high-service, districts, and who shall be given 
proper instructions, in reference to opening communication 
with the reservoirs, and to shutting off portions of the high- 
service area when the exigency of the case requires. 

"The following are the approximate preliminary estimates 
of cost : — 



Report of the Water Board. 



41 



"First Estimate. 

Engine and boiler ; capacity five millions of gal 

Ions in twenty-four hours 
Engine buildings and foundations 
Supply main, twenty-four inches diameter 
Force main, " " " 

Land damages ..... 



" Add ten per cent. ..... 

"Total 

" Second Estimate. 

Reservoir on Parker's Hill ; capacity about 4,500,- 

000 gallons 

Line of twenty-inch pipe to stand-tower 

Land damages ....... 

" Add ten per cent. ..... 

"Total 

"Third Estimate. 

Reservoir on Parker's Hill ; capacity about 6,000,- 

000 gallons 

Line of twenty-four inch pipe to stancl-tower 
Land damages ....... 



" Add ten per cent . 



$60,000 

22,000 

6,150 

30,500 

11,000 

$129,650 
12,965 

$142,615 



$ 53,000 
31,000 
75,000 

$159,000 
15,900 

$174,000 



$73,500 

39,500 

100,000 

$213,000 
21,300 

$234,300 



"Total ...... 

"Respectfully submitted, 

" JOSEPH P. DAVIS, 

" City Engineer. 



42 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Application has been made to the Legislature for an act 
authorizing the construction of a reservoir upon Parker's Hill. 
The season will be so far advanced before the necessary 
appropriations can be made, and the work put under con- 
tract, that it is improbable that the reservoir can be made 
ready for use before another summer. 

The following is a statement of the cost of pumping for the 
year 1872 : — 



Salaries 

Fuel . 

Repairs 

Gas 

Small supplies 

Total 



$3,933 75 

2*588 CQ 

433 91 

316 22 

113 42 

$7,435 30 



Approximate cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 
34 cents. 



CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The table on pages 47 and 48 gives the average daily con- 
sumption of water for each month since 1848. The daily 
average for the year 1872 was 15,063,400 gallons, which is 
in excess of the average for 1871 by about 8 per cent. The 
greatest consumption was in November, for which month the 
daily average was 17,591,100 gallons. 

The great fire of Nov. 9th began at about quarter past 
seven in the evening, and was not brought under control un- 
til the afternoon of the 10th. The consumption of water in 
the city for all purposes, from 6A.M. of the 9th to 6 A. M. 
of the 11th, or for 48 hours, was 43,500,000 gallons. The 
average use for domestic purposes, just previous to the fire, 
was 12,500,000 gallons in twenty-four hours ; hence, it ap- 
pears that fully 18,500,000 gallons were used by the Fire 



Report of the Water Board. 43 

Department in the thirty-five hours from 7 P. M. Nov. 9th, 
to 6 A. M. Nov. 11th, much the greater portion of which was 
used in the first eighteen hours. 

This quantity would cover the entire area burnt over 
(taken at 60 acres), 10| inches deep, and would cover the 
area occupied by the buildings about 14 inches deep. 

ADDITIONAL SUPPLY. 

Since the date of the last yearly report, preliminary sur- 
veys have been made to determine the location of a conduit 
from Farm Pond to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and the best po- 
sition for storage basins upon the Sudbury River. A plan of 
works for securing and conveying to the city the additional 
supply to be drawn from this river has been devised, and its 
cost estimated, and a report, bearing date January 27, to- 
gether with plans of the various structures required, was pre- 
sented to the Water Board. The plan proposed has received 
the approval of the City Government, and an appropriation of 
$500,000 has been made to cover the expenditures of this 
year. 

A force will at once be put into the field, to make the sur- 
veys for the final location of the conduit line, and portions of 
the work got under contract at as early a day as possible. 

RAIN-FALL. 

The usual tables giving the rain-fall at various points for 
the year 1872 will be found appended. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH P. DAVIS, 

City Engineer. 



44 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Average Monthly and Yearly Heights, in feet and decimals, of the 
several Reservoirs above '•'■tide marsh level" 1862-72. 



BROOKLINE. 

Maximum high-water line, 124.60. 



Month. 

January .... 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July. ..... 

August .... 

September . . . 
October .... 

November . . . 
December . . . 
Yearly Average 



1862. 



122.46 
122.85 
123.52 
124.18 
124.00 
123.25 
123.73 
123.70 
123.64 
123.85 
124.07 
123.46 



123.56 



1863, 



123.64 
123.23 
123.23 
123.85 
123.52 
123.17 
122.76 
123.11 
123.36 
122.26 
123.63 
122.53 



123.19 



1864, 



122.37 
122.61 
123.62 
123.82 
123.62 
122.66 
122.87 
122.64 
122.03 
123.19 
122.78 
122.29 



122.87 



1865. 1866, 



123.31 
122.82 
123.26 
123.38 
122.65 
123.23 
123.33 
123.39 
123.29 
123.29 
123.38 
123.24 



123.21 



122.28 
122.47 
123.19 
123.45 
123.04 
123.29 
122.97 
122.80 
122.81 
123.03 
122.75 
122.64 



122.89 



1867. 

122.00 
123.12 
123.05 
123.00 
123.07 
122.34 
122.98 
122.23 
122.52 
122.65 
122.89 
122.37 
122.69 



1868. 1869. 



123.29 
122.79 
122.33 
123.04 
123.04 
122.77 
122.77 
122.75 
122.12 
122.31 
122.56 
122.00 



122.65 



122.58 
122.64 
122.48 
122.60 
122.77 
121.85 
122.10 
122.19 
122.50 
122.58 
122.46 
122.92 



122.48 



1870, 



122.83 
122.60 
122.77 
122.56 
122.75 
122.64 
122.50 
122.23 
122.35 
122.64 
122.60 
122.50 



122.58 



1871. 



121.89 
122.54 
122.08 
122.00 
121.79 
121.98 
122.19 
122.06 
121.50 
119.54 
116.94 
117.71 



121.02 



1872. 



118.64 
120.48 
122.04 
122.10 
122.29 
122.25 
121.25 
122.14 
123.44 
122.96 
120.98 
121.06 



121.63 



BEACON HILL. 

Maximum high-water line, 121.53. 



Month. 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April . . . 
May .... 
June .... 
July .... 
August . . 
September . 
October . . 
November . 
December . 



Yearly Average 



1862. 



117.48 
119.46 
119.18 
117.91 
117.59 
116.39 
116.46 
116.22 
116.22 



1863, 



117.20 
115.23 



118.36 
118.18 
118.03 
117.27 
116.33 
115.40 
116.34 
116.05 
116.12 
115.87 
116.85 
118.30 



116.92 



1864. 
117.72 
117.54 
116.38 
117.21 
116.53 
115.31 
115.32 
115.19 
115.91 
118.17 
118.55 
117.35 



116.77 



1865. 



119.18 
118.91 
120.58 
121.28 
120.31 
120.56 
121.23 
119.83 
119.03 
118.43 
120.14 
120.50 



120.00 



1866. 



119.20 
119.65 
120.72 
120.70 
119.53 
118.53 
119.51 
119.17 
119.39 
119.50 
119.78 
119.37 



119.59 



1867. 



119.11 
118.59 
119.45 
119.86 
118.50 
118.34 
119.00 
117.70 
120.46 
120.46 
120.84 
120.02 



1868. 



119.36 



120.20 
120.11 
120.57 
120.57 
118.65 
118.45 
120.24 
117.11 
118.20 
11S.61 
119.03 
117.78 



119.11 



1869, 



118.51 
118.72 
118.30 
118.82 
119.68 
117.13 
117.20 
117.63 
117.45 
118.36 
118.45 
118.36 



118.13 



1870. 



118.63 
117.78 
118.07 
118.34 
118.63 
118.03 
119.30 
119.59 
117.72 
117.80 
118.61 
119.38 



118 49 



1871. 



119.26 
118.95 
119 38 
119.59 
119.09 

109.63 
109.68 



1872. 



116.20 
116.38 
116.49 
116.72 
116.70 
116.99 
116.95 
117.11 
117.65 
118.20 
118.36 
118.51 



117.19 



Eepoet or the Water Board. 



45 



Average monthly and yearly heights, etc. — Continued. 



SOUTH BOSTON. 
Maximum high-water line, 122.5 



Month. 

January . . . 
February . . . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September . . 
October .... 
November . . 
December . . . 

Yearly Average 



1862, 



113.66 
114.08 
114.12 
114.93 
115.74 
114.22 
114.23 
114.03 
114.04 
114.24 
115.94 
116.35 
114.63 



1863. 



115.73 
115.54 
115.36 
114.73 
112.71 
111.39 
109.75 
109.80 
109.64 
109.90 
111.25 
109.90 

112.14 



1864. 



110.63 
110.94 
111.13 
112.07 
111.64 
109.06 
108.57 
109.53 
110.21 
112.49 
112.49 
113.89 

111.05 



1865, 



114.21 
113.42 
113.64 
114.82 
115.44 
114.91 
114.36 
113.80 
113.69 
112.89 
112.74 
113.78 

113.97 



1866, 



114.38 
114.44 
113.51 
114.99 
114.90 
114.32 
113.96 
114.07 
113.41 
112.74 
112.03 
112.62 



113.78 



1867. 



112.46 
111.36 
111.74 
111.88 
111.63 
111.19 
111.53 
111.90 
111.70 
111.29 
111.26 
111.08 
111.59 



1868.1869 



111.15 
111.15 
111.11 
111.55 
111.61 
112.15 
111.53 
111.53 
111.44 
111.44 
111.44 
111.11 



111.44 



111.15 
111.34 
111.63 
111.96 
111.78 
111.51 
111.19 
110.65 
108.76 
113.15 
113.76 
113.88 
111.74 



1870. 



114.46 
114.80 
114.51 
113.57 
113.53 
113.36 
112.21 
110.78 
110.15 
110.01 
111.86 
112.61 



112.65 



1871 



112.51 
112.61 
112.74 
112.63 
112.71 
112.44 
115.32 
114.03 
113.13 
112.80 
112.76 
109.26 



112.74 



1872. 

109.34 
109.42 
109.38 
109.67 
109.32 
109.24 
109.05 
108.82 
106.49 
109.34 
110.61 
110.71 
109.28 



EAST BOSTON". 
Maximum high-water line, 107.60. 



Month. 


1862. 
96.26 


1863. 
95.64 


1864. 
90.22 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 
99.72 


1870. 

104.45 


1871. 
101. IS 


1872. 


January . 








96.12 


93.61 


91.89 


92 81 


103.47 


February . 








94.94 


93.86 


92.98 


97.00 


96.61 


92.06 


92.10 


100.56 


104.20 


104.33 


102.56 


March . . 








95.75 


94.29 


93.50 


94.83 


94.22 


91.69 


91.14 


100.60 


100.89 


106.12 


1C0.41 


April . . . 








96.71 


95.65 


96.16 


96.52 


96.47 


90.91 




<2 ■ 


104.93 


107.14 


100.10 


May . . . 








96.99 


93.07 


97.68 


96.04 


95.85 


89.63 




to.i 

O rt 


105.91 


106.50 


101.54 


June . . . 








95.99 


91.10 


94.22 


93.91 


93.71 


91.82 


u 

"3 




106.00 


106.43 


106.83 


July . . . 








96.13 


90.43 


92.34 


96.82 


95.35 


94.60 




100.60 


103.87 


106.47 


. • 


August . . 








93.96 


91.23 


92.84 


95.78 


93.85 


94.16 


.2 

to 
o 

"3 

QQ 


95.08 


104.25 


105.22 




September 








95.57 


91.96 


95.00 


94.52 


<2« 


99.40 


94.87 


102.77 


104.91 




October . . 








91.80 


95.02 


97.55 


93.38 


o p. 


96.85 


96.97 


105.20 


104.81 




November 








93.57 


93.36 


98.14 


92.23 


3 *-i 


93.47 




101.12 


104.75 


104.56 




December . 








95.77 


89.79 
92.95 


97.27 


94.34 


92.29 


92.57 
93.25 




102.06 


105.18 


104.58 




Yearly Average 




95.29 


94.83 


95.12 


94.66 


92.02 


99.06 


104.37 


105.18 





46 



City Document. — No. 103, 



Average monthly and yearly heights, etc. — Continued. 



CHESTNUT HILL. 

Maximum high-water line, 125.00. 



Month. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 






102.00 
102.81 
105.19 
110.48 
116.21 
121.46 
122.40 
122.02 
121.44 
119.67 
117.08 
115.35 


116.90 






120.46 






122.29 






122.52 






122.54 






122.35 






121.77 






122.15 






122.77 






122.08 




100.80 
101.29 


122.42 




121.40 








101.04 


114.67 


121.64 







Beport of the Water Board. 



47 



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50 



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51 



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52 



City Document. — No. 103. 



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Report of the Water Board. 



53 



CONDUIT AT THE LAKE. 

The following table shows the varying depths of the water 
in the conduit at the gate-house, the number of da}'s in each 
month that the water was running at those depths, and the 
average depth for each month. 



Depths 
Ft. In. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Total 
Days. 


0-11 




















2 
1 
1 
1 






2 


0-ll| 
























1 


1-0 
























1 


1-6 
























1 


1-7 








1 
















1 


2-0 










1 














1 


2-l| 


















1 






1 


3-8 




1 




















1 


4-0 




3 


















3 


4-1 






1 


















1 


4-2 






6 
1 
1 


















6 


4-3 
























1 


4-4 
























1 


4-6 






1 
1 


















1 


4-10 


26 




1 


4 
2 
3 
4 
9 
















32 


4-10J 
















2 


4-11 








1 


2 

2 

11 














6 


4-ll| 




















6 


5-0 








2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
7 














22 


5-0£ 




















1 


5-1 
























1 


5-11 
























1 


5-2 
























1 


5-2J 
























2 


5-3 








5 
4 


1 














8 


5-3£ 




















5 


5-4 










9 


14 












27 


5-6 




1 


15 


1 












17 


5 8 




2 




2 


30 


19 






47 





















54 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Conduit at the Lake. — Continued. 



Depths 
Ft. In. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 
Daya. 


5-10 












2 


17 


29 




7 
3 


19 
1 
1 

9 


1 

22 


74 


6-0 












12 


6-1} 




















1 


6-2 


1 


















1 


3 


6 3 


















31 


6 4 




















1 


1 


6-8 


1 
2 
1 


2 
1 

24 




















2 


6 10 






















1 


7 


13 




















'38 


8-0 




















2 


8-4 
























1 





























Average Monthly Depths. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Average 
for the year. 


5-3} 


6-9| 


6-0} 


4-8 


5-0§ 


5-1 


5-7} 


5-93 


5-8' 


4-10! 


5-llf 


6-2} 


5-7! 



Report of the Water Board. 



55 



Annual Amount of Rainfall, in Inches, at Lake Cochituate, Boston 
and vicinity, 1849 to 1872 inclusive. 





PLACES AND OBSERVERS. 




















*.i 


SO- 


| 


S i< 


3 




- 




oopq 


SJ 


a>, 


o S 

Is 

t=i '£ 
1 1 




£'5 
= 1 


1 


YEAR. 


£> a 

IS 

"a a 
o & 


.9 


t-.g 

J3 a 

»-° 
fccO 

2 0) • 

£5 


.IS 

j?g 

33 


1-3 


>> 
c 




■s£ 


o* 


s^ 


I s 


o=S 


£ a 


o 


. 


h! i 


FP 


o 


h? 


^ 


Ph 






40.30 


40.97 


40.74 


51.09 




34.69 






53.98 


54.07 


62.13 


45.68 




51.48 






44.31 


41.97 


41.00 


41.00 




43.30 




*47.93 


47.94 


40.51 


42.24 


42.78 




38.58 




*55.73 


48.86 


53.83 


45.04 


43.92 




53.27 




43.15 


45.71 


45.17 


41.29 


42.08 




46.25 




34.96 


44.19 


47.59 


40.63 


• 44.89 


48.41 


39.05 




40.80 


52.16 


53.79 


42.33 


42.49 


45.97 


40.97 




63.10 


56.87 


57.92 


44.04 


49.38 


52.02 


44.74 




48.66 


52.67 


45.46 


37.40 


37.73 


35.80 


44.51 




49.02 


56.70 




48.49 


47.51 


48.41 


45.29 




55.44 


51.46 


46.95 


45.97 


46.91 


46.67 


3S.24 




45.44 


50.07 


50.14 


36.51 


43.32 


42.95 


44.25 




49.69 


61.06 


57.21 


46.42 


44.28 


44.61 


50.09 




69.30 


67.72 


56.42 


53.66 


52.37 


57.81 


54.17 




42.60 


49.30 


39.46 


36.56 


38.11 


40.64 


36.83 


1865 


49.46 


47.83 


43.59 


35.84 


37.38 


38.82 


44.69 


1866 


62.32 


50.70 




43.46 


38.18 


41.36 


46.04 


1867 


56.25 


55.64 


41.71 


41.40 


45.54 


45.87 


47.04 


1868 


49.71 


64.11 


39.89 


44.65 


47.96 


' 49.58 


53.52 


1869 


64.34 


66.28 


47.98 


47.30 


47.30 


48.96 


47.70 


1870 . 


55.89 


59.73 


41.53 


39 40 


46.30 


4^.71 


49.02 


1871 . 


45.39 


48.33 


40.56 


36.82 


44 45 


44.17 


47.91 


1872 


48.47 


58.04 


52.73 


45.80 


44 32 


48.67 


48.71 



* By J. Varmevar. 



56 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Table showing the Rainfall in Boston for the year 1872, and the 
days on which it occurred, from observations by Wm. H. Bradley, 
Esq., Superintendent of Sewers. 



Days. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


2 . . . . 










.08 








.02 


.05 
.20 
.16 


.10 

.02 


.17 


4. . . . 
5 . . . . 


.58 
.14 


1.46 






.12 
.28 
.03 


2.54 
.92 


.72 




.06 

.28 


6 . . . . 




















8 . . . . 








.34 

.24 


.28 
.24 






1.85 






9 . . . . 




08 


10 ... . 






.40 




.05 
.16 












12 ... . 
















13 ... . 






.32 


.22 






.07 


.76 

.60 

1.36 

1.38 

.13 


.20 

.22 

.12 

3.63 


.47 

.84 


.56 
.09 
.06 


12 


14 ... . 




1.06 






.16 








.54 


.03 
.42 
.02 




17 ... . 






.18 














.76 
.80 


.02 
.12 






20 ... . 


1.01 








.02 








.43 

84 


































.17 


.04 

.38 


.88 


2.08 








12 


25 ... . 






.42 


.11 


26. . . . 




.02 


.34 




.94 


.10 


.10 
.96 
.56 


.91 
.17 
.15 


.08 


1.73 
.44 












.83 

.10 
.58 


.03 


















1.93 
1.92 






31 ... . 






.24 






.04 








.44 












Monthly ) 
Totals. J 


2.43 


2.68 


3.98 


3.24 


3.95 


4.S1 


4.48 


10.48 


7.37 


4.98 


4.64 


5.00 



Total for the year 58.04 inches. 



WATEE EEGISTEAE'S EEPOET. 



Water Eegistrar's Office, City Hall, 
Boston, May 1, 1873. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the Cochituate Water Board : — 
Sir, — In accordance with the requirements of the ordi- 
nance providing for the care and management of the Boston 
Water Works, I have the honor to submit the following 
report for the year 1872 : — 

The total number of water-takers now entered for the 
year 1873 is 40,688, being an increase since January 1, 1872, 
of 1,972. 

The total number of cases where the water has been turned 
off for non-payment of rates during the year is 933. Of this 
number 751 have been turned on, leaving a balance of 182 

still remaining off. 

The total amount of water-rates received 

from April 30, 1872, to May 1, 1873, is $903,812 67 

Less amount paid to the City of Charlestown, 

as per contract ..... $52,338 36 



$851,474 31 



Of this amount there was re- 
ceived for water used in pre- 
vious years the sum of . $50,426 81 

Leaving the receipts for water 
furnished durins; the financial 
year 1872 and 1873, the sum 
of $801,047 50 



Amount carried forward, $851,474 31 



58 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Amount brought forward, 
In addition to the above there 
has been received for turning 
on water in cases where it 
had been turned off for non- 
payment of rates, the sum of 



The increased amount of income for the finan- 
cial year ending Apil 30, 1873, over the 
previous year is .... . 

The total amount of assessments now made 
for the present year, is . 

The estimated amount of income from the 
sales of water during the year 1873 is 

The expenditures of my office during the year 
1872 are 



$851,474 31 



1,570 00 
$853,044 31 

$67,525 58 
$650,000 00 
$875,000 00 

$22,362 35 



The items of this expenditure are as follows : 




Paid for Salaries ..... 


$21,498 85 


a a Printing ..... 


$551 65 


" " Stationery ..... 


$186 97 


" " Horse and Buggy 


$123 00 


" " Postage Stamps and Advertising . 


$1 88 




$22,362 35 



Refort of the Water Board. 59 

METRES. 

The total number of metres now applied to the premises 
of water-takers is 955. Of this number 644 are J-iuch, 264 
1-inch, 40, 2-inch, 5, 3-inch, 2, 4-inch size ; they are attached 
to a variety of establishments, embracing hotels, railroads, 
manufactories, stables, confectionery, oyster saloons, and 
buildings occupied by several tenants. 

The following table exhibits the yearly revenue from the 
sale of Cochituate water since its introduction into the city 
October 25th, 1848 : — 

Received by Water Commissioners, as per 

Auditor's Report, in 1848 . 
From January 1, 1849, to January 1, 1850 
" " 1850, 

1851, 

1852, 

1853, 

1854, 

1855, 

1856, 

1857, 

1858, 
'< 1859, 

1860, 
" 1861, 

1862, 

1863, " 

1864, 
" 1865, 

1866, 

1867, " 

1868, 

Amount carried forward, 



. 


$972 81 


1850, 


71,657 79 


1851, 


99,025 45 


1852, 


. 161,052 85 


1853, 


. 179,567 39 


1854, 


. 196,352 32 


1855, 


. 217,007 51 


1856, 


. 266,302 77 


1857, 


. 282,651 84 


1858, 


. 289,328 83 


1859, 


. 302,409 73 


1860, 


. 314,808 97 


1861, 


. 334,544 86 


1862, 


., 365,323 96 


1863, 


.' 373,922 33 


1864, 


. 394,506 25 


1865, 


. 430,710 76 


1866, 


. 450,341 48 


1867, 


. 486,538 25 


1868, 


. 522,130 93 


1869, 


. 553,744 88 




$6,292,901 96 



60 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Amount brought forward, 
From January 1, 1869, to January 1, 1870, 

1870, " 1871, 

1871, " 1872, 

1872, « 1873, 

1873, to May 1, 1873, 



1,292,901 96 
597,328 55 
708,783 68 
774,445 70 
806,102 51 
625,822 82 

1,805,385 22 



Statement showing the number of houses, stores, steam 
engines, etc., in the City of Boston, supplied with Cochituate 
water to the 1st of January, 1873, with the amount of water- 
rates paid for 1872 : — 



25,511 Dwelling-houses . 






$408,651 02 


10 Boarding-houses . 






527 00 


703 Model-houses 






19,307 85 


9 Lodging-houses 






376 00 


14 Hotels 






995 58 


5,286 Stores and Shops . 






55,641 79 


411 Buildings 






16,721 90 


566 Offices 






4,530 28 


26 Printing-offices 






435 83 


24 Banks . 






371 05 


34 Halls . 






468 51 


1 Museum 






36 50 


31 Private Schools 






559 17 


16 Asylums 






979 38 


4 Hospitals 






170 00 


35 Greenhouses . 






493 50 


90 Churches 






1,244 51 


4 Markets 






816 00 


134 Cellars .... 






910 50 


662 Restaurants and Saloons 




13,490 15 


Amount carried forward. 


$526,726 52 



Eeport of the Watee Board. 



61 



Amount brought forward, 


7 


Club-houses 


2 


Bath-houses 




37 


Photographers 




11 


Packiug-houses 




1445 


Stables 




26 


Factories 




8 


Bleacheries . 




1 


Brewery 




2 


Beer Factories 




95 


Bakeries 




1 


Boat-house 




10 


Freight-houses 




3 


Gasometers . 




4 


Ship-yards 




2 


Dry clocks and engines 


66 


Shops and engines 


32 


Stores " " . 


14 


Factories " 


6 


Printing ' ' 


3 


Bakeries " 


2 


Ship-yards ' ' 


10 


Buildings " 


1 


Mill " • 


1 


Packing-house ' ' 


10 


Stationary engines 


63 


Hoisting and Pile-drivin 


15 


Armories 


71 


Hand-hose 




11 


Fountains 




42 


Tumbler-washers 




56 


Water-pressures 




3 


Laundries 





£ engines 



$526,726 52 

202 00 

67 50 

1,173 50 

477 17 

11,550 15 

1,000 50 

144 00 

109 00 

93 97 

746 34 

49 00 
209 00 

41 33 
58 00 

50 00 
3,035 34 
1,945 40 

885 68 
387 18 
108 00 

70 00 
732 12 

76 36 

78 00 
1,002 03 
759 00 
181 58 
390 00 
140 00 
625 00 
279 17 

75 00 



Amount carried forward, 



,467 84 



62 City Document. — No. 103. 

Amount brought forward, $553,467 84 

2 Commercial Colleges . 64 00 
1 Laboratory ...... 50 00 

Custom-house .... 150 00 

3 Branch Post-offices . . . 39 00 
1 Lockup ..... 6 25 

Fitting Gasometers . . . 315 27 

Fitting Cistern .... 18 00 

Steam-dredging Machine . 50 00 

Suffolk Street District ... 227 40 

1 Ice Company (washing ice) . . 30 00 

71 Steamboats ..... 13,308 70 

Office (City Scales) . . . 11 00 

Probate building . . . . 75 00 

House of Reception ... 10 00 

31 Fire-engines, hose and H. & L. houses 680 00 

2,389 Fire-hydrants .... 43,002 00 

96 Reservoirs ..... 1,728 00 

371 Public Schools .... 3,000 00 

City Stables . . . . ' 203 75 

Washing-carts .... 125 00 

Offal Station . . . . 225 00 

Steamer " Henry Morrison" . . 200 00 

Faneuil Hall .... 40 00 

Public Library . . . . 50 00 

" " East Boston Branch . 19 50 

Paving Department Shop and Stable 27 00 

Common Sewer Department . . 250 00 

Deer Park 10 00 

Public Urinals . . . . 110 00 

Street Sprinkling .... 500 00 

Public Garden .... 25 00 

Drin king-fountains ... , 750 00 

Building purposes . . . 4,741 87 

Metered water (9 months) . . 182,592 93 



$806,102 51 



Eeport of the Watek Board. 



63 



Statement' showing the number and hind of Water Fixtures con- 
tained within the premises of Water-takers in the City of Boston 
to January I, 1873, as compared with previous years. 



1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




5,893 


6,041 


6,452 


Taps. These have no connection with any drain or 
sewer. 


53,010 


' 58,946 


64,454 ' 


Sinks. 


23,961 


27,856 


30,632 


Wash-hand basins. 


8,013 


9,130 


10,289 


Bathing-tubs. 


11,319 


13,077 


14,863 


Pan water-closets. 


12,235 


14,104 


14,891 


Hopper water-closets. 


250 


241 


278 


" " " pull. 


216 


258 


213 


" " " self-acting. 


433 


434 


503 


" " " waste. 


607 


619 


602 


" " " door. 


2,447 


2,470 


2.755 


Urinals. 


9,615 


10,743 


11,826 


Wash-tubs. These are permanently attached to the 
building. 


879 


741 


714 


Shower-baths. 


13 


1 





Hydraulic rams. 


547 


468 


445 


Private hydrants. 


723 


578 


641 


Stop-hoppers. 


73 


79 


96 


Foot-baths. 


128,234 


145,786 


159,654 





Eespectfully submitted, 

WM. F. DAVIS, 

Water Registrar. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 

EASTERN DIVISION COCHITUATE WATER 

WORKS, 1872. 



Boston, May 1st, 1873. 

Chas. H. Allen, Esq., 

President of the CocMtuate Water Board: — 

Sir, — I hereby respectfully submit my report for the year 
ending with April the 30th. 

The whole length of main pipes of the different sizes, laid, 
the past year, as will be seen by the tables below, is 94,046 
feet, or nearly eighteen miles. 

The number of service pipes is 2,195, measuring 63,266 
feet, being 12 miles, less 106 feet. 

The lines of pipes on Bradley's Hill, 40 inches, 36 inches, 
and 30 inches in diameter, measuring in all 2,348 feet, were 
successfully lowered to an average depth of 3 feet early in the 
year. The necessity of lowering these lines was the cutting 
down of the hill by the town of Brookline. The work of re- 
laying pipes of a larger size in East Boston, for the better 
supply in case of fire, was completed in good season. The 
jength will be found in the tables below. 

The work of establishing gates at proper places, making 
suitable connection and letting on the water for a high-ser- 
vice supply to South Boston Heights, was completed on July 
15. 

The laying of pipes, establishing proper gates, and making 
suitable connections for the use of the Mystic water for the 



Eeport of the Water Board. 65 

high-service of Beacon Hill, in case of an accident to the 
pumping works or pipes leading therefrom, was completed in 
August. 

The East Boston and South Boston reservoirs were cleaned 
in August and September. 

A new line of 10-inch pipes, 612 feet in length, was laid 
over the creek and by the side of Winthrop Bridge, in Novem- 
ber. The old line was so exposed as to freeze twice during 
the winter of '71 and '72. The new line is enclosed by two 
air-tight boxes, or as near air-tight as could conveniently be 
made, and although last winter was a severely cold one, we 
had not the slightest trouble with it. 

The experiment of stone troughs attached to the drinking 
fountains answered the purpose well through the entire sea- 
son, and I believe gave to the public a satisfaction above all 
others. Your Board have ordered twenty more of them ; a 
few have been delivered and set ; the remainder will be set 
as soon after I get them as possible. I am sorry they do not 
come faster, as the old ones have been taken out, and the 
warm season is near to us. The occasion of their delay is, I 
suppose, the rebuilding on the "burnt district" monopolizes 
the most of the granite laborers. I have, however, the prom- 
ise of more very soon. I think a round trough would be an 
improvement over the present pattern, for a square, or any 
locality where teams or cattle can surround it. 

I am now establishing the Lowry hydrant wherever new 
mains are laid or alterations made. I call your attention to 
what I consider a wicked waste of water at the time of a fire. 
Most of the reservoirs are fed by a short 4-inch pipe, that is 
connected directly with the main pipe in street. The reservoirs 
were constructed before the water works, and fed from the 
roofs of buildings and other sources, consequently they were 
made with an outlet, the hole beino- about eio'ht inches. When 
the water is let on by the firemen, the water rises in the reservoir 
to the outlet, and then escapes unseen through the eight-inch 

9 



66 City Document. — No. 103. 

hole. You can readily imagine how much water is thus 
wasted, and at a time when it is most needed. I have a num- 
ber of times called the attention of the Fire Department to 
this fact, but it has not been heeded that I know of. 

I would ask your attention to what I consider a very im- 
portant part of this report. Ever since my connection with 
the Cochituate Water "Works, I have seen the necessity of 
having a building provided, either by purchase or lease, near 
our pipe-yard, where a number of our workmen can live, and 
be near at hand, to be called on in case of an emergency. 
Let me describe the condition we are in. In case of a break- 
age in our works at night, or of a Sunday, notice is given by 
the police to the watch at the yard ; the watchman travels up- 
wards of a mile to the residence of the nearest workman ; he 
hastens to the point designated. If the break is on the main 
pipe, he has to travel to the north part of the city, a distance 
of over two miles, and notify my assistant. He, the assistant, 
has to send to as many different places as the number of men 
he wants. Thence all repair to the pipe-yard for tools, 
thence to the place of the accident. You can readily imagine 
what damage might occur during all this time, and how much 
time might be saved, if at the yard workmen could be had 
at once. 

Taken Up. 
1,160 feet 6-inch pipe, Sumner street, between Lewis and 

Border street. 
336 feet 6-inch pipe, Lewis street, between Sumner and 

Marginal street. 
1,325 feet 6-inch pipe, Marginal street, between Lewis and 

Cottage street. 
691 feet 6-inch pipe, Clarendon street, between Boylston and 

Beacon street. 
1,032, feet 1^-inch, iron. 
115 " 1 " lead. 



Report or the Water Board. 67 

63 feet f inch, lead. 
120 " | " « 
46 " l " " 

Lowered. 
786 feet 40-inch pipe on Bradley's Hill. 
786 " 36 " " " " " 

786 " 30 " " " " " 

686 "12 " " White street, East Boston. 

272 " 6 " " Clifford street. 



Extended. 



f-inch pipe 11 feet. 
| " " 365 " 
| » " 15 " 



68 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, 'Size, and Number of Feet of Pipe Laid 

in 1872. 



In what Street. 



Haymarket Square 



Exeter 

Columbus Avenue . . 

Gloucester 

Boylston 

Cambridge 

Castle 

Tremont 

Clarendon 

High . 

Summer 

Kirkland 

Porter 

East Canton 

Shawmut Avenue . . . 
W. Clarendon 

Commonwealth Avenue 
North side .... 

Commonwealth Avenue 
South Side .... 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON PROPER. 
Charlestown and Merrimac . . 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Total, 20-inch , 



Beacon and Commonwealth Avenue . 



Total, 16-inch 



Clarendon and Chandler 

Marlboro and Commonwealth Avenue 

Clarendon and Dartmouth 

Dartmouth and Exeter 

Lynde and Hancock 

Tremont and Washington 

Castle and Dover 

Boylston and Commonwealth Avenue 
Commonwealth Avenue and Beacon . 
Hartford and Washington Square . . 

Washington Sq. and Broad 

Church Green and Washington . . . 



Total, 12-inch 



Indiana Place and Pleasant , 



Albany and Harrison Avenue . . 

Pleasant and Warrenton 

Columbus Avenue and Dartmouth 
Clarendon Place and Dartmouth . 



Clarendon and Exeter . 

Dartmouth and Exeter'. 

Carried forward 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



400 

150 
140 
150 
274 
131 

1,177 
821 
525 
691 
461 
372 

1,114 

6,006 

533 

618 
377 
235 
550 
147 

700 

231 

3,391 



Eepokt of the Watee Board. 



69 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Dartmouth 

Fairfield 

Clai emont Park . . . . 

Marlboro 

Bowdoin Square . . . 

Middlesex 

Emerald 

Albion 

Village 

Shawmut Avenue . . . 

Chandler 

Central whf., So. side • 
Mount Washington Av 

Dartmouth 

Clarendon 

Sawyer 

Yarmouth 

Oliver 

"Washington Square . . 

Hamilton 

Purchase 

Hartford 

Sturgis 

Newbury 

Sawyer 

Ohio Place 

Otis Place 

Buckingham Place . . 



Brought forward 

Newbury and R. R. Bridge .... 

Marlboro and Exeter 

Columbus Avenue and Prov. R. R. 

Fairfield and Dartmouth 

Green and Bulfinch 

Lucus and Castle 

Paul and Castle 

Chapman and Castle 



Berkeley and Tremont 

Across Atlantic Avenue 

Federal and the Bridge 

Columbus Avenue and Prov. R. R. 

Boylston and Prov. R. R 

Shawmut Avenue and Lenox . . . 
Columbus Avenue and Prov. R. R. 

Sturgis and Purchase 

Oliver and High 

High and Batterymarch 

High and Pearl 

Purchase and High 

Pearl and Broad 

Berkeley and Clarendon 

Winifred Court and Lenox .... 



Total, 6-inch 



Washington and Shawmut Avenue 

From Brimmer 

From Buckingham , 



Carried forward 



3,391 

100 

150 

190 

1,000 

130 

95 

30 

290 

170 

227 

278 

72 

325 

103 

487 

84 

36 

700 

358 

312 

1,042 

374 

500 

90 

427 

$10,961 

370 

96 

192 



70 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 


Feet 
of Pipe. 








658 


Paul 




4 


339 






72 








123 


Greenwich Park . . . 


Columbus Avenue and Prov. R. R 




60 








66 


Preston & Merrill's Yard 


From Mount "Washington Avenue .... 




161 


Caznove Place .... 






240 




1,719 











Report of the Water Board. 



71 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Thomas 

Dorchester 

• 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

cc 
Sixth 

Seventh 

Ninth 

F 

& 

a 

G 

M 

National 

OldHarhor 

Storey 

Kimball Court . . . 
Cavanaugh Place . . 

Swallow 

Bowen 



SOUTH BOSTON". 

Atlantic and Atlantic 

Dorchester Avenue and Jenkins 



Total 12-inch 



N and O 

L. and M 

Atlantic and G- 

Gr and H 

Gr and Linden 

I and K 

Dorchester Avenue and Ontario 

Hand I 

GandH 

L and M 

Dorchester and Lowland .... 

First and Second 

Seventh and Thomas 

Seventh and H 

Eighth and Ninth 

Third and Broadway 

Thomas and Dorchester . . . . 
Eighth and Old Harbor Place . 
Eighth and G 



Total, 6-inch 



From P Street . . 
From E Street . . 

NandO 

Dorchester and F 



Carried forward 



1,292 
1,038 

2,330 

284 
566 
477 
633 
62 
90 
230 
186 
195 
390 
280 
264 
215 
290 
118 
370 
200 
100 
232 

5,182 

180 
170 
416 
164 



72 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Ontario .... 
Mechanic Place 
Jay 

New Lark . . 
Newman . . . 
Broadway . . 
Athens .... 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . 

Sixth and Swan 

From Eighth Street 

Fourth and Fifth 

Ninth and O.C. &N.R.R. . 
Lowland and Dorchester . . . 
Foundry and O. C. & N. R. R. 
B & B. H. & E. R. R 



Total 4-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



930 
233 
173 

158 
80 
226 
576 
50 

2,426 



Report of the Water Board. 



73 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Brooks 

Sumner .... 
Lewis .... 
Marginal . . . 
Chelsea .... 

Winthrop Bridg< 

Trenton . . . 
Eagle ■ 

Saratoga . . . 
Prescott . . . 
Chelsea .... 
Havre .... 
Putnam .... 
London . . .' . 

Haynes .... 



EAST BOSTON". 
Bennington and Chelsea . . . 



Total, 16-inch 



Bord'er and Maverick Square 
Webster and Marginal . . . 

Lewis and Cottage 

Marion and Saratoga .... 



Total, 12-inch 



East Boston and Winthrop 
Total, 10-inch 



Putnam and White . . . 
Brooks and Meridian . . 
Knox and Putnam . . . 
Prescott and Chelsea . . 
Trenton and Lexington . 
G-lendon and Byron . . 
Bennington and Marion 
Lexington and Trenton . 
Porter and Bennington . 



Total, 6-inch 



Orleans and Marginal 
Total, 4-inch . . . 



629 

629 

1,160 

336 

1,325 

2,830 

5,651 

612 

612 

162 
440 
100 
180 
148 
482 
290 
132 
125 

2,059 

176 

176 



10 



74 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Lorigwood Avenue 

Brookline 

Tremont 

Blue Hill Avenue . 

Centre 

Seaver 

Day 

Shawmut Avenue . 
Ruggles 

New Heath . . . . 

Conant 

Wigglesworth . . 
Worthington . . . 
Westminster . . . 

Windsor 

Warwick 

Townsend . . . . 

Bowers 

Ottawa 

Circuit 

Old Heath . . . . 
New Heath .... 
Woodward Avenue 

Bickford 

Schuyler 

Maple 



Between what Streets. 



BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 
Bumstead Lane and Maple Avenue . . 
Longwood Avenue and Francis . . . . 

Philip and Bumstead Lane 

Alaska and Wayne 

Waverly and Woodville Square . . . 

Old Heath and Armory 

Maple and Walnut Avenue 

New Heath and Creighton 

Codman Avenue and Egleston Square 

Belmont and Cahot 

Warwick and Tremont 

Walden Place and Day 



Total, 12-inch 



Bumstead Lane and Worthington 
Tremont and Longwood Avenue . 



Ruggles and Hammond Park . . . . 
Westminster and Shawmut Avenue 
Ruggles and Hammond Park . . . . 
Warren and Shawmut Avenue . . . 
Laurel and Sherman 



Regent and Shawmut Avenue 
New Heath and Centre .... 
Day and Walden Place .... 

Dudley and George 

New Heath and Bromley Park 
Maple and Blue Hill Avenue . 
Schuyler and Seaver 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Carried forward 



Keport of the Water Board. 



75 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Rand 

Oriole 

St. James 

Vernon 

Akron 

Regent 

Tower 

Winslow 

Longwood Avenue 

Conant 

Folsom Place . . . 
Wigglesworth . . . 
Worthington . . . 

Phillips 

"Westminster . . . 

Marble 

"Warwick 

a 

"Waverly 

Townsend . . . . 

Ottawa 

Fountain 

Riverside 

Catawba 

Regent 

Circuit 

Old Heath . . . . 



Brought forward 

Blue Hill Avenue and Rand Place 

From "Walnut Avenue 

Regent and Shawmut Avenue . . 

Cabot and Simmons 

Regent and Alpine , . . 

St. James and Fountain 

Oriole and Llewellyn Avenue . . 



Total, 9-inch 



Eustis and Dudley 

Brookline Avenue and Maple Avenue 
Bumstead Lane and "Worthington . . 
From Conant 

Tremont and Longwood Avenue . . . 



Tremont and Smith 

Ruggles and Hammond Park . 
"Westminster and "Warwick . . 
Ruggles and Hammond Park . 

Ruggles and Marble 

Perrin and Blue Hill Avenue . 
"Warren and Shawmut Avenue 

Laurel and Sherman 

Circuit and Regent 

From Tremont 

Laurel and Sherman 

St. James and Circuit .... 
Regent and "Walnut Avenue . 
New Heath and Centre .... 



338 
10 

9 
22 
10 
12 
24 

9 

434 

754 
53 
322 
234 
363 
429 
45 

1,206 
412 

1,325 

S4 

142 

1,182 
766 
14 
236 
180 
547 
650 
798 



Carried forward 



76 



City Document. — No. 103= 



Statement of Location* Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



New Heath ...... 

Woodward Avenue . . 

Bickford . 

Schuyler 

Maple ......... 

Albert 

Whitney . 

Cedar 

Delle Avenue 

Rand . 

Drury Place 

Clifford 

Oriole 

Alpine ........ 

St. James 

Vernon 

Dennis 

Zeigler 

Akron 

Tower 

Llewellyn Avenue . . . 

Swett 

Hampshire 

Cahot 

Farnbam 

Place from Dudley . . 
Gaston 



Brought forward ..... 

Walden Place and Day ...... 

Dudley and George ....... 

Prom New Heath ........ 

Maple and Blue Hill Avenue . . . 

Schuyler and Seaver 

Old Heath and Bromley Park ■ . 

Prom Tremont 

Centre and Pynchon 

From Parker 

Blue Hill Avenue and Rand Place 

From Parker 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue . . 
From Walnut Avenue ...... 

St. James and Akron 

Regent and Shawmut Avenue . . 

Cahot and Simmons . 

Dudley and Huckins Avenue . . . 

Warren and Washington 

Regent and Alpine 

Oriole and Llewellyn Avenue . . 

From Walnut Avenue 

Beyond Hilton 

Ruggles and Culvert 



Reed and Hampden 

From Dudley 

Warren and Blue Hill Avenue 

Total, 6-inch 



Report of the Water Board. 



77 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In -what Street. 



Koxbury Alms House . 

Orchard 

Ruggles 

Bickford Avenue . . . 
Fremont and Dayton Av 
Longwood Avenue . . 

Walden Place 

Linwood Square . . . 

Fort Avenue 

Highland Park .... 
Rockville Place .... 
Lagrange Place .... 

Bromley Park 

Guild 

Pevear Court 

Eaton Court 

Sewell Place 

Blanchard Place . . . 



Between what Streets. 



From Marcella 

From Yeoman 

Cabot and Treniont 

From New Heath 

Mall and Mall 

Binney and Brookline Avenue 

From Highland 

From Linwood 

Highland and Beech Glen Avenue . . . 
Beech Glen Avenue and Fort Avenue . 

From Warren 

From Blue Hill Avenue 

Bickford and Albert 

Shawmut Avenue and Lambert Avenue 

From Dudley 

From Cedar 

From Tremont 

Bartlett and Norfolk 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe 



Total, 4-inch 



208 
109 

10 
430 
352 

45 
237 
230 
312 
238 
219 
182 
454 
313 
269 
441 
231 
127 

4,407 



78 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



Bowdoin 

Church 

Cottage 

Harvard 

Hamlet 

Berkeley Place . . 

Clayton 

Myrtle 

Centre 

Pleasant 

Commercial . . m . 

High 

Lincoln 

Winter 

Columbia 

New Seaver . . . . 
Michigan Avenue . 

Elmo 

Brook Avenue . . 

Parkman 

Arcadia 

Westville 

Grant 

Everett Avenue . . 



DORCHESTER. 
"Washington and Church . . 
Bowdoin and Adam . . . . 
Boston and Pleasant .... 
Washington and School . . - 



Total, 12-inch 



Boston and Berkeley Place 

Stoughton and Hamlet 

Park and Commercial 

Bird and Quincy 

Adam and Centre Avenue 

Creek and Commercial 

Hancock Street and Dorchester Avenue 

Commercial and Highland 

Adams and Dorchester Avenue . . . . 

Adams and Hancock 

Washington and Blue Hill Avenue . . . 
Columbia and Erie Avenue 



Blue Hill Avenue and Erie Avenue , 

Cottage and Stoughton , 

Adams and Dorchester Avenue . . , 

Adams and Draper 

Arcadia and Draper 

From Crescent Avenue 

From Stoughton , 



Total, 9-inch 



2,209 
275 
708 
942 

4,134 



25 
32 
17 
35 
14 
10 
16 
53 
27 
36 
24 
22 
49 
39 
12 
12 
11 

485 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 



79 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Howard Avenue 

Green 

Bellevue .... 

Hamlet 

Berkeley Place . 

Park 

Clayton 

Bird 

Myrtle 

tt 

Centre 

Pleasant . . . . 
Commercial . . . 

High 

Lincoln 

Winter 

Columbia . . . . 

New Seaver . . . 
Michigan Avenue 
Elmo ...... 

Erie Avenue . . 
Brook Avenue . 
Parkman . . . . 

Arcadia 

Draper 

"Westville .... 

Grant 

Everett Avenue . 
Fox Avenue . . 
East 



Between what Streets. 



Hartford and Howard 
Prom Bowdoin .... 



Boston and Berkeley Place . . . . 

Stoughton and Hamlet 

Beach and Clayton , 

Park and Granger , 

Ceylon and Myrtle , 

Quincy and Stoughton , 

Bird and Stoughton , 

Adams and Centre Avenue . . . . , 

Creek and Commercial , 

Hancock and Dorchester Avenue . 
Commercial and Highland .... 
Adams and Dorchester Avenue . 

Adams and Hancock 

"Washington and Blue Hill Avenue 
Columbia and Erie Avenue .... 



Blue Hill Avenue and Erie Avenue 
Elmo and Michigan Avenue . . . 

Cottage and Stoughton 

Adams and Dorchester Avenue . 

Adams and Draper 

Arcadia and Robinson 

Arcadia and Draper 

From Crescent Avenue ...... 

From Stoughton 

Adams and Percival Avenue . . . 
"Winter and Highland 



Carried forward 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



231 

219 
16 
472 
336 
134 
969 
20 
530 

1,700 

1,180 
246 

1,551 
417 
400 
593 

1,481 
645 
873 
562 
234 
811 

1,351 
833 
346 
228 
315 
470 
355 
650 

18,168 



80 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Statement of Location, Size, etc. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



East . 
Howard 



Myrtle Place 
Trull . . . . 
Oakman . . 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . . . . 
Winter and Dorchester Avenue 
Myrtle and Howard 



Total, 6-inch 



From Myrtle .... 

From Hancock: . . . 

Walnut and Taylor 

Total, 4-inch 



Diameter of 
Iron Pipe 
in Inches. 



Feet 
of Pipe. 



18,168 
322 
511 

19,001 

229 
657 
146 



Report of the Water Board. 



81 































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82 



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83 



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84 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Repairs of Pipes during the Year 1872. 















Diameter 


or 


Pipes in Inches. 








Where. 


48 
1 

1 


40 
2 

2 


36 
2 

2 


30 

7 

2 
9 


24 
1 

3 

4 


20 
1 
5 

6 


16 



12 

13 

2 
5 

23 


10 

2 
2 


8 
3 
3 


6 

36 
3 

3 

43 


4 

S3 
3 

7 
93 


3 
2 

2 


2 
9 

9 


14 
73 

73 


1| 

7 

7 


1 

52 
19 

3 
1 

75 


i 
9 

1 

10 


B 

921 

179 

64 

56 

6 

1,226 


i 

2 

28 
20 
5 
4 

57 


Totals. 




1,247 

227 

81 

84 

8 




1,647 



Of the leaks that have occurred in pipes of 4 inches and 
upwards, joints, 114 ; settling of earth, 23 ; defective pipe, 
12 ; defective packing, 2 ; concussion by falling of walls, 
6 ; struck by bar, 1. Total, 158. 

Stoppages by frost, 25 ; fish, 5. Total, 30. 

Of 3 iuches and in service pipes, joints, 10 ; settling of 
earth, 149; defective pipe, 34; defective packing, 19; 
defective coupling, 18 ; defective faucet, 4 ; coupling loose 
at main, 7; faucet loose at main, 2; faucet pulled out, 4; 
faucet broken at main, 6 ; faucet knocked out, 6 ; frost, 19 ; 
stiff connections, 73 ; struck by pick, 25 ; gnawed by rats, 
8 ; pipes not in use, 14; settling of wall, 1 ; cut by parties 
unknown, 2 ; blasting, 1 ; concussion by falling of walls, 1. 
Total, 404. 

Stoppages by frost in street, 66 ; frost from inside house, 
169; fish, 581; rust, 218; gasket, 16; solder, 3; dirt, 2. 
Total, 1,055. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



85 



Statement of Number of Leaks, 1850-1872. 



Teak. 



Diameter of 




Four Inches and 
upwards. 


Less than four 
Inches. 


Totals. 


32 


72 


104 


64 


173 


237 


82 


241 


323 


85 


260 


345 


74 


280 


354 


75 


219 


294 


75 


232 


307 


85 


278 


S63 


77 


324 


401 


82 


449 


531 


134 


458 


592 


109 


399 


508 


117 


373 


490 


97 


397 


494 


95 


394 


489 


111 


496 


607 


139 


536 


675 


122 


487 


609 


82 


449 


531 


82 


407 


489 


157 


769 


926 


185 


1,380 


1,565 


188 


1,459 


1,647 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 



86 



City Document. — No. 103. 



HYDRANTS. 

During the je&r 253 hydrants have been established, and 
28 abandoned, as follows : — 



In Boston proper — Lowiy 17 

" " " Wilniarth 47, abandoned 17 

South Boston, " 13, " . 1 

East Boston — Lowry 18 

" " Wilmarth 7 . . 

<< << " abandoned 10 

Boston Highlands — Lowry 59 

« " Wilmarth 17 

Dorchester — Lowry 63 

" Wilmarth 6 

Brookline — Lowry 6 



253 28 

Deducting 10, abandoned in East Boston 



17 
30 
12 
18 

7 

59 

17 

63 

6 

6 



235 
10 

225 



Total number of Hydrants established up to May 1, 1873. 





May 1st, 1872. Put in. 




Abandoned. 




Boston Proper, 


1,058 64 


1,122 


17 


1,105 


South Boston, 


382 13 


395 


1 


394 


East Boston, 


221 25 


246 


10 


236 


Boston Highlands 


, 485 76 


561 




561 


Dorchester, 


251 69 


320 




320 


Brookline, 


3 6 


9 




9 


Charlestown, 


11 


11 




11 


Chelsea, 


8 


8 




8 


Deer Island 


14 


14 

2,686 


— 28 - 


14 




2,433 + 253 = 


2,658 



Total number up to May 1, 1873, 



2,658 



Keport or the Water Board. 87 

86 hydrants have been taken out and replaced by new, or 
repaired ones, and 257 boxes have been taken out and 
replaced by new ones. The hydrants have had the usual 
attention paid them. 

STOPCOCKS. 

250 new stopcocks have been established this year. 127 
boxes have been taken out and replaced by new ones. 

All the stopcocks have had the attention of former years 
paid them. 



88 City Document. — No. 103. 

Statement of Pipes and other Stock on hand, exclusive of Tools, 

May 1, 1873. 

















Diameter in 


Inches 














4S 


40 
14 


36 

10 
3 


30 

58 

2 

1 

2 

6 

1 

7 
141 

2 

22 

2 

13 
1 

4 


24 

32 
4 

6 
13 
1 
5 
2 
2 
5 

8 
3 

4 
2 


20 

17 

5 
12 

8 

4 

3 

4 

17 
3 


18 
3 

1 


16 


12 


10 
41 

6 
10 

6 

2 


9 
146 

149 

7 


8 

24 

1 
6 
3 

10 

7 
3 

1 

1 


6 


4 


3 

48 

3 

12 

7 

8 

8 

14 
54 


2 
8 

12 

4 
2 


li 




273 

12 
1 
2 

21 

13^ 
6 
4 

8 
3 

8 

5 
3 


1,304 
16 

24 
121 

11 
4 

13 
9 

4 
14 

4 
6 

26 
4 

10 
10 


3,591 

3 
8 
63 

42 
18 
56 
41 

1 
14 
39 

9 
27 

9 

10 


881 

1 

25 
'26 
64 
12 
48 
10 
4 
11 
13 

19 
5 

30 
43 

6 
25 

74 














2 

7 
2 
4 

2 
3 

1 

2 

4 
1 

1 


2 
2 
1 
12 
9 
1 
2 

3 

2 

2 
1 






5 




















40 








Blow-offs and Manholes . 













Hydrants. — 56 Lowry, 27 Lowry extensions, 3 Lowry 
chucks, 48 Lowry frames and covers, 4 Lowry barrels, 12 
Lowry caps, 10 round covers, 35 Wilmarth, 1 Wilmarth 
and 16 Lowell (old), 1 wharf hydrant. 

For Hydrants. — 26 bends, 41 leugtheners, 49 covers, 86 
wastes, 21 nipples, 16 socket nuts, 42 rods, 10 wharf 



Eepoet of the Water Board. 89 

hydrant cocks, 75 brass tubes, 40 nuts, 50 stuffing boxes, 26 
valve seats, 42 rubber valves, 25 leather rings, 32 screws, 16 
heavy frames and covers, 47 frames, 73 covers, 2,898 pounds 
iron castings, 61 pounds composition ditto, 72 pairs straps, 
21 pounds Babbitt metal. 

For Stopcocks. — 2 36-inch screws, 3 30-inch ditto, 3 24- 
inch ditto, 2 20-inch ditto, 1 16-inch ditto, 1 4-inch ditto, for 
waste wire, 1 ditto for Brookline reservoir (old), 45 com- 
position screws for 4-inch gates, 1 16-inch check valve, 19 
6-inch valves, 52 6-inch rings, 59 4-inch ditto, 60 6-inch 
stuffing boxes, 23 4-inch ditto, 9,292 pounds iron casting for 
6-inch gates, 5 frames, 5 covers. 

Meters in Shop. — 3 3-inch, 10 2-inch, 13 1-inch, 136 
J-inch. 

Stock for Meters. — 5 2-inch nipples, 3 1-inch ditto, 30 
f-inch ditto, 2 2-inch connection pieces, 8 1-inch ditto, 12 
f-ditto, 46 1-inch cocks, 18 f-inch ditto, 1 4-inch clock, 1 
3-iuch ditto, 1 2-inch ditto, 10 1-inch ditto, 25 |-iuch ditto, 

8 brass spindles, 65 rubber nipples, 13 fish boxes, 12 covers, 

9 glasses, 58 composition nipples unfinished. 

For Service Pipe. — 4 3-ihch union cocks, 94 1-inch ditto, 
119 f-inch ditto, 1,350 f-inch ditto, 78 J-inch ditto, 39 
1-inch air cocks, 32 1-iuch T cocks, 47 f-inch ditto, 35 f-inch 
ditto, 55 f-inch Y cocks, 48 f-inch thawing cocks, 18 2-inch 
tubes, 96 ll-inch ditto, 74 1-inch ditto, 711 f-inch ditto, 15 
f-inch ditto, 282 |-inch ditto, 24 2-inch nuts, 32 f-inch ditto, 
18 2-inch couplings, 46 1-inch ditto, 60 J-inch ditto, 227 
-|-inch ditto, 300 1-inch, ditto, 65 f-inch thawing couplings, 
2,000 boxes, 44 T ditto, 30 Y ditto, 116 extension tubes, 
2,200 tubes, 200 caps, 1,012 pounds unfinished composition 
castings 2 4x2 composition reducers, 93x2 ditto, 44 
2 x f inch ditto, 2 4-inch tunnel pipe, 7 3x2 iron reducers 
with 2-inch composition nipples, 41 1-inch plugs, 66 f-inch 
ditto, 81 f-inch ditto. 

12 



90 Citf Document. — No. 103. 

Lead Pipe. — l,894pounds 2-inch lead pipe, 3,080 pounds 
]|~inch ditto, 1,225 pounds 1^-inch ditto, 3,458 pounds 
1-inch ditto, 4,228 pounds |-iuch ditto, 28,175 pounds |-inch 
ditto, 3,068 pounds ^-inch ditto, 1,291 pounds 1-inch tin 
lined ditto, 2,494 pounds -§-inch ditto, 742 pounds |-inch 
ditto, 200 pounds |-inch block tin pipe, 75 pounds solder, 
455 pounds sheet lead. 

Blacksmith Shop. — 1,300 pounds round iron, 860 pounds 
flat ditto, 100 pounds square ditto, 800 pounds working 
pieces, 400 pounds cast steel, 19 dozen pick blanks, 6,000 
pounds Cumberland coal. 

Carpenter's Shop. — 147 Lowiy hydrant boxes, 5 ditto, 
unfinished, 168 stopcock boxes, 19 unfinished ditto, 84 
hydrant boxes, 84 ditto unfinished, 2 meter boxes, 16 ditto 
unfinished, 1,200 pounds spikes and nails, 37,000 feet 2-inch 
spruce plank, 6,000 feet 1|— inch spruce batting, 35 1 foot 
pieces for raising hydrant boxes, 25 1 foot ditto, for stopcock 
boxes, 30 ditto for Lowry hydrant boxes, 60 feet hard wood 
plank. 

Tools. — 1 steam engine, 1 large hoisting crane, 3 boom 
derricks, 6 hand geared derricks, 5 sets shears and rigging 
for same, 6 tool houses, 3 tool boxes, 2 platform scales, 1 
portable blacksmith shop, 1 portable covering for Brewer 
fountain, 1 hand-roller, 1 horse ditto, tools for laying main 
and service pipes, 2 engine lathes, 1 foot ditto, 1 hand ditto, 
1 Pratt and Whitney taper ditto, 1 chain hoisting gear, 1 up- 
right drilling machine, 3 grindstones, 1 trip hammer, the 
necessary tools for carrying on the machine, blacksmith, car- 
penter and plumbing shops, 1 circular saw, 1 fan blower, 1 
40-inch proving press, 1 36-inch ditto, 1 small ditto, 4 
wheelbarrows, 400 feet old hose. Also a lot of patterns at 
the foundries where we obtain castings. 

Stable. — 11 horses, 8 wagons, 3 buggies, 6 pungs, 1 sled, 
1 cart, 12 sets harness, 22 blankets, 1 buffalo robe, 2 sleighs, 
3 tons English hay, 80 bushels grain, 1| tons straw. 



Report of the Water Board. 91 

Beacon Hill Reservoir. — 1 large composition cylinder, 
16-inch jet, 1 6-inch composition jet, 3 composition plates, 9 
cast-iron plates, 2 4-iuch composition jets, 5 swivel pipe 
patterns, 1 2-inch copper straight jet, 6 composition jets for 
small fountains, 6 large composition cylinders. 

Miscellaneous. — 64 tons pig lead, 10 gallons linseed oil, 
2 barrels kerosene oil, 150 tons furnace coal, 1 freight gravel, 
1,000 paving brick, 110 pounds lead washers, lot of paving 
stones, 52 reservoir covers, 40 cords of wood, 6 manholes, 
5 plates, lot of old lumber. Also old machinery from 
Marlboro. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. R. JONES, 
Sup't Eastern Division. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
WESTERN DIVISION. 



Office Superintendent Western Division, 
Brighton, May 1st, 1873. 
Charles H. Allen, Esq,, 

President of the Cochiluate Water Board: — 
Sir, — In compliance with the rules of the Water Board, 
the following report is submitted : — 

LAKE COCHITUATE. 

Work was commenced April 15th, 1872, to connect Farm 
Pond and the Sudbury River, with the lake. The work was 
completed, and the water turned into the lake, the 25th of 
June. Beaver Brook was cleaned out, made deeper and wider 
from the Walker mill privilege to the intersection of the 
trench dug from Farm Pond ; length of trench about four 
miles, one mile required to be close-sheeted with 2-inch plank. 
Three flumes were built, and two stone culverts, under the 
town roads; two dams, one at the inlet of Farm Pond, 
and one on the Sudbury River, a short distance below the 
bridge of B., C. & F. R. R. The work was done under the 
direction of J. P. Davis, Esq., City Engineer. The water was 
run through the trench from June 25th until September 17th ; 
the stop planks were theu put in, and no water has been run 
into the lake from that time. From May 28th to June 1st, 
1872, the water in the lake was 4 feet 10 inches above the 
bottom of the conduit. This was the lowest point reached 
during the year ; it gradually rose, and on the 15th of Novem- 



Keport of the Water Board. 93 

ber it stood at 13 feet 1 inch. Orders were then given to 
keep it down to 12 feet 6 inches, and it was held near that 
point during the winter, and on April 30th, 1873, it was 
13 feet 1 inch. The number of daj's that the water has run to 
waste will be shown in the report of the City Engineer. 
The engines and pumps have been removed, and stored ; the 
gate-house repaired, and cleaned ; the usual attention given 
to the grounds and fences connected with the lake. I would 
call your attention to the house occupied by the attendant ; 
as it would not be economy to repair it, I would recommend 
that a new house be built, in a more favorable location for 
health, or, if built on the site of the present one, that it be 
raised, at least, three feet, so as to obtain more perfect drain- 
age. 

CONDUIT. 

The water has been drawn off from the conduit twice dur- 
ing the year, October 12th and 13th, to make the annual 
examination, which occupied two days. A very thorough 
examination was made, in company with the City Engineer, 
Clerk of the Board (and fur three miles with some members 
of the Board). The section between the gate-house and the 
waste weir at Dedman's Brook was found very foul, being 
covered with a vegetable growth, and a great deal of sand on 
the bottom of the conduit, that was carried in by the pumps ; 
from Dedman's Brook to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir it was 
quite clean ; no new cracks were discovered, and no apparent 
change in the old ones. Measurements were taken by the 
City Engineer to see if the conduit had settled, so as to 
change its shape to any extent. It was found to be in a 
very good condition. October 25th, the water was drawn off 
and kept off for four days, and the section that required to 
be cleaned was attended to. The waste weirs are all in 
order; the doors and gratings will require painting during 
the season, to keep them so. 



94 City Document. — No. 103. 

CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

Everything connected with the reservoir is in order; the 
gate-houses have been cleaned of the rust and cement that 
covered the stone-work, and the joints repointed where it 
was needed ; stop-plank have been made for the effluent 
gate-house, to be used should they be required, until suitable 
gates can be made and put in, as recommended by the City 
Engineer. There has been no occasion to shut off the water, 
or to make any change in the gates the past year. The varia- 
tion of the water was three feet ; highest point, 24 feet ; low- 
est, 21 feet. The embankments are all in good order; no 
appearance of any leak has ever been seen. The bank on 
the west side of the Lawrence basin has been graded and 
improved ; the two ledges that were left above the level of 
high water in the Bradlee basin have been taken down, so as 
to be covered with a depth of twenty inches at high water. 
The drive-way has not had any repairs on it ; no suitable ma- 
terial can be obtained in this vicinity, and I would recom- 
mend starting the crushing-machine, and dress the drive-way 
with stone crushed very fine, as there is an abundance of 
material at hand ; the expense would not differ much from 
the cost of gravel. 

BROOKLTNE RESERVOIR. 

This reservoir has received the usual care and attention. 
The wall and fence on Dudley street have been completed and 
painted. The arrangements were made to clean this basin in 
November, and the water was drawn down for that purpose, 
when the fire of November 9th occurred, and it was not 
thought advisable to do it. The basin was filled again, and 
connected with the supply. Annexed, will be found the 
height of water at the Bradlee basin during the year, also 
the account of tools, etc. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

A. STANWOOD, 

8up't Western Division. 



Report of the Water Boakd. 



95 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin, above the lower floor, at the 
Effluent Gate-House. 



Date. 



1872. 



May 1 . 
2, 



Height 
of Water. 



In. 

5 
fit 
6 
6| 

7 

n 
n 



Date. 



1872. 
June 1 . . 

2. . 

3. . 

4. . 

5. . 



10 , 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
1C. 
17. 
IS. 
19 . 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
2G. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 



Height 
of Water. 



Ft. 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 



In. 
5| 
4| 
5 
5 
4* 
5i 
61 
7 
6 
6 
6 
5| 
5 

4£ 
41 
4 
3| 
3| 
31 
4 
31 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3^ 
3| 
3 
2 
1£ 



Date. 



1872, 
July 1 . 
" 2. 
" 3. 
" 4. 
" 5. 
" 6. 
" 7. 
" 8. 
" 9. 
" 10. 
" 11. 
" 12. 
" 13. 
" 14. 
" 15. 
" 16. 
" 17. 
" 18. 
" 19 . 
" 20. 
" 21 . 
" 22. 
" 23. 
" 24. 
" 25 . 
" 26 . 
'• 27. 
" 23. 
" 29 . 
" 30. 
" 31 . 



Height 
of Water. 



Ft. 
23 

23 
23 

23 

23 

23 

22 

22 

22 

22 

22 

22 

22 

22 8J 

22 81 

22 SJ 

22 m 



In. 

2 

ik 
oi 


0| 

Oh 

111 

11 
11 

10} 
10 

9 



22 7 

22 1% 

22 8 

22 8J 

22 8} 

22 9 

22 9} 

22 91 

22 10 



96 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 





Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


August 1 . . . 


22 92 


September 1 . . . 


23 8 


October 1 . . . 


23 111 


" 2. . . 


22 10 


" 2 . . . 


23 8 


" 2. . . 


23 Hi 


" 3. . . 


22 10 


" 3. . . 


23 8 


" 3. . . 


23 11| 


" 4. . . 


22 101 


" 4. . . 


23 7J 


" 4. . . 


23 11\ 


" 5. . . 


22 11 


5. . . 


23 7| 


" 5 . . . 


23 11| 


" 6. . . 


22 11 


" 6. . . 


23 71 


" 6. . . 


23 11J 


" 7. . . 


22 10| 


" 7. . . 


23 71 


" 7. . . 


23 m 


" 8 . . . 


22 101 


" 8. . . 


23 7 


" 8. . . 


24 


" 9. . . 


22 10| 


" 9 . . . 


23 71 


" 9 . . . 


24 


" 10. . . 


22 10 


" 10. . . 


23 1\ 


" 10 . . . 


23 113 


" 11 . . . 


22 10 


" 11. . . 


23 7 


" 11. . . 


23 11| 


" 12. . . 


22 1Q\ 


" 12. . . 


23 7 


" 12. . . 


23 8 


" 13. . . 


22 1Q\ 


" 13. . . 


23 6| 


" 13. . . 


23 2 


" 14. . . 


22 10£ 


" 14. . . 


23 7 


" 14. . . 


22 11 


" 15. . . 


23 


" 15. . . 


23 6| 


" 15 . . . 


23 1 


" 1(3 .. . 


23 


" 16. . . 


23 8 


" 16. . . 


23 11 


" 17. . . 


23 2 


" 17. . . 


23 10 


" 17. . . 


23 2 


" 18 . . . 


23 Z\ 


" 18. . . 


23 101 


" 18. . . 


23 21 


" 19 . . . 


23 Z\ 


" 19. . . 


23 11 


" 19. . . 


23 3\ 


" 20 . . . 


23 3| 


" 20 . . . 


24 


" 20 . . . 


23 4, 


" 21 . . . 


23 Z\ 


" 21. . . 


23 11| 


" 21 . . . 


23 5 


" 22. . . 


23 Si 


" 22 . . . 


23 11 


" 22 . . . 


23 f>\ 


" 23. . „ 


23 6 


" 23. . . 


23 111 


" 23. . . 


23 51 


" 24. . . 


23 6 


" 24. . . 


23 11$ 


" 24. ; . 


23 6 


" 25. . . 


23 5J 


" 25. . . 


23 n\ 


" 25. . . 


23 51 


" 20. . . 


23 6 


" 26. . . 


23 11 


" 26. . . 


23 41 


" 27 . . . 


23 6 


" 27 . . . 


23 11 


" 27. . . 


23 2 


" 28. . . 


23 53 


" 28. . . 


24 Ok 


" 28. . . 


22 101 


" 29 . . . 


23 51 


" 29. . . 


24 


" 29 . . . 


22 51 


" 30. . . 


23 0J 


" 30. . . 


24 


" 30. . . 


22 1 


" 31 . . . 


23 8 




1 


" 31. . . 


22 



Eepokt of the Water Board. 



97 



Height of Water at the Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 



Date. 




Height 
of "Water. 


Date. 




Height 
of Water. 


Date. 




1872. 


Ft. In. 


1872. 


Ft. In. 


1873. 


Nov. 1 . 




22 1| 


December 1 . 




22 1 


January 1 . 




" 2. 




22 3 


" 2 . 




22 01 


" 2. 




" 3. 




22 5 


3. 




22 1 


" 3. 




" 4. 




22 7 


4. 




22 1\ 


" 4. 




" 5. 




22 8k 


" 5 . 




22 1§ 


" 5. 




" 6. 




22 10 


" 6. 




22 2 


" 6 . 




" 7. 




23 


" 7. 




22 2| 


" 7. 




" 8. 




23 3J 


" 8. 




22 31 


" 8. 




" 9 . 




23 4 


" 9 . 




22 4| 


" 9 . 




" 10. 




23 1| 


" 10. 




22 h% 


" 10. 




" 11. 




23 1 


" 11. 




22 5 


" 11. 




" 12. 




23 


" 12. 




22 5 


" 12. 




" 13 . 




22 10 


" 13. 




22 5 


" 13. 




" 14. 




22 8 


" 14. 




22 5 


" 14. 




" 15. 




22 6 


" 15. 




22 h\ 


" 15. 




" 16. 




22 4 


" 16. 




22 51 


" 16. 




" 17. 




22 3 


" 17. 




22 5| 


" 17. 




" 18. 




22 2 


" 18. 




22 6 


« 18. 




« 19. 




22 0| 


" 19. 




22 6h 


" 19. 




" 20. 




21 11| 


" 20 . 




22 7| 


" 20. 




" 21. 




21 101 


" 21. 




22 8| 


" . 21 . 




" 22. 




22 


" 22. 




22 9 


" 22. 




" 23. 




22 


" 23. 




22 9J 


" 23. 




" 24. 




22 


" 24. 




22 9 


" 24. 




" 25. 




22 


" 25. 




22 8 


" 25 . 




" 26. 




21 11| 


" 26. 




22 6 


" 26. 




" 27. 




21 111 


" 27. 




22 6 


" 27. 




" 28 . 




21 11| 


« 28.. 




22 4| 


" 28. 




" 29. 




21 11| 


" 29. 




22 21 


" 29 . 




" 30 . 




22 0| 


" 30. 
" 31. 




22 2 
22 01 


« 30. 
" 31. 





Height 
of Water. 


Ft. 


In. 


22 





21 m 


21 10£ 


21 10J 


21 10 


22 


Oh 


22 





22 





22 





22 





21 11| 


21 m 


21 


10 


21 


9 


21 


9 


21 


H 


21 


9 


21 


11 


22 





22 





21 11| 


22 





22 





22 





22 


01 


22 


0| 


22 


o\ 


22 


o\ 


22 


Ok 


21 11 


21 


11 



13 



98 



City Document. — No. 103. 



Height of Wat 


3r a£ the Bradlee Basin. — Continued. 


Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


Date. 


Height 
of Water. 


1873. 


Ft. In. 


1873. 


Ft. In. 


1873. 


Ft. In. 


Feb. 1 


21 8J 




21 1 




21 Hi 


" 2 


21 8\ 




21 1 


" 2 


22 




21 8 




21 1 


" 3 


22 0| 


" 4 


21 7 




21 \\ 




22 11 


" 5 


21 7 




21 1 


" 5 


22 2 


" 6 


21 6f 




21 




22 21 


'• 7 


21 6| 


" 7 


21 


" 7 


22 3£ 




21 7£ 


" 8 


21 


" 8 


22 4 




21 n 


" 9 


21 




22 4| 


"10 


21 7| 


" 10 


21 


" 10 


22 5 




21 6i 




21 




22 51 




21 5| 




21 1 




22 6 




21 5 


" 13 


21 1 


" 13 


22 7| 




21 4i 


" 14 


21 \\ 


" 14 


22 9£ 




21 4 




21 0£ 




22 10 


"16 


21 31 




21 2| 


" 16 


22 101 


"17 


21 4i 


" 17 


21 3 


" 17 


22 lOf 


"18 


21 4i 


" 18 


21 3 


" 18 


22 111 




21 41 




21 Z\ 


" 19 


23 


"20 


21 41 


" 20 


21 33 


" 20 


23 03 


"21 


21. 4} 




21 5| 




23 1J 


"22 


21 5 


" 22 


21 6 


"22 


23 2 


"23 


21 5 




21 6 




23 2 




21 4| 




21 61 


" 24 


23 2 


"25 


21 3 




21 7 


" 25 


23 2 


"26 


21 2 




21 7^ 


" 26 


23 2 


"27 


21 1 




21 1\ 




23 2 


"28 


21 1 




21 8 


" 28 


23 21 






" 29 

" 30 

" 31 


21 8 
21 10 
21 11 


" 29 

" 30 


23 2\ 






23 1\ 



















Keport or the "Water Board. 99 



Schedule of Property at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

1 two-horse express-wagon. 

1 single horse express-wagon. 

1 water cart, with shafts. 

2 two-horse water carts (new). 
2 " " " (old). 
2 " iron rollers. 

8 new castings for rollers. 
1 single horse pung. 
1 two " " 

1 horse truck. 
1 " power. 

1 hay wagon. 

2 hand carts. 
1 ox sling. 

1 pair large wheels. 

3 clay mills and shafting. 
1 large water cistern. 

1 stone drag. 
6 screens. 

40 ox-tie chains. 

2 7-inch rotary pumps. 
2 4" " " 

2 Joyce force, " 

1 house pump. 

1 steam engine. 

1 stone-crushing machine and castings. 

2 blacksmith's forges and tools. 
1 derrick and rigging. 

4 clay knives. 
4 grub axes. 

90 picks. 
48 shovels. 



100 City Document. — No. 103, 

6 spades. 
11 long-handle spades, 

6 new snow shovels. 
3 hoes. 

35 iron bars. 

7 stone hammers. 

6 striking hammers. 
13 iron rakes. 

7 scuffling hoes. 
3 border knives. 
1 root-puller. 

1 pair grass shears. 

5 scythes and snaiths. 
13 wooden rakes. 
11 wooden pails. 

3 lawn-mowers. 
1 garden engine. 

4 hay forks. 
9 lanterns. 

4 reflector lanterns. 

1 large reflector lantern. 

8 peat knives. 

22 tin dippers. 

23 " candlesticks. 
11 barrels cement. 
11 long drills. 

23 short " 

9 wooden rammers. 

2 grindstones. 

3 jack screws. 
chains. 

4 pieces rubber hose. 
2 " belting. 

2 whitewash brushes, 
6 paint brushes. 



Report of the Water Board. 101 



1 wooden brush. 
1 wood saw. 
10 ice chisels. 
3 ice saws. 
1 cross-cut saw. 
3 telegraph batteries. 
1 set scales and weights. 



1 


rain gauge. 


75 


feet 4-inch flange pipe. 


36 


a 8 ' ' " " 


1 


12-inch quarter turn. 


12 


feet 18-inch Scotch pipe. 


30 


K15 " " " 


15 


"30 " cement pipe, 


5 


a Of a a << 


2 


horses, 2 harnesses. 


1 


Concord wagon. 


1 


covered ' ' 


1 


carryall. 


5 


stoves. 


1 


safe. 




At Brookli 


1 


stove and funnel. 


2 


settees. 


2 


lamps. 


1 


spittoon. 


2 


shovels. 


1 


hay rake. 


1 


iron rake. 


1 


pick. 


1 


border knife. 


1 


pail. 


2 


ladders. 


1 


coal hod. 



102 City Document. — No. 103. 



1 


broom. 


2 


floor mats. 


1 


scythe and snaith. 


1 


basket. 


1 


desk. 


1 


oil can. 




Schedule of Property at South Framingham, 


102 


shovels. 


20 


long-handle spades. 


16 


stone hammers. 


15 


axes. 


15 


wheelbarrows . 


85 


picks. 


31 


grub axes. 


4 


stoves. 


4 


chains. 


70 


pair rubber boots (poor) . 


7 


sounding rods. 


1 


grindstone. 


1 


step ladder. 


1 


rain gauge. 


1 


camp tent and utensils. 


3 


bed springs. 


8 


blankets. 


7 


mattresses. 


6 


bolsters. 


17 


pillows. 


3 


brooms. 


1 


brace and bitts. 


2 hand saws. 


1 


screw driver. 


1 


chisel. 


8 


lanterns. 


4 


oil cans. 



Keport or the "Water Board. 103 

1 wash stand. 
1 wash bowl. 
1 water jar. 
1 mirror. 

6 tin clippers. 
1 hatchet. 

1 set blocks and falls, 
lot ropes. 

7 crowbars. 

4 drag ropes. 

5 augers. 

3 ladders. 

4 nail hammers. 
1 timber roller. 

4 pair stop plank hooks. 

1 cart hook. 

4 scrubbing brushes. 

1 boat. 

3 pair handcuffs. 

1 map South Frainingham. 

Schedule of Property at Lake Cochituate. 

1 extension table. 

1 parlor table. 

18 dining-room chairs. 

1 wash bowl. 

1 mirror. 

1 cooking range. 

2 settees. 
1 horse. 

1 carryall. 

1 express wagon. 

1 cart. 

1 cart harness. 

2 single harnesses. 



104 City Document. — No. 103. 



1 buffalo robe. 




1 pung. 




1 rain gauge. 




1 pair steel yards. 




1 dung fork. 




2 hay forks. 




4 hay rakes". 




2 iron-rakes. 




6 hoes. 




3 dung hoes. 




6 picks. 




5 iron bars. 




4 ox chains. 




1 grindstone. 




2 gravel screens. 




2 sand screens. 




1 spirit level. 




2 stone hammers. 




1 sledge hammer. 




2 ice chisels. 




2 ice tongs. 




16 water pails. 




8 lanterns. 




1 telegraph battery. 




9 engine belts. 




2 stop plank hooks. 




'4 whitewash brushes. 




2 grass hooks. 




1 boat. 




2 25 horse-power steam- 


■engines. 


1 15 " " " 


<< 


1 12 " " " 


a 


2 18-inch pumps. 




2 12 " " 





CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATER WORKS FEOM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT, TO MAY 1, 1873. 



Water Commissioners. 
Nathan Hale, James F. Baldwin, Thomas B. Curtis. From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 



Engineers for the Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From 
May, 1846, to November, 1848. 

E. S. Chesbrottgh, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. 
From May, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 



City Engineers having charge of the Works. 

• E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to 

October 1, 1855. 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 
1851, to July 19, 1852. 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to 
October 1, 1855. 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 
1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, 
to April 1, 1863. 



106 City Document. — No. 103. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to 
November 25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, 
to December 8, 1866. 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at C. H. Reservoir. 
From February 14, 1866, to Nov. 1870. 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, 
to present time. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. 
Whitwell, and J. Avery Richards, were elected a "Water Board, 
subject to the direction of a Joint Standing Committee of the City 
Council, by an ordinance passed December 31, 1849, which was 
limited to keep in force one year ; and in 1851 the Cochituate 
Water Board was established. 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned 

April 7, 1856 * * ...... Five years. 

John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned 

June 5, 1860 * * Four years. 

Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired 

April 3, 1865 ....... Five years. 

Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned Jan- 
uary 15, 1867 . . . . One year and nine months. 

John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired 

April 6, 1868 .... One year and three months. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and 

resigned January 4, 1871 . . Two years and nine months. 

Charles H. Allen, elected from January 4, 1871, 
to present time. 



Keport of the Water Board. 



107 



Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 55 * * 
John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 and 

59 * * 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56 . 

James W. Sever, 1851 . 

Samuel A, Eliot, 1851 * * . 

John T. Heard, 1851 .... 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54 and 55 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 1853 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852 * * . 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55 * * . 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56 and 57 * * 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55 . 

Tisdale Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59 * * 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58 . 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59 

Joseph Smith, 1856 .... 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 

and 64 ...... 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61 * * 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859 * * 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 

Clement Willis, 1860 

G. E. Pierce, 1860 .... 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63 * * 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63 

John F. Pray, 1862 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66 

Otis Norcross, * 1865 and 66 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66 and 

67 



Five years. 

Eight years. 

Five 3'ears. 

Four years. 

One jeav. 

One year. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

Three }-ears. 

Six years. 

Four years. 

Two years. 

Four years. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Two months. 

Eight years. 

Five years. 

Five years. 

One year. 

Six years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Three years. 

Two years. 

Seven years. 



108 



City Document. — No. 103. 



John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 67 

Charles R. McLean, 1867 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 

William S. Hills, 1867 . 

Charles R. Train, 1868 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69 

Benjamin Jabies, * 1858, 68 and 69. 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870 . 

John O. Poor, 1870 

Hollis R. Gray, 1870 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66 

70, 71 . 
George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70, 71 
Sidney Squires, 1871 
Amos L. Noyes 1871, 72. 
Charles H. Hersey, 1872 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71, 72 . 
Alexander Wadsworth, * 1864, 65, 66, 67 

68, 69, 72 . 
Jno. A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72 
Edward A. White, 1872 
Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72 
Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 . 
Wm. G. Thacher, 1873 



67,68,69 



Four years. 

One year. 
Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

Two years. 

Three years. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

One year. 

Nine years. 
Four years. 

One year. 
Two years. 

One year. 



Present Board. 



I 



*Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned Nov. 15, 1854, and Charles Stoddard was 
elected to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry B. Rogers resigned Oct. 22, 1865. 
Mr. Wilkins was re-elected Feb., 1856, and chosen President of the Board, 
which office he held until his resignation on June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer 
Johnson was elected President, and on July 2, Mr. Miles Standish was elected 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Wilkins. Otis Nor- 
cross resigned Jan. 15, 1867, having been elected Mayor of the city. Benjamin 
James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected in 1868. Alexander 
Wadsworth served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. 

* * Deceased. 



Report of the Water Board. 109 



COCHITUATE WATER BOARD, 1873. 



Jno. A. Haven, President. 

Leonard R. Cutter, of the Board of Aldermen. 

Edward P. Wilbur, \ 

> Of the Common Council. 
Wm. G. Thacher, ) 

AT LARGE. 

For One Year. For Two Years. 

John A. Haven, Charles R. McLean, 

Edward A. White. Thomas Gogin. 

Clerk. 
Joseph A. Wiggin. 

Superintendent of the Eastern Division. 
Ezekiel R. Jones. 

Superintendent of the Western Division. 
Albert Stanwood. 

Water Registrar. 
William F. Davis. 

City Engineer. 
Joseph P. Davis. 



110 City Document. — No. 103. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 



Eastern Division. 

Edwaed A. White, Chairman. 
Edward P. Wilbur, Thos. Gogin. 



Western Division. 

Chas. R. McLean, Chairman. 
Leonard R. Cutter, Wm. G. Thacher. 



Water Registrar's Department. 

Thomas Gogin, Chairman. 
Wm. G. Thacher, Edward P. Wilbur. 

On New Supply. 

John A. Haven, Chairman. 
Edward A. White, Chas. R. McLean. 



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