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Full text of "Annual report of the Department of Education"

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Public Document No. 2 



I ASS. SI?? (Homtmittiu^altlj of MuBButlinuttB 

!OCS. 

DLL. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THB 

Department of Education 

For the Year ending November 30, 1928 



Issued in Accordance with Section 2 of Chapter 69 
OF THE General Laws 



Part I 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration anii Finance) 
1600 7-'29 Order 6071. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

PAYSON SMITH, Commissioner of Education 

Members of Advisory Board 

Ex officio The Commissioner of Education, Chairman 
Term expires 

1928. A. Lincoln Filene, 426 Washington Street, Boston 

1928. Thomas H. Sullivan, Slater BuUding, Worcester 

1929. Sarah Louise Arnold, Lincoln 

1929. Mrs. Ella Lyman Cabot, 101 Brattle Street, Cambridge 

1930. Arthur H. Lowe, Fitchburg 

1930. Walter V. McDuffee, Central High School, Springfield 
George H. Varney, Business Agent 
Arthur B. Lord, Supervisor of Office Organization 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools 

FRANK W. WRIGHT, Director 
Supervisors 
Burr F. Jones, Elementary Education 
Frank P. Morse, Secondary Education 

Arthur B. Lord, Educational Research and Statistics, Special Schools and Classes 
Harry E. Gardner, Teacher Placement 
Carl L. Schrader, Physical Education 
Alma Porter, Assistant, Physical Education 

Principals of State Normal Schools and the Massachusetts School of Art 
Arthur C. Boyden, Bridgewater Clarence M. Weed, Lowell 

Charles M. Herlihy, Fitchburg Roy L. Smith, North Adams 

James Chalmers, Framingham J. Asbury Pitman, Salem 

Francis A. Bagnall, Hyannis Charles Russell, Westfield 

William B. Aspinwall, Worcester 

Royal B. Farnum, Massachusetts School of Art, Boston 

Division of Vocational Education 

ROBERT 0. SMALL, Director 
Supervisors 
Subdivision of Supervision 
Rufus W. Stimson, Field of Agricultural Schools and Departments 
Daniel H. Shay, Field of Industrial Schools for Men and Boys 
Caroline H. Wilson, Asst., Fields of Industrial Schools, Household Aiis Schools and 
Departments, and Continuation Schools for Women and Girls 

— — , Asst., Field of Household Arts Schools and Departments 

Verna L. Payson,^ Asst., Field of Household Arts Schools and Departments 

Subdivision of Vocational Teacher-Training 
M. NoRCROss Stratton, Co-ordinator, Teacher-Training and Supervision, and 

Fields of Industrial Schools for Men and Boys, and Continuation Schools for Boys 
Franklin E. Heald, Field of Agricultural Schools and Departments 
Winthrop S. Welles, Asst., Field of Agricultural Schools and Departments 
Frederick A. Coates, Assistant, Field of Industrial Schools for Men and Boys 
John I. Lusk, Assistant, Field of Continuation Schools for Boys 
Anna A. Kloss, Fields of Industrial Schools, Household Arts Schools and Depart- 
ments, and Continuxition Schools for Women and Girls 
Martha T. Wonson, Assistant, Field of Household Arts Schools and Departments 
Verna L. Payson, As.st., Field of Household Arts Schools and Departments 
Lou Lombard, Assistant, Field of Household Arts {Resident, Framingham Normal 
School) 

Subdivision of Administration 

Carl E. Herri ck, All Fields 

1 By special assignment. 



2 P.D. 2. 

Rehabilitation Section 
Herbeet a. Dallas, Supervisor 
Henry Heim, Assistant Supervisor 
Mary E. P. Lowney, Assistant Supervisor 
Edward D. Callahan, Assista^it Supervisor 

Division of University Extension 

JAMES A. MOYER, Director 
Supervisors 
Dennis A. Dooley, Class Instruction 
John F. Wostrel, Correspondence Instruction 
Mary L. Guyton, Adult Alien Education 
E. Everett Clark, Adult Alien Education 
Helen B. Garrity, Assistant, Class Organization 
William J. Sheehan, Assistant, Class Organization 

Division of Immigration and Americanization 

Mrs. NATHANIEL THAYER, Director 
Term expires Members of Advisory Board 

1928. Stanislaus Mieczkowski, Worcester 

1928. Mary A. Barr, Boston 

1929. Abraham E. Pinanski, Boston 

1929. Charles M. Herlihy, Fitchburg 

1930. Mrs. Edith C. May, Needham 
1930. B. Preston Clark, Boston 

Alice W. O'Connor, Supervisor of Social Service 

James J. McGuinn, District Immigration Agent {New Bedford) 

Patrick J. Hurley, District Immigration Agent (Fall River) 

George P. Lovett, District Immigration Agent (Springfield) 

Joseph A. Donovan, District Immigration Agent (Lawrence) 

William F. Kelleher, District Immigration Agent (Boston and Worcester) 

Division of the Blind 

ROBERT I. BRAMHALL, Director 
Term expires Members of Commission 

1924. John D. W. Bodfish, Hyannis 

1927. Arthur C. Coggeshall, New Bedford 

1928. Edward E. Allen, Watertown 

1930. Mrs. William W. Taff, Brookline 

1931. Arthur F. Sullivan, Boston 

Florence W. Birchard, Employment Helen F. O'Leary, Accountant 

Edith R. Ervin, Employment Joseph S. Phelps, Census 

Francis B. Ierardi, Relief Mary W. Richardson, Social Work 

Helen E. Jowders, Work for Children Ida E. Ridgeway, Work for Children 

Catharine M. Keenan, Employment Fred V. Walsh, Relief 

Theodore C. Leutz, Census Louise C. Wright, Employment 
Florence E. Cummings; Manager, Salesroom 

Division of Public Libraries 

CHARLES F. D. BELDEN, Director 
Term expires Board of Commissioners 

1930. Charles F. D. Belden, Chairman, Boston 

1931. Anna M. Bancroft, Secretary, Hopedale 
1927. 



1928. Edward H. Redstone, Cambridge 

1929. HiLLER C. Wellman, Springfield 



P.D. 2. 

Edith Kathleen Jones, General Secretary and Library Adviser 

E. Louise Jones, Field Library Adviser 

Edna Phillips, Supervisor, Library Work with Foreigners 

Teachers* Retirement Board 

CLAYTON L. LENT, Secretary 
Membeks of Board 
Ex officio PAYSON SMITH, Commissioner of Education 
Term expires 

1928. Harry Smalley, Fall River 

1929. Elizabeth F. Wassum, Springfield 

Massachusetts Nautical School 

WILLIAM H. DIMICK, Secretary 

Board of Commissioners 
Term expires 

1929. William E. McKay, Chairman, Boston 
1928. Clarence E. Perkins, Winthrop 

1930. Theodore L. Stoker, Cambridge 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ROSCOE W. THATCHER, President 

Trustees 
Ex officio His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller 
Ex officio Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 
Ex officio Arthur W. Gilbert, Commissioner of Agricidture 
Ex officio RoscoE W. Thatcher, President of the College 

Term expires 
1927. Arthur G. Pollard, Lowell 

1927. George H. Ellis, Newton 

1928. John P. Chandler, Sterling Junction 

1928. Atherton Clark, Newton 

1929. Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Framinghara 

1929. William Wheeler, Concord 

1930. Sarah Louise Arnold, Lincoln 

1930. James F. Bacon, Boston 

1931. Harold L. Frost, Arlington 

1931. Frank Gerrett, Greenfield 

1932. Charles H. Preston, Danvers 

1932. Carlton D. Richardson, West Brookfield 

1933. Davis R. Dewey, Cambridge 
1933. John F. Gannon, Pittsfield 

Officers of the Trustees 
His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller, President 
William Wheeler, Concord, Vice-President 
Robert D. Hawley, Amherst, Secretary 
Fred C. Kenney, Amherst, Treasurer 
Frank Gerrett, Greenfield, Auditor 

The Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River 

HENRY W. NICHOLS, Principal 
Trustees 
Ex officio His Honor W. Harry Monks, Mayor 
Ex officio Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 
Ex officio Hector L. Belisle, Superintendent of Schools 



4 P.D. 2. 

Term expires 

1930. James Sinclair, President, Fall River 

1930. John S. Brayton, Vice-President, Fall River 

1931. Peter H. Cork, Vice-President, Taunton 
1931. John Goss, Treasurer, Fall River 

1930. William Hopewell, Clerk, Fall River 

1929. Arthur S. Phillips, Fall River 

1929. Edward B. Varney, Fall River 

1929. James Tansey, Fall River 

1929. Frank E. Arnzen, Fall River 

1929. James W. Anthony, Fall River 

1930. Frank L. Carpenter, Fall River 

1930. George D. Flynn, Jr., Fall River 

1931. Thomas B. Bassett, Fall River 
1931. Edmund Cote, Fall River 
1931. Richard G. Riley, Fall River 

Lowell Textile Institute 

CHARLES H. FAMES, President 
Trustees 
Ex officio His Honor Thomas J. Corbett, Mayor 
Ex officio Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 
Term expires 

1930. Arthur G. Pollard, Chairman, Lowell 
1930. Royal P. White, V ice-Chairman, Lowell 
1929. Irving Southworth, Andover 
1929. Frederick A. Flather, Lowell 
1929. Nellie C. Boutwell, Maiden 
1929. Henry A. Bodwell, Andover 

1929. Edward M. Abbot, Westford 

1930. Edward A. Bigelow, Worcester 

1930. Edward B. Wentworth, Maiden 
1930. 

1931. Hugh J. Molloy, Lowell 
1931. Joseph A. Gagnon, Lowell 
1931. T. Ellis Ramsdell, Housatonic 
1931. 

1931. Thomas T. Clark, Billerica 

New Bedford Textile School 
WILLIAM SMITH, Principal 
Trustees 
Ex officio His Honor Charles S. Ashley, Mayor _ 
Ex officio Payson Smith, Commissioner of Education 
Ex officio Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools 
Term expires 

1931. Abbott P. Smith, President, New Bedford 
1930. James 0. Thompson, Jr., Clerk, New Bedford 

1928. Charles 0. Dexter, New Bedford 

1929. Frederic Taber, New Bedford 
1929. John L. Burton, New Bedford 
1929. Joseph H. Handford, New Bedford 
1929. Thomas F. Glennon, New Bedford 

1929. John Sullivan, New Bedford 

1930. Joseph W. Bailey, New Bedford 
1930. Charles M. Holmes, New Bedford 
1930. Lewis E. Bentley, Fairhaven 

1930. Charles F. Broughton, New Bedford 

1931. George Walker, New Bedford 
1931. Samuel Ross, New Bedford 

1931. Frederick W. Steele, New Bedford 



P.D. 2. 5 

ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 

Legislative Proposals, 1929 
The Department of Education presents the following recommendations for 
legislation as set forth in the drafts of bills submitted to the General Court : 

1. Relative to the Reimbursement of the Commonwealth for the Expenses of the 
Instruction and Support of Blind and Deaf Children in Certain Schools. — Section 
26 of chapter 69 of the General Laws provides for the education of blind and deaf 
children at the expense of the Commonwealth. 

Previous to 1918, the law provided that "parents or guardians of such children, 
who are able wholly or in part to provide for their support and care, may, to the 
extent of their ability, reimburse the Commonwealth therefor." 

Section 171 of chapter 557 of the Acts of 1918, making certain substantive cor- 
rections in existing laws, changed the word "may" to "shall." 

The Department has endeavored to determine the abihty of individual parents 
to reimburse the Commonwealth. Last year an investigator called at the home of 
every child who had been placed in boarding institutions where the blind or deaf 
are being educated. It was found that the great majority of these people were 
without property and received very small wages. A large majority received less 
than $30 a week and had families ranging from five to nine members. It was 
found that in every case, where the family was able, a contribution was being made. 
It was also found that in many cases families were contributing who could not 
afford to do so, but feared the child would not be educated unless they did so. 

It is the intention of the State to have these children educated. I believe the 
present compulsory charge should be eliminated and the procedure as followed 
previous to 1918 revived. This change will allow those able to contribute to do so. 
I believe the self-respect of parents will in most cases lead to contributions. Those 
unable to contribute will not feel the compulsion that now often occurs. 

2. Permitting the Deposit in Savings Banks of the Funds of the Teachers' Retire- 
ment System. ■ — Members of the Association are required to pay assessments of 
5 per cent of their salary, with the provision that the maximum annual assessment 
shall be $100 and the minimum annual assessment S35. The fund created by these 
assessments is referred to in the law as the Annuity Fund. This fund is in the 
custody of the State Treasurer, and at the present time it can be invested only in 
accordance with the laws governing the investment of sinking funds. The invest- 
ments made during the past year ha.ve yielded only about 4 per cent interest. The 
proposed legislation is recommended in order that a higher interest return may be 
secured. The average rate paid by savings banks during the past year was about 
4.70 per cent. 

3. Providing that Any Deficiency in the Anyiuity Fund for Active or Retired 
Members under the Teachers' Retirement Law shall be made Good by the Common- 
wealth. — All teachers in the service of the public schools of Massachusetts, except 
in the city of Boston, are required to be members of the Retirement Association and 
pa J' assessments to the Annuity Fund. This fund is in the custody of the State 
Treasurer, and the law provides that in case of resignation or death before retire- 
ment, the amount to the credit of the members shall be returned. Upon retirement 
a member receives the annuity which his contributions with interest will purchase 
based on regular life insurance tables. There are now 1,050 retired members, and 
with such a limited number on the retired list there is bound to be considerable 
variation between the actual number of deaths and the expected deaths based on 
the mortality table used. This variation will result in a deficit occurring at times 
in the Annuity Fund. 

It would seem that it was the intention of the law to have the fund guaranteed 
by the Commonwealth. In fact, there is such a provision in the three following 
laws, which are similar in principle to the Teachers' Retirement Law : 

Retirement Law for State Employees, chapter 32, section 4 (2) B (b). 

Retirement Law for County Employees, chapter 32, section 24 (2) B (b). 

General Retirement Law for Cities and Towns, chapter 32, section 30 (2) B (6). 

It is, therefore, recommended that in case a deficit occurs in the Annuity Fund for 
active or retired members, established by the Teachers' Retirement Law, the deficit 
shall be made good by the Commonwealth. 



6 P.D. 2. 

DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION 

Early Foreshadowings 

Just twenty years ago the first State-aided day vocational schools in Massa- 
chusetts opened their doors. The "Douglas Commission," so-called, had presented 
its epoch-making report to the Legislature two years earlier. The intervening 
time had Avitnessed a sound though rapid growth of public interest all over the 
Commonwealth, in the vital problem of training a citizenry for skilled industry. 

The beginnings of public recognition of the problem lie much further in the past. 
The General Court of 1870 enacted a law (Chapter 248) requiring the establishment 
of evening classes in "industrial and mechanical drawing" in towns of ten thousand 
population. (Fifteen such classes so established in seven cities of the State became 
in 1908 State-aided vocational classes.) In 1872, legislation was passed (Chapter 
86) permitting any town or city to establish vocational classes. Apparently no 
municipality in Massachusetts stood ready at that time to embark independently 
on so far-reaching an experiment. Springfield, inaugurating its Evening School of 
Trades in 1898, has the distinction of being the first and only city to avail itseK of 
the permissive law. 

Evidently the time was not ripe, in those late decades of the nineteenth century, 
for the establishment of a general system of vocational education. However, the 
opinion of educators and industrialists was moving towards it. The law of 1894 
(Chapter 471), requiring manual training in every school system representing a 
population of 20,000 or more, was the answer of the school to a vaguely felt need. 
Only one year later (Chapter 475, Acts of 1895) the Legislature gave blanket 
authorization for the establishment of a textile school in any city having 450,000 
spindles. In Lowell, Fall River, and New Bedford, such schools were almost im- 
mediately established. These are now conducted as State institutions, and conse- 
quently, like the Massachusetts Agricultural College (established in 1863) and the 
Massachusetts Nautical School (dating from 1891), do not form a part of the pres- 
ent State-aided vocational school system. 

The "Douglas Commission" 

The Magna Charta of vocational education in this State is the report, in 1906, 
of the Commission on Industrial and Technical Education, appointed by Governor 
William L. Douglas in the preceding year by authorization of the General Court 
(Chapter 4, Acts of 1905). This Commission made an extensive study of both 
juvenile and adult employment in the industries of the Commonwealth; and, in 
spite of the brief time at its disposal, succeeded in gaining a prophetically clear 
concept of what trade education should be. 

The Commission found that the advance in scientific and mechanical production 
had far outstripped the ability of industry to train its workers; that apprenticeship 
was already a moribund institution; and that the haphazard and uneven prepara- 
tion of employees in skill and in industrial intelligence was already a serious probleni. 

The report took a decided stand against the prevalent confusion between techni- 
cal and vocational education. It says: "must take the child at fourteen and not 
wait for him to graduate; it must give him academic work more closely related to 
the specific industry; and it must not attempt to give him all of the academic work 
that is at present given in the regular high school, and shop work besides." 

The report recognized homemaking as "that vocation in which all other voca- 
tions have their root," and deplored the extent to which this field had been over- 
looked in the educational scheme. It urged the necessity for evening trade exten- 
sion opportunities for persons already employed; and recommended part-time 
classes for the group of workers between the ages of fourteen and eighteen years, 
who without training were likely to remain in non-educative and non-progressive 
employments. 

The report linked agriculture with the "domestic and mechanic arts" in a three- 
fold recommendation for schools of strictly vocational nature. It foresaw the need 
for specialized training of teachers for such schools. While suggesting an adjust- 
ment of the public school system to the facts of modern economic and industrial 
life, the report urged that vocational schools be permitted to have their birth and 



P.D. 2. 7 

growth in utter independence of existing systems, and entirely outside the influence 
of their traditions. It advocated State aid as a necessary encouragement towards 
the estabhshment by cities and towns of vocational schools whose influence and 
value would never, in the nature of the case, be restrictedly local. 

In the niche which the "Douglas Commission" will always occupy in the history 
of vocational education, the names of the individuals who composed it should be 
engraved. Its chairman was Carroll D. Wright, former United States Com- 
missioner of Labor, and President of Clark College, Worcester. Judge Warren A. 
Reed of Brockton served as vice-chairman; and the secretary was John Golden of 
Fall River, President of the United Textile Workers of America. The other mem- 
bers were Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew of Boston, President of the Women's Educa- 
tional and Industrial Union; George H. Martin, Secretary of the Massachusetts 
Board of Education; Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham, a Trustee of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College; John P. Murphy of Lynn, General Organizer 
of the Boot and Shoe Workers' Union; Simeon B. Chase of Fall River, banker and 
textile manufacturer; and George E. Keith of Brockton, shoe manufacturer. 
These nine persons thus represented leadership in education, finance, labor, law, 
agriculture, business, social service and economics. Their far-sighted vision fixed 
the basic principles which have controlled vocational education ever since their day. 

The Commission on Industrial Education 

In accordance with the recommendations of the Douglas Commission, the Com- 
mission on Industrial Education was authorized by legislative enactment (Chapter 
505, Acts of 1906), and appointed for a three-year term by Governor Guild. This 
body was given power to continue the investigations begun by its predecessor; 
to stimulate by conferences and lectures the rising tide of interest in industrial 
training; and to initiate and establish vocational schools "with the co-operation 
and consent of local authorities." 

The high ability represented by this Commission is apparent from a recital of its 
personnel. Dr. Paul H. Hanus, Professor of Education at Harvard University, 
headed it as chairman. A. Lincoln Filene of Boston, merchant and economist; 
Charles H. Winslow of Fitchburg, vice-president of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Labor and former member of the Legislature; Carlton D. Richardson of 
North Brookfield, member of the State Board of Agriculture and prominent official 
of the Massachusetts Grange; and Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew, who had been a 
member of the Douglas Commission, made up its original membership. Upon 
Mrs. Kehew's resignation, owing to ill health, Milton P. Higgins of Worcester, 
president of the Norton Company and other manufacturing enterprises, was ap- 
pointed her successor. Later Miss Emily G. Balch, Professor of Economics and 
Sociology at Wellesley College, was added to the group. The Commission employed 
as its executive secretary Charles H. Morse, superintendent of the Rindge Manual 
Training School, and consulting engineer. 

The annual reports of this Commission for the three years of its authorized life 
contain records of the most complete investigation ever made of the vocational 
schools then in operation both in this country and abroad. It became apparent 
to the Commission that none of those schools could safely be taken as a model for 
the new system which it was to bring into being in this State. Every step was 
taken carefully and deliberately. The Commission wisely realized that a temporary 
enthusiasm for an innovation was no safe foundation for a successful school; and 
it devoted much time and effort to stimulating and educating public opinion in 
localities which seemed to offer promising fields for vocational work. 

To the Commission on Industrial Education fell the difficult task of putting into 
actual operation the principles so admirably enunciated by its predecessor. Dur- 
ing its three-year regime it assisted in the establishment of sixteen evening and four 
day vocational schools, representing the three fields of industry, agriculture and 
homemaking. Beverly and Cambridge were the first two cities to inaugurate 
courses under the authorization of the Commission in October, 1907, with New 
Bedford, Taunton, and Waltham only a few weeks behind them. In each of these 
cities trade extension work was offered in one or more trades, and in two of them — 
Cambridge and Taunton — homemaking was also a part of the program. In the 
fall of 1908, two day schools were opened, — one in the town of Montague, with an 
agricultural program; the other in the city of Northampton with three courses: 



8 P.D. 2. 

agriculture, carpentry, and domestic science. The Montague school lasted but one 
year. The school at Northampton, organized under the directorship of Dr. Rufus 
W. Stimson, has remained in continuous existence and is thus the oldest State- 
aided day vocational school in Massachusetts. 

Several other schools were in process of organization when the Commission ended 
its labors. These, added to the nucleus of schools already in operation, constituted 
a program of considerable extent to be turned over to the new supervising authority. 

Consolidation with Board of Education 
On July 1, 1909, the work of the Commission was taken over by the reorganized 
Massachusetts Board of Education (Chapter 457, Acts of 1909). Dr. David Sned- 
den of Columbia University became commissioner of education, and Charles A. 
Prosser was shortly afterwards appointed deputy commissioner in charge of voca- 
tional education. Under these men, with the invaluable assistance of Charles R. 
Allen as agent, the Massachusetts system of vocational training took on rapidly the 
definite form and actuating principles which it still carries. 

Development 
Practical Art Education for Women 
In 1912 the scope of the State-aided vocational education system was widened 
by enactment of a law (Chapter 106, Acts of 1912), authorizing evening practical 
art classes for instructing women in homemaking crafts. The searching report 
of the Douglas Commission had not overlooked this field, and had insisted on its 
classification as truly vocational. Practical art classes now form a very important 
part of the program of the State. 

Continuation Schools 
Another seed sown by the report of the Douglas Commission was the suggestion 
for part-time schools for working boys and girls. In 1913 (Chapter 805) an act was 
passed permitting cities to establish mandatory continuation schools. Boston had 
already been operating a voluntary continuation school for employed minors since 
1910. In September, 1914, this school opened under the provisions of the new law 
as the first permissive-mandatory continuation school in Massachusetts. In 1919 
(Chapter 311) the Legislature enacted the general continuation school law. This 
law required every city or town, ha-\dng 200 or more employed minors between the 
ages of fourteen and sixteen j^ears, to establish such a school. In September, 1920, 
49 continuation schools opened their doors. 

Teacher- Training 
The insistence, from the inception of the vocational program, upon teachers 
trained in the trades themselves rather than in technical or normal institutions, 
had brought to the fore the problem of professional training in teaching. The 
Legislature of 1914 (Chapters 174 and 391) authorized municipalities to establish 
classes for the training of vocational teachers, and conferred similar authority on 
the Commissioner of Education. The latter method of organization prevailed. 
Teacher-training classes were established wherever and whenever the need for them 
was felt; and the conduct of the training program became an important function 
of the Division of Vocational Education. 

Smith-Hughes Law 
The Smith-Hughes Law, signed by the President of the United States February 
23, 1917, designed to encourage vocational education of secondary grades, through 
Federal aid, did for the country at large a work comparable to that which the Doug- 
las report had done for Massachusetts. The advent of this law found a system 
already in operation here with ten years' experience behind it. Only a slight 
change was required to bring the Massachusetts vocational schools into conformity 
with the provisions of the law. The Smith-Hughes Act did, however, place em- 
phasis on teacher-training, and so helped to bring about an internal organization 
along functionally differentiated lines within the Vocational Division of the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Education. 



P.D. 2. 9 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Vocational rehabilitation became a part of the Massachusetts program in 1918, 
when a law (Chapter 231) empowered the Industrial Accident Board to give train- 
ing and placement to persons handicapped through industrial accidents. This 
was the first State to make such provision. The work was carried on under this 
Board for three years. By Chapter 462, Acts of 1921, the Legislature accepted the 
provisions of the Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act, and the Department of 
Education at once organized to carry on the new work, and took over the existing 
machinery. 

The vocational education program has shown a consistent growth, and won 
increasing acceptance and appreciation, through a period of time that has given it 
the severe test of widely fluctuating economic and political conditions. In so doing, 
it has amply vindicated the wise vision of the men who established its guiding prin- 
ciples two decades ago. 

CHARACTER OF THE WORK NOW UNDERTAKEN 

The State-aided vocational schools of Massachusetts are organized to give directly 
functioning occupational training to selected groups of pupils. Though distinct 
in character and management, and held not to be part of the public school system, 
they may be organized either under independent authority, or in conjunction with 
established school sj^stems. The training which they give uses occupational 
methods, meets occupational standards, and is given in an occupational atmosphere 
by instructors possessing thorough practical experience in their respective fields. 
Instruction is based on individual needs, and progress is conditioned on individual 
achievement. 

They are not "technical schools." They are not of college grade; they make no 
attempt to parallel the general education given in high schools, neither are their 
entrance requirements based upon a specific academic attainment. They are 
preparatory for profitable employment; not primarily for entry into other institu- 
tions. Established and managed through local initiative, these schools are directly 
supervised by the Department of Education, and one-half their maintenance cost 
is paid out of State funds. 

These vocational schools fall naturally into three classifications, between which 
there is some divergence in the details of organization: Industrial, agricultural, 
and household arts. In each of these fields, several types of opportunity are 
afforded to fit the needs of several groups of pupils. These types of organization 
may be rather roughly denominated day, evening, and part-time schools or classes. 
The continuation school, not strictly vocational, differs essentially, yet has points 
of contact with all the other three. 

Industrial 
Day Industrial Schools 

These schools have as their controlling purpose the preparation of pupils for 
profitable entry into the skilled trades of industry. They are in session thirty-five 
hours a week, forty weeks a year, as a minimum. Eighty per cent of the total 
school time is devoted to vocational instruction. At least fifty per cent of this 
total school time is given over to productive shop work. The size of shop classes 
is restricted to sixteen pupils per instructor, thus giving opportunity for individual 
instruction. Non-vocational instruction may be given to the maximum extent of 
twenty per cent of the school time. None is required, excepting civics, American 
history, and hygiene. 

Pupils must be at least fourteen years old ; must have made deliberate choice of 
the occupations in which they are respectively enrolled; and must show presump- 
tive ability to profit by the instruction and to succeed in the chosen occupations. 

Courses are commonly of two to four years in length, though in most cases gradua- 
tion is not conditioned primarily upon a time requirement, and intensive short- 
unit courses are available to persons whose specific needs indicate that type of 
service. Furthermore, profitable placement in the trade for which he is trained is 
the aim of the pupil, rather than a diploma. Such placement is one of the re- 
sponsibilities of the school. 



10 P.D. 2. 

Part-Time Co-Operative Schools 

Part-time co-operative schools are subject to the same minimum time require- 
ment as all-day trade schools. Their distinctive feature lies in the fact that at 
least one-half the total time is spent in productive work for pay in a commercial 
plant or shop outside the school. The common cycle of alternation between school 
and shop is two weeks. The school has a varying degree of supervision over the 
shop work, and supplements it with related instruction and laboratory shopwork 
within the school. 

The school may co-operate with one or more industrial concerns under definite 
agreements; or it may be so organized as to secure placement of its pupils, by alter- 
nating pairs, in numerous plants which do not or cannot take any responsible 
interest in the educational phase of the arrangement. In either case the function 
of the co-ordinator, who integrates the school work with the shop experience to 
make a well-rounded trade training, is vital. The co-ordinator is usually the 
director or acting-director of the school. 

Apprentice work on a part-time basis, given by special arrangement with an 
employer, in his own plant or elsewhere, during working hours, constitutes another 
phase of co-operative education. Such work, usually organized by group units 
under the jurisdiction of an all-day trade school, is at present limited in extent, but 
susceptible of indefinite expansion to meet any expressed need. 

Trade Extension Classes 

Trade extension work has the distinctive purpose of imparting additional trade 
skill and ability to persons already employed in the occupations in which they seek 
training. Such employment is therefore a pre-requisite for entrance. These 
classes tend to attract a distinctly adult personnel, and the minimum entrance age 
is sixteen instead of fourteen years. The work is conducted in brief units rather 
than in comprehensive programs. The customary organization is in evening units 
of twenty weeks, with two nights a week and two hours a night; but they may be 
held at whatever time of the day will best suit the convenience of the group served. 
Courses are individualized to fit the needs of specific members of the classes. No 
general or cultural instruction is given. Shop processes, or directly related techni- 
cal work, constitute the subject matter. 

Apprentice courses, organized by definite arrangement with firms which require 
compulsory attendance on the part of certain of their employees, are of course 
restricted to the specific groups which they are intended to serve. They may also 
differ in other details from the type. Such courses are comparatively few in 
number. 

Agricultural 

Agricultural education is that form of vocational education which fits for the 
occupations connected with the tillage of the soil, and care of domestic animals, 
forestry, and other wage-earning or productive work on the farm. It is available 
in day schools to suitable applicants of fourteen years of age or over; and in evening 
or unit courses to persons over sixteen who have land or livestock which they desire 
to make contribute more effectively to their support. 

Such education is kept on a thoroughly practical basis, and made to combine 
immediate earning with the learning process, by the stress which all the schools 
place upon the home project. In cases where home projects are impossible, other 
superAdsed agricultural work, extending over at least six months of the year, is 
approved. Usually, home projects owned or controlled by the learners, and other 
agreed-upon supervised agricultural work are combined in the program of instruc- 
tion. Summer supervision of projects and employment is given by the instructors, 
who serve on a year-around basis. 

The several types of work authorized and carried on possess distinctive features. 

All-Day Agricultural Schools 
This type of school, which includes the county agricultural schools, commonly 
offers a four-year course, each year of which is however a unit complete in itself. 
The three countj'' schools possess their own farms and equipment, affording op- 
portunity for demonstrations and supervised practice. The staffs include special- 
ist instructors for the various branches of agricultural work. Program adjust- 



P.D. 2. 11 

ments are made for pupils who wish to specialize instead of taking all the major 
projects. 

Eighty per cent of the school time is devoted to agriculture and related science, 
and twenty per cent to general or cultural training. At least fifty per cent of the 
total time, including out-of-school hours and the summer months,_ is allotted to 
project or other supervised agricultural work and technical study involved in it. 
The related study includes farm booldceeping, science, economics, and shop work. 

High School Agricultural Departments 
Approved departments in high schools offer, as elective work, training in agri- 
culture on a basis similar to that of the all-day agricultural schools. The time 
requirement calls for the devotion of fifty per cent of the school time to agricultural 
instruction and project work or its substitutes and supplements. Whatever 
additional time is needed before and after school and in summer to complete the 
natural cycles of production involved in the projects is given to the vocational 
program. The other fifty per cent of the pupil's school day is given to general 
education in the regular high school program. 

Evening Agricultural Unit Courses 
Evening agricultural instruction is offered to individuals or to families, who 
possess facilities for home project work. The units are specialized in accordance 
with local demand. Project visitation is as important a part of theevening as of 
the day work. The opportunity is not restricted to the rural districts. During 
the "war garden" period, evening agricultural instruction was given in many cities 
of the State with very successful results. 

Incidental Services 

Brief units and part-time instruction are offered by the schools to older pupils 
and to adults who can avail themselves of the opportunity. Such special ser\'ice 
may be given in the form of a straight agricultural program without the inclusion 
of non-related or cultural studies. 

Vocational agricultural instruction is offered in continuation schools where local 
needs dictate or where the employment of a sufficiently large group of pupils 
warrants it. 

Agricultural schools give much aid and advice to alumni and to other local farm- 
ers. Their instructors are encouraged to act as local leaders of agricultural club 
work. The staffs of the county agricultural schools are authorized by law, and are 
strongly encouraged to assist in the agricultural extension programs of their respec- 
tive counties. 

Household Arts 

Day Household Arts Schools 

These schools are planned for girls fourteen years of age and over, who are 
primarily interested in home-making and in profitable employment in occupations 
related to the home. 

Such schools are organized on a forty-week basis, offering thirty-five hours of 
instruction per week. Eighty per cent of this time is devoted to vocational and 
related instruction, with a minimum of at least fifty per cent of the entire time given 
to practical productive work, a part of which is on home projects. The remaining 
twenty per cent of the program is given to non-vocational instruction, with special 
emphasis on personal hygiene and citizenship. 

The majority of these all-day household arts schools offer a two-year course, 
although in a few instances a three- or four-year course is given. 

A distinct feature of all household arts schools is the home-project requirement. 
Through careful supervision from the teachers, the home projects assigned review 
the principles and processes which have been taught at school. Through this re- 
view it is expected that the girls will gain in manipulative skill and at the same time 
acquire a certain amount of managerial ability. 

Day Household Arts Departments in High Schools 
A similar opportunity is open to girls through household arts departments in 
several of our high schools. A distinct feature of such high school departments, 
however, is the fact that, except in special instances, but fifty per cent of the school 



12 P.D. 2. 

program is given to vocational and related work. The other fifty per cent of 
the time does not come under the supervision of the State department. 

Enough supervised home-project work is expected of these girls to make their 
total time, in school and in home projects, equal the total minimum time require- 
ment of the girls in the all-day independent household arts schools: namely, four- 
teen hundred hours a year. 

Practical Art Classes 

Separate day and evening classes in household and other practical arts are held 
for women sixteen years of age and over, who are not regularly enrolled in a day 
school. The aim of this work is to develop intelligent, independent workers who 
are able to assume more easily the responsibilities and duties of homemaking. 
These classes serve equally the busy housewife and mother, the young married 
woman lacking practical home experience, the engaged girl, and the business 
woman needing assistance in homemaking activities. 

Instruction is offered in foods; home nursing, including first aid and child care; 
clothing, including dressmaking and millinery; and decoration, including home and 
costume. 

The work is organized on the short unit basis of either the progressive or the non- 
progressive type. The progressive plan provides continued instruction in one line 
of work; the non-progressive permits a woman to enroll for a short period of time 
in any line of work for which her previous training and experience have qualified her. 

Some localities grant certificates for the satisfactory completion of a prescribed 
amount of work in any one subject. A certificate may also be granted for the 
satisfactory completion of a composite homemaking course. 

Through co-operation with the Americanization department in many cities, 
these practical art classes aid non-English-speaking women in adjusting themselves 
to the envirormiental problems of a home in a new country. 

Continuation Schools 

The compulsory continuation school, though partly vocational in character, 
differs essentially in organization from all types of strictly vocational education. 
This school serves the group of employed youth between the ages of fourteen and 
sixteen years. Such employed minors are required to attend four hours a week, 
during working time, throughout the school year. In case of temporary unem- 
ployment, the requirement is twenty hours a week. 

The continuation school exists to help these boys and girls make the social, civic, 
and economic adjustments which are inherent in their change of status from school 
children to wage earners. The continuation school affords these youths an op- 
portunity to continue a type of general education in character with their new status 
and to become more intelligent citizens. It helps them to get the most out of their 
immediate jobs; tends to stabilize them in employment; aids them to a more in- 
telligent choice of occupation; and encourages their advance from unskilled to 
skilled trades. It maintains such co-operative relationships with employers as 
promise advantage to the minor and the employer. 

The service of the school may thus take the form of instruction, counsel, place- 
ment in industry, or co-operative supervision of the employment. 

Pupils whose dominant needs involve a choice of trades are, as far as possible, 
enrolled in prevocational classes where the school helps them by giving them an 
opportunity for participation in varying kinds of shop work, in visits to established 
shops, in informative occupational study, and in consultation with interested 
parties. 

Pupils, whose chief need is training in occupations already chosen, are helped 
through trade instruction within the school or in a co-operating school; through 
placement in the occupation desired; and through supervision on the job. 

Those pupils, whose outstanding need is an extension of general education, are 
helped by instruction of that character within the school and are advised as to an 
educational program outside the school. In all the instruction afforded within 
the school, shop activities are indispensable as a medium through which to further 
the objectives. 

In general, fifty per cent of the pupil's time is devoted to shop work. In the 
prevocational, trade preparatory, and trade extension courses, seventy-five per 



P.D. 2. 13 

cent of the pupil's time is occupied with shop and related work. Such courses are 
predominantly characteristic of the boys' work in the larger schoools. In the 
smaller schools, the shop work is likely to be of a general home mechanics character. 
In either case, this part of the training is centered about real jobs. An occupational 
atmosphere and environment is maintained; commercial standards of workmanship 
are expected; and every effort is exerted to develop industrially acceptable atti- 
tudes, habits, and standards on the part of the pupils. The girls' homemaking work 
is equally real since it involves instruction on the home project basis. Real tasks 
from the home or for the home are uniformly required. 

Distinctive of the continuation school is its thorough knowledge of the individual 
minor through survey, follow-up, and the keeping of pertinent records. Follow-up 
is required as the only process by which the instructor can secure and organize 
information about the pupil and his or her placement in industry. It is adminis- 
tered on a case basis, and involves visits at both home and place of employment. 
Its methods are guided, and its results recorded and digested through the use of a 
prescribed survey form. The knowledge thus gained is a vitally important guide 
to the individual instruction and service which the school gives to each pupil. 

Placement work is done by all the schools, and the larger ones maintain definitely 
organized employment bureaus. Employers in increasing numbers are availing 
themselves of this service, and relying on it to the exclusion of less satisfactory 
methods of securing juvenile help. 

A significant development in several schools has been the establishment of 
voluntary co-operative arrangements with individual employers, whereby youthful 
workers are given training in excess of the required four hours a week. Employers 
of girls and boys, for example, have half-time arrangements with the local continua- 
tion schools on alternating week bases. 

A comparative statement regarding enrolment and courses offered in these 
schools, as compiled in November, 1920 and 1928, follows: 



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16 P.D. 2. 

SCOPE OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Extent and Growth of Program 

In the school year 1927-28, the total number of vocational and continuation 
schools in operation, classified as distinct administrative units, was 173. These 
schools were maintained by 71 municipalities and 3 counties. They employed 
1,986 teachers, and served 54,551 pupils within the year. The accompanying 
graphs (Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4) show the growth of the vocational education pro- 
gram from the small beginnings of twenty years ago. 

Details showing the growth by types of work are given herewith as of five-year 
intervals : 





1907-8 


1912-13 


1917-18 


1922-23 


1927-28 






Enrol- 




Enrol- 




Enrol- 




Enrol- 




Enrol- 




Sch. 


ment 


Sch. 


ment 


Sch. 


ment 


Sch. 


ment 


Sch. 


ment 


Industrial: 






















Day (including part-time 






















co-operative) 


— 


— 


15 


2,089 


17 


2,524 


23 


4,789 


30 


7,949 


Evening trade extension 


5 


425 


15 


3,124 


21 


4,408 


21 


4,690 


19 


5,980 


Agricultural (schools, de- 






.rl- 
















partments, and evening 




















departments) 


— 


— 


12 


265 


16 


455 


25 


1,018 


22 


881 


Homemaking: 






















Day (schools and depart- 






















ments) 


— 


— 


5 


451 


9 


450 


16 


1,974 


21 


2,075 


Evening 


2 


488 


17 


4,113 


23 


6,874 


38 


18,941 


35 


14,285 


Continuation . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


9,512 


47 


31,697 


46 


23,381 




7 


913 


64 


10,042 


87 


24,223 


170 


63,109 


173 


54,551 



1 The decrease over 1922-23 is due in largest measure to the enrolment of the continuation schools, which 
reflects an industrial depression in its effect on juvenile employment; and in the next largest measure to 
the shrinkage in evening classes for adult women, which denotes a partial satiation of the need. 

FIG. 1. — GROWTH OF ENROLMENT IN STATE-AIDED VOCATIONAL 
SCHOOLS (ALL TYPES EXCEPT CONTINUATION), BY 10-YEAR 

PERIODS 



1907-08 



■ 1 a 

■ II 

■ 1 i 


if*ll 
■1 "11 


ill 
III 
III 



913 



r r p 


[ 

r 1917 -IB n 


r V T^ 


p P P 


14,711 


VVT' 


p\pp 


nr_£rr 


r r n 


n r> r^ 


r \ r 


r r r^ 



u p n 
r r r 

r r r 



r 1927-28 r 

31,170 




n p n 
r r r 



P.D. 2. 17 

FIGS. 2, 3, 4. — GROWTH OF ENROLMENT, BY TYPES, IN STATE-AIDED 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS, BY 5-YEAR PERIODS 



1907- 1912- 1917- 
08 13 18 

Trade and Industrial 




425 5213 



Agricultural 




None 

in 

1907 





1922-23 




9479 




1927-28 




13,929 



455 



1018 




Homemaking 




488 






16,360 



18 



P.D. 2. 



A complete list of the occupations in which vocational training was given in 1927- 
28 is herewith presented. The evening school program is included in this listing by 
departments only, without specific mention of the brief and highly specialized 
units which fluctuate in accordance with specific local and timely needs and would 
make the list misleadingly large: 



Agriculture : 

Dairying 

Farm mechanics 

Fruit growing 

Gardening 

Greenhouse work 

Poultry 
Automobile repair 
Brick masonry 
Cabinetmaking 
Carpentry 
Catering 
Decorative crafts 
Dressmaking 
Electrical work 
Foundry work 
Hairdressing 
Home economics: 

Dressmaking 

Millinery 

Foods and nutrition 



Care of the sick 

Child care 

Home decoration 
Machine shop practice 
Machine drafting 
Millinery 

Optical lens grinding 
Painting and paperhanging 
Pattern making 
Plumbing 

Power machine operating 
Printing 

Sheet metal work 
Shoemaking 
Silk knitting 
Silversmithing 
Steam engineering 
Steamfitting 
Textile work 
Welding 



The corresponding list for the year 1907-08 touched nine occupations, instead of 
the twenty-nine now covered : 

Automobile repair Jewelry 

Blacksmithing Machine shop 

Carpentry Millinery 

Dressmaking Patternmaking 
Electricity 

Articulation avith Industrial Needs 
The exact service of these schools to the industrial life of the State is not suscep- 
tible of tabular or numerical treatment. A significant comparison may be based 
upon the best available data concerning the employment of Massachusetts wage- 
earners, and upon the day vocational school opportunities offered in the State 
program : 

Twelve Leading Massachusetts In- Twelve Leading Day Vocational 

dustries in Order of Importance from School Opportunities, with 1927-28 En- 
Standpoint of Number of Employees: rolments, and Number of Schools 

Offering : 





'Carpentry 


Machine shop 


1,364 


15 


Textiles ' 


Painting 


Automobile repair 


931 


17 


Transportation 


Plumbing 


Agriculture 


756 


17 


Building construction 


Electrical 


Electricity 


754 


12 


Shoes and leather goods 


Masonry 


Cabinetmaking 


617 


11 




Sheet metal 


Dressmaking 


477 


2 


Machinery, tools, etc. 


work, etc. 


Carpentry 


439 


11 


Agriculture 




Shoemaking 


408 


2 


Clothing 




Printing 


390 


11 


Rubber goods 




Sheet metal 


221 


8 


Food products (Including 


; bakery) 


Plumbing 


219 


4 


Printing and publishing 




Power machine sewing 


217 


2 


Paper and pulp 










Electrical equipment 











* In the case of the textile industries, it should be 
chusetts Textile Schools, which are outside the State- 



remembered that they are served by the Massa- 
•aided vocational school program under discussion. 



P.D. 2. 19 

Spread op the Opportunity 
The Massachusetts vocational education pohcy contemplates affording op- 
portunity to every qualified resident of the Commonwealth. A resident of a muni- 
cipality not maintaining a vocational school, or not offering in such a school the type 
of opportunity desired, may without expense to himself attend an institution in 
another city or town. Non-resident attendance thus becomes an important factor 
in the work of these schools. Of the 31,149 pupils enrolled in 1927-28, 3,109 were 
non-residents of the towns in which they attended. Total figures covering five 
years' non-resident attendance in both vocational and continuation schools are : 



1923-24 1924-25 1925-26 1926-27 1927-28 



Day vocational 
Evening vocational 
Continuation 

Total . 



1,220 

847 

4,300 



1,407 

897 

3,434 



1,382 

951 

3,379 



1,674 
1,032 
3,469 



2,004 
1,105 
2,934 



Total 

7,687 
4,832 
17,516 



6,367 



5,738 



5,712 



6,175 



6,043 



30,035 



Detailed statistics, by cities and towns, covering the same five-year period, 
will be found in Supplementary Table of the statistical tables for this division. 

Economy of organization usually dictates the centralization of vocational schools 
in the larger cities and towns. Each of these schools normally serves a territory 
extending far beyond the municipal limits. In the past twenty years, only 31 
out of the 355 cities and towns in Massachusetts have failed to take advantage of 
the vocational program. Most of these 31 towns are sparsely settled and geographi- 
cally isolated. 

Figure 5, presented herewith, indicates with its accompanying legend the spread 
for the year of vocational education. 

FIG. 5. — HOW STATE-AIDED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION SERVES 
THE POPULATION OF MASSACHUSETTS 




Population 

Served by Its 

Own Vocational 

AND Continuation 

Schools 

3,189,054 

in 73 Cities and 

Towns Maintaining 

Schools 



Population 

Served Through 

Non-Re8ident 

Attendance: 

783,290 

in 184 Cities and 
Towns Not Main- 
taining Schools 



Population Not 
Served by Voca- 
tional or Contin- 
uation Schools 

171,861 

in 99 Towns Not 

Maintaining 

Schools 



20 P.D. 2. 

ECONOMIC SIGNIFICANCE 

The Douglas Commission announced its belief that a State-wide system of voca- 
tional education would be economically profitable and worth-while to the individual 
pupil, to industry, and to the community at large. The experience of twenty years 
has resulted in the accumulation of data from which may be read an answer to the 
question as to how far this type of training has succeeded in adding to the re- 
sources of the Commonwealth. Though this answer cannot be totaled in columns 
of mere figures, it is a definite and tangible answer. Educational values are with 
difficulty measured with an economic yardstick; but vocational education has little 
excuse, and no desire, to shrink from such measurement. By very definition, 
its values are not chiefly spiritual, but economic. 

During the period of the war, these values were much in the public eye. The 
vocational schools, giving instruction in the machine trades and in agriculture, 
especially, made a notable contribution to the war manufacturing and war garden- 
ing and farming productivity of the State. The United States Emergency Fleet 
Corporation, operating all over the country, in transforming an infant industry 
into one of gigantic proportions and importance, made use of a vocational training 
program that was headed by Egbert E. MacNary, director of the Springfield Voca- 
tional School, and Charles R. AUen, agent of the Massachusetts Board of Educa- 
tion; and that was manned by many instructors who had received their training in 
the vocational schools of this Commonwealth. 

At the close of the war, the vocational rehabilitation program for veterans 
found our vocational schools ready and equipped to co-operate in its work. Neces- 
sary changes in legislation and adjustments in policy were quickly made, and for 
several years the adult pupils of the Veterans' Bureau worked side by side with 
their younger feUow-pupils in these schools. 

It is not, however, on such special services that vocational education must base 
its claims. It is rather on its everyday functioning in the economic life of the State. 
Any determination of how profitable this form of education is, must take into con- 
sideration the cost as well as the results. Vocational education is an expensive 
type of service. Its average for the State, according to the latest available figures, 
is 23.9 cents per pupil hour. The corresponding average for general education, 
including high and elementary schools, is 14.4 cents. The difference is largely due 
to the obvious and necessary factors of greater space requirements, more expensive 
equipment, and fewer pupils per instructor in the vocational schools. 

The State's total bill for vocational and continuation education in 1927-1928 
was $1,665,671.14. Of this amount, $63,720.92 was for overhead, including the 
training of teachers, and $1,601,950.22 was paid to the towns and cities as reim- 
bursement on the cost of maintaining schools and on tuition and transportation 
paid for non-resident pupils. Federal money paid to the State under the Smith- 
Hughes Act, in the amount of $246,549.74, made the net cost to the Commonwealth 
$1,419,121.40. The towns and cities maintaining these schools or sending pupils 
to schools located elsewhere paid in the same year a bill in the net amount of 
$1,833,046.85. 

Against these figures it is obviously impossible to set totals indicating the return 
to the State, in dollars and cents, which the schools have made. That return is 
made on an instalment basis, which lasts throughout the productive lives of the 
pupils who have received their start or their furtherance in occupational life in 
these schools. 

Data from the various fields are presented separately. 

Economic Significance: Day Industrial Education 
The industrial pre-eminence of Massachusetts depends rather on technical skill 
than on any natural advantages. This pre-eminence can continue only as its 
system of training its youth guarantees superior workmen for the future. Massa- 
chusetts cannot hope to compete in any field where poorly paid, unskilled labor is 
the important factor. 

The tables which follow show the entering wages of boys and girls who were 
graduated from Massachusetts trade schools in 1927 and entered the occupations 
for which they had prepared. This is not a selection of the best or the most im- 
pressive figures. It is a tabulation of the latest available data from all the day 



P.D. 2. 21 

industrial schools reporting that year. The State-wide average entering wage for 
boys from both full-time and part-time schools is $20.67 a week — which is more 
than many adults receive in some semi-skilled occupations. The average age of 
these boys at graduation was 18 years, 7 months. 

Nor does the entering wage tell the entire story. Information available from 
two of the schools listed shows that, after entering industry, these workers won an 
average advance in wages of 31.5 per cent in the first year of employment. This is 
a random figure, not a selected one. The two schools thus reporting were the only 
schools which had completed the "life history" records of their 1927 graduates to a 
year after graduation. 



Boys' Day Industrial Schools 







Entered Tkade 




Name of School 

AND DePABTMENT 


Number of 
Graduates 


Trained for 


Average Initial 
Weekly Wage of 


Number 


Per cent 


Those in Trade 


Boston: 

Automobile 

Cabinet .... 

Electrical 

Machine 

Printing 

Sheet metal 


10 
18 
20 
11 
9 
4 


6 
9 
10 
5 
8 
3 


60.0 
50.0 
50.0 
45.0 
88.0 
75.0 


$18 25 
24 00 
18 50 

16 06 
22 66 

17 90 


Total .... 


72 


41 


57.0 


$20 14 


Chicopee: 
Automobile 
Machine 


1 
6 


1 
6 


100.0 
100.0 


$19 00 
19 66 


Total .... 


7 


7 


100.0 


$19 56 


Fall River: 
Automobile 
Interior decorating . 


1 
2 


1 
2 


100.0 
100.0 


$24 00 
18 00 


Total .... 


3 


3 


100.0 


$20 00 


Holyoke : 
Automobile 
Carpentry 
Electrical 
Machine 
Sheet metal . 


1 
3 
1 
7 
2 


1 
1 
1 
5 
1 


100.0 
33.3 

100.0 
71.0 
50.0 


$22 50 

21 00 
18 00 

22 00 
22 00 


Total .... 


14 


9 


64.0 


$21 50 


Lowell : 

Cabinet .... 

Carpentry 

Electrical 

Machine 


2 
4 
4 
3 


1 
1 
1 

1 


50.0 
25.0 
25.0 
33.3 


$25 00 
20 00 
20 00 
22 00 


Total .... 


13 


4 


30.0 


$21 75 


Lynn: 

Shoemaking . 


9 


6 


66.7 


$28 50 


New Bedford : 
Automobile 
Carpentry 
Electrical 
Machine 
Power .... 


11 

4 
8 

1 
2 


11 
4 

8 
1 
2 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


$17 89 
24 00 
21 71 
20 64 
30 00 


Total .... 


26 


26 


100.0 


$21 05 


Newton: 

Automobile . 

Cabinet .... 

Electrical 

Machine 

Printing 


7 
5 
9 
2 
4 


5 
3 

1 

3 


71.0 
60.0 
11.0 

75.0 


$24 60 
19 33 
25 00 

17 00 


Total .... 


27 


12 


44.4 


$21 41 



22 



P.D. 2. 





- 


Entered Trade 




Name of School 


Number of 
Graduates 


Trained for 


Average Initial 
Weekly Wage of 


AND Department 


Number 


Per cent 


Those in Trade 


Northampton: 
Automobile 
Carpentry 
Silk textile 


6 
5 
1 


5 
3 

1 


83.3 

60.0 

100.0 


$27 00 
18 66 
10 00 


Total .... 


12 


9 


75.0 


$22 33 


Quincy: 
Cabinet 
Electrical 
Macnine 
Pattern . 
Plumbing 
Sheet metal 






3 

5 
4 
2 
5 
5 


1 
3 
1 

1 
3 
3 


33.3 
60.0 
25.0 
50.0 
60.0 
60.0 


$15 84 

15 66 

16 00 
15 00 
19 33 
22 20 


Total .... 


24 


12 


50.0 


$18 20 


Somerville : 
Automobile 

Cabinet .... 
Carpentry 


2 
1 

1 


1 

1 


50.0 
100.0 


$33 00 
32 00 


Total .... 


4 


2 


50.0 


$32 60 


Springfield: 
Automobile 
Cabinet 
Drafting 
Electrical 
Machine 
Pattern . 
Printing 




6 
9 
2 
11 
11 
2 
9 


6 
6 

7 
10 

1 
7 


100.0 
66.7 

63.0 
91.0 
50.0 
78.0 


$17 59 
21 03 

19 40 
16 83 
14 00 
18 64 


Total .... 


50 


37 


74.0 


$18 40 


Vineyard Haven: 
Carpentry 


4 


2 


50.0 


$22 00 


Westfield: 

Cabinet .... 

Electrical 

Machine 

Pattern .... 


3 

7 
8 
2 


2 
5 
6 
2 


66.7 
71.0 
75.0 
100.0 


$18 75 
21 50 
18 25 
21 25 


Total .... 


20 


15 


75.0 


$19 80 


Weymouth : 
Carpentry 


11 


5 


45.5 


$21 16 


Worcester: 
Automobile 
Cabinet . 
Carpentry 
Drafting 
Electrical 
Machine 
Pattern . 
Printing 






8 
11 

7 

5 
12 
19 
11 

3 


7 
8 
3 
5 
7 
16 
2 
2 


87.5 
72.0 
42.0 
100.0 
58.0 
84.0 
18.0 
66.7 


$22 86 
21 90 
29 00 
24 00 
20 90 
24 27 
24 75 
17 10 


Total .... 


76 


50 


65.8 


$23 21 


Day Industrial Schools, Boys', 
Grand Total for Type 


372 


240 


64.5 


$21 12 



P.D. 2. 



23 



Girls' Day Industrial Schools 







Entered Trade 




Name of School 


Number of 
Graduates 


Trained for 


Average Initial 
Weekly Wage of 


AND Department 






Those in Trade 






Number 


Per cent 




Boston: 
Catering 
Dressmaking . 
Millinery- 
Power machine operating . 


9 
66 
20 

28 


7 
59 
14 

27 


77.7 
89.3 
70.0 
96.5 


$11 57 
11 96 
13 25 
11 58 


Total .... 


123 


107 


87.0 


$11 99 


Worcester: 

Hair and skin . 

Power machine operating . 

Catering 

Dressmaking . 


7 
16 

4 
12 


3 

12 
3 
9 


43.0 
75.0 
75.0 
75.0 


$10 00 
13 30 

13 50 

14 38 


Total .... 


39 


27 


69.0 


$13 57 


Day Industrial Schools, Girls', 
Grand Total for Type 


162 


134 


82.7 


$12 27 



Cases: Boys' Day Industrial Schools 

That trade training not only helps individuals to enter skilled occupations advan- 
tageously but also enables them to climb to positions of responsibility, is amply 
borne out by some of the following examples, which could be duplicated in every 
essential detail by a large number of other cases. 

Francis B- , who was graduated from a machine shop department in 1916, 

is now chief inspector for the Remington Computing Machine Company of Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Kenneth entered the silk knitting department of a day vocational school 

in September, 1921, at 14 years of age. He left in January, 1923, to enter the mill 
on full time as a knitter's helper and apprentice at $9 a week. In 1928 he was 
earning $85 a week on piece work. 

Three graduates of a printing department — Francis M , who was gradu- 
ated in 1921 ; John 0— — , in 1925; and Albert P , in 1924 — are now linotype 

operators averaging between $40 and $50 a week. 

R R entered the painting and decorating department of a day vocational 

school at the age of 14 years. He quickly demonstrated an ability in art and 
drawing which was beyond the average. He was graduated four years later and went 
to work for a New York firm which was decorating a church in a nearby city, and 
received journej'iiian wages of $55 a week. Though now barely 21 years old, he 
has earned, with overtime, as high as $108 a week. 

Wesley ^ — entered an electrical department from the ninth grade at the age of 
16 years, 3 months. He was graduated in June, 1927, from a three-year course, 
and entered the employ of the United Electric Light Company at 122 a week. 
One year later he was getting $30 a week. 

James — — • entered a carpentry department at the age of 14 years, 6 months. 
He was graduated in three years and went to work on inside finish at $32 a week. 

Three boys were graduated from the power department of a day vocational 
school in 1924, each holding a State first class fireman's license. One received on 
his first job $54 a week, one $33, and one $35. The first boy's higher wage was due 
to his being on a 12-hour night shift. 

An eighth grade boy, 15 years old, entered a cabinet making department. Gradu- 
ating in June, 1927, he went to work as a carpenter for $26.40 a week. A year 
later he was earning $44. 

Andrew — — took an automobile repair course in a trade school. Entering at 
the age of 17 years, 8 months, he was graduated three years later, in 1927. He 
started work as a repair man for the Packard Automobile Company at $18 a week. 
One year later his wage was $37.50. 



24 P.D. 2. 

Cases: Girls' Day Industrial Schools 

A girl, who was graduated in 1909 from a dressmaking department, entered the 
trade at $5 a week, which was a fair wage in those days. Remaining with the 
same employer, she worked steadily upward until she became the person in charge 
of the establishment at $40 a week. In this capacity she had the entire manage- 
ment of the business during her employer's absence in Europe. Her employment 
was terminated only when she left to be married. 

Another dressmaking graduate, class of 1912, entered the drapery department 
of a Boylston Street store. Her advance was steady until she became the managing 
head of the business at a salary of $52 a week plus a percentage of the yearly profits. 

A girl, who was graduated from a trade school in 1912, had twice shifted from 
one department to another while in school. The trade of her final choice was 
power machine operating, and this choice was evidently an apt one. Not only 
did she gain employment at it in a local factory, but after several years of experi- 
ence, she seized an opportunity to buy out a small business in this line. As the 
proprietress, she has made it into a very profitable venture, and has developed 
into a keen business woman. 

A millinery graduate of 1913 has followed the trade regularly in a downtown 
shop, where she is employed during the "seasons." Between seasons she has 
devoted herself to the building up of a custom millinery trade of her own. She has 
also qualified as a trade teacher, and has taught her trade successfully in State- 
aided evening schools. 

A girl, who was graduated from a catering department, after having been trans- 
ferred from dressmaking, has turned her training to various uses. She has been a 
teacher; for some time she conducted a tea room of her own; and at present she 
is the director of a Home Service Bureau for a large gas and electric company. 

Economic Significance: Part-Time Co-operative Education 

A distinctive factor in the case of the co-operative schools is the fact that the 
pupils in these schools earn regular wages during the period covered by their train- 
ing. The half-time in industry for pay means, in many cases, an opportunity 
to secure training on this basis which could not be undertaken in a full-time school 
owing to economic reasons. The pay earned by the student is frequently enough 
to support himself, or to pay his reasonable share of the family expenses, while he is 
learning his trade. During the school year 1927-28, the earnings of the students of 
one co-operative industrial school totaled $15,809.50. This is an average of $568.68 
for the year for each of the 27.8 pupils in average membership. 

In the co-operative school, also, the pupil's contact with an employer is estab- 
lished long before he graduates. Upon completing the course, he is thus not under 
the necessity of seeking a position. Frequently, he merely changes his status 
from that of a part-time employee to that of a full-time worker in the same plant. 
This factor is doubtless responsible in some measure for the marked success which 
these schools have as measured by the number of graduates entering and remaining 
in the occupations for which they were trained. 

A survey made a few years ago by one co-operative school showed that of the 171 
persons who had been graduated from it up to that time, 146, or 85.3 per cent, 
were still in the trades for which they had received training. Among them were 
machinists, draftsmen, toolmakers, foremen, machine designers, inspectors, and 
an assistant superintendent. 

A tabulation of the placements of one year's graduates (1927) of the co-operative 
schools is herewith presented, in comparable form to the tables given for the Day 
Industrial School field. 



P.D. 2. 



25 



Part-Time Co-operative Schools (Boys') 







Entered Trade 




Name op School 


Number of 
Graduates 


Trained fob 


Average Initial 
Weekly Wage of 


AND Department 






Those in Trade 






Number 


Per cent 




Beverly : 
Machine 


14 


13 


93.0 


S25 30 


Boston: 
Brighton: 
Automobile 


3 


1 


33.3 


22 00 


Charlestown: 
Electrical 


31 


30 


97.0 


16 94 


Boston: 

Dorchester: 
Cabinet 


10 


8 


80.0 


18 25 


East Boston: 
Machine 


10 


8 


80.0 


15 00 


Hyde Park: 
Machine 


13 


11 


84.6 


21 93 


Southbridge: 

Textile .... 


2 


2 


100.0 


16 80 


Part-Time Co-operative 
Schools, Boys', Grand Total 
for Type 


83 


73 


88.0 


$19 18 



Economic Significance: Evening Trade Extension Education 

The evening industrial schools, by virtue of their nature and the restrictions on 
their membership, appeal to a distinctively adult group of people who are beyond 
the influence of the "school habit," who attend from definite motives, and who 
expect tangible results. That adults are willing to come in such large numbers to 
evening school for further instruction in their respective trades or occupations is the 
best of evidence that these people feel that the schools help them to get ahead. 
These schools have no "graduates," and do not maintain records of the subsequent 
careers of their pupils. Many instances could be cited, however, to show the 
effectiveness of evening trade extension education. A few typical ones are given 
herewith. 

Cases: Evening Trade Extension Classes 

A woman, employed as a "table worker" in a shoe factory at $10 a week, took a 
ten-week course in French cord binding and French cord pressing at an evening 
shoemaking school. As a result of her training, she secured a position at this work 
which paid her $30 a week. 

A man employed as a "Goodyear" stitcher was faced with the possibility of 
unemployment because of changes of style. He enrolled in the evening shoe- 
making school for a ten-week evening course on the "McKay" machine. Upon 
completing it, he secured employment at $45 a week as a McKay stitcher. 

A mill in one of the large textile cities, employing a thousand persons, shut down 
permanently some time ago. One man, a weave room overseer for thirty years, 
found employment as a loomfixer with another mill. Finding his specific knowl- 
edge of certain modern types of looms inadequate, he enrolled in the loomfixing 
course at the local evening industrial school. This man found the instruction and 
opportunities of the school to be of great help to him, and he is one of its most 
enthusiastic pupils. 

T M was employed at the C Press as a job and cylinder press 

feeder at $22 a week, when he enrolled in an evening industrial school. After 
attending the printing department for two months and receiving instruction on the 
Kelly press, he was able to procure a position in the private plant of a large manu- 
facturing corporation as a Kelly pressman, and is now receiving $45 a week. 

An evening industrial school in one of the larger cities of the State offers classes 
for stationary firemen and engineers. Of those enrolled in such classes last year, 
and who took examinations for State licenses, 3 received first class engineers' 



26 P.D. 2. 

licenses; 1 received a second class engineer's license; 7 received third class engi- 
neers' licenses; 4 received first class firemen's licenses; and 13 received second class 
firemen's licenses. 

Economic Contribution of Industrial Education 

The State-aided trade schools of Massachusetts have no desire to claim credit to 
which they are not entitled. The industries of the State were adequately manned 
long before the first trade school opened its doors. Even today, that portion of the 
personnel of industry which received trade school training is a small fraction of the 
whole. 

It is significant, however, that the facilities in industry for training its own skilled 
tradesmen have admittedly never been equal to the task since the breaking down 
of the apprenticeship system. The trade schools, followed and supplemented 
by other deliberate efforts towards the solution of this problem, are performing a 
work of recognized and increasing value. 

A careful survey conducted in 1927, through the Chambers of Commerce, and 
through all the industrial concerns reporting to the Department of Labor and 
Industries as employing over 500 persons each, yielded these outstanding facts: 

There are approximately 119,000 minors fourteen to sixteen years of age out of 
school and engaged in industrial pursuits. It was found that only 32,000 (27%) 
had received any organized vocational training. Of this number, 30,500 (25% of 
the whole) had been trained in schools, day or evening. Publicly-supported 
schools trained 29,000 (24%); private schools 1,500 (1.^%); and plant schools 
definitely organized by industrial concerns, 1,500 {iyi%). 

Massachusetts industry is increasingly alive to this situation, and, under the 
leadership of its representative associations, is making strides to meet the problem. 
Reliance upon the State-aided vocational schools still is and must continue to be 
most important. 

Many of the young men and women who have been graduated from these voca- 
tional schools, have found therein their only possible means of entry into occupa- 
tions for which they are suited and to which they are attracted. Most of them have 
advanced further in shorter time than they otherwise could have done. It is in this 
light that the illustrative cases cited above should be read. 

Economic Significance: Agricultural Education 

From the beginning, vocational agricultural education in Massachusetts has 
combined earning and learning. Sixty-six boys, in the first year for which State- 
wide figures were tabulated, earned from farming as part of their schooling, $9,- 
754.28. During the past year, 758 such learners earned from supervised agricul- 
tural and horticultural pursuits and projects the sum of $257,226.65. The grand 
total of such earnings for the entire period 1911 to 1928 amounted to $2,105,883.23. 
Details can be found in the statistical section of this report. 

The aim has been to secure returns from projects fully 20% above the crop and 
animal production indexes of the sections served; or pay appreciably above the 
indexes for less well-trained workers; or a combination of the two. Where boys 
from village and city homes are employed on school farms, the number is kept down 
to that which a private farm owner could profitably employ for carrying on the 
same kinds of productive work. 

It is a safe objective to try to put the graduates as far along in the mastery of 
standard practices and in managerial ability at the age of twenty-eight, as the farmer 
without such educational aid finds himself at the age of forty-five years. 

The opportunity for this tj^pe of education is very favorable in Massachusetts. 
Though fewer than five per cent of its total population live on farms, the density of 
the rural population — 33 per square mile — exceeds the density of the total 
population of 21 states, and the average density for the entire United States. In 
the value of crops per acre, Massachusetts is fourth; only Arizona, Connecticut, 
and California, with their highly specialized crops of cotton, tobacco, and fruits, 
stand higher. In 1922 this value was $48.50 per acre for Massachusetts, as against 
$19.41 for the entire country. The value of Massachusetts farm products in 1926 
was $90,000,000. 

More than half the Massachusetts farms are free from mortgages. Eighty-eight 
per CQut of them are owned by their operators. In this respect, Massachusetts is 



P.D. 2. 27 

second to only one other state. These are some of the factors which make agricul- 
tural education attractive to Massachusetts boys. 

A survey has been made to determine the present occupations of all who have 
had one year or more of training in the agricultural schools and departments of the 
State. This survey, presented here in chart form (Figure 6), covers the period from 
1908 to 1927, inclusive. This record is not one of outstanding schools, of selected 
cases, or of graduates only; it shows the total count. 

FIG. 6. — OCCUPATIONAL STATUS OF GEADUATES AND NON- 
GRADUATES OF MASSACHUSETTS VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURAL 
SCHOOLS AND DEPARTMENTS 

^>^ FARMING ^^> 



6b 



FULL TIME 40j5 
PART TIME 






OCCUPATIONAL xS^t-^S^^^"^ 



STATUS V^r:;!r1^'^'^.?^- ^^' 

NOT REPORTED 



>^^^eI^^^'" 



*ENT TO AGRICUL. 
TURAL COLLEGE. . . 



FOR 629 

^.,,5^^^XII1^ FORMER STUDENTS 

Connected with Agriculture ........ 60% 

Farming full time .......... 40% 

Farming part time ......... 5% 

In agricultural education ........ 1% 

In business allied to agriculture ....... 4% 

Have agricultural side lines ........ 3% 

Went to agricultural college . . . . . ■ . . . 7% 

Not connected with agriculture ........ 40% 

Total' 100% 

Fewer than 5% of the people in Massachusetts are on farms. The above results, with 
more than 95% of the people in attractive callings which are everywhere competing for boys 
and drawing them cityward, are remarkable. 

Percentages are based on the known Occupational Status of 2,157 persons trained one year 
or more. Others similarly trained but not found numbered 629. 

Went to Agricultural College, some of whom are through college and now farming, 7%. 
Went to Non-Agricultural College, 5%. 

Tahxdaiion of a Sxirvey Closed in 1927 of 2,167 Trained one year or more. 



28 P.D. 2. 

Surveys of 2,000 farmers in the Middle West, and of nearly 700 in Massachusetts, 
indicate that a young man bent on a farming career may expect to become an 
owner in the Middle West at about thirty-eight j^ears of age and here at about 
thirty-six years. Through its system of agricultural training, Massachusetts 
appears to be beating such averages by from 10 to 15 years. A study of five sample 
records will reveal that such is the case. 

Illustrative Cases: Agricultural Schools 

A village boy employed in a factory became interested in poultry, and took a 
special course for one year during which his home project of 12 hens and 300 chicks 
netted a "labor income" of $303.37. After completing his course, he continued his 
poultry business at home. In four years it became so profitable that his father 
left the factory and became his partner. The flock was steadily increased from 110 
hens in 1921 to 1,800 in 1927. By 1924, the annual labor income exceeded $3,600. 

Another village boy, graduating in 1921, entered the retail milk business, purchas- 
ing 15 cows. Of $2,500 borrowed to start the project, he repaid $1,100 within a 
year. He now has 60 cows, and sells 650 quarts of milk a day, within a radius of 
two miles from home. When necessary, he buys milk wholesale. He augments 
his income by selling cows to local buyers who appreciate his judgment in selecting 
profitable cows. 

A city boy finished a three-year course in 1923, and during his project summers 
carried on poultry, gardening, and floriculture on vacant lots near his home. He 
took post-graduate work during the winter 1923-24. During his first year out, 
he built and operated a 12'x26' greenhouse. He is now in partnership with his 
father, operating a large retail floral business. They have a shop facing on a promi- 
nent street, connected with three greenhouses 27'x98', 12'xl7', and 12'x8', 
respectively. The total area of the property is three acres, on which they also have 
80 apple trees, 15 pear trees, and 5 other fruit trees, besides maintaining 60 hens 
and four hives of bees. They now employ four men. Their plant, equipment, and 
stock are worth over $20,000. 

A 1924 graduate started his junior year project by purchasing one pure-bred 
Holstein cow and a grade Holstein. In his senior year he rented an 80-acre farm 
which had not been operated for several years. Starting with 13 cows, he de- 
veloped a retail milk route among the summer people; and during the season, he 
bought several more high-grade producers to keep his supply up to the demand. 
After the summer people had left, he worked up a new route in town, and also 
secured the trade of the public schools, against many competitors. Today, he has 
one of the finest herds of high-producing grade cows in the State, and a milk sale of 
400 quarts a day. A year ago he became full proprietor of his farm, and has built 
a modern dairy plant with equipment for Pasteurizing. 

A city boy entered an agricultural course in 1914. Upon graduation he first 
worked for a firm of greenhouse contractors. Later he purchased a 16-acre farm on 
a main thoroughfare, in a neighborhood devoted to private estates and country 
homes. He farmed this very intensively, producing vegetables, asparagus, and 
small fruits. He has added a high-grade herd of dairy cattle, and a Pasteurizing 
and bottling plant. He also carries a large flock of poultry. Recently he purchased 
16 additional acres. His method of marketing is progressive. Besides supplying 
an exclusive boarding house with farm products, he maintains a route over which 
he sells milk and cream, eggs, fruit and vegetables, and he operates a roadside stand. 
He is prominent in the agricultural and civic life of his community, and his farm 
is a demonstration place. In 1928, for outstanding agricultural achievements, he 
was awarded a gold medal by the State Department of Agriculture. 

Purposely, only cases of village and city boys have been here cited. In some 
sections of the country, attendance of such boys is discouraged, owing to a belief 
that they will not seriously attempt agricultural careers. Such boys in this State 
have abundantly proved their right to vocational agricultural education. Farm- 
bred boys are similarly succeeding. 

Economic Significance: Household Arts Education 
The economic significance of homemaking training cannot be evaluated with the 
same exactness as that of occupations where a wage is always paid. The effective- 
ness of the homemaker is measured by tangible and intangible factors both per- 



P.D. 2. 29 

sonal and impersonal. It is patent that many women are good homemakers with- 
out school training. Such persons have, of course, received individual training, or 
have trained themselves through reading or directed study, or by the "trial and 
error" method. There are too many homemakers who are unsuccessful; this 
number can be and is being reduced by vocational homemaking school programs. 
Those who have pursued the courses are demonstrating that this phase of voca- 
tional education has social and economic significance for them and their families, 
both before and after they become homemakers. 

Cases: Day Household Arts Schools 

Six graduates of one department because of the household arts training selected 
the vocation of nurse. These girls either have just been graduated from hospital 
training schools and are now practising, or are about to be graduated. One is 
training as a dietitian as a direct result of her homemaking training. 

Helen was graduated last year. She has a father, a sister, and two brothers, 

who work; and four brothers younger than herself. Most of the care of the home 
falls to Helen who takes entire charge of the household expenses. Her father is 
subject to severe spells of sickness, and at such times her training in home nursing 
stands her in good stead. She occasionally turns her cooking training to account 
by making cakes which find a ready sale with people in the bank where her brother 
works. 

Mary was graduated in 1915. Toward the end of her school career she began to 
sew for her neighbors, and during the summer built up a worth-while trade. The 
next year she secured a place in a fashionable dressmaking establishment and 
rose rapidly to head girl. When that concern went out of business, she entered the 

employ of the • ■ Company, where she is now assistant manager. She is sent 

from time to time to Washington, St. Ivouis, Cincinnati, and other cities, to conduct 
style showings which entail orders for expensive gowns and underwear. She has 
taught dressmaking in State-aided practical art classes. 

After Margaret graduated from a homemaking department in 1919, she 

decided to become a secretary, and entered College Secretarial School. For 

a year after she finished her studies, Margaret worked along this line. Then her 

interest in household science re-asserted itself. In 1922, she entered the 

Store as a hostess ; but she did not remain in that capacity long. By regular stages 
she advanced to her present position as supervisor of bakeries, in which she receives 
S250 a month. She has complete supervision of the bakeries in her company's 
four stores. 

Catherine entered in September, 1918, at 14 years of age, without having 

completed the ninth grade of grammar school. She was found to be quite ordinary 
in scholarship, and suffering with a nervous affliction; but she was trustworthy and 
persevering. She was graduated in 1921. Shortly afterwards an opportunity 
came to her to apply what she had learned in home nursing. She cared for a sick 
woman in a neighboring town for twenty weeks and received $25 a week. After 
this case she had two other long-time cases of nursing at the same rate of pay. 
Shortly after the last case, and two years after graduating, she married, and now 
has her own home. 

Cases: Evening Practical Art Classes 

Mrs. E had been keeping house for three years. She disliked cooking. 

Her food bill was large, and the meals were not always appetizing. Mrs. E was 

persuaded by her husband to enroll in an afternoon foods class to learn to make 
yeast bread. After she completed this unit, a later unit on the use of left-over 

foods proved very helpful in cutting down the food bill. Mrs. E returned for 

a second year to study the planning of meals from the nutritional standpoint. 

Mrs. S had four children, all of school age. One child had had bronchitis 

for three successive winters; a second child had had pneumonia twice; and the other 

two were very susceptible to colds. Mrs. S enrolled in a home nursing class. 

She learned how to recognize symptoms in the first stages, and in several instances 
was probably able to stave off serious illness, due to home prevention measures. 
Of further value were the suggestions Mrs. S— received for training her children 
to form better health habits, and also for planning more healthful food for the 
entire family. 



30 P.D. 2. 

Mrs. H and Mrs. W had done a little plain sewing, but knew nothing 

about garment construction. They attended dressmaking classes, where they 
learned how to plan and to make both adults' and children's clothing. Unexpect- 
edly, they were obliged to help support their families, and found it possible to do 
this by making children's clothes. They state that this would have been impossible 
had it not been for the instruction received in the dressmaking classes. 

Economic Significance: Continuation Schools 

The economic value of the continuation school can be more readily appreciated, 
but less tangibly demonstrated, than in the case of the other types of vocational 
education. These schools deal with a far larger group of pupils than do the strictly 
vocational schools of any of the other three types. The pupils are that great body 
of youth who annually leave the full-time schools to enter employment. The 
annual earnings of this group run to a total of S7, 500,000 for the State. Whether 
or not emplojnnent is sought as an answer to a family financial need, the boy's or 
girl's first job is nearly always a haphazard selection representing no deliberate 
choice. Too frequently it is a necessary type of job temporarily profitable but 
leading nowhere; one which turns a normal minor adrift upon his reaching adult 
age, to make place for another juvenile worker who will be content with juvenile 
wages. 

Essential to the function of the continuation school is the encouragement and 
direction of deliberate thought concerning the immediate employment and the 
prospects ahead, whether they be in direct line with it, or whether they must be 
sought elsewhere. These schools demonstrably minimize idleness, and the at- 
tendant tendency towards delinquency, among the fourteen to sixteen year of age 
group; they assist in forming habits and attitudes that follow the pupils beyond 
those ages. The value to society of such services cannot be measured in material 
terms. 

Incidentally the continuation school is of definite financial advantage to em- 
ployers and employees in its placement work. In the largest school of this type in 
the State, the cost of the placement work is about $1,000 a year. The average yearly 
saving in the form of fees, which might otherwise be paid to private employment 
agencies, is estimated at $25,000. To this value must be added the advantages 
of placement made on an educational basis, and of lessened turnover for the em- 
ployer. 

It would be possible to cite many instances of definite financial returns traceable 
to the instruction given in the continuation school. A few are presented. 

Illustrative Cases: Continuation School 

A Portuguese boy writes: "My standard pay as spare hand at 17 is $20 per 
week. What I learned in the continuation school is included in my job. If it 
were not for the continuation school, I would not have the job I have today." 

James W^ received instruction in the electrical class at the Continua- 
tion School. At 16 he was placed in the employ of the F Electric Company 

at $14 a week. After nine months' emplojmient with the same concern, he was 
receiving $-30 a week. He attributes this advancement to the instruction and 
placement service which he received from the school. 

A girl, while attending continuation school, took the home nursing course, and 
showed marked ability in the care of the sick. She worked for three years after 
leaving the continuation school, and continued her home nursing training in the 
local evening school. At the age of 19 — the minimum age at which applicants 
are accepted — she entered the "Nursing Attendant" course, given by a Household 
Nursing Association, from which she was recently graduated. 

PhiHp C enrolled in the machine shop class of a large continuation school, 

upon securing employment as a sweeper in a cotton mill. After leaving the school, 
he sought emplojmient in the metal trades. He showed his continuation school 
certificate to a gun manufacturing concern in Connecticut, and was hired as a lathe 

hand. , nc„ ■ 

Within a single school year, James C , as a result of learning to "doff in the 

textile department of the continuation school, advanced from sweeper at $5.78 a 

week to doffer at $16.20. 
A girl in a continuation school clothing class showed marked ability in the con- 



P.D. 2. 31 

struction of children's clothes. The teacher, feeling that the girl could sell such 
attractive garments, took several, as samples, to show her friends and procured 
a number of orders. Since then the girl has been kept busy. She has been able, 
through this work, to clothe herself and also keep a younger sister in the high 
school. 

John A , enrolled originally in the woodworking class at continuation school, 

was transferred to the machine shop class. He completed 296 hours of attendance, 
and during that time advanced from wire boy in the weave room to errand boy in 
the machine room, and then to machinist's helper. He later became an apprentice 
in the machine trade, and with the counsel of the continuation school instructor, 
he continued to study machine work in evening school, until he attained the rating 
and pay of a journe3'-man machinist. , 

NEW FIELDS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 

Vocational education faces its third decade in Massachusetts with the stamp of 
twenty years' approval upon its general aims and purposes, and upon its main 
trends. Along these already established and tested lines, a normal, and probably 
an accelerated, progress may be confidently looked for. The purely promotional 
problem of winning acceptance no longer exists. The problems of the future are 
rather those of expansion and enrichment of service; of refinement of method; 
and of more painstaking adjustment with economic needs. In each of the fields 
there are recent developments which may be accepted as indicative of tendencies 
which will mark future progress. 

Industrial Education 

In the field of industry, it is notable that the past five years have witnessed the 
largest expansion of any five-year period, not excluding the stimulated growth of 
the war years. The type of school in which this expansion is the most marked, is 
the day trade school; the one in which the investment in buildings and equipment 
is the largest, and in which the promise of permanency is the highest. Nearly all 
these day industrial schools are filled to capacity, and have waiting lists of appli- 
cants. Towns and cities, which have heretofore sent varying numbers of their 
youth as non-resident pupils to nearby trade schools, are considering the establish- 
ment of similar schools of their own. It is a conservative statement to say that the 
demand for trade education now exceeds the supply. The young people, who 
desire preparation for productive participation in the industrial life of the Common- 
wealth, must not be denied. 

There are twenty-five skilled trades in which preparatory training is offered in 
Massachusetts trade schools, as opposed to at least as many others in which no 
education under public auspices is now attempted. Many of these trades are 
sufficiently important, from the standpoints of numbers employed, of remuneration 
offered, and of skill demanded, to challenge thoughtful consideration in any plans 
for the future. Outstanding among such trades are cooking (for male chefs), 
tailoring, jewelry work, meat cutting and papermaking, to mention only a few. 

There are also several trades now offered in two or three schools only, for which 
larger provision of opportunity should be made. Certain of the building occupa- 
tions — notably painting and decorating, and the masonry trades — are in this 
Hst. 

The danger pointed out by the Douglas Commission of loading and lengthening 
courses with non-functioning technical content is still present. There is no evi- 
dence to justify the assumption that all trade school courses should be four or even 
three years in length. Rather, mastery of a given content should be the goal with- 
out regard to time elapsed. To this end, trades should be organized into short 
units, so that a pupil who cannot stay for the full content of the course, will receive 
a marketable training, which though limited will enable him or her to "hold down" 
a job. The evening trade extension schools can help those with limited training to 
improve and progress. 

The best work will result when trades have been carefully and completely 
analyzed into units and type jobs with definitely related technical work fully indi- 
cated, and when the training of the student is organized to follow these unit out- 
lines. The related technical work should contemplate that some will, because of 
mastery of it, rise quickly to executive or supervisory responsibility. To assume 



32 P.D. 2. 

that all who come will have the capacity to master all that should be found in a 
well organized course, is to admit that we have not profited by the experience of 
twenty years. 

There are at present only two girls' trade schools in Massachusetts. A normal 
development would be the extension of this number to cover all the larger cities. 
These schools might include but a few departments : might even be single depart- 
ment schools. One city is now contemplating the establishment of such a school. 
In this city with a dominant industry employing girls and women, there is some 
sentiment in favor of organizing a single department trade school. This suggests 
a wide field as yet untouched. In several of the household arts schools, a tendency 
is noted to develop the trade aspect of some features of the work : a tendency which 
may in futi^re lead to a complete trade differentiation. 

Part-time Co-operative Education 

The economic advantages of part-time education, referred to elsewhere in this 
report, promise a further expansion of this type of service. The promise is borne 
out by recent developments looking to the establishment of two new co-operative 
schools. These, and most of the co-operative courses now offered, are in trades 
which are also given in full-time day trade schools. 

There are, however, certain skilled occupations which because of cost of equip- 
ment or because of their very nature cannot be effectively carried on at all in inde- 
pendent, self-contained day schools. In such trades industry can and must help, 
if anything is to be done, by co-operating with the local community in establishing 
a profitable training program. Some of the trades just mentioned as having been 
thus far neglected fall within this class. Many of the building trades, and many 
trades in which quantity production is a vital instructional factor, can obviously 
best be taught on a co-operative plan. 

Most of the co-operative schools now in existence operate on a half-time basis, 
with a week-about alternation between school and plant. This arrangement is not 
the only feasible one; nor is it necessarily the most desirable one under all circum- 
stances. There are trades whose content is so largely manipulative and so little 
technical, that the proportion of school time to shop time might well be much 
smaller. 

Evening Trade Extension 

The evening trade extension program shows a tendency to fluctuate, both in 
enrolment and in nature of courses. This is as it should be; and in general, the 
evening schools are alert to local and timely demands, and are quick to fill them. 

In many industrial lines, new developments come to the fore and quickly sup- 
plant older methods and processes. Competent journeymen find it necessary to 
extend their trade equipment to remain abreast of the times. One such develop- 
ment, touching several trades, is oxy-acetylene welding. These courses have 
been very successful in two cities, and there is a present demand for them elsewhere. 
Electric arc welding is also worthy of consideration. In the painting and decorat- 
ing trade, new methods of wall decoration have created a demand for special 
trade extension courses, which has been met in only a few cities. 

In many trades, there is a technical content which is not readily obtainable by 
the apprentice who serves his time "on the job," except through organized courses. 
In the building trades among others, technical trade extension courses have been 
found very profitable and popular. In many instances such courses have been offi- 
cially backed by organized bodies of the industry. There is ample room for ex- 
pansion of this sort of work. 

There are at present no evening industrial schools for women, though one school 
(of shoemaking) does admit women to one of its departments. In view of the wide- 
spread employment of women in industry, the re-establishment and spread of 
such work may be looked for. 

New Fields: Agricultural Education 
A movement to be encouraged is the proposal to provide vocational agricul- 
tural education on a county basis, in co-operation with local school authorities and 
the Department of Education. Administered and financed through a central 
office, the service would be distributed widely throughout the county in units of 
whatever length might appear to be most needed. Counties not now adequately 



P.D. 2. 33 

served by local or county agricultural schools, could profit greatly by an arrange- 
ment of this nature. 

Such a program would open the way to service of the day-unit type, which has 
been very successful in Pennsylvania and New York. It promises to be a most 
significant forward step as to numbers effectively reached and as to low per capita 
cost. 

There are still great possibilities in part-time agricultural instruction for young 
people in rural communities who are past the regular school age and who are home- 
bound. While some efforts have been made to take more education to them much 
greater achievements in this field may be looked for. 

Intensive part-time courses to fill this need might be as brief as two weeks in 
duration, and should be offered at times coinciding with the periods of greatest 
leisure in farm work. They might be either mid-day or evening courses. Their 
content should be limited specifically to local needs and problems. The teacher 
might best follow an itinerant schedule, working out from some established school 
as headquarters or under the county plan already referred to above, to serve several 
such classes. Supervised practice on individual home projects would of course be 
a Adtal factor in such work. 

Plans may well be worked on to make a greater use of the rural high school in 
approaching the problem of wider service through agricultural education. Courses 
covering one or two years — not necessarily consecutive years — should be worked 
out in close co-operation with the State supervisor of high schools. 

New Fields: Household Arts Education' 
In the field of household arts and girls' continuation schools, child care and 
guidance is a fairly recent addition, and it is to be hoped that the guidance and 
training side will be emphasized. Hairdressing and manicuring have been intro- 
duced in a few schools and doubtless will be found in a greater number of schools 
within the next few years. Many communities are voluntarily making a careful 
survey of the individual and employment needs that the household arts training 
may function more efficiently. 

In the practical art field, a recent development is the "comprehensive home- 
making course" in which a woman enrolling for a year's work takes units concern- 
ing different homemaking activities, rather than a full year's work in any one line. 
Emphasis is being placed on practical nutrition in many foods classes. A prospec- 
tive development is the establishment of courses organized from the home stand- 
point in care of the hair and skin. 

Several cities are granting certificates for the satisfactory completion of a pre- 
scribed amount of v^'ork; a few of these cities are conducting graduation exercises 
in this connection. It is hoped and expected that other communities will follow in 
gi^dng encouragement and prominence to the adult homemaking program. 

New Fields: Continuation' School EoucATiof 
The children of the continuation school group need organized opportunities for 
learning by helping to do the world's work rather than by studying abstractions 
about the world's work. There are two very particular problems having to do with 
an adequate program of instruction in the continuation schools. Frequently such 
schools are too small to require the full-time services of even one instructor for boys 
and one for girls. In such cases the continuation school work is too often a part- 
time assignment of teachers whose chief interests are elsewhere. The smaller 
communities might maintain more effective continuation school opportunities, to 
their financial and educational advantage, by co-operating in the employment of 
"itinerant" teachers, professionally trained for this work and devoting full time 
to it. 

All the continuation schools present many specialized occupational instruction 
needs which may not be met because of the impracticability of providing full-time 
professional instructors for each. This situation affects the larger schools nearly 
as much as it does the smaller ones. Where these needs are common to several 
communities, the co-operative itinerant service idea should be adopted. The 
limitation on the number of opportunities could thus be removed or mitigated by 
the employment of instructors possessing proper professional and occupational 
qualifications, and devoting full time to instruction in continuation schools. 



34 P.D. 2. 

A movement has been under way for some time looking towards increasing the 
continuation school time by legislative enactment. Most such proposals contem- 
plate superseding the present 4-hour weekly requirement with a half-time plan, 
involving alternation between school and employment. Such a plan would permit 
further approximation of the advantages of co-operative education. 

Tied up with proposals for extending the time requirement, is usually some plan 
for advancing the age of compulsory attendance at both full-time and continuation 
schools. Such a development seems to be in the normal line of progress. 

Vocational Guidance 

The guidance and advisement of youths regarding future employment and re- 
sponsibihties is a function which has come to be widely accepted as properly belong- 
ing in a school program. 

In the vocational guidance movement there is much promise and some danger. 
Effective vocational guidance in the elementary and junior high schools cannot 
fail to contribute to the minors' intelligent choices of vocations and to the func- 
tioning of vocational education. 

In a strict sense a guidance program has little or no place in a real vocational 
school. The pupils in such a school have made their choice before applying for 
admission, and, along the line of guidance, all the vocational schools should at- 
tempt is to bolster up, modify, or discourage that choice where it is obviously in 
part or on the whole an unwise one. 

The continuation school has pioneered in guidance work. No better setting for 
its functioning can be devised than that in which the time of actual employment 
of the pupil is supplemented by a period in school during which the realities of life 
and the actualities of their employment are interpreted, discussed, and used as a 
basis for academic instruction and social, civic, and vocational guidance. Through 
this activity by the school, the blind alley job, so-called, will fail to function as such 
for the minors with capacity beyond its demands. Guidance is one of the chief 
functions of the continuation school, and will continue to be given, presumably, 
with increasing effectiveness. 

TEACHER-TRAINING * 

The chief object of the vocational teacher- training program is to select, train and 
recommend qualified teachers, and to improve them in service, in order that the 
work of the vocational and continuation schools may be accomplished in accordance 
with the aims, principles, and policies of vocational education in Massachusetts. 

When the vocational program was inaugurated there were no established insti- 
tutions prepared to give specific preliminary training to teachers for work in this 
new field. 

It was obvious that the agency jointly responsible for the administration of these 
schools — the Vocational Di\ision of the Department of Education — could 
best interpret fundamental matters pertaining to them, and could best conduct 
the program of pre-employment teacher-training and the professional improvement 
work for employed teachers. To enable the Vocational Division to provide this 
specialized training for teachers, legislation was passed in 1914. 

In 1917 the Federal Smith-Hughes Act was accepted by the Massachusetts legis- 
lature. This act made available adequate funds for extending the teacher-training 
program and a teacher-training section was established in the Vocational Division 
for the purpose of supervising this work in agricultural, household arts, industrial 
and continuation school fields. 

Teacher-Training: Industrial 
The first requirement for teachers in vocational schools is a thorough all round 
experience in their respective occupations. Obviously few men could be found to 
teach trades in vocational schools who had both adequate trade experience and also 
training or experience in teaching. Some may have taught apprentices or have had 
foreman experience; but the majority came to the trade schools with no training 
whatever in methods of teaching, and in the early days they received little training 
after they were employed. Most men who were old enough to have the required 
experience to qualify had family responsibilities which did not permit them to 
attend long normal school courses had^any such been available. 



P.D. 2. 35 

The policy, therefore, was adopted of giving intensive instruction in trade 
analysis and special methods of vocational teaching, in concentrated courses which 
could be pursued by candidates in the evening without interfering with their day 
employment. Such classes were first established in 1914 by the Vocational Division 
in connection with State-aided vocational schools in Boston, Lowell, New Bedford, 
Springfield and Worcester. Sixty-five men, representing sixteen different trades, 
were admitted to training in these first classes. The local communities furnished 
the meeting places; the cost of instruction, the organization, and the administra- 
tion were handled entirely by the Vocational Di\asion. The work has been suc- 
cessfulty continued according to that plan. 

In the school year 1927-28, 9 such classes were conducted with a total enrolment 
of 145 men representing 18 trades. Since the opening of these classes in 1915-1916, 
1,523 men have received certificates as graduates of this course. 

The problem, which was originally one of securing enough qualified candidates 
for the training, has now become one of selecting the best candidates from a large 
number who desire to take advantage of the opportunity which it represents. 

Recently, this opportunity has been extended by offering a summer course at 
Fitchburg for those who do not find the evening work convenient, and for those in 
small communities too far removed from the established teacher-training centres. 

The standard course requirement is 100 hours of class work, in fifty 2-hour ses- 
sions, with an equal amount of outside preparation; and in addition at least 20 
hours of supervised practice teaching. The aim of this course is to develop the 
following abilities in tradesmen who are preparing to become teachers of their 
trades : 

A. Ability to select and organize subject matter which directly functions in 
the work for which the pupil is being trained. 

B. Ability to arrange shop processes and jobs in the most effective instructional 
order of dijficulty. 

C. Ability to plan an effective scheme for individual progression and promotion 
of pupils. 

D. Ability to determine functioning related subject matter. 

E. Ability to plan lessons. 

F. Ability to effectively teach, using most effective methods and teaching 
technique. 

G. Ability to recognize instructional value of training on real jobs (productive 
work). 

H. Ability to manage a class and conduct a shop efficiently with due regard to 
order, system, safety and discipline, reports and records. 

In addition it is attempted in these courses to give knowledge of the aims and 
objectives of vocational education and appreciation of the teacher's job. These 
classes are taught by specially qualified local instructors and by members of the 
teacher-training staff. 

The educational and trade qualifications of shop teachers in vocational schools 
have shown steady improvement. At first it was difficult to secure men of higher 
educational attainment than graduation from grammar school. During the war 
period and immediately after there was considerable difficulty in getting qualified 
candidates for the teacher-training classes. Today, though the requirement has 
been raised to high school graduation or equivalent education, it is as easy to secure 
qualified men as it was when the standards were lower. 

Many of the candidates now admitted to training possess qualifications, both 
educational and industrial, considerably in excess of the requirements. The 
qualifications of new teachers entering the service are now being tabulated. This 
tabulation will, after a period of years, afford interesting data on this point. 

Entrance examinations are given to candidates for teacher-training classes, and a 
very careful check-up on qualifications is made. When the latest teacher-training 
classes were organized, 256 qualified applicants took the entrance examinations, 
and of that number 108 superior candidates were finally admitted to training in 
six classes. 

Candidates must show at least eight years of thorough trade experience, together 
with demonstrated skill and technical knowledge beyond that of the average 
mechanic. They must be between twenty-three and thirty-nine years of age. 



36 P.D. 2. 

In the industrial field, there are about 400 shop teachers employed. In 1927- 
1928, 30 graduates of the industrial teacher- training courses were placed in teach- 
ing positions. Not all of these were located in State-aided schools. The service 
of the Vocational Division to schools outside its jurisdiction is becoming an import- 
ant factor in the work. The city of Boston absorbs annually into its intermediate 
and high schools a large number of teacher-training graduates. Many other 
cities and towns employ proportionate numbers. Teachers so placed remain 
available for promotion into State-aided industrial schools. 

In the early days, academic teachers in trade schools were commonly enrolled 
in industrial teacher-training classes, to supplement the general college or normal 
school training which they were required to have had. In recent years, special 
classes have been conducted to meet the needs of these teachers. These courses 
are usually conducted in the late afternoon, for teachers already in service. The 
present course requirement is 30 hours of class work. 

Teacher-Training : Agricultural 

It was not until 1918 that a specific plan was set up at Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, under the terms of the Federal Vocational Education Act, to prepare 
qualified candidates for the vocational teaching of agriculture. Prior to that date, 
teachers of agriculture and related subjects were trained primarily on the job. 
This phase of itinerant teacher-training was in the hands of an agent of agricultural 
education. The same function of teacher-training in service has continued, but 
it is now co-ordinate with the main training program in the hands of a supervisor 
with this special teacher-training function. 

The present arrangement with the Massachusetts Agricultural College aims to 
provide an opportunity to secure a balance of agricultural and related subject 
matter before and during the period of teacher-training. 

Due in part to the fact that one of the chief qualifications requisite for teachers 
of vocational agriculture is a period of farm experience greater than that to be 
expected at the usual age of college graduation, the development of institutional 
teacher-training, whereby undergraduates may conscientiously prepare themselves 
for agricultural teaching, has been slow and difficult. 

The course in vocational teaching methods, limited to those who may qualify, is 
under the direct control of the Division of Vocational Education, though given in 
the college and carrying college credit. This course has been offered five hours 
per week, during the fall and winter terms, primarily for seniors and graduates. 
This course deals with the methods and technique of teaching agriculture under the 
project plan, including observation of actual school work in operation. As an 
experiment, the course has recently been divided into two parts. The first half is 
intended to precede practice teaching. The second half should follow practice 
teaching for the purpose of solving the problems which the apprentice meets dur- 
ing his service in real teaching. 

Practice teaching or apprentice teaching is required for certification. The 
minimum for which such credit is given is a full term, either mornings or after- 
noons, at a nearby school. The college credit allowed is about one fourth of the 
required credits for a term. 

An apprentice-teaching ruling of the college permits a man to absent himself 
for a full term for the practice teaching, providing his college standing warrants. 
In this arrangement a man is placed at a distance from the college and carries no 
courses under other college departments. He becomes an assistant teacher under 
a competent critic teacher and is given all the types of experience which usually 
fall to a regular teacher. 

For teachers who are approved, subject to a teacher-training condition, brief 
courses are conducted at Massachusetts Agricultural College in the summer school. 
The college staff and division staff combine to present these courses. The group 
calling for winter courses has gradually disappeared, while the summer school 
courses have met a very definite demand. 

Besides the program carried on at the college, training is also done at certain 
other centers, such as the Essex County Agricultural School, where the supervisor 
of teacher-training conducts agricultural teacher-training courses with the assist- 
ance of the local educational manager. 



P.D. 2. 37 

Teacher-Training: Household Arts 
The established method of meeting the teacher-training requirement for house- 
hold arts schools is through courses conducted by the Vocational Division of the 
Department of Education at the State Normal School at Framingham. An alterna- 
tive method of meeting this requirement is through completion of brief teacher- 
training courses organized and conducted at suitable times and places. 

Normal School Courses 

The Vocational Household Arts Department at Framingham Normal School 
was established in 1919, for the purpose of training teachers of homemaking for 
vocational and continuation schools. This department is in charge of a resident 
supervisor of the Department of Education. 

Four-Year Course. — The course, originally three years in length, has been 
expanded to a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation. The entering class is limited to eighteen, the approximate yearly demand 
for new homemaking teachers in our vocational and continuation schools. 

The course is open to students at least seventeen years of age who present satis- 
factory evidence of two years' actual experience, either in the home as house daugh- 
ter with a large share of responsibility in the management of the home or as a wage 
earner in one of the occupations involved in homemaking. Candidates must also 
be graduates from a standard four-year high school or vocational school course, 
with creditable record' in entrance subjects. 

The program in this vocational household arts course includes instruction in 
vocational, technical, academic and professional work preparatory to teaching 
homemaking on a vocational basis. The program emphasizes the project method 
of instruction and provides a large measure of actual occupational practice in home 
management and responsibilities including home projects. The students are in 
residence at the Home Management House for nine weeks each of their freshmen, 
junior and senior years. Six girls live here with two instructors, making a family of 
eight. There are also 108 hours of experience in the trade in which the student is 
specializing, and 270 hours, or one full quarter of a school year, in apprentice teach- 
ing under supervision in vocational and other schools. The course, therefore, 
includes theory and practice in both homemaking and teaching. 

There have been up to September, 1928, seventy-nine graduates of this course. 
Eighteen have been married and are in homes of their own; and the rest with the 
exception of three have been placed in positions. The majority of the graduates 
are teaching in day vocational household arts or continuation schools. 

One-Year Course. — There is also at Framingham a one-year course, leading to a 
certificate. This course gives training to women twenty-five to thirty-five years of 
age, of at least four years' approved experience in homemaking or related occupa- 
tions, and with high school education or equivalent. 

The program of study in the one-year special course is planned to meet the partic- 
ular needs of the individual in accordance with her previous trade or home experi- 
ence. All students are required to take English, psychology, and methods of 
teaching. Clothing teachers must take one elementary course in foods, and foods 
teachers one elementary course in clothing. 

Up to September, 1928, forty-eight women had completed this one-year special 
course. All with the exception of two have been placed. The majority of these 
certificate holders have added to this initial training of one year, several having . 
received college degrees. 

Special Teacher-Training Courses 

All household arts teachers who have not been trained in the vocational house- 
hold arts course at Framingham are required to take the sixty-hour teacher-train- 
ing course, which in recent years has been offered only in the summer sessions. 
This course consists of the aims, principles, and policies of homemaking education 
as conducted in vocational schools in the State. 

Teacher-training classes for practical art teachers are restricted to promising 
trade candidates who had demonstrated ability in dressmaking, millinery, home 
decoration, or foods work. The training gives these candidates the theory and 
practice of teaching homemaking to adults on the unit basis. The course require- 
ment is eighty hours, including supervised practice teaching. These courses are 
commonly held in the evening, at suitable centers in several cities. 



38 P.D. 2. 

In 1918, when the teacher-training program was started, it was necessary to 
search for quaUfied and promising candidates. This difficulty has been gradually 
eliminated. 

Teacher-Training: Continuation Schools 

Previous to 1920 Boston conducted the only continuation school. Shop teachers 
for this school were trained in the regular industrial teacher-training classes. In 
addition, academic and shop teachers alike were required to complete a special 
course in the aims and philosophy of the continuation school, conducted by the 
Division of Vocational Education in Boston. 

When the State-wide law became effective in 1920, a special summer course, 
four weeks in length, was conducted at Hyannis Normal School, where 293 teachers 
(106 men and 187 women) were given preliminary training for this special work. _ 

Since that time the established method of training teachers for continuation 
schools has been through a four-week summer course conducted by the Vocational 
Division, and differentiated for men and women teachers. Of late years this course 
has been held at the Fitchburg Normal School. The course is in addition to the 
pre-requisite training in teaching, which in the case of academic, practical arts, 
and certain homemaking teachers, is normal school or college graduation; and in 
the case of trade teachers is the completion of the vocational teacher-training course. 

The turn-over in the faculties of the continuation schools has been relatively 
small. Many of those who especially trained for continuation teaching in the 
summers of 1920 and 1921, at the Hyannis Summer Session, conductedby the 
Department, are continuing in the work in 1928. The demand for continuation 
teachers has somewhat lessened, owing to the decrease in the enrolment of the 
continuation schools. 

Training Teachers in Service 

All teachers in State-aided vocational and continuation schools are required to 
add annually to their qualifications by some form of professional improvement. 
The work done by teachers in meeting this requirement must be something which 
directly contributes to increased efficiency in teaching, and must be m addition 
to the normal and incidental work and study demanded by the position. The 
requirement is therefore administered on an individual basis, since the specific needs 
of teachers are so diverse. Work submitted for the purpose of meeting this require- 
ment must be approved by the director of the school, and by the Department of 
Education, until five years' work has been accomplished. The further fulfillment 
of the requirement is then left to the teacher and the director involved. 

Professional Improvement Courses 
Courses in methods of teaching such subjects as related drawing, science, or 
mathematics are conducted during the school year where sufficient demand exists. 
These courses are usually given at a local vocational school, for the benefit of the 
teachers in it and other near-by schools. Most commonly they are given in the 
late afternoon. 

Itinerant Teacher-Training 

A considerable portion of the teacher-training supervisors' time, in all fields, 
is spent in visits to the schools, and in giving help to teachers "on the job." Such 
service is, of course, on an individual or small-group basis, and is governed by 
specific needs as they become apparent during inspection of teachers' daily work. 

In the agricultural field, a teacher-training staff letter, devoted largely to teach- 
ing problems and new helps for teachers, is issued monthly. Helpful material, 
such as lantern slides, books and bulletins, to assist a teacher in improved service, 
is also circulated. This material varies with seasonal needs. 

Individual Proposals 
Work which is not given or directly supervised by the Department is frequently 
accepted and even prescribed as professional improvement. Every trade teacher 
is expected to offer, in fulfillment of at least two of his five years' professional im- 
provement program, work in his own trade. This insures not only continued con- 
tact and renewed skill, but also opportunity to keep abreast of new developments 
and methods. Such work is usually done during the summer vacation. Related 
work teachers also are encouraged to renew and broaden their industrial contacts. 



P.D. 2. 39 

Many trade teachers, though meeting the minimum standard, come into school 
work handicapped by a lack or a rustiness of general education. Courses for im- 
provement in this respect, offered by institutions either through correspondence, 
evening classes or in summer sessions, are approved on an individual basis in meet- 
ing the requirement. Many vocational teachers have received college credit for 
such courses, and a few have received the Bachelor degree. The pursuit of col- 
legiate work to the detriment of a teacher's immediate professional needs, however, 
is not encouraged. 

Special research work done by individual teachers is a form of professional im- 
provement that is frequently accepted. Such work often culminates in the prepara- 
tion of articles for trade and professional magazines. 

Conferences 

In all fields, special conferences of directors or teachers or both are held at con- 
venient times and places, as need dictates. Such conferences may be sectional on 
a geographical or a trade basis; or they may be general for an entire field. They 
may be called to consider specific and timely problems, or they may have general 
discussion and renewal of contacts as their chief purpose. Many such conferences 
are held at the State House in Boston. 

An annual conference of about one week is arranged for all the teachers and direc- 
tors of the agricultural schools and departments. This is held about August 1, 
and alternates by years between the eastern part of the State and the Connecticut 
Valley. Its program includes both professional educational topics and agricultural 
subject matter. 

Smaller groups of agricultural teachers assemble at other times in district con- 
ferences to discuss special problems. 

Organization of Courses of Study 

Conferences on courses of study in various occupational fields have been particu- 
larly noteworthy. In some instances all the teachers of the State in a specific 
line of work have been called in on such a conference. More commonly, a com- 
mittee of department heads has been chosen to hold stated meetings, usually 
monthly, to work with supervisors of the Vocational Division in the preparation 
and improvement of a suggested standard course. Work of this nature has already 
been completed for the trades of automobile mechanics, brick masonry, carpentry, 
marble masonry and plumbing, and for household mechanics courses in continuation 
schools. Courses are now in preparation in the printing and electrical trades. 

The results achieved by these conferences are of value to all teachers in the lines 
touched upon. Those teachers who are members of the committees also receive 
professional improvement credit for their services. 

Summer Courses 

At Fitchburg Normal School. — The Division of Vocational Education conducts 
summer courses and conferences each year for directors and teachers in the various 
fields of State-aided work. Such courses have in recent years been conducted 
at the Fitchburg State Normal School for all the fields except agriculture. 

All teachers in continuation, day vocational and household arts schools are 
expected to attend the summer course at least one year during the first five years of 
service. This should preferably be the summer following the first year of regular 
employment as a teacher. The problems and methods of Massachusetts vocational 
and continuation schools are so specialized, and the opportunities for help from 
local or institutional sources are so meagre, that such special courses are considered 
essential. Through them, the teachers secure a proper background of the aims and 
philosophy of vocational education, an equipment of special methods, and an 
invaluable contact with others facing the same problems. 

For teachers in day trade schools, a summer conference of one week's duration is 
offered. In this conference, the emphasis has usually been shifted, in alternate 
years, between the problems of the shop teacher and those of the related work 
teacher. Plans are now under way for organizing a four-week course for these 
groups, with more specialization of subject matter. 

A two-week course for employed continuation school teachers is another regular 
part of the Fitchburg program. The work for the men teachers of boys' classes 



40 P.D . 2. 

and for the women teachers in the girls' divisions of the schools, is fully differen- 
tiated. 

Professional improvement courses for day household arts teachers at the summer 
school are of two weeks' duration. A two-week course is given annually for 
evening practical art teachers. 

In the summer of 1928 the total enrolment in the professional improvement 
courses and conferences was 166 men and 84 women. 

Other courses, conducted annually at the Fitchburg Summer Session, are of a 
pre-employment nature. These include the regular required course for prospective 
continuation school teachers, both men and women, already referred to. Fitch- 
burg Normal School students in the men's practical arts course are now required 
to complete the continuation teacher-training course as a part of their work for 
graduation. 

Pre-employment teacher-training courses of two weeks' duration are also given 
for prospective teachers of household arts and evening practical arts. 

A special sumnier division of the regular trade teacher-training course for men 
has been heretofore referred to. 

The total number of persons served by both the professional improvement and 
the teacher-training programs at Fitchburg in 1928 was 218 men and 146 women. 

At Massachusetts Agricultural College. — In the field of agriculture, courses of six 
weeks, with college credit, are offered at the Agricultural College each year. Two 
of these courses are in vocational education and special methods of teaching agri- 
culture, respectively. Members of the college faculty co-operate with members 
of the Vocational Division staff; and the work is so distributed that both teacher- 
training and professional improvement candidates may profit. Not all persons 
admitted remain for a full term. 

Foreman Training 

In response to a demand for preparing potential leaders for foreman training 
conference work in industrial concerns, the Division of Vocational Education, 
through its teacher-training service, provides opportunities for such training. 

Three courses of this nature have thus far been organized by the Department: 
one at Fitchburg in the summer of 1926; one at Springfield in 1927-28; and one 
at Gardner, now under way. 

The more general adoption by industry of foreman training programs seems to be 
deterred by a lack of men who have had training in leading such conferences in 
individual plants. These courses are planned to provide training for groups of 
foremen or executives who are otherwise qualified for such work, and preferably 
for those who have been specifically delegated by their employers to attend. 

The courses are planned not for the purpose of training foremen as such. Rather 
they are in the nature of teacher-training courses, for men who will be assigned to 
the duty of training foremen or conducting foreman conferences. 

The groups usually meet once or twice a week, for twenty sessions of two hours 
each. A meeting place is secured where the men can be informally at ease. 

Topics included in the course are: Principal Types of Conference Objectives; 
The Job of a Conference Leader; Conference Devices and Their Uses; Success 
Factors in Conference Work; The General Problem of Training in Industry; 
The General Problem of Supervision in Industry. 

Besides giving instruction in conference methods, the course exemplifies those 
methods by including discussions and model conferences on topics such as are ap- 
propriate for groups of foremen to consider. During the course, each man is re- 
quired to conduct two or more conferences as a part of his training. 

The topics for these conferences are selected by the men after they have made an 
analysis of the foreman's responsibilities. Some topics which have been used are: 
Increasing Production; Working for Promotion; Co-operation between Foremen; 
Rating Men; Waste; Cost Reduction; Instructing New Workers; Reducing 
Labor Turnover. 

REHABILITATION 

The Rehabilitation Section of the Division of Vocational Education came 
into existence in 1921, when the Commonwealth accepted the provisions of an act 
of Congress to promote the vocational rehabilitation of persons disabled in industry 
or otherwise, and their return to civil employment. 



P.D. 2. 41 

By the provisions of the Federal Act, the State Board for Vocational Education 
is designated as the agency to have immediate charge of the work. The responsi- 
bility for initiative rests with the State, and the Federal Government partici- 
pates by lending financial assistance and by promoting standards of efficiency. 

It is widely accepted that: 

(a) The employjed citizen has the right to safety and health protection in his 
place of employment and toil; and it is cheaper to prevent accident and illness than 
to pay for them afterwards. 

(b) Those who are injured are entitled to assistance during disability. 

(c) The injured and ill are entitled to the surgical and medical aid necessary to 
promote their physical rehabilitation. 

Rehabilitation service is the embodiment of a fourth principle logically following 
the other three: 

(d) The handicapped are entitled to vocational rehabilitation for their proper 
reinstatement in the industrial and economic life. 

It has been recognized from the beginning that the re-establishing of the handi- 
capped as economic units of society is not charity or philanthropy, but is a form of 
social insurance: a matter of justice to the individuals, and of ultimate profit to 
the community as a whole. 

The aim of vocational rehabilitation is to render disabled persons fit to engage in 
remunerative occupations. The problem resolves itseK into several phases: 

a. Physical restoration. d. Re-education. 

b. Maintenance. e. Placement. 

c. Advisement. 

Not all of these fall within the province of the Rehabilitation Section. The 
Federal Board has construed the enabling statute as allowing expenditures for 
re-education (of vocational, not general nature), and for placement; but not for 
maintenance or physical restoration. These phases must, therefore, be left to other 
agencies. A discussion of them may be found in a later section of this report, 
under Maintenance, 

Administration 
The rehabilitation service is organized as a section in the Division of Vocational 
Education, and operated under the director of that division. Its staff includes at 
the present time a supervisor and three assistant supervisors. 

Relationship with Federal Board for Vocational Education 
The relationship between the Federal and State governments is that of co-operat- 
ing partners, each having separate and distinct functions. The State has the 
responsibility for the organization and immediate direction of the work, in con- 
formity with the needs and conditions within its own boundaries. It co-operates 
with the Federal Board in the latter's clearing house service by furnishing informa- 
tion regarding practices and experiences. The Federal Board compiles such infor- 
mation on a country-wide basis, and engages in other promotional activities. It 
also contributes financially, matching the expenditures made from state appro- 
priations. 

Co-operation with the Industrial Accident Board 
One of the essential conditions of the program is co-operation between the 
Division of Vocational Education and the Department of Industrial Accidents. 
This is a logical arrangement; a goodly proportion of persons eligible for rehabilita- 
tion naturally come from the ranks of those injured in industry and entitled to 
compensation for such injuries. The Rehabilitation Section has access to the 
records of the Industrial Accident Board, and is thus enabled to establish contact 
with those injured employees who appear to be eligible for, and likely to benefit by, 
the service. In such cases, notification of important steps in regard to compensa- 
tion and rehabilitation is interchanged by the two departments. Frequently, the 
members of the Industrial Accident Board have requested representatives of the 
Rehabilitation Section to attend conferences on individual cases when the matter 
of restoration to suitable employment was involved. Much benefit has resulted 
to the injured employees from such co-operation. 



42 P.D. 2. 

Co-operation with other Agencies 
It is recognized that rehabilitation reaches beyond the scope of any one or two 
governmental agencies, into the fields occupied by various medical, social and civic 
organizations. The co-operation of such groups is welcomed and sought. 

Promotional Publicity 

The Rehabilitation Section has not embarked upon any publicity campaign as 
such. In the ordinary course of the work its representatives have seized the op- 
portunities presented to acquaint groups and individuals with the purposes and 
policies of the Rehabilitation Section, in order that as many eligible people as 
possible might learn of the service, and that those in positions to co-operate might 
be impelled to do so. Printed bulletins have been distributed. Talks have been 
given before numerous clubs and organizations. Two public conferences have 
been held, one in 1923 and the second in 1928. Both were largely attended by the 
medical fraternity, hospital workers, social workers, educators, and by representa- 
tives of compensation insurance companies, of labor organizations and of employers, 
indicating the interest of such groups in rehabilitation, and laying the foundation 
for co-operation by them. 

Method of Procedure 

The case method of conducting rehabilitation has been accepted from the begin- 
ning as the most effective way to deal with the problem. In developing the details, 
certain definitions have been worked out which help to an understanding of the 
application of the method. 

Definitions 

Contacts. — Communications with handicapped persons, or with others in refer- 
ence to them. These are mainly by personal interviews, but also by mail or tele- 
phone. 

Prospects. — Those handicapped persons who seem likely to be eligible for the 
services of the Rehabilitation Section, and with whom some contact has been made, 
though the point of registration has not been reached. 

Registrants. — Persons who appear to be eligible for the service of the Rehabilita- 
tion Section, and likely to benefit by it, if their attitude is interested and co-opera- 
tive. Such determination is made after a personal interview and investigation. 

Eligibility. — The meeting of the following requirements: The handicapped 
person must be a resident of Massachusetts; must have reached the age of em- 
ployability; and must have a physical defect or infirmity which constitutes a voca- 
tional handicap. This defect or infirmity may be congenital, or acquired by 
accident, injury or disease. 

Advisement 

When a handicapped person is found to be eligible for rehabilitation, procedure 
is at once started to prepare him for suitable remunerative employment. Obviously 
the goal to be attained must be selected early, in order that a program may be 
mapped out to include all the essential preparation for it. It is this consideration 
which motivates the careful advisement, in which due weight is given to such fac- 
tors as sex, age, educational background, employment experience, natural ability 
and interests, susceptibility to training, training and emplojonent resources. As 
a result, a definite job objective is decided upon as well as the means for reaching it. 

Training 
In the majority of cases, training is found to be necessary. Marked emphasis 
has been laid upon this feature by the Rehabilitation Section, and especially upon 
the fact that the activities of the Section must be concerned with strictly vocational 
training as distinct from general education. Our experience has indicated that it is 
more feasible to use existing facilities than to establish training centers exclusively 
for the handicapped. The Rehabilitation Section has made use of institutions, 
both public and private; of tutors; of correspondence courses; and of places of 
employment, for training purposes; sometimes singly and sometimes in combina- 
tions, depending upon the needs of the particular individual. Any tuition charges 
have been rightly borne by the Rehabilitation Section as a charge against this exten- 
sion of the system of public education. Likewise instructional supplies have been 
furnished as a legitimate expense, although the trainees have been encouraged to 



P.D. 2. 43 

reimburse for these items, and have responded in a highly satisfactory degree. 
Up to the close of the year ending November 30, 1928, training programs were put 
into effect for 895 persons leading to 149 occupations. A complete list is given in 
Table C below. 

Placement 

Since placement is an essential component of rehabilitation, and when properly 
done is a specialized task linked with the analysis and development of the individual, 
it is logically regarded as an activity within the scope of the Rehabilitation Section. 

Such placement may be under any of the following circumstances: 

{a) When complete rehabilitation can be obtained by direct placement in a 
suitable occupation, training being deemed unnecessary. 

(6) When the circumstances require the handicapped person to earn while 
learning. 

(c) When training on the job is the most effective method of training. 

{d) Wlien after training is completed, the registrant is ready to be tested in the 
occupation for which he has been trained. 

Placement is a function in respect to which the Section has looked for co-opera- 
tion to individuals and groups; for the difficulties which accompany it cannot be 
overcome until the general public, and employers in particular, have a clearer 
understanding of the controlling principles. Chief among these is the principle 
that the employment of a handicapped person is not charity; and the fact that a 
person, lacking certain physical attributes, may have his remaining abilities de- 
veloped to the point of competitive efficiency in a particular job which reciuires the 
exercise of those abilities only. 

The hesitancy of employers in hiring handicapped persons has often been due 
to the contention that a disabled person is peculiarly susceptible to further injury, 
or that permanent and total disability will result from further injury, thereby 
increasing the cost of compensation insurance. Two provisions have been inserted 
in the Workmen's Compensation Act, tending to counteract that attitude; one 
creating a special fund out of which compensation for certain specified injuries is 
payable; and the other permitting the physically disabled to waive the benefits 
of the Workmen's Compensation Act, subject to the approval of the Industrial 
Accident Board. 

Swpervision 
_ The entire process, from the initial planning through the completed rehabilita- 
tion, involves close personal supervision. To bring to the individual and to the 
State the highest returns, socially and economically, constant follow-up is neces- 
sary to see that the service was extended to those who might benefit from it, and 
that those found eligible and susceptible have carried the programs through to suc- 
cessful endings. 

Transportation 

The main and more universal steps in the process of rehabilitation, as outlined 
above, have frequently been supplemented by such additional services as the fur- 
nishing of transportation, of artificial appliances, or of maintenance. Trans- 
portation has been provided at the expense of the Rehabilitation Section when the 
place selected for training was at a distance from the home of the trainee, and the 
latter could not reasonably be expected to pay his own fare. 

Artificial Appliances 
Very definite policies have been evolved in the matter of furnishing artificial 
appliances. Appliances are never furnished for appearances merely, but only 
when they nre a direct and material aid to the performance of the occupation in 
view. The follo\\ing determinations are first made; that the handicapped is eligi- 
ble for and susceptible of rehabilitation; that an employment objective has been 
chosen and a method of preparing for it agreed upon; that the appliance is neces- 
sary to enable the person to perform the work; that the appliance cannot be ob- 
tained from any other source. Then the Rehabilitation Section accepts from the 
handicapped person himself, from his friends, or from a social agency, hospital, 
fraternal organization or other group interested, one-half the cost of the appliance. 
The contribution is deposited with the State Treasurer and the appliance is ordered 
by the Rehabilitation Section from the manufacturer chosen by the handicapped 



44 P.D. 2. 

person. After it is delivered and the wearer is sufficiently satisfied with the fitting, 
the entire bill is paid by the Rehabilitation Section, one-half from the subscription 
and the other half from Federal funds at its disposal. To date contributions have 
been received amountins? to $5,335.15 to be applied to the purchase of 81 appli- 
ances for 74 persons. Under our policy this means that when the purchases are 
complete $9,989.62 will have been spent on appliances as part of rehabilitation 
plans. 

Maintenance 

The Rehabilitation Section has been empowered to provide maintenance for 
trainees since August 21, 1923. This development came about after investigation 
and report by a special commission of which the director of the Division of Voca- 
tional Education was a member. Its report to the Legislature resulted in the 
enactment of Chapter 434, Acts of 1923, which authorized the giving of aid during 
rehabilitation, under rules and regulations approved by the Governor and Council. 
In accordance with those rules, applications for rehabilitation aid are made to the 
Rehabilitation Section. These appHcations are honored only from persons eligible 
for and susceptible of training under the supervision of the Rehabilitation Section, 
who have the ability to so profit by the training as to justify expenditures from 
the fund for their maintenance. Investigation of the circumstances of the handi- 
capped is made by the Department of Public Welfare. When the Rehabilitation 
Section is satisfied as to the need of rehabilitation aid, it determines upon the 
amount of the payments to be made and the duration of their continuance. 

Up to November 30, 1928, 43 applications for aid have been received. No 
investigation was requested in 3 cases because aid seemed unnecessary even on 
surface facts. Of the remaining 40 cases, aid was granted in 30, and disapproved 
in 10 cases. The length of time during which aid was given varied from 1 to 61 
weeks, and the amount from $5 to $25 a week. Altogether $6,117.26 has been 
expended for rehabilitation aid, an average for each person aided of $203.91 for 
30 weeks. Table A below shows pertinent facts concerning such cases. 
Determination of Rehabilitation 

A vocationally handicapped person who has had vocational experience is reha- 
bilitated when fitted for and placed in employment of at least the same status as 
his best job prior to disablement; or in employment as near his best job as his 
physical disability will permit. A vocationally handicapped person who has had 
no vocational experience, is rehabilitated when fitted for and placed in employment 
which is consistent with his educational background, vocational ability, and 
physical disability. RehabiHtation is not deemed complete until the handicapped 
person has satisfactorily demonstrated his ability to meet the requirements of the 
occupation in which he has been placed. By continuing the supervision to this 
point, the RehabiHtation Section not only has the opportunity of testing out the 
effectiveness of the whole procedure, but acquires positive assurance that the 
handicapped person is in reality self-supporting. 

Statistical Summary 

Although the very nature of the work done by the Rehabilitation Section pre- 
cludes an adequate conception of it from mere statistics, the following facts are 
outlined as indicative of the scope of the work. These figures cover the period 
from August 27, 1921, to November 30, 1928: 

Contacts made 24,142 

Prospects listed . . . ^ 4,449 

Cases registered ........-• 1,481 

Registrants put in training ........ 895 

Registrants placed after training ....... 325 

Registrants placed without training ....... 298 

Registrants rehabilitated ......... 675 

Registrants closed for causes other than rehabilitation . . . 526 

Registrants for whom artificial appliances were furnished ... 74 

Registrants to whom maintenance was paid . . . . .30 

Classification of Registrants 

From Table B may be gleaned these facts and trends : 

Approximately 88.25 per cent of the registrants were men and 11.75 per cent were 



P.D. 2. 45 

women. This proportion has held fairly steadily throughout our experience, and 
corresponds with that of the entire country. 

The Rehabilitation Section has dealt primarily with two groups: those injured 
in industry, and those disabled through public accidents or by diseases, either 
congenital or acquired. The latter are classified as "otherwise" cases. Up to 
date, 51.92 per cent of the registrants were industrial accidents and 48.08 per cent 
were "otherwise" cases. 

The distribution by age groups shows that 27.95 per cent of the registrants were 
under 21 years of age, and 30.79 per cent between 21 and 30 years of age. It may 
fairly be assumed that a great number of these were disabled either before they had 
had work experience, or while they were passing through a period of valuable 
experience. The same might be said of an additional 18.43 per cent between the 
ages of 31 and 40 years. Twenty- two and eighty-three hundredths per cent were 
over 40 years old, and were at the period of life during which it is becoming increas- 
ingly difficult for even able-bodied persons to secure opportunities in new lines of 
employment. 

Classification of Disabilities 

The largest group of registrants was disabled by injuries to the hands and arms, 
and the next largest group by injuries to the lower limbs. There were 577, or 38.96 
per cent of the whole number, in the former group; and 350, or 23.63 per cent, in 
the latter. Another large group was of those whose disabilities were classified as 
"miscellaneous," including tuberculosis, cardiac conditions, and head and back 
injuries. 

Previous Education 

The educational experience of registrants at the date of reference to the Rehabili- 
tation Section ranged from no formal school training to some training beyond high 
school. There were 4.32 per cent who had received no schooling, and 24.85 per 
cent who had not been beyond the sixth grade. (It may be noted that the mini- 
mum requirement for employment of a person under the age of 21 in this State is 
sixth grade education.) Of the whole number, 42.67 per cent were from the seventh 
to the ninth grades inclusive; 22.01 per cent had received some high school training; 
and 6.15 per cent had received some education beyond high school. 

Ageyicies of Training 

A total of 895 persons were put in training by the Rehabilitation Section. Pub- 
lic institutions were the principal means of training, being used in 36.87 per cent of 
the cases. Private institutions were used in 20.89 per cent of the cases; employ- 
ment training in 17.99 per cent; tutors in 3.69 per cent and correspondence courses 
in 20.56 per cent. Since the correspondence courses were almost wholly those 
given by the Division of University Extension, the number trained through them 
may be added to those trained in public institutions, showing that public educa- 
tional facilities were used in 57.43 per cent of the total number of training cases. 
The occupations for which training was instituted numbered 149, and are listed 
in Table C. 

Employment Study of Rehabilitants 

Each year a study has been made of cases placed in employment during that year 
for the purpose of comparing the earning power before and after reference to the 
Rehabilitation Section. All placements have been included, whether they were 
made for training purposes, followed or supplemented other training, or formed 
the major part of the rehabilitation program. For the present study, as shown in 
Tables D and E, page 52, only cases actually rehabilitated were taken, thus 
eliminating part-time employment and that which was compensated in ways other 
than by money wages. 

For the group rehabilitated during the period from 1921 to November 30, 1928, 
the average weekly wage at the date of reference was $2.57, as against $20.08 after 
rehabilitation, showing an increase of $17.51 per week per capita, or of $11,819.25 
for the entire number. This increase amounts to $614,601.00 in a year: a sub- 
stantial item on any pay roll. Against this have been expenditures on those cases 
of the following amounts (exclusive of administration overhead, which should be 
spread over all cases in process as well as those rehabilitated) : — Tuition, $20,- 
072.37; instructional supplies, $1,898.76; transportation, $1,702.99; artificial 



46 ' P.D. 2 

appliances, $5,032.87; maintenance, $6,117.26. These expenses total 134,824.25 
over a seven-year period, and give a per capita cost of $51.59. On a per capita 
basis the increase in earnings thus exceeded the cost by $579,776.75. Such re- 
sults are both interesting and satisfying, and indicate that when the measure of the 
value of rehabilitation, as represented by the ratio of expense to the increase in 
earning power, is applied, the balance shows strongly an economic gain for the 
community. 

Illustrative Cases 
Public Institutional Training 

S M was an Italian, 31 years old, married, with a wife and one child 

dependent upon him. He had left school in the fifth grade at the age of fourteen 
years and for the next fifteen years worked as a cotton weaver earning up to $25 
a week. He then met with an accident at his work, through which his right foot 
was so injured as to prevent his returning to his former occupation of weaving, or to 
any employment which required constant standing. Some time later he was given 
a job by his former employer, as a bobbin stripper at $10 a week. He was laid off 
after three weeks' trial, partly because the job was "made" for him and partly 
because he failed to make any effort to perform the work satisfactorily. After 
compensation had been paid for two and a half years he was referred to the Re- 
habilitation Section by another division of the Department of Education. He did 
not appear to be very co-operative or to have any noticeable ambition. It was 
discovered, however, that he had shown considerable talent in drawing while at the 
elementary school and that he was still interested in it. The Rehabilitation 
Section arranged for his enrolment in a public textile school as a special student in 
print cloth design, although many persons were skeptical about the ultimate suc- 
cess of the program. At the end of a year his instructor reported that the man 
seemed to have an unlimited amount of creative ability and that his technique was 
developing rapidly. He finished his training in fourteen months with a rank of 88 
per cent, and commenced work at once with one of the largest textile commission 
houses of the country at an initial salary of $40 a week. The training costs of this 
case to the Rehabilitation Section were $5.11 for instructional supplies, — a strik- 
ingly small amount when compared to the saving in compensation, and particularly 
to the large return to the community by making available the man's hidden talent. 

Private Institutional Training 

J B was an Italian, 35 years old, who had worked as a laborer since 

coming to America at the age of 16. Through an accident at his work he sustained 
a fracture of the sixth and seventh vertebrae. This caused dizziness when stooping, 
disqualified him for further laborious work, and made it necessary for him to turn 
to new employment in order to support his wife and child. His compensation 
case had been settled by a lump sum. He had never been to school, and was illit- 
erate in his native tongue. 

Barbering was selected as a suitable occupation; and, since training for it was 
not offered in any public school, the Rehabilitation Section placed him in a private 
school for intensive training and paid his tuition. He purchased his own instruc- 
tional supplies. In five weeks he had acquired sufficient skill to be placed in a 
barber shop on a wage basis; and in less than three months from the beginning of 
the training he had opened a shop of his own and was making $26 a week net profit. 
He has continued to do well in his own business. 

Em'ployment Training 
A compensation insurance company asked the Rehabilitation Section to interest 

itself in M , a young man, 17 years old, who was so injured in a saw mill 

that the four fingers of his right hand were amputated. He had left school in the 
sixth grade and possessed no industrial experience that was particularly valuable. 
He seemed content to drift along on $12 a week compensation, and it was with 
difficulty that his interest in planning for the future was aroused. Not until he 
had actually tried out several things was an occupation decided upon; then the 
choice was coremaking and moulding. Through the co-operation of a business 
men's club, an opportunity for employment training in the shop of one of the mem- 
bers was found. According to the plan the boy was to put in his time against the 
instruction given by the foreman and the practical experience he would obtain. 
He applied himself satisfactorily, and soon began to overcome whatever difficulties 



P.D. 2. 47 

there were in handling the tools and materials with his injured hand. His training 
period extended over a year, during which time he was paid $6 a week. About 
that time the shop in which he was trained burned down and he was then placed 
in another shop, with which contact was made by the insurer, at a weekly wage 
of $21.60. 

Employme7it Training and Evening Private School 
A school for crippled children requested the Rehabilitation Section to become 

interested in F M , a young man 21 years of age, who had been a former 

student. He was in the care of a child-placing agency, under whose supervision 
he had done various unskilled jobs around restaurants and farms with much in- 
difference. In view of his physical handicap, — a dislocated hip — it seemed wise 
to plan for some sedentary work. Some ability which he had in freehand drawing 
led to his being given a short try-out in photo retouching. His reaction warranted 
a program of training for that occupation, which consisted of day employment 
training in a studio with wages of $12 a week, supplemented by a five-month eve- 
ning course in a private school. He showed keen interest from the beginning, and 
gradually acquired skill in etching and retouching. At the end of six months he 
was earning $21 a week. He has continued in the employ of the photographer 
who trained him, and is happy because, as he expressed it, he has found his work. 

Combination Service 

J D had completed about three years of his enlistment in army service, 

when he met with an accident which necessitated amputating his left hand at the 
wrist. A year later he was referred to the Rehabilitation Section. He was then 
25 years old, and had a seventh grade education and two years' experience as a 
plumber's helper. He had given serious thought to the future, and asked for train- 
ing in welding to prepare him for work in an automobile shop. Following our sug- 
gestion he made an effort to secure some assurance of employment, and succeeded 
in making contact with an employer who agreed to co-operate. The man was then 
placed for training in welding in a public trade school, the Rehabilitation Section 
paying his transportation. Later he was placed for supplementary training in 
automobile repair in the shop of the employer previously approached. To enable 
him to complete his training it became necessary to make payments of $10 a week 
from the maintenance fund for a period of three months. At the end of eight 
months from the time of reference, he was placed as a welder and automobile 
mechanic at $20 a week. 

Placement 

J W , 37 years old, was born in Newfoundland, where he had spent 

practically all of his working life as a fisherman. After coming to Massachusetts 
he worked as a laborer to support his 73-year-old widowed mother. While suffer- 
ing from a severe attack of grippe, he persisted in starting for work, but felt weak 
on the way as he was passing some wharves and crawled under a dory. He re- 
mained there three days before being discovered. Both legs were frost bitten and 
had to be amputated. He had had only two years of schooling, consequently 
there was little educational background to build upon. Considering all the cir- 
cumstances, the wisest plan seemed to be to furnish artificial limbs and to readjust 
the man into suitable employment at the earliest possible moment. Through the 
hospital social worker, the man's friends contributed one-half the cost of the limbs, 
which were ordered by the Rehabilitation Section and paid for from the subscrip- 
tion and from Federal funds. While the limbs were being made and fitted, and 
later while the man was becoming accustomed to them on temporary work, efforts 
were being made to interest employers. After many unsuccessful efforts a place 
was found with an electric appliance manufacturer, who agreed to employ the man 
on bench assembly work at $20 a week. It was only through the fullest co-opera- 
tion of the employer and the man himself that the plan worked out successfully. 
The employer assisted in many ways in the various adjustments necessary in the 
beginning. The man paid strict attention to his work, kept up his interest and 
efficiency and continued with the firm three and a half years. His only absence 
was while he was operated upon for cancer of both lips. When the factory in which 
he worked moved from the State, the experience he had gained there and the recom- 
mendation from the employer enabled us to place him with another company 
inspecting and checking radio parts, on which job he is now earning $24 a week. 



48 P.D. 2. 

Table A 

Statistical Presentation of Maintenance Cases from December 1, 1923, to November 

30, 1928 













Disability 


Employment 






Educa- 
tion 
by 




Number 

of 
Depend- 


Status at Time of Injury 


Sex 


Age 


Civil 

Status 








Wage 






Grades 




ents 


Nature 


Origin 


Occupation 


per 
Week 


M. 


30 


9 


Single 


- 


Arthritis — right leg 
stiff . . 




Porter and elevator 
operator 


S30 00 


M. 


30 


11 


Married 


- 


Tuberculosis . 


- 1 


Edge setter . 


40 00 


M. 


21 


8 


Single 


- 


Right arm ampu- 
tated at shoulder. 




None 




M. 


56 


5 


Married 


5 


Left leg short 


_ 2 


Edge setter . 


50 00 


M. 


36 


8 


Married 


4 


Back injury . 


- 2 


Painter . 


25 44 


F. 


26 


7 


Single 


- 


Right leg amputated 


- 1 


None 


- 


F. 


21 


8 


Single 


~ 


Infantile paralysis 
affecting both legs 




None 




M. 


19 


9 


Single 


~ 


Nerves in arm and 
legs dead 


-1 


None 


- 


M. 


27 


8 


Single 


6 


Left leg amputated 
above knee. Right 
below knee 




None 




M. 


22 


7 


Single 


- 


Left arm amputated 


-' 


Chauffeur 


25 00 


M. 


22 


7 


Married 


2 


Right leg paralyzed 


-1 


Helper in dye house 


16 00 


M. 


18 


11 


Single 


- 


Absence of right 
hand . 


_ I 


None 


_ 


M. 


21 


9 


Married 


2 


Loss of use of right 
hand . 




None 




M. 


22 


5 


Single 


- 


Right leg amputated 
above knee 




Farmer . 


7 00 


M. 


33 


13 


Married 


2 


Compound fracture 
of right radius 




Store clerk 


15 00 


M. 


44 


3 


Single 


~ 


Aortic regurgitation 
and flat feet 


-1 


Pressman 


35 00 


M. 


20 


10 


Single 


- 


Arm amputated few 
inches below 
shoulder 




None 




M. 


41 


7 


Married 


3 


Left leg amputated 
6 in. above knee . 




Plumber 


30 00 


M. 


22 


11 


Single 


- 


Infantile paralysis 
affecting right leg 




None 




F. 


20 


7 


Single 


— 


Right hand useless . 


- 1 


None 


— 


M. 


24 


2 


Single 


- 


Right hand useless . 


-' 


Punch press operator 


18 00 


F. 


33 


17 


Married 


_ 


Deafness 


_ 1 


None 


_ 


M. 


27 


7 


Single 


~ 


Left hand ampu- 
tated at wrist 


-4 


Operating circular 

saw . 


11 00 


M. 


52 


10 


Single 


- 


Injury to spine 


-' 


Hand laster . 


13 00 


M. 


23 


10 


Single 


- 


Compound fracture 
of both ankles 


- 2 


Seaman 


54 00 


M. 


38 


13 


Married 


2 


Left arm amputated 
at shoulder 


_ 3 


Sheet metal and re- 
pair worker 


48 00 


M. 


37 


6 


Single 


1 


Left leg amputated 
below knee 


-1 


None 




M. 


21 


11 


Single 




Right eye vision re- 
duced — left eye re- 
duced 1/5 . 


-I 


Helper on truck 


18 00 


M. 


39 


7 


Single 


1 


Compound fracture 
bones in right foot 


_ 4 


Peddling lunches 


20 00 


M. 


47 


8 


Married 


5 


Paralysis of spine 
affecting both legs 


- 1 


Painter . 


35 00 



' Otherwise case involving public accident, disease or congenital condition. 

' Employment accident compensable case receiving compensation at reference. 

' Employment accident non-compensable case. 

< Employment accident compensable case not receiving compensation at reference. 



P.D. 2. 49 

Table A 
Statistical Presentation of Maintenance Cases from December 1, 1923, to November 

SO, 1928 



Training 


Maintenance 


Employment 
Status at Closure 


Course 


Type 


Costs 


Amount 

per 

Week 


Dura- 
tion 
in 
Weeks 


Total 
Amount 


Occupation 


Wage 

per 
Week 


Mathematics . 


ZoTTes. 














Mechanical drawing 


School 


S276 00 


S12 00 


33 


S396 00 


Draftsman 


$19 20 


Electricity 


School 


78 23 


5 00 


7 


35 00 


Electrical business 


50 00 


Commercial 


School 


188 66 


11 00 


48 


528 00 


Stock clerk 


12 00 


Edge trimming 


School 


_ 


U 00 


14 


196 00 


Edge trimmer . 


6 00 


Machinist 


School 


- 


25 00 


24 


600 00 


Assembler 


19 20 


Cooking 


School 


_ 


10 00 


4 


40 00 


Salad maker 


8 75 


Commercial art and 
















design 


School 


_ 


9 00 


29 


261 00 


Coloring cards . 


10 75 


Commercial 


School 














Commercial . 


Employ- 
















ment 


6 00 


8 00 


44 


352 00 


Production clerk 


17 00 


Operating stitching 


Employ- 














machine 


ment 


— 


8 00 


30 


240 00 


Machine stitcher 


12 00 


Auto ignition . 


School 


_ 


/8 50 
U 86 


44\ 




Auto starting, hghting 










1/ 


378 86 


and ignition worker 


22 00 


Mathematics . 


Corres. 














Commercial . 


School 


165 72 


9 00 


11 


99 00 


Clerk 


19 20 


Auto repair 


Employ- 














Mechanical 


ment 










Service rejected by 




drafting 


School 


- 


7 60 


5 


38 00 


trainee . 


— 


Edge trimming — Mc- 
















Kay stitching 


School 


— 


18 00 


13 


234 00 


Celluloid cementer 


18 00 


Watch maker and re- 












Watch and clock re- 




pairer . 


School 


328 90 


5 00 


64 


320 00 


pairer . 


18 00 


Watch and clock re- 


Employ- 










Clock repairer and ad- 




pair 


ment 


148 00 


16 00 


20 


320 00 


juster 


25 00 


Power machine 
















operator; rattan 


Employ- 














work . 


ment 


- 


9 30 


8 


74 40 


Janitor 


20 00 


Poultry raising 


School 


- 


10 00 


26 


260 00 


Taking additional 
training ' 


_ 


Auto ignition and 
















battery repair 


School 


— 


13 50 


28 


378 00 


Battery repairman 


20 00 


Printing 


School 














Linotype operating . 


School 


16 90 


9 60 


16 


152 00 


Linotype operator 


15 00 


Millinery 


School 


12 57 


5 00 


23 


115 00 


Still in training i 


— 


Power machine 


Employ- 










Waiting for employ- 




stitcher 


ment 


120 00 


13 00 


11 


143 00 


ment ' . 


— 


Dietitian 


School 


_ 


10 00 


11 


110 00 


Dietitian and nurse . 


25 75 


Welding 


School 














Auto repair . 


Employ. 


- 


10 00 


9 


90 00 


Auto mechanic . 


20 00 


Edge trimmer . 


School 


- 


11 00 

/12 00 
t 5 00 


4 


44 00 


Waiting for employ- 
ment 1 . 
Waiting for employ- 


- 


Linotype operator . 


School 


- 


78 00 


ment 1 . 


— 


Duco refinishing 


Employ- 










Duco refinishing and 






ment 


— 


7 00 


24 


168 00 


auto painting 


20 00 


Painting 


Employ- 
















ment 


- 


10 00 


2 


20 00 


Service rejected 


- 


Mattress maker 


Employ- 
















ment 


— 


12 00 


15 


180 00 


Still in training i 


— 


Clothes pressing 


Employ- 










Illness prevents ac- 






ment 


- 


15 00 


17 


255 00 


cepting employment 


- 


Show card writing 


School 


71 25 


12 00 


1 


12 00 


Still in training * 


- 



1 Case not yet closed. 



50 



P.D. 2. 



Table B_ 
Statistical Presentation of Registrants 





Aug. 27, 1921-Nov. 30, 


Dec. 1, 1927-Nov. 30, 


Aug. 27, 1921-Nov. 30, 




1927 


1928 


1928 




Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 


A. Age Groups 














Under 21 years . 


314 


25.65 


100 


38.91 


414 


27.95 


21-30 




399 


32.60 


57 


22.18 


456 


30.79 


31-40 




224 


18.30 


49 


19.06 


273 


18.43 


41-50 




169 


13.81 


36 


14.01 


205 


13.84 


Over 50 




118 


9.64 


13 


5.06 


131 


8.85 


Unknown . 




- 


- 


2 


.78 


2 


.14 


B. Disability 














Hand 


308 


25.16 


79 


30.73 


387 


26.13 


Hands 




35 


2.86 


7 


2.72 


42 


2.84 


Arm . 




105 


8.58 


15 


5.84 


120 


8.10 


Arms 




4 


.33 


3 


1.17 


7 


.47 


Leg . 




226 


18.46 


35 


13.62 


261 


17.62 


Legs . 




79 


6.45 


10 


3.89 


89 


6.01 


Hand — Arm 




19 


1.55 


2 


.78 


21 


1.42 


Hand — Leg 




12 


.98 


_ 


— 


12 


.81 


Arm — Leg . 




14 


1.14 


_ 


— 


14 


.94 


Multiple 




15 


1.23 


5 


1.95 


20 


1.35 


Vision 




33 


2.70 


16 


6.23 


49 


3.31 


Hearing 




112 


9.15 


22 


8.56 


134 


9.05 


General debility 




39 


3.19 


3 


1.17 


42 


2.84 


Miscellaneous 




223 


18.22 


60 


23.34 


283 


19.11 


C. Education 














None 


56 


4.58 


8 


3.11 


64 


4.32 


1-6 grades . 




297 


24.26 


71 


27.63 


368 


24.85 


7-9 grades . 




547 


44.69 


85 


33.07 


632 


42.67 


10-12 grades 




275 


22.47 


51 


19.85 


326 


22.01 


Beyond 12 . 




49 


4.00 


42 


16.34 


91 


6.15 


D. Type of Training 














Public educational i 


n- 












stitutions 


234 


35.40 


96 


41.03 


330 


36.87 


Private educational in 


. 












stitutions 


156 


23.60 


31 


13.25 


187 


20.89 


Employment training 


89 


13.46 


72 


30.77 


161 


17.99 


Tutors 


18 


2.72 


6 


2.56 


24 


2.68 


Correspondence . 


155 


23.45 


29 


12.39 


184 


20.56 


Special training agencie 


s 9 


1.37 


- 


- 


9 


1.01 


E. Origin of Disabih 


ty 












Employment accidents 


630 


51.47 


139 


54.09 


769 


51.92 


Public accidents . 


162 


13.23 


27 


10.50 


189 


12.76 


Disease 


386 


31.54 


79 


30.74 


465 


31.40 


Congenital . 


46 


3.76 


12 


4.67 


58 


3.92 


F. Sex 














Male . 


1,075 


87.83 


232 


90.27 


1,307 


88.25 


Female 


149 


12.17 


25 


9.73 


174 


11.75 






Tab 


LE C 






List of Occupatior 


is for which 


Training 
Novembei 


has been Given from 
' 30, 1928 


August 2' 


y, 1921, to 


Accountant 






Carpenter 






Advertiser 






Cashier 






Advertising design 


er 




Caterer 






Agriculturist 






Chauffeur 






Assembler 






Chemist 






Automobile mecht 


mic 




Cigar maker 






Automobile painte 


r 




Civil engineer 






Barber 






Civil Service 






Battery repairer ai 


id charger 




Clerk 






Blueprint reader a 


nd estimator 




Cloth designer 






Bookkeeper 






Clothes presser 






Bricklayer 






Composition and p 


ress worke 


r 


Brush maker 






Compositor 






Buffer 






Comptometer oper 


ator 




Cabinet make 


r 






Cook 









P.D. 2. 

Coremaker 

Cornet player 

Dental mechanic 

Dictaphone operator 

Dietitian 

Die reamer 

Domestic science 

Draftsman 
Architectural 
Electrical 
Mechanical 

Dressmaker 

Duco worker 

Edge trimmer 

Electrician 

Electrician's helper 

Engineer 

Engraver 

Estimator 

Factory worker 

Farmer 

Filing clerk 

First class lineman 

Florist 

Foreman laborer 

Forging inspector 

Furniture finisher and repairer 

Furniture finisher 

Fur worker 

Garage helper 

Gas engine operator 

Gilder 

Goodyear stitcher 

Greenhouse management and orna- 
mental planter 

Groundman and lineman 

Hairdresser 

Heating and ventilating 

Industrial chemist 

Inspector of radio cabinets 

Insurance collector 

Janitor 

Land title examiner 

Linotype operator 

Machine designer 

Machine shop inspector 

Machinist 

Mattress maker 

Mechanical accountant 

Mechanical dentist 

Merchandiser 

Mill hand 

Milliner 

Monotype operator 

Multigraph operator 

Nursery attendant 

Oiler 

Painter 

Painter and paper hanger 

Pattern maker 



51 



Photo engraver 

Photo etcher 

Photographer 

Piano action maker 

Piano polisher 

Picture frame maker and gilder 

Picture framer 

Plan drawing 

Plan drawing (electrical) 

Plan reading 

Plaster modeller 

Poultry keeper 

Power machine stitcher 

Printer 

Press feeder 

Proof reader 

Radio operator 

Radio repairman 

Rattan worker 

Reed worker 

Routing machine operator 

Secretary 

Sheet metal worker 

Shoe repairer 

Shoe stitcher 

Shoe treer 

Shoe vamper 

Show card writer 

Sign painter 

Skiver 

Social worker 

Solderer 

Spinner 

Stained glass window maker 

Stationary engineer 

Stationary fireman 

Stenographer 

Stock boy 

Stock clerk 

Surveyor 

Tailor 

Telegraph operator 

Telephone assembler 

Time keeper 

Tool designer 

Tool maker 

Trade design 

TraflSc manager 

Typist 

Upholsterer 

Watch and clock repairer 

Watch maker 

Weaver 

Welder (electric) 

Welder (oxy-acetyline) 

Window dresser 

Wood turner 

Wood worker 

Wool comber 

Wool sorter 



52 . P.D. 2. 

Table D 
Employment Study of Rehabilitants from August 21, 1921, to November 30, 1928 



Total number 
in group 
studied 



Number 
employed 



Total wage of 

employed for 

one week 



Average wage 
of employed 
for one week 



Average wage 

for whole group 

studied for 

one week 



Before disability 
After disabihty and 

before reference 
After disability and 

at date of reference 
After disability and 

after rehabilitation 



675 
675 
675 
675 



236 

97 

675 



511,912 04 

4,445 07 

1,734 49 

13,556 97 



$23 92 
18 88 
17 88 
20 08 



$17 65 

6 59 

2 57 

20 08 



Table E ■ 
Study of Weekly Wages Prior to and Subsequent to Disability 



Specified Weekly Wage 




Total 
number 
earning 


Number Earning Specified Weekly Wages 
AFTER Reference to Rehabilitation Section 


BEFORE Disability 


Less 
than 
$10 


$10 and 
less 
than 
$20 


$20 and 
less 
than 
$30 


$30 and 
less 
than 
$40 


$40 and 
less 
than 
$50 


$50 and 
over 


No wages . 

Less than $10 

$10 and less than $20 

$20 and less than $30 

$30 and less than $40 

$40 and less than $50 

$50 and over 








177 
22 
147 
188 
101 
32 
8 


14 
3 

7 
5 
1 

1 


126 
11 
86 
63 
31 
7 
2 


28 
6 

44 
100 

36 

10 
3 


8 
2 

9 

16 

29 

8 

1 


1 

1 
3 
3 
4 
1 


1 

1 
3 


Totals . 








675 


31 


326 


227 


73 


13 


5 



Period of Time from Reference to Rehabilitation 




Period of Time 


Number 


Per Cent 


Less than 3 months .... 
3 months or over, but less than 6 months 
6 months or over, but less than 1 year . 

1 year or over, but less than 2 years 

2 years or over, but lesf than 3 years 

3 years or over, but less than 4 years 

4 years or over, but less than 5 years 

5 years or over ..... 














61 

76 
182 
192 
112 

32 
9 

11 


8.915 

11.292 

26.894 

28.528 

16.641 

4.754 

1.337 

1.634 


Total 














675 


100.000 



DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION AND 
NORMAL SCHOOLS 

NORMAL SCHOOLS 

In connection with the meeting in Boston of the American Association of Normal 
Schools and Teachers' Colleges, the establishment of the first State normal school 
in America was commemorated with appropriate exercises in Horace Mann Audi- 
torium at the Bridgewater State Normal School on February 26, 1928. Dwight 
B. Waldo, President, Western State Normal School, Kalamazoo, Mich., was the 
presiding officer. Four addresses were given: "Bridgewater Achievements," by 
Arthur C. Boyden, Principal, State Normal School, Bridgewater; "Massachusetts 
— Mother of Normal Schools," by Frank W. Wright, Director, Division of Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools; "The Yesterday of 
Teacher Training," by Albert E. Winship, Editor, Journal of Education, Boston; 
and "The Development of Teacher Training in the West," by David Felmley, 
President, Illinois State Normal University, Normal, 111. 

With the opening of school in September, 1928, the two-year course was elimi- 
nated at the normal schools at Lowell and Westfield. It was decided to eliminate 



P.D. 2. 53 

the two-year course at Bridgewater, Salem, and Worcester with the opening of 
school in September, 1929. 

In the last annual report of the Department a full report of the development of 
teacher-training in Massachusetts was printed. Certain developments of the 
past year should be added. 

The General Court of 1928 appropriated $82,000 for the construction of a new 
power plant at the Bridgewater State Normal School. A new site at Longwood 
and Brookline avenues, Boston, was purchased for the Massachusetts School of 
Art. This site of 99,503 square feet was purchased for $109,720.16. In addition 
to an appropriation of $150,000 in 1928, for land and building, the General Court of 
1929 appropriated $450,000 toward the erection of the new building. An ap- 
propriation of $7,000 was also made ^vith which additional land was purchased at 
the Fitchburg State Normal School to enlarge the play field. 

CONFERENCES AND INSTITUTES 

In the first Annual Report of the Massachusetts Board of Education for the 
year 1838, Edward Everett, Chairman of the Board, referring to the act of the 
Legislature creating the Board said: 

"It is made the duty of the Secretary, 'under the direction of the 
board, to collect information of the actual condition and efficiency of the 
common schools and other means of popular education; and to diffuse 
as widely as possible, throughout every part of the Commonwealth, in- 
formation of the most approved and successful methods of arranging the 
studies and conducting the education of the young.' 

"The limited powers conferred on the board left them scarce any dis- 
cretion in the choice of the means by which they could enable their secre- 
tary to discharge his duty as thus prescribed. It was necessary to depend 
most exclusively on the voluntary co-operation of the people; and no way 
suggested itself in which this co-operation could be given so effectually, 
as through the medium of conventions called in each county of the Com- 
monwealth, to be composed of teachers, school-committeemen, and the 
friends of education generally, deputed from the several towns to attend 
these conventions." 

From this beginning by Horace Mann, the convention or conference method of 
strengthening and developing the efficiency of the public schools has gone on until 
it is now one of the most important activities of the Department. 

Conferences were held in 1928, as follows: 

Superintendents of Schools. — The Fourteenth Annual Conference of Superin- 
tendents of Schools was held at Bridgewater State Normal School on April 16-18, 
1928. "Some Results in Modern Education" was the general topic of discussion. 
The principal addresses were: "Conflicting Currents in American Education," by 
Walter E. Ranger, Commissioner of Education, Providence, R. I.; "Using the 
Community," by Mrs. Cornelia J. Cannon, President, Public School Association, 
Cambridge; "Examples of Education in Practice," by Roscoe W. Thatcher, Presi- 
dent, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst; "Recent Scientific Studies of 
School Subjects" and "Responsibility for the Training of Teachers," by Charles 
H. Judd, Director, School of Education, University of Chicago. 

Junior and Senior High Schools. — The Annual Conference of Principals of 
Junior and Senior High Schools was held at Framingham State Normal School 
on May 1-3, 1928. A part of this conference was given over to reports and discus- 
sion on the work of two research studies, namely: "Recognition of Superior Merit 
in High Schools" and "Organization of High Schools." Addresses were given as 
follows: "Athletics as a Factor in Education," by Alfred E. Stearns, Principal, 
Phillips Academy, Andover; "Administration of Athletics," by William J. Bing- 
ham, Director of Athletics, Harvard University; an address by John J. Tigert, 
United States Commissioner of Education; "Administration of Extra-curricular 
Activities," by Francis T. Spaulding, Professor of Education, Graduate School of 
Education, Harvard University; "Some Important Problems of Administration 
in Secondary Schools," by Franklin W. Johnson, Professor of Education, Teachers' 



54 P.D. 2. 

College, Columbia University; "College Material," by J. Edgar Park, President, 
Wheaton College, 

Normal School Instructors. — The Eleventh Annual Conference of State Normal 
Schools was held at Bridgewater on September 4-7, 1928. The program included 
a round-table discussion, reports of research studies, and addresses as follows: 
"Classroom Films," by Dr. Thomas E. Finegan, President, Eastman Teaching 
Films, Inc., Rochester, N. Y.; "Some Elements of a State Program for the Prepara- 
tion of Teachers," by Dr. A. B. Meredith, Commissioner of Education, Hartford, 
Conn.; "The Significance of the Teaching Profession for Home Civilization" and 
"The New Education and Its Demands upon the Preparation of Teachers," by 
Dr. Peter Petersen, University of Jena. 

Music Supervisors. — The Fifth Conference of Music Supervisors was held at the 
Massachusetts School of Art on January 27, 1928. The program consisted of 
demonstrations, discussion, and addresses. Among the addresses given were the 
following: "Recent Tendencies in Evaluating Music," by Peter W. Dykema, 
Professor of Music, Teachers' College, Columbia University; "The Value of the 
Study of Music Appreciation in the Appreciation of Symphonies," by John P. 
Marshall, Professor of Music, Boston University; and in the "Appreciation of 
Operas," by Mrs. James A. Moyer, Newton. "The Value of State and Inter- 
State Meets in the Development of School Music" was given by Mrs. William 
Arms Fisher, Boston. 

Art Teachers. — The Sixth Annual Conference of Art Teachers was held at the 
Massachusetts School of Art on December 7, 1928. The program included ad- 
dresses on "The Creative Spirit," by Rollo Walter Brown, Teacher, Lecturer, and 
Author; and "Prague and the International Congress," by Royal B. Farnum; 
sectional meetings, and a practical demonstration of "Pottery — A Valuable 
School Craft." 

Physical Education. — The Fourth State Conference of Directors and Instructors 
in Physical Education was held on March 2 and 3, 1928. The session on Friday 
was held in Gardner Auditorium, State House, and on Saturday morning in the 
Runkle School Gymnasium, Brookline. There were about six hundred teachers 
and supervisors in attendance. 

Among the speakers were: 

Allen G. Ireland, State Supervisor of Physical Education, Connecticut. Freder- 
ick Rand Rogers, State Supervisor of Physical Education, New York. Jay B. 
Nash, Professor in Department of Education, New York University. Ruth 
Elliott, Director, Department of Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley Col- 
lege. James Edward Rogers, Director, National Physical Education Service. 
W. A. Berdick, State Supervisor of Physical Education, Maryland. E. H. Arnold, 
Director, Arnold College, New Haven. 

The morning of Saturday was given over to demonstration of gymnasium work. 

The conferences for teachers and supervisors of physical education in the public 
schools have been a great aid in promoting improved programs of physical and 
health education throughout the State. 

School Committees. — During the year conferences for school committee members 
were held at Worcester, New Bedford, Lowell, Northampton, and Boston. Con- 
sideration was given at these meetings to the health of school children and financing 
education. The remainder of the programs was given over to the discussion of 
school committee problems, led by school committee members, and a general 
question box. 

Special Class Teachers. — This is the second year conferences have been held 
for this group of public school teachers. Springfield, Worcester, Boston, Bridge- 
water, and Salem were centers where the regional conferences were held. At each 
of these conferences an address was given with reference to determining the men- 
tality of children. Doctors Green, Raymond, and Woodward of the Walter E. 
Fernald State School, Waverley, spoke on this subject, as well as Dr. George E. 
Dawson, Director of the Psychological Laboratory, School Department, Springfield. 
At the Boston Meeting, Dr. Wilham Healy, Director of the Judge Baker Founda- 
tion, gave an address on "Understanding the Mentally Retarded Child." Dr. 



P.D. 2. 



55 



George L. Wallace of the Wrentham State School spoke on this subject at the 
Bridgewater meeting, and Dr. George E. McPherson of the Belchertown School 
at the Springfield meeting. Miss Frances E. Cheney of Northampton spoke at 
Bridgewater, Worcester, and Salem, her subject being the "Relation of the Special 
Class Child to the Community." At all of the conferences there were demonstra- 
tions by school children and reports from the field from special class teachers. 

Health Conferences. — • The seventh annual series of regional conferences on school 
hygiene was conducted in 1928 under the joint auspices of the Department of 
Public Health and the Department of Education. The membership of the con- 
ferences was composed largely of school nurses, school physicians, teachers of 
physical training, superintendents and principals. Among the topics considered 
were the following: 

What We Mean by a Community Nutrition Program. 

Nutrition in a School Program. 

Methods of Teaching as Applied to Health and Nutrition. 

Nutrition and Dental Hygiene. 

Dental Service for Children. 

Dental Health Education. 

The location and enrolment of these conferences were as follows: 





Towns and 


Number 




Cities repre- 


present 




sented 




November 20, Pittsfield . 


30 


34 


November 21, Westfield .... 


50 


72 


November 23, Worcester .... 


49 


71 


November 26, Bridgewater 


62 


106 


November 27, Salem .... 


42 


77 



Totals 233 360 

Teachers' Institutes. — During the past year six institutes were conducted for 
the special benefit of teachers in the smaller towns of the Commonwealth. The 
speakers were largely members of the department staff and State normal school 
faculties. Among the subjects discussed were the following: 

Play Activities. 

Progress of Education Abroad. 

Measuring the Classroom Product. 

Suggestions for the Teaching of Reading and Literature. 

Purposeful Teaching. 

The Use of Problems in Geography Teaching. 

Some Applications of Psychology to Classroom Method. 

Blackboard Drawing as an Aid to Teaching. 

Problems in Oral Expression. 

What Constitutes Good Teaching. 

Types of Teaching. 

The location of these institutes, the number of teachers in attendance, and the 
number of towns represented are given below : 



September 17, Chatham 
September 21, Athol 
September 24, Spencer 
October 1, Chester 
October 5, Webster 
October 19, Nantucket 



Towns 


Number 


represented 


present 


11 


115 


11 


253 


7 


96 


14 


103 


6 


193 


6 


58 



Totals 



55 



818 



56 P.D. 2. 

THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF 

Since 1867, Massachusetts has made some provision for the education of deaf 
children. At first pupils were placed in the "Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb" at 
Hartford, Conn. Later, after the establishment of schools for the deaf within the 
State, a part of the pupils were sent to these schools. 

Existing laws of Massachusetts relating to the education of the deaf provide for 
the placing of such children in boarding schools and day classes for the deaf at the 
expense of the Commonwealth. The law provides that the Department of Educa- 
tion "shall direct and supervise the education of all such pupils." 

An attendance law, chapter 227, Acts of 1928, provides: 

"Every person in control of a deaf child between seven and eighteen shall cause 
such child to attend some suitable school approved by the department, where the 
deaf are taught speech and speech reading; provided, that this section shall not 
apply to such a child whose mental condition or whose physical condition in other 
respects than deafness is such as to render such attendance inexpedient or imprac- 
tical or who is being given private instruction, approved by the department, during 
the time the public schools are in session. Failure for one month during any school 
year by any person in control of such a child to cause his attendance as aforesaid 
shall, on complaint by a supervisor of attendance, be punished by a fine of not more 
than twenty dollars." 

This law will undoubtedly bring the few isolated cases which have not had the 
advantages of special training into the special schools. 

During the present school year, the State is educating pupils at the following 
schools: 

Enrolment 
Boarding schools: November 

30, 1928 

American School for the Deaf, West Hartford, Conn. . 18 

Beverly School for the Deaf, Beverly . . . . 64 

Boston School for the Deaf, Randolph .... 204 

Clarke School for the Deaf, Northampton . . . 130 

Day schools: 

Horace Mann School, Boston ..... 158 

Lynn Day Class, Lynn ....... 23 

Worcester Day Class, Worcester ..... 10 

Springfield Day Class, Springfield ..... 13 

The past ten years has seen much progress in this special type of education. 
The Boston School at Randolph has erected a fine commodious school building with 
ample provision for present-day needs and a normal growth. This school is in 
charge of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph. For the past few years 
the society has followed the practice of sending two nuns annually for the course in 
teacher-training offered at the Clarke School. 

The Beverly School for the Deaf has erected a new dormitory and a shop for 
manual training. These additions to the plant enable the school to offer a well- 
rounded program of study. Vacancies in the teaching force have in every case 
been filled by teachers who have had at least one year of special training for teaching 
the deaf in addition to normal or college training. 

The Clarke School is completing a drive for a $2,000,000 endowment fund. With 
new buUdings and the establishment of a research department, the Clarke School 
of the future will make even greater contributions to the cause than ever before. 

The Horace Mann School now has a beautiful new thirty-room building with an 
auditorium, gymnasium, lunch room, and shops. These facilities will allow an 
expansion in the program, particularly with reference to physical education and 
manual and domestic arts. 

The Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children found it necessary to close the 
school in 1925. The trustees have used a part of their income for the employment 
of an experienced teacher of the deaf, who visits the homes of deaf children of pre- 
school age. She gives the mothers instruction as to training the children and also 



P.D. 2. 57 

instructs the children in a limited degree. This service will be a valuable contribu- 
tion to the education of the deaf in Massachusetts. These children, when they 
enter school, will adjust themselves to the changed environment and progress more 
rapidly than would have been the case without this pre-school training. 

The day classes for the deaf are all located in school buildings with regular classes. 
The children, in some instances, are successfully taking handwork and physical 
education with normal children in other classes of their own chronological age. 
The academic work in these classes is limited to the primary grades. The pupils 
are transferred to the Horace Mann School or to a boarding school after completing 
the work offered. 

Such handwork as is offered in the schools for the deaf is given primarily for its 
pre-vocational values, as is the work in the junior high schools. The definite teach- 
ing of vocations is not attempted. We have realized that some system of voca- 
tional training should be offered these pupils after they complete the course in the 
special schools. The Division of Vocational Education, through its Rehabilita- 
tion Section, has, in part, met this need. During the past seven years, 131 pupils 
have received assistance. The Section assists pupils in getting jobs and, when 
necessary, trains pupils for some particular work. 

Fifty-three pupils, who were given courses in lip reading, were employed in naost 
cases, and the lip reading was given for the purpose of making them more efficient 
with their employment. Of this number, 30 persons were placed in employment 
without vocational training. The remainder were placed after training into occupa- 
tions listed below : 



Typesetter 
Packer 
Office work 
Specker 
Clerk 

Pocketbook binder 
Winding coils 
Stitcher 

Head cataloguer 
Photo etcher 
Assembler 
Engrosser 
Upholsterer 
Cabinetmaker 
Tearing and folding 
pillow slips 



Typist 

Teacher 

Housemaid 

Cigar maker 

Housekeeper 

Stenographer 

Milliner 

General helper 

Night porter 

Chipper 

Stableman 

Mail clerk 

Helper 

Janitor 

Dietitian 

Radiophone worker 



Piano action maker 
Ticketing cloth 
Linotype operator 
Shoe sole sorter 
Maid 

Coloring cards 
Heel setter 
Assistant to printing 

superintendent 
Billing clerk 
Land title examiner 
Multigraph operator 
Picture frame maker and 

gilder 



Several pupils, who were graduated from schools for the deaf last June, are now 
being trained in the Massachusetts vocational schools. It is hoped that more and 
more of those pupils who do not go into high schools may receive worth-while voca- 
tional training in these schools. Such training will assure them a secure place in 
their community when they may become self-supporting, self-respecting and 
respected citizens. 

As we look back over the past ten years here in Massachusetts, we see an increase 
in the number of teachers with special training; the beginning of systematic home 
training with children of pre-school age; the establishment of a department of 
research at Clarke School; a start in vocational training; and increased facilities 
through the opening of day classes. 

The next ten years will see an increased emphasis on pre-school work, research, 
and vocational training and guidance. 



58 



P.D. 2. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



The findings printed below are from a survey made last year and cover a period of 
five years, namely, from 1922, the year the physical education law became opera- 
tive, up to 1927: 

Facilities for Physical Education 







High Schools 
1922 - 1927 


Junior High Schools 
1922 - 1927 


Elementary Schools 
1922 - 1927 


Gymnasiums . 
Auditoriums . 
Basements 
Playgrounds . 
Athletic fields 




47 101 
37 36 
32 15 
61 97 
91 133 

Equipment 


24 
33 
19 
52 
38 


73 
34 
36 
97 
66 


25 

48 

81 

225 

61 


63 
106 

144 

778 

77 






1922 - 1927 


1922 - 


- 1927 


1922 - 


1927 


Heavy apparatus 
Hand apparatus 
Play equipment 
Showers 




38 65 
50 68 
44 83 
44 94 

Teaching Staff 


19 

27 
41 
18 

1922 - 


43 
85 
99 
61 

- 1927 


15 
44 
99 

17 


34 
183 
441 

19 




Elementary schools 
Junior high schools 
High schools ..... 


83 
56 
62 


409 
197 
180 







Total 



201 



786 



Pupil Participation 
The increase in mass participation is commensurate with the increase in better 
facilities and manifests itself best in the number of intramural teams in the various 
types of physical education activities throughout the State in 1927 when compared 
with 1922: 

Intramural Teams 











Senior High School 


Junior High School 


Elementary Schools 




1922 


1927 


1922 


1927 


1922 


1927 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Baseball 


260 


60 


558 


88 


258 


109 


398 


97 


134 


64 


394 


99 


Football 








126 


— 


356 


_ 


37 


— 


200 


— 


50 


— 


217 


— 


Soccer . 








54 


51 


i:^7 


4 


85 


50 


179 


46 


29 


2 


83 


23 


Field hockey 








3 


81 


— 


216 


5 


4 


12 


60 


5 


3 


7 


152 


Ice hockey 








59 




20 


— 


9 


— 


9 


4 


15 


— 


62 


6 


Basket ball 








291 


204 


704 


406 


131 


59 


533 


291 


118 


59 


712 


534 


Volley ball 








28 


54 


137 


115 


25 


62 


115 


117 


46 


132 


51 


109 


Indoor baseball 






46 


39 


39 


10 


15 


51 


9 


51 


34 


12 


35 


118 


Field and track 






163 


31 


151 


194 


106 


10 


162 


107 


274 


49 


183 


65 


Handball 






— 


2 


4 


2 


4 


4 


82 


2 


21 


13 


1 


3 


Tennis . 






52 


43 


16 


3 


7 


5 


13 


33 


3 


3 


82 


150 


Other activities 






- 


- 


102 


58 


"" 


~ 


188 


434 


~ 


~ 


70 


60 



During the past year, three new courses of study were issued — two for physical 
education in the elementary schools, and one on safety education. 

At the two summer normal schools, Hyannis and North Adams, courses in health 
and physical education have been offered for the past six years. The University 
Extension Division offered for the first time a special course in administration of 
physical education, which was well attended. 

TEACHERS' REGISTRATION BUREAU 
During the year 1927-1928, the Teachers' Registration Bureau enrolled 2,499 
teachers, received notice of 778 vacancies, and placed 316 teachers, with an aggre- 
gated salary of $434,620 for full-time teachers. The average salary of the posi- 
tions filled, exclusive of substitute positions, was $1,415.70 — a decrease of $25.53 
from the average salary of last year. 



P.D. 2. 

The number of new registrants having no experience was 1,655. 
are classified as follows: 

Positions Desired 
High school . 
Elementary . 
Grammar and junior high 
Commercial 
Household arts 
Physical education 
Manual training 
Drawing 
Music . 
Sewing . 
Kindergarten . 
Miscellaneous 

Totals 1,302 

The number of teachers placed by the bureau from 1913 to 1928, together with 
the estimate of the aggregate salaries, is indicated in the following table: 



Superintendents of schools 
High school principals 
Elementary school principals 
High school teachers 
Elementary school teachers 
Special teachers 
Normal school teachers . 
Substitutes 





59 


Ls 1,655. 


These teachers 


Women 


Men 


407 


254 


282 


- 


245 


13 


77 


16 


67 


- 


81 


27 


- 


80 


18 


6 


27 


5 


5 


- 


92 


- 


1 


2 



353 



Teachers Placed 








1913-24 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


Totals 


22 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


22 


151 


8 


8 


16 


8 


191 


108 


5 


10 


6 


5 


134 


937 


99 


128 


115 


95 


1,374 


. 2,072 


197 


163 


157 


141 


2,730 


766 


70 


75 


51 


57 


1,019 


17 


4 


8 


4 


1 


34 


180 


13 


11 


28 


9 


241 


4,253 


396 


403 


377 


316 


5,745 


$4,039,513 


$511,730 


$532,480 


$503,000 


$434,620 $6,021,343 



Estimated aggregate salaries of teach 
ers placed . 

CERTIFICATION OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS 
The Department of Education, as required by section 66 of chapter 71 of the 
General Laws, determines by examination or otherwise the qualifications of can- 
didates for the position of superintendent of schools in a superintendency union. 
In accordance with the above provisions of law, six certificates were issued in 1928. 
The classes and number of certificates issued by the Department since the law 
first went into effect are as follows: permanent certificates, 3; preliminary certifi- 
cates, 133; term certificates, 192. 

EDUCATION OF DEAF AND BLIND CHILDREN 

Enrolment in Special Schools for the Blind and Deaf 







En- 
roUed 
Sep- 
tember, 
1927 


Ad- 
mitted 

in 
1927-28 


Dis- 
charged 

1927-28 


Enbolled Septembeb, 
1928 


En- 
rolled 
Nov. 
30, 1928 


State 

expenditures 

for 

tuition 




Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Blind 
Perkins Institution 

Deaf 
American School 
Beverly School . 
Boston School . 
Clarke School . 
Horace Mann School . 
Day Class, Lynn 
Day Class, Springfield 
Day Class, Worcester 




175 

21 

59 

205 

130 

148 

20 

10 


24 

2 
67 
18 

6 
27 

2 

5 


21 

6 
13 
16 

4 
26' 

6 

5 


92 

11 

31 

117 

65 

78 
17 
4 
5 


86 

7 

33 

90 

63 

74 

4 

6 

5 


178 

18 

64 

207 

128 

152 

21 

10 

10 


183 

18 

64 

204 

130 

158 

23 

13 

9 


$67,740 00 

10,750 00 
41,059 09 
78,564 47 
107,442 71 
58,627 91 
3,194 11 

1,711 25 


Totals 




768 


151 


97 


420 


368 


788 


802 


$369,089 54 



1 13 were graduated. 



60 P.D. 2. 

DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 

During the past year, there were 36,559 student enrolments for instruction in 
the Division of University Extension. This raises the total registration to 329,873. 
This year's enrolment was distributed as follows: 3,169 in correspondence courses, 
32,363 in classes, and 1,027 in radio courses. Classes were organized in sixty 
cities and towns. The number of towns reached is approximately the same as in 
recent years, but, as has been indicated in several previous reports, the current 
policy of exacting higher charges for State extension courses must necessarily 
restrict the formation of classes to the larger communities where those who can 
afford to pay the higher fees are more numerous. The expenditures for the year 
were $172,122.41. The total return to the State Treasury from fees for courses and 
for other educational services was $152,496.63. The net cost per student-year 
was $0.53. Thus, it will be seen that the cost to the Commonwealth for this con- 
siderable service was only $19,625.78. 

Necrology 
Charles Wesley Hobbs, Supervisor of Instruction, departed from the circle of 
his associates on the 28th of July. His death came after an illness of less than a 
month and was entirely unexpected. His loss is a severe one. Mr. Hobbs had 
been a member of the staff of the division since its inception. He was a man of high 
scholarly attainments, broad experience and generous character. His work has 
left a permanent impress on the records of the Division of University Extension. 
In reverence and respect for his admirable manhood to which many with whom he 
came in contact were deeply indebted, his associates of the Division of University 
Extension drew up the following memorial which was inscribed on parchment, 
framed, and placed in the instructors' room beneath a picture of Mr. Hobbs, to 
stand as a slight monument to his influence. 

IN MEMORIAM 
CHARLES WESLEY HOBBS 

On the twenty-eighth day of July, 1928, our respected supervisor and 
beloved friend, Charles W. Hobbs, passed out of this life. 

We, his associates in Massachusetts University Extension, with sorrow 
mourn his departed presence and with humility strive to pay an adequate 
tribute to his splendid character. 

Realizing as we do the enormity of this task, it is fitting that we select 
only a few from among the many shining qualities which illuminated his 
personality. 

Some who knew him will wish to speak of his cultured mind and keen 
intelligence, others of his broad interest and tolerant opinions, others still, 
of his sagacious criticism and skillful pen, but all who had the privilege of 
coming within the radius of his influence will cherish the recollection of his 
warm friendliness, his sympathetic disposition and his genuine humanity. 

Charles Wesley Hobbs, man of honor, of integrity, of wit, of gentleness, 
of charity, of all the qualities that go to make up true nobility, we, with 
infinite sadness bow our heads in recognition of your passing, firm in con- 
viction that your memory will live long in the hearts of those whom you 
have left behind. 

"Farewell! a word that must be, 
A sound that makes us linger, 
Yet, Farewefl." 

Courses for the Degree of Bachelor op Science in Education 
In conjunction with the Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and 
Normal Schools, the Division of University Extension has arranged a plan of 
instruction whereby teachers in service who are graduates of the two, three, or four- 
year courses of the State Normal Schools may, by a program of part-time study, 
complete the work required for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education at 
the State Normal Schools located in Bridgewater and Worcester. Under the 
plan as arranged, the equivalent of one year of normal school study may be com- 



P.D. 2. 



61 



pleted through University Extension courses. The first of these courses were 
offered in February, 1928. The following tabulation gives a list of subjects, centers, 
and the number of students enrolled in courses. 



Boston: 

Educational Tests and Measurements I 

Educational Tests and Measurements II 

Psychology of Adolescence I . 

Psychology of Adolescence II . 

Psychology of Adolescence (Summer) 

Advanced English Literature . 
North Adams : 

Advanced English Literature (Summer) 

Art Supervision (Summer) 

Regional Geography (Summer) 
Pittsfield: 

Methods of Teaching Intermediate and Junior High School 
Grades ......... 

Salem : 

Advanced English Literature (Summer) .... 
Springfield : 

Psychology of Adolescence (Summer) .... 

Problems in United States History under the Constitution 
(Summer) ......... 

Methods of Teaching Health Education .... 

Twentieth Century Novel ...... 

Sociology . . . . . . 

Westfield: 

Methods of Teaching in Intermediate and Junior High 
School Grades I ....... 

Methods of Teaching in Intermediate and Junior High 
School Grades II . . . 

Educational Measurements I . 

Educational Measurements II 
Worcester: 



Teachers 
enrolled 

34 

27 
33 
23 
18 
' 25 

28 

9 

14 



41 
13 



Principles of Sociology I . . 

Principles of Sociology II 

Educational Tests and Measurements 

School Methods I . . . 

Educational Tests and Measurements 

School Methods II . . . 
Advanced English Literature (Summer) 
United States History (Summer) 
French IV (Summer) 
Advanced English Literature . 
Modern European History 
Psychology of Adolescence 



and 
and 



Secondary 
Secondary 



24 

14 
39 
61 
22 



44 

20 
40 

24 

42 

26 

46 

23 
11 

24 
9 
26 
20 
32 



The courses listed under North Adams were arranged as part of the residence 
summer program at the State Normal School. These courses accommodated 
teachers from all parts of the State who were able to take, in the six weeks of resi- 
dence there, three credit courses of two points each. 

New Courses 
The following courses were added to the curriculum of University Extension 
subjects for the first time. With the exception of the course in Virgil, all the 
subjects were given by the class method of instruction: International Affairs; Penal 
Institution Administration and Routine; Personal Development in Business; Piano 
Playing; Traveler's French; Practical Applications of Mental Hygiene; Great 
Political Thinkers; Interpretative Piano Playing; Methods of Teaching Woodwork- 
ing; Psychology of Great Men; Visual Aids in Teaching; Airplane Design; Funda- 



62 P.D. 2. 

mental Theory and Practice in Aeronautics; Theory and Operation of Aircraft En- 
gines; Navigation; Modern Merchandising; Virgil; Elementary Thermodynamics 
of the Automobile Engine. 

Projects of Special Interest 
Aeronautics 

Under the heading of Projects of Special Interest, at once comes to mind the courses 
in Aeronautics which were begun in the fall of 1927. The first course, entitled 
Fundamental Theory and Practice of Aeronautics, was given at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Cambridge, beginning on November 17. Mr. Walter F. 
Eade, member of the staff of the Department of Aeronautics at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, was the instructor. Thirty-two persons enrolled in this 
course. Later, similar courses were given in Lowell, Springfield and Worcester. 
In March, a request came in from a group residing in North Attleborough where 
interest in aviation was reported to be very intense. The course started in April 
and more than one hundred persons were present at the first meeting. All of these 
men and women did not enroll, however. In March and June, respectively, a 
second and third course were given in Cambridge at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. The enrolment in the course which began June 2, was sixty-eight 
persons, indicating an increase in registration that has been steady and consistent. 

In November, 1928, a program of three courses, namely. Elementary Aeronautics, 
Airplane Design and Theory and Operation of the Aircraft Engine, was offered in the 
buildings of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at Cambridge. 

Indications point to a consistent demand for instruction in Aeronautical subjects. 
Aside from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one or two commercially 
operated schools of uncertain educational standards. University Extension is the 
only educational institution in the State offering practical instruction in the general 
principles of aviation which are a necessary part of the training of men and women 
who hope to be mechanics or pilots or to occupy other positions in the aviation 
industry which require technical training. 

Mental Hygiene 

In co-operation with the Massachusetts Society for Mental Hygiene, the Division 
of University Extension arranged an extensive program of courses on practical 
applications of mental hygiene. Fourteen courses were offered in thirteen centers 
of the State and 1,137 students enrolled. The principal aim of these courses has 
been to provide practical information to nurses, teachers, parents and all others 
interested in the study of mental health. The instructors in these courses were 
mostly members of the staffs of State hospitals and were recruited by the Massa- 
chusetts Society for Mental Hygiene. In most cases, the lectures in every course 
were given by a specialist on some particular problem in mental hygiene. LTsually, 
the first lecture in a series, a discussion of the field of mental hygiene as related to 
public health, education, and social welfare, was given by a superintendent of a 
State hospital. It is well to remark here that the quality of instruction given by 
these men who are not professional teachers was of the highest calibre. This was 
due, no doubt, partly to a natural ability for clear expression on the part of many of 
the men, but the principal factor was the extremely careful preparation which all 
the lecturers gave to their subjects. The topics discussed in this series, in addi- 
tion to the one mentioned above, were as follows: Mental Hygiene of the Preschool 
Child; Hygiene of the Elementary School Child; Hygiene of Early Adolescence; Hy- 
giene of Late Adolescence; Special Danger Points of Life Periods; Special Needs of 
the Backward Child; Hygiene of Later Life. 

The following tabulation lists the courses in these subjects together with the 
number of enrolments: 



P.D. 2. 



Fall River . 
Greenfield 
Lawrence 
Lowell . 
New Bedford 
Springfield . 
Worcester 



Enrol- 




ments 




. 169 


Attleboro 


. 43 


Boston 


. 107 


Fitchburg 


. 78 


Holyoke . 


. 86 


Hyannis 


. 46 


Lynn . 


. 66 


Worcester 


* Child Psychology. 



63 

Enrol- 
ments 

40 
218* 

85 

35 

37 

56 

71* 



Cost of State University Extension Courses 
Supervisors of the Division of University Extension, whose work carries them 
into the four quarters of the State, still report that persons who favor the cor- 
respondence method of instruction are not satisfied with the charges for that in- 
struction. They contend that public education of this sort in elementary subjects 
should be witliin the means of all who desire it as was the case when University 
Extension was first established and for some years thereafter. 

Adult Alien Education 

The total enrolment for the year in 1,397 classes for the foreign-born was 25,101. 
There were 15,712 students registered in the 767 evening school classes; 2,708 
students in 186 factory classes; 2,335 students in 224 home classes, and 4,346 
students in 220 classes held in clubs and other centers. The total expenditure 
from the State Treasury for these men and women of foreign birth was $164,000. 
The cost per student in the adult alien group was $6.53 per student-year. 

These figures total exactly 22 less than those of the preceding year, despite the 
factor of restricted immigration. As a matter of fact, on account of this condi- 
tion, a new art in recruiting has been developed and, as a result, increasing numbers 
of adult immigrants who have hved in America for a considerable period are being 
brought into the classroom. Moreover, increased quality of instruction and larger 
accomplishment on the part of students themselves continue to attract new pupils. 
At present, there are perhaps 200,000 adult aliens in this State who are yet in need 
of school help. This figure is a conservative estimate, and it is possible that the 
number is considerably larger. In the development of the Americanization pro- 
gram, school systems have been benefited a great deal by co-operating organizations 
of both men and women. A State- wide survey shows some seventy-five such agen- 
cies, including service clubs, women's clubs, foreign-born societies, welfare organiza- 
tions, certain insurance companies, several State departments and many industries, 
working individually and also through the Associated Industries of Massachusetts. 
These agencies have contributed generously in receptions, patriotic meetings, 
participation in programs and pageants. They have presented pupils with prizes 
for good attendance, — flags, pictures, and citizenship manuals. There has also 
been a demonstration of their interest in the visits they have made to classes, efforts 
in recruiting, clerical aid, and financial support in providing speakers, giving enter- 
tainments, and paying for the transportation of pupils. The helps which these 
organizations have contributed have resulted in a clearer understanding of the 
work being done in this field and have created a better appreciation of the worth of 
it to both native and foreign born. 

Industrial Americanization, so-called, always a prominent feature of the_ Massa- 
chusetts plan, was characterized this year by an increased interest, resulting in a 
considerable and larger enrolment than for the preceding year. Over 2,700 stu- 
dents attended factory classes under the direction of trained public school teachers, 
organized and conducted in the plant itself. Each year many new adult students 
make their first direct contacts with adult alien education through opportunities 
offered in industry. Two hundred and twenty-four home classes, registering 2,325 
students, were conducted by qualified public school teachers in a large number of 
cities and towns. 

The home class has again proved its special value, having given school opportu- 
nity to thousands of mothers who are entirely unable to attend school-house classes, 
and many of whom were utterly illiterate. By the methods employed these moth- 



64 P.D. 2. 

ers learn to read and write with astonishing rapidity. Moreover, their lessons in 
English are enriched with new information about American social and economic 
customs, and their teachers are invariably sympathetic friends. 

In clubs and other centers there were registered last year 4,346 students. The 
necessary textbooks, notebooks, and teachers are provided by the local public 
school departments. It is noteworthy that the general membership of these various 
clubs has always been very co-operative. 

American history and government, supplemented by instruction in American 
political, social, economic, and cultural ideals is being presented to applicants for 
naturalization who attend citizenship classes, to the end that our foreign-born may 
understand the fundamentals which underlie civic responsibility. The schools in 
100 cities and towns in Massachusetts are serving this work. 

During the past five years, 2,500 teachers have enrolled for class instruction in 
the regular teacher-training course offered by the division entitled, "Methods of 
Teaching English to Adult Immigrants." This course consists of fifteen lecture- 
conferences of one and one-half hours each ; and in addition each student spends at 
least fifteen hours in supervised observation of adult immigrant classes, practice 
teaching, racial background visits, and discussion conferences. Professional im- 
provement courses for experienced teachers have been conducted in several cities 
and towns. The division also offers a correspondence course for teachers who 
cannot attend classes. 

As heretofore, six-week summer school courses for teachers of adult aliens were 
conducted at the Hyannis and North Adams Normal schools. Methods of teach- 
ing observation and practice work, thorough study of racial backgrounds, immigra- 
tion problems, naturalization and citizenship, Americanism and Americanization, 
were some of the many topics treated. This opportunity of studying the program 
of adult immigrant education intensively for a considerable period was again 
^accepted by a large number of students. 

DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

On November 30, 1928, the Division of Immigration and Americanization com- 
pleted its ninth year as successor to the Massachusetts Bureau of Immigration. 

The most outstanding accomplishment of the division during the past year has 
been the planned and accomplished extension of the work to cities of the Common- 
wealth not previously reached and increased service to those to which the work had 
already been extended. 

Two branches, Springfield and New Bedford, were established at the outset of 
the work to reach the western and southern sections of the State. Later, at the 
request of the citizens of Fall River, and because of the problem of illiteracy there, 
the Fall River office was opened. The fourth branch, Lawrence, centrally located 
in the manufacturing district of the Merrimack Valley, was established to reach 
Essex County and such parts of Middlesex County as are not easily accessible 
from Boston. 

The Springfield district has always been the largest from the point of view of 
territory, extending from the northern to the southern boundary of the State and 
from the western limit of the State to the eastern edge of Worcester County. Last 
May Worcester County was separated from the Springfield district and allocated 
to the Boston district. Under the old arrangement, it was possible only for the 
Springfield district immigration agent to visit the city of Worcester one evening a 
week and the other large cities and towns in the district once or twice a year. Under 
the new arrangement, a full day each week is devoted to the city of Worcester and 
two full days each month to Fitchburg and the adjacent communities of Leominster, 
Gardner and Clinton. The Springfield office, after the release of Worcester County, 
has extended the work to other sections of the western part of the State and a regular 
schedule is now maintained to Greenfield, Pittsfield, Adams, Northampton and 
Holyoke. 

The schedule of the Lawrence office has been materially changed in the past 
year and increased tune given to outlying districts. Formerly, the district immi- 
gration agent had a bi-monthly Sunday schedule for Haverhill and Lowell. Now 
a weekly schedule is maintained with an evening office hour at both cities. The 
cities and towns throughout the district have been visited and a contact made with 



P.D. 2. 



65 



some public official for reference of cases. A regular schedule of visits has been 
established for Gloucester, Amesbury, Peabody and Salem. 

The Fall River office has extended the work on a regular weekly schedule to 
Taunton where an office has been supplied by the city for an evening office hour 
once a week. 

The New Bedford office is so situated that it has not seemed practical to estab- 
lish any regular outposts for the work. The district immigration agent has gone to 
Brockton on particular cases and has co-operated with the school authorities there 
as requested. He has made contacts with several other communities, notably 
Provincetown, Wareham and Nantucket, and has made arrangements for reference 
of particular cases. The train and trolley connections are not good in the district, 
and because of this and other local conditions, no definite schedule of calls or sub- 
offices has been planned. 

At the present time the division maintains its principal office at the State House, 
Boston, and its branch offices at Fall River, Lawrence, New Bedford, and Spring- 
field. By co-operative efforts with local communities part-time service, either in 
the evening or afternoon, is maintained at Fitchburg, Worcester, Adams, Green- 
field, Holyoke, Northampton, Pittsfield, Taunton, Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, 
Haverhill, Lowell and Peabody. The extension of the work to these fourteen 
communities with no additional rental charges has been the distinct achievement of 
the past year. State-wide contacts have been made, by this extension work and 
through our regularly maintained offices, with nineteen localities situated at distant 
points throughout the State. 

DIVISION OF THE BLIND 

On December 1, 1928, there were 4,384 active cases, including 530 children, on 
the register of the blind in Massachusetts. Six years ago there were 3,888 cases 
on the register, including 519 children. During the year, the Division of the Blind 
was in touch with 2,554 adults to whom assistance was rendered as follows: 



Industrial aid in the form of guides, tools, or license to 

Financial aid 

Instruction by the home teacher 

Assistance in home work 

Assistance in the sale of products 

Information given to . 

Visits by field workers 

Visits by home teachers 

Lessons by home teachers . 

Friendly gifts: 

Vacations 

Loans and gifts . 

Flower Mission baskets 

Reading circles . 



22 

717 

353 

35 

120 

1,488 
2,594 
1,639 
3,554 

100 
307 
183 
300 



During the year 335 new cases of blindness in adults were reported to the Divi- 
sion of the Blind for investigation. Of these, 15 were found to be not legally blind, 
18 had moved out of the State, 8 had died, 69 were given instruction by home teach- 
ers, 89 were given information and advice, 31 were granted financial aid, 3 were 
found employment and 2 home work, 127 were found to be in no need of assistance, 
3 could not be located, and 45 cases were pending at the close of the year. 

The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary referred 237 cases of adults. 

Newly Registered Children 

During the year 480 children were referred to the division for investigation, of 
whom 271 were newly registered, and 209 were found to have too much vision to be 
registered after they secured proper attention for their eyes. Of the 271 newly 
registered cases, 115 were reported by the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
12 by other clinics, 9 by oculists in private practice, 105 by the school authorities, 
23 by individuals, and 7 by other organizations. 

There were twelve in the group who were totally blind; 5 from optic atrophy, 



66 P.D. 2. 

2 from complicated congenital cataracts, 2 from glioma, 1 from membranous 
conjunctivitis, 1 from metastatic ophthalmitis, and 1 from amblyopia. 

There were 69 who had vision of 20/200 or less; 149 with 20/50 or less; 35 with 
better than 20/50; and 6 whose vision could not be determined on account of 
infancy or mentality. 

The causes of blindness or low vision in this group were as follows : 



Myopia 

Nystagmus . 

Hyperopia . 

Corneal Opacities . 

Congenital Cataracts 

Atrophy of Optic Nerve 

Congenital Amblyopia . 

Albinism 

Muscle condition . 

Choroid and Retina condition 

Buphthalmos 

Dislocated crystalline lens 

Glioma 

Polycoria 

Microcorneae 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 

Membranous Conjunctivitis 

Blocked pupils 

Unknown 



36 

33 

33 

24 

17 

7 

6 

5 

3 

4 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 



Total 



271 



Sight-Saving Classes 



During the year the division arranged for the education of 105 children in sight- 
saving classes, 18 in Perkins Institution for the Blind, 4 in the Boston Nursery for 
Blind Babies, and 3 by the home teachers. 

Clear typed books were loaned to the schools for 38 children with low vision, 
living in communities not maintaining sight-saving classes. Through friendly 
sources, glasses were provided for 60 children. 

New sight-saving classes were opened in Boston and Medford, making 31 in the 
State, as follows: Boston (12), Brockton, Cambridge (2), Chelsea, Fall River (2), 
Holyoke, Lowell, Lynn, Mediford, New Bedford (2), Newton, Revere, Salem, 
Somerville, Springfield, Worcester (2). 

These sight-saving classes provide opportunities for the education with a mini- 
mum of eye strain for children with low vision from myopia, corneal opacities, 
congenital cataracts, albinism, dislocated crystalline lenses, and abnormal condi- 
tion of the optic nerve, choroid and retina. The amount of their vision in the bet- 
ter eye is seldom more than 20/50 or less than 20/200 with corrective glasses. The 
class work is adapted to reduce the eye strain through the use of desks with adjust- 
able tops to eliminate the stooping position, by the use of textbooks printed in 24 
point type, by an emphasis on aural instruction, and by carefully limiting to short 
periods of all work requiring close application. 

Industries 
The Cambridge Industries for the Blind furnished emplojmaent for 39 blind men 
in the broom shop, 7 in the mop shop and 7 in the rug shop. They manufactured 
11,622 dozen corn brooms, 5,652 dozen mops, and 777 rag rugs. The receipts from 
the sale of these products were S90,113.13, the expenditures were $139,067.60, 
making the net cost to the Commonwealth, $48,854.47. In the Fall River Work- 
shop, 11 blind men were employed. They manufactured 1,106 dozen brooms, and 
reseated 1,279 chairs. In the Lowell Workshop, 9 blind men were employed reseat- 
ing 2,216 chairs. In the Worcester Workshop, 9 blind men were employed, re- 
seating 4,163 chairs. In the Pittsfield Workshop, 20 blind men were employed 
manufacturing 1,929 dozen corn brooms and reseating 2,209 chairs. One man was 
employed in restringing tennis rackets. In the Woolson House Industries, 15 blind 



P.D. 2. 67 

women were employed. They reseated 1,592 chairs and produced woven articles 
valued at $7,452. The receipts from the chair shop amounted to $2,804.08. 

Through the Blindcraft Shop, the division helped 120 home workers sell their 
products. The shop sent out 8,015 pieces of work to be made up by the home work- 
ers, and received 11,363 finished pieces, including 3,877 pieces sent in on consign- 
ment. The shop held 61 sales, varying from a few hours to three weeks in length. 
Articles were shipped to 18 different states. A branch salesroom was also main- 
tained in Pittsfield to assist the home workers in the western part of the State. 
The total receipts of the Blindcraft Shop and the Woolson House Industries were 
$15,838.30. 

Home Instruction 

Seven home teachers were employed to give instruction to 353 pupils in their 
own homes, in reading Moontype, reading and writing Braille, pencil writing, 
basketry, reseating chairs, knitting, tatting, crocheting, sewing, rug making, raffia 
work, bead work, toy making, music, typewriting, and the common branches. 
During the year the teachers traveled 43,690 miles to give 3,554 lessons, and make 
1,639 visits. They also assisted their pupils to dispose of the products through 
local sales, especially during the holiday season. One teacher secured 500 chairs 
during the year for his pupils to reseat. 

Changes in industrial conditions have greatly handicapped the work of placing 
the younger blind in private industry. Positions were secured for 31, of whom 21 
were in housework. About 20 were assisted in canvassing. 

Financial Assistance 
Non-employment has resulted in an increased demand for financial assistance, 
either because the blind individual was unable to secure work, or because his family 
was less able to provide for him. Financial assistance in the sum of $132,633.64 
was given to 717 adults. An analysis of the list receiving aid in November, 1928, 
shows that financial aid was given as follows: 



iillojIi Lxiiiiii\jia,L aiu wao giv 

Persons between ages of: 
21 and 30 years 
31 and 40 years 
41 and 50 years 
51 and 60 years 
61 and 70 years 
71 and 80 years 
Over 80 years 

Total . 



Number 

17 

41 

73 

158 

150 

116 

48 

603 



It is noteworthy that 472, or 78 per cent, of those receiving financial aid, were 
over 50 years of age. The amount given to any individual varied according to the 
needs of the individual and the ability of his relatives and friends and local agencies 
to contribute. The division, by law, cannot undertake the permanent support 
of any individual. 

Local Co-operation 

The division has been fortunate in the loyal co-operation of local organizations 
in carrying on the work in several cities, notably in Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, 
Lawrence, Lowell, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Salem, Springfield and Worcester. 
Reading circles or sewing circles have been maintained in these cities, bringing 
happiness and an opportunity for social intercourse for about 300 blind men and 
women. Local organizations have also assisted in finding employment, conducting 
sales, and doing social welfare work. Through friendly sources, vacation trips 
were provided for 100, gifts and loans were made to 107, Flower Mission baskets for 
183, gifts were sent to 200 in homes, and readers were provided for 4 college 
students. Friendly associations have also made it possible for one of the staff to 
publish a weekly newspaper in Braille, and distribute it free of charge among 419 
readers in this State. 



P.D. 2. 



Receipts 



Cambridge Industries for Men 










$90,113 13 


Rug 






$3,182 77 




Mop .... 








24,081 71 




Broom 








61,553 38 




Cane .... 








1,295 27 




Woolson House and Salesroom 










15,838 30 


Local workshops 










42,159 47 


Pittsfield . 








17,406 84 




Lowell 








7,854 94 




Worcester . 








7,643 58 




Fall River . 








9,254 11 




Total receipts . 


$148,110 90 


Expenditures 




General administration ........ 


$39,705 74 


Administration . 






$38,466 27 




Industrial and educational aid 






1,239 47 




Local workshops 








69,664 26 


Pittsfield . 








29,272 94 




Lowell 








13,299 99 




Worcester . 








12,053 65 




Fall River . 








15,037 68 




Cambridge Industries for Men 










139,067 60 


Subsidy 








34,312 49 




Rug . 








6,849 69 




Mop .... 








24,042 08 




Broom 








71,161 67 




Cane .... 








2,701 67 




Woolson House Industries 










28,670 02 


Woolson House Industries 








15,514 18 




Home work 








8,517 08 




Salesroom . 








4,638 76 




Home teaching 










15,289 57 


Sight-saving classes 










15,208 34 


Relief .... 










132,633 64 



Total expenditure 



,239 17 



DIVISION OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Book Service. — Each public library must build up its own collection of books 
from its own appropriation to meet the tastes and demands of its community. 
The Division of Public Libraries can and does supplement these collections by 
means of loans and gifts to the small libraries with limited incomes. The lending 
library of adult non-fiction has grown rapidly in size and service in the last three 
years. It now numbers 1,036 volumes, 479 of them having been added during the 
past year. As it is built up largely in response to requests sent in from the smaller 
town libraries, there is significance in the fact that about one-third of the year's 
accessions and about one-third of the titles borrowed were books on education and 
child-training. Next to education the subjects most called for were biography, 
psychology, travel, and aviation. 

In all, 184 town libraries have borrowed 2,661 volumes, an increase of 78 towns 
and 1,140 volumes over the figures for 1927. Records from the towns show that 
these books have been borrowed by their townspeople from one to eleven times each, 
bringing the total circulation of our books to nearly 4,500. 

A printed catalog of all books in the lending library August first, together with a 
arge poster advertising this service, was sent in September to all but the city and 
arge town libraries. Catalogs were mailed from the Department of Education 
o all school superintendents and high school principals and to the State normal 
chools and continuation schools. The response was immediate and in the last 



P.D. 2. 69 

three months the circulation has almost doubled. Special requests for books not 
in the lending collection have been filled, in many instances, by loans from the 
Public Library of the city of Boston, the State Library, or the Brookline Public 
Library. 

Through the co-operation of teachers and superintendents in rural districts, the 
certificate reading has been taken up in additional isolated communities and the 
children are reading with eagerness. Reports show that 180 libraries have awarded 
approximately 20,000 certificates. 

Service to Librarians. — To aid untrained librarians in the smaller libraries, three 
courses in children's work, reference work, and cataloguing were given by the Divi- 
sions of University Extension and Public Libraries. One hundred and fifty-six 
librarians and assistants representing 74 libraries were enrolled, and these libraries 
report increased enthusiasm and efficiency. Library institutes are held during the 
spring vacation in the State normal schools of Hyannis, Fitchburg and Westfield 
in rotation. This year the Hyannis Normal School was host, and a five-day meet- 
ing was held with a registration of 90 from 60 libraries. Administrative, technical, 
and literary subjects were discussed with especial emphasis on the problem of 
extending the library's service in the community. 

Field Work. ■ — The field library adviser visits the small public libraries to help 
them by advice as to the most efficient and economical service. More than half of 
the 418 libraries in the State have less than 12,000 a year income and obviously 
cannot afford trained librarians. To assist these libraries is the primary function 
of the division. Larger libraries upon request are advised so far as time permits. 
One hundred and fifty-three visits of from one to four days' duration have been 
made and aid in reorganization given to 33 libraries, resulting in marked improve- 
ment of service. 

An annual return is received from every library indicating its standing and 
needs, and an effort is made to bring each up to the best standard consistent with its 
finances. The trustees ask for surveys, for help in securing competent librarians, 
for information on modern library methods, for advice in establishing village li- 
braries or small branches, for assistance in planning new buildings or making needed 
alterations in old, and on a multitude of similar problems. 

Schools. — The development of high school libraries is of increasing importance, 
and competent trained librarians are needed. Too often, part-time or retired 
teachers without library experience are appointed, and are expected to carry on the 
technical work, select and purchase books, and give to pupils instruction in the use 
of the library. A similar situation would arise if librarians were put in charge of 
schools and allowed to teach with no training or experience. As a result, the field 
library adviser is continually being called upon for advice. In one school, with an 
enrolment of over 1,500 pupils, a part-time teacher was put in charge of the library 
and instructed to catalog, weed out the present miscellaneous collection, and pur- 
chase several hundred dollars' worth of books. Similar situations have occurred 
elsewhere. What can be expected under these conditions? The field adviser 
spent several days with such librarians, outlining the first steps necessary, but ex- 
tended supervision, advice, and follow-up work are needed. The field adviser 
responds to the most urgent requests, but cannot begin to meet all demands. 
Seven high school libraries have been visited and in several cases arrangements 
made for the teacher-librarian to take courses or private instruction in school 
library work. 

The rapid growth of school libraries emphasizes the need of an assistant field 
worker who could help also in this important field. School libraries must not only 
be started right but must be under expert supervision. 

Visits have been made to three normal schools, and three conferences of normal 
school librarians have been arranged by the field adviser. In connection with the 
National Superintendent's Conference in Boston, a two-day meeting was held for 
normal school librarians with representatives from New York, Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, Wisconsin and Massachusetts. 

Institutions. — Visits have been made by the general secretary, who is in charge 
of institution library work, to the State prisons in Charlestown, Norfolk, Bridge- 
water, and Rutland, the Boston city prison at Deer Island, the Middlesex and 



70 P.D. 2. 

Hampden county training schools, the State cancer hospital at Norfolk, and the 
State sanatorium at Rutland. 

At the prison in Norfolk a new library is being built up from the beginning 
under the supervision of the general secretary. Books in general reading, refer- 
ence, and for the men learning English have been procured as gifts. The library 
has been catalogued and classified, and a brief and simple manual of procedure has 
been typed for the guidance of the untrained prison librarians. The charging sys- 
tem, as organized, will afford a check-up on the reading tastes of the men which 
should be of considerable value to social workers. 

A list of boys' books was made out at the request of the superintendents of the 
five county training schools, and new books selected for the "defective delinquent" 
boys and girls at Bridgewater and the men at the prison camp and hospital at 
Rutland. 

In all State and county institution libraries, two great needs are apparent — 
an annual budget for the purchase of new books and trained library service in the 
institutions. As it is, few institutions have money for the purchase of suitable 
books, and they depend almost entirely on gifts, which consist, in the main, of 
cast-offs from private libraries or of "remainders" from bargain counters of book- 
shops. It is now a proved fact that what a man or a child reads, especially the 
child, influences his outlook on life. Men and women, boys and girls within our 
correctional institutions read the books in their libraries, and these books should be 
carefully selected for their educational and inspirational and at the same time 
interesting qualities. The new penology endeavors to rehabilitate a man and 
makes use of every tool. Books are an important psychological tool. However, 
an institution may have a well selected and ample library and yet make little use 
of it. Personal service by someone who knows books and is able to make the con- 
nection between the library and the inmates is essential to efficient service. The 
general secretary has not the time to do the follow-up work necessary to such service; 
moreover, she is hampered in the men's prisons by her sex. With five State cor- 
rectional institutions and several county jails for men besides two State and five 
county training schools for boys, the value to the State of a male librarian to build 
up and supervise these institution libraries is apparent. The Board suggests the 
emplojTnent of such a person by the Department of Correction or the Division of 
Public Libraries. 

Work with the Foreign-born. — No service in connection with library work for the 
foreign-born is more in demand than aid in choosing books in a dozen different 
languages and books to help adult aliens learn English. Many persons working 
with foreigners also inquire about books on immigration, race problems, and the 
countries whence the Massachusetts immigrants come. Requests for information 
about dealers in foreign books have been so frequent that a list of recommended 
dealers was printed in the Massachusetts Library Club Bulletin, and reprints 
sent to the libraries. 

Book review meetings for librarians and Americanization workers have proved 
very useful and have been largely attended; many other meetings and round tables 
on problems in library work with foreigners have been held. At the request of the 
Division of University Extension, letters were sent to 35 libraries near Boston, ask- 
ing their co-operation with the Division of Public Libraries in offering books on 
collateral reading in connection mth a teacher-training course. Considerable 
work was also done in helping select the books recommended. In co-operation 
with public libraries at Hyannis and North Adams, the division offered collateral 
reading for teachers in training for Americanization work. 

SUMMAKY OF THE WORK OF THE DIVISION 

The various activities outlined in the foregoing report may be summarized as 
follows: 

Number of libraries given books and periodicals .... 115 

Number of libraries receiving aid in reorganization, mending, dis- 
carding ........... 33 

Number of library positions filled ...... 41 

Number of official visits to libraries ...... 183 

Number of addresses made by staff ...... 45 



P.D. 2. 71 

Number of libraries receiving general lending library loans . . 184 

Number of books lent 2,661 

Number of libraries loaned foreign books ..... 97 

Number of books lent ........ 5,376 

Number of languages represented ...... 22 

Number of libraries using State Reading certificates . . . 180 

Certificates awarded (approximately) ..... 20,000 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT BOARD 

Paragraph (4), Section 8, of the retirement law (General Laws, chapter 32, section 
8) reads as follows : 

"The board shall adopt for the retirement system one or more mortality tables, 
and shall determine what rates of interest shall be established in connection there- 
with, and may later modify such tables or prescribe other tables to represent more 
accurately the expense of the system, or may change such rates of interest, and may 
determine the application of the changes made." 

In accordance with the provisions of the law above quoted, the Retirement 
Board on October 9, 1913, adopted, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner 
of Insurance, the American Experience Table of Mortality to be used in computing 
annuities and pensions. The American Experience Table of Mortality was the 
table which, until December 31, 1920, the Massachusetts laws required insurance 
companies to use for valuing their annuity contracts. Since December 31, 1920, 
insurance companies have been required to use McClintock's Table for valuing 
all new annuity contracts. 

Our experience shows that retired teachers are longer lived than the ordinary 
population and as there has been a deficit in the Annuity Fund for retired members 
each year since 1923, the Retirement Board on May 15, 1928, voted to request the 
Commissioner of Insurance to have an examination made of the Teachers' Annuity 
Fund for the purpose of recommending new annuity tables, if he deemed it advis- 
able, with the annuity rates for determining the retiring allowances and reserves. 

The examination has been made by the Actuary of the Insurance Department 
and he has recommended that the Retirement Board adopt McClintock's Table of 
Mortality among Annuitants 

The American Experience Table makes no distinction between males and females, 
$1,000 purchasing exactly the same amount of annuity for either men or women if 
the age at retirement is the same. Under McClintock's Table sex is an important 
factor, $1,000 purchasing a smaller annuity for women than for men retiring at the 
same age, experience having proven that women on the average are longer lived 
than men. 

The change to McClintock's Table will have the following effect on retiring 
allowances : 



Annuity ok Pension Purchased by $1,000 



Age at 
retirement 



American 
Table 



McClintock's 

Table 

Male Female 



Maximum Annuity or Pension 

American McClintock's 

Table Table 

Male Female 



60 
65 

70 



$95.36 
115.19 
143.85 



$96.78 
114.15 
138.82 



$85 , 86 
100.04 
119.95 



$500.00 
603.96 
754.24 



$500.00 
589 . 68 
717.16 



$500.00 
582 . 56 
698.52 



The sum which will purchase an annuity of $500 at age sixty is the maximum 
sum which under the retirement law can be used to purchase an annuity or pension. 
Using the American Experience Table, $5,243.40 is the sum which will purchase 
the maximum annuity of $500 at age sixty. Under McClintock's Table, the maxi- 
mum annuity is purchased by $5,166.30 for males and for females $5,823.60 is 
required. 

The change to McClintock's Table will provide smaller retiring allowances 
unless the maximum pension payable under the retirement law is increased. It 
has been suggested that the maximum pension be increased to $750 at age sixty. 
Eighty per cent of the teachers retired in 1928 at age sixty or over with credit for 
prior service received the maximum pension now payable and these teachers would 



ts 



P.D. 2. 



have received larger pensions if the maximum had been $750 at age sixty. An 
increase in the maximum to $750 at age sixty will in most cases offset the decrease 
caused by the change to McClintock's Table and on the average provide pensions 
16 per cent larger than at present. 

The Retirement Board has voted to accept the recommendation of the Actuary 
of the Insurance Department and adopt McClintock's Table, the change to go into 
effect on January 1, 1930, provided, however, that if a change is made in the retire- 
ment law before January 1, 1930, increasing the maximum pension, both changes 
shall become effective at the same time. 

For the year 1928, the deposits received amounted to $1,594,173.83. Members 
who left the service withdrew $382,343.41 and $77,591.72 was paid to the estates 
of deceased members. 

The gross assets have increased to $12,894,703.27. The total liabilities amount 
to $12,744,125.89, leaving a surplus of $150,577.38. 

The income from investments was sufficient so that interest at the rate of 4^% 
was credited to the accounts of the members on December 31, 1928. The total 
interest credited during the year to the members*" accounts and the annuity reserve 
amounted to $517,900.02. 

One hundred forty-one teachers retired during the year 1928, their annual retir- 
ing allowances amounting to $103,787.80. Of this amount, $19,589.24 was annuity 
derived from the contributions made by the members before retirement and the 
balance, $84,198.56, was pension paid from State appropriations. The retirements 
for the year were as follows: On account of disability before attaining the age of 
sixty, 7; voluntary retirements, ages sixty to sixty-nine, 88; compulsory retire- 
ments at age seventy, 46. On December 31, 1928, there were 1,054 retired teachers 
living. The annual retiring allowances for these teachers amount to $650,651.04, 
of which $569,690.60 is pension paid from State appropriations and $80,960.44 is 
annuity. 

The following table gives statistics relating to the 141 teachers retired in 1928 : 





Number 


Average 


Average 


Average 


Average 
Annuity 


Average 


Average 




of Retire- 


Age at Re- 


Length of 


Salary Last 


Retiring 




ments 


tirement 


Service 


5 Years 




Allowance 


Retirements before age 60 on account 
















of disability .... 


7 


55.86 


31.44 


$1,659 17 


$84 46 


$396 54 


$481 00 


Retirements at age 60 or over, with- 
















out eredit for prior service* 


3 


66.33 


10.20 


— 


62 24 


62 24 


124 48 


Retirements at age 60 or over, with 
















credit for prior service* 


131 


65.80 


38.61 


1,858 94 


143 60 


620 12 


763 72 



* The Retirement System was established on July 1, 1914, and teachers who served in Massachusetts prior to that date 
receive credit for prior service if they have at the time of retirement 15 years of service in this State, the last 5 of which are 
continuous. 

Of the 131 teachers retired during the year at the age of sixty or over, with credit 
allowance for their service prior to July 1, 1914, 110 received the maximum pen- 
sion payable under the retirement law and only 3 received minimum pension. 
Eight of these 131 teachers had served in the public schools of Massachusetts for 
fifty years or more. 

MASSACHUSETTS NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

The school is conducted on board the schoolship Nantucket, berthed for the winter 
term at the North End Park, Boston. During the summer term of five months, 
practical instruction is given while cruising under steam and sail. The Nantucket 
is a barkentine rigged iron sailing vessel of about thirteen hundred tons with steam 
power. The Navy Department loans the schoolship to the Commonwealth and 
keeps it in repair. 

The school was filled to its capacity at the opening of the school term in the spring 
and in the autumn, with a waiting list to take care of any vacancies occurring during 
the first weeks of the term. The 187 cadets on the rolls of the school during the 
year came from 82 cities and towns of the Commonwealth. 

During the year the following requirements as to deposits and tuition fee were 
established: Upon entrance, an applicant must make a clothing fund deposit of 
$150, a graduation deposit of $50, and a tuition fee of $50. The graduation deposit 



P.D. 2. 73 

is returned to the cadet upon graduation; if he fails to graduate for any reason, it is 
forfeited to the State. At the beginning of the second year, there is required a 
clothing fund deposit of $50 and a tuition fee of $50. 

A bronze tablet in memory of the graduates and ex-cadets who served in the 
Spanish-American War was dedicated on board the schoolship Nantucket on May 7. 
The memorial was unveiled in the presence of the cadets and Spanish War Veterans 
by Honorable Roger Wolcott, whose father was governor of Massachusetts during 
the Spanish War. 

A number of organizations in the State have in recent years expressed their 
interest in the work of the school in some tangible form. The Rotary Club of 
Fall River has made it possible for a worthy young man of that city to take the 
course in the school. 

The schoolship Nantucket sailed and steamed 11,619 miles, visiting the following 
ports: Provincetown, Ponta Delgada (Azores), Plymouth, Belfast, Glasgow, 
Reikiavik (Iceland), Bergen (Norway), Edinburgh, Hull, Gibraltar, Madeira and 
St. Georges (Bermuda) . 

THE BRADFORD DURFEE TEXTILE SCHOOL 

The Bradford Durfee Textile School of Fall River offers, in its day department, 
the following courses, all of which are closely related to cotton manufacturing: 
General cotton manufacturing, designing and weaving, chemistry and dyeing, 
engineering. 

The evening school year extends over twenty-six weeks, four evenings a week, 
and is divided into two terms of thirteen weeks each. Short unit courses are 
offered in this department, primarily for the men employed in the day time. The 
work is so arranged that the student may obtain instruction in a definite subject 
without being obliged to take related work, or he may arrange for a more compre- 
hensive course. 

The enrolment in the day classes for the school year 1927-28, was 105. In the 
evening classes 1,159 applications were received and 971 were enrolled, no student 
having his name placed upon the register until he had been in attendance at least 
three evenings. 

The school graduated, at the close of the last school year, 30 students from the 
day classes and 295 from the evening classes. Of the evening graduates, 25 were of 
diploma grade and 270 were granted certificates. 

The engineering work has been changed materially, more attention being given 
to electricity than what has been customary in the past. 

Three modern Draper automatic looms were added to the equipment of the school 
during the past year. This installation was made possible largely through the 
generosity of the loom manufacturers. 

The school has continued to extend its research and testing work, and this part 
of the institution's activities is receiving added recognition each year by the cotton 
branch of the textile industry. 

LOWELL TEXTILE INSTITUTE 

By act of the Legislature, effective March 19, 1928, the name of the Lowell 
Textile School was changed to Lowell Textile Institute, and the trustees were em- 
powered to maintain a department to be known as the Lowell Evening Textile 
School. 

The instruction in the day classes has been maintained at the standard required 
to warrant the conferring of degrees of Bachelor of Textile Chemistry and Bachelor 
of Textile Engineering to students who satisfactorily complete these four-year 
courses. To students who complete the three-year courses in cotton manufactur- 
ing, wool manufacturing, or textile designing, a diploma of the Institute is awarded. 
The instruction in these courses is based upon a four-year general or scientific high 
school course or the equivalent. It is continued at the Institute with the object 
of giving a fundamental training in those branches of science which find application 
in the textile industry and co-ordinate with the instruction in the art used in the 
processes of textile manufacture. In addition, the curriculum includes such sub- 
jects as English, modern languages, history, art, economics, business administration, 
accounting, and business law, that the training of the student may be sufficiently 
broad to serve him in every phase of the textile business. 



74 P.D. 2. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitation, laboratory, and machine 
operation, all of which are co-ordinated. 

For the school year ending June, 1928, the registration was 208. At commence- 
ment, 27 degrees were conferred and 16 diplomas awarded. This was the largest 
graduating class in the history of the institution. It is significant that practically 
every graduate from the four-year courses either had accepted a position or' had one 
under consideration at the date of graduation. This was also true with a number 
of the diploma graduates. 

The department, known as the Lowell Evening Textile School, has functioned 
during the past year in the same way as previously. It aims to give relatively 
short courses of from one to three and four years to those who are working in the 
mills and shops located in Lowell and at such other centers as may be within rea- 
sonable automobile distance from Lowell. 

Last year there were 27 different courses of instruction given to 602 pupils. 
This is a somewhat larger registration than that of the previous year. The number 
of students required nine additional instructors. The classes are held on four nights 
per week and for approximately twenty weeks. At the close of the session, 114 
certificates were given to 110 students who had satisfactorily completed some one of 
the prescribed courses. 

The receipts for the year ending November 30, 1928, were $39,112.71, and the 
expenditures, S163, 129.67. 

NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE SCHOOL 

This year the school received six scholarships — four from the Massachusetts 
Charitable Mechanic Association for $250 each, given for one year only; the Wil- 
liam Firth Scholarship of $180 per year for three years; and the Manning Emery 
Scholarship of $150 per year for three years. 

In the knitting department several jacquard and fine gauge machines were added. 
Considerable research work was done in this department on rayon, silks, and wool; 
also on mixtures of these fibres. The testing room was equipped with a new micro- 
photographic apparatus and also micro projection. 

In the designing department more attention was given to color work. A number 
of intricate curtain patterns in marquisettes were made and woven with super 
heddles. 

In the mechanical department advanced work was taken up in designing and 
making of jigs, and each year some new machine tool is made. This work will be 
carried out until a complete bench outfit has been designed and made. The ma- 
chines already made are drill press, lathe and emery grinder, to which will be added 
this year a jig and circular saw. These machines are designed, the patterns made, 
and machines built in machine shop classes. 

The day class enrolment for the year commencing September, 1928, averages 
with the enrolment for the past few years. The enrolment for the evening classes 
is smaller than usual this year. This was due to the strike in the New Bedford 
mills, which was still in effect during the enrolment and the first few weeks of school. 
The enrolment and attendance for the school year 1927-28 was as follows: 

Statistics of Attendance and Graduation 
Day students registered, 103; attending, 95; evening students registered, 1,591; 
attending, 1,153. Graduated June, 1928,— day students, 23; evening students, 
163. 

Classification of Students by Courses 

Day Students: General cotton manufacturing, 27; designing, 7; chemistry, 
dyeing and finishing, 23; knitting, 5; textile secretarial, 1; junior, 4; special 
courses, 28. 

Evening Students: Carding and spinning department, 93; designing department, 
99; chemistry department, 52; weaving department, 564; mechanical depart- 
ment, 330; knitting department, 15. 



P.D. 2. 



75 



STATISTICS 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 

Dec. 1, 1927, to Nov. 30, 1928 

Expenditures 



Item 


Balances and 
Transfers 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Administration: 










Commissioner's salary- 


— 


$9,000 00 


$9,000 00 


— 


Personal services .... 


— 


90,500 00 


89,074 98 


$1,425 02 


Incidentals ..... 


$1,377 20 


13,000 00 


12,838 60 


1,538 60 


Travel 


9 10 


8,500 00 


7,540 80 


968 30 


Division of Elementary and Secondary 










Education and Normal Schools: 










School registers and blanks 


— ■ 


3,000 00 


2,448 14 


551 86 


Sight and hearing tests 


— ■ 


800 00 


192 73 


607 27 


School superintpndents in small towns 


— 


101,000 00 


98,891 27 


2,108 73 


Education of deaf and blind children. 


1,234 83 


396,000 00 


373,236 31 


23,998 52 


High school tuition 


4 20 


182,000 00 


181,971 55 


32 65 


High school transportation 


2,867 00 


172,000 00 


174,389 35 


477 65 


Aid to pupils in normal schools. 


— 


4,000 00 


3,884 22 


115 78 


Teachers' institutes 


— 


3,000 00 


2,566 69 


433 31 


General School Fund (Part I) . 


— 


5,217,814 741 


5,217,814 741 


— 


General School Fund (Part II) 


— 


339,270 37' 


339,270 37' 


— 


State Normal Schools: 










Bridgewatei : 










Maintenance .... 


635 97 


148,250 00 


147,300 83 


1,585 14 


Boarding hall .... 


4 90 


80,000 00 


79,030 04 


974 86 


New buildings .... 


44,832 59 


— 


352 24 


44,480 35 


Heating and power plant . 
Fitchburg: 

Maintenance .... 


— 


82,000 00 


133 84 


81,866 16 


3,924 11 


164,800 00 


163,576 15 


5,147 96 


Boarding hall .... 


200 00 


55,000 00 


47,546 60 


7,653 40 


Purchase of land 


— 


7,000 00 


7,000 00 


— 


Framingham: 










Maintenance .... 


1,847 29 


164,250 00 


161,358 75 


4,738 54 


Boarding hall .... 


— 


92,000 00 


89,709 80 


2,290 20 


Coal pocket 


• — ■ 


7,000 00 


4,835 78 


2,164 22 


Athletic field .... 


— 


1,500 00 


— 


1,500 00 


Hyannis: 










Maintenance .... 


635 86 


58,750 00 


56,457 77 


2,928 09 


Boarding hall .... 


— 


36,500 00 


35,553 89 


946 11 


Lowell: 










Maintenance .... 


— 


75,175 00 


74,616 87 


558 13 


North Adams: 










Maintenance .... 


1,427 52 


86,500 00 


84,187 09 


3,740 43 


Boarding hall .... 
Salem: 

Maintenance .... 


2 27 


35,000 00 


32,808 41 


2,193 86 


917 46 


105,700 00 


103,633 43 


2,984 03 


Westfield: 










Maintenance .... 


2,153 18 


83,600 00 


81,340 73 


4,412 45 


Boarding hall .... 
Worcester: 

Maintenance .... 


206 78 


28,000 00 


21,685 90 


6,520 88 


1,149 65 


95,250 00 


91,255 65 


6,144 00 


Boarding hall .... 


— 


9,000 00 


8,345 38 


654 62 


Fire escapes .... 


1,097 87 


— 


— 


1,097 87 


School of Art: 










Maintenance .... 


294 52 


106,100 00 


105,293 39 


1,101 13 


New biiilding .... 


— 


150,000 00 


109,891 16 


40,108 84 


Division of University Extension: 










Personal services .... 


— 


133,800 00 


133,796 19 


3 81 


Expenses ..... 


20 67 


39,600 00 


38,326 22 


1,294 45 


English-speaking classes for adults: 










Personal services 


— 


10,400 00 


10,391 55 


8 45 


Expenses .... 


137 73 


4,000 00 


4,135 83 


1 90 


Reimbursement of cities and towns 


— 


165,000 00 


149,859 77 


15,140 23 


Division of Vocational Education: 










Independent industrial schools . 


— 


1,345,130 36 


1,345,130 36 


— 


Teachers for vocational schools 


27,470 43 s 


30,500 00 


55,699 94 


2,270 49 


Vocational rehabilitation . 


9,095 333 


16,000 00 


20,605 35 


4,489 98 


Aid to certain persons 


— 


3,000 00 


1,978 72 


1,021 28 


Division of Immigration and Americani- 










zation: 










Personal services .... 


— 


39,600 00 


39,351 41 


248 59 


Expenses ..... 


46 16 


7,000 00 


6,956 90 


89 26 


Division of Public Libraries: 










Personal services .... 


— 


11,890 00 


11,754 20 


135 80 


Aid to public libraries 


— 


14,300 00 


14,299 03 


97 



» From income tax receipts. 

* From income of Massachusetts School Fund and income tax receipts. 

« From Federal Funds. 



76 



P.D. 2. 



Expenditures — Concluded 



Item 


Balances and 
Transfers 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Division of the Blind: 










General administration 


— 


$43,200 00 


$39,705 74 


$3,494 26 


Maintenance of industries 


$28 73 


143,430 00 


139,067 60 


4,391 13 


Maintenance of local shops 


— 


78,000 00 


69,664 26 


8,335 74 


"Woolson House industries for men 


57 85 


32,290 00 


28,670 02 


3,677 83 


Instruction of adult blind at home . 


— . 


15,700 00 


15,289 57 


410 43 


Sight-saving classes for children 


— 


15,250 00 


15,208 34 


41 66 


Aiding adult blind .... 


3,000 00 


130,000 00 


132,633 64 


366 36 


Teachers' Retirement Board: 










Personal services .... 


— 


11,200 00 


10,843 55 


356 45 


Contingent expenses 


— 


2,400 00 


1,858 07 


541 93 


Retirement allowances 


— 


540,000 00 


535,301 34 


4,698 66 


Reimbursement of pensions 


— 


138,569 21 


138,569 21 


— 


Massachusetts Nautical School: 










Personal services of secretary and oflSce 










assistants ..... 


— 


4,460 00 


4,459 00 


1 00 


Expenses of commission . 


— 


2,300 00 


2,294 45 


5 55 


Expenses of schoolship 


1 00 


87,075 00 


85,599 15 


1,476 85 


State Textile Schools: 










Bradford Durfee (Fall River) . 


782 54 


71,050 00 


66,155 35 


5,677 19 


Lowell Textile Institute . 


4,059 78 


164,300 00 


163,129 67 


5,230 11 


New Bedford ..... 


1,201 74 


78,300 00 


69,520 00 


9,981 74 


Totals 


$110,724 26 


811,589,004 68 


$11,369,287 88 


$330,441 06 



Receipts 
Administration: 

Salaries — on account of teachers for vocational schools 
Rent of land and buildings ..... 
Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal 
Schools: 
Education of deaf and blind children .... 
State Normal Schools: 
Bridgewater: 

Maintenance 

Boarding hall ....... 

Town of Bridgewater — on account of Training School 
Fitchburg: 

Maintenance ........ 

Boarding hall ....... 

City of Fitchburg — on account of Training School . 
Framingham: 
Maintenance , 
Boarding hall 
Hyannis: 
Maintenance 
Boarding hall 
Lowell: 

Maintenance 
North Adams: 
Maintenance 
Boarding hall 
Salem: 
Maintenance 
City of Salem 
Westfield: 
Maintenance 
Boarding hall 
Worcester: 
Maintenance 
Boarding hall 
School of Art: 
Maintenance 



on account of Training School 



$5,310 00 
967 57 



3,928 24 



6,383 51 

86,145 84 
5,596 64 

7,481 30 
54,387 86 
46,581 84 

7,651 63 
107,401 46 

3,726 97 
45,441 24 

2,712 56 

3,854 68 
39,581 66 

5,305 70 

5,824 82 

1,811 05 
29,880 76 

2,994 30 
8,989 52 

20,259 37 



P.D. 2. 

Receipts — Concluded 
Division of University Extension: 
Enrolment fees ....... 

Sale of material and rental of films .... 

Division of Vocational Education: 

Vocational rehabilitation (reimbursement) 
Division of the Blind : 
Maintenance of industries ..... 

Maintenance of local shops ..... 

Woolson House industries for men .... 

Massachusetts Nautical School: 

Students' fees ....... 

Expenses of schoolship (grant from Federal Government) 
State Textile Schools : 
Bradford Durfee (Fall River) : 

Maintenance ..... 

Grant from City of Fall River 
Lowell Textile Institute: 
Maintenance ..... 

Grant from City of Lowell . 
New Bedford: 

Maintenance ..... 

Grant from City of New Bedford 

Total 



77 



$136,165 96 
16,394 67 

87 00 

88,315 72 
42,356 18 
16,628 25 

3,750 60 
25,000 00 



3,278 41 
10,000 00 

40,326 33 
10,000 00 

4,085 61 
10,000 00 



,607 25 





Funds 








, 


Original Be- 








Name op Fund 


quest and 
unexpended 

income 
Deo. 1, 1927 


Receipts 


Expenditure 


Balance 
Nov. 30, 1928 


Albert H. Munsell Massachusetts Normal 










Art School Fund .... 


$10,014 83 


$493 89 


$1,231 00 


$9,277 72 


Bridgewater Normal School Playground 










Fund 


50 00 


— 


— 


50 00 


Elizabeth C. Stevens State Normal School 










at Bridgewater Fund .... 


12 13 


— 


— 


12 13 


Gustavus A. Hinckley Free Scholarship 










Fund (Hyannis) .... 


7,014 20 


285 41 


125 00 


7,174 61 


Mercy A. Bailey Normal Art School Fund 


1,866 80 


74 95 


216 00 


1,725 75 


Rebecca R. Joslin Scholarship Trust Fund 


2,101 34 


104 33 


— 


2,205 67 


Robert Charles Billings State Normal Art 










School Fund ..... 


1,586 77 


63 72 


120 00 


1,530 49 


Robert Charles Billings State Normal 










School at Framingham Fund 


1,538 14 


81 25 


51 23 


1,568 16 


The Marguerite Guilfoyle School of Art 










Fund 


1,015 71 


41 27 


— 


1,056 98 


Todd Normal School Fund 


21,892 26 


932 58 


1,222 89 


21,601 95 


Vocational Education Trust Fund — 










United States Grant .... 


51,824 65 


246,549 74 


248,040 43 


50,333 96 


Vocational Rehabilitation Trust Fund — 










United States Grant .... 


22,633 51 


9,718 67 


12,182 09 


20,170 08 


Vocational Rehabilitation Gift Fund 


387 52 


917 87 


968 68 


336 71 



GENERAL EDUCATION 
I. Summary of Statistics of the Public Schools — Day, Evening, and 
Vacation — for the School Year 1927-28 ^ 
Pages 1 to 147 of Part II of this report contain data for each town and city and 
totals for the State. Page 150 contains a table giving a comparison of certain 
State totals for 1927-28 with the corresponding data for 1917-18. Pages 151 to 
158 contain a graduated valuation table in which the cities and towns are arranged 
in the four groups according to the descending order of their valuation per pupil 
in the net average membership, together with their State rank. On pages 148 
and 149 may be found tables on evening and vacation schools. 



' Statistics for State-aided vocational education, continuation schools, and Americanication classes are 
not included in this summary. 



78 P.D. 2. 

A. — Data for the School Year ending June 30, 1928 

I. Registration of Minors, October 1, 1927 

1. Persons between the ages of five and seven years: 

(a) In registration of minors . . . . . . . . . . . 149,008 

(6) In public school membership .......... 102,459 

(c) In private school membership .......... 29,929 

2. Persons between the ages of seven and fourteen years: 

(a) In registration of minors ........... 549,683 

(6) In public school membership .......... 434,816 

(c) In private school membership .......... 116,233 

3. Persons between the ages of fourteen and sixteen years: \ 

(a) In registration of minors ........... 143,069 

(6) In public school membership .......... 105,244 

(c) In private school membership .......... 15,065 

4. Illiterate minors between sixteen and twenty-one years: 

(a) In registration of minors, October 1, 1927 ........ 6,707 

(6) Illiterate minors receiving educational certificates year ending August 31, 1927 . 3,553 

II. Number op Days the Public Dat Schools have been in Session 
1. Average number of days the public day schools have been in session ..... 183 ' 

III. Public Day School Enrolment and Attendance Data 

Increase 
over 1926-27 
6,648 
5,387 
5,295 
1,529,714 
3,473 
Number, ex- 
penditure, etc. 

25,144 



1. Total enrolment of pupils of all ages 

2. Average membership of pupils 

3. Net average membership of pupils 

4. Aggregate days of attendance of pupils 

5. Average daily attendance 

IV. Public Day School Teachers 

1. Number of full-time teaching positions in public day schools — kin- 

dergarten, elementary, and high, Jan. 1, 1928 
(o) Principals ...... 

(6) Supervisors ...... 

(c) Teachers ....... 

2. Number of part-time supervisors and teachers 

V. Public Day High Schools 



Number 
736,177 
691,683 
688,214 
119,045,451 
649,038 



881 
502 
23,761 



Schools 



Number of public high schools 

Number of full-time principals and teachers 

(a) Men ..... 

(h) Women ..... 
Number of part-time teachers 
Pupils enrolled ..... 

(a) Boys ..... 

(6) Girls . . . 

Aggregate days of attendance 

Average number of days the high schools have been in session 
Average daily attendance of pupils 
Average membership of pupils .... 
Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control: 

(a) Amount ....... 

(6) Cost per pupil in average membership 
Expenditure for salaries of principals, supervisors, and teachers 
Expenditure for textbooks ...... 

VI. Public Day Elementary 
Number of full-time principals and teachers . 

(a) Nujnber of principals: 
Men 
Women 

(6) Number of teachers: 
Men 
Women 
Pupils enrolled . 

(a) Boys 

(b) Girls 
Aggregate days of attendance 

Average number of days the elementary schools have been in 
Average daily attendance of pupils 
Average membership . 
Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control: 

(a) Amount ....... 

(6) Cost per pupil in average membership 
Expenditure for salaries of principals, supervisors, and teachers 
Expenditure for textbooks ....... 

VII. Public Evening Schools for the Year ending June 
Evening elementary schools: 

(a) Number of cities and towns maintaining evening elementary schools 

(6) Number of teachers ......... 

(c) Number of pupils enrolled ........ 

(d) Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control 
, Evening high schools: 

(a) Number of cities and towns maintaining evening high schools 

(6) Number of teachers ......... 

(c) Number of pupils enrolled ........ 

(d) Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control 



2,064 
3,799 



67,364 
72,593 



719 



254 
5,863 



152 

139,957 



22,863,166 
184 
124,412 
131,618 

$17,613,850 91 

$133 82 

$13,214,746 09 

. $387,882 31 



312 
383 



831 
17,755 



306,332 
289,888 



19,281 



596,220 



96,182,285 

183 

524,626 

560,065 



$45,432,511 73 

$81 12 

$32,957,887 20 

. $705,434 77 

30, 1928 



62 » 
606 
13,130 
$242,886 53 

492 
827 
25 944 
$290,894 35 



' Obtained by dividing the aggregate days of attendance by the average attendance. 

2 In addition, one town sent its pupils to evening elementary and evening high schools of other cities 
or towns, and one town, to evening high schools. 



P.D. 2. 



79 



VIII. Public Vacation Schools for the Year ending June 30, 1928 

1. Number of cities and towns maintaining vacation schools ..... 32 

2. Number of teachers ............ 880 

3. Number of pupils enrolled ........... 26,698 

4. Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control ...... $160,864 77 



IX. Cost of all the Public Schools — Day, Evening, and Vacation — for 

ENDING June 30, 1928 
Support 



the School Year 



Total expenditure for support .... 
This expenditure is distributed among the following 

classes indicated in the statutory definition of 

support: 

(a) General control ..... 

(b) Salaries and expenditures of supervisors, prin- 

cipals, and teachers 

(c) Textbooks 

id) Other expenses of instruction 
(e) Janitor service, fuel, and miscellaneous ex 

penses of operation 
(/) Repairs, replacement, and upkeep 
(g) Libraries . 
(h) Promotion of health 
(;') Transportation . 
(j) Tuition 
(k) Miscellaneous . 



Expenditure 
$66,961,521 83 



$2,501,296 06 

46,978,662 921 
1,108,634 54 
1,814,256 80 » 

7,241,621 76 

3,464,759 59 

61,043 32 

938,617 47 

1,717,476 06 

591,833 47 

543,319 84 



Increase 
over 1926-27 
$2,344,863 36 



$80,662 96 

1,973,396 71 
10,151 32 
24,856 86 

21,746 95 

199 50 2 

16,268 47 

27,052 08 

90,348 05 

37,490 61 

63,088 85 



Outlay 

2. Total expenditure for outlay ....... 

(a) New grounds, buildings, and alterations . $11,033,424 39 
(6) New equipment 892,209 50 

Support and Outlay 

3. Total expenditure from all sources for support and outlay 

Cost per Pupil for the School Year 19S7-Si 

4. Cost of the public schools for support for each pupil 

in the net average membership ...... 

5. Cost of the public schools for support and outlay for 

each pupil in the net average membere hip . . . . 



$11,925,633 89 $1,871,553 43 2 

1,430,276 81 2 

441,276 62' 



$78,887,155 72 $473,309 93 



$97 30 
114 63 



$2 68 
19 2 



B. — Data for the Last Preceding Town or City Fiscal Year, which in All Towns 
and Nearly All Cities ended Dec. 31, 1927 



I. Cost for the Support of all Public Schools • 



1. Total expenditure for support ...... 

(a) Amount raised by local taxation and expended 

for support $59,644,214 44 

(6) Amount derived from sources other than local 
taxation or its equivalent and expended for 

support 6,926,623 79 

This expenditure includes the following: 

(1) State reimbursement (including Massachusetts 

School Fund and General School Fund) . 5,842,866 42 

(2) Tuition and transportation of State wards . 184,431 02 

(3) Other sources 899,326 35 

2. Local taxation cost for support of public schools for 

each pupil in the net average membership ' 86 66 

3 Total cost for support of public schools for each pupil 

in the net average membership ' . . . 96 72 ■ 

4 Percentage of the total valuation, as of April 1, 1927, 

raised by taxation and expended for support of 

public schools ...... . 008^2/ioo 

or 
$8 42 per $1,000 



■ Day, Evening, and Vacation 

Increase 
Expenditure over 1926-27 
. $66,570,838 23 $3,214,315 40 



2,787,296 95 



427,018 45 



361,731 70 

8,297 56 

56,989 19 

3 40 

3 95 



. 000i»/ioo 
or 
$0 19 per $1,000 



1 In this summary, for purposes of comparison, an item of $266,447.24 for "Expenses of supervisors, 
principals and teachers" has been included as heretofore in "Salaries of supervisors, principals, and teach- 
ers" and deducted from "Other expenses of instruction," in which it is included in column 19, page 132 
of the statistical table. 

2 Decrease. 

' The net average membership, however, is for the school year ending June 30, 1928. 



80 



P.D. 2. 





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P.D. 2. 81 

III. Statistics of Superintendency Unions, Year ending June 30, 1928 

Index of Towns 

[Note. — The number indicates the superintendency union in which the town is found in the table that 

follows.] 



52 Alford 
35 Amherst 

60 Ashburnham 
30 Ashby 

34 Ashfield 
3 Ashland 
46 Auburn 
38 Avon 

61 Ayer 

5 Barre 

7 Becket 
71 Bedford 

58 Belchertown 
21 Bellingham 

53 Berkley 

6 Berlin 

24 Bernardston 
68 Billerica 

66 Blackstone 
37 Blandford 
74 Bolton 

15 Bourne 

61 Boxborough 

67 Boxford 
70 Boylston 

16 Brewster 

8 Brimfield 
11 Brookfield 
14 Buckland 

68 Burlington 
74 Carlisle 
48 Carver 

29 Charlemont 
32 Charlton 
22 Chatham 

44 Cheshire 
7 Chester 

51 Chesterfield 
25 Chilmark 
65 Clarksburg 
14 Colrain 
55 Conway 
34 Cummington 

45 Dana 

55 Deerfield 
16 Dennis 
53 Dighton 
39 Douglas 
31 Dover 

10 Dracut 
57 Dudley 
73 Dunstable 
22 Eastham 

4 Easthampton 

11 East Brookfield 
18 East Longmeadow 



25 Edgartown 

52 Egremont 
58 Enfield 
40 Erving 
47 Essex 

28 Fairhaven 
65 Florida 
64 Franklin 

53 Freetown 

25 Gay Head 

26 Georgetown 

24 Gill 

34 Goshen 

25 Gosnold 
12 Grafton 
23 Granby 
56 Granville 
45 Greenwich 

26 Groveland 
36 Hadley 

43 Halifax 

47 Hamilton 

18 Hampden 

44 Hancock 

19 Hanover 
19 Hanson 

5 Hardwick 
75 Harvard 
22 Harwich 

36 Hatfield 
29 Hawley 

29 Heath 

42 Hinsdale 
38 Holbrook 
33 Holden 
32 Holland 

27 HoUiston 
21 Hopedale 

3 Hopkinton 
2 Hubbardston 

37 Huntington 

43 Kingston 

48 Lakeville 

44 Lanesborough 
41 Lee 

40 Leverett 
71 Lexington 
24 Leyden 
74 Littleton 
18 Longmeadow 

30 Lunenburg 

48 Lynnfield 
1 Marshfield 

15 Mashpee 

28 Mattapoisett 

49 Medfield 



27 Medway 
21 Mendon 
59 Merrimac 

7 Middlefield 
67 Middleton 
13 Millbury 

49 Millis 
66 MillviUe 
65 Monroe 

8 Monson 
41 Monterey 
37 Montgomery 

50 Mount Washington 

44 New Ashford 
17 New Braintree 
59 Newbury 

50 New Marlborough 

45 New Salem 
49 Norfolk 

6 Northborough 
11 North Brookfield 

24 Northfield 

72 North Reading 
63 Norton 

19 Norwell 

25 Oak Bluffs 
33 Oakham 
22 Orleans 

41 Otis 
13 Oxford 

33 Paxton 
35 Pelham 
43 Pembroke 

73 Pepperell 

42 Peru 

5 Petersham 
2 Phillipston 

34 Plainfield 
63 Plainville 

43 Plympton 
45 Prescott 

9 Princeton 

20 Provincetown 
38 Randolph 

69 Raynham 
72 Reading 
54 Rehoboth 
52 Richmond 
48 Rochester 
29 Rowe 
26 Rowley 
2 Royalston 
37 Russell 
33 Rutland 
59 Salisbury 
56 Sandisfield 



82 



P.D. 2. 



Statistics of Superintendency Unions — Continued 



15 Sandwich 




46 Sutton 




40 Wendell 


65 Savoy 




62 Swansea 




47 Wenham 


1 Scituate 




2 Templeton 




70 West Boylston 


54 Seekonk 




10 Tewksbury 


69 West Bridgewater 


50 Sheffield 




25 Tisbury 




17 West Brookfield 


14 Shelburne 




56 Tolland 




4 Westhampton 


27 Sherborn 




47 Topsfield 




9 Westminster 


61 Shirley 




30 Townsend 




59 West Newbury 


70 Shrewsbury 




20 Truro 




52 West Stockbridge 


40 Shutesbury 




73 Tyngsborough 


25 West Tisbury 


62 Somerset 




41 Tyringham 


49 Westwood 


4 Southampton 




12 Upton 




55 Whately 


6 Southborough 




39 Uxbridge 




18 Wilbraham 


23 South Hadley 




8 Wales 




51 Williamsburg 


56 Southwick 




17 Warren 




67 Wilmington 


9 Sterling 




24 Warwick 




60 Winchendon 


74 Stow 




42 Washington 


42 Windsor 


32 Sturbridge 




31 Wayland 




51 Worthington 


31 Sudbury 




57 Webster 




64 Wrentham 


55 Sunderland 




20 Wellfleet 




16 Yarmouth 


fc 






State 
triennial 


Number 
of prin- 
cipals 
and full 


Number 

of 
school 


Each town's 

SHARE OF super- 
intendent's — 


State Aid 

for 1927-28 

on account 

of em- 


^ 
^ 


UNION 


ol 

"S 

p 


valuation, 

May, 
1928 


time 

teachers, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


build- 
ings, 
Jan. 1, 
1928 


Full 
salary 


Travel- 
ing 
expenses 


ployment 
of super- 
intendent 
of 
schools 


1 


--'1 
Marshfield . 


1888 


S6, 557,739 


12 


4 


$1,400 00 


$241 39 


_ 




Scituate 


1888 


12,766,418 


24 


4 


2,100 00 


369 11 


— 


2 


Hubbardston 


1889 


1,306,370 


7 


4 


480 00 


64 00 


$309 33 




Phillipston . 


1889 


483,087 


4 


4 


240 00 


32 00 


154 67 




Royalston . 


1889 


1,340,200 


6 


3 


480 00 


64 00 


309 33 




Templeton . 


1889 


3,938,191 


26 


7 


1,800 00 


240 00 


1,160 00 


3 


Ashland 


1889 


2,740,377 


16 


3 


1,350 00 


20 41 


847 13 




Hopkinton . 


1889 


3,041,716 


16 


4 


1,350 00 


28 38 


852 06 


4 


Easthampton 


1889 


16,992,313 


62 


7 


3,100 00 


50 00 







Southampton 


1889 


977,269 


7 


6 


650 00 


35 00 


289 59 




Westhampton 


1889 


426,949 


3 


2 


250 00 


15 00 


112 03 


5 


Barre . 


1890 


4,616,117 


26 


8 


1,340 00 


200 35 


— 




Hardwick 


1890 


4,616,077 


21 


7 


1,340 00 


200 35 


— • 




Petersham . 


1890 


2,039,085 


7 


2 


670 01 


100 17 


386 67 


6 


Berlin . 


1890 


1,112,591 


6 


5 


640 00 


86 06 


386 69 




Northborough 


1890 


2,300,383 


13 


3 


1,279 88 


172 14 


773 32 




Southborough 


1890 


3,996,718 


15 


3 


1,279 88 


172 14 


773 32 


7 


Becket 


1890 


846,333 


5 


4 


780 00 


120 00 


579 97 




Chester 


1890 


1,720,512 


16 


6 


1,429 96 


219 96 


1,063 23 




Middlefield . 


1890 


376,249 


2 


2 


390 00 


55 00 


286 77 


8 


Brimfield 


1890 


1,534,328 


12 


4 


849 04 


112 50 


483 36 




Monson 


1890 


4,177,870 


28 


6 


2,037 50 


270 00 


1,159 97 




Wales . 


1893 


521,079 


4 


2 


509 38 


67 50 


290 00 


9 


Princeton 


1890 


1,591,280 


7 


2 


600 00 


98 11 


386 67 




Sterling 


1890 


1,801,745 


10 


5 


1,200 00 


196 21 


773 33 




Westminster 


1890 


1,589,970 


14 


8 


1,200 00 


196 21 


773 33 


10 


Dracut 


1891 


5,698,542 


42 


7 


2,275 00 


— 


— 




Tewksbury . 


1891 


3,448,704 


15 


5 


1,225 00 


— 


583 33 


11 


Brookfield . 


1891 


1,567,912 


10 


3 


1,225 00 


94 55 


646 36 




East Brookfield . 


1921 


1,231,133 


5 


2 


700 00 


53 99 


369 33 




North Brookfield . 


1891 


3,374,042 


14 


2 


1,575 00 


121 56 


831 04 



P.D. 2. 



83 



Statistics of Superintendency Unions — Continued 



1 


UNION 


a 

'K 

« 9 

V o 


State 
triennial 
valuation. 


Number 
of prin- 
cipals 
and full 
time 


Number 

of 
school 
build- 


Each town's 

SHARE OF super- 
intendent's — 


State Aid 
for 1927-28 
on account 

of em- 
ployment 


H 






^ 




o 
Q 


May, 
1928 


teachers, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


ings, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


Full 
salary 


Travel- 
ing 
expenses 


of super- 
intendent 
of 
schools 


12 


3rafton 
Jpton 


1891 
1891 


$6,257,502 
1,615,729 


40 
11 


8 
3 


$2,700 00 
900 00 


S376 67 
128 22 


$484 28 


13 


Vlillbury 
Dxford 


1891 
1891 


6,367,742 
3,969,289 


37 

27 


7 

7 


2,6.50 00 
1,766 67 


. — 


666 67 


14 


Suckland 

Dolrain 

Shelburne 


1892 
1892 
1892 


3,496,521 
1,922,094 
3,318,563 


11 
14 
19 


5 
11 
6 


1,066 66 
1,066 67 
1,066 67 


126 57 
126 57 
126 57 


639 93 
639 94 
639 94 


15 


Bourne 

Vlashpee 

Sandwich 


1892 
1892 
1892 


9,407,746 
1,116,908 
2,726,490 


27 
3 
5 


6 
1 
5 


1,568 95 

279 98 

1,049 70 


144 32 

70 32 

255 12 


164 20 
559 68 


16 


Brewster 
Dennis 
Yarmouth . 


1903 
1892 
1892 


1,954,923 
3,317,859 
4,644,612 


6 
11 
10 


1 
6 
3 


560 00 
1,120 00 
1,120 00 


94 25 
183 98 
191 85 


386 80 
770 94 


17 


New Braintree 

Warren 

West Brookfield . 


1898 
1893 
1898 


656,014 
5,276,981 
1,729,171 


3 

25 
9 


3 

4 
4 


481 04 

2,331 00 

888 00 


52 00 

252 00 

96 00 


251 35 
464 00 


18 


East Longmeadow 
Hampden 
Longmeadow 
Wilbraham . 


1893 
1893 
1893 
1893 


3,853,990 

682,867 

9,167,588 

3,845,638 


19 
5 

25 
18 


3 
3 

4 

7 


1,155 00 

385 00 

1,155 00 

1,155 00 


170 14 
52 83 
161 01 
158 49 


583 25 
192 71 

578 13 


19 


Hanover 

Hanson 

Norwell 


1894 
1894 
1894 


3,697,515 
2,605,779 
2,154,032 


17 
10 
10 


5 
5 
3 


1,433 .34 
1,133 33 
1,283 33 


171 10 
154 71 
251 96 


700 56 
562 41 
670 36 


20 


Provincetown 
Truro . 
Wellfleet 


1894 
1902 
1894 


4,992,947 
1,155,653 
1,512,565 


31 
4 
8 


6 
2 
2 


2,345 00 
502 44 
502 44 


280 00 
60 00 
60 00 


289 98 
289 98 


21 


Bellingham . 

Hopedale 

Mendon 


1894 
1894 
1894 


2,967,646 
6,455,187 
1,366,262 


14 
21 

8 


3 
5 
3 


1,260 00 

1,620 00 

720 00 


151 34 
194 57 
86 48 


676 67 
386 66 


22 


Chatham 
Eastham 
Harwich 
Orleans 


1903 
1894 
1894 
1894 


5,334,159 
1,138,915 
5,315,930 
3,996,355 


10 
3 
15 
10 


1 
1 
5 
2 


960 08 

320 00 

1,280 24 

639 96 


167 45 
117 03 
177 86 
145 11 


221 90 
398 61 


23 


Granby 
South Hadley 


1895 
1895 


1,217,817 
7,969,613 


6 

45 


4 

7 


691 63 
2,766 63 


23 38 
93 53 


348 91 


24 


Bernardston 
GiU . 
Leyden 
Northfield . 
Warwick 


1917 
1895 
1901 
1895 
1895 


1,023,186 
1,006,723 

362,355 
2,758,384 

579,047 


10 
7 
5 

18 
3 


5 
5 
5 

7 


5.sn 00 
580 00 
435 00 
1,015 00 
290 00 


120 00 
120 00 

90 00 
210 00 

60 00 


386 67 
386 67 
290 00 
676 66 
193 33 


25 


Chilmark 
Edgartown . 
Gay Head . 
Gosnold 
Oak Bluffs . 
Tisbury 
West Tisbury 


1897 
1895 
1902 
1924 
1895 
1895 
1895 


608,102 
4,135,646 

126,051 
1,382,449 
4,529,384 
5,954,534 

946,152 


1 
10 

1 

1 
12 
13 

2 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


155 00 
775 00 
155 00 
250 00 
775 00 
775 00 
465 00 


32 18 
160 90 

32 18 

70 00 
160 90 
160 90 

96 54 


89 06 
445 27 

89 05 
152 25 

267 16 


26 


Georgetown 
Groveland . 
Rowley 


1895 
1895 
1895 


2,123,950 
2,123,466 
1,713,065 


9 

16 

9 


-' 2 

7 
3 


840 00 

1,400 00 

560 00 


119 96 
199 94 
79 97 


580 00 
966 67 
386 66 


27 


Holliston 
Medway 
Sherborn 


1896 
1896 
1896 


3,883,778 
3,655,205 
1,811,078 


17 

22 

6 


5 
5 
2 


1,240 00 

1,240 00 

620 00 


200 00 
200 00 
100 00 


773 33 
773 33 
386 67 


28 


Fairhaven . 
Mattapoisett 


1897 
1897 


13,541,766 
3,945,597 


69 
10 


9 
3 


3,700 00 
700 00 


76 50 
105 00 


314 11 


29 


Charlemont . 
Hawley 
Heath 
Rowe . 


1897 
1897 
1902 
1897 


1,310,361 
311,024 
.501,878 
806,727 


10 
6 
2 
3 


4 
6 
2 
3 


1,033 33 
775 00 
387 .50 
387 50 


160 00 
120 00 
60 00 
60 00 


773 33 
580 00 
290 00 
290 00 



84 



P.D. 2. 







Statistics 


of Superintendency Unions — Continued 




1 


UNION 


a 

'i 

o 
Q 


State 
triennial 
valuation. 

May, 

1928 


Number 
of prin- 
cipals 
and full 

time 

teachers, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


Number 
of 

school 

build- 
ings, 

Jan. 1, 
1928 


Each town's 

SHARE OF super- 
intendent's — 


State Aid 

for 1927-28 

on account 

of em- 


!? 


Full 
salary 


Travel- 
ing 
expenses 


ployment 
of super- 
intendent 
of 
schools 


30 


Ashby 

Lunenburg 

Townsend 






1897 
1905 
1897 


$1,050,277 
2,545,597 
2,574,081 


9 
14 
15 


1 
3 
4 


$700 00 
1,050 GO 
1,750 00 


$75 39 
113 09 
188 49 


$383 60 
575 39 
958 99 


31 


Dover 

Sudbury 

Wayland 






1898 
1898 
1898 


3,700,247 
2,704,857 
5,336,707 


10 
10 
17 


2 
3 
2 


580 00 

870 00 

1,450 00 


129 93 
190 29 
86 58 


415 06 
619 90 


32 


Charlton 
Holland 
Sturbridge 






1902 
1902 
1898 


2,289,172 

256,753 

1,471,842 


19 
2 
9 


12 
1 
5 


2,000 00 

400 00 

1,600 00 


300 00 

60 00 

240 00 


966 67 
193 33 
773 33 


33 


Holden 
Oakham 
Paxton 
Rutland 






1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 


3,902,491 

568,024 

1,060,695 

1,578,584 


31 
3 
4 

10 


6 
2 

1 
3 


1,815 00 
330 00 
495 00 
660 00 


274 92 
49 99 
74 98 
99 97 


1,063 33 
193 33 
290 00 
386 67 


34 


Ashfield 
Cummington 
Goshen 
Plainfield 






1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 


1,497,477 
606,786 
458,529 
457,394 


13 
5 
2 
2 


10 
2 

i 

1 


1,215 00 
540 00 
405 00 
540 00 


179 98 
80 00 
60 02 
80 00 


869 98 
386 67 
290 01 
386 67 


35 


Amherst 
Pelham 






1901 
1901 


10,320,055 
713,568 


52 
4 


8 
3 


4,450 00 
550 00 


447 13 
64 44 


215 53 


36 


Hadley 
Hatfield 






1901 
1901 


3,499,621 
3,461,439 


29 
25 


11 

7 


1,700 00 
1,700 00 


198 82 
198 82 


965 88 
965 88 


37 


Blandford 
Huntington 
Montgomery 
Russell 






1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 


1,210,280 

1,588,430 

281,783 

5,257,040 


3 
13 

3 
11 


2 
4 
3 
4 


580 00 
1,065 00 

290 00 
1,065 00 


80 00 
140 00 

40 00 
140 00 


375 29 
685 20 
187 65 


38 


Avon . 

Holbrook 

Randolph 






1901 
1901 
1901 


2,391,574 
3,824,515 
5,790,999 


15 
23 
38 


2 
6 
6 


806 68 
1,100 00 
1,393 32 


94 30 
128 61 
162 94 


470 28 
641 30 


39 


Douglas 
Uxbridge 






1901 
1901 


2,235,197 
9,042,727 


16 
35 


4 
9 


1,320 00 
1,980 00 


177 78 
266 67 


773 33 


40 


Erving 
Leverett 
Shutesbury 
Wendell 






1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 


3,215,027 
608,750 
538,318 

1,191,351 


9 
6 
3 
3 


4 
5 
3 
3 


1,040 00 
780 00 
390 00 
390 00 


160 00 
120 00 
60 00 
60 00 


773 33 
580 00 
290 00 
290 00 


41 


Lee . 
Monterey 
Otis . 
Tyringham 






1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 


6,436,119 
831,326 

588,674 
559,024 


25 
2 
5 
2 


5 
2 
5 
1 


1,650 00 
638 00 
638 00 
374 00 


95 00 
95 00 
95 00 
95 00 


382 43 
382 44 
244 70 


42 


Hinsdale 
Peru . 
Washington 
Windsor 






1901 
1901 
1912 
1901 


1,129,128 
406,402 
285,985 
514,717 


9 
2 
2 
3 


6 
2 
1 

2 


1,000 00 
375 GO 
500 00 
625 00 


160 00 
60 GO 
80 00 

100 00 


773 33 
290 00 
386 67 
483 33 


43 


Halifax 
Kingston 
Pembroke 
Plympton 






1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 


1,551,455 

3,927,349 

2,900,144 

779,816 


4 
18 
11 

3 


1 
5 
3 
3 


560 00 
1,240 00 
1,040 00 

360 00 


70 00 
140 00 
130 00 

60 00 


338 33 

741 11 
628 33 
225 56 


44 


Cheshire 
Hancock 
Lanesboroug 
New Ashforc 


h 




1912 
1902 
1902 
1902 


1,871,888 
643,369 

1,461,637 
150,358 


8 

6 

10 

1 


3 
5 
6 

1 


1,000 00 
400 00 

1,000 00 
100 00 


166 20 
66 44 

166 20 
16 61 


773 35 

309 31 

773 34 

77 33 


45 


Dana . 
Greenwich . 

New Salem . 
Prescott 




1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 


836,423 
639,848 
819,299 
293,741 


5 
3 
9 
3 


2 
3 
6 
3 


716 84 
445 80 
891 52 
445 80 


129 42 
77 67 
155 31 

77 67 


556 49 
344 22 
688 38 
344 22 


46 


Auburn 
Sutton 




1902 
1902 


5,743,245 
2,020,583 


32 
18 


12 
10 


1,900 00 
1,500 00 


277 00 
226 80 


855 19 



P.D. 2. 



85 





Statistics 


of Superintendency Unions — Continued 






UNION 


go 
Q 


State 
triennial 
valuation, 

May, 

1928 


Number 
of prin- 
cipals 
and full 

time 

teachers, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


Number 

of 
school 
build- 
ings, 
Jan. 1, 
1928 


Each town's 

SHARE OF super- 
intendent's — 


State Aid 

for 1927-28 

on account 

of em- 


Full 
salary 


Travel- 
ing 
expenses 


ployment 
of super- 
intendent 
of 
schools 


47 


Essex . 

Hamilton 

Lynnfield 

Topsfield 

Wenham 


1902 
1917 
1912 
1912 
1902 


$1,655,289 
5,952,124 
3,386,423 
3,119,154 
3,409,406 


11 
17 

8 
8 
8 


3 
2 
2 
1 
1 


$800 00 

1,200 00 

600 00 

600 00 

800 00 


$80 18 

120 33 

60 18 

60 00 

80 18 


$386 67 

290 02 
289 94 
386 67 


48 


Carver 

LakeviUe 

Rochester 


1902 
1902 
1902 


3,186,285 
1,688,955 
1,603,093 


10 

8 
8 


3 
3 

4 


1,040 00 
728 00 
832 00 


160 00 
112 00 

128 00 


773 33 
541 33 
618 67 


49 


Medfield 
Millis . 
Norfolk 
Westwood . 


1908 
1902 
1902 
1902 


3,105,813 

3,524,464 
1,852,676 
4,292,030 


13 
15 
6 
10 


2 
3 
2 

2 


833 34 
833 33 
833 33 
833 33 


115 65 
115 65 
115 65 
115 65 


483 34 
483 33 
483 33 
483 33 


50 


Mount Washington 
New Marlborough 
Sheffield 


1902 
1902 
1902 


230,646 
1,746,822 
1,610,214 


1 
10 
14 


1 
6 
6 


277 46 
1,109 97 
1,387 54 


34 81 
200 74 
199 50 


188 08 
789 41 
955 84 


51 


Chesterfield . 
Williamsburg 
Worthington 


1902 
1902 
1902 


602,801 

1,940,779 

708,393 


5 

15 

5 


5 
5 

4 


700 00 

1,400 00 

700 00 


74 66 
149 30 
74 64 


466 44 
932 86 
466 43 


62 


Alford 

Egremont . 
Richmond . 
West Stockbridge . 


1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 


342,624 
1,036,523 

889,527 
1,455,225 


2 
3 
6 

8 


2 
3 
6 
5 


418 75 

418 75 

837 50 

1,116 63 


100 01 
100 01 
100 01 
100 01 


314 24 
314 23 
567 89 
736 97 


53 


Berkley 
Dighton 
Freetown 


1902 
1902 
1924 


1,012,388 
5,313,756 
2,211,728 


6 
22 
11 


2 
9 
6 


590 00 

1,475 00 

885 00 


108 52 
257 02 
148 51 


389 85 
576 82 


54 


Rehoboth . 
Seekonk 


1902 
1913 


2,167,937 
4,801,903 


12 
21 


9 
5 


1.604 10 

1.605 00 


198 35 
208 23 


963 78 


55 


Conway 
Deerfield 
Sunderland . 
Whately 


1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 


1,132,229 
5,566,165 
1,619,664 
1,595,780 


6 
32 
10 
10 


3 

8 
3 
5 


633 34 

1,266 66 

633 34 

633 34 


80 00 

160 00 

80 00 

80 00 


386 67 

386 67 
386 67 


56 


Granville 
Sandisfield . 
Southwick . 
ToUand 


1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 


816,861 

792,484 

2,077,031 

405,094 


6 

5 

10 

1 


5 
5 
11 

1 


1,050 00 
875 00 

1,225 00 
350 00 


150 00 
125 00 
175 00 
50 00 


580 00 
483 33 
676 67 
193 33 


57 


Dudley 
Webster 


1903 
1903 


5,359,772 
16,624,309 


23 
49 


10 

7 


1,500 00 
3,000 00 


217 54 
79 83 


— 


58 


Belchertown 
Enfield 


1904 
1904 


2,036,885 
803,936 


18 
4 


7 
2 


2,232 00 
868 00 


216 19 
105 14 


1,345 88 
534 99 


59 


Merrimac 
Newbury 
Salisbury 
West Newbury 


1912 
1905 
1905 
1905 


2,520,085 
2,590,236 
3,874,234 
1,290,998 


14 
8 
9 

13 


4 
2 
2 
3 


625 00 
625 00 
625 00 
625 00 


100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 


483 34 
483 33 
483 33 
483 33 


60 


Ashbvirnham 
Winchendon 


1905 
1905 


1,981,397 
7,100,026 


12 
42 


4 
9 


1,161 11 
2,322 22 


145 79 
291 57 


644 45 


61 


Ayer . 

Boxborough 

Shirley 


1909 
1921 
1909 


4,098,767 

386,667 

2,513,505 


18 
2 
9 


4 
2 
3 


2,062 50 

562 50 

1,125 00 


220 80 
60 22 
120 43 


1,063 33 
290 00 
580 00 


62 


Somerset 
Swansea 


1909 
1909 


12,152,105 
4,568,460 


35 
21 


7 
10 


1,600 00 
1,600 00 


213 90 
213 90 


— 


63 


Norton 
Plainville 


1911 
1911 


3,105,987 
1,836,898 


18 
11 


4 
2 


1,965 00 
1,310 00 


408 80 
279 98 


1,157 82 
775 51 


64 


Franklin 
Wrentham . 


1911 
1911 


9,988,131 
3,551,008 


54 
12 


10 


3,150 00 
1,350 00 


483 83 
208 35 


580 26 


65 


Clarksburg . 
Florida 
Monroe 
Savoy . 


1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 


1,060,516 

1,713,528 

1,175,203 

332,495 


8 
6 
2 
5 


4 
5 
1 
5 


810 00 
675 00 
405 00 
810 00 


120 00 
100 00 
60 00 
120 00 


580 00 
483 33 
290 00 
580 00 



86 



P.D. 2. 





Statistics 


of Superintendency Unions — Concluded 




1 




UNION 


a a 
» o 


State 
triennial 
valuation, 


Number 
of prin- 
cipals 
and full 


Number 

of 
school 
build- 


Each town's 

SHARE OF super- 
intendent's — 


State Aid 

for 1927-28 

on account 

of em- 






ployment 


Z 




"S 
Q 


May, 
1928 


teachers, 

Jan. 1, 

1928 


ings, 
Jan. 1, 
1928 


Full 
salary 


Travel- 
ing 
expenses 


of super- 
intendent 
of 
schools 


66 


Blackstone . 
MillviUe 


1913 
1917 


$3,147,802 
2,044,616 


25 
11 


9 
4 


$1,680 00 
1,120 00 


$240 00 
160 00 


$1,160 00 
773 33 


67 


Boxford 
Middleton . 
Wilmington . 


1916 
1916 
1916 


1,362,928 
1,745,367 
4,005,068 


4 

5 

27 


3 
1 

8 


700 00 

700 00 

2,100 00 


126 45 
126 45 
379 33 


386 67 

386 66 

1,160 00 


68 


Billerica 
Burlington . 


1920 
1920 


11,639,684 
2,465,354 


39 

8 


5 
1 


2,800 00 
750 00 


— 


352 11 


69 


Raynham 

West Bridgewater 


1920 
1920 


2,118,902 
3,316,940 


12 
22 


5 

8 


1,200 00 
2,400 00 


171 60 
329 83 


646 54 
1,286 79 


70 


Boylston 
Shrewsbury . 
West Boylston 


1921 
1921 
1921 


953,526 
8,066,166 
1,962,671 


5 
48 
17 


2 
9 
4 


430 00 
2,580 00 
1,290 00 


40 00 
240 00 
120 00 


193 33 

580 00 


71 


Bedford 
Lexington . 


1921 
1921 


2,887,736 
18,619,889 


9 

77 


2 
6 


900 00 
3,600 00 


91 80 
149 80 


382 31 


72 


North Reading 
Reading 


1922 
1922 


2,388,732 
16,592,628 


8 

77 


2 
10 


3,800 00 
420 00 


— 


165 88 


73 


Dunstable . 

Pepperell 

Tyngsborough 


1911 
1909 
1924 


501,606 
3,711,283 
1,392,147 


2 

18 

6 


1 
5 

1 


435 00 

1,740 00 

725 04 


44 79 
179 14 
74 63 


279 86 

1,119 41 

466 44 


74 


Bolton 
Carlisle 
Harvard 
Littleton 
Stow . 

Totals . 


1926 
1926 
1926 
1926 
1926 


1,331,450 

779,484 
2,778,427 
2,777,951 
1,842,359 


5 
4 
5 
10 
10 


2 
1 
1 
2 
3 


488 75 
320 00 
638 40 
957 50 
797 95 


66 81 

49 72 

103 05 

204 08 

106 69 


287 73 
191 48 
384 01 
601 59 
468 52 




— 


— 


— 


— 


$245,909 39 


$30,043 18 


$98,891 27 



Note. — There are 228 towns in unions, — 187 State-aided, 41 not State-aided. Of the foregoing 
unions, those numbered 21, 25, 35, and 50 were authorized by special acts of the legislature. 



P.D. 2. 87 

IV. Towns op Less than 500 Families and State Aid for High School 

Education therein, School Year ending June 30, 1928 

Explanation of Abbreviations and Symbols in Table 
In column 5 — 

"Acad." denotes that high school education was furnished by a high school not under the order and 
superintendence of the school committee. 
In columns 5 and 7 — 

"Excess" denotes that the ratio of the valuation to the net average membership of the schools exceeded 
the corresponding ratio for the Commonwealth; consequently, the town received no high school aid 
or tuition reimbursement. 
In column 7 — 

* denotes valuation over $1,000,000; reimbursement, one-half. 

t denotes valuation of $500,000 to $1,000,000; reimbursement, three-fourths. 
No symbol, valuation less than $500,000; reimbursement, in full. 
In column 8 — 

t denotes that the town expended from local taxation for the support of schools less than $4 per $1,000 
valuation; consequently, the town received no high school transportation reimbursement. 

* denotes said expenditure was between $4 and $5 per $1,000 valuation; reimbursement, one-half. 
t denotes said expenditure was between $5 and $6; reimbursement, three-fourths. 

No symbol, said expenditure was over $6; reimbursement, in full. 





o 










Attendance at high 


o 




Ol 




Local 


HIGH SCHOOL 


SCHOOLS IN OTHER TOWNS 


o 




i 

a 
U 

1 












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s 


Towns 


o 


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a§ 

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■a3 


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13 

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a 

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Alford 


62 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


$204 00 


$238 00 


$442 00 


Ashby 


236 


4 


37 


2.628 


$657 14 




— 


— 


657 14 


Ashfield . 


233 


4 


51 


3.033 


758 33 


— 


— 


— 


758 33 


Becket 


196 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11 


1,091 91t 


765 05 


1,856 96 


Bedford . 


325 


— 


— 


— 


— 


75 


4,109 04* 


1,593 50 


5,702 54 


Belchertown 


486 


4 


124 


5.00 


1,250 00 


— • 


— 


— 


1,250 00 


Bellingham 


496 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


53 


2,708 16* 


2,814 00 


5,522 16 


Berkley . 


249 


— 


— 


— 


— 


28 


2,394 97 1 


3,092 98 


5,487 95 


Berlin 


221 


— 


— • 


— 


— 


25 


1,153 76* 


613 90 


1,767 66 


Bernardston 


191 


4 


55 


3.557 


889 29 


— 


— 


— 


889 29 


Blandford 


129 











8 


Excess 


618 80 


618 80 


Bolton 


184 


11 


5 


.823 


205 88 


16 


737 67* 


1,006 16 


1,949 71 


Boxborough 


73 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


1,795 24 


1,300 30 


3,095 54 


Boxford . 


163 


— 


— 


— 


Acad. 


21 


Excess 


1,925 85 


1,925 85 


Boylston . 


188 


— 


— 


— 


— 


40 


4,643 97J 


1,218 50 


5,862 47 


Brewster . 


219 


4 


27 


— 


Excess 


— ■ 


— • 


— 


— 


Brimfield . 


207 


4 


71 


5.00 


1,250 00 


— 


— 


— 


1,250 00 


Brookfield 


210 


4 


56 


3.314 


828 57 


— 


— 


— 


828 57 


Buckland 


384 


— 




— 


— 


79 


4,552 40* 


2,140 00 


6,692 40 


BurUngton 


236 


— 


— . 


— 


— . 


54 


2,872 49* 


4,216 66 


7,089 15 


CarUsle 


134 


— 


— . 


— 


— . 


37 


3,382 73t 


2,418 40 


5,801 13 


Carver 


276 


— 


— 


— 


— 


44 


Excess 


3,360 37 


3,360 37 


Charlemont 


234 


4 


52 


4.00 


1,000 00 


— 


— 


— 


1,000 00 


Charlton . 


445 


4 


75 


4.142 


1,035 71 


— 


— 


— 


1,035 71 


Cheshire . 


362 


— 


— . 


— . 


— 


44 


1,792 34* 


1,687 62 


3,479 96 


Chester . 


330 


4 


85 


4.227 


1,057 14 


— 


— • 


— • 


1,057 14 


Chesterfield 


127 


— 


— . 


— 


— . 


14 


1,451 43 


1,685 50 


3,136 93 


Chilmark 


80 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


Excess 


640 80 


640 80 


Clarksburg 


255 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


3,107 04 1 


360 00 


3,467 04 


Colrain . 


388 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


2,969 81* 


4,038 15 


7,007 96 


Conway . 


256 


4 


— 


— 


— 


33 


2,428 60t 


3,891 65 


6,320 25 


Cummington 


148 


2 


17 


1.00 


250 00 


10 


1,000 00 


1,390 55 


2,640 55 


Dana 


183 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


21 


1,881 89t 


1,454 61 


3,336 50 


Dover 


212 


5 


42 


— • 


Excess 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Dunstable 


99 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12 


1,086 88 


1,405 60 


2,492 48 


Duxbury . 


455 


4 


78 


— . 


Excess 


— 


— 


— 


— • 


East Brookfield 


137 


— 


— 


— . 


— 


22 


939 00* 


1,028 69 


1,967 69 


Eastham . 


128 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16 


Excess 


1,620 40 


1,620 40 


Edgartown 


360 


4 


51 


— 


Excess 


— 


— 


— ■ 


— 


Egremont 


131 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18 


Excess 


1,451 80 


1,451 80 


Enfield . 


205 


— 


— 


— 


— 


23 


1,8.33 95t 


2,021 46 


3,855 41 


Erving 


324 


— 


— . 


— 


— 


57 


3,387 50* 


3,891 41 


7,278 91 


Essex 


460 


4 


69 


3 . 585 


896 43 


— 


. — . 


. — - 


896 43 


Florida . 


72 




— 


— 


— 


3 


Excess 


69 90* 


69 90 


Freetown 


397 


— 


— 


— , 


— 


26 


1,515 30* 


2,965 96 


4,481 26 



> Third year of junior high school. 



88 P.D. 2. 

IV. Towns of Less than 500 Families and State Aid for High School Education 
therein, School Year ending June 30, 1928 — Continued 



Gay Head 
GiU 

Goshen 

Gosnold . 

Granby . 

Granville . 

Greenwich 

Halifax 

Hamilton 

Hampden 

Hancock . 

Harvard . 

Hawley . 

Heath 

Hinsdale . 

HoUand . 

Hubbardston 

HuU 

Huntington 

Lakeville . 

Lanesborough 

Leverett . 

Leyden 

Lincoln 

Littleton . 

Lunenburg 

Lynnfield 

Marion 

Marshfield 

Mashpee . 

Mattapoisett 

Medfield . 

Mendon . 

Middlefield 

Middleton 

MilUs 

MiUviUe . 

Monroe . 

Monterey 

Montgomery 

Mt. Washington 

Nahant . 

New Ashford 

New Braintree 

Newbury . 

New Marlborough 

New Salem 

Norfolk . 

Northborough 

Northfield 

North Reading 

NorweU . 

Oak Bluffs 

Oakham 

Orleans 

Otis 

Paxton 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Peru 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Plainfield 

Plainville 

Plympton 

Prescott . 

Princeton 

Raynham 

Richmond 

Rochester 

Rowe 

Rowley 

Royalston 

Russell 

Rutland . 

Salisbury . 

Sandisfield 

Sandwich 

Savoy 

Sheffield . 

Shelburne 

Sherborn . 

Shirley 

Shutesbury 





1 

43 

210 

55 

27 


2 


3 


4 




— 


— 


— 







. 


z 




181 


— 


— 


. — 




173 


— 


— 


— 




113 













133 





— 







419 


4 


91 


— 




164 


— 


— 


— 




110 


— 


— • 


— 




291 
87 
97 


— 


— 


— 















271 





— . 







40 





— 







278 





— . 







433 


— 


— 







342 


4 


91 


5.00 




310 


— 


— 


. — . 




254 





— 







191 


— 


— 


— . 




83 


— 


— 


— 




242 


11 


15 







317 


4 


60 


3.00 




422 


4 


67 


4.00 




321 


— 


— 


— . 




360 


11 


17 


— 




450 


4 


62 


— 




64 





— 







338 


11 


15 


— 




441 


4 


82 


5.00 




247 

58 

257 


4 


29 


3.00 










ZI 




315 


4 


95 


5.00 




460 
39 
80 
60 
20 


— 




— 




— 


— 


— 




354 
26 
89 


11 


17 


— 










Z] 




354 


— 


— 





5h 


262 


4 


25 


2.028 




153 


4 


54 


4.066 




272 





— 






496 


4 


74 


4.028 




455 


4 


87 


4.90 




303 


— 


— . 


— 




389 


4 


60 


4.171 




293 


4 


42 






138 


— 


— 


— . 




333 


4 


77 


— 




94 


— . 


— 







126 


— 


— 







123 


— 


— 


— . 




408 


4 


50 


3.284 




46 





— 






169 


4 


39 







90 


— 


— 


— 




83 





— . 


. 




356 


4 


82 


4.25 




140 


— 


. — . 


— 




70 


— 


. — 


— 




185 


3 


21 







377 


— 


— 


__ 




131 













275 





__ 







82 





— 


— . 




343 













193 





— . 







276 





— 


— 




266 


4 


39 


3.1 




479 











131 


— 


— 


— . 




401 


4 


64 


4.00 




103 











390 


4 


59 


4.028 




436 


4 


220 


— 




312 


4 


28 


— 




452 


— 


— 


— 




65 


~ 


~ 


~ 



5 




6 


— 




4 


■ — • 




33 


— 




5 


— 




2 


— 




29 


— 




18 


— ■ 




9 


— 




28 


Excess 1 


— 


— 




29 


— 




5 


Acac 


. 


1 


— 




7 


— 




7 


— 




30 


— 




5 


— 




39 


— 




86 


$1,250 00 1 


— 


— 




42 


— 




47 


— 




23 


— 




2 


— 




51 


750 


00 


— 


1,000 


00 


— 


— 




70 


— 




11 


Excess 1 


— 


— 




8 


— 




36 


1,250 


00 


— 


750 


00 


— 


— 




9 
42 


1,250 


00 


— 


— 




48 







2 


— 




3 


— 




2 


— 




54 


— 




4 


— 




18 


— 




35 


507 


00 


— 


1,016 


50 


— 


— 




56 


1,007 


00 


— 


1,225 


00 


— 


— 




81 


1,042 


86 


— 


Excess 1 


— 


— 




25 


Excess 1 




— 




13 


— 




20 


— 




18 


892 


86 


— . 


— 




4 


Excess 1 




— 




6 
11 


1,062 


50 


— 


— - 




31 


— 




4 


— 




3 
54 


— 




18 


— 




39 


— 




15 


— 




52 


— 




25 


— 




40 


775 


00 


65 


— 




6 


1,000 


00 


— 


— 




1 


1,007 


00 


— 


Excess 


— 


Excess 


— - 


— 




33 


— 




4 



7 




$440 00 1 


2,396 


25 1 


500 


00 


Excess 1 


2,169 


95t 


1,585 


69 1 


626 


761 


Excess 1 


3,205 


32t 


326 


63t 


Excess 1 


703 


08 


880 


74 


2,842 


50t 


800 


00 


2,828 96t 


Excess 


1,716 


75* 


2,339 


55* 


2,911 


80 


240 


00 


Excess 


Excess 


Excess 


Excess 


2,289 


04* 


Excess 


1,923 


05* 


2,671 


63* 


Excess 1 


Excess 1 


308 


00 


Excess 


Excess 


351 


04 


1,219 88t| 


1,208 


78* 


2,904 


14* 


4,247 


99* 


2,289 


38 


1,853 


22 


2,280 901 


1,532 84J 


Excess 


528 


00 


1,229 


50 


2,011 


35t 


511 


23 


Excess 1 


3,135 


95* 


1,311 OOtI 


2,217 


04* 


1,355 


62 


2,060 


30* 


1,133 


64* 


Excess 1 


3,025 


10* 


386 36t| 


100 


52 


1,859 


38* 


505 


00 



8 




$407 40 II 


1,041 


60 


640 


50 


t 




1,815 


83 


2,294 


60 


653 


60 


1,345 


70 


2,087 


32 


195 90t|| 


76 


00 


687 


40 


958 


30 


2,574 


18 


924 


13 


3,928 


61 


2,632 


00* 


2,151 


84 


1,830 


11 


1,958 


58 


166 


501 


2,193 


08 


3,995 


13 


802 


85 


631 


30 


1,379 


52 


977 


10 


1,546 


80 


2,000 


00 


5 


00* 


172 


80 


139 


35t 


198 


10 


1,361 


10 


427 


70 


2,190 


74 


2,792 


07 


1,649 


54 


4,625 


04 


2,074 


05 


2,016 


10 


1,489 


00 


982 


74 


571 


55 


577 


19 


1,307 


25 


2,094 


58 


592 


90 


214 


00 


1,650 


31 


1,253 


08 


3,741 


27 


1,385 


30 


2,548 


90 


1,965 


36 


1,181 


19 


2,761 


40 


650 


20 


121 


80 


2,928 


15 


322 65 t 



9 

$847 40 

3,437 85 

1,140 50 

3,985 78 
3,880 29 
1,280 36 
1,345 70 

5,292 64 
522 53 
76 00 
1,390 48 
1,839 04 
5,416 68 
1,724 13 
6,757 57 
2,632 00 
1,250 00 

3.868 59 
4,169 66 
4,870 38 

406 50 

2,193 08 

750 00 

1,000 00 

3,995 13 

802 85 

631 30 

3,668 56 

1,250 00 

750 00 

977 10 

3,469 85 

1,250 00 

4,671 63 

5 00 

172 80 

447 35 

198 10 

1,361 10 

778 74 

3,410 62 

4,000 85 

507 00 

1,016 50 

4,553 68 

1,007 00 

1,225 00 

8,873 03 

1,042 86 

4,363 43 

3.869 32 
3,769 90 
2,515 58 

892 86 
571 55 

1,105 19 
2,536 75 
1,062 50 
4,105 93 
1,104 13 

214 00 
4,786 26 
2,564 08 
5,958 31 
2,740 92 
4,609 20 
3,099 00 
1,181 19 

775 00 
5,786 50 
1,036 56 
1,000 00 

222 32 
1,007 00 



4,787 53 
827 65 



> Third year of junior high schooL 



P.D. 2. 89 

IV. Towns of Less than 500 Families and State Aid for High School Education 
therein, School Year ending June 30, 1928 — Concluded 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Southampton . 


222 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


$1,145 63t 


$513 08 


$1,658 71 


Southborough . 


450 


4 


51 


4.884 


$1,221 00 


— 


— 


— 


1,221 00 


Southwick 


289 


— 


— 


— 


— 


33 


1,929 77* 


3.520 15 


5,449 92 


Sterling . 


341 


2 


31 


2.028 


507 14 


20 


1.070 12* 


866 40 


2,443 66 


Stockbridge 


454 


4 


102 


— 


Excess 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Stow 


280 


4 


43 


3.057 


764 29 


— 


— 


— 


764 29 


Sturbridge 


397 


— 


— 


— 


— 


43 


1.917 50* 


1,892 90 


3,810 40 


Sudbury . 


297 


4 


49 


— 


Excess 


— 


— ■ 


— 


— 


Sunderland 


277 


— 


— 


— 


— 


40 


2,422 79* 


1,919 10 


4,341 89 


Tewksbury 


477 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


95 


3,946 48* 


3,531 30 


7,477 78 


Tisbury . 


362 


4 


82 


— 


Excess 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Tolland . 


50 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Excess 


No claim 


— 


Topsfield . 


253 


4 


59 


— 


Excess 


— 


— 




— 


Townsend 


473 


4 


91 


4.342 


1.085 71 


— 


— 


— 


1,085 71 


Truro 


162 


— 


— 


— . 


— 


37 


Excess 


3,302 40 


3,302 40 


Tyngsborough . 


281 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


1,573 15* 


1,833 00 


3,406 15 


Tyringham 


70 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


1,300 00 


956 30 


2,256 30 


Upton 


400 


4 


72 


3.59 


897 50 


— 


— 


— 


1,790 00 


Wales 


120 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


892 50 


814 00 


814 00 


Warwick . 


96 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 


970 00 


713 00 


1,683 00 


Washington 


59 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


No claim 


No claim 


— 


Wellfleet . 


279 


4 


78 


5.00 


1.250 00 


. — . 


— 


— 


1,250 00 


Wendell . 


93 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11 


Excess 


930 20 


930 20 


Wenham . 


288 


H 


31 


— 


— 


45 


Excess 


952 24 


952 24 


West Boylston . 


395 


4 


48 


4.257 


1,064 29 




— 


— 


1,064 29 


West Brookfield 


370 


1' 


14 


1.041 


285 71 


26 


1,370 00* 


1,592 64 


3.248 35 


Westhampton . 


82 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


620 00 


531 53t 


1.151 53 


Westminster 


365 


4 


39 


4.1 


1,025 00 


— 


— 


. — 


1.025 00 


West Newbury . 


401 


4 


59 


4.125 


1.031 25 


— 


— 


— 


1.031 25 


West Stockbridge 


268 


— 


— 


— 


— 


44 


1,846 83* 


3,319 61 


5.166 44 


West Tisbury . 


106 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


Excess 


940 80 


940 80 


Westwood 


316 


— 


— 


— 


— 


56 


Excess 


2,174 20 


2.174 20 


Whately . 


256 


— 


— 


— 


— ■ 


31 


1,581 64* 


1,711 76 


3.293 40 


Williamsburg . 


423 


4 


61 


3.833 


958 33 


— 


— 


— 


958 33 


Windsor . 


95 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 


1,111 86 


635 00 


1,746 86 


Worthington 


120 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11 


1,051 52t 


1,154 83 


2,206 35 


Wrentham 


434 


4 


62 


4.199 


1,049 95 


— 


— 


— 


1,049 95 


Yarmouth 


391 


4 


39 


— 


Excess 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Totals (167 towns) 


— 


— 


3,568 


— 


•137.004 38 


2.972 


$150,753 73 


$178,617 30 


.«366,375 41 



• Third year of junior high school. 

Summary 
Towns that maintained four-year high schools .... 

Received State grant . . . . . . . 36 ^ 

Did not receive State grant because "valuation per pupil" was 
in excess of the corresponding ratio for the Commonwealth 16 
Towns sending pupils to high schools in other towns or cities 
Tuition expenditures: 

Reimbursed in full 27 ^ 

Reimbursed three-fourths ....... 24 

Reimbursed one-half . . . . . . .34 

Not reimbursed . . . . . . . .30 

Transportation expenditures: 

Reimbursed in full ........ 104 ^ 

Reimbursed three-fourths ....... 5 

Reimbursed one-half ....... 3 

Not reimbursed ........ 3 



52 



115 



Total 



167 



» In addition, Bolton, Cummington, Sterling and West Brookfield maintained high schools of less than 
four years, and received the State grant. 

' Twenty-three of these towns received reimbursement in full for both tuition and transportation ex- 
penditures. 

List of State-aided High Schools 
Ashby, Ashfield, Belchertown, Bernardston, Bolton, Brimfield, Brookfield, 
Charlemont, Charlton, Chester, Cummington, Essex, Huntington, Littleton, 
Lunenburg, Medfield, Mendon, Millis, New Marlborough, New Salem, North- 
borough, Northfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Plainville, Rutland, Sandwich, Sheffield, 
Southborough, Sterling, Stow, Townsend, Upton, Wellfleet, West Boylston, West 
Brookfield, Westminster, West Newbury, Williamsburg, Wrentham — 40. 



90 



P.D. 2. 



V. Certification of Teachers for State-aided High Schools 



Teachers in State-aided high schools (of which there were 40 in the year 1927- 
28) are required by section 12, chapter 71 of the General Laws, to hold certificates 
issued by the Department of Education. Teachers in other high schools and teach- 
ers in elementary schools are not required to hold State certificates. Applicants 
are usually issued certificates on credentials without examination. 

The Department recently adopted the additional regulation in connection with 
teachers' certificates, that such certificates would be issued only to teachers in the 
State-aided high schools of Massachusetts or to bona fide candidates for positions 
in such schools. 

Two classes of certificates are now granted, namely, term and special. A general 
certificate was granted prior to July 1, 1912. The requirements for these certifi- 
cates are stated in a circular of information which may be obtained from the De- 
partment of Education. 

The total number of high school teachers' certificates granted up to December 
1, 1928, was as follows: 

General, 587; Preliminary, 1,183; Special, 798; Term, 1,272; Life, 6. Total, 3,846. 

VI. County Training Schools 
The following table gives a list of the county training schools in the State for 
the commitment of habitual truants, absentees, and school offenders: 



County Training School 

Essex ...... 

Hampden ..... 

Middlesex 1 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth Union 
Worcester ..... 



Location 

Lawrence 
Springfield 
North Chelmsford 
Walpole 
Oakdale 



Superintendent 

W. Grant Fancher 
Clifford M. Granger 
Charles G. Hoyt 
James H. Craig 
Alton W. Pierce 



The counties of Barnstable, Berkshire, Dukes, Franklin, Hampshire, and Nan- 
tucket are exempted by law from maintaining training schools of their own, but 
the county commissioners of each of these counties are required to assign an es- 
tablished training school as a place of commitment for habitual truants, absentees, 
and school offenders. The places designated by the several commissioners are as 
follows: Barnstable County, Walpole; Berkshire County, Springfield; Dukes, Frank- 
lin and Hampshire Counties, North Chelmsford; Nantucket County, ... An agent 
of the Department visited all the county schools during the year. 

Table showing the Number of Pupils Attending, Admitted, and Discharged 



County Training School 


Enrolled 

July 1, 

1927 


Enrolled 

July 1, 

1928 


Admitted 
during 
the year 


Discharged 
during 
the year 


Average 
attend- 
ance 


Essex ....... 

Hampden ...... 

Middlesex ...... 

Norfolk, Bristol, Plymouth Union 
Worcester 


99 
47 
103 
28 
42 


103 
48 

100 
38 
39 


37 
16 
77 
30 
17 


45 
18 
80 
20 
20 


94 
44 
88 
31 
33 


Totals 


319 


328 


177 


183 


290 



VII. 



Statistics of Schools in State Institutions for the Year ending 
Nov. 30, 1928 





Number of Pupils 


Number of 
Teachers 


state institutions 


Enrolled 

Dec. 1, 

1927 


Enrolled 

Dec. 1, 

1928 


Admitted 
during 
the year 


Discharged 
during 
the year 


Average 
attend- 
ance 


Men 


Women 


State Industrial School for 
Girls, Lancaster 

Lyman School for Boys, West- 
borough .... 

State Industrial School for 
Boys, Shirley . 


279 
344 

277 


307 
407 
302 


291 
718 
497 


263 
616 
472 


304 
372 
297 


3 
51 


17 
14 
15 


Totals 


900 


1,016 


1,506 


1,351 


973 


54 


46 



1 Under the Law, commitments from Boston, Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop in Suffolk County must 
be to the training school for the county of Middlesex. 



P.D. 2. 91 

VIII. General School Fund 

(Chapter 70, General Laws) 



Distribution under Part I (Nov. 20, 1928): 

General $4,887,267 63 

Supplementary .......... 330,547 H 

Distribution under Part II (March 10, 1928): 

Towns in which the proportionate amount paid by auch towns of every 
thousand dollars of State tax as established by the last preceding 
valuation made for the purpose of apportioning such tax is: 

Class I— 8c or less $39,849 45 

Class II — More than 8c but not more than 16c .... 65,959 67 

Class III — More than 16c but not more than 40c . . . 165,568 43 

Class IV— More than 40c but not more than 50o . . . . 67,892 82 



From income tax (Part I) $5,217,814 74 

From income of Massachusetts School Fund (Part II) . . . . 213,428 18 

From income tax (Part II) 125,842 19 



$5,217,814 74 



$339,270 37 



5,557,085 11 



STATE-AIDED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Table No. 1 — Roster of State-aided vocational and part-time schools 

School Year ending August 31, 1928 

one hundred seventy-three (all) schools IN OPERATION DURING THE YEAR 

(or now) in 75 CITIES AND TOWNS LISTED CHRONOLOGICALLY BY TYPES OF SCHOOLS, 

WITH DATES OF ESTABLISHMENT AND NAMES OP DIRECTORS 

Group I. Twenty-one day industrial schools (boys) 
Smith's Agricultural (Northampton), Oct., 1908; Herbert N. Loomis. 
Newton Vocational, Feb., 1909; Michael W. Murray. 
New Bedford Vocational, Nov., 1909; William H. Mackintosh. 
Worcester Boys' Trade, Feb., 1910; Albert J. Jameson. 
Somerville Vocational School for Boys, Sept., 1910; Harry L. Jones. 
Lowell Vocational, Sept., 1911; Thomas F. Fisher. 
Springfield Trade, Sept., 1911; George A. Burridge. 
Westfield Boys' Trade, Sept., 1911; Chester C. Derby. 
Boston Trade, Feb., 1912; William C. Crawford. 
Quincy, Sept., 1912; Elijah P. Barrows. 
Holyoke Vocational, Sept., 1914; Matthew S. Herbert. 
Diman (Fall River), May, 1916; Frederick H. Rundall. 
Independent Industrial Shoemaking School of the City of Lynn, Aug., 1918; 

Michael J. Tracey. 
Chicopee Vocational, Sept., 1921; John H. Sullivan. 
Weymouth Industrial, Feb., 1924; Frederick W. Hilton. 
Vineyard Haven Carpentry School (Tisbury), Sept., 1925; Henry A. Ritter. 
Beverly Trade, Nov., 1926; Edgar A. Winters. 
Haverhill Trade, Nov., 1926; Albert L. Barbour. 
Everett Trade, Sept., 1927; James T. Gearon. 
Pittsfield Day Industrial, May 1928; John F. Moran. 
Waltham Day Vocational, Sept., 1928; Harold L. Pride. 

Group II. Two day industrial schools (girls) 
Trade School for Girls (Boston), Sept., 1909; Florence E. Leadbetter. 
David Hale Fanning Trade School for Girls (Worcester), Sept., 1911; EUzabeth 
W. Burbank. 

Group III. Nineteen evening industrial schools (men) 
Cambridge, Oct., 1907; James Dugan. 

New Bedford Evening Vocational, Nov., 1907; William R. Mackintosh. 
Lawrence, Mar., 1908; Francis X. Hogan. 

Boston Trade School, evening classes, Oct., 1908; Frederic H. Sawyer. 
Chicopee, Oct., 1908; John H. Sullivan. 
Newton Evening Vocational, Feb., 1909; Michael W. Murray. 
Worcester Boys' Evening Trade, Feb., 1910; Albert J. Jameson. 
Lowell Evening Vocational, Sept., 1911; Thomas F. Fisher. 
Everett, Oct., 1911; J. Henry Clagg. 



92 P.D. 2. 

Holyoke Evening Vocational, Oct., 1911; Matthew S. Herbert. 

Quincy, Oct., 1911; James N. Muir. 

Fall River, Jan., 1914; Hector L. Belisle. 

Waltham, Dec, 1915; Harold L. Pride. 

Springfield Evening Trade, Feb., 1916; George A. Burridge. 

Beverly, Nov., 1916; Edgar A. Winters. 

Southbridge, Sept., 1919; James Forbes. 

Brookline, Jan., 1920; Oscar C. Gallagher. 

Lynn Evening Industrial Shoemaking, Jan., 1927; Michael J. Tracey. 

Haverhill, Mar., 1927; Albert L. Barbour. 

Group IV. Evening industrial schools (women) 
Not conducted 1927-28. 

Group V. Twenty-three day homemaking schools 
New Bedford Household Arts, Nov., 1907; WiUiam R. Mackintosh. 
Smith's Household Arts (Northampton), Oct., 1908; Herbert N. Loomis. 
Newton Vocational, Feb., 1909; Jeannie B. Kenrick. 
Lowell Vocational, Sept., 1911; Thomas F. Fisher. 

Essex County School of Homemaking (Hathorne), Sept., 1914; Fred A. Smith. 
Quincy School of Homemaking, June, 1916; Ruth S. Cowles. 
Fall River Household Arts, Nov., 1919; Hector L. Belisle. 
Boston Household Arts, Feb., 1920; Herbert S. Weaver. 
Somerville Household Arts, Nov., 1920; Mary H. Brown. 
Everett Household Arts, Mar., 1921; Fairfield Whitney. 
Scituate Household Arts, Sept., 1921; Harold C. Wingate. 
Hadley Household Arts, Apr., 1922; James P. Reed. 
Hatfield Household Arts, Sept., 1922; Flavel M. Gifford. 
Pittsfield Household Arts, Sept., 1922; John F. Gannon. 
Weymouth Household Arts, Feb., 1924; Frederick W. Hilton. 
Westport Household Arts, Mar., 1924; Milton E. Earle. 
Haverhill Household Arts, Sept., 1924; Albert L. Barbour. 
Falmouth Household Arts, Apr., 1925; Blynn E. Davis. 
Belchertown Household Arts, Mar., 1925; Herman C. Knight. 
Amesbury Household Arts, Sept., 1925; Ralph R. Barr. 
Shelburne Falls Household Arts, Sept., 1928; Frank P. Davison. 
Bourne Household Arts, Sept., 1928; James F. Peebles. 
Holyoke Household Arts, Sept., 1928; Howard Conant. 

Group VI . Thirty-six evening practical art schools 
New Bedford, Nov., 1907; William R. Mackintosh. 
Lawrence, Mar., 1908; Francis X. Hogan. 
Newton, Feb., 1909; Michael W. Murray. 
Lowell, Sept., 1911; Thomas F. Fisher. 

Worcester (Independent Board), Sept., 1911; Elizabeth W. Burbank. 
Everett, Oct., 1911; J. Henry Clagg. 
Holyoke, Oct., 1911; WiUiam R. Peck. 
Quincy, Oct., 1911; James N. Muir. 
Somerville, Oct., 1911; Mary H. Brown. 
Boston, Oct., 1912; Joseph F. Gould. 
Cambridge, Oct., 1912; James Dugan. 
Methuen, Oct., 1912; Lewis H. Conant. 
Wakefield, Oct., 1912; WiUard B. Atwell. 
Fall River, Jan., 1914; Hector L. Belisle. 
Gloucester, Jan., 1916; Ralph P. Ireland. 
Leominster, Feb., 1916; WiUiam H. Perry. 
Essex County (Hathorne), July, 1918; Fred A. Smith. 
Taunton, Sept., 1918; WendeU A. Mowry. 
HaverhiU, Nov., 1918; Albert L. Barbour. 
Beverly, Sept., 1919; Wilhelmina Patterson. 
Waltham, Nov., 1919; WiUiam H. Slayton. 
Brookline, Jan., 1920; Oscar C. GaUagher. 



P.D. 2. 93 

Worcester (School Committee), Jan., 1920; Catharine A. McHugh. 

Lynn, Feb., 1920; Ervin W. Engler, 

Gardner, June, 1920; Fordyce T. Reynolds. 

Webster, Sept., 1921; Chester R. Stacy. 

Needham, Oct., 1921; John C. Davis. 

Chicopee, Nov., 1921; John J. Desmond, Jr. 

Chelsea, Dec, 1921; Fred A. Pitcher. 

Norwood, Dec, 1921; Edmund C. Eastwood. 

Natick, Oct., 1922; Frederick W. Kingman. 

Medford, Oct., 1922; Stanley C. Battles. 

North Attleborough, Oct., 1924; George W. Morris, 

Salem, Nov., 1926; Nicholas T. McNeil. 

Brockton, Nov., 1926; Kenrick M. Baker. 

Somerset, Sept., 1928; H. Freeman Bates. 

Growp VII. Fifty-two part-time {co-operative and compulsory continuation) schools 
Co-operative schools : 

Beverly Co-operative Trade, Aug., 1909; Edgar A. Winters. 
Boston : 

Charlestown, Sept., 1919; Maurice J. Moriarty. 

Hyde Park, Sept., 1919; James C. Clarke. 

Dorchester, Sept., 1920; Arlon 0. Bacon. 

Brighton, Sept., 1922; Alexander MacGilvray. 

East Boston, June, 1925; Walter Naylor. 
Cole Trade, Southbridge, Sept., 1919; James Forbes. 
Weymouth, May, 1927; Frederick W. Hilton. 
Compulsory continuation schools: 
Boston, Sept., 1914; Paul V. Donovan. 
Adams, Sept., 1920; Ernest C. Simpson. 
Attleboro, Sept., 1920; Milton P. Dutton. 
Beverly, Sept., 1920; LesUe R. Jones. 
Braintree, Sept., 1920; C. Edward Fisher. 
Brockton, Sept., 1920; Kenrick M. Baker. 
Cambridge, Sept., 1920; James Dugan. 
Chelsea, Sept., 1920; Edward J. Hubner. 
Chicopee, Sept., 1920; John H. Sullivan. 
Clinton, Sept., 1920; Thomas F. Gibbons. 
Easthampton, Sept., 1920; Herbert D. Casey. 
Everett, Sept., 1920; James Gearon. 
Fall River, Sept., 1920; Charles E. Reed. 
Fitchburg, Sept., 1920; Watson Otis. 
Haverhill, Sept., 1920; Robert F. Coates. 
Holyoke, Sept., 1920; Edward J. Scanlon. 
Lawrence, Sept., 1920; Francis X. Hogan. 
Leominster, Sept., 1920; Rodney Poland. 
Lowell, Sept., 1920; Thomas A. Ginty. 
Ludlow, Sept., 1920; Melvin A. Lynch. 
Lynn, Sept., 1920; Ralph W. Babb. 
Maiden, Sept., 1920; Leroy M. Twichell. 
Marlborough, Sept., 1920; James T. O'Connor. 
New Bedford, Sept., 1920; Edward T. N. Sadler. 
North Adams, Sept., 1920; Justin Barrett. 
Northampton, Sept., 1920; Percival Mott. 
Northbridge, Sept., 1920; James S. Mullaney. 
Pittsfield, Sept., 1920; John F. Moran. 
Quincy, Sept., 1920; Harlan L. Harrington. 
Salem, Sept., 1920; Agnes V. Cragen. 
Somerville, Sept., 1920; Everett W. Ireland. 
Southbridge, Sept., 1920; Emmanuel F. Vantura. 
Springfield, Sept., 1920; Carroll W. Robinson. 
Taunton, Sept., 1920; Frank L. Caton. 
Waltham, Sept., 1920; WilUam H. Slayton. 



94 P.D. 2. 

Ware, Sept., 1920; William R. Barry. 

Watertown, Sept., 1920; Franklin P. Keating. 

Webster, Sept., 1920; Stephen L. Sadler. 

Westfield, Sept., 1920; Chester C. Derby. 

Worcester, Sept., 1920; Thomas F. Power. 

Gloucester, Sept., 1921; Ernest W. Fellows. 

Milford, Sept., 1921; Almorin 0. Caswell. 

Andover, Sept., 1923; Carl Gahan. 

Newton Voluntary Continuation School for Girls, Sept., 1927; Jessica Meserve. 

Group VIII. Four agricultural schools 

Smith's, Oct., 1908; Herbert N. Loomis. 
Bristol County, Sept., 1913; George H. Gilbert. 
Essex County, Oct., 1913; Fred A. Smith. 
Norfolk County, Oct., 1916; Charles W. Kemp. 
Weymouth Branch, Oct., 1916; Hilmer S. Nelson, instructor. 

Group IX. Twelve vocational agricultural departments with names of instructors 

(daij) 1 

Hadley, Jan., 1912; Paul W. Brown. 
Ashfield, Aug., 1913; Louis H. Moseley. 
Reading, May, 1915; H. T. Wheeler. 
Worcester, May, 1917; John E. Gifford. 
Boston, Nov., 1918; Thomas P. Dooley. 
New Salem, Sept., 1919; R. Arthur Lundgren. 
Shelburne Falls, Mar., 1920; John J. Glavin. 
West Springfield, Apr., 1920; John E. Miltimore. 
Falmouth, Sept., 1920; Lewis B. Robinson. 
Hatfield, Aug., 1921; Edward J. Burke. 
Westport, Aug., 1925; Charles F. Oliver. 
Hanover, Apr., 1927; Leon M. Orcutt. 

Group X. Five vocational agricultural departments with names of instructors 

(evenings) ^ 
Haverhill, Aug., 1918; Ernest A. Howard. 
New Salem, Oct., 1923; R. Arthur Lundgren. 
Worcester, Apr., 1926; John E. Gifford. 
Essex County, Dec, 1926; A. W. Doohttle. 
West Springfield, Oct., 1927; John E. Miltimore. 

1 The superintendent of schools usually serves as director. 



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Charleatown 
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,-h' 




^ 


» 


^" ■ g ^ • 


G 


'c 

3 


HH(— ( -fcJ J-! 


o _. 


, x' 

la, VI 
VI, V 

Qg tui 
ning tl 




E 

c 

c« 


Ware Vllb . 
Watertown Vllb . 
Webster VI, Vllb 
Westfield I, Vllb 
West Springfield IX 
Westport V, IX . 
Weymouth I, V, VI 
Worcester I, II, III, 

IX, X . 
Cost to places payi: 
in but not maintai 
types of schools 


Total, all school 
tion paid for nor 
te office administ 
.nsportation 


Is 













r^-^ 



03 


f! 


i* 







Tt 












« 






C/J 


bi 



C 


CO 





•» 







O) 












m 




CD 




m 








■n 




a 


s 


5 



,50 



114 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 5. — Earnings of vocational agricultural pupils from projects and other 
supervised work during the periods covered hy their school attendance 

A. School Year ending August, 1928 









Other super- 






Vocational Aqbicultubal 


Enrolment 


Ownership 


vised 


Prizes 




Schools 


projects 


agricultural 


won> 










work 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Schools 












Bristol County 


106 


$41,648 84 


$36,119 90 


$26 50 


$77,795 24 


Essex County . 






181 


11,902 56 


49,355 45 


143 50 


61,401 51 


Norfolk County 






116 


11,738 26 


20,932 90 


500 05 


33,171 21 


Weymouth Branch 






22 


1,214 04 


1,895 58 


70 80 


3,180 42 


Northampton . 






20 


5,163 30 


704 58 


67 75 


5,935 63 


Departments 












Ashfield 


15 


7,733 91 


4,364 39 


50 75 


12,149 05 


Ayer 








10 


378 17 


687 39 


' — • 


1,065 56 


Boston . 








79 


— 


10,559 74 


392 00 


10,951 74 


Falmouth 








19 


1,035 85 


3,654 81 


49 50 


4,740 16 


Hadley . 








14 


1,627 11 


4,454 90 


16 00 


6,098 01 


Hanover 








12 


707 25 


325 95 


18 00 


1,051 20 


Hatfield . 








24 


1,324 79 


4,221 70 


118 75 


5,665 24 


New Salem 








13 


828 54 


4,828 63 


61 25 


5,718 42 


Reading 








19 


346 34 


3,076 29 


8 00 


3,430 63 


Shelburne Falls 








31 


6,104 02 


6,611 93 


71 00 


12,786 95 


Westport 








12 


562 92 


1,696 98 


14 50 


2,274 40 


West Springfield 








23 


862 52 


2,412 93 


69 75 


3,345 20 


Worcester 








40 


1,653 49 


4,722 19 


90 40 


6,466 08 


Totals 








756 


$94,831 91 


$160,626 24 


$1,768 50 


$257,226 65 



1 Column 5 gives credit to the various schools and departments for prizes in valuable commodities, 
scholarships and cash won by pupils: Prizes included: 52 firsts; 46 seconds; 44 thirds; 13 fourths; 2 
fifths; 1 sixth; 1 eighth; 2 specials; 4 medals; 6 cups; 4 trips; 269 ribbons; 3 scholarships ; 1 champion- 
ship. 















B. Precious School Yean 










Enrolment 


Eahnings 


Grand Totals 


Totals For 
















Total 




Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Farm 
worki 


Other 
work' 


Cash 


Credit 


cash and 
credit 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1912 . 


66 


4 


70 


$9,754 28 


$1,345 80 


— 


— 


$11,100 17 


1913 






86 


3 


89 


15,399 90 


2,582 61 


— 


— 


17.982 15 


1914 






230 


5 


235 


37,936 67 


4,124 06 


— 


— 


42,060 75 


1915 






413 


5 


418 


51,279 89 


4,974 86 


$25,229 73 


$31,025 02 


56,254 75 


1916 






489 


8 


497 


75,766 53 


8,406 90 


44,977 15 


39,196 28 


84,173 43 


1917 






511 


7 


518 


111,500 87 


8,808 16 


63,751 26 


56,557 77 


120,309 03 


1918 






314 


8 


322 


108,895 59 


12,827 39 


65,463 12 


59,206 35 


124,669 47 


1919 






305 


1 


306 


106,465 93 


12,236 43 


64,651 15 


54,051 15 


118,702 36 


1920 






526 


— 


526 


114,680 40 


— 


— 


— 


114,680 40 


1921 






643 


— 


643 


120,788 07 


— 


— 


— 


120.788 07 


1922 






808 


— 


808 


129,871 48 


— 


— 


— 


129,871 48 


1923 






840 





840 


161,183 47 


— 


— 


— 


161,183 47 


1924 






733 


— 


733 


167,708 92 


— 


— 


— 


167,708 92 


1925 






670 


— 


670 


187,539 91 


— 


— 


— 


187.539 91 


1926 






631 


— 


631 


198,663 57 


— 


— 


— 


198.663 57 


1927 






709 


■ — " 


709 


251,221 10 




~ 


~ 


251,221 10 



I The totals in this column include "Ownership projects" and "Other supervised farm work," thus the 
old and new tabulations may be compared as to volume of agricultural earnings. 

» Earnings from "Other work" were reported during the years 1912 to 1919 as a check on the motives 
of pupils and a measure of their real interest in agriculture. Every year, with the "home project" methods 
dominant in instruction, agricultural interest has been evident and agricultural earnings so overwhelmingly 
predominant that returns on "Other work" have been discontinued since 1919. 



P.D. 2. 

Table No. 



115 



Vital statistics by types of schools and departments 

School Year ending August SI, 1928 
Group I. Day industrial schools (boys) 









Distribution of enrolment by 












MEMBERSHIP AND ATTENDANCE 






Counties, Cities, 


«S 


a 








^ 


TowNS.AND Depart- 




°'3 


•S'^ 


3 


o 


to 


2 


j2-"-a 


3 


ments, 1927-28 




•3 J? 


2 


•o^ 


°l 


fl -S <u 


M 




1 








.»T3 

a a 


"1 


-a 


3 (D o 


1 




« 


z 


s 


<i 


fi 


Iz; 


H 


H 


03 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Beverly 


68 


6 


66 


66.9 


95.5 


— 


14 


12 


95,411 


Boston 


710 


106 


548 


609.1 


90.7 


65 


354 


45 


837,970 


Chicopee 


193 


— 


96 


124.8 


90.4 


8 


126 


10 


160,832 


Everett 


35 


3 


25 


19.1 


88.4 


— 


23 


4 


24,895 


Fall River . 


67 


2 


36 


44.8 


89.9 


2 


37 


4 


58.568 


Haverhill 


75 


1 


63 


62.3 


95.6 


— 


17 


7 


69,463 


Holyoke 


196 


28 


118 


135.0 


94.6 


20 


133 


14 


180,004 


Lowell 


282 


82 


157 


200.3 


94.2 


18 


196 


18 


220.127 


Lynn . 


379 


74 


40 


63.3 


65.4 


— 


339 


7 


61,578 


New Bedford 


309 


88 


210 


244.5 


94.9 


26 


151 


29 


326,545 


Newton 


273 


32 


201 


219.1 


96.3 


26 


162 


20 


280,389 


Northampton 


117 


66 


85 


97.1 


95.3 


9 


57 


13 


129,313 


Pittsfield 


12 


2 


10 


11.2 


81.2 


— 


6 


4 


2,695 


Quincy . 


259 


31 


132 


190.6 


94.3 


43 


178 


15 


248,727 


Somerville . 


186 


88 


103 


120.1 


96.3 


10 


117 


11 


156,401 


Springfield . 


548 


188 


316 


397.0 


94.1 


53 


323 


23 


518.077 


Summer Session 


165 


74 


124 


143.4 


95.1 


— 


40 


11 


29.911 


Tisbury 


9 


2 


8 


8.0 


92.5 


— 


3 


3 


10,374 


Westfield 


97 


1 


69 


71.6 


97.3 


16 


51 


8 


90,566 


Weymouth . 


66 


1 


56 


58.7 


94.3 


15 


32 


8 


78,127 


Worcester 


1,327 


426 


828 


953.1 


91.5 


100 


687 


56 


1,323,782 


Summer Session 


567 


— 


341 


443.9 


87.2 


— 


197 


40 


78,612 


Total for type of 




















school . 


5,940 


1,301 


3,632 


4,283.9 


91.6 


411 


3,243 


366 


4,982,367 







Group II. 


Day industrial schools {girls) 








Boston 

Summer Session 
Worcester 

Summer Session 


710 
218 
290 


231 
81 
61 


383 
193 
196 


454.8 
190.7 
204.4 


90.0 
92.4 
93.1 


125 
26 


443 

14 

198 


47 
20 
23 


825,218 

52.544 

275,759 


Total for tjrpe of 
school . 


1,218 


373 


772 


849.9 


91.8 


151 


655 


90 


1,153,521 



Group III. Evening industrial schools (men) 



Beverly 


195 


96 


110 


145.7 


85.0 




85 


13 


11,172 


Boston 






1,531 


191 


610 


773.0 


79.0 


— 


921 


47 


100,910 


Brookline 






16 


— 


10 


9.9 


78.7 


. — • 


6 


3 


868 


Cambridge 






335 


19 


161 


202.0 


78.0 


24 


174 


21 


17,968 


Chicopee 






218 


. — 


103 


138.0 


77.5 


. — 


101 


10 


21,212 


Everett 






98 


22 


44 


54.0 


82.7 


— 


56 


6 


5,478 


FaU River 






94 


— 


47 


64.3 


81.8 


— 


47 


8 


5,144 


HaverhiU 






13 


1 


11 


11.3 


84.2 


— 


2 


2 


328 


Holyoke 






88 


14 


18 


60.4 


82.7 


— 


70 


7 


2,784 


Lawrence 






424 


57 


145 


210.8 


81.3 


— 


279 


24 


15.227 


Lowell 






198 


24 


102 


131.2 


77.1 


— 


96 


8 


14.301 


Lynn . 






330 


56 


148 


92.0 


76.9 


— 


182 


12 


12.964 


New Bedford 






512 


76 


356 


396.2 


89.0 


— 


156 


30 


31.705 


Newton 






108 


20 


50 


75.6 


71.6 


— 


58 


7 


7,873 


Quincy . 






146 


19 


59 


89.3 


80.4 


— 


87 


8 


6,996 


Southbridge 






80 


. — . 


54 


57.8 


77.6 


— 


19 


8 


4,792 


Springfield 






276 


57 


110 


128.1 


80.2 


— 


166 


15 


15,926 


Waltham 






51 


— 


22 


28.8 


72.0 


1 


29 


4 


4,080 


Worcester 






1,267 


45 


447 


564.5 


73.5 


— 


820 


47 


104.115 


Total for type of 




















school . 


5,980 


697 


2.607 


3,232.9 


79.3 


25 


3.354 


280 


383.843 



116 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 6. — Vital statistics by types of schools and departments — Continued 

Group IV. Evening industrial schools {women) 
(Classes not conducted this year) 



Group V. Day homemaking schools 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Amesbury . 


44 


6 


30 


32.1 


90.0 


— 


22 


8 


28,860 


Belchertown 


28 


9 


20 


21.3 


96.7 


1 


21 


4 


14,155 


Boston 


892 


— 


734 


77.4 


92.3 


167 


437 


30 


1,038,139 


Essex County 


130 


— 


87 


96.7 


93.8 


22 


48 


8 


137,210 


Everett 


115 


— 


96 


101.2 


92.6 


— 


56 


12 


87,352 


Fall River . 


37 


— 


33 


35.3 


94.0 


13 


22 


13 


54,938 


Falmouth 


26 


— . 


21 


22.6 


94.2 


2 


13 


4 


18,177 


Hadley 


31. 


2 


29 


28.0 


93.2 


8 


15 


2 


16,023 


Hatfield 


22 


— 


19 


19.3 


84.4 


4 


11 


4 


9,283 


Haverhill 


53 


— 


47 


47.6 


97.2 


6 


31 


10 


29,122 


Lowell 


124 


20 


68 


88.1 


89.1 


23 


100 


14 


108,462 


New Bedford 


134 


20 


98 


101.2 


91.4 


9 


67 


14 


146,751 


Newton 


66 


5 


48 


52.9 


93.3 


2 


40 


13 


46,831 


Northampton 


41 


17 


26 


32.0 


95.3 


5 


25 


7 


42,830 


Oak Bluffs . 


8 


— 


8 


8.0 


90.0 


— 


■ — 


2 


4,018 


Pittsfield 


54 


1 


40 


42.5 


92.7 


14 


30 


4 


32,928 


Quincy 


77 


3 


40 


47.8 


93.7 


17 


41 


9 


71,462 


Scituate 


13 


— 


12 


12.6 


96.0 


— 


9 


4 


9,479 


Somerville 


120 


— 


93 


99.1 


92.1 


11 


111 


9 


51,690 


Westport 


9 


— 


7 


8.1 


88.8 


4 


6 


3 


5,225 


Weymouth . 


51 


— 


41 


44.7 


92.4 


2 


19 


7 


38,046 


Total for type of 




















school . 


2,075 


83 


1,597 


1,018.5 


92.4 


310 


1,124 


181 


1,990,981 





Group VI. 


Evening practical art schools {classes) 






Beverly 


77 






65.6 


87.8 


_ 


_ 


5 


4,966 


Boston 


2,234 


2 


— 


1,523.0 


78.8 


— 


. — 


69 


129,998 


Brockton 


193 


7 


— 


127.0 


85.0 


— ■ 


— 


10 


9,486 


Brookline 


164 


— 


— 


97.2 


83.9 


— 


— 


7 


7,932 


Cambridge . 


196 


4 


— 


398.7 


75.5 


— 


— 


10 


6,330 


Chelsea 


196 


— 


— 


31.0 


83.2 


— 


— 


3 


1,926 


Chicopee 


284 


— 


— 


220.8 


90.2 


— 


— 


15 


15,514 


Essex County 


361 


— 


— 


312.1 


90.0 


— 


— 


6 


7,924 


Everett 


72 


. — 


— 


54.7 


78.9 


— 


— 


6 


4,342 


Fall River . 


840 


8 


— 


588.9 


91.6 


— 


— 


51 


46,272 


Gardner 


106 


1 


— 


79.3 


90.8 


— 


— 


5 


1,793 


Gloucester . 


356 


17 


— 


326.1 


86.8 


50 


— 


7 


22,334 


Haverhill 


78 


— 


— 


114.0 


89.4 


— 


— 


3 


2,294 


Holyoke 


869 


— 


— 


614.8 


90.9 


— 


— 


20 


44,751 


Lawrence 


1,180 


23 


— 


572.6 


86.3 


— 


— 


34 


50,120 


Leominster . 


126 


2 


— 


88.2 


90.2 


— 


— 


2 


9,299 


Lowell 


1,886 


82 


— 


1,211.1 


90.7 


— 


— 


56 


89,682 


Lynn . 


280 


12 


— 


225.0 


81.4 


17 


— 


13 


18,540 


Medford 


123 


— 


— 


119.5 


78.1 


— 


— 


5 


7,416 


Methuen 


83 


— 


— 


71.7 


97.9 


— 


— 


2 


5,514 


Natick 


51 


— 


— 


23.7 


77.6 


— 


— 


4 


1,898 


Needham 


63 


— 


— 


45.3 


69.0 


— 


■ — 


2 


2,842 


New Bedford 


1,467 


. — 


— 


1,240.1 


90.7 


235 


— 


60 


92,793 


Newton 


71 


— 


— 


44.4 


83.1 


— 


— 


5 


4,362 


North Attleborough 


67 


— 


. — ■ 


48.4 


71.6 


— 


— 


4 


3,876 


Norwood 


81 


1 


— 


59.5 


73.9 


— 


— 


6 


3,865 


Quincy 


936 


44 


— 


745.6 


83.1 


— 


— 


17 


53,330 


Salem . 


127 


— 


— 


119.8 


89.8 


— • 


— 


4 


7,673 


Somerville . 


131 


— 


— 


79.9 


85.9 


— 


— 


5 


6,040 


Taunton 


137 


— 


— . 


124.3 


89.1 


— 


— • 


5 


9,646 


Wakefield . 


98 


— 


— 


72.1 


92.9 


— • 


— 


6 


5,636 


Waltham 


381 


— - 


— 


302.5 


80.8 


— 


• — • 


16 


32,507 


Webster 


150 


29 


— 


119.0 


86.5 


— 


— 


7 


9,400 


Worcester: 




















1. Independent 




















Board of Trus- 




















tees 


492 


40 


— 


373.2 


83.7 


— 


— 


18 


28,491 


2. School Commit- 




















tee 


329 


— 


— 


236.2 


90.6 


— 


■ — 


7 


17,065 


Total for type of 




















school . 


14,285 


272 




10,475.3 


85.0 


302 




496 


765,887 



P.D. 2. 117 

Table No. 6. — Vital statistics by types of schools and departments — Continued 

Group VII. Part-time (a) co-operative; (b) compulsory continuation; and (c) apprenticeship schools 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


(a) Co-operative 




















schools 




















Beverly 
Boston: 

Brighton . 


128 


117 


71 


73.5 


95.1 


20 


57 


5 


148,568 


56 





38 


27.8 


92.0 


9 


56 


10 


54,965 


Charlestown 




137 


11 


48 


83.9 


97.1 


26 


146 


17 


168,711 


Dorchester 




52 


— 


33 


35.8 


96.1 


9 


49 


10 


51,016 


East Boston 




76 


3 


56 


53.2 


99.0 


47 


24 


9 


94,805 


Hyde Park 




76 


. — 


67 


59.8 


94.6 


14 


64 


7 


113,061 


Southbridge . 




160 


25 


99 


104.6 


95.5 


15 


61 


8 


172,412 


Weymouth . 




28 


— 


21 


23.1 


92.2 


— 


15 


4 


32,828 


Total for type of 




















school . 


713 


156 


433 


461.7 


95.2 


140 


472 


70 


836,366 


(6) Compulsory 




















continuation schools 




















Adams 


294 


3 


172 


224.1 


95.5 


131 


14 


6 


39,048 


Andover 






74 


15 


30 


41.0 


91.8 


22 


25 


2 


5,804 


Attleboro 






173 


5 


79 


97.8 


85.9 


63 


61 


5 


15,556 


Beverly 






90 


15 


23 


35.5 


87.1 


15 


80 


3 


5,116 


Boston 






5,738 


1,124 


2,126 


3,903.0 


85.1 


1,802 


2,943 


53 


579,868 


Braintree 






107 


44 


42 


56.0 


96.0 


47 


58 


3 


8,120 


Brockton 






276 


4 


92 


149.3 


83.3 


86 


131 


9 


26,044 


Cambridge 






558 


225 


161 


284.5 


88.2 


68 


529 


9 


44,116 


Chelsea 






288 


97 


120 


157.0 


86.0 


100 


196 


7 


21.992 


Chicopee 






372 


25 


167 


181.8 


86.6 


120 


214 


10 


36,884 


Clinton 






226 


8 


116 


148.2 


88.0 


104 


12 


5 


19,716 


Easthampton 






166 


1 


89 


102.0 


87.3 


85 


29 


3 


15,068 


Everett 






265 


46 


135 


183.9 


71.4 


59 


192 


9 


25,462 


Fall River 






2,820 


126 


1,634 


1,933.9 


91.6 


1,133 


46 


37 


332,270 


Fitchburg 






388 


4 


147 


251.0 


80.0 


147 


116 


8 


42,156 


Gloucester 






147 


1 


75 


71.3 


77.6 


45 


43 


4 


10,708 


Haverhill 






287 


5 


155 


186.1 


78.8 


32 


153 


6 


31,060 


Holyoke 






624 


153 


237 


126.3 


93.9 


231 


239 


11 


71,252 


Lawrence 






866 


127 


292 


510.9 


83.0 


284 


493 


14 


81,538 


Leominster 






278 


50 


125 


140.6 


87.5 


105 


84 


9 


33,260 


Lowell 






640 


21 


300 


364.3 


97.6 


192 


232 


11 


58,008 


Ludlow 






125 


9 


59 


76.5 


92.6 


70 


73 


4 


10,168 


Lynn . 






497 


90 


269 


241.7 


89.2 


161 


288 


6 


48,930 


Maiden 






170 


45 


56 


72.4 


84.7 


47 


105 


4 


13,436 


Marlborough 






214 


• — 


131 


147.5 


93.1 


80 


55 


8 


35,308 


Milford 






132 


2 


60 


76.5 


93.1 


27 


63 


3 


11.110 


New Bedford 






2,256 


258 


1,070 


1,435.7 


93.8 


878 


1,599 


34 


265,067 


Newton 






68 


8 


31 


12.0 


89.2 


22 


46 


1 


4,324 


North Adams 




217 


8 


118 


137.6 


95.0 


41 


73 


6 


19,568 


Northampton 




210 


10 


106 


116.8 


94.5 


52 


101 


4 


17,154 


Northbridge 




143 


13 


85 


96.1 


96.7 


51 


24 


4 


13,608 


Palmer 




152 


9 


59 


96.0 


88.1 


75 


62 


4 


13,126 


Pittsfield 






392 


4 


187 


214.8 


86.5 


149 


73 


6 


33,140 


Quincy 






148 


5 


59 


66.7 


77.9 


26 


98 


6 


11,860 


Salem . 






409 


15 


201 


230.9 


85.4 


152 


136 


5 


41,672 


Somerville 






252 


41 


118 


180.8 


86.4 


118 


94 


5 


26,772 


Southbridge 






184 


2 


77 


115.7 


94.9 


84 


23 


7 


16,680 


Springfield 






733 


204 


262 


467.9 


87.8 


271 


733 


13 


75,430 


Taunton 






394 


9 


199 


247.1 


96.9 


— 


247 


7 


38,524 


Waltham 






140 


9 


53 


93.2 


88.6 


48 


76 


3 


12,121 


Ware . 






164 


2 


68 


110.8 


97.2 


70 


96 


4 


16,672 


Watertown 






78 


43 


34 


42.0 


97.5 


28 


53 


3 


5,748 


Webster 






316 


59 


181 


195.2 


91.3 


81 


14 


8 


29,292 


Westfield 






136 


— 


53 


63.7 


90.5 


40 


61 


4 


12,176 


Weymouth 






20 


4 


9 


14.4 


85.1 


7 


7 


2 


780 


Worcester 






1,154 


56 


497 


625.9 


83.4 


460 


323 


16 


117,603 


Total for type of 




















school . 


23,381 


3,004 


10,359 


14,326.4 


88.9 


7,909 


10,413 


391 


2,393,315 


(c) Apprenticeship 




















schools 




















Boston 


78 


5 


32 


32.0 


88.0 


3 


15 


5 


5,844 


Total for type of 




















school . 


78 


5 


32 


32.0 


88.0 


3 


15 


5 


5,844 



118 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 6. — Vital statistics by types of schools and departments — Continued 

Group VIII. Agricultural schools 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Bristol County 


106 


4 


84 


82.3 


98.5 


11 


22 


10 


152,673 


Essex County 


181 


5 


126 


140.0 


94.5 


— 


58 


26 


287,929 


Norfolk County . 


116 


10 


80 


87.4 


96.5 


20 


36 


17 


129,189 


W eymouth Branch 


22 


3 


18 


18.9 


95.7 


— 


12 


— 


22,098 


Northampton 


20 


13 


17 


18.4 


95.6 


2 


7 


6 


20,094 


Total for type of 




















school . 


445 


35 


325 


347.0 


96.1 


33 


. 135 


59 


611,983 



Group IX. Agricultural departments (day) 



Ashfield 


15 


3 


14 


13.8 


96.3 


7 


3 


3 


20,412 


Ayer . 


10 


— 


6 


7.1 


91.5 


— 


4 


3 


4,560 


Boston 


79 


— 


38 


74.7 


94.7 


17 


43 


4 


81,657 


Falmouth 


19 


2 


11 


12.2 


91.8 


1 


8 


3 


12,291 


Hadley 


14 


— 


12 


10.9 


87.0 


— 


6 


3 


14,951 


Hanover 


12 


— 


7 


9.0 


90.4 


1 


7 


2 


8,137 


Hatfield 


24 


— 


16 


19.4 


92.2 


2 


11 


4 


11,621 


New Salem . 


13 


12 


11 


12.3 


95.9 


2 


2 


3 


17,093 


Reading 


19 


6 


11 


14.7 


98.6 


1 


8 


3 


7,688 


Shelburne Falls . 


31 


24 


29 


29.8 


94.9 


6 


3 


4 


11,120 


Westport 


12 


— 


11 


11.1 


96.3 


1 


4 


3 


7,149 


West Springfield . 


23 


1 


17 


17.1 


94.1 


— 


14 


2 


16,047 


Worcester 


40 


10 


27 


29.4 


95.2 


4 


18 


4 


28,871 


Total for type of 




















school . 


311 


58 


210 


261.5 


93.5 


42 


131 


41 


241,597 



Group X. 


Agricultural departments (evening or short unit courses. 






Essex County 
Haverhill 
New Salem . 
West Springfield . 
Worcester 


61 
32 
15 
7 
10 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 
1 

1 
1 
1 


— 


Total for type of 
school . 

Grand total for all 
types 


125 
54,551 


10 
5,994 


19,967 


35,289.1 


90.2 


9,326 


19,542 


8 
1,986 


13,365 704 



Rehabilitation 

(These statistics are for the year ending Nov. 30, 1928) 

I. Contacts 




Totals to 

date, 
87 months 



Contacts 
Total contacts 

Interviews: 

Original . 

Subsequent 

General . 
By correspondence only 



24,142 



1,998 

157,255 

892 

3,087 



P.D. 2. 

Table No. 



Vital statistics by types of schools and departments 

II. Cases 



119 

■ Continued. 



Prospects 
Total prospects . 
Type of handicap: 

Industrial 

Otherwise 

Registrations 
Total registrations 
Source of reference: 

Industrial Accident Board 

Other public departments 

Hospitals 

Social agencies . 

Insurance companies 

U. S. Comp. Commission , 

Self applications 

Employers 




Totals to 
date 



4,449 



2,906 
1,543 



1,481 

271 

294 

166 

157 

66 

27 

475 

25 



III. Actions 


taken in Registrations 








Current 

month 

registrations 


Previous 
registrations 


Current 
month 
totals 


Totals to 
date 


Total registrations ..... 

Under advisement 

Under supervision : 

Placed without training .... 

Put in training ..... 

Placed after training .... 
Closures 


2 
12 


121 

79 

3 
6 

8 
29 


143 

88 

5 
18 

8 
29 


1,481 
88 

298 

895 

325 

1,207 



IV. Analysis of Training 





Current 

month 

registrations 


Previous 
registrations 


Ciu-rent 
month 
totals 


Totals to 
date 


Total put in training ..... 


12 


6 


18 


895 


Educational institutions: 










Public: 










Day 


4 


4 


8 


207 


Evening 


1 


1 


2 


88 


Private: 










Day 


2 


— 


2 


114 


Evening 


1 


— 


1 


68 


Employment training ..... 


2 


— 


2 


132 


Tutors 


— 


1 


1 


24 


Correspondence ...... 


2 


— 


2 


169 


Special training agency .... 


~ 


~ 




9 



V. Analysis of Closures 








Current 

month 

registrations 


Previous 
registrations 


Current 
month 
totals 


Totals to 
date 


Total closures 

Rehabilitated: 

By placement ...... 

After school training .... 

After employment training 
Other clostu-es: 

Not eligible ...... 

Not susceptible ..... 

Service rejected ..... 

Died 

Other 


— 


29 

5 
6 
5 

4 
6 

3 


29 

5 
6 
5 

4 
6 

3 


. 1,207 

304 

284 

90 

3 

102 

260 

15 

146 



120 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 6. — Vital statistics by types of schools and departments — Concluded 

VI. Summary 



Current 
month 



Totals to 
date 



Present 
condition of 
registrants 



Contacts 

Prospects 

Registrations : 

Total . . . . 

Under advisement only 
Placed without training 
Put in training 
Placed after training 
Closures 



514 
36 



29 



24,192 
4,449 



298 

895 

325 

1,207 



1,481 



156 2 
20 
1,207 



1 And still vmder supervision. 



' And stiU in training. 



Table No. 7. — Use of Federal Funds 









s 


MITH-HUGHES 


(Vocational) 




A. Distribution to cities and towns {Federal fiscal year ending June 30, 1928) 




Salaries of 


Salaries of 


Name of City, Town or County 


teachers, 


teachers of 


IN WHICH Schools are Located to 


supervisors, 


trade, home 


WHICH Payment is to be Made 


and directors 


economics. 




of agricultural 


and industrial 




subjects 


subjects 


Adams ....... 




$549 99 


Amesbury 














— 


288 24 


Andover 














— 


165 00 


Ashfield 














$169 14 


— 


Attleboro 














— - 


769 99 


Ayer . 














62 51 


— 


Belchertown 














— 


219 06 


Beverly 














— 


2,500 56 


Boston 














525 79 


54.117 62 


Braintree 














— 


'366 66 


Bristol County 














1,816 37 


— 


Brockton 














— 


1,251 18 


Brookline 














— 


318 42 


Cambridge . 














— 


2,648 80 


Chelsea 














— 


412 78 


Chicopee 














— 


2,155 85 


Clinton 














— 


559 16 


Easthampton 














— 


430 82 


Essex County 














3,809 24 


1,775 54 


Everett 














— 


2,468 40 


Fall River 
















— 


10,925 46 


Falmouth 
















220 61 


230 59 


Fitchburg 
















— 


1,237 48 


Gardner 
















— 


66 30 


Gloucester 
















— 


637 13 


Hadley 
















198 55 


184 47 


Hanover 
















58 83 


— 


Hatfield 
















205 91 


172 94 


Haverhill 
















— 


1,851 94 


Holyoke 
















— 


5,949 04 


Lawrence 
















— 


5,037 20 


Leominster 
















— 


942 10 



P.D. 2. 



121 



Table No. 7. — Use of Federal Funds — Continued 

Smith-Hughes (Vocational) 
Distribution to cities and towns (Federal fiscal year ending June SO, 1928) 





Salaries of 


Salaries of 


Name of City, Town or County 


teachers, 


teachers of 


IN WHICH Schools are Located to 


supervisors, 


trade, home 


WHICH Payment is to be Made 


and directors 


economics. 




of agricultural 


and industrial 




subjects 


subjects 


Lowell ....... 


_ 


$11,052 91 


Ludlow 












— 


485 82 


Lynn . 












— 


2,851 54 


Maiden 












— 


384 99 


Marlborough 












— 


412 49 


Medford 












— 


161 41 


Methuen 












— 


92 24 


Milford 












— 


238 33 


Natick 












— 


11 53 


Needham 












— 


34 59 


New Bedford 












— 


17,649 24 


New Salem . 












1191 20 


— 


Newton 












— 


6,885 68 


Norfolk County . 












2,691 46 


— 


North Adams 












— 


366 66 


Northampton 












389 75 


3,632 41 


North Attleborough 












— 


46 12 


Northbridge 












— 


487 66 


Norwood 












— 


80 71 


Oak Bluffs . 












— 


69 18 


Pittsfield . 












— 


1,361 57 


Quincy 












— 


5,844 35 


Reading 












161 78 


— 


Salem . 












— 


1,193 52 


Scituate 












— 


345 88 


Shelburne Falls 












227 97 


— 


Somerville . 












— 


4,267 00 


Southbridge . 












— 


2,248 40 


Springfield . 












— 


9,995 77 


Taunton 












— 


1,222 36 


Tisbury 












— 


261 62 


Wakefield . 












— 


149 88 


Waltham 












— 


1,019 24 


Ware . 












— 


302 50 


Watertown . 












— 


137 50 


Webster 












— 


956 01 


Westfield . 












— 


2,329 80 


Westport 












125 01 


172 94 


West Springfield . 












183 84 


— 


Weymouth . 












— 


2,064 26 


Worcester 












757 43 


25,869 80 


Smith-Hughes Spec. (Towle Co.) 








— 


364 00 


Totals 


$11,795 39 


$203,282 61 


Grand total, $215,078 00 







122 



P.D. 2. 



Table No. 7. — Use of Federal Funds — Continued 

B. Expenditures for teacher-training (Federal fiscal year ending June SO, 1928) 





Expenditures 




Federal 


State 


Agriculture . 

Home economics ...... 

Trade and industry ..... 


$7,899 54 
16,349 71 
12,222 49 


$8,025 14 
16,678 98 
12,382 98 


Total expended (Federal and State moneys) 

$63,558 84 

Expended for equipment .... 


$31,471 74 


$32,087 10 
615 36 


Expended for maintenance (shared equally, 
Federal and State) $62,943 48 


$31,471 74 


$31,471 74 



Federal funds: 
Available 
Used . 



P6,593 94 
31,471 74 



Balance $5,122 20 

Fess-Kenton (Rehabilitation), Fedebai Fiscal Yeab ending June 30, 1928 



Expenditures 



Federal 



State 



Non-reimbursement items: 




1. Equipment . 


, , 


2. Maintenance 


. 


3. Artificial appliances 


• 


Reimbursement items: 




1. Salaries 


$13,558 71 


2. Travel . 


2,035 82 


3. Communication 


178 03 


4. Printing 


170 03 


5. Supplies 


29 20 


6. Tuition 


3,923 73 


7. Instructional supplies 


245 77 


8. Miscellaneous 


918 63 



$576 93 



$268 29 
2,237 40 



10,529 96 



10,529 96 



$21,059 92 
Total expended (Federal and State moneys) 

$24,142 54 

Expended for equipment .... 
Expended for maintenance .... 
Expended for artificial appliances . . . 

Expended for maintenance (shared equally, 
Federal and State) $21,059 92 



$11,106 89 



576 93 



$13,035 65 

268 29 

2,237 40 



$10,529 96 



$10,529 96 



i This amoimt was matched by a similar amount made available by gifts. 



P.D. 2. 

Federal funds: 
Available 
Used 



Table No. 7. — Use of Federal Funds — Concluded. 



123 



$36,593 94 
11,050 64 



Balance 



),543 30 



Table No. 8. — Statistics of teacher-training from Sept. 1, 1927, to Aug, 31, 1928 

(Roman numerals refer to divisions) 
Group I. Agriculture 



Location of Classes 



•^ a a 



^M '^S 



Hi) H 5 

• n • > S 

r, o>-l O =0 

p. a.S 

hi ^ 



^.2 a 



gx! o 



u a 0) 



0) M CO 

iH a s 

CP 0) 03 

^.« 

Sal 
3.S >. 

3 flJ2 






.2 55 a 

§•3-3 



XI o o c 

BCS 03 QJ 

£> CD a 

2 



P CO o 



<o 



■SgS 
S S o 

3 a o 

2; 



So 



oi a^^ 
a o-H 



V 



Q a> o 



goo. 

So o 






Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, Amherst 

a. General methods 

b. Special methods 

c. Practice teaching 
Total net enrolment . 
Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college, short 
course, July, 1928 . 

Essex County Agricul- 
tural School, Winter, 
1927-1928 

Summer conference, 
Amherst,' 1928 



T. T. 
T. T. 
T. T. 



T. T. P. I 

T. T. 
P. L 



60 

12 
2> 



12 



13 



13 



'Combined with "Farmers' Week" of Massachusetts Agricultural College except for two sessions. 
Group II. Trade and industry {men) 



Beverly I . 


T. T. 


14 


5 


25 


10 


5 


3 


1 


6 


10 


_ 


_ 


Boston I . 


T. T. 


27 


9 


50 


24 


19 


1 


6 


17 


24 


16 


10 


Boston II 


T. T. 


26 


11 


50 


23 


19 


3 


10 


10 


23 


19 


12 


Boston III 


T. T. 


12 


8 


15 


9 


11 


7 


■ — 


— 


9 


2 


1 


Boston IV 


T. T. 


10 


1 


20 


8 


7 


8 


1 


— . 


9 


— 


— 


Fitchburg I 


T. T. 


17 


6 


20 


16 


15 


3 


4 


10 


17 


— 


— 


New Bedford I 


T. T. 


8 


5 


50 


8 


4 


— 


2 


6 


8 


18 


10 


Springfield I 


T. T. 


17 


9 


50 


15 


5 


1 


2 


13 


16 


9 


1 


Worcester I 


T. T. 


24 


10 


50 


22 


5 


— 


5 


18 


23 


18 


5 


Worcester II . 


T. T. 


7 


1 


20 


7 


1 


7 


— 


— 


7 


— 


— 


Totals 


— 


162 


18 


350 


142 


52 


33 


31 


80 


146 


82 


39 


Springfield II . 


T. T.» 


16 


— 


20 


7 


3 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


— 


Totals 


— 


16 


— 


20 


7 


3 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


— 


Boston I . 


P. I. 


30 


10 


30 


24 


21 


2 


2 


2 


26 


2 


2 


Fitchburg I 


P. I. 


143 


15 


5 


139 


39 


2 


2 


. — 2 


137 


2 


. . 2 


Quincy I . 


P. I. 


23 


10 


15 


19 


7 


2 


2 


2 


21 


2 


__2 


Totals 


— 


196 


15 


50 


182 


44 


2 


_! 


_2 


184 


2 


2 



' Training course for conference- leaders. 
^Teaching in State-aided schools. 



124 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 8. — Statistics of teacher-training from Sept. 1, 1927, to Aug. 31, 1928 — 

Continued 

Group III. Day household arts and industrial {women) ' 



1 

Fitchburg I 


2 
T. T. P. I. 


3 

37 


4 

5 


5 

10 


6 

36 


7 
27 


8 
13 


9 

2 


10 


11 

25 


12 


13 


Totals 


— 


37 


5 


10 


36 


27 


13 


2 


— 


25 


— 


— 


Framingham Normal 
School: 
Resident courses 
Vocational house- 
hold arts . 

Juniors 

Middle juniors . 

Seniors 

One-year special stu- 
dents . 


T. T. 
T. T. 
T. T. 

T. T. 


6 
11 
12 

3 


— 


. 2 

2 

2 

.2 


i 


6 

7 
8 

3 


— 


3 

3 


3 

S 


12 
3 


3^ 

26 


14 
3 


Totals 


— 


32 


— 


» 


— 


24 


— 


3 


3 


15 


5 


17 



1 This includes resident courses at Framingham Normal School. 

2 From September 17, 1927, to June 17, 1928. 

3 Too early to determine. 

* Married after completing course. 
' Returned for further study. 

Group IV. Evening practical art {women) 



Boston I . 


T. T. P. I. 


29 


10 


16 


21 


18 


2 




10 


23 


1 


5 


Boston II 


T. T. P. I. 


21 


10 


15 


15 


20 


3 


— 


4 


19 


14 


7 


Fitchburg I 


T. T. P. I. 


76 


7 


10 


73 


42 


15 


6 


4 


65 


35 


11 


Holyoke I 


T. T. P. I. 


16 


4 


12 


11 


3 


3 


— 


5 


11 


4 


1 


New Bedford I . 


T. T. P. I. 


24 


5 


12 


18 


3 


6 


— 


— 


19 


3 


1 


Totals 


— 


166 


8 


65 


138 


48 


29 


6 


23 


137 


57 


25 







Group V. 


Continuation (men) 














Fitchburg I 


T. T. 


35 


8 


20 


32 


24 


2 


2 


20 


34 


12 


4 


Totals 


— 


35 


8 


20 


32 


24 


2 


2 


20 


34 


12 


4 


Fitchburg II . 


P. I. 


23 


10 


10 


19 


21 


1 


— 1 


1 


20 


— 1 


— 1 


Totals 


— 


23 


10 


10 


19 


21 


— 1 


— 1 


— ' 


20 


— ' 


— ' 



' Teaching in State-aided schools. 
Group V. Continuation {women) 



Fitchburg I 


T. T. 


11 


5 


20 


10 


9 


10 


1 


— 


11 


— 


— 


Totals 


— 


11 


5 


20 


10 


9 


10 


1 


— 


11 


— 


— 


Fitchburg II . 


P. I. 


22 


5 


10 


21 


17 


— 1 


— 1 


— I 


22 


— 1 


— I 


Totals 


— 


22 


5 


10 


21 


17 


— 1 


— ■ 


— ' 


22 


— ' 


— ' 



1 Teaching in State-aided schools. 



P.D. 2. 125 

Table No. 8. — Statistics of teacher-training from Sept. 1, 1927, to Aug. 31, 1928 — 

Continued 

Group VI. Itinerant teacher-training 



Type of School 



■?1 
"o o 

la 



■?-2 






^.2 
" 9. 



g 0) a> 
3 M a 



Day and evening industrial (boys and men) 
Continuation (boys) .... 

Agricultural schools and departments 
Day and evening industrial (girls and women) 
Continuation (girls) .... 

Day household arts ..... 
Evening practical art .... 



2 

39 
45 
23 
21 
46 
21 
36 



3 

141 

111 

256 

13 

111 

70 

91 



4 

570 
196 
91 

68 
185 
174 
486 



5 
349 
136 
467 

16 
205 
126 
239 



6 

87 
34 
111 
4 
51 
32 
57 



126 



P.D. 2. 



'a 

o 
O 



2S ^ 

C3i & 



©3 E-( 



>-H -§ 






Total new 
teachers 

added dur- 
ING TEAR 


otraapBov 


o^O"-! 1 "5 1 lOiooec 1 


doqg 


00rtlf505O'*l00503-*cD 


Total 

teachers 

LEAVING 
THE SERV- 
ICE DURING 
TEAR 


ottnap'Bov 


t>CD 1 1 00 1 oooic-i 1 


doqg 


vCOO-^OOOSiNOOtDTttcOOO 
»Hi-( ffl!NO INi-i 

T-t 


Z 00 

"At 


onnapBov 


"-"Ort Tf( ro (N t^ 05 r-l 


doqs 


•<f(N'-<IM00CDOONl>05 

-HO>omoiOO«050oco(N 

(N M CO 


New TEACH- 
ERS ADDED 
DURING 

SUMMER 

June 30 — 
Aug. 31, 1928 


onnapBOv 


WW 1 1 IN 1 1 1 SsIlN 1 


doqg 


rtooiNNooo 1 ionn^-i 

•H (N -^ 1 


Teachers 

LEAVING 

service dur- 
ing SUMMER 

June 30— 
Aug. 31, 1928 


oiraapBDV 


-H,-< 1 1 "O 1 lOttJO-^ I 


doqg 


©CO(NiOCOOOOlN'-iCOiO 
-N iniNOl <Ni-l 


Teachers in 

SERVICE 

AT CLOSE or 

TEAR 

June 30, 1928 


onnapBoy 


_.O5t^Tt<(N^l^lM-*00t> 


doqg 


O^iOM^OOt^OOCO 
'"OiOO'-icDMOOS^M 


Teachers 
leaving the 

SERVICE 

DURING THE 

TEAR TO 

June 30, 1928 


oniiap'BOv 


f^iO 1 1 M 1 COTJOO 1 1 


doqg 


^(NIMMCDiM 1 ■*« 1 n 


New teach- 
ers ADDED 
DURING THE 
TEAR TO 

June 30, 1928 


onnapBOv 


jpb.TH 1 TO 1 ^o^f5^--H | 


doqg 


''' N .-Hr-ITJH i-H 


5 ?5 


oniiapBov 


"03^ tOTOCOOOOrt 


doqg 


'^ 00113 ©omroo 00 roco 

rH IN w* 


i 






i 


1 

Day industrial (boys) 
Day industrial (giris) 
Evening industrial (men) 
Day household arts . 
Evening practical ari; 
Part-time co-operative 
Continuation (giris) 
Continuation (boys) 
Agricultural 
Agricultural department (c 



P.D. 2. 127 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors 14 to 16 years of age, who, within the 
calendar year, Jan. 1 to Dec. SI, 1928, were employed while schools were in ses- 
sion, as per returns 

Group I. Cities 
[Cities in bold-face type are those conducting continuation schools] 









1 


Total Number of 


DlFFER- 






Number of Minors 


ENT Minors Employed 




m 


14 TO 16 TEARS OP Age 


Within the Town (City) 




73 


October 1, 1927 


UNDER 


Authority op 




a 

6 

o 
"a!2 






Forms C, C2, D 


orG 


CITIES 




^^ 


"o 










OQOJ 


o 


o a 


S ft 

g3 










a 
o 


2S 




^i 










'■+S 


-^ Cl 


■M-^ 


OJ-Q 










03 

3 








(Q 




_ 




a 


"o 


eg 


ftg 


>, 


'm 


■S 




(2 


a 


a 


a 


o 

n 


O 


o 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 Boston .... 


779,620 


25,748 


18,696 


3,123 


3,827 


3,487 


7,314 


2 Worcester 


190,757 


5,053 


4,739 


792 


589 


820 


1,409 


3 Springfield . 


142,065 


5,235 


3,747 


850 


509 


533 


1,042 


4 FaU River 


128,993 


5,018 


2,089 


476 


1,673 


1,729 


3,402 


5 Cambridge 


119,669 


3,493 


2,629 


480 


597 


618 


1,215 


6 New Bedford . 


119,539 


4,353 


2,279 


375 


1,192 


1,278 


2,470 


7 Lowell .... 


110,296 


3,667 


2,297 


677 


513 


696 


1,209 


8 Lynn .... 


103,081 


3,342 


2,719 


337 


273 


268 


541 


9 Somerville 


99,032 


4,423 


3,806 


389 


169 


146 


315 


10 Lawrence 


93,527 


3,159 


2,119 


546 


415 


306 


721 


11 Brockton 


65,343 


2,297 


1,914 


104 


174 


187 


361 


12 Holyoke .... 


60,335 


2,006 


1,086 


468 


214 


299 


513 


13 Ouincy .... 


60,055 


2,023 


1,526 


118 


103 


54 


157 


14 Newton .... 


53,003 


1,848 


1,308 


322 


70 


103 


173 


15 Maiden .... 


51,789 


1,974 


1,520 


354 


105 


97 


202 


16 Haverhill 


49,232 


1,646 


1,189 


237 


230 


218 


448 


17 Medford .... 


47,627 


1,681 


1,421 


126 


77 


73 


150 


18 Chelsea .... 


47,247 


1,951 


1,519 


187 


237 


211 


448 


19 Pittsfield 


46,877 


1,785 


1,293 


222 


236 


263 


499 


20 Fitchburg 


43,609 


1,411 


885 


247 


259 


271 


530 


21 Salem .... 


42,821 


1,474 


854 


352 


208 


305 


513 


22 Everett .... 


42,072 


1,767 


1,403 


38 


133 


195 


328 


23 Chicopee 


41,882 


1,586 


974 


235 


241 


293 


534 


24 Taunton 


39,255 


1,353 


942 


167 


295 


304 


599 


25 Waltham 


34,746 


1,114 


705 


316 


105 


85 


190 


26 Revere .... 


33,261 


1,401 


1,130 


96 


47 


73 


120 


27 Northampton 


24,145 


833 


498 


125 


75 


180 


255 


28 Gloucester 


23,375 


702 


566 


12 


114 


108 


222 


29 North Adams 


22,717 


764 


429 


161 


146 


108 


254 


30 Beverly .... 


22,685 


906 


835 


— 


40 


39 


79 


31 Leominster . 


22,120 


751 


459 


71 


127 


263 


390 


32 Attleboro 


20,623 


687 


537 


33 


126 


141 


267 


33 Melrose .... 


20,165 


743 


631 


52 


8 


6 


14 


34 Peabody .... 


19,870 


894 


829 


65 


116 


35 


151 


35 Westfield 


19,342 


855 


589 


99 


77 


101 


178 


36 Gardner .... 


18,730 


701 


610 


91 


105 


69 


174 


37 Woburn .... 


18,370 


676 


508 


73 


76 


37 


113 


38 Marlborough . 


16,236 


531 


302 


36 


142 


134 


276 


39 Newburyport . 


15,656 


613 


535 


72 


41 


50 


91 


Totals .... 


2,909,767 


100,464 


72,117 


12,524 


13,684 


14,183 


27,867 


Group 


II. Town 


s of BfiOO populatio 


n or over 








[Towns in bold- 


ace type ai 


e those conducting 


jontinuati 


3n schools 






TOWNS 
















40 Brookline 


42,681 


1,219 


870 


321 


33 


4 


37 


41 Watertown 


25,480 


750 


657 


51 


61 


49 


110 


42 Arlington 


24,943 


926 


804 


94 


32 


17 


49 


43 Framingham 


21,078 


696 


636 


17 


41 


47 


88 


44 Methuen 


20,606 


789 


697 


39 


66 


89 


155 


45 Weymouth 


17,253 


614 


564 


32 


18 


8 


26 


46 Winthrop 


16,158 


442 


432 


1 


6 


4 


10 


47 Wakefield 


15,611 


571 


— 


— 


34 


24 


58 


48 Southbrldge . 


15,489 


531 


213 


96 


91 


117 


208 


49 West Springfield 


15,326 


578 


459 


36 


86 


74 


160 



128 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors I4 to 16 years of age, etc. — Con. 

Group II. Towns of 6,000 population or over — Concluded 





TOWNS — Con. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


50 


Belmont .... 


15,256 


452 


424 


24 


17 


8 


25 


51 


Greenfield 


15,246 


491 


498 


11 


26 


20 


46 


52 


Milford .... 


14,781 


550 


362 


93 


86 


91 


177 


53 


Clinton .... 


14,180 


539 


306 


66 


96 


160 


256 


54 


Norwood 


14,151 


650 


660 


— 


17 


11 


28 


65 


Dedham .... 


13,918 


536 


432 


18 


29 


12 


41 


56 


Adams .... 


13,525 


650 


313 


51 


166 


213 


379 


67 


Webster .... 


13,389 


589 


224 


137 


127 


149 


276 


58 


Braintree 


13,193 


472 


354 


33 


63 


46 


108 


69 


Plymouth 


13,176 


406 


142 




49 


93 


142 


60 


Natick .... 


12,871 


457 


411 


6 


34 


33 


67 


61 


Milton .... 


12,861 


348 


278 


67 


7 


1 


8 


62 


Saugus .... 


12,743 


627 


602 


— 


9 


5 


14 


63 


Danvers .... 


11,798 


394 


300 


15 


40 


11 


51 


64 


Easthampton 


11,587 


488 


278 


44 


69 


142 


211 


65 


Winchester 


11,565 


419 


322 


56 


12 


8 


20 


66 


Amesbury 


11,229 


416 


256 


103 


25 


46 


71 


67 


Palmer .... 


11,044 


468 


340 


18 


62 


61 


123 


68 


Fairhaven 


10,827 


289 


102 


16 


48 


40 


88 


69 


Andover 


10,291 


264 


221 




61 


42 


93 


70 


Northbrldge , 


10,051 


353 


226 


18 


82 


104 


186 


71 


North Attleborough . 


9,790 


244 


177 


65 


65 


78 


143 


72 


Athol .... 


9,602 


212 


113 


5 


84 


92 


176 


73 


Bridgewater 


9,468 


280 


211 




78 


63 


141 


74 


Middleborough 


9,136 


347 


280 


2 


26 


18 


44 


75 


Stoneham 


9,084 


318 


216 


41 


20 


24 


44 


76 


WeUesley 


9,049 


315 


300 


7 


14 


8 


22 


77 


Dartmouth 


9,026 


286 


215 


16 


92 


81 


173 


78 


Needham 


8,977 


303 


296 




44 


47 


91 


79 


Swampscott 


8,953 


258 


233 


24 


2 


5 


7 


80 


Ludlow .... 


8,802 


336 


207 


32 


74 


85 


159 


81 


Reading .... 


8,693 


335 


318 


6 


9 


3 


12 


82 


Ware .... 


8,629 


375 


231 


19 


104 


90 


194 


83 


Marblehead 


8,214 


232 


217 


6 


4 


6 


9 


84 


Hudson .... 


8,130 


303 


184 


34 


64 


79 


143 


85 


Montague 


7,973 


329 


230 


21 


44 


66 


110 


86 


Rockland 


7,966 


225 


202 


— 


19 


18 


37 


87 


Maynard 


7,857 


319 


282 


— 


7 


24 


31 


88 


Stoughton 


7,857 


374 


198 


24 


31 


28 


59 


89 


Whitman 


7,857 


248 


240 


1 


8 


10 


18 


90 


Lexington 


7,785 


332 


313 


5 


12 


1 


13 


91 


Concord .... 


7,056 


260 


242 


18 


21 


4 


25 


92 


Franklin .... 


7,055 


234 


214 


8 


16 


11 


27 


93 


Grafton .... 


6,973 


256 


177 


1 


66 


49 


105 


94 


North Andover 


6,839 


223 


201 


3 


22 


17 


39 


95 


South Hadley . 


6,609 


269 


175 


11 


39 


49 


88 


96 


Mansfield 


6,590 


211 


193 


— 


9 


16 


25 


97 


Chelmsford 


6,573 


208 


163 


— 


21 


6 


27 


98 


Spencer .... 


6,523 


127 


116 


11 


36 


33 


68 


99 


Walpole .... 


6,508 


246 


231 


1 


10 


7 


17 


100 


Millbury .... 


6,441 


274 


184 


34 


29 


35 


64 


101 


Great Barrington 


6,405 


178 


148 


6 


14 


23 


37 


102 


Draout .... 


6,400 


144 


131 


— 


2 


4 


6 


103 


Weatborough . 


6,348 


144 


122 


— 


18 


2 


20 


104 


Agawam 


6,290 


248 


209 


— 


62 


47 


109 


105 


Winchendon 


6,173 


218 


179 





63 


67 


120 


106 


Uxbridge 


6,172 


172 


128 


14 


13 


22 


35 


107 


Hingham 


6,158 


203 


172 


16 


5 


5 


10 


108 


Ipswich .... 


6,055 


265 


198 


6 


68 


75 


133 


109 


Amherst .... 


5,972 


196 


172 


— 


21 


16 


37 


110 


Canton .... 


5,896 


160 


94 


45 


25 


70 


95 


111 


Abington 


5,882 


259 


230 


3 


8 


4 


12 


112 


Shrewsbury 


6,819 


222 


218 


1 


9 


20 


29 


113 


Barnstable 


5,774 


206 


194 


— 


12 


8 


20 


114 


Randolph 


5,644 


233 


174 


34 


17 


16 


32 


115 


Wareham 


5,594 


223 


143 


4 


26 


12 


37 


116 


Easton .... 


5,333 


182 


175 


1 


1 


— 


1 


117 


Orange .... 


5,141 


162 


133 


— 


12 


17 


29 


118 


Monson .... 
Totals .... 


5,089 


133 


118 


1 


10 


4 


14 




828,467 


28.770 2 


1,869 


1,976 


3,017 


3,181 


6,198 



P.D. 2. 129 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors 14 to 16 years of age, etc. — Con. 

Group III. Towns of less than 6,000 population and maintaining high schools 



TOWNS — Con. 


1 


2 


. 3 


;4 


5 


6 


7 


119 Foxborough 


4,934 


135 


115 


— 


6 


4 


10 


120 Billerica . . . . 


4,913 


199 


180 


3 


14 


4 


18 


121 Somerset .... 


4,818 


222 


101 


6 


31 


11 


42 


122 Blackstone 


4,802 


143 


80 


12 


5 


7 


12 


123 Falmouth 


4,694 


161 


160 


1 


69 


44 


113 


124 Templeton 


4,368 


186 


143 


' 11 


6 


5 


11 


125 Westport 


4,207 


191 


129 


' 6 


24 


28 


52 


126 Leicester .... 


4,110 


188 


142 


8 


12 


15 


27 


127 Dalton .... 


4,092 


148 


148 


— 


7 


7 


14 


128 Lee .... 


4,058 


130 


108 


4 


8 


4 


12 


129 Oxford .... 


4,026 


155 


100 





49 


51 


100 


130 Williamstown . 


4,006 


140 


118 


5 


32 


23 


55 


131 Warren .... 


3,950 


180 


129 


8 


29 


21 


50 


132 Rockport 


3,949 


167 


167 


■ — 


2 


— 


2 


133 Medfield . . . . 


3,867 


58 


58 


— 


1 


1 


2 


134 Provincetown . 


3,787 


329 


329 


— 


23 


5 


28 


135 Westford 


3,571 


82 


82 


— • 


6 


9 


15 


136 East Bridgewater 


3.538 


142 


121 


1 


13 


3 


16 


137 Wilmington 


3,515 


129 


123 


— 


— 


— 


— 


138 Holden .... 


3,436 


113 


107 


— 


13 


4 


17 


139 Barre .... 


3,329 


119 


112 


4 


23 


29 


52 


140 Holbrook 


3.273 


97 


76 


7 


11 


4 


15 


141 Swansea 


3,250 


158 


57 


, 16 


8 


4 


12 


142 Wrentham 


3,214 


34 


31 


3 


1 


— 


1 


143 Hopedale 


3,165 


99 


80 


3 


3 


1 


4 


144 Nantucket 


3,152 


67 


64 


3 


1 


— 


1 


145 Medway .... 


3,144 


72 


68 


— • 


9 


13 


22 


146 West Bridgewater 


3,121 


78 


78 


— 


8 


4 


12 


147 Sharon .... 


3,119 


153 


89 


39 


3 


1 


4 


148 Hardwick 


3,046 


56 


41 


14 


48 


42 


90 


149 North Brookfield 


3,046 


104 


80 


i 12 


38 


29 


67 


150 Ayer .... 


3,032 


98 


91 


[ — 


1 


— - 


1 


151 Bourne .... 


3,015 


77 


70 


i — 


1 


5 


6 


152 Deerfield .... 


2,968 


102 


92 


! 2 


7 


3 


10 


153 Cohasset .... 


2,913 


81 


77 


4 


2 


— 


2 


154 Weston .... 


2,906 


74 


56 


i 16 


6 


— 


6 


155 Belchertown 


2,905 


83 


79 


1 — - 


12 


13 


25 


156 Lenox .... 


2,895 


99 


96 


! 


4 


1 


5 


157 Hadley . . . . 


2,888 


106 


91 





18 


10 


28 


158 Holliston 


2,812 


85 


76 





4 


— 


4 


159 Pepperell 


2,779 


85 


75 


2 


5 


9 


14 


160 Norton .... 


2,769 


92 


86 


2 


9 


6 


15 


161 Hanover .... 


2,755 


85 


82 


— 


12 


4 


16 


162 Scituate . . . . 


2,713 


85 


82 


— 


2 


— 


2 


163 Hatfield .... 


2,702 


102 


78 


— 


23 


17 


40 


164 Lancaster 


2,678 


87 


35 


32 


4 


8 


12 


165 Hopkinton 


2,580 


88 


69 


— 


— 


3 


3 


166 Kingston 


2,524 


116 


96 


— ■ 


7 


7 


14 


167 Ashland .... 


2,521 


78 


65 


1 


2 


— 


2 


168 Manchester 


2,499 


82 


80 


— 


3 


— 


3 


169 Groveland 


2,485 


76 


67 


— 


5 


2 


7 


170 Groton .... 


2,428 


85 


70 


8 


6 


5 


11 


171 Acton .... 


2,387 


87 


87 


— 


6 


2 


8 


172 Douglas .... 


2,363 


100 


64 


— 


10 


4 


14 


173 Avon .... 


2,360 


83 


75 


4 


5 


6 


11 


.174 Merrimac 


2,349 


81 


78 


; 3 


3 


— 


3 


175 Charlton .... 


2,295 


77 


66 


; — 


15 


13 


28 


176 Wayland .... 


2,255 


73 


62 


; 11 


2 


— 


2 


177 Rutland .... 


2,236 


44 


39 


— 


3 


— 


3 


178 Sutton .... 


2,174 


69 


41 


2 


2 


4 


6 


179 Harwich .... 


2,077 


30 


53 


— 


1 


— 


1 


180 Southborough . 


2,053 


50 


41 


— 


2 


3 


5 


181 Hamilton 


2,018 


46 


45 


1 


2 


— 


2 


182 Williamsburg . 


1,993 


55 


32 


— 


6 


5 


11 


183 Upton .... 


1,988 


60 


59 


— 


4 


11 


15 


184 Northborough . 


1,968 


62 


52 


— 


— 


4 


4 


185 West Boylston . 


1,916 


57 


52 


— 


10 


1 


11 


186 Townsend 


1,895 


71 


70 


— 


8 


7 


15 


187 Westminster 


1,884 


45 


32 


— 


1 


— 


1 


188 Lunenburg 


1,875 


82 


63 


3 


6 


2 


8 



130 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors 14 to 16 years of age, etc. — Con. 

Group III. Towns of less than 6,000 population and maintaining high schools — Concluded 





TOWNS — Con. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


189 


Stockbridge 


1,830 


70 


54 


9 


4 


7 


11 


190 


Northfield 


1.821 


71 


69 


2 




1 


1 


191 


MiUis .... 


1,791 


51 


51 


— 


15 


7 


22 


192 


Marshfield 


1,777 


33 


33 


— 


— 






193 


Dennis .... 


1,749 


38 


38 


— 


1 


— 


1 


194 


Chatham 


1,741 


49 


51 





_ 


_ 




195 


Duxbury .... 


1,688 


53 


50 


— 


4 


1 


5 


196 


Sheffield .... 


1,614 


64 


63 


1 




1 


1 


197 


Huntington 


1,543 


45 


39 


1 


6 


2 


8 


198 


Shelburne 


1,538 


39 


39 


— 


— 


— 




199 


Yarmouth 


1,532 


28 


28 








1 


1 


200 


Sterling .... 


1,516 


55 


47 


1 


3 


4 


7 


201 


Chester .... 


1,514 


59 


59 


— 


— 


1 


1 


202 


Plainville 


1,512 


57 


49 


— 


1 


10 


11 


203 


Pembroke 


1,480 


60 


60 


— 


2 


— 


2 


204 


Sandwich 


1,479 


34 


33 








2 


2 


205 


Norwell .... 


1,466 


41 


41 


— 


1 


— 


1 


206 


Tisbury .... 


1,431 


57 


51 


— 


1 


— 


1 


207 


Littleton .... 


1,411 


46 


44 


2 


3 


— 


3 


208 


Essex .... 


1,403 


40 


40 


— 


1 


— 


1 


209 


Brookfield 


1,401 


49 


42 





8 


21 


29 


210 


Sudbiiry 


1,394 


53 


46 


2 


22 


— 


22 


211 


West Newbury. 


1,337 


38 


38 


— 


— 


— 


— 


212 


Oak Bluffs 


1,314 


48 


42 


— 


4 


1 


5 


213 


Edgartown 


1,235 


46 


42 


— 


— 


— 


— 


214 


Stow .... 


1,185 


37 


37 





3 


1 


4 


215 


Orleans .... 


1,078 


50 


49 


— 


1 


— 


1 


216 


Dover .... 


1,044 


39 


28 


10 


— 


— 


— 


217 


Mendon .... 


1,030 


38 


32 


— 


1 


— 


1 


218 


New Marlborough 


991 


30 


28 


— 


— 


— 


— 


219 


Sherborn .... 


929 


24 


21 


1 











220 


Ashfield .... 


919 


34 


29 


— 


3 


— 


3 


221 


Topsfield 


915 


45 


36 


9 


— 


— 


— 


222 


Ashby .... 


907 


39 


34 


— 


5 


5 


10 


223 


Bernardston 


844 


55 


53 


2 


— 


— 


— 


224 


Brimfield 


840 


31 


31 





2 





2 


225 


Charlemont 


820 


14 


14 


— 


1 


— 


1 


226 


Wellfleet .... 


786 


36 


36 


— 


— 


2 


2 


227 


Brewster .... 


774 


14 


14 


— 


1 


— 


1 


228 


Princeton 


773 


21 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 


229 


Petersham 


672 


16 


16 





1 





1 


230 


New Salem 


519 


11 


10 


— 


1 


— 


1 


231 


Cummington . 

Totals .... 


508 


16 


16 


— 


2 


— 


2 




265,085 


9,047 


7,693 


297 


819 


595 


1,414 



Group IV. Towns of less than 6,000 population and not maintaining high schools 



232 


Tewksbury 


4,985 


91 


85 




3 


_ 


3 


233 


Auburn .... 


4,927 


202 


156 


4 


21 


10 


31 


234 


Dudley .... 


4,594 


247 


99 


72 


32 


48 


80 


235 


Seekonk .... 


4,191 


135 


93 


3 


16 


19 


35 


236 


Acushnet 


4,135 


238 


81 


24 


11 


23 


34 


237 


Longmeadow . 


3,333 


106 


98 


5 


23 


12 


35 


238 


Dighton .... 


3,208 


81 


59 


— 


28 


6 


34 


239 


East Longmeadow 


3,134 


139 


103 


4 


5 


9 


14 


240 


Bellingham 


2,877 


97 


70 


— 


10 


5 


15 


241 


Wilbraham 


2,833 


120 


76 


6 


13 


19 


32 


242 


Hull .... 


2,652 


35 


35 





5 


— 


5 


243 


Shirley .... 


2,394 


28 


12 


9 


8 


22 


30 


244 


MiUviUe .... 


2,366 


89 


55 


— 


11 


3 


14 


245 


Rehoboth 


2,332 


88 


45 


— 


3 


5 


8 


246 


Hanson .... 


2,166 


60 


53 


— 


4 


9 


13 


247 


Ashburnham 


2,159 


92 


27 


36 


12 


6 


18 


248 


Raynham 


2,128 


102 


89 


- 


4 


4 


8 


249 


Georgetown 


1,888 


50 


21 


24 


10 


4 


14 


250 


Sturbridge 


1,845 


58 


38 


5 


8 


12 


20 


251 


Cheshire .... 


1,842 


53 


44 


~ 


6 


1 


7 



P.D. 2. 131 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors 14 to 16 years of age, etc., — Con. 

Group IV. Towns of leas than 6,000 population and not maintainino high schools — Continued 



TOWNS — Con. 

252 Salisbury 

253 Westwood 

254 North Reading 

255 Middleton 

256 Freetown 


1 

1,820 
1,706 
1,689 
1,667 
1,663 


2 
61 
46 
71 
28 
53 


3 

54 
46 
55 
28 
34 


4 
6 

16 


5 

7 

3 
23 


6 

3 

1 

13 


7 
10 

1 

3 
36 


257 Nahant .... 

258 Cob-ain .... 

259 Mattapoisett . 

260 Buckland 

261 Bedford .... 


1,630 
1,562 
1,556 
1,555 
1,514 


44 
54 
71 
61 
53 


44 
53 
53 
61 
53 


— 


1 
7 
2 
6 
1 


5 

1 
2 
2 


1 
12 
3 
8 
3 


262 LakeviUe 

263 Newbury 

264 Burlington 

265 Rowley .... 

266 Russell .... 


1,439 
1,432 
1,431 
1,408 
1,398 


38 
39 
65 
17 
52 


36 
23 
49 
14 
49 


2 


2 
2 
1 
8 


1 
4 


2 
3 

1 
12 


267 Erving .... 

268 Lynnfield 

269 West Brookfield 

270 Carver .... 

271 Lincoln .... 


1,334 
1,331 
1,314 
1,306 
1,306 


37 
61 
36 
66 

42 


36 
58 
28 
66 
37 


"I 
4 


3 
2 
6 
6 


2 

9 

1 


5 
2 
15 

7 


272 Sunderland 

273 Marion .... 

274 Southwick 

275 Whately .... 

276 Clarksburg 


1,290 
1,271 
1,267 
1,229 
1,222 


56 
47 
50 
66 
63 


41 
38 
31 
58 
37 


8 
2 


4 

1 

47 

5 

7 


11 
1 

35 
2 
4 


15 

2 

82 

7 
11 


277 Norfolk .... 

278 West Stockbridge . 

279 Lanesborough . 

280 Wenham .... 

281 Berkley .... 


1,213 
1,212 
1,181 
1,145 
1,118 


48 
39 
51 
42 
41 


46 
36 
44 
41 
22 


2 


2 
1 
6 
2 

1 


1 


2 

1 
7 
2 

1 


282 Tyngsborough . 

283 Rochester 

284 Berlin .... 

285 Hubbardston . 

286 Hinsdale .... 


1,107 
1,100 
1,071 
1,067 
1,044 


30 
61 
35 
47 
5 


21 
56 
33 
31 
5 


— 


5 
1 
2 

1 

1 


2 

1 

1 


7 
2 
2 
1 
2 


287 Harvard .... 

288 Boylston .... 

289 Conway .... 

290 East Brookfield 

291 GiU .... 


996 
970 
931 
929 
918 


24 
46 
25 
28 
32 


7 
41 
19 
22 
32 


16 
5 


1 

1 

5 

12 


2 
1 

1 


1 
3 
6 
13 


292 Southampton . 

293 Royaleton 

294 Granby .... 

295 Bolton .... 

296 Becket .... 


916 

821 
810 
801 

778 


22 
32 
30 
25 
16 


13 
31 
20 
21 
16 


3 


8 
3 

7 
3 
1 


1 
2 
3 


9 
3 
9 
3 
4 


297 Enfield .... 

298 Leverett .... 

299 Dana .... 

300 Hampden 

301 Richmond 


749 
664 
657 
632 
619 


26 
30 
22 
29 
23 


24 
21 
20 
20 
19 


2 


2 
1 
1 
2 


2 
1 
2 


4 
2 
3 
2 


302 HaUfax .... 

303 Granville 

304 Paxton .... 

305 Boxford .... 

306 Oakham .... 


614 
609 
591 
581 
525 


18 
22 
32 
34 
20 


18 
22 
22 
30 
19 


4 


1 

1 


— 


1 
1 


307 Pelham .... 

308 Plympton 

309 Carlisle .... 

310 Hancock .... 

311 Truro .... 


519 
511 
510 
510 
504 


18 
21 
53 
13 
4 


13 
21 
53 
11 
4 


— 


1 

1 
3 
2 


2 

2 
2 


1 
2 
1 
5 
4 


312 Eastham .... 

313 Sandisfield 

314 Egremont 

315 Greenwich 

316 Chesterfield 


494 
480 
477 
450 
445 


12 
15 
12 
9 
22 


12 
13 
12 
4 
12 


5 


— 


— 


— 


317 Blandford 

318 Wales .... 

319 Worthington . 

320 New Braintree . 

321 Savoy .... 


437 
434 
429 
423 
399 


18 
14 
14 
24 
22 


15 
11 
13 
15 

7 


— 


1 


4 


5 



132 P.D. 2. 

Table No. 9. — Number of different minors 14- to i6 years of age, etc. — Con. 

Group IV. Towns of less than 6,000 population and not maintaining high schools — Concluded 



TOWNS — Con. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


322 WendeU . . 

323 Otis . V . 


397 


6 


4 





2 





2 


395 


8 


8 












324 Windsor . . 


388 


4 


4 





1 





1 


325 Phillipston 


384 


8 


8 













326 Warwick . . 


; 364 


11 


11 


— 


— 


— 


— 


327 Fldrida . . . . 


362 


10 


4 








1 


1 


328 Hawley . . 


: 354 


9 


5 


— 


— 


— 





329 Mbnterey 


i 348 


4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


330 Dunstable . 


: 338 


15 


12 


— 


1 


— 


1 


331 Westhampton . 


; 337 


i 4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


332 Boixborough . 


333 


6 


2 














333 WestTisbury . 


332 


12 


12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


334 Heiath . . . . 


298 


6 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


335 Mishpee . i . . : 


298 




2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


336 Rowe • • 


: 292 


3 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


337 Plainfield | . . . 


282 


4 


4 














338 Tyi-ingham . 


: 280 


1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


339 Leyden . . 


270 


i 7 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


340 GojBhen . . ... 


] 251 


8 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


341 Chjlmark i . .i; . 

1 ; 


: 240 


5 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


342 Washington . 

343 Prtecott .... 


231 


3 


3 














230 


4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


344 MWdlefield . . . 


; 223 


5 


6 














345 Aljord . . . . 


• 221 


5 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


346 Shjitesbury ; . 


: 208 


13 


2 


— 


6 


3 


9 


j 
347 MOngtomery . 


■ 191 


3 


3 





3 





3 


348 GaiyHead . 


: 168 


5 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


349 Tolland . . 


: 150 


5 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


350 Monroe . . 

351 Goisnold . ! . 


' 143 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


142 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


352 HolUand . , . . 


: 141 


8 


6 














353 Pet-u . . 


j 113 


5 


5 


— 


1 


1 


2 


354 NewAshford . 


1 85 


5 


5 


— 


2 


— 


2 


355 M(^unt Washington . 


' 58 


' — 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


■totals . ! . 


140,886 


4,788 


3,565 


268 


473 


349 


822 


State . . . . 


4,144,205 


143,069 


105,244 


15,065 


17,993 


18,308 


36,301 



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P.D. 2. 141 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 

I. Summary of total enrolment of students throughout the Commonwealth according 
to type of instruction, — correspondence and class 

(Period covered, Jan. 19, 1916, when first student enrolled, to Nov. 30, 1928) 

Total correspondence enrolment ....... 52,274 

Total class enrolment ......... 277,599 



Total 329,873 

II. Cities and towns in which extension classes were held from Dec. 1, 1927, to Nov. 
30, 1928, subjects taught, and number of students enrolled: 

Amesbury: Automobile repairing for owners and operators. Total enrol- 
ment, 29. 

Amherst: Appreciation of music; public speaking. Total enrolment, 90. 

Arlington: Current literature. Total enrolment, 35. 

Attleboro: Automobile repairing for owners and operators; methods of teach- 
ing silent reading; practical applications of mental hygiene; retail selling. Total 
enrolment, 165. 

Barnstable: Methods of teaching English to adult immigrants; practical ap- 
plications of mental hygiene. Total enrolment, 60. 

Boston: Advanced English Uterature; advanced French composition; ad- 
vanced Gregg shorthand; advertising; American history; applied art; apprecia- 
tion of decorative arts; appreciation of music; appreciation of opera; appreciation 
of symphonies; astronomy; automobile electric ignition and lighting; automobile 
repair course for women drivers; automobile repairing for owners and operators; 
batik; blueprint reading; business administration; business English; business 
law; business problems; child psychology; children's books; copy writing; cor- 
rect use of EngUsh; court stenography; conversational French; conversational 
German; conversational ItaHan; conversational Spanish; cultural personality; 
current events; direct advertising; dramatic workshop; economics; educational 
sociology; educational tests and measurements; estimating building costs ; French 
lectures; French literature; French pronunciation and diction; garage manage- 
ment; genealogy of the English novel; good taste in dress; great political thinkers; 
great periods of European paintings; Gregg shorthand; harmony; heating and 
ventilating; industrial chemistry; interior home decoration; international affairs; 
interpretative piano playing; journaUsm; life insurance fundamentals; library 
cataloguing; locomotive maintenance; methods of piano playing; methods of 
teaching English to adult immigrants; methods of teaching silent reading; methods 
of teaching woodworking; modern and contemporary European writers; parliamen- 
tary law, partnership and corporation law; penal institution administration and 
routine; personal development in business; physical education; piano plajdng; 
poetry and verse writing; practical logic ; psychology of adolescent age ; psychology 
of great men; psychology appUed to business, personal and social problems; psy- 
chology of personality; psychology of self-development; psychology of thought; 
public speaking; real estate law; real estate practice; recreational leadership; 
refrigeration; salesmanship; short story writing; shde rule operation; social 
psychology; speed stenography, traveler's French; visual aids in teaching. Courses 
broadcast by radio; appreciation of symphonies; psychology of your boy and girl. 
Total enrohnent, 18,390. 

Bridgewater: Master portraits of humanity in the novel. Total enrolment, 67. 

Brockton: Appreciation of art; correct use of EngUsh; electric appliances — 
salesmanship; interior home decoration; master portraits of humanity; methods 
of teaching Enghsh in the junior and senior high schools; methods of teaching 
silent reading; radio repairs. Total enrolment, 354. 

Cambridge: Advanced income tax problems; advanced radio theory; air- 
plane design; alternating current machinery; appreciation of decorative arts; 
automobile mechanics; commercial art; conversational Spanish; cost account- 
ing; Diesel engines; elementary accounting; elementary aeronautics; foreman 
training; fundamental theory and practice of aeronautics; income tax problems; 
industrial electricity; mechanical inspection methods; navigation; plain English; 
poetry and verse writing; power plant equipment; power plant testing; practical 



142 P.D. 2. 

calciilus; practical radio; principles of accounting; public speaking; public 
utility economics; radio reception and transmission; radio repairs; radio design 
and testing; short story writing; theory and operation of the aircraft engine. 
Total enrolment, 3,480. 

Canton: Methods of teaching silent reading. Total enrolment, 19. 

Chelsea : PubUc speaking. Total enrolment, 55. 

Concord : Educational tests and measurements. Total enrolment, 55. 

Dedham: Appreciation of music; interior home decoration; the teaching of 
elementary Spanish. Total enrolment, 99. 

Everett: Methods of teaching English; tests and measurements. Total enrol- 
ment, 84. 

Fall River: Advanced French; appreciation of art; blueprint reading and esti- 
mating; conversational French; correct use of English; heating and ventilating; 
interior home decoration; master portraits of humanity; methods of teaching 
elementary English; methods of teaching Enghsh in the junior and senior high 
schools; methods of teaching junior high school mathematics; practical applica- 
tions of mental hygiene. Total enrolment, 637. 

Fitchburg: Elementary aeronautics; practical apphcations of mental hygiene. 
Total enrolment, 92. 

Framingham : Master portraits of humanity ; recent books. Total enrolment, 
102. 

Gardner : Technique of teaching. Total emolment, 78. 

Gloucester: Contemporary Enghsh hterature; public speaking; recent books. 
Total enrolment, 184. 

Greenfield: Practical apphcations of mental hygiene; pubhc speaking. Total 
enrolment, 105. 

Haverhill: Appreciation of music; correct use of EngUsh; public speaking; 
recent books. Total enrolment, 138. 

Holyoke: Correct use of EngUsh; methods of teaching Enghsh to adult immi- 
grants; parhamentary law; practical apphcations of mental hygiene; problems 
in United States history under the constitution; pubUc speaking. Total enrol- 
ment, 385. 

Ipswich: Methods of teaching silent reading. Total enrolment, 38. 

Kingston: Modern tendencies in education. Total enrolment, 51. 

Lawrence: Fabrics for women's clothing; foreman training; parhamentary 
law; practical apphcations of mental hygiene; the teaching of reading. Total 
enrolment, 222. 

Lowell: Appreciation of opera; automobile electric ignition and Ughting; ele- 
mentary accounting; fundamental theory and practice of aeronautics; practical 
application of mental hygiene; principles of accounting, methods of teaching Eng- 
hsh to adult immigrants; pubhc speaking; recent books; the teaching of Enghsh. 
Total enrolment, 591. 

Ludlow: Child psychology'. Total enrolment, 44. 

Lynn: Auditing and business law; blueprint reading; comptometer; conversa- 
tional French; cost accounting; dynamo-electric machinery; good taste in dress; 
industrial electricity; methods of teaching elementary reading; practical applica- 
tions of mental hygiene; principles of accounting; pubhc speaking; shorthand 
and typewriting; shde rule operation; trigonometry. Total enrolment, 579. 

Maiden: Advanced composition — short story writing; technique of teaching. 
Total enrolment, 93. 

Marlborough: Appreciation of art. Total enrolment, 41. 

Maynard : Appreciation of opera. Total enrolment, 44. 

Melrose: Apphed art. Total enrolment, 20. 

Middleborough : Automobile construction. Total enrolment, 32. 

Milford : Recent books. Total enrolment, 45. 

Milton : Parhamentary law. Total enrolment, 14. 

New Bedford: Appreciation of art; civil service arithmetic; civil service 
English; correct use of Enghsh; master portraits of humanity; methods of teach- 
ing Enghsh to adult immigrants; practical apphcations of mental hygiene; psy- 
chology of thought; the teaching of Enghsh. Total enrolment, 534. 



P.D. 2. 143 

Newton: Appreciation of opera, junior high school methods. Total enrol- 
ment, 156. 

North Adams: Advanced English literature; art supervision; current events; 
methods of teaching English to adult irmnigrants; regional geography. Total 
enrolment, 90. 

North Andover: Methods of teaching mathematics. Total enrolment, 35. 

Northampton: Correct use of English. Total enrolment, 39. 

North Attleborough : Fundamental theory and practice of aeronautics. Total 
enrolment, 32. 

Norwood: Modern merchandising. Total enrolment, 15. 

Pittsfield: Methods of teaching Enghsh in the elementary and junior high 
schools; pubhc speaking. Total enrolment, 102. 

Ouincy: Automobile repairing for owTiers and operators; correct use of Enghsh; 
Diesel engines; public speaking. Total enrolment, 129. 

Randolph: Correct use of English. Total em-olment, 23. 

Revere: Educational tests and measurements. Total enrolment, 51. 

Salem: Advanced English literature; appreciation of symphonies; blueprint 
reading and estimating; estimating building costs; recent books. Total enrol- 
ment, 171. 

Saugus: Psychology of learning. Total enrolment, 49. 

Somerville: Modern drama; modern European drama. Total enrolment, 200. 

Springfield: Auditing and public accounting; automobile repairs for women; 
correct use of English; educational psj^chology; elementary accounting; elemen- 
tary aeronautics; estimating building costs; fundamentals of dramatic technique; 
fundamental theory and practice of aeronautics; international affairs; interior 
home decoration; magazine writing; manufacturing processes; methods of teach- 
ing health education; methods of teaching silent reading; methods of teaching 
social science; modern poetry; physical education for women; practical applica- 
tions of mental hygiene; problems in United States history under the constitution; 
principles of accounting; psychology applied to business, social, and personal 
problems; psj'chology of adolescence; public speaking; refrigeration; regional 
geography; sociology; social psj^chology; twentieth century novel. Total enrol- 
ment, 1,397. 

Stoughton: Appreciation of music ; methods of teaching silent reading. Total 
enrolment, 47. 

Swampscott: Modern methods of teaching. Total enrolment, 62. 

Taunton: Recent books. Total enrolment, 54. 

Wakefield: Correct use of English. Total enrolment, 28. 

Westfield: Educational tests and measurements; methods of teaching in the 
junior high schools; public speaking. Total enrolment, 183. 

Weymouth: Contemporary Enghsh literature; methods of teaching elementary 
English. Total enrolment, 62. 

Winchester : Parliamentary law. Total enrolment, 40. 

Winthrop: Civic education; psychological foundations for teachers; pubhc 
speaking. Total enrolment, 134. 

Woburn: Automobile repairing for owners and operators. Total enrolment, 19. 

Worcester: Advanced English expression and rhetoric; advanced Enghsh 
literature; automobile repairing for owners and operators; child psychology; 
correct use of English; educational tests and measurements; elementary account- 
ing; elementary English and rhetoric; estimating building costs; fundamental 
theory and practice of aeronautics; French IV; interior home decoration; interna^ 
tional affairs; master portraits of humanity; methods of teaching English to adult 
immigrants; modern American literature; modern European history; plain Eng- 
hsh; practical applied mathematics; practical mechanics; practical problems in 
mental hygiene; psychology applied to business, social, and personal problems; 
principles of sociology; psychology' of adolescence; public speaking; recreational 
leadership; reference books and their use; tests and measurements; United States 
history. Total enrolment, 1,469. 

Totals: 60 cities and towns; 468 classes; total enrolment, 31,638. 



144 P.D. 2. 

III. Number of students who have completed courses since the establishment of the 



Division 



Completed with certificates : 
In correspondence courses 
In classes . . . , . 

Total 

Completed without certificates: 
In correspondence courses 
In classes . . . . . 

Total . 

Grand total . . . . 



24,368 
91,907 

116,275 



. . ... . 9,726 

. . . . . . . 51,783 

. . - . . . . 61,509 

... . . ... 177,784 

IV. Number of students who have re-enrolled in correspondence courses since the 

establishment of the Division 
Total (men and women), 15,983 

V. Number of students enrolled in North Adams Normal School correspondence 

courses 

1. Average yearly enrolment in first seventeen-year period (1911-1928) 154.^ 

2. Enrolment in 1927-1928, 151. 

VI. Summary of Adult Alien Education since its establishment under the provisions 
of chapter 69, sections 9 and 10, General Laws 
1. Enrolment of adult immigrants in English and citizenship classes for school 
year ending August 3 1 : 

1918-19 (before passage of act) . . . . . . 3,281 



1919^20 
1920-21 
1921-22 
1922-23 
1923-24 
1924-25 
1925-26 
1926-27 
1927-28 



9,030 
20,475 
22,242 
27,658 
32,337 
28,903 
27,759 
25,123 
25,101 



2. Number of English and citizenship classes conducted for adult immigrants 
for school years ending August 31 : 

1920- 1921- 1922- 1923- 1924- 1925- 1926- 1927- 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



In evening schools 


750 


855 


849 


968 


924 


866 


807 


767 


In factories 


327 


366 


306 


302 


240 


199 


166 


186 


In neighborhood 
classes (clubs, 
homes, churches, 
day classes) 


248 


294 


412 


493 


509 


523 


465 


444 



Totals 



. 1,325 1,515 1,567 1,763 1,673 1,588 1,438 1,397 

3. Number of cities and towns operating Aug. 31, 1928, under the provisions of 
chapter 69, sections 9 and 10, General Laws: 

Cities 39 

Towns 97 



Total 



136 



I Many registrations hold over from one year to another. 



P.D. 2. 145 

4. Number of cities and towns employing full-time and part-time directors and 
supervisors for Adult Alien Education, Aug. 31, 1928: 



Full-time directors and supervisors 
Part-time directors and supervisors 

Total 



25 
61 



86 



5. Amount of reimbursement distributed by the State for the school year ending 
Aug. 31, 1928 $149,858 77 



VII. Expenditures, July 1 


, 1927, TO June 30, 1928 


Salaries 




Administration: 




Director 


$5,770 83 


Clerks, stenographers, etc. .... 


12,074 57 


Instruction: 




Supervisors . 


13,555 00 


Full-time instructors 


20,348 06 


Full-time clerks, stenographers, etc. . 


24,149 14 


Part-time instructors ..... 


54,386 51 


Part-time clerical and stenographic service , 


1,165 18 


General Expenses 




Books, periodicals and clippings .... 


322 84 


Express 




496 61 


Films and accessories 






1,353 65 


Furniture 






573 68 


Material for courses 






3,914 73 


Postage 






4,834 43 


Printing 






3,177 29 


Rent . 






1,169 28 


Stationery and office supplies 






2,456 21 


Sundries 






37 50 


Telephone and telegraph . 






234 82 


Textbooks 






11,190 19 


Travel .... 






6,412 12 


Typewriters, other machines and accessories 


2,335 99 


Total 


$169,958 63 


Receipts deposited with treasur 


er 


. 


. $127,516 89 



INDEX 



Adult alien education. See Americanization. 

Adult, blind, appropriation and expenditures for ..... 

Aeronautics, courses in ......... . 

Agricultural education. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

Albert H. Munsell, Massachusetts Normal Art School Fund, financial statement 

Americanization : 

Adult alien education ........ 

Statistics of, summary of . 

Division oi Immigration and, activities of . 

Financial statement ........ 

Public Libraries, Division of, work of, with loreigners 
Appropriations and expenditures, Department of Education, financial statement 
Art Teachers, Sixth Annual Conference oi, held at Massachusetts School of Art 

B 



Blind and deaf children, education of (table) ....... 

Financial statement .......... 

Legislative proposal .......... 

Blind, Division of the: 

Activities of ........... ■ 

Financial statement . . . 

Board of Education, State, consolidation of Commission on Industrial Education with 
Bradford Durfee Textile School, The: 

Activities of ........... • 

Financial statement .......... 

Bridgewater Normal School Playground Fund, financial statement 
Bridgewater State Normal School: 

Commemoration of establishment of first State normal school in America, held at 

New power plant at, appropriation made for conetruction of . . . 



76 
62 

77 

63, 64 
144, 145 

64, 65 
75 
70 

75-77 
54 



59 

75, 76 



65-68 

76, 77 

8 

73 

76, 77 

77 

52 
53 



Certification of superintendents of schools, number of certificates issued 
Certification of teachers for State-aided high schools .... 
Commissioner of Education, report of ..... . 

Blind, Division of the ........ 

Department of Education, divisions and schools of, with names oi members of staff 
Financial statement, December 1, 1927, to November 30, 1928 

Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools, Division of 

Immigration and Americanization, Division of 

Legislative proposals, 1929 

Massachusetts Nautical School 

Public Libraries, Division of 

Teachers' Retirement Board 

Textile schools .... 

University Extension, Division of 

Vocational Education, State-aided, Division of. (Historical report from establishment) 
Commission on Industrial and Technical Education, report of. See Vocational Education 

State-aided, Division of. 
Conferences and institutes ............ 

Continuation schools. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

Conveyance of children to public schools. See Transportation. 

Correspondence courses. See University Extension, Di\'ision of. 

County training schools, location, superintendents; also statistics . . . . . 



59 

90 

5-74 

65-68 

1-4 

75-77 

52-59 

64, 65 

5 

72. 73 
68-72 

71, 72 

73, 74 
60-64 

6-52 



53-55 



90 



D 

Deaf and blind children, education of . . . . . . . . . . 56, 57, 59 

Financial statement, etc. . ... . . . . . . . . • 75, 76 

Legislative proposal ............ 5 

Department of Education : 

Advisory Board of, members of .......... 1 

Commission on Industrial Education, consolidation with Board of Education . . 8 

Divisions and schools of, with names of members oi staff ...... 1—4 

Financial statement, December 1, 1927, to November 30, 1928 .-.. ■ • • 75-77 

Douglas Commission, report of. See Vocational Education, State-aided, Division of. 



Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools, Division of 

Certification of superintendents of schools, number of certificates issued 
Conferences and institutes ........ 

Deaf and blind children, education of ...... 

Financial statement of ....... • 



52-59 
59 

53-55 

56-57, 59 

75 



P.D. 2. 147 

PAGE 

Normal Schools . . . . . . . 52, 53 

Bridgewater State Normal School, appropriation made for construction of new power 

plant at ............ . 53 

Courses of instruction, elimination of two-year ....... 52, 53 

Fitchburg State Normal School, purchase of land for enlargement of play field at . 53 

Massachusetts School of Art, purchase of new site for ...... 53 

Physical education ............. 58 

Teachers' Registration Bureau ........... 58, 59 

Elementary schools, summary of statistics on ........ . 78 

Elizabeth C. Stevens State Normal School at Bridgewater Fund, financial statement . . 77 

Employment of minors, 14 to 16 years ot age, statistics on ...... 127-132 

English-speaking classes for adults, financial statement ....... 76 

Evening schools, summary of statistics on ........ . 78 

Expenditures for public schools, summary oi ........ . 78, 79 

Extension courses. See University Extension, Division of. 



Fess-Kenyon Fund (Federal for vocational rehabilitation), use of .... 

Financial statement. Department of Education, December 1, 1927, to November 30, 1928 

Fitchburg State Normal School, purchase oi land for enlargement of play field at 

Funds : 

Albert H. Munsell State Normal Art School Fund, financial statement . 
Bridgewater Normal School Playground Fund, financial statement 
Elizabeth C. Stevens State Normal School at Bridgewater Fund, financial statement 
General School Fund, financial statement ........ 

Distribution : 

On March 10, 1928 (Part II) 

On November 20, 1928 (Part I) 

Gustavus A. Hinckley Free Scholarship Fund (Hyannis), financial statement 
Marguerite Guilfoyle School of Art Fund, financial statement .... 

Massachusetts School Fund, income of, distribution of. See General School Fund, Part II 
Mercy A. Bailey Normal Art School Fund, financial statement .... 

Rebecca R. Joslin Scholarship Trust Fund, financial statement .... 

Robert Charles Billings State Normal Art School Fund, financial statement . 

Robert Charles Billings State Normal School at Framingham Fund, financial statement 

Todd Normal School Fund, financial statement ....... 

Vocational Education Trust Fund — -U.S. Grant (Smith-Hughes), financial statement i 
Vocational Rehabilitation Giit Fund, financial statement 



122 

75-77 

53 

77 
77 
77 
75 

91 
91 

77 
77 

above. 

77 
77 
77 
77 
77 

7, 121, 122 
77 



Vocational Rehabihtation Trust Fund — U. S. Grant (Fess-Kenyon), financial statement 77, 122 



General School Fund. See Funds. 

Gustavus A. Hinckley Free Scholarship Fund (Hyannis), financial statement 

H 

Health conferences, regional, on school hygiene ..... 

High Schools: 

Certification of teachers for State-aided ...... 

State aid for education in ........ 

State grant, list of towns receiving, in 1928 ..... 

Table showing number of years in course, number of pupils, etc. 
Transportation reimbursement for 1927-28 (table) 

Financial statement ........ 

Tuition reimbursement for 1927-28 (table) ..... 

Financial statement ........ 

Summary of statistics on . 

Hobbs, Charles Wesley, supervisor of instruction in Division or University Extension, death and 

tribute to ............. . 

Household arts. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

I 

Immigration and Americanization, Division of: 

Activities of ............. . 

Financial statement . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Industrial education. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

Industrial Schools, State, number of pupils, teachers, etc. in (table) ..... 



77 



55 

90 

87-89 
89 

87-89 

87-89 
75 

87-89 
75 
78 

60 



64, 65 
75 



90 



Junior and Senior High Schools, Annual Conference of Principals of, held at Framingham 
Normal School ............. 



53 



Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls at, number of pupils, teachers, etc. (table) 
Legislative proposals, 1929 .......... 

Libraries, Public, Division of. See Public Libraries, Division of. 
Lowell Textile School: 

Activities of ........... . 

Financial statement .......... 

Lyman School for Boys at Westborough, number of pupils, teachers, etc. (table) , 

M 

Marguerite Guilfoyle School of Art Fund, The, financial statement 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, teacher-training at .... . 

Massachusetts Nautical School: 

Activities of ........... . 

Financial statement . . . . 



90 
5 



73, 74 

76, 77 

90 



77 
36 



72, 73 
76, 77 



148 

Massachusetts School Fund. See Funds. 
Massachusetts School of Art: 

Marguerite Guilfoyle School of Art Fund, financial statement 

Purchase of new site for ....... 

Robert Charles Billings State Normal Art School Fund, financial statement 
Mental hygiene, courses in ...... . 

Mentally retarded, teachers of, regional conferences for 

Mercy A. Bailey iS'ormal Art School Fund, financial statement . 

Minors : 

Employment of, 14 to 16 years of age, statistics on 

Registration of, October 1, 1927, summary of statistics on 
Music Supervisors, Fifth Conference oi, held at Massachusetts School oi Art 

N 

Nautical School, Massachusetts. See Massachusetts Nautical School. 
New Bedford Textile School: 

Activities of . . . . . . . 

Financial statement ............ 

Normal School Instructors, Eleventh Annual Conference of, held at Bridgewater Normal School 
Normal schools. State: 

Aid to pupils, financial statement .......... 

Appropriations, expenditures, receipts, etc. ........ 

Courses of instruction, elimination of two-year ........ 

First State Normal School in America, establishment of, commemoration of . 

Funds. See Funds. 

Household arts, courses at Framingham State Normal School in . 

Statistics as to number of teachers, admissions, enrolment, etc., for school year ending June 

30, 1928 

North Adams State Normal School, correspondence courses at, statistics . . . . 



P.D. 


2. 


PAGE 




77 




53 




77 


62, 


63 


54 


.55 




77 


127- 


132 


^ 


78 




54 



74 

76, 77 

54 

75 
75, 76 
52, 53 

52 

37 

80 
144 



Physical Education, Fourth State Conference of Directors and Instructors in, held at State 
House and in Brookline ............ 

Practical Arts. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

Public Libraries, Division of: 

Activities of ............. . 

Financial statement . . . . . . . . . . , . 

R 

Rebecca R. Joslin Scholarship Trust Fund, financial statement ...... 

Rehabilitation, vocational. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 

Robert Charles Billings State Normal Art School Fund, financial statement 

Robert Charles Billings State Normal School at Framingham Fund, financial statement 



54 



68-72 
75 



77 



77 
77 



School committees, conferences for members of . 

Returns of, statistical, for 1927-28, summary of . 
School funds. See Funds. 
Secondary education. See High schools. 

Shirley, Industiial School for Boys at, number of pupils, teachers, etc. (table) 
Smith-Hughes Fund (Federal, for vocational education), use of . 
Special class teachers, conferences for ....... 

State Aid: 

General School Fund. See Funds. 

High schools. See H-gh schools, State aid for education. 

Massachusetts Sjhool Fund. See Funds. 

Normal school pupils, financial statement ...... 

Superintendency unions . . . . . . . 

Vocational education. See Vocational Education, State-aided. 
Statistics: (See also Part II, Annual Report, for Tabulation of School Returns). 

Normal schools, State ...... 

Public day, evening, and vacation schools, summary of 

University Extension ... 

Vocational education. State-aided 
Superintendency unions, financial statement 

Statistics of . 
Superintendents of schools, certification of 

Fourteenth Annual Conference held at Bridgewater Normal School 



54 
77-79 



90 

120-122 

54, 55 



75 
81-86 



80 

77-79 

141-145 

91-140 

75 

81-86 

59 

63 



T 

Teachers: 

Certification of, for State-aided high schools . . . 

Training of. See Training of teachers. 
Teachers' institutes ............ 

Financial statement ........... 

Teachers' Registration Bureau, activities of . ... 

Teachers' Retirement Board ........... 

Deficiency in annuity fund to be made good by Commonwealth, legislative proposal 

Deposit in savings banks of funds of teachers' retirement system, legislative proposal 

Financial statement ........... 

Textile Schools: 

Bradford Durfee Textile School, The (Fall River), activities of ... . 

Financial statement ........... 

Lowell Textile School, activities of ........ • 

New Bediord Textile School, activities of ....... . 

Todd Normal School Fund, financial statement ....... 



90 

55 

75 

58, 59 

71, 72 

5 

5 

76 

73 

76, 77 

73, 74 

74 

77 



P.D. 2. 



Training of teachers: 

For agricultural schools and departments .... 

For continuation schools ...... 

For household arts schools and departments 

For industrial schools ....... 

Training schools, county, location, superintendent; also statistics 
Transportation of high school children: 

State reimbursement of expenditures for, financial statement 
Table showing reimbursement for 1927-28 . 
Tuition of high school children: 

State reimbursement of expenditures for, financial statement 

Table showing reimbursement for 1927-28 .... 



u 



tribute to 



University Extension, Division of ..... 

Adult alien education ...... 

Statistics on, summary of . 
Aeronautics, courses in ..... . 

Courses for degree of Bachelor of Science in Education 
Extension courses, cost of ..... 

Financial statement ...... 

Hobbs, Charles Wesley, supervisor of instruction, death and 
Mental hygiene, courses in .... . 

New courses ........ 

Projects of special interest ..... 

Statistics: 

Adult alien education since its establishment, summary of 
North Adams Normal School correspondence courses, students in 
Students, number of: 

In correspondence courses and in classes, summary of total enrolment 
In extension classes, with subjects taught ..... 

Who have completed courses since establishment of Division . 
Who have re-enrolled in courses since establishment of Division 
Union Superintendencies. See Superintendency unions. 



149 


PAGE 


36, 


40 




38 




37 


34-36 




90 




75 


87 


-89 




75 


87 


-89 


60-64 


63 


64 


144, 


145 




62 


60 


61 




63 


75 


77 




60 


62 


63 


61 


62 


62 


63 


144, 


145 




144 




141 


141, 


143 




144 




144 



Vacation schools. Summary of statistics on 
Vocational Education, State-aided, Division of 
Agricultural education 

Economic significance . . 

Graph, showing occupational status of graduates and non-graduates of vocational 
agricultural schools and departtnents 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, courses for teachers in service . 
New fields in 
Teacher-training 

Statistics on 123, 

Agricultural schools, earnings of pupils in (table) 

Vital statistics on ... . 

Commission on Industrial Education, personnel of 
Continuation schools 

Courses in, data concerning (table) 
Economic significance 
New fields in 
Non-residents in 

Protested cases 
Teacher-training 
Statistics on 
Vital statistics on 
"Douglas Commission," personnel of 
Financial statement 

Fitchburg State Normal School, summer courses for teachers 
Hii-tory of, from establishment . 
Historical introduction 

Board of Education, consolidation with 
Commission on Industrial Education 
Development .... 
"Douglas Commission," The 
Early foreshadowings . 
Character of the work now undertaken 
Agricultural .... 

Continuation schools . 
Household arts .... 
Industrial ..... 
Scope of vocational education program 
Articulation with industrial needs 
Extent and growth of program 

Graphs showing growth by types of work as of five year-intervals 
Spread of the opportunity 

Graph showing how State-aided vocational education serves the population 
EcoDomic significance 

Agricultural education 

Continuation schools . 

Evening trade extension education 

Hou.sehold arts education 

Industrial education 

Part-time co-operative education . 





79 


6-52 


10, 


11 


26 


-28 




27 




40 


32, 


33 




36 


125, 


126 




114 




lis 




7 


12, 


13 


14, 


15 


30, 


31 


33, 


34 


133- 


139 




140 




38 


124- 


126 




117 




7 


75. 


77 


39, 


40 


6 


-52 




5-9 




8 


7 


, 8 


>> 


. 9 


e 


, 7 




6 


9 


-15 


10, 


11 


12 


-15 


11, 


12 


9, 


10 


16 


-19 




18 


16 


-18 


16, 


17 




19 




19 


20-31 


26 


-28 


30, 


31 


25, 


26 


28 


-30 


20-24 


24, 


25 



150 

New fields and future developments 
Agricultural education 
Continuation school education 
Household arts education 
Industrial education .... 
Vocational guidance .... 
Household arts, courses in, data concerning (table) 

Teacher-training, statistics on . 
Household arts education .... 

Economic significance . . . 

New fields and future developments in 
Teacher-training . . . 

Homemaking schools, vital statistics on 
Industrial education ..... 

Boys' industrial schools, number of graduates, number entering trade trained 
initial wage (table)' 
Girls' industrial schools 
Part-time co-operative schools 
Economic significance 
New fields and future developments in 
Teacher-training .... 

Legislative enactments, reference to: 

Continuation schools, establishment of, permissive-mandatory (1913) 

Required (1919) 

Commission on Industrial Education, appointment of (1906) . 

Consolidation with Board of Education (1909) 
Douglas Commission, appointment of (1905) . . . 

Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act, acceptance of provisions of (1921 
Industrial and mechanical drawing, establishment of evening classes 

(1870) 

Manual training required (1894) _ . _ . 

Practical art classes, evening, authorization of (1912) 

Rehabilitation Section empowered to provide maintenance to trainees 

habihtation (1923) 

Smith-Hughes Law (1917) 

Teacher-training classes, establishment of (1914) . 
Textile schools, establishment of (1895) 
Vocational classes, establishment of, permissive (1872) . 
Springfield first city to establish such classes (1898) 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, courses for teachers in service 
Minors, 14 to 16 years of age, employment of, statistics on 
'Practical art, courses in, data concerning (table) 
Teacher-training, statistics on 
Vital statistics on 
Rehabilitation Section 
Administration . 
Establishment of (1921) 
Fess-Kenyon Fund, use of . 
Methods of procedure 
Rehabilitation . 

Employment study of rehabilitants from 1921 to 1928 (table D) 
Illustrative cases ........ 

Occupations for which training has been given from 1921 to 1928, list o 
Maintenance cases from 1923 to 1928, statistics on (table A) 
Registrants from 1921 to 1928, statistics on (table B) 
Statistical summary ....... 

Weekly wages prior to and subsequent to disability, study of (table E) 
Statistics ..... 

Smith-Hughes Fund (Vocational), use of 

Springfield, first city to establish vocational classes under permissive law 

Statistics: 

Earnings of vocational agricultural pupils (table 5) 
Employment of minors 14 to 16 years of age (table 9) 

Federal Funds, Use of (table 7) 

Financial statement, all types of schools (table 2) ... 

Summarized financial statement, all types of schools (table 3) 
Roster of State-aided vocational and part-time schools (table 1) 
Supplementary Table: 

Non-residents in State-aided vocational and continuation schooli 
Protested cases 
Teacher-training (table 8) . 

Vital statistics by types of schools and departments (table 6) 
Teacher-training 
Agricultural 
Continuation schools 
Foreman training 
Household arts . 
Industrial 
Teachers in service 
Vocational guidance 
Vocational Education Trust Fund — U. S. Grant, financial statement 
Vocational Rehabilitation Trust Fund — U. S. Grant, financial statement 
Vocational Rehabilitation Gift Fund, financial statement . 

w 

Westborough, Lyman School for Boys at, number of pupils, teachers, etc. (table) 



9, 
for, and 



in, required 
during re 



(table C) 



P.D. 2. 

PAGE 

31-34 

32, 33 

33, 34 
33 

31, 32 

34 

14, 15 

124-126 

11, 12 

28-30 

33 

37 

116 

10; 31, 32 

21, 22 

23 

24, 25 

20-26 
31, 32 

34-36 

8 
8 
7 
8 
6 
9 

6 

6 
8 

44 
8 
8 



40 

127-132 

14, 15 

124-126 

116 

40-52 

41, 42 

40 

122 

42-44 

40-52 

52 

46, 47 

50, 51 

48, 49 

50 

44-46 

52 

118-120 

120-122 

6 

114 
127-132 
120-123 
96-107 
108-113 
91-94 

133-139 

140 

123-126 

115-120 

34-40 

36 

38 

40 

37 

34-36 

38-40 

34 

77 

77 

77 



90 



Public Document ^MMflMRT, Stf/i No. 2 



mss. 

)OCS. 
:OLL. 



QI1|^ OIamm0nttti^altl|[ of MuBB^l^nBHtB 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Department of Education 

For the Year ending November 30, 1928 



Tabulation of the School Returns 
School Year ending June 30, 1928 



Part II 




Pttbucatiom of this Docuuxmt appbotod bt the C!oiaaasiOM on ADimnaTBATiON and Finaitob 
1800 10-'28 Order 3748 



ANNUAL REPORT 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 

Paet II. 

TABULATION OF SCHOOL RETURNS. 

EXPLANATION OF TABLE. 

The table beginning on page 4 gives the principal items in the annual school re- 
turns from the 355 cities and towns of the Commonwealth. 

To find any particular city or town use the index on pages 2 and 3. 

In the table the cities and towns are divided into four groups, and arranged 
within each group in the order of population, as follows : 

Index 
Numbers 

Group I. Cities 1-39 

Group II. Towns of 5,000 population or over .... 40-118 
Group III. Towns of less than 5,000 population and maintaining public 

high schools 119-231 

Group IV. Towns of less than 5,000 population and not maintaining 

public high schools ....... 232-355 

It is to be noted that — 

(1) All per capitas, with the exception of those in the tables on elementary 
schools and high schools, are based upon the net average membership in the public 
schools. 

(2) The rank of each city and town on the basis of the per capita expenditure 
is for the particular group in which it is classed. For the State rank of each city 
and town, see Graduated Valuation Table following this table. 

(3) In computing the amount raised by local taxation for the support of the 
pubhc schools, all reimbursements received from the State on account of school 
expenditures, and all contributions received from sources other than local taxation, 
have first been deducted from the total expenditure. 

The columns containing any particular item have the same number throughout 
the table. They contain the following data: 

Column 
Number 

1. Population, State Census of 1925. 

2. Valuation, as of April 1, 1927. These valuations include supplementary 

assessments made between the 10th and 20th of December, 1927, on 
property as of April 1, 1927. 
3-7. Teaching staff in pubhc day schools. 
8-15. Pupils in public day schools. 

16-28. Itemized expenditures for support of all public schools, year ending June 
30, 1928. 

29-31. Expenditures for outlay, including new grounds, buildings and altera- 
tions, and new equipment, year ending June 30, 1928. 

32, 33. Valuation per pupil, based on the net average membership of the public 
day schools for the year ending June 30, 1928, and the rank in its 
group of the city or town based thereon. 

34, 35. Expenditure per $1,000 valuation for school support from funds raised by 
local taxation, fiscal year next preceding June 30, 1928, and the rank 
in its group of the city or town based thereon. 

36, 37. Rate of total tax per $1,000 valuation for 1927, and the group rank of the 
city or town based thereon. 

38-48. Expenditures for school support classified as to sources from which the 
funds were received. These expenditures are for the city or town 
fiscal year next preceding June 30, 1928, which in all towns and nearly 
all cities ended Dec. 31, 1927. These columns contain also the rank 
in its group of each city and town on the basis of the per capita ex- 
penditure from funds received from local taxation, from the State, 
and from all sources. 



2 P.D. 2. 

Column 
Number 

49. General School Fund. Part II, Chapter 70, General Laws. 

50. General School Fund. Part I, Chapter 70, General Laws. 

51-53. Number of year grades in elementary schools, junior high schools, if any, 

and senior high schools. 
54-67. Day elementary schools. 

68-81. Day high schools in cities and towns in Groups I, II and III. 
82-89. Expenditures for high school education in towns in Group IV, which are 

towns not maintaining public high schools. 
90-106. Persons 5 to 16 years of age, October 1, 1927, classified in the three age 
groups 5 to 7, 7 to 14, and 14 to 16. In each group there is given the 
number in the registration of minors, in public schools, and in private 
schools; also the distribution of such minors in the membership of 
the schools of the State. 
107, 108. Illiterate minors, 16 to 21 years oj age, October 1, 1927. 
109-128. Pupils in each grade. Membership in public day schools, October 1, 

1927, classified as to grade. 
129-134. School buildings in use Jan. 1, 1928, classified as to number of rooms. 
135-143. Value of public school -property. 

Page 150 contains a table giving a comparison of certain State totals for 
1917-18 with the corresponding data for 1927-28, and showing the percentage of 
increase and decrease for the period of ten years. 

Statistics for State-aided vocational education, continuation schools, and Americani- 
zation classes are not included in the school returns, and, consequently, are not given in 
the tables in this tabulation. 



INDEX OF CITIES AND TOWNS. 

The number preceding the name of the city or town indicates its place in the table that follows. 



Ill Abington. 
171 Acton. 
236 Aoushnet. 

56 Adams. 
104 Agawam. 
345 Alford. 

66 Amesbury. 
109 Amherst. 

69 Andover. 

42 Arhngton. 
247 Ashbumham. 

222 Ashby. 
220 Ashfield. 
167 Ashland. 

72 Athol. 

32 Attleboro. 
233 Auburn. 
173 Avon. 

150 Ayer. 

113 Barnstable. 
139 Barre. 
296 Becket. 
261 Bedford. 
165 Belchertown. 
240 Bellingham. 

50 Belmont. 
281 Berkley. 
284 Berlin. 

223 Bemardston. 
30 Beverly. 

120 Billerica. 

122 Blackstone. 

317 Blandford. 

295 Bolton, 

1 Boston. 

151 Bourne. 
332 Boxborough. 
305 Boxford. 
288 Boylston. 

58 Braintree. 
227 Brewster. 

73 Bridgewater. 

224 Brimfield. 
11 Brockton. 

209 Brookfield. 

40 Brookline. 

260 Buckland. 



264 Burlington. 

5 Cambridge. 
110 Canton. 
309 Carlisle. 
270 Carver. 
225 Charlemont. 
175 Charlton. 

194 Chatham. 
97 Chelmsford. 
18 Chelsea. 

251 Cheshire. 
201 Chester. 
316 Chesterfield. 

23 Chicopee. 
341 Chilmark. 
276 Clarksburg. 

53 Clinton. 
153 Cohasset. 
258 Colrain. 

91 Concord. 

289 Conway. 
231 Cummington. 

127 Dalton. 
299 Dana. 

63 Danvers. 
77 Dartmouth. 
55 Dedham. 

152 Deerfield. 
193 Dennis. 

238 Dighton. 
172 Dou^as. 
216 Dover. 
102 Dracut. 
234 Dudley. 
330 Dunstable. 

195 Duxbury. 

136 East Bridgewater. 

290 East Brookfield. 
312 Eastham. 

64 Easthampton. 

239 East Longmeadow. 
116 Easton. 

213 Edgartown. 
314 Egremont. 
297 Enfield. 



267 Erving. 
208 Essex. 
22 Everett. 

68 Fairhaven. 

4 Fall River. 

123 Falmouth. 

20 Fitchburg. 

327 Florida. 
119 Foxborough. 

43 Framingham. 

92 Franklin. 
256 Freetown. 

36 Gardner. 
348 Gay Head. 
249 Georgetown. 
291 Gill. 

28 Gloucester. 
340 Goshen. 
351 Gosnold. 

93 Grafton. 
294 Granby. 
303 Granville. 

101 Great Barrington. 
51 Greenfield. 
315 Greenwich. 
170 Groton. 
169 Groveland. 

157 Hadley. 
302 HaUfax. 
181 Hamilton. 
300 Hampden, 
310 Hancock. 
16i Hanover. 
246 Hanson. 
148 Hardwick. 
287 Harvard. 
179 Harwich. 
163 Hatfield. 
16 HaverhiU. 

328 Hawley. 
334 Heath. 
107 Hingham. 
286 Hinsdale. 
140 Holbrook. 
138 Holden. 



Pt. II. 

352 Holland. 

158 Holliston. 

12 Holyoke. 

143 Hopedale. 

165 Hopkinton. 
285 Hubbardston. 

84 Hudson. 
242 Hull. 
197 Huntington. 

108 Ipswich. 

166 Kingston. 

262 Lakeville. 
164 Lancaster. 
279 Lanesborough. 

10 Lawrence. 
128 Lee. 
126 Leicester. 
156 Lenox. 

31 Leominster. 
298 Leverett. 

90 Lexington. 
339 Leyden. 
271 Lincoln. 
207 Littleton. 
237 Longmeadow. 

7 Lowell. 
80 Ludlow. 

188 Lunenburg. 

8 Ljmn. 
268 Lynnfield. 

15 Maiden. 
168 Manchester. 

96 Mansfield. 

83 Marblehead. 
273 Marion. 

38 Marlborough. 
192 Marshfield. 
335 Mashpee. 
259 Mattapoisett. 

87 Maynard. 
133 Medfield. 

17 Medford. 
145 Medway. 

33 Meh-ose. 

217 Mendon. 
174 Merrimac. 

44 Methuen. 

74 Middleborough. 
344 Middlefield. 
255 Middleton. 

52 Milford. 
100 Miilbury. 
191 MilUs. 
244 Millville. 

61 Milton. 
350 Monroe. 
118 Monson. 

85 Montague. 
329 Monterey. 
347 Montgomery. 
355 Mount Washington. 

257 Nahant. 
144 Nantucket. 

60 Natick. 

78 Needham. 
354 New Ashford. 
6 New Bedford. 
320 New Braintree. 
263 Newbury. 

39 Newburyport. 

218 New Marlborough. 
230 New Salem. 

14 Newton. 



277 Norfolk. 

29 North Adams. 

27 Northampton. 

94 North Andover. 

71 North Attleborough. 
184 Northborough. 

70 Northbridge. 
149 North Brookfield. 
190 Northfield. 
254 North Reading. 
160 Norton. 
205 Norwell. 

54 Norwood. 

212 Oak Bluffs. 

306 Oakham. 
117 Orange. 
215 Orleans. 
323 Otis. 
129 Oxford. 

67 Palmer. 
304 Paxton. 
34 Peabody. 

307 Pelham. 
203 Pembroke. 
159 PeppereU. 
353 Peru. 

229 Petersham. 
325 Phillipston. 

19 Pittsfield. 
337 Plainfield. 
202 Plainville. 

59 Plymouth. 

308 Plympton. 
343 Prescott. 
228 Princeton. 
134 Provincetown. 

13 Quincy. 

114 Randolph. 
248 Raynham. 

81 Reading. 
245 Rehoboth. 

26 Revere. 
301 Richmond. 
283 Rochester. 

86 Rockland. 
132 Rockport. 
336 Rowe. 

265 Rowley. 
293 Royalston. 

266 Russell. 
177 Rutland. 

21 Salem. 
252 Sahsbiu-y. 
313 Sandisfield. 
204 Sandwich. 

62 Saugus. 
321 Savoy. 
162 Scituate. 
235 Seekonk. 
147 Sharon. 
196 Sheffield. 
198 Shelbume. 
219 Sherbom. 
243 Shirley. 
112 Shrewsbury. 
346 Shutesbury. 
121 Somerset. 

9 Somerville. 
292 Southampton. 
180 Southborough. 

48 Southbridge. 

95 South Hadley. 



275 Southwick. 

98 Spencer. 
3 Springfield. 
200 SterUng. 
189 Stockbridge. 

75 Stoneham. 

88 Stoughton. 
214 Stow. 
250 Sturbridge. 
210 Sudbury. 
272 Sunderland. 
178 Sutton. 

79 Swampscott. 
141 Swansea. 

24 Taunton. 
124 Templeton. 
232 Tewksbury. 
206 Tisbury. 
349 Tolland. 
221 Topsfield. 
186 Townsend. 
311 Truro. 

282 Tyngsborough. 
338 Tyringham. 

183 Upton. 
106 Uxbridge. 

47 Wakefield. 
318 Wales. 
99 Walpole. 

25 Waltham. 
82 Ware. 

115 Wareham. 
131 Warren. 
326 Warwick. 
342 Washington. 

41 Watertown. 
176 Wayland. 

57 Webster. 

76 Wellesley. 
226 Wellfleet. 
322 Wendell. 
280 Wenham. 
103 Westborough. 
185 West Boylston. 
146 West Bridgewater. 
269 West Brookfield. 

35 Westfield. 
135 Westford. 
331 Westhampton. 
187 Westminster. 
211 West Newbury. 
154 Weston. 
125 Westport. 

49 West Springfield. 
278 West Stockbridge. 
333 West Tisbiuy. 
253 Westwood. 

45 Weymouth. 
275 Whately. 

89 Whitman. 
241 Wilbraham. 
182 Williamsburg. 
130 WiUiamstown. 
137 Wilmington. 
105 Winchendon. 

65 Winchester. 
324 Windsor. 

46 Winthrop. 
37 Wobum. 

2 Worcester. 
319 Worthington. 
142 Wrentham. 

199 Yarmouth. 



P.D. 2, 



Group I. Cities 







1 


^ 


Teaching 


Staff in Public 






d 


„ 


Day Schools 


— Kindergarten, Ele- 






6 


< 


MENTABY, HiGH JaN. 1, 1928 












PART 




CITIES 


3a 






FULL 


TIME 




TIME 












§ 






a 
2 


a 


m 









2 ^ 






•■3 


■43 t^ 


.2* 


'> 







l« 






Is 


_3 0> 


§ 


ft 




03 


1 








o 


03 *"* 


'G 


3 


<u 





3 






fin 


> 


Ph 


M 


H 


H 


M 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


. 1 


Boston 


779,620 


$1,934,818,900 


97 


84 


4,009 


4,190 


_ 


2 


Worcester 


190,757 


339,696,250 


55 


7 


1,099 


1,161 


1 


3 


Springfield 


142,065 


314,280,440 


36 


16 


929 


981 


9 


4 


Fall River . 


128,993 


189,024,200 


36 


13 


692 


741 


2 


5 


Cambridge . 


119,669 


183,551,600 


35 


5 


564 


604 


- 


6 


New Bedford 


119,539 


216,222,750 


27 


21 


605 


653 


2 


7 


Lowell . 


110,296 


141,777,193 


14 


22 


469 


505 


6 


8 


Ijynn . 


103,081 


132,798,345 


16 


8 


487 


511 


1 


9 


Somerville 


99,032 


116,432,400 


13 


4 


429 


446 


1 


10 


Lawrence 


93,527 


130,763,550 


27 


11 


424 


462 


- 


11 


Brockton 


65,343 


76,528,275 


9 


5 


386 


400 


2 


12 


Holyoke 


60,335 


117,076,310 


16 


3 


257 


276 


2 


13 


Quincy 


60,055 


130,126,250 


12 


7 


383 


402 


1 


14 


Newton 


53,003 


140,071,600 


12 


4 


358 


374 


37 


15 


Maiden 


51,789 


66,843,550 


16 


9 


259 


284 


4 


16 


Haverhill 


49,232 


68,190,975 


11 


7 


263 


281 


_ 


17 


Medford 


47,627 


71,689,700 


14 


9 


327 


350 


— 


18 


Chelsea 


47,247 


54,821,100 


6 


8 


257 


271 


1 


19 


Pittsfield 


46,877 


57,809,775 


22 


9 


307 


338 


— 


20 


Fitchburg 


43,609 


62,437,925 


14 


9 


214 


237 


3 


21 


Salem . 


42,821 


56,104,080 


7 


3 


190 


200 


5 


22 


Everett 


42,072 


64,769,975 


12 


2 


302 


316 


5 


23 


Chicopee 


■ 41,882 


50,850,540 


11 


5 


205 


221 


1 


24 


Taunton 


39,255 


41,382,270 


5 


4 


238 


247 


3 


25 


Waltham 


34,746 


55,210,100 


4 


2 


200 


206 


9 


26 


Revere 


33,261 


40,300,350 


9 


7 


281 


297 


_ 


27 


Northampton 


24,145 


28,564,400 


6 


7 


115 


128 


5 


28 


Gloucester 


23,375 


37,283,129 


3 


6 


149 


158 


1 


29 


North Adams 


22,717 


26,262,818 


7 


5 


119 


131 


— 


30 


Beverly 


22,685 


46,701,675 


9 


5 


160 


174 


4 


31 


Leominster . 


22,120 


22,241,115 


2 


_ 


104 


106 


6 


32 


Attleboro 


20,623 


24,378,255 


8 


4 


137 


149 


6 


33 


Melrose 


20,165 


32,787,000 


7 


6 


117 


130 


21 


34 


Peabody 


19,870 


23,297,638 


9 


6 


127 


142 


— 


35 


Westfield 


19,342 


21,134,220 


9 


4 


122 


135 


- 


36 


Gardner 


18,730 


23,729,344 


1 


2 


95 


98 


1 


37 


Vfoburn 


18,370 


19,787,514 


2 


- 


106 


108 


— 


38 


Marlborough 


16,236 


17,355,448 


— 


4 


70 


74 


— 


39 


Newburyport 
Total 


15,656 


13,568,560 


4 


- 


72 


76 


2 




. 2,909,767 


$5,190,669,519 


603 


333 


15,627 


16,563 


141 



Pt. II. 







Geoup I, 


Cities 










Pupils in Public Day Schools 


— Kindergarten, 


Elementary, 










High — Year ending June 30, 1928 






0< 

13 




03 


J. 

03 


o 




fl fl c b 

0.2 S2 


111 








t i 


feS 




.a«'5S; 


&-^ 


a 


1 


I 


is 


11 


.2* 
13 
2 

^3 


upils for w 
city paid tui 
for not less i 
half of school 


bn-residents 
attended not 
than half of sc 
year 


a 

! 

a) 


Pk 


< 


<^ 


< 


< 


CL, 


Z 


•z, 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


139,507 


21,554,312 


117,143 


184 


126,731 


213 


355 


126,589 


33,641 


5,648,648 


30,046 


188 


32,110 


21 


280 


31,851 


26,558 


4,181,839 


22,418 


187 


24,115 


— 


457 


23,658 


18,741 


3,103,830 


16,401 


189 


17,359 


14 


166 


17,207 


17,175 


2,600,743 


14,561 


179 


15,381 


- 


98 


15,283 


18,468 


3,172,890 


16,544 


191 


17,438 


4 


69 


17,373 


14,428 


2,347,810 


12,706 


184 


13,402 


- 


413 


12,989 


16,347 


2,721,074 


14,809 


184 


15,833 


— 


117 


15,716 


15,537 


2,526,617 


13,902 


182 


14,821 


— 


64 


14,757 


12,884 


2,212,207 


11,918 


186 


12,388 


- 


41 


12,347 


11,816 


2,274,063 


10,797 


185 


11,367 


_ 


59 


11,308 


8,047 


1,318,464 


6,976 


189 


7,389 


— 


20 


7,369 


13,200 


2,161,595 


11,727 


184 


12,481 


— 


19 


12,462 


10,090 


1,632,893 


9,037 


181 


9,654 


4 


44 


9,614 


9,078 


1,463,113 


8,009 


182 


8,605 


- 


34 


8,571 


8,151 


1,084,979 


6,739 


161 


7,348 


8 


60 


7,296 


9,694 


1,597,895 


8,963 


178 


9,510 


— 


67 


9,443 


8,580 


1,394,212 


7,578 


184 


8,322 


— 


21 


8,301 


9,032 


1,519,322 


8,085 


185 


8,545 


— 


119 


8,426 


6,593 


940,035 


5,092 


185 


5,334 


- 


62 


5,272 


5,860 


922,760 


5,141 


180 


5,511 


_ 


11 


5,500 


9,127 


1,542,775 


8,335 


185 


8,783 


15 


24 


8,774 


7,332 


1,175,269 


6,497 


182 


6,828 


4 


11 


6,821 


6,496 


1,067,398 


5,930 


180 


6,210 


— 


226 


5,984 


5,374 


856,733 


4,765 


179 


5,080 


- 


39 


5,041 


8,530 


1,366,664 


7,529 


182 


8,134 


_ 


21 


8,113 


3,618 


614,929 


3,291 


187 


3,469 


7 


33 


3,443 


4,302 


691,830 


3,941 


177 


4.106 


— 


11 


4,095 


3,443 


532,926 


3,053 


175 


3,274 


— 


52 


3,222 


4,877 


817,385 


4,428 


184 


4,669 


2 


8 


4,663 


3,104 


527,088 


2,812 


184 


2,970 


2 


43 


2,929 


4,096 


678,007 


3,681 


184 


3,877 


8 


16 


3,869 


3,794 


633,066 


3,506 


180 


3,687 


- 


60 


3,627 


4,410 


716,526 


3,912 


184 


4,155 


— 


7 


4,148 


4,224 


701,883 


3,917 


179 


4,065 


- 


68 


3,997 


2,880 


479,446 


2,677 


179 


2,774 


_ 


41 


2,733 


3,782 


600,173 


3,314 


181 


3,590 


— 


97 


3,493 


2,205 


366,823 


1,950 


184 


2,075 


— 


61 


2,014 


2,261 


343,342 


1,992 


174 


2,134 


- 


40 


2,094 


496,282 


80,091,564 


434,122 


184 


463,524 


302 


3,434 


460,392 



P.D. 2. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



Itemized Expenditures fob Support of Public 



CITIES 



§•6 2 



17 



19 



1 Boston 

2 Worcester 

3 Springfield 

4 Fall River 

5 Cambridge 

6 New Bedford 

7 Lowell . 

8 Lynn 

9 Somerville 

10 Lawrence 

11 Brockton 

12 Holyoke 

13 Quincy . 

14 Newton . 

15 Maiden . 

16 Haverhill 

17 Medford 

18 Chelsea 

19 Pittsfield 

20 Fitchburg 

21 Salem . 

22 Everett 

23 Chicopee 

24 Taunton 
26 Waltham 

26 Revere . 

27 Northampton 

28 Gloucester 

29 North Adams 

30 Beverly 

31 Leominster 

32 Attleboro 

33 Melrose . 

34 Peabody 

35 Westfield 

36 Gardner 

37 Woburn 

38 Marlborough 

39 Newburyport 

Total . 



$762,176 85 


$10,207,464 59 


$197,741 


62 


$565,728 


24 


65,811 


23 


2,448,651 


83 


50,358 


89 


54,523 


58 


112,029 


81 


2,173,617 


11 


45,000 


77 


126,582 


48 


50,042 


56 


1,390,102 


47 


20,967 


07 


44,059 


28 


68,819 


50 


1,272,698 


89 


24,378 


98 


69,036 


70 


39,754 79 


1,278,460 


37 


16,102 72 


36,356 


15 


27,188 


26 


991,240 


03 


8,932 


12 


16,456 


46 


45,479 


26 


957,768 


18 


23,388 


67 


43,415 


95 


27,201 


59 


907,025 


12 


17,194 62 


19,325 


27 


28,627 


21 


960,586 


54 


14,104 


85 


18,707 69 


18,054 41 


685,275 78 


14,109 


15 


38,029 


53 


30,604 


03 


560.193 


72 


9,377 


12 


19,191 


80 


21,555 


29 


693,176 


11 


27,273 


67 


33,970 


38 


38,412 


13 


847,152 


74 


19,110 


22 


41,919 


19 


16,539 


64 


534,807 


70 


13,248 


04 


20,813 00 


13,447 


57 


450,285 


98 


7,428 


37 


12,869 


46 


17,138 91 


626,463 


26 


15,028 


37 


24,965 97 


13,242 


11 


496,546 


46 


14,131 


94 


19,898 92 


16,077 


21 


515,090 


62 


9,754 74 


19,386 63 


18,223 


53 


401,589 


34 


6,933 


02 


21,220 57 


15,985 


23 


343,731 


26 


9,684 


96 


18,512 70 


17,375 95 


576,485 


02 


8,911 


44 


19,440 


32 


18,784 


00 


372,344 


38 


5,702 


97 


14,079 81 


11,199 


46 


383,613 


87 


10,247 


86 


9,868 


15 


12,312 


74 


377,805 


36 


15,466 82 


22,227 


50 


15,918 


72 


491,386 


15 


7,220 


18 


10,496 54 


9,364 


00 


209,532 


32 


5,600 


19 


6,265 


46 


11,620 77 


248,759 


67 


5,134 


09 


9,801 


55 


9,131 


92 


213,883 


92 


3,729 


46 


4,907 


62 


13,465 


93 


317,137 


34 


6,453 


67 


12,654 01 


10,325 


34 


172,230 


26 


5,308 


64 


10,100 89 


10,989 


80 


247,824 


54 


6,584 


94 


8,248 


24 


10,431 


05 


246,274 


08 


8,218 


56 


9,143 


86 


8,320 


71 


219,451 


81 


7,492 


91 


7,669 


56 


9,854 


34 


214,417 


11 


6,776 01 


10,113 


61 


7,733 


43 


156,020 67 


5,039 


92 


11,009 


59 


8,226 


00 


185,690 


77 


5,361 


61 


8,623 


10 


6,400 


00 


122,376 


87 


3,993 


93 


3,546 


73 


7,411 


57 


115,224 


99 


2,345 


18 


4,567 


46 


$1,645,276 85 


$33,612,387 


23 


$683,838 29 


$1,447,733 95 



Pt. II. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



Schools — Day, Eveninq, Vacation — Yeab ending June 30, 1928 



|i 


1 




"3 




TRANSPORTATION 


s 


a 
2 




■n 


la. 




'o 




•| 


o ^ 

as 


a)'3 to 

I i 

d c3 a> 


,0, 
§•=3 


1 


1 

2 




1 


o 


>-5 


rt 


a 


P4 




H 


H 


20 


21 


22 


23 




24 


25 


$1,196,209 47 


81,315,922 75 


_ 


$175,952 


54 


$9,132 55 


- 


350,877 75 


204,843 15 


$3,717 01 


32,815 


52 


7,279 00 


~ 


359,786 35 


154,869 28 


— 


41,982 


54 


14,173 40 


~ 


221,161 16 


115,772 47 


— 


25,605 


16 


14,440 00 


~ 


167,498 46 


74,028 28 


- 


34,209 


18 


1,899 50 


~ 


160.854 25 


37,554 83 


204 20 


23,870 


00 


6,284 73 


- 


209,249 98 


14,921 40 


— 


26,262 


52 


4,707 15 


— 


150,370 47 


55,404 38 


— 


12,733 


76 


1,511 25 


~ 


114,625 73 


54,538 97 


— 


5,821 


76 


525 00 


~ 


143,354 00 


78,210 10 


- 


18,174 


57 


~ 




145,155 80 


41,181 86 


1,600 00 


13,923 


32 


5,870 00 


- 


108,672 51 


45,870 47 


2,545 74 


8,509 


47 


5,657 05 


~ 


85,658 38 


46,397 00 


9,579 86 


12,698 


61 


8,637 50 


~ 


122,370 31 


69,615 59 


— 


17,120 


72 


7,054 04 


~ 


69,050 31 


45,945 43 


- 


6,791 


44 


~ 




87,837 50 


30,848 83 


150 00 


12,057 


40 


10,870 23 


- 


88,017 42 


28,531 21 


3,464 54 


4,671 


38 


— 


— 


81,460 40 


42,199 66 


— 


9,000 


00 


— 


— 


82,933 70 


6,918 16 


— 


6,484 


23 


10,302 50 


~ 


63,401 91 


14,472 46 


3,647 50 


10,520 


12 


8,549 55 


" 


54,148 93 


16,217 70 


50 00 


3,048 


67 


3,552 88 


- 


87,010 69 


32,769 37 


— 


7,835 


07 


— 


~ 


52,933 78 


13,071 04 


— 


10,738 


63 


12,656 99 


— 


50,896 94 


10,133 31 


356 75 


4,790 00 


15,367 41 


— 


59,250 49 


26,914 20 


3,092 98 


6,244 


48 


6,313 25 


~ 


84,360 99 


8,647 12 


91 81 


7,946 


36 


3,277 20 


- 


31,912 80 


8,044 22 


— 


5,168 


37 


4,453 12 


$133 11 


44,731 34 


30,612 65 


64 69 


3,859 


11 


8,318 83 


— 


29,758 98 


7,300 86 


351 21 


4,250 


00 


2,103 40 


— 


64,924 20 


9,531 19 


- 


9,148 


76 


8,865 83 


~ 


34,000 97 


7,347 17 


_ 


3,983 


34 


11,015 40 


140 00 


38,131 14 


12,134 74 


1,599 48 


3,047 


86 


10,797 43 


~ 


39,926 00 


14,940 95 


— 


3,100 


00 


— 


~ 


42,875 46 


12,571 77 


3,049 50 


4,899 


00 


5,909 48 


— 


27,488 46 


6,163 82 


144 50 


700 


00 


7,844 55 


~ 


22,805 42 


4,062 77 


_ 


3,967 


75 


3,485 40 


- 


27,874 21 


5,472 48 


353 81 


3,319 


79 


650 00 


— 


16,694 72 


4,169 19 


— 


2,350 


00 


6,084 49 


— 


14,561 77 


4,807 92 


165 75 


2,100 


10 


924 55 


~ 


$4,832,833 15 


$2,712,958 75 


$34,229 33 


$589,701 


53 


$228,513 66 


$273 11 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



P.D. 2 



CITIES 



Itemized Expenditures for Support 

OF Public Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation 

— Year ending June 30, 1928 — Con. 



Expenditures 
ENDING June 



•3« 



fl a 







'0 




§ 




^ 




«.«■» 
% 








26 




27 




28 




29 




1 


Boston 


$19,002 98 


$138,527 


43 


$14,587,859 02 


$3,452,101 56 


2 


Worcester . 


7,581 


16 


21,768 


81 


3,248,227 


93 


443,509 01 


3 


Springfield . 


- 




1,068 


04 


3,029,109 


78 


254,401 


90 


4 


Fall River . 


2,713 


04 


32,254 


32 


1,917,117 


53 


157,279 35 


5 


Cambridge . 


648 


45 


4,255 


15 


1,717,473 


09 


15,100 


00 


6 


New Bedford 


422 


01 


7,054 


54 


1,606,918 59 


- 




7 


Lowell 


1,000 


29 


11,111 


98 


1,311,070 


19 


38,598 33 


8 


Lynn 


3,217 


74 


3,154 


66 


1,296,444 


32 


1,367 


82 


9 


Somerville . 


1,018 


59 


2,607 


81 


1,149,884 


46 


105,469 


07 


10 


Lawrence . 


139 


14 


3,041 


81 


1,264,945 


91 


4,224 


69 


11 


Brockton . 


_ 




8,292 


27 


971,492 


12 


- 




12 


Holyoke 


! 1,146 


95 


3,439 


20 


795,208 06 


13,957 


50 


13 


Quincy 


16 


29 


2,162 


48 


941,125 


67 


386,761 


99 


14 


Newton 


656 


01 


84 


00 


1,163,494 


95 


568,393 


28 


15 


Maiden 


468 


01 


994 


28 


708,657 


85 


261,643 


81 


16 


Haverhill . 


705 


43 


1,133 


53 


627,634 


30 


905 


59 


17 


Medford 


685 


15 


19,161 


14 


828,127 


35 


288,276 


58 


18 


Chelsea 


3,404 


57 


1,519 


75 


681,403 


81 


- 




19 


Pittsfield . 


50 


00 


2,968 


11 


669,965 


90 


5,500 


00 


20 


Fitchburg . 


. 




7,765 


39 


556,323 


39 


- 




21 


Salem 


6,016 


81 


5,329 


91 


476,279 


05 


471,445 


36 


22 


Everett 


2,348 


97 


- 




752,176 


83 


- 




23 


Chicopee 


699 


89 


3,725 


45 


504,736 94 


11,904 


23 


24 


Taunton 


25 


00 


2,352 


99 


498,851 


74 


205,357 


60 


25 


Waltham . 


765 


20 


4,007 


86 


534,400 


88 


■ 


- 


26 


Revere 




- 


1,776 


36 


631,121 


43 


229,741 


54 


27 


Northampton 


! 658 


92 


458 


58 


281,591 


09 


1,198 


50 


28 


Gloucester . 


2,154 


24 


1,797 


40 


366,854 


34 


7,318 


18 


29 


North Adams 




- 


5,948 


95 


281,366 


32 


21,549 


54 


30 


Beverly 


246 


71 


1,113 


60 


443,541 


24 


47,812 


10 


31 


Leominster 


105 


00 


4,875 


01 


259,432 


02 


307 


25 


32 


Attleboro . 


464 


67 


3,076 


27 


342,899 


11 


168 


65 


33 


Melrose 


. 643 


50 


500 


00 


333,178 


00 




- 


34 


Peabody 




- 


2,005 


81 


314,246 


01 


114,687 


21 


35 


Westfield . 


! . ! 266 


59 


4,283 


79 


288,052 


78 




- 


36 


Gardner 


314 


24 


424 


06 


214,863 


25 


3,722 


12 


37 


Woburn 


13 


14 


685 


85 


246,270 


76 


1,103 


44 


38 


Marlborough 




- 


660 


92 


166,276 


86 




- 


39 


Newburyport 
Total 


! '. 268 


57 


622 


15 


152,900 


01 




~ 




$57,867 


26 


$315,909 


66 


$46,161,522 


77 


$7,113,796 20 



Pt. II. 





Group I. Cities — 


- Continued 












Expenditure for 






FOB Outlay, Yeab 




Valuation of 


School Support from 






30, 1928 




1927 PER Pupil 


Local Taxation, 


Rate of Total Tax 






IN Net Average 


City Fiscal Year 


PER $1,000 






Membership, 


NEXT preceding 


Valuation, 1927 




1 

3 
O 

f-i 

«2 
1 


Year ending June 


June 30, 1928, 






1 


30, 1928 


per $1,000 Valuation 






1 
i 

lU 


Amount 

Rank in 
Group I 


Amount 

Rank in 
Group I 


d 

1 


i-i 
.Sa 

-J 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


$97,183 18 


$3,549,284 74 


$15,284 2 


$7 22 36 


$30 00 


22 


16,026 93 


459,535 94 


10,665 11 


8 37 29 


29 20 


28 


36,427 26 


290,829 16 


13,284 4 


8 97 21 


27 60 


34 


52,312 49 


209,591 84 


10,985 8 


9 48 14 


35 60 


4 


8,479 94 


23,579 94 


12,010 6 


8 37 28 


31 60 


14 


14,774 49 


14,774 49 


12,445 5 


7 02 37 


27 60 


33 


— 


38,598 33 


10,915 10 


8 26 32 


30 00 


24 


24,056 33 


25,414 15 


8,450 21 


8 46 25 


29 00 


30 




105,469 07 


7,889 24 


9 13 18 


28 60 


31 


746 55 


4,971 24 


10,591 12 


8 28 30 


26 40 


38 


_ 


_ 


6,768 32 


11 31 5 


36 00 


3 


1,128 58 


15,086 08 


15,888 1 


6 43 39 


24 20 


39 


43, 392 91 


430,154 90 


10,442 13 


6 51 38 


27 20 


36 


49,494 85 


617,888 13 


14,570 3 


7 58 35 


27 40 


35 


- 


261,643 81 


7,798 25 


9 64 13 


31 20 


17 


_ 


905 59 


9,346 16 


8 46 26 


30 00 


23 


65,303 86 


353,580 44 


7,592 27 


9 80 12 


32 40 


9 


_ 


— 


6,604 33 


10 74 7 


38 40 


2 


_ 


5,500 00 


6,861 31 


10 55 8 


31 50 


16 


1,871 81 


1,871 81 


11,843 7 


8 26 31 


30 80 


20 


20,670 62 


492,115 98 


10,200 14 


7 78 34 


32 00 


11 


_ 


— 


7,382 29 


10 28 9 


30 40 


21 


_ 


11,904 23 


7,455 28 


8 83 22 


29 50 


26 


600 00 


205,957 60 


6,915 30 


10 19 10 


31 90 


13 


22,987 00 


22,987 00 


10,952 9 


9 16 17 


31 00 


19 


18,361 64 


248,103 18 


4,967 39 


13 96 1 


39 80 


1 


— 


1,198 50 


8,296 22 


8 55 24 


27 00 


37 


_ 


7,318 18 


9.105 17 


9 04 19 


29 80 


25 


3,134 65 


24,684 19 


8,151 23 


9 30 16 


29 20 


27 


150 00 


47,962 10 


1,015 15 


8 44 27 


28 00 


32 


1,782 06 


2,089 31 


7,593 26 


9 91 11 


31 50 


15 


1,491 34 


1,659 99 


6,301 35 


12 57 2 


33 80 


6 


5,000 00 


5,000 00 


9,040 18 


8 99 20 


31 20 


18 


4,000 00 


118,687 21 


5,617 37 


11 81 3 


33 40 


8 


- 


- 


5,287 38 


11 52 4 


32 00 


12 


1,550 64 


5,272 76 


8,683 19 


8 21 33 


29 00 


29 


2,289 70 


3,393 14 


5,665 36 


10 90 6 


34 50 


5 


— 


- 


8,617 20 


8 70 23 


33 50 


7 


317 09 


317 09 


6,480 34 


9 31 15 


32 00 


10 


$493,533 92 


$7,607,330 12 


$11,274 


$8 16 


- 


- 



10 



P.D. 2. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



Expenditure for Support of Public Schools, Day, Evening- 

NEXT preceding 



CITIES 



FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


FROM STATE 

REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 

GENERAL SCHOOL FUND) 


Amount 

Per pupil in 
net average 
member- 
ship 




a 

9 
o 

a 

<! 


Per pupil in 
net average 
member- 
ship 


l-H 

.S a 







38 




39 


40 


41 




42 


43 


1 


Boston 


. $13,977,873 


16 $110 42 


3 


$806,558 35 


$6 37 


35 


2 


Worcester 


2,842,227 


26 


89 


24 


10 


229,790 


62 


7 


21 


23 


3 


Springfield 


2,820,390 


54 


119 


22 


1 


193,847 


15 


8 


19 


6 


4 


Fall River 


1,792,384 


10 


104 


17 


4 


147,000 


84 


8 


54 


3 


5 


Cambridge 


1,536,936 


63 


100 


56 


6 


122,460 


00 


8 01 


7 


6 


New Bedford 


1,516,839 06 


87 


31 


12 


127,317 


40 


7 


33 


19 


7 


Lowell 


1,170,997 75 


90 


15 


9 


101,274 


71 


7 


79 


9 


8 


Lynn 


1,123,112 


18 


71 


46 


28 


102.249 


67 


6 


51 


33 


9 


Somerville 


1,062,510 


50 


72 


00 


27 


88,579 


39 


6 


00 


36 


10 


Lawrence . 


1,082,847 


76 


87 


70 


11 


91,113 


90 


7 


38 


17 


11 


Brockton . 


865,967 


35 


76 


58 


19 


80,220 


00 


7 


09 


26 


12 


Holyoke . 


753,887 


28 


102 


31 


5 


55,476 


90 


7 


53 


12 


13 


Quincy 


846,773 


75 


67 


95 


34 


69,814 


88 


5 


60 


37 


14 


Newton 


1,061,953 


26 


110 


46 


2 


76,530 


20 


7 


96 


8 


15 


Maiden 


644,111 


83 


75 


15 


23 


54,646 


00 


6 


38 


34 


16 


Haverhill . 


576,891 


66 


79 


06 


18 


51,560 


95 


7 


07 


27 


17 


Medford . 


702,689 


65 


74 


41 


25 


77,370 


55 


8 


19 


5 


18 


Chelsea 


588,911 


68 


70 


94 


31 


55,527 


43 


6 


69 


31 


19 


Pittsfield . 


610,171 


80 


72 


42 


26 


63,392 


00 


7 


52 


13 


20 


Fitchburg 


515,662 


62 


98 


00 


8 


38,728 70 


7 


35 


18 


21 


Salem 


436,261 


31 


79 


32 


16 


38,704 


30 


7 


03 


29 


22 


Everett . 


666,030 


28 


75 


90 


20 


61,833 


10 


7 


05 


28 


23 


Chicopee . 


448,783 29 


65 


79 


36 


40,801 


50 


5 


98 


38 


24 


Taunton . 


421,511 


26 


70 44 


32 


45,854 


20 


7 


66 


11 


25 


Waltham . 


505,774 60 


100 


33 


7 


35,380 00 


7 


02 


30 


26 


Revere 


562,749 


08 


69 


36 


33 


70,293 75 


8 66 


2 


27 


Northampton . 


244,334 


97 


70 


97 


30 


24,827 


64 


7 


21 


22 


28 


Gloucester 


337,164 


12 


82 


34 


14 


30,370 


00 


7 


42 


16 


29 


North Adams 


244,139 


11 


75 77 


21 


26,406 


74 


8 20 


4 


30 


Beverly . 


394,269 70 


84 


55 


13 


36,266 


50 


7 


78 


10 


31 


Leominster 


220,514 


81 


75 


28 


22 


20,967 


00 


7 


16 


24 


32 


Attleboro . 


306,331 


80 


79 


18 


17 


29,048 


80 


7 


51 


14 


33 


Melrose 


294,767 


68 


81 


27 


15 


25,777 


50 


7 


11 


25 


34 


Peabody . 


275,135 


24 


66 


33 


35 


24,810 00 


5 


98 


39 


35 


Westfield . 


243,443 


68 


60 


91 


38 


39,965 


10 


10 


00 


1 


36 


Gardner . 


194,745 49 


71 


26 


29 


18,053 25 


6 


61 


32 


37 


Woburn . 


215,711 


96 


61 


76 


37 


26,226 


20 


7 


50 


15 


38 


Marlborough 


151,017 


68 


74 


98 


24 


14,705 


00 


7 


30 


20 


39 


Newburyport . 
Total . 


126,409 00 


60 


37 


39 


15,164 


00 


7 


24 


21 




. $42,382,234 78 


$92 06 


- 


$3,258,914 22 


$7 07 


- 



Pt. II. 



11 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



Vacation — Classified as to Sotjrce, Citt Fiscal Yeab 




Amount paid to Cm 


June 30, 1928 














FROM 


oh^ 


fe 










ll 


'^9. 


'"U 


^ 




FROM 


iLL SOtmCES 






g^ 


sii^ 


o 










£:l 


h% 


0.^ vt 


Q 










§fl 


§^ 


•s"2 " 




a o) 




S 


2 






." M 




M o 


-a a 


From rei 
tuition a 
portation 
wards 






a 

1 


Per pupil 
net avera 
member- 
ship 


.S a 
la u, 


SfSS 




44 


45 




46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


$8,121 10 


$30,603 37 


$14,823,155 98 


$117 09 


3 


_ 


$801,058 35 


998 34 


60,689 


84 


3,133,706 06 


98 38 


10 


— 


228,790 62 


1,307 72 


67,482 


13 


3,083,027 54 


130 32 


1 


- 


193,347 15 


903 45 


18,465 


68 


1,958,754 07 


113 83 


4 


— 


146,100 84 


3,680 12 


23,358 


74 


1,686,435 49 


110 35 


5 


- 


121,460 00 


213 20 


11,767 


67 


1,656,137 33 


95 33 


11 


_ 


126,317 40 


2,798 32 


26,480 


38 


1,301,551 16 


100 20 


9 


— 


100,774 71 


— 


47,283 


43 


1,272,645 28 


80 98 


27 


— 


95,675 00 


3,297 72 


2,335 


58 


1,156,723 19 


78 38 


31 


— 


88,079 39 


969 86 


1,765 


00 


1,176,696 52 


95 30 


12 


- 


91,113 90 


2,383 73 


2,624 


98 


951,196 06 


84 12 


22 


_ 


79,720 00 


606 38 


2,802 


91 


812,773 47 


110 29 


6 


— 


54,976 50 


— 


10,248 


25 


926,836 88 


74 37 


34 


— 


69,814 88 


2,169 06 


3,826 


74 


1,144,479 26 


119 04 


2 


— 


76,030 20 


- 


2,240 


74 


700,998 57 


81 79 


25 


- 


54,646 80 


283 20 


6,462 


14 


635,197 95 


87 06 


17 


_ 


51,560 95 


2,974 44 


13,599 


45 


796,633 99 


84 36 


21 


— 


77,370 55 


791 87 


4,833 


33 


650,004 31 


78 31 


33 


— 


55,027 43 


357 58 


7,538 


03 


681,459 41 


80 87 


28 


— 


63,392 00 


355 69 


8,967 


30 


563,714 31 


106 93 


8 


- 


38,728 70 


707 35 


1,637 


39 


477,310 35 


86 78 


18 


_ 


38,204 30 


1,690 93 


3,760 


25 


733,314 56 


83 57 


24 


— 


61,833 10 


512 07 




- 


490,096 86 


71 85 


38 


— 


40,801 50 


1,554 40 


18,894 


01 


487,813 87 


81 51 


26 


- 


45,854 20 


940 36 


1,465 


00 


543,559 96 


107 83 


7 


- 


35,380 00 


1,054 38 




. 


634,097 21 


78 16 


32 


_ 


70,293 75 


598 46 


6,887 90 


276,648 97 


80 35 


29 


— 


24,827 64 


475 75 


4,531 


32 


372,541 19 


90 97 


13 


- 


30,370 00 


111 70 


6,138 


97 


276,796 52 


85 91 


19 


— 


26,406 74 


356 10 


4,597 


54 


435,489 84 


93 39 


14 


- 


36,266 50 


405 00 


4,263 


75 


246,150 66 


84 04 


23 


_ 


20,967 00 


33 43 


2,928 


93 


338,342 96 


87 44 


16 


— 


29,048 80 


2,546 48 


2,372 


06 


325,463 72 


89 73 


15 


- 


25,777 50 


481 09 


6,770 


39 


307,196 72 


74 05 


35 


— 


24,810 00 


463 23 


6,207 


89 


290,079 90 


72 58 


36 


- 


39,965 10 


273 70 


2,584 


28 


215,656 72 


78 91 


30 


_ 


18,053 25 


3,351 85 


2,568 


88 


247,858 89 


70 95 


39 


— 


26,226 20 


3,761 13 


660 


31 


170,144 12 


84 48 


20 


— 


14,705 00 


273 31 


8,653 


91 


150,500 22 


71 87 


37 


- 


15,164 00 


$51,802 50 


$438,298 47 


$46,131,249 97 


$100 19 


- 


- 


$3,238,939 95 



12 



P.D. 2. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 







Year G 


RADE3 


IN- 


Public Day Elementary Schools (including 






c4 




PRINCIPALS 


TEACHERS 








CITIES 


"3 

o 

03 

1 


1 

u 

'3 


O 

o 
a 

M 

•a 


FULL 


TIME 






a B 


a 


a 

S 
o 


o 


O 






51 


52 


53 


54 55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 


Boston 
Worcester . 
Springfield . 
Fall River . 
Cambridge . 


8 
8 
6 
6 

8 


3 
3 
3 


4 
4 
3 
3 

4 


62 18 

17 34 
8 25 
6 28 

18 10 


231 

30 

32 

19 

9 


2,933 
830 
648 
570 
406 


58,873 

14,433 

10,544 

8,184 

6,903 


55,927 

14,091 

10,284 

7,952 

6,485 


6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


New Bedford 
Lowell 
Lynn 

Somerville . 
Lawrence . 


6 
6 
6 
6 
8 


3 
3 
3 
3 


3 

4 
3 
3 
4 


8 18 
8 5 

7 7 

8 1 
7 19 


27 
11 
29 
12 
15 


512 
345 
365 
316 
327 


8.383 
5,712 
6,242 
6,079 
5,326 


8,120 
5,557 
5,883 
6,010 
5,038 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


Brockton . 

Holyoke 

Quinoy 

Newton 

Maiden 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


2 
3 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 
4 
3 


8 

5 10 
7 
11 
1 11 


4 

8 

10 

20 

2 


284 
189 
286 
264 
187 


4,643 
3,309 
5,479 
3,976 
3,558 


4,331 
3,101 
5,142 
3,768 
3,215 


16 
17 

18 
19 
20 


Haverhill . 
Medford 
Chelsea 
Pitt^field . 
Fitohburg . 


8 
6 
6 
6 
6 


3 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 
3 
3 


4 6 

5 8 
3 2 

6 15 
1 11 


4 
19 
16 
14 
12 


200 
227 
173 
266 
156 


3,500 
3,962 
3,471 
3,806 
2,170 


3,077 
3,682 
3,160 
3,699 
2,017 


21 
22 
23 
24 
25 


Salem 
Everett 
Chicopee . 
Taunton 
Waltham . 


8 
6 
6 
8 
6 


3 
3 

3 


4 
3 
3 
4 
3 


5 1 
4 7 
10 
4 
2 1 


4 

11 

3 

9 


132 
222 
175 
187 
154 


2,255 
3,757 
3,240 
2,615 
2,241 


2,198 
3,826 
3,191 
2,598 
2,085 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


Revere 

Northampton 
Gloucester . 
North Adams 
Beverly 


6 
6 

8 
8 
8 


3 
3 


3 
3 

4 
4 
4 


1 7 

3 2 

2 

3 3 

1 7 


14 
2 
3 

3 


205 
98 

107 
91 

110 


3,563 
1,607 
1,640 
1,363 
1,834 


3,401 
1,427 
1,498 
1,400 
1,683 


31 

32 
33 
34 
35 


Leominster 
Attleboro . 
Melrose 
Peabody 
Westfield . 


6 
8 
8 
8 
8 


2 


4 
4 
4 
5 
4 


1 

4 3 
6 

4 4 
4 4 


2 
2 
4 
4 


72 

106 

83 

96 

100 


1,256 
1,730 
1,448 
2,051 
1,915 


1,185 
1,623 
1,323 
1,490 
1,684 


36 
37 
38 
39 


Gardner 
Woburn 
Marlborough 
Newburyport 

Total 


8 
8 
7 
9 


1 


4 
4 
4 
4 


1 
3 


1 
2 
3 


65 
74 
53 
51 


1,037 

1,561 

869 

892 


1,039 

1,448 

838 

816 




. 


- 


- 


241 284 


591 


11,665 


205,427 


195,292 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. 11. 



13 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



First Two Years of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 



i 


03 


s 


a 


expenditure 


FOR 








1 


s 






J2 


support, exclusive 


OF 


S S <0 






03 


O 


cj 


£ 


GENERAL 


control 


°° § 






• 


C.2 


'a 


i 










^ m Qi 

3 a ^ 




•2 










2 


Is 

< 


o a 


lU 

> ^ 
< 


0) 

> 
< 


a 
o 

a 




slsj 


1-e 




II 


iso 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 


66 




67 


17,661,608 
4,667,476 
3,248,690 
2,671,218 
2,016,514 


184 
188 
187 
187 
179 


95,987 
24,827 
17,401 
14,115 
11,297 


104,000 
26,559 
18,762 
14,929 
11,913 


S10,070,834 
2,314,943 
1,937,679 
1,470,834 
1,085,796 


16 
90 
57 
60 
71 


$96 83 
87 16 

103 28 
98 63 
91 14 


$7,343,421 

1,720,474 

1,446.271 

1,073,888 

846,526 


35 
84 
55 
55 
71 


$121,762 06 
34,414 72 
33,186 84 
15,614 91 
11,915 91 


2,811,694 
1,839,027 
2,023,937 
1,992,640 
1,794,785 


191 

187 
184 
183 
186 


14,647 
9,944 
11,029 
10,887 
9,649 


15,465 
10,460 
11,819 
11,602 
10,024 


1,271,124 
868,763 
811,654 
785,113 
901,545 


19 

88 
63 
42 
74 


82 
83 
68 
67 
89 


19 
06 
67 
67 
94 


1,042,324 
676,905 
617,735 
631,030 
697,583 


96 
40 
52 
30 
68 


11,206 61 

1,096 37 

14,401 56 

10,890 68 

6,631 84 


1,800,753 
1,049,706 
1,736,027 
1,242,272 
1,125,488 


185 
189 
184 
181 

182 


8,239 
5,554 
9,427 
6,876 
6,184 


8,718 
5,881 
10,051 
7,409 
6,647 


677,344 
529,936 
674,348 
752,538 
451,572 


69 
13 
53 
81 
75 


77 
90 
67 
101 
67 


69 
11 
09 
57 
94 


469,412 
396,454 
500,068 
565,969 
352,046 


53 
38 
17 

45 
68 


7,941 55 

6,007 17 

20,978 26 

13,972 27 

9,213 44 


856,198 
1,260,400 
1,089,763 
1,257,926 

705,208 


161 
178 
184 
185 
184 


5,318 
7,098 
5,923 
6,674 
3,825 


5,863 
7,549 
6,483 
7,055 
4,022 


451,070 47 
536,213 42 
450,799 76 
511,547 27 
370,669 42 


76 
71 
69 
72 
92 


94 
03 
53 
51 
16 


320,372 
413,894 
328,337 
399,249 
275,262 


27 
02 
69 
34 

72 


5,454 84 
6,859 68 
8,207 77 
6,648 38 
4,266 77 


703,107 

1,293,134 

1,034,472 

856,582 

679,478 


179 
185 
182 
179 
177 


3,927 
6,986 
5,725 
4,784 
3,830 


4,210 
7,359 
6,014 
5,026 
4,097 


297,218 
541,746 
385,686 
341,660 
382,295 


03 
60 
89 
15 
55 


70 
73 
64 
67 
93 


60 
62 
13 
98 
31 


218,425 
416,270 
293,297 
265,132 
281,677 


64 

88 
72 
59 
95 


4,619 82 
6,323 06 
3,216 02 
6,050 84 
11,492 58 


1,121,537 
514,374 
503,266 
427,172 
592,947 


182 
187 
175 
174 
185 


6,179 
2,756 
2,881 
2,449 
3,206 


6,663 
2,908 
3,005 
2,642 
3,386 


439,594 
208,598 
234,356 
181,177 
275,429 


85 
32 
58 
18 
18 


65 
71 

77 
68 
81 


98 
73 
99 
58 
34 


359,069 
160,132 
162,560 
143,412 
202,100 


90 
32 
84 
63 
51 


2,172 24 
2,881 33 
2,273 37 
2,484 24 
3,160 31 


417,965 
551,905 
460,906 
570,565 
599,480 


184 
184 
180 
183 
179 


2,223 
2,999 
2,562 
3,123 
3,351 


2,349 
3,171 
2,709 
3,319 
3,481 


168,953 
249,091 
212,260 
210,479 
206,511 


00 
20 
71 
24 
94 


71 
78 
78 
63 
59 


93 
55 
35 
41 
32 


119,316 

181,582 
162,402 
153,160 
157,570 


31 
33 
49 

75 
03 


3,113 51 
4,699 84 
5,362 47 
4,887 42 
4,807 81 


339,905 
484,480 
278,707 
260,271 


175 

181 
178 
174 


1,943 
2,677 
1,523 
1,515 


2,020 
2,877 
1,624 
1,628 


129,617 

171,719 

103,980 

95,625 


73 
19 
61 
52 


64 
59 
64 
58 


17 
69 
03 
40 


95,955 

132,523 

81,684 

74,540 


82 
76 
00 
41 


2,942 83 
3,947 78 
2,585 54 
1,233 73 


64,541,583 


185 


349,540 


373,699 


$31,760,334 62 


$84 98 


$23,778,046 99 


$428,926 37 



14 



P.D. 2. 



Gkoup I. Cities — Continued 











Public 


Day High Schools (including Third 




"o 


PRINCIPALS AND 








13 
CI 






jS 


TEACHERS 








<D 






•a 






2 

<o 


PUPILS ENROLLED 


+^ 




FULL 


TIME 


J^ 




CITIES 


bO 






o 

1 






^ 












T3 

•2 






fe 

^ 




a 


1 






03 






a 


a 

to 


a 




" 

^ 


3 








68 


69 


70 


71 


72 


73 


74 


1 


Boston 


16 


481 


465 


_ 


12,306 


12,401 


3,892,704 


2 


Worcester . 


4 


115 


135 


1 


2,319 


2,798 


981,172 


3 


Springfield 


3 


85 


' 183 


5 


2,728 


3,002 


933,149 


4 


Fall River 


1 


44 


74 


— 


1,261 


1,344 


432,612 


6 


Cambridge 


2 


69 


92 


- 


1,928 


1,859 


584,229 


6 


New Bedford 




38 


50 


1 


881 


1,084 


361,196 


7 


Lowell 




36 


100 


1 


1,478 


1,681 


508,783 


8 


Lynn 






36 


67 


- 


2,150 


2,072 


697,137 


9 


Somerville 






25 


84 


1 


1,681 


1,767 


633,977 


10 


Lawrence 






38 


56 


- 


1,352 


1,168 


417,422 


11 


Brockton 






31 


73 


1 


1,473 


1,369 


473,310 


12 


Holyoke 






20 


44 


- 


803 


834 


268,758 


13 


Quincy 






26 


73 


- 


1,146 


1,433 


425,568 


14 


Newton 






33 


46 


17 


1,056 


1,290 


390,621 


15 


Maiden 






25 


58 


3 


1,137 


1,168 


337,625 


16 


Haverhill 






24 


43 


_ 


754 


820 


228,781 


17 


Medford 






34 


57 


- 


1,009 


1,041 


337,495 


18 


Chelsea 






17 


60 


1 


961 


988 


304,449 


19 


Pittsfield 






11 


26 


- 


756 


771 


261,396 


20 


Fitchburg 






28 


29 


2 


662 


744 


234,827 


21 


Salem 






23 


35 


2 


744 


663 


219,653 


122 


Everett 






22 


50 


4 


839 


705 


249,641 


23 


Chicopee 






5 


28 


1 


431 


470 


140,797 


24 


Taunton 






19 


37 


2 


575 


708 


210,816 


25 


Waltham 






11 


29 


5 


523 


525 


177,255 


26 


Revere 




19 


51 


_ 


779 


787 


245,127 


27 


Northampton . 




6 


17 


1 


270 


314 


100,555 


28 


Gloucester 




11 


35 


1 


534 


630 


188,564 


29 


North Adams 




12 


22 


— 


333 


347 


105,754 


30 


Beverly 




10 


43 


3 


666 


694 


224,438 


31 


Leominster 




11 


20 


6 


329 


334 


109,123 


32 


Attleboro . 




9 


25 


2 


344 


399 


126,102 


33 


Melrose 




10 


27 


6 


504 


519 


172,160 


34 


Peabody . 




12 


22 


— 


472 


397 


145,961 


35 


Westfield . 




6 


21 


- 


260 


365 


102,403 


36 


Gardner . 




10 


22 


_ 


388 


416 


139,541 


37 


Woburn . . 




9 


22 


— 


413 


360 


115,693 


38 


Marlborough 




5 


13 


- 


248 


250 


88,116 


39 


Newburyport 




6 


16 


- 


270 


283 


83,071 




Total 




62 


1.432 


2,350 


66 


46,763 


48,800 


15,549,981 



Pt. II. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



15 



Year op 


Junior High Schools), 


Year 


ENDING 


June 


30, 192S 








"3 












^h 


J. 




1 


ft 
2 


expenditure for 
support, exclusive of 


'S P.2 


m 




« 




GENERAL CONTROL 


^n2 


j^ 


a 

O 

1 
a 


'3 
■o 

Mo 


a 










o 




CI 




Per pupil in 
average mem- 
bership of 
high school 


3 


1 


g s 

1= 


2 




o 

a 









75 


76 


77 


78 




79 




80 




81 




184 


21,156 


22,731 


S3,493,307 


78 


$153 68 


$2,666,675 


86 


$70,629 65 


188 


5,219 


5,551 


837,315 09 


150 


84 


706,900 49 


14,959 


17 


186 


5,017 


5,353 


920,855 


58 


172 


03 


678,559 


99 


10,986 


77 


190 


2,286 


2,430 


364,632 


11 


150 


05 


298,491 


70 


4,937 


95 


179 


3,264 


3,468 


520,578 


07 


150 


11 


396,536 


68 


12,463 07 


191 


1,897 


1,973 


273,522 


29 


138 63 


219,290 91 


4,756 


11 


184 


2,762 


2,942 


380,041 


26 


129 


18 


290,420 


13 


7,835 


75 


184 


3,780 


4,014 


426,668 


46 


106 


30 


328,516 


18 


8,956 


00 


172 


3,015 


3,219 


327,113 


87 


101 


62 


268,352 


82 


6,276 


38 


184 


2,269 


2,364 


308,639 


05 


130 


56 


241,982 40 


6,558 98 


185 


2,558 


2,649 


268,662 


59 


101 


42 


208,756 


00 


6,167 


60 


189 


1,422 


1,508 


218,023 


47 


144 


58 


154,955 


44 


3,268 


61 


185 


2,300 


2,430 


240,122 


68 


98 


82 


188,468 


19 


6,223 


06 


181 


2,161 


2,245 


366,933 


98 


163 


44 


276,628 29 


4,949 


12 


185 


1,825 


1,958 


233,575 


61 


119 


29 


176,182 


52 


3,931 


69 


161 


1,421 


1,485 


160,929 


64 


108 37 


127,924 34 


1,973 


53 


181 


1,865 


1,961 


270,651 


47 


138 


02 


208,817 


74 


8,100 


83 


184 


1,655 


1,839 


209,803 


60 


114 


09 


164,015 


81 


5,833 


95 


185 


1,411 


1,490 


139,515 


17 


93 


63 


114,111 


28 


2,806 


36 


185 


1,267 


1,312 


163,152 


77 


124 


35 


122,818 


66 


2,634 60 


181 


1,214 


1,301 


154,613 01 


118 84 


118,664 92 


5,045 04 


185 


1,349 


1,424 


186,175 


43 


130 74 


154,510 


56 


2,445 


32 


182 


772 


814 


98,115 05 


120 


53 


77,009 


16 


2,486 


95 


184 


1,146 


1,184 


136,662 07 


115 


42 


112,588 28 


4,180 


80 


179 


935 


983 


136,309 


59 


138 67 


93,608 


41 


3,874 


24 


182 


1,350 


1,471 


173,099 


64 


117 


67 


130,367 


50 


4,978 49 


188 


535 


561 


61,558 


27 


109 


73 


47,815 


50 


2,718 86 


178 


1,060 


1,101 


119,393 


15 


108 44 


85,387 


83 


2,824 


37 


175 


604 


632 


88,792 92 


140 


50 


69,258 21 


1,245 22 


183 


1,222 


1,283 


153,349 


91 


119 


52 


114,068 33 


3,226 


68 


185 


589 


621 


78,249 


18 


126 


01 


51,406 45 


2,195 


13 


185 


682 


706 


80,362 


41 


113 83 


64,446 


40 


1,857 


61 


180 


944 


978 


109,572 


74 


112 


04 


83,799 


59 


2,856 09 


185 


789 


836 


94,043 


63 


112 


49 


65,064 06 


2,556 


06 


181 


566 


584 


71,099 


00 


121 


74 


56,259 


58 


1,968 


20 


190 


734 


754 


76,599 


59 


101 


59 


59,152 


35 


2,097 


09 


182 


637 


713 


64,601 


36 


90 


60 


51,801 


51 


1,315 


12 


190 


427 


451 


53,737 


24 


119 


15 


38,633 


87 


1,408 


39 


174 


477 


506 


49,862 92 


98 


54 


40,684 


58 


1,111 


45 


184 


84,582 


89,825 


$12,110,241 


65 


$134 82 


$9,352,932 


52 


$240,099 00 



16 



P.D. 2. 



Geoup I. Cities — Continued 



Persons 5 to 16 Years 





CITIES 




5 TO 7 Years 






7 TO 14 




a 
o 


.-a 


"a 


^-gg 


'o 


a 
o 


."a 






'■+3 m 


,-H <U 


ca "^ 


.-, 03 « 


o 


'^ m 


-H « 






fc. o 


^s^ 


t^o. 


° -s 




ss 


s>B^ 






■« a 






«— s 




•g a 








■§a 




^'^ ill 




.S M 


■§a 
















^'^ 


•^"S 

fl 


fl"-^ 








'-' 


hH 


'-' 


i? 




'-' 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


1 


Boston 


. 27,620 


20,865 


6,723 


23 


9 


94,393 


71,775 


2 


Worcester 


6,492 


5,208 


1,141 


— 


143 


22,626 


19,773 


3 


Springfield 


5,025 


4,016 


799 


6 


204 


17,907 


13,741 


4 


Fall River 


4,500 


2,838 


1,567 


— 


95 


18,403 


11,737 


5 


Cambridge 


3,903 


2,305 


1,586 


- 


12 


14,047 


9,088 


6 


New Bedford 


4,163 


2,600 


1,192 


4 


367 


15,777 


11,849 


7 


Lowell 


4,001 


2,094 


1,753 


- 


154 


14,745 


7,807 


8 


Lynn 


2,638 


1,963 


675 


— 


— 


12,359 


9,565 


9 


Somerville 


3,106 


1,954 


923 


— 


229 


12,347 


9,266 


10 


Lawrence . 


3,111 


1,666 


1,252 


1 


192 


12,877 


7,855 


11 


Brockton . 


1,861 


1,196 


257 


_ 


408 


7,923 


7,253 


12 


Holyoke . 


2,297 


1,134 


833 


— 


330 


8,005 


4,372 


13 


Quincy 


2,687 


1,588 


68 


— 


1,031 


8,993 


8,416 


14 


Newton . 


1,917 


1,570 


340 


— 


7 


7,062 


5,557 


15 


Maiden 


1,605 


1,063 


405 


- 


137 


7,450 


5,537 


16 


Haverhill . 


1,505 


1,110 


395 


_ 


_ 


6,292 


4,983 


17 


Medford . 


1,841 


1,146 


296 


— 


399 


6,900 


5,981 


18 


Chelsea 


2,188 


815 


314 


- 


1,059 


7,327 


5,451 


19 


Pittsfield . 


1,696 


1,162 


131 


2 


401 


6,248 


5,442 


20 


Fitchburg 


1,434 


632 


656 


1 


148 


5,925 


3,264 


21 


Salem 


1,487 


868 


619 


_ 


- 


6,140 


3,270 


22 


Everett 


1,647 


1,020 


186 


— 


441 


6,378 


5,724 


23 


Chicopee . 


1,985 


1,174 


611 


— 


200 


7.741 


4,745 


24 


Taunton . 


1,306 


753 


290 


— 


263 


5,086 


4,151 


25 


Waltham . 


1,270 


969 


300 


- 


1 


4,472 


3,038 


26 


Revere 


1,448 


1,308 


90 


_ 


50 


5,682 


5,275 


27 


Northampton . 


763 


550 


176 


— 


37 


2,839 


2,183 


28 


Gloucester 


798 


568 


150 


— 


80 


2,977 


2,580 


29 


North Adams . 


804 


557 


212 


— 


35 


2,906 


2,024 


30 


Beverly . 


666 


536 


130 


- 


- 


3,198 


3,009 


31 


Leominster 


788 


351 


231 


_ 


206 


2,792 


1,871 


32 


Attleboro . 


895 


541 


120 


1 


233 


2,821 


2,581 


33 


Melrose 


586 


349 


160 


— 


77 


2,508 


2,125 


34 


Peabody . 


833 


650 


183 


— 


— 


3.024 


2,582 


35 


Westfield . 


961 


642 


108 


21 


190 


3,288 


2,574 


36 


Gardner . 


436 


227 


209 


- 


- 


2,678 


1,795 


37 


Woburn 


823 


578 


136 


— 


109 


2,837 


2,310 


38 


Marlborough 


515 


308 


207 


— 


— 


1,959 


1,325 


39 


Newburyport . 
Total . 


479 


261 


160 


- 


58 


1,823 


1,299 




. 102,080 


69,135 


25,584 


59 


7,305 


378,755 


283,173 



Pt. II. 



17 









Group I 


Cities — Continued 






























Illiterate 


OF AOE, 


October 


1, 1927 














Minors, 


16 TO 21 






















Years 


OF Age 


Years 










14 TO 


16 Years 








Hi 






















a> 


31a<^ 






















CJ3 

o o 


TS o 


Zk 




"o 


a 
o 


.^a 


Zb 


-1 o H 


la 


—-a 


o 


■■3_a 




■z^i 


o 


Is 


—1 a) 


> ^ a 


'5 M S 


■IK 


o 


|o 






(DJ3 to 




"qq ^ 

o 






XI 

la 




a o-s 

j3 in._ 


.5 bO 


as 


g.2 ?^ 
2-w >>n 






2; 


G 


1— 1 




ti 


H- 


h-^ 


z 


a 


tf 


97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


107 


108 


22,355 


213 


50 


25,748 


18,696 


3,123 


3,130 


586 


196 


17 


1,093 


388 


6,037 


21 


— 


6,053 


4,739 


792 


— 


— 


— 


- 


3 


244 


3,986 


94 


86 


5,235 


3,747 


850 


364 


135 


77 


62 


516 


164 


6,599 


3 


64 


5,018 


2,089 


476 


2,188 


48 


4 


213 


319 


162 


4,951 


5 


3 


3,493 


2,629 


480 


381 


- 


- 


3 


105 


- 


3,862 


44 


22 


4,353 


2,279 


375 


1,495 


168 


29 


7 


1,193 


487 


6,880 


32 


18 


3,667 


2,297 


677 


404 


270 


6 


13 


198 


118 


2,794 


— 


— 


3,342 


2,719 


337 


286 


— 


— 


— 


119 


42 


3,053 


2 


26 


4,423 


3,806 


389 


141 


72 


6 


9 


108 


42 


4,968 


35 


19 


3,159 


2,119 


546 


459 


- 


3 


32 


435 


181 


650 


20 


_ 


2,297 


1,914 


104 


177 


_ 


11 


91 


46 


17 


3,614 


15 


4 


2,006 


1,086 


468 


322 


92 


34 


4 


128 


131 


469 


3 


105 


2,023 


1,526 


118 


62 


249 


5 


63 


278 


11 


1,484 


4 


17 


1,848 


1,308 


322 


32 


109 


8 


69 


60 


24 


1,910 


3 


- 


1,974 


1,520 


354 


98 


- 


2 


- 


39 


39 


1,309 


15 


_ 


1,646 


1,189 


237 


220 


26 


16 


_ 


131 


61 


915 


3 


1 


1,681 


1,421 


126 


77 


44 


2 


11 


11 


11 


1,802 


1 


73 


1,951 


1,519 


187 


230 


— 


1 


14 


152 


129 


783 


19 


4 


1,785 


1,293 


222 


236 


17 


10 


7 


46 


19 


2,607 


16 


54 


1,411 


885 


247 


278 


- 


13 


4 


80 


2 


2,861 


_ 


9 


1,474 


854 


352 


267 


_ 


_ 


1 


147 


73 


603 


9 


42 


1,767 


1,403 


38 


267 


5 


9 


45 


43 


25 


2,957 


11 


28 


1,586 


974 


235 


232 


126 


2 


17 


167 


243 


913 


5 


17 


1,353 


942 


167 


231 


— 


— 


13 


139 


28 


1,429 


3 


2 


1,114 


705 


316 


90 


- 


3 


- 


98 


68 


407 


_ 


_ 


1,401 


1,130 


96 


130 


18 


_ 


27 


33 


25 


645 


5 


6 


833 


498 


125 


141 


56 


4 


9 


6 


6 


397 


— 


— 


702 


566 


12 


104 


20 


— 


— 


23 


23 


864 


9 


9 


764 


429 


161 


161 


— 


1 


12 


9 


9 


189 


- 


- 


906 


835 


- 


49 


20 


2 


- 


4 


4 


917 


3 


1 


751 


459 


71 


200 


21 


_ 


_ 


64 


20 


236 


4 


— 


687 


537 


33 


115 


— 


2 


— 


13 


10 


369 


— 


14 


743 


631 


52 


— 


38 


1 


21 


— 


— 


442 


— 


— 


894 


829 


65 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


14 


566 


131 


13 


855 


589 


99 


67 


27 


29 


44 


37 


35 


883 


_ 


_ 


701 


610 


91 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


62 


65 


621 


— 


6 


676 


508 


73 


1 


1 


2 


91 


3 


2 


634 


— 


— 


531 


302 


36 


193 


— 


— 


- 


4 


4 


523 


1 


- 


613 


535 


72 


- 


6 


1 


- 


13 


13 


97,383 


729 


693 


100,464 


72,117 


12,524 


12,828 


2,161 


479 


899 


5,926 


2,939 



18 



P.D. 2. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



Membership in Public Day 



CITIES 



ELEMENTARY 



^ to 







109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


1 


Boston 


8,948 


1,917 


261 


12,996 


11,809 


10,681 


11,207 


11,324 


2 


Worcester 


. 2,320 


409 


118 


3,958 


3,263 


3,087 


3,203 


2,890 


3 


Springfield 


. 1,554 


306 


262 


2,791 


2,301 


2,151 


2,200 


1,952 


4 


Fall River 


980 


359 


364 


2,243 


1,876 


1,799 


1,922 


1,799 


5 


Cambridge 


. 1,065 


167 


276 


1,757 


1,402 


1,274 


1,377 


1,438 


6 


New Bedford 


868 


128 


387 


2,394 


1,991 


1,881 


1,965 


1,811 


7 


Lowell 


718 


85 


168 


1,613 


1,306 


1,176 


1,385 


1,241 


8 


Lynn 


— 


107 


109 


1,739 


1,573 


1,410 


1,161 


1,447 


9 


Somerville 


609 


74 


13 


1,395 


1,490 


1,366 


1,345 


1,364 


10 


Lawrence . 


132 


83 


- 


1,427 


1,304 


1,204 


1,254 


1,228 


11 


Brockton . 


_ 


51 


29 


1,187 


1,087 


1,040 


1,095 


1,094 


12 


Holyoke . 


! '. 370 


52 


65 


751 


744 


726 


671 


694 


13 


Quincy 


— 


26 


— 


1,817 


1,298 


1,263 


1,304 


1,258 


14 


Newton . 


741 


73 


50 


969 


832 


779 


844 


793 


15 


Maiden . 


. 


73 


- 


917 


932 


840 


809 


854 


16 


Haverhill . 


138 


16 


_ 


877 


837 


814 


808 


780 


17 


Medford . 


— 


97 


— 


1,110 


1,023 


956 


929 


865 


18 


Chelsea 


— 


56 


128 


912 


753 


837 


820 


800 


19 


Pittsfield . 


347 


46 


— 


1,099 


833 


777 


822 


869 


20 


Fitchbiirg 


341 


17 


55 


579 


528 


476 


503 


536 


21 


Salem 


322 


116 


13 


632 


561 


495 


456 


429 


22 


Everett 


- 


93 


29 


969 


873 


822 


861 


878 


23 


Chicopee . 


90 


70 


— 


887 


807 


783 


776 


830 


24 


Taunton . 


_ 


62 


15 


776 


709 


658 


673 


625 


25 


Waltham . 


'. . 446 


128 


- 


645 


565 


460 


431 


423 


26 


Revere 


110 


99 


_ 


1,010 


950 


835 


822 


800 


27 


Northampton . 


28 


18 


— 


418 


340 


322 


344 


348 


28 


Gloucester 


— 


17 


— 


457 


403 


318 


360 


326 


29 


North Adams 


250 


76 


— 


396 


333 


279 


300 


298 


30 


Beverly . 


• 


44 


- 


446 


449 


379 


432 


454 


31 


Leominster 


52 


15 


73 


368 


284 


255 


288 


291 


32 


Attleboro . 


100 


19 


19 


463 


440 


402 


407 


436 


33 


Melrose . 


— 


54 


— 


365 


346 


330 


306 


330 


34 


Peabody . 


— 


7 


15 


534 


465 


431 


432 


408 


35 


Westfield . 


253 


41 


- 


463 


400 


419 


398 


420 


36 


Gardner . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


239 


221 


241 


224 


299 


37 


Woburn . 


_ 


22 


— 


448 


402 


389 


354 


369 


38 


Marlborough 


— 


43 


— 


204 


183 


167 


219 


187 


39 


Newburyport 
Total . 


. 


- 


15 


220 


194 


227 


200 


171 




. 20,475 


5,066 


2,464 


52,471 


46,107 


42,749 


43,907 


43,359 



' Sub-primary. 



Pt. II. 



Group I. Cities — Continued 



19 



Schools by Grades, Oct. 1, 


1927 
















SCHOOLS 


HIGH SCHOOLS 






-*d U 


u 


fl 




u 








T3 », 








11 


o 

00 (N 






o 
u 


u 


u 
03 


g 






1 


to 
•a 


® S M 
■73 ai:-1 


o 
73 d 


® S— 

2 ° 

m a o 


3 




>> 

d 


>> 


>> 


•a o 


"3 


2 


g 


g^W 


t^ 


2Ǥ 


o 


n^ 


u 


3 


% 


^a 


o 


2 


o 


O 


o 


o 


H 


s 


m 


H 


■ Ui 


s 


H 


O 


117 


118 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


124 


125 


126 


127 


128 


11,306 


10,928 


9,801 


_ 


101,178 


9,123 


7,102 


5,465 


4,398 


274 


26,362 


127,540 


2,977 


2,660 


2,049 


— 


26,934 


1,917 


1,466 


1,155 


918 


45 


5,501 


32,435 


1,864 


1,873 


1,879 


- 


19,133 


1,797 


1,447 


1,069 


783 


194 


5,290 


24,423 


1,818 


1,402 


984 


- 


15,576 


874 


660 


550 


401 


36 


2,521 


18,097 


1,325 


1,281 


1,134 


- 


12,496 


1,280 


1,065 


710 


462 


115 


3,632 


16,128 


1,835 


1,430 


1,007 


_ 


15,697 


753 


476 


374 


320 


14 


1,937 


17,634 


1,302 


1,035 


896 


— 


10,925 


1,074 


837 


623 


517 


123 


3,174 


14,099 


1,392 


1,552 


1,291 


- 


11,781 


1,387 


1,365 


788 


584 


37 


4,161 


15,942 


1,378 


1,338 


1,322 


- 


11,694 


1,118 


956 


750 


539 


23 


3,386 


15,080 


1,372 


1,193 


924 


- 


10,121 


976 


659 


479 


382 


24 


2,520 


12,641 


1,056 


1,135 


1,085 


^ 


8,859 


860 


736 


713 


400 


35 


2,744 


11,603 


680 


668 


573 


- 


5,994 


544 


325 


402 


226 


44 


1,541 


7,535 


1,258 


1,189 


982 


- 


10,395 


851 


719 


451 


391 


8 


2,420 


12,815 


773 


801 


833 


- 


7,488 


706 


593 


568 


331 


103 


2,301 


9,789 


1,005 


724 


732 


- 


6,886 


669 


528 


423 


344 


- 


1,964 


8,850 


747 


703 


676 


_ 


6,396 


605 


411 


296 


236 


11 


1,559 


7,955 


811 


854 


839 


- 


7,484 


699 


539 


393 


358 


9 


1,998 


9,482 


700 


863 


789 


- 


6,598 


734 


532 


385 


282 


8 


1,941 


8,599 


823 


904 


648 


- 


7,168 


527 


445 


237 


229 


15 


1,453 


8,621 


495 


440 


421 


- 


4,084 


382 


361 


288 


302 


8 


1,341 


5,425 


446 


464 


417 


_ 


4,351 


504 


368 


265 


206 


13 


1,356 


5,707 


859 


759 


776 


- 


6,919 


711 


484 


423 


347 


14 


1,979 


8,898 


752 


681 


468 


- 


6,144 


394 


243 


149 


84 


7 


877 


7,021 


609 


539 


453 


— 


5,119 


474 


315 


267 


186 


8 


1,250 


6,369 


422 


362 


317 


- 


4,199 


359 


290 


209 


173 


- 


1,031 


5,230 


813 


742 


671 


_ 


6,852 


561 


382 


326 


275 


_ 


1,544 


8,396 


356 


343 


285 


178 


2,980 


188 


204 


104 


85 


6 


587 


3,567 


366 


431 


376 


— 


3,054 


414 


308 


255 


171 


16 


1,164 


4,218 


277 


279 


199 


- 


2,687 


240 


166 


114 


120 


13 


653 


3,340 


387 


462 


440 


- 


3,493 


404 


365 


299 


270 


- 


1,338 


4,831 


296 


277 


225 


_ 


2,424 


236 


194 


125 


95 


2 


652 


3,076 


368 


347 


290 


- 


3,291 


249 


193 


153 


142 


3 


740 


4,031 


304 


335 


344 


- 


2,714 


302 


257 


251 


183 


12 


1,005 


3,719 


418 


381 


314 


— 


3,405 


330 


232 


114 


81 


113 


870 


4,275 


418 


398 


303 


- 


3,513 


254 


156 


116 


75 


5 


606 


4,119 


294 


269 


213 


_ 


2,000 


263 


202 


185 


146 


4 


800 


2,800 


360 


320 


238 


— 


2,902 


252 


224 


177 


138 


3 


794 


3,696 


194 


167 


187 


— 


1,551 


186 


111 


79 


85 


2 


463 


2,014 


198 


184 


171 


102 


1,682 


183 


159 


128 


88 


1 


559 


2,241 


43,084 


40,713 


35,552 


280 


376,227 


33,380 


26,075 


19,858 


15,353 


1,348 


96,014 


472,241 



20 



P.D. 2. 





Group I. 


Cities - 


- Concluded 










School Buildings 


IN 




Estimated Value of 






Use '' " " """ 


, JAN. 


1, 19Z» 
























elementary 




t!) 


2 


2 


2 


>. 








CITIES 


% 

Xi 


'3 


'5 

Xi 

a 

o 
o 


'3 

J2 












a 

o 


o 


S 

O 

o 


li 






1 


S 


a a 


P a 


^1 


1% 


■il 


"5 


0^ 






C"^ 


s-- 


,d — 


O'" 


3 ° 


o 


^ 


3 


E^^ 


O 


H 


H 


Pn 


pq 


H 


m 


m 




129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


136 


1 Boston 


5 


21 


3 


29 


248 


306 


-I 


_ 1 


2 Worcester . 


5 


3 


- 


8 


69 


85 


$572,516 


$5,328,772 


3 Springfield . 


1 


1 


1 


2 


38 


43 


620,848 


3,612,417 


4 Fall River . 


2 


3 


— 


14 


37 


56 


389,900 


3,545,650 


5 Cambridge 


■ 


- 


- 


2 


27 


29 


255,900 


1,719,392 


6 New Bedford 


1 


1 


1 


1 


35 


39 


860,882 


4,008,962 


7 Lowell 


9 


9 


— 


14 


17 


49 


228,890 


1,202,300 


8 Lynn 


— 


7 


— 


11 


22 


40 


263,827 


1,981,112 


9 Somerville . 


— 


— 


— 


3 


26 


29 


202,200 


1,216,000 


10 Lawrence . 


• 


- 


- 


6 


21 


27 


260,250 


2,083,000 


11 Brockton . 


_ 


3 


_ 


12 


16 


31 


139,950 


1,350,725 


12 Holyoke . 


— 


2 


— 


— 


16 


18 


262,560 


910,830 


13 Quincy 


— 


— 


1 


— 


21 


22 


353,925 


2,308,000 


14 Newton 


— 


2 


— 


4 


23 


29 


231,000 


4,087,302 


15 Maiden 


- 


- 


- 


4 


14 


18 


121,000 


578,000 


16 Haverhill . 


3 


3 


_ 


9 


15 


30 


97,125 


1,808,825 


17 Medford . 


— 


3 


— 


3 


17 


23 


211,200 


1,512,000 


18 Chelsea 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


7 


151,750 


1,61&,000 


19 Pittsfield . 


3 


3 


— 


1 


16 


23 


154,700 


1,941,950 


20 Fitchburg . 


2 


2 


2 


6 


14 


26 


104,350 


784,150 


21 Salem 


1 


_ 


_ 


5 


10 


16 


74,366 


1,387,000 


22 Everett 


— 


— 


— 


2 


18 


20 


113,100 


1,081,250 


23 Chicopee . 


1 


3 


— 


2 


14 


20 


65,300 


815,346 


24 Taunton . 


2 


4 


1 


2 


17 


26 


50,000 


1,241,400 


25 Waltham . 


• 


3 


- 


1 


13 


17 


95,600 


1,116,800 


26 Revere 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


13 


18 


130,000 


1,742,500 


27 Northampton 


'. 5 


2 


1 


3 


7 


18 


51,250 


874,000 


28 Gloucester . 


1 


6 


— 


3 


13 


23 


58,900 


349,400 


29 North Adams 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


8 


120,750 


1,006,784 


30 Beverly 


■ 


- 


1 


2 


10 


13 


69,883 


784,534 


31 Leominster 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


9 


13 


25,000 


264,150 


32 Attleboro . 


1 


4 


2 


3 


9 


19 


73,525 


1,051,400 


33 Melrose 


— 


— 


1 


3 


7 


11 


57,500 


770,729 


34 Peabody . 


— 


1 


— 


3 


9 


13 


36,500 


574,687 


35 Westfield . 


; 6 


2 


- 


1 


8 


17 


31,250 


510,000 


36 Gardner 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


7 


10 


80,900 


469,000 


37 Woburn 


— 


3 


— 


5 


7 


15 


49,100 


675,900 


38 Marlborough 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


5 


35,000 


285,000 


39 Newburyport 


; 1 


- 


- 


2 


5 


8 


12,500 


300,000 


Total . 


50 


92 


14 


176 


888 1,220 


$6,713,197 


$56,895,267 



' Detailed information not available. 



Pt. II. 



Group I. Cities — Concluded 



21 



Public School Property 



SCHOOLS 


JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 




III 


1 
o 


1 


1 




"a 
o 


1 

a 

u 


w 


H 


m 


PQ 


w 


H 


O 


137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


_ 1 


— 1 


-1 


_i 


- 1 


_ 1 


$48,937,2741 


$682,701 


$6,583,989 


$267,677 


$2,185,002 


$177,123 


$2,629,802 


9,213,791 


415,191 


4,648,456 


747,412 


4,339,531 


415,191 


6,502,134 


10,160,590 


112,896 


4,048,446 


126,200 


1,425,000 


142,550 


1,693,760 


5,742,196 


200,425 


2,175,717 


170,700 


905,700 


244,965 


1,321,365 


3,497,082 


364,738 


5,234,582 


284,177 


2,113,073 


181,959 


2,579,209 


7,813,791 


36,050 


1,467,240 


209,410 


2,896,800 


47,000 


3,163,200 


4,620,440 


151,738 


2,396,677 


163,400 


2,705,425 


281,247 


3,150,072 


5,646,749 


90,500 


1,508,700 


70,700 


1,496,000 


73,000 


1,639,700 


3,148,400 


240,465 


2,583,715 


120,250 


800,000 


258,635 


1,178,885 


3,762,600 


_ 


1,490,675 


139,700 


715,500 


_ 


855,200 


2,345,875 


78,975 


1,252,365 


251,550 


473,574 


140,323 


866,447 


2,117,812 


84,368 


2,746,293 


249,000 


2,265,000 


209,768 


2,723,768 


5,470,061 


88,750 


4,407,052 


182,272 


3,590,000 


149,062 


3,921,334 


8,328,386 


191,617 


890,617 


208,500 


1,406,500 


207,413 


1,822,413 


2,713,030 


95,000 


2,000,950 


72,425 


700,525 


30,000 


802,950 


2,803,900 


110,000 


1,833,200 


126,900 


1,650,000 


230,000 


2,006,900 


3,840,100 


125,000 


1,892,750 


23,400 


1,000,000 


100,000 


1,123,400 


3,016,160 


240,000 


2,336.650 


25,000 


250,000 


75,000 


350,000 


2,686,660 


67,500 


956,000 


40,000 


725,000 


82,600 


847,500 


1,803,500 


156,160 


1,617,526 


4,000 


825,000 


175,000 


1,004,000 


2,621,626 


59,595 


1,253,945 


56,000 


940,000 


139,200 


1,135,200 


2,389,145 


37,135 


917,781 


89,751 


389,365 


42,673 


521,789 


1,439,670 


98,800 


1,390,200 


5,000 


455,000 


35,000 


495,000 


1,886,200 


75,000 


1,287,400 


156,000 


696,000 


56,000 


908,000 


2,195,400 


144,000 


2,016,500 


240,900 


2,705,600 


230,750 


3,177,150 


5,193,660 


63,500 


988,750 


8,000 


250,000 


18,600 


276,500 


1,265,250 


32,646 


440,946 


10,000 


300,000 


32,091 


342,091 


783,037 


49,465 


1,176,999 


60,000 


493,750 


66,250 


600,000 


1,776,999 


73,579 


927,996 


54,593 


778,780 


118,969 


952,342 


1,880,338 


19,472 


308,622 


65,000 


612,400 


55,000 


732,400 


1,041,022 


64,850 


1,179,775 


10,000 


383,700 


30,275 


423,975 


1,603,750 


66,000 


894,229 


68,200 


300,000 


23,000 


381,200 


1,276,429 


29,000 


640,187 


30,000 


600,000 


30,000 


660,000 


1,300,187 


35,000 


576,250 


18,750 


156,250 


25,000 


200,000 


776,250 


129,292 


679,192 


13,000 


500,000 


63,700 


666,700 


1,245,892 


50,500 


775,500 


20,000 


350,000 


20,000 


390,000 


1,165,600 


40,000 


360,000 


35,000 


450,000 


30,000 


616,000 


875,000 


5,500 


318,000 


5,000 


80,000 


3,500 


88,500 


406,500 


$4,595,408 


$68,203,872 


$4,407,867 


$42,908,375 


$4,220,644 


$51,636,886 


$168,678,032 



22 











Group II 


Towns of 5,000 




TOWNS 


3 

i 

03 


•"5 

o. 

■< 

"S 


Teachinq Staff in Public 
Day Schools — Kindergarten, Ele- 
mentary, High — Jan. 1, 1928 




FULL TIME 


PART 
TIME 












E 






§ 

•+3 

•ii 

r 


i 
Is 

> 


a, 
'3 




E 

o 

1 




-3 
1 


02 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 


Brookline 
Watertown . 
Arlington 
Framingham 
Methuen 


42,681 
25,480 
24,943 
21,078 
20,606 


$155,403,100 
47,044,199 
53,008,550 
31,621,648 
20,064,395 


8 

8 

11 

7 
4 


3 

2 
5 
6 

7 


234 
170 
211 
144 
116 


245 
180 
227 
157 
127 


5 
4 
1 
1 


45 
46 
47 
48 
49 


Weymouth . 
Winthrop 
Wakefield . 
Southbridge . 
West Springfield . 


17,253 
16,158 
15,611 
15,489 
15,326 


37,207,271 
25,087,150 
21,939,045 
12,454,385 
26,949,785 


4 
5 
5 

1 
4 


5 
1 
3 
3 

5 


103 
106 
117 
49 
118 


112 
112 
125 
53 
127 


14 
2 
2 


60 
51 
52 
53 
54 


Belmont 

Greenfield 

Milford 

Clinton 

Norwood 


15,256 
15,246 
14,781 
14,180 
14,151 


32,151,565 
23,646,756 
15,514,370 
16,614,244 
26,483,450 


7 
1 
2 
1 
6 


6 
4 

3 


119 

126 

93 

63 

119 


126 

133 

99 

64 

128 


5 

2 
1 


55 
56 
57 
58 
59 


Dedham 
Adams . 
Webster 
Braintree 
Plymouth 


13,918 
13,525 
13,389 
13,193 
13,176 


22,637,025 
14,342,225 
12,268,589 
21,028,325 
26,834,600 


4 
6 
3 

7 
6 


3 
3 
2 

6 


100 
59 
44 

102 
93 


107 

68 

49 

109 

105 


1 
5 
6 
1 
2 


60 
61 
62 
63 
64 


Natick . 
Milton . 
Saugus 
Danvers 
Easthampton 


12,871 
12,861 
12,743 
11,798 
11,587 


11,030,100 
31,891,945 
13,176,500 
12,049,825 
14,077,987 


2 
4 
2 
7 
2 


7 

5 
5 


81 
92 
88 
73 
60 


90 
96 
95 
85 
62 


1 

1 
1 


65 
66 
67 
68 
69 


Winchester . 

Amesbury 

Palmer 

Fairhaven 

Andover 


11,565 
11,229 
11,044 
10,827 
10,291 


29,780,000 
11,558,820 
11,759,108 
11,964,885 
17,661,427 


2 
2 
1 
6 


6 
3 
2 


72 
48 
74 
63 
56 


80 
53 
77 
69 
56 


2 
2 
9 
1 


70 
71 
72 
73 
74 


Northbridge . 
North Attleborough 
Athol . 
Bridge water . 
Middleborough 


10,051 
9,790 
9,602 
9,468 
9,136 


9,314.816 

10,049,780 

10,605,200 

5,463,435 

9,412,650 


1 
1 
2 
5 
1 


2 
2 

1 


60 
43 
56 
55 
57 


63 
44 
60 
60 
59 


2 
10 

1 


75 
76 
77 
78 
79 


Stoneham 
WeUesley 
Dartmouth . 
Needham 
Swampscott . 


9,084 
9,049 
9,026 
8,977 
8,953 


11,851,675 
31,135,250 
12,413,875 
18,719,150 
22,319,422 


1 
5 
3 
3 
5 


1 
5 
3 
3 
3 


55 
98 
65 
75 
67 


57 
108 
71 
81 
65 


2 

1 
1 

1 


80 
81 
82 
83 
84 


Ludlow 
Reading 
Ware . 
Marblehead . 
Hudson 


8,802 
8,693 
8,629 
8,214 
8,130 


10,483,736 
14,379,299 

7,524,785 
18,637,680 

7.220,601 


4 
3 

2 

1 


1 
2 
2 

3 


51 
72 
41 
53 
38 


56 
77 
43 
65 
42 


6 
3 

4 
1 
1 


85 
86 
87 
88 
89 


Montague 

Rockland 

Maynard 

Stoughton 

Whitman 


7,973 
7,966 
7,857 
7,857 
7,857 


10,636,892 
8,467,249 
6,744,840 
8,613,016 
8,297,740 


1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 
2 


61 
47 
50 
43 
49 


62 
60 
52 
46 
52 


1 
1 
1 

1 


90 
91 
92 
93 

94 


Lexington 
Concord 
Franklin 
Grafton 
North Andover 


7,785 
7,056 
7,055 
6,973 
6,839 


17,114,891 
8,421,040 
8,809,283 
6,122,270 
8,693,910 


4 
3 
1 
1 

1 


1 
4 

5 


72 
45 
53 
39 
43 


77 
52 
54 
40 
49 


3 

4 
2 
3 

1 


95 
96 
97 
98 
99 


South Hadley 
Mansfield 
Chelmsford . 
Spencer 
Walpole 


6,609 
6,590 
6,673 
6,523 
6,508 


7,281,341 
7,692,864 
7,730,640 
4,482,758 
13,118,156 


1 
7 
1 
1 
4 


2 
2 


44 
43 
44 
26 
55 


45 
52 
47 
27 
59 


6 

2 
2 

2 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over 



23 





Pupils in Public Day Schools 


— Kindergarten, 


Elementart, 




1-^ 






High — Year ending June 30, 1928 






•sT 
s- 


-o 

1 


C3 


>> 


"3 

t. a 

si 

3 m 


1 


or whom 
.id tuition 
less than 
chool year 


_9 ^"3 


u 


0) a 


c> 


^ fl 


!s 




•rt « (3 


V 3 


a 
"E 

3 
CM 


r 


<1 


Ml ai 

U c3 


0) 

S'S 


Pupils 
town p 
for not 
haH of 


Non-resii 
attend 
thanh 
year 


^1 
o 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


6,053 


952,536 


5,284 


180 


5,610 


1 


42 


5,569 


5,239 


848,258 


4,846 


175 


5,112 


— 


16 


5,096 


5,473 


901,131 


4,912 


183 


5,240 , 


— 


19 


5,221 


4,502 


711,429 


4,003 


178 


4,297 


5 


50 


4,252 


3,752 


621,385 


3,406 


182 


3,576 


3 


15 


3,564 


3,902 


646,171 


3,517 


184 


3,750 


- 


23 


3,727 


3,326 


537,550 


2,970 


181 


3,193 


— 


8 


3,185 


3,478 


577,809 


3,157 


183 


3,350 


— 


165 


3,185 


1,752 


296,292 


1,551 


190 


1,645 


- 


40 


1,605 


3,370 


565,559 


3,043 


186 


3,212 


- 


9 


3,203 


3,530 


682,442 


3,172 


183 


3,389 


- 


23 


3,366 


3,420 


575,860 


3,127 


183 


3,286 


— 


61 


3,225 


2,988 


506,895 


- 2,804 


181 


2,958 


— 


80 


2,878 


1,865 


308,817 


1,685 


184 


1,774 


2 


32 


1,744 


3,449 


567,794 


3,123 


181 


3,278 


- 


34 


3,244 


3,194 


523,096 


2,870 


183 


3,068 


2 


75 


2,995 


1,990 


329,269 


1,791 


184 


1,883 


2 


76 


1,809 


1,523 


248,703 


1,350 


184 


1,401 


- 


93 


1,308 


3,050 


485,404 


2,669 


182 


2,902 


— 


2 


2,900 


2,643 


435,353 


2,348 


185 


2,482 


14 


6 


2,490 


2,813 


450,869 


2,476 


182 


2,647 


18 


31 


2,634 


2,513 


425,360 


2,261 


184 


2,434 


1 


14 


2,421 


3,048 


486,027 


2,729 


178 


2,914 


18 


27 


2,905 


2,200 


364,855 


2,034 


180 


2,151 


— 


45 


2,106 


1,715 


286,102 


1,509 


189 


1,600 


- 


30 


1,570 


2,254 


355,614 


1,977 


180 


2,138 


_ 


25 


2,113 


1,450 


230,402 


1,269 


181 


1,366 


2 


106 


1,262 


2,242 


366,214 


2,056 


178 


2,119 


— 


89 


2,030 


2,143 


356,744 


1,905 


187 


1,997 


— 


47 


1,950 


1,500 


249,808 


1,370 


182 


1,430 


- 


10 


1,420 


1,892 


318,112 


1,747 


182 


1,806 


- 


5 


1,801 


1,185 


200,013 


1,089 


184 


1,143 


— 


6 


1,137 


2,089 


353,706 


1,950 


181 


2,022 


6 


47 


1,981 


1,648 


262,851 


1,461 


180 


1,552 


6 


42 


1,516 


1,894 


315,012 


1,754 


179 


1,841 


2 


88 


1,755 


1,542 


259,014 


1,413 


183 


1,494 


37 


26 


1,505 


2,024 


328,703 


1,796 


183 


1,922 


— 


10 


1,912 


2,011 


323,245 


1,797 


185 


1,900 


— 


25 


1,875 


2,162 


349,118 


1,942 


180 


2,064 


2 


13 


2,053 


1,556 


255,517 


1,410 


183 


1,502 


1 


1 


1,502 


1,798 


295,835 


1,600 


183 


1,694 


2 


14 


1,682 


1,961 


333,025 


1,830 


182 


1,884 


2 


132 


1,754 


1,368 


218,685 


1,223 


179 


1,291 


14 


27 


1,278 


1,446 


236,172 


1,306 


185 


1,390 


- 


3 


1,387 


1,161 


186,682 


1,048 


178 


1,103 


- 


59 


1,044 


1,685 


278,656 


1,575 


177 


1,640 


- 


38 


1,602 


1,459 


249,124 


1,360 


183 


1,421 


— 


19 


1,402 


1,745 


296,401 


1,658 


179 


1,709 


— 


- 


1,709 


1,380 


227,080 


1,255 


181 


1,331 


— 


55 


1,276 


1,591 


267,095 


1,470 


182 


1,537 


- 


115 


1,422 


2,107 


349,618 


1,903 


184 


2,020 


2 


133 


1,889 


1,297 


213,395 


1,188 


180 


1,269 


— 


78 


1,191 


1,673 


278,842 


1,533 


182 


1,614 


13 


52 


1,575 


1,207 


200,539 


1,101 


182 


1,156 


- 


7 


1,149 


1,281 


220,253 


1,205 


183 


1,259 


- 


11 


1,248 


1,438 


233,968 


1,319 


177 


1,383 


- 


32 


1,351 


1,403 


239,326 


1,283 


189 


1,359 


— 


14 


1,345 


1,429 


236,815 


1,315 


184 


1,367 


— 


27 


1,340 


854 


140,532 


757 


186 


812 


— 


36 


776 


1,732 


283,803 


1,560 


182 


1,659 


3 


55 


1,607 



24 



Group II. 



P.D. 2. 
Towns op 5,000 







Itemized Expenditures for Support of Public 




TOWNS 


1 


So 

^ OS 
CD -T 






3 

h 






o 




J 








1 


« ^ ® 

J.2"S 

5 t* o5 

1^" 


§ 


3 






o 


02 




H 


o 






16 


17 




18 


19 


40 


Brookline 


S17,305 68 


$548,794 96 


$14,881 91 


$20,613 02 


41 


Watertown 


10,949 70 


325,320 


39 


8,056 15 


14,205 98 


42 


Arlington 


14,547 20 


392,534 


72 


11,047 48 


33,736 90 


43 


Framingham . 


10,904 93 


245,011 


33 


6,317 80 


10,609 51 


44 


Methuen 


8,838 77 


194,819 


99 


4,844 22 


6,864 40 


45 


Weymouth 


8,069 36 


183,164 


31 


7,278 95 


7.541 22 


46 


Winthrop 


5,564 53 


190,193 


00 


5,314 92 


8,390 47 


47 


Wakefield 


10,423 05 


220,318 


21 


4,281 47 


8,081 84 


48 


Southbridge . 


5,850 59 


81,678 


75 


2,505 73 


3,466 74 


49 


West Springfield 


11,590 11 


210,832 


45 


7,638 89 


11.119 87 


50 


Belmont 


9,853 78 


233,517 


55 


6,900 10 


14,966 31 


51 


Greenfield 


6,752 33 


207,148 


50 


4,859 78 


7,035 52 


52 


Milford . 


6,173 81 


140,769 


72 


4,362 88 


5,602 34 


53 


Clinton . 


7,204 33 


109,732 


18 


2,754 18 


3,775 74 


54 


Norwood 


9,523 17 


221,865 


02 


6,532 11 


7,637 84 


55 


Dedham 


8,218 38 


177,507 


61 


4,946 82 


5,359 78 


56 


Adams . 


6,512 76 


103,248 


82 


1,809 67 


1,993 18 


57 


Webster 


6,186 58 


86,681 


78 


1,960 15 


3,323 78 


58 


Braintree 


7,606 82 


176,068 


50 


4,744 29 


11,996 61 


59 


Plymouth 


8,888 70 


153,827 


41 


5,691 37 


8.073 05 


60 


Natick . 


5,684 62 


146,974 72 


4,109 21 


7,623 76 


61 


Milton . 


10,069 89 


164,109 


00 


5,955 04 


7,118 97 


62 


Saugus . 


4,845 53 


133,017 


73 


2.643 01 


6,150 85 


63 


Danvers 


6,339 16 


137,625 


71 


5,882 37 


6,553 35 


64 


Easthampton . 


5,583 09 


92,174 


64 


2.462 62 


4,197 68 


65 


Winchester 


10,066 63 


162,827 


83 


5,357 83 


10,305 57 


66 


Amesbury 


6,345 87 


82,011 


62 


3,742 01 


6,285 32 


67 


Palmer . 


7,866 91 


109,841 


31 


2,988 79 


4,855 21 


68 


Fairhaven 


5,218 77 


111,955 


70 


3,625 64 


4.167 28 


69 


Andover 


5,046 31 


88,954 


92 


3,861 50 


2.919 69 


70 


Northbridge . 


5,835 56 


93,096 


44 


3,052 08 


3,946 10 


71 


North Attleborough 


6,006 99 


72,303 


12 


1.693 02 


3,344 81 


72 


Athol . 


7,546 18 


95,900 


20 


2.201 49 


3,556 74 


73 


Bridgewater . 


4,399 48 


78,966 


80 


1,870 23 


2,313 38 


74 


Middleborough 


4,708 21 


80,839 


16 


4,340 61 


3,430 85 


75 


Stoneham 


5,516 48 


97,594 


08 


4.589 23 


6,344 39 


76 


Wellesley 


11,429 50 


202,267 


28 


3,541 51 


10,062 45 


77 


Dartmouth 


6,818 60 


90,700 


35 


2,664 63 


4,299 63 


78 


Needham 


6,529 96 


137,714 00 


3,260 89 


6,084 09 


79 


Swampscott . 


8,694 18 


114,712 


82 


2,997 68 


5,623 16 


80 


Ludlow . 


8,490 19 


102,940 


97 


3,529 41 


5.596 66 


81 


Reading 


5,625 71 


140,429 


17 


4,879 65 


10,175 58 


82 


Ware 


6,099 48 


61,734 


83 


2,246 51 


1,259 54 


83 


Marblehead . 


5,510 86 


88,340 


35 


2,495 96 


6,045 80 


84 


Hudson . 


3,972 00 


68,778 04 


2,133 52 


1,995 63 


85 


Montague 


6,392 88 


99,251 


81 


2,770 14 


4,200 77 


86 


Rockland 


5,072 83 


75,722 


00 


2,757 01 


3,217 83 


87 


Maynard 


5,324 27 


71,382 40 


3,090 38 


3,645 34 


88 


Stoughton 


5,680 11 


67,426 


11 


2,036 67 


2,589 19 


89 


Whitman 


4,218 62 


80,796 24 


2,487 81 


3,559 49 


90 


Lexington 


5,294 49 


130,198 


35 


3,826 18 


6,569 60 


91 


Concord 


7,641 98 


90,114 


72 


2.545 37 


6,381 67 


92 


Franklin 


5,648 00 


79,455 


29 


2,853 49 


4,179 47 


93 


Grafton . 


4,393 13 


58,093 


55 


1,488 94 


3.950 24 


94 


North Andover 


4,803 10 


75,184 25 


1,885 61 


3.884 32 


95 


South Hadley 


4,702 79 


69,886 63 


1,694 97 


3,012 25 


96 


Mansfield 


4,519 42 


72,716 


26 


2,727 52 


3,613 55 


97 


Chelmsford 


4,332 10 


60,998 


20 


1,254 36 


2,590 25 


98 


Spencer . 


2,300 00 


38,600 


00 


929 88 


1.798 12 


99 


Walpole 


6,536 62 


96.589 


96 


2,214 27 


5,668 73 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



25 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation — Year ending June 30, 1928 



■3*3 

S O 



TKAN8PORTATION 



111 




11 




^ 




o 

Q 
° 




o *" 




go 


^ 




« 




a 




£ 




H 




^ 


20 




21 




22 




23 




24 




25 


$86,131 


79 


$45,482 


26 


$2,963 


34 


$11,917 


30 


$4,218 50 


- 


52,069 


25 


14,303 


35 


1,900 


00 


5,096 


80 


328 


00 


~ 


64,188 71 


26,720 


37 


2,000 


00 


5,403 


26 


746 


14 


~ 


44,297 


43 


9,556 


65 


185 


95 


7,123 


08 


9,771 


29 


~ 


35,513 


11 


11,257 


13 


446 


33 


3,562 


93 


4,702 


50 


~~ 


35,827 


25 


25,221 


89 


_ 




3,481 


76 


14,817 


80 


- 


24,834 


23 


4,315 62 


- 




1,442 


00 


1,350 


00 


~ 


39,336 


88 


6,729 


47 


102 


75 


2,146 


02 


340 


00 


~ 


15,330 


70 


2,770 


29 


- 




2,268 


00 


3,593 


26 


~ 


40,911 


26 


21,813 


09 


- 




5,177 


65 


6,215 


00 


~ 


32,388 


50 


12,325 


91 


1,588 


73 


6,905 


49 


1,202 


60 


- 


42,533 


80 


8,259 


62 


923 


75 


2,904 


39 


2,901 


75 


— 


22,019 


90 


5,709 


06 


151 


00 


4,969 


40 


5,944 


58 


— 


20,235 


47 


7,428 22 


348 


02 


2,276 


05 


- 




~ 


33,911 


93 


13,309 


82 


1,231 


36 


6,729 


59 


2,902 


75 


"~ 


26,669 


67 


9,577 


55 


_ 




3,076 


32 


2,516 


12 


- 


23,550 


69 


5,115 


36 


2,072 


75 


3,080 


41 


741 


55 


— 


17,351 


48 


1,295 


61 


167 


14 


2,295 


35 


3,295 


22 


— 


26,187 


61 


9,476 98 


1,500 


00 


2,588 


85 


10,008 


57 


— 


25,042 


30 


18,714 


13 


- 




7,571 


91 


16,029 


15 


$442 40 


• 25,362 


93 


9,476 


92 


. 




3,287 


42 


10,289 


31 


231 00 


30,363 


89 


6,523 44 


739 


68 


9,686 


29 


5,038 40 


— 


23,267 


08 


12,407 01 


- 


- 


2,170 


00 


5,258 


00 


~ 


24,028 


93 


5,594 


54 


- 


- 


1,786 


75 


4,350 


00 


— 


17,848 29 


4,783 


83 




- 


1,671 


44 


6,041 


13 


~ 


■ 24,980 


54 


3,357 31 


. 


- 


2,768 23 


1,869 


00 


- 


16,370 


27 


3,858 


31 


673 22 


2,124 


03 


4,470 


00 


— 


20,068 41 


1,565 


73 


195 


04 


3,080 


34 


9,217 


40 


— 


20,066 71 


4,082 


73 




- 


2,184 


00 


5,250 


00 


— 


15,945 


32 


5,660 86 


38 


50 


2,928 


00 


10,387 


92 


14 68 


19,433 


31 


9,321 


97 


323 


99 


2,019 


73 


6,347 


56 


- 


10,860 


58 


2,162 


07 


254 


21 


1,595 


42 


3,867 


00 


— 


17,113 


95 


3,849 


66 




- 


4,180 


85 


5,991 


02 


— 


9,290 


55 


3,233 


09 




- 


1,960 


63 


7,318 


00 


81 60 


12,967 


57 


9,055 75 




- 


937 


50 


14,216 09 


~ 


13,085 


48 


6,800 


78 


850 


00 


1,017 


67 


1,822 


00 


- 


28,121 


14 


8,857 


40 


615 


98 


6,597 


18 


8,544 


29 


— 


17,875 


30 


4,105 


98 




- 


2,574 


89 


16,512 


20 


— 


19,110 


21 


6,377 40 


83 


67 


2,455 


98 


4,341 


00 


— 


15,202 


80 


3,873 


98 


242 


77 


511 


16 


900 


00 


~ 


18,707 


63 


1,483 


07 


370 


07 


2,464 


82 


9,640 


42 


- 


30,872 


83 


8,112 


63 




- 


2,900 


00 


5,679 


10 


— 


13,006 


85 


3,129 


12 




- 


1,867 


60 


3,836 


96 


109 20 


14,972 44 


10,234 


25 


81 


87 


1,902 


25 


1,657 


36 


~ 


12,283 


51 


1,886 


17 


48 


00 


2,377 


75 


2,931 


48 


~ 


17,996 


76 


600 


79 




_ 


2,709 


66 


12,711 


79 


- 


13,009 


26 


4,176 


38 




- 


3,238 


25 


1,546 


80 


Ill 85 


10,366 


66 


2,710 


85 


183 


73 


1,999 


50 


979 


21 


— 


12,124 


64 


1,810 


51 


194 


18 


2,352 


52 


4,090 


69 


~ 


15,690 


15 


4,127 


94 




- 


2,094 


09 


1,557 


00 


~ 


25,755 


14 


5,841 


55 




_ 


2,475 


77 


7,507 


68 


- 


15,456 


10 


6,085 


98 




— 


2,163 


58 


8,838 


14 


~ 


17,774 


40 


3,798 


56 




— 


1,408 


51 


7,895 


08 


47 00 


12,136 


00 


2,275 


14 


46 


20 


1,333 


19 


9,529 


25 


~ 


16,058 


81 


4,029 


13 




- 


2,294 


38 


1,500 


00 


~ 


16,344 


76 


4,066 


21 




_ 


1,804 


57 


6,356 


09 


14 00 


14,505 


61 


2,947 


61 




— 


2,146 


26 


5,087 


04 


— 


13,644 


15 


2,203 


04 




— 


1,878 


70 


9,109 


63 


— 


6,867 


70 


1,092 


95 


180 


00 


1,500 


00 


7,426 


95 


— 


14,548 


91 


620 


55 


496 


26 


3,947 92 


12,599 


45 


~ 



26 



Group II. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of 5,000 







Itemized Expenditubes for Support 








OP Public Schools - 


- Day, Evening, Vacation 


Expenditures 




TOWNS 


— Year ending 


June 30, 1928 


— Con. 


ending June 










1 










1 






11 






a 

1 


1 




•2 
o 








H 


§ 




H 


:? 






26 


27 




28 


29 


40 


Brookline . 


$70 00 


$3,679 


17 


$756,057 93 


$56,739 62 


41 


Watertown 


74 29 


439 


77 


432,744 28 


123,757 08 


42 


Arlington . 


— 


8,872 


28 


559,797 06 


269,003 26 


43 


Framingham 


595 60 


1,534 


58 


345,908 16 


— 


44 


Methuen 


330 00 


81 


07 


271,260 45 


2,188 97 


45 


Weymouth 


_ 


109 


03 


285,511 57 


291,629 34 


46 


Winthrop . 


— 


5,190 


47 


246,595 24 


55,000 00 


47 


Wakefield . 


— 


1,770 01 


293,529 70 


6,570 16 


48 


Southbridge 


— 


1,115 


62 


118,579 68 


— 


49 


West Springfield . 


104 68 


1,705 


37 


317,108 27 


- 


50 


Belmont 


358 53 


760 


20 


320,767 70 


1,019 67 


51 


Greenfield . 


— 


327 


69 


283,647 13 


2,826 02 


52 


Milford . 


273 18 


404 


61 


196,380 48 


34,209 00 


53 


Clinton 


206 32 


2,961 


66 


156,922 17 


— 


54 


Norwood . 


• 


11,467 


82 


316,111 41 


43,323 66 


55 


Dedham 


_ 


1,164 


03 


239,036 28 


21,776 60 


56 


Adams 


'. 112 00 


699 


62 


148,936 81 


21,987 43 


67 


Webster 


— 


7,619 


73 


130,176 82 


475,000 00 


68 


Braintree . 


— 


2,022 


16 


252,200 39 


109,799 13 ' 


59 


Plymouth . 


1,255 34 


- 




245,536 76 


- 


60 


Natiok 


1,074 86 


1,369 


40 


215,484 15 


29f.,519 11 


61 


Milton 


124 29 


576 


36 


240,304 24 


-,767 44 


62 


Saugus 


1,600 58 


570 24 


191,930 03 


— 


63 


Danvers 


— 


380 


16 


192,540 96 


7,164 13 


64 


Easthampton 


• 


626 


31 


135,389 03 


1,209 05 


65 


Winchester 


_ 


419 


43 


221,962 37 


74,926 01 


66 


Amesbury . 


218 00 


2,250 


24 


128,348 89 


966 68 


67 


■Palmer 


_ 


3,854 


60 


163,633 74 


1,064 67 


68 


Fairhaven . 


_ 


732 


47 


157,283 30 


_ 


69 


Andover 


997 18 


1,807 


84 


138,562 72 


- 


70 


Northbridge 


_ 


413 


75 


143,790 49 


165 50 


71 


North Attleborough 


'. 66 44 


2,873 


99 


105,016 66 


16,310 00 


72 


Athol 


387 40 


1,212 


50 


141,939 99 


76 00 


73 


Bridgewater 


5,077 68 


169 


90 


114,681 34 


600 00 


74 


Middleborough . 


883 86 


1,465 


58 


132,846 18 


22,126 77 


75 


Stoneham . 


2,183 75 


560 


16 


140,364 02 


20,700 00 


76 


Wellesley . 


31 32 


1,828 


25 


281,896 30 


48,722 36 


77 


Dartmouth 


_ 


640 


77 


146,192 35 


69,194 59 


78 


Needham . 


161 10 


3,972 


83 


190,091 13 


157 48 


79 


Swampscott 


277 70 


1,722 


40 


164,758 65 


- 


80 


Ludlow 


323 47 


2,510 


55 


156,057 26 


4,606 71 


81 


Reading 


54 57 


- 




208,729 24 


387,000 00 


82 


Ware 


794 24 


1,230 01 


94,314 34 


— 


83 


Marblehead 


208 00 


187 


09 


131,636 23 


6,913 64 


84 


Hudson 


• 


2,310 43 


98,716 53 


- 


85 


Montague . 


_ 


2,418 25 


149,052 85 


_ 


86 


Rockland . 


_ 


1,856 76 


110,708 97 


— 


87 


Maynard . 


_ 


2,905 


15 


102,687 49 


312 53 


88 


Stoughton . 


_ 


- 




98,304 62 


1,714 60 


89 


Whitman . 


- 


3,823 


39 


118,354 73 


281,968 30 


90 


Lexington . 


160 00 


1,102 


34 


188,731 10 


_ 


91 


Concord 


— 


989 


02 


140,216 66 


— 


92 


Franklin 


684 61 


2,468 70 


126,213 11 


— 


93 


Grafton 




887 


10 


94,132 74 


1,517 62 


94 


North Andover . 


'. 480 00 


101 


28 


110,220 88 


- 


95 


South Hadley 


_ 


1,335 


19 


109,217 46 


379 74 


96 


Mansfield . 


— 


817 


89 


109,081 16 


481 35 


97 


Chelmsford 


_ 


142 


51 


96,152 94 


8,909 97 


98 


Spencer 


— 


1,579 76 


62,275 36 


— 


99 


Walpole 


! 231 11 


2,747 


69 


146,201 37 


132,090 86 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



27 



FOR OuTLAr, YeaB 




Valuation op 


Expenditure for 






30, 1928 




1927 PER Pupil 

IN Net Average 

Membership, 


School Support from 

Local Taxation, 
Year ending Dec. 31, 


Rate of Tot 

PER $1,0 

Valuation, 


\lTax 
00 






1927 






Year ending June 


1927, PER $1,000 Val- 






1 


O 

u 

o 

3 

o 


30, 1928 


uation 






0, 

1 

1 


Amount 

Rank in 
Group II 


Amount 

Rank in 
Group II 


1 
o 

a 
< 


.So. 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


$7,502 24 


$64,241 86 


$27,905 1 


$5 22 79 


$21 00 


79 


15,021 19 


138,778 27 


9,416 17 


8 12 68 


31 50 


33 


5,582 29 


274,585 55 


10,153 12 


9 25 51 


30 60 


36 


1,249 27 


1,249 27 


7,437 36 


9 39 49 


28 80 


53 


782 85 


2,971 82 


5,629 60 


12 24 21 


37 40 


7 


13,159 02 


304,788 36 


9,983 13 


6 72 72 


24 75 


70 


1,500 00 


56,500 00 


7,876 30 


8 84 58 


26 50 


61 


2,173 20 


7,743 36 


6,888 42 


11 52 30 


35 20 


19 


2,479 93 


2,479 93 


7,759 32 


8 59 63 


34 00 


24 


3,244 10 


3,244 10 


8,413 24 


10 71 42 


30 00 


45 


3.628 09 


4,647 76 


9,551 15 


8 63 62 


30 50 


38 


1,419 87 


4,245 89 


7,332 37 


10 56 43 


28 40 


55 


779 93 


34,988 93 


5,391 63 


11 11 34 


32 40 


29 


446 95 


446 95 


9,527 16 


8 45 65 


21 50 


78 


5,926 00 


49,249 66 


8,164 26 


10 91 37 


29 00 


52 


1,832 25 


23,608 85 


7,558 33 


9 18 53 


30 40 


39 


40 00 


22,027 43 


7,928 29 


8 63 61 


30 00 


40 


40,347 76 


515,347 76 


9,380 18 


8 77 60 


25 00 


69 


34,680 73 


144,479 86 


7,251 38 


10 11 46 


34 40 


21 


4,332 05 


4,332 05 


10,776 11 


8 39 66 


24 40 


72 


25,177 75 


320,696 86 


4,188 76 


15 81 6 


47 80 


1 


5,780 59 


7,538 03 


13,173 8 


6 71 74 


26 90 


59 


1,429 76 


1,429 76 


4,536 72 


12 13 24 


35 40 


17 


697 88 


7,862 01 


5,722 58 


13 61 12 


38 00 


5 


2,160 95 


3,370 00 


8,966 22 


8 34 67 


25 00 


68 


6,638 04 


81,564 05 


14,094 5 


6 46 76 


26 80 


60 


1,023 78 


1,990 46 


9,159 19 


9 06 56 


33 50 


25 


742 81 


1,807 48 


5,792 52 


12 32 20 


23 30 


75 


756 98 


756 98 


6,136 47 


9 07 55 


35 00 


20 


1,185 82 


1,185 82 


12,438 9 


7 11 71 


25 50 


66 


1,969 65 


2,135 15 


5,172 68 


13 85 10 


30 00 


43 


1,150 97 


17,460 97 


8,839 23 


9 47 48 


30 00 


42 


— 


76 00 


5,353 66 


11 68 27 


30 00 


41 


_ 


500 00 


3,604 78 


16 22 4 


37 00 


8 


605 00 


22,731 77 


5,363 65 


11 10 35 


32 90 


26 


1,041 85 


21,741 85 


7,874 31 


10 88 40 


35 20 


18 


4,175 51 


52,897 86 


16,284 2 


8 00 69 


22 50 


77 


1,692 95 


70,887 54 


6,621 44 


10 90 38 


30 60 


27 


1,207 21 


1,364 69 


9,117 20 


9 19 52 


28 50 


54 


418 61 


418 61 


14,859 4 


6 18 78 


26 00 


64 


3,466 90 


8,073 61 


6,233 46 


12 97 14 


31 50 


32 


48,091 20 


435,091 20 


8,198 25 


11 76 26 


35 70 


15 


1,588 40 


1,588 40 


5,887 49 


11 01 36 


26 20 


62 


— 


6,913 64 


13,437 7 


6 42 77 


26 00 


63 


- 


- 


6,916 41 


10 74 41 


39 00 


4 


1,728 77 


1,728 77 


6,577 45 


12 65 17 


31 10 


34 


591 81 


591 81 


6,039 48 


11 87 25 


34 00 


23 


908 00 


1,220 53 


3,946 77 


13 38 13 


29 00 


51 


1,655 16 


3,369 66 


6,672 43 


9 11 54 


32 40 


30 


16,146 72 


298,115 02 


5,835 50 


10 90 .39 


30 90 


35 


1,421 71 


1,421 71 


9,060 21 


9 04 57 


32 80 


27 


3,271 01 


3,271 01 


7,071 39 


13 78 11 


40 90 


2 


_ 


— 


5,593 61 


11 20 32 


29 30 


48 


148 24 


1,665 86 


4,458 73 


16 44 3 


35 50 


16 


1,177 96 


1,177 96 


6,966 40 


11 54 29 


36 20 


12 


563 87 


943 61 


5,390 64 


12 20 22 


30 00 


44 


2,571 01 


3,052 36 


5,720 59 


12 37 19 


32 40 


28 


753 51 


9,663 48 


5,769 56 


11 31 31 


29 80 


46 




— 


5,776 54 


12 56 18 


38 00 


6 


1,176 37 


133,267 22 


8,163 27 


9 32 50 


29 20 


49 



28 



P.D. 2. 

Group II. Towns of 5,000 



Expenditure for Support of Public Schools — Day, 

Year ending 

















FROM 


STATE 








FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 
















GENERAL SCHOOL FUND) 




TOWNS 




























.5 a 










•t; M 












"i 




HH 








i. 


H 










a ^ 


5 


d ^ 






'as 




C -^ 






a 




3 >X1 




a 




3 > 


J2 








3 

o 

s 




0) a 


u 


■so 




o 

a 






Z 5" 

i^ O 

JO 






< 




(In " 




rt 


<^ 




Ck 




Ph 






38 




39 


40 


41 




42 


43 


40 


Brookline . 


$655,417 24 $117 


69 


2 


$46,971 


25 


$8 25 


19 


41 


Watertown 


382,134 


20 


76 


49 


34 


32,154 


78 


6 


44 


75 


42 


Arlington . 


490,333 


71 


93 


92 


7 


39,019 


40 


7 


47 


38 


43 


Framingham 


297,062 


66 


69 


86 


53 


27,857 


60 


6 


65 


72 


44 


Methuen . 


245,519 


88 


68 


89 


56 


23,470 


00 


6 


69 


71 


45 


Weymouth 


250,072 


89 


67 


09 


58 


21,273 


82 


5 


71 


79 


46 


Winthrop . 


221,645 


13 


69 


59 


54 


21,540 


00 


6 


76 


67 


47 


Wakefield 


252,784 


75 


79 


37 


30 


23,781 


00 


7 


47 


40 


48 


Southbridge 


107,015 


59 


66 


68 


60 


10,449 


00 


6 


51 


74 


49 


West Springfield 


288,664 


65 


90 


12 


12 


23,880 


00 


7 


46 


41 


50 


Belmont . 


277,545 


31 


82 


46 


22 


23,696 


00 


7 


04 


59 


51 


Greenfield 


249,789 


73 


77 


45 


33 


26,373 


76 


7 


87 


26 


52 


Milford . 


172,389 


77 


59 


90 


71 


18,363 


20 


6 


38 


76 


53 


Clinton 


140,454 


57 


80 


53 


28 


13,101 


40 


7 


51 


34 


54 


Norwood . 


289,012 


90 


89 


09 


13 


24,932 


53 


7 


69 


30 


55 


Dedham . 


207,916 


73 


69 


42 


56 


19,806 


86 


6 


61 


70 


56 


Adams 


123,777 


47 


68 


42 


57 


13,370 


15 


7 


39 


46 


57 


Webster . 


107,647 


74 


82 


29 


23 


10,643 


66 


8 


06 


20 


58 


Braintree . 


212,665 


31 


73 


33 


43 


20,208 


00 


6 


97 


61 


59 


Plymouth 


225,174 


70 


90 


43 


11 


18,626 


00 


7 


48 


37 


60 


Natick 


174,339 


54 


66 


19 


61 


26,926 


72 


10 


22 


10 


61 


Milton 


213,978 


57 


88 


38 


15 


17,089 


06 


7 


06 


58 


62 


Saugus 


159,774 


67 


55 


00 


76 


33,204 


75 


11 


43 


7 


63 


Dan vers . . 


164,043 


73 


77 


89 


31 


14,890 


00 


7 


07 


56 


64 


Easthampton 


117,359 


90 


74 


75 


40 


11,660 


10 


7 43 


43 


65 


Winchester 


192,360 


68 


91 


04 


9 


15,700 00 


7 


43 


44 


66 


Amesbury 


104,735 


06 


82 


99 


21 


9,449 


26 


7 


49 


36 


67 


Palmer 


144,921 


03 


71 


38 


50 


14,675 


60 


7 


23 


49 


68 


Fairhaven 


108,481 


81 


55 


63 


75 


13,061 


42 


6 


70 


68 


69 


Andover . 


125,555 


13 


88 


41 


14 


10,772 


40 


7 


59 


32 


70 


Northbridge 


128,977 


14 


71 


61 


49 


12,381 


00 


6 


87 


64 


71 


North Attleborough . 


95,178 


69 


83 


71 


19 


8,468 


75 


7 


45 


42 


72 


Athol 


123,857 


59 


62 


52 


67 


12,196 


10 


6 


16 


77 


73 


Bridgewater 


88,630 


56 


58 


46 


73 


19,516 


37 


12 


87 


2 


74 


Middleborough . 


104,519 


45 


59 


55 


72 


12,520 


00 


7 


13 


54 


75 


Stoneham 


128,964 


00 


85 


69 


17 


10,740 


00 


7 


14 


52 


76 


Wellesley . 


249,214 


43 


130 


34 


1 


19,286 


50 


10 


09 


11 


77 


Dartmouth 


135,363 


14 


72 


19 


47 


12,262 


20 


6 


63 


73 


78 


Needham . 


172,062 


50 


83 


81 


18 


16,426 


00 


7 


51 


35 


79 


Swampscott 


137,932 


21 


91 


83 


8 


12,660 


00 


8 


36 


17 


80 


Ludlow 


135,933 


12 


80 


82 


27 


11,846 


80 


7 


04 


60 


81 


Reading . 


169,1-49 


47 


96 


43 


6 


13,426 


00 


7 


65 


31 


82 


Ware 


82,877 


04 


64 


85 


64 


9,171 


75 


7 


18 


50 


83 


Marblehead 


119,646 


28 


86 


26 


16 


11,009 


00 


7 


94 


25 


84 


Hudson . 


77,551 


46 


74 


28 


41 


8,150 


00 


7 


81 


27 


85 


Montague 


133,287 


84 


83 


20 


20 


12,100 


00 


7 


55 


33 


86 


Rockland . 


100,484 


36 


71 


67 


48 


11,710 


00 


8 35 


18 


87 


Maynard . 


90,214 


43 


52 


79 


77 


15,666 


00 


9 


16 


13 


88 


Stoughton 


77,576 


45 


60 


80 


70 


9,970 


50 


7 


81 


28 


89 


Whitman . 


90,462 


48 


63 


62 


66 


12,326 


75 


8 


67 


14 


90 


Lexington 


154,692 


66 


81 


89 


24 


16,050 


00 


7 97 


23 


91 


Concord , 


116,079 


27 


97 


46 


5 


10,300 


00 


8 65 


15 


92 


Franklin . 


105,605 


95 


67 


05 


59 


12,675 


00 


8 05 


21 


93 


Grafton . 


84,212 


90 


73 


29 


44 


11,429 


00 


9 


95 


12 


94 


North Andover . 


100,328 


26 


80 


39 


29 


9,320 


00 


7 


47 


39 


95 


South Hadley . 


88,797 


11 


65 


73 


62 


10,755 


35 


7 


96 


24 


96 


Mansfield 


95,204 


97 


70 


78 


61 


9,280 


00 


6 


90 


63 


97 


Chelmsford 


87,396 


69 


65 


22 


63 


9,100 


00 


6 


79 


66 


98 


Spencer 


56,316 


03 


72 


57 


46 


5,141 


00 


6 


63 


69 


99 


Walpole . 


122,245 


55 


76 07 


36 


11,471 


30 


7 


14 


53 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



29 



Evening, Vacation - 


- Classified 


as to Source, 






Amount 


PAID TO Town 


Dec. 


31, 1927 














FROM 




giS 


a> 










■^'■S 


'^9, 




•ii a 03 


^ 










d b 


C^ 




?r^ 






FROM ALL SOURCES 




d 03 


3 ■ 




*5 


o 










feS 


&^ 




.2"i3 o 













§d 


8^ 






C3 OJ 






(U p 


2 






■" tl) 




M O 


-=1 d 




9 -3 m 


dS 




1 
O 

s 
< 


— ' 2 ' 

3 >J2 


.S o. 








From 
tuitic 
porta 
ward 


< 




Per pi 

net a 
mem 
ship 




Sf£2 






44 


45 




46 


47 


48 


49 


50 




$177 67 


$7,460 


16 


$709,026 32 


$127 32 


2 


_ 


$45,971 25 




865 40 


2,677 


46 


417,831 84 


83 63 


43 


— 


32,154 78 




707 85 


3,264 


71 


533,325 67 


102 15 


9 


— 


39,019 40 




2,435 65 


3,102 


72 


330,458 53 


77 71 


60 


— 


27,857 50 




263 25 


2,515 


79 


271J68 92 


76 25 


63 


- 


23,470 00 




1,372 97 


510 


72 


273,230 40 


73 31 


69 


_ 


21,273 82 




442 06 


584 


13 


244,211 32 


97 34 


18 


— 


21,540 00 




1,608 31 


14,984 


51 


293,158 57 


92 04 


25 


— 


23,781 00 




— 


3,346 


80 


120,811 39 


75 27 


65 


— 


10,449 00 




873 96 


1,105 


36 


314,523 97 


98 19 


14 


- 


23,880 00 




880 29 


1,870 


77 


303,991 37 


90 31 


31 


_ 


23,695 00 




1,442 26 


6,619 


66 


283,225 40 


87 82 


36 


— 


25,373 75 




1,673 79 


3,572 


07 


195,988 83 


68 09 


74 


— 


18,353 20 




626 47 


2,103 


07 


156,285 51 


89 61 


32 


- 


13,101 40 




639 74 


813 


92 


315,399 09 


97 23 


19 


- 


24,932 53 




1,630 43 


7,208 


34 


236,562 36 


78 98 


56 


_ 


19,806 86 




— 


8,300 


01 


145,447 63 


80 40 


52 


— 


13,370 15 




— 


10,016 


86 


128,208 25 


98 02 


15 


— 


10,543 65 




155 63 


315 


97 


233,344 91 


80 46 


51 


— 


20,208 00 




- 


20 


34 


243,820 04 


97 91 


16 


- 


18,625 00 




1,292 33 


778 01 


203,335 60 


77 19 


61 


_ 


26,925 72 




814 66 


1,439 


07 


233,321 35 


96 37 


20 


— 


17,089 05 




984 00 


108 


79 


194,072 21 


66 81 


76 


— 


33,204 75 




800 32 


4,763 


15 


184,497 20 


87 61 


37 


— 


14,890 00 




484 38 


1,913 


46 


131,417 84 


83 71 


42 


- 


11,660 10 




1,023 32 


793 


89 


209,877 89 


99 32 


12 


_ 


15,700 00 




200 00 


9,652 


78 


124,037 09 


98 29 


13 


— 


9,449 25 




1,507 98 


4,889 


38 


165,993 99 


81 77 


48 


— 


14,675 60 




700 04 


35,563 


90 


157,807 17 


80 93 


50 


— 


13,061 42 




493 26 


- 




136,820 79 


96 35 


21 


- 


10,772 40 




105 90 


1,053 


81 


142,517 85 


79 13 


55 


_ 


12,381 00 




— 


476 


47 


104,123 91 


91 58 


27 


— 


8,468 75 




1,691 22 


2,250 


91 


139,995 82 


70 67 


73 


— 


12,196 10 




393 46 


3,718 


68 


112,259 07 


74 04 


67 


— 


19,516 37 




457 14 


8,156 


40 


125,652 99 


71 59 


71 


- 


12,520 00 




_ 


5 


00 


139,709 00 


92 82 


24 


_ 


10,740 00 




518 55 


1,381 


54 


270,401 02 


141 42 


1 


— 


18,578 20 




— 


1,198 


44 


148,813 78 


79 36 


54 


— 


12,252 20 




193 80 


1,196 


17 


188,867 47 


91 99 


26 


— 


15,425 00 




202 28 


567 


50 


151,261 99 


100 71 


10 


- 


12,560 00 




_ 


2,948 


52 


150,728 44 


89 61 


33 


_ 


11,846 80 




2,964 29 


9,098 


13 


194,636 89 


110 96 


6 


— 


13,425 00 




993 84 


557 


37 


93,600 00 


73 24 


70 


— 


9,171 75 




143 28 


85 


44 


130,884 00 


94 36 


22 


- 


11,009 00 




1,865 28 


4,140 


32 


91,707 06 


87 84 


35 


- 


8,150 00 




581 55 


3,088 


19 


149,057 58 


93 04 


23 


_ 


12,100 00 




708 17 


820 


14 


113,722 67 


81 11 


49 


— 


11,710 00 




— 


109 


32 


105,978 75 


62 01 


78 


— 


15,655 00 




2,932 64 


698 


21 


91,177 80 


71 46 


72 


— 


9.970 50 




1,093 24 


9,165 


49 


113,047 96 


79 50 


53 


- 


12,326 75 




1,337 50 


13,592 


20 


184,672 35 


97 76 


17 


_ 


15.050 00 




1,091 48 


10,183 


85 


137,654 60 


115 57 


5 


— 


10,300 00 




629 48 


5,255 


75 


124,166 18 


78 83 


57 


— 


12,675 00 




249 38 


73 


67 


95,964 95 


83 52 


44 


— 


11,429 00 




- 


1.106 


62 


110,754 88 


88 75 


34 


- 


9,320 00 




_ 


3,085 


41 


102,637 87 


75 97 


64 


_ 


10,755 35 




1,388 04 




- 


105,873 01 


78 71 


58 


— 


9,280 00 




1,078 11 


844 


62 


98,419 42 


73 45 


68 


- 


9,100 00 




— 


3,075 


25 


64,532 28 


83 16 


45 


- 


5,141 00 




259 46 


4,746 


22 


138.722 53 


86 32 


40 


- 


11,471 30 



30 



P.D. 2. 
Group II. Towns of 5,000 





Year Grades 


IN — 


Public Day Element art Schools (iNCLUDma 




^ 


>> 

d 

c3 








TEACHERS 














PR IN CI X* A. Xj O 






PUPILS EiNnwi^uju LI 


TOWNS 


1 

1 

i 


o 

-E' 

3 

o 

•a 

3 

•-5 


o 

s 

•a 

3 

_o 

'3 
m 






FT7LL 


TIME 








0) 


a 

1 


a 


o 


o 
pq 


■2 
3 




51 


52 


53 


54 


55 


58 


57 


58 


59 


40 Brookline . 

41 Watertown 

42 Arlington . 

43 Framingham 

44 Methuen 


8 
6 
6 
6 
6 


3 
3 
3 
3 


4 
3 
3 
3 
3 


4 
7 
3 
2 


3 

7 
4 
3 


6 
8 
9 
4 
4 


162 
122 
152 

no 

95 


2,195 
2,252 
2,172 
1,868 
1,582 


2,242 
2,057 
2,044 
1,817 
1,485 


45 Weymouth 

46 Winthrop . 

47 Wakefield . 

48 Southbridge 

49 West Springfield . 


8 
6 
8 
8 
6 


3 
3 


4 
3 
4 
4 
3 


1 
2 

4 

1 


2 

2 

2 


3 
2 
2 

3 


80 
70 
79 
39 
94 


1,484 
1,273 
1,397 
720 
1,452 


1,516 
1,234 
1,246 
672 
1,368 


50 Belmont 

51 Greenfield . 
62 Milford 

53 Clinton 

64 Norwood . 


6 

9 
8 
8 
6 


2 
3 


4 
4 
4 
4 
3 


2 
1 

1 


4 

4 


5 
6 
2 

5 


86 
93 
73 
46 
85 


1,412 
1,435 
1,233 
675 
1,404 


1,410 
1,314 
1,221 
660 
1,280 


55 Dedham 

56 Adams 

57 Webster . 

68 Braintree . 

69 Plymouth . 


6 
6 

8 
8 
6 


2 
3 

2 


4 
3 

5 
4 
4 


3 

2 

6 

1 


3 

2 

4 


4 
2 

1 
3 


74 
51 
30 
80 
79 


1,310 

852 

553 

1,304 

1,127 


1,275 

801 

513 

1,215 

1,089 


60 Natick 

61 Milton 

62 Saugus 

63 Danvers 

64 Easthampton 


6 
6 
6 
6 

8 


3 
3 
2 
3 


3 
3 
4 
3 
4 


1 

1 
1 


3 

4 
1 


3 

1 
2 
1 
2 


58 
66 
70 
59 
46 


1,123 

985 

1,305 

874 

739 


1,073 
937 

1,227 
840 
641 


65 Winchester 

66 Amesbury . 

67 Palmer 

68 Fairhaven . 

69 Andover 


8 
6 
9 
8 
6 


2 
2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


1 
2 


1 
3 


1 
2 

1 


56 
30 
62 

47 
42 


883 
507 
1,023 
928 
613 


828 
439 
909 
841 
588 


70 Northbridge 

71 North Attleborough 

72 Athol 

73 Bridgewater 

74 Middleborough . 


6 
6 
9 
6 
6 


2 
2 

3 

2 


4 
4 
4 
3 
4 


1 
1 


3 


3 

1 
1 
3 
3 


48 
29 
42 
44 
40 


831 
489 
862 
674 
751 


803 
406 
850 
668 
682 


75 Stoneham . 

76 Wellesley . 

77 Dartmouth 

78 Needham . 

79 Swampscott 


6 
6 
8 
8 
6 


3 
3 

3 


3 
3 
4 
4 
3 


1 
2 

1 


3 

1 
4 


1 

6 
2 

4 


31 
73 
59 
54 
38 


584 
819 
953 
865 
548 


541 
738 
876 
834 
551 


80 Ludlow 

81 Reading 

82 Ware 

83 Marblehead 

84 Hudson 


6 
6 
6 

8 
8 


3 
3 
2 


4 
3 

4 
4 
4 


1 


3 

1 

1 


1 
3 

1 
2 


44 
44 
33 
36 
29 


852 
687 
595 
538 
457 


813 
715 
493 
560 
445 


85 Montague . 

86 Rockland . 

87 Maynard . 

88 Stoughton . 

89 Whitman . 


8 
6 
6 
6 
8 


2 
2 
2 


4 

4 
4 
4 
4 


1 


- 


2 

1 

2 

1 


47 
32 
39 
31 
28 


724 
571 
753 
558 
590 


631 
535 
665 
522 
523 


90 Lexington . 

91 Concord 

92 Franklin . 

93 Grafton 

94 North Andover . 


6 
6 
6 

8 
8 


3 

2 
2 


3 

4 
4 
4 
4 


2 


3 


1 

1 
3 
2 


47 
30 
36 
29 
35 


825 
482 
663 
525 
505 


710 
427 
622 
526 
495 


95 South Hadley 

96 Mansfield . 

97 Chelmsford 

98 Spencer 

99 Walpole 


8 
6 
8 
6 
6 


3 

2 
2 


4 
3 
4 
4 
4 


2 


5 
1 


4 

1 
1 


34 

28 
34 
17 
42 


583 
590 
609 
323 
660 


565 
555 
594 
339 
696 



' For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. II. 

Population oe Over 



31 



Continued 



FiKST Two Yeahs of Junior High Schools), Yeajr ending June 30, 1928 



13 


>, 




-d 












o ^ 


13 


1 


•S 

*»-! 





a) 




0, 

3 


EXPENDITURE FOR 
SUPPORT, EXCLUSIVE OF 


la 2 

Is J 


OS 






OS 






GENERAL 


CONTROL 




° 


>> 






Per pupil in 
average mem- 
bership of 
elementary 
schools 




(B 

c3 

to (D 
V O 


Q 
a 

2 


a 

O 

1 
g 


OS 

03 
1 


03 


a 


a 

3 
o 

a 




S 3 S 

g g 


1^ 


< 


< 




<< 




<J 


< 




W 


W 



60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 


66 




67 




696,240 


180 


3,868 


4,111 


S489,511 


59 $119 07 


$353,814 47 


$9,819 


52 


692,717 


174 


3,973 


4,214 


295,269 


74 


70 


07 


230,820 


33 


5,115 92 


696,114 


184 


3,783 


4,053 


366,960 


01 


90 


54 


269,276 


18 


7,140 


94 


579,582 


177 


3,268 


3,521 


236,981 


98 


67 


31 


167,593 


10 


4,236 


39 


509,338 


182 


2,790 


2,936 


204,145 


12 


69 


53 


147,180 


60 


2,927 


18 


498,286 


183 


2,722 


2,902 


181,638 


14 


62 


59 


129.191 


15 


5,229 


65 


402,495 


180 


2,232 


2,409 


150,610 


16 


62 


51 


120.492 


00 


2,959 


04 


437,804 


183 


2,396 


2,548 


172,811 


41 


67 


82 


137.697 


83 


2,273 


26 


235,695 


190 


1,233 


1,314 


80,754 


54 


61 


45 


57.929 


75 


1,549 


94 


473,405 


185 


2,553 


2,699 


235,154 


89 


87 


13 


161,741 


02 


5.452 


44 


468,935 


183 


2,552 


2,735 


221,505 


46 


78 


13 


168,435 01 


4.449 


44 


462,574 


183 


2,521 


2,654 


195,202 


57 


73 


55 


143,900 


50 


3,233 


40 


415.147 


179 


2,315 


2,444 


140,117 


25 


57 


33 


100,320 


36 


3,023 


40 


221,838 


183 


1,215 


1,280 


95,763 


05 


74 


81 


69,687 


94 


1,815 


77 


442,327 


179 


2,431 


2,559 


210,993 


12 


82 


45 


153,629 


57 


3,946 


17 


424,657 


182 


2,335 


2,498 


166,315 91 


66 


57 


123,984 


21 


3,589 


95 


271,671 


184 


1,479 


1,560 


106,584 61 


68 


32 


76,984 


58 


1,170 


17 


176,431 


187 


944 


988 


68,623 


95 


69 


45 


50,982 


86 


1,027 


57 


399,180 


182 


2,195 


2,400 


173,183 


09 


72 


16 


130,265 


50 


2,457 


80 


364,140 


185 


1,965 


2,083 


190,688 


10 


91 


54 


119,031 


73 


3,968 96 


349,176 


182 


1,923 


2,065 


142,730 


69 


69 


12 


97,814 60 


2,381 


36 


327,246 


184 


1,730 


1,870 


160,092 


83 


85 


61 


113,651 


74 


3,568 78 


401,740 


177 


2,270 


2,422 


138,642 


19 


57 


24 


98,297 


37 


1,722 


95 


285,342 


180 


1,585 


1,684 


130,067 


33 


77 


23 


93,588 97 


2,893 


33 


230,537 


189 


1,215 


1,295 


92,884 46 


71 


73 


64.193 81 


1,453 


58 


265,764 


178 


1,494 


1,630 


142,016 94 


87 


13 


107,145 


40 


3,074 


30 


147,557 


180 


819 


884 


74,007 


13 


83 


72 


49,385 


77 


2.555 


14 


313,904 


177 


1,778 


1,834 


112,154 


18 


61 


15 


81,692 41 


2,349 


81 


292,640 


187 


1,567 


1,644 


102,632 


20 


62 


43 


76,678 45 


2,194 


93 


199,886 


182 


1,097 


1,150 


96,774 39 


84 


15 


65.352 


01 


2,324 


30 


275,130 


182 


1,509 


1,564 


103,490 


16 


66 


17 


71,101 


95 


1,959 


41 


150,543 


183 


824 


. 867 


63,377 


78 


73 


10 


45.814 


64 


803 


46 


287,131 


180 


1,592 


1,657 


92,220 


62 


55 


66 


64,320 


20 


1,918 03 


211,787 


179 


1,180 


1,259 


78,367 


96 


62 


25 


57,521 


75 


1,081 


99 


238,522 


179 


1,336 


1,409 


85,291 


48 


60 


53 


50,695 


56 


2,785 


73 


187,114 


183 


1,020 


1,084 


72,508 52 


66 


88 


54,605 


59 


2,087 


26 


253,028 


183 


1,380 


1,483 


185,868 


16 


125 


33 


135,766 08 


2,021 


98 


293,448 


181 


1,639 


1,735 


113,970 


72 


65 


68 


74,478 


94 


2,037 


56 


273,257 


179 


1,527 


1,630 


127,775 


25 


78 


39 


92,604 


00 


2,017 


04 


180,413 


181 


999 


1,069 


98,762 


10 


92 


38 


77,294 


82 


1,269 


12 


275,233 


184 


1,487 


1,578 


124,390 02 


78 


83 


86,507 


47 


2,968 62 


242,065 


182 


1,330 


1,350 


132,882 


69 


98 43 


87,788 


23 


3,337 


08 


173,946 


178 


976 


1,029 


60,584 


67 


64 


71 


42,862 


87 


1,431 


34 


183,192 


184 


993 


1,065 


79,682 


92 


74 


82 


54,240 


35 


1,713 


23 


144,363 


177 


814 


857 


69,009 


47 


80 


52 


47,888 04 


1,196 09 


222,710 


175 


1,274 


1,329 


101,626 


62 


76 


47 


72,680 93 


1,634 


10 


187,441 


183 


1,023 


1,075 


66,244 


00 


61 


62 


46,829 


00 


2,088 69 


239,332 


177 


1,354 


1,403 


69.085 


85 


49 


24 


50,886 


32 


1,660 50 


176,471 


180 


978 


1,043 


62,115 


50 


59 


55 


44,166 67 


1,214 


98 


187,990 


182 


1.035 


1,088 


65,792 


59 


60 47 


44,161 


24 


1,368 48 


255,176 


184 


1,388 


1,479 


123,242 


03 


83 


33 


85,429 


60 


2,182 


27 


148,567 


179 


831 


890 


76,683 


02 


86 


16 


48,710 60 


1,246 


33 


214,357 


181 


1,187 


1,247 


81,451 


56 


65 


32 


52,444 


54 


1,556 


61 


173,452 


182 


953 


1,002 


68,046 


69 


67 


91 


42,553 


55 


1,069 


44 


173,471 


182 


951 


992 


76,752 


60 


77 


37 


54,138 75 


1,078 


50 


185,438 


176 


1,055 


1,109 


73,017 


99 


65 


84 


49,333 


62 


1,042 


96 


195,149 


189 


1,048 


1,108 


74,123 


68 


66 


90 


51,775 


96 


1,497 


79 


199,041 


184 


1,114 


1,158 


67,918 41 


58 


65 


46,635 


70 


836 


21 


106,903 


184 


578 


627 


40,747 


64 


64 


99 


24,250 00 


499 


88 


222,151 


183 


1,217 


1,299 


99,854 


30 


76 


87 


69,338 


66 


1,499 


86 



32 



P.D. 2. 

Group II. Towns of 5,000 

Public Day High Schools (including 



o 


principals and 










s 


TEACHERS 








S 


o 




2 


PUPILS ENROLLED 


+= 


towns -^ 

O 

s 


PULL TIME 




a 


C3 






■1 


1 


1 fS 


+3 

1 


o 


5 


^1 

•< 


68 


69 70 


71 


72 


73 


74 


40 Brookline .... 1 


26 44 


_ 


783 


833 


256,296 


41 Watertown . . . 1 


10 33 


1 


434 


496 


155,541 


42 Arlington .... 1 


10 46 


- 


599 


658 


205,017 


43 Framingham . . . 1 


14 23 


— 


411 


406 


131,847 


44 Methuen .... 1 


7 18 


- 


297 


388 


112,047 


45 Weymouth ... 1 


6 20 


7 


418 


484 


147,885 


46 Winthrop .... 1 


11 25 


1 


374 


445 


135,055 


47 Wakefield .... 1 


13 27 


— 


362 


473 


140,005 


48 Southbridge ... 1 


2 12 


— 


161 


199 


60,597 


49 West Springfield . . 1 


7 20 


- 


254 


296 


92,154 


50 Belmont .... 1 


7 22 


_ 


309 


399 


113,507 


51 Greenfield ... 1 


10 24 


— 


291 


380 


113,286 


52 Milford .... 1 


3 20 


— 


272 


262 


91,748 


53 Clinton .... 1 


9 9 


1 


276 


254 


86,979 


54 Norwood .... 1 


7 26 


1 


373 


392 


125,467 


55 Dedham .... 1 


8 18 


1 


286 


323 


98,439 


56 Adams .... 1 


2 8 


2 


170 


167 


57,598 


57 Webster .... 1 


3 14 


4 


217 


240 


72,272 


58 Braintree .... 1 


5 17 


— 


264 


267 


86,224 


59 Plymouth .... 1 


6 12 


1 


184 


243 


71,213 


60 Natick .... 1 


5 23 


_ 


294 


323 


101,693 


61 Milton .... 1 


10 16 


— 


283 


308 


98,114 


62 Saugus .... 1 


8 14 


— 


213 


303 


84,287 


63 Danvers .... 1 


8 12 


— 


243 


243 


79,513 


64 Easthampton ... 1 


4 9 


- 


129 


206 


55,565 


65 Winchester ... 1 


8 14 


_ 


259 


284 


89,850 


66 Amesbury .... 1 


8 12 


— 


235 


269 


82,845 


67 Palmer .... 1 


4 11 


— 


135 


175 


52,310 


68 Fairhaven ... 1 


6 10 


4 


163 


211 


64,104 


69 Andover .... 1 


4 10 


- 


142 


157 


49,922 


70 Northbridge ... 1 


2 10 


_ 


114 


144 


42,982 


71 North Attleborough . . 1 


4 10 


1 


131 


159 


49,470 


72 Athol .... 1 


6 10 


4 


186 


191 


66,575 


73 Bridgewater ... 1 


4 5 


— 


166 


140 


51,064 


74 Middleborough ... 1 


5 11 


1 


194 


267 


76,490 


75 Stoneham .... 1 


11 14 


1 


225 


192 


71,900 


76 Wellesley .... 1 


8 17 


— 


206 


261 


75,675 


77 Dartmouth ... 1 


3 5 


— 


75 


107 


29,797 


78 Needham .... 1 


7 18 


— 


220 


243 


75,861 


79 Swampscott ... 1 


5 14 


- 


220 


237 


75,104 


80 Ludlow .... 1 


2 6 


1 


52 


81 


20,602 


81 Reading .... 1 


9 19 


1 


272 


287 


90,960 


82 Ware .... 1 


3 7 


— 


121 


159 


44,739 


83 Marblehead ... 1 


4 13 


— 


158 


190 


52,980 


84 Hudson .... 1 


2 9 


- 


133 


126 


42,319 


85 Montague .... 1 


5 8 


_ 


172 


158 


55,946 


86 Rockland .... 1 


6 10 


— 


163 


190 


61,683 


87 Maynard .... 1 


4 9 


— 


150 


177 


57,069 


88 Stoughton ... 1 


5 8 


1 


132 


168 


50,609 


89 Whitman .... 1 


7 16 


- 


221 


257 


79,105 


90 Lexington .... 1 


5 21 


1 


250 


322 


94,442 


91 Concord .... 1 


7 13 


3 


182 


206 


64,828 


92 Franklin .... 1 


6 11 


_ 


192 


196 


64,485 


93 Grafton .... 1 


2 6 


— 


73 


84 


27,087 


94 North Andover . . 1 


1 11 


- 


138 


143 


46,782 


95 South Hadley ... 1 


1 10 


2 


121 


169 


48,530 


96 Mansfield . . • . . 1 


6 13 


— 


104 


154 


44,177 


97 Chelmsford ... 1 


2 7 


_ 


89 


137 


37,774 


98 Spencer .... 1 


3 6 


_ 


93 


99 


33,629 


99 Walpole .... 1 


4 9 


- 


175 


201 


61,652 



Pt. II. 




















33 


Population or 


Over — Continued 
















THrao Year 


OF Junior High Schools), Year endinc 


June 30 


1928 












1 


0, 


EXPENDITURE FOR 












^ 


13 


SUPPORT 


, EXCLUSIVE 


OP 




V 








a 


S 


GENERAL 


CONTROL 




m 


o 


Ut 




a 


>f 












O^ 


1 


3 














_o 




i 

a 






^fl Pi 




•« 








a 


1 


4^ 

a 
a 
o 

a 




2 




CI o 


1 

II 


P 


<J 


< 


< 




PlH 




w 




w 




75 


76 


77 


78 




79 


80 




81 




181 


1,416 


1,499 


S245,277 


73 


$163 


62 


$191,857 


49 


$5,010 32 


178 


873 


898 


124,007 


57 


138 


09 


92,454 


94 


2,831 


17 


182 


1,129 


1,187 


173,403 


41 


146 


09 


119,067 


90 


3,767 


18 


180 


735 


776 


98,021 


24 


126 


32 


77,418 23 


2,081 


41 


182 


616 


640 


. 55,463 


16 


86 


66 


45,330 


89 


1,909 


59 


186 


795 


848 


95,804 07 


112 


98 


53,973 


16 


2,049 


30 


183 


738 


784 


89,855 


25 


114 


61 


69,222 


00 


2,349 


58 


184 


761 


802 


108,507 


89 


135 


30 


81,323 95 


1,986 48 


190 


318 


331 


29,594 


24 


89 


41 


21,581 


00 


934 43 


188 


490 


513 


67.463 


27 


131 


51 


46,991 


43 


2,136 45 


183 


620 


654 


89,408 


46 


136 


71 


65,082 


54 


2,450 


66 


187 


606 


632 


81,692 


23 


129 


25 


63,248 00 


1,626 


38 


188 


489 


514 


49,610 


92 


96 


52 


40,006 


86 


1,339 


48 


185 


470 


494 


51,842 


37 


104 


94 


38,396 


24 


935 99 


180 


692 


719 


92,891 


80 


129 


20 


67,322 


66 


2,551 


10 


184 


535 


570 


63,225 


77 


110 92 


52,486 


90 


1,312 


50 


185 


312 


323 


35,839 


44 


110 


96 


26,264 


24 


639 


50 


180 


406 


413 


51,368 


99 


124 


38 


33,835 


12 


932 


58 


182 


474 


502 


71,410 


48 


142 


25 


45,803 


00 


2,286 49 


186 


383 


399 


44,263 


46 


110 


94 


33,688 18 


1,662 41 


184 


553 


582 


66,394 


87 


114 


08 


48,679 


12 


1,698 58 


185 


531 


564 


70,141 


52 


124 


36 


50,457 


26 


2,386 


26 


180 


459 


492 


48,442 


31 


98 


45 


34,720 


36 


920 


06 


182 


449 


467 


56,134 


47 


120 


20 


44,036 


74 


2,989 


04 


189 


294 


305 


34,418 


18 


112 


85 


26,105 


33 


1,009 


04 


186 


483 


508 


69,374 


30 


136 


56 


55,212 


93 


2,283 


53 


184 


450 


482 


47,076 93 


97 


66 


31,830 


85 


1,186 


87 


188 


278 


285 


43,512 


65 


152 


68 


28,148 90 


638 98 


187 


338 


353 


48,952 


33 


138 


68 


34,837 


25 


1,430 71 


183 


273 


280 


35,744 


84 


127 


66 


23,602 91 


1,537 


20 


180 


238 


242 


33,924 


37 


140 


18 


21,459 


49 


1,092 


67 


187 


265 


276 


34,617 


01 


125 


42 


25,626 


75 


857 


61 


186 


358 


365 


41,393 


19 


113 


41 


30,800 


00 


283 


46 


182 


281 


293 


31,913 


90 


108 92 


21,445 05 


788 24 


183 


418 


432 


42,785 09 


99 


04 


30,143 


60 


1,554 


88 


183 


393 


410 


61,813 


24 


150 


76 


42,676 


49 


2,450 


00 


181 


416 


439 


80,610 


21 


183 


62 


62,775 


70 


1,509 


38 


188 


158 


165 


24,566 


53 


148 


88 


15,444 


91 


627 


07 


183 


415 


434 


55,614 


17 


128 


14 


44,974 


25 


1,243 


85 


183 


411 


433 


47,302 


37 


109 24 1 


37,418 00 


1,728 


56 


182 


113 


116 


21,717 72 


187 


22 


15,320 


50 


540 


43 


182 


500 


534 


70,036 


84 


131 


15 


52,456 


94 


1,542 


57 


181 


247 


262 


28,630 


19 


109 


27 


18,871 


96 


815 


17 


185 


313 


325 


46,442 


45 


142 


89 


34,100 00 


782 


73 


181 


234 


246 


25,735 06 


104 


61 


20,890 


00 


937 


43 


186 


301 


311 


41,017 


72 


131 


89 


26,555 


25 


1,136 04 


183 


337 


346 


39,392 


14 


113 


85 


28,893 


00 


668 


32 


190 


304 


306 


28,055 40 


91 


68 


20,385 


88 


1,429 


88 


183 


277 


288 


30,509 


01 


105 


93 


23,259 


44 


821 


69 


182 


435 


449 


48,343 


52 


107 


67 


36,635 


00 


1,119 


33 


184 


515 


541 


59,769 


58 


110 


48 


44,343 


75 


1,643 


91 


182 


357 


379 


55,891 


56 


147 


47 


41,404 


12 


1,299 


04 


186 


346 


367 


39,113 


55 


106 


58 


27,010 


75 


1,296 88 


183 


148 


154 


21,692 


92 


140 


86 


15,540 


00 


419 


50 


184 


254 


267 


28,665 


18 


107 


36 


21,045 


50 


807 


11 


184 


264 


274 


31,496 


68 


114 


95 


20,553 


01 


652 


01 


189 


235 


251 


30,438 


06 


121 


27 


20,940 


30 


1,229 


73 


188 


201 


209 


23,902 


43 


114 


37 


14,362 


50 


418 


15 


188 


179 


185 


19,227 


72 


103 


93 


14,350 


00 


430 


00 


180 


343 


360 


39,810 


45 


110 


58 


27,251 


30 


714 


41 



34 



P.D. 2. 

Group II. Towns op 5,000 





TOWNS 










Pbbsons 5 TO 16 Yeaks 






5 TO 


7 Yeahs 




7 TO 14 




a 
o 


."^Q 


^ a 




"o 


a 
o 


.Za 






'-S CQ 


^ s 


gs 5^ 


o 


tS m 


—, v 






II 


■^^a 


t^a 


"«-B 


-s-s 


|S 


^Sa 








3o3 




ft §5 

loja ffl 




•|a 


3o2 






^ti 


o 2 




o a 




'-tj 


o © 






o 




a ""-^ 


a ^-^ 


a'^-" 


o^ 


0° 


a <nJ2 








^ 


M 


M 


15 




*" 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


40 


Brookline . . • . 


1,187 


917 


234 


_ 


36 


4,399 


3,222 


41 


Watertown 


1,146 


1,010 


98 


— 


38 


3,691 


3,177 


42 


Arlington . . . . 


1,205 


926 


163 


1 


115 


3,724 


3,159 


43 


Framingham 


813 


699 


1 


— 


113 


2,799 


2,780 


44 


Methuen . . . . 


751 


453 


123 


- 


175 


2,883 


2,405 


45 


Weymouth 


669 


474 


72 


_ 


123 


2,648 


2,415 


46 


Winthrop . . . . 


475 


409 


1 


— 


65 


1,963 


1,946 


47 


Wakefield 


518 


506 


12 


— 


— 


2,229 


2,229 


48 


Southbridge 


535 


198 


223 


1 


113 


2,156 


1,216 


49 


West Springfield 


650 


563 


40 


- 


47 


2,398 


2,169 


50 


Belmont . 


638 


609 


27 


_ 


2 


2,172 


2,071 


51 


Greenfield 


578 


568 


7 


— 


3 


2,072 


2,045 


52 


Milford . . . . 


703 


372 


118 


— 


213 


2,361 


2,006 


53 


Clinton . . . . 


497 


265 


182 


— 


50 


1,848 


1,046 


64 


Norwood . . . . 


474 


380 


94 


- 


- 


2,154 


2,098 


55 


Dedham . . . . 


557 


410 


22 


_ 


125 


2,179 


2,088 


56 


Adams . . . . 


573 


300 


150 


1 


122 


2,081 


1,167 


57 


Webster . 


431 


174 


184 


— 


73 


2,134 


775 


58 


Braintree . 


641 


530 


17 


— 


94 


2,013 


1,833 


59 


Plymouth 


480 


363 


- 


- 


117 


1,578 


1,577 


60 


Natick 


557 


439 


_ 


_ 


118 


1,742 


1,742 


61 


Milton 


465 


382 


59 


— 


24 


1,577 


1,320 


62 


Saugus 


550 


350 


— 


— 


200 


2,095 


2,095 


63 


Danvers . 


328 


278 


50 


- 


— 


1,465 


1,456 


64 


Easthampton . 


509 


251 


182 


1 


75 


1,883 


1,024 


65 


Winchester 


459 


361 


78 


_ 


20 


1,533 


1,221 


66 


Amesbury 


393 


134 


205 


— 


54 


1,546 


741 


67 


Palmer 


476 


375 


73 


— 


28 


1,896 


1,332 


68 


Fairhaven 


419 


303 


92 


— 


24 


1,892 


1,540 


69 


Andover . 


500 


173 


89 


- 


238 


1,119 


973 


70 


Northbridge 


441 


257 


27 


_ 


157 


1,369 


1,245 


71 


North Attleborough . 


349 


173 


139 


— 


37 


1,219 


674 


72 


Athol 


335 


238 


2 


— 


95 


1,366 


1,342 


73 


Bridgewater 


268 


238 


— 


— 


30 


1,042 


1,042 


74 


Middleborough . 


286 


214 


- 


- 


72 


1,212 


1,190 


75 


Stoneham 


324 


198 


59 


_ 


67 


1,120 


771 


76 


Wellesley . 


416 


372 


44 


— 


— 


1,237 


1,046 


77 


Dartmouth 


344 


176 


18 


— 


150 


1,601 


1,507 


78 


Needham . 


355 


355 


— 


— 


— 


1,209 


1,200 


79 


Swampscott 


299 


168 


60 


- 


71 


1,098 


815 


80 


Ludlow 


487 


297 


56 


_ 


134 


1,752 


1,222 


81 


Reading . 


303 


296 


— 


— 


7 


1,111 


1,102 


82 


Ware 


333 


188 


145 


— 


— 


1,192 


784 


83 


Marblehead 


230 


201 


13 


1 


15 


890 


858 


84 


Hudson . 


342 


181 


89 


- 


72 


1,020 


682 


85 


Montague 


339 


152 


46 


_ 


141 


1,186 


1,081 


86 


Rockland . 


213 


165 


— 


— 


48 


953 


953 


87 


Maynard . 


333 


187 


— 


— 


146 


1,070 


1,138 


88 


Stoughton 


354 


164 


46 


— 


144 


1,137 


889 


89 


Whitman . 


262 


181 


12 


- 


69 


933 


933 


90 


Lexington 


438 


223 


r 7 


_ 


208 


1,254 


1,247 


91 


Concord . 


200 


142 


19 


— 


39 


827 


772 


92 


Franklin . 


279 


209 


1 


— 


69 


995 


981 


93 


Grafton 


223 


172 


— 


— 


51 


828 


816 


94 


North Andover . 


320 


171 


9 


- 


140 


841 


818 


95 


South Hadley . 


231 


219 


5 


_ 


7 


971 


904 


96 


Mansfield 


255 


161 


— 


— 


94 


916 


916 


97 


Chelmsford 


225 


126 


1 


— 


98 


896 


886 


98 


Spencer 


201 


98 


103 


— 


— 


830 


520 


99 


Walpole . 


273 


273 


- 


- 


- 


979 


970 



Pt. II. 

Population ok Over — Continued 



35 























Illiterate 


OF Age, 


OCTOBEB 


1, 1927 














Minors, 


16 


TO 21 






















Years 


OP 


Age 






















"o"-!" 


~k 


5P, si 


Years 










14 TO 


16 Ye ABB 








o o 

F- 


a 
"3 


-2 => 


'Z s3 

M O OQ 

a "-^ 


51 § 

-■§§ 


Is 


a 
o 


.::a 


^a 

n. H M 


k'o ft 
III 

a "" S 
° a 
"gi 


"3 a 

P O (Q 
>_CJ u 




"o 
o 

n 

a °i 

.S bD 

^ "> 








Z 







« 


a 





1-1 


Z 


Q 


rt 




97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


107 




108 


1,161 


7 


9 


1,219 


870 


321 


8 


5 


7 


2 


6 




3 


513 


1 


— 


750 


657 


51 


34 


8 


— 


— 


41 




8 


664 


— 


1 


926 


804 


94 


3 


7 


1 


17 


1 




2 


17 


2 


— 


696 


636 


17 


— 


— 


— 


43 


17 




9 


476 


2 


- 


789 


697 


39 


48 


- 


5 


- 


14 




- 


219 


3 


11 


614 


664 


32 


14 


_ 


_ 


4 


_ 




1 


10 


2 


5 


442 


432 


1 


2 


2 


— 


5 


— 




— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


571 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




12 


940 


— 


— 


531 


213 


96 


184 


38 


— 


— 


43 




20 


222 


5 


2 


578 


459 


36 


28 


10 


2 


43 


19 




14 


98 


2 


1 


452 


424 


24 


_ 


1 


_ 


3 


_ 




5 


15 


5 


7 


491 


498 


11 


_ 


— 


— 


2 


1 




1 


321 


34 


— 


550 


362 


93 


84 


— 


11 


— 


14 




14 


794 


3 


5 


539 


306 


55 


167 


8 


1 


2 


18 




17 


56 


- 


- 


650 


650 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




13 


88 


3 


_ 


536 


432 


18 


27 


22 


_ 


37 


5 




4 


901 


11 


2 


650 


313 


51 


285 


— 


1 


— 


9 




4 


1,357 


— 


2 


589 


224 


137 


209 


— 


— 


19 


— 




6 


172 


8 


— 


472 


354 


33 


63 


17 


1 


4 


— 




— 


- 


1 


- 


406 


142 


- 


- 


- 


- 


264 


23 




31 


_ 


_ 


_ 


457 


411 


6 


_ 


_ 


1 


39 


16 




5 


251 


— 


6 


348 


278 


67 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


627 


602 


— 


20 


— 


5 


— 


— 




4 


— 


8 


1 


394 


300 


15 


— 


20 


5 


54 


— 




— 


853 


2 


4 


488 


278 


44 


133 


27 


2 


4 


86 




74 


293 


_ 


19 


419 


322 


56 


_ 


_ 


_ 


41 


_ 




2 


796 


3 


6 


416 


256 


103 


— 


— 


4 


53 


55 




66 


561 


— 


3 


458 


340 


18 


93 


5 




2 


5 




9 


352 


— 


— 


289 


102 


16 


64 


2 


— 


105 


45 




45 


226 


- 


- 


264 


221 




43 


- 


- 




- 




- 


112 


7 


6 


353 


226 


18 


86 


10 


1 


12 


49 




32 


526 


3 


6 


244 


177 


65 


— 


— 


1 


1 


31 




13 


20 


— 


4 


212 


113 


5 


— 


— 


1 


93 


— 




15 


— 


— 


— 


280 


211 


— 


— 


3 


_ 


66 


11 




— 


16 


- 


6 


347 


280 


2 


- 


- 


- 


65 


7 




7 


348 


_ 


1 


318 


216 


41 


_ 


4 


_ 


57 


_ 




_ 


191 


— 


— 


315 


300 


7 


_ 


8 


_ 




1 




1 


72 


— 


22 


286 


215 


15 


51 


4 


_ 


1 


44 




34 


9 


— 


— 


303 


295 


— 


2 


6 


— 


— 


3 




— 


283 


- 


- 


258 


233 


24 


- 




1 


- 


- 




- 


524 


_ 


6 


336 


207 


32 


84 


10 


3 


_ 


29 




22 


3 


3 


3 


335 


318 


5 


1 


1 


— 


10 


6 




5 


407 


— 


1 


375 


231 


19 


124 


_ 


_ 


1 


8 




7 


28 


1 


3 


232 


217 


6 


— 


— 


2 


7 


— 




— 


329 


- 


9 


303 


184 


34 


- 


- 




85 


- 




- 


143 


_ 


_ 


329 


230 


21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


78 


1 




3 


— 


— 


— 


225 


202 


— 


— 


— 


— 


23 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


319 


282 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


37 


9 




5 


248 


— 


— 


374 


198 


24 


— 


— 


_ 


152 


— 




5 


- 


- 


- 


248 


240 


1 


- 


1 


- 


6 


1 




1 


6 


1 


_ 


332 


313 


5 


8 


2 


_ 


4 


1 




_ 


65 


— 


— 


260 


242 


18 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


8 


3 


3 


234 


214 


8 


_ 


_ 


1 


11 


4 




6 


9 


— 


3 


256 


177 


1 


_ 


3 




75 


14 




5 


23 


- 


- 


223 


201 


3 


13 




- 


6 


4 




- 


62 


1 


4 


259 


175 


11 


11 


10 


_ 


52 


_ 




2 


— 


— 


— 


211 


193 


— 


— 




1 


17 


— 




_ 


8 


— 


2 


208 


163 


_ 


5 


10 




30 


6 




_ 


310 


— 


— 


127 


116 


11 


— 


— 


_ 




7 




_ 


6 


1 


2 


246 


231 


1 


- 


- 


- 


14 






- 



36 



P.D. 2. 

Gboup II. Towns of 5,000 



Membekship in Public Day 





TOWNS 


a 


ELEMENT AB1 




2:3 

3 


















o 


M 0. 


03 -S 
















■t^ 


" 


"S '^ 
















o3 


■a 


"tD 
















60 


— OJ 


P.O 




IM 


CO 


•<* 


10 








S-w 


m^ 


0) 


<a 


<a 


<D 


ID 






13 


S S 


,a So 



■d 


Ti 


-d 


-B 


-o 






a 





C3 




c 


2 
C 





2 







109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


40 


Brookline . 


393 


27 


_ 


485 


487 


450 


458 


489 


41 


Watertown 


4541 


52 


— 


576 


507 


469 


487 


497 


42 


Arlington . 


3031 


124 


— 


535 


489 


416 


454 


452 


43 


Framingham 


40 


14 


— 


542 


480 


451 


429 


434 


44 


Methuen . 


. 


19 


- 


408 


400 


371 


390 


335 


45 


Weymouth 


_ 


_ 


_ 


437 


386 


398 


335 


361 


46 


Winthrop . 


— 


12 


— 


294 


324 


289 


322 


296 


47 


Wakefield 


— 


18 


— 


399 


326 


390 


309 


358 


48 


Southbridge 


- 




- 


202 


196 


179 


170 


182 


49 


West Springfield 


196 


68 


7 


372 


349 


302 


349 


367 


50 


Belmont . 


275 


9 


13 


373 


369 


320 


319 


276 


51 


Greenfield 


90 


27 


— 


365 


325 


373 


249 


302 


52 


Milford . 


— 


35 


— 


347 


308 


335 


309 


327 


53 


Clinton 


— 


10 


— 


189 


182 


133 


158 


170 


54 


Norwood . 


• 


28 


- 


293 


295 


323 


320 


357 


55 


Dedham . 


_ 


15 


_ 


382 


340 


319 


333 


322 


56 


Adams 


231 1 




_ 


187 


190 


165 


193 


168 


57 


Webster . 


_ 


16 


_ 


179 


112 


113 


119 


113- 


58 


Braintree . 


243 


16 


20 


327 


318 


300 


266 


278 


59 


Plymouth 


• 


32 


10 


314 


260 


260 


275 


247 


60 


Natick 


_ 


11 


_ 


345 


350 


277 


300 


247 


61 


Milton 


! 180 


14 


— 


292 


215 


204 


227 


198 


62 


Saugus 


— 


— 


— 


351 


372 


315 


323 


334 


63 


Danvers . 


— 


15 


— 


239 


252 


216 


192 


172 


64 


Easthampton . 


• 


10 


- 


202 


172 


157 


142 


171 


65 


Winchester 


130 


28 


_ 


272 


186 


180 


195 


188 


66 


Amesbury 


— 


10 


— 


137 


120 


130 


124 


113 


67 


Palmer 


— 


58 


_ 


285 


246 


240 


222 


174 


68 


Fairhaven 


— 


17 


— 


257 


252 


235 


215 


231 


69 


Andover . 


. 


16 


- 


163 


159 


148 


149 


165 


70 


Northbridge 


_ 


25 


_ 


247 


205 


191 


189 


213 


71 


North Attleborough . 


— 


10 


39 


135 


103 


110 


113 


110 


72 


Athol 


— 


27 


— 


249 


218 


186 


149 


264 


73 


Bridgewater 


60 


_ 


— 


191 


158 


143 


158 


170 


74 


Middleborough . 


. 


- 


- 


225 


152 


170 


189 


174 


75 


Stoneham 


86 


40 


_ 


169 


137 


105 


114 


112 


76 


Wellesley . 


138 


12 


34 


199 


170 


160 


197 


123 


77 


Dartmouth 


— 


30 


— 


384 


186 


243 


241 


227 


78 


Needham . 


155 




— 


207 


206 


202 


191 


171 


79 


Swampscott 


• 


17 


- 


145 


151 


141 


131 


126 


80 


Ludlow 


_ 


15 


_ 


306 


264 


220 


193 


136 


81 


Reading . 


_ 


36 


— 


243 


156 


186 


140 


153 


82 


Ware 


■ , _ 


23 


— 


132 


114 


95 


128 


138 


83 


Marblehead 


! 76 


- 


— 


129 


130 


115 


137 


126 


84 


Hudson 




- 


- 


132 


113 


117 


107 


117 


85 


Montague 


_ 


16 


_ 


192 


187 


175 


176 


162 


86 


Rockland . 


— 


9 


— 


137 


144 


116 


125 


132 


87 


Maynard . 


] - 




- 


180 


183 


183 


194 


183 


88 


Stoughton 


— 


21 


— 


164 


150 


129 


128 


146 


89 


Whitman . 


- 


13 


- 


154 


138 


119 


126 


151 


90 


Lexington 


_ 


59 


_ 


200 


228 


207 


171 


195 


91 


Concord . 


— 


16 


— 


115 


101 


109 


112 


126 


92 


Franklin . 


_ 


17 


_ 


172 


160 


151 


146 


161 


93 


Grafton 


— 


33 


— 


154 


137 


140 


142 


120 


94 


North Andover . 


. 




- 


142 


135 


118 


121 


92 


95 


South Hadley . 


_ 


2 


_ 


163 


138 


148 


139 


141 


96 


Mansfield . . ' . 


_ 


11 


— 


159 


155 


131 


143 


141 


97 


Chelmsford 


_ 




— 


196 


152 


150 


156 


138 


98 


Spencer 


_ 


_ 


- 


93 


73 


90 


92 


79 


99 


Walpole . 


70 


15 


- 


201 


169 


142 


180 


161 



• Sub-primary. 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



37 



Schools by Grades, Oct. 1, 1927 



SCHOOLS 














HIGH 


3CH00LS 










■+J Ut 


u 


C3 




tH 








'rt 0) 








II 


o 


ui >> 




o 








§1 






«5 




u 

<i)'3 
t3 a 


S5 C 

<a a ° 


•3 


-1 


a 




1 
J3 


|1 


•3 


•3 


S 


gSffl 


g^ 


g-sg 


o 


£1-5 


8 


2 


3 



45 ^ 





g 


O 


o 


O 


o 


H 


E 


m 


Eh 


fe 


S 


H 





117 


118 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


124 


125 


126 


127 


128 


489 


449 


427 


_ 


4,154 


534 


356 


352 


262 


16 


1,520 


5,674 


481 


464 


359 


— 


4,346 


317 


280 


201 


138 


— 


936 


5,282 


490 


456 


468 


— 


4,187 


436 


412 


264 


157 


10 


1,279 


5,466 


435 


429 


345 


— 


3,599 


270 


246 


161 


115 


5 


797 


4,396 


404 


327 


342 


- 


2,996 


222 


152 


139 


158 


3 


674 


3,670 


376 


343 


300 


_ 


2,936 


332 


230 


163 


163 


4 


892 


3,828 


297 


324 


294 


— 


2,452 


264 


168 


181 


182 


17 


812 


3,264 


335 


288 


267 


— 


2,690 


308 


229 


125 


156 


14 


832 


3,522 


192 


125 


129 


— 


1,375 


114 


103 


67 


78 


— 


362 


1,737 


286 


293 


238 


- 


2,827 


230 


147 


96 


70 


4 


547 


3,374 


272 


300 


245 


_ 


2,771 


286 


158 


121 


109 


9 


683 


3,454 


291 


293 


254 


157 


2,726 


261 


186 


105 


110 


9 


671 


3,397 


260 


298 


245 


— 


2,464 


191 


135 


96 


104 


— 


526 


2,990 


143 


171 


119 


— 


1,275 


205 


127 


103 


74 


5 


514 


1,789 


384 


280 


321 


- 


2,601 


244 


205 


175 


127 


- 


751 


3,352 


301 


339 


223 


_ 


2,574 


200 


190 


123 


73 


_ 


591 


3,165 


" 181 


185 


120 


— 


1,620 


108 


105 


61 


57 


3 


334 


1,954 


120 


117 


142 


— 


1,031 


81 


164 


80 


45 


49 


419 


1,450 


275 


228 


197 


_ 


2,468 


168 


142 


95 


98 


6 


509 


2,977 


335 


193 


217 


- 


2,143 


132 


114 


103 


78 


- 


427 


2,570 


261 


235 


206 


_ 


2,232 


200 


167 


120 


128 


2 


617 


2,849 


199 


207 


182 


— 


1,918 


187 


175 


121 


102 


9 


594 


2,512 


297 


325 


237 


— 


2,554 


264 


112 


56 


81 


— 


513 


3,067 


207 


220 


181 


— 


1,694 


175 


141 


83 


84 


1 


484 


2,178 


182 


176 


108 


- 


1,320 


151 


61 


66 


40 


- 


318 


1,638 


164 


164 


158 


_ 


1,665 


194 


145 


99 


79 


5 


522 


2,187 


97 


101 


91 


— 


923 


182 


136 


96 


79 


10 


503 


1,426 


181 


217 


147 


126 


1,896 


115 


83 


58 


42 


4 


302 


2,198 


223 


177 


118 


— 


1,725 


112 


121 


92 


46 


3 


374 


2,099 


131 


137 


126 


- 


1,194 


127 


68 


73 


29 


1 


298 


1,492 


197 


155 


148 


_ 


1,570 


93 


62 


46 


53 


_ 


254 


1,824 


101 


90 


68 


— 


879 


104 


66 


47 


67 


— 


284 


1,163 


173 


160 


170 


97 


1,693 


138 


94 


70 


75 


— 


377 


2,070 


179 


145 


90 


— 


1,294 


122 


78 


64 


44 


— 


308 


1,602 


150 


133 


171 


- 


1,364 


181 


116 


83 


60 


6 


446 


1,810 


116 


124 


107 


_ 


1,110 


115 


104 


112 


81 


7 


419 


1,529 


153 


167 


150 


— 


1,503 


146 


135 


87 


72 


4 


444 


1,947 


222 


148 


105 


— 


1,786 


71 


46 


42 


23 


— 


182 


1,968 


175 


197 


170 


— 


1,674 


170 


105 


89 


88 


1 


453 


2,127 


121 


131 


126 


- 


1,089 


132 


115 


111 


85 


10 


453 


1,542 


196 


152 


85 


72 


1,639 


39 


31 


19 


32 


_ 


121 


1,760 


165 


135 


169 


— 


1,383 


175 


146 


123 


108 


5 


557 


1,940 


137 


156 


125 


— 


1,048 


113 


61 


47 


45 


— 


266 


1,314 


137 


125 


107 


— 


1,082 


93 


ni 


65 


68 


6 


343 


1,425 


107 


103 


71 


- 


867 


87 


63 


39 


67 


- 


246 


1,113 


125 


158 


166 


_ 


1,357 


140 


93 


51 


46 


_ 


330 


1,687 


140 


147 


146 


— 


1,096 


88 


118 


77 


70 


2 


355 


1,451 


181 


158 


154 


— 


1,416 


109 


94 


78 


46 


— 


327 


1,743 


148 


101 


84 


— 


1,071 


98 


83 


50 


61 


1 


293 


1,364 


139 


130 


114 


- 


1,084 


164 


134 


105 


62 


4 


469 


1,553 


158 


178 


153 


_ 


1,549 


189 


169 


115 


85 


7 


565 


2,114 


104 


121 


104 


— 


908 


100 


98 


65 


57 


8 


328 


1,236 


167 


146 


135 


— 


1,255 


124 


112 


77 


63 


5 


381 


1,636 


103 


107 


92 


— 


1,028 


39 


47 


39 


31 


- 


156 


1,184 


138 


142 


106 


- 


994 


116 


72 


48 


42 


3 


281 


1,275 


137 


130 


120 


_ 


1,118 


111 


86 


44 


43 


_ 


284 


1,402 


152 


122 


131 


— 


1,145 


93 


69 


50 


39 


7 


258 


1,403 


124 


129 


140 


— 


1,185 


83 


65 


44 


31 


1 


224 


1,409 


95 


74 


66 


— 


662 


64 


52 


43 


27 


3 


189 


851 


167 


125 


125 


- 


1,355 


114 


102 


88 


62 


4 


370 


1,725 



38 



P.D. 2. 













Group II. Towns 


OF 5,000 






School Buildings in 
Use, Jan. 1, ^928 




Estimated Value op 




ELEMENTARY 


TOWNS 


1 


lit 
.a 


2 

'3 


XI 


cag 










a 

o 

sa 

a-" 
O 


a 

o 
o 


a 

o 

2 


a 

o 

Sa 


o 2 

|£ 

■sa 

is 


-3 


1 


1 
1 




129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


136 


40 Brookline . 

41 Waterfcown 

42 Arlington . 

43 Framingham 

44 Methuen . 


! 1 

'. 4 
3 


2 

4 


- 


5 
1 
1 

4 
2 


18 
10 
11 
7 
10 


23 
12 
12 
17 
19 


$478,825 
90,600 
78,200 
72,900 
68,427 


$1,461,400 

1,086,250 

890,000 

1,121,300 

1,190,000 


45 Weymouth 

46 Winthrop . 

47 Wakefield . 

48 Southbridge 

49 West Springfield . 


1 

'. 4 
1 


2 

1 

2 

1 


1 


6 

2 
3 
2 


8 
6 
7 
2 
9 


17 
6 
11 
11 
13 


39,990 
47,750 
49,350 
25,000 
61.700 


725,600 
460,000 
854,000 
152,500 
603,500 


50 Belmont . 

51 Greenfield . 

52 Milford 

53 Clinton 

54 Norwood . 


6 

8 


2 
2 
4 
2 


1 


9 
5 
4 


7 
6 

4 
4 
8 


7 
23 
20 
12 
10 


35,000 

164,850 

43,125 

26,000 

114,260 


1,021,000 
424,700 
491,625 
260,000 
415,000 


55 Dedham 

56 Adams 

57 Webster 

58 Braintree . 

59 Plymouth . 


1 
2 
1 
5 


1 
2 

1 
4 


1 


1 

1 
2 
1 
1 


7 
6 
3 
9 
6 


10 
10 
7 
12 
16 


60,000 

18,000 

9,600 

71,000 

143,850 


760,000 
384,000 
163,600 
967,734 
876,700 


60 Natick 

61 Milton 

62 Saugus 

63 Danvers 

64 Easthampton 


1 

'. 3 


2 

1 
2 


3 


5 
2 
3 
2 


4 
4 
6 
6 
5 


12 

6 

12 

12 

7 


40,000 
97,000 
25,202 
26,200 
19,000 


342,500 
517,960 

270,442 
123,500 
248,000 


65 Winchester 

66 Amesbury . 

67 Palmer 

68 Fairhaven . 

69 Andover 


; 2 

'. 2 


1 
1 

2 
1 


1 


2 

1 


7 
4 
8 
7 
4 


8 
7 
10 
9 
9 


113,920 

9,925 

25,000 

13,200 

8,000 


897,547 
130,000 
360,000 
290,000 
250,000 


70 Northbridge 

71 North Attleborough 

72 Athol 

73 Bridgewater 

74 Middleborough . 


1 
3 
2 
1 
12 


1 

1 
3 

1 


3 


1 
1 
4 

1 
1 


6 
2 
4 

4 
4 


9 
9 

11 
9 

18 


29,200 
14,000 
22,000 
4,500 
17,445 


184,401 
212,000 
242,000 
79,850 
112,600 


75 Stoneham . 

76 Wellesley . 

77 Dartmouth 

78 Needham . 

79 Swampscott 


'. 1 
2 


5 
2 


1 


3 

2 

1 

1 


3 

10 
4 
6 
4 


6 
10 
13 
11 

5 


6,000 
85,000 

7,000 
41,900 
12,000 


60,000 
640,000 
384,500 
265,700 
231,000 


80 Ludlow 

81 Reading . 

82 Ware 

83 Marblehead 

84 Hudson 


5 
; 2 


2 
1 
2 


1 


4 
1 
2 
1 


4 
5 
3 
4 
5 


11 

10 

9 

6 

6 


6,000 
20,025 
11,000 

8,600 
15,900 


398,000 
232,900 
145,000 
225,600 
208,500 


85 Montague . 

86 Rockland . 

87 Maynard . 

88 Stoughton . 

89 Whitman . 


1 
2 

'. 3 


5 
3 


- 


5 
1 

2 


4 
2 
5 
4 
4 


10 
10 

5 
10 

6 


13,125 
5,000 
8,600 
6,000 

19,000 


445,575 
100,000 
130,000 
70,000 
210,360 


90 Lexington . 

91 Concord 

92 Franklin . 

93 Grafton 

94 North Andover . 


'. 2 
'. 4 


1 
1 

2 


1 


1 

5 
2 
4 


5 
6 
2 
4 
3 


6 
8 

10 
8 

11 


25,500 
23,000 
9,375 
25,000 
24,500 


442,670 
214,000 
119,500 
245,125 
173,500 


95 South Hadley ■ . 

96 Mansfield . 

97 Chelmsford 

98 Spencer 

99 Walpole 


'. 3 
1 
2 
1 


2 
1 

1 

1 


1 
2 


2 
6 
2 

1 


5 
3 
2 
1 

4 


7 

10 

10 

7 

7 


16,112 

13,000 

13,000 

5,800 

9,000 


196,281 
170,000 
427,000 
60,000 
280,000 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



39 



Public School Property 



SCHOOLS 




JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 










1 


a 


3 c3 

lis 

3 ȣ 


"a 


3 


a 


jy-ti-H 







'3 


0"*^— ' 





t-i 


W 


H 


M 


n 


w 


H 





137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


$226,959 


$2,167,184 


$108,000 


$650,000 


$56,000 


$814,000 


$2,981,184 


32,000 


1,208,850 


84,000 


1,273,250 


181,000 


1,538,250 


2,747,100 


86.903 


1,055,103 


79,000 


586,900 


113,459 


779,359 


1,834,462 


48,500 


1,242,700 


20,000 


225,000 


23,000 


268,000 


1,510,700 


97,000 


1,355,427 


6,000 


600,000 


12,000 


618,000 


1,973,427 


93,901 


859,491 


4,900 


650,500 


45,716 


701,116 


1,560,607 


27,000 


534,750 


16,500 


605,000 


39,600 


661,000 


1,195,750 


44,000 


947,350 


25,000 


395,000 


66,000 


476,000 


1,422,360 


15,000 


192,500 


43,900 


264,000 


16,810 


324,710 


517,210 


66,334 


731,634 


35,000 


400,000 


43,321 


478,321 


1,209,866 


49,000 


1,105,000 


17,000 


652,315 


60,000 


719,315 


1,824,315 


62,000 


641,550 


20,000 


450,000 


90,000 


660,000 


1,201,550 


31,000 


665,750 


8,625 


129,375 


13,800 


161,800 


717,550 


11,500 


297,500 


18,000 


150,000 


12,000 


180,000 


477,500 


24,000 


553,260 


43,000 


849,482 


32,000 


924,482 


1,477,742 


42,500 


862,500 


20,000 


248,500 


17,600 


286,000 


1,148,500 


16,000 


418,000 


32,000 


540,000 


55,500 


627,600 


1,045,500 


13,088 


186,288 


80,000 


600,000 


46,740 


726,740 


913,028 


72,500 


1,111,234 


22,000 


375,000 


54,000 


451,000 


1,562,234 


20,000 


1,040,550 


7,000 


175,000 


16,000 


198,000 


1,238,550 


17,650 


400,150 


38,103 


475,074 


40,400 


563,577 


953,727 


66,000 


670,950 


40,500 


518,600 


89,800 


648,900 


1,319,850 


25,000 


320,644 


9,004 


181,300 


21,400 


211,704 


532,348 


33,710 


183,410 


25,000 


315,000 


31,400 


371,400 


554,810 


10,000 


277,000 


9,000 


82,000 


5,000 


96,000 


373,000 


28,000 


1,039,467 


25,000 


110,000 


14,500 


149,600 


1,188,967 


15,000 


154,925 


9,350 


320,000 


60,000 


389,350 


544,275 


60,000 


445,000 


17,500 


200,000 


26,000 


242,500 


687,500 


42,000 


345,200 


10,000 


800,000 


25,000 


835,000 


1,180,200 


22,000 


280,000 


4,000 


170,000 


15,000 


189,000 


469,000 


12,713 


226,314 


8,000 


223,000 


14,000 


245,000 


471,314 


20,000 


246,000 


21,000 


340,000 


29,500 


390,500 


636,500 


114,000 


378,000 


10,000 


100,000 


60,000 


170,000 


548,000 


7,090 


91,440 


8,000 


67,650 


11,910 


87,560 


179,000 


12,500 


142,545 


80,000 


221,800 


20,000 


271,800 


414,345 


14,000 


80,000 


20,000 


250,000 


42,000 


312,000 


392,000 


40,150 


765,150 


45,000 


330,130 


27,876 


403,006 


1,168,156 


22,500 


414,000 


500 


5,000 


1,000 


6,500 


420,500 


23,000 


330,600 


32,500 


300,000 


30,000 


362,500 


693,100 


20,000 


263,000 


5,000 


290,000 


16,500 


311,500 


674,500 


37,115 


441,115 


1,800 


77,000 


16,660 


94,460 


535,575 


25,000 


277,925 


19,525 


610,000 


73,000 


602,526 


880,450 


10,000 


166,000 


5,000 


371,000 


14,500 


390,600 


656,500 


20,000 


254,100 


6,000 


125,000 


12,000 


143,000 


397,100 


12,000 


236,400 


2,600 


35,000 


6,200 


42,700 


279,100 


12,550 


471,250 


7,000 


81,000 


9,000 


97,000 


568,250 


9,000 


114,000 


8,500 


120,000 


4,800 


133,300 


247,300 


51,000 


189,600 


5,000 


145,000 


49,000 


199,000 


388,600 


6,000 


81,000 


8,500 


163,000 


14,000 


185,500 


266,500 


12,500 


241,860 


15,000 


250,000 


18,074 


283,074 


624,934 


24,500 


492,670 


6,000 


483,000 


61,200 


540,200 


1,032,870 


12,000 


249,000 


7,000 


50,000 


14,000 


71,000 


320,000 


11,000 


139,875 


29,000 


324,000 


30,400 


383,400 


523,275 


14,000 


284,125 


5,000 


62,600 


2,000 


69,500 


363,625 


27,200 


225,200 


3,000 


100,000 


12,500 


116,500 


340,700 


20,480 


232,873 


2,500 


123,164 


9,142 


134,796 


367,669 


9,000 


192,000 


10,000 


100,000 


9,073 


119,073 


311,073 


22,127 


462,127 


3,000 


100,000 


13,000 


116,000 


678,127 


15,000 


80,800 


8,000 


100,000 


15,000 


123,000 


203,800 


41,200 


330,200 


4,500 


194,090 


4,500 


203,090 


533,290 



40 



Gkoup II. 



P.D. 2. 
Towns of 5,000 







3 


.h" 


Teaching 


Staff in 


Public 






d 


^ 


Day Schools - 


— KiNDEBGABTEN 


, Ele- 






o 


< 


MENTARY, HlQH JaN. 1, 1928 












PABT 




TOWNS 




"o 




FULL 


TIME 




TIME 












£ 






§ 


d 


J2 


2 

O 






il 






•■P 


o 


(a 


CQ 


£ 




.^ Q) 






isia 


■^t^ 


ft 


ft 


V 




-1 






5.S 


03 cq 

_3 05 


•3 

a 


03 


1 






o 


"3"^ 


"C 


3 


(U 


o 


5'c« 






P^ 


> 


0^ 


m 


H 


H 


m 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


100 


Millbury 


6,441 


$5,520,644 


1 


_ 


36 


37 


4 


101 


Great Barrington . 


6,405 


9,404,761 


1 


— 


47 


48 


2 


102 


Dracut 


6,400 


4,129,189 


— 


— 


42 


42 


2 


103 


Westborough 


6,348 


4,341,035 


1 


— 


28 


29 


2 


104 


Agawam 


6,290 


8,882,336 


1 


2 


53 


66 


- 


105 


Winchendon . 


6,173 


5,793,995 


1 


1 


40 


42 


_ 


106 


Uxbridge 


6,172 


7,343,635 


— 


— 


35 


35 


4 


107 


Hingham 


6,158 


14,201,415 


5 


— 


37 


42 


3 


108 


Ipswich 


6,055 


8,275,447 


6 


— 


47 


52 


1 


109 


Amherst 


5,972 


9,069,874 


1 


2 


49 


52 


1 


110 


Canton 


5,896 


8,768,290 


6 


_ 


22 


28 


4 


111 


Abington 


5,882 


5,488,306 


3 


— 


40 


43 


1 


112 


Shrewsbury . 


6,819 


7,397,768 


3 


- 


46 


48 


2 


113 


Barnstable . 


5,774 


19,482,390 


1 


3 


46 


60 


— 


114 


Randolph 


5,644 


6,260,600 


- 


- 


38 


38 


2 


115 


Wareham 


5,594 


11,259,705 


1 


1 


40 


42 


2 


116 


Easton 


6,333 


5,334,860 


3 


— 


40 


43 


1 


117 


Orange 


5,141 


5,657,404 


1 


— 


37 


38 


2 


118 


Monson 
Total 


5,089 


3,198,535 


- 


— 


28 


28 


2 




828,467 


$1,286,609,706 


229 


162 


6,333 


5,714 


166 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over 



41 



Continued 



Pupils in Public Day Schools — 


Kindergarten, E 


LBMENTART, 






a. 




High 


— Year ending 


June 30, 


1928 












. c3 


t4 


u a 




horn 
ition 
than 
year 


i 
& 


« o 


a 1 




1 


'O o 




a 
1 


or~' w 

aid tui 

less 1 

school 


St3S3 




1 






r a 


^ a 


1 d fl ° 


1 

a 

o 


-a ja 

C3 « >> 




A 


■< 


< 


■< 


< 


PM 


\z, 






8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




14 


15 


1,040 


174,996 


947 


185 


998 


_ 




2 


996 


1,367 


218,948 


1,232 


180 


1,299 


1 




53 


1,247 


1,407 


223,684 


1,248 


180 


1,323 


187 




25 


1,485 


894 


146,260 


789 


185 


842 


- 




19 


823 


1,625 


263,079 


1,458 . 


180 


1,544 


- 




9 


1,535 


1,293 


208,354 


1,161 


179 


1,217 


8 




24 


1,201 


1,102 


171,752 


957 


181 


999 


1 




26 


974 


1,198 


186,772 


1,047 


181 


1,126 


5 




81 


1,050 


1,570 


239,502 


1,409 


169 


1,491 


— 




52 


1,439 


1,277 


211,770 


1,156 


183 


1,223 


4 




97 


1,130 


765 


124,626 


687 


183 


736 


_ 




12 


724 


1,244 


209,400 


1,129 


185 


1,200 


7 




8 


1,199 


1,364 


219,629 


1,217 


180 


1,290 


— 




8 


1,282 


1,332 


211,034 


1,164 


181 


1,236 


— 




12 


1,224 


1,295 


204,495 


1,137 


179 


1,222 


- 




32 


1,190 


1,339 


210,857 


1,163 


182 


1,252 


_ 




87 


1,165 


1,119 


189,984 


1,038 


183 


1,082 


— 




35 


1,047 


1,067 


173,879 


962 


181 


1,017 


— 




44 


973 


729 


122,318 


670 


183 


714 


56 




17 


753 


161,422 


26,456,224 


145,633 


182 


154,157 


427 


3,106 


151,478 



42 



Geoup II. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of 5,000 



Itemized Expenditures for Support of Public 



TOWNS 



II 



•ilg 



100 MiUbury 

101 Great Harrington 

102 Dracut . 

103 Westborough 

104 Agawam 

105 Winchendon 

106 Uxbridge 

107 Hingham 

108 Ipswich . 

109 Amherst 

110 Canton . 

111 Abington 

112 Shrewsbury 

113 Barnstable 

114 Randolph 

115 Wareham 

116 Easton . 

117 Orange . 

118 Monson . 

Total . 



16 

$3,563 74 
4,321 22 
2,453 00 
2,720 87 
7,165 08 

3,129 13 

2,589 75 

3,669 78 

4,379 63 

6,730 67 

4,846 00 

3,727 84 

5,197 68 

6,412 04 

2,320 80 

4,393 38 

4,848 05 

3,659 45 

3,180 69 



17 

$54,060 00 
75,391 67 
50,128 00 
42,276 17 
86,382 50 

62,761 00 
61,263 58 
74,510 05 
63,186 42 
77,946 56 

47,613 25 
65,147 31 
68,772 22 
85,431 25 
50,844 90 

61,867 27 
62,353 59 
53,203 92 
39,482 50 



18 

$2,197 39 
1,678 44 
1,993 00 
1,570 49 
3,047 35 

1,456 83 
939 60 
5,676 91 
3,695 27 
2,173 52 

1,219 59 
1,901 07 
3,839 94 
3,835 04 
1,953 79 

1,248 72 
1,989 49 
1,970 50 
1,570 19 



19 

$2,551 97 

3,136 43 

1,993 00 

2,195 39 

3,809 30 

2,050 48 
3,748 32 
7,480 71 
3,726 87 
3,547 94 

2,145 44 
3,015 52 
2,988 48 
4,310 44 
1,748 11 

1,598 04 
3,064 39 
2,053 83 
1,822 23 



$500,383 88 $9,297,883 92 $281,373 04 $444,498 30 



Pt. II. 

Population ok Over — Continued 



43 



Schools — Day, 


Evening, Vacation - 


— Yeah ending 


June 30, 1928 




-3 3 











transportation 


3 S 
















a 
3 


la 


St 










1 


a o 


a c3 <u 


! 


1 




g 

o 


o2 


-is 

O in 
o " 


CO 


rt 


a 




(5 


H 


Eh 


20 


21 


22 




23 


24 


25 


$12,714 25 


$3,257 40 


$77 


22 


$1,209 29 


$5,674 83 


- 


12,731 83 


4,425 14 


11 


23 


1,522 00 


7,971 66 


$45 60 


9,695 00 


2,863 00 


- 




1,550 00 


3,685 00 


— 


6,399 74 


1,085 20 


70 


32 


800 00 


5,510 00 


— 


17,858 11. 


2,899 92 


295 


63 


2,319 60 


6,197 35 


— 


13,846 45 


378 34 


_ 




2,061 32 


6,691 64 


- 


9,848 19 


5,747 67 


77 


50 


336 75 


3,749 00 


— 


11,175 69 


6,652 51 


- 




2,060 00 


4,561 79 


— 


8,101 53 


2,945 19 


272 


02 


2,292 21 


4,909 67 


— 


11,374 00 


4,022 99 


30 


42 


1,848 67 


5,596 78 


- 


10,176 17 


6,781 87 


_ 




2,180 00 


6,276 33 


- 


9,137 31 


3,327 87 


163 


79 


5,300 11 


3,200 00 


— 


13,192 82 


5,466 89 


- 




1,700 00 


8,311 46 


— 


19,553 15 


4,648 89 


- 




2,038 72 


18,684 25 


— 


9,563 83 


2,735 87 


- 




1,300 00 


3,219 65 


- 


13,071 84 


4,379 18 


_ 




358 86 


12,273 37 


- 


11,006 08 


3,920 57 


- 




1,988 12 


10, 782 45 


— 


10,429 19 


5,553 41 


- 




615 24 


7 035 50 


— 


6,730 00 


1,122 76 


717 


60 


1,100 00 


8,193 40 


700 00 


$1,618,422 71 


$517,778 84 


$22,914 22 


$222,994 18 


$476,659 35 


$1,797 33 



44 



Group II. 



P.D. 2. 
Towns of 5,000 







Itemized Expenditures for 


Support 


Expenditures 
ENDING June 




TOWNS 


OP Public Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation 
— Year ending June 30, 1928 — Con. 






1 


i 

(4 








a 


s 


<s 


ba£S 






o 

;-3 


S 


-3 


^^1 








1 










26 


27 


28 


29 


100 


Millbiiry . 


$127 74 


_ 


$85,433 83 


$1,450 00 


101 


Great Barrington 


75 00 


$3,274 86 


114,585 08 


10,500 00 


102 


Dracut 


15,414 00 


2,415 00 


92,189 00 


2,840 00 


103 


Westborough 


— 


— 


62,628 18 


— 


104 


Agawam 


- 


1,210 13 


131,184 97 


— 


105 


Winchendon 


468 00 


107 21 


92,950 40 


- 


106 


Uxbridge . 


110 00 


1,622 31 


80,032 67 


— 


107 


Hingham . 


27 79 


532 73 


116,347 96 


75,473 63 


108 


Ipswich 


55 00 


1,130 13 


94,693 94 


136 75 


109 


Amherst 


. 


3,194 42 


116,465 87 


479 61 


110 


Canton 


_ 


_ 


81,238 65 


- 


111 


Abington . 


! 168 00 


94 90 


95,183 72 


— 


112 


Shrewsbury 


— 


1,967 07 


111,436 56 


55,971 62 


113 


Barnstable . 


— 


1,554 63 


146,468 41 


1,468 86 


114 


Randolph . 


- 


- 


73,686 95 




115 


Wareham . 


672 03 


2,180 32 


102,043 01 


5,391 32 


116 


Easton 


— 


2,238 96 


102,191 70 


2,160 66 


117 


Orange 


— 


2,034 62 


86,555 66 


28,662 51 


118 


Monson 
Total 


3,304 53 


986 93 


68,910 83 


- 




$39,811 09 


$133,318 28 


$13,557,835 14 


$3,084,819 89 



Pt. II. 

Population ok Over — Continued 



45 



FOB 


Outlay, Year 




Valuation op 


Expenditure for 






30, 


1928 




1927 PER Pupil 

IN Net Average 

Membership, 

Year ending June 


School Support prom 

Local Taxation, 
Year ending Dec. 31, 
1927, PER $1,000 Val- 


Rate of Total Tax 

PER $1,000 

Valuation, 1927 










1 


1 


30, 1928 


uation 


















■| 


(4 

.2 


t— 1 

5 .9 0. 


a .Ho. 


a 


•Sa 






3 

o 


6 o3C3 


o ^ o 
a B '-' 
a isn 




«50 




iz; 


H 


< rt^ 


•< rt^ 


< 


tf 




30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 




_ 


$1,450 00 


$5,543 62 


$15 57 7 


$37 00 


9 




$507 40 


11,007 40 


7,541 34 


9 93 47 


24 00 


74 




— 


2,840 00 


2,781 79 


17 64 2 


39 00 


3 




190 39 


190 39 


5,275 67 


11 60 28 


26 00 


65 




1,955 15 


1,955 15 


5.787 53 


12 14 23 


28 00 


56 




111 10 


111 10 


4,824 70 


12 86 15 


36 00 


14 




400 68 


400 68 


7,539 35 


8 55 64 


23 30 


76 




2,224 58 


77,698 21 


13,525 6 


6 71 73 


29 70 


47 




957 22 


1,093 97 


5,750 57 


10 15 44 


29 00 


50 




1,179 68 


1,659 29 


8,026 28 


10 12 45 


27 20 


58 




_ 


_ 


12,111 10 


8 83 59 


27 40 


57 




129 75 


129 75 


4,577 71 


15 94 5 


36 10 


13 




2,358 30 


58,329 92 


5,770 55 


12 76 16 


36 60 


10 




3,972 12 


5,440 98 


15,917 3 


6 67 75 


25 50 


67 




563 39 


563 39 


4,412 74 


11 19 33 


31 60 


31 




921 22 


6,312 54 


9,664 14 


7 88 70 


24 10 


73 




1,348 78 


3,509 44 


5,095 69 


15 23 8 


24 50 


71 




— 


28,662 51 


5,814 51 


13 97 9 


34 00 


22 




1,015 23 


1,015 23 


4,248 75 


17 80 1 


36 30 


11 




$307,079 46 


$3,391,899 35 


$8,494 


$9 10 


- 


- 



46 



P.D. 2, 
Geoup II. Towns of 5,000 



EXPBNDITUBE FOE SXTPPOBT OP PUBLIC SCHOOLS — DaT, 

Year ending 















FROM STATE 








FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 




TOWNS 










GENERAL SCHOOL FUND) 








.as 




t-t 




■"1. 


>-< 






^ 


a2 


h 




^ 


■p.« fe 








d 


3 >^ 


a 


st-^ 






g 


p,S 


Bo. 


-^2 


a 


o-f Sa 


^2 






a 


fe| 


al- 


§o 


a 


|SS^. 


go 






< 


Ph^ 




« 


< 


PS 






38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


100 


Millbiiry . 


$74,914 82 


$75 22 


38 


$7,042 92 


$7 07 


57 


101 


Great Barrington 


93,422 95 


74 


92 


39 


9,606 67 


7 70 


29 


102 


Dracut 


72,840 16 


49 


05 


79 


17,270 00 


11 63 


5 


103 


Weetborough 


50,336 93 


61 


16 


69 


9,185 00 


11 16 


9 


104 


Agawam . 


107,799 62 


70 


23 


52 


17,615 40 


11 48 


6 


105 


Winchendon 


74,538 40 


62 


06 


68 


8,330 00 


6 94 


62 


106 


Uxbridge . 


62,811 38 


64 


49 


65 


6,645 70 


6 82 


65 


107 


Hingham . 


95,222 94 


90 


69 


10 


7,770 00 


7 40 


45 


108 


Ipswich 


83,991 30 


58 


36 


74 


8,830 00 


6 14 


78 


109 


Amherst . 


91,809 54 


81 


25 


25 


9,449 80 


8 36 


16 


110 


Canton 


77,418 96 


106 


93 


3 


5,778 00 


7 98 


22 


111 


Abington . 


87,523 45 


73 


00 


45 


13,680 00 


11 41 


8 


112 


Shrewsbury 


94,465 40 


73 


69 


42 


16,340 00 


12 71 


3 


113 


Barnstable 


129,881 34 


106 


11 


4 


9,050 00 


7 39 


47 


114 


Randolph . 


58,746 71 


49 


37 


78 


16,386 15 


13 76 


1 


115 


Wareham . 


88,699 16 


76 


14 


35 


8,342 50 


7 16 


51 


116 


Easton 


81,260 00 


77 


61 


32 


7,684 20 


7 34 


48 


117 


Orange 


79,057 07 


81 


25 


26 


6,910 00 


7 10 


55 


118 


Monson . 
Total . 


56,926 59 


75 60 


37 


9,459 92 


12 56 


4 




. $11,716,993 79 


$77 


35 


- 


$1,175,443 21 


$7 28 


- 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



47 



Evening, Vacation — Classified as to Souhce, 
Dec. 31, 1927 



^ i^ ^ 

OS +=• 



i-n o 



pa? 






FROM ALL 80UBCE8 



fci 0) a ja 



Amount 


PAID TO 
PROM 


Town 


■^■% 




-o > 


a u 




fl o 


3 =3 




^^ 


&s 














o 9 




o o 


o -t- 




•g„-t- 


Mi-KN 




02 "^(N 








g^^ 
















U 




O 



44 



S639 00 

1,290 32 

395 57 

435 47 
244 00 



3,481 13 

486 30 
390 62 

445 22 
918 06 

928 02 
2,021 25 

495 15 
1,326 87 



45 

$60 00 
5,386 38 

749 62 
589 50 

10,046 84 

5,333 92 

9,680 28 

4,252 63 

13.404 79 



165 32 

50 50 

2,218 60 

191 75 

7,436 73 

13,063 71 

2,471 66 

563 80 



46 

$82,017 74 
108,416 00 
90,749 16 
61,561 87 
126,400 09 

93,350 71 
75,035 00 

112,673 22 
97,073 93 

118,145 26 

83,683 26 
101,759 39 
110,855 90 
141,595 16 

76,242 67 

105,406 41 

104,029 16 

88,933 88 

68,277 18 



47 

$82 35 
86 94 
61 11 
74 80 
82 35 

77 73 
77 03 

107 31 
67 45 

104 55 

115 58 
84 87 
86 47 

115 68 
64 07 

90 48 
99 35 

91 40 
90 67 



47 
38 
79 
66 
46 

59 

62 

7 

75 



4 

41 

39 

3 

77 

30 
11 

28 
29 



50 

$7,042 92 
9,606 67 

17,270 00 
9,185 00 

17,615 40 

8,330 00 
6,645 70 
7,770 00 
8,830 00 
9,449 80 

5,778 00 
13,680 00 
16,340 00 

9,050 00 
16,386 15 

8,342 50 
7,684 20 
6,910 00 
8,300 00 



$58,471 09 



$308,641 48 



$13,259,549 57 $87 53 



$1,173,574 99 



48 



P.D. 2. 
Group II. Towns of 5,000 







Yeak Grades 


m- 


Public Day Elementary Schools (including 




„ 


OS 






teachers 






TOWNS 


"o 
o 

& 

a 

a 

lU 


i 
o 

o 

•a 

a 


o 
o 

M 

I 

a 

.2 

a 




FULL TIME 






a 

a a 

(B o 


a 

a a 

a, o 

IS ^ 


1 1 






51 


52 


53 


54 55 


56 57 


58 59 


100 
101 
102 
103 
104 


Millbury . 
Great Harrington 
Dracut 
Westborough 
Agawam 


6 
8 
8 
6 
6 


2 

2 
3 


4 
4 

4 
4 


- 


1 27 

1 34 
42 
17 

2 43 


434 378 
541 499 
729 678 
353 332 
719 664 


105 
106 
107 
108 
109 


Winchendon 
Uxbridge . 
Hingham . 
Ipswich 
Amherst 


8 
8 
6 
8 
6 


2 
2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


1 3 

4 


31 

28 
1 24 

1 35 

2 30 


565 516 
459 489 
441 413 
629 633 
510 432 


110 
111 
112 
113 
114 


Canton 
Abington . 
Shrewsbury 
Barnstable . 
Randolph . 


8 
8 
6 
6 
6 


3 

2 
2 


4 
4 
3 
4 
4 


6 
1 1 
2 


13 
2 24 

37 
4 30 

28 


321 271 
466 467 
620 558 
578 471 
563 518 


115 
116 
117 
118 


Wareham . 
Easton 
Orange 
Monson 

Total 


8 
6 
8 
6 


2 
3 


4 
4 
4 
3 


2 


31 
2 26 

24 
1 18 


556 639 
446 383 
395 417 
303 282 




. 


- 


- 


62 92 


149 3,931- 


65,774 62,101 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over 



49 



Continued 



FiBST Two Yeaes of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 



T3 


>. 


■i 












»fe 


-*^ 


g 


-O 





a 


EXPENDITURE TOR 


■§^2 




-$ 


"ti 




"i 


SUPPORT, EXCLUSIVE 


OP 


i5 3 (u 


■** 


cd 


o 


a 


Pt 


GENERAL CONTROL 


00 a 


kt 


"a* 




>^ 


a 










^P 


o 


^ 






.s 


ft^ 


v-l 


9) 


a. 2 




(0 

s 






■s ® 


£ <u o 




s 

:3 


-t) 












ft bH 


at fl o 
a <o w 


f-g 


■*^ 


lg 


03 OQ 


be o 

c3 o 


o 


-^ 

d 
3 




as 

0) 


11 






|i 


> 


o 

e 




fe^ 


U o u 


1 = -"^ 


&-= 


< 


<J 


«i 


< 


< 




PL, 




W 


w 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




6S 


66 


67 


137,806 


185 


746 


788 


S61,841 


03 


$78 44 


$40,210 00 


$1,409 35 


166,852 


177 


944 


995 


69,390 


57 


69 


73 


50,575 35 


628 44 


223,684 


180 


1,248 


1,323 


74,322 


00 


56 


17 


50,128 00 


1,993 00 


110,389 


185 


604 


648 


37,672 


20 


58 


13 


24,845 87 


774 82 


223,151 


180 


1,241 


1,315 


94,993 


54 


72 


24 


64,119 50 


2,062 85 


174,431 


179 


976 


1,025 


63,909 


20 


62 


35 


41,675 29 


867 30 


146,177 


178 


822 


860 


59,540 


02 


69 


23 


39,262 75 


455 46 


133,398 


183 


736 


800 


68,603 


70 


85 


75 


45,984 70 


1,234 25 


193,487 


169 


1,139 


1,208 


69,229 


62 


57 


31 


47,145 02 


2,226 47 


157,559 


183 


860 


913 


63,942 


99 


70 


04 


44,920 76 


1,144 59 


95,560 


181 


528 


571 


46,997 


30 


82 


31 


29,939 25 


722 23 


156,179 


185 


843 


902 


55,699 


81 


61 


75 


37,133 31 


1,011 49 


187,684 


179 


1,047 


1,110 


82,038 


73 


73 


91 


52,458 72 


3,291 38 


166,479 


181 


918 


975 


91,918 


98 


94 


28 


54,094 50 


2,910 81 


170,087 


178 


954 


1,028 


48,947 


21 


47 


61 


34,412 90 


1,257 15 


171,902 


182 


950 


1,027 


71,372 


91 


69 


50 


44,356 77 


719 02 


140,207 


183 


766 


801 


62,498 


46 


78 


03 


40,839 06 


1,260 32 


129,945 


180 


723 


772 


48,518 


19 


62 


85 


29,269 92 


1,124 64 


97,278 


182 


536 


575 


44,996 


62 


78 


25 


25,287 00 


978 37 


20,921,444 


181 


115,421 


122,507 


$9,026,135 


11 


$73 68 


$6,384,243 52 


$175,081 87 



50 



P.D. 2. 

Group II. Towns of 5,000 









Public 


Day High Schools 


(iNCLUDiNa Thibd 




"o 


PBINCIPAL8 AND 








73 

a 




TOWNS 


■a 

a 

"o 

1 

1 


TEACHERS 


1 

.1 
1 


PUPILS ENROLLED 


1 




FULL TIME 




a 

1 1 


1 


a 


4 
1 






68 


69 70 


71 


72 


73 


74 


100 
101 
102 
103 
104 


Millbviry . 
Great Barrington 
Dracut 
Westborough 
Agawam . 




4 5 
4 9 

4 8 
3 8 


1 


94 
156 

99 
98 


134 
171 

110 
144 


37,190 
52,096 

35,871 
39,928 


105 
106 
107 
108 
109 


Winchendon 
Uxbridge . 
Hingham ... 
Ipswich 
Amherst . 




3 8 

3 4 

4 9 
2 10 
8 12 


2 

1 
1 


111 

78 
155 
142 
156 


101 
76 
189 
166 
179 


33,923 
25,575 
53,374 
46,015 
54,211 


110 
111 
112 
113 
114 


Canton 
Abington . 
Shrewsbury 
Barnstable 
Randolph . 




2 8 
7 8 

3 6 
6 10 
3 7 


1 


92 
154 

85 
133 

86 


81 
157 
101 
150 
128 


29,066 
53,221 
31,945 
44,555 
34,408 


115 
116 
117 
118 


Wareham . 
Easton 
Orange 
Monson . 

Total . 




4 7 
3 10 
6 8 
2 7 


1 
1 


99 
129 
123 

68 


145 

161 

132 

76 


38,955 
49,777 
43,934 
25,040 




79 


441 1,039 


47 


15,617 


17,930 


5,534,780 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over- 



51 



-Continued 



Year of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 





CI 




EXPENDITURE 


FOR 












1 


2 


SUPPORT, 


EXCLUSIVE OP 


^ 3 3 
OS 'DXS 


■** 






03 


I 


GENERAL CONTROL 




m o 


s 






o 


>> 


-g 






a 


g. 


•2,-a^ 


•M 






"s 


a 






• PH 


3 


«'.S''S 


4> 






1 


n 


1 
> 




3 

1 




er pupil 
average 
members 
of high 
school 


ti 3 y 

55 °i ■ 

n o 


li 


Q 


< 


•< 


< 




ft, 




W 


H 




75 


76 


77 


78 




79 


80 


81 




185 


201 


210 


$19,581 


06 


$93 


24 


$13,450 00 


$788 04 


182 


288 


304 


40,873 


29 

_1 


134 


45 


24,816 32 


1,050 00 


185 


185 


194 


22,235 


11 


114 


61 


17,430 30 


795 


67 


184 


217 


229 


29,026 


35 


126 


75 


22,263 00 


984 


50 


183 


185 


192 


25,912 


07 


134 


95 


21,085 71 


589 


53 


189 


135 


139 


17,902 


90 


128 


79 


12,000 83 


484 


14 


180 


311 


326 


43,984 


48 


134 


92 


28,435 35 


4,442 


66 


170 


270 


283 


21,084 


69 


74 


50 


16,041 40 


1,468 


80 


183 


296 


310 


45,792 


21 


147 


71 


33,025 80 


1,028 


93 


183 


159 


165 


28,929 


35 


175 


33 


17,300 00 


497 


36 


186 


286 


298 


35,756 07 


119 


98 


28,014 00 


889 


58 


188 


170 


180 


24,200 


15 


134 


45 


16,313 50 


548 


56 


181 


246 


261 


48,137 


39 


184 43 


31,336 75 


924 


23 


188 


183 


194 


22.418 


94 


115 


56 


16,432 00 


696 


64 


182 


213 


225 


26,276 


72 


116 


79 


17,510 50 


529 


70 


183 


272 


281 


34,791 


19 


123 


81 


21,484 53 


729 


17 


184 


239 


245 


34,378 02 


140 


31 


23,934 00 


845 


86 


187 


134 


139 


20,733 


52 


149 


16 


14,195 50 


591 


82 


183 


30,212 


31,650 


S3,965,585 92 


$125 29 


$2,874,989 76 


$106,598 51 



• Expended $15,414 for 187 pupils in Lowell High School. 



52 



P.D. 2. 
Group II. Towns of 5,000 



Peebons 5 TO 16 Yeabs 





TOWNS 




5 TO 


7 Years 




7 TO 14 






."a 


Zs 


OS 13 2 


o 


a 
o 


."a 






'-S m 


— . lU 


03 2 


- =« § 


o 


*-+S DQ 


—1 a> 






C3 M 
h O 


•^ ^ a 


>Sa 


o -2 


Is 


2S 


^^a 






-e a 






a).2 3 




■g a 








•2-3 

4) 


3 o'^ 


P"^ is 


^11 


.si 




3o2 






'-'^ 


o o 


" S 


t^ a 


■t^Ji 


'-'S 


tj « 






a° 


a '^■^ 


a ""-^ 


a <a.^ 


O'-' 


a° 


a '"■^ 






h- C 


^ 


*-' 


'-' 


Z 




P-H 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


100 


Millbury . 


278 


127 


39 


_ 


112 


888 


691 


101 


Great Barrington 


185 


185 


— 


— 


— 


759 


757 


102 


Dracut 


467 


416 


38 


— 


13 


1,053 


935 


103 


Westborough 


159 


108 


— 


— 


51 


576 


558 


104 


Agawam . 


270 


212 


- 


- 


58 


1,059 


1,056 


105 


Winchendon 


151 


141 


_ 


_ 


10 


875 


871 


106 


Uxbridge . 


280 


159 


58 


— 


63 


802 


678 


107 


Hingham . 


220 


154 


41 


— 


25 


742 


676 


108 


Ipswich 


305 


253 


38 


— 


14 


1,044 


956 


109 


Amherst . 


234 


145 


15 


- 


74 


771 


753 


110 


Canton 


203 


93 


84 


_ 


26 


693 


430 


111 


Abington . 


287 


146 


— 


— 


141 


844 


837 


112 


Shrewsbury 


261 


249 


- 


- 


12 


1,038 


1,037 


113 


Barnstable 


224 


150 


— 


— 


74 


843 


843 


114 


Randolph 


295 


238 


4 


- 


53 


901 


872 


115 


Wareham . 


234 


131 


_ 


_ 


103 


861 


838 


116 


Easton 


163 


126 


1 


— 


36 


681 


674 


117 


Orange 


175 


119 


— 


— 


56 


659 


657 


118 


Monson . 
Total . 


131 


92 


- 


- 


39 


515- 


512 




31,957 


22,611 


3,815 


5 


5,526 


114,988 


98,803 



Pt. II. 

Population ob Ovek — Continued 



53 

























Illiterate 




OF Age, 


October 1, 1927 
















Minors, 


16 


TO 21 
























Years 


OF 


Age 
























"o'-<" 


k 


to" 


M 


Years 










14 TO 


16 


Years 








3 


c3 


3 
< 
























•2 2 




■3 




^a 


-I^-gg 


o 


c 
o 


.-a 


Zs 


03 

3 

a 
o 

a 


o a 
o*2 


la 


mja to 


"o 


a 




rii 


Is 

.g M 

-t-i.2 


11 






m o 

li 


la 

a-3 

§§-s 

!*■« is 

a 


o 

Is 


.2 8°" 

as 

a 


P 
1 


a 
d 


1- 


97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 




103 


104 


105 


106 


107 






108 


197 


_ 


_ 


274 


184 


34 




5 


6 


_ 


45 


_ 






6 


— 


— 


2 


178 


148 


6 




- 


— 


— 


24 


1 






— 


118 


_ 


- 


144 


131 


— 




13 


— 


— 


- 


— 






— 


3 


_ 


15 


144 


122 


— 




_ 


1 


— 


21 


— 






— 


3 


- 


- 


248 


209 


- 




6 


2 


- 


31 


18 






5 


_ 


_ 


4 


218 


179 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


39 


_ 






_ 


124 


— 


- 


172 


128 


14 




9 


7 


— 


14 


— 






— 


64 


— 


2 


203 


172 


16 




_ 


3 


— 


12 


3 






— 


88 


_ 


— 


265 


198 


6 




— 


— 


— 


61 


3 






3 


11 


1 


6 


196 


172 


- 




- 


2 


1 


21 


1 






2 


262 


_ 


1 


150 


94 


45 




_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


_ 






_ 


_ 


2 


5 


259 


230 


3 




- 


5 


— 


21 


— 






— 


— 


1 


- 


222 


218 


1 




— 


3 


— 


— 


— 






— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


205 


194 


- 




— 


— 


— 


11 


— 






— 


26 


2 


1 


233 


174 


34 




15 


8 


2 


- 


- 






- 


_ 


2 


21 


223 


143 


4 




_ 


_ 


1 


75 


3 






4 


5 


_ 


2 


182 


175 


1 




1 


— 


— 


5 


1 






1 




_ 


2 


162 


133 


— 




— 


— 


1 


28 


- 






— 


2 


1 


- 


133 


118 


1 




- 


- 


1 


13 


- 






- 


15,905 


131 


225 


28,770 


21,869 


1,976 


1,943 


281 


63 


2,081 


683 




553 



54 



P.D. 2. 

Group II. Towns of 5,000 



Membership in Public Day 





TOWNS 




ELEMENTARY 




4 


§1 
















s 


*^ s 


-3^ 
















t 


•2 


•s " 


















<UT3 


2| 


m 


IN 


CO 
(0 


O 


"5 






•TJ 


m fe 


S g 


73 


TS 


•V 


T) 


TS 








frt 


xi Eib 


2 


g 


C3 


2 


2 






O*' 


O 


a 


O 


O 


o 


o 






109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


100 


Millbury . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


123 


110 


95 


116 


112 


101 


Great Barrington 


— 


16 


— 


130 


117 


109 


144 


118 


102 


Dracut 


- 


12 


— 


239 


185 


189 


183 


177 


103 


Westborough 


_ 


12 


— 


90 


89 


78 


87 


79 


104 


Agawam . 


. 


- 


- 


183 


183 


172 


184 


163 


105 


Winchendon 


_ 


_ 


_ 


155 


151 


150 


142 


157 


106 


Uxbridge . 


] . - 


- 


- 


204 


121 


96 


114 


113 


107 


Hingham . 


— 


— 


— 


135 


103 


121 


88 


114 


108 


Ipswich 


_ 


— 


- 


201 


159 


179 


155 


173 


109 


Amherst . 


• 


18 


- 


133 


108 


106 


115 


134 


110 


Canton 


_ 


_ 


_ 


82 


84 


79 


72 


82 


111 


Abington . 


\ . _ 


- 


- 


127 


124 


117 


119 


128 


112 


Shrewsbury 


— 


60 


— 


164 


138 


150 


169 


145 


113 


Barnstable 


_ 


_ 


— 


159 


128 


127 


137 


102 


114 


Randolph . 


'. 


- 


- 


169 


158 


133 


134 


139 


115 


Wareham . 


21 


34 


_ 


163 


147 


131 


128 


112 


116 


Easton 


42 


15 


— 


110 


100 


72 


109 


100 


117 


Orange 






_ 


110 


101 


100 


104 


101 


118 


Monson . 
Total . 


. 


- 


- 


76 


73 


47 


86' 


91 




. 3,183 


1,315 


123 18,017 


16,059 


15,201 


15,247 


15,152 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over — Continued 



55 



Schools bt Grades, Oct. 1, 1927 



SCHOOLS 


HIGH SCHOOLS 






+? h 


u 


fl 




u 








■w -, 








II 


o 


<« >> 




o 








§1 

3 

WO 








S^ 


00 (N 






t'^ 




U 


^ 

Qj 




C3 


CO 


b-" rt 


O 


05 a^ 




>>'s, 


>. 


s 


>. 


^^ 




O 


13 


-§|:i 




T3 u-f5 


3 


,'3 


1 


"S 




■a o 


"3 


i 


2 


gS^M 


2"^ 


g^g 


o 


2*^ 


o 


3 


3 
o 


vS ft 


o 


2 


o 


a 


O 


a 


H 


'^ 


m 


H 


[X, 


E 


H 


o 


117 


lis 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


124 


125 


126 


127 


12S 


86 


73 


99 


_ 


814 


88 


65 


32 


41 


2 


228 


1,042 


131 


113 


117 


— 


995 


108 


89 


65 


48 


8 


318 


1,313 


148 


139 


114 


- 


1,386 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1,386 


76 


70 


83 


_ 


664 


75 


51 


42 


33 


1 


202 


866 


159 


150 


119 


43 


1,356 


122 


43 


37 


37 


- 


239 


1,595 


135 


94 


76 


_ 


1,060 


69 


60 


44 


39 


5 


217 


1,277 


97 


77 


62 


— 


884 


50 


30 


39 


22 


2 


143 


1,027 


98 


110 


85 


- 


854 


116 


80 


73 


75 


— 


344 


1,198 


163 


139 


93 


— 


1,262 


117 


76 


65 


47 


3 


308 


1,570 


92 


137 


84 


- 


927 


116 


74 


72 


49 


11 


322 


1,249 


77 


61 


51 


_ 


588 


61 


46 


26 


40 


_ 


173 


761 


101 


99 


100 


— 


915 


102 


82 


59 


65 


— 


308 


1,223 


132 


119 


87 


_ 


1,164 


81 


40 


35 


29 


— 


185 


1,349 


119 


104 


106 


— 


982 


73 


77 


67 


55 


1 


273 


1,255 


130 


138 


117 


- 


1,118 


87 


49 


53 


34 


- 


223 


1,341 


122 


96 


51 


_ 


1,005 


80 


63 


49 


38 


4 


234 


1.239 


108 


80 


108 


— 


844 


61 


80 


57 


59 


1 


258 


1,102 


118 


95 


83 


— 


812 


67 


68 


72 


46 


2 


255 


1,067 


74 


65 


59 


- 


571 


45 


33 


36 


27 


1 


142 


713 


14,862 


13,909 


12,198 


495 125,761 


11,539 


8,891 


6,616 


5,571 


319 


32,936 


158,697 



56 



P.D. 2. 















Group 


II. Towns of 5,000 


















Estimated Value of 








School Bttildings 


IN 














Use, Jan. 


1, i\)^i 




























ELEMENTARY 




-d 


2 


-0 


-i 


>», 










TOWNS 


=3 


■3 


•3 

a 



•3 


«a 
02 












o 


B 


a 


•K S 






m 
















|i 


„ 




a 






o a 


9 a 


u a 


3 « 


^ n 


-2 


a 


.-TS 






a-" 


&•" 


J5 — 


o'" 


3 ° 







a 






O 


H 


H 


fi< 


m 


H 


tB 


pq 






129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


136 


100 


Millbury . 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


$9,000 


$189,000 


101 


Great Barrington 


! 4 


1 


— 


— 


4 


9 


10,000 


135,500 


102 


Dracut 


2 


— 


— 


1 


4 


7 


9,000 


230,400 


103 


Westborough 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


3,000 


70,000 


104 


Agawam 


5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


10 


15,000 


250,000 


105 


Winchendon 


1 


1 


_ 


4 


3 


9 


14,000 


215,000 


106 


Uxbridge 


5 


— 


— 


1 


3 


9 


4,000 


158,000 


107 


Hingham . 


— 


2 


1 


— 


3 


6 


6,150 


107,000 


108 


Ipswich 


2 


1 


— 


— 


4 


7 


35,000 


280,000 


109 


Amherst 


. 


2 


- 


1 


5 


8 


10,000 


113,700 


110 


Canton 


1 


2 


_ 


2 


2 


7 


10,000 


80,000 


111 


Abington . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


12,000 


90,650 


112 


Shrewsbury 


3 


2 


— 


— 


4 


9 


20,000 


242,500 


113 


Barnstable . 


— 


2 


2 


2 


3 


9 


14,000 


190,000 


114 


Randolph . 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


6 


4,000 


48,000 


115 


Wareham . 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


9 


10,300 


359,000 


116 


Easton 


3 


1 


1 


— 


3 


8 


3,625 


129,700 


117 


Orange 


2 


2 


— 


2 


2 


8 


7,500 


100,000 


118 


Monson 

Total . 


2 


1 


- 


1 


2 


6 


11,200 


90,000 




125 


96 


23 


138 


386 


768 


$2,799,231 


$27,723,260 



Pt. II. 

Population or Over 



Concluded 



57 



Public School Pboperty 



SCHOOLS 


JUNIOR AND 8ENI0B HIGH SCHOOLS 




sl'- 








sJ— 






flam 
3 oi 2 






ffl. 


3* d 




o 


■35:2 


"^ 


V 


^ 
^ 
1 




"cS 


-0 

d 

03 


0'+=— 1 


o 


-S 


cr-*^— ' 


o 




W 


H 


m 


m 


W 


H 


O 


137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


$10,000 


$208,000 


$5,000 


$120,000 


$10,000 


$135,000 


$343,000 


9,000 


154,500 


5,000 


75,000 


8,500 


88,500 


243,000 


14,000 


253,400 


— 


— 


— 


— 


253,400 


5,000 


78,000 


11,000 


265,000 


27,000 


303,000 


381,000 


8,500 


273,500 


5,000 


225,000 


25,000 


255,000 


528,500 


100,000 


329,000 


8,000 


150,000 


10,000 


168,000 


497,000 


8,800 


170,800 


2,000 


48,000 


3,000 


53,000 


223,800 


10,000 


123,150 


27,000 


502,600 


40,000 


569,600 


692,750 


50,000 


365,000 


12,000 


60,000 


45,000 


117,000 


482,000 


11,500 


135,200 


16,500 


165,000 


24,000 


205,500 


340,700 


17,000 


107,000 


10,000 


40,000 


13,000 


63,000 


170,000 


12,000 


114,650 


25,000 


126,000 


10,000 


161,000 


275,650 


24,000 


286,500 


10,000 


160,000 


9,000 


179,000 


465,500 


11,800 


215,800 


16,000 


159,000 


14,700 


189,700 


405,500 


12,000 


64,000 


8,000 


110,000 


18,000 


136,000 


200,000 


30,000 


399,300 


5,000 


75,000 


10,000 


90,000 


489,300 


14,452 


147,777 


1,200 


140,000 


23,649 


164,849 


312,626 


4,000 


111,500 


2,500 


250,000 


5,000 


257,500 


369,000 


5,000 


106,200 


4,500 


175,000 


20,000 


199,500 


305,700 


$2,413,222 


$32,935,713 


$1,387,907 


$21,478,220 


$2,245,530 


$25,111,657 


$58,047,370 



58 



Geoup hi. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 





3 


rH 


Teachinq Staff in 


Public 








Day Schools - 


— KiNDEBGABTEN, EliB- 




6 


1 
< 


MENTART, HlGH JaN. 1, 1928 












PAST 




■§ 

M 


"o 

m 




FtTLL 


TIMIl 




TIMB 


TOWNS 










s 




. 






& 






m^ 




1 

Is 


1i 


1 




1 


-a 


i-g 




§•* 


1^ 


•§ 


3 


03 


t 


§•§ 




d, 


> 


(k 


GQ 


H 


H 


m 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


119 Foxborough . 


4,934 


$5,237,505 


_ 


_ 


29 


29 


3 


120 Billerica 


4,913 


9,957,374 


1 


— 


38 


39 


2 


121 Somerset 


4,818 


10,440,372 


1 


— 


34 


35 


2 


122 Blackstone . 


4,802 


2,527,385 


— 


— 


25 


25 


3 


123 Falmouth 


4,694 


18,954,586 


3 


3 


42 


48 


1 


124 Templeton . 


4,368 


2,893,563 


_ 


_ 


26 


26 


4 


125 Westport 


4,207 


6,322,650 


1 


1 


34 


36 


2 


126 Leicester 


4,110 


3,798,505 


1 


— 


22 


23 


2 


127 Dalton 


4,092 


5,558,293 


3 


3 


25 


31 


1 


128 Lee . 


4,058 


5,305,178 


- 


- 


25 


25 


2 


129 Oxford. 


4,026 


2,985,211 


1 


_ 


26 


27 


5 


130 Williamstown 


4,006 


7,329,827 


— 


— 


32 


32 


1 


131 Warren 


3,950 


4,153,961 


1 


— 


24 


25 


1 


132 Rockport 


3,949 


5,478,780 


1 


— 


26 


27 


1 


133 Medfield 


3,867 


2,722,913 


1 


- 


12 


13 


2 


134 Provincetown 


3,787 


4,385,286 


_ 


_ 


31 


31 


1 


135 Westford 


3,571 


4,264,009 


1 


— 


26 


27 


4 


136 East Bridgewater . 


3,538 


4,594,240 


2 


- 


25 


27 


3 


137 Wilmington . 


3,515 


3,767,686 


1 


1 


25 


-27 


2 


138 Holden 


3,436 


3,292,555 


- 


- 


31 


31 


5 


139 Barre . 


3,329 


3,374,890 


1 


1 


24 


26 


3 


140 Holbrook 


3,273 


3,074,132 


— 


— 


23 


23 


2 


141 Swansea 


3,250 


4,226,715 


1 


— 


20 


21 


— 


142 Wrentham . 


3,214 


3,220,389 


— 


— 


12 


12 


i 


143 Hopedale 


3,165 


4,296,782 


- 


- 


21 


21 


144 Nantucket . 


3,152 


10,379,664 


_ 


_ 


21 


21 


1 


145 Medway 


3,144 


3,004,110 


— 


— 


22 


22 


2 


146 West Bridgewater . 


3,121 


3,147,425 


1 


— 


21 


22 


2 


147 Sharon 


3,119 


6,133.701 


2 


— 


25 


27 


1 


148 Hardwick 


3,046 


3,445,591 


1 


- 


20 


21 


2 


149 North Brookfield . 


3,046 


2,503,304 


_ 


_ 


14 


14 


2 


150 Ayer . 


3,032 


3,650,000 


— 


— 


18 


18 


4 


151 Bourne 


3,015 


8,786,693 


— 


— 


27 


27 


2 


152 Deerfield 


2,968 


4,416,680 


1 


— 


31 


32 


5 


153 Cohasset 


2,913 


10,264,345 


1 


- 


20 


21 


2 


154 Weston 


2,906 


8,229,528 


1 


_ 


16 


17 


3 


155 Belchertown . 


2,905 


1,506,060 


— 


— 


18 


18 


1 


156 Lenox . 


2,895 


6,779,368 


— 


3 


25 


28 


— 


157 Hadley 


2,888 


2,885,845 


2 


— 


27 


29 


2 


158 Holliston 


2,812 


3,502,129 


- 


- 


17 


17 


3 


159 Pepperell 


2,779 


3,104,450 


_ 


_ 


18 


18 


4 


160 Norton 


2,769 


2,487,750 


— 


— 


18 


18 


2 


161 Hanover 


2,755 


2,701,900 


— 


— 


17 


17 


2 


162 Scituate 


2,713 


12,379,773 


1 


2 


21 


24 


— 


163 Hatfield 


2,702 


3,087,614 


2 


- 


23 


25 


2 


164 Lancaster 


2,678 


3,517,372 


_ 


_ 


15 


15 


3 


165 Hopkinton . 


2,580 


2,712,846 


— 


— 


16 


16 


5 


166 Kingston 


2,524 


3,246,775 


— 


— 


18 


18 


— 


167 Ashland 


2,521 


2,415,880 


— 


— 


16 


16 


5 


168 Manchester . 


2,499 


12,163,544 


- 


1 


21 


22 


2 


169 Groveland . 


2,485 


1,781,748 


_ 


_ 


16 


16 


2 


170 Groton 


2,428 


3,977,465 


— 


— 


17 


17 


3 


171 Acton . . 


2,387 


3,656,326 


1 


1 


18 


20 


2 


172 Douglas 


2,363 


1,832,315 


- 


- 


16 


16 


4 


173 Avon . 


2,360 


1,865,350 


- 


- 


15 


15 


2 


174 Merrimac 


2,349 


1,983,870 


_ 


_ 


14 


14 


2 


175 Charlton 


2,295 


1,750,660 


— 


— 


19 


19 


3 


176 Wayland 


2,255 


5,147,611 


— 


— 


17 


17 


2 


177 Rutland 


2,236 


1,362,158 


— 


— 


10 


10 


2 


178 Sutton . 


2,174 


1,898,943 


- 


- 


18 


18 


- 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



59 





Pupils in Public Day Schools — Kinderqakten, 


Elementary 




0. 






High — Yeah 


ENDING 


June 30, 1928 






Is 




"S 


i 


u a 




hom 
ition 
ihan 
year 


2 So 


u 


1 


I 


>> 


V o 

fi 


a 
3 


or w 

aid tui 

less < 

ichool 




+ 


t! 


ID O 


o 


d 




t*-, n.-is (» 


T-l « OS 


o c 


a 
o 
m 








11 

t4 




upils 
town 1 
for no 
half of 


lon-resii 
attend 
than h 
year 


o 
►5" 


fs 


< 


< 


< 


■^ 


PL, 


^ 


Z, 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


869 


135,807 


767 


177 


820 


_ 


6 


814 


1,278 


212,204 


1,141 


186 


1,221 


3 


15 


1,209 


1,023 


180,728 


999 


180 


1,046 


— 


15 


1,031 


829 


132,546 


735 


180 


770 


— 


32 


738 


1,232 


193,620 


1,115 


173 


1,191 


- 


6 


1,185 


897 


149,755 


825 


182 


861 


_ 


25 


836 


944 


149,011 


822 


183 


892 


— 


4 


888 


730 


119,793 


667 


180 


693 


— 


44 


649 


893 


141,342 


792 


178 


846 


- 


48 


798 


743 


119,271 


662 


180 


699 


16 


42 


673 


803 


131,176 


712 


184 


764 


37 


9 


792 


790 


124,355 


696 


179 


738 


- 


21 


717 


764 


130,381 


704 


186 


721 


— 


29 


692 


744 


119,312 


678 


176 


707 


— 


— 


707 


362 


62,801 


341 


185 


354 


- 


3 


351 


830 


138,886 


743 


186 


791 


_ 


8 


783 


774 


118,369 


694 


170 


726 


5 


3 


728 


777 


122,199 


705 


173 


748 


— 


20 


728 


890 


136,409 


751 


182 


822 


— 


13 


809 


808 


127,405 


702 


182 


754 


1 


15 


740 


802 


127,784 


726 


176 


783 


9 


7 


785 


739 


115,908 


650 


178 


697 


— 


7 


690 


671 


111,234 


612 


182 


648 


33 


19 


662 


341 


49,918 


287 


174 


313 


3 


2 


314 


591 


98,281 


547 


180 


574' 


- 


15 


559 


582 


88,417 


517 


171 


547 


_ 


_ 


547 


681 


106,745 


585 


182 


630 


— 


40 


590 


698 


106,054 


591 


179 


617 


5 


7 


615 


631 


101,158 


568 


178 


605 


— 


7 


598 


470 


78,012 


423 


184 


447 


9 


46 


410 


360 


60,003 


328 


181 


345 


_ 


21 


324 


586 


97,057 


538 


180 


570 


— 


21 


549 


627 


100,239 


571 


176 


601 


— 


8 


593 


912 


155,426 


830 


187 


874 


— 


90 


784 


622 


110,877 


537 


183 


576 


2 


- 


578 


451 


73,989 


410 


181 


442 


7 


19 


430 


505 


80,616 


434 


186 


461 


7 


52 


416 


604 


92,677 


514 


181 


551 


— 


33 


518 


916 


145,457 


830 


176 


882 


— 


6 


876 


566 


89,113 


493 


180 


534 


2 


19 


517 


542 


85,513 


475 


180 


506 


_ 


10 


496 


633 


91,455 


505 


181 


532 


2 


1 


533 


558 


92,413 


506 


179 


538 


— 


14 


524 


552 


89,971 


497 


181 


526 


1 


— 


527 


754 


119,814 


684 


176 


729 


- 


9 


720 


348 


53,616 


292 


184 


310 


23 


2 


331 


553 


86,632 


476 


182 


521 


10 


43 


488 


532 


84,835 


469 


181 


499 


— 


10 


489 


520 


86,929 


481 


181 


506 


2 


1 


507 


548 


88,221 


490 


180 


523 


- 


- 


523 


493 


82,354 


439 


188 


460 


_ 


6 


454 


467 


73,873 


412 


179 


440 


— 


9 


431 


487 


80,053 


429 


186 


473 


— 


4 


469 


565 


92,697 


519 


178 


536 


1 


9 


528 


500 


80,642 


450 


179 


489 


- 


3 


486 


446 


67,877 


403 


169 


429 


1 


3 


427 


418 


68,612 


380 


181 


400 


5 


— 


405 


454 


70,321 


390 


180 


427 


— 


6 


421 


232 


34,259 


201 


171 


218 


2 


— 


220 


417 


69,495 


375 


185 


398 


- 


- 


398 



60 



Gkoup III. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



Itemized Expenditures fob Support of Public 



o S 



§•1 

"3 






17 



18 



119 


Foxborough 


$3,040 53 


• $37,098 49 


$1,944 75 


$2,493 17 


120 


Billerica 


4,036 98 


54,187 


50 


2,145 


77 


1,606 75 


121 


Somerset . 


2,550 02 


45,681 


75 


2,180 


94 


3,661 85 


122 


Blackstone 


2,065 24 


33,007 


00 


328 


91 


1,170 48 


123 


Falmouth 


7,374 57 


75,750 


58 


2,406 


43 


7,032 01 


124 


Templeton 


2,491 21 


31,290 


53 


958 


41 


1,597 28 


125 


Westport . 


4,220 55 


43,831 


81 


1,018 


80 


1,140 47 


126 


Leicester . 


3,820 83 


28,881 


90 


1,052 


09 


2,113 17 


127 


Dalton 


4,668 17 


44,207 


00 


1,732 


78 


3,327 35 


128 


Lee .... 


1,895 00 


37,082 


75 


1,208 


60 


1,078 37 


129 


Oxford 


2,294 51 


33,914 


50 


1,011 


63 


1,723 80 


130 


Williamstown 


3,836 49 


46,101 


43 


1,105 


51 


1,949 40 


131 


Warren 


3,387 79 


33,777 


50 


1,200 


64 


1,609 97 


132 


Rockport . 


2,813 13 


34,278 


15 


1,251 


07 


1,240 25 


133 


Medfield 


1,231 17 


19,685 30 


683 


22 


2,467 26 


134 


Provincetown 


3,311 78 


34,250 


03 


1,447 


96 


3,131 22 


135 


Westford . 


3,432 59 


34,431 


07 


4,004 


47 


3,566 78 


136 


East Bridgewater 


3,223 32 


36,460 


00 


997 79 


1,812 32 


137 


Wilmington 


2,495 52 


33,056 


50 


1,216 


57 


1,901 97 


138 


Holden 


2,469 71 


42,649 


61 


1,143 


15 


2,000 40 


139 


Barre 


1,852 81 


37,371 


51 


1,284 


14 


1,641 03 


140 


Holbrook . 


1,872 61 


32,451 


19 


1,019 


95 


1,154 36 


141 


Swansea 


2,235 32 


24,033 


48 


1,654 


65 


1,438 23 


142 


Wrentham . 


1,784 38 


18,159 


90 


737 


13 


898 61 


143 


Hopedale . . 


2,074 73 


34,791 


00 


1,235 


44 


752 05 


144 


Nantucket . 


4,486 45 


25,572 


86 


1,643 


84 


1,075 66 


145 


Medway 


1,581 18 


29,773 


38 


798 


13 


1,186 81 


146 


West Bridgewater 


3,536 47 


30,191 


15 


916 


73 


2,676 69 


147 


Sharon 


2,373 07 


38,149 


12 


1,331 


10 


2,582 63 


148 


Hardwick . 


2,093 95 


30,647 


35 


691 


52 


1,553 31 


149 


North Brookfield 


1,742 00 


18,292 


30 


633 


60 


379 60 


150 


Ayer .... 


2,201 43 


24,135 


21 


1,132 


47 


1,364 86 


151 


Bourne 


2,858 17 


44,900 


24 


1,105 20 


2,173 31 


152 


Deerfield . 


1,986 56 


44,060 


50 


1,516 


28 


2,561 80 


153 


Cohasset . 


2,567 43 


36,509 


68 


1,385 


80 


3,306 19 


154 


Weston 


1,043 39 


36,593 


79 


1,086 


05 


2,084 03 


155 


Belchertown 


2,907 32 


20,176 


63 


921 


91 


562 94 


156 


Lenox 


3,435 64 


40,987 


53 


1,484 87 


1,870 97 


157 


Hadley 


2,088 34 


34,361 


25 


1,777 


14 


1.506 57 


158 


Holliston . . . 


1,657 60 


25,349 


90 


735 


23 


1,154 37 


159 


Pepperell . 


2,180 16 


24,121 


05 


742 


58 


886 83 


160 


Norton 


2,518 62 


24,360 


27 


1,399 


29 


1,415 26 


161 


Hanover 


1,868 11 


23,059 


05 


1,238 


52 


1,095 21 


162 


Scituate 


3,059 45 


34,582 


50 


1,498 


63 


1,843 24 


163 


Hatfield . 


2,732 00 


30,096 


25 


1,165 


62 


1,365 17 


164 


Lancaster . 


1,985 00 


21,848 


90 


1,362 


11 


1,089 81 


165 


Hopkinton 


1,496 45 


23,178 


20 


684 27 


598 38 


166 


Kingston . 


1,859 42 


25,535 


00 


328 48 


1,385 82 


167 


Ashland 


1,529 44 


22,040 


20 


957 


45 


922 16 


168 


Manchester 


3,976 70 


37,997 


00 


1,646 


71 


4,116 20 


169 


Grovel and . 


1,849 86 


22,335 


00 


843 70 


1,043 61 


170 


Groton 


2,190 10 


26,492 


50 


725 


63 


1,287 98 


171 


Acton 


3,183 64 


26,812 


50 


1,852 


68 


1,090 11 


172 


Douglas 


1,680 84 


22,148 02 


635 


76 


1,101 98 


173 


Avon 


1,188 08 


18,962 


82 


785 


25 


718 15 


174 


Merrimac . 


1,013 81 


17,673 


87 


897 


80 


839 57 


175 


Charlton . 


2,791 97 


23,574 


25 


799 


27 


839 89 


176 


Wayland . 


1,725 43 


28,830 


00 


848 


86 


1,032 86 


177 


Rutland 


795 97 


12,537 


84 


451 


54 


377 60 


178 


Sutton 


2,202 36 


16,525 


00 


1,017 


45 


408 09 



Pt. II. 

AND RIAINTAINING HiGH BcJIOOLS,—Co7ltinued 



61 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation - 


-Year ending 


June 30, 1928 








^"3 

s 9, 


? 


-(J 

s 

<D 

11 




i 

d 


TRANSPORTATION 


111 






|i 

.go 

•2 t-^ 


111 


4 
11 


1 


.2 

O 

S 
o 


o 

h 

"" o 
o -^ 


^ o 


t? 




rt 


P 


£ 


H 




Eh 


20 




21 


22 


23 


24 




25 


$9,835 


38 


$2,855 81 


_ 


$1,003 31 


$5,609 


40 


_ 


10,134 


54 


3,756 81 


- 


1,313 72 


14,300 


00 


— 


12,112 


80 


2,793 33 


$322 96 


1,734 26 


875 


00 


— 


5,686 


80 


867 87 


— 


541 45 


2,445 


74 


— 


21,954 


24 


4,192 62 


124 00 


2,496 03 


19,799 


62 


- 


6,045 


16 


1,806 58 


28 74 


1,070 60 


5,071 


36 


_ 


8,654 


31 


1,870 65 


29 91 


2,395 41 


12,929 


22 


— 


6,179 


44 


2,093 57 


— 


1,132 00 


5,874 


90 


— 


11,492 


14 


4,410 95 


— 


600 00 


1,986 


50 


— 


6,776 


09 


781 73 


- 


984 79 


3,138 


09 


— 


7,995 


01 


1,979 04 


55 48 


977 15 


5,938 


46 


_ 


11,196 


14 


3,614 75 


227 65 


593 66 


6,388 


50 


— 


7,121 


09 


2,658 70 


— 


668 00 


9,284 


56 


— 


5,947 


53 


3,296 31 


86 28 


634 17 






— 


5,700 


00 


971 46 


- 


542 27 


2,933 


28 


- 


8,413 


93 


5,620 73 


172 50 


1,424 45 




. 


_ 


11,052 


12 


1,112 19 


- 


1,779 40 


7,815 


83 


— 


6,038 


66 


3,813 58 


— 


1,632 70 


5,408 


40 


— 


7,749 


47 


2,194 98 


— 


630 00 


5,798 


56 


— 


8,997 


43 


1,299 58 


- 


1,333 36 


10,607 


22 


$30 00 


7,311 


46 


1,645 93 


_ 


1,147 01 


6,922 


15 


- 


5,327 


03 


2,094 82 


— 


709 75 




- 


— 


8,529 


05 


452 18 


169 00 


879 50 


3,350 


00 


4,493 97 


3,447 


92 


561 28 


55 76 


401 38 


2,448 


88 


186 00 


6,289 


18 


1,975 64 


- 


1,197 90 


844 


75 


- 


6,368 


87 


5,507 16 


17 75 


1,200 65 


3,350 


00 


_ 


6,097 


80 


2,942 27 


60 00 


148 40 


2,500 


00 


— 


5,239 


90 


1,313 30 


— 


1,033 27 


3,816 


10 


— 


6,423 


13 


2,227 05 


— 


1,346 91 


5,832 


03 


— 


5,081 


43 


3,450 53 


- 


953 32 


5,822 


35 


400 00 


1,946 


75 


577 10 


_ 


855 00 


4,804 


00 


_ 


4,056 


52 


1,989 45 


— 


200 00 


187 


50 


— 


6,280 


95 


4,142 95 


— 


450 90 


9.112 


00 


— 


7,955 


56 


2,145 63 


— 


931 54 


11,259 


30 


— 


6,911 


96 


4,395 88 


78 07 


2,174 60 


5,596 


00 


— 


7,196 24 


2,364 72 


_ 


200 00 


13,252 


12 


_ 


4,426 


13 


1,224 80 


— 


767 33 


7,779 


55 


75 00 


13,579 


14 


2,598 78 


56 67 


1,108 08 


3,791 


00 


— 


6,740 


13 


1,551 13 


— 


1,316 29 


2,942 


03 


— 


5,827 


61 


1,765 48 


- 


650 00 


4,540 


00 


— 


2,924 


35 


1,121 56 


_ 


423 40 


5,167 


32 


_ 


5,862 


23 


754 95 


- 


950 00 


6,283 


82 


88 50 


6,813 


70 


930 98 


46 50 


483 72 


6,430 


00 


— 


6,293 


00 


3,757 72 


659 83 


1,740 94 


8.810 


20 


— 


6,613 


53 


891 76 


- 


1,026 32 


1.273 


75 


— 


3,989 


61 


519 22 


_ 


484 17 


3,028 


75 


840 00 


3,606 


19 


254 75 


— 


411 27 


6,111 


50 


— 


4,555 


66 


540 82 


— 


1,154 00 


4,220 


00 


— 


5.389 


28 


772 63 


— 


1,007 50 


5,086 


22 


— 


8,186 


69 


1,251 98 


- 


4,144 43 


510 


80 


- 


5,222 


35 


1,291 06 


_ 


300 00 






- 


5,717 


04 


1,000 86 


— 


89 93 


7,961 


30 


— 


6,573 


20 


1,518 01 


— 


200 00 


2,827 


31 


— 


6,093 


55 


643 32 


— 


709 05 


1,232 


40 


181 95 


3,252 


37 


983 56 


- 


550 00 


631 


50 


- 


3,176 


32 


1,347 42 


_ 


318 10 


2,757 


20 


- 


3,687 


16 


925 08 


— 


625 05 


6,394 


01 


— 


3,937 


75 


788 37 


— 


685 00 


7,017 


80 


— 


3,726 


31 


83 33 


— 


487 50 


5,866 


85 


20 00 


4,228 


46 


962 14 


- 


492 25 


3,390 


68 


- 



62 







Group III. Towns of Less 


THAN 5,000 Population 






Itemized Expenditures for 


Support 








OF Public Schools - 


- Day, Evening, Vacation 


Expenditures 




TOWNS 


— Year ending 


June 30, 1928 — Con. 


ending June 






i 


S 
1 


•3 5 
1^ 








pj 


M 


o * 






§ 


^ 


Z 


&s§ 






1 


§ 


3 


^H-g 






• ^ 


o 


«.«+> 






H 


S 


Eh 


12; 






26 


27 


28 


29 


119 


Foxborough 


— 


$4,160 17 


$68,041 01 


$107,903 87 


120 


Billerica 


— 


292 08 


91,774 15 


— 


121 


Somerset 


— 


1,431 08 


73,343 99 


71,058 10 


122 


Blackstone . 


— 


48 07 


46,161 56 


— 


123 


Falmouth 


. 


2,122 05 


143,252 15 


106 50 


124 


Templeton . 


_ 


1,545 59 


51,905 46 


_ 


125 


Westport 


— 


1,552 91 


77,644 04 


1,703 18 


126 


Leicester 


— 


4,432 65 


55,580 55 


— 


127 


Dalton 


— 


1,260 27 


73,685 16 


— 


128 


Lee 


$850 00 


662 80 


54,458 22 


- 


129 


Oxford 


1,007 00 


_ 


56,896 58 


550 00 


130 


Williamstown 


— 


712 71 


75,726 24 


254 50 


131 


Warren 


— 


822 31 


60,530 56 


— 


132 


Rockport 


— 


651 35 


60,198 24 


— 


133 


Medfield 


- 


- 


34,213 96 


79,932 22 


134 


Provincetown 


_ 


_ 


57,772 60 


14,932 32 


135 


Westford 


'. '. 167 68 


997 81 


68,359 94 


33,363 67 


136 


East Bridgewater 


124 34 


803 62 


60,314 73 


— 


137 


Wilmington . 


— 


8 44 


55,062 01 


500 00 


138 


Holden 


- 


1,611 76 


72,142 22 


- 


139 


Barre . 


1,436 51 


751 77 


61,364 32 


_ 


140 


Holbrook 


— 


— 


44,629 71 


1,349 25 


141 


Swansea 


4,575 00 


3,988 12 


65,798 50 


— 


142 


Wrentham . 


350 20 


20 53 


29,061 97 


— 


143 


Hopedale 


14 40 


1,730 70 


50,906 79 


278 10 


144 


Nantucket . 


_ 


1,374 00 


60,597 24 


_ 


145 


Medway 


— 


164 04 


45,262 01 


— 


146 


West Bridgewater 


305 72 


— 


49,029 33 


— 


147 


Sharon 


22 10 


— 


60,287 14 


1,251 16 


148 


Hardwick . 


1,058 44 


1,328 72 


53,080 92 


- 


149 


North Brookfield . 


_ 


58 95 


29,289 30 


720 67 


150 


Ayer . 


— 


1,282 74 


36,650 18 


— 


151 


Bourne 


10 00 


1,401 20 


72,434 92 


— 


152 


Deerfield 


14 00 


— 


72,431 17 


500 00 


153 


Cohasset 


. 


7,244 56 


70,170 17 


33,995 11 


154 


Weston 


941 12 


_ 


64,761 46 


_ 


155 


Belchertown 


843 66 


87 49 


39,772 66 


147 25 


156 


Lenox . 


— 


148 10 


69,060 78 


— 


157 


Hadley 


— 


291 30 


52,574 18 


7,313 00 


158 


HoUiston 


76 50 


- 


41,756 69 


- 


159 


Pepperell 


_ 


17 50 


37,584 76 


4,435 69 


160 


Norton 


'. '. 151 49 


337 12 


44,121 65 


— 


161 


Hanover 


— 


598 52 


42,564 31 


— 


162 


Scituate 


! 100 00 


2,184 49 


64,530 00 


— 


163 


Hatfield 


• 


- 


45,164 40 


- 


164 


Lancaster . 


2,220 36 


295 43 


37,663 36 


_ 


165 


Hopkinton . 


87 88 


1,210 59 


37,639 48 


45.552 96 


166 


Kingston 


57 52 


221 96 


39,858 68 


34,072 30 


167 


Ashland 


332 60 


209 24 


38,246 72 


— 


168 


Manchester . 


. 


1,273 94 


63,104 45 


64,162 00 


169 


Groveland . 


_ 


101 00 


32,986 58 


_ 


170 


Groton 


— 


1,395 00 


46,860 24 


86,074 75 


171 


Acton . 


— 


365 80 


44,423 25 


431 64 


172 


Douglas 


27 75 


1,152 37 


35,606 99 


7 50 


173 


Avon . 


. 


- 


27,071 73 


- 


174 


Merrimac 


60 00 


125 87 


28,209 96 


999 97 


175 


Charlton 


399 49 


149 89 


40,186 06 


— 


176 


Wayland 


, — 


127 22 


44,993 29 


2,059 46 


177 


Rutland 


. ' . 110 00 


398 18 


24,855 12 


— 


178 


Sutton 


. 


204 66 


29,431 09 


5,725 67 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



63 



FOB OUTLAT, YeAB 

30, 1928 


Valuation of 

1927 PER Pupil 

IN Net Average 

Membership, 

Year ending June 

30. 1928 


Expenditure fob 

School Support from 

Local Taxation, 

Year ending 

Dec. 31, 1927, 

PEB $1,000 Valuation 


Rate op Tot 

PEB $1.0 

Valuation 


alTax 
00 


a 


1 


1927 


J 


h-l 


1-1 




3 


3 

1 


Eh 


1 1^ 


a "s 


i 
1 


.a§- 

go 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


$1,285 96 

86 00 

6,248 81 

2,877 00 

2,775 27 


$109,189 83 

86 00 

77,306 91 

2,877 00 

2,881 77 


$6,434 63 
8,236 44 

10,126 36 
3,425 112 

15,995 16 


$11 46 42 
8 21 85 

5 17 109 
10 82 50 

6 79 95 


$30 00 
30 00 
23 00 
37 80 
27 00 


48 
46 
97 
5 
67 


853 20 
450 44 

238 17 
743 08 


853 20 
2,153 62 

238 17 
743 08 


3,461 110 
7,120 57 
5,853 74 
6,965 59 
7,883 46 


15 08 5 
11 65 37 
13 57 15 
11 47 41 
8 55 82 


35 60 
34 80 
28 80 
25 70 
21 50 


16 
19 
56 
83 
103 


90 00 
3,356 68 


640 00 
3,611 18 

79,932 22 


3,769 106 
10,222 35 
6,003 71 
7,749 50 
7,757 49 


15 76 2 
9 37 70 

12 50 25 
8 25 84 
7 27 93 


40 20 
28 00 
26 00 
32 00 
37 50 


2 
61 
81 
31 

7 


1,648 00 
251 25 

716 30 

224 77 


16,580 32 
33,614 92 

1,216 30 

224 77 


5,601 79 
5,857 73 
6,311 66 
4,657 93 
4,449 96 


10 52 54 

14 21 8 

11 35 44 
9 79 66 

15 20 3 


31 00 
31 00 
28 00 
30 50 
37 00 


37 
38 
59 
42 
9 


457 87 
537 09 
1,501 84 
680 29 
276 04 


457 87 

1,886 34 

1,501 84 

680 29 

554 14 


4,299 99 
4,455 95 
6,385 64 
12,256 25 
7,687 53 


16 25 1 
11 84 32 
10 44 58 
7 57 88 
10 65 53 


27 00 
32 80 

26 20 

27 60 
27 00 


66 
21 
75 
63 
68 


170 18 

77 29 

653 00 

1,120 25 


170 18 

77 29 

653 00 

2,371 40 


18,975 10 
5,092 84 
5,118 83 

10,257 34 
8,403 42 


3 37 112 
11 64 38 
10 78 51 

8 69 79 
13 68 11 


20 00 
33 00 
27 60 
26 50 
22 00 


106 
24 
62 
74 

102 


234 61 

2,469 44 

896 94 

557 90 


720 67 

234 61 

2,469 44 

1,396 94 

34,553 01 


7,726 51 
6,648 61 

14,817 17 
5,634 77 

17,751 12 


10 44 56 
9 12 74 
7 43 90 

13 61 14 
5 94 103 


26 00 
25 60 
22 00 

27 50 
24 20 


79 
84 
99 
65 
89 


3 00 
364 66 

203 00 


150 25 

364 66 

7,313 00 

203 00 


19,138 9 
3,620 107 

13,088 22 
3,294 113 
6,774 60 


6 72 97 
12 21 27 

8 74 78 
15 09 4 
10 96 48 


20 00 
36 80 
23 80 
36 00 
30 40 


108 
10 
94 
12 
43 


35 13 

270 85 

893 17 

2,714 14 

257 50 


4,470 72 
270 85 
893 17 

2,714 14 
257 50 


6,259 67 
4,667 91 
5,156 82 
23,491 1 
4,288 100 


10 44 67 
13 68 12 
13 92 9 
4 82 111 
12 82 23 


28 50 
33 20 
42 00 
28 00 
30 00 


58 
23 

1 
60 
50 


158 24 

298 81 

391 72 

5,272 70 


45,711 20 

34,371 11 

391 72 

69,434 70 


10,627 31 
5,559 80 
6,638 62 
4,765 87 

23,257 2 


9 55 68 
9 31 71 
9 31 72 
11 65 36 
4 89 110 


27 00 

31 00 
29 00 

32 00 
18 90 


69 
34 
55 
30 
110 


235 10 
676 00 
215 87 
7,010 51 
650 00 


235 10 

86,750 75 

647 51 

7,018 01 

650 00 


3,925 103 
9,228 40 
7,796 48 
3.470 109 
3,838 105 


13 51 17 

10 03 64 
9 85 65 

14 94 6 

11 68 35 


37 60 
30 00 
30 50 
33 50 
24 00 


6 
49 
40 
22 
91 


348 49 
166 08 
229 29 
700 62 


1,348 46 
166 08 

2,288 75 
700 62 

5.725 57 


4,646 94 
4,323 98 
12,227 26 
6,146 69 
4,771 86 


11 81 34 
14 81 7 
7 95 87 
11 93 30 
11 86 31 


39 00 
32 60 
22 10 
36 00 
36 00 


3 

28 
98 
14 
15 



64 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



EXPENDITUBE FOB SUPPORT OF PuBUC SCHOOLS DaT, 

Year endinq 

















PROM 


STATE 








FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 




TOWNS 












GENERAL SCHOOL 


fund) 








S, 


L 


hH 




as 


s 






■s 




§"i-S 


.9 a 


'S 


&i-S 


■a& 






g 




a^ 


3a 


■^o 


g 


a« £ 


a 


^o 






a 
< 




U 0) 


3^ 




a 
< 




u 






38 




39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


119 


Foxborough 


$59,998 80 


$73 71 


57 


»4,850 00 


$5 96 


111 


120 


Billeriea . 


81,752 


63 


67 


62 


72 


6,885 00 


5 


69 


113 


121 


Somerset . 


53,962 


97 


52 


34 


99 


9,600 25 


9 


31 


79 


122 


Blackstone 


27,349 


99 


37 


06 


113 


13,235 60 


17 


93 


45 


123 


Falmouth . 


128,658 24 


108 


57 


19 


8,046 00 


6 


79 


107 


124 


Templeton 


43,647 


46 


52 


21 


100 


7,993 95 


9 


56 


78 


125 


Westport . 


73,654 


94 


82 


94 


39 


5,134 83 


5 78 


112 


126 


Leicester . 


61,544 


30 


79 


42 


44 


4,215 00 


6 


49 


108 


127 


Dalton 


63,727 


35 


79 


85 


43 


6,151 25 


7 


71 


97 


128 


Lee . 


45,362 


01 


67 


40 


73 


5,100 00 


7 


58 


99 


129 


Oxford 


47,036 


38 


59 


39 


86 


8,696 42 


10 


98 


68 


130 


Williamstown . 


68,669 


88 


95 


77 


27 


6,000 00 


8 


37 


84 


131 


Warren 


51,939 


16 


75 05 


55 


4,994 00 


7 


22 


103 


132 


Rockport . 


45,187 


02 


63 


91 


79 


6,062 00 


7 


16 


104 


133 


Medfield . 


25,502 


57 


72 


66 


60 


5,140 65 


14 


64 


55 


134 


Provincetown . 


46,141 


26 


58 


93 


88 


8,161 00 


10 


42 


70 


135 


Westford . 


60,603 


85 


83 


24 


38 


5,070 00 


6 


96 


106 


136 


East Bridge water 


52,167 


25 


71 


66 


63 


5,342 50 


8 


10 


92 


137 


Wilmington 


36,897 


82 


45 


61 


107 


17,173 76 


21 


23 


38 


138 


Holden . 


50,055 


21 


67 


64 


71 


21,924 33 


29 


62 


16 


139 


Barre 


54,845 


92 


69 


87 


67 


4,843 76 


6 


17 


110 


140 


Holbrook . 


36,384 


57 


52 


73 


98 


9,896 29 


14 


34 


56 


141 


Swansea . 


44,146 


84 


66 


69 


74 


4,996 66 


7 


55 


100 


142 


Wrentham 


24,379 


73 


77 


64 


47 


5,971 12 


19 


02 


43 


143 


Hopedale . 


45,780 


59 


81 


89 


41 


4,444 21 


7 


95 


93 


144 


Nantucket 


45,359 


77 


82 


92 


40 


3,410 00 


6 


23 


109 


145 


Medway . 


34,961 


43 


59 


26 


87 


7,624 11 


12 


92 


59 


146 


West Bridgewater 


33,913 


73 


55 


14 


93 


13,627 33 


22 


16 


35 


147 


Sharon 


53,312 


77 


89 


15 


33 


4,545 00 


7 


61 


98 


148 


Hardwick . 


47,132 


08 


114 


96 


11 


4,258 95 


10 


39 


71 


149 


North Brookfield 


26,125 


30 


80 


63 


42 


3,250 95 


10 


03 


74 


150 


Ayer 


33,286 


41 


60 


63 


83 


4,597 28 


8 


37 


85 


151 


Bourne 


65,290 


03 


110 


10 


17 


4,920 00 


8 


30 


87 


152 


Deerfield . 


60,107 


03 


76 


66 


49 


7,195 00 


9 


17 


80 


153 


Cohasset . 


60,959 46 


105 


47 


22 


4,240 00 


7 


35 


101 


154 


Weston 


55,312 


97 


128 63 


3 


3,640 00 


8 23 


89 


155 


Belchertown 


18,384 


27 


44 


19 


110 


12,999 94 


31 


25 


14 


156 


Lenox 


59,222 


41 


114 


33 


12 


5,800 00 


11 


20 


67 


157 


Hadley 


43,551 


60 


49 


71 


104 


10,231 67 


11 


68 


63 


158 


Holliston . 


38,354 


56 


74 


19 


56 


4,683 33 


9 


06 


81 


159 


Pepperell . 


32,420 


48 


65 


36 


76 


3,933 87 


7 


93 


94 


160 


Norton 


34,036 


29 


63 


86 


80 


9,382 19 


17 


60 


46 


161 


Hanover . 


37,604 96 


71 


76 


62 


6,221 40 


11 


87 


62 


162 


Scituate . 


59,717 


94 


113 


32 


14 


4,120 00 


7 


82 


96 


163 


Hatfield . 


39,569 


03 


54 


96 


94 


7,052 00 


9 


79 


76 


164 


Lancaster . 


33,597 


08 


101 


50 


24 


3,245 98 


9 


81 


75 


165 


Hopkinton 


25,251 


03 


51 


74 


102 


8,500 12 


17 


42 


47 


166 


Kingston . 


30,239 


93 


61 


84 


82 


10,500 48 


21 


47 


36 


167 


Ashland . 


28,145 


17 


55 


51 


92 


7,444 12 


14 


68 


54 


168 


Manchester 


59,473 


67 


113 


72 


13 


4,370 00 


8 


36 


86 


169 


Groveland 


24,078 


74 


53 


03 


97 


9,658 90 


21 


28 


37 


170 


Groton 


39,879 


78 


92 


53 


28 


3,564 00 


8 


25 


88 


171 


Acton 


36,032 


73 


76 


83 


48 


5,687 92 


11 


91 


61 


172 


Douglas . 


27,369 


58 


51 


84 


101 


9,052 63 


17 


14 


48 


173 


Avon 


21,779 


70 


44 


81 


109 


5,620 40 


11 


56 


64 


174 


Merrimao . 


23,440 


94 


54 


90 


95 


6,725 00 


15 75 


49 


175 


Charlton . 


25,928 


50 


64 


02 


78 


13,365 60 


33 


00 


13 


176 


Wayland . 


40,932 


47 


97 


22 


26 


3,320 00 


7 


89 


95 


177 


Rutland . 


16,128 


85 


73 


31 


58 


6,860 85 


31 


19 


15 


178 


Sutton 


22,528 


50 


56 


60 


89 


7,425 12 


18 


65 


44 



Ft. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



65 



Evening, Vacation - 


- Classified 


A.8 TO Source, 








Amount paid 


TO Town 


Dec. 31, 1927 


















FROM- 


— 




^^- 


















— a 
o o 


•60 




t?^ 




•J? 




FROM 


ALL SOURCES 




° -r- 


3 . 




mi^^ 




o 














■a 1=12 


f=^ fe 




■1-3° 




a 

o 














mtCr 
^2 


— 








.9 a 


(L 


a 




Tom 1 
tuition 
portati< 
wards 






a 
o 

s 




er pup 
net ave 
membe 
ahip 


.S a 

Z 3 

&0 






M 


^ 




< 




< 




CL| 




tf 


o 


a 




44 




45 




46 




47 




48 


49 


50 




$351 45 


$144 


81 


$65,345 06 


$80 27 


86 


_ 


$4,850 00 


526 


40 


2,552 


09 


91,716 


12. 


75 


86 


94 


— 


6,885 


00 


188 


46 


1,420 


00 


65,171 


68 


63 


21 


111 


- 


9,600 


25 


- 




3,331 


35 


43,916 


94 


59 


51 


112 


$3,560 60 


8,515 


00 


938 05 


432 


90 


138,075 


19 


116 


52 


29 


- 


8,046 


00 


809 


07 


694 


32 


53,144 


80 


63 


57 


110 


_ 


7,993 


95 


97 


08 




50 


78,887 


35 


88 


84 


69 


— 


5,134 


83 


219 


01 


1,454 08 


57,432 


39 


88 


49 


71 


— 


4,215 


00 


161 


50 


4,177 


21 


74,217 


31 


93 


00 


60 


- 


6,151 


25 


120 


00 


3,775 


50 


54,357 


51 


80 


77 


85 


- 


5,100 


00 


- 




359 


33 


56,092 


13 


70 


82 


101 


_ 


8,029 


75 


700 


71 


1,321 


05 


76,691 


64 


106 


96 


39 


— 


6,000 


00 


- 




2,617 


52 


59,550 


68 


86 


06 


73 


— 


4,994 


00 


- 




- 




50,249 


02 


71 


07 


98 


— 


5,062 


00 


- 




391 


23 


31,034 


45 


88 


42 


72 


1,055 31 


2,352 


00 


- 








54,302 


26 


69 


35 


104 


_ 


8,161 


00 


687 


68 






66,361 


53 


91 


16 


63 


— 


5,070 00 


790 


20 


754 


14 


59,054 


09 


81 


11 


84 


— 


5,342 


50 


774 


86 


12 


00 


54,858 


44 


67 


81 


106 


5,313 76 


10,700 


00 


- 




766 


50 


72,746 


04 


98 


31 


49 


10,586 00 


10,275 


00 


381 


23 


806 


25 


60,877 


16 


77 


55 


89 


_ 


4,843 76 


89 


48 


75 


90 


46,446 


24 


67 


31 


107 


1,928 58 


7,323 


25 


94 08 


1,339 


00 


50,576 


58 


76 


39 


92 


— 


4,030 


00 


- 




190 


99 


30,541 


84 


97 


27 


52 


2,095 31 


2,230 


00 


681 


17 


1,430 


39 


52,336 


36 


93 


62 


59 


- 


4,444 


21 


- 








48,769 


77 


89 


16 


68 


_ 


3,410 


00 


1,460 


42 


940 


02 


44,985 


98 


76 


25 


93 


1,846 03 


5,004 


75 


- 






- 


47,541 


06 


77 


30 


90 


5,218 64 


7,112 


00 


461 


00 


741 


93 


59,060 


70 


98 


76 


47 


— 


4,545 


00 


559 


27 


2,879 


75 


54,830 


05 


133 


73 


15 


- 


4,258 


95 


370 


18 


1,070 


25 


30,816 


68 


95 


11 


55 


_ 


2,415 00 


374 


67 


736 


22 


38,994 


58 


71 


03 


100 


— 


3,568 


25 


563 


73 


1,223 


02 


71,996 


78 


121 


41 


23 


_ 


4,920 


00 


- 




5,239 


24 


72,541 


27 


93 


53 


61 


— 


7,195 


00 


- 




3,268 


69 


68,468 


15 


118 46 


25 


- 


4,240 


00 


839 


51 


1,217 


90 


60,910 


38 


141 


61 


11 


_ 


3,540 


00 


1,413 


61 


6,862 


29 


39,660 


11 


95 


34 


54 


5,058 33 


5,337 


63 


80 


10 


2,073 


50 


67,176 


01 


129 


68 


18 


- 


5,800 


00 


168 


55 


2,700 


00 


56,651 


82 


64 


67 


109 


_ 


9,265 


00 


883 


27 


28 


80 


43,949 


96 


85 


01 


77 


- 


3,910 


00 


474 


51 


219 


77 


37,048 


63 


74 


69 


97 


_ 


2,819 


43 


61 


28 




- 


43,479 


76 


81 


57 


83 


4,116 64 


4,097 


00 


65 


91 


357 


72 


44,249 


99 


84 


45 


78 


2,772 89 


2,795 


00 




- 




- 


63,837 


94 


121 


13 


24 


— 


4,120 


00 




- 


817 


07 


47,438 


10 


65 


89 


108 


- 


7,052 


00 




- 


271 


16 


37,114 


22 


112 


12 


33 


502 18 


2,743 


80 


3,505 


75 


284 


82 


37,541 


72 


76 


93 


91 


3,040 16 


4,610 00 


226 


08 




- 


40,966 


49 


83 


77 


80 


4,412 14 


5,460 


00 


342 


63 


97 


55 


36,029 


47 


71 


06 


99 


3,056 55 


3,520 


00 




" 




- 


63,843 


67 


122 


07 


22 


- 


4,370 00 


247 


37 




- 


33,985 


01 


74 


85 


96 


2,719 90 


5,985 


00 


1,621 


26 


108 68 


45,163 


72 


104 


79 


44 




3,554 


00 


439 


62 


1,927 


40 


43,987 


67 


94 


19 


58 


1,227 92 


4,360 


00 


591 


14 




- 


37,013 


35 


70 


10 


103 


1,604 30 


6,675 


00 




~ 




- 


27,400 


10 


56 


37 


113 


921 98 


4,225 


82 




- 




_ 


30,165 94 


70 


65 


102 


2,191 66 


4,050 


00 




- 


475 00 


39,769 


00 


98 


19 


50 


5,402 58 


5,952 


50 


450 


13 


8 00 


44,710 


60 


106 20 


41 


_ 


3,320 


00 




- 


337 


50 


23,327 


20 


106 03 


42 


4,094 18 


1,580 00 




- 




- 


29,953 


62 


75 


26 


95 


4,108 13 


2,449 


75 



66 



P.D. 2. 
Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



Year Grades in — Public Day Elementary Schools (including 



-s o 



principals 



TEACHERS 



FULL TIME 



PUPILS enrolled 



119 Foxborougli 

120 Billerica 

121 Somerset . 

122 Blackstone . 

123 Falmouth . 

124 Templeton . 

125 Westport . 

126 Leicester 

127 Dalton 

128 Lee . 

129 Oxford 

130 Williamstown 

131 Warren 

132 Rockport . 

133 Medfield . 

134 Provincetown 

135 Westiord . 

136 East Bridgewater 

137 Wilmington 

138 Holden 

139 Barre 

140 Holbrook . 

141 Swansea 

142 Wrentham . 

143 Hopedale . 

144 Nantucket . 

145 Medway 

146 West Bridgewater 

147 Sharon 

148 Hardwick . 

149 North Brookfield 

150 Ayer . 

151 Bourne 

152 Deerfield . 

153 Cohasset 

154 Weston 

155 Belchertown 

156 Lenox 

157 Hadley 

158 Holhston . 

159 Pepperell . 

160 Norton 

161 Hanover 

162 Soituate 

163 Hatfield . 

164 Lancaster . 

165 Hopkinton . 

166 Kingston . 

167 Ashland 

168 Manchester 



169 Groveland 

170 Groton 

171 Acton 

172 Douglas 

173 Avon 

174 Merrimac 

175 Charlton 

176 Wayland 

177 Rutland 

178 Sutton 



51 



54 



58 



59 



_ 


20 


351 


342 


1 


30 


547 


515 


2 


27 


455 


456 


_ 


20 


351 


362 


3 


35 


497 


515 


2 


18 


394 


344 


2 


30 


438 


420 


2 


15 


336 


290 


1 


19 


355 


329 


- 


16 


280 


271 


1 


20 


364 


333 


_ 


22 


337 


275 


2 


17 


308 


325 


— 


16 


267 


233 


- 


6 


138 


138 


_ 


23 


325 


322 


4 


19 


325 


344 




18 


322 


286 


— 


20 


384 


372 


2 


21 


347 


309 


5 


16 


324 


353 




15 


280 


295 


_ 


17 


317 


289 


1 


7 


144 


134 


- 


15 


254 


216 


_ 


14 


221 


247 


_ 


16 


271 


283 


_ 


15 


295 


270 


1 


17 


254 


248 


3 


11 


165 


187 


_ 


8 


123 


103 


_ 


11 


241 


193 


3 


17 


242 


241 


1 


23 


395 


346 




16 


279 


240 


_ 


10 


159 


170 


_ 


12 


203 


177 


_ 


18 


269 


196 


_ 


23 


418 


378 


- 


12 


227 


217 


2 


11 


247 


191 


_ 


13 


259 


283 


_ 


12 


233 


204 


2 


13 


223 


208 


1 


19 


340 


321 


_ 


11 


157 


152 


_ 


11 


244 


199 


_ 


13 


213 


195 


_ 


11 


206 


200 


2 


12 


201 


213 


_ 


11 


199 


184 


1 


11 


186 


172 




13 


181 


166 


_ 


13 


255 


239 


1 


9 


206 


195 


1 


8 


161 


183 




15 


181 


157 


1 


10 


194 


161 


1 


6 


103 


89 




15 


205 


152 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS' 



67 



Continued 



First Two Y 


EARS OP 


Junior High Schools), Year ending 


June 30, 1928 




a 


1 


T3 




EXPENDITURE FOR 




^ 


S 


-c 


<o 


3 


SUPPORT, EXCLUSIVE OF 


M^^ 


s 


■§ 


"S 
1 




a 


GENERAL CONTROL 


c3 aua 




1 




og'^ 




4 

■2 


0.2 




a 




S £U "^ +J 


m 


s 

3 


Is 








3 


3 c3 » ffl-Q 

^fe ^ a 2 


O 


11 


M«3 


fed 

> — 


|§ 


> 


O 

a 






1^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


<; 


fS 


W 


w 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 


65 


66 


67 


108,125 


175 


614 


658 


$38,964 97 


$59 22 


$22,842 36 


$1,106 71 


176,615 


185 


949 


1,016 


64,176 21 


63 16 


40,527 50 


1,496 28 


161,273 


180 


898 


941 


55,990 74 


59 50 


36,078 25 


1,479 34 


113,936 


179 


636 


666 


31,822 87 


47 78 


24,807 00 


147 71 


159,470 


172 


927 


998 


101,951 02 


102 15 


58,483 16 


1,110 07 


122,700 


180 


684 


715 


35,015 29 


48 97 


22,435 53 


616 82 


135,517 


183 


748 


812 


59,268 02 


72 99 


35,804 75 


799 76 


102,676 


175 


574 


597 


39,488 68 


66 14 


21,127 50 


926 20 


108,378 


177 


611 


653 


44,483 53 


68 12 


28,794 50 


790 10 


88,095 


179 


489 


520 


32,699 16 


62 88 


21,657 00 


581 45 


114,126 


184 


620 


668 


39,566 58 


59 23 


23,814 50 


745 10 


95,022 


178 


535 


569 


45,218 47 


79 47 


29,206 63 


603 47 


109,306 


185 


591 


604 


39,888 55 


66 04 


24,102 50 


620 36 


78,520 


173 


452 


472 


25,720 99 


54 49 


18,439 15 


400 92 


47,693 


184 


260 


269 


15,806 66 


58 76 


9,729 90 


148 56 


108,786 


187 


581 


620 


38,537 28 


62 15 


22,756 28 


992 14 


101,676 


167 


605 


634 


51,668 58 


81 49 


26,836 07 


3,617 30 


92,203 


169 


544 


582 


38,046 95 


65 37 


22,103 38 


666 76 


114,455 


180 


634 


699 


35,231 27 


50 40 


22,177 25 


575 72 


101,392 


180 


563 


609 


44,720 60 


73 43 


27,931 61 


774 01 


107,114 


173 


617 


666 


41,989 91 


63 04 


28,081 51 


666 49 


89,058 


177 


504 


544 


26,443 36 


48 61 


18,800 62 


702 36 


99,748 


181 


552 


585 


30,399 27 


51 96 


18,533 48 


854 76 


40,271 


172 


234 


256 


19,187 85 


74 95 


11,849 90 


552 39 


77,905 


178 


438 


462 


33,431 06 


72 36 


23,291 00 


635 44 


69,939 


169 


415 


439 


30,313 75 


69 05 


15,119 00 


379 67 


87,167 


181 


479 


518 


28,177 03 


54 40 


19,273 38 


446 04 


84,221 


.178 


472 


494 


31,930 44 


64 63 


18,801 85 


737 21 


79,446 


178 


447 


479 


38,547 71 


80 47 


24,469 20 


814 57 


58,586 


182 


321 


341 


28,224 04 


82 77 


18,501 35 


373 89 


37,536 


180 


208 


220 


14,815 06 


67 34 


9,503 60 


117 69 


71,627 


177 


404 


429 


20,716 46 


48 29 


14,251 30 


696 09 


75,656 


171 


441 


466 


42,963 81 


92 19 


30,212 96 


593 75 


126,662 


187 


676 


710 


48,628 25 


68 49 


29,411 50 


783 36 


94,907 


182 


450 


482 


46,045 84 


95 53 


25,278 00 


800 20 


52,798 


181 


293 


320 


35,425 59 


110 70 


16,463 00 


417 10 


60,249 


185 


326 


346 


21,240 85 


61 39 


11,306 63 


583 14 


69,508 


181 


386 


418 


39,680 35 


94 93 


25,675 94 


850 94 


127,372 


176 


729 


773 


38,776 31 


50 16 


27,011 25 


1,263 56 


67,984 


180 


378 


.414 


26,146 20 


63 15 


15,179 94 


426 54 


69,850 


179 


391 


417 


24,470 32 


58 68 


16,297 05 


592 32 


75,392 


180 


420 


445 


28,571 29 


64 21 


15,916 93 


1,021 59 


73,692 


179 


397 


425 


26,236 90 


61 73 


14,290 80 


664 33 


69,473 


181 


384 


409 


37,494 05 


91 67 


19,634 50 


1,159 24 


106,288 


176 


606 


644 


32,209 98 


50 02 


22,771 25 


903 05 


46,909 


172 


257 


272 


25,346 02 


93 18 


15,598 90 


1,287 11 


68,367 


181 


378 


416 


24,624 13 


59 19 


14,633 20 


335 43 


64,958 


181 


360 


3S3 


24,129 56 


63 00 


16,342 00 


168 35 


67,224 


179 


375 


396 


24,821 02 


62 68 


14,217 20 


368 86 


66,892 


181 


370 


395 


36,038 52 


91 24 


22,233 00 


701 83 


64,347 


186 


341 


358 


20,487 74 


57 23 


14,635 00 


372 51 


56,417 


178 


315 


338 


27,400 90 


81 06 


16,061 17 


403 54 


58,016 


185 


313 


342 


25,137 60 


73 50 


15,542 50 


1,428 88 


80,520 


177 


454 - 


469 


24,494 41 


52 23 


16,763 30 


393 10 


63,963 


177 


360 


396 


16,565 44 


41 83 


11,247 27 


591 45 


51,711 


168 


309 


331 


17,328 34 


52 35 


10,398 12 


544 31 


55,911 


180 


310 


328 


26,073 25 


79 49 


17,574 25 


481 18 


55,616 


180 


309 


338 


27,346 78 


80 91 


18,085 00 


507 79 


27,636 


167 


166 


181 


16,839 21 


93 03 


7,937 84 


245 03 


60,118 


185 


325 


345 


20,667 00 


59 90 


12,525 00 


941 73 



68 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 

Public Day High Schools (including Third 



TOWNS 



o 


PRINCIPALS AND 
TEACHERS 






g 


u 




j3 


PUPILS ENROLLED 


4J> 


m 




& 


t 
3 


FULL TIME 




1 








•s 








•t3 


SI 


CI 


1 




c3 


B 

:5 


a B 
o o 


t-i 
PL, 


Boys 
Girls 





68 


69 


70 


71 


72 


73 


74 


119 Foxborough ... 1 

120 Billerica .... 1 

121 Somerset .... 1 

122 Blackstone ... 1 

123 Falmouth .... 1 


3 

1 
1 
3 
3 


6 

7 
5 
2 
5 


1 

1 


81 
82 
59 
62 
113 


95 

134 

53 

54 
107 


27,682 
35,589 
19,455 
18,610 
34,150 


124 Templeton ... 1 

125 Westport .... 1 

126 Leicester .... 1 

127 Dalton .... 1 

128 Lee 1 


2 
2 
2 
2 
3 


4 
2 
4 
7 
6 


2 


75 
32 
46 
93 
95 


84 
54 
58 
116 
97 


27,055 
13,494 
17,117 
32,964 
31,176 


129 Oxford .... 1 

130 Williamstown ... 1 

131 Warren .... 1 

132 Rockport .... 1 

133 Medfield .... 1 


2 
4 
2 

2 
2 


4 
6 
4 
9 
5 


1 


45 
85 
60 
121 
44 


61 
93 

71 
123 

42 


17,050 
29 333 
21,075 
40,792 
15,108 


134 Provincetown ... 1 

135 Westford .... 1 

136 East Bridgewater . . 1 

137 Wilmington ... 1 

138 Holden .... 1 


2 

2 
2 
2 
2 


6 
2 
6 
5 
6 


2 
1 

1 


85 
40 
71 
62 

74 


98 
65 
98 

72 
78 


30,100 
16,693 
29,996 
. 21,954 
26,013 


139 Barre .... 1 

140 Holbrook .... 1 

141 Swansea .... 1 

142 Wrentham ... 1 

143 Hopedale .... 1 


2 
2 
1 
1 
2 


3 

6 
3 
3 

4 


1 


66 
81 
24 
35 
62 


59 
83 
41 
28 
59 


20,670 
26,850 
11,486 
9,647 
20,376 


144 Nantucket ... 1 

145 Medway .... 1 

146 West Bridgewater . . 1 

147 Sharon .... 1 

148 Hardwick .... 1 


3 

2 
2 
3 
2 


4 
4 
5 
5 

5 


- 


47 
64 
62 
59 
54 


67 
63 
71 
70 
64 


18,478 
19,578 
21,833 
21,712 
19,426 


149 North Brookfield . . 1 

150 Ayer .... 1 

151 Bourne .... 1 

152 Deerfield .... 1 

153 Cohasset .... 1 


2 
2 
1 
3 
2 


4 
5 
6 
5 


1 
1 


60 
64 
60 
72 
41 


74 
88 
84 
99 
62 


22,467 
25,430 
24,583 
28,764 
15,970 


154 Weston .... 1 

155 Belchertown ... 1 

156 Lenox . ' . . . 1 

157 Hadley .... 1 

158 HoUiston .... 1 


2 
2 

2 
1 

1 


5 
4 
8 
4 
4 


- 


60 
51 
68 
50 
52 


62 

74 
71 
70 
70 


21,191 
20,367 
23,169 
18,085 
21,129 


169 Pepperell .... 1 

160 Norton .... 1 

161 Hanover .... 1 

162 Scituate .... 1 

163 Hatfield .... 1 


2 
1 
2 
3 
2 


3 

4 
3 
6 
2 


- 


44 
40 
61 
51 
46 


60 
51 
60 
70 
47 


15,663 
16,063 
18,721 
20,498 
13,526 


164 Lancaster . . . . 1 

165 Hopkinton ... 1 

166 Kingston .... 1 

167 Ashland .... 1 

168 Manchester ... 1 


1 
1 
2 

1 
2 


3 

4 
3 
4 
6 


1 

1 
1 


20 
58 
63 
64 
58 


19 
52 
61 
50 
76 


6,707 
18,265 
19,877 
19,705 
21,329 


169 Grovel and ... 1 

170 Groton .... 1 

171 Acton .... 1 

172 Douglas .... 1 

173 Avon .... 1 


1 
1 
4 
1 
2 


4 
4 
3 
2 
3 


- 


49 
49 
60 
38 
43 


61 
60 
80 
33 
56 


18,007 
17,456 
22,037 
12,177 
16,679 


174 Merrimae .... 1 

175 Charlton . . . . 1 

176 Wayland .... 1 

177 Rutland .... 1 

178 Sutton .... 1 


1 

1 
2 
1 
1 


4 
3 
4 
2 
2 


- 


37 
33 
43 

10 
28 


65 
47 
66 
30 
32 


16,166 

12,701 

14,705 

6,623 

9,377 



» Does not include $9,068.97 for the tuition and traneportation of 33 pupils attending other high schools. 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HlGH ScHOOLS 



69 



Continued 



Year of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 





i 


CX 


expenditube 


FOR 






„ 


(U 






^ 


^ 


SUPPORT 


, EXCLUSIVE OF 


.3 s » 








o3 




GENERAL CONTROL 




m 


J 


h 






^ 
■% 


1 

a 
a 












o 
a 




1 






> a 0-3 

•sa^-g 




1 




a 

an 

> 


a 

3 

o 

B 




er pupi 
erage 
bershi 
high 1 


O 
(O, m 


1-3 

II 


Q 


< 


< 


< 




Ph 




W 




w 




75 


76 


77 


78 




79 


80 




81 




181 


153 


162 


$26,035 


51 


$160 


71 


$14,256 


13 


$838 04 


186 


192 


205 


23,560 


96 


114 


93 


13,660 


00 


649 


49 


193 


101 


105 


14,803 


23 


140 


98 


9,603 


50 


701 


60 


188 


99 


104 


12,273 


45 


118 


01 


8,200 


00 


181 


20 


182 


188 


193 


33,926 


56 


175 


78 


17,267 


42 


1,296 


36 


189 


141 


146 


14,398 


96 


98 


62 


8,855 


00 


341 


59 


183 


74 


80 


14,155 


47 


176 


94 


8,027 


06 


219 


04 


184 


93 


96 


12,271 


04 


127 


82 


7,754 


40 


125 


89 


182 


181 


193 


24,533 


46 


127 


11 


15,412 


50 


942 


68 


180 


173 


179 


19,864 


06 


110 


97 


15,425 


75 


627 


15 


185 


92 


96 


15,035 


49 


156 


61 


10,100 


00 


266 


53 


182 


161 


169 


26,671 


28 


157 


82 


16,894 


80 


502 


04 


186 


113 


117 


17,254 


22 


147 


47 


9,675 


00 


580 


28 


182 


226 


235 


21,664 


12 


92 


19 


15,839 


00 


850 


15 


186 


81 


85 


17,176 


13 


202 


07 


9,955 


40 


534 


66 


186 


162 


171 


15,923 


54 


93 


12 


11,493 


75 


455 


82 


187 


89 


92 


13,258 


77 


144 


12 


7,595 


00 


387 


17 


186 


161 


166 


19,044 


46 


114 


72 


14,356 


62 


331 


03 


188 


117 


123 


17,325 


22 


140 


86 


10,879 


25 


640 


85 


188 


139 


145 


24,951 


91 


172 


08 


14,718 


00 


369 


14 


190 


109 


117 


17,521 


60 


149 


75 


9,290 


00 


617 


65 


184 


146 


153 


16,313 


74 


106 


63 


13,650 


57 


317 


59 


191 


60 


63 


14,094 


94' 


223 


73 


5,500 


00 


799 


89 


181 


53 


57 


8,079 


74 


141 


74 


6,310 


00 


184 


74 


187 


109 


112 


15,400 


00 


137 


50 


11,500 


00 


600 


00 


181 


102 


108 


15,797 


04 


146 


27 


10,453 


86 


1,264 


17 


185 


106 


112 


15,493 


80 


138 


34 


10,500 


00 


352 


09 


183 


119 


123 


13,562 


42 


110 


26 


11,389 


30 


179 


52 


180 


121 


126 


19,366 


36 


153 


70 


13,679 


92 


516 


53 


191 


102 


106 


22,762 


93 


214 


74 


12,146 


00 


317 


63 


188 


120 


125 


12,732 


24 


101 


85 


8,788 


70 


515 


91 


190 


134 


141 


13,632 


29 


96 


68 


9,883 


91 


436 


38 


190 


130 


135 


26,612 


94 


197 


13 


14,687 


28 


511 


45 


187 


154 


164 


21,816 


36 


133 


03 


14,649 


00 


732 


92 


183 


87 


94 


21,556 


90 


229 


33 


11,231 


68 


585 


60 


181 


117 


122 


28,292 


48 


231 


91 


20,130 


79 


668 


95 


186 


108 


115 


15,624 


49 


135 


87 


8,870 


00 


338 


77 


181 


128 


133 


25,944 


79 


195 


07 


15,311 


59 


633 


93 


178 


101 


109 


11,709 


53 


107 


43 


7,350 


00 


513 


58 


184 


115 


120 


13,952 


89 


116 


27 


10,169 


96 


308 


69 


187 


84 


89 


10,934 


27 


122 


86 


7,824 


00 


150 


26 


190 


85 


87 


13,031 


64 


149 


78 


8,443 


34 


377 


70 


181 


109 


113 


14,459 


30 


127 


95 


8,768 


25 


574 


19 


182 


113 


117 


23,976 


50 


204 


92 


14,948 00 


339 


39 


175 


78 


85 


10,222 


42 


120 


26 


7,325 


00 


262 


57 


191 


35 


38 


10,332 


34 


271 


19 


6,250 


00 


75 


00 


186 


98 


105 


11,518 


90 


109 


70 


8,545 


00 


348 


84 


181 


109 


116 


13,869 


70 


119 


57 


9,193 


00 


160 


13 


187 


106 


110 


11,896 


26 


108 


15 


7,823 


00 


588 


59 


177 


120 


128 


23,089 


23 


180 


38 


15,764 00 


944 


88 


184 


98 


102 


10,648 


98 


104 


40 


7,700 


00 


471 


19 


180 


97 


102 


17,269 


24 


169 


31 


10,431 


33 


321 


99 


186 


116 


131 


16,102 


01 


122 


92 


11,270 


00 


423 


80 


188 


65 


67 


9,431 


74 


140 


77 


5,384 


72 


242 


66 


185 


90 


93 


9,318 21 


100 


20 


7,715 


55 


193 


80 


173 


94 


98 


9,867 


81 


100 


78 


7,275 


75 


353 


49 


183 


70 


72 


11,320 


84 


167 


23 


6,000 


00 


318 09 


181 


81 


89 


15,921 


08 


178 88 


10,745 


00 


341 


07 


188 


35 


37 


7,219 94 


195 


13 


4,600 


00 


206 


51 


188 


50 


53 


6,561 


73 


123 


81 


4,000 


00 


75 


72 



70 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Persons 5 to 16 Years 





TOWNS 




5 TO 


7 Years 






7 TO 14 




a 
o 


.:^a 


:a 




'o 


a 
o 


O 1 






•■S m 


~.< <u 


rti 5J 


o 


'oS en 


. © 






gs 


•°^ a 


t^o. 


° ■$ 


■s-s 


11 


x>Ba 






•f 

Jo 


3 oS 




f3 OQ.., 


02'—* 

.5 M 


m "^ 
•|§ 

P 


a "-a 








'-' 


t—t 


I-I 


^ 




'-' 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


119 


Foxborough 


160 


109 


_ 


_ 


51 


517 


517 


120 


Billerica . 


214 


182 


14 


— 


18 


850 


847 


121 


Somerset . 


261 


137 


3 


_ 


121 


781 


766 


122 


Blackstone 


194 


150 


30 


_ 


14 


642 


540 


123 


Falmouth 


246 


183 




- 


63 


725 


719 


124 


Templeton 


144 


94 


2 


_ 


48 


625 


578 


125 


Westport . 


212 


96 


_ 


1 


115 


711 


697 


126 


Leicester • 


201 


99 


58 


— 


44 


698 


485 


127 


Dalton 


107 


100 




_ 


7 


509 


508 


128 


Lee .... 


156 


125 


19 


- 


12 


580 


419 


129 


Oxford . 


146 


84 


_ 


_ 


62 


608 


608 


130 


WiUiamstown . 


119 


89 


5 


_ 


25 


462 


456 


131 


Warren 


211 


56 


20 . 


_ 


135 


645 


549 


132 


Rockport . . . 


102 


88 


— 


— 


14 


454 


454 


133 


Medfield . 


55 


55 


- 


- 


- 


233 


233 


134 


Provincetown . 


83 


56 


_ 


_ 


27 


307 


307 


135 


Westford . 


149 


149 


_ 


_ 


_ 


501 


501 


136 


East Bridgewater 


127 


107 


1 


- 


19 


487 


481 


137 


Wilmington 


181 


60 


— 


— 


121 


615 


615 


138 


Holden . 


. . 114 


110 


- 


- 


4 


564 


561 


139 


Barre 


140 


80 


_ 


_ 


60 


607 


589 


140 


Holbrook . 


113 


66 


1 


— 


46 


537 


533 


141 


Swansea . 


145 


123 


1 


_ 


21 


494 


487 


142 


Wrentham 


77 


49 


_ 


_ 


28 


218 


214 


143 


Hopedale . 


107 


97 


- 


- 


10 


385- 


371 


144 


Nantucket 


87 


82 


_ 


_ 


5 


354 


353 


145 


Medway . 


126 


114 


— 


— 


12 


403 


399 


146 


West Bridgewater 


122 


88 


— 


— 


34 


386 


386 


147 


Sharon 


114 


83 


1 


— 


30 


603 


391 


148 


Hardwick 


97 


46 


35 


- 


16 


435 


273 


149 


North Brookfield 


113 


32 


55 


_ 


26 


382 


191 


150 


Ayer 


93 


85 


— 


— 


8 


336 


336 


151 


Bourne 


103 


55 


— 


— 


48 


406 


406 


152 


Deerfield . 


148 


140 


5 


1 


2 


537 


534 


153 


Cohasset . 


112 


86 


7 


- 


19 


408 


379 


154 


Weston 


102 


62 


29 


_ 


11 


317 


244 


155 


Belchertown 


116 


58 


— 


— 


58 


281 


278 


156 


Lenox 


96 


89 


1 


— 


6 


365 


362 


157 


Hadley 


187 


151 


— 


— 


36 


627 


627 


158 


Holliston . 


62 


56 


- 


- 


6 


380 


377 


159 


Pepperell . 


103 


58 


_ 


_ 


45 


340 


339 


160 


Norton 


97 


76 


— 


— 


21 


381 


377 


161 


Hanover . 


. . Ill 


72 


— 


— 


39 


363 


359 


162 


Scituate . 


127 


114 


_ 


— 


13 


325 


325 


163 


Hatfield . 


121 


110 


- 


- 


11 


543 


543 


164 


Lancaster 


81 


46 


6 


_ 


29 


321 


253 


165 


Hopkinton 


106 


68 


— 


— 


38 


353 


354 


166 


Kingston . 


74 


66 


— 


— 


8 


315 


315 


167 


Ashland . 


98 


50 


— 


— 


48 


360 


358 


168 


Manchester 


120 


100 


2 


- 


18 


314 


306 


169 


Groveland 


63 


63 


_ 


_ 


_ 


315 


315 


170 


Groton 


88 


51 


6 


— 


31 


311 


303 


171 


Acton 


42 


42 


— 


— 


— 


300 


300 


172 


Douglas . 


100 


73 


— 


— 


27 


398 


382 


173 


Avon 


90 


74 


4 


- 


12 


347 


323 


174 


Merrimac 


60 


48 


_ 


_ 


12 


280 


280 


175 


Charlton . 


74 


45 


— 


— 


29 


292 


289 


176 


Wayland . 


102 


67 


— 


— 


35 


291 


276 


177 


Rutland . 


42 


28 


— 


— 


14 


150 


150 


178 


Sutton 


83 


64 


5 


- 


14 


302 


290 



Pt. n. 



n 



AND MAINTAINING 


High Sc 


:;hools 


— Continued 








































Illiterate 




OP Age, 


October 


1, 1927 
















Minors, 


16 


TO 21 
























Years op 


Aqb 


Yeaes 










14 TO 


16 Years 












3 


<0 


3 
<< 
























as3 
.2 5 


T3 o 
U 






00 ii 


o 


.2 


.-a 


^a 
''I 


III 


a 
o 


a 

So 


03 C3 '^ 


o 

Is 








01-3 


■aa 

^ O 


3o3 




Soa 




02.^ 


.si 


■gas 


a 
V 

"53 

0^ 


03 

O 


■"OS 

(S . 
0)1-1 




M 


'Z 


1— ( 


hH 







d 






^ 


d 


rt 






97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 


103 




104 


105 


106 


107 






108 


_ 


_ 


_ 


135 


115 


_ ■ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


20 


_ 






_ 


2 


1 


— 


199 


180 


3 


3 




7 


_ 


6 


_ 






_ 


13 


— 


2 


222 


101 


6 


48 




2 


_ 


65 


6 






6 


101 


— 


1 


143 


80 


12 








_ 


51 


8 






4 


3 


1 


2 


161 


160 


1 


- 




- 


- 












33 


_ 


14 


186 


143 


11 


_ 




4 


_ 


32 


1 






_ 


8 


6 


— 


191 


129 


6 


27 




— 


1 


28 


26 






14 


210 


— 


3 


188 


142 


8 






4 




34 










— 


1 


— 


148 


148 


— 


— 






_ 




_ 






_ 


151 


- 


10 


130 


108 


4 


- 




- 


- 


18 


- 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


155 


100 


_ 


3 




2 


_ 


50 


_ 






4 


4 


— 


2 


140 


118 


5 


— 




_ 


_ 


17 


11 






1 


96 


— 


— 


180 


129 


8 


_ 




2 


1 


40 


3 








— 


— 


— 


167 


167 


— 


— 
















_ 


- 


- 


- 


58 


58 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


329 


329 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 




11 








— 


— 


— 


82 


82 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 








_ 


4 


— 


2 


142 


121 


1 


_ 




_ 


_ 


20 


1 






1 


— 


— 


— 


129 


123 


— 


— 




_ 


_ 


6 


_ 








- 


- 


3 


113 


107 


- 


- 




- 


1 


5 


- 






- 


18 


_ 


_ 


119 


112 


4 


_ 




_ 


_ 


3 


1 






_ 


3 


— 


1 


97 


76 


7 


6 




6 


2 










_ 


6 


— 


1 


158 


57 


16 


18 








67 


1 






_ 


3 


1 


— 


34 


31 


3 






_ 


_ 




2 






_ 


14 


- 


- 


99 


80 


3 


4 




- 


- 


12 


2 






2 


1 


_ 


_ 


67 


64 


3 


_ 




_ 












_ 


— 


— 


4 


72 


68 


— 


— 




_ 


_ 


4 


_ 






_ 


— 


— 


— 


78 


78 


— 


_ 




_ 


_ 




_ 






_ 


191 


— 


21 


153 


89 


39 


_ 




_ 


_ 


5 


_ 






_ 


162 


- 


- 


56 


41 


14 


- 




- 


- 


1 


3 






3 


188 


_ 


3 


104 


80 


12 


_ 




4 




8 










— 


— 


— 


98 


91 


— 


_ 






_ 


7 


_ 






_ 


— 


— 


— 


77 


70 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


7 


_ 






_ 


— 


1 


2 


102 


92 


2 


_ 




_ 


_ 


8 


_ 






_ 


28 


1 


- 


81 


77 


4 


- 




- 


- 




- 






- 


72 


1 


_ 


74 


56 


16 


_ 




_ 


2 












— 


— 


3 


83 


79 




3 




_ 




1 


_ 






_ 


2 


— 


1 


99 


96 


— 






_ 


_ 


3 


_ 






_ 


— 


— 


- 


106 


91 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


15 


_ 






_ 


- 


1 


2 


85 


76 


- 


- 




- 


- 


9 


- 






- 


- 


- 


1 


85 


75 


2 


_ 




1 


1 


6 


_ 








3 


— 


1 


92 


86 


2 


_ 








4 


_ 






_ 


— 


2 


2 


85 


82 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


3 


_ 






_ 


— 


— 


— 


85 


82 


— 


— 




1 


_ 


2 


_ 






_ 


- 


- 


- 


102 


78 


- 


- 






- 


24 


- 






- 


71 


- 


- 


87 


35 


32 


20 




_ 


_ 


_ 










— 


1 


- 


88 


69 








_ 


_ 


6 


1 






_ 


— 


- 


- 


116 


96 


— 


_ 




_ 


_ 


20 








_ 


1 


1 


- 


78 


65 


1 


— 




2 


_ 


10 


1 






1 


6 


1 


1 


82 


80 


- 


- 






- 


2 










_ 


- 


_ 


76 


67 


_ 


3 




_ 




6 










8 


— 


— 


85 


70 


8 


2 




5 


_ 




_ 






_ 


— 


— 


- 


87 


87 










_ 


_ 


_ 






_ 


— 


— 


16 


100 


64 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


36 


_ 






_ 


23 


1 


- 


83 


75 


4 


3 




1 


- 




- 






- 


- 


_ 


_ 


81 


78 


3 


_ 




_ 














— 


— 


3 


77 


66 




_ 




1 


_ 


10 


_ 






_ 


14 


— 


1 


73 


62 


11 


_ 






_ 




_ 






_ 


— 


— 


- 


44 


39 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


5 


_ 






_ 


10 


- 


2 


69 


41 


2 


- 




4 


- 


22 


- 






- 



72 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Membership in Public Day 









ELEMENTARY 




k^ 


a S 














TOWNS 




<4-l 




















T3 
tn ^ 


1- 


^ 


o\ 


n 


■* 


lo 






01 


03 T3 


S'S 


<o 


o 


ID 


v 


<o 






•c 


03 *i 


fe g 


T3 


T3 


-a 


•v 


■a 






c 


■2 '* 






g 


03 


c3 






s 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


a 


o 






109 


no 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


119 


Foxborough 


_ 


_ 


_ 


105 


95 


99 


74 


83 


120 


Billerica . 


— 


16 


— 


156 


163 


110 


123 


150 


121 


Somerset . 


_ 


11 


_ 


164 


134 


97 


122 


127 


122 


Blackstone 


— 


_ 


_ 


120 


97 


87 


84 


75 


123 


Falmouth . 


'. 80 


70 


- 


153 


101 


98 


169 


114 


124 


Templeton 


_ 


_ 


_ 


83 


112 


70 


107 


104 


125 


Westport . 


— 


78 


25 


136 


109 


108 


113 


101 


126 


Leicester . 


— 


— 


— 


74 


101 


77 


66 


96 


127 


Dalton 


_ 


_ 


_ 


104 


80 


85 


86 


87 


128 


Lee .... 


; 32 


18 


- 


78 


66 


58 


56 


65 


129 


Oxford . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


108 


85 


88 


101 


83 


130 


Williametown . 


! 20 


_ 


_ 


81 


70 


66 


68 


83 


131 


Warren 




_ 


_ 


88 


82 


90 


76 


89 


132 


Rockport . 


— 


_ 


_ 


47 


65 


61 


59 


62 


133 


Medfield . 


. 


- 


- 


38 


34 


28 


38 


30 


134 


Provincetown . 


_ 


25 


_ 


74 


57 


86 


85 


84 


135 


Westford . 


_ 


11 


— 


105 


94 


85 


80 


79 


136 


East Bridgewater 


\ - 


_ 


- 


87 


76 


71 


65 


65 


137 


Wilmington 


— 


10 


— 


115 


116 


102 


'93 


86 


138 


Holden . 


. 


16 


- 


96 


84 


84 


66 


88 


139 


Barre 


_ 


_ 


_ 


84 


89 


80 


86 


73 


140 


Holbrook . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


69 


66 


83 


74 


64 


141 


Swansea . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


98 


92 


78 


87 


83 


142 


Wrentham 


_ 


_ 


_ 


45 


42 


34 


40 


29 


143 


Hopedale . 


'. 54 


- 


- 


55 


49 


51 


55 


69 


144 


Nantucket 


29 


10 


_ 


65 


58 


57 


58 


54 


145 


Medway . 






_ 


85 


61 


59 


67 


79 


146 


West Bridgewater 


_ 


_ 


— 


85 


68 


60 


66 


56 


147 


Sharon 


_ 


— 


— 


75 


52 


61 


50 


57 


148 


Hardwick . . . 


. 


- 


- 


43 


49 


42 


46 


50 


149 


North Brookfield 


_ 


_ 


_ 


35 


28 


25 


29 


19 


150 


Ayer 


_ 


— 


_ 


69 


51 


46 


65 


48 


151 


Bourne 


_ 


10 


_ 


62 


55 


67 


60 


53 


152 


Deerfield . 


_ 




— 


117 


108 


92 


86 


98 


153 


Cohasset . 


; 59 


- 


- 


63 


63 


55 


59 


57 


154 


Weston 




_ 


_ 


53 


38 


41 


38 


38 


155 


Belchertown 


_ 


_ 


_ 


62 


49 


48 


57 


54 


156 


I^enox 


_ 


_ 


_ 


65 


64 


56 


57 


50 


157 


Hadley 


_ 


_ 


— 


124 


127 


100 


113 


89 


168 


Holliston . 


. 


- 


- 


62 


63 


55 


56 


63 


159 


Pepperell . 


_ 


11 


_ 


68 


57 


43 


61 


48 


160 


Norton 


_ 


_ 


_ 


72 


62 


61 


64 


61 


161 


Hanover . 


_ 


— 


_ 


62 


50 


62 


64 


54 


162 


Soituate . 


[ _ 


_ 


_ 


84 


73 


43 


37 


49 


163 


Hatfield . 


'. 


- 


- 


97 


85 


96 


109 


111 


164 


Lancaster 


_ 


_ 


_ 


60 


32 


37 


29 


45 


165 


Hopkinton 


_ 


_ 


— 


67 


67 


49 


52 


57 


166 


Kingston . 


_ 


_ 


— 


60 


47 


53 


57 


55 


167 


Ashland . 


_ 


_ 


— 


58 


55 


39 


55 


55 


168 


Manchester 


! 40 


- 


- 


58 


59 


41 


46 


36 


169 


Groveland 


_ 


_ 


_ 


49 


47 


54 


53 


47 


170 


Grotou 


1 _ 


_ 


— 


52 


42 


43 


45 


44 


171 


Acton 


_ 


_ 


— 


43 


49 


45 


37 


40 


172 


Douglas . 


' _ 


_ 


_ 


73 


71 


73 


67 


53 


173 


Avon 


. 


- 


- 


63 


57 


53 


53 


37 


174 


Merrimao 


_ 


_ 


_ 


54 


44 


48 


45 


44 


175 


Charlton . 


_ 


— 


— 


47 


48 


47 


52 


43 


176 


Wayland , 


_ 


_ 


5 


59 


42 


52 


38 


35 


177 


Rutland . 


_ 


— 


— 


34 


24 


22 


22 


20 


178 


Sutton 


'. 


- 


- 


65 


48 


60 


31 


31 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



73 



Schools by Grades, October 1, 1927 



ta'3 



o 



(u o 

73 «■« 






S 



HIGH 


SCHOOLS 








T3 « 






§1 




^ 


l."^ 


Pi 

lU 


^ 





120 



72 


77 


65 


120 


113 


111 


122 


103 


51 


91 


75 


41 


102 


72 


62 


94 


89 


56 


69 


53 


44 


72 


71 


65 


79 


81 


74 


65 


52 


62 


78 


87 


60 


73 


65 


56 


71 


72 


63 


69 


59 


64 


30 


34 


32 


85 


69 


76 


80 


87 


48 


73 


77 


73 


81 


74 


66 


64 


65 


62 


129 


79 


57 


92 


67 


71 


77 


45 


47 


29 


27 


23 


45 


81 


17 


45 


38 


37 


78 


63 


43 


61 


65 


47 


65 


62 


68 


45 


40 


37 


24 


30 


33 


56 


58 


41 


63 


57 


51 


74 


93 


63 


56 


55 


46 


45 


38 


33 


43 


38 


27 


64 


59 


50 


106 


78 


63 


65 


42 


38 


48 


52 


36 


48 


58 


38 


48 


42 


52 


47 


41 


57 


63 


61 


51 


37 


38 


31 


45 


51 


41 


59 


50 


26 


46 


54 


41 


34 


50 


50 


42 


49 


39 


48 


43 


41 


47 


47 


41 


56 


50 


35 


60 


49 


46 


34 


42 


33 


39 


30 


28 


38 


33 


52 


25 


24 


16 


44 


37 


21 



124 



125 



670 


62 


48 


34 


30 


1,062 


93 


60 


37 


25 


931 


43 


26 


17 


26 


670 


56 


26 


16 


18 


1,021 


80 


48 


38 


34 


715 


47 


40 


37 


34 


836 


25 


26 


17 


16 


622 


45 


28 


17 


14 


676 


63 


51 


57 


32 


552 


71 


50 


44 


28 


690 


38 


30 


18 


20 


582 


51 


45 


38 


37 


631 


45 


35 


30 


19 


486 


67 


46 


102 


26 


264 


32 


14 


18 


18 


641 


67 


52 


33 


29 


669 


33 


29 


18 


24 


587 


61 


48 


29 


30 


743 


61 


29 


25 


19 


625 


58 


32 


25 


37 


677 


56 


26 


25 


18 


586 


39 


54 


43 


29 


607 


36 


32 


— 


— 


269 


14 


22 


15 


8 


476 


49 


27 


24 


21 


451 


26 


38 


21 


28 


535 


47 


29 


31 


18 


508 


45 


33 


35 


17 


490 


46 


36 


33 


14 


352 


44 


29 


22 


23 


223 


49 


36 


31 


16 


434 


44 


41 


40 


21 


478 


52 


35 


22 


32 


731 


60 


41 


39 


26 


513 


35 


25 


24 


20 


324 


30 


41 


24 


26 


378 


41 


43 


11 


27 


465 


45 


44 


22 


28 


800 


48 


37 


14 


21 


444 


46 


27 


28 


21 


424 


37 


26 


18 


18 


464 


38 


19 


16 


17 


434 


34 


40 


29 


12 


431 


37 


28 


30 


24 


673 


38 


33 


10 


12 


309 


18 


12 


2 


7 


429 


38 


22 


20 


27 


407 


41 


33 


30 


20 


403 


38 


28 


24 


18 


414 


34 


39 


33 


23 


380 


32 


27 


23 


28 


358 


36 


22 


38 


13 


349 


45 


34 


28 


25 


478 


23 


17 


12 


14 


408 


37 


18 


26 


21 


344 


31 


27 


23 


21 


334 


23 


18 


16 


17 


354 


43 


20 


10 


13 


187 


13 


11 


10 


5 


337 


23 


19 


6 


8 



127 



_ 


174 


844 


1 


216 


1,278 


_ 


112 


1,043 


— 


116 


786 


1 


201 


1,222 


1 


159 


874 


2 


86 


922 


_ 


104 


726 


1 


204 


880 


- 


193 


745 


_ 


106 


796 


6 


177 


759 


— 


129 


760 


1 


242 


728 


- 


82 


346 


_ 


181 


822 


1 


105 


774 


1 


169 


756 


— 


134 


877 


1 


153 


778 


_ 


125 


802 


— 


165 


751 


— 


68 


675 


3 


62 


331 




121 


597 


1 


114 


565 


_ 


125 


660 


- 


130 


638 


_ 


129 


619 


- 


118 


470 


1 


133 


356 


1 


147 


581 


2 


143 


621 


3 


169 


900 


3 


107 


620 


_ 


121 


445 


2 


124 


502 


— 


139 


604 


- 


120 


920 


- 


122 


566 


1 


100 


524 


_ 


90 


554 


5 


120 


554 


2 


121 


552 


- 


93 


766 


_ 


39 


348 


— 


107 


536 


— 


124 


531 


— 


108 


511 


5 


134 


548 


_ 


110 


490 


— 


109 


467 


2 


134 


483 


- 


66 


544 


- 


102 


510 


_ 


102 


446 


1 


75 


409 


1 


87 


441 


— 


39 


226 


- 


56 


393 



74 



P.D. 2. 
Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 





TOWNS 




School Buildings in 
Use, Jan. 1, 1928 




Estimated Value of 




ELEMENTARY 




2 
'5 


2 
'3 


13 
42 


2 
'3 


*a 












a 

o 

?l 

<e a 
a-" 
O 


a 

o 


a 

o 
o 


a 

h 


M o 

1 = 

•go 


1 


to 

m 








129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


136 


119 
120 
121 
122 
123 


Foxborough 
Billerica 
Somerset 
Blackstone 
Falmouth . 


1 

2 
4 
1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


2 
1 

1 


1 

1 

2 


2 
3 

4 
2 
4 


7 
5 
7 
9 

7 


$8,000 
8,500 

14,000 
7,100 

35,500 


$170,000 

145,500 

315,247 

40,300 

192,500 


124 
125 
126 
127 
128 


Templeton . 
Westport . 
Leicester 
Dalton 
Lee . 


1 
3 
1 
1 
1 


2 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
2 

1 


2 
1 


1 
2 
3 
3 

2 


7 
11 
6 
5 
5 


3,100 
4,500 
35,000 
5,000 
1,000 


75,000 

114,500 

125,000 

75,000 

96,000 


129 
130 
131 
132 
133 


Oxford 

Williamstown 
Warren 
Rockport . 
Medfield 


2 
1 

1 


2 
1 

3 


1 


2 

1 


3 

2 
2 
2 
2 


7 
5 
4 
7 
2 


8,000 
6,600 
5,300 
11,000 
1,800 


180,000 

213,500 

107,500 

90,000 

22,500 


134 
135 

136 
137 
138 


Provincetown 
Westford . . . 
East Bridgewater 
Wilmington 
Holden 


! 1 
3 

4 
1 


1 
1 
3 

1 


- 


2 
1 

3 


3 
3 

2 
1 
4 


6 
6 

8 
8 
6 


3,000 
10,000 
2,350 
2,300 
5,000 


58,000 
200,000 
47,000 
31,500 
95,000 


139 
140 
141 
142 
143 


Barre 

Holbrook . 
Swansea 
Wrentham . 
Hopedale . 


3 
2 
6 
1 
1 


2 
1 
1 


1 


1 

2 

2 


2 
1 

2 

1 
2 


8 
6 
10 
2 
5 


3,200 
8,000 
4,500 
2,500 
3,100 


75,000 
55,000 

121,950 
30,000 

167,500 


144 
145 
146 
147 
148 


Nantucket . 

Medway 

West Bridgewater 

Sharon 

Hardwick . 


1 
! 3 

'. 3 


1 
2 
2 

1 


1 

1 


2 
1 

1 


1 
3 
1 
2 
2 


4 
5 
8 
4 
7 


8,000 
2,500 
3,000 
9,000 
2,200 


21,000 
82,000 
55,000 
103,000 
90,000 


149 
150 
151 
152 
153 


North Brookfield 
Ayer . 
Bourne 
Deerfield . 
Cohasset 


; 3 

4 
1 


2 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 
3 

4 
2 


2 
4 
6 
8 
3 


500 

8,800 

6,600 

7,500 

18,956 


20,000 

39,000 

135,000 

120,000 

197,598 


154 
155 
156 
157 
158 


Weston 

Belchertown 

Lenox 

Hadley 

HoUiston 


1 
4 
3 
5 


2 
2 


1 

1 


2 
1 

1 

2 


1 
1 
2 
3 

1 


4 
7 
6 
11 
5 


3,000 

2,000 

21,100 

12,000 

3,400 


36,900 
55,000 
61,900 
102,000 
60,000 


159 
160 
161 
162 
163 


Pepperell . 

Norton 

Hanover 

Soituate 

Hatfield 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 

4 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 


2 
1 
1 
3 

2 


5 
4 
5 

4 
7 


3,700 
1,800 
7,500 
4,.500 
6,300 


49,050 
58,000 
158,000 
65,000 
78,000 ■ 


164 
165 
166 
167 

168 


Lancaster . 
Hopkinton . 
Kingston . 
Ashland 
Manchester 


! 2 
1 


1 

2 


- 


1 

1 
1 


1 
2 
1 
2 
3 


3 
4 
5 
3 
3 


3,500 
4,500 
7,000 
1,700 
7,500 


60,000 
115,000 
35,000 
41,000 
47,500 


169 
170 
171 
172 
173 


Groveland . 

Groton 

Acton 

Douglas 

Avon 


3 

; 1 


2 
3 
1 
1 


2 


1 
1 

1 


1 

1 
1 
2 
1 


7 
5 
4 
4 
2 


3,000 
6,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 


39,450 
80,000 
8,000 
79,500 
30,000 


174 
175 

176 
177 
178 


Merrimac . 
Charlton 
Wayland . 
Rutland 

Sutton 


1 

9 

; 1 

7 


1 

2 

1 


2 . 


- 


2 
1 
2 

1 
1 


4 
12 
2 
3 
10 


1,000 
1,150 
2,000 
2,500 
1,500 


60,000 
16,100 
80,000 
27,000 
25,000 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



75 



Public School Property 



SCHOOLS 


JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 




■a o, ~ 
O 03.2 

3 S:2 


"3 




'1 

is 


3 53 ti 
^-^ C3 4) 

cam 
te 03.2 


■^ 


o 


Q(-»J|— t 


o 


.+J 


'3 


o-^ — 


o 


u 


• ^ 


H 


W 


m 


H 


H 


o 


137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


$11,000 


$189,000 


$12,000 


$150,000 


$7,500 


$169,000 


$358,500 


13,100 


167,100 


6,000 


100,000 


10,500 


116,500 


283,600 


24,429 


353,676 


9,500 


10,300 


2,657 


22,457 


376,133 


14,430 


61,830 


3,452 


50,881 


6,735 


61,068 


122,898 


24,000 


252,000 


20,000 


185,000 


29,250 


234,250 


486,250 


7,000 


85,100 


1,100 


100,000 


10,000 


111,100 


196,200 


17,600 


136,600 


500 


7,500 


4,900 


12,900 


149,500 


10,000 


170,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


170,000 


5,000 


85,000 


25,000 


160,000 


15,000 


200,000 


285,000 


2,500 


99,500 


500 


50,000 


2,500 


53,000 


152,500 


8,000 


196,000 


1,000 


80,000 


5,000 


86,000 


282,000 


17,000 


237,100 


5,000 


60,000 


7,500 


72,500 


309,600 


7,000 


119,800 


1,200 


38,500 


1,500 


41,200 


161,000 


15,000 


116,000 


5,000 


125,000 


10,000 


140,000 


256,000 


1,500 


25,800 


2,000 


80,000 


5,000 


87,000 


112,800 


5,000 


66,000 


3,000 


25,000 


1,500 


29,500 


95,500 


15,000 


225,000 


3,000 


60,000 


6,000 


69,000 


294,000 


3,300 


52,650 


1,000 


60,000 


7,500 


68,500 


121,150 


4,200 


38,000 


2,000 


35,500 


3,500 


41,000 


79,000 


12.200 


112,200 


5,000 


125,000 


10,400 


140,400 


252,600 


9,000 


87,200 


2,000 


100,000 


5,000 


107,000 


194,200 


8,000 


71,000 


3,500 


100,000 


10,000 


113,500 


184,500 


11,285 


137,735 


3,000 


225,000 


25,000 


253,000 


390,735 


1,600 


34,100 


1,200 


8,000 


800 


10,000 


44,100 


6,000 


176.600 


1,000 


56,000 


4,000 


61,000 


237,600 


3,450 


32,450 


2,000 


9,000 


1,150 


12,150 


44,600 


10,000 


94,500 


2,000 


100,000 


5,000 


107,000 


201,500 


5,000 


63,000 


— 


— 


• 2,000 


2,000 


65,000 


7,000 


119,000 


2,000 


25,000 


3,000 


30,000 


149,000 


7,000 


99,200 


1,000 


65,000 


5,000 


71,000 


170,200 


6,000 


26,500 


2,000 


40,000 


15,000 


57,000 


83,500 


2,000 


49,800 


2,000 


20,000 


3,000 


25,000 


74,800 


10,500 


152,100 


2,500 


50,000 


6,000 


58,500 


210,600 


6,500 


134,000 


9,500 


150,000 


6,000 


165,500 


299,500 


9,000 


225,554 


3,500 


71,000 


6,200 


79,700 


305,254 


9,000 


48,900 


5,000 


28,500 


8,400 


41,900 


90,800 


4,000 


61,000 


2,000 


90,000 


7,500 


99,500 


160,500 


19,000 


102,000 


13,000 


70,000 


16,800 


99,800 


201,800 


6,500 


120,500 


5,000 


40,000 


5,600 


50,600 


171,100 


9,500 


72,900 


1,000 


75,000 


5,200 


81,200 


154,100 


3,700 


56,450 


2,000 


15,000 


2,100 


19,100 


75,550 


3,000 


62,800 


1,500 


48,000 


2,000 


51,500 


114,300 


13,250 


178,750 


3,000 


130,000 


11,000 


144,000 


322,750 


2,000 


71,500 


1,000 


78,000 


1,500 


80,500 


152,000 


5.000 


89,300 


1,000 


25,000 


2,000 


28,000 


117,300 


3,900 


67,400 


_ 


20,000 


800 


20,800 


88,200 


5,000 


124,500 


1,000 


30,000 


3.000 


34,000 


158,500 


1,500 


43,500 


2,000 


60,000 


5,000 


67,000 


110,500 


6,000 


48,700 


700 


20,000 


3,000 


23,700 


72,400 


5,000 


60,000 


750 


87,000 


2,500 


90,250 


150,250 


3,000 


45,450 


1,000 


12,400 


1,000 


14,400 


59,850 


8,500 


94,500 


5,000 


100,000 


10,000 


115,000 


209,500 


1,000 


10,500 


3,000 


114,000 


13,000 


130,000 


140,500 


6,000 


87,000 


1,000 


104,000 


8,000 


113,000 


200,000 


5,000 


37,000 


3,000 


12,000 


3,000 


18,000 


55,000 


4,000 


65,000 


3,000 


70,000 


11,500 


84,500 


149,500 


3,000 


20,250 


1,500 


50,000 


3,500 


55,000 


75,250 


4,000 


86,000 


500 


40,000 


3,000 


43,500 


129,500 


5,000 


34,, 500 


1,500 


10,000 


1,200 


12,700 


47,200 


3,700 


30,200 


1,000 


25,000 


3,000 


29,000 


59,200 



76 



Group III. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 







§ 


rH- 


Teaching 


Staff in 


Public 






1 


„ 


Day Schools — 


- Kindergarten, Ele- 










MENTART, H 


GH — Jan 


. 1, 1928 












PART 




TOWNS 




"o 

05 




FULL TIME 




TIME 












S 






a 
.2 


a 


S 


1 












ca lo 




05 

3 


.™ 


M 

2 




fs 








S53 

P05 


a 


a 




3 


MT3 

a1 






o 


05 '^ 


'C 


3 


r" 


o 


3 






pm 


> 


PM 


W 


H 


H 


M 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


179 


Harwich 


2,077 


$4,997,162 


_ 


_ 


15 


15 


2 


180 


Southborough 


2,053 


3,244,773 


— 


— 


15 


15 


4 


181 


Hamilton 


2,018 


5,633,399 


— 


— 


17 


17 


3 


182 


Williamsburg 


1,993 


1,332,010 


— 


— 


15 


15 


1 


183 


Upton . 


1,988 


1,367,491 


1 


- 


10 


11 


3 


184 


Northborougb 


1,968 


2,124,414 


_ 


_ 


13 


13 


2 


185 


West Boylston 


1,916 


1,809,777 


— 


— 


17 


17 


4 


186 


Townsend 


1,895 


2,080,034 


— 


— 


15 


15 


2 


187 


Westminster . 


1,884 


1,410,803 


— 


— 


14 


14 


2 


188 


Lunenburg . 


1,875 


2,214,000 


- 


- 


14 


14 


4 


189 


Stockbridfte . 


1,830 


5,492,182 


_ 


_ 


15 


15 


2 


190 


Northfield . 


1,821 


2,001,393 


— 


— 


18 


18 


1 


191 


Millis . 


1,791 


2,821,209 


1 


— 


14 


15 


2 


192 


Marshfield . 


1,777 


5,880,830 


— 


— 


12 


12 


2 


193 


Dennis 


1,749 


2,792,110 


- 


- 


11 


11 


2 


194 


Chatham 


1,741 


5,128,840 


_ 


_ 


10 


10 


2 


195 


Duxbury 


1,688 


6,237,463 


1 


— 


15 


16 


2 


196 


Sheffield 


1,614 


1,453,234 


— 


— 


14 


14 


1 


197 


Huntington . 


1,543 


1,199,840 


— 


— 


13 


13 


2 


198 


Shelburne 


1,538 


2,655,307 


1 


- 


18 


19' 


2 


199 


Yarmouth 


1,532 


4,033,475 


_ 


_ 


10 


10 


2 


200 


SterMng 


1,516 


1,689,450 


— 


— 


10 


10 


1 


201 


Chester 


1,514 


1,368,034 


— 


— 


16 


16 


2 


202 


Plainville 


1,512 


1,416,284 


— 


— 


11 


11 


- 


203 


Pembroke 


1,480 


2,719,855 


- 


- 


11 


11 


2 


204 


Sandwich 


1,479 


2,518,350 


_ 


_ 


12 


12 


2 


205 


Norwell 


1,466 


1,961,575 


— 


— 


10 


10 


3 


206 


Tisbury 


■1,431 


5,867,250 


— 


— 


13 


13 


1 


207 


Littleton . * 


1,411 


2,287,305 


— 


— 


10 


10 


4 


208 


Essex . 


1,403 


1,567,518 


- 


- 


11 


11 


2 


209 


Brookfield 


1,401 


1,330,176 


1 


_ 


9 


10 


2 


210 


Sudbury 


1,394 


2,066,480 


— 


— 


10 


10 


4 


211 


West Newbury 


1,337 


1,173,882 


— 


— 


13 


13 


2 


212 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,314 


3,830,649 


— 


— 


12 


12 


1 


213 


Edgartown . 


1,235 


3,365,085 


- 


- 


10 


10 


1 


214 


Stow . 


1,185 


1,616,125 


_ 


- 


10 


10 


2 


215 


Orleans 


1,078 


3,900,885 


— 


— 


10 


10 


2 


216 


Dover . 


1,044 


3,548,519 


— 


— 


10 


10 


5 


217 


Mendon 


1,03a 


1,294,550 


— 


— 


8 


8 


1 


'218 


New Marlborough . 


991 


1,321,919 


- 


- 


10 


10 


1 


219 


Sherborn 


929 


1,734,637 


- 


- 


6 


6 


3 


220 


Ashfield 


919 


1,278,499 


1 


— 


12 


13 


1 


221 


Topsfield 


915 


2,926,607 


— 


— 


8 


8 


4 


222 


Ashby . 


907 


969,400 


— 


— 


9 


9 


2 


223 


Bernardston . 


844 


774,288 


- 


- 


10 


10 


1 


224 


Brimfield 


840 


1,169,750 


_ 


_ 


12 


12 


2 


225 


Charlemont . 


820 


1,113,190 


1 


— 


9 


10 


— 


226 


Wellfleet 


786 


1,390,143 


— 


— 


8 


8 


1 


227 


Brewster 


774 


1,916,358 


— 


— 


6 


6 


— 


228 


Princeton 


773 


1,366,729 


- 


- 


7 


7 


4 


229 


Petersham 


672 


1,453,285 


1 


- 


6 


7 


3 


230 


New Salem . 


519 


667,354 


— 


— 


9 


9 


1 


231 


Cummington 
Total 


508 


460,140 


- 


- 


5 


5 


1 


\ 


265,085 


$411,835,597 


41 


16 


1,931 


1,988 


244 



pt. n. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



77 





Pupils in 


Public Day Schools — 


Kindergarten, 


Elementary, 










High — 


Year ending June 30, 1928 








S3^ 


















17 












EJ C3 


a H 


O '"'A , 




Is 


■§ 


o 

u a 




§.2 


it 


m 


§5 


T3 


">, 


_>. 


a> o 
II 


a 


& 3 


m'O 


«oS 


+ 


_Q> 


S 

-Oo 


"3 


a 


g^ 


"1 


-gfiO 

§T3Sa 


2g 




II 
II 

< 


■5 




•" ft 
a, 


a o 

&1 


Non-resid 
attende 
than ha 
year 


« 3 
o 

1 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




14 


15 


449 


68,355 


367 


186 


408 


_ 




41 


367 


380 


59,640 


321 


186 


349 


— 




23 


326 


415 


66,532 


361 


186 


384 


— 




— 


384 


419 


64,866 


379 


171 


405 


— 




19 


386 


332 


53,089 


294 


181 


313 


- 




5 


308 


360 


61,710 


334 


185 


354 


1 




8 


347 


462 


72,265 


407 


177 


433 


— 




- 


433 


355 


58,157 


321 


181 


342 


— 




5 


337 


298 


48,221 


259 


186 


277 


9 




— 


286 


370 


60,662 


334 


182 


360 


17 




- 


377 


390 


57,209 


326 


175 


344 


12 




34 


322 


468 


69,330 


398 


174 


433 


— 




4 


429 


395 


67,809 


373 


182 


389 


— 




2 


387 


309 


44,597 


254 


177 


272 


— 




— 


272 


271 


42,240 


230 


184 


259 


- 




1 


258 


313 


49,133 


264 


186 


290 


_ 




12 


278 


341 


53,890 


303 


178 


321 


— 




— 


321 


296 


46,044 


250 


184 


277 


— 




3 


274 


379 


58,829 


325 


181 


350 


— 




41 


309 


397 


67,623 


362 


187 


378 


- 




158 


220 


218 


34,555 


189 


183 


209 


- 




- 


209 


290 


48,955 


261 


187 


280 


27 




8 


299 


359 


57,929 


327 


177 


352 


— 




24 


328 


336 


50,151 


286 


175 


305 


— 




4 


301 


292 


45,773 


251 


181 


270 


2 




12 


260 


264 


42,874 


243 


176 


254 


- 




1 


253 


278 


43,464 


247 


175 


261 


— 




6 


255 


328 


51,102 


281 


182 


307 


— 




28 


279 


263 


43,036 


232 


186 


246 


— 




— 


246 


263 


42,040 


215 


188 


246 


- 




"" 


246 


258 


41,785 


227 


183 


243 


_ 




6 


237 


215 


33,749 


186 


181 


202 


— 




4 


198 


271 


40,469 


233 


174 


253 


4 




7 


250 


290 


43,981 


243 


180 


270 


— 




- 


270 


244 


37,947 


204 


182 


228 


- 




~ 


228 


207 


35,147 


193 


185 


201 


- 




1 


200 


234- 


38,469 


207 


186 


220 


- 




29 


191 


165 


27,662 


152 


182 


162 


5 




14 


153 


195 


29,280 


170 


172 


185 


2 




11 


176 


194 


27,605 


153 


180 


171 


1 




4 


168 


149 


24,730 


134 


186 


143 


- 




9 


134 


192 


32,470 


181 


180 


188 


1 




12 


177 


187 


30,002 


162 


183 


173 


— 




2 


171 


218 


36,307 


202 


171 


212 


— 




6 


206 


252 


38,480 


216 


179 


228 


- 




9 


219 


222 


34,230 


187 


183 


199 


_ 




33 


166 


166 


25,796 


146 


177 


155 


2 




24 


133 


173 


27,009 


147 


183 


157 


— 




39 


118 


124 


19,989 


111 


180 


122 


— 




10 


112 


122 


20,267 


109 


187 


115 


3 




8 


110 


139 


23,021 


126 


182 


132 


_ 




8 


124 


127 


20,798 


113 


184 


119 


3 




47 


75 


79 


12,572 


69 


182 


75 


10 




4 


81 


54,067 


8,665,762 


47,980 


180 


51,142 


285 




1,633 


49,794 



78 







Grotjp III. Towns 


OF Less 


THAN 5,000 Population 








Itemized Expenditures for Support of Public 




> 






ii 

11 




"o 




TOWNS 


2 






S a 










"sf 


"i 


i| 






1 




g-§ - 


o 
o 








u 




•r C) _ 


Xi 


f-t ■*^ 






.<D 








S 3 






O 




m 


H 


o 






16 




17 


18 


19 


179 


Harwich 


$1,991 


73 


$21,067 89 


$640 09 


$1,234 42 


180 


Southborough 


1,830 


61 


24,658 24 


600 58 


1,258 46 


181 


Hamilton . 


1,788 


92 


26,665 26 


752 12 


1,757 32 


182 


Williamsburg 


1,670 


00 


17,365 79 


509 97 


683 89 


183 


Upton 


1,188 78 


13,421 00 


447 64 


548 64 


184 


Northborougli 


1,522 


89 


16,572 92 


889 88 


876 07 


185 


West Boylston . 


1,979 


34 


22,313 00 


833 56 


1,033 82 


186 


Townsend . 


2,044 


17 


19,507 38 


857 73 


790 84 


187 


Westminster 


1,475 


22 


16,476 00 


879 96 


1,629 21 


188 


Lunenbvirg 


1,435 


47 


19,054 34 


828 93 


753 98 


189 


Stockbridge 


3,173 


22 


22,849 00 


813 16 


1,621 08 


190 


Northfield . 


1,300 


00 


18,968 78 


456 57 


492 55 


191 


Millis 


1,202 


42 


20,590 00 


357 85 


1,568 44 


192 


Marshfield . 


1,900 


14 


18,665 50 


1,077 09 


575 35 


193 


Dennis 


1,757 


45 


14,969 16 


740 00 


704 73 


194 


Chatham. . 


1,919 


71 


16,741 63 


842 33 


1,083 47 


195 


Duxbury . 


1,437 


06 


23,077 61 


1,710 02 


990 50 


196 


Sheffield . 


1,623 


10 


15,976 25 


388 32 


1,124 25 


197 


Huntington 


1,532 


38 


15,850 00 


663 62 


- 514 37 


198 


Shelburne . 


1,670 


54 


25,061 84 


595 54 


881 81 


199 


Yarmouth . 


1,638 


35 


14,277 00 


441 87 


1,053 44 


200 


Sterling 


1,461 


96 


11,244 00 


515 70 


460 45 


201 


Chester 


1,736 


45 


19,637 88 


360 97 


1,115 42 


202 


Plainville . 


1,792 


47 


14,704 58 


555 77 


1,185 36 


203 


Pembroke . 


1,595 


99 


15,785 00 


476 30 


871 81 


204 


Sandwich . 


1,487 


21 


17,561 19 


329 19 


1,266 27 


205 


NorweU 


1,902 


30 


14,778 58 


830 38 


616 11 


206 


Tisbury 


1,090 


32 


16,310 00 


730 21 


312 81 


207 


Littleton . 


1,241 


78 


15,174 25 


671 13 


738 08 


208 


Essex 


1,120 44 


14,986 00 


380 90 


648 64 


209 


Brookfield . 


1,604 


62 


13,240 15 


504 66 


447 48 


210 


Sudbury 


1,419 


26 


13,970 00 


376 76 


803 71 


211 


West Newbury . 


1,060 


28 


14,655 17 


301 26 


396 73 


212 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,226 


40 


16,405 00 


881 79 


768 09 


213 


Edgartown 


1,292 


36 


13,120 50 


650 47 


823 06 


214 


Stow .... 


951 


79 


13,471 00 


431 49 


608 28 


215 


Orleans 


1,221 


49 


15,304 06 


245 01 


914 72 


216 


Dover 


1,051 


21 


17,836 66 


392 15 


663 31 


217 


Mendon 


959 


65 


10,523 74 


278 94 


282 32 


218 


New Marlborough 


1,315 02 


10,572 90 


252 68 


733 50 


219 


Sherborn . 


734 


85 


8,145 00 


204 69 


594 94 


220 


Ashfield 


1,528 


17 


13,707 00 


426 26 


516 82 


221 


Topsfield . 


1,049 


18 


14,855 00 


366 39 


515 29 


222 


Ashby 


960 


69 


11,045 36 


457 93 


376 04 


223 


Bernardston 


805 00 


11,451 68 


483 46 


434 62 


224 


Brimfield . 


1,519 


78 


16,538 00 


654 99 


421 83 


225 


Charlemont 


1,521 


80 


11,727 00 


505 07 


836 31 


226 


Wellfleet . 


653 


33 


10,908 75 


942 38 


— 


227 


Brewster . 


803 


28 


8,098 50 


190 35 


455 03 


228 


Princeton . 


703 


14 


9,168 00 


175 26 


506 75 


229 


Petersham . 


1,036 


26 


10,423 50 


308 09 


367 91 


230 


New Salem 


1,287 


03 


10,820 00 


346 91 


568 84 


231 


Cummington 
Total 


727 


09 


5,800 00 


225 34 


178 36 




$227,807 47 $2,714,938 63 


$101,791 88 


$142,611 74 



Pt.ll. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



79 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation — Year ending June 30, 1928 



m R (u 

CO 

b § 

S-o p. 

•a 9 ►< 
ado 



transportation 



d o 
4S k. 



20 

53,944 25 
6,034 11 
3,551 83 
3,831 66 
3,680 07 

4,722 10 

5,050 50 

4,075 44 

2,883 07 

4,000 50 

7,026 61 

3,173 80 

3,497 77 

4,093 26 

2,062 52 

2,427 93 
5,857 91 
2,539 12 
1,664 55 
5,183 68 

2,455 79 
1,637 81 
2,898 85 
2,683 08 
2,874 23 

2,777 44 
3,372 50 
2,818 98 
4,213 38 
2,851 32 

2,363 76 
2,927 80 
2,619 02 
1,789 27 
3,279 40 

2,721 96 
3,599 72 
3,060 03 
1,825 47 
1,140 95 



21 

$790 59 

701 33 

1,870 33 

2,675 17 

474 00 

540 25 
1,185 42 

824 50 
1,646 93 
1,684 35 

1,993 06 
1,224 84 
693 63 
1,440 00 
2,686 96 

687 43 
631 45 
1,159 67 
545 21 
573 77 

980 65 
217 68 
712 34 
452 06 
983 21 

149 39 
1,209 98 

619 20 
1,080 10 
1,208 67 

900 15 
322 30 
625 73 
549 66 
242 25 

829 35 
1,009 48 
735 71 
159 67 
844 24 



22 

$25 50 

68 24 
20 00 

35 35 

28 03 

226 50 

17 10 
66 07 



7 50 
24 61 



160 00 

7 00 



23 

$694 26 
830 15 

1,161 11 
712 41 
500 00 

330 30 

1,100 00 

546 15 

680 00 

96 45 

585 52 

400 00 

1,206 07 

842 51 

93 50 

476 35 
835 77 
630 00 
250 00 
333 80 

146 63 
632 38 
292 00 
440 50 
760 00 

265 03 
82 28 
471 05 
115 97 
395 75 

647 36 
490 00 
215 05 
674 70 
686 20 

367 40 
200 80 
529 00 
237 50 

477 60 



24 

$4,005 00 
5,883 00 
5,670 00 
3,437 98 
4,136 75 

4,819 27 
5,156 00 
7,497 65 
4,276 40 
7,019 13 

2,208 10 
3,324 00 
2,500 00 
9,060 00 
5,471 60 

6,000 00 
8,075 00 
4,332 74 
2,985 00 
2,423 00 

2,754 51 

4,795 35 

1,219 60 

2,758 00 

6,640 00 

3,684 75 
5,499 10 
763 60 
3,450 25 
1,725 30 

3,003 20 
5,192 00 
2,234 75 
520 26 
2,196 70 

4,097 00 
5,378 00 
6,154 60 
1,237 50 
2,767 44 



25 

$26 00 



39 00 



317 69 
378 05 



219 72 



20 00 



526 43 



5 00 

530 50 



1,343 49 


513 


64 






410 75 


3,990 


00 






1,205 


44 


428 


24 


259 


51 


375 00 










2,105 72 


293 


48 


61 


06 


452 


35 


2,412 


00 






2,977 


66 


298 


26 


6 


06 


266 


50 


6,420 


50 






1,384 44 


555 


26 




- 


505 


00 


2,888 


00 






2,978 


29 


339 


36 


53 


43 


277 


00 


5,659 


74 






1,149 


06 


689 


80 




- 


796 


00 


3,279 


32 


20 


00 


1,210 


44 


767 


01 




- 


900 


00 


1,700 


00 






1,636 


53 


700 44 




- 


211 


00 


2,600 


00 






997 


62 


520 


41 




- 


501 


66 


5,760 


00 


240 


00 


1,420 


44 


1,946 


23 




_ 


512 


05 


4,402 


80 






1,712 


22 


510 


52 




- 


205 


00 


1,574 


05 


76 


05 


646 


94 


439 


12 


28 


32 


236 


00 


2,096 00 


1,449 


20 


$557,947 


52 


$163,019 


12 


$3,285 27 


$83,420 96 


$515,489 


55 


$10,163 06 



80 



Gkoup III. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Itemized Expenditures for Support 

OP Public Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation 

— Year ending June 30, 1928 — Con. 



TOWNS 







•; 




.s 




o 




1^ M 


•n 






H 




§ 




H 




z 








26 


27 


28 




29 




179 


Harwich . . > 






$81 


73 


$34,501 


46 


$527 


10 


180 


Southborough 






10 


55 


41,807 


03 


- 




181 


Hamilton 






1,135 


24 


44,420 


37 


346 


00 


182 


Williamsburg 






219 


59 


31,106 46 


- 




183 


Upton 






96 


51 


24,513 


39 


1,800 


00 


184 


Northborough 


$64 


69 


- 




30,377 


37 


- 




185 


West Boylston 






882 


25 


39,533 


89 


6,000 


00 


186 


Townsend 


- 




246 


34 


36,425 


55 


- 




187 


Westminster 


! 794 


88 


324 


70 


31,384 


06 


- 




188 


Lunenburg . 


960 


00 


713 


68 


36,952 


91 


" 




189 


Stockbridpe . 


432 


00 


87 


30 


41,008 


77 


2,605 


50 


190 


Noithfield' . 


160 


00 


175 


28 


29,675 


82 


- 




191 


Millis 






474 


58 


32,090 


76 


1,600 


00 


192 


Marshfield . 






191 


43 


38,071 


78 


3,000 


00 


193 


Dennis 






- 




28,485 


82 


' 




194 


Chatham • • 






40 


20 


29,239 


05 


- 




19.5 


Duxbury . • 






808 


11 


43,440 


53 


83 


00 


196 


Sheffield 






95 


69 


27,769 


04 


- 




197 


Huntington . 






516 


06 


24,587 


26 


- 




198 


Shelburne 


'. 54 


60 


3,406 


86 


40,185 44 


- 




199 


Yarmouth . 






345 


11 


24,093 


35 


- 




200 


Sterling 


! 2,950 


00 


36 


19 


24,477 


95 


- 




201 


Chester 


_ 




17 


75 


27,991 


16 


85 


64 


202 


Plainville 






- 




24,571 


82 


- 




203 


Pembroke . 


! 147 


00 


230 


05 


30,363 


59 


~ 




204 


Sandwich ■ • 




- 


89 


39 


27,609 


86 


169,428 


12 


205 


Nor well 




- 


137 


25 


28,428 


48 


72 


85 


206 
207 


Tisbury 
Littleton 






16 


50 


23,116 

26,708 


17 
94 


415 


33 


208 


Essex . 


; 100 


00 


10 


15 


23,451 


58 


" 




209 


Brookfield . 




- 


35 


00 


22,746 


38 


95 


30 


210 


Sudbury 






181 


10 


25,682 


93 


2,122 


44 


211 


West Newbury 


; 365 


00 


90 


36 


22,563 


35 


- 




212 


Oak Bluffs . 




- 


81 


38 


23,056 


55 


■ 




213 


Edgartown . 




- 


- 




22,297 


94 


" 




214 


Stow . 


100 


00 


6 


76 


23,585 


03 


- 




215 


Orleans 






13 


98 


27,892 


26 


- 




216 


Dover 


! 208 


40 


90 


41 


30,721 


48 


- 




217 


Mendon 


100 


00 


42 


21 


15,647 


00 


748 


65 


218 


New Marlborough 


75 


00 


61 


40 


18,771 


13 


" 




219 


Sherborn 




- 


- 




15,937 


36 




- 


220 


Ashfield 




- 


652 


00 


19,098 


44 


- 


- 


221 

222 


Topsfield . 

Ashby 

Bernardston 




: 


628 
399 


25 
71 


22,738 71 
23,208 71 




- 


223 




- 


19 


30 


18,526 


76 


953 


54 


224 


Brimfield 




- 




- 


28,442 


42 


- 


- 


225 


Charlemont . 


; 289 


00 




- 


20,713 


36 




- 


226 


Wellfleet 




- 


600 


00 


17,681 


91 


1,575 


80 


227 


Brewster 






39 


18 


14,734 


31 




- 


228 


Princeton . 


; 370 


00 


528 


12 


19,470 


96 




' 


229 


Petersham . 




- 


447 


53 


20,864 


81 




- 


230 


New Salem . 


396 


25 


1,256 85 


18,7.53 


72 


87 


60 


231 


Cummmgton 
Total 


1,000 


00 


- 


- 


12,825 


37 




~ 




$23,910 48 


$68,918 70 


$4,613,304 37 


$790,927 


50 



Expenditures 
ending June 



^0-: 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS 



81 



Continued 



FOR Outlay, Year 




Valuation of 


Expenditure for 






30, 1928 




1927 PER Pupil 


School Support from 


Rate of 


Total Tax 






IN Net Average 
Membership, 


Local Taxation, 
Year ending 


PER 

Valuat 


$1,000 






ION, 1927 






Year ending June 


Dec. 31, 1927 






^ 


M 


30, 1928 


per $1,000 Valuation 






(3 


3 










a 


^^ 


i.^ 




)_t 


O 










a 




HH 


1— 1 




t-H 


■§. 


•S. 


8 .aS 


-f' fl 0. 


^ 


S- 


S? 




Cl ■" s 


a 


•~ 9 


1 


1 


1 1^ 


I 11 


3 
o 

a 


■^2 
go 


^ 


H 


•< tf 


< tf 


< 


tf 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


$2,656 02 


$3,183 12 


$13,616 21 


$5 54 105 


$20 00 


105 


1,074 24 


1,074 24 


9,953 38 


11 98 28 


31 20 


32 


414 20 


760 20 


14,670 19 


7 31 91 


23 80 


93 


244 90 


244 90 


3,451 111 


12 38 26 


33 00 


26 




1,800 00 


4,440 97 


10 97 47 


38 75 


4 


71 95 


71 95 


6,122 70 


11 84 33 


37 50 


8 


307 40 


6,307 40 


4,180 101 


13 43 18 


24 60 


87 


59 54 


59 54 


6,172 68 


12 86 22 


35 30 


17 


423 19 


423 19 


4,933 85 


13 27 19 


32 50 


29 


286 04 


286 04 


5,873 72 


11 60 40 


31 00 


36 


1,166 26 


3,771 76 


17,056 15 


6 41 99 


26 00 


80 


456 84 


456 84 


4,665 92 


10 08 63 


33 80 


21 


967 94 


2,567 94 


7,289 55 


9 70 67 


30 00 


51 


575 02 


3,575 02 


21,621 4 


5 99 102 


26 00 


78 




- 


10,822 30 


8 50 83 


26 00 


77 


985 96 


985 96 


18,449 11 


5 34 108 


22 00 


101 


1,653 71 


1,736 71 


19,431 7 


6 27 100 


24 30 


88 


210 12 


210 12 


5,303 81 


11 27 45 


25 80 


82 


37 95 


37 95 


3,883 104 


11 60 39 


31 00 


35 


22 31 


22 31 


12,070 27 


7 29 92 


20 60 


104 


_ 


_ 


19,298 8 


5 51 106 


27 60 


64 


802 50 


802 50 


5,650 76 


8 87 77 


30 00 


52 


342 00 


427 64 


4,170 102 


12 86 21 


35 00 


18 


760 92 


760 92 


4,705 89 


12 74 24 


36 00 


13 


195 75 


195 75 


10,460 32 


8 66 80 


27 00 


70 


_ 


169,428 12 


9,953 37 


8 64 81 


30 75 


39 


2,312 81 


2,385 66 


7,692 52 


10 30 59 


30 50 


41 


297 95 


297 95 


21,029 5 


3 35 113 


13 00 


113 


663 23 


1,078 56 


9,297 39 


8 21 86 


23 00 


96 


3 84 


3 84 


6,372 65 


10 67 52 


29 50 


54 


1,320 00 


1,415 30 


5,613 78 


13 56 16 


26 00 


76 


246 91 


2,369 35 


10,437 33 


10 09 61 


30 00 


53 


516 96 


516 96 


4,695 90 


11 98 29 


34 00 


20 


390 86 


390 86 


14,188 20 


5 40 107 


33 00 


25 




- 


14.759 18 


6 02 101 


23 40 


95 


292 27 


292 27 


8,081 45 


10 47 55 


20 00 


107 


1,646 79 


1,646 79 


20,423 6 


5 94 104 


17 50 


112 


178 00 


178 00 


23,193 3 


7 54 89 


24 20 


90 


529 36 


1,278 01 


7,355 54 


9 22 73 


26 50 


72 


374 31 


374 31 


7,868 47 


9 02 76 


25 00 


86 


_ 


_ 


12,945 23 


7 06 94 


28 80 


57 


168 99 


168 99 


7,223 56 


10 08 62 


30 00 


45 


248 55 


248 55 


17,115 13 


6 79 96 


18 00 


111 


92 60 


92 60 


4,706 88 


13 86 10 


30 00 


44 


216 50 


1,170 04 


3,536 108 


11 35 43 


36 50 


11 


492 92 


492 92 


7,046 58 


12 99 20 


31 00 


33 


46 78 


46 78 


8,369 43 


9 09 75 


22 00 


100 




1,575 80 


11,781 28 


9 54 69 


25 50 


85 


339 71 


339 71 


17,110 14 


6 59 98 


19 50 


109 


166 99 


166 99 


12,424 24 


10 15 60 


27 00 


71 


_ 


_ 


11,720 29 


10 94 49 


26 50 


73 


_ 


87 60 


8,898 41 


13 67 13 


24 00 


92 


126 05 


126 05 


5,680 75 


11 11 46 


30 00 


47 


$76,959 69 


$867,887 19 


$8,271 


$9 01 


- 


- 



82 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Expenditure for Support op Public Schools — Dat, 

Year ending 

















FROM 


state 








from local taxation 


reimbursement (including 




TOWNS 












general school 


fund) 






- a 


o 




t— 1 




rt (U 




I— 1 










bO 








S M 




HH 






-p 


'Bt 


^ t 

S3S 




a ^ 


H^ 


_ IS ■ 

ft © a 




■si 






a 


^ 


t-° 




.9 3 


a 


3 ^-= 








o 

1 


Pi 




f4 


3 
o 

s 
< 




1 


II 






38 




39 


40 


41 


45 




43 


179 


Harwich . 


$27,682 23 


$75 43 


54 


$3,098 26 


$8 44 


83 


180 


Southborough . 


38,886 


76 


119 


28 


9 


4,156 91 


12 


75 


60 


181 


Hamilton . 


41,175 


06 


107 


23 


20 


3,430 00 


8 


93 


82 


182 


Williamsburg 


16,490 


08 


42 


72 


111 


9,291 59 


24 


07 


31 


183 


Upton 


15,000 


21 


48 


70 


105 


7,934 79 


25 


76 


27 


184 


Northborough . 


25,143 


81 


72 


46 


61 


7,134 91 


20 


66 


40 


185 


West Boylston . 


24,310 


60 


56 


14 


91 


14,846 67 


34 


28 


12 


186 


Townsend 


26,756 


31 


79 


40 


45 


9,792 31 


29 


06 


18 


187 


Westminster 


18,717 


72 


65 


45 


75 


11,934 66 


41 


73 


4 


188 


Lunenburg 


25,689 


43 


68 


14 


68 


11,014 65 


29 


21 


17 


189 


Stockbridge 


35,204 


55 


109 


33 


18 


3,294 65 


10 


23 


73 


190 


Northfield 


20,166 


83 


47 


01 


106 


8,939 18 


20 


84 


39 


191 


MiUis 


27,355 


94 


70 


69 


65 


4,402 21 


11 


38 


66 


192 


Marshfield 


35,201 


32 


129 


42 


2 


2,210 00 


8 


13 


90 


193 


Dennis 


23,737 


92 


92 


01 


29 


5,290 97 


20 


51 


41 


194 


Chatham . 


27,366 


55 


98 


44 


25 


2,040 00 


7 


34 


102 


195 


Duxbury . 


39,078 


32 


121 


74 


6 


2,287 50 


7 


13 


106 


196 


Sheffield . 


16,376 


63 


59 


77 


85 


9,958 45 


36 


34 


8 


197 


Huntington 


13,916 


12 


45 


04 


108 


8,491 81 


27 


48 


21 


198 


Shelbm-ne 


19,356 77 


87 


98 


35 


3,456 93 


16 


71' 


60 


199 


Yarmouth 


22,211 


59 


106 


28 


21 


2,348 26 


11 


24 


66 


200 


Sterling 


14,989 


72 


50 


13 


103 


7,960 58 


26 


62 


24 


201 


Chester 


17,599 


11 


53 


66 


96 


8,896 88 


27 


12 


22 


202 


Plainville . 


18,049 


89 


59 


96 


84 


6,906 24 


22 


94 


34 


203 


Pembroke 


23,551 


45 


90 


58 


32 


3,857 25 


14 


84 


53 


204 


Sandwich . 


21,769 79 


86 04 


36 


5,853 84 


23 


14 


33 


205 


Norwell 


20,198 


23 


79 


21 


46 


7,213 42 


28 


29 


19 


206 


Tisbm-y . 


19,659 


03 


70 


46 


66 


2,265 90 


8 


12 


91 


207 


Littleton . 


18,777 


52 


76 33 


51 


6,108 27 


24 


83 


29 


208 


Essex 


16,727 


63 


67 


99 


69 


6,878 44 


23 


90 


32 


209 


Brookfield 


18,038 


88 


76 


11 


52 


6,326 79 


26 


69 


23 


210 


Sudbury . 


20,857 


88 


105 


34 


23 


4,959 08 


25 


06 - 


28 


211 


West Newbury . 


14,070 


41 


56 


28 


90 


9,224 65 


36 


89 


7 


212 


Oak Bluffs 


20,683 


00 


76 


60 


60 


3,542 64 


13 


12 


68 


213 


Edgartown 


20,269 


11 


88 


89 


34 


2,182 64 


9 


57 


77 


214 


Stow 


16,916 


29 


84 


58 


37 


5,698 03 


27 


99 


20 


215 


Orleans 


23,167 


61 


121 


30 


8 


1,975 78 


10 34 


72 


216 


Dover 


26,749 


20 


174 


83 


1 


2,397 68 


16 


67 


51 


217 


Mendon . 


11,936 


15 


67 


81 


70 


3,449 09 


19 


60 


42 


218 


New Marlborough 


11,921 


92 


70 


96 


64 


4,402 22 


26 


20 


25 


219 


Sherborn . 


12,241 


78 


91 


36 


31 


2,078 61 


15 


51 


52 


220 


Ashfield . 


12,886 


32 


72 


80 


59 


6,360 09 


35 


93 


9 


221 


Topsfield . 


19,871 


37 


116 21 


10 


1,800 00 


10 


63 


69 


222 


Ashby 


13,438 


33 


65 


23 


77 


7,119 37 


34 


56 


11 


223 


Bernardston 


8,785 


88 


40 


12 


112 


7,803 78 


35 


63 


10 


224 


Brimfield . 


15,202 


34 


91 


58 


30 


6,819 82 


41 


08 


6 


225 


Charlemont 


10,117 


65 


76 


07 


53 


6,850 98 


51 


61 


3 


226 


Wellfleet . 


13,263 


57 


112 


10 


16 


2,843 54 


24 


09 


30 


227 


Brewster . 


12,633 


26 


112 


80 


15 


1,520 93 


13 


58 


67 


228 


Princeton . 


13,871 


20 


126 


10 


5 


4,423 25 


40 


21 


6 


229 


Petersham 


15,893 


40 


128 


17 


4 


3,224 14 


26 


00 


26 


230 


New Salem 


9,125 


61 


121 


67 


7 


3,987 54 


53 


16 


2 


231 


Cummington 
Total . 


5,112 


15 


63 


11 


81 


6,919 47 


86 43 


1 




. $3,711,026 36 


$74 52 


- 


$715,898 27 


$14 37 


- 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



S3 



Evening, Vacation - 


-Classified as to Source 










Amount paid 


TO Town 


Dec. 31, 1927 




















FROM- 


— 




^i'S 




1^ 














•^-s 




"^9, 




•2 d s 




XI 














a h 




BC^ 




"1 




^i 




FROM ALL SOURCES 




a <!j 




P ^ 




^43 «2 




O 














^^ 




&§ 




"*^ «i-i 




a 














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%^ 




.Sro o 






a ^ 




|_4 




<o a 




2 








.S M 






M o 




-° a 




« <a fl 












« «3 






o ^ 




o g 




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1 


SS 


4J 

a 






.9^ 






CO ° 




O o3 


§1 


3 
o 

a 




ft* 

+3 


aa 
a^ 


■as 






§{22 


44 




45 




46 




47 




48 


49 




50 




$1,600 


02 


$612 61 1 


$32,993 


12 


$89 


89 


66 


_ 




$2,360 00 


661 


50 


82 


25 


43,787 


42 


134 


32 


14 


— 




2,680 


00 






148 


25 


44,753 


31 


116 


55 


28 


— 




3,430 


00 


873 


22 


6,383 


34 


33,038 


23 


85 


59 


75 


$2,675 


14 


4,700 


00 


709 


08 


903 


89 


24,547 


97 


79 


70 


87 


3,439 


99 


3,114 


00 


234 


00 


285 


30 


32,798 


02 


94 


52 


57 


3,253 


92 


2,286 


00 


_ 




- 




39,157 


27 


90 


43 


65 


6,110 


24 


7,235 


00 






389 


00 


36,937 


62 


109 


61 


36 


5,260 


54 


2,686 


00 






2,041 


85 


32,694 


23 


114 


32 


30 


5,529 


66 


4,610 


00 






188 


18 


36,892 


26 


97 


86 


51 


5,133 


40 


4,332 


00 






2,362 


77 


40,861 


97 


126 


91 


20 


_ 




3,294 


65 






338 


31 


29,444 


32 


68 


63 


105 


3,335 


85 


3,910 


00 


124 


00 






31,882 


15 


82 


38 


82 


530 


88 


2,138 00 






_ 




37,411 


32 


137 


54 


12 


- 




2,210 


00 


100 


36 


- 




29,129 


25 


112 


90 


32 


2,665 


74 


1,855 


60 






205 


91 


29,612 


46 


106 


51 


40 


_ 




2,040 


00 






_ 




41,365 


82 


128 


86 


19 


- 




2,287 


50 


154 


47 


82 


05 


26,571 


60 


96 


98 


53 


4,437 


40 


3,556 


00 


389 


68 


3,507 


50 


26,305 


11 


85 


13 


76 


2,496 


22 


4,060 


00 


426 


80 


16,779 


16 


40,019 


66 


181 


91 


3 


- 




2,812 


50 






_ 




24,559 


85 


117 


51 


27 


- 




1,580 


00 


109 


50 


707 


92 


23,767 


72 


79 


49 


88 


2,958 


40 


2,340 


00 


389 


55 


2,228 


74 


29,114 


28 


88 


76 


70 


1,770 


79 


5,020 


00 


103 29 


146 


31 


25,205 


73 


83 


73 


81 


2,552 


21 


2,533 


25 


1,624 


12 


- 




29,032 


82 


111 


66 


35 


1,503 


59 


1,970 


00 






76 


42 


27,700 


05 


109 


48 


37 


1,694 89 


2,468 


00 


554 


67 


602 


49 


28,568 


81 


112 


04 


34 


3,478 


20 


1,900 


00 






2,010 


00 


23,934 


93 


85 


79 


74 


- 




2,265 


90 






618 55 


25,504 


34 


103 67 


45 


2,456 


61 


2,280 


00 






7 


00 


22,613 


07 


91 


92 


62 


2,618 94 


1,930 


GO 






659 


40 


25,025 


07 


105 


59 


43 


2,513 


39 


2,327 


50 


132 


58 


75 


70 


26,025 


24 


131 


44 


16 


1,731 


66 


1,830 


00 


429 


84 


33 


24 


23,758 


14 


95 


03 


56 


4,073 


32 


3,888 00 






- 




24,225 


64 


89 


72 


67 


- 




3,099 


00 




- 


- 


- 


22,451 


75 


98 


47 


48 


- 




1,739 


00 


327 


76 


790 00 


23,632 


08 


118 


16 


26 


2,428 61 


1,940 


00 


258 21 


2,581 


50 


27,983 


10 


146 


51 


10 


- 


- 


1,580 


00 


100 


00 


1,218 


00 


30,464 


88 


199 


11 


2 


- 


- 


1,960 


00 


607 


40 


39 


05 


16,031 


69 


91 


08 


64 


956 


18 


1,593 


75 


321 


48 


129 


00 


16,774 


62 


99 


85 


46 


1,930 


11 


1,200 


00 


474 


40 


1,627 


86 


16,422 


65 


122 


56 


21 


601 


95 


1,090 


00 


92 


50 


695 


58 


20,034 


49 


113 


18 


31 


2,754 


30 


1,977 


45 


366 


38 


1,435 


00 


23,472 


75 


137 


27 


13 




- 


1,510 


00 






1,645 


60 


22,203 


30 


107 


70 


38 


4,262 


69 


1,812 


50 


1,123 


50 


729 


50 


18,442 


66 


84 


21 


79 


3,230 


45 


3,170 


00 


1,371 


22 


5,199 


73 


28,593 


11 


172 


25 


4 


3,086 


46 


2,000 


00 


126 


18 


2,970 


24 


20,065 


05 


150 


87 


9 


3,399 


60 


1,690 


00 


36 


00 


3,600 


00 


19,743 


11 


167 


31 


6 


312 


44 


1,250 


00 


371 


80 




_ 


14,525 


99 


129 


70 


17 


329 


89 


795 


60 






604 


85 


18,899 


30 


171 


81 


5 


2,726 


58 


1,110 


00 


719 


74 


681 


55 


20,518 


83 


165 


47 


7 


1,337 


49 


1,500 


00 


951 


58 


4,824 


03 


18,888 


76 


251 


85 


1 


1,076 


09 


1,170 


00 




- 


524 


34 


12,555 


96 


155 


01 


8 


3,714 


66 


755 


00 


$38,675 25 


$132,705 31 


$4,598,305 


19 


$92 34 


- 


$181,202 25 


$444,481 


83 



84 



P.D. 2. 
Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



Year Grades est — Public Day Elementary Schools (including 



PRINCIPALS 



TEACHERS 



FULL TIME 



PUPILS ENROLLED 







51 


52 


53 


179 

180 
181 
182 
183 


Harwich 
Southborough 
Hamilton . 
Williamsburg 
Upton 


6 

8 
6 
8 
8 


3 


6 

4 
3 

4 

4 


184 
185 
186 
187 
188 


Northborough 
West Boylston 
Townsend . 
Westminster 
Lunenburg . 


• 8 
8 
6 
6 
6 


2 
2 
2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


189 
190 
191 
192 
193 


Stockbridge 
Northfield . 
Millis 

Marshfield . 
Dennis 


8 
8 
8 
6 
8 


2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


194 
195 
196 
197 
198 


Chatham . 
Duxbury 
Sheffield . 
Huntington 
Shelburne . 


6 
6 

8 
S 
8 


3 
3 


3 
3 
4 
4 
4 


199 
200 
201 
202 
203 


Yarmouth . 
Sterling 
Chester 
Plainville . 
Pembroke . 


8 
6 

8 
8 
8 


2 


4 
2 
4 
4 
4 


204 
205 
206 
207 
208 


Sandwich . 
Norwell 
Tisbury 
Littleton . 
Essex 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


209 
210 
211 
212 
213 


Brookfield . 

Sudbury 

West Newbury . 

Oak Bluffs . 

Edgartown 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


214 
215 
216 
217 
218 


Stow . . . ; 

Orleans 

Dover 

Mendon 

New Marlborough 


8 
6 
9 
8 
8 


3 


4 
3 

4 
4 
4 


219 
220 
221 
222 
223 


Sherborn 
Ashfield . 
Topsfield . 
Ashby 
Bernardston 


8 
8 
8 
6 
6 


2 

2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


224 
225 
226 
227 
228 


Brimfield . 
Charlemont 
Well fleet . 
Brewster 
Princeton . 


8 
8 
8 
8 
6 


2 


4 
4 
4 
4 
3 


229 
230 
231 


Petersham . 
New Salem 
Cummington 


8 
8 
6 


4 


4 
4 



55 



56 



Total 



57 



9 
13 

1 9 
1 8 
1 8 

11 

1 12 

8 
7 

2 6 

5 

9 

10 

1 6 

7 

6 

7 

12 

7 

1 6 



58 

186 
167 
170 
194 
142 

156 
218 
128 
128 
153 

139 
199 

148 
120 
118 

122 
143 
119 
157 
101 

92 
154 
142 
150 
137 

107 
113 
126 
121 
94 

91 

95 

103 

113 

102 

85 
76 
63 

79 

87 

59 

79 

68 

100 

109 

85 
65 
41 
47 
50 



4 57 

5 33 
3 33 



59 

186 
162 
156 
164 
115 

130 
197 
136 
130 
149 

145 
180 
152 
127 
106 

104 
120 

117 
126 

78 

87 
106 
129 
101 
105 

93 
104 
119 

82 
100 

108 

70 

109 

135 

89 

79 
77 
58 
87 
82 

62 
62 
60 
81 
90 

62 
51 
53 
50 
51 

43 
38 
29 



64 1,315 22,360 20,860 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



85 



Continued 



First Two Years of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 



-i 


>i 


13 












.£ fe 




-^ 




1 


C3 

-0 




0. 


EXPENDITURE FOR 
SUPPORT, EXCLUSIVE OF 


C3 Mr^ 


1 




ti 


o 


ta 


iS 


GENERAL 


CONTROL 




S C 




U 




• 


S 

.Q 


>. 


1 










o-f -^ 


o 




s 






111 






13 
1 


id 




<u 
S 

9) 






03 

cliS 


a o 




|i 


i.a 


^i 




o 

a 




^11 


II 


&o-^ 


1^ 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 




(U ^-^ 


0) m 


W 




W 




60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 




66 




67 




56,818 


186 


305 


340 


$20,344 


30 


$59 


84 


$13,120 64 


$447 


10 


51,460 


186 


276 


302 


26,502 


35 


87 


70 


13,960 


12 


400 


50 


51,400 


186 


277 


298 


26,406 


85 


88 


61 


17,856 


76 


310 


84 


54,764 


169 


325 


348 


21,041 


69 


60 


46 


11,565 


79 


346 


65 


41,203 


181 


228 


244 


16,019 


50 


65 


65 


8,541 


00 


292 


49 


48,547 


183 


265 


282 


19,463 


04 


69 


02 


10,395 


17 


536 


20 


63,779 


176 


362 


387 


29,559 


39 


76 


38 


15,937 


20 


750 


20 


42,645 


179 


233 


255 


23,083 


43 


90 


52 


12,888 


58 


436 


14 


41,507 


187 


223 


240 


18,717 


64 


77 


99 


9,342 


00 


528 


88 


49,027 


180 


272 


294 


24,425 


24 


83 


07 


13,782 


94 


674 


64 


39,561 


174 


228 


239 


24,797 


60 


103 


75 


15,140 


65 


318 


57 


55,872 


171 


327 


356 


18,324 


95 


51 


47 


12,442 


78 


281 


57 


51,216 


182 


282 


295 


14,420 


18 


48 


88 


10,910 


00 


58 


37 


34,855 


174 


200 


214 


20,126 


60 


94 


05 


8,665 


00 


679 


05 


34,869 


177 


197 


215 


17,637 


72 


82 


04 


10,429 


16 


540 


00 


35,304 


186 


190 


210 


12,943 


04 


61 


63 


7,267 


70 


250 


61 


40,725 


177 


230 


245 


14^990 


89 


61 


19 


8,893 


50 


584 


07 


35,950 


183 


196 


219 


16,065 


66 


73 


36 


9,926 


25 


242 


77 


43,561 


179 


244 


264 


13,471 


48 


51 


03 


9,149 


45 


366 


09 


29,485 


183 


161 


168 


11,122 


57 


66 


21 


7,526 


00 


231 


29 


27,715 


181 


153 


170 


12,659 


77 


74 


47 


8,157 


00 


287 


24 


44,034 


188 


235 


252 


13,419 


93 


53 


25 


7,044 00 


321 


36 


43,759 


175 


251 


271 


17,693 


78 


65 


29 


13,587 


88 


231 


00 


36,255 


173 


210 


225 


14,369 


77 


63 


87 


8,494 


98 


328 05 


38,425 


180 


211 


227 


15,407 


43 


67 


87 


8,852 


00 


295 


26 


31,713 


174 


182 


191 


15,614 


91 


81 


75 


10,761 


17 


137 


84 


33,772 


175 


193 


205 


14,067 


89 


68 


62 


7,663 


04 


464 


22 


38,474 


182 


212 


232 


13,419 


13 


57 


84 


9,830 


00 


§46 


57 


32,667 


184 


177 


189 


15,764 


40 


83 


41 


9,970 


45 


404 


30 


30,550 


188 


154 


182 


12,965 


28 


71 


23 


8,066 


00 


184 04 


31,862 


182 


175 


188 


13,106 


70 


69 


71 


8,513 


15 , 


316 


38 


26,163 


180 


145 


158 


16,729 


82 


105 


88 


9,390 


00 


206 


00 


31,493 


172 


184 


199 


14,387 


75 


72 


30 


9,071 


21 


140 


66 


37,938 


180 


210 


233 


13,031 


34 


55 


91 


9,404 


50 


620 


07 


30,197 


182 


165 


178 


12,384 


25 


69 


57 


7,571 


34 


221 


55 


27,778 


181 


154 


161 


14,433 


80 


89 


65 


8,275 


00 


314 


17 


25,477 


186 


137 


145 


14,550 


11 


100 


35 


7,620 


00 


132 


99 


20,422 


181 


113 


119 


16,758 


36 


140 


83 


9,226 


00 


182 


25 


24,236 


169 


143 


157 


8,861 


10 


56 


44 


5,838 


74 


130 


98 


23,274 


177 


130 


146 


12,501 


72 


85 


62 


7,694 


90 


177 


32 


20,178 


186 


109 


117 


10,076 02 


86 


11 


4,760 


00 


125 


77 


23,697 


178 


133 


138 


10,802 


08 


78 


27 


8,837 


00 


267 


98 


20,105 


183 


108 


117 


11,842 


81 


101 


22 


7,467 


00 


172 


67 


30,032 


170 


169 


177 


16,554 79 


93 


53 


7,403 


36 


273 


71 


29,208 


179 


167 


176 


8,084 


99 


45 


94 


5,100 00 


200 


00 


22,165 


181 


123 


131 


14,661 


70 


111 


92 


8,162 


50 


327 


80 


17,303 


172 


101 


108 


10,748 95 


99 


53 


5,777 


00 


376 


83 


15,157 


182 


83 


89 


7,595 


08 


85 


33 


3,827 


50 


392 


00 


15,573 


179 


87 


96 


7,340 


89 


76 


46 


3,726 


50 


139 


46 


16,620 


187 


89 


95 


10,666 


27 


112 


27 


3,818 


00 


96 


04 


16,251 


180 


90 


95 


10,439 


44 


109 


88 


4,169 


40 


205 


40 


11,529 


180 


64 


67 


7,026 


75 


104 


87 


4,620 


00 


166 


05 


9,769 


181 


54 


58 


7,285 


81 


125 


61 


4,300 


00 


139 


49 


6,887,357 


179 


38,362 


40,999 


$2,832,348 96 


$69 


08 


$1,728,114 


82 


$60,607 08 



P.D. 2. 
Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 

PcTBLic Day High Schools (includinq THran 



"o 


PRINCIPALS AND 








i 


XI 


TEACHERS 


O 

xi 


PUPILS 


ENROLLED 




TOWNS -^ 


FULL 


TIME 


1 


3 


n 


a 

a 

o 


a 


1 


3 
o 


r 


68 


69 


70 


71 


72 


73 


74 


179 Har-ivich .... 1 

180 Southborough ... 1 

181 Hamilton .... 1 

182 Williamsburg ... 1 

183 Upton .... 1 


2 
2 

1 
2 
1 


3 
3 

5 
2 
3 


2 


32 
16 
28 
29 
32 


45 
35 
61 
32 

43 


11,537 
8,180 
15,132 
10,102 
11,886 


184 Northborough ... 1 

185 WestBoylston ... 1 

186 Townsend .... 1 

187 Westminster ... 1 

188 Lunenburg ... 1 


1 
1 
1 
2 


3 
3 

4 
3 
5 


2 
2 


44 
14 
34 
14 
26 


30 
33 

57 
26 
42 


13,163 
8,486 

15,512 
6,714 

11,635 


189 Stockbridge ... 1 

190 Northfield ... 1 

191 MiUis .... 1 

192 Marshfield ... 1 

193 Dennis .... 1 


2 

2 
2 

1 


2 
5 
5 
3 
2 


1 

1 

1 


45 
40 
41 
29 
20 


61 
49 
54 
33 
27 


17,648 

13,458 

16,593 

9,742 

7,371 


194 Chatham .... 1 

195 Duxbury .... 1 

196 Sheffield .... 1 

197 Huntington ... 1 

198 Shelburne .... 1 


2 
4 
2 

1 
5 


3 
3 
2 
5 

7 


- 


40 
37 
31 
45 
109 


47 
41 
29 
51 
109 


13,829 
13,165 
10,094 
15,268 
38,138 


199 Yarmouth ... 1 

200 Sterling .... 1 

201 Chester .... 1 

202 Plainville .... 1 

203 Pembroke .... 1 


2 
1 

2 

1 
2 


2 
2 
2 
3 
2 


1 

1 


15 
12 

40 
38 
24 


24 
18 
48 
47 
26 


6,840 

4,921 

14,170 

13,896 

7,348 


204 Sandwich .... 1 

205 Norwell .... 1 

206 Tisbury .... 1 

207 Littleton . . • . . 1 

208 Essex .... 1 


1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


3 
2 
3 

1 
3 


4 


36 
28 
43 
35 
26 


28 
33 
40 
25 
43 


11,161 
9,692 
12,628 
10,369 
11,490 


209 Brookfield ... 1 

210 Sudbury .... 1 

211 West Newbiiry ... 1 

212 Oak Bluffs ... 1 

213 Edgartown ... 1 


1 

2 
1 
1 
2 


2 
1 
3 
3 

2 


- 


29 
22 
31 
12 
26 


30 

28 
28 
30 

27 


9,923 
7,586 
8,976 
6,043 
7,750 


214 Stow .... 1 

215 Orleans .... 1 

216 Dover .... 1 

217 Mendon .... 1 

218 New Marlborough . . 1 


1 
1 
2 

1 
1 


2 
4 
3 
2 
1 


2 

1 


24 
41 
22 
13 
11 


19 
40 
22 
16 
14 


7,369 
12,992 
7,240 
6,044 
4,331 


219 Sherborn .... 1 

220 Ashfield .... 1 

221 Topsfield .... 1 

222 Ashby .... 1 

223 Bernardston ... 1 


1 
2 
1 
1 

1 


1 
2 
3 
2 
4 


1 


17 
28 
30 
12 
30 


11 
23 
29 
25 
23 


4,552 
8,773 
9,897 
6,275 
9,272 


224 Brimfield .... 1 

225 Charlemont ... 1 

226 Wellfleet .... 1 

227 Brewster .... 1 

228 Princeton .... 1 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


4 
3 
4 
2 
3 


4 


22 
29 
46 
16 
10 


53 
21 
33 
11 
11 


12,065 
8,493 

11,852 
4,416 
3,647 


229 Petersham ... 1 

230 New Salem ... 1 

231 Cummington ... 1 


1 
2 

1 


2 
2 

1 


1 


19 
31 

8 


20 

25 

9 


6,770 
9,269 
2,803 


Total .... 113 


191 


410 


39 


4,984 


5,863 


1,778.405 


Towns in Group IV do not maiin- 
tain public high schools. The 
State totals are, therefore . . 254 


2,064 


3,799 


152 


67,364 


72,593 


22,863,166 



1 Does not include S2,996.43 for the tuition and transportation of 20 pupils attending other high schools, 
of which $1,936.52 is reimbursed by the State. 

» Does not include $610.00 for tuition and transportation of 3 pupils attending other high schools, 
of which $214.00 is reimbursed by the State. 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



87 



Year of 


Junior High Schools), 


Year ending June 


30, 1928 












EXPENDITURE 


FOR 




S3 a 2 






1 


a 


support, exclusive of 




•w 




Is 


^ 


general control 




" % 


u 




_>. 


J3 








l-i^ 


£ 


a 




1 1 






o 
o 


'3 


i 

a 




•iill 


3 C " 


i 


.a 
1 


Ma, 


> 


"S 

3 

o 

s 


er pupi 
erage 
bershi 
high SI 


|ol 


1-i 

■ &5 


Q 


< 


< 


< 


pL, 




W 


w 


75 


76 


77 


78 


79 


80 


81 


186 


62 


68 


$12,165 43 


$178 90 


$7,947 25 


$192 99 


182 


45 


47 


13,474 07 


286 


68 


10,698 12 


200 08 


186 


84 


86 


16,224 60 


188 


65 


8,808 50 


441 28 


194 


54 


57 


8,394 77 


147 


28 


5,800 00 


163 32 


180 


66 


. 69 


7,305 11 


105 


87 


4,880 00 


155 15 


190 


69 


72 


9,391 44 


130 


44 


6,177 75 


353 68 


189 


45 


46 


7,995 16 


173 


81 


6,375 80 


83 36 


189 


83 


87 


11,297 95 


129 


86 


6,618 80 


421 59 


185 


36 


37 


11,191 20 


302 


46 


7,134 00 


351 08 


188 


62 


66 


11,092 20 


168 


06 


5,271 40 


154 29 


180 


98 


105 


13,037 95 


124 


17 


7,708 35 


494 59 


186 


71 


77 


10,050 87 


130 


53 


6,526 00 ■ 


175 00 


181 


91 


94 


16,468 16 


175 


19 


9,680 00 


299 48 


180 


54 


58 


16,045 04 


276 


63 


10,000 50 


398 04 


189 


33 


44 


9,090 65 


206 


61 


4,540 00 


200 00 


186 


74 


80 


14,376 30 


179 


70 


9,473 93 


591 72 


180 


73 


76 


27,012 58 


355 


42 


14,184 11 


1,125 95 


187 


54 


58 


10,080 28 


173 


79 


6,050 00 


145 55 


188 


81 


86 


9,5S3 40 


111 


43 


6,700 55 


297 53 


190 


201 


210 


27,392 33 


130 


44 


17,535 84 


364 25 


190 


36 


39 


9,795 23 


251 


16 


6,120 00 


154 63 


186 


26 


28 


6,599 631 


235 


70 


4,200 00 


194 34 


186 


76 


81 


8,560 93 


103 


69 


6,050 00 


129 97 


182 


76 


80 


8,409 58 


105 


12 


6,209 60 


227 72 


183 


40 


43 


13,360 17 


310 


70 


6,933 00 


181 04 


183 


61 


63 


10,507 74 


166 


78 


6,800 02 


191 35 


180 


54 


56 


12,458 29 


222 


46 


7,115 54 


366 16 


182 


69 


75 


8,606 72 


114 


76 


6,480 00 


383 64 


188 


55 


57 


9,702 76 


170 


22 


5,203 80 


266 83 


188 


61 


64 


9,365 86 


146 


34 


6,920 00 


196 86 


190 


52 


55 


8,035 06 


146 


09 


4,727 00 


188 28 


183 


41 


44 


7,533 85 


171 


22 


4,580 00 


170 76 


183 


49 


54 


7,115 32 


131 


76 


5,583 96 


160 60 


182 


33 


37 


8,798 81 


237 


81 


7,000 50 


261 72 


182 


39 


50 


8,621 33 


172 


42 


5,549 16 


428 92 


189 


39 


40 


8,199 44 


204 


99 


5,196 00 


117 32 


186 


70 


75 


12,120 66 


161 


61 


7,684 06 


112 02 


186 


39 


43 


12,911 91 


300 


28 


8,610 66 


209 90 


190 


27 


28 


5,826 25 


208 


08 


4,685 00 


147 96 


188 


23 


25 


4,954 39 


198 


18 


2,878 00 


75 36 


185 


25 


26 


5,126 49 


197 


17 


3,385 00 


78 92 


183 


48 


50 


6,768 19 


135 


36 


4,870 00 


158 28 


183 


64 


56 


9,846 72 


175 


83 


7,388 00 


193 72 


187 


33 


35 


5,693 23 


162 


66 


3,642 00 


184 22 


188 


49 


52 


9,636 77 


185 30 


6,351 68 


283 46 


188 


64 


68 


12,260 94 


180 


31 


8,375 50 


327 19 


191 


45 


47 


8,442 61 


179 


63 


5,950 00 


128 24 


185 


64 


68 


9,433 50 


138 


72 


7,081 25 


550 38 


184 


24 


26 


6,590 14 


253 


46 


4,372 00 


50 89 


187 


20 


20 


7,491 55 2 


374 


57 


5,350 00 


79 22 


188 


36 


37 


9,389 11 


253 


75 


6,254 10 


102 69 


189 


49 


52 


10,439 94 


200 


76 


6,200 00 


180 86 


183 


15 


17 


2,363 27 3 


139 


02 


1,500 00 


85 85 


184 


9,618 


10,143 


$1,538,023 34 


$151 


63 


$986,823 81 


$41,184 80 


184 


124,412 


131,618 


S17,613,850 91 


$133 


82 


$13,214,746 09 


$387,882 31 



' Does not include 1 
by the State. 



!,449.20 for tuition and transportation of 10 pupils of which $2,268.05 is reimbursed 



88 



P.D. 2. 
Geoup III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Persons 5 to 16 Years 







5 TO 


7 Years 






7 TO 14 


TOWNS 


a 
o 


.- a 


^S 


•1| 


"o 


a 
o 


.-s 




'•4^ m 


.—1 © 


t8 g 


o 


'S m 


-H a> 




d u 

u O 


-^^0. 


> " 0, 


o -2 


1i 


gs 


^^0. 




•a'a 

a) 


3o3 




a) ,2 3 


.si 




3o3 




t(**^ 


t> s 


o a 


c fl 


■\^S< 


M"" 


o 2 




C° 


a "-^ 


0«)X! 


a ■n-S 




o 

d 


a "-^ 






M 


kH 


'"' 


" 


'"' 




90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


179 Harwich . 


103 


61 


_ 


_ 


42 


279 


301 


180 Southborough . 


83 


58 


_ 


_ 


27 


252 


252 


181 Hamilton . 


67 


61 


4 


— 


2 


251 


247 


182 Williamsburg . 


63 


35 




- 


28 


285 


285 


183 Upton 


59 


42 


- 


- 


17 


205 


204 


184 Northborough . 


65 


48 


_ 


_ 


17 


228 


228 


185 West Boylston . 


90 


90 


_ 


_ 


— 


292 


291 


186 Townsend 


58 


30 


— 


— 


28 


219 


218 


187 Westminster 


54 


30 


— 


— 


24 


218 


216 


188 Lunenburg 


76 


39 


1 


- 


36 


281 


257 


189 Stockbridge 


44 


26 


2 


_ 


16 


220 


205 


190 Northfield 


80 


80 


_ 


_ 


— 


295 


292 


191 Millis 


98 


74 


— 


— 


24 


230 


230 


192 Marshfield 


44 


32 


— 


— 


12 


205 


204 


193 Dennis 


37 


25 


- 


- 


12 


166 


166 


194 Chatham . 


41 


27 


_ 


_ 


14 


185 


200 


195 Duxbury . 


66 


47 


— 


— 


19 


206 


204 


196 Sheffield . 


48 


27 


— 


— 


21 


190 


189 


197 Huntington 


65 


47 


— 


— 


18 


226 


225 


198 Shelburne 


47 


24 


- 


- 


23 


149 


166 


199 Yarmouth 


43 


31 


_ 


_ 


12 


141 


141 


200 SterUng . 


63 


39 


— 


— 


24 


225 


222 


201 Chester . 


48 


47 


_ 


— 


1 


201 


201 


202 Plainville . 


62 


44 


3 


— 


15 


228 


197 


203 Pembroke 


45 


42 


- 


- 


3 


186 


186 


204 Sandwich . 


37 


25 


_ 


_ 


12 


158 


158 


205 Norwell . 


48 


46 


— 


— 


2 


170 


170 


206 Tisbury . 


58 


43 


_ 


— 


15 


193 


193 


207 Littleton . 


41 


37 


1 


— 


3 


155 


152 


208 Essex 


33 


33 


- 


- 


- 


167 


166 


209 Brookfield 


46 


32 


_ 


_ 


14 


164 


158 


210 Sudbury . 


50 


27 


4 


— 


19 


140 


119 


211 West Newbury . 


29 


29 


— 


— 


— 


179 


179 


212 Oak Bluffs 


43 


33 


— 


— 


10 


200 


199 


213 Edgartown 


41 


30 


- 


- 


11 


149 


149 


214 Stow 


59 


30 


_ 


_ 


29 


130 


126 


215 Orleans . 


35 


21 


— 


— 


14 


132 


126 


216 Dover 


29 


19 


9 


— 


1 


119 


90 


217 Mendon . 


32 


17 


— 


— 


15 


127 


125 


218 New Marlborough 


35 


30 


- 


- 


5 


126 


126 


219 Sherborn . 


36 


32 


_ 


_ 


4 


100 


98 


220 Ashfield . 


21 


14 


— 


_ 


7 


119 


118 


221 Topsfield . 


30 


28 


— 


— 


2 


100 


94 


222 Ashby 


36 


19 


— 


— 


17 


153 


151 


223 Bernardston 


36 


30 


- 


- 


6 


134 


134 


224 Brimfield . 


31 


18 


_ 


_ 


13 


121 


121 


225 Charlemont 


32 


30 


— 


— 


2 


78 


77 


226 Wellfleet . 


13 


12 


_ 


— 


1 


83 


83 


227 Brewster . 


29 


19 


_ 


— 


10 


78 


78 


228 Princeton . 


26 


14 


- 


- 


12 


80 


77 


229 Petersham 


20 


7 


_ 


_ 


13 


78 


78 


230 New Salem 


10 


6 


_ 


— 


4 


57 


57 


231 Cummington 


17 


4 


- 


- 


13 


54 


54 


Total . 


9,728 


6,877 


334 


2 


2,515 


35,683 


33,991 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



89 



OF Age, October 1, 1927 



Yeabs 



23 






S C -e:=. 



14 TO 16 Yeabs 



» ID 




3 o3 








" « s 

•2i 



li 



>x>': 



Illiterate 

Minors, 16 to 21 

Years of Agei 



<0 



a> 3 






So 






'«2tT -^Ib' 



a 






rt 



!>iCO 



22 



1 

30 



21 



28 
2 



98 



1,584 



26 



30 


53 


50 


41 


46 


45 


55 


32 


60 


59 


62 


52 


57 


52 


71 


70 


45 


32 


82 


63 


70 


54 


71 


69 


51 


51 


33 


33 


38 


38 


49 


51 


53 


50 


64 


63 


45 


39 


39 


39 


28 


28 


55 


47 


59 


59 


57 


49 


60 


60 


34 


33 


41 


41 


57 


51 


46 


44 


40 


40 


49 


42 


53 


46 


38 


38 


48 


42 


46 


42 


37 


37 


50 


49 


39 


28 


38 


32 


30 


28 


24 


21 


34 


29 


45 


36 


39 


34 


55 


53 


31 


31 


14 


14 


36 


36 


14 


14 


21 


20 


16 


16 


11 


10 


16 


16 



9,047 7,693 



104 



105 106 



11 


12 
1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


8 


- 


4 


1 


1 
13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


15 



10 

1 

9 
2 



297 



152 



10 818 



108 



81 



37 



90 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Membership in Public Day 







ELEMENTARY 




a> (B 














TOWNS 




■ft 


3S 

.2 -3 














1 


Stj 




Q> 




(D 


■* 
a 


lO 




Ti 


^s 


fe S 




t; 


T3 


-0 


-o 






j3 M 


S 


g 


2 


03 


OS 




M 


O 


O 


a 


O 


o 


o 


o 



179 Harwich 

180 Southborough 

181 Hamilton . 

182 Williamsburg 

183 Upton 

184 Northborough 

185 West Boylston 

186 Townsend 

187 Westminster 

188 Lunenburg 

189 Stockbridge 

190 Northfield 

191 Millis 

192 Marshfield 

193 Dennis 

194 Chatham . 

195 Duxbury . 

196 Sheffield . 

197 Huntington 

198 Shelburne 

199 Yarmouth 

200 Sterling . 

201 Chester . 

202 Plainville . 

203 Pembroke 



204 Sandwich 

205 Norwell 

206 Tisbury 

207 Littleton 

208 Essex 



209 Brookfield 

210 Sudbury . 

211 West Newbury 

212 Oak Bluffs 

213 Edgartown 

214 Stow 

215 Orleans . 

216 Dover 

217 Mendon . 

218 New Marlborough 



219 Sherborn . 

220 Ashfield . 

221 Topsfield . 

222 Ashby 

223 Bernardston 

224 Brimfield . 

225 Charlemont 

226 Wellfleet . 

227 Brewster . 

228 Princeton . 

229 Petersham 

230 New Salem 

231 Cummington 

Total . 



109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


_ 


_ 


_ 


66 


53 


46 


46 


43 


— 


— 


— 


50 


52 


40 


32 


51 


— 


— 


— 


45 


35 


39 


35 


53 


— 


— 


— 


35 


49 


51 


46 


42 


- 


- 


- 


tl 


33 


32 


27 


30 


_ 


_ 


_ 


41 


42 


27 


44 


38 


— 


17 


— 


50 


79 


54 


54 


57 


— 


— 


— 


33 


37 


33 


34 


39 


— 


— 


— 


31 


36 


37 


31 


33 


- 


- 


- 


37 


48 


37 


36 


39 


_ 


_ 


_ 


23 


30 


34 


28 


38 


_ 


_ 


— 


62 


45 


59 


45 


49 


— 


— 


— 


45 


46 


42 


29 


37 


— 


— 


— 


41 


29 


33 


36 


39 


- 


- 


- 


■ 32 


21 


32 


34 


27 


_ 


_ 


_ 


34 


28 


25 


34 


22 


_ 


_ 


_ 


41 


23 


36 


41 


29 


— 


— 


— 


34 


25 


39 


24 


31 


— 


— 


— 


39 


40 


42 


41 


39 


- 


- 


- 


24 


29 


22 


24 


23 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31 


24 


24 


14 


23 


— 


— 


— 


41 


34 


37 


24 


32 


_ 


_ 


_ 


38 


26 


28 


38 


38 


— 


_ 


— 


39 


30 


22 


34 


23 


- 


- 


- 


45 


34 


36 


25 


32 


_ 


_ 


_ 


28 


27 


24 


27 


24 


— 


— 


— 


31 


34 


28 


21 


29 


_ 


_, 


— 


40 


36 


33 


29 


33 


— 


— 


— 


34 


29 


27 


19 


35 


- 


- 


- 


19 


24 


24 


25 


21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


14 


38 


18 


24 


24 


— 


— 


— 


25 


15 


16 


21 


25 


— 


— 


— 


28 


28 


25 


24 


26 


— 


_ 


— 


37 


30 


26 


44 


35 


- 


- 


- 


27 


24 


29 


24 


25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


28 


23 


14 


16 


20 


— 


— 


— 


19 


16 


22 


25 


17 


_ 


— 




10 


13 


7 


18 


19 


— 


— 


— 


24 


22 


23 


22 


17 


- 


- 


- 


29 


27 


19 


18 


21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


13 


20 


16 


14 


— 


— 


-- 


12 


18 


16 


12 


19 


— 


— 




19 


14 


14 


12 


16 


— 


— 


-. 


24 


20 


19 


19 


22 


- 


- 


- 


25 


27 


26 


22 


22 


_ 


_ 


_ 


22 


19 


19 


13 


19 


_ 


— 


— 


21 


13 


16 


13 


14 


— 


— 


— 


12 


14 


10 


16 


11 


— 


_ 


— 


20 


9 


16 


8 


12 


- 


- 


- 


12 


14 


13 


9 


11 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


11 


7 


25 


11 


— 


— 


— 


7 


4 


8 


11 


9 


- 


- 


- 


7 


4 


16 


10 


8 


314 


303 


30 


6,257 


5,646 


5,303 


5,396 


5,365 



Pt. II. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



91 



Schools bt Grades, October 1, 1927 



«'3 



o 



2 ° 

©as 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



117 



118 



119 



120 



46 


22 


20 


38 


36 


30 


42 


41 


38 


57 


43 


25 


32 


26 


25 


40 


30 


24 


24 


33 


31 


32 


30 


28 


33 


29 


14 


38 


43 


21 


36 


35 


21 


46 


26 


47 


39 


27 


35 


20 


22 


27 


24 


29 


25 


21 


26 


19 


26 


42 


25 


33 


19 


21 


35 


31 


10 


16 


17 


20 


24 


24 


15 


34 


27 


32 


36 


43 


32 


38 


22 


11 


19 


21 


30 


20 


23 


24 


22 


18 


33 


28 


18 


15 


26 


13 


20 


33 


28 


17 


26 


30 


20 


16 


18 


19 


29 


24 


28 


30 


22 


23 


17 


27 


15 


24 


19 


20 


17 


19 


15 


11 


13 


12 


21 


13 


17 


19 


14 


16 


10 


13 


16 


15 


25 


24 


19 


17 


16 


25 


26 


23 


20 


31 


19 


14 


20 


11 


15 


12 


7 


9 


5 


13 


19 


8 


5 


14 


11 


13 


6 


10 


17 


11 


7 


8 


9 


3 


5 



11 



121 

342 
324 
328 
348 
246 

286 
399 
266 
244 
299 

245 
379 
300 
247 
224 

209 
263 
226 
277 
175 

179 
261 
279 
219 
242 

197 
216 
232 
203 
191 

194 
155 
212 
247 

188 

164 
150 
114 
159 
163 

121 
141 
127 
178 
192 

137 

111 

90 

97 

97 

100 
65 
62 



25 
13 
31 
27 
21 

24 
14 
31 
16 
31 

25 
33 
33 
25 
22 

17 
22 
18 
37 
63 

12 
16 
31 
33 
17 

18 
17 
27 
15 
20 

24 
17 
23 
15 
18 

21 

32 

9 

9 

3 

7 

6 

18 

15 

15 

20 
11 
26 



15 
19 
22 
10 
25 

23 

14 

22 

9 

15 

29 
24 
15 
14 
14 

27 
15 
18 
24 
57 

16 
15 
21 
21 
19 

11 
20 
23 
12 
21 

13 
12 
13 
12 

10 

13 

18 

21 

6 

10 

4 
14 
19 
10 
18 

21 

14 

17 

6 



14 
7 
16 
12 
11 

17 
11 
19 
11 
12 

35 
15 
20 
11 
10 

19 
23 
5 
15 
54 



25 
12 

7 

20 
10 
20 
15 
18 

8 
13 
13 
10 
13 

5 

14 
6 



6 
16 
13 

7 
12 

14 

14 
11 

7 
4 

12 
10 



125 

14 
12 
21 
12 
15 

9 

9 

19 

3 



12 
15 

27 

10 

2 

19 
15 

17 
15 
46 



16 

7 

14 
13 
12 
18 
10 

11 
7 
6 
5 

10 

4 

13 

6 



11 

15 

9 

5 

10 

16 
13 

24 
6 



126 

2 
1 



70 
51 
91 
61 

72 

74 
48 
91 
39 
67 

102 
87 
95 
62 

48 

82 
78 
59 
91 
220 

39 
31 
85 
82 
50 

64 
60 
82 
60 
69 

56 
49 
59 
42 
51 

43 
77 
42 
29 
25 

28 
51 
59 
37 
55 

71 
52 

78 
27 
21 

39 
64 
17 



5,099 4,722 3,995 



11 42,441 



3,682 2,828 2,253 1,880 



70 10,713 



92 P.D. 2. 

Group III. Towns op Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



School Buildings in 
Use, Jan. 1, 1928 




Estimated Value op 



ELEMENTARY 



179 Harwich 

180 Southborough 

181 Hamilton 

182 Williamsburg 

183 Upton 

184 Northborough 

185 West Boylston 

186 Townsend . 

187 Westminster 

188 Lunenburg 

189 Stockbridge 

190 Northfield . 

191 MiUis 

192 Marshfield . 

193 Dennis 

194 Chatham . 

195 Duxbury 

196 Sheffield . 

197 Huntington 

198 Shelburne . 

199 Yarmouth . 

200 Sterling 

201 Chester 

202 Plainville . 

203 Pembroke . 

204 Sandwich . 

205 Norwell 

206 Tisbury 

207 Littleton . 

208 Essex 

209 Brookfield . 

210 Sudbury . 

211 West Newbury 

212 Oak Bluffs . 

213 Edgartown 

214 Stow . 

215 Orleans 

216 Dover 

217 Mendon 

218 New Marlborough 

219 Sherborn 

220 Ashfield 

221 Topsfield . 

222 Ashby 

223 Bernardston 



224 
225 
226 

227 
228 

229 
230 
231 



Brimfield . 
Charlemont 
Wellfleet . 
Brewster 
Princeton . 

Petersham . 
New Salem 
Cummington 

Total . 



135 



136 



$300 
3,500 
3,600 
450 
3,000 


$30,000 
90,000 
48,000 
27,000 
44,000 


1,500 

3,000 

800 

700 

2,650 


30,000 
41,500 
25,000 
7,000 
35,000 


3,750 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
550 


47.000 
12,000 
30,000 
8,000 
15,000 


2,800 
2,000 
2,800 
1,100 


50,000 
18,000 
12,000 
20,000 
15.000 


1,700 
300 
6,000 
2,500 
1,100 


18.450 
6,000 
40,000 
35,000 
25,000 


2,000 
850 
1,400 
1,250 
1,000 


20,000 
7,500 
10,000 
10,000 
12,000 


2,500 
900 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 


28,700 
62,000 
50,000 
20,000 
70,000 


1,500 
150 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 


18.000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
12.000 


2,500 

800 

700 

1,000 


62,000 

9,000 

10,000 

30,000 

5,000 


1,200 

900 

500 

2,500 

1,000 


12,500 
7,000 
4,000 
15,300 
11.000 


700 

125 

2,000 


28,500 
3,600 
5,000 



61 171 522 



$458,631 $6,485,545 



Ptil. 

AND MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Concluded 



93 



Public School Property 


SCHOOLS 


JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 












sl^ 












^ g 

' 03 a> 


















"3 


S ts.2 






5, 


S 03.2 







■35:2 


"s 


1 


bo 

a 


33:2 


"3 


T3 

a 

03 


0-^— 







3 


jy-M-, 





u 


W 


H 


M 


m 


w 


H 





137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


$3,500 


$33,800 


$150 


$10,000 


$4,000 


$14,150 


$47,950 


5,000 


98,500 


- 


— 


2,000 


2,000 


100,500 


2,250 


53,850 


1,200 


20,000 


500 


21,700 


75,550 


2,790 


30,240 


1,000 


40,000 


2,950 


43,950 


74,190 


3,000 


50,000 


3,000 


30,000 


4,500 


37,500 


87,500 


3,000 


34,500 


1,000 


60,000 


4,000 


65,000 


99,500 


3,450 


47,950 


2,000 


60,000 


3,500 


65,500 


113,450 


5,500 


31,300 


400 


5,000 


2,500 


7,900 


39,200 


1,000 


8,700 


500 


16,000 


1,600 


18,100 


26,800 


4,650 


42,300 


2,650 


50,000 


6,550 


59,200 


101,500 


4,500 


55,250 


2,500 


38,500 


4,000 


45,000 


100,250 


3,500 


17,500 


3,000 


30,000 


3,000 


36,000 


53,500 


1,500 


32,500 


1,200 


36,000 


1,200 


38,400 


70,900 


1,000 


10,000 


4,000 


45,000 


5,000 


54,000 


64,000 


3,000 


18,550 


50 


3,000 


1,500 


4,550 


23,100 


3,000 


53,000 


750 


50,000 


6,000 


56,750 


109,750 


1,200 


22,000 


3,000 


130,000 


10,000 


143,000 


165,000 


1,000 


15,000 


1,500 


20,000 


3,000 


24,500 


39,500 


2,300 


25,100 


2,150 


20,000 


2,400 


24,550 


49,650 


500 


16,600 


- 


- 


1,000 


1,000 


17,600 


3,800 


23,950 


400 


7,000 


1,600 


9,000 


32,950 


200 


6,500 


1,000 


3,000 


200 


4,200 


10,700 


6,000 


52,000 


4,000 


65,000 


5,500 


74,500 


126,500 


1,900 


39,400 


1,500 


31,000 . 


2,500 


35,000 


74,400 


3,000 


29,100 


500 


25,000 


2,500 


28,000 


57,100 


2,000 


24,000 


1,000 


15,000 


2,500 


18,500 


42,500 


2,000 


10,350 


500 


50,000 


2,500 


53,000 


63,350 


1,400 


12,800 


700 


5,000 


1,000 


6,700 


19,500 


1,000 


12,250 


1,700 


51,000 


4,000 


56,700 


68,950 


1,000 


14,000 


1,000 


12,000 


1,500 


14,500 


28,500 


5,000 


36,200 


1,000 


15,000 


7,800 


23,800 


60,000 


3,425 


66,325 


100 


31,000 


2,200 


33,300 


99,625 


6,000 


57,000 


500 


15,000 


3,000 


18,500 


75,500 


2,000 


23,000 


500 


10,000 


1,000 


11,500 


34,500 


6,000 


78,000 


1,000 


40,000 


4,000 


45,000 


123,000 


3,000 


22,500 


500 


40,000 


1,000 


41,500 


64,000 


1,350 


21,500 


150 


10,000 


1,800 


11,950 


33,450 


3,500 


25,000 


400 


6,500 


4,840 


11,740 


36,740 


1,500 


23,000 


— 


— 


— 


- 


23,000 


1,000 


14,000 


500 


2,500 


500 


3,500 


17,500 


4,500 


69,000 


2,500 


65,000 


2,000 


69,500 


138,500 


3,500 


12,500 


— 


— 


2,000 


2,000 


14,500 


800 


11,600 


200 


5,000 


200 


5,400 


17,000 


1,500 


32,200 


300 


4,000 


500 


4,800 


37,000 


1,000 


7,000 


1,000 


12,000 


3,000 


16,000 


23,000 


500 


14,200 


_ 


_ 


2,500 


2,500 


16,700 


400 


8,300 


500 


8,000 


1,000 


9,500 


17,800 


500 


5,000 


500 


7,000 


2,000 


9,500 


14,500 


1,150 


18,950 


2,500 


15,300 


1,150 


18,950 


37,900 


600 


12,600 


300 


7,000 


400 


7,700 


20,300 


1,200 


30,400 


500 


12,500 


800 


13,800 


44,200 


465 


4,190 


200 


11,000 


700 


11,900 


16,090 


1,600 


8,600 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8,600 


$587,574 


$7,531,750 


$258,402 


$5,119,881 


$512,082 


$5,890,365 


$13,422,115 



94 



GrROUP IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 







^ 


^- 


Teaching 


Staff in 


Public 






1 


^^ 


Day Schools - 


- Kindergarten 


Ele- 






ft 


MENTAET, HlQH JaN 


1, 1928 












PART 




TOWNS 









FTJLli TIME 




TIME 












2 
o5 






. 






m 






mA 






§ 


a 


m 


2 


m 




S =3 






•s 

g3 iO 


o 


ft 




2 




.2 0) 






Is 

O 


03 <N 
03'"' 








O 








(S 


> 


Ph 


m 


H 


H 


M 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


232 


Tewksbury . 


4,985 


$3,147,719 


- 


- 


15 


15 


4 


233 


Auburn 


4,927 


5,368,135 


— 


1 


31 


32 


1 


234 


Dudley 


4,594 


3,683,260 


1 


— 


22 


23 


4 


235 


Seekonk 


4,191 


4,528,946 


— 


— 


21 


21 


2 


236 


Acushnet 


4,135 


3,988,887 


- 


~ 


22 


22 


~ 


237 


Longmeadow 


3,333 


8,615,893 


1 


- 


24 


25 


3 


238 


Dighton 


3,208 


4,098,332 


— 


— 


22 


22 


— 


239 


East Longmeadow . 


3,134 


3,568,795 


— 


— 


19 


19 


2 


240 


Bellingham . 


2,877 


2,559,373 


— 


— 


14 


14 


1 


241 


Wilbraham . 


2,833 


3,251,999 


- 


- 


18 


18 


2 


242 


Hull . 


2,652 


17,591,855 


2 


- 


14 


16 


4 


243 


Shirley 


2,394 


2,093,371 


— 


— 


9 


9 


2 


244 


Millville 


2,366 


1,455,515 


— 


— 


11 


11 


4 


245 


Rehoboth 


2,332 


2,083,692 


— 


— 


12 


12 


— 


246 


Hanson 


2,166 


2,372,886 


- 


- 


10 


10 


2 


247 


Ashburnham 


2,159 


1,703,568 


- 


- 


12 


12 


3 


248 


Raynham 


2,128 


1,839,006 


— 


— 


12 


12 


— 


249 


Georgetown . 


1,888 


1,882,338 


— 


— 


9 


9 


2 


250 


Sturbridge 


1,845 


1,242,750 


— 


— 


9 


9 


4 


251 


Chesliire 


1,842 


1,414,566 


- 


- 


8 


8 


2 


252 


Salisbury 


1,820 


3,090,282 


- 


- 


9 


9 


2 


253 


Westwood . . 


1,706 


4,138,872 


— 


— 


10 


10 


2 


254 


North Reading 


1,689 


2,159,224 


1 


- 


7 


8 


2 


255 


Middleton . 


1,667 


1,647,457 


— 


— 


5 


5 


2 


256 


Freetown 


1,663 


1,750,340 


- 


"" 


11 


11 


"" 


257 


Nahant 


1,630 


4,977,039 


1 


- 


9 


10 


4 


258 


Colrain 


1,562 


1,370,972 


— 


— 


14 


14 


2 


259 


Mattapoisett 


1,556 


3,902,109 


1 


— 


9 


10 


4 


260 


Buckland 


1,555 


2,737,681 


— 


— 


11 


11 


2 


261 


Bedford 


1,514 


2,762,441 


"" 


~ 


9 


9 


5 


262 


Lakeville 


1,439 


1,419,059 


- 


- 


8 


8 


- 


263 


Newbury 


1,432 


2,264,883 


— 


— 


8 


8 


1 


264 


Burlington 


1,431 


2,308,130 


— 


— 


8 


8 


3 


265 


Rowley 


1,408 


1,391,711 


— 


— 


9 


9 


2 


266 


Russell 


1,398 


3,980,326 


— 


"" 


11 


11 


2 


267 


Erving . 


1,334 


2,273,845 


- 


- 


9 


9 


1 


268 


Lynnfield 


1,331 


3,102,084 


— 


— 


8 


8 


2 


269 


West Brookfield . 


1,314 


1,364,578 


— 


— 


9 


9 


2 


270 


Carver . 


1,306 


2,860,010 


— 


— 


10 


10 


— 


271 


Lincoln 


1,306 


2,806,667 


- 


~ 


9 


9 


2 


272 


Sunderland . 


1,290 


1,196,503 


_ 


- 


10 


10 


4 


273 


Marion 


1,271 


4,512,981 


1 


— 


8 


9 


6 


274 


Southwick 


1,267 


1,843,530 


— 


— 


12 


12 


— 


275 


Whately 


1,229 


1,124,177 


— 


— 


10 


10 


1 


276 


Clarksburg . 


1,222 


702,690 


~ 


~ 


8 


8 


4 


277 


Norfolk 


1,213 


1,597,839 


- 


- 


6 


6 


2 


278 


West Stockbridge . 


1,212 


1,195,104 


— 


— 


8 


8 


1 


279 


Lanesborough 


1,181 


1,139,885 


— 


— 


10 


10 


2 


280 


Wenham 


1,145 


3,234,770 


— 


— 


8 


8 


2 


281 


Berkley 


1,118 


975,387 


" 




6 


6 





Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



95 



Pupils 


IN Public Day Schools - 


- Kindergarten, Elementary, 








High - 


- Year ending June 30, 


1928 






•^ 1 


V, 






I-. a 

a) — 

1- 


ft 


lom the 
tuition 
s than 
ol year 






-^ 




2 


tyJi 




si 


3 


MS 


ll 


ol 


upils for 
town pa 
Eor not 
balf of s 


fon-resid 
attende 
than ha 
year 


> 3 

oi o 

O 


Ph 


< 


< 


■< 


< 


(h 


^ 


15 


8 


9 


10 ■ 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


486 


80,843 


441 . 


183 


467 


95 


_ 


562 


1,076 


187,289 


1,001 


187 


1,066 


240 


— 


1,306 


621 


102,580 


551 


186 


590 


104 


— 


694 


865 


131,049 


732 


179 


797 


102 


— 


899 


716 


115,164 


644 


187 


679 


46 


- 


725 


723 


115,555 


636 


182 


685 


123 


21 


787 


608 


97,817 


537 


182 


577 


63 


3 


637 


634 


102,269 


557 


184 


597 


140 


4 


733 


585 


82,112 


481 


171 


512 


53 


13 


552 


487 


76,243 


413 


184 


454 


88 


9 


533 


422 


60,386 


353 


175 


382 


86 


5 


463 


284 


46,845 


272 


172 


283 


33 


— 


316 


431 


70,622 


396 


178 


416 


48 


1 


463 


468 


71,102 


402 


177 


446 


52 


11 


487 


397 


59,585 


332 


179 


368 


98 


4 


462 


424 


69,084 


388 


178 


413 


1 


3 


411 


403 


61,561 


338 


182 


361 


54 


6 


409 


290 


47,729 


267 


182 


282 


— 


4 


278 


282 


45,842 


256 


179 


268 


43 


3 


308 


332 


51,885 


287 


181 


306 


78 


7 


377 


314 


45,729 


257 


178 


278 


68 


1 


345 


255 


41,222 


224 


184 


244 


56 


9 


291 


275 


41,717 


230 


181 


251 


81 


— 


332 


178 


29,546 


164 


180 


171 


42 


1 


213 


281 


44,972 


250 


180 


275 


26 


1 


300 


245 


39,171 


217 


181 


235 


54 


_ 


289 


261 


41,824 


228 


184 


244 


50 


8 


286 


346 


50,195 


271 


185 


284 


36 


— 


320 


226 


38,754 


211 


184 


222 


79 


1 


300 


292 


48,884 


270 


181 


286 


76 


- 


362 


226 


29,143 


171 


170 


183 


42 


4 


221 


206 


33,125 


192 


173 


209 


35 


6 


238 


335 


52,163 


279 


187 


306 


54 


5 


355 


216 


36,535 


203 


181 


213 


52 


3 


262 


268 


44,908 


242 


186 


255 


40 


- 


295 


216 


35,938 


199 


177 


210 


57 


_ 


267 


252 


39,987 


213 


187 


228 


70 


5 


293 


205 


35,315 


190 


186 


202 


28 


6 


224 


298 


43,347 


247 


176 


266 


44 


11 


299 


238 


37,781 


211 


180 


222 


51 


12 


261 


330 


65,328 


304 


182 


317 


40 


_ 


357 


240 


41,224 


221 


187 


230 


11 


— 


241 


313 


44,947 


260 


173 


285 


33 


7 


311 


268 


44,528 


244 


182 


256 


70 


1 


325 


196 


30,364 


171 


178 


189 


35 


2 


222 


192 


30,061 


169 


178 


180 


56 


_ 


236 


236 


36,532 


200 


182 


217 


60 


— 


277 


247 


33,628 


191 


177 


212 


47 


3 


256 


166 


27,945 


148 


191 


156 


45 


— 


201 


228 


32,015 


189 


1G9 


206 


28 


1 


233 



96 



Group IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Itemized Expenditubes for Support of Public 



TOWNS 



•P5 



"3 0.O 





16 




■' 17 


18 


19 


232 Tewksbury 


$1,613 76 


$19,974 75 


$721 38 


$700 00 


233 Auburn 


2,939 


04 


39,554 50 


1,725 88 


1,684 48 


234 Dudley 


3,010 


34 


34,379 50 


849 06 


1,093 28 


235 Seekonk . 


1,964 


25 


22.975 38 


2,570 77 


1,462 16 


236 Acushnet . 


3,738 


19 


28,054 87 


857 62 


1,515 25 


237 Longmeadow 


2,284 


93 


44,577 48 


1,246 74 


1,873 90 


238 Dighton . 


2,237 


34 


26,181 38 


1,951 69 


1,534 15 


239 East Longmeadow 


1,874 


92 


25,422 75 


699 86 


1,045 25 


240 Bellingham 


1,749 


99 


17,035 00 


562 12 


466 83 


241 Wilbraham 


2.056 


32 


22.057 85 


680 97 


1.008 65 


242 Hull .... 


3,303 


10 


39.859 00 


2.422 88 


459 64 


243 Shirley 


1,541 


08 


10,054 00 


441 02 


299 59 


244 Millville . 


1,420 71 


15,718 00 


829 87 


774 80 


245 Rehoboth . 


2,018 


55 


11,676 20 


2.406 25 


514 42 


246 Hanson 


1,560 


64 


11,232 00 


353 03 


427 05 


247 Ashburnham 


1,389 


60 


13,660 04 


597 93 


698 14 


248 Raynham . 


1,868 


31 


12.422 17 


524 52 


388 71 


249 Georgetown 


1,098 


79 


13.558 38 


709 84 


274 45 


250 Sturbridge . 


2,227 


16 


11,757 50 


267 26 


313 70 


251 Cheshire . 


1,249 


94 


8,696 83 


243 31 


287 07 


252 Salisbury . 


926 


56 


11,331 40 


549 47 


175 30 


253 Westwood . 


1,226 


65 


15,013 25 


671 22 


515 75 


254 North Reading . 


550 


35 


10,125 00 


463 91 


665 71 


255 Middleton . 


826 


98 


6,970 00 


251 58 


564 75 


256 Freetown . 


1,606 


87 


13,440 19 


718 90 


512 12 


257 Nahant . 


2,185 


19 


16,718 00 


357 15 


683 85 


258 Coh-ain 


1,659 


56 


14,245 75 


449 25 


501 74 


259 Mattapoisett 


855 


00 


14,620 30 


483 63 


779 25 


260 Buckland . 


1,667 


54 


11,632 88 


462 92 


544 91 


261 Bedford . 


1,188 88 


15,200 85 


483 57 


1,147 21 


262 Lakeville . 


1,137 


79 


8.510 00 


310 64 


411 73 


263 Newbury . 


822 


02 


9.755 00 


409 20 


214 87 


264 Burlington 


1,054 28 


10,854 00 


428 36 


381 40 


265 Rowley 


828 68 


9.355 13 


283 44 


318 71 


266 Russell 


1,609 


35 


14,058 88 


406 82 


597 74 


267 Erving 


1,470 


53 


10,799 00 


300 46 


218 96 


268 Lynnfield . 


1,000 


93 


12,160 00 


493 79 


358 37 


269 West Brookfield . 


1,273 


00 


10,427 13 


218 07 


623 29 


270 Carver 


1,440 


30 


11,488 19 


411 05 


721 82 


271 Lincoln 


793 76 


15,622 00 


579 71 


674 38 


272 Sunderland 


944 


92 


11,336 50 


200 08 


729 96 


273 Marion 


1,260 03 


16,102 51 


426 16 


1,187 20 


274 Southwick . 


1,739 


89 


14,700 00 


570 00 


724 97 


275 Whately . 


1,036 


49 


10,497 50 


236 54 


549 32 


276 Clarksburg 


1,041 


58 


8.814 97 


183 25 


231 01 


277 Norfolk . 


1,119 


19 


8,540 00 


319 64 


653 83 


278 West Stockbridge 


1,277 


60 


8,190 50 


296 55 


453 74 


279 Lanesborough 


1,353 


29 


11,674 25 


177 39 


187 09 


280 Wenham . 


1,164 


33 


13.379 50 


405 56 


363 52 


281 Berkley . 


885 


09 


6,179 47 


349 00 


142 86 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



97 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation — Year ending June 30, 1928 



-3 3 




f3 








transportation 


3 O 




a> 






^ 






•Z, (a 

a 


a 


fe« 












C3 


13 


M 1 


Kca 










<v 






|1 




It 




J3 


•| 


O $ 

SB 


"1 


1 


*| 


«> 


a 


"o 


-sS 








u 


o 




|| 


a c3 


a 


§•* 


rS 


2 


O"*^ 


o " 


1-5 




« 




;3 


dn 


H 


Eh 


20 




21 




22 


23 


24 


25 


$5,490 


28 


$1,816 83 


_ 


$1,342 41 


$4,910 20 


$4,524 40 


11,167 


75 


2,708 


38 


- 


1,582 20 


1,125 00 


3,970 00 


7,466 


63 


863 


78 


$10 10 


427 75 


- 


2,020 68 


4,592 


40 


1,365 


06 


— 


920 40 


4,765 24 


3,032 68 


7,318 73 


1,016 


75 


- 


421 79 


3,228 60 


1,619 35 


9.215 


03 


5,118 


65 


101 04 


1,372 83 


492 00 


2,133 92 


7,449 


75 


4,477 


71 


- 


2,071 42 


3,285 75 


3,048 50 


5,075 


39 


3,105 


46 


— 


1,203 72 


1,249 60 


4,260 97 


3,865 


91 


349 


44 


— 


425 00 


2,322 52 


3,161 70 


4,256 


20 


3,237 


62 


- 


1,229 23 


1,737 30 


5,470 50 


8,822 


29 


2,342 


37 


_ 


3,023 55 


11,080 50 


10,535 00 


3,262 


57 


1,026 


32 


— 


1,375 85 


3,547 50 


3,084 64 


2,239 


29 


805 


12 


— 


244 00 


1,000 00 


2,000 00 


1,494 


99 


788 


25 


— 


857 69 


2,967 70 


5,265 65 


2,668 


00 


844 


21 


- 


695 84 


2,077 25 


4,281 98 


2,771 


83 


1,161 


62 


_ 


625 n 


2,198 25 


60 00 


3,196 


73 


855 


04 


— 


393 33 


2,582 40 


2,180 00 


2,227 


05 


374 


04 


— 


60 00 


4,798 65 


— 


2,283 


49 


379 


71 


_ 


196 75 


4,290 02 


2,377 92 


2,814 


53 


197 


78 


- 


421 22 


2,993 56 


3,030 22 


2,051 


40 


658 


55 


_ 


333 80 


2,250 00 


2,850 00 


2,928 


17 


3,479 


31 


— 


303 35 


2,357 35 


2,426 55 


1,423 


03 


575 


87 


- 


168 53 


8,620 58 


4,312 31 


1,674 


00 


264 


02 


— 


418 70 


2,500 00 


1,216 00 


2,754 


49 


677 


11 


- 


931 90 


3,312 50 


3,351 41 


5,095 


95 


356 


19 


64 00 


765 20 


25 00 


1,243 41 


2,330 


84 


1,165 


28 


— 


102 SO 


1,452 50 


4,680 88 


3,423 


66 


1,428 


39 


— 


300 00 


2,551 25 


1,309 10 


3,240 


50 


859 


09 


— 


100 00 


439 20 


2,140 00 


2,678 90 


165 


93 


- 


972 79 


3,999 75 


1,600 00 


2,133 


63 


976 


66 


_ 


212 20 


3,704 00 


2,199 00 


3,010 


51 


323 


38 


- 


225 75 


1,883 91 


3.028 09 


1,737 


25 


132 


78 


— 


414 17 


3,700 00 


4,296 00 


1,454 


19 


330 


19 


— 


85 00 


2,165 80 


2,493 90 


3,909 


42 


394 


11 


170 08 


500 00 


1,782 01 


1.181 19 


4,754 


48 


488 


67 


6 00 


700 00 


604 00 


4,517 28 


4,021 


73 


501 


57 


— 


505 24 


1,179 00 


3,949 15 


1,796 


13 


1,037 


96 


— 


340 40 


2,195 20 


1,658 80 


1,989 


32 


924 


01 


_ 


211 59 


5,156 34 


3,791 00 


3,107 


27 


553 


66 


- 


636 68 


5,587 00 


2,220 79 


4,115 


52 


9 


85 


_ 


281 40 


3,334 60 


1,919 10 


4,767 


93 


1,368 00 


_ 


472 75 


2,453 74 


850 00 


1,418 


42 


282 


96 


6 00 


188 00 


2,035 27 


1,396 80 


3,598 


76 


500 


77 


_ 


260 30 


1,460 00 


1,800 96 


1,810 


79 


243 


47 


28 59 


264 75 


- 


360 00 


1,947 


04 


174 


97 


_ 


320 28 


2,800 00 


1,710 51 


1,742 


18 


406 


53 


_ 


211 56 


334 00 


3,828 77 


2,636 


53 


582 


45 


— 


187 89 


720 00 


1,794 57 


2,326 


13 


884 


99 


6 16 


667 10 


1,900 00 


1,049 50 


1,395 


42 


167 


22 


~ 


483 98 


3,870 00 


3,476 20 



98 



P.D. 2. 

Gboup IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 







Itemi 


?ed Expendittjhes for Support 










OF Public Schools — 


- Day, Evening 


Vacation 


Expenditures 




TOWNS 


— Year ending 


June 30, 1928 - 


-Con. 




ending June 








Xi 


o 

ft 




2 h 










3 
S 


t 




h 






a 
o 




1 


s 




3 03 
oil « 3 






1 




§ 


1 

o 










26 




27 


28 




29 


232 


Tewksbury 


«9,308 52 


$2,730 55 


$53,133 08 


_ 


233 


Auburn 


. . . 27,641 


00 


— 


94,098 


23 


— 


234 


Dudley 


9,207 


80 


1,284 38 


60,613 


30 


— 


235 


Seekonk 


13,880 


88 


62 42 


57,591 


64 


$244 79 


236 


Acushnet . 


6,685 


20 


39 30 


54,495 


65 


- 


237 


Longmeadow 


20,977 


20 


_ 


89,393 


72 


_ 


238 


Dighton 


7,779 


01 


— 


60,016 


70 


19,124 82 


239 


East Longmeadow 


22,340 


30 


135 10 


66,413 


32 


400 00 


240 


Bellingham 


7,416 


22 


850 34 


38,205 


07 


— 


241 


Wilbarham 


13,230 


30 


559 20 


55,524 


14 


- 


242 


Hull . 


9,370 


43 


4,431 64 


95,650 


40 


668 42 


243 


Shirley 


3,740 


75 


126 49 


28,499 


81 


— 


244 


MiUville . 


5,511 


00 


2 50 


30,545 


29 


— 


245 


Rehoboth . 


5,389 


06 


— 


33,378 


76 


500 00 


246 


Hanson 


9,364 


42 


74 60 


33,579 


02 


- 


247 


Ashburnham 




- 


111 00 


23,273 


52 


_ 


248 


Raynham . 


! • 7,148 


86 


29 97 


31,590 


04 


— 


249 


Georgetown 






4,768 04 


27,859 


24 


— 


250 


Sturbridge . 


'. 3,926 


22 


183 95 


28,203 


68 


3,000 00 


251 


Cheshire 


5,392 


11 


169 29 


25,495 


86 


- 


252 


Salisbury . 


6,404 


00 


22 04 


27,552 


52 


_ 


253 


Westwood . 


7,302 


46 


284 35 


36,508 41 


— 


254 


North Reading . 


7,990 


45 


— 


34,895 


74 


— 


255 


Middleton . 


585 


99 


65 00 


15,337 


02 


— 


256 


Freetown . 


3,242 


50 


135 50 


30,683 


49 


603 57 


257 


Nahant 


8,128 


40 


112 71 


35,735 


05 


_ 


258 


Colrain 


6,064 


67 


150 53 


32,803 


50 


— 


259 


Mattapoisett 


3,549 


66 


61 56 


29,361 


80 


— 


260 


Buckland . 


9,123 


68 


58 38 


30,269 


10 


— 


261 


Bedford 


8,806 


88 


- 


36,244 


76 


- 


262 


Lakeville . 


4,196 


19 


747 34 


24,539 


18 


_ 


263 


Newbury . 


1,274 


61 


134 84 


21,082 


18 


600 00 


264 


Burlington . 


6,021 


86 


15 00 


29,035 


10 


— 


265 


Rowley 


4,592 


50 


70 09 


21,977 


63 


— 


266 


RuBseli 


4,783 


97 


411 97 


29,805 


54 


4,359 56 


267 


Erving 


4,852 


50 


45 50 


28,757 


38 


_ 


268 


Lynnfield . 


10,042 


16 


859 53 


35,071 


47 


10 00 


269 


West Brookfield . 


3,000 


25 


49 10 


22,619 


33 


— 


270 


Carver 


3,911 


62 


549 37 


30,594 


61 


— 


271 


Lincoln 


5,765 


80 ■ 


- 


35,541 


05 


- 


272 


Sunderland 


5,085 


58 


19 00 


27,976 


41 


_ 


273 


Marion 


535 


76 


693 43 


30,117 


51 


— 


274 


Southwick . 


3,972 


24 


— 


27,034 


55 


— 


275 


Whately . 


5,263 28 


- 


25,203 


92 


— 


276 


Clarksburg 


4,234 71 


136 72 


17,349 


84 


4,346 68 


277 


Norfolk 


5,884 


20 


98 00 


23,567 


66 


_ 


278 


West Stockbridge 


4,493 


69 


6 00 


21,241 


12 


832 62 


279 


Lanesborough 


4,658 


23 


267 22 


24,138 


91 


1,159 82 


280 


Wenham 


4,868 75 


526 28 


27,541 


82 


— 


281 


Berkley 


3,435 


78 


"" 


20,295 


02 


2,612 76 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



99 



FOR Outlay, Year 




Valuation op 


Expenditure for 






30, 1928 




1927 PER Pupil 


School Support from 


Rate of 


TOTAT. T*T 






IN Net Average 
Membership, 


Local Taxation, 
Year Ending 


per 81,000 
Valuation. 1027 










Year ending June 


Dec. 31, 1927, 






1 


1 


30, 1928 


per $1,000 Valuation 






a 


3 
O 


> 


> 




> 


0< 












•3 


g 


•s .si 


■*3 d ^ 


^ 


a <=>• 


o* 


**-■ 


d .Ha 


a 


•H d 




3 

o 


1 1^ 


i to 


d 
o 

a 


•^2 

go 


^ 


H 


< Ph 


< Ph 


o 


« 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


_ 


_ 


$5,601 86 


$11 86 23 


$29 00 


45 


S860 57 


$860 57 


4,110 114 


14 16 8 


30 00 


36 


84 32 


84 32 


5,307 94 


15 13 4 


34 00 


12 


86 50 


331 29 


5,037 99 


9 69 53 


26 50 


66 


455 34 


455 34 


5,502 89 


12 76 15 


29 50 


42 


2,164 28 


2,164 28 


10,947 23 


9 50 58 


27 00 


64 


501 80 


19,626 62 


6,434 66 


13 02 13 


25 50 


75 


— 


400 00 


4,868 101 


11 95 22 


28 00 


50 


1,646 21 


1,646 21 


4,637 104 


9 27 65 


22 00 


97 


72 41 


72 41 


6,101 75 


9 06 68 


35 30 


4 


_ 


668 42 


37,995 2 


4 77 118 


30 20 


35 


80 00 


80 00 


6,624 63 


6 41 104 


30 50 


34 


40 80 


40 80 


3,144 124 


15 78 1 


37 00 


3 


— 


500 00 


4,279 111 


11 82 24 


22 80 


95 


- 


- 


5,136 97 


10 84 40 


31 40 


28 


261 00 


261 00 


5,001 100 


10 60 43 


37 50 


2 


— 


— 


4,496 105 


12 24 16 


27 60 


59 


— 


— 


6,771 60 


10 87 39 


27 00 


63 


— 


3,000 00 


4,035 115 


15 71 2 


30 00 


39 


- 


- 


3,752 118 


12 84 14 


32 00 


24 


168 55 


168 55 


8,957 38 


6 15 110 


33 60 


14 


103 85 


103 85 


14,222 13 


7 60 86 


22 20 


96 


— 


— 


6,503 64 


11 04 34 


30 50 


33 


174 65 


174 65 


7,771 45 


7 86 85 


29 60 


41 


225 49 


829 06 


5,834 82 


13 36 12 


30 00 


37 


119 56 


119 56 


17,221 8 


6 36 105 


33 50 


15 


34 00 


34 00 


4,794 102 


15 23 3 


34 00 


11 


40 57 


40 57 


12,194 20 


6 04 111 


23 50 


90 


16 06 


16 06 


9,126 37 


7 59 87 


20 00 


103 


876 81 


876 81 


7,631 47 


10 28 47 


28 00 


49 


62 50 


62 50 


6,421 67 


10 69 42 


28 20 


48 


— 


600 00 


9,516 34 


7 21 96 


27 50 


60 


188 92 


188 92 


6,502 65 


7 43 91 


24 00 


85 


75 72 


75 72 


5,271 95 


9 39 63 


24 00 


87 


252 50 


4,612 06 


13,492 15 


6 69 100 


15 00 


118 


_ 


_ 


8,516 40 


9 46 61 


20 00 


104 


453 62 


463 62 


10,587 26 


8 37 80 


27 70 


57 


— 


- 


6,092 76 


11 60 27 


25 00 


83 


127 09 


127 09 


9,565 33 


8 03 84 


17 00 


113 


551 85 


551 85 


10,754 24 


9 58 55 


20 00 


105 


185 54 


185 54 


3,352 122 


13 55 11 


35 00 


8 


118 02 


118 02 


18,726 6 


6 32 107 


26 00 


71 


— 


— 


5,927 79 


8 14 83 


27 00 


65 


21 25 


21 25 


3,459 121 


14 51 7 


34 55 


9 


384 22 


4,730 90 


3,165 123 


14 94 5 


33 00 


18 


124 50 


124 50 


6,771 61 


11 52 29 


33 00 


20 


181 80 


1,014 42 


4,314 110 


10 41 45 


28 00 


55 


159 00 


1,318 82 


4,452 106 


14 15 9 


35 00 


6 


299 70 


299 70 


16,093 10 


7 38 93 


19 20 


107 


94 00 


2,706 76 


4,186 113 


10 71 41 


31 00 


29 



100 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



EXPENDITUBE FOR SUPPOKT OF PuBLIC ScHOOLS DaT, 

YeAJI ENDINa 

















FROM 


STATE 








FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (iNCLUDINQ 




TOWNS 












GENERAL SCHOOL 


FUND) 








ss, 




> 






.9g 




> 






43 


5.0) S 




d 9 


•43 




%^ 




a 0- 






a 




3 >^ 




.2 3 


a 




a >^ 


.2 a 






3 

1 




g.cSg 


0. 
1 




< 




ft* 
<u a 


So. 








38 




39 


40 


41 




42 


43 


232 


Tewksbiiry 


$37,339 


09 


$66 43 


63 


$12,721 


13 


$22 64 


89 


233 


Auburn 


76,014 


21 


58 


20 


80 


11,785 


00 


9 


02 


118 


234 


Dudley 


55,726 


55 


80 


30 


35 


4,802 


60 


6 


92 


121 


235 


Seekonk . 


43,873 


48 


48 


80 


101 


7,356 


76 


8 


18 


119 


236 


Acushnet . 


50,911 


33 


70 


22 


54 


4,405 00 


6 


07 


123 


237 


Longmeadow 


81,837 


27 


103 


99 


17 


4,598 


80 


5 


84 


124 


238 


Dighton . 


53,348 75 


83 


75 


30 


3,940 


00 


6 


19 


122 


239 


East Longmeadow 


42,661 


41 


58 


20 


81 


20,700 


09 


28 


24 


76 


240 


Bellingham 


23,721 


43 


42 


97 


112 


11,187 


88 


20 


27 


97 


241 


Wilbraham 


48,266 


30 


90 


56 


23 


4,014 


09 


7 


53 


120 


242 


HuU 


83,973 


18 


181 


37 


2 


6,288 


20 


13 


58 


109 


243 


Shirley . 


20,269 


02 


64 


14 


67 


7,787 


31 


24 


64 


85 


244 


MiUviUe . 


22,968 


68 


49 


61 


99 


9,225 


96 


19 


93 


99 


245 


Rehoboth 


24,631 


56 


50 


58 


97 


8,569 


52 


17 


60 


102 


246 


Hanson . 


25,718 


13 


55 


67 


87 


5,011 


68 


10 


85 


115 


247 


Ashburnham 


18,065 


27 


43 


95 


111 


5,558 


43 


13 


52 


111 


248 


Raynham . 


22,515 


75 


55 


05 


90 


8,358 


41 


20 


44 


96 


249 


Georgetown 


20,468 


25 


73 


63 


46 


4,654 


91 


16 


74 


103 


250 


Sturbridge 


19,523 


12 


63 


38 


70 


10,569 


65 


34 


31 


63 


251 


Cheshire . 


18,161 


58 


48 


17 


104 


8,226 


54 


21 


82 


92 


252 


Salisbury . 


19,010 


34 


55 


10 


89 


7,493 


98 


21 


72 


93 


253 


Westwood 


31,448 


66 


108 


07 


14 


4,353 


53 


14 


96 


107 


254 


North Reading . 


23,836 


47 


71 


80 


49 


12,060 


21 


36 


33 


58 


255 


Middleton 


12,952 


64 


61 


10 


76 


4,272 


40 


20 


15 


98 


256 


Freetown . 


23,380 


79 


77 


93 


40 


7,831 


75 


26 


11 


83 


257 


Nahant 


31,675 


12 


109 


60 


13 


3,337 


78 


11 


55 


113 


258 


Colrain 


20,885 


06 


73 


02 


48 


10,134 


26 


35 


43 


60 


259 


Mattapoisett 


23,566 


22 


73 


64 


45 


4,861 


88 


15 


19 


106 


260 


Buokland . 


20,792 


07 


69 


31 


56 


8,738 


90 


29 


13 


72 


261 


Bedford . 


28,384 


82 


78 


41 


38 


7,116 


37 


19 


66 


100 


262 


Lakeville . 


15,163 


95 


68 


62 


57 


6,612 


27 


29 


91 


71 


263 


Newbury . 


16,320 


35 


68 


57 


58 


6,661 


51 


27 


98 


77 


264 


Burlington 


17,152 


27 


48 


32 


102 


9,713 


89 


27 


36 


79 


265 


Rowley 


13,072 


69 


49 


52 


100 


9,158 


84 


34 


69 


61 


266 


Russell 


26,614 


65 


90 


22 


24 


3,229 


19 


10 


95 


114 


267 


Erving 


21,508 


62 


80 


56 


34 


7,719 


70 


28 


91 


75 


268 


Lynnfield . 


25,954 


64 


88 


58 


25 


6,594 


26 


22 


51 


90 


269 


West Brookfield 


15,833 


52 


70 


69 


52 


7,109 


21 


31 


74 


66 


270 


Carver 


22,971 


38 


76 


83 


41 


6,250 


23 


20 


90 


95 


271 


Lincoln 


26,896 


19 


103 


05 


18 


3,876 


78 


14 


85 


108 


272 


Sunderland 


16,212 


12 


45 


41 


107 


11,801 


51 


33 


06 


65 


273 


Marion 


28,521 


11 


118 


34 


7 


3,201 


75 


13 


29 


112 


274 


Southwick 


15,013 


67 


48 


27 


103 


11,507 


12 


37 


00 


52 


275 


Whately . 


16,316 


44 


50 


20 


98 


10,077 


35 


31 


01 


67 


276 


Clarksburg 


10,496 


19 


47 


28 


106 


5,379 


12 


24 


23 


86 


277 


Norfolk . 


18,403 


32 


77 


98 


39 


5,375 


87 


22 


78 


88 


278 


West Stockbridge 


12,438 


71 


44 


91 


108 


8,068 


94 


29 


12 


73 


279 


Lanesborough . 


16,139 


19 


63 


04 


73 


7,767 


06 


30 


34 


69 


280 


Wenham . 


23,880 


97 


118 


81 


6 


2,720 


36 


13 


53 


110 


281 


Berkley . 


10,445 


20 


44 


83 


109 


10,436 


77 


44 


79 


43 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



101 



Continued 



Evening 


, Vacation - 


- Classified 


AS TO SOXIRCE, 








Amount paid 


TO Town 


Dec. 31, 


1927 












FHOM- 


■~ 




^al 


















"s-s 




FROM 


ALL SOURCES 




3 03 


3Z 




5^ 


o 










fes 


f^'^ 




0,t3"o 


a 










§fl 


"o a 






<U 




> 


o o 




S a 


g 




■" W) 




^ o 


.0 ^ 




S^S 


**^ 




ag 


_ 




Mi-rt; 






From r 
tuition 
portati< 
wards 


-p s 




a <u 


u 


3§ 
1=^ 


— S<N 


^^03 




U 

< 


d 

3 

o 

a 
< 


Per pu 

net av 
memb 
sliip 


03^03 
Id 


a 




44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 




_ 


_ 


$50,060 22 


$89 


07 


97 


$709 18 


$3,440 00 




— 


$20 00 


87,819 21 


67 


24 


119 


— 


11,785 00 




— 


11 16 


60,540 31 


87 


23 


98 


- 


4,802 60 




_ 


492 15 


51,722 39 


57 


53 


123 


— 


6,390 00 




- 


- 


55,316 33 


76 


30 


110 


- 


4,405 00 




_ 


94 80 


86,530 87 


109 


95 


63 


_ 


4,598 80 




$591 14 


375 00 


58,254 89 


91 


45 


92 


— 


3,940 00 




381 32 


61 36 


63,804 18 


87 


04 


99 


11,887 17 


8,233 22 




1,150 35 


509 34 


36,569 00 


66 


25 


121 


2,443 41 


3,244 45 




406 30 


77 18 


52,763 87 


98 


99 


83 


- 


3,434 40 




_ 


_ 


90,261 38 


194 


94 


7 


_ 


3,490 00 




— 


516 06 


28,572 39 


90 


41 


96 


— 


1,368 00 




— 


110 65 


32,305 29 


69 


77 


117 


— 


3,641 13 




122 70 


477 50 


33,801 28 


69 


41 


118 


4,053 95 


3,550 00 




134 53 




30,864 34 


66 


81 


120 


1,804 23 


2,620 00 




_ 


_ 


23,623 70 


57 


48 


124 


1,728 67 


3,185 32 




288 84 


— 


31,163 00 


76 


19 


111 


725 88 


3,365 00 




321 17 


_ 


25,444 33 


91 


52 


91 


2,287 51 


1,795 00 






120 58 


30,213 35 


98 


09 


85 


2,136 46 


2,786 00 




405 75 




26,793 87 


71 


07 


115 


1,680 65 


2,920 00 




_ 


_ 


26,504 32 


76 


82 


108 


_ 


1,758 00 




— 


919 91 


36,722 10 


126 


19 


41 


— 


1,930 00 




— 


20 00 


35,916 68 


108 


18 


65 


2,274 51 


1,805 75 




— 


— 


17,225 04 


81 


25 


106 


— 


1,020 00 




- 


4 23 


31,216 77 


104 


05 


73 


1,704 86 


1,840 00 




_ 


_ 


35,012 90 


121 


15 


49 


_ 


2,232 00 




638 93 


313 18 


31,971 43 


111 


78 


59 


1,692 76 


2,280 00 




— 


523 06 


28,951 16 


90 


47 


95 


— 


1,618 57 




327 54 


50 51 


29,909 02 


99 


70 


81 


— 


1,740 00 




- 


- 


35,501 19 


98 


06 


87 


- 


1,810 00 




223 78 


_ 


22,000 00 


99 


54 


82 


982 84 


1,450 00 




_ 


414 75 


23,396 61 


98 


31 


84 


— 


1,590 00 




124 60 


208 56 


27,199 32 


76 


62 


109 


1,017 69 


2,697 50 




233 35 


_ 


22,464 88 


85 


09 


102 


1,872 58 


2,253 25 




- 


273 50 


30,117 34 


102 


09 


76 


- 


2,122 50 




_ 


141 55 


29,369 87 


109 


99 


61 


_ 


1,740 00 




556 86 


_ 


33,105 76 


112 


99 


56 


1,164 46 


1,550 00 




292 82 


53 97 


23,289 52 


103 


97 


74 


1,264 21 


1,505 00 




- 


1,083 88 


30,305 49 


101 


36 


79 


— 


1,650 00 




1,524 70 


615 93 


32,913 60 


126 


11 


42 


- 


1,950 00 




_ 


_ 


28,013 63 


78 


47 


107 


2,038 63 


4,320 00 




218 28 


— 


31,941 14 


132 


54 


39 


— 


1,890 00 




148 46 


296 58 


26,965 83 


86 


71 


100 


2,765 14 


2,150 00 




105 16 


_ 


26,498 95 


81 


53 


105 


2,685 34 


3,620 00 




- 


119 50 


15,994 81 


72 


05 


114 


222 73 


1,889 47 




_ 


_ 


23,779 19 


100 


76 


80 


_ 


1,070 00 




— 


— 


20,507 65 


74 


03 


112 


816 99 


2,300 00 




142 45 


_ 


24,048 70 


93 


94 


89 


857 31 


3,190 63 




— 


255 88 


26,857 21 


133 


62 


37 


— 


1,450 00 




~ 


239 59 


21,121 56 


90 


65 


94 


2,563 67 


2,150 00 



102 



Gkoup IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5.000 Population 







Year 


Grades 


IN- 


Public Day Elementary Schools (including 




„ 


1 






TEACHERS 








o 


o 


o 


PRINCIPALS 


FULL TIME 


PUPILS ENROLLED 




TOWNS 






















s 


3 


2 


a 


a 








0) 




u 


(U 


<o 








s 


o 

•a 


o 

■a 


S 
(u o 


a B 
o o 


1 -i 






S 


1-5 


& 


^ ^ 


S ^ 


P5 O 






51 


52 


53 


54 55 


56 57 


58 59 


232 


Tewksbury 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ _ 


15 


258 228 


233 


Auburn 


8 


— 


— 


— — 


32 


561 515 


234 


Dudley 


8 


— 


— 


1 


22 


338 283 


235 


Seekonk 


8 


— 


— 


— — 


2 19 


454 411 


236 


Acushnet . 


8 


- 


- 


- 


22 


373 343 


237 


Longmeadow 


6 


3 


_ 


1 


2 22 


375 348 


238 


Dighton 


6 


2 


— 


— — 


22 


312 296 


239 


East Longmeadow 


8 


- 


— 


_ _ 


19 


326 308 


240 


Bellingham 


8 


— 


— 


- — 


14 


291 294 


241 


Wilbraham 


8 


- 


- 


- 


18 


248 239 


242 


Hull . 


8 


_ 


_ 


1 1 


14 


227 195 


243 


Shirley 


8 


— 


— 


_ _ 


9 


150 134 


244 


Millville . 


8 


— 


— 


— _ 


11 


214 217 


245 


Rehoboth . 


8 


— 


— 


_ - 


12 


239 229 


246 


Hanson 


8 


- 


- 


- 


10 


205 192 


247 


Ashburnham 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ 


12 


228 196 


248 


Raynham . 


8 


- 


- 


_ - 


12 


218 185 


249 


Georgetown 


7 


2 


— 


— — 


1 8 


135 155 


250 


Sturbridge . 


6 


2 


— 


_ _ 


9 


152 130 


251 


Cheshire 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


198 134 


252 


Salisbury . 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ _ 


1 8 


177 137 


253 


Westwood . 


8 


- 


— 


— — 


1 9 


133 122 


254 


North Reading . 


6 


2 


- 


1 


— 7 


135 140 


255 


Middleton . 


8 


- 


— 


— — 


5 


108 70 


256 


Freetown . 


8 


- 


- 


- 


1 10 


131 150 


257 


Nahant 


6 


3 


_ 


1 


9 


128 117 


258 


Colrain 


8 


- 


— 


— — 


14 


135 126 


259 


Mattapoisett 


6 


3 


— 


1 


9 


171 175 


260 


Buckland . 


8 


- 


— 


— — 


11 


126 100 


261 


Bedford 


8 


- 


- 


- 


1 8 


148 144 


262 


Lakeville . 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ _ 


8 


130 96 


263 


Newbury . 


8 


- 


- 


- - 


8 


100 106 


264 


Burlington . 


8 


— 


— 


— — 


8 


171 164 


265 


Rowley 


8 


— 


— 


— — 


1 8 


114 102 


266 


Russell 


8 


- 


- 


- 


11 


146 122 


267 


Erving 


8 


_ 


- 


_ _ 


1 8 


116 100 


268 


Lynnfield . 


8 


— 


— 


— - 


8 


131 121 


269 


West Brookfield . 


6 


3 


— 


— — 


9 


104 101 


270 


Carver 


8 


- 


— 


— — 


10 


151 147 


271 


Lincoln 


6 


3 


- 


- 


9 


136 102 


272 


Sunderland 


8 


_ 


_ 


_ _ 


10 


167 163 


273 


Marion 


6 


3 


— 


1 


8 


112 128 


274 


Southwick . 


8 


— 


- 


— — 


1 11 


149 164 


275 


Whately . 


8 


- 


- 


- - 


10 


131 137 


276 


Clarksburg 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


104 92 


277 


Norfolk 


8 


_ 


- 


- 


6 


100 92 


278 


West Stockbridge 


8 


- 


- 


- - 


8 


128 108 


279 


Lanesborough 


8 


— 


- 


— - 


10 


129 118 


280 


Wenham 


6 


3 


- 


- ,— 


1 7 


87 79 


281 


Berkley 


8 


~ 


~ 


~~ ~ 


6 


115 113 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 

2 Includes $7,444.07 for high school instruction of 48 pupils in locnl junior high schools. 

3 Includes $4,197.41 for high school instruction of 24 pupils in local junior high school. 
< Includes $4,119.42 for high school instruction of 17 pupils in local junior high school. 
» Includes $1,952.56 for high school instruction of 15 pupils in local junior high school. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT iviAiNTAiNiNG HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



103 



First Two Years of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 








■i 


a 


"2 




expenditure for 












1 




a 


0. 


support, exclusive of 


^&fe 




S 




•*j 




:§ 


wG 


general 


CONTROL 




c3 oQjq 








« 


"o 

1 

3 a 




1 

s 
1 

> 










3 a <« 

m 




8 

i 

a 




■a 


a 

=i 
o 




I 1 «*H 

53 CJ^ 


1 
as 
2 

a s 


8 

Q 


<; 


< 


■< 


< 


< 




flH 




w 




w 




60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 


66 




67 




80,843 


183 


441 


467 


. $37,686 40 


$80 69 


$19,974 75 


$721 


38 


187,289 


187 


1,001 


1,066 


61,388 


19 


57 


59 


39,554 


50 


1,725 


88 


102,580 


186 


551 


590 


46,581 


48 


78 


95 


34,379 


50 


849 


06 


131,049 


179 


732 


797 


38,713 


83 


48 


57 


22,975 


38 


2,570 


77 


115,164 


187 


644 


679 


42,452 


91 


62 


52 


28,054 


87 


857 


62 


115,555 


182 


636 


685 


64,431 


83 2 


94 


06 


38,777 


48 


1,157 


69 


97,817 


182 


537 


577 


47,719 


71 


82 


70 


26,181 


38 


1,951 


69 


102,269 


184 


557 


597 


38,033 


43 


63 


71 


25,422 


75 


699 


86 


82,112 


171 


481 


512 


25,877 


16 


50 


54 


17,035 


00 


562 


12 


76,243 


184 


413 


454 


34,774 


82 


76 


59 


22,057 


85 


680 


97 


60,386 


175 


353 


382 


72,441 


87 


189 


63 


39,859 


00 


2,422 


88 


46,845 


172 


272 


283 


20,133 


34 


71 


14 


10,054 


00 


441 


02 


70,622 


178 


396 


416 


21,613 


58 


51 


96 


15,718 


00 


829 


87 


71,102 


177 


402 


446 


20,876 


50 


46 


81 


11,676 


20 


2,406 


25 


59,585 


179 


332 


368 


18,371 


98 


49 


92 


11,232 


00 


353 


03 


69,084 


178 


388 


413 


21,883 


92 


52 


98 


13,660 04 


597 


93 


61,561 


182 


338 


361 


20,392 


87 


56 


48 


12,422 


17 


524 


52 


47,729 


182 


267 


282 


26,760 


453 


94 


89 


11,958 


38 


550 


84 


45,842 


179 


256 


268 


19,766 


10 


73 


75 


11,757 


50 


267 


26 


51,885 


181 


287 


306 


18,977 


03 


62 


02 


8,696 


83 


243 


31 


45,729 


178 


257 


278 


17,589 


27 


63 


27 


11,331 


40 


549 


47 


41,222 


184 


224 


244 


25,552 


75 


104 


72 


15,013 


25 


671 


22 


41,717 


181 


230 


251 


22,042 


63 


87 


81 


10,125 


00 


463 


91 


29,546 


180 


164 


171 


12,708 


05 


74 


32 


6,970 


00 


251 


58 


44,972 


180 


250 


275 


22,482 


71 


81 


76 


13,440 


19 


718 


90 


39,171 


181 


217 


235 


24,178 


05 


102 


89 


13,918 


00 


289 


86 


41,824 


184 


228 


244 


20,398 


39 


83 


59 


14,245 


75 


449 


25 


50,195 


185 


271 


284 


23,648 04 5 


83 


26 


13,220 


30 


408 


63 


38,754 


184 


211 


222 


17,337 


88 


78 


09 


11,632 


88 


462 


92 


48,884 


181 


270 


286 


24,649 


00 


86 


19 


15,200 


85 


483 


57 


29,143 


170 


171 


183 


17,006 


20 


92 


93 


8,510 


00 


310 


64 


33,125 


173 


192 


209 


15,957 


46 


76 


35 


9,755 


00 


409 


20 


52,163 


187 


279 


306 


17,662 


96 


57 


72 


10,854 


00 


428 


36 


36,535 


181 


203 


213 


14,062 


55 


66 


02 


9,355 


13 


283 


44 


44,908 


186 


242 


255 


22,231 


03 


87 


18 


14,058 


88 


406 


82 


35,938 


177 


199 


210 


17,798 


07 


84 


75 


10,700 


00 


300 


46 


39,987 


187 


213 


228 


20,079 


23 


88 


07 


12,160 


00 


493 


79 


35,315 


186 


190 


202 


16,847 


53 6 


83 


40 


8,977 


13 


176 


73 


43,347 


176 


247 


266 


21.451 


69 


80 


65 


11,488 


19 


411 


05 


37,781 


180 


211 


222 


26,760 


70' 


120 


54 


13,872 


00 


515 


31 


55,328 


182 


304 


317 


20,026 


81 


63 


18 


11,336 


50 


200 


08 


41,224 


187 


221 


230 


27,471 


72 s 


119 


44 


14,002 


51 


269 


17 


44,947 


173 


260 


285 


19,925 


62 


69 


91 


14,700 


00 


570 


00 


44,528 


182 


244 


256 


19,103 


19 


74 


62 


10,497 


50 


236 


54 


30,364 


178 


171 


189 


11,713 


55 


61 


97 


8,814 


97 


183 


25 


30,061 


178 


169 


180 


14,853 


76 


82 


52 


8,540 


00 


319 


64 


36,532 


182 


200 


217 


12,379 


91 


57 


05 


8,190 


50 


296 


55 


33,628 


177 


191 


212 


16,432 


82 


77 


51 


11,674 


25 


177 


39 


27,945 


191 


148 


156 


20,459 


24 


131 


14 


11,707 


07 


354 


87 


32,015 


169 


189 


206 


12,497 


95 


60 


67 


6,179 


47 


349 


00 



J Includes $1,985.54 for high school instruction of 14 pujiils in local junior high school. 
' Includes $2,985.32 for high school instruction of 15 pupils in local junior high school. 
■* Includes $3,482.69 for high school instruction of 17 pupils in local junior high school. 
» Includes $2,592.37 for high school instruction of 31 pupils in local junior high school. 



104 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 

High School 







bT3ja 2 














«2'3^ fl 


EXPENDITURE 


FOB TUITION AND 






P.3 1 




HIGH SCHOOLS IN OTHER 






pils 
own 
iiblic 
her 1 






a 
o 






TOWNS 


Resident pu 
whom the t 
tuition in pi 
schools of ot 
or cities 


d 
•3 

i 




03 ' 

s- 

1 
1 








82 


83 


84 


232 


Tewksbury 


95 


$9,308 


62 


$4,524 40 


233 


Auburn 


218 


25,801 


00 


3,970 00 


234 


Dudley .... 


101 


9,000 


80 


2,020 


68 


235 


Seekonk 


102 


13,880 


88 


3,032 


68 


236 


Acushnet 


46 


6,685 


20 


1,619 


35 


237 


Longmeadow . 


117 


20,543 


04 


2,133 


92 


238 


Dighton 


57 


7,455 


65 


2,604 


00 


239 


East Longmeadow . 


138 


22,244 


00 


4,260 


97 


240 


Bellingham 


53 


7,416 


22 


3,161 


70 


241 


Wilbraham 


87 2 


13,222 


60 


5,470 


60 


242 


Hull .... 


86 


9,370 43 


10,635 


00 


243 


Shirley .... 


. . 33 


3,740 


75 


3,084 


64 


244 


MillviUe 


48 


5,511 


00 


2,000 


00 


245 


Rehoboth 


50 


5,218 


06 


6,265 


65 


246 


Hanson 


98 


9,364 


42 


4,281 


98 


247 


Ashburnham . '. 


- ^ 


- 




- 




248 


Raynham 


! ! 54 


7,148 


86 


2,180 


00 


249 


Georgetown . 


- ' 


- 




- 




250 


Sturbridge 


'. . 43 


3,832 


60 


2,377 


92 


251 


Cheshire 


44 


3,584 


67 


1,684 


22 


252 


Salisbxiry 


65 


6,186 


69 


2,850 


00 


263 


Westwood 


56 


7,302 


46 


2,426 


55 


254 


North Reading 


81 


7,990 


45 


4,312 


31 


255 


Middleton 


42 


585 


99 


1,216 


00 


256 


Freetown 


26 


3,242 


50 


3,361 


41 


257 


Nahant 


54 


8,128 


40 


1,243 


41 


258 


Colrain .... 


50 


6,064 


67 


4,680 


88 


259 


Mattapoisett . 


36 


3,549 


66 


1,309 


10 


260 


Buckland 


79 


9,123 


68 


2,140 


00 


261 


Bedford 


75 


8,806 


88 


1,600 


00 


262 


Lakeville 


42 


4,196 


19 


2,199 


00 


263 


Newbury 


35 


1,274 


61 


3,028 


09 


264 


Burhngton 


54 


6,021 


86 


4,296 


00 


265 


Rowley .... 


52 


4,592 


50 


2,493 


90 


266 


Russell .... 


40 


4,783 


97 


1,181 


19 


267 


Erving .... 


67 


4,852 


50 


4,617 


28 


268 


Lynnfield 


70 


10,042 


16 


3,949 


16 


269 


West Brookfield 


26 


2,840 


00 


1,658 


80 


270 


Carver .... 


44 


3,911 


62 


3,791 


00 


271 


Lincoln 


51 


5,765 


80 


2,220 


79 


272 


Sunderland 


40 


5,085 


58 


1,919 


10 


273 


Marion .... 


11 


635 


76 


850 


00 


274 


Southwick 


33 


3,972 


24 


1,396 


80 


275 


Whately 


31 


3,263 


28 


1,800 


96 


276 


Clarksburg 


35 


4,234 


71 


360 


00 


277 


Norfolk. 


56 


5,884 


20 


1,710 


51 


278 


West Stockbridge . 


44 


3,764 


84 


3,828 


77 


279 


Lanesborough 


47 


4,558 


23 


1,794 


57 


280 


Wenham 


45 


4,868 


75 


1,049 


50 


281 


Berkley 


28 


3,435 78 


3,476 


20 



1 Also expended $7,444.07 for high school instruction of 48 pupils in local junior high school. 

2 Not including pupils attending local academy. 

3 Pupils attend local academy. 

4 Does not include certain bills paid after close of school year. 

6 Also expended $4,119.42 for high school instruction of 17 pupils in local junior high school. 
6 Also expended $1,952.56 for high school instruction of 15 pupils in local junior high school. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



105 



Education for Year ending June 30, 1928 



TRANSPORTATION TO PUBLIC 






_« 

3 




NET COST TO TOWN FOR HIGH 


TOWNS OR CITIES 






Is . 

ftPn 




SCHOOL 


EDUCATION 






a 








"S 






3 

o 




"d <u 








3 
p 










S-g 














C3 


■a 


aJcQ 








& 






SlO. 




so 

M 


1 




o 5. 


"3 




fe 


<0 


S >iOi 


O 




^ « 


■s 




> 


a 


•s^ 


-1 


a 




gft 


H 




< 




P4 




< 




< 


85 




86 


87 




88 




89 


$13,832 


92 


$145 


61 


$7,477 78 


$6,355 


14 


$66 90 


29,771 


00 


136 


56 


- 




29,771 


00 


136 56 


11,021 


48 


109 


12 


- 




11,021 


48 


109 12 


16,913 


56 


165 


82 


- 




16,913 


56 


165 82 


8,304 


55 


180 


53 


- 




8,304 


55 


180 53 


22,676 961 


193 


82 


_ 




22,676 


96 


193 82 


10,059 


65 


176 


49 


- 




10,059 


65 


176 49 


26,504 


97 


192 


07 


- 




26,504 


97 


192 07 


10,577 


92 


199 


58 


5,522 


16 


5,055 


76 


95 39 


18,693 


00 


214 


86 


- 




18,693 


00 


214 86 


19,905 


43 


231 


46 


2,632 


00 


17,273 


43 


200 85 


6,825 


39 


206 


83 


4,787 


53 


2,037 


86 


61 75 


7,511 


00 


156 


48 


4,671 


63 


2,839 


37 


59 15 


10,483 


71 


209 


67 






10,483 


71 


209 67 


13,646 


40 


139 


25 


- 




13,646 


40 


139 25 


9,328 


86 


172 


76 


5,186 46 


4,142 


40 


76 71 


6,210 


42 


144 


43 


3,810 


40 


2,400 02 


55 81 


5,268 


89 


119 


75 


3,479 


96 


1,788 


93 


40 66 


9,036 


69 


139 


03 


5,786 


50 


3,250 


19 


50 00 


9,729 


01 


173 


73 


2,174 


20 


7,554 


81 


134 91 


12,302 


76 


151 


89 


8,873 


03 


3,429 


73 


42 34 


1,801 


99 < 


42 


90 4 


3,469 


85 




- 


— 


6,593 


91 


253 


61 


4,481 


26 


2,112 


65 


81 26 


9,371 


816 


173 


55 


1,361 


10 


8,010 71 


148 35 


10,745 65 


214 


91 


7,007 


96' 


3,737 


59 


74 75 


4,858 76 « 


134 


97 


3,668 


56 


1,190 


20 


33 06 


11,263 


68 


142 


58 


6,692 


40 


4,571 


28 


57 86 


10,406 


88 


138 


76 


5,702 


54 


4,704 


34 


62 72 


6,395 


19 


152 


27 


3,868 


59 


2,526 


60 


60 16 


4,302 


70 


122 


94 


4,000 


85 


301 


85 


8 62 


10,317 


86 


191 


07 


7,089 


15 


3,228 


71 


59 79 


7,086 


40 


136 


28 


4,609 


20 


2,477 


20 


47 64 


5,965 


16 


149 


13 


1,181 


19 


4,783 


97 


119 60 


9,369 


78 


164 


38 


7,278 


91 


2,090 


87 


36 68 


13,991 


31 


199 


88 


3,995 


13 


9,996 


18 


142 80 


4,498 


80' 


173 


03 


2,962 


64 


1,536 


16 


59 08 


7,702 


62 


175 06 


3,360 


37 


4,342 


25 


98 69 


7,986 


59 8 


156 


60 


2,193 


08 


5,793 


51 


113 60 


7,004 


68 


175 


12 


4,341 


89 


2,662 


79 


66 57 


1,385 


76 » 


125 


98 


802 


85 


582 


91 


53 00 


5,369 


04 4 


162 


70 4 


5,449 


92 




- 


— 


5,064 


24 


163 


36 


3,293 


40 


1,770 


84 


57 12 


4,594 


71 


131 


28 


3,467 


04 


1,127 


67 


32 22 


7,594 


71 


135 


62 


4,553 


68 


3,041 


03 


54 30 


7,583 


61 


172 


35 


5,166 


44 


2,417 


17 


54 94 


6,352 


80 


135 


17 


4,169 


66 


2,183 


14 


46 45 


5,918 


25 "0 


131 


52 


952 


24 


4,966 


01 


110 36 


6,911 


98 


246 


86 


5,487 


95 


1,424 


03 


50 86 



' Also expended $1,985.54 for higli school instruction of 14 pupils in local junior high school. 
8 Also expended $2,985.32 for high school instruction of 15 pupils in local junior high school. 
'Also expended $3,482.69 for high school instruction of 17 pupils in local junior high school. 
>" Also expended $2,592.37 for high school instruction of 31 pupils in local junior high school. 



106 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 





TOWNS 










Persons 5 to 16 


Years 






5 TO 


7 Yeaes 






7 


TO 14 






o 


.- S 


Zh 


■^1§ 


"3 


a 
o 


."a 






■*3 00 


-H 0^ 


C3 2 


.« oi g 


o 


tS <o 


M o 






u o 


x>B^ 


t^a 


S--^ 


Is 


gs 


x>B^ 






■g C 






Up— 3 




-g a 








•§a 




-1^ 


^il 


11 


'Si B 










fiS^ 








P 








5 


'-' 


^ 


^ 


1Z 




'-' 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


232 


Tewksbury 


99 


85 


_ 


_ 


14 


364 


340 


233 


Auburn . . . . 


293 


156 


2 


_ 


135 


898 


861 


234 


Dudley . . . . 


182 


132 


43 


_ 


7 


869 


526 


235 


Seekonk . 


153 


93 




_ 


60 


708 


699 


236 


Acushnet . 


216 


85 


35 


- 


96 


765 


627 


237 


Longmeadow 


175 


143 


4 


_ 


28 


533 


609 


238 


Dighton . 


158 


84 




_ 


74 


495 


494 


239 


East Longmeadow 


133 


120 


3 


_ 


10 


491 


476 


240 


Bellingham 


155 


62 


30 


_ 


63 


531 


395 


241 


Wilbraham 


120 


107 




- 


13 


512 


335 


242 


HuU 


72 


72 


_ 


_ 


_ 


315 


315 


243 


Shirley 


67 


45 


15 


_ 


7 


315 


224 


244 


MiUville . 


84 


82 




_ 


2 


326 


323 


245 


Rehoboth 


82 


61 


_ 


_ 


31 


400 


400 


246 


Hanson 


74 


74 


- 


- 




320 


320 


247 


Ashburnham 


75 


66 


_ 


_ 


9 


322 


321 


248 


Raynham 


56 


66 


_ 


_ 




349 


349 


249 


Georgetown 


47 


47 


_ 


_ 


— 


221 


221 


250 


Sturbridge 


54 


36 


— 


_ 


18 


247 


220 


251 


Cheshire . . . . 


65 


56 


- 


- 


9 


279 


276 


252 


Salisbury . 


45 


31 


3 


_ 


11 


241 


229 


253 


West wood 


49 


36 


- 


— 


14 


234 


215 


254 


North Reading . 


130 


84 


46 


_ 




289 


186 


255 


Middleton 


51 


27 




_ 


24 


137 


137 


256 


Freetown . 


79 


63 


- 


- 


26 


205 


206 


257 


Nahant 


42 


26 


_ 


_ 


16 


168 


168 


258 


Colrain 


•41 


40 


_ 


_ 


1 


207 


204 


259 


Mattapoisett 


78 


76 


_ 


- 


2 


223 


234 


260 


Buckland . 


45 


33 


— 


— 


12 


190 


176 


261 


Bedford . 


73 


61 


- 


- 


22 


250 


248 


262 


Lakeville . 


26 


15 


_ 


_ 


11 


138 


138 


263 


Newbury . 


38 


28 


_ 


— 


10 


161 


156 


264 


Burlington 


74 


71 


— 


— 


3 


284 


284 


265 


Rowley 


34 


34 


— 


— 


— 


165 


166 


266 


Russell . 


62 


40 


- 


- 


22 


206 


203 


267 


Erving 


48 


27 


_ 


_ 


21 


186 


186 


268 


Lynnfield . 


44 


39 


— 


— 


5 


186 


184 


269 


West Brookfield 


50 


36 


— 


— 


14 


169 


169 


270 


Carver 


51 


36 


- 


— 


22 


226 


226 


271 


Lincoln 


41 


36 


5 


- 


- 


190 


180 


272 


Sunderland 


66 


61 


_ 


_ 


5 


255 


255 


273 


Marion 


44 


20 


— 


— 


24 


182 


180 


274 


Southwick 


77 


55 


1 


— 


21 


242 


229 


275 


Whately . 


49 


44 


- 


— 


6 


242 


238 


276 


Clarksburg 


47 


38 


- 


- 


9 


193 


154 


277 


Norfolk . 


55 


33 


_ 


_ 


22 


139 


139 


278 


West Stockbridge 


48 


39 


— 


— 


9 


186 


177 


279 


Lanesborough . 


44 


29 


2 


— 


13 


216 


201 


280 


Wenham . 


24 


22 


— 


— 


2 


129 


122 


281 


Berkley 


40 


29 


~ 


~ 


11 


170 


170 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



107 

























Illiterate 


OP Age, 


October 


1, IS 


27 
















Minors, 

Years 


16 

OF 


TO 21 

Age 
























0^ 


d 


"- bi 


Years 










14 TO 


16 Years 












F 

.2 s" 

S2 




a 

V 

a 
'3 


2 a 


"'a 




"o 
o 

Is 

.sir 
^^ 


a 
o 

Is 

*= 


."a 




'Js'S.S' 

III 


Is 

m 

>rt I-c 


o3 a 2 
oQja to 





•2| 


'O bO 

■3 a 
" ate 


a 


a ■" 


^ 


a 


n 


a 


a 

l-H 


a 




'" 


'Z 


a 


1 




97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 


103 




104 


105 


106 


107 




108 


24 


_ 


_ 


91 


85 


_ 


5 




1 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


33 


1 


3 


202 


156 


4 


— 




33 


1 


8 


1 




1 


343 


— 


— 


247 


99 


72 


55 




6 


— 


15 


— 




4 


9 


— 


- 


135 


93 


3 


- 




— 


— 


39 


— 




— 


234 


- 


4 


238 


81 


24 


69 




16 


2 


46 


- 




11 


21 


_ 


3 


106 


98 


5 


_ 




1 


_ 


2 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


1 


81 


59 


— 


— 




2 


— 


20 


— 




— 


12 


— 


4 


139 


103 


4 


— 




12 


— 


20 


— 




— 


134 


— 


2 


97 


70 


— 


— 




— 


— 


27 


1 




1 


175 


- 


2 


120 


76 


6 


- 




11 


- 


27 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


35 


35 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


91 


— 


— 


28 


12 


9 


— 




— 


— 


7 


— 




— 


3 


— 


— 


89 


55 


— 


— 




2 


— 


32 


1 




— 


— 


— 


— 


88 


45 


— 


— 




— 


— 


43 


— 




— 


- 


- 


- 


60 


53 


- 


- 




1 


- 


6 


- 




- 


1 


1 


1 


92 


27 


36 


_ 




_ 


_ 


29 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


— 


102 


89 




— 




— 


— 


13 


- 




— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


21 


24 


— 




_ 


— 


5 


— 




— 


26 


— 


1 


58 


38 


5 


- 




5 


— 


10 


2 




— 


2 


- 


1 


■ 53 


44 


- 


2 




- 


- 


7 


- 




2 


12 


_ 


_ 


61 


54 


6 


_ 




1 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


19 


— 


— 


46 


46 


_ 


_ 




— 


- 


- 


— 




— 


103 


— 


— 


71 


55 


16 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 




- 


— 


— 


— 


28 


28 


— 


— 




— 


— 


- 


- 




— 


- 


- 


- 


53 


34 


- 


4 




2 


- 


13 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


44 


44 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


3 


54 


53 


— 


— 




— 


_ 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


71 


53 


— 


— 




3 


- 


15 


10 




5 


— 


— 


14 


61 


61 


— 


— 




_ 


— 


— 


- 




— 


1 


1 


- 


53 


53 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


38 


36 


_ 


_ 




1 


_ 


1 


_ 




_ 


4 


1 


— 


39 


23 


2 


— 




10 


— 


4 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


65 


49 


— 


— 




3 


— 


13 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


14 


— 


— 




— 


— 


3 


— 




— 


- 


- 


3 


52 


49 


- 


- 




- 


- 


3 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


37 


36 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


1 


_ 




_ 


1 


— 


1 


61 


58 


1 


— 




— 


— 


2 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


36 


28 


— 


— 




— 


— 


8 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


'66 


66 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


- 




— 


10 


- 


- 


42 


37 


4 


- 




1 


- 


- 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


56' 


41 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


15 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


2 


47 


38 


8 


— 




1 


— 


— 


— 




- 


5 


— 


8 


50 


31 


— 


_ 




_ 


_ 


19 


— 




— 


— 


— 


2 


66 


58 


— 


— 




2 


- 


6 


— 




— 


39 


- 


- 


63 


37 


2 


- 




- 


- 


20 


- 




- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48 


46 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


2 


_ 




_ 


— 


— 


9 


39 


36 


— 


— 




- 


— 


3 


— 




- 


13 


— 


1 


51 


44 


2 


— 




_ 


- 


5 


— 




— 


6 


— 


1 


42 


41 


— 


_ 




1 


_ 




1 




_ 


~ 


" 


- 


41 


22 


~ 


~ 




2 


- 


17 


~ 




~ 



108 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Membership in Public Day 









ELEMENTARY 




is 


CI S 














TOWNS 


g 
1 




3 m 
















& 


.r. «) 


&« 


I-H 


N 


eo 


•^ 


ifl 






0) 


i'2 


""i 


0) 


S> 


V 


0) 


a 






-O 


£ ^ 


53 ^ 


73 


73 


13 


-a 


T3 






a 


ca-" 


ja u 

— eu 


OS 


03 


03 


(3 


03 






a 






u 


h 


u 


u 


u 






O 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 






109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


232 


Tewksbury 


_ 


_ 


_ 


79 


65 


54 


58 


56 


233 


Auburn 


— 


10 


— 


189 


155 


134 


150 


132 


234 


Dudley 


— 


15 


— 


130 


82 


52 


54 


65 


235 


Seekonk . 


— 


— 


— 


145 


141 


112 


113 


99 


236 


Acushnet . 


. 


13 


- 


108 


87 


89 


88 


75 


237 


Longmeadow 


26 


_ 


_ 


90 


104 


82 


86 


71 


238 


Dighton . 


— 


— 


8 


95 


87 


93 


63 


76 


239 


East Longmeadow 


— 


12 


— 


84 


82 


66 


74 


83 


240 


Bellingham 


— 


_ 


— 


73 


59 


50 


66 


66 


241 


Wilbraham 


. 


16 


- 


114 


72 


49 


41 


33 


242 


Hull 


_ 


_ 


_ 


54 


59 


81 


64 


41 


243 


Shirley 


— 


— 


— 


43 


37 


31 


51 


38 


244 


MiUville . 


— 


— 


— 


56 


54 


69 


48 


77 


245 


Rehoboth . 


— 


— 


_ 


74 


72 


55 


46 


58 


246 


Hanson 


. 


- 


- 


42 


71 


51 


49 


62 


247 


Ashburnham 


_ 


_ 


_ 


69 


57 


52 


59 


51 


248 


Raynham . 


— 


— 


— 


56 


47 


49 


63 


54 


249 


Georgetown 


— 


— 


— 


26 


31 


30 


39 


31 


250 


Sturbridge 


— 


— 


— 


36 


35 


39 


41 


40 


251 


Cheshire . 


481 


- 


- 


49 


• 52 


43 


50 


50 


252 


Salisbury . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48 


45 


48 


33 


40 


253 


Westwood 


— 


— 


— 


34 


42 


34 


24 


33 


254 


North Reading . 


— 


— 


— 


48 


31 


39 


45 


26 


255 


Middleton 


— 


— 


— 


28 


26 


24 


22 


23 


266 


Freetown . 


• 


- 


- 


52 


53 


32 


44 


21 


257 


Nahant . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


33 


22 


35 


25 


34 


258 


Colrain 


— 


— 


_ 


41 


29 


32 


45 


38 


259 


Mattapoisett 


— 


— 


— 


43 


41 


33 


39 


42 


260 


Buckland . 


— 


— 


— 


38 


27 


35 


19 


31 


261 


Bedford . 


. 


- 


- 


52 


40 


42 


35 


29 


262 


Lakeville . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


36 


23 


35 


18 


30 


263 


Newbury . 


- 


- 


- 


32 


20 


28 


25 


29 


264 


Burlington 


— 


— 


— 


52 


44 


41 


38 


38 


265 


Rowley. . 


— 


— 


— 


31 


31 


20 


37 


20 


266 


Russell 


. 


17 


- 


35 


39 


31 


30 


31 


267 


Erving 


_ 


_ 


_ 


34 


33 


34 


28 


27 


268 


Lynnfield . 


— 


— 


— 


38 


33 


26 


24 


23 


269 


West Brookfield 


— 


— 


. — 


24 


29 


14 


24 


33 


270 


Carver 


— 


— 


— 


62 


33 


37 


40 


33 


271 


Lincoln 


. 


- 


- 


31 


35 


26 


24 


28 


272 


Sunderland 


_ 


_ 


_ 


59 


42 


39 


41 


46 


273 


Marion 


— 


— 


— 


38 


30 


21 


34 


25 


274 


Southwick 


— 


— 


— 


52 


41 


33 


44 


35 


275 


Whately . 


— 


— 


— 


37 


36 


38 


31 


40 


276 


Clarksburg 


. 


- 


- 


29 


24 


22 


32 


16 


277 


Norfolk . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


36 


28 


23 


16 


26 


278 


West Stockbridge 


— 


- 


- 


63 


19 


28 


29 


30 


279 


Lanesborough . 


— 


— 


— 


42 


24 


28 


36 


33 


280 


Wenham . 


— 


— 


— 


16 


13 


15 


14 


20 


281 


Berkley . 


~ 


"" 


~ 


34 


30 


31 


30 


19 



1 Sub-primary. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



109 



Schools bt Grades, October 1, 1927 



SCHOOLS 


HIGH SCHOOLS 






-*-s U 


u 


p 






^1 








"O 0-, 








E 2 


o 








O 








aS 








<S| 




«« 


>> 












03 03 








o-^ 


OCN 


"" 


s 




1" 


c3 


u 




e3 es 




"ea 


to 

1 






OS 

a 




3 

o 




a 
o 


I 


>> 

% 

o 




"3 


o 

'0 


o 


o 


o 


O 




H 


U 


M 


^ 


^ 


P^ 


H 


O 


117 


118 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


124 


125 


126 


127 


128 


47 


51 


60 




_ 


460 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


460 


110 


114 


68 




_ 


1,062 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,062 


103 


68 


44 




— 


613 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


613 


92 


68 


49 




- 


819 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


819 


80 


82 


47 




- 


669 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


669 


62 


67 


69 




_ 


657 


48 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48 


705 


81 


69 


30 




— 


602 




— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


602 


77 


72 


60 




— 


610 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


610 


61 


64 


32 




— 


471 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


471 


35 


59 


40 




- 


459 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


459 


47 


45 


31 




_ 


422 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


422 


31 


26 


21 




— 


278 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


278 


38 


43 


38 




— 


423 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


423 


53 


40 


45 




— 


443 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


443 


39 


49 


32 




- 


395 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


395 


54 


38 


34 




_ 


414 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


414 


39 


22 


32 




— 


362 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


362 


38 


27 


27 




— 


249 


24 


— 


— 


— 


— 


24 


273 


27 


28 


32 




— 


278 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


278 


30 


4 


3 




- 


329 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


329 


39 


37 


23 




_ 


313 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


313 


29 


36 


22 




— 


254 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


254 


31 


27 


28 




— 


275 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


275 


18 


17 


13 




— 


171 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


171 


32 


24 


14 




- 


272 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


272 


26 


27 


25 




_ 


227 


17 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


17 


244 


23 


22 


25 




— 


255 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


255 


38 


33 


22 




— 


291 


15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


306 


20 


31 


25 




— 


226 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


226 


29 


41 


30 




- 


298 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


298 


13 


21 


17 




_ 


193 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


193 


26 


25 


16 




— 


201 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


201 


32 


30 


31 




— 


306 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


306 


25 


29 


24 




— 


217 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


217 


27 


26 


28 




- 


264 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


264 


19 


21 


20 




_ 


216 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


216 


24 


30 


30 




— 


228 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


228 


24 


21 


20 




— 


189 


14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14 


203 


30 


26 


27 


• 


— 


288 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


288 


29 


26 


22 




- 


221 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


236 


50 


28 


22 




_ 


327 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


327 


33 


19 


18 




— 


218 


17 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


235 


41 


22 


32 




— 


300 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


300 


43 


29 


16 




— 


270 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


270 


25 


30 


13 




- 


191 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


191 


20 


17 


21 




_ 


187 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


187 


26 


20 


12 




— 


227 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


227 


35 


23 


17 




— 


238 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


238 


14 


20 


23 




— 


135 


31 


— 


— 


— 


— 


31 


166 


23 


23 


20 




■" 


210 


"" 


~ 


" 


~ 






21Q 



110 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



School Buildings in 
Use, Jan. 1, 1928 



TOWNS 




Estimated Value of 



ELEMENTARY 



232 Tewksbury 

233 Auburn 

234 Dudley 

235 Seekonk 

236 Acushnet . 

237 Longmeadow 

238 Dighton 

239 East Longmeadow 

240 Bellingham 

241 Wilbraham 



242 Hull . 

243 Shirley 

244 MillviUe 

245 Rehoboth 

246 Hanson 

247 Ashburnham 

248 Raynham . 

249 Georgetown 

250 Sturbridge . 

251 Cheshire . 



252 Salisbury . 

253 Westwood . 

254 North Reading 

255 Middleton . 

256 Freetown . 

257 Nahant 

258 Colrain 

259 Mattapoisett 

260 Buckland . 

261 Bedford 

262 Lakeville . 

263 Newbury . 

264 Burlington . 

265 Rowley 

266 Russell 

267 Erving 

268 Lynnfield . 

269 West Brookfield 

270 Carver 

271 Lincoln 

272 Sunderland 

273 Marion 

274 Southwick . 

275 Whately . 

276 Clarksburg 

277 Norfolk 

278 West Stockbridge 

279 Lanesborough 

280 Wenham . 

281 Berkley 



135 



$2,000 
6,500 
7,700 
7,400 
6,000 


$155,000 
119,000 
125,300 
192,500 
110,000 


60,500 
3,000 
6,500 
3,000 
4,000 


105,000 
63,000 
94,000 

100,000 
71,000 


2,400 
2,100 
3,200 
1,500 
1,750 


30,000 
42,000 
33,700 
32,000 
56,000 


3,000 
3,000 
1,000 
5,000 
4,000 


53,000 
60,000 
20,000 
75,000 
84,000 


1,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,500 


65,000 
50,000 
37,000 
50,000 
27,500 


10,000 

350 

5,000 

1,500 

2,000 


230,000 

7,000 

65,000 

61,000 

50,000 


2,500 
1,500 
1,000 
2,600 
6,000 


37,500 
80,000 
70,000 
17,400 
99,359 


1,250 

2,500 

600 

1,800 


80,000 
45,000 
12,000 
30,000 
60,000 


7,000 
4,000 
2,200 
1,500 
3,400 


65,000 
40,000 
19,800 
65,000 
24,000 


1,600 
1,000 
2,500 
4,500 
500 


• 22,500 

7,800 

29,500 

70,000 

24,000 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



111 



Public ScHOOii Peopertt 



SCHOOLS 


JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 




■a|_ 






'5 3 






9 « o 






3 03 c5 






03 flj 






^-^ OS 4) 






■»& - 






-w a . 




•^ 


Q'R 






a aw 






II 


"3 

-►J 


es 
ildings 




"3 


2 
a 

c3 


Ql-W-H 


o 


■s s 


D"^" 


o 




m 


H 


M m 


w 


H 


a 


137 


138 


139 140 


141 


142 


143 


$5,000 


$162,000 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


$162,000 


10,500 


136,000 


— . — 


— 


— 


136,000 


10,000 


143,000 


— — 


_ 




143,000 


10,000 


209,900 


- _ 


_ 


_ 


209,900 


5,000 


121,000 


- 


- 


- 


121,000 


8,000 


173,500 


$18,000 $145,000 


$11,000 


$174,000 


347,500 


6,500 


72,500 


— - 


_ 


— 


72,500 


8,000 


108,500 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


108,500 


5,000 


108,000 


— _ 


_ 


_ 


108,000 


7,000 


82,000 


- 


- 


- 


82,000 


20,000 


52,400 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


52,400 


800 


44,900 


— — 


— 


— 


44,900 


8,950 


45,850 


— — 


_ 


— 


45,850 


1,500 


35,000 


— .— 


_ 


— 


35,000 


4,100 


61,850 


- 


- 


- 


61,850 


5,000 


61,000 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


61,000 


3,000 


66,000 


— — 


_ 


_ 


66,000 


1,000 


22,000 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


22,000 


5,000 


85,000 


— _ 


_ 


_ 


85,000 


5,300 


93,300 


- 


- 


- 


93,300 


4,500 


70,500 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


70,500 


10,000 


64,000 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


64,000 


- 


40,000 


— _ 


— 


_ 


40,000 


3,500 


55,500 


— — 


— 


— 


55,500 


5,300 


34,300 


- 


- 


- 


34,300 


11,000 


251,000 


4,000 


1,000 


5,000 


256,000 


800 


8,150 


— — 


— 


— 


8,150 


6,500 


76,500 


— _ 


_ 


_ 


76,500 


1,500 


64,000 


— — 


_ 


— 


64,000 


5,500 


57,500 


- 


- 


- 


57,500 


2,500 


42,500 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


42,500 


8,500 


90,000 


— — 


— 


— 


90,000 


4,000 


75,000 


— — 


— 


— 


75,000 


1,000 


21,000 


_ — 


_ 


_ 


21,000 


7,422 


112,781 


- 


- 


- 


112,781 


5,500 


86,750 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


86,750 


3,000 


50,500 


— — 


— 


_ 


50,500 


1,600 


14,200 


— — 


— 


— 


14,200 


3,000 


34,800 


— — 


— 


— 


34,800 


5,000 


65,000 


- 


- 


- 


65,000 


1,500 


73,500 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


73,500 


5,000 


49,000 


— — 


— 


— 


49,000 


1,100 


23,100 


— — 


— 


— 


23,100 


5,500 


72,000 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


72,000 


2,500 


29,900 


- 


- 


- 


29,900 


2,500 


26,600 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


26,600 


1,600 


10,400 


— — 


— 


— 


10,400 


4,100 


36,100 


_ _ 


_ 


_ 


36,100 


3,000 


77,500 


— — 


_ 


— 


77,500 


2,700 


27,200 


- - 


- 


- 


27,200 



112 



P.D. 2. 
Group IV, Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



5.2 



Teaching Staff in Public 
Dat Schools — Kinderqabten, Ele- 
mentary, High — Jan. 1, 1928 



FULL TIME 



282 


Tyngsborough 


1,107 


$1,236,665 


283 


Rochester 


1,100 


1,252,942 


284 


Berlin . 


1,071 


1,075,457 


285 


Hubbardston 


1,067 


977,655 


286 


Hinsdale 


1,044 


950,753 


287 


Harvard 


996 


2,269,987 


288 


Boylston 


970 


883,197 


289 


Conway 


931 


997,641 


290 


East Brookfield 


929 


1,080,850 


291 


GiU . 


918 


869,025 


292 


Southampton 


916 


873,343 


293 


Royalston 


821 


1,024,103 


294 


Granby 


810 


980,341 


295 


Bolton . 


801 


1,134,614 


296 


Becket . 


778 


873,191 


297 


Enfield 


749 


787,720 


298 


Leverett 


664 


492,897 


299 


Dana . 


657 


821,858 


300 


Hampden 


632 


576,760 


301 


Richmond 


619 


628,243 


302 


Halifax 


614 


1,483,760 


303 


Granville 


609 


686,492 


304 


Paxton 


591 


839,129 


305 


Boxford 


581 


1,105,896 


306 


Oakham 


525 


479,799 


307 


Pelham 


519 


642,404 


308 


Plympton 


511 


705,360 


309 


Carlisle 


510 


744,195 


310 


Hancock 


510 


514,655 


311 


Truro . 


504 


1,133,017 


312 


Eastham 


494 


1,099,409 


313 


Sandisfield . 


480 


637,379 


314 


Egremont 


477 


856,675 


315 


Greenwich 


450 


640,199 


316 


Chesterfield . 


445 


487,927 


317 


Blandford 


437 


855,869 


318 


Wales . 


434 


418,086 


319 


Worthington 


429 


538,024 


320 


New Braintree 


423 


521,112 


321 


Savoy . 


399 


251,145 


322 


Wendell 


397 


777,078 


323 


Otis 


395 


518,375 


324 


Windsor 


388 


432,437 


325 


Phillipston . 


384 


356,212 


326 


Warwick 


364 


435,886 


327 


Florida 


362 


1,407,914 


328 


Hawley 


354 


261,932 


329 


Monterey 


348 


680,691 


330 


Dunstable 


338 


455,955 


331 


Westhampton 


337 


342,470 



6 


6 


7 


7 


9 


9 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


5 


5 


7 


7 


7 


7 


6 


6 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


6 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


4 


4 


6 


6 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


6 


6 


4 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


6 


6 


6 


6 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 



Pt. 11. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



113 



Continued 



Pupils 


IN Public Dat Schools - 


- Kindergarten, Elementary, 




ft 
13^ 




HlGH- 


- Year ending June 30, 


1928 








•IT 


1 


1 

11 




II 


.2* 
0^ 


for whom the 
paid tuition 
ot less than 
f school year 


-9 « o 
^ — ^ 


II 


{ 


UJ-rt 

< 


< 




gs 
< 


■ft 

3 


|S3 


Non-re; 
atter 
than 
year 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




13 


14 


15 


182 


28,468 


160 


178 


172 




35 


3 


204 


205 


32,501 


184 


177 


194 




39 


10 


223 


151 


24,458 


137 


171 


147 




30 


7 


170 


197 


32,890 


177 


184 


187 




42 


4 


225 


226 


37,992 


202 


185 


216 




30 


8 


238 


158 


25,286 


143 


177 


152 




1 


6 


147 


196 


33,236 


183 


181 


192 




40 


— 


232 


177 


28,419 


155 


183 


168 




34 


14 


188 


139 


22,768 


128 


179 


136 




22 


1 


157 


207 


32,381 


189 


171 


202 




33 


1 


234 


138 


22,028 


124 


178 


133 




27 


1 


159 


143 


22,090 


123 


180 


131 




25 


11 


145 


159 


24,708 


136 


182 


150 




39 


2 


187 


137 


18,668 


105 


177 


116 




16 


12 


120 


109 


16,060 


92 


173 


102 




33 


15 


120 


129 


19,460 


100 


185 


111 




23 


27 


107 . 


136 


19,419 


115 


169 


123 




23 


7 


139 


99 


15,817 


90 


176 


92 




24 


5 


111 


122 


19,024 


105 


181 


114 




30 


12 


132 


88 


14,235 


79 


180 


84 




18 


- 


102 


127 


20,395 


115 


178 


122 




28 


10 


140 


109 


17,043 


100 


170 


106 




18 


15 


109 


129 


20,338 


120 


169 


128 




20 


2 


146 


89 


12,653 


71 


180 


87 




21 


— 


108 


98 


14,313 


84 


171 


89 




25 


3 


111 


93 


15,146 


82 


184 


87 




18 


18 


87 


88 


14,343 


79 


182 


84 




31 


2 


113 


101 


16,810 


93 


181 


98 




37 


8 


127 


84 


13,218 


71 


186 


78 




5 


_ 


83 


72 


11,845 


63 


186 


68 




37 


1 


104 


72 


12,072 


65 


185 


70 




16 


5 


81 


89 


12,356 


72 


172 


77 




17 


1 


93 


73 


11,281 


62 


182 


67 




18 


— 


85 


51 


7,738 


44 


176 


45 




13 


10 


48 


60 


9,056 


53 


170 


59 




14 


4 


69 


60 


8,796 


49 


179 


56 




13 


2 


67 


56 


7,959 


44 


180 


47 




8 


1 


54 


84 


11,207 


68 


165 


75 




11 


— 


86 


67 


11,501 


64 


180 


68 




33 


3 


98 


76 


9,115 


55 


166 


62 




2 


5 


59 


70 


9,987 


59 


169 


65 




14 


_ 


79 


99 


12,958 


72 


179 


76 




13 


14 


75 


67 


9,052 


55 


165 


61 




13 


1 


73 


64 


9,629 


53 


179 


59 




9 


6 


62 


55 


7,672 


44 


172 


49 




10 


- 


59 


75 


10,678 


63 


169 


66 




3 


15 


54 


89 


12,533 


71 


172 


77 




7 


28 


56 


37 


6,081 


34 


178 


36 




2 


- 


38 


54 


8,305 


46 


180 


50 




12 


10 


52 


55 


9,389 


52 


180 


56 




6 


5 


57 



114 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 

Itemized Expenditubes for Support of PubiiIC 



TOWNS 



1 »« 



&.2 



18 



282 
283 
284 
285 
286 

287 
288 
289 
290 
291 

292 
293 
294 
295 
296 

297 
298 
299 
300 
301 

302 
303 
304 
305 
306 

307 
308 
309 
310 
311 

312 
313 
314 
315 
316 

317 
318 
319 
320 
321 

322 
323 

324 
325 
326 

327 
328 
329 
330 
331 



Tyngsborough 
Rochester . 
Berlin 

Hubbardston 
Hinsdale 

Harvard 
Boylston . 
Conway 
East Brookfield 
Gill . 

Southampton 

Royalston 

Granby 

Bolton 

Becket 

Enfield 

Leverett 

Dana 

Hampden 

Richmond 

Halifax 

Granville 

Paxton 

Boxford 

Oakham 

Pelham 

Plympton 

Carlisle 

Hancock 

Truro 

Eastham 

Sandisfield 

Egremont 

Greenwich 

Chesterfield 

Blandford . 
Wales 

Worthington 
New Braintree 
Savoy 

Wendell 
Otis . 
Windsor 
Phillipston 
Warwick 

Florida 
Hawley 
Monterey . 
Dunstable . 
Westhampton 



$875 75 


$9,604 


00 


$260 29 


$286 43 


1,039 96 


8,915 


64 


444 93 


314 05 


805 94 


7,194 


26 


231 78 


247 32 


697 20 


7,226 


06 


293 34 


406 03 


1,162 03 


8,895 


00 


273 33 


629 20 


766 23 


7,209 


00 


362 56 


515 77 


680 50 


7,543 


00 


279 03 


358 35 


931 80 


6,416 


00 


229 23 


272 43 


911 25 


6,619 


27 


204 62 


318 22 


792 08 


6,662 


00 


288 08 


403 72 


720 50 


6,990 


00 


48 24 


93 38 


737 55 


5,396 


59 


132 63 


396 03 


855 47 


7,4S0 79 


80 12 


292 97 


716 42 


6,010 


73 


207 86 


241 08 


1,008 00 


6,108 


00 


56 94 


221 09 


1,096 65 


4,266 


00 


144 96 


277 89 


1,111 16 


6,361 


99 


210 80 


252 66 


962 37 


6,337 


00 


174 69 


302 67 


706 91 


5,094 


76 


134 52 


633 12 


1,044 51 


5,643 


00 


16 63 


106 45 


915 92 


4,550 


00 


167 82 


199 66 


1,153 13 


6,825 


00 


117 69 


316 90 


680 73 


4,892 


38 


226 16 


471 60 


829 13 


5,084 


00 


144 28 


165 84 


448 79 


3,640 


98 


115 94 


72 03 


635 34 


4,019 


00 


256 35 


175 51 


618 71 


3,426 


00 


157 85 


168 00 


537 69 


4,834 


50 


98 67 


233 17 


503 94 


5,200 


00 


86 65 


69 66 


712 44 


4,268 


72 


160 88 


207 92 


606 10 


4,250 


00 


13 20 


724 19 


846 60 


5,400 


00 


136 33 


116 06 


544 32 


3,000 


00 


69 36 


69 16 


659 91 


3,220 


00 


118 48 


128 60 


810 00 


4,446 


00 


81 84 


151 86 


801 19 


3,826 


00 


69 50 


67 38 


716 17 


2,980 


04 


128 49 


82 46 


819 83 


4,032 


00 


113 67 


219 68 


602 07 


3.140 


71 


86 49 


92 22 


1,098 93 


4,485 


21 


103 76 


88 62 


557 38 


2,799 


72 


67 29 


73 46 


848 03 


4,374 


00 


49 24 


— 


784 00 


3,326 


00 


48 13 


124 29 


424 05 


4,047 


00 


100 01 


263 35 


400 00 


2,676 


37 


69 79 


66 24 


799 29 


5,916 


66 


71 08 


102 71 


988 99 


4,976 


48 


309 12 


156 86 


733 00 


1,950 


00 


48 66 


143 40 


485 56 


2,260 


00 


20 92 


31 84 


347 58 


2,703 


50 


34 69 


68 46 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



Continued 



115 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation — Year ending June 30, 1928 



13 3 


« 










transportation 


fl s 


a 

i 






■s 

1 










a 


a 




is 


qj^ 


o 






<v 








^ d 


•^1 






o 




■l 




•al 


g'i '° 


2^ 




a 




■1 




-s" 






n 




.2 




o 




o o 


k i 

5^3 p. 

d CS V 

1-5 




a) 

u 


o 
S 
o 




o _ 




II 


20 


21 




22 


23 




24 




25 


$3,352 33 


$58 40 


_ 


$490 70 


$6,132 


65 


$1,740 00 


1,710 11 


830 


05 


-■ 


183 


77 


1,129 


24 


4,932 79 


1,737 43 


473 


14 


$59 50 


466 


28 


1,241 


20 


858 57 


1,031 50 


235 


14 


— 


296 


00 


4,578 


50 


4,317 17 


2,420 62 


1,191 


96 


- 


128 


60 


1,054 


60 


2,612 60 


1,606 03 


491 


66 


_ 


225 


00 


6,109 


00 


135 60 


2,414 59 


306 


97 


— 


138 


83 


2,853 


50 


1,218 50 


1,359 03 


127 


23 


- 


49 


00 


5,492 


00 


3,896 57 


1,605 89 


85 


87 


— 


371 


50 


498 


01 


1,177 00 


1,593 25 


282 


83 


- 


40 


00 


545 


35 


976 50 


747 75 


123 


54 


_ 


611 


CO 


895 


02 


433 77 


1,285 29 


257 


77 


— 


130 


00 


3,977 


70 


2,112 47 


1,584 67 


565 


36 


— 


222 


60 


3,837 


28 


3,142 43 


1,227 96 


326 


05 


— 


197 


14 


4,206 


53 


1,011 55 


694 13 


442 


08 


- 


221 


43 


460 


00 


1,303 82 


1,018 17 


86 


17 


_ 


153 


00 


1,588 


00 


2,141 55 


552 18 


207 


25 


— 


250 


00 


1,458 


00 


1,728 10 


1,604 28 


288 49 


— 


75 


00 


1,254 


88 


1,540 00 


1,026 08 


188 97 


— 


368 


64 


778 


00 . 


2,088 22 


904 23 


1,377 00 


- 


129 


26 


- 




2,084 26 


733 83 


313 


98 


_ 


328 


35 


3,124 


50 


1,345 71 


477 32 


12 


58 


17 20 


115 


00 


1,076 


93 


2,638 40 


877 91 


1,256 


80 


36 10 


393 


12 


2,340 


00 


1,646 00 


1,049 60 


101 


46 


— 


451 


29 


2,076 


50 


2,182 42 


484 23 


268 


37 


- 


242 


58 


2,318 00 


2,299 90 


645 15 


540 


65 


_ 


75 


00 


722 


25 


1,198 55 


700 20 


144 


79 


18 00 


419 


03 


2,300 


00 


2,100 00 


1,591 21 


105 


46 




217 


27 


3,629 


00 


2,442 00 


338 00 


89 


44 


— 


60 


50 


160 


00 


261 20 


816 05 


571 


07 


- 


725 00 


400 


00 


3,456 00 


847 61 


411 


37 


_ 


155 00 


1,804 


00 


1,800 00 


311 54 


157 


86 


— 


50 


00 


1,905 


00 


1,211 00 


550 84 


279 


55 


— 


275 


00 






1,500 00 


413 01 


97 


85 


— 


8 


72 


1,235 


75 


1,507 85 


206 55 


519 


94 


- 


120 00 


834 


50 


1,975 84 


607 05 




_ 


_ 


100 


00 


2,295 


50 


618 80 


493 29 


371 


39 


9 00 


220 


00 


722 


00 


882 40 


663 24 


41 


43 




250 


00 


2,524 


00 


1,586 75 


519 86 


118 


04 


_ 


103 


09 


1,353 


10 


2,499 04 


294 96 


39 


73 


14 62 


87 


27 


210 


00 


193 60 


278 72 


25 


46 


_ 


15 


00 


1,700 


17 


1,258 64 


303 50 


78 


15 


— 


125 


00 


173 


09 


2,490 80 


607 05 


123 


89 


— 


100 


60 


2,285 


91 


502 20 


400 71 


365 


63 


_ 


222 


85 


620 


00 


655 63 


580 10 


74 


46 


- 


60 


00 


1,593 


50 


713 00 


678 04 


431 


45 


37 78 


75 


00 


151 


20 


316 95 


430 80 


no 


00 




218 


33 


1,078 


50 


1,074 40 


169 00 


336 


88 


— 


24 


00 


885 


25 


212 40 


974 80 


34 


87 


_ 


72 


84 


2,404 


24 


1,691 20 


198 13 


6 


25 


- 






782 


50 


365 30 



116 



Group IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Itemized Expenditures foh Support 

or Public Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation 

— Year ending June 30, 1928 — Con. 



TOWNS 



Expenditures 
ending June 



■CIT3 

g a 

13 C3 

o 

OC IS d 

0)— ■« 

13 







26 




27 


28 




29 


282 


Tyngsborough . . 


$3,146 50 


$11 69 


$25,957 


74 


- 


283 


Rochester . . ~ . 


4,434 08 


54 60 


23,989 


22 


— 


284 


Berlin 


2,416 


20 


51 97 


15,783 


59 


— 


285 


Hubbardston 


4,895 


69 


34 40 


23,911 


03 


— 


286 


Hinsdale 


3,857 


99 


29 66 


22,255 


59 


~ 


287 


Harvard 


89 


81 


1,260 00 


18,770 


65 


- 


288 


Boylston 


6,470 


00 


4 85 


22,268 


12 


— 


289 


Conway 


2,610 


00 


— 


21,382 


29 


— 


290 


East Brookfield . 


1,878 


00 


132 05 


12,801 


68 


— 


291 


GiU . 


3,175 


00 


15 57 


14,764 38 


~ 


292 


Southampton 


3,248 


50 


8 72 


12,920 


42 


$2,144 64 


293 


Royalston . 


2,311 


84 


32 45 


16,770 


22 


— 


294 


Granby 


3,155 


88 


193 68 


21,411 


25 


— 


295 


Bolton 


1,475 


34 


8 13 


15,628 


78 


— 


296 


Becket 


2,920 


24 


63 49 


13,499 


22 


1,477 00 


297 


Enfield 


2,839 


69 


15 59 


13,626 


56 


- 


298 


Leverett 


2,649 


39 


— 


14,781 


43 


— 


299 


Dana 


2,816 


88 


22 87 


14,379 


03 


412 56 


300 


Hampden . 


4,369 


00 


— 


15,388 


21 


— 


301 


Richmond . 


1,748 00 


12 60 


13,063 


84 


"■ 


302 


Halifax 


2,561 


98 


104 50 


14,346 


15 


- 


303 


Granville . 


2,097 


75 


330 00 


15,177 


90 


— 


304 


Paxton 


3,166 


00 


82 88 


16,069 


68 


— 


305 


Boxford 


2,020 


00 


— 


14,104 


52 


— 


306 


Oakham 


2,390 


38 


11 89 


12,293 


09 


~ 


307 


Pelham 


2,183 


46 


8 00 


10,459 


26 


- 


308 


Plympton . 


2,607 


43 


16 06 


12,676 


07 


— 


309 


Carlisle 


4,551 


94 


248 89 


18,489 


80 


— 


310 


Hancock 


436 


50 


133 30 


7,339 


19 


— 


311 


Truro 


3,600 


00 


3 27 


14,911 


35 


~ 


312 


Eastham . 


2,413 


25 


_ 


13,024 


72 


- 


313 


Sandisfield . 


1,007 


56 


— 


11,140 


85 


— 


314 


Egremont . 


2,166 


18 


— 


8,454 


41 


— 


315 


Greenwich . 


1,240 


53 


3 45 


8,634 


05 


— 


316 


Chesterfield 


1,840 


00 


54 61 


11,041 


14 


~ 


317 


Blandford . 


1,318 


80 


_ 


9,694 


22 


- 


318 


Wales 


892 


50 


48 75 


7,546 


49 


— 


319 


Worthington 


1,420 


00 


88 17 


11,758 


''I 


— 


320 


New Braintree 


2,481 


51 


23 35 


11,018 


48 


— 


321 


Savoy 


160 


52 


50 19 


6,827 


40 


~ 


322 


Wendell . 


1,121 


70 


47 50 


7.935 


03 


- 


323 


Otis . 


1,855 


00 


— 


10,296 


81 


— 


324 


Windsor 


1,505 


61 


53 33 


9,460 


01 


— 


325 


Phillipston . 


873 


00 


58 77 


8,031 


99 


— 


326 


Warwick 


970 


00 


19 98 


7,223 


44 


■" 


327 


Florida 


363 


40 


49 12 


8,992 


68 


- 


328 


Hawley 


953 


08 


63 41 


10,357 


96 


— 


329 


Monterey . 


325 


48 


— 


4,828 


07 


— 


330 


Dunstable . 


1,143 


20 


6 20 


9,115 


67 


— 


331 


Westhampton 


380 


00 


2 00 


4,888 41 


1,383 56 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



117 



FOR 


OuTLAT, Year 




Valuation of 


Expenditure for 






30, 


1928 




1927 PER Pupil 


School Support from 


Rate of Totat. Tax 








m Net Average 
Membership, 


Local Taxation. 
Year ending 


PER $1,0 
Valuation 


00 








1927 








Year ending June 


Dec. 31, 1927 








"S 


1 
g 


30, 1928 


PER $1,000 Valuation 








> 


> 




> 




Cl< 






hH 








1 

1 


o 


mount 

ank in 
Group 


mount 

ank in 
Group 


1 


go 




^ 


H 


< Pi 


< K 


< 


rt 




30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 




_ 


_ 


$6,062 77 


$13 60 10 


$33 00 


22 




$581 02 


$581 02 


5,619 85 


11 53 28 


26 00 


72 




— 


— 


6,326 69 


9 17 67 


27 90 


56 




_ 


_ 


4,342 108 


12 13 19 


30 50 


32 




127 78 


127 78 


3,995 116 


10 03 48 


25 30 


76 




183 08 


183 08 


15,442 11 


7 42 92 


23 80 


89 




71 21 


71 21 


3,807 117 


14 58 6 


33 00 


16 




_ 


_ 


5,307 93 


11 97 21 


27 60 


58 




_ 


- 


6,884 58 


9 20 66 


21 50 


99 




232 60 


232 60 


3,714 119 


8 98 69 


28 00 


51 




_ 


2,144 64 


5,493 90 


6 51 101 


26 00 


74 




381 00 


381 00 


7,062 54 


7 34 94 


28 00 


53 




61 40 


61 40 


5,242 96 


12 12 20 


29 00 


44 




133 68 


133 68 


9,455 35 


6 34 106 


27 00 


62 




48 00 


1,525 00 


7,277 52 


11 19 32 


25 00 


77 




_ 


_ 


7,361 51 


9 49 59 


26 00 


69 




_ 


_ 


3,546 120 


9 75 51 


35 00 


7 




— 


412 56 


7,404 48 


7 53 89 


26 00 


68 




53 53 


53 53 


4,369 107 


10 98 35 


33 00 


19 




- 


_ 


6,159 74 


11 12 33 


35 10 


5 




18 85 


18 85 


10,598 25 


7 46 90 


25 00 


80 




86 85 


86 85 


6,298 70 


10 30 46 


26 00 


70 




267 35 


267 35 


5,747 83 


11 72 25 


33 00 


21 




_ 


— 


10,239 29 


9 45 62 


28 50 


46 




45 00 


45 00 


4,323 109 


8 67 77 


23 00 


93 




43 26 


43 26 


7,384 50 


8 16 81 


18 30 


109 




90 03 


90 03 


6,242 72 


12 23 18 


31 75 


27 




18 80 


18 80 


5,860 81 


12 23 17 


33 00 


17 




39 46 


39 46 


6,200 73 


7 22 95 


25 00 


81 




110 00 


110 00 


10,984 22 


6 49 102 


22 00 


98 




30 00 


30 00 


13,572 14 


9 64 54 


19 50 


106 




— 


_ 


6,853 59 


8 92 71 


26 00 


73 




_ 


_ 


10,079 30 


6 71 99 


18 00 


111 




_ 


— 


13,337 16 


8 44 79 


8 00 


123 




- 


- 


7,071 53 


10 43 44 


28 50 


47 




_ 


_ 


12,774 18 


8 45 78 


23 00 


92 




10 65 


10 65 


7,742 46 


10 92 36 


24 60 


84 




— 


— 


6,256 71 


10 88 38 


30 00 


40 




— 


— 


5,317 92 


9 69 52 


21 00 


102 




39 39 


39 39 


4,257 112 


9 51 57 


31 00 


30 




_ 


_ 


9,836 31 


8 84 73 


11 30 


120 




_ 


— 


6,912 57 


6 01 112 


23 00 


94 




9 83 


9 83 


5,924 80 


8 82 75 


33 00 


23 




3 08 


3 08 


5,745 84 


9 90 49 


33 60 


13 




- 


- 


7,387 49 


8 16 82 


28 00 


54 




131 55 


131 55 


26,072 4 


4 47 120 


25 00 


79 




— 


— 


4,677 103 


5 76 114 


25 00 


82 




_ 


_ 


17,913 7 


5 94 113 


21 00 


101 




— 


— 


8,768 39 


9 31 64 


25 00 


78 




~ 


1,383 56 


6,008 78 


5 56 116 


24 00 


88 



118 



Group IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Expenditure for Support of Public Schools — Day, 

Year ending 

















FROM 


STATE 








FROM LOCAL T.VXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 




TOWNS 












GENERA 


J SCHOOL 


fund) 








03 




> 






— bj 

_ IS 




> 






■Q 




111 




.9^ 


a 






.St 






§ 

a 




a 

13 


^2 
go 




o 

B 






^2 

go 






< 




Ph" '^ 




Pi 


< 




fh 




« 






38 




39 


40 


41 




42 


43 


282 


Tyngsborough . 


$16,826 


19 


$82 


48 


31 


$7,650 


16 


$37 


50 


50 


283 


Rochester 


14,452 


06 


64 


81 


66 


8,481 


40 


38 


03 


49 


284 


Berlin 


9,859 


47 


58 


00 


82 


6,485 


70 


38 


15 


48 


285 


Hubbardston 


11,862 


25 


52 


72 


92 


9,972 


16 


44 


32 


44 


286 


Hinsdale . 


9,532 


17 


40 


05 


115 


10,395 


84 


43 


68 


46 


287 


Harvard . 


16,850 


08 


114 


62 


11 


1,502 


42 


10 


22 


117 


288 


Boylston . 


12,884 


95 


55 


53 


88 


12,046 


97 


51 


93 


35 


289 


Conway . 


11,949 


08 


63 


56 


68 


6,287 


74 


33 


44 


64 


290 


East Brookfield 


9,938 


75 


63 


30 


72 


3,431 


38 


21 


86 


91 


291 


Gill . 


7,802 


08 


33 


34 


122 


7,047 


50 


30 


12 


70 


292 


Southampton 


5,681 


64 


35 


73 


118 


5,470 84 


34 


41 


62 


293 


Royalston 


10,640 


52 


73 


38 


47 


3,814 


90 


26 


31 


82 


294 


Granby 


11,878 


61 


63 


52 


69 


8,657 


09 


46 


29 


41 


295 


Bolton 


7,190 


14 


59 


91 


79 


6,626 


42 


55 


22 


32 


296 


Becket 


9,773 


94 


81 


45 


33 


2,800 


11 


23 


33 


87 


297 


Enfield . 


. 7,472 68 


69 


84 


55 


5,278 


43 


49 


33 


39 


298 


Leverett . 


4,805 


92 


34 


57 


120 


9,072 


04 


69 


27 


22 


299 


Dana 


6,188 


70 


55 


75 


86 


5,938 50 


53 


51 


34 


300 


Hampden . 


6,333 


62 


47 


98 


105 


7,789 90 


59 


01 


29 


301 


Richmond 


6,983 


12 


68 


46 


59 


4,469 09 


43 


81 


45 


302 


Halifax . 


11,063 


86 


79 


02 


37 


2,253 


17 


16 


09 


104 


303 


Granville . 


7,072 


50 


64 


89 


65 


7,028 


58 


64 


48 


24 


304 


Paxton 


9,838 


52 


67 


39 


62 


5,451 


76 


37 


34 


51 


305 


Boxford . 


10,461 


23 


96 


86 


20 


3,941 


77 


36 


50 


54 


306 


Oakham . 


4,160 87 


37 


49 


117 


7,782 


93 


70 


11 


21 


307 


Pelham 


5,240 73 


60 


24 


78 


3,187 


56 


36 


64 


53 


308 


Plympton 


8,626 


85 


76 


34 


42 


4,115 


25 


36 


41 


55 


309 


Carlisle 


9,099 


31 


71 


64 


50 


9,040 


88 


71 


19 


19 


310 


Hancock . 


3,716 


03 


44 


77 


110 


3,824 


79 


46 


08 


42 


311 


Truro 


7,347 


87 


70 


65 


53 


8,066 


89 


77 


67 


17 


312 


Eastham . 


10,600 


64 


130 87 


4 


2,465 


54 


30 44 


68 


313 


Sandisfield 


5,685 


12 


61 


13 


75 


4,606 


77 


49 


53 


37 


314 


Egremont 


5,749 


99 


67 


64 


61 


2,184 


93 


25 


71 


84 


315 


Greenwich 


5,406 


05 


112 


63 


12 


3,143 


72 


65 


49 


23 


316 


Chesterfield 


6,090 94 


73 


78 


44 


4,340 


66 


62 


91 


27 


317 


Blandford 


7,234 


31 


107 


97 


15 


1,187 


97 


17 


73 


101 


318 


Wales 


4,563 


95 


84 


51 


29 


2,935 


75 


54 


37 


33 


319 


Worthington 


5,853 


12 


68 


06 


60 


5,270 


23 


61 


28 


28 


320 


New Braintree . 


5,053 


44 


51 


57 


95 


4,846 


71 


49 


45 


38 


321 


Savoy 


2,388 


52 


40 


48 


114 


4,677 


85 


79 


28 


15 


322 


Wendell . 


6,865 


66 


87 


03 


27 


1,668 


59 


21 


12 


94 


323 


Otis . 


3,117 


99 


41 


57 


113 


6,769 


07 


90 


25 


8 


324 


Windsor . 


3,812 


39 


52 


22 


93 


5,945 


12 


81 


44 


13 


325 


Phillipston 


3,525 


75 


56 


87 


83 


3,925 


63 


63 


32 


25 


326 


Warwick . 


3,560 


96 


60 


36 


77 


3,733 


70 


63 


28 


26 


327 


Florida 


6,289 


09 


116 


46 


9 


1,490 


52 


27 


60 


78 


328 


Hawley 


1,510 


26 


26 


96 


123 


5,077 


75 


90 


67 


7 


329 


Monterey . 


4,044 


14 


106 


42 


16 


1,100 


52 


28 


96 


74 


330 


Dunstable 


4,245 


85 


81 


65 


32 


2,909 


54 


55 


95 


30 


331 


Westhampton . 


1,905 


42 


33 


43 


121 


2,044 


42 


35 


87 


59 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS 



119 



Continued 



Evening, Vacation - 


- Classified as to Source 










Amount paid to Town 


Dec. 


31. 1927 














FROM- 


- 






JS 

o 


FROM ALL SOURCES 




it 






o.-rt a 


a 


















recei] 
;ion am 
tation 1 
■da 


t 




"1 

Q, 4) 0) 

3 t-^ 


> 


8 fl 

.a o 

03 O 


02 -t^ 




From 
tuit 
por 
wai 


2 3 

is 
< 


3 
O 

a 
< 




ac3 


a a 
a-i 


-^2 
go 




S 2 




44 


45 


46 




47 


48 


49 


50 




$556 09 


$20 00 


$25,051 


44 


$122 


80 


47 


$2,409 75 


$1,634 28 




218 57 


232 60 


23,384 


63 


104 


80 


70 


1,192 98 


2,130 00 




45 00 


— 


16,390 


17 


96 


41 


88 


1,888 78 


970 00 




66 87 


168 00 


22,069 


28 


98 


08 


86 


2,350 89 


1,511 40 




- 


■ - 


19,928 


01 


83 


73 


103 


2,964 80 


2,595 00 




171 00 


_ 


18,523 


50 


126 


01 


43 


_ 


960 00 




- 


- 


24,931 


93 


107 


47 


67 


2,995 00 


2,750 00 




1,422 55 


— 


19,659 


37 


104 


57 


72 


3,753 93 


1,640 00 




— 


24 00 


13,394 


13 


85 


31 


101 


_ 


850 00 




- 


150 00 


14,999 


58 


64 


10 


122 


770 03 


2,440 00 




21 86 


53 38 


11,227 


62 


70 


61 


116 


2,912 69 


1,100 00 




1,255 62 


1,145 89 


16,856 


93 


116 


25 


51 


135 77 


901 10 




26 73 


— 


20,562 


43 


109 


95 


63 


3,254 39 


1,855 00 




1,177 01 


— 


14,993 


57 


124 


95 


44 


3,942 51 


840 00 




1,123 46 


286 10 


13,983 


61 


116 


53 


50 


123 46 


825 00 




2,115 02 


133 87 


15,000 


00 


140 


19 


28 


_ 


605 00 




56 97 


285 00 


14,219 


93 


120 


30 


75 


2,128 37 


1,960 00 




1,089 17 


366 99 


13,583 


36 


122 


37 


48 


1,338 19 


715 00 




865 32 


32 25 


15,021 


09 


113 


79 


64 


1,364 39 


1,493 57 




- 


- 


11,452 


21 


112 


28 


58 


1,608 45 


950 00 




271 04 


643 46 


14,231 


53 


101 


65 


77 


_ 


730 00 




685 34 


— 


14,786 


42 


135 


66 


32 


2,538 33 


850 00 




— 


85 00 


15,375 


28 


105 


31 


69 


1,380 98 


710 00 




' — 


— 


14,403 


00 


133 


36 


38 


1,248 63 


670 00 




44 29 


180 00 


12,168 


09 


109 


62 


64 


2,780 12 


1,040 00 




838 00 


376 76 


9,643 


05 


110 


84 


60 


111 07 


619 00 




109 90 


- 


12,852 


00 


113 


73 


55 




480 00 




813 24 


— 


18,953 


43 


149 


24 


21 


2,114 16 


1,100 00 




— 


— 


7,540 


82 


90 


85 


93 


1,489 75 


800 00 




- 


224 76 


15,639 


52 


150 


38 


20 


1,495 66 


600 00 




.- 


_ 


13,066 


18 


161 


31 


15 


_ 


640 00 




— 


341 50 


10,633 


39 


114 


34 


53 


2,543 83 


950 00 




— 


— 


7,934 


92 


93 


35 


90 


— 


423 75 




545 16 


1,736 30 


10,831 


23 


225 


65 


4 


1,264 43 


315 00 




427 52 


- 


9,859 


12 


142 


89 


24 


1,856 80 


400 00 




40 56 


698 56 


9,161 


40 


136 74 


29 


_ 


470 00 




145 14 


- 


7,644 


84 


141 


57 


25 


466 93 


493 67 




- 


563 22 


11,686 


57 


135 


89 


31 


2,189 08 


500 00 




48 19 


- 


9,948 


34 


101 


51 


78 


1,718 00 


500 00 




- 


284 61 


7,350 


98 


124 


59 


45 


2,266 56 


1,100 00 




- 


8 25 


8,542 


50 


108 


13 


66 


_ 


450 00 




— 


851 75 


10,738 


81 


143 


18 


23 


2,273 99 


550 00 




— 


17 22 


9,774 


73 


133 


90 


36 


2,847 83 


490 00 




777 55 


114 00 


8,342 


93 


134 


56 


35 


2,194 56 


681 70 




- 


- 


7,294 


66 


123 


64 


46 


1,569 17 


400 00 




- 


903 00 


8,682 


61 


160 


78 


16 


_ 


950 00 




4,396 35 


- 


10,984 


36 


196 


10 


6 


893 80 


1,400 00 




— 


— 


5,144 


66 


135 


39 


33 


_ 


300 00 




1,844 13 


11 00 


9,010 


52 


173 


27 


8 


83 15 


354 93 






178 80 


4,128 


64 


72 


43 


113 


1,139 46 


400 00 



120 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 







Year 


Grades 


IN- 


Public Day Elementary Schools (including 




^ 


>> 
a 

03 




PRINCIPALS 


TEACHERS 


PUPILS ENROLLED 




TOWNS 


o 
o 

i 

B 


o 

-a 

•i 

•a 

a 

1-5 


O 

o 

M 

3 

•a 

m 


FULL TIME 




fl S 
o o 


a 
a a 

a o 


O .3 

pq O 






51 


52 


53 


54 55 


56 57 


58 59 


282 
283 
284 
285 
286 


Tyngsborough 
Rochester . 
Berlin 

Hubbardston 
Hinsdale 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- 


6 
8 
6 
1 6 
9 


93 89 
102 103 

79 72 
112 85 
101 125 


287 
288 
289 
290 
291 


Harvard 

Boylston 

Conway 

East Brookfield . 

GiU . 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- ' - 


1 4 
5 
6 

1 4 

7 


84 74 
77 119 
99 78 
67 72 
114 93 


292 
293 
294 
295 
296 


Southampton 
Royalston . 
Granby 
Bolton 
Becket 


8 
8 
8 
6 
8 


3 


- 


- 


1 6 
6 
6 

5 
1 4 


78 60 

77 66 
82 77 

78 59 
66 43 


297 
298 
299 
300 
301 


Enfield 
Leverett . 
Dana 

Hampden . 
Richmond . 


8 
8 

8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- - 


4 
1 5 
5 
5 
6 


78 51 
68 68 
46 53 
73 49 
52 36 


302 
303 
304 
305 
306 


Halifax 
Granville . 
Paxton 
Boxford 
Oakham 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- 


4 
6 
1 3 
4 
3 


68 59 
55 54 
70 59 
42 47 
46 52 


307 
308 
309 
310 
311 


Pelham 
Plympton . 
Carlisle 
Hancock 
Truro 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- - 


4 
3 
4 
6 
1 3 


48 45 

49 39 
59 42 
36 48 
32 40 


312 
313 
314 
315 
316 


Eastham . 
Sandisfield . 
Egremont . 
Greenwich . 
Chesterfield 


8 
8 
8 
8 
9 


- 


- 


- - 


1 2 

1 4 

3 

3 

5 


41 31 
57 32 

36 37 

37 14 
33 27 


317 
318 
319 
320 
321 


Blandford . 
Wales 

Worthington 
New Braintree . 
Savoy 


8 

8 
9 

8 
8 


- 


- 


- - 


1 2 
4 
5 
3 
5 


30 30 
30 26 
46 38 
39 28 
38 38 


322 
323 
324 
325 
326 


Wendell . 

Otis . 
Windsor 
Phillipston . 
Warwick 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


- 


3 
5 
3 
4 
3 


29 41 
50 49 
37 30 

31 33 

32 23 


327 
328 
329 
330 
331 


Florida 
Hawley 
Monterey . 
Dunstable . 
Westhampton 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


- 


- 


_ _ 


6 
6 
2 
2 
3 


43 32 
62 27 
27 10 
25 29 
24 31 



' For kindergarten, see column 109. 

2 Includes $1,995.94 for high school instruction of 5 pupils in local junior high school. 



Pt. 11. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



121 



Continued 



First Two Years op Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 



■i 


>. 


"^ 




expenditure for 




Sfe 




^ 




1 


03 


a 


0. 


SUPPORT, exclusive 


DF 


S 


1 




tj 


O 

o 

h 




1 

S 
B 


GENERAl 


CONTROL 






I 




1 

CO 






•2a„ 


s 




tov 


li 


a> 

03 




3 




p,<b3 V 


S m 


h 


r^ 


|.a 


l§ 


3 

> 




3 








&0-? 


& 


B 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 




fin 




w 




w 




60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 


66 




67 


28,468 


178 


160 


172 


$20,195 49 


$117 


42 


$9,604 


00 


$260 29 


32,501 


177 


184 


194 


13,582 


39 


70 


01 


8,915 


64 


444 


93 


24,458 


171 


137 


147 


12,054 


55 


82 


00 


7,194 


26 


231 


78 


32,890 


184 


177 


187 


14,100 


97 


75 


41 


7,226 


06 


293 


34 


37,992 


185 


202 


216 


14,622 


97 


67 


69 


8,895 


00 


273 


33 


25,286 


177 


143 


152 


17,779 


01 


116 


97 


7,209 


00 


362 


55 


33,236 


181 


183 


192 


13,899 


12 


72 


39 


7,543 


00 


279 


03 


28,419 


183 


155 


168 


13,943 


92 


82 


99 


6,415 


00 


229 


23 


22,768 


179 


128 


136 


8,835 


43 


64 


96 


5,619 


27 


204 


62 


32,381 


171 


189 


202 


9,820 


80 


48 


62 


6,652 


00 


288 


08 


22,028 


178 


124 


133 


9,210 


40 


69 


25 


5,990 


00 


48 


24 


22,090 


180 


123 


131 


11,608 


36 


88 


61 


5,396 


59 


132 


53 


24,708 


182 


136 


150 


16,012 


08 


106 


74 


7,480 


79 


80 


12 


18,668 


177 


105 


116 


12,425 


472 


107 


11 


5,158 


13 


99 


73 


16,060 


173 


92 


102 


10,408 


82 


102 


04 


6,108 


00 


56 


94 


19,460 


185 


100 


111 


7,548 


77 


68 


01 


4,265 


00 


144 


95 


19,419 


169 


115 


123 


9,292 


78 


75 


55 


6,361 


99 


210 


80 


15,817 


176 


90 


92 


9,363 


91 


101 


78 


5,337 


00 


174 


59 


19,024 


181 


105 


114 


8,288 


08 


72 


70 


5,094 


75 


134 


52 


14,235 


180 


79 


84 


8,187 


07 


97 


46 


5,643 


00 


15 


53 


20,395 


178 


115 


122 


9,522 


54 


78 05 


4,550 


00 


167 


82 


17,043 


170 


100 


106 


9,288 


62 


87 


63 


6,825 


00 


117 


69 


20,338 


169 


120 


128 


10,576 


95 


82 


63 


4,892 


38 


226 


16 


12,653 


180 


71 


87 


9,272 


97 


106 


59 


5,084 


00 


144 


28 


14,313 


171 


84 


89 


7,154 


02 


80 


38 


3,640 


98 


115 


94 


15,146 


184 


82 


87 


6,441 


91 


74 


04 


4,019 


00 


256 


35 


14,343 


182 


79 


84 


7,349 


93 


87 


50 


3,426 


00 


157 


85 


16,810 


181 


93 


98 


10,958 


17 


111 


82 


4,834 


50 


98 


67 


13,218 


186 


71 


78 


6,137 


55 


78 


69 


5,200 


00 


86 


65 


11,845 


186 


63 


68 


7,142 


91 


105 


04 


4,258 


72 


160 


88 


12,072 


185 


65 


70 


8,205 


37 


117 


21 


4,250 


00 


13 


20 


12,356 


172 


72 


77 


8,996 


99 


116 


84 


5,400 


00 


135 


33 


11,281 


182 


62 


67 


4,243 


91 


63 


34 


3,000 


00 


69 


36 


7,738 


176 


44 


45 


5,583 


51 


124 


07 


3,220 


00 


118 48 


9,056 


170 


53 


59 


6,775 


30 


114 


83 


4,446 


00 


81 


84 


8,796 


179 


49 


56 


7,144 


43 


127 


57 


3,826 


00 


69 


50 


7,959 


180 


44 


47 


5,055 


42 


107 


56 


2,980 


04 


128 


49 


11,207 


165 


68 


75 


7,932 


19 


105 


76 


4,032 


00 


113 


67 


11,501 


180 


64 


68 


6,290 


86 


92 


51 


3,140 


71 


85 


49 


9,115 


166 


55 


62 


5,434 


35 


87 


65 


4,485 


21 


103 


75 


9,987 


169 


59 


65 


5,487 


10 


84 


42 


2,799 


72 


57 


29 


12,958 


179 


72 


76 


5,102 


98 


67 


14 


4,374 


00 


49 


24 


9,052 


165 


55 


61 


7,106 


95 


116 


51 


3,325 


00 


48 


13 


9,629 


179 


53 


59 


6,235 


82 


105 


69 


4,047 


00 


100 


01 


7,672 


172 


44 


49 


5,140 


44 


104 


90 


2,676 


37 


69 


79 


10,678 


169 


63 


66 


7,513 


04 


113 


83 


5,916 


66 


71 


08 


12,533 


172 


71 


77 


7,341 


49 


95 


34 


4,975 


48 


309 


12 


6,081 


178 


34 


36 


3,557 


19 


98 


81 


1,950 


00 


48 


66 


8,305 


180 


46 


50 


5,795 


71 


115 


91 


2,250 


00 


20 


92 


9,389 


180 


52 


56 


3,795 


53 


67 


78 


2,703 


50 


34 


69 



122 







Group IV. Towns of 


Less than 5,000 Population 








High School 






EXPENDITURE FOR TUITION AND 






HIGH SCHOOLS IN OTHER 




TOWNS 




1 
1 








§ 1 






c S O O-w 


■■3 a 






82 


83 84 


282 
283 
284 
285 
286 


Tyngsborough 
Rochester 
Berlin . 
Hubbardston . 
Hinsdale 


35 
39 
25 
39 
30 


S3, 146 50 $1,740 00 
4,434 08 4,932 79 
2,309 20 613 90 
4,895 69 4,317 17 
3,857 99 2,612 60 


287 
288 
289 
290 
291 


Harvard 

Boylston 

Conway 

East Brookfield 

Gill 


11 
40 
33 
22 
33 


89 81 135 60 
6,470 00 1,218 50 
2,610 GO 3,896 57 
1,878 00 1,177 00 
3,175 00 976 50 


292 
293 
294 
295 
296 


Southampton 
Royalston 
Granby 
Bolton . 
Becket . 


15 
25 
29 
16 
11 


2,627 50 362 02 
2,311 84 2,112 47 
2,402 64 2,141 06 
1,475 34 1,011 55 
1,455 88 626 52 


297 
298 
299 
300 
301 


Enfield . 
Leverett 
Dana . 
Hampden 
Richmond 


23 
23 
21 
29 
18 


2,839 69 2,141 55 
2,649 39 1,728 10 
2,512 75 1,540 00 
4,329 00 2,064 22 
1,748 00 2,084 26 


302 
303 
304 
305 
306 


Halifax . 
Granville 
Paxton . 
Boxford 
Oakham 


28 
18 
20 

216 

25 


2,561 98 1,345 71 
2,097 75 2,638 40 
3,166 00 1,646 00 
1,820 00 2,182 42 
2,390 38 2,299 90 


307 
308 
309 
310 
311 


Pelham 
Plympton 
Carlisle . 
Hancock 
Truro . 


18 
31 
37 
5 
37 


2,183 46 1,198 55 
2,607 43 2,100 00 
4,651 94 2,442 00 
436 50 261 20 
3,600 00 3,456 00 


312 
313 
314 
315 
316 


Eastham 
Sandisfield 
Egremont 
Greenwich 
Chesterfield . 


16 
6 

18 
9 

14 


2,413 25 1,800 00 
532 56 764 80 

2,166 18 1,500 00 
946 88 1,443 75 

1,480 00 1,975 84 


317 
318 
319 
320 
321 


Blandford 
Wales . 
Worthington . 
New Braintree 
Savoy . 


8 

8 

11 

18 

1 


1,129 80 618 80 

892 50 882 40 

1,420 00 1,586 75 

1,626 51 2,499 04 

100 52 193 60 


322 
323 
324 
325 
326 


Wendell 

Otis 

Windsor 

Phillipston 

Warwick 


11 
13 
10 
6 
10 


866 15 1,024 40 

1,855 00 2,490 80 

1,066 86 502 20 

715 50 655 63 

970 00 713 00 


327 
328 
329 
330 
331 


Florida . 

Hawley 

Monterey 

Dunstable 

Westhampton 


3 

7 

'.'.'. 12 

4 


363 40 316 95 
953 08 1,074 40 
325 48 212 40 
1,143 20 1,691 20 
380 00 365 30 



1 Not including pupils attending local academy. 

2 Pending. 

3 Also expended $1,995.94 for high school instruction of 5 pupils in local junior high school. 
* Does not include certain bills paid after close of school year. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS • 



123 



Continued 



Education for Year ending June 30, 1928 



TRANSPORTATION TO PUBLIC 
TOWNS OR CITIES 



Sm 



3-a, 






NET COST TO TOWN FOR HIGH 
SCHOOL EDUCATION 



85 


86 


87 




88 


89 


$4,886 50 


$139 61 


$3,406 


15 


$1,480 35 


$42 30 


9,366 87 


240 18 


5,958 


31 


3,408 56 


87 40 


2,923 10 


116 92 


1,767 


66 


1,155 44 


46 22 


9,212 86 


236 23 


6,757 


57 


2,455 29 


62 96 


6,470 59 


215 69 


5,416 


68 


1,053 91 


35 13 


225 41 


225 41 


76 


00 


149 41 


149 41 


7,688 50 


192 21 


5,862 


47 


1,826 03 


45 65 


6,506 57 


197 17 


6,320 


25 


186 32 


5 65 


3,055 00 


138 86 


1.967 


69 


1,087 31 


49 42 


4,151 50 


125 80 


3,437 


85 


713 65 


21 63 


2,989 52 


199 30 


1,658 


71 


1,330 81 


88 72 


4,424 31 


176 97 




-2 


— 


— 


4,543 70 


156 68 


3,985 


78 


557 92 


19 24 


2,486 89 3 


155 43 


1,743 


83 


743 06 


46 44 


2,082 40 


189 31 


1,856 


96 


225 44 


20 49 


4,981 24 


216 68 


3,855 


41 


1,125 83 


48 95 


4,377 49 4 


190 33 4 


4,870 


38 


— 


— 


4,052 75 


192 99 


3,336 


50 


716 25 


34 11 


6,393 22 


220 46 


5,292 


64 


1,100 58 


37 95 


3,832 26 


212 90 


2,564 


08 


1,268 18 


70 45 


3,907 69 


139 56 


1,345 70 


2,561 99 


91 50 


4,736 15 


263 12 


3,880 


29 


855 86 


47 55 


4,812 00 


240 60 


3,769 


90 


1,042 10 


52 11 


4,002 42 


190 59 


1,925 


85 


2,076 57 


98 88 


4,690 28 


187 61 


4,363 


43 


326 85 


60 74 


3,382 01 


187 89 


2,515 


58 


866 43 


48 14 


4,707 43 


151 85 


4,105 


93 


601 50 


19 40 


6,993 94 


189 03 


5,801 


13 


1,192 81 


32 24 


697 70 


139 54 


522 


53 


175 17 


35 03 


7,056 00 


190 70 


3,302 


40 


3,753 60 


101 45 


4,213 25 


263 33 


1,620 


40 


2,592 85 


162 05 


1,297 36 


216 23 


1,036 


56 


260 80 


43 47 


3,666 18 


203 68 


1,451 


80 


2,214 38 


123 02 


2,390 63 


265 63. 


1,280 


36 


1,110 27 


123 36 


3,455 84 


246 85 


3,136 


93 


318 91 


22 78 


1,748 60 


218 58 


618 


80 


1,129 80 


141 23 


1,774 90 


221 86 


1,706 


50 


68 40 


8 55 


3,006 75 


273 34 


2,206 


35 


800 40 


72 76 


4,125 55 


229 20 


3,410 


62 


714 93 


39 72 


294 12 


294 12 


222 


32 


71 80 


71 80 


1,890 55 


171 87 


930 


20 


960 35 


87 30 


4,345 80 


334 29 




-2 


— 


- 


1,569 06 


156 91 




-2 


— 


- 


1,371 13 


228 52 


1,105 


19 


265 94 


44 32 


1,683 00 


168 30 


1,683 


00 


- 


- 


680 35 


226 78 


69 


90 


610 45 


203 48 


2,027 48 


289 64 


1,390 


48 


637 00 


91 00 


537 88 


268 94 


172 


80 


365 08 


182 54 


2,834 40 


236 20 


2,492 


48 


341 92 


28 49 


745 30 4 


186 331 


1,151 


53 


" 


~ 



5 Not including pupils attending Barker Free School. 



124 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Persons 5 to 16 Years 



6 TO 7 Years 



TOWNS 



3-03 






7 TO 14 



-Q S a 
so3 



90 



282 


Tyngsborough . 


43 


31 


283 


Rochester 


42 


26 


284 


BerUn 


50 


24 


285 


Hubbardston 


37 


29 


286 


Hinsdale . 


43 


43 


287 


Harvard . 


38 


37 


288 


Boylston . 


34 


34 


289 


Conway . 


24 


21 


290 


East Brookfield 


31 


28 


291 


Gill .... 


49 


44 


292 


Southampton 


31 


24 


293 


Royalston 


35 


32 


294 


Granby 


34 


31 


295 


Bolton 


28 


16 


296 


Beoket 


16 


16 


297 


Enfield . 


28 


25 


298 


Leverett . 


27 


22 


299 


Dana 


17 


10 


300 


Hampden 


21 


21 


301 


Richmond 


27 


12 


302 


Halifax 


21 


20 


303 


GranviUe . 


15 


14 


304 


Paxton 


24 


17 


305 


Boxford . 


33 


16 


306 


Oakham . • . 


17 


12 


307 


Pelham 


18 


11 


308 


Plympton 


17 


10 


309 


Carlisle 


22 


16 


310 


Hancock 


20 


15 


311 


Truro 


17 


17 


312 


Eastham . 


22 


14 


313 


Sandisfield 


18 


11 


314 


Egremont 


18 


12 


315 


Greenwich 


4 


4 


316 


Chesterfield 


12 


8 


317 


Blandford 


14 


4 


318 


Wales 


10 


8 


319 


Worthington 


16 


12 


320 


New Braintree . 


14 


8 


321 


Savoy 


10 


8 


322 


Wendell . 


17 


10 


323 


Otis 


17 


17 


324 


Windsor . 


10 


10 


325 


Phillipston 


4 


4 


326 


Warwick . 


14 


9 


327 


Florida 


8 


7 


328 


Hawley 


14 


11 


329 


Monterey 


6 


4 


330 


Dunstable 


15 


11 


331 


Westhampton . 


9 


7 



95 



10 


154 


149 


16 


172 


172 


26 


141 


123 


8 


147 


147 


- 


181 


181 


_ 


120 


114 


— 


157 


157 


3 


141 


140 


3 


111 


106 


5 


174 


174 


7 


132 


130 


3 


102 


100 


3 


134 


131 


12 


109 


109 


- 


91 


91 


3 


86 


86 


5 


93 


93 


7 


80 


80 




98 


98 


12 


83 


73 


1 


108 


108 


1 


76 


76 


7 


110 


104 


17 


70 


70 


5 


77 


76 


7 


70 


70 


7 


75 


75 


6 


76 


74 


5 


61 


60 


- 


51 


48 


8 


55 


55 


7 


67 


64 


6 


56 


56 


_ 


61 


48 


4 


48 


48 


10 


46 


46 


2 


48 


46 


2 


67 


67 


6 


67 


67 


2 


59 


59 


7 


60 


60 


_ 


72 


72 


_ 


53 


53 


— 


53 


53 


5 


41 


41 


1 


48 


46 


3 


63 


63 


2 


27 


27 


3 


41 


39 


2 


47 


46 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT ivLUNTAiNiNG HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



125 



OF Age, October 1, 1927 



Yeabs 



ze 



•Co3 



^.s ^^ 



14 TO 16 Years 



* S 2- 



•B a 

•S)'a 



3o3 



93 



■i>; 



Illiterate 


Minors, 


16 TO 21 


Years 


OF Age 






Ort 


IS y, M 


d-ii 


"S3 




■"ya M 


■30 


'■3 a 


2 


"^K- 


'ii«- 






■gs 


g'-S >>i:o 


fi 


rrt 



97 98 

5 

18 



4 2 



13 



30 


21 


61 


56 


35 


33 


47 


31 


5 


5 


24 


7 


46 


41 


25 


19 


28 


22 


32 


32 


22 


13 


32 


31 


30 


20 


25 


21 


16 


16 


26 


24 


30 


21 


22 


20 


29 


20 


23 


19 


18 


18 


22 


22 


32 


22 


34 


30 


20 


19 


18 


13 


21 


21 


53 


53 


13 


11 


4 


4 


12 


12 


15 


13 


12 


12 


9 


4 


22 


12 


18 


15 


14 


11 


14 


13 


24 


15 


22 


7 



10 


4 


9 


5 


4 


4 


15 


12 


4 


4 



105 



106 



107 



126 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5.000 Population 



Membership in Public Day 









ELEMENTARY 




i)^ 


h S 














TOWNS 


1 


0°- 


3 Jg 


















""S 


l"2 


rt 


CM 


n 


■* 


lO 








S-p 


S"^ 


a 


a> 


a 


o 


a) 






•n 


m U 


fc 2 


-o 


13 


T3 


T! 


-0 






a 


o3 -t^ 


■5 ** 


cS 




c3 


03 

Eh 


03 






3 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 






109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


282 


Tyngsborough . 


_ 


12 


_ 


22 


21 


20 


19 


17 


283 


Rochester 


— 


— 


— 


26 


25 


31 


32 


25 


284 


Berlin 


_ 


— 


— 


26 


18 


19 


16 


25 


285 


Hubbardston 


— 


— 


— 


24 


17 


23 


26 


32 


286 


Hinsdale . 


. 


- 


- 


37 


23 


34 


43 


24 


287 


Harvard . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25 


27 


27 


15 


24 


288 


Boylston . 


- 


- 


- 


29 


22 


26 


20 


23 


289 


Conway . 


— 


— 


— 


30 


19 


21 


23 


17 


290 


East Brookfield . 


— 


— 


— 


30 


20 


19 


15 


13 


291 


Gill .... 


. 


- 


- 


28 


25 


31 


23 


32 


292 


Southampton 


_ 


_ 


_ 


17 


13 


14 


20 


14 


293 


Royalston 


— 


— 


— 


15 


25 


13 


13 


14 


294 


Granby 


— 


— 


— 


25 


28 


21 


20 


13 


295 


Bolton 


— 


— 


— 


20 


15 


24 


16 


15 


296 


Becket 


. 


- 


- 


14 


12 


14 


6 


22 


297 


Enfield . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


17 


8 


13 


15 


15 


298 


Leverett . 


_ 


— 


— 


23 


18 


19 


14 


IS 


299 


Dana 


— 


— 


— 


13 


13 


9 


11 


14 


300 


Hampden 


[ \ - 


- 


- 


22 


11 


13 


16 


18 


301 


Richmond 


. 


- 


- 


13 


15 


13 


12 


19 


302 


Halifax 


_ 


_ 


_ 


18 


27 


23 


17 


8 


303 


Granville . 


_ 


— 


— 


16 


12 


16 


7 


16 


304 


Paxton 


_ 


— 


— 


21 


21 


17 


13 


8 


305 


Boxford . 


_ 


- 


— 


18 


5 


16 


12 


10 


306 


Oakham . 


• 


- 


- 


10 


14 


14 


16 


9 


307 


Pelham 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


8 


15 


10 


12 


308 


Plympton 


- 


- 


- 


15 


9 


11 


11 


7 


309 


Carlisle 


_ 


- 


— 


15 


12 


18 


12 


7 


310 


Hancock . 


_ 


- 


— 


9 


15 


7 


9 


16 


311 


Truro 


■ 


- 


- 


13 


7 


8 


8 


13 


312 


Eastham . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


12 


3 


10 


9 


11 


313 


Sandisfield 


— 


— 


— 


7 


8 


15 


14 


8 


314 


Egremont 


— 


— 


— 


16 


6 


9 


11 


8 


315 


Greenwich 


— 


— 


2 


6 


3 


5 


7 


9 


316 


Chesterfield 


• 


- 


- 


8 


12 


8 


8 


9 


317 


Blandford 


_ 


_ 


_ 


10 


5 


6 


4 


8 


318 


Wales 


_ 


— 


— 


7 


8 


8 


4 


9 


319 


Worthington 


— 


— 


— 


12 


11 


5 


6 


8 


320 


New Braintree . 


— 


- 


— 


7 


7 


12 


9 


11 


321 


Savoy 


• 


- 


- 


13 


3 


10 


14 


11 


322 


Wendell . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


14 


12 


7 


9 


323 


Otis . . . •. 


_ 


— 


— 


19 


11 


15 


10 


13 


324 


Windsor . 


— 


— 


— 


11 


8 


11 


3 


8 


325 


Phillipston 


- 


- 


- 


7 


4 


6 


7 


10 


326 


Warwick . 


■ 


- 


- 


11 


11 


4 


9 


7 


327 


Florida . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8 


5 


13 


4 


12 


328 


Hawley 


_ 


— 


- 


14 


13 


13 


8 


14 


329 


Monterey . 


- 


- 


- 


7 


5 


3 


5 


1 


330 


Dunstable 


— 


— 


- 


9 


3 


9 


6 


6 


331 


Westhampton . 


— 


" 


" 


7 


7 


6 


3 


9 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



127 



Schools by Grades, October 1, 1927 



eS'S 



^ I'm 
C 



05 C-H 
1) o 



HIGH 


SCHOOLS 








^,«^ 






d ca 


^ 


s 


3 

I-T3 


& 






^ 


J3 




13 


1 
O 


H 


fe 


S 



125 



23 


27 


17 


- 


178 


31 


19 


12 


— 


201 


14 


13 


13 


— 


144 


28 


22 


24 


- 


196 


27 


21 


20 


- 


229 


11 


18 


11 


_ 


158 


19 


19 


22 


- 


180 


16 


25 


20 


- 


171 


11 


13 


13 


— 


134 


28 


27 


13 


- 


207 


20 


15 


24 


_ 


137 


26 


18 


12 


1 


137 


22 


14 


12 


— 


155 


14 


19 


9 


— 


132 


21 


8 


10 


- 


107 


13 


18 


17 


_ 


116 


23 


8 


9 


— 


132 


9 


14 


12 


— 


95 


15 


8 


16 


— 


119 


5 


17 


2 


- 


96 


17 


12 


13 


_ 


135 


13 


14 


15 


— 


109 


20 


15 


12 


- 


127 


9 


9 


9 


- 


88 


11 


12 


6 


- 


92 


5 


23 


4 


_ 


90 


16 


7 


10 


- 


86 


13 


16 


8 


- 


101 


10 


8 


7 


- 


81 


7 


8 


5 


- 


69 


10 


5 


8 


_ 


68 


8 


12 


4 


- 


76 


4 


10 


7 


- 


71 


3 


5 


8 


- 


48 


6 


6 


5 


1 


63 


5 


5 


10 


_ 


53 


6 


9 


5 


— 


56 


10 


11 


11 


1 


75 


9 


11 


6 


— 


72 


10 


7 


3 


- 


71 


6 


8 


2 


_ 


69 


7 


10 


11 


— 


96 


10 


9 


7 


— 


67 


9 


10 


11 


— 


64 


6 


7 


1 


- 


56 


7 


12 


10 


_ 


71 


6 


8 


5 


— 


81 


2 


3 


9 


— 


35 


4 


4 


10 


- 


51 


8 


6 


8 


- 


54 



123 

178 
201 
144 
196 
229 

158 
180 
171 
134 
207 

137 
137 

155 
137 
107 

116 
132 

95 
119 

96 

135 
109 
127 



90 
86 
101 
81 
69 

68 
76 
71 
48 
63 

53 
56 
75 
72 
71 



67 
64 
56 

71 
81 
35 
51 
54 



128 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



TOWNS 



School Buildings in 
Use, Jan. 1, 1928 






Estimated Value op 



ELEMENTARY 



282 Tyngsborough 

283 Rochester . 

284 Berlin 

285 Hubbardston 

286 Hinsdale . 

287 Harvard 

288 Boylston . 

289 Conway 

290 East Brookfield 

291 Gill . 

292 Southampton 

293 Royalston 

294 Granby 

295 Bolton 

296 Becket 

297 Enfield 

298 Leverett 

299 Dana 

300 Hampden 

301 Richmond 

302 Halifax 

303 Granville 

304 Paxton 

305 Boxford 

306 Oakham 

307 Pelham 

308 Plympton 

309 Carlisle 

310 Hancock 

311 Truro 

312 Eastham 

313 Sandisfield 

314 Egremont 

315 Greenwich 

316 Chesterfield 

317 Blandford . 

318 Wales 

319 Worthington 

320 New Braintree 

321 Savoy 

322 Wendell 

323 Otis . 

324 Windsor 

325 Phillipston 

326 Warwick 

327 Florida 

328 Hawley 

329 Monterey 

330 Dunstable 

331 Westhampton 



129 130 131 132 133 



4 
4 1 

3 
5 



2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


- 


4 


1 


- 


2 


5 


- 


3 


— 


3 


— 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


- 





- 


3 


_ 


5 


— 


1 


1 


4 


— 


1 


1 


4 


1 


6 


— 


2 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


1 



$2,000 


S70,900 


300 


9,600 


1,250 


18,000 


2,000 


9,750 


1,600 


33,000 


5,000 


25,000 


2,500 


42,000 


1,000 


35,000 


600 


27,500 


2,000 


20,000 


800 


7,000 


600 


12,000 


2,000 


15,000 


1,600 


40,000 


1,000 


16,000 


1,500 


10,000 


300 


9,000 


350 


22,100 


400 


14,000 


750 


6,000 


1,000 


9,500 


350 


4,500 


2,500 


16,000 


500 


9,500 


2,000 


10,000 


925 


10,700 


— 


2,925 


1,200 


20,000 


300 


6,000 


400 


6,500 


100 


6,000 


600 


3,000 


500 


2,000 


300 


7,000 


375 


3,625 


7,000 


30,000 


600 


8,000 


295 


5,000 


300 


4,400 


800 


6,200 


300 


7,000 


250 


5,000 


450 


15,000 


600 


6,300 


500 


4,000 


700 


4,300 


500 


5,000 


100 


4,500 


200 


10,000 


500 


4,000 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHooLS — Continued. 



129 



Public School Property 



SCHOOLS 


junior and senior high 


SCHOOLS 






"S 3^ 








•s§_ 






•B'h" 








^"^'e? 






' c5 a> 








^~' g3 03 






^i o. . 








4» a . 




1 


c a S 








0*01 






o es.s 






S 


o n.S 




o 


1^1 


3 


Oi 


^ 

2 




"3 


i 


jy-M — 


o 




'3 


cr-"— 


o 


s 


W 


H 


w 


« 


W 


H 


o 


137 


138 


139 


.140 


141 


142 


143 


$3,800 


$76,700 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$76,700 


1,200 


11,100 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11,100 


.2,000 


21,250 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21,250 


2,500 


14,250 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14,250 


3,000 


37,500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37,500 


1,500 


31,500 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31,500 


6,000 


50,500 


— 


— 


— 


- 


50,500 


1,500 


37,500 


— 


— 


$500 


$500 


38,000 


3,000 


31,100 


— 


— 


- 


- 


31,100 


1,500 


23,500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23,500 


600 


8,400 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8,400 


2,800 


15,400 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15,400 


1,501 


18,501 


• — 


— 


— 


— 


18,501 


2,000 


43,600 


$800 


$5,000 


400 


6,200 


49,800 


3,000 


20,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20,000 


1,500 


13,000 


_ 


_ 


_ 




13,000 


2,500 


11,800 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11,800 


1,200 


23,650 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25,650 


2,000 


16,400 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16,400 


1,500 


8,250 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8,250 


1,600 


12,100 


_ 


_ 


_ 




12,100 


1,300 


6,150 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6,150 


1,700 


20,200 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,200 


2,000 


12,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12,000 


1,500 


13,500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13,500 


1,275 


12,900 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


12,900 


500 


3,425 


— 


— 


— 


- 


3,425 


500 


21,700 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21,700 


1,300 


7,600 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7,600 


300 


7,200 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7,200 


2,000 


8,100 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8,100 


1,200 


4,800 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4,800 


500 


3,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,000 


500 


7,800 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7,800 


600 


4,600 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,600 


800 


37,800 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


37,800 


600 


9,200 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9,200 


800 


6,095 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6,095 


750 


5,450 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,450 


800 


7,800 


■ - 


- 


- 


- 


7,800 


700 


8,000 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8,000 


250 


5,500 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,500 


1,000 


16,450 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16,450 


2,000 


8,900 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8,900 


500 


5,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5,000 


800 


5,800 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,800 


1,500 


7,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7,000 


450 


5,050 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,050 


500 


10,700 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10,700 


200 


4,700 


~ 


— 


"* 


~ 


4,700 



130 



Group IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 







3 


T-H 


Teaching Staff 


[N Public 






3 


■^ 


Day Schools - 


— KlNDERGAKTEN 


, Ele- 






1 


MBNTART. HiGH JaN. 1. 1928 






o 


P4 

< 




























S 


«-. 




FULL. 


TIME 




PART 




TOWNS 




o 

c3 










TIME 












s 






ff 






E 






si 






S 


fl* 


»2 


o 






O <S 






•43 
c8 LO 


o 
•-St- 


c3 


■p 


ffi 










"33 


c3(N 


1 
•E 






1 






Ph 


> 


fh 


OQ 


H 


H 


02 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


332 


Boxborough . 


333 


$372,202 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


333 


West Tisbury 


332 


722,994 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1 


334 


Heath . 


298 


380,346 


— 


— 


2 


2 . 


— 


335 


Mashpee 


298 


1,103,737 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


336 


Rowe . 


292 


686,756 


- 


- 


3 


3 


~ 


337 


Plainfield 


282 


333,093 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


1 


338 


Tyringham . 


280 


392,023 


— 


— 


2 


2 


- 


339 


Leyden 


270 


290,418 


— 


— 


5 


5 


— 


340 


Goshen 


251 


376,180 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1 


341 


Chilmark 


240 


521,979 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


342 


Washington . 


231 


205,930 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


343 


Prescott 


230 


292,557 


— 


— 


3 


3 


1 


344 


Middlefield . 


223 


336,840 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1 


345 


Alford . 


221 


230,198 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


346 


Shutesbury . 


208 


470,379 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


347 


Montgomery 


191 


239,937 


- 


- 


3 


3 


2 


348 


Gay Head 


168 


125,460 


— 


— 


1 


1 


1 


349 


Tolland 


150 


295,118 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


350 


Monroe 


143 


887,017 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


351 


Gosnold 


142 


1,379,162 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


352 


Holland 


141 


228,508 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


2 


353 


Peru . 


113 


304,375 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


354 


New Ashford 


85 


103,505 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total 


58 


190,236 


- 


- 


1 


1 


~ 




140,886 


$196,887,136 


8 


1 


870 


879 


168 




State 


. 4,144,205 


$7,086,001,958 


881 


502 


23,761 


25,144 


719 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



131 



• Continued 



Pupils in Public Dat Schools — 


- Kindergarten, Elementary, 




0. 




HlGH- 


— Year ending 


June 30, 


1928 








1 


1" 


J. 

'3 

■d o 

ll 


li 


0. 

g s 


upila for whom the 
town paid tuition 
for not leas than 
half of school year 


on-residents who 
attended not less 
than half of school 
year 


IN 

lUrH 

es 


P^ 


'^ 


< 


<; 


< 


PLh 


z; 


Z 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


53 


8.756 


48 


183 


52 


15 


_ 


67 


50 


6.866 


38 


182 


43 


15 


— 


58 


45 


5.610 


33 


170 


38 


7 


— 


45 


77 


12.504 


70 


172 


77 


8 


_ 


85 


32 


5.166 


31 


171 


32 


34 


4 


62 


56 


8.172 


48 


169 


52 


12 


12 


52 


33 


4.728 


27 


175 


30 


19 


_ 


49 


53 


7.735 


46 


171 


48 


2 


7 


43 


53 


8,167 


46 


178 


49 


5 


— 


54 


30 


3,528 


20 


178 


22 


9 


- 


31 


42 


6,591 


36 


185 


39 


7 


9 


37 


39 


4,363 


26 


168 


27 


4 


3 


28 


44 


5,738 


35 


173 


37 


9 


10 


36 


31 


5,066 


28 


181 


30 


3 


— 


33 


49 


7,117 


42 


169 


48 


9 


- 


57 


26 


3,370 


20 


169 


22 


3 


_ 


25 


24 


2,985 


17 


179 


19 


4 


— 


23 


27 


4,341 


25 


170 


27 


1 


— 


28 


33 


4,568 


27 


169 


28 


— 


3 


25 


9 


1,309 


7 


180 


8 


2 


- 


10 


30 


3,906 


22 


181 


23 


5 


_ 


28 


21 


2,148 


12 


172 


16 


4 


— 


20 


19 


2,398 


14 


176 


16 


4 


— 


20 


6 


1,002 


5 


185 


6 


2 


- 


8 


24.406 


3,831,901 


21,303 


180 


22,860 


4,234 


544 


26,550 


736,177 


119,045,451 


649,038 


183 


691,683 


5,248 


8,717 


688,214 



132 



Gkoup IV. 



P.D. 2. 

Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Itemized Expenditures for Support or Public 



TOWNS 







a 
o 




o a 


s 


-i 










13 




m'S-a 


S 






3 






u 




a a -• 




JH 










(0 

a 




M 


S 


1 




O" 


3 






O 




s 




H 










16 




17 




18 




19 




332 


Boxborough 


$681 


85 


$2,567 


00 


$85 


64 


$76 46 


333 


West Tisbury . 


559 


59 


2,335 


00 


240 


00 


142 


97 


334 


Heath 


575 


99 


2,021 


94 


6 


66 


127 


91 


335 


Mashpee . 


932 


55 


3,278 


60 


99 


20 


184 


08 


336 


Rowe 


647 


60 


2,850 


00 


36 


34 


46 


44 


337 


Plainfield . 


738 46 


2,322 


50 


217 


84 


112 


42 


338 


Tyringham 


614 


00 


2,000 


00 


77 


72 


49 


63 


339 


Leyden 


605 00 


4,549 


95 


35 


00 


27 


17 


340 


Goshen 


515 


57 


2,374 


00 


296 


59 


197 


11 


341 


Chilmark . 


235 


73 


1,449 


56 


34 


98 


52 


51 


342 


Washington 


644 96 


2,400 


00 


120 


37 


75 


90 


343 


Prescott 


625 


48 


2,657 


50 


115 


79 


88 


60 


344 


Middlefield 


470 


00 


2,547 


14 


39 


86 


57 


72 


345 


Alford 


545 


82 


2,150 


00 


10 


42 


52 


46 


346 


Shutesbury 


422 


38 


2,896 


00 


118 07 


95 


32 


347 


Montgomery 


395 


75 


2,592 


00 


15 


72 


45 


42 


348 


Gay Head . 


204 


38 


1,183 


33 


39 


86 


40 


00 


349 


Tolland 


433 


55 


1,000 


00 


23 


09 


51 


49 


350 


Monroe 


509 


55 


2,097 


30 


36 


09 


32 


82 


351 


Gosnold 


617 00 


1,500 


00 


46 


59 


87 


20 


352 


Holland . 


499 


52 


2,555 


00 


10 62 


106 02 


353 


Peru .... 


471 


00 


1,650 


00 


- 




15 


35 


354 


New Ashford 


146 


37 


950 


00 


21 


90 


27 


17 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total . 


311 


27 


1,000 


GO 


10 


09 


4 


33 




$127,827 


86 


$1,087,005 90 


$41,631 


33 


$45,860 05 




State 


. $2,501,296 06 $46,712,215 


68 


$1,108,634 54 


$2,080,704 


04 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS 



Continued 



133 



Schools — Day, Evening, Vacation — Year ending June 30, 1928 



3 o 


a 




+3 




transportation 


"** c 


a 


h 


H 


Ma 








1 


° ^ 

a 5 


S'B 2 


sa 




a 




.2 


.— ^ 


2^t 

■agg 




2 

J3 


o 
o 

a 

2 




o 


o o 


•-9 


rt 


3 


PL( 




Eh 


H 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


$343 37 


$294 90 


_ 


$117 


00 


$550 00 


$1,390 90 


449 24 


65 56 


— 


23 


00 


1,575 50 


1,223 00 


173 50 


81 60 


— 


159 


05 


1,746 00 


1,125 40 


574 85 


326 58 


— 


129 


69 


894 50 


802 00 


158 00 


58 98 


- 


209 


13 


1,624 35 


2,405 60 


815 43 


42 48 


_ 


100 


00 


1,774 40 


1,766 70 


179 75 


454 92 


- 


50 


00 


242 50 


1,571 00 


355 50 


33 60 


— 


81 


50 


— 


222 00 


506 36 


23 32 


— 


123 


00 


2,415 22 


889 10 


177 91 


35 12 


- 


17 


50 


1,201 27 


1,017 50 


119 78 


3 13 


_ 


78 


10 


_ 


364 50 


184 03 


12 98 


- 


40 


00 


152 00 


677 60 


108 40 


329 80 


— 


80 


00 


1,118 60 


1,100 24 


297 10 


38 33 


— 


120 


00 


800 00 


540 00 


165 05 


602 36 


- 


120 


00 


1,033 20 


359 60 


139 20 


397 66 


_ 


95 


00 


_ 


197 20 


227 71 


74 47 


— 


20 


00 


— 


572 80 


85 89 


25 60 


— 


65 


00 


1,179 45 


- 


487 79 


4 26 


$30 33 


192 


25 


501 00 


20 00 


364 32 


196 05 


- 


35 


50 


- 


344 00 


515 25 


21 60 


_ 


60 


00 


871 75 


1,041 10 


101 90 


22 25 


— 


48 


60 


420 00 


654 00 


152 00 


116 85 


— 


30 


00 


486 20 


488 80 


65 80 


17 67 


- 


3 


00 


478 00 


226 40 


$232,418 38 


$71,002 88 


$614 50 


$42,500 81 


$244,793 73 


$239,786 27 


$7,241,621 76 


$3,464,759 59 


$61,043 32 


$938,617 


47 


$1,465,456 29 


$252,019 77 



lU 



P.D. 2. 







Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 






Itemized Expenditubes for 


Support 










OF Public Schools 


— Day. Evening. Vacation 


Expenditures 






— Year ending June 30, 1928 — Con. 




ending June 












2 "^ 














P -*:> 










o 




■^"a 




TOWNS 




i 






•BT3 
C CI 

2 " 






§ 


4 


a 




o 






•43 


.% 


o 










H 


s 


H 




Z 






26 


27 


28 




29 


332 


Boxborough 


$1,795 24 


- 


$7,902 


36 


- 


333 


West Tisbury 


1,635 00 


$64 80 


8,313 


66 


— 


334 


Heath 


880 76 


21 42 


6,920 


23 


— 


335 


Mashpee 


725 70 


85 90 


8,033 


65 


— 


336 


Rowe 


2,948 37 


- 


10,984 


81 


- 


337 


Plainfield . 


1,921 26 


_ 


9,811 


49 


_ 


338 


Tyringham 


1,600 00 


— 


6,739 


52 


— 


339 


Leyden 


240 00 


— 


6,149 


72 


— 


340 


Goshen 


650 00 


5 00 


7,995 27 


— 


341 


Chilmark , 


937 20 


108 65 


5,267 


93 


- 


342 


Washington 


460 50 


20 60 


4,287 


84 


_ 


343 


Prescott 


627 50 


— 


5,181 


48 


— 


344 


Middlefield 


1,207 04 


— 


7,058 


80 


— 


345 


Alford 


344 50 


174 25 


5,072 


88 


— 


346 


Shutesbury 


678 75 


- 


6,490 


73 


- 


347 


Montgomery 


308 00 


45 00 


4,230 


95 


_ 


348 


Gay Head . 


440 00 


9 00 


2,811 


55 


— 


349 


Tolland 


108 00 


15 00 


2,987 


07 


— 


350 


Monroe 


19 32 


65 91 


3,996 


62 


— 


351 


Gosnold 


150 00 


- 


3,340 


66 


- 


352 


Holland 


800 00 


_ 


6,480 


86 


_ 


353 


Peru . . . . 


402 80 


— 


3,785 


90 


— 


354 


New Ashford 


353 40 


4 50 


2,777 


19 


— 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total 


174 86 


15 00 


2,306 


42 


- 




$470,244 64 


$25,173 20 


$2,628,859 


55 


$43,880 80 




State 


$591,833 47 


$543,319 84 


$66,961,521 


83 


$11,033,424 47 



Pt. II. 



135 



AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 






FOR Outlay, Year 
30, 1928 


Valuation of 

1927 PER Pupil 

IN Net Average 

Membership, 

Year ending June 

30, 1928 


Expenditure for 

School Support from 

Local Taxation, 

Year ending 

Dec. 31, 1927 

PER $1,000 Valuation 


Rate of Total Tax 

per $1,000 

Valuation, 1927 


1 


1 
1 


1 


> 


> 

l-H 




> 


o 

1 


O 


1 II 


a "a 

1 II 

< Pi 


1 
i 


1^ 


30 


31 


32 33 


34 35 


36 


37 


- 


- 


$5,555 88 
12,466 19 
8,452 41 
12,985 17 
11,077 21 


$6 29 108 
9 47 60 
8 77 76 
5 49 117 
4 71 119 


S34 00 
12 00 
24 00 
32 00 
15 00 


10 

121 

86 

25 

117 


SllO 88 

85 83 
76 17 


$110 88 

85 83 
76 17 


6,406 68 
8,000 44 
6,753 62 
6,966 56 
16,838 9 


8 82 74 
10 88 37 
3 16 123 
6 19 109 
3 94 121 


40 50 

27 50 
16 00 

28 00 
14 70 


1 
61 

115 
52 

119 


78 06 


78 06 


5,566 87 
10,448 28 
9,356 36 
6,976 55 
8,252 42 


6 86 98 
8 91 72 

5 64 115 
11 43 30 

6 89 97 


29 50 
IS 70 
31 90 
26 10 
18 00 


43 

108 

26 

67 

112 


150 60 
24 49 


150 60 
24 49 


9,597 32 

5,454 91 

10,540 27 

35,481 3 

137,916 1 


8 95 70 
11 61 26 

9 54 56 
3 59 122 
1 98 124 


17 50 

18 20 
31 00 

9 00 
7 00 


114 
110 
31 
122 
124 


- 


- 


8,161 43 
15,219 12 

5,175 98 
23,779 5 


11 40 31 

7 58 88 
9 87 50 
6 47 103 


30 00 
16 00 
21 50 
23 50 


38 
116 
100 

91 


$14,636 43 


$58,517 23 


$7,416 


$9 31 


- 


- 


$892,209 50 


$11,925,633 89 


$10,296 


$8 41 


- 


- 



136 



P.D. 2. 
Group IV. Towns op Less than 5,000 Population 



EXPENDITUKE FOR SUPPORT OF PuBLIC SCHOOLS DaY, 

Year ending 















FROM 


STATE 








FROM LOCAL TAXATION 


REIMBURSEMENT (INCLUDING 




TOWNS 










GENERAL SCHOOL FUND) 






.a bo 

c3 




> 








> 






-*a 


'S. P 


i; 


a a 


+3 


■q, fe 


h 


a & 






a 


S>^ 


■- 3 


CI 


3 5-^ 


.^ ^ 






1 




B 


go 


a 






^2 
JO 






< 


PL('^ 




rt 


< 


Ah " 




Pi 






38 


39 


40 


41 


42 


43 


332 


Boxborough 


$2,342 75 


$34 


96 


119 


$6,480 81 


$96 


72 


4 


333 


West Tisbury . 


6,853 27 


118 


16 


8 


1,556 07 


26 


83 


81 


334 


Heath 


3,335 26 


74 


11 


43 


3,616 58 


80 


36 


14 


335 


Mashpee . 


6,065 01 


71 


35 


51 


893 00 


10 


50 


116 


336 


Rowe 


3,234 04 


52 


16 


94 


5,407 01 


87 


21 


9 


337 


Plainfield . 


2,942 12 


56 


57 


85 


4,295 07 


82 


59 


11 


338 


Tyringham 


4,265 84 


87 


05 


26 


2,345 39 


47 


86 


40 


339 


Leyden 


918 46 


21 


36 


124 


5,382 74 


125 


18 


3 


340 


Goshen 


3,342 80 


61 


90 


74 


4,065 28 


75 


28 


18 


341 


Chilmark . 


2,054 09 


66 


26 


64 


1,221 03 


39 


38 


47 


342 


Washington 


1,412 13 


38 


16 


116 


1,920 38 


51 


90 


36 


343 


Prescott . 


2,606 35 


93 


08 


21 


2,643 80 


94 


42 


6 


344 


Middlefield 


1,899 99 


52 


77 


91 


3,457 62 


96 


04 


5 


345 


Alford 


2,630 25 


79 


70 


36 


2,347 93 


71 


15 


20 


346 


Shutesbury 


3,240 74 


56 


86 


84 


3,186 35 


55 


90 


31 


347 


Montgomery 


2,146 58 


85 


86 


28 


2,053 50 


82 


14 


12 


348 


Gay Head 


1,456 69 


63 


33 


71 


1,795 43 


78 


06 


16 


349 


Tolland . 


2,815 61 


100 


56 


19 


428 83 


15 


32 


105 


350 


Monroe 


3,187 49 


127 


49 


5 


680 00 


27 


20 


80 


351 


Gosnold . 


2,725 83 


272 


58 


1 


358 78 


35 


88 


56 


352 


Holland . 


2,605 01 


93 


03 


22 


3,534 90 


126 


24 


2 


353 


Peru 


2,307 98 


115 


39 


10 


707 12 


35 


36 


57 


354 


New Ashford 


1,022 19 


51 


11 


96 


1,695 77 


84 


78 


10 


355 


Mount Washington . 
Total . 


1,231 06 


153 


88 


3 


1,075 42 


134 


43 


1 




Sl,833,959 51 


$69 


08 


- 


$692,610 72 


$26 09 


- 




State . 


. S59,644,214 44 


$86 


66 


- 


$5,842,866 42 


$8 49 


- 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



137 



Evening, Vacation 


— Classified 


AS TO Source, 








Amount paid to Town 


Dec. 31, 1927 
















FROM 


giS 














■«-s 




13 >' 


>*■ S C3 


X 












c £ 




c o 


03 +J 

.2 


o 


FROM ALL SOURCES 




3 c3 




^^ 


0.-^*0 


E 
















1g 


'^ fl 






C OJ 






o a 




recc 
,ion a 
tation 
•ds 








— to 

_ 'S 1 

3 S-^ 




> 

.si 


M O 




03 ♦.'^ 


rom 
tuit 
por 
war 


u 


3 

o 

E 




« fl E 


0. 

13 


go 


Sf2s 






fe 


< 


<: 




PL, 




£4 


o^^ 




O 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


$13 32 


_ 


$8,836 


88 


$131 


89 


40 


$1,838 28 


$914 00 


- 


- 


8,409 


34 


144 


98 


22 


- 




357 85 


- 


- 


6,951 


84 


154 


48 


17 


1,231 


97 


460 00 


— 


- 


6,958 


01 


81 


85 


104 


- 




400 00 


1,675 44 


$9 09 


10,325 


58 


166 


54 


12 


2,373 


49 


450 00 


1,677 94 


7 50 


8,922 


63 


171 


58 


9 


1,185 


06 


302 55 


— 


— 


6,611 


23 


134 


92 


34 


366 


11 


360 00 


620 60 


174 75 


7,096 


55 


165 


03 


13 


2,009 


24 


1,200 00 


— 


174 24 


7,582 


32 


140 


41 


27 


2,195 


78 


455 60 


- 


- 


3,275 


12 


105 


65 


68 


180 


76 


210 70 


538 08 


_ 


3,870 


59 


104 


61 


71 


939 


05 


150 00 


1,095 82 


- 


6,345 


97 


226 


64 


3 


271 


41 


515 00 


324 30 


470 23 


6,152 


14 


170 


89 


11 


1,249 


80 


409 20 


- 


- 


4,978 


18 


150 


85 


18 


1,128 


15 


300 00 


- 


— 


6,427 


09 


112 


76 


57 


1,906 


50 


500 00 


_ 


88 90 


4,288 


98 


171 


55 


10 


1,271 


82 


231 50 


— 


— 


3,252 


12 


141 


39 


26 


357 


00 


205 40 


— 


— 


3,244 


44 


115 


87 


52 


85 


50 


150 00 


— 


239 75 


4,107 


24 


164 


28 


14 


- 




400 00 


- 


- 


3,084 


61 


308 


46 


1 


- 




200 00 


_ 


_ 


6,139 


91 


219 


28 


5 


1,573 


73 


426 64 


— 


— 


3,015 


10 


150 


75 


19 


9 


22 


200 00 


— 


— 


2,717 


96 


135 


90 


30 


428 


40 


150 00 


- 


- 


2,306 


48 


288 


31 


2 


422 


95 


100 00 


$35,482 18 


$19,681 09 


$2,581,733 50 


$97 24 


- 


$146,005 72 


$200,708 43 


$184,431 02 


$899,326 35 


$66,570,838 


23 


$96 72 


- 


$327,207 97 $5,057,705 20 



138 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Yeab Grax)bs in- Public Dat Elementary Schools (including 



TOWNS 



principals 



teachers 



full time 



PUPILS enrolled 



51 



52 



53 



54 



55 



56 



332 Boxborough 

333 West Tisbury 

334 Heath 

335 Mashpee . 

336 Rowe 

337 Plainfield . 

338 Tyringham 

339 Leyden 

340 Goshen 

341 Chilmark . 

342 Washington 

343 Prescott 

344 Middlefield 

345 Alford 

346 Shutesbury 

347 Montgomery 

348 Gay Head . 

349 Tolland 

350 Monroe 

351 Gosnold 

352 Holland 

353 Peru . 

354 New Ashford 

355 Mount Washington 

Total 

State . . 



6 
312 



2 
383 



27 844 
831 17,755 



58 

30 
24 
26 
38 
14 

38 
24 
31 
25 
16 

23 
26 
26 
14 
23 

13 

10 
15 

16 



59 

23 
26 
19 
39 
18 

18 

9 

22 

28 
14 

19 
13 
18 
17 
26 

13 
14 
12 
17 
3 

13 
10 



12,771 11,635 
306,332 289,888 



1 For kindergarten, see column 109. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS — Continued 



139 



First Two Years of Junior High Schools), Year ending June 30, 1928 



■o 


S 


"3 












l§3 




a 


i 


a 


a 

2 - 


expenditure fob 

SUPPORT, exclusive 


OF 


03 <nj3 


03 


o 


C3 




general CONTROL 




" § 


h 


"m 


a o 




1 

a 
s 










«- tr § 
£■3 1=1 

l.a "^ 


S 












i 


-tS 












ft „ 


:>■ 






0) V 


c3 n 


<u 

Mo 


0) 


S 

s 




-^ ^ o Li m 

ft^"IB-3 


o 


11 


r« 


l-s 


|§ 




o 

a 




-II 


a o 

ag 




P 


<; 


< 


< 


< 


< 




P-I ^"^ 


W 


w 


60 


61 


62 


63 


64 




65 


66 


67 


8,756 


183 


48 


52 


$4,034 


37 


$77 


58 


$2,567 00 ■ 


$85 64 


6,866 


182 


38 


43 


4,896 


07 


113 


86 


2,335 00 


240 00 


5,610 


170 


33 


38 


4,338 


08 


114 


16 


2,021 94 


6 66 


12,504 


172 


70 


77 


5,573 


40 


72 


38 


3,278 60 


99 20 


5,166 


171 


31 


32 


• 6,567 


24 


205 


22 


2,850 00 


36 34 


8,172 


169 


48 


52 


5,452 


57 


104 


86 


2,322 50 


217 84 


4,728 


175 


27 


30 


3,844 


52 


128 


15 


2,000 00 


77 72 


7,735 


171 


46 


48 


5,082 


72 


105 


89 


4,549 95 


35 00 


8.167 


178 


46 


49 


5,940 


60 


121 


24 


2,374 00 


296 59 


3,528 


178 


20 


22 


3,077 


50 


139 


88 


1,449 56 


34 98 


6,591 


185 


36 


39 


3,642 


88 


93 


40 


2,400 00 


120 37 


4,363 


168 


26 


27 


3,250 


90 


120 


40 


2,657 50 


115 79 


5,738 


173 


35 


37 


4,313 


56 


116 


58 


2,547 14 


39 86 


5,066 


181 


28 


30 


3,642 


56 


121 


42 


2,150 00 


10 42 


7,117 


169 


42 


48 


5,110 


00 


106 


45 


2,896 00 


118 07 


3,370 


169 


20 


22 


3,330 


00 


151 


36 


2,592 00 


15 72 


2,985 


179 


17 


19 


1,594 


37 


83 


91 


1,183 33 


39 86 


4,341 


170 


25 


27 


2,553 


52 


94 


57 


1,000 00 


23 09 


4,568 


169 


27 


28 


3,487 


07 


124 


53 


2,097 30 


36 09 


1,309 


180 


7 


8 


2,229 


66 


278 


71 


1,500 00 


46 59 


3,906 


181 


22 


23 


4,140 


24 


180 01 


2,555 00 


10 62 


2,148 


172 


12 


16 


2,258 


10 


141 


10 


1,650 00 


— 


2,398 


176 


14 


16 


1,788 


62 


111 


78 


950 00 


21 90 


1,002 


185 


5 


6 


1,593 


89 


265 


64 


1,000 00 


10 09 


3,831,901 


180 


21,303 


22,860 


$1,813,693 


14 


$79 


33 


$1,067,481 87 


$40,819 45 


96,182,285 


183 


524,626 


560,065 


$45,432,511 


73 


$81 


12 


$32,957,887 20 


$705,434 77 



140 





Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 










High School 






EXPENDITURE 


FOR TUITION AND 






fj 


niQH SCHOOLS IN OTHER 






— d ^ 




a 
o 






aog^d 




•43 




TOWNS 


a:^o 










^■2o„ 


a 


1 






4= - d.2.S 
a S o c -5 


'-+3 


§ 






eside 

whoi 
tuiti 
echo 
or ci 


5 

o 


1 






« 


fe 


^ 






82 


83 


84 


332 


Boxborough . 


15 


$1,795 24 


$1,390 90 


333 


West Tisbury 


15 


1,635 00 


1,223 00 


334 


Heath .... 


7 


880 76 


1,125 40 


335 


Mashpee 


8 


725 70 


802 00 


336 


Rowe .... 


15 


1,724 37 


2,045 60 


337 


PlainBeld 


11 


1,921 26 


1,699 20 


338 


Tyringham 


13 


1,300 00 


1,081 00 


339 


Leyden .... 


2 


240 00 


222 00 


340 


Goshen .... 


5 


650 00 


889 10 


341 


Chi] mark 


9 


937 20 


1,017 50 


342 


Washington . 


- 


_ 


_ 


343 


Prescott 


'.'.'. 4 


627 50 


677 60 


344 


Middlefield . 


9 


1,175 00 


1,100 24 


345 


Alford .... 


3 


344 50 


540 00 


346 


Shutesbury 


4 


598 75 


359 60 


347 


Montgomery . 


3 


308 00 


197 20 


348 


Gay Head 


4 


440 00 


572 80 


349 


Tolland 


— 


— 


— 


350 


Monroe 


— 


— 


— 


351 


Gosnold 


2 


150 00 


344 00 


352 


Holland 


5 


800 00 


1,041 10 


353 


Peru .... 


4 


402 80 


654 00 


354 


New Ashford . 


4 


353 40 


488 80 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total 


2 


174 86 


226 40 




3,953 


$453,349 41 


$233,870 14 



1 Pending. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH SCHOOLS 



141 



Continued 



Education fob Yeab ending June 30, 1928 



TRANSPORTATION TO PUBLIC 




— 
3 


NET COST TO TOWN 


FOR HIGH 


TOWNS OR CITIES 




03 . 

&=3 


SCHOOL EDUCATION 




S 






d 




3 


•+3 - 




3 




o 


d ^ 




o 




S 


§1 




s 




*_ 




«-H 




rs 


Sos 








0. 

tuCk 




■g 


0* 

1^ 


-3 


Si 53 


a 0^ 

S >>a 


O 


f5 u 




1" 


r^ 


1 


< 


85 


86 


87 


88 


89 


$3,186 14 


$212 41 


$3,095 54 


$90 60 


$6 04 


2,858 00 


190 53 


940 80 


1,917 20 


127 81 


2,006 16 


286 59 


1,839 04 


167 12 


23 87 


1,527 70 


190 96 


_ 1 


- 


- 


3,769 97 


251 33 


2,740 92 


1,029 05 


68 60 


3,620 46 


329 13 


2,536 75 


1,083 71 


98 52 


2,381 00 


183 15 


2,256 30 


124 70 


9 59 


462 00 


231 00 


406 50 


55 50 


27 75 


1,539 10 


307 82 


1,140 50 


398 60 


79 72 


1,954 70 


217 19 


640 80 


1,313 90 


145 99 


1,305 10 


326 28 


1,104 13 


200 97 


50 24 


■ 2,275 24 


252 80 


977 10 


1,298 14 


144 24 


884 50 


294 83 


442 00 


442 50 


147 50 


958 35 


239 59 


827 65 


130 70 


32 67 


505 20 


168 40 


447 35 


57 85 


19 28 


1,012 80 


253 20 


847 40 


165 40 


41 35 


494 00 


247 00 


- 


494 GO 


247 00 


1,841 10 


368 22 


1,724 13 


116 97 


23 39 


1,056 80 


264 20 


571 55 


485 25 


121 31 


842 20 


210 55 


778 74 


63 46 


15 86 


401 26 


200 63 


198 10 


203 16 


101 58 


$687,219 55 


$173 85 


$315,878 68 2 


$362,121 86 2 


$92 92 2 



2 Does not include 4 towns, with 56 pupils, whose reimbursement is pending. 
Note. — For State totals for columns 68-81, see pages 86 and 87. 



142 



P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 





TOWNS 










Pebsons 6 TO 


16 Years 






5 TO 7 Years 






7 TO 14 




a 
o 


•"a 


:;s 


OS R g 


"o 


a 
o 


t> 1 






'■H CQ 


.-< o 


03 2 


.„ ea g 


o 


*43 (n 


,— , '1' 






ss 


^^0. 


>s^ 






ss 


^a^ 






"S ^ 






0)^ 




-" a 








'^ o 
a 








.H M 

15 


a 


3'o|3 






'"' 


'"' 


'"' 


'"' 




" 






90 


91 


92 


93 


94 


95 


96 


332 


Boxborough 


. . 13 


9 


_ 


_ 


4 


53 


53 


333 


West Tisbury . 


11 


9 


_ 


_ 


2 


38 


38 


334 


Heath 


12 


10 


— 


_ 


2 


29 


29 


335 


Mashpee . 


_ 1 


15 


_ 


_ 




_ 


60 


336 


Rowe 


! 10 


10 


- 


- 


- 


39 


39 


337 


Plainfield . 


15 


9 


_ 


_ 


6 


44 


44 


338 


Tyringham 


4 


4 


_ 


— 




28 


28 


339 


Leyden 


8 


6 


— 


— 


2 


41 


41 


340 


Goshen 


8 


7 


— 


— 


1 


43 


43 


341 


Chihnark . 


13 


6 


- 


- 


7 


18 


18 


342 


Washington 


10 


10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


29 


29 


343 


Prescott . 


8 


6 


— 


_ 


2 


29 


29 


344 


Middlefield 


4 


4 


_ 


_ 




29 


•29 


345 


Alford 


5 


3 


_ 


_ 


2 


22 


22 


346 


Shutesbury 


10 


4 


- 


- 


6 


48 


48 


347 


Montgomery 


7 


4 


_ 


_ 


3 


21 


21 


348 


Gay Head 


10 


8 


— 


— 


2 


13 


13 


349 


Tolland . 


5 


4 


— 


— 


1 


24 


24 


350 


Monroe 


4 


3 


— 


— 


1 


21 


21 


351 


Gosnold . 


7 


5 


- 


- 


2 


4 


4 


352 


HoUand . 


5 


f1 
3 


_ 


_ 


2 


26 


26 


353 


Peru 


2 


2 


— 


_ 


— 


14 


14 


354 


New Ashford 


3 


2 


— 


— 


1 


13 


13 


355 


Mount Washington . 
Total . 


3 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


4 




5,243 


3,836 


196 


- 


1,230 


20,257 


18,849 




State . 


. 149,008 


102,459 


29,929 


66 


16,576 


549,683 


434,816 



1 No census taken. 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



143 



OF Age, 


October 1, 1927 














Illiterate 

Minors, 16 to 21 

Years of Age 


Yeabs 






14 TO 


16 Years 








O'-I' 
O 

|o 
as 

a 




<0 L 
CI ^-^ 


•=•1 

m 


o 

Is 




o 

■g a 

a 


."a 
— . 41 


^a 

a °°-^ 




la 
la 


__3 

S a 
a <n._ 


o 

Is 

.al 


Receiving e 
tional certifi 
year ending 
31. 1927 


97 


98 


99 


100 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


107 


108 


- 


- 


- 


6 

12 

6 


2 
12 
4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 
2 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


_ 1 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


8 


6 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


y — 


— 


— 


4 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


— 


5 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


13 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


: 


- 


5 
5 


4 
3 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


1 
2 


~ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


— 


~ 


~ 


~ 


~ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


8 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


5 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


6 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


~ 


1,361 


28 


89 


4,788 


3,565 


268 


136 


160 


4 


650 


17 


24 


116,233 


914 


1,148 


143,069 


105,244 


15,065 


15,059 


2,663 


556 


4,448 


6,707 


3,553 



144 



P.D. 2, 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 



Membership in Public Day 



TOWNS 





ELEMENT ART 






















fl <u 














^a 


3 s 












a 


a 














































I 


13 


^S 


7-t 


IN 


CO 


'^ 


>n 


o 


St3 


t-^ 


<a 






v 


H) 


■a 




a 2 


T3 


T3 


•a 


Tl 


•X3 


a 


§5 


-^ M 


c3 


ca 


c« 


« 


c^ 


















M 


O 


o 


O 


O 


a 


o 


o 







109 


110 


111 


112 


113 


114 


115 


116 


332 


Boxborough 


. 


- 


- 


5 


8 


6 


4 


6 


333 


West Tisbury . 


— 


— 


— 


6 


9 


5 


7 


5 


334 


Heath 


— 


— 


— 


7 


2 


9 


6 


4 


335 


Mashpee . 


- 


- 


- 


23 


13 


10 


7 


6 


336 


Rowe 


~" 


~ 


~ 


5 


4 


5 


3 


5 


337 


Plainfield . 


; 


- 


- 


5 


6 


6 


6 


9 


338 


Tyringham 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


6 


7 


3 


339 


Leyden 


— 


— 


— 


8 


3 


7 


5 


8 


340 


Goshen 


— 


— 


— 


7 


6 


11 


7 


8 


341 


Chilmark . 


- 


- 


- 


7 


4 


3 


~ 


5 


342 


Washington 


. 


- 


- 


9 


8 


4 


4 


7 


343 


Prescott . 


— 


— 


1 


4 


7 


3 


5 


6 


344 


Middlefield 


— 


— 


— 


5 


7 


4 


7 


7 


345 


Alford 


. — 


— 


— 


4 


4 


3 


4 


3 


346 


Shutesbury 


- 


- 


- 


6 


4 


6 


6 


2 


347 


Montgomery 


. 


- 


- 


4 


2 


6 


2 


5 


348 


Gay Head 


— 


— 


— 


6 


3 


1 


1 


2 


349 


Tolland . 


— 


— 


— 


5 


3 


5 


5 


3 


350 


Monroe . 


— 


— 


— 


3 


2 


7 


5 


2 


351 


Gosnold . 


. 


- 


- 


1 


4 


3 


1 


"~ 


352 


Holland . 


. 


- 


- 


3 


2 


6 


1 


6 


353 


Peru 


— 


— 


— 


3 


1 


— 


3 


3 


354 


New Ashford 


— 


— 


— 


4 


3 


2 


4 


— 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total . 


. 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


~ 




74 


95 


11 


3,750 


3,171 


3,052 


2,970 


2,943 




State . 


. 24,046 


6,779 


2,628 


80,495 


70,983 


66,305 


67,520 


66,819 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Continued 



145 



Schools by Grades, October 1, 1927 



SCHOOLS 






HIGH 


SCHOOLS 










2 o 


o 


.s 










(-1 

03 


03 03 
o3 03 




3 


CO 


1-^ jg 


o 






^S 


>> 


>, 


>> 






o 




•sis 


4>'3 

•« 3 


T3 (U-g 


-3 


•a 


13 


-d 


o 


•^ O 


3 


■a 

a 


03 


g>.K 


2"^ 


g'oS m 




S^ 


s 


2 


jsS. 


o 


2 


O 


O 


O 


o 


Eh 


Pc< 


M 


H 


U^ 


f^ 


H 


o 


117 


118 


119 


120 


121 


122 


123 


124 


125 


126 


127 


128 


6 


10 


7 


_ 


52 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


52 


3 


5 


3 


— 


43 


— 


- 


— 


— 


- 


— 


43 


4 


7 


1 


— 


40 


- 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


40 


6 


7 


7 


— 


79 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


79 


6 


3 


1 


- 


32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


2 


9 


7 


_ 


50 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


50 


4 


4 


4 


— 


33 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


33 


9 


8 


5 


— 


53 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


63 


4 


5 


3 


— 


51 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


51 


6 


2 


2 


- 


29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


5 


5 


_ 


_ 


42 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


42 


5 


2 


5 


_ 


38 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


38 


6 


3 


3 


— 


42 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


42 


3 


1 


5 


— 


27 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


27 


9 


5 


11 


- 


49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


2 


3 


1 


_ 


25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25 


3 


3 


1 


_ 


20 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


20 


1 


— 


3 


— 


25 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25 


2 


3 


3 


- 


27 
9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 
9 


4 


4 


4 




30 














30 


4 


2 


5 


— 


21 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21 


3 


2 


1 


— 


19 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


— 


19 


1 


1 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


2,719 


2,536 


2,040 


3 


23,364 


186 


- 


- 


- 


- 


186 


23,550 


65,764 


61,880 


53,785 


789 567,793 


48,787 


37,794 


28,727 


22,804 


1,737 


139,849 


707,642 



146 P.D. 2. 

Group IV. Towns of Less than 5,000 Population 









School Buildings in 




Estimated Value of 








Use, Jan 


1, lyzs 


























ELEMENTARY 




2 


2 


2 


2 


^M 




















"s8 










TOWNS 


■3 


"3 


'3 


1 
















B 





2 












S 

S m 


a 


S 


«>£ 






m 








2 XI 

g « 


2^ 
S 




3 fi 


Mo 

2^ 


"d 





to 

2 






a-" 


^ — 


M-" 


o-" 


■3 ° 







3 









H 


H 


f^ 


W 


H 


w 


M 






129 


130 


131 


132 


133 


134 


135 


136 


332 


Boxborough 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


$400 


$6,000 


333 


West Tisbury 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


700 


5,700 


334 


Heath 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


200 


3,500 


335 


Mashpee . 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


400 


10,000 


336 


Rowe 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


300 


2,500 


337 


Plainfield . 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1,000 


13,500 


338 


Tyringham 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


100 


10,000 


339 


Leyden 


. . 5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


500 


10,000 


340 


Goshen 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1,000 


14,000 


341 


Chilmark . 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


400 


3,000 


342 


Washington 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


200 


2,000 


343 


Prescott 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


200 


2,000 


344 


Middlefield 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


500 


6,000 


345 


Alford 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


200 


800 


346 


Shutesbnry 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


250 


5,000 


347 


Montgomery 


3 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


150 


3,350 


348 


Gay Head . 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


200 


1,500 


349 


Tolland 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


100 


1,200 


350 


Monroe 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


250 


1,000 


351 


Gosnold 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


500 


3,500 


352 


Holland . 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


353 


Peru . . . . 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


100 


1,500 


354 


New Ashford 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


100 


1,000 


355 


Mount Washington 
Total 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


200 


2,000 




227 


88 


18 


40 


40 


413 


$271,395 


$3,948,709 




State 


. 570 


370 


83 


415 


1,485 


2,923 


$10,242,454 


$95,052,781 



Pt. II. 

AND NOT MAINTAINING HiGH ScHOOLS — Concluded. 



147 



Public School Property 



SCHOOLS 


JUNIOK AND SENIOll HIGH SCHOOL 


8 




"S § 








■S3 






p +J'— ^ 








t. ^--^ 






•H S " 








3 * « 






^ ca "£ 








C3 QJ 






-*j ^ .. 








-M ft - 




Is 


efts 








c a m 






S c8.2 






S. 


S c«.2 




o 




"3 


O 


a 


■3 2:2 


13 


c 

o3 


&■<-'-' 


o 


-S 


'3 


o--^— ' 


o 




w 


H 


S 


« 


W 


H 


o 


137 


138 


139 


140 


141 


142 


143 


$700 


$7,100 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$7,100 


1,400 


7,800 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7,800 


500 


4,200 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4,200 


700 


11,100 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11,100 


400 


3,200 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,200 


1,600 


16,100 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


16,100 


150 


10,250 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10,250 


600 


11,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11,000 


1,200 


16,200 


— 


— 


— 


- 


16,200 


500 


3,900 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,900 


600 


2,800 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,800 


500 


2,700 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,700 


1,000 


7,500 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7,500 


500 


1,500 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,500 


1,500 


6,750 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6,750 


175 


3,675 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3,675 


300 


2,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,000 


650 


1,950 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,950 


350 


1,600 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,600 


500 


4,500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4,500 


2,000 


2,000 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,000 


600 


2,200 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,200 


350 


1,450 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,450 


200 


2,400 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,400 


$339,173 


$4,559,277 


$18,800 


$154,000 


$12,900 


$185,700 


$4,744,977 


$7,935,377 


$113,230,612 


$6,072,976 


$69,660,476 


$6,991,156 


$82,724,608 


$244,892,494 



148 P.D. 2. 

EVENING AND VACATION SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1928 





Evening Elementaht 




Evening High 












Schools 




Schools 


Vacation Schools 






13 
a 

2 

e 






T3 


•2 




1 


*2 


Towns and Cities 






"o 

s 






"3 

a 






S3 


'a. 


11 


o 

C3 


"a 




J3 








S 


s 


t«i "° 


o 


3 


« ID 


<l> 


3 


M " 




Eh 


CL, 


w 


H 


Ph 


w 


H 


PM 


w 


Amesbury 


1 


26 


$205 00 


4 


76 


$713 96 


_ 


_ 




Andover . 


— 


— 


305 98 


- 


— 


691 20 


— 


— 


— 


Arlington 


1 


63 


396 39 


13 


279 


3,459 05 


10 


195 


$1,031 00 


Athol 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


312 


780 00 


Attleboro 


'. 4 


146 


1,730 20 


- 


- 


- 


7- 


264 


725 50 


Beverly . 


3 


55 


304 00 


4 


68 


992 22 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Boston 


. 69 


2,218 


90,637 41 


176 


7,356 


90,428 54 


398 


15,862 


80,474 28 


Brockton 


— 


— 


— 


26 


636 


5,085 43 


21 


604 


2,345 00 


Brookline 


. 11 


343 


3,392 00 


— 


_ 


— 


4 


136 


570 93 


Cambridge 


. 43 


576 


12,088 64 


26 


775 


6,261 14 


143 


1,879 


23,929 03 


Canton . 


2 


46 


466 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Chelsea . 


. 12 


284 


4,278 77 


13 


282 


3,279 57 


— 


— 


— 


Chicopee . 


7 


154 


1,116 00 


7 


185 


1,035 00 


— 


— 


— 


Clinton . 


4 


73 


852 42 


7 


202 


1,260 00 


— 


— 


— 


Dartmouth 


5 


75 


836 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Dedham . 


2 


51 


454 59 


3 


86 


821 63 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Easthampton . 


5 


89 


1,043 80 


8 


218 


994 50 


4 


70 


465 00 


Easton 


1 


3 


54 00 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


Erving 


— 


— 


— 


1 


9 


119 00 


— 


— 


— 


Everett . 


3 


65 


1,113 15 


14 


404 


5,765 70 


- 


- 


- 


Fairhaven 


3 


46 


480 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Fall River 


. 61 


1,092 


20,895 51 


21 


682 


10,019 75 


4 


28 


693 00 


Fitohburg 


6 


117 


1,748 01 


12 


304 


1,197 16 


10 


312 


1,332 50 


Gardner . 


5 


186 


560 75 


3 


85 


351 75 


— 


— 


— 


Gloucester 


1 


15 


432 22 


5 


185 


1,051 62 


- 


- 


- 


Haverhill 


5 


109 


1,231 48 


6 


167 


955 14 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Hingham 


1 


7 


90 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Holyoke . 


. 23 


222 


6,095 16 


25 


767 


9,574 80 


9 


211 


974 47 


Lawrence 


. 23 


382 


9,555 28 


34 


798 


16,578 63 


— 


— 


— 


Leominster 


6 


66 


717 00 


4 


91 


860 00 


4 


110 


327 50 


Lexington 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


77 


425 00 


Lowell 


'. 25 


453 


12,053 00 


37 


1,174 


17,305 49 


17 


383 


5,718 30 


Lynn 


5 


150 


1,870 50 


48 


1,323 


9,144 37 


15 


296 


1,627 10 


Maiden . 


. 32 


832 


6,969 85 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Marlborough 


5 


106 


1,079 50 


10 


215 


1,079 50 


- 


- 


- 


Maynard 


2 


26 


121 97 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Medford . 


2 


63 


425 09 


11 


312 


2,131 01 


14 


290 


1,567 45 


Melrose . 


— 


— 


— 


1 


20 


913 50 


— 


— 


— 


Methuen . 


3 


49 


750 65 


7 


141 


2,062 75 


— 


— 


— 


Middleborough 


• 


- 


60 401 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Milford . 


4 


47 


478 50 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


Millbury . 


1 


27 


448 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Montague 


1 


3 


15 63 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Natick 


— 


— 


— 


6 


195 


673 97 


— 


— 


— 


Needham 


. 3 


19 


171 75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


New Bedford . 


. 86 


2,117 


15,450 46 


25 


1,303 


7,066 86 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Newton . 


9 


185 


2,690 16 


9 


303 


1,894 16 


8 


236 


1,025 71 


North Adams . 


1 


18 


403 65 


8 


154 


1,860 65 


— 


— 


— 


Northampton . 


2 


19 


540 00 


— 


— 


— 


8 


249 


1,530 50 


North Attleboroug 


h . 4 


62 


449 59 


4 


86 


565 28 


- 


- 


- 


Northbridge 


3 


49 


336 40 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


90 


204 00 


Norwood 


1 


23 


520 40 


1 


23 


700 92 


5 


147 


482 00 


Peabody . 


1 


20 


235 43 


5 


101 


1,167 00 


- 


- 


- 


Pittsfield . 


2 


152 


815 95 


5 


253 


2,010 30 


— 


— 


— 


Plymouth 


. 3 


64 


1,181 50 


- 


- 


- 


4 


66 


514 GO 


Quincy 


_ 


_ 


_ 


14 


435 


2,752 11 


18 


423 


2,346 96 


Reading . 


; 2 


20 


184 00 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Revere 


— 


— 


— 


7 


119 


2,508 22 


— 


— 


— 


Salem 


.' 4 


80 


1,888 04 


11 


178 


4,811 74 


15 


428 


1,763 00 


Somerville 


4 


144 


2,714 82 


23 


1,053 


7,740 76 


" 


" 





» Tuition. 



Pt. II. 149 

EVENING AND VACATION SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1928 





Evening Elementary 




Evening High 












Schools 




Schools 


Vacation Schools 






T3 

_2 


*2 




■« 
o 


t2 






t-4 

«2 


Towns and Cities 




a 






2 






a 


i^ 




fc 


V 


1^ 


<U 


a> 


la 


4) 


(U 


"?§. 




1 


'a 


go. 
o-S 


^ 
§ 


'ft 


§1 


J3 
03 


t 


gi 




<u 


3 


n <o 


(U 


a 


X m 


<u 


3 


X =0 




H 


Ph 


W 


H 


CL, 


w 


H 


PL| 


W 


Southbridge 


8 


90 


$321 00 


11 


198 


$2,059 31 


_ 


_ 




Springfield 


19 


578 


10,990 05 


83 


2,326 


33,954 91 


63 


1,699 


$13,599 86 


Stonehana 


- 


- 


- 


2 


33 


515 78 


- 


— 


- 


Taunton . 


8 


87 


2,054 02 


21 


386 


6,376 04 


7 


172 


900 00 


Wakefield 


5 


102 


1,490 35 


- 


- 


- 


3 


144 


297 00 


Waltham 


7 


273 


3,023 00 


2 


24 


460 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Watertown 


8 


43 


807 35 


7 


157 


1,709 92 


— 


— 


— 


Webster . 


1 


23 


148 00 


6 


133 


915 00 


7 


160 


2,934 30 


Wellesley 


7 


183 


1,971 05 


- 


- 


- 


10 


472 


2,017 38 


Westfield 


4 


37 


587 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


West Springfield 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


103 


2,155 00 


3 


64 


745 00 


Winchester 


1 


14 


224 50 


— 


- 


— 


2 


27 


270 00 


Winthrop 


— 


- 


— 


4 


176 


565 30 


— 


— 


— 


Woburn . 


7 


150 


1,316 21 


- 


- 


— 


4 


47 


408 00 


Worcester 


19 


323 


7,018 00 


40 


1,365 


14,298 71 


43 


1,245 


8,841 00 


Total 


606 


13,130 


S242,886 53 


827 


25,944 


$290,894 35 


880 


26,698 


$160,864 77 



150 P.D. 2. 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS 

Comparison of certain totals for the Commonwealth for the j^ear 1927-28, as 
given in the preceding table, with the corresponding totals for 1917-18, and the 
per cent of increase for the ten years. 



Column 

in 

preceding 

table 



Item 



1917-18 



1927-28 



Per 
cent 



90 

95 

100 

107 



68 
69, 70 

77 
78 



16 

17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 
23 
24,25 
26 
27 
28 
31 

28, 31 



Population 
Population, State Censuses 1915 and 1925 

Registration of minors April 1, 1918, and October 1, 

1927: 
Persons 5 to 7 years of age .... 

Persons 7 to 14 years of age .... 

Persons 14 to 16 years of age .... 

Illiterate minors 16 to 21 years of age 

Public Day Schools, Elementary and High 
Principals and teachers ..... 

Pupils enrolled ....... 

Average daily attendance ..... 

Average membership ...... 

Public Evening Schools 
Cities and towns maintaining .... 

Teachers ........ 

Pupils enrolled ....... 

Expenditure ....... 



Publ'ic Vacation Schools 
Cities and towns maintaining .... 

Teachers ........ 

Pupils enrolled ....... 

Expenditure ....... 

Public Day High Schools 
Number of high schools ..... 

Principals and teachers ..... 

Average membership ...... 

Expenditure for support, exclusive of general control 
Cost per pupil in average membership of high school 

Valuation 
Valuation for 1917 and 1927 .... 

Valuation per pupil in the average membership 

Itemized Expenditures 
General control, including salaries and expenses of 

school committees and superintendents 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Salaries of supervisors, principals, and teachers 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Textbooks ...... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Other expenses of instruction 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Operation of school plant, including janitor 

and fuel ...... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Repairs, replacement, and upkeep 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Libraries ...... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Promotion of health .... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Transportation ..... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Tuition ...... 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Miscellaneous expenditures for support . 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Total for support, including ordinary repairs 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Total for outlay — new schoolhouses, alterations 

and permanent repairs 

Cost per pupil in average membership 
Total for support and outlay 

Cost per pupil in average membership 



3,693,310 


4,144,205 


12 


120,383 


149,008 


24 


464,621 


549,683 


18 


120,131 


143,069 


19 


11,504 


6,707 


421 


18,960 


25,144 


33 


607,805 


736,177 


21 


506,474 


649,038 


28 


547,288 


691,683 


26 


82 


72 


12 1 


1,858 


1,433 


23 1 


45,923 


39,074 


15 1 


$353,912 12 


$633,780 88 


51 


29 


32 


10 


380 


880 


132 


10,668 


26,698 


150 


$40,418 66 


$160,864 77 


298 


253 


254 


_ 


3,682 


5,863 


69 


76,376 


131,618 


72 


$6,402,337 64 


$17,613,850 91 


175 


$83 83 


$133 82 


60 


$4,538,998,071 


$7,086,001,968 


56 


8,294 


10,245 


24 


$1,115,784 43 


$2,501,296 06 


124 


2 04 


3 62 


77 


17,853,534 52 


46,712,215 68 


162 


32 62 


67 53 


107 


421,155 09 


1,108,634 54 


163 


77 


1 60 


108 


821,807 97 


2,080,704 04 


154 


1 60 


3 01 


101 


3,882,703 25 


7,241,621 76 


87 


7 09 


10 47 


48 


1,218,798 83 


3,464,759 59 


184 


2 23 


5 01 


125 


7,411 75 


61,043 32 


724 


01 


09 


800 


215,854 55 


938,617 47 


335 


39 


1 36 


300 


582,681 17 


1,717,476 06 


195 


1 06 


2 48 


130 


250,841 85 


591,833 47 


136 


46 


86 


187 


300,302 03 


543,319 84 


181 


55 


I- "79 


r44 


26,670,875 44 


66,961,621 83 


151 


48 73 


96 81 


99 


3,929,212 86 


11,925,633 89 


204 


7 18 


17i24 


140 


30,600,088 30 


78,887,155' 72 


158 


65 91 


114 05 


104 



1 Decrease. 

' Not including 25,101 in Americanization classes. 



Pt. II. 



161 



GRADUATED VALUATION TABLE 



The cities and towns within each of the following groups are arranged in the 
descending order of their valuation per pupil in the net average membership, 
column 1. Columns 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this table are based on columns 32, 34, 39, 
and 47, respectively, of the Tabulation of the School Returns. 

Group I. Cities 









Expendi- 


Per CAP 










ture 


ITA COST 










FOR SUPPORT OF PUBLIC 




Valuation of 


FOR 8CHOOI 

support 

FROM LOCAl 


SCHOOLS, 




1927 PER PUPIL IN NEl 


FISCAL TEAR 1927 




AVERAGE 


MEMBER- 


TAXATION, 
FISCAL YEAH 






CITIES 


ship, tear ending 
June 30. 1928 


FROM 










1927, PER 




FROM ALL 








$1,000 VAL- 
UATION 


LOCAL 

TAXATION 


SOURCES 




Amount 


State rank 


State rank 


State rank 


State rank 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Holyoke 


. $15,888 


30 


316 


50 


107 


Boston 


. 15,284 


32 


293 


33 


81 


Newton 


. 14,570 


38 


279 


32 


77 


Springfield . 


. 13,284 


48 


223 


16 


58 


New Bedford 


. 12,445 


55 


298 


87 


174 


Cambridge . 


12,010 


63 


256 


52 


106 


Fitchburg . 


. 11,843 


64 


261 


56 


121 


Fall River . 


. 10,985 


68 


189 


47 


92 


Waltham . 


. 10,952 


71 


210 


54 


116 


Lowell 


. 10,915 


72 


262 


76 


144 


Worcester . 


. 10,665 


76 


258 


78 


153 


Lawrence 


. 10,591 


79 


260 


86 


175 


Quincy 


. 10,442 


84 


311 


220 


308 


Salem 


. 10,200 


89 


276 


127 


227 


Beverly 


10,015 


93 


253 


95 


183 


Haverhill 


9,346 


108 


249 


130 


224 


Gloucester . 


9,105 


114 


218 


107 


198 


Melrose 


9,040 


116 


221 


113 


208 


Gardner 


8,683 


122 


265 


193 


280 


Marlborough 


8,617 


123 


237 


159 


240 


Lynn . . 


8,450 


126 


250 


190 


266 


Northampton 


8,296 


130 


246 


194 


272 


North Adams 


8,151 


137 


202 


152 


232 


Somerville . 


7,889 


142 


211 


183 


284 


Maiden 


7,798 


147 


181 


157 


258 


Leominster . 


7,593 


158 


170 


155 


245 


Medford 


7,592 


159 


174 


162 


242 


Chicopee 


7,455 


161 


231 


235 . 


319 


Everett 


7,382 


168 


158 


151 


251 


Taunton 


6,915 


185 


159 


202 


262 


Pittsfield , 


6,861 


190 


147 


181 


268 


Brockton 


6,768 


195 


110 


143 


244 


Chelsea 


6,604 


202 


138 


196 


285 


Newburyport 


6,480 


206 


201 


268 


318 


Attleboro 


6,301 


215 


58 


129 


222 


Woburn 


5,665 


254 


130 


261 


326 


Peabody 


5,617