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Full text of "Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game Annual Report. 1949-1960"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi00mass_1 



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DIVISION OF 



FISHERIES AND GAME 



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, ^ASSACHUb2TT3.;£EPARTii£l. : T OF GOiUSAVA TIOia 
Covering The Fiscal Year From July 1, 1948, To June 50, 19*9 



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September 20, 19h9 



His Excellency Paul A. Dever, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board 
of the Division of Fisheries and Game 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Oiith 
annual report of the Division of Fisheries and Game and its 
first annual report following the reorganization of the 
Department of Conservation under Chapter 6£l, Acts of 19U0 . 



Respectfully submitted j 



ROBERT II. JOHNSON 

DIRECTOR * 



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2. 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
Annual Report for Year Ending June 30, 19U9 



FOREWORD 

This year has been outstanding in many respects. With the reorganiza- 
tion of the Department of Conservation under Chapter 6£l, Acts of I9I48, the 
Division of Fisheries and Game was set up as a separate- legal entity under the 
administration of a five-man Board. Thus far this administration set-up has 
functioned exceedingly well and many fine policies have been enacted. Board 
Members and Division personnel have visited many sportsmen's groups, thus 
keeping the hunting and fishing fraternity better informed as to the activities 
and functions of the Division. 

The former Division of Wildlife Research and Management was incorporated 
into the Division of Fisheries and Game as a Bureau and has functioned excellently 
to supply the Division with technical guidance in this expanding problem of wild- 
life management. The Conservation Officers were removed from the Division and 
set up with the Coastal Wardens as a separate Division of Law Enforcement. 

During the fiscal year the highest sale of hunting and fishing licenses 
has occurred in the history of Division. It points out the great demand and 
interest made by the public in this form of recreation. To supply adequate 
sport for this increasing demand taxes the ability of our Division to its utmost. 
Much is needed in the way of trained wildlife personnel to work with sportsmen 
and landowners to enable them to help us produce the maximum crops of game and 
fish from our covers and waters of the State. The heavy demands of Indus try and 
growing cities on available land for this recreation continue to increase so 
that it is imperative we maintain and develop existing lands available for wild- 
life to the highest capacity. 

A new bookkeeping branch has been organized in the Division to handle 
the accounting of our funds and appropriations, a detailed account of which 
appears later in this report. 

The Director and staff members attended and participated in many state 
and national conferences in the field of wildlife conservation which was of con- 
siderable value in learning the latest trends in this rapidly expanding field. 

PERSONNE L 

At the close of the fiscal year the Division of Fisheries and Game had 
in its employ forty-five permanent employees and forty-nine temporary workers. 

On October 6, 19U8, His Excellency Governor Robert F. Bradford appointed 
Ludlow Griscom of Cambridge, Matthew T. Coyne of Millbury, James W. Cesan of 
Agawam, Oscar Anderson of Wellesley Hills, and Frederick D. Retallick of Pitts- 
field as members of the Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game. At their 
first meeting Mr. Griscom was elected Chairman and Mr. Coyne the Secretary of 
the Board. 

The original position of Chief Fish and Game Culturist was divided into 
two positions, namely Chief Fish Culturist and Chief Game Culturist. Mr. William 
F. Monroe and Mr. J. Albert Torrey were appointed to these new positions, 
respectively, on August 9, 19H8. 



A' '•!■)„> 






3. 



Personnel (continued) ■>■• ■■'>. ■' ■■' . !' ;■ ' "' .' 

Carleton Hudson and Robert Macomber were appointed as Fish Culturists 
on November 10, 19U8 as- the result of a civil service examination held for this 
position. \ 

Andrew S. Roman was appointed Assistant Fish Culturist on June 23, 19U8 
and William F. McMahon was appointed Assistant .Fish Culturist on June 30, 19U8. 

Ruth M. Holden was transferred from the Department of Corporations and 
Taxation to the Division of Fisheries and Game as a junior clerk and typist on 
November 9, 191+8. Katherine E. Davis was appointed junior clerk and typist on 
June 7, 19U9. : 

Winston S. Saville and Charles A. Stiles, both Conservation Skilled 
Helpers at the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory in Upton, were made Wildlife 
Restoration Project Field Agents during the year. 

i 
THE BOARD 

The Board herewith respectfully submits a report of progress since 
organizing on October 21, 19U8, together with plans and hopes for the future. 

Members of the Board, while sincerely appreciating the honor bestowed 
on them, were well aware that with them rested the responsibility of promulgating 
policies and adopting procedures which would determine Thothex' or not the reor- 
ganization was a step in the right direction leading to improved conditions for 
the sportsmen. 

i 

Knowledge as to the financial status of the Division was of immediate 
concern. At the very first Board meeting, the budget on which the Division was 
operating and the budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 19h9 were 
reviewed with Director Robert H. Johnson. The budget for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 19U9 had been submitted to the Budget Commissioner in Septem- 
ber, 19)48. After careful scrutiny and appraisal this budget was given the 
Board's endorsement. 

Before formulating any program it was necessary to meet and know the 
personnel of the Division as well as the physical properties of the Division* 
Early Board meetings were arranged to allow both the inspection of properties 
and the meeting of Division employees. This having been done, the Board was 
then prepared for the construction of a program. 

Two programs were adopted. One, a short term program which would be 
the quickest way to apparent results; the other, a long term program which 
would more completely apply the precepts of sound field and stream management 
and tend towards solving some of the many problems of good conservation. 

Short Term Program 

(1) A business administration which would guarantee a dollar of value for each 
dollar expended was the first requirement to receive consideration. 

(2) Next effected was the coordination of all personnel inCo a smooth running, 
efficient organization utilizing to the fullest extent the ability, knowledge 
and experience of the very capable men whom wo arc fortunate to have found 
associated with the Division of Fisheries and Game and the Bureau of Wildlife 
Research and Management. Eagerness of all personnel to cooperate has made 






The Board ( continued) , 



possible considerable progress towards the development of a Fisheries and Game 
Division of which we can be proud and which they in turn will be proud to be a 
part of. 

(3) Restoration of fish hatcheries and game farms to maximum efficiency as soon 
as possible was then begun. The supplementary budget of May, 1?1|.8, made funds 
available for this purpose. Some improvements have b.een made. Expansion and 
other improvements have been planned but this work must be arranged so that it 
vail not interfere with production schedules. 

(h) Possible methods of increasing production at our fish hatcheries and game 
farms to the limit of facilities available were given close scrutiny. It is 
our intention that all fish and game released will be' of the best quality that 
our capable culturists know how to produce. While realizing our obligations to 
sportsmen, we cannot overlook our responsibilities to the personnel Tip on whom 
we must depend for this production. Manpower shortages were found to be acute 
at the production level. An appropriation was requested in the supplementary 
budget to correct this condition and to cover anticipated increased food costs 
relative to increased production. It would be false economy to spend money to 
improve and expand properties and not spend a little more to get the increased 
production that these improvements would allow. 

(5>) Improved methods of distribution and release to minimize stock losses in 
transition from protected areas to the wild were studied. The "six-week old 
Pheasant Cooperative Program" which the Division entered into with the sports- 
men's clubs has great value in this direction in that it develops the birds in 
close proximity to their point of release. 

Long Term Program 

(1) The' most important element of any long term program is necessarily one of 
proper field and stream management. This was adopted as the primary goal in 
our long range program, and plans were laid for effecting sound management work 
which could conceivably increase and maintain natural production, supplemented, 
in areas of excessive pressure by the output of game farms and hatcheries. 

(2) It was agreed that all development work in fields and streams must be for- 
mulated from sound policies based on the findings of the research work carried 
on by our Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management. 

(3) A study was undertaken of the many serious problems which confront us, with 
the hope that a solution may be found to some o£ these problems under a long 

term program. There is no complete solution to some of these problems and counter 
measures must be adopted which will take these problems into consideration. 

Some of the problems are listed as follows: 

(a) Expanding cities, towns and industrial areas continue to reduce the 
acreage available to wildlife. 

(b) Hard surface roads are increasing to the extent that no section of 
the Commonwealth can be considered even slightly remote. 

(c) Predator Control. Predators stalk our wildlife' 36^ days of the year 
and are much more proficient than our most accomplished- sportsman. 



The Board (continued) 

(d) Deforestation not only eliminates good cover but contributes to 
rapid run-off and increased water temperature in many of our better fishing 
streams. 

(e) Pollution has rendered many of our waters void of aquatic life. 
This is a price we pay for growth and industrial development. ViTe cannot hope 
to restore some of our streams to a state of purity they once enjoyed. We can, 
however, guard against unnecessary violation of those waters which are yet 
capable of supporting aquatic life. 

(f) Deteriorization of Farmer, Landowner, Sportsman relations is 
resulting in more and more acreage being posted against the sportsmen. 

(h) An education program which will keep the sportsmen and future sportsmen 
fully informed on methods of good conservation is of extreme importance. This 
work is being carried on now to the extent that limited funds available will 
allow. There is great need to expand this program. Requests have been made 
through the supplementary budget for funds to make this possible. 

The cooperation of sportsmen is vital to the success of any program. 
The Division of Fisheries and Game must maintain the confidence of all sportsmen, 

With this in mind, Board Members with Director Robert H. Johnson and 
Superintendent Robert L. Jones spent much time during the year visiting with 
sportsmen's organizations to discuss mutual problems. We believe that Massa- 
chusetts sportsmen are better informed as to the operation of the Division, and 
relations between the sportsmen's clubs and the Division are more cordial than 
at any time in the past. Greater interest in hunting and fishing is evident 
from 'an increase in gross revenue from license fees this year. Income for ±9k9 
is at the all time high of $61+3 ,063 .00 and has increased more than .',$0,000 
from last year. 

Hunting and fishing is not only the interest of our sportsmen. It is 
a considerable factor in the economy of the Commonwealth and affects us all 
either directly or indirectly. The manufacturer who makes the equipment, the 
stores that sell that equipment and the sportsmen's toggery, the man who rents 
your camp or cabin, even the gasoline station on the corner where gas is bought 
for that week-end trip to some distant stream, all have a vital interest in 
hunting and fishing. 

With all our problems, Massachusetts has much to offer. Many sportsmen 
have been lured to far places by attractive advertising and dreams of abundance 
only to find that they travelled awa/ from better fishing and better hunting 
close at hand. Often a catch made at some distant place receives great 
publicity while a similar catch made near home goes unnoticed. 

There is here in Massachusetts all the knowledge, ability and origin- 
ality necessary to make this State the leader in wildlife conservation. 

With mutual understanding of our problems, with all efiorts pointed 
in the same direction, with complete cooperation between the sportsmen's clubs 
and the Division of Fisheries and Game, we can look to the future with' confi- 
dence that improved hunting and fishing for all sportsmen of the Commonwealth 

is a distinct possibility in the not too distant future. 

For the Board, 



$.\ 



THE SPORTSMEN S "BUCK 



IN MASSACHUSETTS 




LEASING LAlvfD FOR PUBLIC FISHING AREAS 
"DEER DAMAGE CLAIMS 



FISCAL YEAR 1946-1949 



REVENUE SUMMARY 
19h9 FISCAL YEAR 



6. 



LICENSES 

Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping ' 

Shiner (use of net) 

Propagators ' 

Taxidermists' 

Fur Buyers' 

Trap Registrations 

Total Licenses 

RENTS 

Chilmark Pond 

Property at Palmer, Ayer, Marshfield, 

Sunderland, Sutton, Wilbraham, Upton 

Total Rents 

SALES 

Miscellaneous 

Confiscated Goods 

Fish, Game and Deer Tags 

Total Sales 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Auto Damage Claim 
Refund on Damaged Goods 

Total Miscellaneous 

OTHER RECEIPTS . • 

Refund Prior Yoar 
Pittman-Robertson Fund 
Court Fines 

Total Othor Receipts 

TOTAL REVENUE, (Inland Fish and Game Fund) 



$611,901.2^ 

1,525.00 

2,716.00 

220.00 

680.00 

2,6U?.00 



^619,691.25 



1.00 

2,653-u5 

$2,653. U5 



118.90 
118.35 
196.95 

$131.20 



SURPLUS OF INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND, as of 

Juno 30, 19U9 



10.00 
OJ4O 

$18.U0 



15. 2u 

.10,767.9U 

9,a02.7O 

$20,265.88 
&6U3, 063.18 



^628,085.55 





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IJ. / 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
. AND THE BUREAU OF -WILDLIFE RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT ; 
FOR. THE FISCAL YEAR JULY* 1,': I9k$ to JUNE 30, 19k?, 



Approp. 

Number 



330U-01 
330U-06 
330U-21 
330U-31 

330I4-U5 
33014-51 
330U-53 
330U-56 



Title 



Appropriation 
plus 
Balanoes 



Personal Services and Expenses $ I46, 71-1-0.00 

Expenses of the Board 2, 500.00 

Biological Work 12,1470.00 

Propagation 337,102.00 

Establishment Public Fishing Grounds . 10,000.00 

Protection of Wildlife 1;0, £72,85 

Pittman-Robertson 62,1(35.00 

BioloGical Survey of Streams and Waters 15,510.00 

Totals -$527,079.05 



^ Expenditures 

including 

Liabilities 



$ 113,618.214 

763.65- 

9,97li.56 

205,835.65 

7,6U9.Ul 

32,702.1|2 

h0,0Q9.$h 
9,325.88 

0U3O,O39.35 



SPECIALS 

330I4-I48 Certain Improvements at State 

Game Farms 
330U-U9 Certain Improvements at State 

Fish Hatcheries and for the pur- 
chase of Certain Property 
33QJ4-50 Establishment of Pond Fish Units 
330U-5U Improvement Stream and Bird Cover 
330l;-55 Establishment Public Shooting Grounds 



$ 70,651.90 

111,965.57 
25,000.00 
I5,2u9.2l4 

25,000.00 



Totals -$2li7, 066.71 



033,833.75 



29,190.50 

10,185.79 

9,011.93 

5,51)1+. 77 

88,57U.82 



GRAND TOTAL -$77U,9li6.56 



$510,6114.17 





S 


•'.',' ' <■ 


S 


' ' ■ J ! • 





,10. 

fish hatcheries: *■■' 



During the' year numerous trips were made to all stations in regard to 
general and new work, and close contacts were made with the salvage units on 
various salvage operations throughout the State. For the first time, arrange- 
ments were made for the weighing of all fish shipped to open waters. The results 
of this procedure will be round in the chart showing production rigures. Prom 
tnis weighing we hope to determine as near as possible the cost or producing 
each pound or trout and bass, also the cost per fish and per pound of salvaging 
fish from ponds and reservoirs and from our two rish cultural units at the 
Harold Parker State Forest and the Merrill Pond System. A program or sample 
weighing or trout the rirst and middle or each month is now in progress. From 
this weighing, information can be gathered whether the fish are making the 
desired S by considering the difrerent ractors involved at the various 
stations? II such rish are not showing the rate or growth expected, steps are 
taken to determine the cause, whether it be lack or rood kind o^/iot, disease 
or change in water conditions - such as temperature, volume, or lack or oxygen. 

As a start toward improving our distribution system, two pumps were 
installed on the salvage trucks. These proved so satisractory and successful 
that five more pumps and equipment were purchased for use at each hatchery. 
These will be in operation by the time our next trout distribution season 
arrives. The pumps enable the trucks to carry greater numbers of rish and 
greater weight per load and hasten the liberation or rish from', the hatcheries. 
This new equipment is especially suitable ror longer trips since the fish 
reach their destination in better condition, besides allowing a greater load 
per truck. 

. To exchange ideas and talk over various subjects ' applying to all fish 
hatcheries, a series of get-togethers of all fish culturists was inaugurated. 
• Each meeting will take place at a difrerent hatchery. The first mee ting was 
held at the Palmer Hatchery on June 10 and it proved so successful that plans 
were laid to have three or rour meetings tliroughout the year. 

Spring stocking of trout progressed somewhat ahead or schedule due to 
good weather. The general run or rish were a little larger than usual on 
account or a more open winter with less ice formation and consequently better 
feeding conditions. Stocking was carried out as in previous years with the 
fine cooperation of conservation officer* and club members. The total distri- 
bution or legal size trout will be round in the chart and shows an increase 
Over the previous year. ^ 

With the increased prices or everything needed ror the propagation of 
Tish, our total distribution speaks well for the interest and cooperation oi 
hatchery men and the many hours of hard work they put in to raise these fine 
fish for distribution to trout waters of the State. The meat cost of our iish 
food diet has increased about 300* since 19U1 and although we have done every- 
thing possible to bring down the copt of this diet by adding dry foods, pro- 
cessed fish, etc., the meat cost continues to take a good part of our propaga- 
tion budget. 

Attention was given toward bringing our hatcheries back to pro-war 
condition. During the war years much repair and replacement work was neglected 
duo to lack or funds, lack of personnel, and other conditions beyond our control. 

With a favorable increase- in our new budget for extra personnel, we plan 
to increase the output of trout by at least 10/ 3 ror 1950 using our present 
facilities. The successful propagation of fish in large numbers in small areas 
^^oyelltm^^, and the culturists in charge or our rish hatch er 1 



ff 



.:•■'. 11. 



\' -s\ 



Fish Hatcheries (continued') • ' ' • 'i .• • . , 

must have sufficient crews under them to successfully operate, their stations to 
the fullest possible capacity. '•""', 

East Sandwich State Fish Hatchery , 

The activities at this station were confined mostly to routine until 
early winter when nineteen new wells were driven in the wooden pools in back of 
the Grange Hall. Before this work was started, 'a' supply of much needed equip- 
ment was purchased. On June 17, work was started on a pump house for two 
320 gallon pumps to be installed to furnish cold water to the pools on the west 

side. 

i ■ ■ 

Montague State Fish Hatchery 

A new meat grinder was purchased and installed to replace one which had 
been in use for many years. A much needed tliree car garage was constructed. 
Eight now concrete dams were constructed in the brood 3 bock section along the 
road. The ponds were originally 100 ft. long, and cutting them in two allows a 
more efficient use of the available water supply. 

The Division acknowledges the gift of a large size drill stand from the 
Millers Falls Sportsmen's Club. 

Palmer 'State Fish Hatchery 

i 

A new concrete retaining wall v;as constructed at the end of the daphnia . 
pools, also several decayed wooden sides were replaced in the pools themselves. 
Three new bass ponds are nearing completion. . These ponds were, started about 
three years ago but construction was discontinued because of lack of help, 

Smallmouth bass production will not be- as great this year as in the past. 
While the egg production was large, some eggs disappeared from the beds before 
hatching. Upon investigation it was discovered that snails were responsible for 
the loss of eggs. Measures are being taken to offset any future losses from . . 
this source. 

For the first time, the production of largemouth bass was' under talc en, and 
a small number of brood slock was secured from salvage operations. 

Sandwich Slate Fish Hatchery 

Twenty new artesian wells were driven, thereby increasing the water ' 
supply by l£o gallons per minute. The roof and both sides of the hatch house 
were reshingled and the interior painted and rewired throughout. A, food mixer / 
was transferred from the Sunderland Hatchery. Work was started on replacement 
of a number of rearing pool bulkheads. 

Sunderland State Fish Hatchery 

Six old wooden dams were replaced with concrete. At the Clark section, 
a catch pond at the head was replaced with concrete as was the lower dam. 
Repairs were made on dams of four fry ponds and the head walls rebuilt. 200 ft. 
of 12" tile pipe was laid as a clean out for the ponds above the brood stock. 
About 300 ft. of pipe line was filled in, replacing a rotted out carrying 
trough so that it is now possible to drive a truck along the side of the pools. 
A wooden trough was replaced with pipe from the supply pond to certain ponds in 
the Loop Section, so-called. All buildinns were painted on the outside. 



1 <•', 12, 

Fish Hatcheries (continued) 

. » 

' ' i ' 

Sutton State Fish Hatchery , 

A badly needed food chopper was purchased and installed. 
Merrill Pond System ' 

Sections of the walls that had caved in were replaced at the Arnold, 
Putnam, and Welch Dams. 

Harold Parker Forest Ponds 

New flash boards were installed and repairs were made to the raceway 
at Field Pond. Brush was laid in the water around the shore edges to provide 
better spawning conditions for certain pondfish. It is hoped to carry out 
further experiments with pondfish production in these ponds. 



Through a cooperative arrangement with the Fish and Wildlife Service of 
the United States Government, Department of the Interior, 15,000 brook trout, 
5,000 brown trout, and 12,000 rainbow trout were supplied to this Division by 
the. Hartsville Hatchery, Hartsville, Mass. for stocking Massachusetts waters. 
This Division supplied the food and the federal ' government raised the fish. 



GAME FARMS 



Game farm facilities have been improved and enlarged this year to 
increase production and in the hope that the best possible birds could be 
produced. Construction work was carried on under the supervision of each game 
farm culturist and accomplished with the game farm employees, supplemented by 
labor from the special game farm improvement appropriation. In considering the 
following report on the activities of the four game farms, it should be borne 
in mind that the breeding season does not coincide with the fiscal year ending 
June 30. Practically all the young pheasants and quail liberated this year 
were hatched and partially reared before July 1, 191+8. This year's hatches, 
spring of 19k9, will be liberated in the next fiscal year. 

The distribution started about July 1 by shipping six week old pheasants 
to the sportsmen's club rearing pens. Distribution of twelve week old pheasants 
started about the usual time, August 1. Allotments of pheasant to the towns 
qnd counties were made from the recommendations of the Bureau of Jildlife 
Research and Management based on their survey of the pheasant covers of the 
State. Liberations were also allotted as to sexes. 

The Division cooperated in the so-called matching program whereby the 
Division furnished pheasants and quail to match bird for bird those purchased 
and liberated by the sportsmen's clubs; a program which has been carried on for 
a number of years. It was decided, in order to have sportsmen derive the 
greatest return from game farms, that the cooperative matching program would be 
discontinued as of June 30, and the six week old pheasant club rearing program, 
would be increased for the coming year. A great many of the sportsmen's clubs 
who reared pheasants on the six week old rearing program this year had highly 



13. 
Game Farms ( continued ) 

commendable reports, to the satisfaction of their club members and the Division. 

All liberations were completed so that both pheasants and quail were of 
proper size and age before opening of the upland game season. Production 
figures, which will be found in the chart, show an increase over previous years. 
The only set-back happened in February when an epidemic of fowl cholera occurred 
in the brood stock of pheasants at one of the farms. Although this trouble was 
slight, with very few losses, there was the possibility .of carriers of this dread 
disease among the flock and rather than take the chance of breeding from these 
birds or distributing them in the covers, the entire brood stock was destroyed. 

After precautionary measures had been taken, the farm was put back into 
production by purchasing 73>00 pheasant eggs and transferring 10,935> eggs and 
lhOO day old chicks from the other three state game farms. 

One of the greatest problems encountered at our game farms is the 
purchase of proper food. The only solution advisable seemed to be to prescribe 
our own game bird food formulas, setting up rigid specifications of the quality 
of ingredients used. Constant experimenting will be necessary to perfect and 
maintain the proper formulas to produce ideal birds for distribution. Experiments 
this spring have been hampered because food deliveries of the proper feeds could 
not be made at the proper time by feed dealers. 

Standardization of rearing techniques at all of our game farms is prac- 
tically an impossibility although every effort has been made to transfer ideas 
and methods from one farm to another. 

One of the first considerations in our improvement and expansion program 
was to install labor saving equipment wherever practical. Our farms have very 
satisfactory electric incubators for incubating game bird eggs and these require 
a minimum of labor to run. They have been safeguarded with dual thermostats to 
protect eggs from overheating, thereby eliminating constant checking. Eggs are 
removed from these incubators near the end of the incubation period to be 
hatched in separate machines. Old type still air incubators have been used 
successfully for this purpose, but it is not possible to obtain new parts for 
these incubators. Separate hatchers will be necessary in the near future. 

Two electric hatchers were purchased and tried out this season, but the 
results have not been quite satisfactory. We shall not condemn the machine 
without further experimentation, for with the transferring of eggs necessary 
this year we did not want to sacrifice too many eggs for this purpose. 

Ayer State Game Farm 

Construction . A guard fence was rebuilt around the pheasant breeding 
area and extended 100 ft. Seven sections of pheasant wintering pens were 
repaired and reinforced; ne;v wire was placed on the tops and sides, covering 
an area of 31,000 square foet. An open front pheasant house was constructed, 
200 ft. by 10 ft., partitioned off so as to furnish shelter for twenty holding 
pens. Loam was excavated and replaced with a gravel floor and a cement foundation. 
The construction was of corrugated sheet aluminum reinforced with 3" furring.. 
It is fully equipped with automatic waterers and feed hoppers. A tool house 
i;2 ft. by lU ft. damaged in the 1938 hurricane was jacked up and a concrete 
foundation built to replace the original wooden posts. A concrete floor was 
laid and the building will be used as a workshop. The old wood shod ell on the 
culturist's residence was demolished and replaced for use as a farm office. 
A circulating fireplace and chimney were constructed and a cement floor laid. 
A catch basin, septic tank and drain were installed. The building will be 

t.hr> r.nmmr-r ran^n non synt^m. 



' Gam® Farms '(continued) , 

Ayer. State Game Farm (continued) 

consisting of an area 300 ft. by 150 ft., was practically rebuilt. 

Marshfield State Game Farm 

Construction . Two quail holding houses were completed, 30 ft. by 1$ ft* 
They have a four foot cement foundation with concrete dropping pit, wire floor 
and front, wooden construction sides top and back, with shingled walls and roofs. 
One house was divided into ten pens accommodating 35 - UO quail in each pen. As 
an experiment, the other house was partitioned off into two pens hoping to carry 
successfully large flocks of two hundred quail each. A new tile drainage system 
U25 ft. long was placed in the large pheasant brooder house with seventeen 
concrete drinking fountain bases and outlets , and the cement floor was replaced. 
Two covered pheasant holding pens l£0 ft. by 30 ft. were constructed. A new 
guard fence was erected around the pheasant breeding area. An addition, 30 ft. 
by 20 ft., was made to the storage building and will be used as a garage and 
workshop. A cement foundation and floor were laid and the building was framed 
and the roof shingled. It will be completed this coming fall. 

Sandwich State Game Farm 

Construction . A new brooder house, which was started in 19U7, was 
completed with a 123 ft. addition and fully equipped with lights and automatic 
waterers. Brooder house pens were connected with new partitions. The total 
length of the completed building is now 325 ft. and consists of 36 brooder 
sections accommodating 8000 pheasants. Two covered holding pens 15>0 ft. by 
30 ft. were constructed, also an adjoining open pen 300 ft. square to be used 
for an open range pen. A quail holding house 30 ft. by 1$ ft. was completed with 

a capacity of 35>0 to JLj.00 quail. This is of similar construction to those 
built at the Marshfield Game Farm. Another house was under .construction in 
June. A concrete foundation replaced a wooden foundation on a quail holding 
house constructed in 19^0 and the side walls were shingled, A metal culvert, 
flume, and tide gate were installed under the main road to the game farm. Nine 
new brooder quail boxes were constructed for use in the quail brooder house. 
The top netting was replaced on eight pheasant brooder pens. 

Wilbraham State Game Farm 

Construction. Work was completed on converting the quail brooder house 
to a pheasant brooder house. An addition of 30 ft. was made to the original 
building, a concrete foundation and four inches of concrete were added to the 
floor to bring it up even with the foundation walls. Drains and concrete 
drinking fountain bases were installed, also electric lights and running water. 
5000 cubic yards of gravel fill was placed in front of the building and twelve 
covered pens 60 ft. by 10 ft. were erected on this area complete with shelters 
and feed hoppers. This area will accommodate 3000 pheasants. Work has been 
started fencing the land on the south side of the farm for range pens. U030 ft. 
of fencing will be used but the project was not completed by June 30, 19U9. 
Approximately thirty acres of land was sowed down for cover crops and range 
pens. A much needed heating system was installed in the culturist's residence. 



GAME DISTRIBUTION FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1943 to JUNE 30,1949 

(This table does not show stock transferred from one game 
farm to another, nor does it show additions to brood stock.) 



PRODUCT OP STATE GAME FARMS 



15. 



PHEASANTS : 
Adults 

6 week Rearing Program 
12 week General Liberation 9,674 
TOTAL : 



AYSR 


MARSHFIELD 


SANDWICH 


WILBRAHAM 


TOTAL 


306 


618 


488 





1,412 


775 


'530 


2,650 


4,170 


8,125 


9,674 


7.577 


10.615 


6,443 


34.309 


10,755 


8,725 


13,753- 


10,613 


43,846 



Of the above figures 1,965 - 12 wks old were used for Cooperative 
matching. 12 week old Liberation - 17,422 Hens and 16,887 Cocks. 
Estimated number of 6 week old birds - 4,062 Kens and 4,063 Cocks. 



QUAIL: 
Adults 
Young 



MARSHFIELD 



319 



Total: 



2,309 



2,628 



SANDWI CH 
155 
2.650 
2,805 



TOTAL 

474 

4.959 

5,433 



Of the above figures 120 quail were sent for Field Trials on the 
Cooperative Matching Program. 



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■ ■ ' » * . ' • ' 17, 

DISEASE INVESTIGATIONS 



Headquarters of the Assistant Fish and Game Biologist were transferred 
in August from the Boston office to the Conservation Service Building at Stow 
where a laboratory was being constructed. At' the close of the year this 
laboratory was in use for bacteriological and parasitological work. Four large 
aquaria were installed so that fish could be held for examination. These 
aquaria will permit the running of controlled experiments in the treatment of 
diseases. 

The work of this laboratory will be confined mainly to the prevention, • 
control, and treatment of disease in the hatcheries and game farms. 

As in previous years, the. disinfection of fertilized eggs at the fish 
hatcheries was carried out. The bacterial agent against which this disinfection 
was mainly directed did not appear in any specimens examined during the year. 

A partial loss of brook trout fry took place at some of the stations 
bills spring. The; actual organism responsible for this loss has not been 
isolated, however it lias been found that the epidemic can be checked by the 
use of Sulfonamides following the initial symptoms. Whether prophalactic 
treatment of all fry with one of the Sulphonamides is advisable or not must 
await further experimentation. 

i.luch of the work at the fish hatcheries was directed toward a reduction 
in numbers of ectoparasites of the fish. Due to climatic and water conditions 
this problem assumed gEeatcr importance than it has in past. years. Various 
methods of treatment were tried and those which proved effective were utilized 
with -very good results. This reduction of ectoparasites on the fish resulted 
in improved food conversion and healthier fish. 

This spring man/' reports of dead fish or dying fish were received and 
many examinations into the possible causes were made. In a number of cases 
bacteria were isolated, which after the bacteriological work is completed, may 
reveal some of the conditions affecting the. fish. 

The production of birds at game farms was just reaching its peal: at the 
close of year and no serious problems existed. 



18, 
PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 



The first part of the year was spent in renewing leases on the 
Westfield, Farmington, Millers, and Squannacook Rivers. 

Work was then started on the Ipswich River in Essex County. This river 
is of a much different type and character than those just mentioned. It is 
slow moving and winds in great sweeping bends through large swampy meadows, 
which in the spring of the year, are under water. The Ipswich River, is in all 
probability, the most popular trout fishing stream in Essex County and is 
subject to heavy fishing pressure throughout the fishing season. It attracts 
anglers not only from Essex and Middlesex Counties but from Metropolitan Boston 
and other large centers of population as well. 

It was tentatively decided to attempt to lease a stretch along this 
river from the cement bridge in North Reading to High Street on Route 97 in 
Topsfield. The start was made in Topsfield but not enough landowners in that 
town were agreeable to signing a lease to make the project workable. This was 
unfortunate because there is good trout fishing along this section of the 
stream. The same procedure was followed upstream from Topsfield, although 
tracing the land ownership proved to be a long drawn out job because of the 
large number of small parcels of land involved and other factors which entered 
into the work. 

Approximately six miles of the river are now under lease. In addition 
to much correspondence, approximately I75> personal calls were made on land- 
owners along the river. In some cases four or five return calls had to be 
made 'before a lease was executed. Of necessity many of these calls were made 
in the evenings and on week-ends. A number of conferences were held with the 
assessors in the different towns and many days v/ere spent at the Registry of 
Deeds in Salem for Essex County and the Registry of Deeds in Cambridge for 
Middlesex County searching records. The Division now has a tracing of every 
plan on file in the above named Registries, involving land along the river 
together with the book and page numbers of practically every parcel of land 
along the river from High Street in Topsfield to the cement bridge in North 
Reading. This was a long painstaking job, but it is felt that these records 
will be of great value to whoever renews the leases at the end of the present 
five year period or if an attempt is made to lease more land at a future date. 

Mr. Robert Miller of Marblehead assisted on the project during the 
month of December and the Essex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs who are 
actively interested in the project have been of great assistance. 



19. 



The waters under lease for public fishing ground purposes at the 
date of this report, are shown in the following table: 



Stream 



Town 



Miles of 

stream Date of Expiration 

under 

lease 



Westfield River: 

East Branch. . . Huntington, Chester, Cummington, 
Chesterfield 

Middle Branch. .Huntington, Chester, 

Worthington, Middlefield 

West Branch. .. .Huntington, Chester, 
Middlefield, Becket 

Millers River Athol, Phillipston, 

Royalston 



Farmington River. .Tolland, Otis, Sandisfield 

Buck River Sandisfield 

Clam River. ...... .Sandisfield 

Squannacook River. .Townsend 

Deerfield River . . .Charlemont, Rowo. Florida 

Ipswich River Middle ton, Danvers, 

Peabody, Lynnfield 



13-5 Mar. 31, 1953 

9.0 Mar. 31, 1953 

6.5 Mar. 31, 19^3 

5.8 Mar. 31, 1953 

12.0 Mar. 31, 1953 

9J4 Mar. 31, 1953 

** Apr. 30, 1950 

6.0 Mar. 31, 195U 



##Land owned by the New England Power Company bctwc 
Charlemont and the Vermont line. 



en the cement bridge in 



20, 



GREAT PONDS STOCKED AND CLOSED TO -WINTER FISHING 



In accordance with regulations promulgated by the Director 
of Fisheries and Game, under authority of section Ik, Ch. 131, G.L., 
the ponds listed below are closed to winter fishing annually from 
November 1 through the following April lli. until the expiration date 
indicated. A penalty of twenty dollars is imposed for each violation. 



POND LOCATION EXPIRATION DATE 



Lake George Wales April lU, 1°U9 

Great Pond (Ashfield Lake) . . . Ashfield April lli, 19k9 

Halfway Pond Plymouth . . . , April lU, 1951 

Lake Lashaway North & East Brookfield , April Ik, 1951 

Lead Mine Pond Sturbridge April Ik, 1950 

Mill Pond Upton . . . April Ik, 1951 

Morse ■ s Pond Wellesley and Natick .... April lU, 1950 

Nippenicket' s Pond..... Bridgewater and Raynham. . April Ik, 1950 

Quacuniquasit Pond(South Pond) Brookfield and Sturbridge April Ik, 1950 

Lake Quinsigamond Worcester &. Shrewsbury . . April Ik, 1951 

Spectacle Pond Lancaster r April Ik, 1950 

Turkey Hill Pond Rutland & Paxton April Ik, 1951 

Walden Pond Concord and Lincoln April Ik, 19U9 

Watson' s Pond Taunton April Ik, 19^9 

West Ponds Plymouth April Ik, 19k9 

Winnecunnet Lake Norton , April lU, 19k9 



21, 

BUREAU OF V.1LDLIFE RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT 

GENERAL 

The Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management which was made a part of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game on September 15, 19U8 has expanded its 
operations and functions considerably during this year. To make for better 
organization and operation in the Division the Bureau of Wildlife Research and 
Management took over all fisheries research work which included the biological 
survey of ponds and waters. All habitat improvement programs or wildlife 
development work which had not previously been carried on from the Upton 
Laboratory was, likewise, transferred to the Bureau. 

With the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory at Upton as the field headquarters 
for all wildlife work, the shift during this year has been from research to 
development or habitat improvement as rapidly as possible. This has been made 
possible partly because of the establishment of a Wildlife Cooperative Unit at 
the University of Massachusetts which has undertaken several of the more 
important research studies, allowing for more emphasis on development from the 
Upton laboratory. Three large scale development projects began operation during 
the year; the planting of wildlife shrubs on farms in cooperation with the 
United States Soil Conservation Service, to. improve farm game habitat; the 
control of water chestnut on the Sudbury and Concord River; and the erection 
of wood duck nesting boxes. A deer investigation was also started to collect 
valuable information towards better management of the Massachusetts deer herd. 

A civil service examination was given on March 19, 19h9 to fill four 
permanent positions as Wildlife Restoration Project Field Agents. These had 
all been filled provisionally since the war. 

Realizing the need for public information and conservation education, 
a public information office was started at the Upton Laboratory and regular 
releases and educational information have been sent out during the year. 
Personnel from the Bureau also devoted a considerable amount of time in the 
planning and preparation for the operation of the first .' 'assachusetts Junior 
Sportsmen's Conservation Camp. This first camp is to be held at Swarm Lodge 
in the Arthur vVarton Swann State Forest, Monterey, Mass. 

A considerable amount of preliminary work on both acquisition and 
development projects has been carried on during the year. This has been 
primarily for marsh acquisition and development for waterfowl and muskrats. 
It has included surveying to provide ownership maps, flowage lines, and 
engineering work for test cores and dam designs. A number of tracts of 
upland habitat have been investigated for the establishment of a State managed 
beagle field trial and grouse field trial grounds. These would be used for 
habitat improvement work on rabbits and grouse to demonstrate what can be 
done by manipulating the environment to make it produce more game and as 
managed trial grounds. 



The fishing season opened on April l£, 19UC with stream conditions 
very close to ideal over much of the State. Waters wore not too high and 
fishing was good. From the middle of May on, however, the rainfall was below 
normal and eventually drought conditions set in which finally on June 22 
caused the Governor to close the woodlands to fishing and they remained closed 
until the end of the fiscal year. 



22. 

Hunting and Fishing Conditions (continued) 

Reports on the snowshoe hare population and gunning indicated them to 
be higher than they had been in many years. There was considerable concern 
that they may have been overgunned during the open season particularly in 
December and January when lack of snow made the white rabbits quite vulnerable to 
the gun. The raccoon numbers continued high over most of the State. Foxes 
appeared to be making a slow comeback east of the Connecticut River after 
being severely decimated by a mange epidemic which reached its peak around 
l°l£-l°h6. Foxes west of the Connecticut wore still reported high. The 
ruffed grouse and pheasant gunning was only fair since the previous spring 
nesting season had not been the most desirable with cold rainy weather in 
evidence at the lime of hatching. The spring of 1. ( )l\$ , however, was the best 
in a number of years for nesting and it should be evidenced in the coming 
fall's gunning. 

The deer kill of 23UU in 1°U8 was considerably below the previous years 
due to several factors. The lack of snow made tracking conditions poor and 
the mild weather plus some opening day hunting accidents kept the hunters from 
moving around much and consequently moving the deer. Also, it now appears the 
faun production of the previous spring may have been lower than normal. 

FOND AND LAKE BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Between July 1st and September 1st, 19U3 fifty-one ponds and lakes 
in Barnstable County were studied by the Biological Survey. This was the 
continuation of work commenced in 1°U2 for the purpose of gathering fundamental 
chemical, physical, and biological data on which to base recommendations for 
the proper management of each body of water. 

Dr. Britton C. KcCabe was in charge of the survey. Assisting in the 
field were Jilliam l/if. wilder of Springfield Technical High School Science 
Department, Paul ilhite of the University of Massachusetts, Robert Huckins of 
the University of Massachusetts, and Richard Parks of the University of 
Massachusetts. The ponds and lakes included in the survey are as follows: 
Ashumet Pond, Mashpee and Falmouth; Baker Pond, Orleans; Big Sandy pond, i/est 
Yarmouth; Chequaquet Lake, Barnstable; Cliff Pond, Brewster; Coonarcessett 
Pond, Falmouth; Crystal Lake, Orleans; Dennis Pond, Yarmouth; Eldridge Pond, 
Harwich; Flax Pond, Brewster; Goose Pond, Chatham; Great Pond, Eastham; 
Great Pond, Jellfleet; Greenough Pond, Yarmouth; Gull Pond, V/ellfleet; 
Hamblin Pond, Barnstable; Hathaway Pond, Barnstable; Horring Pond, Easthara; 
Higgins fond, Brewster; Hinckleys Pond, Harwich,; Horse Pond, Yarmouth; Jenkins 
Pond, Falmouth; Johns Pond, Pashpee, Lawrence Pond, Sandwich; Little Cliff 
Pond, Brewster; Little Sandy Pond, Yarmouth; Long Pond, Barnstable (near 
Centerville) ; Long Pond, Barnstable (near Santuit); Long Pond, Harwich and 
Brewster; Long Pond, South Yarmouth; Long Pond, .Tellflect; Lovells Pond, 
Barnstable; Mares Pond, Falmouth; Mashpee-'.Vakeby Pond, Mashpee and Sandwich; 
Mystic and Middle Pond, Barnstable; Peters Pond, Sandwich; Pilgrim Lake, 
Truro; Santuit Pond, Mashpee; Scargo Lake, Dennis; Seymour Pond, Harwich and 
Brewster; Shallow Pond, Barnstable; Sheep Pond, Brewster; Shubaels Pond, 
Barnstable; Slough Pond, Brewster; Snake Pond, Sandwich; Spectacle Pond, 
Sandwich; Triangle Pond, Sandwich; Upper Mill Pond, Brewster; falkors Pond, 
Brewster; Walkers Pond, Harwich; .Thite Pond, Chatham. 



23, 



MASSACHUSETTS WATERFOWL SURVEY 

The preceding year has been one of a gradual change in direction and 
scope for the waterfowl project. Investigation findings of the project are 
being summarized and applied as a practical wildlife management tool in many 
instances. Some of the more apparent of these applications of research are: 
A large scale erection of wood duck nesting boxes; water chestnut control in 
several of our waterways; and an active lands program to improve water fowl 
habitat. V/hile the foregoing projects are not research investigations but 
actual management, their supervision has been carried on by the Waterfowl 
Survey. 

i 

Some of the phases of research investigations active during the past 
year have been: 

A. Survey and investigation of potential waterfowl and upland game areas as 
possible development units. Numerous areas scattered throughout the State have 
received preliminary investigation. Many of these appear suitable and are 
being investigated further. At the present time we are attempting to acquire 
two areas for development. In the near future we hope to have several managed 
waterfowl marshes in various sections cf the State. 

B. YJaterfowl Food Habits Studies. The collection of duck stomachs for the 
determination of feeding habits has progressed well during the year. The 
average sportsman has been particularly cooperative in donating the stomachs 
from waterfowl he had taken during the hunting season. The material on hand 
will be analysed at a later date. 

C. Analysis of Waterfowl Hunting Pressure and Kill Statistics. 

1. A detailed study was made of the waterfowl kill at Pleasant Bay, Orleans, 
The data accumulated by this study has revealed many interesting facts, one 
of which is the possibility of a differential flight and wintering by sex 
and age groups of various species of waterfowl. If this proves valid it 
will of necessity require a revision of many of our present concepts of 
waterfowl. 

2. 7000 questionnaires were mailed to persons who had reported taking 
waterfowl on the game kill forms required by this State. This question- 
naire was of material aid in determining the opinion of the waterfowler 
in various sections of the State as to the duck season most favorable 

to him. Considerable data was also gathered on the gunning success, 
crippling losses, relative importance of the various species in the bag, 
etc., in all sections of the State. 

During the present year many of the research phases of the project will be 
terminated and the results will be published at a later date. 



26, 

WOOD DUCK NESTING BOX PROGRAM 
/ 

Since 19^3 the Massachusetts Waterfowl Survey Project, under Pittman- 
Robertson funds, has conducted experiments on the use of nesting boxes as a 
means of providing artificial nesting sites for the wood duck. Results obtained 
have been well worth while. The first boxes erected on trees had an average 
usage of k$%> Various causes held down a higher use of these boxes by the ducks, 
chiefly that of occupancy by squirrels, mice, raccoons and screech owls. In an 
attempt to overcome this use and predation, boxes were erected on pipes and 
posts in the marshes away from shore so that they were surrounded by water at 
all times. A check for three seasons on this type of erection showed that about 
90$ of the boMos were being used by wood ducks, with use in some areas as high 
as 100$. By this method of erection predation and competition by other species 
is considerably reduced. 

During the past winter a program for the large scale erection of wood 
duck nesting boxes on poles throughout the state was inaugurated. However the 
erection of boxes did not progress as rapidly as was originally planned. The 
warm weather prevalent during most of the winter prevented the formation of 
solid ice, and made it necessary to use a boat which greatly hampered efforts 
to get the hoses up. This work was continued until April l£th at which time- 
it was felt that the current breeding season was sufficiently advanced to make 
the erection of additional boxes unprofitable this year. To date State personnel 
have erected $lk boxes. This includes 178 boxes which were purchased and 
sponsored by various cooperating clubs and individuals. Cooperators also pur- 
chased an additional 21 boxes which they erected themselves. Dimensions and 
specifications were also furnished to 19 clubs and 10 individuals who requested 
them with the intent of constructing and erecting their own boxes. In addition 
3^0 boxes have been furnished to three conservation officers who volunteered to 
get them erected in their districts. 

The cooperative program whereby boxes could be sponsored by groups or 
individuals was discontinued because of the acquisition of war surplus ammuni- 
tion boxes which were converted and distributed without cost except for shipping 
charges. A total of 7I4O of these surplus boxes have been sent out. Llany were 
not erected in time for usage this season but boxes will still be sent out to 
anyone who will erect them for use in future seasons. 

The field inspection of nesting boxes erected throughout the State is 
well underway. Data is being collected on habitat requirements, toleration of 
this species, suitability of various marsh or water areas, molestation or 
predation results, size of clutch and percentage of hatch, and information on 
usage by other species as well as wood duck are being assembled, us yet these 
inspections have yielded only preliminary figures and definite theories cannot 
be advanced until after the final post-season check has been completed in the 
fall . 

By noting the areas of high acceptance and those which have poorer 
usage, these inspection trips give the observers invaluable information as 
touhe suitability of various areas and the habitat requirements of the wood 
duck. The evident reasons are tabulated and areas which could take more boxes 
and new areas are recorded for reference this winter when erection crews will 
again be in the field. 



21. 

V/ATi^ CHESTNUT CONTROL PROGRAM 

ViTator chestnut ( Trapa natans ) is an obnoxious aquatic plant which has 
boon introduced from Europe into several places in the United States. It is 
now known to be found in the Potomac River at YJashington, D. C; the Hudson 
and Mohawk Rivers in IJew York; and in Massachusetts in the Sudbury and Concord 
Rivers 5 Little Spy Pond, Belmont ; and Upper Pond, South Hadlcy. 

This plant is an aquatic annual which spreads very rapidly and unless 
it is controlled, Massachusetts will rapidly lose more and more of its already 
restricted areas for public fishing, boating, swimming, and waterf owiing. . 

Some of the unfavorable effects of water chestnut result from the 
nature of its dense growth which makes boating next to impossible, prohibits 
swimming, renders fishing non-existant, impedes the flow of the stream so as 
to promote silting, stagnation and the breeding of mosquitoes, and suppresses 
valuable food plants for waterfowl and other wildlife. 

Experimental control was inaugurated. by Pittman-Robertson Project PR-ltfl 
dv ing the spring and summer of 19h7 and suitable control measures were found. 
This consisted mainly of spraying the plant beds with a mixture of 2-U-D and 
diesel oil with some cutting and hand pulling/ the more inaccessible areas. 

Work on this project was resumed on June 1st from a base of operations 
at a boathouse on Fairhaven Bay, which was donated for this purpose by a resi- 
dent of Concord. Control measures consisted of spraying all dense beds with 
a mixture of 2-li-D and diesel oil. Beginning June 20th hand pulling of water 
chestnut was resorted to as only scattered plants were left. Buring the last 
week in June it was found necessary to spray many of the areas a second time, 
because at the first spraying many plants had not yet reached the surface and 
for that reason had survived the earlier spraying. The end of the month 
found all areas on the five mile stretch of river between Fairhaven Bay and 
Concord cleared except for occasional scattered plants many of which were 
practically inacessible as the river was at its lowest stages because of the 
continued drought. 

A second site of infestation on the Sudbury River 3 miles above 
Saxonville was sprayed with good results and scattered plants between this 
area and the dam at Saxonville v/ere eradicated by hand pulling. 

Authorities of the Mt. Holyoke College in South Hadle/ were contacted 
and assisted the project by draining Upper Pond. The water chestnut beds were 
dried out and a substantial part of them killed by this action. On July 13th 
a control crew began spraying those sections of the pond which had remained 
moist enough to survive. 

Thesecontrol measures r/il continue until the plant has started to sot 
fruit in late August and then will be renewed the following summer in any 

remaining infested area3. 



minor role. 



FARM GAME INVESTIGATIONS 

During the 19k9 fiscal year farm game investigations have played a 
;^;n;^°r'./^ thG n Pr0V ^° US , 7 P ar ^ SGveral search phases were culminated and 
i ° f h ** Pl T f v V 19k9 WrS f ° r *B"**~t based on the recommenda- 
du^ihg the ear However, a few phases were planned and promoted.. 

i _ fife are continually seeking to increase the efficiency of pheasant 
stocking In regard to this the project assumed responsibility and continued 
the use_of eight field release pens which were originated the previous year by 
the Division of Fisheries and Game. With the cooperation of conservation 
officers, observations were made to test their effectiveness. Little evidence 
was obtained to show any increase in stocking efficiency. On the contrary it 
was decided that they would not be financially feasible' as a state-wide man F e- 
ment procedure because the pheasant cover is so broken up and scattered that 
it would take a prohioitive number of pens to properly distribute the birds. 

_ A controlled feeding experiment was conducted to test the degree of 
toxicity oi salt in the diet of pheasants. An attempt was made to determine 
whether or not the salt used on the highways to clear the ice might have a 
detrimental effect. Pheasants commonlj go to the roads to pick up grit when 
snow has covered regular sources. It was decided that little or no 'pheasant 
mortality should be charged to that source since the bird apparently avoids 
excess salt when possible and has a high degree of tolerance for any taken" 

c+ ,,. , I hG islana ; fl of Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard were visited and 
studied to complete the state-vri.de pheasant cover survey. The data will be 
incorporated with that of the rest of the state and will be used as a ba.L 
for stocking and other management procedures. 

+ o *»«'u A \T^ y by m ° S1 , " 7aS mr ' dG 0f P hoas ^t stocking in the other hi states 
indip a ^7^ h + e7 ' T C ° mPa r ed I dth y ^^°husetts. A summary of these reports ' 
indicated that Uassacnusctts possesses more complete information on the results 

from 19L3 fo lolYT ^ -^ ■ S ^^ ***** rep0rt for ^ work do™ 
irom l^UJ to 19Uo was published during the year. 

FARLI GAM3 DEVELOPMENT 

thn n„/i arg ° of^f.^ g£Une habitat improvement program was started during 
the past year. Stocking has proven to bo only a limited remedy for supplyinp 

ITiortwff tT^ ° f P + hdaSani hUntin& ' B ^ dln e * tudi - hav * shovm that a 
I? is bel? vo^tKr * Sh0t ° aCh 7Gar ar ° ^PP 11 ^ ^ natural reproduction, 
in MLsach^setts" ? "* "^ ^^ 1S ^ ^ t0 **&4* Sinning 

The program is similar to that of several other states in that it is 
conducted in cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service. Some practices 
to tT G ?an1 V hat + °^ i - tion ■« of direct benefit to wildli" as well as 
to the land Among them is the planting of perrenial berry-bearing shrubs 

^ peci"lly nt foo°d U ?oi 0n H 0f "T 8hrubs ' ^ * rQ pr ° Vidin * P-tcctive'co^r and 
hoM Ihlil r d + ° P hGasants °n a permanent basis. Since many of the shrubs 

privi'ed "t the m o a r UGh + the , V r ter T^ eari * Sprin ^ * ™ of food will be 
piovic.ua at the most critical time of year. 

shrubs in^h^forl 3 ^ 1 ^ plan ^ ln S sea *°n, the project planted over ^2,000 
s£ub* andfho , , Vin: f ° nCeS ° r ^ ldli ^c borders. Because of limited 
shrubs and labor, the work was concentrated in Worcester, Plymouth, Barnstable, 



20, 



( Farm Game Development (continued) "' 

and Dukes Counties. Shrubs used included mult if lor a rose, tartar ian honey- 
suckle, hybrid filbert, silky cornel and highbush cranberry. Sportsmen have 
begun to show considerable interest in the work. Shrubs were planted on the 
grounds of two clubs in Worcester County, one in Hampden County, and sports- 
men from Plymouth County planted an area in that region. 

Other management work was in the form of annual' plantings of corn, 
buckwheat and soybeans on areas located in Hampshire, Hampden and Plymouth 
Counties. A long-range program bar- been started with ITest r/er Air Force Base. 
Because of the wy in vhioh this area can be controlled... it offers an excellent 
opportunity to test the result s of various manage:."/ 1 . rr ! : practice ■;, Several 
refuge areas previously established throughout the State have been maintained 
and will be continued in the future, 



DEER INVESTIGATIONS 



Preliminary studies of the vfhi.ietail.ed deer have been carried for one 
full year. The over-all purpose of the project is to collect such information 
as is necessary to establish a management policy that will insure a sustained 
annual yield of deer for the hunter. Most of this information comes from valuable 
data gathered at checking stations whore the successful deer hunter can stop to 
have his deer weighed, measured and aged. 

Last year's stations were set up at Barre, Becket, Belchertown, Brewster, 
Florida, Littleton, Middleboro and South Deerfield. Most hunters were cooperative 
and welcomed the opportunity to help the program. Better than 13 percent of the 
total deer kill was checked. Res\iits show that approximately 25 percent of the 
kill occurred in each of the first three age classes (fawns, yearlings, two- 
year-olds) with the remaining 25 percent being distributed among deer three to 
seven years old. 

A study of the reproductive tracts of the does furnished some important 
life history data. It was learned that adult docs in this State had an average 
embryo production in I9U8 of 1.65, that all the yearlings bred successfully, 
and that better than one-third of the fawns bred their first year. This infor- 
mation is needed to establish the normal rate of increase of the herd and the 
rale at which fawns replace the older animals which are killed by the gunner, 
predators, accidents, weather and natural causes. 

Conservation Officers cooperated with the Deer Study by sending to 
Upton all accidentally killed deer that were in good condition. Thirty-one 
deer were received between December and the middle of Liay when the arrangement 
was stopped. Of these 21 were killed by car, 9 by predators (mostly dogs) and 
1 by train. These animals were studied in detail, then turned ovjr to State 
Hospitals where they were used for meat consumption. 

The project feels :i t has made substantial progress during its one year 
of operation. Another year or two o£ research along the sane lines should mean 
the accumulation of sufficient facts to establish a wise management policy for 
the Bay State's deer herd. 



30. 

RABBIT MANAGEMENT PROJECT 

On December 16, 19h&, a rabbit trapping and transfer program was 
started, with two men assigned. It was originally intended that they would 
cover the entire state, live-trapping cottontails from closed areas and 
transferring them 'to areas open to public gunning. , 

Circumstances which appeared as the program progressed altered the 
plan considerably, limiting the work to areas in the immediate vicinities of 
Upton and Ipswich. Due to the lack of snow last winter, and a scarcity of good 
rabbit cover on posted land, only a few rabbits were taken. It was therefore 
concluded that only under more favorable conditions would it be feasible for 
the Division to undertake such a program alone on a practical, state-wide 
basis. Consideration is now being given to working out a satisfactory method 
of carrying on live trapping under existing conditions. 

Work on the' acquisition of land in the township of Barre, for a 
rabbit management demonstration area and field trial grounds, is progressing 
favorably. Thus, the interests of rabbit hunters and beagle field trial 
enthusiasts are receiving consideration, through the demonstration of sound 
management techniques. This program is expected to expand greatly in the 
future . 

GENERAL STATE •.rL'LDLIFE PROJECT 

The duties of the personnel on this project were many. However, the 
major phases of the project were the grouse population study and the beaver 
live-trapping program. 

Considerable time was spent during the year in assisting the various 
Pittman-Robertson projects in the Bureau. During the winter of 19U8-19U9, 
personnel of this project worked onthe erection of wood duck nesting boxes on 
marshes throughout the State. During the spring and early summer the personnel 
worked with the farm game project, planting shrubs on farms throughout Worcester 
County. 

Other smaller phases of the project were: small mammal census, experi- 
mental shrub planting, tabulation of kill forms, operation of deer checking 
stations, speaking at sportsmen's clubs and attending exhibits of the Division. 

Beaver Management 

With the beaver increasing in Massachusetts and because of their 
flooding valuable farm land and undermining road beds, a beaver' management 
program was initiated in the fall of 19hl* The work on this project was done 
by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Project No. 5-R until September 15, 
19U8. The work was then assigned to the present state project. The primary 
purpose of the project is to live trap beaver from areas where damage is being 
done and to release them into forested areas where damage may be held to a 
minimum. Nine beaver were live-trapped and transplanted during the fiscal 
year 19u8-19U9. 



31. 

i 

Grouse Fall Population Study 

The study is based on wing and tail samples of ruffed grouse killed 
during the open season. It v/as initiated in 1°U7 and will be conducted 
annually over a period of years. 

The results of this work are used in conjunction with the spring and 
summer population census. It will provide additional information on the status 
of our partridge population each year and consequently aid in establishing a 
season communsurate with the available supply. Valuable information can be 
gleaned from the wing and tails of the ruffed grouse; basically they are as 
follows : 

1. The age and sex ratios of the fall population 

2. She success of the preceding breeding season as evidenced by the percentage 
of young birds. 

3. The rise or decline of the grouse populations. 

U. An evaluation of good grouse cover in the state through a study of density 
and distribution of the kill. 

A knowledge of the sex and age ratios of the fall grouse population in Massachu- 
setts is probably the major aspect of this study. It is the birds in the fall 
that eventually make up the breeding population the following spring. Information 
gained as a result of the 19U6 fall population study showed a below normal age 
ratio (a proportion of 0.8:1). In a normal year the juvenile adult proportion 
should be 1:1, while in a good year the proportion should be approximately 3:1. 
The sex ratio in 1^U8 was U3/J females to ^J% males which is considered a normal 
condition in a fall partridge population. 

Additional information as a result of this study, when gathered over a 
period of years, should also help in providing a sound basis for establishing 
seasons and clear awa./ some misconceptions as regard to the external sexing of 
the birds. 

information-education 

These activities were on a part time basis, the remainder of time being 
spent on various projects underway at the Phillips V/ildlife Laboratory. This 
arrangement was considered advantageous, since it allowed for personnel require- 
ments besides familiarizing the employee with Division operations in the field. 
Since inception of the program in November, the following activities were 
promulgated: 

HEY/5 RELEASES: Mimeographed news releases are made as stories arise to all Rod 
And Gun editors, selected weeklies, and national sporting magazines. The 
mailing list for news releases has reached a present total of 2l}2 names, 
including individuals who expressed interest in receiving the information. 
FEATURES: Close ooperation with the assistant commissioner of conservation 
resulted in several feature articles appearing in Sunday papers, including one 
full page rotogravure on the Phillips Laboratory. Direct contact with"0utdoor 
Life" magazine resulted in an article and photographs on wood duck boxes plus 
several plugs from time to time. 

RADIO: The Division made use of radio particularly during the last duck 
hunting season, when publicity given the waterfowl projects 's kill survey at 
Pleasant Bay resulted in their being swamped with cooperative sportsmen. Several 
Rod and Gun editors who carry regular programsmake frequent use of our news 
rleases. 

TELEVISION: In addition to radio time, some favorable air time wa3 received on 
television channels. This consisted mostly of the provision of live and mounted 
specimens and other props for conservation programs being conducted by other 
agencies. 



32 

I nformation-Education ( continued ) 

DISPLAYS: The Division appeared at several sportsmen's sho\vs during the year; 
notably among them was the Annual Sportsmen's Show at Boston where good wild- 
life management was featured, with live beaver and ducks as an added attraction. 
Several smaller club-operated shows were also included where the work of the 
Bureau of ,'ildlife Research and Management were featured. in educational displays. 

SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS AND CONTACTS: All personnel took frequent advantage of 
contacts in the field and invitations to appear before sportsmen's groups in 
order to bring our operations before the public, and to clear up possible 
misunderstandings. All personnel, including members of Board, have made 
themselves available at any time for public appearances and conferences, since 
this is one of the primary means by which we promote favorable public relations. 
REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS: Certain requests for conservation 
material and Division publications were turned over to the Information-Education 
office for processing. V/ith an expanding list of available publications such 
as "The Beaver in Massachusetts", "Fisheries Report for Lakes of Central 
Massachusetts" 3 "Stream Improvement Possibilities in Massachusetts", this factor 
is rapidly coming into importance in the conservation education and public 
relations fields. 



33. 3 



STATISTICS OF GAME AND FUR-BEARING ANIMALS TAKEN 

—— ^— I. ■ ■■■- H I >■! ■—■■*-*!%*■ - H I —H I! — *. I. K. I- ■! it ** * m Mil ■ I* »—!■«* . H I 

The numbers of game killed in the calendar year of 19U7 as shown by 
tabulating the game report forms (the form which the hunter fills out upon 
receiving a new license) are as follows: 

Gallinules iiU 

Rails 16 

Fresh-water coots (mud hens)... 5>U3 

All Ducks 25,Ohl 

Geese . * * 1^1 

Woodcock 2 ,$lk 

Quail 2,017 

Ruffed Grouse 0,22? 

Pheasants 1$, 0^3 

Deer 3,886 

Cottontail rabbits 51,099 

White hare 9, 1+33 

Grey squirrels . . , 19, 06^ 

Total head of game taken 139,801 

Muskrat 37,99k 

Mink 963 

Skunk 1,079 

Red Fox 1,U10 

Grey Fox .' . . 322 

Raccoon 1,376 

Weasel 3kh 

Otter 71 

Opossum 8 

Bay Lynx (wild cat or bobcat) . 27 

Total number of pelts taken. UU,39U 






Bounties were paid by County Treasurers in the Commonwealth during 
the calendar year I9U8 (which falls within the fiscal year 19h9) on 
06 wildcats killed within the Commonwealth, to a total of ^360.00. 



































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35. 

LEGISLATION 

The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fish-.ries and Game 
were enacted during the legislative session of 19k9- 

Chap. 50 , Acts of 19h9 : Resolve providing for an investigation and study 
by a special commission relative to the organization, administration, powers 
and duties of the Department of Conservation and of similar departments or 
authorities in other states. 

Chap. 282, Acts of I9I4.9: An act relative to the hunting of deer. 

Chap. Ih9t Acts of 19h9' An act repealing certain provisions of law 
relative to fishing in a certain lake in the town of Webster. 

Chap. 30l|, Acts of 19)49: An act relative to the hunting of deer and 
other mammals. 

Chap. 311, Acts of 19h9- An act authorising the town of Edgartown to 
construct a channel from Edgartown Great Pond to the ocean. 

Chap. 37U, Acts of 19h9- An act relative to a right of way for public 
access to White Pond in the towns of Concord and Sudbury. 

Chap. U20, Acts of 19U9: An act providing for the establishment of a 
right of way for public access to Upper Mill Pond or Walkers Pond in the town 
of Brewster, and an area for the parking of vehicles contiguous to said right 
of way. 

Chap. 507, Acts of I9I4.9: An act relative to the draining of certain 
ponds, reservoirs and other bodies of \vater. 

Chap. 5l6, Acts of 19U9: An act authorizing the granting of fishing 
licenses to certain aliens. 

Chap. 536, Acts of 19U9: An act relative to the control of Morth Pond, 
Middle Pond and South Pond of Congamond Lakes in the town of Southwick. 

Chap. $h5, Acts of 19U9: An act relative to the form of licenses issued 
for sporting, hunting, fishing and trapping. 

Chap. 7£l, Acts of 19h9' An act relative to the payment of compensation 
for damage caused by deer or moose. 

Chap. 7$Q, Acts of 19h9- An act further regulating the trapping of 
certain animals and providing for the registration of traps used therefor. 



36. 
REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME 



All rules and regulations promulgated by the Division of Fisheries and 
Game during the fiscal year 19k9 are listed herewith as required by section h 
of Chapter h99> Acts of 1939. (See Summary for rules and regulations still in 
effect promulgated prior to the above-mentioned period. ) 

July 8, 19U8: Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of fish. (Sec. 107, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

July 8, I9I48: Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of 
birds and mammals. (Sec. 107, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

August 5, I9U8: Ru3.es and regulations for the taking of pheasants and 
quail in the season of I9U8. (Sec. 59, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

August 10, 19U8: Migratory game bird regulations for the season of 
19u8. (Sec. 62, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

September 5, 19U8 : Rules and regulations for the taking of ruffed 
grouse in the season of 19U8. (Sec. 59, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

December 16, I9U8: Closing Lake Quinsigamond in the city of Worcester 
and the town of Shrewsbury to winter fishing from December 16, 19U8 to April lit, 
1951. (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

December 16, 19U8: Closing Lake Lashaway in the towns of North and East 
Brookfield to winter fishing from December 16, I9I18 to April lli, 1951. (Sec. lU, 
Ch. 131, G. L.) 

December 16, I9U8: Closing Turkey Hill Pond in the towns of Rutland 
and Paxton to winter fishing from December 16, 19h8 to April IJ4, 1951 • (Sec. lU, 
Ch. 131, G. L.) 

December 16, I9U8: Closing Mill Pond in the town of Upton to winter 
fishing from December 16, 19)48 to April lU, 1951. (Sec. lU, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

December 16, 19^8: Closing Halfway Pond in the town of Plymouth to 
winter fishing from December 16, 19hQ to April II4, 1951. (Sec. ll;, Ch. 131, G.L.) 



37. 
SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS 

\ . . . ■ 

Section k of Chapter U99, Acts of 1939, requires the inclusion in 
annual reports of all rules and regulations promulgated by the respective 
departments and divisions, and in force and effect upon the date the report is 
made. The following regulations promulgated by the Director of Fisheries and 
Game in prior years are still in effect on June 30, 19k9 : 

Jan. 31, 1936. Establishing the Deerfleld River and its diverted waters 
as a restricted area for breeding and developing troutj establishing fishing 
regulations herein; and rescinding regulations approved March 20, 1935- (Sec, 60, 
Ch. 131, G. L.) 

Mar. 2k, 19k2. Prohibiting fishing except between April l£ and July 31, 
both dates inclusive, in Bailey's Pond, Amesbury, and restricting the catch to 
six trout a day per person by fly fishing, with no trolling permitted. (Sec. lU, 
Ch, 131, G. L.) 

June ll|, 19U6. Suspending the open season on deer in Dukes County. 
(Sec. 80, Chi 131, G. L.) 

Oct. 29, 19U6. Rules and regulations relative to seasons, legal lengths, 
bag limits and license requirements to apply to Yfallum Lake in the town of 
Douglas (also lying partly in the town of Burrilville, R. I.). (Sec. 37, Ch. 131, 
G. L.) 

April 1, 19U7- Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish and 
the use of land in the areas leased by the Division of Fisheries and Game for 
public fishing ground purposes. (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

April 11, 19U7- Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a 
certain area in Robbins Pond, East Bridgewater, and closing it to all fishing 
for five years beginning April Ik, 19U7« (Sec. lii, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

April 11, 19U7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in Little Sandy Bottom Pond in the town of Pembroke, and closing it to all 
fishing for five years beginning April 15>, 191+7 • (Sec. lk, Ch, 131, G. L. ) 

April 11, 19U7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in East Monponsett Lake in the town of Halifax, and closihg it to all 
fishing for five years beginning April 1$, 19k7 <• (Sec. lU, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

April 11, 19U7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in Stetson Pond in the town of Pembroke, and closing it to all fishing for 
five years beginning April 1$, ±9h7 . (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

April 11, 19U7^ Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in West Monponsett Lake in the town3 of Halifax and Hanson, and closing it 
to all fishing for five years beginning April 1$, ±9kl . (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G.L.) 

April 11, I9I4.7. Setting aside as a breeding area a certain section of 
Indian Head Pond in the town of Hanson and closing it to all fishing for five 
years beginning April l£, I9U7. (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

August 29, 19U7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish that 
portion of Lake Maspenock, also known as North Pond, in the town of Hopkinton, 
lying north of the highway between Upton and Hopkinton, for a period of five 
years beginning October 1, 19h7. (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 



EIGHTY-FIFTH A 




L REPORT 



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MASSACHUSETTS 



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DIVISION 



FISHERIES AND 



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Covering The Fiscal Year From July 1, 3 949, To June 30, 1950 






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*T/»ft HOUSE, BOSTON 







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October 1, 19^0 



His Excellency Paul A. Dever, Governor of the Commonwealth; 
The Executive Council; the General Court-; and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty- 
fifth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
and its second annual report following the reorganization 
of the Department of Conservation under Chapter 6£l, Acts 
of 19U8. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT !!. JOHNSON 
DIRECTOR 



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2, 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
Annual Report for Year Ending June 30, 19$0 

FOREWORD 

The past year has heen one of significant changes and developments in the 
Division of Fisheries and Game as it applies to the overall objective of producing 
better hunting and fishing conditions in our great Commonwealth, 

From an administrational standpoint the Division has its second Poard as 
set up under the recent reorganization of the Department of Conservation and is 
the first group to operate oh the staggered term basis with one to five year 
appointments, This has aided in lending continuity to the administration of 
present and future programs and policies so vital in the field of natural 
resources. The Poard, in acting as representatives of the sportsmen of the 
Commonwealth, have succeeded in maintaining a high degree of responsibility in 
their administration of the Division's oolicies, and tribute is paid to their 
unselfish and untiring efforts in this behalf. 

All personnel of the Division have extended themselves above the normal 
call of duty in performing their share of the work. Without this excellent 
oooperation the advances made in programs of the Bureau of Wildlife Research 
and Management, fish hatcheries and game farms, public fishihg grounds, educa- 
tional work, and office administration would not have materialized as presented 
in this annual report. The sportsmen of this State should pride themselves on 
the high caliber of the personnel of their Fish and Game Division, who are. 
working for their interests in producing better sports afield with rod and gun. 

Outstanding accomplishments and developments in the Division have been 
the acquisition of the Birch Hill Area in northern Worcester. County as a public 
shooting ground and wildlife development area; the acquisition of Podick Springs 
tract in Sunderland as a future trout rearing station to be operated in connec- 
tion with the nresent Sunderland Fish Hatchery; increased production at our fish 
hatcheries and game farms to the highest level yet attained, along with substan- 
tial improvements to these properties; rapid development of a better fishery 
management program, putting into effect recommendation of our lake surveys to 
make for better pond fishing which is the backbone of the Massachusetts fisherman; 
active participation in th^> education of our youth in the field of conservation 
at the Massachusetts Junior Sportsman Camp; new public fishing grounds along the 
Shawsheen River being leased; and more active programs in the development and 
management of our wildlife resources with Federal lid programs. 

To meet the needs of this expanding program the sportsmen must be ever 
aware of the increasing costs involved in carrying them out for their ultimate 
benefit. It will be necessary in the very near future to get more revenue into 
the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund so as to adequately finance the work and still 
keep a safe balance in the Fund to meet any emergency condition that may arise, 

PERSONNEL 

At the close of the fiscal year the Division of Fisheries and Game had in 
its employ forty-eight permanent employees and seventy- five temporary workers. 



3. 

Personnel (continued) 

On March 15, 193>0 His Excellency Governor Paul A. Dever appointed the 
following as members of the Board of Fisheries and Game: 

Paul V. Fleming of North Adams five-year term 

James W. Cesan of Feeding Hills (reappointment) four-year term 

Frederick A. McLaughlin of Amherst three-year term 

Matthew T. Coyne of Millbury (reappointment) two-year term 

Ovide N. Lanois of Marlboro one-year term 

At their first meeting Mr. Coyne was elected Chairman of the Board and Professor 
McLaughlin was elected Secretary. 

As the result of civil service examinations held for these positions, the 
following appointments were made: Cecil R, Ellison, Lloyd W« Raymond, and 
Charles A. Nickerson as Assistant Fish Culturists on July 1, 1°H° and Warren C. 
Besse on April 2U, 1950; Michael W. Miskewich, Fish Culturist, on March 16, 19^0; 
John Prouty, Game Bird Culturist, on February 10, 195>0; and Stanley A. Torrey, 
Assistant Game Culturist, on February 9, 19^0. 

As a result of the civil service examination given on March 10, 19U8, four 
men — Winston Saville, Charles Stiles, Gordon Nightingale, and Samuel Shaw were 
made permanent Wildlife Restoration Project Field Agents. Charles McLaughlin was 
appointed to the position of Pittman-Robertson coordinator on October 1, 19U9. 

Mr. Richard Stroud was appointed to the oosition of Aquatic Biologist on 
August 8, 19U9. 

To staff the new bookkeeping unit made necessary by the reorganization of 
the Department of Conservation, Anna O'Brien, Jr. Clerk and Stenographer, was 
transferred from Administration section, Department of Conservation, on 
November 1, 19U9 and Hilda Sutherland was appointed Jr. Clerk and Stenographer 
on November 1, 19U9. Madeline Ellis was appointed Junior Clerk and Typist on 
July 1, 19U9 to fill a vacancy. 

THE BOARD 

This, the Eighty-Fifth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
is the second report issued since the Division has operated under direction of 
a Five -Man-Board . 

Members of the present Board were appointed by His Excellency, Governor 
Paul A. Dever, on March 22, 19!?0 and qualified by taking the oath of office on 
March 29, 19^0. 

In accordance with Section 2, Chapter 21 of the General Laws, only one Board 
member may be changed in any one year by executive action. This gives reasonable 
assurance of continuity in programs and policies of the Division by avoiding such 
delays and changes in policies as might ensue with a complete change in the 
personnel of the Board. 

The Board Members organized at a meeting on April $, 1950 and immediately 
set about familiarizing themselves with the nresent organization and operation of 
the various departments of the Division, its policies, projects and methods of 
procedure. Practices of economy in operation were encouraged and endorsement 
given to all programs which showed progress toward thr: broad objective of provid- 
ing better hunting and fishing for sportsmen of the Commonwealth. 



The Board (continued) 

With the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 195-0, fish hatcheries and 
game farms are found to have operated in a manner which reflects ere it to the 
Division. The orogram for rehabilitation of all fish hatcheries and game farms 
was found to be well under way, and we believe that all these properties should 
be brought into first-class condition at the earliest possible date. Production 
schedules have been laid out which will keep those properties close to maximum 
production, though minor improvements will result in a slight increase. Funds 
for this purpose were made available by the Legislature which approved the 
Division of Fisheries and Game Supplementary Budget. Upon completion of the 
program the Board intends to maintain the properties at maximum efficiency and 
production. 

Game Farms 

The total number of birds produced at the ":ame farms for liberation prior 
to the 195>0 hunting season will not be less than ^0,000. Upon completion of 
facilities now under consideration it is estimated that 60,000 birds may 1x2 pro- 
duced for the 1951 Gunning Season. Production will probably be held at this 
figure to supply birds for covers where the hunting- pressure is the heaviest, but 
primarily to supply a constant flow of choice seed stock into covers which are 
found best suited to the maintenance and natural propagation of game. 

V. r e feel that we can no longer entirely continue largely on what has been 
called a "put and take policy". Continued increase each year of production and 
liberation reaches the noint where costs are more than receipts to say nothing 
of the law of diminishing returns in the take of stock liberated. More attention 
must oe given to scientific management of our game covers which may be done by 
the experts in our Bureau of Wildlife and Research with cooperation from the 
Soil Conservation Service and members of the organized snorting clubs. 

Fish Hatcheries 



Production at the fish hatcheries for liberation of trout during the spring 
of 19^1 is proceeding at near maximum capacity. While the total number of fish 
produced may not greatly exceed the number roared in 19^0, the present policy of 
striving to produce a larger proportion of 9 inches and over is mooting with a 
reasonable degree of success. The total number of fish nine inches and over 
liberated in 1?50 was at an all-time high of approximately 120,000. Present 
indications are that '-his figure will have increased when time arrives for the 
195>1 stocking. 

With our present facilities for rearing fish operating at maximum capacity, 
we must look to new developments for increased production of fish. A material 
increase will come from an allotment of $0% of the production of the Federal 
Hatchery at Attleboro, which is now under construction. Also acquisition of the 
Podick Soring property, purchased this year with consent of Governor Dever and 
his Council, naves the way for the development of a new hatchery in Massachusetts. 
When constructed and in production, this now hatchery will materially increase 
the number of trout available for liberation in our ponds and streams. 

All our attention has not been devoted to the roaring of trout. Tn recent 
months progress has been made in applying recommendations of the Biological Survey 
for our ponds, based on previous years' investigations. Operations have been 
carried out by our r>ond management crews under supervision of the aquatic biologist, 
thus improving pond fishing by applying sound principles of pond management, a 
practice which has boon lacking in the past. This lack often resulted in stocking 
fish in waters already overpopulated with certain species that consumed food 
needed for the development of other more desired socci^s. 



5. 

The Board (continued) 

We believe that the Division of Fisheries and Game must be conducted on 
principles based on sound business management and operated according to the best 
knowledge we can obtain from scientific procedure. We have utmost confidence 
in members of the Division of Fisheries and Game. Our fish and game culturists 
have proven ability to produce excellent quality fish and game at a production 
cost which compares favorably with the best. The Bureau of Wildlife Research and 
Management consists of highly skilled technical men who are trained to investigate 
and assist in the solution of our various problems and who already have made 
commendable progress. Reports on the various projects are to be found elsewhere 
in this publication. Throughout the Division we have found personnel sincere, 
competent and cooperative. 

Since in many instances the Division can only give supervision and 
technical advice, much must be accomplished through cooperation of the sportsmen 
who are genuinely interested in conservation and sound field management. ' 

We wish to express our appreciation for the excellent cooperation we have 
received from the sportsmen, to whom we promise that we shall endeavor to repre- 
sent the best interests of all the sportsmen in every section of this State. 
Special consideration to any one section or group has no place in our program. 

For the Board, 
(signed) Frederick A. McLaughlin 
Secretary 
September 13, 19?0 




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BET/MUE SUMMARY 

1950 FISCAL YEAR 



LICENSES 



Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping $^5^6, S15 . 75 

Shiner (use of net) 1,U60.00 

Propagators' 2, bOO. 50 

Taxidermists 1 23O.OO 

Fur Buyers' 520.00 

Trap Registrations 929.25 

1 I I. Will i 1 |||| T 1 ^ — ... _ 

Total Licenses $562,555.50 

REHTS 

Chilmark Pond 

Property at Palmer, Ayer, Marshfield, 

Sunderland, Sutton, Wilhraham, Upton. 

Total Rents $2,678.00 

_. SALES 



Miscellaneous 2.66 

Consfiscated Goods 67. 80 

Fish, Game and Deer Tags IOU.10 

Total Sales $17^.56 

MISCELLA raUS. , 
Money held "by Barbara Boyd 

Total Miscellaneous $5.00 

.OTHER RECEIPTS 



Refund Prior Year Uo.85 

Pittman-Rohertson Fund 61,812.66 

Court Fines 12.6U8.75 



Total Other Receipts §7*1,502.26 

TOTAL RSVE1TUS, (Inland Fish and Game Fund) $639, 915- 32 

SURPLUS OF IELAHL FISH AH2 GAME FUND as of 

June 30, 1950 SS5U.lU3.i9 



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APPROPRIATIONS AID EXPENDITURES 0? THE DIVISION 0? FISHERIES AND GAME 
AND THE BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH AID 1UNAGEKENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR JULY 1 , I9U9 to JUNE 30, 1950 



APPROPRIATION 



TITLE 



3304-01 
330U-06 

330U-31 
330U-U3 

330^-51 

330U-53 



3304-42 

3304-48 

3304-49 
330^-50 
330U~^i4 

3304-55 
3304-56 



Personal Services and expenses 
Expenses of the Board 
Propagati on 
Information Program 
Protection of Wildlife 
Pittman-Robertson 

TOTALS 



SPECIALS 



Improvement & Management 
Lakes, Ponds and Rivers. 
Public Fishing Grounds 
Improvement of Game Farms 
Improvement of Fish Hatcheries 
Pond Fish Units 

Stream and Sird Cover Improvement 
Public Shooting Grounds 
Biological Stream Survey 



GRAND TOTAL 



APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


PLUS BALANCES 


INCLUDING 








LIABILITIES 


57, 


,511« 


,00 


51,867.91 


2, 


,500. 


,00 


1,120.06 


4lo, 


,107. 


,00 


351,308.86 


5, 


,000, 


,00 


4,294.28 


49,oi4, 


,00 


45,560.58 


132, 


,325. 


,00 


74,659.87 


$656, 


Ml' 


,00 


$528,811.56 


15, 


,000, 


,00 


14, 610.19 


10, 


,000, 


,00 


7,967.39 


m; 


,659. 


.5* 


33,341.20 


9b, 


,333. 


,38 


40,305.23 


25, 


,315- 


.09 


17,904.87 


11, 


,3^3- 


,87 


10,546.31 


20 


,437- 


,18 


14,834.70 


13, 


,S76. 


,00 


10,327.96 


$233, 


,970. 


.56 


$155,337.85 


$890, 


427. 


56 


$684,i49.4l 



11. 

FISH HATCHER ES 

The past year was an unusual one inasmuch as the summer was probably the 
warmest and driest in the history of the Division. The drought continued well into 
the late fall, and during the winter the lack of rainfall caused unfavorable condi- 
tions in most of our hatcheries. The water volume dronoed below normal causing 
not only higher water temperatures and lack of available oxygen during the summer 
months but the low water caused a low oxygen content during most of the wintpr 
months. To overcome these conditions, pumps had to be nut 'into operation for the 
first time at most of the stations. Also, a program of light feeding of the trout 
had to be resorted to in order to keep the fish in as healthy a condition as possi- 
ble and to avoid a disease problem that could have had a bearing on our sprinp 
distribution of this species of fish. " * 

However, by persistent care and a great deal of hard work and long hours put 
m by our culturists and their crews, it was possible to go through the year with- 
out reducing production. Much credit is due these men for their efforts in this 
respect. 

Further attention was given to bringing our hatcheries up to pre-war condi- 
tions and purchases of much needed equipment were made. Reports of this nhase of 
the work will be found under individual station reports. All buildings have been 
painted, and the stations in general are rapidly reaching their maximum nroduction 
with replacement work being carried out as fast as possible. 

Spring distribution of trout progressed on schedule. The addition of pumps 
on all distribution trucks not only enabled greater numbers and poundage of fish to 
be carried per load but also hastened the lib-ration program. Fish reached their 
destination in livelier condition. Tt is figured that these pumps will easily nay 
for themselves m less than one season's operation. Stocking was carried out as in 
previous years with the fine cooperation of conservation officers -and club members. 
The total distribution of legal size trout will be found in the chart and shows an 
increase of ten per cent over the all time high of last year and twelve oerc-nt on 
the 9" plus size, despite adverse conditions. 

"Get Togethers" of the fish culturists were continued and two were held 
during the year, one at the Sunderland Hatchery on August 19, 19h9 and one at *n« 
Sandwich Hatchery on June 2, 1950. Discussions of a general nature on various' 
subjects took place with an exchange of ideas among the culturists. 

" hn Chief Culturist made numerous trips to all stations and to the two oond- 
rish culture systems, and contacts were made with the nond management units on' 
various salvage operations. He also attended a two-day session' of the Ulnntic 
Fisheries Biologists' meeting at "'oods Hole on September 17 and 18. Daring the vear 
many trips were made to look over ponds together with attendance at fish and same 
club meetings. h 

nc • + ThG . n Cr:\° f fche two Snlvrv -'Q units were changed to Pondfish Management Units 
as it was felt that as their duties were now slso associated with the various 
phases of pond management work, along with the work of removing fish from various 
1 ponds, such a nnme would be more indicative of their activities. 

The pondfish management units with their crews trapped and distributed manv 
iisnirom various water supply systems. These fish were graded, weighed and counW 
and distributed for the most part to ponds previously surveyed and stocked on the ' 
recommendations as to soecies and poundage of fish per acre'. Scale samples of fish 
oi every desired species in each pond were taken, catalogued, and brought to the 
-nil Lips /ildlii : Taborato»y. Numerous fish of the larger siz -e tagged .nth 
metal tags and the number on each tag, the size in length and the nonds where the 
Ush were liberated have been recorded. 



12. 
Fish Hatcheries (continued) 

All sunfish and bluegills were either transferred to so- called "kid fishing 
ponds'' or destroyed if special ponds for then were not available. Suckers, eels 
and turtles were destroyed. The poundage on the fish destroyed totals 38111 lbs., 
divided as follows? bluegills and sunfish - 15>28 lbs.; carp - 320 lbs.; suckers - 
1903 lbs.; and eels - 90 lbs. 

Two badly needed boat trailers were purchased and two old outboard motors 
were traded in for new ones. Fyke nets and leaders were replaced and another pump 
and motor for use in distribution as a spare between the two units; new scales and 
thermometers were purchased. The addition of this new equipment has greatly aided 
the work of these units in making it easier and more efficient. 

During the winter months, about eighty private ponds throughout the State, 
for which the Division has signed agreements with the owners allowing public fish- 
ing and reasonable access thereto, were posted with signs stating that they were 
open to public fishing. 

The total distribution of pondfish for the year will be found in the chart 
and shows an increase over the previous year. 

EAST SlHDVflCH STA TS FI SH HATCHERY 

A considerable amount of reconstruction took place during the year. Three 
wells, in addition to the previous two, were driven to insure a more adequate water 
supply for the pump. The two pumps that were partially installed in the previous 
fiscal year were completed and connected up to the wells for use in the summer 
months. The pump house for these two new pumps was completed and electric wiring 
was extended to it. The electric system was changed over from 110V to 220V. 

Early last fall, work was started en three new cement pools l£ feet by 5>0 

feet in back of the Grange Hall to replace four old v/ooden pools 5 feet by 5>0 feet. 

These will be completed in the early part of the next fiscal year. Four 1 1/2" 
wells were driven in each of these pools. 

A garage and storage building 2k feet bv 26 feet was erected on the west 
side to house the truck, fish tanks, lumber and other equipment. 

A new fish tank was purchased together with a pump and motor and a ns 
sickle bar mower to round out the equipment. 

"OHTV^'E S?\TE FISH HATCHEHY 

The new three-car garage was given two coats of paint and the roadway lead- 
ing to the garage between the neat house and the bank was dug out wider and a st^ne 
wall was laid up the whole length. Stone dust was used for covering the area. 

A large distribution tank was added to the oresent equipment and this tank 
was completely fitted out with partitions and covers with a spare set for use 
during the icy months. This new tank made it possible to haul larger loads of fish 
and often more safely than the old system of using oxygen. 

\ three-quarter-ton pickup truck was purchased and proved to be Ideal for 
this station. A garden tractor with a heavy snow plow 11 nee w-^s pure d. Tt is 
also being used to plow out the paths around the ■ groun . 

Five rotted out wooden dams were replaced with concrete in the main stream 
at the lower part ^f the hatchery. 



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The throe new bass ponds started before the war and continued in the past 
fiscal year were completed and put into use. Po pairs to the dam of the rain supply 
pond which had reached a bad state were undertaken during the spring and completed 
in tine to carry on the trout program at the station. 

This job consisted of replacing the old drain pipe, building a new spillway 
box, resurfacing the main dam and building a new concrete apron. 

The culturist's residence, the two garages, the hatchery building and 
combination moat and refrigerator building, the two-tenement house and small 
storage building were all painted. 

A small pump and motor was purchased for use in distribution and a ^00 gallon 
centrifugal pump for uso in case of low water and to facilitate the ra^id filling 
of the bass ponds after bass distribution is completed and trout are brought in 
from other stations for wintering. An electric drill and a power cement mixer were 
also procured. 

Sl'TDVrrCH STATE FTS IT HATCHERY 

Seven wooden bulkheads were replaced in the rearing nools and one set of six 
concrete fry pools were ripped out and reconstructed as they had become unfit for 
use due to the many cracks and breaks in the walls. \ new concrete floor was laid 
in the storehouse, replacing one of wood which had caved in. Five new artesian 
wells were driven to supply the concrete fry pools. \ new gas driven portable pump 
for sterilizing pools and general pumping was purchased, also a new neat grinder. 
A set of conveyors and stand for unloading carload lots of meat, and a new 3 1/2 h.p. 
gas driven winch for use in driving wells were added to the equipment. A portable 
pump was installed for fish distribution. 

swid ehlamd state fts:; hatch ery 

A new concrete box was built for a freezing unit and when this box is 
insulated and the freezing unit installed, it will give additional capacity for a 
carload of meat. The foundation for a storage shed and tool shed 20 feet by 30 
feet was laid and the lumber and material for its completion purchased. T 
building will be erected by the regular labor at the station. It will give much 
needed spare for tools, fish tanks, and the pick-no truck, 

A, new supply pond ae the center section was built and is to be used in con- 
junction with the 500 gallon per minute pump purchased. This will be used only in 
case of extreme drought. A supply pond was built to help out the water supply at 
the further hatch house. The supply pond and the catch pond of the l<-op series 
were replaced with concrete. The six wooden dans in the loop series were also 
replaced with concrete. The three remaining wooden dans in the Clark . n were 
replaced with concrate. This work completes the Clark section and the Loop scrips. 
A new trough was built to replace? the rotted one along th ■ top at the Clark 
sactien. 

Approximately 2000 feet of lumber was cut from th( st .•'ion timber for 

general use nnd approximately 2000 foot was cut and ' roi Palmer Ihtchcry 

for building holding troughs. 1 K 00 feet of cement pipe *ch d for replace- 
ments . 

A new 3/U ton oick-up true 1 ,: was purchased. A snail tractor was purchased 
for plowing out snow, mowing nd for cl< mud from pnols and 

ponds . 



(Fish Hatcheries (continued) li*. 

SUTTOM STATE FISH HATCHERY 

The following paint projects were undertaken during the year:- the barn, 
camp, culturist's dwelling, and the meat house , two coats; and the sorting house, 
one coat. The driveway to the station was repaired and gravelled. Three pools 
below the dan were filled in with gravel. The head wall of the trout pond was 
replaced with concrete and the cement pool at the head of the pond was repaired 
with concrete. A badly needed freezing unit was installed in the ice box for 
carrying fish food more efficiently. 

HAROLD PARKER PT-ID SHfTEH 

A. new concrete holding pool was constructed at the outlet oi Field P^nd. 
A new road was built along the Field Pond dan to this holding pool. This project 
has saved many hours of labor during the removal oi fish from Field Pond. Brush 
was placed in all the ponds of this system to provide hotter spawning areas and 
protection for the young fish. Some roads were trimmed out and gravelled. 

CTJilLL PQhP SYSTS? 7 

The trap below Y.'clch Pond, was reconstructed with concrete. A new concrete 
tank was built inside the sorting house together with a new cement wall, and steps 
leading down into the building were repair;! with concrete. The inside of the 
building was rewired with floodlights. Below the sorting house, three new concrete 
holding and sorting pools were constructed. \t this time repairs aro in progress 
on the Town Farm dam, sluiceway and wall. During the spring months, for the first 
time, a program of fertilization of these ponds was inaugurated. It is expoctcd 
that this fertilization will produce greater poundage o£ fish per acre by increas- 
ing the growth of the young fish through a greater quantity of aquatic insects. 



Through a cooperative arrangement with the Fish and Wildlife Service of 
the United States Government, Department of the Interior, 15,000 brook trout, 
5,000 brown trout, and 12,000 rainbow trout were supplied to this Division by the 
Hartsville Hatchery, Hartsville, ''ass. for stocking Massachusetts waters. This 
Division supoliod the food and the federal government r n .sod the fish. 



0AJ.C5 FARMS 

The total nroduction of oho-sants and quail exceeded the all-time high 
figure of last year although according to the chart, liberation figures for 
pheasants are slightly less. This is due to an increase in the number of ph:osant 
br?orlers necess-.ry at the farms. \s the major part of the br resorvod were 

hens, the liberation of one'.: phonsants into the covers exceeded that of last year 
by approximately 1000. The loss of brood stock at one of the farms last year had 
a direct bearing on production figures for this year. Ml libera .'.'pre made 

as in the post, so that both pheasants and quail wore of proper size ir)d -. 
before the opening of the upland g^re season. 

Liberation of discardod brood stock in . r • r previous 

years. Many of these birds were liberated in tin; to nroducc a late hitch, and 
reports of resultant chicks have been {received. 

Two of the farms have corrv-d on further oxperi meets on the larg ctric 
incubator hatchers purchased last year. Th tits ^re better but not yet satis- 
factory. Another make oi' hatcher ' pur ;d this year and the results co-p^r^d 
so favorably with the small hatchers now in use th^t irl r ourchases ire 

mam 



Game Farms (continued) '' • 



The purchase of proper feed for game birds is still considered our greatest 
problem. Experiments with some commercial game bird feeds have produced consistently 

fine results. Experiments carried out with our own formulae mixed by commercial 
dealers have been inconsistent. 

New equipment such as dump trucks 3 large and small tractors, tractor equip- 
ment, cultivators, water pumps, and most essential at a quail farm, an automatic 
electric and oil burning portable steam sterilizer were purchased and proved to be 
of great value. 

Our greatest fear in quail raising is the dreaded so-called "Quail Disease" 
and in the oast an outbreak has meant the destruction of infected birds immediately. 
n ur worst outbreak in years was experienced at one of our quail farms this year, 
-and the exposed and affected birds were moved to remote sections of the farm. 
Experiments carried out under the supervision of the division biologist proved most 
encouraging and as a consequence many of the birds were saved. 

The six iveek old pheasant club rearing program is becoming more popular each 
year. Practically all clubs participating heretofore have continued and many have 
increased their pen rearing programs. Furnishing these birds to the clubs has had 
very slight effects on our game farm production as the game farms arc full to 
capacity, holding birds to the liberation age. 

Many fine pens have been built by the clubs and will be serviceable many 
years, while others could be improved upon. Every effort will be made to encourage 
clubs to build larger and more durable pans. Club members have see^ the value of 
adequate pen soace. : ,T any clubs have been permitted to hold oheasants until later 
in the fall or for spring liberation. It is honed that clubs will report the 
results of their field experiments, as much information can be garnered fro~ the 
observations by club members of these club liberations. 

White hare were ourchased from * T ev; Brunswick and delivered both by express 
and truck loads direct to conservation officers. Reports indic-nt^d that the hares 
were in excel 1 ent condition and in some cases the best ever liberated. 

The special appropriation ,;T mprovemer>t to Game Farms" greatly assisted an 
overall program for the improvement and expansion of our game farm facilities. All 
new construction, alterations, and replacements have been ma.de to eliminate crowded 
conditions thereby nroducing better birds for maximum liberation at minimum cost 
per bird. Exoa^sions for increased production were moderate although it is planned 
tn have all f^rms equipped and prepared for the requirements of future o^o grains. 
Buildings have been repaired and painted inside and out, grounds have been inprovd 
and water and electric lines have been replaced and extended ana put in safer and 
more sorviceab] i condition. 

Movable shelters for brooder and range oens were eplaced or constricted at 
all the farms from corrugated sheet aluminum considered to be very oc^normcnl be- 
cause of its durability and lightness. The add:'- tional shelters have proved t~> be 
of great value to the comfort and well being of the pheasants. y outside feed 
hoppers were constructed and others repaired. 

Two 7 1/2 kilowatt electric generators purchased las ■ ■>£ tailed 
at the farms raising quail for use during current breakdowns as \ ra and 

practically all incubators are electrically heated. 

KCER STATE GA "', E 



A new one-story all on the cu turist's res cemnleted. One re- 

serves as r coat room and laundry and the other an attr 
office. In automatic oil burning steam heater was installed and radiators placed 



Game Farms (c o ntinued) --$ • 

Ayer State Game Farm (continue d) 

in all the rooms; the .foundation was repaired and the west wall re-clapboarded to 
eliminate the loss of heat, A sixty foot section of the brooder house formerly 
used for quail was rased and the material salvaged. A remaining section 36 feet 
by ll; feet, a comparatively new building of standard frame construction, was moved 
back to form the nucleus of a new pheasant brooder house. Completed, this building 
is 106 feet by lU feet divided into 10 pheasant brooder pens fully equipped with 
oil burning colony brooder connected to outside storage tank. Automatic waterers, 
ventilators and electric lights were installed. Ten covered brooder house pens 
10 feet by 66 feet were constructed, and a drainage system installed to take care 
of the automatic waterers. This drainage system was also connected to roof gutters 
to carry any surplus water array from the brooder house pens. 

Seven pheasant holding pens built for wintering pheasants were oractically 
rebuilt. All wire was replaced with new material. A heavy gauge wire was used on 
the sides as a protection against dogs. These pens will be used for summer range 
pens. A ^0 foot extension was made to each of the 20 starting house yards. 
Completed, these covered pens are 10 feet by 70 feet each. During the height of 
the rearing season, the well serving as the source of water dried np and until the 
well could be dug deeper and walled up, water was carted by truck, 

hahsufiet.d state ga^ farm 

The brook running through the farm was thoroughly cleaned of refuse from 
the point of entry on the westerly side of the property to the outlet. The culvert 
under the driveway was extended and tile was laid for drainage from the port area 
to the brook, thereby helping to keep range pens dry. 

The addition to the storage shed, 20 feet by 30 feet, which was under 
construction at the beginning of the year, was correlated and is now used as a garage 
and work shop. A brick chimney was built, and the building was vdred for electricity, 
A gravel road to the building was constructed. The area at the southwesterly corner 
of the farm was graded and filled in, and a covered holding pen, 90 feet by 150 feet 
and divided into three sections, was constructed on this o.ron. 

A guard fence, aporoximately £00 feet leng, was buj.lt on the easterly side 
of the farm. A concrete building, 6 feet by 8 feet with a shed roof, was 
constructed next to the residence for housing the lighting plant. Considerable 
repairs were made to the quail brooder house pens, quail breeding pens, and 
pheasant broader house pens, 

SATT/IT: ST:?:i 0A:!Z FAIU: 

The quail holding r>c:n under construct? on at the beginning of the fiscal year 
has been completed. It is I5 feet by 30 feet with a holding capacity of u00 quail. 
Two covered pheasant holding Dens have been compl stely n placed and a new pen 
constructed, totaling approximately 2?, 000 square feet of area. An on^n pheasant 
range pen 270 feet square was constructed on e new area to be used for pheasants 
in conjunction with some pens constructed last y^^r. The interior of a pheasant 
brooder house was completely remodeled, and a hot water brooder sw L las replaced 
with oil burning colony brooders. This building is 6I4 feet by 15 fei t and is 
divided into eight brooder oens, A. building, 20 feet by 16 feet with concrete 
foundation and wooden construction, was or. is a feed house in the 

quail area. 



Game Farms (continued) 17. 

VJT I.BR.1HAM STATE CU^TS FARM 

The fencing of the land at the southerly side of the game farm which was 
started during the last fiscal year was completed. This is new land for game 
raising purposes and is an adequate range and growing area for handling all the 
pheasants reared at this station. The outer fence is over 1100 feet square 
covering approximately 2$ acres. It is composed of six open range pens and 
twelve covered range pens. The covered pens total approximately 68,000 square 
feet. On this summer range area, a building 20 feet by 30 feet, was erected for 
use as a feed and service building. Five new pheasant covered holding pens 30 feet 
by 100 feet were added to the present holding pen system. Forty-five covered 
breeding pens 12 feet by lii feet were constructed. As a result of a heavy wet 
snow storm in December, thirty-five breeding pens had to be repaired and new top 
stringers had to be replaced in the brooder house pens. 



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G-^'I D3ST R1BPT7QH FC£ Ti^ ZLMI! JULY 1. 19 A9 to J UNE 30. 1950 

(TMs table does not show stock transferred fron one game farm 
to another, nor c-oes it show additions to brood stock.) 



PRODUCT OF STATE GAM! FIRK3 



AY^R KA33KF.- 3 LP 

Adults: 563 54A 

6 week Rearing Program: 3,345 2,220 

12 week General Liberation: /,326 5 1 301 

TOTALS:- 9,239 3,565 

Of the above figures: 12 week old Liberation - 12,333 Henr, and 15,325 Cocks. 
6 week old Pheasants delivered to clixb oons (Sexes er!;inated)65"-5 Hens and 
6535 Cocks. 



SAKDWICH 


WHBRAHAM 


TOTAL 


563 


2^0 


1,915 


4,230 


2,375 


13,170 


10.293 


7 f 23S 


23,153 


15,036 


10,353 


43,243 



QUAIL 

IitRo r -I-j^LD SAl-ID',rrC!I TOTAL 

Adults: 270 322 592 

Young: 2,966 1*500 6,466 

TOTALS:- 3,236 3,322 7,053 

WHITE HARE 
Liberated between December 1/, 19/9 and February 26, 1950 1,999 



20. 

DISEASE F-T7ESTTGAT IONS 

The work of the disease laboratory was mainly directed toward the 
prevention and control of disease at the fish hatcheries and game farms. 

This year was one of the most critical ever experienced at the fish 
hatcheries because of the extreme drought. All stations were operating close 
to capacity and a slight drop in the usual volume of water had a very definite 
effect upon the health of the fish. During the early part of the drought a 
marked increase in the number of ecto-parasites was anted which made it necessary 
to treat the fish more often than usual. In the later stages of the drought the 
amount of dissolved oxygen present in the water became critical. Many methods were 
used to increase the oxygen content in order to keep the fish alive until rainfall 
restored the ground water supply. The stations were fortunate that lossos from a 
lack of oxygen were extremely small. 

During th? month of June when the Inject Pest Control Unit was spraying 
Plymouth County with D.D.T. by plane, an intensive survey of the ponds for evidence 
of any losses of fish due to poisoning was made. Mo losses of game fish were 
noted in which D.D.T. was the toxic agent. One loss of sunfish was found in a 
pond which was overcrowded with these species. 

Additional evidence has been collected Which points to epidemic condi- 
tions in certain oonds in the eastern part of the State. 

- Many cases of fish daad or dying were investigated and if the cause of 
death was due to pollution the Department of Public Health was notified. It was 
found in the majority of cases in which fish di^d in ponds that their death was 
most likely due te causas other than pollution. 

All eggs collected at the fish hatcheries ivcre disinfected shortly after 
fchey had been fertilised. 

The loss of trout fry which has occurred in many hatcheries in this area 
was extremely minor at our stations. The disease appears to be bacterial and the 
causative organism has so far been resistant to the Sulfa drugs. Preliminary 
work with Penicillin 0. was negative as was the attempts to culture it on 
artificial media. 

Mo new problems arose at the game farms and the year closed without 
any ma.ior outbreaks of disease. 



21. 
P UDIIC FISHING GROlklDS 

The first part of the fiscal year was spent in cleaning up the numerous 
odds and ends remaining on the Ipswich Paver leasing. An attempt was made to 
acquire more leased land in the North Reading section of the River, but it was not 
possible to get enough land to make it worth while. 

T/Tork was then started on leasing the Shawsheen River from Bedford through 
to Andover. The nature and character of the Shawsheen River is somewhat similar to 
the Ipswich River although it does not have quite as much meadow land. It is sub- 
jected to very heavy fishing pressure and has produced excellent trout fishing 
through the years. Its popularity as a summer resort area has made leasing very 
difficult in some sections. Large land developments for summer camping purposes 
have sprung up in some sections, especially in the towns of Billerica and Tewksbury. 
Since the river front lots in these developments do not have for the most part 
more than a fifty- foot frontage the work involved in looking up the owners and 
contacting them is too costly for the benefits derived from leasing them. Therefore 
it was decided to eliminate these areas from further consideration, while we 
realize that by eliminating those areas it will be impossible to acquire through 
lease a continuous stretch of the River, we nevertheless feel it is the wisest 
policy to follow. At the close of the year the leasing work on the Shawsheen was 
progressing in a very satisfactory mannc 



lv_'J. 



During the winter a booklet entitled, "Public Fishing Grounds Guide" was 
compiled. This booklet showed the location of the rivers on which land has been 
leased for public fishing grounds, together with a description of each stream. 
This booklet was printed and made available for public distribution. 

Early in March work was started in renewing all the posters along the 
public fishing grounds throughout the State. This was the first time in about 
fifteen years that a complete job of this kind hod been undertaken. In all, 27U 
posts and backers were erected. In addition, the area between the cement bridge 
in Charlemont and the state line on the Deorfield River was nested with the 
"Special Regulation 1 ' signs. During the month of April the seventy odd miles of 
leased waters were nested, giving fishermen a chance to know just what sections of 
each stream were under lease. It is hoped that eacl veer the posting on all these 
rivers can be checked over before the opening of the fishing season* 

Considerable time during the voir was spent in checking with the 
different Registries of Deeds in an attempt to keep up to date on the land title 
transfers affecting the public fishing grounds. If wo can keep up to date on 
these transfers, it will not be as difficult to renew the leases when the present 
lease period expires. 



23. 



GREAT PONDS STOCKED A '-ID CLOSED TO WINTER FISHING 



Irs accordance with regulations promulgated by the Director 
of Fisheries and Game, under authority of section Ik, Ch. 131, G.L., 
the oonds listed below are closed to winter fishing annually from 
November 1 through the following Anril Ik until the expiration date 
indicated. 1 penalty of twenty dollars is imposed for each violation, 



POND 



LOCATION 



EXPIRATION DATE 



Lake George .... 

halfway Pond 

Lead Mine P rid 

Mill Pond .... 

Morse ' s Pond 

Nippenicket ' s Pond . 

Quacumquasit Pond f South 

Lake Quinsigamond 

Spectacle Pond 
Turkey Hill Pond. 
Lake Wyola 



• If 'i 3, _1. 6 S * • • • • 

.Plymouth .... 
. Sturbridge . . . . 

Upton 

.Wellesley and Natick . 
. Bridgewater & Raynham 
Pond) Brookfield and 
Sturbridge 
Worcester & Shrewsbury 
Lancaster 
. Rutland & Pax ton 
Shut es bury 



April Ik, 


19^2 


April lk, 


1951 


April la, 


1050 


April Ik, 


1951 


April la, 


19^0 


April lit, 


1950 


April lk, 


1950 


April 111, 


1951 


April Ik, 


1950 


Aoril lk, 


1951 


A£ril lii, 


1052 



21. 
PIPORUATI^I-ED jCVriQ'] PROGRAM 

This was the first year that a direct appropriation was mac3e for educational 
purposes to the Division of Fisheries and Game. Consequent!;/, a great deal of 
thought and planning went into the initial period in order to get a really good 
information-education program underway. 

Probably the outstanding product to come out of this program during its first 
year has Veen the semi-monthly news bulletin "Massachusetts Wildlife". This 
rel°aso has grown to a total mailing list at present of 71h names with additional 
names being added frequently. Enough other extra conies are usually distributed 
to make the average distribution nor issue about 75>0 copies. Other products of 
this program during the past fiscal year have been three wildlife project booklets 
slanted toward sportsmen's clubs, outlining various field projects that such clubs 
can accomplish, seven special news releases to the press alone, two educational 
booklets purchased from another conservation agency ana released to Massachusetts 
sporting clubs, n conservation handbook also purchased outside and distributed 
to all members of the Division, and a color sound movie entitled"So You tfant : fore 
Ducks?" purchased outside the Division and made available for general showing to 
Bay state snorting clubs, schools and other interested organizations. In addition, 
Iho Information-Education office conducted Division displays, featuring typical 
Massachusetts wildlife, at the Topsfield Fair, Concord Sportsmen's Show, Eastern 
States Exposition, Boston Sportsmen's Show, Lawrence Sportsmen's Show and in the 
display window of one of the Boston banks. 

Photographic output with which this office was directly concerned consisted 
of coverage of the Junior Conservation Camp, prints of each boy attending the 
camp sent to home-town napers, and consultant services in connection with movie 
work undertaken by the wildlife photographer. A few particularly applicable prints 
on wildlife subjects wero released to interested napers, A. breakdown of coverage 
achieved on printed material follows: 

"Massachusetts Wildlife": Issues: 17 Total copiers: 12,7^0 

Distribution: Outdoor press, dept. heads and personnel in the field, 

sporting clubs, news services, and other papers, other States, 
conservation organisations, interested individuals, StateHouse. 



Special 'lews Releases 



issues 



Total £60. 



Distribution: Outdoor press only, plus news services and other papers. 



Pamphlets: 

Prepared by I&E office: ff\ Farmer-Sportsman Halations: 

"Whose Game Is It?" 



Distribution: 



300 clubs 
200-camp 
100-requ ests 
300-clubs 
200-camp 

10-requests 
lbs 
200-camp 

10-requests 
200- purchased 

30-r ■ pjests 
U00 purchased 

• 

150 purchased 

' ") olus Div. 

rsonnel. 
A series of recorded talks on wildlife management - 



#2"Turtle Trapping" 

#3 "More Ducks - How?" 

Purchased from other agencies: "Waterfowl ! -riant" 

"The Farmer ■'• Wildl Lf " 
"A Conserval ' ndbook" 



2<. 



BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT 






The Pureau of Wildlife Research and Management has experienced an 
outstanding year of progress. It has been able to not only expand its former 
functions and operations but also inaugurate many new and needed management 
programs. 

Four large scale management programs began operation during the year: 

1. The planting of lespedera shrubs for quail in the sootheastern section of 
the State. 

2. The live trapping and transplanting of rabbits from areas oosted against 
hunting into areas ooen to hunting by Sportsmen's Clubs, following the 
development of a new rabbit live trap by personnel of the Rabbit Project. 

3. The apnlicatinn by a newly formed Pond Management Crew of the recommenda- 
tions of the biological Survey in regard to the inland waters of the State. 

U. The establishment of an area in the Upton State Forest to be used for 

habitat improvement work for rabbits to demonstrate to the sportsmen what 
can be done in the form of environmental improvement to make land produce 
more game . 

Mr. Daniel Grice began work with the Pureau in September, 19l|9 and has 
spent most of his time making both films and sories of photographs of the work 
carried on by the Bureau. These films and pictures will soon be ready for 
showings to interested sportsmen's r and other conservation groups. 

A Bureau library was established at the Phillips V. r ildlife Laboratory and 
all books and publications of the Bureau incorporated in it, and an index file 
was set up. 

The Junior Sportsmen's Cons?rvati^n Camp in Monterey successfully completed 
its first season this year having enrolled a total of 81 boys. Plans were made 
for the next year which included an expansion of ail facilities so that the 
enrollment can be increased to 'jO boys per session or a total of 200 ^oys for the 
entire season. 

Construction of a fish screen and trap was started at the Otis Reservoir, 
a project for which the sportsman native to that area have agitated for over ten 
years. 

Considerable time was spent in arranging for the leasing of the U£00 acre 
Birch Hill flood control area from tho Army. The Bureau formulated plans for 
managing t^e area for fish and game and also the use of the area as public hunting 
grounds . 

\ creel census was set up at Long-sought-for Pond in Westford for trout, 
and the creel census at Cliff Pond in Brewster was continued. 

ft. winter waterfowl feeding program was started to prevent losses of 
wintering black ducks along the Massachusetts coast during severe critical wea' 
periods of short duration. 

The Pittsfield State Forest Wildlife Sanctuary and the Harvard Forest 
Wildlife Sanctuary' in Petersham were discontinued during the year as part of the 
program of abolishing those areas that seem to have little vilue as sanct at 
the present time. 



26, 
/QrisrsL! ' continued i 



The system inaugurated during the 1930' s requiring trapping permits to trap 
on Stat Q Forest la n ds was discontinued and trapping is now allowed during the 
regular trapping season by the general public. Traoping is still not allowed, 
however, on State Forest Wildlife Sanctuaries or on beaver flowages within State 
Forests. 

The snowshoe hare and cottontail rabbit populations continued high but 
there were some reports that, perhaps, the hare population had reached its high 
peak and smaller numbers could be expected in the next few years. The raccoon 
numbers still showed an increase and increased damage to agricultural croos and 
poultry were reported. Coon predation on wood duck nesting boxes increased 
tremendously in some areas. Foxes appeared to be gradually coming back after a 
very low population due to a mango epidemic east of the Connecticut River. The 
natural populations of ruffed grouse, pheasant, and quail were higher during the 
fall gunning season than for several years, primarily due to good nesting 
conditions in the spring of 19U9. The serin- of 19!?0 was, likewise, favorable for 
nesting and it is expected results ".Till be even better for 19h'0 fall gunning. 

Trout fishing conditions during the soring were better than we anticipated 
they would be last fall. The dry and warm summer of 19u9 together with a lack of 
rain and snow during the winter months led us to believe that to a certain extent 
the streams would not come back to their normal condition by the time the trout 
season opened. 

For the most cart, the streams did come heck to a point where good fishing 
still prevailed. 'While a number of the smaller sir- 'ins did not have the volume 
of water r.xoactcd, they nevertheless held an during the trout fishing s jason. 

Taking everything into consideration and with the fine reports received, 
we feel that the east season was successful as far as water and weather conditions 
were concerned in most earls of the State. 

Fishing conditions were effected somewhat by closing of bhc woods June 22, 
19k?, and consequently some consideration was :.*ivei to ext ndin th 1 -rout season 
after the woods were re-opened ^n Sept mber 23, !9k9. '' : "• actj .. is not taken, 
however, since an extended trout season would oose n additional firs hazard as 
well as place a serious strain on trout populations already adversely bed by 
low water conditions. 

CjTflTTT e ■ ' ,TT y T U~' r T^T^T 

r eyond the incidental routine luti s oi bl : Ltion, * ar was spent 
on three categories of waterfowl work.- population : budi s, 1 opment of a 
program of emergency winter foedin .. and the processing of t< n previously 

collected. 

Population studies included th : series of periodic fall (inter co 

which has been usual in recent years, and which forms bh \ . r rr : 

of current trends in numbers of ducks ■'s'l geese; i . '"• sur- 

vey of t'e numbers and distribution of win 4 : 

Plymouth region. This Droject was ^^-wrr rveys . r n iv- 

buryport-Ioswich, in th? *!orth and South Ri t 

outer Dnpe. rpi . r suits are covered in a short r n .- J r>n fil ion 

of ^ish and Game. 



Sta te Orni t hologist (continued) 

Prior to the beginning of the year a report was prepared on the heavy 
winter mortality of Black Ducks at Ipswich in 19U7-U8. This reoort was discussed 
at several, departmental conferences in the fall of 191$ and resulted in authoriza- 
tion for an experimental winter feeding program. Stations were operated at Orleans, 
Plymouth, North River, Nfewburyport, and late in the season at Essex. The early 
winter was very mild, but a period of sharp cold late in February caused new losses 
of ducks in the Parker River region. This mortality was investigated as thoroughly 
as time oormitted during the first three weeks of March. The general feeding 
program is described in a reoort on file with the Division, and the special mortal- 
ity problem in another report which is being prepared for limited public distri- 
bution. 

Processing of data collected in past years covered three important segments 
of the waterfowl investigation. Canada goose handings in the whole of Mew England 
were analyzed and put in shape for application to practical management. Black 
duck bandings at 'Jewburjgoort, both state and federal, were worked up into usable 
condition. Finally, all the data from the study of distribution and routine habits 
of wintering black ducks on Cape God were tabulated, and at the end of the year were 
being analyzed for written reoort. To complete the field work done before 19l|C, 
there remains only the preparation of a short reoort on certain aspects of black 
duck food-habits. 



CQTT^T\ T h RA T: DTT ^R^JgCT 

A cottontail rabbit trapping and transfer urogram was carried on last winter 
by the project. The program consists of trapping cottontail rabbits from land 
within the state where hunting is prohibited or where damage is being done and 
releasing in oo°n gunning covers. 

As an experiment, four sportsmen's clubs were asked t.o participate in the 
program. One man was selected hy each club and issued a trapping oormit by the 
Division. The numerous difficulties encountered in setting up the program were 
worked out through the cooperation of these soortsmen. Eighty-five wooden, two- 
door, internal mechanism box traps constructed at the Wildlife Laboratory were 
districted to the s oortsmen and the technician in charge sueolied trapping infor- 
mation. Eighty-three cottontail rabbits were trapoed, tagged and released in 
onon gunning covers. A new type of box trap designed by L he project leader is now 
in production at the lab. It is Plennod to include all clubs throughout the State 
that are interested in taking part in the trapping program this comine; winter. 
A 3°0 acre pi'ce of the Pratt Hill section of the Upton State Forest, Upton, bass, 
has been set up as a cottontail ra'.bit management area. Only 91 acr being 
considered this year. The purpose of the area is to demonstrate to sportsmen and 
sportsmen's clubs methods of improving their local covers and club grounds. 

Management work has progressed wel] this summer. Two food patches hav 

limed, fertilized and planted. A bulldozer has speeded or-crnt.i ons on fire br 

and proposed i'ood patches. Some selective thinning and slash cutting ■ ' to 

provide food and cover. 



FISHERIES INVESTIGATION AND MANAGEMENT 2b ' 



THE FISHERY OFFICE-LABORATORY. A primary need before initiating a fish 
management program in Massachusetts was the establishment of a combined office 
and laboratory at Upton. A section of the former C.C.C. camp shower building 
was selected and sheathed in. Installation of running water, heater, minimum 
office furniture, and a storage room provides a base for operations. A most 
important piece of equipment, yet available in relatively few states, was de- 
signed and installed at considerable saving in cooperation with a local instru- 
ment company and is nox^ in use. This is a special fish-scale reader without 
which the element of guess work cannot be eliminated from fish management, A 
large-scale operational vail map records the progress of management activities. 
A convenient gravel pit, having its own natural water supply, has been modi- 
fied into a controllable test pond at minor expense. This provides a sort of 
gigantic test tube for limited experimental x-rork required in an up-to-date 
application of modern fish management practices. It is another assurance that 
"guess-work" management is being eliminated; important facts have already re- 
sult ed . 



PUBLIC RELATIONS. Considerable time has been devoted to public re- 
lations work. This is essential. No substantial progress can be realized 
without a widespread understanding of our objectives. This has developed 
largely through: (l) a growing correspondence with clubs and individuals, (2) 
an increasing demand for advice on management of club properties, (?) frequent 
talks on fish management to clubs and leagues, and (4) the preparation of 
material for popular articles and periodic news re leases in cooperation with 
the Information-Education Leader. In addition, a particular effort is made 
to discuss the management program v r ith visiting newspapermen and sportsmen, 
wherever encountered . Orientation and coordination of activities with the 
conservation officers whose territories are directly affected by fisheries 
activities is a major objective. 

INVESTIGATIONS. 1. The Biol ogical Survey of Lak es and Fonds . Be- 
tween June 15 and September 1, 1949, 37 ponds and lakes in Essex and estern 
Middlesex Counties were studied. This was the continuation of vork begun in 
1942 to inventory fundamental chemical, physical and biolo-^icil data necessary 
for intelligent formulation of proper management plans for each body of water. 

r >r. Britton C. McCabe, Springfield College, was in charge of the survey. 
Assisting in the field were Frank Grice, Robert Huckins and VJilliam Sweeney, all 
wildlife Management students r-t the University of Massachusetts, and Malcolm 
Durward, Wildlife student at the University of Maine. Dr. A. H. Gustafson, 
Bowdoin College, was engaged to conduct a special study of aquatic vegetation 
(microscopic and macroscopic) encountered by the survey party. 

Preparation of past survey report data for Plymouth (1946), Berkshire 
(1947), and Barnstable (19^8) Counties was accelerated to permit distribution 
as soon as possible 

2. C reel Census . The inventory of fish yield was continued for the 
second year at Cliff Pond, Brex^ster. Certain refinements were instituted to 
achieve increased accuracy and increased utility of the data. Prior survey 
data has classed Cliff Pond (204 acres) as a good trout pond. A short-tem 



. . ,„,., ■ •• i<f 



"'! . J 



2?. 
Fi sheries Investigation and Management (continued) 

inventory was also established at Long Sought For Pond, West ford. Prior survey 
data has revealed a. very narrow stratum of trout water in mid -summer, thereby 
showing that Long Sought For Pond (95 acres) is a marginal trout pond. The cen- 
sus at this pond has a dual purpose, viz. 1) to provide a basis for comparison 
of good and marginal trout water in terms of trout production, and 2) to provide 
a basis for final determination of the somewhat controversial issue of Long Sought 
For Pond's ability to produce "carry over" trout. Results should aid greatly in 
interpretation of survey data gathered on other borderline or marginal trout waters. 

3. Ice Fishing. Considerable time was devoted last winter examining / 
the catches of ice fishermen on a number of lakes and ponds throughout the state. 

A high proportion (75%) of all chain pickerel dissected in the field were fe- 
males under 14 inches, all of which were preparing for their first spawning the 
following spring. Corroborative evidence was supplied by a number of slightly 
undersized chain pickerel (none of which were mature) made available for examin- 
ation through the cooperation of Conservation Of ficer vlbert Glenn. It appears 
likely that pickerel fishing might be rejuvenated and the necessity for closing 
ponds periodically to winter fishing (thus merely shifigfegadded pressure to other 
waters) obviated by raising the minimum legal length to"$14 inches and reducing 
the bag limit to 5 per day per angler. Corroborative evidence will be sought 
directly on this point during the 1950 pond survey. 

4. White Perch. Population studies initiated in connection with sal- 
vage activities combined with population data collected in past summers by the 
pond survey has emphasized the need for revision of legislation governing the 
harvest of white perch. Extensive and largely unharvested white perch popula- 
tions abound in many of our natural waters, a fact well known to many anglers 
in Massachusetts. Many of these populations are composed largely of stunted 
fishes. In one instance, for example (Cedar Meadow Pond, Leicester), 3 tons of 
white perch 4" to 7" in length (48,000) were removed. Population analysis re- 
vealed that about 8-1/2 tons (136,000) of white perch of the same size remained 
after netting. This represented an estimated white perch population of about 
87 pounds per acre prior to netting. The rate of removal by netting was about 
26^ and was not excessive. All evidence points to the need, long ago recog- 
nized for all other pan fishes, of removing the minimum legal length on white 
perch and increasing the bag limit to 20 pur day as now in force for other de- 
sirable pan fishes, 

5. Tagging . A pond fish tagging program was inaugurated in connection 
with spring-time salvage activities. Necessarily of small scope initially, 100 
game fish of legal size were tagged (bass and pickerel) and planted in public 
fishing waters. To date only two of these fish are known to have been caught. 
Although limited, this data is in accord with that from other states in indica- 
ting a low return on stocked pond fish. The tagging program will be greatly 
accelerated and widely advertised next spring, in order to determine extent of 
harvest of salvaged fish stocks in Massachusetts. 

6. Stocking. Another insight into the uneconomical aspects of pond 
fish stocking was gained in the experimental pond at Upton that was described 
in the first section above. Here, two successive plants of white perch were 



4 ■ ■■ ' 

i ; . ■' ■ 



30. 
Fisheries I n vestigation and Management (continued) 



followed in a relatively short time by mortalities of about 80% in each case. 
Since most white perch sank to the bottom upon dying such post-stocking mortal- 
ities might easily have escaped unnoticed by the angler on a larger, deeper pond. 
Survivors, however, spawned successfully, thereby proving the environment to be 
suitable and supporting the utility of pond fish stocking for purposes of: (a) 
establishing new populations, or, (b) replacing populations lost through catas- 
trophies. 

MANAGEMENT A CT I VIT IES . 

1. Agreement Ponds. Early last v/inter some time was spent posting 83 
ponds and reservoirs other than great ponds that have been opened to public 
fishing through successful negotiation between riparian ovmers and the Division 
of Fisheries and Game. Many of these have be<-.n open for many years but the 
general angling public has heretofore had no means of identifying the waters in- 
volved. A new sign stating "Fishing Permitted" has been designed. This sign is 
now posted at most of these ponds. The posting will be completed soon. Stocking 
pond fishes in such waters is very worthwhile since by that act, upon written 
agreement with the riparian owners, new fishing waters are nt.de available to the 
public. 

2. Otis Fish Trap . In accordance with long-standing local demand and 
pond, survey recommendations, construction of a permament concrete and steel fish 
trap was commenced on the outlet (Farmington River) to, and immediately below, 
East Otis Reservoir in Otis. Put for a shortage of steel, construction would 
have been virtually completed by the close of the fiscal year. It is now nearing 
completion. While the supposed merits of this installation are subject to doubt, 
it is believed that the long-range value of other possible uses not generally 
envisioned by its ardent supporters warrant the expenditure. 

3. Habitat Improvement . Twenty-five ponds were selected from those 
recommended for bass shelter improvement work to commence application of certain 
pond survey recommendations during the winter. Due consideration was given to 
the need for initiating this important work in each area so far surveyed. An 
unusually mild winter prevented entry to some ponds, particularly in the western 
part of the state. Despite this fact, and the necessity of devoting much time to 
the training of an inexperienced labor force, substantial progress was made; 1*3 
shelters had been placed in 24 ponds by the end of the year. The work will be 
continued in the summer and intensified next winter. Instruction of the labor 
force in the construction and placement of other typos of shelter installations — 
one type designed to aid pickerel populations under some circumstances and another 
type designed to increase the ease of harvesting the underfished black crappie 
(calico bass) in some ponds — is in progress. 

4. Bass Spawning Areas. The protection of bass spawning areas has been 
widely recommended on bass ponds by the lake and pond survey. The preliminary 
work of setting reference posts to demarcate and facilitate description of t ; 
areas, as required before actual posting, was commenced on the same p^nds 
selected for initial habitat improvement. In addition, a new simplified poster 



Fisheries Investigation and Management (continued) 

denoting the closure of "Bass Spawning Grounds", with a simple explanation there- 
of, was designed. The establishment of these areas will proceed as rapidly as 
time permits, giving due consideration to possible conflict with other water-use 
interests. The protection of a dozen or fifteen bass nests together with brush 
shelter installation will assure an adequate annual supply of young bass in each 
pond. 

5. Pan Fish P opulation Con trol. The first planned progress of control 
of overabundant pan fish in Massachusetts waters by netting was inaugurated at 
Cedar Meadow Pond, Leicester, in May. The action was described above under the 
section on INVESTIGATIONS. Results will be apparent through increased rate of 
growth of white perch and larger ultimate size available to the angler. Similar 
population control is badly needed in many waters throughout the state. It promises 
much by the way of direct improvement of the fish stocks available to the angler. 
This activity should supplant a large measure of the former purely salvage nettings. 
Most fishes available for transplanting to public waters from private waters never 
reach the creel because of increased mortality due to overcrowding waters already 
at full productive capacity. ■ It is extremely doubtful whether any substantial 
harvest of fishes present in reservoirs closed to public fishing can ever be 
realized by the angler except as these waters may become opened to fishing. This 
of course will occur only as anglers demonstrate sufficient responsibility first in 
the prevention of undesirable contamination of public waters with trash and refuse. 

Efforts at control of underfished pan fish populations through encourage- 
ment of increased angling have also been undertaken. Eyke nets set in Jordan Pond, 
Shrewsbury (21A), for example, captured more than a ton of white perch between 8 
and 13 inches long. Considerable publicity was accorded this demonstration in an 
effort to increase the white perch harvest. It is obvious that additional white 
perch stocking here would have been very harmful, yet prior to the demonstration 
this had been demanded on the grounds that the white perch were "fished out". 

It is apparent, despite possible increased angling pressure for pan fish 
due to educational publicity, that pan fish population control by netting is a 
pressing management need in many ponds and lakes throughout the Commonwealth. 



32. 



PONDS SURVEYED IN ESSEX AND EAST MIDDLESEX COUNTIES - 1949 



Lake -Att it ash, Amesbury 

Bailey Pond, Amesbury 

Baldpate Pond, Boxford 

Beck Pond, Hamilton 

Browns Pond, Peabody 

Chebaco Lake, Hamilton and Essex 

Coy Pond, Wenham 

Flax Fond, Lynn 

Forest Lake, Methuen 

Fosters Pond, Andover & Wilmington 

Four Mile Pond, Boxford 

Fry Pond, Andover 

Lake Gardner, Amesbury 

Hood Pond, Ipswich 



Lower Pond, Saugus 

Mystic Lake, Methuen 

Niles lone"., Gloucester 

Pentucket Lake, Georgetown 

Peters Pond, Dracut 

Pleasant Pond, Wenham and Hamilton 

Rock Pond, Georgetown 

Lake Saltonstall, Haverhill 

Sluice Pond, Boxford 

Spof fords Pond, Boxford 

Stevens Pond, Boxford 

Stiles Pond, Boxford 

Tuxbury Fond, Amesbury 

Upper Pond, Saxagus 



PONDS WITH BRUSH SHELTERS INSTALLED 
THROUGH June 30, 1950 



Alum Pond, Sturbridge 

Baddacook Pond, Groton 

Bloody Pond, Plymouth 

Dorothy Pond, Millbury 

Fort Pond, Lancaster 

Fort Pond, Littleton 

Great Pond, Wellfleet 

Great Island Pond, (Island Pond) 

Hampton Fond, Westfield 

Lawrence Pond, Sandid.cn 

Yokum Pond 



Plym 



Long Fond, Brewster 
Mary's Pond, Rochester 
Mascopic Lake, Dracut 
Oldham Pond, Pembroke 
Sandy Pond, Plymouth 
Sampson Fond, Carver 
Seymout Fond, Brewster 
Snow's Pond, Rochester 
Stetson Fond, Pembroke 
Jhite Island Pond, V/areham 
Becket 



33. 



PHOTOGRAFH VJORK 



Mr. Daniel Grice on September 6, 1949 was assigned the duties of taking 
photographs and movies for all the programs within the Bureau. This fulfilled a 
phase of , work long needed for the provision of black and white photos of various 
investigative and development programs. It also made possible the taking of 
colored slides and movies of all activities for information and education purposes - 
primarily for the use of sportsmen's organizations. 

Work was immediately started on the construction of a darkroom and within 
two weeks it was receiving heavy usage. 

The cameras and equipment belonging to various other projects were pooled 
and other necessary photographic equipment was purchases as funds became available 
until a fairly adequately equipped darkroom and photo-laboratory was producing black 
and white pictures for newspapers, colored slides for lecturing purposes, and l6mm. 
movies. Many photographs were taken for research studies and will also prove value- 
able for passing on information to the sportsmen of the state. 

At present there is one major film in production, the story of the wood 
duck in Massachusetts. This film v/hen completed will be approximately 1200 feet in 
length and in full color. It will present a complete picture of the status of the 
wood duck in this state - its decline in past years; investigative studies carried 
on; and the effects of a wide scale management program by the Bureau in which 
sportsmen's clubs have given very valuable assistance. This film will be an out- 
standing example of how the a tate through its research and management programs and 
the organized sportsman's clubs through their continuation of those management 
practices on a state-wide scale can, by combining their effors, aid a wildlife 
species in its struggle for survival in our highly populated state. 

Black and white, color slides, and movie film filing systems, also set up 
by the photographer, make all material available for use. All projects have made 
use of the movies and slides in their lectures to sportsmen's clubs throughout the 
state. 

It is felt that the photographs and movies are filling a great need in the 
Division and are being enthusiastically received by the sportsmen. 



J>U. 



GENERAL MIDLIFE PROJECT 



The work of this project has varied considerably in the past year. 
However, the important phases of the work were the grouse wins; and tail study, 
the wildlife shrub nursery and the turtle trapping program. 

Some time was spent in assisting the various Pittman-Robertson projects 
and the state rabbit project. The summer and fall survey ci nsus of grouse broods 
took considerable time but was important to a lesser degree. 

Grouse Fall Population Study: 

This study was carried on for the third consecutive year and will be 
conducted over a period of years. The results of this phase of the project will 
aid in setting a more sound season and contribute valuable information to the 
cyclic phases of Massachusetts grouse. 

Sex and age ratios gleaned from the wings and tails of the birds shot 
during open season shew: 

1. The composition of the fall population. 

2. The success of the previous breeding season. 

3. The success of brood survival and hence juvenile mortality. 

A. An indication of good grouse cover throughout the state through a 
study of density and distribution of the kill. 

The primary objective of this phase of the work was to obtain a clear 
picture of the sex and age composition of the Massachusetts grouse population. 
The past years results were encouraging because of the favorable change shown. 

The juvenile/adult ratio increase from 0.8:1 in 1948 to 1.05:1 in 19A9 
indicates the adult population was more than replaced and hence the following 
spring probably had a greater breeding population. 

Wildlife Shrub Nursery : 

This is the first year that the shrub growing duties have been assigned 

to a project as such. An agreement with the Worcester State Hospital allowed 

Personnel to start and partially maintain a small nursery of multiflora rrse and 
lespedeza on the hospital's grounds. 

The results of this work are promising to the extent that there has been 
a source of lespedeza seed made available from mother st.ck on the nursery and also 
approximately 100,000 multiflora rose plants for the coming spring shrub planting 

program. 

Turtle Trapping Program: 

This work has been active since April, 1950. The purpose was to show 
Massachusetts sportsmen a way in which they could improve their sport. Emphasis 
was put on the Dredacious character of the snapping turtle towards waterfowl in 



35. 

GENERAL MIDLIFE PROJECT (continued) 



the bird's breeding grounds. Because the trapping season was not over at the end 
of the fiscal year the results are not available at this time. 



with: 



Other duties of the personnel of this project included cooperative work 



1. The B.B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory at Bar Harbor, Maine, in the 
form of a small mammal trap line for the purpose of contributing to 
a North American small mammal census. 



2. The Fish and Wildlife Service, by conducting a roadside dove count, 
once a week, 

3. The New England Bird Dog Field Trial Association, being started on 
the Harold Parker State Forest in connection with creation of a 
future field trial area, 

4. The State Division of Forestry, to the extent of testing porcupine- 
repellents with good success at the Granville-Tolland State Forest. 

The personnel of this project spent some time talking to organizations 
on four occasions. It is h'ped that this phase can be enlarged and more work of 
this type can be done in conjunction with the project. 



POTMAN-ROBERTSON (Federal Aid) 

During the past year thirteen projects have been operated under the Federal 
Aid to vr ildlifc Act, commonly called the Pittman-Robertson Bill, Under this Act 
the State is reimbursed by the federal government for 75* of the costs of research 
and development oro.iocts, the monies deriving from a tax on arms and ammunition. 

When the Federal Aid program first started most of the monies available to 
the States were spent on investigation projects. These orojects were set up to 
study various game birds and animals so that wise management plans could be 
determined for each species. As these orojects have been brought to completion 
they have been followed by development projects aimed at carrying out their 
recommendations. During the past fiscal year h%% of the money spent was on d evel- 
opment projects and it is expected that this percentage will increase each year. 

Development work, particularly for waterfowl, has boon handicapped during 
the oast year because of the lack of a law which will allow the Eureau ^o purchase 
the necessary marsh land. The erection of water control structures, with Federal 
Aid money, on land not under the control of the Bureau is prohibited, ".'e have not, 
therefore, been able to develop suitable marshes. It is hop.-. a law allowing 
the Bureau to acquire land for management purposes will be passed in the near 
future . 

The reports of the individual projects follow. 



WOOD DUCK RESEARCH. PROJECT 3 °* 

The Wood Duck Nesting Box program with its large scale erection of nesting 
boxes has brought many problems to light which require answers if the program is 
to continue at maximum efficiency. The Wood duck research project was instigated 
in May to supply these answers. Previously, a lesser amount of research has been 
carried on by the waterfowl survey. 

Some of the phases being studied are: 

A» The relationship of nesting boxes to natural nesting cavities. 
Bi The interrelationship of wood duck nesting Within an area-i»e. 

1» Maximum nesting density 

2.i Multiple usage of boxes by wood duck 

3* Habitat requirements, etc* 

C. Nesting success and actual production of duckling each year* 

D. Prevention of predation. 

E. Checking the efficiency of surplus boxes distributed free to sporting 
clubs and general public. 

WATERFOWL SURVEY 

The waterfowl survey during the past fiscal year has been relieved of 
supervision of the: 1. Experimental Marsh Management-Blasting Project ; :\ food Duck 
Nesting Box Program; 3. Water Chestnut Control Program; 4. and preliminary lands 
acquisition work. This will enable the project tc bring its present work to a 
conclusion at an earlier date. Exclusive of the previously mentioned projects, 
which were supervised until about October 1949, the main topics studied have been: 

1. Sex and age ratios in hunter kill of waterfowl and banded waterfowl 
to better determine the mechanisms of migration and wintering birds 
and to be in a position to more wisely harvest surpluses. 

2. Winter mortality of black ducks in cooperation with the state 
ornithologist . 

In addition to other miscellaneous research the survey has been tabulating 
and writing up data accumulated in the past, 

WATER CHESTNUT 

Water Chestnut (Trapa natans) is an obnoxious aquatic plant which has been 
introduced from Europe into several places in the United States. It is now known 
to be found in the Potomac River at Washington, D.C.; the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers 
in New York; and, in Massachusetts in the Sudbury and Concord Rivers; Little Spy 
Pond, Belmont; and Upper Pond, Holyoke. 

This plant is an aquatic annual which spreads very rapidly and unless it is 
controlled, Massachusetts will rapidly lose more and more of its already restricted 
areas for public fishing, boating, swimming, and watcrfowling. 

Some of the unfavorable effects of the plant result from the nature of its 
Sense growth which: makes boating next to impossible; prohibiting swimming; renders 
fishing non-c-xistant; impedes the flow of the stream so as to promote silting, 
stagnation and breeding of mosnuitoes; and suppresses valuable food plants for 
waterfowl and other wildlife. 

Experimental control was inaugurated by Pittman-Robertscn project PR-4R 
during the spring and summer of 1947. Suitable control methods developed were: 



".■'V,' i. 



J..." V'.- H 



:.;"■■ i ••" 



37 
WA TER CHESTNUT (continued) * 

spraying of dense beds i^ith a mixture of 2/4/D and diesel oil and hand pulling 
scattered plants. Beginning during the summer of 1948 large scale control was 
started and this has continued each year to date. The total area in dense beds 
within the state has been reduced from about 70 acres to 5 at the end of this fis- 
cal year. There remains however, mile after mile of streams in which scattered 
plants occur. These will have to be pulled by hand before effective control can be 
achieved. 

MARSH BLASTING 

Many of our marsh lands are too dry during certain portions of the year to 
support any numbers of waterfowl and furbearers. This project is aiding wildlife 
by blasting pot holes and ditches in semi-dry marshes and measuring the effects. 
The findings of this project will enable us to better manage our marshes and to 
advise others on managing private marshes. 

The actual blasting to date has been confined to 3400 ft. of ditches ten 
feet or wider at Great Meadows, a Federal Refuge in Concord. The cost of this 
blasting as a management tool, was about $.23 / ft. 

It is planned to extend this project to further test the efficiency of 
blasting as a management tool under varying conditions. 

FARM-GAME RESTOR ATION 

The cooperative program with the Soil Conservation Service was continued 
during the past year. The planting schedule was expanded to include Norfolk, 
Middlesex, Essex, Bristol and Nantucket counties as well as Worcester, Plymouth, 
Barnstable, and Dukes. An attempt will be made to include the whole state in the 
coming year. 

Approximately 2,000,000 shrubs were planted. The work included 37.4 miles 
of multiflora rose, 2.2 miles of tatarian honeysuckle, 1.7 miles of silk cornel, 
3.2 miles of coralberry, .5 miles of highbush cranberry and .5 miles of lespedeza 
bicolor. Several sportsmen's clubs planted shrubs on their club grounds and two 
assisted in planting farms in their towns. The interest of the sportsmen, in this 
project is rapidly increasing. This work makes an especially good club project 
because it has a two-fold result; mere food and protection is supplied to wildlife. 
Also, the goodwill of farmers nay be obtained since the plantings are a part of 
soil conservation plans on farm land. 

Corn, buckwheat and soybeans were planted on areas in Ludlow and West Bridge- 
water. Four row shrub borders were also plrnted on these areas as well as in 
Lincoln, Belchertown, and Holliston. The experimental management program at West- 
over Field was continued with plantings similar to those mentioned. In addition, 
all birds released at Westover, as a part of the cooperative six week old program, 
were banded. Returns from these released birds were recorded by personnel at the 
Base during their controlled hunting season. This project at '/est >ver is supply- 
ing a testing ground for management practices under controlled conditions* Thr 
refuges previously established throughout the state have been maintained and will 
be continued, 

FA RK-G AM E INVEST IGAT I CNS 

All phases of the farm game investigation project were terminated at the 
end of this year. During the 1950 fiscal year, the w- rk included: 1. Final report- 



FARM-GAME INVESTIGATIONS (continued) 38. 

Experimental Field Release Pens; 2. Final Report - The Toxicity of Salt in the 
Diet of the Ring-necked Pheasant; 3. Final Report - Pheasant Cover Survey of Dukes 
and Nantucket Counties; 4. Determination of a method to keep pheasant cover survey 
up to date; 5. Observation of experimental shrub plantings, 6. A printed bulletin 
on the pheasant in Massachusetts is being prepared. The pheasant stocking program 
is now based on results of pheasant cover surveys. 

The project continued observations on experimental shrub plantings made in 
1947 and 1948 on five areas located throughout the state. This is a cooperative 
effort with the Soil Conservation Service. The purpose is to test the suitability 
of certain shrubs for use on farms as wildlife plantings. The shrubs are rated not 
only on their ability to grow under varying conditions but on how much fruit and 
seed they produce which is suitable for wildlife. Information from this state will 
be incorporated with that of others in the northeast. 

The bulletin on the pheasant in Massachusetts will be a summary of work 
done and recommendations for the future. It is written in non-technical language 
so that it will be more acceptable to the average reader. Notice will be given 
when the bulletin has been printed and is available, 

BEAVER MANAGEMENT 

The project continued the trapping and transplanting program \\ r hich was 
started in 1948. The objects included (l) the transfer of beaver from nuisance 
areas to more suitable habitat; (2) investigation to determine the success of 
former transplants, (3) determine the present beaver population. 

During 1948, 37 beavers were trapped. The- total for 1948 and 1949 was 57. 

Trapping sites were supplied by conservation officers and landowners. Beavers 

were released mostly on state forest land. All beavers were measured and ear 

tagged before release. The majority were trapped in the western part of the state 
although one was taken as far east as Vestford. 

During 1948 and 1949, beavers were liberated at 19 different locations. 
The percent of success for these releases is high. Colonies were established at 
16 of the 19 locations. Due to these transplants, about 40$ of the colonies are 
now located in the most suitable beaver range. The big factor in determining good 
range, besides meeting the actual living needs, is the lack of human population 
with which the beavers can interfere. 

A census taken in 1948 showed an estimated population of 300 beavers living 
in about sixty colonies. The 1950 census revealed about 86 colonies and an esti- 
mated population of 430. 

This work should be continued so that some type of open season can be 
established and a financial return be obtained from this valuable furbearer, 

GAME KILL DATA INVESTIGATION 

The two main objectives of this project were tc tabulate the game kill of 
the 1948 fiscal year and to investigate our present method of obtaining a kill 
• report . 

In the past, the tabulation of kill was the duty of a clerk in the Boston 
office. This year it was decided that it should be part of the investigations 
made in the Bureau of :r ildlife Research and Management. This change was dur. 



:.i I- 



rrr 



».?*• iifi 



I 



<• ' ri: ■ 



i ■ 



GAI*E KI L L DATA IN^STIQkTION (c.ntinue d) 



39. 



largely to the fact that the many research projects of the Bureau refer to the 
kill report frequently for information other than the actual kill. Such items as 
the geographic location of the kill, the hunter-success ratio and the names of 
most successful hunters of certain species are all important in carrying cut re- 
search projects. If this information is taken at one time, when the kill is re- 
corded, it saves going through the kill reports at later dates. The person 
responsible for the kill report will from n--w on obtain a list of what information 
is desired by the projects before going ahead with the work and thus efficiency of 
the research program will be improved. 

When the hunter renews his license, he is required by law to report his 
success of the previous year on specially prepared forms. An investigaticn of the 
number of kill reports made for 1948 as compared with the licenses sold in 1949 
was very revealing. In 1949, there were a total of 138,613 licenses sold. Only 
66,535 kill reports were received. Approximately half the hunters did not make a 
report. It is true that a certain per cent would be buying a license for the first 
time, but that number would be relatively small. In addition the kill figure is : 
not known until more than year after it is made. It is obvious that some more 
accurate means of obtaining total kill figures must be worked out. 

STATISTICS OF GALE AND FUR FEARING ANIMALS TAKEN 

The numbers of game killed in the calendar year of 1948 as shown by tabula- 
ting the game report forms (the form which the hunter fills out upon receiving a 
new license) are as follows: 

Cros 21,678 Kuskrat 28,621 

Woodchucks 9,918 Mink 683 

Fresh-water Coots A, 112 Skunk 596 

All Ducks 18,647 Red Fox 2,008 

G-ese 379 Grey Fox 501 

Woodcock 3,773 Raccoon 2,652 

Quail 2,137 Weasel 260 

Grouse 8,522 Otter 65 

Pheasant 21,459 Bobcat 280 

Rabbits 77,608 Opposum 44 

Hare 12,666 

Grey Squirrels 26; 89$ 

Total head of game taken 207,798 Total pelts taken 35,710 

DEER KILL 3Y COUnTIES 

The total deer kill for 1949 was 47374 which is the highest ever recorded 
by the Division. This is accounted for by the fact that the deer herd has been in- 
creasing plus the ideal hunting conditions found during the one week season. Of 
the 4,374 deer killed 2,401 were bucks and 1,973 does. Dukes County was opened to 
deer hunting for the first time in 1949. fhe number ties f 



Barnstable 


269 


Hampshire 


/*22 


Berkshire 


983 


' j dies ex 


211 


Bristol 


83 


tucket 


85 


Dxikes 


95 


rfolk 


30 


Essex 


86 


uth 


115 


Franklin 


842 


•c sti r 


737 


Hampden 


36« 


No C ^ur.ty stated 


ir 



DEER INVESTIGATIONS liO. 



Preliminary studies of the whitetailed deer (Pittman-Robertson Project 7R) 
were continued throughout the past fiscal year, and much useful information 
applicable to a good deer management policy was assembled. Most of this informa- 
tion, as was the case last year, came from data collected at the deer checking 
stations. 

The checking station program was expanded in 1949. Hunter cooperation was 
excellent as 18 stations processed 1200 deer, which amounted to 27.4 percent of 
the total kill (4374). The most important data obtained was the age composition 
of the herd because it was used to determing the average annual removal of deer 
from all causes. The aggregate annual reduction throughout all the age classes 
was in the vicinity of 40 percent. This meant that over the past several years 
about 40 percent of the deer herd in the state had been removed each year from 
all causes, the principle cause, of course, being the legal kill, Summarized 
below are the number of deer checked in each age class. 

Age Number checked 



5-7 mos . 


292 


4 yrs . 

2| " 


284 


206 


3 | » 


147 


4| 


66 


5| 


33 


6l " 


14 


7* » 


10 


al-9i " 


6 


10^ " & over 


3 



The degree of replacement with fawns during the spring of 1950 was predic- 
ted from a study of female reproductive tracts furnished by cooperative hunters 
who stopped at the stations and by Conservation Officers who shipped accident- 
ally-killed deer to the Laboratory in Upton. It was found that better than half 
the fawns had bred their first year (6 to 8 months old) and produced one fawn. 
Ninety five percent of all yearlings or older were bred with an average fawn 
production of just under two (1.85).. All breeding showed an increase over the 
previous season which was considered a very healthy condition. In spite of a 
heavy kill during the 1949 season, it appears that high fawn replacement will 
make deer available for the 1950 season in sufficient numbers to permit a 
sizeable kill - probably in excess of 3,000 animals. The actual kill, of course, 
will depend largely on weather conditions during the hunting season. 

A complete summary of the checking station work, including information on 
weights, measurements, ages, antlers and reproduction, is available in mimeo- 
graphed form at the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory in Upton. 

Efforts were made during the past year to help make effective a special 
license for hunting deer in Massachusetts. A questionnaire survey of oth r 
states revealed that three out of every four deer-hunting states require a 
special deer license or? h-\a game license including deer. Such a license: in 
this state, including a self-locking metal tag to be put on the deer immediately 
after the kill, would be an aid to law enforcement, and from the management 
standpoint the license would furnish necessary information on the amount and 
districution of the hunting pressure, which is necessary for a sound deer manage- 
ment program. 



'i 

: 



'/.:'. •: 



DSSR INVESTIGATIONS (continued) Iil# 

The deer study is now in its third and final year of operation as a full- 
time project. The checking station phase of the work, however, should be carried 
on by the State in future years. Other phases of the study, too numerous to be 
mentioned in a report of this kind, will be included in a final report giving a 
summary of all important information collected over the three year period. This 
report will be prepared in printed form and made available to anyone interested in 
the work. The publication should be ready for distribution during the fall of 1951. 

QUAIL DEVELOP ! PvivT 

A new project designed to stabilize and. possibly increase the quail popula- 
tion in the southeastern counties of the State was initiated during the 1949 fiscal 
year. The principal work of the Project was the large-scale planting of Lespedeza 
seedlings. In a year or two these will grow into five to eight foot shrubs bearing 
seed pods which serve as excellent winter food for quail. Similar plantings- in 
the southeastern states , mostly as field borders, have been used heavily by quail. 

All plantings for the first year were confined t% Plymouth, Barnstable and 
Dukes Counties because relatively mild winters there permit better survival of the 
plants. This also is where the bulk Of the quail population is located. Approxi- 
mately 45,000 Lespedeza seedlings were planted during the month of April. Born- 
stable County received about 20,000, and Plymouth and Dukes Counties 12,500 each. 
Four seed beds of the same species also were planted. All stocks was supplied by 
the Soil Conservation Service and all plantings were made on frrms recommended by 
that Service. Twenty three different landowners benefited from the operations. 

A variety of sites were chosen for the plants, as follows: 10 field 
borders, 4 fields with scattered patches, 4 abandoned gravel pits, 3 banks adja- 
cent to farm ponds, 1 old tennis court, 1 irrigation ditch, and 1 entire 1^-acre 
field. If Lespedeza become established at all these sites, there will be an aggre- 
gate of about 252,000 square feet of patches. The quail project will continue for 
a minimum of three years, 

: '•' : nc: :Liz;i! ■..;;" stl-py of th-. native; epp.-b ov.rers 

This project was initiated on October I, 194 V for a three year period. The 
primary objectives are the development of proper management techniques for the 
perpetuation of trapping within the state and the recommendation of biologically 
and economically soma"- trapping seasons. 

An effort has been made to determine the value, in a monetary sense, of 
the fur animals taken within the Commonwealth, Present information shows the raw 
fur harvest during the 1949-1950 trapping season am< unted to well in excess of two 

hundred thousand dollars. 

Considerable contact work has been mode with trappers and fur buyers alike 
during the part of the fiscal year this pr J ct has been in operation. It has 
been found conclusively that both groups favor a fall openii y f r the trapping 
season. It is also evident that the majority of the furs are trapped within 
month period from the opening date. Information has b< i thered n such thing 
as: average prices paid to the trooper per pelt by the fur buyer j nt of furs 
purchased from farmers or farm boys; practical open tr seasons, when t 
nammals are at their best as regard to primeness, color and toxtur-.; time spent n 
the trap line by the trapper; and what opening -bate for the trarvin- season is 
preferred by the majority of the people interested in the taking r f fur. 



hi. 
PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE NATIVE FU R-BEARERS (contin ued) 

Data was collected during the fall of 1949 on muskrat pelt primeness. This 
work was carried on in cooperation with University of Massachusetts Cooperative 
Wildlife Research Unit personnel. The information shews that muskrat in the four 
i/estern counties are prime earlier than in the eastern counties. This, however, is 
one season's work; more data is necessary before it can bo considered as fact. 

An effort was made to develop a method of estimating population trends of 
mink and otter by sign count. Since most of the water courses in the state are 
crossed by roads it was felt that here was an opportunity to cover a considerable 
portion of the state in a relatively short time. 

A muskrat census was also undertaken during the fall cf 1949. Several 
areas were chosen throughout the state f ;r periodic checks of muskrat activity. It 
was found that this type survey was time consuming and that the results obtained on 
so few areas might not apply to the state as a whole, It is tentavely planned to 
use a heliocopter in the coming year for this type of census since more areas would 
then be exposed to the study. 

The beaver live trapping and transplanting program was assigned to this 
project in the spring of 1950. Flans are to determine the feasibility of trans- 
planting beaver into potential flowage areas as a means of creating additional fur 
bearer habitat and the subsequent recapture of the beaver thereby using the inher- 
ent dam-building ability of the beaver as an important habitat rest ration tool. 
As of June 30, 1950 a total of 13 beaver have been lived trapped by personnel of 
this project. Six beaver have been released into potential flowage areas. The 
results of their activities will n"t be known until the fall of 1950. 

WOOD DUCK NESTING BOX PROGRAM 



During the winter months of the year, the wood duck nesting program was 
carried on by a 5 man crew which erected 766 boxes. With the work of previous 
years added to this, a total of 1358 nesting boxes have been erected by the Bureau 
cf Wildlife. All of these boxes are narked with an aluminum tag to identify the 
boxes as belonging to the Division c^ Fisheries and Game. The project crew put up 
their boxes in 32 towns in various parts of the State. 

Inasmuch as most cf the boxes were erected ~n cedar poles driven through 
the ice on ponds, rivers and marshes, it was necessary to operate ^n favorable ice 
conditions. During March, the best ice conditi' ns existed, and at that time more 
boxes were erected than during all the other mi nths conbined. In order to circum- 
vent the obstacle of poor ice conditions, the use of angle irons and iron rods was 
inaugurated. These iron supports for the boxes cculd be installed from a beat in 
the rivers and marshes when there is no ice. Cedar poles were found t' I t heavy 
and cumbersome tr be installed from a boat - or indeed in any way except n th< ice. 
Th : cedar p-les, however, seem to be a better support for the t x s, in ..-ill 
probably continue to be used more than ^.ny other type of support. The ir ns ray in 
' time prove to lend themselves to the job of protecting the boxes from clli 
predatrrs. 

Along the line of trying to discourage predators, a type of guard was 

fashioned -ut of a 6 inch section of 5 inch stov flanged . This 

stove pipe was fastened at the entrance hole of the box. Th . which the 

irds were installed were erected on trees. If a suitable pr tor or r can 
devised fea that some boxes can be erected: on trees, the erect! n .; r t- 

ly aided. 



u3. 
WOO D DUCK NE S TING BOX P ROGRAM (continued) 

Besides putting up boxes, the project crew converted 1856 war surplus 
ammunition boxes intc wood duck nesting boxes. These boxes were distributed to 
interested individuals and organizations who expressed the intention f ;f putting up 
the boxes on suitable areas. 

Of the 18.56 boxes sent out, 1723 were given to game clubs, who, although 
there is a closed season on wood ducks, are leading the way in our efforts to 
build up the wood duck population. That the clubs are getting the boxes up - and 
in good areas - was evidenced by the fact that several tines, during the course of 
erecting their own boxes, the project crew ran onto the war surplus boxes already 
put in choice spots. To date, 2.596 war surplus airimunition boxes have been conver- 
ted into nesting boxes and distributed. 



lilt. 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game 
were enacted during the legislative session of 195>0? 

Chapter 101, Acts of 1950: An act increasing the amount of money cities 
and towns may appropriate for stocking inland waters therein with fish and for 
liberating game therein. 

Chapter 107, Acts of 19!?0 r An act further regulating the trapping of 
certain animals. 

Chapter 136, Acts of 195>0: An act relative to the trapping of birds. 

Chapter 138, Acts of 19^0: An act further regulating the trapping of 
mammals . 

Chapter 196, Acts of 195>0: An act relative to the control of Maquin Pond 
in the town of Hanson. 

Chapter 233, Acts of 19^0:- An act providing for the issuance of fishing 
licenses without charge to blind persons. 

Chapter 23U, Acts of 19^0: An act relative to the close season on all 
birds and mammals. 

Chapter 23£, Acts of 1950s An act relative to the training of hunting dogs. 

Chapter 2^9, Acts of 19?0: An act relative to the use of sporting, hunting, 
fishing and trapping licenses not signed bv the licensee. 

Chapter U2h, Acts of 19^0: An act relative to the breeding and raising of 

mink. 

Chapter 1;38, Acts of 19^0: An act further regulating the taking and 
hunting of birds and mammals. 

Chapter 2h, Acts of 193>Ot Resolve providing for a survey of the great 
ponds of the Commonwealth and the rights of way thereto. 

Chapter 723, Acts of 195>0: An act authorising the Division of Fisheries 
and Game to enter into an agreement with the Secretary of the Arnjy of the United 
States for the purpose of acquiring a license for the Conunonwealth to use u lrch 
Hill area for fish and wildlife management. 



••.."_•■ 



REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AMD GAftffi ^ 

All rules and regulations promulgated by the Director of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game during the fiscal year 1950- are listed herewith as required by 

5?T??A?J ^ r i"l 5° tS ° f 1939 ' (See SUrmary of rules and regulations 7 
still in effect promulgated prior to the above-mentioned period.) 

July 21, 19h9' Rules and regulations for the taking of pheasants and 
quail in the season of 19li9- (Sec. 59, Ch. 131, O.L.) Peasants and 

August 10, 19U9: Establishing the Deerfield River and its diverted waters 
as a restricted area for breeding and developing trout; establishing fishing 
regulations therein, and rescinding regulations aonroved February 6, 1936. (See. 

OU , On. l_j_L, Lr« ij . ) 

re /i^ t Hj 1 . il9 ' N Mi S rator y g^e bird regulations for the season of 191*9. 
^oec. Oil, L/ii . IJl, G, L. ) 

August 19. 19h9t Rules and regulations for the taking of ruffed grouse in 
the season of 19U9. (Sec. 59, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

September 9, 19^9: Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake 
fconomonac in the town of ITinchendon, Long Pond in the towns of Tyngsboro and 

hT;:| ana ff7 P °? d *? ^ t0Wn ° f Me5hur * (thrGG P° nds ^ in g Partly in 
the State of New Hampshire). (Sec. 37, Ch. 131, 0. L. ) 

November 3, 19^9 1 Closing Lake George in the town of Wales to winter fishing 
from November 3, 19h9 to April lit, 19^2. (Sec. li*, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

November 3, 19U?: Closing Lake Wyola in the town of Shutesbury to winter 
fishing from November 3, 19h9 to April Ik, 1952 (Sec. 1J4, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

November 3, 19l*9: Rescinding regulations promulgated December 16, 19L8 
fishin g (Spc L lf W Ch ^ tOVmS ° f N ° rth Brookfield and East Brookfield to winter 

November 23, 19ll9: Rescinding order dated June II4, 19U6 suspending the open 
season on deer within Dukes County. (Sec. 80, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

March 7, 1950: Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish and use 
n land m areas leased by Division of Fisheries and Game for public fishing 
ground purposes. (Sec. lU, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 



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SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS ^6. 

Section h of Chapter h99 > Acts of 1939 requires the inclusion in annual 
reports of all rules and regulations promulgated by the respective departments and 
divisions and in force and effect upon the date the report is made. The following 
regulations promulgated by the Director of Fisheries and Game in prior years are 
still in effect on June 30, 19p0r 

March 2Jj., 19^2. Prohibiting fishing except between April 1$ and July 31, 
both dates inclusive, in Bailey's Pond, Ames bury, and restricting the catch to 
six trout a day per person by fly fishing, with no trolling oermitted. (Sec. lii, 
Ch. 131, G. L.) 

October 29, 19^6. Rules and regulations relative to seasons, legal lengths, 
bag limits and license requirements to apply to Wallum Lake in the town of Douglas 
(Also lying partly in the town of Purrilville, R. I.). (Sec. 37,Ch.l31, G.L.) 

April 11, 19U7: Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in Robbins Pond, East Pridgewater, and closing it to all fishing for five years 
beginning April lii, 19^7. (Sec. lh, Ch. 131, 0. L.) 

April 11, 191+7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in Little Sandy Bottom Pond in the town of Pembroke, and closing it to all 
fishing for five years beginning April 15, 19U7. (Sec. Ill, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

April 11, 191+7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in East Monponsett Lake in the town of Halifax, and closing it to all fishing 
for five years beginning April IS", 19h7. (Ch. lii, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

April 11, 191+7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a certain 
area in Stetson Pond in the town of Pembroke, and closing it to all fishing for 
five years beginning April 15", 1°U7. (Sec lU, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

April 11, 191+7. Setting aside as a brooding area for all fish, a certain 
area in West Monponsett Lake in the towns of Halifax and Hanson, and closing it 
to all fishing for five years beginning April 13', 1?1;7 . (Sec lU, Ch. 131, G.L.) 

April 11, 191+7. Setting aside as a breeding area a certain section of 
Indian Head Pond in the town of Hanson and closing it t^ all fishing for five years 
beginning April 1$, 19h7 . (Sec lU, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

August 29, 19a7. Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish that portion 
of Lake Maspenock, also known as ?Iorth Pond, in the town of Hopkinton, lying north 
of the highway between Upton .and Hopkinton, for a period of five years beginning 
October 1, 191+7. (Sec. IJ4, Ch. 131, 0. L. ) 

July 8, 19U8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
imaintenance of fish. (Sec. 107, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

July 8, 19U8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of birds 

and mammals. (Sec 107, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

Dec. 16, I9I48. Closing Lake 3uinsigamond in the city of Worcester and the 
town of Shrewsbury to winter fishing from December 16, 1?U8 to April lU, 1951. 
(Sec 1U, Ch. 131, G. L.) 

Dec. 16, 19U8. Closing Turkey Hill Pond in the towns of Rutlind and Paxton 
bo winter fishing from December 16, 19U8 to April lU, l°5l. (SeclL., Ch. 131, G.L.) 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS (continued) ^ 7 ' 

December 16, 19U8. Closing Mill Pond in the town of Upton to winter fishing 
:rom December 16, 19U8 to April llj., 1951. (Sec. Ik, Ch. 131, G. L. ) 

December 16, 19l±8. Closing Halfway Pond in the town of Plymouth to winter 

lishing from December 16, 19i;8 to April Ik, 1951. (Sec. lU, Ch. 131, O.L. ) 



Leg islative Recommen d a tions of Division of Fisheries and Game 

1. AN ACT PROVIDING FOR INCREASED LICENSE FEES FOR RESIDE:!? AND NON-RESIDENT 
HUNTERS AND FISHERMEN. 

This recommendation is intended to raise the cost of hunting and 
fishing licenses, so that additional revenue would be forthcoming to 
the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund. 

2. AN ACT INCREASING THE JT U!^ER OF GREAT P^HDS MICH MAY BE OCCUPIED PY THE 
DIRECTOR OF THE DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAi«!E FOR PURPOSES ^F SCIENTIFIC 
STUDY OR EXPERIMENT. 

This would allow the Division to occupy six instead of two great 
ponds for purpose of carrying on scientific studies in fisheries investi- 
gations and managements on various species of fish. 

3. AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE DIRECTOR OF THE DIVISION OF FISHERIES ATT) GAME TO 
REGULATE THE TAKING OF CERTAIN FISH. 

It is intended by this recommendation to allow the Division of 
Fisheries and Game through its own regulatory powers to establish the 
species, bag limits, minimum lengths, and open seasons on the taking 
of fish in the State so as to complement the findings of our fisheries 
management program as rapidly as possible in the protection and 
furtherance of good fish management. 

h. AN ACT REPEALING THE CLOSE SEASON ON ".TOOL DUCK. 

This would repeal the present closed season on wood duck and allow the 
Division to permit the hunting of wood duck in line with laws promulgated 
by the Federal Government through its Migratory °ird Treaty Act. 

5. AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE DIRECTOR OF DIVISION qf FISHERIES AND GAMS TO FURTHER 
REGULATE T T IE HUNTING OR TAKING OF GRAY SQUIRRELS, HARES, AND RABBITS. 

This would allow the Division of Fisheries and Game authorization to 
establish rules and regulations with regards to the hunting of these 
animals so that flexibility in their tailing would allow for better manage- 
ment of the species. 

6. AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE KEEPING OF CERTAIN RECORDS BY PUR BUYERS. 

This act provides that fur buyers shall keep an accurate record of 
their dealing on forms prescribed by Division of Fisheries and Gome and 
recort same yearly. 

7. AN ACT CONSTITUTING THE ASSENT OF THE COMMON17EALTH THROUGH ITS DIVISION OF 
FISHERIES A^D GAME TO PARTICIPATE IN THE FEDERAL \TD TO FISHERIES RROGRA! - 

This would allow the Division of Fisheries and Game to participate 
in the newly passed Federal Aid program commonly called the Dingell-Johnson 
Act for the purposes of fisheries restoration and management projects simi- 
lar to our present Pittman-Robertson nrogram. 

■3. A\ r ACT CHANGING THE DEFINITION OF \ GREAT POND, 

This recommends the changing of the definition of a great nond is 
referred to in the fish and game laws from one of twenty acres in size to 
one of ten acres in size. 



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October l t 1951 



His Excellency Paul A. Dever, Governor of the Commonwealth; 
The Executive Council; the General Court; snd. the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty- 
sixth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
and its third Annual Report following the reorganization 

of the Department of Conservation under Chapter 6^1, Acts 
of I9US. 



Respectfully submitted, 






P.03ZEE H. JOHNSON 
DIRECTOR 



DIVISIOII OF H SHSEISS AND GAME 

S I G H T Y - S I X T H A H II U A L REPORT 

TABLE 0? C IT T S II T S 

Page 

Report of the 3oard 1 

Pish Propagation 3 

Game Bird Propagation 3 

Wildlife Research and Management Projects U 

Fisheries Surveys and Management 5 

State Ornithologist 6 

Control of Water Chestnut 6 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit Program 6 

Inf ormati oil-Education Program 7 

Public Pishing Grounds 7 

Organization Chart 3 

The Sportsman's Dollar Chart 9 

Summary of Income 10 

Receipts from Licenses 11 

Appropriations and Expenditures 12 

Fish Distribution Table 13 

Game Distribution Table lU 

1951 Legislation 15 

Summary of Regulations lb 



REPORT 01 THE BOARD 

At the close of the fiscal year on June JO we find that 1951 has 
shown continued improvement and progress in the operation of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game. 

No personnel changes affecting administration have occurred during 
the year. On December k, 1950 "^is Excellency, Governor Paul A. Dever, 
reappointed Ovide N. Lanois to serve on the Board for a five 7/ear term. 
At an organization meeting in March, Matthew T. Coyne was re-elected Chairman 
and Frederick A, McLaughlin, Secretary. At special meetings Robert H. Johnson 
was reappointed to serve as Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game for 
a five year term and Robert L. Jones was reappointed Superintendent of the 
Bureau of Yildlife Research and Management for a term of five years. With no 
changes in administrative personnel it will be possible to continue those 
policies and programs which have proven sound and productive, and projects 
now in progress may be completed as planned. 

At this writing those programs involving short term planning have 
been completed. 

Fish hatcheries and game farms are in good condition and now produc- 
ing at maximum capacity of present facilities. 

Production of trout at the fish hatcheries for spring distribution 
set a new record. In three years time, production of the larger trout, 
nine inches and over, has beer, increased from 37,000 to 157.000. Further 
increases are planned and expected. 

Our game farms for the coming gunning season will produce not less 
than 60,000 pheasants and approximately 9.000 quail. 

With rising feed, labor and maintenance costs, our cost of production, 
at both fish hatcheries and game farms, has been held at a satisfactory level 
well below the prevailing market. 

Satisfactory progress is being made in construction at our new Podick 
Springs Trout Rearing Station and at the Federal Trout and Bass Hatchery in 
North Attleboro. ¥e are promised 50;i> of the production at the Federal Hatchery. 

Our pond management crews have done much to restore many waters of the 
State to a proper biological balance. More has been done along this line in 
the past year than in any equivalent period in the Division's history. This 
work is scheduled for more rapid progress. 

The district manager plan, inaugurated during the -oast year, is 
already proving its worth. These managers have brought the Division closer 
to the sportsmen in their respective districts. They are always available to 
assist and instruct the sportsmen in carrying out sound conservation and 
wildlife programs. 

The research work, carried on bv our 3ureau of Wildlife Research and 
Management over a period of years, has imde available a wealth of information 
and facts which will enable the Board to formulate future policies and programs 
on a much firmer basis. It is to this Bureau that we look :'or the preservation 
and improvement of those species of wildlife which do not adapt themselves to 

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artificial preparation. Its work will be expanded along the line of develop- 
ment and field management work with only the necessary research to maintain 
progress. 

Through our Information-Fducation Office we have made every effort to 
keep the sportsmen of the Commonwealth thoroughly Informed. .Their assistance 
is of vital importance in carrying out conservation and habitat improvement 
programs in the field. 

, Sportsmen pay the bills. It is our intention to keep them informed 
of what is "being done with Division funds, so that they may see that their 
money is "being judiciously spent. The good will and cordial relations which 
exist between the sportsmen and the Division of Fisheries and Game have ■ 
assisted progress to no small degree. Vide understanding that sportsmen have 
of the way in which the Division of Fisheries and Game operates is borne out 
by the substantial support given ''oy sportsmen to legislation recently enacted 
to increase license fees. Without sportsmen's support this legislation would 
never have been enacted. In the face of rising costs, further progress would 
have been impossible and curtailment of present programs inevitable. 

The Board wishes to express sincere appreciation to all personnel of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game and the Bureau of Wildlife Research and 
Management for the continuous loyalty and industry displayed in the perfor- 
mance of their respective duties. Their cooperation is needed if we are to 
continue to be an efficient, productive organization. 



3y order of the Board. 



Frederick A. McLaughlin 
Secretary 



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PISH PROPAGATION 

The Division's six trout hatcheries this year exceeded their- all-time 
high production of last year, raising and distributing a total of 1, 196,^3^ 
brown, rainbow and brook trout. 

About 22$ of these were in the nine-inch plus class alone. 

Trout distribution this past spring was about one-third ahead of 
schedule as compared to previous years, even though thousands more fish were 
distributed to waters of the Commonwealth. 

Pond management units, which come under this section in cooperation 
with the aquatic biologist, were engaged during spring and summer months in 
the removal of trash fish from many ponds. They also salvaged game fish from 
various public water supplies and distributed same to open waters in accordance 
with recommendations of the great pond survey. 

Work at the recently acquired Podick Springs hatchery site was begun 
during January. 

In line with the Division's efforts to keep all installations in good 
repair and to expand where necessary, all trout stations received various 
structural improvements, notably piping, water supply systems, pools, dams, 
roads, etc. Much of the work utilized some 30,000 board feet of lumber cut 
at the Palmer hatchery. 

A table showing fish production by stations anil other data will be 
found to the rear of this report. 

In addition to our own production, this Division received 15,000 
brook trout, S.000 browns, and 12,000 rainbows from the Hartsville federal 
hatchery. Bach year under this cooperative arrangement with the U. S. Pish 
and Wildlife Service, this Division supplies food in exchange for these fish 
which are distributed in Massachusetts waters. 

************** 

G-AM3 3 IBS PROPAGATION 

Pdngneck pheasants and quail are the two game birds propagated at the 
Division's four game farms. This year a total of 19.2S2 cock pheasants and 
13,26l hens were reared and released in time for the past fall gunning season. 
This Inst spring another 2,S0U adult pheasants were released from the brood 
atock in time to make nests in the wild. 

Quail liberat : ons, confined to the southeastern counties of Massachu- 
setts, amounted to 6, : .10 in the fall and ~f6o the following spring. 




Through the use of a new feed formula, developed ~oy thia Division an 
increase in the percental of hatch of pheasant and quail eg:- was accomplished 
and the mortality of chicks has decreased. The new formula, which hns been 

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under test for some time, also resulted in an improved growth rate and has 
contributed heavily to decreasing cannibalism and feather pulling. 

In addition to raising game birds, this section also handled the 
purchase of 1,898 white hare, ' wild' trapped in New 3runswick. These were 
released in suitable covers throughout the State. 

Continued structural improvements have been made at all game farms. 

*************** 

BUREAU OF WILDLIFE 33 SEARCH AND MANAG3M2HT 

The Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management continued its part in 
the Division's activities by conducting studies of our more important game, 
fur and fish species, to further place management of our wildlife resources on 
a sound, biological basis. 

The Bureau's activities are gradually changing from an emphasis on 
research, the basis of effective knowledge, to an emphasis on management, i.e., 
putting the knowledge gained through research into effect on the land. 

Perhaps an outstanding example of this can be found in the inaugura- 
tion of wildlife management districts this year. The State was divided into 
four districts, and a competent biologist placed in charge of the crew in 
each area. These men are performing the field work, habitat improvement and 
other management practices indicated by research, but possibl;^ their greatest 
contribution is an educational one, in rendering technical assistance and 
guidance to conservation-minded groups who themselves desire to perform the 
work necessary to preservation of our wildlife. 

Also under the Bureau's jurisdiction is the Birch Hill area, a U^OO-acre 
tract for which a lease was acquired and preliminary surveys to determine a plan 
of wildlife management started during the year. This area, in Baldwinsville 
and Winchendon; is to be managed for public hunting. 

WILDLIFE RESEARCH AiJ3> RANAGEi'SlTT PROJECTS 

As part of its work to determine the solutions to problems affecting 
our wildlife, the Bureau conducted studies during the year on the following: 
wood duck, fur bearers, fresh water fish, ruffed grouse. The white-tailed 
deer investigation was completed as a research project during the year and 
final reports prepared for later publication. Experimental planting of various 
shrubs for quail was done in southeastern Massachusetts. 

On the management side, the cottontail rabbit trapping and transfer 
program, operated in conjunction with cooperating sportsmen's clubs, trans- 
ferrer rabbits from closed areas to areas open to gunning and/or beagle 
running. Personnel of this project also conft$nii£d work on the cottontail 
rabbit habitat management area in the Upton State Forest. Habitat management 
techniques in the form of planting feed patches, conifers, multiflora rose, 
fertilizing and silvi cultural Cuttiiigs are being utilized here to demonstrate 
to sportsmen ' e clubs ."'.he methods they can use to improve their own covers. 

The general State wildlife project conducted the annual ruffed grouse 
population study. It also operated the wildlife shrub nursery at the 
Worcester State Hospital, source of many of the shrubs planted in the manage- 
ment districts. Personnel from this project also contributed to the opening 

(fcj 



of a grouse field trial area in the Harold Parker State Merest. Sixteen one- 
half hour courses were laid out and two successful trials were conducted here 
during the year. This is a wild "bird field trial area, one of the few of its 
kind (the only one in this State) and at one trip! it was reported that over 
thirty "birds were started. This project also cooperated with other agencies 
"by censusing small mammals and doves. The large scale erection of wood duck 
nesting "boxes throughout the State has brought to light many problems which 
require solution if the program is to continue to gain in efficiency and value. 
The wood duck nesting research project have "been studying these problems, 
which include a check of various census methods, evaluation of live trapping 
and banding, study of wood duck populations, and plans to conduct a hunter bag 
census in the coming open season. The effects of predators and a comparison 
of duckling production by natural tree cavities with that of the boxes are 
also under study. J 

Native fur bearers were studied by personnel of that project, who 
evaluated/ the importance of fur animals to the economy of the Commoiwealth. 
It was found that the principal fur bearers produced an income of $26^-, 037*59 
to trappers during the 1950-51 season. Muskrats alone made up $201,806.80 of 
this total income. The real value of this harvest, however, lies not just 
in its source of income to trappers, but also in the employment it makes for 
thousands of people in the fur processing business, up to the sale of the 
finished garment. The fur nearer project also made experimental plantings of 
live beaver to create natural aquatic habitat and tested several methods of 
mink and otter census. They examined over 10,000 muskrat pelts to determine 
pelt primeness dates in various localities and to discover sex and age ratios 
of the rat population, all information valuable to this stud;/ - . 

FISHERIES SURVEYS AHD MA1TAG213NT 

The biological survey of lakes and ponds continued as in past years, 
with 35 bodies of water in Franklin, Hampshire, anri northern Worcester counties 

be ing comple ted. 

Cliff Pond, Brewster, and Stockbridge 3owl, Stockbridge were the scenes 
of special investigations to determine the rates of harvest of various game fish. 
The Cliff Pond census showed a marked increase in the numbers of spring-stocked 
trout being caught coincident with the change-over this year from stocking 
browns to stocking rainbows. A special trout season last fall failed to show 
an appreciable increase in the harvest of brown trout on this pond. 

Stockbridge Bowl was given special attention as a typical warm-water 
pond. It was found here that some ll+OO adult pickerel are present each fall, 
and these maintain their numb as despite heavy sunmer fishing by virtue of their 
rapid growth. 

During the winter, surveys were made to check the take of ice fishermen 
on re-opened trout ponds. It wa.s found that practically no trout were harmed by 
ice fishermen, while they took many fish that could be classified as potential 
trout predators. 

The majority of game fish handled by pond management crews were tagged, 
as well as half of the surplus brood trout from hatcheries. 

Studies on the spawning activity of white perch and continue", netting of 
this species at Cedar Meadow Pond in Leicester were conducted. The taking of 
large numbers of white perch from this pond over the mst three years has 

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resulted in this species increasing its percentage of legal sized individuals 
from 1/6 to about ljr>. Other fisheries management activities completed during 
the year included the erection of- a fish trap at the outlet of 'the Bast Otis 
Reservoir, the placement in ponds about the State (in concurrence with recom- 
mendations of the great pond survey) of 62 "bass "brush shelters and 75 panfish 
concentrator?* posting of bass spawning areas^ and experimental weed control 
at Sandy Fond, Ayer. 

In addition, direct control of fish populations was carried on through 
pond management personnel and wildlife district crews who removed about one 
and one-quarter tons of suckers and bluegills from 3illington Sea, Plymouth, 
to mention one pond out of several that were so treated. n hey commenced 
destruction cf bluegill nests in over-populated waters, removed about one ton 
of carp and one ton o"" other trash fish from Laurel Lake, Lee,' and removed the 
entire fish population (of which only four individuals were of decent -size) 
from Higgins Pond, Brewster. This latter was later re-stocked with fingerling 
trout and will be managed strictly as a trout pond, it being more suited to 
that species. 

STAZ3 ORFITHOLO&IST 

During the year, the State Ornithologist further developed .the program 
for winter feeding of waterfowl, processed data collected in orevious research 
studies and prepared new studies of local distribution of waterfowl, age and 
sex ratios and take by hunters. 

Feeding stations for waterfowl were maintained last winter at Orleans, 
Plymouth, Forth River, Rssex, and "ewbur7/port , but the winter was so mild that 
the birds were in no great trouble at any time. 

CONTROL 0? tfATER CHESTjUJT 

The control of water chestnut (tr^'oa iiatans), an obnoxious aquatic 
weed found in the Concord and Sudbury Rivers, Little Spy Pond, Rel.nont, and 
Upper Pond, Holyoke , \\'as continued for the third year. The total area in beds 
.of this plant within the Commonwealth has been reduced from over ^0 acres to 
five acres to date, with a few scattered plants and thinly spotted areas 
remaining. 

C00P23AH73 WILDLIP3 RRSRAROH "JUT PROGRAM 

The cooperative wildlife research unit prosraii, at the University of 
Massachusetts, is a program of student training in wildlife management, educa- 
tion, research projects , and technical service. 

The unit at Amherst is one of serene een such units in land grant 

colleges throughout the United States. The units are financed jointly by the 

various states, the U. S. Pish and Wildlife Service, and the Wildlife Manage- 
ment Institute. 

The Massachusetts unit cooperate! with the 3ureau of Wildlife Research 
and Management during the year by performing certain parts of original research 
on ruffed grouse, muskrats, and cottontail rabbits, and in addition ran studies 
on woodcock p.xiu. snowshoe hare. 

******* ********** 



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IHFORMATION-EDUCATIOH PROGRAM 

Publicity service for the Division of Fisheries and Game was conducted 
throughout the year by the Information-Education Leader. This included publi- 
cation of "Massachusetts Wildlife 1 , 1 a periodic information bulletin sent to 
sporting clubs, the press, Division key personnel, etc. Releases of suitable 
news items and photos were made to the press during the year. Exhibits were 
presented at various sportsmen's shows and fairs. 

The placement of feature articles with the press was a part of this 
work, as was the distribution of educational pamphlets, both prepared by us or 
purchased elsewhere. Some tine was spent in appearing on or making arrangements 
for the appearance of other personnel on established radio and television 
programs. The distribution of technical bulletins and reports requested by mail 
was also part of this work. Preparation of the annual report is also a duty of 
this section. 

Other educational work undertaken by the Division during the year was 
the Junior Conservation Camp, operated in cooperation with Wildlife Conservation, 
Inc., and the sportsmen's clubs of this State. This was its second year of 
operation, with an enrollment this time of 170 boys. The Bureau of Wildlife 
Research and Management was charged with supervision of the Division's part in 
this undertaking. 

Photography played an increasingly important part in the Division's 
educational and publicity work, with the Wildlife Photographer of the Bureau of 
Wildlife Research and Management producing many still photos for publicity 
release and technical purposes. He also worked on several motion pictures to 
be released 'at later date. 

Personnel from all sections of the Division as usual sjoent many days 
and nights giving lectures, or showing movies and slides to sportsmen's clubs, 
achool groups, and other organizations. 

PUBLIC PTSRT^G GROUNDS 

The program of obtaining leases for public access to the banks of our 

principal trout streams continued during the year, with seven miles of shore 

line along the Shawsheen River in Tewksoury and Andover being added to the 
list of public fishing grounds. 

This brings the total to eighty miles of stream bank open to the 
public, on the following rivers: Deerfield, Westfield (west, middle, and east 
branches), Parmington, Millers, Squaimacook, Ipswich, Shawsheen, Clam, and Buck. 

Areas set aside for fly fishing only were given considerable study this 
year, it being found through survey that sportsmen's clubs favored such areas. 

One and one-tenth miles along the Farmington River were set aside for 
fly fishing only, as was a stretch of about five miles on the Deerfield. The 
so-called "artificial lure :I area previously ir. force on the Deerfield was 
abolished. 

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Si 'VhV F FISH & GAME INCOME 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 
Special Licenses, Re gist rati ore & Tags 
Rents 

Confiscated Goods 
Miscellaneous Sales arid Income 
Refund Prior Year 
Pittman-Robertson Fund 
Court Fines 



$610,535.25 
5,569.25 
2,939.50 

5o.5o 

77.05 
19. Ul 

• hk, 701.00 
13,363.50 

TOTAL INCOME $677, 7 75. U6 



SURPLUS OF INLAND FISH ATID QA;K FUND AS OF JUNE 30, 195l 



$U78.,Ii35.75 



Analysis of the Sbecial Licenses issued under Sections-' 1|3, 68A, 102, 0.03, 
lOlj., 105, 106 and 107, Chapter 131, G. L., ouring the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1951. 



Type of License 



rlumber 
Issued 



Receipts 



Special Fish Propagator License!. ■-. . 
Soecial Fish- Propagator License-No Fee 
Fish Propagator * License 
Propagator License (Birds or Mammals) 
Special Propagator, License-Mo Fee 
Dealer's License '* 
"Possession Only"' 'License 
Taxidermist License 
Resident Citizen' Fur Buyer's 
Non-Resident Citizen Fur Buyer 
License to take Shiners for bait 
'Iran Registration Certificates 
Fish Tags 
Game Tags 



62 

363 

1 

200 

71 

38 

u2 

2 

295 

l,8a0 

15,350 

• 3,085 



$ 205.00 

. 20h,00 
l,2liO,50 

55o.oo 

•U-5.50 

190.00 

• 1*20.00 

200.00 

1,1466.00 

■ '7Uo.5o 

153.50 

15U.25 
t.5,569.25 



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(11) 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
APPROPRIATIONS A I© EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 1950 TO JUNE 30, 1951 

!.!AINT ifliA.NCE 'AFPRCPRl A? IONS - Expiring June 30, 1951 



Acct.No. 



Title 



33CU-01 Personal Services and Expenses 

330I4-O0 Expenses of the Board 

330U-31 Propagation, etc. 

330U-U3 Information Program . • ■ 

330U-U5 Est. Public Fishing Grounds 

330U-51 Protection of Wildlife 

--330U-53 Wildlife Restoration 

330U-5U Stream and Bird Cover Improve- 
ment 

330U-56' Biological Survey 



Appropriation 
"^ 9, HO. 00 
1,^00.00 

1+16,052.00 
5,700.00 

8,367.lU 

60,U20.00 

10U, 313.00 

9,6U2.18 
27,567.22 



Totals ". . . $693,171. 5U 



Expenditures & 

Liabilities 
^57,317.25 

1,U17.70 
391, 262. U8 

5,33U.62 

8,217.73 
52,88U.19 
8U, 993.19 

9,522.67 

26,ii92.8U 

:J637,UU2.67 



Reverted 

01,792.7? 

82.30 

2ii,789.52 

365.38 

1U9.U1 

7,535.81 

19,819.81 

119.51 

1,07U.38 

$55,728.87 



-x-Pittman-Robertson 75'"' reimbursement from Federal Funds. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS 






Acct.No. 



?it.le 



Appror riation & Expended & Balance Unallot- 
Ereylcus Balance Encumbered Forward tad 



330U-U2 Improvement and Management 
of Lakes jPonds and Rivers 

330U-U8 Lmprov. State Game Farms 

330U-U9 Lmprov. State Fish Hatcheries 

330U-50 Pond Fish Units 

330U-55 Est. Public Shooting Grounds 



- 



419,157.61 sA3,i;63.U2 $69^.19 

;:-, 112.35 19,566.35 lU,5U5-70 

73,073.76 36,139.96 18,283.80 18,650.00 

23,618.68 23,3lU.35 303.83 

9,770.68 9,770.68 - 



Totals . . . . ^159,733.08 107,255.26 33,827.52 18,650.303 

GRAND TOTAL $852,901.62 7UU,697.93 

All of the above Special Appropriations will expire June 30, 1952 

with the exception of 330U-55 which expired June 30, 1950. 

(12) 



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GAHE DISTRIBUTION __[ THE PERIOD JULY 1. 1950 to JUNE 30^ 1951 



General liberation 12 week old oheasants: 37,54-3 

Adult pheasants liberated: 2,504- 

Soortsnan's Pheasant Rearing Program; 15,690 

55,737 



Of the pheasants liberated by the Commonwealth and through the 
Sportsman's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated that 27,160 hens 
and 27,64-7 cocks vent into the covers. 



General liberation adult quail: 766 

General liberation young quail: 6,6 10 

7,376 

Adult pheasants purchased and liberated: 100 

Northern varying white hare purchased and liberated:. 1,898 



(1U) 



L3SISLAII0N 

The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1951: 

Chapter 28, Acts of 1951 : Resolve authorizing the continuation of 
the survey by the Department of Public Works of the great ponds of the 
Commonwealth and the rights of way thereto. 

Chapter 207, Acts of 1951: An act constituting the assent of the 
Commonwealth to the provisions of the act of Congress entitled "An act to 
provide that the United States shall aid the states in fish restoration and 
management projects and for other purposes". 

Chapter 217, A.cts of 1951 : An act abolishing the close season on 
wood duck. 

Chapter 25 U, Acts of 1951 '• An act further regulating the hunting of 
hares and rabbits. 

Chapter 29^, Acts of 1951 : An act changing the open season on fur- 
bearing mammals. 

Chapter 353. Acts of 1951: An act relative to the use of firearms 
and wearing red while deer hunting. 

Chapter 37^. Acts of 1951 : An act relative to the control of the 
Monponsett lakes in the town of Halifax. 

Chapter ^05, Acts of 1951: An act increasing the fees for sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses. 

Chapter 399. Acts of 1951 : Ah act relative to the number of great 
ponds which ma'"' be occupied by the director of the division of fisheries and 
game for purposes of scientific study or experiment. 

Chapter U?9, Acts of 1951 ; *&■ nct relative to the keeping of certain 
records by fur buyers. 

Chapter 535. Acts of 1951: An act enabling the Director of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game in the Department of Conservation to acquire certain lands 
and to regulate their use. 



l*********:*:*-*** 



(15) 



SUMMARY 0? KZSi.^LATIC'.TS PROl-lULGA T DD 3Y THE DIRECT O R OP PISHSRL3S AIID GAMS 

March 2U, 19U2. Prohibiting fishing except between April 15 and July 31. 
-Jioth^dates incJLujslye_^_.in..3ailey'a. Pai :&»..A:{ie^ ur.y r .and i^.fi r-ra ^-ti/gg ■ the- f-^tnVi to 
six trout a day per person by fly fishing, with no trolling permitted. 

October 29, 19^-0. Rules and Regulations relative to seasons, legal 
lengths, "bag limits and license requirements to apply to 'Jallusi Lake in the 
town of Douglas, also lying partly in the town of Burrilville, Rhode Island. 

April 11, I9U7. Setting aside as a "breeding area for all fish, a 
certain area in Robbins Pond, Sast 3ridgewater, and closing it to all fishing 
for five years "beginning April 1<+, 19^-7. 

April. 11, 19^7- Setting aside as a "breeding area for all fish, a 
certain area in Little Sandy 3o~tto:n Pond in the town of Pembroke, and closing 
it to all fishing for five years "beginning April If-, 19^7» 

April 11, 19^-7 • Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a 
certain area in East Monponsett Lake in the town of Halifax, and closing it 
to all fishing for five years .beginning April 15, 19^7 •■ 

April 11, 19'+7« Setting aside as a breeding area for all fish, a 
certain area in "est i'onponsett Lake in the towns of Halifax and Hanson, and 
closing it to all fishing for five years beginning April 15, 19^7 • 

April 11, 19M-7.. Setting aside as a breeding area a certain section 
of Indian Head Pond in the town of Hanson and closing it to all fishing for 
five years beginning April 15 , 19^7 • 

August 29, 19^7 • Setting aside as a, breeding area- for all fish that 
portion "01 Lake" Maspenoc't, •aiso" 'aiown^y^ viorth* Pond, dTT' , rhe"' , to«r''of"'H6pkinton, 
lying north of the highway between I/ptpn and Hopki-nton, for a period of five 
years beginning October 1, I9U7. 

July 3, I9M-8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation 
and maintenance of fish. 

July 3, I9M-8. Rules and regulations ' p or the artificial propagation 
of birds and mammals. 

September 9, 19^9- Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake 
Monomonac in the. town of Winehendp-i, Long Pond in the towns of "Tyngsboro and 
Dracut, and Tuxbury Pond in the town of Amesbury (three ponds lying partly 
in the State of !Tew Hampshire). 

March J, 1950: Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish 
and use of land in areas l.-ased by Division of Fisheries and Game for public 
fishing ; round purposes. 

July 10, 1950 : Pheasant, Quail, and Ruffed Grouse Regulations for 
season of 1950. 

August 30, 1950: Migratory game bird regulations for season of 1950* 



(16) 

■ 



September 8, 1950. Sstablisking Cliff Pond in the tovm of Brewster as 
an experimental pond with an open season on all species of fish from Septem- 
ber 15, 1950 to October 15 , 1950 • "both dates inclusive. 

November 15, 1950. Closing Great Pond (also called Ashfield Lake) in 
town of Ashfield to winter fishing from November 15 . 1950 to April lU, 195 1. 
both dates inclusive. 

January 2, 1951- Public wishing Grounds, supplement, establishing 
fly fishing area on Parmington River. 

February lU, 1951* Special regulations for ~)eerfield River and its 
diverted waters and establishing a fly fishing area thereon. 

March lh, 1951* Setting aside as bass spawning grounds certain areas 
in the following ponds and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 
and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1951 : 
Bloody Pond, Plymouth; Dorothy Pond, Mill'bury; Port Pond, Lancaster; Port Pond, 
Littleton; Hampton Pond, Southampton and 'festfield; Island Pond (Great Island 
Pond), Plymouth; Mascopic Lake, 'Tyngsboro and Dracut; Oldham Pond, Pembroke; 
Sampsons Fond, Carver; Sandy Pond, Plymouth; Snows Pond, Rochester; Stetson 
Pond, Pembroke; Vftiite Island Pond, Plymouth and Mareham; Alum Pond, Sturbridge. 



*sfc***3fc*5jc:fr * ** 



(17) 







*-"■.-- r-i- 






v.: 







1952 



mj## 










SHERIES AND GAME 




1 I 




M/5 






October 1, 1952 



His Excellency Paul A. Dever, Governor of the Commonwealth; 
The Executive Council; the General Court; and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty-seventh 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game and its 
fourth Annual Report following the reorganization of the 
Department of Conservation under Chapter 651, Acts cf 19l|8 . 

This report covers the fiscal year from July 1, 1951 
to June 30, 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 



(Zu* # %t 



BERT H. JOHNSO: 
DIRECTOR v 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
EIGHTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Report of the Board 1 

Fish Propagation „ _ 3 

Fish Distribution Table „ _ k 

Pheasant Propagation _ — - 5> 

Game Distribution Table - 6 

Information and Education ~ 7 

Public Fishing Grounds _ „ „ 8 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management 9 

Wildlife Management Districts 9 

Table of District Activities 10 

Wildlife Research Projects _ 12 

Fisheries Management ,... _ _ 16 

Panfish Control Table 19 

Fish Salvage Table 20 

Ornithologist _ „ 21 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 22 

Birch Hill Public Hunting Grounds _ 23 

Organizational Chart „ 2k 

How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent __ 25> 

Tables - Summary of Income 26 

Receipts from Licenses ._ 27 

Appropriations and Expenditures 28 

1952 Legislation „ 29 

Summary of Regulations „ 30 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



The personnel of the Division of Fisheries and Game and the sportsmen 
of Massachusetts can look with much satisfaction on the accomplishments of the 
Division during the fiscal year which closed June 30, 1952. 

The year's end finds the Division sound financially. Production 
schedules have been met, properties and equipment are in very good condition and 
all programs are developing in line with expectations. 

Although increased license fees were in effect for only the first six 
months of this fiscal year, estimates of income are proving surprisingly accurate 
and it is now possible to make a closer appraisal of our financial status as 
based on anticipated revenue from license fees. Depletion of our reserve fund 
has been checked in spite of a year in which all costs of operation were at the 
highest level in the history of the Division. The reserve fund as of June 30, 
1952 amounts to $523,i;32 as compared with $1*78, U85 on June 30, 1951. 

The Board is confident that ample funds are available for normal 
operation and continued progress of the Division. Sportsmen may be assured that 
we can foresee no time in the future when increased license fees will be needed 
because it is planned to keep expenditures in balance with estimated revenue of 
any given year. Reserve funds will be used only in case of extreme emergency or 
for an occasional non-recurring capital investment. 

Our new trout rearing station at Podick Springs has been completed on 
schedule and within estimated costs. This property will increase the number of 
legal size trout available for distribution in the spring of 1953 by not less 
than 100,000. The number of trout 9 inches and over distributed from our hatch- 
eries during the past year showed better than a 10 per cent increase over the 
prior year. 

Aquatic biologists of the Division and pond management crews made great 
progress during the year with programs to improve fishing throughout the Common- 
wealth. Results of their efforts are becoming more apparent each successive 
season. 

The opening of Quabbin Reservoir to boat fishing was a major development 
during the past fiscal year. This body of water has great potentialities. The 
Division of Fisheries and Game will co-operate with the Metropolitan District 
Commission and every effort will be made to introduce large gamefish species to 
the waters at the earliest possible date. 

Our game farms continue to operate on maximum production schedules. 
Not only are we producing a great many birds but emphasis is always on the quality 
of the bird with production at reasonable cost. 

The inevitable result of population growth and industrial expansion is 
the reduction of areas formerly available for hunting and fishing. As a result 
areas available to wild life must be made more productive. Cordial relations 
between farmers, landowners and sportsmen must be established and maintained to 
keep these areas open to sportsmen. Our field problems are tremendous, but 
believe our Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management, with its scientific 
knowledge and highly skilled personnel, will meet the challenge. 

- 1 - 



An intelligently informed sporting public is imperative. Hence, our 
Information and Education Office considerably expanded its work during the past 
fiscal year with numerous bulletins, news releases, radio and television programs, 
colored films, wild life displays and speaking engagements. The extensive 
coverage achieved by our information and education program would be impossible 
without the cooperation of the many outdoor editors and radio commentators. 

The spirit of good will and mutual understanding which continues to 
exist between the sportsmen and the Division is extremely gratifying. We feel 
that the sporting public is quite capable of judging the value of policies which 
affect its interests, and consequently shall continue to maintain an active 
information program to keep sportsmen aware of our policies and our activities. 

The Board takes this opportunity to express appreciation to all 
personnel of the Division of Fisheries and Game for their diligence and loyal 
support and to the many sportsmen and others for their evidences of interest and 
confidence throughout the year. 

Membership of the Board remains the same as in the previous fiscal 
year. On December 12, 1951, His Excellency Governor Paul A. Dever re-appointed 
Matthew T. Coyne to serve on the Board for a term of five years. 

At the March meeting of the Board, Matthew T. Coyne was elected 
Chairman and Frederick A. McLaughlin was elected Secretary. 

By order of the Board. 



s/ FREDERICK A. McLAUGHLIN 
Secretary 



- 2 - 



FISH PROPAGATION 

The trout program and distribution of legal size trout for the year 
was an outstanding one. It was the largest overall production of legal size 
trout in the history of the Division of Fisheries and Game. The total libera- 
tion of legal size trout has increased during the last five years from 61*0,692 
to 800,U37. It is noteworthy to mention that of the total distributed, the 
increase of the larger fish (9" plus) alone has gradually gone upward during 
this period of five years from 10^,296 to a total of lfU,h^>k for this year. The 
liberation of these larger size fish has been in answer to demands of the sports- 
men for bigger fish to catch and from the many fine reports received, the stock- 
ing of these larger fish have shown most excellent results. The trout distri- 
bution during the spring went along on schedule although in a few cases stocking 
of certain streams had to be delayed owing to high waters. 

It was an exceptionally good year for the production of trout, having 
abundant rainfall to maintain a good water supply throughout the year and no 
serious outbreak of diseases. Continued effort was made at all stations to keep 
them as near as possible in first class condition. In this respect pools were 
repaired, bridges replaced with concrete, driveways regra veiled, building painted 
where needed, pipe lines replaced, new wells driven, etc. It will be necessary 
to continue repairs and replacement work at all stations to maintain our present 
high level of production. 

At the Sandwich Hatchery work has been started on the construction of 
four new trout pools. These will be in operation this summer. Also t this 
station new adult pools are being rebuilt to replace the old concrete ones. The 
old open shed at Sutton for the storing of vehicles is being replaced by a com- 
bination garage and storage building. Much of the lumber used during the year 
for repairs was cut at the Palmer Hatchery ; 12,000 board feet was cut during the 
winter months at this station. This cutting of timber at Palmer has saved many 
dollars and we hope to be able to continue a small amount of this cutting each 
year. 

Work at the new Podick Springs site which was started last year con- 
tinued with the pouring of concrete for the pools. At the time of this report 
the work that was originally planned has been nearly completed except for the 
pouring of a few yards of concrete and some fill along the system of pools, to- 
gether with some grading and construction of a combination sorting and storage 
building. Two thousand evergreen trees were planted on the site. This station 
will be in operation during the next fiscal year. 

Two new stake dump trucks were purchased to replace worn out ones at 
Montague and Sunderland stations. Also during the year other pieces of equipment 
such as a food mixer and lawn mowers were purchased to replace existing ones at 
the different stations. 

A table showing fish production by stations and other data appears on 
Page k of this report. In addition to our production this Division received 
15,000 brook, 5,000 brown trout and 12,000 rainbow trout from the Hartsville 
Federal Hatchery. Each year under this co-operative agreement with the U. S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service this Division supplies food in exchange for these fish 
which are distributed in Massachusetts waters. 

.;;. .;;. tL j;- .;;. ft -;;- .;;. .;;. .k- j;- 

- 3 - 



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- ii - 



PHEASANT PROPAGATION 

Edward E. Backus retired from the service of the Division of Fisheries 
and Game on January 15, 1952 after 38 years of service. He had been with the 
Division since 1912 serving as game warden, deputy fish and game commissioner, 
as superintendent and game bird culturist at the Ayer Game Farm. As game warden, 
Mr. Backus assisted in a great many wildlife management projects along with his 
law enforcement work. During his years at the Ayer Game Farm, he pioneered in 
game propagation work and was instrumental in establishing many methods in use 
at the game farms at the present time. Although most emphasis was placed on the 
rearing of pheasants at Ayer, quail, cottontail rabbits and racoon were also 
reared there by Mr. Backus. 

■ George Henry, of Ayer, was promoted to the game bird culturist position 
to fill the vacancy. Mr. Henry worked with Mr. Backus for many years and served 
as assistant game culturist. 

The pheasant program for this year was outstanding in more ways than 
one. The largest over-all pheasant production in the Division of Fisheries and 
Game was realized and this record will probably stand as an all time high for 
the next few years at least. The pheasant season started off with an extra large 
brood stock on hand. Eggs were transported from the eastern stations to the 
western part of the state so that all farms were able to set eggs and have their 
first pheasants hatch much earlier than ever before and all farms had hatches at 
approximately the same date. This lengthened the hatching season for the western 
stations. The farms were run at capacity and each one enjoyed good hatching and 
rearing seasons. 

The club-reared pheasants under the Sportsmen' s Pheasant Rearing Program 
added considerably to the over-all picture. Of the l8,13l| pheasants furnished to 
clubs, it is estimated that 7500 hens and 8500 cocks were released in the covers 
before the hunting season. Approximately 1000 hens and 100 cocks were liberated 
as adults after the hunting season and in the early spring. As a result of game 
farm liberations of twelve week old pheasants, 17,928 hens and 23,106 cocks went 
into the covers between August 1 and October 1 and 6^35 hens and i860 cocks were 
liberated as adults in the spring, for the most part in time for nesting in the 
wild. 

From these combined liberations, the results have been very satisfactory, 
as reports have come in from various parts of the state that there are more pheas- 
ants in the covers than ever before. If this is a fact, it is very pleasing to 
think that at last a gain has been made in the over-all state population. 

Quail production was about normal this year. The two eastern farms are 
the only ones raising quail as all the quail are liberated in the eastern Massa- 
chusetts counties. 7656 twelve week old quail went into the covers before the 
hunting season and 1117 adults were liberated in the spring and early summer. The 
quail population in Barnstable, Dukes, Nantucket and parts of Flymouth and Bristol 
Counties has been reported very high, despite an unusual snow storm in the eastern 
part of the state. 

At the quail farms, one of our greatest worries has been quail disease. 
In the past, drastic measures have been taken to eliminate it when we have had 
occurrences. During the past season, quail disease was in evidence and the birds 

- 5 - 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 
FOR THE PERIOD 

July 1, 1951 to June 30, 1952 

General liberation 12 week old pheasants Iil,03U 

Adult pheasants liberated 8,295 

Sportsman' s Pheasant Rearing Program 18 , I3I4. 

67,U63 



Of the pheasants liberated by the Division and through the 
Sportsman's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated that 32,280 . 
hens and 33,681; cocks went into the covers. 



General liberation adult quail 1,117 

General liberation young quail 7,656 

8,773 

Northern varying white hare purchased and liberated 1,125 



- 6 - 



were isolated to one section of the farm and treated with anti-biotics. We are 
satisfied that this disease can be cured and we are looking forward to further 
experiments using anti-biotics as a preventive measure. 

From 2000 white hares ordered from New Brunswick, Canada, only 1125 
were delivered. Trapping conditions seemed to be unusually poor due to the 
weather. Two separate loads were held up at the border due to quarantine by the 
United States Government because of hoof and mouth disease in cattle. The 
quarantine was not placed on the hares, however, but there was a misunderstanding 
by the customs officials. It was difficult to distribute equitably this small 
quantity of hares throughout the covers of the state. 

Considerable new construction and replacement work was accomplished at 
all the farms for the benefit of both pheasants and quail. The special appropria- 
tion "Improvements to Game Farms" expired as of June 30, 1952. This fund made it 
possible to equip our farms with labor saving facilities and replace many pens, 
as well as to make major repairs. All farms are being maintained at top physical 
condition. 

# -x- -x- -x- ■% # -x- -x- -x- -x- -x- 



INF0RMATI0N PROGRAM 

The Information and Education Office of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game has grown in the past four years from an additional assignment for a con- 
servation helper to a full time sportsmen's service agency, employing two informa- 
tion specialists and a photographer. 

The office publishes or supervises the publication of popular Division 
literature, prepares and distributes news releases, a monthly bulletin, motion 
pictures, stills and slides, presents wildlife exhibits at sportsmen's shows and 
fairs, and directs to some degree the educational activities of Division field 
personnel. 

Its purposes are: (1) to encourage the active, properly directed 
effort of sportsmen's organizations and the general public in the advancement of 
conservation; (2) to keep sportsmen informed of the activities and policies of 
the Division as a means of reporting on the use being made of license money; 
(3) and to promote the interests of sportsmen in general. 

Another concept of this type of work is coming on the scene in Massa- 
chusetts. The new idea (new for Massachusetts) is called conservation education. 
Several widely separated evidences of this idea have cropped up recently. The 
Newton school system is conducting an active program. The Division, in coopera- 
tion with "Wildlife Conservation, Inc." operates a summer conservation camp for 
boys, which 171 boys, sponsored by sportsmen's and civic organizations , attended 
during the current (fourth) year of operation. Several individual schools in 
different parts of the state have or are contemplating conservation programs. 
The district wildlife managers are being called upon more and more to aid in 
setting up conservation education programs in youth's groups, schools, the Boy 
Scouts and others. 

The Division has in its Information and Education Office the nucleus of 

- 7 - 



an organization that may some day be called upon to cooperate "with other educa- 
tional agencies in the formulation and operation of a state-wide program of 
youth conservation education. In the meantime, one major responsibility of the 
office will be to continue its program of adult education through the public 
relations media open to it. 

Following is the report of the Information and Education Office for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1952. 

The office produced 19 separate news releases covering 2k individual 
stories. These were sent to newspapers, magazines, radio stations and field 
personnel. Seven issues of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE were published, containing a 
total of 53 informative articles on various aspects of wildlife conservation and 
several articles reprinted from other conservation publications that were deemed 
to be particularly valuable to Massachusetts. Two feature stories were placed 
with newspapers during the period, one press tour of Division installations was 
conducted for outdoor editors, and two educational pamphlets were produced in 
cooperation with other agencies. Information personnel appeared or arranged for 
the appearance of others on six different radio programs and two television pro- 
grams. Of course there were the usual routine activities such as distributing 
literature in answer to requests, correspondence, conferences, contact work, 
lectures, etc. 

The single most outstanding educational production during the year was 
the color film, "MASS-Produced Woodies," of which six copies are in constant 
circulation throughout the state. This film has also received national acclaim 
as being outstanding in presentation of the wood duck story. 

•K- *- # tf- *•> # # # * tt # 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 



The program of obtaining leases for public access to the banks of our 
principle trout streams continued during the year, with another mile and one- 
quarter added on the Shawsheen River and five miles on the Assabet River, bring- 
ing the total mileage of leased stream banks in the state to 86 and one-fourth 

miles. 

Public fishing grounds are now located on the following rivers : 
Deerfield, Westfield (all branches), Farmington, Millers, Squannacook, Ipswich, 
Shawsheen, Clam, Buck and Assabet. 

Preliminary work was started in reopening leases on all the western 
public fishing grounds as present leases in that area will soon expire. The usual 
maintenance work, posting, etc., took up the remainder of the year. 

The five miles leased on the Assabet can be attributed to the helpful 
cooperation of the Marlboro, Northboro and Hudson sportsmen's clubs. 

•* % -a- % % # ■}{• # # # # 



- 8 - 



BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH & MANAGEMENT 

The activities of the Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management have 
continued along the emphasis of last year in that more and more effort has been 
directed toward management, i.e., utilizing the knowledge gained by the research 
studies on fish, fur, and game species. 

The four wildlife management districts inaugurated last year have now 
completed their first full year of operation. The complete reorganization of 
staff and reassignment of duties and equipment which accompanied this development 
have resulted in a much more efficient operation of the Bureau and a much closer 
contact with the interested public. Examples of this are readily seen in the 
considerable progress that has been made in working with sportsmen's clubs on 
co-operative programs and the acceleration and improvement of the Division 1 s pro- 
grams through local knowledge and controls. 

The past year has seen further expansion in the fisheries program, with 
the result that the necessary biological knowledge for sound fisheries management 
is rapidly becoming available on a state-wide basis. Also, considerable effort 
in planning and organizational work was expended by Bureau personnel in connection 
with the opening of Quabbin Reservoir to controlled boat fishing. 

A paper on "New England Waterfowl Problems," growing directly out of 
studies on waterfowl in Massachusetts was given jointly by Superintendent 
Robert L. Jones and Mr. Joseph A. Hagar, State Ornithologist, at the Regional 
Northeastern Wildlife Conference in West Virginia during April. 



->t JL J'. 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS 

The four wildlife management districts perform in the field the manage- 
ment and development work that has been indicated by the results of various 
research studies carried on at the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory. The districts 
also aid in certain of the field work of some research studies, but their main 
purpose is to perform actual development work in the field, usually in cooperation 
with sportsmen's clubs. Besides this, the district crews also act as regional 
educational agents, giving many lectures to sportsmen's clubs, conservation 
groups, youth organizations and school assemblies as well as making frequent news 
releases and contacts with the local press and other media. 

The accomplishments shown in the table are those of the districts them- 
selves, and are not to be confused with activities reported by other sections 
elsewhere in this report unless otherwise stated. The table does not indicate 
all activities of the districts, only those which readily lend themselves to 
tabulation of this sort. Each district performs some work that is peculiar to it 
alone and that cannot be presented in tabular form. 

For example, districts two and three worked together in an experimental 
weed control project on Sandy Pond, Ayer, in which 32,720 pounds of fertilizer 
were used. Each district also spent considerable time counting anglers on various 
ponds j district three, for example, counting fishermen on 35 different ponds. 

- 9 - 



TABLE OF DISTRICT ACTIVITIES 



ACTIVITY 



(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


00 


Western 


Central 


North-Eastern 


South-Eastern 


District 


District 


District 


District 



F-R Projects 
Wood duck 
Boxes built 

Boxes erected this year 
Boxes to clubs this year 
Boxes checked for usage 
Ducks banded 


158 
209 

65 
77U 

28 


310 
220 

77 
630 

18 




2U1 
226 
108 
578 
2 


238 
198 

Uo 

639 
23 


Checking stations 
Deer 

Waterfowls 
Beaver 


3 

2 


2 
(Ass't 




Dist. 


3 

3) 1 




5 




Census 
Mink-otter 
Muskrat areas 
Beaver 


Watershed 
15>0 miles 
7 
3 


Culvert Counts 
16 
8 



5 
8 



3 

h 




Habitat Improvement 
Number of plants 
Number farms involved 
Number of plants to clubs 
Fence row boarders cut back 
Woodland borders cut back 


21,280 
18 
1,500 
1,300 ft 
200 ft 


19,600 

20 

114,000 



300 


ft 


U7,665 

37 

13,800 



600 ft 


78,290 

72 

11,030 



800 ft 



Water Chestnut Control 

Acres treated 

Fisheries Management 
Pan and weedfish control 
Bluegill nests destroyed 2,070 

Crappie concentrators placed 

Fish traps placed 111 

Panfish derbies assisted 2 

Poisoning, ponds treated 1 

Ponds reclaimed 1 



3,000 
3 

27 
5 
l 
1 



15 



(For further information on poisoning and reclamation, 

Management section elsewhere in this report) 



800 


250 


17 


20 


20 


17 


3 








3 








see Fisheries 





Game fish 
Bass shelters 
Bass spawning grounds marked 




1 



Club activities 
Clubs aided in various projects 5 

Game, non P-R 
Cottontail live traps distributed Xk$ 



8 
177 



5 

2 



6 
230 



5 
151 



- 10 - 



TABLE OF DISTRICT ACTIVITIES (Cont'd) 



ACTIVITY 

Game, non P-R, continued 
Rabbit damage sites 

surveyed 
Beaver complaints 
Beaver transplanted 
Woodcock singing grounds 
located 



(1) 

Western 
District 



(2) 

Central 
District 



3 


11 


26 





21 


3 



(3) 

North-Ea stern 

District 



10 
3 

1 



(U) 

South-Eastern 
District 



several 


1 



Education 
Meetings with clubs, etc. 
Other contacts 
News releases 

Displays (in coop, with I & E) 
Conservation camp lectures 
Publications (in coop, with I&E) 
Radio appearances 
Television appearances 



& 


81 


several 


35 


several 


several 





2 


15 








1 





2 









78 

32 

5 

h 

o 
o 

3 




76 
50 
7 



2 




#*-*■* * -:.<- -x- * # * # 



- 11 - 



District three also spent 11 weekends, two holidays and opening day of fishing 
season running a creel census on Long Sought For Pond, Westford. 

District two aided local sportsmen in erecting a snow fence on a smelt 
run in Worcester and assisted pond survey crews on three occasions. District four 
fin-clipped 20,000 trout that went into Cape Cod streams and sampled the Santuit 
River and Cliff Pond for trout populations. District one spent some time 
attempting to rear walleyed pike, a project which fell through due to lack of a 
supply of eggs. District one had the only beaver season of the year. 

All districts participated in grouse wing and tail surveys and rabbit 
research work by distributing and picking up specimen bags at collection points. 

Districts two and three also took part in some turtle control work, 
while district four planted several hundred pounds of lespedeza seed in addition 
to live plants shown on the table. 

# * # * * -Jf- # * *- *- # 



STATE WILDLIFE PROJECT 



The work of this project has varied considerably in the past year. The 
most important phases of the work were the grouse wing and tail study, the Harold 
Parker Field Trial Area, the wildlife shrub nursery and the turtle trapping 
program. 

Grouse Wing & Tail Study 

During the fiscal year, 1620 complete sets or parts of sets of grouse 
wings and tails were examined. 

Sex and age ratios gleaned from the wings and tails of the birds shot 
during open season showed: 

1. The composition of the fall population. 

2. The success of the previous breeding season. 

3. The success of brood survival. 

The primary objective of this phase of the work was to obtain a clear 
picture of the sex and age composition of the Massachusetts grouse population. 

Harold Parker Field Trial Area 

Three successful field trials were held on the sixteen one-half hour 
courses in the Harold Parker Forest. 

Work accomplished was as follows: 

1. ItO crab apple trees planted along some of the courses. 

2. Trails were repainted with a more durable and brighter paint. 

3. Conifer and natural food plots were released. 

- 12 - 



It. Courses were brushed out. 

5. Most of the courses were mapped. 

This is the only wild bird field trial area in the state. 

Wildlife Shrub Nursery 

The nursery was shifted from the Worcester State Hospital grounds to 
the Westboro State Hospital grounds. Approximately 110,000 multiflora rose plants 
were harvested from the Worcester nursery and at present there is in the vicinity 
of 200,000 plants growing in Westboro. 

Seeds were collected from the lespedeza mother stock and sent to the 
Pittman-Robertson coordinator. 

Turtle Trapping Program 

The only work done in this phase was the never ending correspondence with 
cooperators and speaking to clubs while working with them in an advisory capacity. 

Other duties of the personnel of this project included cooperative work 
with other agencies in the form of small mammal trap line and a periodic roadside 
dove count. 

•k- # #■ # * # x ■>,* #- x # 



PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE PROJECTS 

(75 per cent of the cost of these projects is reimbursed by federal tax monies on 
firearms and ammunition under the Pittman-Robertson Act.) 

Cottontail Rabbit Habitat Management Area 

The purposes of the rabbit management area are: to determine the effects 
of habitat improvement on the cottontail rabbit populations and to demonstrate to 
sportsmen' s clubs management techniques that may be used for improving their local 
covers and club grounds. 

Census figures to indicate population trends are taken by periodic live 
trapping, tagging and releasing cottontail rabbits. 

Hunting pressure was measured by erecting Ik boxes containing data 
sheets and pencils. Hunters were asked to fill in the results of the day's hunt. 
Sportsmen were also interviewed in the field. 

Habitat management techniques in practices to date include: the estab- 
lishing and maintenance of six food patches of various sizes; conifer and multi- 
flora rose plantations; 13 experimental fertilizer plots; various silvicultural 
cuttings. The area is open to hunting and inspection by sportsmen and beagle 
clubs . 



- 13 - 



■Vcod Duck Nesting Research Project . 

Trapping and banding of wood ducks was resumed on April 1st. To date 
73 new birds have been banded and many birds banded in previous years have been 
retrapped. In addition close to 1*00 day-old ducklings have been marked. Subse- 
quent retrappings of these ducklings will give a clearer picture of juvenile 
survival. Slides are being prepared of blood smears from known age juvenile ducks 
in cooperation with a study of leucocytozoon disease in waterfowl conducted by 
C. M. Herman, Sc.D. of the Patuxent Research Refuge, Maryland. 

Special areas have been set up to determine the percentage of adult 
females which will return to these areas in subsequent nesting seasons. In this 
experiment the incubating female wood ducks are banded in the nesting boxes found 
to be occupied in each special area. One hundred and thirty-three birds were 
banded in eleven such areas. 

Compilation of the state-wide check of 1600 nesting boxes has just begun, 
and while the tabulation is not yet complete it is evident that there has been an 
increase in wood duck numbers in Wildlife Management Districts II, III & IV with 
a slight decrease in District I. The overall increase can probably be attributed 
for the most part to the ample water levels maintained last summer which aided 
brood dispersal and juvenile survival. 

A study of the data obtained from the hunter bag check during the first 
two weeks of the 1951 waterfowl hunting season on the Sudbury Marshes showed that 
while the wood duck was more vulnerable to gunning than the black duck, the kill 
was not excessive. This was due to the one-in-possession limit and the early mi- 
gration of the wood duck. The peak of the wood duck flight occurred about October 
1st and the waterfowl hunting season opened October 26th. By November 3, few wood 
duck were in evidence. 

A waterfowl checking station was operated at Newburyport during the open 
season for the third and final year. A final report is being completed showing 
hunter success, composition of the bag and sex and age ratios. 

This project is continuing with the objective of determining the informa- 
tion which will allow the Division to effectively manage this valuable wildlife 
species. 

Wood Duck Nesting Box Erection 

This year 836 wood duck nesting boxes were erected, making a total of 
2,7U8 boxes erected to date all over the state by the Division of Fisheries and 
Game. 

220 boxes were repaired, 9h7 built, 268 boxes distributed to others for 
erection, making a total to date of 14,071. 

Deer Checking Stations 

During the open season on deer December 3 to December 8, 3,h32 were 
reported killed, an increase over last year, and an increase over the past twelve 
year average. Of the 3,li32 reported killed, 1,1^0 (33.5$) were checked at 17 
stations. There the deer were weighed, aged, sexed and hind foot measurements 
taken. From the data gathered, the herd is in good condition, and the annual re- 
placement still exceeds the annual kill. 

- 11; - 



Farm Game Feed Planting 

For the purpose of aiding farm game restoration llju,785 shrubs were 
planted on the farm lands of Massachusetts. This work is carried on with the 
cooperation of U. S. Soil Conservation Service who recommend the farms to be 
planted, and who supply many of the shrub seedlings. 

Water Chestnut Control 

The control of water chestnut (trapa natans) by spraying and hand pulling 
continues on the Sudbury and Concord Rivers, and on the College ponds at Mt. 
Holyoke College. Progress has reached the point at which all the former dense 
beds are now reduced in size and density^ some are entirely gone and of some there 
remain only scattered plants. 

Quail 

For the specific purpose of aiding quail, 18,800 Lespedeza natab seed- 
lings and 93 pounds of Lespedeza bicolor seeds have been planted in Southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

Cock Pheasant Stocking 

To determine the practicality of stocking only cock pheasants, a research 
project has been carried on at Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. 

Only cock pheasants will be released on that area; and a tally of hunting 
returns will be kept. Food patches and strips have been planted to insure an 
adequate supply of winter food. 

Fur Investigations 

Fur animal studies were carried on during the fiscal year 1951-52 with 
the major emphasis on muskrat, mink and otter. Information is being gathered as 
to the economical value of the fur harvest, trapper success, trapper preference, 
time spent on the trap line, rate of harvest, sex and age ratios and fluctuations 
in the fur animal populations. This information to be used in the wise management 
of the fur resources of the Commonwealth. 

Beaver management during this year has entailed the live trapping of 
nuisance beaver (damage complaints) and releasing the animals into the relatively 
unsettled sections of the state. Also, an open beaver trapping season was declared 
during the month of February 1952, in which 63 animals were harvested out of an 
estimated population of 1,000 animals. 

The 1951-52 open fur trapping season harvest and the resulting monetary 
value to the people of the Commonwealth interested in trapping is shown in the 
following table. 

Species Harvest 1951 Fall Price Monetary Return 

Muskrat 109,UoU $ 1.70 $ 185,986.80 

Mink 2,286 20.00 u5, 720.00 

Otter 26a lu.00 3,696.00 

*Red Fox 277 -75 207.75 

- 15 - 



-"-Grey Fox 


1U5 


$ .25 


Skunk 


1,338 


1.00 


Weasel 


90h 


1.25 


•^Raccoon 


1,263 


1.90 


Beaver 


63 


- 



Harvest 1951 Fall Price Monetary Return 

$ 36.25 

1,338.00 
1,130.00 
2,398.70 
1,000.00 

Total Value $2ul,5lU.30 

■is- These figures do not include the animals taken by hunters. 

* -::- -x -x -x -x -x -;:- * -x -x 

FISHERIES INVESTIGATIONS & MANAGEMENT 



Surveys 

The biological survey of lakes and ponds was continued as in past years 
but at a greatly accelerated pace in an effort to bring this important work to a 
close at an early date. Acceleration was achieved largely through use of techno- 
logical improvements in survey methods that permitted a reorganization of the 
survey along more efficient lines. Major changes included substitution of echo 
sounding for hand line sounding, substitution of chemical fish collection methods 
for seining, improved methods of handling gill nets, use of electrical thermometers 
for taking water temperatures, and elimination of currently valueless activities. 
Consequently, with but a 60$ increase in summer-time employees, speed of coverage 
was increased by nearly 300$ — a two-fold increase in efficiency resulting. One 
hundred and six bodies of water in Barnstable, Bristol, Essex, Franklin, Hampden, 
Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester Counties were completed. An 
especial effort was made to include all remaining ponds with trout stocking his- 
tories, or with trout "reputations", or that appeared in any way to have trout 
possibilities, in anticipation of early preparation of a trout pond management 
bulletin. 

Over-population of our ponds by hordes of weed fish and small pan fish, 
resulting in widespread stunting of pan fish and low levels of abundance, has 
been found to be the outstanding management problem. 

The fisheries report covering work in 19i|6 (Plymouth County), 19l|7 
(Berkshire County) and 19U8 (Barnstable County) has been distributed. A report 
covering the work of 19i;9 (Essex County and part of Middlesex County) was completed 
and is now being printed. 

It was decided to use first disbursements of Dingell-Johnson funds 
(federal aid to fisheries tax monies) to answer a pressing need for information on 
stream fishing conditions in Massachusetts. With well over 1/2 million legal trout 
being stocked annually in thousands of miles of streams it is high time to find out 
what is happening to these fish and how a higher harvest may be achieved by the 
angler. James W. Mullan of Leominster was appointed to head up this project. 

The first year's work was begun on the Westfield River drainage where 
r^arly 100,000 legal trout, all marked, were stocked. A creel census was maintained 



- 16 - 



on the middle branch of the Westfield River. Following this a field -party began 
seeking evidences of the fate of state-stocked trout, extent of native fish popu- 
lations, degree of natural reproduction, and possibilities of improvement both in 
habitat and methods of managing (including stocking) the fish populations. Already 
it is known that the vast bulk of fish stocked were not harvested by the anglers 
and that most fish actually taken by anglers from the middle branch were stocked 
fish. Few trout stocked last spring, despite low angler harvest, have been found 
still present in the system so far, but many tributaries have native trout popula- 
tions that are maintaining themselves through natural reproduction. In some 
instances trout stocked in the Westfield River are known to have gone down the 
Connecticut River into Long Island Sound, apparently during high flood water condi- 
tions that characterize the Westfield drainage at frequent intervals. Stream bank 
erosion is a serious problem thruout the drainage. Suckers, fallfish and dace have 
been found to be far more abundant than trout. Productivity, in terms of weight 
of fish that can be supported, is low. 

Angling Pressure 

Data is being accumulated on actual fishing pressure thruout the state. 
It will be possible to tell just which waters are most popular or convenient in 
another year or so. 

• While a knowledge of how many people may fish some body of water is 
important, it is more important to know how well they may be harvesting the fish 
crop. A number of waters were test-netted where anglers complained of a dearth of 
fish. Invariably large quantities of fish were demonstrated to be present, in 
' some cases being of highly attractive kinds and sizes. In these cases more skilfull 
angling seems to be the only answer. In order to accumulate information on the 
harvest of various species, and the effective angling pressure on individual waters, 
the tagging program was intensified. Most adult game fishes taken during salvage 
and transfer activities were tagged before liberation. 

To date, tag returns of recaptured tagged fishes indicate that about 2$% 
of adult predator fishes (bass and pickerel) are being harvested annually state- 
wide but that less than 6% of adult pan fishes (perch, pout, crappie, rock bass, 
bluegills) are being harvested annually state-wide. Relative abundance of these 
species is just the reverse. Unless much more emphasis is placed by anglers on 
harvesting the pan fishes, substitute harvest by state personnel using nets and 
chemicals will be needed for many years if fishing for the preferred bass and 
pickerel is to be improved. 

Fish Management Policy 

A modern fish management policy was formulated, based largely on accumu- 
lated pond survey data, and other fisheries research findings, and adopted by the 
Board. Under this policy Massachusetts for the first time has an integrated 
fishery management and research program. Recognizing the widespread overabundance 
of pan fish and the futility of indiscriminate pan fish stocking — the major 
management tool of the past — the Board, in adopting this policy, moved toward a 
program featuring population control. The generally wasteful and harmful practice 
of stocking small pan fishes (the vast bulk of warm-water fish stocking for many 
years) was curtailed. 

Population control consists of reducing the numbers of overabundant pan 
fish and weed fish by one method or another. It also includes limited habitat 

- 17 - 



improvement work, a modification of the regulations governing harvest of fish crops, 
modified salvage and transfer closely coordinated with pond survey findings, and 
a program of sportsman education operated in conjunction with the Division' s 
Information and Education Office. 

Thinning of Overabundant Pan and Weed Fishes 

With transfer of former salvage crews from the propagation section to the 
aquatic biology section, and their reorganization into pond management units, it 
became possible to coordinate salvage work efficiently with the need for reduction 
of overabundant fish populations since the same types of nets need to be used in 
many instances. Wildlife district managers and their field forces have also con- 
tributed strongly to this phase of activities, largely through partial poisonings, 
pond reclamation and bluegill spawn destruction. In addition, experimental wire 
fish traps of an inexpensive, portable design are being developed by the managers 
under direction of the aquatic biology section. These are designed as a possible 
aid in wide -spread efforts to effect control of certain pan fish — bluegills and 
pumpkinseeds in particular. This will be in experimental stages for at least 
another year. 

By all methods about 19 tons of overabundant pan and weed fish were 
removed from as many ponds (see Table 1). The weed fish (suckers and carp) 
averaged over 2 pounds apiece in weight, while the pan fish (yellow perch, white 
perch, calico bass, and horn pout) average one-tenth pound (1^ oz.) apiece in 
weight. The heading "Bluegills" in Table 1 includes pumpkinseeds as well.. Several 
ponds received concentrated attention, having particularly poor quality fish popu- 
lations. 

From one of these, Billington Sea, Plymouth, 1179 pounds of bluegills 
and pumpkinseeds and 3166 pounds of suckers had been removed in early 1951 (195>0-5l 
fiscal year). This was followed up by further netting and a partial poisoning 
this past spring. By these means, 3,368 more pounds of bluegills and pumpkinseeds 
and 2,275 more pounds of suckers, and 2,000 pounds of other overcrowded pan fish 
were removed. Thus some six tons of worthless fish were removed. It is believed 
that this void will be partly filled by more and better game fish. Another of 
these, Stearns Pond, North Andover, was drained. Over two tons of worthless fish • 
were removed. It was found that less than two per cent of all fish present 
exceeded 7 inches in length. Sufficient brood stock pickerel and yellow perch 
were restocked here to restore good angling for these species in a few years. 

Habitat Improvement 

Please see reports on activities of individual wildlife districts for 
progress in habitat improvement, pond reclamation and other specific fisheries 
accomplishments not reported here. While under the direction of the aquatic biology 
section, these activities are largely conducted by the district managers. 

Regulations 

A number of changes were proposed to bring fisheries laws and regulations 
into harmony with research findings. For those ' actually passed please refer to the 
section on legislation in the rear of this report. 



- 18 - 






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- 20 - 



Salvage and Transfer 

A wealth of biological information is now available from the biological 
survey of ponds and lakes. The harmful and wasteful nature of stocking additional 
hordes of small pan fish where they are already overabundant is obvious. Conse- 
quently the stocking of such fishes has been virtually eliminated, and emphasis 
placed on salvage of game species. While some pan fish continued to be stocked 
this is on a greatly reduced scale. Only the very largest pan fish were stocked 
in public waters (many small ones were released in youth's ponds), with a large 
percentage being tagged for experimental purposes, in line with survey findings. 
The emphasis is now on discriminatory justifiable stocking. The average size game 
and pan fish stocked weighed in excess of 1/3 of a pound. This is about a six fold 
increase in average size over those formerly stocked. Large quantities of minnows 
were also stocked. A more detailed summary of salvage activities is shown in 
Table 2. 

New Waters 

Considerable effort was expended by the aquatic biologist in preparing a 
plan, based on collected experiences in several other states, for a proposed opening 
of Quabbin Reservoir to controlled boat fishing. With the adoption of this plan in 
most respects by the controlling agency, the area of available public fishing 
waters was increased by about 2/3. This large an increase in fishing territory is 
an utter impossibility in most eastern states. Possibly even more significant is 
the fact that for the first time a body of water suited to big game fish species 
development has become available in the Commonwealth. It behooves every sportsman 
to give the utmost cooperation to the controlling agency in its efforts to work 
out details of administering the growing angling facilities and protecting the 
quality of the water for drinking at the same time. With adequate cooperation and 
patience these objectives are not incompatible. This fact has been clearly shown 
in other states for many years. 

Publications 

As a direct result of advances being made in fisheries management in 
Massachusetts a technical paper was prepared and presented at the 17th North 
American Wildlife Conference on "Management of Warm Water Fish Populations in 
Massachusetts' Lakes, Ponds, and Reservoirs". Other papers reporting to the 
fisheries profession on various fisheries developments, both in press and published, 
include "Notes on Reliability of Some Fish Tags Being Used in Massachusetts", "Use 
of a Wetting Agent to Facilitate Pond Reclamation", and "Echo Sounding Massachu- 
setts Lakes, Ponds, and Reservoirs". 

# x -:c- -;:- ■}<- ■&• -::- -;><■ * * -:c- 



STATE ORNITHOLOGIST 

Except for relatively short periods required for the routine duties of 
the position, the year has been spent on the waterfowl work of the Division — 
processing of information previously collected, supervision of the winter feeding- 
program, and intensive new studies of local distribution, age and sex ratios, and 
kill. A group of banding stations in the Parker River region of Essex County, 
operated from August to May, produced data of much better quality than anything 

- 21 - 



previously available. This material has been worked up during the spring, and is 
already being used in discussions with the game divisions of other Atlantic Coast 
states and with the federal regulatory agency. The gathering of exact information 
about waterfowl is a rather slow process, but it is unquestionably showing the way 
to more effective management. 

In the summer and fall, prior to the waterfowl shooting season, a full 
time banding program was conducted in the Newburyport-Plum Island area. Banding 
traps were operated on seven sites, and a total of 1,059 black ducks were banded. 
An additional 27 blacks banded by other operators were caught and released. From 
such banding, information essential to the intelligent management of the black duck 
will be obtained. 

The banding program was resumed on November 28 and continued until 
May 15, 1952. A total of 955 blacks were banded during this period, bringing the 
year's total up to 2,01u. The bulk of the birds trapped after the season were 
taken in a trap on Woodbridge Island in Newburyport harbor. 

The bulk of the spring season was spent in transcribing, compiling, and 
evaluating the banding data and band recoveries. Other activities in the past year 
included participation in the wintering ground waterfowl counts and brood census 
trials using a retriever. 

% ■){■ # tf # % # ■«■ # ■«• #- 



COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 
(University of Massachusetts) 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

The study on ruffed grouse inaugurated in 19ii9, was continued in skeleton 
form awaiting the acceptance of a second full-time graduate student to devote two 
years of work on the study areas. 

Woodcock Project 

The long-term woodcock project was continued. One hundred and fifty-four 
v/oodcocks were banded, and ecological studies made on their breeding habitats. A 
study was made of suggested methods of altering the current census technique used 
by the federal government. 

Cottontail Rabbit Project 

A second two-year study on the geographical and ecological ranges of the 
two species of rabbits native to Massachusetts was completed. Results indicate 
somewhat different management techniques for the two species. 

Snowshoe Hare Project 

Studies were continued on the survival of released snowshoe hare,, their 
distribution and ecological requirements in the state. 



- 22 - 



Bobwhite Quail Project 

A two-year study on the bobwhite quail in southeastern Massachusetts was 
initiated. The focus of attention will be on the survival of pen raised birds. 

Economic Survey 

In cooperation with NENYAC, a survey of the economic importance of 
hunting and fishing in Massachusetts has been started. It is anticipated that this 
should be completed by the end of 1953. 

* # ######■ -x- # # 



BIRCH HILL PUBLIC HUNTING AND FISHING GROUNDS 



Comprising some h^OO acres in the towns of Templeton, Winchendon and 
Royalston, the Birch Hill area is maintained as a public hunting grounds. All 
streams within the area are, of course, also open to the public. 

Work on this area is direct management to maintain and increase, if 
possible, the native wildlife species. A research project to keep a check on the 
results of management is conducted there, with this year's management efforts being 
based on the findings of the research project of the previous year. 

The management work accomplished during the past year includes: (1) the 
erection of a 20' by $0' building to supply office and storage space; (2) the main- 
tenance of bridges within the area to prevent washing out in flood water; (3) the 
repair of roads during warm weather and plowing during the winter; (k) the erection 
of signs to mark the main entrances and the headquarters; (5) the planting of 6,000 
conifers on field borders and in groups to provide escape cover; (6) the planting 
of 10,000 multiflora roses in field borders and travel lanes to provide both food 
and escape cover; (7) the planting of 10 acres of winter rye in the fall to supply 
winter food and to be turned in for green manure in the spring; (8) the planting 
of 18 acres of food strips consisting of a grass and clover mixture, oats and a 
soybean-buckwheat mixture; (9) the thinning of overcrowded pine plantation to en- 
courage sprout growth which will provide both food and escape cover; (10) the 
reclamation of burned pine plantation so that new plantings could be made; (11) the 
locating of two sites for waterfowl and muskrat management. 

The research project consisted of censusing the various game species. 
Information was obtained from several sources. Cottontail rabbits and white hare 
were counted by means of box trapping several sections of the area. The ruffed 
grouse population was determined by walking established grid lines at regular 
intervals and by making a count of drumming birds in the spring. Woodcock singing 
grounds were located in the spring. Daily observations of all game seen throughout 
the year were kept on specially prepared report cards. Results of all sources 
showed good hunting populations of all game species within the area. 

# # * # * # tt # ¥■ * # 



- 23 - 



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- 21* - 



THE SPORTS 



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.23 




FISCRL YEAR. 1952 



* Certain amounts of these expenditures (330ti— U7 & 33 r it— 53 ) 
75$ reimbursed by federal funds. 



- 25 - 



INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 



SURPLUS AS OF JUNE 30, 1952 



#523,U32.U2 



-;:- a # Mr 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
1952 Fiscal year 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Registrations and Tags 

Rents 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 

Refund Prior Year 

Pittman-Robertson Fund 

Court Fines 

TOTAL INCOME 



$783,827.25 
5,569.75 
2,730.50 
1,199.81 
75.06 
58,662.19 
9,000.50 

$861,365.06 



# * # 



Analysis of the Special Licenses issued under Section I4.8, 68A, 102, 103, lOlj, 105, 
106 and 107, Chapter 131, G. L., during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1952. 



Type of License 

Special Fish Propagator License 

Special Fish Progagator License - No Fee 

Fish Propagator License 

Propagator License (Birds or Mammals) 

Special Propagator License - No Fee 

Dealer's License 

"Possession Only" License 

Taxidermist License 

Resident Citizen Fur Buyer's 

License to take Shiners for bait 

Trap Registration Certificates 

Fish Tags 

Game Tags 



Number 




Issued 


Receipts 


170 


$ 189.00 


k 


- 


69 


231.00 


39U 


1,368.00 


h 


- 


5iU 


822.00 


$9 


35.50 


39 


195.00 


38 


380.00 


307 


1,530.50 


1,117 


553.75 


16,900 


I69.OO 


1,920 


96.00 



$5,569.75 



- 26 - 



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- 27 - 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND CAME 

APPROPRIATIONS ■ AND EXPENDITURES 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1951 to June 30, 1952 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS - Expiring June 30, 1952 



Acct. No. 
330U-01 
330li-06 
330U-31 
330U-13 
330JM5 
330U-51 
*330l*-53 
3301-5U 
330U-56 



Title 



Appropriation 



Personal Services and Expenses $65,01*8.00 
Expenses of the Board 1,750.00 

Propagation, etc. ' ' ' 1*27,892.00' 
Information Program 5,890.00 

Public Fishing Grounds 9,500.00 

Protection of Wildlife 63,530.00 
Wildlife Restoration lll*,51*0.00 

Stream & Bird Cover Improvement 7,500.00 
Biological Survey . i 22,837.00 

Totals ' $718,1*87.00 



Expenditures & 
Liabilities 

$62,91*9.81 

1,61*7.1*3 

"1*15,108.50 

5,639.1*1* 

9,130.90 

60,32li.82 

101,71*^.52 

JyhXkA 

21,359.93 



Reverted 

$2,098.19 

102.57 

12,783.50 

250.56 

369.10 

3,205.18 

12,797.1*8 

85.1*9 

1,1*77.07 



$685,317.86 $33,169.11* 



Acct. No. 



Title 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS ; 

Appropriation & Encumbered | i 

Previous Balance Expended (Bal. Forward) Reverted 



330U-U2 Improvement & Manage- 
ment 
Rivers 



raent of Lakes, Ponds, 



$51,956.11* $1*1*,179.15 th,379.hh $3,397.55 



-^330U-U7 


Stream Survey and 
Inventory Work 


21,853.00 


13,370.65 


3,231.17 


5,251.18 


330U-U8 


Improv. State Game 
Farms 


16,307.17 • 


11 ,1*65 .'06 


•1*, 690. 25 


151.86 


330U-U9 


Improv. State Fish 
Hatcheries 


1*0,392.09 


22,718.05 


12,986.62 


1*, 687.1*2 


330U-50 


Pond Fish Units 


1*, 783.35 


3,919.87 


837.80 


25.68 


330!*-55 


Est. Public Shooting 
Grounds 

Totals 


395.00 
$135,686.75 


395.00 
$96,01*7.78 










$26,125.28 ; 


$13,513.69 



% 75% reimbursement from Federal Funds ; 

i 
All of the above Special Appropriations .expired June 30, 1952 with the exception of 

330l*-55 which expired June 30, 1950. 
- 28 - 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1952: 

Chapter 28 U, Acts of 1952: An act relative to the carrying and use of bows and 

arrows while hunting. 

Chapter 301;, Acts of 1952: An act increasing the fees for non-resident trappers. 

Chapter 309, Acts of 1952: An act providing for the establishment of a right of 

way for public access to South End Pond in the town 
of Millis. 

Chapter hh9 , Acts of 1952: An act enabling the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game in the Department of Conservation 
to acquire certain land known as the Pantry Brook Area 
in the town of Sudbury. 

Chapter h5k s Acts of 1952: An act increasing the fee for certain trapping 

licenses. 



Chapter 501, Acts of 1952: An act further regulating the discharge of injurious 

substances into waters used for fishing. 



■k- -x- -::- #- •»> ■* k -;:- #• -x- -a- 



- 29 - 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY 
THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1952 



March 2k, 1952. Prohibiting fishing except between April 15 and July 31, 
both dates inclusive, in Bailey's Pond, Amesbury, and restricting the catch to six 
trout a day per person by fly fishing, with no trolling permitted. 

October 29, 191*6. Rules and regulations relative to seasons, legal 
lengths, bag limits, and license requirements to apply to Wallum Lake in the town 
of Douglas, also lying partly in the town of Burrilville, Rhode Island. 

July 8, 19l$. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of fish. 

July 8, 19U8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of 
birds and mammals. 

September 9, 191*9 • Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake Mono- 
monac in the town of Winchendon, Long Pond in the towns of Tyngsboro and Dracut, 
and Tuxbury Pond in the town of Amesbury (three ponds lying partly in the State of 
New Hampshire) . 

March 7, 1950. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish and 
use of land in areas leased by Division of Fisheries and Game for public fishing 
ground purposes. 

January 2, 1951. Public fishing grounds, supplement, establishing fly 
fishing area on Farmington River. 

February Ik, 1951. Special regulations for Deerfield River and its 
diverted waters and establishing a fly fishing area thereon. 

March Ik, 1951. Setting aside as bass spawning grounds certain areas in 
the following ponds and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 and June 
30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1951: Bloody Pond, 
Plymouth; Dorothy Pond, Millbury; Fort Pond, Lancaster; Fort Pond, Littleton; 
Hampton Pond, Southampton and Westfield; Island Pond (Great Island Pond), Plymouth; 
Mascopic Lake, Tyngsboro and Dracut; Oldham Pond, Pembroke; Sampsons Pond, Carver; 
Sandy Pond, Plymouth; Snows Pond, Rochester; Stetson Pond, Pembroke; White Island 
Pond, Plymouth and Wareham; Alum Pond, Sturbridge. 

June 12, 1951. Pheasant, Quail, and Ruffed Grouse Regulations for 
season of 1951. 

September 18, 1951. Migratory Game Bird Regulations for season of 1951- 

September u, 1951. Special fishing regulations on Cliff Pond in Brewster. 

January 18, 1952. Beaver Trapping Regulations for 1952 season. 

March 28, 1952 and April 16, 1952. Special regulations on Higgins Pond 
in Brewster. 

March 28, 1952. Special fishing regulations on Hoosac Reservoir. 

- 30 - 



""0 f~, 

- / 










STATE LIBRARY OF MASSA»tlli» 

j j 1953 

state house, m&rm 

MASSOFFIC 



<*<3 7ri, 




C73s 

1 953 



S^£^i^/m/iMam t!$/xiJ<ms S' 



October 1, 1953 



His Excellency Christian A. Herter, Governor of the Commonwealth; 

The Executive Council; The General Courts and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 



Sirs 



I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty-eighth Annual 
Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the fiscal year 
from July 1, 1952 to June 30, 1953. 



Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT H. JOHNSON 
DIRECTOR' 




DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

EIGHTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Report of the Board 1 

Fish Propagation U 

Fish Distribution Table 5 

Game Propagation 7 

Game Distribution Table 8 

Education 9 

Public Fishing Grounds 12 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management 

Wildlife Management District One Ill 

Wildlife Management District Two 18 

Wildlife Management District Three 22 

Wildlife Management District Four 27 

State Wildlife Project 3k 

Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Projects 35 

Fisheries Investigations & Management 39 

Panfish Control Table U2 

Fish Salvage Table 1|3 

State Ornithologist hS 

Mass. Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit hS 

Birch Hill Public Hunting and Fishing Ground U6 

Organizational Chart hi 

The Sportsman's Dollar hQ 

Distribution of Sportsman's Dollar 1*9 

Tables - Summary of Income 

Receipts from Licenses 5l 

Appropriations and Expenditures 52 

1953 Legislation 53 

Summary of Regulations 5k 



Publication of this document 



approved by 



George J. Cronin - 



State Purchasing Agent - #22 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



This is the fifth report of the Division of Fisheries and Game since 
reorganization of the Department of Conservation under Chapter 651, Acts of 
19^8. Much progress has been made during these five years, hence comment is 
not only made on developments of the past fiscal year but in certain instances 
attention is called to progress which is apparent at the end of the five-year 
period since reorganization. 

For the first time in the history of the Division yearly income has 
exceeded one million dollars. To be more exact, on June 30, 1953, which marks 
the end of the past fiscal year and also the first full year of increased 
license fees, income is $1,015,991.33. 

Our finances are in a healthy condition as shown by the surplus of the 
Inland Fisheries and Game Fund, which on June 30, 1953, is $571,999.00 in com- 
parison with $523,1*32.00 at the end of the fiscal year of 1952. 

The Board has adopted a policy of management which provides that at no 
time will the surplus in the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund fall below 
$250,000.00. At the same time, our properties and equipment will be kept in 
first-class condition, constructive programs will be continued and new ones 
planned and carried out. At no time in the foreseeable future will sportsmen of 
the Commonwealth be asked to contribute more to the Inland Fisheries and Game 
Fund through increased license fees. Surplus in excess of $250,000.00 warrants 
an occasional capital outlay when needed and where no general increase in 
operating costs can be anticipated. Such capital outlay is under consideration 
for the Fiscal year beginning July 1, 1951;. 

Shortly after operation of the Division of Fisheries and Game was 
taken over by the five -man Administrative Board, both a short and a long term 
program were adopted. It will be recalled that one phase of the short term 
program called for rehabilitation of the fish hatcheries and game farms for 
maximum efficiency and production according to schedules which at that time were 
feared to be over -optimistic. However, our confidence in the ability and 
co-operation of the personnel has not been misplaced, since production has ex- 
ceeded expectations, as shown by the following statistics: 

Approximately 66,000 pheasants have been reared and will be released 
into suitable covers this year in comparison with 20,000 birds five years ago. 

This year 18U,392 trout, nine inches or over, were stocked as compared 
with 10U,296 five years ago. More pounds of trout were stocked in ponds and 
streams during the last fiscal year than in any preceeding year. 

Along with high production, costs have been maintained at a very 
satisfactory level. We continue to raise and stock trout at approximately $1.02 
per pound. The cost of rearing game birds has been slightly reduced each 
succeeding year and is expected this year to be down to $2.15 per bird. The 
figures quoted include all costs such as labor, feed, distribution, repairs and 
replacements . 



- 1 - 



This year 1875 hares were purchased and released in suitable covers in 
the Commonwealth, whereas five years ago no white hares were procured or 
released by the Division of Fisheries and Game. Funds have been appropriated 
for purchase of a larger number of hares for liberation during the present 
fiscal year. The number actually delivered will depend, as in former years, 
upon conditions prevailing during the trapping season in New Brunswick. 

A biological survey of all the great ponds of the Commonwealth has 
been completed. Pond management crews are carrying out practices in accordance 
with findings of the Aquatic Biologists at an accelerated pace. Full potential 
of our water resources may now be realized, justifying expenditures over a" 
period of years for this research. 

For the first time the Sunderland and the Montague hatcheries are 
rearing lake trout and walleyed pike are in production at Palmer. A good start 
has been made in the culture of both species of fish, the entire production of 
which is for stocking of the Quabbin Reservoir, which we hope may eventually 
under wise management become one of the best fishing waters in the eastern United 
States. 

The District Manager program instituted three years ago is proving its 
value. The application of wildlife management practices, under the direction of 
the manager, has been co-ordinated over the state on a firmer and more refined 
basis. The many expressions of high regard and approval by the sportsmen for 
each of the four District Wildlife Managers and their work in their respective 
districts is probably the best proof of the success of this program. 

The Department- of Natural Resources is now an established fact. Under 
this new organization our Conservation Officers will more properly be known as 
Law Enforcement Officers and may not be expected to indefinitely continue such 
services as stocking of fish and game for the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
Recognizing this eventuality, steps will be taken to have personnel under direc- 
tion of the District Wildlife Managers gradually take over the distribution of 
fish and game, ( 

In order to acquire a basic knowledge on which sound management practices 
could be formulated, our Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management has done con- 
siderable research work, and field surveys from the very beginning. The trend 
away from the research phase and more into management has been more evident during 
the past year. Field management requires highly skilled technicians and it is 
from the knowledge and the work of these men in the field that we shall expect 
our greatest future progress. The Board commends the University of Massachusetts 
for an excellent job in the training of wildlife technicians and the quality of 
research by staff members and students. 

Five years ago there was no section within the Division of Fisheries 
and Game for carrying out necessary work along the lines of information and educa- 
tion such as was being done by almost every state in the country except Massachu- 
setts. A modest beginning has now been made with results which the Board feels 
more than justify the cost. Certain conditions involving personnel which were 
expected to be only of a temporary nature are not satisfactory at the present 
time, but it is hoped they may be corrected through provisions of a budget now in 
preparation. Fisheries and Game is an important part of the economy of the 
Commonwealth. We believe a modest expenditure of funds for the support of an 
Information and Education office as a permanent establishment will prove most 
valuable in achieving our goal of continued and improved hunting and fishing. 

- 2 - 



Favorable relations continue to exist between the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game, the press and other agencies directly concerned with informing 
the public. This condition is highly desirable. Every effort will be made to 
keep these agencies up to date as regards to our policies and programs so that 
they in turn may assist in adequately informing the sporting public. 

The past fiscal year has seen the enactment of much constructive 
legislation. Regulatory powers have now been delegated to the Director of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game which allows him, with approval of the 
Administrative Board, to name seasons and bag limits for fish and game. This 
will, to some degree, reduce the great number of bills on conservation submitted 
for legislative action each year. 

A nevt responsibility is placed on the Division of Fisheries and Game 
which the Board and the Director fully realize. It is intended to co-operate 
with the sportsmen, keeping them fully informed and giving them voice in hear- 
ings which will be held before any changes in regulations, are made. In this 
way, it is expected that all changes in rules and regulations will be construc- 
tive and will be to the best interest of all parties concerned. The sportsmen 
have always evidenced their willingness to co-operate when properly informed on 
matters of mutual interest. 

No changes occured in the membership of the Board during the past 
fiscal year. The term of Frederick A. McLaughlin expired October 6, 1952 and 
he was re-appointed for a term of five years by His Excellency Governor Paul A. 
Dever. 

At the March Meeting of the Board, Mathew T. Coyne was elected Chair- 
man and Fred A. McLaughlin was elected Secretary. 

In September, 1952 the Board accepted with regret the resignation of 
Robert L. Jones, Superintendent of the Bureau of Wildlife Research and Manage- 
ment. Mr. Jones resigned to take a position with similar responsibilities in 
California. On December 12, 1952 the Board appointed Allan S. Kennedy to the 
position of Superintendent of the Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management 
for a term of five years. 

Sincere appreciation is again expressed to the entire personnel of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game, to the Sportsmen and many others. Progress 
in the future as in the past is possible through their loyal support and co-oper- 
ation. 



By order of the Board 

s/ FREDERICK A. McLAUGHLIN 
Secretary 



- 3 



FISH PROPAGATION 



The trout program for the past year was another outstanding one. The 
distribution of legal size trout exceeded over 100,000 the total for the previous 
year which was then the greatest overall production in the history of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game. The total liberation of legal size trout has increased 
during the past six years from 6IjO,692 to a total for the past year of 912,763. 
Of this total 18U,392 were 9" plus in size, which also shows an increase in the 
larger size over previous years. 

Due to more emphasis being placed on the stocking of ponds with trout, 
a greater number of the larger size fish were allotted to ponds. The spring 
distribution to streams did not move along in some cases as rapidly as planned 
due to high waters, but extra effort later on brought the distribution before 
the fishing season opened to a point where most streams had been stocked. 

The distribution of such large quantities of fish from our fish hatch- , 
eries is a tremendous job and while we endeavor to keep abreast with modern im- 
provements in our distribution equipment, the problem of distributing so many 
trout to the streams and ponds before the season opens puts a great burden on 
our hatcheries. We do feel that the culturists and their crews did an outstanding 
job in moving their fish, an achievement accomplished many times in rough weather. 

The past year was another good year for the production of trout, as we 
had sufficient rainfall to maintain a more or less good water supply throughout 
the year and fortunately we were free of any serious outbreak of disease. Trout 
are subject to many diseases especially when such large quantities are raised 
and it. is only through constant care and preventive treatments that disease pro- 
blems are overcome. 

Continued effort is being made to keep all hatcheries in first class 
condition as it is only through such effort that we can expect to maintain such 
a high level of production. Much work is constantly in progress, for example, 
repairing pools, painting buildings, replacing pipe lines, driving new wells, 
repairing buildings and erecting new ones, repairing and overhauling equipment, 
etc. 

For the first time, the propagation of lake trout was undertaken at the 
Montague and Sunderland hatcheries. This is in keeping with the decision of the 
Board of Fisheries and Game to endeavor to establish this species of trout in 
the Quabbin Reservoir. We were able to obtain from the New York Division of 
Fisheries and Game, last fall, 100,000 of these eggs on an exchange basis for a 
like number of rainbow trout eggs which we have agreed to supply to them in the 
fall of 1953. 

The 100,000 laker eggs were divided between our Montague and Sunderland 
hatcheries and at the time of this report the resulting fish are doing nicely and 
if everything goes well with them we hope to be able to liberate many thousands of 
this new type of trout in the Quabbin Reservoir in the fall of 1953. 

Also, through an exchange basis with the State of Vermont, we were able 
to liberate in the Quabbin Reservoir approximately 10,000 lake trout fingerling in 
October 1952. This gave us a one year jump on introducing these fish in this body 
of water. From information obtained from other states where lake trout are found, 
it will be about three years more before the sportsmen can expect to harvest any 
of these fish. 

- h - 



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- 5 - 



Certain ponds at the Palmer hatchery have been turned over to raising 
■walleyed pike. This is also in line with a decision of the Board to introduce a 
second new species of fish in the Quabbin Reservoir. Approximately 500,000 
walleyed pike were obtained from the New York Division of Fisheries and Game in 
the spring of 1953 and shipped to our Palmer hatchery for hatching. The result- 
ing fry were placed in bass ponds for further rearing and while this is a new 
undertaking to rear pike to fingerling size, it is hoped some results will be 
obtained and that we will be able to stock Quabbin this fall with these fish. 

The new Podick Springs site at the Sunderland hatchery was completed 
the first of the fiscal year and put in operation. Small trout were transferred 
from the main hatchery and did exceptionally well. As the season advanced, all 
pools were put in operation and the results from this new site more than came up 
to expectations and produced 100,000 trout in the 6" to 8" class for liberation. 
The Podick site is run in conjunction with the Sunderland station, thereby saving 
a great deal of overhead. A new building, 22' x 2l|', was erected to be used as a 
sorting house and storage space for nets, tools, etc., at this site, by the regular 
hatchery crew. The installation of 700 feet of 6 inch pipe here enabled us to 
make better use of the available water and to increase the flow to the pools. 

At the main plant of the Sunderland Hatchery , a badly needed office was 
constructed at the rear of the culturist's dwelling. The building is separately 
headed thus eliminating the necessity of passing through the dwelling. During 
the winter months, approximately 12,000 board feet of lumber was cut at the 
Sunderland station for use in pond repairs and general work. During the spring, 
old wooden dams of twelve ponds were replaced with concrete and the sides repaired. 

A 3/h ton Chevrolet and a 2-ton long wheel base Ford truck were pur- 
chased giving this large station two trucks for use in distribution. A fish 
distribution tank and two pumps were purchased to complete this unit. Another 
pump was bought to replace one of the original pumps on another unit. A large 
rotary type mower replaced the old Whirlwind mower which had been in service for 
twelve years. 

At the Montague Hatchery , the wooden sides of eight ponds were replaced 
with concrete. Driveways were widened, stone walls erected, the exterior of the 
hatch house and equipment were painted and considerable ground work and brushing 
out within the hatchery grounds took place. Due to a heavy infestation of gypsy 
moth clusters on the upper grounds, much time was spent cutting out roadways for 
spraying. Mist spraying took place in May and results seem to be satisfactory. 

A 2-ton Ford distribution truck was purchased as a replacement, also a 
sickle bar mower, and a new side cutter attachment for the tractor. 

At the Palmer Hatchery , a much needed sorting house was constructed at 
the bass section. Most of the lumber used was cut from the tJmber at the hatchery. 
New head plates were put in the refrigeration system. The sides of trout pools 
7/ere replaced with new lumber and other pools repaired where necessary. A new 
concrete spillway was installed in the main brook to replace an old wooden one. 
6000 board feet of lumber were cut during the winter months. 

A 2-ton Ford truck replaced the old distribution truck and one small 
pump was purchased for it. 

At the Sandwich Hatchery , six worn out bulkheads were replaced during the 
year, six new wells were driven and four of the old ones were cleaned with calgon. 
One new rearing pool was completed for use this year with three others nearing 

- 6 - 



completion. A long needed office over the garage is also nearing completion. 
The worn out drain beneath the hatchery road was replaced with a 36" concrete 
pipe. The storage house was wired for electricity making it available for use 
as a workshop during inclement weather. 

A 2-ton Ford truck replaced the old distribution truck and a new pump 
was purchased for driving wells. 

At the East Sandwich Hatchery , work continues on repairs to the pools 
on the west side which we plan to finish this coming year. Two new fry pools 
were built and wells driven. An electric drill was purchased. 

At the Sutton Hatchery , worn out wooden sides and overflows of three 

pools were replaced with concrete together with general repairs to other pools, 

buildings, etc. Through an exchange of a right of way with the B. N. T. Sand 

and Gravel Company of Millbury, we acquired the spring area at the upper part 
of the hatchery. 

The overall liberation figure of 912,763 includes 15,000 brook, 
12,000 rainbow and 5,000 brown trout received by the Division from the Harts- 
ville Federal Hatchery. The brook and rainbow trout were transferred to Palmer 
Hatchery in the Fall of 1952 for further growth and liberated in the Spring of 
1953. The 5,000 brown trout were distributed direct from Hartsville to open 
waters of the state by the Division, in the spring of 1953. Each year under this 
cooperative agreement with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the 
Division supplies food for these fish distributed to Massachusetts waters. 

A chart showing fish production by hatcheries and other data appears 
on page 5 of this report. 



GAME PROPAGATION 



Fred W. Wood retired from the service on December 31, 1952. Mr. Wood 
was Game Bird Culturist at the Wilbraham State Game Farm since his appointment on 
December 1, 1927. Previous to that time he was in charge of the Penikese Island 
Sanctuary where he carried on management work for the benefit of v/ildlife, 
including bird census and banding. At that time, the island was used as a rear- 
ing area for cottontail rabbits, the offspring of which were trapped and shipped 
to the mainland for stocking purposes. In late years, the Wilbraham Game Farm 
has been used solely for the rearing of pheasants but in past years, experiments 
were carried on with ruffed grouse and wild turkeys and during the period when 
quail were being stocked throughout the state, quail were reared here also. 

Walter Jajuga who had worked as Assistant Culturist under Mr. Wood, was 
promoted to the position of Culturist to fill the vacancy. 

A successful year was enjoyed in our pheasant rearing activities. The 
Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program was carried on and a few mere pheasants than 
the previous year were furnished. Of the 18,785 birds furnished, it is estimated 
that 92 per cent were reared and liberated. Ul,h90 twelve-week old pheasants were 
shipped out for general liberation from our four game farms during the late sun 
and early fall. During the spring and early summer 5993 adults were liberated. 

- 7 - 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 



July 1, 1952 to June 30, 1953 



PHEASANTS 



Hens Cocks Total 



Adults : Spring liberation 

Young: 12 week liberation summer and 
early fall 

Furnished to pens on Sportsmen's Rearing 
Program 

32,7h7 33,521 66,268 

Of the pheasants liberated by the Division of Fisheries and Game and the 
Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated that 32,012 hens and 
32,75U cocks went into the covers. 



U,969 


1,021* 


5,993 


18,586 


22,90^ 


Ul,U90 


9,192 


9,$93 


18,785 



QUAIL 



Adults: Spring liberation 916 

Young: Late summer and early fall 7,U02 



8,318 



Northern Varying White Hare (Purchased) 1,875 



- 8 - 



After three years of increased production and liberations in the covers 
of the state, it is discouraging to feel that nature could not have done more to 
assist this program. Undoubtedly more birds have been taken during the hunting 
season than ever before and the population in the covers seemed higher than ever 
during the winter months. Good winter weather was enjoyed but the breeding stock 
in the covers does not seem to come through with the anticipated results. 

Quail production consisted of 7U02 twelve week old young quail liberated 
in the fall and 9l6 adults in the spring. This compares favorably with the last 
few years' activities. Quail production could be greatly increased with very 
little effort and expenditure if conditions should warrant it. Quail population 
in the eastern counties is very satisfactory. An increase in the present program 
does not seem necessary. More Massachusetts sportsmen could enjoy quail hunting 
and the population of quail would still be maintained at a high level. 

White hare were plentiful in New Brunswick and with an appropriation of 
$7500 W e were able to purchase 1875 hares only, as the price was $i;,00 each. 
Deliveries were made promptly and the first load of approximately 600 hares 
arrived during the worst snowstorm of the year. Liberations were delayed by the 
storm and some of the hares could not be taken out until the following day. In 
the past few years, sportsmen's clubs were disappointed because they were unable 
to purchase hares due to the shortage. This year, all clubs desiring hares were 
able to purchase them. 

As usual, considerable maintenance work was necessary to our many farm 
buildings and great number of pens. Each year some pens can no longer be repaired 
and replacements are necessary. Every effort has been made to keep buildings in 
best repair and considerable painting has added to appearances. Extensive repairs 
were necessary at one of the farm residences due to settled foundations, rotted 
sills and joists. At another farm, a small workshop was converted into a two-room 
apartment, needed for personnel who live on the farm since game bird rearing is 
a seven day a week job. Improvements were made to rearing equipment, additional 
pheasant range shelters were constructed, experiments were conducted on feed 
hoppers, frost proof water lines were installed and extended and automatic 
waterers connected, all for labor saving purposes. Many changes were made in the 
electric wiring and electric lines were extended for convenience, safety and 
simplicity. Much has been accomplished in improving sanitary conditions at the 
farms. Landscaping, grading, filling, installing retaining walls and drains and 
road construction have been outstanding improvements. 



EDUCATION 



The Educational Program of the Division of Fisheries and Game expanded 
its work considerably during the last fiscal year. 

The program's purposes are: (1) to encourage the active, properly 
directed effort of sportsmen's organization and of the general public in the 
advancement of conservation; (2) To keep sportsmen and the general public informed 
of Divisional policies and programs and of developments in the wildlife conserva- 
tion field in general, as an aid to their activities in (1); (3) to promote the 
interests of sportsmen in general. 

During the year ending June 30, 1953, twenty-six special news releases 

- 9 - 



totaling U3 separate stories were issued. These were sent to rod and gun editors, 
wire services, appropriate weekly papers, radio and television news editors, 
sporting magazines, conservation officers and Division field personnel. Seven 
editions of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE were issued, totaling $6 articles on the 
various aspects of wildlife conservation, Divisional policies and programs, etc. 
This publication is sent to the same list as the special news releases, plus 
all sportsmen's organizations in the state, all other state conservation agencies, 
certain legislators and a small group of individual sportsmen. A survey was • 
initiated during the latter part of the year to evolve means of increasing the 
circulation among sportsmen not affiliated with clubs. 

The educational program originated and placed eight feature articles 
with outdoor publications and newspapers during the year, besides interesting 
several writers in doing their own stories on certain Divisional operations. The 
work of the district managers in handling local publicity, making press contacts, 
etc., resulted in considerable coverage amd is worthy of sincere praise. 

The Podick Springs hatchery dedication was one of the two special 
events handled by this program this year. Prominent sportsmen and outdoor editors 
were invited to this opening. National Wildlife Restoration Week, the other event, 
was announced by His Excellency Governor Christian A. Herter with a proclamation 
originated by a staff member of this program. 

Exhibits featuring live native wildlife and illustrating their dependence 
on sound conservation practices were given in sportsmen's shows, trade shows, 
county fairs and farmers' field days. While the design, and in some cases most 
of the labor in placing these exhibits, was a duty of educational personnel, not 
as successful an exhibit program could have been completed without the assistance 
rendered on many occasions by research and management, wildlife district and propa- 
gation personnel. A total of seven shows were attended with Division exhibits and 
cooperation was extended to sportsmen's organizations operating their own local 
shows. An estimated 350,000 people attended these exhibits. Lack of time, funds 
and facilities prevented a more complete participation by the Division in various 
exhibitions around the state. 

Two pamphlets were prepared by this program during the year, these being 
the "Where to Fish" list and the annually published "Abstracts of the Fish and 
Game Laws." Editing the annual report is also a responsibility of educational per- 
sonnel. 

Photography played its increasingly important part in the educational 
program by producing the film, "Sportsmen of Tomorrow." This film tells the story 
of the Junior Conservation Camp, in sound and color, and is a must on the calendar 
of all organizations interested in our youth and conservation. The photographer 
also continued to handle black and white research photography, color slides for 
research and lecture purposes and photography for publications. 

The Junior Conservation Camp, which is operated in conjunction with 
"Wildlife Conservation Inc.," was attended by 197 boys this summer. Arrangements 
for the instructional program, utilizing volunteer lecturers and conservation 
movies, was part of the educational program. The camp had its most successful 
season (the fifth) to date, with all openings filled well before the starting 
date. As this was the first year the Division's educational section handled the 
camp program directly, much the same schedule as in previous years was given. It 
is planned to greatly improve and modernize the program for next year, with pre- 
planning sessions of all organizations cooperating in the camp scheduled this 
winter. 

- 10 - 



The major educational objective tackled this year was the problem of 
relations between landowners and sportsmen. 

It has been fairly well established that one of the principal causes 
of landowners placing "No Trespassing" signs around their property is the care- 
less hunter who pursues his game too close to houses and farm buildings. Con- 
sequently a project of marking the 5>00-foot safety zone around occupied dwellings , 
within which it is illegal to hunt without specific permission, was evolved in 
conferences among various Division personnel. 

The town of Littleton was selected for a test area, and the local 
wildlife district crew contacted every landowner in the town, with the objective 
of placing signs provided by the Division around each safety zone. The educa- 
tional staff handled publicity arrangements for the project, which was named 
"Operation Littleton," and in addition to final layouts for printing of the signs 
used, also designed six billboards which were constructed by the Department of 
Public Works and erected by wildlife district personnel at all highway entrances 
to the town. 

With the completion of "Operation Littleton," the billboards were 
issued to the four wildlife management districts for erection in suitable spots 
in their areas, and plans were begun to carry the idea of marking the safety 
zones to all corners of the state. 

The new project, which puts "Operation Littleton" on a state wide 
basis, is called "Operation Safety Zone." A revised sign, printed in red on 
weather-proof paper, has been issued to managers for distribution in their 
areas. It probably won't be possible to saturate the state the way Littleton 
was, with all but two landowners going along on the idea, but district crews are 
hopeful of getting a majority of local landowners to use the new signs. The 
part played by sportsmen's clubs in pushing "Operation Safety Zone" will be a 
vital one. 

Other educational objectives pursued during the year were: (1) To 
acquaint sportsmen with the fish management policy and the trout pond management 
policy; the requirements of various species of fish and conditions found in 
various waters as applied to the policies adopted, and to acquaint them with the 
application of these policies, reasons for their adoption, etc. One especially 
strong application of the policies adopted was the continual effort during the 
year to encourage the taking of more panfish from our overcrowded waters. 

(2) To increase sportsman-cooperation with all Division programs and activities. 

(3) To discourage shooting of hen pheasants, (k) To foster a safety-conscious 
attitude on the part of hunters. (5) To discourage the practice of keeping young 
wildlife as pets. (6) To keep sportsmen informed on conservation developments of 
interest to Massachusetts. 

This section continued its work of studying the conservation education 
picture on a national scale, collecting and analyzing information as background 
material for possible use in any conservation education program that may become 
reality in the future. Although the work of this section is primarily directed 
to fish and game information and education activities, it is definitely recognized 
that conservation education, of which this activity is actually one phase, is 
becoming increasingly important. Several widely scattered educational programs 
are now being operated in schools, among the Boy Scouts, and elsewhere in the 
state, but there is not a state -sponsored and operated program in evidence as yet. 
Since the scope of such a program is necessarily wide, and would take in several 
state agencies as well as private agencies, the Division, through its information 
facilities, is preparing itself to cooperate in any such future endeavor. 

- 11 - 



Another project, although a minor one, undertaken during the year was the 
design of an insignia to identify Division Fisheries and Game vehicles, field 
personnel, etc. The design finally selected is reproduced on the cover of this 
report. It was later learned that utilization of such designs on vehicles, station- 
ary, etc., was contrary to established state administrative policy, so its use is 
necessarily somewhat limited. 

Routine activities of educational personnel, such as attendance at 
meetings, distribution of motion pictures and filling of requests for Division- 
published literature was carried on as usual. 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 



The major part of the year was spent in renewing leases on the Westfield, 
Farmington, Millers and Squannacook rivers. 

Since a thorough search into the ownership of all the land along these 
rivers had not been made for some time, it was decided to do a complete job this 
year when the leases were being renewed. Although this project was long, time 
consuming and difficult, there being many changes in ownership, it was nevertheless 
very profitable. 

On the east branch of the Westfield two miles were added to the leased 
land with the work still unfinished, on the middle branch of the Westfield eight 
and one half miles were added and on the west branch of the Westfield one and one 
half miles were added with the work still unfinished, making a total of twelve 
miles added to the leased land along the Westfield River system. 

On the Farmington River system, which includes the Buck and Clam rivers, 
a thorough search was also made to determine and contact all the owners. Three 
miles were added to the leased land along this river. 

The leased land along the Squannacook River remained about the same as 
in the past with a few small parcels added. 

The Division cannot say too much in praise of the people who have leased 
their land along the above-mentioned rivers. Their wholehearted co-operation in 
signing new leases and their willingness to help Division personnel in any way 
they could was most gratifying and appreciated. After doing business with these 
people our one regret is that more fishermen who frequent these waters do not 
take a few minutes out of their fishing time to make the personal acquaintance of 
some of these landowners. If they did, we feel sure that they would look upon 
them as real sportsmen. Many of them, it is true, never handle a rod, but they 
maintain a year around interest in the river on which they live and the fishing 
therein. Man's faith in his fellow man is in no better way exemplified than by 
these landowners. They continue to co-operate in this program despite the fact 
that the few bad apples in the barrel continue to litter the stream banks with 
rubbish, leave bar-ways open and knock down stone walls. Whenever we use these 
areas it might be well to remember that "today's actions determine tomorrow's 
privileges ." 

- 12 - 



The one big disappointment during the year was the loss of nearly 
seven miles of leased land along the Millers River in Athol and Royals ton. This 
property is owned by one party and despite an earnest effort on the part of the 
Division to renew this lease it was not renewed. The Division felt that in 
fairness and justice to the many landowners throughout the state who lease their 
property at a standard rate per mile per year it could not meet the terms of this 
party . 

Prior to the opening of the trout season the posting was renewed on most 
of the public fishing grounds. High water during April and early May retarded the 
work in the eastern part of the state. The two fly fishing areas and part of the 
Deerfield River were also posted. 

With the number of miles of leased land increasing every year the main- 
tenance of posters along these streams is fast becoming a major project especially 
when every effort is made to have all the areas posted prior to the opening of the 
trout season. 

We wish to express our sincere thanks to all who assisted us in any way 
during the year. 

J'_ M. i>- .". SL J'- .>'_ iL .$'- M. J>/ 



During this fiscal year, the Division of Fisheries 
and Game lost the services of its oldest employee, Miss Lizzie 
B. Rimbach, who retired on February 28, 1953, after completing 
nearly E>0 years of continuous service. 

Mas Rimbach first joined the Division in 190U. Her 
position at retirement was that of Head Clerk of the Boston 
office. 

All members of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
wish Miss Rimbach continued health and happiness and pleasant 
memories of her long service to sportsmen. 



- 13 - 



BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH & MANAGEMENT 



Wildlife Management District One 



I. F.R. Projects 

A. Wood Duck 



1. Boxes built - 175 
Boxes maintained - 185 
Predator guards built - 200 
Predator guards installed - 10£ 

2. Erection: 

a. Total boxes erected - 60 

b. Number of areas involved - Ik 

3. Boxes distributed to clubs - 5 

k. Total number of state erected boxes up in district - 559 

5. Box checks 

a. Number of boxes in first check - I4I6 

b. Number of boxes in second check - 300 

6. Ducks banded: 

a. A total of 10 female adult wood ducks were banded on Mill 
Pond, Sheffield and Cheshire Reservoir, Cheshire. 

7. Other? 1 

a. Time was spent on locating new sites for box erection, etc. 

B. Checking Stations 

1. District personnel operated deer checking stations at Pittsfield, 
North Adams, and made roving checks throughout Berkshire County. 

2. No time was spent on waterfowl checking stations. 

3. District personnel operated beaver tagging stations at Pittsfield, 
North Adams, and East Otis during the open beaver season in 1953. 

C. Census 

1. A roadside and canoe census was taken on seven study areas during 
the months of October and November to determine the muskrat popu- 
lation trend. 

2. A beaver census was taken on the Deerfield and Hoosac rivers ; 
checked questionable beaver flowages determined by aerial censusj 
contacted conservation officers in regard to beaver colonies, etc. 

- Ill - 



D. Beaver - P.R. only 

1. Number of animals live trapped and transplanted - U 

2 . Number of sites involved - 3 

E. Habitat Improvement 

1. Plantings 

a. Number of plants - 23,500 
Number of farms - 18 

2. Plants distributed - 7,500 multiflora rose (3 clubs) 

3. Borders sprayed back 

a. Fence rows - 2,000 feet 

b. Woodland border - 2,100 feet 

h. Other 

a. Planted, limed, and fertilized 2 acres of food patches (6 sites) 
and limed and fertilized only one acre of gas lines 

F. Water Chestnut - "none" 

G. Economic Survey 

1. District personnel contacted 50 sportsmen for Mass. Coop Wildlife 
Research Unit 

II. Fisheries Management 

A. Pan and Weed Fish Control 

1. Bluegill ne.st destruction - none 

2. Crappie concentrators - none 

3. Fish traps 

a. Number built - hZ 

b. Number of areas - 1 (Stockbridge Bowl) 

U. Panfish derbies 

a. Number - 2 

b. City cf Pittsfield Derby 
Streamside Angler's Derby 

5. Poisoning 

a. Partial poisoning - Laurel Lake for carp control, Otis Reser - 
voir . For detail report see Chief Aquatic Biologist. 

b. Reclamation - Berry Pond, Pittsfield State Forest. 

- 15 - 



6. Other 

a. Drainage of Renfrew Pond, Adams. 

b. Installed sucker trap in Parker Brook, Onota Lake. 

B. Game Fish 

1. Bass shelters - none 

2. Spawning grounds - 1 (Hampden Pond, Westfield) 

C. Maintenance of equipment 

1. Six man days were spent on maintenance of equipment. 

D. Club activities 

1. District personnel aided the Adams Sportsmen Club and Cheshire 
Rod &. Gun Club in their attempt to stock Cheshire Reservoir with 
great northern pike. For number of pike tagged see Chief Aquatic 
Biologist report. 

E. Other 

1. Angler's count was taken on all great ponds in the district. 

2. Fish screen at Otis Reservoir was checked at odd times. 

3. District personnel aided salvage crew in collecting smelt at 
Cobble Mountain Reservoir for Quabbin Reservoir. Also checked 
Onota Lake for smelt run. 



III. Game - Non P.R. 



A. Cottontail live traps 

1. Number of traps built - 
Number of traps repaired - 150 

Number of traps painted and stenciled - 100 

2. Number of traps distributed - 130 - to the following clubs: 
Richmond Beagle Clubj Great Barrington Sportsmen Club] Pittsfield 
Sportsmen Club] and Ludlow Sportsmen Club. 

B. Pertinent rabbit information 

1. About 125 rabbits were trapped by the above named clubs. 

2. Ten rabbit damage sites were surveyed. These areas were trapped 
by local sportsmen or beagle clubs 

C. Beaver 

1. Number of complaints received - 38 

2. Number of beaver trapped and transplanted - 22 

3. Number of release areas surveyed and checked - 11 



- 16 - 



D. Research data contacts 

1. Grouse wing and tail bags to 30 points. Number of bags distri- 
buted not known. 

E. Census 

1. A woodcock singing ground census was taken in various sections of 
Berkshire County. Two woodcock were trapped and banded. 

F. Tabulation of separate projects with clubs, where club labor 
furnished 

Club 

Lee Sportsmen Club 

Pittsfield Sportsmen Club 

Richmond Beagle Club 

Ludlow Fish & Game Club 
it u it it it 

G. Other activities 

1. Aided several clubs in release of white hare. 

2. Banded 250 pheasants released by the Lee Sportsmen Club. 





District 






Project 


Labor 


Club 


Labor 


Pheasant rearing 


2 days 


35 - 


l\0 days 


it it 


3 days 


UO - 


ii5 days 


Habitat improvement 


9 days 


25 - 


35 days 


ii it 


12 days 


5 - 


6 days 


Posting sanctuary 


3 days 


6 - 


8 days 



IV. Miscellaneous 



A. Public relations 

District Personnel Attending 
1. Type of meeting Manager Assist. Mgr. Others 



County Leagues 


15 








Sportsmen Clubs 


85 





10 


Granges 








15 


Churches 








9 


Boy Scouts 








8 


Soil Conservation 


10 








Misc. groups 


12 





15 



2. Technical advice was given to private individuals concerning 
aquatic weed control, pond management, wildlife depredation, 
habitat improvement, etc. - a total of $0 contacts. 

B. Publications, news releases, etc. 

1. District manager sent news releases to Berkshire Eagle, Springfield 
Union, and North Adams Transcript - a total of 2h news releases. 

C. Other activities 

1. District personnel conducted 2U lectures and field trips at the 
Junior Conservation Camp. 

- 17 - 



2. District personnel constructed a workshop and storage building 
at the Pittsfield State Forest. 

3. District manager made five radio appearances. 
I4. Publications - one with I & E (panfish derby). 

Wildlife Management District Two 



I. 1 .R. "Projects 

A. Wood duck 



1. Boxes built - 280 
Predator guards built - 5 2$ 
Predator guards installed - [j.58 

2. Boxes erected - 29k 
Areas involved - 53 

3. Boxes distributed to clubs, etc. - 55 
No. clubs, individuals concerned - 8 

h* Total number state boxes now up - 878 

5. Box checks 

a. No. boxes first check 1953 - 395 

b. No. boxes second check 1952 - 319 

6. Ducks banded 
a. Adults - 7 

7. Other (maintenance, etc.) 

a. Mo. boxes repaired - 161 

b. No. old pred. guards removed (3" x Ir 1 ' , inoperative) - 172 

c . Faced tops of 197 cedar poles 

d. Took photos of experimental boxes, erection methods 

B. Checking stations 
1. Deer 

a. Stations operated by District personnel - 2 

b. Stations operated within the District by Bur. Personnel - 3 

c. Total deer checked by District personnel - 2J4.9 

C . Census 

1. Muskrat house count - 1 

Beaver survey, Millers and Swift Rivers - 1 

Assisted furbearer project on aerial beaver survey - 1 

Checked muskrat, mink and otter pelts for age, sex, primeness - 101 

- 18 - 



D. Beaver 

1. Animals trapped and transplanted - 2 
No. of sites involved - 1 

E. Habitat improvement 

1. Plantings - State 

a. No. plants planted - 6,1^00 

b. No. farms involved- 7 

2. Plants distributed to clubs, individuals 

a. No. plants - 1^0,700 

b. Clubs concerned - 11 

c. Individuals concerned - 138 

3 . Other 

a. Conducted experimental spraying w/weedicide on £00 rose plants 

b. Assisted weeding nursey of approx. 1^0,000 roses 

F. Economic survey in cooperation with Wildlife Research Unit, University 
of Massachusetts 

1. Contacted 78 sportsmen re questionnaires 
Completed £0 questionnaire forms 

G. Prepared and mimeographed deer-flyer for distribution on state-wide 
basis 

II. Fisheries Management 

A. Pan and weed fish control Areas Units 

1. Fish traps operated 1 U3 

2. Weed fish removed 1 2700 

3. Panfish derbies promoted or assisted (with) 

U. Poisoning 

a. Partial 1 Assisted Aquatic 

Biologist 

5. Constructed 3U experimental wire fix traps. 

6. Constructed and painted U0 experimental wire fish trap floats. 

B. Game fish Areas Units 

1. Spawning grounds 3 3 

2. Assisted pond mgt. crew, drainage and removal of game fish, 
Carpenter's Reservoir 



- 19 - 



C. Maintenance of equipment, posters 



1. Performed raaint. on tools, equip., several times 
Maintained old, installed new, posters on 5>1 areas 



D. 



Club activities 
Club 



Type Project 



Man/days 
labor 
(District) 



Man/days 
labor 
(Clubs) 



Wore. Co. F & G Assn. 
Worcester 

Smith Pond, Inc. 
Worcester 



Wore. Co. F & G Assn. 
Worcester 



Install screens, 2 
Lake Quins igamond 

Planned fyke and seine 3 
weed-fish . ( Operation 
postponed until fall due 
to adverse conditions ) 

Remove remaining snow 3 
fence, Lake Quinsigamond 



3 



o 



E. Other 

1. Angler counts - numerous, summer and winter 

2. Checked flow, temperatures, at Quinapoxet River 

3. Assisted Wore. Co. F & G Assn. install screens, Lake Quinsigamond 
U. Prepared news release, re tagging studies, Millers River 

5. Conducted experimental seining of fish, Mill Pond, Upton 

6. Distributed tagging posters to stores, boat liveries, etc. 

7. Gave technical advice re 3 club ponds 
III. Game - Non P.R. 

A. Cottontail live traps 

1. No. repaired, adjusted - 195> 
No. distributed to clubs - IJ4O 

No. clubs involved - 7 (12 trappers) 

B. 1. Damage complaints received - 12 

a. Checked - 12 

2. No. rabbits trapped and released by clubs - 66 

C. Beaver 

1. No. damage complaints - 7 

No. beaver trapped and transplanted - k 
No. areas involved in trapping - 6 

2 . Other 

a. Released 1 beaver trapped by Dist. Ill 

- 20 - 



D. Research data contacts 

1. Grouse -wing and tail bags distributed - 2275 
Clubs, individuals involved - 65 

2. Cottontail head bags distributed - 50 
Clubs 5 individuals involved - 7 

3. Turtle trapping, spearing, etc. 

a. No. turtles removed by spearing, capture - 2k (386#) 

E. Tabulation of separate projects with clubs were club labor furnished 

Man/days Man/days 
Club Type Project labor labor 

(District) (Clubs) 

Wore. Co. League of Fair display 
Sports. Clubs (Wore. Co. F.F. Day) 6 10 

F. Other activities 

1. Posted sanctuaries - 2 

2. Assisted in development work, Harold Parker Dog Trial Area 

3. Assisted District III in posting Littleton 
IV. Miscellaneous 

A. Tabulation of meetings attended 

District personnel attending 
Type of meeting Manager Asst. Manager Others 



County League 


7 


k 


1 


Sportsmen ' s Clubs 


8 


5 


1 


Church Clubs 


7 





1 


High School Assemblies 


k 


2 





Grange 


2 


1 


1 


Rotary, Kiwanis, other service clubs 


6 








Boy Scout Leaders 


1 








Boy Scout Troup 


2 





1 


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture 


h 








Totals 


ui 


12 


5 


Grand Total 






58 



B. Technical advice to, inspection, assistance to individuals, etc., 
not included above: 

1. Assisted 30 individuals, clubs, etc. by giving technical advice 
on property improvement for fish and game. 

C. Wildlife Displays 

1. Assisted I & E setting up display, N.E. Sportsmen's and Boat Show 

- 21 - 



C. Wildlife Displays (cont'd) 

2. Cooperated with I & E on exhibit , Worcester County Farmer's Field 
Day 

D. Publications, news releases, etc. 

1. Prepared and mailed 11 news releases 

2 . Contacted newspaper sportswriters about 30 times 

E. Other Activities 

1. Participated in 3 radio programs 

2. Assisted in setting up a conservation exhibit for Boy Scout Troup 

3. Attended District meetings with Conservation officers 
U. Attended N. E. Chapter meeting, Soil Cons. Society 

5. Prepared suggested posters for sportsmen's clubs 

6. Attended 2 dog trials 

7. Trapped 5 squirrels at Wore. Co. Elec. Co. sub-station (nuisance 
complaint) 

8. Assisted clearing Tornado damage w/power saw 

9. Assistant District Forester Woodman by giving talks on woodland 
management for wildlife at k district Forestry meetings 



Wildlife Management District Three 



I. P.R. Projects 

A. Wood Duck 



1. There were 230 nesting, boxes and 295 predator guards constructed 
during the year. 

2. Erection 

a. A total of 190 new nesting b.oxes were erected. 

b. The boxes were erected on 31 new sites. 

3. There were 100 war surplus ammunition and state boxes distributed 
to 16 sportsmen's clubs and individuals. 

k* The number of state erected boxes nor; up in the district total 970 

5. Box checks 

a. ij.20 wood duck boxes were inspected during the season's second 
check in 1952. 

b. 350 boxes were checked during the first check of 1953. 

6. No ducks banded during the year. 

7. A total of k$0 nesting boxes v;ere maintained for shavings, cover, 
replacements, and minor repairs. Major repairs were necessary on 
27 boxes. 

- 22 - 



B. Checking stations 

1. Two deer checking stations were operated by district personnel, 
one in District II S and one in District I. 

2. Six man days were spent attending deer checking station classes 
at Upton, Mass. 

C. Census 

1. Muskrat 

a. Eight separate census sites were covered two times during the 
fall in Essex and Middlesex County. Approximately 12 miles on 
three rivers were covered. 

2 . Beaver 

a. One aerial census was conducted with the P.R. Project leader, 
two areas were covered on the North Shore. 

3. Waterfowl 

a. One census on the North Shore. 

D. Beaver - P.R. 

1. Two beavers were trapped and transplanted. 

2. Two sites were involved in the trapping operation. 

E. Habitat Improvements 

1. Plantings - State 

a. A total of 12 farms received 18, 705 berry producing shrubs. 

b. Three food patches were planted, totaling approximately 2\ 
acres; fertilizer used, 15>00 pounds; lime used, 25>00 pounds. 

2. Plants distributed to clubs 

a. 19,800 shrubs and trees distributed. 

b. The shrubs were distributed to 19 clubs and individuals. 

3. Borders cut back 

a. Woodland borders, 900 lineal feet, 27,000 sq. ft. cut back 
600 lineal feet sprayed with weed killer. 

F. Water chestnut 

1. Hand pulling and spraying. 

a. Spraying operations, both power and hand spraying from a boat 
was continued on approximately 12 miles on the Sudbury and 
Concord Rivers. Eradication work was also undertaken at 
College Pond in South Hadley. One new area, the Assabet River, 
infested with V/ater Chestnut was located and control was started. 
Seventy -five man days were spent on this work. 

- 23 - 



II. Fisheries Management 



A. Pan and Weed-fish Control 

1. Approximately 1000 blue gill and sunfish nests were destroyed on 
one great pond. 

2. Two Crappie concentrators were built and installed. 

3. 38 fish traps were placed in one great pond. 

1;. Eight pan fish derbies planned with clubs, two were attended. 

5 . Others 

a. Posted h$ great and agreement ponds with fisheries posters. 
Maintained posters on 28 crappie concentrators in 10 great 
ponds . 

b. Constructed 25 fish traps and hP trap floats. 

6. Approximately l/k ton bluegills and sunfish destroyed in one pond. 

B. Game Fish 

1. Constructed 5 bass spawning floats and anchors. Posted three 
bass spawning areas on three great ponds. 

C. Maintenance of Equipment 

1. Several man days were spent maintaining power equipment, automo- 
tive equipment, and tools. 

D. Club Activities 

1. Three days were spent with three Sportsmen's Clubs on various 
cooperative projects. 

a. Needham Sportsmen's Club - Constructed crappie concentrators 
for North Pond. 

b. Lake Massapoag Rod & Gun Club - Management work on Lake 
Massapoag. 

c. Westford Sportsman's Club - Management work at Knopps Pond. 

E. Others 

1. Fertilization 

a. 82,000 pounds of commercial fertilizer was applied to Sandy 
Pond, Ayer, in an experimental weed control program. The job 
also included transporting the fertilizer from the storage 
area to the Pond, and required a total of approximately $0 man 
days of work. 

2. Angler counts 

a. Five man days were spent on weekends during the winter deter- 
mining fishing pressure on 35 great and agreement ponds. 

-21*- 



3. Creel Census 

a. Four man days were spent opening day of the fishing season in 
an effort to determine pressure, and recover tags and take 
measurements . 

U. Pond Survey 

a. 1§ days were spent at Martins Pond, Groton, aiding Biological 
Survey crews. 

5. Pond Management 

a. Six man days were spent aiding pond management crews at 
. Knopps Pond, Lake Quannapowitt and Bear Hill Pond. 



III. Game - Non P.R. 



A. Cotton-tail Live Traps 

1. 200 rabbit traps were repaired and adjusted. 

2. 80 rabbit traps were distributed to four participating clubs. 

B. Rabbit Information 

1. 18 rabbit complaints were registered to the district. 

C. Beaver 

1. Four complaints were registered to the district. 

2. One beaver was trapped and removed from a complaint site. 

3. Other 

a. Two adult beaver were killed by vehicle and one turned over to 
the district. 

D. Research Data Contacts 

1. Approximately llj.00 grouse wing and tail bags were distributed to 
IS sporting stores, clubs and individuals. 

2. Information was given to clubs and Soil Conservation Service on 
turtle trapping procedures and approximately 25 turtles destroyed 
by district personnel. 

E. Census 

1. Two evenings were spent locating wood-cock singing grounds census 
areas. 



- 25 - 



F. Tabulation of Separate Club Projects 



Club 



Project 



Man Days 


Man Days 


(District) 


(Club) 


2.0 


1U 


1.0 


10 


.$ 


5 


.$ 


5 


.$ 


10 


1.0 


8 



Metropolitan Sportsman's 
Littleton Sportsman's 
Nashoba Sportsman's 
Nashoba Sportsman's 
N. Shore Beagle 
Metropolitan Sportsman ' s 

Other Activities 



Operation Littleton 
Operation Littleton 
Posting Land 
Shrub & Seed Planting 
Habitat Improvement 
Shrub Planting 



1. Two porcupine complaints handled by district. 

2. Several raccoon complaints handled by district. 

3. Two muskrat complaints handled by district. •. a. 

k' Attempted to capture one deer, wild, caught in city. 

5. A total of several man days spent advising clubs and property 
owners on developmental work, on club and private property. 

6. Erected two roadside Sportsman Reminder Signs in Littlefield and 
Lynnfield. 

7. Posted one wildlife sanctuary. 

8. Surveyed towns for available existing hunting cover. 

9. Several man days spent in the evening interviewing sportsmen for 
economic survey. 



IV. Miscellaneous 



A. Public Relations 



1. Tabulations of meetings attended 
Type of Meeting 



Manager Asst. Manager 



2. 



Sportsman 

Scout 

Church Men's Club 

School 

Pollution 

U. S. 0. 

S.C.S. Supervisors 

Forestry 

Volunteer Firemen 

Miscellaneous 



Totals 
Technical Advice 



\6 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 



61 



2 

1 
1 



a. In addition to above mentioned meetings, advice and assistance 
was requested and rendered to clubs and individuals on hk 
separate occasions. 



- 26 - 



3. Wildlife Displays 

a. Personnel from District III either set up or assisted in the 
setting up of displays at: 

(1) Essex County Field Day 

(2) New England Sportsman Show 

(3) Maynard Sportsman Show 

(k) Littleton Sportsman's Club Field Day 

B. News Releases 

1. Several news items released. 

2. Three radio broadcasts made. 

C. Other Activities 

1. "Operation Littleton ," the Division's posting -and educational 
program undertaking. Over 3000 "Safety Area" signs were erected 
over entire town of Littleton. All residents contacted either 
personally or by mail. This project required approximately 

100 man days. 

2. Two Northeastern Regional Conservation Officer Meetings attended 
by District Manager. Several days were spent in the field with 
local officers. 

3. Attended 7 District Manager's Meetings, and a total of 7 weeks 
vacation and h weeks of sick leave was taken during the fiscal 
year. 

k» Several man days were spent by the Manager on routine administra- 
tive duties. 



Wildlife Management District Four 



I. F.R. Projects 

A. Wood Duck 



1. Boxes built - 205 

Predator guards built - 2783 installed - 273 

2. Erection 

a. Total No. of boxes this year - 1^7 

b. Number of areas involved - 21 

3. Boxes distributed to clubs, etc. - 27 

U. Total number of state erected boxes now up in district - 76I1 



27 - 



5. Box checking 

a. Number of functional boxes checked in spring and summer of 
1952 - 367. 291 of these functional boxes checked were in 
Plymouth and Bristol Counties and 76 in Barnstable County. 
Usage in the latter area was again poor (only 6 boxes being 
used by woodies). 

b. The average usage of functional boxes in the district were as 
follows : 

1 year old boxes - 38, 8$ 

2 year old boxes - 33.3$ 

3 year old boxes - 88.0$ 
k year old boxes - 52. J% 

6. Wood ducks banded - Adult females during spring of 1953* 

a. Meadow Lea Bog, Easton - 15 new birds (also examined 11 returns 

from birds banded in 
1952 on same area) 

b. Atwood Bog j Carver - h new birds (also recorded 6 returns 

from last year's banded 
birds ) 

7 . Maintenance 
a. 268 boxes were maintained during the winter of 1952 and 1953 • 

8. Miscellaneous 

a. 20 wood duck boxes were constructed by the Franklin School in 
Brockton and given to the district for distribution to sports- 
men clubs interested in wood duck development projects. This 
project was financed by the City of Brockton. 

B. Checking Stations 
1. Deer 

a. District personnel assisted in deer checking at three stations 
in the Western and Central District. 

b. Three checking stations were operated in the Southeast District. 
Of these, two were mobile stations (Cape Cod and Nantucket). 
The third station (Martha's Vineyard) was operated by Marine 
Fisheries personnel. 

c. The number of deer checked were as follows : 

Cape Cod - 102 
Nantucket - 83 
M. Vineyard- 23 

Total - 208 deer 

C. Census 

1. Four muskrat areas were censused once during Nov. of 1952. A 

re con. was made of potential new census areas for the 1953 census 
period. 



28 - 



D. Habitat Improvement 

1. Fall of 1952 

Mult, rose Lespedeza Total 

a. Planted by district personnel 13,750 5,600 19,350 

b. Total number of sites involved in above plantings - 7 

2. Spring of 1953 

Mult . Other 

Planted by Rose Lespedeza shrubs Conifers TOTAL 

District personnel 20,800 15,350 3,100 1*00 39,650 

Dist. Pers. & Clubs U,000 lU,500 1,625 1,075 21,200 
Dist. Pers. & Prison 

Camp labor 3,000 30,000 3,900 - 36,900 

TOTALS 27,800 59,850 8,625 1,1*75 96,900 

Seed planted? 

Lespedeza OSh lbs ) - 15 acres 
Clover and grass seed - 8 acres 
Buckwheat and Soybean - 3 acres 

Total number of sites involved in the above spring planting - 25 
(includes h gas lines) 

3. Plants distributed to clubs, farmers, etc. 



Mult, rose 


6,300 


Lespedeza 


1U,750 


Other shrubs 


1,050 


Conifers 


2,550 



Total 2U,650 
Total number of sites involved in the above distributed plants - 17 
i|. Borders cut back 

a. Approximately 500 feet of woodland border was cut back on 
2 sites. 

b. Brush killer was applied on 600 feet of border on 2 sites. 
(One of these sites was cut back this year and one last year) 

E. Economic Survey 

1. 35 interviews were completed by dist. personnel in cooperation 
with the economic survey being conducted at the Mass. Coop. 
Wildlife Unit. 

F. Land Purchase 

1. The District Manager assisted in obtaining options on lands in 
the West Meadows Area, Brockton. 

- 29 - 



II. Fisheries Management 

A. Pan and Feed Fish Control 

1. Fish trapping (chicken wire traps) 



Date Pond No. of Fish No. of fish Weight of fish Species 

Traps Removed Removed Removed 



July 1952 


Furnace , 












Pembroke 


17 


U86 


— 


P,B,eels 


Aug. 19£2' 


ViTinneconnet, 












Norton 


10 


281 


— 


P,B,BC 


May 1953 


Norton Res., 












Norton 


26 


2,917 


926.6 lbs 


P,B,BC, 

WP,WS,GS, 

eels 


June 1953 


Norton Res., 












Norton 


26 


5,586 


1,520.1 lbs 


P,B,BC, 

WP,FS,GS, 



eels 
12 fish traps were constructed during the year. 

2. Panfish Derbies Assisted 

a. Field Parks Pond, Brockton - Summer 1952 

b. Norton Reservoir, Norton - sponsored by Norton F & G Club 
(Long term derby to run through spring and summer of 1953) 

3. Poisoning (Reclamation) 

a. Trout Ponds 

(l) North Hathaways, Barnstable - A joint club and state 

project financed by the town of Barnstable. Labor supplied 
by Barnstable Spts. Club and state personnel. Reclaimed 
Sept. 1952. Restocked (rainbow trout fingerlings and 
landlocked alewifes). Latter transported from New Jersey 
during May 1953. 

b. Warm water ponds - Work done in Oct. 1952 

(1) Micajah Pond, Plymouth (20 acres). Removed 1100 plus 
pounds of fish. Restocked in spring of 1953 with LMB, BB, 
and alewifes. 

(2) Ezekial Pond, Plymouth (36 acres). Removed It 75 plus pounds 
of fish. Restocked in spring of 1953 with LMB, YP, and 
alewifes. 

k» Experimental shore seining, June 23, 1953 - Furnace Pond, 
Pembroke . 

a. Removed 260 P & B. 

B. Game Fish 

1. Bass spawning grounds were posted in 10 different ponds. 

- 30 - 



C. Club Activities 

1. Reclamation of North Hathaway Pond with Barnstable Sportsmen's 
Club (See Reclamation II A, 3, a.) 

2. Fish trapping, Norton Reservoir. Norton Fish and Game Club 
assisted in experimental fish trapping project during May and 
June of 1953. 

3. Drainage. A detailed investigation of the Field Park Ponds in 
Brockton was made and management recommendations drawn up for 
future management through drainage . Two Brockton Sportsmen clubs 
are promoting this project. Actual work will commence if and when 
the City of Brockton approve these recommendations. 

D. Other 

1. Posting. Tagging and Fishing Permitted Signs were installed and 
maintained at designated ponds throughout the district. 

2. Fishermen counts. Fishermen counts were taken at great ponds in 
the district throughout the year. Special weekend counts were 
conducted when time was available. 

3. Salter Trout Study. During the year the following Cape streams 
were sampled one or more times with the use of electric shockers. 

River No. times sampled 

Mashpee River, Barnstable 7 

Santuit River, Barnstable 6 

Marston Mills River, Barnstable 2 

Coonamessett River, Falmouth 1 
Quashnet River, Falmouth & Mashpee 2 

Scroton Creek, Sandwich 3 

Childs River, Falmouth 1 

15,000 (6-8" brook trout) were fin clipped (four combinations) 
during May of 1953 for use in the Salter Trout investigation. 
These were stocked in four south Cape streams (Mashpee, Santuit, 

Quashnet and Marston Mils). 

Two sets of electrodes were constructed during the year. 

1;. Tagging. Rainbow and Brown Trout were gill netted, tagged, and 
released in Cliff Pond, Brewster, during February of 1953. 

5. Population estimate. Was attempted for brook trout in Higgens 
Pond during the fall of 1952. Methods used for sampling fish were 
shore seining (300 ft. net) fyke trapping, and angling. 

6. Miscellaneous 

a. Assisted pond management crew in South Watuppa Pond, Fall River. 

b. Assisted pond survey crew in several ponds in Plymouth and 
Barnstable Counties. 



- 31 - 



III. Game - Non P.R. 



A. Cottontail live trapping 

1. l^U traps were maintained 

2. l^li traps were distributed to 10 sportsmen clubs 

B. Damage complaints 

1. 8 rabbit damage complaints were investigated. 

2. 6 of the l$h, rabbit traps were given to landowners who had 
rabbit damage problems. 

C. Research data contacts 

1. 500 grouse wing and tail envelopes were distributed to l\2 sporting 
good stores. 

2. Numerous sportsmen were contacted and requested to send in quail 
wings to Mass. Coop. Wildlife Unit for age determination. 

D. Census 

1. Two morning dove census routes were run in cooperation with a 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife survey. 

2. January , 1953, waterfowl counts were made in Plymouth Harbor, 
Duxbury Bay, North River, Boston Harbor areas, and fresh water 
areas of Plymouth County in cooperation with the annual Fish and 
Wildlife Service waterfowl census. 

3. A census of waterfowl broods and adults was taken during the 
course of the annual wood duck box usage census. 

E. Club Projects * 

Club Project 

Nantucket Sportsmen Quail habitat improvement 

Martha's Vineyard Spts. " » " 

Bass River Rod & Gun " " » 

Wood duck box maintenance 

Barnstable Sportsmen Quail habitat improvement 

Cape Cod Beagle Club Rabbit habitat restoration 

*-"-Oak Hill Beagle Club " « " 

**Bay State Beagle Club " » " 

New Bedford Rod & Gun Farm game restoration 

Brockton Sportsmen " " " 

Norwell Fish & Game » » « 

Fall River Rod & Gun " » ' " 

Mattapoisett Fur, Fin, Feather " " " 

TV/in Oaks Beagle Club Rabbit habitat restoration 

Norton Fish and Game Club Wood duck restoration 

* All planting work included in P-R Planting report 
*■# Detailed management plans were drawn up with cooperation of the 
Bristol County Soil Conservation District. 

- 32 - 



Man Days 


- Labor 


Dist. 


Club 


3 


3 





5+ 


3 


5+ 





1 


2 


5+ 


6 


10+ 


h 


10+ 


3 


10+ 


k 


10+ 


1 


2+ 


1 


$+ 


1 


? 


1 


■? 


1/2 


9 


1/2 • 





IV. Miscellaneous 



A. Public Relations 

Types of Meetings Attended Number Meetings Attended 

Individual sportsmen clubs meetings, 

dinners and banquets 29 

County League Meetings 10 

Men's clubs, granges, etc. 5 

Boys clubs (Jr. Spts., U-H, Scouts) 3 

Town selectmen meeting 1 

Soil Conservation Meetings 3 



Total 51 

Technical assistance was given to numerous persons, clubs, landowners, 
etc., throughout the year. In a number of cases management recommen- 
dations for specific development problems were written up. 

B. Publicity 

1. Six news releases were written and sent to seven daily newspapers. 

2. Periodic contact and stories given to seven daily newspapers. 
Newspapers involved in these releases and contacts are Cape Cod 
Standard Times, New Bedford Standard Times, Fall River Herald, 
Taunton Gazette, Brockton Enterprise, Boston Herald and Boston 
Globe . 

3. Outdoor writers (2) were taken on show trips of district activities 
i|. One radio appearance was made. 

5. Three radio stations periodically carried district news. These 
stations were at Cape Cod, New Bedford and Attleboro. 

6. Information pertaining to sportsmen-landowner relations was sent 
out to all clubs in the District. 

C. Other activities. 

1. Two show -me trips were conducted with sportsmen in observing the 
operation of the pond management crew in rough fish and panfish 
removal at South Watuppa Pond, Fall River, and Lake Monponsett, 
Halifax, during the summer of 1952. 

2. Two forestry woodlot demonstrations were attended in Plymouth 
County, under the supervision of the District Forester. Gave 
talks on the value of forestry practices in wildlife management. 



- 33 - 



STATE WILDLIFE PROJECT 

The work of this project with its various aspects has had considerable 
work accomplished in each of the following phases: 

1. The Grouse Wing and Tail Study. 

2. Harold Parker Field Trial Area. 

3. The Wildlife Shrub Nursery. 

The following phases of this project were active to a lesser degrees 

1. Turtle trapping. 

2. Small Mammal Census. 

Grouse Wing and Tail Study 

During the fiscal year 1953, this project collected 2381 wings and tails 
which it was able to use in the study. Data obtained showed the ruffed grouse 
population in the fall of 1952 was comprised of 53«2$ males, 1|6.8$ females, 
33«1$ adults and 66,9% juveniles. This could be a very promising condition and 
is nearly a k% higher juvenile component than ever recorded by this study in the 
past six years. 

The primary objective of this work was to obtain a clear picture of 
the sex and age composition of the Massachusetts ruffed grouse population in the 
fall, the success of the previous breeding season and some knowledge of the 
success of brood survival. 

Harold Parker Field Trial Area 

This forest is the only wild bird field trial area in the state. Work 
accomplished was as follows: 

1. One half -hour course relaid, marked and brushed. 

2. Forty quail and eighty pheasants were released on the area. 

3. Trails were repainted. 

U. All courses were brushed out. 

5. Area was posted. 

6. Crab apple trees were planted in cleared areas. 

7. Additional areas were cut for the purpose of encouraging natural foods. 

8. Two field trials were attended and marshalled on the area. 

9. Various conferences were held with field trial men re the work and 
improvement of the field trial area. 

The Harold Parker Field Trial Area is one of the most important phases of 
this project's work in view of the fact that the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Game makes available this area to all sportsmen. Field trial men from all of 
the New England states, New York, Pennsylvania and a number of other states, have 
used its facilities. The public relations aspect of this work is tremendous and 
are have not as yet begun to realize its full importance. 

The Wildlife Shrub Nursery 

The Wildlife Shrub Nursery located at the Westboro State Hospital grounds 
was active over the past fiscal year. Multiflora roses were the only plants grown. 
One hundred and fifty thousand roses were harvested this year. This necessitated 

- 31* - 



cultivating, weeding, and spraying which accounted for many man days of the 
project's personnel time. 

It was only through the close cooperation of Mr. Whitney, superintendent 
of the hospital's farm program and Mr. Wolfe, his assistant, with the Division's 
personnel which brought the mult if lor a rose nursery the success it attained this 
past year. 

The other work done by this project included the turtle trapping program 
and the small mammal census. 

The only work done relative to turtle trapping was in an advisory capacity 
to clubs and correspondence. 

The spring small mammal census was taken and an appropriate report 
submitted. 



-* -x- *• -:<- # -x- # x # 



PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE PROJECTS 

(75 per cent of the cost of these projects is reimbursed by federal tax monies on 
firearms and ammunition under the Pittman-Robertson Act.) 

Cottontail Rabbit Habitat Management Area 

The purposes Of the rabbit management area are to determine the effects 
of habitat improvement on the cottontail rabbit population, and to demonstrate to 
sportsmen and sportsmen's clubs, rabbit management techniques that may be used to 
improve their local covers or club grounds. 

Census figures to indicate population trends are taken by live trapping, 
tagging and releasing native cottontail rabbits. 

Hunting pressure and hunter kill data was measured when hunters volun- 
teered information on the results of the day's hunt. Some of this information was 
collected by interviews in the field. 

Habitat management techniques in practice to date include: Maintenance 
of six food patches: conifer and multiflora rose plantations j 13 experimental 
fertilizer plots; and various silvicultural cuttings. 

The area is open to hunting and inspection by beagle clubs and sportsmen 
in general. 

Wood Duck Nesting Research Project 

The banding of adult female wood ducks utilizing nesting boxes was 
resumed in April. 119 new birds were banded on the study area in the Sudbury-Concord 
River Valley. In addition 35 new adult females were banded in the special study 

- 35 - 



areas in Districts I. II and IV. Nearly one hundred females which were banded 
in previous years and returned to the nesting boxes were recorded. In the 
Sudbury-Concord Valley nearly 1600 day-old ducklings were captured in the nesting 
boxes. These were tagged with the new web-tag devised last year, and released. 
A trapping and banding program has been started and will continue throughout the 
summer. Many of the tagged birds are being recaptured and valuable information 
on juvenile survival should be gained. Since the age of these tagged ducklings 
is known to the day, data as to growth and development and other age criteria is 
being gathered when the ducklings are recaptured. 

Compilation of the state-wide check of 1600 nesting boxes has just 
begun. Preliminary tabulations indicate the wood ducks are maintaining the high 
levels noted in the last three years. 

A study of the data obtained during the 195>2 hunting season on the 
Sudbury Marshes showed very few wood ducks were taken. The peak of the wood 
duck flight occurred about October 1, and the waterfowl season did not open until 
November 11th because of the fire hazard. By that time few wood duck were in 
evidence. 

During the summer breeding season, material and photographs have been 
gathered for a display and demonstration of wood duck research techniques to be 
given at the September conference of the Northeast Section of the Wildlife Society 
meeting at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire. This project was chosen in recognition 
of Massachusetts' role as leader in the research of this species. 

Wood Duck Nesting Box Erection 

July 1st, 1953 marked the end of the nesting box erection project as 
such. However, maintenance of the boxes will continue, and some erection work 
will be done. This year, 890 nesting boxes were erected, which added to the 
27U8 boxes the Division had erected in previous years, totals 3hk9» During the 
past five years, It232 nesting boxes were fabricated and handed out to interested 
clubs and individuals ?;ho erected the boxes themselves. 



Deer Checking Stations 

During the open season on deer, December 1 to December 6, 295>9 deer were 
reported killed by hunters. Hunting conditions in 195>2 were generally dry, noisy 
and windy. There was some snow in the Berkshires for a few days. Without having 
any reliable means of measuring hunting pressure, it is possible to say only that 
it seemed as if hunting pressure was lighter than in recent years. At any rate, 
U73 fewer deer were reported killed during the hunting season this year than last 
year. 

In spite of fewer deer being killed, more deer were brought into the 
checking stations to be weighed, aged and measured. This season 1163 deer were 
examined at the checking stations. As in previous years, the sample lacked 
sufficient fawns and other small deer to make the sample random, and thus 
conducive to accurate statistical analysis, as far as age composition of the herd 
is concerned. Yfeights and measurements indicated the individual deer to be 
heavier and otherwise in better condition than the past four-year average. 



- 36 - 



Farm Game Program 

During the fiscal year, 101,775> trees and shrubs were planted to benefit 
farm game. Eighteen acres of food patches were planted on farms, club areas and 
gas pipe lines. 

67OO feet of fence rows and woodland borders were cut back or spray- 
killed to restore their usefulness to wildlife. 



Water Chestnut Control 

The control of the noxious water chestnut (trapa-natans ) was carried on 
at the infested sites on the Sudbury, Assabet and Concord rivers and on the 
college ponds at Mount Holyoke College. Although the areas affected have been 
greatly reduced, continued vigilance is necessary to prevent any new beds of 
water chestnut from gaining a foothold. 

Quail Feed Planted 

In the counties of Southeastern Massachusetts, 79,700 lespedeza seed- 
lings were planted for winter food for quail. 15U pounds of lespedeza seed were 
broadcast on prepared areas. As in the farm-game program, the Soil Conservation 
Service provided some help and plants. A state forest prison camp and game clubs 
also furnished assistance. 

Cock Pheasant Stocking 

To determine the practicality of stocking only cock pheasants, a research 
project has been carried on at Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee. Only cock 
pheasants were released on that area, and a tally of hunting returns has been 
kept. Food patches and strips have been planted to insure an adequate supply of 
winter food. 

During the two years the project has been in operation there has been 
no indication of adverse effect because of stocking only cock pheasants. The 
project will continue to gather more information. 

Fur Investigations 

As in the past few years, the major emphasis has been on muskrat, 
beaver, mink and otter. 

A final report of three years' work on muskrat primeness and harvest 
shows the following? 

1. Bulk of muskrat crop is taken in three weeks. 

2. Adverse trapping weather conditions affect the harvesting of the 
muskrat crop but only if the season is of short duration. 

3. The Mass. trapper is capable of harvesting the muskrat each ypar 
regardless of adverse weather, if the season opens in early November and continues 
for a minimum of four weeks. 

- 37 - 



U. Little difference is noted in muskrat pelt primeness throughout the 
state during any given period during the trapping season. 

5. Tall sex ratios show a preponderance of males. 

An attempt to develop a technique for the live trapping of mink was 
carried on for the second year. As a result of the two years' -work, this phase 
of the project was discontinued. 

1. During the two periods of activity, only two mink were captured. 

2. It was found that mink live trapping as a means of censusing prior 
to the fall season was extremely difficult, certainly beyond the scope of the 
present District Management activities. 

The annual muskrat census was carried on again in October, 1952. The 
results showed a definite increase in the number of muskrat structures counted as 
compared to the 195l count. However, dry conditions prevailed for a month or two 
prior to the 1952 season causing the muskrats to congregate in areas with avail- 
able water. This drought condition was probably the reason for the large number 
of muskrat houses counted. However, it will be possible to analyze the situation 
correctly when the fur harvest figures are available. 

A beaver census was conducted during the fall of 1952 by the use of an 
airplane and by ground methods. A final tabulation showed 136 beaver colonies 
in the state during the fall of 1952, h&% located within established beaver range. 
There are about 700 to 1,000 beavers in the state at the present time. 

Some information was gathered on muskrat trapping pressure. 

1. Muskrat trapping had stopped on eight miles of river route at five 
weeks. 

2. Eighty-five per cent of culverts surveyed were inactive at the end 
of five weeks. ' 

Time was spent during the beaver season visiting the trap lines with 
various beaver trappers. 

1. Information was gathered on 900 trap nights. 

2. A corrected figure of 20 muskrats were taken during the beaver 



season. 



3. 83.5$ of the traps were placed under the ice. 

U. There is a question as to the justification of the present 25-foot 



xaw. 



5. There is a need for considering the use of a larger trap when trap- 
ping beaver. 

Operation of beaver checking stations. 

1. The 1953 beaver season harvest was 83 animals. 

2. The pelts were worth approximately $1,162,00 to the beaver trappers 
of the Commonwealth. 

- 38 - 



3. The rate of hardest was reasonably distributed throughout the 
entire season. 

During the spring of 1953, a total of 58 muskrats were live-trapped, 
tagged and released back into the Great Meadow Refuge in Concord. It was felt 
that about one-fourth of the total muskrat population was tagged. Information 
will be gathered on the survival of the animals to the steel trap during the fall 
of 1953. 

* % K K *- *■ *- X ■){■ -X- # 



FISHERIES INVESTIGATIONS & MANAGEMENT 

Surveys 

The biological survey of lakes and ponds was brought to a conclusion 
following the same pattern of acceleration adopted during the previous year. 
Ninety-six lakes, ponds, and reservoirs in Barnstable, Berkshire, Bristol, Dukes, 
Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Plymouth counties were 
completed. An especial effort ivas made to include all ponds intentionally or 
unintentionally by-passed for one reason or another during previous years of the 
survey. As far as is known, all bodies of \vater that are now legally open to 
public fishing have been considered by the survey. Undoubtedly, however, a few 
additional waters will come into legal public use from time to time and some 
will be lost. A continuing program of progressive fish management will serve to 
keep information fairly well up to date. 

Overcrowding by hordes of weed fishes and small pan fishes, resulting in 
low levels of game fish abundance through poor survival of their young, is one of 
two outstanding pond management problems. Past haphazard state stocking, "unoffi- 
cial" (illegal) stocking by elements of the public, and disproportionate angling 
emphasis on game fishes correlated with low levels of pan fish angling "know-how", 
are all important factors contributing to a condition of widespread unbalance of 
fish populations. Another pressing management problem is public access to public 
fishing waters. The vast majority of public waters lack any public access. Future 
fishing is jeopardized if this deficiency long continues. All of these problems 
must be solved on a significant statewide scale if fishing is to be improved 
noticeably. This will require forthright implementation of the Fish Management 
Policy on an expanding scale. 

The fisheries report covering work in 19ii9 (northeastern Mass., princi- 
pally Essex County) has been distributed. A report covering the 1950 work (north- 
central Mass.) should be available for distribution soon after this report is 
released. 

The first year's work under Federal Aid to Fisheries (Dingell- Johns on 
program) was a study of the trout fishing potential of the Westfield River drainage 
system. A detailed report of findings and recommendations is in preparation. 
Already major findings have been applied both through delayed stocking (stocking 
closer to opening day) and increased stocking in upstream sections to delay sub- 
stantial loss down into the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound during high 
water. Last spring's flood, served to emphasize the importance of these measures. 

The second year's work is underway in the Millers River drainage. Much 
higher utilization of stocked fish by anglers and more prolonged survival of trout 

- 39 - 



in the system is clearly evident although exact figures are not available at this 
writing. Both observations appear to be closely correlated with lower drainage 
gradients that serve to modify turbulence and water level fluctuations to a marked 
degree. Extent of actual carry-over cannot be estimated at this time. Loss of 
nearly seven miles of public fishing grounds, through inability of the Division to 
renegotiate a satisfactory lease agreement, was a serious, though not a crippling 
blow to the creel census phases of the study. A particularly well planned census 
of angling success comprised the very stretch involved. Loss of this stretch 
necessitated termination of the census after 6 weeks of a planned 10-week period 
-?ere completed. This is regrettable, but the data already secured can serve as a 
fair (though inadequate) basis for estimating total harvest. 

Differential Harvest of Game and Pan Fishes 

One of the factors possibly contributing to unbalance in ponds is the 
habits of anglers regarding harvest of fish crops. On the average about ll$ of 
the weight of all fish in our ponds are predators (game fishes), nearly $0% are 
pan fishes, and the remainder are primarily weed species. Pan fishes outweigh - 
game fishes about three and one-half times but outnumber them about seven times. 
Yet tag returns over a three-year period indicate that anglers harvest annually 
on the average about 20 per cent (numerically) of the predators and less than 
five per cent (numerically) of the pan fish. By number, then, anglers harvest 
about four times as many predators as pan fishes whereas they actually constitute 
a minority of the population. By weight, obviously, this disproportionate harvest 
is much greater. The principal damage here is failure to harvest pan fishes to 
any extent, since substantial harvest of pan fishes is crucial to maintenance of 
pond balance (and good fishing). In lieu of a several-fold increase in angler 
harvest of pan fishes, the state must substitute state-wide control of unused 
species by means of nets, chemicals, drainage, spawn destruction, relaxed regula- 
tions governing catch, and any other possible method that may be developed. 

Trout Pond Management Policy 

As a refinement of the overall Fish Management Policy previously adopted, 
a specific Trout Pond Policy was formulated based largely on accumulated pond 
survey data and other fishery research findings and adopted by the Board. Under 
this policy Massachusetts for the first time has an integrated policy, based on 
vater quality and carrying capacity, for managing trout and thereby rejects costly 
and wasteful trial-and-error stocking. Under this policy a long range program of 
reclamation of suitable ponds for trout fishing is planned. To date four ponds 
(two ponds this year) have. been reclaimed and restocked with trout and a total of 
UO are to be reclaimed by the end of 1957. Plants of legal size trout (two-year 
olds) in non-reclaimed ponds are to be increased several-fold within the same 
period. Within the first year of operation a commendable 5>0 per cent increase in 
such plants was achieved (see report of Fish Propagation section). 

A trout pond policy evolved first after completion of the state-wide 
survey because heaviest fishery investment currently lies in trout propagation. 
Thile about three-fourths of total fishery investment goes for the latter purpose, 
-tbout four-fifths of public fishing water area is essentially warm-water in poten- 
tial. A heavy expenditure for warm-water management is obviously required to bring 
-,his more into balance commensurate with the natural potential of our waters. 

'hinning of Overabundant Pan and Weed Fishes 

Pond management (reorganized salvage) crews using fyke nets continued 
-heir important work of reducing fish populations recognized by the pond survey to 

- 10 - 



be overcrowded. Wildlife district managers and their crews also contributed 
strongly to this phase of activities, largely by means of partial poisonings, pond 
reclamation and bluegill spawn destruction. In addition, the second and final 
season of experimentation with an inexpensive, portable wire trap was undertaken. 
These are designed as a possible tool for state-wide cooperative pan fish control 
programs to serve as a controllable supplement to the hook and line. 

By all methods over 23 tons of overcrowded pan and weed fishes (about a 
quarter of a million individual fishes) were removed from 21 ponds (Table 1) and 
destroyed. The weed fish (carp, suckers, golden shiners) averaged about eight 
ounces apiece in weight, while the pan fish (bluegills, pumpkinseeds, yellow perch, 
white perch, calico bass, and horned pout) averaged about three ounces apiece in 
weight. Two ponds were reclaimed in their entirety — Ezekials Pond and Micajah 
Pond, both in Plymouth — and restocked with combinations of largemouth black bass 
and yellow perch, and largemouths and brown bullheads (horned pout), respectively. 
Since exact methods for stocking these species have never been developed in this 
region these combinations must be regarded as somewhat experimental and subject to 
later manipulation as may appear desirable to maintain effective balance. The 
original populations were removed on the basis of survey findings that indicated 
unbalance. These ponds are already back in production and furnishing angling. 

Particularly poor fish populations were encountered during the surveys 
of Lakes Massapoag in Sharon (Norfolk County) and Quannapowitt in Wakefield (Middle- 
sex County) and especial attention is being devoted to these waters with several 
seasons of work planned. Intensive control of pan and weed fishes in these waters 
promises to improve game fish angling possibilities considerably. 

Habitat Improvement 

Please see reports on activities of Wildlife Districts for habitat im- 
provement work and other specific fisheries projects not mentioned here. While 
under the direction and supervision of the Aquatic Biology Section, these activities 
are largely conducted by the Wildlife District Managers. 

Regulations 

A number of changes were proposed to bring laws and regulations into 
harmony with research findings. For those actually enacted please refer to the 
section on legislation in the rear of this report. 

Salvage and Transfer 

Completion of the state-wide pond survey has resulted in accumulation of 
a wealth of fisheries information. This data shows clearly that overcrowding by 
hordes of unharvestable weed and small pan fish constitutes the outstanding limit- 
ing factor to good angling. About two- thirds of all ponds surveyed appear to be 
unbalanced. Only about one-fourth appear to be well balanced and to offer optimum 
angling potential. The remainder are in a precarious or indeterminate state of 
balance at best bordering on unbalance. The harmful and wasteful nature of stock- 
ing additional hordes of small pan fish (the vast bulk of most past salvage plants) 
in these waters is obvious. Indeed, much of this wide-spread unbalance is directly 
traceable to the energetic haphazard stocking of warm-water fishes formerly con- 
ducted throughout the state in response to "political" pressure from misguided 
groups and persons. Consequently the stocking of such fishes has been virtually 
eliminated under provisions of the Fish Management Policy, and emphasis almost 
entirely shifted to salvage of predatory game species. Fortunately our politicians 
and angling public have become much enlightened in these matters in recent years. 

- \a - 



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- U3 - 



Only those pan fish (usually of harvestable size) believed actually needed from a 
biological standpoint were placed in public waters (many small ones were released 
in youth's ponds) closely coordinated with survey findings. Two badly unbalanced 
ponds that were reclaimed by complete poisoning for warm-water fish management 
were restocked with fishable balanced populations thereby accounting for a sub- 
stantial quantity of pan fishes stocked. A high proportion of harvestable pan 
f is lies released were tagged for experimental purposes. The emphasis is increasingly 
on discriminatory justifiable stocking. Wherever possible stocking of predatory 
game fishes should be coordinated with intense thinning of pan fishes to obtain 
maximum results. In any case increasingly concentrated plants of adult game fishes 
are being made in fewer ponds. Salvage of game fishes is expensive at best 
(though many times cheaper than raising them in hatcheries) and the most judicious 
biological use is imperative. The average weight of transferred fishes was about 
one-third pound. A more detailed summary of salvage activities is shown in Table 2. 



New Waters 






According to an official release of the Metropolitan District Commission, 
despite a late season opening, over 10,000 people took advantage of the limited 
boat facilities available at Quabbin Reservoir in calendar year 1952 without 
polluting the water supply. Minimum facilities were completed at Quabbin with 
announced availability of 100 boats and $0 motors for rent at reasonable rates. 
Fishing for warm-water species has been good for persistent anglers as was predict- 
ed. It has been demonstrated clearly in this case as in other states that use of 
domestic water supplies for both fishing and drinking is not incompatible. 

An initial small plant of lake trout fingerlings has already been made 
and more are being raised at Sunderland and Montague hatcheries. Walleyes are 
scheduled for introduction by finger ling plants to be made from those currently 
being raised at the Palmer hatchery (see account of Fish Propagation elsewhere in 
this report). An especial effort should be made to obtain fifty to several hundred 
adult walleyes and lake trout for introduction to Quabbin annually for about three 
years (in addition to largest possible fingerling plants during the same period) 
to serve as brood stock and help speed up the process of establishing these species. | 
Such action could conceivable reduce by as much as five years the time necessary to 
develop excellent fishing for these big game species. 

Publications 

As a direct result of advances being made in fisheries technology in 
Massachusetts the following papers purporting to the fisheries profession were 
published: "Spot Poisoning Applied to the Massachusetts Lake and Pond Fisheries 
Survey," and "Notes on Reliability of Some Fish Tags Being Used in Massachusetts." 
Manuscripts in preparation during this period includes "Management of Massachu- 
setts Ponds for Trout Fishing," "Fisheries Report for Some Central, Eastern, and 
Western Massachusetts Lakes, Ponds, and Reservoirs, 1951-1952," "Harvests and 
Management of Warm-Water Fish Crops in Massachusetts," and "A Fishery Investiga- 
tion of the Westfield River Drainage." It is hoped to complete and publish these 
in the current fiscal year. 

-;$■ # # % # *- •}(- ft *- ■«■ -* 



- bh 



STATE ORNITHOLOGIST 



Following the practice of recent years , the year has been spent on the 
waterfowl work of the Division. The intensive study of local distribution, age 
and sex ratios, and kill of black ducks in Essex County was carried through the 
second of its projected three-year course, and resulted in the collection of 
data which are better in quality and greater in quantity than anything hitherto 
available. The processing and analysis of this material is a long job, but it 
is producing information which can be applied constantly to more effective manage- 
ment in the Northeast. 

-;:- ■?:- -* -5:- * # -x- * *- *- *- # 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 

Woodcock Project 

As a result of research work on woodcock census techniques in the state, 
federal census methods have been changed resulting in more accurate annual inven- 
tories. Based on population figures for 1952, the shooting regulations have been 
liberalized allowing a UO-day rather than a 30-day open season subject to indivi- 
dual state preferences. Habitat requirements and the status of this bird in the 
state are being studied. Over 150 new birds have been banded. 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

Work on the grouse project was resumed by a new graduate student in 
September, 1952. In addition to work on the study areas, a special project on a 
possible new census technique was completed. Such will result in recommendations 
which can be applied state-wide and thus enable the Director to have a more 
accurate estimate of annual populations on which shooting regulations will be 
based. 

Bobwhite Quail Project 

The quail project was completed as a Unit project in June, 1953, but will 
be continued by the same graduate student as a state P-R project for the next two 
years. Under Unit supervision, the investigator developed accurate methods of 
making annual inventories, and estimating the survival of game farm released birds. 
Based on this work, recommendations to the Director on new stocking methods and 
regulations have already been made. 

Economic Survey 

Tabulations of the results of a state-wide survey on the economic impor- 
tance of hunting and fishing in Massachusetts were virtually completed at the end 
of the fiscal year. In addition to these figures, valuable information was 
gathered on the numbers of license holders hunting or fishing for certain species 
of fish and game. The information will be written up in popular terminology and 
disseminated in published form, if possible. It is believed the survey may well 
be the soundest from a statistical viewpoint of any similar study completed in the 
nation. 

- h$ - 



Snowshoe Hare Fro.iect 

The hare project remained inactive during the year. The former student 
worker on this project will complete his report by September, 1953, and the 
project will be resumed under a new student for the next two years. 

Other Activities 

As in the past, personnel of this unit have made a number of talks 
before public gatherings of all kinds. 



BIRCH HILL PUBLIC HUNTING AND FISHING GROUND 



The research and management programs at Birch Hill were conducted as 
planned with management consuming about three-fourths of the time. The development 
work is necessarily based on long range schedule with the research carried along 
to check progress. 

The following management was accomplished during the year: (1) erection 
of a shed 25' x 36' in size to provide storage for project equipment and supplies j 
(2) completion of plans to manage two marshes including construction detail for 
control structures j (3) maintenance of bridges within the area before and after 
the occurrence of flood water; (k) repair and maintenance of roads; (5) construc- 
tion of rustic-type signs to mark entrances, roads and streams; (6) planting of 
2000 conifers in field borders to provide escape cover; (7) planting of 3000 multi- 
flora rose shrubs on field borders and in travel lanes to provide food and escape 
cover; (8) planting of about 10 acres of winter wheat and rye to provide winter 
food and green manure for spring plantings; (9) planting of 15 acres of food 
strips consisting of a grass and clover mixture, oats, buckwheat, soybeans, rape 
and corn; (10) thinning of overcrowded pine plantations to encourage sprout growth 
which would provide food and escape cover; (11) stocking of xvhite hare and ring- 
necked pheasants; (12) pruning of abandoned apple trees to provide natural food. 

Population counts were made of white hare, cottontail rabbits and ruffed 
grouse. An index was kept of other game species including deer, pheasants, foxes, 
mink, waterfowl and beaver. More drumming grouse were noted on a given area in 
the spring of 1953 than in 1952. More cottontail rabbits but less white hare were 
found on given areas in 1953 than in 1952. Other game populations appeared to 
stay about the same with the exception of pheasants which were increased through 
stocking. There are good hunting populations of all species within the area. 

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FISCRL YEAR 1953 



% Certain amounts of these expenditures (specifically accounts 330l±-lj.7 and 
330^-53) are reimbursed 75$ by Federal funds. 

- U8 - 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 



Distribution of Sportsmen's Dollar 



Fiscal Year 1953 



ADMINISTRATION: 



#330U-01 $63,001.91 

330ii-06 1,970.82 $6^,972.73 72 



PROPAGATION: 



Game #330^-31 $211,971.91 

330U-U8 U.U60.00 $2l6,U31.91 222 

Fish 330U-31 $260,102.09 

330U-lr9 7,228.32 

330li-50 259.39 $267,589.80 27$ 



EDUCATION; 



WILDLIFE: 



#330U-U3 $13,280.33 12 



Game #330U-UU $6,l;96.88 

330U-51 38,320.60 

330l*-$3* 11U,196.63 

330ii-5U 6,hh0.79 

330U-57 6,01^.55 $171,189. l& 172 

Fish 3301H42 $57,386.95 

330li-lr5 13,170.12 

330U-U7* 21,329.71 

330ii-5l 25,000.00 

3301+-56 19.372.6U $136,259.1*2 11$ 

LAW ENFORCEMENT: $116,252.86 122 

GRAND TOTAL: $986,286.50 1002 



* Expenditures under #330U-li7 and #330U-53 
are reimbursed 752 by Federal Funds. 



- 19 - 



INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND — SURPLUS AS OF JUNE 30, 1953 



$683,559.80 



•$(■ # # -;*■ *• # 

SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
1953 Fiscal Year 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations, and Tags 

Rents 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 

Court Fines 

TOTAL INCOMi 



$903,618.25 

6,1+20.30 

2,706.50 

91*2.67 

7ii, 725.68 

19,170.93 

8,660.50 

.,016,2^.83 



Ji. Ji. M. it. .% .$4. 



Analysis of the Special Licenses issued under Section 1+8, 68A, 102, 103, 10l+, 105, 

during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1953. 



106, and 107, Chapter 131, G. L. 



Type of License 



Number 
Issued 



Receipts 



Special Fish Propagator License 

Special Fish Propagator License - No Fee 

Fish Propagator License 

Propagator License (Birds or Mammals) 

Special Propagator License - No Fee 

Dealer's License 

"Possession Only" License 

Taxidermist License 

Resident Citizen Fur Buyer's 

License to take Shiners for bait 

Trap Registration Certificates 

Fish Tags 

Game Tags 



188 

1 

88 

U30 

5 

k!9 

Sh 

hZ 

270 
1,663 

91^,825 
1,921 



% 216.00 

310.00 
1,1+80.00 

761.00 

33.50 

210.00 

350.00 

1, 31+5.50 

670.00 

91+8.25 

96.05 

$6,1+20.30 



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- 51 - 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1952 to June 30, 1953 

EXPENDITURES 
ACCOUNT NO. TITLE APPROPRIATION & LIABILITIES REVERTED 

#330l*-01 Administration 

330U-06 Board of Fisheries and 
Game - Expenses 

330h-31 Operation of Fish Hatcheries 
and Game Farms 

330l*-l*2 Improvement & Management 
of Lakes, Ponds & Rivers 

330l*-l*3 Information Program 

330U-U5 Public Fishing Grounds 

''a) 330[|.-[|.7 Stream Survey and 

Inventory Work 28,01*9.00 21,329.71 6,719.29 

330U-51 Bureau of Wildlife Research 



68,720.00 


63,001.91 


5,718.09 


2,500.00 


1,970.82 


529.18 


501,331;. 00 


l*72,07l*.00 


29,260.00 


61,799.00 


57,386.95 


1*, 1*12.05 


13,630.00 


13,280.33 


31*9.67 


13,335.00 


13,170.12 


162*. 88 





and Manage men t-Admin is trat: 


Lon 75,91*0.00 


63,320.60 


12,619.1*0 


v 'a) 330U-53 


Wildlife Restoration 


11*8,282.00 


ill*, 196.63 


3li,085.37 


330U-5U 


Stream & Bird Cover 
Improvement 


7,500.00 


6,1*1*0.79 


1,059.21 


330U-56 


Biological Survey of 
Streams and Waters 


19,960.00 


.19,372.61* 


587.36 


330U-57 


Acquisition & Improvement 
of Certain Land 


30,000.00 


6,ol*l*.55 


23,9$S.h$* 



TOTALS $971,01*9.00* $851,589.05 $H9,h59.95 

* This amount plus outstanding liabilities of $1*, 792.12 
re-appropriated to expire June 30, 1951*. 

(a) 75$ reimbursement from Federal Funds 
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS** 



330l*-l*8 
3301*-1*9 
330l*-50 


Improvements - State 
Game Farms 
Improvement - State 
Fish Hatcheries 
Pond Fish Units 


APPROPRIATION 

[*, 1*60.00 

7,228.32 
259.39 


EXPENDED 

1*, 1*60. 00 

7,228.32 
259.39 


REVERTED 

- - 

- - 

- - 



TOTALS $11,91*7.71 $11,91*7.71 - - 

These special appropriations expired June 30, 1952. Amounts shown 
represent encumbrance balances available for expenditure in 1953 
fiscal year. 

52 - 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1953: 

Chapter 21, Acts of 1953: An act relative to forest fire emergencies. 

Chapter 115, Acts of 1953; An act allowing the use of dogs for waterfowl hunting 

during the open season on deer. 

Chapter 218, Acts of 1953? An act providing for the display of sporting, hunting, 

fishing or trapping licenses . 

Chapter 22U, Acts of 1953: An act repealing certain provisions of law penalizing 

the use of certain bait in ice fishing. 

Chapter 2i|l, Acts of 1953? An act requiring the tagging of deer. 

Chapter 285, Acts of 1953: An act relative to protection of salmon in the Connec- 
ticut River or its tributaries. 

Chapter U78, Acts of 1953: An act authorizing the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game to regulate the taking of certain 
fish. 

Chapter 1|80, Acts of 1953? An act authorizing the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game to regulate the hunting of deer. 

Chapter U8l, Acts of 1953: An act authorizing the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game to further regulate the hunting or 
taking of gray squirrels, hares and rabbits. 

Chapter i|82, Acts of 1953: An act authorizing the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game to regulate the hunting and trapping 
of mammals. 

Chapter 599, Acts of 1953: An act authorizing the Commonwealth to enter into a 

compact with the State of Connecticut for inaugurating 
legislation to protect the return of salmon and other 
migratory fish to the Connecticut River. 

Chapter 651, Acts of 1953: An act relative to the organization, powers and duties 

of the Department of Natural Resources. 



*- *- *- ■>/<■ *■ j a- x- -y- -;:- % # 



- 53 - 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED 
BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1953 



March 2U, 1952. Prohibiting fishing except between April 15 and July 31, 
both dates inclusive, in Bailey's Pond, Amesbury, and restricting the catch to six 
trout a day per person by fly fishing, with no trolling permitted. 

October 29, 19l|6. Rules and regulations relative to seasons, legal 
lengths, bag limits, and license requirements to apply to Wallum Lake in the town 
of Douglas, also lying partly in the town of Burrilville, Rhode Island. 

July 8, 191*8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of fish. 

July 8, 19U8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of 
birds and mammals. 

September 9, 19^9. Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake 

Monomonac in the town of Winchendon, Long Pond in the towns of Tyngsboro and Dracut, 

and Tuxbury Pond in the town of Amesbury (three ponds lying partly in the State of 
New Hampshire ) . 

March 7, 1950. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish and 
use of land in areas leased by Division of Fisheries and Game for public fishing 
ground purposes. 

January 2, 1951. Public fishing grounds, supplement, establishing fly 
fishing area on Farmington River. 

February lU, 1951. Special regulations for Deerfield River and its 
diverted waters and establishing a fly fishing area thereon. 

March li;, 1951. Setting aside as bass spawning grounds certain areas in 
the following ponds and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 and June 
30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1951: Bloody Pond, 
Plymouthj Dorothy Pond, Millbury; Fort Pond, Lancaster; Fort Pond, Little t on j 
Hampton Pond, Southampton and Westfield; Island Pond (Great Island Pond), Plymouthj 
Mascopic Lake, Tyngsboro and Dracutj Oldham Pond, Pembroke; Sampsons Pond, Carver; 
Sandy Pond, Plymouth; Snows Pond, Rochester; Stetson Pond, Pembroke; White Island 
Pond, Plymouth and Wareham; Alum Pond, Sturbridge. 

July lU, 1952. Pheasant, Quail, and Ruffed Grouse Regulations for season 
of 1952. 

September 2, 1952. Migratory Game Bird Regulations for season of 1952. 

September 29, 1952. Special fishing regulations on Cliff Pond in 
Brewster for 1952. 

March 28, 1952. Special fishing regulations on Hoosac Reservoir prohibit- 
ing the taking of great northern pike only from April 15, 1952 to April llj., 195^, 
both dates inclusive. 

July llj, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 

-$k - 



January 16, 1953* Regulations for bass spawning areas in Long Pond, 
Yarmouth and Long Pond, Barnstable and closing the areas to all fishing between 
April 15 and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 
1953. 



for 1953. 



January 16, 1953. Beaver Trapping Regulations for 1953 season. 
April U, 1953. Special fishing regulations on Higgins Pond, Brewster 



# # -tt •* •& * -* * *- *- # 



- 55 - 



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BB OF MASSACHUSETTS 
APR 20 I 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

MASS OFF1UAL& 









I 



• C7St 
the commonwealth of massachusetts 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



October 1, 19 54 

!His Excellency Christian A. Herter, Governor of the Commonwealth 
The Executive Council; The General Court; and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty-Ninth Annual 
Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the fiscal year 
from July 1, 1953 to June 30, 19H. 

Respectfully submitted 




Director 



Publication of this Document Approved by George J. Cronin, State Purchasing Agent 
I-12-54-9137S1 






H 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Board 
Fish Propagation . 

Fish Distribution Table 
Game Propagation 

Game Distribution Table 
Information and Education 
Public Fishing Grounds 
Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management . 

Wildlife Management Districts 

Ornithologist 

Federal Aid Fisheries Projects 

Fisheries Management Activities .... 

Fisheries Management Tables .... 

Federal Aid Wildlife Projects . . . . 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit .... 
General Administration 

How the Sportsman's Dollar was Spent 

Summary of Fish & Game Income .... 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting & Trapping Licenses . 

Appropriations & Expenditures 

Legislation 

Regulations 



PAC 



II 

15 

14 

lfi 

1G 

19 

19 

20 

21 

23 

26 

29 

29 

29 

30 

31 

31 

32 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 

In every way the Division of Fisheries and Game has made favorable 
progress during the fiscal year of 1953-1954. 

Our financial status is very satisfactory. Although outlay for the year was 
at an all time high, income exceeded expenditures. This resulted in an addi- 
tion of $103,298.41 to the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund, which now 
amounts to $666,423.80. 

In connection with this fund it may be timely to call attention to the need 
for new quarters to house the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory at Upton now oc- 
cupying buildings constructed years ago as a C.C.C. camp in the State Forest. 
Present buildings are in such poor state of repair and otherwise unsuited for our 
needs that it will not pay to recondition them. Present plans call for a request 
for adequate funds for new quarters to be located on Fisheries and Game prop- 
erty. 

The sale of licenses for the year broke all records. Sales for the six months' 
period January 1 to July 1, were far ahead of any previous season's average 
for this period, or in other words, they exceed the normal "trend line". 

The law requiring that possession of a fishing, hunting, or trapping license 
be indicated by the attachment of a container, with the visible license number 
enclosed, in a conspicuous manner to the outer clothing undoubtedly contributed 
to the increase of license sales. The wearing of this "tag" also served in some 
degree the primary purpose of retarding posted land and improvement of 
sportsman-landowner relations. 

Sportsmen, City Clerks, Town Clerks, and other interested individuals have 
made many constructive suggestions for an improved visible license to be worn 
in 1955. Board members and the Director accordingly designed a license form 
which is expected to eliminate most of the objectionable features of 1954 
license, yet retain all benefits to be gained in wearing of a number in a promi- 
nent place on the outer garment. 

Production of fish and game again exceeded the record of the previous year. 
'Personnel of the fish hatcheries and game farms continue to produce quality fish 
and game at a reasonable cost. 

Greater progress was made in fish management work during the year than 
lin any other phase of our operations. Results are in line with the Board policy 
lof acquiring the best trained and experienced men and allowing them freedom 
oi action. 

Pond reclamation and management for both trout and warm water species 
Of fish has progressed to the full extent commensurate with personnel and 
equipment. The plan outlined for the management of Quabbin Reservoir 
s operating in a favorable manner. The greatly increased number of fisher- 
nen and the number of fish taken indicates that this body of water is fast 
>ecoming one of the choice fishing areas in this part of the country. 

Further progress was made in our game management program during the 
'ear. More equipment was acquired for the use of District Managers in carry- 
ng out an expanded basic plan of crop planting for cover improvement and 
n connection with other sportsman-landowner cooperative procedures. The 
>utlook in this department is one of optimism. 





P.D. 25 



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All our field work as in other Departments is based on the knowledge 
acquired through sound research. The results of research have permitted our 
management work to proceed in an orderly and practical manner with a mini- 
mum of error. We feel that there will always continue to be a need for research 
and plan to recognize this element in all our operations. At the present time 
our staff is largely engaged in management, though research is going on to a 
limited extent. The University of Massachusetts is conducting extensive re- 
search projects, the results of which have and will continue to be of great 
importance and assistance in all management work. 

We rely on our Bureau of Information and Education to inform the 
sporting public of what is being done, why, and what is expected to be accom- 
plished. Much appreciated assistance to these ends has been received from 
sportswriters, radio, television programs, and other educational and public 
relations media. 

We regret that all our budgetary requests for the Bureau of Information 
and Education for the fiscal year were not allowed, but some small increase 
over the previous year was granted permitting establishment of the Bureau on a 
firmer basis. 

Changes in salary grades for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1954, have 
corrected some inequalities which have existed in Department personnel. Dis- 
trict Manager grades continue to be out of line, hence every effort will be 
made to correct this situation in the next annual budget. 

On October 7, 1954, the Division moved to new quarters at 73 Tremont 
St., Boston. 

In March, 1954, Matthew T. Coyne of Millbury was elected Chairman of 
the Board and Frederick A. McLaughlin of Amherst, Secretary. Also in March, 
1954, Mr. Ovide N. Lanois of Marlboro resigned as a Board member in the 
Division of Fisheries and Game. His Excellency, Governor Christian A. Herter, 
appointed Mr. Powell M. Cabot of Dover to fill the vacancy created by the 
resignation of Mr. Lanois. 

The Board wishes to express appreciation for the continued loyal coopera- 
tion of Division of Fisheries and Game personnel. Appreciation is also ex- 
pressed to the many sportsmen and others who by their confidence and support 
have contributed to further progress that has been made. 

By Order of The Board 

S/ Matthew T. Coyne, Chairman 

Frederick A. McLaughlin, Secretary. 



FISH PROPAGATION 



The past year has again shown an increase in production of legal size 
trout at our fish hatcheries. This increase has been advancing steadily to a total 
of 944,927 trout for thi* fiscal year. It is particularly noteworthy to mention 
that of the total distributed, the increase of the larger size 9" plus alone has 
been outstanding. The number of larger fish has gradually increased during 
the past few years from 104,296 to a total of 214,337 for this year. 

Because of the establishment of more of our natural great ponds for trout 
fishing, the demand for these larger trout has taxed our rearing facilities at the 
fish hatcheries to the utmost. However, because of the acquisition of the best 
equipment available, good quality food and sufficient man power to enable us 
to keep pools and ponds and the hatcheries in general in first class condition, 
it has been possible to raise our production and distribution to this high level. 
Our fish hatchery culturists are doing an outstanding job and much credit is 
due them not only for the quantity and size of the trout liberated but also for 
the fine quality of fish reared. 

During the year, continued improvements were undertaken at the hatcheries 
in order to keep them at production. Pools and ponds must be repaired, 
buildings painted and kept in repair, equipment kept in good condition alto- 
gether with a great many other tasks necessary to keep the property in as good 
condition as possible. 

For the second year, the propagation of lake trout was undertaken at the 
Montague and Sunderland hatcheries. In the fall of 1953, 100,000 eggs were 
obtained from the New York Division of Fisheries and Game on an exchange 
basis for a like number of brook trout eggs to be furnished this state in the 
fall or early winter of 1954. The eggs were divided between Montague and 
Sunderland for hatching and rearing. From this hatch, 32,450 fingerlings were 
liberated in Quabbin Reservoir. Also, from the Vermont Fish and Game Divi- 
sion, we received about 20,000 lake trout fingerlings in the early part of 1954 
and these are being held for further growth at the Montague and Sunderland 
hatcheries. 

For the second year, approximately one-half million walleyed pike eggs 
were obtained for the Palmer hatchery from the New York Division of Fisheries 
and Game on an exchange basis, in the spring of 1954 and 150,000 of the result- 
ing fry were liberated in Quabbin Reservoir. The remaining fry were kept in 
bass ponds at Palmer for further growth. In the fall of 1953, 2,515 walleyed 
pike 4" — 10" were liberated in the Quabbin. We feel every means possible 
is being undertaken to establish this desirable species of fish in Quabbin 
Reservoir. 



East Sandwich Hatchery 

Much needed repairs to another row of trout pools on the so-called west 
side of the hatchery were completed. Repairs to the remaining two rows of 
pools in this series were started in April and will be completed in July of the 
new fiscal year. It has taken about three years to complete this very 
necessary repair work as only a limited amount of work could be done each 
year without suspending production. The work had to be done in the spring 
and early summer between the completion of general distribution and the time 





I 




6 P.D. 25 

when pools were needed for the new stock of fish. Another small rearing pool 
was constructed and two new wells driven for additional water supply. To 
further trout hatching operations, the hatch house was put into operation 
for the first time in several years. The old pipe to this building was replaced 
with some 4" pipe in order to get an adequate supply of water to the troughs. 
During the winter months, the workshop was shingfed, the shingles stained 
and the trim painted. The meat room and the hatch house also received 
a coat of paint. For improvement of the appearance of the grounds, a new 
rotary type power lawn mower was purchased. 

Montague Hatchery 

This hatchery had a very successful year. The total of legal size trout 
distributed showed an increase over the previous year together with an increase 
in the larger size 9" plus. Outside of the general work normally carried on, 
a 2" water supply line to the cement ponds at the lower end of the hatchery 
was laid to provide extra water during hot and dry weather conditions prevail- 
ing in July and August. It was found advisable to change this line to a 4" 
size due to the continual accumulation of slime deposits. Materials for this 
change are on hand. A large size ramp was constructed near the woodshed to 
assist in truck body repairs and to drain the distribution tanks completely 
and keep the run-off from entering the ponds system. 

Further experiments were carried out on diets for trout brood stock, espe- 
cially for the rainbows. A general improvement in the egg fertility was evi- 
denced from certain changes and further study in brood stock diet is thereby 
warranted. A shipment of 50,000 eyed rainbow eggs was obtained from the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service for additions to the present brood stock. This 
lot of eggs showed considerable loss through deformities in the fry stage; how- 
ever, in a later stage they improved greatly and many of them will be considered 
as additions to the present brood stock. 

During the winter months, much time was spent painting gypsy moth 
clusters around pools and ponds and cutting brush for new roadways to provide 
entrance for spraying equipment to other sections of the hatchery infested 
more or less with gypsy moths. Due to the cement strike, the job of replacing 
the sides of three rearing pools was deferred until the next fiscal year. A new 
and larger pump rack was installed and a wood jacket built around the dis- 
tribution tank to make it more serviceable the year round. A Ford 2-ton stake 
body truck replaced the 1947 Chevrolet truck. A 3" diaphragm pump was pur- 
chased for experimental use in cleaning the bottoms of ponds. It has gone through 
many tests and has proved its value in cleaning mud from ponds and pools and 
in keeping waste from accumulating in the ponds during the season. 

Palmer Hatchery 

This hatchery is the only one where a combination of trout and warm 
water fish is hatched and reared. Besides trout, the propagation of both small- 
mouth and largemouth black bass, walleyed pike and some shiners is carried 
on. Such diversified activities require utilization of available ponds to their full 
extent. Due to the management policy of many ponds throughout the state, 
the demand for warm water fish is undergoing a change. This affects the opera^ 
tion of the hatchery from season to season inasmuch as plans must be laid out 
according to the species required, particularly as it relates to bass. As mentioned 
elsewhere, all walleyed pike hatched and reared at this hatchery are liberated 






P.D. 25 7 

in Quabbin Reservoir. The shiners are used for food for pike fingerlings and 
for bass breeders. 

During the year a much needed septic tank was installed at the double 
tenement house and a cement walk was laid also. To minimize lack of oxygen 
difficulties during very dry and warm weather, a new 2" pipe line was laid to 
certain trout ponds thus eliminating the use of pumps. More pipe was laid 
to round out separate pipe lines to each bass pool. It is hoped in a couple of 
years, to complete this project which has been needed for a long time. A new 
pipe line was installed to further improve facilities at the new sorting house. 
In the spring, the sides of a number of trout pools were re-boarded and the 
sides of others replaced where needed. 

During the winter months many general repairs were made to equipment, 
buildings, etc., new nets and seines were made, brush was cut, driveways 
were gravelled where needed, hatch troughs and trays were painted, etc. A rest 
room and facilities were installed in the main building. 

New equipment purchased during the year included three distribution 
pumps, a power rotary lawn mower, a steel distribution tank to replace the old 
wooden one, an International 2-ton staked dump truck to replace the 1942 
Chevrolet dump truck and a 3^-ton Chevrolet pick up truck to replace a 1946 
i/ 2 -ton Chevrolet. No lumber was cut but some milled lumber on hand was 
transferred to other hatcheries and to the Bureau of Wildlife and Research 
Management. Cutting lumber on the hatchery grounds by hatchery personnel 
has saved a good many dollars. 

Sandwich Hatchery 

This hatchery for the past few years has undergone many changes and each 
year the production and distribution of legal size trout has been increased. 
This year was no exception with an increase that showed this Cape hatchery 
had another very successful year. Continued improvements were made and 
eight pool ends badly in need of repairs were replaced with 2" wood planking. 
Three old artesian wells were fitted with new pipe which increased the water 
supply over 25 gallons per minute. The four additional new pools started 
last year were completed and put into use in the latter part of this year. 

New wells were driven and pipe was laid to connect with other parts of the 
water supply. The careful planning and laying out of water connections is 
most important in order to be able to switch water supplies from one point to 
another as conditions during different times of the year warrant it. The com- 
pletion of the four new rearing pools is expected to increase the capacity and 
distribution from this hatchery 15,000 to 20,000 legal size trout next year. A 
much needed office and toilet facilities were completed. 

A steel distribution tank was purchased to replace the old wooden 
one. It is an improvement over the old one and will carry more fish to the 
load and insure better working conditions of the unit during distribution of the 
fish to ponds and streams. A distribution pump and engine was purchased 
and an old engine was traded in for a new one. Two old stoves in the work- 
shop and meat room were replaced. 

Sunderland Hatchery 

This hatchery which includes the new Podick Springs site completed an- 
other very successful year. Production of the 9" plus brown trout showed a 
substantial increase without affecting the overall output of legal &ize fish. Every 



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means possible was undertaken to take advantage of the available water supply. 
Two brood stock ponds were repaired with concrete and two other ponds are 
in the process of being repaired with the same material but were held up 
temporarily due to the cement strike. In the spring, 200 feet of 8" pipe was in- 
stalled at the Podick site for better utilization of the available water. Also at 
this site, a number of large evergreens were planted for shade purposes. An 
additional coat of asphalt was laid to improve the driveway and parking area 
which should hold now for many years. 

For safety measures, lightning rods were installed on the main garage which 
houses all refrigeration, the meat room, maintenance materials and two trucks. 
The sorting house at the Podick section was boarded up with inside walls and 
ceiling during the winter, the inside was painted and the outside given another 
coat of paint. The main garage and dwelling were painted. New shingles 
were laid on the west side of the garage to replace those in bad condition. The 
inside of the old sorting house at the main plant was painted to improve the 
lighting and two new holding troughs were built and installed at the sorting 
house for holding loads of sorted fish. 

A Ford 2-ton chassis was purchased to replace the 1947 Chevrolet and 
a body built by our own crew to fit our larger distribution tank. This body is 
much lower than the regulation bodies thereby making the handling of fish 
much easier. A skill saw was purchased also. 

Sutton Hatchery 

During the spring, we continued the job of replacing old rotted sides 
and ends of trout pools, four of which were replaced with concrete. The 
balance will be taken care of as soon as possible. Two coats of paint were ap- 
plied to the garage, the cement walls of the meat room and sorting house also 
received a coat of paint. About 700 feet of driveways were gravelled. Much 
needed toilet facilities were installed in a corner section of the meat room and 
general repairs were made to the dwelling. 

Merrill Ponds System 

The upkeep and general supervision of this system is worked in conjunc- 
tion with the Sutton Hatchery. The operation of this system has gradually 
undergone a change. For many years, a general run of pondfish was reared 
and distributed but to due to surveys of our natural great ponds and their 
recommended stocking with particular species of fish, the system of ponds was 
sterilized to kill off the snails, etc., and then stocked with brood stock pickerel and 
shiners only. The sterilizing took place in the early part of 1953, the ponds 
were filled with water in the fall and the brood stock was planted in the spring 
of 1954. The large building and the building near the sorting house were 
painted and considerable brush was cut around the Arnold, Adams and School- 
house ponds. General repairs were made to dams, stone walls, etc. 

NOTE. The overall liberation figures include 15,000 brook, 12,000 rainbow 
and 5,000 brown trout of legal size received from the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service Hatchery at Hartsville. The brook and rainbow trout were trans- 
ferred to the Palmer Hatchery in the fall for further growth and liberated in 
the spring. The brown trout were distributed direct from Hartsville to open 
waters of the State by our trucks in the spring. Each year under this coopera- 
tive agreement with the Federal Government, the Division supplies the food 
for these fish distributed to Massachusetts waters. See table. 



P.D. 25 



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Pheasant production at the four game farms of the Division of Fisheries 
and Game was given an unusual boost by an early laying season. For the first 
time in the history of the Division, pheasant eggs were hatched before May 1. 
Each farm enjoyed early hatching, which lengthened the breeding season by at 
least one additional hatch before July 1. In order to have pheasants of at least 
16 weeks of age before the opening of the upland game season, we attempted 
to complete hatching by July 1, as no increased wintering program was con- 
templated. 

At all farms, hatching percentages were higher, with lower chick mortality. 
This, together with the longer breeding season, resulted in a much greater 
production than anticipated. A total of 82,905 pheasants, a decided increase 
over the previous high of 1952, was distributed. 

There was a slight increase in the Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Pro- 
gram, 20,086 pheasants being delivered to the club pens. As a whole, the club 
rearing results continue to be very good. Records show that 9,176 hens and 
9,579 cocks were liberated from the club pens. Most of these were 14 weeks 
of age after being held in the club pens for six weeks. Various liberation pro- 
grams were carried out by the clubs, the most outstanding and most costly to the 
clubs being the carrying of pheasants through the winter for spring liberation. 

The two game farms located in the eastern part of the state raise quail 
along with pheasants. Quail production continued about the same as in the 
last few years. Some changes in the liberation program were made due to the 
high population of quail on the Cape and Islands. Liberations in Barnstable, 
Dukes and Nantucket counties were decreased while Plymouth and Bristol 
counties were increased with experimental liberations made in Norfolk County. 

8,602 quail were liberated consisting of 8,090 young in late summer and 
early fall and 512 adults in the spring and early summer. The results obtained 
from our quail stocking program in the eastern part of the state in the last 
few years have been gratifying and it is hoped that natural reproduction will 
be able to carry on successfully for a few years without any assistance from 
game farm liberated quail as the present brood stock in the Cape and Island 
covers is at a very high level. 

Too few of our Massachusetts sportsmen realize the very unusual bird 
we have in the quail, better known to many as the Bob White. He outsmarts 
many a good dog and most masters. To those who enjoy seeing bird dogs in 
action, nothing can top a bevy of quail. The quail is not the easiest bird to 
raise nor the cheapest; however, our efforts in the production of quail give 
greater opportunities to more sportsmen. Some of the eastern counties of the 
state have a quail population that would stand a greater hunting pressure than 
they have had in the last few years. 

Again this year we had no difficulty in purchasing white hare from New 
Brunswick. 2,500 were ordered and the price was lower than anticipated. 
$3.50 each was the live-delivered price. The hares were shipped in earlier than 
in previous years, the first shipment arriving on December 20. Deliveries were 
completed on January 21. They were delivered by truck to a central point and 
then distributed by game farm trucks to the conservation officers. 

We still do not have any way of liberating hares after the hunting sea- 



P.D. 25 



11 



son. The intent o£ white hare liberation is to place additional brood stock in 
our covers but many of the hares we liberate are shot, thereby having no oppor- 
tunity to carry through the winter to the next breeding season. 

Construction consisted in practically all repairs and replacements with 
very little increase in facilities. The upkeep and maintenance of our expanse 
of buildings and pens and equipment is considerable. Whenever possible, every 
effort was made to improve farm facilities and to economize on labor. Water 
lines were extended, automatic waterers were installed and we experimented 
with more improved feed hoppers. Corrugated aluminum range shelters are not 
only replacing wooden shelters but are adding greatly to the comfort of pheas- 
ants, thus helping to produce a better bird. 



CAME DISTRIBUTION 
July 1,1953 to June 30, 1954 

Pheasants Hens Cocks Total 

Adults: Spring liberation 2,496 697 3,193 

Young: 12 week liberation; summer and 

early fall 28,807 30,819 59,626 

Furnished to pens on Sportsmen's Pheasant 

Rearing Program 9,842 10,244 20,086 

41,145 41,760 82,905 

Of the pheasants liberated by the Division of Fisheries and Game and the Sports- 
men's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated that 40,479 Hens and 41,095 cocks 
went into the covers. 

Quail 

Adults: Spring liberation 512 

Young: 12 weeks and over 8,090 

8,602 
White Hares (Northern Varying) (Purchased) 2,500 



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The closing of the fiscal year on June 30, 1954, marked the end of an era as 
far as the Information and Education Program of the Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Game is concerned. 

Almost since its inception, five years ago, the program has been con- 
ducted largely by consultants with all the problems peculiar to employment 
of consultant services. During this fiscal year, funds and positions under em- 
ployee status at least, if not civil service, were granted which makes it pos- 
sible to begin the new fiscal year with a greatly augmented program on a some- 
what firmer basis. 

Considerable more activity took place in this program during the past 
fiscal year than heretofore, since several major events took place which re- 
quired more than normal news coverage. This was the year the Division began 
actively using its newly-won powers of regulation, which called for extensive 
activity in publicity and educational projects. Changes in fishing regulations, 
an expanded fisheries management program, adoption of a farm game coopera- 
tive program, continued efforts to improve land-owner-sportsman relations, and 
other developments of importance required extensive effort on the part of 
Information and Education personnel, District Managers and others to ade- 
quately gain the needed understanding and support of the sporting public. 
The Division continued, through the I. & E. program staff, to study the needs of 
conservation education at the public school level, in order to be prepared for 
the eventual day when a well-integrated educational program in basic natural 
resources in the public school system becomes a reality. 

Following is a numerative synopsis of the Information and Education Pro- 
gram during fiscal year 1953-1954. 

News Releases 

A total of thirty news releases were issued from the I. and E. office to the 
press, radio and television stations and Division field personnel. Sixty-one 
separate stories of Division activity, regulations changes, announcements and 
other news items were included. Fifty-four news items were released by District 
Managers (see report). 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

Seven editions of the bi-monthly bulletin, "MASSACHUSETTS WILD- 
LIFE" were issued to the press, radio and television stations, Division field per- 
sonnel, sportsmen's and other conservation minded organizations, other govern- 
mental conservation agencies and individual subscribers. The mailing list at 
the close of the fiscal year totaled 2,914 copies, and is growing currently at the 
rate of about 150 new names per month entirely without solicitation. Fifty-one 
full articles on Division policies, programs, various aspects of wildlife conserva- 
tion and other material of interest to sportsmen were included in the seven 
editions published. 

Newspaper and Magazine Features 

The Information and Education and Program staff originated and placed 
four feature articles with newspapers and magazines serving Massachusetts 



P.D. 25 



13 



readers during the year. Several other features resulted from direct contact 
by the press with Division personnel on various programs and projects. 

Special Events 

Advantage was taken of two special events occurring during the year to 
further spread the Division's message of wildlife conservation. A time capsule 
buried at Hyannis, Massachusetts, to be dug up one hundred years hence, in- 
cluded copies of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE, "The Farmer and Wildlife," 
a current list of sportsmen's organizations, and a letter addressed to the future 
sportsmen of 2053 A.D., prepared by the I. k E. staff. Extensive publicity in 
the area was received from this stunt. 

Professor R. E. Trippensee, University of Massachusetts, was the recipient 
of a national award from the American Association for Conservation Education, 
for his book "Wildlife Management." The I. & E. staff arranged for presenta- 
tion of this award by the Governor, which resulted in considerably more pub- 
licity than the event might have otherwise achieved. 

A third "special event" was the skunk beauty contest run in connection 
with the 1953 sportsmen's show in Boston as an attention getter for the Divi- 
sion exhibit. 

Exhibits 

Eleven exhibits were erected and placed by the I. & E. staff, with four of 
them in cooperation with the District Managers, two in cooperation with 
conservation officers, four in cooperation with sportsmen's organizations, and 
the Boston show. Breakdown: Fair (4); Scouts (4); Flower Show (1); Sports 
Show (2). 

Pamphlets and Reports 

Preparation of the Fish and Game Law Abstracts, and of the Annual Report 
was accomplished by the I. & E. staff during the year. 

Visual Aids 

Plans for a portable panel exhibit, on landown-sportsman relations, to be is- 
sued to District Managers were commenced this year. 

Photography 

With the resignation early in the year of the wildlife photographer, photo 
activity was restricted to film circulation and only nine still-photo publicity 
releases. A 45-minute film on Bobwhite Quail, produced by the Missouri Con- 
servation Commission, was purchased and issued to the quail project leader for 
use in the quail area. A one-minute leader relating the film to Massachusetts 
was prepared by the I. & E. staff and attached to the film. During the last 
two months of the year, a program of television news films was begun in co- 
operation with the Central District. (See District Report.) 

Junior Conservation Camp 

The Division's participation in this camp, except for actual conducting 
of several of the instructional periods, (See District Reports), and in-session pub- 
licity, is largely completed just prior to the close of the fiscal year. The Division 
Director, Wildlife Bureau Superintendent, and the Information and Education 






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P.D. 25 



Chief met with the camp committee on several occasions during the year. The 
result was a greatly improved curriculum for the current year, with many 
changes made in the modus operandi at the camp. A total of 119 boys were 
booked to attend the 1954 sixth annual sessions. Three separate publicity 
efforts were made by the I. & E. staff prior to the close of the fiscal year to pub- 
licize the current session, including one news release, an article in MASSACHU- 
SETTS WILDLIFE, and origination of a magazine feature. The staff also was 
responsible for arranging for classes to be conducted by other Division personnel. 

Conservation Education 

While the I. 8c E. staff continued to study the conservation education pro- 
grams now in operation in many other states, and to prepare itself for eventual 
participation in any future program of this type in Massachusetts as de- 
scribed earlier in this report, I. 8c E. personnel, District Managers and others 
took full advantage of opportunities to educate youth that arose during the 
year. 

Besides the formal participation by the Division in the Junior Conservation 
Camp as previously reported, Division personnel were called upon to speak 
before Junior Conservation Clubs, high school assemblies and Boy Scout groups 
on several occasions, particularly cooperating with the Boy Scout "Conservation 
Good Turn" movement inaugurated this year by order of the President. 

Film and Literature Circulation 

The routine task of answering requests for showing of films and mailing 
of available literature, pamphlets etc., became noticeably heavier this year, 
with current supplies of most literature reaching the zero level, and several 
of the films beginning to show signs of wear. 

While no exact attendance records were kept, booking records indicate 
that, at the average attendance per showing of about 30 persons, at least 6,000 
people viewed Division films during the year. Since this is a "guesstimate" at 
best, the number is probably quite higher as many groups, particularly schools, 
will seat a far greater number per showing. 192 requests for individual films 
were processed through the I. & E. office in addition to usage of the films by 
other Division personnel. 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 

During the first part of the year work was continued on leasing land along 
the Westfield River. The thorough search of land ownership that was carried 
out along this river last year proved valuable in that we were able to add more 
land to the already leased stretches along the river. Approximately eight 
more miles were leased along the East Branch of the river and two and one half 
miles added to the Middle Branch. One of the major complaints of those leas- 
ing their land along the Westfield River as well as along other rivers where 
land is leased for public fishing is the growing tendency on the part of fisher- 
men to park their cars in areas where this practice proved to be a hindrance 
and handicap to the landowner. We refer to parking in front of barways, en- 
trances to fields and other areas that are frequently used during the day by 



P.D. 25 



15 



farmers and landowners. We realize and the landowners also realize that in 
the great majority of cases these acts are not done intentionally; it is simply 
a matter of not stopping to think of the added bother and inconvenience the 
landowner is put to in such cases. The Division is attempting to get adequate 
and suitable parking areas as a solution to this problem. Next year "no park- 
ing" signs will be put up in areas which should be kept open at all times and 
fishermen are urged to be considerate and refrain from parking their cars 
in these areas. Remember fire in rural districts is a dreaded menace and a car 
parked in a driveway or in the middle of a narrow road could mean the dif- 
ference between a blackened cellar hole and a home or barn still intact. 

The leases on the Ipswich River expired during the year and they were 
renewed for another five year period. The mileage leased along the river re- 
mained about the same as it was during the last five year period. It was inter- 
esting to observe that the dire consequences which were predicted by those who 
were skeptical of the public fishing grounds program in this area when the 
first leases were executed five years ago, failed to materialize. In areas such as 
those along the Ipswich River where there is a relatively thick population, 
fishermen frequenting the leased areas are urged to be extremely cautious and 
careful. Homes and back yards are in many places very close to the river banks. 
The owners of property, who through their personal kindness co-operate with 
the Division by leasing their property, should be given every courtesy and 
consideration. 

Fishermen are advised that the public fishing grounds throughout the 
state are leased, not owned, by the Division. The rules and regulations which 
have been promulgated for the wise and prudent use of these areas should be 
strictly adhered to at all times. 

In the spring, as soon as the weather would permit, the job of replacing 
and renewing signs along the public fishing grounds and fly fishing areas was 
done as usual. Weather conditions prior to the opening of the fishing season 
made it possible to complete this job on most of the areas involved. 

The problem of distributing to the City and Town Clerks a supply of 
the new plastic holders and pins for use with the number to be issued to each 
license holder came up for solution in the fall. The holders had to be 
allotted and packaged according to the previous years license sales of each 
Clerk, and then delivered to each one. Rather than hire extra help in the 
Boston office to allot and package these holders and then mail them from 
Boston it was decided that this job would be done by the public fishing grounds 
personnel. Consequently two hundred seventy thousand plastic holders and 
inns were allotted and packaged by this section along with delivering the pack- 
ages in three Counties. A very concrete example of the close co-operation of 
Division personnel was shown when all the fish hatchery and game farm 
personnel along with the District Managers pitched in and delivered the 
holders to City and Town Clerks throughout the rest of the State. The whole 
operation resulted in a very considerable saving for the Division as the cost of 
extra help and postage would have been quite high. 

Hearings on the establishment of rights of way to great ponds were a( 
tended through the year along with preparatory work prior to the hearings. 

Other work clone throughout the year consisted in title searching and 
contacts with owners of various parcels of property in which the Division was 
interested, attending various club meetings and routine office work. 



BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH 
AND MANAGEMENT 




WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS 

The four wildlife management districts perform such a great variety of 
tasks, of which only certain ones readily lend themselves to uniform tabulation, 
that some explanation is required. 

District One, with headquarters at Pittsfield, operated four beaver pelt 
tagging stations, at Pittsfield, Williamstown, East Otis and Williamsburg, while 
District Three, headquarters at Acton, operated one station at the Ayer Game 
Farm. District One also conducted winter creel census on three ponds (Cheshire 
Reservoir, Onota Lake and Pontoosuc Lake) and ran a trout creel census at 
North Pond, Florida. Responsibility for cleaning the fish screen at Otis 
Reservoir also fell on District One, and this district also aided the Westfield 
River Watershed Association on several occasions. Personnel of District One 
gave the fisheries, fur bearer and beaver field trip lectures and demonstrations 
at the Junior Conservation Camp. 

District Two, headquarters at Upton, assisted pond management units 
in Fyke-netting operations on two ponds within the District, maintained posters 
on 51 fishing areas, and during the latter part of the year personnel from this 
district took and processed film for television news shorts of Division activities 
and news of importance to sportsmen. Twenty-four spots, ranging from one- 
half minute upwards, were achieved, some of the film taken being used more 
than once, or by more than one station. See Education Program report. Per- 
sonnel of District Two were called upon in connection with the gypsy moth 
aerial spray project and establishment of wildlife management districts in 
Connecticut. 

District Three, headquarters at Acton, distributed 76,000 pounds of 
commercial fertilizer in Sandy Pond, Ayer, in the third year of an experimental 
weed control project and maintained posters on 45 great ponds and agreement 
ponds, besides spending considerable time during the winter determining 
fishing pressure on 35 ponds. This district also maintained a creel census at 
White Pond, Concord, aided the fisheries section in a survey of Bailey's Pond, 
Amesbury, and assisted pond management crews on several ponds in the dis- 
trict. All the towns that have, in effect, closed their borders to hunters are in 
District Three, hence personnel of this district spent considerable time making 
contacts in towns that were reported to be thinking of enacting similar laws, 
and the district was also most active in the safety zone sign program, erecting 
7,000 of the signs. District Three planned a "show-me" field trip for classes 
at the Conservation School at Bradley Palmer state forest. The district head- 
quarters building, first of its kind for the wildlife management districts, was 
designed and construction begun during this year. The Ruffed Grouse project, 
and management of the field trial area at Harold Parker state forest, was trans- 
ferred to District Three this year. Separate reports on these projects follow: 






P.D. 25 



17 



Harold Parker Field Trial Area: 

1. Work under this project was transferred to the district during the last 
fiscal year and was under the supervision of the project leader, who now 
serves as Assistant District Manager. The following work was accom- 
plished: 

a. Courses brushed out 

b. Area was posted 

c. Two field trials attended and marshalled 

d. Trail markers erected 

e. Trails painted where necessary 

f. Crab apple trees planted 

g. Thinning to improve natural foods undertaken 

Grouse Wing and Tail Study: 

1. Work under this project also transferred to the district. 

The primary objective of this work was to obtain a clear picture of the 
sex and age composition of the ruffed grouse population in the fall, the 
success of the previous breeding season and some knowledge of the suc- 
cess of brood survival. 

During the fiscal year 1954 the project collected 2,502 wings and tails that 
were used in the study. Data obtained showed the grouse population in 
the fall of 1953 was comprised of 53.4% males, 46.6% females, and 46.1% 
adults and 53.9% juveniles. 

Birds were encountered in numbers during the fall only in the best of 
covers, and to a lesser extent as the value of cover diminished. There 
were no birds consistently found in fair to poor covers. Some covers 
which supported birds in the last 4 or 5 years seemed to be devoid of birds 
last year. Spotty seems to describe the grouse conditions of 1954, par- 
ticularly in the central section of the state. 

District Four, headquarters at Monument Beach, was active in coopera- 
tion with the quail project (See Federal Aid to Wildlife Restoration Projects 
report), since this district contains all quail hunting areas. Personnel of District 
Four also were active on "salter trout" investigations. They sampled five Cape 
Cod streams periodically throughout the year, maintained live trout traps in two 
streams, and jaw-tagged 10,000 trout released in coastal streams. Fish popula- 
tion checks were run on six ponds, and 1,500 trout released in Cliff Pond 
were fin-clipped, as part of the management studies. A mourning dove 
census was run twice in cooperation with the Federal Fish and Wildlife Serv- 
ice. Four thousand safety zone posters were distributed in District Four. 

All four districts spent the usual time in maintenance of equipment, at- 
tendance at managers' meetings, etc. 

Tabulation of readily enumerated activities follows: 



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Item A' - Completed, 

I. Federal-Aid Projects, Came (See Federal-Aid Projects Report) All Districts 

Wood Duck 

Boxes built this year 434 

Boxes maintained 1,383 

Predator guards built 1,087 

Predator guards installed 651 plus 

Total boxes erected this year . 467 

Number areas involved 21 plus 

Boxes distributed to clubs, etc. 140 

Total of state-erected boxes now up 3,251 

Boxes checked for usage 1,112 

Wood Ducks banded 34 

Checking Stations Operated 

Deer 11, several mobile 

Waterfowl ° 

Beaver 5 

Census 

Muskrat areas censused 32 

Quail See project report 

Beaver (P-R Project, experimental flowages only) 

Live trapped and transplanted 18 

Areas involved 3 plus 

Fur 

Pelts checked 1,124 plus 

11- Habitat Improvement 

Plantings 

Number of plants set 87,434 

Farms and other areas involved 39 

Plants distributed to clubs, owners, etc. 23,110 

Fence rows, borders, etc., treated 3,400 feet 

Food patches planted, areas prepared 105 

Acreage under farm-game program 20,000 acres 

III. Fisheries Management (See Fisheries Section Report) 

Pan and Weedfish Control 

Bluegill nests destroyed 200 

Crappie concentrators installed 32 

Fish traps installed and tended 6 

Panfish derby promotion and participation 18 

IV. Came (Non-Federal Aid) 

Cottontail Live Trapping and Transfer 

Number of traps built this year 32 

Number maintained 590 

Number distributed to cooperators 422 

Damage sites investigated 48 

Beaver 

Damage complaints investigated 48 

Beaver live trapped and transplanted 37 

Release areas surveyed and checked 26 

Research Data Contacts 

Grouse wing and tail collection points 191 

Number of collection containers distributed 5,150 

Census conducted, upland game 6 areas 

Clubs Assisted With Game Projects 21 

V. Education (See Education Program Report) 

Meetings of all types attended 336 

Technical advice rendered (contacts) 64 plus 

Publications originated I 

News Releases issued 54 

Junior Conservation Camp lectures 32 

Radio and television guest appearances 14 

Exhibits 8 

Publicity contacts 40 

Landowner-sportsman relations billboards erected this year 1 

Landowner-sportsman billboards now up 6 

Safety Zone posters erected or distributed 11,000 



P.D. 25 



19 



ORNITHOLOGIST 

With minor exceptions, the past fiscal year was spent on the waterfowl 
work of the Division. The field phase of the three-year banding study of local 
distribution, age and sex ratios and kill of black ducks in Essex County was 
completed in March as scheduled and analysis of collected material is presently 
underway. 

In January, the Division published a pamphlet entitled "Northeastern Fly- 
way — A Proposal for More Effective Waterfowl Management in the New Eng- 
land Coastal States and Long Island," which is being used in the Atlantic 
Waterfowl Council to support certain modifications in the New England 
regulations for taking waterfowl. The Ornithologist authored this material. 



FEDERAL AID FISHERIES PROJECTS 

(75% of the cost of these projects is reimbursed by federal tax monies on fish- 
ing tackle under the Dingell-Johnson Act.) 

Stream Investigations 

The purpose of this project is to obtain fundamental fishery information 
relative to the management of streams in this state, both for cold-water and 
warm-water species. During this year the Millers River drainage was com- 
pleted, and work begun on the Merrimac and Ipswich River drainages. Pre- 
liminary figures show that of 11,900 tagged trout stocked in the main stream of 
the Millers River only 44% were harvested by anglers, despite the fact that an 
estimated 28,107 hours were spent fishing for them. Recently stocked trout 
made up 96% of the catch with only 4% being native or carryover trout. In 
the tributaries of the Millers River only 35% of the stocked trout were taken by 
fishermen. Of the total trout taken 73% were recently stocked fish, while 27% 
were unmarked fish. Recommendations concerning the time of stocking, made 
during the first year's work on this project, were substantiated by results on the 
Millers. In-season or close-to-opening-day stockings resulted in about twice 
the return to anglers as earlier March stockings. A detailed report of findings 
and recommendations is in preparation. 

Prior to the 1954 season, 26,000 of the trout being stocked in the Merrimac 
and Ipswich River drainages were tagged and the remaining 80,000 fin-clipped 
as a part of this year's segment of the project. Extensive and intensive creel 
census work has been done, but results are not yet tabulated. A full-time 
warm-water creel census of a portion of the Sudbury and Concord Rivers has 
been set up to evaluate the potential of this fishery. 

Salter Trout Study 

During 1954 preliminary studies of salter trout in Massachusetts were ex- 
panded into a Federal Aid Project. The primary objective of the project is 
to determine il sea-running, or "salter" populations of brook trout can In- 
established on a scale large enough to support a modest fishery. Two-way fish 
traps have been constructed on the Quashnet River and Scorton Creek, both 
Cape Cod tidal streams, and migration studies undertaken. Ten thousand 
tagged brook trout have been stocked in the study areas, and their movements 
checked, both through the fish traps and by an extensive creel census. 




20 



P.D. 25 



Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

Investigational and management activities on the Quabbin Reservoir were 
accelerated with the inception of a full-time project on this body of water. 
This study includes a determination of the total amount of fishing pressure now 
being exerted on the Quabbin, and the total harvest of fish. It also takes in a 
study on the results of a spring bass season on this reservoir. Long range ob- 
jectives include the development of management practices for this reservoir, 
and an evaluation of recent introduction of game species. As a part of this 
latter phase, 1,200 pounds of adult walleye pike were stocked in the spring 
of 1954, and the planting of fingerling walleye and lake trout was continued by 
the Fish Propagation Section. 

Trout Pond Reclamations 

Expanding activities in the field of pond reclamation for trout were set 
up as a Federal Aid project in the spring of 1954. Ten ponds totalling 480 acres 
have been tentatively selected for reclamation during the fall of 1954. 




FISHERIES MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 

Thinning of Overabundant Fish Populations 

Pond management crews, through the use of fyke nets, continued their 
work of thinning down overabundant pan and weed fishes in selected ponds 
throughout the Commonwealth. 

During the past year over 25 tons of pan and weed fishes were removed 
from 13 ponds. (Table 1) The results of the past year's thinning operations 
are apparent in the majority of the ponds, although a few have failed to re- 
spond readily to this type of management. Lake Massapoag, Sharon, which last 
year showed itself to be in particularly poor condition, has progressed so 
rapidly that the long program expected to be needed to restore its population 
to balance is no longer deemed necessary. Both Billington Sea, Plymouth, and 
Cheshire Reservoir, Cheshire, are now carrying greater poundages of catch- 
able fish than they were prior to the inception of operations. Jordan Pond, 
Shrewsbury, has responded exceedingly well, and it is likely that only routine 
checks will be necessary on this pond during the immediate future. On the 
other hand Massapoag Pond, Lunenburg, has failed to show any marked 
improvement, as has Lake Quannapowitt, Wakefield, and a continuation of this 
program, or different management technique, will be necessary in these in- 
stances. 

Warm-Water Stocking 

Salvage of pond fishes from thinning operations and from other public 
waters (Table 2) has been carried out to meet three major demands. First, 
the procurement of stock for reclaimed warm-water ponds, secondly for hatch- 
ery brood stock, and thirdly to supply fish for youth fishing ponds. During 
the past year 7,188.6 pounds of fish were transferred from various sources 
(Table 2.) for the purposes listed above. The bulk of the forage and game 
fishes were used to stock reclaimed ponds or for hatchery stock. Pan fishes 
were stocked only in reclaimed ponds or in youth-fishing ponds, in line with the 



P.D. 25 



21 



Fish Management Policy of this Division. Eight hundred and forty-one pounds 
of adult smelt were stocked in the Quabbin Reservoir as a forage species for 
walleye pike and lake trout now being introduced there. 

Pond Reclamations 

During the past year 10 ponds totaling 248 acres were reclaimed for warm- 
water fishes. (Table 3.) Where possible all populations were weighed and 
measured at the time of reclamation, and sorted as to species. The results 
clearly point to the one major factor contributing to poor fishing in many of 
the ponds of Massachusetts, namely, overcrowding by hordes of weed 
and small pan fishes. For every pound of game fish taken during these opera- 
tions forty-two pounds of pan and weed fishes were recovered! Exhaustive 
studies conducted on ponds elsewhere have shown that a ratio of one pound of 
game fish to four pounds of pan fish produces the best population balance and 
the best fishing. The ponds that were reclaimed for warm-water species were 
carrying populations which were hopelessly out of balance, and could only be 
rehabilitated through total reclamation. All of the ponds have been re- 
stocked with populations of pickerel or bass and yellow perch or horned pout. 

During this period seven ponds were reclaimed for trout, and their 
populations analyzed. (Table 4.) These ponds were carrying an average of 
one pound of game fish to each seven pounds of pan and weed fish. The 
reclamation of these ponds was based upon their desirability as trout producing 
areas, and they were not selected, as were the warm-water ponds, on the basis of 
the quality of the population present. All of the ponds so reclaimed were 
stocked with adult trout prior to the opening day of the season, and with 
fingerlings in the late spring. 




Table 1. Summary of reductions in overcrowded fish populations by fyke netting, 
June 1, 1954 to July 30, 1954. 



POND, TOWN 


Area 
Acres 


Pan Fish! 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Weed Fish2 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Misc. 3 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Total 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Bad Luck Pd., Douglas 


69 


548.65 


27.05 




575.70 


Billington Sea, Plymouth 


269 


2,344.50 


393.53 


179.90 


2,917.93 


Cheshire Res., Cheshire 


418 


7,987.99 


340.49 




8,328.48 


Dicks Pd., East Wareham 


40 


105.20 


53.50 




158.70 


Duck Pd., Groton 


52 


800.08 


303.00 


16.0 


1,119.08 


Heard Pd., Wayland 


83 


2,622.00 


605.20 


811.10 


4,038.30 


Holland Pd., Holland 


65 


848.95 


638.31 




1,487.2(» 


Indian Lk., Worcester 


177 


13,486.30 


595.90 




14,082.21) 


Jordan Pd., Shrewsbury 


19 


3,955.23 


64.19 




4,019.42 


Massapoag Pd., Lunenburg 


38 


5,004.90 


190.70 


15.5 


5,211.10 


Lk. Massapoag, Sharon 


353 


262.60 


505.60 


13.2 


781.40 


Lk. Quannapowitt, Wakefield 


254 


2,474.40 


929.60 


840.10 


4,244.10 


Wedge Pd., Winchester 


21 


2,863.70 


90.10 


108.00 


3,061.80 


Totals 


1,858 


43,304.50 


4,737.17 


1,983.80 


50,025.47 



1 Includes bluegills, pumpkinseeds, horned pout, white perch, yellow perch, black crappie. 

2 Includes white suckers, carp, golden shiners, lake chubsucker. 

3 Includes snapping turtles, eels. 






■ . ■■ ■ 



22 



P.D. 25 



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Table 2. Summary of fishes trapped in public waters for stocking purposes, July 1, 
1953 to June 30, 1954. 



POND 


Forage Fish 


Game Fish 


Pan Fish 


Total 


Bad Luck Pond 


37.0 


21.0 


1,520.0 


1,578.0 


Cliff Pond 


120.0 






120.0 


Cobble Mountain 


721.0 






721.0 


Harold Parker Ponds 


96.0 


498.0 


93.0 


687.0 


Holland Pond 




13.0 


32.1 


45.1 


Indian Lake 






236.0 


236.0 


Jordan Pond, Shrewsbury 






977.0 


977.0 


Merrimac River 


925.0 


151.0 


251.0 


1,327.0 


Parker River 


120.0 






120.0 


Quannapowitt 






659.5 


659.5 


Wareham River 


734.0 






734.0 


Totals 


2,753.0 


683.0 


3,768.6 


7,204.6 



Table 3. Summary of warm water populations removed from ponds reclaimed for 

..,»«« ...««- A _ C.-l-^.- T»1.. 1 1(1-9 *« T.,«„ 9A 1 flK I 



warm water fisht 


;s, July ] 


, 1953 to 


fune 30, 1' 


)54. 






POND, TOWN 


Area 
Acres 


Game Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Pan Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Weed Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Misc. 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Total 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Barrett Pd., Carver 


16 


27.0 


733.0 


168.1 




928.1 


Bell Pd., Worcester 


6.2 


12.6 


583.7 


26.4 




622.7 


Crow Hill Pd., Westminster* 


8 










800.0 


Curlew Pd., Plymouth 


43 


66.4 


1,877.1 


269.5 




2,213.0 


Dunn Pd., Gardner 


18 


34.5 


1,529.2 


237.5 




1,801.2 


Nutting Lk., Billerica 


27 


113.0 


3,960.4 


171.0 


27.0 


4,271.4 


Spoffords Pd., Boxford 


28 


203.3 


1,560.9 


168.5 


84.5 


2,017.2 


Stuarts Pd., Princeton 1 


38 










3,800.0 


Studley Pd., Rocklandl 


26 










2,600.0 


Sutton System (Culture Pds.)2 














Whites Pd., Plymouth 


38 


10.5 


1,071.7 






1,082.2 


Totals 


248.2 


467.3 


11,316.0 


1,041.0 


111.5 


20,135.8 



1 Fish not picked up. Most population trash and pan fish. 

2 Cultural pond drained and fish salvaged 1953; not reflowed immediately as a control measure on 
snail population; poisoning carried out to eliminate limited numbers of pan and trash remaining. 

Table 4. Summary of warm water populations removed from ponds reclaimed for 
trout, July 1, 1953 to June 30, 1954. 


POND, TOWN 


Area 
Acres 


Game Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Pan Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Weed Fish 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Misc. 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Total 
Wgt. (lbs.) 


Berry Pd., N. Andover 


5 


25.4 


102.5 


69.5 


16.6 


214.0 


Chapin Pd., Ludlow 


25 


593.2 


2,736.8 


231.4 




3,561.4 


Cranberry Pd., Sunderland 


24 


305.2 


1,897.1 


191.1 


2.5 


2,395.9 


Fiv« Mile Pd., Springfield 


48 


808.9 


4,662.6 


130.4 


6.4 


5,608.3 


Lk. Lorraine, Springfield 


39 


529.5 


3,890.1 


106.9 




4,526.5 


Moning-Russell Pds., Plymouth 


8 


27.3 


784.6 


427.0 


5.1 


1,244.0 


Whites Pd., Concord 


41 


326.1 


2,840.9 


2.1 




3,169.1 


Totals 


190 


2,615.6 


16,914.6 


1,158.4 


30.6 


20,719.2 



IMt 



P.D. 25 



23 



FEDERAL AID WILDLIFE PROJECTS 

(75% of the cost of these projects is reimbursed by federal tax monies on fire- 
arms and ammunition under the Pittsman-Robertson Act.) 

During the past year thirteen projects have been operated under the Fed- 
eral Aid to Wildlife Act, commonly called the Pittman-Robertson Bill. Under 
this Act the state is reimbursed by the federal government for 75% of the costs of 
investigation and management projects, the monies being derived from a tax 
on arms and ammunition. 

As the various investigation projects have been concluded, recommenda- 
tions for management have been put into effect. As a consequence, approxi- 
mately 55% of the monies expended during the period have been on manage- 
ment projects. 

A major change was effected in the Farm Game Restoration Project during 
the year. In an effort to open or keep open privately owned lands for hunting 
and to increase the supplies of farm game on these areas, cooperative agree- 
ments have been entered into with landowners by the Division for the mutual 
benefit of both parties. Under these agreements the landowner agrees to open 
or keep open his land to hunting and the Division agrees to carry out certain 
activities which will mutually benefit both the land and wildlife. 

Some of the activities which are carried out under this program are: The 
erection of safety zone posters; planting of annual food patches; planting of 
conifers where coniferous cover is lacking; encouragement of native food pro- 
ducing shrubs in fence rows and woods borders; planting of legumes and 
hay mixes in old run down fields; and development of old areas by planting 
of shrubs and trees. 

To date the response to this program on the part of landowners has been 
encouraging and it is expected that by the end of another year about 20.000 
acres of land will be signed up under the program. 

White-Tailed Deer Investigations 

Project 7-R: During the open season of 1953, December 7 through De- 
cember 12, 3,911 deer were reported killed. The sex composition was 54.6% 
bucks and 45.4% does. 

The kill by counties was as follows: 

Barnstable 291 

Berkshire 1,005 

Bristol 43 

Dukes 120 

Essex 63 

Franklin 688 

Hampden 327 



Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 
County Unknown 



413 
114 
123 

14 
117 
561 

32 



3,911 



Deer checking stations were run during the open season and a total of 1,095 
deer were examined for age and sex. 

Examination of the data obtained at the checking station indicates that 
the deer herd is in a healthy condition and that replacement continues slightly 
greater than removal, thus giving a slowly increasing deer herd. 





24 P.D. 25 

Farm Came Restoration 

Project 9-D: The activities of this project are carried out by the Wildlife 
Management Districts. See their reports for a summary of the activities. See 
remarks at beginning of this report. 

Water Chestnut Control 

Project 10-D: The control of the water chestnut by spraying and hand 
pulling continues on the Sudbury and Concord Rivers, and on the College ponds 
at South Hadley. Only scattered plants now remain of once extensive beds 
and complete eradication of this noxious water weed appears to be in sight. 

Quail Habitat Development in Southeastern Massachusetts 

Project 14-D: See report of the Southeastern Wildlife Management Dis- 
trict. 

Fur Investigations 

Project 16-R: Fur animal studies were carried on with the major emphasis 
on the muskrat, otter, mink, and beaver. Information is being gathered as to 
the economic value of the fur harvest, trapping, pressure, rate of harvest, sex 
and age ratios and fluctuations in fur animal numbers. 

In addition the feasibility of using beaver to construct flowages for the 
benefit of other furbearers, waterfowl and other game animals is being 
investigated. Beaver are released on an area during the spring and fall, allowed 
to build a dam and then are removed by live trapping. The area is then 
watched to determine wildlife usage and the life of the dam. To date several 
flowages created in this way have been under observation for two or more years 
and have had high usage by other wildlife. 

The 1953-1954 fiscal year fur harvest and its value is shown below. 

Species Harvest Average Price Value 

Muskrat 80,460 $1.00 .$80,460.00 

Mink 1,166 15.00 17,490.00 

Otter 113 15.00 1,695.00 

Skunk 19 .50 9.50 

Weasel 118 1.00 118.00 

Raccoon 2,225 1.50 3,337.50 

Red Fox 12 .25 3.00 

Gray Fox 6 .25 1.50 

Beaver 191 11.00 2,101.00 

Total $105,215.50 

Wood Duck Nesting Investigation Project 

Project 19-R: Wood duck nests increased on Great Meadows Refuge 
during 1953 for the second successive year. A total of 1,567 day old ducklings 
were marked with monel fish tags in the Sudbury-Concord area. 

A total of 1,766 wood duck boxes were checked throughout the state; 1,239 
of these were functional and 775 (62.6%) were used by wood ducks. The per- 
centage of unsuccessful nests attributed to raccoon predation decreased from 



P.D. 25 



25 



50% in 1950, 38% in 1951, 28% in 1952, to 27% in 1953. This was undoubt- 
edly due to the erection of a wooden tunnel type of predator guard on the boxes. 
Another year of investigation should provide enough information to allow 
the Division to effectively manage this valuable wildlife species. 

Birch Hill Investigations 

Project 20-R: This is a part time project run in connection with the Birch 
Hill Development project to determine game populations on the Birch 
Hill Area and to judge the effectiveness of the management program. 

The cottontail rabbit census made in February showed a decrease of 50% 
over the previous year. This was attributed to increased hunting on the area 
in the fall of 1953. This is considered a healthy situation since it was felt that 
the cottontails had not been adequately harvested in previous years. 

The snowshoe hare census made in February and March indicated a slightly 
higher population than in 1953. 

A drumming grouse census made in the spring indicated a slight drop from 
the previous spring. 

During the hunting season a total of 300 cock pheasants were liberated on 
the area. Band returns from 53% of these birds were received and it is be- 
lieved that about 70% of these birds were recovered by the hunters. 

Birch Hill Development 

Project 21-D: Two control structures were completed which will stabilize 
water on about 125 acres of land to provide muskrat and waterfowl habitat. 

Bridges and roads were maintained and repaired when necessary. 

Approximately 25 acres of annual crops and legumes were planted and 
maintained, while 7,500 multiflora roses were planted on field borders. 

Strips totaling 2,800 feet in length and 25 feet in width were cut through 
dense red and white pine plantations to allow ground cover to come in. All 
marketable thinnings were sold to a tub factory. 

A selective cutting of 25,000 board feet of pine and hemlock was made 
to improve wildlife conditions in the forested land. The lumber will he 
used by the Division in its other programs. 

Cottontail Rabbit Experimental Management 

Project 22-R: Experimental management of several types continued on 
the study area in Upton as did the evaluation of the practices effected. Many 
of the practices put into effect, such as cuttings of various types, take several 
years before their effects on rabbit populations can be measured and as a result 
it takes several years to judge their effectiveness. When this project is com- 
pleted the Division should be able to determine a sound management program 
for the cottontail rabbit. 

Cock Pheasant Stocking Investigation 

Project 23-R: Investigations of this project over a three year period at 
Westover Air Force Base have been completed. The objective of the project 
was to determine what effect not stocking hen pheasants would have on the 
"wild" population of pheasants on an area. During the study only cock birds 
were released, all of which were banded. The hunters were contacted at the 
entrance to the area, their bag was examined and the number of unhanded 
cocks (wild birds) was recorded. 



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P.D. 25 



The number of wild birds was not affected in any way by not releasing 
hens, their production remaining constant each year of the study. It was con- 
cluded that on this area it was not necessary to stock hens in order to maintain 
the production of native birds. 

It is planned to expand this study to one county (Bristol) next year to de- 
termine if the same results can be expected on a much larger area. 

Quail Project 

Project 25 R: Massachusetts has an annual harvest of several thousand 
quail each year in its southeastern section. In addition, from five to nine thou- 
sand quail are annually raised in state game farms and released in this section. 
The economic and recreational value of the species in this section is consid- 
erable, yet only a limited amount of information is available on the quail. 

In order to more intelligently manage this species through regulation, 
stocking, and habitat improvement, this project has been set up to gather the 
following information: annual abundance, census methods, seasonal cover usage; 
sex ratios, age distribution, food habits, survival of pen reared quail, and evalua- 
tion of food patches. 

Acquisition of Management Areas 

All but a few parcels of land in the planned West Meadows Waterfowl 
Area in West Bridgewater have been acquired. Legislative approval of a 
taking of the few remaining parcels will be necessary before the acquisition can 
be completed. 

A taking was made of the Pantry Brook Waterfowl Area in Sudbury and 
plans are being completed for erection of a central structure during the coming 
year. 

Acquisition of the Buckley Dunton Area in Becket was completed and 
plans for its development are under way. 

Several other possible management areas have been examined and plans 
are being made for their acquisition in the future as soon as necessary surveys 
can be made. 

MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 

General 

The Unit Leader talked before several sportsmen's clubs, men's clubs, 
and other group during the year. A series of newspaper write-ups on Unit 
activities and one television appearance aided in the Unit policy of public 
education. 

Woodcock Project 

As a long term federal-state cooperative study, intensive research work on 
Massachusetts woodcocks has been continued. Routine banding of about 150 
birds and annual spring censuses were conducted. Methods of capturing 
birds in the summer were developed, and a study is in progress of moulting 
patterns in an effort to work out a practical method of aging birds in the hunt- 
er's bag. An analysis is being conducted of what stage of vegetative growth 
makes woodcock habitat no longer favorable. Such a study may suggest suitable 
practical management measures. Woodcock populations are widespread in the 
state and maintaining their numbers. 



P.D. 25 



27 



Economic Survey 

The Economic Survey of the monetary value of huunting and fishing in the 
Commonwealth was completed. A bulletin entitled, "74 Million Dollars for 
the Fun of It", was sent to press as the fiscal year ended. This summarizes the 
findings of the survey, and will be supplemented by a multilithed publication 
of the University of Massachuselts describing in detail the statistical methods 
employed. 

State Ecological Survey 

What may well prove the most important project conducted by the Unit 
is the mapping of the forests and openlands of the state from recently available 
aerial photographs. At the end of the fiscal year, over 1,000 square miles were 
completed. These ecological types will be transposed to geological survey 
topographic maps. For the first time, the Division will know exactly where 
and how much of various game habitats exist in the state. This should aid 
the Division in formulating long-range plans for game management. 

Ruffed Crouse Project 

Work continued on ruffed grouse, and by trapping and marking birds it 
was found that during the hunting season there is a large turnover of birds in 
favorite feeding or resting spots. Every such area appeared to have a certain 
carrying capacity. A study of such spots suggests simple, practical methods for 
improving grouse habitat. 

White Hare Project 

With the objective of appraising the Division's stocking policy on white 
hares, this study is going into its fourth year. Results to date suggest that much 
stocking in favorable "native" hare habitat is largely ineffective. Stocking in 
very heavily hunted areas or in any localities which have grown into good 
hare cover and not now having hare, may be the best policy. More conclusive 
results and some firm recommendations will be forthcoming by June, 1955. 













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P.D. 25 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 

Administration: 

#3304-01 $87,058.24 

3304-06 2,081.74 



Propagation: 

Game #3304-31 

Fish 

Information — Education: 
#3304-43 



Wildlife: 



Game #3304-44 
3304-51 , 
3304-53* 
3304-57 . 



$5,996.66 

41,266.58 

132,350.59 

28,747.12 



Fish 3304-42 .. .. $62,657.36 

3304-45 9,729.40 

3304-47* 25,964.94 

3304-51 41,266.58 



Law Enforcement: 

#3308-05 

3308-07 

1003-03 



$7,258.81 

7,441.21 

100,742.73 



GRAND TOTAL 



$89,139.98 

$205,035.45 
$241,517.84 



$14,029.95 



$208,360.95 



$139,618.28 



$115,442.75 
$1,013,145.20 



* Expenditures under 3304-47 and 3304-53 are reimbursed 75% by Federal Funds. 

SUMMARY OF FISH AND CAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting & Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, trap registrations & tags 

Rents 

Miscellaneous Sales & Income 

Pittman Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 

Court Fines 



$955 
5 
2 
1 

78 
8 

12 



9% 

20% 
24% 



1% 



21% 



14% 



11% 
100% 



,252.25 

455.05* 

,962.90 

,156.62 

,669.74 

,551.66 

,207.85 



Inland Fisheries & Game Fund — Surplus as of June 30, 1954 



$1,064 
$666 



,256.07 
,423.80 



Analysis of Special Licenses issued under Sections 48, 68A, 

102-3-4-5-6-7, Chapter 131, C.L. during the 

fiscal year ended June 30, 1954 

Type of License 

Special Fish Propagator License 

Special Fish Propagator License — No Fee 
Fish Propagator License 

Propagator License (Birds or Mammals) 

Special Propagator License— No Fee 

Dealer's License 
"Possession Only" License 
Taxidermist License 

Resident Citizen Fur Buyer's 

License to take Shiners for bait 

Trap Registration Certificates 

Fish Tags 

Game Tags 



Number Issued 


Receipts 


190 

1 
92 


$21100 


300.00 


430 


1,478.00 


466 


692.00 


96 


52.50 


42 


210.00 


27 


270.00 


286 


1,430.00 


1,456 


550.50 


13,850 


138.50 


2,451 


122.55 



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P.D. 25 



31 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND CAME 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1953 to June 30, 1954 

Expenditures 

Account No. Title Appropriation & Liabilities Reverted 

3304-01 Administration $94,263.00 $87,058.24 $7,204.76 

3304-06 Advisory Board 2,500.00 2,081.74 418.26 

3304-31 Operation of Fish Hatch- 
eries & Game Farms 492,435.00 446,553.29 45,881.71 

3304-42 Improvement & Management 

of Lakes, Ponds & Rivers 67,534.00 62,657.36 4,876.64 

3304-43 Educational Program 16,610.00 14,029.95 2,580.05 

3304-45 Public Fishing Grounds 10,030.00 9,729.40 300.60 

3304-47* Fish Restoration Projects .... 31,615.00 25,964.94 5,650.06 

3304-51 Bureau of Wildlife Research 85,060.00 82,533.16 2,526.84 

3304-53* Wildlife Restoration 138,906.00 132,350.59 6,555.41 

3304-56 Biological Survey of Streams 

and Waters 5,000.00 5,000.00 

3304-57 Acquisition and Improve- 
ment of Certain Land... 28,747.57 28,747.12 .45 

TOTALS $972,700.57 $891,705.79 $80,994.78 

* 75% Reimbursement from Federal Funds. 

The Principal Financial Items of this report are in agreement with the 
Comptroller's books. 

Date: Checked by: S/ Joseph A. Prenney 

September 29, 1954 

S/ Fred A. Moncewicz 
Comptroller 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game 
were enacted during the legislative session of 1954: 

Chapter 88, Acts of 1954: An act relative to the revocation of certain li 

censes issued by the Division of Fisheries and 
Game. 

Chapter 92, Acts of 1954: An act defining coastal waters as used in the 

laws relating to fisheries and game. 

Chapter 99, Acts of 1954: An act relating to the taking of trout in coastal 

waters. 

Chapter 258, Acts of 1954: An act regulating the lowering of the waters 

of a great pond. 

Chapter 339, Acts of 1954: An act providing for the establishment of a right 

of way for public access to Lake Metacomet in 
the town of Belchertown. 

Chapter 457, Acts of 1954: An act relative to sporting, hunting, fishing, or 

trapping licenses issued to certain minors. 




32 



P.D. 25 










SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS AND REGULA- 
TIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND 
GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1954 

October 29, 1946. Rules and regulations relative to seasons, legal lengths, 
bag limits, and license requirements to apply to Wallum Lake in the town of 
Douglas, also lying partly in the town of Burrilville, Rhode Island. 

July 8, 1954. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of fish. 

July 8, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of birds 
and mammals. 

September 9, 1949. Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake Mono- 
monac in the town of Winchendon, Long Pond in the towns of Tyngsboro and 
Dracut, and Tuxbury Pond in the town of Amesbury (three ponds lying partly 
in the State of New Hampshire). 

March 7, 1950. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish and use 
of land in areas leased by Division of Fisheries and Game for public fishing 
ground purposes. 

January 2, 1951. Public fishing grounds, supplement, establishing fly 
fishing area on Farmington River. 

February 14, 1951. Special regulations for Deerfield River and its diverted 
waters and establishing a fly fishing area thereon. 

March 14, 1951. Setting aside as bass spawning grounds certain areas in 
the following ponds and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 and 
June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1951: 
Bloody Pond, Plymouth; Dorothy Pond, Millbury; Fort Pond, Lancaster; Fort 
Pond, Littleton; Hampton Pond, Southampton and Westfield; Island Pond 
(Great Island Pond), Plymouth; Mascopic Lake, Tyngsboro and Dracut; Old- 
ham Pond, Pembroke; Sampsons Pond, Carver; Sandy Pond, Plymouth; Snows 
Pond, Rochester; Stetson Pond, Pembroke; White Island Pond, Plymouth and 
Wareham; Alum Pond, Sturbridge. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 

January 16, 1953. Regulations for bass spawning areas in Long Pond, 
Yarmouth and Long Pond, Barnstable and closing the areas to all fishing be- 
tween April 15 and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years be- 
ginning in 1953. 

July 2, 1953. Rules and regulations governing hunting of migratory game 
birds in the State of Massachusetts. 

August 18, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected fresh 
water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
snowshoe hares and cottontail rabbits in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of deer 
in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and 
trapping of mammals in Massachusetts. 

January 8, 1954. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of certain 
fish in Massachusetts. 

January 8, 1954. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trap- 
ping of mammals in Massachusetts and revoking rules and regulations in this 
regard promulgated on September 23, 1953. 

February 25, 1954. Revoking regulations relative to fishing in Bailey's 
Pond in the town of Amesbury. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts and revoking rules and 
regulations in this regard promulgated on September 23, 1953. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

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STATE LIBRARY OF MASSAGOSETft 



MAR 8 1956 



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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



October 1, 1955 

His Excellency Christian A. Herter, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council, The General Court, and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninetieth Annual 
Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the fiscal 
year from July 1, 1954 to June 30, 1955. 

Respectfully submited 




Director 



Publication of this Document Approved by Georce J. Cronin, State Purchasing Acent 
2m-12-55-916487 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PACE 

Report of the Board 3 

Fish Propagation 6 

Game Propagation 6 

Distribution of Stocked Game and Fish . . . . . . . 7 

Information and Education . 10 

Public Fishing Grounds 13 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management 

Wildlife Management Districts 14 

Ornithologist 15 

Federal Aid Fisheries Projects 16 

Fish Management Activities 18 

Federal Aid Wildlife Projects .20 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit . . . .24 

Table of Organization 25 

General Administration 

How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent 26 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses ... 27 

Summary of Fish and Game Income ....... 28 

Legislation 29 

Regulations 30 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



The Division of Fisheries and Game continued to follow a progressive pro- 
gram during the fiscal year which closed June 30, 1955 and remains in excellent 
financial condition at the end of this period. 

Board policies are based on an expanding program which can be financed 
by income of the Division at all times and still leave sufficient surplus in the 
Inland Fisheries and Game Fund to cover any emergency. 

The number of licenses to fish and hunt are on the increase each year, 
reflecting greater interest in these sports and of course increasing the operating 
revenue of the Division as shown by the surplus in the Inland Fisheries and 
Game Fund which on June 30, 1955, is at the all-time high of $692,518.39. The 
Board feels that this surplus is now more than adequate to assure present opera- 
tion and still provide for an emergency and has taken this fact into considera- 
tion in drawing up a budget for the fiscal year of 1956-57 which will provide 
means to carry out extended future programs. 

Hunting and fishing is a privilege to be enjoyed by every citizen of the 
Commonwealth. In the enjoyment of this privilege sportsmen are annually 
spending not less than $74,000,000 in this state for their sport, thus contributing 
to the economy of the Commonwealth. It is the intent of the Board to employ 
every known means that will make hunting and fishing as good as possible in 
this state, at a minimum cost to every license holder. 

The future of good fishing in Massachusetts is particularly promising as a 
result of sound management which is being applied on an increasing scale to 
our ponds and streams in response to a popular demand from sportsmen who 
have noted beneficial results. The skill of our aquatic biologists and tech- 
nicians, co-ordinated with production by culturists at the fish hatcheries, promises 
success of the whole fisheries program. 

Regulatory powers to fix seasons and bag limits, entrusted to the Director 
and the Board, have brought about a liberalization which has not only increased 
the harvest but has allowed a more intelligent management of our wildlife 
species. The harvest of deer, game birds and fur bearers by sportsmen and 
trappers is amazing when one considers the decreasing area that is suitable for 
wildlife. 

Our biologists and technicians, alert to the diverse conditions which we face, 
are constantly working on programs which will protect our wildlife and pro- 
duce a surplus for harvest. 

The crop planting and land management program for wildlife was con- 
siderably expanded during the year. 

Our game farms operated at capacity to produce birds both for harvest and 
to replenish natural stock removed from the cover. 

Our policy of importing and stocking white hares from New Brunswick 
is reasonably successful according to research carried on by the Wildlife Coopera- 
tive Unit at the University of Massachusetts, hence it is planned to increase 
stocking of this species. 

Research projects conducted by the Unit at Amherst have proven of great 
value to the Division and have cost the Division less than if we were to do all 
the work ourselves. 

Sportsmen are becoming increasingly concerned about the difficulty of 
gaining access to some of the great ponds of the Commonwealth. A study of the 
problem and related matters was delegated to the "Joint Standing Committee 
on Conservation Sitting in Recess." The findings of this Committee together 
with recommendations have been reported in Senate Bill No. 640. This Com- 
mittee has rendered a great service to the general public with an intelligent and 
constructive approach to the problem. 

One of our greatest problems will continue to be the need for adequate 
areas in which to hunt. Aside from posted lands, a growing population is claim- 
ing space formerly open to hunting, for building, business, transportation and 



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P.D. 25 4 

other needs. Increased hunting pressure as a result of a larger population, 
coupled with other factors noted, further complicates the matter. Your Board 
will continue to request the appropriation of money for land purchase in our 
next budget in order that we may take advantage of such suitable acreages in 
desirable locations, as may become available at reasonable cost. Opportunities 
have been lost in the past because the Division was unable to negotiate promptly. 

Much of the area over which we hunt is available by virtue of the tolerance, 
good will and generosity of the landowner. Good sportsmen realize and appre- 
ciate this and are constantly endeavoring to educate the thoughtless and 
irresponsible element to act for better landowner-sportsman relations. Public 
relations programs by sportsmen's clubs and cooperation with the Division of 
Fisheries and Game in a "Safety Zone" program have done much to improve 
relations. Efforts of our Information and Education Bureau, sportswriters and 
others familiar with the problem are becoming effective. The last hunting season 
showed a notable decrease in the number of complaints from land owners. It is 
also noted that only one new town has been added to the list of those which 
have closed their borders to hunting, although no claim can be made that any 
large amount of closed acreage has been opened to the hunter. 

Plans to replace the Wildlife Laboratory in Upton with suitable field head- 
quarters have at last been realized. The Youth Service Board has given the 
Division a building adjacent to the Lyman School in Westboro. With remodel- 
ling completed the Division will have an excellent centrally located field head- 
quarters at a fraction of the cost of new construction. 

The term of Board member Paul V. Fleming, of North Adams, expired in 
October, 1954. Mr. Frederick D. Retallick of Pittsfield, a member of the original 
Board appointed in 1948, succeeded Mr. Fleming. 

In March, 1955, Matthew T. Coyne of Millbury was elected Chairman of 
the Board and Frederick A. McLaughlin of Amherst was elected Secretary. 

The support and cooperation of sportsmen, sportswriters and many others 
sincerely interested in our wildlife resources continues to be a source of extreme 
gratification to the Board. 

Appreciation is expressed to the entire personnel of the Division of Fisheries 
and Game for their continued and loyal support. 

Per Order of the Board: 




Matthew T. Coyne, Chairman 
Frederick A. McLaughlin, Secretary. 



3fo iHemortam 



1894 



WILLIAM F. MONROE 



1955 



The death on March 6, 1955, of William F. Monroe, Chief 
Fish Culturist for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Game, was a real loss to this Division and to the sportsmen 
of the Commonwealth. 

William (Bill) Monroe had an exceptional service record 
in the fish cultural profession, having first entered this field 
in May, 1915. He started under his father, the late Otis D. 
Monroe, then Superintendent of the Palmer Fish Hatchery. 
Bill continued this work until he entered the United States 
Army in World War I. He separated from military service 
on July 1, 1918. 

The Palmer Hatchery was established as one of the first 
bass hatcheries in Massachusetts and the east and Bill Monroe 
was appointed as Superintendent there on June 1, 1927. Bill 
soon became one of the recognized authorities on bass culture. 

On August 9, 1948, Bill was promoted to Chief Fish Cul- 
turist, a position he held until his death. His long period of 
service as head of the Palmer Hatchery enabled him as Chief 
to effectively administer operations at all six fish hatcheries 
and to render valuable advice to all who sought his counsel. 

Bill Monroe was highly respected by all the Division per- 
sonnel and his passing was a great loss to those of us who were 
so closely associated with him, as well as to the sportsmen of 
Massachusetts. 



■ ■ ■ ' ,* ■ 






FISH PROPAGATION 

The six fish hatcheries of the Division again enjoyed a favorable year, with 
liberation from the hatcheries plus fish received from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service totaling more than last year both in terms of numbers and poundage. A 
greater number of trout in excess of nine inches in length were released this 
year than in the previous year. 

Smallmouth and largemouth bass production was reduced, but walleye 
pike releases were upped by the addition of fry hatched at the Palmer hatchery 
to almost five million fish. Most of the walleyes were released in Quabbin 
Reservoir. Table 1, in the section "Distribution of Stocked Game and Fsh," 
gives complete liberation figures of all fish for the year. 

Although legal lengths were removed from the trout fishing regulations, all 
hatchery efforts were concentrated on releasing as many trout as possible in 
lengths equal to or better than the former legal lengths. 

Lake trout eggs were obtained from New York and the resulting fingerlings 
were stocked in Quabbin, as were some of the same species obtained from Ver- 
mont. 

The walleye eggs were also obtained from New York. Fish and eggs ob- 
tained from other states were in exchange for certain of our hatchery produc- 
tion, while fish obtained from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartsville 
station, were the result of a cooperative program in which this Division pro- 
vides the necessary feed. 

Although the staple diet fed at Division fish hatcheries continues to be fresh 
pork spleens-cortland mix and herring bits, supplements of beef liver have been 
tried, with excellent success. In addition, vitamin A fed to brood stock may help 
increase the fertility of eggs. 

Expansion of the Sandwich trout hatchery was begun this year to answer 
requirements for additional fish in southeastern Massachusetts. Several new 
pools were completed by June 30, with the remainder scheduled for completion 
during the coming year. Two lines of ponds are planned, utilizing cement dams 
with natural dirt sides. Principal production of this new addition will be two- 
year-old rainbow trout. 

Some losses of fish were experienced during the coldest part of the winter 
at two of the smaller stations, but fortunately surplus fish were available at other 
stations to more than make up this loss. 



GAME PROPAGATION 

Pheasant 

Pheasant production compared very favorably with last year's all time high, 
although the late spring season slowed up early egg production. 

Losses from disease were practically non-existent at our game farms this 
year, hatching and rearing success continued high, and all birds released were 
healthy, well feathered and showed excellent growth. Apparently the feed 
formulas developed by our culturists are well adapted to game birds. 

The feed formulas are consantly watched to insure proper ingredients and 
no substitutions are allowed. Comparative feeding experiments were continued 
in an effort to constantly increase the quality of birds released. Culturists also 
accomplished much disease prevention and control with the help of the Poultry 
Disease Laboratory of the University of Massachusetts. 

A program of sexing day-old pheasant chicks, in an effort to decrease the 
number of hens reared and thereby provide space to rear an increased number 
of legal cocks, was instituted last year. All chicks are not sexed since this pro- 
gram is still in the experimental stages. The sexing program examined 16,878 
chicks in 1955, of which less than half were hens. 



P.D. 25 7 

Total distribution figures for the year are given in table 2, in the section 
"Distribution of Stocked Game and Fish." All pheasant distributions were made 
in accordance with the pheasant cover survey. Towns restricting hunting and the 
discharge of firearms were eliminated, and allotments were cut in many towns 
which had lost good cover due to expansion of residential areas. 

Distribution of birds in good condition was aided by a new type of shipping 
rack applied to three of the trucks this year. This rack enables each truck to 
carry a capacity load, furnishes proper ventilation and protects the birds from 
weather. 

The average age of pheasants at liberation is from 14 to 15 weeks, since 
the birds are held in open range pens to better prepare them for life in the wild. 

The Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program continues to handle about 
one-fourth of the total yearly production. More than 100 clubs throughout 
the state cooperate in this program, in which they are issued eight-week-old 
birds to be reared in club pens until about 14 weeks of age. 

Quail 

Quail production was reduced about one-third to conform with policy of 
the Board. Quail areas are presently well populated with these game birds and 
are not heavily hunted. Liberations were made only in Barnstable, Plymouth, 
Bristol, Dukes and Nantucket Counties, with some experimental stocking in 
Norfolk county. 

Considerable research has been conducted at the two farms that raise quail, 
not only to improve hatching and rearing results, but also to produce the best 
possible birds for liberation. With a smaller production, it was possible to hold 
quail to an older age without over-crowding, and also an earlier hatch was ex- 
perienced. The release of older birds thus made possible should prove more 
satisfactory in that the birds are better able to care for themselves after libera- 
tion. 

White Hare 

White hares were purchased again this year, at a price of $3.20 each. 2500 
were delivered to the game farms, and distributed from there into suitable hare 
cover. 

Experiments with holding hares at the farms until after the hunting season 
indicate that this may be the best method to insure receiving their full potential 
as breeding stock in the wild. Hare that have been conditioned and acclimated 
in this way have proven successful in areas where previous stockings directly 
upon delivery have not. 



DISTRIBUTION OF STOCKED GAME AND FISH 

The position of Assistant Fish and Game Biologist was reactivated in Febru- 
ary, with a change of duties. This position now calls for supervision of distribu- 
tion throughout the state of fish and game reared at state fish hatcheries and 
game farms, or obtained from other sources. 

Stocking places and rates, schedules and other details of coordinating the 
annual releases of artificially reared game and fish are determined by this office, 
in cooperation with the chief game and fish biologists, utilizing information 
furnished from past and current research projects. The purpose of this central 
direction of all stocking is to achieve the greatest possible return of stocked game 
and fish to the sportsman. 

This office supervised 1955 spring distribution of trout and worked on a 
re-evaluation of the pheasant stocking program up to the close of the fiscal year. 

The following tables give fish and game release figures for the entire fiscal 
year, July 1, 1954, to June 30, 1955. Fish distribution for the 1955 season 
(Table 1) was supervised by this office, while game distribution for the 1954 
season (Table 2) had been completed prior to reactivation of the position. 



P.D. 25 



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P.D. 25 9 

TABLE 2. 

GAME DISTRIBUTION 
July I, 1954 to June 30, 1955 

Pheasants: Hens Cocks Total 

Adults: Spring liberation 2,996 941 3,937 

Young: 12 week old liberation; summer and 

early fall 24,629 30,327 54,956 

Furnished to pens under the Sportsmen's 

Pheasant Rearing Program 9,653 9,578 19,231 

37,278 40,846 78,124 

Of the pheasants liberated by the Division of Fisheries and Game, and the Sports- 
men's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated than 36,508 hens and 40,326 cocks 
went into the covers. 

Quail: 

Adults: Spring liberation 734 

Young: 12 weeks and over 5,165 

5,899 
White Hares (Northern Varying) (Purchased) 2.500 






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INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

June 30, 1955, marked the closing of the first full fiscal year in which the 
Information and Education Program of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Game was operated entirely by state employees, rather than by consultants 
as in the past. 

Although the I. & E. staff is in the "temporary position" employee classifica- 
tion, it became possible this year for the first time to operate as a unit with 
some division of responsibilities. Consequently, unprecedented progress can 
be reported in the audio-visual phases of information and education work. 

With employment at the beginning of the year of a wildlife photographer, 
who operates as assistant chief of the program, and half-way through the year, 
employment of a full time clerk, it was possible to accomplish all phases of the 
program more efficiently within the narrow confines of the limited budget 
allowed. At the close of the year, the entire I. & E. staff consisted of three persons. 

The following numerative report lists the activities of the Information and 
Education Program staff. Where such activities were in direct cooperation with 
other sections of this Division, or with other agencies, mention is made of the 
fact. 

News Releases 

A total of twenty-nine mimeographed news releases were issued from the 
I. & E. office to the press, radio and television stations and Division field per- 
sonnel. Fifty-five separate stories of Division activity, regulations changes, an- 
nouncements of various kinds and other news items were included. 

Thirty-two stories, many of them included with the mimeographed releases, 
were covered with black and white photos sent to the press. 

Fifty-five individual news strips were photographed and released to television 
stations. Many of these news strips were keyed to the press releases so that 
each individual story would receive maximum coverage in all media. Every 
news release, photograph and television news strip was used extensively by the 
media involved. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

Five issues of "MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE" were sent to individual 
subscribers, sportsmen's and other conservation organizations, radio and tele- 
vision stations, the press, Division field personnel and other government con- 
servation agencies. Forty-seven full length articles on the various aspects of 
wildlife conservation, Division policies and programs, helpful information and 
other material of value to sportsmen were included, as well as numerous short 
items of particular interest. 

For the first time the individual mailing list began to greatly exceed other 
more static portions of the list. At the close of the fiscal year the mailing list 
totaled 3500 names with another 3500 being held in reserve for lack of sufficient 
funds to publish the required quantity. 

Special Events 

Two special events were used this year to further spread the Division's mes- 
sage of wildlife conservation and to call attention to the need for observance 
of common sense safety rules while hunting. 

"Wildlife Week" was named in March, with a proclamation prepared by 
the I. 8c E. staff and issued by the Governor. This observance was tied in with 
the national announcement of National Wildlife Week, using wetlands conserva- 
tion as a theme. 

"Hunt Safely Week" was established concurrent with the open season on 
deer in December, with a special announcement from the Governor's office also 
prepared by I. & E. 



P.D. 25 



11 



Both events were thoroughly covered by television, still-photo and news- 
paper releases from the I. & E. office. 

Exhibits 

The emphasis on exhibits was deliberately shifted this year from direct 
I. & E. participation, representing the Division, to a dependence on the district 
managers to handle small exhibits in their immediate areas, and to providing 
assistance on exhibits presented by private conservation organizations rather 
than by establishing a Division exhibit as such in each show. 

The I. & E. office designed and constructed an exhibit on the stage at the 
New England Sportsman's Show, with the assistance of personnel from the 
game farms and fish hatcheries, central and north-eastern wildlife districts, and 
the Phillips Wildlife Laboratory. This being the biggest show of the year, 
district managers as well as I. & E. personnel were assigned to attend the exhibit 
during the course of the show. 

I. & E. personnel also designed and built an exhibit at the Topsfield Fair, 
in cooperation with sportsmen's organizations, at Uxbridge with the Boy Scouts, 
and cooperated in wildlife exhibits at the Brockton Fair, Greenfield Fair and 
Rockland Sportsman's Show. The Worcester County Farmers' Field Day, 
Leicester Sportsmens Show, Southbridge Rotary and Worcester Boy Scout shows 
were serviced by district personnel. An exhibit was also placed in a bank 
window in Boston late in the fiscal year, by I. & E., in cooperation with game 
farm personnel, and another exhibit was placed in the Museum of Science 
during their "Sport Fishing Institute," just prior to the fishing season. 

Pamphlets and Booklets 

The following booklets and pamphlets were prepared and released by I. & E. 
during the year: 

Harold Parker Field Trial Area. 

1955 Fish and Game Laws. 

1954 Annual Report (in cooperation with all sections). 

A New View on Perch. 

Closed Towns (map). 

"Let's Go Fishing" was also prepared, but lack of funds prohibited publish- 
ing it. This booklet was serialized in MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE. 

Editing, layout, reproduction, and in most cases, distribution, of the follow- 
ing pamphlets were handled by I. & E., in cooperation with the author. 

Heyl Don't Throw Those Panfish Back (Harney). 

Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program (Torrey). 

Meet The Walleye (Harney). 

How To Turn Kids Into Sportsmen (reprint-CouDERT). 

$74,000 A Year Just For The Fun Of It (Couture). 

Action Plan For Towns (Shepard). 

In addition, 1,200 copies of "Fish Conservation Fundamentals" were pur- 
chased from the Sport Fishing Institute and provided to district managers. 

Visual Aids 

Portfolios were furnished the Board and district managers. Pertinent photo- 
graphs and other material were forwarded from time to time to be inserted in 
the portfolios. 

News clippings were photostated and furnished each person involved 
throughout the year. 

"Shooting Safety" posters, obtained free from the Sporting Arms and Am- 
munition Manufacturer's Institute, were furnished for erection in each wildlife 
district. 

"Shooting Safety" matrices, also from the same source, were distributed to 
all newspapers in the state just before the hunting season. 




12 



P.D. 25 



"Certificates of Appreciation" for landowners cooperating in the farm-game 
program were prepared and furnished to the districts. 

The photo laboratory processed hundreds of research photographs for 
various projects and programs and provided technical assistance in connection 
with the use of photographs in various technical reports and bulletins. 

A magnetic sound track recording unit and projector was purchased, making 
it possible to begin exploitation of this economical means of producing sound 
movies. Two films, "Operation Reclamation" and "Massachusetts Deer Hunt" 
were completed and sound added, but lack of funds prohibited producing re- 
lease copies during this year. All shooting on two additional films, "Farming 
Our Ponds for Better Sport Fishing," and "Walleyes For The Quabbin" was 
completed but sound could not be added during the fiscal year because of lack 
of funds. All films have been shown as occasion demanded, those without sound 
being live-narrated, and this procedure will continue until funds are available 
to make copies immediately available for public release. 

A new insignia for the Division was designed by I. & E. and officially adopted 
during the year. Initial supplies of the insignia for application to vehicles of 
the Division were purchased. 

Radio and Television Programs 

The Division's participation in radio and television programs continued 
to be entirely of the "guest appearance" type, it not being possible at this time 
to conduct any program of our own. I. & E. arranged for nineteen, fifteen 
minute television shows. Film produced by I. & E. was used on each program 
and Division personnel applicable to the subject were interviewed. Three radio 
interview programs were arranged. 

The two existing optical sound track films previously produced by the 
Division, "Mass-Produced Woodies" and "Sportsmen of Tomorrow," were shown 
on several occasions over television stations. 

Television, Special 

"Station break" material was used on three occasions, to stress current laws 
and safety. This type of material is used between programs for one week by the 
station. Cards and/or short film strips were produced for use before the up- 
land game hunting season, deer hunting season and waterfowl hunting season. 

Junior Conservation Camp 

I. 8c E. participation in this camp, operated in cooperation with Wildlife 
Conservation Inc. and the other Divisions of the Department of Natural Re- 
sources, consisted mainly of publicity services, instructional film scheduling and 
scheduling of Division personnel who act as instructors at the camp. A greater 
amount of newspaper coverage was achieved this year than had been given the 
camp in all of its previous six years of operation. Extensive television coverage 
and a two-page spread in a major national outdoor magazine was received. A 
total of 176 boys were booked to attend the 1955 seventh annual summer sessions. 

Conservation Education 

The junior camp continues to be our only formal effort in the field of 
youth conservation education. The I. & E. staff of the Division continued to 
prepare for the time when a state-wide program in cooperation with all organi- 
zations and agencies concerned might become a reality. In the meantime, I. & E. 
personnel, district personnel and others took all possible advantage of oppor- 
tunities to educate youth, through public speaking engagements, that arose 
during the year. Particular emphasis was placed on appearances before junior 
conservation clubs, school assemblies, boy scouts, etc. 

General 

The routine tasks of answering requests for films, literature and sundry 
information continued unabated. 



P.D. 25 



13 



The I. & E. Chief attended the annual conference of the American Associ- 
ation for Conservation Information, in New Orleans, in May. This was the 
first time that Massachusetts has ever been represented at this national con- 
ference. 

The Photographer attended the New England Wildlife Conference at 
Atlantic City, N. J. to show Division films. 

I. 8c E. personnel attended numerous club meetings throughout the year. 

A survey was made during the year to determine the status of Massachusetts' 
I. & E. program in relation to similar programs in other states. 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 



During the first part of the year two more parcels of land, adding about one 
and one-half miles, were leased on the Ipswich River. 

Work was then started on leasing the land on a new stretch of the Squanna- 
cook River between Townsend Harbor and West Groton. 

The Division has been keenly aware of the very heavy concentration of 
fishermen on the leased areas of the Squannacook River. After a serious and 
concentrated study of the problem it was decided to attempt to add more leased 
areas on this river. Subsequently, work to acquire added mileage as public 
fishing grounds was started and a total of six and three-quarter miles were 
already leased at the close of the year, with two more parcels in the negotiation 
stage. 

The new area contains some excellent trout fishing water but, due to the 
fact that it is not as accessible as the areas through the West Townsend section, 
it has been overlooked by many fishermen. 

Fishermen using this new area are reminded that the public fishing grounds 
regulations strictly prohibit fires within any of these leased areas. Fishermen 
using this newly leased section are asked to be extremely careful because of the 
great difficulty firefighters would encounter in reaching some parts of the area 
and because of the resultant destruction of valuable timber should a fire get 
started. 

As was mentioned in last year's report, parking of cars is becoming an in- 
creasingly difficult problem on the public fishing grounds. Parking areas in the 
most suitable places are difficult to acquire. Fishermen are again requested to 
use common sense and discretion in parking their cars when fishing. Leave the 
driveways, barways and narrow roads open. "No Parking" signs have now been 
erected in many of the troublesome areas and by next spring we hope to have 
all these areas posted. These signs should not be looked upon as an added 
restriction on fishermen, but rather as another "clause" in the Division's "insur- 
ance" plan for maintaining open waters where licensed fishermen may enjoy 
their sport. 

Once again this section handled the allotment and distribution of the plastic 
license holders. The personnel of the fish hatcheries, game farms and wildlife 
districts cooperated in every way possible in making deliveries to the city and 
town clerks. This inter-Division operation resulted in considerable savings in 
handling, packing and mailing costs. 

In the spring, as soon as weather would permit, the job of replacing and 
renewing signs along the public fishing grounds was done as usual. 



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BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH 
AND MANAGEMENT 




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WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS 

The four wildlife management districts perform a great variety of tasks, of 
which only certain types lend themselves to tabulation. Following is a brief 
report of various activities peculiar to the district concerned, while a table of 
uniform activities will be found farther on in this section of the annual report. 

District One, headquartered at Pittsfield, spent considerable time develop- 
ing the Hopkins Memorial Forest Area, Williamstown, into an excellent shooting 
grounds. The area totals 2,000 acres. This district also performed most of the 
beaver management work and operated three of the beaver pelt checking stations 
during open season since most of the state's beaver range is located in the district. 
Personnel of District One also gave most of the Division's lectures at the junior 
camp in the 1954 session at the start of this fiscal year. 

District Two, based at the Division of Fisheries and Game's Field Head- 
quarters, Westboro, put on four displays of its own within the district, besides 
assisting I. & E. and District Three with the Boston sportsmen's show. This 
district also cooperated with District Three in the winter waterfowl census. 

District Three, with offices at West Acton, had charge of water chestnut 
control in all infested waters of the state, and conducted the annual winter 
aerial census of waterfowl. Personnel of this district were also called upon to 
assist in a search for a missing child in Billerica. District Three worked out a 
management plan for 3,000 acres of land in Fort Devens, aided in forest fire 
fighting, and investigated several pollution complaints. Personnel of this district 
spent a great deal of time in new construction at the headquarters building, and 
also investigated several land purchase possibilities for the Division. District 
Three also has charge of the bird dog field trial area at North Andover, and 
performed various tasks in connection with development and use of the area. 
The grouse wing and tail study is also assigned to this district, with the assistant 
district manager serving as project leader. 

District Four moved into its new headquarters building on Bournedale 

Road, Buzzards Bay. The building was largely constructed by the district crew. 
This district has the quail project in its area, and gave considerable assistance to 
the project leader in running census counts. The district also assisted the fisheries 
project leaders on both salter trout investigations and the Taunton River study. 
The assistant district manager was project leader of the annual deer check, and 
personnel of the district aided the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in a mourning 
dove census and a wetlands survey. 

All four districts worked cooperatively on major pond reclamations and in 
other projects where additional manpower was required. 

Item 
I. Federal-Aid Projects, Came (See Federal-Aid Projects Report) 

All Districts 

Wood Duck Completed 

Boxes built this year 375 

Boxes maintained 1,370 

Predator guards installed 580 

Total boxes erected this year 358 

Number areas involved 101 

Boxes distributed to clubs, etc 120 

Boxes checked for usage 762 

Wood Ducks banded 40 



P.D. 25 



15 



Checking Stations Operated 

Deer 

Beaver 

Census 

Muskrat areas censused 

Quail census trips 

Beaver (P-R Project, experimental flowages only) 

Live trapped and transplanted 

Fur 

Pelts checked 

II- Habitat Improvement 

Plantings 

Number of plants set 

Farms and other areas involved 

Plants distributed to clubs, owners, etc 

Fence rows, borders, etc., treated 

Food patches planted, areas prepared 

Acreage under farm-game program 

III. Fisheries Management (See Fisheries Sections Report — most field 

management work is done by district 
crews — all trout pond stocking is handled 
by districts.) 

IV. Came (Non-Federal Aid) 

Cottontail Live Trapping and Transfer 

Number of traps built this year 

Number maintained 

Number distributed to cooperators 

Damage sites investigated 

Beaver 

Damage complaints investigated 

Nuisance beaver live trapped and transplanted 

Release areas surveyed and checked 

Research Data Contacts 

Wing and tail collection points 

Number of collection containers distributed 

Woodcock census 

Re-survey of pheasant cover 

Clubs Assisted With Game Projects 

V. Education (See Information & Education Program Report — This 
is district activity only.) 

Meetings of all types attended 

Technical advice rendered (contacts) 

Publications originated 

News Releases issued 

Junior Conservation Camp Lectures 

Radio and television guest appearances 

Exhibits, participated in 

Publicity contacts 

Landowner-sportsman billboards presently maintained 

Safety Zone posters erected or distributed 

Panfish derbies assisted 



All Districts 
Completed 

7 stationary 
4 mobile 

6 

27 
23 

10 

1,913 plus 



11,450 

68 

4,000 plus, 

and seeds 

7,690 

136 

20,000 plus 



40 
375 
407 

34 

34 
27 
20 

225 

6,650 

all districts 

all districts 

30 



225 

100 plus 

1 

28 

12 

20 

9 

30 

6 

10,000 plus 

5 






ORNITHOLOGIST 

The major project of the year, aside from routine waterfowl work of the 
Division, has been sorting and tabulation of data resulting from the 1951 through 
1954 bandings of black ducks in Essex County. This job is now advanced nearly 
to the point of drawing up a final report. 



16 



P.D. 25 



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Experimental banding of greater scaup at Moon Island was attempted in 
the winter, in cooperation with the Atlantic Waterfowl Flyway Council, but 
met with little success. 

In February, the efforts of many years of work on waterfowl, in cooperation 
with waterfowl technicians from other states, resulted in a united agreement of 
fish and game administrators of the New England states that an increase in the 
length of the waterfowl seasons should be allowed by federal authorities. 



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FEDERAL AID FISHERIES PROJECTS 

(75% of the cost of these projects are reimbursed by federal tax monies on fish- 
ing tackle under the Dingell- Johnson Act.) 

Stream Investigations 

During the past year the third segment of a project designed to obtain 
fundamental fishery information relative to the management of streams in this 
state, both for trout and warm-water species, was completed. At the present time 
surveys have been finalized on the Westfield, Millers, and the Merrimac and 
Ipswich River drainages. Work was begun on the Taunton River drainage, the 
last segment of the reconnaissance survey. During this period a summary of 
that portion of the study dealing with trout streams was published and dis- 
tributed. This report was presented to the Northeastern Division of the Ameri- 
can Fisheries Society at a meeting in Atlantic City in March of 1955. 

Management recommendations, based on the past three years' survey, in- 
cluding observations on the fate of 78,688 tagged trout, include the following 
points: 

Stocking. Massachusetts is largely a put-and-take trout state. Stocking is 
the most important management tool to provide trout fishing in any of the 
streams investigated. This is readily understood when one realizes that in Massa- 
chusetts between 90 and 95 percent of all trout taken during the season are the 
current year's hatchery production. The major facet of management revolves, 
then, around stocking hatchery-raised trout at a size, at a time, and in areas 
which will give maximum returns to the fishermen. At the present time only 
one out of every three trout stocked is harvested by the sportsmen, and thus out 
of his license monies each trout fisherman must pay for the ones that are not 
taken. This raises the cost of trout in the creel to between two and four dollars 
per pound, depending upon the success of harvest in a particular stream or 
from a particular lot of fish. Evidence gathered for Massachusetts streams indi- 
cate that maximum returns and the most sustained angling can best be realized 
by stocking as close to opening day as possible, as well as by frequent in-season 
stocking. Trout stocked just prior to opening day, or in-season, gave just about 
double the return to the fishermen over trout stocked in March. Fishermen 
success can also be increased by stocking larger fish. Actual tag returns, by size 
lots, from the 78,668 tagged trout stocked over the last three years shows that 
best returns are experienced from good size fish (eight inches plus) as com- 
pared to smaller size fish (six to eight inches). Present hatchery size objectives 
should be raised to eight inches. Reduced numbers would be compensated by 
this larger, more harvestable size. 

Regulations. As a result of the findings of this study, the trout season was 
changed in 1954 to run from the third Saturday in April to the third Saturday 
in October, and all size limits were abolished on trout in 1955. Several other 
recommendations regarding regulations have been made, as follows: 

1. Abolish the present restrictions on night fishing for trout. 

2. Reduce the daily bag limit from twelve to six fish per day for the first 
four weeks of the season, after which allow the present daily bag limit of 
twelve fish to prevail. The purpose in doing so would be to provide the 
most sustained angling for the most people commensurate with maximum 
harvest returns of relatively expensive hatchery trout before that period 
of high summer water temperatures when most fish not caught will be lost. 



P.D. 25 



17 



3. Remove present restrictions on the taking of bait fish for commercial use 
from public fishing ground areas. 

4. Legalize spring sucker spearing during that part of the closed season that 
falls in March and April. 

5. Manage all streams stocked with trout for trout and as such remove 
restrictions of bag, size limits, and season on all other species except to 
honor the general statewide closed season from March first to the third 
Saturday in April with the exception of spring sucker spearing, as per 
recommendation (4). 

Recommendations (3) and (4) are advocated partially as a limited rough 
fish control measure as well as allowing for wise use of an unexploited renewable 
resource. 

Stream Improvement. Actively encourage and support the pollution control 
and abatement recommendations put forward for Massachusetts' streams by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Such recommendations if imple- 
mented would generally clean up obnoxious pollution conditions. The value of 
generally accepted stream improvement structures such as V-dams, deflectors, etc., 
is questionable in correcting for the limiting factor of high summer water tem- 
peratures and low flows. It is believed that the use of such structures should be 
minimized in favor of stream bank plantings to increase shade and reduce bank 
erosion. The possibilities of creating greater summer flows through either the 
creation of multiple wildlife-use ponds and marshes or by modifying current 
water usage procedure in existing facilities, such as U. S. Army flood control 
storage reservoirs, should be thoroughly explored. The possibilities of the use of 
explosives to increase water depths and modify habitats should likewise be 
investigated. 

Population Manipulation. The possibilities of tipping the equilibrium in 
marginal trout streams in favor of trout by controlling or eliminating competi- 
tion from other species should be investigated. Stream rehabilitation as com- 
pared to lake rehabilitation with chemicals is only in its infancy, but it would 
seem to hold great promise in providing additional food stocks for newly-planted 
hatchery trout, thereby possibly decreasing initial stocking losses, and in improv- 
ing the environment for greater summer carry-over and growth of trout. 

Salter Trout Study 

During 1955 information continued to be gathered on the behavior of brook 
trout stocked in five Cape Cod tidal streams, in order to determine if areas of 
this sort could be utilized to establish sea-running, or "salter" populations. To 
date 25,000 tagged brook trout have been stocked in the study areas, and their 
movements checked. Migratory patterns established from trap records show an 
upstream migration of trout from tidal waters during the fall months, fluctuating 
upstream and downstream movements associated with spawning activities during 
the early winter, a downstream movement in the late winter, and a spring up- 
stream movement beginning in early March. The fact that stocked brook trout 
migrate into salt water, and are not confined to brackish tidal areas, is pointed 
up by numerous returns of tagged fish stocked in study areas and recovered in 
other streams accessible only by comparatively long trips along the Cape Cod 
shore. 

Of special interest to the investigators was the growth rates and survival 
exhibited by the stocked fish. During 1954 60% of all trout taken from these 
streams were current hatchery stock, 30% were fish stocked in the spring of 1953, 
and 10% were unmarked, or native, fish. The recovery of this number of carry- 
over hatchery fish was not duplicated in any typical non-tidal stream studied in 
Massachusetts. These fish, averaging between six and seven inches when re- 
leased in 1953, ranged between ten and twelve inches when caught in 1954. 

During the coming year all similar streams on Massachusetts coastal 
boundaries will be inventoried, and steps taken to initiate trout management in 
these areas. It is believed that the results of this study will provide many more 
hours of fruitful recreation for Massachusetts anglers. 



18 



P.D. 25 



Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

During the past year information on the results of a full fishing season on 
Quabbin Reservoir were gathered and analyzed, and the results summarized 
and distributed. This paper was presented at the Northeastern Division of the 
American Fisheries Society. During the 1954 season, 45,448 fishermen utilized 
this body of water, carrying away 156,753 fish weighing 53,069 pounds. 

Quabbin Reservoir was opened to bass fishing on April 17, in contrast to the 
statewide July first opening date. Eighty per cent of all bass taken were caught 
during the normally closed period. The over 1,500 legal bass taken during the 
season represents only one bass from each eleven acres. 

During the past year 800 pounds of adult walleye were introduced into the 
Quabbin, and the planting of fingerling walleye and lake trout was continued 
by the fish propagation section. During this period the first reports of walleye 
being caught were made to the Division, and project personnel took adult wall- 
eyes in netting operations. 

Population studies conducted during the past year, coupled with routine 
field operations, point to a very material increase in the bass population. This, 
coupled with the apparent success of walleye introductions, makes the future of 
fishing in this reservoir seem assured. 

Trout Pond Reclamations 

During the past year ten pounds qualifying for trout management were re- i 
claimed and stocked with fingerling and adult trout. From these 529 acres were 
removed 23,500 pounds of assorted warm-water fishes. (Table 1) In their place 
were stocked 15,750 adult trout and 95,000 trout fingerlings. In the absence of 
competing warm water species many of the fingerlings stocked in 1954 came into 
the catch in 1955. In the next few years thousands of Massachusetts anglers will 
have the opportunity to catch trout that are as "native" as the basic characters of 
our waters permit. 



Table 1. Summary of warm-water populations removed from ponds reclaimed for 
trout, July 1, 1954 to June 30, 1955. 




POND, TOWN 


Area 
(Acres) 


Weight 
Game Fish 


of Fish Removi 
Pan Fish 


:d (lbs.) 
Weed Fish 


Baker Pond, Orleans* 


28 








Crystal Lake, Orleans 


38 


52.9 


1,607.5 


555.8 


Dug Pond, Natick 


48 


37.2 


1,774.6 


991.4 


Flax Pond, Brewster 


48 


62.8 


1,112.5 


488.9 


Goose Pond, Chatham 


38 


62.7 


1,575.0 


65.1 


Greenwater Pond, Becket 


93 


101.9 


1,155.1 


311.4 


Leadmine Pond, Sturbridge 


53 


361.0 


1,653.6 


86.6 


Little Pond, Plymouth 


43 


76.1 


1,735.6 


16.5 


Lake Saltonstall, Haverhill 


41 


334.3 


3,594.1 


42.1 


Whalom Lake, Lunenburg 


99 


510.9 


4,640.7 


19.6 


Totals 


529 


1 ,599.8 


18,848.7 


2,577.4 



•Fish not picked up. 



FISH MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 

Fyke Netting Activities 

During this period 15,770 pounds of weed fish and stunted pan fishes were 
removed from ten ponds being managed by this method (Table 2). The removal 
of these fishes permits those remaining to attain larger and more desirable sizes. 






P.D. 25 



19 



This activity is akin to weeding one's garden or to thinning down a row of 
carrots. In order to establish a healthy, thriving population of any species that 
population must have a certain amount of space to expand into, and a certain 
amount of surplus food available. Overcrowded populations of fishes have 
neither, and drastic thinning is often necessary to provide better conditions, 
both for the fish and the fishermen. 

Warm Water Pond Reclamations 

Although trout pond reclamation has been widely publicized and practiced 
throughout the United States and in Massachusetts, a great deal of interest has 
recently been shown in the reclamation of ponds for warm water game fishes. 
This practice originated in Massachusetts in 1951, and today is one of the fastest- 
growing management endeavors carried on by the Bureau of Wildlife Research 
and Management. During the past year 13 ponds (Table 3) were reclaimed for 
warm-water species. Requests for this type of work from sportsmen's clubs, lake 
associations, and civic groups are being received in such numbers that fish 
management schedules are now filled until 1958. During the past year, as in 
the case of trout pond reclamations, the Bureau has depended quite heavily upon 
the services of hundreds of sportsmen who assisted in the actual mechanics of 
pond management. Several projects were set up on weekends so that as many 
sportsmen as possible could help improve the ponds for better fishing. In the 
future fish management projects of this sort must and should become a co- 
operative venture between the sportsmen and the Bureau. Certainly the re- 
habilitation of fishing waters is a task prodigious enough to warrant an 
application of the efforts of all who are concerned with fish conservation. 

Partial Reclamations 

A third facet of Massachusetts' warm-water fisheries program deals with the 
use of partial eradication as a means of improving fishing. This type of manage- 
ment, in which up to 50% of the entire population is removed through the use 
of chemicals; and fingerling predators, either bass or pickerel, are stocked in the 
void thus created, was initiated in Massachusetts during the past year. Future 
expansion of the use of this type of management will depend upon available 
supplies of fall fingerling bass and pickerel. 

Experimental Fish Culture 

In order to cope with an increasing demand for bass and pickerel for 
stocking purposes, brought about by the rapid acceleration of the warm-water 
program, the Bureau now maintains two rearing pond systems for the culture 
of these species. During the past year the Merrill Pond System at Sutton was 
placed under the direction of the Bureau. In the fall of 1954 over 15,000 yearling 
pickerel were stocked from this system into ponds that were either reclaimed or 
being managed for this species. An additional 15,000 were held over for stock- 
ing as two year-olds. Experimental procedures in relation to pickerel culture 
are being carried on concurrently with production. The Harold Parker Pond 
System in North Andover has been placed entirely into the production of fall 
fingerling largemouth bass. During the fall of 1954 20,000 fingerlings were 
distributed to ponds being managed for this species. As in the case of the 
Merrill Pond System, the use of the alewife as a forage fish is being evaluated, 
and it is felt that cultural practices being innovated at both systems will be of 
major importance to future fisheries work in this state. 

Management Evaluation Activities 

Concurrent with old phases of fisheries management is a continuous program 
of evaluating, for the purpose of improving, current management techniques. 
All managed ponds are being checked each year to determine the results of 
practices being employed. Age and growth data, population balance, reproduc- 
tive success, and survival rates are being followed. Creel census projects measure 



20 



P.D. 25 



fishermen success on selected ponds. The physical and chemical characteristics 
of over a hundred ponds were checked during the past year. These activities, 
although not providing immediate fishing, form the base upon which future, 
and better, management will be built. 

Table 2. Summary of reductions in overcrowded fish populations by fyke netting, 
July 1, 1954 to June 30, 1955. 



POND, TOWN 


Area 
Acres 


Weight of Fish Removed (lbs.) 
Pan Fish Weed Fish Total Wgt. 


Billington Sea, Plymouth 


269 


650.7 


186.8 


837.5 


Chesire Res., Chesire 


418 


1,152.6 


73.6 


1,226.2 


Lk. Gardner, Amesbury 


80 


1,145.3 


265.4 


1,410.7 


Holland Pd., Holland 


62 


609.5 


274.1 


883.6 


Indian Lk., Worcester 


177 


2,705.7 


83.7 


2,789.4 


Jordan Pd., Shrewsbury 


20 


862.0 




862.0 


Massapoag Pd., Lunenburg 


38 


1,600.5 


11.0 


1,611.5 


Massapoag Pd., Sharon 


353 


512.1 


88.4 


600.5 


Pontoosuc Lk., Pittsfield 


505 


2,195.0 


2,155.7 


4350.7 


Wedge Pd., Winchester 


21 


116.4 


1,082.1 


1,198.5 


Totals 


1,943 


11,549.8 


4,220.8 


15,770.6 



Table 3. Summary of fish populations removed from ponds reclaimed for warm-water 
fishes between July 1, 1954 and June 30, 1955. 




POND, TOWN 


Area 
Acres 


W 
Game Fish 


eight of Fish 
Pan Fish 


Removed (lb 
Weed Fish 


Total Wgt. 


Beck Pd., Hamilton 


36 


60.4 


1,372.2 


636.6 


2,069.2 


Benedict Pd., Monterey 


40 


121.1 


3,887.0 


420.5 


4,428.6 


Dean Pd., Brimfield* 


11 








1,100.0 


Dean Pd., Upton 


5 


16.0 


64.0 


20.0 


100.0 


Five Mile Pd., Plymouth 


29 


0.0 


570.6 


670.2 


1,240.8 


Kinnicum Pd., Wellfleet 


3 


0.0 


377.0 


0.0 


377.0 


Little Cliff Pd., Brewster* 


18 








900.0 


Little Five Mile Pd., Plymouth 


5 


0.0 


96.1 


53.6 


149.7 


Long Pd., Wellfleet 


34 


42.0 


926.8 


266.6 


1,235.4 


Silver Lk., Wilmington 


28 


184.1 


2,453.1 


468.4 


3,105.6 


South Pd., Savoy 


27 


30.9 


429.5 


0.0 


460.4 


Upper Pd., Saugus 


13 


48.5 


591.5 


428.0 


1,068.0 


Watershops Pd., Springfield* 


255 








15,750.0 


Totals 


504 


503.0 


10,767.8 


2,963.9 


31,984.7 



•Population estimated but not measured. 



FEDERAL AID WILDLIFE PROJECTS 

Thirteen projects have been operated during the past year under the 
Federal Aid to Wildlife Act. Under this Act the state is reimbursed by the 
federal government for 75% of the costs of investigation and management 
projects, the monies being derived from a federal excise tax on arms and am- 
munition. 






P.D. 25 



21 



Over 55% of the monies expended during the period were for management, 
the rest for investigation. It should be pointed out, however, that many of the 
investigation projects contain phases which are more properly classified as 
management. For instance, the recording of the deer kill by towns, and the 
tabulation of the annual fur take are management measures as is the census 
of quail and wood duck. 

An effort is being made to increase the relative amount of money expended 
each year for management activities as existing investigation projects are com- 
pleted. Research will continue, however, to develop new management methods 
and evaluate existing management methods. With changing habitat, land use 
and human populations, a program which is not continually observing, experi- 
menting and testing, will soon be outmoded and not doing its best to produce 
for the sportsman. The whole object of management is production while the 
object of investigation is to develop and improve methods of production. 

White-tailed Deer Investigations 

Project 7-R: A record kill of 4,713 deer was reported taken during the 1954 
open season, December 6 through December 11. The sex composition was 52.5% 
bucks and 47.5% does. This was the highest kill of deer to be reported in recent 
history and came about as a result of good hunting conditions throughout most 
of the state and a constantly expanding deer herd. 

The kill by counties was as follows: 

Barnstable 423 Hampshire 402 

Berkshire 1,245 

Bristol 80 

Dukes 178 

Essex 103 

Franklin 748 

Hampden 322 

Deer checking stations were operated during the season. A total of 1,565 
deer were examined for sex, age and condition. 

The data collected at the checking stations continues to show a healthy 
deer herd which is slowly increasing. 

Farm Came Restoration 

Project 9-D: Farm game restoration activities this year surpassed last year's 
work in number of sites involved and acres of land developed. Management 
practices were carried out on 54 farms, 6 game clubs and 12 other areas which 
included state lands and airports. Management practices include the following: 
planting of food patches, planting of conifers and shrubs, cutting back of woods 
borders and fence rows to encourage native food producing shrubs, reclaiming 
of abandoned fields, and erection of safety zone posters. 

Water Chestnut Control 

Project 10-D: The control of water chestnut on the Sudbury and Concord 
Rivers and on the College ponds at South Hadlcy continued. Scattered plants 
continue to appear each year which are killed by spraying or hand pulling. The 
large beds of this plant which at one time restricted fishing and boating are no 
longer present, but control activities are being continued on a small scale in an 
attempt to completely eradicate this noxious water weed. 

Fur Investigations 

Project 16-R: All but a few phases of this study were completed during 
the year. A final report will be prepared as to its findings during the coming 
year. 

Observations on the life of beaver dams and of their use by wildlife will be 
continued as will the census of muskrats and the determination of the fur harvest. 



Middlesex 


167 


Nantucket 

Norfolk 


105 
20 


Plymouth 205 


Worcester 704 


County unknown 


11 



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P.D. 25 



1954-1955 Fur Harvest and Value 



Muskrat 

Mink 

Otter 

Skunk 

Raccoon 

Weasel 

Red Fox 

Grey Fox 

Beaver 

Total Value 



Harvest 


Value 


92,358 


$92,358.00 


1,225 


22,050.00 


167 


2,475.00 


160 


80.00 


3,587 


3,381.00 


178 


178.00 


20 


5.00 


18 


4.00 


181 


2,940.00 




$123,471.00 





Wood Duck Nesting Investigation Project 

Project 19-R: Wood duck nesting at Great Meadows Refuge stayed at a 
high level during 1954. A total of 540 day old ducklings were marked on the 
Great Meadows area. 

A total of 834 boxes were checked throughout the state: 768 of these were 
functional and 533 (or 69.4%) were used by wood ducks. The number of duck- 
lings produced was about the same as 1953. All but a few minor phases of this 
project were completed during the year and a final report will be prepared 
during the next year. 

Birch Hill Investigations 

Project 20-R: This project is run in conjunction with the Birch Hill 
Development project to determine game populations and management methods. 

The census of cottontail rabbits made in February showed an increase over 
last year in spite of increased hunting pressure This was also true of the snow- 
shoe hare which was present in higher numbers than in any of the previous three 
years. 

Grouse populations in both the fall and spring counts showed little variation 
from 1953 numbers. 

A total of 563 cock pheasants were liberated at intervals during the hunting 
season. Band returns from 62.7% of these were received and it is believed that 
at least 80% of the birds stocked were recovered by the hunters. 

Birch Hill Development 

Project 21-D: Routine maintenance of the bridges, roads, flowages, and 
buildings was carried out. Signs were placed at the major entrances to the area 
and on the roads within the area. 

Annual food patches were planted and maintained throughout the area. 
Additional fields were reclaimed for future planting. 

Strips totaling about 1,500 feet in length were cut through dense white 
pine and red pine plantations to allow ground cover to come in. 

A selective cutting of about 42,000 board feet of white pine and hemlock 
was made to improve wildlife conditions in the forested land. The lumber 
obtained from this cutting will be used by the Division in its other programs. 

Cottontail Rabbit Experimental Management 

Project 22-R: The cottontail rabbit is one of the most popular game ani- 
mals in Massachusetts. This project is set up to determine management methods 
which can be used to increase the numbers of cottontails found in our covers. 
Several different types of management practices have been established and 
information as to their effectiveness and cost is being collected. 






P.D. 25 



23 



Cock Pheasant Stocking Investigation 

Project 23-R: This project seeks to determine if it is necessary to stock 
hen pheasants in order to maintain a population of "wild" pheasants. Pre- 
liminary studies on a small area indicated that it was not necessary. The study 
has now been expanded to a county basis to determine the effect on a large area. 
Bristol County has been picked for the study and during the past year no hens 
have been stocked in this county nor will they be stocked in this county for the 
next two years. 

Quail Project 

Project 25-R: Quail populations remained at a high level in southeastern 
Massachusetts and were not adversely affected by the two hurricanes of 1954. 
Census data for this year indicates a continuing high population. The project 
determined that stocking of quail in areas of high population contributed little 
to the harvest and recommended reduced stocking in these areas and larger 
stocking in areas of small populations. 

Much information is being obtained relative to quail which will enable 
the Division to more intelligently manage this highly desirable species. 



Maintenance of Wood Duck Nesting Boxes 

Project 26-M: This project is set up to perform necessary maintenance of 
wood duck boxes and to erect boxes in new areas. The boxes maintained and 
erected are tabulated under the activities of the District Managers. 

Ecological Survey 

Project 27-R: See report of Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research 
Unit. 



Land Acquisition 

A tract consisting of 174 acres of farm and forest land located at Westboro 
was given to the Division by the Youth Service Board. This land is being de- 
veloped and will be used to demonstrate farm-game management practices. 
The area will be open to hunting. 

A tract of forested land containing 840 acres was purchased in the towns of 
Philipston and Hubbardston. This area will be open to public hunting and 
upon completion of plans will be managed for forest gime. Land lying adjacent 
to this area is also being considered for acquisition and it is hoped that a block 
of about 1,500 acres can eventually be acquired. 

The acquisition of the Pantry Brook Waterfowl Area in the town of Sudbury 
was completed. This area consists of about 380 acres of land most of which is 
marsh or wooded swamp. It is planned to construct a control structure at the 
outlet to control water levels in the marsh. The Division of Fisheries and Game 
now controls 7.506.9 acres of land open to public hunting. 

State Came Projects 

The state game projects (non Federal-Aid) are carried out in the districts 
and a summary on these activities can be found in the district reports. 

A re-survey of the pheasant cover present in the slate was started. The last 
state-wide survey was made in 1943 and 1944 and was obviously outdated. 
Results to date show that about half of the pheasant cover existing in the state 
can be legally hunted. Building of homes near or in pheasant cover has been 
the largest contributor to the closing of much of our pheasant cover to shooting — 
not necessarily through posting of the land to trespass but from the establish- 
ment by law of 500 ft. safety zones around new homes. Stocking quotas have 
been changed to conform with this new information. 



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24 



P.D. 25 





MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 

Ceneral 

Several talks by the Unit Leader before sportsmen's clubs and men's clubs, 
as well as several newspaper accounts of Unit activities, contributed to the 
information and education activities of the Division 

Woodcock Project 

This long term federal-state cooperative study has made a great deal of 
progress during the past fiscal year. Through summer capture and banding 
activities as well as examination of wings of fall shot birds, there is promise 
of working out a technique for aging fall shot birds, and thus more accurately 
gauging annual production. The annual survival of woodcocks was studied from 
the results of six years of spring trapping. Results are presented in a paper 
submitted for publication and indicate a survival in excess of 50 percent. 

Due to vegetative changes which are being analyzed, woodcock populations 
have fallen off in much of the Unit study areas. Spring censuses throughout 
the northeastern breeding areas indicated no serious decline in woodcock 
populations. 

State Ecological Survey 

Vegetative mapping from aerial photographs of the state has made excellent 
progress. This has become a federal-aid project administered by the Cooperative 
Unit. The Department of Natural Resources is cooperating in this study, and 
has provided the funds for one full-time assistant and several part-time assistants. 

At the end of the fiscal year, approximately half the state has been com- 
pleted. Tabulations on the acreages of different ecological types in each town- 
ship are being computed, and it is anticipated that the entire project will be 
completed during the current fiscal year. 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

Work continued on ruffed grouse populations in the central part of the 
state. During the spring of 1955, the Unit instituted a grouse drumming census 
on 100 miles of grouse habitat. It is anticipated that this method will give a 
statistically sound annual index of spring breeding populations of grouse. By 
using the state vegetative maps referred to in the paragraph on the State Ecologi- 
cal Survey, an attempt is being made to define on broad terms the type of habitat 
holding the highest grouse populations, based on spring drumming counts. 

Observations on the study areas indicate that the spring of 1954 resulted in a 
higher production of chicks than did the spring of 1955. 

White Hare Project 

This project was completed in June and resulted in a detailed report on 
the findings. Recommendations on the state policy of stocking wild New Bruns- 
wick hares in Massachusetts coverts are given in detail in the Unit's spring 
quarterly report. In brief, the study indicated that stocking hares in areas well 
populated by native hares is uneconomical. Best returns for this investment 
can be realized by stocking hares in numbers of at least 15 or more in coverts 
heavily hunted in central or western Massachusetts or in isolated areas of hare 
coverts in the eastern part of the state. 



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GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 

Administration: 

Administration $82,068.63 { m „.,-, 

Fish & Game Board #3304-06 2,185.80 \ ^ m '^ iA!i 

Information-Education $17,556.13 

Propagation: 

Game #3304-31 $219,688.36 

Fish $268,821.50 

Wildlife: 

Game #3304-44 $6,160.54 ■ 

#3304-51 45,384.55 

#3304-53* 138,387.07 $189,932.16 

Fish #3304-42 $84,403.97 

#3304-45 10,565.57 

#3304-47* 42,412.27 

#3304-51 45,384.55 

#3304-53 5,766.13 

#3304-56 5,000.00 $193,532.49 

Law Enforcement: 

#3308-05 11,892.38 

#3308-07 7,572.23 

#1003-03 112,553.65 $132,018.26 

$1,105,803.33 
* Expenditures under 3304-47 and 3304-53 are reimbursed 75% by Federal Funds. 

Surplus Inland Fisheries and Game Fund— June 30, 1955— $692,518.39 



8% 

2% 

20% 

24% 



17% 



17% 



12% 
100% 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND CAME 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1954 to June 30, 1955 

Expenditures 
Account and 

No. Title Appropriation Liabilities Reverted 

#3304-01 Administration $100,330.00 $99,624.76 $705.24 

#3304-06 Fish and Game Board 2,500.00 2,185.80 314.20 

#3304-31 Operation of Fish Hatcheries and 

Game Farms 520,351.00 488,509.86 31,841.14 

#3304-42 Improvement and Management of 

Lakes, Ponds and Rivers 88,435.00 84,403.97 4,031.03 

#3304-45 Public Fishing Grounds 10,840.00 10,565.57 274.43 

#3304-47* Fish Restoration Projects 45,128.00 42,412.27 2,715.73 

#3304-51 Bureau of Wildlife Research 93,547.00 90,769.10 2,777.90 

#3304-53* Wildlife Restoration 153,602.00 144,153.20 9,448.80 

#3304-56 Biological Survey of Streams and 

Waters 5,000.00 5,000.00 — 

$1,019,733.00 $967,624.53 $52,108.47 
* 75% Reimbursement from Federal Funds. 



P.D. 25 



27 



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28 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND CAME 

Analysis of Special Licenses Issued Under Sections 48, 
102-3-4-5-6-7, Chapter 131, C.L. during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1955 

Type of License Number Issued 

Class 1 — Special Fish Propagator's License 220 

Class 3 — Fish Propagator's License 95 

Class 4 — Propagator's License (Birds or Mammals) 492 

Class 6 — Dealer's License 463 

Class 7 — Possession Only License 65 

Taxidermist License 64 

Resident and Non-Resident Citizen's Fur Buyers License 33 

License to take Shiners for bait 296 

Trap Registration Certificates 1,237 

Fish Tags 11,225 

Game Tags 2,970 



P.D. 25 



68A, 



Receipts 

$254.00 
307.00 

1,706.00 

715.00 

41.50 

320.00 

510.00 

1,480.00 
427.75 
112.25 
148.50 



$6,022.00* 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1954 to June 30, 1955 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $967,280.75 

Special Licenses, trap registrations and tags 6,022.00* 

Rents 2,946.30 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 1,146.00 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 86,866.30 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 19,687.03 

Court Fines 11,857.00 

Refunds Prior Year 14.48 



$1,095,819.86 




The principal financial items of this report are in agreement with the 
Comptroller's books. 

Date: November 1, 1955 Fred A. Moncewicz 

Comptroller 



. 



P.D. 25 



29 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game 
were enacted during the legislative session of 1955: 



Chapter 28, Acts of 1955: 



Chapter 84, Acts of 1955: 



j Chapter 209, Acts of 1955: 

| Chapter 292, Acts of 1955: 

Chapter 304, Acts of 1955: 

Chapter 356, Acts of 1955: 

Chapter 482, Acts of 1955: 

Chapter 524, Acts of 1955: 



Chapter 647, Acts of 1955: 



Resolve authorizing the continuance of an 
investigation relative to the study of the elimina- 
tion or control of submerged weeds in certain 
great ponds of the Commonwealth 

Resolve providing for an investigation and study 
by a special commission relative to hunting and 
fishing within the Commonwealth and certain 
matters relating thereto, including the subject of 
the ground water level within the Common- 
wealth. 

An act providing that applicants for a sporting, 
hunting, fishing, or trapping license need not 
personally appear. 

An act authorizing the issuance of fishing licenses 
to aliens. 

An act authorizing the sale of live bait on the 
Lord's Day. 

An act authorizing the Director of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game to acquire certain lands 
in the towns of Barre and Phillipston. 

An act authorizing and directing the Division of 
Fisheries and Game of the Department of Natural 
Resources to manage for fishing purposes Lake 
Winneconnet in the town of Norton. 

An act providing that the Director of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game may authorize the mem- 
bers of certain licensed organizations to shoot 
game birds at field trials of retriever and bird 
dogs without possessing hunting or sporting 
licenses. 

An act relative to the revocation of hunting, 
fishing and trapping licenses. 







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P.D. 25 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS; AND REGULA- 
TIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES 
AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1955 

Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 



Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of 



August 4, 1948. 
maintenance of fish. 

August 4. 1948. 
birds and mammals. 

September 9, 1949. Special rules and regulations to apply on Lake Mono- 
monac in the town of Winchendon, Long Pond in the towns of Tyngsboro and 
Dracut, and Tuxbury Pond in the town of Amesbury (three ponds lying partly 
in the state of New Hampshire). 

March 14, 1951. Setting aside as bass spawning grounds certain areas in 
the following ponds and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 and 
June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1951: Bloody 
Pond Plymouth; Dorothy Pond, Millbury; Fort Pond, Lancaster; Fort Pond, 
Littleton; Hampton Pond, Southampton and Westfield; Island Pond (Great 
Island Pond), Plymouth; Mascopic Lake, Tyngsboro and Dracut; Oldham Pond, 
Pembroke; Sampsons Pond, Carver; Sandy Pond, Plymouth; Snows Pond, 
Rochester; White Island Pond, Plymouth and Wareham; Alum Pond, Stur- 
bridge. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 

January 16, 1953. Regulations for bass spawning areas in Long Pond, Yar- 
mouth and Long Pond, Barnstable and closing the areas to all fishing between 
April 15 and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 
1953. 

July 11, 1953. Rules and regulations governing hunting of migratory 
game birds in the state of Massachusetts. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected fresh 
water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of gray 
squirrels in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
pheasants, quail, and ruffled grouse in Massachusetts. 

September 23, 1953. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of deer 
in Massachusetts. 

January 8, 1954. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trap- 
ping of mammals in Massachusetts and revoking rules and regulations in this 
regard promulgated on September 23, 1953. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts and revoking rules 
and regulations in this regard promulgated on September 23, 1953. 

July 5, 1954. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake. 

October 29, 1954. Hunting regulations on bird cover improvement area 
in the town of Ludlow, closing to all hunting until September 24, 1957. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing grounds 
in Massachusetts. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging of deer 
in Massachusetts. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of hares 
and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

January 28, 1955. 
fish in Massachusetts. 



Rules and regulations relating to the taking of certain 



January 28, 1955. Revoking rules and regulations relative to public fish- 
ing grounds (supplement), dated January 2, 1951. 









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ANNUAL REPORT 



1956 




THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

* WQJUi>xflLfi. >UUU3^-A. QjLC> ; DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

73 TRBMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



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6 ~ J 2. 

STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MAR 13 1058 

£TAT£ HOUSE, BOSTON 



^ASS OFFICIALS 



6 



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19 A 5~£ 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, Foster A. Furcolo, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council, The General Court, and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety-first 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the 
fiscal year from July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956. 



Respectfully submitted, 




CHARLES L. McLAUGHMN 



Director 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 



NINETY -FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Board „ _ 1 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management: 

Game Se ction 2 

Fisheries Section 6 

Wildlife Cooperative Research Unit 15 

Information and Education Program „ l6 

Propagation : 

Fish Hatcheries 19 

Game Farms _ „ „ 20 

Distribution of Stocked Game and Fish .., 20 

Public Fishing Grounds „„. _ .22 

General Administration 

Tables: How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent „, 2k 

Appropriations and Expenditures 25 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 26 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and 

Trapping Licenses 27 

Analysis of Special Licenses 28 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations 29 

Legi slation _ 30 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



The Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game is pleased to report con- 
tinued progress and achievement during the fiscal year 1955-1956. The financial 
status of the Division remains in a healthy condition although a decrease in the 
surplus in the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund is noted from the prior year. This 
decrease was partly due to non-recurring expenses resulting from damage to some 
of our properties during the August 1955 flood. 

A slight reduction in license sales during the year was reflected in a 
corresponding reduction in revenue. A late and rather unpleasant Spring resulted 
in some decrease in sales of fishing licenses but the license sales picture is 
being thoroughly analyzed to detect any significant trend. 

The surplus in the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund at the close of the fiscal 
year was $587,079.26, which is more than adequate. For this reason, the Board 
will continue to request the appropriation of money for the purchase of suitable 
land to be managed for hunting whenever such land is available at reasonable 
cost. Several tracts of land were acquired by the Division during the past year 
and others are being negotiated at this writing. 

The opening of several large bodies of water to fishing which had hitherto 
been closed and held exclusively as municipal water supply systems is one of the 
major recent developments. The opening of these waters to fishermen was brought 
about through the co-operation of Local Water Commissions, Sportsmen and the 
Division of Fisheries and Game. This trend holds great promise for the future. 

The result of pond management work both for trout and warm water species 
becomes increasingly evident each year. Sportsmen have been quick to note the 
beneficial results and are looking for waters of the Commonwealth not yet under 
management to be brought into the program. This program will be expanded as 
rapidly as available manpower and funds will permit. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game is today a coordinated organization 
capable of producing fish and game and capable of producing good hunting and fish- 
ing in available areas. Our major problem will continue to be adequate places to 
fish and to hunt for a sporting population which will be constantly on the in- 
crease. The Division recognizes this problem and with the cooperation of the 
sportsmen will meet the challenge. 

The transfer of our Field Headquarters and Wildlife personnel from Upton to 
the new location in Westborough has been completed. The facilities at Westborough 
are most satisfactory and future needs can be met at this location with a minimum 
capital outlay. 

A fond hope of the Division has been realized with the publication of 
"MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE" in magazine form. The value of this magazine as a medium 
for wildlife information and education cannot be overestimated. The magazine will 
be dedicated to education in sound conservation and the dissemination of informa- 
tion on the best in wildlife management practices. 

Robert H. Johnson resigned as Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
in October, 1955> to assume new responsibilities as Assistant Director of the 
Federal Fish and Wildlife Service in Washington, D. C. In November, 1955, the 
Board appointed Charles L. McLaughlin as Director. Mr. McLaughlin was formerly 
Chief Game Biologist for the Division. 

-1- 



In March, 1956, the Board elected Matthew T. Coyne, Chairman, and Frederick 
A. McLaughlin, Secretary. 

Sincere appreciation of the Board is expressed to the many people involved 
in all phases of our operations within and outside the Division who have been 
helpful to us during the past year. 

Per order of the Board 

s/ MATTHEW T. COYNE, Chairman 

s/ FREDERICK A. MCLAUGHLIN, Secretary 

BUREAU OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH & MANAGEMENT 



Game Section 
Fisheries Section 
Cooperative Research Unit 

The four wildlife management districts, set up in 1951 to facilitate con- 
ducting the many activities of the Division with a minimum of travel required, 
have proven of inestimable value. District personnel, headquartered in strategic 
locations in the four general geographic regions of the state, serve as local 
liaison with sportsmen's groups, federal and other state agencies, and the general 
public. They conduct research, management, stocking, and development work in 
both fisheries and game; and a considerable portion of time is spent in education 
and public relations work. 

The general program of the districts, administered from the Field Headquarters 
in Westboro, is much the same in both fisheries and game work, from the Berkshire s 
to the Cape. Because of differences in geography and species, however, there are 
activities peculiar to one district that may be secondary, or entirely lacking, 
in any of the other districts. 

Beaver pelt checking stations were operated in the western and central 
portions of the state; it was here, too, that the majority of the nuisance beaver 
were live -trapped and transplanted. Bob-white quail, found in the southeastern 
part of the state, were the subject of a study there, and were inventoried by 
personnel of two wildlife districts. Water chestnut, a noxious aquatic water 
plant, was treated with chemicals as a control measure by personnel of the north- 
eastern district. This brief listing serves only to indicate that each district, 
while functioning under centrally directed administration, was required to extend 
its activities beyond the usual scope. 

Certain phases of the annual work program, particularly in game management, 
lend themselves to easy tabulation of work accomplished. For convenience, the 
game activities of the four wildlife management districts have been grouped under 
appropriate headings In the table. Fisheries work is reported under the Fisheries 
Section, and information and education activities are reported in the report of 
the I & E Section. 



-2- 



GAME SECTION 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS 



I, Federal -Aid Projects, Game (See Federal -Aid Projects Report) 



Wood Duck: 

Boxes built this year 

Boxes maintained 

Predator guards built and installed 

Total boxes erected this year 

Number areas involved 

Boxes distributed to clubs, etc. 

Boxes checked for usage 

Wood Ducks banded 

Checking Stations Operated: 
Deer 



All Districts 
Completed 

^28 

1,286 

510 

301 

65 

152 

1,030 

IT 



7 stationary 
k mobile 



Beaver 



Census : 

Muskrat areas censused 
Quail census trips 



12 

28 



II. Habitat Improvement 

Plantings: 

Number of plants set 

Farms and other areas involved 

Plants distributed to clubs, landowners, etc. 

Fence rows, borders, etc., treated - lineal feet 
Food patches planted, areas prepared 
Acreage under farm-game program 

III. Game (Non-Federal Aid) 

Cottontail Live -Trapping and Transfer: 
Number of traps built this year 
Number maintained 

Number distributed to cooperating live -trappers 
Damage sites investigated 



7,000+ 

75 

3,ooo+ 

and seed 
8,000+ 

250+ 

50,000+ 



85 
325 

55 



Beaver : 

Damage complaints investigated 

Nuisance beaver live-trapped and transplanted 

Release areas surveyed and checked 

Research Data Contacts: 

Grouse wing and tail collection points 
Number of collection containers distributed 
Woodcock census 



38 
37 

20 



230 
6,650 
all districts 



Clubs Assisted with Game Projects 



Uo 



■3- 



Federal Aid in Wildlife Projects 

Twelve projects have been operated during the past year under the Federal Aid 
to Wildlife Act. Under this Act, the state is reimbursed by the federal govern- 
ment for 75$ of the costs of investigation, management, development and land 
acquisition projects, the monies being derived from an 11$ federal excise tax on 
sporting arms and ammunition. All federal aid projects are administered by the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, under the direct supervision of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game. 

Major contributions have been made to the information available on several 
game species — information which is a valuable asset in management of the 
species. Semi -technical reports on these studies are being readied for publica- 
tion and distribution to other wildlife agencies and the sporting public. 

Briefly, the following summaries highlight the activities of the projects 
which were active during the past fiscal year: 

White Tailed Deer Study 

Project 7-R: During the 1955 open season, ^-,127 deer were reported killed. Divi- 
sion personnel, manning checking stations located strategically on major highway 
road nets, checked 1,505 deer; bucks represented 56$ and does represented kktfo, to 
conform to the 40-year average previously tallied. 

Reproductive tracts were collected from cooperating sportsmen and the labora- 
tory analysis was done at Springfield College. A graduate student at the Wildlife 
Research Unit at the University of Massachusetts is compiling and evaluating the 
data collected for the past 10 years, on a geographical basis. 

Farm Game Restoration 

Project 9-D: Farm game restoration work was carried out on 75 areas (farms, game 
club lands, town land and Division-owned lands); 50,000 acres are being made more 
suitable for wildlife through habitat improvement work. Management, work included 
establishment and maintenance of fall and winter food patches, planting of coni- 
fers and shrubs, reclaiming abandoned fields, cutting back fence rows and woods 
borders, posting of safety zone posters and other appropriate posters. 

Water Chestnut Control 

Project 10-D: The Northeastern district applied chemical herbicides to portions 
of the Sudbury and Concord Rivers and the College Ponds in South Hadley as a 
control measure toward eventual elimination of this noxious aquatic weed. 

Furbearer Investigations 

Project l6-R: The manuscript for the final report of this project was prepared 
from the mass of data collected during the study on the more economically impor- 
tant furbearer s of the state. Printing and distribution of the report bulletin 
are planned for early 1957* 

Wood Duck Nesting Investigation Project 

Project 19-R: Field work has been completed and the write-up on the final report 
vas begun. The publication, a semi -technical bulletin, will summarize the infor- 
mation collected, and provide a plan for management of the species in Massachusetts, 

-h- 



At the 150-acre Great Meadows study area, it was noted that 758 ducklings 
hatched in the 62 successful nests -- this, in spite of extended cold weather 
and repeated blizzards which delayed the arrival and buildup of woodducks in 
the spring of 1956. 

Birch Hill Investigations 

Project 20-R: Birch Hill Public Hunting Grounds has two projects being carried 
out there. This project is concerned with making periodic appraisals of game 
populations, and management methods being used, (its companion project is 
concerned with developmental work on the area.) 

The Cottontail census indicated a slight drop in numbers; this may have 
been caused by excessive fall and winter flooding. The post-season census on 
varying hare indicated no appreciable change over the previous year. Only 17 
hare tags were returned from a release of 100 hare released in- season. The 
fall grouse census, also probably influenced by high waters, showed a slight 
decline . 

There was a 56.1$ return of leg bands from the 5^7 cock pheasants released. 
Hunting pressure increased materially over previous years. Muskrat, mink, 
otter and beaver were trapped on the area, but fewer pelts were taken than dur- 
ing the year previous. 

Birch Hill Development 

Project 21-D: Maintenance of buildings, equipment, roads, signs, bridges and 
dams are routine functions, but constitute a large part of the program. Habi- 
tat improvement work included the planting of 2,200 wildlife trees and shrubs; 
20 acres of food patches planted to grain, legumes and grass; and the clearing 
of 8 acres of brush land for fall planting. 

Strip thinnings were made on 1,000 feet of red and white pine plantations 
to open the dense overstory and encourage establishment of new growth. Selective 
cutting in mature soft woods yielded 20,000 board feet of lumber for use by the 
Division. 

Cottontail Rabbit Experimental Management Area 

Project 22 -R: An estimated 250,000 cottontails are shot annually by Bay State 
gunners. The project is set up to develop and evaluate management methods best 
adapted to local covers, to insure continued hunting potential for this, the 
most popular game species in the state. Live -trapping, tagging and release of 
cottontails as a census method reveals a rising population in 1956. 

A statistical analysis of data collected for a period of 7 years is expected 
to provide a valid comparison of management methods in use. 

Cock Pheasant Stocking Investigation 

Project 23-R: An effort is being made to determine if the stocking of hens is 
necessary to maintain a population of wild birds. A comparison of the kill of 
banded cocks against unhanded "native" cocks is being made in two adjoining 
counties, one of which has had no hens stocked for the past two years. Prelimin- 
ary data indicate that higher bag returns are realized from birds stocked close 
to the gun season, or in- season, than from birds stocked two months before the 
open season. 

-5- 



Suail Project 

Project 25-R: Field work, office analysis of data, and preparation of the final 
report was largely completed. It is contemplated that a semi -technical bulletin 
summarizing the project activities will be published early in 1957 for distribu- 
tion. 

Maintenance of Woodduck Nesting Boxes 

Project 26-M: Periodic checks are made of all nesting boxes erected to date, and 
limited numbers of new boxes are erected where necessary. Detailed summaries are 
listed under wildlife management district activities. 

Ecological Survey 

Project 27 -R: See report of the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 
at the University of Massachusetts. 

Land Acquisition 

The Division now owns 2,2^7 acres of wetlands, upland and forest land as 
public hunting areas. In addition, 10,^77 acres are being administered as public 
hunting areas under permit, license, or agreement with the owning agency. 

During the past year 1,855 acres of land were purchased; it is anticipated 
that these holdings may be expanded by additional purchases in adjoining tracts. 

Habitat development work is being carried out on five of the wildlife areas. 
The other areas will be developed and managed for game species as needs, funds ' 
and manpower permit. 

State Game Projects 

The state game projects (non-Federal Aid) are carried out in the districts 
and a summary of these activities can be found in the district reports. 

For the second consecutive year, the districts handled the stocking of all 
pheasants and during the past winter undertook the liberation of white hare. 

FISHERIES SECTION 

FEDERAL AID FISHERIES PROJECTS 

(75$ of the cost of these projects are reimbursed by federal tax monies on fishing 
tackle under the Dingell- Johnson Act.) 

Stream Investigations 

During the past year the fourth and final segment of a project designed to 
obtain fundamental fishery information relative to the management of streams in 
this state, both for trout and warm-water species, was completed. The work 
finalized this year was on the Taunton and North River drainages. Previously, 
work had been completed on the Westfield, Millers, Squannacook, Merrimac, and 
Ipswich River drainages. Findings for the Taunton and North River drainages sub- 
stantiated those reported previously for the other drainages. 

Stocking. Massachusetts is largely a put-and-take trout state. Stocking is 

-6- 



the most important management tool to provide trout fishing in any of the 
streams investigated. This is readily understood when one realizes that in 
Massachusetts between 90 and 95 percent of all trout taken during the season 
are the current year's hatchery production. The major facet of management 
revolves, then, around stocking hatchery-raised trout at a size, at a time, 
and in areas which will give maximum returns to the fishermen. At the present 
time only one out of every three trout stocked is harvested by the sportsmen, 
and thus out of his license monies each trout fisherman must pay for the ones 
that are not taken. This raises the cost of trout in the creel to between two 
and four dollars per pound, depending upon the success of harvest in a particula. 
stream or from a particular lot of fish. Evidence gathered for Massachusetts 
streams indicate that maximum returns and the most sustained angling can best be 
realized by stocking as close to opening day as possible, as well as by frequent 
in-season stocking. Trout stocked just prior to opening day, or in-season, gave 
just about double the return to the fishermen over trout stocked in March. 
Fishermen success can also be increased by stocking larger fish. Actual tag 
returns, by size lots, from the 85,239 tagged trout stocked over the last four 
years shows that best returns are experienced from good size fish (eight inches 
plus) as compared to smaller size fish (six to eight inches). Present hatchery 
size objectives should be raised to eight inches. Reduced numbers would be 
compensated by this larger, more harve stable size. 

Regulations. As a result of the findings of these studies, the trout 
season was changed in 195^ to run from the third Saturday in April to the third 
Saturday in October, and all size limits were abolished on trout in 1955* Also, 
abolished in 1955 were the restrictions on night fishing for trout. Several 
other recommendations regarding regulations have been made, as follows: 

1. Reduce the daily bag limit from twelve to six fish per day for the 
first four weeks of the season, after which allow the present daily 
bag limit of twelve fish to prevail. The purpose in doing so would 
be to provide the most sustained angling for the most people commen- 
surate with maximum harvest returns of relatively expensive hatchery 
trout before that period of high summer water temperatures when most 
fish not caught will be lost. 

2. Remove present restrictions on the taking of bait fish for commercial 
use from public fishing ground areas. 

3» Legalize spring sucker spearing during that part of the closed season 
that falls in March and April. 

k. Manage all streams stocked with trout for trout and as such remove 
restrictions of bag, size limits, and season on all other species 
except to honor the general statewide closed season from March first 
to the third Saturday in April with the exception of spring sucker 
spearing, as per recommendation (3). 

Recommendations (2) and (3) are advocated partially as a limited rough fish 
control measure as well as allowing for wise use of an unexploited renewable 
resource. The chain pickerel found in the Taunton and North River drainages 
illustrate the utter lack of need for protection. A total of 1,682 chain 
pickerel were collected, yet, only 75; or h percent, were legal-size fish. The 
reason for this is that most die a natural death prior to reaching Ik inches 
in length. Such streams are only rarely fished at the present. 

Stream Improvement. We actively encourage and support the pollution control 
and abatement recommendations put forward for Massachusetts' streams by the 

-7- 



Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Such recommendations If implemented 
would generally clean up obnoxious pollution conditions. The value of generally 
accepted stream improvement structures such as V-dams, deflectors, etc., is 
questionable in correcting for the limiting factor of high summer water tempera- 
tures and low flows. It is believed that the use of such structures should be 
minimized in favor of stream bank plantings to increase shade and reduce bank 
erosion. The possibilities of creating greater summer flows through either the 
creation of multiple wildlife-use ponds and marshes or by modifying current water 
usage procedure in existing facilities, such as U. S. Army flood control storage 
reservoirs, should be thoroughly explored. The possibilities of the use of explo- 
sives to increase water depths and modify habitats should likewise be investigated, 

Population Manipulation. The possibilities of tipping the equilibrium in 
marginal trout streams in favor of trout by controlling or eliminating competition 
from other species should be investigated. Stream rehabilitation as compared to 
lake rehabilitation with chemicals is only in its infancy, but it would seem to 
hold great promise in providing additional food stocks for newly -planted hatchery 
trout, thereby possibly decreasing initial stocking losses, and in improving the 
environment for greater summer carry-over and growth of trout. 

Salter Trout Study 

Information continued to be gathered on the behavior of brook trout stocked 
in five Cape Cod tidal streams, in order to determine if areas of this sort could 
be utilized to establish sea-running, or "salter" populations. Tagged brook trout 
have been stocked in the study areas, and their movements checked. Migratory 
patterns show an upstream migration of trout from tidal waters during the fall 
months, fluctuating upstream and downstream movements associated with spawning 
activities during the early winter, a downstream movement in the late winter, and 
a spring upstream movement beginning in early March. The fact that stocked brook 
trout migrate into salt water, and are not confined to brackish tidal areas, is 
pointed up by numerous returns of tagged fish stocked in study areas and recovered 
in other streams accessible only by comparatively long trips along the Cape Cod 
shore . 

During the year 1955-56, this project consisted of two phases. One phase 
consisted of the intensive study of five known salter streams through stocking 
marked fish, creel checks, and population inventory with the electric shocker. 
The other phase consisted of a reconnaissance survey of most coastal streams to 
learn whether any of these could be profitably managed for salter brook trout. 

Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

An estimated total of 32,297 fishing trips were made on Quabbin Reservoir 
during 1955, with the boat fishermen contributing 60.2 percent, the shore fisher- 
men 26.0 percent, and the night fishermen 13. 8 percent. This amounted to 1.3 
trips per acre for the total acreage or 1.9 trips per acre for the area open to 
fishing. 

A total of 27,8l8 boat and shore fishermen fished 156,112 hours to catch an 
estimated total of 90,790 fish weighing 29,79U pounds. The average fishing trip 
was 5.6 hours in length. Fishing success amounted to 0.6 fish per hour weighing 

0.2 pounds. 

There appears to be no significant difference between the 195^ and the 1955 
harvest in the reservoir. The catch per hour in 195^ was 0.62 fish weighing 
0.22 pounds, and in 1955 it was O.58 fish per hour weighing 0.19 pounds. 

-8- 



The early bass season initiated on Ouabain Reservoir produced only one bass 
for each eleven acres of fishable water. A large 195**- year class should provide 
sustained if not improved fishing for this species in the future. 

An attempt to estimate total fishermen catch as opposed to take -home catch 
by use of plastic bags failed through insufficient cooperation by the anglers. 
More thorough publicity on what was being attempted would probably rectify this 
in another attempt of this type. 

A more adequate age and growth sample was collected due to the younger year 
classes of fish present in the plastic bag collections, as well as a larger 
sample of fishes considered undesirable by the anglers. This alone could justify 
the inclusion of a plastic bag collection in a creel census program. 

Six coves with a total surface area of 9.0 acres were selected as permanent 
study areas to be sampled yearly with rotenone. Good game and pan fish repro- 
duction was found, as well as a variety of forage species. 

A large 195^ year class of largemouth bass was indicated by all methods of 
sampling and indicates sustained bass fishing for the future. 

Survival of introduced species of lake trout, and yellow pike -perch was 
found through gill netting and in checking angler creels. 

Trout Pond Reclamations 

During the past year 8 ponds qualifying for trout management were reclaimed 
and stocked with fingerling and adult trout. From these 827 acres were removed 
17,701 pounds of assorted warm-water fishes (Table l). In the absence of com- 
peting warm water species many of the fingerlings stocked in the fall of 1955 
came into the catch in 1956. 

The following is a summary of conclusions reached in regards to the trout 
pond program. (1) Size limits are of no value and may be a definite hindrance 
in managing trout in reclaimed ponds. (2) The law of supply and demand efficient 
ly regulates a reclaimed trout fishery, consequently, the length of the fishing 
season can only be set arbitrarily. Preferably, the season should include the 
spring and fall months, when fishing is the best due to favorable water tempera- 
tures, and also the summer vacation months when most campers wish to fish. 
(3) Trout should be grown fast and heavily harvested in the 8-12 inch size in 
order to make way for the next crop, (k) Forage fish for trout are not needed, 
and any forage species introduced as such will cut down on trout production. 
(5) Winter growth can be as fast as summer growth. (6) The best period for 
reclaiming deep stratified ponds generally falls in the month of September when 
the heat budget is at a maximum for the year, and just prior to the fall over- 
turn. (7) Restocking should be done the same fall as soon as the pond becomes 
non-toxic. (8) A good rule -of -thumb stocking rate is 100 fall fingerlings 
(3-5 inches in length) per acre, although this is dependent on pond productivity 
and may vary. (9) Maintenance stockings are best made in the fall when water 
temperatures are below 70° F. (10) Spring fry plants are subject to extremely 
variable mortalities. (11) Drastic draw downs prior to reclamation will almost 
invariably result in incomplete fish kills. 



-9- 



FISH MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES 

Fyke Netting Activities 

During this period 10,091 pounds of weed fish and stunted pan fishes were 
removed from eight ponds being managed by this method (Table 2). The removal of 
these fishes permits those remaining to attain larger and more desirable sizes. 
This activity is akin to weeding one's garden or to thinning down a row of 
carrots. In order to establish a healthy, thriving population of any species 
that population must have a certain amount of space to expand into, and a certain 
amount of surplus food available. Overcrowded populations of fishes have neither, 
and drastic thinning is often necessary to provide better conditions, both for the 
fish and the fishermen. 

Warm Water Pond Reclamation ' 

During the past year 11 ponds totalling 337 surface acres (Table 3) were re- 
claimed for warm water species. This program consists essentially of killing the 
fish population from a pond through the use of rotenone, where the need has been 
adequately demonstrated by initial creel census and survey sampling, and restock- 
ing with a balanced and desirable species complex. Requests for this type of work 
from sportsmen's clubs, lake associations, and civic groups has increased tremen- 
dously as the benefits derived in improved fishing become more apparent. Results 
to date are extremely encouraging even though much remains to be learned in how 
to properly manage such waters. 

Partial Reclamations 

Partial eradications up until 1955 in Massachusetts had been aimed at improv- 
ing fishing for warm water species. In that summer a target of opportunity 
presented itself to similarly treat Big Alum Pond, Sturbridge, to improve the 
angling for both warm-water species and trout as well. Several complaints were 
received relative to a severe fish kill. Reports from local residents and field 
investigation corroborated that the kill had been exceptional and largely restricted 
to smallmouth bass and sunfish, even though the bulk of the fish had been removed 
and buried prior to field examination. Cause of the die-off was obscure. Accord- 
ingly, the complete shoreline, all coves, and several acres of open water were 
selectively treated with a light concentration of rotenone. Although two and one- 
quarter tons of fish were killed only about one percent consisted of game fish 
(bass, pickerel, and one trout) . Fingerling and adult trout plus smallmouth bass 
were stocked in the void made by the partial reclamation. According to local 
residents, trout fishing was greatly improved in the spring of 1956. Brook trout 
stocked as two to three inch fingerlings in August had grown to six to eight 
inches in length by the following May. This technique offers great promise in 
vastly improving the trout fishing in certain types of large trout ponds that 
cannot be reclaimed dur to one reason or another. 

The program of partial poisoning warm water ponds has been expanded over that 
of last year and likewise shows tremendous promise of more adquately accomplishing 
the objectives of fyke net thinning. All told, four lakes totalling 1,020 surface 
acres were treated during the fiscal year. A total of 25,293 pounds of fish were 
removed from these lakes (Table k) . 

Experimental Fish Culture 

Bass and pickerel were again raised at the Harold Parker System, North Andover 
and the Sutton Pond System. From the bass rearing ponds at North Andover U8,590 
fingerlings from k to 10 inches in length were stocked in managed public waters in 

-10- 



the fall of 1955- This figure more than doubled the 195^+ fall production, and 
reflected the success of new cultural methods. 

Although the hurricane of August, 1955 virtually wiped out the Sutton 
system, 10,056 chain pickerel, from h to 12 inches in length were salvaged and 
distributed. Extensive repairs to this system were begun early in 1956. 

Experimental Stream Reclamation 

Although reclamation of suitable ponds for trout has become a valid and 
accepted fisheries management technique, the principles involved have only 
limitedly been applied and evaluated in regards to streams. In 1955> three 
small streams were reclaimed and subsequently stocked with fingerling trout, 
plus catchables the following spring. These streams were inventoried a year 
later using various fish sampling gear. Results were compared with original 
survey findings, fish samples collected at the time of reclamation, or both. In 
summary, it can be said that the technique of reclaiming streams stocked with 
trout looks promising, but many questions need to be answered through additional 
research. 

Opening of Closed Water Supplies to Public Fishing 

Through the cooperative efforts of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
local and state health officials and local sportsmen, five drinking water supply 
reservoirs (^,233 surface acres) previously closed to angling were opened. There 
is little validity in the fears that the water standards will be lowered in these 
reservoirs as a result of controlled public fishing. This has never been shown 
to have occurred in instances of this type. Shorter working hours and the re- 
sulting increase of leisure time demand that every municipality and agency 
concern itself with fostering channels of healthful recreation. Demands upon 
our water areas are becoming greater each year, and the multiple usage of sur- 
face water must be accepted as becoming an integral part of our way of life, as 
it has become in other communities. 

Trout Distribution 

For the first time, the total statewide trout distribution was carried out 
by Division of Fisheries and Game personnel. Formerly, Conservation Officers of 
the Division of Law Enforcement and personnel of the Propagation Section were 
responsible for the operation. However, Conservation Officers gave freely of 
their services and advice in assisting Division of Fisheries and Game personnel 
in accomplishing this herculean task. Altogether, 303*390 pounds or 1,060,127 
catchable trout were distributed to the streams and ponds of the Commonwealth. 
In addition, l,U85,00O fingerling trout were distributed as well. 

Inventory and Evaluation Activities 

Any fisheries program that is designed to benefit the sportsman in improved 
fishing must of necessity be an active one. Consequently, such a program quickly 
encounters a wide range of frustrating problems for which there are no available 
answers. It must then set out to find these answers. Therefore, many kinds of 
year-to-year management activities are engaged in much as inventories of "stock" 
and "sales" are periodically done in supermarkets. 

The following summary illustrates the magnitude and variety of such activi- 
ties. Fourteen ponds were fyke netted, 4l ponds spot poisoned, ten ponds seined 
and 11 ponds gill netted so as to determine growth rates, population balance, 
reproductive success, and survival rates of the fish populations in these waters. 

-11- 



The majority of these waters are ponds that are under intensive management through 
reclamation, partial poisoning or fyke netting. It is vital that a continuous 
program of evaluation concurrent with management be carried out for the purpose 
of improving current management technique. Less obvious than the field work in 
procuring necessary fish samples but equally important is the laboratory analysis 
of such data. The key to such analysis generally revolves about the aging of fish 
samples. During the last year over 15/000 individual fish were aged through the 
scale method. Sample checks of angler creels, besides yielding information on 
growth and survival rates of stocked fish, also measures fishermen success. On 
the opening weekend of the 1956 trout season 3,^23 anglers were contacted on 22 
reclaimed trout ponds. These anglers had fished 10,l62 hours to take 3,257 trout 
at a rate of 0.32 trout per hour. Four reclaimed trout ponds were similarly 
checked the previous fall. A total of 116 anglers were checked who had fished 299 
hours to take 219 trout or 0.73 trout per hour. It can be seen from this limited 
sampling that apparently fall trout fishing is considerably more productive per 
unit of effort than spring fishing. Ten managed warm-water ponds were similarly 
checked periodically during the season. Billington Sea, Plymouth, is an example 
of the kind of information sought and secured from these latter ponds. Here, 
during the ice fishing season, 132 fishermen were checked, who had caught 70 pick- 
erel, 330 yellow perch, 6 white perch, and 5 bass. The catch rate averaged 1.7 
hours per fish and all of the fish were of large size (pickerel averaged 20 inches) 
indicating the success of the management done here a few years previous. 

There were many other activities engaged in, which although not providing 
immediate fishing, form the base upon which future, and better, management will 
be built. The physical and chemical characteristics of 37 ponds were checked 
during the past year. An intensive creel census was initiated on Asnacomet Pond, 
Hubbardston, to obtain harvest information on a good trout pond for two years 
before and two years after reclamation. Two other small reclaimed trout ponds 
were studied through an intensive type creel census. Several ponds and lakes 
were the subject of intensive winter creel censuses to obtain information on 
winter fishing, which has come to rival that of summer fishing in importance on 
some waters. 

Publications 

Several popular and technical fisheries articles were prepared and published. 
Copies may be obtained by writing the Division of Fisheries and Game, Field Head- 
quarters, Westboro. 

(1) Individual one page fliers for 56 specific ponds and lakes showing 
location, access, facilities available, stocking histories, pond depths, 
and other pertinent information relative to fishing. Printed. 

(2) "Fishing in the Drink at Quabbin Reservoir". Published in Jan. -Feb. 
issue of MASS. WILDLIFE. 

(3) "What's in Our Trout Streams?" Published in March -April issue of 
MASS. WILDLIFE. 

(U) "Eetter Fishing - With Trout Pond Management." Published in May- June 
issue of MASS. WILDLIFE, 

(5) "Largemouth Bass in Massachusetts." Published in May- June issue of 

MASS. WILDLIFE. 

(6) "Harvests and Management of Warm-Water Fish Populations in Massachu- 
setts 1 Lakes, Ponds and Reservoirs." Published in the Progressive 
Fish-Culturist. 

-12- 



(7) "Trout Fishing at Cliff Pond, Brewster, Massachusetts." Mimeographed. 

(8) "The Comparative Returns of Various Sizes of Trout Stocked in Massachu- 
setts Streams." Published in the Progressive Fish-Culturist. 

(9) "Returns from Tagged Discard Brood Stock Trout, 12-28 Inches in 
Length, Stocked in Massachusetts Ponds and Lakes." Mimeographed. 

(10) "The Problem of Public Access to Great Ponds." Mimeographed. 

Miscellaneous Routine 

There are literally hundreds of relatively unglamorous activities engaged 
in over the year that require in the aggregate a tremendous amount of time and 
which are vital to the fisheries program, but which are not easily reported on 
in tabular form. Such activities include: Posting of ponds; the repair, 
maintenance, and building of fish screens and dams on some waters; salvage and 
transfer of predator and forage fish for use in managed waters open to fishing, 
cultural ponds, and for use in experimental biology studies conducted by univer- 
sities; fertilization and water level manipulations on cultural ponds; purchase 
and distribution of supplies and equipment; maintenance and repair of property, 
equipment, and supplies; installation of rights-of-way and sanitary facilities 
at some reservoirs; field investigations on fish kills and pollution complaints; 
processing of applications for federal trout and bass, and in some cases, dis- 
tribution of these fish; promotion and assistance to clubs and civic groups 
relative to kids fishing derbies, as well as the stocking of some waters for 
this purpose; preparation of material for countless news releases and articles; 
trouble shooting, advice, and correspondence relative to countless problems 
affecting water areas such as weed problems, leeches in a pond, parasites in 
fish, crayfish along swimming beaches and in industrial inlets from ponds; 
sportsman club, civic group, federal and state meetings; assistance and advice 
to other government agencies on fishways, pollution studies, weed control, tech- 
niques and methods, etc.; instruction on fish conservation at camps and schools; 
demonstration stream improvement; general correspondence; keeping abreast of 
fishery activities and techniques in other areas; and attending public hearings 
on rights-of-way, changes in regulations, flood control, opening closed reser- 
voirs to public fishing, etc. The last year was a full one in respect to the 
foregoing activities mentioned. 

Table 1. Summary of fish populations removed from ponds reclaimed for trout, 
July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956. 





Area 
(Acres) 


Weight of Fish Removal (Lbs.) 


Pond, Town 


Game Fish 


Pan Fish 


Weed Fish 


Ashland Res., Ashland 


155 


135 


103 


427 


Lake Mattawa, Orange 


112 


999 


5,424 


286 


Peters Pd., Sandwich 


127 


113 


2,605 


3,477 


Bailey Pd., Amesbury 


14 


5 


256 


41 


Wallum Lake, Douglas 


322 

3.5 

5 

0.5 


390 


3M9 


21 


Round Pd., Truro* 


— 


— 


— 


Berry Pd., No. Andover* 
2 Quarry Holes* 


mwmm 


Totals 


827 


1,642 


11,807 


4,252 



* Used for experimental purposes even though public fishing is allowed, 



_1 "3. 



Table 2. Summary of reductions in overcrowded fish populations by fyke 
netting July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956. 





Area 
(Acres) 


Weight of Fish Removal (Lbs.) 


Pond, Town 


Pan Fish 


Weed Fish 


Total Wgt. 


Duck Pd., Groton 


52 


455 


154 
510 


609 


Massapoag Pd., Dunstable 


113 
103 
177 


1,006 


1,516 


Spy Pd., Arlington 
Indian Lake, Worcester 


590 
2,456 


275 

r 98 
130 
179 


865 
2,554 


Lake Winnecunnet, Norton 


148 


1,186 


1,316 


Pontoosuc Lake, Pittsfield 


480 
129 


384 


563 


Mossy Pd., Clinton 


600 
1,692 


100 
276 


700 


Coes Reservoir, Worcester 


90 


1,968 


Totals 


1,292 


8,369 

1 — -- 


1,722 


10,091 



Table 3* Summary of fish populations removed from ponds reclaimed for warm- 
water fishes between July 1, 1955 and June 30, 1956. 



l/ Population estimated but not measured. 

2/ Reclaimed by the Barnstable Sportsmen Club. 

3/ Reclaimed twice - the first time with experimental rotenone. 





Area 
(Acres) 


Weight of Fish Removed (Lbs.) 


Pond, Town 


Game Fish 


Pan Fish 


Weed Fish 


Total Wgt. 


Ruth Pd., Brewster l/ 


5 


.-- 


187 


I87 
620 


374 


Rocky Pd., Plymouth 3/ 


19 


100 


1,186 


1,906 


Muddy Pd., Barnstable 2/ 


33 

48 


7 

287 


663 


515 


1,187 


Maquan Pd., Hanson 


5,373 


2,300 


7,960 


Lower Pd., Saugus 
Long Pd., Tewksbury 
Little Island Pd., Plymouth 


_ 19 
39 
32 


167 
~l4l 


973 
1,772 
1,310 


330 
524 

488 


1,470 
2,437 
1,798 


Keders Pd., Brewster l/ 


3 




100 


200 


300 


Lake George, Wales 


93 


279 

6 


9,068 
2,150 


103 
4 


9,450 


Flax Pd., Bourne 


22 


2,160 


Fearings Pd., Plymouth 3/ 


24 


154 


2,330 


170 


2,654 


Totals 


337 


1,141 


25,114 


5,441 


31,696 



-14- 



Table U. Summary of reductions in overcrowded fish populations by partial 
reclamations July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956. 





Area 
(Acres) 


Weight of Fish Removed (Lbs.) 


Pond, Town 


Game Fish 


Pan Fish 


Weed Fish 


Total Wgt. 


Lake Boone, Hudson 


175 


506 


9,016 


225 


9,7^7 


Big Alum Pd., Sturbridge 
Laurel Lake, Lee 


195 
170 


^5 
119 


Moo 
320 


55 
588 


U,500 
1,027 


Pontoosuc Lake, Pittsfield 


U80 


269 


822 


8,928 


10,019 


Totals 


1,020 


939 


1^,158 


9,796 


25,293 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 



General 

There were a number of talks given by Unit personnel before sportsmen's clubs 
and other groups describing Unit projects. 

Training of professional personnel continued and several graduates completed 
either undergraduate or graduate training. 

Woodcock Project 

The long-term woodcock project continues to provide valuable, original infor- 
mation on this bird which will make wiser management possible. Approximately 200 
woodcocks were banded. A method of measuring annual production was developed and 
progress was made on a technique of aging fall-shot birds. There was evidence of 
a slight drop in the woodcock population. Annual publications in technical jour- 
nals keep other workers informed on the Massachusetts studies. 

State Ecological Survey 

During the fiscal year, vegetative typing of the state from aerial photo- 
graphs continued with approximately 90 per cent of state area completed. Typing 
will be finished early in the next fiscal year, and computation of acreages of 
all land types on a town basis will be completed before the end of the fiscal 
year. 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

A technique was developed to estimate acreages of favorable grouse habitat 
from the ecological survey maps. A method of establishing a grouse spring popu- 
lation index on a state-wide basis is still in an experimental stage. 

Evaluation of Forest Types as Game Cover 

Further utility of the ecological survey maps is being tested by working 
out correlation between the crown forest types as depicted on the maps and forest 
game habitat. 

Other Project 

Studies are being conducted on this furbearer with the emphasis on its im- 

-15- 



portance as a fish predator in Massachusetts. 

Projects Financed by Outside Funds 

There are two additional projects not financed by Division funds. One is on 
methods of porcupine control and the other on control of birds inflicting damage 
to agricultural crops. 

-it*************-**********-***'* 

INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Publication of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE in magazine format for the first time 
this year represented an achievement that had been a major objective of the infor- 
mation and education program since its inception in November of 19^8. 

While the magazine represented solid progress for the editorial side of 
information and education work, progress in audiovisual aids vas achieved with 
addition of three titles to the free film library, and increased television acti- 
vity, augmented by acquisition of five motion picture projectors for district and 
headquarters use. 

The following report covers the major information and education activity for 
all units of the Division of Fisheries and Game. While formal information and 
education activities, such as the magazine, news releases, motion pictures, etc., 
are conducted by the information and education section, work of an information 
and education nature, in support of or supplementary to formal activities, is 
done to varying degrees by other sections in cooperation with the Information and 
Education Section. 

News Releases 

The I & E Section issued news releases on 65 separate news stories during the 
year. The great majority were released state-wide, with a few beamed to selected 
media. All releases are sent to a limited national list as well. The section 
also released 60 television news films and 21 newspaper photo releases. TV news 
films were primarily directed to one major station, although an experimental re- 
lease was made to all channels on one occasion. Funds and personnel considerations 
prohibited releasing copies of TV news to all channels each time, Newsphotos 
were sent to those papers most likely to use them. Most of the TV and news 
photos were coordinated with printed releases, while some items were covered by 
visual means alone. 

District Wildlife Managers issued approximately 30 news stories within their 
districts, and secured additional press coverage by personal contact. 

Wire service usage of major releases was considerable, resulting in extensive 
national coverage on several occasions. One TV news strip was used on a national 
network . 

Feature Articles 

Three feature articles, two in major state newspapers and one in a national 
magazine, were instigated by the Division, while several other newspaper features 
resulted from news release activity. One of the feature subjects was presented 
as a feature in a major metropolitan newspaper, and picked up by others via wire 
service all over the country. 

-16- 



Massachusetts Wildlife 

Four issues of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE were produced, three of them in the 
new magazine format. The printing order for the May- June, 1956, issue was 
11,000, of which better than 9000 were mailing list distribution and the remainder 
utilized for internal distribution and as handouts at the Boston office, field 
headquarters, district offices, fish hatcheries and game farms. Public and 
parochial schools, teacher's associations, and other educational groups were 
added as a new category to the mailing list with adoption of the magazine format. 

Special Events 

The I & E Section instigated and prepared proclamations for the Governor 
to mark the opening of upland hunting season and to establish"Wildlife Week in 
Massachusetts." The proclamation for upland hunting season stressed the economic 
contribution of sportsmen and emphasized necessity for mutual cooperation and 
understanding between sportsmen and landowners. The proclamation for Wildlife 
Week stressed wildlife's dependence upon sound natural resource conservation and 
pointed out the need for public and youth education in conservation. 

Exhibits 

Following a policy of limiting Division participation in exhibits to only 
major shows (because of the vast disproportion between cost of exhibits and their 
educational value), the I & E Section placed an exhibit in the New England 
Sportsmen's Show in cooperation with hatchery personnel. The exhibit was staffed 
by I & E, hatchery and district personnel, and was seen by about 120,000 people. 

Other shows of a more local nature were assisted by cooperative efforts of 
the wildlife districts, hatchery and game farm units and I & E, by aiding local 
exhibitors among the organized sportsmen rather than by placing a Division exhi- 
bit as such. It is believed that the major value of display work, public rela- 
tions, is most economically achieved in this manner. These included exhibits in 
a garden show, a bank window, two sports shows, a farmer's field day, two county 
fairs, a boy scout exhibition and a Grange exhibit. 

Pamphlets and Booklets 

The following literature was prepared and released by I & E Section during 
the year: 

1956 Fish and Game Laws 

1955 Annual Report (in cooperation with all sections) 

1955 Deer Flier (in cooperation with author, Harney) 

1955 List of Closed Towns 

Audio -Visual Aids 

Increased activity in audio-visual aids was made possible by a more realistic 
budget than had ever been available for this purpose before. The new dark room 
and office, consolidated with other I & E facilities in one section of the new 
headquarters building in Westboro, greatly aided this work. A once-a-month com- 
mitment to provide all material for a regularly scheduled animal program on one 
major TV station was fulfilled, with 12 programs produced. In addition, two 
special programs were produced on other channels. Station break and 20-bccond 

-17- 



break material was furnished one station and used during the 1955 deer season. 

The audio-visual aids unit was responsible for all television and photo news 
releases. 

All work was completed and release copies of two new 15-minute films obtained 
and added to the film library, and a copy of another film produced by another state 
but applicable to Massachusetts problems was purchased. Shooting was started on 
several other films. Provision of projectors to field personnel and a greatly 
improved method of handling the free film loan library resulted in maximum usage 
of all copies of all titles presently carried. Several films were presented on 
TV. Estimates based on return of film-use cards by organizations and Division 
personnel indicate that more than 53>000 people, exclusively of TV audiences, 
viewed Division films during the year. 

The photo lab processed several hundred black and white stills for technical 
reports, as well as all photos needed for publicity, the magazine and other litera- 
ture . 

Conservation Education 

Participation by the Division, as one of the many agencies cooperating in 
operation of the Junior Conservation Camp, continued to be our major effort in 
conservation education. The I & E Section obtained and scheduled all films used 
at the camp, as well as scheduling Division instructors who handled game and 
fisheries management classes. Division personnel, primarily the western district, 
gave 12 lectures at the camp. 

The I 8s E Section also handled certain publicity services, to encourage 
organizations to send boys to the camp. A total of 155 boys attended the 1956 
eighth annual session. 

The new magazine made possible a sizeable contribution to conservation educa- 
tion by providing a regular means of getting printed and illustrative material 
into the hands of school administrators and teachers. A list supplied by the 
state Department of Education was added to the mailing list, and a regular feature 
of the magazine, "Conservation Schoolhouse" is devoted to sources of conservation 
teaching aids and factual material that can be used by teachers. In addition, 
most of the other features of the magazine have definite educational value and 
are so slanted. 

General 

District personnel were the principal speakers at approximately 275 meetings 
of sportsmen's clubs, service clubs, fraternal orders, youth groups, garden clubs 
and other organizations. Each manager averaged close to 70 meetings during the 
year. Personnel of other sections also spent many evenings and weekends at such 
meetings, but district managers continued as the Division's primary means of per- 
sonal contact in the field. 

Operation Safety Zone, a perennial special educational campaign, continued 
with some 10,000 safety zone signs being distributed, and the six landowner- 
sportsman billboards that have been placed beside highways for several years con- 
tinued in use. Use of the safety zone signs by sportsmen and cooperating land- 
owners continues to be our most effective measure against closing of towns by 
local ordinance. Every town that has contemplated closing, and given Operation 
Safety Zone a try, has remained open to hunting. 

-18- 



Three panfish derbies, an educational effort to encourage utilization of 
these species, were assisted by Division personnel. 



PROPAGATION 



Fish Hatcheries 

The table given in the distribution office report represents the production 
and liberation of trout stock to open waters from our five fish hatcheries and 
a lot from the Fish and Wildlife Service, also the pike perch fry and the final 
distribution of bass from the Palmer Hatchery. Compared with previous records, 
the results show that the propagation section has established a new production 
record above all previous years. Many favorable factors contributed to this 
success, the basic one was the excellent cooperation of all personnel. Follow- 
ing are some of the highlights most worthy of mention: 

On September 30, 1955, Alfred E. Fish, Culturist in charge of the East 
Sandwich Fish Hatchery, retired. In recognition of his faithful service, the 
Fish and Game Culturists Association presented Alfred with a purse of money as 
a parting remembrance from all the culturists and assistant culturists. On 
October 1, 1955, with the approval of the Director and the Fish and Game Board, 
the East Sandwich Hatchery became a part of the Sandwich State Fish Hatchery, 
to be operated jointly under the direction of Fish Culturist Robert B. Macomber. 

The hurricane storm of August 18 and 19, 1955, caused severe damage at the 
Palmer Fish Hatchery, where fourteen inches of rainfall was recorded which 
resulted in washing out the supply pond dam and loss of bass, trout and shiner 
stock. Restoration of facilities was made possible by a special appropriation 
for labor, materials and rental of construction equipment. Work was advanced 
sufficiently to restock the hatchery system in late Fall so that a normal pro- 
duction was realized this past Spring. A 2-l/2" well was put in ju6t below the 
highway and above the bass section. The water is of excellent quality and up 
to one hundred gallons per minute can be obtained from this well. We are certain 
that other wells can be established to assure sufficient water by pumping for 
expansion to trout, once the bass section can be reconstructed into trout ponds 
and shade provided. 

In addition to the work at Palmer, all other hatcheries were allotted labor 
and materials and ponds were rebuilt with either cement or wood. The new sec- 
tion of ponds at Sandwich was completed and will materially add to the output at 
that station. 

For the first time in many years the fish hatcheries experienced a wide 
variance in the spawning period of brook trout. The brown and rainbow breeders 
showed no such difference in their spawning. 

All fish hatcheries carried on research in nutrition, such as pellets, 
cortland, supplements and cover sion of fats. 

The distribution was started to ponds in February and other waters later. 
The shipments were made through the District Managers with the cooperation of 
the Conservation officers who have carried on the distribution work very satis- 
factorily in years past. Some delays were experienced from the late snow. The 
larger tanks with double water Jets have added considerably to the success of 
transferring the stock to stocking waters. 

-19- 



A tabulation of visitors reveals a great deal of interest being taken by 
the public as well as organized school groups who visit all of our fish hatch- 
eries. All hatcheries have made improvements to their road entrances and all are 
now equipped with machines to keep their grounds in good, clean condition. 

Game Farms 

The production of game birds at the state game farms was slightly decreased 
for both pheasants and quail although the average ages of stock liberated was in- 
creased above the Ik to 15 week average of the previous year. 

Holding pheasants to these older ages along with some in season stocking 
lengthened the rearing season and delayed the usual fall activities of the game 
farms considerably. Reduction in feed prices during the year made it possible 
to purchase the increased quantities of feed necessary to hold the stock to 
these older ages and still keep within our budget. 

The Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program compared quite favorably with the 
previous year's activities, although unavoidable losses were encountered due 
to the flood disaster. It was remarkable that many of the club pens were not 
entirely wiped out. Many pheasants were saved by prompt action of the club 
members. 

Some of the sportsmen's versions of what happens to game farm reared 
pheasants prompted those responsible for the rearing of the pheasants to have 
all cock pheasants banded. The return of the leg bands to the Division contri- 
butes considerably to the future management program, and also enlightens the 
sportsman to the fact that many of the beautiful specimens and unusually wild 
birds they shoot can be the products of our farms. 

White hares were again purchased by this section of the division, but in- 
stead of deliveries being made to the game farm, they went directly to the dis- 
trict game managers for distribution to the covers. 2500 white hares were pur- 
chased. 

The maintenance and replacement programs at the game farms continue to be 
major items, the upkeep of the many buildings and replacement of pens require 
considerable time during the off season. Whenever possible, improvements are 
being made in our facilities to better handle the stock in an economical manner. 

Nutrition and disease prevention and control continue to be vital to our 
production program. 



DISTRIBUTION OF STOCKED GAME AND FISH 



During this fiscal year, all phases of wildlife liberation came under super- 
vision of the Assistant Fish and Game Biologist. These various phases included 
the Sportsmen's Club Pheasant Rearing Program, the trout matching program, white 
hare releases and the general distribution of birds and fish from the State game 
farms and fish hatcheries. 

The re -evaluation of the pheasant stocking program was completed for every 
town in the Commonwealth and new stocking quotas established. This re -evaluation 
was based upon a resurvey by the four District Wildlife Managers of all towns in 

-20- 



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-21- 



their districts to determine the amount of available pheasant cover previously 
open that has been lost to the sportsmen through private posting, town restric- 
tions or closures to hunting, or by the encroachments of civilization. 

Tovn quota for birds and mammals, and stream or pond quotas for fish are 
established by the District Managers in cooperation with the Chief Game Biologist 
and the Chief Aquatic Biologist. These are then correlated by this office and 
shipping instructions are sent to the farms or hatchery with the inventory of 
stock available as supplied by the two chief culturists. Stocking records and 
dates are maintained in this office for use in determining further policy or 
management alterations. 

GAME DISTRIBUTION 

Game Produced at Division's Game Farms July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956 

PHEASANTS HENS COCKS TOTAL 

Adults: Spring Liberation 

Young: General liberation 

summer and early fall 

Furnished to pens on Sportsmen's 
Pheasant Rearing Program 



QUAIL 

Adults: Spring liberation 
Young: General liberation 

WHITE HARES (Northern Varying) 
Purchased 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 

The first part of the year was spent in cleaning up loose ends on the lower 
Squannacook River. Work was then started in re -leasing the Shawsheen River in 
the towns of Billerica, Tewksbury, Wilmington and Andover. Since the current 
trend towards urban development was making inroads along the banks of the Shaw- 
sheen, it was necessary to spend much time in determining current ownership. 
When the leasing was completed the Division had approximately as much land under 
lease as it had previously. The willingness of the same landowners to again re- 
new their leases tends to indicate that from a landowner's point of view, the 
public fishing grounds program is acceptable to them. Since the Shawsheen River 
is subjected to heavy fishing pressure because of the large centers of population 
within a twenty-five mile radius, this would seem to indicate that fishermen using 
these public fishing grounds as a whole conduct themselves as gentlemen. The 

-22- 



2,953 


1,253 


4,216 


21,33*+ 


27,879 


49,213 


9,964 


10,065 


20,029 


34,261 


39,197 


73,458 

610 
5,315 
5,925; 

2,500 


* * -x- * * 


* -x- * 


* * * * * 



rapid pace with which houses are being constructed within close proximity to the 
banks of the river may, within the next five years, cut down considerably the 
area available for public fishing grounds. 

Prior to and during the first two weeks of the fishing season, all the 
leased areas throughout the state were posted. Since this posting of our leased 
areas is done as a service to the landowners and fishermen alike and, as a matter 
of fact, as a service to the general public, it is difficult to understand why 
every year so many of these posters are wantonly destroyed. 

Waters Under Lease for Public Fishing Ground Purposes 
as of June, 1956 

— — .— .!■ I ■»■■,■■! I II ■ ' .■ ■ ■ II I ,. | I ■■i.l — ,. I ■ ■ ■■ i I. ,|| ■■! .1 ■ — II II ... » ^'^' ■ ' ■■ ■ I l—l I ■■ ■ ' ■ ' — I '■ ■■ ' » — ■*■.!. « 

Stream Town 

Westfield 

East Branch Huntington, Chester, Cummington, Chesterfield 

Middle Branch Huntington, Chester, Worthington, Middle field 

West Branch Huntington, Chester, Middlefield, Becket 

Millers River Athol at Bears Den 

Farmington River Tolland, Otis, Sandisfield 

Buck River and Clam River .Sandisfield 

Squannacook River Townsend, Groton 

Deerfield River Charlemont, Rowe, Florida 

Ipswich River. . . Middleton, Danvers, Peabody, Lynnfield 

Shawsheen River Billerica, Tewksbury, Wilmington, Andover 

Assabet River Hudson, Berlin 



As in the past few years the Public Fishing Grounds Section handled the 
counting and packaging of all the license holders distributed to City and Town 
Clerks. Most of the distribution of the holders to the clerks was very ably and 
efficiently handled by the personnel of the fish hatcheries, game farms and wild- 
life districts. 

In February the personnel of the Public Fishing Grounds Section were assigned 
to assist in the acquisition, through purchase, of other properties for the Divi- 
sion. The first of these projects was the renewal of negotiations for the purchase 
of a section of the Quashnet River in the towns of Mashpee and Falmouth. After 
several conferences, terms were agreed on, and the Division purchased this proper- 
ty, marking the first time in the history of the Division that land was purchased 
for public fishing grounds. Negotiations for the purchase of a tract of land in 
the town of Peru for wildlife management and hunting were carried on and toward 
the end of the year this tract of five hundred forty-five acres in the Trout Brook 
section of this town were purchased. At the close of the year, negotiations were 
being carried on for the purchase of other tracts in this same locality. An 
excellent, well located parcel of land partly in Dalton and partly in Pittsfield 
was purchased for the future site of the Western Wildlife District Headquarters. 

-23- 



Negotiations were under way for the purchase of land necessary to establish a 
waterfowl area at West Meadows in West Bridgewater. Other land and water matters 
concerning the general welfare of the Division were investigated at Charlton, 
Palmer, W. Bridgewater and Becket. 

At the close of the year preliminary ownership surveys were under way on 
several other parcels of land in which the Division was interested. 



-X- 



* 



# 



* 



-x- 



* 



-x- 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

"HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 

ADMINISTRATION 3304-01 

Administration 79,482.91) 81,633 «8l 

Information-Education 26,088.77 

Fish & Game Board 2,150.90) 

PROPAGATION 

Game 224,465. 57 

Fish 308,414.20 

WILDLIFE 

Game 3304-44 6,243.39 

3304-51 52,938.05 

* 3304 -53 120,134.99 179,316.43 

Fish 3304-42 97,432.92 

3304-45 10,901.44 

*3304-47 39,577.39 

3304-51 52,938.05 200,849.80 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

3308-05 6,100.91 

3308-07 7,396.26 

1003-03 95,711.84 109,209.01 

$1,129,977.59 



2$ 



20$ 
27$ 



18$ 



10$ 



* Expenditures under 3304-47 
and 3304-53 are reimbursed 
75$ by Federal Funds 



Surplus Inland Fisheries and Game Fund - June 30, 1956 - $587,079.26 



-24- 



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-25- 



SUMMARY OF FISH & GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $912,297.00 * 

Special Licenses, trap registrations and tags 5>882.65 ** 

Rents 2,63^.10 

Misc. Sales and Income 839*50 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 7^,863.1+5 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 28,692.11 

Court Fines 8,269.75 

Refunds Prior Year 98. 90 



TOTAL $1,033,577.^6 



JFS 



THE PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL ITEMS OF 
THTS REPORT ARE IN AGREEMENT 
WITH THE COMPTROLLER'S BOOKS 



Nov. 8, I956 L. A. Burke (signed) TJS 
Date Checked by 



Fred A. Moncewicz (signed) 
COMPTROLLER 



.26- 



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DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS kQ, 68a, 
102-3-4-5-6-7, 112-A, Chapter 131, G.L. during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1956 



TYPE OF LICENSE 
Class 1 - Special Fish Propagator's License 
Class 3 - Fish Propagator's License 
Class k - Propagator : s License (Birds or Mammals) 
Class 5 - Special Propagator's License - No Fee 
Class 6 - Dealer's License 
Class 7 - Possession Only License 
Field Trial License 
Taxidermist License 

Resident & Non-Resident Citizen's Fur Buyers License 
License to take Shiners for bait 
Trap Registration Certificates 
Fish Tags 
Game Tags 



TOTAL 

Minus adjustments per closing journal entries 



NUMBER ISSUED 


RECEIPTS 


212 


$222.00 


90 


276.00 


485 


1,673.00 


5 


— 


460 


686.00 


77 


50.50 


2 


20.00 


68 


340.00 


ise 42 


600.00 


266 


1,330.00 


1,500 


558.75 


10,100 


101.00 


1,628 


81.40 



$5,938.65 

56.00 



$5,882.65 ** 



-28- 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS; AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF 
FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1956 

August k, 19^8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of fish. 

August k, 19^8. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of 
birds and mammals. 

July Ik, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting -with bows and arrows. 

January 16, 1953- Regulations for bass spawning areas in Long Pond, Yarmouth 
and Long Pond, Barnstable and closing the areas to all fishing between April 15 
and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year for five years beginning in 1953* 

July 1, 1953* Rules and regulations governing hunting of migratory game birds 
in the state of Massachusetts. 

August 12, 1953* Rules and regulations governing sale of protected fresh 
water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 195^. Rules and regulations governing the display of sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, effective April 9, 195^> 
and revoking rules and regulations in this. regard promulgated on September 23, 1953* 

October 29, 195^ • Hunting regulations on bird cover improvement area in the 
town of Ludlow, closing to all hunting until September 2k, 1957* 

January 28, 1955* Rules and regulations relative to public fishing grounds 
In Massachusetts. 

January 28, 1955- Rules and regulations relative to the tagging of deer in 
Massachusetts . 

January 28, 1955 • Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of hares and 
rabbits in Massachusetts. 

November 28, 1955 • Rules and regulations relating to the talcing of certain 
fish in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

November 28, 1955* Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of gray 
squirrels in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

November 28, 1955* Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of pheasants, 
quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

November 28, 1955* Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of deer in 
Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

November 28, 1955* Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trapping 
of mammals in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956, and revoking rules and 
regulations promulgated on January 8, 195*+ • 

April 3> 1956. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake, effective April 

10, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish in inter- 
state ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, effective April 10, 1956. 

-29- 



LEGISLATION 



The folio-wing laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game 
were enacted during the legislative session of 1956: 



CHAPTER 60, ACTS OF 1956: 



CHAPTER 23, ACTS OF 1956: Resolve reviving and continuing the special 

commission providing for an investigation and study 
relative to hunting and fishing within the Common- 
wealth and certain matters relating thereto, including 
the subject of the ground water level within the 
Commonwealth . 

Resolve increasing the scope of the investigation and 
study of the commission established to make an 
investigation and study relative to hunting and fishing 
within the Commonwealth and certain matters relating 
thereto, including the subject of the ground water 
level within the Commonwealth, 

CHAPTER 25^, ACTS OF 1956: An act relative to the penalty for hunting birds by 

boats and the possession of firearms therein. 

CHAPTER 326, ACTS OF 1956: An act authorizing the Director of the Division of 

Fisheries and Game to take certain land by eminent 
domain. 

CHAPTER 420, ACTS OF 1956: An act relative to permits for the netting of certain 

fish in the inland waters of the Commonwealth. 



-30- 



C73x 
I'D 5-7 



13J7 



W.z£ 













19 5 7 




THE COMMONWEALTH OF = MASSACHUSETTS> Qltfk* 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAMB 
73 TRBMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



•^aJjuLinll 



o — I -t - O fl— 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 

^ss oFFictAt: 



,«• 



C73r, 

1957 
A 



THE COMMONWEALTH OP MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OP FISHERIES AND GAME 

73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, Poster A. Purcolo, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council, The General Court, and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety-second 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the 
fiscal year from July 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES L. McLAtfGHLIN 
Director 






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'10 



DIVISION OP FISHERIES AND GAME 
NINETY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Board 1 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management 3 

Game Section • • • • • . • I). 

Fisheries Section , • .10 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit. . 12 

Land and Water Acquisition. ....••••••••.••• . «13 

Public Fishing Grounds .......... .llj. 

Information and Education Program. 15 

Propagation; 

Fish Hatcheries. ............17 

Game Farms 19 

General Administration 

Tables; How the Sportsman 1 s Dollar Was Spent 22 

Appropriations and Expenditures 23 

Summary of Fish and Game Income ,2l\. 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and 

Trapping Licenses. .2£ 

Analysis of Special Licenses .26 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations .»27 

Legislation • • 2d 



Publication Approved By State Purchasing Agent - #9 






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1. 

REPORT OP THE BOARD 

The Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game is pleased to 
report continued progress of the Division for the fiscal year of 
1956-1957. 

Production of both fish and game has been based on quality rather 
than on numbers, resulting in much higher grade individuals. In keeping 
with this policy, the largest number of nine -inch-plus trout ever 
released in any one year was stocked from the fish hatcheries. The 
total number produced in this size was 352,201. Production of brook 
trout in the smaller stockable sizes fell off somewhat duo to some 
unknown factor that reduced expected hatch of the eggs. Sexing of 
pheasants was practiced for the first time on all of our game farms, 
resulting in a larger percentage of cock birds for liberation. This 
permits a potential capable of supplying an equal amount of game to 
the bag as before, although the total stocking of hens and cocks 
combined will be smaller. 

All our hatcheries are in excellent physical condition, in keeping 
with a policy of repair, renewal and purchase of additional equipment 
where advisable. During the year a new meat house, equipped with 
refrigerators, was constructed at the Sandwich Fish Hatchery, and 
rearing pools at each of the hatcheries were repaired and in many 
instances entirely reconstructed. An additional supply of water was 
obtained by sinking new wells at Sunderland and at Palmer. The wells 
at Palmer are a part of the plan to bring in water in quantity and at 
the lower temperatures suitable for trout rearing, since this hatchery, 
which in the past was largely given to the production of bass, is no 
longer needed for that purpose. At the game farms, numerous repairs 
have also been made and some of the rearing pens have been entirely 
replaced. 

In keeping with our policy of acquiring land for public hunting 
grounds, 103 acres have been purchased at Phillipston, 90 acres at 
Tyngsboro, and 60 acres at Townsend. The area of Tyngsboro includes 
a pond to be managed for warm-water fish, together with a right of way 
and adequate parking space. Negotiations are practically complete at 
this time for the acquisition of 1000 acres in Peru to bo added to 
approximately 500 acres already acquired there, and 3000acres comprising 
a large part of the area originally taken for the inland portion of the 
Parker River Refuge. 

At a meeting of the Board on April 25th, the Director was authorizec 
to obtain permanent public fishing rights on streams by purchase or 
easement where possible, rather than by renewal of leases every five 
years as is presently done. This procedure will prove to be moro 
economical in the long run and will insure that such areas will forovor 
be available to fishermen. 

The sound management of our ponds becomes more impressive each 
succeeding year. Of particular intorost in this respect at this timo 
is the success from stocking of lake trout in the Quabbin Reservoir. 
Five years after the first introduction of this fish incomplete data 
indicates that not less than 1000 lake trout have been taken from this 
lake since the fishing season opened in April of thi3 year. 

The publication of " Massachusetts Wildlife " has met with 
enthusiastic reception by sportsmen and conservationists in general. 



I 

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2. 



Requests for this publication are increasing by approximately 1000 per 
issue, amounting to a need of 20,000 copies for the current issue. We 
I hope every sportsman in the State will be on the mailing list for 
I "Massachusetts Wildlife" eventually and thus, as a part of our Infor- 
mation and Education program, become better acquainted with what is 
I going on in the Division, and more important, realize the facts which 
underlie good management. 

The Department of Natural Resources has cooperated very closely 
with the Division of Fisheries and Game. We are advised that hunting 
will be permitted on some of the State Parks under the Departments' 
jurisdiction. Management for wildlife has already been approved in 
some of the State Forests with work now in progress on 2000 acres of 
the Myles Standi sh Reservation. 

With the occupation of a new building recently constructed at 
Dalton, each of our four districts is now provided with headquarters 
for the District Managers. 

Although our finances are ample at this writing, the fact remains 
that surplus of tbe Inland Fisheries and Game Fund is decreasing at an 
alarming rate as shown by the balance on June 30, 1957 which is 
Ci|29,100.61| as compared with ^587,079.26 on June 30 of the previous 
year. Costs for operation of the Division are and have been on the 
increase along with the general cost of living of x^hich all of us are 
painfully aware. With income practically the same year after year and 
outgo steadily on the increase, it appears that we shall shortly be 
faced with the need of larger income or the curtailment of present 
operations. The Board feels that it would be extremely unwise to allow 
the Inland Fisheries and Game fund to fall below a reserve of ^250,000. 
We believe that every dollar is being spent i-jiscly and effectively. The 
situation outlined above is not peculiar to Massachusetts but is common 
to every State Conservation Department or Division of Fisheries and Garni 
In fact, 27 states requested increases in their license fees this yer.r. 

During the fiscal year there were two vacancies on the Board 
occasioned by the untimely death of Powell Cabot and the completion of 
the term of Matthew T. Coyne. Eotb Mr. Cabot and Mr. Coyne have served 
the sportsmen wellj the former for a short term and the latter as 
Chairman of the Board for seven years. Mr. Henry F. Russell succeeded 
Mr. Coyne and Mr. Thomas M. Joyce was appointed to the incomplete term 
of Mr. Cabot. On February 2, 1957 Mr. James W. Cesan was elected Chair- 
man of the Board and Frederick A. McLaughlin, Secretary . 

Sincere appreciation Is expressed to those who have been helpful 
to us during the year. 

Per order of the Board 

S/ James W. Cesan, Chairman 

S/ Frederick A. McLau. hlin, 

Secretary 






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3. 

BUREAU OP WILDLIFE RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT 

GAME SECTION 
FISHERIES SECTION 
COOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNIT 

Administration of the Bureau 1 s field activities is centered in the 
Field Headquarters in Westboro. Four Wildlife Management Districts, 
headquartered in strategic locations in the four general geographic 
regions of the State, servo as locrl liaison with sportsmen's groups, 
Federal and other State agencies, and the general public. District 
personnel conduct research, management, stocking and development work 
in both fisheries and game and spend considerable time in education and 
public relations i^rork. 

A notable development in the organization this year included the 
installation of separate fisheries and game crews in each wildlife 
management district. Each crew conducts activities in its primary 
assignment, yet the system is flexible enough to permit an interchange 
of personnel when the need arises. 

In general, the fisheries and game restoration programs in each of 
the wildlife districts are very similar. Because of differences in 
geography and species, however, there arc rctivities peculiar to one 
district that may be secondary or entirely lacking in any of the other 
districts. 

In habitat restoration work, a considerable change and emphasis 
has occurred within the lest year. The Division now owns, or controls 
by use-permit, considerable acreages of land for gunning and fishing. 
Extensive habitat development work is being conducted on these areas 
to provide public hunting and fishing areas. Other State agencies have 
extended considerable cooperation to this Division in allowing use of 
lands under their control. 

Final reports and bulletins, one done in cooperation with the Wild- 
life Research Unit at the University of Massrchusetts, are being pre- 
pared and will be published during the coming year. The Division and 
the Wildlife Research Unit again coopcrrtod In the conduct of investi- 
gations on several game species. 

Personnel of the game and fisheries sections and the Cooperative 
Research Unit contributed several articles to the magazine "Massachusct 
Wildlife". Technical articles published in professional journals arc 
listed in detail under each section heading. 



aid programs in both fish and wildlife restoration again 
a sizeable share of the work program. Federal aid project: 



Federal 
contributed a sizeable share of the work program. Federal aid projects 
arc financed in part by monies derived from an excise t. x levied on the 
sale of sporting arms and ammunition and fishing tackle. In this 
manner, the State is enabled to do certain types of work which would 
be impossible under the limited funds derived from the sale of licenses 



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:i • 



GAME SECTION 
WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS 



k. 



I. Federal-Aid Projects, Game (See Federal-Aid Projects Report) 



Wood Duck: 

Boxes built this year 

Boxes maintained 

Predator guards built and installed 

Total boxes erected this year 

Number areas involved 

Boxes distributed to clubs, etc. 

Boxes checked for usage 

Checking Stations Operated: 
Deer 

Beaver 



All Districts 
Completed 

300 

573 
270 

112 

58 

75 
377 



8 Stationary 
l\. mobile 

6 



Census: 

Quail census trips 
Woodcock census trips 
Winter waterfowl census (aerial) 
Mourning Dove census in cooperation with U.S. 
Wildlife Service 

III. Habitat Improvement: 

Plantings: 

Number of plants set 

Farms and other areas involved 

Plants distributed to clubs, landowners, etc. 

Fence rows, borders, etc., treated - lineal feet 

Food patches planted, areas prepared 

Acreage under farm-game program 

Clearing land; maintaining and creating openings 

Fencing erected 

III. Game (Non-Federal Aid) 

Cottontail Live-Trapping and Transfer: 
Number of traps built this year 
Number maintained 

Number distributed to cooperating live-trappers 
Damage sites investigated 

Beaver: 

Damage complaints investigated 

Nuisance beaver live-trapped and transplanted 

Release areas surveyed and checked 

Research Data Contacts: 

Grouse wing and tail collection points 
Number of collection containers distributed 
Game bag check 



31 
10 



8,200+ 

76 

2,000+ 

and seed 

6,000+ 

300+ 

50,000+ 

110+acres 
i|,000 feet 



75 
250 

22S 

75 



ko 

31+ 
22 



2i|.0 

6,000 
all districts 



Clubs Assisted with Game Projects 



52 



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Federal Aid in Wildlife Projects 



>• 



Twelve projects have been operated during the past year under the 
Federal Aid to Wildlife Act. Under this Act, the State is reimbursed 
by the Federal Government for 75$ of the costs of investigation, 
management, development and land acquisition projects, the monies being 
derived from an 11% Federal Excise Tax on sporting arms and ammunition. 
All Federal Aid Projects are administered by the U. S. Fish and Wild- 
life Service, under the direct supervision of the Division of Fisheries 
and Game . 

Major contributions have been made to the information available 
on several game species — information which is a valuable asset in 
management of the species. Semi-technical reports on these studies 
are being readied for publication and distribution to other wildlife 
agencies and the sporting public. 

Briefly, the following summaries highlight the activities of the 
projects which were active during the past fiscal year: 

White Tailed Deer Study 

Project 7-R: During the 1956 season, lj.lj.26 deer were reported killed. 
Division personnel operated checking stations located strategically on 
major highway road nets and checked 1,580 deer. Bucks represented Sl% 
and does represented !|3$. 

Deer reproductive tracts were collected with the aid of cooperat- 
ing sportsmen. The laboratory analysis was done at Springfield College. 
Evaluation of collected reproductive data is being dono at the Wildlife 
Cooperative Research Unit, University of Massachusetts, by a graduate 
student. 

Farm-Game Restoration 

Project 9-D: This important project is beginning to show excellent 
results. During the past year, habitat improvement was continued on 
some farms originally signed up under the cooperative program. How- 
over, due to limited funds and personnel, emphasis has been shifted 
from privately-owned land to the Division's Public Hunting Grounds or 
use-permit areas. 

Farm-game restoration work was carried out on 76 areas which 
included farms, sportsmen's club game lands, town land and Division- 
owned or permit-use lands. Over 50,000 acres of land are being managed, 
meking such areas more suitable for wildlife through habitat improve- 
ment work. Game habitat management practices were many, including 
clearing or reclaiming old abrndoned fields, creating and maintaining 
openings in wooded areas, establishment and maintenance of fall and 
winter food patches, planting of conifers for cover, and wildlife shrubs 
' for food, cutting back fence rows and woodland borders, posting and 
) distributing safety zone posters, and fencing several areas. For a 
completo break-down, see the district table. 

: Water Chestnut Control 

Project 10-D: Control of water chestnut in the waters of the Common- 
wealth continued by the northeast wildlife district. Work was continued 
on the Sudbury, Concord, and Assabot Rivers; also College Pond in South 
Hadley and Heard Pond in Way land. To date, a marked reduction of water 
chestnut is evident throughout the infested areas of Massachusetts' 
waters. The two hurricanes, with resultant high waters, late in the 
summer of the two previous years, had little effect on the control of 



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Furbearer Investigations 

Project 16-R: The manuscript for the final report of this project was 
prepared from the mass of data collected during the study on the more 
economically important furbearers of the state. Printing and distri- 
bution of the report bulletin are planned in the near future. 

Wood Duck Nesting Investigation Project 

Project 19-R: The write-up on the final report is near completion. 
The publication, a semi-technical bulletin, summarizes data collected 
from an intensive study done at the Great Meadows Study Area in Con- 
cord, and checks of study areas spotted throughout the State. Arrange- 
ments have been made for publication of this bulletin this coming fall. 

The Great Meadows Study Area was given a final check for the 1957 
nesting season. It was found that the nesting population for 1957 was 
made up as follows: 2% first year females, 10 second year females, 
11 third year females, 3 fourth year females, 5 fifth year females, 
1 sixth year female and 1 seventh year female. 

The seven year old female was first banded as an immature bird in 
1950 and nested successfully every year from 1951 up to and including 
1957. In that time, she has contributed a total of 110 birds to help 
keep up the resident population at Great Meadows. 

Birch Hill Investigation 

PR-20-R-7: This project is carried on as a check of the yearly game 
populations and to determine the effect of management. 

The cottontail rabbit census made during January and February 
showed an increase in population over the previous year. However, at 
one rabbit per llj.,1 acres, it is still lower than the seven-year 
average of one per 12.7 acres. 

The white hare population measured after the hunting season showed 
an increase in the native population. At one (1) hare per 2.1 acres, 
it is higher than the six-year average of one (1) hare per 3.7 acres. 
Fifty white hare were stocked after the hunting season. Out of 125 
hare stocked the previous year, only eight (8) were reported taken 
during the hunting season. 

The fall grouse census showed an increase in the grouse population, 
At one (1) bird per 9 acres, this is the highest population recorded 
during the past seven years. This spring's count of one (1) bird por 
1(4 acres is the lowest spring count since the census started in 195L 

Before and during the hunting season, 690 cock pheasants were 
I stocked. There was a return of 3ol birds or 52.3$. Hunting pressure 
again increased this year about 100$ on opening day and 5% for the 
remaining Saturdays. 

At least three (3) deer were taken on the area, but many more were 
taken on the outside borders. 

Lesser numbers of muskrat, mink, ottor and beaver were taken this 
year. 



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Birch Hill Development 

PR-21-D-6: Maintenance of buildings, equipment, roads, signs, bridges 
and dams are a large part of the management program. A well was dug 
and an addition made to the office building for a lavatory. The 
addition of gravel for top-surfacing and grading was done to keep over 
fifteen (l£) miles of dirt road in usable condition. All entrance 
signs were reconditioned by staining and painting. One bridge was 
cabled down to prevent floating away during high water. Another was 
closed off except for foot travel. Dams were repaired to prevent leak- 
age. 

About seven (7) acres of winter rye and legume plantings were made 
in the fall and eighteen (18) acres of buckwheat and oats were sown thii 
spring. About five (5) acres of brush and pole-stage trees were clearoc 
for cultivation. 

Red pine plantations were marked for thinning by contract. Over 
120 cords were marked to open up the dense canopy and allow new ground 
cover to grow. Selective thinning in mature pine and hemlock yielded 
20,000 board feet of lumber for use by the Division. 

Apple trees scattered throughout the area were pruned to improve 
fruiting and provide more natural wildlife food. 

Cottontail Rabbit Research Investigation Pro.ject 

Project 22-R: Various rabbit habitat management techniques applied to 
the 300-acre study area in the Upton State Forest, Upton, Massachusetts 
were evaluated. Analysis of the data suggests that, of the two species 
of cottontail rabbits present on the study area, the eastern Cottontail 
( Syl villus f loridanus ) responded to some of the management practices 
while the New England Cottontail ( Sylvilagus transitionalis ) did not 
respond. Rabbits demonstrated a slight rise in population in wooded 
areas when partial slash cuttings were made 60 feet wide, 100 to 600 
feet long, and 21+0 feet between slashings. 

On a state-wide basis, it appears that the cottontail is a product 
of the soil, i.e., relatively high populations arc associated with 
rich, fertile soils, and low rabbit populations are associated with 
areas of low fertility. 

The rabbit population on the management area was censused, using 
wooden box traps and the tag and release method. The census data 
indicated a slight decline in the spring rabbit population. Predation 
by dogs necessitated the closing of all traps during both the spring 
and fall census periods. The dog problem has become acute in this area, 
and unless dog owners cooperate, it may be necessary to terminate 
collection of census data. 

Hunter-kill data sheets collected during the open gunnin£ season 
and the census data indicate that the cottontail rrbbit is under- 
harvested by hunters. 

Project personnel attended sportsmon and beagle club meetings, 
investigated Field Trial Areas and havo advised clubs on habitat 
improvements for their club grounds. 



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Cock Pheasant Stocking Investigations 

Project 23-R: During the past several years, considerable study has 
been made to evaluate the effects of stocking cocks only, on the pro- ■ 
duction of "native pheasants" | to determine whether it is necessary to 
stock hens to maintain a population of wild birds. Consequently, 
Bristol County received a stocking of cocks only, while adjacent Norfolk 
County was stocked with both hens and cocks. Data collected to date 
have been limited, and the project will be continued for one more year 
to permit more valid evaluation of results. 

Quail Project 

Project 25-R: At the time of writing, 10,000 copies of "Bobwhitc in 
Massachusetts", a semi-technical bulletin, are being printed and will 
be ready for distribution by September. Annual whistle counts taken 
throughout the present quail range indicated no significant changes in 
the quail population has occurred. Experimental quail management in 
Barnstable County, shows early indication of being productive. Data 
collected indicates juvenile survival was increasod substantially and 
egress reduced in the area. 

Ecological Survey 

Project 27-Rj See report of the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife 
Research Unit at the University of Massachusetts. 

Land Acquisition 

The Division recognizes the paramount importance of an active land 
acquisition program and has initiated an accelerated effort to purchase 
economical land which warrants purchase for use as public hunting 
grounds. In addition, 10,ij.77 acres are being administered as public 
hunting areas under permit, license, or agreement with the owning agency 
However, it should be noted that any land acquisition program has many 
problems and that the Division will never bo able to purchase enough 
land to satisfy its requirements. 

At the present time, the Division owns 2,£00 acres of wetlands, 
uplands and forestland for use as public hunting areas. The Division, 
during the past year, purchased 2£2 acres of land and anticipates 
enlarging these holdings by purchasing adjacent areas. The usage of 
these present areas as public hunting grounds has increased from 300- 
500 percent from year to year which illustrates the popularity of those 
sites . 

Most habitat development work consists of land clearing, planting 
food plots, and making areas more accessible for hunting. Such 
management projects arc carried out by the wildlife district personnel. 

State Game Projects 

The state game projects (non-federal aid) are carried out by all 
wildlife districts. Considerable time was 3pent by the districts on 
such game projects as distributing grouse wing and tail bags plus 
analysis of collected data; conducting woodcock census; constructing 
an experimental marsh for waterfowl and furbearers; collecting data for 
the game bag check; distributing safety zone signs and posting boundary 
markers on hunting areas; rendering toebnical assistance to sportsmen's 
clubs, boy scout councils and landowners; conducting annual aerial 
winter waterfowl inventory from Now Hampshire border to Crpc Cod along 
the Atlantic coast. 



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Tho southeastern wildlife district working with the U.S. Airforce, 
Otis Air Br.se, initiated and put into effect a cooperative agreement 
allowing public deer hunting on a 3>,Q00-c.cve tract of land on the base 
area. This area was patrolled during the open deer season cooperatively 
with district wildlife crews, Conservation Officers and U. S. Airforce 
personnel. 

Tho wildlife district crews continued for the third year stocking 
phe a s ant s and whi t c h ar e . 

The Division, recognizing the importance of bird dogs as good 
conservation, has cooperated with the various bird dog field trial 
organizations by developing the Wcstboro Public Hunting Grounds into an 
excellent field trial area. This 176-acre area is very typical of our 
New England bird covers and has been regarded by leading bird dog men 
as a superior course. One trial was held in the spring drawing entries 
from all New England States plus other states such as Maryland, New 
York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, etc. 

For the beaglcrs, an excellent course (150 acres) for both train- 
ing and field trials is being developed at Wostboro State Hospital 
Grounds. This is another first for Massachusetts as it is the first 
beagle field trial grounds of its kind in the country, created 
exclusively for beagle training and field trials. 






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10. 

FISHERIES SECTION 

Management Activities 

During this period, Wildlife District Fisheries Management Units 
reclaimed and restocked eleven trout ponds, totalling 3&7 acres, and 
nineteen warm water ponds, totalling 913 acres. In addition, a 193- 
acre, " two-story 1 ' pond was partially reclaimed for multiple bass-trout 
management. 

Trout were stocked in these ponds from state hatcheries and bass 
and pickerel obtained from the rearing ponds maintained by the Bureau 
at Sutton and North Andover. 

Fisheries management personnel stocked the total production of 
state hatcheries (see Propagation Section report) in all trout ponds 
and acceptable streams. During this period, they distributed over 
11,000 alcwives to reclaimed ponds and rearing stations. 

A great deal of the fish management activities wore of a trouble- 
shooting or service nature, such as the trapping of fish for experiment; 
use, construction of small dams and bridges, stocking of children's 
fishing ponds, and the development of new methods in fish collection cltk 
transportation. 

All units engaged in an active program of assisting communities, 
sportsmons' groups, and civic organizations in obtaining rights-of-ways 
to great ponds and in opening hitherto closed water areas to public 
fishing. 

Research Activities 

Biologists and technicians of the Fisheries Section, and District 
personnel working under their direction, continued to delve into many 
of the problems still unsolved in the mass-production of good fishing. 

During the past five years, an intensive program of rehabilitating 
ponds, both with chemicals and netting gear, had been undertaken. The 
evaluation of this program was stepped up during the reporting period. 
Creel census, or the measurement of fishing success, was undertaken on 
forty-six ponds, both managed and natural. Intensive creel censuses 
wore operated on several ponds scheduled for reclamation in 1957 or 
1958, in order that success changes could be itemized. 

The creel census at Quabbin Reservoir wrs continued. Good spawn- 
ing runs of landlocked smelt were observed, and lake trout of up to 
six pounds were being taken. Both of these fishes were introducod. 

Evaluation work also included the tabulation of all data on prior 
fyke netting operations. A comparison of this type of population con- 
trol with that of partial poisoning, from the viewpoint of results 
achieved, was mado. The findings dictated that, from the point of cost 
versus success, fyke netting must be dropped as a primary management 
tool on larger ponds, and supplanted by the roccntly evolved partial- 
poisoning technique. Fyke netting was used during this period to 
supplement evaluation work, and will continue to bo so used. Populatior 
samples were collected from selected managed ponds and population 
structures analyzed. Remedial measures were made on some. 



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Another facet of management evaluation dco.lt with trout streams 
which were reclaimed in 1955. Results were encouraging on those 
streams in which the rmo -chemical conditions were not a barrier, i.e., 
where some true trout water existed. 

Survey teams continued to catalog new ponds, including water 
supplies, as they are opened to public fishing. During the past year, 
the Salter program was completed, all potential Salter streams were 
surveyed and those considered satisfactory will be placed under manage- 
ment. 

During the reporting period, two regulations of some significance 
were promulgated. The first allows commercial minnow dealers to seine 
year around, which will ensure fishermen a supply of bait on the open- 
ing day. The second lengthened the trout season until the last day of 
February, with a daily bag limit of two trout after the third Saturday 
in October, but restricts such fishing to non-reclaimed ponds. 

A more detailed account of fisheries activities can be gleaned 
from the following technical and popular publications released during 
this period. Copies may be obtained from the Division of Fisheries 
and Game, Field Headquarters, Westboro. 

1. Individual one or two page fliers for I4.0 specific ponds 
and lakes showing location, access, available facilities, 
stocking histories, pond depths, and other pertinent informatioi 
relative to fishing. Printed. 

2. "Fisheries Report for some Central, Eastern, and Western 
Massachusetts Lakes, Ponds, and Reservoirs", i+47 pages. Print 

3. "Spring Bass Fishing". 12 pages. Mimeographed. 

!|.. "An Introduction to Fisheries Problems for Junior Sports- 
men". 16 pages. Mimeographed, 

5. "Some Observations on the Reclamation of a Good, a Marginal 
and a Poor Trout Stream in Massachusetts". 19 pages. Mimeo- 
graphed. 

6. "Selective Poisoning as a Management Tool in Massachusetts 
Stratified Trout Ponds". 16 pages. Mimeographed. 

7. "Why the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game Does 
Not Salvage Fish with Nets Prior to Reclaiming Ponds". 5 pages. 
Mimeographed. 

8. "An Evaluation of Massachusetts Fyke Netting Program", 18 
pages. Mimeographed. 

9. "Better Fishing-With Warm Water Management". Published in 
July-August issue of Massachusetts Wildlife. 

10. "Questions and Answers on Ice Fishing". Published in 
January-February issue of Massachusetts Wildlife. 

11. "The Problem - Public Access to Great Ponds". Published 
in March-April issue of Massachusetts Wildlife. 



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COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE" RESEARCH UNIT 



General 

Unit personnel appeared on television, radio, and before sports- 
mens* groups, grange meetings and other groups describing Unit projects. 

Training of professional personnel continued, and several graduate; 
completed either undergraduate or graduate training. 

Woodcock Pro.lect 

Investigation of this migratory upland game bird continued, and 
data for three scientific articles were gathered. Banding of over 100 
birds and studies of moulting and feather wear gives promise of a valid 
technique for aging fall-shot birds by examination of wings as is done 
with quail and ruffed grouse. Such an inventory will make it possible 
to accurately measure the annual production, which is fundamental to 
wise management. 

State Ecological Survey 

Early in the fiscal year, vegetative typing of the state from 
aerial photographs was completed and reproductions of typed maps for th( 
entire state are available to public agencies. Computations of the 
exact acreages down to ten acres of forest types and various catcgorios 
of open land for each town were partially completed. This project has 
been supported by the Division of Fisheries and Game, the Department of 
Natural Resources, and the U. S. Pish and Wildlife Service. The maps 
are of high utility to wildlife workers, foresters, agriculturalists, 
tax assessors and others. 

Evaluation of Forest Types as Game Cover 

Approximately 300 of 5>00 sample forest plots have been evaluated 
as game cover. These plots were selected from the types defined on the 
state ecological survey maps. The purpose of the study is to determine 
what correlation there may be bctwoen the forest crown cover as depicted 
on the maps and ground cover providing wildlife habitat. 

Deer Project 

One graduate student has completed two yoars of work in rcvaluatinf 
the status of the Massachusetts deer herd as revealed by the data 
collected at deer checking stations since 1914-8. Analysis of the results 
ofthis study has not been completed. 

Ruffed Grouse Study 

Further experimental census methods of determining spring grouse 
populations have been continued. Juno investigations suggested a highly 
successful grouse hatch. Further study of the correlation between 
vegetation as depicted on the ecological survey maps and grouse cover 
has been carried out. 









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Otter Project 



Field work was completed on this furbearer. Analysis of the 
species of fish preyed on was begun late in the year, and should be 
completed by the end of September next year. 

Posted Land Study 

• q A 4- st !* dy of the re asons for posting land against hunters was begun 
in September. A statistically sound sample of landowners were mailed 
questionnaires. There was a 79 per cent response. Personal interviews 
were begun of non-respondents and analysis of tho results will be 
completed during the first six months of the next year. 

Projects Financed by Outside Funds 

In addition to projects financed by Division Funds, the Unit 
supervised a study on methods of control of birds damaging agricultural 
crops and a study of methods of porcupine control. Initial results hav^ 
provided some encouraging results. 



LAJxJD AND WATER ACQUISITION 

A program of land and water purchase is by its very nature slow 
to get started; especially when funds are limited and every effort is 
made to get maximum return in acres purchased for each dollar spent. 
The Division must compete in a high real estate market, which shows 
every sign of continuing that way. However, the purchases made, and 
those in the making, represent sound, full-value investments in pro- 
viding public hunting and fishing areas for the future. 

This year the Division purchased its first pond for public fishing, 
by the acquisition of Flint Pond in Tyngsboro. The main pond flows 
about ninety acres; the smaller one flows a few acres. In addition, 
a four-acre tract was purchased adjacent to the upper pond dam for a 
parking area and boat launching site, together with a right of way 
from the main road. A sizeable section of the parking area has 
already been cleared of debris and gravelled. The upper end of the 
pond is a swamp area which offers excellent possibilities for the 
development of a waterfowl area. 

A sixty-acre tract was added to the Townsend State Forest, which 
provides some excellent deer hunting every year. 

More work was done on West Meadows in West Bridgewater, and a 
preliminary survey was made of the large Hockamock Swamp area embrac- 
ing land in Bridgewater, West Bridgewater, Taunton, Easton and Raynham. 
Approximately 103 acres were purchased in Phillipston adjoining a tract 
owned by the Division. 

At the close of the year several other parcels were under 
negotiation and their purchase undoubtedly will be completed in the 
coming year. 

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34. 

PUBLIC PISHING GROUNDS 

Leases were renewed on the Assabet River during the year. There 
was no appreciable change in the total area leased. 

All leased areas throughout the state were posted prior to the 
opening of the fishing season. 

The Public Pishing Grounds Section again handled the counting and 
packaging of all the license holders and pins distributed to City and 
Town Clerks. The distribution of these holders was very ably and 
efficiently handled by the personnel of the fish hatcheries, game farms 
and wildlife districts. 



Under Lease for Public Pishing Ground Purposes 
Stream Town 

Westfield 

East Branch .....Huntington, Chester, Cummington, Chesterfiel 

Middle Branch Huntington, Chester, Worthington, Middlefiel 

West Branch Huntington, Chester, Middlefield, Becket 

Millers River .Athol at Bears Den 

Farmington River Tolland, Otis, Sandisfield 

Buck River and Clam River. . .Sandisfield 

Squannacook River..... Townsend, Groton 

Deerfield River... Charlemont, Rowe, Florida 

Ipswich River Middleton, Danvers, Peabody, Lynnfield 

Shawsheen River. Billerica, Tewksbury, Wilmington, Andover 

Assabet River Hudson, Berlin, Marlboro 












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15. 

INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 



News Releases 



A total of 97 individual news stories (5l in mimeographed releases 
and I4.6 in television news strips) were released by the Information and 
Education Section, and 25 stories were released through the four Wild- 
life Districts. Direct contact between Division personnel and the press 
resulted in additional press coverage. Most of the television news 
strips were separate from stories included in printed press releases, 
although several were coordinated with press releases to achieve max- 
imum coverage in all media. Still-photo coverage was included in 
several of the press releases. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

Publication of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE continued in the 20-page, 
6 n x 9", slick format, with the mailing list growing by voluntary 
request from approximately 9000 at the start of the fiscal year to a 
mailing of llj.,379 for the last issue in the year. At the close of the 
fiscal year, the approximate production cost of the magazine per 
subscriber was Sk^ P er year. Six issues were published during the year. 

Special Events 

The only special event staged during the year was the Massachusetts 
observance of National Wildlife Week, in March. The Information and 
Education Section prepared a proclamation which was issued by the 
Governor, and cooperated with the State Wildlife Week Chairman by 
providing publicity coverage of the event. 

The Information and Education Section also assisted the Governor's 
office in preparation of an Arbor Day proclamation. 

Exhibits 

A total of 13 separate exhibits were aided by the Wildlife Districts 
by providing assistance in the form of wildlife, exhibit panels or 
other material. The majority of these were sportsmen's organization 
exhibits, presented at the following: sports shows, 7; agricultural 
fairs, 1+; Scout jamboree, 1; bank window, 1. 

In addition, the Now England Sportsmen's Show included a Division 
exhibit featuring trout pond management. 

Audio-Visual Aids 

In addition to producing the television news strips and news still- 
photos, the audio-visual aids unit of the Information and Education 
Section participated in 16 television programs of 15 minutes each. 
This included the once-a-month commitment on Channel Four, as well as 
four other special programs. The unit filled I4.52 requests for films 
from the Division film library, which resulted in showing of Division 
films before approximately 36,160 people exclusive of television 
audiences. Eight titles were in uso during the yoar, with a total of 
21 prints. Shooting of a new film on trout hatchery operations was 
nearly completed during the year. The audio-visual unit also provided 
all photo-lab services, technical and informational photographic needs 



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for the Division. 16, 

District personnel participated in 2 television and 5 radio 
programs. 

Literature 

The 1956 Annual Report , the 1957 Fish and Game Laws , Let's Go 
Fishing , and various mimeographed handouts were produced during the 
year. An Introduction to Fisheries Problems For Junior Sportsmen was 
produced jointly by Fisheries and Information and Education. The 
Fisheries Report (1955) was delivered during the year. Additional 
supplies of various literature were purchased from outside sources, 
and reprints ordered of certain titles that were becoming depleted. 

A total of 21 different titles were maintained for public 
distribution during the year. 

Conservation Education 

Participation in conservation education activities, apart from 
contributions provided through the physical program itself, included 
the Division's participation in the Junior Conservation Camp, and 
meetings with the Massachusetts Committee for Outdoor and Conservation 
Education. The latter is composed of recreational and teacher- 
training leaders in Massachusetts, plus conservation agencies and 
sportsmen's groups. 

A program of orientation meetings with scoutmasters was begun in 
the Districts during the spring in cooperation with the Scout 
conservation education program. District personnel gave a total of 2+1 
educational lectures before scouts, other youth groups and the junior 
camp. 

Safety-Zone 

Approximately 12,700 Safety Zone posters were distributed through 
the Districts, and 2,897 by the Information and Education Section. A 
special effort in the towns of Wcstford, Billorica and West Newbury 
resulted in those towns deciding to remain open to hunting. 

Over 700 hunter safety posters were distributed through the 
Districts. 

General 

In addition to the activities reported, all personnel contributed 
to the information and education program of the Division during the 
year, through meetings, personal contact with individuals, authorship 
of articles, etc. District personnel attended 298 meetings with 
sportsmen's and service groups. 

Information and Education personnel attended the national 
Information and Education conference (American Association for 
Conservation Information) in Biloxi, Mississippi, and conducted a one- 
day conference on Information and Education at the Northeast Wildlifo 
Conference in Now Haven, Connecticut. 

45- ft it # 












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The table covers distribution of stock from the five fish hatcheries 
and while the totals are under a year ago, the increased number of fish 
over 9 inches in length contributed to better fishing this spring. 
The drop in the 6 to 9 inch class was due to poor quality of brook 
trout eggs taken in the fall of 1955 at the eg^-producing stations, 
resulting in very limited inventories of fingerlings from which to 
produce yearling brook trout. 

In addition, it will be noted that the Federal Fish and Wildlife 
Service is listed for stock planted from their Hartsville Hatchery. 
The Fish and Wildlife Service also supplied some stock used in the pond 
program and some to the Palmer Hatchery on the agreement plan. 

Nutritional Research 

While pork melts, cortland mix and sardines still provide the bulk 
of our food supply, pellets are being used on an experimental basis wit] 
careful checks being kept on production costs. Many supplements are 
being added to fortify rations, especially fry food. A program of 
establishing several sources of trout eggs from four of our stations is 
progressing and in due time, this work can be evaluated. 

Construction 

Two 8" gravel developed wells with pumps have been provided at the 
Sunderland and Palmer Hatcheries and a separate supply was created at 
the Sutton Hatchery, Pumping equipment at East Sandwich was completely 
overhauled and additional small wells were driven at both Sandwich 
stations. At the Sunderland Hatchery, considerable time has been spent 
during the year prospecting for water, using the wash system, resulting 
in an accumulation of approximately seventy-five gallons from such 
openings. 

The meat house building at Sandwich was enlarged by adding a new 
section on the south side as a new food storage capable of holding 
several car loads. 

Repair and reconstruction of pond units took place at all stations, 
employing both wood and reinforced concrete. Many improvements were 
made on various structures and pipe lines were extended at several 
hatcheries. All painting is done by hatchery personnel. Fencing, 
reforestration and grounds maintenance consumed a considerable amount 
of time. Increasing numbers of visitors make attractive, well-kept 
grounds a necessity. 

Equipment 

Several vehicles were replaced at the stations, such as 3/4 ton 
pickups and two-ton dump and stake body trucks. Grounds equipment, 
including mowers, saws, and other tools, were purchased to assist the 
station personnel in performing their work. Improvements were made 
with several distribution tanks and thermometers were installed in the 
distribution tanks so that the drivers can observe the load temperatures 
A year ago, barometers were purchased for all hatcheries. Several 
distribution water pumps were purchased and other units were rebuilt or 
motors exchanged so that all truck equipment was safe for transporting 
live fish. 

DIED 



Michael J. Biscoe - Born June ll|, 1900. Served as a conservation worker 
at the Sunderland Fish Hatchery for 27 years; passed away on November 10, 



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GAME FARMS 19. 



PHEASANTS 



The pheasant distribution policy of the Division increased the 
liberation quota of cock pheasants, while reducing the percentage of 
hen pheasants to a minimum. The decrease in hen pheasants was obtained 
by a full scale sexing program of day-old chicks at each of the four 
State game farms. 

This year's production results were achieved from pheasant chicks 
hatched just previous to July 1, 1956. The hatching program was as 
follows: 131, 5C0 eggs set; 102,902 chicks hatched; 1+2,191 chicks 
destroyed as *3eing hen chicks. Results indicated that only a minimum 
of cock chicks were destroyed due to difficulty in identifying the 
sexes at one day of age. 

Due to the caution practiced in this first over-all sexing program, 
results were very satisfactory as the figures indicate. A total of 
60,711 sexed chicks were placed in brooders and £3>601 were raised* 
They numbered 12,018 hens and 1+1,583 cocks or 22.1$ hens and 77. 6$ 
cocks. 

Pall distribution was affected to some degree by the Equine 
Encephalitis problem. Early shipments of birds were held until after 
the first general frost, to avoid any contribution, however unlikely, 
to spreac* of the disease. Hen pheasant liberations were made during 
the first half of November, while some hens were carried through the 
winter /me to bad weather. 

Tho average age of both hen and cock pheasants when liberated was 
approximately 20 1/2 weeks, an increase of 3 to 1+ weeks over the 
previous year. 

QUAIL 

Quail production quotas were set at J+, 000 young quail as a total 
to be liberated from the two game farms raising quail. This reduction 
made it possible to hold the birds to an older age without any increase 
in facilities. Liberations were made in Octoter and the first part of 
November. 

Considerable experimenting has been undertaken and more research 
will be necessary to obtain the best equipment for holding quail to the 
older ages, especially if many quail should bo held over winter for 
spring liberation. 

Just before the close of the fiscal year fi\ # o pair of Coturnix quai! 
were purchased for experimental purposes only. None had been hatched 
prior to June 30. 

WHITE HARES 

As in recent years, an crder was placed for 25t>0 v/ild-trappcd White 
Hares from New Brunswick Canada. Of these, 2u69 ware recoived. Bcforo 
the close of the hunting season, 1393 hares woro delivered and placed 
in pens at three of the game farms, to be hold and conditioned for 
liberation after tho closing of the ser.son. This eliminated the 
possibility of the hares being taken by sportsmen while they were in a 



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weakened and confused condition. 20, 

Part of the program of holding hares was exceptionally good, with 
90% to 91+% survival. The overall percentage, however, was very 
discouraging, averaging little better than ?0$. Contributing factors 
to these losses were dogs; what was believed to have been a bobcat; 
and the fact that many of the hare arrive from the source in a weakened 
condition. 

To substantiate previous findings on the health and condition of 
hares delivered to the game farms, all hares were weighed in groups 
upon arrival and again when distributed. The average weight gained 
was better than l/2 pound. This weight gain compensated for the flesh 
lost during the period of trapping, handling, and transportation when 
the hares are confined in boxes or crates. 

RESEARCH 

In the field of game propogation, research in the various phases 
of activities is vital and must be' planned, carried out and evaluated 
within the gane farms of the State, as outside information is very 
limited. 

The incubators and hatchers experimented with this year have proven 
very satisfactory and will guide us in future purchases. The types of 
brooders best fitted for game birds are not being manufactured by many 
poultry equipment companies, so it becomes necessary to experiment with 
other makes and types for possible future replacements. 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis has further complicated our usual 
disease control and prevention activities. Previous to the breeding 
season, and during the fall and winter, considerable work was performed, 
under the guidance of the local Mosquito Control Groups, to destroy 
mosquito breeding areas. At the height of the Encephalitis infection, 
all types of spraying was done at the three eastern game farms. Aerial 
and mist spraying, along with repeated power spraying during the 
remainder of the season, was done by our own personnel. 

Laboratory tests of sick birds shows that one of our farms is 
known to have had the infection, while another farm disclosed evidence 
of previous infection, found this spring by blood samples. Every effori 
has been made to cooperate with the survey conducted by the Federal and 
Massachusetts Departments of Health. 

Construction has been confined to replacement, remodeling and 
maintenance, rather than construction of additional facilities. Newly 
constructed pens would replace ones dismantled due to rotted posts and 
rusted out netting. Money appropriated for maintenance and replacement? 
this year was not adequate to fully offset the usual yearly 
depreciations. This also holds true for our equipment inventory. 

At three farms, considerable remodeling was done to incubator 
cellars in order to eliminate cramped conditions and to improve the 
ventilation. In one instance, incubators were placed at another locatic 
to remove a possible fire hazard in the collar of the Culturist's 
residence. 

Many needed improvements h-\ve been accomplished at all game farm 
residences. Extensive alterations v/cre nadc to electric wiring at three 
farms, to increase capacity, eliminate over-loading and interruptions 
_in service, and to insure the safety of our facilities. 






. 



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GAME DISTRIBUTION 
July 1, 1956 to July 1, 1957 



21. 



PHEASANTS: 

Adults: Spring liberation 

Young: 12 week liberation: 

summer and early fall 

Furnished to pens on Sportsmen 1 s 
Pheasant Rearing Program 



hens 
3,033 

6,^67 

2,1+75 



cocks 
"73T" 

33,159 



7,1+05 



TOTAL 

rrm 

39,626 



9,880 



Of the pheasants liberated by the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
and the Sportsmen's Pheasant Rearing Program, it is estimated 
that 11,727 Hens and i|0,558 Cocks went into the covers. 



QUAIL: 

Adults: Spring liberation 
Young: 12 weeks and over 



WHITE HARES (Northern Varying) (purchased) 



U50 
l+,390 

4,81*0 

2,1+69 



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22. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
"HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 

ADMINISTRATION 3304-01 

Administration $80,204.16) 

Fish. & Game Board (3304-06) 1,689.00) $81,893.16 7$ 

Information-Education 34,580.94 3$ 

PROPAGATION 3304-31 

Pish 314,156.73 25$ 

Gamo 230, 391.95 18$ 

WILDLIFE 

Game 3304-44 7, 422. Lj.6 

330i|-5l 54,736.46 

^-3304-53 138.346.88 200,505.80 16$ 



Fish 3304-42 116,582.08 

3304-45 10,936.34 

*-3304-47 49,069.92 

3304-51 54,736.46 

3304-56 4,500.00 235.824.80 19$ 

LAND ACQUISITION- *3304-58 15, 000 . 00 1$ 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

3308-05 13,137.31 

3308-07 8,100.00 

1003-03 111,851.22 133,088.53 11$ 



,245,411.91 100$ 



^Expenditures under 

3304-47 

3304-53 

3304-58 
arc reimbursed 75$ 
by Federal Funds 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries and Game Fund as of June 30, 1957 - 

$429,100.64 



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23. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES & GAME 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1956 to Juno 30, 1957 

EXPENDITURES 
ACCOUNT NO. TITLE APPROPRIATION & LIABILITIES REVERTED 

33014.-01 Administration 118,510.00 111]., 785.10 3,72i;.9C 

33OI4-O6 Board of Fisheries and 

Game 2,500.00 1,689.00 811.00 

3301+-31 Operation of Fish 

Hatcheries & Game Farms 555,930.00 £!;!;, 51+8. 6 8 11,381.32 

3301+-1+2 Improvement & Mgmt. of 

Lakes, Ponds & Rivers 125,525.00 116,582.08 8,91+2.92 

3301].-1].5 Public Fishing Grounds 10,955.00 10,936.34 18.66 

3301+-1+7 Fish Restoration Projects 59,210.00 1+9,069.92 10, 11+0.08 

330i].-5l Bureau of Wildlife 

Research 112,900.00 109,1+72.92 3,1+27.08 

3301].-56 Biological Survey of 

Streams & Waters 1]., 500.00 l+,500.00 



Sub Total: 1990,030.00 951, 581].. 01+ 38,1+1+5.96 

CONTINUING ACCOUNT EXPENDITURES BAL. 
& RESERVED FORWARD 

330I}.-53 Wildlife Restoration 161,957.72 138,31+6.88 23,610.81]. 

330l].-58 Acquisition and Improve- 
ment of Wet Lands and 
Public Hunting & Fishing 
Grounds 50,000.00 15,000.00 35,000.00 



GRAND TOTAL: 

11,201,987.72 $1,101;, 930.92^97,056 .80 



*75$ Reimbursement from Federal Funds 






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SUMMARY OP FISH & GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957 



ttSee Detail Sheet 
*#See Detail Sheet 



2k. 



Pishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $96^,269.75 * 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 5,593.25 #* 

Rents 2,14.81.10 

Misc. Sales a\id Income 292.18 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 63,777.56 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 14.1,836.14.8 

Court Fines 7,9814.. 65 

Refunds Prior Year 1,070.57 



TOTAL $1,087,305.54 



. 






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26. 

DIVISION OP FISHERIES AND GAME 
ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS I4.8, 68A, 
102-3-l|.-5-6-7 and 112-A, Chapter 131, G.L. during the 
fiscal year ending June 2,0, 1957 



TYPE 21? LICENSE NUMBER ISSUED RECEIPTS 

Class 1 - Special Fish Propagator's License 

Class 2 - " » » " (no fe 

Class 3 - Fish Propagator's License 

Class \\. - Propagator's License (Birds or Mammals) 

Class 5 - Special Propagator's License (no fee) 

Class 6 - Dealer's License 

Class 7 - Possession Only License 

Field Trial License @ $10 

Taxidermist License 

Resident & Non-Rosident Citizen's Fur Buyer's 
License 

License to Take Shiners for Bait 

Trap Registration Certificates 

Fish Tags @ 1^ 

Game Tags @ $$ 

TOTAL 5,593.25 ** 



197 


1211.00 


) 2 


- 


93 


303.OO 


) 391; 


i,3U4.oo 


5 


- 


1*56 


658.00 


83 


55.00 


1 


10.00 


56 


280.00 


33 


510.00 


312 


1,5^6.50 


1227 


ll.85.25 


8700 


87.00 


2070 


103.50 



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SUMMARY OP OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS; AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE 
DIRECTOR OP FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1957 

August l\., 19i+8. Rules end regulations for the artificial 
propagation and maintenance of fish. 

August 4> 19)4.8. Rules and regulations for the artificial 
propagation of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and 
arrows. 

January 16, 1953. Regulations for bass spawning areas in Long 
Pond, Yarmouth and Long Pond, Barnstable and closing the areas to all 
fishing between April 15 and June 30, both dates inclusive, each year 
for five years beginning in 1953. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protectc 
fresh water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954 • Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, 
effective April 9, 1954* an<i revoking rules and regulations in this 
regard promulgated on September 23, 1953. 

October 29, 1954 • Hunting regulations on bird cover improvement 
area in the town of Ludlow, closing to all hunting until September 24, 
1957. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fish- 
ing grounds in Massachusetts. 

November 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts, effective 
January 1, 1956. 

November 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of deer in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake, 
effective April 10, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish 
in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, 
effective April 10, 1956. 

September 7, 1956. Migratory game bird regulations for season of 
1956. 

January 30, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts, effective February 1, 1957, 
and revoking rules and regulations dated January 1, 1956. 

January 30, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
certain fish in Massachusetts, effective February 1, 1957, and revoking 
rules and regulations promulgated January 1, 1956. 

February 5> 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 



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28. 



February llj., 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of carp and suckers for the purpose of sale, 

February 1$, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging 
of deer in Massachusetts. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 



LEGISLATION 

The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries 
and Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1957* 



CHAPTER I4.O, ACTS OF 1957: 



An act requiring the wearing of red or 
yellow clothing or material while hunting 
during the open season on deer. 



CHAPTER 105, ACTS OF 1957: An act authorizing the Director of the 

Division of Fisheries and Game to extend 
the number of days for the hunting of 
ruffed grouse, quail or pheasants. 

CHAPTER 116, ACTS OF 1957: An act allowing the taking of certain fish 

by means of a bow and arrow. 

CHAPTER 26!+, ACTS OF 1957: An act restricting to resident licensed 

fishermen the taking of shiners and suckers 
for the purposo of sale as bait. 

CHAPTER 320, ACTS OF 1957: An act authorizing the Director of the 

Division of Fisheries and Game to acquire 
additional public shooting grounds, and to 
regulate further the use of such grounds. 



CHAPTER 350, ACTS of 1957 



An act authorizing the Diroctor of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game to issue 
licenses to allow the use of quail for the 
purpose of training dogs. 






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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 TRJBMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
APR 7 I960 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 
Bfe OFFICIALS 



Vflfl 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, Foster A. Furcolo, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of Fisheries 

and Game 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety- third 

Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the 

fiscal year from July 1, 1957 to June 30, 1958. 



Respectfully submitted, 




CHARLES L. MCLAUGHLIN, 
Director 



i 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Ninety-third Annual Report 

July 1, 1957 to June 30, 1958 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Board * k i 1 

Game Program. . * i 5 

Fisheries Program j .... * . * 11 

Information and Education Program * . * * * 21 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit ♦ 24 

Administration: 

Tables; How the Sportsmen's Dollar was Spent. *.*...** 26 

Appropriations and Expenditures , „ 27 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 28 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping 

Licenses 29 

Analysis of Special Licenses 30 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations 31 

Legislation 32 



In Memoriam ) 30 

Retired )* 



Publication Approved by State Purchasing Agent #9 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 

The Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game is pleased 
to report continued progress of the Division for the fiscal year of 1957-1958. 

There have been many noteworthy accomplishments during the 
past fiscal year in all phases of the Division's operations, the details of which 
are described in the individual reports of the several sections of the Division 
contained herein. Highlighting these accomplishments, the Board wishes to 
comment as follows: 

Organization and Policy : 

After complete study by the Board, the Director, and members 
of the Division's staff, in which existing policy and organization were re- 
viewed, examined and brought up to date, the Board, on August 22, 1957, 
unanimously adopted an organization manual, complete with descriptions of 
the functions of the key men within the Division. This manual was prepared 
in order to achieve the highest possible efficiency in both the organization 
and activities of the Division and to clarify the chain of responsibility of all 
personnel in keeping with modern administrative practices. 

Concurrently, the Board also adopted a revised policy manual 
entitled, "A Policy for the Conservation of Inland Fisheries and Game Re- 
sources of Massachusetts, " stating in detail the general and specific policies 
regarding all phases of the Division's activities. It is felt that both the organ- 
ization and policy manuals are important to the improved efficiency of oper- 
ations and clarification of responsibilities. 

Game Management and Propogation: 

The emphasis in the game program other than propagation during 
the past year was on management. The majority of time and funds was spent 
on acquisition of land for public hunting grounds and management of those areas 
Further progress was also made by working closely with the Department of 
Natural Resources in opening up areas controlled by the Department for pub- 
lic hunting and fishing. 

During the fiscal year we purchased 1,400 acres in the town of 
Peru, and obtained options on a number of other tracts. One tract adjacent 
to a public hunting area was leased for a period of five years, with an option 
to purchase. The Peru area acquired increases the original area, obtained in 
a prior year. 

There was very little change in the leased stream areas, as most 
of the leases have another few years to run before renewal is necessary. 

A complete list of public hunting grounds and public fishing 
grounds will be found elsewhere in this report. 



2. 

This effort was conducted without neglecting the vital function 
of research in game management so that new techniques and methods may be 
developed and adopted. 

Production of game continued with the policy of sexing the 
pheasants, which was successfully started in the previous year. This pro- 
gram resulted in the rearing of 38, 747 cock birds and 7, 261 hens. 

Fish Management and Propogation: 

In the most difficult period of drought in the summer of 1957, 
during which one of the lowest rainfalls ever recorded in the state was ex- 
perienced, the efforts of hatchery personnel were outstanding. From all the 
hatcheries during the year, 1,412, 646 fish were produced compared to 
1, 106, 376 fish in the preceding year. This is an extraordinary record 
achieved under the most trying circumstances and with very little more 
expenditure of funds. This is a tribute to the personnel involved. 

After thorough research and experimentation in pellet feeding 
as opposed to meat feeding, the hatcheries at Sandwich and Sutton were 
entirely converted to pellet feeding with most encouraging results. During 
this period the four other hatcheries were converted to a limited program of 
pellet feeding. 

The physical condition of the six fish hatcheries is excellent 
but the demands for production exceed their capacity. Therefore, the Div- 
ision undertook a study of the feasibility of establishing a new fish hatchery 
in the area adjacent to the Ouabbin Reservoir and will shortly make appro- 
priate recommendations to the General Court recommending the construction 
of this proposed hatchery which, it is estimated, will be capable of providing 
884,000 10-inch trout or the equivalent weight in other sizes when in full 
operation. 

The results of the management programs of our ponds continue 
to be very successful. 

Information and Education: 



It is the opinion of the Board that one of the most serious prob- 
lems confronting it is the need for increased information going not only to the 
sportsmen but to the public in general regarding the activities and programs 
of the Division, plus the greater need for increased public awareness of the 
importance of conservation. 

The tremendous increases in population, the lengthening of 
leisure time and the resultant increased recreational activity of the citizens 
of the Commonwealth, plus the lis proportionate growth of the population 
with the available hunting, fishing and recreational areas, creates a situation 
which must be known and understood by sportsmen and the general public. Due 



3. 

to the intensive housing and highway construction, as well as the trend to 
more posting against hunters and fishermen, the rate of loss of land and 
water areas for hunting and fishing is alarming. 

This concern is shared by the Department of Natural Resources 
with which the Board continues to work very closely and wishes to acknow- 
ledge the fine cooperation received from the personnel of the Department. 

It is felt that the activities of the Information and Education 
Section must be increased if the sportsmen are to be given a factual under- 
standing of not only the current problems but a projection of what these prob- 
lems will be in the immediate future. Through the media of news releases, 
television and radio, the magazine, films, exhibits and participation in clubs 
and civic groups, this story is being effectively told within the limitations of 
the budget available. However, there is the feeling of necessity that it must 
be more widely disseminated and understood. 

Publication of the Division's bi-monthly magazine, Massachu- 
setts Wildlife, continued in the same format with six issues being published. 
With each successive issue, circulation increased by approximately 800 
copies, with the May/ June issue being sent to approximately 20,200 people. 
This is an excellent publication and the Board feels that wider circulation 
must be attained in the future. 

Finances ; 

The surplus of the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund continues to 
decrease, with the balance as of June 30, 1958, at $310, 151.41. This com- 
pares with the balance June 30, 1957 of $429, 100.64. The Board feels that 
it would be imprudent to allow this fund to fall below a reserve of $200, 000. 
and, with the increased costs for operation consistent with the increased cost 
of living experienced in all phases of business and personal life, the Board 
is recommending to the Legislature an increase in license fees to at least 
arrest, if not overcome, the serious decreasing trend in available funds. 

Furthermore, it is the opinion of the Board that, without the 
availability of greater income, there is no alternative other than the curtail- 
ment of present operations. If the Division is to furnish adequate hunting 
and fishing facilities to the citizens of the Commonwealth, it must have ad- 
ditional financial resources to meet the increasing demands that it faces at 
this time and in the years ahead. 

Personnel: 

There were no changes in the Board membership during the 
fiscal year. On March 28, 1958, Mr. James W. Cesan was re-elected Chair- 
man and Mr. Henry £. Russell was elected Secretary. 



4. 

The Board wishes to acknowledge and express its appreciation 
of the extremely effective and loyal service of the personnel within the 
Division. 



Sgrtd/ Henry E. Russell, 
Secretary 






5. 



GAME PROGRAM 

Emphasis in the game program during the past year was on man- 
agement, acquisition of public shooting areas and development of these areas, 
and efficient use of pheasants and quail reared at our game farms to produce 
maximum hunting opportunity for hunters on both state-operated public 
shooting grounds and on open, private land. 

This does not mean that research was completely ignored, be- 
cause such action would result in an unbalanced program. The plan has 
been to manage wildlife species on the basis of information already gained 
from past research and to continue investigations only as a check on man- 
agement or to study new fields or techniques to determine their possible 
worth for application in Massachusetts. 

The majority of the work other than operation of game farms* is 
75 percent financed through federal allotments from the Pittman -Roberts on 
funds. Following is a summary of federal -aid projects for the year: 

W-7-R White-Tailed Deer : 

During the 1957 season, 4,090 deer were reported killed. Check- 
ing stations were again operated by the Division at strategic locations through- 
out the state. Through the cooperation of the hunters, 1,470 deer were ex- 
amined at these stations. A check of this year's figures against a ten-year 
average showed that the sex ratio, remains about the same (56 bucks to 44 
does); that the overall decline in the population was 39 percent as compared 
to 38 percent; that the rate of replacement was the same (about 42 percent). 

W-9-D Farm Game Restoration: 



Habitat improvement work was done principally on public shoot- 
ing grounds although some seed, fertilizer, and lime were supplied to clubs 
and cooperating farmers. Management activities included: the erection of 
various types of signs to mark boundaries, etc. ; the planting of wildlife trees 
and shrubs; the planting of grains and legumes for food and cover; the thinning 
of dense woodland to encourage new growth for food and cover; the control of 
water chestnuts on the Sudbury, Concord, and Assabet Rivers and also in 
College Pond, South Hadley and Heard Pond, Wayland. ... .£••..- • ; .' 

of natural reproduction such as apples in abandoned orchards by release 
cutting and pruning; and the maintenance of wood duck nesting boxes. This 
intensive management along with inseason pheasant stocking has made the 
public shooting grounds increasingly popular with the Massachusetts hunter. 
This program will be continued and enlarged according to available funds. 

W-16-R Fur Bearer Investigation : 

The final report of this project was sent to the printer during the 
year and will soon be ready for distribution. 



6. 

vV-19-R Wood Duck Nesting Investigations; 

The manuscript of this final report was revised during the year 
and will be printed during the next fiscal year. 

W-20-R Birch Hill Investigations: 

This project was originated to evaluate the management program 
at Birch Hill. The fall grouse population has remained fairly constant during 
the past six years averaging one bird per 16 acres. Cottontail rabbits and 
white hare increased slightly last year over the eight-year average. A check 
on pheasant stocking showed an actual return close to 60 percent. Hunting 
pressure again increased and during certain periods reached the safety 
limit. Over 80 percent of the hunters came from within a 15-mile radius 
which points out that many more such areas are needed if the hunters through- 
out the state are to receive the same privilege. 

W-22-R Cottontail Investigations: 

Information from the trapping and tagging program over the past 
eight years shows that 39 percent of all rabbits tagged survived at least six 
months and that the survival rate was higher for oylvilagus transitionalis 
than for oylvilagus floridanus . An area of about 150 acres was obtained for 
development as a beagle field trial area. The proposed management plan 
included bulldozing grid lines, seeding them to clover and clear cutting 
blocks of woodland to stimulate new growth for food and cover. This area 
is available for clubs to use for trials or practice runs. 

W-25-R Bobwhite Quail Investigations : 

Whistle counts in Norfolk and Dukes Counties showed a decline 
in quail populations while counts in Bristol, Barnstable and Plymouth 
Counties showed no significant difference. During the eight-day extension 
of the 1957 quail season, 14 percent of the quail harvest occurred. Pen- 
reared quail made up only 22 percent of the total kill, showing that the major- 
ity of quail hunting is coming from native reproduction. There was no sig- 
nificant difference in the return from quail raised from brood stock second 
generation Removed from the wild and regular farm stock. 

W-32-R Experimental Wetland Management : 

A survey was made of potential wetland areas on state-owned 
land. From this survey, five areas were chosen for management. After 
more preliminary engineering data has been obtained, structures will be 
planned and constructed for stabilizing the water level. 

Land Acquisition : 

Land for public shooting grounds was acquired in Peru, while use 
agreements and/or options to purchase were obtained on several other areas. 



7. 



this report. 

Non -federal aid: 

The wildlife districts engaged in many other activities that were 
not financed by federal funds. They were responsible for the stocking of all 
pheasants, quail and white hare. They participated in the census of ruffed 
grouse, woodcock, mourning doves, and waterfowl. Damage complaints were 
handled by providing box traps for cottontail rabbits, live trapping and trans- 
planting beaver and providing deer-proof fencing. In the interest of better 
sportsmen-landowner relations, safety zone signs were distributed. During 
the upland bird season a game bag check was made on public shooting grounds 
and grouse wings and tails were collected for analysis of the grouse populatio 
Technical assistance was given to sportsmen's clubs, boy scouts, and land- 
owners. Field trial clubs were encouraged to use the facilities at the state- 
owned area in Westboro. 

Pheasant Propagation; 

In the spring of 1957 the quota set for the production of young 
pheasants for distribution from the Division's four game farms was 8,000 
hens and 38,000 cocks, a total of 46,000. This was slightly exceeded with 
the total finally produced being 7,261 hens and 38, 747 cocks. 

Sexing of day-old chicks continued with very satisfactory results, 
with approximately 56 percent of all chicks hatched placed in brooders. The 
remainder was considered females of which 15, 128 were sold. 

General distribution of pheasants consisted of 5, 692 cocks lib- 
erated during the middle to the latter part of September at the ages of 12 to 
14 weeks, and the remainder liberated in October and November, before and 
during the hunting season, at ages from 15 to 27 weeks. The overall average 
of cocks for general liberation was 19 weeks plus. 

t^u ail Propagation: 

The quail production quota was further decreased this year and 
set at 2,000. All quail-rearing activities were being carried on at the Sand- 
wich State Game Farm with the exception of some experimental work with the 
coturnix quail at the Marshfield State Game Farm. Practically all pens and 
quail-rearing facilities were transferred from Marshfield to Sandwich. 

White Hares : 

Continuing the policy of recent years, $10,000. was allocated 
for the purchase of white hares from New Brunswick, Canada. Due to the 
high price of $4. 50 each, only 2, 222 were accepted. 



8. 

Nutritional Research: 

Every effort has been made to modernize our game bird feed- 
ing formulas with hopes of reducing the cost, developing a harder pellet, 
encouraging more bidders and, if possible, improving the growth and 
feathering of the birds. Experiments carried on to date have been very 
enlightening and valuable for the coming year. Feeding comparisons will 
be continued before adjusting our present formula. 

Disease: 



Preparations were made for the prevention and control of 
eastern equine encephalitis in case of an epidemic. The unusual drought 
during the summer eliminated the threat. We assisted the Department 
of Health on their sentinel pheasant program for any indication of the 
virus. Other diseases affecting pheasants presented no particular pro- 
blems during the year. 

Construction and Maintenance: 



Heavy, wet snow on the night of March 15 caused more damage 
to covered pens at the Ayer State Game Farm than has ever been experi- 
enced by our state game farms. Over 200, 000 square feet of poultry net- 
ting was crushed to the ground. All pens had some damage and hundreds 
of pheasants escaped, the majority of which were eventually picked up. 
Many of the pens have been erected and repaired while the remainder will 
have to be rebuilt. New posts, lumber, and netting, though costly, will 
not compare with the labor costs involved. 

Construction and maintenance consisted of the usual repairs 
and replacements at all farms which normally required considerable la- 
bor and material. Some new construction was completed while others were 
in the process. Some remodeling and improvements to facilities and equip- 
ment were accomplished to save on labor in the future. 



9. 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 



Pheasants 



Hens 



Cocks 



Total 



Adults: Spring Liberation 3200 665 3865 

Young: Approximately 12-14 weeks 

of age, liberated in Sept. 5692 5692 

Approximately 20-21 weeks 
of age, liberated in Oct- 
ober and November 6318 26520 32838 

Sportsmen's Club Pheasant Rearing 

Program: 943 6535 7478 



10,463 



39,410 



49,873 



Quail 



Adult: Spring Liberation 

Young: 16-20 weeks old, liberated 
in October and November 



693 



2217 



White Hare 



Northern Varying - purchased 



2222 



PUBLIC HUNTING GROUNDS 
vVildlife Areas Owned by the Division of Fish and Game 



Area 
Pantry Brook Area 
West Meadwos Area 
Phillipston Area 
Rowley Area 
*Westboro Area 
Ouashnet River Area 
Peru Area 



Town 



Sudbury and Concord 

vVest Bridgewater 

Phillipston, Barre, Hubbardston 822 

Rowley 17 

Westboro 175 

Mashpee, Falmouth 26 

Peru 2100 



Acreage 
377 Acre. 
387 



Buckle y-Dutton Area Becket 

*Crane Wildlife Mgt. Area Falmouth 



200 plus 
1400 



Total 5504 

Wildlife Areas Used by Permit, License, or Agreement 
Area Town Acreage 



^Northeast Area 



Newbury, Groveland, Georgetown 1500 Acres 



* Birch Hill Public Hunting Royalston, vVinchendon, Templeton4277 
Grounds 



^Hopkins Memorial Forest Williamstown 
(National Forest and Pri- 
vate land under agreement) 

^Hubbardston Area (M. D. C. 

agreement) Hubbardston 

*Myles Standish State Forest Plymouth 

* Areas stocked with pheasants 



2500 



Total 



2200 



11578 
22055 



u. 

1 '•' FISHERIES PROGRAM 
Quabbin Reservoir (25,000 acres) * 

The intensive creel census at Quabbin Reservoir was continued 
during the past year. Creel data through to June 30?*r shows that the lake 
trout catch thus far in 1958 was greater than that reported for the whole of 
the 1957 season. Over 1,000 lake trout, averaging about four pounds but 
ranging up to eight and one -half pounds, were harvested in the first ten week: 
of the 1958 season. 

Stocking 37,000 smelt in 1953 resulted in the establishment of a 
huge smelt population. Descendants of this stock have played a key role in 
the rapid growth of lakers. 

Preliminary studies indicate that even a limited program of 
stocking other species of trout can be made to yield a handsome return. An 
experimental stocking of 1,000 brook, 1,000 brown, and 1,000 rainbow trout, 
nine to twelve inches, in 1957 gave first year returns of 66, 23 and 36 per- 
cent. Average weight gains between stocking in March and angler harvest 
the same season were negligible for brook trout, while brown and rainbow 
trout doubled or tripled. Some brown and rainbow trout from this stocking 
ranged between two and three pounds when caught in the early fall. Carry- 
over and increased growth of browns and rainbows into the 1958 season has 
been substantial as reflected in fish between three and five pounds in angler 
creels sampled. 

* Pond Reclamation : 

The chemical treatment of fishing waters that have become over- 
run with hordes of small pan fish, rough fish, or combinations of both --- 

which are detrimental in a number of ways to good sport fishing is an 

increasingly important fish management tool. One object of such treat- 
ment is to eradicate the entire fish population in order to make a fresh 
start with desired species. Another object maybe to reduce the abundance 
of one or more species. 

Rotenone is thekey ingredient of most fish toxicants. The effects 
on fish vary according to species, size, and water temperatures. The chem- 
ical causes a breakdown in the epithelial cells of the gills, making them im- 
permeable to dissolved oxygen. The fish then suffocate. It is not poisonous 
or harmful in any way to man or other warm-blooded animals. 

During the past year, 13 ponds, totaling 1,448 acres, were so 
treated for trout and 17 ponds totaling 1,202 acres were rehabilitated for 
such warmwater fishes as bass # pickerel, yellow perch, and hornpout 
(Table 1). 

* Those projectsdesignated by an asterisk are federal-aid-to-fisheries-proj- 
ects. Seventy-five percent of the cost of these projects is . reimbursed by 
federal tax monies on fishing tackle under the Dingell-Johnson Act. 



12. 
^ Intensive Harvest Studies: 

Precise information concerning stocking results and other types 
of management is essential for progressive action on the part of any agency 
charged with maintaining a fisheries resource. Frequently, conflicting re- 
ports tend to obscure these results, an understandable condition in view of 
the fact that individual reports are based on a relatively limited experience 
within a given situation. Currently, some 19 ponds are subject to regularly 
scheduled periodic checks of anglers and their catches. This is being done 
in such a way that the information collected may be expanded to allow for 
valid estimates of the annual take. 

In this way, knowledge of fish and angler behavior is being ac- 
quired and is falling into recognizable patterns that is being used profitably 
in the management of less -important waters where an intensive study is not 
justified. Likewise, the cost of various practices and techniques are being 
evaluated in the light of "before and after" fishing results. 

* Flint Pond Acquisition : 

The area in question comprises approximately 95 acres, 61 acres 
of which consist of water area, in the town of Tyngsboro, Middlesex County. 
This is an artificial pond built in the early part of the century. Many of the 
features of the dam, sluiceway, etc. , were non -functional when acquired, 
and needed extensive repairs. These were completed along with a parking 
area and a suitable boat -launching site. Flint Pond will be managed as a 
public fishing area. 

^ Sterilization and Sex Reversal Studies : 

Present concepts of warmwater fish management are based 
upon producing and maintaining artificial population structures. The major 
problem plaguing fisheries managers is the tremendous reproductive po- 
tential of the pan fishes or forage species that must form one -half of the 
equation if it is to "balanced In small, weed-free ponds, the use of various 
bass-bluegill combinations has been shown to produce fair to excellent 
fishable populations, especially in southern waters. 

In northern waters, no satisfactory warmwater management 
practices have yet been conceived for native pan fishes and game fishes. A 
great deal of success, however, has been experienced with trout introduced 
into reclaimed ponds. This stems directly from the fact that, in the major- 
ity of our ponds, reproduction is impossible for these species, and their 
omnivorous character does not call for a supply of forage in the form of 
fish flesh. Unfortunately, the trout water in this state, and in most others, 
is but a fraction of the total acres available for public fishing. 

As fishing pressures build up on our warmwater areas, new 
concepts of management will have to be developed. In Massachusetts, our 



13. 

relatively infertile ponds and lakes demand that as much as possible of the 
total productivity be utilized for the creation of usable fish. This can never 
be accomplished by using multi -species complexes, as it is axiomatic that 
an inherent waste is evidenced in even one additional step of a food chain. 
It is also true that the stocking of only one species of fish in a reclaimed 
warmwater pond results* without exception, in a rapidly-expanding, and 
eventually stunted, population. 

In Massachusetts, the pan fishes principally sought by anglers 
are yellow perch, white perch, and brown bullheads. The ability of these 
fishes to produce large populations of stunted individuals is well-known. 
If, however, it were possible to place these fishes on the same status as 
trout, i.e., introduced as non-reproducing individuals in numbers determint 
by the carrying capacities of the ponds in question, warmwater fishing could 
be vastly improved. By control of the sex of panfishes stocked, reproduction 
and consequent overcrowding and stunting might be controlled. 

This Division has stocked small reclaimed ponds with uni- 
sexual adults obtained by trapping during their spawning seasons. This 
method is costly and cumbersome and it is desired through this project to 
attempt to sterilize large numbers of fishes, while in the egg or fry stage, 
for stocking in reclaimed ponds. 

Initial work has centered on the use of estrogenic hormones, 
primarily estradiol ar.d sti.lbe sterol. These have been shovn to produce 
chromosomal changes related to sex in fishes and toads. The basic aim 
of this primary work has been to determine if these, or other synthesized 
hormones or chemicals can be introduced into the media and bring about 
changes in sex. 

Preliminary research has been on guppies, bullheads and 
yellow perch in the laboratory at vVestboro. As yet, it is too early for any 
definite conclusions. 

Past researchers have been satisfied with promoting changes 
in sexes, and have not attempted to produce fatal aberrations. This might 
be accomplished in either sex during the development of the primordial 
tissue, thus allowing only one sex to survive. If so, and if the technique 
could be demonstrated as feasible on a large scale, this approach would 
satisfy the objective of the project. 

* 3alter Trout Study ; 

This project was concluded during the past year and results pub- 
lished. The following represents a brief summary of this work. 

For a study of the sea-run trout fishery of Cape Cod, 92, 100 
marked brook trout (3-8 inches) were stocked in five coastal streams be- 
tween the years 1949 and 1956. Marine movement of hatchery brook trout 



14. 

was most pronounced between streams draining the same estuarine environ- 
ments, although there was inter stream movement that necessitated passage 
of the open sea for distances up to about eight miles. Salters move into 
fresh water streams mostly in May, June, and September, although there 
is some movement at all seasons of the year. Harvest, growth, and sur- 
vival of stocked brojk trout in these coastal streams is above the statewide 
average. "Salter" trout, as such, have a smaller average size (9-14 inches) 
than commonly believed. 

It was concluded that the potential of the "salter" resource, even 
though modest, is unique and well-worth management for maximum results. 
This is best accomplished by stocking brook trout, purchasing the better 
"salter" streams, and improving them through use of proven stream improve- 
ment techniques where needed. 

Rights -of- Way: 

Through the cooperative efforts of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game and other agencies, three rights-of-way to ponds were created. One 
was to Spectacle Pond, Lancaster, for which the U. 5. Army at Fort Devens 
deserves a great deal of credit. Army officials built a quarter-mile access 
road, parking area and boat -launching site at no cost to the sportsmen. The 
other two rights-of-way were provided by the selectmen of the towns of 
Spencer and Sturbridge at Sugdcn and Walker Ponds, respectively. The Div- 
ision was likewise active in encouraging various sportsmen's organizations, 
town, city and state groups to take positive action in solving this all-import- 
ant problem. The value of such action is self-evident in many areas of the 
state, particularly Cape Cod, where many excellent rights-of-way to ponds, 
open to use by all sportsmen, have been provided by the towns. 

Warmwater Fish Culture : 

In order to cope with an increasing demand for bass and pickerel 
for stocking reclaimed warmwater ponds, two rearing pond systems for 
culture of these species are maintained. In the fall of 1957, a total of 
10, 380 largemouth bass fingerlings (2-5 inches) and 14,565 largemouth bass 
yearlings (5-12 inches), weighing 2,373 pounds, were stocked from the Harold 
Parker System at North Andover into ponds that were either reclaimed or 
were being managed for this species. An additional 23,000 fingerlings were 
held over for stocking as two-year-olds. During the past year, four of the 
ponds at the Merrill Pond System at Sutton were drained. Production 
amounted to 1,084 fingerlings (3-8 inches) and 1,289 yearling and adult (7-23 
inches) chain pickerel. Their combined weight amounted to 475 pounds. A 
total of 1,097 yearling and adult pickerel were stocked in managed waters 
only. The remaining pickerel were restocked in the ponds drained either for 
brood fish or for carryover to yearling size. In addition, two of the larger, 
better ponds of the system, Adams and A r nold, were not drained, and their 
pickerel production was held over for stocking in 1958 as two-year -old fish. 



15. 

In addition, 695 largemouth bass (3» 15 inches) and 500 brown bullheads were 
stocked from this system. Use of the alewife as a forage fish in botjp systems 
proved a worthwhile innovation in increasing yield. 

Salvage and Transfer : 

Indiscriminate, haphazard stocking of warmwater fishes formerly 
conducted throughout the state in response to pressure from uninformed 
groups and persons has virtually been eliminated under provisions of the Fish 
Management Policy. The harmful and wasteful nature of these past stock- 
ings have become obvious. Fortunately, the angling public has become much 
enlightened in these matters in recent years. Emphasis has almost entirely 
shifted to salvage of predatory game species and pan fishes needed for spe- 
cific introduction into ponds that have been reclaimed. A more detailed sum- 
mary of salvage and thinning activities is shown in Table 2. 

Trout Culture : 

Table 3 covers fish produced at the five fish hatcheries maintained 
by the Division of Fisheries and Game, plus fish received from the U. S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service for liberation into open waters of the Commonwealth. 
A shipment of 5,000,000 eyed pike perch eggs was received on April 21, 1958, 
on an exchange basis with the New York Conservation Department, for incu- 
bation at our Palmer Hatchery. Some trouble was experienced following 
hatching which reduced the planting in the Quabbin Reservoir. 

Rainfall: The summer of 1957 received the least rainfall in many 
years and seriously affected several of the hatchery water supplies. However, 
wells installed a year ago provided emergency water to continue operations 
and a resulting production was achieved favorably comparable to recent years. 

Nutritional Research: This work was not only continued from 
the previous year but expanded by setting up feeding programs at all stations 
with monthly production reports filed on special forms with all necessary in~ 
formation appearing on one sheet. Clark self-sustaining pelleted food was 
used for comparable production costs at the Montague and Sunderland hatch- 
eries along with the standard hatchery diet and the Cortland pellets and meat 
ration. The Sandwich hatchery entered the research program in November 
using Clark pelleted food on large fingerling rainbow. Initial results at the 
latter station were promising enough to place the entire station on pellets in 
June. Both the Palmer and Sutton hatcheries were assigned limited programs 
employing Cortland pellets in order that all personnel at the stations could 
become better versed in pellet nutrition. The accumulated data thus far in- 
dicates a considerable saving in food costs, comparing the standard meat diet 
with pelleted foods. 

Disease Control : No major problems were experienced from 
infectious diseases at the hatcheries during the past year. There was, how- 



16. 

ever, some trouble with the fingerling and yearling stock at one of the 
hatcheries, necessitating the use of drugs for controlling mortalities, 
which to date has proven successful. This is one of the many problems 
that confront the average fish culturist and must be dealt with as part of 
the trade. 

Reconstruction and Co nstruction : The installation of 900 feet 
of 6-inch transit water pipe for carrying much-needed water from the new 
8-inch well at Sunderland to all sections of the pond systems, enabling pro- 
duction to remain at a reasonably high level, was of major importance. Re- 
construction of ponds took place at all stations. Many small 2-inch wells 
were driven to eir.her supplement existing supplies or replace units no longe: 
producing. The maintenance of state properties, including pond systems, 
presents considerable need for an increase in funds to cover labor and mat- 
erials needed to meet maintenance costs. 

Regulations: 

During the reporting period, bass fishing was legalized to co- 
incide with the opening of the regular fishing season on the third Saturday of 
April. This was a regulatory change of vast significance to Massachusetts 
anglers. Prior to this, the season on black bass did not open until July 1. 

Inventory and Miscellaneous: 

Any fisheries program that is designed to benefit the sportsman 
by improved fishing must of necessity be an active one. Consequently, such 
a program quickly encounters a wide range of frustrating problems for 
which there are no available answers. It must then set out to find these 
answers. Therefore, many kinds of year-to-year investigational manage- 
ment activities are engaged in, much as inventories of stock and sales are 
periodically done in supermarkets. 

The following summary illustrates the magnitude and variety 
of such activities. Twenty-six ponds were fyke-netted, 72 ponds spot- 
poisoned, ten ponds seined and 25 ponds gill-netted to determine growth 
rates, population balance, reproductive success and survival rates of the 
fish populations in these waters. The majority of these waters are ponds 
that are under intensive management through reclamation, partial poisoning 
or fyke -netting. It is vital that a continuous program of evaluation con- 
current with management be carried out for the purpose of improving cur- 
rent management techniques. Less obvious than the field work of procuring 
necessary fish samples, but equally important, is the laboratory analysis of 
such data. The key to such analysis generally revolves about the determining 
of the age of fish samples. During the last year, the ages of over 10,000 in- 
dividual fish were determined through the scale method. 

Other laboratory work centered on analyzing the physical-chem- 
ical field data on some 25 ponds, including map-making. 



17. 

Other activities included: Posting of ponds, repair and main- 
tenance of property and equipment, field investigations on fish kills and 
pollution complaints; processing of applications for federal trout and bass, 
and, in some cases, distribution of these fish; promotion and assistance to 
clubs and civic groups relative to conservation projects; preparation of ma- 
terial for publication, trouble -shooting problems affecting water areas, such 
as; weed problems, leeches, parasites in fish, crayfish along swimming beacheb 
and in industrial inlets from ponds; assistance and advice to other government 
agencies on fishways, pol.lution studies, weed control, etc., demonstration of 
stream improvement; general correspondence; keeping abreast of fishery act- 
ivities and techniques in other areas; and attending public hearings on rights- 
of-way, changes in regulations, flood control, opening closed reservoirs to 
public fishing, and renewal of management agreements on artificial ponds, 
Opening -weekend creel sampling on reclaimed trout ponds; and a myriad of 
other small but necessary tasks fundamental to the operation of any state 
fisheries program. 



PUBLIC FISHING GROUNDS 
(Under Lease) 

Stream Town 

Westfield 

East Branch Huntington, Chester, Cummington, 

Chesterfield 

Middle Branch Huntington, Chester, Worthington, 

Middlefield 

West Branch Huntington, Chester, Middlefield, 

Becket 

Millers River Athol at Bears. Den 

Framir_gton River Tolland, Otis, Sandisfield 

Buck River and Clam River Sandisfield 

Squannacook River Towns end, Groton 

Deerfield River Charlemont, Rowe, Florida 

Ipswich River Middleton, Danvers, Peabody, Lynnfield 

Shawsheen River , Billerica, Tewksbury, vVilmington, 

Andover 
Assabet River Hudson, Berlin, Marlboro 



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20, 



21. 

INFORMATION AND EDUCATION 

The policy of the Division of Fisheries and Game has this to say 
with regard to information and education: 

"Every effort should be made to inform the public regarding the 
purpose and progress of all wildlife conservation activities in the Common- 
wealth. By so doing, an informed populace will demand that only sound, 
far-sighted conservation programs will be employed 11 . 

To fulfill this statement of policy, the information and education 
section is charged with developing a public awareness of the need for con- 
servation of natural resources^ with particular emphasis on wildlife re- 
sources, and is further responsible for informing and educating the public 
concerning sound courses of action regarding general and specific problems 
in the management and utilization of fish and game resources. 

The section is also responsible for developing an atmosphere of 
public understanding and cooperation with the policies, programs and proj- 
ects of the Division, and further must provide general informational ser- 
vices requested by the public such as "how to" and "where to go" materials, 
information on laws and regulations, motion pictures for club, lodge, civic 
association and youth-group meetings, and a host of literature on varied 
subjects of interest and value to sportsmen. The section is further charged 
with coordinating and superivising the information and education activities 
of all other units of the Division to affect a sound, well-integrated, total 
information and education program. 

Following is a numerative account of the measureable production 
of the Division's information and education program during the past fiscal 
yaar. Many effective activities in this field cannot be measured - inform- 
ation and education work is essentially a creative field, highly dependent 
upon individual participation, verbal effort, personal contacts and similar 
"idea transferring "measures that do not lend themselves to tabulation. 

Press Releases: 



A total of 60 written press releases were issued by information 
and education during the year. Of these, 46 were statewide releases and 14 
were special releases in answer to requests originating with the press. 
Numerous personal contacts with the press resulted in considerable additional 
publicity as well. District managers issued a total of 25 releases within 
their districts. The total number of individual news stories thus released 
(excepting through personal contacts) was 109. In addition, several still- 
photo releases were made, either to cover a given story or in response to 
requests. Television news releases numbered 31. Most of these were on 
the same stories covered in the general press releases but a few were on 
special stories that lent themselves particularly to this media. As is usual, 
all general releases were sent to all rod and gun editors, daily newspapers, 






22. 

selected weekly papers, all radio and TV news directors, certain intetfe*£t- 
ed;: individuals, and conservation field personnel. 

Massachusetts Wildlife: 

Publication of the Division's bi-monthly magazine continued in 
the same format, with six issues published. Circulation figures increased 
each issue by some 700-800 names, with the issue at the close of the fiscal 
year being sent to approximately 20,200 names. Another 2500 copies of 
this issue have received additional circulation in answer to inquiries for 
specific information as is the case with each issue. 

Television and Radio: 



In January, the Division was given an opportunity to present 
its own half -hour weekly television program over a major Boston station. 
Unfortunately the limited size of the staff available to the information and 
education section made a weekly commitment impossible, but a monthly 
half -hour program, narrated live - over - film and with live guests, is 
being conducted on this station. This program (Dateline Boston) received 
a merit award from the American Association for Conservation Information 
during the year. Seven of these programs were produced, and five were 
later re-done over a Springfield station. In addition, the information and 
education section and the Sunderland fish hatchery each "guested" one 15- 
minute program over another station, and information and education per- 
sonnel provided all material and appeared as guests on 13 "Critter Corner" 
TV shows over another major Boston station. In January, a monthly com- 
mitment to provide material and guests for an outdoor radio program was 
taken, and two of these five -minute interviews are being run each month. 
Other personnel frequently assisted in the Division's TV and radio act- 
ivities. 

Exhibits : 

The Division participated in 12 exhibits at sportsmen's shows 
and fairs. Seven included presentation of Division exhibits, and five con- 
sisted of providing assistance to sportsmen's groups. District personnel 
handled all exhibits except the New England Sportsmen's Show which was 
handled by information and education with District assistance. 

Film Library : 

all f4l c "^ ° f ^ free - loan film library continued unceasingly although 
aU films are xn poor condition as a result of insufficient funds to provide 
new ones. Approxxmately 25, 600 people viewed Division feature films dur- 



23. 

sufficient funds for final printing and distribution. In addition, several 
of the 600 "800 -foot reels shot for television use show promise as po- 
tential feature films for the film library. 

Meetings: 

An important part of information and education activities 
throughout the Division is taking part in organizational meetings. Dist- 
rict personnel participated in 269 meetings of sportsmen's clubs, civic 
groups, church groups, schools^ and -other community groups. In addition, 
30 special talks before youth groups, scouts and the junior conservation 
camp were made by District personnel. 

Publications: 

A total of 24 titles were maintained in the free publications 
list, and thousands of requests for these publications, or for information 
supplied in them, were filled. 

During the reporting period, the annual report and the current 
year's fish and game laws flier were produced. In addition, a reprint of 
74 Million Dollars Just for Fun was obtained, and at the close of the fiscal 
year work was nearing completion on Th e Salter Trout Fishery of Cape 
Cod, Fur Facts and Trapping in Massachuse tts, and a printed, illustrated 
version of An Introduction to Problems of Producing Sport Fishing in 
Massachusetts. Work was also begun on a similar publication to be called 
An Introduction to Problems of Producing Hunting in Massachusetts. 



24. 



COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 
Supported by the Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Game, U. S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service and Wildlife Manage- 
ment Institute. 



General: 

Unit personnel gave several public talks during the year before 
sportsmens' clubs and other groups. 

Training of professional personnel continued, and several grad- 
uates completed either undergraduate or graduate training. 

Woodcock Project : 

Of greatest importance from a research point of view was the 
development of an aging technique by examination of wings of fall-shot wood- 
cocks. Such a technique has proved an invaluable tool in the management 
of other upland game birds, and previous efforts by other workers had failed 
to develop a similar method for woodcocks. 

Evaluation of Forest Ty pes as Game Cover: 

Roger W. Rich is completing his thesis on this project in absentia 
and completion is planned during fiscal year 1958-59. 

Otter Project: 

Analysis of populations and food habits of the river otter in 
central Massachusetts has been almost completed and will be reported on in 
the next year. 

Posted Land Study : 

Work on this project was completed in June, and the results will 
appear in a later publication. 

Ruffed Grouse Study : 

Censusing of spring populations of drumming grouse was expanded 
experimentally to a statewide basis with the cooperation of the District Game 
Managers. Results suggested this method of inventory should be continued 
on an annual basis. 

Wetland Study : 

A new project was begun during the past year with the main ob- 






25. 

jective of evaluating wildlife values or potential of different types of marshes 
and swamps. Currently the project is confined to a study of wooded swamps. 

Other Projects Not Financed by Division of Fisheries and Game: 

One graduate student financed by the University Experiment 
Station completed the first phase of a long-term study on control of birds 
causing agricultural depredations. An effective repellent and control 
method, was developed in a porcupine project financed by the U. S. Fish 
and "Wildlife Servicei 





^-.jlNISTRATION 










HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S 
July 1, 1957 to 


DOLLAR WAS SPENT 
June 30, 1958 






ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 
Fish & Game Board 
Information-Education 


3304-01 
3304-06 
3304-01 


$ 83,619.96 
1,348.02 


$ 


84,967.98 
40,615.71 


11° 
Jl° 


PROPAGATION 
Fish 
Game 


3304-31 
3304-31 






338,308.78 
244,785.15 


27* 

20$ 


WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 
Game 


3304-44 

3304-51 

(a) *3304-53 


$ 7,476.30 

55,905.77 

115,689.35 




179,071.42 


l4# 


Fish 


3304-42 

3304-45 

*3304-47 

3304-51 


$ 91,671.60 
12,498.85 
47,629.85 
55,905.78 




207,706.08 


17$ 


LAND ACQUISITION 


(a) *3304-53-l8 
(a) *3304-58 

(a) 3308-05 
3308-07 
1003-03 


$ 698.40 
205.80 




904.20 
147,483.21 


.( 


LAW ENFORCEMENT 


$ 8,255.02 

8,080.00 

131,148.19 


12$ 








$1,243,842.53 


lOOfo 



26 



.0007$ 



* Expenditures reimbursed 75$ by Federal Funds 
(a) Continuing Appropriations - expenditures only 

SURPLUS IN INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND AS OF JUNE 30, 1958 - $310,151.41 



THE 


PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL ITEMS OF THIS 


REPORT 


ARE : 


EN AGREEMENT WITH THE COMPTROLLER'S 


BOOKS. 


J. F 


. L. 10-23-58 J. T. O'Shea T. 
Date Checked by 

Frederick J. Sheehan 
Comptroller 


J. S. 



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28 



SUMMARY OF PISH AND GAME INCOME 
JULY 1, 1937 to JUNE 30, 1958 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $ 984,877-75 * 
Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 5 > 737. 30 ** 

Rents 2,554.90 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 2, 825.41 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 87,499.67 

Dinge 11- Johnson Federal Aid 44,767.08 

Court Fines 10,054.90 

Refunds Prior Year 15.20 

$1,138,332.21 

*See Detail Sheet #1 
**See Detail Sheet #2 



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Detail Sheet #2 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 48, 68A, 

102-3-4-5-6-7 and 112-A, Chapter 131, G. L. during the 

fiscal year ending June 30, 1958 



TYPE OF LICENSE 
Class 1 - Special Fish Propagator's License 
Class 2 - Special Fish Propagator's License 
Class 3 - Fish Propagator's License 
Class 4 - Propagator's License (Birds & Mammals) 
Class 5 - Special Propagator' 6 License 
Class 6 - Dealer's License 
Class 7 - Possession Only License 
Class 8 - Quail for Training Dogs 
Trap Registrations 

Fur Buyer's License (Resident & Non Resident) 
Taxidermist's License 
License to Taie Shiners for Bait 
Field Trial License 
Fish Tags @ 1# 
Game Tags @ 5^ 



NUMBER 
ISSUED 



AMOUNT 



211 


$ 229.00 


1 


no fee 


103 


333.00 


383 


1,299.00 


5 


no fee 


477 


689.OO 


76 


47.00 


15 


67.00 


1071 


384.75 


31 


490.00 


56 


280.00 


347 


1,735.00 


2 


20.00 


7500 


75.00 


1771 


88.55 



** $5,737.30 



31. 

NUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATION^; AND REGULATIONo PRO: j; 
ULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES -" ND GAME DURING FISCAL 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1958 



August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial prop- 
agation and maintenance of fish. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial prop- 
agation of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows 
and arrows. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of 
protected fresh water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

/larch 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display 
of sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, 
effective April 9, 1954, and revoking rules and regulations in this regard 
promulgated on September 23, 1953. 

January 28, 1955, Rules and regulations relative to public 
fishing grounds in Massachusetts. 

November 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of deer in Massachusetts, effective January 1, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Interstate fishing regulations on vVallum Lake, 
effective April 10, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of 
fish in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, 
effective April 10, 1956. 

January 30, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts, effective February 1, 1957, 
and revoking rules and regulations dated January 1, 1956. 

February 5, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

February 14, 195?. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging 
of deer in Massachusetts. 

February 15, 195 7. Rules and regulations relating to the hunt- 
ing of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 



32. 

September* 7, 1957* Migratory game bird regulations for 
season of 1957. 

October 10, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of certain fish in Massachusetts, effective October 10, 1957, and revoking 
rules and regulations promulgated on February 1, 1957. 

October' JO, 1957, Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts, effective 
October 10, 1957. 

October 21, 1957. Rules and regulations for public shooting 
grounds in Massachusetts, effective October 21, 1957. 



LESIGL^TION 

The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries 
and Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1958. 

CHAPTER 30, RESOLVES, 1958: Resolve providing for an investigation 

and study relative to the feasibility of 
establishing a fish hatchery in the area 
adjacent to Quabbin Reservoir. 

CHAPTER 124, RESOLVES, 1958: Resolve increasing the scope of the 

special commission established to 
make an investigation and study rel- 
ative to hunting and fishing within the 
Commonwealth and certain matters 
relating thereto. 

CHAPTER 440, .^CTS, 1958: An act£ prohibiting the hunting of 

certain wild or undomesticated birds. 



33. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Edward G. Griffin, aged 59, fish culturist in charge of 
the Palmer state fish hatchery, died May 12, 1958 as a result of in- 
juries sustained when struck by an automobile. The accident occurred 
the evening of May 11, 1958, while he was on tour of duty attending pike 
perch eggs and newly-hatched fry. 

Edward Griffin was born in Thorndike and spent his early 
life in that vicinity. He entered state service at the Palmer hatchery 
in April, 1930, as a laborer under the late William Monroe. His in- 
terest and loyalty made him a valued and trusted employee and led to 
his promotion to assistant culturist in November of 1936 and fish cult- 
urist on July 1, 1954. Ed acquired considerable knowledge in bass cul- 
ture work at the hatchery and while engaged in pond fish management 
work for the Division which took him to all sections of the state. He 
was highly respected by all personnel within the department. 

Surviving is his widow, Alice Griffin, now residing at 
Palmer, Massachusetts. 



RETIRED 



Jacob Grosbergof the Sunderland hatchery, retired. March 
31, 1958, having served 16 years as a permanent worker. His con- 
struction knowledge was of great help to the structural projects carried 
on throughout the years he was in state service. 



Y. 



^S <L 











1 9 



M 




THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
7; TRBMONT STREHT, BOSTON 6 






STATEUBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

APR 7 I960 

STATE HOUSE. BOSTON 



MASS OFF 






d3<jP\ 






r\^ 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, Foster A. Furcolo, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council;, the General Court, arid the Board of Fisheries 

and Gs.me 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety- 
fourth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering 
the fiscal year from July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959. 



Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES L. McLAUGHLIN, 
Director 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Ninety -fourth Annual Report 

July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959 

T ABJ ± E_qF_C^N_TE2Tr_S_ 

Report of the Board 1 

Fisheries Program 4 

Information and Education Program 10 

Game Program. 14 

Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 22 

Administration: 

Tables: How the Sportsmen's Dollar was Spent 24 

Appropriations and Expenditures 25 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 26 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trap- 
ping Licenses 27 

Analysis of Special Licenses 28 

Legislation 29 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations 30 



Personnel 31 



Publication. Approved by State Purchasing Agent #9 



■V ! 



i 3 ( '■ -s -. 



.•■f ;•-.- 



•• ■ir. t> 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



The Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game is pleased to 
report continued progress, with several notable achievements, of the Div- 
ision for the fiscal year 1958 - 1959. 

Details of the activities of all sections of the Division are des- 
cribed in the individual reports contained herein. Highlighting these ac- 
complishments, the Board wishes to comment as follows: 

Game Program 

Development of better public hunting has been the aim of the game 
program during the past year. Stocking programs were modified to pro- 
duce maximum results in the hunter's bag, additional land was acquired 
for public shooting grounds and several other areas were investigated and 
given priority for purchase when funds become available. The research 
program continued with investigations centering on evaluation of manage- 
ment work. 

An area of 1,404 acres in the town of Falmouth was purchased, 
which not only will provide public hunting grounds, but also contained some 
of the shoreline of .Ashumet Pond, benefiting fishermen as well. Several 
smaller parcels of land were turned over to the Division by the Military 
Affairs Commission, which helped to increase the land available for public 
hunting and improved Division property in several instances. 

More pheasants were released this year than in the past. The 
propagation units raised 40,470 cocks and 9^615 hens for release during 
the reporting period, 

The highest harvest of deer ever recorded in Massachusetts took 
place in the 1958 season, with 4,387 being taken. Bowhunters took 36 of 
these. 

In line with the Board's emphasis on economy, deer checking 
stations this year were limited to the first and last days of the season, 
rather than being run all week as was the case in the past. An adequate 
sample of the herd was obtained. 

Fisheries Program 

In spite of no increase in facilities, hatchery personnel produced 
a record number of trout for stocking Massachusetts streams and ponds this 
year. A grand total of 1, 886, 1 19 fish were reared, of which 1, 050, 532 were 
catchable size. The larger sizes above nine inches totaled 634,586 fish. 

-1- 



In reaching this production figure, two of the biggest stations 
achieved a production food cost of only 27 cents per pound of fish raised, 
the lowest yet, This can be attributed to careful management and the use 
of pelleted feeds. 

A unique research study on sterilization of panfish that may be 
an aid to warmwater fisheries management, by preventing overpopulation 
and consequent poor growth, was continued. Preliminary results on aquar- 
ium fish appear to be promising. 

Management work on ponds continues to produce better fishing. 
During the year, IE ponds were reclaimed for trout management and 11 ponds 
were reclaimed for warmwater species. 

Information and Education 

The tremendous population of Massachusetts, which is crowded 
into a relatively small area,creates aggravated resource problems. The 
need for more educational effort is obvious. The Board continued to seek 
expansion in this field through budgetary requests. Our greatest lack, in 
addition to needing more personnel in the visual-aid and writing fields, is 
in youth education. There is no statewide conservation education program 
for youth in Massachusetts at the present time. 

The Board feels that immediate expansion is required in the 
information and education program. Public understanding and cooperation 
is the key to success of any program involving the public. Conservation 
must become a common term .properly understood by the majority of people, 
if we are to really have wise use of natural resources in this state. Such 
public understanding and public action is possible only through a properly 
financed, progressive information and education program utilizing every 
possible medium of information; newspapers, magazines and other publi- 
cations, television and radio, exhibits, motion pictures, and youth programs. 

The I & E section produced 31 television shows and 12 television 
news strips, and participated in television and radio in other ways on num- 
erous occasions. Over 34,000 people saw Division films last year, exclu- 
sive of television audiences. Release of an average of two new stories a 
week, plus numerous contacts to obtain feature coverage, resulted in pub- 
lication ranging from local rod and gun columns, regional and national wire 
service stories, to national magazine features. The subscription list of 
Massachusetts Wildlife increased by 3, 613 bringing the total mailing list to 
23, 813 at the close of the fiscal year. 

Finances 

The surplus- o& t'hp. JrlanH Fish^ri^s and f,amf> Funrl contilM***! to 

rlpntoaofl, with tbf» balance as of June 30, 1959, at $231,953, 13. This com- 

-2- 



pares with the balance as of June 30 1958* of $310, 151.41. Fortunately, 
the 1959 legislature passed our request fot a general increase in license 
fees, which will help to slow this declining trend when income from these 
increases becomes available in the coming fiscal year. 

Personnel 

During the fiscal year there were three vacancies on the Board 
occasioned by the completion of the terms of Mr. Frederick A. McLaughlin 
and Mr. James W. Cesan and the resignation of Mr. Henry Russell. All 
three served the sportsmen well during their tenure of office. Mr. Harper L, 
Gerry was appointed to the Board on August 14, 1958, succeeding Mr. Mc- 
Laughlin, and Mr. Bert Nietupski was appointed on May 7, 1959, succeeding 
Mr. Cesan. On May 27, 1959, Mr. Frederick Retallick was elected Chair- 
man and Mr. Thomas Joyce was elected Secretary. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the effective 
and loyal service of all of the personnel of the Division whose interest in the 
work extends beyond the monetary considerations involved. 



Sgnd/ Thomas M. Joyce, 
Secretary 



-3- 



FISHERIES PROGRAM 

During the reporting period the fisheries program of the Mass- 
achusetts Division of Fisheries and Game was divided into four distinct 
phases; i.e., management, evaluation, research, and trouble -shooting. By- 
far, the greatest amount of time and money was spent in management act- 
ivities. Under this heading are grouped those activities designed to provide 
immediate recreation for the Massachusetts angler, and the techniques used 
are based on proven facts and past successes. These activities include pond 
reclamation, warmwater fish culture, trout propagation, and stocking. Also 
included are less obvious duties running the gamut from the erection of "Fish- 
erman Landing" signs to the construction of fish screens on pond outlets. 

Under evaluation are listed those activities that assist the fish- 
eries managers in determining what management practices must be applied 
to any given body of water to ensure better fishing. During the past year, 
fish populations of 112 ponds and lakes were sampled through the use of nets 
and/or chemical spot-checks. Opening -weekend creel checks were run on 
25 ponds scattered throughout the state. Extended surveys of fishing success 
were carried out on 19 ponds during this period. The actual field work, in 
this phase of the operation, was only part of the story. All field data was 
analyzed in the offices and laboratories of the Field Headquarters. From 
these figures, and from age and growth interpretations made from the scales 
of thousands of fish, fisheries technicians arrived at, and implemented, man- 
agement plans for the bodies of water i-i question. 

Fisheries research is, in the main, so closely tied in with the 
other phases of the complete program that it may, to many persons, be ob- 
scured. The strides made in fisheries management over the past few years 
attest to the fact that, in this state and the country, our admittedly meager 
research funds have paid tremendous dividends. In Massachusetts there is 
only one project that could even possibly bear the oft -maligned label of "basic 
research", It is unfortunate that such is the case. Nonetheless, research, 
or fact-finding, is an important phase of the activities of the fisheries section, 
Because of the demands made on the staff of the fisheries section by the mech- 
anics of administering a statewide fisheries program, research time must be 
sandwiched into the schedule whenever the opportunity presents itself. 

The fourth category, trouble -shooting, includes a host of act- 
ivities ranging from field investigations of fish die-offs to. speaking before 
such widely divergent groups as garden clubs, sportsmens' clubs, and police 
athletic associations. A considerable amount of time must be spent on pub- 
lic relations duties, • writing for publications, pollution investigations, at- 
tending public hearings relating to conservation, assisting local, state, and 
federal groups in planning conservation programs, and the routine mainten- 
ance of public properties and equipment assigned to the fisheries section. 

Specific phases are reported upon as follows: 

-4- 



(Projects designated by an asterisk are federal-aid-to-fisheries 
projects, 75 percent of the cost of which is reimbursed by federal tax monies 
collected on fishing tackle under the Dingell-Johnson Act,) 

Quabbin Reservoir* 

In order to measure fish harvest in this, our largest single 
angling area, the intensive creel census was continued through the past re- 
porting period. It was obvious that the stocks of lake, brown, and rainbow 
trout were being rapidly enlarged through efforts of the development program. 
It is also apparent that the introduction of walleyes has met with no success; 
a situation that may be overcome by varying future stocking techniques. The 
smelt population rose to such a high level that control measures had to be 
taken to protect water interests of the Metropolitan District Commission. 
The extreme abundance of smelt was reflected in an acceleration of growth 
rates and harvested size of all trout and warmwater game species. 

Pond Reclamations * 

The chemical reclamation of ponds continued, with 12 ponds 
totaling 238 acres treated to improve trout fishing, and 11 ponds totaling 594 
acres similarly rehabilitated for warmwater sports fishes. The individual 
ponds are listed in a table presented at the end of this report. 

Sterilization and Sex Reversal Studies* 

During the past reporting period this project was expanded and 
aided by the construction of six small ponds adjacent to the Westboro Field 
Headquarters. This allows testing the effects of estrogenic hormones and 
chemical castration agents in natural water areas, and gives technical per- 
sonnel the opportunity to observe growth and reproductive changes artificially 
induced in larger specie s a Pilot tests on aquarium fish, completed during 
this period, were encouraging enough to warrant this expansion, 

Warmwater Fish Stocking 

In the fall of 1958, 29, 132 largemouth bass yearlings and finger- 
lings, as well as 15,400 smallmouth bass fingerlings, were placed in state- 
managed waters from the Harold Parker rearing system at Andover. Only 
one pond of the Merrill system at Sutton was drained during this reporting 
period, and 4,402 chain pickerel, of which 80% ranged between 8 and 15 inches, 
were released into managed waters,, The use of the salt water alewife as a 
forage species continued, and 13, 760 ripe adults were distributed to rearing 
systems and open waters. Field units netted and transferred brood stock 
from many closed waters to reclaimed ponds throughout the state. Eleven 
ponds received a total of 14,575 yellow perch and 665 adult game fishes. It 
should be noted that, consistent with the fisheries policy of the Division, these 
plantings were made only in ponds under active management and where the 
need and justification of such action had been biologically demonstrated. 

-5- 



Trout Production 

A new low in food costs per pound of fish production, advancing 
our trout egg hatching periods, ajad a general increase in total pounds pro- 
duced at our trout hatcheries, ar4 only a few of the highlights accomplished 
within the propagation unit of the Division of Fisheries and Game during the 
period of July, 1958, through June, 1959. 

The attached summarized production table covers all five fish 
hatcheries, also trout received from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service for 
liberation in open waters of the Commonwealth. The distribution of 4, 900, 00 
pike perch fry originated from a consignment of eyed pike perch eggs re- 
ceived from the New York State Conservation Department, in exchange for 
eyed brook and rainbow trout, eggs. Sufficient inventories of brook, brown, 
and rainbow brood stocks are being maintained for supplying all trout egg 
needs of the Division, 

Results of continued investigations of pellet feeding have been 
very encouraging in that two of the larger stations have already established 
production food costs of 27 cents per pound, at the same time increasing 
each station's output of fish. Nutrition has consisted of both the self-sus- 
taining pellets and the combination of pelleted materials supplemented with 
meat feedings. It appears more certain now that the self-sustaining foods 
will eventually be used as the standard diet at all stations, with the exception 
of starting fry on meats and an occasional meat feeding for the breeders. 

The very cold winter weather demonstrated the need of raceway 
systems and a further use of warm well water for conversion of food through 
cold periods. Many new wells were constructed at several of the stations 
and added greatly to the success of the work. The wells at Palmer made 
possible trout fry hatching and feeding several weeks earlier than in other 
years. 

During this period several newly developed items of equipment 
were acquired to further trout propagation. .Among these were a noise de- 
vice to discourage fish-eating birds, a newly designed distribution tank, and 
an aeration device to make environmental conditions in rearing ponds more 
conducive to rapid growth during hot, humid periods and to maintain ice -free 
condition? during winter months, 



-6- 



'a. :. , 



Warmwater Reclamations 



Pond 


Town 


Area 


Wgt of Fish 






(Acres) 


Removed 
(Pounds) 


Barretts Pond 


Carver 


16 


790 


Cunningham Pond 


Hubbardston 


28 


1158 


Ezekial Pond 


Plymouth 


36 


1104 


Five Mile Pond 


Plymouth 


29 


2 79 


Flints Pond 


Tyngsboro 


61 


480 


Herring Pond 


Eastham 


43 


1720 


Hoods Pond 


Ipswich 


63 


3830 


Jacobs Pond 


Nor we 11 


59 


1200 


Lawrence Pond 


Sandwich 


138 


6000 


Walker Pond 


Stur bridge 


104 


8850 


Widgeon Pond 


Plymouth 
Totals 


30 


669 




594 


21,981 



-7- 



•b ; 



!.!(!• 



Trout Pond Reclamations 



Pond 



Town 


.Area 


Wgto Fish 




(Acres) 


Removed 
(Pounds) 


Ludlow 


25 


3700 


Concord 


43 


2150 


Wenham 


28 


1680 


Have rhill 


41 


4100 


Falmouth 


28 


1568 


Plymouth 


8 


1200 


Truro 


17 


850 


Truro 


3 1/2 


175 


Brimfield 


11 


440 


Brimfield 


10 


400 


3rimfield 


4 


160 


Clinton 


20 


2000 



Chapin Pond 
White Pond 
Pleasant Pond 
Plug Pond 
Mares Pond 
Russell & Monings P 
Great Pond 
Round Pond 
Dean Pond 
Woodman Pond 
Dearth Hill Pond 
Lancaster Mill Pond 



Totals 



238 1/2 



18,423 



-8- 



FISH DISTRIBUTION JULY 1, 1958 to JUNE 30, 1959 
(This table does not show fish retained for brood stock) 

TROUT 
Brooks Browns Rainbows Total Trout 

Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6 " 

572,987 698,056 102,500 208,993 160,100 143,483 1,886,119 

Total Trout distributed 6 - 9" 415,946 

Total Trout distributed 9" plus 634, 586 

Total Catchables (6 n plus) 1,050,532 

Total Finger lings (6" minus) 835, 587 

Grand Total 1,886, 119 

POUNDAGE PRODUCTION BY STATIONS 
Station Total Pounds 



Montague 64, 440 

Sandwich 89,660 1/2 

Sunderland 119,881 

Sutton 14,213 

Palmer 32, 823 
U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service 4, 713 



Tastal Poundage 325, 730 1/2 



Palmer Hatchery also distributed 4,900,000 pike perch fry. 



-9- 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 



Recognizing that public understanding is essential to conser- 
vation progress, the information and education program continued to stress 
public awareness of, and cooperation with, conservation measures. 

The program did not confine itself to merely publicizing the 
activities of the Division, however, but continued through the media of public 
information to acquaint people with the need for;, and the way towards, wise 
use of all natural resources. Emphasis was placed on wildlife and resources 
having direct bearing on wildlife, both as a reflection of the source of funds 
and as an indication of the sportsmen's concern for all natural resources. In- 
formation on the Division's activities was made available continually, and as 
rapidly as possible, in the belief that an informed public will insist on pro- 
gressive, effective conservation measures. 

Efforts during the year were directed strongly toward emphas- 
izing wildlife's economic, cultural, esthetic and recreational contributions 
to our national life, to improving relations among sportsmen, landowners, 
and others concerned with the outdoors, and to promoting conservation-ed- 
ucation in schools. 

Much that is called "information and education" does not lend 
itself to normal reporting methods. This report includes an indication of 
such activity throughout the Division, as well as numerically reported act- 
ivities, whether of the I&E section or of other units. 

Massachusetts continues to spend a far smaller proportion of its 
fish and game funds on this prog r ana than do nearly all other states. 

Conservation Education 

A primary effort continued throughout the year was that of de- 
veloping public demand for a statewide, state -coordinated program of con- 
servation education in our school systems. 

Notable teaching programs have been in operation for years in 
certain areas, under dedicated individuals, and by the Audubon Society. The 
Massachusetts Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs has developed an active pro- 
gram of making selected conservation education materials available to schools, 
through its member clubs. The Audubon Society annually conducts natural 
resource courses in over 100 school systems, and materials are available from 
several governmental and non-governmental groups, to teachers who request 
assistance. 

However, there is no widely integrated, properly coordinated 
statewide program available as in the case of most other states. The majority 
of our school children still have little or no opportunity to acquire a sense of 

-10- 



responsibility for the proper use of natural resources, nor much opportunity 
to acquire any knowledge about them. 

Perhaps even more important is the lack of any planned program 
in Massachusetts to prepare student teachers, while in training, to teach this 
subject or to relate it to teaching methods and curricula. 

Considerable effort through editorial writing, public speaking, 
and official contacts was directed to the potential correction of these con- 
ditions. 

The Junior Conservation Camp, the only immediately productive 
youth education project in which the Division is regularly engaged, completed 
its tenth year during the reporting period, with 158 boys attending. The Div- 
ision's part in this camp is to provide audic-visual materials,, wildlife and 
fisheries management instruction, certain publicity, and assist in planning 
through participation in the camp committee representing the many public 
and private resource groups sponsori.ig the camp, 

Inservice Training 

Of growing importance is the conduct of annual inservice training 
workshops for Division personnel* Many states require cei'tain or all of their 
personnel to attend such vvorks^op-s regularly. A two -day workshop for fish- 
eries personnel was conducted by the fishes ies section with the cooperation of 
the I&E section in February. Training of this type has already proved val- 
uable to all personnel in increased efficiency. 

Press Releases 



The Division issued 103 news stories (28-district, 75-I&E) during 
the year, In addition 53 recorded cor.tacts were made (39 -district. 14-I&.E) 
during the year to obtain fsatarc coverage. The press was assisted at their 
request by all units on many occasions t 

I&E issued 12 television news films and six releases of photo- 
feature material. 

Coverage achieved through press releases and feature contacts 
ranged from publication in rod a>rd gun columns throughout the siate, regional 
and nationwide wire service stories, to national magazine features. Radio 
and TV newscasts utilized press release material on many occasions. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

Publication of the Division's bi-monthly magazine continued in 
the 6" x 9 M , 24-page, slick format, with the subscription list at the end of the 
fiscal year totaling 23, 813 names, a net gain of 3, 613 over the previous year. 

-11- 



An additional distribution of from 1, 000 to 3, 000 copies of each issue has been 
made upon individual request. 

No particular effort was made to promote circulation, since nor- 
mal increases in the mailing list Without promotion already place a strain on 
the limited budget. 

Television and R?dio 

I&E prepared and presented 13 Dateline Boston shows, 13 Critter 
Corner shows and 5 Fish and Game shows during the year. The Dateline Boston 
series are half -hour presentations aimed primarily at the adult, general public. 
The Critter Corner shows run about 15 minutes each and are aimed at a juv- 
enile audience. Both are presented on free time over Boston stations, cover- 
ing an area within which more than two -thirds of the population of New England 
lives. The Fish and Game shows are also on free time, and were presented 
over a Connecticut Valley station. All programs rely heavily on up-to-the- 
minute film plus live presentation with guests from the Division or outside 
depending on subject matter. 

In addition, hatchery and I&E personnel appeared as guests on 
sponsored shows in western Massachusetts on two occasions. 

A greatly limited I&E budget, less than was available last year, 
further aggravated by rising costs and generally increased activity, continued 
to prevent our accepting additional time offered on other stations. 

The only regular radio participation that has been possible, other 
than release of news, is the monthly recording of tw -4-minute interviews with 
a Boston station, done on a rotating basis by districts, plus an occasional guest 
spot. Considerable spot coverage was obtained by personal contact with one 
prominent disc jockey. 

Film Library 



No additions to the outmoded and worn-out film library were made 
during the year, due to budgetary problems. A total of 429 showing^ before 
34,320 people, was recorded for the exitting library of seven titles. This is 
an increase in use over the previous year. 

Exhibits 

Ten exhibits were participated in by the Division. For the most 
part, participation consisted of districts assisting the sponsoring groups by 
providing live specimens, and in a few cases, erection of simple display 
boards, provision of literature, etc. Shortage of operating funds makes this 
phase of activities the first to be reduced, since it gives the least informational 
and educational value of all I&E activities, for funds and time expended. There 

-12- 



wa& no New_England Sportsmen's Show this year. 

Publications 

A total of 57 titles were. maintained in the free publications list, 
and thousands of requests for these publications or for information supplied 
in them, were filled. 

During the reporting period, the Annual Report of the Division 
and the current year's Fish ar d Game Laws flier, Reclaimed Pond List , 
Stocked Waters Lis ts Clo'e d Towns List , and Spo rtsmen's Organization List 
were compiled and publis2.ed<, Work 'as completed on and delivery received 
of Fur Facts and Trapp i i -; in .■/l assadj'j setts, Problems of Producing Sport 
Fishing and 6 issues of IvLu sa- . huseit 3 Wildlife . Editorial work was about 
one -half completed on Trout Pond Management in Massachusetts at the close 
of the fiscal year. 

Meetings 

A total of 262 meetings with sportsmen's clubs, civic groups, etc., 
were participated in by district personnel. District personnel also gave 18 
educational lectures before youth groups, and the Junior Conservation Camp. 
Other personnel of the Division made public appearances as necessary. 

The chief of information and education was a panel chairman at 
the national conference of the American Association for Conservation Inform- 
ation in May. 

Printing, Posters, Miscellaneous 

The I&E section assisted other units by handling printing and ed- 
itorial functions connected with informational material, fliers, maps, posters, 
etc. , during the year. The annual Safety Zone Poster project continued with 
12, 100 posters being distributed by the districts and I&E. 

In addition, 430 gun safety posters were distributed. The I&E 
section also assisted other units by taking low altitude aerial photos for use 
in management planning on several areas. 



-13- 



GAME PROGRAM 

Development of better public hunting has been the aim of the game 
program during the last year. In the districts, the majority of time was spent 
in work on wildlife management - public hunting areas. The quail and pheasant 
stocking program was modified in an effort to bring maximum return to the 
hunter's bag. New land was acquired for public shooting grounds and many 
areas were investigated and given a priority rating pending the availability of 
funds for purchase. The research program continued with investigations 
centered around evaluation of management work. 

As in the past, the majority of the work other than the operation 
of game farms was financed 75 percent through federal aid allotments from 
Pittman-Robertson funds, 

FEDERAL AID PROJECTS 

W-9-D Statewide Development Project 

Land purchased or leased by the Division is usually farm land 
that has revetted to woodland. Consequently, developing these wildlife man- 
agement areas for public shooting grounds means starting from scratch. The 
bulldozer, brush cutter and chain saw are the principal tools of management. 
Many acres of new land were opened up last year, but it is evident to anyone 
using these areas that the land clearing program is only just beginning. The 
amount of heavy equipment should be tripled to meet the demand. 

This development of land for cultivation is carefully planned to 
fully utilize each management area. Access roads and trails are made, not 
only to connect openings and facilitate stocking, but to encourage better util- 
ization by hunters. The land is prepared for planting by plowing, harrowing, 
liming and fertilizing, following recommended agricultural practices. Last 
year, a variety of annuals, some of which were experimental, were planted. 
However, buckwheat was the principal crop in the spring and winter rye in the 
fall. In order to expand the planting of annual grains, perennials are planted 
on established food strips. Lespedezas, hay, and clover mixtures are used 
for these permanent plantings. 

Other permanent plantings include wildlife shrubs, such as multi- 
flora rose, which supply food and cover, along with tree plantings of conifers 
such as pine and spruce. Where possible, natural foods are encouraged. .Aban- 
doned apple orchards are released and pruned. Field borders are cut back to 
reduce competition with planted crops and to supply travel lanes and browse. 
Dense stands of woodland are broken up by clear cutting and spraying. Lumber 
obtained in forest thinning and other cutting is utilized throughout the Division. 

The development of public hunting areas involves other phases. 



-14- 



There are about 60 miles of roads to maintain, along with numerous bridges 
and culverts. This road maintenance includes not only graveling and grading 
in the warm weather, but snow plowing in the winter. There are numerous 
signs marking entrances, roads and boundaries, which must be maintained, 
and other special signs which must be posted every hunting season. Buildings 
for office and storage space have to be maintained. Several control structures 
have been built to stabilize water levels. T".\ese need attention throughout the 
year to remain effective. Dikes have to be mowed, flash boards adjusted and 
debris cleared from outlets. 

For many years the Division has had a statewide wood duck man- 
agement program The four districts have approximately 2,200 nesting boxes 
erected at about 300 different sites. These boxes need periodic attention to 
maintain their effectiveness. The present plan calls for each box to be checked 
every three years, Maintenance includes replacing shavings, predator guards, 
tops and sometimes the whole box. Boxes are constructed each year by Div- 
ision personnel from lumber obtained from forest thinnings previously mentione 

The Division has been attempting control of water chestnut (Trap a 
natans) since 1947. This plant is obnoxious becar.se its dense growth prohibits 
fishing, boating and swimming, along with impeding the stream flow. This re- 
sults in silting and stagnation to a poir^t where wildlife foods are suppressed. 
Spraying with 2-4-D and fuel oil has been done on the Sudbury, Concord and 
Ass abet Rivers and on Little Spy Pond. Belmont, Heard Pone, Wayland, and 
Upper Pond, South Kadley* The large concentrations have been broken up but 
isolated patches persist and need yearly attention. Where scattered plants 
occur, they are destroyed by hand pulling. 

W-22-R Cottontail Investigations 

This marks the last year of this project as written. The work has 
progressed from a reaeaxxh stage to development based on recults of previous 
study. A report highlighting the various phases of these investigations will be 
published during the coming year. 

Attention during the past year has been centered on the 150-acre 
beagle trial area at Westboro. This land is being managed intensively through 
the use of bulldozer and hand cutting. Results to date have been exciting, with 
a tremendous increase in the rabbit population. Field trials held there have 
been continually successful. Development work will continue until the proposed 
management plan is completed. 

Project personnel have visited nunc rous areas to give advice on 
development to both individuals and clubs. Anyone interested in such manage- 
ment work should not hesitate to contact the Division. 

W-32-R E xpe x-lmenta l Wetl and Management Project 



-15- 



A number of potential flowages were visited and appraised for 
the possibility of development. The best sites located so far are the larger 
areas in the eastern part of the state. Considerable time was spent in a sur- 
vey of the flowage at Harold Parker State Forest to collect preliminary engin- 
eering data. Water guages were installed at Cold Brook and watershed char- 
acteristics were calculated for several additional areas. Inventory stations of 
flora and fauna were set up. Photographs of potential areas were taken for per 
manent record and management analysis. Cooperative surveys were made with 
several mosquito -control districts. 

W-35-R Game Population Trend and Harvest Survey 

This is a new project started this year. It is designed to combine 
under one heading all the part time research projects, most of which are studies 
of the more popular game species. 

Statewide Game Harvest: A random sample of 2, 600 license 
holders were sent a postal card questionnaire to determine the harvest of 
grouse, woodcock, pheasant, quail, cottontail rabbit, white hare, gray 
squirrel and waterfowl. Two follow-up mailings were sent to non-respondents. 
Return cards were sorted in various combinations and results were compiled by 
use of a calculator. 

Sportsmen returned 73.4 percent of the questionnaires. The data 
were expanded to describe only this portion of the hunter population because it 
was not possible to sample the non-responders. The bulk (63.6 percent) of the 
licensees contacted did hunt and three-fourths of those who hunted were success- 
ful. 

Pheasants were the most-hunted species, followed by cottontail 
rabbits, ruffed grouse, gray squirrels, white hare, black ducks, other species 
of ducks and geese, woodcocks, quail and raccoons. More than twice as many 
cottontail rabbits were harvested than other species, followed in decreasing 
order by gray squirrels, pheasants, black ducks, other species of ducks and 
geese, ruffed grouse, white hare, woodcocks, quail and raccoons. The highest 
percentage of success was realized on gray aquirrels and cottontail rabbits. 
Better than 60 percent of the pheasants harvested were shot in four counties, 
which also contributed more than half the gunners. Of the total birds shot 
statewide, 52 percent were from wild stock and 48 percent were released birds. 

Statewide Deer Harvest : Reports of successful deer hunters were 
tabulated after being received at the Director's office. A total of 4,887 deer 
were reported killed, of which 36 were taken by bow and arrow. Of the deer 
killed during the "shotgun" week, 2,453 were bucks, 2,399 were does, and 
sex was not reported on three. Approximately 65 percent of the deer reported 
killed were taken in Berkshire, Franklin, and Worcester counties. This kill 
was the highest ever recorded in this state. 



-16- 



Deer checking stations were open only on the first and last days 
of deer week and a 20 percent sample of the deer kill was collected. Statistics 
collected -were comparable to previous years, indicating that the present deer 
season is adequate for maintenance of the deer herd. 

Spring Grouse Census and Population Composition: Grouse road- 
side drumming census routes established in 1958 were run again during April 
and May, 1959. There was no significant difference in numbers of drumming 
grouse per stop. New census routes were established at Phillipston, Peru 
and Ipswich. These routes are run in an attempt to set up an index of the spring 
population, from which the fall population may be predicted, but as yet there 
has been no definite correlation, 

Approximately 3, 000 wing and tail bags were distributed to indiv- 
iduals, clubs and sporting goods stores. During the fall, 1, 035 complete sets 
of wings and tails were examined for age and sex. The data showed a juvenile 
to adult ratio of 70:30 and a male to female ratio of 55:45. These figures are 
comparable to results of other years. 

Spring Quail Census and Population Composition : Roadside 
whistle counts were conducted during the first two weeks of July, following est- 
ablished procedures and routes. County quail call indices in 1958 showed a 
significant increase in Bristol County (90 percent level) over 1957. Other 
counties indicated no significant changes. All counties in 1958 showed no sig- 
nificant changes as compared to the averages from 1953 through 1956. The 
statewide call index in 1958 was not comparable with preceding years because 
Norfolk County was not census ed in 1958, 

Postage -free envelopes were distributed to quail hunters for col- 
lecting wings and attending data on kill. During the season, 295 wings of native 
and pen-reared quail were received. During the eight-day extension of the 1958 
season, 14. 2 percent of the harvest occurred. Pen-reared quail made up 18. 3 
percent of the total kill and 68. 5 percent of the pen-reared birds harvested were 
killed during the first week of the season. The kill distribution of native quail, 
although somewhat higher on opening day than in previous years, was relatively 
uniform throughout the season. 

An attempt was made to take a total inventory of coveys and birds 
using bird dogs and track counts on the Barnstable study area. There was a 
lack of snow but counts in November and December established a minimum early 
winter population of 88 birds which is comparable with the preceding year. 

Winter Waterfowl Census and Harvest : In January, Division per- 
sonnel flew the coast from the New Hampshire line to the Rhode Island line. This 
was in conjunction with the mid-winter inventory which is run each year by the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The count showed a decrease in the black duck, 
our most popular species, as well as in other species of waterfowl. 



-17- 



The Division again participated in the postal card survey which 
is run by the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service to determine the waterfowl kill. 
A tabulation of this data is being made and will be available for comparison 
with other years* 

Hunter Use of Public Hunting Grounds : This job was designed to 
determine hunting pressure on public hunting grounds, distance traveled by 
hunters to use these areas, and to determine amount of game and species 
killed on public hunting grounds. Information was collected on hunters con- 
tacted at permanent or roving checking stations on days of peak usage. 

Hunting pressure increased on public shooting grounds this year 
up to 300 percent. Pressure was heavy only on opening days, Saturday, and 
one holiday and then only during the first four hours of the day. The average 
party was 2.0 hunters, who averaged 3. 1 hours per trip. On all areas, over 
70 percent of the gunners came from within a 20-mile radius. Of gunners 
contacted, 41 percent were successful in taking some species of game. It 
took an average of 10.8 hours to shoot a pheasant. Other game species shot 
in order of numbers taken were; quail, cottontail rabbits, gray squirrels, 
grouse, white hare and woodcock. 

Evaluation of Pheasant Stocking : This study was to determine the 
best age and time to stock pheasants, based on the return to the hunter's bag, 
and to determine the ability of stocking sites to hold birds. 

All birds stocked by the Division and clubs were leg-banded. 
Records were kept on date of release, age of the birds, and place of release. 

Statewide pheasant stockings gave the following band returns: 1. 
eight to ten weeks before the season - 8.93%; 2. one week before the season - 
13.00%; 3. inseason stocking - 16.84%. The average return from stocking on 
public hunting grounds was 61. 7%. This high return was due to an intensive 
band collection program which included strategically located return boxes and 
personal hunter contact. Birds raised and released by sportsmen's clubs gave 
a 21.44% return. This again was due to extra effort by club members. A 
check by wildlife districts on "A" stocking (eight to ten weeks before the sea- 
son) showed little variation in return throughout the state. The biggest single 
factor in determining the suitability of stocking sites is their accessibility to 
the gunner. 

Wood Duck Nesting Success: This job was to determine the age 
composition of the breeding population. Checks were made at Great Meadows 
Refuge in Concord, and representative parts of the state, during the nesting 
season, to determine the annual rate of return of nesting birds which had been 
banded in previous years. 

This check revealed that the production of ducklings at Great 
Meadows very nearly equaled the 1957 total. In other sections of the state, 

-18- 



there has been a substantial drop in the number of nesting attempts. The res- 
ident population of the check areas appeared to be composed mainly of old 
birds, and the decline was attributed to the shortage of young females. The 
lack of young females returning to their hatching site may be due to low brood 
survival or to increased mortality from hunting. Regardless, there has been 
a decline indicated in the wood duck population. 

Land Acquisition 

Division personnel investigated numerous tracts of land 
offered for sale or lease and made appropriate recommendations for their 
acquisition. In Falmouth, 1,404 acres were purchased for a wildlife man- 
agement area. Several small tracts were turned over to the Division by the 
Military Reservation Committee. Some provide access to ponds, others to 
salt water. The rest may be developed for public hunting. 

Non-federal Aid 

District personnel engaged in other activities which are not 
permitted under federal aid allotments. They established stocking schedules 
and distributed all pheasants, quail and white hare. They participated in cen- 
suses of woodcock and mourning doves. Answering damage complaints for 
rabbits, beaver and deer was an additional responsibility, Rabbits and beaver 
were live -trapped and transplanted. Deer -proof fencing was supplied to or- 
chardists. Safety Zone signs were distributed to private landowners in an 
effort to promote better relations between them and the sportsmen. Tech- 
nical advice was given to individuals and groups who had wildlife problems. 

Pheasant Propagation 

This year's production of game birds compared very favor- 
ably with prog rams as planned. There was a slight increase over the previous 
year in the production of pheasants although holding and rearing facilities were 
reduced at one farm as a result of heavy snow the previous spring. 

A total of 50,085 pheasants were distributed, including 9,615 
hens and 40,470 cocks. The majority of cocks were liberated just before and 
during the hunting season. Hens were released during the later part of the 
season. 

Quail Propagation 

Production of bobwhite quail was continued at the Sandwich 
game farm. Distribution totaling 3, 069 full-grown birds was made prior to 
and during the hunting season. 

White Hare 

White hares were purchased from New Brunswick. Of the 1, 96C 

-19- 



purchased, 600 were delivered early in January to be held in pens for liberation 
after the close of the hunting season on hares* The usual loss of hares a day or 
two after arrival occurred. Of the total received, 89 percent were liberated. 

Feed Improvement Research 

The research project started last year to improve and modernize 
our game bird formulae was continued with all four game farms participating 
in experimental feedings. New formulae have been developed and results have 
proven valuable. The vitamin and mineral content in our formulae are well 
established, and supplements have been substituted for more costly ingredients, 
making a substantial saving in costs per ton. 

The new breeder formula was used this breeding season, with 
the result that pheasant egg production was the highest ever, hatching percent- 
ages were increased, pheasants continued laying later in the season than usual, 
and late -hatched pheasants showed improvement over previous years. 

The new starting formula is also reducing feed costs. The re- 
sults appear satisfactory, however, an evaluation at the end of the coming 
distribution season should furnish complete answers. Further savings of feed 
costs were made and a better bird produced by increasing the amount of hard 
grains in the diet of pheasants on the range. In some instances pheasants re- 
ceived up to 50 percent grain in their dists. Scratch or hard grains can be 
purchased $10. 00 to $15. 00 less per ton than pelleted feed. Since the Div- 
ision uses over a million pounds of feed yearly, these savings are worthwhile. 



-20- 



Pheasants 



Quail 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 



July 1, 1958 - June 30, 1959 



Hens 



Cocks 



Total 



Adults: 


Spring and summer liberations 


2,388 


473 


2,861 


Young: 


August liberations (12 weeks 
of age): 




3,656 


3,656 




October and November liber- 
ations (18-25 weeks of age): 


6,305 


29, 509 


35,814 




Sportsmen's Club Pheasant 
Rearing Program: 


922* 


6,832 


7,754 



9,615 40,470 50,085 



Adults: 


Spring and summer liberations: 


374 


387 


761 


Young: 


October and November liber- 










ations : 


2.695 


78 


2,773 



White Hare: 



3,069 



465 



3,534 



Northern Varying, purchased 



1,960 



♦Includes 370 hens distributed in the wintering program. 



-21- 



COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 
Supported by the Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Game, U, S, Fish and 
Wildlife Service and Wildlife Manage- 
ment Institute, 



General 



Unit personnel gave several talks during the year before sports - 
mens ' clubs and other groups. 

Posted Land Study 

One graduate student, Joseph Larson, completed his survey of 
posted land in the state. His inventory indicated that over 2, 000, 000 acres 
were closed to hunting due to posting, discharge of firearm laws and other 
causes. Of this closed acreage, 600,000 acres would be open to the sports- 
man sufficiently courteous to ask the landowner's permission to trespass 
first. 

Evaluation of Abandoned Fields as Cottontail Rabbit Habitat 

A graduate student completed this project. Habitat evaluated was 
open land of the type characterized as "abandoned field' 1 in the state aerial 
photographs. It was determined that photographs taken at a scale of 1/7920 
when deciduous leaves had fallen were at an optimum scale to depict details 
of ground cover in old fields as well as cover on a forest floor. 

Ecological Changes and Wildlife Use in Impounded Areas with Emphasis on 
Flooded Forest Swamps 

Another graduate student completed a study of wildlife values of 
impounded forest wet areas. Evidence suggested small wooded impound- 
ments on a per-acre basis were more productive of black duck broods thai -tf 5 
larger areas. Management recommendations included that of flooding small 
wooded areas with water control structures. 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

Statewide ruffed grouse drumming censuses were continued. The 
study areas in Quabbin Reservoir and Hardwick have been abandoned. The 
graduate student is working entirely in the Phillipston public shooting ground 
area, recently acquired by the state. Detailed spring censusing and cover 
mapping have been underway. 

Woodcock Project 

Approximately 1,500 woodcock wings from the northeast were 

-22- 



analyzed by the Unit and cooperating biologists. The sex and age ratio showed 
a preponderance of females. More than 50 percent of the sample were adults. 
This study will be expanded during another year. 

Projects not Financed by Unit Funds 

There are several additional projects under Unit supervision fin- 
anced from other University or outside funds. These include studies on the 
physiology of porcupines, two separate studies on bird control, and a pest- 
icide-wildlife study about to be inaugurated. 

Miscellaneous 



Mr. David Wetherbee of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife 
joined the staff as a Unit Assistant. His field of research will be devoted to 
basic research on blackbirds in an effort to discover control methods by the use 
of chemicals and by other methods. 

A second Federal vehicle and additional Federal funds were assigned 
to the Unit primarily to support Or. Wetherbee's work. 



-23- 



... ';..'. 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 





July 1, 1958 to 


June 30, 1959 






ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 
Pish and Game Board 
Information -Education 


3304-01 
3304-06 
3304-01 


$ 81,305.12 
740.00 


$ 82,045.12 
39,535.04 




PROPAGATION 
Fish 
Game 


3304-31 
3304-31 




321,516.18 
222,494.58 


2Gfo 

10* 


WILDLIFE 
Game 


3304-44 

3304-51 

*3304-53 


7,472.32 

56,858.45 

108,281.74 


172,612.51 


Ikfo 


Fish 


3304-42 

3304-45 

*3304-47 

3304-51 


90,066.81 
11,183.91 
36,812.71 
56,858.45 


194,921.88 


15* 


LAND ACQUISITION 


*3304-53 
3304-58 


14,246.60 
78,949.20 


93,195.80 


7# 


LAW ENFORCEMENT 


*3308-05 
3308.07 
1003-03 


5,727.36 

7,774.02 

117,491.27 


130,992.65 
$1,257,313.76 


10/0 

100$ 



^Continuing Accounts 



Expenditures under 3304-47, 3304-53, and 3304-58 are reimbursed 75# by Federal 
Funds. 

Surplus in INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND as of June 30, 1959 - $231,953-13 



-24- 



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SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1958 to June 30, 1959 

Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping Licenses $ 975,824.75* 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 5,68l.8l** 

Rents 2,720.50 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 6,191.46 

Pittman -Roberts on Federal Aid 116,423.15 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 41,600.24 

Court Fines 6,736.90 

Refunds Prior Year 16.75 

$1,155,195.56 



*See Detail Sheet No. 1 
**See Detail Sheet No. 2 



-26- 






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Detail Sheet No. 2 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 1+8, 

68A, 102-3-^-5-6-7, m> H2A, CHAPTER 131, G.L. DURING 

THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1959 



TYPE OF LICESBE 
Special Fish Propagator License 
Special Fi6h Propagator License - No Fee 
Fish Propagator License 
Propagator License (Birds or Mammals) 
Special Propagator License - No Fee 
Dealer's License 
"Possession Only" License 
Taxidermist License 
Fur Buyer's License 
License to Take Shiners for Bait 
License - Quail for Training Dogs 
Field Trial License 
Trap Registration Certificates 
Fish Tags 
Game Tags 



NUMBER ISSUED 


RECEIPTS 


211 


$ 236.00 


1 


0.00 


105 


337-00 


376 


1,284.00 


k 


0.00 


6ok 


804.00 


70 


UU.00 


57 


285.00 


27 


450.00 


298 


1,1+90.00 


21 


77.00 


2 


20.00 


909 


331.50 


23,576 


235.76 


1,751 


87.55 



$5,681.81 



-28- 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1959. 



CHAPTER 58, RESOLVES, 1959: 



CHAPTER 78, RESOLVES, 1959: 



CHAPTER 41, ACTS, 1959: 



CHAPTER 175, ACTS, 1959: 



CHAPTER 243, ACTS, 1959: 



CHAPTER 244, ACTS, 1959: 



Resolve reviving and continuing and in- 
creasing the scope of the special com- 
mission established to make an invest- 
igation and study relative to hunting and 
fishing within the Commonwealth and cer- 
tain matters relating thereto. 

Resolve providing for a study by the Div- 
ision of Fisheries and Game of wildlife 
habitat in the Quabbin Watershed and in the 
fringe towns. 

An act relative to the hunting of raccoons 
or opossums. 

An act imposing a penalty for failure to sur 
render a sporting, hunting, /fishing or trap- 
ping license after demand and notice. 

An act authorizing the possession of cer- 
tain mammals without a permit. 

An act relative to the evidence required for 
the payment of a bounty for killing certain 

animals . 



CHAPTER 265, ACTS, 1959: 



CHAPTER 333, ACTS, 1959: 



CHAPTER 498, ACTS, 1959: 



An act relative to the molesting, attacking 
or killing of deer by dogs in Berkshire 
County. 

An act increasing the fees for sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses. 

An act relative to hunting and fishing rights 
of a person without a license on land owned 
or leased by him. 



-29- 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS: AND REGULATIONS PROM_ 
ULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1959. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation 
and maintenance of fish. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation 
of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrow 

.August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected 
fresh water fish by licenses dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts effective 
April 9, 1954. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing 
grounds in Massachusetts. 

November 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
deer in Massachusetts effective January 1, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake, effect- 
ive April 10, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish in 
interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, effective 
April 10, 1956. 

January 30, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and 
trapping of mammals in Massachusetts, effective February 1, 1957. 

February 5, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging of 
deer in Massachusetts. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 



-30- 



October 10, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
certain fish in Massachusetts. 

October 21, 1957. Rules and regulations for public shooting 
grounds in Massachusetts. 

September 25, 1958. Migratory game bird regulations for season 
of 1958, 

October 17, 1958. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of pheasants, quail? and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

June 23, 1959. Amendment to Rules and Regulations relating to 
the taking of certain fish in Massach&seSts. 

*fi ^F ^F ^F ^F ^F ^F ^F ^* t* *i* ^F If* ^F ^F 



PERSONNEL 
RETIREMENTS 

Sigmont Bednark , Sandwich Game Farm November 30, 1958 

Joseph A, Hagar , Ornithologist April 30, 1959 

Agnes L. Mahoney Boston Office March 31, 1959 

****************** 

DEATHS 

Walter Kolbusz, Wilbraham Game Farm July 31, 1958 

Agnes L. Mahoney, Boston Office June 5, 1959 



-31- 



Y • . *-«. 











i960 




THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OP FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 TRBMONT STREET, BOSTON 8 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS '. X)ej 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
Ninety-fifth Annual Report 
July 1, 1959 to June 30, I960 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Board 1 

Game Program 4 

Real Estate Section 10 

Fisheries Program 12 

Information and Education Program 20 

Cooperative "Wildlife Research Unit 24 

Administration: 

Tables: How the Sportsmens' Dollar was Spent 26 

Appropriations and Expenditures 27 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 28 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping 

Licenses 29 

Analysis of Special Licenses -__-_„ 30 

Legislation - 31 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations 32 

Personnel 32 



Publication Approved by Ctatt; Purchasing Agent 



#9 



ft 

STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

NOV 16 19: 

STATE HOUSE,, BOSXQM 



MASS OFFICIALS 



I..>. 






/9&0 

A 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, Foster A„ Furcolo, Governor of the Common- 
wealth, the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board 
of Fisheries and Game, 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety- 
fifth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1959 to June 30, 1960„ 



Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES L. McLAUGHLIN, 

Director 



REPORT OF THE BOARD 



Detailed reports fro c. the various staff and operational sections 
of the Division will be found throughout this report. However, the Board wishes 
to co nment briefly on the highlights of major programs as follows: 

Ga me Management and Land Acquisition 

Acquisition and ..management of land for public hunting areas con- 
tinued to receive a high priority during the past year. The Division realizes 
that, if hunters are to have the opportunity to engage in field sports in the future, 
the Commonwealth must obtain suitable areas now, while land is still available 
at prices within reason. However, such land need not always be purchased,, but 
on occasion can be leased from other state, or federal, agencies, and contributes 
just as much to the Massachusetts hunter. 

Culmination ofnegotiations of several years resulted in the pur- 
chase of 3, 300 acres in Essex County from the federal government. The real 
estate unit is engaged in obtaining various small parcels contingent with this area, 

/ new high in the number of cock pheasants reared at our ga^.e 
farms was reached, with 49,420 being released for the 1959 hunting season. An 
additional 13,290 hens were also released. 

Fisheries Program 

The problem of public access to great ponds was considered to 
be of prime importance during the reporting period, as indeed, it is at all times. 
Surveys were made and published of the right-of-way situation on all great ponds 
in Barnstable and Middlesex counties, and the town of Plymouth, during the year. 
Similar surveys are underway in other areas of the state. 

Our propagation units produced a total of 2, 170, 547 trout for 
distribution during the year. Of these, 886,317 were over six inches, and of 
these, nearly half were over nine inches. The remainder, 1,284,230 fingerlings, 
were utilized in reclaimed ponds and streams. 

Virious other phases of the fisheries program were expanded, 
including continual assessment of management work to improve fishing. 

Stream reclamation, to improve the trout fishery in these waters, 
was begun in earnest during the year, with the largest project being reclamation 
of 20 miles of the Deerfield River and immediate restocking with both fingerling 
and adult trout. Similar treatment was applied to Tully River and Nashoba 
Brook. Thus, the Division endeavors to improve fishing in streams as well as 
ponds. 

-1- 



Info r .nation and Education 

This vital function continues to demand an increasing amount of 
time. Personnel throughout the Division regularly engage in information and 
education activities, since it is the Division's policy to make all of its activities 
public information, 

Further, the Division recognizes, as do all other conservation 
agencies in the country, that effective implementation of conservation programs 
cannot be achieved without public understanding and support. This public coop- 
eration can come only tnrough widespread dissemination of information through 
the media of public information - newspapers, radio and television, magazines 
and other publications, .notion pictures, etc In this sense,, Information and 
Education is a conservation tool, on a par with research, management, law 
enforcement, propagation, etc 

In addition, the infor. .nation and education program provides 
informational aids,, such as "where to go" material, maps,, copies of pertinent 
regulations,, and a host of ether infor. national material as a service to the 
public. 

Publication of the bi- ..onthly magazine "i Massachusetts Wildlife" 
continues to gain public favor, without promotion, with a net gain of 3, 693 
subscribers for the year, bringing the initial distribution for the last issue of 
the year to 27, 506, 

The information and education program continued to function at 
levels approa.ching that of the most progressive states - but on far less money 
than is expended by most other state s Our major lack in this program pres- 
ently is in the area of youth education. 

Finances 

The reserve in the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund stands at 
$259, 675. 75 as of June 30, I960. The decreasing trend in this reserve has 
apparently been halted for the time being, thanks to the granting of license fee 
increases by the 1959 legislature. Last year, this reserve was $231,953. 13 
as of June 30, 1959» The Board feels that this reserve should be maintained in 
the vicinity of $200,000., annually, to allow for possible fluctuations in income 
as well as a source of funds in the event of emergencies, natural disasters, etc. 

Personn el 

iv.i.r. Lawrence Barbieri was appointed to the Board on October 
22, 1959, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the completion of the term, of Mr, 
Frederick D Retallick, ./ : .r. F. Stanley .viikelk was appointed to the Board 



-2- 



on February 4, I960, to complete the term of v.r, Henry Russell who had 
resignedc On October 29, i'-'r, riarper Gerry was elected Chairman. 

The Board wishes to extend its appreciation to the employees 
of the Division for their efforts in behalf of the sports -nen of Massachusetts. 



Sgnd/ Thomas M, Joyce, Secretary 



-3- 



ga,.v.;e program 

Branca of Wildlife Biology 

Land acquisition for public hunting areas has received a hign 
priority during the past year. The Division realizes that land must be pur- 
chased now while it is still available if it is to insure public hunting in the future, 
This land need not always be purchased, but .xay be leased from other state 
agencies and from the federal government, Development of these lands and 
stocking them with quail, pheasants, and hare have occupied tne majority of 
time in the game management program. Applied research to evaluate the man- 
age nent work was a lesser program, in time expended, but just as important,, 

The research and xianage.nent program is financed by both 
Pitt r.an-Robertson funds and the state account. The former provides for 75 
percent reimbursement by the federal government and is specified by numbered 
projects, 

W-9-D - Statewide Development Project 

This covers tne development of wildlife management areas that 
are used for public shooting grounds. There were a variety of development 
activities. A storage shed was constructed in one district and additional office 
space in another. General maintenance was done on all headquarters and 
storage buildings. New access roads were bulldozed on manage .nent areas 
to encourage hunters to more fully utilize them. i/Iany miles of established 
roads were graded and graveled to keep them fit for travel. Permanent and 
seasonal signs were erected to direct hunters. 

^bout 10,000 trees and shrubs were planted, plus more tnan 300 
acres of annual and permanent food patches to provide food and protection for 
wildlife. In preparation for new wildlife plantings, over 200 acres of land in 
cover ranging from brush to mature tin ber were cleared by bulldozing, brusn 
cutting, spraying with herbecides and by cutting with chain saw and axe. 

Over 40,000 feet of lumber were salvaged fro n forest thinnings 
and distributed to the various sections of the Division for construction and main- 
tenance purposes. Where apple trees occurred on manage -rent areas, they were 
pruned and released to provide additional natural food. 

Control structures on established flowages were checked regu- 
larly to keep the water at the desired level. Control of water ciiestnut (Trapa 
natans ) was continued by spraying and hand pulling on the Sudbury and Concord 
River systems and at College Pond in South Hadley. 

W-32-R - Experimental Wetland ivianage r.ent Project 

This project, which started in 1957, was discontinued during tne 



year. Its purposes were: to locate potential sites for marsh ix.anage.nent; to 
provide the necessary engineering data for construction; to determine usage by 
waterfowl before and after manage -Tie nt; to determine changes in flora and 
fauna as the result of management. The survey for potential sites was con- 
fined to state -owned lando Several sites were picked and preliminary engin- 
eering data were gathered on four areas. 

"W-35-R --Game Population Trend and Harvest Survey 

Statewide Game Harvest. An analysis of the random -sample 
postal questionnaire shov/ed the following: The majority of licensees contacted 
did hunt and 76,4 percent were successful. There was no significant change 
from 1958 in the take of any gaa:e species except for cottontail rabbits, whicn 
showed an increase of about 10 percent. 

Pheasants were the most-hunted species, followed in order by 
cottontails, grouse, gray squirrels, white hare, black ducks, other ducks 3 
woodcock, quail, and raccoon. In regard to hunter success, cottontails ranked 
first, followed by gray squirrels, black ducks, pheasants, other ducks, 
raccoon, woodcock, grouse, white hare, and quail. Of the total pheasants 
shot, 55 percent were supplied from native, wild stock. 

Sixty-five percent of the hunters reported hunting only on private 
land and six percent hunted only on state-managed areas. The other 29 percent 
hunted on both. 

Statewide Deer Harvest , A total of 3, 771 deer were reported 
killed during the 1959 season. Of this, 46 were taken by bow and arrow. There 
were 1949 bucks and 1819 does reported and three with no sex indicated. The 
kill was less than the twelve -year average and was the lowest since 1952, A 
20 percent sample (774 deer) was received at the checking stations, which were 
run on the first and last days of the season. 

Spring Grouse Census and Population Composition . Roadside 
drumming counts were made again this spring and indicated no change in the 
grouse populations as compared to previous years. 

Wing and tail collection bags were distributed to individuals, 
clubs, and sporting goods stores. As a result, 1068 returns were examined 
for age and sex of fall-shot grouse. The data showed an adult-to»juveni).e ratio 
of 1 to 2. 1 and a male -to-female ratio of 1 to 1. 1. This indicates a healthy 
grouse population. An analysis of data for the past thirteen years shows a 
fluctuating population with a gradual build-up from. 1948 to a high point in 195 7. 

Spring Quail Census and Population Composition. County quail 
call indices in 1959 showed no significant changes as compared to 1958 or pre- 
vious years. The Barnstable County indice was suggestive of a population de- 

-5- 



crease, but it may have been due to adverse weather conditions during the 
census period,, Plymouth County data suggested a slight increase. 

Winter Waterfowl Census and Harvest , Ten flights prior to the 
winter inventory were made, starting in the middle of October and continuing 
into the last week of December, These flights shov/ed a gradual build-up in 
black ducks during that time to a peak during the regular inventory made on 
January 4 and 5, Black duck and goose populations were higher on both the 
north and south shore than averages of past years. Eiders and scoters were 
up over last year, but not higher than the averages of previous years. 

Hunter Use of Public Hunting Grounds . Hunting pressure showed 
a leveling off on established management areas. Pressure was excessive on 
opening day, Saturdays and holidays, especially during the first few hours of 
the day. The average party size was two hunters who spent 2.8 hours per trip. 
Sixty-three percent of the hunters traveled less than 20 miles and 96 percent 
traveled less than 50 miles to hunt. Of all gunners contacted, 41 percent were 
successful. Pheasants and quail supplied 85 percent of the bag. 

Evaluation of Pheasant Stocking , An evaluation of statewide 
pheasant stocking showed that birds stocked during the season gave the highest 
return followed next by birds released a week before the season and the lowest 
return was from those released eight to ten weeks before the season. 

The average return from birds stocked on public shooting grounds 
was 61.5 percent. Birds raised from six weeks of age by sportsmen's clubs 
showed a satisfactory return in most cases. 

W ood Duck Nesting Success. The check of nesting boxes in 1959 
at Great Meadows showed a sharp drop in duckling production A decline in the 
resident breeding population of wood ducks was reported throughout the state. 
The decline is apparently due to a shortage of young ducks coming back to nest 
in the areas where they were hatched. 

Experimental Turkey Stocking. Preliminary work was started on 
an experi.r ental turkey stocking program. The potential turkey range in Mass- 
achusetts was tabulated and found to be 543, 348 acres. "Wild-trapped birds 
were purchased from "West Virginia and released in April on Prescott Peninsula 
in the Cuabbin Reservation, Turkey signs have been seen since release > but 
no broods have been sighted. 

Census of Cottontail Rabbits and White Hare. Trapping on the 
Westboro Training and Field Trial Grounds showed a population of 101 rabbits 
which was a 40 percent increase over 1958 and a 94 percent increase over 1957. 

Non-PR Activities 

District personnel engaged in many activities which are not rei.r:- 



bursed under federal aid allot-fnents. They resurveyed pheasant cover as a 
basis for establishing fall stocking schedules, liberated pheasants, quail and 
white hare, and participated in censuses of woodcock and mourning doves. To 
solve rabbit damage complaints, district personnel supplied box traps and 
instructions for trapping. They removed beaver from areas of complaint, in- 
vestigated deer damage complaints and supplied deer fencing where necessary. 

Safety-zone posters were distributed to private landowners in 
an effort to pror. ote better landowner -sports.man relations. Many meetings were 
attended with individuals, towns, and other state or federal agencies to advise 
on wildlife problems. District personnel regularly attended *meetings of sports- 
men's clubs to explain the Division programs. They examined land offered for 
sale to the Division. 

Game Propagation 

The pheasant production at the Division's four game farms was 
increased approximately 12, 500 over the previous year. Of this number, 8, 950 
were cocks. Contributing to this increased production was a slightly earlier 
laying season in the spring of 1959 combined with a longer hatching period. Con- 
struction of new facilities added to our increased production. 

The rearing season proceeded with losses about normal. In- 
fections or diseases encountered were controlled by medication. 

This spring's (I960) breeding season started with the largest 
brood stock in the Division's history, producing a quicker start in hatchingo A 
total of 186,676 eggs were set with 147,022 chicks hatchedc Chick sexing was 
continued. There were 81,636 chicks placed in brooders. 

Feed formula research included carefully watching the continued 
results obtained from the breeder and starter feeds developed last year. : High 
percentages of antibiotics were placed in part of the breeder feeds, resulting 
in increased egg production in imost cases. A game bird grower for.mula has 
been developed and to date seems satisfactory, witn a further saving in cost c 
It is hoped that this for.mula will improve feathering and increase the stamina 
of our pheasants in further preparedness for their life in the wild. 

Bobwhite quail production was intentionally decreased, Half of 
our needs were purcnased and used for experimental liberation comparisons. 
Quail reared at the Sandwich farm was superior to those purchased. The rearing 
of Coturnix quail for use in field trials was continued. 

Purchased white hare were held again this year at two of our 
game farms until after the close of the hare and rabbit season. Of the 617 re- 
ceived, over 92 percent were conditioned and liberated. Re., ainder of the 1280 
purchased were released immediately upon receipt and not kept at the farms. 

-7- 



iv. aintenance and construction is a never-ending procedure at tne 
ga-me farms. This year the replacement of poultry netting on covered pens and 
guard fences was a major job. The main reason for these replacements was the 
fact that netting purchased following the war lacked durability, New construction 
consisted of pens to facilitate the handling of stock, and covered pens in connect- 
ion with open range pens. More watering facilities, shelters and feed hoppers 
continued to be an important part of the program. 

Approximately 3000 linear feet of heavy-gauge poultry netting 
replaced lightweight netting on guard fences. ^Approximately 64,000 square feet 
of poultry netting was replaced on brooder house pens and holding pens. 

The construction of new pens was planned to save labor, and, in 
the final analysis, to lower the cost of rearing pheasants. Approximately 37,000 
square feet of covered pen area were built for brooder pen extensions, connect- 
ing, and holding pens. 

The following table gives liberations for the reporting period: 



-8- 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 



July 1, 1959 - June 30, I960 



Pheasants 

Adults: Spring and summer liberations 

Young: August liberations (1Z weeks 

of age) 

October and November 
liberations 
(17 - 25 weeks of age) 

Sportsmen's Club Pheasant 
Rearing Program; 



Hens 
4,598 

5,324 



Cocks 



773 



7,306 



Quail 



Adults: Spring and summer liberations 

Young: October and November 
liberations 



276 



1,500 



1, 776 



401 



30 



Total 
5, 371 

12,630 



2,441 


33,800 


36,241 


927* 


7,541 


8,468 


13,290 


49,420 


62,710 


Bobwhite 


Coturnix 


Total 



431 



677 



1, 530 



2,207 



White Hare: 



Northern Varying, purchased 



1,280 



* Includes hens distributed in the wintering program 



-9- 



RE/ L ESTATE SE CTION 

During the year negotiations which had been going on for a long 
period of ti me were brought to a successful conclusion and the Division pur- 
chased approximately 3,300 acres in Essex County from the United States Fish 
and "Wildlife Service. The land purchased is located in the towns of Newbury, 
West Newbury, Georgetown and Rowley, The purchase of this property made 
possible the establishment of a much needed public hunting area in the North- 
east section of the state. Since this purchase was made, several small pri- 
vately owned parcels within the large area have been purchased and more are 
in the negotiation stage* When completed, thte#e purchases from individuals 
will add between 200 and 300 acres to the area purchased fro... the government. 

The first Division-owned public fishing grounds in the western 
part of the state became a reality with the purchase of a strip of land one mile 
in length along both sides of Little River in Huntington. This area was leased 
for many years by a private club and closed to the public. Thus, the first 
step has been taken in what is hoped will result in the purchase of many Of tne 
tracts now under lease to the Division in this section of the statet 

P. tract of land adjacent to the Sandwich Fish -latchery was pur- 
chased, relieving a troublesome boundary condition at this station and making 
good land available for future expansion. 

Host of the detailed title searching and research into old titles, 
plans and other pertinent information, was completed on the _ toilers River Proj- 
ect. The Division will shortly begin negotiations for the purchase of this 
property. 

More survey work was done on the West i/eadows project and 
the Division is now ready to miake the takings of the remaining parcels. 

Preliminary negotiations were in progress at the close of the 
year for tne purchase of a large tract of land west of the Connecticut River for 
public hunting grounds. One of the limiting factors in making the purchase of 
a large tract of land is the fact that after a few small purchases are made 
there are not sufficient funds left to make a large purchase. Thus, it becomes 
necessary to try and delay the purchase until the next year. Since there is no 
guarantee that the money will be available the following year, no purchase 
agreement can be signed and the Division in many cases loses out to the pur- 
chaser with cash in hand. 

"Many tracts which were reported to the Division as being up 
for sale were investigated. .Although this involves much ti ne and proves 
fruitless in many cases it is, however, considered necessary because of the Div< 
ision's pressing need for more public hunting and fishing areas. 

-10- 



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The Division finds itself in a tight squeeze as far as the pur- 
chase of real estate is concerned, In most cases it is competing with land 
developers who can and will pay top prices and with individuals and agencies 
with the financial means at their disposal to buy and speculate on future in- 
creases in land valuation. These conditions, together with the fact that the 
Division is attempting to purchase in a seller's market where there is very 
little chance of reducing the asking price, make it most difficult to acquire 
land for what the Division would consider fair market value. 



-11- 



FISHERIES PROGRAM 

During the reporting period, the fisheries program of the 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game was expanded in several fields. 
Among these v/as the use of more effective methods of sampling fish populations. 
This was brought about through the refinement of electric shocking devices 
which could be operated from a boat. These shockers merely stun the fish, 
allow them to be picked up by the technicians, and returned to the water un- 
harmed, During I960, a great deal of time and effort was spent in sampling 
the fishes of managed ponds as well as determining areas in which manage ment 
is necessary. 

Laboratory facilities at the Field Headquarters were expanded 
and refined. Although primarily set up to handle the sterilization and sex- 
reversal studies, this facility has proved invaluable in many other fields, prin- 
cipally bio-assays relative to pollution studies and in cooperating with other 
agencies conducting biological and .medical research. 

A great deal .more attention has been devoted toward fish kills 
brought about by the indiscriminate use of insecticides. The Field Headquarters 
has been designated by the United States Department of Public Health as the 
processing and collecting agency for a study on the impact of pollution upon the 
fish populations of the Commonwealth. Continued efforts were made by all per- 
sonnel to advise the public relative to ±.any other phases of fisheries manage- 
ment. Again this year the problem of public access to great ponds was con- 
sidered to be of prime importance and surveys were made and published of 
the right-of-way situation as regards all great ponds in Barnstable County, 
Middlesex County, aad the town of Plymouth, Work is now going on with regard 
to the status of the remaining geographical areas of the state. 

During this period the Division published a Trout Pond Manage- 
ment Bulletin which was the culminati on of many years 1 work and which ties 
together all the diverse facts which biologists and thinking sportsmen must 
consider when speaking of an overall state trout pond program. Many other 
technical and popular articles and releases were given to various informational 
media and these will be reported under the section on the Information and Ed- 
ucation Program, 

In I960, the Division of Fisheries and Game was charged with the 
responsibility of overseeing a federal-aid marine project. Also during this 
period, two other new federal-aid projects, to be discussed later, were added 
to the list of those already in effect. The first deals with the reclamation of 
trout streams, a management tool which is gaining more and more prominence 
and favor in Massachusetts, as well as in the nation as a whole. The second 
deals with a survey of the Connecticut River, both from a viewpoint of the 
existing fish populations and the facilities whereby sportsmen can gain access 
to the area, 

-12- 



Specific phases of the overall fisheries program are reported 
upon as follows: (projects designated by an asterisk are federal-aid-to -fish- 
eries projects, 75 percent of the cost of which is reimbursed by federal tax 
monies collected on fishing tackle under the Dingell- Johnson / ct)„ 

Cuabbin Reservoir Investigations * 

Intensive creel census in effect during the past several years 
was continued through this reporting period. Catch figures are cOxT:parably 
higher than that of the preceding year and the size of trout taken was grat- 
ifying both to the Division and to the lucky anglers who participated. For- 
tunately, the smelt seemed to be no longer a problem as far as the "'etropolitau 
District Commission was concerned and field observations indicate that a 
plentiful supply remains as forage for adult predators. 

During I960, several substantiated reports of walleye pike 
catches were recorded., Inas.nuch as this species behaves quite erratically 
when introductions of fry and minimal numbers of adults are attempted, the 
Division does not feel that the scarcity of returns means a definite failure. 
In order to enlarge the chances of success, several thousand walleye pike fry 
have been reared at the Palmer Hatchery and introduced at a size of fro/r two 
to five inches into various areas of the Reservoir. At the same time, a sub- 
sidiary area of the Quabbin above Gate 31 was reclaimed and stocked with 
1,500,000 fry. It is expected that these walleye, without the competition of 
other fishes, should flourish and drift into the main body of water. 

Pond Reclax'nations * 

During this period, five trout ponds and several small exper- 
imental areas were reclaimed to improve trout fishing and six ponds similarly 
rehabilitated for warmwater sports fishing. The individual ponds are listed 
in a table presented at the end of this report. 

Harvest Studies * 



An important aspect in fisheries management is an accurate 
evaluation of the results obtained fro.v such activities. During I960, extensiv. 
opening weekend creel checks were run on 27 waters scattered throughout the 
state. .After the opening weekend, this schedule was dropped to 8 ponds and 
continued throughout the year. From these checks enough data was collected 
and analyzed to allow fisheries technicians to initiate, modify, or implement 
management plans for the bodies of water in question. 

Sterilization and S_ex Re versal Studies * 

This past year has seen the completion of the first trials to be 
run on native panfishes and was taken up with testing tne effects of various 



hormones and che.- icals on tneir reproductive behavior. The additional ponds 
available outside of the laboratory permitted the field testing of the organises 
in question. It was obvious tnat veterinary procedures, as applied to warm- 
blooded vertebrates, would be practically impossible to utilize for such a proj- 
ect. Definite preliminary success -feas achieved through the use of harsh chem- 
ical castration agents which hitherto had been disregarded 8 

Strea.n Recla .nation * 

In the past year a new federal-aid project was undertaken on 
trout stream s. This involved the rehabilitation of extensive areas and their 
restocking with trout. The largest of these projects entailed the removal of 
so me 75,000 pounds of trash fish from 40 miles of the Deerfield River, and 
restocking im .. mediately with both fingerling and adult trout, The improved 
frshing in the Deerfield can be traced to the fingerling stocks, especially during 
the last few .i.onths of the reporting period, /.t that ti-^.e, these fish constituted 
50 percent of the catch, and ran between 6 and 10 inches in size. 

Similar treatment was applied to Tully River and Washoba Brook, 
and experimental work carried cut in smaller areas. It is felt that this type of 
management may well become the r.ost vital technique for the successful man- 
ipulation of trout stocked in strea.s, and will provide better and more sustained 
fishing for Massachusetts angler s„ 

vlarine Sport Fisheries Inventory * 

In January, I960, the Division of Fisheries and Game began a 
project in a field that is becoming more and more important; namely, the salt- 
water coastal fisheries. Among the aims of the project is an attempt to deter- 
mine the existing facilities, in terms of boat -launching areas, public fishing 
piers, boat liveries, etc, , and the needs, if any, for public access areas along 
the coastline, A second, and vasvly more ambitious aim, is to determine the 
total fishing pressure and eaten by sportsmen in our coastal waters. It is 
obviously impossible to interview each and every angler, so a sampling pattern 
based on those used in various other fields of endeavor, such as the national 
census, is being followed. Two ground units are continuously sampling fishing 
pressure and success over predetermined routes covering the entire coast. 
Boat and bank fishermen counts are being made from the air on selected days. 
This data, when completed at the end of this year, can then be expanded to give 
the first estimate, based on valid samplings, ever to be made on the importance 
of this fishery. 

Finally, aid of rnuch interest to a great i any sportsu en, a cox* - 
parison of the harvest between sport fishermen and co. mercial fisherrren can 
be made. Data on commercial fisning will be procured fro ,. records of com- 
mercial landings through the cooperation of the United States Fish and "Wildlife 
Service, with special attention given to those fish over whicn a conflict of in- 
terest does, or .-ay, exist between the two fishing groups, 

-14- 



Connecticut River Survey * 

That portion of the Connecticut River which traverses massachu- 
setts a mounts to some 7 ; 000 surface acres. In June of I960, a project was 
begun to survey the fish populations of this area. It is known that the river 
supports an ever-growing fishery, and it is felt that if the present pollution 
abatement trend continues this river night well beccne one of the most im- 
portant, if not the most important, fishing area in the Commonwealth, 

The project is inventorying the fishes of this area relative to 
their sports fishery potential, but it is also concerned with a survey of access 
points on the river* The combination of such large water areas adjacent to 
metropolitan populations indicates the need for a development plan which, when 
executed, will give the public convenient access to the river. 

War r.water Fish Stocking 

In the fall of 1959, 34, 300 large r.outh bass fall f ingerlings, 
10,637 yearlings, and 340 brood stock were distributed to managed public 
waters from the Harold Parker rearing system at Andover. This same system 
produced 12, 160 smallmouth bass for distribution to reclaimed ponds being 
managed for this species. A total of 3,364 chain pickerel averaging 14 inches 
in length were stocked from the Sutton rearing system into managed waters. 

The PaLTe r Hatchery distributed 7 S 300, 000 walleye pike fry to 
ponds in which introductions of this species was felt desirable, and the United 
State 8 Fish and Wildlife Service Hatchery at North .Attleboro contributed 
195, ZOO advanced fry for stocking in open waters. During this period 14,210 
adult alewives, 35,000 fingerling yellow perch, and a half-million forage 
minnows were distributed to state rearing systems and managed waters. 



-15- 



n> ', 



Warmwater Recla-r ati&as 



Pond 



Town 



lVlonponsett Pond3 Halifax 

Gate 31 Pond New Salem 

Faarings Pond Plymouth 

Little Chauncey Pond Northboro 
Lake Wyola Shutesbury 

Lake Cuannapowitt Wakefield 



Area (acres) 
528 


W 


eight of fish re 
oved (pounds) 
"55", 440 


79 




3, 300 


24 




2,527 


28 




3,600 


129 




9,812 


239 




26,400 



Pond 



Trout Pond Reclau ations 



Town 



/rea (acres) 


Weight of fish re 
t oved (pounds) 


26 


4, 


062 


13 




670 


15 




300 


8 




160 


5 




190 


10 




640 


25 




900 


36 


1. 


080 



Sheomet Pond 



Warwick 



Pepper mill Pond Ware 

Hoxie Pond Sandwich 

Lilly Pond Sandwich 

Berry Pond North ^ndover 

Little Coachlace Pond Clinton 



Higgins Pond 
Goose Pond 



Brewster 
Chatham 



-16- 



Trout Production 

Nutritional research again highlighted activities within the prop- 
agation section of the Division of Fisheries and Game. .All stations were act- 
ive in feeding experiments designed to check on costs of this very important 
item as compared to preceding years. Cost determination alone was not the 
sole aim of these experiments, however, as the end result r-ust be measured 
in quality of fishing. For this reason, tests of stamina, a paramount factor 
in producing better and more sustained fishing, were run on groups of fish that 
had been reared on various diets. 

The continuing search for, and development of, ground water 
supplies has proven fruitful in providing a greater degree of control over 
water temperatures in the hatcheries. This need, especially in the weatern 
hatcheries, has demanded the expansion of power facilities throughout the Hatch- 
eries, and the installation of additional pumping equipment, The use of wells 
does not materially increase the cost of trout production, as the more rigid con- 
trol of water quality resulting from these supplies allows the application of 
better hatchery management techniques. 

New construction was confined to eight new concrete rearing 
pools in the process of completion at the Sandwich Fish Hatchery, and the con- 
version of three former bass ponds to trout raceways at the Palmer Fish Hatch- 
ery. During the year, automatic fish sorters, new metal hatchery troughs., 
chemical test sets, and clinical testing units were obtained in order to keep 
abreast of modern fish cultural techniques being developed and to contribute 
to overall eficiency. 

The hatcheries in the western part of the state were most for- 
tunate in obtaining assistance in water sampling from the Department of Public 
Health through their organization at the University of ... assachusetts. Dissolved 
oxygen counts were provided throughout the summer of 1959. These findings 
were used as guides in hatchery management, 

The pike-perch program was stepped up by receipt of 7,500.000 
eyed eggs from the New York Conservation Department in exchange for eyed 
brook and rainbow eggs supplied from the Montague Hatchery. The results of 
the pike-perch program are noted on the liberation figures fro.v the Palmer 
Hatchery to the Quabbin Reservoir. 

.An Air-Aqua System was installed in the largest rearing pond at 
the .'iontague Hatchery. The unit, powered by a 1/4 h.p. electric motor attached 
to an oil-less air compressor, supplies air to a plastic hose line containing 
patented nosales hardly visable to the eye c "When in operation, a constant flow 
of tiny bubbles is emitted to the surface, bringing a change of air and water from 
the pond bottom. This is hignly desirable to keep ponds ice -free during the 
winter months. Further time and study is needed, however, to thoroughly eval- 

-17- 



uate this equipment before it is nade available to all hatcheries. 

/n automatic fish-pellet feeder was developed at the Sunderland 
Hatchery and is presently in use at this station. Although the feeder is still in 
an experimental stage it has proved to be satisfactory, providing extra time 
for other duties. 

The following table lists the production of fish from the state 
fish hatcheries. £lso listed are those received from the United States Hsh 
and Wildlife Service. 



18- 



FISH DISTRIBUTION July 1, 1959 To June 30, I960 
(This table does not show fish retained for brood stock) 



TROUT 



BROOKS 
Jnder 6" Over 6 I,: 



256,530 541,692 



BROWNS 
Under 6" Over 6" 

162,600 200,877 



RAINBOWS 
Under 6' Over 6'' 

165,100 143,748 



TOTAL TROUT 
2,170,547 



Total Trout Distributed 6-9" 517,217 

Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 369,100 

Total Catchables (6" plus) 886,317 

Total Fingerlings (6" minus) 1,284,230 

GRAND TOTAL 2,170,547 

POUNDAGE PRODUCTION BY STATIONS 

STATIO N TOTAL LBS. 

Montague 63,141 

Sandwich 63,856 

Sunderland 110,565 

Sutton 19,863 

Palmer 36,020 

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 17,697 

TOTAL POUNDAGE 311,142 



Palmer Hatchery also distributed 7,330,000 pike perch fry 



-19- 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A highlight of the year's program was an exhaustive field study 
of the relative merits of certain fluorescent and non-fluorescent colors for use 
as hunter -safety warning devices. This cooperative study was conducted by 
a committee representing the United States Army, the American Optical Com- 
pany, and the divisions of Law Enforcement and Fisheries and Game. Inform- 
ation and Education personnel represented the Division of Fisheries and Game 
on this committee. In brief, the study established a definite element of danger 
in wearing non-fluorescent yellow, established that non-fluorescent red was 
relatively ineffective, and established that a fluorescent color, trade-named 
"blaze orange", was superior for the purpose. The study resulted in strong 
recommendation by the committee that legislation requiring wearing of a color 
within certain technical limits, approximating the color tested, by hunters dur- 
ing the firearm season on deer in i.v Massachusetts. At the close of the reporting 
period, a technical report on the study and ^Jiveral popular .magazine articles 
were in process of publication. A documentary 16 mm film - "Be Seen" - 
was produced. 

Following are otner activities of the Information and Education 
Program during the year: 

Conservation Education 

A primary effort continued throughout the year was that of de- 
veloping public demand for a statewide, state -coordinated program of con- 
servation education in our school systems. 

Notable teaching programs have been in operation for years in 
certain areas, under dedicated individuals, and by the „udubon Society. The 
Massachusetts Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs has developed an active pro- 
gram of making selected conservation education materials available to schools, 
through its member clubs. The Audubon Society annually conducts natural re- 
source courses in over 100 school systemis. Materials are available from sev- 
eral governmental and non-governmental groups, to teachers who request 
assistance, such as^ the materials available from the American Forest Prod- 
ucts Industries Inc., National "Wildlife Federation, etc. 

However, there is no widely integrated, properly coordinated 
statewide program available as in the case of most other states. The majority 
of our school children still have little or no opportunity to acquire a sense of 
responsibility for the proper use of natural resources, nor mjich opportunity to 
acquire any knowledge about them. 

Perhaps even more important is the lack of any planned pro- 
gram in i Massachusetts to prepare student teachers, while in training, to teach 
this subject or to relate it to teaching methods and curricula. 

Considerable effort through editorial writing, public speaking, 

-20- 



and official contacts were directed to the potential correction of these con- 
ditions. Appearance by the Information and Education Chief at the New Eng- 
land Conservation Conference at Harvard University last spring emphasized 
conservation education. 

The Junior Conservation Camp, the only immediately productive 
youth education project in which the Division is regularly engaged, completed 
its eleventh year during the reporting period, with 158 boys attending. The 
Division's part in this camp is to provide audio -visual materials, wildlife and 
fisheries management instruction, certain publicity, and assist in planning, 
through participation, in the camp committee representing the many public and 
private resource groups sponsoring the camp. 

Inservice Training 

The first Division-wide employee's conference was held at West- 
boro Field Headquarters February 18 and 19, 1960„ A majority of personnel 
was able to attend the two -day program which included papers, panel dis- 
cussions and open discussions on most areas of Division activity. An innovation 
was the use of an I&E tool - film - to show what was done, rather than reliance 
on purely verbal expression. Use of film technique in propagation papers, 
and a dramatization of the production of a television program from first con- 
ferences to final telecast were favorably received. The conference was 
immediately followed by an employee opinion survey relative to the conference 
which was in the process of evaluation at the close of the reporting period. 

Press Releases 

The Division issued 108 news stories through formal releases 
(77 - I&E, 31 - Districts) during the reporting period. 

In addition, the Division, either through the I&E office or through 
other personnel, assisted the press in obtaining material for both news 
stories and feature articles. More than 50 contacts with the press to offer 
feature material were recorded by districts and I&E. Many more, which did 
not get recorded, were made. 

Several releases of still photos and twenty-eight television news 
films were issued by I&E during the year. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 



Publication of the Division's bi-monthly magazine, Massachu- 
setts Wildlife, continued in the 6" x 9" slick format, with the subscription list 
at the end of the fiscal year totaling 2 7, 506, a net gain of 3, 693 for the year. 
An additional distribution of from 1,000 to 3,000 copies of each issue has been 
made, as correspondence aids and in answer to other requests. 

Audio-Visual Aids 

-Zl- 



Information and Education prepared and presented 12 "Dateline 
Boston" and 12 "Critter Corner" television shows during the year. The "Date- 
line Boston" series are half-hour shows aimed pri.narily at a general adult 
audience. While subjects are kept to the wildlife field, or related fields, pres- 
entations are planned to arouse interest of the general public as well as sports- 
men. The "Critter Corner" series is aimed at a juvenile audience. Both 
utilize free time. 

Interstate cooperation received a boost witn inauguration of fish 
and game shows on the program "RFD #3", over WTIC-TV, Hartford, Tnis 
Division invited the Connecticut Board of Fisheries and Game to participate 
with us in this program, thereby increasing its effectiveness for both agencies. 
This program reaches the Connecticut valley area usually not reached by the 
Boston stations. 

District personnel and others participated in two recorded radio 
interviews per :t onth, total 24 for the year, coordinated through the I&E 
section. A few guest spots on both radio and TV were filled by district and 
I&E personnel as they occurred. 

Two new 16 mm f ilm s produced by the Division were added to 
the film library during the reporting period. These were: "Be Seen", story 
of the i/assachusetts Hunter-Safety Color Study, and "Time for Trout", story 
of trout hatcheries in Massachusetts. Also added to the film library were the 
films "Wings Abounding", and "Kappy Hunting Ground", botn telling the story 
of commercial shooting areas, and both obtained without cost. 

Film library usage remained high, with a total of 413 showings 
booked, before 33,040 people. This was exclusive of television showings. 

Exhibits 

Eleven exhibits were participated in by the Division. For the 
most part, this participation consisted of districts assisting the sponsoring 
group by providing live specimens, display boards, literature, etc. This act- 
ivity is held to a it ininuun since it is probably the least productive I&E act- 
ivity in terms of returns for the time and funds expended. 

Publications 

A total of 60 titles were maintained in the free publications list 
and many thousands of requests for these publications, or for information 
answerable by them, were serviced. 

During the reporting period, the Annual Report o f the Division 
and the current year's Fish and Game Laws flier, Reclaimed Pond List, 
Stocked Waters List, Closed Towns List, Sportsmen's Organization List and 
Migratory Game Seasons were compiled and published. 

-22- 



Work was completed on, and delivery received, of Trout Pond 
Management in Massachusett s, a 132-page treatise on the subject, and six 
issues of Massachusett s Wildlife . Numerous reprints of particular Massachu- 
s etts Wildlife articles and articles from national outdoor magazines, pertinent 
to Massachusetts, were obtained and distributed. 

Meetings . 

A total of 252 meetings with sportsmen's clubs, civic groups, 
etc. were participated in by district personnel. District personnel also gave 
27 educational lectures before youth groups and the Junior Conservation Camp. 
Other personnel of the Division made numerous public appearances as necessary. 

Special "Show Me" tours were conducted by the Northeast and 
Southeast districts, in which large groups of sportsmen and several members 
of the press were taken on tours of major Division installations and project sites 
in each district. Individuals of particular importance were conducted on tours 
of installations, etc. , on several occasions,, by all districts. 

Personnel of the Information and Education section served on 
the program of the national conference of the American Association for Conser- 
vation Information in May. The color study and the film "Be Seen" were pre- 
sented. 

Printing, Posters, Miscellaneous 

The I&E section assisted other units throughout the year by 
handling editorial and printing functions connected with informational material, 
fliers, maps, posters, etc. 

The annual Safety Zone poster project continued with in excess 
of 13,000 posters being distributed,, Approximately 500 SAMMI Hunting Safety 
posters were distributed. 



-23- 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 

General 

Several papers were published by Unit personnel during the last 
fiscal year; there were press releases on Unit projects and different groups 
were addressed by the Unit Leader and project leaders. 

Wild Turkey Project ; 

Eight wild-trapped turkeys (5 hens and 3 gobblers) were released 
on Prescott Peninsula, Quabbin Reservation, on a strictly experimental basis „ 
Surveys of Massachusetts forests by wild turkey experts, and the success 
achieved by New York State in similar woodlands, indicate that it may be pos- 
sible in time to re-establish this fine game bird in the state. The key to suc- 
cessful stocking is the availability of wild birds from other states. 

New England Cottontail Stud y 

A two-year biological study of the New England Cottontail 
( Sylvilagus Transitionalis) was completed by one graduate student and will be 
continued for two more years. Effective methods of manipulating habitat to 
increase numbers of this species are not known (incontrast to the common 
Eastern Cottontail) and it is hoped that more knowledge of the differences be- 
tween the two species may supply a key for successful management. 

Ruffed Grouse Project 

A complete habitat map was completed of the Phillipston public 
hunting ground area of over 900 acres. The map was made from large-scale 
aerial photographs. Included in the completed large-scale map are suggested 
vegetative changes that might be implemented to improve the area as ruffed 
grouse habitat. 

Pesticide -Wildlife Project 

A long-term study of the effect of forest spraying on productivity 
of certain wild bird species was commenced c This is a project financed by 
a contract with the federal Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. 

Woodcock Project 

In the past year, the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife 
analyzed the sex and age of 8, 500 woodcocks using the wing -aging technique 
developed by the Unit. Analysis of subsequent wing collections will provide 
our first quantitative data on the productivity and annual population trends of 
this migratory upland game bird. 

-24- 



• U ' > ••:•■■, 



■•■ .-t;.iii 



Other Frojects 

There is intensive work in bird control studies by Dr t David 
Wetherbee and a graduate student. These projects are not financed by Div- 
ision but by federal and university funds. 

Unit Publications 



Supervised by William G. Sheldon. 1959. Classification of land cover types 

by towns. Published by Cooperative Extension Service, College 
of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass- 
achusetts e Data in separate bindings for each county. 

Sheldon, William G. I960* The Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research 
Unit, Massachusetts Wildlife, May-June, pp. 13-17. 

Webb, John S. and David K. Wetherbee. I960. Southeastern breeding range 
of brownheaded cowbird. Bird-banding, Vol 31. pp. 83-87. 

Pringle, Laurence P. I960, Notes on coyotes in southern New England. 
Journ. of Mamm. , 41, No, 2, pp. 278, 



-25- 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



July 1, 1959 to June 30, i960 



ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 
Fish and Game Board 
Information-Education 

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 
Fish Hatcheries 
Management 
Management 
Fish Restoration 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 
Game Farms 
Management 
Wildlife Coop. Unit 
Wildlife Restoration 

LAND ACQUISITION 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 



3304-01 
3304-01 
3304-01 


$ 80,249.52 
800.00 


$ 81,049.52 
50,974.49 


6$ 


3304-42 
3304-42 
3304-51 
3304-47* 


105,783.16 
62,292.15 
46,939-21 


333,741.79 
215,014.52 


26% 

17* 


3304-51 
3304-51 
3304-44 

3304-53* 


62,292.15 

7,490.10 

131,970.28 


222,034.85 
201,752.53 


1856 

l6f 


3304-53* 




12,127.68 


1# 


3308-05* 

3308-07 

1003-03 


6, 146. 16 

8,174.62 

130,510.31 


144,831.09 


12$ 




$1,261,526.47 


100$ 



Continuing Accounts 



Expenditures under 3304-47 and 3304-53 are reimbursed 75$ by Federal funds. 
Reserve in INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND as of June 30, i960 - $259,675.75. 



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■27- 



SUMMARY OF PISH AND GAME INCOME 



July 1, 1959 to June 30, i960 



Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations, and Tags 

License to Carry Firearms 

Rents 

Miscellaneous Sales and Income 

Pittman -Robert son Federal Aid 

Dingell- Johns on Federal Aid 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 



$1,126,703.50* 
5,3^0.16** 

9.00*** 

2,76^.00 

3,288.29 

128,892.19 

55,167.03 

7,383.00 

17^.11 



*3ee Detail Sheet No. 1 
**3ee Detail Sheet No. 2 
***Credited to General Fund 



$1,329,721.28 



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-29- 



Detail Sheet No. 2 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS U8, 
68A, 102-3- 1 +-5-6-7 and 112 -A, CHAPTER 131, G.L. DURING 
THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, i960 



TYPE OF LICENSE 



Trap Registrations : 



Fur Buyers : 



Taxidermist 

Propagators : 
Special Fish 



Fish 

Birds and Mammals 

Dealers 

Ind. Birds or Mammals 

Shiners for Bait 
Field Trial License 
Carp and Suckers for Sale 
Quail for Training Dogs : 

Tags : 





NUMBER 


ISSUED 


RECEIPTS 


Initial 




1^9 




Renewal 




810 


$ 351.50 


Resident 




29 




Non -Resident 




1 


390.00 



Initial 
Renewal 

Initial 
Renewal 

Initial 
Renewal 

Initial 
Renewal 
Additional 

Initial 
Renewal 



Initial 
Renewal 

Game 
Fisb 



63 



315.00 



8 

186 


202.00 


k 

9± 


302.00 


6k 
289 


1,187.00 


11 

90 

1+86 


811.00 


13 
53 


39.50 


272 


1,360.00 


3 


30.00 


1 


10.00 


16 
17 


131.00 


1,703 
12,601 


211.16 



$5,3^0.16 



-30- 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS; AND REGULATIONS PROM_ 
ULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, I960 

August 4, 1948„ Rales and regulations for the artificial propagation 
and maintenance of fish. 

August 4, 1948, Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation 
of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and 
arrows. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected 
fresh water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, effective 
April 9, 1954. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing 
grounds in Massachusetts. 

April 3, 1956. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake, effect- 
ive April 10, 1956. 

April 3, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish 
in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, effective 
April 10, 1956. 

January 30, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the hunting and 
trapping of mammals in Massachusetts, effective February 1, 1957. 

February 5, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
carp and suckers for the purpose of sale, 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging 
of deer in Massachusetts. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 

September 25, 1959. Migratory game bird regulations for season 
of 1959. 

October 10, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
certain fish in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public shooting grounds 
and wildlife manageme nt areas in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

November 1, 1959. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
deer in Massachusetts. 



# jf * # £ # # # # 



-31- 



LEGISL£ TION 

The following laws directly affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of I960. 



CHAPTER 100, ACTS, I960: An Act prohibiting the use of firearms or bows 

and arrows on the Greylock State Reservation 
from May first to October twentieth, inclusive. 

An Act permitting the use of the color orange in 
clothing or material required while hunting 
during the deer season, 

An Act repealing the provisions of law providing 
for a close season on birds and mammals durin 
certain periods. 

An Act clarifying the definition of the word 
"firearms". 

An Act authorizing the trapping of beavers 
which have been declared a nuisance in certain a. 
areas. 

An Act authorizing the Director of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game to convey certain land in 
the town of Sandwich. 

An Act further regulating the issuance by the 
Director of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game t< aliens of hunting permits and permits 
to ownor possess certain firearms. 

CHAPTER 425, ACTS, I960 An Act requiring a person who hunts deer by 

means of a bow and arrow during the exclusive a 
archery season to obtain a certain stamp and 
to pay a fee therefor. 



CHAPTER 101, ACTS. I960; 



CHAPTER 146, ACTS, I960: 



CHAPTER 186, ACTS, I960: 



CHAPTER 362, ACTS, I960; 



CHAPTER 385, ACTS, I960: 



CHAPTER 419, ACTS, I960: 



PERSONNEL RETIREMENTS 



Arthur Brothers, Palmer Fish Hatchery 
Hilda M. Sutherland, Boston Office 



February 27, I960 
May 31, I960 



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