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Full text of "Annual report of the directors of the Wabash Railroad Co., for the fiscal year ending .."

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofdi10waba 



Tenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



DIRKCTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co 



Kor the Kiscal Year Ending 
June SOthi, 1899- 



ST. LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co. 

1899. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



-OF- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO 



O. D. ASHLEY, President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., Vice-President and General Manager. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

W. H. BLODGETT, General Solicitor. 

E. B. PRYOR, Assistant Secretary. 

H. L. MAGEE, General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

M. KNIGHT, Freight Traffic Manager. 

S. B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

C. B. ADAMS, Superintendent Transportation. 

H. H. WELLMAN, General Storekeeper and Purchasing Agent 

W. S. LINCOLN, Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery. 

M. M. MARTIN, Superintendent Car Department. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Dr. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 

GEO. M. BURNS, Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 

0. D. ASHLEY, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

GEO. J. GOULD, EDWIN GOULD, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

HENRY K. McHARG, JOHN T. TERRY, 

C. J. LAWRENCE, RUSSELL SAGE, 

P. B. WYCKOFF, C. C. MACRAE. 
FRANCIS PAVY, 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DIReCTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1899. 



The result of the year's operations is given in the follow- 
ing condensed statement. The details will be found in the 
Auditor's report, hereto annexed : 

Gross Earnings 114,393,974 15 

Miscenaneous Eeceipts 185,031 81 

Total Receipts 114,579,005 96 

Deduct Operating Expenses $10,411,473 82 

Deduct Taxes 567,163 29 

Deduct Balance Joint Track Rent- 
als and Miscellaneous Expenses 760,937 40 11,739,574 51 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $ 2,839,431 45 

Interest on Bonds and Rental of Eel River Road.. 2,691,495 00 

Surplus , $ 147,936 45 



— 4 — 

As compared with the statement for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1898, the following changes appear, namely : 

In Gross Earnings, an increase of 11,186,111 72 

In Miscellaneous Receipts, an increase of 4,375 84 

In Operating Expenses, an increase of 1,106,694 52 

In Taxes, an increase of 67,676 94 

In Balance of Joint Track Rentals, an increase of 272,725 56 
In Net Earnings, applicable to interest, a de- 
crease of 256,609 46 

In Surplus Earnings, a decrease of 253,559 46 

These changes, which, in a superficial view, may seem 
inconsistent with an admitted improvement in railway 
traffic during the year, require an explanation, that bond- 
holders and stockholders may not be led to erroneous 
conclusions. 

1. The increase in Gross Earnings is partly due to the 
additional business of the line through Canada, leased from 
the Grand Trunk Kailway Co., and now called the Buffalo 
Division of the Wabash System. For the year ending June 
30, 1898, this Division had been in operation for both freight 
and passenger business only four months. 

2. The Operating Expenses have been largely increased 
by payments on account of new rolling stock, steel rails, 
and the application of air-brakes and automatic couplers to 
equipment, in compliance with law. 

3. The increase in Taxes is partly due to an under-esti- 
mate last year, as at the time our Annual Report is made, 
taxes in several of the States are not assessed, but are ascer- 
tained later in the year. 

4. The increase in the Balance of Joint Track Rentals is 
mainly due to the rentals paid to the Grand Trunk, to the 
Erie, and to the Lehigh Valley Railway Companies for the 
use of track and terminals for the Buffalo Division. 

These four paragraphs account for the difference in Net 
Earnings applicable to Interest and Surplus Earnings. 



The policy of the Company, as heretofore announced, has 
been to charge all betterments in the way of new rolling 
stock, steel rails, new bridges, stations and track improve- 
ments to Operating Expenses. This policy has been adopted 
partly because it is believed by the management to be a 
fairer test of the profit-earning capacity of the System, than 
to charge such items to Construction Account (and thus to 
increase the aggregate cost of the property), and partly 
from necessity. The only resources of the Company avail- 
able for such purposes are the net earnings, and such assets 
as may be from time to time convertible into cash. Hence, 
the operating expenses have been heavily burdened with 
such expenditures, to the detriment of net earnings, rather 
than to incur a large floating debt, which might prove a 
source of embarrassment. 

The magnitude of these expenditures during the last 
three or four years will be more clearly appreciated when it 
is understood that more than three-quarters of the entire 
equipment of the System has been practically renewed 
during that period, while, at the same time, nearly all of the 
main track has been renewed with steel rails, and much of 
it with steel weighing eighty pounds to the yard. 

When the reorganization of the Company took place in 
1889, the property came into our possession in fair condition 
for roads at that time, but the receivers had done little 
towards bringing the property up to modern railway stan- 
dards, and the rolling stock had approached the stage of 
wear when renewal would be essential to continued opera- 
tion. 

Plans of reorganization which have been completed 
within a year or two, embracing some of the largest systems 



in the country, have wisely provided for these betterments 
and additions to equipment by reserving an ample amount 
of the senior securities, and have thus met requirements, 
which can not be avoided if the lines of such companies 
are to compete for traffic with first-class systems upon equal 
terms. In the reorganization of the Wabash in 1889, such 
a reservation was not considered practicable, and, conse- 
quently, the Company has been obliged to rely mainly upon 
its earnings for such expenditures. Since 1890, a great change 
has taken place in traffic conditions. Keduced rates of trans- 
portation have suggested economies in operation in heavier 
and more powerful engines, freight cars of larger capacity, 
and increased train loads. These changes in rolling stock 
have required corresponding improvement in road beds, 
bridges and tracks, to sustain the greater power and weight 
of the new machinery. This process of adjusting the 
means of transportation to the prevailing traffic conditions, 
is the accepted solution of the problem of moving low class 
freight long distances at a minimum of cost. The experi- 
ment has been a signal success thus far, but it has called 
for an outlay in money which has severely taxed the 
resources of railway companies. 

The Wabash Company has simply been compelled to 
adopt these improvements, in order to maintain its position 
as an important and efficient carrier. The present physical 
condition of the property, including its new and enlarged 
motive power, and increased carrying capacity, are satis- 
factory proofs of the wisdom of the policy followed. It is 
worthy of note, in this connection, that in these timely 
expenditures a very large saving has been made, and the 
Company is now able to suspend its outlays in this direction 



during a period of pressing demand, and advancing prices 
for steel rails and rolling stock. 

The annexed report of Vice-President and General Man- 
ager Eamsey will furnish interesting details of these better- 
ments, and their relative cost. 

The financial condition of the Company shows satisfactory 
improvement. The Auditor's statement gives a balance in 
notes payable of $212,345.72, a reduction of $200,000 since 
the last annual report. Of this, notes for $200,000 have been 
paid since the close of the fiscal year. The Company is, at 
the date of this writing, substantially free of floating debt, 
except in equipment notes of long date, which will be extin- 
guished in monthly payments. This result has been partly 
due to the conversion of some of the available assets in the 
hands of the Purchasing Committee, and the closing up of 
the accounts of that Committee, which carries $645,988.33 
to the credit of Profit and Loss Account, and leaves a balance 
to the credit of that account of $222,480.94, as compared with 
a debit balance of $517,189.96, June 30, 1898. The remain- 
ing liabilities consist largely of vouchers constantly in process 
of liquidation and equipment notes of long dates. 

The new link between Moulton and Albia, to complete 
and shorten the line to Des Moines, is making satisfactory 
progress in construction, and will probably be in working 
order before November 1st. The four per cent, mortgage 
bonds authorized for the acquisition and construction of this 
line, and amounting to $1,600,000, have been negotiated 
upon satisfactory terms, and the proceeds appropriated in 
accordance with the terms of the mortgage. This issue adds 
to the Funded Debt of the Company to that extent. The 
only other change in this account is a reduction of $61,000 



in the amount of outstanding bonds of the Detroit Division, 
caused by the purchase of that amount in accordance with 
the sinking fund provision of the mortgage. 

The operation of the Buffalo Division, under the lease 
agreement made with the Grand Trunk Eailway Co., and 
the agreements made with the Erie and Lehigh Valley 
Companies, have proved highly advantageous in adding to 
the volume of traffic on the lines west of Detroit, although 
not yet yielding any profits above the rentals and expenses 
of that Division from its own lines. The earnings of this 
Division are now showing a substantial increase over those 
of the corresponding period in 1898, and the promise of 
more liberal profits in the near future justifies confidence in 
the ultimate advantage of an extension which connects 
Buffalo with the important gateways reached by the Wabash 
lines at Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. 

An impartial view of the condition of railway property 
encourages expectations of much more satisfactory results 
from the large increase of traffic than in recent years. Rates 
for the transportation of freight continue lower, and show a 
reduction per ton per mile, as compared with 1898, but the 
more active employment of all the machinery of transporta- 
tion has led to greater stability in established rates, and, 
in this respect, the situation is more favorable. It is, never- 
theless, a conspicuous fact that railway freight is carried in 
immense volume at unnecessary sacrifice, in consequence of 
competitive struggles which no influences can reach, and for 
which Congress, in its wisdom, refuses to provide a remedy. 
The time will come, perhaps, when Western railways, like 
those of New England, can afford to ignore unprofitable 
freight, and depend upon the passenger traffic of a dense 



— 9 — 

population ; but this is a slow process and a deferred hope. 
The movement of freight from the West to the seaboard, at 
the rate of two mills per ton per mile, has recently excited the 
wonder of intelligent men that such a rate can be established 
and pay a profit to the transportation agencies. The error 
into which the observers are led by this statement is easily 
explained. The average rate per ton per mile, for example, 
on the Wabash lines for the last year was 5.53 mills, against 
6.24 mills for the previous year — a reduction of .071 mills, 
or about three-quarters of one mill per ton per mile. Now, 
while grain and coal, and other freight of lower classification, 
may be carried at two mills per ton per mile, the higher 
classes of freight pay much better rates, and the average is 
thus obtained. While, therefore, the low rate quoted is 
made practicable by the higher rates obtained on first class 
freight, it is doubtful if the rate of two mills per ton per 
mile, of itself, would pay the cost of transportation, not to 
mention the wear and tear of track and machinery. The 
average cost of moving freight on the Wabash in 1898 was 
4.47 mills per ton per mile, and, in the last fiscal year, 4.21 
mills. It is safe to say that no railway in this country could 
reduce its average rate to two mills per ton per mile 
without going into bankruptcy soon afterward. At two 
mills per ton per mile, the Wabash would have lost in the 
year 2.21 mills per ton per mile, which, on the tonnage of 
1897-8, would have figured up a loss of about |3,020,000, or 
nearly as much as the entire net earnings of the company 
applicable to interest. It is interesting to note in this connec- 
tion that the reduction of .071 mills per ton per mile in the 
rates of the last fiscal year amounts to $1,183,449.33, and is 
equivalent to that reduction in the net profits of the year 



— lo- 
in recognition of the necessity of moving the immense 
tonnage in grain, food products and coal over long distances 
to the seaboard at the lowest rates possible, railway 
managers have been making a study of the economical 
methods of transportation, and the result of this investigation 
is one cause of the large expenditures in the way of 
improvement already referred to. 

It may be satisfactory to the bond-holders and share- 
holders to know that, so far as we can form opinions of the 
future from present indications, the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1900, appears to promise much better profits than the 
last, although the monthly payments on rolling stock will 
continue large until next June. After that date the burden 
will be materially lightened. The property itself was never 
in such excellent condition, and never so well provided 
with the power, machinery, and facilities to meet the 
competition of first class lines. 

It is always gratifying to add the usual paragraph at the 
close of our annual report, giving due credit to the ofiicers 
and employes of the Company for the successful operation 
of the road. To their zeal, care, and hearty co-operation, 
we owe the safe movement of the trains and the efiicient 
handling of a vast tonnage. 

For the Directors, 

0. D. ASHLEY, 

President 
New York, September, 1899. 



Report of Vice-President and General Manager. 



I 



September 1st, 1899. 
Mr. 0. D. Ashley, 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company, New York : 

Sir — In analyzing the usual comparative statements of 
earnings and expenses of operation herewith submitted, 
with the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1898, and previous 
years, it must be borne in mind that the fiscal year ending 
June 30th, 1899, was the first year during which the Bufialo 
Division was operated for both freight and passenger traffic 
the entire year. March 1st, 1898, the lease for the joint use 
of the Grand Trunk line became operative, and that for the 
use of the Erie tracks from Suspension Bridge to Buffalo 
not until January 1st, 1899, although passenger trains had 
been run, under trackage arrangements, over the Grand 
Trunk and Erie since June, 1897. These radical changes in 
the system caused just as radical changes in both revenues 
and expenses, and it is practically impossible to make any 
accurate comparison with previous years. 



— 12 — 

BUFFALO EXTENSION. 

The year's operation of the extension to Buffalo has been 
entirely satisfactory. It has not only met all the legitimate 
expenses of operation, rentals and taxes of that division out 
of its own earnings since March 1st, 1898, but has also paid 
quite heavy expenditures for new freight station and local 
yards at Buffalo ; new side tracks on the line, and revision 
and enlargement of yards at the terminals, payment of 
heavy tariffs on all the engines, cars and other equipment 
imported into Canada for that division, etc., and has left a 
small surplus. In addition to the proven ability of this 
extension to more than pay its way out of its own earnings, 
it has clearly demonstrated its great value to the Wabash 
proper, west of Detroit. 

HANNIBAL CUT-OFF. 

The lease of the Hannibal Bridge, and the lease of the 
joint use of the M., K. & T. line between Moberly and Han- 
nibal, reported in the last annual report, giving us an un- 
broken line between Kansas City and Buffalo, has also 
proven satisfactory, both in the improvement of our fast 
freight traffic and in the showing of a neat balance after 
payment of all expenses and rentals. 

DES MOINES AND ST. LOUIS LINE. 

In May, 1899, the construction of twenty-seven miles of 
road from Moulton to Albia was commenced, and, barring 



— 13 — 

delays on account of material, it will be completed in 
October. The old abandoned line from Albia to Harvey is 
being rebuilt. The completion of this line will give us a 
line from St. Louis to Des Moines over our own rails, and 
about twenty-five miles shorter than our present route, via 
Ottumwa, and thence over the Rock Island rails to Harvey, 
about thirty ' nine miles. In addition to shortening the 
line, it will give us the local traffic along fifty-two miles of 
line from Moulton to Harvey, whereas, under our Rock Island 
trackage arrangement, we are prohibited from doing local 
business over the thirty-nine miles from Ottumwa to Harvey. 
By the use of our own line, we will save about $30,000 
annually in trackage rental and expenses of Ottumwa ter- 
minals. 

OPERATION STATISTICS. 

The statements submitted by the Auditor do not include 
the line from Harvey to Des Moines, as that line has been 
carried in the Purchasing Committee's accounts up to June 
30th, 1899. On July 1st, 1899, it was taken into the general 
accounts, and will hereafter be included. All property, 
equipment, and physical statistics, include the Des Moines- 
Harvey line. 



— 14 — 

REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Earnings and Expenses. 



1898-9. 



1897-8. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings , 

Operating Expenses , 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent. Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 

♦Decrease. 



$14,393,974 15 

10,411,473 82 

3,982,500 33 

72.33 

6,319 52 

4,671 05 

1,748 47 



$13,207,862 43 

9,304,779 30 

8,903,083 13 

70.45 

6,407 54 

4,514 03 

1,893 51 



$1,186,111 72 
1,106,694 52 
79,417 20 
1.98 
88 02* 
57 02 
145 04* 



EARNINGS. 



Per 
Cent. 



Per 
Cent. 



1897-8. 



Increase. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total. 



64.00 
27.76 
3.80 
2.25 
2.19 



$9,212,691 70 

3,995,102 07 

546,795 14 

323,712 91 

315,672 33 



64.54 

26.72 

4.15 

2.43 

2.16 



$14,393,974 15 



$8,524,733 21 

3,528,745 87 

548.641 11 

320,769 99 

284,972 25 



$ 687,958 49 

466,356 20 

1,845 97* 

2,942 92 

30,700 08 



$13,207,862 43 



$1,186,111 72 



♦Decrease. 



EXPENSES. 



Per 
Cent. 


1898-9. 


Per 
Cent. 


1897-8. 


Increase. 


Conducting Transportation 
Motive Power 


42.65 

30.06 

16.20 

8.56 

2.53 


$4,440,788 17 

8,129,737 09 

1,686,362 86 

891,526 55 

263,059 15 


43.30 
26.90 
17.87 
9.35 
2.68 


$4,029,307 99 

2,502,652 04 

1,662,986 83 

870,311 42 

239,521 02 


$ 411,480 18 
627,085 05 


Maintenance of Way 


23,376 03 


Maintenance of Cars 


21,215 13 


General Expenses 


23,538 13 






Total 




$10,411,473 82 




$9,304,779 30 


$1,106,694 52 









The increase of $1,186,111.72 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 



Wabash west of Detroit, Increase $342,947 41 

Buffalo Division, iDcrease 843,164 31 



— 15 — 

The increase of $1,106,694.52 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash west of Detroit, Increase |325, 156 34 

Buffalo Division, Increase 781,538 18 

Leaving out the Buffalo Division for the years 1898 and 
1899 the percentage of operating expenses to earnings on 
the Wabash proper was as follows : 

Year ending June 30th, 1898, 70.55 per cent. 
Year ending June 30th, 1899, 71.21 per cent. 

TEAFFIC. 

FEEIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics show a large increase of 
301,136,880 (22.05 per cent.), in "tons carried one mile," at 
an average rate of 0.553 cents per mile, a decrease of 0.071 
cents (11.5 per cent.), at a cost per ton mile of 0.421 cents, a 
decrease of 0.026 cents (5.8 per cent.), leaving a net profit of 
0.132 cents, as compared with 0.177 cents last year, a de- 
crease of 0.045 cents. 

The revenue per freight train mile was $1.2973, expense 
per mile, $0.9887, and net earnings, $0.3086, as against 
$1.3517, $0.9680, and $0.3837 respectively, last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 7,101,324 miles, an 
increase- of 894,820, or about 14.19 per cent. 

The loaded cars per train increased 0.53 cars, the load 
per car 0.65 tons, and the train load was 234.72 tons, 
against 216.55 tons last year, 212.87 in 1897, 193.04 tons in 
1896, and 176.29 tons in 1895, an increase of 8.4 per cent, 
over 1898, and 33.14 per cent, over 1895. 



— 16 — 

The above figures show clearly what has caused the 
increase in percentage of expenses to earnings. With an 
increase of 22.05 per cent, in "services rendered," i, e., tons 
carried one mile, there was an increase in freight revenue 
of only $687,918.49, or 8.07 per cent. 

PASSENGER. 

"Passengers carried one mile" increased 30,233,772 (16.76 
per cent.), and in revenue $466,356.20 (13.22 per cent). 
$122,666.90 of this increase was on the Buffalo Division, 
leaving $393,689.30 of the increase on the Wabash proper. 
The rate per passenger per mile was 1.897 cents, a decrease 
of 0.06 cents, and expenses per passenger mile 1.610 cents, a 
decrease of .164 cents, leaving 0.287 cents per mile net, as 
against 0.183 last year. 

Train earnings per mile were 79.42 cents, a loss of 2.28 
cents ; expenses 54.06 cents per mile, a decrease of 4.12 cents, 
and net earnings per train mile 25.36 cents, against 23.52 
cents in 1898. 



— 17 — 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows : 





Buffalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Conducting Transportat'n 
Motivs Pow6r 


$272,339 55 
318,159 77 
162,333 52 

44,557 34 
4,158 00 


$139,140 63 

308,925 28 

*138,957 49 

* 23,342 21 

19,380 13 


$411,480 18 

626,085 05 

23,376 03 

21,215 13 

23,538 13 


Maintenance of Way 

Maintenance of Cars 

General Expenses 




Total 


$781,538 18 


$325,156 34 


$1,106,694 52 



*Decrease. 

The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Hire of Cars — passenger, baggage and sleep- 
ing $ 30,759 93 

FreightCars 126,275 01 $157,034 94 

Passenger Train Service— train and engine 
men, fuel, oil, waste and tallow, cleaning 
and lighting coaches, etc. (14.65% inc.).. 118,303 37 

Freight Train Service— train and engine men, 
fuel for locomotives, oil, waste and tal- 
low, cleaning, oiling and inspecting cars 
(19.8% inc.) 292,148 18 

Eepairs of Engines — freight and passenger 

(42.7% inc.) 239,195 60 

Eepairs to Passenger and Freight Cars 17,502 93 

Outside Agencies, Fast Freight Lines, Com- 
missions, etc 103,388 56 

Station Agents, Clerks, Labor, Light, Fuel, 

etc 89,814 47 

Telegraph Expenses 34,734 70 

Yard men and Switch tenders 30,928 08 

Eepairs, Shops, Turn-tables and Water Sta- 
tions 33,062 13 

WarEeveiitie Stamps 21,156 31 

The increase in freight tonnage was 22.05 per cent, and 
the increase in cost of freight train service was 19.8 per cent. 
The " passengers carried one mile " increased 16.76 per cent., 
while the cost of passenger train service increased 14.60 
per cent. 



18 — 



MILES OF ROAD OPERATED. 



LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI EIVER. 



Description of Lines. 



•d 


-d 




■Ill 


tal, 
Line. 


a 


1 






H-S 


1 


°§2 


§ 



O o 



FROM TO 

Toledo E. Hannibal.. 

E. Hannibal-Hannibal 

Blufis Camp Point .. 

Camp Point... Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Pittsfield Jct..Pittsfield 

Attica Covington 

Sidney Champaign... 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville 
Crossing 

Chicago W. I. June... 

W. I. June Effingham ... 

Shumway Altamont 

Forrest.... Fairbury 

Fairbury Streator 

Detroit Delray 

Delray Butler 

Butler Logansport... 

Chili Peru 

Montpelier Clark June... 

Clark June W. I. June ... 



Edwardsville 



Total Lines East 



462.3 
39.4 
34.5 



110.2 
8.5 



205.4 
10.3 



31.5 
109.9 



149.7 



1161.7 



1.6 



6.1 



94.2 
9.5 



111.4 



21.8 

7.8 



2.2 



8.0 



5.5 
4.6 



17.5 



67.4 



14.8 
11.7 



462.3 

1.6 

39.4 

21.8 

34.5 

7.8 

6.1 

14.8 

11.7 

112.4 

8.5 

8.0 

205.4 

10.3 

5.5 

31.5 

4.6 

109.9 

94.2 

9.5 

149.7 

17.5 



218.9 
2.0 
3.9 
0.2 
1.8 
1.2 
0.7 
2.1 
2.0 
40.3 

1.4 
23.1 
55.4 

0.3 



3.4 
14.9 
30.1 
20.4 

0.4 
47.3 



681.2 

3.6 

43.3 

22.0 

36.3 

9.0 

6.8 

16.9 

13.7 

152.7 

9.9 

31.1 

260.8 

10.6 

5.5 

34.9 

19.5 

140.0 

114.6 

9.9 

197.0 

17.5 



26.5 1367.0.469.8 



1836.8 



FEOM TO 

Detroit Black Rock.. 

Welland Jet ..Susp. Bridge. 
Susp. Bridge..BuSalo 



Total Buffalo Division 



228.2 
18.0 
25.6 



271.8 



228.2 
18.0 
25.6 



271.8 



142.4 I 370.( 



13.6 
12.0 



31.6 
37.6 



168.0 439.8 



19 — 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI EIVER. 



Description of Lines. 



-5 o © 
f-, t^ rt 

ft'O o 
O 13 S3 



lis 

O ^ %r 
« Q. ^ 



§3 ^ 



St. Louis — 

Union Station. 23d st 

Tayon av Harlem 

Harlem Kansas City 

St. Louis — 

Franklin av...N. Market st 

Olive st Carr st 

Carr st Ferguson 

Moberly Hannibal.... 

Moberly Ottumwa 

Ottumwa Harvey 

Harvey Des Moines.. 

Brunswick Chillicothe.. 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Centralia Columbia ... 

Salisbury. Glasgow 

Excello Ardmore 



274.8 



10.8 



131.2 



15.3 



Total Lines West 

Total Lines East 

Total Buffalo Division 

Total All Lines 



432.1 
1161.7 



1593.! 



38.2 
41.4 
21.6 



101.2 
111.4 



212.6 



0.7 



1.5 



0.6 
69.7 
38.0 



110.5 

67.4 

271.8 



449.7 



43.4 



0. 

274. 
1. 



0. 
10, 
69. 
131, 
38, 
43, 
38, 
41, 
21. 
15, 



99.6 
3.5 



43.4 687. 
26.51367. 
i 271 



2J182, 
0'469. 
8:168, 



69.92326.0820.53146.5 



0.7 

374.4 

5.0 

1.5 
1.0 
40.3 
78.2 
144.4 
38.0 
49.8 
41.2 
45.5 
22.8 
16.1 
11.0 



869.9 

1836.8 

439.8 



Note. — The line from Albia to Harvey, 23.4 miles, is not now being 
operated, and the mileage is not included above. This is part of the 
Des Moines & St. Louis Railroad, and belongs to the Purchasing 
Committee. 



Note A. — No change in "Owned," "Leased," "Joint Track," and 
"Purchasing Committee" mileage except in double track and sidings 
on Buffalo Division. When report was made last year the mileage of 
sidings on joint tracks had not been ascertained. 



— 20 — 

The Main Track mileage shown in the foregoing state- 
ment is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New York 25.6 

In Canada 246.2 

In Michigan 80.4 

In Ohio 115.4 

In Indiana 435.1 

In Illinois 736.1 

In Missouri 562.5 

In Iowa 124.7 

Total 2,326.0 



— 21 — 

TEANSPORTATION. 
Train and Car Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT 1899. 1898. 1897. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 

for year 1,637,617 1,421,417 1,268,099 

Total Empty Cars moved 
for year 819,693 724,738 700,202 

Total Loaded and Empty 

Cars moved for year 2,457,310 2,146,155 1,968,301' 

Average Loaded Cars 
moved perday 4,541 3,894 3,474 

Average Empty Cars 
moved per day 2,246 1,985 1,918 

Average Loaded and 
Empty Cars moved per 
day 6,787 5,879 5,392 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 7,245,206 6,338,830 5,432,934 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 19,850 17,367 14,885 

Total number Freight 
Trains for year 87,100 74,008 67,678 

Average number Freight 
Trains per day 239 203 185 

Average number Miles run 
per train, per day 83.1' 85.6 80.3 

Average number Loaded 
Cars moved per train 
mile 16.9 16.6 16.5 

Average number Empty 
Cars moved per train 
mile , 7.4 7.4 7.9 

Average number Loaded 
and Empty Cars moved 
per train mile 24.3 24.0 24.4 

Average number Cars 
handled per train mile, 
reduced to loaded car 
basis 21.4 21.1 21.2 

Mileage made by all 
Loaded Cars for year 122,435,819 105,497,721 89,697,456 

Mileage made by all 
Empty Cars for year 53,781,587 46,822,053 43,399,078 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 176,217,406 152,319,774 133,096,534 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 73,024,596 61,164,310 47,919,165 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 27,833,095 23,409,005 18,398,275 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 

for year 100,857,691 84,573,315 66,317,440 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 49,411,223 44,333,411 41,778,291 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 25,948,492 23,413,048 25,000,803 



— 22 

FREIGHT— Cont. 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 

Mileage made by Wabash 
Cars on other roads for 
year 

Number Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. R 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Foreign 
Roads 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day 

PASSENGER. 

Total Passenger Train 

Mileage for year 

Total number Passenger 

Trains run for year 

Average number Passenger 

Trains run per day 

Average number Miles per 

Train per day 

Average number Miles by 

all Trains per day , 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Coaches and Chair Cars 

for year 

Total Mileage Sleeping 

Cars for year 

Total Mileage Wabash 

Dining Cars for year 

Total Mileage of all Cars 

for year 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled for 

year 321,565 277,400 266,085 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled per 

day 881 760 729 

Average number of Cars 

per train 4.71 4.66 4.64 



75,359,715 


67,746,459 


isyy. 

66,779,094 


33,266,040 


33,939,563 


32,513,880 


12,995 


11,774 


11,849 


5,527 


4,239 


3,680 


27.6 


24.6 


22.4 


16.5 


21.9 


24.2 


5,656 


5,130 


3,952 


56.9 


52.7 


54.5 


6,302,399 


5,267,013 


4,855,171 


68,245 


59,376 


56,641 


187 


163 


155 


92.3 


88.6 


85.7 


17,260 


14,441 


13,283 


7,064,903 


6,482,614 


6,438,700 


13,350,422 


11,355,883 


10,044,177 


7,060,827 


5,338,535 


4,681,415 


765,833 


518,691 


393,850 


29,627,962 


24,589,410 


22,541,258 



— 23 — 



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 



The increase in Maintenance of Way expense was only 
$23,376.03, although 23,777.6 tons of 80-lb. steel rail, 109 
tons of 70-lb. steel rail, and 294 tons of 63-lb. steel rail were 
laid in main tracks ; 121.4 miles newly ballasted and heavy- 
expenditures for repairs of bridges, frogs and switches, 
spikes, splices and fastenings, and $18,823.93 for river pro- 
tection. 

We purchased 26,250 tons of 80-lb. rail at a cost of 
$450,675 at the mill. On account of delay in shipping by 
the mills, the bulk of this new rail was delivered after 
December, 1898, and old rails were worth more per ton 
when they were released from the track than the new steel 
cost. June 30th, 1899, we had on hand 5,224 tons of 63-lb. 
rail, which will be re-rolled and laid on our branch lines, 
and 10,072 tons of scrap rails and relayers. 

The work of improving the roadway by the replacing of 
trestles and open water-ways with iron pipe culverts was 
vigorously pushed, and during the year 5,669 lineal feet of 
trestles, 1.06 miles, were filled, and three iron bridges were 
built to replace wooden bridges, at a cost of $20,172.76. 

New shop buildings were erected at various points, at a 
cost of 422,966.30, and $19,269.91 was expended in additions 
to and remodeling of Springfield passenger station, and 
$23,200.81 was expended for the new freight terminals, 
house and tracks at Buffalo. 

For reducing grades and removing sags on Western 
Division, $11,733.96 was expended. 



— 24 — 

The Missouri River east of Kansas City gave us a great 
deal of trouble this year, cutting into our road-bed at several 
points, requiring protection by mattress and rip-rap at a 
cost of $17,489.90. 

Interlocking plants at six crossings of other roads were 
put in at a cost to the Wabash of $13,761.59. 

13.3 miles new side tracks and spur tracks to various 
industries were built at a cost of $48,891.54. 

Real estate was bought for extension of yard facilities at 
St. Louis, Peru, Bement and Detroit, and at Logansport to 
remove some bad curves and heavy grade, at a cost of 
$19,911.77. 

Maintenance op Way. 
new steel eail laid. 





1898-99. 


1897-98. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No . Tons 63-lb . Re-rolled 
Eail 


294.0 

109.0 
23,777.6 


1,696.0 




1,402 


No. Tons 70-lb. Re-rolled 
Rail ,. .. 


109 
1,941.6 


No. Tons 80-lb. New Rail 


21,836.0 




Total 


24,180.6 
193.2 


23,532.0 
192.05 


648.6 
1.15 




Miles New Steel Rail Laid 









Note: — The above statement of steel rail laid, covers only rail laid 
on tracks owned and leased by the Wabash Railroad, amounting to 
1,806 4 miles, and does not include any new rail laid by the proprietary 
companies of tracks operated under joint trackage arrangements, a 
mileage of 449.7 miles. On the line operated jointly by the Wabash and 
Grand Trunk Companies between Windsor, Black Rock and Suspen- 
sion Bridge, eighty miles of eighty-pound rail were laid, the cost of the 
rail being borne entirely by the Grand Trunk Company. On the 2,326 
miles of main line owned, leased and operated under joint trackage 
arrangements, there were over 300 miles, or about thirteen per cent, of 
the total mileage laid with eighty-pound steel rail during the year, and 
in addition there were 590 tons of eighty-pound steel used for making 
frogs and switches. 



25 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 





1898-99. 


1897-98. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No. Cross-ties laid. Main 
Track 


469,817 

58,844 

370 

121.4 

13.3 

144.5 

200.6 
11.9 


772,177 

54,784 

483 

107.4 

7.9 

177.0 

202.1 
67.0 




302,360 


" Cross-ties laid, Side 
Track 


4,060 


•' Sets Switch-ties put 
in 


93 


' ' Miles track ballasted 

(stone, gravel, etc.) 

*• Miles Sidings Built.. 

' ' Miles Fence Eebuilt. 


14.0 
5.4 




32.5" 


" Miles Old Fence Ee- 
paired 




1.5 


*' Miles Ditching 




55.1 



Number of Feet of Trestle Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc., During 
Year Ending June 30th, 1899. 





Shortened. 


Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 


Filled and 
Abandoned. 


Eastern Division 


87 feet. 
16 " 
419 " 


961 feet. 
3,199 " 
443 '* 




Middle Division 


290 feet. 


Western Division 


254 " 






Total 


522 feet. 


4,603 feet. 


544 feet. 







TOTAL DECREASE, IN LINEAL FEET, OP TRESTLE WORK. 

Decrease. 

Eastern Division 1,048 feet. 

Middle Division 3,505 " 

Western Division 1,116 " 

Total 5,669 feet. 

Total for year ending June 30th, 1898 5,081 " 



EXTRAORDINARY RENEWALS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Bridges, Wooden, Eebuilt. 

Milan, Mich, — Eebuilt trestle bridge across Saline Eiver $ 985 10 

Eaisin Center, Mich. — Eebuilt trestle bridge across Eaisin 

Eiver, (completed) 1,006 94 

Blakesley, Ohio. — Eebuilt trestle bridge across Bear Creek.. 1,229 23 

Gilletts, Ohio. — Eebuilt trestle bridge across Jackson Creek 645 38 

Cerro Gordo, 111.— Eebuilt trestle bridge. No. 98 1,763 51 



— 26 — 

Bridges, Wooden, Rebuilt — Con. 

Bluffs, 111.— Built new trestle bridge, No. 512-A $ 770 51 

Bluffs, 111.— Built new trestle, No. 513-A 1,657 50 

Griggsville, 111.— Built trestle bridges, Nos. 511, 512, 513, 514, 

515, 516, 517, 518, 522, 523, 525, 526, 527, (washed out) 6,620 03 

Carpenter, 111.— Rebuilt trestle bridge. No. 862 658 27 

Centralia, Mo.— Built new brick arch, No. 348 850 51 

Wakenda, Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Sambo Creek, 780 42 

Carrollton, Mo.— Rebuilt trestle bridge across Moss Creek.. 1,318 00 
Lexington Jet., Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Willow 

Creek 956 67 

Hardin, Mo.— Rebuilt trestle bridge, No. 550 998 69 

Brunswick, Mo.— Rebuilt trestle bridge across Brush Creek 1,220 38 

Brunswick, Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Salt Creek... 3,092 75 

Bedford, Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Medicine Creek, 5,440 60 

Sampsell, Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Indian Creek, 885 30 

Gallatin, Mo. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Indian Creek .. 1,001 14 

Carbon, Iowa. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Big Soap Creek, 1,178 96 

Carbon, Iowa. — Rebuilt trestlebridge across Little SoapCreek 2,152 48 

Ottuniwa, Iowa.— Rebuilt trestle bridge. No. 2223 732 11 

Tracey, Iowa. — Rebuilt trestle bridge across Cedar Creek, 

(completed) 4,337 20 

Total 140,281 68 

Iron Bridges (new) to replace Wooden Bridges. 
Rockfield, Ind. — Built new iron bridge across Rock Creek ..$ 5,510 95 
New Lenox, 111. — Built new iron bridge across Hickory 

Creek 7,893 12 

Philo, 111. — Built new iron bridge across Embarrass River.. 6,768 69 

Total $20,172 76 

Iron Bridges Repaired and Strengthened. 

Wabash, Ind.~ Rebuilt deck iron bridge across Charley 

Creek $2,160 29 

Delphi, Ind. — Rebuilt deck iron bridge across Deer Creek.. 4,200 34 

Danville, 111. — Renewed floor system, Vermillion River 
bridge 5,158 96 

Meredosia, 111. — Renewed deck on through iron spans and 
rebuilt upper and lower draw rests Illinois River bridge .. 4,236 23 

St. Louis, Mo. — Rebuilt deck Vandeventer Avenue bridge 
over street 815 75 

St. Charles, Mo.— Renewed ties east and west approach, Mis- 
souri River Bridge 5,033 37 

Total $21,604 94 

Summary. 

Bridges, Wooden, rebuilt $40,281 6S 

Iron Bridges, new, to replace Wooden Bridges 20,172 76 

Iron Bridges repaired and strengthened 21,604 94 

Total $82,059 38 



27 



DEPOTS, BUILDINGS, ETC. 

Passenger and Freight Stations, New, Eebuilt and Enlarged — 

Toledo, 0,— Rebuilt lake house platform and dock $ 3,867 73 

Ft. Wayne. — Built new brick platform, passenger depot 1,568 73 

Peru, Ind. — Built new brick platform, passenger depot 1,549 72 

Peru, Ind. — Water tank rebuilt and new stand pipe 

erected 1,133 60 

Tilton, 111.— New track scale 944 72 

Decatur, 111.— New 70-foot iron turntable 3,043 98 

Springfield, 111. — Passenger depot rebuilt 19,269 91 

Moberly, Mo.— Yard Master's ofiice rebuilt 778 90 

Buffalo, N. Y. — New freight house, freight house plat- 
forms, driveways, grading, tracks, etC: 23,200 81 

Total $55,358 10 

Additions to Shops, Round-houses, etc. — 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new addition to machine shop 

and overhauled machine shops $ 6,295 39 

Peru, Ind.— Addition to B. & B. Dept. Office Bldg 512 05 

Peru, Ind.— New saw mill, B. & B. Dept 1,000 70 

Decatur, 111.— Engine house rebuilt 6,525 26 

Decatur, 111.— New boiler house 1,667 50 

Decatur, 111. — New iron shed 734 03 

Decatur, 111.— New Sand house 344 46 

Moberly, Mo.— New boiler house 5,886 91 

Total $22,966 30 

Wood, Water, and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged. 

Wea, Ind.— Water tank rebuilt $ 892 20 

Danville, Hi.— Water tank rebuilt 553 24 

Tilton, 111.— Water tank rebuilt 1,031 24 

Worth, 111.— AVater tank rebuilt 825 52 

Gibson, 111. — Water tank, pump house, etc., rebuilt 2,199 35 

Bement, 111. — Built two water tanks, rebuilt pump house... 2,659 24 

Decatur, 111. — New water tank and stand pipe 2,147 10 

Moberly, Mo.— New water tank 880 00 

Pattonsburg, Mo.— Coal chutes rebuilt 1,728 01 

Marley, 111.— Coal chutes rebuilt (completed) 3,928 41 

Total $16,844 31 



SUMMAEY. 

Passenger and Freight Stations, new, rebuilt and enlarged. ..$55, 358 10 

Additions to shops, round-houses, etc 22,966 30 

Wood, water and coal stations rebuilt and enlarged 16,844 31 

Total $95,168 71 



28 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



Raising sags and lowering grades — 

Between Foristell and Wrights $4,931 20 

Between Jonesburg and New Florence 4,672 57 

Between New Florence and High Hill 2,169 69 |11,773 46 

Expended for protection against Missouri River 

at Missouri City and De Witt $17,489 70 17,489 70 

Interlocking Plants — 

Crossing of P. & E. Ry., Mansfield, 111., 

Wabash proportion $1,871 49 

Crossing of L. E. & W. and C. C. C. & St. 
L. Railways at La Fayette June, Ind., 
Wabash proportion 3,705 26 

Crossing I. C. R. R. at Tolono, 111., 
Wabash proportion 2,427 27 

Crossing I. C. R. R. at Monticello, 111., 
Wabash proportion 2,941 80 

Crossing of St. L., K. & N.-W. and Mis- 
sissippi River draw span, Hannibal, 
Mo., Bridge, Wabash proportion 2,815 77 13,761 59 

Total $43,024 75 



— 29 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department show an increase of 
$627,085.05, of which |318,149.77 was due to the Buffalo 
Division, leaving $308,935.28 increase on the Wabash proper. 
The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Engineers and Firemen $118,179 38 

Fuer for Locomotives 149,610 13 

Repairs to Engines (including new engines) 236,195 60 

Repairs, E. & M. S., W., W. & C. Stations 21,811 24 

Tools and Machinery, and New Tools 8,805 39 

Incidentals (Buffalo Division, Import Duties) 6,447 65 

Hire of Engines 17,752 87 

Wipers, Hostlers and Dispatchers 15,302 46 

The large increase in "Fuel for Locomotives" (24.6 per 
cent.) was due to the increase in train and engine mileage, 
and to the fact that the BuflPalo Division fuel was not in- 
cluded in last year's reports. On lines west of Detroit there 
is an increase in cost of fuel of only 3i% per cent., although 
the total engine mileage increased 4i^ per cent. 

During the year, 11 more engines were sent to the 
Buffalo Division, making 26 Wabash engines on that divi- 
sion, and an average of 10 leased from the Grand Trunk. 
This drain of engines from the Wabash proper made it 
necessary that every engine should be put and kept in 
the best working condition. The total amount expended 
for repairs of engines (including $123,234.20 paid for new 
engines) was $799,895.33, equal to $1,925.00 per engine, 
including the 10 leased from the Grand Trunk. This is 
far in excess of the average per engine on other railroads. 



— 30 — 

Contracts were placed in February for 40 locomotives ; 8 
high class 8-wheel passenger engines, 28 heavy mogul 
freight and 4 heavy switching engines for May, June and 
July deliver}^ but owing to the delay in the builders getting 
material from the mills, the first deliveries were not made 
till late in August. It is expected that all will be delivered 
by the end of September. These engines will cost $396,- 
125.00; 10 of these engines, costing $100,000.00, will be 
assigned to the Des Moines and St. Louis Division, and paid 
for out of the D. M. & St. Louis bond issue, and the 
remaining $296,125.00 will be paid, 10 per cent, cash, and 
by equipment notes extending over four or five years, in 
monthly payments. 



— 31 — 

Motive Power and Machinery, 
locomotive equipment. 



1897-98. Increase. 



Decrease. 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 

Bought during the year 

Built during year 

Scrapped or sold during year... 
On hand June 30th 



Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, new 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

New Fire-boxes 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



412 



2 

9 

405 



138 

269 

406 

484 

2 

58 

15 

48 

16 

34 

258 

50 

■ 277 

4 

53 

355 

16 

2 

37 

91 

3,375 



401 
25 



14 
412 



116 

267 

328 
671 



26 
6 
51 
15 
25 

226 
41 

294 

6 

99 

250 

17 

4 

40 

63 

2,852 



22 
2 

78 



2 

32 

9 



1 

9 

32 



105 



28 
523 



25 



187 



17 

2 
46 



ENGINE MILEAGE. 



^ 


1898-99. 


1897-98. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Passenger 


6,302,399 
7,556,842 
2,459,771 

237,228 


5,159,271 
6,009,445 
2,497,348 

215,469 


1,143,128 
1,547,397 




Freight 




Switch 


37,577 


Work Train and 
other service 


21,759 






Total 


16,556,240 


13,881,533 


2,674,707 









32 



Expense of Operating Locomotives. 



1897-98. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



E-^p-- {Mtt°eriai::;::; 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood).. 
Engineers and Firemen 
Wiping and Dispatch- 
ing 

Total 



410,666 76 
389,228 57 
42,127 30 
749,338 77 
919,712 00 

122,997 63 



12,634,071 03 



339,378 501 71,288 26 
218,902 66 



29,887 05 
555,045 57 
764,826 36 

101,721 88 



170,325 9] 

12,240 25 

194,293 20 

154,885 64 

21,275 95 



12,009,762 021624,30901 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 





1898-99. 


1897-98. 


Incre ase. 


Decrease. 


For Repairs 


$ 4 82 
25 

4 51 

5 53 
74 

115 85 


1 4 03 
22 

4 01 

5 52 

74 


1 79 
03 
50 
01 




Stores 




Fuel 




Engineers and Firemen... 
Wiping and Dispatching.. 










Total 


114 52 


$ 1 33 









1898-99. 1897-98. 

Total engine mileage 16,602,748 13,848,058 

Average mileage per engine in service for year... 47,572 43,275 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service... 3,964 3,606 

Total tons of coal consumed 811,018 680,865 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender $0 97 $0 86 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 20.5 20.3 



33 — 











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— 34 — 



OAK DEPARTMENT. 



The expenses of this department for the year were, 
as last year, above the normal — first, on account of the 
unusual requirements of the Buffalo Division ; second, 
putting on of safety appliances, couplers and air-brakes, and 
third, new freight cars. 

Gould vestibules were applied to 17 coaches, chair, dining 
and combination cars, making 92 cars now equipped, and 
"Wabash" vestibules to 8 baggage, express and postal cars, 
making 48 now so equipped. 

One postal car and 18 passenger cars were equipped with 
Pintsch gas, making a total of 112 cars now equipped with 
gas lighting arrangements. 

Forty-three passenger cars, all classes, were equipped 
with steam heat. Gold system, making 104 now so equipped. 

Automatic couplers were applied to 2,939 freight cars, and 
air-brakes to 780 cars, not including new cars bought. On 
June 30th, we had 11,620 freight cars equipped with 
automatic couplers and 1,962 without; 5,912 equipped with 
air-brakes and 7,670 without. Amount charged account 
this work during year, |102,192. 

The cars for which contracts were made in May, 1898, 
namely, 1,000 30-ton, 36-foot box cars, 5 chair cars and 5 
first-class coaches, were delivered in August and September 
of that year, and monthly car trust notes, at 5 per cent 
interest, extending over five years, were issued for the box 
cars. The payment for the chair cars and coaches was cash. 



— as- 
under the Interstate Commerce Act, the time for applica- 
tion of couplers and air-brakes expires December 31, 1899 
We had, on June 30, 1899, 85 per cent of our freight equip- 
ment with automatic car couplers, and 43 per cent with air- 
brakes. By December 31, 1899, all of the freight cars run 
in Interstate Traffic will be equipped with automatic 
couplers. We now have enough equipped with air-brakes 
to comply with the law. Still, we will continue to apply 
air-brakes as rapidly as possible on account of increased 
safety in operation of our freight trains. 

In January, 1899, contracts were made for 500 30-ton 
36-foot box cars, 200 45-foot furniture cars, and 500 40-ton 
coal cars. All of the box and furniture cars, and 294 of the 
coal cars, were delivered by June 30th, and the remainder 
of the coal cars in July. No equipment notes were issued 
for these cars, but in lieu thereof, an operating contract, on 
a fixed monthly rental, which will pay for the cost of the 
cars, with 5 per cent interest (equalized), in 10 years, was 
entered into. The Wabash Company has the option of 
anticipating payments at any time, and, when paid, cars 
become the property of the Wabash Company. In addition 
to the above, 50 furniture cars were bought and paid for in 
condemned cars. 



— 36 — 
Car Equipment. 





On 

hand 

July 1, 

1898. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed 
or 
sold. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1899. 


On 

hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENGER. 
Official 


3 

2 

6 

120 

32 

39 

8 

3 

64 

'1 

24 
5 

1 






3 

2 

6 

124 

37 

43 

8 

3 

63 

15 

4 

24 

5 

1 


4 


Pay 






2 


Dining 






5 


Coach 


5 

5 

5 


1 


108 


Combination 


22 


Chair 


1 


35 


Parlor 




Cafe 








Baggasre 


1 


9 


64 


Baggage and Mail 

Baggage, Mail and Passenger.. 
Postal 


15 


1 




6 




19 


Pacific Express 


5 


Air-Brake Instruction 
















Total Passenger 


325 


17 


4 


338 


285 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


5,979 

948 

4,644 

45 

150 

100 

186 

64 

7 

8 

8 

2 

220 


1,504 


390 
114 
348 


7,093 

834 

4,616 

295 

149 

100 

186 

64 

7 

8 

8 

2 

220 


8 075 


Stock 


1,471 
3 439 


Coal, Flat and Eack 


320 
250 


Furniture 


33 


Fruit 


1 


50 


Refrigerator 


100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 

Tool and Work 






129 


3 


3 


36 


Pile Drivers 


7 


Derricks 


1 


1 


12 


Cable Cars 


1 


Ice Cars 






4 


Cabooses 


10 


10 


212 






Total Freight 


12,361 
325 


2,088 
17 


867 
4 


13,582 
338 


13,569 
285 


Total Passenger 


Total Car Equipment 


12,686 


2,105 


871 


13,920 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons 


297,676 






351,296 


235,074 









CARS REPAIRED. 





Passenger, 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


1,049 

127 

49 

9 


93,808 

1,416 

723 

621 


94,857 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


1,543 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 

Cars Rebuilt 


772 
630 






Total .* 


1,234 

4,775 


96,568 
10,432 


97,802 


New Wheels applied 


15,207 



— 37 — 



TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 



1898-99. 1897-98. 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 1,979 1,979 

Total Namber Miles of Wire assigned to this Company, 5,273 5,273 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph Co... 8,805 7,959 

Total Number Miles of Wire used jointly 605 605 

Total Miles of Wire 14,683 13,837 



GENERAL. 

During the three years, July 1st, 1896, to June 30th, 1899, 
liberal purchases were made of equipment and rail ; 2,580 
30-ton box cars ; 250 30-ton furniture cars ; 500 40-ton coal 
cars ; 10 coaches and chair cars ; 2 dining cars ; 65 locomotives 
(including those now being delivered) and 62,327 tons of 80-lb. 
rail, with large quantities of frogs, switches and fastenings. 
The wisdom of these large purchases of equipment and expen- 
ditures to improve the property during a period of depression 
in the commercial and business world, and consequent low 
gross earnings for railroads was questioned, and criticisms 
thereon jaade by some who are interested in the property. 

In view of these criticisms I think it only proper to call 
attention to one point which alone fully justifies the manage- 
ment in these purchases, namely, by placing our orders 
when we did, we bought our equipment, rails and fastenings 
for $1,400,000 less than they could be bought for to-day, 



— 38 — 

and by purchasing them liberally, and in advance of our 
actual requirements, we are not forced to buy at the present 
higli prices, but can wait a year or two for prices to fall to 
a normal basis. 

Furthermore, if we had not purchased this equipment 
and improved our track, we would not have been able to 
handle the present large tonnage, or to have made such 
large gains in our passenger traffic. 

The present demands of traffic call for every car and 
engine, both freight and passenger, and when the report 
for the year ending June 30th, 1900, is made up, it will 
prove beyond question the wisdom of these expenditures. 

During the first half of the fiscal year, and in January, 
1899, freight rates were badly demoralized, being lower than 
ever before. For one month our average rate per ton mile 
was 0.472 cents. Since January, rates have been low, but 
more stable, and I anticipate a better average per ton mile 
for the current fiscal year. Although grain is carried from 
Chicago to New York to-day under open tariffs which pays 
the carrying lines one and one-half mills per ton per mile, 
such rates may increase the gross earnings, but I fear 
it decreases the net. Some of these lines would " starve 
to death " on such rates, if they couldn't make good 
their losses on that traffic from profits on higher class 
freight. 

The Wabash is in better condition physically, and to 
secure and handle traffic promptly, and at a lower cost per 
ton, than ever before. 



— 39 — 

Heads of departments, subordinate officers, and employes 
generally, are entitled to credit for the energy, ability, and 
loyalty to the Company's interests displayed by them during 
the past year. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., 

Vice-President and General Manager. 

St. Louis, August, 1899. 



— 40 — 



WABASH EMPLOYES HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 





1898-9. 


1897-8. 


Increase. 


Contributions and other receipts 

Expenses of Operation 


$43,476 77 
40,124 83 

$ 3,351 94 
25,273 62 


$42,013 92 
37,900 57 


$1,462 85 
2,224 26 






Surplus for year 


$ 4,113 35 
21,160 27 


* $ 761 41 


Previous Balance 








Total Surplus 


$28,625 56 


$25,273 62 


$3,351 94 


Eeal Estate and Buildings 


Balance on hand 


$28,625 56 


$25,273 62 


$3,351 94 





* Decrease. 

1898-99. 1897-98. 

Number treated in Hospitals 1,272 1,086 

Number treated outside of Hospitals 23,969 20,543 

Total number of casestreated 25,241 21,629 

Number of Surgical casestreated 3,093 2,853 

Number of Medical cases treated 22,148 18,776 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes in Hos- 
pitals 7,888 7,296 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes not in 

Hospitals 42,653 36,889 

Total number of deaths 16 16 



The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jk., Chairman, 
"VV. H. Blodgett, 
E. B. Peyoe. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 25tli, 1899. 

0. D. Ashley, Esq., 

President, The ]Vabash Railroad Company, New York. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1899, as follows : 

A. Eesults of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Train and Mileage Statistics. 

G. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

H. Mileage Statistics for Nineteen Years. 

/. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

K, Statement Showing Lines Covered by the First, 

Second and Debenture Mortgages of the Wabash 

Railroad Company. 
L. Supplementary Statement Showing Results of 
Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



43 — 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 
Results of Opeeation for the Year Ending June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses., 

Net Earnings 



Taxes. 



Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc. 



Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis below 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest 
Interest on Bonds * 



Surplus 

Dividend on Preferred Debenture Bonds 



Net Surplus . 



$14,398, 
10,411, 



974 15 
473 82 



$3,982. 
567, 



500 33 
163 29 



$3,415, 

185; 



337 04 
031 81 



$3,600, 
760, 



368 85 
937 40 



$2,839, 
2,691, 



431 45 
495 00 



$147,936 45 



$147,836 45 



$13,207,862 43 
9,304,779 30 



$3,903,083 13 
499,486 35 



$3,403,596 78 
180,655 97 



$3,584,252 75 
488,211 84 



$3,096,040 91 
2,694.545 00 



$401,495 91 



$401,495 91 



*Includes Rent of Eel River R, R. 



Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses 

AS Above. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 


$770,276 09 
64,779 34 


$527,755 93 


Credit " " " 


111,409 36 






Traffic Association and Miscellaneous Expenses 


$705,496 75 
55,440 65 


$416,346 57 
71,865 27 




$760,937 40 


$488,211 84 



44 — 



B 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Comparative Statement op Earnings and Expenses. 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



July 

August 

September 

October , 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total Earnings 

Freight 

Passengers 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous 

Total Earnings 

Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total 

" " Passenger " " 

" Mail " " 

" *' Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 

Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) .. 

Taxes 

Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 

Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted) 

Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings 

Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



1,079 
1,283 
1,288 
1,313 
1,212 
1,222 
1,138 
1,011 
1,251 
1,139 
1,196 
1,258 



,210 55 
,293 01 
,639 07 
,135 35 
,452 16 
,391 99 
,487 95 
,498 98 
,051 50 
,025 95 
,421 85 
,365 79 



970 
1,218 
1,202 
1,305 
1,061 
1,055 
941 
952 
1,157 
1,110 
1,141 
1,090 



,635 15 
,181 64 
,509 47 
,010 02 
,232 95 
,907 91 
,752 31 
,812 64 
,542 14 
,041 45 
,677 65 
,559 20 



$14,393,974 15 



$13,207,832 43 



$ 9,212,691 70 

3,995,102 07 

546,795 14 

323,712 91 

315,672 33 



$ 8,524,733 21 

3,528,745 87 

548,641 11 

320,769 99 

284,972 25 



$14,393,974 15 



$13,207,862 43 



64.00 
27.76 
3.80 
2.25 
2.19 



64.54 
28.72 
4.15 
2.43 
2.16 



$10,411,473 82 


$9,304,779 30 


$ 567,163 29 


$ 499,486 35 


72.33 


70.45 


$3,982,500 33 


$3,903,083 13 


27.67 


29.55 



2,277.7 

$6,319 52 
4,571 05 
1,748 47 



2,061.3 

$6,407 54 
4,514 03 
1,893 51 



45 



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46 



THE WABASH EAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit — June 30, 1899. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 
ASSETS. 





1899. 1898. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 

Supplies and Materials on 

Hand 


$135,033,500 00 

709,517 71 
747,986 53 

822,093 18 

213,720 68 
139,131 05 
43,699 68 

711,975 62 
14,468 39 

45,713 20 
851,352 17 


$133,433,500 00 

598,247 42 
408,402 94 

784,631 54 

137,391 32 

137,713 17 
28,535 75 

793,536 19 
15,566 39 

50,369 20 
526,078 55 

68,571 92 
517,189 96 


$1,600,000 00 

111,270 29 
339,583 59 

37,461 64 

76,329 36 

1,417 88 

15,163 93 






CashonHand 




Investments in Stocks and 
Bonds . 




SundryAccounts Collectible- 
Due from Agents 




From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 
Pacific Express Co 






Sundry Railroads and Indi- 


$81,560 57 
1,100 00 

4,656 00 


Bills Receivable... 

Advances Fast Freight Lines 
Account Working Fund 


325,273 '62 


Jas. F. Joy, T. H. Hubbard, 
O. D. Ashley and E. T. 
Welles , the Purchasing 


68,571 92 
517,189 96 


Balance to debit, Profit and 














$139,333,156 21 


$137,499,734 35 


$1,833,421 86 









LIABILITIES. 





1899. 


1898. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$ 28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

83,073,000 00 

185,292 00 

610,071 24 

1,718,966 84 

287,631 13 

351,926 88 

3,314 48 

212,345 72 

668,126 98 

222,480 94 


$ 28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

81,534,000 00 

151,055 00 

610,091 24 

1,730,955 97 

285,209 24 

339,659 88 

3,460 23 

414,610 39 

430,692 40 






Preferred Stock . 






Bonds (3) 


$1,539,000 00 
84,237 00 




Interest Due 




Interest Accrued, not Due 


$ 20 00 


Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 




11,989 13 


Sundry Railroads and Indi- 


2,421 89 
12,267 00 




Taxes Accrued, not due 




Hospital Account 


145 75 


Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable (4) 

Equipment Notes of Long 
Date (5) 


202,264 67 


237,434 58 
222,480 94 


Balance to credit, Profit and 
Loss 












$139,333,156 21 


$137,499,734 35 


$1,833,421 86 









(1) Increase is occasioned by bonds issued for Des Moines Division, $1,600,000.00. 

(2) Miscellaneous includes $803,050.16, carried in Suspense, on account new- 
equipment. 

(3) Des Moines Division Bonds issued $1,600,000.00 less Detroit & Chicago 
Extension Bonds, retired by Sinking Fund $81,000.00, net increase $1,539,000.00. 

(4) $200,000.00 has been paid since. 

(5) The equipment notes extend over a period of 53 months, the payments 
averaging $24,369.38 per month for the next 12 months, and $9,392.36 for the 
remaining 41 months. 



THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 
Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1899. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— PASSENGER, 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of.. 

Agents— Station 

Baggage Masters 

Brakemen and Porters 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Dining Car Expenses 

Incidentals 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Baggage 

Mail Expenses 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Union Depots — Expenses of 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total : , $1,515,286 52 



59,788 31 

85,485 47 

79,104 46 

32,646 16 

69,702 74 

96,782 23 

10,4.=.5 22 

132,549 27 

28,151 33 

13,048 16 

73,116 21 

133,759 15 

144,128 57 

7,056 98 

8,238 11 

9,301 67 

21,056 38 

31,837 81 

2,255 44 

3,269 22 

38,685 65 

7,403 86 

3,923 19 

31,837 81 

7,307 46 

57,376 49 

48,425 30 

67,971 88 

4,537 32 

129,379 43 

68,122 78 

8,582 46 



10. 

101 ; 

21, 
11, 
66. 
96. 

120 ; 

12. 

9: 
12: 
13 i 
53 

3 

3 
37 

6. 

2 
26 

6 
65 
45 
56 
111 
119 



911 16 
274 06 
533 30 
400 29 
211 86 
314 04 
370 85 
789 34 
037 63 
196 84 
105 29 
165 55 
072 47 
969 56 
014 80 
451 29 
971 51 
384 06 
205 73 
377 01 
318 42 
949 72 
567 08 
037 26 
663 91 
994 09 
036 65 
919 55 
467 93 
214 47 
445 31 
140 82 



$1,473,511 85 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of. 

Agents— Station 

Brakemen 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions , 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Incidentals ...^ , 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Goods 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations — Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Real Estate-St. Louis 

do Detroit 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total ^2,925,501 65 



268.033 93 
131,585 71 
291,559 43 

70,942 01 

854 89 

493,044 41 

230 82 

19,048 73 

.369,196 15 

7,877 94 

205.034 33 
14,516 33 

8,919 82 
11,641 73 
33,117 24 
36,328 29 
41,127 31 
14,803 02 
8,590 21 

291,258 88 
14,855 20 
45,629 71 
95,762 35 

138,367 21 
20,672 82 

261.528 66 



30,974 52 



209,305 07 

120,194 81 

252,045 50 

69,618 61 

371 99 

366,769 40 

133 62 

14,459 16 

347,893 38 

5,023 25 

175,231 81 

28,169 98 

9,232 72 

1,093 46 

47,184 40 

41,890 02 

38,583 03 

11,071 94 

4,696 32 

270,149 89 

12,404 79 

49,268 66 

85,663 32 

114,674 84 

28,207 52 

229,278 05 

11,178 72 

7,273 33 

4,828 65 



$2,555,796 14 



— 48 — 

E — Continued. 

THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MOTIVE POWER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Engineers and Firemen— Passenger 

do do Freight 

Engine Houses, M. S., etc., Fuel, Lights, etc., for. 

do do M. S. & T. T.— Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Locomotives, Passenger — Coal for 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Freight— Coal for 

Passenger— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc. , for 

Freight— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc. , for 

Passenger — Repairs of 

Freight— Repairs of 

Passenger— Wood for 

Freight — Wood for 

Furniture and Fixtures of 

Hire of 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations, Fuel— Expenses of 

do do Repairs of 

do Water — Expense Pumping 

do " Repairs of 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expenses and Repairs of 

Watchmen 

Wipers, Hostlers and Despatchers 



Total $3,129,737 09 



$ 320 

599 

17 

60 

56 

195 

547 

13 

28 

245 

541 

1 

4 

12 

41, 

2, 

41, 

10, 

68, 

35: 

82. 

71, 

17, 

122, 



,551 75 
,160 25 
,331 14 
,932 41 
,867 06 
,777 61 
,280 23 
,725 99 
,401 31 
,230 25 
,802 28 
,979 53 
,301 40 
,862 80 
,106 45 
,873 15 
,464 97 
,001 53 
,856 61 
,159 86 
,091 00 
,872 35 
,109 53 
,997 63 



281,853 61 

519,679 01 

12,357 13 

29,121 17 

50,419 51 

175,442 65 

419,026 61 

11,093 05 

20,392 06 

182,667 01 

368,544 71 

1,552 63 

3,706 75 

9,488 01 

23,353 58 

2,467 54 

33,123 44 

12,501 59 

60,786 27 

26,483 84 

71,368 56 

63,066 96 

16,461 18 

107,695 17 



$2,502,652 04 



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Ballast 

Bridges— Repairs of 

Cross-Ties 

Fences and Road Crossings — Repairs of 

Frogs and Switch Fixtures 

Incidentals 

New Side Tracks — Grading 

Oil, Tallow, Waste and Fuel 

Printing and Stationery 

River Protection 

Section, Tool, Watch Houses, etc 

Snow and Ice Removing 

Spikes— Track 

Splices, Bolts and Fastenings 

Steel Rails 

Superintendence and Supervisors 

Telegraph— Repairs of 

Tools and Machinery — Repairs and Renewals of. 

Track— Repairs of 

Watchmen of Roadway and Bridges 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 



67,544 46 

198,302 16 

272,210 69 

59,044 35 

73,114 96 

4,979 92 



9,994 30 

1,612 17 

18,823 93 

3,892 87 

8,114 91 

23,767 64 

81,079 90 

34,690 14 

87,102 02 

23,391 15 

12,756 35 

598,224 42 

98,623 95 

9,092 .57 



Total $1,686,362 86 



48,253 45 

188,248 59 

306,462 29 

56,775 20 

62,486 57 

5,049 96 

1,880 74 

6,757 49 

1,414 67 

5,376 74 

1,851 98 

10,690 24 

22,222 46 

56,175 46 

89,251 34 

79,959 73 

25,584 61 

11,722 39 

593,001 48 

85,005 71 

4,815 73 



$1,662,986 83 



49 



E — Continued. 

THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MAINTENANCE OF CARS. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Cars, Pass., Express, Mail and Bag.— Repairs of 

do Freight— Repairs of 

do Road Service— Repairs of 

do Furniture and Fixtures 

Car Shops and Buildings, Fuel, Light, etc., for... 

Car Shops and Sheds— Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Printing and Stationery 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expense and Repairs of.. 

Watchmen 

Total 



$ 198,923 42 
,760 85 
,585 66 
10 
,499 43 
,727 69 
865 38 
,039 46 
,112 65 
,228 91 
,147 00 



555, 

14, 

29, 

1, 

10, 



$211,599 06 

530,154 80 

10,593 12 

29,056 62 

756 42 

8,132 82 

1,228 69 

1,773 25 

42,267 76 

30,776 58 

3,972 80 



$ 891,526 55 



$870,311 42 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



General Offices— Attendants at 

do Clerks in 

do Fuel, Lights, etc., for , 

do Rent of 

do Repairs of 

do .Printing and Stationery ..., 
do Petty Expenses of 

General Officers— Salaries and Expenses of 

Insurance 

Incidentals 

Interest and Exchange 

Legal Department — Expenses of. 

Expenses of New York Office 

do London Agency 

War Revenue Stamps 

Total 



$ 2,806 43 

35,877 33 

306 45 

23,389 60 

9,333 99 
19,544 48 

2,819 56 
43,365 20 
23,344 52 

5,445 70 

73 58 

61,289 02 

12,397 25 

1,909 73 
21,156 31 



$ 3,964 92 

34,456 28 

614 19 

23,967 42 

4,793 92 

21,246 48 

3,731 58 

43,6.31 15 

21,185 36 

6,595 34 

206 6N 

58,143 61 

13,108 42 

3,875 70 



$263,059 15 



$239,521 02 



RECAPITULATION. 



y 


Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 


Conducting Transportation 


$4,440,788 17 

3,129,737 09 

1,686,362 86 

891,526 55 

263,059 15 


$4,029,307 99 


Motive Power 


2,502,652 04 


Maintenance of Way 


1,662,986 83 


Maintenance of Cars . . ... 


870,311 42 


General Expenses 


239,521 02 






Total Operating Expenses 


$10,411,473 82 


$9,304,779 30 



50 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Train and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1898. 



Tons Carried 

Tons Carried one Mile 

Average Distance each Ton carried 

Earnings from Freight traffic 

Operating Expenses 

Average Earnings per Ton 

Average Expenses per Ton 

Average Kate per Ton per Mile 

Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 

Average Net per Ton per Mile 

Total Freight Train Mileage.... 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 

Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 

Car Mileage, Loaded 

Car Mileage, Empty 

Car Mileage, Total— Loaded and Empty 

Average Loaded Cars per Train. 

Average Empty Cars per Train 

Average Total Cars per Train 

Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 

Average Load per Car, Loaded and Empty — Tons, 
Average Load per Train— Tons 

Average Earnings per Loaded Car per Mile 

Average Expenses per Loaded Car per Mile 



6,987,641 
1,666,830,054 
238.5 Miles. 



6,382,831 
1,365,693,174 
214.0 Miles. 



$9,312,691 70 


$8,624,733 21 


7,021,200 59 


6,104,869 98 


$1 31.84 


$1 33.56 


1 00.48 


95.65 


Cts. 0.553 


Cts. 0.624 


" 0.421 


" 0.447 


" 0.132 


" 0.177 


7,101,324 


6,306,504 


$1 29.73 


$1 35.17 


98.87 


96.80 


30.86 


38.37 


122,188,784 


105,161,660 


53,634,604 


46,642,525 


175,823,388 


151,804,185 


17 21 


16.68 


7.65 


7.39 


24.76 


24.07 


13.64 


12.99 


9.48 


9.00 


234.72 


216.55 



Cts. 7.54 
" 5.75 



Cts. 8.11 
" 5.81 



PASSENGER. 



Number of Passengers carried 


3,751,019 
210,592,939 
56.1 Miles. 


3,517,682 
180 359 167 


Number of Passengers carried one Mile 


Average distance each Passenger carried 


51.3 Miles. 






Earnings from Passenger Traffic 


$3,995,102 07 
4,979,967 59 
3,390,273 23 


$3,528,745 87 
4 493,269 74 


Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc 


Operating Expenses 


3,199,909 32 






Average Revenue per Passenger 


$1 06.51 

90.38 

Cts. 1.897 

" 1.610 

" 0.287 


$1 00 31 


Average Cost carrying each Passenger 


90.97 


Average Rate per Passenger per MiTe 


Cts 1 957 


Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 


" 1.774 


Average Net per Passenger per Mile , 


" 183 






Total Passenger Train Mileage 


6,270,751 
$0 79.42 
54.06 
25.36 


5,499,994 
$0 81.70 


Average Earnings per Train Mile 


Average Expenses per Train Mile 


58.18 


Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 


23.52 






Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 


21,248,495 
28,613,737 


18,685,045 


Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, Mail, Ex- 
press and Sleepers 


25,282,275 


Average number Cars per Train 


4.56 

9.91 

33.68 


4.60 


Average number Passengers per Coach and Sleeper 
Average number Passengers per Train 


9.65 
32.79 






Average Earnings per Car per Mile 


Cts. 17.40 
•' 11.85 


Cts. 17.77 


Average Expenses per Car per Mile 


" 12.65 







51 



THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 
Tonnage of Articles Carried. 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1899. 



Per 
Cent. 



Tons. 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1898. 



Per 
Cent 



Tons. 



Products of Agriculture: — 

Wheat 

Corn 

Other Grain 

Flour 

Other Mill Products 

Hay 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Fruits and Vegetables 



Products of Animals: — 

Live Stock 

Dressed Meats 

Other Packing House Products. 

Wool 

Hides and Leather 



Products of Mines :- 
Stone, Sand, etc... 
Anthracite Coal... 
Bituminous Coal.. 

Coke 

Ores 



Products of Forest: 

Lumber 

Other Articles 



Manufactures :— 

Petroleum and Other Oils 

Sugar 

Iron, Pig and Bloom 

Iron and Steel Rails 

Other Castings and Machinery. 

Cement, Brick and Lime 

Agricultural Implements 

Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc.. 

Wines, Beer and Liquors 

H. H. Goods and Furniture 



Merchandise... 
Miscellaneous, 



25.38 

2.30 
10.57 
3.94 
2.17 
2.68 
0.93 
0.07 
0.87 
1.85 

10.89 

4.29 
3.65 
2 33 
0.08 
0.54 

27.94 

2.78 
3.18 
21.45 
0.22 
0.31 

8.48 

6.22 
2.26 

8.30 

1.02 
0.73 
0.45 
0.86 
1.33 
2.04 
0.46 
0.20 
0.94 
0.27 

6.51 
12.50 



Total Tons 



100.00 



Company's Freight. 



160,671 
738,314 
275,384 
151,502 
187,224 

65,360 
4,595 

60,605 
129,122 



299,504 

255,413 

162,530 

5,354 

37,814 



194,056 

222,216 

1,498,881 

15,564 

21,929 



434,833 
158,303 



71,258 
51,021 
31,830 
60,174 
92,939 
142,526 
31,879 
13,802 
65,990 
18,994 

454,745 
873,309 



6,987,641 



1,291,695 



30.72 

2.83 
14.76 
5.54 
1.43 
1.79 
1.29 
0.06 
0.59 
2.43 

f(.04 

5.11 
3.40 
1.88 
0.03 
0.62 

22.95 

3.10 
1.89 
17.66 
0.26 
0.04 

7.63 

5.59 
2.04 

8.56 

1.10 
0.65 
0.36 
1.02 
1.29 
2.15 
0.37 
0.22 
1.12 
0.28 

7.22 
11.88 



100.00 



180,747 
942,243 
353,631 

90,987 
114,239 

82,047 
3,704 

37,620 
154,826 



326,827 

217,245 

119,975 

2,227 

39,335 



197,868 

120,882 

1,127,212 

16,643 

2,607 



356,881 
130,239 



70,163 
41,220 
23,067 
65,681 
82,412 
137,265 
23,778 
14,205 
71,295 
17,517 

460,585 
758,158 



6,382,831 



52 



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-55 



Statement of Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages 
OF the Wabash Railroad Company. 

LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

Toledo to East Hannibal 462.3 Miles. 

Bluffs to Camp Point 39.4 " 

Clayton to Elvaston 34.5 " 

Decatur to East St. Louis 110.2 " 

Auburn Junction to Effingham 205.4 " 

Shumway to Altamont 10.3 ' ' 

Falrbury to Streator 31.5 " 

Edwardsville to Edwardsville Crossing 8.5 " 

Delray (near Detroit) to Butler 109.9 " 



Total Lines East 1,012.0 Miles. 

LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

St. Louis, Tayon Avenue to Harlem 274.8 Miles. 

St. Louis, Franklin Avenue to Ferguson 10.8 " 

Moberly to Ottumwa 131.2 " 

Brunswick to Pattonsburg 79.6 " 

Salisbury to Glasgow 15.5 " 

Centralia to Columbia 21.6 ' ' 



Total Lines West 533.5 Miles. 

Total all Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages.. 1,545.5 " 

The Second Mortgage covers all the lines east of the Mississippi River, as 
above. 

Total number of miles, 1,012.0. 

Note.— The First and Debenture Mortgages also cover the Leasehold interest 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Eel River Railroad from Butler 
to Logansport, a distance of 94.2 miles, and also covers the Leasehold interests 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, 
Hannibal, Quincy and Kansas City, and in the Bridges at Hannibal, St. Louis and 
Kansas City. 

The Second Mortgage also covers the Leasehold interest which the Wabash 
Railroad Companj^ has in the Eel River Railroad frona Butler to Logansport, a 
distance of 94.2 miles, and also covers the Leasehold interests which the Wabash 
Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, Hannibal and Quincy, 
and in the Bridge at Hannibal. 

The Firsthand Debenture Mortgages cover the lines west of the Mississippi 
River above described, subject to prior Divisional Mortgages. By the terms of 
the First Mortgage, a sufficient number of First Mortgage Bonds are reserved to 
meet, at their maturity, or whenever exchanges can be made, the said Divisional 
Mortgages covering the lines west of the Mississippi River. 

LINE COVERED BY THE FIRST MORTGAGE- 
DETROIT AND CHICAeO EXTENSION. 

Montpelier, Ohio to Clarke Junction, Ind 149.7 Miles. 



— 56 — 



L 

Results of Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R., 
FOR THE Year Ending June 30th, 1899. 

Gross Earnings $1,061,094 85 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc 3,275 21 

Total Receipts 11,064,370 06 

Deduct Operating Expenses |787,845 27 

Deduct Taxes 47,427 53 

Deduct Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 

Expenses 26,207 36 861,480 16 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $202,889 90 

Interest on Bonds 171,950 00 

Surplus $ 30,939 90 



Note.— The Statement of Results of Operation, Table A, includes the Montpelier 
& Chicago R. R. 



). 



56 



L 



Results of Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R., 
FOR the Year Ending June 30th, 1899. 

Gross Earnings $1,061,094 85 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc 3,275 21 

Total Receipts 11,064,370 06 

Deduct Operating Expenses |787,845 27 

Deduct Taxes 47,427 53 

Deduct Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 

Expenses 26,207 36 861,480 16 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $202,889 90 

Interest on Bonds 171,950 00 

Surplus I 30,939 90 



Note.— The Statement of Results of Operation, Table A, includes the Montpelier 
Chicago R. R. 



Gross 
Misce: 

Deduc 
Deduc 
Deduc 

Interei 



Not; 
& Chicai 




Eleventh Annual Report 



OF the; 



DIRKCTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



Kor ttie Kiscal Year Ending 
Jiane 30tti, 1900. 



ST. LOUIS, 

Woodward & Tlernan Printing Co. 

1900. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO, 



O. D. ASHLEY, President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., Vice-President and General Manager. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

W. H. BLODGETT, General Solicitor. 

E. B. PRYOR, Asst. to the Vice-Prest. and Asst. Secretary 

H. L. MAGEE, General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

M. KNIGHT, Freight Traffic Manager. 

S. B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

C. B. ADAMS, Superintendent Transportation. 

H. H. WELLMAN, Purchasing Agent and General Storekeeper. 

W.S.LINCOLN, Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery. 

M. M. MARTIN, Superintendent Car Department. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

De. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 

S. E. COTTER, Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 

O. D. ASHLEY, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

GEO. J. GOULD, EDWIN GOULD, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

HENRY K. McHARG, JOHN T. TERRY, 

C. J. LAWRENCE, RUSSELL SAGE, 

P. B. WYCKOFF, C. C. MACRAE. 
FRANCIS PAVY, 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OIRECXORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co, 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1900. 



The results of the traffic on the entire system, as stated by 
the Auditor for the year ending June 30, 1900, were as 
follows : 

Gross Earnings $16,440,990 29 

MisceUaneous Eeceipts 269,613 85 

Total Eeceipts $16,710,604 14 

Deduct Operating Expenses $11,947,417 43 

Deduct Taxes 567,327 22 

Deduct Balance Joint Track Eent- 

als and MisceUaneous Expenses 767,746 67 
Deduct Additions to Property and 

Other Charges 292,207 70 13,574,699 02 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $ 3,135,905 12 

Interest on Bonds 2,715,806 11 

Surplus $ 420,099 01 

Dividends on Debenture A Bonds 210,000 00 

Net Surplus $ 210,099 01 



— 4 — 

The very full report of Vice-President Ramsey and the 
tables of the Auditor, both herewith submitted, will enable 
the bondholders and stockholders of the Company to 
analyze the operations of the year, and to form a correct 
idea of the policy which has governed the management, 
and which is still influential in the affairs of the Company. 

This policy demands the completion of plans for bring- 
ing the physical condition of The Wabash Railroad System 
up to the standard of first-class lines, and to provide rolling 
stock adequate to meet the requirements of a constantly 
increasing traffic. Inability to comply with these demands 
will diminish the competing power of our lines in the ratio 
of the deficiency. Hence the necessity of large expendi- 
tures to meet up-to-date conditions, not only in road-bed 
and track but in equipment. Under these circumstances 
the Board of Directors has not hesitated to authorize liberal 
outlays from earnings in order to enable the lines of The 
Wabash to compete with other first-class systems. The 
proposition, reduced to its most simple form, presented the 
alternative of losing instead of gaining traffic, if the require- 
ments of shippers could not be met. Considering it vital, 
therefore, to the interests of the Company, the orders for new 
box and coal cars have been largely increased, and are now 
in the course of delivery. Reference to Vice-President 
Ramsey's report will develop the striking fact that during 
the pressure of traffic in the past fiscal year a daily shortage 
of 1,500 cars has been a common occurrence. At competing 
points the company which can supply these cars will neces- 
sarily secure the traffic, and it has, therefore, resolved itself 
into a simple question of providing for business, which the 
constantly developing resources of the country offer, and 



— 5 — 

which belongs to our system. Failure to do this would be 
inexcusable, unless circumstances rendered it impossible to 
furnish the means of payment. 

This brief explanation of the policy of the Company seems 
necessary in order to account for the liberal additions to 
rolling stock, which must be paid for from earnings. 
These payments extend through the ensuing six years, in 
monthly instalments, and except so far as they have been 
increased by the addition of the leased lines between Detroit 
and Buffalo, are a legitimate charge to operating expenses 
in the department of maintenance and repair. 

Attention is directed to the interesting table of the Audi- 
tor on page 54, giving the mileage statistics of the Company 
for twenty years. The comparison from 1889 to 1900 is 
made substantially upon the same system. The year 1900 
shows for the first time since 1893 an increase in the earn- 
ings per mile, while at the same time the rate per ton per 
mile has decreased from 0.683 cents to 0.558 cents. In other 
words, the road has earned more net per mile at about 5| 
mills per ton per mile in 1900 than in 1894 at about 6f mills 
per ton per mile. The passenger statistics show a similar 
improvement, and the net earnings per mile ($1,920.74) are 
the largest since 1889, the year of reorganization. A careful 
study of these tables will show that notwithstanding the dis- 
couraging features of railway traffic, incidental to constantly 
declining rates and more aggressive competition, The 
Wabash Company has not only held its own, but is fairly 
gaining in its efforts to solve the transportation problem. 

A fact bearing upon the economical handling of freight is 
made impressive by a comparison of the average loads per 
car and per train. The table shows that from 11.08 tons 



— 6 — 

per car in 1889 the average increased to 16.07 tons per car 
in 1900, while the average train loads increased from 179.40 
tons in 1889 to 291.02 tons in 1900. This forcibly illustrates 
the advantages gained by discarding the small freight cars 
formerly in use for those of larger capacity, and also 
demonstrates the value of the more powerful engines recently 
added to our motive power. 

The financial condition of the Company is substantially 
the same as at the close of the last fiscal year, except so far 
as the engagements for new rolling stock have added, or 
will add, to the obligations of that character. There is no 
floating debt, as represented by borrowed money. The 3,500 
box and coal cars recently ordered and now being delivered 
are not included in the Auditor's statement, and do not 
appear in the accounts of the last fiscal year. Payment for 
these cars in monthly instalments will extend through the 
ensuing six years, unless otherwise provided for. 

The officers and employees of the Company have zeal- 
ously contributed to the successful operations of the year, 
and in all departments they are entitled to this recognition 
of loyal and faithful services. 

For the Directors, 

0. D. ASHLEY, 

President 
New York, August, 1900. 



Report of Vice-President and General Manager. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 14th, 1900. 

Mr. 0. D. Ashley, 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company: 

Dear Sir: — 

I have the pleasure of submitting herewith the usual 
statements, statistics and summaries, of the results of opera- 
tion of the property for the year ending June 30th, 1900. 

With the large increase in gross earnings, $2,047,016.14, 
there may be some feelings of disappointment in the com- 
paratively small increase in net earnings, but a careful 
examination of the various statements and statistics, es- 
pecially those showing the expenditures on account of the 
various improvements and additions to the property, cars 
and locomotives, will show that a large part of the increase 
in expenses has been due to actual improvements and ad- 
ditions, and that the increase due to cost of securing, moving 
and handling the increased traffic and legitimate mainte- 



— 8 — 

nance of the property has been not out of proportion to 
the increase in earnings. 

1900. 1899. 

The total revenue of the company, from 

all sources, was $16,710,604 14 $14,579,005 96 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 13,282,491 32 11,739,574 51 

$3,428,112 82 $ 2,839,431 45 
Interest on Bonds 2,715,806 11 2,691,495 00 

Net Revenue $ 712,306 71 $ 147,936 45 

Additions to Property 223,j564 22 87,657 89 

$ 488,642 49 $ 60,278 56 

Sinking Fund Charges 
and maintenance of 
Steamers $ 68,543 48 

Dividend 6 % on Deben- 
ture '*A" Bonds 210,000 00 278,543 48 

Surplus to Profit and Loss Account $ 210,099 01 



REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Earnings and Expenses. 



1899-1900. 



1898-1899. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$16,440,990 29 

11,947,417 43 

4,493,572 86 

72,67 

7,027 57 

5,108 83 

1,920 74 



$14,393,974 15 

10,411,473 82 

3,982,500 33 

72.33 

6,319 52 

4,571 05 

1,748 47 



$2,047,016 14 

1,535,943 61 

511,072 53 

.34 

708 05 

535 78 

172 27 



EARNINGS. 



Per 

Cent. 



1899-1900. 



Per 
Cent. 



1898-1899. 



Increase. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous 



64.57 
27.22 
3.97 
2.08 
2.16 



Total. 



$10,616,340 19 

4,474,652 16 

653 025 08 

342.529 77 

354,443 09 



64.00 

27.76 

3.80 

2.25 

2.19 



$16,440,990 29 



$9,212,691 70 

3,995,102 07 

546,795 14 

323,712 91 

315,672 33 



$1,403,648 49 

479,550 09 

106,229 94 

18,816 86 

38,770 76 



$14,393,974 15 



$2,047,016 14 





Per 

Cent. 


1899-1900. 


Per 
Cent, 


1898-1899. 


Increase. 


Conducting Transportation 
Motive Power 


40.55 
30.18 
15.87 
11.17 
2.23 


$4,844,253 20 

3,605,625 28 

1,896,131 36 

1,334,758 26 

266,649 33 


42.65 

30.06 

16.20 

8.56 

2.53 


$4,440,788 17 

3,129,737 09 

1,686,362 86 

891,526 55 

263,059 15 


$ 403,465 03 

475,888 19 

209,768 50 

443,231 71 

3,590 18 


Maintenance of Way 


Maintenance of Cars 






Total 




$11,947,417 43 




$10,411,473 82 


$1,535,943 61 







— 10 — 

The increase of $2,047,016.14 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,586,236 42 

Buffalo Division, Increase 460,779 72 

The increase of $1,535,943.61 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,209,446 66 

Buffalo Division, Increase 326,496 95 

Leaving out the Buffalo Division for the years 1898-1899 
and 1899-1900, the percentage of operating expenses to 
earnings on the Wabash proper was as follows: 

Year ending June 30th, 1899, 71.21 per cent. 
Year ending June 30th, 1900, 71.87 per cent. 



TEAFFIC. 

FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics again show a large increase, 
236,051,224 (14.16 per cent) in "tons revenue freight carried 
one mile," at an average rate of 0.5579 cents per mile, an 
increase of 0.0052 cents (0.94 per cent), at a cost per ton 
mile of 0.4250 cents, an increase of 0.0038 cents (00.9 per 
cent), leaving a net profit of 0.1329 cents as compared with 
0.1315 cents last year, an increase of 0.0014 cents. 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.5005, 
expense per mile, $1.1431, and net earnings, $0.3574, as 
against $1.2973, $0.9887 and $0.3086 respectively, last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 7,075,158, a decrease 
of 26,166, or about 3.67 per cent. 



— 11 — 

The loaded cars per train increased 0.90 cars, the load per 
car 1.24 tons, and the "revenue" train load was 268.94 tons 
against 234.72 tons last year, an increase of 34.19 tons or 
14.6 per cent. For the years from 1895 to 1900 the 
"revenue" train load has been as follows : 

1895 176.29 tons. 

1896 193.04 

1897 212.87 

1898 216.55 

1899 234.72 

1900 268.94 

The actual train load, including company freight, was 
291.02 tons, against 255.12 last year. 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars, 
whether "revenue" freight or "company" freight, are 
included in "loaded cars per train," but prior to this year 
only "revenue" freight tonnage has been taken in arriving 
at "average load per car," and consequently the "average 
load per car" has been too small by about 9 per cent. 

In this report the statistics have been correctly made up 
and the figures for 1899 corrected on the same basis for 
accurate comparison. The "average load per car" includes 
"company freight,"™the "average load per train" shows 
"revenue freight" load, and also total load, including "com- 
pany" freight. 

The "average load per car" corrected for past years as 
above, was, — 

1895 13.37 

1896 13.80 

1897 14.00 

1898 14.16 

1899 14.83 

1900 16,07 



— 12 — 

With an increase of 14.16 per cent in "services rendered," 
i. e., tons carried one mile, there was an increase in freight 
revenue of |1,403,648.49, or 15.23 per cent, with an increase 
of $1,066,617.56, or 15.05 per cent, in expenses of freight 
traffic. While the increase in freight tonnage was 14.16 
per cent, the increase in cost of freight train service was 
only 10.78 per cent. 

PASSENGER. 

"Passengers carried one mile" increased 23,255,126 (11.04 
per cent), and in revenue $479,550.09 (12.00 per cent), 
$145,832.02 of this increase was on the Buffalo Division, 
leaving $333,718.07 on the Wabash proper. The rate per 
passenger per mile was 1.913 cents, an increase of .016 cents, 
and expenses per passenger mile 1.650 cents, an increase of 
.040 cents, leaving 0.263 cents per mile net, as against 
0.287 last year. 

Train earnings per mile were 84.03 cents, a gain of 4.61 
cents ; expenses 58.09 cents per train mile, an increase of 4.03 
cents, and net earnings per train mile 25.94 cents against 
25.36 cents in 1899. 

The "passengers carried one mile" increased 11.04 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service increased 13.89 
per cent. 



— 13 — 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance Increased as 
follows : 





BuflFalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Conducting Transportat'n 
Motive Power 


$104,266 40 

91,711 26 

104,259 74 

22,093 83 

4,165 72 


1 299,198 63 

384,176 93 

105,508 76 

421,137 88 

* 575 54 


$403,465 03 

475,888 19 

209,768 50 

443,231 71 

3,590 18 


Maintenance of Way 

Maintenance of Cars 

General Expenses 




Total 


$326,496 95 


$1,209,446 66 


$1,535,943 61 





*Decrease. 



The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Hire of Cars— passenger, baggage and sleep- 
ing $ 14,034 22 

Freight Cars (decrease) 13,045 59 $ 988 63 

Passenger Train Service — train and engine 

men, fuel, oil, waste and tallow, cleaning 

and lighting coaches, etc. (13.89%) 129,796 89 

Freight Train Service — train and engine 

men, fuel for locomotives, oil, waste and 

tallow, cleaning, oiling and inspecting 

cars (10.78%) , 190,583 60 

Repairs of Engines— freight and passenger 

(24.60%) 196,874 25 

Eepairs to passenger, freight and other cars 

(53.36%) 427,038 74 

Outside Agencies, Fast Freight Lines, Com- 
missions, etc 10,876 19 

Station Agents, Clerks, Labor, Light, 

Fuel, etc. 

Passenger (5.9%) $ 12,352 41 

Freight (10.77%) 89,444 47 101,796 88 

Telegrap^i Expenses 15,656 43 

Yard Men and Switch Tenders 20,505 85 

Repairs, Shops, Turn-Tables and Water 

Stations 53,017 72 

Damages to Property, Persons, Stock, etc 82,916 64 

Fences $ 30,340 59 

Frogs and Switches 20,746 16 

Missouri River Protection 31,063 98 

Steel Rail and Fastenings 59,765 30 

Labor on Tracks 108,771 35 250,687 38 



— 14 — 

Maintenance of Way. 
new steel eail laid. 





1899-1900. 


1898-1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No . Tons 63-lb . Ee-rolled 
Eail 


1,035.30 


294.00 

109.00 
23,777.60 


741.30 




No. Tons 70-lb. Ee-rolled 
Eail .. 


109.00 


No. Tons 80-lb. New Eail 


14,909.70 




8,867.90 






Total 


15,945.00 
. 129.26 


24,180.60 
193.20 




8,235.60 


Miles New Steel Eail Laid 




63.94 









Note A. — 927.2 tons, 10.5 miles, of 63-lb. re-rolled rail were fur- 
nished for the reconstruction of the Albia Harvey line and charged 
to that work. 

B. — 150 tons of new 80-lb., second quality rail were furnished to 
the Quincy terminals and charged to that account. 

0. — In the above statement is included 12,201 tons of 80-lb. rail 
laid in the Buffalo Division between Niagara Falls, Black Eock and 
Windsor, and 2,510 tons of 80-lb. rail laid on the Buffalo Division be- 
tween Niagara Falls and Buffalo. Of the cost of this rail the Wabash 
paid its proportion on the wheelage basis amounting to $152,036.93, 
less the value of the old rail taken out. 



MISCELLANEOUS WOEK. 





1899-1900. 


1898-1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No. Cross-ties laid, Main 
Track 


723,264 

114,121 

655 

65.2 
191.9 

215.7 

22.1 
80.3 

32.1 


469,817 

58,884 

370 

121.4 
144.5 

200.6 

22.1 
11.9 

13.3 


253,447 

55,237 

285 




" Cross-ties laid. Side 
Track 




*' Sets Switch-ties put 
in 




" Miles track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

" Miles Fence Eebuilt. 


56.2 


47.4 
15.1 




*' Miles Old Fence Ee- 
paired 




" Miles New Fence 
Built 




" Miles Ditching 

" Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 


68.4 
18.8 











Note: — Included in the above are 129,125 cross ties, 82 sets switch 
ties, 16 miles track ballasted, 7.5 miles fencing, 21.5 miles ditching and 
4.1 miles sidings, on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo Division, 
and 8,690 cross ties, 14 sets switch ties, and 9.74 miles ballasting on the 
Erie Section of the Buffalo Division. 



15 



Number of Feet op Trestle Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, 
ETC., During the Year Ending June 30th, 1900. 





Shortened. 


Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 


Filled and 
Abandoned. 


Cost. 


Detroit Division... 


3 feet. 
426 '* 
123 " 
857 " 


62 feet. 
454 '* 
1,861 " 
764 " 




1 520.18 


Eastern Division... 
Middle Division... 
Western Division 


13 feet. 
48 " 
708 ** 


4,498.64 

14,393.91 

6,279.20 


Total 


1,409 feet. 


3,141 feet. 


769 feet. 


$25,691.93 









Total Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 





189&-1900. 


1898-1899. 


Detroit Division 


65 

893 

2,032 

2,329 


223 


Eastern Division 


825 


Middle Division 


3,505 


Western Division 


1,116 


Total 


5,319 


5,669 







— 16 — 



EXTEAORDINARY RENEWALS, IMPROVEMENTS 
AND ADDITIONS. 

EENEWALS. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt — 

Oakwood, Mich.— New Trestle No. 715-A, built | 519 06 

Sand Creek, Mich.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 897 794 76 

Calumet, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1699 2,734 16 

Monclova, Ohio— Rebuilt Trestle No. 37 443 32 

Liberty, Ohio— Rebuilt Trestle No. 84 1,373 97 

Woodburn, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 174 327 40 

Erie, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestles Nos.320and 320-A 455 68 

La Fayette, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 450 412 96 

Artie, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1037 1,092 51 

Brownell, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1289 778 00 

Mexico, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1308 464 19 

East Hannibal, 111.— Built New Trestle No. 649-C 3,791 80 

Poag, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 890 1,259 60 

Brisbane, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1090 865 65 

Quincy, 111.— Built New Trestle No. 373-A 950 61 

Blue Mound, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 721 • 913 48 

Edwardsville Junction, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 888 703 20 

Pattonsburg, Mo. — Rebuilt Truss Bridge across Big Creek, 3,545 56 

Ardmore, Mo.— Rebuilt Truss Bridge across E. Chariton... 1,396 68 

De Witt, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 507 1,702 25 

Forrest Green, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 733 549 56 

Chillicothe, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 819 597 43 

Green Top, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2041 1,106 30 

So. Ottumwa, la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2224 1,362 31 

Salisbury, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 473 603 73 

Centralia, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 361 611 39 

Mexico, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 317 881 42 

Warrenton, Mo.— Rebuilt Culvert Bridge No. 191 2,149 21 

Total 132,386 19 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Iron Bridges (new) to replace Wooden Bridges. 

La Fayette, Ind. — Built new iron deck girder bridge. 

No. 452, over highway I 5,792 76 

Defiance, Ohio. — Built new iron highway bridge at North 

Clinton Street 6,080 44 

Defiance, Ohio. — Built new iron highway bridge at Ralston 

Avenue 7,510 09 

Hannibal, Mo. — Built new steel superstructure, M. K. & T. 

bridge. No. 3, $6,688.78, Wabash proportion 3,449 21 

Evansville, Mo. — Built new steel superstructure, M. K, & 

T. bridge, No. 42, Wabash proportion 2,111 20 

$24,943 70 

Trestles shortened, replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc., 

during the year $25,691 93 



I 



— 17 — 

Iron Bridges Eepaired and Strengthened. 

Valley City, 111. — Eenewed deck on through iron truss 
bridge, No. 508, across Illinois River $ 2,841 86 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed deck on iron deck truss bridge, 
No. 705, across South Sangamon River : 2,821 18 

Custer Park, 111. — Renewed deck on through iron truss 
bridge, No. 1145, across Kankakee River 1,461 66 

Total $ 7,124 70 



Improving Line and Reducing Grades. 

Changing, straightening line and lowering grade of main 

track east of Logansport, Ind I 6,339 10 

Reducing grade between High Hill and New Florence, Mo. 4,561 85 
Reducing grade at St. Charles, Mo 2,082 82 

$12,983 77 
For protection against Missouri River at Missouri City and 

De Witt $50,803 94 

Note: — During the year $6,992.07 was expended by the Road 
Department on Boody Hill grade, which amount was charged to that 
account. 



Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc. Passenger and 
Freight Stations, New, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 

Toledo, O. — Repairs to Lake freight house and renewal of 

platforms $ 2,672 58 

Cecil, O. — Built new combination depot platform 396 14 

Peru, Ind. — Buildings moved from Andrews and enlarged 

for store department 1,107 53 

Peru, Ind. — Buildings removed from Andrews and enlarged 

for various offices 542 74 

Peru, Ind. — Freight house moved and enlarged, and plat- 
form rebuilt 1,778 10 

Logansport, Ind. — Built new brick platform at passenger 

depot 1,078 28 

Monticello, 111. — Built new passenger depot 1,910 87 

Baylis, 111. — Rebuilt depot and platform 1,844 65 

Ritchie, 111. — Rebuilt depot and platform 551 70 

Chicago, Ilh — Bumping posts erected at freight house 458 00 

Garber, 111. — Built new depot and platform 475 12 

Litchfield, 111. — Built new brick platform at depot 623 45 

Lanesville, 111. — Rebuilt depot and platform 928 74 

Chicago Ridge, 111. — Built new waiting room 262 97 

Jacksonville, 111. — Built crossing gates at Church Street... 230 27 

Springfield, 111. — Built new switchman's house 109 35 

Mexico, Mo. — Improvements in passenger depot 638 21 



— 18 — 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Etc. — Continued. 

Moberly, Mo.— Built new brick platform at depot $1,847 61 

Clark, Mo.— Built new depot and platform 1,829 96 

So. Liberty, Mo.— Built new depot and platform 1,278 21 

Kansas City, Mo. — Put in new track scale 801 91 

Chicago, 111. — Renewing driveway 1,707 25 

Delray, Mich.— Built new 70-foot turn table 4,607 21 

Delray, Mich. — Built new cinder pit 932 42 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new erecting and tank shop 9,131 05 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Built new addition to boiler room 1,294 85 

Peru, Ind.— Rebuilt cinder pit 970 31 

Springfield, 111. — Rebuilt part of round house 701 22 

Streator, 111. — Built new one stall engine house 481 18 

Hamilton, 111. — Renewed wooden turn table 341 13 

Springfield, 111.— Built new store room at shops 562 45 

Total $42,095 46 



Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 

Delray, Mich. — Connected tank with city water pipes $ 527 26 

Adrian, Mich. — Rebuilt tank and put in two stand pipes... 2,730 92 

Lanesville, 111. — Rebuilt tank and erected new stand pipe 1,678 43 
Morrisonville, 111. — Rebuilt tank and erected new stand 

pipe 1,675 13 

Shumway, 111. — Rebuilt water tank 726 34 

Jacksonville, 111. — Put in new stand pipe 324 82 

Brunswick, Mo. — Rebuilt coal chute 620 36 

Total $8,283 26 



ADDITIONS. 



New Yard, Side, and Spur Tracks to Various Industries Built— 

Detroit Division 12.0 miles, $59,289 60 

Eastern Division 10.0 miles, 46,086 50 

Middle Division 2.5 miles, 13,188 03 

Western Division 3.5 miles, 17,005 24 $135,569 37 



Interlocking Plants Erected, Wabash Proportion — 

Crossing, G. R. & I. R. R., La Otto, Ind $2,042 97 

Crossing, C. I. & L. R. R., Delphi, Ind 4,164 06 

Crossing, 1. 1. & I. R. R., Reddick, Ind 2,776 55 

Crossing, I. C. R. R., Strawn, 111 2,494 06 

Crossing, H. & St. J. R. R., Chillicothe, Mo 1,073 75 

Crossing, L. V. R. R., Bufialo, N. Y 2,841 53 $15,392 92 



— 19 — 

Additions to Property, Shops, Eound-Houses, Stations, Etc.— 

Detroit, Mich.— New A. E. T. Co., transfer platform $ 1,406 74 

Detroit, Mich, — Addition to freight house and platforms at 

Russell Street 336 11 

West Detroit, Mich. — New freight house and platform 391 43 

Oakwood, Mich. — New yard office 231 11 

So. Milford, Ind. — New combination depot and platform.... 1,316 40 

Dillon, Ind. — New dwelling for operators 688 16 

Magee, Ind. — New dwelling for operators 726 71 

Peru, Ind.— Built new addition to round-house 7,013 93 

Peru, Ind. — Built new boiler room and office 2,090 18 

Moberly, Mo.— Built addition to boiler house 390 96 

Peru, Ind. — Built new coal chutes 6,418 14 

Peru, Ind. — Built new tank and stand pipe 2,780 93 

High Hill, Mo.— Built new tank and pump house 2,085 37 

125,876 17 

SUMMARY. 

Extraordinary Eenewals, Improvements and Additions. 

Renewals. 
Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt 132,386 19 

Improvements. 

Iron Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges 24,943 70 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc., 

during year 25,691 93 

Iron Bridges Repaired and Strengthened 7,124 70 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades 12,983 77 

Protection against Missouri River 50,803 94 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc 42,095 46 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations Rebuilt and Enlarged, 8,283 26 

$ 171,926 76 

Additions. 

New Yard, Side, and Spur Tracks to Various Industries,....! 135,569 37 

Interlocking Plants Erected, Wabash proportion 15,392 92 

Additions to Shops, Round-Houses, Stations, etc. 25,876 17 

$ 176,838 46 

fRenewals I 32,386 19 

Totals, ^Improvements 171,926 76 

[Additions 176,838 46 

1381,151 41 

Note. — In addition to the above, 152,225.03 was expended on the 
Buffalo Division for extraordinary renewals and improvements. (See 
Buffalo Division statement.) 



20 — 



Buffalo Division. 

Extraordinary Renewals and Improvements — Depots, Build- 
ings, etc. Grand Trunk Section. 

Niagara Falls. — Placed steam heating plant in station $ 4,793 93 

Niagara Falls. — Altering ticket office 376 76 

Niagara Falls. — Built new shanty for switchmen 128 34 

Total I 5,299 03 



Additions to Shops, Round-houses, etc. 

St. Thomas, Ont.— Put in new 60-foot iron turn table $ 3,488 09 

Niagara Falls. — Built new sand house 560 86 

Niagara Falls. — Put in new ash pits, etc 1,798 66 

Niagara Falls. — Moving and improving car shops 439 43 

Total $ 6,287 04 

Note. — New freight house was built by Wabash at Louisiana Street, 
Buffalo, N. Y., costing $24,041.50, of which $18,854.58 was charged 
during the year ending June 30th, 1899. 



Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 

Niagara Falls. — Built new water tank and stand pipes $ 2,871 31 

Niagara Falls. — Moved and improved old water tank 268 02 

Niagara Falls. — Built new coal chutes 6,569 59 

Fort Erie. — Built new coal chutes 6,404 51 

Total $16,113 43 



Sundries — 
Niagara Falls. — Grading and improving yard in front of 

station , $ 925 17 

Niagara Falls. — Enlarging yard facilities 21,662 26 

Fort Erie. — Built new coal chute sidings 1,938 10 

Total $24,525 53 



SUMMAKY. 

Buffalo Division. — 

Depots, Buildings, etc $ 5,299 03 

Additions to Shops, Round-Houses, etc 6,287 04 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged 16,113 43 

Sundries 24,525 53 

Total $52,225 03 



— 21 



A>'XrAL STATEMENT OF SUPERINTENDENT 
TRANSPORTATION. 

FEEIGHT. 1900. 1899. 1898. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 

for year 1,645,789 1,637,617 1,421,417 

Total Emptv Cars moved 

for year .: 834,587 819,693 724,788 

Total Loaded and Empty 

Cars moved for year 2,480,376 2,457,310 2,146,1-55 

Average Loaded Cars 

moved perday 4,509 4,484 3,894 

Average Emptv Cars 

moved per day..'. 2,287 2,246 1,985 

Average Loaded and 

Emptv Cars moved per 

day.." 6,796 6,730 5,879 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 7,075,158 7,245,206 6,333,830 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 19,384 19,850 17,367 

Total number Freight 

Trains for year 7... 85,499 87,100 74,008 

Average number Freight 

Trains per day 234 239 203 

Average number Miles rum 

per train, per day 82.8 83.1 85.6 

Average number Loaded 

Cars moved per train 

mile 18.1 16.9 16.6 

Average number Empty 

Cars moved per train 

mile 8.0 7.4 7.4 

Average number Loaded 

and Emptv Cars moved 

per train mile 26.1 24.3 24.0 

Average number Cars 

handled per train mile, 

reduced to loaded car 

basis ......." 22.9 21.4 21.1 

Mileage made bv all 

Loaded Cars for year 128,106,845 122,435,819 105,497,721 

Mileage made bv all 

Empty Cars for year 56,920,676 53,781,587 46,822,053 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 185,027,521 176,217,406 152,319,774 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 75,815,200 73,024,596 61,164,310 



27,833,095 


23,409,005 


100,857,691 


84,573,315 


49,411,223 


44,333,411 


25,948,492 


23,413,048 


75,359,715 


67,746,459 


34,266,040 


33,939,563 


12,995 


11,774 



— 22 — 

FREIGHT— Cont. 1900. 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 29,169,225 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 

for year 104,984,425 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 52,291,645 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 27,751,451 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 80,043,096 

Mileage made by Wabash 
Cars on other roads for 
year 39,867,175 

Number Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 12,560 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day, including Switch 
Cars 5,964 5,527 4,239 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 5,091 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. R 33.2 27.6 24.6 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Foreign 
Roads, including Switch 
Cars 18.3 17.5 21.9 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on For- 
eign Roads, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 21.4 , 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day*" including 
Switch Cars 5,836 5,656 5,130 

Average number Foreign 
Cars on Wabash R. R. 
per day, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 5,073 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 
including Switch Cars... 56.1 56.9 52.7 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per car per day, 
exclusive of Switch Cars, 64.5 



— 23 — 

PASSENGER. 1900. 

Total Passenger Train 

Mileage for year 6,644,720 

Total number Passenger 

Trains run for year 70,535 

Average number Passenger 

Trains run per day 193 

Average number Miles per 

Train per day 94.2 

Average number Miles by 

all Trains per day , 18,180 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 7,346,132 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Coaches and Chair Cars 

for year 14,645,386 

Total Mileage Sleeping 

Cars for year 7,873,619 

Total Mileage Wabash 

Dining Cars for year 802,652 

Total Mileage of all Cars 

for year 32,086,126 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled for 

year 340,684 321,565 277,400 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled per 

day 933 881 760 

Average number of Cars 

per train 4.83 4.71 4.66 



6,302,399 


5,267,013 


68,245 


59,376 


187 


163 


92.3 


88.6 


17,260 


14,441 


7,064,903 


6,482,614 


13,350,422 


11,355,883 


7,060,827 


5,338,535 


765,883 


518,691 


29,627,962 


24,589,410 



— 24 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department show an increase of 
$475,888.19, of which $91,711.26 is due to the Buffalo Divi- 
sion, leaving $384,176.93 increase on the Wabash proper. 
The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Engineers and Firemen $ 99,200 08 

Fuel for Locomotives 112,349 19 

Repairs to Engines (including new engines) 196,874 25 

Repairs, E. & M. S., W., W. & C. Stations 9,126 33 

Tools and Machinery, and new Tools 30,300 08 

Incidentals (Buffalo Division Import Duties) 6,599 08 

Wipers, Hostlers and Dispatchers 9,775 82 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines (in- 
cluding $197,261.85 paid for new engines) was $996,769.58, 
equal to $2,323.00 per engine for 429 engines, the average 
number on hand during the year. This is $398.00 per 
engine in excess of the average per engine last year. 

We received, during the first five months of the fiscal 
year, 8 eight-wheel passenger engines, 28 mogul freight and 
4 switching engines. Ten of these were allotted to the Des 
Moines Divisio;i and charged to the Construction Account 
of that division. 

The total cost of these 40 engines, not including interest, 

was 1402,887 99 

10 Engines charged to Des Moines Division Construction 

Account 100,014 28 

Balance, for which 60 monthly notes were given,.. |302,873 71 

On June 30th, 1900, there were 52 monthly notes outstand- 
ing, each 15,071.88 263,737 76 

The following statement gives some idea of the large 
amount of repair work done on engines, and the general 



— 25 — 

character of the repairs. Nearly 50 per cent, of the engines 
on hand July 1st, 1899, went through the shop for general 
repairs, and 72 per cent, for heavy repairs. These per cents 
are away above the average for such repairs, and show the 
^' building up" of our motive power that is going on. 



Motive Poweb and Machinery. 

LOCOMOTIVE equipment. 



1899-1900. 1898-99. Increase. Decrease 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 

eepaies. 

Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, new 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

New Fire-boxes 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Eods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

NewTanks^ 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



405 
41 

9 
437 



198 

290 

378 

511 

1 

71 

2 

61 

25 

32 

298 

42 

322 

2 

79 

378 

40 

6 

52 

127 

3,316 



412 
2 
9 

405 



138 
269 

406 

544 
2 
58 
15 
48 
16 
34 

258 
50 

277 

4. 

53 

355 

16 

2 

37 

91 

3,375 





7 


39 








32 




60 




21 






28 




33 




1 


13 






13 


3 




9 


2 


40 






8 


45 


2 * ' 


26 




23 




24 




4 




15 




36 






59 



— 26 — 



DISTRIBUTION OF ENGINE MILEAGE. 





1899-1900. 


1898-99. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Freight Train Mile- 
age 


7,075,158 

750,426 

6,644,720 

135,332 
2,855,400 

274,178 


7,101,324 

484,531 

6,270,571 

31,828 
2,459,771 

237,228 




26,166 


Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 


265,895 

374,149 

103,504 
395,629 

36,950 


Passenger Train 
Mileage . 




Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 




Switching 




Miscellaneous , 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 






Total 


17,735,214 


16,585,253 


1,149,961 









Expense op Operating Locomotives. 



1899-1900. 



1898-1899. 



Increase. 



Kepaire {^teriai::::::::: 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood) 

Engineers and Firemen 

Wiping and Dispatching 

Total 



P 462,374 64 

534,394 94 

47,462 29 

867,749 88 

1,018,912 08 
132,773 45 



$ 410,666 
389,228 
43,098 
759,048 
919,712 
122,997 



13,063,667 28 



12,644,751 77 



76151,707 88 
57 145,166 37 
44 4,363 85 
37 108,701 51 
00 99,200 08 
63 9,775 82 



1418,915 51 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 





1899-1900. 


1898-1899. 


Increase. 


For Repairs 


1 5 60 
27 

4 88 

5 73 
75 


1 4 78 
26 

4 53 

5 49 
73 


1 82 


Stores 


01 


Fuel 


35 


Engineers and Firemen 


24 


Wiping and Dispatching 


02 






Total 


117 23 


$15 79 


1 1 44 







— 27 — 

1899-1900. 1898-1899. 

Total engine mileage 17,790,103 16,749,605 

Average mileage per engine in service for year... 48,212 47,993 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service... 4,018 3,999 

Total tons of coal consumed 898,928 837,413 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

handling included) |1 02 |0 96 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 19.8 20.0 

Note : Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense which 
has been added to Auditor's figures, and is as follows : 

1899-1900. 1898-1899. 

Stores $ 565 65 $ 971 14 

Fuel 6,061 32 9,709 60 

Total 16,626 97 110,680 74 



Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash pro- 
portion of all joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



— 28 — 







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a S 






eg h 

60 &p 



43 c3 



— 29 — 



CAR DEPARTMENT. 



The expenses of this department for the year were, as last 
year, away above the normal — first, on account of the 
charging out amount carried in suspense for new dining 
cars and coaches ; second, putting on of safety appliances, 
couplers and air-brakes, steam heat, etc. ; third, new Ireight 
cars, and fourth, postal and combination cars. The total 
amount on account of these items was |741,557.15. 

Gould vestibules were applied to 5 coaches, making 97 
coaches, chair, dining and combination cars now so equip- 
ped. In the application of these 5 vestibules we spent 

$1,623.28. 

We equipped with the Gold system of steam heat 168 
passenger cars, all classes, making 272 now so equipped. 
During the year we expended $24,483.59 for steam heating. 

We equipped three passenger cars with Pintsch gas, at a 
cost of $735.00, making a total of 115 cars now so equipped. 

Automatic couplers were applied to 1,639 freight cars, and 
air-brakes were applied to 622 cars. This does not include 
couplers and air-brakes for new equipment. All of our 
freight equipment is now supplied with automatic couplers 
and about 51 per cent supplied with air-brakes. In the 
application of automatic couplers and air-brakes we ex- 
pended about $73,000.00 during the year ending June 30th, 
1900. 

In March, 1900, contracts were entered into for 3,000 thirty- 
ton box cars, 36 feet long in clear, and for 500 forty-ton coal 



30 



cars, all to be delivered by September 1st, 1900. They are 
now being received rapidly, and all will be on hand by about 
the first of September, as per contract. They are all built 
to modern standards, steel bolsters, air-brakes, automatic 
couplers, draft rigging and large dimensions. The contracts 
provide for payment in 72 equal monthly notes, interest at 
5 per cent, with option of anticipating payments. 



31 



Car Equipment. 





On 

hand 

July 1, 

1899. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1900. 


On 
hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASRENQEE. 

Official 


3 

2 

6 

124 

37 

43 

8 

3 

63 

15 

4 

24 

5 

1 






3 

2 

6 

125 

40 

43 

8 

3 

62 

15 

4 

28 

5 

1 


4 


Pav 






2 


■t^.j'. 


1 
1 
3 


1 


5 


Coach 


108 


Combination 




22 


Chair 




35 


Parlor 








Caf6 . 








Baggage 

BasTffaffe and. Mail 




1 


64 




15 


Baggage, Mail and Passenger.. 
Postal 






6 


4 




19 


Pacific Express 


5 


A.ir-Brake Instruction 
















Total Passenger 


338 


9 


2 


345 


285 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


7,093 

834 

4,616 

295 

149 

100 

186 

64 

8 

7 

8 

2 

220 


47 

6 

250 

2 

2 


467 

139 

133 

2 

1 


6,673 

701 

4,733 

295 

150 

100 

194 

71 

9 

6 

8 

3 

99fi 


8,075 
1,471 


Stock 


Coal, Flat and Rack 


3,439 
33 


Furniture 


Fruit 


50 


Refrigerator 


100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 

Tool and Work 


10 

7 
1 


2 


129 
36 


Derricks 




12 


Pile Drivers 


1 


7 


Cable Cars 




1 


Ice Cars 


1 
16 




4 


Cabooses , 


10 


212 




XV 1 




Total Freight 


13,582 
338 


342 
9 


755 

2 


13,169 
345 


13,569 

285 


Total Passenger 


Total Ca/Equipment 


13,920 


351 


757 


13,514 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons 


351,296 




348,837 


235,074 









— 32 — 



CARS EEPAIEED. 





Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


1,415 

162 

76 

4 


100,037 
1,426 

752 
580 


101 452 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


1,588 
828 
584 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 

Cars Rebuilt 






Total 


1,657 
4,090 


102,795 
11,023 


104,452 
15,113 


New Wheels applied 



DES MOINES DIVISION. 



The new line from Moulton to Albia, and reconstruction 
of the line from Albia to Harvey, was completed and opened 
for traffic in November, 1899. 

The results of the operation of this as our through line 
have been very satisfactory, and fully up to our expecta- 
tions. The local traffic is developing and increasing rapidly 
along the new line, and especially in the coal district between 
Albia and Harvey, and the entire line from Moulton to Des 
Moines will undoubtedly be a self-sustaining division. 



33 



TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1899-1900. 1898-1899. 

Total Number of Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines... 2,013 1,979 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to this Company.. 5,515 5,273 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph Co.. 8,908 8,805 

Total Number Miles of Wire used jointly 621 605 



Total Miles of Wire 15,044 14,683 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

The most salient items of expenditures in this report are first, 
''Equipment," and second, * 'Improvements of the Property." 

EQUIPMENT. 

$772,057.15, divided as follows: 

New Freight Cars $ 379,137 60 

New Passenger, Combination, Postal and Dining Cars 90,456 06 

New Locomotives 197,261 85 

New Safety Appliances, Air-brakes, Automatic Couplers, 

Steam Heat, etc 105,201 64 

Total I 772,057 15 



The expenditures on this account will during the year 
1901, be greatly increased by the payments necessary under 
the contract for the 3,000 new box and 500 new coal cars. 
The monthly payments will be, this year: New cars, |46,- 
899.86 ; locomotives, |5,071.88, an increase of $21,117.91 per 
month. 

In considering these increases in expenditures, we must 
not forget that these new cars will largely increase our rev- 



— 34 — 

enues and decrease the amount we pay other roads for the use 
of their equipment. The Wabash Company has always been 
"short" in car equipment, always a borrower from competi- 
tive as well as friendly lines, and, while in "lean" years it man- 
aged to get along, in years of heavy grain or other traffic, 
it was forced to look to other roads for cars, and of course 
got them only where the owner could spare them, and as a 
result the Wabash has lost enormous tonnage for want of 
cars during rush periods. Cars must he provided when 
wanted by the shipper, or the traffic is lost. 

During the past year, we were, for months, "short on 
orders," by actual records, an average of 1,500 cars per day, 
and while we paid other roads some $400,000.00 for use of 
their cars we lost unknown amounts in traffic by not hav- 
ing cars when traffic was offered, or by not being able to 
control the cars via any route shipper desired. 

The value of the new equipment is already apparent in 
the movement of new grain, and although some 800 new 
cars are now in service, we are still short on orders. 

It must not be assumed that the large expenditure for 
new cars and locomotives was all in excess of the require- 
ments of maintaining equipment. I estimate that from 
1450,000.00 to $500,000.00 per annum would be required to 
make good the depreciation of locomotives, cars, etc., so that 
our expenditures during the past year on this account have 
not been more than $300,000.00 above what our normal 
expenditures should be. 



35 



Car and Engine Trusts. 
June 30th, 1900, the car and engine trust notes outstand- 
ing were as follows : 

St. Charles Car Company, Contract June 28th, 1898, 39 notes 

(last one due September 24th, 1903), each |4,696.18 $183,151 02 

Missouri Car and Foundry Company, Contract June 28th, 
1898, 41 notes (last one due November 5th, 1903), each 
14,696.18 , 192,543 38 

Engines, St. Louis Trust Company, 52 notes (last one due 
November 1st, 1904), each 15,071.88 263,757 76 

Total amount trust notes outstanding 1639,452 16 

In addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundry Company for 500 box, 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage payments are $7,194.76. 

Improvements and Additions to the Property, 
1420,525.50. 
The items included under this head are given in detail 
in other portions of the report, but are so scattered in the 
different reports that the aggregate value and importance 
of the work is not fully understood until attention is called 
to it. 

ADDITIONS. 

Eeal Estate I 11,616 59 

New yards, tracks, spurs, etc 140,201 17 

Double track, Bement to Decatur 23,247 07 

New Shops, Stations, Buildings, etc 31,739 17 

New Interlocking Plants 15,392 92 |222,196 92 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Reducing Grades and Removing Curves | 55,719 56 

Filling Trestles, Iron Bridges in place of 
Wooden ones, River Protection, New Stations 
enlarged, etc 133,999 29 

New Shop Machinery 8,609 73 198,328 58 

1420,525 50 



— 36 — 

In addition to these items of expenditure to improve the 
property, there have been great improvements made in the 
condition of the property, and considerable sums expended 
in the way of heavy rails, frogs, switches and track better- 
ments. 

As shown by the foregoing statistics, there was no let-up 
in the policy of improvement which has been in force since 
the reorganization in 1889. While large sums have been 
and are being expended annually in this direction, it is the 
aim of the management to make these expenditures in such 
directions as will secure the best and quickest results in in- 
creased traffic, reduction of expenses and increased safety 
of operation ; and that such results have been secured, at 
least to a moderate degree, is shown by the large increase 
in both freight and passenger traffic, increase in car and 
train load, and decrease in cost of handling traffic on the 
ton mile basis. The average earnings per ton mile for the 
past year were less than the cod per ton mile for the year 
ending June 30th, 1895, the cost per ton mile for 1900 being 
25 per cent less than for 1895. 

The reduction of grades at Boody Hill and Cerro Gordo 
from 49 to 21 feet per mile will make the capacity of every 
engine operating over these districts about 30 per cent 
greater, and the double tracking between Bement and 
Decatur will considerably reduce the "overtime" paid to 
train men and delays to trains. 

While gross earnings were large for the year just ended, 
the present year promises a good increase ; rates are better 
maintained and are slightly higher than a year ago, and 
the crops tributary to the Wabash are large. The corn crop 



— 37 — 

tributary to our line is reported twenty per cent better than 
last year, and last year we carried nearly 1,000,000 tons of 
corn. The wheat crop west of us is heavy, and is beginning 
to move at fair rates. The reduction of prices for iron and 
steel will largely increase orders for building supplies, and 
the termination of the long strike and lockout between 
building contractors and labor unions at Chicago and other 
points, and the outlook for a long treaty of peace between 
these interests, promises well for traffic in building material. 

The reduction in prices will prove a double benefit, 
increasing traffic and reducing expenses. 

The relations existing between heads of departments, 
subordinate officials and employes, have been very satis- 
factory, and much of the success in the operations has been 
due to this fact. At one time during the year there was an 
attempt on the part of some who had not been in our 
employ very many years to create a little agitation, but the 
action of our old and conservative employes, who knew 
the policy of the company to be " fair play and proper treat- 
ment of its employes of all grades," prevented any disagree- 
able results to either the company or its employes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., 

Vice-President and General Manager 



38 



MILES OF KOAD OPERATED. 

LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI EIVER. 



Description of Lines. 



©DO 




^h3 

^•§ 



S3 



Toledo E. Hannibal 

E. HannibaL.Hannibal U. D.... 

Bluffs Camp Point 

Camp Point... Quincy 

E. Hannibal.. Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Pittsfield Jet. .Pittsfield 

Sidney Champaign 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville..Edwardsville Jet. 

Chicago C. & W. I. June. 

C. & W. I. Jct..Effingham 

Shumway Altamont 

Forrest Fairbury June 

Fairbury Jet.. Streator 

Detroit Delray 

Delray Butler 

Montpelier Clarke June 

Clarke Junc.C. & W. I. June .. 

Attica Covington 

Butler Logansport 

Chili Peru 



460.5 
39.4 



34.5 



11.7 

110.1 

1.7 



205.4 
9.5 



30.9 



109.8 
149.6 



14.8 



Total. 



1177.9 



3.0 



6.2 



94.1 
9.5 



0.4 



21.8 
17.3 



7.8 



3.8 
8.0 



0.8 
6.1 



4.6 



17.6 



460.5 

3.4 

39.4 

21.8 

17.3 

34.5 

7.8 

6.2 

11.7 

113.9 

1.7 

8.0 

205.4 

10.3 

6.1 

30.9 

4.6 

109.8 

149.6 

17.6 

14.8 

94.1 

9.5 



112.8 



88.2 



1378.9 



219.7 

2.4 

4.0 

0.2 

1.4 

1.8 

1.2 

1.1 

2.1 

40.3 

1.2 

23.3 

56.4 

0.3 



3.5 
18.3 
31.8 
52.3 



2.3 

19.3 

0.5 



483.4 



680.2 

5.8 

43.4 

22.0 

18.7 

36.3 

9.0 

7.3 

13.8 

154.2 

2.9 

31.3 

261.8 

10.6 

6.1 

34.4 

22.9 

141.6 

201.9 

17.6 

17.1 

113.4 

10.0 



1862.3 



Note. — Above does not include 6.8 miles main track and 0.2 mile 
side track, total 7.0 miles, ''Owned" between Edwardsville Junction 
and Edwardsville Crossing, which is leased to the Illinois Terminal 
Railroad Company. 

Note A. — Above does not include 0.9 mile main track and 0.5 mile 
side track, total 1.4 miles, "Owned" built at Quincy, 111., during the 
year by contract to be used as terminals. 



— 39 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI EIVER. 



Description of Lines. 


i 

o 


1 


fas 

® ® O 


i 


Side 

and Double 

Track. 


< 


FEOM TO 

St. Louis- 
Union Station. 23d St 






0.7 


0.7 

274.8 
1.5 


95.4 
3.5 

1.5 
0.4 

29.7 
8.5 

14.4 
2.0 
0.6 
8.1 
3.0 
3.5 
1.2 
0.8 

11.0 


7 


Tayon av Harlem 


274.8 




370 2 


Harlem Kansas City 

St. Louis- 
Franklin av...N. Market st 




1.5 


5.0 
1 5 


Olive st Carr st 


10.7 

131.5 
28.3 




0.6 


0.6 

10.7 

69.7 

131.5 

28.3 

0.2 
68.2 
38.2 
41.4 
21.6 
15.4 


1.0 

40.4 


Carr st Ferguson 


Moberly Hannibal 

Moberly Ottumwa 




69.7 


78.2 
145.9 


Moulton Albia 







30 3 


Albia Albia Connecti'n 




0.2 


0.8 


Albia Des Moines 


68.2 
15.4 




76.3 


Brunswick Chillicothe 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Centralia Columbia ......... 

Salisbury Glasgow 

Excello Ardmore 


38.2 
41.4 
21.6 


E 


41.2 
44.9 
22.8 
16 2 






11 








72.7 






Total 


528.9 


101.2 


702.8 


183.6 


886.4 



— 40 — 



LINES EAST OF THE DETROIT RIVER. 



Description of Lines. 


'6 

§ 
1 








r 


< 


FROM TO 

Detroit Black Kock 






228.2 

18.0 

25.6 

4.5 


228.2 

18.0 

25.6 

4.5 


142.5 

17.6 

12.0 

4.5 


370.7 


WellandJct . .Susp. Bridge 






35.6 


Susp. Bridge.. ..Buffalo 






37.6 


Black Rock International Jet.. 






9.0 










Total 


276.3 


276.3 


176.6 


452.9 











Note. — Above does not include 4.3 miles New York Central tracks 
between Black Eock and Exchange Street Station, Buffalo, for the use 
of which the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



Note A, — Above does not include 0.6 mile Lehigh Valley track at 
Wabash freight station, Louisiana Street, Buffalo, for the use of which 
the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



— 41 



Eecapitulation. 



MILES OP EOAD OPERATED. 



Description of Lines. 


t 
O 


'6 


-0.3 6 




Ill 

03 


3 
g 


Lines East of the Mississippi 
River 


1177.9 

528.9 


112.8 
101.2 


88.2 

72.7 
276.3 


1378.9 

702.8 
276.3 


483.4 

183.6 
176.6 


1862.3 


Lines West of the Mississippi 
River 


886.4 


Lines East of the Detroit River.. 


452 9 










Total 


1706.8 


214.0 


437.2 


2358.0 


843.6 


3201 6 







Note. — Increase in '*Owned" is caused by transfer of various lines 
from the Purchasing Committee, construction of the Moulton and 
Albia line and the reconstruction and operation of the Albia and 
Harvey line. 



The Main Track mileage shown in the foregoing statement 
is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New YorV 30.1 

In Canada 246.2 

In Michigan 80.4 

In Ohio 114.9 

In Indiana 435.5 

In Illinois 744.0 

In Missouri 566.2 

In Iowa 140.7 

Total 2358.0 



— 42 — 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 





1899-1900. 


1898-99. 


Increase. 


Contributions and other receipts 

Expenses of Operation 


146,408 84 
40,095 66 


143,476 77 
40,124,83 


$2,932 07 
* 29 17 






Surplus for year 


1 6,313 18 
28,625 56 


$ 3,351 94 
25,273 62 


$2,961 24 


Previous Balance 


3,351 94 




Total Surplus 


134,938 74 


$28,625 56 


$6,313 18 






Balance on hand 


$34,938 74 


$28,625 56 


$6,313 18 





* Decrease. 

1899-1900. 

Number treated in Hospitals 1,400 

Number treated outside of Hospitals 22,027 

Total number of casestreated 23,427 

Number of Surgical casestreated 2,549 

Number of Medical cases treated 20,878 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes in Hos- 
pitals 5,186 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes not in 

Hospitals 36,913 

Total number of deaths 15 



1,272 
23,969 
25,241 

3,093 

22,148 

7,888 

42,653 
16 



The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jr., Chairman, 
W. H. Blodgett, 
E. B. Pryor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 15th, 1900. 

0. D. Ashley, Esq., 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company, New York. 

Dear Sir:— I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1900, as follows : 

A. Results of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 
H. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

J. Mileage Statistics for Twenty Years. 

K. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

L. Statement Showing Lines Covered by the First, 
Second and Debenture Mortgages of the Wabash 
Railroad Company, Detroit & Chicago Extension 
First Mortgage, and Des Moines Division First 
Mortgage. 

if. Supplementary Statement Showing Results of 
Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



44 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Results op Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1900, 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses- 
Net Earnings 



$16,440,990 29 
11,947,417 43 



Taxes. 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc. 



Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 



Net Earnings from Operation 

Additions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest 
Interest on Bonds * 



Surplus 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds. 



Net Surplus 



$210,099 01 



$14,393, 
10,411, 



974 15 
473 82 



$4,493,572 86 
567,327 22 


$3,982,500 33 
567,163 29 


$3,926,245 64 
269,613 85 


$3,415,337 04 
185,031 81 


$4,195,859 49 
767,746 67 


$3,600,368 85 
760,937 40 


$3,428,112 82 
292 207 70 


$2,839,431 45 






$3,135,905 12 
2,715,806 11 


$2,839,431 45 
2,691,495 00 


$420,099 01 
210 000 00 


$147,936 45 







$147,936 45 



*Includes Rent of Eel River R. R. (Year ending June 30, 1900, includes Rent 
of Eel River R. R.— July 1, 1899, to March 31, 1900, inclusive). 



1. Analysis op Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses 

AS Above. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 

Credit " " " 


$797,678 17 
69,908 47 


$770,276 09 
64,779 34 


Traffic Association and Miscellaneous Expenses 


$727,769 70 
39,976 97 


$705,496 75 
55,440 65 




$767,746 67 


$760,937 40 



Analysis of Additions to Property and Other Charges, 
as Above. 



Additions to Property as per Table "F" 

Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sinking Fund Charges 

and Maintenance of Steamers 

Detroit & Chicago Extension— Sinking Fund 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



$223,664 22 



47,981 31 
20,562 17 



$292 207 70 



— 45 — 



THE WABASH KAILKOAD COMPANY. 

Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November.. 
December.. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passengers 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 
" " Passenger " " 
" " Mail 

" " Express '• " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings , 



Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted). 
Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings.. 



Average number of miles operated 



Average Earnings per mile . 
Average Expenses per mile. 
Net Earnings per mile 



1,273 
1,462 
1,497 
1,574 
1,410 
1,430 
1,314 
1,209 
1,354 
1,310 
1,292 
1,310 



,185 70 
,956 61 
,840 83 
,196 75 
,460 65 
,458 28 
,582 20 
,155 53 
,260 00 
,884 93 
,869 32 
,139 49 



$16,440,990 29 



$10,616,340 19 

4,474,652 16 

653,025 08 

342,529 77 

354,443 09 



$16,440,990 29 



64.57 
27.22 
3.97 
2.08 
2.16 



$11,947,417 43 



$ 567,327 22 



72.67 



$4,493,572 



27.38 



2,339.5 

$7,027 57 
5,106 83 
1,920 74 



1,079. 
l,283i 
1,288; 
1,313, 
1,212, 
1,222, 
1,138, 
1,011, 
l,25i: 
1,139, 
1,196, 
1,258, 



210 55 
293 01 
639 07 
135 35 
452 16 
391 99 
487 95 
498 98 
051 50 
025 95 
421 85 
365 79 



$14,393,974 15 



$ 9,212,691 70 

3,995,102 07 

546,795 14 

323,712 91 

315,672 33 



$14,393,974 15 



64.00 

27.76 

3.80 

2.25 

2.19 



$10,411,473 82 



$ 567,] 



72.33 



$3,982,500 33 



2,277.7 

$6,319 52 
4,571 05 
1,748 47 



— 46 — 



OP 

Q 1-5 

^ 8 

J2i 







4h o-"^ 



l> CO t-lN »0 

TtH CO «0 CO OS 











o 


o 


^ 


o 


05 














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— 47 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1900. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 
ASSETS. 





1900. 


1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 
Supplies and Materials on 
Hand 


$134,944,500 00 

891,218 94 
962,736 66 

875,914 75 
64,664 07 

214,273 72 

163,473 29 

26,840 45 

464,995 22 
14,466 39 

45,211 20 
667,685 19 


$135,033,500 00 

709,517 71 
747,986 53 

822,093 18 


$181,701 23 
214,750 13 

53,821 57 
64,664 07 

553,04 
24,342 24 


$ 89,000 00 






Investments in Stocks and 

Bonds 

Construction Account 




Sundry Accounts Collectible- 
Due from Agents 


213,720 68 
139,131 05 
43,699 68 

711,975 62 
14,466 39 

45,713 20 
851,352 17 




From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 




16,859 23 
246,980 40 


Sundry Railroads and Indi- 




Bills Receivable 




Advances Fast Freight Lines 

Account Working Fund 

Miscellaneous (2) > 




502 00 
183,666 98 








$139,335,979 88 


$139,333,156 21 


$2,823 67 













LIABILITIES. 





1900. 


1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease, 


Common Stock 


$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

83,045,000 00 

182,177 00 

587,176 24 

105,000 00 

1,747,015 23 

241,334 58 

397,493 68 

3,489 75 

10,019 00 

639,432 16 

377,842 24 


$ 28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

83,073,000 00 

185,292 00 

610,071 24 






Preferred Stock 










$ 28,000 00 


Interest Due 




3,115 00 


Interest Accrued, not Due 

Dividends Debenture Bonds, 


$105,000 00 
28,048 39 


22,895 00 


Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 


1,718,966 84 

287,631 13 

351,926 88 

3,314 48 

212,345 72 

668,126 98 

222,480 94 




46,296 55 


Taxes Accrued, not due 


45,566 80 
175 27 


Hospital Account 




Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable 


202,326 72 
28 694 82 


Equipment Notes of Long 
Date (4) 




Balance to credit. Profit and 


155,361 30 




• 






$139,335,979 88 


$139,333,156 21 


2,823,67 









(1) Decrease is amount of Detroit & Chicago Extension Bonds, retired by 
Sinking Fund, years ending June 30, 1898 and 1899. 

(2) Miscellaneous includes $639,432.16, carried in Suspense, on account new 
equipment. 

(3) Decrease is Detroit & Chicago Extension 1st Mortgage Bonds, retired by 
Sinking Fund from Surplus Earnings June 30, 1899, 

(4) The Equipment notes extend over a period of 52 months, the payments 
averaging $14,464.24 for the next 39 months, $9,768.06 for the next 2 months, and 
$5,071.88 for the next 11 months . 



— 48 — 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1900. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION-PASSENGER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Advertising. 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of 

Agents— Station 

Baggage Masters 

Brakemen and Porters 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for. 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Dining Car Expenses 

Incidentals 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Baggage 

Mail Expenses 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Union Depots— Expenses of 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 

Total 



60,153 21 
89,671 33 
83,758 72 
37,182 48 
77,436 26 
103,967 44 

9,686 35 

146,583 49 

38,077 72 

14,825 08 

78,843 47 

128,926 05 

161,104 31 

10,305 12 

10,038 57 

14,673 12 

23,365 27 

44,683 88 

869 12 

3,719 73 
42,659 65 

9,350 14 

4,035 82 
31,522 00 

7,535 25 
46,155 94 
52,196 24 
73,298 73 

2,831 36 

141,557 21 

79,292 18 

6,478 23 



10 

1.32 

28 

13 

73 

133 

144 

7. 

8 

9 

21 

31 

2 



67 

4 

129 



,788 31 
,485 47 
,104 46 
,646 16 
,702 74 
,782 23 
,455 22 
,549 27 
,151 33 
,048 16 
,116 21 
,759 15 
,128 57 
,056 98 
,238 11 
,301 67 
,056 38 
,837 81 
,255 44 
,269 22 
,685 65 
,403 86 
,923 19 
,837 81 
,307 46 
,376 49 
,425 30 
,971 88 
,537 32 
379 43 
,122 78 
,582 46 



$1,634,781 47 



$1,515,286 52 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Advertising 

Agents — Outside — Salaries and Expenses of. 

Agents— Station 

Brakemen 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions , 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Incidentals , 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Goods 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total $3,209,471 73 



277,738 53 

135,495 37 

318,989 79 

78,235 91 

650 76 

479,998 82 

570 36 

21,580 15 

393,795 66 
8,331 67 

224,208 57 
26,399 60 
10,800 29 
8,508 95 
63,535 64 
58,556 38 
45,196 53 
17,276 15 
8,580 02 

349,646 03 
15,030 41 
65,183 27 

103,203 49 

148,706 79 
27,549 25 

270,865 11 
50,838 23 



131,585 71 

291,559 43 

70,942 01 

854 89 

493,044 41 

230 82 

19,048 73 

369,196 15 
7,877 94 

205,034 33 
14,516 33 
8,919 82 
11,641 73 
33,117 24 
36,328 29 
41,127 31 
14,803 02 
8,590 21 

291,258 88 
14,855 20 
45,629 71 
95,762 35 

138,367 21 
20,672 82 

261,528 66 
30,974 52 



$2,925,501 65 



— 49 — 

E — Continued. 
THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MOTIVE POWER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Engineers and Firemen— Passenger 

do do Freigb-t 


$ 360,578 90 

658,333 18 

15,346 77 

60,829 49 

63,466 14 

233,919 16 

619,147 15 

17,164 16 

29,863 78 

285,098 91 

693,299 42 

2,804 90 

5,817 35 

18,371 25 

38,452 50 

3,207 41 

46,436 34 

10,270 58 

71,317 70 

34,120 06 

84,353 59 

102,172 43 

18,480 66 

132,773 45 


$ 320,551 75 
599,160 25 


Engine Houses, M. S., etc., Fuel, Lights, etc., for... 
do do M. S & T. T. — Repairs of 


17,331 14 
50,932 41 




55,867 06 


Locomotives, Passenger — Coal for 


195,777 61 




547,280 23 


do Passenger— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 
do Freight— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc. , for 
(lo Passenger Repairs of . 


13,725 99 

28,401 31 

245,230 25 

541,802 28 


do Freight — Repairs of 




1,979 53 


do Freight — Wood for 


4,301 40 




12,862 80 


do Hire of 


41,106 45 


Printing and Stationery 

Stations, Fuel— Expenses of 

do do Repairs of 


2,873 15 
41,464 97 
10,001 53 




68,856 61 


do " Repairs of 


35,159 86 


Superintendence 


82,091 00 


Tools and Machinery — Expenses and Repairs of 

Watchmen. ... . . .. 


71,872 35 
17,109 53 




122,997 63 






Total 


$3,605,625 28 


$3,129,737 09 



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899, 



Ballast 

Bridges— Repairs of 

Cross-Ties 

Fences and Road Crossings — Repairs of.. 

Frogs and Switch Fixtures 

Incidentals 

New Side Tracks— Grading 

Oil, Tallow, Waste and Fuel 

Printing and Stationery 

River Protection 

Section, Tool, Watch Houses, etc 

Snow and Ice Rem^oving 

Spikes— Track 

Splices, Bolts and Fastenings 

Steel Rails 

Superintendence and Supervisors 

Telegraph— Repairs of 

Tools and Machinery— Repairs and Renewals of. 

Track— Repairs of 

Watchmen of Roadway and Bridges 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 



42,256 66 

157,835 29 

281,492 67 

89,384 94 

93,861 12 

7,128 89 



6,007 96 

2,075 69 
49,860 71 

4,020 64 
19,306 96 
22,701 83 
49,288 90 
128,246 44 
95,605 89 
26,448 12 
16,382 64 
704,884 58 
99,461 68 

1,879 75 



67,544 46 

198,302 16 

272,210 69 

59,044 35 

73,114 96 

4,979 92 



1,612 17 
18,823 93 

3,892 87 

8,114 91 
23,767 64 
81,079 90 
34,690 14 
87,102 02 
23,391 15 
12,756 35 
598,224 42 
98,523 95 

9,092 .57 



Total 



$1,896,131 



$1,686,362 86 



50 



E — Continued. 

THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MAINTENANCE OF OARS. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Oars, Pass., Express, Mail and Bag.— Repairs of. 

do Freight— Repairs of 

do Road Service — Repairs of 

do Furniture and Fixtures 

Oar Sliops and Buildings, Fuel, Light, etc., for.... 

do Shops and Sheds— Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Printing and Stationery 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expense and Repairs of... 
Watchmen 



$322,092 62 

858,361 08 

21,011 79 

25,879 18 

1,856 48 

8,980 45 

405 38 

2,4.^4 41 

46,913 77 

42,567 46 

4,255 64 



198,923 42 

555,760 85 

14,585 66 

29,636 10 

1,499 43 

10,727 69 

865 38 

2,039 46 

45,112 65 

28,228 91 

4,147 00 



Total 



$1,334,758 26 



$ 891,526 55 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 




Year ending 
June 30, 1899, 



General Offices— Attendants at 

do Olerks in 

do Fuel, Lights, etc., for 

do Rent of 

do Repairs of 

do Printing and Stationery ... 

do Petty Expenses of 

General Officers— Salaries and Expenses of 

Insurance 

Incidentals 

Interest and Exchange 

Legal Departmen1>-Expenses of 

Expenses of New York Office 

do London Agency 

War Revenue Stamps 

Total 



$ 2,821 04 

33,718 21 

774 75 

19,027 64 

1,347 09 

19,366 24 

1,972 96 

42,767 72 

28,381 85 

6,869 11 

537 58 

76,675 93 

13,138 49 

954 00 

18,293 73 



$ 2,806 43 

35,877 33 

306 45 

23,389 60 

9,333 99 
19,544 48 

2,819 56 
43,365 20 
23,344 52 

5,445 70 

73 58 

61,289 02 

12,397 25 

1,909 73 
21,156 31 



$266,649 33 



$263,059 15 



RECAPITULATION. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 


Conducting Transportation 


$4,844,253 20 
3,605,625 28 
1,896,131 36 
1,334,758 26 
266,649 33 


$4,440,788 17 

3,129,737 09 

1,686,362 86 

891,526 55 


Motive Power 


Maintenance of Way 


Maintenance of Cars 


General Expenses 


263,059 15 






Total Operating Expenses 


$11,947,417 43 


$10,411,473 82 



51 — 



F 
THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Additions to Pkopeety. 
(Referred to in Table A— Note 2.) 

New Sidings I 66,888 74 

New Yards— Buffalo 6,186 92 

New Yards— Peru 18,710 89 

New Yards— Oakwood 21,676 70 

New '*Y"— East Hannibal 4,587 73 

Real Estate— St. Louis 3,357 02 

Real Estate— Ferguson 3,609 10 

Real Estate— Bement 2,039 63 

Real Estate— Peru 2,610 84 

Helmer Branch 23,150 19 

Y. M. C. A. Building— Decatur 5,863 00 

Boody Hill Grade 42,736 39 

Double Track— Bement to Decatur 23,247 07 

1223,664 22 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Teain and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1899. 



Per Cent. 



Increase. Decrease. 



PASSENGER. 





8,080,220 

1,422,851 

9,503,071 

1,902,881,278 

156,105,144 

2,058,986,422 

216.7 Miles. 


6,987,641 

1,291,695 

8,279,336 

1,666,830,054 

144,840,715 

1,811,670,769 

218.8 Miles. 


15.64 
10.15 
14.78 
14.16 
7.78 
13.65 




Tons Carried Company Freight 




Total Tons Carried 




Tons carried one Mile, Revenue Freight- 
Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 
Total Tons carried one Mile . . 








Average Distance each Ton carried 


0.96 








$10,616,340 19 
8,087,818 15 


$9,212,691 70 
7,021,200 59 


15.24 
15.19 




Operating Expenses 








Average Earnings per Ton 


$1 31.39 
1 00.09 
Cts. 0.5579 
' ' 0.4250 
" 0.1329 


$1 31.84 

1 00.48 

Cts. 0.5527 

" 0.4212 

" 0.1315 




0.34 




O.M 

0.90 
1.06 


0.39 


Average Rate per Ton per Mile 




Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 










Total Freight Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 


7,075.158 
$1 50.05 
1 14.31 
35.74 


7,101,324 
$1 29.73 
98.87 
30.86 




0.37 


15.66 
15.62 
15.81 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 








Car Mileage, Loaded... 


128,106,845 

56,920,676 

185,027,521 


122,188,784 

53,634,604 

175,823,388 


4.84 
6.13 
5.23 




Car Mileage, Empty 




Car Mileage, Total— Loaded and Emptv . 








Average Loaded Cars per Train 


18.11 
8.04 
26.15 
16.07 

11.13 

291.02 

268.94 


17.21 

7.65 

24.76 

14.83 

10.30 

255.12 

234.72 


5 23 




Average Empty Cars per Train 


6.49 
5.62 
8.36 

8.05 

14.07 

14.58 




Average Total Cars per Train 




Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 




Average Load per Car, Loaded and 
Empty — Tons 




Average Load per Train — Tons — includ- 
ing Company Freight 




Average Load per Train — Revenue 
Freight only 








Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 8.29 
" 6.31 


Cts. 7.54 
" 5.75 


9.95 
9.74 




Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 









Number of Passengers carried 


4,277,735 
233,848,065 
54.7 Miles. 


3,751,019 
210,592,939 
56.1 Miles. 


14.04 
11.04 




Number of Passengers carried one Mile. 




Average distance each Passenger carried 


2.49 






Earnings from Passenger Traffic 


$4,474,652 16 
5,583,851 21 
3,859,599 28 


$3,995,102 07 
4,979,967 59 
3,390,273 23 


12.00 
12.13 
13.84 




Earnings, Including Mail, Express, etc... 












Average Revenue per Passenger 


$1 04.60 

90.23 

Cts. 1.913 

" 1.650 

" 0.263 


$1 06.51 
90.38 
Cts. 1.897 
" 1.610 
" 0.287 




1.79 


Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 
Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 




17 


0.84 
2.47 




Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 




Average Net per Passenger per Mile 


8.36 






Total Passenger Train Mileage 


6,644,720 
$0 84.03 
58.09 
25.94 


6,270,751 
$0 79.42 
54.06 
25.36 


5.96 
5.80 
7.45 
2.28 




Average Earnings per Train Mile 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 




Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 








Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 


23,446,015 
31,116,942 


21,248,495 
28,613,737 


10.34 
8.75 




Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 








Average number Cars per Train ,. 


4.69 

9.97 
35.19 


4.56 

9.91 
33.58 


2.85 

0.61 
4.79 




Average number Passengers per Coach 
and Sleeper 




Average number Passengers per Train... 








Average Earnings per Car per Mile 

Average Expenses per Car per Mile 


Cts. 17.94 
" 12.40 


Cts. 17.40 
" 11.85 


3.10 
4.64 














53 



H 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Tonnage op Aeticles Caeried. 



ARTICLES. 



Year ending 
June Both, 1900. 



Per 

Cent. 



Tons. 



Year ending- 
June 30th, 1899. 



Per 

Cent. 



Tons. 



Products of Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 

Other Grain 

Flour 

Other Mill Products 

Hay 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Fruits and Vegetables.... 



Products of Animals: — 

Live Stock 

Dressed Meats 

Other Packing House Products. 

Wool 

Hides and Leather 



Products op Mines: 
Stone, Sand, etc.. 
Anthracite Coal.. 
Bituminous Coal. 

Coke 

Ores 



Products of Forest: 

Lumber 

Other Articles 



Manufactures :— 

Petroleum and Other Oils 

Sugar 

Iron, Pig and Bloom 

Iron and Steel Rails 

Other Castings and Machinery. 

Cement, Brick and Lime 

Agricultural Implements 

Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc.. 

Wines, Beer and Liquors 

H. H. Goods and Furniture 



Merchandise .. 
Miscellaneous, 



Total Tons 



Company's Freight. 



26.27 

1.48 
11.99 
5.51 
1.60 
2.26 
1.13 
0.06 
0.53 
1.71 

9.25 

3.77 
2.20 
2.49 
0.10 
0.69 

29.41 

2.67 
3.15 
23.18 
0.24 
0.17 

9.05 

6.32 
2.73 

7.45 

1.07 
0.39 
0.42 
0.91 
1.01 
1.93 
0.35 
0.22 
0.85 
0.30 

6.00 
12.57 



100.00 



119,885 
968,557 
444,914 
129,012 
182,434 

91,004 
4,523 

42,819 
138,094 



304,594 

177,409 

201,485 

8,374 

55,747 



215,928 
254,839 
1,872,619 
19,175 
13,374 



510,415 
221,788 



83,111 
31,795 
35,099 
73,140 
81,459 
155,708 
28,156 
18,156 
68,672 
23,857 

484,964 
1,016,114 



8,080,220 



1,422,851 



25.38 

2.30 
10.57 
3.94 
2.17 
2. 63 
0.93 
0.07 
0.87 
1.85 

iO.89 

4.29 
3.65 
2 33 
0.08 
0.54 

27.94 

2.78 
3,18 
21.45 
0.22 
0.31 

8.48 

6.22 
2.26 



8. 



30 

1.02 
0.73 
0.45 
0.86 
1.33 
2.04 
0.46 
0.20 
0.94 
0.27 

6.51 
12.50 



100.00 



160,671 
738,314 
275,384 
151,502 
187,224 

65,360 
4,595 

60,605 
129,122 



299,504 
255,413 
162,530 
5,354 
37,814 



194,056 

222,216 

,498,881 

15,564 

21,929 



434,833 
158,303 



71,258 
51,021 
31,830 
60,174 
92,939 
142,526 
31,879 
13,802 
65,990 
18,994 

454,745 
873,309 



), 987, 641 



1,291,695 



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57 



Statement of Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages 
OP the Wabash Railroad Company. 

LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

Toledo to East Hannibal 460.5 Miles. 

Bluffs to Camp Point 39.4 " 

Clayton to Elvaston 34.5 ' ' 

Decatur to East St. Louis 110.1 " 

C. &W. I. Junction to Effingham 205.4 " 

Shumway to Altamont 9.5 ' ' 

Fairbury Junction to Streator 30.9 ' ' 

Edwardsville to Edwardsville Crossing 8.5 " 

Delray (near Detroit) to Butler 109.8 '♦ 

Total Lines East 1,008.6 Miles. 

LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

St. Louis, Tayon Avenue to Harlem 274.8 Miles. 

St. Louis, Carr Street « to Ferguson 10.7 " 

Moberly to Ottumwa 131.5 " 

Brunswick to Pattonsburg 79.6 " 

Salisbury to Glasgow 15.4 " 

Centralia to Columbia 21.6 " 



Total Lines West 533.6 Miles. 

Total all Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages.. 1,542.2 " 
The Second Mortgage covers all the lines east of the Mississippi 
River, as above 1,008.6 " 

Note.— The First and Debenture Mortgages also cover the Leasehold interest 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Eel River Railroad from Butler 
to Logansport, a distance of 94.1 miles, and also covers the Leasehold interests 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, 
Hannibal; Quincy and Kansas City, and in the Bridges at Hannibal, St. Louis and 
Kansas City. 

The Second Mortgage also covers the Leasehold interest which the Wabash 
Railroad Company has in the Eel River Railroad from Butler to Logansport, a 
distance of 94.1 nules, and also covers the Leasehold interests which the Wabash 
Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, Hannibal and Quincy, 
and in the Bridge at Hannibal. 

The First and Debenture Mortgages cover the lines west of the Mississippi 
River above described, subject to prior Divisional Mortgages. By the terms of 
the First Mortgage, a sufficient number of First Mortgage Bonds are reserved to 
meet, at their maturity, or whenever exchanges can be made, the said Divisional 
Mortgages covering the lines west of the Mississippi River. 

LINE COVERED BY THE DETROIT AND CHICAGO EXTENSION-FIRST 
MORTGAGE. 

Montpelier, Ohio to Clarke Junction, Ind 149.6 Miles. 

LINE COVERED BY THE DES MOINES DIVISION-FIRST MORTGAGE. 

Moulton, Iowa to Des Moines, Iowa 96.5 Miles. 



— 58 — 



M 



Eesults op Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R., 
FOR the Year Ending June 30th, 1900. 

Gross Earnings $1,328,396 87 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc 675 15 



Total Receipts $1,329,072 02 

Deduct Operating Expenses $1,008,046 37 

Deduct Taxes 45,068 13 

Deduct Joint Track Rentals and Miscella- 
neous Expenses 84,445 35 1,137,559 85 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest $191,512 17 

Interest on Bonds 170,950 00 



Surplus over and above Interest set aside as 

Sinking Fund $ 20,562 17 



Note.— Results of Operation, Table A, includes the Montpelier & Chicago R. R. 



I 



Twelfth Annual Report 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



Kor thie Fiscal Year Endiog 
Jume SOth, 1901. 



ST. LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co. 

1901. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



-OF- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 



0. D. ASHLEY, Chairman of the Board. 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-Preside7it. 

M. KNIGHT, Second Vice-President. 

W. H. BLODGETT, Third Vice-President and General Counsel. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

E. B. PRYOR, Asst. to the Vice-Prest. and Asst. Secretary. 

H. L. MAGEE, General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

S. B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

C. B. ADAMS, ....... Superintendent Transportation. 

H. H. WELLMAN, .... . Purchasing Agent and General Storekeeper. 

W.S.LINCOLN, Chief Engineer. 

J.B.BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Dr. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 

S. E. COTTER, Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 



O. D. ASHLEY, 
GEO. J. GOULD, 
EDGAR T. WELLES, 
HENRY K. McHARG, 
CYRUS J. LAWRENCE, 
P. B. WYCKOFF, 
FRANCIS PAVY, 



S. C. REYNOLDS, 
EDWIN GOULD, 
THOS. H. HUBBARD, 
JOHN T. TERRY, 
RUSSELL SAGE, 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1901. 



At the close of the fiscal year, June 30th, the undersigned 
having retired from the Presidency of the Company, was 
elected Chairman of the Board of Directors, and in that 
capacity submits the Twelfth Annual Report of the Wabash 
Railroad Company. Reference to the report of Joseph 
Ramsey, Jr., the newly elected President, will enable stock- 
holders and bondholders to acquaint themselves with the 
details of the operating department. The expenditures for 
new rolling stock, additions and improvements, which have 
been unusually large, are also fully explained in the Presi- 
dent's report. 



The result of the year's operations is shown in the follow- 
ing condensed statement : 

Gross Earnings $17,554,465 15 

Miscellaneous Receipts 262,180 94 

Total Receipts $17,816,646 09 

Deduct Operating Expenses $12,752,045 11 

Deduct Taxes 586,199 20 

Deduct Balance Joint Track Rent- 
als and Miscellaneous Expense s 757,938 50 14,096,182 81 

$ 3,720,463 28 
Deduct Additions to Property and 

Other Charges as follows : 
New Passenger Station, etc., 

Decatur $ 54,478 51 

Freight House, etc., East St. Louis 42,411 08 

New Side Tracks 102,676 51 

Relay Passenger Station, East St. 

Louis 3,125 00 

Annex to Y. M. C. A. Building, 

Decatur 1,735 29 

Y. M. C. A. Building, Moberly... 9,102 38 

Real Estate, Peru 1,754 50 

Real Estate, Bement 1,935 92 

Real Estate, Litchfield 850 00 

Real Estate, Ferguson 3,609 10 

Gravel Pit near Simcoe, Ont 10,668 12 

Boody Hill Grade 97,902 79 

Double Track, Bement to San- 
gamon 213,877 09 

Lake Erie Transportation Co. — 

Sinking Fund Charges and 

Maintenance Steamers 59,544 84 

Detroit & Chicago Extension — 

Sinking Fund 19,751 60 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund 

Bonds of 1901, four months 

Sinking Fund Accrued 33,333 33 656,756 06 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $ 3,063,707 22 

Interest on Bonds 2,760,571 24 

Surplus $ 303,135 98 

Dividends on Debenture A Bonds 210,000 00 

NetSurplus $ 93,135 98 



During the year two issues of bonds have been authorized 
by the stockholders and debenture mortgage bondholders 
at special meetings held for the purpose. One of these, 
called the Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901 
for $3,000,000, is dated March 1, 1901, and runs for twenty 
years at five per cent interest, and provides for a sinking 
fund of $100,000 per annum for five years ; $150,000 per 
annum for the next ten years, and $200,000 per annum for 
the last five years. These bonds are secured by new rolling 
stock, part of which has been hitherto paid for in monthly 
installments, and the remainder of which is in course of 
delivery. This arrangement will relieve the operating 
expenses of a monthly charge of about $20,000 after provid- 
ing for the sinking fund and interest. 

The other issue, called the Toledo and Chicago Division 
First Mortgage Bonds, is dated June 1, 1901, runs forty 
years and bears four per cent interest. The mortgage 
securing these bonds provides for the construction of the 
new line from Toledo to Montpelier (a distance of about 
fifty-seven miles), and the cut-ofi" from New Haven near 
Fort Wayne, Ind., to a junction with the line from Detroit, 
at or near Butler, Ind. (about twenty-seven miles). This 
new connection has been rendered necessary by the decision 
of the Indiana courts, which pronounced the lease of the 
Eel River road invalid, and placed that line in the hands 
of a receiver. The new mortgage is a first lien on these 
two important lines, as well as on new rolling stock belong- 
ing to this division, and is a second mortgage also on the 
line from Montpelier to Chicago. 



—6— 

The bonds referred to have been sold upon satisfactory 
terms, and the new lines are in process of construction, and 
will be completed during the year. The connection between 
New Haven and the Detroit line will undoubtedly save a 
considerable part of the amount heretofore paid for the 
rental of the Eel Eiver road. The line from Toledo to 
Montpelier will open up a short and direct line between 
Toledo and Chicago, the advantages of which are obvious. 
The extension of the Wheeling and Lake Erie road to 
Pittsburgh, Pa., now under way, will, it is believed, give 
especial importance to this new link between Toledo and 
Chicago. 

The new rolling stock provided by these two mortgages 
will complete, substantially, the equipment of the system 

The completion of the double track between Bement and 
Decatur, will require an additional expenditure of about 
$200,000. 

Railway traffic during the year has fully realized antici- 
pations, which, at the time, appeared somewhat too sanguine, 
inasmuch as they implied increase over the results of three 
years of great prosperity. The optimistic view has, however, 
in this instance, proved correct. An especially encouraging 
feature is developing in the growth of local traffic and in 
the increase of passenger travel. These items of improve- 
ment are substantial indications of permanent growth in a 
department of traffic not aflPected by the competition to 
which through business is subjected. This interesting 
development, stimulated by the increasing density of the 
population, and the establishment of local manufacturing 
industries, will, in the long run, prove to be a solid basis of 



enduring prosperity. Under this natural process of internal 
expansion, railway lines, which at the time of construction 
appeared superfluous, will become self-supporting, and in 
the ratio of the growth in local resources, the rate question, 
which has for so many years been the principal factor of 
disturbance in railway traffic, will be practically eliminated. 
A study of the railway conditions in the New England 
States, and especially in Massachusetts, Connecticut and 
Rhode Island, will illustrate the soundness of this proposi- 
tion. Whenever, for example, the density of population in 
the three great Central Western States of Ohio, Indiana and 
Illinois equals per square mile of area that of the three New 
England States named, all of the railway lines now in exist- 
ence, or which are likely to be added in the territory east 
of the Mississippi River, will be self sustaining, without 
struggling for through traffic. 

At the beginning of the new fiscal year some clouds 
appear above the horizon in labor disturbances, which must 
be necessarily of but brief duration, and in the partial fail- 
ure of the corn crop threatened by the long continued 
drought. In certain localities this crop has undoubtedly 
suflPered material injury, but experience teaches us that 
crop alarms are generally much exaggerated, and before 
these words are in print the aggregate crop condition may 
present more encouraging features. Except so far as a 
possible decrease in the corn crop may diminish the volume 
of freight during the year, the prospective business of the 
system is quite encouraging. The Pan-American Exhibi- 
tion at Buffalo has added materially to passenger earnings, 
and our cars have been fully employed in the movement of 



— 8— 

freight. It would, perhaps, be too much to anticipate a 
continuance of the gains over three years of unusual busi- 
ness prosperity of the country, but, as yet, there are no indi- 
cations of a turning in the tide. 

We have to regret the loss, during the year, of Mr. M. M. 
Martin, Superintendent of our Car Department, whose long, 
faithful and eflBlcient services as an officer of the Company 
deserve especial recognition. 

The usual acknowledgment is due to the officers and 
employees of the Company for loyal and zealous co-operation 
in every department. 

0. D. ASHLEY, 

Chairman of the Board. 
New York, August, 1901. 



REPORT OF TOE PRESIDENT. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 25th, 1901. 

To THE Board of Directors, 

Mr. 0. D. Ashley, Chairman^ 

New York, N. Y. 
Dear Sir: — 

In submitting to the Board the usual statements and 
statistics of the Accounting and other departments for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1901, I desire to briefly call 
attention to the salient features of the operations and the 
work done on the property during the year. 

With the close of the fiscal year, we have had forty -seven 
months of continuous increases in gross earnings, the earn- 
ings for the year being $17,554,465.15, while the earnings 
for the year ending June 30th, 1897, were $11,526,787.36, an 
increase In the four years of $6,027,677.79, or 52.3 per cent. 

On account of the heavy expenditures for equipment, 
reduction of grades, double track, etc., the heaviest in any 
year since the reorganization, the surplus is not as large as 
for the previous year. 



-10- 



Particular attention is called to the detailed statement of 
expenses, showing that with the large increase in earnings, 
there was a decrease in transportation expenses; that of the 
$303,690.00 increase in Motive Power, $234,109.00 was on 
account of increase in price of fuel, and that Maintenance of 
Way and Equipment increased $561,632.00, or 70 per cent 
of the whole. There was, in round figures, $1000 per mile 
expended on Maintenance of Way and track improvement. 

Although the previous years have seen many improve- 
ments in and additions to the property of the Company, 
the work done in this direction during the past year has 
been far ahead of any previous year. In addition to the 
amount expended for "Additions to Property" (see table F), 
and charged against net earnings, there were large sums 
expended for other additions to property, equipment, new 
sidings, station buildings, grade improvements, etc., and far 
more than the ordinary expenditures for maintenance, all 
of which was charged direct to operating expenses. 

The total amount expended for actual additions 
to Real Estate, Tracks, Shops, Stations, etc., 
was $830,066 58 

For New Engines, Freight and Passenger Cars, 620,270 51 

For Air Brakes, Steam Heat, Gas and Electric 
Lighting of Coaches, etc., 37,091 60 

Total, $1,487,428.69 



The extraordinary increase in the Maintenance of Way 
expense was due to the pushing of the work on tracks, bal- 
lasting, cross ties, surfacing, etc., as early as possible in the 
spring in order to have the track in the best condition 



—11— 

possible for the anticipated heavy travel to the Pan-Ameri- 
can Exposition. The pushing of this work ahead of the 
usual time added some $250,000.00 to the normal expenses. 

1901. 1900. 

The total revenue of the company, from 

all sources, was $17,816,646 09 $16,710,604 14 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 14,096,182 81 13,282,491 32 

I 3,720,463 28 $ 3,428,112 82 
Interest on Bonds 2,760,571 24 2,715,806 11 

Net Eevenue I 959,892 04 $ 712,306 71 

Additions to Property 544,126 29 223,664 22 

$ 415,765 75 $ 488,642 49 

Sinking Fund Charges and Maintenance 
of Steamers 112,629 77 68,543 48 

$ 303,135 98 $ 420,099 01 
Dividend of 6% on Debenture "A" Bonds 210,000 00 210,000 00 

Surplus to Profit and Loss Account $ 93,135 98 $ 210,099 01 



—12— 

REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Earnings and Expenses. 



1900-1901. 



1899-1900. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$17,554,465 15 
12,752,045 11 



$16,440,990 29 
11,947,417 43 



$1,113,474 86 
804,627 68 



$4,802,420 04 

72.64 

7,437 39 

5,402 72 

2,034 67 



$4,493,572 86 

72.67 

7,027 57 

5,106 83 

1,920 74 



$308,847 18 

.03* 

409 82 

295 89 

113 93 



EARNINGS. 



Per 
Cent. 



1900-1901. 



Per 
Cent. 



1899-1900. 



Increase. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous 



Total. 



63.57 
28.38 
3.76 
2.22 
2.07 



$11,158,966 24 

4,982,694 25 

659,175 32 

389,774 43 

363,854 91 



64.57 
27.22 
3.97 
2.08 
2.16 



$10,616,340 19 

4,474,652 16 

653,025 08 

342.529 77 

354,443 09 



$17,554,465 15 



$16,440,990 29 



542,626 05 

508,042 09 

6,150 24 

47,244 66 

9,411 82 



$1,113,474 86 



EXPENSES. 





Per 
Cent. 


1900-1901. 


Per 
Cent. 


1899-1900. 


Increase. 


Conducting Transportation 
Motive Power . . . 


37.37 
30.66 
18.31 
11.43 
2.23 


$ 4,765,999 47 

3,909,315 67 

2,335,371 25 

1.457,151 03 

284,207 69 


40.55 
30.18 
15.87 
11.17 
2.23 


$ 4,844,253 20 

3,605,625 28 

1,896,131 36 

1,334,758 26 

266.649 33 


$ 78,253 73* 
303,690 39 


Maintenance of Way 


439,239 89 


Maintenance of Cars 


122,392 77 


General Expenses .... 


17,558 36 


Total 




$12,7.52,045 11 




$11,947,417 43 


$ 804,627 68 











* Decrease. 



J 



—13- 



The increase of $1,113,474.86 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase 11,001,832 69 

Buffalo Division, Increase 111,642 27 

•The increase of $804,627.68 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase |792,316 31 

Buffalo Division, Increase 12,311 37 

Leaving out the Buffalo Division for the years 1898-1899, 
1899-1900 and 1900-1901, the percentage of operating 
expenses to earnings on the Wabash proper was as follows : 

Year ending June 30th, 1899, 71.21 per cent. 
Year ending June 30th, 1900, 71.87 per cent. 
Year ending June 30th, 1901, 72.34 per cent. 

TRAFFIC. 

FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics again show a fair increase, 
76,071,175 (4.00 per cent) in "tons revenue freight carried 
one mile," at an average rate of 0.5639 cents per mile, an 
increase of 0.006 cents (1.08 per cent), at a cost per ton mile 
of 0.4363 cents, an increase of 0.0113 cents (2.66 per cent), 
leaving a net profit of 0.1276 cents as compared with 0.1329 
cents last year, a decrease of 0.0053 cents. 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.5984 ; 
expense per mile, $1.2369, and net earnings, $0.3615, as 
against $1.5005, $1.1431 and $0.3574 respectively, last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 6,981,266, a decrease 
of 93,892, about 1.34 per cent. 



—14- 



The loaded cars per train increased 0.42 cars, the load 
per car 0.60 tons, and the " revenue " train load was 283.47 
tons against 268.94 tons last year, an increase of 14.42 tons, 
5.40 per cent. For the years from 1895 to 1901, the 
" revenue " train load, and load per car, have been as 
follows : 



YEAR. TRAIN LOAD. CAR LOAD. 

1895 176.29 tons. 13.37 tons. 

1896 193.04 '' 13.80 '' 

1897 212.87 " 14.00 ** 

1898 216.55 *' 14.16 " 

1899 234.72 <' 14.83 " 

1900 268.94 *' 16.07 '' 

1901 283.47 " 16.67 " 



The actual train load, including company freight, was 
309.00 tons, against 291.02 last year. 

The increase in train load over 1895 has been 107.18 
tons (61.36 per cent), and car load has increased 3.30 tons 
(24.68 percent). 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars, 
whether " revenue " freight or " company " freight, are 
included in "loaded cars per train." 

With an increase of 4.00 per cent in " services rendered," 
i. e., "tons carried one mile," there was an increase in 
freight revenue of $542,626.05 (5.11 per cent), with an 
increase of $546,973.38 (6.76 per cent) in expenses of freight 
traffic. While the increase in freight tonnage was 4.00 per 
cent, the decrease in freight train service was 1.34 per cent. 



15— 



PASSENGER. 



" Passengers carried one mile " increased 30,420,149 (13.01 
per cent), and in revenue $508,042.09 (11.85 per cent); 
$7,031.61 of this increase was on the Buffalo Division, 
leaving $501,010.48 on the Wabash proper. The rate per 
passenger per mile was 1.885 cents, a decrease of .028 cents, 
and expenses per passenger mile 1.558 cents, a decrease of 
.092 cents, leaving 0.327 cents per mile net, as against 0.263 
last year, a gain of 24.33 per cent. 

Train earnings per mile were 85.14 cents, a gain of 1.11 
cents ; expenses were 56.89 cents per train mile, a decrease 
of 1.20 cents, and net earnings per train mile were 28.25 
cents, against 25.94 cents in 1900. 

The "passengers carried one mile" increased 13.01 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service decreased 
6.68 per cent. 

It is interesting to note that statistics of freight and 
passenger traffic show the " net earnings " divided between 
the two classes of traffic as follows : 

Freight train net earnings 12,524,178 71 

Passenger train net earnings 2,044,623 82 

Total $4,568,802 53 

Passenger train earnings include mail, express, etc. 



-16- 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows: 





Bufifalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Conducting Transportat'n 

Motive Power 

Maintenance of Way 

Maintenance of Cars 

General Exnenses 


$ 6,316 39 
65,673 78 

* 49,730 00 

* 2,306 47 

* 7,642 33 


*| 84,570 12 

238,016 61 

488,969 89 

124,699 24 

25,200 69 


* 1 78,253 73 

303,690 39 

439,239 89 

122,392 77 

17,558 36 




Total 


$ 12,311 37 


$792,316 31 


1804,627 68 





*Decreases. 



The principal items of increase were as follows 



ir Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel, oil, waste tallow, cleaning and 

lighting coaches, etc. (14.78%) 

Freight Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel for locomotives, oil, waste and 
tallow, cleaning, oiling and inspecting 

cars (11.64%) 

Repairs to passenger, freight and other cars 

(10.53%) 

Station Agents, Clerks, Labor, Light, 
Fuel, etc. 

Passenger (3.62%) $ 9,463 98 

Freight (5.83%) 57,559 04 

Telegraph Expenses 

Yard Men and Switch Tenders 

Repairs, Shops, Turn-Tables and Water 

Stations 

Fuel Stations — Expense and repair of 

Tools and Machinery — Expense and repair 

of.... 

Bridges— Repair of 

Ballast 

Cross Ties 

Track Tolls 

Dining Car and Restaurant Expenses 

Fences 

Frogs and Switches 

Labor on Tracks 



156,251 15 


168,058 21 


126,468 62 


67,023 02 


10,088 94 
9,608 10 


9,654 49 
20,112 21 


25,091 89 

78,480 85 

120,904 72 

289,960 02 

8,190 26 

9,016 84 

10,655 28 

2,766 52 

20,913 83 



—it- 
Maintenance OF Way. 

NEW STEEL RAIL LAID. 





1900-1901. 


1899-1900. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No. Tons 63-lb. Ee-rolled 
Rail 




1,035.3 
14,909.7 




1,035.3 

8,054.2 


No. Tons 80-lb. New Rail 


6,855.5 

6,855.5 
54.5 








Total 


15,945.0 
129.3 




9,089.5 
74.8 


Miles New Steel Rail Laid 











Note— In the above statement is included 2,864 tons of new 80-lb. 
rail laid on the Buffalo Division between Niagara Falls and Windsor, 
the Wabash paying its proportion on a wheelage basis. 

25,000 tons of 80-lb. rail were contracted for in November, 1900, 
for delivery beginning April, 1901. Through unavoidable causes, 
delivery was delayed, and we received the first lot in June. When 
this rail is laid, the entire line, St. Louis to Buffalo, will be heavy rail. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



1900-1901. 



1899-1900. 



Increase. Decrease. 



No. Cross-ties laid, Main 
Track 

*' Cross-ties laid. Side 
Track , 

'* Sets Switch-ties put 
in 



Miles Track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

Miles Fence Rebuilt. 

Miles Old Fence Re- 
paired 

Miles New Fence 
Built 

Miles Ditching 

Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 



1,142,116 

182,153 

510 

267.3 

287.7 

238.6 

42.0 
55.0 

30.3 



723,264 

114,121 

655 



65.2 
191.9 



418,852 
68,032 



145 



215.7 

22.1 
80.3 

32.1 



202.1 

95.8 

22.9 
19.9 



25.3 
1.8 



Note— Included in the above are 152,116 cross ties, 41 sets switch 
ties, 54 miles of track ballasted 17 miles of fencing and 4.9 miles of sid- 
ings on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo Division ; and 15,312 
cross ties and 12 sets switch ties on the Erie Section of the Buffalo 
Division. 

The total number of cross ties put in track was 1,324,269, equal to 
600 per mile, away above the normal replacements. 



-18— 



Number of Feet of Trestle Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, 
ETC., During the Year Ending June 30th, 1901. 





Shortened. 


Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 


Filled and 
Abandoned. 


Cost. 


Buffalo Division 










Detroit Division... 
Eastern Division... 
Middle Division... 
AVestern Division 


2 feet. 
132 '' 
249 '' 
375 " 


430 feet. 
336 " 
320 " 

858 " 


71 feet. 
506 *• 
164 " 


$ 3,827.65 

20,163.08 

2,504.04 

4,718.70 






Total 


758 feet. 


1,944 feet. 


741 feet. 


131,213.47 







Total Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 





1900-1901. 


1899-1900. 


Buffalo Division 






Dptroit Division 


503 

974 

733 

1,233 


65 


Eastern Division 


893 


IVTidflle Division 


2,032 
2,329 


Western Division 


Total 


3,443 


5,319 





—19— 

EXTRAOEDINAEY RENEWALS, IMPROVEMENTS AND 
ADDITIONS. 

KENEWALS. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt — 

Milan, Mich.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 802 $ 929 76 

Milan, Mich.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 807 267 68 

Munson, Mich.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 937 516 18 

Kunkle, Ohio.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 972 740 05 

Hamilton, Ind,— New Deck on Trestle No. 1394 1,219 89 

Helmer, Ind.— Repaired Trestle No. 1429 525 91 

Stoney Creek, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1493 571 43 

Millersburg, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1495 945 34 

Benton, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1503 319 98 

Benton, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1504 305 52 

Benton, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1505 216 54 

Foraker, Ind.— New Deck on Trestle No. 1522 588 34 

Foraker, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1525 272 35 

Foraker, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1657 274 69 

Willow Creek, Ind.— New Deck on Trestle No. 1694 882 80 

Okolona, Ohio.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 106 670 39 

Antwerp, Ohio.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 170 ,... 667 77 

Prairie Switch, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 215 352 68 

Roanoke, Ind.— New Deck on Trestle No. 228 597 77 

Wabash, Ind. — Renewed Approaches and Deck, Trestle 

No. 295 712 97 

Cass, Ind.— Built New Trestle No. 351 830 26 

Clymers, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 271 370 20 

Colburn, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 435 256 68 

Shelbys, Ind.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 634 349 67 

Artie, Ind. -Rebuilt Trestle No. 1037 ' 603 56 

Proctor, 111.— Renewed Deck, Trestle No. 1326 765 54 

Perry Springs, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 283 1,228 79 

Mt. Olive, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 817 482 50 

Perrv Springs, 111.— Renewed Bents, Trestle No. 282 841 40 

Proctor, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1320 786 57 

Raymond, 111.— Renewed Deck, Trestle No. 777 878 31 

Edwardsville Junction, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 882 760 30 

Horse Creek, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 1150 506 52 

Palmer, 111.— Renewed Deck, Trestle No. 761 821 50 

Decatur, 111.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 703 596 15 

Ferguson, Mo.— Rebuilt Culvert No. 40 500 00 

St. Peters, Ho.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 86 638 00 

St. Peters, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 88 231 20 

St. Peters, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 100 538 05 

Warrenton, Mo.— Rebuilt Culvert No. 199 750 00 

Randolph Springs, Mo.— Rebuilt Truss Bridge No. 428 2,578 25 

Clifton, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 454 324 35 

Salisbury, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 464 583 05 

Salisbury, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 469 223 45 

Miami, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle Approaches to Bridge No. 516 354 45 

Wakenda, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 524 564 00 



—20- 



Bridges, Wooden, New and 'Rebuilt— Continued. 

Hardin, Mo.— Rebuilt Approach to Bridge No. 551 $ 489 35 

Missouri City, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 600 673 85 

Hallsville, Mo.— Replaced Bridge No. 676, with Trestle 527 30 

Fountain Grove, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 787 400 75 

Fountain Grove, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 788 459 55 

Fountain Grove, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 789 341 75 

Chillicothe, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 816 351 90 

Chillicothe, Mo.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 824 246 20 

Chillicothe, Mo.— Rebuilt approach to Bridge No. 825 486 05 

Bloomfield, la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2154 1,489 95 

Belknap, la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2169 414 45 

Ottumwa, la.— Rebuilt Approach to Bridge No. 2224 5,630 35 

Cordova, la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2933 277 45 

Dunreath la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2944 206 65 

Morgan Valley, la.— Rebuilt Trestle No. 2967 520 35 

Morgan Valley, la.— Built Trestle No. 2969 437 65 

Excelsior Springs Branch. — Rebuilt Trestles 818 00 

Total 142,662 29 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings. 

Detroit, Mich.— Dredging C. P. and G. T. slips ....| 600 00 

Detroit, Mich. — Renewing fender piling on G. T. slip 4,404 58 

Detroit, Mich.— Renewing retaining wall along G. T. slip.. 628 01 

Detroit, Mich. — Renewing wing on G. T. slip 775 00 

Detroit, Mich. — Renewal of anchor piling and bulkhead 
inside C. P. slip 1,311 53 

Total $ 7,719 12 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Iron Bridges (liew) to replace Wooden Bridges. 
Defiance, Ohio. — New iron overhead Highway Bridge 

No. 126, completed at North Clinton St | 470 17 

Steele, 111.— Through Iron Girder Bridge No. 1081, built to 

carry Michigan Central tracks over Wabash Railroad 9,819 28 

Dalton, Mo.— Built New Iron Plate Girder Bridge No. 489, 

over Farmer's Creek 7,793 45 

Orrick, Mo. — Built New Through Iron Truss Bridge No. 

582, over Fishing River 13,949 45 

Birmingham, Mo. — Built New Two Span Iron Plate Girder 

Bridge No. 621, over Shoal Creek 12,554 35 

Luther, Mo. — Built New Two Span Iron Plate Girder 

Bridge No. 653, over Prairie Creek 12,008 20 

Total $56,594 90 

Trestles shortened, replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc., 

during the year 131,213 47 

Iron Bridges Repaired and Strengthened : 

Riverside, Ind.— Rebuilt deck on Bridge No. 505 $ 237 73 

Attica, Ind.— Rebuilt deck on Bridge No. 529 344 72 

Hannibal, Mo.— Renewed deck on draw span of bridge No. 
651 across Mississippi River 1,378 79 



—21- 



Iron Bridges Kepaired and Strengthened — Continued. 

St. Charles, Mo. — Renewed deck on trass spans ; renewed 
stringers in approaches ; renewed stone caps in approaches 
and painted spans on Bridge No. 59 across the Missouri 
River | 5,037 90 

Warrenton, Mo. — Took out old iron plate girder Bridge 
No. 196 over wagon road and replaced with new iron 
plate girder 1,702 75 

Ottumwa, la. — Renewed deck on through truss Bridge No. 
2224 across Des Moines River 932 65 

Total .....$ 9,634 54 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades: 

Riverside, Ind. — Lowered bridge No. 501 to grade % 884 12 

Boody, 111. — Lowered grade of main track 97,902 79 

Total 198,786 91 

For protection against the Missouri River at De Witt, Hull's 

Point and Missouri City % 5,271 21 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc. Passenger and 
Freight Stations, New, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 

Milan, Mich.— Freight depot remodeled $ 297 30 

Montpelier, O. — Addition built to freight depot 1,114 67 

Montpelier, O. — Built new ice house 1,123 45 

Montpelier, O. — Built new track scales 552 73 

Montpelier, 0. — Built new feeding stock pens 1,174 91 

Stroh, Ind. — Combination depot moved from Tolieston, 

and put up at Stroh 417 49 

Toledo, O. — New crossing gates at Broadway 481 02 

Toledo, O. — New transfer table at car shops 950 00 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. —New closets put in passenger depot 309 29 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Renewed platform at freight depot 785 52 

Wabash, Ind. — Renewed platform at freight depot 538 57 

Peru, Ind. — Built addition to baggage room 314 10 

Peru, Ind. — Built addition to office building 649 70 

Peru, Ind. — Built new ice house 477 07 

Peru, Ind.— Built new yard office 207 79 

Peru, Ind.— Painted Wabash Hospital 654 73 

Logansport, Ind. — Renewed platform at freight house 805,33 

Clymers, Ind. — Built addition to combination depot 215 85 

La Fayette, Ind. Built new cob house at elevator 331 95 

La Fayette, Ind. Building new yard office 272 07 

Riverside, Ind. — Built new section dwelling house 824 38 

East St. Lo'uis, 111.— Rebuilt in-bound freight house 28,036 69 

Chicago, 111. — Renewed track scales at 14th street 710 22 

Chandler, 111. — Renewed track scales 417 15 

Chicago, 111. — Overhauling elevator and docks 15,065 08 

Chicago, 111.— Erected 20-ton pillar crane 1,777 10 

East St. Louis, 111. — Rebuilt ice house 525 05 

East St. Louis, 111. — Repaired and renewed roof on old in- 
bound freight house, now torn down 371 80 

Decatur, 111. — Renewing floor in coach shop with brick 777 25 

East. St. Louis, 111. — Tore down old in-bound freight 

house 558 45 



—22— 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc. — Continued. 

Forrest, 111.— Moved and repaired freight house | 212 18 

St. Louis, Mo. — Built ventilators on engine house at 22d 

street 204 40 

O'Fallon, Mo.— Rebuilt depot platform 307 35 

Truesdale, Mo. — Rebuilt depot platform 313 10 

Montgomery, Mo. — Built new passenger depot and plat- 
form 2,3B2 95 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed iron ties on cinder pit 258 85 

Moberly, Mo. — Put granitoid floor in engine room 222 30 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed foundations for machinery in 

shop 426 25 

Excelsior Springs, Mo. — Rebuilt depot platform 445 80 

Excello, Mo. — Moved depot and rebuilt platform 303 65 

Sublette, Mo.— Rebuilt depot platform 229 50 

Total $66,023 04 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 
Adrian, Mich. — Water tank rebuilt, and put in two new 

12-inch stand pipes (completed) $ 569 30 

Ashley, Ind. — New water plant installed, including new 

well, new pump house, pumping machinery and 

pipes 1,327 09 

La Fayette, Ind. — Put in new well, pumping machinery, 

pump house and water mains 1,415 48 

La Fayette, Ind. — Put in two new 10-inch stand pipes 1,566 53 

La Fayette, Ind. — Building new 20-pocket coal chutes 2,603 59 

Tilton, 111.— Building new 30-pocket coal chutes 8,914 07 

Decatur, 111. — Erected new water tank and two new 

10-inch stand pipes 3,860 74 

Litchfield, 111. — Erected new 12-inch stand pipe 1,324 24 

Kinderhook, 111. — Rebuilt pump house 207 15 

Springfield, 111. — Rebuilding water tank and new 8-inch 

stand pipe 389 71 

Brooklyn, 111. — Erected new 3-inch stand pipe 243 68 

Moberly, Mo. — Put in new deep well pump 989 55 

Brunswick, Mo. — Renewed coal chutes 1,129 30 

Hamilton, la. — Built shed over coal chutes 241 50 

Chicago, 111.— Built coal chutes at 41st street 2,753 96 

Total 127,535 89 

ADDITIONS. 

Double Track. 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to various Industries Built: 

Buffalo division 4.9 miles, | 16,883 84 

Detroit division 3.4 '* 19,079 12 

Eastern division 4.3 " 18,230 88 

Middle division 11.0 " 72,104 63 

Western division 5.3 " 20,242 86 

Chicago terminal 1.4 " 9,482 82 

Double track Bement to Sangamon 15 2 " 213,877 09 

Total 45.5 miles, $369,901 24 



-23- 



Interlocking plants erected, Wabash proportion : 

Buffalo, N. Y.— Crossing, L. V. E. E. (completed) $ 593 85 

Britton, Mich.— Crossing, C. N. E. E 4,980 67 

Milan, Mich.— Crossing, A. A. E. E 3,602 66 

Gibson, 111.— Crossing, I. C. E. E. and L. E. & W. E. E ... 3,111 50 

Essex, 111.— Crossing, C. C. C. & St. L. E. E 1,737 87 

Chillicothe, Mo.— Crossing, H. & St. J. E. E. (completed) 1,073 75 

Albia, la— Crossing, C. B. & Q. E. E 3,201 33 

Clark, Mo.— Crossing, C. & A. E. E 1,958 42 

Moulton, la.— Crossing, C. B. & K. C. E. E 6,700 30 

Total $26,960 35 

Additions to Property, Shops, Eound Houses, Stations, Etc. : 

Delray, Mich.— New Turn Table, put in (completed) | 4,617 56 

Peru, Ind. — Putin water main and plugs for fire protection 

at timber yard 608 90 

Peru, Ind. — Built new brick boiler room, stack and office 

(completed) 438 64 

Decatur, 111. — Built new brick passenger station 54,478 51 

Quincy, 111. — Building new passenger station 2,000 00 

Brooklyn, 111. — Built new round-house and shops 16,108 19 

Chicago, 111. — Built extension to freight house 2,502 06 

Decatur, 111.— Built annex to Y. M. C. A. building 1,735 29 

East St. Louis, 111. — Paved alleys at in-bound freight house 

with brick 4,231 91 

East St. Louis, 111. — Put five new scales in freight house .. 646 28 
East St. Louis, 111. — Paved alleys at out-bound freight 

house with brick 5,678 30 

East St. Louis, 111. — Put three new scales in out-bound 

house 344 69 

Brooklyn, 111. — Put in new 70 foot iron turn table 4,246 99 

Brooklyn, 111. — Built new masonry cinder pit 1,072 73 

East St. Louis, 111.— Paved Winter Street with brick 2,843 88 

Springfield, 111. — Built new boiler house and stack 1,988 79 

East St. Louis, 111. — Erected new freight transfer platform 1,051 45 
Kinloch Park, Mo. — Built new platform and fence at race 

track 621 55 

Columbia, Mo. — Putin new water supply pipes 376 60 

Kansas City, Mo. — Put in steam pipes for heating coaches 381 75 

Moulton, la. — Built new coal chutes 3,495 65 

South Ottumwa, la. — Built new engine house = 1,309 55 

South Ottumwa, la. — Put in 60 foot iron turn table (old)... 834 35 

South Ottumwa, la. — Built new tank and pump house 1,734 95 

Eunnells, la.— Built new water tank 1,015 05 

East St. Louis, 111.— Eelay passenger station 3,125 00 

Total r. 1117,489 62 

SUMMARY. 

Extraordinary Eenewals, Improvements and Additions. 
Renewals. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Eebuilt $ 42,662 29 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 7,719 12 

Total $ 50,381 41 



-24— 



Improvements. 

Iron Bridges (New) to Replace "Wooden Bridges $ 56,594 90 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc.. 31,213 47 

Iron Bridges Repaired and Strengthened 9,634 54 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades 98,786 91 

Protection against Missouri River 5,271 21 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc 66,023 04 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations Rebuilt and Enlarged 27,535 89 

Total $295,059 96 

Additions. 

Double Track $213,877 09 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks, Built to Various Indus- 
tries 156,024 15 

Interlocking Plants Erected, Wabash proportion 26,960 35 

Additions to Shops, Round-Houses, Stations, etc 117,489 62 

Total $514,351 21 

(Renewals $ 50,381 41 

Totals, \ Improvements 295,059 96 

(Additions 514,351 21 

Grand total $859,792 58 

In addition to the above, the following amounts were 
expended on the Buffalo Division for extraordinary renew- 
als and improvements, the Wabash paying its proportion 
of this sum on a wheelage basis. 

Depots, Buildings, etc $ 45,151 64 

Additions to Shops, Round Houses, etc 7,225 80 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, new and rebuilt 2,316 49 

Iron Bridges repaired, renewed and strengthened 41,902 91 

Interlockers erected 9,411 96 

Block Signal System 1,700 08 

Total $107,708 88 



—25- 



ANNUAL STATEMENT OF SUPERINTENDENT 
TRANSPORTATION. 

FREIGHT. 1901. 1900. 1899. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 

for year 1,688,066 1,645,789 1,637,617 

Total Empty Cars moved 

for year 795,829 834,587 819,693 

Total Loaded and Empty 

Cars moved for year 2,483,895 2,480,376 2,457,310 

Average Loaded Cars 

moved per day 4,625 4,509 4,484 

Average Empty Cars 

moved per day 2,180 2,287 2,246 

Average Loaded and 

Empty Cars moved per 

day 6,805 6,796 6,730 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 6,981,266 7,075,158 7,245,206 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 19,127 19,384 19,850 

Total number Freight 

Trains for year 80,682 85,499 87,100 

Average number Freight 

Trains per day 221 234 239 

Average number Miles run 

per train, per day 86.5 82.8 83.1 

Average number Loaded 

Cars moved per train 

mile 18.5 18.1 16.9 

Average number Empty 

Cars moved per train 

mile 7.8 8.0 7.4 

Average number Loaded 

and Empty Cars moved 

per train mile 26.3 26.1 24.3 

Average number Cars 

handled per train mile, 

reduced to loaded car 

basis A 23.2 22.9 21.4 

Mileage made by all 

Loaded Cars for year 129,392,990 128,106,845 122,435,819 

Mileage made by all 

Empty Cars for year 54,579,744 . 56,920,676 53,781,587 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 183,972,734 185,027,521 176,217,406 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 65,975,987 75,815,200 73,024,596 



—26— 



FREIGHT— Cont. 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 
for year 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 

Mileage made by Wabash 
Cars on other roads for 
year 

Number Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day, including Switch 
Cars 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. R 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Foreign 
Roads, including Switch 
Cars 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on For- 
eign Roads, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day, including 
Switch Cars 

Average number of Foreign 
Cars on Wabash R. R. 
per day, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 
including Switch Cars... 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per car per day, 
exclusive of Switch Cars, 



1901, 1900. 1899. 

25,209,948 29,169,225 27,833,095 

91,185,935 104,984,425 100,857,691 

63,417,003 52,291,645 49,411,223 

29,369,796 27,751,451 25,948,492 

92,786,799 80,043,096 75,359,715 

49,973,760 39,867,175 34,266,040 



15,463 



7,279 



6,659 



31.1 



18.8 



20.5 



5,629 



4,839 



44.3 



51.6 



12,560 12,995 



5,964 



5,091 



33.2 



18.3 



21.4 



5,836 



5,073 



56.1 



64.5 



5,527 



27.6 



17.5 



5,656 



56.9 



1901. 


1900. 


1899. 


7,237,313 


6,644,720 


6,302,399 


77,432 


70,535 


68,245 


212 


193 


187 


93.5 


94.2 


92.3 


19,822 


18,180 


17,260 



—27- 

PASSENGER. 

Total Passenger Train 

Mileage for year 

Total number Passenger 

Trains run for year 

Average number Passenger 

Trains run per day 

Average number Miles per 

Train per day 

Average number Miles by 

all Trains per day , 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 7,613,395 7,346,132 7,064,903 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Coaches and Chair Cars 

for year 15,346,137 14,645,386 13,350,422 

Total Mileage Sleeping 

Cars for year 8,682,415 7,873,619 7,060,827 

Total Mileage Wabash 

Dining Cars for year 874,595 802,652 765,883 

Total Mileage of all Cars 

for year 34,138,164 32,086,126 29,627,962 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled for 

year 362,382 340,684 321,565 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled per 

day 993 933 881 

Average number of Cars 

per train 4.68 4.83 4.71 



i 



—28— 

The value of the 3,500 new freight cars received in 
August, September and October, 1900, in reducing the use 
of foreign cars on our own lines and of increasing mileage 
paid by other lines are clearly shown in the above statistics. 

With a decrease of 1,054,787 in total freight car mileage 
on Wabash, there was an increase of 12,743,703 miles in the 
mileage of Wabash cars, and a decrease of 13,798,490 miles 
in the mileage of foreign cars, and an increase of 10,106,585 
miles in the mileage of Wabash cars on other roads, the net 
result being a. decrease in the amount paid by this Company 
on freight car mileage balances of $154,699.14. 

MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department show an increase of 

$303,690.39, of which $65,673.78 is due to the Buffalo 

Division, leaving $238,016.61 increase on the Wabash proper. 

The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Engineers and Firemen % 47,252 16 

Fael for Locomotives 222,607 91 

Repairs, E. & M. S., W., W. & C, Stations 25,119 10 

Tools and Machinery, and new Tools 26,246 84 

Wipers, Hostlers and Dispatchers 3,921 62 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines was 
$951,470.44, equal to $2,187.00 per engine for 435 engines, 
the average number on hand during the year. 

There was built in our own shop during the fiscal year 
three engines. 

The following statement will show the large amount of 
repair work done on engines, and the general character of 
the repairs. Fifty-four per cent of the engines on hand 
July 1st, 1900, went through the shop for general repairs, 
and 72 per cent for heavy repairs. 



—29— 

Motive Poweb and Machinery, 
locomotive equipment. 



1900-1901. 1899-1900. Increase. Decrease. 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 



Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, new 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

New Fire-boxes 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new , 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



437 
3 
6 

434 



234 

310 

514 

748 



67 

9 

55 

23 

29 

379 

46 

398 



47 

340 

40 

7 

39 

109 

3,948 



405 
41 

9 
437 



198 

290 

378 

511 

1 

71 

2 

51 

25 

32 

298 

42 

322 

2 

69 

378 

40 

6 

52 

127 

3,316 



32 



36 

20 

136 
237 



81 

4 

76 



632 



38 
3 
3 



2 

22 

38 



13 

18 



-30— 



DISTRIBUTION OF ENGINE MILEAGE. 



1900-1901. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Freight Train Mile- 
age 

Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 

Passenger Train 
Mileage 

Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 

Switching 

Miscellaneous, 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 

Total 



6,981,266 

693,738 
7,237,313 

182,301 

2,885,276 

539,400 



18,519,294 



7,075,158 

750,426 

6,644,720 

135,332 
2,855,400 

274,178 



17,735,214 



592,593 

46,969 
29,876 



265,222 



784,080 



93,892 



56,688 



Expense of Operating Locomotives. 



1900-1901. 



1899-1900. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Repairs {^^rriai::::;: 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood).. 
Engineers and Firemen 
Wiping and Dispatching 

Total 



I 485,687 65 

465,782 79 

49,169 69 

1,101,859 76 

1,066,164 24 

136,695 07 



$3,305,359 20 



P 462,374 64 

534,394 94 

47,462 29 

867,749 88 

1,018,912 08 
132,773 45 



$3,063,667 281241,69192 



I 23,313 01 



1,707 40 

234,109 88 

47,252 16 

3,921 62 



$68,612 15 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 





1900-1901. 


1899-1900. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


For Repairs 


$ 5 10 
27 
5 90 
5 71 
73 

$17 71 


$ 5 60 

27 

4 88 

5 73 
75 




$ 50 


Stores 






Fuel 


$ 1 02 




Engineers and Firemen... 
Wiping and Dispatching.. 


02 




02 




Total 


$17 23 


$ 48 









-31— 



1900-1901. 1899-1900. 

Total engine mileage 18,664,615 17,790,103 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 50,309 48,212 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 4,192 4,018 

Total tons of coal consumed 954,724 898,928 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

of handling included) $1 21 $1 02 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 19.5 19.8 

Note : Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense which 
has been added to Auditor's figures, and is as follows : 

1900-1901. 1899-1900. 

Stores $ 989 06 $ 565 65 

Fuel 17,563 29 6,061 32 

Total $18,552 35 |6,626 97 

Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash proportion of all 
joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 

In March, 1901, a contract was entered into with the 
Kichmond Locomotive Works for 50 large engines — 12 
passenger engines (6 Atlantic type and 6 ten-wheel), 34 
freight engines (Mogul type), and 4 switching engines, at 
an aggregate cost of about $660,000.00. The delivery was 
to begin in June and be completed by September, but on 
account of delay in getting material, the first engines were 
not received till about the 25th of August. Forty of these 
engines will be paid for out of the $3,000,000.00 Equipment 
Bond and the remainder out of the proceeds of the Mort- 
gage Bonds for the construction and equipment of the 
Toledo-Chicago Line. 



-32- 







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-33— 

CAR DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department for the year were, as last 
year, away above the normal, on account of the expense of 
application of air brakes, steam heat, and new freight and 
passenger equipment. 

Gould vestibules were applied to 5 coaches and 1 chair 
car, also to one end of 1 combination car. Stationary or 
Martin vestibules were applied to 8 baggage, 1 express, 1 
postal, 2 baggage and mail, and one end of 1 combination 
car, making a total of 179 cars vestibuled in our passenger 
equipment. In the application of these vestibules we spent 
$6,029.02. 

We equipped with the Gould system of steam heat, 58 
passenger cars, all classes, making a total of 346 cars now 
so equipped. During the year we expended $8,637.57 for 
steam heating. 

We equipped 3 cars with Pintsch gas at a cost of $813.08, 
making a total of 130 cars now so equipped. 

We equipped one official car, No. 181, with electric light 
during the past year at a cost of $1,720.50. 

Air brakes are applied to 433 freight cars at a cost of 
$19,891.43. All of our freight cars are equipped with auto- 
matic couplers, and 66 per cent, are supplied with air brakes. 

Contracts were entered into in April, 1901, for 1,000 thirty- 
ton box cars, 36 feet long in clear, 500 forty-ton coal cars, 
and 50 Rogers convertible ballast cars of forty tons capacity 
to be delivered in September. They are all to be built to 
modern standards, metal bolsters, air brakes, automatic 



—34— 

couplers, draft rigging and large dimensions. These box 
and coal cars will come under the $3,000,000.00 Toledo- 
Chicago Mortgage. 

When the 1,500 freight cars above referred to are delivered 
we will have a total revenue freight equipment of 17,165 
cars with a tonnage capacity of 498,000 tons, an increase of 
263,000 tons over the capacity on July 1st, 1889. 

In January, 1901, contracts were entered into with the 
American Car and Foundry Company and The Pullman 
Company for 2 dining cars, 3 library-dining cars, 40 chair 
cars and coaches and 8 combination coach and baggage 
cars. These cars range from 63 feet, 7 inches to 70 feet 
in length, all wide vestibuled, modern in all equipment 
and finish, and the dining cars and 5 chair cars and coaches 
are lighted with electric lamps of the Gould system. All 
of the cars are now in service, but at the close of the fiscal 
year only 2 dining cars and 10 coaches had been received. 



—35— 



Car Equipment. 





on 

hand 

July 1, 

1900. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1901. 


On 

hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENGER. 

Official 


3 
2 

6 

125 

40 

43 

8 

3 

62 

15 

2 

2 

28 

5 

1 






3 

2 

8 

133 

40 

44 

6 

3 

62 

14 

2 

3 

29 
5 
1 


4 


Pav 






2 


Diniiiff 


2 

10 
1 
2 




5 


Coacli s 


2 
1 
1 
2 

2 

1 


108 


Combination 


22 


Chair 


35 


Parlor 




Cafe 


2 




Baggage 

Baesaee and Mail 


64 
15 


Passenger and Mail 






Baggage, Mail and Passenger.. 
Postal 


1 
1 




6 




19 


Pacific Express 


5 


Air-Brake Instruction 








Total Passenger... 


345 


19 


9 


355 


285 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


6,673 

701 

4,733 

295 

150 

100 

194 

71 

9 

6 

8 

3 

226 


3,019 


356 
133 
117 


9,336 

568 

5,118 

295 

148 

100 

192 

73 

9 

6 

8 

5 

229 


8,075 

1,471 

3,439 

33 


Stock 


Coal, Flat and Rack 


502 


Furniture 


Fruit.... 




2 


50 


Refrigerator 




100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 




2 
1 
1 


129 


Tool and Work 


3 

1 


36 


Derricks 


12 


Pile Drivers 


7 


Cable Cars 






1 


Ice Cars 


3 

12 


1 
9 


4 


Cabooses 


212 






Total Freight 


13,169 
345 


3,540 
19 


622 
9 


16,087 
355 


13,569 
285 


Total Passenger 


Total Car Equipment 


13,514 


3,559 


631 


16,442 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons 


348,837 






446,067 


235,074 









—36— 

Cars Rbpairbd. 





Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


2,037 
154 

72 
9 


101,594 

1,671 

606 

507 


103,631 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


1,825 
678 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 


Cars Rebuilt 


516 






Total 


2,272 


104,378 
8,733 


106,650 




New Wheels Applied, Cast , 


3,694 
271 


12,427 


New Wheels Applied, Steel 


271 








Total New Wheels Applied 


3,965 


8,733 


12,698 







s 



—37— 

Car and Engine Teusts. 

June 30th, 1901, the car and engine trust notes outstand- 
ing were as follows : 

St. Charles Car Company, Contract of June 28th, 1898, 27 notes 

(last one due September 24th, 1903), for $4,696.18 each $126,796 86 

Missouri Car and Foundry Company, Contract of June 28th, 
1898, 29 notes outstanding, (last one due on November 5th, 
1903), for $4,696.18 each 136,189 22 

Engines, St. Louis Trust Company, 40 notes outstanding 

(last one due November 1st, 1904), for $5,071.88 each 202,875 20 

Total amount trust notes outstanding $465,861 28 

A reduction during the year in car and locomotive trusts 
notes of $173,590 88 

In addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundry Company for 500 box, 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage pa3^ments are $7,194.76. On 
this contract there was paid during the year ending June 
30th, 1901, the sum of $86,337.12. 

All of the new equipment now under contract, including 
the 3,500 box and coal cars bought in 1900, will be taken 
care of by the Equipment Mortgage, the interest and sink- 
ing fund requirements of which amount to $250,000.00 per 
annum. This will make our expense account annually 
some $300,000.00 less than it would be if we had made the 
usual 5 year trust arrangement. 



TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1900-1901. 1899-1900. 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 2,022 2,013 

Total Number Miles Wire assigned to this Company... 5,614 5,515 
Total Number of Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph 

Company 9,618 8,908 

Total Number Miles of Wire used jointly 639 621 

Total Miles of Wire 15,871 15,044 



—SB- 
GENERAL. 

The work of construction of the line from New Haven 
to Butler, Indiana, and of the line from Montpelier to 
Toledo, Ohio, is progressing satisfactorily and it is expected 
they will be completed in November, provided no delay is 
met with in the delivery of the steel rail and bridge iron. 

The operation of the New Haven-Butler line, in place of 
the Eel River Railroad, will have a very beneficial effect 
upon the operating expenses and fixed charges. There 
will be but 25 miles of railway to maintain in place of 100 ; 
the concentration of train service to Fort Wayne (instead of 
splitting it at Peru,) will largely decrease the train mileage, 
and the fixed charges and taxes will be about $40,000.00 
instead of $118,000.00. The losses from local traffic on the 
Eel River Railroad will be fully made up in the increase 
in traffic from the cities of Fort Wayne, Huntington and 
Wabash by putting them on our through-line between St. 
Louis and Buffalo. The line from Montpelier to Toledo is 
expected to add largely to our revenues, by opening up a 
direct line between Chicago and Toledo and to points east 
and south of Toledo, a traffic from which the Wabash has 
been completely shut out heretofore. It will also enable us 
to make further economies in the concentration of through 
train service. With proper traffic relations with connections 
at Toledo, the opening of this line should be of great value 
to the Wabash System. 

The prospect for the current fiscal year is very promising, 
even in the face of the partial failure of the corn crop and 
the strikes of the metal workers which are just now under 
full headway. The corn tonnage for the past fiscal year 



—39— 

was less than 11 per cent of the total Wabash tonnage. A 
loss of one-half of this tonnage would not cause the Wabash 
much loss in revenue and that would be more than made 
up by traffic from new sources above outlined, from our 
ability to secure more traffic from old sources through our 
great increase in freight equipment, and by the travel to 
and from the Pan-American Exposition. 

The increases in gross earnings for the month of July 
and the first three weeks of August, 1901, amount to 
$335,000.00, and we have every reason for anticipating 
gross revenue of $18,000,000.00 for the year ending June 
30th, 1902. 

The operations of the year have been very satisfactory, 
all departments have worked together in the greatest har- 
mony and for the best interest of the Company ; and the heads 
of the various departments with their subordinates, as well 
as the rank and file of the employes of the Wabash Rail- 
road Company, are to be congratulated upon the result of 
their efforts and their loyalty to the Company's interests. 

The death of Mr. M. M. Martin, Superintendent of the 
Car Department, makes the only break in the official list 
during the year. Through his death the Company has lost 
a faithful and capable officer, one who had worked in its 
interests for a great many years and whose place it will be 
hard to fill. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., 

President. 



40- 



MILES OF ROAD OPERATED. 

LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



Description of Lines. 



■o a 

U) (£ O 








CO 5 

o 
Q 



FROM TO 

Toledo E. Hannibal 

E. HannibaL.Hannibal U. D.... 

Bluffs Camp Point 

Camp Point... Quincy 

E. Hannibal.. Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Maysville Pittsfield 

Sidney Champaign 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville..Edwardsville Jet. 

Chicago C. & W. I. June. 

C. & W. I. Jct..Effingham 

Shumway Altamont , 

Forrest Fairbury June 

Fairbury Jet.. Streator , 

Detroit Delray 

Delray Butler 

Montpelier Clarke June 

Clarke Junc.C. & W. I. June .., 

Attica Covington 

Butler Logansport 

Chili Peru, 



Total. 



460.5 
39.4 



0.9 
34.5 



11.7 

110.1 

1.7 



205.4 
9.5 



30.9 



109.8 
149.6 



14.8 



1178.8 



3.0 



6.2 



94.1 
9.5 



0.4 



21.8 
17.3 



7.8 



3.8 
8.0 



0.8 
6.1 



4.6 



17.6 



112.8 



88.2 



460.5 


240.9 


3.4 


2.1 


39.4 


4.0 


21.8 


0.2 


18.2 


2.1 


34.5 


1.8 


7.8 


1.2 


6.2 


1.1 


11.7 


2.1 


113.9 


43.3 


1.7 


1.2 


8.0 


23.3 


205.4 


60.1 


10.3 


0.3 


6.1 




30.9 


3.5 


4.6 


18.7 


109.8 


33.0 


149.6 


54.1 


17.6 




14.8 


2.3 


94.1 


19.3 


9.5 


0.5 


1379.8 


515.1 



701.4 

5.5 

43.4 

22.0 

20.3 

36.3 

9.0 

7.3 

13.8 

157.2 

2.9 

31.3 

265.5 

10.6 

6.1 

34.4 

23.3 

142.8 

203.7 

17.6 

17.1 

113.4 

10.0 



1894.9 



Note. — Above does not include 6.8 miles main track and 0.2 mile 
side track, total 7.0 miles, "Owned" between Edwardsville Junction 
and Edwardsville Crossing, which is leased to the Illinois Terminal 
Railroad Company. 



—41- 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



Description of Lines, 


i 

O 


rs 


oil 






< 


FROM TO 

St. Louis— 
XJnion Station 23 d. st 






0.7 


0.7 

274.8 


95.7 
1.5 
0.4 

29.8 
3.5 
8.5 

14.4 
2.0 
0.6 
8.0 
3.0 
3.5 
1.2 
0.8 

11.0 
0.3 


7 


Tayon av Harlem 


274.8 




370.5 


Franklin av N Market st 






1.5 


Olive st Carr st 






0.6 


0.6 
10.7 

1.5 

69.7 

131.5 

28.3 

0.2 
68.2 
38.2 
41.4 
21.6 
15.4 


1.0 


Carr st Ferguson 

Harlem Kansas Citv 


10.7 




40.5 




1.5 
69.7 


5 


Moberly Hannibal. 






78.2 


Moberlv . . Ottumwa 


131.6 
28.3 




145 9 


Moulton Albia 






30.3 


Albia Albia Connecti'n 

Albia Dps Moines 




0.2 


0.8 


68.2 
15.4 




76.2 


Brunswick Chillicothe 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Centralia Columbia 

Salisbury.. Glasgow 

Excello Ardmore 


38.2 
41.4 
21.6 


E 


41.2 
44.9 
22.8 
16 2 






11.0 


ExcelsiorSps Jc. Milwaukee June. 


9.5 






9.5 


9 8 




72.7 




Total 


538.4 


101.2 


712.3 


184.2 


896.5 



Note: The Excelsior Springs Branch, 9.5 miles, was purchased 
in April, 1901. 



42— 



LINES EAST OF THE DETROIT RIVER. 



Description of Lines. 


i 

a 

1 




-d 3 ® 


i 

Eh '3 


i 


i 


FROM TO 

Detroit Black Kock 






227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


147.2 

20.5 

14.1 

4.5 


374.3 


WellandJct . .Susp. Bridge 






38.3 


Susp Bridge Buffalo 






39.7 


Black Rock International Jet.. 






9.3 










Total 


275.3 


275.3 


186.3 


461.6 











Note. — Above does not include 4.3 miles New York Central tracks 
between Black Rock and Exchange Street Station, Buffalo, for the use 
of which the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



Note.— Above does not include 0.6 mile Lehigh Valley track at 
Wabash freight station, Louisiana Street, Buffalo, for the use of which 
the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



43— 



Recapitulation . 



MILES OP ROAD OPERATED. 



Description of Lines. 


1 

o 


1 


ill 
III 


el 
■^ . 

Eh 


4) 

i 


3 


T.ines East of the Mississippi 
River 


1178.8 
538.4 


112.8 
101.2 


88.2 

72.7 
275.3 


1379.8 

712.3 
275.3 


515.1 

184.2 
186.3 


1894.9 


Lines West of the Mississippi 
River 


896 5 


Lines East of the Detroit River.. 


461.6 










Total 


1717.2 


214.0 


436.2 


2367.4 


885.6 


3253.0 







Note. — Increase in '* Owned" is caused by purchase of the Excel- 
sior Springs Branch, 9.5 miles, and 0.9 mile main track built at 
Quincy, 111. 



The Main Track mileage shown in the foregoing statement 
is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New York 31.0 

In Canada 244.3 

In Michigan 80.4 

In Ohio 114.9 

In Indiana '. 435.5 

In Illinois.. 744.9 

In Missouri 575.7 

In Iowa 140.7 

Total 2367.4 



—44— 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 



1900-1901. 



1899-1900. 



Increase. 



Contributions and other receipts. 
Expenses of Operation 



Surplus for year.. 
Previous Balance. 



Total Surplus 

Balance on hand. 



149,259 44 
42,397 38 



$ 6,862 06 
34,938 74 



$41,800 80 



141,800 80 



146,408 84 
40,095,66 



I 6,313 18 
28,625 56 



134,938 74 



$34,938 74 



$2,850 60 
2,301 72 



$ 548 88 
6,313 18 



$6,862 06 



$6,862 06 



1900-1901. 1892-1900. 

Number treated in Hospitals 1,141 1,400 

Number treated outside of Hospitals 23,697 22,027 

Total number of casestreated 24,838 23,427 

Number of Surgical casestreated 2,475 2,549 

Number of Medical cases treated 22,363 20,878 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes in Hos- 
pitals 4,169 5,186 

Number of prescriptions filled for employes not in 

Hospitals 42,007 36,913 

Total number of deaths 13 15 

The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jr., Chairman ^ 
W. H. Blodgett, 
E. B. Pryor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 15th, 1901. 

J. Ramsey, Jr., 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1901, as follows : 

A. Results of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 
H. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

J. Mileage Statistics for Twenty Years. 

K. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

L. Statement Showing Lines Covered by the First, 

Second and Debenture Mortgages of the Wabash 

Railroad Company. 
M. Statement Showing Results of Operation of the 

Montpelier & Chicago R. R. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



—46- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses.. 

Net Earnings 



$17,554,465 15 
12,752,045 11 



$16,440,990 29 
11,947,417 43 



Taxes. 



$4,802,420 04 
586,199 20 



Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc. 



$4,216,220 84 
262,180 94 



Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 



$4,478,401 78 
757,938 50 



Net Earnings from Operation 

Additions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 



$3,720,463 28 
656,756 06 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest 
Interest on Bonds * 



$3,063,707 22 
2,760,571 24 



Surplus 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds. 



$303,135 98 
210,000 00 



Net Surplus 



$93,135 98 



$4,493,572 86 
567,327 22 



$3,926,245 64 
269,613 85 



$4,195,859 49 
767,746 67 



$3,428,112 82 
292.207 70 



$3,135,905 12 
2,715,806 11 



$420,099 01 
210,000 00 



$210,099 01 



*Includes Rent of Eel River R. R. 

Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses 
AS Above. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 




$796,096 27 
81,655 53 


$797,678 17 
69,908 47 


Credit " " " 




Traffic Association and Miscellaneous Expenses 


$714,440 74 
43,497 76 


$727,769 70 
39,976 97 




$757,938 50 


$767,746 67 



2. Analysis of Additions to Property and Other Charges, 
AS Above. 



Additions to Property as per Table "F" 

Lake Erie Transportation Co. — Sinking Fund Char- 
ges and Maintenance of Steamers 

Detroit & Chicago Extension — Sinking Fund.. 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, four 
months Sinking Fund accrued 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



$544,126 29 

59,544 84 
19,751 60 

33,333 33 



$656,756 06 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



$223,664 22 



47,981 31 
20,562 17 



$292,207 70 



47- 



B 



THE WABASH RAILKOAD COMPANY. 

Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November.. 
December.. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passengers 

MaUs 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 
" " Passenger " " 

" Mail " " . 

" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings (T^xes not deducted). 
Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings... 



Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



1,350 
1,527 
1,615 
1,643 
1,431 
1,536 
1,518 
1,270 
1,467 
1,354 
1,411 
1,427 



,104 31 
,318 57 
,570 52 
,001 55 
,584 84 
,237 29 
,685 96 
,495 80 
,308 49 
,534 86 
,684 72 
,938 24 



$17,554,465 15 



$11,158,966 24 

4,982,694 25 

659,175 32 

389,774 43 

363,854 91 



$17,554,465 15 



63.57 

28.38 

3.76 

2.22 

2.07 



$12,752,045 11 



$ 586,199 20 



72.64 



$4,802,420 04 



27.36 



2,360.3 
$7,437 39 
5,402 72 
2,034 67 



,273,185 70 
,462,956 61 
,497,840 83 
,574,196 75 
,410,460 65 
,430,458 28 
,314,582 20 
,209,155 53 
,354,260 00 
,310,884 93 
,292,869 32 
,310,139 49 



$16,440,990 29 



$10,616,340 19 

4,474,652 16 

653,025 08 

342,529 77 

354,443 09 



$16,440,990 29 



64.57 
27.22 
3.97 
2.08 
2.16 



$11,947,417 43 



$ 567,327 22 



72.67 



$4,493,572 86 



27.33 



2,339.5 

$7,027 57 
5,106 83 
1.920 74 



48- 




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-49- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1901. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 

ASSETS. 





1901. 


1900. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 
Supplies and Materials on 


$136,980,500 00 

816,930 67 
935,860 44 

1,282,331 20 
607,120 29 

185,191 88 

165,378 25 

70.705 57 

441,592 64 
14,466 39 

46,060 90 
■ 511,350 27 


$134,944,500 00 

891,218 94 
962,736 66 

875,914 75 
64,664 07 

214,273 72 
163,473 29 
26,840 45 

464,995 22 
14,466 39 

45,211 20 
667,685 19 


$2,036,000 00 




74,288 27 


CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 

Bonds (2) 

Construction Account (3) 

Sundry-Accounts Collectible- 


406,416 45 
542,456 22 

1,904 96 

43,865 12 


26,876 22 


29,081 84 


From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 
Pacific Express Co . .. 






Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 


23,402 58 


Bills Receivable 






Advances Fast Freight Lines 
Account Working Fund 


849 70 




156,334 92 










$142,057,488 50 


$139,335,979 88 


$2,721,508 62 









LIABILITIES. 



1901. 



1900. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Common Stock 

Preferred Stock 

Bonds (5). 

Interest Due 

Interest Accrued, not Due 

Dividends Debenture Bonds, 
Series "A" due 

Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls (6) 
Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 

Taxes Accrued, not due 

Hospital Account 

Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable (7) 

Equipment Notes of Long 
Date (8) 

Balance to credit. Profit and 
Loss... 



$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

85,081,000 00 

193,636 00 

622,883 74 

105,000 00 

2,312,670 25 

348,972 31 
340,605 61 



180,009 50 
465,861 28 
403,000 86 



$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

83,045,000 00 

182,177 00 

587,176 24 

105,000 00 

1,747,015 23 

241,334 58 

397,493 68 

3,489 75 

10,019 00 

639,432 16 

377,842 24 



$142,057,488 50 $139,335,979 88 2,721,508 62 



2,036,000 00 
11,459 00 
35,707 50 



565,655 02 
107,637 73 



359 20 
169,990 50 



56,888 07 



173,570 88 



25,158 62 



(1) Increase is amount of Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, issued 
to June 30th, 1901, $2,055,000.00 less $19,000.00 Detroit and Chicago Extension Bonds 
retired by Sinking Fund. 

(2) Increase is due principally to amount invested in Wabash Elevator at 
Chicago, $275,000.00; Capital Stock Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, $15,000.00; 
Capital Stock St. Louis World's Fair, payment on account, $6,500,00; Capital Stock 
Toledo & Chicago R. R., $25,000.00; and Capital Stock Ft. Wayne and Detroit R. 
R., $27,000.00. 

(3) Increase is due mainly to amount advanced on account construction To- 
ledo and Chicago R. R. and Ft. Wayne and Detroit R. R. , viz: $470,203.33, and 
■which amount was replaced in July, 1901, in the Treasury of the company from 
proceeds sale of Toledo and Chicago Division Bonds. 

(4) Miscellaneous includes $465,861.28 carried in suspense, on account New 
Equipment. 

(5) Increase is amount of Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, issued 
to June 30th, 1901, $2,055,000.00, less $19,000,00 Detroit and Chicago Extension 
Bonds retired by Sinking Fund . 

(6) Increase is due mainly to amount advanced on account construction To- 
ledo and Chicago R. R. , and Ft. Wayne and Detroit R. R. (see note 3) and which 
amount was replaced in the Treasury of the company in July 1901 , from pro- 
ceeds sale of Toledo and Chicago Division Bonds. 

(7) Increase is due to notes issued on account purchase of the Wabash Ele- 
vator at Chicago. 

(8) The Equipment notes extend over a period of 40 months, the payments 
averaging $14,464.24 for the next 27 months, $9,768.06 for the next 2 months, and 
$5,071.28 for the novt, 11 mnTiths 



-50- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Yeae Ending June 30, 1901. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— PASSENGER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of 

Agents— Station 

Baggage Masters 

Brakemen and Porters 

Cars — Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for. 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Dining Car Expenses and Restaurants 

Incidentals 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Baggage 

Mail Expenses 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at _ 

do Light at . 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Union Depots — Expenses of 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total , 



48,811 29 

122,851 09 

94,267 69 

39,222 71 

86,204 62 

108,686 76 

5,013 55 

162,578 77 

42,960 50 

14,451 11 

77,297 88 



185,198 51 

5,710 97 
14,564 03 
23,689 96 
25,806 99 
54,135 08 

6,593 28 

3,696 31 
43,822 40 
10,166 30 

4,434 55 
34,060 81 

8,871 25 
41,616 84 
54,641 62 
76,603 32 

9,281 80 

143,314 51 

86,727 34 

8,485 06 



$1,643,766 90 



89 
83 
37 
77 

103 
9 

146 
38 
14 
78 

128 

161 
10 
10 
14 
23 
44 



4, 
31 : 

7, 
46, 
52, 
73, 

2, 

141 ; 

79. 



,163 21 
,671 33 
,758 72 
,182 48 
436 26 
,967 44 
686 35 
,583 49 
077 72 
825 08 
843 47 
926 05 
104 31 
305 12 
036 57 
673 12 
365 27 
683 88 
869 12 
719 73 
659 65 
350 14 
035 82 
522 00 
535 25 
155 94 
196 24 
298 73 
831 36 
557 21 
292 18 
478 23 



$1,634,781 47 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of. 

Agents— Station 

Brakemen 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock , 

Incidentals 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Goods 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations — Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls , 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total 



$ 272,399 06 


$ 277,738 53 


138,399 70 


135,495 37 


330,815 32 


318,989 79 


75,739 28 


78,235 91 


899 50 


650 76 


325,299 68 


479,998 82 


638 66 


570 36 


18,455 94 


21,580 15 


408,634 13 


393,795 66 


8,162 89 


8,331 67 


231,625 32 


224,208 57 


11,062 07 


26,399 60 


11,513 06 


10,800 29 


12,628 89 


8,508 95 


36,697 30 


63,535 64 


65,888 93 


58,556 38 


45,500 93 


45,196 53 


17,961 18 


17,276 15 


9,538 96 


8,580 02 


368,807 64 


349,646 03 


16,376 93 


15,030 41 


82,847 41 


65,183 27 


109,117 80 


103,203 49 


155,490 84 


148,706 79 


39,289 07 


27,549 25 


273,038 05 


270,865 11 


55,404 03 


50,838 23 


$3,122,232 57 


$3,209,471 73 



—51— 

E — Continued. 
THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MOTIVE POWER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Engineers and Firemen— Passenger 

do do Freight 

Engine Houses, M. S., etc., Fuel, Lights, etc., for... 

do do M. S. & T. T.— Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Locomotives, Passenger — Coal for '. 

do Freight— Coal for 

do Passenger— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

do Freight— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc. , for 

do Passenger— Repairs of 

do Freight— Repairs of 

do Passenger— Wood for 

do Frei^ht^-Wood for 

do Furniture and Fixtures of 

do Hire of 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations, Fuel— Expenses of 

do do Repairs of 

do Water— Expense Pumping 

do do Repairs of , 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expenses and Repairs of . 

Watchmen 

Wipers, Hostlers and Despatchers 

Total 



395,225 78 

670,938 46 

18,367 23 

64,719 41 

61,820 13 

313,100 19 

761,692 65 

19,333 20 

28,847 43 

317,259 68 

614,813 91 

3,700 98 

5,802 65 

19,396 85 

46,783 60 

3,661 92 

51,083 94 

25,735 19 

75,185 11 

39,884 63 

86,732 78 

128,419 27 

20,115 61 

136,695 07 



658 
15 
60 
63 

233 

619 
17 
29 

285 

693 

2 

5 

18 

38 

3 

46 

10 

71, 

34 

84, 

102: 
18. 

132. 



,578 90 
,333 18 
,346 77 
,829 49 
,466 14 
,919 16 
,147 15 
,164 16 
,863 78 
,098 91 
,299 42 
,804 90 
,817 35 
,371 25 
,452 50 
,207 41 
,436 34 
,270 58 
317 70 
,120 06 
353 59 
172 43 
480 66 
773 45 



$3,909,315 67 $3,605,625 28 



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Ballast 

Bridges— Repairs of 

Cross-Ties 

Fences and Road Crossings — Repairs of 

Frogs and Switch Fixtures 

Incidentals 

New Side Tracks— Grading 

Oil, Tallow, Waste and Fuel 

Printing and -Stationery 

River Protection 

Section, Tool, Watch Houses, etc 

Snow and Ice Removing 

Spikes— Track 

Splices, Bolts and Fastenings 

Steel Rails 

Superintendence and Supervisors 

Telegraph— Repairs of 

Tools and Machinery — Repairs and Renewals of. 

Track—Repairs of 

Watchmen of Roadway and Bridges 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 



163,161 38 
236,316 14 
571,452 69 
100,040 22 
96,627 64 
6,369 10 



11,097 76 

1,821 79 

5,696 76 

3,537 25 

12,634 90 

21,377 39 

28,577 44 

81,662 68 

104,373 42 

29,688 88 

20,784 98 

725,798 41 

107,466 11 

6,886 31 



42,256 66 
157,835 29 
281,492 67 
89,384 94 
93,861 12 
7,128 89 



6,007 96 

2,075 69 
49,860 71 

4,020 64 
19,306 96 
22,701 83 
49,288 90 
126,246 44 
95,605 89 
26,448 12 
16,382 64 
704,884 58 
99,461 68 

1,879 75 



Total $2,335,371 25 



$1,896,131 36 



—52— 



E — Continued. 
THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Opekating Expenses — Continued. 

MAINTENANCE OF CARS. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



Cars, Pass., Express, Mail and Bag.— Repairs of 

do Freight— Repairs of 

do Road Service— Repairs of 

do Furniture and Fixtures 

Car Shops and Buildings, Fuel, Light, etc., for... 

do Shops and Sheds — Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Printing and Stationery 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expense and Repairs of.. 
Watchmen 

Total 



238,514 02 

,063,667 95 

25,752 14 

27,473 50 

948 65 

8,664 14 

112 85 

2,555 42 

49,669 00 

36,010 17 

3,783 19 



$322,092 62 

858,361 08 

21,011 79 

25,879 18 

1,856 48 

8,980 45 

405 38 

2,4.34 41 

46,918 77 

42,567 46 

4,255 64 



$1,457,151 03 



$1,334,758 26 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 



General Offices— Attendants at 

do Clerks in 

do Fuel, Lights, etc., for 

do Rent of 

do Repairs of 

do Printing and Stationery ... 

do Petty Expenses of 

General Officers— Salaries and Expenses of 

Insurance 

Incidentals 

Interest and Exchange 

Legal Department — Expenses of 

Expenses of New York Office 

do London Agency 

War Revenue Stamps 

Total 



$ 2,819 70 

35,286 46 

362 81 

19,632 64 

1,279 59 
19,186 03 

2,755 45 
44,978 65 
28,662 34 

7,834 77 

121 89 

83,632 20 

16,691 22 

1,948 00 
19,015 94 



$ 2,821 04 

33,718 21 

774 75 

19,027 64 

1,347 09 

19,366 24 

1,972 95 

42,767 72 

28,381 85 

6,869 11 

537 58 

76,675 93 

13,138 49 

954 00 

18,293 73 



$284,207 69 



$266,649 33 



RECAPITULATION. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 


Conducting Transportation 


$4,765,999 47 
3,909,315 67 
2,335,371 25 
1,457,151 03 
284,207 69 


$4,844,253 20 


Motive Power 


3,605,625 28 


Maintenance of Way 


1,896,131 36 


Maintenance of Cars 


1,334,758 26 


General Expenses 


266,649 33 






Total Operating Expenses 


$12,752,045 11 


$11,947,417 43 



53- 



F 

THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Additions to Property. 
(Referred to in Table A— Note 2.) 

New Passenger Station, Decatur $ 54,478 51 

Freight House, East St. Louis 42,411 08 

New Side Tracks 102,676 51 

Relay Passenger Station, East St. Louis 3,125 00 

Annex to Y. M. C. A. Building, Decatur 1,735 29 

Real Estate— Peru 1,754 60 

Real Estate— Bement 1,935 92 

Real Estate— Litchfield 850 00 

Real Estate— Ferguson 3,609 10 

Y. M.C. A. Building— Moberly 9,102 38 

Gravel Pit near Simcoe, Ont 10,668 12 

Boody Hill Grade „. 97,902 79 

Double Track— Bement to Sangamon 213,877 09 

$544,126 29 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Tkain and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 



PASSENGER. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1900. 


Per Cent. 




Increase. Decrease. 




8,354,949 

1,672,409 

10,027,358 

1,978,952,453 

178,263,782 

2,157,216,235 

215.1 Miles. 


8,080,220 

1,422,851 

9,503,071 

1,902,881,278 

156,105,144 

2,058,986,422 

216.7 Miles. 


3.40 
17.54 

5.52 

4.00 
14.19 

4.77 




Tons nfl.Trifirl Comna.nv F'rele'litj 








Tons carried one Mile, Revenue Freight- 




Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 
Total Tons carried one Mile 






Average Distance each Ton carried 


0.74 






'RnT'Tiin cpts frrnn Tfreis'Tit t.ra.ffic 


$11,158,966 24 
8,634,791 53 


$10,616,340 19 
8,087,818 15 


5.11 
6.76 














$1 33.56 

1 03.35 

Cts. 0.5639 

" 0.4363 

" 0.1276 


$1 31.39 

1 00.09 

Cts. 0.5579 

" 0.4250 

" 0.1329 


1.65 
3.26 
1.08 
2.66 




AvAraffft Exnenses T)er Ton 




Average Rate per Ton per Mile 

Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 




4.15 








Total Freight Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 


6,981,265 
$1 59.84 
1 23.69 
36.15 


7,075.158 
$1 50.05 
1 14.31 
35.74 




1.34 


6.52 
8.20 
1.15 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile ..... 










129,392,990 

54,579,744 

183,972,734 


128,106,845 
56,920,676 
185,027,521 


1.00 




Car Mileage, Empty 


4.29 


Car Mileage, Total — Loaded and Empty. 




0.57 








18.53 

7.82 

26.35 

16.67 

11.73 

309.00 

283.47 


18.11 

8.04 

26.15 

16.07 

11.13 

291.02 

268.95 


2.32 




Average Empty Cars per Train 


2 81 


Average Total Cars per Train 


0.76 
3.73 

5.39 

6.18 

5.40 




Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 




Average Load per Car, Loaded and 
Empty — Tons 




Average Load per Train— Tons — includ- 
ing Company Freight 




Average Load per Train — Tons— Revenue 
Freight only 








Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 8.62 
" 6.67 


Cts. 8.29 
" 6.31 


3.98 
5.71 




Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 









i 





4,943,016 
264,268,214 
53.5 Miles. 


4,277,735 
233,848,065 
54.7 Miles. 


15.55 
13.01 




Number of Passengers carried one Mile. 
Average distance each Passenger carried 


2.24 








$4,982,694 25 
6,161,877 40 
4,117,253 58 


$4,474,652 16 
5,583,851 21 
3,859,599 28 


11.35 
10.35 
6.68 




Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc... 














$1 00.80 
83.29 
Cts. 1.885 
" 1.558 
" 0.327 


$1 04.60 

90.23 

Cts. 1.913 

" 1.650 

" 0.263 




3 77 


Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 

Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 

Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 

Average Net per Passenger per Mile 




8.33 




1 49 




5.91 


24.33 








Total Passenger Train Mileage 


7,237,313 
$0 85.14 
56.89 
28.25 


6,644,720 
$0 84.03 
58.09 
25.94 


8.92 
1.32 




Average Earnings per Train Mile 






2.11 


Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 


8.91 








Car Mileage — Coaches and Sleepers 


25,101,227 
33,083,356 


23,446,015 
31,116,942 


7.06 
6.32 




Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 








Average number Cars per Train 


4.57 

10.53 
36.51 


4.69 

9.97 
35.19 




2 63 


Average number Passengers per Coach 
and Sleeper 


5.62 
3.75 




Average number Passengers per Train... 




Average Earnings per Car per Mile 


Cts. 18.63 
" 12.45 


Cts. 17.94 
" 12.40 


3.85 
0.40 




Average Expenses per Car per Mile 









-55- 



H 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Tonnage of Aeticles Carbied. 



AETICLES. 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1901. 



Per 

Cent 



Tons. 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1900. 



Per 
Cent. 



Tons. 



Products of Agriculture :- 

Wheat 

Corn 

Other Grain 

Flour 

Other Mill Products 

Hay 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Fruits and Vegetables 



Products of Animals:— 

Live Stock 

Dressed Meats 

Other Packing House Products. 

Wool .. 

Hides and Leather 



Products of Mines :- 
Stone, Sand, etc.. 
Anthracite Coal.., 
Bituminous Coal., 

Coke 

Ores 



Products of Forest: 

Lumber 

Other Articles 



Manufactures:— 

Petroleum and Other Oils 

Sugar 

Iron, Pig and Bloom 

Iron and Steel Rails 

Other Castings and Machinery. 

Cement, Brick and Lime 

Agricultural Implements 

Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc.. 

Wines, Be^r and Liquors 

H. H. Goods and Furniture 



Merchandise .. 
Miscellaneous, 



Total Tons 



29.02 

3.31 
10.89 
5.92 
1.89 
2.76 
1.81 
0.06 
0.44 
1.94 

9.2i 

4.00 
1.47 
2.94 
0.08 

0.72 

27.8! 

3.86 
3.07 
20.47 
0.24 
0.17 

7.74 

5.73 
2.01 

7.80 

1.07 
0.61 
0.43 
0.84 
1.17 
1.94 
0.42 
19 
0.85 
0.28 

6.29 
1 2 .13 



276,403 
910,048 
494,794 
158,240 
230,851 
151,006 
4,772 
36,882 
161,928 



334,108 

122,625 

245,739 

6,680 

60,501 



322,412 

256,426 

1,710,650 

19,992 

13,848 



478,341 
168,182 



89 110 
51,322 
35,849 
70,003 
• 97,711 
161,866 
35,119 
15,945 
70,704 
23,786 

525,261 
1,013,845 



8,354,949 



26.27 

1.48 
11.99 
5.51 
1.60 
2.26 
1.13 
0.06 
0.53 
1.71 

9.25 

3.77 
2.20 
2.49 
0.10 
0.69 

29.41 

2.67 
3.15 
23.18 
0.24 
0.17 

9.05 

6.32 
2.73 

7.45 

1.07 
0.39 
0.42 
0.91 
1.01 
1.93 
0.35 
0,22 
0.85 
0.30 

6.00 
12.57 



100.00 



119,885 
968,557 
444,914 
129,012 
182,434 

91,004 
4,523 

42,819 
138,094 



304,594 

177,409 

201,485 

8,374 

55,747 



215,928 

254,839 

1,872,619 

19,175 

13,374 



510,415 

221,788 



86,111 
31,795 
35,099 
73,140 
81,459 
155,708 
28,156 
18,156 
68,672 
23,857 

484,96 
1,016,11 



8,080,220 



Company's Freight. 



1,672,409 



1,422,851 



—56- 



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-59- 



Statement of Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages 
OF the Wabash Railroad Company. 

LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

Toledo to East Hannibal 460.5 Miles. 

Bluffs to Camp Point 39.4 

Clayton to Elvaston 34.5 

Decatur to East St. Louis 110.1 

C. &W. I. Junction to Effingham 205.4 

Shumway to Altamont 9.5 

Fairbury Junction to Streator 30.9 

Edwardsville to Edwardsville Crossing ; 8.5 

Delray (near Detroit) to Butler 109.8 



Total Lines East 1,008.6 Miles. 

LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

St. Louis, Tayon Avenue to Harlem 274.8 Miles. 

St. Louis, Carr Street to Ferguson 10.7 '* 

Moberly to Ottumwa 131.5 " 

Brunswick to Pattonsburg 79.6 " 

Salisbury to Glasgow 15.4 " 

Centralia to Columbia.... 21.6 " 



Total Lines West 533.6 Miles. 

Total all Lines Covered by the First and Debenture Mortgages.. 1,542.2 ' ' 
The Second Mortgage covers all the lines. east of the Mississippi 
River , as above . Total number of miles /. 1,008.6 " 

Note.— The First and Debenture Mortgages also cover the Leasehold interest 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Eel River Railroad from Butler 
to Logansport, a distance of 94.1 miles, and also covers the Leasehold interests 
which the Wabash Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, 
Hannibal, Quincy and Kansas City, and in the Bridges at Hannibal, St. Louis and 
Kansas City. 

The Second Mortgage also covers the Leasehold interest which the Wabash 
Railroad Company has in the Eel liiver Railroad from Butler to Logansport, a 
distance of 94.1 miles, and also covers the Leasehold interests which the Wabash 
Railroad Company has in the Terminals at Detroit, Chicago, Hannibal and Quincy, 
and in the Bridge at Hannibal. 

The First and Debenture Mortgages cover the lines west of the Mississippi 
River above d'escribed, subject to prior Divisional Mortgages. By the terms of 
the First Mortgage , a sufficient number of First Mortgage Bonds are reserved to 
meet, at their maturity, or whenever exchanges can be made, the said Divisional 
Mortgages covering the lines west of the Mississippi River. 



—60- 



M 

Results of Operation of the Montpelier & Chicago R. R., 
FOR the Year Ending June 30th, 1901. 

Gross Earnings 11,387,665 55 

Deduct Operating Expenses $1,064,253 86 

Deduct Taxes 46,550 77 

Deduct Joint Track Rentals and Miscella- 
neous Expenses 87,509 32 1,198,313 95 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $189,351 60 

Interest on Bonds 169,600 00 

Surplus over and above Interest set aside as 

Sinking Fund $ 19,751 60 



i 



Note.— Results of Operation, Table A, includes the Montpelier & Chicago R. R. 



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Thirteenth Annual Report 



OF THK 



DIRKCTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co 



Kor the Kisca.1 Year Ending 
Jtane 30tln, 1902. 



ST. LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co. 

1902. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



-OF- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 



0. D. ASHLEY, Chairman of the Board. 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

M. KNIGHT, Second Vice-President. 

W. H. BLODGETT, Third Vice-President and General Counsel. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

E. B. PRYOR, Asst. to the Vice-Prest. and Asst. Secretary. 

H. L. MAGEE, . General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

S. B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. B. ADAMS, Superintendent Transportation. 

C. P'. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

H. H. WELLMAN, Purchasing Agent and General Storekeeper. 

W. S. NEWHALL, Chief Engineer. 

J.B.BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery . 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Db.B.. W.MOREB.OVSE, .. Chief Surgeon. 

S. E. COTTER, Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 



0. D. ASHLEY, 
GEO. J. GOULD, 
EDGAR T. WELLES, 
HENRY K. McHARG, 
CYRUS J. LAWRENCE, 
P. B. WYCKOFF, 
JAMES HAZEN HYDE, 



S. C. REYNOLDS, 
EDWIN GOULD, 
THOS. H. HUBBARD, 
JOHN T. TERRY, 
RUSSELL sage; 
J. RAMSEY, Jr. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1902. 



A condensed statement of the operations of the company 
for the fiscal year ending June 80th, gives the following 

results : 

Gross Earnings $19,053,493 17 

Miscellaneous Receipts 317,288 15 

Total Receipts $19,370,781 32 

Deduct Operating Expenses $13,847,435 88 

Deduct Taxes 627,930 12 

Deduct Balance Joint Track Rent- 
als and Miscellaneous Expenses 758,650 79 

Deduct Additions to Property and 

Other Charges 760,547 62 15,994,564 41 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest $ 3,376,216 91 

Interest on Bonds 2,964,756 87 

Surplus $ 411,460 04 

Dividends on Debenture A Bonds 210,000 00 

NetSurplua $ 201,460 04 



President Ramsey's report annexed will enable stock- 
holders and bondholders to examine the details of the 
year's business. 

During the year, under the authorization of the stock- 
holders and Debenture bondholders at the annual meeting 
in October, 1901, the Company acquired the Omaha & St. 
Louis Railway, extending from Pattonsburg, Mo., to Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, a distance of about 145 miles. Under the terms 
of purchase the Wabash Company executed a mortgage of 
$3,500,000, dated October 1, 1901, running forty years and 
bearing interest at the rate of three and a half per cent, 
payable semi-annually in April and October. Of this 
amount $500,000 is to be appropriated to equipment and 
betterments of the line. 

The Omaha & St. Louis was originally a part of the 
Wabash, St. Louis and Pacific System, and is an important 
link in the line between St. Louis and Council Bluffs in 
connection with the Wabash at Pattonsburg. 

At the annual meeting of the Stockholders and Debenture 
Bondholders held in October, 1901, a resolution was adopted 
authorizing the Company to acquire, by deed or in other 
lawful manner, the Boone County & Boonville Railroad, 
extending from Centralia to Columbia, in the State of Mis- 
souri, and in consideration thereof guarantee payment of the 
principal and interest of the four per cent gold bonds of 
said Company to an amount not exceeding the sum of 
$300,000; with the understanding that with 200 of said 
bonds, of the par value of $1,000 each, all existing liens on 
said road should be discharged, and that 100 of said bonds, 



of the par value of one thousand dollars each, should be 
the property of the Wabash Company, and the proceeds 
thereof expended in improving said line and in the acquisi- 
tion of additional rolling stock. A new corporation was 
organized, known as the Columbia & St. Louis Railroad 
Company, and the latter company acquired all the railroad 
property of the Boone County & Boonville Railroad Com- 
pany, subject to an existing mortgage thereon to secure 
bonds to the amount of $100,000. The new company (the 
Columbia & St. Louis Railroad Co.), then executed its forty 
year four per cent gold bonds in the sum of $300,000, and 
secured same by mortgage on said road. The Wabash 
Company guaranteed payment of the principal and interest 
thereof, and as a consideration for such guarantee there was 
transferred to the Wabash Railroad Company, in exchange 
for 100 of said bonds for $1,000 each, the entire capital 
stock of the Boone County & Boonville Railroad Company, 
the entire capital stock of the Columbia & St. Louis Railroad 
Company, and the Columbia & St. Louis Railroad Company 
also executed to the Wabash Railroad Company a deed to 
said railroad and its appurtenances, subject only to the lien 
of said mortgages. The remaining 200 of said bonds are 
now on deposit with the Mississippi Valley Trust Company 
of St. Liouis, subject to the order of the Wabash Railroad 
Company, 100 of which will be used in retiring said out- 
standing bonds of the Boone County & Boonville Railroad 
Company when they mature in May, 1903, and the 
proceeds of the remainder will, when issued, be used in 
improving said property. 



Railway traffic during the year has been remarkably good, 
notwithstanding the partial failure of the corn crop, and it 
is gratifying to hear confident assurances of universally 
favorable harvests during the present year. 

0. D. ASHLEY, 

Chairman of the Board. 

New York, September 1st, 1902. 



J 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 



St. Louis, Mo., September 1, 1902. 

To THE Board of Directors, 

Mr. 0. D. Ashley, Chairman, 

New York, K Y. 
Dear Sir: — 

It is with pleasure that I again lay before the Board an 
annual statement showing a continuation of large increases 
in the earnings of the Company and gratifying improve- 
ments in the condition of its property. 

The expectations of a continuation of prosperity during 
1901-1902, set forth in the annual report of June 30th, 1901, 
were more than realized, each month showing an unbroken 
record of increases. The estimate of earnings was exceeded 
by over $1,000,000. 

1902. 1901. 

The total revenue of the company, from 

all sources, was $19,370,781 32 $17,816,646 09 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 15,284,016 79 14,096,182 81 

$ 4,136,764 53 $ 3,720,463 28 

Interest on Bonds 2,964,756 87 2,760,571 24 

Net Revenue..... $ 1,172,007 66 $ 959,892 04 

Additions to Property... 583,499 60 544,126 29 

$ 588,508 06 $ 415,765 75 
Sinking Fund Charges, Account New 

Equipment, Steamers, etc 177,048 02 112,629 77 

$ 411,460 04 $ 303,135 98 

Dividend of 6 % on Debenture "A" Bonds 210,000 00 210,000 00 

Surplus to Profit and Loss Account $ 201,460 04 $ 93,135 98 



During the year some very iroportant changes in the 
mileage of the System were made. In November, 1901, the 
Omaha & St. Louis Railway, from Pattonsburg to Council 
Bluffs, 144.2 miles, and the Boone County & Boonville 
Railroad, from Centralia to Columbia, 21.7 miles, were 
purchased, and the new lines from Toledo (Maumee Junc- 
tion) to Montpelier and from Butler to New Haven were 
completed in January and February, 1902. The Eel River 
line, from Logansport to Butler, was turned over to its new 
owners December 31st, 1901. 

These changes and additions give us our own lines 
through from St. Louis to Omaha and Toledo to Chicago, 
and will be of great value to the Company by giving us 
direct through short lines and a control of traffic which 
could not be had when working through connections, whose 
own interests were, to a certain extent, adverse. 

It may seem monotonous to repeat what has been said in 
our annual reports for the past several years about "addi- 
tions to and improvements to the property," and yet, with 
the large increases in the gross earnings and small increases 
in the net earnings, it is only proper to show the owners of 
the property what has been done with the revenues. 

Operating expenses increased $1,095,390.77 (8.58 per cent), 
of this amount $405,530.07 was in Maintenance of Way, an 
increase of 17.32 per cent over 1901, and of $844,772.00, 
44.6 per cent, over 1900, while the increase in mileage was 
only 6.13 per cent. The total amount expended was 
$2,740,901.32, or $1,103.00 per mile of road operated. 



— 9— 

The average per mile for the year by principal divisions 
was : 

Wabash proper * $1,103 00 

Omaha & St. Louis 1,370 00 

Buffalo Division 1,760 00 

These general figures show an expenditure far above the 
normal repair requirements and examination of the detail 
maintenance statements will prove it. 

There has been a general increase in the rates of pay and 
wages of almost all branches of the service, particularly in 
shopmen, trackmen, agents, etc., until the average rate of 
wages is higher now than ever. Should there be any check 
in the present tide of prosperity and earnings of railroads 
decrease, without any decrease from the present rates of 
wages and prices of materials, many a railroad company 
now showing a fair surplus will find it very difficult to 
make both ends meet. It is wise, therefore, to prepare for 
this day of adversity by putting our property in such con- 
dition now that we may be prepared to face a few years of 
depression without danger. 

While there have been large sums expended during the 
past few years for equipment, motive power, improvement 
to track, ballasting, reduction of grades, etc., etc., the ex- 
penditures for these purposes during the past year being as 
follows : 

For Additions to Tracks, Shops, Stations, 

Real Estate, etc , $ 666,808 69 

For New Engines, Freight and Passenger 
Cars (including Sinking Fund on Equip- 
ment Mortgage) 550,837 32 

For Air Brakes, Steam Heat, Gas and 

Electric Lighting 34,134 45 

Total $1,251,780 46 



—10— 

There is still much to be done in this direction before the 
property will be in condition for such economical operation 
as will enable it to meet the competition of its strong com- 
petitors and still show satisfactory net earnings. 

Excepting the shops at Moberly, the Company has no 
shops — locomotive or car — worthy of the name. The engine 
shops at Springfield and Ft. Wayne and the car shops at 
Decatur and Toledo are no larger than they were twenty- 
five to thirty years ago, and most of the machinery is old 
and obsolete and incapable of doing the heavy work on the 
large engines now in use. The shops are too small and 
located where ground can not be secured for enlargements. 
We must, therefore, at once arrange for new shops for both 
the Middle and Eastern Divisions. This will require within 
the next two years between $400,000.00 and $500,000.00. 

Contracts were let and the work is now well under way for 
reducing the grades from 60 feet to 21 feet per mile at five 
points on the Middle Division ^ between Bement and Chicago, 
at a cost of about $250,000.00. 

500 forty ton 40 foot flat cars, steel under-frame, 
50 locomotives— 12 Passenger, 32 Freight and 6 

Switching — and about 
50 Coaches, Chair cars and Combination Cars, 

have been contracted for at an aggregate cost of about 
$1,500,000.00. 

The enormous growth of the traffic of the Company, the 
entrance of new competitive lines into its territory, and the 
combination of old lines and absorption of smaller lines, 
which have in the past been friendly connections, by large 



—11— 

systems competitive with the Wabash, has forced the pur- 
chase of additional real estate at important terminals and 
increase of terminal facilities at quite a heavy cost. These 
purchases had to be made, and others will have to be made 
in the near future, or otherwise the Company would have 
found itself with limited terminals and badly handicapped 
in competition with other lines for traffic. 

The large increase in both Freight and Passenger earn- 
ings during the past few years — much larger, comparatively, 
than that of other roads in Wabash territory — proves the 
wisdom of the policy of the Directors and management to 
so improve the road and equip it that it could secure and 
transport economically and safely that portion of the traffic 
to which it was justly entitled. This policy should be con- 
tinued until the property is in such condition and so 
equipped that it can be sure of its share of this traffic under 
any conditions of competition. 

All these expenditures must be paid for out of earnings. 



—12— 

REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Earnings and Expenses. 



1901-1902. 



1900-1901. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$19,053,493 17 
13,847,435 88 



$17,554,465 15 
12,752,045 11 



$5,206,057 29 

72.68 

7,815 21 

5,679 83 

2,135 38 



$4,802,420 04 

72.64 

7,437 39 

5,402 72 

2,034 67 



$1,499,028 02 
1,095,390 77 



$403,637 25 

.04 

387 82 

277 11 

100 71 



EARNINGS. 



Per 

Cent. 



1901-1902. 



Per 
Cent. 



1900-1901. 



Increase. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous 



61.74 

30.34 

3.63 

2.18 

2.11 



$11,763,541 41 

5,780,240 62 

691,100 63 

416,474 62 

402,135 89 



63.57 
28.38 
3.76 
2.22 
2.07 



$11,158,966 24 

4,982,694 25 

659,175 32 

389,774 43 

363,854 91 



604,575 17 
797,546 37 
31,925 31 
26,700 19 
38,280 98 



Total. 



$19,053,493 17 



$17,554,465 15 



$1,499,028 02 



EXPENSES. 





Per 
Cent. 


1901-1902. 


Per 
Cent. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


Conducting Transportation 
Motive Power 


37.91 
31.02 
19.79 
8.98 
2.30 


$ 5,249,038 25 

4,294,888 83 

2,740,901 32 

1,244,086 56 

318,520 92 


37.37 
30.66 
18.31 
11.43 
2.23 


$ 4,765,999 47 

3,909,315 67 

2,335,371 25 

1.457,151 03 

284,207 69 


$ 483,038 78 

385,573 16 

405,530 07 

*213,064 47 


Maintenance of Way 


Maintenance of Cars 


General Expenses 


34,313 23 


Total 




$13,847,435 88 




$12,752,045 11 


$1,095,390 77 









* Decrease. 



—13- 



The increase of $1,499,028.02 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,226,487 88 

Buffalo Division, Increase 272,540 14 

The increase of $1,095,390.77 in expenses is divided as 
follows: 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $993,394 28 

Buffalo Division, Increase 101,996 49 

Leaving out the BuflPalo Division for the years 1898-1899, 
1899-1900, 1900-1901, and 1901-1902, the percentage of 
operating expenses to earnings on the Wabash proper was 
as follows : 

Year ending June 30th, 1899 71.21 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1900 71.87 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1901 72.34 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1902 72.91 per cent. 



TRAFFIC. 

FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics show a decrease, 31,548,311 
(1.59 per cent) in "tons revenue freight carried one mile," 
at an average rate of 0.6041 cents per mile, an increase of 
0.0402 cents (7.13 per cent), at a cost per ton mile of 0.4629 
cents, an increase of 0.0266 cents (6.10 per cent), leaving a 
net profit of 0.1412 cents as compared with 0.1276 cents last 
year, an increase of 0.0136 cents. 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.7195 ; 
expense per mile, $1.3178, and net earnings, 0.4017, as 
against $1.5984, $1.2369 and $0.3615 respectively, last year. 



—14— 

The total freight train mileage was 6,841,121, a decrease 
of 140,145, about 2.01 per cent. 

The loaded cars per train increased 0.43 cars, the load 
per car 0.02 tons, and the "revenue" train load was 284.66 
tons against 283.47 tons last year, an increase of 1.19 tons, 
0.42 per cent. For the years from 1895 to' 1902, the "rev- 
enue" train load, and load per car, have been as follows: 

Year. Train load. Car load. 

1895 176.29 tons. 13.37 tons. 

1896 193.04 *♦ 13.80 " 

1897 212.87 •' 14.00 *' 

1898 216.55 " 14.16 '* 

1899 234.72 " 14.83 " 

1900 268.94 *' 16.07 ** 

1901 283.47 '' 16.67 •' 

1902 284.66 " 16.69 " 

The actual train load, including company freight, was 
316.38 tons, against 309.00 last year. 

The increase in train load over 1895 has been 108.37 tons 
(61.47 per cent), and car load has increased 3.32 tons (24.84 
per cent). 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars, 
whether "revenue," freight or "company" freight, are in- 
cluded in "loaded cars per train." 

With a decrease of 1.59 per cent in "services rendered," 
i. e., "tons carried one mile," there was an increase in freight 
revenue of $604,575.17 (5.42 per cent), with an increase of 
$380,273.84 (4.40 per cent), in expenses of freight traffic. 
While the decrease in freight tonnage was 1.59 per cent, the 
decrease in freight train service was 2.01 per cent. 



—15— 



PASSENGER. 



"Passengers carried one mile" increased 58^440,276 (22.11 
per cent), and in revenue $797,546.37 (16.01 per cent); 
1281,257.83 of this increase was on the Buffalo Division, 
leaving $516,288.54 on the Wabash proper. The rate per' 
passenger per mile was 1.791 cents, a decrease of .094 cents, 
and expenses per passenger mile 1.497 cents, a decrease of 
.061 cents, leaving 0.294 cents per mile net, as against 0.327 
last year, a loss of 10.09 per cent. 

Train earnings per mile were 91.40 cents, a gain of 6.26 
cents ; expenses were 62.83 cents per train mile, an increase 
of 5.94 cents, and net earnings per train mile were 28.57 
cents, against 28.25 cents in 1901. 

The "passengers carried one mile" increased 22.11 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service increased 
17.37 per cent. 

Statistics of freight and passenger traffic show the "net 
earnings" divided between the two classes of traffic as 
follows : 

Freight train net earnings 12,748,476.04 

Passenger train net earnings 2,197,273.55 

Total $4,945,749.59 

Passenger train earnings include mail, express, etc. 



16— 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows : 





Buffalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Conducting Transportat'n 
Motive Power 


*$ 1,568 49 

* 33,264 21 
135,849 28 

* 4,092 63 
5,072 54 


$ 484,607 27 

418,837 37 

269,680 79 

* 208,971 84 

29,240 69 


$483,038 78 

385,573 16 

405,630 07 

* 213,064 47 

34,313 23 


Maintenance of Way 

Maintenance of Cars 

General Expenses 




Total 


$101,996 49 


$993,394 28 


$1,095,390 77 





♦Decrease. 



The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Passenger Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel for cars and locomotives, repairs 
locomotives, oil, waste and tallow, clean- 
ing and lighting coaches, etc. (11.63%) $178,008 82 

Freight Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel for cars and locomotives, repairs 
locomotives, oil, waste and tallow, clean- 
ing, oiling and inspecting cars, etc., (5.00%) 137,037 94 

Repairs cars — Passenger, Express, Mail, 
Baggage and Road Service, (37.82%) ' 99,945 87 

Station Agents, Clerks, Labor, Light, 
Fuel, etc. 

Passenger (15.97%) $43,227 84 

Freight ( 9.38%) 84,822 32 128,050 16 

Telegraph Expenses 16,606 97 

Telegraph, Repairs of 11,158 17 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 27,401 01 

Engine Houses, Machine Shops, Turn- 
Tables, Water Stations — Repairs of and 
Fuel and Light for 39,207 21 

Fuel Stations — Expense and repair of 20,874 97 

Water Stations— Expense Pumping 17,073 37 

Tools and Machinery — Expense and repair 

of 67,769 04 

Bridges— Repair of 78,667 53 

Ballast 17,251 97 

Track— Repairs of 110,885 05 

Track — Spikes, Splices, Bolts and Fasten- 
ings , 72,371 46 

Steel Rail 160,435 38 



—it- 
Maintenance OF Way. 

NEW STEEL RAIL LAID. 





1901-1902. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No Tons 80-lb. New Rail 


25,737.0 


6,855.5 

6,855.5 
54.5 


18,881.5 








Total 


25,737.0 
204.7 


18,881.5 
150.2 




Miles New Steel Eail Laid 









Note — In the above statement is included 6,316 tons of new 80-lb. 
rail laid on the Buffalo Division between Niagara Falls and Windsor, 
the Wabash paying its proportion on a wheelage basis. 



MISCELLANEOUS WOEK. 





1901-1902. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No. Cross-ties laid, Main 
Track., 


812,784 

158,803 

687 

248.1 
248.5 

267.4 

32.4 
224.2 

26.6 


1,142,116 

182,153 

510 

267.3 

287.7 

238.6 

42.0 
55.0 

30.3 




329,132 
23,350 


" Cross-ties laid, Side 
Track 


177 


** Sets Switch-ties put 
in 


** Miles Track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

" Miles Fence Rebuilt. 


19.2 




39.2 


" Miles Old Fence Re- 
paired 

*' Miles New Fence 
Built 


28.8 




9 6 


** Miles Ditching 

" Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 


169.2 
V- 




3.7 







Note — Included in the above are 142,938 cross ties, 172 sets switch 
ties, 24.7 miles of track ballasted, 32.3 miles of fencing and 3.0 miles of 
sidings on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo Division ; and 9,731 
cross-ties and 7 sets of switch-ties on the Erie Section of the Buffalo 
Division. 

Note.— In addition to the above there are 8,322 cross-ties, 61 sets 
switch-ties, 23.9 miles of track ballasted with crushed rock and 39 miles 
of fencing, in connection with the re-construction of the Omaha 
Division; and 20,731 cross-ties, 6 sets of switch-ties and 9.12 miles of 
fencing used in the construction of tracks to the Empire Coal Com- 
pany mines from Maryville, Iowa. 

There were 7.35 miles of track built in connection with the Empire 
Coal Company mines from Maryville, Iowa, at a cost of ^33,258.71, in 
addition to which there was an expense of $2,186.40 chargeable to 
fence construction. 



-18— 



Number op Feet op Trestle Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled 
ETC.. During the Year Ending June 30. 1902. 





Shortened. 


Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 


Filled and 
Abandoned. 


Cost. 


Buffalo Division... 






45 feet. 

16 " 
108 " 
364 " 


1 1,063.23 
13,423.87 
16,195.92 
18,817.01 

12,252.78 


Detroit Division... 
Eastern Division... 
Middle Division... 
Western Division 


374 feet. 
8 '' 
49 " 
1,037 " 


1,506 feet. 

788 " 
2,175 " 
4,040 " 






Total 


1,468 feet. 


8,509 feet. 


533 feet. 


$61,752.81 





Total Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 



1901-1902. 



1900-1901. 



Buffalo Division.. 
Detroit Division... 
Eastern Division. 
Middle Division.. 
Western Division 

Total 




503 

974 

733 

1,233 



3,443 



— ID- 



EXTRAORDINARY RENEWALS, IMPROVEMENTS 
AND ADDITIONS. 

EENEWALS. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt — 
Rebuilt 156 trestles at various points |108,878 19 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Iron Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges — 

Steele, 111.— Renewed Frame Trestle Bridge No. 1081 with 
through girder and masonry abutments. (Completed). ..$ 993 02 

Trestles shortened, replaced with Iron pipe, filled, etc., 

during the year $60,689 58 

Iron Bridges, Repaired and Strengthened — 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Iron Truss Bridge No. 207, over St. 
Mary's River replaced with through iron girder and 
abutments $22,109 36 

Andrews, Ind. — Painted Bridge No. 263, over Wabash 
River 361 74 

Logansport, Ind. — Painted Bridge No. 365, over Wabash 

River 327 03 

Attica, Ind. — New Deck and painted Bridge No. 529 5,443 99 

Markham, 111. — Renewed Deck on Iron Deck Truss Bridge 

No. 258 252 64 

Valley City, 111.— Renewed 304 ft. Pile Trestle West Ap- 
proach to Through Iron Truss Bridge No. 508, over Illi- 
nois River 1,680 54 

Barry, 111. — Renewed Deck on Frame Trestle West Ap- 
proach to Through Iron Truss Bridge No. 610 1,449 05 

Hannibal, Mo. — Bridge No. 651, over Mississippi River ; 
Rip-Rap placed around Draw Rests, Pivot and Channel 
Piers ; renewed Lower Float ; renewed Vertical Tubular 
Boiler on Draw Span 4,604 52 

Honey Bend, 111. — Renewed Deck on Iron Deck Truss 
and Iron Plate Girders Bridge No. 789 306 97 

Ferguson, Mo. — Replaced Iron Girder Bridge No. 41, over 

Street , 5,919 42 

St. Charles, Mo. — Renewed Stringers on Approaches to 
Iron Truss Bridge No. 59, across Missouri River 8,413 04 

St. Charles, Mo. — Renewed Stone Caps to Pedestals in 
Approaches to Iron Truss Bridge No. 59, across Miss- 
ouri River 490 41 

Warrenton, Mo.— Rebuilt Overhead Bridge No. 189A 977 96 

Mexico, Mo. — Replaced Overhead Wagon Bridge with 
Iron Tpuss Bridge 5,004 67 

Brunswick, Mo. — Renewed West Approach to Iron Truss 

Bridge No. 499, across Grand River 2,722 05 

Brunswick, Mo. — Renewed Deck on Iron Truss Bridge No. 
499, across Grand River 133 05 

Excelsior Springs, Mo. — Renewed Approach to Iron Girder 
Bridge, No. 2232, across Fishing River 1,902 85 

Kansas City, Mo. — Replaced Overhead Wagon Bridge 
with Iron Truss Bridge 1,565 35 

Total $63,664 64 



-20— 



Improving Line and Reducing Grades — 

Riverside, Ind.— Lowered Bridge No. 501 to Grade | 7,219 56 

For protection against the Missouri River at De Witt and 

Missouri City $ 2,138 80 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc. Passenger and 
Freight Stations, New, Rebuilt and Enlarged — 

Detroit, Mich.— Repairs driveway, 12th street freight 

house $ 1,139 75 

Delray, Mich. — Painted round house 195 66 

Belleville, Mich. — Built new combination depot 699 29 

Willis, Mich, — Built new combination depot 733 88 

Milan, Mich. — Renewed stock pens 693 80 

Montpelier, O.— Rebuilt ice house 1,130 63 

Ashley, Ind. — New smoke jacks on round house 832 31 

North Liberty, Ind.— Renewed coal chute trestle 338 98 

Toledo, O. — General repairs. Lake freight house 838 88 

Toledo, O. — New transfer table at car shops (complete) 2,139 83 

Defiance, O. — Renewed freight platform 646 10 

Defiance, O. — Built coal chute trestle 1,154 94 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Built new 70 ft. through turn table 5,760 76 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— New transfer table 1,013 84 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New engine pits in shop 1,259 71 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New floor in machine shop 613 36 

Huntington, Ind. — Rebuilt freight platform 1,299 89 

Peru, Ind.— Painted round house 399 06 

Peru, Ind. — Renewed round house roof 755 65 

Peru, Ind. — Put in 20 in. vitrified sewer, Broadway 484 00 

Peru, Ind. — Built addition to oflace building (complete)... 275 80 

Attica, Ind. — Rebuilt stock pens 521 66 

Danville, 111.— Renewed freight platform 1,020 73 

Danville, 111. — Renewed freight house roof 198 65 

Tilton, 111.— Repaired round house 1,367 27 

Tilton, 111.— New 70 ft. through turn table 4,316 79 

Pontiac, 111. — Remodeled and extended depot 1,126 03 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed coach shop floor (completed) 397 75 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed gravel roofs on Car and Road De- 
partment buildings 455 77 

Springfield, 111. — Rebuilt portion of round house 435 71 

Springfield, 111. — New plumbing and basins, machine shop 

closets 645 90 

Jacksonville, 111. — Remodeled passenger depot, granitoid 

platform, etc 7,754 60 

Bluffs, 111.— Renewed 54 ft. frame turn table 365 23 

Clayton, 111.— Renewing old ''Greenleaf" turn table 879 11 

Taylorville, 111.— Renewed platform with brick 1,083 63 

Litchfield, 111. — Renewed 55 ft. iron turn table; new 

masonrv 1,871 80 

Staunton,' 111.— New 60 ft. steel turn table 3,234 50 

Brooklyn, 111. — Renewed track scales 919 42 

Chicago, 111.— Overhauling elevator and dock (completed) 8,796 96 
Chicago, 111.— Repaired 12th street freight house and plat- 
form 1,597 66 



-21— 



Kenewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc. — Continued. 

Chicago, 111. — Repaired driveway 12th street freight hou8e$ 274 63 

Chicago, 111. — Repaired 41st street round house 588 56 

Luther, Mo. — Replaced track scale 815 11 

Martinsburg, Mo.— Rebuilt depot 1,151 14 

Moberly, Mo. — Built addition to Car Department shop .... 310 62 

Hardin, Mo.— Rebuilt stockyards 212 29 

Macon, Mo.— Rebuilt freight depot platform 322 74 

Macon, Mo. — Rebuilt passenger depot platform 832 95, 

Moulton, la.— Rebuilt depot 1,805 13 

Howell, la.— Rebuilt depot 899 27 

Percy, la.— Rebuilt depot 972 10 

Total $67,579 83 



Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged- 
Milan, Mich. — Laid pipe line from River to Well, to 

increase water supply % 732 78 

Milan, Mich.— Rebuilt coal chutes 2,838 72 

Napoleon, O.— Built new water tank 737 80 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New stand pipe and water main 1,366 49 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— New water tank built . 1,223 76 

Roanoke, Ind. — New water tank, stand pipe and water main. 930 80 

Lafayette, Ind. — New water tank built , 957 30 

Tilton, 111. — Put; in new stand pipe and main 1,423 37 

Springfield, 111. — Rebuilt new water tank and new stand 

pipe ,.. 1,644 15 

Berlin, 111. — Renewed water tank 1,314 26 

Maysville, 111. — Scraped and deepened water station pond, 414 75 

Bluffs, 111. — Renewed inclines trestle to coal chutes.. 1,190 69 

St. Louis, Mo. — Renewed water meters at 22nd Street 372 08 

Moberly, Mo.— New deep well No. 2 3,029 89 

Moberly, Mo. — Water train expense 8,801 64 

Brunswick, Mo. — Extending suction pipe to river 596 54 

Kansas City, Mo. — New stand pipe and extending pipe 1,345 16 

Selection, la. — Raising dam at pond 237 00 

Hamilton, la. — Renewed water tank and pump house 1,457 31 

Total 130,614 49 



ADDITIONS. 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries Built— 

Buffalo Division 3.0 miles, | 14,000.15 

Detroit Division 3.9 miles, 19,569.55 

Eastern Division 6.8 miles, 32,130.64 

Middle Division 2.9 miles, 17,982.09 

Western Division 10.1 miles, 40,693.60 

Chicago Terminal miles, 

Total 26.7 miles, $124,376.03 



—22— 

Interlockiag plants erected, Wabash proportion : 

Lodge, 111.— Crossing, I. 0. R. R $ 1,814 51 

Staine, 111.— Crossing, I. C. R. R 1,966 51 

Saunemin, 111.— Crossing, I. C. R. R 1,712 63 

Essex, 111.— Crossing, C. C. C. & St. L. Ry. (completed). . 1,013 00 

Streator, 111.— Crossing, A. T. & S. F. Ry 963 17 

Springfield Jet., 111.— Crossing, C. & A. Ry 1,991 93 

South Litchfield, 111.— Crossing, J. & St. L. Ry. Renewing 

foundations and overhauling plant 358 91 

Moravia, la.— Crossing, C. M. & St. P. Ry. (completed).... 2,416 66 

Total $12,237 32 

Additions to Property, Shops, Round-houses, Stations, Etc. — 

Romulus, Mich. — Built new transfer house and platform... | 510 75 

Montpelier, O. — Built new block tower house 271 53 

Montpelier, 0.— Built new coal chutes 6,827 66 

Montpelier, O. — Built new elevated sand house 963 85 

Montpelier, O. — Built new cinder pit 1,501 90 

Ashley, Ind. — Put in pipe line for fire protection 329 36 

North Liberty, Ind. — Built new cinder pit 258 19 

New Haven, Ind. — Built new block tower house 296 62 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Built extension to freight platform 464 78 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Built new coal chutes 6,457 26 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new cinder pit 394 23 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new iron and flue shed 286 84 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new masonry foundation for 

planer 241 89 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new masonry foundation for bor- 
ing machine 216 12 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new drop pit in round house 733 58 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. -Built extension to floor in paint shop... 266 64 

Prairie Switch, Ind. — Built new block tower house 328 53 

Mardenis, Ind. — Built new block tower house 346 95 

Huntington, Ind. — Put in pneumatic gates at Jefferson, 

State and Warren streets 1,423 15 

Wabash, Ind. — Built new block tower house 314 24 

Hartman, Ind. — Built new block tower house 354 13 

Erie, Ind.— Built new block tower house 319 71 

East Peru, Ind. — Built new block tower house 280 41 

Peru, Ind. — Built new block tower house. Grant street 358 29 

Peru, Ind. — Put down 10-in. well, pumping machinery and 

water main at round house , 3,241 18 

Lafayette, Ind. — Built new block tower house, east yard... 220 89 

Lafayette, Ind. — Built new coal chutes 4,565 86 

Lafayette, Ind. — Built new block tower house 387 28 

Wea, Ind. — Built new block tower house 322 80 

Williamsport, Ind. — Built new block tower house..... 267 84 

State Line, Ind. — Built new block tower house 342 95 

Newell, Ind. — Built new block tower house 275 57 

Danville, 111. — Built new brick and stone passenger station 16,457 70 

Danville, 111. — Laid water main to new passenger station.. 269 54 

Elmira, 0. — Put in new stock scales 228 97 



—23— 



Additions to Property, Shops, Round-houses, Stations, etc. — Continued. 

West Montpelier, 0.— Built new blocis tower house % 201 30 

Artie, Ind. — Built new block tower house 206 87 

Butler, Ind. — Put in new stock and wagon scales 213 40 

Rose, Ind. — Built new block tower house 259 32 

Grabill, Ind. — Put in new stock and wagon scales 226 36 

Palos Park, 111. — Built new depot and platform 950 00 

Cardiff, 111.— Built new depot and platform 1,154 09 

Chicago Ridge, 111. — Built new depot and platform 2,163 86 

Bement, 111.— New water station well 2,762 33 

Decatur, 111. — Built new brick passenger station (com- 
pleted) 13,618 99 

Decatur, 111.— Built addition to freight house 2,340 70 

Decatur, 111. — Built new freight transfer platform 500 54 

Decatur, 111. — Built addition to coach shop 3,475 21 

Decatur, 111.— Erected four "Ellis" bumping posts 248 00 

Brooklyn, 111. — Built new round house and shops (com- 
pleted) 427 43 

Brooklyn, 111. — Built new sand house 507 29 

Brooklyn, 111. — Built new water tank 255 03 

East St. Louis, 111. — New baggage building and Relay Pas- 
senger Station, Wabash proportion 600 00 

East St. Louis, 111. — Erected new 20-ton crane in freight 

house 1,733 44 

East St. Louis, 111. — Erected new 20-ton scale and three 

warehouse scales in freight house (completed). 284 63 

East St. Louis, 111.— Erected three ''Ellis" bumping posts, 233 60 
East St. Louis, 111. — Paved middle alley at freight house 

with brick 1,215 80 

Pontiac, 111. — Put in new stock scale «, 236 56 

Quincy, 111. — Building new brick passenger station (not 

completed) 9,639 00 

Quincy, 111.— Built storm water sewer at Sixth Street 209 25 

Quincy, 111.— Built new stone sewer at Sixth and Kentucky 

Streets 338 40 

Moberly, Mo. — Built new drop pit in round house 318 85 

Moberly, Mo. — Built foundation and pipe for washout 

pump in round house..... 275 62 

Brunswick, Mo. — Built new engine house ■. 1,440 36 

Millard, Mo.— Built new coal chutes 3,321 00 

Fifield, la.— Built new coal chutes , 3,279 96 

Total 1102,964 26 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings- 
Detroit, Mich.— Repairs fender piling G. T. slip $ 1,120 00 

Detroit, Mich.— Repairs to C. P. slip 413 00 

Toledo, Ohio.— Repairs Dock Lake freight house 498 63 

Toledo, Ohio. — Renewal coal dock (not completed) 1,428 94 

Total $3,460 57 



-24- 



SUMMAEY. 

Extraordinary Benewals, Improvements and Additions. 

Renewals. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt |108,878 19 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 3,460 67 

Total 1112,338 76 

Improvements. 

Iron Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges $ 993 02 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc. 60,689 58 

Iron Bridges Repaired and Strengthened 63,664 64 

Improving Line and Reducing Grade 7,219 66 

Protection against Missouri River 2,138 80 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc 67,679 83 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged 30,614 49 

Total $232,899 92 

A.dditions. 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks Built to Various 

Industries |124,376 03 

Interlocking Plants Erected, Wabash proportion 12,237 32 

Additions to Shops, Round Houses, Stations, etc 102,964 26 

Total $239,577 61 

f Renewals .$112,338 76 

Totals <^ Improvements 232,899 92 

[Additions 239,677 61 

Grand Total...... $584,816 29 

In addition to the above, the following amounts were 
expended on the Buffalo Division for extraordinary renewals 
and improvements, the Wabash paying its proportion of 
this sum on a wheelage basis : 

Depots, Buildings, etc $ 12,623 82 

Additions to Shops, Round-houses, etc 6,179 83 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, New and Rebuilt 5,714 36 

. Iron Bridges Repaired, Renewed and Strengthened 28,118 17 

Wooden Bridges, Rebuilt 3,083 30 

Total $ 55,719 48 



—25— 



OMAHA DIVISION. 

New Steel Eail Laid — 

No. Tons 80-lb. new rail 12,219.1 

No. Miles 80-lb. new rail laid 97.2 

Miscellaneous Work — 

No. Cross Ties put in track 8,322 

No. Sets Switch Ties put in track 61 

No. Miles Track Ballasted with rock 23.9 

No. Miles Fence Built 39.0 

Additions to Property, Shops, Round-Houses, Stations, Etc. — 

Stanberry, Mo. — Built new Roadmaster's office $ 245 39 

Stanberry, Mo. — Built new car shop 463 27 

Stanberry, Mo. — Built new boiler and tin shop 576 94 

Burlington Junction, Mo. — Built new water tank 1,539 03 

Burlington Junction, Mo. — Built new stock yards 216 35 

Total ..$ 3,040 98 

SUMMARY. 

New Steel Rail Laid (97.2 miles) $380,410 31 

Miscellaneous Work 47,630 44 

Additions to Property, Shops, Round-Houses, Stations, Etc.. 3,040 98 

Total 1431,081 73 



—26— 



ANNUAL STATEMENT TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 

FREIGHT. 1902. 1901. 1900. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 

for year 1,738,098 1,688,066 1,645,789 

Total Empty Cars moved 

for year 776,474 795,829 834,587 

Total Loaded and Empty 

Cars moved for year 2,514,572 2,483,895 2,480,376 

Average Loaded Cars 

moved perday 4,725 4,625 4,509 

Average Empty Cars 

moved per day 2,127 2,180 2,287 

Average Loaded and 

Empty Cars moved per 

day 6,889 6,805 6,796 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 6,841,121 6,981,266 7,075,158 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 18,743 19,127 19,384 

Total number Freight 

Trains for year 80,303 80,682 85,499 

Average number Freight 

Trains per day 220 221 234 

Average number Miles run 

per train, per day 85.2 86.5 82.8 

Average number Loaded 

Cars moved per train 

mile 19.0 18.5 18.1 

Average number Empty 

Cars moved per train 

mile 7.4 7.8 8.0 

Average number Loaded 

and Empty Cars moved 

per train mile 26.4 26.3 26.1 

Average number Cars 

handled per train mile, 

reduced to loaded car 

basis 23.5 23.2 22.9 

Mileage made by all 

Loaded Cars for year 129,714,750 129,392,990 128,106,845 

Mileage made by all 

Empty Cars for year 50,721,670 54,679,744 56,920,676 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 180,436,420 183,972,734 185,027,521 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 67,218,628 65,975,987 75,815,200 



—27— 






1902 


1901 


1900 


23,375,135 


25,209,948 


29,169,225 


90,593,763 


91,185,935 


104,984,425 


62,496,122 


63,417,003 


52,291,645 


27,346,535 


29,369,796 


27,751,451 


89,842,657 


92,786,799 


80,043,096 


54,237,148 


49,973,760 


39,867,175 


16,460 


15,463 


12,560 



FREIGHT-Cont. 

♦Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 
for year 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 

Mileage made by Wabash 
Cars on other roads for 
year 

Number of Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
perday,includingSwitch 
Cars 7,734 7,279 5,964 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads, 
per day, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 7,253 6,659 5,091 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. E 28.2 31.1 33.2 

Miles run per Carper day, 
Wabash Cars on Foreign 
Roads, including Switch 
Cars 19.2 18.8 18.3 

Miles run per Carper day, 
Wabash Cars on For- 
eign Roads, exclusive of 
Switch Cars 20.5 20.5 21.4 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day, including 
Switch Cars 5,943 5,629 5,836 

Average number of Foreign 
Cars on Wabash R. R. 
per day. exclusive of 
Switch Cars 5,204 4,839 5,073 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 
including Switch Cars.... 41.8 44.3 56.1 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 
exclusive of Switch Cars. 47.7 51.6 64.5 



1902. 


1901. 


1900. 


,691,050 


7,237,313 


6,644,720 


81,990 


77,432 


70,535 


225 


212 


193 


93.8 


93.5 


94.2 


21,105 


19,822 


18,180 



—28— 

PASSENGER. 

Total Passenger Train 

Mileage for year 

Total number Passenger 

Trains run for year 

Average number Passenger 

Trains run per day 

Average number Miles per 

Train per day 

Average number Miles by 

all Trains per day , 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 8,425,552 7,613,395 7,346,132 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Coaches and Chair Cars 

for year 16,807,827 15,346,137 14,645,386 

Total Mileage Sleeping 

Cars for year 9,188,022 8,682,415 7,873,619 

Total Mileage Wabash 

Dining Cars for year 1,591,510 874,595 802,652 

Total Mileage of all Cars 

for year 37,451,010 34,138,164 32,086,126 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled for 

year 400,040 362,382 340,684 

Average number of Cars of 

all classes handled per 

day 1,096 993 933 

Average number of Cars 

per train 4.87 4.68 4.83 



-29 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department show an increase of 
$418,837.37 on the Wabash proper, with a decrease on the 
Buffalo Division of $33,264.21, leaving the net increase for 
the System of $385,573.61. 

The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Engineers and firemen $ 37,311 33 

Fuel for locomotives 62,847 88 

Fuel and light for engine houses, machine 

shops, etc 5,602 05 

Repairs of locomotives 138,934 44 

Repairs of E. & M. S., W., W. and C. 

stations 45,147 10 

Tools and machinery and new tools 56,963 21 

Wipers, hostlers and dispatchers 19,915 64 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines was 
$1,097,189.46, equal to $2,374.84 per engine for 462 engines, 
the average number on hand during the year. 

The following statejnent will show the large aruount of 
repair work done on engines, and the general character of 
the repairs. Fifty-four per cent of the engines on hand 
July 1st, 1901, went through the shops for general repairs 
and seventy-eight per cent for heavy repairs. 



—30— 

Motive Powee and Machinery, 
locomotive equipment. 



1901-1902. 1900-1901. Increase. Decrease. 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 



REPAIRS. 

Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

Fire-boxes, new 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



434 

72 

16 

490 



237 

337 

658 

786 

63 

2 

57 
35 
21 

365 
49 

401 

6 

44 

298 

44 

7 

36 

65 



3,834 



437 
3 
6 

434 



234 

310 

514 
748 

67 
9 

65 

23 

29 
379 

46 

398 



• 47 

340 

40 
7 

39 
109 



3,948 



69 
10 
66 



3 

27 

144 

38 



2 
12 






8 
14 



3 
42 



3 
44 

114 



-31— 



DISTRIBUTION OP ENGINE MILEAGE. 





1901-1902. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Freight Train Mile- 
age 

Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 


6,841,121 

559,895 

7,691,050 

204,796 
3,106,726 

770,119 


6,981,266 

693,738 
7,237,313 

182,301 

2,885,276 

539,400 




140,145 
133,843 




Passenger Train 
Mileage 


453,737 

22,495 
221,450 

230,719 


Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 




Switching 




Miscellaneous, 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 






Total 


19,173,707 


18,519,294 


654,413 









Expense of Operating Locomotives. 





1901-1902. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


-I-. • r Labor :. 


$ 580,394 77 

516,794 69 

55,402 47 

1,164,707 64 

1,103,475 57 

159,087 33 


1 485,687 65 

465,782 79 

49,169 69 

1,101,859 76 

1,066,164 24 

136,695 07 


$ 94,707 12 
51,011 90 
6,232 78 
62,847 88 
37,311 33 
22,392 26 


I^^Pai^s {Material.....: 


Stores 


Fuel (Coal and Wood) 


Engineers and Firemen 


Wipingand Dispatching 




Total 


$3,579,862 47 


13,305,359 20 


$274,503 27 





Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 





1901-1902. 


1900-1901. 


Increase. 


For Repairs,^ 


1 5 68 
28 
6 03 
5 71 
82 


$ 5 10 
27 
5 90 
5 71 
73 


$ 58 
01 
13 


Stores 

Fuel 


Engineers and Firemen 




Wiping and Dispatching 


09 






Total 


$18 52 


$17 71 


I 81 







—32— 



1901-1902. 1900-1901 

Total engine mileage 19,326,197 18,664,615 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 48,804 50,309 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 4,067 4,192 

Tons of coal consumed 1,055,948 954,724 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

of handling included) $116 |1 21 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 18.3 19.5 

Note : Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense which 
has been added to Auditor's figures, and is as follows : 

1901-1902. 1900-1901. 

Stores I 1,601 32 $ 989 06 

Fuel 26,510 59 17,563 29 

Total $28,111 91 $18,552 35 

Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash proportion of all 
joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



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-34- 



CAR DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department for the year June 30, 
1902, were, as last year, far above the normal on account of 
application of air brakes to our freight cars, vestibules to our 
passenger cars, and new freight and passenger equipment 
purchased. 

The total on account of these items amounts to 
$524,109.21. 

Narrow Gould vestibule was applied to one coach, and 
stationary vestibules to four baggage cars, one postal car and 
one end of two combination passenger and mail cars. 

Narrow vestibules were changed to wide on eleven cars at 
a cost of 112,734.17. Total cars now vestibuled, 232. 

Steam heat was applied to four cars during the year at a 
cost of $580.80, making a total of 388 cars now equipped for 
steam heating. 

Three cars were equipped with Pintsch gas at a cost of 
$847.50, making a total of 182 cars so equipped. 

Air brakes were applied to 373 freight cars at a cost of 
$16,889.79, making a total of 13,084 cars, or 76 per cent of 
all freight cars so equipped. 

Contract has been entered into for 50 Kodger Convertible 
Ballast and Coal cars, similar to those purchased last October 



35- 



Car Equipment. 





On 

hand 

July!, 

1901. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1902. 


On 
hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENQEB. 

Official 


3 
2 

8 

133 

40 

44 

6 

3 

81 

14 

2 

3 

29 

5 

1 

1 


2 




5 

2 

8 

147 

44 

55 

6 

6 

63 

14 

4 

3 

32 

5 

1 

1 


4 


Pav 




2 


Dining 






5 


Coach 


21 

9 

13 


7 
5 
2 


108 


Combination 


22 


Chair 


35 


Parlor 




Cafe 


3 
3 

2 

1 
3 






Baggage 

Baggrage and Mail 


1 


64 
15 


Passenger and Mail 




Baggage, Mail and Passenger.. 
Postal 


1 


6 
19 


Pacific Express 


5 


_A.ir-Brake Instruction 








InsDection 












Total Passenger 


355 


57 


Ifi 


396 


285 








FREIGHT. 

Box 


9,336 
568 
148 

5,118 
295 
100 
192 


1,467 
18 


715 
123 

1 
168 

1 


10,088 

463 

147 

5,470 

295 

100 

189 

80 

79 

11 

6 

8 

5 

12 

242 


8,075 


stock 


1,471 


Fruit 


50 


Coal, Flat and Rack 


520 
1 


3,439 


Furniture 


33 


Refrigerator 


100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 

Ballast and Convertible 




3 
1 
2 


129 


81 
8 
2 
1 




Tool and "Work 


73 
9 
6 
8 
5 


36 


Derrick 


12 


Pile Driver 


1 


7 


Cable 


1 


Ice 






4 


Caboose Box 


12 
16 






Caboose Standard 


229 


3 


212 


Total Freight 

Total Passenger 


16,087 
355 


2,126 

57 


1,018 
16 


17,195 
396 


13,569 
285 


Total Car Equipment 


16,442 


2,183 


1,034 


17.591 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacitv, 
in Tons 


446,067 






495.971 


235,074 



-36— 



Cars Eepaired. 








Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


2,352 

118 

49 

8 


118,544 

1,529 

635 

497 


120,896 
1,647 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 


684 


Cars Rebuilt 


505 






Total 


2,527 


121,205 


123,732 




New Wheels Applied, Cast 


2,486 
296 


9,280 


11,766 


New Wheels Applied, Steel. 


296 








Total New Wheels Applied 


2,782 


9,280 


12,062 





Car and Engine Trusts. 

June 30th, 1902, the car and engine trust notes outstand- 
ing were as follows : 

St. Charles Car Company, Contract of June 28th, 1898, 15 
notes (last one due September 24th, 1903), for $4,696.18 each $70,442 70 

Missouri Car and Foundry Company, Contract of June 28th, 
1898, 17 notes outstanding (last one due on November 5th, 
1903), for $4,696.18 each 79,835 06 

Engines, St. Louis Trust Company, 28 notes outstanding 

(last one due November 1st, 1904), for $5,071.88 each 142,012 64 

Total amount trust notes outstanding $292,290 40 

A reduction during the year in car and locomotive trust 

notes of $173,570 88 

In addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundry Company for 500 box, 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage payments are $7,194.76. On 
this contract there was paid during the year ending June 
30th, 1902, the sum of |86,337.12. 



—SI- 



TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1901-1902, 1900-1901 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 2,153 2,022 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to this Company.. 6,055 5,614 
Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph 

Company 10,550 9,618 

Total Number Miles Wire used jointly 649 639 

Total Miles of Wire : 17,254 15,871 



The effect upon the traffic and earnings, from the opening 
of the Toledo-Montpelier and Butler-New Haven lines and 
the purchase of the Omaha & St. Louis, has been very satis- 
factory. From the present conditions and earnings we are 
justified in predicting a gross earning of $20,000,000.00 for 
the year ending June 30th, 1903. 

The only change in the official list has been due to the 
death of Mr. Lincoln, who was for more than thirty years the 
Chief Engineer of this Company and its predecessor com- 
panies. He was a competent and faithful officer whose loss 
will be felt. The vacancy was filled by the appointment of 
Mr. W. S. Newhall. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., 

President. 



-38- 



MILES OF ROAD OPERATED. 



LINES EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



Deacription of Lines. 



u uM 
(O <s o 
ft'O g 








Q 



FROM TO 

Toledo E. Hannibal 

E. Hannibal-Hannibal U. D.. 

BluSs Camp Point 

Camp Point... Quincy 

E. Hannibal.. Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Maysville Pittsfleld 

Sidney Champaign , 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville . .Edwardsville Jet. . 

Chicago C. & W. I. June 

C. & W. I. Jct..Effingham 

Shumway Altamont 

Forrest Fairbury June . . . 

Fairbury Jet.. Streator 

Detroit Delray , 

Delray Butler 

Butler New Haven 

Maumee Montpelier 

Montpeher Clarke June 

Clarke Junc.C. & W. I. June 

Attica Covington 

Chili Peru 



460.5 
39.4 



3.0 



0.4 



0.9 
34.5 



21.8 
17.3 



7.8 



6.2 



11.7 

110.1 

1.7 



3.8 
8.0 



205.4 
9.5 



0.8 
6.1 



30.9 



4.6 



109.8 
25.7 
49.5 

149.6 



17.6 



14.8 



Total. 



1254.0 



9.2 



88.2 



460.5 

3.4 

39.4 

21.8 

18.2 

34.5 

7.8 

6.2 

11.7 

113.9 

1.7 

8.0 

205.4 

10.3 

6.1 

30.9 

4.6 

109.8 

25.7 

49.5 

149.6 

17.6 

14.8 



1351.4 



241.0 

2.1 

4.2 

0.9 

2.1 

1.8 

1.0 

1.1 

2.2 

44.5 

1.2 

23.3 

60.6 

0.3 



3.6 

18.8 
37.8 
7.2 
10.2 
54.5 



2.3 
10.0 



701.5 

5.5 

43.6 

22.7 

20.3 

36.3 

8.8 

7.3 

13.9 

158.4 

2.9 

31.3 

266.0 

10.6 

6.1 

34.5 

23.4 

147.6 

32.9 

59.7 

204.1 

17.6 

17.1 

10.0 



530.7 



1882.1 



Note. — The above does not include 6.8 miles main track and 0.2 
mile side track, total 7.0 miles, ''Owned" between Edwardsville Junc- 
tion and Edwardsville Crossing, which is leased to the Illinois Ter- 
minal Railroad Company. 

Note. — Decrease of 28.4 miles main track is due to giving up the 
Eel River Road, between Butler and Logansport, 94.1 miles, and dis- 
continuing the operation of the line between Chili and Peru, 9.5 miles ; 
also, by the addition of line between Maumee and Montpelier, 49.5 
miles, and between Butler and New Haven, 26.2 miles. 



—39— 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



Description of Lines. 


1 
1 


1 


III 
If! 


n 




< 


FROM TO 

St. Louis — 
Union Station.23d st 






0.7 


0.7 

274.8 


99.6 
1.5 
0.4 

30.0 
3.5 
8.5 

15.9 
2.6 
0.6 
8.9 
3.4 
3.7 

22.4 
1.2 
0.9 

11.0 
0.7 
7.3 

222.1 


7 


Tayon av Harlem 


274.8 




374 4 


Franklin av...N. Market st 






1 5 


Olive st Carr st 






0.6 


0.6 
10.7 

1.5 

69.7 

131.5 

28.3 

0.2 
68.2 
38.2 
41.4 
144.0 
21.6 
15.4 


1.0 

40.7 


Carr st Ferguson 


10.7 




Harlem Kansas City 




1.5 
69.7 


5 


Moberly Hannibal 






78-2 


Moberly Ott'imwa 


131.5 
28.3 




147 4 


Moulton Albia 






30.9 


Albia Albia Connecti'n 




0.2 


0.8 


Albia Des Moines 


68.2 

143.7 
15.4 




77.1 


Brunswick Chillicothe 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Pattonsburg...... Council Bluffs... 

Centralia Columbia 

Salisbury Glasgow 


38.2 
41.4 

21.6 


0.3 


41.6 
45.1 
166.4 
22.8 
16 3 


Excello Ardmore 






11 


Excelsior Spa Jc. Milwaukee June. 


9.5 






9.5 


10.2 


May ville June. Empire Coal Co.. 






7.3 








73.0 






Total 


682.1 


101.2 


856.3 


1078.4 







Note. — Main Line mileage is increased 144.0 miles on account 
of acquiring the Omaha & St. Louis Railroad, between Pattonsburg 
and Council Bluffs. 



—40- 



LINES EAST OF THE DETROIT RIVER. 



Description of Lines. 




•3 


Operated 
under Joint 
Trackage. 


i 

23 


3 . 
33'-' C 

r 


hi 
< 


FROM TO 

Detroit Black Rock 







227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


147.9 
20.6 

14.1 
4.5 


375.0 


Welland Jet . .Susp. Bridge 






38.4 


Susp. Bridge. ...Buffalo 






39.7 


Black Rock .. International Jet 






9.3 










Total 


275.3 


275.3 


187.1 


462.4 











Note. — Above does not include 4.8 miles New York Central tracks 
between Black Rock and Exchange Street Station, Buffalo, for the use 
of which the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 

Note. — Above does not include 0.6 mile Lehigh Valley track at 
TVabash freight station, Louisiana Street, Buffalo, for the use of which 
the "Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



-41— 



Eecapitulation. 
miles of eoad operated. 



Description of Lines. 


d 
O 


•o 




a 

r 


Ill 


i 


Lines East of the Mississippi 
River 


1254.0 
682.1 


9.2 
101.2 


88.2 

73.0 
275.3 

436.5 


1351.4 

856.3 
275.3 


530.7 

222.1 
187.1 


1882.1 


Lines West of the Mississippi 
River 


1078.4 


Lines East of the Detroit River.. 


462.4 










Total 


1936.1 


110.4 


2483.0 


939.9 


3422 9 







Note. — Increase in Lines "Owned" is caused by purchase of 
Omaha & St. Louis Railroad, 143.7 miles, and the completion of 
Toledo & Chicago Railway, 49.5 miles and the Ft. Wayne & Detroit 
Railway, 26.2 miles. 



The Main Track Mileage shown in the foregoing state- 
ment is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New York 31.0 

In Canada 244.3 

In Michigan ;... 80.4 

In Ohio 165.0 

In Indiana 357.0 

In Illinois 744.9 

In Missouri 653.9 

In Iowa 206.5 

Total 2483.0 



—42- 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 

Amount received from employes $54,582 

Amount received from Wabash Railroad for care of injured 

passengers 1,662 78 

Amount received from other railroads for care of their em- 
ployes 332 11 

Total Receipts $56,577 09 

Expenses 47,792 42 

Surplus for year $ 8,784 67 

Surplus, June 30, 1901 ...; 41,800 80 

Interest on Surplus during year 1,226 29 

Rent Peru property 140 00 

Surplus June 30, 1902 $51,951 76 

1901-1902. 1900-1901 

Number of patients treated in Hospitals 1,270 1,141 

Number of patients treated outside of Hospitals 24,154 23,697 

Total number of patients treated 25,424 24,838 

Number of Surgical casestreated 2,991 2,475 

Number of Medical cases treated 22,433 22,363 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients in Hos- 
pitals 6,248 4,169 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients outside of 

Hospitals 42,291 42,007 

Total number of deaths 20 13 

The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jr., Chairman , 
W. H. Blodqett, 
E. B. Pryor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., August 15th, 1902. 
J. Eamsey, Jr., 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1902, as follows : 

A. Kesults of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 
H. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

J. Mileage Statistics for Twenty-one Years. 

K. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



—44— 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Taxes 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc 

Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 

Net Earnings from Operation 

Additions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest 

Interest on Bonds 

Surplus 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds 

Net Surplus 



$ 19,053, 
13,847, 



493 17 
435 88 



$5,206, 
627, 



057 29 
930 12 



$4,578, 
317, 



127 17 
288 15 



$4,895, 
758, 



415 32 
,650 79 



$4,136 
760, 



764 53 
547 62 



$3,376. 
2,964, 



216 91 
756 87 



$411, 

2io; 



460 04 
000 00 



$201,460 04 



$17,554, 
12,752, 



465 15 
045 11 



$4,802,420 04 
586,199 20 



$4,216, 
262, 



220 84 
180 94 



$4,478, 
757, 



401 78 
938 50 



$3,720,463 28 
656,756 06 



$3,063 
2,760, 



707 22 
571 24 



210 



,135 98 
,000 00 



$93,135 98 



1. Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 


$805,325 92 ! S79R 09R 27 


Credit " " " 


100.867 57 


81 655 53 






Traffic Association and Miscellaneous Expenses 


$704,458 35 
54,192 44 


$714,440 74 
43,497 76 




$758,650 79 


$757,938 50 



2. Analysis of Additions to Property and Other Charges. 



Year ending i Year ending 
June 30, 1902. June 30, 1901. 



Additions to Property as per Table *'F" 

Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sinking Fund Char- 
ges and Maintenance of Steamers 

Detroit & Chicago Extension— Sinking Fund 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, Sink- 
ing Fund 

Premium on Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds. 



$583,499 60 



45,339 88 
27,208 14 



100,000 00 
4,500 00 



$7fi0,547 62 



$544,126 29 



59,544 84 
19,751 60 



33,333 33* 



$656,756 06 



* Gold Equipment Sinking Fund, 1901, represents 4 months accrued. 



—45- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 



Eaknixgs. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



July 

August 

September 

Ocxober 

November., 
December.. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passengers 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 
" " Passenger " " 

" Mail ■ " " . 

" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings j;Taxes not deducted) 

Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings. 

Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



1,552, 
1,686, 
1,661, 
1,805, 
1,639; 
1,592, 
1,660, 
1,396, 
1.551, 
1,481 
1,510, 
1,515. 



341 36 

381 71 
285 09 
700 46 
573 09 
341 54 
210 93 
170 79 
555 51 
552 09 
759 63 
620 97 



$19,053,493 1'; 



$11,763,541 41 

5,780,240 62 

691,100 63 

416,474 62 

402,135 89 



$19,053,493 17 



61.74 

30.34 

3.63 

2.18 

2.11 



1,350 

1.527 
1,615 
1,643 
1,431 
1,536 
1,518 
1,270 
1,467 
1,354 
1,411 
1,427 



,104 31 
,318 57 
,570 52 
.001 55 
,584 84 
,237 29 
,685 96 
,495 80 
,308 49 
,534 86 
,684 72 
,938 24 



$17,554,465 15 



$11,158,966 24 

4,982,694 25 

659,175 32 

389,774 43 

363,854 91 



$17,554,465 15 



63.57 

28.38 



2.22 
2.07 



$13,847,435 88 


$12,752,045 11 


$627,930 12 


$ 586,199 20 


72.68 


72.64 


$5,206,057 29 


$4,802,420 04 


27.32 


27.36 



2,438.0 


2,360.3 


$7,815 21 


$7,437 39 


5,679 83 


5,402 72 


2,135 38 


2,034 67 



—46— 



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-47— 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1902. 

(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 

ASSETS. 





1902. 


1901. 


Increase. Decrease. 


Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 

Supplies and Materials on 

Hand 


$144,009,500.00 

1,259,860 13 
1,128,740 87 

1,377.530 23 


$136,980,500 00 

816,930 67 
935,860 44 

1,282,331 20 
607,120 29 

185,191 88 

165.378 25 

70,705 57 

441,592 64 
14,466 39 

46,060 90 
511,350 27 


$7,029,000 00 

442,929 46 
192,880 43 

95,199 03 




CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 
Bonds 






607,120 29 


Sundry Accounts Collectible- 
Due from Asrents 


234,437 67 

179,296 45 

62,884 15 

749 052 04 


49,245 79 
13,918 20 

307,459 40 


From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 
Pacific Express Co 


7,82142 


Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 




14,466 39 


Advances Fast Freight Lines 
Account Working Fund 


42,961 20 
476,853 26 




3,099 70 




34.497 01 






$149,521,116.00 


$142,057,488 50 


$7,463,627 50 









LIABILITIES. 





1902. 


1901. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

92,110,000 00 

190,169 00 

703,883 74 

105,000 00 

2,603,535 65 

293,850 05 

387,108 79 

4,601 15 

75,000 00 

292,290 40 
113,256 43 

642,420 79 


$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

85,081,000 00 

193,636 00 

622,883 74 

105,000 00 

2,312,670 25 

348,972 31 

340,605 61 

3,848 95 

180,009 50 

465,861 28 






Preferred Stock . 






Bonds (4) 


7,029,000 00 




Interest Due 


3,467 00 


Interest Accrued, not Due 


81,000 00 


Dividends Debenture Bonds, 
Series ''A'' due . 




Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 


290,865 40 




55,122 26 




46,503 18 
752 20 




Hospital Account 

Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable.. 




105,009 50 


Equipment Notes of Long 


n3,"256'43 

239,419 93 


173,570 88 


Miscellaneous (6) 


Balance to credit, Profit and 
Loss .... 


403,000 86 










$149,521,116 00 


$142,057,488 50 


7,463,627 50 





(1) Increase is due to issue of Toledo and Chicago Division 1st Mortgage 
Bonds, $3,000,000 00, Omaha Division Bonds, $3,000,000.00, Kansas City, Excelsior 
Springs & Northern Railroad Bonds, $100,000,00, Columbia & St. Louis Railroad 
1st Mortgage Bonds, $100,000.00, Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, 
balance $945,000.00, less Detroit and Chicago Extension Bonds retired by Sinking 
Fund, $16,000.00, and Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds retired, $100,000.00. 

(2) Decrease is due to re-payment of advances from Earnings prior to June 
30th, 1901, on construction accounts Toledo & Chicago R. R. and Ft. Wayne & De- 
troit R. R. from proceeds of sale of Toledo & Chicago Division Bonds. 

(3) Miscellaneous includes 5294,615.40 carried in suspense, on account of new 
equipment and $131,946.25 advanced from Earnings for Real Estate in St. Louis 
and which latter amount was replaced in July. 1902, in the Treasury of the Com- 
pany from proceeds sale of Debenture Bonds Series B. 

(4) See note No. 1. 

(5) The Equipment Notes extend over a period'of 28 months, the monthly pay- 
ments averaging $14,464.24 for the first 15 months, $9,768.06 for the next 2 months 
and $5,071.88 for the remaining 11 months. 

(6) Miscellaneous includes $79,923.10 balance of proceeds of Omaha Division 
Bonds, less Omaha & St. Louis liabilities paid and expenditures for reconstruc- 
tion, and also accrued liability, Sinking Fund on Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds 
March 1 to June 30, $33 ,333,33. 



-48— 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1902. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— PAS3ENGER. 



Year ending Year ending 
June 30, 1902 June 30, 1901. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of 

Agents— Station 

Baggage Masters 

Brakemen and Porters 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock 

Dining Car Expenses and Restaurants 

Incidentals 

Injuries to Individuals 

Loss and Damage of Baggage 

Mail Expenses 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent.... 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Union Depots— Expenses of 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total - $1,974,941 20 



78,416 94 
139,955 76 
102,898 89 
42,259 64 
91,387 63 
127,428 51 
5,889 26 
175,941 69 
56,867 03 
14,769 20 
86,471 45 



203,494 35 

15,539 19 

13,690 72 

23,351 34 

33,706 46 

151,119 50 

7,fi68 88 

4,320 40 

51,336 93 

9,755 61 

5,297 47 

38,204 02 

10,626 82 

60,688 90 

56,022 00 

81,615 75 

19,690 78 

162,097 68 

95,519 35 

8,909 05 



48,811 29 
122,851 09 
94,267 69 
39,222 71 
86,204 62 
108,686 76 
5,013 55 
162,578 77 
42,960 50 
14,451 11 
77,297 88 



185,198 51 

5,710 97 
14,564 03 
23,689 96 
25,806 99 
54,135 08 

6,593 28 

3,696 31 
43,822 40 
10,166 30 

4,434 55 
34,060 81 

8,871 25 
41,616 84 
54,641 62 
76,603 32 

9.281 80 
143,314 51 
86,727 34 

8,485 06 



$1,643,766 90 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Advertising 

Agents— Outside— Salaries and Expenses of. 

Agents — Station 

Brakemen 

Cars— Cleaning, Oiling and Inspecting 

do Fuel for 

do Hire of , 

do Light for 

do Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc., for 

Clerks 

Commissions 

Conductors 

Damage to Property 

Damage to Stock , 

Incidentals , 

Injuries to Individuals , 

Loss and Damage of Goods 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations— Expenses of 

do Fuel at 

do Labor at 

do Light at 

do Repairs of and Rent 

Superintendence 

Telegraph— Expenses of 

Track Tolls 

Yardmen and Switch Tenders 

Ferry Transfer at Detroit 



Total $3,274,097 05 



295,611 14 

144,543 29 

334,319 19 

85,559 12 

1,591 82 

284,685 94 

688 61 

21,611 24 

427,772 77 

7,222 85 

233,376 02 

30,345 31 

11,297 38 

8,800 84 

58,034 40 

73,158 90 

48,187 97 

18,758 33 

11,508 20 

412,814 59 

17,355 62 

100,779 06 

111,323 62 

167,085 38 

24,773 77 

291.647 05 

51,244 64 



272 
138 
330 

75 

325 

18 

408 

8 

231 

11 

11 

12 

36 

65, 

45: 

17, 

9. 

368, 

16, 

82, 
109, 
155, 

39, 
273, 

55, 



,399 70 
,815 S2 
,739 28 
899 50 
,299 68 
638 66 
,455 94 
,634 13 
,162 89 
,625 32 
,062 07 
,513 06 
,628 89 
,697 30 
,888 93 
,500 93 
,961 18 
,538 96 
,807 64 
,376 93 
,847 41 
117 80 
490 84 
289 07 
038 05 
404 03 



$3,122,232 57 



49- 



E — Continued. 
THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

MOTIVE POWER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Engineers and Firemen— Passenger 

do do Freight 

Engine Houses, M. S., etc., Fuel, Lights, etc., for... 

do do M. S. & T. T.— Repairs of 

Incidentals 

Locomotives, Passenger — Coal for 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Freight— Coal for 

Passenger— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc.,f or 

Freight— Oil, Tallow, Waste, etc. , for 

Passenger— Repairs of 

Freight— Repairs of 

Passenger— Wood for 

Freight — Wood for 

Furniture and Fixtures of 

Hire of 

Printing and Stationery 

Stations, Fuel— Expenses of 

do do Repairs of 

do Water — Expense Pumping 

do do Repairs of 

Superintendence 

Tools and Machinery— Expenses and Repairs of 

Watchmen 

Wipers, Hostlers and Despatchers 



Total $4,294,888 83 



425,189 34 

678,286 23 

23,969 28 

66,200 70 

71,021 58 

355,867 58 

769,394 73 

22,303 43 

31,497 72 

357,825 50 

713,182 53 

5,084 94 

7,849 80 

24,351 59 

20,372 40 

4,219 25 

60,416 97 

37,277 13 

92,258 48 

72,008 50 

89,980 96 

185,382 48 

24,337 00 

156,610 71 



$ 395,225 78 

670,938 46 

18,367 23 

64,719 41 

61,820 13 

313,100 19 

761,692 65 

19,333 20 

28,847 43 

317,259 68 

614,813 91 

3,700 98 

5,802 65 

19,396 85 

46,783 60 

3,661 92 

51,083 94 

25,735 19 

75,185 11 

39,884 63 

86,732 78 

128,419 27 

20,115 61 

136,695 07 



$3,909,315 67 



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Ballast 

Bridges— Repairs of 

Cross-Ties 

Fences and Road Crossings — Repairs of 

Frogs and Switch Fixtures 

Incidentals 

New Side Tracks— Grading 

Oil, Tallow, Waste and Fuel 

Printing and Stationery 

River Protection 

Section, Tool, Watch Houses, etc 

Snow and Ice Removing 

Spikes— Track... ^ 

Splices, Bolts and Fastenings 

Steel Rails 

Superintendence and Supervisors 

Telegraph— Repairs of 

Tools and Machinery — Repairs and Renewals of. 

Track- Repairs of 

Watchmen of Roadway and Bridges 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 



180,413 35 
314,983 67 
503,934 77 
102,940 72 
85,354 98 
10,221 82 



11,288 06 

2,065 19 

1,289 70 

3,304 37 

18,228 51 

25,385 35 

96,940 94 

242,098 06 

100,315 02 

50,847 05 

23,300 82 

836,783 46 

113,714 89 

17,490 59 



163,161 38 
236,316 14 
571,452 69 
100,040 22 
96,627 64 
6,369 10 



11,097 76 

1,821 79 

5,696 76 

3,537 25 

12,634 90 

21,377 39 

28,577 44 

81,662 68 

104,373 42 

29,688 88 

20,784 98 

725,798 41 

107,466 11 

6,886 31 



Total 



$2,740,901 32 



$2,335,371 25 



—50— 

E — Continued. 
THE WABASH KAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Opekatinq Expenses — Continued. 

MAINTENANCE OF CARS. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Cars, Pass., Express, Mail and Bag.— Repairs of 


$274,060 69 

732.376 20 

90,151 34 

33,523 89 

845 55 

13,866 74 

329 75 

2,798 61 

48,520 45 

44,. 300 16 

3,313 18 


$ 238,514 02 

1,063,667 95 

25.752 14 

27,473 50 

948 65 


do Road Service— Repairs of , 

do Furniture and Fixtures 

Car Shops and Buildings, Fuel, Light, etc., for 




8,664 14 

112 85 

2,555 42 


Incidentals 

Printing and Stationery 


Superintendence 


49,669 00 


Tools and Machinery— Expense and Repairs of 

Watchmen 


36,010 17 
3,783 19 


Total 


$1,244,086 56 


$1 457,151 03 





GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



General Offices— Attendants at 

do Clerks in 

do Fuel, Lights, etc., for 

do Rent of 

do Repairs of 

do Printing and Stationery ... 

do Petty Expenses of 

General Officers— Salaries and Expenses of 

Insurance 

Incidentals 

Interest and Exchange 

Legal Department— Expenses of 

Expenses of New York Office 

do London Agency 

War Revenue Stamps 

Total 



$ 2,820 00 

36,323 39 

495 96 

20,807 64 

1,612 06 
27,330 37 

2,661 63 
47,378 28 
43,238 67 

9,707 39 

372 86 

87,420 98 

17,224 79 

2,931 00 
18,193 00 



$ 2,819 70 

35,286 46 

362 81 

19.832 64 

1,279 59 
19,186 03 

2,755 45 
44,978 65 
28,662 34 

7,834 77 

121 89 

83,632 20 

16,691 22 

1,948 00 
19,015 94 



$318,520 92 



$284,207 69 



RECAPITULATION. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 



Conducting Transportation 

Motive Power 

Maintenance of Way 

Maintenance of Cars 

General Expenses 

Total Operating Expenses 



$5,249,038 25 
4,294,888 83 
2,740,901 32 
1,244,086 56 
318.520 92 



$4,765,999 47 
3,909,315 67 
2,335,371 25 
1,457,151 03 
284,207 69 



$13,847,435 88 



$12,752,045 11 



-51- 



F 
THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY, 

Additions to Property — Year Ending June 30, 1902. 

New Yards, Main, Side and Spur Tracks $ 205,538 31 

Cost of Property in Quincy, 111 178,203 46 

Real Estate 160,277 64 

Changing Grades on Chicago Division 7,021 41 

New Freight and Passenger Stations 32,458 78 

Total $ 583,499 60 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Train and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1901. 


Per Cent. 




Increase. Decrease. 


Tons Carried, Revenue Freight 


8,578,603 

1,903,089 

10,481,692 

1,947,404,142 

217,017,487 

2,164,421,629 

206.5 Miles. 


8,354,949 

1,672,409 

10,027,358 

1,978,952,453 

178,263,782 

2,157,216,235 

215.1 Miles. 


2.68 
13.79 
4.53 




Tons Carried, Company Freight 








Tons carried one Mile , Revenue Freight- 


1.59 


Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 
Total Tons carried one Mile 


21.74 
0.33 






Average Distance each Ton carried 


4.00 






Earnings from Freight traffic 


$11,763,541 41 
9,015,065 37 


$11,158,966 24 
8,634,791 53 


5.42 
4.40 














$1 37.13 

1 05.09 

Cts. 0.6041 

" 0.4629 

" 0.1412 


$1 33.56 

1 03.35 

Cts. 0.5639 

" 0.4363 

" 0.1276 


2.67 
J. 68 
7.13 
6.10 
10.66 




Average Expenses per Ton 




Average Hate per Ton per Mile 

Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 

Average Net per Ton per Mile 










Total Freight Train Mileage.... 


6,841,121 
$1 71.95 
1 31.78 
40,17 


6,981,266 
$1 59.84 
1 23.69 
36.15 




2.01 


7.68 

6.54 

11.12 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 




Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 






Car Mileage, Loaded... 


129.714,750 
50,721,670 
180,436,420 


129,392,990 
54,579,744 
183,972,734 


0.26 




Car Mileage, Empty 


7.07 


Car MUeage, Total — Loaded and Empty. 




1.92 








Average Loaded Cars per Train 


18.96 

7.41 

26.37 

16.69 

12.00 

316.38 

284.66 


18.53 

7.82 

26.35 

16.67 

11.73 

309.00 

283.47 


2.32 




Average Empty Cars per Train 


5.24 


Average Total Cars per Train. 


0.08 
0.12 

2.30 

2.39 

0.42 




Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 




Average Load per Car, Loaded and 




Average Load per Train— Tons — includ- 




Average Load per Train— Tons— Revenue 








Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 9.07 
" 6.95 


Cts. 8.62 
" 6.67 


5.22 
4.20 




Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 









PASSENGER. 



Number of Passengers carried 

Number of Passengers carried one Mile. 
Average distance each Passenger carried 

Earnings from Passenger Traffic 

Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc... 
Operating Expenses 

Average Revenue per Passenger 

Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 

Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 

Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 

Average Net per Passenger per Mile 

Total Passenger Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile. 

Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 

Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 

Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 

Average number Cars per Train 

Average number Passengers per Coach 

and Sleeper 

Average number Passengers per Train... 

Average Earnings per Car per Mile 

Average Expenses per Car per Mile 



5,109,302 
322,708,490 
63.2 Miles, 



$5,780,240 62 
7,029,644 06 
4,832,370 51 



$1 13.13 
94.58 
Cts, 1.791 
" 1.497 
" 0.294 



7,691,050 
$0 91.40 
62.83 
28.57 



26,900,759 
35,659,206 



4.64 



12.00 
41.96 



Cts. 19.71 
" 13.55 



4,943,016 
264,268,214 
53.5 Miles. 



$4,982,694 25 
6,161,877 40 
4,117,253 58 



$1 00,80 
83.29 
Cts. 1.885 
" 1.558 
" 0.327 



7,237,313 
$0 85.14 
55.89 
28.25 



25,101,227 
33,083,356 



4.57 



10.53 
36.51 



Cts. 18.63 
" 12.45 



22.11 
18,13 



16.01 
14,08 
17,37 



12,23 
13,56 



6.27 

7.35 

10,44 

1.13 



7.17 
7.79 



1,53 



13.96 
14.93 



5.80 
8,84 



4,99 
3,92 
10.09 



-53— 



H 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Tonnage of Articles Cakried. 



Year ending 
June SOth, 1902. 



Per 
Cent. 



Tons. 



Year ending 
June SOth, 1901. 



Per 
Cent. 



Tons. 



Products op Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 

Other Grain 

Flour 

Other Mill Products 

Hay 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Fruits and Vegetables.... 



Products of Animals: — 

Live Stock 

Dressed Meats 

Other Packing House Products. 

Wool 

Hides and Leather 



Products of Mines:- 
Stone, Sand, etc.. 
Anthracite Coal.., 
Bituminous Coal., 

Coke , 

Ores 



Products of Forest: 

Lumber , 

Other Articles 



Manufactures :— 

Petroleum and Other Oils 

Sugar 

Iron, Pig and Bloom 

Iron and Steel Rails. 

Other Castings and Machinery. 

Cement, Brick and Lime 

Agrieulturallmplements 

Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc.. 

Wines, Beer and Liquors 

H. H. Goods and Furniture 



Merchandise .. 
Miscellaneous, 



Total Tons 



Company's Freight. 



100.00 



21.12 




29.02 




1.91 


164,196 


3.31 


276,403 


6.52 


559,723 


10.89 


910,048 


4.11 


352,757 


5.92 


494.794 


1.68 


144,074 


1.89 


158,240 


2.61 


223,727 


2.76 


230,851 


1.65 


141.200 


1.81 


151,006 


0.04 


3,412 


0.06 


4,772 


0.57 


49.314 


0.44 


36,882 


2.03 


173,759 


1.94 

j 


161,928 


8.25 




; 9.21 




3.97 


340,151 


4.00 


334,108 


1.32 


113,424 


1.47 


122,625 


2.17 


186,288 


2.94 


245,739 


0.10 


8,926 


0.08 


6,680 


0.69 


59,516 


0.72 


60,501 


31.39 




27.81 




2.08 


178,490 


3.86 


322,412 


3.02 


259,039 


3.07 


256,426 


25.62 


2,197,500 


20.47 


1,710,650 


0.34 


28,961 


0.24 


19,992 


0.33 


28,568 


0.17 


13,848 


8.48 




i 7.74 




6.33 


543,301 


1 5.73 


478,341 


2.15 


184,302 


2.01 


168,182 


9.24 




7.80 




0.97 


83.530 


1.07 


89 110 


0.53 


45,160 


0.61 


51,322 


0.53 


45,150 


1 0.43 


35,849 


1.22 


104,681 


: 0.84 


70,003 


1.40 


119,846 


1.17 


97,711 


2.60 


222,753 


1.94 


161,868 


0.57 


49.288 


0.42 


35,119 


0.17 


14,592 


19 


15,945 


0.92 


78,532 


0.85 


70,704 


0.33 


28,379 


0.28 


23,786 


6.58 


564,048 


6.29 


525,261 


14.94 


1,282,016 


12.13 


1.013,845 



8,578.603 
1,903.089 



100.00 



8,354,949 



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LINE i 




RAILROAD 

1 




Fourteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co 



Kor tine Kiscal Year Ending 
June 30th, 1903. 



ST LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co. 

1903. 



i 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



-OF- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 



O. D. ASHLEY, Chairman of the Board. 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

M, KNIGHT, Second Vice-President. 

W. H. BLODGETT, Third Vice-President and General Counsel. 

A. C. BIRD, Vice-President. 

E. B. PRYOR, Asst. to the President, Executive Dept. 

H. W. ASHLEY, Asst. to the President, Operative Dept. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

H. L. MAGEE, General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

S. B. KNIGHT, ....... General Freight Agent. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. B. ADAMS, Superintendent Transportation. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

H. H. WELLMAN, Purchasing Agent and General Storekeeper. 

W. S. NEWHALL, Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

De. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 

R. J. WOODS, Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 

O. D. ASHLEY, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

GEO. J. GOULD, EDWIN GOULD, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

HENRY K. McHARG, JOHN T. TERRY, 

CYRUS J. LAWRENCE, RUSSELL SAGE, 

JAMES HAZEN HYDE, WINSLOW S. PIERCE, 
JOSEPH RAMSEY, Jk. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DIRECTORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co, 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1903 



St. Louis, Mo., October 1, 1903. 

To THE Board of Directors, 

The Wabash Railroad Company 

Mr. 0. D. Ashley, Chairman. 
Dear Sir:-^ 

The annual report for the year ending June 30th, 1903, 
herewith submitted, like all the annual reports since June 
30th, 1897, shows a continuous growth in the earnings of 
the System and great improvements in the condition of 



— 4— 

the Property and in its Equipment and facilities for 
handling its traffic economically and promptly. 

The following statement gives in condensed form the 
revenues, expenses, charges, etc, for the fiscal year as com- 
pared with the previous year : 

1902-1903. 1901—1902. 

Total revenue of the Company from all 

sources was $21,608,756 88 $19,370,781 32 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 17,350,805 40 15,234,016 79 

$ 4,257,951 48 | 4,136,764 53 
Interest on Bonds 3,034,512 60 2,964,756 87 

Net Kevenue $ 1,223,438 88 $ 1,172,007 66 

Additions to Property 253,132 15 583,499 60 

$ 970,306 73 $ 588,508 06 
Sinking Fund Charges, account new 
equipment, steamers and amount set 
aside for new equipment $ 564,156 65 $ 177,048 02 

$ 406,150 08 $ 411,460 04 
Dividend of 6% on Debenture "A" Bonds 210,000 00 210,000 00 

Surplus to Profit & Loss Account $ 196,150 08 $ 201,460 04 



The great growth of the traffic and revenues since 1897 
is clearly shown by the following comparisons : 



Year. Ton Miles. Passenger Miles. Gross Earnings. 

1897 1,149,989,024 135,963,860 $11,526,787 00 

1898 1,365,693,174 180,359,167 13,207,862 00 

1899 1,666,830,054 210,592,939 14,393,974 00 

1900 1,902,881,278 233,848,065 16,440,990 00 

1901 1,978,952,453 264,268,214 17,554,465 00 

1902 ,1,947,404,142 322,708,490 19,053,493 00 

1903 2,198,073,383 330,111,942 21,140,829 00 

Increase 1903 over 1897... 91.1% 142.8% 83.4% 



The increases in different classes of earnings were : 

1897. 1903. Per cent Increase. 

Freight 17,604,769 95 $13,327,478 75 75.3% 

Passenger 2,837,973 54 6,135,500 85 116.2% 

Mails 542,635 09 716,200 09 31.9% 

Express 284,706 69 464,645 19 63.2% 

Miscellaneous 256,702 09 497,004 06 93.6% 

Total ...,..$11,526,787 36 $21,140,828 94 83.4% 



There is every prospect of a continuance of this satisfac- 
tory growth in our traffic, for the current year at least. The 
increase for the quarter July 1st to September 30th, 1903, 
will be at least $850,000.00, which justifies an estimate of at 
least $23,000,000.00 gross earnings for the current year 
ending June 30th, 1904. 

While there were general advances in wages during the 
year ending June 30th, 1902, the increases then made did 
not satisfy all the employees, and during the present year 
large additional increases were rendered necessary by the 
action of other railways, until every class of the service has 
received from ten to twenty per cent advance over the rate 
paid two years ago. 

In addition to the direct increase in rates of pay, rules, 
changing hours of work, mileage, doubling and overtime 
have materially added to the cost of train and switching 
service. The total increase due to these advances in wages 
and changes in rules will fully reach |550,000.00 per year. 

The work of building up the property and improving 
the condition of tracks, roadway, station buildings and 
facilities, reduction of grades and elimination of curves and 



increase in rolling stock and motive power continued with 
vigor during the year. The details of this work are shown 
in the Maintenance of Way and Equipment statements. 

The principal items of expenditures on account of addi- 
tions and improvements were : 

Additions to Tracks, Shops, Stations, Real 
Estate, etc I 879,722 95 

For New Engines, Freight and Passenger 
Cars, including Sinking Fund on Equip- 
ment Mortgage 698,214 69 

New Machinery in Shops 80,403 33 

Reduction of Grades and Filling in 
Trestles 268,318 39 

New Steel Bridges to Replace Wooden 
Trestles and Weak Iron Structures 481,801 30 

Total Extraordinary Expenditures $1,908,460 66 

28,192 tons or 223.9 miles, of 80 pound 

steel rail was laid in track at cost of | 347,412 31 

The contracts referred to in last annual report for reduc- 
tion of grades at five points on the Chicago Division were 
completed, and work is now progressing at Carpenter Hill, 
Custer Park, Bement and Edwardsville, all of which work 
will be completed by December 31st, 1903, when our 
Chicago-St. Louis line will be operated on a 21 foot per 
mile grade basis. 

During the year all the old bridges on the Buffalo Divi- 
sion were replaced with modern steel bridges at a total cost of 
over 1500,000.00, of which the Wabash paid over $300,000.00. 
This Division has been practically rebuilt since the Wabash 
commenced running over it— heavy bridges, rail, ballast 
and longer passing tracks — and we may now expect an 



— 7— 

increase in the net earnings of that Division. The comple- 
tion of bridges will now permit of the use of our heavier 
engines, giving a more economical operation in train service. 

The new engines (50) contracted for last year are being 
delivered now. Those received and in service are showing 
good results. 

500 forty-ton steel underbody flat cars were received early 
in the spring. 

1,500 forty-ton coal cars were contracted for, and at pres- 
ent date 500 have been received. The remaining 1,000 are 
now being completed at the shops. 

42 passenger coaches, chair cars, postal and baggage cars 
were received under contracts entered into during the year, 
and twelve more are yet to be delivered. 

On these contracts 15 per cent to 20 per cent was or will 
be paid in cash out of amount appropriated by the Board 
for new equipment, and Car Trust notes running sixty 
months at 5 per cent interest will be given for the balance. 

In anticipation of a very large passenger travel on 
account of the Exposition at St. Louis it was deemed wise 
to push the work on the tracks, changes of grade and 
increased siding and double track facilities during the 
past year, and have this work all completed by December 
31st, 1903, and thus avoid any work on main tracks during 
the Exposition period, May 1st to November 30th, 1904, 
reducing liability of delays and accidents to our passenger 
traffic. This policy accounts for a good portion of the 
increase in extraordinary expenses. 



— 8— 

The large increase in traffic, and in equipment for mov- 
ing the traffic — cars and engines — has clearly demonstrated 
during the past two years the utter inadequacy of our facili- 
ties for handling — loading, unloading and warehousing — 
this traffic at our principal terminal points — ^^Chicago, St. 
Louis, Detroit, Toledo, Kansas City and other points. Under 
ordinary conditions we might have been able to gradually 
secure the land necessary for these increased terminal facil- 
ites and have paid for them out of earnings during the next 
few years, but the conditions were such, owing to the 
scarcity of choice locations for terminals in the large cities, 
the pressing necessities calling for immediate relief, and the 
activity of competing lines in purchasing desirable lands 
for their own terminals, that immediate action on the 
part of your Company was necessary; delay was very dan- 
gerous. The plan of a Terminal Bond issue was therefore 
decided upon, the total issue to be $10,000,000.00, $4,000,- 
000.00 to be used for immediate requirements. 

Pursuant to this plan, land was bought in St. Louis, 
bounded by Second street and Third street and extending 
from Franklin avenue northward about 1,200 feet, giving 
about eleven acres of ground, within three blocks of the 
business section of St. Louis. No other railroad can secure 
as choice a location for freight house purposes. 

At Chicago, Detroit and Toledo plans have been devel- 
oped and progress made in securing land. 

These desirable and valuable terminals will add so largely 
to our revenues that the fixed charges of the Terminal Bond 
issue will be more than met from these sources, and they 



— 9— 

will hasten, instead of delay, the time when the holders 
of Debentures and the Stocks of the Company will receive 
dividends. 



ANALYSIS OF OPERATION:. 

Operating expenses increased $1,968,226.44 (14.21 per 
cent), of this amount $782,527.04 was in Maintenance of 
Way and Structures, an increase of 26.81 per cent over 1902. 

The principal item of increase in Maintenance of Way 
was repairs and renewals of bridges, which was $500,220.22 
more than last year, $304,434.87 of this was the Wabash 
wheelage proportion of amounts expended on bridges on the 
Buffalo Division, which will enable us to use heavier engines 
on that division, and largely increase the train load as well 
as to cut down the running time of our fast passenger trains 
over that division. 

The total amount expended for Maintenance of Way and 
Structures was $3,700,961.69, or $1,490.00 per mile of road 
operated. 



■10- 



I 



REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Earnings and Expenses. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net IDarnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$21,140,828 94 
15,815,662 32 



$5,325,166 62 

74.81 

8,513 20 

6,368 81 

2,144 39 



$19,053,493 17 
13,847,435 88 



$5,206,057 29 

72.68 

7,815 21 

5,679 83 

2,135 38 



$2,087,335 77 
1,968,226 44 



$119,109 33 

2.13 

697 99 

688 98 

9.01 



EARNINGS. 



Per 
Cent, 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Exi)ress 

Miscellaneous 



Total. 



63.04 
29.02 
3.39 
2.20 
2.35 



1902-1903. 



Per 
Cent. 



$13,327,478 75 
,135,500 85 
716,200 09 
464,645 19 
497,004 06 



$21,140,828 94 



61.74 

30.34 

3.63 

2.18 

2.11 



$11,763,541 41 

5,780,240 62 

691,100 63 

416,474 6'2 

402,135 89 



$19,053,493 17 



Increase. 



$1,563,937 34 
355,260 23 
25,099 46 
48,170 57 
94,868 17 



$2,087,335 77 



EXPENSES. 





Per 

Cent. 


1902-1903. 


Per 
Cent. 


1901-1902. 


Increase. 


Maintenance of Way and 
Structures 


23.40 

19.69 

53.82 

3.09 


$ 3,700,961 69 

3,114,663 95 

8,511,277 61 

488,759 07 


21.08 

19.18 

56.55 

3.19 


$ 2,918,414 65 

2,656,118 20 

7,829,958 99 

442,944 04 


$ 782,547 04 


Maintenance of Equipment. 
Conducting Transportation 
General Expenses 


458,545 75] 

681,318 62 

45,815 03 


Total 




$15,815,662 32 




$13,847,435 88 


$1,968,226 44 











11— 



The increase of $2,087,335.77 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $2,075,059 14 

Buffalo Division, Increase 12,276 63 

The increase of $1,968,226.44 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase 11,793,064 82 

Buffalo Division, Increase 175,161 62 

The large increase in expenses of the Buffalo Division, 
was owing to the large expenditures in connection with new 
bridges, the Wabash wheelage proportion of which amounted 
to $804,434.87, as stated above. 

Leaving out the Buffalo Division for the years 1898-1899, 
1899-1900, 1900-1901, 1901-1902 and 1902-1903, the per- 
centage of operating expenses to earnings on the Wabash 
proper was as follows : 

Year ending June 30th, 1899 71.21 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1900 71.87 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1901 72.34 per cent. 

Year ending June 30th, 1902 72.91 per cent. . 

Year ending June 30th, 1903 74.46 per cent. 



TRAFFIC. 

FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics show an increase of 250,669,241 
(12.87 per cent), in "tons revenue freight carried one mile," 
at an average rate of 0.6063 cents per mile, an increase of 
0.0022 cents (0.36 per cent) , at a cost per ton mile of 0.4692 



cents, an increase of 0.0063 cents (1.36 per cent), leaving a 
net profit of 0.1371 cents as compared with 0.1412 cents 
last year, a decrease of 0.0041 cents (2.90 per cent). 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.8297 ; 
expense per mile $1.4159, and net earnings, $0.4138 against 
$1.7195, $1.3178 and $0.4017 respectively last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 7,284,158, an increase 
of 443,037, about 6.48 per cent. 

The loaded cars per train decreased 0.37 cars ; the load 
per car increased 1.13 tons and the revenue train load was 
301.76 tons against 284.66 tons last year, an increase of 17.10 
tons 6.01 per cent. For the years 1895 to 1903 the revenue 
train load and load per car, have been as follows : 

Year. Train Load. Car Load. 

1895 176.29 tons. 13.37 tons. 

1896 193.04 " 13.80 *' 

1897 212.87 " 14.00 " 

1898 216.55 '* 14.16 '* 

1899 234.72 *' 14.83 " 

1900 268.94 " 16.07 " 

190L 283.47 " 16.67 " 

1902 284.66 " 16.69 *' 

1903 301.76 " 17.82 " 

The actual train load, including company freight, was 
331.29 tons, against 316.38 tons last year. 

The increase in train load over 1895 has been 125.47 tons 
(71.17 per cent), and car load has increased 4.45 tons (33.29 
per cent). 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars, 
whether " revenue," freight or " company" freight, are 
included in " loaded cars per train." 



—13- 



With an increase of 12.87 per cent in " services rendered " 
i. e., " tons carried one mile," there was an increase in freight 
revenue of $1,563,937.34 (13.29 per cent), with an increase 
of $1,298,350.05 (14.40 per cent), in expenses of freight traffic. 
While the increase in freight tonnage was 12.97 per cent, 
the increase in freight train service was 6.48 per cent. 

PASSENGER. 

" Passengers carried one mile " increased 7,403,452 (2.29 
per cent), and in revenue $355,260.23 (6.15 per cent). 
There was a decrease of $187,614.51 on the Buffalo Division 
(the Pan-American Exposition was held at Buffalo during 
the previous year), leaving an increase of |542,874.74 on 
the Wabash proper. 

The rate per passenger per mile was 1.859 cents, an 
increase of 0.068 cents and expenses per passenger per mile 
1.667 cents, an increase of 0.170 cents, leaving 0.192 cents 
per mile net, as against 0.294 cents last year, a loss of 34.69 
per cent. 

Train earnings per mile were 96.84 cents, a gain of 5.44 
cents; the expenses were 71.32 cents per train mile, an 
increase of 8.49 cents, and net earnings per train mile were 
25.52 cents against 28.57 cents in 1902. 

The " passengers carried one mile " increased 2.29 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service increased 
13.86 per cent, and the actual number of passengers carried 
was 5,948,913, an increase of 839,611 (16.43 per cent). 



-^14— 

Statistics of freight and passenger traffic show the "net 
earnings" divided between the two classes of traffic as 
follows : 

Freight train net earnings $3,014,063 33 (60.49%) 

Passenger train net earnings... 1,968,745 32 (39.51%) 

Total $4,982,808 65 

Passenger train earnings include mail, express, etc. 



15— 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows : 





Buffalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Maintenance of Way and 
Structures 


198,134 70 

18,705 31 

62,961 24 

* 4,639 63 


$ 684,412 34 

439,840 44 

618,357 38 

50,454 66 


$ 782,547 04 
458 545 75 


Maintenance of Equip- 
ment 


Conducting Transportat'n 
General Expenses 


681,318 62 
45,815 03 




Total 


1175,161 62 


$1,793,064 82 


$1,968,226 44 





♦Decrease. 

The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Repairs of Roadway $320,874 74 

Renewals of Rail 105,314 15 

Repairs and Renewals of Bridges 500,220 02 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives 241,853 51 

Repairs and Renewals of Pass. Cars 53,184 10 

Repairs and Renewals of Freight Cars 120.431 72 

Passenger Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel and water for cars and locomo- 
tives — train supplies — oil, waste and other 

supplies for locomotives, etc., (7.19%) 106,528 09 

Freight Train Service — train and engine 
men, fuel and water for cars and locomo- 
tives — train supplies — oil, waste and other 

supplies for locomotives, etc., (14.94%) 359,127 01 

Station Service — 

Passenger (9.82%) $18,891 79 

Freight (8.99%) 77,299 12 96,190 91 

Maintenance of Way. 
new steel rail laid. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. 



Increase. Decrease. 



No. Tons 80-lb. New Rail 
Miles New Steel Rail Laid 



28,085.0 
223.0 



25,737.0 
204.7 



2,348.0 
18.3 



Note — In the above statement is included 107 tons of new 80-lb. 
rail laid on the Buffalo Division between Niagara Falls and Windsor, 
the Wabash paying its proportion on a wheelage basis. 



—16— 

MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



No. Cross-ties laid, Main 
Track 

Cross-ties laid, Side 
Track 

Sets Switch-ties put 

in 

Miles Track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

Miles Fence Rebuilt. 

Miles Old Fence Re- 
paired 

Miles New Fence 
Built 

Miles Ditching 

Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 



596,751 

139,274 

493 



133.8 
284.3 



140.4 



812,784 
158,803 

687 



248.1 

248.5 

267.4 



113.0 
33.4 



32.4 

224.2 

26.6 



216,033 

19,529 

194 

114.3 



35.8 



127.0 

32.4 
111.2 



6. 



Note— Included in the above are 106,924 cross ties, 50 sets switch 
ties, 10.9 miles of track ballasted, 27.4 miles of fence rebuilt, and 2.5 
miles sidings and spurs built on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo 
Division; and 8,661 cross-ties and 2 sets switch-ties put in on the 
Erie Section of the Buffalo Division. 



Number op Feet op Trestle Shortened. Replaced with Iron Pipe, 
ETC., During the Year Ending June 30, 1903. 



Filled 





Shortened. 


Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 


Filled and 
Abandoned. 


Cost. 


Buffalo Division... 










Detroit Division... 
Eastern Division... 
Middle Division... 
Western Division 


41 feet. 
17 " 
32 '* 
183 " 


297 feet. 
220 " 
884 *' 
1,853 " 


438 feet. 

60 " 
213 " 

62 '' 


$ 13,068 37 

12,233 09 

8,635 08 

12,158 53 


Total 


273 feet. 


3,254 feet. 


773 feet. 


$46,095 07 



Total Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 





1902-1903. 


1901-1902. 


Buffalo Division 




45 


Detroit Division 


776 

297 

1,129 

2 098 


1,896 
904 


Eastern Division 


Middle Division 


2,588 


Western Division 


5,077 


Total 


4,300 


10,510 



—IT- 
EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS AND EXPENSES; IMPROVE- 
MENTS AND ADDITIONS. 

RENEWALS. 

Bridges, wooden, new and rebuilt — 

Rebuilt 121 trestles at various points $88,087 76 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings — 

Detroit, Mich.— Renewal dock along 12th street freight 

house (not completed) | 4,377 58 

Toledo, Ohio. — Renewed coal dock 8,255 79 

Total $12,633 37 

Renewals and Repairs — Depots, Shops, Buildings, Etc., Passenger and 
Freight Stations, new, rebuilt and enlarged — 

Detroit, Mich. — Renewed roof I2th street freight house $ 2,700 02 

Belleville, Mich. — Built new combination depot and plat- 
form. 1,132 11 

Willis, Mich. — Built new combination depot and platform 1,053 28 
Holloway, Mich. — Built new combination depot and plat- 
form (not coujpleted) 616 74 

Alvordton, O. — Moved depot and built new platform 813 23 

Westville, Ind.— Removed combination depot and plat- 
form from Eddy, Ind., and erected same at Westville, 

building new platform 1,428 39 

Aetna, Ind. — Built new combination depot and platform... 1,669 62 

Toledo, O. — Renewal steam heat in engine house 653 92 

Ft.. Wayne, Ind. — Renewal roof and smoke jacks on engine 

house 2,194 83 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Renewal roof and furnaces, blacksmith 

shop 1,037 98 

Rich Valley, Ind. — Renewal combination depot and plat- 
form (not completed) 1,202 74 

Buck Creek, Ind. — Remodeled depot, built new bay win- 
dow and platform 655 87 

Danville, III. — Built new brick and stone depot 8,795 51 

Tilton, 111. — Enlarging engine house doors 747 80 

Tilton, 111. — Renewal stationary boilers 1.002 36 

Sidney. 111. — Rebuilt and enlarged depot 1,655 93 

Saunemin, 111. — Rebuilt depot and platform 1,386 16 

Berlin, 111.— Remodeled depot 1.057 08 

Mounds, 111. — Remodeled depot 531 70 

Chicago, 111. — Repairs to driveways at 12th street freight 

house 1,446 99 

Chicago, 111. — Renewed 60 ft. iron turntable at 4l8t street, 

with new 60 ft. 150 ton capacity steel turntable 1,900 00 

Mobf^rlv, Mo. — Renewed 60 ft. iron turntable, with new 

70 ft 200 ton capacity steel turntable 4,919 03 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed floor in Car Dep't paint shop 1,171 91 

Brunswick,'' Mo. — Renewed depot platform with brick 959 64 

DeWitt, Mo. — Rebuilt depot and renewed platform 1,076 92 

Kansas City, Mo. — Repaired freight house and renewed 

platform 1,262 42 

LaPlata, Mo. — Moving depot and coal house and renewing 

platform 1,970 81 

Green Top, Mo. — Remodeled depot and renewed platform 837 31 
Stanbprry, Mo. — Renewed 55 ft. wooden turntable, with 

new 70 ft 200 ton capacity steel turntable 4,919 23 

Bingham, la. — Moving and remodeling depot 502 76 

Total $51,302 29 



—18— 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations, Eebuilt and Enlarged — 

Milan, Mich. — Rebuilt coal chutes, complete | 2,198 78 

Lakevilie, Ind. — Built new 12 in. stand-pipe and 14 in. 

water main (not completed) 1,725 74 

Napoleon, O. — Built new water tank (not completed) 445 74 

Roanoke, Ind. — Rebuilt water tank, 12 in. stand-pipe and 

watermam 1,671 91 

Bement, 111. — Renewed water main at water station 2,571 82 

Bement, 111. — Renewed pump at water station 880 50 

Forrest, 111. — Renewed pump at water station 616 20 

Sadorus, 111. — Dredged and deepened reservoir at water 

station 622 50 

Mexico, Mo. — Rebuilt water tank on iron frame and re- 
newed iron pipe 1,226 44 

Moberly, Mo. — Built ditch to drain water from shop 

grounds into water station reservoir 870 55 

Moulton, la. — Building new reservoir for water station 1,674 00 

Stanberry, Mo. — Rebuilt coal chutes and sand house 5,007 87 

Total .119,512 05 



IMPROVEMENTS. 

Steel Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges — 

Horse Creek, 111. — Bridge No. 1149, renewed double pile, 
bent trestle, with through steel span and masonry 
abutments (not completed) 116,691 69 

Alpine, 111. — Bridge No. 1057, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry and deck span (not completed) 867 82 

Salisbury, Mo. — Renewed Howe truss bridge No. 449, over 
Chariton River, with 133 ft. steel truss bridge, masonry 
rebuilt (not completed) 9,579 27 

Miama, Mo. — Renewed Howe truss bridge No. 516 over 
Wakenda Creek, with 160 ft. steel truss bridge, new 
masonry (not completed) 17,138 51 

Camden, Mo.— Renewed Howe truss bridge No. 557 over 
Copper Creek, with 63 ft. steel girder, masonry rebuilt, 
one abutment new (not completed) 2,787 43 

Randolph, Mo. — Renewing Howe truss bridge No. 633 
over Mill Creek, with 60 ft. steel girder, new masonry 
(not completed) , 5,490 84 

Randolph, Mo. — Renewed low truss bridge No. 636 over 
small stream, with 55 ft. steel girder, new masonry (not 
completed) 4,275 71 

Maryville, Mo. — Renewed Howe truss bridge No. 1062 
over Street, with 75 ft. steel girder (not completed) 5,476 55 

Total 162,307 82 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc $57,339 81 



—19— 

Steel Bridges, Repaired and Strengthened — 

Delray, Mich. — New deck on through iron truss draw 
bridge No. 714, over Rouge River and removing obstruc- 
tions from river 1,573 04 

Cone, Mich. — Built new concrete abutments for iron 
girder bridge No. 813 (not completed) 1,098 93 

Britton, Mich. — Built new concrete abutments for steel 

girder bridge No 821 (not completed) 209 70 

Britton, Mich. — Built new concrete abutments for iron 

girder bridge No. 823 (not completed) 777 66 

Westville, Ind. — Built new stone abutments for deck plate 
girder bridge No. 1644 8,867 52 

New Haven, Ind. — Built new masonry abutments for steel 
girder bridge No. 317 3,142 67 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new masonry abutments for steel 
girder bridge No. 323 5,991 18 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Replaced iron truss bridge No. 337, 
over St. Mary's River, with through steel girder 5,168 83 

Logansport, Ind. — Replaced through iron truss bridge 
No. 497, over Wabash River, with heavy through steel 
truss, new abutments and piers 56,726 41 

Custer Park, 111. — Bridge No. 1145, over Kankakee River, 
j-enewed through steel truss spans and masonry abut- 
ments 81,614 79 

St. Charles, Mo. — Built false work for new girders over 
public streets. (Not completed) 1,297 52 

Total $166;468 25 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades — 

St. Joe, Ind. — Filling sink hole along line, caused by de- 
struction of highway bridge when line New Haven to 

Butler was built ' 687 37 

Chicago Division— Changing grades and removing curves. 165,868 86 

Carpenter, 111. — Changing grades and removing curves 20,215 60 

Edwardsville, 111. — Changing grades and removing curves 4,386 88 

Sturgeon, Mo. ...Tiling cuts 306 45 

Omaha Division — Widening embankments 877 44 

Total $192,342 10 

For Protection Against Missouri, Fishing and Des Moines Rivers — 
At DeWitt, Missouri City, Miltondale and Carbon $ 1,194 60 

ADDITIONS. 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries Built— 

Buffalo Division 2.5 miles, | 12,743 54 

Detroit Division 7.3 miles, 41,580 53 

Eastern Division 2.9 miles, 20,841 98 

Middle Division 6.8 miles, 42,011 58 

Western Division 11.6 miles, 52,735 10 

Chicago Terminal 2.3 miles, 14,570 20 

Double Track— Delray to Oakwood .9 miles, 7,626 18 

Total 34.3 miles, $192,109 11 



-20— 



Interlocking Plants Erected— Wabash Proportion— 

Maumee, O. — Interlocking switch was put in operation to 

govern the cross-over of 1st aad 5lh District connection. .$ 608 71 

Peru Junction, Ind. — Interlocking plant w=^8 constructed 

to operate and govern the cross-over switch 867 09 

Muncie Junction, Ind. — Crossing L. E. & W. R R. Inter- 
locking plant r-'ne wed and overhauled 1,026 21 

Springfield Junction, III. — Crossing C. & A. Ry. Inter- 
locking plant renewed 1,334 44 

Ponciac, 111. — Crossing C. & A. Ry. Interlocking plant 
renewed and overhauled ,. 468 89 

Total $ 4,305 34 

Additions to Property, Shops, Round-houses, Stations, Etc. — 

Detroit, Mich. — Built new water line and stand pipe for 

17th Street yards I 488 88 

Detroit, Mich. — Built new yard and telegraph ofBce for 

17th Street yards 472 65 

Adrian, Mich. — Built addition to freight platform 440 84 

North Morenci, Mich. — Built new water plant — including 
tank, pump house, four inch water main and one twelve 

inch stand pipe 7,111 14 

Alvordton, O. — Built new transfer house 474 82 

Montpelier, O. — Built new car repairer's house 218 14 

Montpelier, O. — Put in new stock scale at stock pens (not 

completed) 215 71 

Edon, O. — Built 20 ft. extension to depot (not completed).. 302 26 

Steubenville, Ind. — Built new" depot 354 97 

Wolcottville, Ind. — Built new transfer house 562 82 

Aetna, Ind. — Built dwelling house for Agent 1,240 22 

Toledo O.— Built new office for yard clerks 268 73 

Montpelier. 0. — Built new office for Div. Roadmaster 333 81 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new water plant — including tank, 
pump house at St. Mary's River, and laid 6 inch water 

main 7,814 26 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Constructed pneumatic crossing gates at 

Taylor Street 641 23 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new casting shed forMach'y Dept. 615 23 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new scrap bins for Mach'y Dept. 1,049 00 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Built new charcoal and coke shed for 

Machinery Department 332 97 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Constructing addition to brick shop 

building, for Machinery Department (not completed)... 5,070 41 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Building addition to Master Mechanic's 

office 1,310 90 

Wabash, Ind.— Built new sewer along Wabash tracks 1,557 13 

Peru, Ind.— Built new employees R. R. Y. M. C. A. Build- 
ing 15,496 38 

Peru, Ind. — Built new drop pit in engine house 798 55 

Peru, Ind. — Built shed addition to store room 230 10 

Peru, Ind. — Built and connected up two concrete hot 
water cisterns for engine house 2,206 75 



-21- 



Additions to Property, Shops, Round-houses, Stations, Etc. — Continued. 
Peru, Ind. — Built new water plant, including pump house 

at Little Pipe Creek, and laid eight-inch water main |11,459 78 

LaFayette, Ind. — Built new water tank 619 42 

Danville, 111. — Built new derrick at freight house 456 15 

Tilton, III. — Built new casting shed for Machinery Depart- 
ment 262 86 

Quincy, 111. — Built new brick passenger station (not com- 
pleted) 16,752 74 

Quincy, 111.— Built new brick freight station (not com- 
pleted) 27,257 67 

Quiiicy, 111. — Erected eight new "Ellis" bumping posts 5i2 00 

Decatur, 111. — Built addition to freight house, new office, 

etc 814 73 

Decatur, 111. — Built extension to blacksmith shop for Car 

Department 403 14 

Decatur, 111.— Erected fence around property, north side 

car shops and round house 487 69 

Decatur, 111. — Built sewer for drainage of new property at 

Car Department Shops 461 25 

Decatur, 111. — Built new brick boiler house and smoke 

stack 3,483 65 

Decatur, 111, — Built new shed for protection of Road De- 
partment supplies 315 40 

Decatur, 111. — Built new shed for protection Machinery 

Department castings 391 87 

Decatur, 111. — Built new combination oil house and boiler 

room , 238 57 

Decatur, 111. — Set up boilers in new brick boiler house 983 50 

Springfield, 111. — Built new extension to brick freight 

house 4,202 52 

Springfield, 111. — Built pit at Machinery Department Shops 

for storage of fuel oil tanks 384 78 

Forrest, 111. — Built extension to cinder pit at roundhouse.. 781 11 

Horse Creek, 111. — Erected new telegraph office 281 93 

Willeys, 111. — Built new depot and cinder platform 742 93 

Winston, 111. — Built new telegraph office 271 92 

Litchfield, 111. — Built extension to cinder pit 356 06 

Brooklyn, 111. — Repaired and built second story on yard- 
master's office 515 51 

Luther, Mo. — Built addition to cinder pit 255 67 

St. Charles, Mo. — Built new brick station platform 336 90 

Moberly, Mo. — Built foundation for planer at Machinery 

Department Shops 218 30 

Moberly, Mo. — Built drain pits for steam pipes at round- 
house 247 23 

Moberly, Mo. — Built new cinder pit at roundhouse 1,155 95 

Moberly, Mo.— Put in two 4 in. Gem Meters 406 91 

Moberly, Mo. — Built new frame addition to Car Depart- 
ment Shops 635 47 

Hardin, Mo.— Built new track scale 868 73 

Moulton, la. — Built new addition to sandhouse 305 68 

Tracy, la.— Erected 55 ft. wooden turntable, removed 
from Stanberry, Mo 287 98 

Total $126,663 90 



-22— 



SUMMARY. 



Extraordinary Eenewals, Improvements and Additions. 



Renewals. 

Bridges, Wooden, New and Rebuilt I 88,087 76 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings 12,633 37 

Renewals and Repairs, Depots, Shops, Buildings, etc 51,302 29 

Water and Coal Stations, Rebuilt and Enlarged 19,512 05 

Total $171,535 47 



Improvements. 

Steel Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges. $ 62,307 82 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, etc.. 57,339 81 

Steel Bridges, Repaired and Strengthened 166,468 25 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades 192,342 10 

Protection against Missouri, Des Moines and Fishing 

Rivers 1,194 60 

Total $479,652 58 



Additions. 

Double Track $ 7,626 18 

New Yard, Side and Spur Tracks Built to Various Indus- 
tries 184,482 93 

Interlocking Plants Erected, Wabash Proportion 4,305 34 

Additions to Shops, Round-houses, Stations, etc 126,663 90 

Total $323,078 35 



/-Renewals $171,535 47 

Totals^ Improvements 479,652 58 

lAdditions 323,078 35 

Grand Total $974,266 40 



—23— 

In addition to the above, the following amounts were 
expended on the Buffalo Division, for extraordinary renew- 
als and improvements, the Wabash paying its proportion of 
this sum on a wheelage basis : 



Depots, Buildings, etc I 9,817 49 

Additions to Shops, Round-houses, etc 1,640 58 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations— New and Rebuilt 10,633 85 

Docks and Slip Tables— Repairs and Renewals 6,275 14 

Steel Bridges— Repaired and Renewed i 419,493 48 

Wooden Bridges— Rebuilt 1,776 93 

Total $449,637 47 



Included in above item of Steel Bridges repaired and 
renewed, are the following : 

Cayuga, Grand River $ 47,960 13 

Cayuga, Over Private Road 3,839 13 

Decewsville, Over Private Road 528 68 

Decewsville, Over Private Road 530 14 

Nelles Corners, Stream 1,023 95 

Jarvis, Sandusky Creek 1,678 31 

Jarvis, Over N. & N. W. Ry. (G. T. Ry.) 1,559 70 

Jarvis, Nanticoke Creek : ,...., 9,831 76 

Jarvis, Over Public Road 764 99 

Renton, Black Creek 10,242 22 

Simcoe, Over G. B. & L. E. Ry. (G. T. Ry.) 1,373 01 

Delhi, Big Creek (not completed) 65,501 28 

Tilsonburg, Otter Creek...... 106,217 11 

Aylmer, Little Catfish Creek.... 5,317 29 

Aylmer, Stream 887 49 

New Sarum, Big Catfish Creek (not completed) 18,108 58 

St. Thomas, Kettle Creek 76,079 77 

Paynes, Paynes Creek 3,171 65 

Paynes, Sills Creek 1,164 15 

Thames Riiver, Thames River (not completed) 28,028 11 

Middlemiss, Over Public Road. 1,225 39 

Middlemiss, Big Muncey Creek 17,273 20 

Middlemiss, Gentleman's Creek 15,358 81 

Ekfrid, Over Public Road 1,166 30 

Glencoe, Cornell Creek 630 08 

Total $419,461 23 



—24— 
OMAHA DIVISION. 



Miscellaneous Work — 



No. cross-ties put in track 9,436 

No. miles track ballasted with crushed rock 53.1 

No. miles fence built 103.7 

No. railroad crossings put in track 1 



SUMMARY. 

Miscellaneous Work $111,001 76 

EECAPITULATION . 

Eenewals, Improvements and Additions | 974,266 40 

Buffalo Division, Extraordinary Renewals and Improve- 
ments 449,637 47 

Reconstruction, Omaha Division 111,001 76 

Grand Total $1,534,905 63 



—25- 



TRANSPOKTATION DEPAETMENT. 



FREIGHT. 1903. 1902. 1901. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 
for year 1,830,621 1,738,098 1,088,066 

Total Empty Cars moved 
for year 793,889 776,474 795,829 

Total Loaded and Empty 

Cars moved for year 2,624,510 2,514,572 2,483,895 

Average Loaded Cars 
moved per day 5,015 4,725 4,625 

Average Empty Cars 
moved perday ' 2,175 2,127 2,180 

Average Loaded and 
Empty Cars moved per 
day 7,190 6,889 6,805 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 7,284,158 6,841,121 6,981,266 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 19,957 18,743 19,127 

Total number Freight 
Trains for year 86,134 80,303 80,682 

Average number Freight 
Trains per day 236 220 221 

Average number Miles run 
per train, per day 84.6 85.2 86.5 

Average number Loaded 
Cars moved per train 
mile 18.6 19.0 18.5 

Average number Empty 
Cars moved per train 
mile , 7.2 7.4 7.8 

Average number Loaded 
and Empty Cars moved 
per train mile 25.8 26.4 26.3 



—26— 



FREIGHT-Cont. 1903. 1902. 1901, 

Average number Cars 
handled per train mile, 
reduced to loaded car 
basis 22.9 

Mileage made by all 

Loaded Cars for year 135,424,005- 
Mile age made by all 

Empty Cars for year 52,573,824 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 187,997,829 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 75,534,916 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 26,439,131 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 
for year 101,974,047 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 59,889,089 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 26,134,693 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 86,023,782 

Number of Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 16,089 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
perday, 7,834 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
E. R 28.5 28.2 31.1 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day, 8,562 5,943 5,629 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 32.6 41.8 44.3 



23.5 


23.2 


129,714,750 


129,392,990 


50,721,670 


54,579,744 


180,436,420 


183,972,734 


67,218,628 


65,975,987 


23,375,135 


25,209,948 


90,593,763 


91,185,935 


62,496,122 


63,417,003 


27,346,535 


29,369,796 


89,842,657 


92,786,799 


16,460 


15,463 


7,734 


7,279 



-27- 



PASSENGER. 1903. 1902. 

Total Passenger Train 
Mileage for year 7,715,162 

Total number Passenger 
Trains run for year 82,549 81,990 77,432 

Average number Passenger 
Trains run per day 226 225 212 

Average number Miles per 
Train per day 93.5 93.8 93.5 

Average number Miles by 
all Trains per day , 21,138 21,105 19,822 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 8,691,319 8,425,552 7,613,395 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Coaches and Chair Cars 
for year 16,670,309 16,807,827 15,346,137 

Total Mileage Sleeping 
Cars for year 9,234,387 9,188,022 8,682,415 

Total Mileage Wabash 
Dining Cars for year 1,443,536 1,591,510 874,595 

Total Mileage of all Cars 
for year 37,791,983 37,451,010 34,138,164 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled for 
^ year 404,055 400,040 362,382 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled per 
day 1,107 1,096 993 

Average number of Cars 
per train 4.90 4 87 4.68 



—28— 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department show an increase for 
the System of |579,034.18. 

The principal items of increase were as follows . 

Engineers and firemen $116,706 62 

Fuel for locomotives 184,879 72 

Repairs of locomotives 239,544 16 

Wipers, hostlers and dispatchers 28,704 42 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines was 
$1,336,733.62, equal to $2,739.21 per engine for 488 engines, 
the average number on hand during the year. 

The following statement will show the large amount of 
repair work done on engines, and the general character of 
the repairs. Sixty-nine per cent of the engines on hand 
July 1st, 1902, went through the shops for general repairs 
and forty-nine per cent for heavy repairs. 



—29— 

Motive Power and Machinery, 
locomotive equipment. 



1902-1903. 1901-1902. Increase. Decrease. 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 



Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

Fire-boxes, new 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



490 


434 

72 


56 


2 


16 




488 


490 




338 


237 


101 


239 
635 


337 

658 






906 


786 


120 


102 


63 


39 


10 


2 


8 


48 
41 


57 
35 




6 


17 
433 


21 
365 




68 


51 


49 


9 


393 
25 


401 
6 




19 


72 


44 


28 


442 


298 


144 


67 


44 


23 


13 


7 


6 


48 


36 


12 


70 


65 


5 


4,189 


3,834 


355 



72 
14 



23 



Note— The 488 engines in service June 30, 1903, had a Tractive 
Power of 8,742,650 lbs. June 30, 1896, there were 412 engines with 
Tractive Power of 6,334,915 lbs., showing an increase of 38% in power 
of engines. 

The 50 new engines now being received will raise the total Tractive 
Power to 10,062,584 lbs. 



—80— 



DISTRIBUTION OF ENGINE MILEAGE. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. Increase. 



Decrease. 



Freight Train Mile- 
age 

Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 

Passenger Train 
Mileage 

Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 

Switching 

Miscellaneous , 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 

Total 



7,284,158 

572,928 

7,715,162 

155,833 
3,436,104 

647,478 



6,841,121 

559,895 

7,691,050 

204,796 
3,106,726 

770,119 



19,173,707 



443,037 

13,033 
24,112 



329,378 



637,956 



48,963 
"r 

122,641 



Expense op Operating Locomotives. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. 



Increase. 



K^p-- {M't°eriai::::::;: 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood)..., 
Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching 

Total , 



681 



% 728,985 

607,747 94 

64,601 73 

1,349,587 36 

1,220,182 19 

187,791 75 



580,394 77 

516,794 69 

55,402 47 

1,164,707 64 

1,103,475 57 

159,087 33 



$4,158,896 6513,579,862 47 



$148,590 91 

90,953 25 

9,199 26 

184,879 72 

116,706 62 

28,704 42 



$579,034 18 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 



1902-1903. 



1901-1902. Increase. 



For Repairs.... 

Stores 

Fuel 

Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching. 

Total .... 



$ 6 70 
32 
6 77 
6 12 
94 



$20 85 



$ 5 68 


28 


6 03 


5 71 


82 


$18 52 



$ 1 02 


04 


74 


41 


12 


$ 2 33 



Note. — Engine mileage increased 3.3 per cent, while the amount 
paid engineers and firemen increased 10.6 per cent, showing an 
increase in the rate of pay of 7.05 per cent. 



—31— 



1902-1903. 1901-1902. 

Total engine mileage 19,946,946 19,326,197 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 50,376 48,804 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 4,198 4,067 

Tons of coal consumed 1,139,312 1,055,948 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

of handling included) |1 24 |1 16 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 17.6 18.3 

Note: Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense. 
Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash proportion of all 
joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



-32-- 







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3:i 



CAR DEPARTMENT. 



The expenses of this department for the year ending June 
30th, 1903, were, as last year, far above the normal, on 
account of application of air brakes to our freight cars, ves- 
tibules to our passenger cars, and new freight and passenger 
equipment purchased. 

The total on account of these items amounts to $598,- 
214.69. 

Narrow Gould vestibule was applied to one coach, and 
stationary vestibules to three baggage cars and one express 
car. 

Narrow vestibules were changed to wide on nine cars, at 
a cost of $9,811.97. Total cars now vestibuled 263. 

Three cars were equipped with Pintsch gas at a cost of 
$887.07, making a total of 211 cars so equipped. 

Air brakes were applied to 167 freight cars at a cost of 
$7,154.85, making a total of 13,806 cars or 80 per cent of all 
freight cars so equipped. 

Contract has been entered into for 1,500 new 40-ton 
hopper bottom coal cars, which are to be delivered com- 
mencing in August. 

Twenty-two of the fifty passenger equipment cars con- 
tracted for iast year, have been delivered and the remaining 
twenty-eight cars will be delivered within the next few 
months. 



-34- 



Car Equipment. 



' 


On 

hand 

July 1 , 

1902. 


Changed, 
Built 
-and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
Sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1903. 


On 

hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENGER. 

Official 


5 

2 

8 

147 

44 

55 

6 

6 

63 

14 

4 

3 

32 

5 

1 

1 







5 

2 

8 

151 

56 

51 

6 

5 

73 
14 
4 
3 
33 
5 
1 
1 


4 


Pav 


2 


Dininff 


5 


Coach 

Combination 


10 

12 

5 


6 


108 

22 


Chair 


9 


35 


Parlor 




Cafe 




1 
1 




Baggage 

Baggage and. Mail 


11 


64 
15 


Passenger and Mail 


4 


'3" 




Baggage, Mail and Passenger., 
Postal 


6 
19 


Pacific Express 

Air-Brake Instruction 


5 


Inspection 












Total Passenger 


396 


42 


20 


418 


285 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


10,088 

463 

147 

5,470 

295 

100 

189 

80 

79 

11 

6 

8 

5 

12 

242 


66 


625 
29 

2 
191 

4 


9,529 

434 

146 

5,785 

294 

100 

188 

131 

279 

11 

6 

8 

8 

6 

246 


8,075 


Stock 


1,471 
50 


Fruit ,. 


1 

506 

3 


Coal, Flat and Rack 


3,439 


Furniture 


33 


Ref ri gerator 


100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 

Ballast and Convertible 


51" 

201 


1 
1 


129 


Tool and Work 


36 


Derrick 


12 


Pile Driver 






7 


Cable 






1 


Ice 


3 




4 


Caboose Box 


6 
4 




Caboose Standard 


8 


212 


Total Freight 

Total Passenger 


17,195 
396 


839 
42 


863 
20 


17,171 
418 


13,569 

285 


Total Car Equipment 


17,591 


881 


883 


17.589 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons 


495,971 






502,290 


235,074 









-35— 



Cars Repaired. 








Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 

Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


2,929 

164 

69 

9 


130,252 

1,971 
599 
415 


133,181 

2,135 

668 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 


Cars Rebuilt 


424 






Total 


3,171 


133,237 
11,429 


136 408 






New Wheels Applied, Cast 


2,439 
384 


13,868 
384 


New Wheels Applied, Steel 








Total New Wheels Applied 


2,823 


11,429 


14,252 





Car and Engine Trusts. 

June SQth, 1903, the old car and engine trust notes out- 
standing were as follows: 

St. Charles Car Company, Contract of Jane 28th, 1898, 3 

notes (lastone due September 24th, 1903), for |4,696. 18 each $14,088.54 

Missouri Car and Foundry Company, Contract of June 28th, 
1898, 5 notes outstanding (last one due on November 5th, 
1903), for $4,696.18 each 23,480.90 

Engines, St. Louis Trust Company, 16 notes outstanding 

(last one due November 1st, 1904), for $5,071.88 each 81,150.08 

Total amount old trust notes outstanding $118,719.52 

A reduction during the year in car and locomotive trust 

notes of $173,570.88 



New car trust notes have been issued as follows: January, 
1903, 60 notes for $6,329.36 each (last one due February 2d, 
1908), covering 500 steel underframe flat cars, $379,761.60, 
outstanding June 30th, 1903, $348,114.80. Also 46 notes for 
$2,526.00 each (last one due April 3d, 1907), covering 22 
new passenger equipment cars. 



— se- 



ll! addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundry Company for 500 box, 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage payments are $7,194.76. On 
this contract there was paid during the year ending June 
30th, 1903, the sum of $86,337.12. 



TELEGEAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1902-1903. 1901-1902. 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 2,153 2,153 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to this Company.. 6,830 6,055 
Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph 

Company 11,953 10,550 

Total Number Miles Wire used Jointly 747 649 

Total Miles of Wire 19,530 17,254 



The growth in the revenues, freight, passenger, etc., 
clearly shows the energy, ability and faithfulness of the 
heads of the Traffic Departments and their subordinates; 
and the results of the operation, improvement of the condi- 
tion of the property and immunity from serious accidents, 
that of the officials and employees of the Operative Depart- 
ment; and to all officials and employees I desire to express 
my full appreciation of their loyalty to the Company and 
the support and personal sympathy which I have received 
from them during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr,, 

President 



MILES OF ROAD OPERATED. 



LINES EAST OP THE MISSISSIPPI KIVER. 



Description of Lines. 



© © o 






23 

o 
Q 



FROM TO 

Toledo E. Hannibal 

E. HannibaL.Hannibal U. D,... 

Bluffs Camp Point 

Camp Point... Quincy 

E. Hannibal.. Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Maysville Pittsfield 

Sidney Champaign 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville..Edwardsville Jet. 

Chicago C. & W. I. June. 

C. & W. I. Jct..Effingham 

Shumway Altamont 

Forrest Fairbury June 

Fairbury Jet.. Streator 

Detroit..... Delray 

Delray Butler 

Butler New Haven 

Maumee Montpelier...... 

Montpelier Clarke June 

Clarke Junc.C. & W. I. June ... 

Attica Covington , 

Chili Junction, Peru 



460.5 
39.4 



0.9 
34.5 



11.7 

110.1 

1.7 



205.4 
9.5 



30. 



109.8 
25.7 
49.5 

149.() 



14.8 



Total..^. 



1254.0 



3.0 



6.2 



9.2 



0.4 



21.8 
17.3 



7.8 



3.8 
8.0 



0.8 
6.1 



17.6 



88.2 



460.5 

3.4 

39.4 

21.8 

18.2 

34.5 

7.8 

6.2 

11.7 

113.9 

1.7 

8.0 

205.4 

10.3 

6.1 

30.9 

4.6 

109.8 

25.7 

49.5 

149.6 

17.6 

14.8 



1351 .4 



247.3 

2.1 

4.2 

0.9 

2.1 

1.8 

1.0 

1.1 

2.2 

46.2 

1.2 

23.3 

65.5 

0.3 



3.7 
19.9 
43.5 

8.2 
10.7 
55.6 



2.0 

7.7 



707.8 

5.5 

43.6 

22.7 

20.3 

36.3 

8.8 

7.3 

13.9 

160.1 

2.9 

31.3 

270.9 

10.6 

6.1 

34.6 

24.5 

153.3 

33.9 

60.2 

205.2 

17.6 

16.8 

7.7 



550.5 



1901.9 



Note — The above does not include 6.8 miles main track and 0.2 
miles side track, total 7.0 miles, "owned," between Edwardsville 
Junction and Edwardsville Crossing, which is leased to the Illinois 
Terminal Railroad Company. 



—38- 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



Description of Tiines. 


a 
o 


'6 

3 


® o &c 


® 


1' 


Eh 


FROM TO 

St. Louis- 
Union Station. 23d st 






0.7 


0.7 

274.8 


99.6 
1.5 
0.4 

30.0 
3.5 
8.5 

15.9 
2.6 
0.6 
8.9 

3.4 

3.7 

22.4 

1.2 

0.9 

11.0 

0.7 

7.3 


7 


Tayon av Harlem 

Franklin av...N. Market st 


274.8 




374.4 






1.5 


Olive st Carr st 






0.6 


0.6 
10.7 

1.5 

69.7 

131.5 

28.3 

0.2 
65.8 

2.4 

38.2 

41.4 

143.7 

0.3 

2.8 
21.6 
15.4 


1 


Carr st Ferguson 

Harlem Kansas City 


10.7 




40 7 




1.5 
69.7 


5 


Moberly Hannibal 






78 2 


Moberly Ottumwa 

Moulton Albia 


131.6 

28.3 




147.4 






30.9 


Albia Albia Connecti'n 




0.2 


8 


Albia ...Chesterfield 


65.8 




74.7 


Chesterfield Des Moines 




2.4 


2 4 


Brunswick Chillicothe 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Pattonsburg Council Bluffs... 

Wabash Conn. ..Co. Bluffs, U.D.. 


143.7 


38.2 
41.4 


41.6 

45.1 

166.1 




0.3 

2.8 


0.3 


Council Bluffs... Omaha 






2.8 


Centralia Columbia 


21.6 
15.4 




22.8 


Salisbury Glasgow 

Fxcello Ardmore 






16.3 






11.0 


Excelsior SpsJc. Milwaukee June. 
Maryville June. Empire Coal Co.. 


9.5 






9.5 


10.2 






7.3 








78.2 






Total 


701.3 


79.6 


859.1 


222.1 


1081.2 



Note. — Increase in lines "Owned," due to the purchase of the 
Boone County and Boonville Kailroad, 21.6 miles from Centralia to 
Columbia. 

The line from Chesterfield to Des Moines, 2.4 miles is reported in 
"Joint Trackage," instead of lines "Owned," on account of being 
operated under joint agreement with Des Moines Union Kailway. 



39- 



LINES EAST OF THE DETROIT EIVEK. 



Description of Lines. 


o 


1 
^ 
3 


© 0) o 


CO 


r 


< 


FROM TO 

Detroit Black Rock 






227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


227.1 
17.8 
25.6 

4.8 


149.1 

21.9 

14.1 

4.5 


376 2 


WellandJct . .Susp. Bridge 






39.7 


Susp Bridge....BufEalo 






39 7 


Black Rock Intercational Jet 






9.3 










Total 


275.3 


275.3 


189.6 


464.9 











Note. — Above does not include 4.3 miles New York Central tracks 
between Black Rock and Exchange Street Station, Buffalo, for the use 
of which the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 

Note, — Above does not include 0.6 mile Lehigh Valley track at 
Wabash freight station, Louisiana Street, Buffalo, for the use of which 
the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 



—40— 



Recapitulation, 
miles of road operated. 



Description of Lines. 


i 

o 




PI 




% . 


t 
o 


Lines East of the Mississippi 
River 


1254.0 
701.3 


9.2 
79.6 


88.2 

78.2 
275.3 

441.7 


1351.4 

859.1 
275.3 


550.5 

222.1 
189.6 


1901.9 


Lines West of the Mississippi 
River 


1081.2 


Lines East of the Detroit River.. 


464.9 










Total 


1955.3 


88.8 


2485.8 


962.2 


3448 







Note. — Increase in lines "Owned" dae to the purchase of the 
Boone Coanty & Boonville Railroad, 21.6 miles, from Centralia to 
Columbia. 



The Main Track Mileage shown in the foregoing state- 
ment is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New York 31.0 

In Canada 244.8 

In Michigan 80.4 

In Ohio 164.4 

In Indiana 3^7.5 

In Illinois 745.0 

In Missouri 653.7 

In Iowa 208 9 

In Nebraska 6 

Total 2485.8 



—41 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 

Amount received from employes 1-59,436 75 

Amount received proceeds sale of Springfield Hospital 15,000 00 

Amount received from other railroads for care of their em- 
ployes 71 42 



Total Receipts $74,508 17 

Expenses 149,033 50 

Expended on new Hospital at Decatur 34,367 83 83,401 33 

Deficit for the year $ 8,893 16 

Surplus June 30, 1902 61,951 76 

Interest on Surplus during year , 869 49 

Rent Peru property 120 00 

Surplus June 30, 1903 $44,048 09 

1902-1903. 1901-1902 

Number of patients treated in Hospitals '.... 1,018 1,270 

Number of patients treated outside of Hospitals 24,998 24,154 

Total number of patients treated..... 26,016 25,424 

Number of Surgical casestreated 3,151 2,991 

Number of Medical cases treated 22,865 22,433 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients in Hos- 
pitals 6,485 6,248 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients outside 

of Hospitals 42,629 42,291 

Total number of deaths 12 20 

The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jr., Chairman, 
W. H. Blodgett, 
E. B. Pryor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., October 1st, 1903. 
J. Ramsey, Jr., 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1908, as follows : 

A. Results of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 
H. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

J. Mileage. Statistics for Twenty -two Years. 

K. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



—43- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Gross Earnings ... 

Operating Expenses., 

Net Earnings 



Taxes. 



Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc. 



Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 



Net Earnings from Operation 

Additions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest 
Interest on Bonds 



Surplus 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds. 



Net Surplus . 



$21,140 
15.815. 



828 94 
662 32 



$5,325, 
664: 



,166 62 
702 96 



$4,660, 
467, 



463 66 
927 94 



$5,128, 
870, 



391 60 
440 12 



$4,257, 
817, 



951 48 
288 80 



$3,440 
3,034, 



662 68 
512 60 



$406. 
210, 



150 08 
000 00 



$196,150 08 



$19,053, 
13,847, 



493 17 
435 88 



$5,206, 
627, 



057 29 
930 12 



$4,578 
317 



127 17 
288 15 



$4,895 
758 



415 32 
,650 79 



$4,136 
760 



,764 53 
,547 62 



$3,376 
2,9o4 



216 91 
,756 87 



$411. 
210. 



460 04 
000 00 



$201,460 04 



1. Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 


$898 517 62 
63,500 00 


$805,325 92 


Credit " " " 


100,867 57 


Miscellaneous Expenses 


$835,017 62 
35.422 50 


$704,458 35 
54,192 44 








$870,440 12 


$758,650 79 



2. Analysis of Additions to Property and Other Charges. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Additions to Property as per Table "F" 

Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sinking Fund Char- 
ges and Maintenance of Steamers 

Detroit & Chicago Extension— Sinking Fund 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, Sink- 
ing Fund 

Premium on Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds. 

Appropriation for New Equipment . . .. 


$253,132 15 
59,636 65 


$583,499 60 

45,339 88 
27,208 14 


100,000 00 

4,520 00 

400,000 00 


100,000 00 
4,500 00 








$817,288 80 


$760,547 62 



-44— 



B' 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Comparative Statement op Earnings and Expenses. 



Eaknings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November- 
December.. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passengers 

MaUs 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 
" " Passenger " " 
" " Mail " " 

" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted). 
Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings... 



Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



1,721 
1,903 
1,840 
1,970 
1,714 
1,694 
1,672 
1,516 
1,706 
1,760 
1,928 
1,709 



,531 93 
.705 28 
,910 79 
,096 31 
,998 95 
,345 55 
,454 08 
,613 47 
,631 66 
,961 62 
,672 49 
,906 81 



$21,140,828 94 



$13,327,478 75 

6,135,5-0 85 

716,200 09 

464,645 19 

497,004 06 



$21,140,828 94 



63.04 

29.02 

3.39 

2.20 

2.35 



2,483.3 
$8,513 20 
6,368 81 
2,144 39 



,552,341 36 
,686,381 71 
,661,285 09 
,805,700 46 
,639,573 09 
,592,341 54 
,660,210 93 
,396,170 79 
,551,555 51 
,481,552 09 
,510,759 63 
,515,620 97 



$19,053,493 17 



$11,763,541 41 

5,780,240 62 

691,100 63 

416,474 62 

40 i, 135 89 



$19,053,493 17 



61.74 

30.84 

3.63 

2.18 

2.11 



$15,815,662 32 


$13,847,435 88 


$ 664,702 96 


$627,930 12 


74.81 


72.68 


$5,325,166 62 


$5,206,057 29 


25.19 


27.32 



2,438.0 
$7,815 21 
5,679 83 
2,135 38 



-45- 



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46- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1903. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 

ASSETS. 





1903. 


1902. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Cost of Road & Equipment 

Supplies and Materials on 
Hand 


$143,882,500 00 

1,244,803 46 
987,034 96 

1,553,020 34 

520,891 43 

179,975 79 

61,621 59 

613,497 20 
53,239 27 

43,004 74 

1.033,524 81 
659,089 38 


$144,009,500.00 

1,259,860 13 
1,128,740 87 

1,377,530 23 

234,437 67 

179,296 45 

62,884 15 

749,052 04 




$127,000 00 
15,056 67 


CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 


175,490 11 

286,453 76 
679 34 


141,705 91 


Sundry Accounts CoUectible- 




From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 
Pacific Express Co 


1,262*56 

135,554 84 


Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 




Bills Receivable 


53,239 27 

43 54 

1,033,524 81 
182,236 12 




Advances Fast Freight Lines 

Account Working Fund 

Advances on Account Real 
Estate in St. Louis 


42,961 20 
476,853 26 




Miscellaneous (1) , 










$150,832,202 97 


$149,521,116 00 


$1,311,086 97 









LIABILITIES. 



1903. 



Increase. Decrease. 



Common Stock 

Preferred Stock 


$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

91,949,000 00 

186,403 25 

696,885 83 

105,000 00 

2,738,405 58 

466,607 12 

386,337 60 

5,183 00 

23,286 66 

583,030 32 

369,237 50 

311,959 80 

40.871 82 

969,994 49 


$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

92,110,000 00 

190,169 00 

703,883 74 

105,000 00 

2,603,535 65 

293,850 05 

387,108 79 

4,601 15 

75,000 00 

292,290 40 







Bonds 




161,000 00 




3,765 75 


Interest Accrued, not Due 




6,997 91 


Dividends Debenture Bonds , 
Series "A" due 






Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 


134,869 93 
172,757 07 






77119 


Hospital Account 


58185 




Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable.. 


51,713 34 


Equipment Notes of Long 

Date (2) 

Proceeds sale Debenture 
Bonds, Series "B" 


290,739 9-2 

369,237 50 
311,959 80 

327,573 70 






Equipment Fund Account 

Miscellaneous 

Balance to credit. Profit and 
Loss . . 






113,256 43 
642,420 79 


72,384 61 








$150,832,202 97 


$149,521,116 00 


1,311,086 97 





(1) Miscellaneous includes $583,030.32 carried in Suspense on account of new 
equipment. 

(2) The Equipment Notes extend over a period of 55 months, the monthly pay- 
ments averaging $23, 319.60 for 3 months; $18,623.42 for the next2months; $13,927.24 
for the next 11 months; $8,855.36 for the next 30 months and $6,329.36 for the next 
9 months. 



—47— 



THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1903. 

MAINTENANCE OF WAY AND STRUCTURES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Repairs of Roadway 

Renewals of Rails 

do of Ties 

Repairs and Renewals of Bridges and Culverts 

do do Fences, Rom d C, etc 

do do Buildings and Fixtures 

do do Docks and Wliarfs 

do do Telegraph 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 

Total 



$1,672, 

347, 

343, 

815, 

106, 

350, 

17, 

42, 

4, 

•2, 



3C2 45 
412 21 
008 59 
290 78 
272 63 
408 94 
777 v6 
078 89 
175 81 
234 13 



$1,351,427 71 

242,098 06 

603,934 77 

315,070 76 

102,940 72 

322.317 98 

17,490 59 

50,847 05 

2,065 19 

10,221 82 



$3,700,961 69 



$2,918,414 65 



MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Superintendence 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives, Passenger 

do do Locomotives, Freight 

do do Passenger Cars 

do do Freight Cars 

do do Work Cars 

do do ■ Marine Equipment 

do do Shop Machinery & Tools 

Stationery and Printing... 

Other Expenses 

Total 



95,655 32 

441,665 03 

870 199 51 

346,447 05 

867,129 55 

81,148 80 

29,359 13 

273 821 43 

7,693 70 

101,544 43 



118,815 21 
357,828 50 
713,182 53 
293,262 95 
746.697 83 
90,151 34 



229,682 64 

7,017 86 

99,479 34 



$3,114,663 95 



$2,656,118 20 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— PASSENGER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Superintendence.. 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste, for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmen, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Servic^ 

Station Supplies 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipment— Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions 

Rents for Tracks, Yards and Terminals... 
do of Buildings and Other Property... 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



Total $3,122,114 38 



89,652 23 
519,233 19 
481.702 87 

31,559 33 

25,865 39 

11,414 39 
351,533 49 
246,336 72 
162,915 67 

98,137 02 
211,316 05 

23 631 22 

191,391 10 

4,290 62 

28,239 02 

177,559 03 

4,079 57 

7.770 28 

85,356 37 
153,819 18 



149,616 54 

61,647 82 

52,844 87 

2,202 41 



$ 76 
485 
382 

30 

22 

9 

337 

242 

133 

81 
192 

25 

175 

8 

35, 
150 



,043 70 

,601 72 
,711 60 
,752 81 
,303 43 
,773 96 
,141 63 
,832 14' 
,432 29 
,615 75 
,424 26 
,366 87 
,941 69 
,935 05 
,558 34 
,449 27 



8,909 05 

78,416 94 

139,955 76 



139,081 46 
73,345 24 
51,336 93 
18,940 95 



$2,900,870 84 



—48— 

E — Continued. 

THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Superintendence 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmen, FJagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipment— Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions 

Stock Yards and Elevators 

Rents tor Tracks, Yards and Terminals, 
do of Buildings and Other Property. 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



Total 



$ 168, 

930 

972 

67 

38 

21 

647 

84 

444 

199 

938 

49 

112 

16 

99 

53 

19 

51 



417 61 
,860 42 
,858 90 
194 49 
288 18 
305 23 
430 89 
084 70 
698 89 
625 37 
228 92 
329 29 
,571 29 
810 74 
,768 43 
,923 34 
,618 99 



351,106 92 
8,342 98 



30,594 75 
14,672 61 
64,079 90 



$5,389,163 23 



154 

798 

820 

61 

31 

14 

567 

108 

3V2 

167 

861 

47 

284 

11 

106 

56 



,529 97 
,821 56 
,762 71 
,505 67 
,497 72 
,577 63 
,696 21 
,368 21 
,552 43 
,085 38 
,326 25 
,622 15 
,685 94 
,437 35 
,284 93 
,694 05 



51,244 64 



35,611 14 
7,222 85 



24,773 77 

27,276 01 

48,187 97 

9,324 61 



$4,929,088 15 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Salaries of General Officers 


$ 93,138 47 
197,717 39 
16,800 11 
49,060 40 
89,490 93 
27,976 72 
14,575 05 


$ 87,499 68 


do of Clerks and Attendants 


168,988 60 


General Office Expenses and Supplies 


13,276 21 


Insurance 


43,238 67 


Law Expenses 


68.406 52 


Stationery and Printing (General Offices) 


27,470 83 


Oth^r Expenses ^... 


34,063 53 






Total 


$488,759 07 


$442,944 04 







RECAPITULATION. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 


Maintenance of Way and Structures 


$3,700,961 69 

3,114,663 95 

8,511,277 81 

488,759 07 


$2,918,414 65 


Maintenance of Equipment . . 


2,655,118 20 




7,829,958 99 




442,944 04 








$15,815,662 32 


$13,847,435 88 







49- 



F 

THE WABASH EAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Additions to Peoperty — Year Ending June 30, 1903. 

New Yards, Main, Side and Spur Tracks ..: $ 185,452 47 

Cost of Property in Quincy, 111 56,244 30 

Y. M. C. A. Building, Peru, Ind 11,435 38 

Total $ 253,132 15 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Train and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1902. 



Per Cent. 



Increase. Decrease 



Tons Carried, Revenue Freight 


9,691,514 

1,833,755 

11.525,269 

2,198,073,383 

215,088,765 

2,413,162,148 

209.4 Miles. 


8,578,603 

1,903,089 

10,481,692 

1,947,404,142 

217,017,487 

2,164,421,629 

206.5 Miles. 


12.97 






3.64 


Total Tons Carried 


9.96 
12.87 




Tons carried one Mile, Revenue Freight.. 
Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 
Total Tons carried one Mile 


0.89 


11.49 
1.40 




Average distance each Ton carried 








$13,327,478 75 $11 .7fi3..f;41 41 


13.29 
14.40 




Operating Expenses 


10,313,415 42 


9,015,065 37 








Average Earnings per Ton 


$1 37.52 

1 06.42 

Cts. 0.6063 

" 0.4692 

" 0.1371 


$1 37.13 

1 05.09 

Cts. 0.6041 

" 0.4629 

" 0.1412 


0.28 
].27 
0.36 
1.36 








Average Rate per Ton per Mile 




Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 

Average Net per Ton per Mile 




2 90 








Total Freight Train Mileage 


7,284,158 
$1 82.97 
1 41.59 
41.38 


6,841,121 
$1 71.95 
1 31.78 
40.17 


6.48 
6.41 
7.44 
3.01 








Average Expenses per Train Mile 




Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 








Car Mileage, Loaded... 


135,424,005 
52,573,824 
187,997,829 

18.59 

7.22 

25.81 

17.82 

12.84 
331.29 
301.76 


129,714,750 
50,721,670 
180,436,420 


4.40 
3.65 
4.19 




Car Mileage, Empty 




Car Mileage, Total— Loaded and Empty. 








Average Loaded Cars per Train 


18.96 

7.41 

26.37 

16.69 

12.00 

316.38 

284.66 




1.95 


Average Empty Cars per Train 




2 56 


Average Total Cars per Train 




2.12 


Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 


6.77 
7.00 
4.71 
6.01 




Average Load per Car, Loaded and 
Empty — Tons 




Average Load per Train— Tons — includ- 
ing Company Freight 




Average Load per Train — Tons— Revenue 
Freight only 









Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 9.84 
" 7.62 


Cts. 9.07 
" 6.95 


8.49 
9.64 




Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 









PASSENGER. 



Number of Passengers carried 

Number of Passengers carried one Mile 
Average distance each Passenger carried 

Earnings from Passenger Traffic 

Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc... 
Operating Expenses 

Average Revenue per Passenger 

Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 

Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 

Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 

Average Net per Passenger per Mile 

Total Passenger Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 

Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 

Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 

Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 

Average number Cars per Train 

Average number Passengers per Coach 

and Sleeper 

Average number Passengers per Train... 

Average Earnings per Car per Mile 

Average Expenses per Car per Mile 



5,948,913 


5,109,302 
322,708,490 
63.2 Miles. 


16.43 
2.29 




330,111,942 




55.5 Miles. 


12.18 


$6,135,500 85 


$5,780,240 62 
7,029,644 06 
4,832,370 51 


6.15 

6.28 

13.86 




7,470.992 22 




5,502,240 90 




$1 03.14 


$1 13.13 
94.58 
Cts. 1.791 
" 1.497 
" 0.294 




8 83 


92.49 




2 21 


Cts. 1.859 


3.80 
11.36 




" 1.667 




" 0.192 


34.69 








7,715,162 


7,691,050 
$0 91.40 
62.83 
28.57 


0.31 

5.95 

13.51 




$0 96.84 




71.32 




25.52 


10 68 








27,128,690 


26,900,759 
35,659,206 


0.85 
1.33 




36,134,240 








4.68 


4.64 

12.00 
41.96 


0.86 

1.42 
1.98 




12.17 
42.79 








Cts. 20.68 
" 15.23 


Cts. 19.71 
" 13.55 


4.92 
12.40 





—51 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 
Tonnage of Articles Caeried. 



ARTICLES. 


Year ending 
June 30th, 1903. 


Year ending 
June 30th, 1902. 




Per 
Cent. 


Tons. 


Per 
Cent. 


Tons. 


Products of Agriculture:— 

Wheat 


23.65 

3.45 
7.81 
4.23 
1.99 
2.68 
1.37 
0.05 
0.12 
1.95 

6.68 

3.63 
1.11 
1.20 
0.08 
0.66 

31.99 

2.31 
2.32 
26.33 
0.39 
0.64 

7.46 

5.65 
1.81 

9.42 

1.05 
0.36 
0.61 
1.30 
1.91 
2.34 
0.44 
0.14 
0.94 
0.33 

6.41 
14.39 


334,822 
756,765 
409,762 
193,339 
269,263 
182,292 
4,480 
11,438 
189,390 

352,125 

107,985 

116,135 

7,315 

63,947 

223,530 

225,297 

2,551,579 

37,477 

62,293 

547,839 
175,255 

102,228 

34,708 

59,034 

126,897 

185,526 

226,626 

43,084 

13,644 

90,815 

31,527 

620,327 
1,394,770 


21.12 

i 1.91 

! 6.52 

4.11 

1 1.68 

! 2.61 

1.65 

0.04 

0.57 

2.03 

8.25 

3.97 
1.32 
2.17 
0.10 
0.69 

31.39 

2.08 
3.02 
25.62 
0.34 
0.33 

8.48 

6.33 
2.15 

9.24 

0.97 
0.53 
0.53 
1.22 
1.40 
2.60 
0.57 
0.17 
0.92 
0.33 

6.58 
14.94 


164,196 


Corn. 


559,723 


Other Grain 


352,757 


Flour 


144,074 


Other Mill Products 


223,727 




141,200 


Tobacco . 


3,412 




49,314 


Fruits and Vegetables 


173,759 


Products of Animals:— 

Live Stock 


340,151 




113,424 


Other Packing House Products- 
Wool 


186,288 
8,926 




59,516 


Products of Mines:— 


178,490 




259,039 


Bituminous Coal 


2,197,500 


Coke ; 


28,961 


Ores . . . 


28,568 


Products of Forest:— 

Lumber 


543,301 


Other Articles 


184,302 


Manufactures : — 

Petroleum and Other Oils 


83 530 




45,160 


Iron, Pig and Bloom 


45,150 


Iron and Steel Rails 

Other Castings and Machinery- 
Cement, Brick and Lime 


104,681 
119,846 
222,753 




49,288 


Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc... 


14,592 
78,532 
28,379 

564,048 
1,282,016 


H. H. Goods and Furniture 




Miscellaneous 


Total Tons 


100.00 


9,691,514 


100.00 


8,578,603 




CoTTipaTiy's Freight , ,- ,,,,,, 




1,833,755 




1,903,089 









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Fifteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



Kor The Ki^ca.1 ~Yesir Ending 
June SOthi, 1904. 



ST. LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co. 

1904. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 



GEO. J. GOULD, Chairman of the Board. 

J. KAMSEY, Jr., President. 

O. D. ASHLEY, Vice-President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

M. KNIGHT, Second Vice-President. 

W. H. BLODGETT, Third Vice-President and General Counsel 

A. C. BIRD, Vice-President. 

E. B. PRYOR, Asst. to the President, Executive Dept. 

H. W. ASHLEY, Asst. to the President, Operative Dept. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

H. L. MAGEE, General Superintendent. 

D. B. HOWARD, Auditor. 

S.B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent. 

0. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

C. B. ADAMS, Superintendent Transportation. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

H. H. WELLMAN, Purchasing Agent and General Storekeeper. 

W. S. NEWHALL, Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Motive Power and Machinery, 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Dr. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 
R.J.WOODS, ...... .Fuel Agent. 



DIRECTORS. 

GEO. J. GOULD, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

0. D. ASHLEY, EDWIN GOULD, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

HENRY K. McHARG, JOHN T. TERRY, 

CYRUS J. LAWRENCE, RUSSELL SAGE, 

JAMES HAZEN HYDE, WINSLOW S. PIERCE, 
JOSEPH RAMSEY, Jr. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DIRECTORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co, 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1904. 



St. Louis, Mo., October 1st, 1904. 

To THE Board of Directors, 

The Wabash Railroad Company, 

Mr. George J. Gould, Chairman. 
Dear Siif : — 

The report for the year ending June 30th, 1904, which I 
have the honor of submitting herewith, while showing a 
large increase in gross earnings, |1,882,797.69 (this being 
the seventh year of continuous increases, 1904 showing an 



increase of $11,496,839.27 over 1897), also shows that this 
increase in earnings was offset by a corresponding increase 
in expenses. 

The conditions affecting operating expenses during the 
past year were, to a certain extent, unusual ; in fact, 
abnormal. 

A. In April, 1903, wages of trainmen on the Western 
Division were advanced twelve and fifteen per cent and 
promises made which resulted in a similar advance on the 
Middle Division, these two advances covering two-thirds of 
the System. In addition, wages of engineers and firemen, 
shopmen and other classes of labor, were more or less 
advanced. The total increase in expenses due to these 
changes in rates of pay and rules of service aggregated 
about $400,000.00. 

B. During January, February and March and part of 
April we had the severest winter, with lowest temperature 
and worst storms, all over the System, than ever known in 
the history of the Company, not only reducing the earnings 
but largely increasing the expenses of operation. 

C. The cost of fuel for the first ten months of the year 
was higher than ever before, being nearly 30 per cent more 
than the previous year. 

D. The work of preparing the line for the World's Fair 
traffic was pushed vigorously and added largely to the 
expense account. The detailed statements of expenses will 
clearly show what was done in this line. 

During the past four years the reduction of grades and 
improvement of the line between St. Louis and Chicago 



— 5— 

have been under way and are now practically completed, 
so that trains northbound can be made up for a ruling 
grade of 21 feet per mile instead of from 50 to 60 feet per 
mile. The cost of the work to date has been $617,300.00 
and the results as follows : 

Curves removed 18 

Degrees of curvature removed 388° 52' 

Length of curved line removed 23^ miles. 

Mileage of grades changed. 31.3 miles. 

Line shortened 3^ mile. 

Highway grade crossings removed 9 

Eailroad grade crossings removed 1 

Train loads increased from an average of 1100 

tons to 1850 tons. 

During the year, in order to comply with the require- 
ments of the statutes of some of the States through which 
our System passes, it was necessary to increase the capital 
stock of the Company to such amount as would make it 
equal the bonds authorized, and the stockholders, on March 
22d, 1904, added $50,000,000.00 to the Common Stock. 

THE WABASH PITTSBURGH TERMINAL RAILWAY COMPANY. 

In 1901 the stockholders of the Company authorized the 
officers of the Company to enter into certain trackage and 
traffic agreements with The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad 
Company and The Pittsburgh, Carnegie & Western Rail- 
road Company to secure the construction of a line of rail- 
road from a point on The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad 
near Jewett, Ohio, to Pittsburgh, with necessary terminals and 
connecting railways in Pittsburgh, with a close traffic alliance 
between the three contracting railroads, so as to practically 
make them one system. This agreement was afterwards 
modified and the amended agreement provided that the 



Wabash and Wheeling & Lake Erie Companies should, if 
it became necessary so to do, pay 25 per cent (or so much 
thereof as might be required to meet any deficit on the 
bonds of The Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway Com- 
pany) of the gross earnings of either Company from traffic 
which they received from or delivered to The Wabash 
Pittsburgh Terminal Railway. This condition puts no 
burden on either Company, as they will not be required to 
pay anything unless they have increased earnings on 
account of the Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway lines. 

The Pittsburgh, Carnegie & Western Railroad Company, 
through consolidation with the Cross Creek Railroad in 
West Virginia and the Pittsburgh, Toledo & Western Rail- 
road in Ohio, became The Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal 
Railway Company, and the latter Company has carried out 
or is carrying out all the obligations assumed by the Pitts- 
burgh, Carnegie & Western Railroad Company. 

On July 2d, 1904, the line was opened for through pas- 
senger traffic and through train service between St. Louis, 
Chicago and Pittsburgh by Wabash trains. 

The Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway Company 
also purchased a controlling stock interest in The Wheeling 
& Lake Erie Railroad, thus owning and controlling some 
550 miles of railway lines, reaching from Pittsburgh to 
Toledo, Cleveland, Wheeling, Steubenville and Zanesville, 
the greatest freight tonnage territory in the world, the 
Pittsburgh district alone last year consuming and shipping 
over 86,000,000 tons of coal, coke, ores, iron, steel, manu- 
factures and merchandise. 



A proposition was submitted to your Board for the pur- 
chase by the Wabash Company of all the stock of The 
Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway Company ($10,000 , 
000.00), by the issuance of $10,000,000.00 Wabash common 
stock in exchange therefor. As the ownership of the stock 
of The Wabash Pittsburgh Terminal Railway Company 
carried with it the controlling interest in The Wheeling & 
Lake Erie Railroad, your Board authorized the purchase, 
and the exchange of stocks was made. 

Your Board, at the same time, authorized the purchase 
of $6,600,000.00 First Mortgage Bonds of The Wabash 
Pittsburgh Terminal Railway Company for $6,000,000.00 
This purchase was made and paid for through the issuance 
of a three-year obligation, secured by the $6,600,000.00 of 
bonds as collateral. 

It is confidently expected that the control of these prop- 
erties and of the traffic secured to the Wabash thereby will 
add largely to the revenues of the Company. 

The outlook for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1905, 
is excellent. Our passenger traffic is enormous and will 
remain so until the end of the Exposition, November 30th, 
and the freight traffic, while below last year's (1903), is 
still above 1902, and I look for improvement in it before the 
end of the year. The gross earnings will exceed $24,000,- 
000.00 for the year. 

The condition of the property — tracks, roadbed, bridges, 
stations, rolling stock and motive power — has been greatly 
improved during the year. The extent of this work will 
be shown by the detailed statement herein of principal 
replacements and improvements. 



— 8— 

STATISTICS. 

The following statement gives in condensed form the 
revenues, expenses, charges, etc., for the fiscal year as 
compared with the previous year : 

1903-1904. 1902—1903. 

Total revenue of the Company from all 

sources was $23,513,332 70 121,608,756 88 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 19,250,873 18 17,350,805 40 

$ 4,262,459 52 $ 4,257,951 48 
Interest on Bonds 3,092,422 72 3,034,512 60 

Net Eevenue $ 1,170,036 80 | 1,223,438 88 

Additions to Property 591,446 10 253,132 15 

I 578,590 70 $ 970,306 73 
Sinking Fund Charges, account new 
equipment; steamers $ 459,299 54 $ 564,156 65 

$ 119,291 16 $ 406,150 08 
Dividend on Debenture "A" Bonds 105,000 00 210,000 00 

Surplus to Profit & Loss Account $ 14,29116 $ 196,150 08 

The growth of the traffic and revenues since 1897 is 
shown by the following comparisons : 

Year. Ton Miles. Passenger Miles. Gross Earnings. 

1897 1,149,989,024 135,963,860 $11,526,787 00 

1898 1,365,693,174 180,359,167 13,207,862 00 

1899 1,666,830,054 210,592,939 14,393,974 00 

1900 1,902,881,278 233,848,065 16,440,990 00 

1901 1,978.952,453 264,268,214 17,554,465 00 

1902 ,1,947,404,142 322,708,490 19,053,493 00 

1903 2,198,073,383 330,111,942 21,140,829 00 

1904 2,175,680,058 369,283,834 23,023,626 00 

The increases in different classes of earnings were : 

1897. 1904. Per cent Increase 

Freight $7,604,769 95 114,064,656 81 84.9% 

Passenger 2,837,973 54 7,045,525 29 148.3% 

Mails 542,635 09 830,928 23 53.1% 

Express 284,706 69 533,703 85 87.4% 

Miscellaneous 256,702 09 548,812 45 113.8% 

Total.... $11,526,787 36 $23,023,626 63 99.8% 



REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 
Eaenings and Expenses. 



1903-1904, 



1902-1903. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$23,023,626 63 
17,683,508 85 



$21,140,828 94 
15,815,662 32 



$5,340,117 78 

76.81 

9,148 34 

7,026 47 

2,121 87 



$5,325,166 62 

74.81 

8,513 20 

6,368 81 

2,144 39 



$1,882,797 69 
1,867,846 53 



14,951 16 

2.00 

635 14 

657 66 

22.52* 



EARNINGS. 



Per 

Cent. 



1903-1904. 



Per 
Cent, 



1902-1903, 



Increase. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous 



61.09 

30.60 

3.61 

2.32 

2.38 



Total. 



$14,064,656 81 

7,045,525 29 

830,928 23 

533,703 85 

548,812 45 



63.04 

29.02 

3.39 

2.20 

2.35 



$13,327,478 75 

6,135,500 85 

716,200 09 

464,645 19 

497,004 06 



737,178 06 

910,024 44 

114,728 14 

69,058 66 

51,808 39 



$23,023,626 63 



$21,140,828 94 



$1,882,797 69 



EXPENSES. 



C?nt. 1903-1904. 

I 



Per 
Cent. 



1902-1903. 



Increase. 



Maintenance of "Way and 

Structures 

Maintenance of Equipment. 
Conducting ^Transportation 
General Expenses 



Total 



19.64 

56.43 

3.11 



$ 3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 68 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 



$17,683,508 85 



23.40 

19.69 

53.82 

3.09 



$ 3,700,961 69 

3,114,663 95 

8,511,277 61 

488,759 07 



$15,815,662 32 



$ 19,353 69* 
358,337 73 
1,467,351 18 
61,511 31 



$1,867,846 53 



*Decrease. 



■ID- 



ANALYSIS OF OPERATION. 

Operating expenses increased $1,867,846.53 (11.81 per 
cent), of this amount $1,467,351.18 was in Conducting 
Transportation (or 78.55 per cent of the total increase), an 
increase of 17.24 per cent over 1903. 

The principal items of increase in Conducting Transpor- 
tation were : Fuel for locomotives, $456,427.23 ; engine 
and round house men, $215,513.37 ; train men, $148,496.13 
station service, $108,671 07; car mileage balance, $150,239.07 
switchmen, watchmen, etc., $112,731.71. 

The increase of $1,882,797.69 in earnings is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,817,329 90 

Buffalo Division, Increase 65,467 79 

The increase of $1,867,846.53 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,956,628 23 

Buffalo Division, Decrease 88,781 70 

TRAFFIC. 

FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics show a decrease of 22,393,325 
(1.02 per cent), in "tons revenue freight carried one mile," 
at an average rate of 0.6464 cents per mile, an increase of 
0.0401 cents (6.61 per cent), at a cost per ton mile of 0.5400 
cents, an increase of 0.0708 cents (15.09 per cent), leaving a 



11- 



net profit of 0.1064 cents as compared with 0.1371 cents 
last year, a decrease of 0.0307 cents (22.39 per cent) . 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.8510 ; 
expense per mile $1.5463, and net earnings, $0.3047 against 
$1.8297, $1.4159 and $0.4138 respectively last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 7,598,295, an increase 
of 314,137, or 4.31 per cent. 

The loaded cars per train decreased 0.16 cars; the load 
per car decreased 0.68 tons and the revenue train load was 
286.34 tons against 301.76 tons last year, a decrease of 15.42 
tons 5.11 per cent. For the years 1895 to 1904 the revenue 
train load and load per car, have been as follows : 

Year. Train Load. Car Load. 

1895 176.29 tons. 13.37 tons. 

1896 193.04 " 13.80 " 

1897 212.87 ** 14.00 " 

1898 216.55 '* 14.16 " 

1899 234.72 " 14.83 " 

1900 268.94 " 16.07 " 

1901... 283.47 " 16.67 *' 

1902 284.66 " 16.69 ** 

1903 301.76 ♦* 17.82 " 

1904 286.34 " 17.14 " 



The actual train load, including company freight, was 
315.94 tons, against 331.29 tons last year. 

The in,crease in train load over 1895 has been 110.05 tons 
(62.42 per cent), and car load has increased 3.77 tons (28.20 
per cent). 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars, 
whether " revenue," freight or " company " freight, are 
included in " loaded cars per train." 



—12— 

With a decrease of 1.02 per cent in "services rendered'' 
i. e., "tons carried one mile," there was an increase in freight 
revenue of 1737,178.06 (5.53 per cent), with an increase of 
$1,435,666.58 (13.92 per cent), in expenses of freight traffic. 
While the increase in freight tonnage was 7,481 tons (0.08 
per cent), the increase in freight train service was 4.31 per 
cent. 

PASSENGER. 

"Passengers carried one mile" increased 39,171,892 (11.87 
per cent), and in revenue $910,024.44 (14.83 per cent). 
There was an increase of $43,915.70 on the Buffalo Division, 
and an increase of $866,108.74 on the Wabash proper. 

The rate per passenger per mile was 1.908 cents, an 
increase of 0.049 cents, and expenses per passenger per mile 
1.607 cents, a decrease of 0.060 cents, leaving 0.301 cents 
per mile net, as against 0.192 cents last year, a gain of 
56.77 per cent. 

Train earnings per mile were $1.0592, a gain of 9.08 
cents; the expenses were 73.26 cents per train mile, an 
increase of 1.94 cents, and net earnings per train mile were 
32.66 cents against 25.52 cents in 1903. 

The "passengers carried one mile" increased 11.87 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service increased 7.85 
per cent, and the actual number of passengers carried was 
6,183,474, an increase of 234,561 (3.94 per cent). 

Statistics of freight and passenger traffic show the earn- 
ings divided between the two classes of traffic as follows : 

Freight train gross earnings $14,064,656 81 (62.11%) 

Passenger train gross earnings... 8,580,184 02 (37.89%) 

Freight train net earnings $2,315,574 81 (46.67%) 

Passenger train net earnings 2,645,757 17 (53.33%) 

Passenger train earnings include mail, express, etc. 



— IB- 
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows : 





Buffalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper, 


Total. 


Maintenance of Way and 
Structures 


1233,522 54* 

79,926 06 

63,643 62 

1,171 16 


$ 214,168 85 . 

278,411 67 

1,403,707 56 

60,340 15 


$ 19,353 69* 


Maintenance of Equip- 
ment 


358,337 73 


Conducting Transportat'n 
General Expenses 


1,467,351 18 
61,511 31 




Total 


$ 88,781 70* 


$1,956,628 23 


11,867,846 53 



♦Decrease. 

The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Repairs of Eoadway 1277,704 81 

Renewalsof Cross Ties.... 78,796 10 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives 171,638 55 

Repairs and Renewals of Pass. Cars 60,816 01 

Repairs and Renewals of Freight Cars 157,316 54 

Passenger Train Service— train and engine 
men, fuel and water for cars and locomo- 
tives — train supplies— oil, waste and other 

supplies for locomotives, etc., (16.17%)... 261,508 97 

Freight Train Service— train and engine 
men, fuel and water for cars and locomo- 
tives—train supplies— oil, waste and other 

supplies for locomotives, etc., (22.63%) 625,204 10 

Station Service- 
Passenger (7.87%) $ 18,493 30 

Freight (H.02%) 108,840 25 127,333 55 



The decrease in Maintenance of Way and Structures 
on the Buffalo Division was owing to the heavy expendi- 
tures on bridges during the year 1902-1903. 

Maintenance of Way and Structures shows a decrease of 
^19,353.69 for the entire system, but the amount expended 



—14— 

in repairs to roadway shows an increase of $277,704.81, and 
the amount expended for cross ties shows an increase of 
$78,796.10, and repairs to buildings and fixtures an increase 
of $70,670.74. 

Maintenance of Way. 
new steel rail laid. 



1903-1904. 



1902-1903. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



No. Tons 80-lb. New Eail 
Miles New Steel Eail Laid 



34,488.0 
275.0 



28,085.0 
223.0 



6,403.0 
52.0 



Note. — In the above statement is included 3730 tons 29.6 miles of 
new 80-lb. rail laid on the Buffalo Division between Niagara Falls and 
Windsor, the Wabash paying its proportion on a wheelage basis. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



1903-1904. 



1902-1903. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



No. Cross-ties laid, Main 

Track 

Cross-ties laid, Side 
Track 

Sets Switch-ties put 



Miles Track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

Miles Fence Eebuilt. 

Miles Old Fence Ee- 
paired 

Miles New Fence 
Built 

Miles Ditching 

Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 



870,521 

167,652 

483 



198.9 
160.4 

149.1 



596,751 

139,274 

493 



133.8 
284.3 

140.4 



99.0 
48.6 

55.7 



113.0 
33.4 



273,770 

28,378 



65.1 



8.7 
99.0 



22.3 



10 



123.9 



64.4 



Note. — Included in the above are 66,509 cross ties, 29 sets switch 
ties, 22.9 miles of track ballasted, 20.5 miles of fence rebuilt, and 6.9 
miles sidings and spurs built on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo 
Division; and 9,903 cross-ties and 4 sets switch-ties put in on the 
Erie Section of the Buffalo Division. 



-15- 



Number op Feet of Trestle Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled. 
ETC., During the Year Ending June 30. 1904. 



Shortened. 



Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 



Filled and 
Abandoned. 



Cost. 



Buffalo Division... 
Detroit Division... 
Eastern Division... 
Middle Division... 
"Western Division 
St. Louis Division 



Total 1,053 feet 





494 feet. 


85 


a 


233 


<( 


241 


(( 



418 feet. 
24 
174 
416 
561 
643 



2,236 feet. 



192 feet. 
680 " 
146 '* 
4.491 '' 



3,070 



8,579 feet. 



$ 5,807 33 

27,389 97 

4,190 01 

11,481 60 

3,281 08 

2,991 99 



$55,141 98 



Total Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 



1903-1904. 

1 


1902-1903. 


Buffalo Division 


610 
704 
814 

4,992 
794 

3,954 




Detroit Division 


776 


Eastern Division 


297 


Middle Division 


1,129 
"2,098} 


Western Division 

St. Louis Division 




Total , 


11,868 


4,300 



—16— 

EXTRAORDINAEY REPAIRS AND RENEWALS, IMPROVE- 
MENTS AND ADDITIONS. 

REPAIRS AND RENEWALS. 

Bridges, Wooden — 

Rebuilt 75 trestles at various points $ 50,462 69 

Harvey, la. — Bridge No. 2891, renewed Howe truss; two 

spans 11,169 37 

Total $ 61,632 06 

Wharfs, Docks and Landings — 
Detroit, Mich.— Renewal of dock along 12th street freight 

house $ 4,340 94 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other Buildings, 
etc. — 
Detroit, Mich. — Renewed driveway 12th street freight 

house 1,189 00 

Delray, Mich.— Rebuilt sand house 380 00 

Delray, Mich.— Water connection 345 00 

Holloway, Mich. — Rebuilt combination depot 885 00 

Adrian, Mich. — Paving around freight house 1,132 00 

Adrian, Mich. — Renewed passenger platform with brick.. 685 50 
Montpelier, O. — Changing old freight house into restau- 
rant, baggage and express rooms 523 00 

Montpelier, 0. — Moving freight house from Millersburg 
and converting same into freight bouse 

and office building 103 00 

Montpelier, 0. — Renewing engine terminal 8,156 00 

Ashley, Ind. — Rebuilt track scales '. 231 00 

Toledo, O.— Rebuilt tower at Broadway 267 00 

Toledo, 0. — Renewed roof and skylight on coach shop... 1,538 00 

Homewood, 0. — Renewed depot 352 00 

Napoleon, 0. — Extension of freight house 841 00 

Napoleon, 0. — Raised passenger depot, repaired same 

and rebuilt platform 985 00 

Okolona, O.— Rebuilt platform 370 00 

Jewell, 0.— Rebuilt platform 176 00 

Emmett, O. — Rebuilt depot arid platform 608 00 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Enlarged three engine house doors 263 00 

LaGro, Ind.— Remodeled depot and platform 993 00 

Rich Valley, Ind. — Rebuilt depot and platform..... 120 00 

Peru, Ind. — Extension and improvement of engine house 12,155 14 
Peru, Ind.— Renewed 60 ft. turn table with 70 ft. 200 ton 

deck table and masonry foundations 4,387 75 

' Peru, Ind. — Renewed elevated sand house 485 20 

Peru, Ind.— Sidewalk from engine house to Broadway.... 331 35 
Lafayette, Ind. — 60 ft. deck turn table from Peru and 

masonry foundation 1,961 00 

Danville Jet., 111. — Renewed concrete platform and side- 
walk 1,100 00 

Danville, 111.— Replanked Main street crossing 428 00 

Tilton, 111.— Enlarged five stalls in engine house 660 00 

Chicago, 111.— Renewed 60 ft. turntable at 41st street 395 00 

Bluffs, 111. — Renewed round house roof.. > 207 00 

Bluffs, 111.— Renewed station platform in brick 506 00 

Mavsville, 111.— Rebuilt depot and platform 1,711 60 

Springfield, 111.— Rebuilt ice house 737 00 

Forrest, 111. — Renewed heater boiler at station 521 00 



—17— 

Forrest, 111.— Raised depot and renewed platforna in 

concrete $ 3,940 21 

Forrest, 111.— Renewed turntable with 70 ft. 200 ton table 

and foundations 5,833 75 

Quincy, 111. — Renewed heater boiler at freight house 367 00 

Quincy, 111. — Renewed round house roof 160 00 

Gibson, 111. — Renewed station platform in concrete 855 00 

Springfield, 111. — Renewed Motive Power Dept's office 

roof 175 00 

Springfield, 111. — Renewed cinder pit 392 00 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed eave trougbing on passenger 

station 348 00 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed ice house roof 413 00 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed boiler washing pump at round 

house 525 00 

Decatur, 111. — Renewed cinder pit at round house 415 00 

Decatur, 111. — Lengthened and lined cinder pit 682 18 

Bay windows added on the following depots: — 

Galesville, 111., Foosland, 111., Garber, 111., Strawn, 111., 

and Osman, 111 350 00 

East St. Louis, 111. — Rebuilding outbound freight house... 25,865 00 

Hannibal, Mo. — Improving depot building and shed 1,567 00 

Luther, Mo. — Renewing yard office, account of fire 1,500 00 

Luther, Mo. — Renewed cinder pit 615 00 

Luther, Mo. — Renewed steam heat in round house 350 00 

Heights, Mo.— Addition to depot 135 00 

Ferguson, Mo. — Renewed ice house 255 00 

Ferguson, Mo.— Renewed sidewalk 206 00 

Gilmore, Mo. — Rebuilt depot and platform, account of tire.. 1,251 86 
Wellsville, Mo. — Rebuilt depot and plattorm, account of 

fire 1,504 91 

Thompson, Mo. — Rebuilt depot and platform, account of 

fire 1,337 00 

Columbia, Mo. — Renewed stock yards 265 00 

Moberly,- Mo.— Rebuilt end wall of roundhouse 1,068 00 

Moberly, Mo.— Renewed cinder pit 792 00 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed blast furnaces in blacksmith 

shop and brass foundry.. 176 00 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed steam heat at round house 770 00 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed machinery foundation 325 00 

Moberly, Mo.— Renewed scales 595 00 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed car shop floor , 294 00 

Macon, Mo.— Built addition to freight house 442 00 

Salisbury, Mo.— Renewed depot and platform, account 

of fire ; 2,351 00 

Brunswick, Mo.— Renewed scales 466 00 

Kansas Citv, Mo.— On account of* flood, rebuilt freight 

house with brick 3,114 00 

Kansas City, Mo. — Steam heat 310 00 

McFall, Mo.— Brick floor 640 00 

McFall, Mo.— Sand house 205 00 

McFall, Mo.— Moving depot and platform 397 00 

Elmo, Mo.— Renewed depot ■- 1,542 00 

Elmo, Mo. — Renewed stockyards 178 00 

Burlington Junction, Mo. — Built addition to hotel 3,277 00 

Blanchard, la. — Moving depot and platform 314 00 

Shenandoah, la. — Renewed depot and platform, account 

of fire , 3,600 00 

Total $115,892 45 



—18— 

Water and Fuel Stations. — 

Belleville, Mich.— Rebuilding water tank $ 214 19 

Napoleon, O.— Rebuilt water'plant 900 00 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Rebuilt water tank at shops and new 

water mains 5,000 00 

Peru, Ind. — Relaying water line in engine house 1,464 77 

Marley, 111.— Six in. well casing 216 00 

Manhattan, 111.— Six in. well casing 388 00 

Taylorville, 111.— Two ten in. well casings 883 00 

Chicago, 111., 4l8t street— Rebuilt roof over coal chute 500 00 

Stanberry, Mo. — Built addition to sand house 185 00 

Total $ 9,750 96 

Renewals of tracks, 23d street to Page avenue, St. Louis, Mo. — 

Two main tracks relaid with 80 lb. rail from 23d street to 
Union avenue $ 32,711 64 

One main track from Union avenue to Page avenue, relaid 

with 80 lb. rail 17,106 90 

Total $ 49,818 54 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Steel Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges — 

Whittaker, Mich.— Bridge No. 779, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and through girder (not completed) $ 2,697 76 

Cone, Mich. — Bridge No. 813, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and deck plate girder (not completed) 254 18 

Britton, Mich. — Bridge No. 821, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and through girder (not completed) 3,118 68 

Britton, Mich. — Bridge 'No. 823, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and deck plate girder (not completed) 42 00 

Montpelier, O.— Bridge No. 1357, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and deck plate girder (not completed).. 1,455 41 
Hamilton, Ind. — Bridge No. 1383, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and deck plate girder (not completed)... 4,568 79 
New Haven, Ind. — Bridge No. 317, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and deck girder (not completed) 2,091 12 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Bridge No. 323, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and deck girder (not completed) 1,336 44 

Roanoke, Ind. — Bridge No. 351, pile trestle renewed with 

masonry and through girders (not completed) 6,885 33 

Roanoke.'ind. — Bridge No. 357, pile trestle renewed with 

masonry and through girder (not completed) 1,061 98 

Williamsport, Ind.— Bridge No. 683, replaced pile trestle 

with 65 ft. girder and masonry (not completed) — 6,155 72 

Danville, 111.— Bridge No. 745, pile trestle replaced with 

deck girder and masonry over Seminary Street, (not 

completed) 12,047 49 

Okolona, O.— Bridge No. 845, pile trestle replaced with 

concrete abutments and girder (not completed) 613 85 

Okolona, O.— Bridge No. 848, pile trestle replaced with 

concrete abutments and girder (not completed) 1,328 49 

Horse Creek, III.— Bridge No. 1149, renewed pile trestle 

with through steel span and masonry 430 85 



b 



—19— 

Alpine, 111.— Bridge No. 1057, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and deck span , $1,044 23 

Sibley, 111.— Bridge No. 1285, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and solid floor girder 2,636 .62 

Campus, 111. — Bridge No. 1195, pile trestle reconstructed 

with masonry and girder 3,632 94 

Wing, 111. — Bridge No. 1236, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry pier and two through spans 24,902 97 

Honey Bend, 111, — Bridge No. 790, renewed pile trestle 

with concrete abutments and solid floor deck span 832 92 > 

Stonington, 111. — Bridge No. 730, renewed pile trestle 

with concrete abutments and solid floor deck span 2,097 69 

Sadorus, 111. — Bridge No. 63, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and through girders with heav)'^ center 8,483 79 

Carpenter, 111. — Bridge No. 870, renewed frame trestle 

with masonry and through girder 5,398 20 

Carpenter, 111. — Bridge No, 871, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and through girder 3,716 89 

Wing, 111. — Bridge No. 1240, renewed pile trestle with 

masonry and deck span (old material) 904 64 

Salisbury, Mo. — Bridge No. 449, renewed Howe truss 

bridge' with steel truss 9,883 16 

Keytesville, Mo. — Bridge No. 471, renewed Howe truss 

bridge with steel truss 10,735 47 

Miami, Mo. — Bridge No. 516, renewed Howe truss bridge 

with iron truss bridge .. 13,643 74 

South Liberty, Mo, — Bridge No. 604, renewed Howe truss 

bridge with 65 ft. iron girder 2,836 63 

Maryville, Mo. — Bridge No. 1062. renewed Howe truss 

bridge across street with 75 ft. iron girder 7,842 04 

Camden, Mo. — Bridge No. 557, renewed Howe truss bridge 

with 63 ft. iron girder 2,779 22 

Randolph, Mo. — Bridge No. 633, renewed Howe truss 

bridge with 60 ft. girder 2,263 80 

Randolph, Mo. — Bridge No. 636, renewed low truss bridge 

with 55 ft. iron girder 2,046 74 

Camden, Mo. — Bridge No. 567, renewed low truss bridge 

with 35 ft. iron girder... 5.249 33 

Total $155,019 11 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Stone Arches, 

Filled, etc $ 68,221 83 

Steel Bridges Repaired and Strengthened — 
Danville, 111.— Bridge No. 747, renewed west approach 

over yermillion River 1,654 40 

Williamsport, Ind.— Bridge No. 683, buiJt retaining wall 

of masonry for protection of highway under bridge 245 00 

Meredosia, 111.— Bridge No. 282, renewed deck 1,077 81 

Riverton, 111.— Bridge No. 173, repaired through iron truss 

span 1,135 63 

St. Charles, Mo.— Bridge No. 69, trussing stringers and 

connecting columns in approaches 11,079 27 

St. Charles, Mo.— Bridge No. 59, putting in new girders 

over public streets and putting in new capstones 8,897 78 

Gilmore, Mo.— Bridge No. 116. two girders added 3,107 43 

Total $ 27,197 32 



—20— 

New Steel Bridges to Replace Old Steel Bridges— 

Logansport, Ind. — Bridge No. 494, over street, replaced 

with heavy girder and solid floor | 2,523 86 

Logansport, Ind.— Bridge No. 497, replaced through iron 
truss bridge over Wabash River with heavy through 
steel truss, new abutments and piers 1,000 00 

Total $ 3,623 86 



Improving Line and Reducijjg Grades — 

Chicago Division— Gibson, Lodge, Mansfield, Garber and 

Sibley — Changing grades and alignment $ 15,045 54 

Ritchie, 111.— Changing grades and alignment 76,321 42 

Monticelio, 111. — Changing grades and alignment 71,596 57 

Bement, 111. — Changing grades and alignment 10,829 66 

Carpenter, 111. — Changing grades and alignment 48,097 94 

Edwardsville, 111. — Changing grades and alignment 34,551 24 

Total $256,442 37 

For Protection Against Missouri and Des Moines Rivera — 
At Randolph, De Witt and Harvey $ 57,756 95 



ADDITIONS. 

Second, Third, Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries — 

Buffalo Division 6.9 miles | 83,196 00 

Detroit Division 7.0 miles 47,320 50 

Eastern Division 4.0 miles 22,819 61 

Middle Division 24.0 miles 106,962 12 

Chicago Terminal (Landers Yard) Grading 

Only miles 3,910 15 

E. St. Louis Terminal (Brooklyn Yard) Grad- 
ing Only miles 10,912 17 

St. Louis Terminal Facilities : 

23rd St. to Grand Ave., Yard Tracks 1.46 miles 10,402 53 

Compton Ave. to Euclid Ave., Third Track. 1.85 miles 9,434 99 

Vandeventer Ave., Pass. Eng. Trml. Tracks. 1.47 miles 7,000 00 

Boyle Ave., Pass. Car Storage Yard 1.68 miles 4,170 17 

Boyle Ave., Frt. Car Storage Yard 1.44 miles 10,843 66 

Olive Road, New Tracks 0.6 miles 2,517 44 

Page Ave., Two Sidings 0.95 miles 9,915 95 

St. Louis Division 3.5 miles 22,585 38 

Western Division 0.9 miles 4,060 64 

Second Track— Delray to Oakwood 1.75 miles 15,844 12 

Second Track— Ashburn to Banks 6.30 miles 76,982 34 

Second Track— Litchfield to Worden 8.10 miles 100,874 36 

Second Track— Poag to Granite City 9.60 miles 59,798 46 

Second Track — St. Louis, Union Ave to Page 

Ave 2.55 miles 11,350 36 

Total 84.05 miles $620,900 95 



—21— 

Interlocking Plants, Wabash Proportion — 

Crocker, Ind — Rebuilt interlocking tower E. J. & E. 

crossing $ 1,057 23 

Eeddick, 111. — Interlocking plant erected, 111. Cent. Eail- 

way crossing 1,311 12 

Lotus, 111 — Interlocking plant erected. 111. Cent. Railway- 
crossing 1,342 44 

St. Louis, Mo. — Union Avenue. Interlocking plant 

erected, St. L., K. C. & C. connection. 4,879 35 , 
St. Louis, Mo. — Forsythe Junction. Interlocking plant 
erected, St. L., K. C & C. Railway 

crossing 5,037 97 

St. Louis, Mo. — Page Avenue. Interlocking plant 
erected. Terminal R. R. Association 

connection 5,552 07 

Total $19,180 18 

New Buildings, or Additions to Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops 
. and other Buildings, etc. — 

Delray, Mich. — Machinery for turning drawbridge (not 

completed) $ 550 59 

Montpelier, O. — New engine terminal (not completed) ... 685 21 

Ashley, Ind. — New cinder pit (not completed) 544 59 

Eddy, Ind.— New block tower 308 02 

Stoney Creek, Ind.— New block tower 317 55 

New Paris, Ind. — New stock scales 231 99 

N. Liberty, Ind. — New turntable (not completed) 315 00 

N. Liberty, Ind. — New water plant (not completed) 5,861 42 

Morris. Ind. — New block tower 321 07 

Calumet, Ind.— New block tower 367 52 

Tolleston, Ind.— New block tower , 329 87 

Clark, Sw., Ind.— New block tower 359 34 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New brick shop building „.. 1,001 91 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Addition to M. M. office 349 22 

Ft. Wayne, Ind, — New oil storage cellars 618 33 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New foundation for air compressor 253 76 

Spencerville, Ind. — New stock scales 234 53 

St. Joe, Ind.— New stock scales 222 68 

Neapolis, O. — New No. 4 depot and platform 590 59 

Defiance, O. — Standpipe and water main 1,521 04 

Rich Valley, Ind. — New water tank and standpipe (not 

completed) 318 00 

Liberty Center, 0. — Extension to depot 115 92 

Jewell, O. — Extension to depot 340 16 

Knoxdale, Ind. — New No. 4 depot and platform 673 11 

Gar Creek, Ind. — New No. 4 depot and platform 603 66 

Ashwood, Ind. — New block tower 322 58 

Peru, Ind.— Extension of baggage room for lunch room 

and express office 1,138 44 

Peru, Ind. — New water plant, Little Pipe Creek 1,464 77 

Peru, Ind. — Extension of passenger platform with brick.. 157 60 

Peru, Ind. — New water plant for hot-water cisterns 1,070 29 

Peru, Ind. — New General Foreman's office 647 24 



■22— 



Peru, Ind.— New casting platform (Machinery Dept) | 1,307 57 

Peru, Ind.— New office building (Car Dept) 398 39 

Peru, Ind — New casting platform (M. of W.) 956 25 

Peru, Ind.— New scrap bins 461 97 

Peru, Ind. — Extension of storeroom platform with shed 

roof 580 48 

Peru, Ind.— New brick oil house (Store Dept.) 617 44 

Peru, Ind.— New vault for records (M. W. Dept.) 313 58 

Tilton, 111.— New casting shed 14 80 

Tilton, 111. — New elevated sand house 768 47 

Landers, 111. — New telegraph office 259 55 

Landers, 111.— Test well , 459 46 

Chicago, 111. — Two scales in freight house at Twelfth St... 319 85 

Chicago, III. — Planking for team track 338 76 

Chandler, 111. — Connection with water main and laying 

pipe for car washing purposes 1,190 32 

Decatur, 111.— Addition to Y. M. C. A. building 4,216 50 

Decatur, 111. — New iron shed for Car Department 196 80 

Decatur, 111.— New heater boiler in Y. M. C. A. building.. 440 00 
Decatur, 111. — Addition to stable of Wabash employes 

Hospital Association 99 63 

Decatur, 111. — New scrap iron shed „. 61 76 

Decatur, 111. — Built addition to passenger station 9,920 83 

East St. Louis, 111. — New scales in outbound freight- 

house 736 99 

East St. Louis, 111. — Addition to car repair shops 571 86 

Quincy, 111. — New standard water tank 1,252 94 

Quincy, 111.— 60 ft. turn table and foundations 1,074 10 

Quincy, 111. — New freight house and office building 

(completed) 631 15 

Quincy, 111. — New 44 ft. 100 ton capacity track scale at 

new yard near roundhouse 1,201 72 

Quincy, 111. — New passenger station (completed) 10,407 24 

Quincy, 111. — Swinging beam derrick crane 1,683 03 

Brooklyn, 111. — New standard water tank 1,742 26 

Brooklyn. 111. — Brick floor in machine shop 450 95 

Forrest, 111. — Concrete masonry drop pit 645 81 

Forrest, 111.— Concrete floor in turntable 346 01 

Forrest, 111.— New block tower 398 27 

Springfield, 111. — Concrete masonry foundation for new 

air compressor in boiler house at blacksmith shop 222 39 

Mt. Olive, 111.— 17 ft. extension to depot for freight room. 1,014 10 

Bement, 111. — New block tower 813 51 

Brisbane, 111.— New block tower 452 13 

Markham, 111.— New No. 4 depot 186 26 

Lodge, 111. — New stock pens and chute 329 04 

Knights, 111. — New block tower 751 34 

St. Louis, Mo. — Second and North Market Street, new 

freight platform 876 19 

St. Louis, Mo. — Collins Street, new platform 74 29 

St. Louis, Mo. — Collins Street, new watch house 80 93 

St. Louis, Mo.— North Market Street, new watch house... 46 59 

St. Louis, Mo.— Boyle Avenue, new watch house 87 42 

St. Louis, Mo. — Newstead Avenue, new watch house 89 20 

Luther, Mo.— Paved back of stalls in round house 765 25 



—23— 

Sands, Mo.— New block tower $ 373 06 

Elm Point, Mo.— New block tower 377 41 

Benton City, Mo. — New well at stock yards 97 55 

Missouri City, Mo. — Built coal chutes and enlarged plat- 
form 1,500 00 

Moulton, la. — Built reservoir, new pump house, new 

mains, and installed gasoline engine 3,355 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Engine terminal, Vandeventer Avenue, 
13 stall round house, new 70 ft. turntable, coaling tipple, 
new water tank, new stand pipes, freight car repair 
shop, oil house, elevated sand house and two ash pits... 9,896 76 
St. Louis, Mo. — Electric block signal system. Twenty- 
third Street to Page Avenue, St. Louis (not completed) 9,723 04 

St. Louis, Mo —Olive Eoad, new station 2,ti00 00 

Moberly, Mo.— New ice house and platform 1,549 79 

Moberly, Mo.— New fuel oil house 711 73 

Moberly, Mo. — Fuel oil house heating apparatus 221 24 

Moberly, Mo. — New general foreman's office, machine 

shops 251 29 

Moberly, Mo. — Foundation for cinder hoist 28 12 

Moberly, Mo. — New air compreaser, car shops 91 42 

Moberly, Mo. — Shed and platform for track supplies and 

scrap 744 61 

Macon, Mo. — New coal house 70 18 

LaPlata, Mo. — New wells at stock yards and depot 226 76 

Millard, Mo.— New wells at stock yards and depot 112 50 

Huntsville, Mo. -New well at stock yard 177 72 

Dalton, Mo. — NiBW shed at stock yard 105 21 

Brunswick, Mo. — New Train Master's office 1,353 54 

Kandolph, Mo.— New ice house 1,225 59 

Harlem, Mo. — New turntable timber foundation 6,840 03 

Total $112,621 92 



—24— 

SUMMARY 
OF 

Extraordinary Bepairs and Benewals, Improvements and Additions. 

Eepairs and Eenewals. 

Bridges, Wooden | 61,632 06 

Wharves, Docks and Landings 4,340 94 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other Build- 
ings, etc 115,892 45 

Water and Fuel Stations 9,750 96 

Renewals of Tracks 23d St. to Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo... 49,818 54 

Total $241,434 95 

Improvements. 

Steel Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges |155,019 11 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, Etc. 68,221 83 

Steel Bridges, Repaired and Strengthened 27,197 32 

New Steel Bridges to Replace Old Steel Bridges 3,523 86 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades 256,442 37 

Protection against Missouri and Des Moines Rivers 57,756 95 

Total $568,161 44 

Additions. 

Second Track $264,849 64 

Third, Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries. 356,051 31 

Interlocking Plants, Wabash Proportion 19,180 18 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other Build- 
ings, etc 112,621 92 

Total $752,703 05 

r Repairs and Renewals $241,434 95 

Totals] Improvements 568,161 44 

(.Additions 752,703 05 

Grand Total $1,562,299 44 



—25— 

In addition to the above, the following amounts were 
expended on the Buffalo Division for extraordinary renewals 
and improvements, the Wabash paying its proportion of 
this sum on a wheelage basis : 

Depots, Buildings, etc $ 10,619 41 

Additions to Shops, Round-houses, etc 45,551 56 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations— New and Eebuilt 10,929 29 

Docks and Slip Tables — Repairs and Renewals , 773 90 

Steel Bridges Repaired and Renewed 200,558 25 

Trestles Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled and Abandoned.. 8,410 74 

Total 1276,843 15 



OMAHA DIVISION. 



Miscellaneous Work — 



No. cross ties put in track 2,318 

No. miles track ballasted with crushed rock 23.9 

No. miles fence built, 4,9 



SUMMARY. 

Miscellaneous Work I 84,898 13 

EECAPITULATION. 

Extraordinary Repairs and Renewals, Improvements 

and Additions $1,562,299 44 

Buffalo Division, Extraordinary Renewals and improve- 
ments 276,843 15 

Reconstruction Omaha Division 84,898 13 

Grand Total |],924,040 72 



-26— 



TRANSPOETATION DEPARTMENT. 



FREIGHT. 1904. 1903. 1902. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 
for year 1,881,101 1,830,621 1,738,098 

Total Empty Cars moved 

for year 803,553 793,889 776,474 

Total Loaded and Empty 
Cars moved for year 2,684,654 2,624,510 2,514,572 

Average Loaded Cars 
moved perday 5,153 5,015 4,725 

Average Empty Cars 
moved perday 2,202 2,175 2,127 

Average Loaded and 
Empty Cars moved per 
day 7,355 7,190 6,889 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 7,598,295 7,284,158 6,841,121 

Average Freight Train 
Mileage per day 20,817 19,957 18,743 

Total number Freight 
Trains for year 91,251 86,134 80,303 

Average number Freight 
Trains per day 251 236 220 

Average number Miles run 
per train, per day 83.3 84.6 85.2 

Average number Loaded 
Cars moved per train 
mile 18.4 18.6 19.0 

Average number Empty 
Cars moved per train 
mile 6.9 7.2 7.4 

Average number Loaded 
and Empty Cars moved 26.4 

per train mile 25.4 25.8 



-27- 



FREIGHT- Cont. 1904. 1908. 1902. 

Average number Cars 
handled per train mile, 
reduced to loaded car 
basis 22.6 22.9 23.5 

Mileage made by all 
Loaded Cars for year 140,074,003 135,424,005 129,714,750 

Mileage made by all 
Empty Cars for year 52,644,623 52,573,824 50,721,670 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 192,718,526 187,997,829 180,436,420 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 88,221,505 75,534,916 67,218,623 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 27,065,112 26,439,131 23,375,135 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 

for year 115,286,617 101,974,047 90,593,76 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 51,852,498 59,889,089 62,496,122 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 25,579,411 26,134,693 27,346,535 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 77,431,909 86,023,782 89,842,657 

Number of Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 16,039 16,089 16,460 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
perday, 7,624 7,834 7,734 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
E. K ." 25.2 28.5 28.2 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day, 9,179 8,562 5,943 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 34.4 32.6 1.84 



—28— 



PASSENGER. 



1904. 


1903. 


1902. 


100,348 


7,715,162 


7,691,050 


86,625 


82,549 


81,990 


237 


226 


225 


93.5 


93.5 


93.8 


22,193 


21,138 


21,105 



Total Passenger Train 
Mileage for year 

Total number Passenger 
Trains run for year 

Average number Passenger 
Trains run per day 

Average number Miles per 
Train per day 

Average number Miles by 
all Trains per day , 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 8,746,068 8,691,319 8,425,552 

Total Mileage "Wabash, 
Coaches and Chair Cars 
for year 17,527,348 16,670,309 16,807,827 

Total Mileage Sleeping 
Cars for year 9,883,877 9,234,387 9,188,022 

Total Mileage Wabash 
Dining Cars for year 1,423,277 1,443,536 1,591,510 

Total Mileage of all Cars 
for year 39,430,771 37,791,983 37,451,010 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled for 
year 421,210 404,055 400,040 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled per 
day 1,154 1,107 1,096 

Average number of Cars 
per train 4.87 4.90 4.87 



—29- 



MOTIVE POWEE DEPARTMENT. 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines was 
$1,508,614.14, equal to $2,857.22 per engine for 528 engines, 
the average number on hand during the year. 

The following statement will show the large amount of 

repair work done on engines, and the general character of 

the repairs. 

Motive Powee and Machinery. 

locomotive equipment. 



1903-1904. 1902-1903. Increase. Decrease, 



Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 



EEPAIES. 

Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

Fire-boxes, new 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks.. r. 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



488 
50 
10 

528 



340 

299 

745 

1048 

103 

1 

55 

44 

12 

546 

47 

381 

3 

138 

424 

70 

6 

50 

80 

4,588 



490 



2 

488 



338 

239 

635 

906 

102 

10 

48 

41 

17 

433 

51 

393 

25 

72 

442 

67 

13 

48 

70 

4,189 



50 

8 
40 



2 

60 

110 
142 

1 



113 



2 
10 

399 



4 
12 

99 



Note.— The 528 engines in service June 30, 1904, had a Tractive 
Power of 9,887,387 lbs. June 30, 1896, there were 412 engines with 
Tractive Power of 6,334,915 lbs., showing an increase of 28% in num- 
ber and an increase of 56% in power of engines. 



-30— 



DISTRIBUTION OP ENGINE MILEAGE. 





1903-1904. 


1902-1903. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Freight Train Mile- 
age 


7,598,295 

513,216 

8,100,348 

162,677 
3,904,205 

988,223 


7,284,158 

572,928 

7,715,162 

155,833 
3,436,104 

647,478 


314,137 




Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 


59,712 


Passenger Train 
Mileage 


385,186 

6,844 
468,101 

340,745 




Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 




Switching 




Miscellaneous, 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 






Total 


21,266,964 


19,811,663 


1,455,301 









Expense of Operating Locomotives. 



1903-1904. 



1902-1903. 



Increase. 



repairs {]!^ZZ: 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood)... 
Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching 

Total 



421 



I 829,903 

678,710 72 

72,812 49 

1,860,990 52 

1,360,584 03 

218,526 40 



728,985 68 

607,747 94 

64,601 73 

1,404,563 29 

1,220,182 19 

187,791 75 



15,021,527 5814,213,872 58 



$100,917 74 

70,962 78 

8,210 76 

456,427 23 

140,401 84 

30,734 65 



$807,655 00 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 



1903-1904. 



1902-1903. Increase. 



For Eepairs 

Stores 

Fuel 

Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching. 

Total 



7 06 

34 

8 35 
6 36 

1 02 



$23 13 



$ 6 70 
32 

6 77 
6 12 
94 



$20 85 



$ 36 

02 

1 58 
24 
08 



$ 2 28 



Note. — Engine mileage increased 7.3 per cent, while the amount 
paid engineers and firemen increased 11.5 per cent, showing an 
increase in the rate of pay of 3.8 per cent. 



—31— 

1903-1904. 1902-1903. 

Total engine mileage 21,378,516 19,946,946 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 49,696 50,376 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 4,141 4,198 

Tons of coal consumed 1,263,804 1,139,312 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

of handling included) $1.48 $124 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 16.9 17.6 

Note. — Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense. 
Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash proportion of all 
joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



-32— 















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—33— 



CAR DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of this department, for the year ending 
June 80th, 1904, were, as last year, above the normal, on 
account of application of air brakes to our freight cars, 
vestibules, steam heat and gas to our passenger cars, and 
new freight and passenger equipment purchased. 

The total on account of these items amounts to 

$1,526,272.87. 

Wide vestibules were applied to one chair car, 
stationary vestibules to 2 baggage, 3 postal and 3 combina- 
tion cars. Narrow vestibules were changed to wide on one 
chair car and one combination car, all at a cost of 
$5,201.05. Total cars now vestibuled, 296. 

Steam heat was applied to one coach and two pay cars 
at a cost of $322.49, making a total of 434 cars so equipped. 

We equipped 10 cars with Pintsch gas, at a cost of 
$2,757.62. making a total of 243 cars so equipped. 

Air brakes were applied to 139 freight cars, at a cost of 
$5,754.83,"making a total of 16,097 cars, or about 85% of all 
our freight cars, so equipped. 



—34— 



Car Equipment. 





On 

hand 

July 1 , 

1903. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
Sold and 
Changed 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1904. 


On 
hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENQBE. 

Official 


5 

2 

8 

151 

56 

51 

6 

5 

73 
14 
4 
3 
33 
5 
1 
1 


, 




5 
2 

165 

55 

58 

6 

6 

70 
13 
5 
3 
33 
5 
1 
1 


4 


Pay 






2 


Dining 


1 
16 




5 


Coach 

Combination 


2 
1 
2 


108 
22 


Chair 


9 


35 


Parlor 




Cafe 


2 
1 


1 
4 

1 




Baggage 

Baggaare and Mail 


64 
15 


Passenger and Mail 


1 




Baggage, Mail and Passenger.. 
Postal 




6 


1 


1 


19 


Pacific Express 


5 


Air-Brake Instruction 








Inspection 
















Total Passenger 


418 


31 


12 


437 


285 








FREIGHT. 

Box 


9,529 

434 

146 

5,785 

294 

100 

188 

131 

279 

11 

6 

8 

8 

6 

246 

17,171 
418 


19 


261 
22 


9,287 

412 

146 

7,175 

290 

100 

202 

132 

296 

12 

6 

8 

8 

6 

252 


8,075 


Stock 


1,471 


Fruit 




50 


Coal, Flat and Rack 

Furniture 


1518 

1 


128 
5 


3,439 
33 


Refrigerator 


100 


Cinder and Stone (Dump) 

Ballast and Convertible 


18 
1 

31 
1 


4 


129 


Tool and Work 

Derrick 


14 


36 
12 


Pile Driver 




7 


Cable 






1 


Ice 






4 


Caboose Box 








Caboose Standard 


14 


8 


212 


Total Freight 


1603 
31 


442 
12 


18,332 
437 


13,569 


Total Passenger 


285 


Total Car Equipment 


17,589 


1634 


454 


18,769 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons 


502.290 






554,160 


235,074* 



—35— 

Cars Repaired. 





Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


3,233 

161 

73 

13 


147,234 

1,791 

520 

320 


150,467 

1,952 

593 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 


Cars Rebuilt 


333 






Total 


3,480 


149,865 
12,797 


153,345 




New Wheels Applied, Cast 


1,593 
629 


14,390 
629 


New Wheels Applied, Steel 








Total New Wheels Applied 


2,222 


12,797 


16,019 





Car and Engine Trusts. 

June 30th, 1904, the car and engine trust notes outstand- 
ing were as follows : 

St. Louis Trust Company, 30 Locomotives, Contract of No- 
vember 1st, 1899, 4 notes outstanding (last one due No- 
vember 1st, 1904), for $5,071.88 each $ 20,287 52 

American Car and Foundry Company, 500 Flat Cars, 
Contract of August 8th, 1902, 43 notes outstanding (last 
one due February 2nd, 1908), for $6,329.36 each 272,162 48 

American Car and Foundry Company, 500 Coal Cars, 
Contract of March 9th, 1903, 50 notes outstanding (last 
one due August 24th, 1908), for $6,365.78 each 318,289 00 

American Car and Foundry Company, 1,000 Coal Cars 
Contract of March 9th, 1903, 53 notes outstanding (last 
one due November 11th, 1908), for $12,698.12 each 673,000 36 

American Car and Foundry Company, 22 Passenger and 
Baggage Cars, Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 34 notes out- 
standing (last one due April 3rd, 1907), for $2,526.00 
each 85,884 00 

American Car and Foundry Company, 22 Passenger Cars, 
Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 38 notes outstanding (last 
one due August 27th, 1907), for $4,014.83 each 152,563 54 

American Locomotive Company, 12 Passenger Locomo- 
tives, 9 notes outstanding (last one due November 10th, 
1908), various amounts 213,597 00 

Baldwin Locomotive Company, 38 Freight and Switch 
Locomotives, 18 notes outstanding (last one due No- 
vember 17th, 1908), various amounts 575,253 06 

Total.. $2,311,036 96 

Note. — The above does not include the Gold Equipment Bonds 
amounting to $840,000.00 issued in May, 1904, for the payment of 67 
New Locomotives under the Equipment agreiement with Blair & Co., 
Series A. 



—se- 
ll! addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundry Company for 500 box^ 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage payments are $7,194.76. On 
this contract there was paid during the year ending June 
30th, 1904, the sum of $86,337.12. 

TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1903-1904. 1902-1903. 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 2,153 2,153 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to this Company.. 7,178 6,830 
Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph 

Company 13,585 11,953 

Total Number Miles Wire used jointly 747 747 

Total Miles of Wire 21,510 19,530 

Acknowledgment is made of the faithful and efficient 
service of heads of Departments, Division and subordinate 
officials and the rank and file of employees of the Company. 
It is very gratifying to note a constant growth in that feeling 
of loyalty to the "Wabash" among all classes of employees 
which is desired by the Management, and is so beneficial to 
both the Company and its employees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. RAMSEY, Jr., 

President. 



—37- 



MILES OF BO AD OPEEATED. 



LINES EAST OP THE MISSISSIPPI RIVEK. 



Description of Lines. 



-kJ . 


m 


-o fl © 


® 




13 


0) ® o 


o a 


a'drt 




oaU 



CO 5 

o 
Q 



FROM TO 

Toledo E. Hannibal 

E. Hannibal.. Hannibal U. D.... 

Bluffs Camp Point 

Camp Point. . . Quincy 

E. Hannibal.. Quincy 

Clayton Elvaston 

Elvaston Keokuk 

Maysville Pittsfield 

Sidney Champaign 

Decatur St. Louis 

Edwardsville-.Edwardsville Jet. 

Chicago C. & W. I. June. 

C. & W. I. Jct.Effingham 

Shumway Altamont 

Forrest Fairbury June 

Fairbury Jet.. Streator 

Detroit Delray 

Delray Butler 

Butler New Haven 

Maumee Montpelier.... ...... 

Montpelier Clarke June 

Clarke Junc.C. & W. I. June .. 

Attica Covington 

Chili Junction, Peru 

Toledo.... Milan 



460.5 
39.4 



0.9 
34.5 



11.7 

110.1 

1.7 



205.4 
9.5 



30.9 



109.8 
25.7 
49.5 

149.6 



14.8 



Total. 



1254.0 



3.0 



0.4 



21.8 
17.3 



7.8 



6.2 



3.8 
8.0 



0.8 
6.1 



17.6 



30.9 



9.2 



119.1 



460.5 

3.4 

39.4 

21.8 

18.2 

34.5 

7.8 

6.2 

11.7 

113.9 

1.7 

8.0 

205.4 

10.3 

6.1 

30.9 

4.6 

109.8 

25.7 

49.5 

149.6 

17.6 

14.8 



30.9 



1382.3 



249.5 

2.1 

4.2 

0.2 

4.5 

1.8 

1.0 

1.1 

2.2 

70.4 

2.2 

23.7 

80.5 

0.3 



3.7 
20.0 
58.6 

8.2 
10.7 
56.8 



2.2 

7.7 
21.9 



710.0 

5.5 

43.6 

22.0 

22.7 

36.3 

8.8 

7.3 

13.9 

184.3 

3.9 

31.7 

285.9 

10.6 

6.1 

34.6 

24.6 

168.4 

33.9 

60.2 

206.4 

17.6 

17.0 

7.7 

52.8 



633.5 



2015.8 



Note.— The above does not include 6.8 miles main track and 0.2 
miles side track, total 7.0 miles, "owned," between Edwardsville 
Junction and Edwardsville Crossing, which is leased to the Illinois 
Terminal Eailroad Company. 



-38— 



LINES WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI EIVER. 



Description of Lines. 

















SfcH^ 


J3 


SSI 


a 




® <B O 


"^ a 


O 


^ 




^•3 





St. Louis — 

Union Station. 23d st 

23d st Harlem 

Franklin av...N. Market st 

Olive st Carr st 

Carr st Ferguson 

Harlem Kansas City 

Moberly Hannibal 

Moberly Ottumwa 

Moulton Albia 

Albia Albia Connecti'n 

Albia Chesterfield 

Chesterfield Des Moines 

Brunswick Chillicothe 

Chillicothe Pattonsburg 

Pattonsburg Council Bluffs... 

Wabash Conn. ..Co. Bluffs, U.D.. 

Council Bluffs... Omaha 

Centralia Columbia 

Salisbury Glasgow 

Excello Ardmore 

Excelsior SpsJc. Milwaukee June 
Maryville June. Empire Coal Co.. 



274.8 



Total. 



10.7 



131.5 
28.3 



65.8 



38.2 



143.7 



41.4 



21.6 
15.4 



0.7 



0.6 



1.5 
69.7 



0.2 



2.4 



0.3 

2.8 



9.5 



739.5 



41.4 



78.2 



0.7 

274.8 



0.6 
10.7 

1.5 

69.7 

131.5 

28.3 

0.2 
65.8 

2.4 

38.2 

41.4 

143.7 

0.3 

2.8 
21.6 
15.4 



9.5 



859.1 



113.1 
1.5 
0.4 
31.5 
3.5 
8.5 
16.0 
2.6 
0.6 
9.3 



3.4 
3.7 

22.4 



1.2 
0.9 
11.0 
0.7 
7.3 



237.6 



0.7 
387.9 

1.5 

1.0 
42.2 

5.0 

78.2 

147.5 

30.9 

0.8 
75.1 

2.4 

41.6 

45.1 

166.1 

0.3 

2.8 
22.8 
16.3 
11.0 
10.2 

7.3 



1096.7 



Note. — The line from Chesterfield to Des Moines, 2.4 miles is re- 
ported in "Joint Trackage," instead of lines "Owned," on account of 
being operated under joint agreement with Des Moines Union Railway. 

Double Teack. — Joint track Wabash yards to Bridge Junction 
H. & St. J. R. R. Kansas City, Mo., 2220 feet, 0.4 miles. 

This statement includes all side and double track constructed 
on St. Louis Division except tracks to World's Fair Station, the same 
being considered only temporary tracks. 



-39— 



LINES EAST OF THE DETROIT EIVBK. 



Description of Lines. 


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1 


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01 

® 


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r 


hi 


FROM TO 

Detroit Black Rock 






227.1 

17.8 

25.6 

4.8 


227.1 
17.8 
25.6 

4.8 


156.0 

21.9 

14.1 

4.5 


383.1 


WellandJct . .Susp. Bridge 






39.7 


Susp. Bridge.. .Buffalo 






39 7 


Black Rock International Jet.. 






9.3 










Total 


275.3 


275.3 


196.5 


471.8 











Note. — Above does not include 4.3 miles New York Central tracks 
between Black Rock and Exchange Street Station, Buffalo, for the use 
of which the Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 

Above does not include 0.6 mile Lehigh Valley track at Wabash 
freight station, Louisiana Street, Buffalo, for the use of which the 
Wabash pays a fixed sum per car. 

The 196.5 miles of side and double track consists of 97.3 miles of 
double track and 99.2 miles of side track. 



i 



—40- 



Recapitulation. 



MILES OF ROAD OPERATED. 



Description of Lines. 


t 

o 


i 

m 




1. 


111 


H 


Lines East of the Mississippi 
River 


1254.0 
739.5 


9.2 
41.4 


119.1 

78.2 
275.3 

472.6 


1382.3 

859.1 
275.3 


633.5 

237.6 
196.5 


2015.8 


Lines West of the Mississippi 
River 


1096.7 


Lines East of the Detroit River.. 


471.8 










Total 


1993.5 


50.6 


2516.7 


1067.6 


3584 3 







The Main Track Mileage shown in the foregoing state- 
ment is located as follows : 

Miles. 

In New York 31.0 

In Canada 244.3 

In Michigan 105.6 

In Ohio 170.1 

In Indiana 357.5 

In Illinois 745.0 

In Missouri 653.7 

In Iowa 208.9 

In Nebraska 6 

Total 2516.7 



—41— 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 

Amount received from employes $68,142 95 

Amount received from Wabash E. R. Co. for care of injured 

persons 177 85 

Amount received from other railroads for care of their em- 
ployes 390 00 

Total Receipts 168,710 80 

Expenses 159,155 73 

Expended on new Hospital at Decatur 18,557 08 77,712 81 

Deficit for the year $ 9,002 01 

Surplus June 30, 1903 44,048 09 

Interest on Surplus during year 135 17 

Rent Peru property 120 00 

Surplus June 30, 1904 $35,301 25 

1903-1904. 1902-1903. 

Number of patients treated in Hospitals 1,222 1,018 

Number of patients treated outside of Hospitals 25,423 24,998 

Total number of patients treated 26,645 26,016 

Number of Surgical casestreated 3,223 3,151 

Number of Medical cases treated 23,422 22,865 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients in Hos- 
pitals 10,597 6,485 

Number of prescriptions filled for patients outside 

of Hospitals 41,814 42,629 

Total numberof deaths 29 12 

The Board of Trustees, 

J. Ramsey, Jk., Chairman, 
W. H. Blodgett, 
E. B. Pryor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



St. Louis, Mo., October 1st, 1904. 
J. Ramsey, Jr., 

President, The Wabash Railroad Company. 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit statements of General 
Account, and tables showing the results of operation for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1904, as follows : 

A. Results of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 
H. Tonnage of Articles Carried. 

J. Mileage Statistics for Twenty-three Years. 

K. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 

Yours respectfully, 

D. B. HOWARD, 

Auditor. 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Taxes .' 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc 

Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 

Net Earnings from Operation 

Addilions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 

Net Earnings applicable to Interest 

Interest on Bonds 

Surplus 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds 

Net Surplus 



$23,023 
17,683 



626 63 
,508 85 



$5,340, 
750, 



117 78 
158 71 



$4,589, 
489, 



959 07 
706 07 



$5,079, 
817, 



665 14 
205 62 



$4,262, 
1,050. 



459 52 

.745 64 



$3,211, 
3,092, 



713 88 
422 72 



$119, 
105, 



291 16 
000 00 



$14,291 16 



$21,140,828 94 
15,815,662 32 


$5,325,166 62 
684,702 96 


$4,660,463 66 
467,927 94 


$5,128,391 60 
870,440 12 


$4,257,951 48 
817,288 80 


$3,440,662 68 
3,034,512 60 


$406,150 08 
210,000 00 



$196,160 08 



1. Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 


$964,438 33 
151,640 71 


$898 517 62 


Credit " '♦ " 


63,500 00 


Miscellaneous Expenses 


$812,797 62 
4,408 00 


$835,017 62 
35,422 50 






$817,205 62 


$870,440 12 



2. Analysis op Additions to Property and Other Charges. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Additions to Property as per Table "F" . ... 


$591,446 10 

33,069 68 

100,000 00 

2,568 75 

323,661 11 


$253,132 15 


Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sinking Fund Char- 
ges and Maintenance of Steamers 


59,636 65 


Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, Sink- 
ing Fund ... . . 


100,000 00 


Premium on Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds. 
Appropriation for New Equipment 


4,520 00 
400,000 00 




$1,050,745 64 


$817,288 80 



—44- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Comparative Statement op Earnings and Expenses. 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



July 

August 

September 

October 

November.. 
December ;. 

January 

February ... 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passengers 

Mails 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 

" " Passenger " " 

" Mail " 

" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted). 
Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings.. 



Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



2,000 
2,121 
2,239 
2,206 
1,818 
1,881 
1,771 
1,522 
1,750 
1,794 
1,889 
2,028 



,158 67 
,426 47 
,688 37 
,296 69 
,076 77 
,094 15 
,413 70 
.943 23 
,620 45 
,760 97 
,106 88 
,040 28 



$23,023,626 63 



$14,064,656 81 

7,045,525 29 

830,928 23 

533,703 85 

548,812 45 



$23,023,626 63 



61.09 
30.60 
3.61 
2.32 
2.38 



$17,683,508 85 


$15,815,662 32 


$750,158 71 


$664,702 96 


76.81 


74.81 


$5,340,117 78 


$5,325,166 62 


23.19 


25.19 



2,516.7 

$9,148 34 

7,026 47 

2,121 87 



1,721 
1,903 
1,840 
1,970 
1,714 
1,694 
1,672 
1,516 
1,706 
1,760 
1,928 
1,709 



,531 93 
,705 28 
,910 79 
,096 31 
,998 95 
,345 55 
,454 08 
,613 47 
,631 66 
,961 62 
,672 49 
,906 81 



$21,140,828 94 



$13,327,478 75 

6,135,500 85 

716,200 09 

464,645 19 

497,004 06 



$21,140,828 94 



63.04 

29.02 

3.39 

2.20 

2.35 



2,483.3 
$8,513 20 
6,368 81 
2,144 39 



—45— 



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46— 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1904. 

(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 

ASSETS. 



1904. 



1903. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 
Supplies and Materials on 

Hand . 

CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 

Bonds (2) 

Sundry Accounts Collectible- 
Due from Agents 

From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 

Pacific Express Co 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 

Bills Receivable 

Advances Fast Freight Lines 

Account Working Fund 

Advances on Account Real 

Estate in St. Louis 

Miscellaneous (3) 



$145,335,419 36 

1,641,051 84 
1,182,777 23 

17,661,089 14 

343,328 54 
209,096 67 
105,215 00 

1,546 386 94 
1,875 00 

37,973 10 

634,088 96 
3,494,001 12 



$172,192,302 90 



$143,882,500 00 

1,244,803 46 
987,034 96 

1,553,020 34 

520,891 43 

179,975 79 

61,621 59 

613,497 20 
53,239 27 

43,004 74 

1,033,524 81 
659,089 38 



$150,832,202 97 



$1,452,919 36 



396,248 38 
195,742 27 



16,108,068 80 



29,120 88 
43,593 41 



932,889 74 



2,834,911 74 



$21,360,099 93 



177,562 89 



61,364 27 

5,031 64 

399,435 85 



LIABILITIES. 



1904. 1 1903. 1 Increase. 


Decrease. 


Common Stock 

Preferred Stock 


$38,000,000 00 
24,000,000 00 

100,513,000 00 
270,171 59 
693,361 66 


$28,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

91,949,000 00 

186,403 25 

696,885 83 

105,000 00 

2,738,405 58 

466,607 12 

386,337 60 

5,183 00 

23,286 66 

583,030 32 

369,237 50 

311,959 80 

40.871 82 

969,994 49 


$10,000,000 00 





Bonds (4) 


8,564,000 00 
83,768 34 








Interest Accrued, not Due 


$ 3,524 17 
105,000,00 

110,551 74 


Dividends Debenture Bonds, 
Series ''A" due 




Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 


3,734,692 89 

356,055 38 

388,877 00 

5,986 20 

414,000 00 

2,311,036 96 

369,237 50 


996,287 31 


Taxes Accrued, not due 


2,539 40 
803 20 

390,713 34 

1,728,006 64 




Hospital Account 




Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable.. 




Equipment Notes of Long 
Date (5) 




Proceeds sale Debenture 
Bonds, Series "B" 








311,959 80 


Miscellaneous 


41,576 18 
1,094,307 54 


704 36 
124,313 05 


Balance to credit, Profit and 
Loss 










$172,192,802 90 


$150,832,202 97 


$21,360,099 93 





(1) Increase is due to cost of new Terminals in St. Louis, $1,527,000.00; less Gold 
Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds retired, $100,000.00. 

(2) Increase is due to investment in Capital Stock of The Wabash- Pittsburgh 
Terminal Ry., $10,000,000.00, and First Mortgage Bonds of The Wab ash-Pittsburgh 
Terminal Ry., $6,154,000.00. 

(3) Increase is due to amounts carried in suspense on account of purchase of 
new equipment, 

(4) Increase is due to issue of Wabash R. R. First Lien 4% Terminal Gold 
Bonds, 51,664,000.00; Wabash R.R. Equipment Gold Bonds Series A, $840,000.00; 
Wabash R.R. temporary 5% Collateral Notes, $6,160,000.00; less Gold Equipment 
Sinking Fund Bonds retired, $100,000.09. 

(5 ) See Note 3. 



47- 



THE WABASH KAILROAD COMPANY. 

Opeeating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1904. 

MAINTENANCE OF WAY AND STRUCTURES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Repairs of Roadway 

Renewals of Ralls 

do of Ties 

Repairs and Renewals of Bridges and Culverts 

do do Fences, Road C, etc 

do do Buildings and Fixtures 

do do Docks and Wharves 

do do Telegraph 

Stationery and Printing , 

Other Expenses 

Total 



$1,950 

188 

421 

522 

114 

421 

7 

51 

3 



,007 26 
,963 21 
,804 69 
,933 43 
,243 15 
,079 68 
,364 43 
,332 82 
,104 67 
774 66 



$1,672,302 45 

347,412 21 

343,008 59 

815,290 78 

106,272 63 

350,408 94 

17,777 26 

42,078 89 

4,175 81 

2,234 13 



$3,681,608 00 



$3,700,961 69 



MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Superintendence , 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives, Passenger.. 

do do Locomotives, Freight 

do do Passenger Cars 

do do Freight Cars 

do do Work Cars 

do do Marine Equipment 

do do Shop Machinery & Tools.. 

Stationery and Printing... 

Other Expenses 

Total 



98,726 73 

532,322 63 

951,180 46 

407,263 06 

,024,446 09 

40,214 16 

34,671 67 

223,079 13 

8,238 32 

152,859 43 



95,655 32 

441,665 03 

870,199 51 

346,447 05 

867,129 55 

81,148 80 

29,359 13 

273,821 43 

7,693 70 

101,544 43 



$3,473,001 68 



$3,114,683 95 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION-PASSENGER. 



r 



Superintendence 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste, for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service 

Train Supplies' and Expenses 

Switchmen, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipment— Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions 

Rents for Tracks, Yards and Terminals.... 
do of Buildings and Other Property,... 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Total $3 



105,382 01 

571,468 32 

560,368 37 

33,539 08 

25,013 83 

14,626 86 

393,433 15 

280,704 74 

192,380 06 

111,993 97 

221,976 99 

31,463 58 

186,201 55 

4,768 91 

22,857 37 

55,110 24 

9,641 80 

8,773 49 

100,724 79 

59,322 11 



167,314 46 
78,744 39 
60,749 76 
1,725 45 



89,652 23 
519,233 19 
431,702 87 

31,559 33 

25,865 39 

11,414 39 
351,533 49 
246,336 72 
162,915 67 

98,187 02 
211,316 05 

23,631 22 

191,391 10 

4,290 62 

28,239 02 

177,659 03 

4,079 57 

7,770 28 

85,356 37 
153,819 18 



149,616 54 
61,647 82 
52,844 87 
2,202 41 



$3,122,114 



48— 



E — Continued. 

THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 



Superintendence , 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives , 

Oil, Tallow and Waste for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmen, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipment— Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks *., 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions , 

Stock Yards and Elevators 

Rents for Tracks, Yards and Terminals., 
do of Buildings and Other Property., 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



Total $6,580,343 51 



198,827 53 

,093,695 85 

,300,622 15 

70,239 24 

42,773 37 

27,557 72 

753,901 70 

98,769 79 

527,352 02 

228,321 26 

,036,635 50 

60,059 04 

267,757 91 

43,772 86 

156,068 87 

73,197 45 

32,349 83 

53,596 88 



363,853 55 
11,028 86 



44,163 73 
18,515 25 
74,905 98 
2,377 17 



168,368 03 

930,417 61 

972,860 42 

67,858 90 

38,194 49 

21,288 18 

647,305 23 

84,430 89 

444,084 70 

199,698 89 

938,625 37 

49,228 92 

112,329 29 

16,571 29 

99,810 74 

53,768 43 

19,923 34 

51,618 99 



351,106 92 
8,342 98 



30,594 75 

14,672 61 

64,079 90 

3,982 36 



$5,389,163 23 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 




$103,529 88 
230,873 42 
18,122 46 
50,522 58 
99,714 40 
31,931 97 
15,575 67 


$ 93,138 47 


do of Clerks and Attendants 


197,717 39 


General Office Expenses and Supplies 


16,800 11 


Insurance 


49,060 40 


Law Expenses 


89,490 93 


Stationery and Printing (General Offices) 


27,976 72 


Other Expenses r.... ' 


14,575 05 






Total 


$550,270 38 


$488,759 07 







RECAPITULATION. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Maintenance of Way and Structures 


$3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 68 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 


$3,700,961 69 




3,114,663 95 


Conducting Transportation 


8,511,277 61 




488,759 07 






Total Operating Expenses 


$17,683,508 85 


$15,815,662 32 







—49— 



F 
THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 

Additions to Property — Year Ending June 30, 1904. 

New Yards, Main, Side and Spur Tracks $213,457 33 

Double Track, Ashburn to Worth 76,982 34 

Litchfield to Worden 100,874 36 

*' " Poag to Bridge Junction 59,798 46 

New Tracks, Terminals, etc., Twenty -third Street to Page 

Avenue, St. Louis 92,806 96 

Additions to Y. M. C. A. Building, Decatur, HI 4,656 50 

Cost of Terminals in Quincy 37,541 35 

Cost of Real Estate in Toledo 5,328 80 

Total $591,446 10 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Train and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1903. 


Per Cent. 




Increase. 1 Decrease. 


'Pnnsi C\nw\e>if\ TJpvftrmp T^rftie'hfi 


9,698,995 

2,013,016 

11,712,011 

2,175,680,058 

224,937,904 

2,400,617,962 

205.0 Miles. 


9,691,514 

1,833,755 

11,525,269 

2,198,073,383 

215,088,765 

2,413,162,148 

209.4 Miles. 


0.08 
9.78 
1.62 




Tons Carried, Company Freight 


... 






Tons carried one Mile, Revenue Freight.. 
Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 
Total Tons carried one Mile 


1.02 


4.58 




0.52 


Average distance each Ton carried 




2.10 






Plarnincsi fmrn ITrfticlit Traffic 


$14,064,656 81 
11,749,082 00 


$13,327,478 75 
10,313,415 42 


5.53 
13.92 




Operating Expenses 










$1 45.01 

1 21.14 

Cts. 0.6464 

" 0.5400 

" 0.1064 


$1 37.52 

1 06.42 

Cts. 0.6063 

" 0.4692 

" 0.1371 


5.45 
13.83 

6.61 
15.09 


. 






Average Rate per Ton per Mile 

Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 







22 39 








Total Freight Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 


7,598,295 
$1 85.10 
1 54.63 
30.47 


7,284,158 
$1 82.97 
1 41.59 
41.38 


4.31 
1.16 
9.21 






Average Expenses per Train Mile 




Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 


26.37 






Car Mileage, Loaded 

Car Mileage, Empty 


140,074,003 
52,644,523 
192,718,526 


135,424,005 
52,573,824 
187,997,829 


3.43 
0.13 
2.51 






Car Mileage, Total— Loaded and Empty. 








Average Loaded Cars per Train 


18.43 

6.93 

25.36 

17.14 

12.46 

315.94 

286.34 


18.59 

7.22 

25.81 

17.82 

12.84 
331.29 
301.76 




86 






4 02 


Average Total Cars per Train. 




1 74 


Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 




3.82 


Average Load per Car, Loaded and 




2 96 


Average Load per Train—Tons — includ- 
ing Company Freight 




4 63 


Average Load per Train-Tons— Revenue 
Freight only 




5 11 








Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 10.04 
" 8.39 


Cts. 9.84 
" 7.62 


2.03 
10.10 




Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 









PASSENGER. 





6,183,474 
369,283,834 
59.7, Miles, 


5,948,913 
330,111,942 
55.6 Miles. 


3.94 
11.87 

7.57 




Number of Passengers carried one Mile . 




Average distance each Passenger carried 






■ 


Earnings from Passenger Traffic 


$7,045,525 29 
8,580,184 02 
5,934,426 85 


$6,135,600 85 
7,470,992 22 
5,502,246 90 


14.83 

14.85 

7.85 




Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc... 
Operating Expenses 










Average Revenue per Passenger 


$1 13.94 
95.97 
Cts. 1.908 
" 1.607 
" 0.301 


$1 03.14 

92.49 

Cts. 1.859 

" 1.667 

" 0.192 


10.47 
3.76 
2.64 




Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 
Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 






Average Cost per Passenger per Mile 


3 60 


Average Net per Passenger per Mile 


56.77 








Total Passenger Train Mileage 


8,100,348 
$1 05.92 
73.26 
32.66 


7,715,162 
$0 96.84 
71.32 
25.52 


4.99 

9.38 

2.72 

27.98 




Average Earnings per Train Mile 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 





Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 









Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 

Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 


28,619,997 
37,722,660 


27,128,690 
36,134,240 


5.50 
4.40 









Average number Cars per Train 


4.66 

12.90 
45.59 


4.68 

12.17 
42.79 




43 


Average number Passengers per Coach 
and Sleeper 


6.00 
6.54 




Average number Passengers per Train... 








Average Earnings per Car per Mile 


Cts. 22.75 
" 15.73 


Cts. 20.68 
" 15.23 


10.01 
3.28 




Average Expenses per Car per Mile 









-51- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Tonnage of Articles Carried. 



ARTICLES. 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1904. 



Per 
Cent. 



Tons, 



Year ending 
June 30th, 1903. 



Per 

Cent. 



Tons. 



Products of Agriculture:— 

Wheat 

Corn 

Other Grain 

Flour 

Other Mill Products 

Hay 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Fruits and Vegetables 



Products of Animals: — 

Live Stock 

Dressed Meats 

Other Packing House Products. 

Wool 

Hides and Leather 



Products of Mines: 
Stone, Sand, etc.. 
Anthracite Coal.. 
Bituminous Coal. 

Coke 

Ores 



Products op Forest: 

Lumber 

Other Articles 



Manufactures :— 

Petroleum and Other Oils 

Sugar 

Iron, Pig and Bloom 

Iron and Steel Rails 

Other Castings and Machinery. 

Bar and Sheet Metal 

Cement, Brick and Lime 

Agricultural Implements 

Wagons, Carriages, Tools, etc.. 

Wines, Beer and Liquors 

H. H. Goods and Furniture 



Merchandise... 
Miscellaneous. 



Total Tons 



Company's Freight. 



21.39 

2.03 
7.94 
3.07 
1.81 
2.83 
1.40 
0.05 
0.42 
1.84 

6.92 

3.78 
1.10 
1.39 
0.07 
0.58 

33.44 

3.34 
3.31 
25.91 
0.44 
0.44 

7.60 

5.51 
2.09 

8.98 

0.96 
0.30 
0.40 
0.66 
0.65 
1.34 
2.79 
0.35 
0.13 
1.08 
0.32 

6.76 
14.91 



100.00 



197,448 
770,092 
297,496 
175,288 
274,055 
136,176 
5,260 
40,284 
178,195 



106,761 

135,203 

6,974 

56,112 



323,564 

321,011 

2,512,772 

42,666 

42,704 



534,347 
202,491 



93,327 
29,333 
38,483 
64,264 
63,126 
129,427 
270,798 
34,152 
13,268 
104,897 
31,489 

655,350 
1,445,716 



9,698.995 



2,013,016 



23.65 

3.45 

7.81 
4.23 
1.99 
2.68 
1.37 
0.05 
0.12 
1.95 

6.68 

3.63 
1.11 
1.20 
0.08 
0.66 

31.99 

2.31 
2.32 
26.33 
0.39 
0.64 

7.46 

5.65 
1.81 

9.42 

1.05 
0.36 
0.61 
1.30 
0.58 
1.33 
2.34 
0.44 
0.14 
0.94 
0.33 

6.41 
14.39 



100.00 



334,822 
756,765 
409,762 
193,339 
259,263 
132,292 
4,480 
11,438 



352,125 

107,985 

116,135 

7,315 

63,947 



223,530 

225,297 

,551,579 

37,477 

62,293 



547,839 
175,255 



102,228 
34,708 
59,034 

126,897 
56,271 

129,255 

226,626 
43,084 
13,644 
90,815 
31,527 

620,327 
1,394,770 



9,691,514 



1,833,755 



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Sixteenth Annual Report 



OF the; 



DIRECTORS 



OF 



The Wabash Railroad Co, 



Kor The Kisca.1 Year Ending 
June SOthi, 1905» 



ST. LOUIS. 

Woodward & Tiernan Printing Co., 

1905. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 

OCTOBER 18th, 1905. 



EDWARD T. JEFFERY, . . Chairman of the Board. » 

FREDERIC A. DELANO, . . President, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

WELLS H. BLODGETT, . . Third Vice-President and General Counsel. 

E. B. PRYOR, Fourth Vice-President and Asst. Sec'y. 

HENRY MILLER, General Manager. 

C. N. TRAVOUS, General Solicitor. 

GEORGE G. YEOMANS, . . Assistant to President. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

S. E. COTTER, General Superintendent. 

T. J. TOBIN, Auditor. 

D. Or IVES, General Traffic Manager. 

W. C. MAXWELL, Asst. General Traffic Manager. 

S. B. KNIGHT, General Freight Agent, 

C.S.CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

D.I. FORSYTH, Acting Superintendent Transportation. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

C. A. HOW, Acting Purchasing Agent. 

I. R. L. WILES, Supply Agent. 

A. O. CUNNINGHAM, . . . Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Locomotive and Car Dept. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Dr. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 



DIRECTORS. 

GEO. J. GOULD, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

EDWARD T. JEFFERY, ROBERT C. CLOWRY, 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

WILLIAM B. SANDERS, JOHN T. TERRY, 

FREDERIC A. DELANO, RUSSELL SAGE, 

WELLS H. BLODGETT, WINSLOW S. PIERCE, 

ROBERT M. GALLOWAY. 



In Memoriam 



npHE Directors of the Wabash Railroad Com- 
-^ pany record their affectionate remembrance 
of their former President, 

OSSIAN D. ASHLEY, 

who died on December 16th, 1904, and their rec- 
ognition of his long and eminent service in the 
interest of the company and its patrons. 

Mr. Ashley's connection with the present com- 
pany, and the companies it succeeded, covered 
a period of some thirty years. He was its cheer- 
ful and undaunted counselor in time of adversity, 
and its wise and conservative guide in time of 
prosperity. He gave his constant thought and 
his mature and marked ability to the arduous work 
that made the basis of the company's present 
success and strength, and through his safe and 
conservative policy the company steadily advanced 
in its service to the public and in value to its 
owners. It is not eulogy, but simple truth, to say 
that all who knew him conceded his manly courage, 
his exceptional strength and his inflexible honesty. 

The Directors also record that, in the death, 
on March 27th, 1905, of Vice-President and Freight 
Traffic Manager, 

MILTON KNIGHT, 

the company lost the services of one of its oldest 
and most valued officials, who had, by his un- 
questioned integrity and kindness of manner, 
endeared himself to all his associates, and who, 
by. his ability and strength of character, had at- 
tained the highest rank among the traffic officials 
of the country. 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DIRECTORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co, 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30th, 1905 



New York, N. Y., October 18th, 1905. 

To THE Stockholders and Debenture 
Mortgage Bondholders of 

The Wabash Railroad Company, 

Gentlemen : — 

The report for the year ending June 30th, 1905, is sub- 
mitted herewith, and while showing a large increase in 
gross earnings ($1,672,973.47), it also shows an increase in 
operating expenses of $2,819,935.70, or a decrease in net 
earnings of $1,146,962.23, but an analysis of the extraor- 
dinary expenditures charged direct to operating expenses 
will fully explain the decrease. 



STATISTICS. 

The following statement gives in condensed form the 
revenues, expenses, charges, etc., for the fiscal year as 
compared with the previous year : 

1903—1904. 1904— 1S05. 

Total revenae of the Company from all 

sources was $23,513,332 70 $25,434,940 27 

Expenses of Operation, including taxes, 

track rentals and miscellaneous 19,250,873 18 22,089,940 82 



$ 4,262,459 52 $3,344,999 45 
Interest on Bonds 3,092,422 72 3,468,572 17 



Net Revenue $ 1,170,036 80 $ 123,572 72=* 

Additions to Property 591,446 10 656,862 95 



$ 578,590 70 $ 780,435 67 
Sinking Fund Charges, account new 

equipment; steamers $ 459,299 54 $ 678,936 72 

$ 119,291 16 $1,459,372 39^ 

Dividend on Debenture "A" Bonds 105,000 00 



Surplus to Profit & Loss Account $ 14,291 16 

Deficit to Profit & Loss Account $1,459,372 39 

The growth of the traffic and revenues since 1897 is 
shown by the following comparisons : 

Year. Ton Miles. Passenger Miles. Gross Earnings. 

1897 l,149.9^9,024 135,963,860 $11,526,787 00 

1898 1,365,693,174 180,359,167 13,207,862 00 

1899 ...1,666,830,054 210,592,939 14,393,974 00 

1900 1,902.881,278 233,848.065 16,440,990 00 

1901 1,978,952,453 264,268,214 17,554,465 00 

1902 1,947,404.142 322,708,490 19,053,493 00 

1903 2,198,073,383 330,111,942 21,140,829 00 

1904 2,175,680,058 369 283,834 23,023,626 00 

1905 2,339,770,238 534,669,484 24,696,600 CO 

The increases in different classes of earnings were: 

1897. 1905. Per cent Increase 

Freight $7,604,769 95 $13,650,185 54 79. 5% 

Passenger 2,837,973 54 8,917,828 77 214.2% 

Mail 542,635 09 837,088 25 54. 3% 

Express 284,706 69 691,736 42 143.0% 

Miscellaneous 256,702 09 699,761 09 133. 6% 



Total $11,526,787 36 124,696,600 10 114. 3 

♦Deficit. 



REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 



Earnings and Expenses. 



1903-1904. 



1904-1905. 



Increase. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses 

Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Exp. to Earnings 

Gross Earnings per mile 

Operating Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$23,023,626 63 
17,683,508 85 



$5,340,117 78 

76.81 

9,148 34 

7,026 47 

2,121 87 



$24,696,600 10 
20,503,444 55 



$4,193,155 55 

83.02 

9,811 14 

8,145 34 

1,665 80 



$1,672,973 47 
2,819,935 70 



$1,146,962 23* 
6.21 
662 80 
1,118 87 
456 07* 



EARNINGS. 



Freight 

Passenger 

Mail 

Express 

Miscellaneous 



Total. 



Per 

Cent. 



61.09 

30.60 

3.61 

2.32 

2.38 



1903-1904. 



Per 

Cent. 



1904-1905. 



$14,084,658 81 

7,045,525 29 

830,928 23 

533,703 85 

548,812 45 


55.27 

36.11 

3.39 

2.80 

2.43 


$23,023,626 63 







$13,650,185 54 

8,917,828 77 

837,088 28 

691,736 42 

599,761 09 



$24,696,600 10 



Increase. 



414,471 27* 

,872,303 48 

6,160 05 

158,032 57 

50,948 64 



$1,672,973 47 



EXPENSES. 





Per 

Cent. 


1903-1904. 


Per 

Cent. 


1904-1905. 


Increase. 


?.Iaintenance of Way and 


- 20.82 

19.64 

56.43 

3.11 


$ 3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 68 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 


19.55 

22.31 

54.90 

3.24 


$ 4,007,505 59 

4,575,148 43 

11,255,672 39 

665,118 14 


$ 325,897 59 


Maintenan-Ce of Equipment. 
Conducting Transportation 
General Expenses 


1,102,146 75 

1,277,043 60 

114,847 76 


Total 




$17,683,508 85 




$20,503,444 55 


$2,819,935 70 









*Deerease. 



— 6— 



ANALYSIS OF OPERATION. 

Operating expenses increased $2,819,935.70 (15.95 per 
cent). 

The increase of $1,672,973.47 in earnings is divided as ^ 
follows: , 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase $1,601,883 32 

Buffalo DiTision, Increase 71,090 16 

The increase of $2,819,935.70 in expenses is divided as 
follows : 

Wabash, west of Detroit, Increase 12,509,853 24 

Buffalo Division, Increase 310,082 46 

TRAFFIC. 
FREIGHT. 

The freight traffic statistics show an increase of 164,090,180 
(7.54 per cent) in " tons revenue freight carried one mile," 
at an average rate of 0.5834 cents per mile, a decrease of 
0.0630 cents (9.75 per cent), at a cost per ton mile of 0.5409 
cents, an increase of 0.0009 cents (0.17 per cent), leaving a 
net profit of 0.0425 cents as compared with 0.1064 cents 
last year, a decrease of 0.0639 cents (60.06 per cent). 

The average revenue per freight train mile was $1.7440 ; 
expense per mile $1.6168, and net earnings, $0.1272 against 
$1.8510, $1.5463 and $0.3047 respectively last year. 

The total freight train mileage was 7,827,171, an increase 
of 228,876, or 3.01 per cent. 



—1— 

The loaded cars per train decreased 0.01 cars ; the load 
per car increased 0.42 tons and the revenue train load was 
298.93 tons against 286.34 tons last year, an increase of 12.59 
tons 4.40 per cent. For the years 1895 to 1905 the revenue 
train load and load per car, have been as follows : 



Year. Train Load. 

1895 176.29 

1896 193.04 

1897 212.87 

1898 216.55 

1899 234.72 

1900 268.94 

1901 283.47 

1902 284.66 

1903 301.76 

1904 286.34 

1905 298.93 



ad. Car Load 


OS. 13.37 tons 


13.80 




14.00 




14.16 




14,83 




16.07 




16.67 




16.69 




17.82 




17.14 




17.56 





The actual train load, including company freight, was 
323.44 tons, against 315.94 tons last year. 

The increase in train load over 1895 has been 122.64 tons, 
and car load has increased 4.19 tons. 

In the preparation of train statistics, all loaded cars 
whether " revenue, " freight or " company " freight, are 
included in " loaded cars per train. " 

With an increase of 7.54 per cent in "services rendered" 
i. e., "tons carried one mile," there was a decrease in freight 
revenue of $414,471.27 (2.95 per cent), with an increase of 
$905,988.34 (7.71 per cent), in expenses of freight traffic. 
While the increase in freight tonnage was 568.441 tons 
(5.86 per cent), the increase in freight train service was 
3.01 per cent. 



PASSENGER. 

'' Passengers carried one mile " increased 165/285,650 
(4476 per cent), and in revenue $1,872,303.48 (26.57 per 
cent). There was an increase of $94,740.31 on the Butfalo 
Division, and an increase of $1,777,563.17 on the Wabash 
proper. 

The rate per passenger per mile was 1.668 cents, a decrease 
of 0.240 cents, and expenses per passenger per mile 1 468 
cents, a decrease of 0.139 cents, leaving 0.200 cents per mile 
net, as against 0.301 cents last year, a loss of 33.55 per cent 

Train earnings per mile were 1.1076, a gain of 4.84 cents; 
the expenses were 81.81 cents per train mile, an increase of 
85.5 cents, and net earnings per train mile were 28.95 cents 
against 32.66 cents in 1904. 

The "passengers carried one mile" increased 44.76 per 
cent, while the cost of passenger train service increased 32.25 
per cent, and the actual number of passengers carried was 
6,615,459, an increase of 431,985 (6.99 per cent). 

Statistics of freight and passenger traffic show the earn- 
ings divided between the two classes of traffic as follows : 

Freight train gross earnings $13,650,185.54 (56.23%) 

Passenger train gross earnings... 10,626,252,08 (43.77 f^ 

Passenger train earnings include mail, express, etc. 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Expenses of operation and maintenance increased as 
follows : 





Biaffalo 
Division. 


Wabash 
Proper. 


Total. 


Maintenance of Way and 
Structures 


1 93,158 33 

91,472 35 
124,579 34 

872 44 


$ 232,73 26 

1,010,674 40 

1,152,464 26 

113,975 32 


$ 325,897 59 

1,102,146 75 

1,277,043 60 

114,847 76 


Maintenance of Equip- 
ment 


Conducting Transportat'n 
General Expenses 


Total 


$310,082 46 


12,509,853 24 


$2,819,935 70 





The principal items of increase were as follows : 

Maintenance of Way and Structures — 

Renewals of Rails.... $235,619 95 

Renewals of Ties 212,769 87 

Renewals of Buildings, Etc 103,469 15 $651,858 97 

Maintenance of Equipment — 

Repairs of Locomotives 124,269 04 

Repairs of Passenger Cars 38,016 95 

Repairs of Freight Cars 637,151 27 

Payments Account Equipment 302,491 21 1,101,928 47 

Conducting Transportation- 
Fuel for Locomotives 94,840 38 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 127,026 58 

Train Service 85,257 23 

Train Supplies 140,750 81 

Station Service, Etc 123,817 62 

Car Mileage Balances , 94,059 01 

Switchmen and Watchmen 37,494 26 

Telegraph Expenses 63,521 64 

Injuries to Individuals 330,105 99 

Loss and Damage 105,214 48 

Advertising 36,102 43 1,238,190 43 



-10- 



Maintenance of Way. 



NEW STEEL RAIL LAID. 





1903-1904. 


1904-1905. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


No. Tons 80-lb. New Rail 
Miles New Steel Rail Laid 


34,488.0 
275.0 


6,051.9 
48.5 




28,436.1 
226.5 











Note.— In the above statement there are included 56.7 tons, 0.5 
mile of new 80-lb. rail laid on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo 
Division, the Wabash paying its proportion on a wheelage basis. 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



1903-1904. 



1904-1905. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



No 



. Cross-ties laid, Main 
Track 

Cross-ties laid. Side 
Track 

Sets Switch-ties put 

in 

Miles Track ballasted 
(stone, gravel, 
burnt clay, etc.).... 

Miles Fence Rebuilt. 

Miles Old Fence Re- 
paired 

Miles New Fence 
Built 

Miles Ditching 

Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 



870,521 

167,652 

483 



198.9 
160.4 

149.1 

99.0 

48.6 

55.7 



1,088,283 

265,516 

806 



198.8 
248.6 



124.4 

19.2 
29.7 

44.2 



217,762 

97,864 

323 



88.2 



0.1 



24.7 

79.8 
18.9 

11.5 



Note.— Included in the above are 154,968 cross ties, 48 sets switch 
ties, 68.5 miles of track ballasted, 22.8 miles of fence rebuilt, and 6.9 
miles sidings and spurs built on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo 
Division; and 7,275 cross-ties and 2 sets switch-ties put in on the 
Erie Section of the Buffalo Division. 



11- 



NuaraHR OF Feet op Trestle Shortened, REPiiACEo with Iron Pipe, Filled, 

ETC., DUBINO THE YEAR ENDING JUNB 30TH, 1905. 



Shortened. 



Replaced with 
Iron Pipe. 



Filled and 
Abandoned. 



Cost. 



Buffalo Division 

Detroit Division 

Eastern Division 

Middle Division 

Springfield Division 
St. Louis Division... 
Western Division... 


80 feet. 

71 '* 
112 " 

32 " 
102 " 


30 feet. 
445 " 
112 '' 


1,597 " 
546 '' 


Total 


397 feet. 


2,730 feet. 











8,728 feet. 


1105,299 56 

8,961 92 

612 20 

642 60 

18,329 27 

6,681 83 


324 " 

52 '^ 

1,326 " 

95 " 


10,525 feet. 


$140,527 38 



ToTAii Decrease, in Lineal Feet, of Trestle Work. 





1903-1904. 


1904-1906. 


Buffalo Division 


610 

704 
814 

4,992 1 

3,954 
794 


270 


Detroit Division 


9,418 
516 


Eastern Division 


Middle Division 


548 


Spr ingfi eld Division 


84 


St. Louis Division... 


102 


Western Division 


641 


Total 


11,868 


11,679 





•12— 



EXTEAOEDINARY REPAIRS AND RENEWALS, IMPROVE- 
MENTS AND ADDITIONS. 

REPAIRS AND RENEWALS. 

Bridges, Wooden — 

Rebuilt 69 trestles at various points | 56,668 33 

Harvey, la., Bridge No. 2891, renewed Howe truss 7,607 00 

Total $ 64,276 33 

Wharves, Docks and Landings — 

Detroit, Mich.— Renewed C. P. slip dock $ 7,716 63 

Chicago, 111. — Repaired dock and dock house and filling at 

16th street (unfinished) 1,458 33 

Total f 9,174 86 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and Other Buildings, 
etc. — 

Detroit, Mich. — Renewed driveway, team tracks | 333 06 

Hand, Mich. — Rebuilt combination depot 1,482 22 

Adrian, Mich. — Renewed passenger platform with brick.. 691 46 

Adrian, Mich. — Renewed depot roof with slate 401 38 

Montpelier, O. — Steam heat line for coaches 329 46 

Montpelier, O. — Renewed engine germinal 14,768 60 

Hamilton, Ind. — Rebuilt combination depot 1,561 29 

Ashley, Ind. — Rebuilt combination depot 3,353 62 

Ashley, Ind.— Extension and repairs to roundhouse 2,496 22 

Ashley, Ind. — Repairs to steam heating in roundhouse... 272 98 

N. Liberty, Ind. — Renewed depot roof with slate 263 89 

N. Liberty, Ind, — Renewed coal dock trestle 275 18 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Extended transfer table pit 468 85 

Burrows, Ind. — Rebuilt station platform 526 06 

Lafayette, Ind. — Rebuilt frame four stall engine house... 3,943 63 

West Point, Ind. — Renewed station platform (unfinished) 169 60 

State Line, Ind.— Rebuilt No. 3 depot 1,497 44 

State Line, Ind. — Rebuilt station platform with brick 207 20 

Whitehouse, O. — Rebuilt station platform 671 Oi 

Whitehouse, 0.— Rebuilt stock yards 233 48 

Napoleon, O. — Rebuilt passenger platform with brick 343 17 

Chicago, 111. — Renewed roof and general repairs of round 

house..., 1,361 74 

Chicago, 111.— Planked team track at 12th street (un- 
finished) 648 04 

Chicago, 111.— Placed screens in windows of Wabash 

elevator 290 00 

Worth, 111.— Renewed timber platform with brick (un- 
finished) 609 85 

Worth, 111.— Built new No. 3-A depot to take place of old 

depot which was sold (unfinished) 689 34 

ForreBt, 111.— Renewed railroad crossings at intersection 

of Wabash and T. P. & W. Ry 438 00 

Gibson, 111. — Renewed depot platform with concrete 15 40 

Gibson, 111.— Renewed railroad crossing at intersection of 

Wabash and I. C. R. R 285 00 

Proctor, 111. — Renewed timber platform with brick 52 40 

Mansfield, 111. — Renewed railroad crossing at intersection 

of Wabash and C. C. C. & St. L. Ry : 217 00 



13— 



Lodge, 111. — Kenewed railroad crossings at intersection of 

Wabash and I. 0. R. R § 258 00 

Lovington, 111. — Extender, remodeled and painted depot 764 38 
Decatur, 111. — Renewed six stalls of old brick round 

house with six temporary frame stalls 4,738 06 

Decatur, 111.— Kenewed 70 ft. 125 ton turntable with new 

70 It. 200 ton table 4,200 35 

Blue Mound, 111.— Kenewed timber platform 663 28 

Taylorville, 111. — Paved driveway at passenger station 

with brick 2,292 63 

Taylorville, 111.— Threw 540 ft. of track for Paper Mill Co. 101 88 
Litchfield, 111. — Kenew^ed railroad crossings at intersec- 
tion of Wabash and C. C. C. & St. L. Ky 1,153 00 

Edwardsville, 111. — Paved crossing, put in concrete curb- 
ing and rebuilt platform, etc 2,906 53 

Edwardsville, 111. — Raised tracks, etc 2,284 85 

Harristown, 111. — Renewed timber platform with brick ... 334 32 
Springfield, 111.— Repaired tile floor and marble work in 

passenger station 300 18 

Springfield, 111. Renewed cab shop pits with concrete... 621 75 
Jacksonville, 111. — Rebuilt part of stock pens and sheds, 

account fire 228 09 

Jacksonville, 111. — Built new freight house to replace old 

one (unfinished) ^ 5,798 32 

Markham, 111. — Built new No. 4 depot to replace one 

destroyed by fire 671 56 

Versailles, 111. — Built new frame depot to replace old one 

(unfinished) 127 53 

St- Louis, Mo. — Sarah street, renewed crossing gates 396 34 

St. Louis, Mo. — Olive road, renewed crossing gates 230 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Delmar avenue, renewed crossing gates... 455 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Union avenue, renewed crossing gates... 430 80 

St. Louis, Mo. — Deetrehan street, renewed crossing gates 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo.^— Bremen avenue, renewed crossing gates 346 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Ewing avenue, renewed track scales 1,241 52 

Darst Place, Mo.— Rebuilt waiting shed and platform 124 09 

Foristell, Mo. — Renewed depot roof and platform 584 09 

Benton City, Mo.— Renewed platform 445 30 

Moberiy, Mo.— Renewed platform at freight house 1,413 49 

Moberly, Mo. — Renewed track scale foundation 590 32 

Macon, Mo. — Rebuilt baggage and express building 422 41 

Queen City, Mo — Renewed depot roof and platform 348 55 

Hamilton, la. — Rebuilt depot and platform 1,656 61 

Salisbury, Mo. — Renewed depot and platform 2,648 91 

Salisbury, Mo. — Renewed engine house 707 18 

KeytesviUe, Mo.— Moved depot 251 01 

Brunswick, Mo. — Renewed track scales 624 79 

Miami, Mo. — Renewed platform 203 72 

Carrollton, Mo.— Renewed roof of depot with slate 576 23 

Carrollton, Mo. — Renewed wood platform 77 18 

Mo. City, Mo.— Renewed depot 1,892 31 

Mo. City, Mo. — Renewed coal and oil hotise 120 77 

Mo. City, Mo. — Renewed water closet 46 27 

Triplett^ Mo.— Renewed platform 274 71 

Jameson, Mo.— Renewed platform 382 06 

Lock Springs, Mo. — Renewed platform 329 40 

Council Bluffs, la. — Renewed platform 311 27 

Total $ 83,584 74 



-14— 



Renewals of tracks, 23d Street to Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo. — 

Two main tracks relaid with 80 lb. rail, 23d St. to Union 

Ave $ 1,072 00 

One main track, Union Ave. to Page Ave., relaid with 

80 lb. rail 2,426 63 

Total , $ 3,498 72 

Water and Fuel Stations.— 

Belleville, Mich.— Rebuilt water plant $ 2,388 26 

Milan, Mich.— Rebuilt water plant (unfinished) 34 24 

Ashley, Ind. — Repairs to stand pipe 115 00 

Defiance, O.— Rebuilt water tank 1,823 89 

Ft. Wayne, Ind.— Relaid 4 inch water main to shops 446 49 

Campus, 111. — Built new pump house, to replace one des- 
troyed by fire 186 55 

Streator, 111. — Erected water tank moved from Mitchell 

(unfinished) 1,214 85 

Taylorville, 111.— Renewed old 8 inch Poage standpipe, 

erected 1885, with new 12 inch Poage style '*C" 335 54 

Bluffs, 111. — Raised coal chute sixteen inches 290 74 

Ferguson, Mo. — Water tank on iron frame 1,680 96 

St. Charles, Mo. — Changed standpipe to 12 inch 386 58 

Macon, Mo. — New water tank on iron frame 1,441 84 

Kirksville, Mo. — New water tank on iron frame 3,605 59 

Gallatin, Mo.— Renewed tank 1,338 65 

White Cloud, Iowa.— Renewed tank 1,377 59 

Silver City, Iowa. — Renewed tank 1,533 84 

Total $ 18,200 61 



IMPROVEMENTS. 

Steel Bridges (new) to Replace Wooden Bridges. — 

French Landing, Mich. — Bridge No. 752, renewed Howe 
truss with deck spans and masonry $ 2,005 05 

Whittaker, Mich.— Bridge No. 779, renewed pile trestle 
with masonry and through girder 92 65 

Britton, Mich. — Bridge No. 821, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry and through girder 183 05 

Montpelier, O. — Bridge No. 1357, renewed pile trestle 
with masonry and deck plate girder 2,850 03 

Hamilton, Ind. — Bridge No. 1383, renewed pile trestle 
with masonry and deck plate girder 9,104 99 

Montpelier, O. — Bridge No. 214, renewed pile trestle with 

solid floor deck girder 1,711 24 

Artie, Ind. — Bridge No. 235, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry and solid floor deck girder (unfinished) 1,273 54 

New Haven, Ind.— Bridge No. 317, renewed with masonry 
and solid floor deck girder 23 90 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Bridge No. 323, renewed pile trestle 
with masonry and solid floor deck girder 26 7S 

Roanoke, Ind. — Bridge No. 351, renewed pile trestle 
with masonry abutments, one pier and solid floor two- 
span through girder 41 #8 



—15- 



Roanoke, Ind. — Bridge No. 357, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry and deck girder $ 263 57 

Williamsport, Ind. — Bridge No. 683, renewed pile trestle 

with masonry and solid floor through girder 151 92 

Danville, 111. — Bridge No. 745, renewed with masonry 

and solid floor deck girder 76 25 

Okolona, O. — Bridge No. 845, renewed with solid floor 
deck girder 839 50 

Okolona, O. — Bridge No. 848, renewed with solid floor deck 
girder 260 54 

Homer, 111. — Bridge No. 34, renewing pile trestle with 
concrete abutments and solid floor construction (unfin- 
ished 954 62 

Sidney, 111. — Bridge No. 42A, renewed pile trestle with 
new 45-foot girder (unfinished) 510 37 

Sidney, 111. — Bridge No. 45, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry abutments, solid floor and deck girder (unfin- 
ished) 2,714 67 

Campus, 111. — Bridge 1195, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry abutments and through solid floor girder 
(unfinished) , 1,619 26 

Wing, 111. — Bridge No. 1240, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry and deck span 392 90 

Osman, 111.— Bridge No. 1348, renewed pile trestle with 
concrete masonry abutments and solid floor 740 15 

Pontiac, 111. — Bridge No. 1705, renewed pile trestle and 
through iron truss with two old trusses from Custer 
Park Bridge 4,723 48 

Bruce, 111. — Bridge No. 1526, renewed pile trestle and 
steel span with wood and old span from Custer Park 
bridge 3,983 33 

Stonington, 111. — Bridge No. 730, renewed pile trestle 
with concrete masonry abutments and solid floor con- 
struction 40 97 

Poag, 111. — Bridge No. 890, renewed pile trestle with 
masonry abutments and pier, and two fifty-foot through 
girders (unfinished) 2,290 64 

Elm Point, Mo. — Bridge No. 69, renewed truss bridge 

with through steel girder and concrete abutments 2,512 57 

St. Peters, Mo. — Bridge No. 84, renewed truss bridge with 
through steel girder with concrete abutments 1,984 53 

Salisbury, Mo. — Bridge No. 449, renewed truss bridge with 
steel truss bridge 411 77 

Keytesville, Mo. — Bridge No. 471, renewed truss bridge 
with steel truss bridge 923 76 

Camden, Mo. — Bridge No. 567, renewed truss bridge with 
steel deck girder 435 75 

South Liberty, Mo. — Bridge No. 604, renewed truss 
bridge with steel through girder 462 55 

Total $ 43,606 61 



Trestles shortened, replaced with iron pipe, stone arches, 
box culverts, filled, wood culverts replaced with trestles, 
end walls on iron pipe, etc .$133,719 49 



—16— 

Steel Bridges Repaired and Strengthened— 

Huntington, Ind. — Bridge No. 377, renewed deck | 324 41 

Huntington, Ind.— Bridge No. 378, renewed deck 633 21 

Wea, Ind.— Bridge No. 607, renewed approaches and deck 1,532 74 
New Haven, Ind. — Eenewed highway bridge on account 
of old bridge washed out, due to changing channel of 
Six Mile Creek when the Ft. Wayne & Detroit line was 

built 3,642 16 

Custer Park, 111. — Bridge No. 1145, repainted through 

truss 389 09 

Lodge, 111.— Bridge No. 1392, repainted deck girder 23 13 

Lodge, 111. — Bridge No. 1393, repainted through girder... 26 99 

Lodge, 111. — Bridge No. 1394, repainted deck girder 21 63 

Mansfield, 111. — Bridge No. 1362, repainted deck girder... 24 06 

Monticello. 111. — Bridge No. 1401, repainted deck girder.. 117 80 
Monticello, 111. — Bridge No. 1402, repainted through 

girder 16 10 

Effingham, 111. — Bridge No. 1589, making general repairs 718 76 

Sadorus, 111.— Bridge No. 63, repainted through girder 49 53 

Arnold, 111. — Bridge No. 231, repaired and repointed 

masonry and sloped off bridge seats with concrete 251 23 

Valley City, 111. — Bridge No. 508, renewed protection 

piling 4,754 33 

Meredosia, 111. — Bridge No. 280, renewed protection 

piling , 3,714 81 

St. Charles, Mo,— Bridge No. 59, renewed deck on 

approaches 2,392 68 

St. Charles, Mo.— Bridge No. 59, renewed deck on spans.. 122 32 

St. Charles, Mo. — Bridge No. 59, painted approaches 1,068 52 

St. Charles, Mo. — Bridge No. 59, rip-rapped each approach 637 27 
St. Charles, Mo.— Bridge No. 59, Trussed stringers in ap- 
proaches 256 29 

Gilmore, Mo.— Bridge No. 116, renewed deck 1,383 85 

TotaL $ 22,100 91 

New Steel Bridges to Replace Old Steel Bridges — 
St. Louis, Mo.— Bridge No. 11, renewed 45 ft. iron girder 
with 80 ft. steel girder, concrete abutments and solid 

floor $ 19,109 04 

Neeley's, 111. — Bridge No. 275, replaced iron stringers on 
masonry with S5 ft. through steel girder (unfinished)... 940 84 

Total I 20,049 88 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades — 

Custer Park, 111.— Changed line and grade $ 15,756 30 

Monticello, 111. — Changed line and grade 403 50 

Carpenter, 111.— Changed line and grade , 1,161 09 

Camden, Mo.— Changed line 8,984 58 

Edwardsville, 111. — Change of line and grade 1,801 69 

Total I 28,107 16 

For protection against Missouri River and Grand River at 
Harlem, Camden, Randolph, Hulls Point, Missouri City, 
Brunswick, Bridge 825 Western Division, change of river 
channel at McCurry, Mo., and against Illinois River at 
Meredosia, 111 I 8,802 90 



-17 



ADDITIONS. 

Second, Third, Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries — 

Buffalo Division 6.9 miles. ..$ 68,040 08 

Detroit Division 2.5 miles... 14,82160 

Eastern Division 4.0 miles... 23,456 72 

Middle Division 15.2 miles... 69,89199 

Chicago Terminal (Landers yard) 4.6 miles... 37,235 07 

E. St: Louis Terminal (Brooklyn yard) 5.3 miles... 46,222 73 

St. Louis Terminal Facilities : 

Compton Ave. to Euclid Ave., Third track... 1.85 miles... 19,998 73 

Boyle Ave., Pass. Car storage yard ........... 1.68 miles... 15,176 41 

Boyle Ave., Frt. Car storage yard 1.44 miles... 1 60 

Olive Road, new tracks 0.6 miles... 940 04 

St. Louis Division 2.3 miles... 18,174 22 

Western Division 1.3 miles... 6,090 01 

Second Track— Litchfield to Worden 11.6 miles... 203,315 54 

Second Track— Poag to Granite City 10.9 miles... 90,850 64 

Second Track— Union Ave. to Page Ave 2.55 miles... 37,964 32 

Total 72.72 miles. ..|652,179 70 

Interlocking Plants, Wabash Proportion — 

Sulu, 111.— Interlocking plant erected I 409 29 

Knights, 111. — Interlocking plant erected 2,143 83 

Detroit, Mich. — Interlocking plant erected with P. M. 

R. R., D. U. Ry. crossing 1,694 56 

Detroit, Mich. — Reconstructed Beaubien street interlock- 
ing plant, D. U. Ry. crossing 388 39 

Delray, Mich. — Additions to P. M. R. R. interlocking 

tower, Wabash double track connection 1,632 39 

Romulus, Mich. — Rebuilt interlocking tower, P. M. R. R. 

crossing 844 83 

Raisin Center, Mich. — Rebuilt interlocking tower, L. S. 

& M. S. crossing 882 82 

New Paris, Ind. — Rebuilt interlocking tower C. C. C. & 

St. L. crossing 958 70 

Cecil, O. — Interlocking plant erected with Cincinnati 

Northerui- 1,539 80 

Champaign, 111. — Interlocking plant erected with I. C. 

R. R 1,770 91 

St. Louis, Mo.— Interlocking plant North Market street 

with Terminal R. R. Assn 5,696 30 

St. Louis, Mo. — Interlocking plant erected at Page avenue, 

Terminal R. R. Assn. connection 703 16 

Willow Creek, Ind.— Rebuilt interlocking plant 1,701 39 

Total $ 20,366 35 



—18- 



New Buildings, or Additions to Passenger and Freight Sta- 
tions, Shops and Other Buildings, etc. — 

Detroit, Mich. — Warehouse scales 12th street freight 

house $ 513 47 

Detroit, Mich. — Warehouse scales Russell street freight 

house 146 94 

Detroit, Mich. — Addition to platform, Russell street 

freight house 126 02 

Delray, Mich. — Machinery for turning drawbridge 4,738 01 

Romulus, Mich. — New stock pens 200 89 

Romulus, Mich. — Extension to freight room 260 91 

Britton, Mich. — New watch tower and gates 1,015 54 

Franklin, Ohio — New transfer house and platform (un- 

' finished) 586 05 

Montpelier, Ohio— New deep well 1,174 38 

Montpelier, Ohio — Water line deep well to tank 252 00 

Montpelier, Ohio — Changing old freight house into 

restaurant, baggage and express rooms 512 74 

Montpelier, Ohio — Moving old freight house from Millers- 
berg and converting same into freight house and office 

building 1,589 58 

Montpelier, Ohio. — New freight platform 295 31 

Montpelier, Ohio — New transfer platform 127 80 

Montpelier, Ohio — New engine terminal 12,945 63 

Ashley, Ind. — New cinder pit 1,833 18 

North Liberty, Ind. — New water plant 319 29 

North Liberty, Ind.— New engine house 1,457 67 

North Liberty, Ind.— New turntable 1,847 47 

North Liberty, Ind.— New cinder pit 347 18 

North Liberty, Ind. — Drainage, account improvements... 159 44 
Toledo, Ohio — New bridge over Toledo Urban and Inter- 
urban R. R. (unfinished) 2,228 85 

West Unity, O.— New stock scales 212 20 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — Addition to brick boiler room 266 39 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. — New boiler and foundation for shops .. 505 09 

Huntington, Ind. — New water plant 2,670 66 

Hartman, Ind. — New water plant 2,806 86 

Peru, Ind. — Extension on baggage room for lunch room 

and express office 977 68 

Peru, Ind. — Extension of storeroom platform 301 17 

Peru, Ind.— New water tank 2,343 82 

Tilton, 111. — New elevated sand house 817 48 

Defiance, O. — New standpipe and water mains 885 09 

Ft. Wayne, In'd.— New bridge No. 326?^, over Ft. Wayne 

Van Wert, & Lima Traction line (unfinished) 275 30 

Worth, 111. — Erected unloading platform for Worth 

Jockey Club 642 65 

Worth, 111. — Erected Ellis freight bumping post at end 

of track on **¥" at Worth race track 78 26 

Brisbane. 111.— Building block tower at lap siding 9 00 

Forrest, 111. — Building block tower, Forrest yard 9 00 

Lotus, 111. — Built new brick platform 67 25 

Mansfield, 111.— Erected crossing gates 249 88 

Monticello, 111.— Erected crossing gates at Main street ... 440 88 



-19- 



Sulu, 111. — Built block tower at lap siding <.$ 9 00 

Bement, 111. — Extended north end of passenger platform 

140 feet along 7th District 204 59 

Decatur, 111. — Addition to passenger station 9,057 03 

Decatur, 111. — Erected scrap iron shed and platform 2,035 94 

Decatur, 111.— Built addition to Y. M. C. A. building 577 00 

Decatur, 111. — Setting two new boilers for car department 

heater plant 1,022 34 

Decatur, 111. — Built new frame building for motor, for 

charging electric lighted equipment 709 63 

Decatur, 111.— Built addition to car department boiler 

house for air compressor 167 25 

Fairmount, 111. — Erected Chicago crossing signal at Main 

and Park streets 453 08 

Windsor, 111.— Erected new standard No. 3 depot 1,243 56 

Knights, 111. — Built new block tower at lap siding 179 52 

Blue Mound, 111. — Built new No. 2 depot to replace one 

destroyed by fire 2,257 26 

Litchfield, 111. — Erected 12 inch Poage standpipe to re- 
place the old south standpipe, size 8 inch Poage 790 44 

Staunton, 111. — Erected two 12 inch Poage standpipes 1,126 68 

Worden, 111. — Erected one Chicago crossing signal at 

Wall and Kell streets 472 34 

Edwardsville Junction, 111. — Erected one Chicago cross- 
ing signal at Alton road crossing., 289 00 

Edwardsville Junction, 111. — Building new depot and 

platform (unfinished) 4,355 02 

Edwardsville, 111. — Erected one Chicago crossing signal 

at St. Louis and Vandalia streets , 448 85 

Edwardsville, 111.— Erected 3 inch wrought iron stand- 
pipe and put in connections on account of water plant.. 126 70 
East St. Louis, 111. — Put up Ellis bumping posts at out- 
bound freight house tracks Nos. 9, 10 and 11 194 46 

Harristown, 111. — Bought ground and built new stock 

pens and chute 675 00 

Niantic, 111.— Built new stock pens and chute 175 00 

Springfield, 111.— Built new paint shop 838.92 

Springfield, 111.— Built extension to M. P. & M. store room 1,080 77 

Springfield, 111. — Built new tin and pipe shop 707 37 

Springfield, 111. — Remodeled passenger station for Divi- 
sion officials 3,140 26 

Curran, 111.— Built new No. 3 depot and platforpa. 1,320 11 

Curran, 111. — Put six ton scale in stock pen 78 12 

Berlin, 111. — Built concrete dam at overflow Berlin pond.. 281 78 
Kinderhook, 111. — Digging well as test for water supply 

(unfinished) 174 59 

12th District — New snow fences on sections 145, 148 and 

149 485 12 

St. Louis, Mo. — Engine terminal Vandeventer avenue 56,625 71 

St. Louis, Mo. — Electric block signal system, 23d street 

to Page avenue 9,354 66 

St. Louis, Mo. — Vandeventer avenue, new watch house, 

bridge No. 9 70 02 

St. Louis, Mo. — Ewing avenue, new crossing gates 190 45 

St. Louis, Mo. — Compton avenue, new crossing gates 184 99 



—20— 

St. Louis, Mo.— Theresa avenue, new crossing gates | 245 8S 

St. Louis, Mo.— Spring avenue, new crossing gates 235 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Boyle avenue, new crossing gates 396 34 

St. Louis, Mo. — Newstead avenue, new crossing gates 396 34 

St. Louis, Mo.— Lindell avenue, new crossing gates 239 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Maple avenue, new crossing gates 395 30 

St. Louis, Mo.— Mullanphy street, new crossing gates 346 00 

St. Louis, Mo.— Angelica street, new crossing gates 346 00 

St. Louis, Mo. — Clark avenue, new crossing gates 346 00 

St. Louis, Mo.— St. Louis avenue, new crossing gates 323 34 

St, Louis, Mo. — Wright street, new crossing gates 323 34 

St. Louis, Mo. — Palm street, new crossing gates 323 34 

St. Louis, Mo. — Branch street, new crossing gates 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo. — Dock street, new crossing gates .., 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo. — Buchanan street, new crossing gates 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo. — Angelrodt street, new crossing gates 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo. — Ferry street, new crossing gates 323 33 

St. Louis, Mo. — Boyle avenue, car repairers' building and 

platform 655 50 

St. Louis, Mo. — Boyle avenue, air, water and steam pipes 6,595 94 

St. Louis, Mo. — Boyle avenue, new tower house... 7 68 

St. Louis, Mo. — Union avenue, new tower house 21 35 

St. Louis, Mo. — Union avenue, new coal and lamp house.. 50 62 

St. Louis, Mo. — Forsyth Jet., new tower house 23 98 

St. Louis, Mo. — Forsyth Jet., new coal and lamp house... 241 34 

St. Louis, Mo.— Page avenue, new tower house 37 96 

St. Louis, Mo. — Page avenue, new coal and lamp house... 211 60 

Moberly, Mo. — New car inspectors' building 305 81 

Moberly, Mo. —Storage platform and derrick 430 89 

Moulton, la. — New office building for trainmaster 581 12 

Brunswick, Mo. — Steam heat in office building 256 21 

Chillicothe, Mo. — New tank and stand pipe 1,575 68 

Gallatin, Mo. — New coal chutes and sand house 5,824 12 

Maryville, Mo. — New brick walk under bridge No. 1062... 16 50 
Luther, Mo. — Extending water service for washing stock 

cars 698 41 

Moberly, Mo. — New brick boiler room at round house 3,537 48 

Moberly, Mo. — New brick pump house 1,261 19 

Moberly, Mo.— New coal chutes 14,835 77 

Moberly, Mo. — Addition to paint shop, Car Dept 850 04 

Moberly, Mo.— Addition to tin shop. Car Dept 217 11 

Moberly, Mo. — Addition to iron shed. Store Dept 533 55 

Moberly, Mo.— New transfer table and pit (unfinished).. 2,944 03 

CarroUton, Mo. — New brick platform 852 28 

Kansas City, Mo.— New scales in freight house 187 46 

Kansas City, Mo.— New brick floor in freight house 493 39 

Chillicothe, Mo.— New brick platform 974 22 

Shenandoah, la. — New coal chutes 2,414 85 

Bement, 111.— Crossing-bells, erected at Sangamon, Mor- 
gan and Champaign Streets , 224 67 

Hannibal, Mo. — Crossing alarm bells at 3d and Lindell Av. 335 27 

Norborne, Mo. — Crossing alarm bells installed 315 64 

Brooklyn, 111.— Advance signal erected 158 73 

Total $200,622 39 



—21— 



SUMMARY 



Extraordinary Bepairs and Benewals, Improvements and Additions. 

Eepairs and Renewals. 

Bridges, Wooden $ 64,275 33 

"Wharves, Docks and Landings 9,174 86 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other Build- 
ings, etc 83,584 74 

Water and Fuel Stations 18,200 61 

Renewals of Tracks 23d St. to Page Ave., St. Louis, Mo... 3,498 72 

Total 1178,734 26 



Improvements. 

Steel Bridges (New) to Replace Wooden Bridges $ 43,606 61 

Trestles Shortened, Replaced with Iron Pipe, Filled, Etc. 133,719 49 

Steel Bridges, Repaired and Strengthened 22,100 91 

New Steel Bridges to Replace Old Steel Bridges 20,049 88 

Improving Line and Reducing Grades 28,107 16 

, Protection against Illinois, Missouri and Des Moines Rivers 8,802 90 

Total $256,386 95 



Additions. 

Second Track $332,130 50 

Third, Yard, Side and Spur Tracks to Various Industries. 320,049 20 

Interlocking Plants, Wabash Proportion 20,366 35 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other Build- 
ings, etc 200,522 39 

. Total $873,068 44 

f Repairs and Renewals $178,734 26 

Totals -j Improvements 256,386 95 

(.Additions ., 873,068 44 

Grand Total $1,308,189 65 



—22— 

In addition to the above, the following amounts were 
expended on the Buffalo Division for extraordinary renewals 
and improvements, the Wabash paying its proportion of 
this sum on a wheelage basis : 

Depots, Buildings, etc $ 12,418 45 

Docks and Slip Tables — Eepairs and Renewals 3,166 10 

Additions to Shops, Eound-houses, etc 13,031 94 

Wood, Water and Coal Stations— New and Rebuilt 19,143 99 

Steel Bridges Repaired and Renewed.... 43,141 27 

Miscellaneous 4,623 93 

Total $ 95,525 68 

Included in the above item of steel bridges repaired and renewed 
are the following : 

Thamesville, Thames River $16,908 99 

Decews Creek 19,396 68 

Vosburg, McGregor's Creek 1,793 01 

Puce, Pike Creek 5,042 59 

Total $43,141 27 



OMAHA DIVISION. 

Miscellaneous Work — 

No. cross ties put in track 46,971 

No. miles track ballasted with stone 23.09 

No. miles fence built 24.85 

SUMMAKY. 

Miscellaneous Work $46,755 7S 

EECAPITULATION. 

Extraordinary Repairs and Renewals, Improvements 
and Additions $1,308,189 65 

Buffalo Division, Extraordinary Renewals and Improve- 
ments 95,525 68 

Reconstruction Omaha Division 46,755 78 

Grand Total $1,450,471 11 



—23— 

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT. 

FREIGHT. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 
for year 1,738,098 1,830,621 1,881,101 1,917,557 

Total Empty Cars moved 
for year 776,474 793,889 803,553 888,47^ 

Total Loaded and Empty 
Cars moved for year 2,514,572 2,624,510 2,684,654 2,804,032 

Average Loaded Cars 
moved per day 4,725 5,015 6,153 5,2M 

Average Empty Cars 
moved per day 2,127 2,175 2,202 2,428 

Average Loaded and 
Empty Cars moved per 
day 6,889 7,190 7,355 7,682 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age for year 6,841,121 7,284,158 7,598,295 7,831,004 

Average Freight Train 
Mileage per day 18,743 19,957 20,817 21,455 

Total number Freight 
Trains for year 80,303 86,134 91,251 94,720 

Average number Freight 
Trains per day 220 236 250 260 

Average number Miles run 
per train, per day 85.2 84.6, 83.3 82.5 

Average number Loaded 
Cars moved per train 
mile .". 19.0 18.6 18.4 18.4 

Average number Empty 
Cars moved per train 
mile 7.4 7.2 6.9 7.7 

Average number Loaded 
and Empty Cars moved 
per train mile 26.4 25.8 25.4 26.0 



—24- 



FREIGHT-Cont. 1902. 1908. 1904. 1905. 

Average number Cars 
handled per train mile, 
reduced to loaded car 
basis 23.5 22.9 22.6 22.9 

Mileage made by all 
Loaded Cars for year 129,714,750 135,424,005 140,074,003 144,198,504 

Mileage made by all 
Empty Cars for year 50,721,670 52,573,824 52,644,623 59,121,794 

Grand Total of Car Mile- 
age for year 180,436,420 187,997,829 192,718,526 203,320,298 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 67,218,623 75,534,916 88,221,505 86,246,968 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 23,375,135 26,439,131 27,065,112 29,513,045 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 

for year 90,593,758 101,974,047 115,286,617 115,760,013 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age for year 62,496,122 59,889,089 51,852,498 57,951,536 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age for year 27,346,535 26,134,693 25,579,411 29,608,749 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 
for year 89,842,657 86,023,782 77,431,909 87,560,285 

Number of Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 16,460 16,089 16,039 17,625 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
perday, 7,734 7,834 7,624 7,455 

Miles run per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. R 28.2 28.5 25.2 23.6 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per day, 5,943 8,562 9,179 8,836 

Average Miles run by For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. per Car per day, 41.8 32.6 34.4 35.9 



—25— 

PASSENGER. 1902. 1903. 1901. 1905. 

Total Passenger Train 
Mileage for year 7,691,050 7,715,162 8,100,348 9,607,066 

Total number Passenger 
Trains run for year 81,990 82,549 86,625 96,379 

Average number Passenger 
Trains run per day 225 226 237 264 

Average number Miles per 
Train per day 93.8 93.5 93.5 99.7 

Average number Miles all 
Trains per day , 21,105 21,138 22,193 26,321 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars for year 8,425,552 8,691,319 8,746,068 10,036,499 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Coaches and Chair Cars 
for year 16,807,827 16,670,309 17,527,348 21,245,835 

Total Mileage Sleeping 
Cars for year 9,188,827 9,234,387 9,883,877 12,387,349 

Total Mileage Wabash 
Dining Cars for year 1,591,510 1,443,536 1,423,277 1,757,772 

Total Mileage of all Cars 
for year 37,451,010 37,791,983 39,430,771 48,979,207 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled for 
year 400,040 404,055 421,210 491,290 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled per 
day y 1,096 1,107 1,154 1,346 

Average number of Cars 
per train 4.87 4.90 4.87 5.10 



-26- 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT. 

The total amount expended for repairs of engines was 
$1,626,093.38, equal to $3,079.72 per engine for 528 engines, 
the average number on hand during the year. 

The following statement will show the large amount of 

repair work done on engines, and the general character of 

the repairs : 

Motive Power and Machinery. 

LOCOMOTIVE equipment. 



1903-1904. 1904-1905. Increase. Decrease 



Locomotives on hand Jnly 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 



REPAIRS. 

Locomotives receiving general 

repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 

repairs 

Locomotives receiving light re 

pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

Fire-boxes, new 

Fire-boxes repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset... 

New Engine Frames.. 

New Main and Side Rods 

Tires, new 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tanks 

New Tank Frames .*.. 

New Driving Wheel Centers 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 

Wheels 



488 
50 
10 

528 


528 
67 
14 

581 


40 

17 

4 

53 


340 
299 


370 
324 


30 

25 


745 

1048 

103 

1 

55 

44 

12 

546 

47 

381 

3 

78 

424 

60 

6 

50 

80 

4,588 


819 
1011 

132 

2 

45 

65 

21 

509 
32 

420 
10 

132 

953 
41 


74 


29 
1 


21 
9 





39 

7 

54 

529 




41 
151 

4,528 




71 





37 



10 



37 
15 



19 
6 
9 



60 



Note. — The 581 engines in service June 30, 1905, had a Tractive 
Power of 11,759,700 lbs. June 30, 1896, there were 412 engines with 
Tractive Power of 6,334,915 lbs., showing an increase of 38% in num- 
ber and an increase of 86% in power of engines. 



-27— 



DISTRIBUTION OF ENGINE MILEAGE. 



1903-1904. 



1904-1905. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Freight Train Mile- 
age 

Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 

Passenger Train 
Mileage 

Pass. Lights and 
Double Headers. 

Switching 

Miscellaneous, 
"Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 

Total 



7,598,295 

513,216 

8,100,348 

162,677 
3,904,205 

988,223 



21,266,964 



7,831,004 

525,453 

9,607,066 

277,664 
4,098,945 

606,105 



22,946,237 



232,709 

12,237 

1,506,718 

114,987 
194,740 



1,679,273 



382,118 



Expense of Operating Locomotives. 



1903-1904. 



1904-1905. 



Increase. 



««p-- {Seriai::;::::: 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood)..., 
Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching 

Total 



421 



$ 829,903 

678,710 72 

72,812 49 

1,871,850 23 

1,360,584 03 

218,526 40 



956,187 52 

669,905 86 

75,063 77 

1,975,226 52 

1,435,741 15 

225,782 25 



$5,032,387 29 $5,337,907 07 



$126,284 10 

8,804 86* 

2,251 28 

103,376 29 

75,157 12 

7,255 85 



1305,519 78 



Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 



1903-1904. 1904-1905 



Decrease. 



For Eepairs 

Stores 

Fuel 

Engineers and Firemen.. 
Wiping and Dispatching. 

Total 

*Decrea8e. 



7 06 

34 

8 76 
6 36 

1 02 



$23 54 



$ 7 06 
33 
8 58 
6 24 
98 



$23 19 



01 
18 
12 
04 



$ 35 



-28— 



1903-1904. 1904-1905. 

Total engine mileage 21,378,516 23,013,959 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 49,696 46,399 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 4,141 3,866 

Tons of coal consumed 1,263,804 1,368,316 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender (cost 

of handling included) $1 48 U 44 

Average miles run to one ton of coal 16.9 16.8 

Note. — Cost of stores and fuel includes work train expense. 
Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash proportion of all 
joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



-29— 











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—30— 



CAE DEPARTMENT. 

The increase in expenses of this department for the year 
ending June 30th, 1905, can to a great extent be attributed 
to the fact that during the year 3,045 cars of dififerent classes 
were sent to the shops of the American Car & Foundry 
Company for repair or to be rebuilt, and the entire cost of 
such repairs, $468,121.57, is included in operating expenses. 

The cost of application of air brakes to freight cars, vesti- 
bules and gas to passenger cars and payments on account 
of equipment, passenger and freight, aggregating 
$705,074.57, was also charged to operating expenses. 

Stationary vestibules applied to one baggage car at a cost 
of $271.76. Total cars now vestibuled— 318. 

We equipped three cars with Pintsch gas, at a cost of 
$791.31, making a total of 257 cars so equipped. 

Air brakes were applied to 112 freight cars, at a cost of 
$4,230.85, making a total of 16,213 cars, or about 89 per 
cent of all of our freight cars, so equipped. 



-31--- 



Car Equipment. 



' 


On 

hand 

Julyl, 

1904. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed , 
Sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1905. 


On 
hand 
July 1, 
1889. 


PASSENGER. 

Official 


5 

2 

1 

1 

9 

6 

6 

33 

70 

13 

3 

5 

55 

165 

58 

5 






5 
2 
1 
1 
11 
8 
6 

34 

70 

13 

3 

5 

57 

175 

59 

5 


4 


Pav 






2 


Air-Brake Instruction 








InsDection 








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2 
3 




5 


Parlor 


1 




Cafe 




Postal 


1 
2 




19 


Baggage 

Baggage and iVIail 


2 


64 
15 


Baggage, Passenger and Mail.. 
Passensrer and jMail 






6 








Combination 


5 

16 
3 


3 
6 

2 


22 


Coaches 


108 


Chair 


35 


Pacific Express 


5 










Total Passenger 


437 


32 


14 


455 


285 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


9,287 

412 

7,165 

300 

146 

100 

202 

132 

296 

12 

6 

8 

8 

6 

252 


78 

2 

151 


305 

19 

113 

6 


9,060 

893 

7,054 

445 

146 

100 

227 

127 

327 

13 

6 

8 

8 

7 

264 


8,075 


Stock 


1,471 

3,439 

33 


Coal and Flat 


Furniture and Rack 


Fruit 


50 


Refrigerator 






100 


Cinder and Stone 


39 


14 

5 

13 


129 


Ballast and Convertible 




Company Service 


44 

1 


36 


Derricks 


12 


Pile Drivers and P. D. Derricks 




7 


Cable 






1 


Ice 


4 


Caboose Box , 


1 
23 






Caboose Standard 


11 


212 


Total Freight 


18,332 
437 


339 
32 


486 
14 


18,185 
455 


13,569 

285 


Total Passenger 


Total Car Equipment 


18.769 


371 


500 


18,640 


13,854 


Total Frt. Car Capacity, 
in Tons '... 


554,160 






'552,210 


235,074 



—32— 



Cars Repaiebb. 








Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 


3,626 

122 

84 

13 


182,183 

2,088 

634 

402 


185,709 

2,210 

718 


Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs 


Cars Receiving General Repairs 


Cars Rebuilt 


415 






Total 


3,745 


185,307 


189,052 




New Wheels Applied, Cast 


1,645 
896 


17,454 


19,099 
896 


New Wheels Applied, Steel 








Total New Wheels Applied 


2,541 


17,454 


19,995 



Car and Engine Trusts. 
June 30th, 1905 the car and engine trust notes outstand- 
ing were as follows: 

American Car and Foundry Company, 500 Flat Cars, 
Contract of August 8th, 1902, 31 notes outstanding (last 
one due February 2nd, 1908;, for $6,329.36 each 196,210 16 

American Car and Foundry Company, 600 Coal Cars, 
Contract of March 9th, 1903, 38 notes outstanding (last 
one due August 24th, 1908), for $6,365.78 each 241,899 64 

American Car and Foundry Company, 1,000 Coal Cars 
Contract of March 9th, 1903, 41 notes outstanding (last 
one due November 11th, 1908), for $12,698.12 each 520,622 92 

American Car and Foundry Company, 22 Passenger and ^ 
Baggage Cars, Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 22 notes out- 
standing (last one due April 3rd, 1907), for $2,526.00 
each 65,572 00 

American Car and Foundry Company, 22 Passenger Cars, 
Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 26 note^^ outstanding (last 
one due August 27th, 1907), for $4,014.83 each 104,385 58 

American Locomotive Company, 12 Passenger Locomo- 
tives, 7 notes outstanding (last one due November 10th, 
1908), various amounts 162,439 20 

Baldwin Locomotive Company, 38 Freight and Switch 
Locomotives, 14 notes outstanding (last one due No- 
vember 17th, 1908), various amounts 447,419 02 

American Car and Foundry Company, 150 Furniture 
Cars, Contract of January 28th, 1904, 46 notes outstand- 
ing (last one due April 19th, 1909), for 3,383,01 each 155,618 46 

American Car and Foundry Company, 11 Passenger Cars, 
Contract of August 1st, 1904, 38 notes outstanding (last 
one due August 18th, 1908) , for $2,543.59 each $ 96,656 42 

Total $1,980,823 40 

Note.— The above does not include the following bonds: 



-33- 



Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, amounting 
to 13,000,000,00, issued in March, 190i, for payment of 
Locomotives, Cars, and other rolling stock, bonds out- 
standing June 30th, 1905 o $2,600,000 Oa 

Equipment Gold Bonds, Series A, amounting to $840,000.00, 
issued in May, 1904, for the payment of 67 New Loco- 
motives under Equipment Agreement with Blair & Co., 
Series A, bonds outstanding June 30th, 1904 756,000.00 

Equipment Gold Bonds, Series B, amounting to $870,000.00 
issued in November, 1904, for the payment of 999 Coal 
Cars under Equipment Agreement, Series B, with the 
Colonial Trust Co. of Pittsburg, bonds outstanding June 
30th, 1905 826,000 00 

Total Equipment Bonds outstanding June 30th, 1905.$4,182,000 00 



In addition to the above, we have an operative contract 
with the American Car and Foundr}^ Company for 500 box, 
500 coal and 200 furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running 
to July, 1909, when the mileage payments will be complete 
and the cars belong to the Wabash Company. On this 
account the monthly mileage payments are $7,194.76. On 
this contract, there was paid during the year ending June 
30th, 1905, the sum of $86,337.12. 

TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 

1903-1904. 1904-1905 

Total Number Miles of Road with Telegraph Lines 2,153 2,153 

Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to this Company.. 7,178 7,192 
Total Number Miles of Wire assigned to Telegraph 

Company 13,585 13,624 

Total Number Miles Wire used jointly 747 747 

Total Miles of Wire : 21,510 21,563 

By^order of the Board of Directors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. OTTESON, 

Secretary. 



—34- 



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WMMt— II— (I— It— IH-(I— I 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENTS, 



A. Results of Operation. 

B. Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses, 

C. Income Account and Profit and Loss. 

D. Financial Exhibit. 

E. Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses. 

F. Additions to Property. 

G. Train and Mileage Statistics. 

H. Mileage Statistics for Twenty-four Years. 

/. Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 



—40— 

A 

THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Gross Earnings 

Operating Expenses- 
Net Earnings 



Taxes. 

Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, Dividends, etc. 



Balance Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous 
Expenses, as per Analysis (1) below 



Net Earnings from Operation , 

Additions to Property and other Charges, as per 
Analysis (2) below 



Net Earnings applicable to Interest 
Intei'est on Bonds 



Surplus 

Deficit 

Dividends on Preferred Debenture Bonds. 



Net Surplus . 
Net Deficit .. 



$23,023,626 63 
17,683,508 85 



$5,340,117 78 
750,158 71 



$4,589,959 07 
489,706 07 

$5,079,665 14 

817,205 62 



$4,262,459 52 
1,050,745 64 



$3,211,713 88 
3,092,422 72 



$119,291 16 

'ios'obobo 



$14,291 16 



$24,696 600 10 
20,503,444 55 



$4,193,155 55 
826.623 71 



$3,366,531 84 
738,340 17 



$4,104,872 01 
759,872 56 



$3,344,999 45 
1.335,799 67 



$2,009,199 78 
3,468,572 17 



$1,459,372 39 



$1,459,372 89 



1. Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Debit Joint Track Rentals 
Credit " " " 

Miscellaneous Expenses... 



$964,438 33 
151.640 71 



$812,797 62 
4,408 00 



$817,205 62 



$883 623 99 
136,921 51 



$746,702 48 
13,170 08 



$759,872 56 



2. Analysis of Additions to Property and Other Charges. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Additions to Property as per Table "F" 

Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sinking Fund Char- 
ges and Maintenance of Steamers 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds of 1901, Sink- 
ing Fund 

Premium on Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds. 

Payments for Equipment 



$591,446 10 

33,069 68 

100,000 00 

2,568 75 

323,661 11 



$1,050,745 64 



$656,862 95 

63,037 15 

100,000 00 

4,893 75 

511,005 82 

$1,335,799 67 



—41— 

B 

THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses, 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



July 

August.. ;:.... 
September 

October 

November., 
December .. 

January 

February ... 

March. 

April 

May 

June 



Total Earnings. 



Freight 

Passenger... 

Mail 

Express 

Miscellaneous. 



Total Earnings. 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total. 
<' " Passenger " " 
« " Mail " " 

" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 



Operating Expenses (not including Taxes) 
Taxes 



Per cent of Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted). 
Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings.. 



Average number of miles operated 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses per mile 

Net Earnings per mile 



2,000 
2,121 
2,239 
2,206 
1,818 
1,881 
1,771 
1,522 
1,750 
1,794 
1,889 
2,0-28 



,158 67 
,426 47 
,688 37 
,296 69 
,076 77 
,094 15 
,413 70 
943 23 
,620 45 
,760 97 
,106 88 
,040 28 



$23,023,626 63 



$14,084,656 81 

7,045,525 29 

830,928 23 

533 703 85 

518,812 45 



$23,023,626 63 



61.09 

30.60 

3.61 

2.32 

2.38 



$17,683,508 85 



$750,158 71 



76.81 



$5,340,117 78 



23.19 



2,516.7 

$9,148 34 

7,026 47 

2,121 87 



$ 2,082,154 11 
2,480,786 25 
2,609,662 10 
2,543.166 61 
2,057,814 48 
2,032,401 62 
1,852,051 81 
1,575,771 50 
1,872,461 85 
1,795,289 49 
l,8fi0,201 30 
1,934,838 98 



$24,696,600 10 



$13,650,185 54 

8,917,828 77 

837,088 28 

691, TSe 42 

599,761 09 



$24,696,600 10 



55.27 
36.11 



2.^0 

2.43 



$20,503,444 55 



$826,623 71 



83.02 



$4,193,155 55 



16.98 



2,517.2 

$9,811 14 

8,145 34 

1,665 8« 



—42- 



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43- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Financial Exhibit— June 30, 1905. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 
ASSETS. 



1904. 



1905. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 
Supplies and Materials on 

Hand 

CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 

Bonds 

Sundry Accounts Collectible- 
Due from Agents 

From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 

Pacific Express Co 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 

Bills Receivable 

Advances Fast Freight Lines 

Account Working Fund 

Advances on Account Real 

Estate in St. Louis 

Loans Receivable (2) 

Miscellaneous (3) 

Balance to Debit Profit and 

Loss 



$145,335,419 36 

1,641,051 84 
1,182,777 23 

17,661,089 14 

343,328 54 
209,096 67 
105,215 00 

1,546 386 94 
1,875 00 

37,973 10 

634,088 96 

'"3,'49iV6oi"l2 



$172,192,302 90 



$145,910,347 70 

1,419,258 30 
1,554,539 73 

17,662,358 16 

375,731 67 

209,513 80 

63,963 65 

700,180 13 
1,975 00 

36,940 05 

864 318 52 
5,225,000 00 
3,950,352 07 

515,419 77 



$178,489,898 55 



$574,928 34 



371,762 50 
1,269 02 



32,403 13 
41713 



230,229 56 

5,225 000 00 

456,350 95 

515,419 77 



$6,297,595 65! 



221.793 54 



41,251 35 
845,206 81 



1,033 05 



LIABILITIES. 



1 1904. 


1905. 1 Increase. 1 Decrease. 




$38,000,000 00 
24,000,000 00 

100,513,000 00 
270,171 59 
693,361 66 

3,734,692 89 

356,055 38 

388,877 00 

5,986 20 

414,000 00 

2,311,036 96 

369,237 50 
41,576 18 

1,094,307 54 


$38,000,000 00 
24,000,000 00 

108,887,000 00 
236,735 75 
799,349 58 

2,958,947 35 

481,157 23 

441,134 11 

5,538 20 

250,000 00 

1,980,823 40 

369,237 50 
78,975 43 






Preferred Stock. 




Bonds (4) 


8,374,000 00 
$165,98792 

125,101 85 
55,257 11 




Interest Due 

Interest Accrued, not Due 


33,4.35 84 


Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals .. . 


777,745 54 


Taxes Accrued, not due 




Hospital Account 


448 00 


Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable 


164,000 00 
330,213 56 


Equipment Notes of Long 
Date 




Proceeds sale Debenture 
iJonds, Series "B» 




Miscellaneous 


37,399 25 




Balance to credit, Profit and 
Loss .J, 


1,094,307 54 











$172,192,302 90 


$178,489,898 55 


$6,297,595 65 





(1) Increase is due to cost of new Terminals in St. Louis and Quincy, $501,928.39 
also issue of Omaha Division Bonds, $173,000.00; less Gold. Equipment Sinking 
Fund Bonds retired, $100. 000. 00. 

(2) This represents amounts advanced to the Toledo Central Station Ry. 
Company, $175,000,00, and The Wabash- Pittsburg Terminal Ry.. $5,050,000.00. 

(3) Increase is due to amounts carried in suspense on account of purchase of 
new equipment. 

(4) Increase is due to issue of Wabash R. R. First Lien 4% Terminal Gold 
Bonds, $559,000.00; Wabash R. R. Equipment Gold Bonds Series B, $870,000.00; 
Wabash R. R. temporary 41/2% Gold Notes, $7,000,000.00; Omaha Division Bonds, 
$173,000.00; less Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds, retired, $KO,000.00. 
Equipment Gold Bonds, Series A, retired, $84,000.00; Equipment Gold Bonds, 
Series, B, retired, $44,000.00. 



—44— 



THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 
Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1905. 

MAINTENANCE OF WAY AND STRUCTURES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Repairs of Roadway 

Renewals of Rails 

do of Ties 

Repairs and Renewals of Bridges and Culverts 

do do Fences, Road C, ete 

do do Buildings and Fixtures 

do do Docks and Wtiarves 

do do Telegraph 

Stationery and Printing , 

Other Expenses , 

Total , 



$1,950 
188 
421 
522 
114 
421 
7 
51 



,007 26 
,%3 21 



,243 15 
,079 68 
,364 43 
,332 82 
,104 67 
774 66 



$3,681,608 00 



$1,781,858 90 

424,583 16 

634,574 56 

480,489 47 

117,273 71 

524,548 83 

12,285 72 

26,311 10 

4,684 14 

896 00 



$4,007,505 59 



MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 80, 1905. 



Superintendence 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives, Passenger... 

do do Locomotives , Freight 

do do Passenger Cars 

do do Freight Cars 

do do Work Cars 

do do Marine Equipment 

do do Shop Machinery & Tools... 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 

Total 



^ 98,726 73 

532,322 63 

951,180 46 

407,263 OS 

1,024 446 09 

40,214 16 

3t,871 67 

223,079 13 

8,288 32 

152,859 43 



$3,473,001 68 



$ 100,829 20 

555,780 76 

1,043,642 62 

529,532 36 

1,851,850 70 

■ 71,451 01 

7,125 20 

228,836 78 

9,263 86 

176,835 94 



$4,575,148 43 



OONDUCTINQ TRANSPORTATION-PASSENGER. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Superintendence 

Engine and Roundhouse Men.. 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste, for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service.. 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmea, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipmeat--Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Rents for Tracks, Yards and Terminals... 
do of Buildings and Other Property... 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



Total $3,398,285 28 



105,382 01 

571, 4H8 32 

560,368 37 

33,539 08 

25,013 83 

14,626 86 

393.433 15 

280,704 74 

192,380 06 

111,993 97 

221,976 99 

81,463 58 

186,201 55 

4,768 91 

22,857 37 

55,110 24 

9,6tl 80 

8,773 49 

100,724 79 

159,322 11 

167,314 46 

78,744 39 

60,749 76 

1,725 45 



122 
691 
652 



11 
473 
390 
204 
138 
262 

53 

269 

8 

28 
S84 



,726 71 
,450 20 
.111 68 
,848 15 
,211 27 
,102 96 
,433 17 
.812 73 
,001 08 
,669 77 
,406 17 
,790 19 
,222 34 
,076 06 
,805 32 
,693 89 
,071 73 
.987 38 
,777 22 
,091 80 
,845 95 
,163 17 
,044 11 
,267 87 



$4,395,610 92 



E — Continued, 
THE WABASH RAILEOAD COMPANY. 

Operating Expenses — Continued. 

CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION— FREIGHT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Superintendence , 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives 

Train Service 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmen, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Oar Mileage — Balance 

Hire of Equipment — Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising , 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions 

Stock Yards and Elevators , 

Rents tor Tracks, Yards and Terminals., 
do of Buildings and Other Property.. 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 



$ 198 

1,093 

1,300 

70 

42 

27 

753 

98 

527 

228 

1,036 

60 

267 

43 

156 

73 

32 

53 



,827 53 
,695 85 
,H22 15 
,239 24 
,773 37 
,557 72 
,901 70 
,769 7i> 
,352 02 
,321 26 
,635 50 
,059 04 
,757 91 
,772 86 
,068 87 
,197 45 
,349 83 
,596 88 



363,853 55 
11,028 86 



44,163 73 

18,515 25 

74,905 98 

2,377 17 



$ 213,552 09 

1,100,740 56 

1,303,719 22 

74,772 97 

48,604 84 

21 ,556 06 

759,159 41 

129,412 61 

553,222 26 

265,167 10 

1,096,230 63 

61,525 74 

278,796 13 

26,183 69 

255,335 40 

73,719 79 

33,761 44 

58,386 59 

50 00 

369,236 97 

11,729 77 



24,745 84 
19,251 84 
77,554 09 
3,646 44 



Total 



$6,580,343 51 



$6,860,061 47 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Salaries of General Officers 


$103,529 88 
230,873 42 
18,122 46 
50.522 58 
99.714 40 
31,931 97 
,15,575 67 


$117,496 10 
254,867 97 




General Office Expenses and Supplies, 


22,901 14 
61,618 37 


Law Expenses 


150,265 73 


Stationery and Printing (General Offices) 


32,860 92 


Other Expenses , 


25,107 91 






Total 


$550,270 38 


$665,118 14 







RECAPITULATION. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Maintenance of Way and Structures 


$3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 88 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 


$4,007,505 59 

4,575,148 43 

11,255,672 39 

865,118 14 


Maintenance of Equipment 


Conducting Transportation 


General Expenses 




Total Operating Expenses 


$17,683,508 85 


$20,503,444 55 







II I -46- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Additions to Property — Year Ending June 30, 1905. 

New Yards, Main, Side and Spur Tracks $178,416 63 

Double Track, Litchfield to Worden 203,315 64 

Double Track, Poag to Bridge Junction 90,860 64 

New Tracks, Terminals, etc., Twenty -third Street to Page 

Avenue, St. Louis 140,764 63 

New Engine Terminal, Montpelier 13,934 56 

Additions to Y. M. C. A. Building, Decatur, 111 577 00 

Cost of Real Estate in Bement, 12,663 95 

Cost of Real Estate in Harlem 2,340 00 

Land for Gravel Pit, Fountain Co., Ind. 14,000 0© 

Total , $656,862 95 



THE WABASH KAILROAD COMPANY. 

Train and Mileage Statistics. 

FREIGHT. 



— .- - 


Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Per Cent. 




Increase. 


Decrease. 




9,698,995 

2,013,016 

11,712,011 

2,175,880,058 

224,937,904 

2,400,617,962 

205.0 Miles. 


10,257,436 

1,959,999 

12.227,435 

2,339,770,238 

191,820,687 

2,531,590,925 

207. C Miles. 


5.86 






2.63 


Total Tons Carried 


4.40 
7.54 




Tons carried one Mile, Revenue Freight- 
Tons carried one Mile, Company Freight 

Total Tons carried one Mile 

Average distance each Ton carried 




14.72 


5.46 
0.98 








TTa-rn-incra f-nr\m TTrot crh f fraffin 


$14,084,656 81 
11,749.082 00 


$13,650,185 54 
12,655,070 34 




2.^5 




7.71 










$1.4501 
1.2114 
Cts. 0.6464 
" 0.5400 
" 0.1064 


$1.3295 
1.2325 





8.32 




1.74 






Cts. 0.5834 

" 0.5409' 0.17 


9.75 


Average Expenses per Ton per Mile 




" 0.0425 







60.06 










Total Freight Train Mileage 

Average Earnings per Train Mile 


7,598,295 
$1.8510 
1.5463 
0.3047 


7,827,171 
$1.7440 
1.6168 
0.1272 


3.01 




5.78 


Average Expenses per Train Mile 

Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 


4.56 




58.25 






Car Mileage Loaded . 


140,074,003 
52,644,523 
192,718,526 


144,198,504 
59,121,794 
203,320,298 


2.94 
12.30 

5.50 








Car Mileage, Total— Loaded and Empty. 








18.43 

6.93 

25.36 

17.14 

12.46 

315.94 

286.34 


18.42 

7.55 

25.97 

17.56 

12.45 

323.44 

298.93 




0.05 


Average Empty Cars per Train 


8.95 
2.41 
2.45 








Average Load per Loaded Car— Tons 




Average Load per Car, Loaded and 
Empty — Tons 


08 


Average Load per Train— Tons — includ- 
ing Company Freight 


2.37 
4.40 




Average Load per Train — Tons— Revenue 
Freight only 








Average Earnings per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


Cts. 10.04 
" 8.89 


Cts. 9.47 
" 8.78 




5 68 


Average Expenses per Loaded Car per 
Mile 


4.65 









PASSENGER. 



Number of Passengers carried 


6,183,474 
369,283,834 
59.7 Miles. 


6,615,459 
534,569,484 
80.8 Miles. 


6.99 
44.76 
35 34 




Number of Passengers carried one Mile 




Average distance each Passenger carried 








Earnings from Passenger Traffic 


$7,045,525 29 
8,580,184 02 
5,934,426 85 


$ 8,917,828 77 
10,626,252 08 
7,848,374 21 


26.57 
23.85 
82.25 




Earnings, including Mail, Express, etc... 




Operating Expenses 









Average Revenue'per Passenger 


$1.1394 
0.9597 
Cts. 1.908 
" 1.607 
" 0.301 


$1.3480 
1.1864 
Cts. 1.668 
" 1.468 
" 0.200 


18.31 
23.62 




Average Cost carrying each Passenger... 




Average Rate per Passenger per Mile 


12.58 


Average Cost per Passenger per Mile , 




8 65 


Average Net per Passenger per Mile 




33.55 








Total Passenger Train Mileage 


8,100,348 
$1.0592 
0.7326 
0.8266 


9,593,769 
$1.1078 
0.8181 
0.2895 


18.44 

4.57 

11.67 




Average Earnings per Train Mile 




Average Expenses per Train Mile 


'*" ■ 


Average Net Earnings per Train Mile 


11 36 








Car Mileage— Coaches and Sleepers 

Total Car Mileage, including Baggage, 
Mail, Express and Sleepers 


28,619,997 
37,722,660 


36,216,353 
46,812,467 


26.54 
24.10 








Average number Cars per Train 


4.66 

12.90 
45.59 


4.88 

14.76 
55.72 


4.72 

14.42 
22.22 




Average number Passengers per Coach 
and Sleeper 




Average number Passengers per Train... 




Arerage Earnings per Car per Mile 


Cts. 22.75 
" 15.73 


Cts. 22.70 
" 16.77 




0.02 


Average Expenses per Car per Mile 


6 61 











■48— 








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Seventeenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



Ror The Kisca.1 Year Ending 
June 30th^ 1906. 



ST. LOUIS: 

Woodward & Tieman Printing Co. 

1906. 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



THE WABASH RAILROAD CO. 



EDWARD T. JEFFERY, . . Chairman of the Board. 

FREDERIC A. DELANO, . . President. 

EDGAR T. WELLES, .... Vice-President. 

WELLS H. BLODGETT, . . Third Vice-President and General Counsel. 

E. B. PRYOR, Fourth Vice-President and Asst. Sec'y. 

HENRY MILLER, General Manager. 

C. N. TRAVOUS, Gejieral Solicitor. 

J. L. MINNIS, General Attorney. 

B.C.WINSTON, .' General Claim Agent. 

GEORGE G. YEOMANS, . . Assistant to President. 

J. C. OTTESON, Secretary and Asst. Treasurer. 

F. L. O'LEARY, Treasurer. 

S. E. COTTER, General Superintendent. 

T. J. TOBIN, Auditor. 

D. O. IVES, General Traffic Manager. 

W. C. MAXWELL, Asst. General Traffic Manager. 

S. B. KNIGHT, Industrial Commissioner. 

C. S. CRANE, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

D.I. FORSYTH, Superintendent Transportation. 

C. P. CHESEBRO, General Car Accountant. 

C. A. HOW, Purchasing Agent. 

I. R. L. WILES, Supply Agent. 

A. 0. CUNNINGHAM, . . . Chief Engineer. 

J. B. BARNES, Supt. Locomotive and Car Dept. 

G. C. KINSMAN, Superintendent Telegraph. 

S. H. OVERHOLT, General Baggage Agent. 

Dr. H. W. MOREHOUSE, . . Chief Surgeon. 



DIRECTORS. 

GEO. J. GOULD, S. C. REYNOLDS, 

EDWARD T. JEFFERY, ROBERT C. CLOWRY% 

EDGAR T. WELLES, THOS. H. HUBBARD, 

WILLIAM B. SANDERS, JOHN T. TERRY, 

FREDERIC A. DELANO, RUSSELL SAGE, 

WELLS H. BLODGETT, WINSLOW S. PIERCE, 
ROBERT M. GALLAWAY. 



In Memoriam 



RUSSELL SAGE 

AT a meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
Wabash Railroad Company, the following 
resolution was adopted : 

That this Board has heard with deep regret 
of the death of Mr. Russell Sage, a member of 
this Board since the organization of the Com- 
pany, and one whose services were always at 
the command of the Company. His good judg- 
ment always proved of benefit and his associates 
desire to put on record their appreciation of his 
many sterling qualities. He will be greatly 
missed by his associates, not only on this Board, 
but on others, and it is desired to record this 
expression of their regard. 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DIReCXORS 



The Wabash Railroad Co. 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30th, 1906. 



To THE Holders of Debenture Mortgage Bonds, 
AND to the Stockholders of the Wabash 
Railroad Company : 

A summary of the operations of the Company for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1906, as compared with 
previous years, is given herewith. The previous year 
with which we have to compare, being abnormal on 
account of the World's Fair at St. Louis, the results for 
the fiscal year of 1903-1904 are also included for the 
sake of comparison : 



■6— 



REVENUES, EXPENSES AND TRAFFIC. 



Earnings and Expenses. 





Year ending \ Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 1 June 30, 1905. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 


Increase this 
year over 
last year. 


Gross Earnings 


$23,023,626 63 
17,683,508 85 


$24,696,600 10 
20,503,444 55 


$25,016,378 70 
18,077,887 35 


$ 318,778 60 
2,425,557 20* 


Operating Expenses 


Net Earnings 

Per Cent, of Oper. Bxp. 


$5,340,117 78 

76.81 

9,148 34 

7,026 47 
2,121 87 


$4,193,155 55 

83.02 

9,811 14 

8,145 34 
1,665 80 


$6,937,491 35 

72.27 

9,937 78 

7,181 74 
2,756 04 


$2,744,335 80 
10.75* 


Gross Earnings per 
TTiile 


126 64 


Operating Expenses 
per mile. 


963 60* 


Net Earnings per mile.. 


1,090 24 



ANALYSIS OF EARNINGS. 





Year ending 
June 30. 1904. 


Per Year ending 
Cent. June 30. 1905. 


Per 
Cent. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 


Per 
Cent. 


Increase 

this year 

over last 

year. 


Freight 

Passenger 
Mail 


$14,064,656 81 

7,045,525 29 

830,928 23 

533,703 85 

548,812 45 


61.09 
30.60 
3.61 
2.32 

2.38 


$13,650,185 54 

8,917,828 77 

837,088 28 

691,736 42 

599,761 09 


55.27 

36.11 

3.39 

2.80 

2.43 


$16,138,466 18 

6,723,658 43 

835,984 26 

767,057 46 

550,212 37 


64.51 

26.88 

3.34 

3.07 

2.20 


$2,488,280 64 

2,194,170 34* 

1,104 02* 

75,321 04 

49,548 72* 


Express ... 
Miscella- 
neous 


Total... 


$23,023,626 63 




$24,696,600 10 




$25,015,378 70 




$ 318,778 60 











ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Per 
Cent. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Per 
Cent. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 


Per 
Cent. 


Increase 

this year 

over last 

year. 


Maint. of 
Way and 
Struc 

Maint. of 
Equip 

Conduct' g- 

Trans 

General 
Expenses 


$ 3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 68 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 


20.82 

19.64 

56.43 

3.11 


$ 4,007,505 59 

4,575,148 43 

11,255,672 39 

665,118 14 


19.55 
22.31 
54.90 
3.24 


$ 3,109,021 54 

3,679,948 04 

10,629,920 84 

658,996 93 


17.20 
20.36 
58.80 
3.64 


$ 898,484 05* 

895,200 39* 

625,751 55* 

6,121 21* 


Total 


$17,683,508 85 




$20,603,444 55 




$18,077,887 35 




$2,425,567 20* 







*Decrea9e. 



It will be noted that there was a very large decrease in 
passenger earnings as compared with the World's Fair 
year, but that this was a little more than made up by 
freight earnings, which increased more than 18% over 
the previous year. The diminution in passenger earn- 
ings was not wholly due to World's Fair business ; for, 
undoubtedly a large contributing cause has been the 
opening of new rail lines between Chicago and St. Louis 
and between St. Louis and Kansas City ; as well as the 
competition of electric lines both in Illinois and Indiana. 
The margin of profit at which passenger business is now 
done, is so very small considering the service demanded 
that we must look largely to freight traffic for net revenue. 
Since the first of January, 1906, the State of Ohio has 
passed a law limiting passenger rates to two cents per 
mile and this, of course, still further diminishes the 
revenues from passenger business. 

The results of the year just closed show a very large 
decrease in operating expenses, and, as will be seen in 
detailed statements which follow, these economies are 
distributed through almost every item of operating 
expense. Conducting Transportation items show hand- 
some decreases as the result of an increased train load of 
about 16%. Expenditures for Maintenance of Equip- 
ment and Maintenance of Way have also diminished, 
but the stockholders may be assured that the property 
has been fully maintained, and that economies have been 
made either by the employment of better methods or where 
appearances could be sacrificed for actual necessities. 
A large ^sum of money was spent during the year, 
out of operating expenses for reballasting and for heav- 
ier rail ; and considerable sums, as will appear in the 
detailed statements, have been charged to operating 
expenses, and appropriated out of Surplus Earnings, 
for new Equipment, for Car Shops at Decatur, for double 
track between Sangamon and Decatur, and between 
Knights and Taylorville ; also for necessary yard improve- 



— 8— 

ments at Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, 
Decatur and other minor points. The reports of the 
General Manager, the General Traffic Manager and the 
Fourth Vice-President, enclosed herewith, are referred to 
for details in regard to all of these matters. 

In a general way, your Directors feel that the results of 
the year's operations have been most satisfactory, and 
that the stockholders are to be congratulated on the 
condition and prospects of the Company. 

During the last fiscal year a considerable increase in 
the freight facilities at St. Louis and Chicago was made 
and property purchased at Detroit and Buffalo for 
increased facilities at these points. We have already 
begun to realize the benefits of the expenditures made at 
Chicago and St. Louis and the management feels that 
there is great opportunity for further growth at these 
larger cities. The Wabash is also beginning to feel the 
benefit of the Pittsburg extension, and it is hoped that 
the next fiscal year will reflect largely the result of the 
heavy expenditures at Pittsburg. The terminal improve- 
ments at St. Louis, Quincy, and at Chicago (in part), and 
to be made at Detroit and Toledo, have been thus far 
financed by the sale of Wabash Railroad Company First 
Lien Four Per Cent Terminal Gold Bonds ; part of the 
issue of $10,000,000 which were authorized under date of 
January 1, 1904. There were sold during the fiscal year 
$1,332,000 of these Terminal Bonds, and the total amount 
outstanding at the present time is $3,555,000. 

During the month of June, just before the close of the 
fiscal year, there were sold $6,180,000 of Ten Year Four 
and One-half Per Cent Equipment Notes. These Equip- 
ment Notes are to pay for eighty locomotives and six 
thousand cars, deliveries of which are to be made during 
the months of July to December, inclusive. 

It will be noted that over and above Fixed Charges, 
Equipment Obligations and Improvements charged to 
Operating Expenses, in the first six months, the Company 



— 9— 

earned in round figures $1,300,000 Surplus, which was 
appropriated by your Board to apply against the cost of 
new equipment, and that in the last six months, in addi- 
tion to similar items (which embrace somewhat larger 
charges for Betterments included in Operating Expenses) 
the Company earned a surplus of $509,332.79, which was 
credited to Profit and Loss account. Hence, while Profit 
and Loss account showed a deficit at the close of the last 
fiscal year of $515,419.77, it now shows, by reason of 
this and other credits, a credit balance of $248,200.01. 

It seems appropriate at this time to submit briefly to 
the holders of stock and debenture bonds of the Company 
certain considerations which have been of growing im- 
portance to their interests and which seem to the manage- 
ment to be now of controlling importance. 

Certain definite and settled conditions have resulted 
from the vast consideration which has been given in this 
country to the relations between the public and the rail- 
roads. These conditions may fairly be deduced from the 
nature of popular demands which have reached the con- 
crete form of further federal legislation. Public require- 
ments have become clearly imperative that rates shall be 
fixed, stable and universal in their application and that 
facilities shall be adequate and impartially provided. 
As a just correlative, however, there seems to be now 
existing a wider and fairer tolerance of rates remunera- 
tive for the service rendered. The management is not 
apprehensive of serious reduction of the present scale of 
rates (which in our territory are very low), but it is ap- 
prehensive that unless ample provision is made for con- 
siderable capital outlays, the Company will not be able to 
fully meet its obligations to the public in the way of 
facilities furnished, or to gain the greatest measure of 
profit from the operation of the property. In short, it is 
believed that the tendency in rates is toward just, but 
fixed standard ; that the competition of the future will be 
in the character of service and facilities offered to the 



—10— 

public, and that the profits of operation must grow or be 
reduced and disappear in the measure in which service 
and facilities are advanced, or suffered to halt and decline. 

It must be remembered that the lines of the Wabash 
Company traverse a zone of dense traffic, handled on a 
basis of rates normally so low as to absolutely require 
ample and perfect facilities for economical operation if 
operation is to be, and continue to be, profitable. More- 
over this is an era of revolutionized views of what must 
constitute railroad efficiency, and vast expenditures of 
capital are being made, to conform railroad plants to 
modern standards. Competing lines, great systems to 
the north and south of your property, have had the bene- 
fit of large and continued capital expenditures while the 
Wabash Company, with its debenture mortgage as an 
obstruction to every important source of new capital, has 
been seriously handicapped in this respect, restricted, as 
it has been, to its surplus earnings as its almost exclus- 
ive capital fund and with this fund limited in its appli- 
cation by the provisions of the mortgage. 

The management has not been indifferent to the disap- 
pointment from year to year of the expectations of the 
debenture bondholders, but not only has the application 
of surplus revenue been necessary in the effort to keep 
pace with competitors in facilities furnished and to meet 
the growing demands of the public, but these revenues, 
conditioned in their use by the terms of the mortgage, 
have been insufficient to fully meet these needs in the 
past and are wholly inadequate to enable your company 
to follow the great strides now being taken by competing 
systems. 

In view of these considerations the management is con- 
strained to urge upon stockholders and debenture mort- 
gage bondholders the importance of the provision made 
in the plan, which is now pending for their consideration, 
to meet the immediate and future capital requirements of 
the Company and to enable the Company not only to 



—11- 



increase the profits of operation but to make these profits 
distributable. 

As bonds under the new mortgage embraced in the 
pending plan will be reserved for the retirement of exist- 
ing liens, equipment obligations and notes, in addition to 
the reservation for exchange of the debenture bonds, the 
provision through the remaining bonds for the improve- 
ment, equipment and extension of the property and for- 
required additions to its terminal and other facilities will 
be by no means excessive to cover the future require- 
ments of your great and growing property. 

Owners of the property must appreciate that a neglect 
to furnish needed facilities or equipment not only drives 
business away to our competitors, but invites hostile 
legislation and criticism, whereas there is every cer- 
tainty that money wisely spent in such added facilities 
will, by the increase in earnings it will bring, render a full 
return on the investment and in addition greatly enhance 
the value of the existing property. Indeed, our earnings 
now, some $10,000 per mile, ought, with an infelligent 
expansion of our facilities, be readily increased to even 
double that figure. 

As for the coming year the prospects are good. The 
management estimate that Gross Earnings will increase 
very considerably, with a proportionate increase in Net 
Earnings. The extent to which Surplus Earnings must 
be drawn upon for necessary Betterments will depend, as 
already explained, very largely upon the action of the 
holders of Debenture Bonds A and Band of the stock- 
holders in the matter, which is now before them for 
consideration. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation to officers 
of the Company and other employes for their loyal and 
effective work in the company's interests. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

F. A. DELANO, 
Chicago, September 30, 1906. President. 



—12— 



Report of the General Manager. 

St. Louis, Mo., September 8th, 1906. 

Mr. F. a. Delano, President. 

Dear Sir — During the year ending June 30th, 1906, 
the Engineering and Maintenance of Way Departments 
have been reorganized, the Locomotive and Car Depart- 
ments have been consolidated, the Fuel and Store Depart- 
ments have been converted into a Supply Department 
with jurisdiction over fuel, supplies, stationery and 
material; the Buffalo and Detroit Divisions, also the 
St. Louis and Western Divisions have been consolidated — 
these and other changes, careful methods, close scrutiny 
and rigid economy have greatly reduced the cost of super- 
vision and operating expenses generally without impair- 
ing the efficiency of the institution. 

A large reduction in passenger mileage was made by 
taking off unnecessary trains that were not paying ex- 
penses, thus improving the showing of the balance of the 
trains. 

The following statement shows the cost per mile for 
Maintenance of Way and Structures during the fiscal 
year just ended as compared with the fiscal years ending 
June 30th, 1904 and 1905. 



COST PER ] 


MILE- 


-MAINTENANCE OF WAY AND 
STRUCTURES. 






Total Maint. 
of Way 


Cost 
Per Mile 


Maint. of Way 

Excluding 
Additions and 
Improvements 


Cost 
Per Mile 


Wabash (Proper)... 

Leased Lines 
Buffalo Division 


fl904 
■^1905 
tl906 

ri904 
n905 
11906 


$3,400,297 86 
3,580,372 65 
2,744,400 81 

244,074 77 
337,233 10 
262,327 49 


$1,587 96 
1,672 06 
1,281 65 

886 58 

1,224 97 

952 88 


$2,589,730 91 
2,996,819 94 
2,110,939 34 

244,074 77 
337,233 10 
262,327 49 


$1,209 42 
1,399 53 

985 82 

886 58 

1,224 97 

952 88 


Moberly to Hannibal 


ri904 
U905 
11906 


30,268 65 
82,266 23 
95,993 41 


434 27 
1,180 29 
1,377 24 


30,268 65 
82,266 23 
95,993 41 


434 27 
1,180 29 
1,377 24 


Milan to Toledo 


ri904 
U905 
U906 

fl904 
■^1905 
11906 


6,966 72 
7,633 61 
6,299 83 


225 46 
247 04 
203 88 


6,966 72 
7,633 61 
6,299 83 


225 46 
247 04 

203 88 


Total 


$3,681,608 OO 
4,007,505 58 
3,109,021 54 


$1,462 58 
1,592 05 
1,235 11 


$2,871,041 05 
3,423,952 88 
2,475,560 07 


$1,140 57 
1,360 22 




983 46 



—13- 



The following statement shows a comparison of the 
average cost of repairs per locomotive, per passenger car 
and per freight car (including work cars) for the fiscal 
years ending June 30th: 

1904. 1905. 1906. 

Locomotives $2,800 47 $2,789 73 $2,037 17 

Passenger cars 833 74 884 40 597 14 

Freightcars 44 20 78 10 49 97 

Note— The reason for the abnormally high cost per freight car during the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1905, was on account of 3,045 cars being sent to the 
shops of the American Car & Foundry Co. to be repaired or rebuilt, the entire ex- 
pense, $468,121.57, having been included in operating expenses. No cars were sent 
to the American Car & Foundry Co. for repairs during the fiscal year just ended. 
The average cost per freight car does not include 999 coal cars which are rented 
so and maintained by the West Side Belt. All of the above averages are based on 
straight maintenance and do not include any payments for new equipment. 

In a general way the buildings, structures and all other 
property has been well maintained, and the following 
statement shows Additions and Improvements and Ex- 
traordinary Repairs and Renewals included in Operating 
Expenses during the last fiscal year in comparison with 
the two previous fiscal years. Also statements showing: 

Miles of Road Operated (there having been no 
change in the main track mileage during the 
past year) ; 

Transportation Department statistics; 

Maintenance of Way Department statistics; 

Locomotive and Car Department statistics; 

Telegraph Department statistics. 

Wabash Employes' Hospital Association. 

Respectfully, 

HENRY MILLER, 
General Manager. 



—14— 



ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS INCLUDED IN OPERATING EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Remodeling Yards, North Market Street, St. Louis.. 

New Second Track, Knights to Taylorville 

New Second Track, Sangamon to Decatur 

Additions to Terminals, Randolph 

New Car Shops, Decatur 

One Clam Shell Unloader for Coal Chutes, Decatur.. 
Passenger Train Electric Lighting Plant, St. Louis... 

New Passenger Depot, Mexico 

New Transfer Table Car Shops, Moberly 

Appropriation for New Equipment 

Filling and Renewing Bridges 

Crossings, Crossing Signals and Interlocking 

River Protection , 

Ballasting 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other 

Buildings 

New Tools 

Water and Fuel Stations , 



18,633 95 

8,033 52 

100,000 00 

6,045 21 

450,000 00 

5,300 00 

4,880 95 

6,241 81 

8,052 22 

400,000 00 

51,977 00 

11,667 75 

5,467 25 

10,762 15 

15,824 03 
1,964 60 
3,633 14 



Total. 



$1,108,383 58 



EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS AND RENEWALS INCLUDED IN OPERATING 

EXPENSES. 



American Car & Foundry Co., 12 Comb. Passenger 

and Baggage Cars and 10 Baggage Cars 

American Car & Foundry Co., 14 Coaches, 7 Chair 

Cars and 1 Dining Car 

American Car & Foundry Co., 11 Cars for Banner 

Blue Trains 

American Car & Foundry Co., 500 Flat Cars 

American Car & Foundry Co., 500 Coal Cars 

American Car & Foundry Co., 1,000 Coal Cars 

American Car & Foundry Co., 150 Furniture Cars... 
American Car & Foundry Co., 500 Box Cars and 200 

Furniture Cars 

American Car & Foundry Co., 500 Coal Cars 

Freight Cars Equipped with Air Brakes 

Filling and Renewing Bridges 

Crossings, Crossing Signals and Interlocking 

Ballasting 

Passenger and Freight Stations, Shops and other 

Buildings = 

Water and Fuel Stations 

Repairing and Renewing Telegraph Lines 

Building, Repairing and New Equipment 

Operating Ditcher 

Expense Account High Water 

Total 

Total Additions and Improvements and Extra- 
ordinary Repairs and Renewals included 
in Operating Expenses 



12,097,436 98 



$2,169,277 28 



I 30,312 00 

48,177 96 

30,523 08 
75,952 32 
76,389 36 
152,377 44 
40,596 12 

49,816 92 
36,520 20 
14,989 35 
55,600 97 
256 50 
3,468 64 

21,545 99 
6,774 88 
6,227 51 

22,852 34 
2,422 50 
2,264 08 



I 677,067 16 



$1,785,450 74 



-15- 





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—19- 



TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT. 

Year ending June 30th, 
FREIGHT. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 

Total Loaded Cars moved 1,830,621 1,881,101 1,917,557 2,108,613 

Total Empty Cars moved 793,889 803,553 886,475 955,664 

Total Loaded and Empty 
Cars moved 2,624,510 2,684,654 2,804,032 3,064,277 

Average Loaded Cars 
moved per day 5,015 5,153 5,254 5,777 

Average EmptyCars 
moved per day 2,175 2,202 2,428 2,618 

Average Loaded and 
Empty Cars moved per 
day 7,190 7,355 7,682 8,395 

Total Freight Train Mile- 
age 7,284,158 7,551,585 7,782,336 8,384,058 

Total Mixed Train Mile- 
age ., 210,094 207,851 156,186 

Average Freight Train 

Mileage per day 19,957 20,817 21,455 23,397 

Total number Freight 
Trains 86,134 91,251 94,720 98,663 

Average number Freight 
Trains per day 236 250 260 270 

Average number Miles run 
per train, per day 84.6 83.3 82.5 86.7 

Average number Loaded 
Cars per train mile 18.59 18.05 18.05 19.80 

Average number Empty 
Cars per train mile 7.22 6.78 7.40 8.28 

Average number Loaded 
and Empty Cars per 
train mile 25.81 24.83 25.45 28.08 



-20— 



Year ending June 30th, 
FREIGHT-Cont. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 

Average number Cars 
per train mile, reduced 
to loaded car basis 22.9 22.6 22.9 24.8 

Total Loaded Car Mileage 135,424,005 140,074,003 144,198,504 169,120,230 

Total Empty Car Mileage 52,573,824 52,644,523 59,121,794 70,661,309 

Total Loaded and Empty 
Car Mileage 187,997,829 192,718,526 203,320,298 239,781,539 

Foreign Loaded Car Mile- 
age 75,534,916 88,221,505 86,246,968 116,219,796 

Foreign Empty Car Mile- 
age 26,439,131 27,065,112 29,513,045 41,037,308 

Total Foreign Car Mileage 101,974,047 115,286,617 115,760,013 157,257,104 

Wabash Loaded Car Mile- 
age 59,889,089 51,852,498 57,951,536 52,900,434 

Wabash Empty Car Mile- 
age 26,134,693 25,579,411 29,608,749 29,624,001 

Total Wabash Car Mileage 86,023,782 77,431,909 87,560,285 82,524,435 

Number of Wabash Cars in 
Service, exclusive of 
work trains 16,089 16,039 17,625 17,722 

Average number of Wa- 
bash Cars on other roads 
per day 7,834 7,624 7,455 9,213 

Miles per Car per day, 
Wabash Cars on Wabash 
R. E 28.5 25.2 23.6 26.8 

Average number of For- 
eign Cars on Wabash 
R. R. perday 8,562 9,179 8,836 10,035 

Miles per Car per day. 
Foreign Cars on Wabash 
R. R 32.6 34.4 35.9 42.9 



—21— 



Year ending June 30th. 
PASSENGER. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 

Total Passenger Train 

Mileage 7,715,162 7,936,964 9,447,883 7,530,122 

Total number Passenger 
Trains 82,549 86,625 96,379 81,934 

Average number Passenger 
Trains per day .' 226 ' 237 264 '224 

Average number Miles per 
Train per day 93.5 93.5 99.7 92.1 

Average Passenger Train 
Mileage per day 21,138 22,193 26,321 20,630 

Total Mileage Wabash, 
Baggage, Mail and Ex- 
press Cars 8,691,319 8,746,068 10,036,499 8,758,389 

Total Mileage Wabash, 

Coaches and Chair Cars 16,670,309 17,527,348 21,245,835 17,159,303 

Total Mileage Sleeping 
Cars 9,234,387 9,883,877 12,387,349 9,888,854 

Total Mileage Wabash 
Dining Cars 1,443,536 1,423,277 1,757,772 1,696,717 

Total Mileage, all Cars 37,791,983 39,430,771 48,974,354 39,311,852 

Number of Cars of all 

classes handled 404,055 421,210 491,290 426,685 

Average number of Cars of 
all classes handled per 
day 1,107 1,154 1,346 1,169 

Average number of Cars 
per train 4.90 4.84 5.07 5.11 



-22— 



Maintenance of Way Department. 



NEW steel rail LAID. 





Year Ending June 30th. 


This Yr. Compared 
with Last Year. 




1904. 1905. 


1906. 


Increase. 


Decrease 


No. Tons 80-lb. New Rail 


34,488.0 
275.0 


6,051.9 

48.5 


7,609.6 
61.6 


1,557.7 
13.1 




MilesNewSteel Rail Laid 









Note. — Of the rail laid during the fiscal year ending, June 30, 
1904, 4,613.7 tons was laid in new second main track on the Decatur 
Division, and 3,648.5 tons on the Buffalo Division. 



miscellaneous work. 



Year Ending June 30th. 



1904. 



1905. 



1906. 



ThisYr. Comp'r'd 
with Last Year . 



Decrease. 



No. Cross-ties laid. Main 

Track 

" Cross-ties laid. Side 

Track 

*' Sets Switch-ties put 
in 



Miles Track ballasted 

Miles Track Rebal- 
lasted 

Miles Fence Rebuilt. 

Miles Old Fence Re- 
paired 

Miles New Fence 
Built 

Miles Ditching 

Miles Sidings and 
Spurs Built 



872,839 

167,652 

483 

I 222.8 

160.4 

149.1 

103.9 
48.6 

55.7 



1,135,254 

265,516 

806 
44.4 
177.5 

248.6 

124.4 

44.1 
29.7 

44.2 



908,238 





172,271 





539 
56.3 
128.8 


n*.9" 


158.0 





87.3 





17.6 

87.4 


'57'.7* 


39.8 





227,016 

93,245 

267 

48'.7" 

90.6 
37.1 
26.5 

4.4 



Note. — Included in the above are 145,019 cross ties, 56 sets switch 
ties, 62.9 miles of track reballasted, 22.5 miles of fence rebuilt, and 22.5 
miles sidings and spurs built on the Grand Trunk Section of the Buffalo 
Division : also 19 miles of track ballasted on the Omaha Division. 



—23— 

LOCOMOTIVE AND CAR DEPARTMENT. 

Locomotive Equipment. 





Year Ending June 30. 


Increase. 






1905. 


1906. 




Locomotives on hand July 1st... 
Bought and built during year... 
Sold and scrapped during year 
On hand June 30th 


528 

67 

14 
581 

11,759,700 


581 


53 


67 


7 
574 

11,664,246 




7 




7 


Tractive Power in Lbs. of En- 
gines on Hand June 30th 




95,454 







LOCOMOTIVE REPAIRS. 



Year Ending June 



1905. 



1906. 



Locomotives receiving general 
repairs 

Locomotives receiving heavy 
repairs.. 

Locomotives receiving light re- 
pairs 

New Driving and Truck Axles .. 

Boilers, general repairs 

Sets Air Brakes 

New Cylinders 

New Cabs 

Fire-boxes, new 

Fire-boxes, repaired 

Sets Flues, new 

Sets Flues, reset 

New Engine Frames 

New Main and Side Rods 

New Tires 

New Engine and Tender Trucks 

New Tank Frames 

New Driving Wheel Centers...,. 

New Engine, Truck and Tender 
Wheels 



340 
299 

745 
1,048 

103 

1 

55 

44 

12 

546 
47 

381 
3 

138 

424 
70 
50 
80 

4,588 



4,528 



370 


304 


324 


312 


819 


619 


,011 


427 


132 


287 


2 




45 


19 


65 


34 


21 


28 


509 


523 


32 


20 


420 


537 


10 


7 


132 


16 


953 


374 


41 


18 


41 


24 


151 


35 



3,078 



24— 



DISTRIBUTION OF ENGINE MILEAGE. 





Year Ending June 30th 


Increase. 






1906. 


1906. 


Decrease. 


Freight Train Mile- 
age 

Mixed Train Mile- 
age 


7,782,336 
207,851 

525,453 

9,447,883 

277,664 
4,098,945 

67,722 

606,105 
23,013,959 


8,384,058 
156,186 

708,742 

7,530,122 

108,905 
4,221,386 

95,993 

351,302 


601,722 


51,665 


Frt. Double Head- 
ers, Pushers and 
Lights 


183,289 




Passenger Train 
Mileage 




1,917,761 
168,759 


Pass. Doable Head- 
ers and Lights... 
Switching 




122,441 
28,271 




Joint Train Mile- 
age, Buffalo Di- 
vision 




Miscellaneous, 
Work Trains, 
Pay Trains, etc... 


254,803 






Total 


21,556,694 




1,457,265 





Expense of Operating Locomotives. 



Year Ending June 30th 



1905. 



1906. 



Decrease. 



Rep-- {Material:::::::;. 

Stores 

Fuel (Coal and Wood).... 
Engineers and Firemen... 
Wiping and Dispatching. 



521 



$ 956,187 

669,905 86 

75,063 77 

1,975,226 52 

1,435,741 15 

225,782 25 



819,776 32 

356,693 70 

59,834 34 

1,925,538 85 

1,381,058 95 

194,128 41 



Total. 



$5,337,907 0714,737,030 57 



$136,411 20 
313,212 16 
15,229 43 
49,687 67 
54,682 20 
31,653 84 



$600,876 50 



Note. — Stores and fuel includes work train expense. 
Cost Per 100 Miles Run. 





Year Ending June 30th 


Increase. 






1905. 


1906. 


Decrease. 


Repairs 


17 06 

33 

8 58 

6 24 

98 


$ 5 46 

28 

8 93 

6 41 

90 




$ 1 60 


Stores 




05 


Fuel 


$0 35 
17 




Engineers and Firemen 





Wiping and Dispatching... 


08 






Total 


$23 19 


$21 98 




$ 1 21 









25— 



Year Ending June 30th 
1905. 1906. 

Total engine mileage 23,013,959 21,556,694 

Average mileage per engine in service for year.. 46,399 45,671 

Average monthly mileage per engine in service.. 3,866 3,806 

Tons of coal consumed 1,368,316 1,368,284 

Average cost per ton of coal on tender, in- 
cluding cost of handling $144 $141 

Average miles run to ton of coal 16.8 15.8 

Note— Mileage includes work train mileage and Wabash propor- 
tion of all joint mileage on the Buffalo Division. 



—26— 



Car Equipment. 





On 

hand 

July!, 

1905. 


Changed, 
Built 
and 
Pur- 
chased. 


De- 
stroyed, 
Sold and 
Changed. 


On 

hand 

June 30, 

1908. 


PASSE NGEK. 

Official 


5 

2 

1 

1 

11 

8 

6 

34 

70 

13 

3 

5 

57 

175 

59 

5 






5 


Pay 






2 


Air-Brake Instruction 






1 


Inspection 






1 


Dining 






11 


Parlor 




1 


7 


Cafe 


6 


Postal 






34 


Baggage 

Baesage and Mail 


1 




71 




13 


Baggage, Passenger and Mail 






3 


Passenger and Mail 






5 


Combination 




1 
6 


56 


Coaches 




169 


Chair 




59 


Pacific Express 






5 










Total Passenger 


455 


1 


8 


448 






FREIGHT. 

Box 


9,060 

393 

8,053 

445 

146 

100 

227 

127 

327 

13 

6 

8 

8 

7 

264 


37 


124 

9 

70 


8,973 


stock 


384 


Coal and Flat 


51 

1 


8,034 


Furniture and Rack 


446 


Fruit 


2 


144 


Refrigerator 




100 


Cinder and Stone . 




8 

2 

83 


219 


Ballast and Convertible 




125 


Company Service 


1 


245 


Derricks .... 


13 


Pile Drivers and P. D. Derricks 






6 


Cable 






8 


Ice 




3 

1 
3 


5 


Caboose Box 




6 


Caboose Standard 


261 


Total Freight 


19,184 
455 


90 

1 


305 

8 


18,969 


Total Passenger 


448 


Total Car Equipment 


19,639 


91 


313 


19,417 






Total Frt. Car Capacity, in 
Tons .. 


713,710 






710,180 



Note.— Total Freight Equipment includes 999 coal cars which are 
rented to the West Side Belt Railroad and maintained by them. 



—27— 



Cars Repaired. 





Year 
Ending 
June 30. 


Passenger. 


Freight. 


Total. 


Cars Receiving Light Repairs 

Cars Receiving Heavy Repairs... 
Cars Receiving General Repairs 
Cars Rebuilt 


(1904 
\ 1905 
(1906 

(1904 
\ 1905 
(1906 

(1904 

- 1905 

.1906 

(1904 
<^ 1905 
11906 

(1904 
i 1905 
11906 


3,233 
3,526 

5,248 

161 
122 
175 

73 

84 
41 

13 

13 

3 


147,234 
182,183 
227,182 

1,791 
2,088 
1,803 

520 
634 
653 

320 

402 
393 


150,467 
185,709 
232,430 

1,952 
2,210 
1,978, 

593 
718 
694 

333 

415 




396 


Total 


3,480 
3,745 
5,467 


149,865 
185,307 
230,031 


153,345 
189,052 




235,498 


New Wheels Applied, Cast 


(1904 
\ 1905 
il906 

(1904 
\ 1905 
11906 

(1904 
< 1905 
11906 


1,593 
1,645 
1,056 

629 
896 
340 


12,797 
17,454 
17,982 


14,390 
19,099 
19,038 

629 


New Wheels Applied, Steel 




896 




340 








Total New Wheels Applied.. 


2,222 
2,541 
1,396 


12,797 
17,454 
17,982 


15,019 
19,995 
19,378 



During the last fiscal year air brakes were applied to 335 freight cars 
at a cost of $16,586.76, making a total of 16,652, about 88% of the total 
number of cars so equipped. 

No passenger cars were equipped with vestibules or gas during the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1906. 

TELEGRAPH DEPARTMENT. 





Year ending June 30 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




1905. 1 1906. 


Total Miles of Road with Tele- 
graph Lines 


2,153 

7,192 

13,624 
747 


2,153 

7,436 

14,970 
227 






Total Miles of Wire assigned 
to this Company 


244 
1,346 




Total Miles of Wire assigned 
to Telegraph Company 




Total Miles Wire used jointly... 


520 


Total Miles of Wire 


21,563 


22,633 


1,070 





-28— 



WABASH EMPLOYES' HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 

June 30, 1905. June 30, 1906. 

Amount received from Employes $71,415 90 $65,781 39 

Amount received from the Wabash Rail- 
road Co. and from other railroads for 
care of injured persons not members 
of the Association 1,996 70 439 14 

Amount received from Bank — Interest on 

deposits 231 31 962 06 

Received from Rent of Old Hospital at Peru 100 00 120 00 

Total Receipts $73,743 91 $67,302 59 

Expenses..... 60,241 14 56,159 80 

Excess Receipts over Expenditures $13,502 77 $11,142 79 

Balance of Excess Receipts over Expend- 
itures from June 1st, 1884 $48,804 02 $59,946 81 

The hospitals at Peru, Ind., Decatur, 111., and Moberly, 
Mo., have been well maintained and some improvements 
added, and an extension of the work, in the way of 
building a new hospital at St. Louis, is now under con- 
templation. 

The Wabash Railroad Company has, as in the past, 
contributed to the Association, in the way of expense of 
administration, collection of contributions and free trans- 
portation, both freight and passenger. 

A report has been printed, giving full information in 
detail, as to the operation of the Association during the 
past year, and copies furnished to all parties interested. 



—29- 



Report of the General Traffic Manager. 

St. Louis, Mo., September 12th, 1906. 

Mr. F. a. Delano, President : 

A report of the various subdivisions of the Traffic 
Department is submitted herewith : 

FREIGHT DEPARTMENT. 

GROSS FREIGHT EARNINGS. 

Year ended June 30th, 1903 113,327,478 75 

Year ended June 30th, 1904 = 14,064,656 81 

Year ended June 30th, 1905 13,650,185 54 

Year ended June 30th, 1906 16,138,466 18 

Per cent of inc. as compared with year ending June 30th, 1903, 21.09 
Per cent of inc. as compared with year ending June 30th, 1904, 14.74 
Per cent of inc. as compared with year ending June 30th, 1905, 18.23 

Of the increase of $2,488,280.64 in the year ended 
June 30th, 1906, as against the preceding year, 
$2,265,000.00 occurred in the last nine months of 
the year. 

Rate per Ton per Mile. 

Year ended June 30th, 1905 (cts) 0.5834 

Year ended June 30th, 1906 (cts) 0.5435 

Decrease 6.8% 

These figures, taken by themselves, are discouraging, 
but are due to an increase of average haul, rather than to 
a general decrease in rates, as shown by the following 
figures : 

Average Haul. 

Year ended June 30th, 1905 228 miles. 

Year ended June 30th, 1906 252 miles. 

Increase 10% 

This increase in average haul results from our efforts 
to handle a larger share of freight moving between the 



—30— 

Missouri River and our eastern terminals, and fully 
offsets the decrease in rate per ton per mile. At the 
same time we view any material decrease from figures 
already extremely low, as dangerous to the prosperity of 
the Company, and trust that they have about reached 
the lowest point. 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT. 

GROSS PASSENGER EARNINGS, 

Year ended June 30th, 1903 16,135,500 85 

Year ended June 30th, 1904 7,045,525 29 

Year ended June 30th, 1905 8,917,828 77 

Year ended June 30th, 1906 6,723,658 43 

The above shows a decrease of $2,194,170.34 as com- 
pared with the year ended June 80th, 1905, caused 
largely by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. The Fair 
closed December 1st, 1904, but part of the earnings from 
this business appear in December and January; from the 
1st of February to June 30th, passenger earnings show 
no decrease, but are almost exactly the same. 

Number of Passenger Train Miles. 

Year ended June 30th, 1904 7,936,964 

Year ended June 30th, 1905 9,447,883 

Year ended June 30th, 1906 7,530,122 

A decrease of 1,917,761 miles as compared with the 
preceding year, or slightly over 20%, and 406,842 miles 
less than the year ending June 30th, 1904, or 5.13%. 

ADVERTISING AND COMMISSARY DEPART- 
MENTS. 

The Advertising and Commissary Departments have 
been reorganized and already a very satisfactory show- 
ing has been made*, in the direction both of economy 
and of greater efficiency. A determined effort to im- 



-31- 



prove the dining car and restaurant service is already 
meeting with gratifying results, and a decreased deficit 
from these operations. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

An Industrial Department has been organized during 
the year and efficient work is now being done to locate 
and provide suitable facilities and service for desirable 
industries, warehouses, etc. 

MAIL. 

This department has been reorganized to look after the 
service given U. S. mail hauled for the Government, 
with a view to improving the service and increasing the 
business. 

GENERAL. 

New agencies have been established at the following 
points, viz.: Atlanta, Ga., Dallas, Tex., Hannibal, Mo., 
Indianapolis, Ind., Los Angeles, Cal., Memphis, Tenn., 
Minneapolis, Minn., Moberly, Mo., Peoria, 111., and San 
Francisco, Cal., and we have strengthened our forces at 
other points. 

This department has co-operated with the Operating 
Department to the end of perfecting a system of fast 
freight trains between all principal terminals that shall 
be reg-ularly run on their advertised schedules, and a 
system of reports by which our customers are promptly 
advised of the whereabouts of their property, believing 
such service to be the best solicitor of business under 
present conditions. 

Our passenger trains are running very closely to their 
schedules, and our equipment has been considerably 
improved; cars on all runs between Chicago, St. Louis 



—32— 

and Kansas City being equipped with electric light, etc., 
but it is hoped that in the near future an appropriation 
may be made to put all our passenger equipment up to the 
highest standard. 

From a commercial standpoint the prospects for busi- 
ness are excellent and yet the possibilities for its growth 
along the line and at the larger terminals seem to be 
determined largely by the ability to furnish equipment 
and facilities. The Traffic Department is organized to 
effectively solicit business and I am confident that the 
business can be increased very materially if the equip- 
ment and facilities are supplied. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. 0. IVES, 
General Traffic Manager. 



-33— 

Report of the Foiirth Vice-President. 

St. Louis, Mo., September 6th, 1906. 

Mr. F. a. Delano, 

President. 
Dear Sir — 

I submit herewith statements of the Accounting De- 
partment showing in detail the results of Operation, etc' 
for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1906, as follows: 

A — Results of Operation. 

B — Comparative Statement of Earnings and Expenses. 

C — Income Account and Profit and Loss Account. 

D— Financial Exhibit. 

E — Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses Three 

Years. 
F — Improvements and Payments for Equipment Charged 

against Income. 
G — Train and Mileage Statistics Three Years. 
H — Mileage Statistics for Twenty-five Years. 
I — Statement of Funded Debt and Interest Charges. 
J — Statement of Car and Engine Trust Notes Outstanding. 

The Company has no outstanding bills payable except 
Car and Engine Trust obligations. Vouchers are paid 
up closely, only the current month's vouchers and pay 
rolls being unpaid. 

Since July 1st, 1905, Mr. D. B. Howard, who had 
been the Auditor of this Company and its predecessor 
companies since 1878, retired on account of continued 
ill health, and was succeeded by Mr. T. J. Tobin, the 
Assistant Auditor, and on August 12th, 1906, Mr. G. G. 
Landers, Auditor of Passenger Accounts, died. Mr. 
Landers had had charge of the Passenger Accounts of 
this Company and its predecessor companies for nearly 
thirty-four years and was a faithful and conscientious 
official. 

Very truly yours, 

E. B. PRYOR, 

Fourth Vice-President, 



-34— 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 
Results of Operation for the Year Ending June 30, 1906. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 


Gross EJarnings 


$23,023,626 63 
17,683,608 85 


$24,696,600 10 
20,503,444 55 


$25,015,378 70 
18,077,887 35 






Net Earnings 


$5,340,117 78 
750,158 71 


$4,193,155 55 
826,623 71 


$6,937,491 35 
915,908 74 


Taxes 




Miscellaneous Receipts, Interest, 
Dividends etc 


$4,589,959 07 
489,706 07 


$3,366,531 84 
738,340 17 


$6,021,582 61 
1,020,514 36 




Balance Joint Track Rentals and 
Miscellaneous Expenses, as per 


$5,079,665 14 
817,205 62 


$4,104,872 01 
759,872 56 


$7,042,096 97 
744.100 74 




Net Earnings from Operation... 

Additions and Improvements and 

other Charges, as per Analysis (2) 


$4,262,459 52 
1,050,745 64 


$3,344,999 45 
1,335,799 67 


$6,297,996 23 
1,974,152 68 




Net Earnings applicable to In- 
terest 


$3,211,713 88 
3,092,422 72 


$2,009,199 78 
3,468,572 17 


$4,323,848 55 




3,814,510 76 






$119,291 16 




$509 332 79 


Deficit 


$1,459,372 39 




Dividends on Preferred Debenture 


105,000 00 










Net Surplus 


$14,291 16 


$1,459,372 39 


$509 332 79 


Net Deficit 





1. Analysis of Joint Track Rentals and Miscellaneous Expenses. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 


Debit Joint Track Rentals 

Credit " " " 


$964,438 33 
151,640 71 


$883,623 99 
136,921 51 


$947,960 23 
211 330 74 






Miscellaneous Expenses 


$812,797 62 
4,408 00 


$746,702 48 
13,170 08 


$736,629 49 
7,471 25 






$817,205 62 


$759,872 56 


$744,100 74 



2. Analysis of Additions and Improvements and Other Charges. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904, 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Additions and Improvements, as per 
Table "F" 

Payments for Equipment, as per 
Table "F" 

Appropriation for New Equipment... 

Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds 
of 1901, Sinking Fund 

Premium on Gold Equipment Sinking 
Fund Bonds of 1901 

Detroit and Chicago Extension- 
Sinking Fund 

Lake Erie Transportation Co.— Sink- 
ing Fund Charges and Mainten- 
ance of Steamers 



$591,446 10 
323,661 11 



$656,862 95 
511,005 82 



100,000 00 
2,568 75 



100,000 00 
4,893 75 



33,069 68 



63,037 15 



$1,050,746 64 



$1,336,799 67 



$110,744 94 

347,882 22 
1,300,000 00 

116,666 67 

4,548 75 

66,980 00 

27.330 10 



$1,974,162 68 



-35— 



B 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 



COMPAKATIVE STATEMENT OF EARNINGS AND EXPENSES. 



Earnings. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending } Year ending 
June 30, 1905. June 30 , 1906. 



July 

August , 

September 

October ., 

November .., 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total Earnings 

Freight 

Passenger 

Mail 

Express 

Miscellaneous 

Total Earnings 



Per cent of Freight Earnings to Total 
" " Passenger " " 

" Mail 
" " Express " " 

" " Miscellaneous " " 

Operating Expenses (not including 
Taxes) 

Taxes 

Per cent of Operating Expenses (not 
including Taxes) to Earnings 



Net Earnings (Taxes not deducted) . 



Per cent of Net to Gross Earnings 

Average number of miles operated ... 

Average Earnings per mile 

Average Expenses permile 

Net Earnings per mile 



$23,023,626 63 



$14,064,656 81 
,045,525 29 
830,928 23 
533,703 85 
548,812 45 



$23,023,626 63 



$2,000 
2,121 
2,239 
2,206 
1,818 
1,881 
1,771 
1,522 
1,750 
1,794 
1,889 
2,028 



,158 67 
.426 47 
,688 37 
,296 69 
,076 77 
,094 15 
,413 70 
,943 23 
,620 45 
,760 97 
,106 88 
,040 28 



$ 2,082 
2,480 
2,609 
2,543 
2,057 
2,032 
1,852 
1,575 
1,872 
1,795 
1,860 
1,934 



,154 11 
,786 25 
,662 10 
,166 61 
,814 48 
,401 62 
,051 81 
,771,50 
,461 ',85 
,289 49 
,201 30 
,838 98 



,001,084 2.3 
,251,703 74 
,162,812 68 
,150,222 84 
,060,981 00 
,061,847 00 
,046,053 00 
,940,555 00 
,100,503 00 
,899,408 30 
,018,866 20 
,321,341 71 



$24,696,600 10 



$25,015,378 70 



$13,650,185 54 
,917,828 77 
837,088 28 
691,736 42 
599,761 09 



$16,138,466 18 

6,723,658 43 

835,984 26 

767,057 46 

550,212 37 



61.09 

30.60 

3.61 

2.32 

2.38 



$17,683,508,85 



$750,158 71 



76.81 



$5,340,117 78 



2516.7 

$9,148 34 

7,026 47 

2,121 87 



$24,696,600 10 



$25,015,378 70 



55.27 

36.11 

3.39 

2.80 

2.43 



64.51 

26.88 

3.34 

3.07 

2.20 



$20,503,444 55 



$18,077,887 35 



$826,623 71 



$915,908 74 



83.02 



72.27 



$4,193,155 55 



$6,937,491 35 



16.98 



2,517.2 

$9,811 14 
8,145 34 
1,665 80 



2517.2 

$9,937 78 

7,181 74 

2,756 04 



—36— 











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-37- 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Financial Exhibit — June 30, 1906. 
(Per Condensed Balance Sheet.) 

ASSETS. 



1905. 



1906. 



Increase. Decrease. 



Cost of Road & Equipment (1) 
Supplies and Materials on 

Hand 

CashonHand 

Investments in Stocks and 

Bonds 

Sundry Accounts Collectible- 
Due from Agents 

From U. S., Carrying Mails.. 

Pacific Express Co 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
viduals 

Bills Receivable... 

Advances Fast Freight Lines 

Account Working Fund 

Advances on Account Real 
Estate in various places (2) 

Loans Receivable 

Miscellaneous , 

Balance to Debit Profit and 

Loss 



$145,910,347 70 

1,419,258 30 
1,554,539 73 

17,662,358 16 

375,731 67 

209,513 80 

63,963 65 

700,180 13 
1,975 00 

36,940 05 

1,089,318 52 
5,000,000.00 
3,950,352 07 

515,419.77 



$178,489,898 55 



$147,224,094 81 

1,380,701 78 
1,500,352 78 

17,856,093 68 

677,587 58 

209,658 04 

64,923 17 

1,013,857 68 
600 00 

29,348 44 

3,016,364 67 
5,000,000 00 
2,913,122 62 



$180,886,705 25 



$1,313,747 11 



193,735 52 

301,855 91 
144 24 
959 52 

313,677 55 



1,927,04615 



$2,396,806 70 



38.556 52 
54,186 95 



1,375 00 
7,591 61 



1,037,229 45 
515,419,77 



LIABILITIES. 





1905. 


1906. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$38,000,000 00 

24,000,000 00 

108,887,000 00 

236,735 75 

799,349 58 

2,956,947 35 

481,157 23 

444,134 11 

5,538 20 

250,000 00 

1,980,823 40 

369,237 50 
78,975 43 


$38,000,000 00 
24,000,000 00 

109,948,000 00 
273,374 50 
796,746 67 

2,019,457 16 

753,350 00 

478,672 91 

5,536 65 






Preferred Stock . . ... 






Bonds (3) , 


1,061,000 00 
36,638 75 




Interest Due 




Interest Accrued, not Due 


2,602 91 
937,490 19 


Sundry Accounts Payable- 
Vouchers and Pay Rolls 

Sundry Railroads and Indi- 
Yi(juals ... • 


272,192 77 
34,538 80 






Hospital Account 


1 55 


Bills Payable- 
Notes Payable.. 




250,000 00 
631,210 50 


Equipment Notes of Long 
Date 


1,349,612 90 

369,237 50 

944,51695 

1,700,000 00 

248,200 01 




Proceeds sale Debenture 
Bonds, Series *'B" 




Miscellaneous (4) 


865,541 52 
1,700,000 00 

248,200 01 




Equipment Fund Account 




Balance to Credit, Profit and 






Loss 






$178,489,898 55 


$180,886,705 25 


$2,396,806 70 





♦ Common Stock authorized, $78,000,000.00. 

* Common Stock issued, $38,000,000.00. 

(1) Increase is due to cost of new Terminals in St. Louis and Quincy, and at 
Chicago, (Landers Yard) , $1,424,347.11, less Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds 
retired, $100,000.00, and sale of several grain elevators at various points, $10,600.00. 

(2) Increase is due to advances on account of property purchased at various 
points. 

(3) Increase is due to issue of Wabash R. R. First Lien 4% Terminal Gold 
Bonds, $1,332,000.00, less Gold Equipment Sinking Fund Bonds, retired, 
$100,000.00; Equipment Gold Bonds, Series A, paid, $84,000.00; Equipment Gold 
Bonds, Series, B, paid, $87,000.00. 

(4) Increase is due to unexpended appropriations for new Car Shops at 
Decatur and for new Second Track, etc. 



-38— 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 
Operating Expenses — Year Ending June 30, 1906. 

MAINTENANCE OP WAY AND STRUCTURES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Repairs of Roadway 

Renewals of Rails 

do of Ties 

Repairs and Renewals of Bridges and Culverts 

do do Fences, Road C, etc 

do do Buildings and Fixtures.. 

do do Docks and Wharves 

do do Telegraph. 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 

New 2nd Track Sangamon to Decatur 

" Oar Shops, Decatur 



Total ., $3,681,608 00 



,950,007 

188,963 

421,804 

522,933 

114,243 

421,079 

7,364 

51,332 

3,104 

774 



$1,781,858 90 

424,583 16 

634,574 56 

480,489 47 

117,273 71 

524,548 83 

12,285 72 

26,311 10 

4,684 14 

896 00 



$4,007,505 59 



$1,415,007 72 

149,951 96 

460,277 57 

199,801 53 

75,312 16 

226,338 64 

8,443 18 

22,338 43 

1,398 64 

151 71 

100,000 00 

450,000 00 



$3,109,021 54 



MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Superintendence 

Repairs and Renewals of Locomotives, Passenger 

do do Locomotives, Freight 

do do Passenger Cars 

do do Freight Cars.. 

do do Work Cars 

do do Marine Equipment 

do do Shop Machinery & Tools 

Stationery and Printing 

Other Expenses 

Payments Account New Equipment 

Appropriation for New Equipment 

Total 



98,726 73 
520,150 07 
902,490 46 
356,425 25 
744,499 80 
40,214 16 
34,671 67 
223,079 13 
8,238 32 
152,859 43 
391,646 66 



100,829 20 

651,633 98 

995,275 59 

394,442 20 

,381,651 07 

43,465 19 

7,125 20 

228,836 78 

9,263 86 

176,835 94 

685,789 42 



$ 98,304 75 

358,832 77 

817,637 25 

269,609 36 

879,149 86 

24,218 08 

16,330 33 

116,429 49 

6,346 18 

152,424 57 

540,665 40 

400,000 00 



$3,473,001 68 



$4,575,148 43 



$3,679,948 04 



CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Superintendence 

Engine and Roundhouse Men 

Fuel for Locomotives 

Water Supply for Locomotives 

Oil, Tallow and Waste, for Locomotives 

Other Supplies for Locomotives , 

Train Service 

Train Supplies and Expenses 

Switchmen, Flagmen and Watchmen 

Telegraph Expenses 

Station Service 

Station Supplies 

Switching Charges— Balance 

Car Mileage— Balance 

Hire of Equipment— Balance 

Loss and Damage 

Injuries to Persons 

Clearing Wrecks 

Operating Marine Equipment 

Advertising 

Outside Agencies 

Commissions 

Stock Yards and Elevators 

Rents for Tracks, Yards and Terminals- 
do of Buildings and Other Property.. 

Statlone-ry and Printing 

Other Expenses 

Total 



304,209 54 

,665,164 17 

,860,990 52 

103,778 32 

67,787 20 

42,184 58 

,147,334 85 

379,474 53 

719,732 08 

340,315 23 

,258,612 49 

91,522 62 

"453,959 46 

48,541 77 

178,926 24 

128,307 69 

41,991 63 

62,370 37 

100,724 79 

523,175 66 

11,028 86 

"2il,*478"l9 

97,259 64 

135,655 74 

4,102 62 



^ 336 

1,792 

1,955 

114 

76 

32 

1,232 

520 

757 

403 

1,358 

115 



,278 80 
,190 75 
,830 90 
,621 12 
,816 11 
,659 02 
,592 58 
,225 34 
,223 34 
,836 87 
,636 80 
,315 93 



548,018 47 

34,259 75 

284,140 72 

458,413 68 

41,833 17 

68,373 97 

136,827 22 

536,328 77 

11,729 77 

'211 j 591 '79 

81,415 01 

139,598 20 

6,914 31 



$9,978,628 79 



$11,255,672 39 



$ 317 
1,706 
1,918 



22 

1,126 

371 

698 

345 

1,365 

69 

24 

530 

61 

300 

304 

32 

66 

73 

532 

17 



,985 06 
,296 53 
,353 79 
,891 89 
,083 16 
,425 05 
,822 77 
,302 09 
,736 14 
,157 36 
,918 19 
,700 24 
,307 75 
,945 97 
,025 23 
,839 80 
,628 05 
,280 22 
,555 13 
,995 08 
,981 49 



346,472 48 

109,301 85 

115,247 04 

5,308 52 



$10,629,920 84 



—39— 



E — Continued. 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 



Operating Expenses — Continued. 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Salaries of General OfiBcers 

do of Clerks and. Attendants 

General OflSce Expenses and Supplies 

Insurance 

Law Expenses 

Stationery and Printing (General 

Offices) 

Other Expenses 

Total 



$103,529 88 

230,873 42 

18,122 46 

50,622 58 

99,714 40 

31,931 97 
15,575 67 



$550,270 38 



$117,496 10 

254,867 97 

22,901 14 

61,618 37 

150,265 73 

32,860 92 
25,107 91 



$665,118 14 



$117,641 79 

283,326 00 

24,741 08 

67,514 82 

122,411 69 

29,388 80 
13,972 75 



$658,996 93 



RECAPITULATION. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 



Year ending 
June 30, 1906. 



Maintenance of Way and Structures 

Maintenance of Equipment 

Conducting Transportation 

General Expenses 

Total Operating Expenses 



$3,681,608 00 

3,473,001 68 

9,978,628 79 

550,270 38 



$17,683,508 85 



$4,007,505 59 

4,575,148 43 

11,255,672 39 

665,118 14 



$ 3,109,021 54 

3,679,948 04 

10,629,920 84 

658,996 93 



$20,503,444 55 



$18,077,887 35 



40 



THE WABASH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Additions and Improvements, Year Ending June 30, 1906. 

New Side Tracks = I 69,792 77 

Cost of Coal Run Coal Co. Track, Streator, 111 25,000 00 

Cost of Land, Ferdinand St., Detroit 15,952 17 

Total $110,744 94 



Payments for Equipment, Year Ending June 30, 1906. 

Payments account 50 Locomotives $176,882 22 

Payments account 67 Locomotives, Series A 84,000 00 

Payments account 999 Coal Cars, Series B 87,000 00 

Total 1847,882 22 



—41— 



THE WABASH EAILROAD COMPANY. 



Teain and Mileage Statistics. 





Year ending 
June 30, 1904. 


Year ending 
June 30, 1905. 


Year ending 
June 30. 1906. 




91,251 
7,551,585 
210,094 
$1.8121 
9,698,995 
2,013,016 
11,712,011 
2,175,680,058 
224,937,904 
2,400,617,962 
Cts. 0.6464 
" 0.5400 
140,074,003 

52,644,523 

24.83 

24.16 

280.31 

28.98 

309.29 

Cts. 10.04 


94,720 
7,782.336 
207,851 
$1.7084 
10,267,436 
1,959,999 
12,227,435 
2,339,770,238 
191,820,687 
2,531,590,925 
Cts. 0.5834 
" 0.5409 
144,198,504 

59,121,794 

25.45 

26.16 

292.83 

24.01 

316.84 

Cts. 9.47 


98,663 


Number of Freight Train Miles 


8,384,058 




156,186 




$1.8897 


Tons of Revenue Freight Handled 


12,016,925 


Tons of Company Freight Handled 


1,694,962 


Total Tons of Freight Handled . . 


13 711 887 


Tons of Revenue Freight Handled One Mile. . . . 
Tons of Company Freight Handled One Mile. . . 

Total Tons of Freight Handled One Mile 

Rate per Ton per Mile (Revenue Tons) 


2,969,200,493 
163,432,491 
3,132,632,984 
Cts 0.5435 


Cost per Ton per Mile (Revenue Tons) 


" 0.3980 


Loaded Freight Cars One Mile 


169,120,230 


Empty Freight Gars One Mile, including 
Caboose Cars 


70,661,309 


Average Nuraber of Cars per Freight Train 


28.08 


Percentage of Empty Freight Cars One Mile to 
Total, excluding Caboose Cars 


26.86 


Average Number of Tons Per Train (Revenue 
Freight) 


347.67 


Average Number of Tons per Train (Company 
Freight) 


19.14 


Average Total Number of Tons Per Ti^ain 

Gross Earnings per Loaded Freight Car Mile.. . 


366.81 
Cts. 9.54 


Number of Passenger Trains 


86,625 
7,936,964 

$1.0532 
6,183,474 
369,283,834 
Cts. 1.908 
*' 1.607 
18,736,120 
9,883,877 
10,810,774 
39,430,771 

4.84 

Cts. 24.62 


96,379 
9,447.883 

$1.1005 
6,615.459 
534,569,484 
Cts. 1.668 
" 1.468 
23,829,004 
12,387,349 
12,758,001 
48,974,354 

5.07 

Cts. 24.62 


81,934 


Number of Passenger Train Miles 


7,530,122 




$1.1020 


Number of Revenue Passengers 


5,555,687 


Number of Revenue Passengers One Mile 


360,013,901 
Cts. 1.868 


Cost per Revenue^assenger One Mile 


'* 1.739 




18,379,555 


Sleeping Car Mileage 


9,888,854 


Other Car Mileage 


11,043,443 


Total Car Mileage 


39,311,852 


Average Number Cars per Passenger Train 
Mile 


5.11 


Gross Earnings of Passenger and Sleeping Cars, 


Cts. 23.79 






Total Traffic? Train Miles 


15,698,643 

$1.4425 
1.1264 
0.3161 


17,438,070 

$1.3922 
1.1758 
0.2164 


16,070,366 


Earnings per Trafl&c Train Mile 


$1.5313 


Operating Expenses per Traffic Train Mile 

Net E arnings per Traffic Train Mile 


1.1249 
0.4064 







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154.727,718 
154,700,993 
138,274,372 
131,005,562 
143,762,871 
157,146.634 

152,404,045 
149,183,008 
149,904,203 
170,201,067 
177,119,065 
210,281,487 
139,472,829 
158,966,979 
135,963,860 
180,359,167 
210,592,939 
233,848,065 
264,268,214 
322,708.490 
330,111,942 
369,283,834 
534,569,484 
360,013,901 


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5,024,882 
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4,103,310 
4.521,426 

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4,475,682 
4,559,766 
4,714,252 
4,805,338 
5,133,272 
4.917,128 
5,019,857 
4,823,090 
5.499,994 
6.270,751 
6,644,720 
7,237,313 
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7,715,162 
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—45— 



CAK AND ENGINE TRUST NOTES OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30th, 1906. 

American Car & Foundry Company, 500 Flat Cars, Con- 
tract of August 8th, 1902, 19 notes outstanding (last 
one due February 2nd, 1908), for $6,329.36 each $ 120,257 84 

American Car & Foundry Company, 500 Coal Cars, Con- 
tract of March 9th, 1903, 26 notes outstanding (last 
one due August 24th, 1908), for $6,365.78 each 165,510 28 

American Car & Foundry Company, 1,000 Coal Cars, Con- 
tract of March 9th, 1903, 29 notes outstanding (last 
one due November 11th, 1908), for $12,698.12 each 368,245 48 

American Car & Foundry Company, 22 Passenger and v 
Baggage Cars, Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 10 notes 
outstanding (last one due April 3rd, 1907), for 
12,526.00 each 25,260 00 

American Car & Foundry Company, 22 Passenger Cars, 
Contract of April 3rd, 1903, 14 notes outstanding (last 
if! one due August 27th, 1907), for $4,014.83 each 56,207 62 

American Locomotive Company, 12 Passenger Locomo- 
tives, 5 notes outstanding (last one due November 
10th, 1908), various amounts 113,391 00 

Baldwin Locomotive Company, 38 Freight and Switch 
Locomotives, 10 notes outstanding (last one due 
November 17th, 1908), for $31,958.50 each $ 319,585 GO 

American Car & Foundry Company, 150 Furniture Cars, 
Contract of January 28, 1904, 34 notes outstanding 
(last one due April 19th, 1909), for |3,383.01 each 115,022 34 

American Car & Foundry Company, 11 Passenger Cars, 
Contract of August 1st, 1904, 26 notes outstanding 
(last one due August 13th, 1908), for $2,543.59 each... 66,133 34 

Total $1,349,612 90 

In addition to the above, we have an operative contract with the 
American Car & Foundry Company for 500 box, 500 coal and 200 
furniture cars, on a mileage basis, running to July, 1909, when the 
mileage payments will be complete and the cars belong to the Wabash 
Company. On this account the monthly mileage payments are 
$7,194.76. On this contract there was paid during the year ending 
June 30th, 1906, the sum of $86,337.12. 

Total amount unpaid, June 30th, 1906, $250,708.54. 



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