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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

Illinois State 

mmmi of niiiurji[ mmi 

URBANA. ILLINOIS. 




L I ft R A R^ 

OF THL 

U N I \' E R S I T V 

or ILLl NOI5 



NA /BY 

50 7 
8 9^/95^-/890^/300 



C o 






1 



Pl^BLTCATlONS 



OF THE 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 



REPORT SERIES 



Volume i 



WWC955g 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
1894-1900. 



Field Columbian Museum 



Publication 6 



Report Series. 



Vol. i, No. i. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1894-95 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
October, 1895. 



i! 



C 



I 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, - - - - - - -'. 4 

Officers and Committees, ----.-.. r 

Staff, 6 

Income and Maintenance, -- - - - - -7 

Memberships, -----..-. 7 

Lecture Courses, -----.--.3 

Publications, --------- 10 

Library, ---------- j-^ 

Records, --------- 14 

Accessions, - - - - - - - - - 15 

Expeditions and Field Work, ------ jg 

South Park Commissioners, - - - - - - - 19 

Photography, - - - - - - - . , . jg 

Printing, ------.,-. j^ 

Exposition Records, -------- 20 

Warehouse and Workshop, - - - - - - - 20 

Light and Heat, -------- 20 

Rearrangement- ?f Installations, - - - - - - -21 

Fire and Police Patrol, - - - - - - - 23 

Lost and Found Department. - - - - - - - 24 



Roof and Basement, 



24 



Financial Statement, - - - - - - - -25 

List of Cash Contributors, -------28 

Attendance and Receipts, - - - - - - -29 

Accessions, i893-'94 -------- ^o 

Accessions, 1894-95, - - - - - - - - 31 

Articles of Incorporation, ------- 52 

Amended By-laws, - - - - - - - "54 

List of Corporate Members, ''''--- S7 

Patron, Life and Honorary Members, - - - - - "58 

List of Annual Members, ------- 59 

List of Donors of Exposition Stock, • - - - - - - 67 



Full. Columbian Mishm— Ki:ih>rts, Voi- i. 



NIL B< >.\RI> Ol IKTSTKHS. 

-.., ... AoAMs. Huntington W. Jackson. 

,-.. ,N F. Alp- Arthlr B. Jmnks. 

}■'  r- \ ^ George Mamkrre. 

\\ v,^ Cyrus H. McCoRVirs 

Wiiitv^ J Ku^■■'fx>. Norman H. Rkam. 

c;»..R,.i H P Martin A. Rykv "V 

Harlow N. Hu.inuoiiiam Eiavin Walker. 

Norman Williams. 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 



OFFICERS. 

Edward E. Ayer, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 

Norman B. Ream, Second Vice-President. 
George Manierre, Secretary. 

Byron L. Smith, Treasurer, 



COMMITTEES. 

executive comiviittee. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Edward E. Ayer. Norman B. Ream. 

Owen F. Aldis. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE committee. 

Norman Williams. 
Watson F. Blair. Huntington W. Jackson. 

committee on building. 

Geo. E. Adams. 
William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 



auditing committee. 
George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



• ItMlllW Mts»fM RH'ORTS, N' 



STAf-i or niR A\i'si:i!w. 



OIRICTOH. 



OCPARTMCNT or ANTMROPOLOOY. 

W H IIoiMKs. Curator. 



OlPARTMtNT OF OEOLOOY. 

U. C. I'AKklNtiTON, Curator. 

If W V"' "loi ^ Ciir.if.yt iif p,'i>ni>fnii' (trt^tocx. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

t I Mil.l.sPAlCH, &/rator. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. tXCtPT ORNITMOLOOY. 
I yj El.l.lOT. (urat.'f O. P. Uw, Ass'f r,.,.,/-/ 



DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

V, Curator. G. K. Chkkrie. Ass't Curator. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 
DIVISION or THAMtPORTATION. DIVISION OF THE RAILWAY. 

Wi \. Smith, //."i Curator. J. (i. Fam;born, //«»« Curator. 



DEPARTMENT OF COLUMBUS MEMORIAL. 

Tm» Hicohdbr in CHARf.r.. William E. Curtis, /fon. Curator. 



THE LIBRARY 
E. L. BurCHARD, Jiti • ''" "•'' fit^fAti.tn. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1894-1895. 



To the Trustees and Members of the Field Columbian Museum. 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year closing September 30, 1895. Much of the 
work of this first full year has necessarily been of a prepar- 
atory character and of systematizing the methods for conducting the 
affairs of the Institution. Necessarily also from the very nature of 
the circumstances under which the original installation was accom- 
plished, much re-arrangement and re-adjustment has been carried on 
in all of the departments. And as to the building itself and its interior 
arrangement, considerable reconstruction and re-adaptation has been 
demanded to render the building more fit for the unexpected uses to 
which it is now devoted. Viewing its present condition, it would 
seem almost as if nothing had been done. And yet in contem- 
plating what has been accomplished from the commencement, the 
criticism of idleness will certainly not fall upon the executive force. 

Income and Maintenance. — In accordance with the instructions 
of the Executive Committee, the Director prepared in January last a 
budget of the income and cost of maintenance for the actual year of 
1895. The total estimated income for the year was ^70,770. The 
estimated expense for the year was $104,296. An effort has been made 
to increase the revenue and decrease the expenses, with the result 
that by taking the actual figures for nine months of the year to Octo- 
ber I, and estimating very carefully and conservatively the figures 
likely to be made for the three remaining months, it is found that the 
income for 1895 will be $74,095, and that the cost of maintenance for 
1895 will be $80,672, a very gratifying contrast with the estimate 
made the first of the year. These figures do not include special cash 
donations, nor do they include special appropriations for material and 
permanent improvements made by the Executive Committee. 

The Memberships. — The By-laws published elsewhere in this re- 
port explain the different characters of memberships and disclose the 
conditions under which they may be secured. Under the direction of 
the Secretary of the Corporation, nominations for Annual Mem- 



S Fiii.n CoLUMitiAN Mrsn M — Kr.i>oKi>, V.-i i. 

|>r'- .. rrc niadr in cuiifc larfjc nuni?"'- M the beginning of this 

yi.:;,.. ! ttiiis far 7^3 txTs-ins ha\ <• .i( ( . pt. tion. licsidcs securing 

to the N :n an • y in many ways, these mcm- 

)>«r«hi|>< providr 'crabic annual revenue, and it is 

b ': thai with proper effort the number may be largely augmented 

from year to year. Only one Honorary Life Member has l>eeo 
«' Charles H. Cory, of Hoston. and tlms far but one 

l.ilc M* ;i.;»* r hus been ' '1. Mr. Win. J. Chalmers, of Chicago. 
Mr Allison V. Armour ii.in i-. en elected a Patron. 

I.». Ti Rr. Coi'Rsrs. The lecture courses wen- iii.uiKuiaicu m 

T* '■• • '^ ; Since that tiate four courses have been projected, 

thrr twt-ntyscven lectures. Most of these lectures 
h.. itetl by sterropticon views, for which special appara- 

tus was purchased by the Museum. The first tliree courses were 
given during the season of 1894-95. For lecturers the Museum 
dcpende*! primarily upon the Curators of the Museum, but 
the '  were augmented both in extent and interest by lecturers 

fron» 11. ity of Chicago, the Museum of Archeology of the 

Ohio Iniwi.tN. the Chicago Academy of Sciences; Lake Forest 
T"..:i. .c,"*! t|,c (ieographical Society of California, etc. 

sion to these lectures was free to the public, although for 
thr fust two lectures of the first course complimentary admission 

ts were sent to the officials and constituency of the Museum. As 
this was found to entail considerable extra expense and trouble, how- 
ever, the method was abandoned and the doors were thrown open to 
the public indiscriminately. 

The first course, as given, was as follows: 
Dec 'A Trip to Greenland." * Illustrated). 

Frof. T. C. Chamberlain, University of Chicago. 

Dct. J- " nts of •' r irth's Stirfacc." 

Iv. I). iry. L'nivrrsit\ of Chicatro. 

Jan. 5. '• How Gold Occurs in Nature." 

M \V. Nichols, Curator of Economic Geology, Field 

f  • • M . 'Mil. 

Ja;i I li ^oiwciaues of tiiL 1 ellowstutir (lllus- 

II .:-.|). 

I'rnf I p. Iddings, University of Chicago. 

Jan. 19. — "The 1 ion of Iron from Its Ores." (Illustrated). 

H. \V. Nichols. 

Jan. i6. " History of GoM Minini; in the United States." 

Prof. K. .\. F. Penrose, University of Chicago. 

fh' -• "• «»Mr. t vv.ro well attended at the start, but during the 
roldrst some diminution in nunibrrs prrsrnt. .Xs the 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 9 

courses proceeded, however, and as, through the aid of the press of 
Chicago, the value of the lectures was brought more prominently before 
the public, the attendance gradually grew larger, and in the next 
course the lecture hall was invariably crowded beyond its seating 
capacity. 

The second course was as follows: 

Feb. 2. — " Pre-Columbian Man in Ohio." (Illustrated.) 

Warren K. Moorehead, Curator of Archeology, Ohio 
State University, etc. 

Feb. 9. — "Life Among the Cliff Dwellers." (Illustrated). 
Warren K. Moorehead. 

Feb. 16. — "The Story of a Birch Tree." 

Dr. Selim H. Peabody, President Chicago Academy 
of Sciences. 

Feb. 23. — " The Other Half of the Discovery." (Illustrated). 

Edward Morris Brigham, formerly connected with 
the Smithsonian Institution. 

Mar. 2. — " Theories of Evolution." 

Prof. John M. Coulter, President of Lake Forest 
Universit}'. 

Mar. 9. — "The Fishes of Illinois and Adjacent Regions." (Illus- 
trated). 
Dr. O. P. Hay, Assistant Curator of Ichthyology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

Mar. 16. — " The Structure and Constitution of Tv^jCteorites. " (Illus- 
trated). 
Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

The third course was as follows: 

Mar. 23. — " Giants of Other Days as Revealed in the Zoology of the 

Past." 
Parti. "Reptiles." (Illustrated). 
Prof. D. G. Elliot, Curator of Zoology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

Mar. 30. — " Giants of Other Days." 

Part 2. "Birds and Mammals." (Illustrated). 

Prof. D. G. Elliot. 
Apr. 6. — "Cats and the Lands They Inhabit." (Illustrated). 

Prof. D. G. Elliot. 

Apr. 13. — "Through Death Valley." (Illustrated). 

Mr. Frederick I. Monsen, of the Geological Society 
of California. 
Apr. 20. — "Yucatan, the Land of Picar and Cuido." (Illustrated). 
Lecture First — "Along the Coast." 
Dr. Charles Frederick Millspaugh, Curator of Bot- 
any, Field Columbian Museum. 



FlKI.I) rol.UMiiiW Mt-sKL'M — KlCI*UKTit, VOL. I. 

Apr. Viictitan, lUv l^aixl ol l'i«.aranil( ' (Illustrated). 

LcHf '• *^ ' ' " In till- I"' 

I)r. ' Ti« k Ml. .;li. 

The fourth i:oui.s« i-i .• • i-n- -^ >^.i-« j-iannctl (or tin- Saturtlay aflcr- 
nooiiv iif October sin«l Novcrnlx' i*<o; auil Itppan on Ortolirr c. 
til- , ,,rannnr bruig as follows: 

Oct. <, and ihr I ■' ''^ They Inhabit. " 

«l\r by request). 

1 C». Mlliot, Curator of Zoology, Field 

uiiian Miiscuni. 
'* • l.iMii;; i 11 uirrs of Invertebrate Animals."' 

I'rof. A. H. Cole, I'nivcrsity o( C'hicago. 
(> • Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms. " 

Dr. Charles Frederick Millspaugh. Curator of Bot- 
any, I'irld Columbian Museum. 
(> ,.,, — _\ i napter in the Ivarly History of C.hica^,w. 

Prof. O. C. Farrington. I'h. I)., (urator of Geology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

Nov. a. — "Structure and Natural History of Sharks." 

(). V. Hay. Ph. I).. .Assistant Curatorof Ichthyology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

N. ^ ', " On the Origin of Coal." 

H. \V. Nichols. Curatorof Economic Geology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

•Nov. it>. ••'Ill- I-^tl: ' \ i>f the Japanese. ' 

S. ( Ct)mmissiouer of I'ine .\rts, Imperial Jap- 

ai ommission, World's Columbian Exj^osi- 

tion. 
No\ ■' Archeology and l.pisodes of Travel in Mexico. 

Prof. \V. H. Holmes, Curator of \nthroi...lorv. 
I'ield Columbian Museum. 
Nov. ' Origin and Development of the Native Architecture of 

Mexico." Prof. \V. II. Holmes. 

The course was opened auspiciously by Prof. Elliot, the lecture 
hail bring comfortably filletl. This lecture course has been brotight 
prominently before the universities of Chicago and vicinity, and the 
public school principals and teachers. 

PuBUCATi The first edition of the Guide to the Museum 

was prepared durmg the early spring of 1894, and appeared in time 
lor the opening day. June i. Owing to the somewhat unsettled 
stale of the collections at that time, there was much difficulty in pre- 
p.T'" '   -trate plans, or even descriptions. This Guide contained 
84 , .^L .md provitled a systematic, although condensed, presenta- 
tion of all the material then in the Museum, indicating the location by 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. ii 

hall and case numbers. An appendix contained a list of the donors, 
contributors of loan collections, and collectors' names. The numer- 
ous changes and arrangement of material entailed much alteration of 
the proof, so that the edition was more expensive than usual. The 
edition was 3,000. The second edition of the Guide was published 
as soon as the first was exhausted, and the opportunity was taken 
advantage of to make the numerous changes required by re-installa- 
tion. This edition was also of 3,000. A subsequent edition of 3,000 
was issued in March of this year. 

In October, 1894, a plan was outlined for a series of scien- 
tific and historical publications which should be the medium of 
presenting to the world the results of the research and investi- 
gation conducted under the auspices of the Museum. The pub- 
lications are intended primarily to convey information upon the col- 
lections and expeditions of the Museum. There is no restriction, 
however, as to authorship or subject, provided the papers come 
within the scope of scientific or technical discussion. Each number 
as issued is treated as a separate monograph on the subject, so 
that the publication series includes what in other museums and scien- 
tific institutions appear under the title of transactions, memoirs, 
bulletins or catalogues. In order to provide for volume binding, a 
sectional plan has been adopted, and the following series have thus 
far been established: Historical, Geographical, Botanical, Zoologi- 
cal and Anthropological. Each series has its own volume numbers 
and consecutive pagination. This plan has the obvious advantage 
that the publications of each department are kept distinct, and when 
bound for library use the numbers are already classified according to 
subjects. Another great advantage is in enabling the Museum to 
enlarge its exchange list; instead of sending an entire set of publi- 
cations in each case, only that series is sent to an institution or indi- 
vidual that is of especial interest thereto. The following publications 
have been issued: 

Pub. I. — Hist. Ser. , Vol. i, No. i. An Historical and Descriptive 

Account of the Field Columbian Museum. 
Pub. 2. — Hist. Ser., Vol. i. No. 2. The Authentic Letters of Colum- 
bus. 
William Eleroy Curtis, Honorary Curator of the Colum- 
bus Memorial. 
Pub. 3. — Geol. Ser., Vol. i, No. i. Handbook and Catalogue of the 
Collection of Meteorites. 
Oliver C. Farrington, Curator of Geology. 

Pub. 4. — Bot. Ser., Vol. i. No i. Flora of Yucatan. 

Charles Frederick Millspaugh, Curator of Botany. 



FlKLU COLUMHIAN Ml l\EIH)kTS, Voi.. I. 

Id I'rcss aiul i 'reparation: 
Antliropol. Scr. , Vol. i, No. i, I't. i. Mudus .\tuunK the .\iicicnt 
Cities of >f-- • ■■' 
\V. II. H«»lin. ' lAtorof Anthropology. 
Anthropol. Si-r.. \'o|. i, No. i. Pt. a. Stmlics .Anioni; the .Ancient 
Cities of M«-\ 
W. H. Holmes, i. ur.itor ut .\iiiiii<>i'"i<>^n . 

Zoo! ^- • Vol. I, No. I. ^*- "■ hral Column of ,\mia. 

O. I*. Hay, A i Curator of ichthyology. 

Bot. Ser.. Vol. i. No. 2. Flora of West N'ir^inia. 

Charles Frederick Millspaui;h and L. \V. Nuttall. 

I 'our of the Museum publications have already been distributed. 
Ihu scientific institutions to whom the publications have been sent 
were' selected with special reference fust, to their prominence and 
si/e; second, ability to send in exchnnRc publications of scientific 
value, third, caj^crness for the publications. The following state- 
ment shows the distribution in this country: Trustees, 15; Staff, 13; 
Corporate Members, 56; Annual Members, 723. General — Museums, 
16; Scientific Societies, 62: Universities, Schools and Colleges, 67; 
Libraries, i2i. Special — Anthropology, 21; Botany, 81; Geology, 114; 
History, 20; lndu«^trial .Vrts. 21: Transportation, 16; Zoology, 16. 
(Note. Only Botanical, (ieological and Historical series have 
been issued). Acknowledgments for these publications have been 
received from the ablest scientists and their words of commendation 
an .» •<>>irce of much gratification to the Museum. The (juotation of 
a ce or two from the letters of professors of the leading uni- 

versities of the country will be partlonetl. • 1 am very much gratified 
to see the strong movement the Museum is making in the line of 
scientific publications of a high order." '• I wish to congratulate the 
I'leld Columbian Museum on issuing. such a publication." " It is ver) 
n* ottcn out and will have considerable value aside from a mere 

cataiugue of the collections. Your plates are particularly good." 

" An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Field Colum- 
bian Museum," was sent by mail soon after issuance to the principal 
museums and scientific institutions of foreign countries. Since that 
time the Museum has availed itself of the privileges of the Bureau 
of International Exchanges of the Smithsonian Institution, by which 
means packages of literature can be forwarded to any foreign ad<lress 
without charge to the Museum, l>eyond that of delivery to the Smith- 
sonian Institution at Washington. The foreign list of the Museum 
as far as made up comprises: General — Museums, 58; Libraries, 2; 
A' ' '-"'--. 11; Institutes, 4: journals, 9; Schools, 9: Societies. 43. 
S ithrotmloev. Ti: Bot.in\. in: drolocv. Tio: Industrial 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 13 

Arts, 2; Transportation, 2; Zoolog}', 23. A printed acknowledgment 
form is sent with each pubHcation so that the Museum may be more 
certain to be apprised of the receipt of the pubHcations. A request 
is added in each case that the publications of the recipient be sent in 
exchange. About 100 personal letters have been written requesting that 
back volumes be sent to complete sets of books, journals, etc., already 
on the shelves of the Library, or asking to be placed on the per- 
manent mailing list for contemporaneous publications. 

Library — The Library w-as organized in March, 1894. At that 
time the collections of books on hand were 1,390 titles from the De- 
partment of Ethnology, and 350 titles from the Department of Mines 
and Mining of the Exposition. The Kunz collection of books 
on Geology, Gems, Metallurgy, etc., and the Baltimore and Ohio 
collection on Transportation were added shortly afterward. There 
were 6,300 titles and 460 titles respectively in these two libraries. 
The Cory collection on Ornithology, consisting of 587 volumes was 
purchased and added to the Library on October 5, 1894. Through 
the generosity of Beloit College the splendid ornithological library of 
Edward E. Ayer has been conditionally presented to the Museum. 

The total number of books accessioned and inventoried to 
October i, 1894, was: Gifts, 2,864; loans, 869, purchases, 3,406. 
The accessions during the year October, 1894, to October, 1895, have 
been: Gifts, 421 bound volumes, and 465 pamphlets; loans, 123 
bound volumes and 79 pamphlets; purchases, 1,170 bound volumes, 
51 unbound volumes, and 16 pamphlets. All books published in 
foreign countries have been purchased through agents in London, 
Berlin and Leipzig. Most American books have been purchased 
through Chicago houses. $3,500.00 was appropriated for the purchase 
of books for the Library, of which approximately $1,000.00 was spent 
for general reference works, sets of scientific perodicals, etc., and 
about $500.00 for books in each of the Departments of Anthropology, 
Botany, Geology, Zoology and Industrial Arts. The whole number 
of periodicals subscribed for is 94. A large number of the volumes 
received from the Department of Ethnology of the Exposition were 
unbound, and as a matter of preservation were sent to the bindery, 
together with the accumulating numbers of current scientific periodi- 
cals and old sets of unbound but valuable publications. The total 
number of volumes bound is 495. The large collection of pamphlets 
acquired in the "Kunz Collection" have been classified according to 
subjects, and fastened in cheap bindings, making them thus avail- 
able for immediate and constant use. 

A new system of shelf classification has been prepared on the 



FiKi.n Coi.UMRiAN MrsM M- Kkports, Vou I. 

(Ill iiiiai >yst«'ni niitl llic linnn^ ii.n«- ini-n (.icjii-m iiiiM iii>itkc(i l»oth 
with subject anil authornuiniu-r. A shelf list card c.-i(nlo(;uc, con tain- 
ini; about (j.tKX) cartls. has bt-en written ami is uscil as a subject 
catalogue to the books. Some 5.boo canls have iK'en written on 
the author-catalogue — about one thini of the work necessary to 
finish this catalogue. A card catalogue has also l>ecn commenced of 
bdoks oy science and trchnology in the different Chicago I^ibraries, 
with a re; to the Library where located; the idea Ixring to 

provide the v uutors with means of knf)wing what literature on a 
given scientific subject is to be fountl in the city, and also to avoid 
purr'i «->i;i • for the Museum Library expensive books already in other 
libr.i the city. This is a typewritten catalogue, and probably five 

or six thousand cards have already been prepared, but a large amount 
of work is, of course, still necessary to complete the catalogue. 
The Library has been quite generally and constantly used by the 
Curators. The number of books drawn for desk use liy Curators 
during the year amounts to some 630 volumes. All periodicals are re- 
scrvetl for the use of Curators for three days, .\ftcr this time they arc 
exposed upon the tables of the reading-room for public use and remain 
there until the receipt of new numbers. Out of a total of 52 periodi- 
cals  ;itly exposed on the tables in this way only two numbers 
have l>cen abstracted. 

The ultimate plan of organization for the Library is upon the 
departmental system, according to which the more important 
reference works, cyclopedias, sets of periodicals, etc., will be re- 
srrvcil in the main library room, with smaller libraries in each 
department containing books bearing distinctly upon that depart- 
ment. Hcparlmental libraries are already coniT<<<"' '•«! in the de- 
partments of Cieologv and Ornithology. 

Kkcori>>%— The system of recording accessions and inventorying 
Sjiecimens has worked efficiently. A set of records for " Accession 
Catalogues " is kept in the office of the Recorder, one book for each 
Department, in which the accessions are entered as soon as received. 
Besides the .\ n Kecoril the Recorder keeps an "Announce- 

ment Record," winch is an account of all material expcolcd to 
arrive or to which the Museum is entitled: a " Transportation 
Record," in which is entered the facts pretaining to the transportation 
and receipt of material; a " Distribution Record." which gives the 
hiitnrv of the material sent away from the Museum as a gift, loan or 
s.i Storage Record." accounting for the collections put away 

for future u^-- The archives contain all the correspondence pertain- 
ing to the accessions, including copies of the letters of the Director 
in each case. These files of papers are jacketed and numbered, 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 15 

corresponding to the numbers of the catalogue. Correspondence 
relating to offers of material are preserved in the same manner and an 
alphabetical card index containing all names that enter into the 
correspondence is kept for each set of files. 

The catalogue of specimens or "Department Inventory" is pre- 
pared by the Curators of departments. A set of books has been pro- 
vided each department and the inventorying is being pushed as 
rapidly as time and circumstances permit. The cataloguing of 
specimens is, of course, an immense undertaking, but the progress 
thus tar made is satisfactory. In this direction the following has 
been accomplished: Department of Anthropology, 15,000 cards; 
Department of Botany, 9,041 entries; Department of Geology, 8,000 
entries, 4,000 cards; Department of History, 1,455 entries; Depart- 
ment of Industrial Arts, 3,261 entries; Division of Transportation 
7,251 entries; Department of Zoology, 388 entries; Department of 
Ornithology, 1,900 entries; Library, 9,551 entries. 

Accessions. — A detailed list of all of the accessions received for 
the Museum, either from donations, loans, deposits, for examination, 
Museum expeditions, and purchases, accompanies this report. As 
will be observed, the number of the accessions during the 
year has been quite large; statistics do not signify much where 
there is such a variation in the size and character of the accessions 
themselves. Your attention is therefore directed to a few of the 
larger and more notable acquisitions. The material received 
through Museum expeditions, especially that of Mr. Allison V. 
Armour, referred to elsewhere, has added a large amount of valuable 
scientific material to the collections of several departments. The 
donations and purchases in Egyptian archeology has enabled the 
Department of Anthropology to devote an entire hall to their 
exhibition, and helps to fill the great need of material illustrating the 
archeology of the Old World. Friends of the Museum have been 
liberal in their donations to the Department of Botan}', and particular 
mention should be made of the generous contributions of Mrs. M. S. 
Snyder, who has sent extensive collections of both phanerogamic and 
cryptogamic plants. The Department of Geology, besides acquiring 
a large amount of new material by the recent visit of the Curator to 
the New England States, has been the recipient of numerous 
individual specimens and complete suites of ores and minerals. An 
equipment of microscopic and scientific apparatus for cutting sections 
of rock and mineral for microscopic examination will enable the Curator 
to carry qjx lines of investigation that would otherwise have been im- 
possible. In the Department of History the parts of the group of the 
Columbus Quadriga were assembled in the Museum model room and 



i6 Fi»ii» Coi.i-MiinN Museum — Rkports, \\u 

adilcti to thr statuary of the Coiurnl>ian Kotundn. A nuiul>cr of the 
souvenirs of th«' l"'.\p«)siti<ni have l»ccn courteously donatetl by 
ini' lis In th* P«p.irtnMnt of Industrial Arts the 

priiu : h.»vi- horn i«» the textile room. Several •promi- 

nent w. .. • 's», Iri'lantI, have contributed to the completeness 

of the !<• trated in the textile collection. A nun)ber of 

new c have addctl to the attractiveness of the new ceramic 

hall The fnvriie (glassware collection of the Tiffany Glass and 
pecorativr ( ul the sets of early American china ^'athcred in 

PenuNvlvania. by Mr. E. A. Barber, for the Museum, should be 
particularly mcntii Tpon the application of the Museum to 

Hn(;lish A liii.im Ault «Sc Co., exhibitors at the Exposi- 

tion.  '  .1 >« t of miMiern English ware in lar^e sizes. Not- 

able I s has i» • " made in cxtcndini;; the collections of the 

pcpi: of / ,>. A large lot of skins of mammals, 

pn V from tropical habitats, have been purchased in London. 

These were mountetl by the Museum Taxitlermist ami will make 
effective groups when all are placed in position. A collection of 
shells, of rodents, and a number of minor vertebrate animals have 
also been purchased and arc now being prepared, classihcd and 
' ' I for ' ' A collection of Colorado birds, including 114 

vj. -ui ly --j'l limens. has been purchased for the Department of 

Or:..; ■■^ -•".! < < >MSiderable field work has been unt!. i takiii to 

cnth< r at, of binls from Chicago and vicinit) 

K\pKi>irioNs AM» FiKi.D WoRK — Although a great deal of work 
that might properly come under the head of expeditions has t>een 
done during the year, only three regular expeditions have been sent 
out by the Museum: One to Yucatan and the Islands and States of 
M< xico, the other to the West Indies, and the third to Alaska and 
Siberia. 

r . Mr. .Mlistin \ . .\rmour. ot this cily, invited 

Dr. M  I ii.. Department of Botany, and Trof. Holmes, of 

the I>« , "f \iiflir..i.,.!...'v, to accompany him on his yacht to 

Havana, -n the east coast of Yucatan, Laguna 

di Terminos and Vera Cruz. On this expedition the Curator of Bot- 
any fitted out for making collections in both Zoology and Botany and 
(or general photography. His work resulted in the acquisition of 
nearly eight hundred specimens in botany, which formed the types 
inc" ' ;n his " Flora of Yiicatan," and considerable material for 
-^ • rment the small herbarium in his department. He 

... .)Ut four hundred sprrimens in Zoology, principally 
' ^ . and'a numl>er of excellent necatives relating to Geology, 

Botanv. Ethnology and Travel. Having met with a serious accident 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. . 17 

in one of the early days of the trip which hampered his work from the 
start and finally compelled his return to America before the Expedi- 
tion had covered half its itinerary, the collections were far smaller 
than his hopes and inclinations had promised. Prof. Holmes fitted 
out for surveys and observations in Archeology. He secured at .all 
points a large amount of valuable information that he is now embody- 
ing in a contribution to the Museum publications, illustrating his 
work from the wealth of sketches obtained by him on the trip. He 
secured altogether about one thousand specimens in Archeology from 
Yucatan, Chiapas, Oaxaca, Vera Cruz and the valley of Mexico. He 
also established desirable scientific connections and correspondents 
in all parts of the country visited, and, as with Dr. Millspaugh, 
secured a knowledge of the countries and the peoples visited that 
will be of great value in future work. The expedition as a whole was 
out for three months, and during that time covered a great deal of 
very interesting territory, much of it theretofore unvisited by scien- 
tists. Four lectures in the Museum course have resulted from the 
trip, two delivered by Dr. Millspaugh in the Spring series, and two 
by Prof. Holmes scheduled in the present course. All of the expenses 
of the expedition were borne by Mr. Armour, and to him the Institu- 
tion and the Curators who accompanied him are indebted for the 
priceless results obtained. 

The expedition to San Domingo was conducted by Mr. Geo. K. 
Cherrie, Assistant Curator in the Department of Ornithology. He 
departed in November, 1894, and returned in the latter part of May, 
1895. His work was very thorough, very laborious, at times quite 
dangerous, and exceedingly successful. Most of his work was done 
in the interior and on the Caribbean slope and along the Nigua river, 
and the climatic danger to which the Curator was subjected is appar- 
ent from the fact that four of his guides were stricken with fever dur- 
ing his stay upon the Island. Mr. Cherrie obtained one thousand 
nine hundred and fifty-eight bird skins, sixteen mammals, eighty rep- 
tiles, and a number of specimens of fish and Crustacea. Among the 
birds, two species proved neAv to science and a number of others are 
very interesting as representing rare and little known forms. 

Capt. Miner W. Bruce, unattached, but a student in Ethnology 
and an explorer in the Northwest, of repute, was outfitted by the 
Museum for an expedition to Alaska and Siberia in June, 1894. Capt. 
Bruce failed to reach the point of his destination last season on 
•account of an accident to the machinery of the vessel in which he 
sailed, but he will imdertake the work again this season, using the 
material he had purchased for exchanges last year. Resulting 
thus far from the expedition has been the acquisition of valuable 



|8 Fiiii.h Col iMtiUN MisruM —Reports, Vol 

« li Mai from Nuiui .xiask.i. which wiil iitui its way to the 

Mii>. uii. .lii. i its exhibition l»y (apt. Hnur at the I'.xposition at 
Atlanta, whcrr it is at th«' «lale of this report. 

Prcsidfut Aycr viMteil ICn\piin firmary hist, remaining about 
two months and obtaining by purcl lar^^c amount of very valu- 

able, unique and Kcncrally intcrrstint; Ef^yptian archcologic material. 
The collections arrived hrr«- sal May ami Jtinf, and having l>cen 

attractivily installed, adtl largely to the growing interest of the Egyp- 
tian suite of halls. 

Prof. O. F. II.i lor ui uic L'cp.irinn nt oi /oology, 

has ma«lc a number .-i .■< ..i iiij- . "nccting material in the Ichthyology, 
nerpot«>loi;y an-l Tom In.l.u'v i,f IHinois. His collections have added 
to the Musrum n hundred sp»timcns and one hun- 

dred and fifteen sp< Specimens of the Illinois riv« r shells were 

sent to the Smithsonian Institution for identification. 

Mrs. M. S Snyder, of Champaign, III., has been a very success- 
ful volunteer collector for the Museum in the Botany of Lower Cali- 
fornia. The lady carefully identified and splendidly mounted two 
hun»lretl and throe specimens and seven species of Alga- and onehun- 
ilrcil ami ( ighty four specimens, and thirty-seven species of phane- 
rogamic plants. 

Prof. Harrington, the Curator of Geology, has accomplished 
considerable work in the field during the past year, his labors includ- 
ing a survey of the rocks of the Green Mountain Chain as exposed 
in Western Massachusetts and Northern Connecticut; of the Triassic 
rocks of the Connecticut Valley; a study of the emery licposits at 
Chester. Mass., and of the f- of the local geology made visible 

by the excavations for the Lnica;;o Drainage Canal. The work in 
Massachusetts and Connecticut was carried on in company with sev- 
. r.i! ..fh«r geologists under the guidance of Prof. Kmerson, of .\mherst 
t .•', and Prof. Hobbs, of the University of Wisconsin. A com- 

plete series of specimens illustrating the different formations of the 
<freen Mountains and the rocks of the Connecticut Valley was 
obtained, and several specimens illustrating structural features. At 
Chester. Mass.. a rolI«Tiion was made which illustrates fully the 
mode of occurrence of th- v, the rocks by which it is surrounded 

and the minerals which i>any it. This will form a part of the 

r-"''-tion illustrating at;.. -..iS in the Department of Economic 
<j ;;y. Study of the Drainage Canal has been carried on by 
means of visits of from one to four days in length, which offered 
opportunity for collecting specimens from the material that is being 
excavated and for taking photographs of the specimens as they 
were exposed. In this latter work the photographer of the Museum 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. ig 

has rendered valuable assistance. About sixty large photographs 
have been obtained and a number of fossils and specimens illustrat- 
ing glacial and other phenomena. 

South Park Commissioners — The appropriation by the Board of 
South Park Commissioners of $15,000 per annum, to be applied to the 
maintenance of the Museum has been one of the gratifying and 
encouraging incidents of the year. It is a substantial evidence of the 
co-operative and helpful attitude of the Commissioners. The Di- 
rector begs to acknowledge the very friendly and cordial attitude 
maintained at all times, and often under very trying circumstances, by 
the Superintendent of the South Park system, and his subordinates. 
They have aided the Museum effectively whenever the opportunity 
presented itself. 

Photography. — The necessity arising for photographic work 
of a nature that the general photographer could not execute, such 
for example as illustrating publications and lectures, as well as 
preserving numerous conditions and objects that could in no other 
way be illustrated in the collections of the Museum, it was deter- 
tnined, in October, to establish a photographic section for work 
for all the departments of the institution. The Curator of the Depart 
ment of Botany, who is skilled in the required processes, consented 
to take charge of the work. One of the rooms in the North Bal- 
cony makes an excellent dark chamber, and three cameras with 
the necessary lenses, one micro-camera and microscope, and the 
materials and chemicals needed were procured. The work soon 
became of greater volume than could be performed without assist- 
ance in the detail and routine, and an assistant was given Dr. 
Millspaugh from the staff of the Librarian. The results of the photo- 
graphic work are as follows: Negatives made, 310; photo-prints, 
115; lantern slides for lectures, 119; prints to illustrate publications^ 
42; photographs taken on expeditions, 131. Fully as much work 
as was performed in the last year is already on hand for immediate 
attention. 

Printing. — A printing office was established in the latter 
part of March to execute the large amount of labels and general 
printing that is so necessary in the Museum. The intention is to 
replace all of the hand-written, and in many cases, illegible 
labels, with printed ones, and each department of the Museum has 
commenced upon this process of substitution. The amount of labor 
involved in such an undertaking is, of course, very large, and the 
•establishment of an office was, therefore, not only a necessary but an 



ao FiEi.h Coi.UMHiAN Mr- Uh*oris, W, 

im step. i he lut.n iiu!iu'ct ut spii mii ii tU.< s juintcii tor 
i. nt iicpnrtincnts hns luvn ns IoIUiwh: l)c|>artincn( of Anthrop- 
ology. 651; DcparttncMit of (iroloRy, i.zr,^ nir>.irtmcnt of llistor)-, 
140: Department of IiultiHtrial Arts, i. n of Steam Trans- 
portation, 2b2. department of Zoolof^y, MH, also much general work. 
The announcements for lecture courses and all of the blank forms 
used in the Museum are now issued from the Museum printing office. 

ExrnsiTioN Rkcords. — By order of the ICxecutive Committee, 
the room of that Committee was offered to and accepted by the 
World's Columbian ICxposition for the purpose of storing and index- 
ing the papers ami recorcls of the I-lxposition, preparing final reports, 
etc. Two tire- proof vaults were constructed by the Ivxpo.sition under 
the rooms of the Executive Committee, and the adjoining room. No. 
19. entrance to which is accomplished by means of a stairway leading 
from the Executive Committee room. In these vaults have been 
stored the records and correspondence and vouchers and papers gen- 
erally of the Exposition, of which the Museum, it is understood, is to 
eventually become the custodian. 

Warehouse and Workshop. — The purchase of a warehouse and 
workshop, by order of the ICxecutive Committee, which building is 
locatc<l on the corner of Fifty sixth Street and Jefferson Avenue, has 
provided the institution with ample room for storage purposes and 
with rooms for carpentry, modeling and plaster work, and for taxi- 
derniy. three kinds of labor which could not be permitted within the 
Museum building as at present arranged. The small rooms, in what 
may be termed, the second galleries of the Courts, which it was 
thought might be utilized for these purposes, have by force of cir- 
cumstances been pre-empted by the Curators of Botany, Zoology and 
Ornithology for laboratories, by the poisoning and disinfecting labor- 
ator^■. by the guards and by the departments of printing and photog- 
raphy. These twelve rooms are already inadeipiate for the purposes 
to which they arc devote*!, and more room for workin:: is alreadv one 
of the great needs of the Museum. 

Li<-iM NM' Hkvi -The most important permanent improve- 
ments during the past year have l»een the construction of steam 
heating and electric light plants, which systems are installed in 
a new boiler house at the west of the building, and have given the 
greatest satisfaction in operation. The steam plant has three 100 H. 
P. boilers. 12,000 feet of steam pipe an<l 70 radiators. The electric 
light plant has a capacity of forty i.2«H)-candle power arc lamps. The 
problem of heating the immense area within the Museum walls was 

f|i.if r< i!uir»il the most serious consirlrration. It was fourid 



iir»i 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 21 

impossible to heat the four great courts with their height of 
seventy-eight feet, and it was an almost hopeless undertaking to 
warm the eight}- spacious doorless halls. But the necessity for it 
compelled a means. The entrances to the halls leading from the 
courts and leading in and out of the long and narrow annex passages were 
fitted with large movable partitions filling the entire space, in which 
doors were constructed. By this means all the exhibition halls were 
enclosed, and being provided in each case with ample steam radia- 
tion, a minimum temperature of about 55 degrees was ordinarily 
maintained throughout the building. The boiler plant being located 
at the West Annex, it was feared that steam in sufficient quantity 
could not reach the East Annex. But the construction was so excel- 
lent and the return system so" capable that all of the halls maintained 
about the sama temperature except on very cold days. The courts 
are treated as streets, and visitors seem to readil}^ adapt themselves 
to this condition of affairs. This arrangement practically closes the 
Department of Botany during the colder months, for, except on the 
few warm days of the winter season, it is impossible to view the col- 
lections there with any satisfaction. Covering the grille work around 
the sky-lights of the halls with asbestos, of which 15,000 square feet 
was used, aided very much in creating an agreeable temperature 
throughout the building. 

The only occasion for lighting the building is for patrol purposes, 
as the Museum is never open to the public after dark. A judicious 
disposition oj the forty arc lamps has amply illuminated the interior 
of the building and given six lamps for the patrol of the outside of 
the structure. 

The question of light and heat naturally assumes an entirely 
different phase during the hot months, when the sun driving 
down upon the sky-lights creates an intensity of heat and a glare of 
light that at times become unbearable. To obviate this, sun curtains 
of unbleached muslin were hung under all of the ceiling lights 
throughout the building and under the great sky-lights in the main 
roof. This lessened the heat rays very noticeably, and softened the 
theretofore blinding sunlight. 

Installation, Re-arrangement and Permanent Improvements. 
— The largest amount of work under this head has been performed 
upon the roof. The eight gables on the East and West Annexes, 
have been covered with tin. Two domes, have been covered with tin; 
3,000 square feet of corrugated iron have been put on the roof, while 
aprons to keep out the snow, and six new fire-proof scuttles have been 
constructed and covered. Wall strips, gutters, ridge strip*s and stair 
domes have been repaired and constructed to the extent of about 5,000 



Fir.i.i* CoLUMiiuN MisF.UM — Kri'ORTs, Vol. i. 

s<|uarc icti. 30,000 iccl of iuinl>«T wire constinutl m bracing the 40 
skyliKiit^ in the roof. 2<x) li(;hts nf f;lass havi- been placed in the roof 
ihirin^ th<' year. Thr painti-rs havr k«>"' ■•^'■i i'.> •^;'. v...!*?*- f<-»-t «»f 
surf.u c durini; the year. 

I >' l>.ii tiiii lit of /oology. - Halls 19. 2a, and 23 have been opened, 
fitteil with new cases, and filled with material that had been crowded 
into the cases of other halls. An iron gallery for the use of the Cur- 
ator of Ornithology and the storage of skins has been constructed in 
Hall .■ Halls 20, 25, and 26 have been re-arrangcd and cases and 
bases repainted. 

Department of Geology. — In Halls (xiantl (■! ;m;« «.i-^el.s have been 
constructed ami all the relief maps re-painted or re-touched. The 
West Hotunda statistical column has been rebuilt with iron frame- 
work. The Laboratory has been fitted up with working benches, 
storage cases, etc. Hall 79 has been re-arranged, cases re-painted, 
new glass put in upri(.;ht cases, statue of Vulcan in iron and copper 
transferred from East Court and re erected. Halls 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 
68, 70, 72, 76, 77, and 7H each have had attention in the nature of either 
repairs, re-painting, new sash, new bases, new cases entire, glass, etc. 

Hepartment of Anthropology. — In Halls 4, 5, 6. 7, 10, 11, 16, and 
17, old cases have been re-backetl and rc-painted, and storage bases 
provided for flat cases. Halls 13 and 15 have been provided with 
storage bases with drawers, and new cases for the gold collection. In 
Hall 18 a new center case has been built and a re-arrangcmentof sus- 
pcn<led installation carried out. 

East Court. — Entire re-installation. The olil engine models were 
presented to Armour Institute and other large objects, donated to the 
Museum, were removed bv the donors. The Court, being adtlcd to the 
Department of Anthropology, was installed with new material, anii 
material crowtled from the adjoining halls. Alcoves 81, 85, 8b, 89, 
90, 91 and f)2 have all been re-arranged, cases placed on new bases, 
and general repairs and improvements made. Halls i, 2 and 3 have 
been re-arranged, with entirely new cases, most of the material dis- 
placed by the re-arrangement being either re-installed in the North 
Court Alcoves or sent to the warehouse. 

North Court.— ^New installation in new cases containing collec- 
tions of anti(]ue glass, the repro<lu<;tions of the Naples bronzes and the 
Irish anti(]uities. Six partitions were erected in the North Court form- 
ing new alcoves. In this Court 10 new cases have been placed and all 
of the old cases re-painted 

West Court. — In the West Court few changes have been made 
except th^ a row of cases of shells has been installed on the south 
side of the Court. 



Ocr. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 23 

Department of Botany. — Very little expense has been called for 
in the Department of Botany, the original installation seeming to 
have met all requirements. 

Department of Industrial Arts. — Hall 33 has been opened in this 
Department and devoted to ceramics, while Halls 30 and 31, textiles, 
have been entirely re-installed. In these three halls, and in 32, 
thirty-four new cases have been fitted, and eighteen new bases placed. 
One hundred and seven frames for the tapestry collection have been 
provided and hung in Hall 30 and in Lecture Hall. 

Division of Transportation. — Many models have been re-covered, 
re-bronzed, and re-painted, and many repairs and improvements 
made in Halls 46 to 53 inclusive. Boat Hall and the Burden-Bearer 
suite have been re-arranged, cases and bases re-painted, new glass put 
in, new railings constructed, and a general re-arrangement of all of 
the material contained therein. 

Columbus Memorial. — Many alterations and re-arrangements 
have been made in Halls 8 and g. The pictures have been re-hung 
and much of the material which was rather hurriedly placed in posi- 
tion has been cared for and put in a more satisfactory condition. 

Lecture Hall — Has been re-fitted as an audience room, furnished 
with a movable platform, rear and side doors, roof and base ventilat- 
ors, stereopticon stand, two hundred new chairs, etc. 

The Library — Has been enclosed with doors, tables in the read- 
ing-room have been partitioned and re-painted, and pictures hung 
therein, and railing and new filing cases constructed in the office of 
the Librarian. 

Memorial Rotunda. — The model of the Quadriga has been con- 
structed and placed in position. All of the models have been 
re-painted, and a passage from east to west and north and south 
through the collections has been provided by means of iron railings.. 

The above is a very brief, imperfect synopsis of the general work 
of the Museum during the year, and while indicating, in a measure, 
the amount of work performed, gives necessarily a very inadequate 
idea of it. 

Fire and Police Patrol. — While there has been a sharp reduc- 
tion in the cost of the protection of the building and its contents, 
there has been a marked increase in the efficiency of the service. 
The Fire Department is provided with a chemical carriage of the 
capacity of fifty-five gallons; two hose jumpers with five hundred feet 
of hose on each machine; forty-two hand chemicals, stationed in dif- 
ferent parts of the building; one hundred and forty-eight pails of 
water with automatic lids, etc., stationed inside the Building, and one. 



24 Fit 1.1' C<n.LMi;i.\N Ml-sium 1<khikt>, \<h 

hiiiulml stationed on the roof; and sixtrcn barrels of water located on 
tilt* roof. T)u<rc arc also eight hyiirants in the building connected 
with a twelve-inch main constructed by tin Musiuni from Stony 
Islaml Avenue to the Museum buililing, thus giving Hyde Park pres- 
sure within thr buiiiling at all times. All exposed wood work 
has bt'en covrred with fireproof paint, and tests made satisfy the man- 
agement that thf tire risk has been greatly reduced thereby. An 
insiH>ction for ilanger is made not only throughout the building, but 
on the roof and in the basement, every two hours from six o'clock 
in the morning until ten o'clock at night. During the year galler)' 
and roof traps have been constructed in tliffcrent parts of the build- 
ing, with iron ladders leading to the roof, thus increasing the facility 
for reaching the remote parts. A Fire Alarm system is in operation in 
the buiiiling, with twelve stations for alarm boxes. 

The Guard is diviiled into three reliefs, with a Sergeant 
in charge of each. The Museum is provided with the American 
Watchman's Time Detector system, and indicating boxes arc rung 
by the guards regularly when on duty. In Iliginbotham Mall the 
guard rings the indicator every fifteen minutes at night, as does the 
guard at the entrance to the building. This hall is provided with 
automatic electrical alarm devices. The exterior o' the building is 
patroled by a guard during the night. 

Lost and Founii Dkpartmkni. A lost and found department 
is conducted in connection with the guanls, and a careful record kept 
of anything lost or found. .\ great many objects and articles, and in 
some cases sums of money, purses, etc., have been relumed to their 
owners through its agency. 

I^oiiF AM» BaskMKNT. - Its condition has been such that it has 
been found necessary to have special men constantly at work and on 
guard on the roof. The winter of 1S94 95 and the spring and sum- 
mer seasons of this year have passed without any material damage to 
the interior of the building, from the roof. Severe storms of snow and 
rain and wind have been withstood in a very satisfactory, not to * • sur- 
prising, manner. The extent of this work is referred to in more 
tietail elsewhere, but its importance will be realized when it i> con- 
sidered that there are seven acres of roof and five acres of sky-light to 
be cared for. 

Herewith is submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, lists of accessions, names of members, etc., etc. 

F. J. V. SKIFF. 

Director. 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 25 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Receipts and Disbursements 
During Year ending September 30, 1895. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Oct. i, 1894, $136,755.74 

Petty Cash on hand, 978.20 $137,733-94 

Membership Account: — • 

Annual, 7,210.00 

Corporate, 210.00 7,420.00 

Chicago City Railroad Co 2,250.00 

W. G. Hibbard, special Egyptology, 1,000.00 

Martin A. Ryerson, special department of Zoology, . . . 600.00 

Alex. H. Revell, 450.20 

H. N. Higinbotham, special department of Industrial Arts 253.08 

D. G. Hamilton, special Egyptology, 250.00 

D. W. Burrows, sf cial Egyptology, 50.00 

B. F. Cummins C ., 20.00 

Divd. W. C. Exp..Stock:— 

H. P. Victor, 1. 00 

Josephine M. Gillette, Executrix, 50.00 

J. K. George, 2.00 

E.A. Simon, i.oo 54-oo 

The McCormick Estate, 10,000.00 

H. H. Porter, 5,000.00 

Martin A. Ryerson, 5,000.00 

Geo. M. Pullman 100,000.00 

Mary D. Sturges, 50,000.00 

South Park Commissioners . 13,750.00 

Proceeds of sale of old material, boilers, etc., 1,341.94 

Refund TTniforms (Guards and Janitors) 241.65 

Admissions to Museum, 7,436.95 

Check Rooms, 1,952.55 

Guide Account, two editions net profit (1,700 of 3rd 

Edition on hand Sept. 30, 1895), • • • 116.74 

Interest Account : — 

On $600,000 Temple Bonds 30,000.00 

On 143 Shares 111. Trust and Savings Bank . 1,501.50 

On 18 $500 Calumet Club Bonds 156.09 

On Sundry Mortgages 520.56 

Amount allowed by Bank on Daily Balances . 1,231.24 33,409.39 

$378,330.44 



2() FlKLD COLI'MBIAN Ml'SEUM — KkpoRIS, Vol.. I. 

*^.i*.irit-< < • 1 1 I Q . .( 

. ; 

janiior Service. 6^35.50 

Kire Pn»tecti" 



10.376.14 

1 .704.03 
! .>78 l3i3.&> 

■It!-, 











I'aittl Co., 






W.I. 






L 


ight 


Account : - 










l*Ct>|.I 


c« 


LiRht & VitwtT C 






tlydc 


l'.i 


irk (ia« 0> 



liu;Kliu^ .\ccount: 



Alteration in loilct Ro«itn>. 228.78 ijOJj.^q 

Repair* Account 

\Va^:ts <>t t .irpcnters, I'aiiitcr.s. I'la.Mercrs. 

.iiul Kiw»fcrs ' ^"^\-7<) 

Mtitcnal usetl -raiTit«. Oils. HarHwarr. dlas- 

an<I I.umbt I -.407-42 1 4.782.2 1 

Steam &: Electric Light Plants Account:— 

' Ml riant 10,4^1.47 

Trie I-i^jht Plant. . ' '"7-37 

•^— W.Tccs. . . .;:a75 

hue J. 527.1 2 

Knuiiiccr ,s .Niipplics, 406.55 21,833.26 

Kunntiirc an«l Fixtures Account: — 

r ... . <' .' .1- vie. . . :^ - - '"■: 

. Type, etc.. 

Stereopticon. Photographic < )ut lit. 1. 151. 12 

"Sundries. 1,187.59 13,4-0./^ 

I he Library:— 

n..,l V t\,r. hascl. . . ',::i ■>; 

. etc.. ; V -'  

Kxpense Account. • 79-55 2^34-70 

Dept. •>( Anthrf>pology : — 

«iid .\r' :r« based. . -''-'7 

I xi'cnM ■. 1.^42.32 in:oR-4'> 

ri... ,.,. 

>ns and .Articles purchase*! ;.oo 

Installation Expenses. Et« 14001 165.01 

Dept. of Columbus Mem»»rial: — 

Installation Expenses. n.i' 

Dept. of Ex: Nlcnior 

Ni.Hiv liiig Qua.ii .k,.t. A'ages and Materia!. 321. 5^ 

Carriftlforwar.r $131,619.66 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 27 

Brought forzvard, $131,619.66 

Dept. of Industrial Arts : — 

Collections and Articles purchased, .... $1,615.82 
Installation Expenses, 456.61 2,072.43, 

Dept. of Geology: — 

Collections and Articles purchased, .... 1,288.35 
Installation Expenses, 350.61 1,638.96 

Dept. of Ornithology : — 

Collections and Articles purchased, .... 333-oo 

Installation Expenses, 29.98 362.98 

Dept. of Zoology : — 

Collections and Articles purchased, . .  . . 3,940.56 
Installation Expenses, 184.13 4,124.69 

Div. of Railway:— 

Paid B. & O. R. R., Acc't Contract $25,000, . 8,452.78 

(Total amount paid on above contract 

$17,452.78) 

Installation Expenses, 68.57 8,521.35 

General Expense Account: — 

* Freight, Expressage and Teaming 2,687.91 

Stationery, 47144 

Expeditions to Yucatan and West Indies, . . 1,095.92 

Cost of Publications Nos. i and 2, 782.14 

Telephone Service 171-83 

Rent of Warehouse, 170.00 

Mailing, Printing, etc.. Annual Membership 

Notices, 1,071.75 

Lecture Course Expenses, 214.32 

Doctor, Hospital and Druggist Bills, .... 329.35 

Incidentals, 1,575.24 8.569.90 

$156,909.97 

Mortgages, etc., purchased, 194,200.00 

Real Estate (Warehouse Property), 10,186.00 

In Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1895, 16,294.52 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1895, 739-95 221,420.47 

$378,33044 

TOTAL INVESTMENTS, OCTOBER i, 1895. 

$600,000 Temple Bonds @ 5^ $600,000.00 

143 Shares Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, 50,000.00 

18 $500 Calumet Bldg., Association Bonds @ 6^ .... 9,000.00 

Sundry Bonds and Mortgages, approx. 5$^ per annum, . . 135,200.00 

$794,200.00 



38 



Field Coll-mbias Mt sr.fM — Rrports. Vou i. 



List of Cash Contrilniton* to the 



111.1.1) COl.lMhIAN MUSHU.W 

Kroin Us mccpliun to uctub«r I, isvj. 



NAMK 

Mai^hall KirUi. 

II. N. lliKiii)>t>lhai).. 

• M. I'ullniati, 

Kr.i 
Tiffany \ « 

D.K.I 

Ihc Ml ;... k Kstate. • 

II H. Porter 

Martin A. Ryerson, 
r. I>. .\nnoiir. 
!. \V. Dminc. 
Nxnnan li. Ream, 

A. A. Sprapuc. 

I . 

Willi.iin A. Fuller. 

' K. Adams. 

K. 1 I ranc. 

A. C. Ilartlcu. 

C. I.. Hutchinson, 

Martin .\. Kycrwm, »|icciai. I>ept. «>( Z(>oli>gy. 

(,co. I ^ ' -: 

\V. (i. 1 . ;. account Kj:vptolf»t:v. 

\V, \'emnn Ikmth. " 

i>. c;. I! 

I). \V. 1 
F. .S. W 

Ja». W. Scott. 

 ' r ' ,- •• ♦* 

W. T. liaker. i 
Alex. H. Rcvr 

Prj "■ - v\ Miii;:i);, \\ ur.ii s t-uluiulJiaii i.xjMssnn 

H. 1 ~ C. 

Wt jiiet Fund, 

Hivd. World * hair Stock. Sc« list of donors elsewhere 



A\tnvsT 
fi.oocoxxoo 

IOO,COO<00 

lOOiOOOXX) 

^OJOOOjOO 

3,O0O>O0 

lO/XXXOO 

S/X3OX30 

10,000.00 

S.ooaoo 
5,000.00 

IO,OnO.OO 
SfiOOJOO 

5,ooox)o 
5.000XX} 
5,000.00 
^.ooo.oo 

--.OOOXX) 

5,000,00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,oooxx> 
600.00 

jOOX» 

2.706.25 

500.00 

25aoo 

5000 

83-33. 
83.34 
83-33 

65.00 

50.00 

450.20 

i.<>i2.6o 

20XX} 

25.40 

I ;:.;;S.oo 



*r.4«6.537.45 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 29 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FOR YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1895. 

Total Attendance, 328,321 

Paid Attendance: — 

Adults, 29,164 

Children, 1,458 30,622 

Free Admissions on pay days:— 

School Children, 7.035 

Students, i???? 

Teachers, 306 

Members — Corporate, 60 

Annual, 726 

Press, 10 

Officer's Family, 'j'j QjQSg 

Admissions on Free Days: — • 

Saturdays, 95>839 

Sundays, 191,871 287,710 



Highest Attendance on any day (Oct. 14, 1894) 10,952 

Lowest Attendance " " " (Feb. 7, 1895) 5 

Highest paid Attendance, (July 4, 1895) 575 

Average Daily Admissions, (365 Days) 900 

Average paid Admissions, (261 Days) 117 



Receipts. 

Guides sold, 2,849 @ 25 cents, $ 712.25 

Articles Checked, 39,051 @ 5 cents, 1,952.55 

Admissions, 7,436.95 

Total, $10,101.75 



Fir.1.1* Con MHiw Mi seim — Reports, Vol. i. 

•Accessions. 189^ 94. 

I HI 1 \i r I •! M I \ I It !•» 1 • I 'ill >r I %4 m DCTOIIRR ISn*, loQl- 

DKI'AkTMKNTOF AM HRtH'oHM.Y: 



DF.I'AK TMKNT OK UOTANN 



Tola; 



I'urc ha-' - 

DiirAK r\n m or i.loiak.v: 

t ' • ■• -ns .... 
iihI hcpositft 

I'uniiasc** 

Dl.i.xj I mK HISTORY: 



I.iMns 



I )F. TAR FN 



lotal .Accession' 



Total Accession- 



Total Accession- 
•K INDl SlklAL ARTS:- 



•77 



60 



i uri.Uit»C9 



DIVISI''^ " rn \N*^!0RTATI0N 



Total Arcessioii- 



11 



1)1. PA I 



-LOGY: - 



I 
I 



LIBRARY 



1 " 'lai .\tcc55ioii  



Vol*, and Pamph' 



ft~. •■. 



•i» 



I ' lilt ■11 KM (••* \ II jir* 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 31 



Accessions, 1894-9^. 

From October i, 1894, to October i, 1895. 



DONATIONS. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

W. G. FORREST, Chicago. . ^ ,. ^^ vr • 

2 feather robes— Seris Indians, Gulf oMZahfornia. 

JAMES W. SCOTT, Chicago. 

Amphora — Ancient Troy. 
W. B. WALTON, Big Foot Prairie, 111. 

Large wooden bowl— South Sea Islands. 

JOHN B. CATON, Chicago. 

Chinese or Tartar gun. 

EDWARD E. AVER, Chicago, .,.,,. 

I Buffalo skin, i lot of spear heads,' i lot of stone, implements, Indian 

basket. 
Indian baskets — Pacific Coast. 

DR. JOHN W. O'NEILL, Chicago. 

Archeological specimens — Yucatan. 
ALLISON V. ARMOUR.'Chicago. 

Portion of hide and hair of a Mammoth— Siberia. 

WILLIAM G. HIBBARD, Chicago. 

Collection of ancient iron and brass utensils— Egypt. 

LAWRENCE C. MOOR'E, Chicago. 

Sculptured stone head — Florida. 

JOSEPH CLARK, Congo. 

Arrows— Upper Congo, Africa. 

EDMOND JOHNSON, Dublin, Ireland. 

Model of Dalway harp — Ireland. 
EUGENE ARNSTEIN, Chicago. 

Antique bedstead — Indiana. 

*W. VERNON BOOTH, Chicago. 

Collection of ancient gold ornaments — Egypt. 

WARREN K. MOOREHEAD, Columbus, O. 

Plan of the Hopewell Group of Mounds, Ross Co., Ohio. 

Maps of Fort Ancient, Ross Co., Ohio. 
WESSELL, NICKEL & GROSS, New York. 

Evolution of the modern piano movement. 

A. BIERSTADT, New York. 

Indian skull — Island of San Salvador. 



3^ FifcLl' C'MIMIINN Ml ^KLM - K»-r«.-»Kl S, \ OI . J. 

F. MUNSON. WimliM.r Park. 111. 

Kflu-!t fnun l''Ky|>i. Iiulian aioiic ax nnd oihcr anlii|uilicK. 

DK. Tin " »-'"'''- ' ' 

Lithuania. Pnlaiul. 

' li. 
'- from l'«»m|>cii. 

II- Nr. thrinigh A. I). SirauM, New York. 

A arc aiul nrticlcs i>f stone fmm ancient gra^'es. 



w 


. II. 


in I 


NICAK 






c 


H. 


K. 


COAI 

Alttit|;. 


w 


\r 


-<n\- r ! 



c. I book— Egypt. 

jOK L. DA" 

I r.i 1 it.it 

ntr Vtv*"r\ . >\ ! I > ^C.y \\\>t\,\\ ("oluinl.iaii I'vjM.sition. thmueh 

\V. K. 
.\t<_heologn:.ii t >'i HI tii'ii 'Mill', 

ni-.PARTMEXT or r.OTANV. 

L. I . Mil I 

ll.M 

MKS. H. n. MIMI K. n.ir%anl. III. 
< >nr franjc of 1 •• 

PROF. <;F«> r I>\\ 1 1 Mrrlf.r.l. M.1S*. 

I Icm.s. 

Mk>. N' ' " 1. ill. 

» lolla. Cal. 

, ...;.ts— La I.. 11.. C.it 
Cil. 
• nts— I.a Jolla, Cal. 

IAS F .*. III. 

I) ol wil«l chrrr>' .Miowin^ "luituml crafting;." 

I.. \\..N    ^ " ' 

MARTINA. K N. (_hi. 

350 »|»C< It; JM.IIltJl. 

DKPAHl.MLM uv obuLu(".V. 

MKX \' ..... 



w II ' 



i. ii. NM« .11 1 



• ph ot >hi>9hi>nc Falls. Idaho. 



W < o. 



I . .\ {' 



ILL. New »>anjr, N. Y, 

< >< •>ii>^ical map ot inc :<>•< 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 33 

E. R. SNABLE, Summit, 111. 

Piece of limestone with bitumen. 
ILLINOIS STEEL CO., South Chicago, 111. 

20 specimens of iron ores, 8 specimens fuels and slags. 

B. A. ECKHART, Sanitary District of Chicago. 
Map showing entire Drainage Canal. 

W". B. DAVENPORT, Chicago. 

7 specimens illustrating the occurrence of gold— Cal. 

MATTHIESSEN & HEGELER ZINC CO., La Salle, Ills. 
Specimens illustrating the extraction of zinc. 

FRANK MANSON, Chicago. 

Specimens of ores and minerals. 

GEO. W. GOETZ, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Piece of iron forged and rolled from iron 2000 years old. 

JOHN BROWN & CO., Sheffield, Eng. 

Serve's ribbed steel tubes, 
j. W. LAMB, Chicago. 

Marcasite specimens. 
ALBERT S. GAGE, Chicago. 

Collection of ores. 
B. S. MILLSPAUGH, Windsor Park, Ills. 

Onyx marble. 
THE CARBORUNDUM CO., Monongahela, Penn. 

Carborundum (Carbide of Silicon) crude and manufactured. 

T. J. GRIER, Lead City, South Dakota. 

Free gold in quartz. 
W. L. MILLIKEN, Chicago. 

Egyptian Jasper or Argillyte. 

PICHER LEAD CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

Specimens illustrating Lewis-Bartlett lead process. 

PETER KOFOD, Chicago. 

Quartz containing porphyritic crystals of Orthoclase. 

MAJ. GEO. D. MILES, Old Fort, N. C. 

5 specimens of Garnet Sands, i specimen of Monazite. 

W. A. GRIFFIN, Griffin, 111. 

I specimen of Chalcedony in coral. 

DR. ROBERT PARHAM, Chicago. 

I slab of stalagmite marble (polished.) 
ILLINOIS TERRA COTTA & LUMBER CO., Chicago. 

I specimen of porous partition tile. 

W. W. HILL, South Dakota. 
I specimen of clay. 

HENRY W. NICHOLS, Field Columbian Museum. 

Zinc ores and accessory minerals, zinc minerals. 

6 fossils. 

I specimen of slate. 
MRS. F. W^ PAR KER, Chicago. 

55 samples of sand of different colors — The Dells of Wisconsin. 
PRINCE MANUFACTURING CO., New York. 

9 specimens of crude and finished mineral paints. 

F. M. SMITH, San Francisco, Cal. 

20 specimens illustrating mining and refining of borax — California. 
EDWARD E. AYER, Chicago. 
Specimens of gold ore. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

LIEUT. E. H. REED, Chicago. 
Old release deed. 1760. 



34 Fl»l l» ConrMPIAN M: HF.foRTS, Vol . i, 

A. lUJ.l 

t San S.il\ .ii!«>r 

V. MINSON. Windsor Park. III. 

p, • • • • •■■ 



.tk an<l Imie- 



fH\ nn KttfiTMMinn ifrotin<l<t. 



Wokl.l 



kj I • Mi J » i M "^l 



A. W. M«M I! 

I II r of |h< 

GUATF^' • ■■^ ^' . x,...sui..n. 

DKI'T. ^»^ MINI > ASM MINIM,. \V orids Columbian KxfM»iition. 

•^^ ■• •' ''•■ ' »r|>artincm. 

C0I«»^' N. WorlMsColumbiai, tion. 

• I by the ConiniiMion. 

II. |i -,i, ^, . .... M ,,„ 

I'niiictl the World's Columbian Kxposiiion. 

CON I |)K i 

.:.i lal Kx; . , ..f the French Commission. 

KKANK I»« Nl \] inbian .Museum. 

t <t No. ji7.$39for Cold Storage Fire Fund. 

S. W»» 

I button. 

WILLIAM L.cl KIIS. W n. DC. 

I •> , . ,,tion siationti . ]',.-^,.u..,,\ '"-'lunation. 

o( Watlinc Is! 
JKROM 



nRAZII iMMIS.SlON. Worlds Columbian Kxposition. 

• rv iisrd by Commission. 

\V<)TJII .; .i -.IIlON ''• ? ..f Ii,...^. -rs. 

r arm) relic of first Kx; rs" Meeting. 

SIM- III. 

I r.i\ I'., wliiltti'i! I if u I H mI froiii T \ t I IS. I ii ,n liiilTiliiiL'i. 

MKYER BALLIN. 

Photografths and aiitugrapii lcttcr.s ot lian.s Lhrtj>tiAh Ander&cn. 

DHPAKTMHNT OF INIH'STKIAL ARTS. 

JOHN S. nR<»WV JV «U^V. Helfast. Ireland. 

to the linen industry. 

WM. LI " • '''»nd. 

IRISH I i A 1 ION. Chicago. 

• red. 

YORK \NINr, CO.. Ltd.. Belfast. Ireland. 

) wi>rks and process of linen working. 

SAN? ' • . I M,. 

1 the fleece hetl Libric. 

WILLIAM Al Li. -. Kngland. 

JOHN F 

t »iM' «i>krii .^ ' Hij, 

MARTIN A. RYFK ^ 
8 ancient fabrics, i 



Oct. 1895.. Annual Report of the Director. 35 

MRS. J. M. HORTON, Chicago. 

Korean bed — Seoul, Korea. 
J.N. RICHARDSON, SONS & OWDEN, Belfast, Ireland. 

Photographs of early linen manufacture — Ireland. 
F. MUNSON, Windsor Park, 111. 

Sets of ancient Chinese coins. 
K. NAKAMURA, Tokyo, Japan. 

Embroideries, bronzes and ceramics. 
SOSUKE NAMIKAWA, Tokyo, Japan. 

Cloisonne panel — Japan. 
MARSHALL FIELD & CO., Chicago. 

Ramie fiber — Shanghai, China. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., Chicago. 

2 cases bamboo fiber for electric light filaments. 
I case miniature incandescent light bulbs. 

S. I. TAKASHIMA, Kyoto, Japan. 

I embroidered picture of bird and grasses — Japan. 

MR. DOMEI, Tokyo, Japan. 

I old Japanese embroidered silk table cover. 

SOZAYEMON NISHIMURA, Tokyo, Japan. 
I velvet picture of Fujiyama. 
I embroidered chrysanthemum design — Japan. 

J. AUDO, Nagoya, Japan. 

I cloisonne plaque in lacquer. 

HENRY ROEPKE, Chicago. 
I lady's work box. 

DIVISION OF TRANSPORTATION. 

CHAS. CHATEAU, St. Louis, Mo. 

Shipping bill dated March 4, 1826. 

LAWRENCE HARGRAVE, Stanwell Park, New South Wales. 

Flying machine (model.) 
WM. G. HIBBARD, Chicago. 

Cariole — Norway. 

T. J. OLSEN. Chicago. 

Model of land and water velocipede. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

A. E. J. SVEGE, Field Columbian Museum. 

1 Monkey — South America. 

H. P. FRIDENBERG, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Chameleon. 

CHAS. B. CORY, Field Columbian Museum. 

47 jars of reptiles, insects, etc., in alcohol. 
WILL A. CONNELLY, Danville, 111. 

Hog's foot, showing abnormal number of toes. 
HENRY L. SEIDLER, Columbus, O. 

Shark's jaws and small, dried Hammer-headed shark. 
ED. LEWIS, Chicago. 

2 masses of the worm-like tubes of Vermetus — West Coast, Florida. 
J. A. HUME, Field Columbian Museum. 

1 Dog-fish, Amia calva — Lake Michigan, Jackson Park. 

3 fishes — Lake Michigan, Jackson Park. 

2 fishes. Bull-head and Goggle-eye — Lake Michigan, Jackson Park. 
W. S. ROYCE, Hawthorne, 111. 

1 Butterfly — Hawthorne. 
GEORGE MANIERRE, Chicago. 

2 fishes, Notropis megalops. 
MRS. KAUFMANN, Chicago. 

I Opossum — Central America. 



36 FiJ-.i.n Cohmhiw M« skim_R»:i'<»rts, Voi 



MkS. DK 

t • 

I'KUK 

N. 
I" "N \V 



A. iHOMr>«»N. 
i Us\\ !..> 
C K. AKII.IY. 1 

DKI'AKTMKNT OF OKNITHOl.OfiV 

A. K. j. S\ lunibinn Museum. 

I «. ..; 

KDWAkn K AYKk.Chicaeo. 

5' 

HARRY \ f'-'tn Trinidail. World's CoJumbian ExpVn. 

H s case— Island of rrinidaii. 

J. C C 

... fhii krns. 

CHAS H. lOkY. in Museum. 

I. 

sin. 



A. W 



MRS. RIYNOKD.S. « 

M ' '• 

r;F*> K. < d Columbian Mii<ciim. 



n bma, chictU 



c.\t' 1 . .VI 



LIBKAKY. 
For Grai'HIc Art ani> rKisTiNO 0>i t fctios. 

BARNHARPT |ik«»THKRS ^ SPtVPl FR. Chi. 

Old K ' from hcpartment 

GERMAN (.« . . i ICI.. Ilcrlin. 

Framc5 o! mens — IransferrctI fn»m Department " I ". 

ART r '} i\l AN. I. 

the Ktikka. a: " •" T.ti,aii»-*c. 

MF-RGKNin I INOTYPK ( New York. 

I ie. 

12 i>e. 

R. HOE .\ reel. New YorV 

21 -«. sampie» ut • rk, etc. 
CHir\r.»> 

:>e printing pnxcsses. 
U. 5. N 

HAMILTON MANIFACTIRING CO., Two River*. Wis. 
Collection of •■' ••€. framed. 

r.-. rAMlHI ETS AND SERIAL^. 

ALABAMA r.Foior.irX! ^\v\y\ 

K' ima. \  

(if- . V t •• -^ ! 



Report uj»on the 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 37 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS. 

Transactions for 1895. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Bulletin, 1894. 

Annual report of the president for 1894. 

Annual report, act of incorporation, etc., 1893. 
AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Proceedings and papers of thirty-fifth annual meeting, 1893. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. 

Rules and regulations of the Magellanic premium. 

Supplementary report of the committee to consider an international lan- 
guage. 1888. 

List of deficiencies in the library. 1889. 

Catalogue of the library. 1863-84. 

Proceedings at the dinner commemorative of the Centennial Anniversary. 
1880. 
'' Report of the committee to assist the commission on amended orthogra- 

phy. 1889. 

Subject register of papers published in the transactions and proceedings. 

List of surviving members, prepared by H. Phillips. 1895. 

Laws, regulations, charter, etc., prepared by H. Phillips. 1894. 

List of the members. 1890. 

Proceedings. 1893-94. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

Proceedings, new series, vol. xxi. 1894. 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM. 

Catalogue of the echinodermata, part i. 1891. 

Catalogue of the Australian birds, parts 1-4. 1876-94. 

Catalogue of marine shells of Australia and Tasmania. 1892-93. 

Catalogue of the Australian hydroid zoophytes. 1884. 

Catalogue of the Australian stalk and sessile-eyed Crustacea. 1882. 

Catalogue of a collection of fossils. 1883. 

Descriptive catalogue of the nests and eggs of birds found breeding in 

Australia. 1889. 
History and description of the skeleton of a new sperm whale. 1890. 
Notes for collectors. 1887. 
Memoirs no. 2; Lord Howe Island. 1889. 
Catalogue of sponges. 1888. 

Catalogue of the general collection of minerals. 1885. 
Guide to the contents, with list of old documents and relics. 1890. 
Records, vol. i, and nos. 1-5 of vol. 2. 1891-92. 
Catalogue of the fishes, part i. 1888. 

Catalogue of Australian mammals, by J. D. Ogilby. 1892. 
Report of trustees, for 1894. 

ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 

Atlas pintoresco historico de los Estados L^nid. Mexicanos, by Ontario 
G. Cubas. 1885. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

The development of the American rail and track, bv J. E. Watkins. 

1891. 
The relics of Columbus, by W. E. Curtis. 1893. 

Third report of the Entomological Commission, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

BADT, E. B. (the author), Chicago. 

Bellhangers' handbook. 1893. 
Electric transmission handbook. 1891. 
Incandescent wiring handbook. 1895. 
New dynamo tenders' handbook. 1894. 

BALTIMORE HOME FOR INCURABLES, Bahimore, Md. 

Eleventh annual report. 1895. 
BARROWS, REV. DR.J. H. (the author), Chicago. 

Results of the Parliament of Religions. 1894. 



38 FlKi,i> CoiAMiiiAS M ( M l\»:i><>kis. \i»i 

IJKKHK. \V *;. fthr attthnrl. •nMmi.s..n C.nn. 

A: 






V.C Ui ta^ur t>t the Mtilc iJiMributioii u( ihc thc«)r>' <>f 

ihuAnacu dial. "■ ; 



BKRLIN 

Itts-nrT-  


UoAKh • 

A ; . 
BOAZ, FRAN/ 

nn'sTriv 



r K HI 



Ii« )U i 



I 



H. 
ILinovrr. l8i>4. 

^>. \\ < vimsiinon. 

\t,. 1 



>iiImi|!i, by i>. C Mamh. i^ 

of the trustees. l8«>i . 

'I. 
. ; ^..,..u>c»c enamels. 



. % rx I .>. 



BRAZILIAN H)M\' \. 

The <trai' .,, Nr». iS. Hmzil at the ColumUirtii Exposition. 1803. 

nKrnr.i p. .p I- 1 , . i ihrary. 

il list. 
IiKv.>OKl.NN \k\. 

rhirt\ . . ..::i an11u.1l report of the Ixjanl cf -lir.. i..r^ is^.: 

JlCfKNI R. H. (the author). Strassbur^:. (iermany. 

Ncuc muieralfunile von \\ cstert-cdn. 
r.fPf-n \iot. I- T . t,..M .■..'„. ,,j„an Museum. 

N. K.-»stcrn .Mabama, hv C. W. Hayes. i8qi. 

I'r ima. by \V. B. 

fa:.. .. .. ; ■••'lection of Canadian rocks for the 

Worlds < by \V. F. Ferrier. 

• tnc UfJiogiral .Sur\'ey of Texas, 1892. with 

K< the )(eoiogi«.al structure of Murphrers Valley. .Mabama. by A. 

The r o. by F. K. .Siward. 

Mcmor .1 ^1  . ' ' special sobn- las n]ii!a> en la rcj"iL»iMa Xr^^cutina, 



b. 


H 


1) 


1 








F' 














Ti 












S. 


,M 






A. 


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, .t. 


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Commis- 


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■:an !■ M't^rttnn. 




C. 










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Da; 










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Report of »-<>r trt of i- 



Oct, 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 39 

CALIFORNIA MIDWINTER INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION MEMO- 
RIAL MUSEUM. 
Guide to the halls and galleries. 1895. 

CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU. 

Bulletin No. i, 3, 4 and 5. 1888-94. 

1 2th report of the State Mineralogist. 1894. 

Bulletin No. 5. The Cyanide process by A. Scheidl. 1894. 
CALIFORNIA WORLD'S FAIR COMMISSION. 

Final report including a description of all exhibits of California. 1894. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY.' 

29th annual report of the museums and lecture rooms syndicate. 1895. 
CANADA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Maps to illustrate reports 1871-79. 

Annual reports. 1885-88, and 1890-93, 7 vols. 

Report of progress. 1876-84, 6 vols. 

CAYUGA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 
Collections, no. 11. 1895. 

CHANUTE, O., Chicago. 

Progress in flying machines. 1894. 
CHERRIE, G. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

On the structure and distribution of coral reefs, by Darwin. 

The Batrachia of North America. 1889. 

The public writings of G. Newbold Lawrence, by Foster. 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 

A naturalist in Mexico, by F. C. Baker. 1895. 
Bulletins i-io. 1883-86. 

CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE. 

Circular of instruction. 1894-95. 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY. 

Programme. 1895-6. 

Quarterly announcements. Nov. 1895. 

Quarterly calendar, vol. 3, nos. 3-5. 

Annual register. 1892-95. 

Circulars of information, 1895. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION. 

ist-9th annual reports. 1882-89. 

14th annual report. 1895. 

Catalogue of spring exhibition. 1885. 

CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Supplement to the prose fiction in the library. 1884-94. 
Bulletin of books added in the various departments. 1894 . 

CINCINNATI SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Journal. 1894. 

CINCINNATI TECHNICAL SCHOOL, 

8th annual catalogue. 1894-95. 
CLARK, JOHN M., Chicago. 

Report of the collector of customs at Chicago, relating to the W^orld's 
Columbian Exposition. 1894. 

CLARKE, ROBERT & CO., Cincinnati, O. 

Catalogue of a valuable collection of books and pamphlets relating to 
America. 1895. 
COLBY UNIVERSITY. 

75th annual catalogue of officers and students. 1895. 
COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Pmlletin No. 31. 1895. 

COLORADO STATE SCHOOL OF MINES. 

Catalogue. 1894-95. 
COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

Proceedings. 1891-93. 

Vein structure in the Enterprise mine. 1895. 



40 



V 1 ' t y M 



i> i ^ ^ 4*1 L 



The tlcicrminaliim of hi«inuth in refined leatl and "<)$. 

N the precipitin ion of prccioii* meuU fn>m L>aiuac. :v_>iuuon». 



I 
! 
I 

N 

I 

OHIMI 



H>N\ \Ji.KIMI.M M AIION. 

OMill.k r\H)\ ink Till ADVANCKMKNTOFSCIKNCK AND ART. 
K ' ition» of the free ni^ht school, ami woman's art scho»l. 



I . National Museuti 

NALIONAL. 



I s hormi^a.s <le Costa Rica. l8(>4. 

|: prcscntado |M»r A. Alfan*. 



c of the Cella collection of Alpine and Caucasian Views. iRqi- 
1>AKIM' 

DAVI K R.. « 

1 Kair. 

mh t rary commission. |8»>4. 

1>I A/. N 

( !i» iiu'tr.. rites du Mr\i>iMr. 

I)' .upbrii! 

1 iit: t.it<ti4clt;i ai.tl .iulaiuily t>t rcruviatt civiii^atum. I&/5. 
■T- T T.. 

' fires of a naturalist, by C. E. F.dwords. 
KLhclK !ll\GCO..THL. 

1... I. 

ELLIOT, n. ' im 

I i^X>^i. 

r \ t,' t.M\ . nn. 

I >ana a» » 

l-KU KK>. i. U 

A coil t> I'l «tinkc rcremonv. 180%. 

ITie 
H»MF.K 
I 

Fl KSS. R.ahe 
I 

r.f \Tr' 

\ de liUatemaiain 

liAKl t > 

.\ '.infoni Librarv .Association. 1893. 

1 

1 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 41 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

Description of courses in Lawrence scientific school. 1894-95. 
Papers used at the examination for admission to Lawrence scientific 
schooL 1 891. 

HAY, O. P. (the author), Field Columbian Museum. 

A consideration of some theories of evolution. 1891. 

HAYES, SETH (the author), Cincinnati, O. 

Another Miami valley skeleton. 1895. 

The Shaw Mastodon. 1895. 
HEAD, WILLIAM R. (the author), Chicago. 

Paleozoic sponges of North America. 1894. ^ 

HILLIS; W. J., Albany"^ N. Y. 

Catalogue of the Hurst collection of stuffed skins, by Frank A. Ward. 
1894. 

HILLS, R. C. (the author), Denver, Colorado. 

Ore deposits of Camp Floyd district. 1894. 

HODGE, F. W. (the author), Washington, D. C. 
The early Navajo and Apache. 1895. 
The first discovered city of Cibola. 1895. 

HOVEY, E. O. (the author), Jefferson City. 

A study of the cherts of Missouri. 1894. 
HUNT, C. W. & CO., New York City. 

Industrial railways. 1895. 
ILLINOIS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Geological survey of Illinois, 1883. 

Report on geology and paleontology, vol. 8. 1890. 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY. 

Trustees' report. 1894. 
ILLINOIS STATE LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Biennial report of the directors. 1894. 
ILLINOIS STATE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Bulletin nos. 3, 4, 5 and 6. 1894. 
INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 

Proceedings. 1891-93. 
INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION CO. 

American Line. Red Star Line. 1895. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Second annual report. 1893. 

Coal deposits of Iowa, vol. 2, by C. R. Keys. 1894. 
JACK, ROBERT L., Brisbane, O. 

Artesian water in the western interior of Queensland. 1895. 

JACKSON, N. A., Springfield, Illinois. 

The ornithology of Illinois by R. Ridgeway and S. A. Forbes. 1889. 

JOHNSON, EDMOND, Dublin, Ireland. 

Notes on the cross of Cong, by Margaret Stokes. 1895. 
JONES, JOSEPH, New Orleans, La. 

Original investigations on the natural history of yellow fever. 1854- 
1894, by J. Jones. 

Biographical sketch of Dr. Joseph Jones. 

KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 

Transactions. 1881-88. 
KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

7th annual report for 1894. 
KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

9th biennial report. 1893-94. 

Transactions, vol. 4. 1890. 

KIRKMAN, MARSHAL M., Chicago. 

Further illustrations of primitive transportation in Japan and China. 1895. 
The science of railways. 1894. 



4^ 1-lKii' Loi.iMlilA.\ MthELM Kj.rok: . \.': I 

K. K. ACKFRIlAr MINISTKRIUM. 

(ieuloi;i!«chhrrKmaiiiii.<w:hc kartell mil pmfilcn von Mria, by Wilhclin 
(iobl. iK.>v 

K. K.OSTKKkllt IIISCHKCENTKAI. 0)MMIS.SI0N. Worlds Columbian 

't. i8()4. 
KNI(;nT. K. C. (ihc author). Denver. ( 

Kvs/y 

Lj. ll.XKU.N. 

4tli •> M in»ccl9 of Illinois. i8(>4. 

I. KICK. H rSIN KkSITY. 

LKi..\M> -^ t \\Ki»Kii n\u>K rvivHRsnv. 

t ~ I ami .• irc. i8qi. 

• "^ i-.r>>ii iiM opcninf; day. 

I ttc iversity and the .American man, by (>corge Elliot 

The lariri conlroventy, 1780-183^ by O. L. Elliot. 1802. 
I.ENO.X I.inkARV. N. • • City. 

The Ifttt-r i«f C< «in the discovery of .America. 18**2. 

LINNKAN S« K IKTV. New South Wales, 

A' •- • ' ' ' -< |8.>2K,4. 

LONDON IKTY. 

kc|M>rt ol the cutincii and auditors for l8()3. 

( "  !r of the hbr.iry. 1K87. 

I.OS AN< ITIU.K I.IHkAkY. 

l.tM <>t novels and talcs, i 
I.OW. I.VMW H. (the .Tuthor). New huk c uy. 

< >l>scrvatn>iis on thi- pnnticc of counterfeiting coins and medals. i8<>5. 
McCLURd. A. C. \ CO., ( 

C,Ttali>>jue of the r«> of nicteontcs in the TcalMtdy Museum. 1886. 

M. t mRMW K. « VKIS H.. 

vc .ni'i hition. 1851. 

1 ;i. 

I .... . 

I 

1  
I 

1 

1 

< -6. 
.'\ 

kettons on the i otoni.i n of the i,olonial and Indian Exhibiti<in. 

I I... mi/ 

ke|" tier* Universal Exposition. <if i88r>. 

•' »t Congress. iSrji. 

1 

Mr(;RE<;nk. H. H.. Pontiac. II 

,. . ..... . .• ,^ 

MACK A 

I ID Nc\« d With 10 other pamphlets on birds. 1891-95. 

.MAN' " rV 1.11..X X,. V. 

rt of the trustees. 180C. 

MASSA* Ik MANAGERS. 

iUustrated report. 1994. 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 43 

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART. 

25th annual report of the trustees. 1895. 

Seal cylinders and other oriental seals, by William Hayes Ward. 

MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Report on Upper Peninsula and Lower Peninsula. 1895. 
MICHIGAN MINING SCHOOL. 

Catalogues, 1886-87, 89-90, 93-94. 

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

17th annual report of the Board of Trustees. 1894. 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Field Columbian Museum, 

Hardwood: A journal of the hardwood and lumber trade. 1892. 
Catalogue of the specimens and vegetable products sent to the World's 
Columbian Exposition, 1893, from Altoo Magdalena, by C. C. Marquez. 

MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY. 
Bulletins, nos. i, 2, 4-8 & 10. 
Reports, 1872-73, '82, 1887-93. 
23rd annual report, by N. A. Winchell. 1895. 
Final report, vol. 3, pt. i. Paleontology. 1895. 

MISSOURI GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Paleontology, vols 4, 5, 6, and 7. 1894. 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN. 
Sixth annual report. 1895. 

NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Finding list, 2nd edition and ist supplement. 1890-93. 
Finding list, French and German books. 1894. 

NEWARK TECHNICAL SCHOOL. 

Annual circular, 1894-95. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Final report, vol 3. 1894. 
NEW SOUTH WALES DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND AGRICULTURE. 

Annual report for 1894. 

Memoirs: Paleontology, no. 8, by R. Etheridge. 1895. 

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. 
Transactions, 1893-94. 

NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

1 2th annual report of the board of control. 1894. 

NEW YORK FREE CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 
Catalogues, English books. 1884-92. 

NEW YORK GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

iith-i3th annual reports of the State Geologist. 1891-93. 

NEW YORK STATE BOARD OF GENERAL MANAGERS. World's Col- 
umbian Exposition. 

Report. 1894. 
NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

8th annual report of the North Carolina State Weather service. 1895. 

Eight biennial report. 1895. 

17th annual report. 1895. 

NORTH CAROLINA UNIVERSITY. 

Catalogue, 1894-95. 

A comparison of the methods of separation and estimation of zirconium, 
by Chas. Baskerville. 1894. 
NOVA SCOt'iAN institute OF NATURAL SCIENCE. 

Proceedings and Transactions. 1870, '78, '80, '85, '86. 
OBER, FREDERICK A. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Aborigines of the West Indies. 1894. 
OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Maps showing outcrop boundaries of principal coal seams. 1893. 

Report, vol. 7: economic geology, archeologv, botany, paleontology. 
' 1893. 



FlKLI» CuLLMI-IAN Ml si I VI — Kll'oi '\ 

OHHXTATF VRrjII ol or.HA! >NI» Ml^ !• »KIC \l. SOCIKTY. 

I'H I L, \ 1 \ I I t» i\ \ r. I * ' ' 

I -. new »cru-«t. mw. 20-24 «•«• .VV35- iWo-'qo, '«>4. *'»i 

I'HII.AIH I.IUIA MMIsMAIK AND A\ I H^l" AKI AN lY 

{ • • .itiil l>\ '■ ^' - ••• ■''•" • 

1 Mav I 

I 



\' : III t iMiti'>\ ix.iiii.i. i.^-ii. 

THE PI-.N >-. . V X M x .V X.I '■■ •^" ' '». 

The I'rniiovlv.ifiia K. K Worlil's Columbian KxpoftUioD. 189.V 

PINNSVl VAMA 'l-l.M.h. 

Annual r<-|>' 
I'KNNSVI V \\l \ K^ITV 

! 

. ania. 1 M Culin. 

Ill I »< j .1 1 iiiii Ml HI Afi iM ' Ml -^ y. 
.vart Culm. iScjj. 

I'RKSmi OMIANN. 

Miisiral instruments at the NVorM's Columbian Kxpo*!*!'— '^-j 
PRINCK roN NAIION AI. AI IMN! ASSOCIATION. 

Annual report for iS-ii 

PROVIP" "  \Tm N/M M. 

; lal report i»f the Ikwrtl of Directors, i8<>4. 

riTNAM > I., v. SONS. New York City. 

! ■••'•■  •• -^  'If 1. ■■>.•- ,.f jtiwhI nien ami Rri*-* f'arKl" '«v r 

QIAKI I\ H. li.. l...u.i..n. 

f ' 1 • 1 ", . ■: I . .f 'hi nil iTiiiiiiiiit". I if the I'.i f \ I .r ;li!ir « I ^^!*. 

KI.N l.\ I Ja UML INM III 11-. 

•1 r. tv,:. 

RKSP IK !!•«». \ l\( !Mf Ho-Mta. 

■nquiMa K»paAola. 12 %'oI- 

ROI.LIN 

« tirnnes. l8()|. 

Knsl. IMILN I 1.1 HNU IN>U M 

^ . ........ .,.1 /... tt..iiit. 



•("*'i<]rrf I hompvin. 1883. 

SAINT 1 11 UK \'^ 

! I . M.< 

SAINT I ININIKSIIN. 

( 



^A! \^h' (the nuthor). Chicago. 

• Irih; it» charactCT id relation- 

i .lumtartrat' 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 45 



« 



Zur frat^e der structurformelii der metasomatischen zersetzungsproduct 
1893. 

SIVYER, LEONARD (the author), Spokane, Wash. 
Silver coin and its relation to gold. 1895. 

SKIFF, F. J. v., Field Columbian Museum. 

Proceedings 42nd meeting American Association for the Advancement 

of Science. 
Preliminary announcement of the 44th meeting of the A. A. A. S. 1895. 
Transactions, Bridgeport meeting, Am. Institute Mining Engineers. 1894. 
Transactions, Atlanta meeting 189?. 
Officers, members, rules, etc. July 1895. 

Electricity at the Columbian Exposition, by J. P. Barrett. 1894. 
Proceedings of the presentation to Beloit College of "the Fisher collection 

of antique Greek sculptures. 1894. 
The inheritance of acquired characters, by D. G. Elliot. 1892. 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 

List of foreign correspondents of the Institution, 1885, by George H. 

Boehmer. 
Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum. 1888. 
Catalogue'of prehistoric work east of the Rocky Mountains. 1891. 
Scientific taxidermy for museums, by R. W. Shufeldt. 1894. 
Bulletins no. 28-30 of the U. S. National Museum. 1885. 

SMYTH, B. B., Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions of 24th and 25th annual meeting, Kansas Academy of 
Science. 1890-93. 

SOUTH CAROLINA MILITARY ACADEMY. 

Semi-Centennial, 1893. 

The South Carolina Military Academy. 1894. 

Official register. 1895. » 

SOUTH DAKOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Bulletin no. i. A preliminary report on the geology of South Dakota. 
1894. 

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE SCHOOL OF MINES. 
Circular of information. 1887-88. 
Catalogue and prospectus. 1892. 
Catalogue and calendar. 1895. 

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TEXZHNOLOGY. 

Catalogue, 1895-96 and catalogue of Stevens School. 

THAYER SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Catalogue of Dartmouth College with Thayer School of Civil Eng. 1895. 
Programme of the requisites for admission. 

TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB. 
Memoirs, vol. 5. 1894. 

UNION UNIVERSITY. 

Annual catalogue. 1894-95. 

U. S. BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

Handbook of the American Republics. 1893. 

Manual de la Republicas Americanas. 1891. 

Annual reports, 1891, 1892 and 1894. 

Bulletin, nos. 18,32,33, 42,51,52,54, 55, 57,58, 61, 62, 6> and monthly 

bulletin, December, 1893-June, 1894. 
Commercial nomenclature, 2 vols. 1894. 
Commercial directories, 9 bulletins. 1892. 
Foreign commerce of the American Republics. 1S91. 
Import duties of the different American Republics, 10 vols. i89i-'92. 
Patent and trade-mark laws of America. 1891. 
Money, weights and measures of the American Republics. 1891. 
Coal and petroleum in Columbia. 1893. 



46 




I- 


I . >. 


1 




1 - 


It 


IJ 


r. s. 


ni 


1 ; 



FlKI.U CoLt'MlilAN MfsHM — KKfOKTii. Voi 



 •■*•• \. 



<'.rccn. i8Si. 
.;e in llir nouth, by Sicphcn U. Weeks. 1884 



III ^ " ' 
hv Kr 



^"j. tR.>4. 
>NI K OK I.AIlni 

f the I . >., «>> v.. i>. \\ ri^Ml. IN>3. 
iCn TIRT 
ition record. 

YrarlMMik. l8f>4. 

r. s. I'  

 -• ••-/I ■>-.•••-•■ ». . ■... n. ii.iiiibcrs. 
r. S. I . I OK THi: IMKklnR. 

V <  of the publication of the U. S. Government. 1889- '93. 

K\ The five  1 tri)>es in Indian Territory. l8c>4. 

' • cr of cdin.itii'ii, 189I-92. 
U. S. M 

A report . il cases treated in the I'. S. Army 1865-71 by the Sur- 

A. 

k. S;5. 

In. 

r. S. GKol.OCICAL SIKVIV. 
I r' ' . (K>rts. 

Hi .^~, V, ,50,66, 68. 79, 08 and 100-122 incl. Mono- 

I. a, ii and 24. 
;4 

A! 

Rc< "I .^., >>iiiiMiii^ tin,- ijiiitribution «>f the );coiiigi- 

c;» 
Minci .•! tiic I . b. l885<>4. 

r s; V \\v T ...... r.NT. 

'ts. Atlantic coast line. 1886. 
U. .S. FAI I N 1 t>M K K. 

to the reeiMmtion of trademarks. 1889. 
VAI.EM 

Ai • ' iKjue tablets. tSo?. 

VI DAL (^lADRA.S Y RAMON. C. Barcelona. .Spain. 

( .T <lr la r. " 1 de moneflas y mcdallas. ia>^z. 

viRf.iM \ : \K', riK. 

'^ : and 54th annual report. 

I •!• 

It liaMilitary Institute cadet. by F. H.Smith. 1878. 

Sc kl iHit i.>r the Virginia Military Institute. 1889. 

WAl.H' t IN O). 

nrr-ilrev^ine and coal-washing machincr>'. 1895. 

WASH IN' 

( .1 .... manual trjitiint' sfhi>ol t%r>~i): 

> Mudents. ct 

Wl 

. iano-fiirte actions. t''.-j; 

WKSTERN rKNNSVIAANIA KNGINKKRIM, 

Tf .,...,... . iLC aiid .'\rts. 1890-92. 

WIFN K. r .1. 

jahresbencht. 1894. 



Oct. 1895, Annual Report of the Director. 47 

WISCONSIN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, ARTS AND LETTERS. 

Transactions. 1876, '78, '82, '86, '89, '92, 95. 
AVISCONSIN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Annual reports 5 vols., loth and iith. 1894-95. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Annual report 2nd, 3rd, 2ist-23rd, 25th, 26th, 28th-32nd. 

Report and collections. 1883-85. 

Collections State Historical Society, \'ols. 11 and 12. 1888-92. 

Proceedings, 34th, 36th-42nd annual meetings. 1887, '89-95. 

Free soil party of Wisconsin, by T. C. Smith. 1895. 

Bibliography of Wisconsin. Authors. 1893. 

2nd triennial catalogue of the portrait gallery. 1892. 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Catalogue of the Circulating Department. 1884. 
Supplement to catalogue. 1889. 
35th annual report. 1893-94. 

AVORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 
25th annual catalogue. 1895. 

WORLDRAILWAY PUBLISHING CO. 

Classical portfolio of primitive carriers, by Marshall M. Kirkman. 1895. 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Annual report for 1894. 
WYOMING UNIVERSITY. 

Catalogue for 1893-94. 
YALE UNIVERSITY. 

Catalogue 1894-95. 
YERINGTON^ J. A., Carson City, Nev. 

Report of managing director Nevada Exhibit Midwinter Fair. 1895. 

Report of Nevada State Board of World's Fair Commissioners. 1895. 



LOANS AND DEPOSITS. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

PROF. ALLAN MARQUAND, Princeton, N. J. 

24 lantern slides of Yucatan subjects. 
C. F. MILLSPAUGH, Field Columbian Museum. 

160 species plants, herbarium specimens — -West Virginia. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM, Albany, N. Y. 
Triplite. 

RICHARD D'AILLY, Harrison, Ark. 

20 crystallized specimens, lead and zinc ores. 

O. P. HAY, Field Columbian Museum. 

Jaw of Porthens thaunias. 
PROF. A. H. COLE, Chicago. 

I framed bromide photograph of Palaaster Eucharis. 
CHAS. P. RICHARDSON, Princeton, 111. 

Photo-negative films of mining scenes. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
3 Columbus Caravels and equipage. 



l^ FlKLD Coi.1 MIIIAM Mt I<»l«» 

GEUK'. 

J. C. M I I 

HKRMAV ! 

> ji ol the Krouiitis and I i>f ihc WfirM'a Columbian 

DKI'AKTMHNT OF INDLSTHIAL AHTS. 
VfKKWY ART fc t>I- roR ATING rn . New York. 

I i\ \ > rs 

1 ri wilh carved wood frame. 
Wll! .kc H>rc«l. III. 

nKPAKTMKNT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Nf ATT. Mil \IN rh;r.iiro. 

2 lar. molltisk Triiittitia ffif^ds. 
IKHK. C  Mass. 

'' 

LIHKAKY. 
I ! lURrffARI). Field (Mlumhian MiiopMrn. 

< • rs > r I I IV IN I i , Field i^'Miininiaii >i ii.sriitii. 
4 4 vohinies. 

(.rSTAVI A. I IK. 

Hihlia. i\v ■■• "• !i gantskehr ' ••  ' ' •' 

C.F. MM ! ^P\« 

•; . !> and pamphlets. 

t \ I VI 

•rum omnium hucusque cognitorum. P. A. Saccardo. 



EXCHANGES. 



DFPAHTMENT OF BOTANY. 



HARV.XRD COLLKGK. Cambridge, M.155. 
lot species platits. 



I)I-r\KTMKNT OF GFOLOGV 



V, Mammoth and 

I 1 1 «^ A t. < I 

fc. t. H< » 

"^ ;contc. 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 49 

FOR EXAMINATION. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

S. D. MITCHELL, Ripon, Wis. 

Archeological collection — Wisconsin. 

W. W. BLAKE, Mexico City, Mex. 

2 collections of antiquities — Mexico. 

EDMOND JOHNSON, Dublin, Ireland. 

Communion plates. 
E. O. MATTHEWS, Mexico City, Mex. 

90 specimens of antiquities — Mexico. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

PROF. L. H. PAMMEL, Ames, Iowa. 

15 species of Euphorbia. 
PROF. WILLIAM TRELEASE, St. Louis, Mo. 

Plants of genus Etiphorbia. 
O. S. WHITMORE, Chicago. 

I species plant. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

DR. L. VAN PATTEN, Chicago. 
Supposed meteorite. 

H. B. DERR, Chicago. 

Unknown Paleozoic crustacean. 
Tooth of fish of the Carboniferous era. 

ALVIN JOI-NER, Polo, 111. 

Fossil mammal tooth. 
WILLIAM H. FRIEDRICK, Coldwater, Mich. 

3 pieces of limestone (supposed meteorite). 
MRS. C.M.WINSTON, Chicago. ^ 

Orthoceras and Icthyocrmus — Chicago limestone. 

MR. YEAKLE, Baltimore, Md. 
Oil-bearing shale. 

DR. G. M. EMRICK, Chicago. 
Trachyte — Montana. 

E.S. STRATTON, Chicago. 

Gold ore — Cripple Creek, Col. 

JOSEPH ARGYLL, Coal City, 111. 
Carboniferous fossils. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

PROF. J. B. STEERE, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Collection of shells, insects and mammals. 

64 mjimmals in alcohol. 
DENTON BROTHERS, Wellesley, Mass. 

Mounted fish and model of snake. 
MORRIS GIBBES, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

1 1 frogs and Salamanders. 

PROF. C. B. CORY, Boston, Mass. 

Small collection of vertebrate animals. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

C. P. HOWE,, Waukesha, Wis. 
Birds. 



50 Fiixn Columbian Mt K^pokts, Vol. i. 

THR(M'r,Il \\l'SEUA\ LMThl FIONS. 

DKI'AKIMIINT Ol' ANT1IK()I'()L()C•^ 

AI I ISON V. ARMOI'R fXlTDnioN. 

^;'' i.< •■. Kincn-, Him implcfncnls. jewelry, and other 

arv iicoioj^K .11 iii.iii I i.ii. Mexf'' 

DKPAKTMKNT Ol HOTANV 

AI.LIM>N \ \. 

Sot) I . 

4J photu ueKalives. 

DKPAKTMllNT OF (.KOLOGY. 

AI.l.ISllN V AKNUH'R I- X PKDITK )N. 

;: 111. 

id onyx.— Mexico. 

DEPARTMKNT OF ZOOLuoi 
•^w i>-»MiN(;»> rvri i)i HON. 

i7 phoio n< 76 li/anis: 4 snakes; fish; i bat; 2 crahs; 2 insects; 

18 manun.ii "<k,!',s aiul sktill<i. 

ALLISON V. AKMOlk KXIMDITK iN 

Reptiles, tishes. cnistaccas, mnllusks, cchin<»clemis, ci>rals. Muficre* an«l 
CozuincI Islands. Yucatan. 

ni:pAHTMi:NT of okm tiiolocy. 
SAN n<)MiN(;o Kxi'F.ni rioN. 

ifljS hird skins. 

COLLECTED BY CURATORS. 
dep\ktmi:nt of r.FDT.onv 

< I. I . i A  ''N. 

I ■'»•; .Ttid lK»ti!drn!. -("hir.Tijf* Drainage Canal, 

f. il. 

<> ., Dminaffe Canal. 

3-, 'u\ rocks. Western Massarhu.sctts. 

3 i'CM'iii.in to^isiis, Nt csteni NLissachusetls. 

DKPAlv'TMFNT Ol- ZOOLOi.V 
n V H W 

1 • <<i. rnistarea. insects, m hesplaines River. 

_ .-...•,.. . — . 11...... I  

■« • 

4 

3lv ' r at Shelhv. Ind.. and 

Momence. ill. 

PURCHASES. 

DEFAKTMI:NT of ANTHKoIuLuui. 
1 

I'.. 

I- ^ • - ■■■-■-■  . -  - " •  - •- -■■ :--a. 

37 paintings of American Indians by George Catlin. 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 51 

4 jars, 2 boats, 3 embroideries, and 2 sculptures. — Egypt. 
260 reproductions of Ancient Roman bronzes. — Naples. 

Jewelry, charms, emblems, bottles, vases, bronze needles, surgical instru- 
ments, papyrus. — Egypt. 

Collection of 263 articles of bronze and earthenware. — Etruscan and 
Roman, 

Sculptured hierogylphs and figures, mummy cases, etc. — Egypt. 

2 glass cases, i bronze picture, i mirror. — Ancient Roman. 

3 glass vases, 4 bronze vases. — Ancient Roman. 
Navajo Indian woman's dress. — Arizona. 

Collection of Indian pottery, masks, blankets, pigments, etc. — Arizona. 

2 ladles, I strainer, i bowl, i tripod, i vase. — Egypt. 
Canopic jars, vases. — Egypt. 

25 specimens of Mummy cloth, i papyrus. — Egypt. 
Navajo Medicine Man's outlit.^ — Arizona. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Collection of minerals. 

Microscope, and petrographic apparatus for cutting rock sections. 

Relief maps of U. S. glacial area, of Missouri, Kentucky, Conn, and Mass. 

5 slabs of red sandstone with fossil tracks. — Arizona. 
25 fragments bones of extinct elephant. 

18 mineral specimens. — Chester, Mass. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

Silver model of Horticultural Building, World's Columbian Exposition. 

84 specimens of Indian textiles. 

Loom with raw material. — Congo, Africa. 

89 pieces collection of jewelry antique in character. — Egypt, Etruria and 

Pompeii. 
1 1 cameos. 
44 intaglios. 
30 pieces of ceramic ware. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 
I white deer. 

Carpenter's collection of shells. 
Collection of mammals and skeletons. 
Collection of shells. 
Skeleton and skin of Florida Crocodile. 
747 skins of rodents. 
21 skulls of various quadrupeds. 
Colored zoological slides. 

3 mounted mammals, Africa. 

16 skins and skulls of mammals, Africa. 

Skins of small mammals. 

I Black Bass, i Jack Salmon, 2 Trout-Perch. — Chicago. 

3 mammals — Bear, Wild Ass and Hartebeest. — Asia and South America. 

I Kudu — Africa. 

9 young and half grown turtles. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

I albino half-grown Wood-chuck — Saranac Lake, N. J. 
Collection of bird skins representing the fauna of North and Central 
America, Mexico and the West Indies, including 55 types of species. 
Group of two Eider Ducks in glass cases. 
386 Colorado bird skins, 114 species. 

LIBRARY. 

1 100 volumes purchased (516 orders). 

94 periodicals subscribed for. 

587 volumes " Cory Ornithological Library." 



52 Field Coi.rMniAS Muskum— Kk.im»i<i!j, Vtn 



Akmiclls oi Incokpokation. 



STATI OI ILLINOIS 

DKPAKTMRNT OF STATF. 

Wii.LlAU H. HiNRlCHSEN, Secretary of StitU : 

T«> ALL T«> Whom These Presents Shall Comk. (iRErting: 

/(>...... . <%-rtificate duly si: ' ....i ..i ''•<—-' '-nvin^ brcn tiled in 

the olVirc <■; .ir)- «»f State, o rr, A. I). 1893, for 

the orvTAniration of the COl.l'MIUAN M' I OF CHICAGO, under and in 

with the pr \u A«.l ' rations." ap- 

. .. i;l I*' - ' ... .1872.31 ..< i:or>- lhcre<«f. a 

V of which attached. 

Ntnv, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichscn. Secretary of State of the State of 
Illii)nis. by virtue of the powers and dutic!« vested in me by law, do hereby certify 

^ElM OF CHICAGO, is a legally organucd 

'- . ; .,.* ....i. . . , ...,■. Stale. 

In l.stimof tfi.....,/ \ berr'- ^ ^ ' -• ■! cause f--'— ^•t^--' •».- 

Seal of State. . c City • - \(a\\ <i 

the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundre<l and ninety-three, and o( the 

Independence of the United States the one hundred and eiw'^ 

'-"-'-'-^ . W " " \. 

X SEAL J , c. . 

TO Jlu.N. w li-UlAM u. iuNkilmM.N.. 

Sit « I T V i \ .it "< I VII 

Sir 

U c. the xi- 
«tin?> "• ■'' ' ^' Ai. 

.Act > latory 

thereof: and that for the purposes of such orv ;i we hereby state as follows, 

to wit: 

I T! .• namr ..f «ii. li roriK^.rt( 'TI'.I \ \' \TfSFt'M OF 

rn; 

:. I he object (or which 11 is formefi is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
' ' ' ation and exhibition of objects illustrating An 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 53 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen ( 15 ) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence: 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchmson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. 
Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the Czfy of Chicago, County of Cook, and 
State of I//ifiois. 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert Mc- 
IMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, Geo. 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell,R. A. Waller, H.C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm.Sooy Smith, 
P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, Geo. R. Davis, 
Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
Geo. M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. 
Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, ) 
Cook County. ( 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby cer- 
tify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknow- 
ledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
(Seal) Notary Public, Cook County, III., 

CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUxM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



ss. 



54 Fiu.i* Columbian Mr^ lUirtiuis. \'..i i. 



AWIiNDfJ) BV-LAW'S. 



ARTKI.l 1 



\t t \f ii I ^ • 



Sk« Tiox I. M' ..| lut ' Mctnliers, Curi><>rat« 

Members. I.ifr ^' . .> . .. ' !'  

Sft. ;. Mrmtx i .s as arc sclectetl from 

time tn lime by the Roanl nf Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee ol ten « n thirty clays after notice of 

elr'''- »nd within: .• .. io ..i i ...^' annual ilalc. I he failure of 

ati. to make such ii. . inent and such annual payments within 

said time shall, at the option of the Hoard of Tnistees, be ground of forfeiture of 
annua' " ip. 

I ... " •' M,. tn'..r<l,;t, chall entitle the member to: 

First.- Fi and family to the Museum on any day. 

5a <'«</.— "I en tickets every year admitting the Inrarer to the Mu-scum on pay days. 
Thirii. A ition of the Museum sold at the entrance door, 

aiii! • ; - , . . . 

Fouft' ;ations to all receptions, lectures or other entenainments which may 

be given at the Mii^' 

the 
art , <• to 

time bv the Hoard of Tnistees at anv of its meetings, upon the recommendati«in 
of . that such 1 in the articles 

of ' - " • ' 

pri 

respective election, pay into the treasury the sum <>f twenty dollars ^%2oxKi\ or 

more. Tt  shall, 

at •' • ■■!. ... 

m« Ip. Tl. > 

after the first year of membership, and no one •- ic rights of a 

corporate the 

pa* •'"■'■• . i NJiip. 

rrson paying mto the treasury the sum of live hundred 
d<  l>e chosen 

a .;...-. ., ;; • iiTi of thr 

Ev '- ife members shall be exempt from all dues. 

."^ - shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees upon recr>mmend- 



Oct. 1895. Annual Report of the Director. 55 

ation of the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and by 
virtue of their election as patrons shall also be corporate members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary members shall be chosen from among persons who have 
rendered eminent service to science, art or mechanics. They shall be chosen by 
a vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the Executive 
Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. In commemoration of the 14th 
day of October honorary members shall not be more than fourteen in number at 
any one time. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible to appointment 
upon committees other than the Executive Committee. 



ARTICLE II. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees named in the articles of association 
shall continue in office until the annual meeting in the year 1894, with power to 
fill vacancies occurring in the meantime. Before the date of such annual meeting 
said Trustees shall divide themselves by lot into three classes of five each, the 
term of office of one class to expire at the annual meeting of 1894, of another 
class at the annual meeting of 1895, and of another class at the annual meeting 
of 1896. The Board of Trustees, at its last regular meeting before the annual 
meeting in each year, shall elect by ballot from among the corporate members 
five persons as Trustees -to serve for a term of three years, and until their 
successors are elected and qualified, and vacancies in the Board of Trustees 
occurring in the interval between such annual elections may be filled by a vote of 
the Board at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary 
and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall be chosen 
by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early as practicable 
after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall be ex officio a. m&mher 
of the Executive Committee, in addition to the other four members. The Secretary 
and Treasurer may, or may not, be the same person, and the Secretary may, or 
may not, be a corporate member. 

Any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any office 
may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Committee 
on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure of the Board. 

Sec. 4. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such other duties as the Board of Trustees may from 
time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount 
and witU such surety as shall be approved by the Executive Committee, and shall 
disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with the directions of the 
Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter-signature of such officers 
as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall have full control of the affairs of 
the Museum, under the general supervision of the Board of Trustees. 



56 



Fu 



inuN Ml Kri'iiKi^, \' 

ARTin T I" 



MKK I ISii.s. 

V I. In coiniiiciiioniiion «)( th' 



I r- 

then u|M>ii th' 
lran».i('t such \n\ 
m^i* iif tl>' 
written »• 
by mail ^ 
such 

first \ 

April and lulv o! 

a: 



irh itlr. 



iv |>n>|" 



the t 



ti) 



conM>ralc mcnilMrrs of the linp 



rhrukt«»|»hcr 



.mtr Hi- 



ll mcet- 



r|K»se of 



may be called by the President at 
c liy II the written 



ARTICLK IV. 

AMKNDMF.NTS. 

I ION I. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 

the Trustees by a two-thirds' vote of all the members present, provided the 

a: -i'«l at the last regular meeting preceding, or 

sli.i,, '•' "• '"••nimittcc. 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



57 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



GEO. E. ADAMS 

O. F. ALDIS 

ALLISON V. ARMOUR 

PHILIP D. ARMOUR 

ED. E. AYER 

WM. T. BAKER 

A. C. BARTLETT 

JOHN C. BLACK 

WATSON F. BLAIR 

ELIPHALET W. BLATCHFORD 

THOMAS B. BRYAN 

EBENEZER BUCKINGHAM 

M. C. BULLOCK 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM 

EDWARD B. BUTLER 

JOHN M.CLARK 

W. J. CHALMERS 

H. C. CHATFIELD-TAYLOR 

A. CRAWFORD 

WM. E. CURTIS 

GEO. R. DAVIS 

JAMES H. DOLE 

SIDNEY C. EASTMAN 

JAMES W. ELLSWORTH 

CHAS. FITZSIMONS 

L. J. GAGE 

HENRY H. GETTY 

FRANK W. GUNSAULUS 

C. F. GUNTHER 

WM. E. HALE 

WM. R. HARPER 

AZEL F. HATCH 

FRANKLIN H. HEAD 

H. N. HIGINBOTHAM 

EMIL G. HIRSCH 



CHAS. L. HUTCHINSON 

H. W. JACKSON 

ARTHUR B. JONES 

E.G. KEITH 

HERMAN H. KOHLSAAT 

BRYAN LATHROP 

L. Z. LEITER 

E. B. McCAGG 

A. C. McCLURG 

JOHNMcCONNELL 

CYRUS H. Mccormick 

ROBERT McMURDY 
ANDREW McNALLY 
GEO. MANIERRE 
JOHN J. MITCHELL 
ROBERT W. PATTERSON 
FERD. W. PECK 
ANDREW PETERSON 
P. S. PETERSON 
J. IRVING PEARCE 
GEO. M. PULLMAN 
N. B. REAM 
JOHN A. ROCHE 
HENRY WADE ROGERS 
MARTIN A. RYERSON 
GEORGE SCHNEIDER 
JOSEPH STOCKTON 
BYRON L. SMITH 
WM. SOOY SMITH 
A. A. SPRAGUE 
MELVILLE E. STONE 
EDWIN WALKER 
R. A. WALLER 
JOHN R. WALSH 
NORMAN WILLIAMS 



DECEASED. 



JAMES W. SCOTT 



GEORGE F. BISSELL 



5» 



FiEi.u Coi.fMHiAN Museum— Keiuk IS, \\n 



Lirr: .\\ea\blk. 

/.i //;«■ r^tytnriit of five ht$iuirfd ,l>rr,. 
\V. I. CHALMKKS. 



HONORARY WnMB^R- 

(II \S. B. COKV. 



PATRON. 

ALLISON V. AKMorK 



Oct. 1895. 



Annl'al Report of the Director. 



SO- 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ABEL, JONATHAN 
ADAMS, CHARLES 
ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADLER, DANKMAR 
ALLEN, W. L 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ALLERTOX, MRS. S. W. 
AMBERG, \VILLL\M A. 
ANDREWS, W. H. 
ANSLEY, ROBERT 
ARMOUR, BARBARA 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 
ARMS, W. A. 
ARNOLD,]. B. 
AVERY, FRANK M. 
BAKER, ALFRED L. 
BAKER, FRANK 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAILEY, E. W. 
BALDWIN, WILLIS M. 
BALLARD, ORVILLE W. 
BANE, OSCAR F. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARNHART, ARTHUR M. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BARRETT, JOHN P. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARRINGTON, CHARLES V. 
BARTLETT, JOSIAH C. 
BARTLETT, WILLLVM H. 
BATCHELLER, W. 
BAUER, PHIL. C. 
BEACH, F. G. 
BEAUVAIS, E. A. 
BECK, CHARLES A. 
BECKER, A. G. 



BEECHER, MRS. JEROME 
BEIDLER, H. A. 
BEIDLER, FRANCIS 
BEIFELD, JOSEPH 
BELDEN, J. S. 
BELDING, MRS. L. S. 
BENNETT, THOMAS 
BENSLEY, JOHN R. 
BENTLEY, CYRUS 
BERRY, H. J. 
BICKFORD, R. K. 
BIDDLE, GEORGE W. A. 
BIDDLE,W. B. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BINGHAM, A. E. 
BIRKHOFF, JR., GEORGE 
BLACKMARR, FRANK H. 
BLACKSTONE, T. B. 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, LYMAN 
BLAIR, WILLIAM 
BLANCHARD, WILLIAM 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLISS, SAMUEL E. 
BLODGETT, H. W. 
BLUM, EDGAR C. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOLTON, JAMES 
BONFIELD,JOHN 
BOOTH, A. 
BOOTH, W.VERNON 
BORDEN, JAMES U. 
BORDEN, JOHN 
BORLAND, MRS. JOHN J. 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
BOUTON, C. B. 



tx) 



FiKi.n Coi.i'MiiUN MtsfcLM — Kkh^k 



liolTON. N. S. 
HRADI.KY. j. HAkl.l-.V 
Hk \!)\\ MI. I.WIKS It. 

I \\ n> K 

I 

HKi. 1 1. I mi ii>uKi- J . 
I'vi. I wvu T. .nv >-; 

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HKo\VN.(.i oKr.r r 

HK<»\VN. I<>H\ 
Hkt)\\ N. |oHN H. 

HK«»\\ \. \\ 

HkMWM . i 

HKoWNIII. K 

HI KHI ! !iN 

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Blkl.KY. A. H. 

I' NCK A. 

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NHAM.AISTIN A, 

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CHAMHI.kLIN. I.. .\l. 
CIIANDI.KR.CC. 
CII.\NI)I.f:k. FkANK R. 

cHANDi.ik. ri.vn»\ k. 

LH.M'IN. Mk.S. .M. A. 
CHAPMAN. MRS. J. DEERK 
(. H.M'I'I I.I. ( . H. 



11' ' '•' ' 



' \ M i:.s 



C. i IS c. 

CHASE. S. 11 
CHASE. I L M. 

C f ' ' ^ ' 
Ci 

CLARK. AI.SON E. 
CI.AkK.(,KnK(;F. M. 
CI. AkK. joNAIH \\ 
CLARK. \V. D. 
CLAkK F.CLINTON C. 
CLARKE, L. H. 



CLIFF. CAFT. I«>HN 
CLAY. JOHN, 
ci.orn. jNu. U. 
comi, .s. ij. 

CdFUN.C. H. 
Col.HY. JOHN A. 
COLMN. W III lAM H. 

(■( )\t W vl \ Ml it I.- 

^M <• 

«.«»NKI.IN(,. Al 

CO ( n.\i,i I .s 1. 

K 
U' ' 1' Ml.N C 

Ci ' 

COkWITH. CHARLES R. 

E. F. 
^_.M « H. MRS. J.VMES 
COWAN. \V. 1'. 
COX. ALFRED J. 
COX. I \E R. 

COY. i.M - 
CHI R HELL. R.S. 

i:R. MRS. CHARLES E. 
ClM MINGS. E. A. 
Cl'R IIS, I). H. 
("ISIFK. I. k. 



DAL. DR. JOHN \V. 
DAMSEL. NV. IL 
DANA. AkTHlk D. 
DA\ IS. CHA.S. K. 
DAVIS. HARRY G. 
DAVIS. LEWIS H. 
DAY. A in I RT M. 
DAY. CI L\ TIN A. 
DAYTON. MELVILLE E. 
DEAKIN. HARRY 
DFAN. THAI). 
DLKRINC. WILLIAM 
DeKOVEN. JOHN 
DELANO. F. A. 
DKWI - '^^^ \NCIS J. 
DKWi \ ID n. 

DICK. A. B. 
DILI. MAN. L. M. 
DOANF. I W. 
DoimiNS. TH'iMAS S. 
DOIXJE. GEORGE E. P. 
DORR. GEORGE J. 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



61 



DOW, WILLIAM C. 
DOWNS, C. S. 
DRAKE, JOHN B. 
DUDDLESTON, GEORGE 
DUMMER,W. F. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
DURAND, H. C. 
DWEN, JAMES C. 
DWIGHT,JOHNH. 

EAMES, L. H. 
EDDY, CLARENCE 
EDMONDS, HOWARD O. 
EDSON, J. M. 
EGAN, WILEY M. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
ELLIOTT, EDW^ARD S. 
ELLIOTT, W. S. JR., 
ELTONHEAD, E. Y. 
EMMERICH, CHARLES 
ENGERT, DR. ROSA H. 
ETHERIDGE, MRS. J. H. 
EVANS, ORIN L. 
EVERINGHAM, L. 
EWING, WILLIAM G. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FAITHORN, J. N. 
FARGO, CHARLES 
FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FARRAR, MRS. ARTHUR 
FAY, C. N. 

FEATHERSTONE, A. 
FELSENTHAL, H. 
FERGUSON, B. F. 
FERGUSON, CHAS. H. 
FISCHER, FREDERICK 
FISH, STUYVESANT 
FISHER, L. G. 
FITCH, M. J. 
FLANNERY, J.L. 
FLERSHEM, LEM.W. 
FLOWER, JAMES M. 
FOLTZ, FRITZ 
FORD, J. S. 

FOREMAN, EDWIN G. 
FOREMAN, OSCAR G. 
FORREST, WILLIAM H. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FORSYTH, R. CLARKE 



FOSTER, SAMUEL B. 
FOWLER, E. M. 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRANK, JOSEPH 
FRANK, MAX 
FREER, NATHAN M. 
FREES, B. M. 
FREYTAG, MORITZ 
FULGHUM, B. W. 
FULLER, O. F. 

GAGE, ALBERT S. 

GANS, LEOPOLD 

GARRISON, MRS. M. HARROLD 

GARTZ,ADOLPHF. 

GARVEY, JOHN W. 

GATES, RYERSON D. 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 

GERALDINE, DION 

GEROW, F. P. 

GIBBS, JAMES S. 

GIFFORD, C. E. 

GIFFORD, I.CUSHMAN 

GIVINS, ROBERT C. 

GLESSNER, J. J. 

GOODFELLOW,MRS. WM. 

GOODRICH, A. W. 

GOODWIN, DANIEL 

GORDON, EDWARD K. 

GORMULLY, R. PHILIP 

GRAHAM, EUGENE 

GREEN, O. Bi 

GREY, CHARLES F. 

GREY, WILLIAM L. 

GRIDLEY, NELSON C. 

GRIFFIN, T. A. 

GRISWOLD, E. P. 

GROSS, S. E. 

GROSSMITH, ALFRED 

GUION, GEORGE MURRAY 

GUNNING, ROBERT J. 

HAINES, T. L. 

HALLE, LOUIS 

HAMBLETON, C. J. 

HAMBLETON, EARL L. 

HAMER, R. W. 

HAMILTON, HENRY E. 

HAMILTON, I. K. 

HANECY, ELBRIDGE 

HANLON, JOHN J. 

HARAHAN, J. T. 

HARBECK, EUGENE 



KlKI.I» COI.UMIUAN MUSEl'M— RKP'iin'i. Vol.. I. 



HAKhlMi. AMOS J. 

n \K<.kKA\ KS.OEuiv'.. 

HAKKl^ I^ t 

H ARRl Kr.K H. 

IIAKkl>. John k. 

H AKKIS. M ADISi'V >' 

H AKKIS. N. \V. 

HARTMAN. ISA.\ 

HAR\ KY. TIKI l\«.lON W . 

HAnKI I.I.. KRtDllKlCK T 

HA\ INS. A. K 

HAYES. D. H 

HI ARD. I>\VH,H I I.ANLKO^ I 

HI AIM. I.KNI.sr W. 

HKMMKI.C.ARN. H. 

HI.NI>KRSON.CHARI.r.S M. 

HI NMN<'.. HR FRANCIS A. 
HlKHAKl). K.V. S. 
HINI >. KinVARI) 
HOARD. CHAR I. IS D. 
HoIHINI). AI.I.X. 
Hot, I.. Hol.MI^ 
lUH.nOM. JI> : 
HOI.T. I). R. 
HOI r.(,KoR(;K H. 
HOPKINS. JOHN P. 
HoRNKR. ISAAC 
HOSKINS. WII.I.IAM 
HorC.H.t HAR I KS R. 
Horc,Hri.l.lN(.. I AMIS I.. 
HOWARD. I RKDKRICK 
HoWI.AND. WAI.TKR M. 
HoVNK. jAS. T. 
HI*. HIM. MARVIN 
HILL. MORTON B. 
HCNI. lAMI S A 
Hire HISS. I.ri.l.NK R. 
HC II HINSON.MRS. B. P. 
HYDK. JAMKS NKVINS 

ILIFK. WII.I.IAM H. 
INC.ALS, DR. KPHRAIM 
INCrAl.S. 1.. FLKTCHF.K 
I NCR AH AM. MRS. C. S. 
INSILL. SAMl'KL 
ISBF.STKR.T. 
ISHAM. EDWARDS. 

JACKSON. HFRMAN B 
JANFS. JOHN J. 
JENKINS, T. R. 
JENKINS. WILTON A. 



Jl DR. ROBERT H. 

J( N. HERBERT B. 

JOHNMiN. J. M. 

JnllN^oN. W. v. 

JoHN^IUN D r 

JONI 

Ji -.C.E. 

Jl I'NuN. HARRY I'HMT 

KAMMFRFR. Ft.. 
K \\ ANAt.M ' " ^''f r<i t 
Kl.l KER. 1 

KEELER.HERVEY E. 
Kl KB. AI BFRT 
Kill'. WII.I.IAM F. 
Kl I IH. KDSoN 
KEITH. W. scon 
KEI.LEV. DAVID 
KFI.UH.C. MRS. L. I . 
KELI.oC.(.. JAMES B. 
KEM.o( ".(■.. Ml LOT,. 
KKNNE IT. FRANCIS J. 
KENT. THO.MAS 
KEOC.H.EVC.ENE 
KEWI.EV.'). R. 
KIMBAI.I.. Eir.ENE S. 

KIMHAI.I.. (.FORCE F. 
KIMBALL. MRS. MARK 

KIMBALL. W. W. 

KINC. IM.NRV W. 

K1KCHBFK(.FR. S. H. 

Kl LINE. HENR^ 

KNKiHT. MRS. WILLIAM M. 

KNOTT. HENRY A. 

Koc HERSBER(.ER.D. H. 

KoEHLER. THOMAS N. 

LAFLIN. ALBERT S. 
LAFLIN. ARTHIR K. 
LAFLIN, r.EoRC.E H. 
LAFLIN. INo. V. 
LAFLIN. LYCURCrs 
LAMB. C HAS. A. 
LAMB. FRANK H. 
LAMI'TON. MRS. A. D. 
LANGDON. R. B 
LART/. W.C C. 
LAWRENCE. EDWARD F. 
LAWSON. VICTOR F. 
LAV. A. TRACY. 
LE.ACH. THOS. A. 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



63 



LeBAROX, wai. 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEGNER, WM. 
LEITER, JOSEPH. 
LELAND, WARREN F. 
LEVI, HENRY C. 
LEVY, ALEXANDER H. 
LEWIS, JAMES F. 
LEWIS, MRS. WILLIAM G. 
LEYENBERGER, CHARLES 
LIGHTNER, MILTON C. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LLOYD, EVAN 
LOCKE, JOHN M. 
LOEWENTHAL, B. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LOMBARD, JOSIAH L. 
LONG, EUGENE C. 
LORD, GEORGE S. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOSS, C. E. 
LOWY, HAIMAN 
LUDLAM, DR. R. 
LUNT, ORRINGTQN 
LYFORD, O. S. 
LYFORD, W. H. 
LYON, GEORGE M. 
LYON, THOMAS R. 

McCREA, W. S. 

Mcdonald, j. s. 
mcelligott, thomas g. 

McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McKINLEY, WILLIAM B. 
McKEEVER, JAMES L. 
McKINLOCK, GEORGE A. 
McKINLOCK, WILLIAM H. 
McLEAN, W. A. 

Mclennan, j. a. 

McNALLY, ANDREW 
McNEIL, MALCOLM 
McVICKER,J. H. 
McWTLLIAMS, LA FAYETTE 
MacGEAGH, JOHN W. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MAIR, CHARLES A. 
MALLETTE, J. P. 
MANASSE, LOUIS 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E.L. 
MANVEL, MRS. ANNA F. 



MARK, CLAYTON 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MARSH, CHARLES A. 
MARSHALL, GEORGE E. 
MARSTON, THOS. B. 
MARTIN, DR. FRANKLIN H. 
MASON, EDWARD G. 
MATHEWS, GEORGE W. 
MATTHIESSEN, C. H. 
MAURER, WILLIAM 
MAY, HORATIO N. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MAYO, J. B. 
MEAD, W. L. 
MEARS, CHARLES 
MERRICK, L. C. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, ISAAC 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MIDDLETON, GEORGE 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, DeLASKIE 
MILLER, HENRY G. 
MILLER, THOMAS 
MILLER, DR. TRUMAN W. 
MILLIKEN, WALTER L. 
MILLS, FRANK O. 
MILNOR, LLOYD 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MIXER, C. H. S. 
MOORE, LAWRENCE C. 
MOORE, JAMES HOBART 
MOORE, N. G. 
MOORE, SILAS M. 
MOORE, WILLIAM H. 
MORGAN, GEO. C. 
MORISON, GEORGE S. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, IRA 
MORRIS, NELSON 
MORSE, CHARLES J. 
MORSE, JAY C. 
MOULTON, D. A. 
MOULTON, GEORGE M. 
MUHLKE, JOSEPH H. 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 
MUNRO, WILLIAM 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 
MURDOCK, DR. E. P. 



<>4 



Fi»:i.i> Columbian Mi skum — Reports, Voi 



V ^ m AN. Arxn.PH 

\ IHW.HI.KMW 
NK; U kkN 

m;u 1.; K K(,i. «.. 



V I \\ 1 I I 



, .K \. 



t ). S. 
NOI. AN. j»>H\ II 
NoK ION. UoKAIlO N. 

Noi 

NOYKS. I.A\ KKN 

ol MM . I HI. ODOR r. 
.. JOHN A 

N, HLNkVA. 
ORNE. FRANK SAYKK 
HAKI I S T. 
y I 1^. « .KnRCK L. 
OTIS. L. H. 

PALMER. MILTON J. 
PALMIK. PIRCIVAL n. 
IWriN. MRS. K. A. 
I'AKKKR. A. K. 
PARKER. FRANCIS W. 
IXKKKR. F. W. 
lAKKI - '■ 'UN C. 
PA ! ! I W. R. 



I'M K.(iK(»R(.E R. 
11 (K.WALTER L. 

II Ik- w H. 

1 H>V. T ( 

! K n. 

Ii, ! \, t.i.' na.l-. L. 

PI. 1 . N. WII I I \M \ 

ri I I M'.itNE. A. < 

I C. F. 

i INI . : * NE S. 

PINK I . W. A. 

PITKIN. HARVEY E. 

I'M \r' \THAN \V 

I'MMt. 

loll. 

P(H (RANK \V. 

! K. H. II. 

I . - . .,R. MK- " ' I \ F. 

PoRTER. \VA -roN 

POTTER. OR R IN W. 



PR^^ I' iN. ,., ..i ' 

PRIM! I S. f P 

I 

PI .M.\, l>k.LlI.\KLl..s M. 

QUICK. JOHN H. S 

RABER. P. \V. 
RANI). H MI N (. 
RANUALI.. riH»\i V. 1- 
R.W. I R.\NK n 
RAVNER. JAM 
RAWSnN.sTIIHKN \V. 
RFKCI ^' "^  \ 
REHM, 
REH). W. H 
RFW. HENRY C. 
Rj.-^v<it ti< <-,riit:'r;r n 

Rlln: 

RICE. UR. N. B. 

RICIIARH.S. J, T. 

R K KC< )R I)S. r.EORr.F F 

rum; WAY, WM. 

RIPLEY. E. P.' 

RoK.CHAS. S. 

RODMAN. SAMfM 

ROLOSON, R. \ 

ROOD. 

ROSF.NIm.ki,. ,.\v ' T. 

knSKVFELD. MALRK F 

k' 1 \ I HAL. LSA.VC 

K I HAL. 

K« '^1 N I II.M, « '^» \ i\ 

koTILsiHILD. A. M. 

ROTHSCHILD. FRED 

ROWl , Mk^. ( HARI.ESH. 



SABIN. .\. R. 
SATTI FY. W. N 

SAW 1'.. 

SCHI.N 1 /., 1 ill t M " U\I. 

ScniN T/ rm ( i n 

S« PuLD 

SCHMihI.i.I oRi,h A. 

SCHMIDI. L. 

SCHMIOr. o. L. 

SCHMIDTT. ANTHONY 

SCHNFIDKk.olTOC. 

SCHNKkINf;. " • " - 

SCHWAkT/.C, 

SCULL, HENkY 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



65 



SEARS JOSEPH 

SEAVERNS, JR., GEORGE A. 

SECKEL, ALBERT 

SEDERHOLM, E. T. 

SEIPP, MRS. C. 

SEIPP, W. C. 

SELZ, MORRIS 

SENN.MRS. N. 

SERCOMB, ALBERT L. 

SEWELL, BARTON 

SHAFFER, J. C. 

SHANKLAND, EDWARD C. 

SHAW, GILBERT B. 

SHEDD, JNO. G. 

SHEPARD, J. H. 

SHEPARD, MRS. HENRY MAR- 

TYN 
SHERWOOD, H. M. 
SHERWOOD, MARC 
SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 
SHORTALL, JOHN G. 
SHUTE, JOHN W. 
SIEGEL, FERDINAND 
SIMM, JAMES C. 
SIMMONS, J. J. 
SIMONDS, GILBERT 
SIMONS, DR. CHARLES J. 
SINGER, A. L. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SLOCUM, J. E. 
SLOSSON, ANSON H. 
SMITH, CHARLES HEAD 
SMITH, CHARLES MATHER 
SMITH, F. B. 
SMITH, JOHN C. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SMITH, ROBERT J. 
SNELL, MRS. HENRIETTA 
SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 
SNYDER, REV. CHAS. C. 
SODEN, G. A. 
SOLLITT, OLIVER 
SONTAG, FRITZ 
SOMERVILLE, ROBERT 
SOBER, ALEX. C. 
SOPER.JAMESP. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPALDING.JESSE 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPRAGUE, O. S. A. 
STANLEY, FRANK W. 



STANTON, W. A. 
STEELE, HENRY B. 
STICKNEY, MRS. EDWARD S. 
STILES, JOSIAH 
STIRLING, W. R. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STRAHORN, ROBERT 
STRAUS, SIMON 
STROBEL, C. L. 
STUART, ROBERT 
STUDEBAKER, PETER E. 
SULLIVAN, LOUIS H. 

TAYLOR, SAMUEL G. 
TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TIFFANY, H. S. 
TILTON, MRS. L.J. 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 
TREAT, CHARLES P. 
TRIPP, C.E. 
TRUAX, CHARLES 
TRUDE, A. S. 
TRUE, ALBERT W. 
TRUMBULL, JOHN H. 
TURBIN, DR. LOUIS M. 
TURNER, E.A. 
TURNER, VOLUNTINE C. 
TYRRELL,JOHN 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 
UPTON, GEORGE P. 

VAN HAMM, F. R. 
VIERLING, LOUIS 
VIERLING, ROBERT 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WAIT, HORATIO L. 
WALKER, ALDACE F. 
WALKER, AMOS W. 
WALKER, GEORGE C. 
WALKER, HENRY H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, ROBERT P. 
WALKER, WM. B. 
WALKER, W. S. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WATKINS, WILLIAM W. 
WATSON, A. D. 



66 



Finn CoLi'MiiiAN Mrsruw- Hki-orts, Vol.. i. 



\V \ rSuN. lAMI > I . 
W.M.St >N. W ILI.I.WI J. 

\v.\r<;n. i>R wii.i.i.wi f. 

NVl KC.I. H. 

Wl'.lNMll.lMl.K. A. S. 
\\].i T Tvr. ToUN C 

NVl N. A. t; 

\VM.I..s. It. K. 

wi KM.K. r. i:. 

WHI.KI.IR. CHARI.KS W . 
WmiLKR. FRANCIS T. 
WUKKl.F.R. G. H. 
WliriK. A. STAMFORD 
Willi K. WM.. SR. 
WHITKHKAD, WM.M. 
WIIITI mUSi:. FRANCIS M. 
W K KIS. T. H. 
WILLIAMS. AUKAM 
WILLIAMS. DI.XON C. 
W II.LIAMS. SIMI-.nN H. 
WII.LINC. MRS. IM.NRV J. 
WILMARTH. MRS. H. M. 



\\ IL.SDN. L. I . 
WIL.SnN. M. H. 
WILSON. WM. J. 
WILSON. W. M. 
WINC. DR. KLBLKI 
W I NC;. THOMAS W. 
WINK.HKNRY 
WINSLoW. 7..R. 
WITH Row. RKV. j. L. 

Wolf, frkd w. 

WC^)D. lOHN H. 
W ( • 

W« »« 'i " " i< N. l.l.S l.'.-1.\l 

WOODHKAD. J. K. 
WOODLAND. ( IKORGE 
WooLF. ISAAC 
WKir.HT. THos. A. 

YKRKKS.CHARLKS T. 
YorNC. CARYL 
vol \r,. WM s 



1 



DECEASED. 



F. C. OS BORN. 



I 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



67 



LIST OF DONORS OF WORLD'S COLUMBIAN 
EXPOSITION STOCK. 



10 

50 
100 

5 
50 



Aagard, J 

Abbott, A. H. & Company . . 
Abendpost Company, The . . 

Adair, John D 

Adams, F. F., Tobacco Company 
Adams, George E 200 

5 
250 

10 

25 
2 

I 

100 

10 



Adams, J. McGregor . . . 
Adams & Westlake Co., The 
Adams, \Vm. Henri . . . 
Adler, Dankmar .... 

Aiken, Lois M 

Aiken, \Vm 

Ajax Forge Company . . . 
Aldrich, J. Frank 



Allen, Benj. & Co 250 

Allen, Charles L 25 

Allen, E. L 5 

Allen, E. L i 

Allen, George E. ..... 5 

Allen, J. D 20 

Aller, D. S r 

Alt George E i 

Alzen, Carl A i 

American Cutlery Company . 25 
Am. Emp. Liability Ins. Co., The 25 

American Exchange Nat'l Bank 500 

American Express Company . 2500 

American Soda Fountain Co. . 25 

Ames and Frost Company . . 100 

Ames, H. D. . , i 

Anderson, D. F 10 

Anderson, W. P 5 

Andrews, Elliott R i 

Andrews, W. J 5 



Armour, Allison V 

Armsby, J. K., Company . . . 
Armstrong, Charles G. . . . 

Arnold Brothers 

Artingstall, Samuel G. . . . 
Atlas Nat'l Bank of Chicago . 

Austin, F. C 

Ayer,B. F 

Ayer, Ed. E 

Bach, Becker & Company . . 
Baeder, Adamson & Company 

Baker, Charles S 

Baker, Frank 

Baker & Vawter Company 

Balding, Jennie M 

Baldwin, Annie S 

Baldwin, Chas. W 

Baldwin, John A 

Ballard, Addison 

Ballard, Thomas C 

Barbour, James J 

Barnes, J. M , 

Barnhart Brothers &: Spindler 
Barnhart, Kenneth . . . , 

Barrett, J. P 

Barrett, S. E., Mfg. Co. . . 
Bartlett, Frazier & Co. . . 

Barton, E. M 

Batcheller, W . 

Bateman, S 

Battams, George E. ... 

Baude, Frank W 

Bayley, Edwin F. .... 
Becker, A. W 



100 
100 

5 

100 

100 

200 

50 

25 
250 

25 
100 
20 
20 
10 

5 
I 

10 

30 

10 

2 
2 

5 

150 

5 

5 
510 

50 
20 
20 
10 
I 
I 
25 
25 



note.— The number of shares is equivalent to the number of dollars donated in each case, 
as the declared dividend was ten per cent and the shares were ten dollars each. 



68 



Field Coi.umiuan Mi skim — Rkports, Vol. i. 



IUm ker. P.. \' Compain 

lUr Hive. The 

i;. . '. . ( itorjjc I.. 

I . Ileniard 

i . I. . 

1 '• ' .... 

I ' Coinpany 

Itell. C'i>iinid jt Cnmpany 

I o li., \' Coni|>aii)r 



1 . Trumbul! i\ Co. 

Urniiett. K. \V. 
It MDcti. H. K. 
r.r;;tu-tt. K.I. 

He lit, ( ii' <ii.v r. 

lienllcy. Waller t;. 
Bcri:. A. 
Hrrt. Miss I . 
Ii^'clnw Itros. 
h:r.>th. Henry 
Hirr, Krc«l I-".. Jr.. . 
I'-i-hup, A., \' Cnm|>.»ii 
ni-.i»i»p, Charles N< 

H.sscll.G. r 

Hlackwcll's iMirhaiu inbatco 

Co 

lUakelidge, (;. W . 
IMatrhfonl CartriilKc W nrks 
]•■'•'' r<I. K. \V.. \- Company 

1. .. Arthur C 

Illayncy, T. ' 

HI. ickc. F. \V 

lUss. Hul!.«nl \- Gonnley 

lUiss. ( .c.Tcc H. ... 

IMiHs. N. \V. 

IJoake. A. V 

IW>al.<.'harl< 

HimIc, Krc<l 

It^Mhnan, A. ' 

I "id kokjtrs 

1 1. M.I.. . 

Hoi,. I. \\ ilham A. 

I'.. -.'ii r.i. 'Kitifj c< 

r " " -.1 . 

1 . inpaiiv 

lUm-en, Arthur F. 

H. wni. "^trphen I 

Uowrtt, >. 1. 
Hover, l.ouis I 
r'"\lc*. Charles ' 
I nico..Jr. 



1. 



w A VV^ 



SO 


Hradsirecl Compaii) 


•.The 


100 


-50 


Hra.ly. ( ' f.. . 




1 


1 


Hniiiianl ' >> . 
Brainani. 1. <  


Ihe S. 


50 

1 


100 


HraumciAler ! 




10 


2 


Hraiin, ((Corw;! t . 




50 


-5" 


Itrriinai), I-'.dwanI 1' 




1 


SO 


Brewster. Kdwani L. 


, \ C.». . 


101 


as 


1 ak. H. A. 




2 


5 


1': . Arthur 




t 


w 


H; .. INireiire 


I . 


1 


1 


Hriil^inai). H. L. 




10 


5 


]\' 


 ' 


50 


no 


IW...; . ...; 




to 


25 

1 


nnnti.all.\V. H. 
Hn»okc. Albert M. 




to 


•» 


HfiMikc, LiDCfiln . 




1 


1 


BnM)kcr \ Ho:iii< - 




20 


100 


BriKik?. J. F. 




1 


25 


Browcr. D. K 




50 


1 


Btfiwii, A. I" 




25 


100 


Brown, A. F. 




1 


10 


Broun. C". ,\. 




f 


50 


Br«»wn. F.. W 




2 




Brown. H. C. . 




5 


too 


Brown, Harry M 




20 


I 


Brown. Henry F. . 




10 


-5 
250 


Brown Paul 




-y 


• ' •  ' WW 9 9^ m ■• •■ • 

Brown. R. L. t. . . 




2 


5 


BroM tnn^ Kinjj &• C' 




250 


5 


Buck &- Kayner 




100 


2 


Buck. Silas K. . . 




5 


100 


Buckingham. J. 




10 


10 


Biiehlcr, John 




100 


20 


Buchlcr. John W 




5 


I 


Bueschcr, Henrv 




I 


25 


Bull. L. J. . 




5 


25 


Bundy, John < 




25 


5 


Bunlick. F. M 




: 


30 


Bur ley \- Co. 




250 


3 


Bunnan. F.dw. F 




1 


50 


Burnham. I). H. 




150 


-'50 


Burtnn, LcGrand 




2S 


wx> 


Burton. S ' ! 




2S 


50 


Bush, Sill . to. . 


75 


10 


Bushnell. J. A 




1 


I 


Buss, Frederick H. . 




5 


2 


Butler Bnithers 




500 


f. 


Butler. Walter 




5 




Bultolph. A. < 




•^5 




Brachvojjel. Charles 


H. 


10 




Br\an, Thomas H 




100 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



69 



Byford, Henry T 

Byrne, Margaret 

Byrne, Sarah 

Cahn, B. R 

Cahn, Wampold & Company . 
Cameron, Amberg & Company 
Cameron, John McRae . . . 

Cameron, \V. F 

Cameron, W. H 

Campbell & Custer . . . . 

Cantrovitz, Harry S 

Cantrovitz, Admr. of J. S. . . 

Cantrovitz, Sol. M 

Carlisle, W. K 

Carlson, Alfred 

Carnall, J. M 

Carpenter, W. M 

Carter, L. J 

Carrington, William T. . . . 

Carse, David B 

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company 

Carter, E. P 

Cary, Eugene 

Case, J. I., T. M. Co., .... 

Case & Martin 

Castle Shirt Company, The 

Catlin, C. E 

Chace, L. J . . 

Chace, Paul Griswold • . . 
Chace, Robert Arnold . . . 

Chadevick, J. P 

Chambers, J. B. & Co 

Champlin, A. H 

Chandler, G. M 

Chandler, Joseph B 

Chapin & Gore 

Chesebro, W. H 

Chicago Arc Light & Power 

Company 

Chicago City Railway Co. . . 
Chicago Corset Company . . 
Chicago Edison Company, The 
Chicago Folding Box Company 
Chicago Packing & Prov. Co. 
Chicago Rawhide Mfg. Co. . 
Chicago Screw Company 
Chicago Shot Tower Works 
Chicago Slate & Mantel Co. 
Chicago Spring Butt Co. 
Chicago Sugar Refining Co. 
Chicago Telephone Company 
Chicago Varnish Company . 



10 Chicago Wilmington & Ver- 

5 million Coal Company, The 100 

5 Christensen, A. L i 

50 Clark, Melville 10 

250 Clay & Forrest 50 

100 Clay, Robinson & Co. ... 150 

I Cleveland, L. D 2 

3 Cleveland Twist Drill Co. . . 20 

10 Cluett, Coon & Company . . 300 

50 Cobb, Henry Ives 50 

I Cobb, S. B 100 

I Cobb, Thomas A i 

I Cochran, J. Lewis 100 

5 Cohn, Daniel A 20 

I Cole, George E., & Company . 100 

I Colton, A. M. F 15 

1 Coman, Seymour 10 

2 Commercial Cable Company . 250 
50 Comstock, W. C 300 

5 Conkey, W. B 100 

2500 Conover, C. H 10 

1 Cook, Henry L i 

50 Coolidge, Winthrop .... i 

100 Coolidge, W. G 7 

40 Cooper, John S 10 

75 Corn Exchange Bank . . . 750 

2 Cornell, Paul 15 

2 Crandall, CD 3 

I Crane Company . .- . . . . 1000 

I Crane Elevator Company . . 750 

1 Crawford, A 50 

150 Crerar, Adams & Company . . 250 

5 Crilly, W. M 25 

2 Critchell, R. S. & Co. . . . 100 

3 Crook, V. E I 

500 Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co. 50 

5 Crouch, R. B. & Co 25 

Cumberland, A. A. .... i 

200 Curtis, Agustus D. ..." i 

loooo Cushing, E. T 50 

100 Cutler, A. J i 

250 C. Y. Transfer Company . . 10 

10 Daily National Hotel Reporter 10 

250 Danforth, I. N 10 

150 Daniels, A. M 2 

40 Dashiell, L i 

25 Davis, Anna I i 

20 Davis Brothers 10 

10 Davis, Charles W 3 

150 Davis, Geo. R 100 

500 Davis, The John, Company . 100 

100 Daube, M. Jacob 20 



70 



FiEi.n Colombian Museum — Kkim»rts, V< 



nr»<>- ''V Tr..>, \V...l^ 


1 


I)c 


O 


Dean. 




IV 


s 


l)i .. ;.. . 


5 


Dccnnp. \Vm. i\- < 


lOOO 


Dclancy \- Nfiirphy 


i .  


nrni;Irr. • "' ' 


s 


Dcruiis, J> , 


5 


Dent, Thoin.i- 


2; 



PcviiM. j. n. . 

Pcvorr, A. A., A -'III. 

Dcwcy. Alhrrt H. . 

Hcwcy, Charles \'. 

iVwit/. H. 

Uc Wolfe. Walla. I 1.. 

Hcxtcr, Miss l.yilia A. 

Dexter, Mrs. Kansom 

Dn . The Albert, Co. . 

Du ,M,,-...i, Nathan .... 

Difflcy. M. W 

Disstim, Henry, & .S)ns . . . 

Dobbins, Ihomas S. 

Do''- ' ' "TS |{ 

D. . K. R., iV Sins Co. 

Dore, John C. 

!).■ Wilh.un A. . . . 

D.r. .hk-. H. V. r S V..n 

Drake, Parker & Co. 
Drake. T. D. . 
Drew ' ' V. 
Drur) : : - 
" Dry GtKKls Bulletin 
Duck Brand Company, I he 
Dun. R. C. \- Co. 
Dun<lee. WiIli.Tm 
Dunham, J. S 

Dunham Towing & Wreckmg 
Co. . . . . . 

Dunlap, K., & Co. . 
Dunlop, Simpson 
Dunnmg, Orrin .*^ 
Duranrl, Henry t. . 
Durgin, John C. . . 
Dutton, D. D. 
Dyneiwieir. W 
Dyrcnforth \ . . . 
Easton, Charles I. 
Eberle, Wm. H. 
El>er5oIe. T«>^. . 

Lckenbrccht, H. I 

Eckhart & Swan 



150 

I 

S 
I 
I 
150 
I 

50 
100 

') 

50 

50 

100 

5 

100 

1500 

} 

50 

20 

10 

50 

100 

to 

20 

too 
;<oo 

i> 

10 



I 
100 



•' Econ«. ;...,;. The 25 

1 Hwnnls, W. H. . a 

'ti. Malettc \- Brownell 100 

10 

1 ;.^ - 10 

I i"*eiiilrnlh. B. W., \- Cnmi».iny 25 

I Mixirath, Henr) 1 

W. N., & company 50 

'^' 3 

: 25 

worth, James W. 2>o 

\- .Antlerson 25 

J.R. . . 25 

Emmerich, Charles, & Co. too 

' T. K. y\ 10 

1 :,.. .W..I. A. H I 

l.n>;lewo<H| Electric Light Co. 10 
Kricks«in. .Anclrew Magnu< 

r.thcri«l^;e. Kr.iiuis ... 10 

I.tircka Fire liusc Compan> 50 

l.van.s, ( )rrin 1 5 

Evatt. Wni 5 

Everett, W., \ ^M>Jl 10 

l-^wen, John M it 

Fairbanks. The E. Sc T., fc Co. 250 

Falkcnau, Victor 50 

Fa rim. J. W 25 

Farrcll. I*. . . . 20 

Farwell, Arthur B 5 

Farwell, C.e«)rge F 15 

Farwcll. John \'., Conipan\ 1000 

Fay, (". M.. \ Co 50 

Fay. 1 \ 500 

Fclsenthal. F.ii B. 2$ 

Fcr^jiison. B. F. . 50 

I erj^ju.son, Chas. H 100 

Ferguson, George \\ . 10 

Fic<ller. A. B.. vV .S«>ns 100 

Field, y - ' -" s ' . 10000 
Fire F.\- .20 

Fisher. A. F., & Co 25 

1 -kc. Geo. F. . . . . t 

i .ci.-irhmann iV Company 50 

Fleming. R. H 100 

Floixl, J. Ramsay (M.D.j . 25 

I m Brr>-- 25 

I. M. . 30 

•ee, S. M. 10 

hollansl>ee. Tyler & Co. . . 50 

F<xite. F:.. jr. .  50 

Fonl. I. S It<litisoti iV Coni- 

pat too 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



71 



Ford River Lumber Co. . . 5° 

Forsythe, R 50 

Fowler, Charles W i 

Fox, George H 5 

Franklin, L 10 

Franklin MacVeagh & Co. . . 500 

Fraser, George 10 

Froehlich, Max 3 

Frost, Charles S 50 

Frost, W. E., Mfg. Company . 25 

Fuller's Adv. Agency, Chas. H. 25 

Fuller, A. M no 

Fuller, D. G 2 

Fuller & Fuller Co 350 

Fuller, George A 50 

Furst, Conrad 100 

Gage Brothers & Company . 100 

Gage, Downs Company ... 25 

Gage, Lyman J. 250 

Galloway, Helen M 25 

Galloway, James B 10 

Gans, Samuel 25 

Garlichs, Fred A. H I 

Gartside & Leffingwell ... 25 

Gary, Joseph E 25 

Gauer, N. J., Jr i 

Gaver, F. P i 

Gaylord, E 100 

Geehr & Gardner 20 

Gentry, C. H 25 

Georg, Adolph 10 

George, J. K. 2 

Gerts, Lumbard & Company . 100 

Gibb, J. W 5 

Gibbs, F. C 50 

Giesler, Rudolph G i 

Gilbert & Bennett Mfg. Co. . 25 

Gilbreath, W. S i 

Gillespie, John 7 

Gillespie, Robert H i 

Gillespie, Thomas 3 

Gillett, E. W 200 

Gillette, J. F 50 

Gillette, Josephine M., Exec'x. 50 

Gillick, W. M 100 

Gilmer, Thomas L 10 

Gilmore, T. W 2 

Ginn & Company 20 

Ginter, F. W i 

Githens, J. X 2 

Glover, George H., Adm. . . 46 

Glover & Willcomb .... 50 



Gradle, Dr. H 10 

Gradle & Strotz 100 

Greenebaum Sons 25 

Grey, Clarke & Engle . . . 225 

Griffin Wheel & Foundry Co. 100 

Griggs, F.H i 

Grimes, W. F 5 

Griswold, Palmer & Co. . . . 400 

Grommes & Ullrich .... 500 

Gross, Howard H 50 

Gross, S. E 350 

Gobel, E. F 50 

Goodman, Mrs. D i 

Goodman, Miss Grace . .• . i 

Goodrich Transportation Co. . 100 

Goodwin, Daniel ...... 25 

Gould, I. L., & Company . . 25 

Gould, R. M 5 

Hack, Patty A i 

Hale Elevator Company . . . 750 

Hall, Thomas C 5 

Hallberg, L. G 50 

Halsted, Edward M i 

Hamann, C. F i 

Hambleton, C. J 50 

Hamilton, D. G 50 

Hamilton & Merryman Co. . . 100 

Hamlin, George A 10 

Hammer, D. Harry 25 

Hammond, C. L 5 

Hammond, Fry & Co 25 

Hanaford, H. M 2 

Handy, Henry H 10 

Hanford, P. C. ...... 100 

Hankey, F. L i 

Hanlon, Thomas J i 

Harbert, W. S 10 

Hardy, F. A 25 

Hardy, Henry W 3 

Harlan, A. W 100 

Harris, Mrs. D. J i 

Harris, N. W., & Co 153 

Harshberger, C. R 25 

Hartman, L 20 

Hartwell, Edwin S 50 

Hatch, Azel F 50 

Hately, John C 100 

Hately, Walter C 50 

Hathaway, Franklin .... 10 

Haskell, G. W 5 

Haskell, L. P 5 

Haugan & Lindgren .... 10 



73 



Fir.i.n Coi.uMituN Museum — Rkp^rts, Vol. i. 



Hnulienritrtlt i ., ^ ..,,,,.. 


to 


Haves. Nellie I 


to 


HayJ. H. C. . 


-'5 


HaywixMl, 1. 


S 


Ural. John U . 


1 


Heath. Charles .\ 


1 


Heath \ MilliKan Mfg. « 


ICO 


Herht. ,\..\. 


1 


Hecht. K. A. . . 


>o 


He«Utn>ni. E. 1... !t t 


lOO 


Hertr.-n. Helen M. 


1 


Hcffr-.n. I. la C. 


1 


Hemerk. .\»ik 


1 


Heincinaiin. K. W.. Comnaiu 


2 5 


Hcissler & Junge Co 


lOO 


Hellyrr. Frcilenck . . 


lO 


Hcllyci. Mr». (ienr>;iana 


5 


Hellyer, Miss Marion . 


5 


Helmer A Frank. . . 


25 


il 1(1. Charles K 


2 




lO 


Merrick, John J. 


25 


Hertle. l.oms 




Hetherinmnn, H.J 


3 


Heyw.HKl. 1'. H 


lO 


Hihlianl, Spencer, Hartlelt &r Co. 


1500 


HilxTnian Banking Association 


150 


Hi.ks. Oliver H. 


20 


Hill. James J. 


2500 


Hill. Mat.s«.n 


30 


Hillrr \ Ki*llciit)cr.. 


20 


Hiilman. C. H. 


2 


Hilnicrs. Henr>- 


20 


Hinckley James « ). 


5 


Hirs. h. S..I. I. 


1 


Hi-Kfii \Iar^'ar<  


I 


li N.A. n 


I 


Hitch.. KTk. K. M 


10 


H.ff. \V. 1. . . . 


I 


Iln.ir.l. Charles 1). 


5 


n< can & Hisgen 


5 


Hol.hinl &• Roche 


too 


H ' ' 


50 


H 1 


50 


Holt Lumber Company 


50 


Holton. F. C, 


I 


H - H. M.. Compat 


•.x> 


li . M. H. 


1 


Hormuth. Josep! 




Horton. « ). H. ... 


20 


Hoskine. Ben T.. \- Br<> 


25 


Ht'smer & Fenn . . 


too 



••H..tel W...... 

H.»vey, K. G. 

Hoyne, Florence .\ 

Hoyiir. Frank (i. 

Hiii>har(l. D. B. 

Huflon, Thomas 

Hugel. I.. I 

Huchitl. Marvin, tru^tcc 

Huling, J. P. 

Hull, M. I. 

" Humane Journal. The 

Hiimiston, Keeling iV < 

Hunt. J. H. ... 

Hunt. Kol>ert W.. & Companv 
Hunter. Thomas M. 
Huntingt.i: " ' I' 
Hiint.Mtn, y 
Hurlbut. V. L. 

Husrher. .\ 

Hutchinson. Charles .\. 
Hutchinson. Chas. I.. . 
Hutchins«)n. W. H.. & S«n 
Flyman. K. \V.. Jr. & Co. 
Hypes. Fanny I 
Hypes. \V. F. 
Illinois Central K. R. Co. 
Illinois Leather C.>mpan% 
Illinois Paper Company . . 
Illinois Trust \- 5tavings Bank 
Inderrietlen, J. B., & Bro. , . 
•• In.Iustrial \V..rM " Co., The . 
Ingalls. F.phraim .... 
Ingalls. M. K.. Fresi. «if ihe < 

I . C. & .St. L. Railway C«». 
ingais. E. Fletcher 
Ingram. J. .S. . . . 
** Inland .Architect 
Instantaneous \V;*er Heating 

C.I.. The 

Intern.itional Nav. Co.. The 
Jackson. Charles i 
Jackson. F. W 
Jackson. H. U 
Jacks4in. J. M. 
Jackson, J. M. 
Jacks<»n. Luis. 
Ja. V- .. < K. . . 
Ja- V. Harry- 

Jay Dwiggins & Conipan\ 
Jeffery . K. T. . 
Jenkins. John E. 
Jenkins. Kreer & Co. 



I 

10 

2 



1 1 

20 

10 

too 

50 
100 

I 

I 



I 
100 

200 

I 

I 

5000 

50 
too 
850 

50 

to 
10 

750 
50 

5 

10 

10 
>oo 

I 
10 

.v> 
I 

5 

t 

25 
I 

10 

10 

10 

25 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



73 



Jenkins, R. E 25 

Jenkins, Sam R 2 

Jenks, John G i 

Jerrems, W. G 100 

Johns, H. W., Mfg. Co. ... 25 

Johnson Chair Company . . 100 

Johnson, Emma Irene ... 2 

Johnson, H. A., Estate ... 10 

Johnson, Dr. Frank S. . . . 5 

Johnson, Dr. Frank S. . . . 5 

Johnson, James W 10 

Johnson, Oscar C I 

Johnson, Peter, & Co 50 

Johnson, W. S 25 

Jones A. B 5 

Jones & Hacker 10 

Jones, Harriet A 25 

Jones, WilHam 25 

Josephi, Kate i 

Juergens & Anderson . . . 200 

Julius, Frank J i 

Kaestner, Charles 50 

Karpen, S., & Bros 50 

Kartheiser, John J i 

Katz, Charles A 5 

Kedzie, J. H 10 

Keep, Wm. B 25 

Keily, John J 2 

Kelsey, Horatio N 3 

Kendall Mfg. Company . . 25 

Kennedy, Madison B. ... 5 

Kenthan, Alice B i 

Kenthan, Isabella G i 

Kern, Harry W 200 

Kessler, G. T 25 

Kimball, Eugene S 25 

Kimball, W. W., Co 500 

Kimball, Elizabeth J 25 

Kimbark, S. D 100 

King Brothers 100 

King, Henry W., & Co. . . . 500 

King, James C 100 

Kingsley, H. H i 

Kinney, Frank F 5 

Kinsey & Callman 50 

Kips, Fred i 

Kirchner, F. W 2 

Kirk, James S. & Co 500 

Klein, Mathias, & Son ... 10 

Klicka, Joseph 50 

Knabe, William, & Company . 100 

Knerr, L. F i 



Knight, Clarence R 3 

Knight, Wm. M 50 

Knightj W. S., & Company . . 25 

Kohlsaat, C. C 50 

Kreis, A i 

Kreuger,J. L 3 

Kueken, A. W 15 

Lacey, Maurice 5 

Laflin, George H 100 

Lake Mich. & Lake Superior 

Trans. Co 50 

Lake Shore & Mich. Southern 

Ry. Co., The 5000 

Lambeau Leather Company . 75 

Lamson Bros. & Co 100 

Lane, Francis B 10 

Lang, Rosa A i 

Lapp & Flershem 150 

Lathrop, Bryan loo 

Law, Robert 250 

Lawton, James S 10 

Lay, C. C 25 

Lee, Charles W i 

Lee,W. H 25 

Leger, Edward & Son ... 50 

Lehman, John C i 

Leman, Francis E 5 

Leman, Henry W 10 

Leman, Sheldon Dole .... 50 

Leonard, Myron 2 

Leonard, R. L 10 

Lepper, George A i 

Lerow, George L 5 

Lesher, William T 5 

Levi, Henry C 250 

Lewis, H. C 2 

Lewis, H. L 10 

Lightner, M. C 25 

Linden Glass Company ... 5 

Lindsay, H. P 2 

Linkenheld, Charles .... i 

Lipman, A • . . 20 

Little, John S i 

Livingston, D 2 

Lloyd, Evan 100 

Lobdell, Farwell & Co. . . . 100 

Lobdell, H. H 5 

Lochner, George 2 

Lockwood & Strickland ... 20 

Lodge, 36, S. M. A. A. of N. A. 10 

Loeffel, J. C i 

Logan, F. G. & Co 80 



74 



FiFi.n Coi.tMniAN Mi'SKi'M- Kf ports, Vol. i, 



1. 



l<>M.ih 1... and C 11. 



lick Hnncstint; Machine 



. i I 



l.iioinis. John H. 
l.ooini«. John Nfason 
I.onl. I 

I.onl i\ i^ 

Lothholx. KicIkidI 
I.ovej<n-. J. \V 



I.ukens. Herman. T. 

I.uttt. ( )rrii));ton 

I.ii$9ky. I'ayn \ L<<. 

I.yman, David I*. 

I.yim \' Hcaiv 

I.yiUi, Thiiinas k.. Ajft. 

Ma' ' ' Iwnrd 

M... J. W. . 

Maclean, (ieonic A. 

Mapcc. H. W 

Ma^ccc, John J. 

Ma^jcs. (icornc C 

Mallory, Son & Zimiucrman Ca 

Mal«»nc. William 

Maitdiiini, J. . . . 

Manicrre, Wm. K. 

Mansnn, William 

" C. W 

vV HinKham Co., The 
Marsh. KniMu.<« P.. Receiver . 
Marshall, (icorge K. 

•re I-... v\. Li.. . 

„ ir & luitlc 

Martin. George P. . . 

Mason llp«thcrs . . 

Mason. K.G. \ H. H.. Kxccu- 
tors 

Mason. K. T., & Co 

" 'ss Metal Polish Co.. The 

;. Peter L. . 
Mathews. Geor>rc W. 
Matlack. K. I 



100 



io 



paiiy 



Matthews. Wm. H 
Maurer. Cass I 
Mayer. Hen. .'^ 
Mayer. R. H. 
McCajiK. I 
Mr( l-irp. A. C. & Co. 

Mcl 



Ju 
20 
30 

I 

i 

50 

^5 
200 
50 
30 
20 

50 
50 

10 
25 

50 

25 
to 

^ 

t 



20 
I 



-> 



t 


.;<xx> 


'•!■ i 'u:ice, Andrew I. 


10 


MrKwen. John 


50 




20 


'I'l.ii .ji,»», »». 


2 


Mrlnt<>i»h Uatterx- \ optir.n 


20 


Mclntyre, Allai 


1 


M< Kav, John A 


5 


\f. K I. I 


10 


"' f Wm. H. and Geo. 




A., I riistccs for Central 




r:.,!,:. ( ,, . . . 


too 


*Co. 


100 


M« I.enahan, M. li. 


1 


McLennan, J. A. 


1 «i 


Meail. Harriet .A. 


10 


Mead Paper Company, Tli< 


100 


Means, W. K. . . .' 


1 


^Irrl (..lilts 1,0.111 \ Trust c«. 


1500 


'.;. t. i.mts Nat 'I Hank . . . 


1000 


Mcrriam, Collins & Co. 


too 


Mern.k.L. C 


100 


Metcalf. McDonald Compaii> . 


50 


MctMpi.Jitan Natl Mank . . 


500 


Mnl«lendorf, George \N 


25 


Miller. K. W 


27 


Miller. K.W. . . . 


1 


Miller. James A.. & Hr 


f,o 


.Miller. James C 


: 


Miller. John H. 


5 


.Miller. John .S. 


10 


Mill.s. Harry J. 


3 


Milmine. lioilman & Company 


too 


'^' ' " '<'r Company 


100 



^ ■-- - 3 

Mo<lerwell, E. ( 10 

Moll. E.. & ' 50 

^' ' ' ' -> ' oinpai.N v> 

. W. M. 100 

Morgan. C. H.. Compai. 11 

MiTk:.!!!. J. A. . . . 3 

^' •• n.Plumroer\ Cuiii|>.iiiy 250 

' H '. I 

Mueller, Chas. M. 1 

M'lsr. John ... 5 

Milliner, G. M., & C\.. . 100 

\lu<scy. C. E., &• Son 20 

Nathanson, M. i 

.. L<i. The 50 

•le Castings Co. 150 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



15 



Neeler, H. G i 

Neimann & Weinhart Table 

Co., The 50 

Nelson Knitting Company . . 20 

Nelson, Walter C 50 

Nelson, W. P. & Co 50 

Nevers, Edward 10 

Newberry Warehouse & Stor- 
age Company 40 

Newburger, E. N 2 

Newell, Augustus 50 

Newhall, F., & Son 50 

Newton, E. F 15 

Newton, F. A 5 

Newton, L. C. . 10 

Newton, P. A 30 

Newton, P. A., Jr 40 

Niles, H. G., Jr i 

Nixon, Wm. W. K 10 

Northam, J. V 50 

Northern Trust Co., The . . 500 

Northwestern Lead & Oil Co. 50 

"North Western Lumberman" . 50 

Northwestern National Bank . 500 
North Western Terra Cotta 

Co., The 200 

Norton Brothers 200 

Norton, James S 10 

Norton & Worth mgton . . . 100 

Noyes, L. W 100 

Nye, James W . 10 

Oconto Company 100 

O'Connor, Lilla i 

Odell, B.F.J. I 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co. . . 136 

Olbrich & Golbeck 25 

Orelup, Amasa 11 

Orr & Lockett Hdwre. Co. . . 100 

Orr, Robert M 2 

Ortlieb, Jacob 25 

Osborn, H. A 10 

Osborne, M. C, Trustee ... 5 

Otis, F. R 50 

Otis, George L 50 

Otis, James 50 

Otis, J. E 50 

Ottofy, Louis i 

Ottofy, Mrs. Nellie F i 

Overdier, H. D., & Co. ... 20 

Overlock, F. F i 

Pabst, Herman 20 

Page, William R 50 



Pairpoint Manufacturing Co. . 50 

Palm, L F 5 

Palmer, Fuller & Company . . 100 

Parker, F. L 2 

Parks, W. R 2 

Patton, E. A. i 

Payson, W. G 2 

Peabody, Houghteling & Co. . 250 

Peale, R. S . 300 

Pearson, D. K 100 

Pearson Lumber Company.The 10 

Pearsons & Taft loo 

Pease, Edward H 10 

Peck, Annah B 250 

Peck, Clarence 1 250 

Peck, Ferd W . 250 

Peck Walter L 250 

Reiser, Sam C 5 

Pence, A. M 10 

Pennoyer, J. C, & Co 25 

Percival, F. W i 

Ferine, J. W 2 

Perkins, George W 25 

Pernod, P i 

Perrin, William R., & Company 10 

Perry, A I 

Perry, J. C 2 

Perry, W 2 

Peters Trimming Company . 25 

Peterson, Carl I 

Peterson, Ing. F i 

Peterson, P. S 20 

Pettet, F. E 25 

Pettibone, Mulliken & Co. . . 50 

Pettibone, Wells & Company . 25 

Pfeiffer, J. F. . . 2 

Pfiaum, Harry 5 

Pflueger, Wm. F 5 

Phcenix Ins. Company . . . 150 

Philpot, B., & Co 50 

Pickands, Brown & Co. . . . 200 

Pierce, C. W 10 

Pierce, George H i 

Pierce, H. A i 

Pierce, L. A i 

Pike, Eugene S 5°° 

Pitkin & Brooks 250 

Plows, Edward 150 

Plummer, John T 2 

Plummer, Joseph i 

Poole Brothers loo 

Populorum, P 25 



pIVI n f III I\II;1 V '. \l ^» 



I'ortcr Mn»«*. \ t onifwinv 


50 


I'urtcr. K. W . . . 


S 


I'ortcr. \V .vJ,M,..t.,M . . . . 


35 


Po»lal'I< Mc(o. 


500 


Pniu. K. H. 


25 


r- 1. li.. *... 


50 


1 :■- .1.. H.. \: Co«i(>n?iv 


100 


Price KlAvoring Kxlract t 


too 


rrime, S. Frc«l 


1 


I' ' '..hn 


1 


1 :.. Kimball Brick r... 


50 


Quackcnb<i». Stella B. 


; 


Qtiiiilan. J. 1 


1 


Randall, r. I > 


50 


Kami. McNally X* ("tminaMv 


term 


Rans<im. E. S. 


; 


K C. I 


3 


I< ' < I). Trustee . 


10 


\< , , 1) 


30 


Kayiiolcls. Julia B. . 


10 


K r.t can. Ge«irgc Kills 


1 


kiain, N. li. . . . . 


;oo 


Kc.lhcld. C. S. . . 


10 


Rcicl. F. T. 


1 


Kci.l. Mtir.lncli v\ L". 


1000 


Kri.l. \\ ilham C 


I 


Ktr..it..rff. H. 


20 


Rew, Henn. 


100 


K . •  f 


10 


h . .■ ;;.. 


100 


1 .Arch K. 


2 


RichanlsA. \V. 


1 


K ' • . F-.milv K 


^ 


h ...J. T. ' 


5 


Rirhanis \ Kelly Mfg. Co. 


25 


Rirhanlson, (). W., &• C • 


50 


K ' ' ^ilk Company 


50 


h . \Vm. I). . . 


so 


Rids way. Charl< 


 


Rilry. H. H. . 




}•  '  " '"..tV i ..miMli) 


y'J 


K M. F. . 


25 


Robert*, C. \V. 


1 


Kohrrts, David 11. 


1 


1  ' 


I 


1 

Robertsrm. A. I'. 


to 


K 


2 


1 ... .. . \ 


5 


1 r, H. W 


10 


RockwtKxi. K. .\ 


3 


Rockwood, \V. H., jr. . 


I 



\l K I I", il; ? s \'i <! ! 

Roger* & Diamond '> 

Rofjeni,<»e«>r);iana I 

R.-. ' ' M. . . :o 

R. Sc Co o 

Roiichoom. W. I... ) 
R' " tr« &: Lo. . $0 

R. . . 100 

R. : Bro«. 9c C*t». 10 

Rosenthal. It. j. ; 

R. • '• 10 

K- 75 

RolhMrhild. Lew $ 

Rubber Paint Company 2$ 

Russell, l.dward W. 50 

Russell. P. A.. \ ( n 2<, 

Ryan. D. W. 10 

Ryan. John F. . . . 10 

Rycnwrn. Jos. T.. & S-ii 200 

Ryerson. Martin A. 1000 

Ryerson. Martin. & Co. 50 

Sanfnrd Mffj. Company .'5 

Sancho. .\. . . 1 

Samlers, F.dgar i 

Sargent. Orcenleaf &• llrooks ^5 

Saucr. .Albert F 5 

Sawyer.C.H.(scc Lombard, J. L.). 
Sawyer, Gcxnlman \" Company lOO 

Scammon. Mrs. J. Younv: 100 

.Scanlon. Thimias . . 40 

Sch.-»ar, Koch A: ("<.mii, m . i;o 

Schaffner.W. S. i 

Schaller it Staffoni ;o 

Schaub P.i 10 

Schilling. , I 

Schilling. .Arthur i 

Schilling. Gretchen 1 

Sr' " Henry I 

S« „ Paul J 

Schimpferman. \V. H. 250 

Sr Mayer 1500 

Stiiiiiiiii, » n ••rge V 25 

Schmilt. F. P. 25 

Schneider. K.. tV Co. 250 

S< '. Georgr >o 

.Sc..i ,r. H 20 

Schulti. H. »S 50 

Schuttler i\ Hot; 250 

.Schwennfen. H. ! 20 

.Schyke. Henry W . . . 2 

Scuily Syrup Co., D. B. 100 
Seaman Cox Brown Cooperage 



I 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



77 



Seaverns, George A 500 

Seipp, William C 489 

Sharpe, C. A 5 

Shaw, William W iioo 

Shay, Maurice W 2 

Sheldon, G. W., & Co. ... 50 

Sheriffs, John 20 

Sheriffs, John, & Son .... 20 

Sherman & Flavin 50 

Sherwood, Marc 25 

Shirlaw, Hugh 5 

Shoemaker, CD 2 

Siegel, Cooper & Co. . ' . . 750 

Silsbee, J. L 5 

Silverman, S. M 5 

Simon, E. A i 

Singer & Talcott Stone Co. . . 105 

Sisson, H. A i 

Skinner, Herbert E I 

Skinner, J. B., Treas 100 

Skinner, William, Mfg. Co. . 50 

Slaughter, A. O. & Co. ... 100 

Smith, Byron L 250 

Smith, CM 5 

Smith, Dunlap 25 

Smith, Ellen i 

Smith, F. J 2 

Smith, George E 5 

Smith, George T 100 

Smith, George W 25 

Smith, Granger, Miller & Co. . 25 

Smith, L. M. & F. M 25 

Smith, Orson 25 

Smith, Percy H i 

Smith, R. J 50 

Smith, R. P., Sons & Company 50 

Smith, Shea, & Co 25 

Snydacker, Godfrey .... 20 

Solberg, Albert F 2 

Soper Lumber Co., The . . . loo 

South Branch Lumber Co. . . 100 

Spaulding & Company . . . 500 

Spencer, Charles i 

Spencer & Macdonald ... 10 

Spencer, Robert 5 

Spierling & Linden .... 10 

Spierling & Linden .... 20 

Spitz, H 2 

Sprague, Warner & Co. . . . 1000 

Squire, Homer A i 

Stallwood, H. T. ..... . 5 

Stanley, H. P., & Co 100 



Stanton & Company .... 100 

Stansbury, E. W i 

State Bank of Chicago ... 40 

Stebbins, Henry S 10 

Stebbins, Leonard C 50 

Stebbins, S. 1 20 

Stecher, M. D 5 

Steele, S. B 3 

Steele, Wedeles & Co. ... 50 

Stern, Julius 4 

Stevens, F. L 25 

Stevenson, D. M 10 

Stewart, Graeme 195 

Stiles, Josiah 25 

Stillman, Anna i 

Stinson, James 100 

Stockton, John L 9 

Stockton, John Thaw .... 10 

Stockton, Joseph 45 

Stoltze, William 25 

Stone, J. D i 

Storrs, D. W 10 

Strasburger, E i 

Strauss, Ralph 5 

Streeter Brothers loo 

Stubbs, James E 10 

Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co. . . 500 

Sullivan, Louis H 25 

Sullivan, T. J i 

Sweet, Wallach & Co 30 

Swift & Company 2000 

Swift & Company ico 

Switzer, E. M 25 

Taft, Lorado 10 

Talcott, W'illiam A 10 

Tallman, L. C - 2 

Tanner, Louis A i 

Taylor, C W i 

Taylor, W. G. ...... . 5 

Templeton, Thomas .... 25 

Thacher, CI 10 

Thayer & Chandler .... 30 

Thoman, L. D 10 

Thomas, James ' 5 

Thomasson & Dray .... 50 

Thompson, John F 50 

Thompson, Slason, & Company 25 
Thompson & Taylor Spice 

Company 200 

Thorn, Frank 25 

Thurston, F. W 10 

Thurston, Whales B i 



7« 



Fir 1 i> <._••! I liiiiiS Mi.ii'-vM Hi i 



1 It Hitcc cv I rust * ••m- 

Tonk, Max 

ip«iiy 



Treat. 1 ! 

Tree. Lainl»crl 

I . . . . I I' 



\ 



rnimbull. I.. & F. 
Tulcy. M. F. 

' H. S 

^. R.. &• rompanv 
rilnck. Waltct 
l'n<lcrwo«Hl \ I <)inj»an> . 
I •- " '• • « Oiupaiiy. . . 
1 .Y«l. \T. Co. 

I'nion Wire Matin-ss l«>. 
T  • ril Fibre Co. 

Frank 
I pman. Frank 

" ^;.ur 1. 

Valentine. P. A 
\'a)lens. FuRcne, vS 
\'.»n HiTkrrn. W. F 
\ at» linx klin. W. 
Van Dcursen. (. . S. 
\'an Dcurscn, M. ... 

\ .111 \ ' ' H., iV lii. 

\ «■ t. ii,  •• . . 

N'eseen. Angus* 
Victor. H. V. . 
\'icrlii)c. < !.T 1 ' 
\ icrliiiL.'. 1 • 
VicrlinR. Rol»ert . 
W.ihl iV Hcnivis . 
Wait. H- ""■ I 

Wan. n; 

WakefieM Kattan Conipan . 
"" "it Co. 

Walker, (ieorjic C. 
Walker. James R. 
S. I.. . . 
; \ Wrenn 
Walker-Oakley Comj»any 



too 

I 
I 



W allcr. William 

W .> ■; , ' 
W.ir 



ncr 



20 
lo 

lOO 

til 
50 

IC» 

100 

50 

5 
25 
50 
50 

I 

5 
10 

5 

25 
3 
3 
I 

5 

50 
SO 
10 
10 

5 
too 

2 5 
too 

'50 

100 

to 

50 

-25 



50 

lOOU 

.•;o 



\' 
\\ 

\>. . 

Waterman, RichanI > 

W atr>-. N. . . 20 

Wa«^>n. Win. J. 2 

W a\nc \ l.ow 50 

\\ rl.licr. t . M. 10 

\' I 

\'. 20 

W 2$ 

Wells. Frank 5 
Wril"*. M. I).. Jt Louipaiiy . . 1000 

\\ crncr. P. E 20 

Western Klectric Comi>any 250 

Western News Company. The 50 
Western Planing and Mfg. Co. 

The 25 

Western Wheel Works 100 

Wester\elt. Jt»hn J. D. 5 

\\ Frank P. 2 

W :. IJoyd Ci. lO 

Whitacre, Charles C $ 

White, Charles I 20 

\\' • ' .tiies H. I 

W ;,<;. W. 5 

Whitlield. Thomas 50 

Whitney. (ieiTKe H. $ 

Whitney. John !'• 5 

Wi. hert, llenrv- 50 

Wilcox. A. ! ; 

Wil.ox. T. I". 2 

Wild. The... . . f; 

Wilder \- Cf>mpanv 100 

Wiley, B. I». I 

Wiley. F. M 2 

W iley, W . K 10 

W illanl. M. I 10 

Willard, S. I 3 

w •■ . - '■■ . ••-■ 25 

W -. .. .. I,. 10 

W illiams. Norman . 50 

W illiams. .'^. Lawren' ;o 
\\ H. j. . . . .too 
W V Kobbins . 25 

Wilson, George < 50 



Oct. 1895. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



79 



Wilson, Harlow S i 

Wilson, Henry K i 

Wilson, Joseph P i 

Wilson, Maria J 3 

Wilson, Marshall J 3 

Wilson, Paul C i 

Wilson, Walter H 25 

Winchell, Ann E 3 

Wing, Thomas W 10 

Winslow, Bros. & Co., The . . 100 

Winterbotham, J. H., & Son . 50 

Wise, Abraham 10 

Witbeck, The H., Company . 100 

Witkowsky & Affeld .... 25 

Wright, Charles J i 

Wright & Meysenburg . . . 200 

Wolf, H., & Co 50 



Wolff, L., Mfg. Company . . 500 

Wood Brothers 100 

Wood, William H 15 

Woodbridge, John 15 

Woodbridge, John, Jr. ... 10 

Woodcock, L. T 5 

Woodnutt, Thomas W. ... i 

World, Richard 10 

Wyman, Edward F 5 

Yale & Towne Mfg. Company 100 

Yoe, L. G., & Co 25 

Young & Farrell Diamond S. S. 

Co 40 

Young, H. L 5 

Young, Hugh 20 

Zeese, A., & Company ... 25 

Ziegler, S 5 



Jdif^t.-.:. 



NIVTRSITY OF lUINOlS URBAMA 



CmQO 



ctn 



'« ^Ml 



II ii 



3 0112 017517 



42