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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

IjtBRART OIF* 

Illinois State 

| LflBORATORr OF NATURAL HISTORY. | 

URBANA. ILLINOIS. 




LIBRA RY 

O F THE 

U N I VER.5 ITY 

OT 1LL1 NOIS 

NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY 

1 894*/ 95^/89^/300 

C o p. 3 



r^>. 






Field Columbian Museum 



Report Series. 



Publication 14 



Vol. 1, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1895-96 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

October, 1896. 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, - - ----- 84 

Officers and Committees, - - - - - - - 85 

Staff, - - - 86 

Income and. Maintenance, - - - - - 87 

Memberships, ------- - 88 

Lecture Courses --------- 88 

Publications, --------- go 

Library, _■-_.■- - - - 92 

Records, - ----- 93 

Inventorying and Labeling, - - 94 

Accessions, --------- 95 

Exchanges, - - - - - - - - - 101 

Expeditions and Field Work, ------ 101 

Installation and Permanent Improvements, ----- 103 

A Xew Department, ----- - - 108 

Taxidermy, ---------- 109 

Photography, - - 109 

Printing, - - - - - - - - - - no 

Fire Protection and Policing, - - - - - - no 

Personal Property, - - - - - - - - 1 1 1 

Admissions, - - - - - - - - -in 

Financial Statement, - - - - - - - - Ir 3 

Attendance, ------ - - 116 

Accessions, -,- - - - - - - - - "7 

Department of Anthropology, - - - - - 117 

Department of Botany, - - - - - - 118 

Department of Geology, -------- 120 

Department of History, ------- 123 

Department of Industrial Arts, - - - - - - 124 

Department of Monographic Collections, ----- 125 

Department of Ornithology, - - - - - - 127 

Department of Zoology, - - - - - 128 

The Library, - - - - - - - -130 

Photographic Section, - - - - - - - L5 2 

Articles of Incorporation, - - '?3 

Amended By-laws, - - - L55 

Patrons, I. ife Members and Honorary Members, - - 158 

List of Corporate Members, - - - - - - T 59 

List of Annual Members, - ----- 160 



s, Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Adams Huntington W. Jackson. 

Owen F. Aims. Arthur B. Joni s. 

Edward E. AVer. George Manierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Cyrus II. McCormick. 

William |. Chalmers. Norman B. Ream. 

Gl ORGE R. Davis. M VRTIN A. R\ i RSON. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Edwin Walker. 

Norman Willi vms. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 85 



OFFICERS. 

KnwAKD E. Aver, President. 

Martin A. Ryersox, First Vice-President. 
Nor max B. Ream, Second Vice-President. 

Harlow N. Higixbotham, Chairman Executive Committee. 
George Maxterre, Secretary. 
Bvrox L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Edward E. Ayer. Norman B. Ream. 

Owex F. Aldis. Martin A. Ryersox. 

finance committee. 

Norman Williams. 
Watsox F. Blair. Huxtixgtox W. Jackson. 

committee on building. 

George E. Adams. 
William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

George R. Davis. 

auditing committee. 
George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 



DIRECTOR. 

I iv i DERICK J. V. Ski i i . 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

W. H. Holmes, Curator. C. A. Dorsi v, Ass't Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
C. }•'. M i T.I. mm (.11. Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

O. C. Farrington, Curator. 
H. W. Nichols, Curator of Economic Geology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, EXCEPT ORNITHOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

C. B. CORY, Curator. ('.. K. CHERRIE, Ass't Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

lin Directob en Charge. S. C. Sim ms, Ass't Curator. 

W. A. Smith, Hon. Curator of Transportation. 

department of monographic collections. 

Division of Printing and Graphk Arts. 
The Librarian in Charge. 

• Division of Musical Instruments. 

Assistant Curator of Industrial Arts in Charge. 
DEPARTMENT OF COLUMBUS MEMORIAL. 

The Recorder in Charge. William E. Curtis, Hon. Curator. 

THE LIBRARY. 

E. L. Burchakd, Recorder and Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1895-1896. 



To the Trustees and Members of Field Columbian Museum: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year closing September 30, 1896. The system of 
the Museum generally has been much improved during the past twelve 
months. Expenditures have been made more in the direction of 
classification than in re-installation; in working over old, rather than 
in purchasing new material, and in labeling, numbering and cata- 
loguing specimens. While the work of the first year may be charac- 
terized as rushing and spasmodic, the labor of the second year has 
been even and steady. The number of department subordinates and 
clerks has been increased, but the pay roll of mechanics has been cur- 
tailed. Except in the lower ranks, there have been no changes in the 
personnel of the staff, and except as may be demanded by the further 
subdivisions of the departments, the Museum may be said, with 
respect to its salary roll, to be upon a permanent basis. Much of the 
crudeness of the original installation has disappeared during this 
year, producing greater harmony of method, and connecting divisions 
with closer regard for an intelligent and comprehensive scheme of 
installation. The great courts have been metamorphosed, not only 
providing requisite space for the growing collections of Archeology 
and Zoology, but substituting for an installation of the character of 
an exposition, an arrangement on museum lines. While the year 
has been a busy one, and the results satisfactory, yet considering the 
requirements, constantly growing in importance and increasing in 
number, the second year, like the first, seems to have demonstrated 
simply the necessity for still greater effort. 

Income and Maintenance. — The Director's "income and main- 
tenance " budget for the current year, estimated the income at $71,576, 
and the expenses at $101,220. These two estimates based upon those 
of the previous year, have naturally proven to have come nearer the 
actual figures than those of the first year, for which there was no 
precedent. But as the present budget provided for a sharp increase 

in the departmental force, the efforts made to bring the two sums 

8 7 



ss Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

together have not been fully rewarded, as indeed was not expected, 
although a saving has been made in the budget, of $14,5311. By 
estimating the income and expenses of the four months to January 
1st, the deficit for maintenance, it is found, will approximate $15,000; 
i. e., income %j 1,250, expenditures $86,690. It will be borne in mind 
in this connection, as was the case in the last report, that these fig- 
ures do not include special cash donations, nor special appropriations, 
made by the Executive Committee, for material and permanent 
improvements. 

The Memberships. — Nominations for Annual Membership were 
made in very large numbers at the beginning of this year, and the 
total membership of this class now registered is 610. A large pro- 
portion of the old Annual Members are found upon this year's list, but 
the number of new names cannot be said to be very gratifying, 
although every effort has been made to secure an increased member- 
ship. Several Honorary Life Members have been elected by the Trus- 
tees: Mary D. Sturges, Harlow N. Higinbotham, George M. 
Pullman, and Edward E. Ayer. Frederick J. V. Skiff, Willard A. 
Smith and W. I. Buchanan have been elected Patrons. 

Lecture Course. — Two series of lectures have been given since 
the last Annual Report, most of them being illustrated with stereop- 
ticon views. The fourth course comprised nine lectures: 

Oct. 5. — "Cats and the Lands they Inhabit."* 

D. G. Elliot, Curator of Zoology, Field Columbian 
Museum. 
Oct. 12. — " Living Pictures of Invertebrate Animals." 

A. H. Cole, University of Chicago. 

Oct. 19. — "Edible and Poisonous Mushrooms." 

C. F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany, Field Colum- 
bian Museum. 
Oct. 26. — "A Chapter in the Early History of Chicago." 

O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology, Field Colum- 
bian Museum. 

Nov. 2. — "Structure and Natural History of Sharks." 

O. P. Hay, Asst. Curator of Ichthyology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

Nov. 9. — "On the Origin of Coal." 

H. W. Nichols, Curator of Economic Geology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 



* Repeated by request. 



Oct. 1896. Annua] Report of the Director. 89 

 

Nov. 16. — "The Ethnology of the Japanese." 

S. Choyo, Commissioner of Fine Arts, Imperial Jap- 
anese Commission, World's Columbian Exposition. 

Nov. 23. — "Archeology and Episodes of Travel in Mexico." 

W. H. Holmes, Curator of Anthropology, Field Col- 
umbian Museum. 

Nov. 30. — " Development of Architecture in Mexico." 
W. H. Holmes. 

Fifth course, given during the months of March and April: 

March 7. — "The History of Coins." 

Sigmund Krausz, Chicago. 

March 14. — "Mining in the Middle Ages." 

H. W. Nichols, Curator of Economic Geology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

March 21. — "The Oldest Known Bird." 

O. P. Hay, Assistant Curator of Ichthyology, Field 
Columbian Museum. 

March 28. — "How Plants Travel." 

C. F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany, Field Columbian 
Museum. 

April 4. — " Masterpieces of Aboriginal American Art." 

W. H. Holmes, Curator of Anthropology, Field Col- 
umbian Museum. 

t 
April 11. — " The Evolution of Transportation." 

Willard A. Smith, Chicago. 
April 11. — "The Illustration of Books." 

Edward L. ' Burchard, Librarian, Field Columbian 
Museum. 
April 25. — "Caricature." 

John H. Finley, President Knox College. 

The audiences vary greatly according to the weather, the ap- 
proach to the Museum being at times so disagreeable, on account of 
wind or dust storms, as to prevent many from venturing out, but all 
things being taken into consideration, the attendance has been grati- 
fying. The time for the lectures seems to be suitable, viz.: Satur- 
day afternoon, at 3 o'clock, as probably a larger number of persons 
can conveniently attend then. A new set of lenses has been provided 
for the stereopticon, enabling the instrument to be placed at the rear 



go Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

of the hall, where it does not obstruct the view. The Recorder now 
has on hand, classified by lectures, 634 slides, as follows: — 

Number of illus- W'lmle number 
trated lectures. of lectin 

Anthropology . . . . . mS slides 3 7 

Botan) 1 38 1 6 

Geology, 122 " 4 12 

Industrial Arts 64 " 2 2 

Library 52 " 1 1 

Zoology 150 " 5 8 

Publications. — The series of publications established in October, 
[894, have been continued, and numbers have appeared at compara- 
tively regular intervals. Below will be found the titles of those 
issued since October first last, with the number of pages and illustra- 
tions. 

Pub. 5. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 1. On the Structure and 
Development of the Vertebral Column of Amia. By 
O. P. Hay. 54 pages, edition 1,000, three lithographs 
in three colors, anatomical sections. 

Pub. 6.— Rep. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 1. Annual Report of the Director, 
79 P a g es > edition 3,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 7. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. On Certain Portions of the 
Skeleton of the Protostega Gigas. By O. P. Hay. 8 
pages, edition 1,000, two illustrations (one half tone and 
one zinc etching). 

Pub. 8. — Anthropol. Ser. . Vol. 1, No. 1, Pt. 1. Archeological Studies 
Among the Ancient Cities of Mexico. ByW. H. Holmes. 
137 pages, edition 1,250 of usual size and 200 copies 
edition de luxe, sixty-two illustrations (fourteen half 
tones and forty-eight zinc etchings). 

Pub. 9. — Bot. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 2. The Flora of West Virginia. 
By C. F. Millspaugh and L. W. Xuttall. 209 pages, 
edition 1,000, two illustrations (one half tone and one 
zinc etching). 

Pub. 10. — Ornith. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 1. Contribution to the Orni- 
thology of San Domingo. By G. K. Cherrie. 26 pages, 
edition 1,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 11. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 3. On Sundry Collections of 
Mammals received by the Field Columbian Museum. 
By D. G. Elliot. 17 pages, edition 1,000, ten plates of 
illustrations (half tones). 



Oct. 189b. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



9i 



Pub. 12. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 4. On Some Collections of Fishes. 
By O. P. Hay. 16 pages (Combined with No. 13). 

Pub. 13. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 5. On the Skeleton of Toxochelys 
Latiremis. By O. P. Hay. 8 pages, edition 1,000, 
two illustrations (zinc etchings). (Combined with No. 12.) 

A fourth edition of the Guide (2,000 copies) was issued in 
August. As a third edition of the Guide was issued in March, 1895, 
the year that had elapsed saw unusual changes in installation ; con- 
sequently the fourth edition of the Guide had to be almost entirely 
re-written. 

In regard to the distribution of the publications, the table below 
shows the number and classes of foreign and domestic addresses. A 
comparison is also made with the number distributed last year ; 



Official: 

Trustees 

Staff 

Corporate Members 
Honorary Members 
Annual Members . 



General Addresses:* 

Museums 

Scientific Societies 

Academies and Institutes . . . 
Universities, Schools and Colleges 

Libraries  . . . 

Journals 

Addresses in Special Sciences: 

Anthropology 

Botany 

Geology 

History 

Industrial Arts 

Ornithology 

Zoology 

Total Addresses: 1,363 



DOMESTIC. 


1S94-95 


1895-96 


15 


14 


13 


15 


56 


53 


.... 


3 


723 


757 


16 


5 


62 


37 


67 


56 


122 


62 




11 


21 


128 


8l 


i^3 


IU 


150 


20 


56 


37 


3i 


.... 


19 


16 


93 



FOREIGN. 



-95 



189 



^6 



58 


42 


43 


45 


15 


15 


9 


3i 



20 



13 


81 


40 


53 


HO 


ii5 


4 


3 


.... 


12 


23 


68 



1,613 



326 



;i2 



The distribution to foreign countries is accomplished through 
the Bureau of International Exchanges of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion. In addition to the printed requests for exchanges transmitted 
with the Museum literature, about 350 personal letters have been 



* Museums, Societies, Academies, etc., devoted to one science are classified in the next section 
with special sciences. 



1 eld Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i. 

prepared and sent out requesting exchanges of particular publica- 
tions. Responses have always been courteous and in nearly all 
instances favorable, so that the reading room of the Library is DOW 
assured of a permanent and valuable series of current periodicals, 
such as transactions, memoirs, journals, proceedings, etc., of the 
principal publishing scientific bodies of the world. 

Library.- During the fiscal year there have been added to the 
Library 687 bound volumes and 1,148 pamphlets and unbound 
volumes, making a total of 1,835 titles. This compares very fav- 
orably with the growth of the Library for the preceding years, 
although the total number added in 1894-95 was 2,411, and in 1893-94, 
the opening year of the Library, 7,139, but both these years saw the 
acquisition of several large collections. The number of donations 
has materially increased; attributable, of course, to the rapidly grow- 
ing exchange list of the Museum. A list of the accessions to 
the Library accompanies this report. The number of accessions 
would indicate the present size of the Library were it not for 
the fact that two collections of engineering and railroad literature 
which were loaned to the Museum, have been returned to their 
owners. Subtracting these collections from the total, gives 10,635 
titles at present in the Library, not including some 3,000 pamphlets 
bound in cheap bindings. The Museum is also in constructive pos- 
session of the ornithological library of Mr. Edward E. Ayer, 
consisting of about 400 valuable works, which he has recently 
presented to the Museum and which will be added to the catalogue 
this winter. In order that the staff of the Museum might avail itself 
in the most convenient manner of the scientific literature on the 
shelves of other Chicago libraries, co-operative arrangements have 
been made as far as possible with those libraries by which their 
books can be used at the Museum. The Chicago Public Library 
allows its reference or other works to be drawn out upon the requisi- 
tion of the Museum Librarian and delivers them at a neighboring 
Delivery and Reading Station. The John Crerar Library promises 
a duplicate printed copy of its card catalogue and has indicated 
its willingness to buy scientific literature specially desired by the 
Museum. The University of Chicago Library has been extensively 
used by the staff of the Museum, and many courtesies have been ex- 
tended and future facilities promised. The three largest scientific 
libraries of the citv are thus in effective co-operation with the 
Museum. The Library, young as it is, cannot, of course, pretend to 
have a full quota even of the necessary books, and the fact needs to 
be emphasized that special literature, descriptive of scientific species 



Oct. 1896. Annum. Report of the Director. 93 

and collections, and of geographic regions or sources of specimen 
supply, as well as the most modern manuals are the most important 
permanent accessories to specimens themselves, and are indispensable 
for reference, to a progressive working staff. The Curators complain 
that they are unable to do the careful scientific work required 
of them owing to the fact that the effective descriptive literary tools are 
not provided. Although, as far as possible resources of other Libraries 
are being drawn upon, it yet remains to be said that each department 
of the Museum needs a still larger complement of specialized scientific 
books for constant reference. As the routine work of the Library is 
being performed by one assistant, the large amount of cataloguing to be 
done progresses slowly. A type-written card catalogue shelf-list 
is kept up to date and arranged by subjects so that the resources 
of the Library on any specific subject can be given. A carefully 
studied subject catalogue, which will give cross references to the 
minor matter in collective books, has already been begun. The 
author catalogue, comprising some 12,000 titles, has been completed 
and is in use. All of the literature on the shelves of the Library 
and belonging to the Museum, has been stamped with the Library 
seal. Twenty-eight periodicals which would otherwise have been 
subscribed for are now received regularly in exchange. The number 
of periodicals subscribed for is 47. The total number of books in 
the Department Libraries is as follows : Department of Geology, 
1,190 and 1,100 pamphlets. Department of Ornithology, 368. De- 
partment of Botany, 163. Department of Zoology, 169. Depart- 
ment of Anthropology, 88. Total deposited in Departments — Books 
and pamphlets, 3,078. No record of the use of these books is kept 
by the Librarian. 

Records. — The accession catalogues have been carried on as 
described in the Report of last year, with the exception that two new 
books have been opened, one for the Department of Monographic 
Collections, the other for the Section of Photograph}'. Great incon- 
venience was caused by the lack of catalogues accompanying the 
collections received at the inception of the Museum. At present for 
each new accession either catalogues are obtained from the sender or 
the Curators prepare catalogues of the material upon receipt. These 
are then filed and jacketed for future use. The total number of 
such descriptive papers, letters, documents, etc., now in the Record- 
er's files reaches 9,426. Each paper filed receives its individual 
number, and cannot be withdrawn from the Recorder's office without 
written receipt. The Recorder, who acts as Custom House Agent 
for the Museum, has cleared through the Custom House about 30 



94 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

consignments of material from foreign ports. In this connection, 
knowledgment should be made to the Foreign ' Mlice of Messrs. 
Marshall Field «.V Company for continued and courteous assistance. 
Departmental Catalogue, Inventory and Labeling. — The cata- 
^uing of specimens in the Department I nventories is progressing 
rapidly, and in some Departments has been completed. In the 
Department of Anthropology, the numbering, cataloguing and label- 
Sj of the collections has been interrupted during the ear by other 
more essential work, but large numbers of specimens have been iden- 
tified and catalogued, the card system being used in the preliminary 
work as a matter of convenience. Much advance has been made in 
the work of labeling, attention having first been given to general 
d-scriptive, group, and case labels. A most important feature of 
this work is being carried out in the Egyptian Section, where 
Mr. f. H. 15reasted, Egyptologist of the Chicago University,, is 
engaged in translating the numerous hieroglyphic texts of papyri, 
grave tablets, scarabs, mummies, etc. The results will first be applied 
to the writing of detailed labels for the collections, and afterward to 
the preparation of a guide. The appointment of George A. 
Dorsey of Cambridge as Assistant Curator in Charge of Physical 
Anthropologv, has made it possible to proceed with the work of 
identifying and cataloguing the material in this important division. 
The Department of Botany has all records of material completed 
and all specimens numbered and labeled. This not only 
applies to the case specimens, but also to those stored away as dupli- 
cates. Specific classification is far from complete, however, and 
descriptive label writing is only begun. The Curator of Geology has 
catalogued the entire paleontological collection, and new material is 
now disposed of upon arrival. The work of replacing the temporary 
by printed descriptive labels has been carried forward as opportunity 
permitted, and enough has been done in this direction to add largely 
to the popular interest in the material. In Economic Geology, the 
year has been marked by the most patient and steady devotion to 
cataloguing and labeling. As a result, the records of the Depart- 
ment are in excellent condition, and descriptive labels have been 
attached to specimens so generally that the Department is assuming 
a finished appearance. In addition to the labels on individual 
specimens, large labels have been provided for each class. The 
work in the Department of Zoology, except Ornithology, has not 
been active, owing to the absence of its Curator in Africa, but gratify- 
ingheadway has been made in cataloguing. A large number of descrip- 
tive framed labels have been provided for Halls 19 and 20 and for 



Oct. 1896. 



Annum. Report of the Director. 



95 



the mammals in the West Court, and the purchasing lists of three 
large shell collections have been compared with the material and 
corrected preparatory to inventory. The entire collection in the 
Department of Ornithology has been catalogued, something over 
1,000 skins having been recorded quite recently. Labels have been 
written for all the mounted birds. The Department of Industrial 
Arts has finished its card catalogue and Inventory, and reports 
that only a very few labels are lacking. Owing to the demands 
of his regular duties, the Recorder who has charge of the Depart- 
ment of Columbus Memorial, has done little in Memorial Hall this 
year except to replace new for old labels. The catalogue was com- 
pleted in 1895. The important work to be done is the numbering of 
the pictures to correspond with the original Exposition inventory. 
When all the material is identified and numbered correctly, it will be 
possible to print a hand-book to the collection, the manuscript of 
which is now in possession of the Museum, and which would add 
greatly to interest in the collection. 

The year's work in the Museum on catalogues and inventories is 
shown in detail : 







Total No. of 


Entries 






No. of 


entries to 


between 


Total No. of 




Record Books. 


Oct. 1, 1896. 


1895-6. 


Cards Written. 


Anthropology, 


1 1 


9,089 


9,089 


13,200 




10 


1 1 ,949 


9,000 


1,000 


Geology, . . . 


7 


13,185 


5,312 


6,000 


History, . . . 


2 


i,5i4 


— completed— 


Industrial Arts, . 


8 


13,600 


100 


860 


Monographic Col., 


2 


202 


202 




Zoology, . . . 


8 


6,339 


6,339 


4,345 


Library, . . . 


3 


9,55i 


1,835 


12,000 


Section of Photog., 


1 


997 


997 





Accessions. — The accessions of material by gift, purchase and 
expedition have been large and valuable, and seem to have been 
rather evenly distributed among the different Departments, if the pre- 
vailing flattering estimate of the results of the African expedition be 
included. It is obviously impossible to discuss all of the many acces- 
sions, but some seem to demand a reference beyond the simple record. 
A number of noteworthy additions have been made to the Department 
of Anthroplogy. Special attention may be directed to the collections 
of Eskimo material brought from Northern Alaska by Miner W. 
Bruce. These include valuable fur costumes, implements and uten- 
sils pertaining to the native arts and industries, and many carvings 
in bone and ivory. It is expected that these will be utilized to some 
extent in setting up a group of figures illustrating the • Alaskan 



96 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

I skimo. Students of the ancient peoples and arts of America will 
look with particular interest on certain acquisitions from Yucatan, and 
some examples of sculpture from the Valley of Mexico give an excel- 
lent idea of the achievements of the Dative races in this line. South 
America has yielded but little directly, although collections returned 
to the Museum from the Peabodv Museum of Cambridge add greatly 
to the wealth of material from 1 'em and other Pacific Coast countries. 
The culture of the ancient Romans, already so well represented both 
by reproductions and original works, is further illustrated by a group 
of bronze objects of surpassing interest, recently obtained from a 
villa near Pompeii. The most remarkable of these objects are two 
bronze bath-tubs ami a bronze table with circular top supported by 
legs imitating those of the lion. Among the most notable additions 
to the Egyptian collections is the magnificent series of stoneware, 
ranging in date from 3,000 years before Christ to a late period. 
The bronze sistrum presented by Dr. Keeley is a large and perfect 
specimen, and its inscriptions are of the greatest interest, showing it 
to have been used in the Temple of Ammon at Thebes. Among 
numerous other bronzes, a large statue of Osiris is worthy of special 
mention. A series of grave tablets and tombstones includes two 
large fragments of tomb tablet reliefs of exquisite workmanship, 
similar to pieces recently acquired and published by the Berlin 
Museum. A fine series of faience or blue glaze mortuary figurines is 
of interest, but is exceeded in importance bv the coiled ser- 
pents in the same material, one of which is remarkable for size 
and color. Among the stone statues is a noticeable figure of Apet, 
executed in black basalt. From Asia the Department has secured 
three valuable marble images representing Buddhistic divinities. 
Main specimens from the mounds of the Mississippi River and the 
ancient copper mining district of upper Michigan collected by the 
Curator of the Department have been added to the arche- 
ological division. The Division of Physical Anthropology especially 
has been enriched by materials selected from collections now 
brought together for the first time, although in possession 
of the Museum before the current year. One collection made by 
D. Scott Moncrieff for the Columbian Exposition, consisted of four 
skeletons, several crania and an original burial package, containing 
three adult women and one girl, all in desiccated condition. As to 
this package, although the funeral garments are of European origin, 
the date of burial is probably about 1845, as with the bodies were a 
large quantity of the "Log-cabin" medals of the '' Tippecanoe and 
Tyler too'' campaign of 1840. The bodies, otherwise, were note- 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 97 

worthy only for the pendant ear ornaments of coins, brass bells and 
dentalinm shells. In the mouth of one individual were found twenty 
brass buttons. The acquisition of eight skeletons and several crania 
for the Division of Physical Anthropology is timely, for with this added 
material, the Department now possesses a fairly complete osteologi- 
cal collection of North-West Indians, the tribes well represented 
being: Kwakiutl, Salish, Songish, Kawitchin, Catlalty and Chinook. 
The Mound material from Ross County, Ohio, returned from stud}' at 
Cambridge by the Chief of the Department of Anthropology of the 
Columbian Exposition, has been placed on view by the Museum 
this year. There were three notable and celebrated "finds" in Ohio 
Mounds: (a) that of Squier and Davis of two hundred carved effigy 
pipes at Mound City; (b) that of Professor Putnam of Cambridge of 
seven altars, each covered with countless objects of adornment and 
ceremony, at the Turner Group; and (c) that of Mr. Moorehead at 
the Hopewell Group. In the amount and beauty of symbolic carv- 
ings in copper, in the quantity of copper implements, in the number 
of bone carvings in which conventionalism and realism are blended 
in a most striking and artistic manner, and in the cache of unfinished 
implements numbering over 7,000, this collection far surpasses any 
hitherto made in the Mississippi Valley. There are also two valuable 
collections from Fort Ancient and Oregonia, Ohio. These are 
remarkable for the large number of skeletons which were in a good 
state of preservation. Among other material, new so far as its exhi- 
bition is concerned, are the collections made by G. A. Dorsey in 1892 
in Peru, four of which should be specially mentioned: From La Plata 
Island, Ecuador, consisting of (a) fragments of ceremonial pottery 
and images from the summit of the Island, made by coast tribes of 
Ecuador, who resorted to the Island for centuries as a place of 
worship and ceremony; (b) contents of three graves near the 
beach, including gold and silver images and pins, beautiful pottery, 
and a remarkable ceremonial stone-axe. These objects are Peruvian 
in origin and their presence on the Island is to be explained by the 
fact that Ecuador was conquered and over-run by Incas of Peru 
shortly before the Spanish conquest; (c) from Santa Valley about 500 
pieces of pottery of exquisite workmanship, and, taken collectively, 
portraying in a vivid manner the physiognomy, religion, industries, 
houses, and foods of the people ; besides ceremonial sceptres and 
bone carvings inlaid with turquoise; (d) from Ancon, the contents of 
125 graves, showing every form of burial and the complete life of 
individuals of both sexes, of all ages and of varying degrees of 
wealth. From the notes and labels of the collector each grave can 



I ( 'I UMBIAN MUSEI M R] POR I S, V< 'I . I. 

be reconstructed. From the osteological material of the Ancon 
exploration it is possible to make a full and complete investigation of 
the physical characteristics, so far as the skeleton is concerned, of 
the ancient inhabitants of this Necropolis. The most important 
Herbarium accessions to the Botanical Department this year, are the 
plants of the Gaumer collection purchased by the Museum, and the 
Mexican plants donated by Mr. Ryerson. The former are particularly 
valuable, as they maintain this special field for the Museum, and 
yield a large percentage of species entirely new to science. Mrs. 
Snyder has continued her enthusiastic interest in the welfare of this 
Department during the past year by additional contributions of 
plants collected by herself in the Californian region. Mr. Nuttall, 
of West Virginia, who co-operated with the Botanical Department in 
the preparation of its publication on the Flora of West Virginia, has 
exhibited his interest in the work of the Museum by sendi 
specimens illustrating the flora of that state. Special significance 
should also be attached to the valuable material collected by the 
Curator as a beginning of the contemplated North American Forestry 
Collection. In this work a good start has been made, and much 
work outlined for the next collecting season. The Department 
of Geology has obtained a large collection of fossils illustrating 
the fauna of the Chicago beds during the Niagara period. This 
includes over five hundred specimens representing at least one 
hundred distinct species, many of them rare, and two as yet unde- 
scribed. These were gathered during a series of years by the late 
Dr. Kennicott, and include many of the best specimens so far 
obtained from the Bridgeport and Hawthorne localities. Oth> r 
important accessions to the paleontological collection are a series of 
about sixty species of tertiary leaves from the Denver beds of South 
Table Mountain and Golden, Colorado: twenty species of Devonian 
plants from the Fern Ledges of St. John, N. B. : one hundred speci- 
mens of the Cretaceous fossils of Texas representing twenty distinct 
species: and a Placenticeras from Montana, nearly two feet in diam- 
eter, with sutures beautifully preserved. A relief map of France, 
four feet in diameter, a relief map ol Northwestern Illinois and a 
of seven relief maps of the continents and the world, are 
important additions to the geographic material already exhibited. 
To the mineral collection have been added a number of the rarer 
minerals of Mexico, such as Guanajuatite. Livingstonite, Bustanite, 
etc., obtained by exchange with the Mexican National School of 
Engineering, and some showy specimens of the better known minerals 
collected by the Curator of Geology. A series of remarkable Joplin, 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 99 

Mo., calcite crystals, the crystals being six inches in length, nearly 
transparent and showing faces of two scalenohedrons in great 
perfection, are also valuable additions. The Meteorite Hall has 
received by exchange specimens of falls not heretofore represented. 
One of the most interesting accessions to the metallurgical collections 
is the series of specimens illustrating the toughening of cast iron, 
rendering it, to an extent, malleable. The Chief of the Division of 
Mineral Resources of the United States Geological Survey, Dr. 
David T. Day, who was in charge of the Mining Department at the 
Atlanta Exposition, remembered the Museum at the close of that 
event by sending an interesting series of nickel, magnesite and gold 
ores from Canada, South Carolina and California. A specimen of 
Crocidolite from Cape Town, South Africa, was donated by Mr. W. J. 
Chalmers. A specimen of Albertite from Utah, from W. H. 
Holmes represents a valuable mineral in a new locality. But 
by far the most important addition to the Economic Collections are 
the ores from Curator Farrington's Mexican Expedition. The 
silver ores are so numerous as to compel a complete rearrangement 
of the present collections of silver ores, which now represent all 
phases of the occurrence of silver in Mexico. There were secured 
interesting iron ores from the well-known Iron Mountain of Durango 
and examples of the little known tin and mercury deposits of Mexico. 
The Department of Zoology, except Ornithology, which in extent and 
character of material did not at the beginning rank with the other 
Departments of the Museum, has been brought to a higher standard 
of completeness during the past year by extensive acquisitions in all of 
its several divisions. Not so much attention has been devoted 
to the lower as to the higher invertebrates. The Aldis expedition to 
Florida brought in a quantity of sponges, crabs and molluscan forms. 
Mr. Allison V. Armour, of Chicago, has contributed a collection of 
5,000 insects from Yucatan, gathered by Mr. Thompson. By the 
gift of Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, of Chicago, the Museum came into 
the possession of a superb collection of 700 lepidoptera from India. 
The molluscan collections have been considerably worked over and 
revised, and additions have been made where needed. In Ichthyology 
should be mentioned the gift of the National Museum of 105 species 
of fishes, and several gifts of reptiles are to be noted, including 
that of a boa constrictor presented by the Ringling Brothers. 
The efforts of the Department have been concentrated prin- 
cipally upon enlarging and upbuilding the mammalian collection. 
To this end, as previously stated, an expedition was sent to Africa, 
and large acquisitions are expected on the return of Curator Elliot. 



ioo Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Extensive purchases had previously heen made of mammal skins and 
skulls representing principally the antelopes, monkeys and the felines. 
Purchases were also made of small mammals from California, the 
1 i ice collection, which has since been described in a Museum Memoir 
by the Curator of the Department. Other countries, including Sibe- 
ria, Africa, Japan and the West Indies, have contributed of their 
fauna to this division, while the gift of a fine girailc by Ringling 
Brothers was a valuable donation. The collections in Ornithology 
have been increased very considerably during the past year, especially 
by the acquisition of valuable North American species. Some 230 
species, chiefly from the vicinity about Chicago, have been added by 
the staff of the Department, and will be useful to the student 
of local fauna. The study collection has been further increased 
by about 1,500 specimens, representing thoroughly the birds 
of Cook County, Illinois, and also, in a lesser degree, the birds 
of the north coast of Texas. Collections gathered during the pre- 
vious season are now in the hands of the Curator for study and prepa- 
ration. Notable progress has been made, particularly in two 
sections of the Department of Industrial Arts — the textile and the 
ceramic. The ceramic room has been enriched by several purchases 
of old china gathered by the Museum's representative in the East, 
Mr. E. A. Barber, and illustrating the ware and art of the colonial 
period. From the same source has come a set of Wedgewood cameos 
and other art specimens. There has also been installed a loan col- 
lection of vases and ware from Mrs. Schimmelpfeng, of Chicago. 
French faience plates of considerable historical value were donated 
by Mr. Hawkins, of New Orleans, and by Mrs. Keeley a set of Rhoda 
and Damascus plates. To the series of machines and looms in the 
section of textiles has been added a fabric glove machine and an old 
hosiery loom. These were secured through the courtesy of Messrs. 
Marshall Field & Company, at Chemnitz, and were by gift from prom- 
inent manufacturers of that city. An interesting collection of Roman 
plaid textiles, mounted, was contributed by Mr. Henry II. Getty, 
who obtained them during his travels in Italy. Another attractive 
gift is that of 104 specimens of mounted laces, velvets and brocades, 
presented by Jesurum & Co., of Venice. By purchase has been 
acquired a collection of 500 mounted specimens of similar material, 
collected by Mr. Aver while abroad. To fill out this section speci- 
mens of mummy cloths and primitive textiles have been transferred 
from the Department of Anthropology. Numismatics has grown 
steadily, the periods represented being from the beginning of the 
Christian era to a recent date. A set of fragments, supposed to be 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. ioi 

copper coins, have been added to this section by gift of Mr. Ryerson. 
Among other additions to Higinbotham Hall may be specially men- 
tioned antique snuff-boxes, a series of crystallized gold specimens, 
and gold jewelry from Egypt, while a large collection of gold orna- 
ments from the United States of Colombia and silver ornaments from 
Bulgaria have been transferred from the Department of Anthropology. 
Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick presented to the Agricultural Implement 
section a set of Arabian plows and yoke plows, and seed-sowers from 
Palestine. In the section of Leathers » complete collection, illus- 
trating the art of tanning, has been obtained of Tiffany & Company. 
In the division of Transportation may be noted, among the principal 
contributions, a large ancient cedar boat discovered in Egypt and 
presented to the Museum by Mrs. C. H. McCormick. A number of 
minor relics have been deposited in the Museum by Chicago gentle- 
men. 

A detailed list of accessions and acknowledgments is pre- 
sented elsewhere. 

Exchanges. — One of the most profitable and satisfactory means 
of obtaining new material is by exchange. A large amount of dupli- 
cate material is in the possession of the Museum, especially in Eco- 
nomic Geology, Botany, and in several divisions of Anthropology and 
Zoology. Very gratifying arrangements have already been made 
with contemporaneous institutions by the Curators of Economic 
Geology and of Botany, and anumberof desirable exchanges effected. 
During the year, all the duplicate material has been listed by Depart- 
ments. This list will be published and sent to all institutions and 
individuals, collectors, etc., soliciting correspondence on the subject 
of the exchange of duplicates. The lists will probably be issued in 
December. 

Expeditions and Field Work. — The most important expedition this 
year has been the commission to Africa, of D. G. Elliot, Cura- 
tor of the Department of Zoology, except Ornithology. He 
was accompanied by C. E. Akeley, Chief Taxidermist of the 
Museum, and by Mr. Dodson of London who was with the Lake 
Rudolph expedition of Donaldson Smith. The departure from 
London was made March 27th, Aden was reached April 14th, and 
Berbera April 21st. At this latter point the caravan was organized, 
consisting of about 60 native guides, hunters and porters, with 
seventy-five camels and ponies. Start was made from Berbera April 
30th, and at the time of the last written report, August gtli, the party 
was at Higlileh, Ogaden, proceeding toward Tug Turfa and toward 
Eur River, Long. 42.12 and Lat. 7.50. This is in the Galla country. 



io2 Field i ibian Museum — Reports, Vol. i 



They expected then to go on to San Moretta, Long. 42.25 ami 
Lat. 6.50 — the giraffe country. A cable dated Septeml th, 

reported the party safely at Aden on their return with a splendid 
collection. There can be no doubt that if the material reaches the 
Museum in good condition, the results will exceed all expectations. 
No detailed information as to the number or variety of skins obtained 
has been received. But that the quantity is ample may be gathered 
from Mr. Elliot's statement in June that it seemed '-simply a <]ues- 
tion of transportation." The expedition has attracted a great deal of 
attention, and both the official and scientific reports and the popular 
narrative of its chief will be awaited with much interest. He 
will reach Chicago about December 1st. remaining probably in Lon- 
don several weeks to work over the material and identify species. 
C. F. Millspaugh, Curator of the Department of Botany, began 
his work this year on the Forestry of the Mississippi Valley. His 
work so far has been confined to the State of Mississippi and South- 
ern Illinois, procuring photographs from species in leaf, timber speci- 
mens from the living trees, and leafing and flowering branches from 
the same individual. The trip will be repeated over the same terri- 
tory this winter for trunk specimens, planks, boards and fruits. When 
this work is completed, as provided by the appropriation, the Museum 
will possess a very valuable collection of the timber-producing trees 
of the country, that, added to its foreign material, will constitute a 
notable forestry collection. The officials of the Illinois Central Rail- 
way are lending every possible aid. The work of the Department on 
the Flora of Yucatan commenced by the Curator in the winter of 
1 894-95 is being continued, in the field under instructions, by G. F. 
Gaumer, a resident of that State, and two consignments of 
very interesting and valuable plants have already been received. 
The Curator of Geology went on expedition to the Republic of 
Mexico in the winter of 1895-96. It was fruitful in results. The 
object of the trip was to obtain specimens illustrating volcanic and 
glacial phenomena, and the economic deposits. The expedition was 
largely made possible through the courtesy of the officials of the 
Mexican Central and A. T. & S. F. Railways. The Curator made a 
complete ascent of Popocatepetl and explored the crater and ascended 
Ixtaccihuatl far enough to permit a study of its glacier. A great 
many mineral specimens and ores were obtained and exchanges of 
material arranged for with institutions and individuals, resulting 
finally in the possession of an excellent representation of the minerals 
and ores of the Republic. Professor Farrington has prepared 
several lectures for the Museum course based on this expe- 



Oct. 1896. A\ni \i. Report of the Director. 103 

dition that will be illustrated from photographs taken on the trip. In 
the past winter, G. K. Cherrie, Assistant Curator of Ornithology, 
spent three months collecting bird skins along the Gulf Coast between 
New Orleans and Corpus Christi, Texas. Nearly one thousand skins 
were added to the North American division of this Department. Mr. 
Cherrie has also made a number of excursions in the vicinity of 
Chicago collecting local material. Miner W. Bruce arrived May 
7th from Alaska after nearly two years absence, with a collec- 
tion of 1,200 or more specimens illustrating the arts and industries of 
the Eskimo of Alaska. He has returned again to the North with a 
commission to add further material and to extend his work into 
Siberia. During the past year, E. H. Thompson became asso- 
ciated with the Department of Anthropology and was assigned to 
work in Mexico. He has made a report on the recently examined 
ruins of Xkichmook, accompanied by specimens and photographs. 
He is now studying and mapping the ruins of Chichen-Itza, conclud- 
ing which he will make investigations among the Mayas. President 
Ayer passed the winter in Egypt adding much valuable material 
to the archeologic collections from that country. He also secured 
numerous articles in bronze and glass from Italy, representing the 
culture of the ancient Romans. Vice-President Ryerson and Mr. C. 
L. Hutchinson, on their trip around the world, procured and pre- 
sented to the Museum a large and unique amount of material, 
including Etruscan and Stone Age remains from Italy, Roman terra 
cottas, metal and stone work from the Indies, and butterflies from 
the Himalayas. Mr. Owen F. Aldis invited O. P. Hay, Assistant 
Curator of Ichthyology to accompany him on an excursion to the 
waters of Southern Florida. Nearly one hundred fine specimens 
were obtained, several of which, including a splendid tarpon, have 
been mounted. This contribution to the material of this division of 
Zoology has added much to the appearance of Hall 22. 

Installation, Re-Arrangement and Permanent Improvements. — 
Estimated by its cost, the largest amount of material improvement 
has been made on the Building itself. By order of the Executive 
Committee, experts were secured to make recommendations that as 
far as possible would insure the safety and stability of the Building 
for at least five years. Acting upon these reports, the Executive 
Committee appointed a sub-committee, consisting of Mr. Owen F. 
Aldis and the Director to execute the recommendations of these 
experts, modified in such directions as the judgment of this sub-com- 
mittee might dictate. The repairs to the Building consisted in tin- 
ning and painting the roof, strengthening the main floor, putting in 



Field Columbia** Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

an entirely new roof-drainage system, removing the ornamentation 
on the exterior of the Building, securing in place such plaster acces- 
sories as seemed in danger of displacement, and re-plastering and 

patching the exterior, closing the unused entrances with iron railing, 
cleaning and repainting all of the structural iron work of tlie Building 
and putting iron guards at all of the windows. With the exception 
of the tinning and the plastering, the work was performed by con- 
tract, within an appropriation of $15,000. The Building is as nearly 
perfect in condition now, as it appears possihle to make it, and 
while the plaster work will be a continual source of annoyance and 
expense, yet it can be cared for with the force at the disposal of the 
Museum unless during the coming winter there is such displacement 
as to require additional labor. This can only be determined by the 
results as they transpire. It is estimated that unless something 
unforseen arises, the Building can be maintained in its present physi- 
cal condition for five years with the regular force of the Museum, and 
possibly the expenditure of $3,000 per annum. Improvements in the 
steam heating plant have been extensive. An independent line of 
steam pipe has been constructed to the East Annex that will enable 
heat to be forced into the extreme East end of the Building, without 
the necessity of adding to the temperature of the system of the main 
Building, through which system steam has been heretofore conveyed 
to the East Annex. Water and steam pipes have also been laid to 
the new workshop; to the Division of Physical Anthropology; to 
Photography and other parts of the Building, as the establishment of 
new offices, laboratories and working rooms have demanded. The 
disadvantage of having the general workshop and taxidermy rooms 
of the Museum located in the warehouse at Fifty-Sixth street and 
Jefferson avenue, became so apparent, that by consent of the South 
Park Commissioners, an independent brick building accommodating 
workshops, laboratory and taxidermic rooms, has been constructed 
to the North of the East Main entrance of the Building. It is almost 
concealed from view, and at the same time gives ample room for 
work, and its proximity to the Museum itself simplifies and system- 
atizes the work. A special vault was built for the skin vats of the 
taxidermists; the rooms all have sky-lights, and are fire-proof. The 
location of the carpenter shop and paint shop in this addition will 
enable workmen to take small jobs to the shop and prevent a great deal 
of annoyance, noise and litter created by carrying on such work in the 
Museum, while the Curators of Zoology or Ornithology are in quick 
communication with their taxidermists. During the past year a local 
telephone system has been established in the Building, giving prompt 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 105 

and easy method of communication between the different divisions 
and offices of the Museum. It has been found of the greatest utility 
and economy. The Columbus caravels have been removed from the 
South Chicago Ship Yards to the Main Basin in Jackson Park, and 
secured to place and made ready for the rough weather of the winter. 
The Viking Ship was about to be removed to the Basin, but by order 
of the Executive Committee, the plan was changed and the ship was 
housed at the East of the Museum, as was the case the year before. 
Several improvements have been made in the printing office, in the 
photographic section, and in the poisoning division; new fixtures, 
furniture, appliances and accessories provided in each case, and the 
scope for work improved as the demands for its performance increased. 
The printing office now prints the mailing list, and all addresses on 
publications are attached by a mailing machine. The poisoning 
force is doing effective work in all departments of the Museum where 
such services are required, and has been attached during the past 
year to the Superintendent's jurisdiction. The presence of moths, 
wood worms and dermestes in all parts of the Museum has necessi- 
tated the greatest watchfulness and activity. The pests are now 
under control, although the work is continued everywhere unremit- 
tingly. A careful study of poisons, and advice, by correspondence, 
from other institutions, has added much valuable information as to 
the best methods to pursue and the most effective poisons to employ, 
so that this very important division of the Museum now feels fully 
equipped to meet these most dangerous enemies of all Museums. 

The work of permanent installation in the Department of 
Anthropology has been advanced in many directions, and more 
artisan labor has been performed, and more facilities for permanent 
installation provided, for this Department than any other, unless it 
may be the department of Zoology. Re-adjustment and repairs to 
old cases and the addition of new ebony cases, many textile frames 
and numberless ebony bases, has vastly improved the appearance of 
the Department, while the re-arrangement of collections and the trans- 
fer of material to obtain more suitable geographic and other significant 
relationships has very much improved the appearance of the entire De- 
partment. The North Court and the East Court have been entirely 
reinstalled. The large and undesirable objects in these two courts have 
been either returned to the donors, donated to other institutions, or 
stored for future disposition, and the two courts are now devoted 
almost exclusively to Archeology, the East Court to America, and the 
North Court to Europe. Halls 10, 11, 15 and 16 have been much 
improved in appearance by segregation, modification and the applica- 



106 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol.- i. 

tion of a uniform system. The Division of Physical Anthropology has 

lized and placed in the working circuit during the past \ 
and the alterations and improvements incidental to the establishment 
of this Division have required considerable labor. The Assistant Cura- 
tor in charge of this Division has been provided with offices in the 
first East Court gallery, and a store room has been constructed for 
him with sliding trays, etc., adjoining his office and laboratory. Less 
physical alteration and re-arrangement has been necessary in the 
1 >epartment of Botany than in any other. However, the receipt of 
new material by expedition, gift, exchange and purchase now requires 
for this Department accommodations that will be furnished. The 
necessary facilities are being provided that will work a great change 
in this gallery during the ensuing year. A part of this work will 
consist in completing eight monographic series, which will include 
the following interesting displays: 

\ Rubbers and gums of the world. 

| Seeds and their natural appliances for traveling. 

Textile fibres of the world. 
! Cotton: its growth and utilization from the seedling to food, 
clothing, warfare, medicine, surgery, implements, paper, pho- 
tography and the arts. 

\ Notable foods of the world. 
3" J Edible fruits and their products. 

Habit plants and their products. 

Opium, Tobacco, Cocaine, Betel Nut, Tea, Coffee, Mate, etc., 
**' etc., Vegetable poisons, Curare Woorare, Hellebore, Pyre- 

thrum, etc. 

Eight special herbarium cases have been provided and placed in 
the laboratory of this Department, in which is being gathered a 
reference herbarium about the nucleus formed by the Yucatan 
material obtained by expedition. The Department of Geology 
exhibits very little physical change during the year, although plans 
are being executed that will materially improve Halls 66 and 67. 
The paleontological collection has been largely re-arranged and 
re-mounted, and now follows more nearly the stratigraphical order of 
occurrence. From the lithological collection, most of the polished 
slabs have been transferred to the Economic Division, and their places 
filled by sp< 1 miens illustrating the petrology of Manhattan Island and 
the Green Mountains of Massachusetts. The metallic meteorites have 
been coated with varnish, and several of the relief maps have been 
retouched. In the Economic Division, a number of the halls have 
been re-installed, but the old cases and bases have been utilized in 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 107 

this work. Hall 78, salts, asbestos, etc., has been completely 
re-arranged and the collections placed in logical order, while a col- 
lection illustrating the manufacture of soda has been added from 
storage. Hall 77, clays, sands, cements, etc., has also been com- 
pletely re-arranged, while some of the inappropriate material such as 
tiling, etc., has been transferred to the Department of Industrial 
Arts. Hall 76, the metallurgy of iron, has received attention, and 
when the collections of test specimens is completed, the collection of 
malleable castings now in storage added, etc., the Hall will be in 
excellent shape. A large geological section of the oil fields has been 
added to the wall of Hall 71, Petroleum. The Department of Indus- 
trial Arts has made noticeable progress and improvements through 
re-arrangement and new material installed, transfers from other 
departments, etc. Two cases for knitting machines have been 
installed in the alcove of Hall 30; coin cases have been added to the 
installation of the alcove of Hall 33, while Higinbotham Hall has 
been practically re-installed, much interesting and valuable material 
added, new wall and upright cases provided, etc. In Ceramic Hall, 
several new cases have been added, one striking collection of old 
Sevres porcelain being provided with a large case for the center of 
the room. Additions have been made to the Division of Agricultural 
Implements in the alcove of Hall 31. In the Division of Transpor- 
tation, Boat Hall and Hall 40 (Pack Animals) have been thoroughly 
overhauled, the models repaired and improved, and new models pro- 
vided, while the original locomotives in the extreme East Annex have 
been cleaned, and a suitable preparation applied to all of the metal 
work. The Egyptian boat, presented by Mrs. McCormick, has been 
installed in the extreme end of the East Court, and surrounded by an 
iron railing, mounted upon ways, etc. The Department of Zoology 
has been entirely re-modeled during the year, Hall 20 being provided 
with a new set of cases of mahogany and plate # glass, and the Depart- 
ment extended into the West Court. In the center of this Court has 
been placed groups, and the sides occupied by molluscan collections. 
A new wall case has been provide^ in Hall 21 for the butterflies which 
have been re-mounted and to accommodate the Ryerson Himalayan 
collection now being worked over. All of the birch cases in this 
Department have been stained to conform in color with the new 
mahogany cases, and a vastly improved appearance is the result. 
The working rooms of the Department in the second South gallery 
have been re-furnished with storage shelves, poisoning boxes, chests, 
etc. The growing collection in the Department of Ornithology 
necessitated the provision of more space, which was accomplished in 



to8 Field Cm.iMr.i \n Misi.um — Rkports, Vol. i. 

the re arrangement of the Zoological halls. The Museum now has 
two very handsome bird rooms and several groups and uniquely 
mounted set pieces. The birch cases have all been mahoganized, 
and new mahogany cases provided for a duck group, horn-bill group, 
ostrich group, etc. New oological cases have been purchased, and 
this material re-arranged and re-installed. Room 27 in this Depart- 
ment contains North American species only, while Room 26 will con- 
tain the remainder of the collection. The Department in a number 
of directions has been noticeably improved. 

A New Department. — With the assent of the Curators whose 
departments would be drawn upon for some of the material, a 
new Department named, "The Department of Monographic 
Collections," has been organized for the purpose of bringing 
together for illustrating particular phases of culture, material 
that had appropriate place in two or more of the departments 
of the Museum, the general scheme being upon chronological 
or evolutionarv lines. Two divisions have been established in this 
Department, Printing and Graphic Arts, and Musical Instruments. 
The purpose of the first division is to show the history, the evolution 
and the practical processes of the arts employed in printing and illus- 
tration. The subjects are treated from the modern point of view, 
that is to say, as technical processes of the useful and fine 
arts of today, dating back to the fourteenth century, previous 
to which time they are purely of archeologic interest. The 
section of Graphic Arts has a large field. The arrangement 
of the specimens is according to the classification of Koehler, 
that is, first the old processes, including wood engraving, 
steel and copper line engraving, etching and mezzo-tint, and the 
lithographic and substitute processes. The modern methods are to 
be shown by themselves, and include all of the applications of pho- 
tography to the graphic arts. In the line of older processes, several 
interesting accessions have been made. A small fund has been 
expended in prints that illustrate in an excellent manner the results 
of the different older processes, both plain and in color. They are 
at the same time good specimens of fine art, worthy to be placed upon 
the walls of the Museum. In the line of the modern processes there 
has been added recently an excellent series of specimens illustrating 
the half tone process, and the Museum section of Photography is 
now preparing a collection that will illustrate the history and develop- 
ment of photography, which will be included under this group. In 
the division of Musical Instruments, the installation at this time is far 
from satisfactory, owing to the crowded condition of the un-related 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 109 

material in that part of the Building where it is now installed, and 
considerable re-arrangement will be demanded before this division 
will attract any particular attention. However, there is a good deal 
of material already collected and subject to requisition, that when 
grouped and placed with relation to chronology, geography, develop- 
ment of culture as well as character of instrument, will make an 
excellent beginning. So far, the unique examples are largely from 
Asia and Africa, although South America furnishes some very good 
objects. Several old piano movements, a calderarpa, and a col- 
lection of the movements of the modern piano are in place, and 
invite a great deal of attention from the visitors. It is hoped to add 
to the divisions of this Department within the year a tentative instal- 
lation in fire-making and horology. 

Taxidermy. — The section of Taxidermy established during the 
year, while without a head, in the absence in Africa of its chief work- 
man, was not instituted in advance of requirements, for without 
considering new work, the material that has been restored, preserved 
and saved, is remarkable. The greatest work has been done among 
the old mounted mammals that have been re-installed in Hall 20. 
The entire collection purchased before the opening of the Museum 
has been carefully restored, embellished, repaired, renovated, 
re-mounted, etc., and presents an entirely fresh appearance. Quite a 
number of the specimens in this collection require such treatment 
that they have been stored awaiting the return of the Chief Taxider- 
mist. Great care has been bestowed upon the re-poisoning of the 
entire collection. Eighteen large mammals, mostly antelopes and 
deer, were mounted before the African expedition started, and two 
groups of monkeys were designed, mounted and installed in the West 
Court. The accessories for these groups, tree trunks, branches, 
leaves, fruits etc., were also prepared by the Museum taxidermists. 
Quite a number of fishes, reptiles and Crustacea have been prepared 
and mounted, and two hundred and thirty birds, mostly North 
American, have been mounted and added to the Ornithological col- 
lections. The Curator of Ornithology has prepared sketches and 
details for a heron and a duck group on which work is now in 
progress. 

Photography. — Notwithstanding the poor quarters and lighting of 
the only available place for photographic work, much has been 
accomplished. The importance and need of such a section in the 
Museum is fully exemplified in the demand which has been made 
upon it from all departments for the illustration of publications and 



tlO Fll LD C0L1 MB1 \\ M i -li M REPO . V( 'I . I. 

the preservation of data. The details of this work are related in the 
following table : 

Negatr Prints. Lantern Slides 

Anthropology [38 108 

Botany 10S [37 

j 1 22 ii, 

I ndustrial Aits ,xx 1 1 

Zoologj 144 39 

Library 144 85 52 

General 13 7 

702 5 1 3 

The operator lias manipulated the stereopticon at the lectures 
where it has l>een used. 

Printing. — The printing office has been in constant operation. 
In the way of improvements, there have been added to the equipment 
a paper cutt series of wood type, and many metal fonts. The 

following figures show the number of impressions made in the way of 

label printing and general jobs : 

Labels. Other Impressidns. 

Anthropology 1,577 1:^50 

Botany 1,861 12,250 

Geology 1,196 475 

History 8 

Industrial Aits 1,- 5,000 

Zoology 3,775 6,500 

Librarj 47 2' 1.699 

Director's Office, 3,082 .,77 

Fire Protection and Policing. Fire Marshal D. ]. Swenie, of 
the City Fire Department, made a personal inspection of the Build- 
ing with reference to fire protection in September. His report in 
writing, dated September 28th may be summarized to sav : "1 found 
everything in first-class shape as regards cleanliness and freedom 
from rubbish, or anything that would invite a fire. Your future 
safety depends on the continuance of your present policy, viz.. doing 
rything possible in the way of prevention." It being deemed 
advisable to add further means of prot< ction to the equipment already 
in operation, the Museum has pun 1 hose, couplings and pipes 

for ten new stations, a number of ladders, fire axes and pike poles, 
and has constructed additional trap doors for admission to the base- 
ment. Chief Swenie made no suggestions with reference to the 
Museum Fire Department, its rules, methods, etc., from which it is 
inferred that these were satisfactory. The regular semi-monthly fire 
drill of the guards is maintained, and the hourly inspection of the 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. hi 

building, including the basement and main dome is continued. The 
annual report of the Captain of the Fire Department conveys every 
indication of an efficient service in this important direction. The 
guard service has been very satisfactory during the year. So satis- 
factory in fact, that no changes have been made either in members or 
methods. There has been no complaint filed against the guard from 
the many thousands of visitors. The discipline and orderliness 
of the building has been carefully maintained, and no thefts 
reported/ 

Personal Property and Intrinsically Valuable Material. — A list of 
the office furniture, desk supplies, of all tools, appliances, and acces- 
sories so far purchased by the Museum, has been taken from the 
vouchers and records, as a basis for the personal property inventory, 
which it is proposed to make each six months or year as circum- 
stances may dictate. These lists were checked by the head of each 
department or division on whose account the material was purchased. 
The items unaccounted for will be erased from the inventory and here- 
after new purchases will be added as made, and it is believed this sys- 
tem of searching for property of this character, will cause all con- 
cerned to exercise more care in its custody. The intrinsically valuable 
exhibition material has also been checked from the records, with sat- 
isfactory results, although it is contemplated to re-check the material 
in Higinbotham Hall in February when the services of an expert in 
jewels will be available. 

Admissions. — -The admissions for the year have diminished about 
98,000, and this decrease seems to have affected all of the classes of 
visitors. There are several minor reasons for this falling off, but 
the emphatic cause is that people who the first year visited the 
Museum under the impression that it was a miniature World's Fair, 
have discovered their error, and being uninterested in the real scope 
of the Museum, have passed their vacation hours in pursuits that 
promised greater amusement and excitement than was furnished by 
the Museum. This is especially illustrated by the fact that there 
have been no great crowds on any one day, as was often the occur- 
rence the first year. Visitors to the Museum now come for edification, 
instruction and study. There is one point, however, to which special 
attention should be directed in this connection, and that is the sharp 
decrease in the attendance of school children and students. Of 
course no record is kept of those school children and students who 
attend on the free days, as no tickets are issued and there are no 
means of distinguishing one visitor from another. But it is fair 



1 1 j Field Columbian Mi eum Reports, Vol. i. 

to assume that if the free admissions on pay days in any par- 
ticular class vary one year from another, it is a strong indica- 
tion that the interest of this class is abating. The Museum has 
made every effort to encourage principals and teachers of schools 
of all characters to induce their scholars and students to utilize the 
opportunities offered by the institution to broaden and emphasize their 
e lucation in scientific anil technical directions, and it must be admitted 
that the Museum has been impressed during the year with the 
indifference of teachers : more especially those of the public schools. 
Several schools have carried this indifference to the point of not even 
providing their scholars with the tickets that are furnished through the 
office of the Superintendent of Schools. It would seem that if the 
attention of the proper authorities was brought to this condition of 
affairs, remedial measures might be adopted. A great many classes, 
and notably classes from the parochial schools have visited the 
Museum accompanied by teachers to take up some particular line of 
study, and in some instances after collections have been inspected and 
notes taken, talks upon the collections have been made in the Lecture 
Hall, the Curators often performing this service. This seems the 
most desirable method of utilizing the material in the Museum for 
the education of the young, and it is encouraged in every way possible. 
Herewith are submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, list of accessions, names of members, etc., etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF, 

Director. 



Oct. 1896. 



Ann lai. Report of the Director. 



113 



Financial Statement. 



Receipts and Disbursements 



During" Year ending September 30, 1896. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1895 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1895, 

Dues of Members — 

Life, S 500.00 

Corporate, 370.00 

Annual, 6,110.00 

South Park Commissioners, 

Chicago City Railroad Co., 

P. U. Armour 10,000.00 

R. T. Crane 5,000.00 

Norman B. Ream, 5,000.00 

A. A. Sprague, 5,000.00 

Edson Keith, 5,000.00 

Win. A. Fuller, • 5,000.00 

Geo. E. Adams, 5,000.00 

C. L. Hutchinson, on account, 3,000.00 

Martin A. Ryerson, special donation account Zoology, . 665.00 

Martin A. Ryerson, special donation account Botany, . . 50.00 

George Manierre, special donation account Geology, . . 45.00 

George Manierre, special donation account Anthropology, 22.50 

W. J. Chalmers, special donation account Geology, . . . 45.00 

W. J. Chalmers, special donation account Anthropology, 22.50 

Dividend, World's Columbian Exposition stock: — 

Arthur B. Farwell 5.00 

F. T. Ainicker, 2.00 

Sale of Sundry Articles, 

Interest on Investments, 

Interest on Bank Balances 

Admissions 

Check Rooms, 

Sale of Guides 

Sale of Securities 



$16,294.52 
739-95 



6,980.00 

15,000.00 

2,250.00 



43,000.00 

715.00 

67.50 

67.50 



7.00 

145-64 

40,085.56 

1 70.66 

6,281.65 

i,49i-25 

470.75 

25,000.00 

$158,766.98 



114 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. . i. 

DlSBl RSEMEN I S. 

Salaries *37.732-87 

Guard Service 12,224.01 

Janitor Service 5,704.44 

I ire Protection: — 

\\ ages of Firemen, > 2,700.00 

Uniforms and Supplies 7 M -04 ;6.04 

I [eat and Light Account: — 

Wages of Engineer and Assistants, . . . '■•'•.22 

1 uel 3»84376 

Supplies 71 1.54 7,226.52 

Repairs and Alterations: — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers and 

Plasterers 10,297.08 

Material used — Paints, Oils, Hardware, Glass, 

I, umber and Plaster, 5.04 

Contracts, Special Work, 8,769.35 21,751.47 

Furniture and Fixtures: — 

Cases and Bases, 9,820.20 

Building Fixtures, 762.86 

Safe in Deposit Vault 611.00 

Sundries, 344-66 1 1,538.72 

The Library: — 

Books and Periodicals Purchased 1,000.26 

Binding 3"-? 

Lecture Course 4.7.28 

Expense Account 103.10 1,461.81) 

Sections of Printing and Photography: — 

Printing — Type, etc., purchased [69. 1 5 

Wages ol Printers 923.65 

Photography — Stock Purchased 113.61 

Supplies Purchased, . . . 172.00 

Wages of Photographer, . . 600.00 1,978.41 

Department of Anthropology: — 

Collections and Articles Purchased, . . . 15,500.77 
Installation Expenses, 796.44 16,297.21 

Department of Industrial Arts: — 

Collections and Articles Purchased, . . . . 396.2; 

Installation Expenses, 187.67 5^3-91 

B. & O. R. R., balance of contract 547-35 

Department of Geology: — 

ections and Articles Purchased, . . . 1,208.20 
Installation Expenses, 50.55 1,258.75 

Department of Zoology: — 

Collections and Articles Purchased, . . . [,768.20 

Installation Expenses, 2,310.87 4,070-07 

Carried forward, $132,220.66 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 115 

Brought forward, '$132,220.66 

Department of Botany: — 

Collections and Articles Purchased, . . . $400.00 

Installation Expenses 235.76 635.76 

Department of Ornithology: — 

Collections and Articles Purchased, . . . 28.30 

Installation Expenses 25743 285.73 

Department of Columbus Memorial: — 

Expense Account 92.00 

General Expense Account: — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming, .... 3,621.17 

Stationery 1,388.56 

Postage, Telegrams and Telephone, . •. . 1,267.03 

Publications, 2,565.52 

Expeditions to Africa, The Gulf Coast, 

Mexico, etc., 11,762.87 

Guide, Fourth Edition, 565.53 

Sundries, 2,585.70 23,756.38 

§156,990.53 

In Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1896 1,036.50 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1896, 739-95 1,776.45 

Si 58,766.98 



n6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



Attendance and Receipts for Year Ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



Attendance. 

Total Attendance -30,337 

Paid Attendance: — 

Adults 24,624 

Children, 1,259 25,883 

Free Admission on pay days: — 

School Children 4,095 

Students, 827 

Teachers, 366 

Members — Corporate, 80 

Annual, 053 

Officer's Family 124 

Special, 21 6,466 

Admission on Free days: — 

Saturdays, 54,64 1 

Sundays, 143.347 

Highest Attendance on any day (Aug. 23, 1896) 5>370 

Lowest Attendance " " (Feb. 3, 1896) 6 

Highest paid Attendance " (July 8, 1896) 917 

Average Daily Admissions, (366 days) 629 

Average Paid Admissions, (262 days) 99 



Receipts. 



Guides sold— 1893 (g 25 cents S 47°-75 

Articles checked — 29,825 fa 5 cents 1,101.25 

Admissions 6,281.65 

Total SS.243.65 






Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 117 



Accessions. 

From October i, 1895, to October i, 1896. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALDIS.OWEN F., Chicago. 

144 specimens of pottery, copper implements, obsidian implements, beads, 

etc. — Valley of Mexico and Oaxaca. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V., Chicago. 

2 earthenware water bottles — Valley of Mexico. 

Indian potter's outfit, (32 specimens); copies of ancient mural paintings 

and drawings, (89 sheets) — Mexico. 
80 stone implements, 22 earthen vases, 24 negatives of Yucatan ruins, 12 

bushels fragmentary pottery, etc. — Mexico. 
65 archeological specimens: sun stone, diorite head of Tlaloc, obsidian 

core, head of idol, pestles, celts, fiber beaters, stone blades, bronze 

bells, arrowpoints, earthen dishes, silver beads, etc. — Valley of Mexico. 

AVER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

Silver ornaments, articles of leather, baskets, fetiches, etc., (32 specimens) 

— Navajo Indians. 
Medicine man's rattle — Indians of California. 
Copper bracelet — Indians of N. W. Coast. 
Piece of painted buffalo skin — Plains Indians. 
Wristlet — New Guinea. 
Bronze figure of Isis — Egypt. 

32 specimens colored Roman glass, (fragments) — Rome. 
1 unbaked brick — Egypt. 
1 small carnelian figure, pendant — Egypt. 

1 figure in green-glaze ware— Egypt. 

2 statuettes of stone — Egypt. 

AVER, E. E., PORTER, H. PL, BURNHAM, D. H., and SINGER, CHA.S. 

2 bronze bath tubs, 6 bronze vases, 1 bronze table, 1 bronze lamp — 
Ancient Rome, Pompeii, (Loan). 

AVER, MRS. EDWARD E., Chicago. 

160 pieces blue-glaze earthenware; ornaments, ushabti figures, vases, 
etc. — Egypt. 

44 pieces blue-glaze earthenware; ornaments, etc. — Egypt. 
BLAIR, W. F., Chicago. 

21 bronze figures of ancient gods, etc. — Egypt. 
BURNHAM, D. H., Chicago. See Aver. 
CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

Quiver, necklace and stone implement, used by Indians of British Guiana. 
CHERRIE, G. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

2 Indian baskets — Louisiana. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by W. H. Holmes: 

30 specimens of ancient mining implements — Rockland, Michigan. 

Purchases: 

47 reproductions of ancient Roman bronzes, (purchased from S. de 
Angelis and Sons, Naples, Italy). 



Field Columbian Musi um — Repoi rs, Vol. i. 

• 

ers Malay, (purchased From J. * '. Tanty, Chi< ago). 

i buffalo robe, decorated with quill work, (purchased from John Butter, 
Chicago 

Ancient Roman swords, knives and spear-heads ol iron, 11 piei ily; 

Phoenician glass, bronzes, stone vases, mummies "I animals, etc., 256 
pieces Egypt and Syria; 27 si mill earthenware vessels Egypt, I 
chased by E. E. Ayer, Chicas 

4 human skulls, (purchased from Tmax & Green, Chii aj 

1 grooved stone axe, (purchased from Ad >lpfa Miller, Bowmanville, 111). 

207 flaked Hints — vicinitj of St. Louis, Mo.; jS large flaked stone imple- 
ments — 111. and Mo., i purchased from W. J. Seever, St. Louis, Mo). 

( '1 'licet ion of Eskimo material, I 172 spec i mens- Alaska, (purchased from 
M iner W. Bruce). 

Indian skull with arrow point imbedded behind nasal cavity, (purch 
from J. V. Tallman, Pendleton, Oregon). 

Skull of Apache Indian woman, (purchased from F. M. Noe, Indian- 
apolis, I nd 1. 

HUTCHINSON, C. L., Chicago. 

20 specimens earthenware vases, spoons, tablet and platter. 

KEELEY,DR. LESLIE E., Dwight, 111. 
1 bronze sistrum 1 )gj 1 >t. 

KR( »WS, MELVIN, Momehce, 111. 

1 conch shell hammer or casse-tete — Florida. 

I AEGELER, JULIUS, Highwood, III. 

Indian pack saddle and skin carrying bag — Sioux Indians. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H., Chicago. 

1 ancient iron plow-point — Italy. 

MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

-tone celts, 1 shell celt, 1 shell casse-tete, etc.— Florida, (exchange). 

MUSEUM OP FINE ARTS, St. Louis, Mo. 

60 pieces of ancient Roman ijass. 

2 bronze rings, (for examination). 

NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. Johns, N. B. 

6 specimens of partially shaped spear points and flakes of flints, and 4 
fragments of pottery — Queens County, N. B. 
PILLARS, JAMES, Lima, Ohio. 

27 photographs of stone implements — 1 Ihio, (exchang 
PORTER.H. II., Chicago. See Ayer. 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

1 terra cotta Etruscan urn — Italy. 

4 ancient Roman terra cotta roofing tiles — Italy. 

500 prehistoric stone implements Italy. 

20 small pieces of bronze, said to have been used .is money. 

3 marble images of Buddha — India. 

1 'pper and brass vases India. 

SINGER, CHAS., Chicago. See Ayer. 

I ALLMAN, J. V., Pendleton, Oregon. 

(.3] arrow and spear points— Oregon, (for examination). 

1 HOMPS< >N, I-:. II., Menda, Yucatan. 

Report on the ruined city of Xkichmook, Yucatan — Manuscript and 

drawii 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
• Accessions are by gift unless otherwise m.signated.) 

CLARK, E. B., Chicago. 

2 specimens of fungi, (for examination 1. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, for Department of Botany: 
6 herbarium specimens— Mississippi. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 119 

3 herbarium specimens— Mt. Carmel, 111. 

76 specimens of fungi, 9 species — Blue Island, 111. 

Trunk of tree, Aralia spinosa — New York. 

1 photo-negative of . Xralia spinosa -Waverly, N. Y. 

31 specimens of fungi, cotton, and tield species for Herbarium— Mis 

sissippi. 

150 herbarium specimens (35 species) for Forestry Collection — Mis- 
sissippi. 

12 specimens of fruit Mississippi. 

36 blocks of wood — Mississippi. 

1 bromide enlargements of negative — Mississippi. 
Purchases: 

3,500 botanical specimens, 560 species, and 1,150 herbarium plants, 200 
200 species — Yucatan, (purchased from Geo. F. Gaumer, Izamal, 
Yucatan). 
GRAY HERBARU M. Cambridge, Mass. 

2 dried plants, Phyllanthus and Argythamnia, (for examination). 

LANSING, O. E., Chicago. 

3 specimens of fungi. 

LEE, J. ELLWOOD, CO., Conshohocken, Pa. 

7 samples illustrating process of manufacture of absorbent cotton. 
1 lb. "Hospital Grade" absorbent cotton, and 1 gallon liquor residue 
after first process in the manufacture of absorbent cotton. 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

3 herbarium specimens — North America, (exchange). 
54 herbarium specimens — West Virginia, (exchange). 
17 herbarium specimens — Brazil, (exchange). 

NAUMANN, J., San Diego, Cal. 

Cane of Manzanita wood — natural curiosity, head in form of a woman, 
(for examination). 
NEVIN, W. G., Chicago. 

1 piece of oak wood, (for examination). 

NUTTALL, L. W., Nuttallburg, W. Virginia. 

45 fungi — West Virginia. 

PALMER, DR. EDWARD, Washington, D. C. 

6 photographs of trees — Acapulco, Mexico. 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 

4 plants, Euphorbiaceae, (for examination). 

PETFORD, C. E., Chicago. 

32 plant products — Turkestan, (exchange). 

14 specimens of fruits, gums, wood and rubber. 

1 specimen of lace bark - Brazil. 

1 1 specimens fruits, fibers and flowers — Johore, Java and Trinidad. 

PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pa. 
28 forestry products — Japan, (exchange). 
146 forestry products — Siam, (exchange). 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago.* 

150 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

SCHXECK, DR. JOSEPH, Mt. Carmel, 111. 

2 herbarium specimens -Mt. Carmel, 111. 

6 specimens of Gladitchia //lonosperma, leafing branch in spine and fruit 
Mount Carmel, 111. 

STREIT & SCHMIT, Cincinnati, ( >. 

Mounted photograph of curiously marked board of Liriodendron tu/if> 
if era. 
THOMPSON, E. H., Merida, Yucatan. 

Pod and seeds of Xtabay — Chichen-Itza, Yucatan, 
TOWNE, MLS. M. M., Lake Geneva, Wis. 

9 specimens of fungi, 3 species — Harvard, 111., (for examination). 



120 Field Columbian Museum- Reports, Vol. i. 

TRACY, PROF. S. M., Agricultural College, Miss. 

1 cotton plants in "square" and "bloom"- Mississippi. 

1 NDERWOOD, L. M.. Auburn, Via. 

2 negatives ol new species ol Yucatan plant. 

\ ALDEZ, PORFIRIO, Merida, Yucatan. 

300 medicinal plants (100 species) — Yucatan. 

WH1 rMORE.O. S., Chicago. 

2 specimens of supposed poisonous plants, (for examination). 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(Accessions \ki by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AGUILAR, PONCIANO, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

j^ specimens of Mexican minerals, Albite, Calcite, Valencianite, etc. — 
Guanajuato, Mexico, (exchange). 

AlZA, MANUEL, Durango, Mexico. 

1 specimen of Calcite, stalactitic, and 1 of Sulphur, stalagmitic— Desert 
of Mapimi, Mexico. 

\I.MV, JOHN D., Villa Corona, Mexico. 

7 specimens of silver ores and minerals — Villa Corona and Durango, 
Mexico. 

.\\ ER, E. E., Chicago. 

1 specimen of Calc Tufa — Tivoli, Italy. 

BERRY, ROBERT J.. Durango, Mexico. 

7 specimens of mercury and tin ore — Durango, Mexico. 
BRENNAN, G. A., Chicago. 

Clay-ironstone concretion — supposed meteorite — (for examination). 

BROWN, C. W., Los Angeles. Cal. 

2 (orals, 3 Brachiopods, etc. — Appleton, Wis. 

BURNHAM, 1). D., Battle Creek, Mich. 

6 charts showing the beginnings of life on earth, (for examination). 

BUTLER, E. C, U. S. Legation, Mexico, D. F. 

4 specimens of mercury ore — State of Guerrero, Mexico. 

CANN.JOS. BOARDMAN, Wyoming. 

1 specimen of supposed platinum ore. 

CARRERA, PROF. I. C, Las Cruces, N. M. 

1 specimen of Melaconite Organ Mountain-, N. M., (for examination.) 

CENTRAL SCHOOL SUPPLY HOI SI'., Chicago. 

1 relief map each of northeastern Illinois, United States, North America, 

South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, the World. 
1 relief map ol I- ranee, (loan). 

CHALMERS, W. J., Chicago. 

1 specimen"! pseudomorph oi Pyrite Virginia. 
1 spe< imen of Crocidolite — Cape Town. 

1 specimen of Calymene Blununbachii var. Niagarensis — Chicago 
Drainage Canal. 

CHOATE, J. C, Woodstock, 111. 

1 specimen of hornstone in quartzite, f^or examination). 
10 specimens of Trenton fossds, (for examination). 

CLAYTON, G. P., Pullman, III. 

1 specimen of sand concretion— Green County, Wis. 

COCKERELL, L. M., Guanajuato, Mexico. 

1 specimen of Quartz-crystal showing movable bubble — Guanajuato, 
Mexici >■ 
COLORADO SCHM'U. < >F MINES, Golden, Colo. 

74 specimens of fossil leaves and 10 specimens of minerals — Table Moun- 
tain and Golden, Colo., (exchange). 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 121 

DAY, DAVID T., Chief Mining Dept., Atlanta Exposition. 

12 specimens of nickel and gold ores — Canada and South Carolina. 
1 specimen of Magnesite — California. 

DERR, H. B., Chicago. 

1 specimen of Athyra substellata — Illinois Coal Measures. 

DIXON, CHAS., Elkhart, Ind. 

Tooth of Elephas primigenius, (for examination). 

DOTY, DUANE, Pullman, 111. ' 

1 specimen of crystallized Gypsum in clav, 1 Gypsum crystal — Pullman 
111. 
DUCKWORTH, A. S., Chicago. 

100 specimens of Cretaceous fossils, representing 37 distinct species — 
Texas, (exchange). 

EBERSBACHER, ALF., Youngstown, Ohio. 

8 nuts from the Coal Measures of Mahoning County, Ohio. 

EHREXFELD, FREDERICK, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1 specimen of Philadelphite — Philadelphia, Pa. 

ESCUELA X. de IXGEXIEROS, Mexico, D. F. 

15 specimens of minerals, including Apophyllite, Calcite, Guadalcazarite, 
Livingstonite, Bustamite, Xaiostocite, etc. — Mexico, (exchange). 

FERRIS, DR. U. B., Chicago. 

1 slab showing glacial striae — Chicago. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

21 specimens of silver ores, El Nayal and Yalenciana mines, building 
stones, specimens of Amethyst, Dolomite, Calcite, Quartz, etc. — Guana- 
juato, Mexico. 
15 specimens of Wulfenite, Aragonite, lead ore, Anglesite, etc. — Organ 
Mountains, N. M. 

24 specimens of silver ore, gangue and country rock, tufa, etc. — Pachuca, 

Real del Monte, Durango and Zacatecas, Mexico. 

25 specimens of Martite and rocks of Cerro Mercado — Durango, Mexico. 
31 specimens of lava, pumice, sulphur, glacial bowlders, etc. — Popoca- 
tepetl, Ixtaccihuatl, and Valley of Mexico, Mexico. 

Purchases: 

259 specimens of fossils, (6q species) — Galveston Deep Well, Texas, 
(purchased from J. A. Singley, Giddings, Texas). 

300 specimens of Chicago fossils, 100 of Carboniferous fossils, 5 speci- 
mens of Quartz, 20 of miscellaneous minerals, and 45 of shells and 
corals, (purchased from Mrs. M. A. Kennicott, Chicago). 

15 specimens of Cretaceous Ammonites and Lamellibranchs — Livingston, 
Mont., (purchased from O. D. Booth, Forsyth, Mont.) 

25 crystals, (purchased from George L. English & Co., New York). 

3 specimens of Calcite — Joplin, Mo., (purchased from P. P. Peck, Joplin, 
Mo). 

FORDING, D., Alliance, Ohio. 

Supposed meteoric stone, (for examination). 
FURNESS, DWIGHT, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

1 specimen of Stephanite, 1 of Native Silver and 1 of chloride silver 

ore — Mexico. 

GILL, GEO. C, Olympian Springs, Ky. 

2 fossil Crinoids — Salt Lake Creek, Bath County, Ky. 
GILL, MRS. GEO. C, Olympian Springs, Ky. 

1 specimen of limomte concretion. 

GORDON, C. H., Beloit, \Yis. 

1 specimen of Syenite-gneiss, (Leopard Rock) — High Rock Mine, Ottawa, 
Canada. 

HAND, N. S., Silver City, X. M. 

1 piece of Onyx, banded —Mexico. 

1 specimen of Cobaltite — Silver City, N. M. 



Field Columbia*! Museum Reports, Vol. i. 

HATRY, OT H I, Kansas City, Mb. 

i slab of < arboniferous fossils, i specimen of Cyathophyllum, (exchange). 
i spe< imen i \\ Baculites ovata, (exchange l. 

Ill I MIR. M. F., Mechanicsville, Iowa. 

i specimen "I Chalcedony, (for examination). 

HOLMES, W. II.. Field Columbian Museum. 

i specimen of Albertite I tali. 

Pie< i "l Vlbertite, I For examination i. 
Ill \ riNGTON, J. D., Chicago. 

5 specimens of Obsidian and Calcite — Regla Falls and Pachuca, Mexico. 
JACKSON, CI IAS. P., San Francisco, Cal. 

Shingle and nail from cabin oi I. M. Marshall, the discoverer of gold in 
California, and a piece <>\ granite from his monument at Colona, Cal. 
KANE, W. (',., Kansas < ity, Mo. 

\ specimens Muscovite in Biotite — Custer. So. Dakota, (exchange). 
KELLER. MRS. C. I .. Little River. Kansas. 

7 specimens pyrite, gypsum, limestone, marl, etc. — Lit tie River, Kansas, 

(for examination |. 
KELLER, MRS. I. K., Chicago. 

i specimen oi sand from Mounl < Hivet, Jerusalem. 
KONIGLICHE BERGSWERKSDIRECTION, Saarbriicken, Germany. 

i geological map Saarbriicken Coal Fields, Germany. 

LANDERO, CARLOS, representing Compania Minera de Pachuca y Real del 

Monte, Pachuca, Hidalgo, Mexico. 
25 specimens of silver ores and minerals — Real del Monte and Pachuca, 

Mexh 0. 
1. VWRENCE, W.J., Chicago. 

3 specimens of Pyrite, 1 of Chrysocolla — Colorado and Utah. 
2 fossils— Chicago, 111. 

I specimen oi cul Rubellite — California. 

1 specimen of stalactitic Calcite— Southern Illinois. 

1 specimen of Malachite and Azurite — Bisbee, Ariz, (exchange). 

LEFFMANN, CARLOS, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

2 specimens of Albite, and one ol M a nganite after Calcite — Guanajuato, 

Mexico. 

McCAULI \ , CHARLES, Chicago. 

Fragmenl of alum, supposed to have fallen from the sky — Chicago, (tor 
examination). 

MEEK, M. W .. Chicago. 

18 mineral spe< imens, (for examination). 

5 specimens of Trenton fossils, (for examination 1. 

MILLARD, W. K.. Chicago. 

i Cyathophyllum, Grass Lake, 111., (for examination). 

MILLER, I . C, Chit ago. 

1 specimen ol Calymene Blumenbachit, var. Niagarensis — Drainage 
< anal, ( !ook County, 111. 
MILLSPAUGH, MRS. M. I... Chicago. 

4 specimens of fossil coral — Petoskey, Mich. 

MINNESOTA IRON D >., Soudan, Minn. 

1 large oil painting of a se< tion of a mine — Soudan, Minn. 

M<)SS, PROF. MILTON, 1 hit ago. 

2 specimens oi Chenivixite, and 2 of Conichalcite — Eagle Mine, Utah. 

MUSE( » NACN >NAL de MEXIO >, Mexico, D. F. 

8 specimens of minerals, including Cassiterite, Topaz, Stilbite and Calcite 

— Mexico, (exchange.) 

NAGELOOXT, T. I'... Chicago. 

Sand from under kame — Northville, Mich. 

NATIONAL MALLEABLE CASTfNGS CO., Chicago. 

6 specimens illustrating the manufacture of malleable castings. 






Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 123 

NEW BRUNSWICK S< ICIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, St. Johns, N. B. 

24 specimens of Devonian fossil plants in slate — Fern Ledges, St. fohns, 
N. B., (exchange). 

NICHOLS, H. W., Field Columbian Museum. 

Specimen of free gold in quartz — Nova Scotia, (loan). 
NORIEGA, PEDRO DE LA, Ameca, Mexico. 

3 specimens of Sulphur — Popocatepetl, Mexico. 
OROZCO, PABLO, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

8 specimens of Calcite, Quartz, Silver, Argentite, etc. — Guanajuato, 
Mexico, (exchange). 

PECK, P. P., Joplin, Mo. 

Large cluster of crystallized Calcite, 2 specimens of single crystals of 
Calcite, 2 specimens of crystallized Galena — Joplin, Mo., (exchange). 
PENFIELD, PROF. S. L., New Haven, Conn. 

8 specimens of rare minerals. 
REED, LIEUT. HUGH T., Chicago. 

2 pieces of glacial bowlder — Chicago, (for examination). 
RODRIGUEZ, FIDENCIO, City of Mexico. 

1 specimen of Hornblende Andesite — Tlapacays, Mexico. 
1 specimen of Olivine-Basalt — Ixtapalapa, Mexico. 
1 specimen of Polybasite — Zacatecas, Mexico. 
1 specimen of Sulphur — Popocatepetl, Mexico. 

RUST, HORATIO N., South Pasadena, Cal. 
Specimen of supposed meteoric iron. 
SAFFORD, J. M., Nashville, Tenn. 

3 casts of teeth of Petalodus Ohioensis. 
SHEAHAN, THOMAS, Batavia, 111. 

26 specimens of Calymene Blumenbachii, var. Niagarensis, with speci- 
mens of pyrite and chert — Chicago Drainage Canal. 
SNYDER, WM. ALBERT, Chicago. 

15 specimens of septaria and fossiliferous pebbles. — Glen Pier, Mich. 
SPAULDING.GEO. H., Marion, Ind. 

3 specimens of chert and pyrite concretions, (for examination). 
SYEGE, A. E. J., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 specimen of Eaculites — Medicine Hat, Assiniboia. 
THOMPSON, E. H., Merida, Yucatan. 

Specimen of limestone — Yucatan, (for examination). 
ULLERICK, DR. C. A., Chicago. 

1 specimen of siliceous oolite. 

Fragment of a Ganoid — Colorado, (for examination). 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

1 crystal of Triplite — Stoneham, Me., (for examination). 
WATTLES, JUNIUS H., Kansas City, Mo. 

1 specimen of geode containing Siderite and Dolomite — Kansas City, Mo. 
WELLER, S., University of- Chicago. 

5 casts of type specimens of Petalocrinus mirapilis — Iowa. 
WERTHY, WM., Sailor Springs, 111. 

2 specimens Hornblende Granite and Galena, (for examination). 
WILLIAMS, T. B., Chicago. 

1 basket Tallow clay and associated chert and limestone — Reynolds 

Co., Mo., (for examination). 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

CURTIS, WM. £., Washington, D. C. 

2 photographs of Columbus Monument, Ma\aguez, Puerto Rico. 
DALE, JOHN T., Chicago. 

Gun originally owned by Ethan Allen, Revolutionary General. 



[24 Field Coi.i'mi-.ian Mim.im — Reports, Vol. i. 

DAY, J. I... Chicago. 

Copy "I " The ( Mil Flag," a paper printed with pen and ink. 
EVANS, W. S., S,.uth Chicago. 

[6 specimens ol U. S. fractional currency, stamps, Exposition pass, etc., 
contained in cue frame. 

FRENCH, D. C, New York. 

Wreath and acorn for "Republic Statue." 
Kl NZ.GEO. I .. New York. 

1 bronze medal, (loan). 
MOSS, PROF. Ml LION, Chicago, 

Map of Edinburgh in 1647, (copy). 

SIMPSON, HALL, MILLER, & C< >., Chicago. 

Exposition souvenirs — 3 silver plaques. 

1 silver napkin ring. 
SKIFF, F. J. V., Field Columbian Museum. 

Copy of Harper's Weekly, April 29, 1865, containing account of Lincoln's 
assassination. 

STEVENSON, DUDLEY. 

6 admission tickets World's Columbian Exposition. 

WARREN, PAUL, Chicago. 

Chromolithograph of the Art Building. 
WILSON, MARSHALL J., Chicago. 

( onfederate money: 5C, 15c, 25c and $1.00. 
WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 

4 invitations and programmes to Exposition functions. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

(AC< ESSIONS ARE BY GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

AV1.K, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 piece, cross-section, of first iron rail laid in Chicago. 
P.A1.LIN, MEYER, Chicago. 

Crayon portrait of Hans Christian Andersen. 

BHUMGARA & CO., F. P., London. 

1 vase of green, blue and white with elephant's head as mouth. 

BURY & Co., EDWARD, Liverpool, England. 

2 blue prints showing engines constructed to Dec. 1834, and measurement 

of engine " Liverpool." 
Di IDGE, LEMUEL P., Oak Park, 111. 

1 intaglio enclosed in gold locket, (for examination). 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchases: 

500 mounted specimens of velvet, brocades, etc. — Italy; gold beads, 

<l earrings and gold bracelet, 8 pieces; crystal figure of owl 

with head of gold, and I specimen of Sicilian silk, (purchased by F. 

E. Ayen. 

28 pieces of crystallized gold — Breckinridge, Colo., (purchased from J. R. 

Putnam & * '"., < hicago). 
63 coins — 42 P. C. to [840 A. I >., 1 silver snuff box, and 1 piece of carved 

ivory, (purchased from Thos. Gillett, Chi' ag 
65 pieces of old china, and 4 Wedgewood cameos, 1 purchased by E. A. 

Barber, Philadelphia, Pa). 
1 harp piano, (pun h ised from K. D. Lindsay, Chicago). 
1 antique Dutch copper and brass snuff box, (purchased from W. H. 

Peck, Chicau r| 1  
Complete sent - 1 7 specimens 1 1 >f materials used in tanning fancy leathers, 
1 purchased from Tiffany & Co., New York). 
GETTY, PL, Chic.K 

81 pieces of Roman plaid textiles. 






Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 125 

GLENNY SONS & CO., W. H., Buffalo, N. Y. 

2 jugs of Doulton ware, (Columbia jugs). 
HAWKINS, ARMANI), New Orleans, La. 

1 old French faience plate known as the " Rouget de Lisle plate." 
1 plate made by Mason in 1818, known as the "Billy Bowleg plate." 

JESURUM & CO., M., Venice, Italy. 

104 specimens of mounted velvets and brocades, and laces — Venice, Italy. 

KEELEY, MRS. LESLIE E., Dwight, 111. 

13 Rhoda and 4 Damascus plates. 
KINO, WM. G., Chicago. 

Railroad time-table. 
KIRCHEISEN, F., Chemnitz, Germany. 

Fabric glove machine — Chemnitz, Germany. 

KOERNER BROTHERS, Chemnitz, Germany. 
Old hosiery loom — Chemnitz, Germany. 

LINTON, ALFRED, Chicago. 

1 bronze medal, (for examination)* 

McCORMICK, C. H., Chicago. 

3 Arabian plows, etc. — Egypt. 
1 plow — Southern Palestine. 

1 plow — Galilee. 

1 yoke — Palestine. 

1 seed-sower. 
McCORMICK, MRS. C. H., Chicago. 

1 ancient cedar boat — Egypt. 
MORRIS, MISS JESSIE, Chicago. 

1 antique cotton bed spread — India, (loan). 

REESE, HENRY, Baltimore, Md. 

1 battery claimed to have been originally used by Morse on line between 
Washington and Baltimore, (for examination). 

SCHIMMELPFENG, MRS. MARIE, Chicago. 

8 shell cameos, (for examination). 

32 cups, saucers, vases, etc., of Sevres and Dresden porcelain, (loan). 
SCHLESINGER, B. F., Chicago. 

1 silk loom and accessories — Japan. 
SHEARER, MRS. W. W., Chicago. 

3 pieces of old china. 
SIMMS, S. C, Field Columbian Museum. 

1 porcelain vase, white overlaid glaze, colored decoration — School of 
Technology, Tokyo, Japan, (loan). 

SMITH, WILLARD, Chicago. _ 

Collection of railroad tickets and passes from railways of Victoria, 
Australia. 

VISCONTI, F., Chicago. 

3 antique bronze coins, (for examination). 

DEPARTMENT OF MONOGRAI J HIC COLLECTIONS. 

(Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.*) 

DIVISION OF PRINTING AND GRAPHIC ARTS. 

BARNHART BROS. & SPINDLER, Chicago. 

Old Ramage Press, (transferred from Library). 

BINNER ENGRAVING CO., Chicago. 

8 specimens illustrating progressively the Half-tone process. - 

♦Collections marked as transferred from another department have been previously acknowledged. 
They are mentioned again in order to give a complete list of collections in this newly-created 
department. 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

CART] R, E. 1 . 

i copy of " rhe Trenton Weekly Mercury," 1788, and 1 copy <>f "Poor 
Wills Almanack," 1793, (transferred from Department of History). 

CHICAGO PHOTOGRAVURE CO., Chicago. 

Collection illustrating Collotype process, (transferred from Library). 
Pi:\ OLL, MRS. GEO. B., Sandwich, [11. 

Copj of first newspaper published in America, (transferred from 
Library). 
DICK & CO., A. B., Chicago. 

Collection illustrating mimeograph work. 

FIELD COH MBIAN MUSEUM. 

Purchases: 

14 pictures of early printers, presses, etc., (purchased from J. < >. Wright, 
New Y< irk.) 

20 color prints, portraits, painter etchings, mezzotints, etc., (purchased 

from K. M. Lindsay, Philadelphia, P 
4 electrotypes and zinc etching* (transferred from Library). 
2 old books printed in 1641 and 1679; a "^ "'*' Bible, (purchased from 

H. B. McGregor, Pontiac. 111. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Berlin, Germany. 

frames ot specimens showing style of printing, etc., (transferred from 

Library). 

G< 'WARD. <;.. Chicago. 

19 Japanese prints. 
Gl'STAVLS ADOLPHUS COUNCIL, No. 21;, Chicago. 

< )ld Swedish Bible. 
HAMILTON MFG. CO., Two Rivers, Wis. 

Wood type, (transferred from Library). 

HOE & CO., R., New York. 

21 pictures of printing presses and samples of color work, (transferred 

n Library. 

JAPAN ART INSTITUTE, Tokyo, Japan. 

Kokka — an art magazine in Japanese, (transferred from Library 1. 

II. E, < 1. A., Chicago. 

1 >anish bible of the year 1550, (loam. 

LE\ Y. M \.\. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Glass screen ruled 133 lines to the inch, for half-tone process. 

MERGENTHALER LINOTYPE CO., New York. 

Photograph of Linotype press, matrices, slugs of type, (transferred from 
Library). 
MILLSPAUGH, C. I'., Field Columbian Museum. 

Et< hing tools, ci ipper plate and print. 

PETTIBONE & O >., P. F., Chicago. 

1 lection Illustrating lithograph printing. 

SHILLING, [. I... Chicago. 

7 proofs of photo-chrome printing. 

K & SONS.. RAPHAEL. 

2 albums containing samples of chromo-lithograpb cards, (transferred 

from Library). 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, I >. I . 

Picture showing monks working at printing press, (transferred from 
1 kpartment of Histoi 
U. S. NA Hi INAL MUSEUM, Washington, I). C. 

Photograph of benjamin Franklin Printing Press; 17 pictures of old print- 
ing pn ssi -. 

WESTERN RANK NOTE CO., Chicago. 

( ollection illustrating steel engraving. 

WILE, JACOB. LaPorte, Ind. 

S rolls of parchment and accessories, (transferred from Library;. 






Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 127 

DIVISION OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

COALE, H. K., Chicago. 

( >ld piano, (transferred from Department of Anthropology |. 

JAVA CHICAGO EXPOSITION SYNDICATE. 

Musical instruments, (transferred from Department of Anthropology). 
LINDSAY, E. D., Chicago. 

Calderarpa or harp piano, (transferred from Department of Industrial 
Arts). 
LYON" & HEALY, Chicago. 

11 musical instruments, (transferred from Department of Anthropology). 
MEYER & SON, C, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron plate piano, (transferred from Department of Anthropology). 
WESSELL, NICKEL & GROSS, New York. 

Piano movements, (transferred from Department of Anthropology). 
WORLD'S COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, Department of Ethnology. 

27 musical instruments, (transferred from Department of Anthropology). 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

(Accessions are p,y gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AKELEY, C. E., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 mounted Ardetta ncoxena Cory. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York. 

9 bird skins — Brazil, Mexico, Yucatan, Guiana, (for examination). 

BRANDLER, CHAS., Field Columbian Museum. 

2 birds: Syrnium nebulisum and Asio wilsonianus. 

1 mounted bird: Accipiter cooperi — Milwaukee, Wis. 
CHRISTENSEN, L. A., Baldwin, Wis. 

1 bird's nest made of twine. 

CORY, C. B., Boston, Mass. 

23 bird skins and 1 nest — Florida. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by Geo. K. Cherrie: 

2 mounted birds: Symphemia semipalmata and Calidris arena via — 

Indiana. 
38 bird skins — Du Page Co., 111. 
121 bird skins, 37 species — Mississippi. 
229 bird skins — Louisiana. 
609 bird skins, 96 species — Texas. 

Nest and 4 eggs of Tyrannus tyrannies — Wolf Lake, 111. 
20 bird skins, 12 species — Wolf Lake and South Chicago, 111. 
32 mounted birds, 20 species — Jackson Park, Hegewisch and Worth, 111. 

14 bird skins, 8 species— Wolf Lake, 111. 

15 bird skins — Worth and Glen Ellyn, 111. 
36 mounted birds — Illinois. 

22 bird skins, 15 species — Indiana and Illinois. 
Collected by I. N. Travis: 

7 birds: Laurus argentatus smithsonianus — Chicago. 
Nest and 4 eggs of Poocaetes grammineus — Whiting, Ind. 
25 mounted birds, 18 species— Whiting, Ind. 

7 mounted birds — Indiana. 

1 mounted bird: Stri.x pratincola — Chicago. 
Purchases: 

8 birds — Illinois, Indiana and Iowa, (purchased from Lepmann & Heggie, 

Chicago). 
1 mounted lynx for bird group, (purchased from W. W. Hart & Co., New 
York). 



128 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

6 bird skins — California, (purchased from W. W. Price, Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia i. 

9 birds Illinois, (purchased from < '.. W. I. inn & Son, Chicago). 

i bird: Chen hyperborea [llinois,( purchased from Barnetl I '.ms., Chicago). 

12 mounted birds, (purchased from I. X. Travis, Field Columbian 
M useum i. 

6 birds— Illinois, (purchased from J. N. Adams. Chi< ago). 

2 birds: ttubo vtrginianus, Anas americanas -Wisconsin, (purchased 
from Chas. I'.randler, Field Columbian Museum). 

2 birds: Anas boschas, Anas obscura — Illinois, (purchased from M. Mayer, 
Chicago). 

MANIERRE, A.. Chicago. 

i old-squaw duck, ClanguZa hyemalis. 

MOULTON, MRS. G. M., Chicago. 

I peacock. 

RYERSON, M. A., Chicago. 

i mounted, albinistic, American coot, Fulica americana. 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

7 bud skins, Chordeiles v. henryi, (for examination). 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

i Accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ADAMS, \V. H., Peoria, 111. 

I dead shrew, in the flesh. 

ARMOUR, A. V., Chicago. 

5,000 insects — Yucatan. 
BOOTH", A., PACKING CO., Chicago. 

1 fish, Mo/a Mold. 

CHALMERS, \V. J., Chicago. 

2 spiders, 1 scorpion, 1 horned toad, I trap-door spider's nest, 1 rattle- 

snake skin, 1 centipede — British Guiana. 

CHERRIE, GEO. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 snake, Thamnopkis radix — Chicago. 
CHERRIE, MRS. G. K., Chicago. 

2 horned toads, Phrynosoma, 1 land turtle, Tt'stuJo— Texas. 

CHIRPK, Rl (BERT, Chicago. 

Rat with 'hree young, alive — Chicago. 

COOPER. K. R., Chicago. 

1 Grizzly bear, Ursus horribilis — Montana. 

( I >RY, PROF. C. R.. Boston, Mass. 

i<> mammal skins — Florida, Bahamas, Yucatan and Cuba. 
1 mounted puma, Felts concolor L. 

OORR, GEO. J., Chicago. 
1 tooth of elephant. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MFSEUM. 

Collected on < >wen F. Aldis Expedition, by < >. 1'. Hay: 

686 fishes, 2 dried sponges, 2 ises ol -harks, 1S0 shells of mollusks, 

77 crabs, 10 shrimps, 2 young alligators, - ascidians, 16 sea-urchins, 2 
masses of egg-cases of mollusks, 15 starfishes, 4 skins of sharks, 1 
skin of saw-fish, 2 skins of cow-nosed rays, 1 jaw of shark, 1 rough 
skeleton of fish, 1 string of egg-cases of mollusks, 1 mass of oyster- 
shells on root of manu r P've — Florida. 
Collected by G. K. Cherrie: 

4 skins and skulls of / rpits, 3 skins and skulls of SpJurmophilus — Corpus 
Christi, Texas. 
Purcha - 

2,669 mammal skins and skulls, (purchased from \Y. W. Price, Palo 
Alto, Cal.i. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 129 

3 proboscis monkey skins and a baby ourang, (purchased from C. E. 

Akeley, Field Columbian Museum). 

5 antelopes (1 mounted, 4 skins) —Africa, (purchased from F. \Y. Frank- 

lin, New York City). 
1 skin of Equus somalicus, 2 skins of Antelope pelzelni male and female 

-Africa, (purchased from E.Gerard & Son, London, England). 
13 turtles -North Carolina, (purchased from H. H. & C. S. Pnniley, 

Raleigh, N. C). 
1 albino skunk, mounted — Montana, (purchased from Luke Dillon, 

Columbia Falls, Mont). 
Skin and skeleton of black wolf — Manitoba, (purchased from A. C. Fos- 
ter, Winnipeg, Manitoba). 
1 pickerel, Lucius lucius — Green Bay, (purchased from S. S. Lewis, 

Chicago). 
10 large mammal skins — Siberia, Africa, Japan, Corsica, (purchased 

from J. F. G. I inlauff, Hamburg, Germany). 
1 white-tailed gnu, Connochcrtis taurinus, (purchased from Rowland 

Ward & Co., London, England). 

GILL, UR. GEORGE M., Chicago. 
1 butterfly, Papilio ajax. 
1 Hemiptera, Emesa longipes. 

GILMAN, J. C, Field Columbian Museum. 

Shell of snail {helix) — Chicago. 
GUATEMALA COMMISSION, World's Columbian Exposition. 

Collection of reptiles and insects — Department of Peten, Guatemala. 
HAY, O. P., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 rattlesnake, Crotalus horridus. 

2 turtle f, Macroclemmys concentrical. 

1 skull of dog. . 

HAY, W. P., Washington, D. C. 

1 rough green snake, Cyclophis vestinus — Washington, D. C. 
HUME, J. A., Field Columbian Museum. 

4 fishes. 

HUTCH I NS( )N, C. L., Chicago. 

3 boxes of sponges--Greece, (for examination). 
KIMBALL, J. A., Astabula, Florida. 

1 shed skin of the diamond rattlesnake. 

MINNEAPOLIS ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Deer skin — Phillipine Islands, (for examination). 
PEABODY, DR. S. H., Chicago. 

1 dragon-fly, /Eschnajulia — Chicago. 
PENSE, GE< ). B., <ape Gracias, Nicaragua. 

1 fish, Symbranchus Marmoratis — Nicaragua. 

PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

23 shells. 

RINGLING BROTHERS. 

Skeleton and skin of female giraffe, Camelopardalis giraffa Schreber. 
Skin of boa constrictor. 

RUSSELL, MRS. ANNE M., Ravinia, 111. 

1 box of shells — California. 
RYAN, P. T., Chicago. 

1 soft-shell turtle. 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

6 orang-outangs. 

5 proboscis monkeys Borneo. 

12 deer skins— Phillipine Islands. 

13 skulls -Borneo. 

700 unmounted butterflies, Lepidoptera — Darjeeling, India. 
I porcupine — Phillipine Islands. 



130 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i. 

SMITH, ERNEST N.. Chicago. 

1 skin of fish, Stereolepis gigas -Santa Catalina island, < 

I'll I A\N & C( »., New York, N. Y. 
1 fruit bat, (for examination 1. 

1 . S. NATION \l. MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 
10; specimens of fishi 

WHEELER, DR. WM. M., University of Chicago. 

1 turtle, Etnys blandingii Holbrook — West Pullman, III. 

WI.sW ALL, MRS. I'.. C, Kenosha, Wis. 

38 polished shells, (for examination). 

WITTER, C. ORVILL \. South Bend, In. I. 

2 snakes, Ophibolus doliatus, Eutainia saurita, South Bend, Ind., (for ex- 

amination). 

THE LIBRARY. 
(Accessions are by gifi unless otherwise designated.) 
Books, Pamphlets and Serials. 

ACHELIS, DR. TH., (the author), Bremen, Germany. 

Moderne Volkerkunde, (exch.) 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SI RVEY, Montgomery, Ala. 

Bulletin no. 4, (exch.) 

ALABAMA INDUSTRIAL ANT) SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Proceedings, 1891-96, (exch.) 

ALDRK II. II' »N. J. FRANK, Chicago. 

I . S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Report, 1801, parts 1-2. 

U. S. Department of* Agriculture. Report ol Chiei of Weather Bureau, 
92. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. Report of Secretary, 1892. 

Heyl, L.: U. S. duties on imports, 1891. 

I . S. Treasury Department. The foreign commerce and navigation of 
U.S. 1893. Commerce oi I . S. with European countries, i7<)0-i8<p. 
Report of Commissioner of Navigation, 1804. 

I . S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education. Circular of in- 
formation, nos. 2 and 4. 

Immigration and passenger movement at the ports of U. S. 

Illinois Bureau oi Labor Statistics. Report, 1 

U.S. Bureau of Ethnology: \ pamphlets. 

U. S. G al Survey of the Territories. Final report, vol. 3, hook 1. 

International American Conference reports. \ vols. 

I irst rail-American Medical Congress transactions, 2 vols. 

International Prison Congress (3rd), Paris. Report of !'. S. delegates. 

American Historical Association. Annual report. r- 
ALLEN, I'.. P., Field Columbian Museum. 

Anthony's Photographic Bulletin, vols. 1, 2 and 5. 

\\ Photographic Magazine, vol. 22, no. 457. 

The Photo Beai 1 m, vol. 7, no. ;. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIl'.M I . 

Salem. M.i 

Proceedings, vol. 4 1. (exch.) 
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASS< ►CIATION, Cleveland. I >. 

onceming the American Library Association, 18th General Conference. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM 01 NATURAL HISTORY, New York. 

Bulletin, vol. 1 , no. 6. 

Bulletin, vol. 7. vol. 2, no. 1. 

Annual report, 1895, (exch.) 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHK Al. SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, 1893, (exch.) 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report ok thk Director. 131 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NATURALISTS, Boston, Mass. 
Records, vol. 1, incomplete. 
Records, vol. 2, current nos., (exch.) 

APACHE, ANTONIO, Field Columbian Museum. 

Collection of 100 books and pamphlets, chiefly on the World's Colum- 
bian Exposition. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Ariz. 

Bulletin, 1896. 
ARTHUR, PROF. J. C. (the author), Lafayette, Ind. 

Development of vegetable physiology. 

1 lie distinction between animals and plants. 

Deviation in development due to the use of unripe seeds. 

Delayed germination of cocklebur. 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 
Annual address by the president, 1896. 
Journal, vol. 65, part 1, no. 1, part 2, nos. 1 and 2. 
Proceedings, nos. 1-3, 1896, (exch.) 

AS TOR LIBRARY, New York. 

Annual report, 1894, (exch.) 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, Australia. 
Records, vol. 2, no. 7, (exch.) 

BARBER, EDWIN ATLEE (the author), West Chester, Pa. 
The Cartlidge Porcelain Works. 
The Museum, vol. 1, nos. 1-4. 

BASSETT, HELEN W., Chicago. 
The Folk-lorist, vol. 1. 
The Folk-lore Manual. 

BAUER, DR. MAX (the author), Marburg, Germany. 

has vorkommen und die gewinnung des rubins in Birma, with another 
pamphlet, (exch.) 

BEMENT, CLARENCE S. (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Third rough list of meteorites, (exch.) 

BERLIN KONIGLICHE MUSEEN, Berlin, Germany. 

Nachtrag zum verzeichnis der verkauflichen gipsabgiisse. 23 pamphlets, 
(exch.) 

BERLIN KONIGLICHE MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 
Etnologisches Notizblatt, heft. 2-3. 
Ethnische elementar gedanken, abth. 1-2. 
Veroffentlichungen, vol. 4, no. 1. 

Denkschopfung umgeb. welt aus kosmog. vorstellungen, (exch.) 

BESSEY, PROF. C. E., Lincoln, Neb. 

Contributions from the Botanical Department, University of Nebraska, 

new series, 1 10 inch 
Reports, 1-3 of the Botanical Survey of Nebraska. 
Sargent's studies of the forests of Japan, by the donor. 

BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago. 
Black Diamond, current nos. 

BLAIR, W. !■'., Chicago. 

Le pantheon egyptien, by Paul Pierret. 
BOETTGER, FRED, Peoria, 111. 

Flora Peoriana (2 copies), by F. Brendel, (exch.) 

BORNTRAEGER, GEBRUDER, Berlin, Germany. 

Die literatur des jahres 1892 liber morphologic systcmatik und verbrei- 
tung der phanerogamen. 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 
20th annual report, [805. 
Catalogue of a collection of etchings, by F. S. Haden, (exch.) 



i3- Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

BOSTi IN PI Bl 1C I [BRARY, Boston, Mass. 
\ nnual report, 1895. 
Monthlj bulletin, 1 cch.) 

BOSTON SOCIETY OF X \ II RAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 
Proceedings, vol. 26, vol. 27, parts 1 
Memoirs, vol. ;, n<>^. 1 >, (exch.) 

IK >ST< >N TR VNSIT C< >M MISSIl >N, Boston, Mass. 
First annual report, i{ 

B( ISTON 1 \l\ ERSITY, Boston, Mass. 

Year hook, vols. 22 ami 23. 

Annual report, iS.,;. 

3 catalogues, (exch.) 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Me. 

Address at the dedication of the Mary Frances Searles Science Building. 

1 1 publications, catalogues, etc., (exch.) 

BREZIN \. DR. A. (the author), Vienna, Austria. 

Die meteoriten sammlung des K. K. Naturhist. Hofmuseums. 
1 eber neuere meteorite. 

BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Catalogue of 2nd annual winter exhibition of paintings. 
15th annual report, 1896, (exch.) 

BRINTON, DANIEL G. (the author), Media, Pa. 

Relations of race and culture to degeneration of the productive organs in 
women, (exch.) 

BR] riSH Ml SEUM, 1. on, Ion, England. 
Guide to the mineral Lrallery. 
Students' index to the collection of minerals. 
Introduction to the study of minerals. 
Introduction to the study of rocks. 
Introduction to the study of meteorites. 
List of the natural historj publications, (excli.i 

BROOKLYN INSTITUTE, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
7th yearbook (2 copies), 1894-95. 
Prospectus for 1895 96, (ex< h.) 

BROOKLYN LIBRARY, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
38th annual report, (exch.) 

BROWN l NIVERSITY, Providence, R. I. 
Historical catalogue, 1764 94. 
Cat. - p, (exch.) 

BUENOS AIRES Ml -1 NACIONAL, Buenos Aires. Argentine. 

Anales, vol. 4, (< .< h. 1 
BUDAPEST MAGYAR NEMZET1 MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

rerm^sgetrajzi Fiizetek, vol. [9, parts 1-2, (exi 

Bl 1 1 ALu LIBRARY, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Annual report, nos. 52 00, 1888-96. 
1 ,aws. 

Finding list, parts 1-3. 
Additions, new series, nos. 

Index to classified subject ue, (exch.) 

BUI FALO SOCIETY OF NAT1 RAL SCIENCES, Buffalo, X. V. 

Bulletin, vols. 1-4, vol. 5, nos. 1-4. 

Annual reports, 1 8 .-". ch.) 
Bl rCHERS AND PACKERS MAGAZINE PUBLISHING CO., St. Louis, Ma 

Butchers & Lackers Magazine, current nos. 

BUTLER, A. W. Brookville, tnd. 

Bulletins, Brookville Society of Natural History, 1 -3. 

10 pamphlets and reprints, by the donor. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, Cal. 

Proceedings, vol. ;, parts 1-2, (exch.) 






Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 133 

CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, Cal. 
Bulletin, nos. 7-8, (exch.) 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin of the Department of Geology, vol. 1, nos. 12—13; V °L 2 > no. i> 
(exch.) 

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, Cal. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
Report, 1894-95, (2 copies.) 

CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM OF ZOOLOGY, Cambridge, England. 

30th annual report of the Museums and Lecture Rooms Syndicate, (exch.) 

CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bulletin, vol. 29, nos. 1-6, (exch.) 

CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 
Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 2. 
Annual report of trustees, 1895, (exch.) 

CANADA DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual reports, 26th and 27th, 1893-94. 

Report of the Dominion Fishery Commission on the fisheries of Ontario, 
1893. 

Report of the British Columbia Fishery Commission, 1892. 
CANADA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Palaeozoic fossils, vol. 3, parts 1-2. 

Summary report of the Geological Survey Department, 1895. 

List of publications, (exch.) 

CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Ontario. 

Transactions, vol. 4, part 2. 

Archaeological report, 1894-95. 

The functions of a great university, (exch.) 
CANEBRAKE EXPERIMENT STATION, Uniontown, Ala. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-18. 

CARPFNTER, PHILIP P. Montreal, Canada. 

Catalogue of the collection of Mazatlan shells. 

CARUANA-GATTO, ALFREDO, Valetta, Malta. 

4 pamphlets. 

CASE LIBRARY, Cleveland, O. 

Short title-list of books on engineering. 
Bibliography of card games. 
Catalogue of Cleveland Library Association. 
Proceedings Cleveland Academy of Natural Science. 
Treatise on artificial propagation of fish, (exch.) 

CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE, Cleveland, O. 
Catalogue, 1894-95, 1895-96, (exch.) 

CENTRAL ART ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, Chicago. 
Arts for America, current nos. 

CHAMBESY L'HERBIER BOISSIER, Geneva, Switzerland. 
Bulletin, 1896, (exch.) 

CHAPMAN, FRANK M., New York. 

5 ornithological papers. 
CHERRIE, G. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

Anales del Instituto Fisico— Geografico Nacional de Costa Rica, 1892. 
Exploraciones zoological efectuadas en el Yalle del Rio Naranjo, 1893. 
CHICAGO ACADEMV OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 
38th annual report. 
Bulletin, vol. 2, no. 2. 

Bulletin no. 1 of the Geological and Natural History Survey. 
Constitution and by-laws. 
Annual address, 1878. 
Historical sketch of the Academy. 
2 pamphlets, (exch.) 



134 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

( HICAGO CYC1 E TR \l'l' JOl RNAL, Chi( ago. 

Chicago Cycle Trade Journal, current nos. 
CHICAGO LAW SCHOOl . Chi< 

Announcement, 1896 97. 

CHICAGO PUB! [C 1 IBR \KY, Chicago. 

Bulletin, nos. exch.) 

CHURCH HOME FOR ORPHANS, Chica 
4th annual report. 

CINCINN \TI HOUSE OF REF1 GE, Cincinnati, O. 
15th animal report, (exch.) 

CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cin< innati, 1 >. 

1 5th annual repoi t, 

2 catalogues, (exch.) 

CINCINNATI SOCI] H 01 [STATURAL HISTORY, Cincinnati, O. 
Journal, vol. iS, nos. 1-4; vol. [9, no. i, (exch.) 

CLARK] , ROBERT, Cincinnati, 1 >. 

Iln M( »und-Builders. 
The antiquities of the State of < )hio, (exch.) 

CI. AY RECORD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Clay Record, current 1 

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, O. 
2~{\\ annual report, [& 15. 
The ( >pea Shelf, vol. 2, no. 4, (exch.) 

COBB'S LIBRARY, Chicago. 

:8th annual catalogue, 1894-05. 

>HEN, PR( IF. E. (the author), Greifswald, Prussia. 

1 eher eine nordlich von Pretoria in granit jjelegene salzpfanne. 
Verzeichniss der meteoriten in der greifswalder sammlung. 

4 pamphlets, (exch.) 

COLLIERY ENGINEER CO., Scranton, Pa. 

The Colliery Engineer, current nos. 

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins, Colo- 
Bulletin, current nos. 

COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colo. 
The nickel deposits near Riddles, I >regon. 
On the occurrence of Uranite. 
On l'earceite. Th( San Miguel formation. 

2 treatises, by H. B. Patton. 

The <l\ke on the Columbia vein in Ward District, Boulder Co., Colo., 
ch.) 

COLORADO STATE MINING LI REAL', Denver, Colo. 
Bulletin No. t, (2 copie 

COLORADO STATE SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colo, 
( latalogui - [.-96, I exch.) 

COLUMBIA 1 NIVERSITY, New York. 
Annual report, [895. 
I ttalogue, 1895-96. 
I Hi\ ersity bulletin, no. 1 4. (exch.) 

IMSTOCK, PROF. FRANK M., Cleveland, O. 

Composition of the American sulphur petroleums, by ( '. F. Mabery. 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATU >N, New Haven, 
Conn. 

19th annual report. 
Bulletin, current 110s. 

COOK, PRoF. O. F., Huntington, N. Y. 

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 0, (exch.) 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 135 

COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART, 
New York. 

37th annual report, (exch.) 

NATURHISTORISKE FORENING, Kjobenhavn, Denmark. 
Yidenskabelige meddelelser, 1895, (exch.) 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Catalogue of the President White Library, 3 parts. 

Catalogue of the Rhaeto-Romanic collection. 

Library bulletin of Cornell University, vols. 1 and 2 and current nos. 

Register. 1894, (exch.) 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

COSTA RICA INSTITUTO FISICO-GEOGRAPHICO NACIONAL, San Jose. 
Costa Rica. 

Anales, vol. 6, 1893, (exch.) 
C( >STA RICA MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

Informe, 1896, (exch.) 

CUDMORE, P. (the author), Faribault, Minn. 
The battle of Clontarf. 

CURTIS, WILLIAM E. (the author), Washington, D. C. 
Venezuela. 

Report on the Columbian Historical Exposition, Madrid (2 copies). 

DALL, WM. H. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Partial list of charts, maps and publications relative to Alaska, (exch.) 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 

Catalogue, 1895-96, (exch.) 
DAVENPORT, GEO. E. (the author), Medford, Mass. 

Filices Mexicana, (exch.) 
DAWSON, G. J. & CO., San Salvador, San. Sal. 

El porvenir de Centro-America, vol. 1, nos. 5-33. 
DAWSON, SIR J. WILLIAM (the author), Ottawa, Canada. 

The animal nature of Eozoon. 

On collection of Tertiary plants. 

On specimens in the Peter Redpath Museum of McGill University. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Del. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

DENVER PUBLIC LIBRARY, Denver, Colo. 
Hand-book. 

Catalogue of periodicals. 
Bulletin vols. 1-5 and current nos. 
Finding list, (exch.) 

DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Mich. 
Annual reports, 1892-96. 
Circular of instruction, 1895-96. 
Historical report, 1891, (exch.) 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Mich. 

15th report of the Library Commission, 1895, (exch.) 

DORSEY, GEO. A. (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

History of the study of anthropology at Harvard Univ., (exch.) 

DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Madison, N. J. 
Alumni record 1869-95, (exch.) 

DU BOIS, CONSTANCE G, Waterbury, Conn. 

Asa Gray Bulletin, current nos., (exch.) 
DURAND, PROF. E. J. (the author), Ithaca, X. Y. 

Some rare myxomycetes of Central New York. 

Botanical notes, (exch.) 



136 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i. 

l'.l >GR EN, A. II. 1 the author), Lincoln, Neb. 

5 pamphlets, (exch.) 
EDINBURGH Ml SEUM OF SCIEN( I Wl> AR I . I dinburgh, Scotland. 

List of additions to the art and industrial divisions 1894, (exch.) 
EDINBURGH ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Proceedings, vols, ia and jo, (exch.) 

EDWARDS, B. & CO., Chicago. 

The American ( bntractor, current nos. 
EKATERINBURG SOCIETE OURALIENNE D'AMATEURS DES SCI- 
I \i ES N ATI RELLES, Ekaterinburg, Russia in Asia. 

Bulletin, vol. 1?. no. 1 2. 

Bulletin, vol. 14, no. 4. (exch.) 
1 I E< rRIC RAILWAY GAZETTE, New York. 

Electric car tests, by II. S. Hiring. 

ELLIOT, IX G., F ield Columbian Museum. 

In memoriam George N. Lawrence, by the donor. 

The life and services of J. J. Audubon, by the doner. 

Publishers' catalogues. 

Reports of the Council of the Geol. Soc. <>f London, 1893-01- 
I.I ISM A MITCHELL SCIEN HFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, X. C. 

Journal [889.pt. 1; l892.pt. 1; 1893, pts. 1 and 2; 1894, pts. 1 and 2, 
(exch.) 

ELLIS, J. B. (the author), Newfield, N. J. 

5 reprints on American fungi, (exch.) 

ERNST, DR. A., Caracas, Venezuela. 

Upper ( >rinoco vocabularies, by the donor. 

Revista cientiticde la Universidad Central de Venezuela, vols. 1 and 2. 

I iaceta Medica de Caracas, vol. 1, nos. 1 24. 

La Exposicion Xacional de Venezuela en 1883, (exch.) 

ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Mass. 

A partial catalogue of publications. 
Historical collections, vol. 31, Xos. 7-24, (exch.) 

EVANS, \. W. 1 the author); New Haven, Conn. 

4 pamphlets on Hepatica, (exch.) 
EVANS, SIR JOHN (the author), Hertfordshire, England. 

The stone age in Hertfordshire. 

The bronze age, (exch.) 
FEWKES, J. WALTER (the author), Boston, Mass. 

The < >raibi flute altar. 

The prehistoric culture of Tusayan. 

1 111.1), MARSHALL, Chicago. 

Animal locomotion plates and text, 2 vols, by E. Muybridge. 
Animal locomotion; the Muybridge work at the University oi Pennsyl- 
vania. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchases: 

104 vols, for ( General Library. 
36 vols, for Department of Anthropol 
I.) vols, for Department of Botany. 
26 vols, for Department of Geology. 
9 vols, for Department of Industrial Arts. 
s vols, for Department of Monographic Collections. 
1 vol. for Department of Ornithology. 
22 vols, for Department of Zoology. 
FISCHER, MORITZ, Field Columbian Museum. 

Princeton College Bulletin, vols, \ -.incomplete. 

4 bulletins Alabama Agric. Exp. Station. 

15 pamphlets. » 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 137 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lake City, Fla. 

Bulletin, nos. 20-35, mc '- 
FOREST AND STREAM PUB. CO., Chicago. 

Forest and Stream, Rod and Gun, current nos. 
FORSTEMANN, DR. ERNST \V. (the author), Dresden, Germany. 

Zur entzifferung der Mayahandschriften. 

Verzeichnis der schriften. 

Die Zeitperioden der .Mayas. 

Die Mittelamerikanische Tonalamatl, (exch.) 
FOSTER, DR. C. LE NEVE, London, England. 

First annual report upon the mineral industry of Great Britain and 
Ireland. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Franklin Institute, 1824-94, (sketch). 
Charter and by-laws. 
Journal, current nos., 1896. 
Index, 1888-95, (exch.) 

FRANZ-JOSEPHS UNIYERSITAT, Czernowitz, Hungary. 

Ubersicht der akademischen behorden. 

Verzeichnis der offentlichen vorlesungen, 1896-97, (exch.) 
GATSCHET, ALBERT S. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Collection of pamphlets, mostly reprints, (exch.) 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, vol. 7, current nos., (exch.) 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Ga. 

Bulletins, nos. 1 and 2, (exch.) 

GEORGIA UNIVERSITY, Athens, Ga. 

Annual announcement. 

Catalogue, 1894-96. 

The Engineering Soc. Annual, vols. 1 and 2, (exch.) 
GOLDEN GATE PARK MUSEUM, San Francisco, Cal. 

24th annual report of San Francisco Board of Park Commissioners, 
(exch.) 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Mass. 

Contributions, new series, nos. 1-9, inch, (exch.) 

GREEN. SAMUEL S. (the author), Worcester, Mass. 
The Scotch-Irish in America. 

GREENE, PROF. EDW. L. (the author), Washington, D. C. 
Pittonia, vol. 3, current nos., (exch.) 

GREGORY, JAMES R. (the author), Kensington, England. 

Catalogue of collection of meteorites, (exch.) 
GROLIER CLUB, New York. 

Catalogue of exhibition illustrative of lithography, 1796-1896, (exch.) 
GROSSHERZOGLICHE HOFBIBLIOTHEK, Darmstadt, Germany. 

Zugangs-verzeichnis 1891, (exch.) 
HAMILTON ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada. 

Journal and proceedings, i88g-<,5. 

Constitution and by-laws, 1892. 

A trace of old travel, (exch.) 
HAMILTON COLLEGE, Clinton, N. Y. 

Inauguration of Pres. Stryker. 

Annual catalogue 1895 (2 copies), (exch.) 
HAMY, DR. E. T., Paris, France. 

Journal de la Societe des Americanistes, Paris, vol. 1, no. 1, (exch.) 
HARDWOOD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Harwood, current nos. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM C, New York. 

The fishes of North America, vol. 1, nos. 1-10. 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Bulletin, vol. 18, current nos. 

List of periodicals. 

58th annual report, 1896, (exch.) 
HARTFORD THEOLOGK A.L SEMINARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual register, 1895-1 16. 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

1 1 pamphlets (circulars and description of courses), (( x< h.) 
HA rCH EXP. STATION MASS. AGRIC. COLLEGE, Amherst, Mas 

2d and 41I1 7th annual report. 

Bulletin, no. I and 3-29 and 31-33. 

j special bulletins. 
HAUSER, HENRY (the author), Madrid, Spain. 

Sur une cause probable de l'explosioh des bolides dans l'atmosphere ter- 
restre, (3 copi( s). 

HAY, DR. I >. P., Chicago. 

Indiana Dept. of Geol. and Nat. Resources. 19th annual report. 

HA\', W. P. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The crayfishes of Indiana. 
HELLER, A. A. (the author), Lancaster, Pa. 

Botanical explorations in Southern Texas, 1894, (exch.) 

HIERSEMANN, K. W., Leipzig, Germany. 

Catalogues on fine arts, 1 vol. 
HITCHCOCK, A. S. (the author), Manhattan, Kansas. 

list of plants collected in the Bahamas, with 5 other pam., (exch.) 

HODGE, F. W. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Puebl" snake ceremonials, (exch.) 
HOLMES, PROF. W. IL, Field Columbian Museum. 

A partial index to the proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society. 

10 pamphlets on meteorites. 

Rules for the preparation of manuscript, etc., L. S. Geol. Survey. 

The gla< ial period in the Chatauqua Lake Region. 

U. S. Dept. of Agric, Div. of Entomology. Bulletin no. 29. 

Rules fur watchmen. Smithsonian Institution. 

( Idd numbers of Nature and Science. 

Monthlj cat. L. S. Gov't. Publications, vol. 4. no. 10. 

Circular, etc., on the earthworks of Ohio. 

Register of the Appalachian Mountain Club, 1S95. 

The Jesuit relation, (reprint). 

5 bonks and pamphlets. 

HOVEY, DR. E. I ». (the author), Now York. 

1 atalogue of meteorites in the American Museum, with another extract, 
lex. h.) 

HUARD, Y. A., Chicoutimi, Quebec. 

Le Naturaliste Canadien, vol. 22, (ex< h.) 
ILLINOIS HOARD OP STATE FISH COMMISSIONERS, Havana, 111. 

8 reports, (exch.) 
ILLINOIS BnAKI) OF WORLD'S FAIR COMMISSIONERS, Springfield, 111. 

Report. 

History of the 111. Institution for Deaf and Dumb at Jacksonvdle. 

The Illinois Building and Exhibits therein at the \Y. C. E. 
ILLINOIS STATE LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Cham- 
paign, 111. 

The ornithology of Illinois, vol. 2, part 1. 

bulletin, \ ols. 1 3, and \ artii les 1 II. 

17-iQth report ot the State Entomologist. 
ILLINOIS STATE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, 111. 

Bulletins, nos. 7-1 1, (exch.) 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report ok the Director. 139 

ILLINOIS STATE NORMAL UNIVERSITY, Normal, 111. 
37th annua] catalogue, 1895, (exch.) 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, 111. 

Catalogue, 1895-96, (exch.) 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Urbana, III. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Proceedings, vol. 1, part 4 and vol. 2, (exch.) 

IOWA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, Iowa. 
Bulletin, nos. 14-30 inch, current nos., (exch.) 

IOWA COLUMBIAN COMMISSION, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Report. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

3d annual report, 1894. 

Annual leport, 1895. 
IOWA STATE LIBRARY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Acts and resolutions of 25th general assembly of Iowa. 

Catalogue. 

Biennial report, 1889, '93 and '95. 
Iowa official register. 

Acts and resolutions pass-d at the regular session of the 26th general 
assembly of Iowa, (exch.) 

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Catalogue, 1894-95 and 1895-96. 

Report, 1895. 

Bulletin of the Laboratories of Nat. History, vol. 3, no. 4, (exch.) 
IRISH NATURALIST, Dublin, Ireland. 

The Irish Naturalist, vol. 5, nos. 8 and 9, (exch.) 

JACK, ROBERT L. (the author), Brisbane, Queensland. 

On aboriginal cave drawings on the Palmer gold field. 

JACOBS, J. WARREN (the author), Waynesburg, Pa. 
Eggs of native Pennsylvania birds. 

JAMAICA BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT, Kingston, Jamaica. 
Bulletin, current numbers, (exch.) 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Md. 

Circulars, vol.25, no - I2I » (exch.) 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, vol. 14, (exch.) 

KANSAS CITY DENTAL COLLEGE, Kansas City, Mo. 
16th annual announcement. 

KANSAS STATE AGRIC. COLLEGE EXP. STATION, Manhattan, Kansas. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
8th annual report. 

KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas. 
Kansas historical collections, vol. 3 and 4. 
10 reports of the Board of Railroad Commissioners. 
Decisions of the Board of Railroad Commissioners. 
Laws pertaining to railroads. 

Biennial reports, vols. 9-14, of the State Board of Agriculture. 
4 horticultural reports. 
4 reports on forestry. 

6 reports of the State Inspector of Mines. 
4 publications of the university. 
4 reports of the State Librarian. 
4 Exposition publications, (exch.) 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY EXPERIMENTAL STATION, Lawrence, Kansas. 
Annual report, 1st— 5th. 
Common injurious insects of Kansas. 
The horn-fly of cattle, (exch.j 



140 Field Columbian Museum Reports, 'Vol. i. 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY GEOL. SURVEY, Topeka, Kansas. 

Kc]> Ht, vol. I. 
KENTUCKY BUR1 \l 01 MINES, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

1 ith annual report of the Inspector of Mines. 
KENT1 CKY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Reports on timber and botany, (exch.) 
KENTUCK\ STATE COLLEGE AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. 

8th annual report. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
KEW ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, England. 

Bulletin of miscellaneous information, nos. io; 112, (exch.) 
K I .AIT. DR. F. W. (the author), Hamburg, Germany. 

4 botanical pamphlets, (exch.) 
KUKENTHEL, DR. WILLY (the author), .Una, Germany. 

14 pamphlets on zoological subjects. 
Kl MMEL, 11. B. (the author), Trenton, N.J. 

Lake Passai< ; an extinct glacial lake. 
KUNZ, GEORGE F., New York. 

The production of precious stones, 1894, by the donor. 

5 publu at ions, Tiffany & Co. 

LACKAWANNA INST. OF HISTORY AND SCIENCE, Scranton, Pa. 

Proceedings and collections, vol. 1, 1887. 

( 'barter and by-laws. 

Special publications, nos. 1 and 2. 

Flora of the Lackawanna and Wyoming valleys. 

Reminiscences of the early history of Scranton. 

Powdered anthracite, (exch.) 
LAKE KoRKSl I tSf I VERSITY, Lake Forest, 111. 
talogue, [895-96, .; copies. 

Circular of information, 1896-97, (exch.) 

LAWRENCE PI BLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence', Mass. 

Bulletin, nos. 18-23. 

Annual report, no. 24, 1895, (exch.) 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Courses, general literature and engineering, (exch.) 
LEIPZIG ZOOLOGISCHER GARTEN, Leipzig, Germany. 

Fiihrer. 
1.1 LAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERS1 l'Y. Stanford University, Cal. 
ister. 1895-96. 

1 -in 1I1. to biology, nos. 1-4. 

Geol. and paleont., no. I,(exch.) 

LILLARD, BENT., New York. 

Popular Science News, vol. 29, nos. 11 and 12; vol.30.no. i, (exch.) 

LINNEAN 11 UN BULLETIN, Binghampton, N. Y. 

Linnean Fern Bui., vol. 3, nos. 4 12. 

" 4, current nos. 

LLoYD. C. <;., Cincinnati, 0. 

Photogravures ol Vm. fungi, nos. 1 10. 

Additions to (his) Mycological Museum. 

( atalogue of hooks relating to the flora ot Europe, (exch.) 
LONDON Cl OLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Geol. literature added to the library, 1895, (exch. I 

LOUBAT, I. V.. Paris, France. 

The medallic history of the U. S. of America, 1776-1876, (exch.) 

LOUISIANA AGRIC. 1 XP. STATION, Baton Rouge, La. 
Bulletin, current nos. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 

LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY, Los Angeles, Cal. 
7th annual report, (2 copies), (exch.) 

LYNX PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lynn, Mass. 
Annual reports, 1894-95. 
Bulletin, 2d ser., no. 3, (exch.) 

LYONS MUSEUM d'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Lyons, France. 
Ar hives, vol. 6, (exch.) 

MABERY, PROF. C. F. (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Composition of the American sulphur petroleums. 
Mc( IW'AN, P., Cape Town, Cape of Good Hope. 

Cape of Good Hope Dept. of Agric, Manual of practical orchard work. 

Report of the Gov't Botanist, 1895, (exch.) 
M< RITCHIE, DAVID (the author), Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Dwarf types in the eastern Pyrenees. 

Scottish gypsies under the Stewarts. 

Origin of the Irish superstitions regarding Banshees and Fairies. 

Fians, Fairies and Picts. 

Ancient and Modern Britons. 

The testimony of tradition. 

The gypsies of India, (exch.) 

MAIMONIDES FREE LIBRARY, New York. 
Report, 1895, (exch.) 

MAITLAND, A. GIBB (the author), Brisbane, Queensland. 

The geological structure of extra Australian artesian basins. 
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Annual report, 1895, (exch.) 
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Racial photographs from the Egyptian Monuments, (190). 
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33d annual report. 

The crambidse of N. A. 

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Transactions, 1894, pt. 2; 1895, pts. 1 and 2, (exch.) 

MASS. INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass. 

Technological Quarterly, vol. 8, no. 3, (exch.) 
MASS. STATE LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Reports, 1894-95. 

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75th annual report, (exch.) 

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Revision des lithosidi'-rites. 
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Boletin, nos. 1, 2 and 3. 
Expedicion Cientilica al Popocatepetl. 
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Bulletin, current nos. 

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Report of the State Hoard of Geo!. Survey for the years 1891-92. 

Upper Peninsula, 1869-73, vol. 1, and 1878 8o, vol. 4. 

Mineral Statistics, 1880, 1881, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1890 and 1 S. > 4 , 7 vols, 

1 exch.) 



[A2 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i . 

MICHIGAN MINING SCHOOL, Houghton, Mich. 

Report of the director and treasurer, 1885 91. 

Report "I" the director, 1890 92, (exch.) 
MICROSCOPICAL PUB. C< >MPANY, W ashington, D. C. 

Microscope, current nos., (exch.) 
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; pamphlets 1 reprints) by J. C. Baj . 

Transactions ol the Mass. I torticultural Society for 1894, pt. 1. 
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Bulletin, current nos. 
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Bulletin no. 3. 
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Some applications of logical and psychological principles to grammar, 
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Biennial reports, 1891 95, (exch.) 
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Bulletin, current nos. 
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I r< atise and photo, of mastodon, (ex< h.) 
MOORE, CLARENCE (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 
rtain shell neaps of St. John's River. Fla. 

Certain sand mounds of St. John's River, Fla., pts. 1 and 2. 

Certain sand mounds of Duval county, etc. 

Additional mounds of Duval and Clay counties. 

I rania from the mounds of the St. John's Liver, by H. Allen, ( xch.) 

MLRin WEATHER, Gl ' »RG1 . I hii a 

rhecoaltrade t88i, , [889, 1890, 1892, 1895, (7 vols.), by Saward. 

Leiin. Commission on waste ol coal mining: Report, [893, (2 copn 
NADAILLAC, LA MARQUIS DE (the author), Paris, France. 

Expeditions polaires, (exch.) 
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Report, 1895, (exch.) 



s 

Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 143 

NEBRASKA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Lincoln, Neb. 

Proceedings, 1893, (publication no. 4.) 

Publications, [-3, (exch.) 
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Bulletin, current nos. 

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Bulletin, current nos. 
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Catalogue, 1895-96, (exch.) 
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Monthly bulletin vol. I, nos. 1-5, (exch.) 
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Report of the trustees, 1895, (exch.) 

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Bulletin, no. 13, (exch.) 

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Proceeding, January meeting, 1896, (exch.) 

MAY HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Dur- 
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Bulletin, nos. 17-24, 26-34, and current nos. 

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Report of the Botanical Department, 1891-95. 
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Report on forestry, 1894-95. 

The Forester, vol. 1, no. 6, (exch.) 

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Annual report, 1894-95, (exch.) 

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Annual report, 1895, (exch.) 

NEW JERSEY STATE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, New Brunswick, N. J. 
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Las Cruces, N. M. 

bulletin, nos. 16-19, inch 

NEWPORT NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Newport, R. I. 
Proceedings, 1883-90 (documents 1-7), (exch.) 

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Sydney, N. S. W". 

Record, vol. 4, part 4, vol. 5, part 1. 
Annual report, 1895, (exch.) 

NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Elizabeth Bay, N. S. W. 

Abstract of proceedings, March 25, 1896. 
Proceed, vol. 21, part 1, (exch.) 

NEW YoKK ACADEMY OF S( [ENCES,. New York. 

Memoir I , part 1. 
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Annals, vol. 8, nos. 6-12, vol. 9, nos. 1-3, (exch.) 

NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, N. Y. 

13th annual report. 



144 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York. 
Bulletin, vol. i, no. i. 

NEW YORK COMMISSIONERS OF THE STATE RESERVATION AT 
NIAGARA, New York. 
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\I \\ YORK GENERAL SO( IE I Y OF Ml CHANICS AND TRAD! SME N, 
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Annual r< the trustees, 1871 94. 

Annual report, 1896. 
( ruide. 

1) handbooks. 

Russian arl reprodui tions. 
Cuneiform texts. 
( ireek and Latin inscriptions. 
^ addresses, bj Cesnola, (exch.) 

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Journal, vol. 1 1 , (exch.) 

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NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, N. Y. 
Animal reports, 72nd 76th. 
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Annua) reports, 32, 39, M, [3, |4, \S and 46, ( 1 879 93). 
Bulletin, vols. 1, J and 3, nos. 1—15, (exch.) 

NICARAGUA, SECCION DE CONSULADOS, Managua, Ni« aragua. 

La guerra. 

\ [CI I 1 'I S, II. \Y., Field Columbian Museum. 

Programme "I M issa< husetts Institute of Technology, li 
A ' : of publications of the Institute, 13. 

Briei ac< 1 »unt of its foun< ation, etc. 

Ni »K III CARi >LINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION,Raleigh, 
N. I . 

Bu letin, 1 urrenl nos. 

Report on North Carolina weather, 1 

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N. D. 

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1 lataloifue, 1895-96, (ex< h.) 

NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY, Notre Dame, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, [894-95; [895- ch.) 

NI >\ A SCO! IAN INSTITl I E 01 SCIEN< I. Halifax, N. S. 

I .iv. - i if the Institute. 

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1 )\\\ RLIN a 'III GE, 1 »b< rlin, 1 >. 
Laboratory bulletins, m s. 
Preliminary list of the flowering and fern plants of Lorain Co. 

etin, nos. 7 and 8 (if the Wilson < >rnithology Chapter of the Ag 
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Bulletin, current 1 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 145 

OHIO STATE ARCHEOLOGICAL & HISTORIC SOCIETY, Columbus, O. . 
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ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, N. Y. 

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Annual report of the Ontario Entomological Society, 23rd— 25t h. 

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7th annual report of the delegates of the University Museum, (exch.) 

PARIS MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 
Bulletin, no. i,(exch.) 

PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Bulletin of Pharmacy, vol. 10, no. 8, and current nos., (exch.) 
PAX, PROF. FERDINAND (the author), Breslau, Germany. 

Portulacaceae Africanae, with 6 other pamphlets, (exch.) 
PEABODY INSTITUTE LIBRARY, Peabody, Mass. 

Finding list, 1878-88. 

The George Peabody Centennial Celebration, (exch.) 

PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY AND ETHNOL- 
OGY, Cambridge, Mass. 
29th report, 1895. 

Putnam: Review of Certain sand mounds of Florida. 
Memoirs, vol. i, no. I, (exch.) 

PEEK, \V. H., Chicago. 

Meteorological registers of Mauritius, 1893-94. 

2 photos illustrating cyclonic effects. 

1 barometric record. 
PENAFIEL, DR. ANTONIO (the author), Mexico, Mex. 

Explication de l'edifice Mexicain, with 9 other publications, (exch.) 

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PEORIA SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Peoria, 111. 
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i (.6 Fn ld Columbian Museum Repi »r i s, V< il. i . 

POLLARD, C. L. (the author), Washington, I ». I . 

Notes "ii some Southern Cassias. 

Some uew < ir rare plants. 

rhe purple floVered violets ol the Atlantic coast, (exch.) 
Pi IF II R, I Ih 6. a >NR \D (the author), Easton, Pa. 

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Bulletin, current nos. 
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I a lenqua Vilela Chulupi, with \ other pamphlets, (exch.) 

RAILWAY LIST COMPANY, Chicago. 

Railway Master Mechanic, current nos. 
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REIGHARD, DR. JACOB, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

1 >n the anatomy and histolog) of autophorus vagus, 1>\ Hie donor. 

10th and nth biennial 1 ol State Board 01 I ish Commissioners of 

M ichigan. 
Bulletin of State Hoard of Fish Commissioners of Mil higan, 1890, (exch. 

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7th annual report. 

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14th annual catalogue, (exch.) 
ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

Pro< eedings and transactions. 2nd -eru S, vol. 1. 

Summary of original articles in the Canadian Naturalist, (exch.) 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 147 

ROYAL SOCIETY OF QUEENSLAND, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Proceedings, vol. 1 1, pt. 2, (exch.) 
RUTLEY, PRl >F. FRANK (the author), London, England. 

( rranites and greenstones, (exch.) 

RUTTER, CLOUDSLEY (the author), San Francisco, Cal. 
Notes on fresh water fishes, Pacific slope. 

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ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Annual report of the Board of Directors, 1894-95, (exch.) 

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Bulletin, vol. 3, nos. 1-11, (exch.) 
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43d annual report, 1895, (exch.) 
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Bulletin, vol. I, current nos., (exch.) 

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Revista, vol. 1, (exch.) 
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Das schvvirrholz, with' 2 other pamphlets, (exch.) 

SHEAR, C. L., (the author), Lincoln, Neb. 

< >n the relation between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, (exch.) 
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Shipping and commercial list and N. Y. price current, centennial edition. 
SIMMS, S. C, Field Columbian Museum. 

Prospectus, Marionette Mining Co. 

Collection of 15 books and pamphlets. 

SKIFF, F. J. Y., Field Columbian Museum. 

Transactions, American Institute of Mining Engineers, vol. 24. 
Transactions, Atlanta & Pittsburg Meeting, (1895-96). List of officers, 

members, etc., 1896. 
Proceedings, New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Jan. 1896. 
Official Catalogue, Atlanta Exposition, 1895. 
Cripple Creek & Colorado Springs, by Warren & Stride. 
Annual report, loth, of the Art Institute of Chicago. 
Hunting and fishing in Florida, by C. B. Cory. 
Meddelanden fra.net besok vid varlds expositionen, Chicago, by E.G. 

< >delstjerna. 
Prehistoric ruins of Copan, Honduras. 

SMITH, PROF. JAR F.I) G., (the author), St Louis, Mo. 

North American species of sagittaria and lophotocarpus. 
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Atlanta. 
Smithsonian miscellaneous collections, nos. 971 and 972. 
List of publications of the Institution. 
Report of the U. S. National Museum, 1893. 



i P Field Columbian Museum- Reports, Vol. i. 

List of institutions and foreign and domestic libraries to which it is de> 

d future publications of the U. S. National Museum. 
Pro< eedings, vol. 17, > 1894 1. 
etin, no cch.) 

SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA ANTONIO ALZ \ II . Mexico, Mex. 

Memorias y Revista, vol. 8, nos. 5, 8, 9 and 12, vol. 9, < urrenl n h.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN1 STATION, Fort 
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Bulletin, no. 25. 
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Bulletin, nos. i 7, 9-1 r, 14 and 17-46 inclusive. 
SOI Fill l:\ CALIFORNIA SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Los Angeles, Cal. 
of members, etc., 1894-95. 
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SPEARS, JOHN R., (the author), New York. 

The gold d - of Cape Horn, (exch.) 

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Library bulletin, current nos., fexch.) 
- I \ IT.\ [SL WD NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Staten Island, \. V. 

p ri , , edi -. 1-3, \ no. 12, 5 current nos., (exch.) 

STEERE, I. B., (the author), Ann Arbor, Mich. 

The origin and meaning of animal groups, (typewritten). 
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Mitiheilungen, 18 - b.) 

S I'FINFR T, Mi >RRIS, (the- author), New Haven. Conn. 

The M. Steinert collection of keyed and stringed instruments. 
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Annual report 1st 8th. 

Bulletin, No. 1-17 inclusive. 
STREET RAILWAY PUBLISHING O ►., Chicago. 

Street Railway Journal, current 1 
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Publications of the Historical Society of Southern California, vol. 2 part I. 

A. Sutro's letter to the Regents of the Universitj of California. 
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20 reports on the World's Columbian Exposition. 

SYDERE, A. H.. Toronto. I >ntario. 

Collection of Canadian Government reports. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, N. V. 

Catalo 16. 

Special bulletin, 1896, (exch.) 
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Proceeding ttra< t.) 

Illustrated guidebook to Mount Tacoma. 

TAUNTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Taunton, Mass 

30th annual report of the trustees. 

Additions, no. ^, lex h.) 
TENNESSEE UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATU 'X. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Annual report, 1st and 3rd-Sth inclusive. 

Bulletin, vols. 1-8, (incomplet> 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, P. O. College Station, 
Texas. 

8th annual report. 

Bulletin, current nos. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 149 

THOMPSON, EDW. H. (the author), Merida, Yucatan. 
The ancient structures of Yucatan, (exch.) 

T( )LEDO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Toledo, O. 
Annual report, 18th, 1891. 
Catalogue, (1886). 
Bulletin, no. 2-6 and 8-12, (exch.) 

TOOKLR, \Y. \V. (the author), Sag Harbor, L. I. 

John Eliot's Cockenoe-de-Long Island, with 5 other pamphlets, (exch.) 
TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB, Lancaster, Pa. 

Bulletin, current nos., (exch.) 

TRINITY COLLEGE, Hartford, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1895; i895-'96, (with addresses of surviving Alumni), (exch.) 

TUBINGEN, UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Tubingen, Wurtemberg, Germany. 
Festgabe, (exch.) 

TUFTS COLLEGE, Tufts College, Mass. 

Tufts college studies, nos. 1-4 inclusive, (exch.) 
U. S. AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

List of publications i8.ii-'95. 

Annual reports, i867,-'68-'77-'78-'84-'85 anc j '88 to date. 

Index to reports, 1837-93. 

Bulletins and circulars, current nos. (exch.) 

U. S. AMERICAN REPUBLICS BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Annual reports, 1891-95. 

Bulletins, nos. 40-41, 53, 58, 60, 64. 

Monthly bulletin, vol. 1, vol. 2, no. 1, vol. 3 and vol. 4, no. 2, (exch). 
U. S. EDUCATION BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Report, vol. 2, (1892-93). 

Education in Alaska. 

Education at the World's Columbian Exposition. 

Notes on education at the Columbian Exposition, (exch.) 

U. S. ETHNOLOGY BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, nth, 12th and 13th. 

Contributions to North American ethnology, vol. 9. 

Map of linguistic stock of North American Indians. 

The American Race, by Brinton. 

Travels in Central America, by McRelet, (exch). 
U. S. FISH AND FISHERIES COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

Commissioner's report, 1889-92, (2 vols.) 

Bulletins, vols. 8-15 inclusive, 1895, (exch). 
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Geological atlas of the United States, folios 1-20. 

Annual report, 15th and 16th, pts. 2-4. 

Bulletin, 123-26, 128-29 and 131-34. 

36 atlas sheets. 

Mineral products of the U. S., 1886-95, (exch). 
1 . S. GOVT. PRINTING OFFICE, Washington, D. C. 

Monthly catalogue of publications, Jan.-Aug., 1895. 

1st annual report. 

Check-list of public documents, 2nd ed., (2 copies). 

Congressional documents, 8 vols. 

Narrative of 2d Arctic exp., by C. F. Hall. 

I . S. INTERIOR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Abstract of the nth census, 1890, ( 6 copies). 

Reports of the nth census, 15 vols. 

Report regarding the receipt of public documents. 

I '. S. mining laws. 

Annual reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1873-1895, (except 
1879). 

Annual reports of the Bd. of Indian Commissioners, 1871-1895 inch, (ex- 
cept 1872, '73, '77, '80 and '91), (exch). 



150 Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i . 

I . S. IN I" I K ST \ II' C»)M Ml k( I COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

|th oth annual reports. 

Statistics of railways, 1st ;th annual repi I 
1 . s. Mil I 1 ARY V VDEMY, West Point, N. Y. 

Official register of officers and cadets, June, 1895. 

I . S. Ml\ I BUREAU, w ashington, D. C. 

2isl and m\ annual reports ol the Director of the Mint, 2 vols. 
Reports upon productions of the precious metals for 1891 94, \ 

1 . S. SI \11. DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 
1 . S. Consular reports. 
1 . S. Consular special report, vol. 6. 
1 '. S. Consular report, current nos. 
Title and index to vols. 30 and 31. 
Review of the world's commei 
Commercial relations of the U. S., 1894 95, vols. 1 and 2, (exch). 

I .S. SURGEON GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C. 

Index ue, 2d sit., vol. 1, (exch). 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, I). C. 
Index nf periodicals, etc. 
Mexican bibliography, pts. [-3. 
Report of the Secretary of War, 1875-94, 55 vols. 

1 PSALA KONGLIGA I NIV. BIBLIOTEKET, Upsala, Sweden. 

Bulletin of the > *eol. Institution of the I niv., vol. 1 and vol. 2, pt. 1. 

57 publii ations, chiefly pamphlets, (exch.) 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXP. STATION, Logan, Utah. 

1 1 illetin, current nos. 

VALENTINE, PHILIPP J. J. (the author), New York. 

Analysis of pictorial text on 2 Palenque tablets, pt. 2. 

VASSA1 1 ! HERS INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, N. V. 

Transactions, vols. 1 -6 (except vol. 3, pt. 2), (exch.) 

VERMONT AGRIC. STATION, Montpelier, Vt. 
Eighth annual report, 18 >\. 

VERMONT AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Burlington, Vt. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
VIRGINIA AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
VIRGINIA I NIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Va. 

Alumni bulletin, vol. 2, no. 3. 

Annals of mathematics, vol. 10, nos. 1-5, (exch.) 

WABASH C< >LLE< IE, < Irawfordsville, Ind. 

1 italogue, 1894-95, 189S -96. 

'Triennial catalogue of alumni, etc., 1895, (exch.). 
WAGNER FREE INSTITUTE OF SCIEN( I . Philadelphia, Pa. 

'Transactions, vol. 3, \ ol. 4. pt. I. 

Announcement, 1 •'- h.J 

WARD, Ro\\ LAND (the author), London, England. 

Horn measurements and weights of the great game ol the world. 
WARR T.N. PRI >F. B. II. (the author), Harrisburg, Pa. 

The varying hare, with 2 other pamphlets. 

Bulletin, no. 6 of Div. of Econ. Zoof., Dept. of Agric, Pa., (exch.) 
WASHINGTON ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCH IT, Washington, D. C. 

American Anthropologist, current nos.. (exch.) 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIL TV, Washington, I). C. 

Proceed in us, vol. 10, pp. 1 64, (exch.) 
WASH. STATE AGRIC. COLLEGE AND SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, Pull- 
man, Wash. 

Bulletin, nos. 15 and 17. 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 151 

WATERTOWN FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Watertown, Mass. 

28th annual report, 1895, (exch.) 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE, Wellesley, Mass. 

Calendar, 1895-96, (exch.) 
WELLS, LIEUT. ROGER, JR., (the author), Washington, D. C. 

English-Eskimo and Eskimo-English vocabularies. 

Vocabulary of the Guaivo or Guahibo language, (typewritten). 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Conn. 

Annual catalogue, 1895-96. 

Wesleyan University, Bulletin no. 18, (exch.) 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRIC. EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgantown, W. Va. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WESTERN ELECTRICIAL CO., Chicago. 

Western Electrician, current nos. 
WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY, Cleveland, O. 

Catalogue, 1895-96. 
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO., New York. 

Annual report, 1895. 
WHITMAN, PROF. C. O. (the author), Chicago. 

Biological lectures, 3 vols. 
WIEN K. K. HOFBIBLIOTHEK, Wien, Austria, 

Instructionen fur die katalogs arbeiten, with another pamphlet, (exch.) 

WIEN K. K. HOFMUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Jahresbericht, 1895, (2 copies), (exch.) 
WILLEY, HENRY (the author), New Bedford, Mass. 

Enumeration of the lichens found in New Bedford. 

Notes on some North American species of Parmelia, (exch.) 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Mass. 
Catalogue, 1895-96. 
President's report, 1895-96. 
William's College catalogue of north polar stars, (exch.) 

WINDSOR & KENFIELD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 
Brick, current nos. 
Street Railway Review, current nos. 

WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wis. 
Historical collections, vol. 13. 
Proceedings, 43rd annual meeting, (exch.) 

WISCONSIN AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Madison, Wis. 
1 2th annual report. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

WISCONSIN, UNIVERSITY Madison, Wis. 

Bulletins: Economic series, vol. 1, nos. 1 and 2. 
Bulletins: Engineering series, vol. 1, nos. 1-6. 
. Bulletins: Science series, vol. 1, nos. 1-4, (exch.) 

W ORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Mass. 
36th annual report. 
Second supplement to catalogue. 
Additions to the library, current nos., (exch.) 

WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Worcester, Mass. 
26th annual catalogue, 1896, (exch.) 

WORLD'S COLUMBIAN C( )M M 1SSK >\\ Washington, D. C. 
Final report of Executive Committee on Awards. 
Supplement, final report. 

WYOMING UNIVERSITY AGRIC. COLLEGE AND FXP. STATION, Chey- 
enne, Wyo. 
Fifth annual report, 1895. 
Bulletin, current nos. 



is- Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

WYOMING UNIVERSITY, Laramie, Wyo. 
Petroleum series, bulletin no. i. 
Catalogue, 1895 96, (exch.) 

YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

Report, [J 

< atalogue, [895-96, (exch.) 
/.KISS. CAR I., Jena, Germany. 

Sei '■: , atalogues, 
ZULAUF & CO. C... Zurich, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet, (reprint). 

Set of 1 atalogues. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(AC( ESSIONS ARE BY GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNAT1 D. 

ARMOUR, A. V., Chic 

24 negatives of Yucatan ruins, (transferred from Department of 
Anthropoh i{ 

BALTIMORE & OHIO R. R. 

20 negatives of engines, (transferred from Division of Transportation!. 
FIELD Cl IL1 MBIAN Ml SEUM. 

lade In Section of Photography from April 1, 189?, to May i, 

1806, to illustrate publications, lectures, newspaper articles, etc., 607. 
Made by I >. C. Farrington: 

~2 views of mine-, peoples, etc. — Mexico. 

al views— Maine and Massachusetts. 
1 negative of glacial drift— Drainage Canal, Cook County, 111. 

I negative of glacial boulder pocket. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

45 views of ruin-, trees, etc. — Yucatan. 

II views along Drainage Canal- Cook Co., 111. 
\2 views m and around Clarksdale, Miss. 

- of trees— Mt. Carmel, 111. 
7 views of forest trees, etc.- Mississippi. 
6 negatives of trees— Blue Island, 111. 
Made by E. P. Allen: 

44 views alniig Drainage Canal-- Cook Co., 111. 
Purchases* 

6 portraits of Alaskan Eskimo, male and females, (purchased from Dr. 
Fran/ Boas). 

GREEN, C. H., Denver, Col. 

32 negatives of mummies, baskets, caves, etc., (transferred from 
Department of Anthropology). 

[NGLIS, JAMES, Chica 

11 negatives oi 1 fyptian scenes and mumm 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F.. Field Columbian Museum. 

3 views of Yucatan ruins in World's Columbian Exposition Grounds. 
MOI IREHEAD, WARREN K., Columbus, Ohio. 

views among the Indian mounds of Ohio, (transferred from Depart- 
ment of Anthropi 

SOI 1 IN, 11. 1... Chicago. 

of views in Museum made to illustrate Museum article in 
" The Interior,' (transfi \vv<\ from Department of Anthropology). 

STEERE, J. I'.., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

2\ negatives of mammals, skulls, etc., (transferred from Department of 
Zoology 1. 

THOMPSON, EDWARD IF. Merida, Yucatan. 

16 negatives of ruins in and around Merida, Yucatan. 

U. S. BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, Washington, D. C. 

247 negatives of original Columbus documents, (transferred from 
Department of History). 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 153 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

department of state. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State : 

To all to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting : 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and 
in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," ap- 
proved April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a 
copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir : 

We, the undersigned Citizens of the United States, propose to form a cor- 
poration under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled, 
"An Act Concerning Corporations" approved April 18, 1872, and all acts 
amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby 
state as follows, to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art. 
Archeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 




154 Field Columbian Mi -mm — Reports, Vol. i. 

Ed. I'.. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell,' G I . Adams, George R. Davis 

Charles I . Ilutrhnis.ni, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock; Emil 
(i. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. I . Aldis, Edwin Walker, 
John C. Black and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of CI County of Cook. 

ol Illinois. 

'•' '"' 
George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Rob- 
ert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. I. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer 
Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John .M.Clark, Herman H. 
Kohlsaat, 1 Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R.Harper, Franklin H. 

Head.E. G. Keith, J. [rving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas 
B. Bryan, L. /. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. 
I . Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Ruche, E. B. Mc- 
1 'wen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, 
Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A.Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. 
Crawford, \\ "m. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. 
Gunther, Geo. R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bul- 
lock, Edwin Walker, Geo. M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, 
William F. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, 
X. Ii. Ream, Norman Williams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. 
Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

ST \ IF OF ILLINOIS, ) 

y ss. 
Cook County. \ 

1, C R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowl- 

erally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, i> 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
(Seal) Notary Pi blk , Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, [894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
tiled June 26, i8<>4, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Oct. 1896. Annum. Rkport of the Director. 155 



Amended By-laws. 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of 
any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within 
said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground of forfeiture of 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
Fits/. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum on any day. 
Second. — Ten tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on paydays. 
Third. — A copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance door, 

and to the annual reports. 
Fourth. — Invitations to all receptions, lectures or other entertainments which may 

be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The corporate members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of association, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles 
of association shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
persons hereafter chosen as corporate members, shall, within ninety days of their 
respective election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or 
more. The failure of any person to make such payments within said time shall, 
at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate 
membership. The annual dues of corporate members shall be five dollars ($5.00) 
after the first year of membership, and no one shall exercise the rights of a 
1 orporate member until his dues are paid; and a delinquency of six months in the 
payment of annual dues shall be ground for forfeiture of corporate membership. 
( >nly corporate members shall be eligible to the office of Trustee. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
at any one time, shall upon the unanimous vote of the trustees, become a life 
member. Life members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees upon recommen- 
dation of the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and by 
virtue of their election as patrons shall also be corporate members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary members shall be chosen from among persons who have 
rendered eminent service to science, art or mechanics. They shall be chosen by 



i s'> Field Columbian Museum Reports, Vol. i. 

.! vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the Executive 
Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. In < ommemoration ol the i ith 
day ol October honorary members shall not be more than fourteen in number at 
any one time. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible t" appointment 
upon committees other than the Executive Committer 



ARTICLE II. 
OFFICERS. 

Si 1 HON 1. The respective members of the Hoard of Trustees now 
in office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. 
Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the remain- 
ing members of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary 
and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall be chosen 
by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early as practicable 
after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall bef.r officios member 
of the Executive Committee, in addition to the other four members. The Secre- 
tary and Treasurer may, or may not, be the same person, and the Secretary may, 
"r may not, be a corporate member. 

Any officer maj be removed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
bj a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any office 
may be tilled by the board at any meeting. 

. ;. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Committee 
on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a Committee 
• mi Buildings and Grounds, who shall serve- during the pleasure of the Board. 

Sec. \. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and Midi ether duties as the Board of Trustees may from 
time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount 
and with such surety .1- shall he approved by the Executive Committee, and shall 

disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with the directions of the 

Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter-signature of such officer- 
as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

. ;. The I \< cutive Committee shall have full control of the affairs of 
the Museum, under the general supervision of the Ph.. ml ol Trustees. 



\K TU IF. III. 
MEETING 

Section i. In commemoration of the discovery of America by Christopher 

imbus, the annual meeting of the corporate members shall be held on the 

14th dav of < '. tober in each year, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and 

then upon the Monday following. At such meetings the corporate members shall 

transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. Special meet- 

_- of the corporate members shall be called at any time by the Secretary upon 



Oct. 1896. Annual Report of the Director. 157 

written request of twenty corporate members. In such case thirty days' notice 
by mail shall be given to corporate members of the time, place and 'purpose "I 
such meetings. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon the 
first Monday after the 14th day of October, and upon the last Monday of January, 
April and July of each year. Special meetings may be called by the President at 
any time upon reasonable notice by mail, and shall be called upon the written 
request of three Trustees. Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum. 



ARTICLE IV. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Trustees by a two-thirds' vote of all the members present, provided the 
amendment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding, or 
shall be recommended by the Executive Committee. 



; 58 Fn ii' Coli mb] w Museum Ri poi i », Vol. i. 



LIFE MEMBER. 

By the payment of five hundred dollars. 
\Y. |. CHALMERS. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

CHARLES B. CORY. MARY D. STURGES. 

EDWARD E. AVKK. HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM. 

GEORGE M. IT 1. 1. MAX. 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOI R. FREDERICK I. V. SKIFF. 

WILLARD A. SMITH. WILLIAM I. Bl CHANAN. 



Oct. 1896. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



i59 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



GEORGE E. ADAMS 

OWEN F. ALDIS 

ALLISON V. ARMOUR 

PHILIP U. ARMOUR 

EDWARD E. AYER 

WM. T. BAKER 

A. C. BARTLETT 

JOHN C. BLACK 

WATSON F. BLAIR 

ELIPHALET W. BLATCHFORD 

THOS. B. BRYAN 

W. I. BUCHANAN 

EBENEZER BUCKINGHAM 

DANIEL H. BURNHAM 

EDWARD B. BUTLER 

JOHN M. CLARK 

W. J. CHALMERS 

H. C. CHATFIELD-TAYLOR 

ANDREW CRAWFORD 

WM. E. CURTIS 

GEORGE R. DAMS 

SIDNEY C. EASTMAN 

JAMES W. ELLSWORTH ' 

CHAS. FITZSIMONS 

LYMAN J. GAGE 

HENRY H. GETTY 

FRANK W. GUNSAULUS 

C. F. GUNTHER 

WM. E. HALE 

WM. R. HARPER 

AZEL F. HATCH 

FRANKLIN H. HEAD 

H. N. HIGINBOTHAM 

CHARLES L. HUTCHINSON 



HUNTINGTON W. JACKSON 

ARTHUR B. JONES 

E. G. KEITH 

HERMAN H. KOHLSAAT 

BRYAN LATHROP 

L. Z. LEITER 

E. B. McCAGG 
A. C. McCLURG 
JOHN McCONNELL 

cyrus h. Mccormick 

ROBERT McMURDY 
ANDREW McNALLY 
GEORGE MANTERRE 
JOHN J. MITCHELL 
ROBERT W. PATTERSON 
FERD W. PECK 
ANDREW PETERSON 
P. S. PETERSON 
J. IRVING PEARCE 
GEO. M. PULLMAN 
NORMAN B. REAM 
MARTIN A RYERSON 
GEO. SCHNEIDER 

F. J. V. SKIFF 
JOSEPH STOCKTON 
BYRON L. SMITH 
WILLARD A. SMITH 
A. A. SPRAGUE 
MELVILLE E. STONE 
EDWIN WALKER 

R. A. WALLER 
JOHN R. WALSH 
NORMAN WILLIAMS 



JAMES W. SCOTT 



DECEASED. 

GEORGE F. BISSELL 



[()(> 



Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ABEL, JON \ III W 
\l> \MS. ( A Kl S II. 
ADLER, DANKMAR 
Al LEN, W. I. 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ALL] R rON, MRS. S. W. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, MRS. BARBARA 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 
ARNOLD, I. B. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAILEY, I . V\ . 
BAKER, All RID L. 
BAKER, FRANK 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BALDWIN, WILLIS M. 
B Wl . OSCAR F. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARN] S, I HARMS J. 
BARNES, I . A. 
BARNHART, ARTI1I R M. 
BARR] M.! \Mi:s 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, WILLIAM II. 
BARTLETT, JOSIAF C. 
BATGHE1 DER, A. 
BATCH] I III'. A 
BJ \( II. I . G. 
1.1 Al \ Al i, E. 
B] I K. « HAS. A. 
BECKER, A. G 
BEECH] K. MRS. JEROME 
BEIDLER, FRANCIS 
BEIDLER, H. A. 
RIM ELD, JOS] I'll 
Bl LDEN, 

BENNETT, II l< >MAS 
1,11 I [N< iS, I . K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BINGHAM, A. E. 
BIRKHO] I . GEO. JR. 



BLACKM W, W. L. 
BLACKS rONE, T. B. 
B] \l\l . MRS. EMMI >NS 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, LYMAN 
BLAIR, WILLIAM 
BLANCH \RD, WILLIAM 
BLISS, SAMUEL I .. 
BLODGETT, II. W. 
BL1 M, EDGAR C. 
BOAL, CHAS. I. 
BOLTON, JAMES 
B< INFIELD, J< >I I X 
BONNEY, CHARLES C. 
BOOTH, A. 
Roo III, II. W. 
BOOTH, W. VERNi »N 
BORDEN, [AMES U. 
BORDEN, [I IHN 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
Bl >i I ON, N. S. 
BOU roN, ( . B. 

BRADLI Y, CHARLES FRED. 
BRADLEY, J. HARLEY 
BRADW] 1. 1., JAMES B. 
BRAINERD, E. R. 
BRAUN, GEORGE P. 
BREGA, CHAS. W . 
BREMNER, DAVID 1 . 
BRENOCK, fOHN 
BRIGGS, CLIN l< >N 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROOKS, J. W. 
BROWN, GEORGE 1". 
BROWN, JollN B. 
BROWN, JOHN H. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BRYANT, HENRY W. 
Bl RKH \KD T. H. S. 
BURLEY, ARTHUR G. 
BURLEY, AUGUSTUS H. 



Oct. 1896. 



Annum. Ri port of the Director. 



161 



BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURLEY, FRANK E. 
BURNET, WM. H. 
Bl RNHAM, AUSTIN A. 
I*. VRAM, A. 

CARLE, R. R. 
CANNELL, S. WILMER 
CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER, MYRON J. 
CAR TON, L. A. 
CHANDLER, C. C. 
CHANDLER, FRANK R. 
CHAPIN, MRS. M. A. 
CHAPMAN, MRS. J. DEERE 
CHAPPELL, C. H. 
CHASE, S. B. 
CHENEY, C. C. 
CLARK, JONATHAN 
CLARK, W. D. 
CLARKE, CLINTON C. 
CLIFF, CAPT. JOHN 
CLOUD, JNO. W. 
COBB, S. B. 
COFFIN, C. H. 
COMAN, SEYMOUR 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONKLING, ALLEN 
CONN ELL, CHARLES J. 
CONOYER, CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 
COOLIDGE, CHAS. A. 
COONLEY, MRS. JOHN C. 
CORNEAU, D. E. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
COY, IRUS 
COX, ALFRED J. 
COX, EUGENE R. 
CRITCHELL, R. S. 
CROSBY, WILLIAM HOWARD 
(I DA 11 Y, JOHN 
CI LVER, MRS. CHARLES E. 
CUM MINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, I). II. 
CUSTER, J. R. 

DAL, JOHN \V. 
DAMSEL, W. H. 
DAVIS, CHARLES E. 
DAY IS, LEWIS II. 



DAY, ALBERT M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DAYTON, MELVILLE E. 
DEAN, THAI) 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DE KOVEN, JOHN 
DELANO, F. A. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DETMER, HENRY 
DEWEY, DAVID B. 
DICK, A. B. 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DOANE, J. W. 
DOBBINS, THOMAS S. 
DODGE, G. E. P. 
DORR, GEORGE J. 
DOWNS, C. S. 
DUDDLESTON, GEORGE 
DUMMER, W. F. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, H. C. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
DWIGHT, JOHN H. 

EARNSHAW, E. 
EDMUNDS, ABRAHAM 
EDWARDS, J. A. 
EGAN, WILEY M. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
ELLIOTT, W. S., Jr. 
ELTONHEAD, E. Y. 
EMMERICH, CHAS. 
ETHERIDGE, MRS. J. H. 
EVANS, ORRIN L. 
EWING, WILLIAM G. 

FAIR, R. M. 
FAITH . > 

FARGO. C A 
FARNSWOR'l H, GEORGE 
FARRAR, MRS. A. 
FARWELL, JOHN V. 
FAY, C. N. 

FEATHERSTONE, A. 
FELSENTHAL, H. 
FERGUSON, B. F. 
FERGUSON, CHAS. H. 
FISCHER, FREDERICK 
FISH, STUYVESANT 
FISHER, L. G. 
FLANNERY, JOHN L. 



[62 



Field Columbian Museum Repor/i . Voi 



FLERSHEM, LEM W. 

II o\\ l R, JAMES M. 

I I IRD, J. S. 

FOREM W. EDWIN G 

I ORE M VN, OSCAR G. 

I ORS\ I'll. R< >BER I 

FOW1 IK. E. M. 

I K \\K. Ill \KY I.. 

FRANK JOSEPH 

FR W'K. M W 

FRANKEN II I Al. II > IK I .. M.D. 

I K \-lll K. fOHN E. I . 

I REER, \.\ I'll W M. 

FR] ES, K. M. 

1 REY I'AC. MORITZ 

FRY, HENRY T. 

FULGHUM, B. W. 

I III IK. <). F. 

1 URST, CONRAD 

GANS, I 1 I IPOLD 

c, \.NS, SAMUEL 

GARTZ, AIM ILPH 1 . 

cxi ES, I. W. 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 

GEROW, F. P. 

GIBBS, JAMES S. 

GIFFORD, i . I . 

GIF FORD, I. CUSHMAN 

GLESSN1 R, J. J. 

GO! i'- I I IN, ADO] KM 

I ,« II IDRICH, A. W. 

C< IRDON, EDWARD K. 

GORMULLY, K. PHILIP 

GREEN, E. II. K. 

GRI EN, O. B. 

GR] Y, CHARLES I . 

GREY, WM. I.. 

GRI] FIN, I\ A. 

GRISWOLD, E. P. 

GR< >SS, S. I . 

Gl ION, GEO. Ml RRAY 

GUNNING, ROBERT J. 

GURLEY, W. W. 

HAMBLE n IN, C. J. 
HAMBLETON, EARL L. 
II VMILTON, HI \KY I. 
II VMILTON, I. K. 
HANECY, ELBRIDGE 
HANLON, I' 'UN J. 



II \\S<>\. 1>A\ ID \. 
HARAHAN, I. T. 
II A Kill ( k. II GENE 
HARDING, \.MOS J. 
HARRIS, I). J. 
II \KKIS, GE< '. B. 
HARRIS, fOHN I . 
HARRIS, MADISON R. 

II VRRIS, N. W. 

IIASKil L, I IM DERICK T. 
HEARD, DWIGH 1' BANl R( U I 

III A I'll, I RNEST W. 
HELMER, FRANK A. 
HEMMELGARN, H. 

HI NNING, FRANCIS A., M. D. 

HENRY, GEO. W. 

HER 111. LOUIS 

HIBBARD, F. V. S. 

HINES, EDWARD 

HITCHCOCK, R. M. 

H< 'LI" IM, [ESSE 

HOLT, I). R. 

HOLT, GEO. H. 

HI IPKINS, JOHN" P. 

HORNER, ISAAC 

HOSKINS, WM. 

HOI C.II. (HAS. K. 

HOI c,|| II I. INC. | WII'.S L. 

HOWARD, FREDERICK 

HOWLAND, WALTER M. 

HUGHITT, MARVIN 

III NT, [AMES A. 

Ill rCHINSON, MRS. I'.. 1'. 

HYDE, JAMES NEVINS 

IL1I I . W M. H. 
[NG \l S, I . 1 II rCHER 
l\C \l S, EPHRAIM, M. D. 
INS1 LL, S VMUEL 

I SKI SI IK. T. 
ISHAM, EDWARD S. 

fANES, \n]\S J. 

I IY, III' 'MAS B 

II NKI\N G] 0. H. 
fENKINS, T. R. 
JENKINS, WILTI IN A. 
JOHNSON, I. M. 
fOHNS H IN, I). P. 
JONES, I. 5. 

II D AH, N< IBLE B. 



Oct. 1896. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



163 



JUDSON, C. E. 

JUDSON, HENRY PRATT 

KAMMERER, F. G. 
KAVANAGH, CHARLES J. 
KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEELER, HERVEY E. 
KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEEP, HENRY 
KEEP, WILLIAM F. 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, DAVID 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KELLOGG, MRS. C. P. 
KELLOGG, JAMES B. 
KENNETT, FRANCIS J. 
KENT, THOS. 
KEWLEY, J. R., M. D. 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, GEO. F. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 
KIMBALL, W. W. 
KING, HEXRY W. 
KIRCHBERGER, S. H. 
KLEINE, HENRY 
KoCHEKSPERGER, D. H. 
KoEHLER, THOMAS X. 

LAFLIN, ALBERT S. 
I.AFLIN, GEO. H. 
LAFLIN, LYCURGLS 
LAMB, CHAS. A. 
LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAMP TON, MRS. A. O. 
LAXGDON, R. B. 
LARTZ, W. C. C. 
LAWRENCE, EDWARD F. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEACH, THOS. A. 
LEE, WALTER H. 
LEI "ENS, THIES J. 
LEGNER, W A. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LEI IE K, JOSEPH 
LEWIS, I \MES I . 
LEWIS, MRS. WILLIAM G. 
LEYENBERGER, CHARLES 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 



LLOYD, EVAN 
LOEWENTHAL, B. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LOMBARD, IOSIAH L. 
LONG, EUGENE C. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOSS, C. E. 

lowther, thos. d. 
lowy, halm an 
ludlam, dr. r. 
lunt, orrtngton 
lyfori). w. h. 
lyon, frank r. 
lyon, George m. 
lytton, henry c. 

m< alley, john t. 

McCREA, W. S. 

Mcdonald, j. s. 
mcelligott, thomas g. 

McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McKINLOCK, GEO. A. 
McVICKER, J. H. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MacFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MacGEAGH, JOHN W. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MACKIN, JOHN 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MAIR, CHARLES A. 
MALLETTE, J. P. 
MANASSE, LOUIS 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSLRE, E. L. 
MANVEL, MRS. ANNA F. 
MARK, CLAYTON 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MARSHALL, GEO. E. 
MATTHIESSEN, C. H. 
MAY, HORATIO N. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MAYO, JOHN B. 
MEAD, W. L. 
MERRICK, L. C. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEO. 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, De LASKIE 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MILLER, RoSW ELL 



1 1' I 



Fill 1 1 COH MBIAN Mi -I i M Ki PORTS, VOL. I. 



Mill l'K. THOS. 

MILLER, DR. V\<\ MAN W 

MILLS, I RANK O. 

MILNOR, LLOYD 

MIXER, C. II. S. 

MOORE, JAMES HOBART 

MOORE, I.. L 

MOORE, N. G. 

M< M >KI . SILAS M. 

MOORE, WILLIAM II. 

MORISON, GEO. S. 

MORRIS, I D\\ ARD 

M< >RRIS, IRA 

Mi (RRIS, NELS< '\ 

MORRISSON, JAMES W. 

MORSE, [AY C. 

Mm I rON, GEO. M. 

Ml LLIKEN, A. II. 

Ml LLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

Ml NRO, WILLIAM 

Ml RDO< II. llli'MAS 

\ \ niA\, Am >i.rn 

NELS< IN, MURRY 
NOLAN, [OHN H. 
NORTON, i). W. 
NOYES, La VERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
OGDEN, Kl k\< »\ 
ORB, fOHN A. 
ORTSEIP EN, ADAM 
I ISBI >RN, HENRY A. 
oils. do. I.. 
OTIS, L. B. 
OTIS, LUCIUS J. 

PALMER, MM. I< »N J. 
PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, Ik AM [S W. 
PARKER, I RANCIS W. 
PA I rERSON, W. R. 
PE M' »i K. C. D. 
PEARSON, I.l i . IN I . H. 
PEASE, [AMES 
I'l AS! I Y, [. r. 
PECK, GEO. R. 
PECK, CLAREN< E I. 
P] CK, MRS. MARY K. 
PECK, WALTER L. 
PEEK, W. H. 



PERRY, FREDERICK B, 
II I I RS, HOMER H. 
PE rERSEN, GEO. L. 
PE rERSON, WILLIAM A. 

I'l II ll'.i >M . A. C. 

I'M. rscH, c. i. 

PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PITKIN, II AK\ LA 1 . 
II 1 MMER, JONA I HAN W. 
POND, IRVING R. 
POPE, MRS. CHARLES 13. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, MRS. II LI A I . 
PORTER, W ASHING I <>N 
Pl >l II. K. ORRIN W. 
PR1 SSING, EUGENE E. 

< M ILK, JOHN H. S. 

RABER, I'. W. 
RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
R.W . I RANK II. 
RAYNER, [AMES B. 
REECE, ALONZO N. 
K 1.1 1 M, [ACOB 
REID, W. H. 

REYNOLDS, GEORGE B. 
REW, HENRY C. 
RICHARDS, J. I . 
RICKCORDS, GE( >. E. 
RIGGS, GEORGE W. 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROBERTS, MRS. J. P. 
ROBINSI 'N. D. B. 
ROBINSON, J. K. 
ROE, CHARLES S. 
R( IS] NBA1 M. Ji >SEPH 
ROSENB1 RG, I V< OB 
ROSI Nl ELD, MAI Kill 
Ki ISI N 11 1.\L, mm AR 
RO rHSCHILD, A. M. 
ROTHS( 1111. D. FRED 
RUMSEY, GEO. D. 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 
RYERSON, MRS. MARTIN 

SAWYER, CHAS. \. 

:i A I I MR. [OSEPH 
SCHIN IV. THEODORE 
SCHINTZ, THEO. H. 



Oct. 1896. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



165 



SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 

SCHMIDT, GEO. A. 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 

Ml I MITT, ANTHONY 

SCHNEIDER, OTTO C. 

SCHNERING, JULIUS 

SCHWARTZ, G. A. 

SCULL, HENRY 

SEARS, JOSEPH 

SEIPP, MRS. C. 

SEIPP, W. C. 

SELFRIDGE, HARRY G. 

SELLERS, FRANK H. 

SELZ, MORRIS 

SENN, MRS. N. 

SEWELL, BARTON 

SHANKLAND, EDWARD C. 

SHAW, GILBERT B. 

SHEDD, JOHN G. 

SHEPARD, MRS- H. MARTYN 

SHERWOOD, H. M. 

SHERWOOD, MARC 

SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 

SHORTALL, JOHN G. 

SHUTE, J. W. 

SIEGEL, FERDINAND 

SIMMONS, J. J. 

SINGER, A. L. 

SKINNER, THE MISSES 

SLOSSON, ANSON H. 

SMITH, F. B. 

SMITH, FRANK J. 

SMITH, JOHN C. 

SMITH, O. C. 

SMITH, ORSON 

SMITH, ROBERT J. 

SMITH, SHEA 

SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 

SOMERVILLE, R. 

SOPER, ALEX C. 

SOPER, JAS. P. 

SOUTHWELL, H. E. 

SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

SPOOR, J. A. 

STANTLEY, FRANK W. 

STANTON, W. A. 

STEELE, HENRY B. 

STICKNEY, MRS. EDWARD S. 

STILES, JOSIAH 

STIRLING. W. R. 



STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STRAHORN, ROBERT 
STRAUS, SIMON 
STRAUSSER, FRANK 
STUART, ROBERT 
STUDEBAKER, PETER E. 
SULLIVAN, LOUIS H. 
SULLIVAN, W. K. 

TAYLOR, SAMUEL G. 
TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TIFFANY, H. S. 
TILDEN, EDWARD 
TILTON, MRS. L. J. 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 
TREAT, CHARLES P. 
TRIPP, C. E. 
TRUAX, CHARLES 
TRUMBULL, PERRY 
TRUMBULL, JOHN H. 
TRUDE, A. S. 
TURBIN, LOUIS M. M.D. 
TURNER, E. A. 
TURNER, VOLUNTINE C. 
TYRRELL, JOHN 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 
UNZICKER, OTTO 
UPTON, GEORGE P. 

VIERLING, LOUIS 
VIERLING,- ROBERT 
VISCONTI, F. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WAIT, HORATIO L. 
WALKER, AMOS W. 
WALKER, GEORGE C. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, HENRY H. 
WALKER, WM. B. 
WALKER, W. S. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 
WALTER, MRS. J. C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WATKINS, WILLIAM W. 
WATSON, A. D. 
WATSON, WM. J. 
WEBSTER, GEO. H. 



1 66 



I'm i d Coi umbi w Museum Ri pok i s, Vol . i 



\\ I BS I'I'K, T. K. 

\\ 1 I LING, fOHN C. 

WEI I S, B. K. 

\\ I II S, M. I). 

\\ I RNER, P. E. 

WHEELER, A. W. 

WHEELER, CHARLES W. 

WHEELER, FRANCIS T. 

WHEELER, G. II. 

\\ 111 I I. \. ST \MI I IRD 

Will II.. \\ \1.. SR. 

Will II III \1>. W. M. 

Will I 111' 'I SE, IK VNCIS M. 

WICK! S, I. II. 

WILLIAMS. ABRAM 

WILLIAMS, SIMEON B. 

WILLING, MRS. HENRY J. 

WILMAR 111, MRS. II. M. 

WILS( IN, GE< IRGE C. 



WILS< »N, W . M. 
W [LSON, I . i . 
WILSON, M. II. 
W [LSON, WM. J. 
WING, DR. ELBERT 
WINK, HENRY 
WINS] OW, /. R. 
WOLF, FRED. W. 

wood. John H. 

Wool). S.L. 

Wl M M'lll AD, I. I . 

Wl »OD< 0< K, LINDSAY I. 

WOOD] AND, GEORG1 

WOOSTER, CLARENi 1 K. 

WRIGHT, TH( IS. A. 

YERKES, CHAR] ES I . 
YOI NG, CARYL 
YOUNG, WM. S. 



CHANDLER, PEYTON 

CO! \ IN, WILLIAM II. 



R. 



DECEASED. 



HENDERSON, ('HAS. M. 
Kl nil. EDSON