(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

'y 



i, 



i Illinois State 

I IflBORfllORr OF ilURfll 



URBANA, ILLINOIS. 



&S5 




LIBRARY 

OF THE 

U N 1 VER5 ITY 

or ILLl NOI5 

NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY 

|894-/9r-./892^/3op 




0-) 



Field Columbian Museum 

Publication 29. 

Report Series. Vol. I, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1897-98. 



P 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
October, 1898. 



o 

u. 

uJ 



2 
D 
oJ 

D 
5 

Z 
< 



o 
o 



o 

_l 
u 




s 

D 
uJ 
I/) 

D 



< 

m 

S 

D 
-I 
O 

u 

Q 
_l 
111 



cr 
O 



LU 

O 

UJ 

> 



UJ 

I 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, -.--...- 260 

Officers and Committees, - - - - - - - 261 

Staff, ' - - - - 262 

Income and Maintenance, ------- 2''i3 

Memberships, - - - - - ' . ' ' " 264 

Lecture Courses, -..--.-- 264 

Publications^ -...----. 266 

Library, - - - - - - - - - - 269 

Records, ---.----.- 270 

Inventory and Labeling, - - - - - - - , 271 

Accessions, --------- 272 

Exchanges, --------- 275 

Expeditions and Field Work, - ' - - - - - - 276 

Installation and, Permanent Improvements, - . . - 280 

Photography and Illustration, ------- 286 

Printing, --------- 286 

Taxidermy, ---------- 287 

Guards, and Fire Protection, ------ 287 

Attendance, ------... 288 

Acknowledgments, - - - - - - - - 289 

Financial Statement, -------- 291 

Accessions, - - - - - - - - - 294 

Department of Anthropology, ---,.. 294 

Department of Botany, ------- 296 

Department of Geology, - - - - - - - 298 

Department of Ornithology, - - - - - - 301 

Department of Zoology, ------- ^03 

The Library, - - - - - . - - - 305 

Articles of Incorporation, .---..- ^-ji 

Amended By-laws, --.-..-. ^33 

Honorary Members and Patrons, ...... ^^6 

List of Corporate Members, ------- 337 

List of Life Members, -.---... ^38 

List of Annual Members, - - - - - - - 339 



FiKLD Columbian Museum — Reports, \'ui.. i. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Adams. Huntington W. Jackson. 

Owen F. Alois. Arthur B. Jones. 

Edward E. Ayer. George Manierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

William J. Chalmers. Norman B. Ream. 

George R. Davis. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Edwin Walker. 

Norman Williams. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 



OFFICERS. 

Edward E. Ayer, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 

Norman B. Ream, Second Vice-President. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, Chairmajt Executive Committee. 
George Manierre, Secretary. 

Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 



executive committee. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Edward E. Ayer. Norman B. Ream, 

Owen F. Aldis. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMIVIITTEE. 

Norman Williams. 
Watson F. Blair. Huntington W. Jackson. 

committee on building. 

George E. Adams. 
William J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

George R. Davis. 

auditing committee. 
George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 



DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

G. A. DORSEY, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

C. F". MiLLSPAUGH, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

O. C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, EXCEPT ORNITHOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot. Curator. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

C. B. Cory, Curator. 

THE LIBRARY. 

J. Dieserud, Librarian. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1897-1898. 



To the Trustees of the Field Columbian Museum : 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year closing September 30, 1898. The same uniform, 
steady, and systematic work that was in progress at the time of the 
last report has been maintained during the past twelve months, 
marked by a spirit which seems to pervade the institution, always 
leading to a higher standard of strictly scientific treatment and an 
increasing regard for popular demand. The routine of the Museum 
has been excellent, and the general method of operation confirms the 
wisdom of the original plans. It will be observed, as details are 
presented, that the claims of each department and of each feature of 
the scope of the Museum, as well as the requirements of the institu- 
tion as a whole, have had consideration and have received a proper 
share of attention. The concert of action on the part of the staff 
during the past year has been especially gratifying in an individual 
sense, and of course productive of much benefit collectively. With- 
out in the least abating an interest in original research and in special 
work in the laboratories, a broader policy has marked each depart- 
ment in the treatment of those principles of Museum work that 
appeal to the public and concern the great mass of people to whose 
betterment and uplifting institutions of this character are dedicated. 
With the exception that in nearly all departments and sections the 
working force has been strengthened as the necessities of each case 
seemed to require, there have been no changes in the personnel of 
the staff. It is fair to assume, therefore, that its members enter 
upon the new year with increased capacity to meet the growing 
requirements of their respective stations, and with added interest in 
and devotion to the work assigned to each. 

Income and Maintenance. — The annual budget, approved by the 
Executive Committee, provided the sum of $102, 000 for the mainten- 
ance of the Museum for the fiscal year. The actual amount expended 
was $88,020, leaving a balance within the anticipated expenses for 
the year, of $13,980. In addition to the cost of maintenance, sums were 

263 



264 Field Columiuan Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

expended for collections and for new installations, expeditions, etc., 
that brought the total to $111,940, the deficit being met by individual 
contributions and by the sale of certain securities. An analysis of 
the itemized financial statements appearing elsewhere in this report, 
will convey the suggestion that a large proportion of the deficit, 
including expenditure for new material, is accounted for in the cost 
of guards, protection from fire, and repairs to the building. That the 
total outlay, however, so nearly approaches the income from all 
sources under the constant pressure for funds that the growth and 
development of the institution creates, and the proper protection that 
the building requires is, it would seem, rather satisfactory than other- 
wise. The books of the Museum have been compared with the 
Treasurer's statements, and a certificate of agreement issued. 

The Memberships. — The annual memberships have decreased dur- 
ing the j'ear, owing to the fact that life memberships were taken by 
a number of persons who were previously annual members. In 
accordance with the instructions of the Executive Committee, no 
effort was made to increase the annual membership, and the list 
now of record comprises those who have voluntarily renewed their 
annual subscriptions. The attendance of annual members has been 
considerably larger than in any previous year. 

Lecture Courses. — The spring and autumn lecture courses, com- 
prising Course Number Eight in October and November, 1897, nine 
lectures, and Course Number Nine in March and April. 1898, nine 
lectures, were attended more largely than had been the case thereto- 
fore. In fact, with one or two exceptions, the capacity of the lecture 
hall has been inadequate to the demands for admission, several hun- 
dred people being ordinarily unable to gain admission, and the num- 
ber of those disappointed, in one case at least, approximating one 
thousand. With one exception, the eighteen lectures under consid- 
eration were illustrated, and the lecturers, except in five instances, 
were members of the staff of the Museum. A perusal of the sub- 
jects presented will give an idea of the range and variety of the topics 
and will account for the interest manifested by the public in their 
delivery. Following is the Eighth Course, delivered in October and 
November, 1897, with subjects and lecturers : 

Oct. 2. — The East African Expedition — "London to South of Toyo 

Plain." 
D. G. Elliot, Curator Department of Zoology. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Rki'out of thk Dirf.ctor. 265 

Oct. 9. — The East African Expedition — " Toyo to Ogaden and 

Berbera. " 
D. G. Elliot, Curator Department of Zoology. 

Oct. 16.— " How Plants Travel." 

Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator Department of Botany. 

Oct. 23. — " Gold Placer Mining." 

Mr. Henry W. Nichols, Assista^nt Curator Department 
of Geology. 

Oct. 30. — "The Beetles of Chicago and Vicinity." 

Mr. Ed vard B. Chope, Assistant in Department of 
Zoology. 

Nov. 6. — "A Visit to Queen Charlotte Islands." 

Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Assistant Curator Department of 
Anthropology. 

Nov. 13. — "The Home of the Tsimshians." 

Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Assistant Curator Department of 
Anthropology. 

Nov. 20. — " The Salmon of the Pacific Coast." 

Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator Department of 
Zoology. 

Nov. 27. — " Mammoth Cave." 

Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator Department of 
Geology. 

The following is the Ninth Course, delivered in March and April, 
i8g8, with subjects and lecturers: 

March 5. — •' Mammoth Cave." (Repeated by request.) 

Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator Department of 
Geology. 

March 12. — "The Everglades of Florida." 

Dr. David T. Day, U. S. Geological Survey. 

March ig. — "Oraibi— A Primitive Tusayan Pueblo." 

Dr. George A. Dorsey, Acting Curator Department 
of Anthropology. 

March 26. — "Warning Colors and Mimicry in Animals." 

Prof. W. H. Dudley, Wisconsin State Normal School. 



266 Fjei.d Columbian Museum — Rkports, Vol. i. 

April 2. — "Zinc Mining and Smelting." 

Mr. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator Department 
of Geology. 

April 9. — -" Zoology — A Glance at the Leading T)pes of the Animal 

Kingdom." 
Prof. Frank Collins Baker, Curator of the Chicago 
Academy of Sciences. 

April 16. — "A Tour of the Plant World." (North America. ) 

Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator Department of Bot- 
any. 

April 23. — "The Archeology of Peru." 

Dr. George A. Dorsey, Acting Curator Department 
of Anthropology. 

April 30. — " Historical Development of the Steam Engine." 

Prof. C. V. Kerr, Armour Institute of Technology. 

There are now on hand 1,466 slides, classified by lectures as fol- 
lows : 

Total Number Number of lUus- 

Departinent. of Slides. trated Lectures. 

Anthropology, 262 slides 12 

Botany 315 " 8 

Geology, 455 " ^3 

Zoology, 327 " 14 

General, 107 " 3 

Total, 1,466 slides 

In addition to their assignments on the regular lecture course of 
the Museum, the curators of the institution entered cordially into the 
Chicago Record course of lectures delivered at different public schools 
within the city, contributing very largely, as has been generously 
acknowledged, to the success of that undertaking. 

Publications. — The publications of the Museum during the year 
have appeared from time to time as the opportunity for study, re- 
search, and observation presented itself and the importance of the 
subject matter dictated. The following list is presented, giving the 
titles of issues since the date of the last report, with the number of 
pages and illustrations : 

Pub. 22.— Zool. Ser., Vol. i. No. 8. "List of Fishes and Reptiles 
by Field Columbian Museum East African Expedition 
to Somali Land in 1896," By S. E. Meek. 26 pages, 
edition 1,000, 2 illustrations (2 zinc etchings). 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Dirkctor. 267 

Pub. 23. — Anthropol. Ser., Vol. 2, No. 2. "A Bibliography of the 
Anthropology of Peru." By Dr. George A. Dorsey. 
150 pages, edition 1,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 24. — Report Ser., Vol. i, No. 3. "Annual Report of the Di- 
rector." 92 p^ges, edition 2,000, 18 illustrations (14 
half-tones and 4 zinc etchings). 

Pub. 25. — Bot. Ser., Vol. i, No. 4. "Contribution III to the Coastal 
and Plain Flora of Yucatan." By C. F. Millspaugh. 
66 pages, edition 1,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 26. — Zool. Ser., Vol. i. No. 9. "List of a Collection of Shells 
from the Gulf of Aden, obtained by the Museum's Afri- 
can Expedition." By Dr. W. H. Dall. 6 pages, edi- 
tion 1,000, no illustrations. 

Pub. 27. — Zool. Ser., Vol. i, No. 10. "Lists of Species of Mam- 
mals, principally Rodents, obtained by W. W. Price, 
Dr. S. E. Meek, G. K. Cherrie, and E. S. Thompson in 
the States of Iowa, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, 
and California, with Descriptions of New Species." By 
D. G. Elliot. 32 pages, edition 1,000, no illustra- 
tions. 

Pub. 28. — Anthropol. Ser., Vol. 2, No. 3. " Ruins of Xkickmook, 
Yucatan." By Edward H. Thompson. 22 pages, edi- 
tion 1,000, 24 illustrations (3 zinc etchings, 7 drawings, 
and 14 half-tones). 

The method of mailing these publications, of checking the ac- 
knowledgments, and of keeping the list correct as to changed and new 
addresses has been very satisfactory, and it is rare that complaints 
are received of improper direction or failure to receive the publications 
promptly. Such tardiness or neglect in acknowledging the receipt 
of these publications appeared to exist the first of the year that it was 
found necessary to send out a special circular letter reminding those 
to whom the publications had been sent of the importance of signing 
and returning the acknowledgments enclosed in the several publica- 
tions. This not only enabled the institution to account for the dis- 
tribution of publications, but was the indirect means of correcting 



268 



FiEt.n Coi.u.MRiAN Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



errors that had prLviously crept into the lists of addresses. The fol- 
lowing table presents a record of the disposition of the publications 
of the institution by series: 



Official: 



Iriistees, 

Staff, 

Corporate Members, 
Honorary Members, 
Annual Members, 



Received Publications in all Departments: 

Individuals, 

Universities, Schools, and Colleges 

Academies and Institutes, 

Museums and Gardens, 

Scientific Societies, 

Libraries, 

Government and State Departments, 8 

Journals, lo 



'5 




II 




3 




3 




415 




Domestic. 


Foreign. 


10 


10 


59 


35 


29 


17 


6 


35 


20 


43 


• 55 


2Q 



'7 



Received Publications in One or More Departments: 



Individuals, 81 

I'niversities, Schools, and Colleges, . 

.Museums and Gardens, g 

Academies and Institutes, 3 

Societies, 9 

Libraries, 

Government and State Departments, i 

Journals '3 



Indivitluals, 55 

Universities, Schools, and Collet? es, . 
Academies and Institutes, .... 
Museums and Gardens, .... 

Scientific Societies, 

Libraries 

Government and State Departments, 
Journals, 



5 

10 
6 
I 



B 

56 



I 

17 

2 

8 
8 



B 

28 



6 

7 

5 

-> 



DOMESTIC. 
G H I .\ O 
12 
2 I 



96 

6 

6 

2 

12 

I 

15 
6 



I 

14 

19 

4 



FOREIGN 
G hi; 

';2 



6 

5 
12 



1 1 

6 



5 5 



o 

5 

I 
I 

3 



T Z 
I 31 

1 8 
6 

2 I 

13 
I 

14 
4 

Z 
21 

4 

4 

17 



* .\, B. G. H. I A, O. T and Z denote Anthropology. Botany. Geology 
.\rts, Ornithology. Transportation, and Zoology. 



History, I 



2 
idustrial 



Acknowledgment is made of the continued obligation of the 
Museum for the facilities offered for the distribution of publications 



o 

Q. 
Ill 

cr 



liJ 
(/I 

D 
S 

Z 
< 

OQ 

D 
_j 
O 
O 




Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 269 

by the Bui-eau of International Exchanges connected with the Smith- 
sonian Institution. The fifth edition of the Guide was issued during 
the year. It has become rather bulky and it will doubtless be neces- 
sary within at least the next two years to divide the Guide into 
departments for the greater convenience of the public. The cost of 
the Guide in its present form so nearly equals the price that should 
be charged for such a publication that it does not yield the profit 
which its sale should reasonably bring to the Museum. The Museum 
has also issued from its own press 500 copies of a small pamphlet, 
*' Herbarium, Field Columbian Museum." 

Library. — The library at present contains 9,003 books and 9,630 
pamphlets, distributed as follows : 

Books. Pamphlets. 

General Library, 6,944 6,822 

Department of Geology 1,072 2,530 

Department of Ornithology, 368 

Department of Botany, including Division of 

Photography, 298 233 

Department of Anthropology, 134 45 

Department of Zoology 187 

The additions during the fiscal year were 941 books and 
1,949 pamphlets and bulletins, making a total of 2,890 titles, 
as against 2,213 ^^^ the preceding year. Of these 283 books 
and 550 pamphlets were added by purchase, and 20 books and 
9 pamphlets by exchange for duplicate material. The bulk of the 
piircliased books and pamphlets was derived from the library of 
the late Mr. Bebb, and came with the collection of plants bought 
by the Museum. Unfortunately, 95 volumes and 173 pamphlets 
were duplicates of material already contained in the library. The 
additions by gift and exchange for Museum piiblications consequently 
amount to 2,028 books and pamphlets. The number of periodicals 
subscribed for is 47; the number received in exchange or as gift, 50, 
exclusive of the publications of societies, academies, etc. A complete 
list of the accessions to the library accompanies this report. Among 
the gifts, special mention is made of the receipt of the second part of 
the " Galerie Am^ricaine du Mus^e d'Ethnographie du Trocad^ro," 
by E. T. Hamy, presented by the Due de Loubat. It is a magnifi- 
cent representation on folio plates, with explanatory notes, of the 
American antiquities contained in the Museum. The same donor 
presented an interesting reproduction of the Mexican "Borgi- 
ano " manuscript. The Royal Society of New South Wales sent 



270 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

20 volumes of its journals and proceedings, and the British Museum 
22 of its valuable publications. The work of cataloguing the resources 
of the library has progressed steadily. The shelf list and the author 
catalogue have been kept up to date. The subject catalogue has 
been completed so far as regards the books, pamphlets, and separates, 
some 8,500 cards having been written during the fiscal year. The 
staff are anxious to have subject cards for the more important 
papers in the scientific transactions, proceedings, and bulletins; 
this work has recently been started and can be pushed with vigor 
during the next year. 372 volumes have been bound during the past 
year, involving an expense of $300.60. The Union list of periodicals 
referred to in the last report has not been published yet, owing to the 
many difiticulties of the undertaking, but it is hoped that it will be 
available for reference some time, this winter. Of the duplicate cata- 
logue of the John Crerar Library some 12,500 cards have been 
received and arranged in alphabetical order by authors. This accu- 
rate and carefully prepared catalogue is likely to be very useful to the 
Museum staff in many ways, besides preventing the duplicating of 
expensive books, and will surely repay the not inconsiderable work 
involved in its handling. The permission secured from the Chicago 
Public Library to draw out books is constantly made use of. While 
the members of the staff in this way have an opportunity of availing 
themselves of many important books not contained in the Museum 
library, it is nevertheless true that many standard works are yet inac- 
cessible to them, and a moderate amount expended once for all for 
such books would add much to their facilities. 

Records. — This most essential and basic feature of the routine 
work of the Museum is in the highest degree satisfactory, and the 
assurance is gratifying that the receipt, the distribution, and the for- 
warding for storage, for exchange, for identification, etc., is accu- 
rately, systematically, and intelligently recorded. Several improve- 
ments have been made in the manner of keeping the records dur- 
ing the year. Heretofore no distinction has been made between 
the Departments of Zoology and of Ornithology, notwithstanding a 
different curator presided over each department. This division of 
material has been made with much labor, and separate sets of records 
are now maintained £or each department. No systematic record 
has been kept of negatives, lantern slides, and photographs. As 
very many negatives, etc., have been acquired or made by the 
Museum, it was deemed advisable to open an accession book under 
the head, " Section of Photography and Illustration," purchases 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 271 

being accessioned as they are acquired, while lantern slides and neg- 
atives executed by the Museum are entered at the end of the year. 
The library accession cards had hitherto not been indexed, chiefly 
owing to the fact that the elaborate system of cataloguing in the 
library had been considered sufficient. For the sake of ready refer- 
ence, however, an index has been made and is kept in the Recorder's 
office. The records of the Department of Anthropology were virtually 
rewritten from beginning to end, the endless changes in the jackets 
having created much confusion in the records. The Recorder has 
now on file a catalogue of nearly all the collections in that depart- 
ment, a very satisfactory state of affairs. An exchange record 
was also opened during the year, reference to which at any time 
will show the status of an exchange account. The commer- 
cial idea of a ledger was used in this case as being the best 
means of recording such transactions. An index to the book 
renders reference to it comparatively simple. The distribution 
card originally adopted has been changed. The chief idea 
influencing this change was the fact that a considerable number 
of specimens sent out for examination had, on their return, to be 
re-accessioned. This also applied to material sent for examination^ 
and thus the records were burdened with a number of entries that were 
more or less fictitious. To obviate these inconveniences a memo card 
was provided, which, in cases like the above, is held until the trans- 
action is complete. In case of material sent for examination and 
returned, no entry is made in any book except the Transportation 
record, and this with the card, which is numbered and indexed, is all 
that is required for prompt reference. The total number of speci- 
mens accessioned during the year was a,pproximately 74,200, not 
including the specimens secured by the Dorsey expedition. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labels. — In no pre- 
vious year has so much attention been given to this highly important 
but uninterestin gan dendless labor. Especially in the Departments of 
Anthropology and Zoology, and as it was demanded in the other 
departments as well, identification, numbering, and recording of his- 
torical data have been continued unremittingly. The results obtained 
form the most gratifying feature to which reference may be made in 
this report, and it is difficult to convey an adequate idea of the 
amount of hard work and unremitting attention required from both 
the heads of departments and their assistants in this task. The year's 



27^ Fi F.I.I) Columbian Miskum — Kkpokis. \'oi.. i. 

work in the Museum on catalogues and inventories is shown in detail 
as follows: 





No. of Rec- 
ord Books. 


Total No. of 

entries to 
Sept. 30. iSqS. 


Entries 
during 


Total No. of 
Cards Written. 


Anthropology, 


24 


27.149 


17,960 


41,989 


Botany, 


IQ 


39,335 


18,621 


1,400 


Geology, 


10 


18.575 


3,6 1 6 




Library, 


•  5 


15,418 


2.045 


11,000 est 


Ornithology, . 


o 


9.234 


1.597 




Photography, . 


1 


5.142 


3,333 




Zoology 


•  9 


17.421 


10,225 


'.533 



Accessions. — The jear has been bountiful in the contribution of 
new material to the Museum. Accessions, by gift, by expedition, by 
exchange, and by purchase, have been generous, and, unlike other 
3'ears, have been largely directed with reference to the actual needs 
of the different departments in completing series, suites, classifica- 
tion, and special plans. The accessions to the institution are classi- 
fied as follows : 

Souice. 

Gifts, 

Loans, 

Exchange, 

Collected, 

Purchase, 



No. of 


No of 


.Accessions. 


Specimens, 


155 


6,544 


4 


236 


25 


4,226 


90 


7,356 


88 


55,797 



Among the more important accessions of the year should be 
mentioned the large collections from Egypt and Italy secured for the 
department of Anthropology by President Ayer. These include a 
large number of Stella,' tombstones, covering a long period of Egyp- 
tian history, a valuable addition to the already important collection 
of Egyptian and Etruscan jewelry, some important pieces of bronze, 
and two very remarkable stone tombs of the early Etruscan period. 
With the material obtained by President Ayer came a large collection 
of fabrics of the fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth cen- 
turies, secured by Vice-President Ryerson, chiefly in Venice. This 
is a valuable addition to our already interesting collection of middle- 
age tapestries and fabrics. Rev. T. \V. Woodside, for many years a 
missionary of Benguela, Africa, enabled the Museum to obtain a 
small but extremely valuable collection of ethnological objects from 
the native inhabitants of Portuguese Southwest Africa. A large col- 
lection of objects, numbering about 600 specimens, from remote 
islands of the Pacific, was purchased of Mr. W. T. Shepherd, of 
Boston. In April the Museum received its third consignment of ob- 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. XVI. 



• 






^.•sS^^B 








■iCT^ffii " 








bKl— » 






■£.."• 


sB 


A 




"^ 




m 


> 






w 


-■ 






w 









1 






< 'H 


1 


^ 






1 










' -^:^ ■■'" -■ 'C 




m-^ 




1 •'■> 


^'~ ' '^-^ ; • , 




'iV 












 


^K 


" ' "^^ ^4tmS^tSS3mit^^ 




^H 




i > 


-_-^-^ ^^_' ^J^:^^^r 




.«^. 






^■*'^Marm^^m <^ 




^^H 


^^^- 


^'■^M/BUK^/f- . ,. 






^^^K 


-~ '•— ' '-" "^^SB^^inJi'- 


''. 




^^^^. . 


-Ti-v-^S^HBH^E^ - ■' •?, 




iJ^nS _>:{- 


^^^^ 


- -'%;- ^^^^H^S^HI^BSHb^'  r~~ 




■^m^ 


^^ 


' -•-.^'S 


s::JaB3^£S^ 


SfiX^"' ' 




' .mLe^ I 






^TOfir  


^ 


^ . '-mic^' 


Bt';:.^ *t-V - " r _' .y^^g 


S^^-- 




w * ^ 


^ 


 -ai 


'" »^:^ ■S---' / 






f 




L. ^ 


^-__;— '^ 




i 


^m- i 




Hii^ 


'^^H 


 


i^^tKSpft'- 


iii- 






W' 


 




■' --— ^.*S^.- ' 




j^ 



Model of the Moon— Field Columbian Museum. 

(Diameter, ig feet.) 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 273 

jects from the Port Clarence Eskimo of Alaska. The Alaskan collec- 
tion now numbers over 10,000 objects. In the Division of Physical 
Anthropology over 150 skeletons have been received, including many 
interesting specimens. Dr. R. Parkinson, of Ralum, Bismarck 
Archipelago, has presented this department of the Museum with 52 
Papuan skulls from the Gazelle Peninsula of the Island of New 
Britain. This very valuable and highly appreciated gift was made in 
exchange for Museum publications. It is hardly necessary to remark 
that the transaction has left the Museum largely indebted to Dr. Park- 
inson. Not the least of the valuable contributions to this department 
resulted from the expedition of the Curator of the department to Ari- 
zona, of which mention is made elsewhere. The most important 
collection acquired by the department of Botany during the year was 
the complete herbarium of the late Mr. M. S. Bebb, including his 
library, letters, and drawings. Through this collection and that of 
Dr. Schott, obtained the previous year, the herbarium of the Museum 
has been in many important collections projected backward to the 
middle of the present century. Locally, the herbarium of Mr. Bebb 
is of great value, as it represents much of the flora of the Western 
States, and about all that of Illinois. His collections of willows is 
very complete and, in " connection with his notes, drawings, and 
communicated types, is acknowledged to be the very best. Another 
collection of Yucatan plants has been received from Dr. Gaumer, 
consisting of many thousand representatives from old and new 
localities on the peninsula, which collection will form the basis of a 
fourth contribution to the flora of that region and will provide a large 
amount of valuable duplicate material for exchange. In addition to 
the above more notable accessions to the Department of Botany, the 
following sets have been acquired during the year: Pringle and Pal- 
mer's new Mexican material ; Anthony's Insular Mexican collection ; 
Lumholtz's Mexican plants ; Peary Relief Expedition Plants of Labra- 
dor and Greenland ; Schlechter's African centuries ; Heller's 
Sandwich Islands, New Mexican, and Texan plants; Millspaugh's 
West Virginian and New York plants; Pollock*^s West Virginian 
species ; Lotentz and Hieronymus' Argentine flora ; Allen's plants 
of the Cascade Mountains ; Dr. Edward Palmer's Florida col- 
lection of 1874; Franchsschi's Grecian plants; Lansing's centuries of 
the plants of the Lake Michigan Basin; and the Curator's plants of 
Mackinac Island, In Geology, the gift of Mr. L. W. Reese, of Chi- 
cago, of the Schmidt-Dickert relief model of the moon is a notable 
acquisition. This great model, 19 feet in diameter, exhibits with 
scientific accuracy the surface features of the moon. It was prepared 



274 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

with great care from tlie charts of Beer and Madler and of Dr. Schmidt 
of the Athens Observatory, undoubtedly the greatest authority upon 
the topography of the moon of his time. Five years were occupied 
in its construction. The sections of the model have been kept for 
some years in Chicago, but they have not been available for obser- 
vation until the gift of Mr. Reese made possible its erection by the 
Museum. It is believed that the model as exhibited will prove of 
great interest to the public in general and especially to students of- 
astronomy. Besides the collections made in the field by the Curator 
and his assistants, mention of which is made under the proper 
heading, many additions of value have been gained through gift, 
purchase, or exchange in the Department of Geology. The meteorite 
collection has been enriched by several fine specimens. These 
include, among others, sections of the Roeburne, Mungindi, San 
Angelo, Tonganoxie. and Sacramento Mountain meteorites. A mag- 
nificent specimen of aurichalcite, undoubtedly the finest in ex^ 
istence, has been added through the generosity of Captain A. B. 
Fitch. A fine series of stalactites and other cave products from 
Mammoth and Wyandotte Caves was received from E. B. Baldwin. 
Other cave specimens of unusual beauty have been obtained by 
purchase and exchange, and the collection in this line is now 
one of unusual size and value. A collection of varieties of candles 
made from petroleum has been donated by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany and makes an attractive and economic display. R. W. Goodell 
gave a fine specimen of fossil fish from the Green River, Wyoming, 
beds; G. H. Hammond a large and complete collection illustrating 
varieties of clay stones, and Mr. C. C. Hafer a series of Trenton fos- 
sils from Minnesota. Two tusks, several teeth and leg bones of 
great size, of the Mammoth, brought from Alaska by Miner W. Bruce, 
have been received as a loan and placed on exhibition. An unusually 
perfect skull and part of a skeleton of a species of Elotherium were 
obtained by purchase. A petrified egg of a miocene bird acquired at 
the same time deserves mention as being a specimen of more than 
usual scientific interest. Specimens of a number of rare minerals 
were obtained by exchange with Dr. Otto Kuntze, and many fine 
specimens of crinoids of the Burlington group b}' exchange with J. 
M. T. Myers. Miscellaneous minerals and fossils of value were 
obtained by exchange with the Case School of Applied Science. Four 
beautiful slabs of marble, donated by the Georgia Marble Company, 
deserve mention, also a large collection of ores and minerals of eco- 
nomic value from the Nashville, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railroad; 
about 1,200 briquettes from George H. Hartwell; a collection of silver- 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 27^ 

lead ores of the Kootenai District from R. I. Kirkwood, and a collec- 
tion of Colorado ores from Mrs. E. F. Dyche. Many valuable speci- 
mens, illustrating Western ores and minerals, were secured by the 
Curator and Assistant Curator while visiting the Omaha Exposition, 
and other specimens have been promised by the exhibitors there. In 
the Department of Zoology the largest contribution of material has 
come from the expedition of its Curator to the Olympian Mountains 
and the Northwest, comprising about 520 specimens. President Ayer 
presented the department with thirty-four rare mammal skins with 
their skeletons, from Madagascar, collected by Dr. Forsyth-Major. 
The American Museum of Natural History presented a very valuable 
amount of exchange material, including buffaloes, greenland seals, 
walruses, etc., etc. Mr. Frank C. Bestock presented a valuable lot of 
material. Mr. Chope, an assistant in the Division of Entomology, 
collected several thousand specimens during the year. Dr. Meek, 
Assistant Curator of Ichthyology, was very successful in two expedi- 
tions. By purchase the department has acquired numerous specimens 
of fishes and many very valuable skins, as will appear from the detail 
list of accessions elsewhere. The Department of Ornithology has had 
a number of desirable accessions during the year, mostly resulting 
from the local expeditions of the department. It will be observed 
from the list elsev/here that many valuable specimens were also 
obtained by purchase. An important and interesting collection of 
folk-lore of precious stones was purchased for Higinbotham Hall of 
Mr. George F. Kunz. Following is a table showing the amount 
expended on collections and articles purchased during the year for 
the different departments: 

Department of Anthropology, $1,272.10 

Higinbotham Hall 1,150.00 

Department of Geology : . . . . 905.65 

Department of Zoology, 301.17 

Department of Botany, 5,807.32 

Department of Ornithology 47.89 

Total, $9,484.13 

The amount expended for collections in the Department of Botany 
represents the price paid for the Bebb collection, $5,000, and half the 
amount due on the Gaumer collection, $650. 

Exchanges. — Reference is made elsewhere to the system of 
exchanges adopted by the Museum, and in its proper place will be 
found a list of the materials received through this medium. The 



276 FlEI-D COLIJMRIAN MlSKlM REPORTS, Voi.. I. 

relations sustained with contemporaneous agencies for an exchange 
of material are very satisfactory and have been productive of much 
benefit. The preliminary negotiations in the matter of these ex- 
changes are conducted by the curators of departments, and when 
ready for conclusion are submitted to the Director for his approval. 
The cost of carriage is paid in each case by the party receiving the 
material and, as stated, regular accounts are kept by the Recorder 
with the persons or institutions with whom exchange relations are 
established. The catalogues of material available for exchange, 
heretofore issued, have assisted materially in opening correspond- 
ence, and several other institutions have adopted this method of 
acquainting museums and collectors of their possessions. The num- 
ber of specimens sent in exchange during the year was 3,54^, repre- 
senting thirty-nine different transactions. The number of specimens 
received in exchange was 4,226, representing twenty-five transactions. 

Expedition and Field Work. — The expeditions and field work of 
the Museum have been confined this year to North America, and 
have all been authorized with special regard to the direct needs of 
the department in each particular instance, thus carrying out the 
instructions of the Executive Committee, that staff collections and 
original research must be upon an outlined system, and confined, as 
far as possible, to the domestic field. Following is a list of the 
expeditions of the Museum since the date of the last report : 

Date. Locality. Collectors. Material. 

Nov. 9, 1897, . Northeast Arkansas, . S. E. Meek, . . . Fishes, etc. 

Ian. 15, 1898, . Missouri, O. C. Farrington. . Fossils, etc. 

Jan. 31, 1898, . Tampa, Florida, . . S. E. Meek, . . . Fishes. 

Jan. 28, 1898, . Oraibi, .Arizona, . . . George A. Dorsey \ Plaster Casts 

and F. li. Melville, . ( Moki Indians. 

Mar. 15, 1898, . Southwest Missouri, . H. \V. Nichols, . . Lead and Zinc Ores. 

May 31, 1898, . Missi'pi and Arkansas, 

(.North American Forestrv), . . C. F. Millspaugh, . Plants and Woods. 

Mar. 22, 1898, . Bad Lands, S. Dakota, O. C. Farrington 

and E. S. Riggs 

July 12, 1898, . Olympian Mountains, D. G. Elliot and 

C. E. Akeley, . . . Mammals. 
July 15, 1898, . Northern Michigan, 

(Xorth Aniencan Forestry;. . . C. F. Millspaugh, . Plants and Woods. 

June 30, 1898, . LaCrosse& Elroy.Wis., E. B. Chope, . . . Insects. 

July 25, 1898, . Havana, Illinois, . . S. E. Meek, . . . Fishes, etc. 

Sept. g, 1898, . Mitchell, Indiana, . . S. E. Meek, . . . Fishes, etc. 

Mr. Dorsey, Curator of the Department of Anthropology, accom- 
panied by Mr. F. B. Melville, visited the province of Tusayan, 



Oct. 1898. Annl'al Report of thk Director. 277 

Arizona, in December and January. The object of the expedition 
was to make casts of a number of Hopi Indians, for the purpose of 
reproduction. Mr. Dorsey, in his report, says : "Although we suf- 
fered greatly from the unusually cold weather, and from several mis- 
haps generally incident to a wagon journey in Arizona, the expedition 
was very successful, and, as a matter of fact, we secured two more 
figures than we had anticipated. In addition to the casts, I secured 
a small collection, supplementing the one I made in August last 
year. This consisted chiefly of garments and paraphernalia necessary 
for the building of the Hopi groups. At this time I also passed four 
days in exploration of the ancient Hopi ruin of Homolobi, near 
Winslow. Here we secured over one hundred specimens of most 
interesting ceramics and a number of stone implements and fetiches." 
During the month of April, Mr. Dorsey took advantage of the unusual 
opportunity offered by the presence in Chicago of a band of Esqui- 
maux, brought here by Captain Miner W. Bruce, to whom the Museum 
is chiefly indebted for its extensive Alaskan collections. Captain 
Bruce kindly placed these people at the disposition of the Museum, 
and they came to the building day after day, until in all casts of nine 
individuals had been completed. These were made under extremely 
favorable conditions, and the results obtained promise to be entirely 
satisfactory. In the Department of Botany, Mr. Millspaugh, the 
Curator, has continued his work upon the collection of North Ameri- 
can forest trees, making trips to Southern Illinois, Mississippi, 
Arkansas, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and Northern New 
York, during which a large amount of material was secured and 
much valuable data acquired. The most important field work under- 
taken by the Department of Geology during the year was the equip- 
ment of an expedition for the collection of vertebrate fossils in the 
Bad Lands of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Wyoming. This was 
intended, chiefly, to begin a collection for the purpose of repre- 
senting the structure and characteristics of the ancient vertebrates 
which inhabited this region during Tertiary times. Mr. Farrington, 
in his report of this expedition, says: " No region in the world is 
richer in the remains of ancient mammals than that mentioned, and 
the work of collecting and preserving them before they decay 
seems of paramount importance. Aside from the intrinsic interest 
which the structure of these ancient animals possess, it seems hardly 
less than a duty on the part of the Museum to secure and preserve as 
far as possible these remains, as often as they are exposed by the hand 
of Nature. The expedition sent by the Museum this year devoted its 
attention mainly to collecting mammal remains of the White River 



278 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

and Loup Fork ages. I was ably assisted in the work of collecting by 
Mr. E. S. Riggs, and about three months were spent b}- the party in 
the held. The work was conducted during the first seven weeks in 
the Bad Lands of South Dakota, after which the "Corkscrew" beds 
near Harrison, Nebraska, were visited. The party then explored the 
escarpments of the Deep River beds near White Sulphur Springs, 
Montana, and the remainder of the time available was spent in the 
Hat Creek basin of Wyoming. While the material is as yet too 
largely in the matrix to be accurately reported upon, the ex- 
pedition may be characterized as remarkabh- successful. The 
amount and quality of the material collected are such as amply to 
repay for the outlay, and it was clearly demonstrated that the material 
could be secured by collection in the field far more profitably than by 
purchase. The quantity of material obtained for a given outlay was 
larger. The work of collection was directed towards a needed kind 
of material, and details of scientific value were noted which could 
not be gained with a purchased collection. Among the specimens 
secured were a nearly complete skeleton of Titanotherium, a large 
skull, with jaws and thirteen vertebrae, three skulls and many miscel- 
laneous bones of animals of the same genus: two skulls, jaws, and 
leg bones of Aceratherium; a probably complete skeleton of Poebro- 
therium ; a skull of Protoceras ; twenty-fives kulls, some with jaws, 
and leg bones, of Leptauchenia, and about twenty-five skulls each 
of species of Eporeodon and Oreodon ; a skull, jaws, vertebrae, and 
leg bones of Cynodesmus; skulls and miscellaneous bones of Hyra- 
codon, Mesohippus, Hyaenodon, Daph^enus, and Leptomeryx, and 
representative bones of three genera of rodents. These specimens 
will be cleaned and mounted during the winter months, and from 
them it will soon be possible to make a creditable exhibit, as a begin- 
ning of a collection of ancient vertebrates. Besides the main work of 
the expedition, many auxiliary results of value were gained. From 
the "Corkscrew" beds of western Nebraska five fine specimens of 
the remarkable Daemonelix, or "devil's corkscrew," were secured. 
These specimens have spirals three to eight feet in length, with 
rhizomes attached. From the Fort Pierre beds of South Dakota a 
choice collection of the richly-colored amber barite, golden calcite, 
and chalcedony geodes, which occur in the concretions of these beds, 
was obtained. About one hundred photographs illustrating geologic 
and scenic features were taken, and about forty specimens of plants 
showing the character of the flora of the region were collected. 
During the stay of the party in South Dakota I visited the principal 
mining camps in the vicinity of Deadwood, and obtained arepresenta- 






> 



If) 

t- 

O 

Q. 

UJ 
DC 



D 
UJ 
1/5 

S 

2 
< 
CO 

S 
3 
_< 
O 
o 



UJ 




-3 
3 

3 
O 

cn 
-O 

c 
n 



S 
3 
ul 
I/) 

z 
< 

m 

D 
_l 
O 
(_> 

o 

_l 

UJ 



a. 

O 
K 

a 

o 

z 
I 
1- 



o 

I 

K. 

o 

X 



< 

o 






Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 279 

tive series of the ores and country rocks of the Homestake and Gilt 
Edge mines, and others of that region." During February, Assistant 
Curator Nichols, of the department of Geology, spent three weeks 
among the zinc-lead deposits of Southwest Missouri, studying the 
ores and metallurgy of the region, collecting ores, metallurgical 
products, and minerals, and taking photographs of the workings, 
both above and below ground. Besides the ores and metallurgical 
products collected, exceptional specimens of the fine minerals 
for which this region is famous were secured. The photographs 
taken were used to illustrate a lecture upon the region given in 
the spring course. As a result of this trip, the economic col- 
lections have been enriched by a collection of zinc and lead 
ores and associated rocks from the most important zinc-producing 
region of the country. A collection illustrating the ore hearth proc- 
ess of lead smelting adds much to the completeness of the metal- 
lurgical collection. In January the Curator spent some time in 
investigating a find of mastodon bones near St. Louis, Mo. A large 
amount of the remains was found in place, but owing to excessive 
rains, but few specimens could be collected. During the return trip 
of the expedition to the Bad Lands, the Omaha Exposition was 
visited and a number of specimens secured from exhibitors there. 
Mr. Elliot, the Curator of the Department of Zoology, and his assist- 
ant, Mr. C. E. Akeley, were commissioned upon an expedition to the 
Northwest in July. Under date of September 13, from the Olym- 
pian Mountains, Mr. Elliot writes: " The expedition to the Olym- 
pian Mountains, which I am at present conducting, has thus far 
secured five hundred skins of deers, carnivora, and rodents, which col- 
lection we hope to increase considerably before our labors are ended. 
This collection is exceedingly valuable, coming as it does from hith- 
erto unknown localities where no naturalist has ever penetrated. 
There are probably species new to science among them, but how 
many cannot be determined until they have been examined and com- 
pared with other material. The country in which these have been 
procured is the roughest and most difficult to traverse that I have 
ever seen, and my experience in the various mountain ranges of 
North America has been very extensive. A great portion of the 
Olympians is absolutely impassable, and we have reached a point 
beyond which nothing, unless provided with wings, can go, while 
from our camp we can look over a vast extent of the range totally 
unknown and unapproachable. A naturalist, therefore, can fully ap- 
preciate the value of the material we have secured. Even if already 
known, specimens coming from such localities are of almost as much 



28o Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

value as if undescribed. and will prove of great assistance in settling 
questions of geographical distribution and others of equal importance. 
Snakes and batrachians are not plenty in the range, but wt- have 
secured some of both, which I am sure will prove of much interest, 
and I hope to be able to obtain somt- of the fishes of this region. All 
these, whether known or unknown, will be valuable additions to our 
Museum, where they are entirely unrepresented." It is expected that 
this expedition will return to Chicago the first of the coming month, 
and the results of the expedition will undoubtedly appear in the pub- 
lication series of the Zoological Department. During the year the 
Assistant Curator of Zoology made a few collections, one in north- 
eastern Wisconsin, one at Havana, 111., and a few in the vicinity of 
Chicago. A small collection was also obtained by the Assistant 
Curator while attending the National Fishery Congress at Tampa, 
Florida. The collections from Wisconsin and Havana, 111., are being 
used in making excnanges. One set has been sent to Stanford Uni- 
versity ; other sets are being prepared for the British ^Museum, 
the United States National Museum, and the Museum of Compara- 
tive Zoology, Cambridge. During the year, Mr. Chope, Assistant 
in the Department of Zoology, has been very energetic in collecting 
insects in the vicinity of Chicago. He visited La Crosse and Juneau 
counties, Wisconsin, in the same pursuit, procuring over i,6oo speci- 
mens. He has collected many cocoons of moths and butterflies in 
the vicinity of Chicago, from which 148 specimens have been hatched 
in the laboratory of the department, thus obtaining more perfect 
examples than could be secured in any other manner. Several 
species have been reared from the egg. Those of one brood have 
been killed at different times, thus securing a verj- complete series 
from the egg to the imago. 

Installation, Rearrangement, and Permanent Improvements. — 
The jtermanent improvements within and about the Museum build- 
ing during the past year have been quite extensive, and have in a 
measure been brought about by the demands for greater convenience 
and better facilities for the prosecution of the daily work of the insti- 
tution. New offices have been constructed in the east and west 
courts respectively for the Curators of Anthropology and of Orni- 
thology, while the offices and laboratories of the Departments of 
Botanv and of Zoology have practically been reconstructed, largely 
extended, and rearranged in the interior. A new studio, complete 
and modern in every respect, has been constructed in the third 
gallery of the east court for the section of Photography. A poison- 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 281 

ing-room and two new storerooms, equipped with storage racks and 
trays, have been built for the Department of Anthropology. A ship- 
ping-room has been constructed in the west court. In the Depart- 
ment of Geology the laboratories and workrooms have been re- 
arranged, and the two rooms formerly used as laboratory and library 
are now divided into laboratory, library, storeroom, and workroom. 
A brick addition to the boiler-house has been erected, and an assay- 
ing-room for the use of economic geology has ^been fitted with fur- 
naces connected with the smoke-stack in the boiler-house. Besides 
all of the above additions and improvements, making great demands 
upon the mechanical force of the institution, the'usual and routine 
repairs, and the attention required by the roof and the exterior of 
the building, have been kept up. In the Department of Anthro- 
pology the east court has been entirely reinstalled, all the material 
not relating to Archaeology having been transferred to appropriate 
locations. The court is now entirely devoted to American ArcTiae- 
ology, the north alcoves containing North American Archaeology, 
the central portion Mexican and Central American Archaeology, and 
the south alcoves South American Archaeology. Every case of the 
court has been reinstalled and rearranged, and the material has been 
entirely reclassified. In the north court twelve cases have been 
added within the present year. Six of the new cases are de- 
voted to Etruscan Archaeology, the contents of each tomb being 
installed as a unit. Hall No. 7, formerly devoted to Chinese Eth- 
nology, has been used for the last six months as a workroom for 
casting, molding, and sculpturing. The Chinese Joss-House material 
which heretofore occupied the room, no longer being regarded as 
worthy of exhibition, has been mostly destroyed, that of any value 
whatever being boxed and stored. The contents of Halls 16 
and 17 have been removed, together with all the cases. Both halls 
have been renovated, and now present a fresh and attractive appear- 
ance. Hall No. 16 has been recased with new standard cases, and 
is devoted to South American Ethnology, that portion which relates 
to British Guiana and Venezuela having all been "installed. For the 
first time there is used in this hall a portable screen which divides the 
case into two equal halves, and does away with the cumbrous and 
unsightly fixed partition. Hall No. 17 has also been recased with new 
standard cases and is to be devoted to the Ethnology of the Southwest, 
chiefly that of the Hopi. A large group, showing the characteristic 
features of a Hopi dwelling, the several inmates being engaged in 
domestic pursuits, has been completed. A young man throwing a 
boomerang has also been installed, and figures of a bride and two 



282 FlKLl) Coi.UMUlAX MuSliUM — RkI'OKIS, \'l)L. I 



groups of Katcina dancers have been completed. Halls Nos. lo and 
II art' being dismantled and the old ill-assortment of cases will be 
replaced with new standard cases. Plans have already been made 
for a complete reinstallation of these rooms, and casts have been 
made for nine figures, which will be arranged in four groups. For 
the first time in the history of this department, the work of the pres- 
ervation of specimens from the ravages of insects is in a condition 
that seems to guarantee the protection of the material, which has 
already noticeably suffered from inattention. In the Department of 
Geology some slight changes have been made to provide for the erec- 
tion of the model of the moon in Alcove 103 of the west court. The posi- 
tion of the glacial slabs has been somewhat changed, and the smaller 
specimens formerly contained in the alcove have been removed to Halls 
Nos. 36 and 59. The cases in Hall No. 35, containing the collection 
of vertebrate fossils have been replaced by upright cases brought 
from Hall No. 7. This was deemed desirable because the old cases 
were too small and so loosely built as to give little protection from 
dust. With the new installation a much better light is secured, and 
specimens will no longer suffer injury from dust. In the same hall 
a collection of about 500 specimens, illustrating the Niagara fauna 
of Chicago and vicinity, has been installed in two floor cases brought 
from the east court. The collection has hitherto been in storage for 
lack of case room. It is accompanied by a collection illustrating 
methods of petrifaction, prepared specially for instruction of the 
pupils of the public schools. The cases used were remodeled from 
their former shape, and, besides other changes, were fitted with 
brackets made after a design prepared in the Museum, which permits 
adjustment of the shelf to any slope. In Hall No. 62, devoted to the 
meteorite collection, the old wall cases have been replaced by some 
of a more desirable pattern brought from Hall No. 7. The mt-teorite 
accessions, including the Long Island meteorite, have been installed 
in these, and the change, together with some other rearrangements, 
has resulted in a marked improvement in the appearance of the hall. 
At the same time a better protection from dust has been secured for 
the specimens. Hall No. 77, devoted to the display of fictile materials, 
has been entirely rearranged. The })yramids of brick, sewer pipe, 
etc., which formerly occupied much of the space, have been replaced 
by more valuable material. A series of 1,200 briquettes, made from 
clays of as many different localities of the United States and Canada, 
illustrates the adaptation of different kinds of clay to brick making. 
A second collection shows the composition of clays and the effect 
of impurities upon their value. Another illustrates fine clays and 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL XIX. 




Meteorite Hall— Looking Noxth- -Field Columbian Museum 




Meteorite Hall— Looking South--Field Columbun Museum. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 283 

their uses. All these make up an unusually complete and instructive 
exhibit. A collection illustrating the varieties, origin, and composi- 
tion of soils has also been prepared and installed here, the material 
having been largely gathered by the Assistant Curator. This was 
prepared chiefly in response to requests from teachers in the public 
schools who wished to use it for purposes of instruction. Other col- 
lections shown in this hall illustrate the origin and methods of manu- 
facture of mineral paints, of varieties of sand ajid cement, of varieties 
of pressed brick, and of varieties of brick clays and fire clays. In 
Hall No. 79 the collection of zinc ores and products has been re- 
arranged to include the material obtained by the Assistant Curator in 
Joplin and vicinity. A rearrangement of the gold, silver, and lead 
ores is now in progress in Hall No. 72. This has been made neces- 
sary in order to provide for the exhibition of a large amount of mate- 
rial now in storage, and to improve the classification of the collections. 
A series of about fifty large framed photographs, illustrating the 
methods of mining and metallurgy in use in Ecuador and Chile, has 
been placed upon the walls in this hall. The phosphates received 
from the Nashville Exposition have been installed with the collection 
previously exhibited in Hall No. 78, increasing its size and value. 
Halls Nos. 74 and 75, occupied by the departmental library and labor- 
atory, have undergone extensive alterations which add much to their 
appearance and increase the working facilities of the department. 
In the library the books have been made to occupy but half the 
space they formerly filled. The area so gained has been parti- 
tioned off and fitted with storage trays and tables for the use of 
the assistants in vertebrate paleontology. The laboratory, likewise, 
has been divided by a partition into two rooms, one of which con- 
tinues to serve as the laboratory. It has been provided with water 
and air baths, sink and table, and is piped for gas and water. A 
Becker chemical balance, sensitive to one-tenth of a milligram, 
and a set of platinum dishes have been provided. The laboratory is 
now, therefore, fairly well equipped with facilities for chemical work 
which have long been needed, and it is hoped in the coming year to 
carry on a number of investigations in this line. The three Goyard 
assay furnaces which were formerly kept in the laboratory have been 
removed to the boiler-house and set up in a room specially built 
for the purpose. These will give facilities for making assays, for 
which there is frequent demand. The transparencies, enlarged from 
cuts in De Re Metallica, which were formerly exhibited in the 
laboratory, are now shown in classified order in Halls Nos. 72 and 
79. In the Herbarium of the Department of Botany very extensive 



284 FiKii) CoiiMiUAN MrsKiM — Ri-POKis, Vol. i. 

improvements have been made, and every facility given for carrying 
out the plans outlined by the Curator of that department. Tun large 
air-tight tin cases have been added, in which duplicates may be 
kept secure from dust in an atmosphere of carbon bi-sulphide. 
These cases are divided into fifteen compartments, and contain at 
the present the large duplicate collection of Yucatan plants just 
acquired, which are being rapidly arranged for distribution in 
exchange with several institutions in this country and Europe. In 
his report Mr. Millspaugh says: "In these cases the plant.s are 
arranged on sheets of light manilla paper, plainly numbered, and the 
fascicle of each number placed in a folded sheet used as a genus 
cover. These are arranged consecutively, and from them a plant of 
any special number, or a number of plants of any special number, 
century, or set, can be quickly assembled for distribution at any 
time, meanwhile being thoroughly protected from insect depreda- 
tions. Eighteen similar tin cases, having chiefly racks and tin trays 
instead of compartments, have been placed in the herbarium for the 
storage of seeds, fruits, fungi, and other material which needs 
protection from pests. These, like the cases previousl}' mentioned, 
can be bi-sulphided at any time. The capacity for storage of 
material in a manner convenient for quick and read\' reference has 
been considerably augmented by the original cases that contain 
the Bebb herbarium, fourteen in all." With reference to the meth- 
ods of the herbarium, the Curator, in a most interesting report, says : 
"Upon the arrival of a package of plants destined for the herbarium, 
an accession card is filled out and sent to the Recorder of the 
Museum. This card states from whom the package was received, 
how it was acquired by the Museum, the collector's name, the date 
of the collection, localit}', and number of specimens contained. The 
plants are then poisoned and laid out upon mounting sheets, to which 
labels are immediately attached. These sheets are placed in boxes 
in such a manner that the plants cannot possibly shift or mix, and are 
turned over for mounting. After mounting, each sheet is impressed 
with the seal of the herbarium, which includes a space for the con- 
secutive catalogue number of the department. The collection is then 
arranged in the order of the collector's numbers, each species is 
entered in the continuous inventory book or department catalogue, 
and the catalogue number of each sheet is written in the seal, after 
which the sheets are distributed to their proper genera or orders in 
the herbarium. Thus a complete record of all species, localities, col- 
lectors, and collections is always ready at hand for reference, but any 
collection can be reassembled for reference as a whole by monograph- 



Oci. 1898. Annual Rkport of thk Director. 285 

ists and students in Ecology. In case of the records of an herbarium 
as a whole, like that of a Schott or Bebb, a special seal is used, stat- 
ing 'Herb. Schott' or 'Herb. Bebb,' in addition to the words 'Field 
Col. Mus.,' in order that the sheets may ever be credited to the pre- 
vious botanist through whose hands they have passed. These accjuired 
herbaria are not distributed in the herbarium until each sheet has 
been catalogued, numbered, and credited to the original collector. In 
addition to the inventory books, a running card catalogue of locali- 
ties and collectors keeps pace with the accessions of collections and 
the reference data are thus made complete. Although this entails a 
large amount of clerical work, and draws upon the time of the 
Curator, yet the result in usefulness, it is felt, will amply repay in the 
end. This method also extends to and includes the economic collec- 
tions upon the walls and in the cases of the department. So com- 
plete is the record that, should the whole collection be taken frorathe 
cases and thrown together in chaos, a new incumbent could readily 
reinstall the whole without loss of time or confusion of records or 
labels. Within the herbarium another method has been adopted, 
destined to save a vast amount of time to those who consult the col- 
lections, each large biological division of the world being represented 
by a different colored genus cover ; temperate American specimens 
being in manilla covers, tropic and sub-tropic American in orange, 
European in green, Asiatic in red, African in blue, and Oceanian in 
}'ellow." In the Department of Ornithology, Hall No. 27 has under- 
gone needed alterations in reducing the depth of the cases, thus 
bringing the individual specimens closer to the glass and rendering 
them more easy of inspection and the labels more readily consulted. 
In the Department of Zoology, the contents of Halls Nos. 19 and 20 
have been rearranged in the cases, which were new one year before, 
and by constructing partitions with shelf brackets and including more 
specimens in the same case, room has been provided for the installa- 
tion of new mounted specimens. In the west court two great 
groups have been installed in large mahogany plate-glass cases — 
the Oryx and Waller's Gazelles. As stated, the offices, work- 
room and laboratories of the department in the third gallery 
of the south court have been enlarged and entirely refitted. A 
large number of improved storage cans has been provided for the 
laboratories, and immense racks for alcoholic specimens have been 
constructed in one of the new rooms. The suite of apartments 
thus provided and equipped furnishes the best example of conven- 
ience and economy of time in the conduct of work for which it is 
intended. During the past year nearly all the poUections in the 



286 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Department of Zoology have been carefully gone over, and the large 
collection of shells and the contents of the hall of fishes have been 
entirely reinstalled. In the Osteological Hall two new cases have 
been provided, and all of the material rearranged to accommodate 
the specimens secured during the year. In this division, with 
new appliances provided for the use of the Osteologist at the shop, 
corner of 56th street and Jefferson avenue, considerable work has 
been done furnishing new skeletons for exhibition, while still more 
are so far advanced that they will soon be ready for the cases. 

Photography and Illustrations. — This division moved into its 
commodious and very complete studio and storage and work rooms 
in the third gallery of the east court during the year and is perform- 
ing very creditably its share of the work of the institution. While 
both the Curator of Botany, who has charge of this department, and 
the operator have been away upon expeditions a great deal of the 
time, yet the work has been in a measure constant and much more 
comprehensive than any previous years, owing to increased facilities 
and conveniences. The following table shows the actual results, 
only, of a large number of photographic operations, many of which 
require hours of preparation : 

Department. Negatives. Prints. Lantern Slides. 

Anthropology, ......... 79 224 112 

Botany, 47 208 113 

Geology, I45 47 I47 

Zoology, 46 152 34 

Expeditions, I47 

464 631 406 

Enlargements, loi. The operator has also stored in new cases 
and catalogued 3,000 negatives. 

Printing. — The printing-office becomes more essential and a great 
saver of time and money every year. Considerable new type and 
several new appliances have been added to the material of this sec- 
tion, and the character, no less than the amount, of work executed is 
gratifying in the extreme. During the year the following work has 
been performed by this small, though important, section : 

Other 

Labels. Impressions. 

Anthropology, 2,270 21,980 

Botany 308 11,35° 

Geology, 3*289 

Zoology 623 23,100 

Ornithology, 356 35° 

Director's office, 29,541 

Higinbotham Hall, 155 

Library, 7.70o 



cr 

O 



s 

u 
I/) 

D 
5 

Z 
< 

ffi 

D 
_l 
O 

o 




11 

CI 

< 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 287 

In addition to the above, the mailing list has been corrected as 
required by the issuing of the different publications, and 500 copies 
of an Herbarium pamphlet have been printed. 

Taxidermy. — Notwithstanding his three months' absence on expe- 
ditions in the Northwest, Mr. Akeley, the chief taxidermist, has created 
two more striking groups from the material obtained on the African 
expedition — Waller's Gazelles and the oryx group. The same appre- 
ciation of the high purpose of his work, the same skillful blending of 
nature and of art, the same conspicuous care in detail, distinguish 
these groups as they marked the other creations of which he has been 
the author. The facilities provided for this important and most 
valuable division of the Museum are entirely inadequate, not only as 
to space in which this work must be performed, but as to the con- 
veniences and appurtenances, and the skilled assistance available. 
The Curator of the Department of Zoology, to whom the taxidermist 
is assigned, has submitted an outline for the expansion of this section 
and for the provision of such aids and agencies as will enable the 
force so fortunately at command of the Museum to take advantage of 
the unusual conditions and of a large amount of material of excep- 
tional value and interest, and to produce in greater quantity and in 
quicker succession the masterpieces in the representation of animal 
life, of which Mr. Akeley is so highly competent. I shall ask for these 
recommendations of the Curator of the Department of Zoology the 
earliest consideration of the Executive Committee. 

Guards and FmE Protection. — By instruction of the Executive 
Committee, the guard of the Museum was increased one member 
during the year, to permit the execution of the rule of the committee 
granting to each member of this branch of Museum service an annual 
two weeks' vacation, with pay. Not one complaint of inattention or 
incivility to the public on the part of a guard has reached the Director 
during the year. I wish to call special attention to the excellent dis- 
•cipline, general deportment, and soldierly and genteel appearance of 
the guard of the Museum, to whom the safety of the building, the 
security of its contents, and the convenience of the public are due in 
a large measure. The appliances of the fire department have been 
increased by the exchange of the two-gallon extinguishers for new 
three-gallon machines. The equipment at present consists of a 
Champion chemical engine with a capacity of 55 gallons, and 300 



288 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

feet of hose which will reach every part of the building. A hose-cart 
is located in each court of the main building, and of six hose-reels, 
one is placed in the east annex, one in the west annex, and four upon 
the gallery floor. In each court 2,500 feet of hose are distributed on 
the various hose-reels and racks, together with ten ^-inch nozzles ; 
three i-inch nozzles; four 26-foot fire-ladders; seven pike-poles of 
various lengths; twenty-six fire-axes, and one hundred and forty-five 
buckets. Eight fire-hydrants are located within the main building, 
and twelve more just outside of the building. The water pressure 
has been increased by connection* with the park system instead of the 
city water main. The present system has a hydrant pressure of about 
forty pounds, and gives a fair hydrant stream on the gallery floor, 
but in case of fire higher up, the chemical engine alone could be 
relied on. An understanding has been reached between the Fire De- 
partment of the Museum and the City Fire Department that, in case 
of fire, the Museum hose would be connected by the first fire engine 
company, which would save delay in getting water higher than the 
gallery floor. The apparatus for local fire alarm has been improved 
by putting in an automatic mercurial fire alarm in the north, east, 
and south balcony offices, auxiliary fire alarm boxes in the east and 
south balcony offices, and a fire alarm box- in the boiler-house. The 
daily inspection through the building has been faithfully performed 
during the year. The Chief of the Chicago Fire Department, at his 
annual inspection, reported the building in good order. In fact, he 
had no complaint to make. The regular hours of inspection for danger 
from fire through the basement are 7 and 11 o'clock a. m., 3:30 and 9 
o'clock p. M. ; the main dome at 4:30 p. m., and the vaults at 4 p. m. 
The balcony offices and the roof are inspected every Saturday. The 
guards are drilled in fire drill, and the janitors have instructions 
in case of fire. The members of the fire department continue to look 
after. all the electric work of the building, trimming forty arc lamps 
daily, keeping them in repair, and also keeping in repair the burglar, 
telephone, and watch systems of the building. 

Attendance. — The total attendance of the year was 3,963 more 
than in the year previous. The increase in paid attendance was 
189, and the increase in the attendance of teachers was 45. More 
persons visited the Museum on a single day than on any day since 
October 4, 1894, the number being 6,220. An analysis of the attend- 
ance during the entire year appears in another portion of this report. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 289 

The following is a gratifying list of the school classes (thirty pupils or 
more) that visited the Museum during the year just closed : 

rwoil' Teachers. Pupils. 
Ch cago — '^ 

Hyde Park High, i loi 

Hyde Park High, i 85 

North Division High, i 80 

Normal, 2 63 

Normal, ' • 2 67 

Normal, 2 67 

Normal, i 65 

Normal, '2 59 

Normal, 4 306. 

Sherwood, 2 50 

Sherwood, i 38 

D. S. Wentworth, 2 74 

D. S. Wentworth 2 51 

Mark Sheridan i 42 

Fernwood, 4 79 

Kershaw, i 36 

Graham, 2 71 

Froebel 5 no 

La Grange Public School i 39 

\'alparaiso (Ind.) Normal School, — 50 



The following comparison between the daily attendance in the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1897, and the year ending Sept. 30, 1898, will 
be interesting: 

Increase. Decrease. 

Total attendance, 3,963 . . . 

Paid attendance, 189 . . . 

"Attendance of school children on pay days, 1,680 

Attendance of students 573 

Attendance of teachers ' . 45 • • • 

Attendance of members, 91 ... 

Average daily attendance, 1897, . . . 603 

Average daily attendance, 1898, 614 

Acknowledgments. — It is proper to acknowledge the generosity 
and courtesy of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, the Great 
Northern Railroad, the Northern Pacific Railway, the Canadian Pa- 
cific Railroad, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, the Illinois 
Central Railroad, and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in 
transporting members of the Museum staff and material obtained on 



290 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



expeditions. Also of the courtesy of Mr. H. J. Stadelman, of Mar- 
shall Field & Co.'s New York office, and of the foreign office of Mar- 
shall Field & Co. in this city, in clearing consignments at the Custom 
House. 

During the summer the Curator of Anthropology, the Curator of 
Geology, and the Director visited the Museums of Europe. This 
opportunity is taken of acknowledging the attentions received at the 
hands of the officers of the institutions visited. 

Herewith are submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, lists of accessions, names of members, etc., etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF, 

Director. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 291 



Financial Statement. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS . 
During the Year Ending September 30, 1898. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1897 $5,211,72 

Petty cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1897 739-95 

Dues of Members — 

Corporate, $ 195.00 

Annual 4,150.00 4,345.00 

South Park Commissioners, 15,000.00 

Chicago City R. R. Co., 2,250.00 

Joseph N. Field, 12,500.00 

Lambert Tree, • • 5,000.00 

J. W. Doane, 5,000.00 

H. N. Higinbotham — Folk-lore Collection, 1,000.00 

Sundry receipts, 118.52 

Interest on Investments 36,405.25 

Interest on Bank Balance, 109.91 

Admissions, 5,075.60 

Check Rooms, 1,122.30 

Sale of Guides, 328.50 

Sale of Securities 22,927.40 

$117,134.15 
Disbursements. 

Salaries, $40,210.04 

Guard Service, 11,147.69 

Janitor Service 6,548.22 

Fire Protection — 

Additions to Equipment, ' $ 100.00 

Wages of Firemen, 2,760.00 

Uniforms and Sundries, 68.88 2,928.88 

Heat and Light- 
Additions to Plant, 152.49 

Wages of Engineer and Assistants, . . . 2,759.74 

Fuel, . . . • 3072.98 

Supplies, etc., 887.44 7,172.65 

Carried forward, $68,007.48 



292 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Brought fofward, $68,007.48 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters and Roofers, 9,194.06 
Materials used — Paints, Oils, Hardware, 
Glass, Lumber and Plaster 2,348.26 11,542.32 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases, 7,544.25 

Building f^ixtures, 1,625.80 

Sundries, Ii5o0 9,28555 

The Library — 

Books and Periodicals Purchased, . . . 274.02 

Binding, 300.50 

Sundries, 209.57 784.09 

Sections of Printing and Photography 522.96 

Collections and Articles Purchased, 9,484.13 

Installation Expenses, 2,686.94 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming, . . 1,942.42 
Stationery, Postage, Telegrams and Tele- 
phone, 875.59 

Publications, 1,996.69 

Expeditions, 3,287.65 

Sundries, • . . . . 1,532.68 95635.03 

$111,948.50 

In Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, i8g8, ■. . 4,445.70 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1898, 739-95 5.185.65 

$117,134.15 



Oct. 1898. Anniai. Rki'oki' of vue Diricctok. 293 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPT. 3O, 1898. 



ATTENDANCE. 

Total Attendance,   224,246 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults, 19.892 

Children, 1,026 20,918 

Free Admission on pay days — 

School Children 5,272 

Students 856 

Teachers, 417 

Members — Corporate, 41 

Annual, 620 

Life, 22 

Officers' Family, 83 

Special, 16 

Press, 13 7,340 

Admission on Free Days — 

Saturdays, 57.309 

Sundays, 138.679 

Highest Attendance on any day (August 28, 1898), .... 6,220 

Lowest " " " (February i, 1898) 6 

Highest Paid " " " (July 4, 1898), 469 

Average Daily Admissions (365 days), 614 

Average Paid Admissions (261 days), 80 



RECEIPTS. 

Guides sold — 1,314 at 25 cents, $ 328.50 

Articles checked— 22,446 at 5 cents ' . . . . 1,122.30 

Admissions, 5,075.60 

$6,526.40 



294 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol, i. 



Accessions. 

From October i, 1897 to September 30, 1898. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AVER, EDWARD E., Chicago, 111. 

13 specimens of feather-work of California Indians, head-dresses, etc. — 

San Francisco. 
2 etched and carved ivory pipes — Alaska. 

2 etched ivory pipes — Alaska. 

3 etched ivory bow drills — Alaska. 

I etched scraper jade-blade — Alaska. 
I large horn spoon (carved) — Alaska. 
I small horn spoon (carved) — Alaska. 
BALDWIN, EVELYN B., Centralia, 111. 

Bundle of reed torches, cobs, etc. — Mammoth Cave, Ky. 

I kyak. 

I double paddle. 

3 harpoons. 

I kyak seat. 

I skin float. 

1 reindeer skin, head and antlers. 

BRUCE, M. W., Chicago, 111. 

5 pieces of Eskimo clothing — Alaska (exchange). 

COLE, MRS. W. H., Chicago, 111. 

Flowers of feathers and beetles' wings— Brazil, S. A. 
Carved open-work ivory vase. 

I royal Copenhagen vase, 8 inches high, decorated with human figure and 
head of cherub (loan). 

CHERRIE, W. S. 

I calvarium, Boabos-Mobain tribe — Africa. 
DEPARTMENT OF ETHNOLOGY, World's Columbian Exposition. 
Collected by D. Scott Moncrieff : 

7 skeletons, fragments, etc.— Dalles, Ore. 
Collected by George A. Dorsey : 

Collection of skulls — Chancay, Peru. 

Collection of skulls — Sierra Gorda, Peru. 
Collected by J. M. McLean : 

Crania (Blackfoot) — Alberta, Canada. 
Collected by Dr. C. L. Metz : 

Skeletons and skulls — Miami Valley. 
Collected by Lieut. R. E. Peary : 

Collection of skulls and bones— Greenland. 
Collected by Lieut. W. E. Safford : 

Collection of Aymara bones from Chulpa— Oruro, Bolivia. 
Collected by Lieut. G. P. Scriven : 

Skulls — Costa Rica. 
Collected by H. I. Smith : 

Skeletons — Warren County, Ohio. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 295 

Collected by F. Starr : 

Collection of pottery, baskets, rattles, arrows, bows, blow-guns, darts, 
spoons, etc. — Cherokee Indians, North Carolina. 
Collected by Ernest Volk : 

Skeletons, etc. — Trenton, N. J. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by J. A. Burt, for Department of Anthropology : ' 

Fragments of skeletons from an Indian mound — Sag Bridge, 111. 
Collected by George A. Dorsey : 

1 skull (cleft palate) — San Nicolas Island, California. 

2 skeletons (Blackfoot) — Blood Reserve, Canada. 
Collection of ethnological material — Blackfoot Indians. 
2 skeletons — Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. 

Collection of ethnological material — Flathead Indians, P^lathead Reserve, 

Montana. 
Collection of ethnographical material — Kootenay Indians, British Colum- 
bia and Idaho. 
Collection of ethnographical and archeological material from the Haidas 

— Queen Charlotte Islands, B. C. 
Collection of ethnological and archeological material from the Moki 

Reservation. 
Collection of ethnological and archeological material from Zuni, Pueblo, 

New Mexico. 
i basket and cover, i carved image — from grave at New Tongass, Alaska. 
f box, pipe, birchskin shirt (?) labret, 2 cedar bark collars, 2 pouches — 

from grave near Old Tongass, Alaska. 
I rattle, used in dog-eating and slave-killing ceremonies at China Hat, 

British Columbia. 
I stone celt, i arrow point (broken), i spear point, i slate implement — 

from ancient grave near Cedar Hill, Victoria, B. C. 
Collection from Hagwilgait, near Hazelton, B. C. 
Collection from the Tsimshians — British Columbia. 
Collection of skeletons, skulls, etc. — from Hill Top Cemetery on Two 

Medicine Lodge River, Blackfoot Reserve, Montana. 
Collection of Hopi ethnographic material — Oraibi, Arizona. 
Collection of Haida skulls and skeletons — Queen Charlotte Islands 

British Columbia. 
Collection of ancient pottery, etc. — from ruins of Homolobi, Arizona. 
I skeleton of Swede, aged 27. 
Skeletons of negroes. 
I cadaver. Chinaman. 
Brain and skeleton of Eskimo girl. 
Skeletons of whites — Chicago Medical Colleges. 
Collected by S. C. Simms : 

I barrel of tiles from Providential Tile Works — Trenton, N. J. 
Purchases : 

19 crania, Chinook — The Dalles, Oregon (purchased from D. M. Averill, 

Portlatid. Oregon). 

4 glass jars with covers, i earthen cinerary jar, i circular lead box, i long 

bronze urn — Rome (purchased in Rome, Italy, through Edward E. 

Ayer). 
Flint hoe, fifteen inches long, five inches widest part (purchased from 

Richard M. Boren, Pulaski, 111.). 
Ethnographical specimens— Alaska and Siberia (purchased from Miner 

W. Bruce). 
Collection of bones, pottery, etc. — Wisconsin (purchased from A. E. 

Chase, Oshkosh, Wis.). 

5 skeletons, .SV?«z/tV/— Vancouver Island, B. C. (purchased from James 

Deans, \'ictoria, B. C). 
I calvarium — New Caledonia (purchased from Otto Finsch, Museum 
Umlauff, Hamburg). 



296 Field ColUxMbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Purchases : 

I birch-bark canoe (purchased from Richard Fry, Bonner's Ferry, 
Idaho). 

Collection of skulls — Peru (purchased from Capt. T. Harris, Panama, 
Colombia) 

Photographs of individuals and Hopi Indians — Tusayan, Arizona (pur- 
chased from G. Wharton James, Pasadena, California). 

1 stone serpent, Tescoco — Valley of Mexico (purchased from E. O. Mat- 

thews, Mexico, City of Mexico). 
Flint arrow, spear points and fragments — Great Lakes (purchased from 

Dr. A. J. Mears, 175 Dearborn street, Chicago, 111.). 
Collection of skulls — Arkansas and Colorado (purchased from C. W. 

Riggs, World's Columbian Exposition). 
Ethnographical collection from the South Sea Islands, Africa (purchased 

from William T. Shepherd, Boston, Mass.). 
18 copper implements, 6 stone implements — Wisconsin (purchased from 

Earl Westcott, 230 Thirty-seventh street, Chicago, 111.). 

2 skeletons, 5 skulls, sacred pipe outfit and buffalo skull used in sun- 

dance (Blackfoot), 14 Blackfoot skulls — Blood and N. Piegan Re- 
serves, (purchased from R. N. Wilson, McLeod, Alberta, Canada). 
Collection of ethnological material from Ovimbundu, Africa (purchased 
from T.jW. Woodside, Freeport, 111.). 

1 skull (purchased from Wyman Bros., Chicago, 111.). 

MOOREHEAD, W. K., Columbus, Ohio. 

4 skulls, 2 skeletons, etc. — New Mexico. 

RYERSON, M. A., Chicago, 111. 

250 pieces of fabrics, velvets, brocades — Florence, Italy. 
THOMPSON, E. H., Yucatan, Merida. 

2 skulls — Chichen Itza. 

WHEELER, EDMUND, MEXICO, Oswego County, N. Y. 
Spinning wheel. 

YOUNG, JOE A., Bellevue, Iowa. 

Photograph of large stone spear head, qX inches long, ^y% inches wide. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago, III. 

1 section of treated wood — Texas. 
BOTANIC GARDENS, Grenada, British West Indies. 

2 packets of fruits. 
BOUTLOU, REV. A., Fairmont, W.Va. 

I herbarium specimen — W. Va. 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, N. Y. 

42 herbarium specimens — Nugusuak Peninsula (exchange). 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington, for Department of Botany: 

4 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 

17 herbarium specimens — Bad Lands, S. Dak. 
Collected by C. A. Lockwood, for Department of Botany: 

20 herbarium specimens — South Dakota. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh, for Department of Botany: 

152 herbarium specimens — Mackinac Island, Mich. 

6 herbarium specimens — Lake Superior Region. 

6 wood specimens — Lake Superior Region. 

I bark specimen — Lake Superior Region. 

I box of woods — Michigan. 



^ d, idS i 



f { i ! 




m 

r— 
o 

o 
o 

f— 
C 

> 

c 
in 
m 

c 



33 

m 

-o 
O 

33 



< 



Ocr. 1898. Anm Ai. Report ok the Director. 297 

Purchases: 

204 herbarium specimens — Lower Cahforiiia (purchased from A. \V. 
Anthony, Portland, Ore.}. 

Complete herbarium of M. S. Bebb, Rockford, 111. (purchased from the 
Bebb Estate, Rockford, 111.). 

3 cases of plants and fruits — Yucatan (purchased from George F. Gaumer, 
Izamal, Yucatan). 

130 herbarium specimens — N. W. Mexico (purchased from Gray her- 
barium. Harvard rniversity, Cambridge, Mass.). 

864 herbarium specimens— Durango, Mexico, and vicinity (purchased 
from Dr. Edwai-d Palmer, Washington, D. C). 

153 herbarium specimens — Mexico (purchased from C. G. Pringle, Char- 
lotte, Va.). 

373 herbarium specimens — Africa (purchased from Prof. Karl Schumann,. 
Berlin Hof. Museum, Berlin, Germany). 

GEORGIA RAILWAY CO., Augusta, Ga. 
2 mmiature bales of cotton. 
I box of South Carolina tea. 

GRAY HERBARIUM, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

1 type of species (loaned for study). 
605 herbarium specimens (exchange). 

HELLER, A. A., Minneapolis, Minn. 

155 herbarium specimens — Texas (exchange). 

28 herbarium specimens — New Mexico (exchange). 

96 herbarium specimens — Sandwich Islands (exchange). 
HILL, E. J., Englewood, 111. 

13 herbarium specimens, typical crategi and Hill's Oak — Chicago Basin.. 
KOENIG BOTANICAL MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

783 herbarium specimens — Argentine (exchange;. 

LANSING, O. E., Jr., Chicago, 111. 

90 herbarium specimens — Lake Michigan Basin. 

MACKINTOSH, LAUGHLIN, 5522 Laflin street, Chicago, 111. 

2 cakes of brick spawn — Chicago, 111. 

1 box of flake spawn — Chicago, 111. 
12 button mushrooms — Chicago, 111. 

2 fine ripe mushrooms — Chicago, 111. 
MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F., Field Columbian Museum. 

21 lithographs of plants (in color). 

739 mounted plants from his herbarium (exchange)L 

479 mounted plants from his herbarium (exchange). 
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY, Evanston, 111. 

ig herbarium specimens — North Greenland (exchange). 

9 herbarium specimens — Spitzenbergen (exchange). 
PETFORD, C. E., 1243 Adams street, Chicago, 111. 

3 economic specimens of cycas circinnate — Trinidad. 
31 economic plant products (exchange). 

POLLOCK, W. M., Morgantown, W. Va. 

100 herbarium specimens — West Virginia (exchange). 
SHEHAN, THO.MAS. Clayton, Miss. 

I twisted vine — Clayton, Miss. 
SHOTTER, S. P. & CO., Savannah, Ga. 

21 economic products of pine — Georgia. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

127 herbarium specimens— Various localities- (exchange). 



298 Field Columbian Museum^ — Reports, Vol. i. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALMY, JOHN D., Villa Corona, Durango, Mexico. 

8 specimens of crystals of unknown nature, probably a new mineral 
species. 

ATCHISON, TOPEKA & SANTA FE R. R., Chicago. 

4 specimens of waxy yellow Calcite. 

2 specimens of very coarse Horneblende granite. 
I specimen of ferruginous sandstone. 

1 specimen of white sandstone. 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

2 specimens of copper ore from Leviathan mine, near Flagstaff, Ariz. 
BALDWIN, EVELYN B., Centralia, 111. 

1 specimen of gypsum — Mammoth Cave. 

44 specimens of stalactites and 7 specimens of gypsum incrustations — 
Wyandotte Cave. 

2 large specimens of stalactites — Marengo Cave. 
BALL, SYDNEY H., Oak Park, 111. 

Bones of Oreodon, Mesohippus and other Tertiary vertebrates (loan). 
BARBOUR, PROF. E. H., Lincoln, Neb. 
6 specimens of Chalcedony geodes. 

2 specimens of Amber Barite. 
I lot of small Barite crystals. 

BRESKE, F., 273 Stark street, Portland, Ore. 

5 specimens of zinc ore, gangue and country rock — Venus mine, Oregon. 
, I specimen of copper ore — May Day mine, Oregon. 

BRUCE, CLARK, Chicago. 

I specimen of tetrahedrite — Batcheller mine, Ouray, Col. 
I specimen of gold ore — Treadwell mine, Alaska. 
I specimen of gold ore — Rio Grande County, Col. 

3 specimens of silver-lead ore — Silver Citj, Ark. 

CASE SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE, Cleveland, Ohio. 

24 specimens of Devonian fossils (exchange). 

ig specimens ot minerals (exchange). 
DENNISON, GEORGE W., 5646 Jefferson Ave., Chicago. 

I specimen of Blende in chert — Ashgrove, Mo. 

I specimen of Blende with calamine — Ashgrove, Mo. 

I specimen of Marcasite on Galena — Carterville, Mo. 

I specimen (in two pieces) of Brachiopod in chert — Webb City, Mo. 

DOHMEN, U. A., Field Columbian Museum. 

I specimen of native copper with Calcite — Arizona. 

8 specimens of copper, gold and silver-lead ores — Colorado and vicinity. 

4 specimens of fossils. 

4 specimens of minerals. • 

I specimen of mercury ore. 

DYCHE, MRS. E. F., 2216 Prairie Ave., Chicago. 

()"] specimens of ores and minerals — San Juan, Colorado, and other locali- 
ties. 

ELLIS, J. W., Maquoketa, Iowa. 

II specimens of fossils — Maquoketa Shale (exchange). 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by George A. Dorsey : 

3 specimens of Analcite — Queen Charlotte Islands. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington : 

 3 specimens of rocks of White River beds. 

4 specimens of rocks of dike and veins— Bad Lands, S. D. 
3 specimens of mammal bones. 

30 specimens of mastodon bones. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report ok thk Director. 299 

Collected by O. C. Farrington : 

2 specimens of weathered limestone. 

4 specimens of Trenton fossils. 

115 specimens of gold ore, gypsum, lignite, building stones, minerals, fos- 
sil leaves, brachiopods, corals and miscellaneous specimens — Black 
Hills, S. D., and Buffalo, Wyo. 

143 specimens of golden Calcite with Barite, Calcite crystals, Geodes, 
Baculites, Scaphites, etc. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington and H. W. Nichols : 

15 specimens, series of beach pebbles — Chicago. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington and E. S. Riggs : 

About 250 specimens of Vertebrate fossils-^Bad Lands, S. D. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

9 specimens of brick clay, slags, soils, etc. 

Large group of Octahedral, Galena and Sphalerite. 

Large group of crystallized Calcite. 

53 specimens of zinc and lead ores with their associated minerals. 

119 specimens of zinc and lead ores and associated minerals of Joplin, 
I\Io., and vicinity. 

12 specimens of raw, treated and burned clays. 

9 specimens of sub-carboniferous fossils. 

1 specimen of spherical siliceous concretion. 
Purchases : 

2 specimens of Rhodochrosite (purchased from Maynard Bixby, Salt 

Lake City, Utah). 

11 casts of meteorites (purchased from D. Brucciani «fc Co., 40 Russell 

street, London, England). 

5 mineral specimens. Amber Aphrosiderite, Quartz and Amethyst (pur- 

chased from Lydia A. Dexter, 2920 Calumet Ave., Chicago). 
I petrified egg (purchased from Kelley Robinson, Dakota City, S. D.). 
Full-sized section of Sacramento Mts. meteorite, weight 2,330 grammes 

(purchased from A. E. Foote, 1317 Arch St., Philadelphia Pa.). 
22 specimens of carboniferous fossils, ferns and calamites (purchased 

from John Keay, 6009 La Salle St., Chicago). 
I specimen of Basalt containing native iron — Disco Island, Greenland 

(purchased from Hugh J. Lee, Meriden, Conn.). 

12 specimens of Barite, Smithsonite, Limonite, etc. (purchased from G. 

W. Taylor, 984 63d St., Chicago). 
Head and portion of skeleton of Elotherium sp., i Placenticeras Placenta, 
18 inches in diameter (purchased from Charles F. Thompson, Plym- 
outh, Ind.). 

1 iron meteorite, weight 540 grammes (purchased from H. R. Voth, 

Keams Caiion, Arizona). 

2 sections of Roebourne and Mungindi meteorites (purchased from Henry 

A. Ward, 620 Division St., Chicago.). 
Full-sized section of San Angelo (Texas) meteorite, weight 1,501 grammes. 
Full-sized section of Tonganoxie (Kansas) meteorite, weight 264 
grammes (purchased from Ward's Natural Science Establishment, 
Rochester, N. Y.). 
FITCH, A. B., Magdalena, New Mexico. 
Large specimen of Aurichalcite. 
FULTON, J. L., Chicago. 

2 fragments from thigh bone of Mastodon. 

GEORGIA MARBLE CO., Tate, Pickens Co., Ga. 

4 polished slabs of varieties of Georgia marbles. 

GOODELL, ROBERT WOOD, Houghton, Mich. 

I specimen of petrified fish, Miojilosus sp. — Wyoming. 

GUION, G. MURRAY, iii E. 47th St., Chicago. 

Block showing chert, bedded with limestone — Joliet, 111. 

HAFER, C. C, 911 W. Adams St., Chicago. 

44 specimens of Brachiopods, Gasteropods, Lamellibranchs and Bryozoa 
from the Trenton Shales, near Lake Street Bridge, Minneapolis, Minn 



300 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

HAMMOND. GEORGE W., Yarmouthville, Me. 

i8i specimens of clay stones from various localities. 
HARDIN, B., Two Bits, S. D. 

2 moonstones (uncut) — Los Angeles, Cai. 

I specmien of native gold ore. 

HARTWELL, GEORGE H., i6i La Salle St., Chicago. 

1,200 Briquettes illustrating tests of varieties of brick clay. 
HAYWARD, J. T. Omaha, Neb. 

Photographs of Saratoga, Colo. — Gold Mine model. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. D., Chicago. 

I specimen of Onyx — Nepigon, Canada. 
HIGINBOTHAM COLLECTION, Field Columbian Museum. 

I specimen of jade from Burmah, weighing 1.237 grammes (transferred 
from Higinbotham Hall). 

HODGSON, E., Pekin, 111. 

I specimen of gabbro — supposed meteorite (for examination). 
HOGGINS, MRS. JOHN, Oak Park, 111. 

I Oreodon skull (tertiary) — Bad Lands, S. D. 

KEAY, JOHN, 6009 La Salle St., Chicago. 

I Fern showing circinate vernation — Minonk, Woodford Co., ill. 

I specimen of Neuropteris from roof of seam — Westville, 111. 
KIRKWOOD, R. I., New Denver, B. C. 

I specimen of copper ore — Kootenai District, B. C. 

16 specimens of silver-lead ores — Kootenai District, B. C. 
KUNTZE, DR. OTTO, Iowa City, Iowa. 

45 specimens of minerals and fossils (exchange). . 

LESTER, F. M., 3845 Calumet Ave., Chicago. 

9 specimens of siliceous gold ores — Lawrence Co., South Dakota. 

LOWE, CHARLES E., Mt. Crescent House, Randolph, N. H. 

I specimen of yellow Beryl in Granite, Mt. Crescent, N. H 

MAXSON, COL. H. B.', Reno, Nev. 

I specimen of Cinnabar— Reno, Nev. 

I specimen of Sulphur — Humboldt, Nev. 

I specimen of Infusorial earth — Carson City, Nev. 

I specimen of mineral soap — Elks County, Nevada. 

I specimen of plumbago — Battle Mt., Nev. 
MOORE, JOSEPH, Earlham College, Richmond, Ind. 

I specimen of pyrite and quartz (for examination). 

MORTON, JOHN P. &'cO., Louisville, Ky. 
Map of Mammoth Cave. 

MYERS, J. M. T.. Fort Madison, Iowa. 

71 specimens of Crinoids, Brachiopods, Bryozoans, etc., of the Keokuk 
and Burlington groups ; 2 Calcite Geodes (exchange). 

NASHVILLE, CHATTANOOGA & ST. LOUIS R. R. 

29 specimens of phosphates, iron ores, gold ores and cements^ — Georgia 

and Tennessee. 
26 specimens of Tennessee phosphates and iron ores. 

PEARSON, WILLIAM R., Goldsboro, N. C. 

7 specimens of Pentamerus Oblongus — Lyons, Iowa. 

RANDALL, B. G., 4625 Ellis avenue, Chicago. 

I specimen of Calcite and Sphalerite — Joplin, Mo. 

REESE, LEWIS, 1435 State street, Chicago. 

Model in relief of the moon (diameter 19.2 feet). 
SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE, St. Mary's, Vigo county, Indiana. 

I quartz and calcite geode (diameter 12 inches). 

SLOCUM, A. W., Milwaukee, Wis. 

44 specimens (12 species) of Devonian fossils (exchange). 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 301 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY, Chicago. 

2 specimens of machine and elaine oils. 
312 specimens of candles. 
225 spun brass candle-holders. 
264 paraffine candles. 
8 fine white candles. 

STILES, \'. H., 595 East 65th street, Chicago. 

I granite pebble, enclosed in magnesian limestone (cotton rock), from the 
Ozark, near contact of sub-carboniferous — Bolivar, Mo. 

STILLWELL, L. W., Deadwood, South Dakota. 
10 specimens of minerals (exchange). 
1 specimen of Strophomena (exchange). 

STRONG. HENRY, 278 West Madison street, Ch cago. 
Trap showing fissure produced by weathering. 

S\'EGE, A. E. J., Field Columbian Museum. 

I meteorite — Estherville, Emmet county, Iowa. 
WARD, HENRY A., 620 Division street, Chicago. 

I specimen of Arlington (Minn.) meteorite, weight 70 grammes (exchange). 
WEARE, W. W., Old Colony building, Chicago. 

I specimen of jade — St. Michaels, Alaska. 
WILLISTON, PROF. S. W., Lawrence, Kan. 

Figures of Kansas Mosasaurs. 
WOLFE, J. S., Cedar Rapids, Neb. 

I specimen of Brachiopod in Sub-carboniferous limestone — 2 miles north 
of Weaubleau, Mo. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

(.ACCESSIONS ARE BV Glt^T UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

BRANDLER, CHARLES, Field Columbian Museum. 

1 mounted short-eared owl, Asio accipitrinus. 

2 mounted long-billed marsh wrens, with nest, 
g wading birds — Mud Lake, Chicago. 

BRYAN, WILLIAM A., Field Columbian Museum. 
I short-eared owl, Asio accipitrinus (in flesh). 
I brant (blue goose) — Rock River Falls, Ind. 
I buffle-head duck — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

DARRAGH DR. THOMAS, loii Tacoma building, Chicago. 

I mounted domestic pigeon — Chicago. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by William A. Bryan : 

3 .'\merican herring gulls — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
27 bird skins, Passerim — 83rd street, Chicago. 

Collected by S. E. Meek : 

I mocking-bird — Tampa, Fla. 

1 Cape Alay warbler — Tampa, Fla. 
Purchases : 

I scaup duck (purchased from J. N. Adams, Chicago). 

2 green-wing teal ducks (purchased from B. Aron & Son, Chicago). 

I American golden eye duck— Illinois (purchased from George Benze- 

ville (S; Co., Chicago). 
6 bird skins (purchased from the Chicago market, Chicago). 
I blue goose, i canvas-back duck (purchased from A. M. MuUin, Chicago). 
I gadwall duck— New Boston, 111. (purchased from Stiffey Brothers, 

Chicago). 

GAUMER, GEORGE F., Izamal, Yucatan. 
9 bird skins, i bird egg — Yucatan. 



302 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

HARRIS, MRS. JOSEPH, 31 12 South Park avenue, Chicago. 
I humming-bird nest. 

KANI, SAMUEL W., St. John, N. B. 
iQ bird skins — Japan. 

SAMTER, MAXNIE, Knoxville. Iowa. 

1 whistling swan — Knoxville, Iowa. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, Field Columbian Museum. 

4 negatives, Ethnological objects. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

317 negatives, made by Section of Photography, from October i, 1897, to 
September 30, 1898, to illustrate lectures, publications, etc. 

631 prints, made by Section of Photography, from October i, 1897, to Sep- 
tember 30, 1898. 

loi enlargements (on glass and paper), made by Section of Photography, 
from October i, 1897, to September 30, 1898. 

406 lantern slides, made by Section of Photography, from October I,j897, 
to September 30, 1898. 

1,824 negatives of specimens in Museum, used in lectures and to illustrate 
publications, made by Museum Photographer. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM EXPEDITION. 
Made by E. P.Allen: 

256 negatives, Indian portraits, general views and details — Northwest 
coast. 
Made by George A. Dorsey: 

14 negatives, Indian portraits, etc. — Oraibi ^'illage, Arizona. 
Made by O. C. Farrington: 

13 negatives, views in the " Bad Lands " — Black Hills, S. D. 
Made by S. E. Aleek: 

13 negatives in and around Tampa, Fla. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

9 negatives, tree portraits — Mt, Carmel, 111. 

6 negatives, tree portraits — Mississippi. 

82 negatives, forestrv scenes — Upper Michigan. 
Made by H. W. Nichols: 

36 negatives, views in zinc and lead mines — Joplin, Mo. 
Purchases: 

44 lantern slides, illustrating lecture "A Glance at the Leading Types of 
the Animal Kingdom " (purchased from Frank C. Baker, Chicago). 

2 lantern slides (purchased from P. H. Dorsett, Department of Agricul- 

ture, \Yashington, D. C). 
16 lantern slides (purchased from Ben. Haines, New Albany, Ind.). 
12 lantern slides (purchased from ^Y. H. Jackson Photo. Co., Denver, 

Colo.). 

6 lantern slides, illustrating " Tour of the Plant World" (purchased from 

T. H. McAllister & Co., 49 Nassau street, New York, N. Y.). 

7 lantern slides (purchased from A. T. Thompson & Co., Boston, Mass.). 

GEORGIA R. R. EXHIBIT, Nashville Exposition. 

6 photographs of their exhibit at Nashville, 1897. 

MILLSPAUGH, DR. C. F. 

2 negatives of the great mound at Moundsville, W. Ya. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 303 

SPECIAL ACCESSIONS. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AVER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

Primitive wooden plow — Santa Fe, N. M. 

Bill of lading of the steamer Majestic from Natchez to St. Louis in 1834. 
Receipt of money to apply on stock of the Hudson River Steamboat Co., 
signed by Robert Fulton. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchases: 

Collection of Folk Lore of precious stones (purchased from George F. 
Kunz, New York, N. Y.). 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

BALDWIN, E. B., Naperville, 111. 
I old high-frame bicycle. 

DRAKE, A. A., St. Thomas, Ontario. 

Wooden models of rails, etc., showing method of holding nuts on bolts by 
donor's patented process. 

MELOY, E. S., Chicago. 

I Chicago &: Rock Island R. R. Line pass, dated December 31, i860. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALSTON, G. C, Field Columbian Museum. 
I raccoon. 

AMERICAN xMUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York, N. Y. 

I female buffalo skin and skeleton, i skin and skeleton of American buf- 
falo, 4 Greenland seals, 6 walrus, i skeleton of Indian antelope, 8 
monkeys, 14 carnivore, 6 opossums, 748 rodents and insectivora, skin 
and bones of calf of American bison (exchange). 

ASHBY, J. H., Manager Union Stock Yards, Chicago. 
I skeleton of domestic hog. 
I skeleton of sheep. 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

34 mammal skins, with their skeletons — Madagascar. 
BAILEY, G. v., Field Columbian Museum. 

I squirrel, Spermophile. 

BEBB, Dr. M. S., Rockford, 111. 

Large collection of shells — Illinois and Ohio. 

BOSTOCK, FRANK C, Chicago. , 

I giant kangaroo. 

I fox. 

I badger, Coati mondi. 

I lizard, Gila monster. 

I lizard, Iquana. 

I alligator. 
BOYER, LEWIS, Fort Bayard, N. M. 

I horned toad, Fhrynosoma cornutum. 

BRAGDON, C. E., 147 Fifth avenue, Chicago, 111. 
I brown bat. 



304 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

BRANDLER, CHARLES, Field Columbian Museum. 

1 skeleton .of setter dog. 

BRINKMAN, C, Chicago. 

2 alligators. 

BRYAN, W. A., New Sharon, Iowa. 
I skeleton of Shetland pony. 

CHOPE, E. B., Field Columbian Museum. 

184 butterflies and moths hatched in Museum buildmg. 
403 butterflies and moths (140 species), i bat, 11 shells, 2,180 beetles (vari- 
ety of species), 265 other insects — Cook Co., 111. 

•CITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago, 111. 
I skeleton of a horse. 

DIXON, W. H., 5225 Jefferson avenue, Chicago. 

1 skeleton of domestic cat. 

3 snakes (2 species), i garter snake, 3 snapping turtles. 

DODSON, C. E., London, England. 

2 photographs of lion. 

FARRINGTON, O. C, Field Columbian Museum. 
II beetles — Harrison, So. Dak. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by E. B. Chope, Field Columbian Museum: 

1,863 beetles, 12 butterflies (10 species) — La Crosse and Juneau Counties, 
Wis. 
Collected on East African Expedition, by D. G. Elliot: 

1 cheetah (young). 

Collected by S. E. Meek, Field Columbian Museum: 

5 gray squirrels, 45 species of fishes — Greenway, Ark. 
32 species of fishes, 3 species of crustaceaus — Florida. 

3 species of echinodenus, 2 species of shells, i snake — Florida. 

5 cave salamanders, i blind fish — Mitchell, Ind. 

31 species of fishes, i turtle — Salt Creek, Clinton, 111. 

6 species of turtles, 48 species of fishes — Havana, 111. 

5 bats, 2 mice, i snake, i salamander, 6 frogs — Caves near Mitchell, Ind. 
57 beetles — Paw Paw, Mo. 
Purchases: 

40 species of fishes — Lower California (purchased from A. \V. Anthony, 
Portland, Ore.). 

2 skeletons of apteryx mantelli, the " Kiwi " (purchased from O. Spanner 

& Co., Toronto, Can.). 

2 fur seals (purchased from the Stanford University, Palo Alto, Cal.). 

35 rodents, 2 carnivore, 3 gray squirrels, 13 mammal skins, 39 mammal 
skins (squirrels), (purchased from Thaddeus Surber, White Sulphur 
Springs, W. Va.). 

23 specimens of rodents (purchased from E. S. Thompson, 141 Fifth ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y.). 

I water buck, skin and skull (purchased from Rowland Ward & Co., 
London, England). 

Collection of pearl-bearing mollusks (purchased from Mrs. E. C. Wis- 
wall, Kenosha, Wis.). 

GAUMER, DR. G. F., Izamal, Yucatan. , 

3 frogs, 2 snakes, 2 lizards, i toad, i small box of insects, 11 shells, 4 small 

mammals — Izamal, Yucatan. 
HANLEY, PATRICK, 5529 La Salle street, Chicago. 
I salamander — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

HAINES, MRS. FLORA, Boston, Mass. 

I ablone, Haliotis rubesceus (exchange). 
HENION & HUBBELL, 61-69 N. Jefferson street, Chicago, III. 

I centipede. • 

HUME, JAMES, Field Columbian Museum. 

. : I dogfish — Lagoon, Jackson Park, Chicago. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Rkport of the Director. 305 

KENKEL, LOUIS, 140 Fifty-fourth street, Chicago, 
g salamanders. 
I shrew. 
I mouse. 

3 frogs. 
LAWRENCE, W. J., Chicago. 

4 carpet shells. Tapes staminea. 

MEARNS, E. A., United States Army, Fort Clark, Kinney Co., Texas. 
17 species of land and fresh-water shells. 

MEEK, HIRAM, Hicksville, Ohio. 
I woodchuck skin. 

1 chipmunk skin. 
3 red squirrels. 

2 fox squirrels. 
I minkskin. 

MEEK. S. E., Field Columbian Museum. 

I hellbender, Cryptobranchus alleghaniensis. 

MITCHELL, LUCIAN, Greenway, Ark. 
I mole, 7 bats — Greenway, Ark. 

NORRIS, PHILLIP, Field Columbian Museum. 
I turtle — Chicago. 

OGDEN, DR. H. V., Milwaukee, Wis. 

12 species of small fresh water fish (for examination). 
27 small mammal skins (for examination). 

ROLFS, PROF. P. H., Lake City, Fla. 
I alligator for skeleton. 

STERT, A., 5649 Cottage Grove avenue, Chicago. 
I ground squirrel-^— Uoalde County, Texas. 

THOMPSON, A. J., Field Columbian Museum. 

3 fishes (2 species). 

UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 
I fish, Cyprinodon mydrus — Key West. 
I fish, Cyprinodon bovinus — Chihuahua, Mex. 
I fish, Cyprinodon riverendi — Cuba. 

ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 
7 fishes, Etheostoma variatum — Ohio (exchange). 
3 fishes, Etheostoma camurum— Ohio (exchange). 
I fish, Leuciscus elongatus — Ohio (exchange). 



THE LIBRARY. 

(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise DESIGNATED.) 

Books, Pamphlets and Serials. 

ACHELIS, TH., Bremen, Germany. 

Archiv fur religionswissenschaft, vol. i, no. i. 
Friedrich Ratzel. 

ALABAMA INDUSTRIAL AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, University, Ala. 
Proceedings, vol. 7, pt. 2. 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Proceedings, vol. 11, pt. 3, and vol. 12. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADV. OF SCI., Boston, Mass. 

Preliminary announcement of th% Boston meeting, 1898. 

Proceedings, 46th meeting, 1897. 



3o6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

AMERICAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. 
The Forester, current nos. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 
Annual report, 1897. 
Bulletin, vol. 9. 

AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCH^OL. SOCIETY, New York City. 
Proceedings and papers, 39th annual meeting, i896-'97. 

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Conn. 
Journal, vol. 19, pt. 2. 

AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Proceedings, current nos. 

AMSTERDAM K. AKAD. VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, Nether- 
lands. 

Verhandelingen, 2d section, vols. 1-5. 

Verslagen van de zittingen, vols. 1-5. 
AMSTERDAM. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Collection of 30 university publications. 

ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Andover, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
ANDREE, RICHARD, Braunschweig, Germany. 

Globus, vols. 72 and 73. 
ANTHROP. INST. OF GREAT BRITAIN & IRELAND, London, England. 

Journal, vol. 27, current nos. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Bulletin, nos. 27-29. 
ARTHUR, J. C. (the author), La Fayette, Ind. 

Movement of protoplasm in coenocytic hyphse, with 3 other patas. 
ASHMEAD, A. S., New York City. 

Racial degeneracy in America : goitre and dwarfing (gift). 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, Bengal. 

Journal, current nos. 

Proceedings, current nos. 

The Kaqmiracpabdamrta, pt. i, by I^vara-Kaula. 
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN ANATOMISTS, Washington, D. C. 

History, constitution, etc. 

Proceedings, sth-gth annual session (gift). 

AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Catalogue of Australian birds, pts. i and 2. 

Memoirs, vol. 3, pts. 4-6. 

Records, vol. 3, nos. 3 and 4. 
BACHSTROM, HELGE (the author), Stockholm, Sweden. 

VestanAfaltet, with 8 pams. 
BAKER, F. C. (the author), Chicago. 

Notes on radulce. 

The molluscan fauna of western New York. 

BAKER, R. T. (the author), Sydney, New South Wales. 

Contributions to a knowledge of the flora of Australia, no. i, with 4 other 
pams. 
BAUER, MAX (the author), Marburg, Hesse, Germany. 

Beitrage zur geologie der Seyschellen. 

BELL, A. G. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The question of sign language and the utility of signs. 

BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wis. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 

Semi-centennial anniversary, i897-*98. 
BERLIN. FRIEDRICH-WILHELM'S-UNIVERSITAT, Berlin, Germany. 

37 inaugural dissertations. 



ft 



a. 




31 



O 
O 

n 
C 

w 

> 



c 

m 

c 



O 
73 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 307 

BERLIN. KONIGLICHE BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahres-verzeichniss der an den deutschen universitaten erschienenen 
schriften, vols. 1-12. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHE GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Bericht, 1897-98. 

Notizblatt, vol. 2, nos. 10-14. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKAD. DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Berlin. 
Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current nos. 
BERLIN. MUSEUM FUR NATURKUNDE, ZOOL. SAMMLUNG, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Bericht, 1897-98. 

Mitteilungen, vol. i, no. i. 

3 pamphlets. 
BERLINER GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fur ethnologie, current nos. 

BEYER, G. E. (the author). New Orleans, La. 

Contributions on the life histories of certain snakes. 
Publications of the Louisiana Historical Society, vol. 2, pt. i. 

BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago. 

Black diamond, current nos. (gift). 
BLANCHARD, RUFUS & COMPANY, Chicago. 

Discovery and conquest of the Northwest, pt. i (gift). 
BLYTT, AXEL (the author), Christiania, Norway, Europe. 

Nye bidrag til kundskaben om karplanternes udbredelse i Norge. 
BOETTGER, FRED, Peoria, 111. 

Annual report (3d) of the Board of Trustees of Park District, Peoria (gift). 
BOLTON, HERBERT (the author), Manchester, England. 

Descriptive geological labels, with 5 other pams. (gift). 

BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. DEP'T. OF LAND RECORDS AND AGRIC, 
Bombay, India. 

Annual report, 1896 and 1897. 

Crop experiments, 1896-97. 

Report on the rail and road-borne trade, 1896-97. 

Returns of the rail-borne trade, i897-'98. 

BOSTON. MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 22d. 

Catalogue of a loan exhibition of book-plates and super-libros. 
BOSTON. PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual list of new and important books added, i896-'97. 

Annual report, 46th. 

Monthly bulletin of books added, current nos. 

BOSTON. SOCIETY OK NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 
Proceedings, current nos. 

BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Mass. 
Annual report, 3d. 

BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Annual report, 17th. 
BRINTON, D. G. (the author). Media, Pa. 

The ethnic affinities of the Guetares of Costa Rica, with 3 other pams. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION, London, W., England. 

Report of the 67th meeting, Toronto, 1897. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. BUREAU OF STATISTICS, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report (i8th) of the British Columbia Board of Trade. 

British Columbia mining record, vol. 3, nos. 10-12. 

Bulletin, no. 2, pt. i, of the Natural History Society of British Columbia. 

Fifth report of the Department of Agriculture. 

The Klondike mining district, by W. Ogilvie. 



3o8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. BUREAU OF STATISTICS, Victoria, B. C. 
Lecture on the Yukon Gold Fields, by W. Opilvie. 
Report of the Dairymen's Association, i896-'97, with 2 other reports. 
Report of the minister of mines, 1897. 
Report of the \'ancouver Board of Trade, 1896-97. 

Seventh report of the British Columbia Fruit Growers' and Horticultural 
Society, 1898 (gift). 

BRITISH MUSEUM, London, S. W., England. 

"Alert" report, 1884. 

General guide, 1896. 

List of British diaiomacese, 1859. 

List of cetacea, 1885. 

15 catalogues. 

9 guides. 
BROOKLYN LIBRARY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Annual report, 40th. 

Bulletin, no. 36. 
BROWN UNIVERSITY, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 1896. 

Catalogue, i897-'98. 
BROWN, FRANCIS F., Chicago. 

The Dial, current nos. (gift). 
BRUXELLES. ACAD. ROYALE DE BELGIQUE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1898. 

Bulletin, 3d ser., vol. 35, current nos. 

BRUXELLES. MUSEE ROYAL D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Bruxelles, 
Belgium. 

Guide dans les collections. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOL., Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Annals, vol. 11 and vol. 12, current nos. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE LINNEENNE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, 23d year, nos. 1-7 and 9. 
BUENOS AIRES. INST. GEOGRAFICO ARGENTINO, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 

Boletin, vol. 18, nos. 4-9. 
BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Anales, vol. 5. 

Memorias, i894-'96. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Finding list. 1897. 

First annual report, 1897. 
BUFFALO SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 5, and vol. 6, no. i. 

BURT, E. A. (the author). Middleburg, Vt. 

The phalloideae of the United States, with two other pams. 
BUSCHAN, G. (the author), Stettin, Germany. 

Aus der italienischen literatur, with 8 other pams. 
BUSSEY INSTITUTION, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, pts. 6 and 7. 
BUTCHERS AND PACKERS MAGAZINE CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

Butchers and packers magazine, current nos. (gift). 
CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report of the Government Cinchona Plantation in Sikkim, 1896-97. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, Cal. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin, nos. 120 and 121. 

Partial report of work for the years i895-'96 and i896-'97 (gift). 



Oct. 1898. Annial Report of the Director. 309 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSH A', Berkeley, Cal. 

Annual report, 1897. 

Bulletin of the Department of Geology, vol. 2, nos. 3 and 4. 

Register, 1896-97. 

University chronicle, vol. I, nos. 1-3. 

I pamphlet. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, current nos. 
CAMBRIDGE l^NIVERSITY, Cambridge, England. 

Annual report of the Library Syndicate, 1897. 

Annual report (32d) of the Museums and Lfecture-Rooms Syndicate. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, 2d ser., vol. 2. 
CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada. 

Proceedings, vol. i, nos. 4 and 5. 

Transactions, vols. 1-3, vol. 4, pt. i, and vol. 5, pt. 2 
CARDOT, JULES (the author), Stenay (Meuse), France. 

Repertoire spagnologique, with i pam. 

CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Catalogue of collection of pictures loaned by R. H. McCormick. 

Founder's day, 1897. 

Second annual exhibition held at the Carnegie Institute, 1897. 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Annual report, 2d, 1897. 

CARPENTER, GEORGE H., Dublin, Ireland. 
The Irish naturalist, current nos. 

CARR, LUCIEN (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

Dress and ornaments of certain American Indians. 
CATHOLIC L^NIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington, D. C. 

Catholic University bulletin, vol. 3, no. 4, and vol. 4, nos. 2 and 3. 

Catholic University chronicle, vol i, nos. 7-12. 
CENTRAL ART ASSOCIATION, Chicago. 

Arts for America, current nos. (gift). 
CERAMIC MONTHLY PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Ceramic monthly, current nos. (gift). 
CHESTER, A. H. (the author). New Brunswick, N. J. 

Catalogue of minerals, 3d ed. 

On krennerite from Cripple Creek. • 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 

Annual report, 40th. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Annual report, i8th, 1896-97, and 19th, t897-'98. 

Catalogue of the tenth annual exhibition of oil paintings and sculpture by 
American artists. 

Exhibition of work by Chicago artists, February, 1898. 

Sec(md annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists. 

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago. 

Annual register, 1896-97 and i897-'98. 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Report of annual meeting, Nov. 16, 1897. 
CHRISTIANIA UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTHEK. Christiania, Norway. 

Fauna Norvegiae, pt. i, by G. O. Sars. 

Norriinaskaller, by J. Barth. 
CINCINNATI. HOUSE OF REFUGE, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 47th. 

The proper training of juvenile delinquents, by J. Allison. 



3IO Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

CINXINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Annual report, 17th, 1897. 

Catalogue of 5th annual exhib. of works by American artists. 
Notes upon an exhibition of paintings, December, 1897. 
Second annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists. 

CINCINNATI SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Journal, vol. 19. nos. 3 and 4, with i pam. 

CINCINNATI TECHNICAL SCHOOL, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Annual catalogue, 1896-97 and i897-'98. 

CLARKE, ROBERT, Glendale, Ohio. 

Introduction to the study of North American archaeology, by C. Thomas. 

CLAUSTHAL. K. BERGAKADEMIE UND BERGSCHULE, Clausthal, Han- 
over, Germany. 

Katalog der bibliothek. 
Programm, 1898-99. 

CLAY RECORD PUB. CO., Chicago. 

Clay record, current nos. (gift). 
COHEN, E. (the author), Greifswald, Germany. 

Ein neues meteorseisen von Beaconsfield, Australia, with 6 other pams. 

COLBY UNIVERSITY, Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER CO., Scranton, Pa. 

The Colliery engineer, current nos. (gift). 
COLLINGE, WALTER E. (the author), Birmingham, England. 

A collection of slugs from the Hawaiian Islands, with 3 other pams. 
COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Fort Collins, Colo. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colo. 

Bulletin, no. 11. 

Circular, no. i. 

Proceedings, vol. 5, 1894-96, with 3 pams. 
COLORADO STATE BUREAU OF MINES, Denver, Colo. 

Report, 1897. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Annual report, 8th, 1897. 

Bulletin, nos. 18-20. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
COMBS, ROBERT (the author), Ames, Iowa. 

Alfalfa leaf-spot disease 

Plants collected in the District of Cienfuegos, 1895-96 (gift). 
CONNECTICUT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New Haven, Conn. 

Transactions, vols. 1-7. 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, New Haven, Conn. 

Annual report, 1897 (gift). 

Bulletin, current nos. 
COOK, O. F., Huntington, N. Y. 

Third report of the New York State Colonization Society. 

COOPER UNION, New York City. 

Annual report, 39th. 
CORNELL COLLEGE, Mt. Vernon, Iowa. 

The Pisgah of the century, by W. F. King. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
COSTA RICA. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

Informe, i897-'98. 
CRANDALL, C. C. (the author), Fort Collins, Colo. 

Natural reforestation on the mountains of northern Colorado. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 311 

CUSHING. F. H. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

A preliminary report on the exploration of ancient key-dweller remains 
on the gulf coast of Florida, with 3 pams. 

CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ - JOSEPHS - UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 
Bukowina. 
Uebersicht der akadeniischen behorden, iSgS-'gc;- 
Verzeichnis der offentlichen vorlesungen, 1898-99. 

DAMES, WILHELM (the author), Berlin, Germany. 

Uber die gliederung der flotzformationen Helgolands, with 5 other pams. 
DARAPSKY, LUIS (the author), Santiago de Chile, Chile. 

Las aguas minerales de Chile, with 2 pams. (gift). 
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 

Addresses of living graduates, 1897. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 

DAWSON, J. WILLIAM (the author), Ottawa, Canada. 
On the genus lepidophloios. 

DAY, D. T., Washington, D. C. 

Across the Everglades, by H. L. Willoughby. 

DEAN, BASHFORD (the author), New York City. 

Note on the ventral armoring of dinichthys, with 4 other pams. - 
DELAWARE COLLEGE, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Newark, Del. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Mich. 

Annual report, i897-'98. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Mich. 

Annual report, 33rd. 
DEWALQUE, G., Liege, Belgium. 

Melanges geologiques, ser. 6 and 7. 
DIELS, L. (the author), Berlin, Germany. 

Die epharmose der vegetationsorgane bei rhus 1. & gerontogese Engl. 
(gift). 
DRESDEN. K. SAMMLUNGEN, Dresden, Germany. 

Mitteilungen des mineralogischenMuseums. 

DRESDEN. K. ZOOL. UND ANTHROP. ETHNOG. MUSEUM, Dresden, 
Germany. 

Bericht liber die koniglichen sammlungen, 1894 & '95. 

DREW, S. H. (the author), Wanganui, New Zealand. 
Notes on regalecus sp. 

DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Madison, N. J. 
Report of the library, i896-'97. 
Yearbook, 1897-98. 

DU BOIS, C. G., Waterbury, Conn. 

Asa Gray bulletin, nos. 8, 19, and current nos. 
DL^FF, U. F. (the author), San Marcial, New Mexico. 

The prehistoric ruins of Rio Tularosa, with 2 other pams. 

EDINBURGH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Edinburgh, Scotland. 
Report, 1896. 

EDINBURGH ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 
Proceedings, vol. 21. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PUB. CO., Chicago. 

Electrical engineering, current nos. (gift). 
ELECTRICAL PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Western electrician, current nos. (gift). 
ELLIS, J. B., Newfield, N. J. 

New species of fungi from various localities, 4 reprints. 

ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Allegheny, Pa. 
Bulletin, vol. 13, no. 10, and vol. 14, current nos. 



312 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Md. 
Annual report, I2th. 
Bulletin, vol. 3, current nos. 
Finding list, 7th ed. 

ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Mass. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
Historical collections, current nos. 

EVANS, A. W. (the author). New Haven, Conn. 

A revision of the North American species of frullania, a genus of 
hepaticae. 
EVANSTON FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, 111. 

Annual report, 24th. 
FEWKES, J. W. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The winter solstice ceremony at Walpi. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchase : 

283 books. 
550 pamphlets. 
Exchange for duplicates : 
20 books. 
9 pamphlets. 
FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB OF VICTORIA, Melbourne, Victoria. 

The Victorian naturalist, vols. 11-14, and current nos. 
FISKE, JOHN (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 
The American revolution, 2 vols. 
The critical period of American history. 
FLETCHER, A. C. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The emblematic use of the tree in the Dakota group, with 5 other pams. 

FLINK, GUSTAV, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Beschreibung eines neuen mineralfundes aus Gronland, with another 
pam. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Lake City, Fla. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
FOJIEST AND STREAM PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Forest and stream, rod and gun, current nos. (gift). 
FORSTEMANN, E. (the author), Dresden, Germany. 

Die tagegotter der Mayas, with another pam. 
FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, Lancaster, Pa. 

Obituary record, vol. i, nos. i and 2. 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current nos. 
FREIBERG. KGL. SACHSISCHE BERGAKADEMIE, Freiberg, Germany. 

Programm, 1897-98, and 1898-99. 
FRIEDLANDER, R & SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current nos. 
FRITSCH, KARL (the author), Wien, Austria. 

Gesneriacese, with a collection of 41 separates and reprints. 

GALLINGER, J. H. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

American tariffs from Plymouth Rock to McKinley (gift). 
GATSCHET, A. S., Washington, D. C. 

Bibliographic notes, with 12 other pams. 
GENOVA. MUSEO CIVICO DI STORIA NATURALE, Genova, Italy. 

Annali, series 2, vols. 17 and 18. 
GENTLEMAN FARMER CO., Chicago. 

Gentleman farmer magazine, current nos. (gift). 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, vol. 9, current nos. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 313, 

GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Experiment, Ga. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
GIESSEN. HESSISCHE LUDWIGS-UNIVERSITAT, Giessen, Hesse, 
Germany. 

7 inaugural dissertations. 

GLASGOW. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Transactions, new series, vol. 5, pt. 1. 
GLASS AND POTTERY WORLD CO., Chicago. 

Glass and pottery world, current nos. (gift). 
GOETTE, A. (the author), Strassburg, Germany. 

Einiges liber die entwickelung der scyphopolypen. 
GOLDEN GATE PARK MUSEUM, San Francisco, Cal. 

Annual report, 26th, of the Board of Park Commissioners, San Francisco. 
GOODSPEAD, E. J., Chicago. 

The Ayer papyrus, a mathematical fragment (gift). 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Gottingen, Germany. 

Geol. und pnlaont. untersuchung der grenzschichten zwischen jura und 
kreide, by W. Koert. 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG- AUGUSTS - UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Gerr 
many. 

Amtliches verzeichnis des personals, etc., iSgZ-'gS. 

Analecta Plautina, by F. Leo. 

Chronik, 1896-97. 

Verzeichnis der vorlesungen, 1898-99. 

56 dissertations. 

4 orations. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

Contributions, new ser., nos. 13 and 14, with 10 other pams. 
GREAT BRITAIN. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, England. 

Summary of progress for 1897. 
GREENE, E. L., Washington, D. C. 

Pittonia, vol. 3, pt. 18. 

GUNCKEL, L. W. (the author), Dayton, Ohio. 

Analysis of the deities of Mayan inscriptions (gift). 

HAAN, J. \'AN BREDA DE (the author), Buitenzorg, Java. 

De bibitziekte in de Deli-tabak. 
HAARLEM. STADSBIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

A'erslag van den toestand, 1897. 
HADDON, A. C. (the author), Cambridge, England. 

The decorative art of British New Guiana. 
HALSTED, B. D. (the author), New Brunswick, N. J. 

The fungous foes of the farmer. 
HAMBERG, AXEL (the author), Stockholm, Sweden. 

Mmeralogische studien with i pam. 
HAMBURG. NATURHISTORICHES MUSEUM, Hamburg, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, i893-'96. 
HAMILTON COLLEGE, Clinton, N. Y. 

Annual register, 1897-98. 

Hamilton literary magazine, new ser., vol. 2, no. 2. 

Presentation holiday, Nov. 16, 1897. 

HAMY, E. T. (the author), Paris, France. 

Etude sur les collections americaines, with 2 other pams. 
HANNOVER. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, Ger- 
many. 

Festschrift zur feier des 100 jiihrigen bestehens* 1897. 

Flora der provinz Hannover. 

3 catalogues. 



314 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

HARDWOOD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Hardwood, current nos. (gift). 
HARRIS, G. D., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Bulletins of American paleontology, no. 10 (gift). 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 
Bulletin, vol. 19, no. 4, and vol. 20, no. i. 

HARVARD COLLEGE, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass. 
Annual report, 1896-97. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

"HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Mass. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HAUSER, OTTO (the author), Zurich, Switzerland. 

Das amphitheater Vindonissa. 

Der Kampf und Vindonissa (gift). 

HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Annual report, 5th. 
Papers, nos. 9 and 10. 

HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Baden, Germany. 
Collection of 59 inaugural dissertations. 

iHELLER, A. A. (the author), Minneapolis, Minn. 

Two botanists in New Mexico, with 4 other pams. 
iHERBIER BOISSIER, Chambesy, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

.HIGGINSON, C. M. (the author), Chicago. 

Soft coal burning (gift). 
■HILL, E. J. (the author), Chicago. 

Two noteworthy oaks, with two other pams. 
.HITCHCOCK, A. S. (the author), Manhattan, Kan. 

Ecological plant geography of Kansas, with 3 other pams. 
liOBBS, W. H. (the author), Madison, Wis. 

A contribution to the mineralogy of Wisconsin, with 7 other pams. 
.HOCK, F., Luckenwalde, Germany. 

Allgemeine pflanzen-geographie (gift). 
HODGE, FREDERICK (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The enchanted mesa, with two other pams. 
.HOLMES, W. H., Washington, D. C. 

Collection of 15 books and 122 pams (gift). 

HOPKINS, T. C. (the author), State College, Pa. 

The Bedford oolithic limestone of Indiana, with i abstract. 

HOVEY, E. O., New York City. 

Catalogue of the types and figured specimens of the palasontological 
collection of the Am. Mus. of Nat. Hist. 

HOWARD MEMORIAL LIBRARY, New Orleans, La. 

Papers read before the New Orleans Academv of Sciences, vol. i, no. i. 
HOWES, G. B., London, S. W. 

Collection of 22 pams. 

HRDLICKA, A. F. (the author), New York City. 

The medico-legal aspect of the case of Maria Barbella, with 5 pams. 
HUARD, V. A., Quebec, Canada. 

Naturaliste canadien, current nos. (gift). 
ILLINOIS. STATE ENTOMOLOGIST, Springfield, 111. 

Twentieth report on noxious and beneficial insects of Illinois. 
ILLINOIS STATE LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Urbana, 111. 

Bulletin, vol. 5, articles 3, 4 and 5. 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, 111. 

Catalogue, i897-'98. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 315 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Urbana, 111. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Bloomington, 111. 

Illinois Wesleyan magazine, vol. 2, current nos. 
INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Proceedings, 1894-96. 

2 pamphlets. 

INLAND PRINTER CO., Chicago. 

The Inland printer, vol. 19, and current nos. 

IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Des Moines, la. 

Proceedings, vols. 3 and 4. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, la. 

Annual report, 1896 and 1897. 
IOWA MASONIC LIBRARY, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Occasional bulletm, Dec, 1897. 

Quarterly bulletin, vol. i, nos. 1-3. 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Ames, la. 

Bulletin of the Iowa Agric. Exp. Station, nos. 13, 15, 16, 18-21, and cur- 
rent nos. 
Contributions from the Botanical Department, nos. 2-6. 

IOWA STATE LIBRARY, Des Moines, la. 
Biennial report. 26th. 

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, la. 

Bulletin from the Laboratories of Natural History, vol. 4, no. 3. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
ISIS, NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT, Dresden, Ger- 
many. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, 1896, and 1897, pts. i and 2. 

JACOBS, J. W., Waynesburg, Pa. 

Gleanmgs from nature, no. i. 
JAMAICA BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, ist-3d, 1895-97. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNI\'ERSITY, Baltimore, Md. 

Circular, vol. 17, current nos. 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Md. 

Register, 1897-98. , 

JONES, ARTHUR B., Chicago. 

Annual report of the Lake Superior Iron Co., 1897. 

Geology and mining industries of the Cripple Creek District. 

Report of the Governor of Arizona, 1895. 

Report of the L'^niversity of Illinois, i895-'96 (gift). 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Topeka, Kan. 

Transactions, vol. 15, 1895-96. 
KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Manhattan, Kan. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Tenth annual report, 1897. 

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 
Report, 1st and 2nd quarters, 1897. 
Report for quarter ending March, 1898. 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kan. ' 

Kansas University quarterly, current nos. 
University Geological Survey of Kansas, vol. 2. 

KEARNEY, T. H. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

New or otherwise interesting plants of eastern Tennessee. 



3i6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Lexington, Ky. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

KENTUCKY POLYTECHNIC SOCIETY, Louisville, Ky. 
Report and proceedings of 20th annual meeting. 

KEW ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, England. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 
Bericht, 1897-98. 

KING, W. H. H., Jacksonville, 111. 

Catalogue of (his) Museum, compiled by Th. Darragh. 
KLEIN, C. (the author), Berlin, Germany. 

Uber leucit und analcim und ihre gegenseitigen beziehungen. 

KJOBENHAVN. NATURHISTORISKE FORENING, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Videnskabelige meddelelser, 1897. 
KNIGHT, \Y. C. (the author), Laramie, Wyo. 

Some new Jurassic vertebrates trom Wyoming (gift). 
KOFOID, C. H. (the author), Urbana, 111. 

The fresh-water biological stations of America, with two other pams. 
KOLLIKER, ALBERT VON (the author), Wiirzburg, Germany. 

Zur kenntnis der quergestreiften muskelfasern, with 16 other pams. 
KRAUSS, F. S., Wien, Austria. 

Der urquell, vol. 2, nos. 1-8. 
LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY, Lake Forest, 111. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
LAMB, D. S., Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings of the loth session of the Association of Am. Anatomists, 
with I pam. 

LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 
Report for 1897 (gift). 

LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence, Mass. 
Annual report, 26th. 

LEEDS PHILOSOPHICAL AND LITERARY SOCIETY, Leeds, England. 
General guide to the Museum. 

LEHMANN-NlfsCHE, ROBERT (the author). La Plata, Argentina. 

Antropologia y craneologia (gift). 
LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCHE MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Uittreksel, 1895-96. 
LEIPZIG. K. SACHSISCHE GESELL. DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Leip- 
zig, Germany. 

Berichte, mathematisch-physische classe, current nos. 

Sachregister der abhandlungen und berichte, iS46-'95. 
LEMMON, J. G. (the author), Oakland, Cal. 

Conifers of the Pacific slope. 
LEON, NICOLAS, Guadelupe Hidalgo, D. F., Mexico. 

La moneda del general insurgente Don Jose Maria Morelos. 

Concilio provincial Mexicano 4. 

3 pamphlets. 

LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Second annual register. 

LEWIS, T. H. (the author), St. Paul, Minn. 

The northwestern archjeological survey (gift). 
LILIENFELD, PAUL VON (the author), Berlin, Germany. 

Zur vertheidigung der organischen methode in der sociologie (gift) 
LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England. 

Proceedings, vol. 7, no. 4, and vol. 8, no. i. 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. XXVII. 




Group of Orang-Outang Field Columbian Museum. 

C. E. Akeley. Taxidermist. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 317 

LLOYD, C. G., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Photogravures of American fungi, nos. 21-24. 

Third report of the Lloyd Mycological Museum, with 3 other pams. 

LOCY, W. A. (the author). Evanston, 111. 

Accessory optic vesicles in the chick embryo, with another pam. 

LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 

List of the society, 1897-98. 

Journal, current nos. 

Proceedings, Nov., 1896, to June, 1897. 
LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Geographical journal, current nos. 
LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, current nos. 

Year-book, 1896 and 1897. 
LONDON. SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH, London, W. E., 
England. 

Proceedings, vol. 13, pt. 33. 

LONDON. SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England. 

Journal, current nos. 
LONDON. ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, W., England. 

List of the fellows, 1897 and 1898. 

Proceedings, current parts. 

Transactions, vol. 14, pts. 4-6. 
LONG ISLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Memoirs, vol. 4. 
LOUBAT, J. F., Due de, Paris, France. 

Galerie Americaine du Musee D'Ethnographie du Trocadero, Pt. 2. 

II manoscritto Messicano Borgiano. 
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATIONS, 
Baton Rouge, La. 

Annual report, loth, 1897. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
LUCAS, F. A. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The tongues of b rds. 
MACDONALD, ARTHUR (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Emile Zola, a study (gift). 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Papers from the various departments, current nos. 
MACKAY, G. H. (the author), Boston, Mass. 

The terns of Muskeget Island, Mass., pt. 3. 
MAC RITCHIE, DAVID (the author), Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Pitcur and its merry elfins. 

The cave of Airlie. 
MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS. Madrid, Spain. 

Discursos en la reception pubiica del Sr. D. P. Mateo Sagasta. 

Memorias, vol 17. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Termeszetrajzi fuzetek, vol. 20, pt. 4, and vol. 21, pts. i and 2. 

MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Orono, Maine. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

MANCHESTER GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 
Transactions. v(>', 25, pts. 12-19. 

MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England. 

Catalogue of the Hadfield collection ot shells, pts. 2 and 3. 
Nomenclature of the seams of the Lancashire lower coal measures (gift). 
Report, 1897-98. 



3i8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

MANN, J. R., Washington, D. C. 

Report upon the condition and progress of the'U. S. National Museum^ 

1895 (gift). 

MARBURG. K. PREUSSISCHE UNIVERSITAT Marburg, Germany. 
Chronik, 1897-98. 

MARINE BIOL. ASS'N OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, Plymouth, England. 
Journal, new series, vol. 5, no. 2. 

MARSEILLE. FACULTE DES SCIENCES, Marseille, France. 
Annals, vol. 8, nos. 5-10. 
Annales de I'lnstitut Colonial, vol. 3, 1896. 

MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Baltimore, Md. 

Report, vol. i. 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE, Baltimore, Md. 

Semi-centennial report, etc., 1898. 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 

Transactions, 1897, pts. i and 2. 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass, 

Annual catalogue, i897-'98. 

Technology quarterly, current nos. 
MATTHEWS, WASHINGTON (the author), Washington, D. C. 

The Catlin collection of Indian paintings, with 20 other pams. 
MEEK, SETH E. (the author), Chicago. 

Report upon the fishes of Iowa, with 20 other pams. (gift). 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. 

Calendar, 1889-96 and 1898. 

MELNIKOFF, MICHEL, Petersburg, Russia. 
Guide du Musee de I'lnstitut de Mines. 

MERCER, H. C. (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Cave hunting in Yucatan, with 4 pams. 

MERIDEN SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Meriden, Conn. 
Transactions, vol. 8 (gift). 

MEUNIER, STANISLAS (the author), Paris, France. 
Revision des pierres meteoriques, with 2 pams. 

MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mex. 

Boletin, nos. 7-10. 
MICHIGAN ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, nos. i and 2. 
MICHIGAN STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXP. STATION, 
Michigan. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Elem. science buL, nos. 1-4. 

Report of the Botanical Department, 1896-97 (gift). 

MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Calendar, i897'-98. 

Report, 1897. 
MICROSCOPICAL PUBLISHING CO., Washington, D. C. 

The Microscope, current nos. (gift). 
MILLER, M. L. (the author), Chicago. 

Preliminary study of the Pueblo of Taos. 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F. (the author), Field Columbian Museum. 
Collection of 8 books and pams. 
Notes on the euphorbias of Dr. Edward Palmer's Durango Collection of 

1896 (gift). 

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Annual report, 15th. 
MINERAL COLLECTOR CO., New York City. 

Mineral collector, current nos. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 319: 

MINNESOTA. GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Minnesota botanical studies, 2d ser., pt. i. 

Title page and index to Bulletin, no. 9. 
MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minn. 

Biennial report, 8th and 9th. 

Collections, vols. 6, 7, and vol. 8, pts. 1-3. 

MINNESOTA UNU'ERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, St. An- 
thony Park. 

Bulletin, nos. 57 and 58 (gift). 

MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION,, Agricultural College, Miss. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Columbia, Mo. 
Bulletin, nos. 38-43 (gift). 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Mo. 
Annual report, 9th, 1897. 
North American lemnaceae, by C. H. Thompson. 

MONTEVIDEO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 
Anales, vol. 2, no. 8, and vol. 3, no. 9. 

MONTREAL. NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, 
Canada. 

Canadian antiquarian and numismatic journal, 3d ser., vol. i,nos. 2 and 3. 
MOORE, C. B. (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Certain aboriginal mounds. 
MOSES. A. J. (the author), New York City. 

The geometrical characters of crystals, with 5 other pams. 
MUGGE, O. (the author), Konigsberg, Prussia. 

Quarzporphvr der Bruchhauser steine in Westfalen, with another pam. 
MiJNCHEN. K. B.'aKAD. DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Munich, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1896, pts. 3 and 4, and 1897, pts. i and 2. 

I pamphlet. 

MUSEE DE GIZEH, Cairo, Egypt. 

Notice des principaux monuments exposes. 

MUS^E GUIMET, Paris, France. 

Annales, vols, i-io, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27. 

Annales, Bibliotheque, d'etudes, vols. 1-3 and 5-7. 

Le Boudhisme, par L. de Milloue. 

Catalogue, 1883. 

Comptu rendu du Congres Provincial des Orientalistes, Lyon, 1878. 

Guide illustre, 1894. 

MUSEO DE LA PLATA, La Plata, Argentina. . 
Anales, anthropologic, no. 2. 

Limites occidentales de la Republica Argentina, by E. S. Delachaux. 
Revista, vol. 7, pt. 2, and vol. 8. 

MUSEU PARAENSE DE HISTORIA NATURAL E ETHNOGRAPHIE, 
Pard, Brazil. 

Boletin, vol. 2, nos. 1-3. 

MUSEUM UMLAUFF, Ham'burg, Germany. 
Die Koreanische sammlung (gift). 

NADAILLAC, J. F. A. du P. (the author), Paris, France. 
Les agglomerations urbaines. 
Le royaume de Benin. 

NAPOLI. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Naples, Italy. 
Rendiconto, current nos. 

NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal, Africa. 
New Natal plants, decades i and 2. 
Report, 1897, with report of the Colonial Herbarium. 



320 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. i. 

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 
National geographic magazine, current nos. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATIONARY ENGINEERS, Chicago. 
Questions and answers in i8g6-'97 competition. 
Report of the license committee, 1895-96 (gift). 

"NATURA ARTIS MAGISTRA," Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Koninklijk zool. genootschap '• Natura Artis Magistra," 1838-98 (gift). 
NATURE STUDY PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Birds, current nos. (gift). 

NEBRASKA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Lincoln, Neb. 
Proceedings, t8q6. 

"NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Neb. 
Calendar, 1897-98. 

:NEBRASKA university agricultural EXP. STATION, Lincoln, 
Neb. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

NEDERLANDSCHE DIERKUXDIGE VEREENIGING, Leiden, Nether- 
lands. 

Catalogus der bibliotheek. 
Tijdschrift, 2d ser., vol. 5, pts. 1-4. 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, Ba- 
tavia, Java. 

Bockwerken ter tafel gebracht, 1897. 

Natuurkundig tijdschrift voor NederlandschTndie, vol. 57. 
:NEVADA state university AGRIC. EXP. STATION, Reno, Nev. 
Bulletin, nos. 34-36. 

■NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Mass. 
Annual report, 46th. 

:NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. John, Canada. 
Bulletin, vol. 4, pt. i. 

NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 
Proceedings, 1898. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Dur- 
ham. N. H. 

Bulletin, nos. 46-52 (gift). 

NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXP. STATION, Trenton, 
N. J. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Report of the Botanical Department, 1897. 

NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, X. J. 
Annual report, 1897. 
Final report, vol. 4. 

NEW JERSEY STATE MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, New Brunswick, N.J. 

Abstract of the minutes, October, 1894-April, 1897. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Mesilla Park, N. M. 

Bulletin, nos. 13, 14, 20 and 23-26 (gift). 

NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, New South Wales. 
Annual report, 1897. 

.NEW SOUTH WALES. DEP'T OF MINES AND AGRIC, Sydney, New 
South Wales. 

Annual report, 1897. 

Mineral resources, nos. i and 2. 

Records of the Geological Survey, vol. 5, nos. 3 and 4, 
NEW SOUTH WALES. LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Journal and proceedings, vols. 12-31. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 321 

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City. 

Annals, vol. il, pt. I. 

Transactions, vol. 16. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Geneva, N. Y. 

Bulletin, nos. 117, 118, and current nos. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

Bulletin, vol. i, no. 3. 
NEW YORK. GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADES- 
MEN, New York City. 

Annual report, 112th, 1897. 
NEW YORK. MERCANTILE LIBRARY, New'York City. 

Annual report, 77th. 

Bulletin, no. 18. 
NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 

Annual report, 1898. 
NEW YORK MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Journal; vol. 14, no. i. 
NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, current nos. 
NEW YORK. YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, New York. 

Annual report, 44th, 1896 (gift). 
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE OF FORESTRY, Ithaca, New York. 

Announcement, 1898-99 (gift). 
NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, N. Y. 

Annual report of the State ISotanist, 1895. 

Annual report, 78th and 79th, of the New York State Library. 

Annual report, 49th and 50th, of the New York State Museum. 

Bulletm of the New York State Museum, vol. 4. nos. 16-18. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, N. J. 

Annual report, 1897. 

List of periodicals and newspapers in the reading-room. 

NEWARK TECHNICAL SCHOOL, Newark, N. J. 

Commercial technical education, by C. A. Colton. 

Hand-book of information, 1897-98. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1896-97. 
NORTH CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Bulletin, nos. i, 3, 5, 6, 9, 10 and 13. 

First biennial report, 1891-92. 
NORTON, A. H. (the author), Westbrook, Me. 

The sharp-tailed sparrows of Maine, with 2 other pams. 
NOVA SCOTIA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Proceedings and transactions, vol. 9, pt. 3. 

OBER, F. A., Washington, D. C. 

Aborigines of the West Indies. 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlm, Ohio. 

Laboratory bulletin, nos. 8 and 9. 

Wilson bulletin, nos. 15-21. 

OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Annual report, 13th, 1897. 

Ohio archaeological and historical quarterly, vol. 6, nos. i, 2 and 3. 

Publications, vols. 4 and 5. 



322 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Eighth annual report of Farmers" Institutes. 

Official report of condition of crops. 

Proceedings of 53rd annual state agricultural convention (gift)i 
OHIO STATE FAIR, Columbus, Ohio. 

Premiums and regulations for the 4.8th annual fair. 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Neb. 

Report, 1897. p 

ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, N. Y. 
Transactions, no. 7. 

ONTARIO BUREAU OF MINES, Toronto, Ontario. 
Report, vol 7, pt. 2. 
Sixth report, 1896. 

ONTARIO. DEFT OF AGRICULTURE, Toronto, Ontario. 

Annual report, i8g6, 2 vols. 

Annual report, 28th, of the Entom. Society of Ontario. 

Ontario, premier province of Canada. 

ORDONEZ, EZEQUIEL (the author), Mexico, Max. 
Note sur les gisements d'or du Mexique (gift). 

OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Bulletin, nos. 45-48, 50-52, and 54 (gift). 
OREGON UNIVERSITY, Eugene, Oregon. 

Annual catalogue, 22d. 
OTTAWA FIELD-NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, vol. 12, nos. 2-5. 

OLTTES, F. F. (the author), Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Los Querandies (gift). 

PALERMO. REALE ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 
Index seminum anno 1897 collectorum. 

PALMER, MRS. C. F., New York City. 

Inebriety, its source, prevention, and cure (gift). 
PAMMEL, L. H., Ames, Iowa. 

Sugar beet growing in Iowa, 1897 (gift). 

PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 
Comptes rendus des seances, current nos. 

PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current nos. 

PASADENA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Pasadena, Cal. 
Publication, nos. 2 and 3 (gift). 

PEABODY MUSEUM, Cambridge, Mass, 
Memoirs, vol. i, nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5. 
Report, 1896-97. 

PECK, C. H., Albany, N. Y. 

Annual report of the New York State Bonanist, 1896. 

PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography, current nos. 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, 
State College, Pa. 

Bulletin of information, no. 2. 

Bulletin, nos. 39, 40 and 41 (gift). 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE LIBRARY, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Report of the Treasury Department, 1896. 
17 pamphlets. 
1 1 state reports. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 323 

PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report, 1897. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 

University bulletin, vol. 2, no. 4. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, FREE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND 
ART, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, nos. 2-4. 

PEQRIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, 111. 

Annual report, 17th and 18th. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 66th. ■• 

PERRY MASON c\: CO., Boston, Mass. 

Arthur Henry Hallam, by W. E. Gladstone (gift). 

PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, 1897, pts. 2 and 3, and 1898, pt. i. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Transactions, 3rd series, vol. 19. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, new series, nos. 39, 40 and 41. 
PHILLIPS, P. L., Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Alaska and the northwest part of North America, 1 588-1898 (gift). 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBARY, Portland, Me. 

Annual report, i897-'98. 
PRAG. K. K. DEUTSCHE CARL-FERDINANDS UNIVERSITAT, Prag, 
Bohemia. 

Feierliche installation des rectors, 1897-98. 

Ordnung der vorlesungen, i898-'99. 

Personalstand, 1898-99. 

Seznam prednasek, 1898-99. 

PRATT INSTITUTE. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report of the free library, 1896-97. 

PRESTO CO., Chicago. 

The Presto, current nos. (gift). 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N. J. 

Bulletin, vol. 9, current nos. 

Catalogue, i897-'98. 
PROVIDENCE ATHEN^UM, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 62d. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, R. L 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, La Fayette, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, 1897-98. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY AGRIC. EXP. STATION, La Fayette, Ind. 

Annual report, loth, 1897. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Bulletin, nos. 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of the Geological Survey. 
II pamphlets. 

QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Aimals, no. 4. 
Annual report, 1897. 
Annual report on British New Guinea, 1896-97. 

QUEENSLAND. ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 
Proceedings, vol. 13. 



324 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

QUEVEDO, SAMUEL A. LAFONE (the author), Paliciao, Argentina. 
Lenguas argentinas, idioma Abipon. 
Los Indios Chanases y su lengua. 
Los Indios Matacos y su lengua. 

RADDE, G., Tiflis, Kaukasus. 

Die lachse des Kaukasus, pt. 2 (gift). 

RADLKOFER, LUDWIG (the author), Munich, Germany. 

BeitrJige zur anatomie und systematik der begoniaceen, with 4 pams. 
RAILWAY LIST CO., Chicago. 

Railway master mechanic, current nos. (gift). 

RANCH, S. H. (the author), Baltimore, Md. 

Need of additional copyright depositories (gift). 

RANDALL, T. A. & CO., Indianapalis, Ind. 
Clay worker, current nos. (gift). 

READ, C. H. (the author), London, England. 
Works of art from Benin City. 

REDWOOD LIBRARY AND ATHEN^UM, Newport, R. I. 
Annals, by J. C Mason. 
Osteology of anterior vertebras in doras niger, by R. Bliss. 

REID, H. F. (the author), Baltimore, Md. 

Glacier Bay and its glaciers. 

Studies of Muir Glacier, Alaska. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Kingston, R. I. 

Annual report, 9th, 1896. 

Bulletin, nos. 47 and 48. 

RICE, W. N. (the author), Middleton, Conn. 

Geology and mineralogy in the U. S. National Museum, \yith i review. 

RICHET, CHARLES, Paris, France. 
Revue scientifique, current nos. 

RIGGS, R. B. (the author), Hartford, Conn. 

The analysis and composition of tourmaline, with 6 other pams. 

RIVERS, FOX PITT, Salisbury, England. 

Excavations in Cranborne chase, Bokerly Dyke and Wansdyke, 3 vols. 

ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, i6th, 1898. 
ROSENBUSCH, H., Heidelberg, Germany. 

Der nephelinit vom Katzenbuckel, with 11 other pams. 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, CEYLON BRANCH, Colombo, Ceylon. 
Journal, vol. 15, no. 48. 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, CHINA BRANCH, Shanghai, China. 
Journal, vols. 28-30. 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, STRAITS BRANCH, Singapore, Straits Set- 
tlements. 
Journal, no. 30. 

RUSSEL, I. C. (the author), Ann Arbor, Mich. 

A geological reconnaisance in southern Oregon, with 7 other pams. 

RUST, H. N. (the author), South Pasadena, Cal. 

Catalogue of prehistoric relics from San Nicolas Island, Cal. 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, Fordham, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1896-97. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, St. Louis, Mo. 

Transactions, current nos. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Chronological list of Missouri and Illinois newspapers, i8o8-'97. 
ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FIXE ARTS, St. Louis, Mo. 

Second annual exhibition of the Society of Western Artists, 1897. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Rf.port of the Director. 325 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY. St. Louis, Mo. 

.•\nnual report, 1896-97. 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue, i897-'<)8. 
ST. VIATEUR'S COLLEGE, Bourbonnais, 111. 

Catalogue, 1898-99. 

The Viatorian, vol. 15, nos. i-io (gift). 

ST. \TNCENT COLLEGE, Pennsylvania. 
Catalogue, i896-'g8. 

SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Mass. 

Annual report. 9th, 1897. ■* 

Bulletin, current nos. 

SANDWITH, THOMAS (the author), Nicosia, Cyprus. 

Different styles of pottery found in ancient tombs in the island of Cyprus 
(gift). 
SAN FRANCISCO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, San Francisco, Cal. 

Report, 1896-97. 
SAN FRANCISCO. MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, San Francisco, Cal. 

Annual report, 43d. 

Bulletin, vol. 2, current nos. 

SAO PAULO. MUSEU PAULISTA, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Revista, vol. 2. 
SAVILLE, M. H. (the author). New York City. 

An ancient figure of Terra Cotta from the Valley of Mexico, with two 
other pams. 

SCHARIZER, RUDOLF (the author), Czernowitz, Hungary. 

Professor Dr. Albrecht Schrauf, eine biografische skizze. 

SCHMELTZ, J. D. E. (the author), Leyden, Netherlands. 
Das pflugfest in China, with 4 other separates (gift). 

SELIGMANN, G. (the author), Coblenz, Germany. 

Beschreibung der auf der grube Friedrichssegen vorkommenden miner- 
alien, with 7 pams. 

SHATTUCK, L. B., Chicago. 

Fame's tribute to children (gift). 

SHOOTING AND FISHING PUBLISHING CO., New York City. 

Shooting and fishing, current nos. (gift). ' 
SHUFELDT, R. W. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Taxidermical methods in the Leyden Museum, Holland. 
SKIFF, F. J. v., Chicago. 

Am. Inst, of Mining Engineers: List of officers, etc., 1898. 
" " " Papers read, 1897. 

" " " Transactions, vols. 25-27. 

Descriptive catalogue of useful fibre plants of the world, by C. R. Dodge. 

Lord & Thomas' pocket directory, 1895 and '97 (gift). 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington. D. C. 
Bulletin, no. 38, pt. L. 
Contributions to knowledge, no. 1 126. 
Contributions to Philippine ornithology. 
Miscellaneous collections, vols. 38, 40,,, and nos. 856, 969, 970, 1087, 1090, 

1 125 and 1 1 26. 
Proceedings, vol. 19. 
Report of the Secretary, 1897. 
Report of the U. S. Nat. Mus., 1895. 
The Smithsonian Institution, i846-'96. 

SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico, Mex. 
Memorias y revista, current nos. 

SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 
Bollettino, current nos. 
Memorie, current nos. 



326 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

SOCIETY DES AEMRICANISTES DE PARIS, Paris, France. 

Journal, nos. 4 and 5. 
SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, Cape Colony. 

Annals, vol. i, pt. i. 

Report, 1897. 

Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society, vol. 7, pt. 2, and 
vol. 9, pt. 2. 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Clemson College, 
S. C. 

Bulletin, nos. 31-35 (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Brookings, S. D. 

Bulletin, nos. 56-60. 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Mass. 

Collections in the Museum of Natural History. 

Library bulletin, current nos. 
STATEN ISLAND. NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Staten Island, 
N. Y. 

Proceedings, vol. 6, current nos. 

STEWARD, J. F., Chicago. 

Memorial of Robert McCormick (gift). 
STOCKHOLM. K. SVENSKA VETENSKAPSAKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 

Bihang, vol. 22. 

Handlingar, vol. 28. 

Ofversigt, vol. 53. 
STOCKHOLM. K. VITTERHETS HIST. OCH ANTIQ. AKAD., Stockholm, 

Sweden. 

Manadsblad, 1887-94, 8 vols. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Storrs, Conn. 

Annual report, loth, 1897.- 

Bulletin, no. 18 (gift). 
STRASSBURG. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Strassburg, Germany. 

22 inaugural dissertations. 

STRETTON, C. E., Leicester, England. ei. ^ ,^ » t • 1 

Rules, regulations and by-laws of the Manchester, Shefheld & Lmcoln- 

shire Railway C©. 
3 pamphlets. 

SWAN, A. M. (the author), Albuquerque, N. M. 
The birth of man. 

SYDERE, A. H., Toronto, Ontario. . ^ t. • t r^ .  a t^ 

Collection of 73 Government reports of the Provmce of Ontario and Do- 
minion of Canada. 

2 bulletins. 

I pamphlet. 
TAUNTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Taunton, Mass. 

Annual report, 1897. 
TEALL, J. J. H. (the author), London, England. t r t ^ 

Notes on a collection of rocks and fossils from Franz Josef Land. 
TELEGRAPHIC HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Washington, D. C. 

History with proceedings of ist to 3d annual meetings (gift). 

TENNE, C. A. (the author), Berlin, Germany. 

Uber gesteine der gethiopischen vulkanreihe, with another pam. 
TENNESSEE CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION, Nashville, Tenn. 

Preliminary report of the work of the jury of awards (gift). 
TEPPER, J. G. O. (the author), Norwood, South Australia. 

The phaneropteridae of Australia, with 4 other pams. 
TERRY, JAMES (the author). New Haven, Conn. 

Sculptured anthropoid ape heads. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 327 

TEXAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Austin, Texas. 
Transactions, vol. 2, no. i. 

TEXAS AGRICUL rURAL EXP. STATION, Austin, Tex. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

THOMAS, CYRUS (the author), Frederick, Md. 
Day symbols of the Maya year. 

THOULET, J., Nancy, France. 

Notice sur les travaux, scientifiques publics par M. J. Thoulet. 

THRUSTON, G. P. (the author), Nashville, Tenn. 

The antiquities of Tennessee, 2d ed. 
THURSTON, L. A. (the author), Hand-book on the annexation of Hawaii (gift). 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Botanical magazine, current nos. 
TOKYO. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCH. FUR NATUR UND VOLKER- 
KUNDE OSTASIENS, JAPAN. 

Mittheilungen, no. 60 and supplem. to vol. 6. 

Sprichvvorter und bildlichen ausdriicke der japanischen sprache, pts. 2 
and 3. 
TOOKER, W. W. (the author), Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

The significance of John Eliot's Natick. 

TORINO. MUSEI DI ZOOL. ED ANAT. COMPARATA DELLA R. UNI- 
VERSITA, Italy. 

Bollettino, current nos. 

TORINO. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Torino, Italy. 
Atti, vols. 31, 32 and 33, nos. 1-6. 

TORINO. REGIO MUSEO INDUSTRIALE ITALIANO, Torino, Italy. 
Annuario, i8g8. 
Memorie e note, i8g8. 

TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

University of Toronto studies, history, 2d ser., vol. i, pt. i. 
TORREY BOTANICAL CLUB, New York City. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

TRING. ZpOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 
Novitates zoologicae, current nos. 

TUBINGEN. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

Tiibinger universitatsschriften, 1896-97. 

Zur frage der kausalitat, by Dr. E. Pfleiderer. 
TUFTS COLLEGE, Tufts College, Mass. 

Tufts College studies, no. 5. 
TURNER, H. W. (the author), Washington, D. C. 

Further contributions to the geology of the Sierra Nevada. 

U. S. AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 
Annual reports, (897. 

Exp. Station record, vol. 8, no. 12 and current nos. 
North American fauna, no. 13. 
Report of the Secretary, 1897. 
Special report on the beet sugar industry. 
161 bulletins. 
83 circulars. 

U. S. AMERICAN REPUBLICS BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 
Annual report, 1897. 
Monthly bulletin, current nos. 

U. S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

Fourteenth annual report, 1896-97 (gift). 
U. S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1896. 



328 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

U. S. EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 
International reports of Schools for the Deaf. 
Pronunzia Inglese visibile, by A. M. Bell. 
Report, 1895-96 and '96-97, vol. i. 

U. S. ETHNOLOGY BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, i6th, 1894-95. 
U. S. FISH AND FISHERIES COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

Report on salmon investigation in the Columbia river, 1898. 

Report, pts. 22 and 23, i895-'96. 
U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, i8th, pt. 5 (2 vols.), and Director's report. 

Chart of mineral products of the U. S., 1888-1897. 
U. S. INTERIOR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents, 1896 and 1897. 

Lands of the Arid Regions, by Powell. 

Reports of the Commissioner of Education, 1877-1891 (15 vols.). 

Reports of the Commissioner of General Land Office, 1876-1896. 

Reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1879 ^^^ 1896. 

Report on population of the V. S. at the Eleventh Census, 1890, pt. 2. 

Report on vital and social statistics of the Eleventh Census, 1890, pt. i. 
U. S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 

List of books relating to Cuba, with 2 other pams. 
U. S. STATE DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Consular reports, current nos. 

General index to monthly consular reports, vols. 42-54. 

International exposition at Paris in 1900. 
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Washington, D.C. 

Condition of seal life on the rookeries of the Pribilof Islands, 1893-95^ 
pt. 2 (2 vols.). 
U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Index catalogue of Library, Surgeon-General's Office, 2d ser., vol. 2. 
UPSALA. K. UNIVERSITETS-BIBLIOTHEK, Upsala, Sweden. 

Bulletin of the Geological Institution, vol. 3, pts. i and 2. 

Farmakodynamiska studier, by K. Hedborn. 

Studien liber nordeuropaische fibelformen, by O. Almgren. 

L'psala Universitet, i872-'97. 

4 pamphlets. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, 
Utah. 

Annual report, 8th, i896-'97. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Montpelier, Vt. 

Annual report, loth (gift). 

Bulletin, current nos. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vt. 

Catalogue, i897-'98. 
VICTORIA. ZOOL. AND ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Melbourne, 
Victoria. 

Annual report, 22d, 24th, 26th-28th, and 30th-33rd. 

Proceedings, vols. 2 and 4. 

2 pams., by D. LeSouef. 
VIGNOLI, TITO (the author), Milano, Italy. 

Peregrinazioni antropologiche e fisiche. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Va. 

Annals of mathematics, current nos. 
Catalogue, i897-'98. 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of thk Director. 329, 

VOLTA RUREAl\ Washington, D. C. 

Sermon reading and memoriter delivery, by A. M. Bell. 

WAGNER FREE INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Transactions, vols. 4.and 5. 

WANGANUI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Wanganui, New Zealand. 
Annual report, 1897. 
Natural history notes, by S. H. Drew. 

WASHINGTON ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, I). C. 
American anthropologist, current nos. 

WASHINGTON AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Pullman, Wash. 
Bulletin, no. 32 (gift). 

WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 
Proceedings, vol. 11, current nos. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
WEBB, W. W., Albion, N. Y. 

The Museum, vols. 1-3 and vol. 4, nos. 1-4 (gift). 
WEINSCHENK, ERNEST, Miinchen, Bavaria. 

Die graphitlagerstatten des bayerisch-bohmischen grenzgebirges. 
WELLER, STUART (the author), Chicago. 

The Batesville sandstone of Arkansas, with 9 other pams. (gift). . 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE, Boston,. Mass. 
Calendar, 1897-98. 

WELLINGTON ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Wellington, New Zealand. 
Annual report, nth, 12th and 13th. 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middleton, Conn. 
Annual catalogue, i897-'98. 
Bulletin, nos. 21 and 22. 

WEST CHESTER STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, West Chester, Pa. 
Historic letters (gift). 

WESTERN AUSTRALIAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, W. Australia. 
Bulletin, no. i. 
Reports on the water supply of the goldfields. 

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO., New York City. , 

Annual report, 1897 (gift). 
WHITMAN, C. O. (the author), Chicago. 

Some of the functions and features of a biological station. 
WHITE, T. G. (the author). New York City. 

A contribution to the petrography of the Boston Basin. 

WIEN. ANTHROPOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Vienna, Austria. 
Mittheilungen, current nos. 

WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOF-MUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen, vol. 12. 

WIEN. . K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria. 

Ubersicht der akademischen behorden, 1897-98, with 4 other pams. 
WILLE, NILS, Christiania, Norway. 

Beitrage zur physiologischen anatomie der laminariaceen. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 

Report, 1898. 

WINDSOR AND KENFIELD PUBLISHING CO., Chicago. 

Brick, current nos.' 

Street railway review, current nos. (gift). 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wis. 

Collections, vol. 14. 

Proceedings, 1897. 

Story of its growth, etc. 



330 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wis. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Madison, 
Wisconsin. 

Annual report, 14th, 1897. 
Bulletin, nos. 63-65 and 67-68. 

■^WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Mass. 
Annual report, 38th, 1896-97. 
The use of pictures in libraries. 

WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Worcester, Mass. 
Journal, vol. r, no. i, 

WULFING, E. A., Tubingen, Germany. 

Beitrage zur kenntnis der pyroxenfamilie, with 8 other pans. 

WORTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 
Stuttgart. 

Jahreshefte, vols. 52-54. 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXP. STATION, Laramie, Wyo. 
Annual report, 7th. 
Bulletin, nos. 34-37. 

WYOMING HIST. AND GEOL. SOCIETY, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

The German leaven in the Pennsylvania loaf, by H. Richards. 
Proceedings and collections, vol. 4, pt. i. 

WYOMING UNIVERSITY, Laramie, Wyo. 
Catalogue, 1897-98. 

TALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1897-98. 
Report, 1897. 

.ZIMANYI, KARL (the author), Budapest, Hungary. 

tjber dem azurit vom Laurion-gebirge in Griechenland, with 8 other pams. 



o 

73 



> 



o 

-n 

O 

m 
O 
O 

J3 

> 

I 



o 

m 
O 

r- 
O 

o 



o 

o 

c 

> 
z 



c 
t/) 
m 

c 
s 




Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 331 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. HmKicnsET^, Secretary 0/ Sfa/e : 

To ALL TO Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting : 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, A. p, i8q3, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under and 
in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Tcstimofiy Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the 
Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[seal] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State : 
Sir : 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled, " An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof ; and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archeology, Science and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid museum shall be vested in a Board of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 



332 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E.Adams, George R. Davis^ Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. 
Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, 
John C. Black and P>ank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of [Chicago, County of Cook^ 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Buck- 
ingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M.Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat^ 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, Geo. 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin 
Walker, Geo. M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. 
Hale, Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream^ 
Norman Williams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop. Eliphalet W. Blatchford, 
Philip D. Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, ) 

[• ss. 
Cook County. \ 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowl- 
edged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was 
changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was 
filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Oct. i8g8. Annual Report of the Director. 333 



Field Columbian Museum. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 

(April 25, 1898.) 
ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of 
any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within 
said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground of forfeiture of 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
First. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum on any day. 
Second.— Ttn tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay days. 
Third. — A copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance door, 

and to the annual reports. 
Fourth. — Invitations to all receptions, lectures or other entertainments which 

may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The corporate members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of association, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 
time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in the articles 
of association shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
persons hereafter chosen as corporate members, shall, within ninety days of their 
respective election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars ($20.00) or 
more. The failure of any person to make such payments within said time shall, 
at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of his corporate 
membership. The annual dues of corporate members shall be five dollars ($5.00) 
after the first year of membership, and no one shall exercise the rights of a cor- 
porate member until his dues are paid; and a delinquency of six months in the 
payment of annual dues shall be ground for forfeiture of corporate membership. 
Corporate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members 
shall be exempt from dues. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of fi.ve hundred dollars 
at any one time shall, upon the unanimous vote of the trustees, become a life 
member. Life members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees, upon recommen- 
dation of the Executive Committee, from among persons who have rendered 



334 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 

eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by- 
virtue of their election as patrons, shall also be corporate members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary members shall be chosen from among persons who have 
rendered eminent service to science, art or mechanics. They shall be chosen by 
a vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the Executive 
Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. In commemoration of the 14th 
day of October, honorary members shall not be more than fourteen in number at 
any one time. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible to appointment upon 
committees other than the Executive Committee. 



ARTICLE II. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The respective members of the Board of Trustees now in office, 
and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies 
occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the remaining mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Secretary 
and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall be chosen 
by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early as practicable 
after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall be ex-officio a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee, in addition to the other four members. The 
Secretary and Treasurer may, or may not, be the same person, and the Secretary 
may, or may not, be a corporate member. 

Any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any office 
may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Committee 
on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure of the Board. 

Sec. 4. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such other duties as the Board of Trustees may from 
time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount 
and with such surety as shall be approved by the Executive Committee, and shall 
disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with the directions of the 
Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter-signature of such officers 
as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall have full control of the affairs of 
the Museum, under the general supervision of the Board of Trustees. 



ARTICLE III. 

meetings. 

Section i. In commemoration of the discovery of America by Christopher 
Columbus, the annual meeting of the corporate members shall be held on the 14th 
day of October in each year, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and then 
upon the Monday following. At such meetings the corporate members shall 



Oct. 1898. Annual Report of the Director. 335. 

transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. Special meet- 
ings of the corporate members shall be called at any time by the Secretary upon 
written request of twenty corporate members. In such case, thirty days' notice 
by mail shall be given to corporate members of the time, place and purpose of. 
such meetings. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon the 
14th day of October, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and then upon the 
Monday following, and upon the last Monday of January, April and July of each 
year. Special meetings may be called by the Presid,ent at any time upon reason- 
able notice by mail, and shall be called upon the written request of three Trustees. 
Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum. 



ARTICLE IV. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding, or shall be^ 
recommended by the Executive Committee. 



336 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



HONORARY MEMBERS- 

CHARLES B. CORY. MARY D. STURGES. 

£DWARD E. AYER. HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM. 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR. FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF. 

WILLARD A. SMITH. WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN. 

FREDERICK W. PUTNAM, 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. XVII. 




Hopi Hunter Ethnic Group Field Coluwbian Museum. 

Cast from life and sculptured by F. B. Melville. 



Oct. 1898. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



337 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN V. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
AVER, EDWARD E. 

BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 
BRYAN, THOMAS B. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CLARK, JOHN M. 
CHALMERS, W.J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 

DA\- IS, GEORGE R. 

EASTMAN, SYDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R, 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 

JACKSON, HUNTINGTON W. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEITH, E. G. 
KOHLSAAT,*HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 
LEITER, L. Z. 

McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McCONNELL, JOHN 

Mccormick, gyrus h. 

McNALLY, ANDREW 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PETERSON, P. S. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SKIFF, F. J. V. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WALSH, JOHN R. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



SCOTT, JAMES W. 



DECEASED. 

BISSELL, GEORGE F, 
PULLMAN. GEORGE M. 



338 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



By the payment of five 

ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, P. D. 

BLAIR, CHAUNCEV J. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BOOTH, W. VERNOX 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WHJJAM J. 
COOPER, FRANK H. 
CRANE, R. T. 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DOANE, J. W. 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARGO, CHARLES 
FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HEALY, P. J. 
HIBBARD, W. G. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. [PORTER 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 

JOHNSON, M. D., FRANK S. 
JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
JONES, ARTHUR B. [AYER 

KEITH, ELBRIDGE G. 

KIMBALL, W. W. 

KING, FRANCIS 

KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER THOMPSON 



hundred dollars. 
McCORMICK, MRS. 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 

McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
MACKAY, JOHN W\ 

macveagh, franklin 
mitchell, j. j. 
murdoch, thomas 

newell, a. b. 

ogden, mrs. frances e. 
orr, robert m. 

pearsons, d. k. 
pike, eugene s. 
porter, george t. 
porter, h. h. 

PORTER, Jr., H. H. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. ' 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, ROBERT S. 
SEAVERNS, GEORGE A. 
SHERMAN, JOHN B. 
SINGER, C.G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STUDEBAKER, CLEM. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMBERT 

WELLING, JOHN C. 
WELLS, M. D. 

WHEELER, GEORGE HENRY 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



Oct. 1898. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



339 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADLER, DANKMAR 
ALDRICH, FRED 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ALLERTON, MRS. S. W. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 
ARNOLD, J. B. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, ALFRED L. 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BALDWIN, WILLIS M. 
BANE, OSCAR F. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARNHART, ARTHUR M. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, WILLIAM H. 
BATCHELLER, W. 
BEAUVAIS, E. A. 
BECK, CHARLES A. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BEECHER, MRS. JEROME 
BEIDLER, FRANCIS 
BELDEN, J. S. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BINGHAM, A. E. 
BIRKHOFF, JR., GEORGE 
BLACK MAN, W. L. 
BLACKSTONE, T. B. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BLAIR, WILLIAM 
BLISS, SAMUEL E. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BONNEY, CHARLES C. 
BOOTH, A. 



BORDEN; JAMES U. 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BOUTON, N. S* 

BRADLEY, CHAS. FREDERICK 
BRAD WELL, JAMES B. 
BRAINERD, E. R. 
BRAUN, GEORGE P. 
BREGA, CHARLES W. 
BREMNER, DAVID F. 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROWN, GEORGE F. 
BROWN, JOHN H. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, AUGUSTUS H. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURLEY, FRANK E. 
BURNET, WILLIAM H. 
BYRAM, A. 

CABLE. R. R. 
CANNELL, S. WILMER 
CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER, MYRON J. 
CHANDLER, C. C. 
CHANDLER, FRANK R. 
CHAPPELL, C. H. 
CHENEY, C. C. 
CLARK, JONATHAN 
CLARKE, CLINTON C. 
CLIFF, CAPTAIN JOHN 
CLOUD, JOHN W. 
COBB, S. B. 
COMAN, SEYMOUR 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONKLING, ALLEN 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 
COOLIDGE, CHARLES A. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. JOHN C. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 



340 



Field Columbian Musf.um— Reports, Vol. i. 



COWAN, W. P. 

COX, ALFRED J. 

CRANE, CHARLES R. 

CROSBY, WILLL\M HOWARD 

CUDAHY, JOHN 

CULVER, MRS. CHARLES E. 

CUMMINGS, E. A. 

CURTIS, D. H. 

DAL, M.D., JOHN W. 
DARLING, MRS. ADELINE 
DAVIS, LEWIS H. 
DAY, ALBERT M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEAN, THAD. 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DELANO, F. A. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DICK, A. B. 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DODGE, G. E. P. 
DUDDLESTON, GEORGE 
DUMMER, W. F. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
DURAND, H. C. 
DWIGHT, JOHN H. 

EDMUNDS, ABRAHAM 
EDWARDS, J. A. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, CHARLES 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FEATHERSTONE, A. 
FELSENTHAL, H. 
FERGUSON, B. F. 
FERGUSON, CHARLES H. 
FISCHER, FREDERICK 
FISH, STUYVESANT 
FISHER, L.G. 
FLANNERY, JOHN L. 
FLERSHEM, LEM W. 
FLOWER, JAMES M. 
FOREMAN, EDWIN G. 
FOREMAN, OSCAR G. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRANK, MAX 
FRANKENTHAL, L. E., M.D. 



FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FREER, NATHAN M. 
FREYTAG, MORITZ 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GANS, SAMUEL 
GATES, J. W. 
GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GIBBS, JAMES S. 
GIFFORD, C. E. 
GIFFORD, I. CUSHMAN 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GORMULLY, R. PHILIP 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GRIFFIN, T. A. 
GRISWOLD, E. P. 
GROSS, S. E. 

GUION, GEORGE MURRAY 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HAMBLETON, C. J. 
HAMILTON, HENRY E. 
HAMILTON, I. K. 
HANECY, ELBRIDGE 
HANSON, DA\TD N. 
HARBECK, EUGENE 
HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, D. J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N.W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HEARD, DWIGHT BANCROFT 
HEATH, ERNEST W. 
HELMER, FRANK A. 
HENNING, FRANCIS A., M.D. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HINES, EDWARD 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, D. R. 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, JAMES L. 



Oct. 1898. 



Annual Report of ihk Director. 



341 



HOWLANI), WALTER M. 
HUTCHINSON, MRS. B. P. 

ILIFF, WILLIAM H. 
IXGALS. E. FLETCHER 
INGALS, EPHRAIM, M. D. 
INSULL, SAMUEL 
ISHAM, EDWARD S. 

JANES, JOHN J. 
lEFFERV, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JENKINS, T.R. 
JOHNSON, J. M. 
JONES, J. S. 

KAMMERER, E.G. 
K.-\VANAGH, CHARLES J. 
KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KELLOGG, MRS. C. P. 
KENT, THOMAS 
KENT, WILLIAM 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, GEORGE F. 
KIMBALL. MRS. MARK 
KIRCHBERGER, S. H. 
KLEINE, HENRY 
KOEHLER, THOMAS N. 

LAFLIN, ALBERT S. 
LAFLIN, ARTHUR K. 
LAFLIN, GEORGE H. 
LAFLIN, LYCURGUS 
LAMB, CHARLES A. 
LAMB, FRANK H. 
LARTZ, W. C. C. 
LAWRENCE, EDWARD F. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LEITER, JOSEPH 
LEWIS, JAMES F. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LLOYD, EVAN 
LOEWENTHAL, B. 



LOGAN, F. G. 
LOMBARD, JOSIAH L. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LOWTHER, THOMAS D. 
LOWY, HAIMAN 
LYON, GEORGE M. 
LYON, THOMAS R. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McLENNAN, j: A. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MACFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MAIR, CHARLES A. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MANVEL, MRS. ANNA F. 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MARSHALL, GEORGE E. 
MATTHIESSEN, C. H. 
MAY, FRANK E. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MEAD, W. L. 
MERRICK, L. C. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, JOHN S'. 
MILLER, ROSWELL 

MILLER, THOMAS 

MILLER, DR. TRUMAN W. 

MIXER, C.H.S. 

MOORE, L. T. 

MOORE, N. G. 

MOORE, SILAS M. 

MORISON, GEORGE S. 

MORRIS, EDWARD 

MORRIS, IRA 

MORRIS, NELSON 

MORRISSON, JAMES W. 

MORSE, JAY C. 

MOULTON, GEORGE M. 

MULLIKEN, A. H. 

MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

MUNRO, WILLIAM 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 



342 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. i. 



NELSON, MURRY 
NEVIN, W. G. 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
ORTSEIFEN, ADAM 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 
OTIS, L. B. 

PALMER, MILTON J. 
PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PATTERSON, W. R. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PEASE, JAMES 
PEASLEY, J. C. 
PECK, CLARENCE I. 
PECK, GEORGE R. 
PECK, MRS. MARY K. 
PEEK, W. H. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSEN, GEORGE L. 
PETERSON, WILLIAM A. 
PETTIBONE, A. G. 
PIETSCH, C. F. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
POND, IRVING K. 
POPE, MRS. CHARLES B. 
PORTER, MRS. JULIA F. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 
PRUSSING, EUGENE E. 

QUICK, JOHN H. S. 

RABER, P. W. 
RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
REHM, JACOB 
REID, W. H. 
REW, HENRY C. 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROBINSON, J. K. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENBERG, JACOB 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
ROSENTHAL, OSCAR 
RUMSEY, GEORGE D. 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 
RYERSON, MRS. MARTIN 



SCHAFFNER, JOSEPH 
SCHMIDT, GEORGE A. 
SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHMITT, ANTHONY 
.SCHNEIDER, OTTO C. 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SCULL, HENRY 
SEARS, JOSEPH 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SEIPP, W. C. 
SELFRIDGE, HARRY G. 
SELLERS, FRANK H. 
SELZ, MORRIS 
SENN, MRS. N. 
SEWELL, BARTON 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SHERWOOD, H. M. 

SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 

SHORTALL, JOHN G. 

SIMMONS, J. J. 

SINGER, A. L. 

SKINNER, THE MISSES 

SMITH, EDWARD E. 

SMITH, F. B. 

SMITH, FRANK J. 

SMITH, JOHN C. 

SMITH, O. C. 

SMITH, ROBERT J. 

SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 

SOMERVILLE, R. 

SOBER, ALEXANDER C. 

SOPER, JAMES P. 

SOUTHWELL, H. E. 

SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

SPOOR, J. A. 

STANLEY, FRANK W. 

STEELE, HENRY B. 

STILES, JOSIAH 

STOCKTON, JOHN T. 

STRAUS, SIMON 

STRAUSSER, FRANK 

STUART, ROBERT 

SWIFT, G. F. 

TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TILTON, MRS. L.J. 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 
TRIPP, C. E. 
TRUDE, A. S. 
TRUMBULL, PERRY 



Oct. i8g8. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



343 



TURBIN, LOUIS M ., M.D. 
TURNER, E. A. 
TURNER, VOLUNTINE C. 
TYRRELL, JOHN 
TYSON, RUSSELL 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 
UNZICKER, OTTO 

VIKKLING, ROBERT 

WACKER, CHARLES U. 
WAIT, HORATIO L. 
WALKER, GEORGE C. 
WALKER, HENRY H. 
WALKER, JAMES- R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALKER, EDWARD C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WATSON, A. D. 
WATSON, WILLIAM J. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WELLS, B. R. 



WHEELER, CHARLES W. 
WHEELER, FRANCIS T. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WHITEHOUSE, FRANCIS M. 
WICKES, T. H. 
WILLIAMS, SIMEON B. 
WILLING, MRS. HENRY J. 
WILSON, E.C. 
WILSON, GEORGE C. 
WTLSON, M. H. 
WILSON, W. M- 
WING, DR. ELBERT 
WINK, HENRY 
WOLF, FRED. W. 
WOOD, JOHN H. 
WOOD, S. E. 

WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. . 
WOOSTER, CLARENCE K. 
WRIGHT, THOMAS A. 

YERKES, CHARLES T. 



BONFIELD, JOHN 



DECEASED. 
KING, HENRY W. 



DE KOVEN, JOHN 



.TH0squ8 ^j3h8 aaoHiH .IIIVXX .j^^ 



gniiuDsa audi ,([iv/ a, baiav/ol in heaiai ^niad ilaria ariJ lo aJimbfi J3jl3/iid airlT 
r[)iv^ abfifn ai J3>f3Kiff arlJ anoiJBllBJani nisJiao lo"? .baiiasb arf /fim ai5 alg'tiB riju« 
,n33iDa lo IIkw aril oJ YlJ33"tff> bariaJaBi nadJ ai Ji ;av/e»iD2 loi ilofid aril no sjfilq i; 
bciB qoj 3rlj no baoslq qnJa wcniBn A .aJiilq Il£v/ \o aai/ adi gnibiovB yd^iadj 

.[firiaJBra ad; io bna 9no aaiuoaa Ja^lofiid ad} dJiw (allBiBq 



.SOT 3MAa1 32aD ^0 JlATaQ 



B iuoiilm Jdgil abia rnurnixErn k §nivig oJ waiv b div// bangiaab si ^aBO aidT 
Ue anui 3}Blq ni nwod? tfid iBJam sdT .qoj gniniBJaua-ilaa b bnB .Jioqqua lainsD 
s^tbI nl .lariJsgoJ baJlod ^fiiad alodw adJ .lajnao adj aaoiOB bnB bnuoiB '{fjw sdJ 
.abiw aad-^rri lurd bnfi >l.jidJ doni ilsd ano noii Jdgiioi// io ai isd idi aaar.o 



.M33no2 JA0ITfl3V 



a)D3ido 3dT .iiaBD b oJ jlosd b io noilijicq IbiJoso b ladda armoi naaija aidT 
dJod bnfi iBiiaJBfn doni-^^ io absm ai smBil loiiaJni adT .3Df,\ adJ no baofilq oib 
2'i3JiTv/-ngia io lavoo b badaJaua ai aidi lavo ;3niq doni-^)', dJiw baJaada 3ie aabis 
s^nainavnoo bnB x'ilidBjqBbr, 8)1 baofilq ai dainft ynoda hb doidw noqu nilanm 

.banoijaaupnii 3ib 



Pl. XXVIII. Hinged Shelf Support. 



This bracket admits of the shelf being raised or lowered at will, thus securing 
such angle as may be desired. For certain installations the bracket is made with 
a plate on the back for screws; it is then fastened directly to the wall or screen, 
thereby avoiding the use of wall plate. A narrow strip placed on the top and 
parallel with the bracket secures one end of the material. 



Detail of Case Frame Top. 



This case is designed with a view to giving a maximum side light without a 
center support, and a self-sustaining top. The metal bar shown in plate runs all 
the way around and across the center, the whole being bolted together. In large 
cases the bar is of wrought iron one-half inch thick and four inches wide. 



Vertical Screen. 



This screen forms either a central partition or a back to a case. The objects 
are placed on the face. The interior frame is made of %-inch material and both 
sides are sheeted with /-^-inch pine; over this is stretched a cover of sign-writer's 
muslin upon which an ebony finish is placed. Its adaptability and convenience 
are unquestioned. 



\\\^" 



' TN^gW't *; 



m 



..■-.^i''