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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."






aHMMHHHr 









I'l BLICA I H INS 



OF THE 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 



REPORT SERIES 
Volume II 




1 an igo, U. S. A. 

iijoi - 1005 . 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. XVI. 




The Late Huntington W. Jackson, 
An Incorporator "I the Museum. 



Field Columbian Museum 

Publication 70. 

Report Seriks. Vol. II, No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YKAK 1901-1902. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

< >i t"l>er, ig02. 



CONTENTS. 

Board of Trustees 

83 



 and Maintenance 85 

I thi M isi im 85 

86 

Publications 88 

Library 89 

Inventory and Labeling 91 

93 

i ditions and Field Work, 97 

lation .mil Permanent Improvements, 99 

i graphy, Illustration and Printing 105 

taxidermy 106 

Attendance, 106 

Financial Statement no 

ssions 113 

partment of Anthropology [13 

Department of Botany 114 

Di partment of Geology 117 

Department ol Ornithology 119 

Department of Zoology, 120 

jraphy '. 124 

The Library 125 

Incorporation, 152 

intended By-Laws 154 

rary Members and Patrons 157 

rpurate Members 158 

! Life Members 

List of Annual Members 160 



rvJ^ST 



82 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



George E. Adams. 
Owen F. Alois. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
Norman B. Ream. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 



Edwin Walker. 






DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. George R. Davis. 

Huntington W. Jackson. 






Oct. igo2. Annual Report ok the Director. 83 



OFFICERS. 

HARLOW N. HiGINBOTHAM, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Norman B. Ream, Second Vice-President. 

Harlow N. HiGINBOTHAM, Chairman Executive Committee. 
George Manierre, Secretary. 

Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 






Harlow N. HiGINBOTHAM, Chairman Ex- Officio. 



Edward E. Ayer. Norman B. Ream. 

Owen F. Aldis. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 
Watson F. Blair. Marshall Field, Jr. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING. 

.1 E. Adams. William J. Chalmers. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. Owen F. Alois. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



84 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 

S. C. Simms, Assistant Curator Division of Ethnology. 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archozology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 

S. W. Willi ston. Associate Curator of Paleontology. 

Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, EXCEPT ORNITHOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot, Curator. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. 

RECORDER. 

D. C Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

TAXIDERMIST - IN - CHIEF. 

Carl E. Akelev. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 
1901-1902. 



To the Trustees of the Field Columbian Museum: 

I have tin honor to present the Report of the operations of the 
Museum during the year closii S mber 30, 1902: 

Income and Maintenance. — In executing the plans initiating with 
the Sp< cial Committee on new work, approved by the Executive 

mittee, the cost of new installation in the Museum for the past 
year lias approximated S50.ooo.oo, the chief item being 526,000. 00 for 
new cases. This sum has been about equally divided, not in amount 
but in importance of results, between the four Departments of the 
institution. 

While the repairs and physical maintenance of the building by 
the exercise of the greatest economy cost 82,000.00 less than the pro- 
vision of the budgi t tor these items, this should not be accepted as 
an indication that the building is requiring less attention. The fact 
is, on the contrary, that the structure has about reached the limits of 
repair, using that word in its literal sense. That is to say, any 
further expenditure in what might be called the maintenance of the 
building would be in the line of new construction. This is especially 
true of the ( xterior of the building, which, in spite of the most per 
it and ingenious efforts to conceal the real condition, is gradually 
falling to pieces. The building is safe — in fact, much safer than it 
was when it was taken possession of by the Museum, and I have no 
m to believe that disintegration threatens the security of tin- 
building as a structure. But I do feel compelled to direct the atten 
Hon ol the Hoard of Trustees to the necessity which exists, in my 
opinion, for seriously considering at an early date the welfare of the 
mat. rial whose intrinsic value- must be over §3,000,000.00 and whose 
educational value is incomputable. 

Staff of the Museum.— The si ii ntific staff of the Museum has 
signally augmented in its importance by the addition of Dr. S. 
\V. Williston, the well known paleontologist, whose services have 
secured undei an arrangement with the University of Clin 

85 



86 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Lecture Courses. — The lecture courses have been unusually inter- 
esting and well attended. They have been participated in by dis- 
tinguished scholars and students in the various branches of the 
natural sciences, and I desire to make grateful acknowledgment of 
the generosity and good will this participation has manifested on their 
part toward the Museum and its mission. 

Following is the Sixteenth Lecture Course: 

Oct. 5. — "The Megalithic Monuments of Brittany " (Illustrated). 
Dr. George A. Dorsey, Curator, Department of Anthro- 
pology. 

Oct. 12. — "Through the Arizona Canon and Yosemite to the Gla- 
ciers of Alaska" (Illustrated). 
Dr. Edward Burton McDowell, Chicago. 

Oct. 19. — " The Houses and Family Life of the Natives of Sarawak, 
Borneo " (Illustrated). 
Dr. Alfred Cort Haddon, F.R.S., F.Z.S., University 
of Cambridge, England. 

Oct. 26. — "The Ceremonial and Secular Dances of the Papuans" 
(Illustrated). 
Dr. Alfred Cort Haddon, F.R.S., F.Z.S., University 
of Cambridge, England. 

Nov. 2. — "Economic Geology, Particularly of Michigan, in Its 
Relation to the Business World" (Illustrated). 
Prof. Alfred C. Lane, State Geologist, Michigan. 

Nov. 9. — "Color in Nature" (Illustrated). 

Prof. William H. Dudley, Plattesville, Wis. 

Nov. 16. — "Mexico" (Illustrated). 

Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator, Department of 
Zoology, Field Columbian Museum. 

Nov. 23. — "Recent Dinosaur Discoveries" (Illustrated). 

Mr. Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleon- 
tology, Field Columbian Museum. 

Nov. 30. — "Crystals" (Illustrated). 

Prof. O. C. Farrington, Curator, Department of 
Geology, Field Columbian Museum. 



r 

a 
r~ 

c 
s 



c 




LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOU 



Oct. 1902. \nm u Repob m Director. 87 

Following i> the Seventeenth Course, delivered in March and 
April, 1902: 

March 1. — "The Glacial Period in North America" (Illustrated). 
Prof. Rollin D. Salisbury, University of < I 

March 8. — "The Sun Dance oi the Cheyenne and the Arapaho" 
(Illustrated). 

Dr. George A. Dorsey, Curator of Anthropology, 
Field Columbian Museum. 

March 15. — "The Northern Rocky Mountains" (Illustrated). 

Prof. Stuart Weller, Assistant Professor of Paleon- 
tology, University of Chicago. 

March 22. — "Geological Field Work in the Iron and Copper Dis- 
tricts of the Lake Superior Region" (Illustrated). 
Prof. U. S. Grant, Northwestern University, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

March 29. — '-Birds and Their Nests" (Illustrated). 

Dr. James Rollin Slonaker, University of Chicago. 

April 5. — 'Insects of Southern Peru and Bolivia" (Illustrated). 

Mr. William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator, Division 
of Entomology, Field Columbian Museum. 

April 12. — "Interpretation of Some Features of Landscape" (Illus- 
trated). 
Prof. Conway MacMillan, University of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis. 

April 19. — " Recent Explorations in Pre-Historic Hopi Ruins, Ari- 
zona" — Stanley McCormick Expedition (Illus- 
trated). 
Mr. C. L. Owen, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Archaeology, Field Columbian Museum. 

April 26. — " The Crow Indians of Montana, a Western Plains Tribi 
1 Illustrated). 
Mr. S. C. Simms, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Ethnology, Field Columbian Museum. 



88 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Publications. — During the year just ended eight papers were 
issued in the regular series and several are now in course of prepara- 
tion. Below will be found the titles of those issued since October ist, 
1901, with the number of pages and illustrations indicated: 

Pub. 60. — Geol. Ser. , Vol. 1, No. 9. "The Dinosaur Beds of the 
Grand River Valley of Colorado." By Elmer S. Riggs. 
20 pp., edition 1,000, illustrations 6(5 half-tones, 1 zinc 
etching). 

Pub. 61. — An. Ser., Vol. 3, No. 2. "The Oraibi Powamu Cere- 
mony." By H. R. Voth. 95 pp., edition 1,000, illus- 
trations 39 (32 half-tones, 3 zinc etchings, 4 colored 
plates). 

Pub. 62. — Report Ser., Vol. 2, No. 1. "Annual Report of the 
Director." 80 pp., edition 2,250, illustrations 14 (half- 
tones). 

Pub. 63. — Geol. Ser., Vol. 1, No. 10. "The Fore Leg and Pectoral 
Girdle of Morosaurus, with a Note on the Genus 
Camarosaurus." By Elmer S. Riggs. 14 pp., edition 
1,000, illustrations 5 (4 half-tones, 1 zinc etching). 

Pub. 64. — Geol. Ser., Vol. 1, No. n. "Meteorite Studies — 1." By 
O. C. Farrington. 45 pp., edition 1,000, illustrations 9 
(8 half-tones, 1 zinc etching). 

Pub. 65. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 3, No. 6. "A Contribution to the 
Icthyology of Mexico." By S. E. Meek. 65 pp., 
edition 1,000, illustrations 30 (half-tones). 

Pub. 66. — An. Ser., Vol. 3, No. 3. "The Mishongnovi Ceremonies 
of the Snake and Antelope Fraternities." By G. A. 
Dorsey and H. R. Voth. 100 pp., edition 1,000, 124 
illustrations (117 half-tones, 7 colored plates). 

Pub. 67. — Zool. Ser., Vol. 3, No. 7. "Notes on a Collection of 
Cold-Blooded Vertebrates from Ontario." By S. E. 
Meek and H. W. Clark. 12 pp., edition 1,000, no 
illustrations. 

The distribution to foreign countries is still continued through the 
Bureau of International Exchanges of the Smithsonian Institution. 



1902. 



\nm m Report oi i hi Direi 



89 



following table shows the Dumber and classes of foreign and 
don* stic addn ss< - at present included in the mailing list: 

Official : 

tees 13 

Stafl 10 

I orporate Members 3 

Honorary Members 3 

Annual Members 291 



Received Publications in All Departments : 



I > iroesl ic Fi ireign. 



Individuals 10 

Universities, Schools and Colleges 5S 

Museums and Gardens 6 

Academies and Institutes 31 

ties 24 

Libraries 60 

Government and Statu Departments ii 

Journals 11 



10 

37 



4') 

27 

Q 



Received Publications in One or More Departments : 

DOMESTIC. 

».\. tB. (',. tH. (-0. V. |T. 

Individuals 79 54 1 10 5 I 39 . . 

Universities, Si I is and Colleges, . . 3 28 11 7 1 8 1 

Museums and Gardens 10 8 8 9 .. 7 .. 

A< idemies and Institutes 4 2 3 7 . . 1 2 

eties ,. 1 1 13 10 13 5 9 4 

Libraries 2 1 18 . . I .. 

Journals 12 9 6 .. 342 

Government and State Departments, .1 7 18 4 .. 13 .. 



FOREIGN 

*.\. tB. < ; - til. fl 

Individuals, . 54 27 47 

Universities, Sc 1 Is and Colleges, . . 1 .. 5 .. 

Museums and Gardens 10 5 5  

Academies and Institutes 3 •• 9 •• 

Si 11 I' ties 12 12 19 . . 

Libraries I 

Journals 26 16 19 .. i< 

Government ami State Departments, ... 5 15 .. . 



IT. Z. 

IQ 
9 

5 
3 

25 



The Library.- During the past year there have been added to 
tin library 921 hound volumes and 944 pamphlets, making a total of 

•A., B '  Mm]. 1/ denote Anthropology, Botans Gi ilogy, llismrs On 

'irtatinn and Zoology, 

ated by dagger during 11 end ng Septem ber 30, 1902. 



7. .. 



%.'.■ • 



go Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

1,865 titles. This compares very favorably with the growth of the 
library for the preceding years. Donations and exchanges have been 
received from 105 individuals and 486 societies and incorporated 
institutions, 105 of which are foreign. Eighty-seven books and nine 
pamphlets were obtained by 'purchase, making the total number of 
books and pamphlets now in the library 30,037, distributed as fol- 
lows: 

Books. Pamphlets. 

General Library 10,032 13.670 

Department of Anthropology 308 95 

Department of Botany 527 249 

Department of Geology 1,642 2,827 

Department of Ornithology, 378 

Department of Zoology 309 

The number of periodicals currently received was 154; by pur- 
chase 65, by exchange 89. 

It is particularly desired that acknowledgment be made to the 
Agricultural Experiment Stations of the United States for many back 
numbers sent to complete the files of its bulletins in the Museum 
Library. 

The physical condition of the library has been much improved 
during the year; a new double stack for books has been installed in 
the general library and several minor changes made in the reading 
room and office to expedite the work of the staff as well as improve 
the general appearance of the rooms. Four hundred and forty-nine 
books have been sent to the binder, 302 of which have been returned 
and placed on the shelves. It was mentioned in the last Report that 
several books and pamphlets were missing. Careful search has 
resulted in the restoration of all those that were missing with the 
exception of one book and eight pamphlets. This is a satisfactory 
showing when it is considered that this was the first inventory taken 
since the opening of the library. The most important work done 
during the year, aside from the regular routine duties, was on the 
shelf list, subject and author catalogues. Over 2,400 new cards have 
been written, and considerably over 10,000 cards have been revised 
and rewritten. Eight installments of the John Crerar duplicate 
catalogue and 242 index cards from the United States Agricultural 
Department have been received and distributed. Acknowledgment 
should be made of the courtesies extended the library by the Chicago 
Public Library, the John Crerar Library and the University of Chicago 
Library. 



Oct. 1902. Asm u Report 01 ink Director. 91 

Departmental Inventorying, Cataloguing and Labeling. All speci- 
eived by the Department "t Geology have been numbered 
and catalogued as received, and all descriptive data regarding them 
filed. The Curator oi this department reports steady and nota- 
ble progress in labeling, both new specimens and in replacing 
old written labels with printed ones. Over 700 labels were provided 
for the collection of gold and silver ores, the data being obtained by 
a careful study of each specimen so that a statement of the minerals 
it contained might be made upon the label. Each label was made of 
a size to correspond with that of the front of the block upon which 
the specimen was mounted. The systematic rock collection to the 
number of 1,500 specimens was supplied throughout with printed, in 
place of written labels. The paleontological collection has received 
labels for the larger part of such specimens as were mounted upon 
tablets, 2,200 having been made. Sixty-five case labels have also 
bi en prepared and about 600 miscellaneous ones. 

The question of properly labeling the economic collections in the 
Department of Hotany has occupied much thought during the past year. 
Experiments have been made which have led through the following 

s of considerations, to a final unification of the labels throughout 
this department. In referring to these experiments Mr. Millspaugh, 
head of the department, says: "From observation at various times 
of the movements of people who were examining the collections, 
it would seem that the first impulse covering the majority of museum 
visitors is that of curiosity, the second interest and the third a desire 
for education. Premising the truth of these conclusions, it was 
decided that the installation of a case should be such as to excite 
sufficient curiosity in the people who approach it as to attract their 
attention to it as a whole. The principles involved in such installa- 
tions are, as I take it, a neat and well ordered arrangement of the 
specimens not detracted from by strongly contrasting, obtrusive . 
sharply defined label cards, scattered about in a confusing, disorderly 
manner. Next, the individual specimens composing the elements of 
the complete- installation should be- rendered as attractive as possible 
without materially affecting their individual character and natural 
sequence, in order that, having been attracted by tin whole, tin 
observer may be interested in some one or all of the specimens 
exhibited therein. It is now for the first time important thai the 
hibe-ls should become apparent to the eye as an integral pari ol the- 

lmens, and that they should be of such charai !• 1 as to invite 
reading; plainly typed and condensed; iprehensible to the- 

leader ratlnr than abstrusely scientific; short, pithy ami elm 1 1. 



g2 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Having arrived at these conclusions and noting that installations 
as yet unlabeled have proven to be more attractive than those 
rendered distracting by too evident labels, it was decided that the 
best background to form a general setting for the contents of a case 
should be dead black, and the label card be the same, typed in some 
ink just off the strong contrast that white would make. This ink 
proved to be aluminum. Plate XIX shows the result in a case devoted 
to the Amarylls. This case, at a distance of 10 feet, appears to be 
unlabeled, while in fact it contains over thirty cards. Above the 
photograph at the left of the case is a 6 in. square label describing 
the Agaves, below it is another of the same size with a full description 
of Sisal Hemp, the specimens of which, each with its \)/ 2 in. label, 
occupy this half of the case. Ixtle fiber and its like sized labels in 
series occupies the left two-thirds of the right side of the case while 
the Century and Pulque plants fully labeled, complete the installation. 
Plate XVIII illustrates the same case and installation using the yellow 
of buff label card. The labels as now adopted are, as previously stated, 
of dead-black card printed in aluminum ink, and comprise four sizes 
only: a "case label," placed outside and above each case announcing 
the systematic order to which the contents belong ; a "generic label," 
describing the order and its general characters; a "sub-generic label," 
relating in general, when necessary, to a series of related specimens 
or to a process illustrated by successive elements; and a "specific 
label," describing each specimen as an individual. Uniformity with- 
out monotony is the key-note aimed at throughout the Department, 
uniformity not only in the cases themselves, but also in the specimen 
blocks, containers, framings and labels. 

In the Department of Anthropology not only has the work of 
cataloguing and inventorying kept up with the incoming material, but 
three unusually large collections have been described. Mr. J. W. 
Hudson, on returning from expedition late in igoi, began at once the 
cataloguing and preparing for exhibition of extensive collections 
made by him in California, as also did Assistant Curator Owen on his 
return from Tusayan, on the various collections, chiefly archaeological, 
which had been secured through the generosity of Mr. Stanley 
McCormick. This latter accession comprised over 8,000 specimens 
and the necessary work of preparing and properly cataloguing such 
an extensive collection has consumed the larger portion of Mr. 
Owen's time. In accordance with the policy inaugurated three 
years ago the work of overhauling the entire Department has been 
carried on and as a result all of the exhibition material formerly 
occupying Hall 4 and including collections from the various Islands 




O - 



a. 

h. 

Z 
O ' 



\ 



umVER»TY$lU\HOU 



02. Annual Ri me Dir r. 93 

of the Pacific have been thoroughly examined and compan d with the 
collector's original list and arc now in satisfactory condition. The 
immense amount of labor involved in this cataloguing has l< tt but 
little time for the preparation ol printed labels, but all :i 
acquired material placed upon exhibition has at least been tem- 
porarily labeled. 

It is highly gratifying to Ik- able to report that the Department 
ol Ornithology has completed tin- inventory ol the study collection 
which approximates 27,000 specimens. A card catalogue has been 
prepared showing the number ot specimens in each spi • ies, from 
whence obtained, the sex, month ami locality in which they 
taken and th and tray in which they may be found. Five 

hundred anil eighty-four specimens, a part ot the donation ot the 
United Stat, s ot Colombia in 1893, have been identified, properly 
labeled, and entered on the ion records. The bird skins 

obtained by Mr. I er in Mexico to the numbei ol . soo have 

also been labeled, accessioned and incorporated in the stud\ collection. 

In the Department of Zoology the inventory books have been 
kept up and the records an in a satisfactory condition. Over 4,500 
printed labels, describing the shell collection, have been substituted 
Id the written ones and about 500 new mounts have been made. 
I < ■ins of protozoa, sponges, corals and staf-fishes have also 

I"  1  labeled. 

The following table shows m detail the year's work in the 
um on catalogues and inventories: 

I lEPAB 1 Ml vc 

Anthropi 
Botany, 

Library, 

< >rn it 

Phi * igraphy, 

Zoology, 

Accessions. — Practically all ot the accessions in the Department 

of Anthropology for the year have fallen within the division of 

Ethnology. If two purchases, both of considerable interest, are 

excluded, all collections have been derived from field expeditions, 

equently they are ot unusual interest and ot great scientific 

The Curator made three trips to Oklahoma and one to 

Ni Mexico and on these occasions was able t < > obtain additional 

rial which strengthened in a notable manner thi lions 

idy made from the Pawnee, Osag< . Arapaho, Ponca and Oto tribes 



1 
B 


1 tal N 
1 
Sept. 10. 1902. 


Entries 

during 
1901-2. 


1"' 

ol C'aril ■- 

Written. 


J 2 


56,000 


I0,08l 


58,867 


49 


121,;;: 


20,117 


4,050 


1 1 


30,964 


I.OQI 


6,000 


1 


32.15-1 


3,882 


l8,l8q 


3 


13.268 


2,199 




4 








20 


2:, 081 


1,089 


13,100 



94 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

and two pueblos on the Rio Grande. Assistant Curator Simms madi 
two expeditions to the Crows of Montana, the result being a collectioi 
of unparalleled interest in the possession of the Museum up to th< 
present time from any of the Plains tribes. Especially notewortlr 
in this extensive collection are a large number of very fine skii 
garments from the times of the buffalo and an extensive collection o 
over sixty buffalo shields. In connection with the work of collect 
ing, Mr. Simms conducted ethnological investigations chiefly inti 
the mythology and heraldry of the Crows. Mr. Hudson, specia 
assistant of the Department, returned to California early in the yea 
where he still remains continuing the work of investigation an> 
collection among the California tribes. It will probably requir 
another year to complete Mr. Hudson's field work in California, a 
which time the entire state will have been covered. His success ha 
been unexpectedly gratifying, owing to the fact that several of th 
California tribes have been found much richer in material than ha> 
been anticipated. Mr. Charles F. Newcombe, for several years a: 
interested friend of this Department, began a systematic series c 
investigations among certain tribes of the northwest coast early thi 
year with a special object in view of strengthening and supplementin ; 
the already valuable collection from this region. Mr. Newcombe ha 
so far confined his attention to the Haidas, especially those c 
Southern Alaska, where he has met with unexpected success and as 
result a large and beautiful series of specimens have been added t 
the collection from this region, which was hitherto poorly represented 
A short exploration of two of the lower Tlingit villages was als 
made, where he secured a number of very interesting ancien 
carvings. Though not directly connected with the Department 
Lieutenant Emmons generously placed his services at the dispositio 
of the Museum during the summer of this year and purchased fo 
the Museum ioo specimens of Tlingit manufacture, all o 
unusual merit and forming a notable addition to the collectio: 
purchased from him. Through a generous provision of Mr. W 
McGee, of the Bureau of Ethnology, the Department was enabled t 
arrange for a piece of co-operative work with the Bureau among th 
Cheyenne. This work has been carried on during the year by Mi 
James Mooney, a well known ethnologist of the Bureau, and wil 
require an additional year for completion. As a result of this ivor 
the Museum expects to acquire a complete collection of Cheyenn 
artifacts in addition to the reproduction of an entire Cheyenn 
camping circle as it existed many years ago. All the tipis of a certai: 
year will be reproduced in miniature, properly decorated and wit 



-go2. Annuai Kir. 'i. i 01 nit Director. 95 

each tipi will be tin shield and other objects especially connected 
with their very remarkable syst< m of heraldry. Two collections 
which were of unusual interest were purchases. The first is a 
collection of about 1,400 specimens from the Tlingits of Alaska 
and known as the Spuhn collection, although the majority of 
specimens were collected by Lieut. Emmons, while the entire 
collection was labeled by him. The collection is unusually complete 
even to tin- minutest detail and is especially welcome inasmuch as 
this region of the northwest coast was not before represented ex 

• rtain priceless specimens illustrating a certain few phases of 
culture in the Edward E. Aver collection. The second collection 
purchased was kindly selected for the Department by Mr. Ayer and 
comprised a number of remarkable bronze castings from Benin, 
Africa, and two ancient and valuable Etruscan tombs. 

The accessions in the Department of Botany have been many and 
important. The Herbarium has been augmented to the extent of 
of dried plants from various countries, principally from 
the United Stati s. Of these 9,946 sheets have been mounted, classi- 
fied and arranged in the genus covers, together with about 1,500 
sheets from tlu- Patterson Herbarium, which is now about one-half 
mounted ami installed. Among the notable collections secured w( re 

illowing: The private herbarium of Mi. Mason Bross, compris- 
ing 1. lis sheets. r . presenting his work of collecting, principally of the 

of Cook County and Northern Illinois ami Indiana; the private 

ilium of the late Mr. J. A. Stewart of Peoria, 111., consisting of 
resenting his collection of the flora of the Peoria 

:i and a tour through the Southern States in 1862. Mrs. Agues 
Chas. also contributed 190 sheets of the more interesting plants <it 

hicago region. By purchase the herbarium of Mr. A. A. Heller, 
of Lancasti r, Pa., was obtaini d, 1 .insisting of over 13.000 sheets of 

plants. In addition to tin above, thi following sets w 

i k E. McDonald, Southern Illinois plants, 355 sheets: Rugel's 
Florida collection, 430 sheets: S. M. Tracy's dull States collection 

1 (Oi, 437 sheet- < . G. Pringle's Mexican collection f 01 tgoi, 107 
•beets; tin Bot nil Gardens, Sydney. N. S. W., too sheets of 
Australian plants: Rev. Ernest C. Smith. 21 2 sheets of plants from 
thi Yellowstone National Park, and the Robert Bebb series of 252 
she. t- from his Southern Illinois and Indiana collection, 1901. Much 

matt rial has also been acquired, the notable addition- being 

lows: Mr. J. N. Rose, S4 spe< imens of 1 conomii material; Mr. 

W. K. Kuffner, series of coffees; Marshall Field & Company, 98 type 

mens of typical co thi < elluloid Company, 



g6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

New York, 23 specimens illustrating the processes in the manufacture 
of celluloid; Rev. H. R. Voth, 94 specimens of maize raised by the 
Hopi Indians; the N. K. Fairbank Company, a series of 25 specimens 
illustrating the utilization of cotton seed oil, The Old Times Distillery 
Company, a series of 10 specimens illustrating the manufacture of 
whiskey from maize. 

The chief additions to the Department of Ornithology were 
obtained by Mr. Breninger in the field, consisting of 1,500 bird skins, 
many of which were new to the collections, and 163 eggs. Some 
minor gaps in the exhibition series were filled by purchase in the 
local market from time to time. 

A series of the ores and minerals of Chile from the Chilean Com- 
mission to the Pan-American Exposition was among the important 
acquisitions in the Department of Geology. Other important acces- 
sions were: Portion of a fossil tree of the Carboniferous period, with 
markings well preserved, from the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 
Railroad Company; 5 large slabs showing different varieties of Wash- 
ington serpentine marble, from the United States Marble Company; 
several specimens of crystals from Mr. W. J. Chalmers; a number of 
representative gold, copper and corundum ores from Mr. B. W. Good- 
sell, and a collection of Hawaiian lavas and minerals from Father M. 
J. Boarman. Quite an amount of material was obtained by exchange, 
the most important being about fifty specimens of rocks and minerals 
of Colorado from the Colorado School of Mines, 200 specimens of 
foreign invertebrate fossils from Mr. W. E. Crane, Tarrytown, N. Y.; 
a section of the Algoma meteorite from the University of Wisconsin, 
and a number of specimens of modern invertebrates from Ward's 
Natural Science Establishment. By purchase the chief acquisitions 
have been a meteorite from Kansas and specimens of three other 
falls; relief maps of Niagara Falls, the Hawaiian Islands and Porto 
Rico, and a series of four relief maps illustrating the stages of reces- 
sion of Lake Michigan; a collection of fossils from Alaska, including 
some types of Bison; a series of Upper Silurian and Devonian fossil 
fishes from Scotland and a number of mineral specimens. 

The condition of the specimens obtained by Mr. Heller in the 
field justifies the great importance which should be attached to this 
method of obtaining additions to the Zoological collections. This 
collector's itinerary ranged from Oregon to California and from Cali- 
fornia to Mexico, and the conscientious manner in which he covered 
this territory is a matter on which the Museum should be congratu- 
lated, as will be seen by the accession lists appended. Much desirable 
material was also obtained by purchase, notably that obtained from 






A\M w. I\'l POR I "1 I III' I >IREl I OR. 



97 



Mr. C. 1". Periolat, consisting oi grizzly beai skins, white foxes, blue 

. caribou, etc. Mention should also be made of the 
gift oi Mr. \ ernon Shaw Kennedy ol certain Mexican mammals. Mi . 
Gerhard, Assistant Curatoi ol the Division oi Entomology, add.. I 
pecimens oi insects to tin- < ollections. 

Expeditions and Field Work. Sixteen expeditions, representing 
all of the Departments oi the Museum, visited different plao 

irch in North America during tin- year. Anthropology has, per- 
haps, pi rformed the notable original work, which lias been prose- 
cuted with great vigor by all ol the members of the staff of that 
Messrs. 1 >orsey, Simms. ( (wen. Hudson and Newcoml.e. 
A list of the expeditions made during tin- year follows: 






;a, . 

ii 'in.i. 

Ment.ii,, i, 

Oklahoma, 

California, 
Mi xico. 



C. 1- 



Ce:l< 

Newi ombe, 



James Mi » mey, 

S. C. Simms, 

A. Dorsey, . 

J. W. Hudson, . . 
Geo. F. Breninger, 



ii Asia Alleyne Ireland, 

nia Geo. A. Dorsey, 

Indiana, Kentucky, Ten- 

 and Missouri, . W. A. Phillips, 



em Minnesota, 



Chas. J. Brand, 



Montana S. C. Simms, . 

Oklahoma Geo. A. I ' 

Oklahoma, Geo. A. D 

I >.ikota, . . . i-;. s. Riggs, 

O. C. Farrington, 

South Dakota and Wyo- 

- H. W. Nil hols, 



Man-rial. 
I laid. i and Tlingit Ethnol- 
ogy. 

Kiowa and Comanche Eth- 
oology. 

( n >w anil Cheyenne Ethnol- 
ogy. 

Pawnee and Arapaho Ethnol- 

1 '!s r y- 

California Ethnology, 
birds and Eggs. 
Ethnology, Geology and 
Botany. 

Pawnee, Osage and Oto 
Ethnology. 

Data for Mapof Distribution 
"f Mill Creek Quarry. 

North American Forestry 
Woods, Herbarium Speci- 
mens, Economic Speci- 
mens. 

Cr..w Ethnology. 

Ponca, Tonkaway and Ara- 
paho Ethnology. 

Paw nee I Ithm J. i 

Cretai eous h'-sils. 

Minerals 

and M in e r; 



During tin early part of the year, Mr. Nichols, Assistant Curator 
of Geoli : ited several graphite mines in South Dakota and V 



g8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

tiling and collected full suites of specimens illustrating the occurrence 
of that mineral, as well as other ores and minerals of the vicinity. 
A find in North Dakota of Cretaceous bird remains and other verte- 
brates, news of which had reached the Museum, was investigated by 
Mr. Riggs, Assistant Curator of Paleontology. About two weeks 
were spent in the region, and as a result some fragmentary fossils 
and economic specimens were secured and arrangements made to 
have further finds forwarded to the Museum. The Curator spent 
about two weeks in mineral localities in Oxford County, Maine, and 
obtained about two hundred specimens of the typical minerals of the 
region, such as beryl, orthoclase, tourmaline, bertrandite, lepidolite, 
quartz, garet and amblygonite. Some collecting of local fossils and 
minerals at Thornton and Elmhurst, 111., was carried on by the 
Curator and Mr. A. W. Slocom. 

The collection of an adequate representation of the forest trees 
of the United States that bear particularly upon commerce and the 
deforestation of the country that was begun several years ago and 
lapsed for the last three years on account of lack of time with the 
then working force of the Department of Botany, has again been taken 
up, three weeks being spent in Northern Minnesota for this purpose. 
Incidental to this work, other collections of economic material were 
made in the same locality. The Department has continued its field 
work upon the Plant Life of the "Lake Chicago Basin," a flora that 
is rapidly becoming extinct from drainage and reclaiming of the area 
for building and other purposes. During the year 388 specimens 
have been added to the already fine series representing this interest- 
ing region. 

The expeditions of the Department of Anthropology include 
three by the Curator to Oklahoma and New Mexico, one of these 
being especially to the Pawnee, funds for which were generously pro- 
vided by Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, Mr. Wat- 
son F. Blair and Mr. E. E. Ayer; two by Assistant Curator Simms to 
the Crows; Mr. Mooney's work especially concerning the heraldry of 
the Cheyenne: Mr. Hudson's extended investigations among the tribes 
of California; Mr. Newcombe's investigations among the Haidas, 
especially concerning certain phases of their mental culture. There 
remains to be noticed the continuation of a series of investigations 
begun three years ago by the Department among the Hopi. and 
which have been carried on through the generosity of Mr. Stanley 
McCormick. The work during the present year has been in charge 
of Mr. H. R. Voth, who is engaged in preparing for publication 
accounts of Hopi ceremonies. Mr. McCormick's provision also makes 
possible the completion of the series of Oraibi altars. 



UBfi 

.uftl. 

■.:as\TYofiuwO»' 



ii Annual Report of the Director. gg 

tnajoritj ol additions to tin Zoological collections wi n 
cured by work in the field. The collections made by Mr. Heller are 
of verj considerable value and of great assistance in scientific work 
anection with the stud) collection. In ordei to extend the field 
work in this Department and enable the Department <i more 

ground, Mr. \\ . E. Snyder was engaged to collect in certain of the 
Stat< s, but In was unfortunately compelled to 
make an early return. 

Installation, Rearrangement and Permanent Improvements. — The 
exterior of the building has received the usual attention but it is 

ming evident that certain parts oi the structure have reached a state 

i a\ whi re renewal is impossible. The steam plant was entirely 
overhauled and a new boiler substituted for one entirely worn out. 
Tii. Director's office has been calsomined and a hardwood floor laid. 

As usual, installation in the Department of Anthropology was 
pushed forward as rapidly as cases were provided, in accordance with 
tin poli< \ di termined upon three years ago. The work of repainting 
the halls of the Department was also proceeded with. Tin If. \. 

nbotham Korean collection occupying Hall 2 has been recased. 
During the year the contents of Halls 4, 5 and 6 were removed, the 

- abandoned, the walls freshened and the work of reinstallation of 
Elections carried on in accordance with the number of new cases 
provided. Hall 4 is completed and the work of installing the South 
ollections is about completed. No provision has yet been made 
for the re-rasing of the collections from Asia and Africa. It is 
gratifying to note that the textile collection has been formally 
abandoned and that therefore the lines of the Department on a 

tly anthropologic basis are becoming more and more tightly 
drawn. Owing to the increase in the collections in North American 
Ethnology it has been necessarj to find additional space. The 

ctions which formerly occupied Halls 10 and 11. therefore, com- 
prising the material from tin- Eskimo, have been removed to one of 
the halls north of the East Court. This will make possible a bi tt< 1 
arrangement of the material in tin- southeast corner oi tin Museum. 
Tin following collections have been installed and properly placed in 
new cases: Apache, Navaho, Winnebago, Cheyenne, Crow 

aptian, as well as I ion made by Mr. Hudson in 

ornia, and 1>\ tin Mc( ormick Expedition among the ruins of 
Tusayan. Tin- largi collection of Tlingit material purchased 

t. Emmons has been temporarily installed in Hall 1, awaiting 
rangement of all the northwest coast collections when Mr. 
be shall have finished his h, Id work among these tribes. 



ioo Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

In the Department of Botany the work of installing thceconomic 
collections in proper display cases for view by the public and study 
by students and special workers has been diligently continued 
throughout the year, an assistant having been employed with especial 
view to forwarding this work. In installing the cases referred to 
1 165 specimens have been added to the collections. The following 
installations have been accomplished: 

GRAM1NE/E: 

Six and one-half cases illustrating Indian Corn. Its geographic 
distribution (by specimens), its varieties, its history and mythology 
(by specimens). Various forms of aboriginal and commercial foods, 
the manufacture of whiskey. The use of pith as an obtunder and 
obturator in warships, and various utilization of the husk. 

fagacve: 

One-half case illustrating the utilization of the beech in the 
extraction of vinegar and alcohol. Two cases illustrating the growth, 
character and utilization of the cork tree. 

MALVACEAE: 

Three cases illustrating the utilization of cotton. The extraction 
and use of the seed oil, the manufacture of celluloid, absorbent 
cotton, thread and cloth, the stalk fiber and the root. 

theace^e: 

One-half case of various teas. 

ilicine/E: 

One-half case showing the utilization of Paraguay tea or mate 1 . 

rubiace/E: 

One case illustrating coffee. Its geography (by specimens), its 
harvesting, its sophistication and substitution. 

ANACARDIACEjE: 

One-half case showing the various products of the family: 
Japanese lacquer, pistach nuts, marking nuts, wine, oils, waxes, 
gums and fruits. 

lauraceje: 

One-half case showing the various products of the family: 
Camphor, cinnamon, cassia bark, sassafras, oils, fruits and gums. 

palmeve: 

Two and one-half cases illustrating the utilization of the coco- 
nut palm, cordage, wood, utensils, matting, sugar, oil, confections, 



•jo2. \n\: ai Repori oi Mir Di 



IOI 



r and soap. One-hall case of palmetto illustrating brush 
manufacture. On< case of saw palmetto illustrating brush and 
manufacture. 

I K I : 

-half case of hemp illustrating tin- utilization of tin fiber, the 
drug hashish, tin seed and the oil. 

:i case s illustrating flax, old domestic implements, home- 
spun linen, machine linen, machine- thread, ami linseed oil extraction. 

Five oases illustrating the turpentine industry, the manufacture 
:  stiles from the needles of the Georgia pirn-, indurated fib. i wan , 
and the- manufacture of paper from wood. 

-Ill-' : \ i ! : 

One-half cast- illustrating cocoa and chocolate. 

 
Three cases illustrating; various products of this large family: 
Indigo, licorice, peanuts, beans, peas, lentils, lupines, tamarinds, 
gums, cassia, tonka linns, fibers, tanning substances, etc. 

amakw.1 .idaci i : (Plates XYIII and XIX.) 

One- case illustrating the- utilization of the Mexican Hemp plant, 
entury plant, the Pulque plant and the Ixtle oi Mexico. 

3 AND 1 i I 1.1 Ks: 

Two cases illustrating the various products of this nature with a 
;al view to the instruction of pharmacological students. 

1AK PLAN I 1 I ii 

case containing temporarily, various odd and interesting 

human foods of peculiar origin, which will later go into the general 

matic arrangement: Agar Agar. Vegetable Cheese, Mandioc 

i , Mowha Flowers, Jamaica Flo same Cakes, Screw Beans, 

kly Pears, Yui i a Br< ad, etc. 

In the Department of Geology, tin most important work per- 
formed i n installation and rearrangement has been that ol a complete 
anization of the paleontological collections. These have been 
installed in entirely n< v. i asi S and now occupy five halls instead of 
three, as formerly. These halls, before occupation, were thoroughly 

vated and repainted. For containing tin collections thirty two 



102 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

wall cases and fourteen floor cases were constructed, after plans pre- 
pared by the Curator and assistants. Provision of two kinds of cases 
was deemed desirable, in order to give more open and attractive 
appearance to the halls than could be done if either kind was used 
alone. Further, by this means large and small specimens can be 
exhibited effectively in the same hall. The wall cases constructed 
are 12 feet long, 8 feet high, and either 2 or 3 feet deep. The base 
of the case is 20 inches in height and instead of being made solid, as is 
usually done, is cut so as to leave six legs, each 6 inches in width and 
8 inches high, upon which the case rests. By the substitution of 
legs for the solid base, marring of the base by the feet of visitors is 
prevented and dust does not accumulate beneath the case. The 
portion of the case above the base consists practically, except at the 
rear, of a series of sashes, each with a single light, framed together. 
Two sashes, each with a single light 68x70 inches, form the front of 
the case. These are supported by pin butts fastened to the top rail, 
by means of which the sash can be swung outward when entrance to 
the case is desired, or by drawing the pins the entire sash can be 
removed. This plan of swinging the sashes was adopted with some 
misgivings on account of the weight to be borne, but it proves in 
practice to be entirely satisfactory. A specimen in any part of the 
case can be reached in a moment without the removal of the screws 
or wearing out of screw holes. Two locks in the lower rail of each 
sash serve as fastenings. Felted tongue and groove joints prevent 
the entrance of dust. The backs of the cases are of white— wood 
made of a framework carrying panels to permit normal shrinkage 
and expansion of the wood. The cases are provided with shelves cut 
in 3-foot lengths and varying from 7 to 16 inches in width. Con- 
siderable study was given the matter of making the shelf supports 
adjustable to any height and yet inconspicuous and not unduly 
consumptive of space. The plan adopted and one which seems to 
fulfill all requirements is to support the brackets by strips of one- 
quarter inch strap iron in which holes one inch apart bearing a screw 
head have been bored. To these, brackets of steel or iron, according 
to the weight which is to be supported, are fastened with screws, the 
screw passing in until it is flush with the surface of the bracket. 
The brackets have the form of a right angle, strengthened nearest the 
angle by extra thickness. By such a system of shelving and supports 
the case furniture becomes so inconspicuous that the eye scarcely 
appreciates its existence, and the specimens alone stand out as the 
objects which the case was designed to exhibit. The prominence of 



( I 1902. \wi u Repori OF I III DlRl 



103 



hell is further lessened '\ bevelling its front edge .1 quarter 
of an inch from the top. In the construction ol the flooi 

 t desidc rata was deemed to be the lighting and installa- 
tion "i the small specimens which form so important a feature of all 
al collections, so that they could be easily and fully 
examined. ["he ordinary style of flat or table case 1- not will suited 
to this). th< visitoi must bend over tl n a fatiguing 

position, the light is reflected in a glaring manner, quite a number ol 
the specimens are beyond an easj rang< ol th< eye and thi space 

available for exhibition is no larger, but in fact smaller than the ll 

space occupied by the case. Vertical are better lighted and 

more economical ol space, but they give a hall a crowded appearance 
and the majority of the specimens are out ol range ol tin eye. 
irdingly a case with top sloping two ways was adopted as bi I 
meeting tin- above needs. The cases so constructed and now 
in use are 5 feet long, 3 feet 8 inches wide and 5 feet $y 2 inches high. 
The base is 36 inches high, 8 inches of a portion of this being cut 
awaj to leave legs similar to those of the vertical cases. The 
remaining space is rilled by four tiers of drawers which are utilized to 
hold specimens supplementary to those exhibited in the case above. 
The case itself constructed upon this base, has a truncated A shape, 
tin sides and ends being single lights. The side lights are 31x56 
inches in size and represent the amount of exhibition space, no use 
being made of the ends for display purposes. The end lights are ol 
ground glass and with the narrow top lights aid in illuminating th< 
interior of the case. For installing specimens each case is provided 
with a wooden screen of the shape of a triangular prism and of such 
a si/e ;,s to [eavi a space of 5 inches between it and the side sashes, 
parallel with the latter. Upon this screen the specimens are installed. 

• nli. 1 fastened immediately to it, or, for the most part, glued 
to tablets of manila board which are then laid upon the screen. The 
mens are thus brought so clos, to the eye that they .an be 
minutely examined. The economy of space afforded by such a 
east is shown by the tact that 25 square feet of exhibition spi 
and 25 cubic feet of storage space are secured on each 20 
square feet of floor spac . The sashes of the cases are, like 

of th< vertical cases, supported by hinges fastened to the 
rail. They are fastened by locks at the bottom. To open the 
'a- th( sash is swung up and held by struts swinging from the i' 
of the case. All the openings being felted, th. case is dust-proof. 
In both th. vertical and floor cases the glass used is plate and th. 



104 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

wood mahogany. In rearranging the paleontological collections the 
specimens were so grouped as to distinguish the three great eras. Thus 
all of the fossils of the Palezoic era are now exhibited in Hall 35, those 
of the Mesozoic era in Halls 36 and 59 and those of the Cenozoic era in 
Halls 59, 60 and 61. At the same time all form a consecutive series 
from the earliest to the latest. Besides the cases in which the 
specimens are arranged in stratigraphical order, and which form the 
bulk of the collection, a collection occupying two cases has been 
prepared which affords a comparison of ancient and living forms while 
another collection illustrating methods, of fossilization occupies a 
single case. A series of bromide enlargements illustrating restora- 
tions of ancient animals has been framed and placed in the cases. 
An ideal Carboniferous landscape painted in oil was made by 
the Museum artists and is exhibited in connection with the fos- 
sils of that period. The painting is 8x4 feet in size. The large 
skeletons and specimens having individual floor mounts were 
moved to positions corresponding with the new classification 
and new bases were made for them. Three of the large Dinosaur 
bones have been placed upon floor mounts. The work of cleaning 
from the matrix the bones of the large dinosaur individual obtained 
by the expedition of 1901 was pushed as rapidly as the available 
force would permit. The following portions of this skeleton are at 
present cleaned and upon exhibition: 23 caudal vertebras (in series), 
15 chevrons, 3 dorsal vertebras, 2 pubes, 2 ischia, 1 femur and 
1 ilium. In addition considerable work has been done in the paleon- 
tological laboratory in remounting and reassembling vertebrate fossils 
on hand since the opening of the Museum which had never been 
properly prepared. A careful revision of the identification and 
labeling of the invertebrate fossils was made by Mr. Slocom of the 
Department and at the same time any needed cleaning and restora- 
tion of the specimens was performed. The result of this extensive and 
detailed labor has been to greatly increase the value and improve the 
appearance of the collections. As the force of preparators in paleon- 
tology was increased and more room was needed for their work, the 
Curator's office and the paleontological laboratory were exchanged in 
place. The laboratory thus obtained was fitted with storage racks, 
sink, closet and revolving work tables, and sliding overhead curtains 
were provided to regulate the light. In the room now occupied as the 
Curator's office a side window was cut, the room recalcimined, a closet 
built, and a transfer of bookcases made. The collection of relief maps 
formerly occupying Halls 60 and 61 was transferred to Halls 75 and 






:yo2. Annum Repori oi nu Director. 105 

77. these halls together with Hall 68 having been first entirely 
fated .md repainted. A shelf with iron railing was built entirely 
around the walls of the halls to providi a means oi supporting and 
exhibiting the maps. In addition twenty iron easels made aftei 
designs by the Curator, wen provided for the exhibition ol maps in 
tin floor space. Four large tables were also provided for displaying 
small relief maps. In drawers in these tables have been fill d the 
unmounted maps to the number oi several hundred, 'rinse- are now- 
arranged alphabetically and in labeled covers. A total of sixty-two 
: maps, large and small, besides globes and wall maps is now 
displayed in tin se two halls and the ( olle< tion is one ol tin largest oi 
its kind to be found on exhibition in an] Museum. The collection of 
clays, sands and fictile material which formerly occupied Hall 77 was 
moved to Mall 6S, this hall being in turn vacated by consolidating 
collection of building stones with that of marbles in Hall 67.. 
Two new casts win added to accommodate an additional series oi 

- presented by Mr. |. J. Moroney. Some work in reorganizing 
the clay collection has been done, the principal undertaking being to 
exhibit in connection with each specimen of clay, briquettes which 
show the clay before and after burning. When completed this 
collection will be of great economic interest and value. 

The installation of Hall 24, containing the protozoa, sponges and 
coral collections, has been almost completed. The specimens havi 
placed in new cases specially built for their display to advantagi . 
not only showing the specimens in the best possible way, but effecting 
a great economy of space, the collection, as a matter of fact, now- 
occupying about one-half tin- space it formerly did. 

Photography, Illustration and Printing. —The development of 

two divisions continues and their importance as factors in 

Musi 11111 work cannot be questioned. The addition of a new Gordon 

- and a large amount of type has greatly increased the usefulness 

of the Division of Printing. The number of label tonus and other 

impressions turned out by the printer is shown 111 the following 

tab 

Other 
Lai- Impressions. 

Anthropolog) 2,2:1'-, 13,600 

-.my . I,l66 10,550 

5,267 

2.99" 2 9.375 

Din fice i.i ,762 

Library 10,370 



106 Field Columhian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

A statement of the work done in the Division of Photography 
appears below: 







Lantern 




Enlarge 




Negatives. 


Slides. 


Prints 


merits. 


Department A, . 


. 261 


479 


5,l62 


,4 


Department B, . 


37 


35 


41 




Department G, . 


127 


185 


92 




Department Z, . 


• 838 


188 


789 




Director's Office, . 


7 




ICQ 




Distribution, 






38 




Album, Record, etc., 






4,93° 





1,270 887 11,161 4 

Taxidermy and Laboratory Work. — Laboratory work has been of 
an exceptionally effective character, and the taxidermists have had 
a busy and productive year. The magnificent group of red deer 
exposed to the public about ninety days ago seem to mark the 
highest point that has been reached in the contribution of scientific 
illustration upon popular lines. While this group has not, of course, 
been inspected by the critics at home and abroad whose opinions are 
of the highest desirability, yet enough is known of their opinion of 
this piece of scientific art to flatter even so diffident a temperament 
as that of its creator, Mr. Akeley. 

Excellent results have been secured from the persistent working 
over and the installation of new material in economic botany and 
paleontology, and the Herbarium has made splendid progress in the 
identification, classification and arrangement of its abundant material. 

In the Osteological laboratory much has been accomplished in 
the last twelve months. The skeletons of fourteen large mammals 
have been macerated, degreased and bleached preparatory to mount- 
ing. One hundred and twenty large skulls and sixteen smaller ones 
have been cleaned and prepared for the study collection. A large 
number of skulls have also been prepared for photographing, the 
illustrations being needed for the work on " The Mammals of Mexico," 
now in preparation. 

Attendance. — An increase in the attendance approximating 14,000, 
including 2,500 increase in paid admissions, during the year is the 
most gratifying evidence that could be given of the growing popu- 
larity of the Museum and its increasing interest and consequent use- 
fulness. August 24 marked the fourth largest number of admissions 
in a single day, 11,000. The analysis of the attendance will be quite 
interesting. It shows a slight falling off in the attendance of school 
children and teachers on pay days, but this decrease was co-incident 
with very inclement weather, in the absence of which the comparative 



tO 

c 






o 
o 




c 

2 






UWAKY 
OV THE _. 

UNIVERSITY of ILUHOU 



1902. Awi u Repori OF im: DlRE( ink. 107 

attendant at other times shows that in this character of attendance 

the numbers would hav< been largelj increased. There can be no 

doubt that the schools oi Chicago and Cook County, the public 

schools as well as universities and colleges, are availing themselves 
more and mon of the facilities oi the Museum as teaching adjuncts 
to the books. 

A list is luii with submitted of the classes containing thirty or 
more scholars that visited the institution during the year just clos, d. 
A comparative statement of the attendance in the last two years is 
also append* ! 

>. no,. iv vn-i, L01 ition Teachers. Pupils. 

Normal 444 West Sixty-ninth st 36 

1 igg West Twelfth pi 1 35 

ild Avenue — Emerald ave. and Seventy-ninth st ... 2 55 

River Forest -River Forest, III 2 4.1 

Sherwood— Princeton ave, .mil Fifty-seventh st., 2 35 

Sherwood Princeton ave. and Fifty-seventh st., 3 58 

st Ohio s 'u st. 2 44 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . . . 1 70 

Sluru I ceton ave. and Fifty-seventh St., 2 39 

N 1 1 — 444 West Sixty-ninth st. 3 33 

Marquette— Wood and Harrison sts 1 39 

• -625 West Nineteenth st. 2 66 

n ave. and Fifty-seventh st 2 34 

■i-iky — Thi rner West Twentieth st., . . . . 1 40 

Princeton ave. and Fifty-seventh st. 4 74 

Harvard — Harvard ave., near Seventy-fourth st 1 37 

Sherwood Princeton ave. and Fifty-seventh st 2 41 

VV. Earle —Sixty-first St. and Armitage ave. 2 34 

A. Earle — Sixty-first St. and Armitage ave 2 63 

nth st 2 4; 

Fourteenth pi., corner Johnson St., 1 40 

il— 444 West Sixty-ninth st. .3 34 

1 rich— West Taylor and Sangamon sts 1 34 

le— Bishop and West Forty-eighth sts., 1 . 32 

 Taylor and Sangamon sts 2 58 

Seventieth st ; 36 

Sherw I — Princeton ave. and Fifty-seventh St., 2 30 

ch West Taylor and Sangamon sts., 2 44 

. . 30 

Sixty -tir>t st. and Annii ige .... I 

i/enth and Wallace sts. 3 40 

["wenty-seventh and Wallace sts., ... 4 80 

1 irles st., 1 orner West 104th st 3 41 

and West Sixty-fourth st 2 44 

Sixty-first st. and Armitage ave 1 

' ty-sixth St., corner Greenwood ave., . 1 33 

University of Chicago 7 4; 



io8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Schools and Location. Teachers. Pupil 

John Marshall— West Adams st. and Kedzie ave., .... 2 62 

Jewish Training School — 199 West Twelfth pi. 2 51 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . . . 1 32 

Sherwood — Princeton ave. and Fifty-seventh St., 1 44 

Yale — Yale ave. and Seventieth st 5 36 

C has. W. Earle — Sixty-first st. and Armitage ave 1 39 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave 1 62 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh St. and Kimbark ave 1 40 

Normal 444 West Sixty-ninth st 1 33 

West Pullman — West 120th and Wallace sts 1 37 

Normal— 444 West Sixty-ninth st 1 34 

Normal— 444 West Sixty-ninth St., 6 55 

Normal— 444 West Sixty-ninth St., 1 32 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., ... 2 30 

Purdue University — Lafayette, Ind 1 40 

Yale — Vale ave. and Seventieth st 3 36 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., ... 2 36 

Garfield^West Fourteenth pi., corner Johnson St. 1 42 

Normal 444 West Sixty-ninth St., 1 42 

Normal — 444 West Sixty-ninth St. 1 44 

Hyde Park High— Fifty-seventh St. and Kimbark ave., ... 2 34 

Van Ylissengen —West 108th pi. and Wentworth ave., ... I 30 

Perkins Bass— West Sixty-sixth St., corner South May St., . . 1 35 

Garfield— West Fourteenth pi., corner Johnson St., . . . . 1 32 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 1 35 

Komensky — Throop St., corner West Twentieth st 2 46 

Riverside— Hammond, Ind., 5 94 

Komensky — Throop St., corner West Twentieth St., .... 2 58 

Mark Sheridan — Twenty-seventh and Wallace sts. 2 47 

Prescott — Wrightwood ave., corner North Ashland Ave., . . 2 59 

Riverside — Hammond, Ind 2 52 

1 1. 1\ rn— Wabash ave. and Fourteenth st. I 31 

Mark Sheridan — Twenty-seventh and Wallace sts 3 75 

Prescott — Wrightwood ave., corner North Ashland ave., . . 2 40 

Josiah L. Pickard — W. Twenty-first pi., corner S. Oakley ave., . 2 34 

O'Toole — Bishop and West Forty-eighth sts., 2 33 

Mark Sheridan — Twenty-seventh and Wallace sts., 1 -31 

Kershaw— Union ave. and West Sixty-fourth St., 1 34 

Englewood High — West Sixty-second St., corner Stewart ave., 1 106 

Avondale— Sawyer ave., corner West Wellington St., 30 

Komensky — Throop St., corner West Twentieth st. 4 100 

Wells— North Ashland Ave., comer Cornelia ave 2 63 

Buckley— West Forty-third St., corner Hermitage ave., ... 4 167 

Linne — Sacramento ave., corner West School St., 2 51 

George Dewey— West Fifty-fourth St., corner Union ave., . . 2 56 

Cornell — Drexel ave. and Seventy-fifth st 2 51 

Hermann Raster — Wood st., corner West Seventieth St., . . 1 38 

Sherman — Morgan st. and West Fifty-first pi. I 53 

Chicago Lawn — West Sixty-fifth st. and South Homan ave., . 1 52 

Marquette— Wood St., corner West Harrison st 6 



20 



•  . '-'. Annual Report oi rm Director. 109 

ION. I Pupils. 

m L'nion ave. and West Sixty-fourth St., 2 30 

Headlej corner Garfield ave.,' 1 34 

St. Patrick's Commercial ave., comer Ninety-fifth st 1 5} 

iwn Lexington ave and Sixty-fourth St., 39 

University of Chicago 39 

I St. 3 4 J 

Hyde Park High Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . .. . 1 76 

Hyde Park High Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 



< > iMPARATIVE All I NDANI I 
For rm Yi vrs Ending Si ptember 30, iijoi, and Septi mbi r 30, 1902. 

Increase. Decrease. 

Total attendance 14,168 .... 

Paid attendance 2,528 .... 

Attendanci of Scl I Children on pay days 1,008 

Attendance of Students 615 .... 

Attendance of Teachers 41 .... 

Attendance ol Members 36 .... 

Average Daily Attendance, 1901, . . . ' 682 

ige Dailj Att> -ndance, 1002, 719 

Il> rewith arc- submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ani e, list of accessions, names of members, etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF. 

Director. 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



Financial Statement. 



Receipts and Disbursements 
During the Year Ending September 30, 1902. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1901 

Petty Cash on hand, Sept. 30, 1901, 

Dues of Members — 

Corporate S 135.00 

Annual, 2,800 00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 

South Park Commissioners 

Chicago City Railway Company 

Sale of Guides 

Sundry Receipts 

Interest on Investments 

Huntington W. Jackson Estate 

W. J. Chalmers, Special, 

Walker & Payne 

Watson F. Blair, ... 1 f 

M. A. Ryerson, . . I Pawnee J 

Edward E. Ayer, . . . | Expedition, | 

Cyrus H. McCo.rmick, J I 

Sale of Securities 



Disbursements. 

Salaries 

Guard Service 

Janitor Service 

Fire Protection 

Heat ami Light — 

Wages, S 3.254-92 

Fuel and Supplies 5,418.47 

Additions to Plant 1,504.54 S 10,267. 

Carried forward, S 88,571. 



\\M M Repori 01 I 111 DlRI 



1 ] I 



«rd 

nd Alterations 

\\ ages ol i arpenters, Painters, Roofi rs, 1 1,080 60 

Material used Paints, < >il>. I 

etc 3,008 22 14,088.82 

Furniture and I ixtu 

1 Bases 25020.08 

Sundries , |Sl 6l 

•».!i(. lis gg-J ™ 

Binding ,-, 

Sundries 1.152.54 

i.ipli\ 1. 294. 39 

5 and Articles Purchased 2286080 

ation ' "penses ^664.64 

1 nt — 

reaming, . . . 1421 ,94 
:ry, Posl ige, Vi legrams and Tele- 
phone, 762.50 

Publications 2,471.11 

Expeditions 18,768.51 

Sundries 1,222.69 24,646.75 

Si82.761.16 

In 1 . iqo2 I , .„ ! ,,, 

fc Treasurer's hands, Sept. 30, 1902, Savings A. nt, . 983.64 

30, 1902 739-95 

Securities Purchased 7,441.67 13,254.92 

$196,016.08 






Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



Attendance and Receipts for the Year Ending Sept. 30, 1902. 



ATTENDANCE. 

Paid attendance — 

Adults 21,676 

Children, 1.359 

2 3.°35 
Free admissions on pay days — 

School Children 6,849 

Students, 2,807 

Teachers, 632 

Members — Corporate 14 

Annual 310 

Life 10 

Officers' family, 147 

♦Special 228 

10,097 

Admissions on free days . 

Saturdays 54,986 

Sundays " 173.558 

228,544 

Total attendance 262,576 

Highest attendance on any day (August 24, 1902), . . . 10,914 

Highest paid attendance on any day (July 4, 1902), . . . 522 

Average daily admissions (365 days), 719 

Average paid admissions (261 days), 88 

RECEIPTS. 

Guides sold — 1,334 at 25 cents each, S 333-50 

Articles checked — 26,800 at 5 cents each 1,304.00 

Admissions 5,554.90 

57,192. 40 

♦American Society of Naturalists. 



LIBKAKY 

Of THE 

UNIVERSITY of ILLINOIS 



( )i t. i \\ \ - m Report 01 rHE Director. 113 



Accessions. 

i RON 1 i] 1; i, Kjoi, to September 30, 1902. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

ONS IRE B1 GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

AD \MS. MILWARD, Chicago. 

lit of Japanese armor (exchange). 
AMI KUAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York. 
Plaster cast of stone image from Seattle, Wash, (exchange). 
Bl C K WALTER. 1 . B., Homer, Neb. 

Winnebago peace pipe, catlimte bowl (exchange). 
G IFFIELD, \\ . A., Pine Ridge, S. D. 

Sioux war bonnet— S. Dakota (exchange). 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey : 

Ethnological specimens from the Kickapoo, Pawnee, Arapaho— Okla- 
homa. 
Ethnological specimens from the Pawnee, Oto, Osage— Oklahoma. 
Ethnological specimens from the Pawnee — Oklahoma. 
Ethnological specimens from the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Kiowa, etc.— 
Oklahoma. 
Collected by J. W. Hudson : 

Ethnological collections from N. E. California. 
Collected by C. F. Newcombe : 

Ethnological specimens from the Tlingit and Haida — Alaska. 
Collected by S. C. Simms : 

Ethnological specimens from the Crow and Cheyenne — Montana. 
2 skeletons — Crow Reservation, Mont. 

Buffalo hide shields, buckskin shirts, bows and arrows, etc.— Crow Reser- 
vation, Mont. 

Purchases : 

Double-headed drum, Winnebago — Wisconsin. 
Set of Lacondon, bows and arrows — Mexico. 
Skull and skeleton— San Nicholas Island, Cal. 
Stone celt— Cahokia, III. 
Cheyenne buffalo robe. 
Hopi buffalo head dress. 
Winnebago war club. 
Winnebago war bow. 
Winnebago bone knives. 
Buffalo hide shield. 

Ethnological specimens from the Ovimbundu and the Lovali tribes- 
West Africa. 
Ethnological specimens from the Tlingit stock— Alaska. 
Benin bronze heads -Benin, Africa. 
Etruscan marble sarcophagi — Italy. 
Roman iron garden tools from villa at Boscoreale. 
Hopi Indian photographs. 



ii 4 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



FIELD, MARSHALL & CO., Chicago. 

Apache necklace of polished stone beads— Arizona (exchange). 
FREE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Copies of games (exchange). 

Original head dress (exchange). 

Archaeological material, pottery, etc.— Pachacamoc, Peru (exchange). 

Skeletons of Yankton Sioux— Fort Peck Reservation, Mont, (exchange). 
HAMMOND, CHAS. L., 4627 Greenwood avenue, Chicago 

Indian book from village of Northern Cheyenne— Wyoming. 
HINSDALE, W.B., Ann Arbor, Mich. • . 

Ethnological specimens from among the Klamath— California (exchange). 

MOORE, C. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Casts of rare stone implements from Alabama and Georgia. 

RODDY, T. R., Chicago . 

Sacred Sioux medicine bags (exchange). 

Snow Snake, Iroquois, sacred lightning medicine of the Winnebago— 
(exchange). 
SARGENT, HOMER E., Chicago. . 

Small water basket (cheeter cup) made by Paiute— Nevada. 

Photographs of Paiute Indians— Nevada. 

Pueblo ceremonial robe of Pueblo Indians, N. M. 

Dress of Hopi Indians, Arizona. 
SCOTT. MRS. I. W., Chicago. . 

War bonnet, pair beaded leggings, knife sheath, hair ornaments of horse 
hair and porcupine quill, of the Sioux (loan). 

Sioux saddle bags. 
SETON-KARR, W. H., Wimbledon, London, England. 

Rude stone implements— Somaliland, Africa. 

SPINK, R. C, Yainac, Oregon. .A , \ ^ 

Beaver teeth dice game— Klamath Reservation, Oregon (exchange). 

TIN'TED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C 

Ethnological specimens from the Andaman Islands (exchange). 

WESTON, H. M., Chicago. 

Buckskin dress, beaded (deposit). 

Basket cap (deposit). 
WIT SON R. N., McLeod, Alberta. . . 

Games, etc., of the Piegan Indians-N. Piegan Reservation (exchange). 
WOHLGEMUTH, CARL, Bozen, Tyrol, Austria. 

Collection of historical relics from Bavaria (exchange). 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(ACCESSIONS ARE BY GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

ADY, G. E. & CO., Denver, Colo. 

12 samples Dent corn— Colorado. 
ARTHUR ]■ C, La Fayette, Ind. 

1 specimen Puce in la 1 1 1 mho, ice Schw-La Fayette, Ind. 

AYER, MRS. E. E., Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen— Lake Geneva, Wis. 
REBB, ROBERT, Washington Heights, Chicago. 

252 herbarium specimens-Illinois, Indiana and Massachusetts. 
BIDWELL, JOSEPH E., Chicago. 

3 samples of standardized corn— Illinois. 
■RDTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, Australia. 

13 herbarium specimens-New South Wales (exchange). 
120 herbarium specimens— Australia (exchange). 

BROSS, MASON, Chicago. 

1 1 18 herbarium specimens— various localities. 



i . igoj. A\m u Repori in i in Direi tor. 

BUDGE, ENRIQU] . Buffalo, N. Y. 

no specie .m fruits ami seeds. 

THE CELLULOID CO., New York City, 
ects. 
i book of " Tex-o-derm." 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Baltimore, Md. 

3 samples of standardized corn Marj land. 
CHAMB1 OMMERCE, Boston, Mass. 

- graded corn Massachusetts. 
CHASE, MRS. V.GN | VIonroi ai run, , Chii a ;o 

.i packagi is, Illinois. 

i package fruits of Crataegus Illinois. 
171 herbarium specimens Indiana, Illinois and Michigan. 
J packages fruits of Crataegus— Mokena, Illinois. 
3 upholstery tibers. 
CHASE. \ . IL. Wady Petra, Illinois. 

it herbarium specimens— Illinois (exchange). 
DEEKINC. HARVESTER CO., Chicago. 

1 leaf of Sisal hemp — Yucatan. 
DORSI Y, GEO. \ . 

1 cotton cloth— Ancon mummy, 
tton cloth-Peruvian lndi 
EMRICK, DR. ('.. M.. 5700 Kimbark avenue, Chicago. 

pecimens dried plants and fruits Paso del Rio, Mexico. 
ENTORI . RUFFNER 8 CO., Chicago. 

37 samples coffee types. 
FAIRBANK CO., THE N. K., Chicago. 
-'; samples vegetable oil products. 
FIELD C0L1 MBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collated bj Mrs. Agnes Cha 

irtions of plants— Missouri Botanical Garden. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 
14 various grammeae. 

127 portions of plants, tracings anil drawings. 
Collected by Charles J. Brand: 

100 herbarium specimens— Bemidji, Minn. 
woods — Bemidji, Minn. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, |r.: 

56 herbarium specimens Illinois and Indian. 1. 
332 herbarium specimens— Illinois and Indiana. 

Colle. :t( d bj S. E. Meek: 

4 herbarium specimens— Ocotlan, Mexico. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

57 herbarium specimens Arizona. 
Purchases: 

84 specimens in plant economics— Mexico. 

1 pint essence of coffee. 

I sample of kola nuts. 

I sample of dandelion root. 

4 samples coffee substitutes. 

1 sample cotton root bark. 

1 sample fluid extract cotton root bark. 

lg specimens corn types— Illinois. 

1,522 herbarium specimens various localities. 

13,000 herbarium specimens— North America and Hawaiian. 

437 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

545 herbarium specimens— Texas and Mexico. 

212 herbarium specimens— Yellowstone National P. ok. 

1 lacquer box. 



"5 



n6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

i carved bamboo. 

I sample cassia oil. 

I sample sassafras oil. 

I sample cinnamon oil. 

I sample hemp seed oil. 

4 bromide enlargements. 

4 economic specimens — Cashew seeds, mastich gum, pistach nuts, Chian 
turpentine. 
MARSHALL FIELD & CO., Chicago. 

98 samples various types cotton goods. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Mass. 

1 herbarium specimen — Cuba. 
ITASCA PAPER CO., Grand Rapids, Minn. 

14 specimens illustrating paper pulp manufacture. 
KANSAS CORN FEATHER CO., Clinton, Iowa. 

I corn feather mattress. 

1 sample corn feathers. 
KATO COFFEE CO., Chicago. 

1 bottle coffee fiber. 

I bottle rancid fat. 

1 bottle kato. 
MAYERHOFF, DR. PAUL S.. Fort Apache, Arizona. 

127 Indian plants and economics — Arizona. 
McDONALD, FRANK E., Peoria, Illinois. 

355 herbarium specimens — Illinois (exchange). 
MIDLAND LINSEED OIL CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

12 samples illustrating linseed oil extraction. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 type moss — West Virginia. 

1 type flowering plants — West Virginia. 

21 herbarium specimens — West Virginia and Mexico. 

1 sample French chestnuts. 

r sample French chestnut burrs. 

12 samples coffee substitutes. 

1 sample Padang coffee. 

1 sample German coffee berry — soy beans. 

18 drawings and type fragments. 

1 package banana cigar wrappers — Porto Rico. 

I quart parched sweet corn. 

1 bottle corn stigmas from Hopi corn. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, Bronx Park, New York. 

634 herbarium specimens — Porto Rico (exchange). 

48 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

18 samples typical corn — Minnesota. 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

134 herbarium specimens — Ohio (exchange). 
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 

16 specimens fungi exsiccati — Ohio (exchange). 

26 specimens fungi exsiccati— Ohio (exchange). 

18 specimens fungi exsiccati — Ohio (exchange). 

20 specimens fungi exsiccati — Ohio (exchange). 
THE OLD TIMES DISTILLERY CO., Louisville, Ky. 

10 specimens illustrating corn whisky. 
PARKE, DAVIS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 

126 medicinal roots and herbs. 
THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUMS, Philadelphia, Pa. 

128 economic specimens (exchange). 
POLLARD, C. L., Washington, D. C. 

2 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 



Oct. 1902. Anni u Ri mr Direi n 117 

I . BARTi IN 8 FALES, Worcester, Mass 

2 photographs of fourdrinier. 
SAM l.\S Ml FOOD CO., Battle Creek, Mich. 
I package hulless bi 
1 package bean hulls. 
1 package toasted com flakes. 
ESTATE "1 HIRAM Sllil I ey, Illinois. 

unples corn types— Sibley, Illinois. 
SNOW, MISS 1 . M . Chicago. 

5 herbarium specimens— Delaware. 
SPRAGUE, WARNER 81 CO., Chicago. 
1 sample cassia buds. 
1 sample Sargoh cassia. 
1 sample Ceylon cinnamon. 
1 sample Java cassia bark. 
1 sample Canton cinnamon. 
THORBURN, 1. M. 8c CO., New York. 

specimens typical corn New York. 
ecimens typical beans— New York. 
UMBACH, DR. L. M.. Naperville, Illinois. 

102 herbarium specimens— Illinois, Indiana and Canada (exchange) 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 
lerbarium specimens — Florida and Mexico (exchange). 
65 herbarium specimens— various localities (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, Minneapolis, Minn. 

135 herbarium specimens— North America (exchange). 
VAUGHAN, I. C. \ CO., Chicago. 

specimens typical corn— Milford, Conn. 
YOTH, H. R., Oraibi, Arizona. 

rbarium specimens— Arizona. 
36 specimens corn of the Hopi— Arizona. 
WHITMAX, CLARENCE 8i CO., Chicago. 

4 samples various grades cotton goods. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(ACI ESSIONS ARE BY out UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

BAILEY, MRS. C. A., Rome, N. Y. 
1 relief 11 

1 cast "Welcome" nugget. 
I cast crustacean track. 

5 casts meteorites. 

1 cast platinum nugget. 

1 lava stalactite. 
BOARMAN, FATHER M. I., Chicago. 

specimens volcanic products— Hawaiian Islands. 
BOEDAKER, WILLIAM, 60: 117th street. Chicago. 

ecimen trilobile— Calymene 'liagarensis—LemoM, 111. 
'WLAND, MISS M. M., Galion, Ohio. 

2 specimens fossil fishes — Colorado. 

3 specimens fossil plant impressiens— Colorado. 
BUDGE, ENRIQ1 K, Buffalo, N. Y. 

31 specimens minerals and ores— Chile. 
CHALMERS, W. J., 188 Lincoln Park boulevard, Chicago. 

I specimen tourmaline crystal — California. 

1 section smoky quartz crystal showing zonal structure— Colorado. 
CRANE, W. E., Tarryiown-on-the-Hudson, New York. 

20? specimens Paleozoic fossils (50 species), (exchange). 



n8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

CONSOLIDATED MINES, Kimberley, South Africa. 

25 photographs, illustrating diamond mining. 
DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RAILROAD, Scranton, Pa. 

1 stump of tree of the Carboniferous period, diameter at base 2 feet, 
height lYz feet. 
DERR, H. B., Champaign, 111. 

1 photograph of Ptychophyllum stokesii, Niagara limestone, Chicago. 
ELDRIDGE, E. W., Chicago. 

3 specimens graphite — Colorado. 
FARGO, DR. J. F., Los Angeles, Cal. 

2 specimens crystallized corundum in matrix — California. 
1 specimen opal — California. 

1 specimen axinite — Japan (exchange). 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington : 

162 specimens minerals, beryl, orthoclase, tourmaline, bertrandite, etc. — 
Maine. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington and A. W. Slocom : 

8 specimens bitumen in limestone, 5 specimens fossils, 1 specimen 

pyrite — Thornton, 111. 

2 species fossil fish teeth, 2 species crinoids, 1 species coral, 1 glaciated 

pebble — Elmhurst, 111. 
Collected by L. V. Kenkel : 

1 specimen marcasite concretion — Chicago. 
1 specimen banded jasi er — Wauconda, 111. • 

Collected by H. W. Nichols : 
 28 specimens ores of the Black Hills, S. D., and Laramie Mountains, Wyo. 
I specimen zinc ore — Tennessee. 
I specimen graphite — Wyoming. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs : 

14 specimens of fossil shells (2 species) — Illinois. 

1 specimen adobe clay — Colorado. 

9 specimens cement rock clays and their products — North Dakota. 

24 vertebras of Morosaurus and Plesiosaurus, 10 invertebrate fossils — 
North Dakota. 
Purchases : 

2 pyrite " suns." 

1 specimen pyrite on slate. 

2 specimens anorthite. 
1 specimen sulphur. 

1 specimen gold — North Carolina. 
1 section of Casas Grandes meteorite. 
1 relief map of Porto Rico. 
1 relief map of Hawaiian Islands. 

1 relief map of Niagara Falls. 
18 specimens celestite crystals. 

2 specimens sulphur. 

2 specimens crystallized epidote. 
47 grams Agen meteorite. 
85 grams Lancon meteorite. 

15 mineral specimens — various localities. 
Skull of Hyracodon — South Dakota. 
Saline Township, Kansas, meteorite. 

92 specimens vertebrate fossils— Wyoming and Alaska. 
28 specimens Upper Silurian and Devonian fishes— Scotland. 
20 specimens minerals. 
2 tusks of mammoth — Alaska. 

1 relief map showing stages of recession of Lake Chicago. 
8 bromide enlargements. 
FOHRMAN, CHAS. A., Chicago. 

1 specimen covellite — Wyoming. 



'. 11)02. A\\i w Repori of ihk Director. 119 

I 1 MINERAL CO., Philadelphia. Pa. 

1 section of amethyst crystal — Brazil (exchan 
GARDNER, JOHN L.. Jr., Boston, Mass. 

1 negative and print of beryl crystal. 
GOODSK1.I . B. W., Chicago. 

8 specimens coppi 1 re, i specimens gold ore, 1 specimen corundum — 
United States and Canada. 
JOHNSON, 1 . C, Hill City, South Dakota. 

1 spei mien of tin ore, weighing 200 lbs. — Gertie mine, Black Hills. 
KING. IRVING, Chica) 

? spei its fossil ostn 1, 1 species fossil coral, 1 species fossil foraminit, 
Natchitoches, La. 
MILLS, A. C, 5613 Kimbark avenue, Chica 

1 specimi icial conglomerate Wabash, Ind. 
MORONEY, I. J., Chicago. 

briquettes, 11 specimens clays. 
PHILLIPS, DR. W, B., Austin, rexas. 

2 s] - 111, rcury ore. 

2 specimens country rock of same. 
PIERCE, H. B., Golconda, 111. 

6 f] fluorite, 2 specimens sphalerite, 1 specimen smithsonite, 

1 specimen haute, 1 specimen galena — Illinois. 
ROMANO, JOSEPH, Austin, 111. 

1 specimen limonite concretion. 
SHA1 IK. SILAS A., Assumption, 111. 

2 blocks of bituminous coal from 1,000 foot level, upper and lower veins 

— Assumption, 111. 

SLOCOM, A. W., Chica, 

347 specimens fossils 155 species), 4 specimens rocks, 3 specimens min- 
erals, (loan I. 

STATE SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado. 

17 specimens rocks, 18 specimens minerals — Colorado and Minnesota 
(exchange). 
pTURTEVANT, G. \V., Chi, . 

6 specimens gold and 'silver ores Arizona. 

1 Mil 1> STATES MARBLE m., Spokane, Washington. 

5 specimens marble Washington. 
1 STVERS1 n OF CHICAGO, Chicago. 

177 specimens fossils dS species, -Utah and Indiana. 
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN. Madison, Wis. 

»i polished section of Algoma meteorite, 6% grams — Algoma, Wis., 
(exchangi 
1 cast of Algoma meteorite (exchange). 
WARD'S NATURAL SCIENCE ESTABLISHMENT, Rochester, N. Y. 

[3 specimens modern crinoids, brachiopods and echinoderms (exchange). 
1 si. lizard (exchange). 

1 skull of pec cars (exchai 

WEBER, DR. F. 

1 specimen lerro -titanium-bor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

ESSIONS VR] KS i.IM UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNAT1 

CLARK, II. W., Chicago. 

1 lesser scaup duck — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
DEARBORN, N\, Chicago 

6 bird skins- New Hampshire. 



120 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by Geo. F. Breninger: 

232 bird skins — Chihuahua, Mexico. 

515 bird skins — Mexico. 

487 bird skins — Mexico. 

65 bird skins— Mexico. 

2 bird skins, 163 bird's eggs — Mexico. 

186 bird skins — Mexico. 
Collected by E. R. Chope: 

1 Maryland yellowthroat. 

1 Northern shrike. 

2 sora. 
Purchased: 

1 hooded merganser — Browning, Illinois. 

20 bird skins. 

I ring-necked duck. 

1 scaup duck. 

1 widgeon. 

2 plantain eaters, I hornbill, I heron, 2 hawks — Cameroons, West Africa. 
GERHARD, WM. J., Chicago. 

1 Tennessee Warbler — Illinois. 

1 flicker — Illinois. 
KENNICOTT, H., The Grove, Illinois. 

1 shoveler duck — Illinois. 
McCORMICK, R. H., Virginia Hotel, Chicago. 

1 Owens apteryx. 

1 owl parrot. 
SCHAUB, MRS. J. W., Chicago. 

1 rose-colored cockatoo. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York. 

1 skeleton European red deer (exchange). 
BEAN, DR. T. H., Washington, D. C. 

1 mole — Long Island, New York. 

93 fishes, 5 snakes, 2 turtles, 2 frogs, 1 crab, 3- shrimps — Long Island, 
New York. 

3 fishes — Long Island, New York. 
BRIND, W. L., 4001 Grand boulevard, Chicago. 

3 snakes— South Chicago, 111. 
CHAMBERLIN, R. V., Brighton, Utah. 

1 centipede— Utah. 
CHOPE, E. B., Field Columbian Museum. 

446 beetles, 5 ichneumon flies — various localities. 

1 spider's nest — Chicago. 

53 beetles, 6 flies, 4 bugs — various localities. 

1 cockroach, 32 bugs, 16 flies, 20 bees and wasps, 4 grasshoppers, 1 beetle 
— Chicago. 

1 wasp, 1 fly, 10 bugs, 116 beetles, 1 moth — Chicago. 

61 bees and wasps, 13 flies, 12 beetles, 2 bugs — Chicago. 

9 flies, 2 grasshoppers, 22 bees and wasps, 1 bug, 42 beetles — Chicago. 

3 bugs, 1 katydid, 1 wasp, 1 fly, 3 beetles. 12 grasshoppers— Russell, Ala. 

6 flies, 29 beetles, 3 bugs, 2 butterflies — Illinois. 

13 flies, 11 bees and wasps, 1 moth, I beetle, 3 bugs, 2 butterflies, 1 ant- 
Chicago. 

6 flies, 1 bee — Chicago. 



Asm 11 RePORI 01 mi DlREi 1'OR. 



I Jl 



rLAKK. H. \\ . Field Columbian Museum, 
i bug Chicago. 
2 dragonflies, 2 beetles, 2 fungusflies— Chicaj 

etle, 2 moths— Chicago. 
:<>K\ . C. Iv, Boston, Mass 

i rabbit Mexico. 

I si|uirrel — Mexico. 
DEARBORN, N.. Field Columbian Museum. 

I fly — Clin 

•OHM EN, 1. A., Field Columbian Musi 
j Hies, i beetle Chicago. 
i beetle— Roby, Ind. 
IRUMMOND, GEO. H., Chi.,. 

i waterbug- -Chica 
ELLIOT, I). G., Kiel. I Columbian Museum. 

i beetle— Chicago. 
•IELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by Geo. F. Breninger 

lirrels, 4 chipmunks— Mexico. 
Collected by Wm. J. Gerhard: 

106 specimen? lies, grasshoppers, bees, etc.— Chicago. 

114 specimens butterflies, bees, wasps, riies, beetles and bugs— Chicago 
loo sit. imens grasshoppers, butterflies, bees, wasps, flies, beetles, moths, 
etc. — Chi. 

73 specimens mayflies, moths, butterflies, bees, wasps, beetles, bugs, etc. 

— Chicago. 
53 specimens moths, flies, cockroaches, bees, wasps, etc.— Chicago. 
40 specimens cockroaches, butterflies, dragonflies, flies, bees, wSsps and 

beetles— Miller.'Iiui. 
138 specimens moths, beetles, roaches, bugs, flies, grasshoppers, bees, 

wisps, etc.— Chicago. 
91 specimens bugs, beetles, moths, flies, etc.— Chicago. 
159 specimens grasshoppers, moths, butterflies, flies, beetles, bees and 

wasps— Glen Ellyn, III. 
77 specimens beetles, moths, (lies, butterflies, dragonflies, wasps, etc.— 

Chicago. 
89 specimens caddiceflies, bugs, beetles, moths, dragonflies. bees, wasps, 

etc.— Chicago. 
39 specimens butterflies, moths, bugs, flies, bees and wasps— Riverdale, 

Illinois. 
170 specimens caddiceflies, mayflies, beetles, moths, butterflies, bees, 

wasps, etc.— Chicago. 
276 specimens dragonflies, caddiceflies, bugs, moths, beetles, bees, wasps, 

etc -Chicago. 
1 bat— Willow Springs, III. 
I cricket, 2., moths— Chicago. 
148 specimens moths, butterflies, bees, wasps, grasshoppers, waterbug, 

flies, etc.— Riverside and Chicago, 111. 
72 specimens parasites, lacewings, leafhoppers, flies, moths, caterpillars, 

butterflies, bees, etc.— Chicago and Beverly Hills, III. 
70 specimens moths, flies, beetles, grasshoppers, bees, wasps, parasites, 

etc —Chicago and Maywood, 111. 

64 specimens flies, moths, scorpion fly, bees, wasps, caterpillars, parasites, 

etc.— Chicago. 

13.5 specimens beetles, flies, buj S, urn ths, dragonflies, bees, wasps, etc.— 

Chicago and West Pullman, 111. 
I gopher -Willow Springs, III. 

65 specimens moths, flies, butterflies, beetles, bees, wasps and bugs- 

Beverly Hills, 111. 

66 specimens moths, scorpion flies, grasshoppers, beetles, bees, wasps, 

etc. — various localities. 



122 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 






65 specimens parasites, sawflies, scorpionflies, beetles, gall insects, etc. — 

Illinois. 
163 specimens moths, parasites, bugs, bees, wasps, etc. — Illinois. 
43 specimens beetles, moths, wasps, bees, grasshoppers, butterflies, etc. — 

Illinois. 

20 specimens bugs, flies, hemerobians, beetles, bees and wasps — Chicago. 
Collected by E. Heller: 

28 specimens snakes and lizards — California. 

2 black-tailed deer — California. 

178 specimens skunks, rabbits, weasels, minks, squirrels, moles, shrews, 
1 mice, gophers, chipmunks, etc.— Oregon. 

3 polecats, 2 squirrels, 2 shrews, 13 pouch rats, 4 rabbits, 2 wood rats, 1 

muskrat, I weasel — Oregon. 

16 snakes, 1 lizard — Oregon. 
2 snakes, 2 lizards — Oregon. 
149 rodents — Oregon. 

43 rodents — Mexico. 

8 rabbits, 7 foxes, I antelope, 4 bats, 219 rodents — Mexico. 

I scorpion — California. 

T3 rodents — Mexico. 

15 ground squirrels, 17 bats, 2 foxes, 2 rabbits, 15 wood rats, 5 jumping 

rats, 10 gophers, 101 mice, 13 sheep, 5 deer — Mexico. 
1 bat — Mexico. 

g snakes, 95 lizards, 1 toad, 4 fishes — Lower California. 
7 horned toads, 91 lizards, 7 snakes, 100 fishes — Lower California. 
Collected by F. E. Lutz : 

1 beetle, 1 male cricket, 1 centipede, one dragon-fly lava — Mexico. 

2 beetles, 8 bugs, I dragon-fly lava— Mexico. 
1 bug, 1 tarantula, 5 scorpions — Mexico. 

6 water bugs, 9 water beetles — Mexico. 

1 water bug — Mexico. 

2 water bugs — Mexico. 

18 grasshoppers, 1 diggerwasp, 6 beetles, 17 bugs, 50 mosquitoes — Mexico 
95 cockroaches, 1 grasshopper, 11 crickets, 1 velvet ant — Mexico. 

1 water bug — Mexico. 
Collected by W. E. Snyder : 
35 rodents — N. Dakota. 

17 ground squirrels, 1 badger, 1 rabbit, 3 gophers, 13 mice — JS T . Dakota. 

16 rodents — N. Dakota. 

49 rodents, 1 insectivora, 1 carnivora — N. Dakota. 
30 rodents — Steele, N. Dakota. 
83 rodents, 2 bats — N. Dakota. 
Purchases : 

7 rat and weasel skins, 6 skeletons — W. Va. 
6 mountain goat — Alaska. 

I moose skin and skull. 

19 skulls of mink, marten and otter. 

21 mammal skins and skulls. 
1 wolf skin and skull. 

6 ourang-outang skulls. 

49 moths, 138 dragon-flies, 1012 bees and wasps,g5 grasshoppers, 123 flies, 

832 beetles. 
1 bull moose, 2 cow moose, 1 yearling — Alaska. 

1 rabbit, 1 badger, 4 hares, 5 weasels, 8 mice, 1 rat, 3 woodchucks, 18 

ground squirrels — Canada. 

8 bats, 3 shrews — N. W. Territory. 

3 grizzly bear skins and skulls, 1 brown bear skull— Alaska. 

2 white foxes, 2 blue foxes, 4 rabbits, 1 seal. 
1 moose skin and skull — Alaska. 

6 gophers, 4 rats, 21 mice, 4 jumping mice, 4 ground squirrels — California. 

9 rats, 29 mice, 2 ground squirrels. 

4 caribou — British Columbia. 
4 squirrels, 1 weasel. 



(i )02. Annum Repori 01 rm Direi tor. 123 

t r..'.~. its, 2 poiket rats, 6 mice, I armadillo, i wolf, 1 fox. 

6 monkey skins and skulls. 
I blue bear skin. 

4 kangaroo rats. 
; bea\ er skins. 

J hear skins and skulls. 

1 skeleton of New Zealand lizard. 

2 fishes, i timber wolf -Michigan. 

or beetles— various localities. 

5 antelope, 3 monki .: squirrels, 2 rats, 4 mice. 
140 specimens fishes 142 species). 

; I 1 ive bats — Cuba. 

it'le, 3 mink, 2 t'oxes, 6 lynx, 2 wolverines, 3 otters, 1 caribou— Alaska. 

FISH. CARL. Harrisburg, Neb. 

1 beetle- Nebraska. 

k( Nebraska. 
GERHARD. \VM. J., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 1 ; moths, 282 butterflies — various localities. 

lit specimens beetles, flies, grasshoppers, bugs, bees, wasps, etc. — New 
York. 

ENNIE, 5445 Drexel avenue, Chicago. 

2 scorpions (in alcohol) — Texas. 
HELLER, E., Field Columbian Museum. 

51 rodents and insectivores— Oregon. 

49 mammal skins — California. 
HARRIS, MRS. JOSEPH. 4532 Lake avenue, Chicago. 

1 dragon By— Chicago. 
■ART, W. H., New York. 

3 bear skulls — Mexico. 
KENKEL. L. V., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 wasp's nest — Chicago. 

I dragon fly — Chicago. 

18 specimens bugs, beetles, bees, wasps, flies, moths — Illinois. 

3 bats— Chicago. 

1 centipede, 1 water bug — Chicago. 

KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW, 5524 Michigan avenue, Chicago. 

2 bears, 5 pumas, 4 foxes, 3 lynx — Mexico. 
I bear skin and skull. 

KREKO BROS. Armenia. 

1 camel. 
LINDAHL. SETH, 53 75th street, Chicago. 

696 beetles— various localities. 
LUTZ, F. E., Chicago. 

6 mice — Chicago. 

1 wood rat, 1 porpoise skull — Mississippi. 
MASON, C. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

ind wasp — Chicago. 
MEAKN-. DR. EDGAR A„ Newport, R. I. 

4217 specimens shells (37 species) — Newport, R. I. 
MEEK, S. E., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 wasp— Chicago. 

MII.I.SPAUGH, CHAS. F., Field Columbian Museum. 

12; specimens weevils, parasites, beetles, flies, etc. 

2 pea weevils. 
108 specimens flies, beetles, pea weevils, ichneumon flies — various 

localities. 
207 specimens dragon flies, moths, butterflies, bees, wasps, bugs and 

beetles— Colorado. 
228 specimens beetles — various localities. 
7 beetles -Mexico. 
1 moth — Chicago. 






124 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 
3 killifishes — Florida. 

MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

I beetle — Harvey, 111. 
MORRIS, PHILIP, Field Columbian Museum. 

i beetle — Chicago. 

I dragon-fly, I fly, 2 beetles— Chicago. 
PEDERSEN, J. K., Field Columbian Museum. 

I ground squirrel— Chicago. 
PETERSEN, J. F., Field Columbian Museum. 

33 specimens beetles, flies, saw-flies, ant, etc.— Chicago. 

17 specimens flies, grasshoppers, saw-flies, etc.— Chicago. 

21 specimens butterflies, bees, wasps, buijs— Chicago. 

21 specimens grasshoppers, flies, bees, wasps— Chicago. 
SLOCOM, A. W., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 bumblebee, 1 butterfly, 4 beetles— Illinois. 

1 bat— Chicago. 

1 wasp, I centipede, 1 spider, 1 ichneumon fly— Illinois. 

1 velvet ant — Chicago. 
SPAULDING & CO., Chicago. 

69 specimens pearl-bearing shells from Wisconsin. 

1 shell showing some peculiar pearl formation— Wisconsin. 
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, California. 

Collection of fishes from Brazil and Japan, comprising 100 specimens 
(exchange). 
STONE, FRANK B., Chicago. 
4 beetles — California. 

2 beetles — Mexico. 
TIEMANN, B., Field Columbian Museum. 

1 beetle— Chicago. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 
1 fish— Mexico. 

1 bat, 1 mouse (exchange). 

2 fishes — Mexico. 

1 fish — Kentucky. 
VIERECK, HENRY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

2 seventeen-year bicadas. 

1 nvmph case of the same species. 

WARD'S NATURAL SCIENCE ESTABLISHMENT, Rochester, N. Y. 

26 sponges, 2 corals, 1 crinoid, 1 star fish, 1 sea urchin, 7 sea cucumbers, 
3 worms, 2 tunicates (exchange). 
WHITE, E. N., Chicago. 

2 parasites — Chicago. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Salem, Ohio. 

6 fishes— Ohio. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Made by Chas. J. Brand: 

60 negatives, North American forestry. 

Made bv Geo. A. Dorsey: 

126 negatives, Indians of Arizona and New Mexico. 

522 negatives, Indians of Indian Territory and New Mexico. 
Made by O. C. Farrington: 

36 negatives, views of landscapes, etc.— Maine and New Hampshire. 



1902. \s\i w Repor hi Direi roR. 125 

Made by J. W. Hudson 

legatn is. California Indians. 

144 negatives, California Indians. 
Made by S. C. Simms: 

66 negatives, oi Crow Indians. 

Purchases: 

34 lantern slides on Economic Geology. 



THE LIBRARY. 

(ACC1 >l<! B\ EXCHANG1 UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

Books, Pamphlets and Serials. 

A 1 '• 1 RDEEN UNIVERSITY, MARISCHAL COLLEGE, Aberdeen, Scotland. 

1 pamphlet. 
ADAMS. C. C. [the author), Chicago, 111. 

3 reprints. 

Alabama agricultural experiment station, Auburn, Aia. 

Bulletins. 43 back nos. and current nos. (gift). 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Ala. 

Charles Mohr: Plant life of Alabama. 
AMBROSETTI, JUAN B. (the author), Buenos Aires. Argentina. 

4 reprints. 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Proceedings, vol. 14, pts. 1 and 2. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Proceedings, Denver meeting, vol. 50. 
AMERICAN BUREAU OF GEOGRAPHY, Winona, Minn. 

Bulletin, vol. I, nos. 1, 3 and 4, vol. 2. 
AMKRICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL, Baltimore, Md. 

Journal, current nos. 
AMKRICAN FOLK LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Journal, Nos. 54-57. 
AMKRICAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION. Washington, D. C. 

I orestry and irrigation, current nos. 
AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF HOMEOPATHY, New York City. 

Transactions, vol. 57, 1901. 
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, curreni 
AMERICAN MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Journal, current nos. 
AMKRICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Annual report, 1 < >o I . 

Bulletin, vol. 1 1, pt. 4. 
Bulletin, vol. 14. 
Bulletin, vol. 1 ;, pt. 1. 
Memoirs, vol. 3 and 6. 
AMKRICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCH.-EOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New 
York City. 
Proceedings and papers, 43d and 44th meetings. 



ij6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Conn. 

Index, vols. 1-20. 

Journal, vol. 21, pt. 1. 

Journal, vol. 22, pt. 2. 

Journal, vol. 23, pt. 1. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, vol. 40, nos. 167-169. 
AMERICAN SOAP JOURNAL, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Journal, current nos. (gift). 
AMSTERDAM. KONIGLICHE AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, 
Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Proceedings, section of sciences, vol. 3. 

Verhandelingen, vol. 7, nos. 4-6. 

Verslag, vol. 9. 
AMSTERDAM. UNIVERSITEITS BIBLIOTHEEK, Amsterdam, Netherlands 

12 inaugural dissertations. 
ANDOVER THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Andover, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1901-1902. 
ANDREE, RICHARD, Braunschweig, Germany. 

Globus, vols. 80 and Si. 
ANGERS. SOCIETE d'ETUDE SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, Maine-et-Loire, 
France. 

Bulletin, vol. 30. 
ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France. 

Annales, current nos. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRE- 
LAND, London, England. 

Journal, current nos. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, 9, 10, II, 12. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 
Arkansas. 

Bulletin, no. 36. 
ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago, 111. 

Year book, 1902-03. 
ARTHUR, J. C. (the author), Lafayette, Indiana. 

4 reprints. 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Journal, current nos. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN ANATOMISTS, Washington, D. C. 

History, constitution, membership, and the letters and abstracts of papers, 
for the years 1888-1892. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current nos. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, Australia. 

Nests and eggs of birds found breeding in Australia and Tasmania. 

Records, current nos. 

Report of the curator, 1900. 

Report of the trustees, 1900. 
AUTOMOBILE REVIEW, Chicago, 111. 

Journal, current nos. (gift). 
BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD CO., Baltimore, Md. 

Book of the royal blue, current nos. (gift). 
BAMBERG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bamberg, Germany. 

Bericht, vol. 18. 



LIBRARY 
UMlVERSrrVSflLUHOl^ 



Annual Report of the Di 127 

BARLOW, CHESTER, Santa Clara, Califon 

List "I the 1. u I Placerville, Ca 

BARROWS, D. P., Chicago, 111. 

1 pamphlet. 
BASI L-NATl RFORSCH1 ND1 GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland. 

Namenverzeichnis und sai I 6-12. 

Verhandlungen, Band 1 ;. pt. 2 and 3. 
tndlungen, Band 14. 
Bl AN, 1. H . '.'. 1. C 

Report of the department of forestry and fisheries, Paris Exposition, 1900. 
BEECHER, C. E. (the author), New Haven, Conn. 

5 reprints. 
I'd I OIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
BERGENS MUSEUM, Bergen, Norway. 

Aarbog, 1901, pt. 1 
. 1901. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, vol. 7. 

Verhandlungen, current nos. 

Zeitsciirift, current 
BERLIN. KONIGLICHE BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany. 

lahres verzeichniss der an den deutschen universitaten erscheinenen 
schriften, vol. [6. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANICAL GARTEN t ND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Appendix 9. 

Ni tizblatt, no. 29. 
BERLIN. KONIGLICHE MUSEEN, Berlin, Germany. 

Ftthrer, 1901. 
BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Hthnologische notizblatt, current nos. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current 
BERLINER GESELLS( 1 1 \ 1 1 I I'R ANTHROPOLOGIE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fur ethnologic, current nos. 
BERN. HOCHSCHUL BIBLIOTHEK, Bern, Switzerland. 

32 inaugural dissertations. 
BERNICE PAUCHI BISHOP Ml SKIM, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Fauna Hawaiiensis, vol. 3, pt. 1. 

Merai iirs, vol. 1, no. 3. 

Occasional papers, vol. I, nos. 3 and 4. 
BERTONI. M. S. (the author), Asuncion, Paraguay. 

Aves nuevas del Paraguay (gift). 
BIXBY, MAYNARD (the author), Salt Lake City, Utah. 

I tab minerals and localities (gift). 
BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Black diamond, current ii"-. (gift |. 
:.\N PRESIDENCY, DEPARTMEN1 OF LAND RECORDS \nd 
IGRN 1 1 rURE, Bombay, India. 

Crop experiments report, 1899-1900, 1900-1901. 
BORDEAI'X. SOCIETE LINNEENNE, Bordeaux. France. 

Proces-verbaux, 1901. 
BOSTON BOOK COMPANY, Boston, Mass. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 



128 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual list of new and important books, iqoo-iqoi. 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 7th, igoi. 
BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Mass. 

President's annual report, 1901. 

Yearbook, vol. 28. 
BOTANICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, New York City. 

Publication, iS (gift). 
BOUCARD, A. (the author), Oak Hill, Spring Vale, Isle of Wight. 

Catalogus avium. 

Genera of humming birds. 

The Humming Bird, vols. 1-5. 

Travels of a naturalist. 

35 pamphlets. 

i photograph. 
BOWDITCH, C. P. (the author), Boston, Mass. 

2 reprints. 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Me. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

President's report, 1901-02. 
BRISTOL MUSEUM AND REFERENCE LIBRARY, Bristol, England. 

Report, 1901. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London, England. 

Report, 7901. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Victoria, B.C. 

Sessional papers, 1901. 

Statutes of British Columbia, toot, 1902 (gift). 
BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England. 

Catalogue of African plants, vol. 1, pt. 4. 

Catalogue of African plants, vol. 2, pt. 2. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Prospectus, 1901-1902, 1902-1903. 

Yearbook, 1808-1899, 1899-1900, 1900-1901. 
BROWN UNIVERSITY, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 1901-02. 

Ill XELLES. ACADEMIE ROYAL DE BELGIQUE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1902. 

Bulletin, 1901. 
BRUXELLES. INSTITUTE GEOGRAPHIQUE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Publications, nos. 2-7 (gift). 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1901, vol. 13. 

BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE LINNEENNE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Program, 1901-02. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Annual report, 1901. 

BUITENZORG. L'INSTITUTE BOTANIQUE, Buitenzorg, Java. 
Bolletin, no. 13. 

BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Comunicaciones, current nos. 
BUSSEY INSTITUTION, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Bulletin, vol. 3, pt. 2. 



i. 1902. Annual Report oi ink Dn 129 

[FORNIA ACADEMY 01 SCIENCES. San Francisco, 1 
lii eedings, current nos. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Bei 
Bulletin, 46 back nos. and current 
Natural study bulletin. 
Report. [898- 1901. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, Cal. 
illetin, current nos. 

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin of the Dep'l ol 1 ol. 2, Nos. 10. it and 12. 

le, current nos. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Annual report, I90I. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY-MUSI UM "I ZOO! OGY, Cambridge, England. 

Annual report <>f the Museum and Lecture Room Syndicate, 1S66-1868, 

I. 1901-02. 
Catalogue of Strickland collection of birds. 

CANADA DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Ottawa, Canada. 
Annual report, 33d. 

CANADA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual report, 1898. 

Catalogueof Canadian birds pt. 1. 

Index to reports of the Geological Survey, 1863-1884. 
CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada. 

Archaeological report, 1900, 1901. 
CALK GOVERNMENT HERBARIUM, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Report of the botanist, 1001. 
CALE TOWN GEO] : COMMISSION, Cape '['own. Smith Africa. 

Annua] report, 1898-99. 
CAPITAN, I... Paris, France. 

1 reprint. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, DEPARTMENT OL LINE ARTS, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Sixth annual exhibit, 1901. 
CARNEGIE LIBRARY. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annua] report, 6th. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annales. vol. 1. nos. 1 and 2. 

Memoirs, vol. 1. no. 1. 

Prize essay contest, 1900. 

Report of the Director, 1900-01. 
CARPENTER, GEORGE H., Dublin, Ireland. 

Irish naturalist, current nos. 
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington, D. C. 

Bulletin, vol. 1-4 and current nos. 
CHAVERo. ALFREDO, Mexico, Mex. 

La Piedra del Sol. 
CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. III. 

Historical sketch of the Academy. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago, 111. 

Annual report, 23d. 

Catalogue of the fourteenth annual exhibition by American artists. 

neral catalogue of paintings, sculptures and other objects of art in the 
M useum, iooi. 
!ier catalogues. 
CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago, 111. 

Report of annual meeting, November i<;, njoi. 
CHICAGO LIBRARY CLUB, Chicago, 111. 

A list of serials in public libraries of Chicago and F.\ 



130 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago, 111. 
Annual report. 29th. 
Bulletin nos. 55-58. 

Catalogue — English prose and juvenile books. 
Finding list, history and biography. 
Special bulletin, nos. 2 and 3. 

CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago, 111. 
Announcements, vol. 2, no. 2. 
Botanical gazette, current nos. 
Journal of geology, current nos. 
Register, 1901-02. 

2 reprints. 
CHICKERING & SONS, Boston, Mass. 

1 catalogue (gift). 

CHILE COMMISSION TO THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION, Buffalo, 
New York. 

Brief notes on Chile and general catalogue of the Chile exhibit at the 
Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901. 

8 pamphlets. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 21st. 
CINCINNATI NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Journal, vol. 20, nos. 1 and 2. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual list of books added during 1901. 

Annual reports, 1901-02. 

Finding list of English prose fiction. 

Leaflet, current nos. 

Quarterly bulletin, current nos. 
CLAUSTHAL. KONIGLICHE BERGAKADEMIE, Clausthal, Germany. 

Programm, 1902-03. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Annual report, 33d. 

Open shelf, current nos. 
COHEN, E., Greifswald, Germany. 

3 reprints. 

COLBY COLLEGE, Waterville, Maine. 

Bulletin, vol. I, no. 3. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pa. 

Mines and minerals, current nos. 
COLLI NGE, W. E., Birmingham, England. 

2 reprints. 

COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins, 
Colorado. 

Annual report, 4, 6-1 1, 13. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
COLORADO BUREAU OF MINES, Denver, Colorado. 

Bulletin, no. 5. 

COLORADO STATE SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado. 

Catalogue, 1900-01. 
COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado. 

Studies, vol 1, no. 1. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Quarterly, current nos. 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Annual report, 25th. 

Bulletin, 29 back nos. and current nos. 



1 1, Annual Repori 131 

NECTICl 1 COMMISSION OF FISHERIES AND GAME, H 

Fish and game laws for 1901. 
COOP! K ORNI rHOl OGK \i , < LI B, tn 
1 1 ifauna, 1 
The Condor, vol. 1, nos. 2, 1. 6, vol. 2 and 3, and currenl 

UNION, New York City. 
Annual report, 43d. 

COPENHAGEN 1 NIVERSm MUSEUM, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Beretning, i<xji. 

Communn ations paleonh logiques, nos. 1 and 2. 
1 pamphlet. 
NEL1 UNIVERSITV AGRIC1 I. II RAL EXPERIMENT SI A I 
Ithaca, New York. 
I lulletin, current nos. 
Report, [898-1900 (gift). 
A RICA INSTIT1 l«> I IMCO-GEOGRAFICO NACIONAL, San [ose, 
ta Rica. 
Bulletin, current n< is. 
MORI . P., Faribault, Minn. 

1 pamphlet (gift 1. 

CZERNOWITZ. K. K. IRAN/ JOSEPHS-UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 

Austria. 
Uebersicht der akademischen behorden, 1902-03. 
Verzeichnis der offentlichen vorlesungen, 1902-03. 

2 catalogues. 
1 pamphlet. 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 
Catalogue, 1900-01, 1901-02. 

DAVENPORT ACAD] MY OF SCIENCES, Davenport, Iowa. 
Proceedings, vol. 8. 

DELAWARE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Newark, Del. 

Annual reports, 1-13. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
DETROIT MUSEUM, Detroit, Mich. 

Annual report, 1901. 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Mich. 
Annual report, 37th. 
Bulletin, no. 13. 

DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 
Zeitschrift, current nos. 
I pamphlet. 

DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR UNO VOLKERKUNDE 
< ISTASIENS, Tokio, Japan. 

I estsi nrift, 25 jahrige stiftungslest. 

Mittheilungen, vol. 8, pt. 3. 

Mittheilungen, supplement. 
DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

The Dial, current nos. (giftt. 
DIXON, K. B. (the author), New York City. 

Basketry designs of the Indians of Northern California. 

3 pamphlets. 

DRESDEN. K. SAMMLUNGEN FOR KUNST UND WISSENSCHAFT, 
Dresden, Germany. 
Bericht, 1898-99. 
DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH-ETHNO 
GRAPHISCHES MUSEUMS, Dresden, Germany. 
Studies, pt. 2. 



132 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. II. 

DREW, I! I I 1 ILOGICAL SEMINARY, Madison, N. J. 

List of the alumni, etc., 1902. 

Report of the librarian, 1901-02. 

Year book, iqoi-'02. 
DRUGS, OILS AND PAINTS, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current nos. (gift). 
DUNCAN, C. H. (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
EAST KENT SCIENTIFIC AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Canter- 
bury, Kent, England. 

Report and transactions, 1001. 
EDINBURGH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Guide to collections of the Geological Survey, pt. 1. 

Report, 1901. 
EIGENMANN, C. H. (the author), Bloomington, Ind. 

Report from the biological station. 

4 reprints. 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone magazine, current nos. (gilt). 
ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Journal, vol. 17, pts. 1 and 2. 
ELROD, M. J., Missoula, Montana. 

1 reprint. 

ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 17th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Mass. 

Annual report, 1902. 

Historical collections, vol. 38, nos. 1-3. 
EVANS, A. W., New Haven, Conn. 

The lejeuneae of the United States and Canada. 

2 reprints. 

EVANSTON FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, 111. 

Annual report, 28th, 1900-01. 
FERNALD, M. L. (the author), Cambridge, Mass. 

The northeastern carices of the section hyparrhenae. 

3 reprints. 
FESSENDEN, R., Washington, D. C. 

1 pamphlet. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM, Chicago, III. 
10 publications. 
Purchases : 
87 books. 

9 pamphlets. 
65 periodicals. 
FISHER. A. K., Washington, D. C. 

1 reprint. 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lake City. Fla. 

Bulletin, nos. 4, 9-13, 16, 17, 19 and current nos. 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Forest and stream, current nos. 
FORSTEMANN, E. (the author), Charlottenburg, Germany. 

2 reprints. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Journal, current nos. 



1902. A.wi \i K i 1 in nn Direi rem. 



133 



[BERG. K. SACHS. BERGAKAD1 MIE, Freibei , Gem 
Programm, 1902-03. . 

FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDB GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, Gei 

many. 
Bericht, vol. 12. 

FRIEDLANDER, R. AND SOHN, Berlin, Gei 

Naturae novitates, current nos. 
I KI I SCH, CARL (the author), Wien, Austria. 

edae ad floram exseccatam Austro-Hungaricam. 

Ft RBRINGER, MAX (the author), Heidelberg, Germany. 

1 reprint. 
GAMBA, I. P. Bogota, Colombia, S. A. 

Riqueza mineral de la Repuhlica de Colombia (gifl 1. 
GENEVE. ( ONSERVATOIRE AM) JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneva. 
Switzerland. 

Annuaire, 1900. 

GENEVE. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, 

Geneva, Switzerland. 

Memoires, vol. 33, no. 2. 
Memoir* s, vol. 4, nos. 1 and 2. 

GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
GEORGIA EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment, Georgia. 

Annual reports, 1 8, 10-14. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gilt). 
C.HI/EH ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, Cairo, Egypt. 

Report, I901. 

GIESSEN. GROSSH. HESSISCHE LUDWIGS UNIVERSITAT, Giessen, 
Germany. 

1 inaugural dissertations. 

GOT riNGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Germany. 

Chronik, 1900. 

Verzeichnis des personals etc., 1901-02. 

Verzeichnis der vorlesungen, sommer, 1902. 

Verzeichnis der vorlesungen, winter, 1902-03. 

62 inaugural dissertations. 
GOULD, I. C. (the author), London, England. 

Early defensive earthworks (gift). 
GRATZ. STYRIA NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHEN VEREIN FUR 
STEIERMARK, Gratz-Styria, Austria. 

Mittheilungen, 1901. 

GREGG, W. H. (the author). St. Louis. Mo. 

Where, when, and how to catch iish on the east coast of Florida (gift). 
.GREENE, E. I.., Washington, D. C. 

Pittonia, vols. 1 and 2. 

Pittonia, vol. 3, pts. 13 and 14, and current nos. 
GRENADA BOTANIC GARDEN. St. George, West Indies. 

Annual report, 1900. 
GROSVENOR LIBRARY, BUFFALO, N Y. 

Catalogue of poetry. 

HAARLEM. STADS BIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 
Yerslag van den toestand, 1901. 

HAMBURG. NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUM, Hamburg. Germany. 

Mittheilungen, vol. 18. 
HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Journal and proceedings, vol. 17. 
HAMY, E. T. (the author). Pans, France. 

3 reprints. 



134 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

HANCOCK, J. L. (the author), Chicago, 111. 

The tettigidae of North America (gift). 
HANNOVER. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, Germany. 

K.italog der stadt-bibliothek. 
HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual report, 64th. 
HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Mass. 

President's and treasurer's annual reports, 1900-01. 
HARVARD COLLEGE. MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Annual report, 1900-01. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Catalogue, Lawrence Scientific School, 1902-03. 

Catalogue, department of mining and metallurgy, 1902-03. 
HASSE, CARL (the author), Breslau, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Mass. 

Annual report, 14th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HATCHER, J. B. (the author), Pittsburg, Pa. 

4 reprints. 
HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, H. I. 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
HAWAII. GOVERNMENT SURVEY, Honolulu, H. I. 

4 maps. 
HEIDELBERG. UXIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany 

Anzeiger der vorlesungen, 1901-02. 

54 dissertations. 
HEILPRIN, ANGELO (the author), Philadelphia, Pa. 

A defense of the Panama route. 
HERBIER BOISSIER, Geneve, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
HILLER, H. M. & FURNESS, W. H. (the authors), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Trip to the Veddahs (gift). 
HINTON, C. H., Washington, D. C. 

I reprint (gift). 
HITCHCOCK, C. H. (the author), Hanover, N. H. 

3 reprints. 

HOBBS, W. H. (the author), Madison, Wis. 

The Newark system of Pomperang Valley, Connecticut. 
HOLLS, F. W., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Charles George Holls — a memoir (gift). 
HOLMES, SAMUEL, New York City. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
HOWE, R. H., Longwood, Mass. 

Birds of Massachusetts. 

Birds of Rhode Island. 

4 pamphlets. 

HOYT, F. W. PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Stone, current nos. (gift). 
IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho. 

Annual report, 1894, 1895, 1897-1901. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois. 

Circular, no. 198. 

Statistical report, 1901. 



Annum Rep i Diri 



ILLINOIS 1 N1V1 RSITY, I i, 111. 

Memorial com ocation: 



•35 



ILLINOIS STAT] LABORATORY 0] NATI RAL HISTORY, Champaign, 
Illinois. 

i tin, \ i il. 6, artii li i. . 
ILLINOIS LN1\ ERSITY, Urbana, 111. 
e, 1901-02. 

College "i law catalogue, 1902-03. 
ILLINOIS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Bloomington, 111. 

Illinois W esh azine, current nos. 

INDIANA AGRK i LT1 RAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lafayette, Ind. 

Annual report, 8. 9, 13 and 14. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
INDIANA. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURAL RE- 
si >i RCES, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Annual report, 25th, 1900. 
INGERSi '1.1 , C. L. (the author), Fort Collins, Colorado. 

2 pamphlets (gifl |. 
INLAND PRINTER COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Inland printer, vols. 27, 28. 
IOWA VCADEMY 01 SCIENCES, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Pri eedings, i ol. 8. 
LAVA AGRICULTI RAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, Iowa. 

Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 

IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURA EY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annual report, vol. 12, 1901. 
Bulletin, no. 1. 

IOWA MASONIC LIBRARY, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Quarterlv bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
IOWA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Quarterly bulletin, vol. 1, no. 4. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Calendar, 1901-02. 

[SIS. NATI RWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT, Dresden, Ger. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, 1901, pt. 1. 
JAMAICA. BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT, Kingston,. Jamaica. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
JAMAICA. PUBLIC GARDENS ANT) PLANTATIONS, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Annual report, 1901. 

Report on the- cultivation oi pineapples and other products of Florida. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago, 111. 

Annual report, 7th. 

1 pamphlet. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Md. 

Circulars, current nos. 
JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, New York City. 

Journal, vol [, 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, vol. 17. 
KANSA.s AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Annual- report, 14th, 1900-01. 

I Bulletin, nos. 1 3, 5, 6 12, 1 t-15, 18, 20, 22 24, 29 31, a, 37 45. 
I he Industrialist, current nos. 
KANSAS STATE HOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 
Quarterly report, current nos. 
KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas. 
1 iuarterly bulletin, current nos. 
KELLERMAN, W. A., Columbus, Ohio. 




i3'' Field Con mbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, Ky. 

Annual report, 2-7 anil II. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
KENTUCKY. BUREAU OF MINES, Lexington, Ky. 

Annual report, 1000. 
KEW ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, England. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht, 1901. 
KJOBENHAVN. KONIGLICHE BIBLIOTHEK, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Catalogue, 1902. 
KJOBENHAVN. MINERALOGISKE MUSEUM, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Beretning, 1899-1900. 
KJOBENHAVN. NATURHISTORISKE FORENING, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Yidenskabelige meddelelser, 1901. 
KLAGENFURT. NATURHISTORICHES LANDES-MUSEUM VON 
KARTEN, Klagenfiirt, Austria-Hungary. 

Jahrbuch, 1900. 

1 diagramme. 
KONIGSBERG. K. UND UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Konigsberg, 
Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
LAFAYETTE COLLEGE, Easton, Pa. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 

Report for 1901. 
LANE, A. C. (the author), Lansing, Mich. 

The economic geology of Michigan in its relation to the business world 
(gift). 
LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence, Mass. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
LEHIGH UNIVERSITY, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Register, 1901-02. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1900-01. 
LEIPZIG. K. SACHS. GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Leipzig, Germany. 

Berichte, 1901, pts. 1-7. 

Berichte, 1902, pts. 1 and 2. 
LEIPZIG. MUSEUMS FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany. 

Bericht, 1900. 
LELAND STANFORD, JUNIOR, UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, Cal. 

Contributions to biology, No. 27. 

2 pamphlets. 

LEMMON, J. G. (the author), Oakland, Cal. 

Oaks of Pacific slope. 

1 pamphlet. 
LEON, NICOLAS, Mexico, Mex. 

1 pamphlet. 

LE SOUEF, D., Melbourne, Australia. 

2 reprints (gift). 

LEWIS, W. J., Cambridge, England. 

2 pamphlets. 
LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago, 111. 

Annual register, 1902-03. 
LIMA.- SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICA, Lima, Peru. * 

Boletin, vol 10, nos. 2-4. 

Boletin, vol. 11, nos. 1-4. 



Of 
UNIVERSITY of I LLINOU 



\\ \ i vi Report o] rHE Direci 137 

LIND MIL, SE 111. Chicago, 111. 

List ol the coli 1 * America north ol Mexico, 

j books. 

4 pamphlets (gift). 

1 I 11 RARY NEWS, New York City. 

Literary news, current nos, 

l.l\ ERPOOL GEOLl IGIC \l SO( II r\ . Liverpool, I ngland. 

Proa 1 '1. s, pt. 4. 

Proci ol. o, pt. 1. 

I I 1 >Y1> LIBRARY . ( incinnati, Ohio. 

Bulletin, nos. ;,, | anil 5, 

Myi oli '.mi ,1! m iii-s, nos. ; o. 

LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 
Journal, botany, current nos. 
journal, . oologj . current nos. 
list, 1901-02. 
Pre 1 13th session. 

LONDON. ROYAL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE, London, England. 
Prospectus, 1001-02. 

LONDON ROYAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, London, England. 
Journal, current nos. 

LONDON ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England. 
Proceedings, current nos. 

Report to the evolution committee, pt. 1. 

Report to the malaria committee, 6th and 7th, series. 
LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

List of the fellows, 1902. 

Proceedings, current nos. 

Transactions, current nos. 
LURING, J. A., New York, N. Y. 

1 reprint. 

LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Annual report, 13th. 
I.iH Ti AT, Dl/C DE, Paris, France. 

Codex Fejervary Mayer manuscrit Mexicain pre-colombien des Free 
l'ublic Museums de Liverpool. 

LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Baton Rouge, La. 

Annual report, 8th, 9th, toth, nth, 12th and 14th. 
Bulletin, 13 Kick nos. and current nos. 
Report on the geology of Louisiana, pts. 3, 4, 5 and 6. 
MAC RITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

2 reprints. 

MAURA- 1 ' I RNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India. 
Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 2. 

MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Madrid, Spain. 
Inventario de un |ovellanista. 

MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE SCIENCIAS, Madrid, Spam. 

Memorias, vol. 14, pt. 1 and atlas. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSI I'M, Budapest, Hungary. 

Terme'szetrajzi fii/etek, current nos. 
MAIDEN, J. H, Sydney, N. S. W. 

I 5 reprints. 
MAINE AGRIC1 LTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maim-. 

Annual report, iS.,;, iK,/,, 1899, 1900, 19OI. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

MAINE UNIVERSITY, Orono, Maine. 
Catalogue, 190102. 



i j8 Fiei i i oli ii:ian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

MANCHESTER INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Manchester, N. H. 

Nature study, current nos. 
irol. 3. 
MANCHESTER .MUSEUM, Manchester, England. 

Publications, 34, 35, 37 and 3 8 - 
MARBURG. K. PREUSSISCHE UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Chronik, iqoi-02. 
MARIN] BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, Plymouth, England. 

Journal, vol. 6, no. 3. 
MAR< 'I \N1>, A., Princeton, N. J. 

Robbia pavements, pt. 2. 
MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Park, 
Maryland. 

Annual report, 10th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 54th, 1902-03. 
MARYLAND STATE LIBRARY, Annapolis, Md. 

House and senate documents, 1900-02. 

Journal, house of delegates, 1902. 

Laws of Maryland, 1900, 2 vols. 

Laws of Maryland, 1902. 

Report of librarian, 1902. 

Senate journal, 1902. 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, 
Massachusetts. 

\nnual report, I ami 2. 

Bulletin, 15 back nos. and current nos. 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 

Schedule of prizes, 1902. 

Transactions, 1901, pt. I. 
MASSACH1 SETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Technology quarterly, current nos. 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Free public library commission report, nth. 

Report, 1899-1900. 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Victoria, Australia. 

Calendar. [902. 
MERRIAM, J. C, Berkeley, California. 

1 reprint. 

ME1 NIER, STANISLAS, Paris, France. 

I Ibservations sur la structure intime du diluvium de la Seine. 

12 reprints. 
METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 

Annual report, 32d. 
MEXICO, I oM MISSION FOR PUBLIC PROMOTION, Mexico, Mex. 

A few facts about Mexico. 

4 pamphlets (gift). 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mex. 

Boletin, vol. 15. 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Mexico. 

Anales, vol. 7, nos. 6-9. 
XICO. RED METEOROLOGICAL Y REVISTA CIENTIFICA, Toluca. 
Mexico. 

Boletin, current nos. 
MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Lansing, Mich. 

Annual report, 3d. 



I \\ni u Ri D 

MICHIGAN VGRICULT1 RAL COLLEGE, \ ri< tfich. 

Bull< tin, k nos. and current w 

MICHIGAN COLLEGJ OF MINKS, Houghton, M 
o, with views at th< 

. I9OIO2. 

MICHIGAN >; \IK LIBRARY, Lansing, Mich. 

Kiln. n. iSo8-looo. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Calendar, I9OI-02. 

MINERA1 rOR PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York ( 

Mineral collector, current iws. 
MINIM; AND METALLURGY PUBLISHING CO., New York • 

Journal, current uos. (gift). 
MINNESOTA AGR RAL KXPKK I M IN 1 STATION, St. Am! 

Park, Minn. 

Annual - )4-i9CO. 

Bulletin, current 1 
MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, St. 
Paul. Minn. 

Botanical studies, pt. 6. 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
Coll> 

Annual r< port, 1, 7 and 10. 

Bulletin, 6 back nos. and current nos. (gift). 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Mo. 

1 niversity studies, vol. 1, nos. 2 and 3. 
MONTANA STATE SCHOOL OF MINKS, Butte, Montana. 

Catalogue, 1901-02 (gift). 
MONTANA UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana. 

Summer birds of Flathead Lake. 
MONTEVIDEO. Ml SEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

. ptS. 20-22. 

MONTR] AL. NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, 
Canada. 

Canadian record of science, vol. 8, nos. 6 and 7. 
MORSK. EDWARD S. (theauthor), Salem, Mass. 

Observations of living brachiopoda. 
MOSCOW". PUBLIC RUMIANTZOFF Ml SKI M, Moscow, Russia. 

Annual report, 1000. 
MOS( OVV. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATL'KALISTKS, Moscow, Russia. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Memoires, current nos. 
Ml NCHEN. K. 15. AKADEMIE DKR WISSENSCHAFTEN, Munchen 
Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1001, pts. 1-3. 

2 pamphl 

MUMFORD, A. W., PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Birds and nature, current nos. 
Ml SEE DE L'ETAL INDEPENDENT Dl I ONGO, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annates, current nos. 

Memoires, current nos. 
Ml SEE GUIM1 I. Paris, France. 

Annates, vol. 30. 

Annates, bibliotheque d'etudes, vols. 10 and 13. 
MUSEUMS' ASSOCIATION, Sheffield, England. 

Reports, 1890-1900. 
MADAILLAC, I. F. A. DU P. 1 the author), Paris, France. 

Vers le pole nord. 

3 reprints. 



140 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

NANCY. SOCIETE DES SCIENCES. Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, ser. 2, vol. 2, nos. 2 and 3. 
NAPOLI. SOCIETA REALE DI NAPOLI, Naples, Italy. 

Rendiconti, current nos. 
NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Wiesbaden, Germany. 

Jahrbucher, vols. 53 and 54. 
NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal, S. A. 

Natal plants, vol. 3, pts. 3 and 4. 
NATAL GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Pietermardzburg, Natal, S. A. 
Report of the geological survey of Natal and Zululand, 1901. 
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Washington, D. C. 

Memoirs, vol. 8, nos. 1-5. 
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

National geographic magazine, current nos. 
NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada. 

Naturaliste Canadien, current nos. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, Neb. 
Annual reports, 8, 9, 10, II, 12, 13, 14. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Bibliographical contributions from the library, pt. 3. 
NEDERLANDSCHE DIERKUNDIGE YEREENIGING, Helder, Netherlands, 
Aanwinsten van de bibliotheek, 1900. 
Tiidschrift. ser. 2, vol. 7, pts. 3 and 4. 
NEDERLANDSCH INDIE K. NATUURKUNDIGE YEREENIGING, Ba- 
tavia, Java. 
Natuurkundige tydschrift voor Nederlandsch-Indie, vol. 61. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, N. J. 

Annual report, 13th, 1901. 
NEWARK TECHNICAL SCHOOL, Newark, N. J. 

Handbook of information, 1901-02. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago, 111. 

Report, 1901. 
NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Mass. 

Annual report, 50th. 
NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. John, Canada. 

Bulletin, vol. 4, pt. 5. 
NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, Bos 
ton, Mass. 
Supplemental number, 1902. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Dur 
ham, X. H. 
Annual report, 2, 7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12 and 13. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. New Bruns 
wick, N. J. 
Annual report, 1st. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, N. J. 

Annual report, 1901. 

NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla Park 

New Mexico. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Annual report, 1900. 

Handbook to the mining and geological museum, Sydney. 
Mineral resources, nos. 9 and 10. 
Records, vol. 7, pt. 2. 



Awi Al. REPOR1 "I I H 1 DlRECTI >k. 1 . ( i 

NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. W. 

:. JO. 

NEW SOUTH WALES ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Imirnal and proceedings, vol. ;p 
NEW YORK ACADEMY 01 Si IENCES, New York 

Annates, vol. u. pts. i anil 2. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, N  

Annual report, 14th ami 1 5th. 

1 lulletin, current n< is. 

A YORK BOTANK AL GARDENS, Bronx Park, New York Cil 
Annua] report, 1001. 
NEW YORK I M [E I'Y, New York Cits. 

Transact: _ r iftV 

NEW VORK. FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION \. v. 

Annual report, jjth 
NEW VORK GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND I RADESMEN, 
\ i w York City. 
Annual report, 1 [6th. 
VORK JUVENILE ASYLUM, New York City. 
.Annual report, ;oth. 

NEW YORK MERCANTILE LIBRARY, New York City. 

Annual report, 81st. 
NEW VORK METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARE. New 1 

Annual report, i-'l 
NEW VORK SOCIETY LIBRARY, New York City. 

Annua] report. 1901-02. 
VI IRK STA II COLLEGE OF FORESTRY, Ithaca, New York. 

Annual report, 4th. 

Bulletin, current m 
VORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, N. Y. 

Annual report, [900 [901, 

Bulletin, nos. 58, 67-74. 

State museum bulletin, nos. 40, 46-51. 

Stale museum report, 53d, ptS. I and 2. 

A\ VORK STATE MUSE1 M, Albany, N. Y. 

Report of the state botanist, 1900. 
W YORK. Vol NG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, New York City. 

\--' < iation notes, current nos. 
iKIII Carolina AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ra- 
Mi. N. C. 
Annual report, 1 900-01. 
Rill CAROLINA STATE BOARD OK AGRICULTURE, Raleigh, N. ( . 
Bulletin, Jan. to Dec , 1901. 
Report, 1900. 

►RTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, I 

North I lakota. 
Annual reports, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12. 
Bulletin, current nos. (gift). 
■ORTHWESTERN RAH WAN Ci IMP WY. Chii ago, III. 
The Indian The Northwest, 1600-1900 (gift). 
TON, \. II. (the author), Westbrook, Me. 

2 reprints (gift). 

Nl RNBERG. NAT1 RHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Nurnberg, Ger- 
many. 
5tSi Drift-Jubilee, 100th, jahr. 
OBEKLIN C0LLEG1 . Obi rim, Ohio. 
I ,abi iratory bulletin, no. 1 1. 
Wilson bulletin, vol. 8 and current nos. 



142 Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. II. 

OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbus, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
OHIO STATE ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Annual report. 10th. 
OHIO STATE ARCH.TlOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 
Quarterly, current nos. 
OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Official report of the board for 1901. 
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 
Annual report, 31st. 
Report of the president, 1901. 
University bulletin, current nos 
OIL, MINING AND FINANCE, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Journal, current nos. (gilt 1, 
OLD CHINA, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Magazine, current nos. (gift). 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Neb. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
OMAHA UNIVERSITY, Bellevue, Neb. 

Annual announcement, 1901. 
ONTARIO. BUREAU OF MINES, Toronto, Ontario. 

Report, 1902. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Toronto, Ontario. 
Annual report, 1900, vols. 1 and 2. 
General index to reports, 1870 1899. 
Report of the entomologist, 1871, 1891, 1901. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

The Monist, current nos. 
ORCUTT, C. R., San Diego, Cal. 

Review of the cactaceas, vol. 3, no. 8. 
West American scientist, current nos. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon- 
Annual report, 1890, 1891, 1893, 1895-1901. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
OSNABRUCK. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Osnabriick, 
Germany. 
Jahresbericht, 14th. 
OTTAWA. FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current nos. 
OUT WEST COMPANY, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Out West, current nos. 
OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY. New York City. 

Outing, current nos. 
PALERMO. REAL ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 
Contribuzioni, vol. 3, no. 1. 
Index seminum, 1901. 
PALERMO. SOCIETA DI ACCLIMAZIONE ED AGRICOLTURA, Palermo, 
Italy. 
Publications, 1901-2, no. 1. 
PAPER MILL AND WOOD PULP NEWS COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current nos. (gift). 
PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus des sciences, current nos. 
PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, 1901, 1902, nos. 1 and 2. 
PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY. Detroit, Mich. 
Bulletin of pharmacy, current nos. 



LIBRARY 



(i Annual Report of th] Diri  ik. i 13 

OW, A. W (the author), Mos< ow, K iss 
imphlets. 
P] VBi >DV IN'Sl'l rUTE, Peabody, M 

Annual report, ;oth. 
PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCH/* OLOGY ANDETHNOLO' 
Cambridge, Mass. 
\ Nuttall. 
Memoirs, vol. 1, no 
Memoirs, vol. 2, no. i. 
Report, -,;th. 
PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, State 
College, Pa. 
Bulletin, current DOS. i trift). 
PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Magazine of history and biography, current n s, 
NSYLVANIA. MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OP 1ND1 STRIAL ART, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual reports 25th and 26th. 
PF. NNS^ I.VAN1A UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, no. 2, pt. 4. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Pro\ . ist's r. port, tool. 
PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, 111. 

Annual report, 2 1 St. 

: irterly bulletin, current nos. 
PI PPER, G. H.', New York City. 

Ancient basket makers ol Southeastern Utah. 

I pamphlet. 
PERGANDE, [THEODORE, Washington, D. C. 

1 pamphlet. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION* AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE 
BLIND, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 70th. 
PHARMACEUTICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis- 

Pharmaceutical archives, current nos. 

Pharmaceutical review, current nos. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

eedings, current nos. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American journal of pharmacy, current nos. (gift). 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Transactions, vol. 23. 
PHILADELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Charter, by-laws, list of members. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, nos. 48 and 49. 
PHILADELPHIA NUMISMATIC AND ANTIOJ ARIAN SOCIETY, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

I 'eedings, 1899-1901. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. BUREAU OF NON-CHRISTIAN TRIBES, Manila, 
Philippine Islands. 

Circular of information (gift). 
PISA. SOCIETA TOSCANO DI SCIENZE NATURAI.I, Pisa, Italy. 

Memoirs, vol. 18. 

Pro eedings, current nos. 
PLYMOUTH Mi SI 1 M AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, England. 

Annual report, 3d (gift). 



144 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

POLLARD, C. L., Washington, D. C. 

2 reprints. 
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Popular science news, current nos. 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Me. 

Annual report, igoi. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PRAG. K. K. DEUTSCHE CARL-FERDINANDS-UNIVERSITAT, Prag, 
Bohemia. 

Feierliche installation des rectors, 1901-02. 

Ordnung der vorlesungen, wintersemester, 1902-03. 
PRATT AND LAMBERT, Chicago, 111. 

A few notes on varnishes and fossil resins, by Mr. R. I. Clark (gift). 
PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Annual report, 1900-01. 
PRESTO COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Presto, current nos. (gift). 
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N. J. 

Bulletin, current nos. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Princeton University expeditions to Patagonia, 1S96-1899, vol. 4, pts. I 
and 2. 
PROVIDENCE ATHEN/EUM, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 66th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, 24th. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Ind. 

Annual report of the president and other officers, 27th, 1900-01. ' 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
PURDY, CARL (the author), Ukiah, Cal. 

Indian baskets and their makers. 
PUTNAM. F. \\\, Cambridge, Mass. 

Archaeological and ethnological research in the United States for 1901. 
QUEENSLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Annual progress report, 1896-1900. 

Bulletin, nos. 1 1 — 1 3. 

16 reports. 
QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Proceedings, vols. 1-11. 

Proceedings, vol. 17, pt. 1. 
QUEVEDO, S. A. LAFONE, Pilciao, Catamarca, Argentina. 

La cruz in America. 

2 pamphlets. 
RAILWAY REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Railway review, current nos. (gift). 
REDWOOD LIBRARY AND ATHEN^UM, Newport, R. I. 

Annual report, 171st. 
REGALIA, F., Firenze, Italy. 

5 pamphlets. 
RENXES. LTXIYERSITE DE RENNES, Rennes, France. 

Travaux scientifiques, vol. 1, nos. I and 2. 
RFXXES. SOCIETE SCIENTIFIQUE DE L'OUEST, Rennes, France. 

Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 1. 
REVISTA PUBLICA INSTRUCTION MEXICANA, Mexico, Mex. 

Revista, current nos. (gift). 
REVUE GENERALE DES SCIENCE, Paris, France. 

Revue, current nos. 



II \s\i w Repo I 111 I >IRE( TOR. I 45 

RHODE ISLAND 1GRICULTURA1 EXPERIMEN1 STATION. Kingston, 

R I 

Annual repi irt, 1. 2, 1 o. 1 4. 

Bulletin, 1 urrenl nos. 1 ^i(t). 
RICHET, CHARLES, Paris, France. 

Revue scienlihcpie. current nos. 
RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca, N. V. 

1 pampl 
RlVISTA ITALO AMERICANA, Rome, Italy. 

Revista Italo-Americana, vol. I, nos. 1 1. 
ROBBINS, R. C, Boston, Mass. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
ROME. Kl ALE Vi 1 AIM MIA I'M LINCEI, Rome, Italy. 

Alti. current nos. 

Rendiconti, current nos. 
ROSE POLYTE< HNK INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indian... 

Annual 1 20th. 

RO> \1. ASIATIC SOCIETY, CEYLON BRANCH, Singa] ;, Asia. 

Journal, 1 ind 

\1. ASIA nc SOCIE IN. STRA1 I S BR \M II. Col bo, G ylon. 

Journal no. 51. 
>L HORTICULTURA1 SOCI1 rY, London, England. 

Journal, \ i 1. 25. 
Journal, vol. 21 . nos. 1-3. 
RUSSE M.I RANK (the authoi i, tt ashington, D. C. 

1 n print. 

RITLI'.Y. FRANK (the author), London, England. 
J reprints. 

1 COLLEGE, Montreal. Canada. 
Bulletin, nos. 13, 15-17. 
Catalogue, 1^00-1901. 

2 pamphlets. 

ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, St. Louis, Mo. 

Transai tii ins, 1 urrenl m is. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Mo. 

Annual report, 56th. 
ST. 1.0! IS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 
Catalogue, 1001-02. 
U I PI BLIC LIBRARY, St. Paul, Minn. 
Annual report, 20th. 
ST. PI rERSBL'RG. ACADEMIE 1MPERIALE 1U.S SCIENCES, St. 
Petersburg, Rus 
Bulletin, current nos. 
SI. PI ["ERSBURG. IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, St. Petersburg, Russia. 

Studies of the geological section, vol. 4. 
ST. \ [ATEUR'S COLLEGE, Bourbonnais, 111. 

The Viatorian, current nos. 
SALEM PI BLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Mass 
lal report, Igoi. 
Bulletin, current nos. 
: SI. INST] I UTO I ISIOLOGICO, Sassaresi, Italy. 
ies, vol. 1. no. 2. 
Studies, vol. 2, no. 1 (gift). 
SCHALLER. AUDI BON SOCIETY, Schaller, Iov 
5 papers. 
Nl K, C. A . Biltmore, N. C. 
Forestry interests of the south. 
4 pamphli ts. 



146 F Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

SCHUCHERT, C, Washington, D. C. 

2 reprints. 
SELER, EDWARD, Berlin, Germany. 

16 pamphlets. 
SENCKENBERGIAN SOCIETY OF NATURALISTS, Frankfort-on-the-Main, 
Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
SHEFFIELD. FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES AND MUSEUM, Sheffield, 
England. 

Report, 45th, 1901-02. 
SHOOTING AND FISHING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Shooting and fishing, current nos. (gift). 
SINCLAIR, W. J. (the author), Berkeley, Cal. 

1 reprint. 

SKIFF, F. J. V., Field Columbian Museum. 

Am. Inst, of mining engineers ; list of officers, etc., 1901. 
Am. Inst, (if mining engineers ; transactions, vol. 30. 

2 books. 

14 pamphlets (gift). 
SMITH, H. I. (the author), New York City. 

4 reprints. 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1900. 

Miscellaneous collections, vols. 41-43. 
SMYTH, G. (the author), New York City. 

Life of Henry Bradley Plant (gift). 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico, Mex. 

Memorias y revista, current nos. 
SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Anales, ser. 2, vol. 10. 

Boletin, 1901, vol. 1. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

Bulletino, current nos. \ 

SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Firenze, Italy. 

Archivio per l'antropologia, vol. 31. 
SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy. 

Atti, current nos. 

Memorie, vol. 18. 
SOCIETE DF.S SCIENCES, Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, ser. 3, vol. 2, nos. 2 and 4. 

Bulletin, ser. 3, vol. 3, no. I. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES DE REIMS, Reims, France. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
SOCIETE NEUCHATELOIRE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, Switzerland 

Bulletin, vol. 13 and 14. 
SOCIETE ROYALK MALACOLOGIQUE DE BELGIQUE,Bruxelles,Belgium 

Bulletin, 1900. 
SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, vols. 11-26, 1886-1900. 
SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, vol. 16, pt. 41. 
SOI III AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, S. A. 

Annals, vol. 2, pts. 6-8. 
SOUTH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, S. A. 

Transactions, current nos. 
SOI 111 AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART GAL- 
LERY, Adelaide, S. A. 

Report, 1900-01. 






ANNUA1 REPORl hi i ill' I >1U i 






II \l STR MIA ROYA1 Si ICIETY, Adelaide, S. A. 
I'i tnsactions ami proceedings, vol. _';, pts. i ami 2. 
ill CAROLINA AGRICULT1 RAL EXPERIMENT STATIO . 
son College, S. i 
Bulletin, cum it i. 

rH DAKOTA AGRIC1 I H RAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Brookings, 

Smith Uakota. 
letin, current nos. 

SOI I'll DAKOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Vermilion, S. D. 
Bulletin, no. 5. 

1NGFIELD Cm LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Mass. 
Annual report, 40th. 

SPRINGFIELD. MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Springfield, Mass. 

An: i, 5th and 8th. 

STATEN ISLAND X A fURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Staten Island, N.N. 
Proceedings, current aos. 

M i. I UN. GESl LLS< HAFT FOR VOLKERK1 ND] UND ERDK1 NDE, 

Stettin. Gem 

-. lSgS 1900, IQOO-OI. 

MS" INSTITUTE 01 TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, N. J. 
Catalogue, 1002-03. 

STOCKHOLM. K. VETENSKAPS AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Bihang, vol. 26. 

Han and 34. 

Ofversigt af forhandlingar, vol. 57. 
STOCKHOLM. K. VITTERHETS HISTORIE OCH ANTIQUITETS 
AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Manadsblad, 1896-1899. 

STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Conn. 

Annual report, 13th. 
Bulletin, current nos. 

STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, Ger- 
many 
Stiftungsfest, 191 12. 

1 atlas. 

16 inaugural dissertations. 

STRETTON, CLEMENT E., Leicester, England. 

10 pampl 

SN DERE, A. II.. Inmiiii., Ontario. 

86 government reports for 1901 02. 
SYRACUSE MUSEUM, Syracuse, N. V. 

Catalogue l<>oo-oi (gift). 

TENNESSEE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Knoxville, 

Tenn. 

Annual report, 1st, i;,th and 14th (gift). 

TEPPER, J. G. O., Norwood, South Australia. 
Handbook of South Australia. 
Insects and insect lore. 

2 pamphlets. 

VS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. Austin, Texas. 
Transactions, vol. 4, pt. 2, nos. 1 (. 

TEXAS AGRICULTUR \l. EXPERIM1 \ I STATION, College Station, 
I exas. 
Annual report, 1st, 2d, 3d, 7th, 12th and 1 jtb. 
Bulletin, current n 

.- 1 NIVERSITY, Austin, Ti 
Bulletin, nos. 1 and 20) thi Texas mineral survey. 



[48 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Chicago, 111. 

Review, current nos. (gift). 
THOMAS, CYRUS (the author), Frederick, Mel. 

1 reprint. 
TIEDE, A., Berlin, Germany. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
TIFLIS. KAUKASUS MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia. 

Bericht, 1901. 

Die cyprinden des Kaukasus (gift). 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Botanical magazine, current nos. 
TORINO. MUSEI DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPARATA, Torino, 
Italy. 

Bolletino, vol. 16. 
TORINO. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Torino, Italy. 

Atti, current nos. 

Osservazioni meteorologiche, 1901. 
TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

Studies, biological, ser. no. 2. 

Studies, psychological, ser. no. 3. 
TRELEASE, WILLIAM (the author), St. Louis, Mo. 

The yuccea?. 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 

Novitates zoologicae, vols. 1, 2, 3 and current nos. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Ikrmathena, no. 27. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, Hartford, Conn. 

Catalogue. 1901-02. 
TRONDHJEM. K. NORSKE VIDENSKABERS SELSKABS, Trondhjem, 
Norway. 

Skrifter, 1900. 
TUBINGEN. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

Tubingen universitats schriften, 1900-01. 
TUFTS COLLEGE, Tufts College, Mass. 

Studies, nos. 6 and 7. 
TURNER, H. W., San Francisco, Cal. 

Esmeralda formation. 

3 reprints. 
I . S. AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT, Washington. D. C. 

Bibliography of American economic entomology, pts. 1-7. 

Card index, nos. 404-644. 

Crop reporter, current nos. 

Experiment station record, current nos. 

Field operations of the division of soils, 1900. 

Progress of the beet-sugar industry in the United States, 1901. 

Report of the forester, 1901. 

Report of the irrigation investigations, 1900. 

Report of the secretary, 1901. 

\ cir book, 1901. 

132 bulletins. 

128 circulars. 
U. S. AMERICAN REPUBLICS BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 

Monthly bulletin, current nos. 
U. S. CE NSI S OFFICE, Washington, D. C. 

Report of the twelfth census, 1900, vols. I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and vol. 9. 
pt. 3 (gift). 
I . S. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, Washington, D.C. 

Report, 1 899-1900 (gift). 



UNIVERSITY of ILL1NQU 



■2. Annual Rei i^g 

I IC SURVEY, Washing* 
Report, 1809-1901. 
Sp< n, No. 7. 

AMISSION OF FISH AND FISHERIES, Washingt 

in- 

1 too. 
Kis: : Porto Rico. 

CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY, Washington, 1). C. 
List mi>a and Guam— Griffin. 

List ; rusts— Grittin. 

list oi map? hi America — Phillips. 

31 of references on reciprocity — Griffin. 
Report of the librarian with manual, iqoi. 
I. S. EDUCATION BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 
International reports of schools for the deaf. 
Report, iK.<q iijoo. vols. 1 and 2. 

U. S. ETHNOLOGY BUREAU, Washington, D. C. 
An th, pt. 2. 

Bulletin, n 

I . S. \l, SI RVEY, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 21st, pts. 1-7. 

Bulletin, nos. 178. 180, 181, 183 and 

Geology and mineral resources of a poi trict, 

-ka. 

Mineral chart, l8g2-IOOI. 

Mineral resources, 1900. 

Monograph, vol. 40. 

Reconnaissances in the Cape Nome and Norton Bay regions, Alaska, 1900. 
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Washington, l> I . 
te, current nos. 
NATIONAL MUSEUM^ Washington, D. C. 

Annual repi n 00. 

Bulletin, no. 50, pt. 1. 

Directions for collectors of American basketry. 

Directions fur preparing si mens of small mammals. 

if publications ol the U. S. National Museum. 

Proceedings vol. 23. 

3 pamphlets. 
NAVAL ACADEMY, Annapolis, Md. 

Annual register, 1ijoi-o2. 
I . S. STAT1 : MENT, Washington, D. C. 

Commercial relations of the United States, vol. 1, 1901. 

Consular reports, current nos. 

Review nf the world's commerce, 1901. 
U. S. I REASURY DEPAR1 MENT, Washington, D.C. 

Report of the director of the mint, 1 

Report of the precious metals in the United States, iqoo (gift). 
DEPARTMENT, Washington, D.C. 

Index catalogue of library of surgi eneral's office, ser. 2, vol. 6. 
l1 A. K. I"NI\ ERSITf Is BIBLIOTEKET, Upsala, Sweden. 

5 pamphlets. 
1 1 AH AGRICULTURAL C( iLl EG] ;an, Utah. 

Annual report, 5th, nth and 12th. 

Bulletin, cum 1 ift). 

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, Nashville, Tenn. 

Quarterly, vol. 2, nos. 1-3. 
VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Burlington, Vt. 

lal report, 14th. 
letin, current m 



150 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vt. 

Catalogue, iqoi-02. 
VICTORIA. FIELD NATURALISTS' CUM',. Melbourne, Australia. 

Victorian naturalist, current nos. 
VICTORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS AND NATIONAL GALLERY, 
Melbourne, Australia. 

Handbook of the destructive insects of Victoria, pts. 1-3. 

Report of the trustees, 1900. 
VIRCHOW, H., Berlin, Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Annual report, 1900-01. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Catalogue, 1901 02. 
WANGANUI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Wanganui, New Zealand.- 

Annual report, 7th. 
WARD, H. A., Chicago, 111. 

2 reprints. 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current nos. 
WASHINGTON GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Seattle, Washington. 

Annual report, vol. 1, 1901 (gift). 
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
WELLESLEY COLLEGE, Wellesley, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletovvn, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgan- 
town, West Virginia. 

Annual report, 7th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, W. A. 

Annual pi gress report, 1900. 

Bulletin, ui 
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO., New York City. 

Annual ■■•port, 190001. 
WHITFIELD, K. P. (the author), New York City. 

3 reprints. 

WIEN. ANTHROPOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Wien, Austria. 

Mittheilungen, vol. 31. 
WIEN. K. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Wien, Austria. 

Verzeichnis, 1892. 
WIEN. K. K. HOF-BIBLIOTHEK, Wien, Austria. 

Hofbibliother, vol. 1, no. 1. 

4 pamphlets. 

WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen, vol. 15 and 16. 
WIEN. UNIVERSITATS BIBLIOTHEK, Vienna, Austria. 

Inaugurationsbericht, 1901-02. 

Persnnalstand, 1901-02. 

Vnrlesungsaerzeichnis, somersernester, 1900-01. 

Vnrlesungsaerzeichnis, wintersemester, 1901-02. 
WILLI, N., Christiana, Norway. 

Nyt magazine for naturvidenskaberne, current nos. 



Annuai Ri i nil 1 >i i i 151 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, W illiamstown, Mass. 
, 1901-02. 
Report ol the president, 1902. 

WILLOUGHBY, C. C, Cambridge, Mass 
1 pamphlet. 

WINDSOR AND KENFIELD PI BUSHING COMPANY, 1 .111. 

Brick, current 

Street railwa) review, current nos. 
WINN MBERG, I. W., Washington, Onl ino, 1 anada. 

1 pamphlet ijlift). 

WISCONSIN AGRIC1 LT1 RAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Madison, Wis. 

Annual report. [8th. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Madi- 
51 m, Wisco isin. 
letin, nos. and 7, pt. 1. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison. Wis. 

Proceedings, igth meeting. 
Y\ 1 M IT, J. E. (the author). Cambridge, Mass. 

4 reprints. 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Mass. 

Annual report. 42d. 

Bulletin, current nos. 
WOR 1 MAN, 1. 1 ... New Haven. Conn. 

Studies oi eocene mammalia in the Marsh collection, Peabody Museum, 
pt. 1. 
WRIGHT, G. F., Oberlin, Ohio. 

2 reprints. 

Wl RTTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 
Stuttgart, ( Germany. 
Jahreshefte, vol. 57. 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, Wyom- 
ing. 

Annual repori. 1 i . i< 101,1902. 
WYOMING HISTORICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SOCIE IN , Wilkes-Bar., . I 

Procei dings, vol. 6. 
WYOMING UNIVERSITY, Laramie, Wyo. 

Catalogue, 1902-03. 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1901-02. 

Librarian's report, 1901. 

President's report, 1001-02. 
N A I ES, I.. O. (the author), Santa Barbara, Cal. 

1 pamphlet. 
ZURICH. BOTANISCHER MUSEUM DERI NIV1 RSITAT, Zurich, Switz- 
erland. 

Mittheilungen, nos. 14 and 15. 

Report, [1 
ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland 

Yierteljahrschrift, vol. 46, nos. 1 an 



152 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



Articles of Incorporation. 



SPATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William II. Hinrichsen, Secretary oj State: 

To all to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM ( >F CHICAGi >, under and 
in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved 
April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory thereof, a copy 
of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, Therefore, I. William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State of 
Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify 
that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organized 
Corporation under the laws of this State. 

/// Testimony II 'hereof, 1 hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the great 
Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. \\ 1LLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State : 
Sir : 

We, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a corpora- 
tion 'Under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, entitled, "An 
Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof: and that for the purposes of such organization we hereby state as follows, 
to-wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OK 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is lor the accumulation and dissemina- 
tion ol knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating Art, 
Archeology, Science and Ilistorv. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in aboard of 
Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named person'- are hereby selected as the Trustees for the 
first year of its corporate existence : 



Annua] Ri pi m hi I )i 

Ed. I - li. l.i! well, i ge I Vdams 

L. Hutchins I H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. ( 

James W. . Allis..n V. Armour, 0. I ■'. Aldis, Edwin \\ 

nk \V. Gui 

 
State of 111 

:>■</ \, 

 well. SlM: I 1 . \\ , I 

McMurdy, Andrew I f. Gage, i Hutchinson, J 

im, Andrew McNally, Edward E. A. VI. Clark, Herman II 

lineider, Henrj H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin II. Head, I 
\ :el F. I latch, Henry Wade R I 

L. /. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, \. A. Spragui , A. C. VlcClurg, James W. Si 

R. Walsh. Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, I i 'wen 

erdinand W. Pi - H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 

John McConnell, R. A. Waller, II. C. Chatfii •id. Wm 

. P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Guntl ge R. 

A. Forbes, Ruben W. Patterson, Jr.. M ! dwin 

Walker, Geo. M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, Willi. 
Hale, Win. T. 1 irtin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. 11. 1 

m Williams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, 
Philip I). Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, , 

(_■ II IK Li 'I MY. ' 

I. G. R. Miti in ii. a Notary Public in and for ity, do hereby 

certify ilia' petitioners personally appi 

rally that they signed the foregoing petition as e and voluntary 

act for tin uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th da) 

(1. R. MITCHELL, 
\i I Notary Pi bi ic, ( e County, III. 

( II Will. OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting rnembei 

25th day oi Jul the name oi the COLUMBIAN Ml SE1 M was 

red to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A cei ct was 

tiled. . 1894, in the office of thi Secretarj I 5tate foi Illinois. 



i<54 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. 11. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(January 29, 1900.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporat* 
Members, Life Members, Patrons and Honorary Members. 

Sic. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to nun l>\ the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee of ten dollars (Sio.oo), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure of 
any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within 
said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for forfeiture of 
annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
First. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum mi any day. 
Second. Ten tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay days. 
Third— A copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance door, and 

to the Annual Reports. 
Fourth Invitations to all receptions, lectures or other entertainments which may 

be given at the Museum. 

m C. ;,. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articli iation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from time to 

time by the Hoard of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee ; provided, that such persons named in the articles of 
association shall, within ninety days from the adoption of these By-Laws, and 
I n 'i sons hereafter chosen as Corpi irate Members, shall, within ninety days of their 
ctive election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty dollars (320.00) or 
The failure of an) person to make such payments within said time shall, 
it thi option ol tlu- Hoard ofTrustees.be ground for forfeiture of his corporate 
membership. The annual dues of Corporate Members shall be five dollars ($5.00) 
after the first year of membership, and no one shall exercise the rights of a Cor- 
porate Member until his dues are paid; and a delinquency of six months in the 
payment of annual dues shall be ground lor forfeiture of corporate membership. 
irate Members becoming Life Members, Patrons or Honorary Members 
shal I i 'in dues. 

;. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred dollars 
time shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Trustees, become a Life 
tilt Members shall be exempt from all dues. 



uw 



T oflLUHO^ 



D 
_J 
O 




ii \wi m Report 01 rm Direi ion. i 55 

Patrons shall be chosen b) ! mmen- 

n of tin Executive Committee, from amon 

to the Museum. The) shall be exempt from .ill dues, and, by 
le "I their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Membi 
Sec. 6. Honorarj Members shall be chosen from among 
lered eminent service to science, art or mechanics. I sen by 

the Trustees, and onl) upon unanimous nomination ol tin I 
tti I In •. shall bi i Kempt from all dues. In commemoi e i |th 

M embers shall m it be mi ire than fourti i n in numl 
inc time. 

Si i J All members ol whatever class shall be eligible to appointnv nl 
littees nther than th< Exi i immittee. 

ARTICLE II. 
OFFICERS. 

rioN i rhe respective members of the Board of Trustees now in ofl 
ami those who shall hereafter be el life Va< ancies 

ring in the Board shall be filled by a majority voti ol the remaining mem- 

Ebers nl the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 
Sec. 2. rhe other officers shall be I 'resident, two Vio Presidents, Secrei 

and .in Exe< utive Committee of four persons, who shall be chosen 
by ballot by the Board ol I from their own number as earl) is pracl 

alter the annual meeting in eai ti year. The President shall be < a mem- 

itive Committee and Chairman thereof, in addition to tin 
pour members. The Secretary and ["reasurei may, 01 ma) not, be the same per- 
5ecretary may, or may not, be a Corporate Member. 
Any officer may be n moved al an) regular meeting of thi I rrustees 

h\ a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Hoard. Vacancies in 
may be tilled by the Hoard at an) meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees 1 Comn 

nam e, a Cot ittee on Property, an Auditing Committi 

on Buildings a nd Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure ol the Board. 

1. Tin officers shall perform such duties as ordinaril) appertain to 
their respective offices, and such other d e Board ol rrustees ma) 

time tn time devolve upon them. The Treasure] shall give bond in such an 
and with such surety as shall be approved b) the 1 icecutive Committee, and shall 
ie funds of the Museum only in accordance with I of the 

n iii the signature and 1 - mnti 1 signatun  1 
as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

1 5. I in I itecutivi Committei shall have full control of the affairs of I 
Museum, under the general supervision ol the board ol Trust 






ARTICLE 111 

mi 1 I INGS. 



Section I. It nmei ation of the discovery ol America by I ristopher 

' mbus, the annual meeting of the Corporate Members shal b< h 14th 

da) ol October in eai h year, except when that <\-i\ falls on a Sim. I.e. ind then 



156 



Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. II. 



upon the Monday following. At such meetings the Corporate Members shall 
transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. Special meet- 
ings of the Corporate Members shall be called at any time by the Secretary upon 
written request of twenty Corporate Members. In such case, thirty days' notice 
by mail shall be given to Corporate Members of the time, place and purpose of 
such meeting-. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon the 
14th day of October, except when that day falls on a Sunday, and then upon the 
Monday following, and upon the last Monday of January, April and July of each 
year. Special meetings may be called by the President at any time upon reason- 
able notice by mail, and shall be called upon the written request of three Trustees. 
Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum, but meetings may be adjourned by any 
less number from day to day or to a day fixed. 

ARTICLE IV. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding, or shall be 
recommended by the Executive Committee. 









Annual Ri  i m I >i 157 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



p)W VRD ! VYER HARLOW N HIGINBOTHAM 

CHARLES B. COIO 



DECEASED. 
MARY I). STURGES 



PATRONS. 

ALLISON Y. ARMOUR FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

WILLIAM I.BUCHANAN FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

W1LLARD A. SMITH 



1 5 8 



Field Columbian Museum— Reports, Vol. II. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN I 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BAKER, WILLIAM T. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 

BLACK, [OHN C. 

BLAIR, WATSON F. 

I;, ATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 

1,1 ( HANAN.W. 1. 

Bl CKINGHAM, EBENEZER 

BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 

BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

( II \LMERS, W. J. 
I HATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK. JOHN M. 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 

ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, < I 

HARPER, WILLIAM R. 

HATCH, AZEL F. 

HI \1>. FRANKLIN II 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEITH, E.G. 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 
LEITER, L. Z. 

McCAGG, E. B. 
McCONNELL, JOHN 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MCNALLY, ANDR] W 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PUTNAM, FREDERICK W. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SKIFF, F. J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE.A. A. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WALKER, EDWIN- 
WALSH, JOHN R. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BISSELL, GEORGI I 
( RAWFORD, ANDREW 

DAVIS, '.I i IR< T. R. 

HALF, WILLIAM I 

| Ai KSON, HUNTINGTON W 



McCLURG, A. C. 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
WALLER, R. A. 



WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



1902. Annuai Repori 



159 



LIFE MEMBERS. 

By the paym 



ADAMS, 1 I . 

ALDIS, 1 >\V EN I 

BLAIK, CHAUNCEY J. 

Ml II. 
BARRETT, MRS. 1 
BARRJ I I. R< 1 
BARRETT, S. 1 
B< lOTH, \V. VERNON 

SHAM, D. 11. 
l;i 1 LER, EDWARD B. 

CARTER, JAMES - 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 

PER, FRANK H. 
CKANL. R.T. 

PEERING, CHARL1 S 
DRAKE, 1 K \i \ C 

FARWELL, WALL! R 
FAY.C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 

ER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GR< (MMES, J< IHN B. 

1IAM1LL. ERNEST A. 
HEALY, 1'. I. 
HIBBARD, V\ 

HILL. l.< H IS W. 
HI (.HILL. MAK\ IN 
111 TCHINSl IN, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. I . [POR I ER 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 

JOHNSON, M.H.. 1 RANK S. 
JOHNSON, MRS. LI 1/AL.I I II 
JONES, ARTHUR 15. [AYER 

Kl I HI. ELBRIDGl G 
KIMBALL, W. W. 
KIM,. 1 RAN< IS 



KING, JAMES 
KIRK, WALTER I 

LAW SON, VI< 

Mi CORMICK, MRS. 
Mi I ORMK K, CYRUS H. 
[1CK, HARi ILD I 
Mi \ U.I \ , ANDREW 
MacVEAGH, 1 RANK1 IN 
MITCHELL, I. I. 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, R( iBER I M. 

PEARSONS, 1). K. 
P1KE.EUGEN] S. 
PORTER, GEORGI I 
PORTER, II. II. 
POR ["ER, Jr., II. II. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLIN1 P 
REAM, MIR MAX B. 
REVE1 I . MIX. II. 
RUSSEL1 . I DMUND A. 
R'i 1 RSON, MRS. CARRI1 II 
m 1 RSi IN, \l VR I IS A. 

S< III I SING! R, I EOP< il n 
SCHNJ GE( IRGE 

1 I i:t IB] Rl S. 
SEAVERNS, '.I ' IRGE A. 
SINGER,! 
sMI III. BYRON I.. 
SMITH, ORSi is 
SPRAGI I , A. A. 
SPRAG1 E, 1 >l lh 1 S.A. 
ST1 RGES, GE( 'I 

lih IRNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMB! 

\\ ELLING, l"lis - 
WELLS, M. I>. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 

\\'i il. I I . H DWIG 



I 111 



Field Con mbian Mi sei m— Reports, Vol. II. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS II. 
\H wi-,. MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
ALLERTON, MRS. S. W. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A, 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

LAI LEV, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, SAMI EL 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, I HARLES J. 
BARNHART, ARTHUR M. 
BAR REEL. JAMES 
BATCH ELEER. W. 
LI AUVAIS, E. A. 
BECKER. A. G. 
BEIDLER, FRANCIS 
BELDEN, J. S. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, JR. 
BLACKMAN, W. L. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
LI VIR, III NRYA. 
B( ' \L, CHARLES T. 
BONNEY, CHARL1 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
BOl TON, C. B. 
BOUTON, X. S. 
BRADWELL, JAMES B. 
BRAUN, GEORGE P. 
BREGA, CHARLES W. 
BREMNER, DAVID F. 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROWN, GEORGE F. 
BRi IWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
HER LEY, FRANK E. 

CABLE, R. R. 

CARPENTER, A. A. 

CARPENTER, MYRON J. 

CHANDLER, FRANK K 

CHAPPELL, C. II. 

C( IMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 

CONKLING, ALLEN 

Ci INOVER, CHARLES II. 

COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 

CI M >LI I >C,K, CHARLES 

COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 



CORWITH, CHARLES R. 

COWAN, W. P. 

COX, ALFRED J. 

( KANE, CHARLES R. 

CUDAHY, JOHN 

CUMMINGS, E. A. 

CURTIS, D. H. 

DAL, DR. JOHN W. 
DAY, A. M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DELANO, F. A. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DILLMAN, E. M. 
DODGE, G E. P. 
DUMMER, W. F. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
I (WIGHT, JOHN H. 

EDWARDS, J. A. 
LDMCNDS, ABRAHAM 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, CHARLES 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
ELANNERY, JOHN L. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRANK, MAX 
F RASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GATES, J. W. 
GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GIFFORD, C. E. 
GIFFORD, I.CUSHMAN 
GLESSNER.J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM, E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GUION, GEORGE MURRAY 
GURLEY, W. W. 



I ' 



Annum Repori m Directoi 



161 



II Will rON, I. K. 
HAM CY.l LBKIDGE 
HANSl in, DAVID N. 
HARDING, AMOS I. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HAK RIS, l< >HN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, I REDERICK T 
HELMER, FR \NK A. 

HI RTLE, LOl IS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
Hi »LD( »M, f] SSI 
HOLT.GEORGl II. 
Hi >PKINS, |OHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, [AMES L 

III n HINS< »N, MRS. B I 

IXG \l S.l II I rCHER 
INS1 1. 1.. SAMUEL 

III FERY, THOMAS B. 
[ENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, |. S. 

KAMMERER, F. G. 
KEEI ER, I.i HIS 
KEENE, |OSB I'll 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEITH, U SO 'II 
KELLEY, WILLIAM I 
KEN I, WILLIAM 
KIMBA'LL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 
K1RCHBERGER, S. E. 
Ki lEHLER, I'lli >M.\S N. 

L \l LIN, ALBERT S. 
LAFLIN, GE( iRGE II 
LAMB, I RANK II. 
LAW si )N. \ ICT( IR !■'. 
LAY. A TRACY 
II 1 , WALTER II. 
I.I I I NS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD IV 
LEITER, JOSEPH 
I.INi i il.N. R( i|;| KIT. 
LINN. W. R. 
LLOYD, l.\ AN 



I "I W 1 NTHAL, B. 
LOGAN, I i, 
I 1 1MB \i:i i, [( isi am ].. 
LORD, J B 

LOWDEN, FRANK 0. 
I ' A\ I'HKR. Tl|u\] VS D. 
LYON, THOMAS R. 
I A ITi IN. Ill NIO i 



McCREA, W. S. 

Mi i .1 IRE, REV. 11. 

Mi I ENNAN, I. A. 

Mi WILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 

McF'ARLAND, HENRY J. 

MAGEE, HENRY W. 

MANSON, WILLIAM 

M VNSURE, E. L. 

MARKWALD, I II I I.I l:Nsl 

MARSHALL, GEORGE E. 

MAY, FRANK E. 

MAYER, DAVID 

MAYER, LEVY 

Ml AD, W. L. 

MLR RICK. 1.. ( 

MERRYWEATHER, GEi IRGE 

MEYER, MRS. M. \. 

MILLER, ( II \RI.LS P. 

MILLER, JOHN S. 

MILLER, THOM VS 

MIXER, C. H. S. 

MOORE, L. T. 

Mi 'i IRE, n. <;. 

MORRIS, EDWARD 

MORRIS, IRA 

Mi iRR IS, NELSON 

MORRISSON, IAS. W. 

Ml I.I.1KI N, V. II. 

Ml 1.1,1 K IN. i LAR1 N. 



N \ I II \N. Mm > I I ' 1 I 
NO! AN, H IHN II. 
NORTON, 0. W. 

N( A ES, I \ \ 1 I.N I W 



til IINI .Till ilhiikl 
< IRB, imiN \. 
ORTSEIFE N. \1 > \M 

i islii IRN, IILNRN A. 



l62 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



PALMER, Mil rON I 
PALMER, PERCH AL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
i' \ r ri.ksi in. w . R. 
pi \us( >N. El GENE 11. 
PECK.CLARI NCE1 
PECK, GEORGE R. 
PERRY, LEWIS S. 
p] TERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSEN, GEORGE 1.. 
II TERSON, WM. A 
PIETSCH, C. F. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
POND, IRVING K. 
pi ,|'l . MRS < II VRLES 1'.. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RABER, 1'. W. 

R VNDALL, THOMAS D. 

RAYNER, IAMESB. 

REHM, JACOB 

REID, W. H. 

REW, Hl.NKN I 

RIPLEY, E. P. 

ROBINSON, 1. K. 

ROSENBAUM, [OSEPH 

ROSENFELD, MAURICE 

ROSENTHAL, MRS. OSCAR 

RUMSEY, GEORGE D. 

RT NNELLS, J. S. 

R\ ERSi iN. MRS. MARTIN 

SCHAFFNER, JOSEPH 
si HMIDT, DR. O. 1 .. 

SCHMITT, wnmw 

-i HWARTZ, G. A. 
S] VRS, [OSEPH 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SEIPP.W.C. 
SELFRIDGE, HARRY G. 
SE1 LERS, FRANK II. 
5ELZ, MORRIS 
SHEDD.JOHN G. 
SHERW< » Hi. H M 
SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 
SHORTALL, fOHN G. 
SKINNER, THE MISS! S 
SMITH. F. B. 
SMITH, ]< 'UN < 
SNOWi MISS 111 I i n 1 
[AMES 1'. 



SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPOOR, J. A. 
STANLEY, FRANK W. 
STEELE, HENRY B. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STUART, ROBERT 
SWIFT, G. F. . 

TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TILTON, MRS. L. J. 
TOBEY. FRANK B. 
TRIPP, C. E. 
TRUDE, A. S. 
TRUMBULL, PERRY 
TURNER, E. A. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 
LNZICKER.OTTO 

YIERLING, ROBERT 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 

WALKER, GEORGE C. 

WALKER, JAMES R. 

WALKER, WILLIAM B. 

WALLER, EDWARD C. 

WARNER, EZRA J. 

\\ F.BSTER, GEORGE H. 

WELLS, B. D. 

WHEELER, MRS. CHARLES W. 

WHITE. A. STAMFORD 

WHITEHEAD, W. M. 

WHITEHOUSE, "KAVIS M. 

WICKES, T. H. 

WILLIAMS, SIMEON B. 

WILLING, MRS. HENRY J. 

WILSON, E. C. 

WILSON, M. H. 

WINK, HENRY 

WOLF, FRED. W. 

W< )OD, S. E. 

W< (ODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 

W< >i iSTER, CLARENCE K. 

YERKES, CHARLES T. 

DECEASED. 

BOOTH, A. 
CLARK, JONATHAN 
ISHAM, E. S. 



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