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L 



THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 

50T 

F45 

l<30o/ol-\^o4-/os 



NOnCE: Raoim or rwmw alt Ubrary MaWiMsl The lUolmum Fm tor 
MCh Loit Book l« SSO.OO. 

The person charging this material is responsible for 
its return to the hbrary from which it was withdrawn 
on or before the Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilatton, and underlining of books are reasons for discipli- 
nary action and may result in dismissal from the University. 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



0CJ3 



JUN 2 1 19!I7 



'990 



L161— O-I096 



i 




Field Columbian Muskum 

it 1 l.n. A I up.> 107 

Report Series Vol. ii, No. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1904-1905 




Chicago. U. S. A. 

October, 1905 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. LXI. 




Martin A. Ryerson, Vice-President. 



Field Columijian Museum 

Publication 107 

Rki'ori Skkiks Vol. 11, No. 5 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

DIRECTOR 



TO riiK 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



R)R THE YEAR 1904-1905 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
October, 1905 



r. 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees 334 

Officers and Committees, 335 

Staff 336 

Maintenance. . 337 

Lecture Courses, . 338 

Publications, . 339 

< Library 342 

Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling, 343 

Accessions 345 

^^Expeditions and Field Work 355 

-^Installation and Permanent Improvements, 358 

'Photography and Illustration, 365 

^Printing 365 

'JTaxidermy, 366 

, Attendance, . . •. 366 

Financial Statement, 369 

A. .cessions, .. 372 

Department of Anthropology, 372 

Department of Botany  374 

Department of Geology, 37S 

Department of Ornithology, 383 

Department of Zoology, 384 

Special Accessions, . 386 

Section of Photography, 386 

The Library, 387 

tides of Incorporation 425 

.mended By-Laws, 427 

Honorary Members and Patrons 430 

List of Corporate Members, 436 

List of Life Members 438 

List of Annual Members 439 



333 



,^;f5479 



334 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

George E. Ad.\ms. Arthur B. Jones. 

Owen F. Alois. George Manierre. 

Edward E. Ayer. Cyrus H. McCoRiMiCK. 

Watson F. Blair. Norman B. Ream. 

William J. Chalmers. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Marshall Field, Jr. Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Edwin Walker. 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. George R. Davis. 

Huntington W. Jackson. 



Oct., 1Q05. Annual Report of the Director. 335 



OFFICERS. 

Harlow X. Higinbotha.m, President. 

Martix a. Rverson, First Vice-President. 

Marshall Field, Jr., Second Vice-President. 

Harlow X. Higixbotham, Chairman Executive Committee 
George Maxierre, Secretary. 
RvRON L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow X. Higixbotham, Chairman Ex Officio. 
Edward E. Ayer. Xormax B. Ream. 

Owen F. Alois. Martix A. Ryersox. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Martix A. Ryerso.x. 
Watsox F. I^laik. Marshall Field, Jr. 

committee on BUILDING. 

Harlow X. Higi.xbotham. 
George E. Ada.ms. Willia.m J. Chalmers. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. Owen F. Aldis. 

auditing committee. 
George Maxierre. Arthur B. Jones. 



336 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 

S. C. SiMMS, Assistant Curator Division of Ethnology . 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archasology . 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 
Jesse M. Greenman, Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, EXCEPT ORNITHOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot, Curator. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

TAXIDERMIST-IN-CHIEF. 

Carl E. Akeley. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
1904-1905 



To the Trustees of the Field Columbian Museum : 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending September 30, 1905. 

In some respects the year just closed has been the most im- 
portant and interesting in the history of the institution. The con- 
sideration by the Staff of the plans of the new building ; the acquisi- 
tion of a large amount of valuable material from the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition, the expeditions and the several important collec- 
tions purchased have all been factors in making the period covered 
by the last twelve months noteworthy. The building has been 
inspected for safety by experts appointed by the architects and 
repaired and strengthened in accordance with their recommendations. 
The exterior of the building has been replastered and will be repainted 
early in the Spring. 

The Director attended the International Congress on Economics 
and Expansion at Mons, Belgium, in September. The Convention 
had a distinct ethnological and sociological tendency, and the pro- 
ceedings in the more important sections were largely dominated by 
scientific men who gave a scholarly tone to the sessions and placed 
the records of the Congress on an academic basis. The most im- 
portant action of the Congress as relates to the scope of the Field 
Institution, was the adoption of a Memorial for the formation of 
a permanent organization to be termed the International Bureau of 
Ethnography. 

Maintenance.— The cost of maintenance for the year 1904-1905 
was $122,880, an increase over the previous year of approximately 
$13,000. The excess was occasioned Ijy an increase in the cost of 
repairs and alterations to the building of $3,500; additions to the 
general staff accounting for an increase in salaries of $4,000, and 
$5,000 due to extraordinary expenses in connection with the installa- 
tion of new material obtained chiefly from the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. The total amount expended as shown by the financial 

.337 



338 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

statement was $208,467. The difference, $86,000, between this 
amount and the cost of maintenance is accounted for by special 
appropriations, for: cases, $10,000; expeditions, $n,ooo; publica- 
tions, $5,500; special exterior repairs, $5,500; and collections pur- 
chased, $50,000. The latter item exceeds any amount previously 
expended for new material in any one year with the exception of the 
first year of the Museum's existence. 

Staff of the Museum. — The Staff has been augmented by the 
appointment of Dr. Jesse M. Greenman, formerly of the Gray Her- 
barium, as Assistant Curator of the Department of Botany, and 
bv the appointment of Dr. X. Dearborn as Assistant Curator in 
charge of Ornithology. 

Lecture Courses. — Both the Autumn and the Spring Lecture 
Courses were given in Fullerton Memorial Hall by special ar- 
rangement with the trustees of the Art Institute, and it is en- 
couraging to state that the capacity of the hall was taxed at almost 
every lecture. Opportunity is here taken to thank the gentlemen 
who very generously cooperated in this method of public instruction. 

Following is the Twenty-first Lecture Course, delivered during 
the months of October and November, 1904, with the subjects and 
lecturers : 

Oct. I. — " Wild Flowers of the Chicago Basin." " 

Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany. 

Oct. 8. — "Japan — Land of Lacquer and Bamboo." 
Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany. 

Oct. 15. — " Variation of Birds." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Department of Ornithology. 

Oct. 22. — " Crystals." 

Dr. O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology. 

Oct. 29. — " Wyandotte and Marengo Caves." 

Dr. O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology. 

Nov. 5. — "A Naturalist in Africa — Field Columbian Museum 
Expedition." 
Prof. D. G. ElHot, F. R. S. E., Curator of Zoology. 

Nov. 12. — " Cats and the Lands they Inhabit." 

Prof. D. G. Elliot, F. R. S. E., Curator of Zoology. 



Oct.. 1905. AxNi'Ai. Report of the Director. 



339 



Xov. ig. -  The Decorative Art of the X.mli American Indians — 
Fart 1." 
Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Curator of Anthropology. 

Xov. 26. — " The Decorative Art of the North American Indians — 
Part II." 
Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Curator of Anthropology. 

The following is the Twenty-second Lecture Course, delivered 
in March and April, 1905, with the subjects and lecturers: 

March 4. — " The Explanation of Indian Ceremonies." 

Dr. G. A. Dorsey, Curator of Anthropology. 

March 11. — "Giant Reptiles of North America." 

Mr. E. S. Riggs, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Paleontologv. 

March 18. — " Extinct Mammals of North America." 

Mr. E. S. Riggs, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Paleontologv. 

March 25. — " Aims and Methods of Bird Study." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator, Department 
of Ornithologv. 

April J. — "Hawaiian Cruise of the Albatross." 

Prof. C. C. Nutting, Professor of Zoology. Uni- 
versity of Iowa. 

.\pril 8. — " The Fertilization of Flowers by Insects." 

Dr. F. H. Snow, Professor of ' Systematic Ento- 
mology, University of Kansas. 

April 15. — " Geographic Factors Involved in the Rise of Chicago." 
Dr. J. Paul Goode, Assistant Professor of Geo- 
graphy, University of Chicago. 

April 22. — ■' How Rivers and Lakes became Stocked with Fishes." 
Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

April 29, — " The Basketry of California." 

Dr. J. W. Hudson, Department of Anthropology. 

Publications. — The publications of the Museum have appeared as 
usual from time to time as opportunity presented itself. The 
list includes seven numbers of the established series, details of which 
follow: 



34° Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Pub. 96. — Anthropological Series, Vol. 8. " The Traditions of the 
Hopi." By H. R. Voth. 319 pp., no illustrations, 
edition 1,500. 

Pub. 97. — Anthropological Series, Vol. 4, No. 2. " Oraibi Natal 
Customs and Ceremonies." By H. R. Voth. 14 pp., 
8 illustrations (half-tones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 98. — Report Series, Vol. II, No. 4. " Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees, for the Year 1903- 
1904." 80 pp., 12 illustrations (half-tones), edition 
2,500. 

Pub. 99. — Anthropological Series, Vol. 9, No. I. " The Cheyenne." 
Part I. " The Ceremonial Organization." By George 
A. Dorsey. 55 pp., 23 illustrations (11 colored plates 
and 12 zinc etchings), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 100. — Anthropological Series, Vol. VI, No. 3. " Hopi Proper 
Names." By H. R. Voth. 47 pp., no illustrations, 
edition 1,500. 

Pub. loi. — Geological Series, Vol. II, No. i. " The Rodeo Meteor- 
ite." By O. C. Farrington. 13 pp., 4 illustrations 
(half-tones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 103. — Anthropological Series, Vol. IX, No. 2. "The Chey- 
enne." Part II. " The Sun Dance." By George A, 
Dorsey. 131 pp. 159 illustrations (13 colored plates, 
136 half tones, and 10 zinc etchings.) 

The Museum Exchange List now numbers 1,123 names, of which 
510 are in foreign countries and 613 in the United States. Early in 
the year the list was carefully revised and many changes and addi- 
tions made. 

The following table shows the number of exchanges with each 
of the foreign countries: 

Canada 29 Greece, 2 

Central America, .... 6 The Netherlands, .... 10 

Cuba and the West Indies, 5 Italy 28 

Mexico, 16 Malta, i 

Philippine Islands, . i Norway. 7 

Yucatan, 2 Portugal 5 

Argentine Republic, 10 Roumania, i 

Brazil, 7 Russia, 14 

British Guiana, i Spain, 5 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 



341 



Chili, . . . 
Peru, . . . 
U. S. Columbia, 
Uruguay, . 
Austria. 
Belgium. 
Denmark. 
France. 
Germany, 
Great Britain, 



I 


Sweden 


10 


J 


Switzerland, 


1 1 


.^ 


India, . 


1 1 


I 


Japan, 


6 


=.^ 


Egypt, 


I 


I 2 


Liberia 


I 


4 


South Africa, 


8 


4-' 


Australia, 


22 


04 


Oceanica 


9 


s.s 


Tasmania, 


2 



The following table shows the number of exchanges receiving 
the dififerent publications: 

General, everything issued by the Museum, 161 

Anthropological, 85 

Botanical 48 

Geological 78 

Orinthological Q 

Report 6 

Anthropological and Geological, 5 

Geological and Zoological, 19 

Zoological 39 

Botanical and Geological 15 

Botanical, Geological, and Zoological, 27 

Miscellaneous, 18 



The publications 

Alabama, . . . . 

Arizona, . 

Arkansas. . 

California, 

Colorado. . 

Connecticut, 

Delaware, 

District of Columbia, 

Florida, 

Georgia . 

Illinois. 

Indiana, 

Iowa, . 

Kansas. 

Kentucky, 

Louisiana. 

.Maine, 

Maryland, 

Massachusetts, 



510 



are distributed to the different states as follows: 

Missouri, 13 

Montana, . 3 

Nebraska, 7 

Nevada i 

New Hampshire. 5 

New Jersey, 16 

New York 95 

North Carolina 6 

New Mexico, i 

Ohio 24 

Oregon i 

Pennsylvania, 35 

12 Rhode Island, 6 

7 South Carolina, i 

2 South Dakota, 2 

4 Tennessee, 2 

7 Texas, 2 

1 2 Vermont, . 3 

69 Virginia. . 3 



I 

I 

29 



84 

I 

I 

58 

12 



342 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Michigan, 12 Washington 3 

Minnesota, 11 West Virginia, 3 

Mississippi, 3 Wisconsin 16 

Wyoming 2 

The following table shows the number of exchanges receiving 
the different publications; 

Domestic. 

General, everything issued'by the Museum, 167 

Anthropological, 82 

Botanical 85 

Geological, 114 

Ornithological, q 

Report, 35 

Zoological, 29 

Geological and Zoological. 18 

Geological and Anthropological 7 

Botanical, Geological, Ornithological, and Zoological, ... 42 

Botanical and Zoological, 11 

Botanical and Geological, 3 

Miscellaneous 11 



613 



It would seem pertinent to mention that the service of the 
Bureau of International Exchange connected with the Smithsonian 
Institution in distributing the publications to foreign countries is 
highly satisfactory, and grateful acknowledgment is tendered that 
Institution for providing such excellent facilities. 

A special report of the work done at the St. Louis Fair and a list 
of the material obtained was published for private circulation only. 

Library. — The number of books and pamphlets in the library 
is now 36,572, which represent an addition during the year of 1,375 
books and 1,032 pamphlets, distributed as follows: 

Books. Pamphlets. 

General Library, 12,518 16,563 

Department of Anthropology, .... 600 85 

Department of Botany, 740 319 

Department of Geology, 1,998 2,984 

Department of Ornithologj', .... 397 

Department of Zoology, 361 7 

The additions during the year were 549 titles acquired as fol- 
lows: By purchase 273 books and 63 pamphlets, and the remainder 
by gifts and exchange. The Library receives 160 periodicals, 77 of 



i 



Oct.. 1905. Annu.m. Report of the Director. 343 

which are jjurchased. A number of valuable books have lieen pur- 
chased during the year, among them the following: — Thwaite's Early 
Western Travels. 1748-1846 (31 vs.). Rlair and Richardson, The 
Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (55 vs.). Cavanilles. Icones et Descrip- 
tiones Plantarum. 1791-1801 (6 vs.). Humboldt, von. Nova Genera 
et Species Plantarum. 1815- 1825 (h vs."*. It was ascertained during 
the rear that there were a number of institutions, both at home 
and abroad, that were publishing literature that would be of great 
assistance to the staft and students of the Museum. Invitations 
to the number of 330 were extended for an exchange of publi- 
cations and it is gratifying to report that very hearty acceptances 
have been received from a large proportion of those addressed. 
Several of these societies have sent, also, as complete sets of 
their back publications as were available; among them are the 
Saint Petersburg Imperial Academy of Sciences, which sent its 
Memoirs dating back to 1830, and, while not complete, are 
most valuable; The Societe Beige de Geologie, de Paleontologie, 
Bruxelles, 8 volumes; Roval Botanical Garden, Ceylon, 3 volumes; 
Biblioteca Xacional, Chile, 21 volumes; Royal Zoological Society, 
Dublin, 15 reports; Field Naturalists and Microscopical Society, 
Edinburgh, 5 volumes; Gesellschaft der Xaturfreunde. Stuttgart, 
f) volumes; Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, England, 
10 volumes; South African Philosophical Society, Cape Town, 7 vol- 
umes; Missouri Horticultural Society, 11 volumes; and Iowa State 
Horticultural Society, 13 volumes. An inventory has been made 
i)f all books and pamphlets purchased since the establishment of the 
Library in 1894. On account of the increasing number of books needed 
in the Departmental Libraries, it was thought advisable to nominate 
,1 member of the staff of each department to have charge of the 
books, and the wisdom of this step is alreadv apparent. Four hun- 
dred and fifteen additional titles were fumished-for the Second Supple- 
ment (now in press) of the List of Serials in the Libraries of Chicago. 
The number of cards written and added to the catalogues was 8,435, 
exclusive of several thousand cards received from the Department of 
Agriculture, to which the call number of the Library was added. 
Twelve installments of the John Crerar Library catalogue cards have 
i'cen received. 583 books have been sent to the bindery during 
the year, of which 225 have been returned. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling. The records of 
the Department of Anthropology show an unusually large num- 



344 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

ber of specimens entered in the inventory books during the 
year. These books now number 25 volumes. Card catalogues 
have been made of collections as fast as they have been received, and 
few of the great collections acquired remain uncatalogued. The 
preparation of lists of specimens from the catalogue cards for the 
office of the Recorder have been brought to date. Aluminum sunken 
labels have been prepared during the year for the North Pacific Coast 
collection and for a large part of the California collection, while 
identifying labels have been placed on all specimens on exhibition. The 
Curator of Botany reports entries to the number of 16,147 as having 
been made during the year, bringing the total up to date to 178,008 
items contained in 51 catalogue books. In addition to this, approxi- 
mately 2,500 cards have been written. In the Department of Geol- 
ogy the amount of cataloguing performed was greater than usual, 
owing to the large quantity of material obtained from the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition. The cataloguing of the invertebrate fossils 
collected bv Mr. Slocom in western New York was also a task of con- 
siderable magnitude. With the exception of the Bixby collection, 
however, which was not received until late in the year, it is possible 
to report all material in the Department fully inventoried and 
catalogued. The record of the entries is as follows: Number of 
Record Books, 19; total number of entries, 52,835; entries during 
the year, 15,011; total number of cards written, 6,600. These en- 
tries are subdivided as follows: Paleontological specimens, 11,546; 
economic specimens, 1,748; mineral specimens, 1,100; geological 
specimens, 264; lithological specimens, 187; meteorites, 149; and 
geographical specimens, 17. The cataloguing of photographs filed 
in the Department albums has been dontinued, and additions 
made during the year number 301. In addition, a system of filing 
loose photographs has been established, which proves very service- 
able for preserving such photographs and rendering them acces- 
sible. The files used are similar to the ordinary letter file reinforced 
by a binding of strong muslin. In these the photographs are 
filed alphabetically, while the files are grouped according to subjects. 
The number of photographs now filed in this manner in the Depart- 
ment is 745, and the number of files 22. New labels were provided 
for the meteorite collection in connection with its reinstallation. 
These labels are of black cardboard printed with aluminum ink and 
of a size to fit the front of each block on which a specimen is mounted. 
Each label shows the name of the meteorite, its date of fall, its classi- 
fication, weight, and description of the specimen. The number of 




o 



Oct., 1905 Annual Report of the Director. 345 

ibels so prepared is 382. In addition two diagrams illustrating 
graphically the composition of meteorites were made. The collec- 
tions of clays, soils and sands have been fully labelled, a total of 
459 labels, 30 of which were descriptive, having been prepared for 
this purpose. Ninety comf)lete labels were prepared for the series 
of oil sands and a total of 385 labels for new specimens in the scries 
'if ores of gold, silver, copper, etc. made. A total of 1,465 labels 
has been prepared a^d printed for the Department during the 
year. All the new material in the Department of Ornithology, 
as well as a number of skins belonging to the original Cory purchase 
which had hitherto not been numbered, were card catalogued. A 
catalogue of the birds of North and Central America, including the 
names and geographical distribution of more than 3,000 birds, has 
been prepared and is ready for publication. The Curator of Zoology 
reports all records in that department as being in a highly satisfactory 
condition. The year's work in the Museum on catalogues and in- 
ventories is shown in detail below: 





Number 


Total No. of 


Entries 


Total No. of 




of Record 


Entries tn 


During 


Cards 


Departments. 


Books. 


Sept. 30, 1Q05. 


1904-1905. 


Written. 


Anthropology. 


26 


72.551 


9,710 


76.441 


Botany. . 


51 


178,008 


16,147 


7.050 


Geologj-, . 


19 


52.835 


15,011 


6,600 


Library, . 


10 


43.-02 


4.136 


42,391 


Ornithology-. 


10 


iy.699 


3,681 


3.402 


Photography. 


4 


40,108 


12.385 




Zoology, . 


20 


32.130 


968 


15,610 



Accessions. — The most important accessions in the Department 
of Geology were received from the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 
They were, for the most part, the gifts of home and foreign 
commissions of states and countries exhibiting at the Exposition. 
The material obtained was all carefully selected under the super- 
vision of the Curator, and hence represents new and altogether 
desirable accessions only. In weight the total shipment from the 
Exposition aggregated about eight tons. The largest and most 
important acquisition received from any single commission was 
that from Brazil, which numbered 1,060 specimens. This included 
several series of ores and minerals of great rarity and importance. 
The important manganese ore deposits of Brazil are represented 
by one mass of manganese ore weighing 3,300 pounds and 
■by several hundred pounds of ores of the same from other 
localities. The gold ores are represented by large masses from 



346 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

the well-known Ore Velho mines of Bahia and the arsenical de- 
posits of Minas Geraes. The characteristic siliceous and pipe 
iron ores of Minas Geraes are also well represented in the mate- 
rial obtained. A full series of diamond-bearing gravels was secured, 
also several hundred pounds of the Brazilian monazite sands from 
different localities. Ores of copper, zinc, cadmium and mercury 
were also secured. The minerals obtained included representatives 
of a number of rare species, such as goyazite, scorodite, anatase and 
hydrargillite, and of gem minerals, such as tourmaline, topaz, aqua- 
marine, etc. Other foreign countries from which valuable collections 
were obtained were: Bulgaria, which furnished lA specimens, chiefly 
of copper ores and coals; Canada, 55 specimens, ores and economic 
minerals, including some from the newly discovered cobalt deposits 
of Haileybury ; Egypt, 20 specimens copper ores and salts; Germany, 
29 specimens peat and its products, clays, etc.; Haiti, 39 specimens, 
copper, gold, manganese, and other ores, and a manuscript geological 
map of part of the island ; Italy, 14 photographs of the marble quarries 
of Carrara; Japan, 14 specimens phosphates and products; New 
Zealand, 37 geological photographs; and Rhodesia, 20 specimens 
ores and minerals, including a remarkable occurrence of gold in talc. 
Commissions or exhibitors of the United States and territories from 
whom important collections were obtained were: Alaska, 10 speci- 
mens gold ores and coals; Alabama, 30 specimens, chiefly iron ores 
aad sands; Arizona, 57 specimens copper, gold, and other ores and 
minerals; Arkansas, 54 specimens zinc ores, phosphates, bauxite, 
asphalt, etc.; California, 131 specimens ores of mercury, chromium, 
lithium and other metals, infusorial and nitrous earths, onyx and 
other ornamental stones, and a relief map 8x4 feet, of a portion 
of San Bernardino County; Illinois, 10 specimens soils and clays; 
Kentucky, 31 specimens clavs, sands, and ores; Maryland, 20 speci- 
mens soils; Mississippi, 36 specimens clays, marls and sands; Mis- 
souri, 51 specimens zinc and iron ores, clays, barites, etc. ; New Mexico, 
78 specimens of various ores; New York, 17 specimens slates, talcs, 
and iron ores; North Carolina, 8 specimens monazite, barite, and 
other minerals; Oklahoma, 22 specimens clays and gypsums; South 
Dakota, 52 specimens gold and tungsten, ores, quartz, spodumene, 
mica and other products; Tennessee, 26 specimens phosphates, iron 
and copper ores; Utah, ;^t, specimens ores and rare minerals; Vir- 
ginia, 168 specimens representing the different mineral resources of 
the state; Washington, 47 specimens gold, silver, lead and copper 
ores; Wisconsin, 20 specimens building stone, iron ores, etc.; and 



Oct.. 1905. Annual Rkport of the Director. 347 

Wyoming, 4 specimens jet, kaolin, agate and soda. Some additional 
valuable accessions were received by gift during the year from sources 
other than the Exposition. Of these may be mentioned 68 thin 
sections of meteorites and casts of the Bath Furnace and Boogaldi 
meteorites from Prof. H. A. Ward; a complete series of rocks and 
minerals of the Cerro Mercado, Mexico, and a number of rare Mexican 
minerals, in all aggregating 230 specimens, from Mr. W. H. Schlemm; 
a series of remarkable sand concretions from California, from 
Herbert W. Brown; four limonite concretions from Kentucky, from 
Dr. W. S. Gilmore; three limonite concretions from Indian Terri- 
tory, from Gen. G. Murray Guion; a series of 83 specimens, illus- 
trating the manufacture and uses of carborundum, from the Carbor- 
undum Company ; seven specimens gold ores and tundra of Alaska, 
from W. M. Johnston; and 31 specimens ores and minerals of Cali- 
fornia and Arizona from, the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. By 
exchange were obtained sections of five meteorites new to the collec- 
tion. These were as follows: Felix and Persimmon Creek, from the 
United States National Museum; Billings and Bella Roca, from Prof. 
H. A. Ward; and St. Mesmin, from B. Sturtz. From the United 
States National Museum were also obtained by exchange large pol- 
ished slabs of orbicular diorite from Advance, North Carolina, and 
of jasperized hematite from Ishpeming, Michigan. From the Mon- 
tana School of Mines were received by exchange eleven specimens of 
the ores and rocks of the Butte district; from Mr. R. F. Jones of 
Concord, Massachusetts, a series of nine remarkable crystallized 
specimens of datolite from Westfield, Massachusetts; from Prof. 
L. H. Borgstrom, a cast of one of the Shelburne meteorites; and 
from Mr. Henry E. Purdy of Michigan City, Indiana, two complete 
fulgurites, each about 18 inches in length, and a number of fragments 
of fulgurites. The most important purchase was that of the mineral 
collection of Maynard Bixby of Salt Lake City. This collection 
represents the fruits of many years' collecting by Mr. Bixbv, chiefly 
in the little known and comparatively inaccessible districts of Utah, 
Colorado and adjoining states of the W'est. The collection is, there- 
fore, largely made up of mineral occurrences little known elsewhere, 
and affords material of a rare character for purposes of study and 
display. Suites of specimens which may be mentioned as of especial 
interest and importance are the following: Crystallized gold, weigh- 
ing 3 ounces, Breckenridge, Colorado; silver nugget, weighing 3 
pounds. Globe, Arizona; crystallized realgar and orpiment, Mercur; 
Utah; crystallized argentite and hessite, Colorado and Montana, 



348 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

crystallized tiemannite, Marysvale, Utah; quartz- crystals contain- 
ing inclusions, phantoms, etc., Placerville, California; precious opal, 
Washington; precious sapphires, including crystals and rolled pebbles, 
Montana; minium, Leadville and Eureka, Utah; rhodochrosite in 
large and transparent crystals, Alma, Colorado; crystallized cerus- 
site, Utah and Idaho; crystallized azurite in large and varied forms, 
Arizona; hiddenite in crystals of gem quality, Alexander County, 
North Carolina; rose beryl, Dugway Range, Utah; crystallized 
phenacite, Crystal Peak, Bear Creek and Mount Antero, Colorado; 
topaz crystals in great variety from the Thomas Mountains, Utah; 
probably the largest perfect crystal of topaz ever found in the United 
States, Cheyenne Mountain, Utah; large crystal of andalusite, 
Oreville, South Dakota; crystallized blue calamine, Elkhorn, Mon- 
tana; bixbyite, Dugway Range, Utah; olivenite in great variety, 
Eureka, Utah; scorodite in remarkable perfection of form from the 
same locality; an extraordinary crystal of vivianite from Silver 
Citv, Idaho; coni-chalcite in large masses of rich color, Tintic Dis- 
trict, Utah; crystallized uraninite, Portland, Connecticut; anglesite 
in crystals of remarkable perfection and size. Eureka, Utah; crys- 
tallized leadhillite, Shultz, Arizona; an extraordinary crystal of 
linarite on matrix. Eureka, Utah; crystalHzed wulfenite of rich and 
varied colors, Shultz, Arizona; napalite, Aetna mine, California; 
pseudomorphs of hematite after enargite, Copperopolis mine, Utah; 
and malachite pseudomorphous after selenite. Mammoth, Utah. 
The collection numbers 2,400 specimens and adds to the Museum 
collections 75 species or varieties which had not been before rep- 
resented. From the Director of the Geological Survey of Japan a 
series numbering 34 specimens of new or unusual minerals of that 
country was obtained by purchase. These specimens include beauti- 
ful danburites from Obira, hyalite from Tateyama, twin quartzes 
from Otomezaka, and choice topazes from the well-known Takayama 
locality. In a series of specimens purchased from the estate of the 
late George Wilkinson of Beloit, some remarkable manganites from 
the well-known Negaunee, Michigan, locality were obtained. These 
include a geode and two specimens of the " nailhead " variety. 
An extraordinary crystal of hematite, a fossil fish from the Green 
River beds and a disarticulated fossil nautilus were other important 
specimens obtained in this purchase. Twelve specimens of the large, 
violet-colored calcites recently discovered at the May Bell mine near 
Joplin, Missouri, were obtained from an exhibitor at the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition by purchase. The South Bend meteorite, re- 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 



349 



ontly discovered in Indiana, was purchased entire, also one of the 
nvo stones of the Shclburne, Canada, meteorite, which fell August 13, 
1904. Other purchases of special importance were those of a glaciated 
mass of copper weighing 372 pounds found near Markesan, Wiscon- 
sin, and two remarkable crystals of gem quality of pink beryl recently 
discovered near San Diego, California. The accessions in Anthro- 
pology have been largely due to purchase, these for the first time in 
several years exceeding in importance and number those acquired 
by exploration in the field. This is due to the fact that much of the 
time of the various members of the staff of the department was oc- 
cupied in St. Louis at the close of the Exposition in matters of in- 
terest to the department, at which time a large number of collections 
were purchased. From the few expeditions which have been in the 
field, however, important material has been obtained. Thus, through 
Dr. C. F. Xewcombe, notable additions to the Northwest Coast collec- 
tions have been made, the most important consisting of skulls and 
skeletons, several inside house posts, and other carvings from that 
region. From Dr. J. W. Hudson has been acquired a large collection 
of material from the Lower Klamath, supplementing the collection 
made by him in the year previous. Of acquisitions through gift, the 
most important is that from Mr. S. L. James of this citv, who pre- 
sented a large number of earthenware vessels, several smaller objects 
of Egyptian archaeology, seven mummy coffins, and one large white 
marble sarcophagus seven feet in length and beautifully carved. 
This sarcophagus is of a lat-e period and was unquestionably done hv 
Roman or Grecian artisans. Mr. H. D. Higinbotham presented an' 
unusually interesting prepared head from the Jivero Indians of 
Equador, while Mr. W. E. Prager also presented a small but inter- 
esting collection of flint and stone implements illustrating the archse- 
ology of Ireland. Of the collections received through exchange, the 
most important was a collection of about 100 skulls , of the Navajo 
and other Indians of the Southwest from the Brooklyn Institute of 
Science and Art; an unusually interesting Haida house post and a 
large model of Mitla and Monte Alban from the United States Na- 
tional Museum, and a series of busts from Siberia from the American 
Museum of Natural History. The collections acquired by purchase 
are many in number, and include several of great importance. Of 
these only the most important are here noticed. Considering first 
the collections acquired at the St. Louis Exfjosition, mav be men- 
tioned the very large and important collection illustrating the archae- 
ology of the Province of Calchaqui of the Argentine Republic secured 



350 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

from Mr. Zavaleta. Probably next in importance to the Zavaleta 
collection is that of a large number of Thibetan bronzes and East 
Indian ethnology ; the Donne collection from New Zealand com- 
prising six Maori feather cloaks and a number of Maori carvings, and 
the archaeological collection from Egypt selected by Dr. Breasted. 
From Mr. Hardy of Berlin was purchased an interesting collection of 
ethnological specimens from German East Africa, chiefly from the 
Massai. Of especial interest in this collection is a series of thirty 
life masks and a completely costuined Massai warrior. There is 
also a very interesting carved door-way of native design and con- 
struction. From the Siamese Pavilion was obtained a collection 
numbering several hundred specimens, among them being many 
musical instruments, pieces of armor and weapons. In the Soudan 
collection, exhibited in the Fish, Forestry and Game Building, an 
exhibit was secured which extends the collections in the department 
to the North of Africa, a region heretofore unrepresented. From 
Dr. Jenks, the Director of the Bureau of Ethnology of the Philippine 
Islands, was secured a choice series of objects largely of head-gear. 
These are of special interest, owing to the fact that they were selected 
and thoroughly identified by Di. Jenks. From the Rev. Mr. Verner 
was secured a valuable collection brought by him from the Pigmy 
region of Central Africa. Other collections secured from St. Louis 
are Haida carvings, a collection of Hupa feather work, a large collec- 
tion of Cinghalese ceremonial masks, a collection of about 200 speci- 
mens from the Cliff Dwellers, an interesting collection from the Ainu, 
a few specimens from the Cheyenne and a large number of objects 
from the North Pacific Coast taken to the Exposition by Dr. C. F. 
Newcombe. The more important of the other purchases made dur- 
ing the year include two ceremonial bufi^alo robes from one of the 
Rio Grande Pueblos ; a gold necklace and other valuable additions 
from Egypt and Italy, purchased by Mr. Ayer; a small collection of 
Blackfeet objects including a number of skulls and skeletons; a 
carefully collected collection from the Togo Hinterland secured 
through the kindness of Dr. Otto Finsch ; a large number of carefully 
selected and choice specimens from Fred Harvey, including buffalo 
robes, buffalo hide shields, a number of rare Tlingit specimens and 
four representative basket collections and a large collection, in many 
ways unique, from one of the tribes of the Columbia River. From 
Professor Starr was purchased a collection numbering about 6,000 
specimens comprising in addition to the material obtained by his 
three years' exploration at Tlacotapec, a large number of archasolog- 



<)CT., 1905. Annual Rkport of thk Dirkctdk. ,^51 

R-al specimens from various ])arts of Mexico, tlie Penctiel collection, 
a series of 100 busts of Mexican Indians, a larjje and comprehensive 
ethnological series illustrating the life of the Mexican Indians of to-day, 
and several miscellaneous collections of the North American Indians, 
among them the Iroquois. Tonkawa, and Sauk and Fox. The col- 
lection also included one of the very rare ancient throwing sticks from 
the Cliff ruins of Utah. Of the new material acquired in the Depart- 
ment of Botany a fair half was secured by careful selection among 
the principal foreigfn countries exhibiting at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. From this source the following specimens were derived: 
From Portugal, a series of vegetable oils from the fruits to the prod- 
ucts, illustrating the utilization of the oil of olives, coco, purging nut, 
and ground nut ; a very full series of the native plants used in this 
country in domestic medication by the laity ; a full illustrative collec- 
tion of the Portuguese method of harvesting pine resins, from a large 
trunk showing the method of tapping, through the tools and utensils 
u.sed, to the various resins, gums and oils extracted; an interesting 
series of the principal agricultural products of the country, and many 
of its colonial jjossessions ; a few examples of cork products needed 
to complete the already very full illustrative collection in the depart- 
ment ; and a series of the rubbers of Portuguese Africa. From Egj'pt, 
a very comjjlete and representative collection of the cereals, legumes, 
and other edible grains peculiar to the delta of the Nile; an excellent 
series of the more valuable Egyptian cottons; a fine series of sugar, 
exemplifying the products from the cane; a valuable collection of 
dried dates representing all the Egyptian varieties of the fruit ; and 
a series of the native rubbers of upper Egypt. From Ceylon, an unique 
series of specimens showing the various utilizations of cocoanut ; the 
husks, shells, nuts, meat, trunk, sheath, leaf ekels, and wood of the 
tree; a ver}^ full and selected series of the native spices of the country 
in a large variety of forms and sorts; a full series of the plants em- 
ployed in disease by the natives, accompanied by a pamphlet giving 
the source and utilization of each; a complete set of odd fibers, em- 
ployed by the natives, but not yet having commercial value or ex- 
])loitation, each of these accompanied by a cord or rope manufactured 
from the same; various wild and agricultural grains, nuts, berries 
and other fruits entering into domestic use; the gums, tans, dyes, 
and barks utilized in woodcraft and domestic arts ; the starches manu- 
factured from native plants, utilized but not yet commercial; a very 
full collection of the varieties of Ceylon teas; a very complete series 
of the cereals, legumes and other grains of Ceylon ; also of the cottons ; 



352 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

and a fine series of various odd nuts growing wild on the island. 
From California, a series of specimens representing the olive as grown 
on the Pacific coast, and the extraction of oil therefrom; an excellent 
series of the cultivated nuts of California, including the various varie- 
ties of walnuts, almonds, peanuts, etc. ; and a fine specimen, pre- 
served in liquid, showing the full fruiting spathe of the date palm. 
From Japan, an interesting series of sticks of various timber species, 
8x8 inches x lo feet long, which add a number of species to the al- 
ready nearly complete series of Japanese timber specimens now in- 
stalled in this department ; a very complete and scientific series of 
the various bamboos produced in that country, this series, organized 
by the Japanese Forestry Commission, is one of the finest ever ex- 
hibited in any foreign country ; a collection of waxes ; a series of the 
fine chip produced so extensively in Japan for the manufacture of 
hats and cords, in this series the chips are accompanied by blocks 
of the wood from which they are made, and in each case bear the 
botanical name of the tree from which they are produced; a series 
of fine examples showing the products of the camphor tree at various 
steps in the manufacture of the gum, this series adds greatly to the 
incomplete set already installed in the department; fine collections 
of saki, nuts, and roots; and various odd forest products of the archi- 
pelago, represented by excellent illustrative specimens. From New 
Zealand, grains and fibers. From Haiti, besides a collection of 
tobacco and cigars, specimens showing the product of the chocolate 
nut as made by the natives for domestic use. From Virginia, a col- 
lection of peanuts. From Louisiana, a series of white papers made 
of bagasse — of higher class than those already installed in this de- 
partment — thus completing the exhibit of this interesting product. 
From Siam, various specimens and utilizations illustrating the native 
processes and products in the manufacture of Laos and Siamese 
papers, from the raw products to native books of the finished article. 
From Germany, a long illustrative series of the various peats of Ger- 
many, with specimens showing their utilization in many ways: fab- 
rics, paper, mats, mattress filling, surgical dressing, vineyard torches, 
etc., etc. From Bulgaria, a complete series of the cereals, legumes, 
and other grains, nuts and tobacco. From Rhodesia, native rubbers 
as produced from several species of Apocymaceous plants, including 
one interesting new rubber existing in pure threads in the crushed 
roots of a thus far unknown species; also, collections of fibers, grains, 
and cottons. From Italy, a series of cereals and legume grains ; and 



Oct. 



1905. 



Ax.Ni-Ai. Report of the Director. 



353 



a fine scientifically identified series of the seeds of the native slirubs 
and trees of Italy, an excellent collection and one seldom, if ever, 
seen at an exposition. From Formosa, a full series of tree sections 
of the various timbers utilized upon the island, these were carefully 
named and prepared by the Forestry Department of Japan ; an ex- 
cellent series of the fibers of Formosa, with some instance of utilization 
of the same; raw material, pulp and finished papers of various bast 
and other paper-fiber producing plants ; camphor and products ; teas ; 
a series illustrating the food nuts of the country; specimens repre- 
senting the various grades of sugars produced in Formosa from the 
cane ; and series of the food and condiment roots of the island. The 
herbarium has been augmented during the past year by the accession 
of 11,089 specimens, among which the most notable series are as 
follows: Fiebrig's plants of Paraguay (465); Mrs. Ayer's plants of 
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin (78); Curtiss' plants of the Isle of Pines 
(308); Mrs. Chase's plants of Maryland, District of Columbia and 
Virginia (516); Ames' plants of Florida (418); and those of Britton, 
Small. Small and Carter. Small and Nash, and Small and Wilson (581) ; 
van Hermann's plants of Cuba (922); Broadway's plants of Granada 
(415); the Berea plants of Natal (99); Nash and Taylor's plants of 
Inagua (249); Britton and Brace's plants of New Providence (478); 
plants of the Bahamas, Britton and Millspaugh (1147) ; plants of the 
Forest of Arden, Illinois, Skeels, (414) ; the Mexican plants of Palmer 
(315); and Pringle (1,125); Johnson's plants of Margarita Island 
(176) ; Harris' later plants of Jamaica (169) ; Harper's last collection 
of Georgia (272); Groth's Texan plants (214); and the Gulf States 
plants of Tracey (406) . The substantial additions to the Herbarium 
distributed geographically are as follows: 

Alabama, 

Bahamas (in general), 

Abaco 

Cat Island, . 

Cave Cay 

Cay north of Wide Opening, 

Crooked Island, 

Eleuthera, . 

Exuma, 

Fortune Island, 

Frozen Cay, 

Galiot Cays, . 

Goat Cay 



Accessions. 


Total in 
Herb. 


402 


960 


21 


148 


I 


I 


117 


"7 


33 


33 


40 


40 


56 


56 


160 


160 


221 


221 


S3 


8S 


23 


23 


24 


24 


16 


16 



354 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Accessions. Total in Herb. 

Great Bahama, 401 401 

Guana Cay, 64 64 

Harbor Cays, 52 52 

Hog Island, 36 77 

Inagua 396 396 

Lignum Vitie Cay 31 31 

New Providence, 736 1,325 

Rose Island, 62 63 

Rum Cay, i i 

Ship Channel Cay 28 28 

Silver Cay, 17 17 

Sturrup Cay 31 31 

Watlings Island 31 31 

Whale Cay 27 27 

California. 16 8,312 

Canada 29 1,718 

Colorado. 77 4.321 

Cuba, 991 2,873 

Isle of Pines, 308 638 

District of Columbia 162 1,411 

Florida, 881 8,763 

Florida Keys, 323 595 

Georgia 272 1,256 

Granada 417 517 

Idaho 23 698 

Illinois, 557 14.242 

Indiana 35 3.°05 

Iowa, ' 4 784 

Jamaica, 157 2,731 

Louisiana 51 802 

Maryland 245 595 

Mexico 1.474 9.537 

Mississippi, 33^ 1,686 

Montana, 69 1.4 17 

Natal, 99 (>33 

Ohio 23 592 

Oregon 15 2.924 

Paraguay. 465 874 

Texas 713 2,709 

Virginia, 122 457 

Venezuela 

Margarita Island, 176 450 

Washington 62 2.500 

West Virginia. 20 1.136 

Wisconsin, 79 819 

Wyoming, 97 3o3 

Comparativelv few additions have been made to the collections 
of mammals, the total number of specimens acquired being 403 ; 



Oct.. iqo^. Annual Report of the Director. 



355 



of which 14 were purchased, 15 presented, and 374 collected in the 
field. 721 specimens of fish were obtained during the year; of which 
050 were received in exchange or presented. A large number of 
reptiles were added, and 373 specimens were added to the insect 
collection. Xo additions were made to the conchological collection 
during the year. There have been acquired upward of 2,500 bird 
skins; 228 complete or partial sets of eggs, and 34 nests; of which 
43 species of birds, 82 kinds of eggs and 21 examples of nests were 
new to the collection. The classification of accessions follows: 

Number of Number of 

Accessions. Specimens. 

Gifts, . 202 6,481 

Exchanges 63 5,948 

Collected 48 15.205 

Purchase, . ' q5 24.185 

Deposit I 6 

Collated, 2 824 

Transfers, 5 18 

Expeditions and Field Work. — For reasons already given, expedi- 
tions conducted liy the Department of Anthropology have been 
few in number. Mr. Alleyne Ireland, earlier in the year, concluded 
his expedition to Borneo and the neighboring islands. Dr. C. F. 
Xewcombe spent two months in securing special information re- 
quired by him in installing the Northwest Coast collections and pre- 
paring a report thereon. Dr. J. W. Hudson continued his in- 
vestigations in the Lower Klamath, begun early in the year, brought 
them to a close and returned to the Museum, where he has been 
engaged in preparing his collections for exhibition. The work of in- 
vestigation among the Arapaho has been continued, Mr. Cleaver 
Warden being in the field for five months. The Curator has tvv'ice 
visited the Pawnee in connection with his investigations for the Car- 
negie Institution of Washington. The joint expedition with the 
Bureau of Ethnology in charge of Mr. James Mooney among the 
Cheyenne and Kiowa was interrupted during a great part of the vear 
by the necessity of Mr. Mooney's presence in Washington. Mr. 
Mooney has recently returned to the field. The Curator of Botanv, 
in company with Dr. N. L. Britton, Director of the New York Botan- 
ical Garden, and Dr. M. A. Howe, Algologist of the garden, continued, 
in January last, their united, systematic exploration of the islands of 
the Bahamian Archipelago never before botanically visited. The 
party left New York on January igth, reaching Nassau, New Provi- 



3s6 Field Columbian MuseujM — Reports, Vol. II. 

dence, on the morning of the 22nd. Here, after working the neighbor- 
hood of Nassau until the 26th, they chartered and commissioned a 
38-ton schooner and made a trial run to Rose Island, returning to 
Nassau on the 28th. At 2:00 a. m. on the 29th the cruise began in a 
run northward along the Berry Islands to Great Bahama, exploring 
on the way: Whale Cay, Little Harbor Cay, Frozen Cay, Goat Cay, 
Lignum Vitse Cay and Great Harbor Cay, reaching Great Bahama 
Island on the third of February. Here, on account of the dangerous 
coast, the party went into camp at Eight Mile Rock, sending the 
vessel away to safe harbor to return on the qth. After five days' 
valuable collecting at this point the schooner returned and the party 
moved to Barnett's Point, and later to Golden Grove, leaving again 
for Nassau on the 14th. On the i6th, another start was made to the 
southward for the purpose of exploring the Exuma Chain from Ship 
Channel Cay to Great Exuma. Work was begun at Ship Channel 
Cay February 17th, and continued southward along the chain, visit- 
ing Shrouds Cay, Cave Cay, Little and Great Galiot Cays, the Cay 
north of Wide Opening and Great Guana Cay, reaching Exuma on the 
morning of the 23rd. Six days were spent on this interesting island, 
and Nassau reached, at the end of the reconnoissance, on March 3rd, 
where four days' further exploration was conducted while awaiting 
a return steamer to New York. This trip resulted in large collections 
of herbarium material, and a series of observations, especially in 
phytogeography and the mutation of species, of deep interest to 
botanical science. During April and May the Curator of Geology 
visited points in Arizona and southern California for the purpose of 
procuring specimens of minerals and ores not hitherto represented in 
the Museum collections. In Yuma County, Arizona, several im- 
portant mining districts were visited and full series of the ores and 
rocks there to be obtained were collected. Among these districts were 
those of Castle Dome, Picacho, La Paz, Middle Camp, Cinnabar, and 
Kofa. In the Plumosa Mountains of Arizona specimens of a remark- 
able and little known copper deposit were obtained, together with a 
number of volcanic rocks. From the Santa Maria Mountains of Cali- 
fornia were obtained specimens of new occurrences of iron ores, of 
garnet, and of marble, also several remarkable examples of rock 
weathering, polishing, and petrifaction. About two dozen geo- 
logical photographs, illustrating chiefly the history of the Colorado 
River, were also made. In San Diego, California, specimens of a new 
occurrence of large garnet crystals, also of zoisite, pink beryl, citrine 
quartz and precious tourmaline were obtained. Field work for the 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. LXIV. 



■.^' 






, >e 




Prospecting for Fossils in the Bad Lands of South Dakota. 
Museum Expedition of 1905. 



\ Oct.. 1905. Anntai. Report of the Director. 357 

' oUection of vertebrate fossils was continued during tour months of 
the summer by a party under the direction of Assistant Curator 
Riggs. It was deemed best to devote the time to the collection of 
lossil mammals rather than of reptiles as heretofore, since several im- 
portant groups of mammals remained as yet unrepresented in the 
collections, and the reptilian skeletons occupy so much space as to 
make their exhibition impracticable at present. The work of collect- 
ing was carried on for the most part in the White River beds of South 
Dakota. The results were highly gratifying, as regards both the 
quantity and quality of the material obtained. Remains of the 
water-deer, Leptomeryx, which are usually of rare occurrence, were 
found m abundance and enough material obtained to insure one or 
'uore complete skeletons, together with a slab about 10 by 4 feet in 

ize on which massed skulls and skeletons will appear in relief. Re- 
:iiains of the sabre-tooth cat, Dinictis, and the primitive horse. 
Mesohippus, were also obtained in sufficient quantity to insure a 
mounted skeleton of each. Of the American rhinoceros, Acerathe- 
rium, five skulls were obtained; of the cursocial rhinoceros, Hyraco- 
'lon,four heads and a partial skeleton; of the carnivores, Hyaenodon, 
Daphaenus, and Hoplophoneus, a number of good skulls; of the 
large suilline, Elotherium, three heads; of the gigantic Brontops 

>ne fine skull; of the rarer ungulates, Hyopotamus. Anthracothe- 
rium, and Protoceras, representative skulls; also a number of 
skulls of squirrels and other small mammals, and the only complete 
skull of a lizard known from this formation. The shipment from 
the field aggregated about four tons in weight. Several dozen 
photographs illustrative of the work of collecting and the geology 
of the region were also made by the expedition. The Chief Taxi- 
dermist and his assistants were in the field intermittently, investi- 
gating the Fox River region of Illinois, securing ornithological 
notes and material to be utilized later for group work. Messrs. 
Heller and Barber, having returned from southern Mexico, were 
dispatched during the early part of the year to Guatemala, where 
they were successful, taking many specimens for the systematic and 
study collections. Probably the most important expedition is the 
one dispatched to British East Africa under the direction of Chief 
Taxidermist Akeley . In the report on local field work by the Depart- 
ment of Ornithology, the Assistant Curator explains that in order 
to extend the study of local distribution of birds, longer and, conse- 
quently, fewer trips were made this year than previously. Inasmuch 
as the collection in this department is far more comjilete in eggs and 



3S8 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



skins than in an}' other branch of ornithology, very little of that sort 
of collecting was attempted. The series of alcoholic nestlings begun 
last year was considerably increased. A collection of skins of moult- 
ing birds, prepared so as to show the progress of moult from origin 
to finish, was begun. When complete, this series will be valuable and 
unique. Another collection, also begun this season, consists of 
viscera to be used for comparative purposes when the accumulation 
is large enough and, in connection with the collection of bones 
begun several years ago, to show correlation between structure and 
habits. The study of life histories was continued and a camera 
was used wherever it was possible. The following list indicates the 
various expeditions sent out during the year; 



Locality. 
North Pacific Coast, . 
Lower Klamath River, 
California, 
Wyoming. 
Bahamas, . 
South Dakota, 
Oklahoma, 
Fox River, Illinois, . 

Guatemala, 

Arizona and California, 

Illinois 

*Bermuda, 



Collector. 
C. F. Newcombe, 

J. W. Hudson, 
C. Warden, 
C. F. Millspaugh, 
E. S. Riggs, . 
Geo. A. Dorsey, . 
C. E. Akeley and Assist- 
ants, .... 
Edmund Heller and 
C. M. Barber, 
O. C. Farrington 
N. Dearborn, 
T. H. Bean, . 
1 Carl E. Akelev 



Material. 
Tsimshian Ethnology. 

Hupa Ethnology. 
Arapaho Ethnology. 
Herbarium Material. 
Vertebrate Fossils. 
Pawnee Ethnology. 

Ornithological Material. 



Mammals. 
Minerals and Ores. 
Ornithological Material. 
Fishes, Reptiles and Invertebrates. 



*British East Africa, 

Installation, Rear 



Vernon Shaw Kennedy, j- 
Edmund Heller, ' 



Mammals and Birds. 



RANGEMENT, AND PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. NeW CaSCS 



have been provided for the meteorite collection, occupying Hall 
62. Five of these are wall cases, both kinds of cases being 
similar in design, with a few modifications, to those of Skiff Hall. 
The wall cases are upright, with a pillared base and projecting 
bay. Their dimensions are: Length 12 feet, height 7 feet, depth of 
upper portion 10 inches. The sashes of the upright portions 
consist of single lights 38 x 68 inches in dimension, and are secured 
in place by locks and bolts. The bolts screw into nuts fitted into the 
framework of the case, thus obviating the loosening from wear which 
would result if they screwed into wood alone. The lower edges of 
the sashes are rounded to fit grooves in the framework of the case, 
*Expedition still in field. 



<)rT.. igo^. Anniai. Report of tiik ])iukctor. 



359 



thus permitting ease in swinging and removal of the sash without 
danger of marring. The cases are shelved, and the shelves are ad- 
justable as to number and height by supports fitting into a series of 
slots at either end. The sashes of the bays are i6 x 70 inches in 
dimension. They are swung by hinges and locked by bar locks. In 
order to prevent the entrance of dust all edges meeting with the frame- 
work are tongued or grooved to fit corresponding grooves or tongues 
in the framework, while felt stops are also provided along the grooves. 
The floor cases are four feet square and four feet six inches high above 
the base, which rests on heavy turned legs two feet high. The bases 
are constructed so as to be able to support if necessary a weight of 
at least one ton. Step pyramids within the cases corresponding in 
size to the sizes of the specimens afford means of installation. The 
iir floor cases are devoted to the exhibition of four meteorites. 
These are: Brenham, fifteen individuals and sections weighing 980 
I'uunds; Canon Diablo, twenty individuals and sections weighing 
1.51S pounds; Long Island, one individual weighing 1,161 pounds; 
and Toluca, twenty-four individuals and sections weighing 390 pounds. 
The remaining specimens of the collection are installed in the wall 

 ises just described, being grouped under the three classes of iron, 
■in-stone and stone meteorites, and arranged chronologicallv under 

 uh group. Each specimen is mounted on a bevelled black 
block of a corresponding size and has a label of black cardboard 
printed with aluminum ink. The case interiors are also black. 
Thus a uniform tone in the surroundings of the specimens is secured 
which throws them into greater prominence and enables them to be 

■en to better advantage. In the case-bays are exhibited chiefly 
ists illustrating forms of individual meteorites. The total number 
of meteoric falls now represented in the collection is 280, and the 
total weight 5,060 pounds. The specimens of native silver, Hall 63, 
which had been badly tarnished, were cleaned and placed in closed 
glass jars, thus enabling them to be exhibited without further danger 
of tarnish. Accessions to the mineral collection received during the 
year have also been installed in this hall in their proper places. In 
Hall 68, devoted to clays, sands and cements, a large number of 
specimens has been added, the clay collection alone having been 
increased to nearly three times its former size. This increase was 
largely due to material obtained from the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. The synoptic clays, as now exhibited, number 43 
specimens, the potter's clays 60 specimens, the fire clays 54 speci- 
mens, and the brick clays 147 specimens. These specimens are for 



360 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

the most part from distinct localities and include briquettes showing 
the qualities of the burned as well as of the raw product. Of mineral 
paints, ochres and fuller's earths, 71 specimens are shown. A series 
illustrating the manufacture of glass has been installed, together with 
glass sands from various localities. Other uses of sand, such as for 
molding, refractory purposes, grinding, etc., are illustrated by a 
collection numbering 61 specimens. The soil collection has also been 
considerably increased, there being now shown 53 specimens of soils 
and subsoils arranged according to the nomenclature of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and 63 specimens of soils as they 
are more commonly known. In addition a collection of 34 speci- 
mens illustrates the origin of soils and their physical and chemical 
characters. In Hall 78, devoted to salts, abrasives, etc., a large 
increase in material, due in part to accessions from the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition, has compelled a general rearrangement and re- 
installation. . The collection of abrasives. has been increased so that 
it now fills three cases instead of one as heretofore. The new material 
added is chiefly corundums, quartzes, infusorial earths, novaculites 
and whetstones. An entire case of barites, or heavy spar, from 
different localities, is now shown. To the salt collection specimens 
illustrating 17 localities or products, chiefly from Egypt and Peru, 
have been added. A large chart presented by the Solvay Company 
illustrating the use of soda has been framed and placed in the hall. 
In Hall 70, devoted to forms of carbon, a number of German peats 
and their products obtained from the Louisiana Purchase Exposi- 
tion, have been added to the peat collection, also specimens of the 
Alaskan, tundra. To the diamond collection have been added eleven 
specimens illustrating varieties of the diamond gravels of Brazil. 
The graphite collections in the same hall have also been rearranged 
and reclassified and are now large and complete. The labels of 
the series of oil sands. Hall 71, numbering 64 specimens, which 
were mounted in bottles so as to be capable of being turned about 
for examination, had suffered much injury owing to constant 
handling. New labels were accordingly provided and coated with 
varnish to prevent further wear. Two cases of kerosenes were dis- 
carded from the hall, as they duplicated other specimens. By 
removal of these cases and a rearrangement of those remaining, about 
300 square feet of much needed storage space was obtained at the 
south end of the hall. This was partitioned off and connected with 
the paleontological laboratory. In Hall S9. devoted to Mesozoic 
fossils, the large and complete Plesiosaur girdle and paddle, col- 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 361 

lected by the paleontological expedition of 1904, has been installed, 
also a large carapace, two feet four inches in length, of a Cretaceous 
turtle, and numerous bones of Triceratops collected by the same 
expedition. Space for the installation of these specimens was ob- 
lined by the reinstallation of three cases which had previously been 

ii'voted chietly to invertebrate fossils. The result has been to im- 
;rove the appearance and sequence of the collections as a whole. 
The life-size model of the skeleton of Dinoceras, Hall 61, which had 
become much discolored and badly cracked, has been thoroughly 
refilled and repainted so as to be now in excellent condition. In the 
paleontological laboratory attention has been devoted chiefly to 
cleaning and mounting the large amount of Triceratops material 
collected in Montana in 1904. Of the three skulls collected one has 
been fully worked out and mounted for exhibition. This skull is 
one of the largest and finest of this extraordinary reptile ever found, 
and possesses features new to science. The length of the skull 

- six feet, six inches, its width at the frill four feet, four inches, 
and its height, including horns, three feet, six inches. The following 
portions of the skeleton of the same individual have also been pre- 
pared for exhibition: Right scapula and coracoid, left scapula, right 
and left humerus, right and left ulna, right ilium, right and left pubis 
and seven caudal vertebrte. Another skull of Triceratops has been 
partially worked out. Remains of a large Cretaceous turtle and 
some Plesiosaur remains collected bv the same expedition have also 
been worked out. The collection of Silurian and Devonian inverte- 
brate fossils made in western New York by Mr. Slocom in 1904 and 
numbering over 11,000 specimens, has been carefullv classified, 
cleaned and identified, affording representatives of nearlv 300 species, 
for the most part new to the collections. The rock cutting and 
grinding machine, which has hitherto been worked bv foot power 
only, has been connected with the water motor and a mechanical 
abrasive and water feed provided. A series of laps suitable for the 
various stages of grinding and polishing has also been provided. By 
the use of this apparatus a large number of rock and mineral speci- 
mens have been polished in the laboratory at a slight cost, improving 
their appearance and exhibition value. The relief map of Mt. Shasta, 
Hall 76, which had begun to scale badly, was treated to secure a firm 
adherence of the outer coating and the whole surface repainted. In 
Hall 77 a framed geological map of Illinois has been installed. The 
large and monotonously duplicated series of tobaccos and cottons 
that has, from the opening of the Museum, filled the North Court 



362 Field Columbian- Museum — Reports. Vol. II. 

galleries, has been removed to storage and its place filled with a 
complete series of 41 new wall cases and 4 new floor cases, in which 
the systematic installation, representing Economic Botany, begun 
upon the transept galleries, will be continued in greatly expanded 
form. The plan for installing these cases embodies the intercalation 
of the cases already installed with the new ones, and the installation 
of 8 new cases with products of the Grass family; i of the Sedge 
family ; 7 of the Palm family ; i of the Pineapple family ; i of the 
Lily family ; i of the Banana family ; %. of the Orchid and K of the 
Ginger family ; i of the Willow family ; yi. of the Walnut and % of the 
Birch family ; i of the Oak family ; i of the Laurel family ; ^ of the 
Poppy and y^ of the Mustard family ; i of the Rose family ; 2 of the 
Bean family; i of the Olive family; >^ of the Cactus and y^ of the 
Parsley family ; yi of the Milkweed and V2 of the Milkwort families ; 
I of the Chocolate family ; i of the Mint family ; 2 of the Nightshade 
family ; i of the Daisy family ; and several of the families including 
the Fungi. Mosses, Seaweeds, Lichens, etc. As an adjunct to the 
work of the department and the reconstruction of the north court 
galleries, the north gallery has been partly enclosed in such manner 
as to form a well lighted study 12 x 20 feet, and an installing and 
storage room 12 x6s feet, without in any way interfering with the 
disposition of the collections or the free movement and comfort of 
the public. These changes have converted the north court galleries 
into an harmonious uniformity of arrangement that must invite and 
enhance public interest in the collections, and broaden its knowledge 
of the sources of economic wealth in the vegetable kingdom. The 
heretofore crowded Herbarium quarters have been remodeled and 
enlarged to a capacity sufficient for about five years of normal growth, 
by throwing the three rooms into one, through the removal of old 
plaster partitions, and the building of an extension 16 x 28 feet 
south of and adjoining the west room. This yields well lighted and 
thoroughh' ventilated rooms for the Assistant Curator ; accommoda- 
tions for the Herbarium Recorder and his catalogue and record books ; 
a consecutive arrangement for the herbarium itself; and a well 
lighted and equipped mounting, storage and distributing room for 
the Herbarium Preparators. The case equipment of the herbarium 
has been augmented by the installation of four blocks (of eight cases 
each) of steel construction. These new steel cases appear, at present. 
to be the acme of herbarium case construction, being of neat appear- 
ance, in part, at least, fire proof and air tight; and having a solidity 
and evident permanency that is highly gratifying. All danger of 



Oct., igoq. Anni'al Report ov the Director. 363 

\v;ir|)ing, cracking open, or having tlie doors become too loose or too 
tight is at once avoided, while the ability to poison or insectifuge the 
contents without removal from the cases, gives a feeling of securitv 
not possible in those of any other constructive material. The gain 
in content space (due to less quantity of material utilized) proves to 
'10 about 32 five-inch ]jigeon-holes over a like size block of wooden 

uses. The Curator's design of these cases, based upon those already 
mstalled in the only other herbarium having adopted the steel cases, 
gives evidence of the following improvements: the shelf flanges 
are turned up instead of down and flush riveted instead of bolted, 
thus avoiding all chance of the genus covers becoming difficult to 
insert by engaging the flanges or the bolt heads; the allowance of a 
2-inch space between the faces of the shelves and the inside faces of 
the doors, thus yielding free circulation and shelf-label space; the 
use of straps of steel at the back of the pigeon-holes as stops for the 
contents, and leaving a 2-inch space between these stops and those 
of the pigeon-holes of the case immediately in the rear, thus allowing 
further circulation of air or ]:oison fumes; and at the Ijottom of each 
case, the installation of an enameled steel trough in which may be 
placed carbon-disulphide or a generous quantity of naphthaline or 
other insectifuge without interfering with the contents of the pigeon- 
holes; the afhxion of a label-holder of generous size to the face of each 
case in which an indication of the contents may be placed ; and the 
use of paper board slides and drops which automatically convert 
each pigeon-hole into an easily operated drawer, thus doing away 
entirely with the breakage of mounted plants through frequent grasp- 
ing of the fascicles for removal. With these additional cases, em- 
bracing 1,008 5-inch pigeon-holes, the capacity of the herbarium is 
now 3,276 pigeon-holes, capable of containing in the neighborhood of 
300,000 mounted sheets. In these the collections have been com- 
pletely shifted and rearranged in a consecutive, systematic order, 
and at the same time the pigeon-hole contents have been severally 
" opened up " to allow of the introduction of inserrendce for a period 
"f at least three years of normal growth. The enormous increase of 
the Northwest Coast ethnological collections made it imperative that 
this material should be reclassified, rearranged and installed. This 
has been undertaken, and three halls have been opened to the public, 

(.:..• those containing the Tlingit and Haida collections. Two other 
rooms are now being installed; one will contain the Kwakiutl and 
the other the Salish collections. A regrouping and reinstallation of 
the California material also became imperative. Fortunately the 



364 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

transfer of the lecture courses to the Art Institute made available 
a splendid hall for this purpose, equal in size to four ordinary halls. 
Into this the California collections have been installed in forty-eight 
cases, and thus it becomes one of the notable exhibition halls of the 
Museum — notable, indeed, when it is remembered that six years 
ago the entire California collections were contained in a single case. 
The old hall formerly occupied by the California collections became 
available for the Haida collections. Hall No. 6 has been thrown 
open to the public during the year, and cases have been requisitioned 
for Hall No. 7. Considerable work has been done during the year in 
Osteology, and while no additions have been made to the series of 
skeletons, much has been done in other portions of the collection. 
All of the skeletons have been thoroughly cleaned and the standards 
and bases painted, and all defects in mounting or old workmanship 
were corrected and repaired. The disarticulated skeletons were also 
cleaned and arranged in cases under glass. A number of skeletons 
and skulls that have been cleaned and macerated cannot be mounted 
and placed on exhibition for lack of a degreasing plant. The Curator 
decided that it would be advisable to form a new section in Osteology, 
that of Craniology, and to carry out this idea, the various skulls not 
belonging to any skeleton have been systematically arranged in 
Room 25. Seventy-six skulls were especially prepared for this ex- 
hibit and a considerable number are awaiting stands. It occurred 
to the Curator, that, as the classificat jn of mammals is determined 
in a great degree upon the teeth, their shape and construction, it 
would be instructive to have a number of skulls prepared to show 
the formation, situation and method of growth of the teeth, and 
four have been placed on exhibition, viz.: a bear, a beaver, a horse, 
and a walrus, representing the Orders of the Carnivora. Rodentia, 
Ungulata, and Pinnipedia. Others will be added as rapidly as 
opportunities offer, and, as this feature of Craniology is rather unique 
as well as novel and useful, it is hoped it may be carried out in the 
future and extended until not only the Orders, but also Families, and 
sometimes species, may be illustrated by this method. Three hun- 
dred and seven skulls belonging to specimens received have been 
cleaned and arranged in drawers. The Coral Room is nearly in 
complete order, and the collection has been rearranged and new labels 
provided, so that nothing detracts the attention from the specimens 
themselves ; and the general construction of the cases and the method 
of installation challenges the admiration of the visitor, be he layman 
or scientist, and has received from all quarters unstinted praise. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 



365 



Photography and Illustration. — The following table indicates the 
work performed in this important division: 

Negatives. Prints. Lantern Slides. 

49 



Anthropology, . 






"■I 


Botanv. 






2 


Geology. 






131 


Ornithology, 






46 


Zoology, 






40 


Distribution, ... 




Totals 


1. 018 



8,313 

400 

475 

91 

278 

41 

9,647 



580 

3 
61 

179 

12 

200 



1,03s 



Negatives made in the field by Curators of Departments and 
developed by the Division of Photography: 

Anthropology, " 270 

Botany, 168 

Geology, 235 

Zoology, 12 



68s 

Printing. — The number of labels, forms and other impressions 
turned out by the printer is shown in the following table: 



Anthropology, 

Botany, 

Geolog)', 

ZoOlogj', 

Director's Office, 

Library, 



Labels. 


Ot? 


er Impressions. 


889 




12,050 


236 




11.335 


4,31s 




3,721 


725 




3,500 


'SI 




68,641 
2,500 



In addition, 50 copies of a Special Report to the Board of Trustees 
(42 pages) has been set and printed. 

Taxidermy. — The Taxidermist (until his departure for British 
East Africa) and his assistants have been chiefly engaged on experi- 
mental ideas for new installations. Several large specimens have 
been mounted, however, for the systematic collection, and approxi- 
mately 400 skins prepared for the cabinet series. 

Attendance. — The total attendance record for the year is 
207,867, being a decrease of over 37,000 below last year's figures. 
No special reason can be given for this deficiency. The decrease in 
the attendance of school children is also to be noted, and this may 
be accounted for by the fact that the principals of the schools are not 
aware of. the privileges which are accorded by the Museum to their 



366 



Field Colu.mbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



pupils. The average daily attendance, from the point of figures, 
must be considered satisfactory, as few European museums boast 
of an average daily attendance of over five hundred. It is reason- 
able to suppose that if the Museum were located more conve- 
niently, a large increase in admissions would be realized. Ap- 
pended is a list of classes, thirty or more, that visited the Museum 
during the year just closed. A comparison between the daily attend- 
ance for the year ending September 30, 1904, and the year ending 
September 30, 1905, is also given. 



and 



LIST OF CLASSES. 
Schools and Location. 
Geo. W. Curtis — One Hundred and Fourteenth pi 

State St 

St. Xavier Academy — 4928 Evans ave., .... 
Kershaw — Union ave. and West Sixty-fourth st., . 
Moody Bible Institute — 80 Institute pi., .... 
St. Xavier Acadein}' — 4928 Evans ave., 
Kershaw — Union ave. and West Sixty-fourth St., . 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
McCosh — Champlain ave. and Sixty-sixth st., . 
Mark Sheridan — Wallace and Twenty-seventh sts.. 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave.. 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Schneider (George) — North Hoyne ave. and Wellington st. 
A. A. Libby — West Fifty-third and Loomis sts., 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave.. 
School of Education — LTniversity of Chicago, Chicago, 111 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
Chicago .Home for Friendless — 5059 Vincennes ave., 

Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts. 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
John Marshall — West Adams st. and Kedzie ave., 

Valparaiso College — Valparaiso, Indiana 

Valparaiso College — Valparaiso, Indiana 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
W. H. Ray — Fifty-seventh st. and Monroe ave.. 
Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth St.. . 
Washburne — West Fourteenth and Union sts.. 
Auburn Park — Normal ave. and West Eightieth St., 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth St., between Prairie and 

Forest aves 

Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., 

Jonea — Plymouth Court and Harrison st 

Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., 



Teachers. 


Pupils. 


I 


47 


2 


35 


I 


45 


I 


61 


2 


43 


I 


33 


I 


30 


I 


64 


2 


37 


I 


49 


2 


70 


I 


53 


2 


37 





45 


2 


63 


4 


38 


2 


46 


I 


39 


I 


34 


4 


63 


I 


41 


5 


200 


— 


1 10 


3 


64 




36 




44 




30 




55 




32 




39 




32 




39 




37 




38 



Oct.. 



1905- 



Annual Report of the Director. 



367 



Schools and Location. 
Baptist Missionary Training — 241 1 Indiana ave., . 
Washbume — West Fourteenth and Union sts.. 
Kershaw — Union ave. and West Sixty-fourth st., . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
Washbume — West Fourteenth and Union sts., 

Hammond — Hammond. Indiana 

Cooper — 625 West Nineteenth st 

J. N. Thorp — Superior ave. and Eighty-ninth st., 

Hammond — Hammond. Indiana 

Seward — West Forty-sixth st. and South Hermitage ave. 
Moseley — Twenty-fourth st. and Michigan ave.. 

Foster — South Union ave. and O'Brien st 

Englewood High — West Sixty-second st. and Stewart ave 
W. K. Sullivan — Eighty-third St. and Houston ave., . 
W, K. Sullivan — Eighty-third st. and Houston ave., 
D. R. Cameron — Potomac and Monticello aves., 
Chicago Lawn — West Sixty-second pi. and Hamlin ave., 
"lylor — Avenue J. and Ninety-ninth St.. .... 

iver Goldsmith — 210 Maxwell St., 

A. L. Barnard — W. One Hundred and Fourth and Charles 
Chicago Home for Friendless — - 5050 Vincennes ave., . 

St. Patrick's — Desplaines and Adams sts 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Pullman — Pullman ave. and One Hundred and Thirteenth st 

School of Education — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, 

All Saints' Academy — Watertown, Wisconsin, . 

W. H. Ray — Fifty-seventh st. and Monroe ave., 

Tilton — West Lake st. and Forty-fourth ave., . 

Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts., 

McCosh — Champlain ave. and Sixty-sixth St., . 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark 

Jones — Plymouth Court and Harrison St., . 

Washburne — West Fourteenth and Union sts., 

Washbume — West Fourteenth and Union sts., 

Mark Sheridan — • Wallace and Twenty-seventh sts., 

Forestville — St. Lawrence ave. and Forty-seventh st 

J X Thorp — Superior ave. and Eighty-ninth st., . 



sts 



Teachers. Pupils. 

— 3» 

 97 

4 154 

3 66 

2 67 

3 I" 
2 67 

43 
59 
34 
38 
34 
81 

59 
66 

38 
71 
62 



125 

I 



33 
36 
32 
115 
loi 
61 
38 
43 

38 
36 
52 
32 
34 
33 
32 
80 
38 
42 

lOI 



Comparative attendance for the years ending September 30, 1904, 
iiid September 30. 1005. 



Total Attendance 

Paid Attendance 

Attendance of School Children on Pay Days, 

.\ttendance of Students 

.\t tendance of Teachers 



Increase. 



10 



Decrease. 

37.258 
3.382 

1.75° 



368 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



Increase. Decrease. 

Attendance of Members . 47 

Average Daily Attendance. 1904 669 

Average Daily Attendance. 1905, 569 

Herewith are submitted financial statements, analysis of attend- 
ance, list of accessions, names of members, etc., etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF, 

Director. 



I 



;■; 



Oct., 1905. AnnVal Report of the Director. 369 



Financial Statement. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
During the Year Ending September 30, 1905. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, September 30, 1904, $ 14,350.39 

Petty Cash on hand, September 30, 1904 739-95 

Dues of Members — 

Corporate, S 135.00 

Annual 2,250.00 2,385,00 

Admissions and Check Rooms, 

Sale of Guides 

South Park Commissioners 

' hicago City Railway Company 

Interest on Investments, 

Huntington W . Jackson Library Fund, .... 

Final Di\idend on World's Columbian Exposition 
Stock 

Sale of Securities, 

Sundry Receipts, 



Disbursements. 

Salaries 

Guard Service, 

Janitor Service, 

Fire Protection, 

Heat and Light — 

Wages $3,420.00 

Fuel and Supplies 3.875.53 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, . 10,052.04 

Material used — paints, oils, lumber, glass, 

etc 1.987.94 12,039.98 

~^pecial Exterior Repairs 5,432.71 



5 


,048 


.20 




272 


■75 


15 


,000 


.00 


2 


,2SO 


.00 


48 


,014 


.96 




40 


.00 




141 


■97 


13° 


,000 


.00 




901, 


.27 


S219 


,144.49 


$ 63, 


,827. 


57 


11^ 


,869, 


19 


6, 


,768. 


,16 


3- 


,291. 


00 


9. 


295- 


53 



Carried forward 8112,524.14 



370 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Brought forward $112,524.14 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases, g, 808. 68 

Sundries 1,140.23 10,948.91 

The Library —  

Books and Periodicals 1,397.21 

Binding, 407.20 

Sundries 114.02 1,918.43 

Sections of Printing and Photography, .... 1,656.98 

Collections Purchased, So.397-ii 

Departmental Expenses 8,394.90 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage, and Teaming, . . 2,463.71 
Stationery, Postage, Telephone, etc., . . 1,138.09 

Expeditions 11,344.79 

Publications, .' 5.655-53 

Sundries 2,025.20 22,627.32 



$208,467.79 
In Treasurer's hands, September 30, 1905, . . . 9.936-75 
Petty Cash on hand, 739-95 10,676.70 



I 



1)219,144.49 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 371 



ATTENDANCE .AND RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR E\D1N(^. SEPT. 30, 1905. 



Attend.\nce. 
Paid Attendance — 

Adults 16,579 

Children 985 17.564 



Free Admission on Pay Days — 

School Children 4,435 

Students 2,915 

Teachers, 502 

Members, 149 

Special, 282 8,283 

Admission on Free Days — 

Saturday, 40,339 

Sunday, 141,681 182,020 



Total Attendance 207,867 

Highest Attendance on any day (August 20, 1905), 6,424 

Highest Paid Attendance on any day (July 4, 1905), 381 

Average Daily Admission (365 days) 569 

Average Paid Admission (260 days) 67 

Receipts. 

Guides sold — 1,091 at 25 cents each $272.75 

Articles checked — 16,099 *' 5 cents each, .... 804.95 

.\dmissions 4,243.25 

$5,320-95 



372 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



Accessions. 

From October i, 1904, to September 30, 1905. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Ethnological specimens from Hudson Bay Eskimo (exchange). 

6 Siberian busts (exchange). 

Plaster casts of busts of natives at Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 
AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Cap worn by Enrique Daguhob, chief of the Samar Pulajanes — - 
Samar, P. I. 

BHUMGARA & CO., F. P., Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 
24 bronze objects — Asia. 

BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND ART, Brooklyn, N. Y 
Navaho skulls — Arizona (exchange). 

Navaho skulls and skeletons — Chin Lee Valley, N. M. (exchange). 
DORSEY, GEO. A., Chicago. 

3 Aymara blankets — Le Paz. Bolivia. 
ELLIOT, D. G., Chicago. 
I Eskimo pouch. 
EMMONS, LIEUT. G. T., Princeton, N. J. 

I old buckskin dress, Wasco — - Columbia River, Oregon (exchange) . 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by J. W. Hudson: 

Ethnological specimens from Klamath River and Kern and Inyo 
Counties, California. 
Collected by Alleyne Ireland: 

Ethnological specimens from Borneo and Java. 
Burmese photographs, Sarawak photographs. 
Collected by James Mooney: 

Cheyenne skin tipi, poles and furnishings — Oklahoma. 
Collected by Dr. C. F. Newcombe: 

7 house posts from Clyoquot, Vancouver Island. 
Collected by S. C. Simms: 

Ethnological material from Kwakiutl and Clyoquot Indians at St. 

Louis Exposition. 
House timbers from Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo 
Collected by Cleaver Warden: 

Ethnological specimens — Northern Arapaho, Wyoming. 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS. PL. LXVI. 




Partial View. 
Steel Herbarium Cases 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 373 

Purchases: 

I gold necklace. 3 bronze vessels, i glass bowl — Egj-pt. 
Ethnological specimens from Igorote, Moro, Bontoc, etc. — Phil- 
ippines. 
Cheyenne specimens — Oklahoma. 
Iroquois specimens — Ontario. 
Ethnological specimens — Hupa, California. 
Philippine photographs. 

Ethnological collection from the Pigmy tribes of Central Africa. 
Skulls from Chickasawaba Mound, Mississippi Co., Arkansas. 
Archaeological specimens from Argentine and Peru. 
I Apache medicine man's ceremonial effig\\ 

1 quiver. 40 arrows and bow — Ft. Apache. X. M. 

2 car%-ed Haida house timbers — Alaska. 

Costumes, household utensils, weapons, ceremonial objects, etc., 

from the Ainu. 
Reproduction of Pompeian stove. 
Ethnological collection from German East Africa. 
Soudanese ethnological specimens. 
Eg^-ptological specimens. 
Ethnological collection from Ceyloiu 
Ethnological collection from Thibet and East India. 
Ethnological specimens from Siam. 

Feather robes and other ethnological specimens — Xew Zealand. 
I Chippewa bag. 

Cheyenne bow and arrows — Oklahoma. 
.\rchaological specimens from Missouri. 
-•Vrchsological specimens of Cliff Dwellers. 
Archaeological collection — Columbia County, Ga. 
Plaster casts of faces of natives of German East Africa. 
I sacred bundle and contents — Pawnee. Oklahoma. 
I o specimens Arapaho and Cheyenne ethnology — Oklahoma. 
Photographs of Mexican Indians. 
Tlingit ivon.' car\-ings from Alaska. 
I Santa Inez Indian basket — California. 
I cotton shirt red embroidery of Mazateca Indian woman — Rio 

Tonto, Oaxaca. 

I Hopi woman's dress — Arizona. 

I I Blackfoot skulls — Piegan Reser%-e. 

I Blackfoot medicine flag, i man's shirt, i war bonnet, i boy's shirt, 
I boy's leggings — Piegan Reser^'e. 

Ethnological specimens from Togo-Hinterland — Togo. Africa. 

Thompson and Frazer River baskets, Coconino baskets. Xavaho 
baskets, Chemehuevi baskets, Apache (White Mountain) baskets, 
mbcellaneous specimens, buffalo robes, medicine shields, Wasco 
collection. 

I Steatite pipe — Murphy, X. C. 

.Archaeological collection from Mexico and Xew Mexico, ethnological 
collection from Mexico and Iroquois, Cherokee, Coahuila, Tonka- 
way. Sauk and Fox Indians, Mexican and Pueblo busts. 



I 



374 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Purchases : 

Prehistoric skulls — Mexico. 
Ethnological specimens from Alaska. 

5 Nez Perce bags, 2 Salish baskets, 3 Makah dolls. 
8 Blackfoot skulls — Blood Reserve. 

2 Steatite pipes, i Steatite bowl, 10 spear points. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. D., Chicago. 

I artificially shrunk human head Jiveros Indian — Ecuador, S. A. 
JAMES, S. L. (Estate), Chicago. 

Egyptian pottery and stone sarcophagi from Egypt. 
MARATTA, H. G., Chicago. 

50 small sandstone carv'ings. 
PRAEGER, WM. E., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

8 stone celts, 59 flint knives, etc. — Ireland. • 

SCHUPP, P., Bowmanville, 111. 

6 fragmentarv skeletons — Budlong Farm. 
SEELEY, GEO. E., Chicago. 

28 photographs and prints of Irish archaeological objects and Moaris. 
SIAMESE COMMISSION', Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

Models of carts, boats, and other modes of transportation — Siam. 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

Haida carved house pole — Queen Charlotte Island (exchange). 

Model of ruins of Mitla (exchange). 
VAN SCHAACK, PETER, Chicago. 

Material from tombs of Egypt. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AMES BOTANICAL LABORATORY, North Easton, Mass. 

418 herbarium specimens — Florida (exchange). 
AYER, MRS. EDWARD E., Lake Geneva, Wis. 

78 herbarium specimens — Lake Geneva, Wis. 
BEAN, TARLETON H., St. Louis, Mo. 

I section of bark Sequoia sempervirens. 
BELKNAP, FRANKLIN, Chicago Lawn, 111. 

7 herbarium specimens — Colorado. 
BRITISH SOUTH AFRICAN CO., London. England. 

13 Rhodesia products — South Africa. 
BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

47 Bulgarian products. 
CALIFORNIA STATE COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

27 California products. 
CANDOLLE, C. DE, Geneva, Switzerland. 

I drawing from t3-pe of Wedelta hispida. 
CEYLON GOVERNMENT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

65 Ceylon products. 



Oct., 1905. Annl^al Report of the Director. 375 

CHASE. MRS. AGNES, Washington, D. C. 

520 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

I herbarium specimen — Indiana. 
DEPARTMEXT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, Field Columbian Museum. 

6 specimens basket material, Scirpus lacustris (transfer). 
DEPARTMEXT OF GEOLOGY. Field Columbian Museum. 

I specimen diatomaceous earth — San Luis. California (transfer). 
DIAS, C. E. A.. Colombo, Ceylon. 

I sample king coconut oil. 
DONNE, T. E , Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

20 Xew Zealand products. 

14 New Zealand products. 
DON PAUL, K., Colombo, Ceylon. 

3 specimens coco wine, arrack and vinegar. 
DRIEBERG, C, Ceylon Commission, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis. Mo. 

282 specimens medicinal plants — Ceylon. 
EAGAN, D. H., Dover, Mo. 

1 specimen cob pipe com — Missouri. 

EGYPTIAN GOVERNMENT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 
' 131 specimens products — Eg\-pt. 

EHMANN OLIVE CO., Oroville, California. 

6 specimens ripe olives, refined olive oil, crude olive oil, olive oil emul- 
sion, crushed olives and olive branch. 
ELIOT, R. HUYSHE, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

105 samples Cevlon tea. 
EMRICK, DR. G. M.. Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
EXGIXEER TOLKSDORF, Berlin, Germany. 

I specimen peat vinevard torch — Germanv. 
ESTACIOX AGRONOMICA DE CUBA, Santiago,' Cuba. 
,1 66 herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 

H FERNANDO, T. R., Colombo, Ceylon. 

33 specimens currv powder ingredients. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

S03 herbarium specimens — Bahama Islands and Grand Cayman.W. I. 
Collected by C. F. .Millspaugh: 

1 147 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 

Purchases: 

I grass root fan — East India 

186 herbarium specimens — Paraguay. 

279 herbarium specimens — Paraguay. 

3 specimens vanilla. 

5 specimens of drugs. 

308 herbarium specimens — Isle of Pines, Cuba. 

80 specimens fibers and ropes — Ceylon. 

I Sinhalese book — Ceylon. 

I bundle licorice root — Spain. 



376 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

Purchases: 

21 series Sinhalese tans and starches — Ceylon. 

55 coconut products — Ceylon. 

114 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. 

6 economic specimens — Bahamas. 

70 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. 

49 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. , 

315 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

65 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. 

I specimen sea weed, Rhodymenia palmata — Bay of Fundy. 

42 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. 

272 herbarium specimens — Georgia. 

1 1 27 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

406 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

75 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. I. 

FIELD. MARSHALL, & CO., Chicago 

I specimen Gossypium herbaceum bolls — Little Rock, Ark. 
FILCHER, COL. J. A., Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

I cane made of bark of Sequoia seinpervirens — California. 
FORMOSA, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

5 specimens fibers — Formosa. 

104 specimens Formosa products. 
GATES, F., Lake View, 111. 

I herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
GOONESEKERE, E., Wilimbula Fiber Mills, Ceylon 

I I specimens ropes, fibers and braids — : Ceylon. 
GOVERNMENT OF SIAM. Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

i6 specimens bark, leaves and implements for paper making — 

Siam. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

I herbarium specimen — Colorado. 

202 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 
GREENMAN. J. M., Chicago. 

213 herbarium specimens — Texas. 
HAITI COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

1 specimen native chocolate — Haiti. 

2 specimens Haiti tobacco and cigars. 
HELLER, E. & C. M. BARBER, Chicago. 

3 1 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
HILL, E. J., Englewood, 111. 

19 specimens mosses — Illinois and Indiana. 
IMPERIAL GERMAN COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

2 specimens beet seed. Beta vulgaris — Germany. 
INSTITUTE BETHEL, Friestadt, Germany. 

I specimen peat for hospital bed — Germany. 
ITALIAN GOVERNMENT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

197 specimens grains and seeds — Italy. 



Oct., 1905. An-\ual Report of the Director. 377 

JAPANESE GOVERXMEXT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition. St. Louis, Mo. 

67 specimens Japan products. 
JOHNSTOX. W. M.. Chicago. 

2 specimens lichens — Nome City. Alaska. 
KURO^YSKI. MRS. A., Chicago. 

1 specimen Japanese candy. 

LOUISIAXA STATE COMMISSIOX, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis. Mo. 
6 specimens bagasse paper — Louisiana. 
-MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

3 species seeds. 

3 species berries and nuts. 

4 economic specimens. 

2 species artichokes and turnips. 

4 herbarivun specimens — Yucatan. 

I species nuts. Mauritia fiexuosa — Brazil. 

19 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 

MISSOURI STATE COMMISSIOX, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis. Mo. 

14 specimens Missouri ear com. 
XATAL BOTAXIC GARDEXS. Berea, Xatal. 

99 herbarivmi specimens — South Africa (exchange). 
XEAPE. FRAXK, Fresno, California. 

I specimen raisin cluster — • CaUfomia. 
XEWCOMBE. C. F.. Victoria, B. C. 

I herbarium specimen. Eltragnus argentea — British Columbia 

1 specimen plumed grass, Phragmites phragmites — British Colum- 

bia. 
NEW YORK BOTAXICAL GARDEX, Bronx Park, Xew York City. 
59 herbarium specimens — Colorado (exchange). 
1 409 herbarium specimens — Bahamas (exchange) . 
169 herbarium specimens — South Florida, Cuba, Bahamas and 

Jamaica (exchange). 
2 1 herbarium specimens — various localities (collated) . 

2 specimens Zea mays — Peru (exchange). 

9 economic specimens — Florida and Bolivia (exchange). 
94 specimens algae — various localities (exchange). 
OHIO STATE UXIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 

20 specimens fungi — Ohio (exchange). 

OMORI BRAID MAXFG. ASSOCIATIOX, Tokyo, Japan. 

23 specimens Japanese chip wood and chips. 
PALMER, DR. EDWARD. Washington, D. C. 

4 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
PAREIRA & JARDIX. Lisbon. Portugal. 

49 specimens medicinal plants — Portugal. 
PEAT FACTORY. Heidekrug, Germany. 

16 specimens peat and peat products — Germany. 
PORTUGAL GOVERXMEXT, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

68 specimens products — Portugal and Portuguese Africa. 



378 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

ROUFFET & CASTLEBON, Bayonne, France. 

24 specimens turpentine products, log and tools — Portugal. 
SHINKIU-GUMI, Kobe, Japan. 

4 specimens wood chips, cord, cordage and chip basket, Thujopsis 
dolahrata — Japan. 
SHIPKOFF & COMPANY. New York City. 

I ounce otto of roses. 
SHOTTER & CO., S. P., Savannah, Georgia. 

3 specimens turpentine products — Georgia. 
SILVA TELLES & CO., Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

7 specimens fiber, yarn, rope and matting, Urena lobata, " Aramina " 
— Brazil. 
SIMPSON, J. H., Braidentown, Florida. 

1 herbarium specimen — Florida. 
SKEELS, H. C, Joliet, 111. 

414 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
STATE OF VIRGINIA, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

2 specimens peanuts — Spanish and Virginia. 
STRENGE, OTTM., EHzabahfehn, Germany. 

6 specimens grass peat — Germany. 
SWAMPILLAL M. B., Colombo, Ceylon. 

2 specimens Jaffna tobacco and cigars. 
TARRANT & COMPANY, Colombo, Ceylon. 

12 specimens green tea. 
TORIKAI, H., Kanagawaken, Japan. 

I specimen hat braid, Populus suaveolens — Japan. 
UMBACH, PROF. L. M., Naperville, 111. 

132 specimens mosses — various localities (exchange) . 

1 herbarium specimen. Lamarckia aurea — California (exchange). 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 

216 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 
U, S. NATIONAL HERBARIUM, Washington, D. C. 

729 herbarium specimens — North America and Europe (exchange). 
URBAN, I.. Berlin, Germany. 

2 herbarium specimens — Antilles and Martinique. 
VAN HERMANN, H. A., Santiago de Los Vegas, Cuba. 

950 herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 
WHALER PROGRESS EXHIBIT, World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago. 

46 specimens fruits found floating at sea. 
WILSON, PERCY. Bronx Park, Ne%\- York City. 

3 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ALABAMA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

30 specimens ores and rocks — Alabama. 
ALASKA COMMISSION. Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

3 specimens bitimiinous coal, 5 specimens gold ore, 2 specimens copper 
ore — Alaska. 



I 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 379 

ARIZONA COMMISSION. Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

57 specimens minerals, rocks, and ores — Arizona. 
.\KKANSAS COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis. Mo. 

44 specimens ores and minerals — Arkansas. 
UECK. WILLIAM, Kimmswick. Mo. 

3 specimens carboniferous compound corals — Kimmswick, Mo. 
BOARD OF TRADE, San Luis Obispo. California. 

22 specimens ores and minerals — San Luis Obispo Co., California. 
BORGSTROM. LEON H.. Helsingfors. Finland. 

Cast of Shelburne meteorite (exchange). 
BRAZIL CO.MMISSIOX; Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

1060 specimens minerals, rocks and ores — Brazil. 
BRIDGEPORT WOOD FINISHER CO., New Milford. Conn. 

2 speciinens rose quartz — Connecticut 
BROWN, HERBERT, Yuma, Arizona. 

I geode, 5 specimens sand concretions, i specimen dumortierite — 
California and Arizona. 
BULGARIA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

i6 specimens ores and lignites — Bulgaria. 
CALDWELL, DR. CIIAS., Chicago. 

I specimen chalcocite — Butte, Montana. 
CALIFORNIA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 
1 20 specimens minerals and ores — California. 
XLIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, California. 

4 models gold nuggets — California. 
VMPBELL, D. H., Chicago. 

3 crystals of barite — Joe Daviess Co., Illinois. 

.V.NADIAN COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

55 specimens ores and minerals — Canada. 
THE CARBORUNDUM CO., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

83 specimens illustrating manufacture of carborundum and its 
products. 
CAREY MANFG. CO.. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

I specimen asbestos fiber, 3 specimens magnesium carbonate. 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Carrara, Italy. 

14 photographs of the Carrara Marble Quarries — Carrara, Italy. 
CHICAGO CRUSHED STONE CO., Chicago. 

I specimen Niagara limestone, i specimen glacial pebble. 
COLONIAL MINING CO., Chicago. 

I specimen mercury ore — Cinnabar, Arizona. 
COMBS, R. M., Chicago 

3 specimens fire clays — Scioto Furnace, Ohio. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 

7 photographs — 2 Porto Rico, Utah, Illinois, Colorado, Florida. 
Maryland. 
EDISON, THO.MAS A., East Orange, N. J. 

3 specimens Portland cement in diflferent stages of manufacture. 
EGYPTIAN COMMISSION. Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

12 specimens copper ore, i copper ring (20 lbs.), 8 specimens salt — 
Egypt. 



I 



380 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

FARRINGTON, O. C, Chicago. 

14 specimens of minerals — Maine. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 

Collected by O. C. Farrington: i 

84 specimens ores and minerals — Arizona and California. I 

Collected by J. W. Hudson: 

I specimen californite — mouth of Trinity River, California. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

I nearly complete skull of Triccratops . 3 incomplete skulls of Tricera- 
tops, 2 partial skeletons of Triceratops, 3 partial skeletons of 
plesiosaurs, i carapace of large fossil turtle, 25 specimens fossil 
sea crabs — Montana. 
I specimen shell marl, i specimen humus — La Crosse, Indiana. 
177 Plesiosaur gizzard stones — Alzada, Montana. 
I specimen Laramie soil — Chalk Buttes, Montana. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

11,043 specimens invertebrate Silurian and Devonian fossils, is speci- 
mens gypsum nodules, 8 specimens concretions, 5 specimens 
iron ore, 7 specimens clays and shales — Western New York 
336 specimens invertebrate fossils, i specimen leaf impression, 4 speci- 
mens soils, 2 specimens rock weathering — Kimmswick. Mo. 

Purchases: 

3 geological photographs. 

I copper boulder, weight 372 pounds — Markesan, Wis. 
ig minerals, 16 fossils, 3 miscellaneous geological specimens. 
I specimen bavenite — Baveno, Italy. 
1 2 specimens calcite crystals — Joplin, Mo. 

1 Shelburne meteorite, weight 123,^ pounds. 

2 stalactites — Killian's Cave, Mo. 
I specimen moss agate, section of stalactite (polished) — Wyoming. 
12 specimens minerals — Joplin, Mo. 
I specimen danburite — • Switzerland. 
34 specimens minerals — Japan. 

4 specimens minerals — Arizona and Colorado. 
I Mishawaka meteorite, weight sj4 pounds. 
56 specimens minerals ^ California. 

1 specimen chalcedony — Ballast Point, Tampa, Florida. 
2,530 specimens minerals — collection of Maynard Bixby. 

FOOTE MINERAL CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 specimens minerals (exchange). 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GEORGIA. Atlanta, Ga. 

6 specimens ores and rocks — Georgia (deposit) . 
GILMORE, DR. W. S., Chicago. 

4 hollow limonite concretions — Ohio River. 
GRAVES, F. P., Doe Run, Mo. 

2 calcite crystals, i concretion — Doe Run, Mo. 
GREENE COPPER CO., THE, Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. 

I specimen chalcocite — Greene Mines, Cananea, Mexico. 



1 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 381 

GRIFFITH, D., Penryn, California. 

I cube granite — Penryn, California. 
GUIOX, G. MURRAY, Chicago. 

I specimen weathered sandstone, i specimen iron ore — Manitou, 
Colorado. 

3 specimens limonite concretions — • Muskogee, Ind. Ter. 
HANSEN, JAMES, Ephraim, Wis. 

I specimen weathered diabase. 
HONDURAS COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

4 specimens iron ore — Iguala, Honduras. 

IDAHO COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

1 specimen jasper — Owvhee County, Idaho. 
ILLINOIS CLAYWORKERS' ASSOCIATION, Champaign, 111. 

1 1 specimens shales and clays — Illinois and Indiana. 
ILLINOIS COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

10 varieties of Illinois soils. 
IMPERIAL GERMAN MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, Berlin, Germany. 

29 specimens peat, phosphate and clay — Germany. 
JAPANESE CO^L^HSSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

14 specimens phosphates, i specimen manganese ore, i specimen 
gold ore — Japan. 
JOHNSTON, W. M., Chicago. 

2 specimens gold ore, 2 specimens tundra — Nome City, Alaska. 

3 specimens water-worn pebbles — Bluff, Alaska. 
JONES, R. F., Concord, Mass. 

9 specimens datolite — Westfield, Mass. (exchange). 
JUDD, LOUIS S., Ehrenberg, Arizona. 

1 specimen camotite — Colorado. 

KANSAS COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

4 specimens chalk, i specimen salt — Kansas. 
KEELYN, JAS. E., Evanston, 111. 

6 specimens ores and associated minerals — New River, Virginia and 
North Carolina. 
KENTUCKY COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

3 1 specimens clays, sands and ores — Kentucky. 
KERR MARBLE AND STONE CO., Denver, Colorado. 

2 specimens polished marble slabs — Beuiah, Colorado. 
LA MARSH, ALEXANDER, Dillon, Wyoming. 

I specimen polished jet — Dillon, Wyoming. 
LOS ANGELES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Los Angeles, California. 

3 1 specimens ores and minerals — - Arizona and California. 
MANDLE, L., St. Louis, Mo. 

6 specimens potters' clays — United States. 
MARYLAND COM.MISSIO.N, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

20 varieties Maryland soils and subsoils. 
-MICHIGAN CO.MMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

I fossil tree tnmk, specimens ores — Michigan. 
MISSISSIPPI COM.MISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

29 specimens clays, i specimen silica, i specimen sand, 2 specimens 
marls. 2 specimens gravels — Mississippi. 



382 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

MISSOURI COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo, 

51 specimens ores, minerals, and clays — Missouri. 
MONTANA SCHOOL OF MINES, Butte. Montana. 

7 specimens copper ores and minerals, 4 specimens rocks — Butte 
Montana (exchange). 
MORONEY, JOHN J., Chicago. 

56 specimens clays, 54 specimens briquettes, i specimen tripoli, 9 speci 
mens sands — United States, Mexico, and India. 
MYLES SALT CO., New Orleans, La. 

I specimen rock salt, i block rock salt — Week's Island, La. 
NEWELL, DR. S. C, Larchland, 111. 

I specimen silica — Phelps County, Mo. 
NEW MEXICO COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

78 specimens minerals, ores, and rocks — New Mexico. 
NEWTON, MERRITT. Victor, Colorado. 

I specimen sylvanite with fluorite, Gold Coin Mine, Cripple Creek, 

I specimen descloizite. Bison Mine, Leadville — Colorado. 
NEW YORK COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo- 

II specimens slate, 2 specimens iron ore, i specimen salt, 3 speci- 

mens talc — New York. 
NEW ZEALAND GOVERNMENT TOURIST DEPARTMENT, Louisiana 

Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 
35 prints and 2 bromide enlargements of views in New Zealand. 
NORTH CAROLINA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase E.xposition. St. 

Louis, Mo. 
6 specimens monazite sands, i specimen barite, i specimen genthite — 

North Carolina. 
NORTH DAKOTA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 

Louis, Mo. 

1 1 specimens minerals and soils — North Dakota. 
OKLAHOMA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

22 specimens clays, gypsums, and concretions — Oklahoma. 
PANGALO, GEORGE, Chicago. 

1 specimen alum ore — Box Elder Co., Utah. 
PIKE MANFG. CO., Pike Station, N. H. 

12 specimens abrasive stones — New Hampshire. Vermont and 
Arkansas. 

PORTERFIELD, M. W.. Silver City, N. M. 

7 specimens turquoise matrix. 
PURDY, HENRY E.. Michigan City, Ind. 

2 fulgurites. 119 fragments of fulgurites — Michigan City, Indiana 

(exchange). 
RICHARDSON, E., Chicago. 

I specimen glass sand, 10 specimens garnet powders — New York 

and Michigan. 

ROUMAIN, DR. EDMOND S., Port Au Prince, Haiti. 

39 specimens ores and rocks — Western Haiti. 

SAN BERNARDINO CO. COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

St. Louis, Mo. 

I relief map of portion of San Bernardino County — California. 



I 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. LXVII. 




Carpographic Mount. 



Oct., 1905. Annial Report of the Directok. 383 

SCHLE.MM, \V. H., Villa Corona. Durango, Mexico. 

91 specimens rocks and ores of the Cerro Mercado, 53 specimens tin 
ores. 86 specimens minerals — Mexico. 
SOLVAV I'ROCESS CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Chart representing manufacture and products of soda. 
SOUTH DAKOTA COMMISSION'. Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. 
Louis, Mo. 
52 specimens ores and minerals — South Dakota. 
SQUIER & CO., E. E., St. Louis, Mo. 

5 specimens molding sands — Missouri and Illinois. 
STURTZ. B., Bonn, Germany. 

Fragment of St. Mesmin meteorite (exchange). 
TENNESSEE COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

26 specimens ores and minerals — Tennessee. 
UTAH COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

33 specimens ores, minerals, and rocks — LUah. 
r S. NATIONAL MUSEUM. Washington, D. C. 

165 grams Persimmon Creek meteorite, 44.5 grams Felix meteorite 
(exchange). 

Polished slab of orbicular diorite, polished section of jasperized hema- 
tite (exchange). 
VAN SCHAACK, PETER, Chicago. 

1 1 specimens ores, minerals and rocks. 
VERMONT MARBLE CO., Proctor, Vermont. 

2 photographs showing varieties of marble. 
VIRGINIA COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

168 specimens ores, minerals, and rocks — -Virginia. 
WALSH, PATRICK, Chicago. 

I specimen lepidodendron — Tug River, West Virginia. 
WARD, PROF. H. A.. Chicago. 

Cast of Boogaldi meteorite — Boogaldi, Australia. 

Cast of Bath Furnace meteorite — Bath Furnace, Ky. 

68 thin sections of meteorites. ^ 

224 grams Bella Roca meteorite, 521 grams Billings meteorite, 26- 
grams Jelica meteorite, 50 grams Braunau meteorite (exchange). 
WASHINGTON COMMISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

47 specimens ores — Washington Idaho, and British Columbia. 
WELLER, S. A,. Zanesville, Ohio. 

6 specimens pottery clays, spars, and flints — United States and 
England. 

WHITE, ALBERT S., Chicago. 

I specimen foliated graphite — Montana. 
WILLARD, N P., Chicago. 

I specimen silver ore — Montrose County, Colorado. 

I specimen mercury ore, i specimen gold ore — Yuma County, Ariz. 
WISCONSIN COM.MISSION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

20 specimens ores and rocks — Wisconsin. 



384 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORNITHOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
DANDLIKER, RUDOLPH, Morgan Park, 111. 

I turkey buzzard — Frankfort, 111. 
DEWEY, CLARENCE L., Chicago. 

4 eggs of the wild turkey — Dowagiac, Mich. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by N. Dearborn; 

S4 bird skins, 4 birds' eggs, i birds' nest — Chicago. 
49 bird skins, ig alcoholics, 49 birds' eggs, 3 birds' nests — Chicago. 
Collected by E, Heller and C. M. Barber: 

131 bird skins — Sabinas, Mexico. 
Purchases: 

29 birds' nests, 878 birds' eggs, 2,062 bird skins — various localities. 

105 bird skins — various localities. 

248 bird skins, representing 56 species of Indian birds — Sirur, India. 

4 birds' nests, 36 birds' eggs — Red Lodge, Alberta, Canada 
KENKEL, LOUIS V., Chicago. 

I Alice's thrush — Chicago. 
WHITMAN, C. O., Chicago. 
I ring dove. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
BARBER, C. M., Chicago. 

I salamander, 2 frogs, 9 toads, 2 tree toads, 2 snakes, 42 lizards, 
3 horned toads, i turtle — Texas, New Mexico, and Mexico 
BRIND, W. L., Chicago. 

3 butterflies — Malaga, Spain. 
CARPENTER, C. H., Chicago J 

I dragon fly — Chicago | 

CHORE, E. B., Chicago. 

8 moths, I grouse-locust — Lake Geneva, Wis., and Chicago. 
DOHMEN U. A., Chicago. 

I digger-wasp, i beetle — Chicago. 
DOUGLAS, J. B., Chicago. 

I hawk-moth — Chicago. 
DUGES, ALFRED, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

6 specimens fishes — Guanajxiato, Mexico. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

I desert tortoise — Yuma, Arizona. 
Collected by E. Heller and C. M. Barber: 

6 antelope, i coyote — Mexico. 

5 antelope, 6 deer, 5 peccaries, i coyote — Mexico. 
14 squirrels, 2 skunks, i fox, 2 coyotes, 7 deer, 4 peccaries — Mexico. 
19 deer, 2 antelope, i badger, 2 peccaries, 36 small rodents — Mexico. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 385 

6 snakes, i 7 lizards — Jural, Mexico. 

3 turtles. Oo lishes — - Sabinas, Mexico. 

8 coons, 2 rabbits, 6 wood rats, i armadillo, 8 wood mice, 16 jumping 

mice, 18 bats — Mexico. 
I rabbit, 3 squirrels, 3 coons. 2 wolves, i wildcat, 5 beavers, 2 deer — 

Mexico. 
4 manatees — Mexico. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

I pine snake 3 rattlesnakes — Thumbdance, S. D. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

50 fresh-water shells — Kimmswick, Mo. 
Collected by Wm. J. Gerhard: 

53 specimens thrips, moths, ichneumon flies, flies, beetles, parasite, 
stoneflies, caddiceflies — Chicago. 

Purchases : 

3 antelope — Turkmenen-Steppe, Russia. 

1 wolf, 7 wolverines — British Columbia and Newfoundland. 

3 goats —  between Bull River and Sheep Creek, British Columbia. 

2 spoon-bill catfish — Mississippi River, near New Orleans, La. 
175 beetles — ^ Turkey in Asia. 

HANCOCK, J. L. 

I mouse — Lakeside, Mich. 
JAPANESE SECTION, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo. 

4 pearl shells. 
KENKEL, L. V., Chicago. 

22 frogs, 2 lizards, 2 snakes, 3 salamanders, 4 turtles, 6 toads, 50 tree 
toads, 4 fishes — Egelston Town, Mich. 

1 cicada, 30 beetles — Egelston Town, Mich. 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW, and WALTER DUPEE. 

5 mountain sheep — Lower California. 
MANN. WILLLAM, Canadian, Texas. 

30 lizards. 2 toads, i turtle, 4 snakes — Florida, Pennsylvania, Texas, 
and New Mexico. 
MASON. GEO. E., Chelsea, England. 

2 shells. 
MENGEL, L. W., Reading. Pa. 

10 beetles — Rockhampton, Australia. 
.MILWAUKEE MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 

22 lizards, 6 toads — Mexico (exchange). 
MUELLER, F. R., Chicago. 

I large alligator gar — Lake Washington; Miss. 

3 gar pike — Mississippi. 

NEW ZEALAND COMMISSIO.V, Louisiana Purchase Exposition. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

3 trout -r- New Zealand. 
PERIOLAT, C. F., Chicago. 

I wolf skull — Alaska. 
ROUX, DR. F., Basel, Switzerland. 

26 toads and frogs, 39 salamanders, 17 lizards, 18 snakes (exchange). 



386 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

U. S. BUREAU OF FISHERIES, Washington, D. C. 

616 specimens fishes — Samoa. 

32 specimens fishes — Maine and Florida. 
WAGNER, G.. Madison, Wis. 

I steelhead trout, — Lake Michigan. 
WILLARD, F. C, Tombstone Arizona. 

I beetle — Tombstone, Arizona. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

15 beetles, 8 cicadas, 3 bees, i moth, 10 book -lice — Indiana and 
Illinois. 



SPECIAL ACCESSIONS. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
ADAMS, MILWARD, Chicago. 

4 Hudson Bay coins. 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Purchases: 

I Etruscan necklace of gold figurines alternating with small beads. 

100 Syrian, Turkish, Arabian, etc., jewelry, ornaments, etc. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

I lantern slide, " Hall in Karnak." 

1. 018 negatives, 9,647 prints, 1,035 lantern slides, 685 negatives and 
films developed, log photographs mounted, 61 enlargements. 
Made by Geo. A. Dorsey: » 

48 negatives of general views, etc., on Indian Reservation. I 

18 negatives of cases, etc. — New York Museum of Natural History. ; 
Made by O. C. Farrington: 

24 negatives of general views — California and Arizona. 
Made by E. Heller: 

1 2 negatives of mammals and general views — Mexico. 
Made by J. AV. Hudson: 

48 negatives of general views, Indian scenes, etc. — California. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

168 negatives of general views. 
Made by C. F. Newcombe: 

24 negatives of general views — Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 
Made by C. L. Owen: 

132 negatives of general views, portraits, etc., among the Indians — ' 
California. 
Made by E. S. Riggs: 

108 negatives of general views — Montana and Wyoming Expedi- 
tion, 1904. 

60 negatives of general views — Bad Lands Expedition, 1905. 



I 



Oct., 1905. Anni-al Report of the Director. 387 

Made by A. W. Slocom: 

6 negatives of the Eclipse of th^ Sun — Chicago, 111. 
36 negatives of general views — Missouri and New York. 
HADDOX. DR. A. C, Cambridge, England. 

303 lantern slides, Ethnology of the Torres Strait region (exchange). 

THE LIBRARY. 
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 
(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 
ACIREALE. REALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy. 

Rendiconti e memorie, ser. 3, v. 3, 1904. 
ADAMS, CHAS. C, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

I reprint. 
.\DAMS, FRANK D., Montreal, Canada. 

I separate. 
AGUILERA. JOSE G., Mexico, Mexico. 

I pamphlet. 
ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, Ala. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Ala. 

Bulletin, Xo. 8. 
ALABAMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Montgomery, Ala. 

Bulletin, Nos. 2, 3. 

Circular, Nos. 2-7, 11 (gift). 
-\LBANY MUSEUM, Grahamstown, Cape Colony. 

Records, v. i, pts. 3-4. 
ALLEX, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Mass. 

9 pamphlets. 
AMBROSETTI, JUAN B., Buenos Aires, Argentina 

3 pamphlets. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL AND ETHNOLOGICAL SOCIETIES, 
New York. 

Memoirs, v. i, pt. i. 
.\MERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Washington, DC. 

Proceedings, St. Louis meeting, 1903-1904 (gift) 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. 

Forestry and irrigation, current numbers. 
AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York, N Y. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



388 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF HOMEOPATHY, New York City. 

Transactions, 1904. 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
2 catalogues. 
AMERICAN INVENTOR PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

American inventor, current numbers. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Album of Philippine types, found in Bilbid prison in 1903. 

Annual report, 1904. 

Bulletin, v. 17, pt. 3: v. 18, pt. 3; v. 20. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Memoirs, v. 2, pt. 3. 

13 separates. 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Conn. 

Journal, v. 25. pt. 2; v. 26, pt. i. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN RAILWAY GUIDE COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Travelers' railway guide (western section) (gift). 
AMSTERDAM. BIBLIOTHEQUE DE L'UNIVERSITE, Amsterdam, Neth- 
erlands. 

17 dissertations. 
AMSTERDAM. K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, 
Netherlands. 

Proceedings, v. 6, pts. 1-2. 

Verhandelingen, v. 10, nos. 1-6. 

Verslag, v. 12, pts. 1-2. 
ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France. 

Annales, current numbers. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRE- 
LAND, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ARCHITECTS' AND BUILDERS' MAGAZINE COMPANY, New York City. 

Magazine, current. 
ARCHIVES D'ANTHROPOLOGIE CRIMINELLE, Paris, France. 

Current numbers. 
ARCHIV FUR NATURGESCHICHTE, Berlin, Germany. 

Current numbers. 
ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONSURSSENSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 

Archiv, v. 7. 
ARGENTINA UNIVERSAL NACIONAL DE CIENCIAS, La Plata, Ar- 
gentina. 

Paleontologia Argentina, no. 2. 
ARIZONA UNIVERSITY, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, agricultural experiment station. 

Bulletin, agricultural experiment station, current numbers. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 3S9 

ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERLMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 
Arkansas. 

Bulletin, nos. 50-86. 

Reports, nos. 8, 9, 10, 13. 14, 17, (gift). 
ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago, 111. 

Yearbook, 1905-06. 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Publications, current numbers. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AUGSBURG. NATURWISS. VEREINS FUR SCHWABEN UND NEU- 
BURG, Augsburg, Germany. 

Bericht., v. 35, 1904. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Monograph, v. i and 2. 

Records, v. 5, no. 4-5. 

Report, 1903-04. 
AUGUSTANA COLLEGE, Rock Island, 111. 

Library publications, no. 4. 
BABINE, ALEXIS V., Washington, D. C. 

The Yudin Library, Krasnovrsk, E. Siberia (gift). 
BARBER, EDWARD A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I separate. 
BASEL. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland. 

Verhandlungen, v. 17. 
BEAN, TARLETON H., New York. 

Food and game fishes of New York. 
BELFAST NATURALISTS' FIELD CLUB, Belfast, Ireland. 

Annual report and proceedings, 1902-3, 1903-4. 
BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 
Belfast, Ireland. 

Report and proceedings, 1902-3, 1903-4. 
BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wis. 

Catalogue, 1904-1905. 
BELOWSKY, MAX, Berlin, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
BERGENS MUSEUM, Bergen, Norway. 

Aarbog, 1904. 

Aarsberetning, 1904. 

Hvdrographical and biological investigations in Norwegian fiords. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin,Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, b. 10, 1901. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahres-verzeichnis, v. 19. 
BERLIN. K BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Notizblatt, v. 4, no. 35. 



39° Field Columbian- Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUXDE. Berlin, Germany 

Ethnologisches notisblatt. current numbers. 

Fiihrer, 12th edition. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSE.VSCHAFTEN, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current numbers. 
BERLIN. ZOOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Bericht, 1903. 

Mitteilungen, v. 2, heft 4. 

BERLINER GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fUr ethnologie, current numbers. 
BERN. HOCHSCHULE BIBLIOTHEK, Berne, Switzerland. 

30 inaugural dissertations, 1903-04. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Handbook, 1903. 
BESSEY, CHARLES E., Lincoln, Nebr. 

I pamphlet. 
BIXBY, MAYNARD, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Utah minerals and localities (gift). 
BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Black diamond, current numbers (gift). 
BOHEMIA ROYAL MUSEUM, Prague, Bohemia. 

Archiv der naturwissenschaftlichen landesdurchforschung, v. 11, 
no. 5; V. 12, no. 4: V. 13, no. :. 
BOLTON, H , Bristol, England. 

I pamphlet. 
BOMAN, E., Paris, France. 

I pamphlet. 

I reprint (gift). 
BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India. 

 Journal, v. 7, nos. 1—2. 
BONN NATURHISTORISCHE VEREIN, Bonn, Germany 

Verhandlungen, v. 61, pt. i. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1904, pt. i. 
BORDEAUX SOCIETE LINNN^ENE, Bordeaux, France. 

Pro-ces-verbaux, v. 59. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 1904 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual list of books added during 1903— 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION. Boston. Mass. 

Annual report, loth. 
BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, .Mass. 

President's report, 1903-1904. 

Yearbook, 1905. 
BOVORD, J. F., Berkeley, Cal. 

I reprint (gift). 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 391 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine. 

Catalogue. 1904-05. 

Report. 
BREMEN" NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIX, Bremen, Ger- 
many. 

Abliandlungen, v. 18, no. i. 
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London, England. 

Report, 1904. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Victoria, B. C. 

Seventh report, 1902. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Victoria, B. C. 

Report, 1904. 
BRITISH COLU.MBIA. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, Victoria, 
British Columbia. 

Statutes of British Columbia, 1905. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Victoria. B. C. 

Catalogue of British Columbia birds. 
BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England. 

Catalogue of corals, vs. 1-4. 

Catalogue of the Leech collection of butterflies. 

Catalogue of moths, vs. 1-5 (plates and text). 

Catalogue of the library, v. 2. 

Guide to the galler>' of birds: 

Monograph of the tsetse-flies. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report, 1904. 

Yearbook. 1903-1904. 

Children's museum news. nos. 4-8. 
BRUNN LANDWIRTHSCHAFTLICHE-LANDES-VERSUCHSSTATION 
FUR PFLANZENKULTUR, Brunn. Austria. 

3 pamphlets. 
BRUXELLES. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES DE BELGIQUE, 
Bruxelles. Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUXELLES. INSTITUT GEOGRAPHIQUE, Bruxelles. Belgium. 

Publications, no. 10. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIF.TE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Bruxelles. Belgium. 

Annuaire 1905. 

Annales, current numbers. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIF.TE BELGE DE GEOLOGIE, ET PALEONTOL, 
Bruxelles. Belgium. 

Proces-Verbaux, 1895-1900; 1901, no. 6; 1902-1904. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE D'ETUDES COLONIALES, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, v. 12. no. 4 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE LIXXEENE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 



392 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE ZOOLOGIQUE ET MALACOLO- 
GIQUE DE BELGIQUE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, 1902-1904. 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Monographs, v. i, no. i ; v. 5 ; (reprint series). 

Program, 1905-06. 
BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany. 

3 reprints. 
BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Anales, vs. 3-4, ser. 3. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY. Buffalo, N. Y. 

Annual report, 8th. 
BUFFALO SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY. Buffalo, N Y. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BUTLER, AMOS W.. Indianapolis, Ind. 

12 pamphlets. 
CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report of the Garden, 1904-05. 

Annual report of the Government Cinchona Plantation in Sikkim, 
1903—04. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, Cal. 

Memoirs, v. 5, no. i. 

Occasional papers, v. 9. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

I pamphlet. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Sacramento, 
California. 

Annual report, 22nd, 1903-04. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA, LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Final report of the commission (gift). 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Biennial report, 1902-1904. 
CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, Cal. 

Bulletin, no. 37. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin, department of geology, current numbers. 

Publications: Anthropology, current numbers. 
Botany, current numbers. 
Physiology, current numbers. 
Zoology, current numbers. 

University Chronicle, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

Report and proceedings, vs. i-io, 1851-1903, except no. 2 of v. 4. 

Publications, no. 35, 40. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Annual report, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 393 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, England. 

Department of Agriculture: Annual report, 1-5, 1897-1903. 

5 other reports. 
Library- syndicate, report, 1904. 
Museums and lecture room syndicate, report, 1904. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual report, 1903. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. Ottawa, Canada. 
Catalogue of Canadian birds, pt. 3. 
Geological Sur%'ey, annual report, with maps, v. 13. 
Report. Queen Charlotte Islands, 1878. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Ottawa, 
Canada. 
Report, 1903 and 1904. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, sec. ser. v. 10, pts. 1-2. 
CAMPINAS. CENTRO DE SCIENCIAS, LETRAS, E ARTES, Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. 
ReNnsta, current numbers. 
CAPE TOWN. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Cape Town, South 
Africa. 
Agricultural journal, v. 27, no. 2. 
Report of the government biologist, 1904. 
Report of the government botanist 1904. 
CAPE TOWN. GEOLOGICAL COMMISSION, Cape Town, South Africa. 
Annual report, 1903, 1904. 
Index, annual reports, 1896-1903. 
CARDIFF NATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales. 

Report and transactions, v. 36, 1903. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D. C. 
Research on North American acridiidae. 
Yearbook, 1904. 
CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Pittsburg, Pa 

Annual report, 9th, 1905-05 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Annals, v. 3, nos. 1-2. 
Founder's Day, 1904. 
Memoirs, v. 2, nos. 2-5. 
Prize essay contest, 1904. 
Report, 1904-05. 
CARPENTER, G. H., Dublin, Ireland. 

Irish naturalist, current numbers. 
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington, D. C 

Yearbook, 1905-06. 
CANTON CLUB, Chicago, lU. 

Catalogue. 
CEYLON. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon, India. 

Circulars, ser. i, nos. 15-22, 24-25; v. 2, nos. 12-29; v. 3, nos. 1-4. 
CHAZAL, PHILIP E., Charleston, S. C. 

The century in phosphates and fertilizers (gift). 



394 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

CHEMNITZ. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT. Chem- 
nitz, Germany. 

Bericht, 1899— 1903. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE. Chicago. 

Annual report, 1903-04. 

9 cataloa;ues. 
CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago, 111. 

Annual report, 1904-05. 
CHICAGO JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, Chicago, 111. 

Journal, current numbers. 
CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago, 111. 

Annual report, 32nd. 

Bulletin, nos. 65, 67-69. 

Finding list, 8th edition. 

I pamphlet. 
CHICAGO. SPECIAL PARK COMMISSION, Chicago, 111. 

Metropolitan Park System report, 1904 (gift). 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago, 111. 

Annual register, 1904-1905. 

Botanical gazette, current nuinbers. 

Contributions from Walker Museum, nos. 1-5, 

Decennial pviblication, v. 5. 

Journal of geology, current numbers. 

President's report, 1902-1904. 

19 doctors' theses. 
CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago, Chile. 

Historia de Chile, 4 vs. 

Historia de la Medicina, 6 vs. 

Miscellaneous publications, n vs. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 1904. 

Finding list. 

Library leaflet. 

Quarterly bulletin, no. 162. 
CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 

Library, bulletin, nos. 10, 13-15, 18, 21, 24, 25. 

Educational science, v. i, nos. 1-3. 
CLARK, AUSTIN, Cambridge, Mass. 

4 reprints. 
CLAUSTHAL. KONIGLICHE BERGAKADEMIE, Clausthal, Germany. 

Programme, 1905-06. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Open shelf, current numbers. 

Report, 1904. 
COIMBRA. BIBLIOTHECAS E ARCHIVOS NACIONALES, Coimbra, 
Portugal. 

Boletin, 1903, no. 4; 1904, nos. 1—2. 



Oct., 1905. AxxLAL Report ok the Director. 395 

COLBY COLLEGE. Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1904-1905. 
COLLETT, R., Christiania, Norway. 

Meddelelser om Xorges fiske, 1884-1901, with 3 pamphlets. 

Report on Norwegian fishery and marine investigations, 1003, v. 2, 
no. 3 (gift). 
COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pa. 

Mines and minerals, current numbers. 
COLLINGE, WALTER E.. Birmingham, England. 

Journal of malacology, vs. 8, 11. 
COLOMBA, L., Torino, Italy. 

2 pamphlets. 
COLOMBO MUSEUM, Colombo, Ceylon. 

Spolia zeylanica, v. 2, nos. 7-8. 
COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins. 
Colorado. 

Annual report, 17th, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Annual bulletin, 1905. 

Studies, science series. 2nd and 5th an. publications; vols. 6-10. 
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Fort Collins, Colo. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1905-06. 
COLORADO STATE BUREAU OF MINES Denver, Colorado. 

Report, 1903-04. 
COLORADO. STATE HISTORICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SO- 
CIETY, Denver, Colorado. 

Biennial report, 1902-04. 
COLORADO. SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE, Denver, Colorado. 

Annual report (gift). 
COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado. 

Catalogue, 1904—05. 

Studies, current numbers. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 

3 pamphlets. 
CONKLIN, EDWIN F., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Contributions from the zoological laboratory. University of Penn- 
svlvania. (3 vs.) 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

f Bulletin, current numbers. 

Fourth report of the state entomologist. 
Report, 28th, 1904. 
ONNECTICUT STATE LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 
State Geological and Natural History survey; bulletin, 1-5. 



396 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

COOK, MELVILLE, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 

Insect galls of Indiana (gift). 
COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART, 
New York City. 
Report, 46th, 1905. 
COPENHAGEN, MINERALOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Cop- 
enhagen, Denmark. 
Beretning, 1903. 

Contributions to mineralogy, no. 5. 
CORA, GUIDO, Rome. Italy. 

Cosmos, V. I. nos. i, 5-6; vs. 2, 2-5, nos. 2, 4-5, 7, 10-12; vs. 6-12; 
1873-1S96. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Agricultural experiment station, bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1903-1904. 
COSTA RICA. INSTITUTO FISICO-GEOGRAFICO NACIONAL, San Jose, 
Costa Rica. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
COULTER. S., AND DOMER, H. B., Lafayette, Ind. 

I pamphlet. 
CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 
Bulletin, no. i. 
Circular, nos. 16-17. 
CUMMINGS, EDGAR E.. Bloomington, Ind. 

3 reprints. 
CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPHS UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 
Austria. 
Feierliche inauguration derektors, 1903-04, 1904-05. 
Ubersicht der akademischen behorden, 1 904-05 . 
Verzeichniss der offentlichen Vorlesungen, 1904-05. 
DARMSTADT. GROSSHERZOGLICHE HOFBIBLIOTHEK, Darmstadt, 
Germany. 
Benutzungs-ordnung, 1904. 
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 

Catalogue, 1904—05. 
DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Davenport, Iowa. 

Proceedings, v. 9, 1901-03. 
DAWKINS, BOYD, Manchester, England. 

I reprint. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Delaware. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCES, Media, Pa. 

Proceedings, v. i, no. i. 
DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio. 
Bulletin, v. 12, ar. 9. 
General index, vs. i-io, 1885-189 7. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 
Bulletin, no. 16. 
Report, 1904. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 397 

DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 
Register. Band 1-50, 1S48-1898. 
Zeitschrift, v. 56. 
DEWALQUE. G.. Liege, Belgium. 

2 reprints (i map). 
DIAL PUBLISHIXG COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DONALDSON', HENRY H., Chicago. 111. 

5 reprints. 
DORSEY, GEORGE A., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 
Traditions of the Arikara. 
Mvthologv of the Wichita (gift). 
DRESDEN. NAfUR\VISSENSCH.\FTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT" ISIS." 
Dresden. Germany. 
Sitzungsberichte und Abhandlungen, 1904. 
DRESDEN. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH - ETHNO- 
GRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 
Publications, v. 14. 
DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY LIBRARY, Madison. N. J. 
Report of the library, loth. 
Yearbook, 1904-05. 
DRUGS, OILS AND PAINT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Proceedings, v. 25; section B; pts. 1-5; section C pts. 1-9. 
DUBLIN ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Annual report, 1878-1889, 1891-1903. 
DUBLIN SCIENCE AND ART MUSEUM, Dublin. Ireland. 
Guide . . . collection of rocks and fossils. 
List of Irish birds. 
DUBLIN. TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Hermathena, v. 30. 
DUNEDIN. OTAGO UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Dunedin, New Zealand. 

Annual report, 1904. 
EAST KENT SCIENTIFIC AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Canter- 
bury. England. 
Report and transactions, ser. 2, vs. 3-4. 
EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, 
Edinburgh Scotland. 
Transactions, v. i, nos. 1-3 5; v. 2-3; v. 4. nos. 2-4; v. 5, nos. 1-2. 
EDINBURGH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Report of the director, 1900. 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Report, 1904. 
EHRENREICH, PAUL, Berlin, Germany. 

I reprint. 
EIGENMANN, CARL H., Bloomington, Ind. 
4 reprints. 



398 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

ELBERFELD. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Elberfeld, 
Germany. 

Jahres-berichte. 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Telephone magazine, current numbers (gift). 
ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Journal, current numbers. 
EMERSON, BENJAMIN K., Amherst, Mass. 

5 pamphlets. 
ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 19th, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Finding list, 6th edition, pt. 7. 
ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Mass. 

Annual report, 1904-05. 

Historical collections, v. 41. 
EVANSTON FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston. 111. 

Report, 1903-1904. 
EVERMANN, BARTON W , Washington, D. C. 

I reprint. 
FARRINGTON, OLIVER C, Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Collection of books and pamphlets (29) from the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition. 
FEDDE, F., Berlin, Germany. 

1 separate. 

FLETCHER, ALICE C, Washington, D. C. 

The Hako: a Pawnee ceremony. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Lake City, Florida. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Farmers' Institute, bulletin, nos. 1-2. 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 
FORD, W. E., AND PENFIELD, S. L., New Haven, Conn. 

4 reprints (gift). 
FORSTEMANN, E., Charlottenburg, Germany. 

2 reprints. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FREIBERG. K. SACHS'. BERGAKADEMIE, Freiberg, Germany. 

Programme. 1905-06. 
FREIBERG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiberg, Ger- 
many. 

Berichte, v. 14. 
FRIEDLANDER, R., AND SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current numbers. 
FURBRINGER, MAX, Heidelberg, Germany. 

Ziir frage der abstammung der siiugetiere, pts. 1-2. 





Mm 




Oct., 1905. Akxual Report of the Director. 399 

GALIXDO V VILLA. J., Mexico, Mexico. 

5 reprints. 
GENOA. MUSEE CIVICO DI STORIA NATURALE, Genoa Italy. 

Annali. ser. 3, v. i. 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bulletin, nos. 11-12. 
GIESSEN. GROSSHERZOGLICHT HESSISCHEN LUDWIGS-UNIVER- 
SITAT. Giessen, Germany. 

9 dissertations. 
GIGLIO-TOS, ER.MAXXO. Cagliari, Italy. 

Las problfemes de la vie, pt. 2. 
GILBERT, G. K., Washington. D. C. 

I reprint." 
GIRTY, GEORGE H., Washington. D. C. 

1 pamphlet. 

GIZA. ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, Giza (Cairo) Egypt. 

Annual report, 6th, 1904. 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT Giittingen, Germany. 

Chronik, 1903. 

Verzeichniss, 1905; 1905-06. 

4 pamphlets. 

Mineral Institute; 2 dissertations. 
HAARLEM. STADT-BIBLIOTHEK, Haarlem. Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1904. 
HABANA UNIVERSIDAD, Habana, Cuba. 

Facultad de letras y ciencias, v. i, no. i. 

Re vista. 
HALIFAX. BOTANICAL CLUB OF CANADA, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Report, 1903-04. 

pamphlets. 

HAMBURG, NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUMS, Hamburg, Germany. 

Jahrbuch, v. 21, 1903. 

.Mittelungen, current numbers. 
HAMILTO.V SCIE.NTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Ontario. 

Journal and proceedings, 1 903-1 904. 
HANCOCK. J. L.. Chicago, 111. 

2 reprints. 

HANOVER NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT. Hanover, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1899-1904. 
HARRISON, BENJAMIN, Ightham, Kent, England. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual report. 67th. 
HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Mass. 

Report of the president and treasurer, 1903-04. 



400 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 
Annual report. 
Catalogue, 1904-1905. 

Gray Herbarium contributions, current numbers. 
Museum of Comparative Zoology: 
Annual report, 1904. 
Bulletin, current- numbers. 
Memoirs, current numbers. 
HASSE, C, Breslau, Germany. 

5 pamphlets. 
HATCH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Mass. 

Annual report, 17th, 1905. 
HAWAII. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF AGRICULTURE AND 
FORESTRY, Honolulu, H. I. 
Bulletin, no. i. 
Circular, nos. 1-2. 
Report, igoo, 1902, 1903-04. 

2 pamphlets. 

HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, H. I. 

Annual report, 12th, 1904. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS' ASSOCIATION, Honolulu, H. I 

Report of the experiment station committee, 1904 
HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany. 

88 dissertations. 
HENRIKSEN, G., Christiania, Norway. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
HERRICK, GLENN W., Agricultural College, Mississippi. 

7 reprints. 
HERZOGL. NATURHISTORISCHEN MUSEUMS, Braunschweig. Germany. 

Anthropologische literatur Braunschweigs, Germany. 

Beitrage zvir wissenschaft, medicin, 1897. 

Faunistische literatur, 1891. 

Festschrift, 1897, with 55 transactions and reprints. 
HINRICHS, GUSTAVUS D., St. Louis, Mo. 

Amana meteorites of February 12, 1S75 (gift). 
HITCHCOCK, C. H , Hanover, N. H. 

I book. 

3 pamphlets. 

HOBBS, WILLIAM H., Madison, Wis. 

5 separates. 
HONGKONG. BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT, 
Hongkong, China. 

Report, 1904. 
HOPKINS, T. C, Syracuse, N. Y. 

I pamphlet. 

I map. 
HORNIMAN MUSEUM, London, England. 

Handbook (birds' eggs). 

Report, 1904. 



1 



( 



I 



Oct., 1905. An'N'ual Report of the Director. 401 

HOVEY, E. O., New York City. 

I separate. 
HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hvill. England. 

Publication, no. 19. 

Hull Scientific and Field Naturalists' Club; Transactions, v. i. nos. 
2,4; V. 2; V. 3, no. I. 
HUNT, C W., New York City. 

I catalogue (gift). 
IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report. 1904. 
IDAHO. STATE INSPECTOR OF MINES, Boise, Idaho. 

Report, 1904. 

I pamphlet. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, 111. 

Circulars. 
ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, 111. 

Publication, no. g. 
ILLINOIS STATE LIBRARY, Springfield, 111. 

Catalogue of the state library, 1904. 
ILLINOIS. SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, Spring- 
field, 111. 

Biennial report, 1902-1904 (gift). 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Champaign, 111. 

Register, 1904-05. 

Experiment station; bulletin, current numbers. 
INDIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. Calcutta, India. 

Memoirs, v. 32, pt. 4; v. 35, pt. 3. 

Records, v. 31, pts. 3-4 
INDIA. SUPERINTENDENT OF GOVERNMENT PRINTING, Calcutta, 
India. 

Agricultural gaiette, current numbers. 

Census of India, 1901, v. i: (Ethnographic appendices.) 
INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report, 1903-04. 

Catalogue of the Indian decajiod Crustacea, pt. 2, fasc. i. 

Echinoderma of the Indian Museum. 
INDIANA. BOARD- OF STATE CHARITIES, Indianapohs, Ind. 

Annual report, isth, 1904. 
INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURALR ESOURCES, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Annual report, 29th, 1904. 
INDIANA. STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Annual report, 3rd-4th, 1903-1904. 
INLAND PRINTER COMPANY, Chicago, 111 

Inland printer, vs. 33-35 (gift). 



402 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

List of books relating to Chile, Brazil and Central America. 

History of coffee. 

Paraguay. 

Patent and trade-mark laws. 
INTERN.ATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICANISTS, New York City. 

Report. 13th session (gift). 
INSTITUT DE CARTHAGE, Tunis. 

Revue Tunisienne, nos. 49-52. 
INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Boletin, v. 21. 
IOW.\ ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Proceedings, v. 21, 1904. 
IOWA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, Iowa. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annual report, vs. 14-15, 1903, 1904. 
lOW.-V HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annals, ser. 3, vs. 1-7. 
IOWA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Transactions, vs. 14-19, 21-23, 25, 27-39. 

Iowa State Agricultural College and Farm, rept. 1882-83. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Laboratory of natural history, bulletin, v. 5, no. 4. 
' JACOBS, J. WARREN, Waynesburg. Pa. 

I pamphlet. 
JAMAICA INSTITUTE, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Bulletin, no. i. 

9 pamphlets on the industries of Jamaica. 
JAMAICA. PUBLIC GARDENS AND PLANT.\TIONS, Kingston, W. I. 

.\nnual report, 1903-04. 

Bulletin, department of agriculture, current numbers. 
JAPAN IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Tokyo, Japan. 

Japan in the beginning of the 20th century. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, loth, 1904. 

List of cyclopedias and dictionaries, with a list of directories. 
JOHNS. HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, .Md. 

Circular, current numbers. 
ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Topeka, Kansas. . 

Transactions, v. 19, 1903-04. * 

KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Experiment station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 17th, 1903-04. 

Industrialist, The, current numbers, 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Biennial report, 19th, 1904. 

Report, no. 91 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 403 

KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas. 

Biennial report, 14th. 
KEN'KEL, LOUIS V., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Collection of handbooks, catalogues, and reports (26) from the Louis- 
iana Purchase Exposition, 1904. 
KEW. ROYAL GARDEN'S, Kew, England. 

Appendix, 1904, no. 4; 1905, nos. 1-3. 
KIEL. K UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht, 1903-1904. 
KJOBENHAVX. NATURHIST. FORENING, Kjobenhavn, Denmark. 

Videnskahelige meddelelser, 1904. 
KOSMOS. GESELLSCHAFT DER NATURFREUNDE, Stuttgart. Ger- 
many. 

Bolsche: " Abstammung des menschen." 

France: " Sumes-lenen der pflanzen." 

Kosmos: Jahrgang, 1904, v. i, nos. 1-4; v. 2, no. i. 

Meyer: " Weltuntergang." 

Meyer: " Weltschopfung." 

Zell: " 1st das thier unvemunf tig. " 
KUNZ, GEORGE P., New York City. 

2 separates. 
LAHILLE, FERNANDO, Buenos Aires, Brazil. 

2 pamphlets. 
LAKE MOHONK ARBITRATION CONFERENCE, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

Proceedings, 1904. 

Report 9th annual meeting, 1902-03; loth, 1904; nth, 1905 (gift). 
LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY Lawrence, Mass. 

.\nnual report, 33rd. 
LEHM.A.N.\-NITSCHE, R., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

2 reprints. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCHE MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Crania ethnica Philippinica, by G. A. Koeze. 

Ethnographical notes, ser. 2, no. 6. 

Notices anthropologiques, nos. 1-2. 

Verslag, 1903-04. 

Verzamelingen. 

I pamphlet. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS GEOLOGISCH-MINERALOGISCH MUSEUM, Leiden, 
Holland. 

Sammlungen, ser. i v. 7; v. 8, no. i. 
LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia. 

Register, 1904-05. 

I dissertation. 
LEON. NICOLAS, Me.xico, Mexico. 

Codice. (Mariano Jimenez.) 
LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago, 111. 

Register, 1905. 
LIMA. SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICO, Lima. Peru. 

Boletin, current numbers. 



404 Field Coluhbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

LISBOA. COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisboa, Portugal. 

Broteria, v. 2-3. 
LISBOA REAL ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Lisboa, Portugal. 

Journal, v. i, no. 26. 
LIVERPOOL MARINE BIOLOGY COMMITTEE Liverpool, England. 

Annual report, i8th. 

Proceedings and transactions, v. 18. 
LIVERPOOL UNIVERSITY, Liverpool, England. 

Lancashire sea-fisheries laboratory report, 1904. 
LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Bulletin, nos. 7-8. 

Mycological notes, nos. 15-18. 
LOCY, WILLIAM A., Evanston, 111. 

I reprint (gift.) 
LONDON. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, Lon- 
don, England. 

Handbook to British minerals. 

Summarv of progress, igo3, 1904. 
LONDON LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, botany, no. 257. 
zoology, no. 190. 

List, 1904-05. 

Proceedings, i i6tli session, 1903-04. 
LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON. ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. London England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Obituary notices, 1904, pt. i. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Report of the evolution committee, no. 2. 

Report of the sleeping sickness committee, no. 5. 
LONDON. SOCIETY OF ARTS. London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON. ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Report, 1904. 
LOUBAT, DUC DE, Paris, France. 

Codex Borgia. 
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS, Baton Rouge 
Louisiana. 

Annual report, 17th, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
LOUVAIN. UNION DES ANCIENS ETUDIANTS, Louvain, Belgium. 

Bulletin, 1904-05. 
LUBECK. NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUM, Lubeck, Germany. 

Das Museum an Lubeck. 1900. 

Festschrift deutschen anthropologischen gesellschaft, 1897 

Mitteilungen der Geograph. gesellschaft, ser. 2, nos. 10-19. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Directok 



405 



McGILL UXIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
-MADRAS AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. Madras, India. 

Proceedings, 1905. 
-MADRID. BIBLIOTECA .\ACIONAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Bibliogratia de las controversias sobre la licitud del teatro. . . 
MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Memorias. current numbers. 

Revista, current numbers. 
MAGYAR XEMZETI MUZEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Annales, 1904, v. i. pt. i. 

Aquila, vs. 7-10, 1900-1903. 

Mathematische und Xatunvis. berichte aus Ungam, 1899-1901 

2 separates. 
-MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIME.XT STATIOX, Orono, Maine. 

Annual report, iS-20. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MAIXE UXIVERSITY, Orono. Maine. 

Catalogue. 1904-05. 
MAXCHESTER FIELD XATURALISTS ' AKD ARC HAEOLCGIST S' 
SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 

Report and jiroceedings, 1903, 1904. 
MAXCHESTER GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Manchester, England 

Transactions, current numbers. 
MAXCHESTER LITERARY AXD PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Man- 
Chester, England. 

Memoirs and proceedings, vs. 41-49. 
MAXCHESTER MUSEUMS. OWEXS COLLEGE, Manchester, England. 

Publications, current numbers. 

Report, 1903-1904 fpub. 53). 
MAXUFACTURER'S RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Baltimore, Md. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

MARBURG K. PREUSS. UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Chronik, 1904—05. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue. 1904-05. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, Plymouth, England. 

Journal, v. 7, no. 2. 
MARKS, A. J., Toledo Ohio. 

6 reports. 

2 pamphlets. 

MARSEILLES. FACULTE DES SCIENCES, Marseilles, France. 

Annales. v. 14. 
MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. College Park. 
Maryland. 

Bulletin, current numbers 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE, Baltimore, Md. 

Report. 1905-06. 
MARYLAXD STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, College Park, Md. 

Annual report. 1-6, 1891-1904. 



4o6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

MARYLAND. STATE LIBRARY, Annapolis, Md. 

House journal, 1904. 

House and Senate journal, 1904. 

Laws of Maryland, 1904. 

Senate journal, 1904. 
MASON, OTIS T , Washington, D. C 

I pamphlet. 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 

Transactions, 1904, pt. i. 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1904. 

Technology quarterly, current numbers. 
MEEK, S. E.. FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM, Chicago. 

Bibliographia zoologiae, by Agassiz, 4 vs. (gift). 
MELBOURNE NATIONAL MUSEUM. Melbourne, Australia. 

Three papers relating to fossils in the museum. 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY. Melbourne, Australia. 

Calendar, 1905. 
MERRIAM, JOHN c' Berkeley, Cal. 

4 reprints. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE, Chicago, 111. 

I pamphlet. 
MEXICO. DIRECCION GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mexico 

6 reports. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Paregones, current numbers. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO MEDICO NACIONAL, Mexico, D. F 

Circular, no i. 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico. 

Annales, current numbers. 
MEXICO. RED METEOR Y REVISTA CIENTIFICA, Toluca. Mexico. 

Boletin, current numbers.' 
MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Annual report, 5th. 1903. 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL STATION, Agricultural College, Mich. 

Annual report, 17th. 

Bulletin, current numbers 
MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Mich. 

Yearbook, 1904-05. 
MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lansing, Mich. 

Report, V. g, pt. i. 
MICHIGAN STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Agricultural College, 
Michigan. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Calendar, 1904-05. 

Report, University Museum, 1903-04. 

Yearbook, 1904-05. 



I 



FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. 



REPORTS, PL. LXX. 




A Four-Storied Nest of a Yellow Warbler iDendr/eca /estivai. Each story represents an 

ATTEMPT BY THE WARBLER TO AVOID BECOMING A FOSTER PARENT OF A YOUNG COWBIRD. 



Oct., 1Q05. AxNUAL Report of the Director. 407 

MILLSPAUGH. CHARLES F., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Collection of books (S) and pamphlets (6) from the Louisiana Exposi- 
tion (gift). 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Annual report. 22nd. 
MINING MAG.\ZINE PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Mining magazine, current numbers. 
.MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Report, 1904. 

2 lists. 
.MINNESOTA ACADEMy OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Bulletin, v. 4, no. i, pt. 2. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. Anthony's 
Park. Minn. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERI.MENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Miss. 

Annual report, i6th. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Mo. 

Administrative reports, 1904. 

Annual report, 1904. 
MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, RoUo, Mo. 

Biennial report, 1903-04. 

Report, 2nd ser. vs. 1-3. 
MISSOURI COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS, 
Columbia, Mo. 

Experiment station bulletin, current numbers., 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Collections, v. 2, nos. 3-4. 
MISSOURI STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Kansas City, Mo. 

Annual report, vs. 26-29, 3'-33. 35-37. 39-42. 44-46. 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Mo. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MONTANA UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Mont. 

President's report, 1903-04. 
MONTEVIDEO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

.A.nales, ser. 2 v. 2, no. 2. 

Seccion Historico-Filosofica, tomo i. 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I reprint. 
MORGAN, W. C, Berkeley, Cal. 

I reprint (gift). 
MOSCOW. SOCI^TE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow. Russia. 

Bulletin, 1904, vs. 2-3. 

Memorias, v. 16, nos. 3-4. 
MUMFORD PUBLISHING COMPANY. Chicago, 111. 

Birds and nature, vs. 16-17, 18, no. i. 



4o8 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

MiJXCHEN ORXITHOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT IN BAYERN, 
Miinchen, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1897—98; 1899— 1900; 1901— 1902. 

Verhandlungen, v. 4, 1903. 
MUSEE DU CONGO, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annales; zoologie ser., t. 3, nos. 1-2. 

Publications, no. 21. 
MUSEE GUIMET, Paris, France. 

Annales bibliotheque d'etudes, vs. 16-17. 

Catalogues, collection G. pts. 1—2. 
MUSEES ROYAUX DES ARTS DECORATIFS ET INDUSTRIELS, Brux- 
elles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MUSEU GOELDI DE HISTORIA E ETHXOGRAPHIA, Para, Brazil. 

Boletin, v. 4, nos. 1-3. 

Memorias, v. 1-4. 
NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Natal, Africa. 

Natal plants, v. 2, pt. 3; v. 4, pts. i, 3. 

Report, 1Q02-03; 1903—04. 
NATAL GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Pietermaritzburg, Natal. 

Report, 2nd, 1903. 
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. Washington, D. C. 

National geographic magazine, current numbers. 
NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada. 

The Canadian record of science, v. 9, nos. 1-4. 
NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada. 

Journal, current numbers. 
NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE WOCHE.MSCHRIFT, Berlin. Germany 

Current numbers. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Lincoln, Neb. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lincoln. Xeb. 

Report, V. 2, no. i. 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Neb. 

Calendar, 1905-06. 

Studies, V. 5, nos. 1-3. 
NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY OF NORTHUMBERLAND, Durham and 
X'ewcastle-upon-T^-ne, England. 

Transactions, v. 15, pt. i; new ser. v. i, pt. 2. 
NEDERLANDSCHE DIERKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, Helde, Netheriands. 

Aanwinsten van de bibliotheek, 1904. 

Catalogus der bibliotheek, 1S97— 1903. 

Tijdschrift, ser. 2, v. 8, pts. 3-4; v. g, pts. 1-2. 
NEDERLANDSCH-IXDIE. K NATUURKUXDIGE VEREENIGING, Ba- 
tavia, India. 

Natuurkundig tijdschrift, v. 64. 
NEVADA STATE UXIVERSITY, Reno, Nevada. 

Agricultural experiment station, current numbers. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 409 

NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, \ew Bedford, Mass. 
.\nnual re^xart, 53rd 
Monthly bulletins. 
NEW EXGLAXD HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. Boston. 
Massachusetts. 
Proceedings, 1905 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND THE MECHANIC 
.ARTS. Durham. N. H. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Catalogue, 1904-1905. 
NEW JERSEY .-\GRICULTUR.-\L EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, N. J. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURYEY Trenton, N. J. 

Annual report, 1904. 
NEW JERSEY ST.\TE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Mount Holly, N. J. 

Proceedings, 1905. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla Park, 
New Mexico. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NEW SOUTH WALES BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney. N. S. W. 

Report, 1903. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Sydney. 
New South Wales. 
Agricultural gazette, current numbers. 
Diseases of plants, bv N. A. Cobb. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, N. S W. 

Report, 18S3, 1886-94. 1S96-1902, 1903 pt. I. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND AGRICULTURE, 
Sydney, N. S. W. 
Annual report, 1904. 

Memoirs of the Geological Survey; Paleontology, no. 13. 
Records, v. 7. no. 4; v. 8, no. i. 
NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY. Sydney. N S. W 

Proceedings, v. 29. 
NEW SOUTH WALES ROYAL SOCIETY. Sydney. N. S. W. 

Journal and proceedings, v. 37, 1903. 
NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City 
Annals, v. 16. 
Memoirs, v 2, no. 3. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT ST.ATION, Geneva, N. Y. 
Annual report, 22nd. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK BOTANIC GARDEN, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN, 
New York City. 
.\nnual report, 119th, 1904. 
NEW YORK MERCANTILE LIBRARY, New York City. 
Annual report, 84th, 1904. 
Bulletin of new books, no. 25. 



4IO Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 

Annual report, 35th, 1904-05. 

Catalogue o£ paintings. 
NEW YORK MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Journal, 1902. 
NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY, New York City. 
Annual report, 1904-05. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, N. Y. 
Bulletin, nos. 63, 73-75- 
Memoirs, no. 6. 
Regent's report, 1903. 
NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM, Albany, N. Y. 
Bulletin, no. 77-79. 81-83, 85-89, 91. 
Report, no. 56, vs. 1-4. 
NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 
Annual report, 9th, 1904. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, N. J. 
Annual report, i6th, 1904. 
Library news, current numbers. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago, 111. 

Report, 1904. 
NEWCOMB, H. T., Washington, D. C. 

2 pamphlets (gift). . 

NORTH CAROUNa'aGRICOLTUEAL EXPERIMENT STATION, R- 

leigh, N. C. 
.\nnual report, 26th, 27th. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). „,^t^^t -c- 

NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fargo. 

N. D. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NOPCSA, FRANCIS B. 

4 reprints (gift). 
NUTTALL, ZELI.A. Coyoacan, Mexico. 

3 reprints. 
OBERHUMMER, E., AVien, Austria. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Annual report of the librarian, 1904. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 411 

OHIO DEP.\RT.\IENT OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Division of nursery and orchard inspection: 
Bulletin, nos. 1-3. 
Report, 1902-04. 
imiO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio. 

Bulletin. 4th ser., nos. 2-3. 

Topographical survey, 1903. 
OHIO ST.VTE .\C.\DEMY OF SCIENCES, Columbus, Ohio. 

Proceedings, v. 4, pt. 5. 
|>HI0 STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 

Quarterly, current numbers. 
OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Annual report. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report of the secretarv, 1904. 
OKLAHOMA .\GRICULTUR.\L EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater. Okla. 

-Annual report, 1S98-99, 1S99-1900, 1900-01, 1901-02. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Nebraska. 

-Annual report, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ONTARIO BUREAU OF MINES, Ontario, Canada. 

Annual report, 13th. pts. 1-2, 1904. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF .VGRICULTURE, Toronto, Ontario. 

-Annual reports, v. 1-2. 

Report, Farmers' institutes, pts. 1-2, 1904. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Monist. current numbers. 
' >REGON. ST.ATE BIOLOGIST, Eugene, Oregon. 

Biennial report, nos. 1-2 (gift). 
OSBORN. HENRY F., New York City. 

Fossil vertebrates in the -American Museum of Natural History, v. 2. 

6 separates. 

OSBORN. HERBERT, Columbus. Ohio. 

I pamphlet. 
OSGOOD, WILFRED II., Washington, D. C. 

7 separates (gift). 

OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 
OTTUMWA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

.Annual report, 1904. 
oUTES, FELI.X F., Buenos Aires, .Argentina. 

I reprint. 
OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Outing, current numbers. 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England. 

.Annual report. 1904. 



412 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

PALACHE, CHARLES, Cambridge, Mass. 

3 reprints. 
PALERMO. MUSEO DI GEOLOGL^E MINERALOGIA R. UNIVERSITA, 
Palermo, Italy. 

7 publications. 
PALERMO. REALE ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 

Contributions to biology, v. 3. m 

Index, 1904. 
PARIS ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus, current numbers. 
PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE N.\TURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France. 

Journal, new ser. v. i. 
PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current numbers (gift). 
PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Mass. 

Annual report, 53rd. 
PEABODY MUSEUM OF ARCHEOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY, Cambridge 
Massachusetts. 

Memoirs, v. 3, no. 3. 
PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT ST.\TION, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Division of zoology: ~ 

Bulletin, monthly, 
quarterly. 
PENNSYLVANIA BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. i, nos. 1-3. 
PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Magazine of history and biography, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report, 29th, 1905. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 

Provost's report, 1904. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, FREE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND 
ART, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Department of Archeology: Pachacamac, Report of the William 
Pepper Peruvian Expedition of 1896. 
PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, 111. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

List of books, supplement. May, 1894, to December, 1904. 
PEPPER, GEORGE H., New York City. 

I reprint. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 413 

PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE 
BLIND, Boston, Mass. 
Annual report, 73rd. 
PERU. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS DE MINES, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin. current numbers. 
PHARMACEUTICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Review, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American journal of pharmacy, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report, 9th, 1904. 
PHILADELPHI.V GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Charter, by-laws, list of members, 1905. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, no. 53-54- 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Manila, 
Philippine Islands. 
Bureau of government laboratories: 

Dictionary of plant names, Philippine Islands, with 2 pamphlets. 
Publications, no. 25, 27. 
Ethnological Survey: 

Publications, v. 2, pts. 1-2. 
Mining Bureau: 

Fifth annual report, 1904. 
I reprint. 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Mass. 

' Catalogue. 1904-05. 

PIOLTI, GUISEPPE. Torino, Italy. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

PLYMOUTH MUNICIPAL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, Eng. 

.■\nnual report, 6th. 
PORTL.\ND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Me. 

Annual report, 1904. 
PORTO RICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mayaguez, 
Porto Rico. 

Bulletin, no. 5. 
PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report, 1903-04. 
PREUSS, K. T., Berlin, Germany. 

2 reprints. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, N. J. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue. 1904-05. 
PROSSER. CHARLES S., New York City. 

5 reprints. 
PROVIDENCE ATHENAEUM. Providence, R. I. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 69th, 1904. 



414 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

PROVIDE\XE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, K. I. 

Annual report, 27th. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY. Lafayette, Ind. 

Bulletin agricultural experiment station, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Geological survev publications, nos. 190-195. 
RAILWAY AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERING PUBLISHING COM- 
PANY, New York City. 

Journal, current numbers. 
RAMALEY, FRANCIS, Boulder, Colorado. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
RANDALL, T. A., AND COMPANY, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clay worker, current numbers (gift). 
RANSOM, CAROLINE L., Chicago, 111. 

Studies in ancient furniture (gift). 
RAYMOND, G., Paris, France. 

4 reprints. 
REDWOOD LIBRARY AND ATHENAEUM. Newport, R. I. 

Annual report, 1903-04. 
REID, HENRY F., Baltimore, Md. 

3 reprints (gift). 
RENNES. L'UNIVElRSITE DE, Rennes, France. 

Rapports sur les pares ostreicoles de Coucale. 

Travaux scientifiques, v. 3, 1904. 
REVUE GENERALE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Journal, current numbers. 
RHODE ISL.AND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Kingston, 
Rhode Island. 

Annual report, 17th. 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
RHODE ISLAND. LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION, 
Providence, R. I. 

Rhode Island at the Universal Exposition, 1904 (gift). 
RHODESIA MUSEUM, Bulawayo, Transvaal. 

Annual report, 3rd. 
RICHARDSON, R. E., Urbana, IlL 

2 pamphlets. 
RIES, HEINRICH, Washington, D. C. ^ 

3 pamphlets. T 
RIGGS, ELMER S., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

Manual of North -American diptera, by S. W. Williston, with 6 pamph- 
lets (gift). 
RIO DE JANEIRO MUSEU NACIONAL, Rio de Janeiro. Brazil. 

Archivos, vs. 1-12, 1876-1903. 
RIPON COLLEGE. Ripon, Wis. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 415 

ROEMER MUSEUM, Hildesheim, Germany. 

Bericht, 1899-1901. 

Fuhrer, 1894-1S98 (7 nos.). 

Mittheilungen, nos. 1-20, 1895-1904. 

2 catalogues. 
ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, R. I. 

.Vpert)-^, current numbers. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ROME. REALE ACCADEMIA DEI LINXEI, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Annual catalogue, 1905. 
ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY OF ENGLAND. London, England. 

The Wobum experimental station report for 1902. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, CEYLON BRANCH, Shanghai, Asia. 

Journal, no. 55. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, STR.\ITS BRANCH, Singapore, India. 

Journal, nos. 42-44, 1905. 
ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AUSTR.\LIA, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 28, 1904. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Mo. 

Classified list of papers and notes, vs. 1-14. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

-Annual report, 59th. 
ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

America's aid to Germany in 1870-71. 

Annual report, 1902-03; 1903—04. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis. Mo. 

Catalogue, 1905. 
ST. LOUIS. WORLD'S FAIR COMMISSION, St. Louis, Mo. 

The State of Missouri (gift). 

ST. PETERSBURG ACADEMIE IMPERIALE DES SCIENCES, St. Peters- 
burg, Russia. 
Bulletin, v. 18-20. 
Catalogue, 1904. 

Catalogue de la collection entomologique, 1889. 
Collection of 36 botanical excerpts and reprints. 
Collection of 40 zoological excerpts and reprints. 
Explorations in Amur-Lande, 1854-56. 
Flora of Russia, by C. Weinmann, 1836. 
Histoire de la Siounie, by Orbelian, 1864-66. 
Meletemala, entomologica, 1840-1845. 
Memoirs. 6th ser. [1830-1859]; 7th ser. [1859-1894]; 8th ser. [1894- 

i9°3]- 
Musee D'Anthropologie et Ethnologic, publications, nos. 1-2. 5. 
Mus^e Zoologique. annuaire, vs. 1-8. 1896-1903. 



4i6 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

OmithographiaRossica, 1889-189 1. 

Species graminum, fasc. 1-29, 1S23, by C. B. Trinius. 

Travels through Russia, 1768-1774. 

Zoographia Rosso-Asiatic, 181 1. 

81 miscellaneous publications. 
ST. PETERSBURG. SOCIETE IMPERIALS DES NATURALISTES, 
St. Petersburg, Russia. 

Travaux, v. 35, nos. 5-8; v. 36, no. i. 
ST. PETERSBURG SOCIETE IMPERIALS DE GEOGRAPHIE, St. Peters- 
burg, Russia. 

Publications, 1904. 
ST. PETERSBURG JARDIN IMPERIALS BOTANIQUE, St. Petersburg, 
Russia. 

Bulletin, tomes 1-4. 
ST. VIATEUR'S COLLEGE, Bourbonnais, 111. 

The Viatorian, current numbers. 
SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Mass. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Trustees' report, 1904. 
SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY, San Francisco, Cal. 

Report, 1904. 
SANTLVGO DE LAS VEGAS, Estacion Central Agronomica, Cuba. 

Circular, no. 14. 
SAO PAULO. SOCIEDADE SCIENTIFICA, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Relatorio da directoria, 1903-1904. 

Revista, no. i. 
SAN DIEGO SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, San Diego, Cal. 

Transactions, v. i, no. i. 
SAN SALVADOR MUSEO NACIONAL, San Salvador. 

Anales, v. 9-12. 
SARAWAK MUSEUM, Borneo, India. 

Report, 1904. 
SCOTT, W. B., Ottawa, Canada. 

Canadian yearbook, 1905 (gift). 
SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURF. GESELLSCHAFT, Frankfurt-am-Main, 
Germany. 

Bericht, 1904. 
SHELFORD, R., Sarawak, Borneo, India. 

1 pamphlet. 
SHOOTING AND FISHING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Shooting and fishing, current numbers (gift). 
SKIFF, F. J. v.. Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 
American Institute of Mining Engineers: 
Transactions, v. 35. 
Officers, members, etc., 1904. 
Lord and Thomas' Pocket directory, 1905. 
5 pamphlets (gift). 
SLOCOM, A. W., Field Columbian Museum, Chicago. 

2 maps. 
4 pamphlets (gift). 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 417 

SMITH, J. C. New Orleans, La. 

I reprint. 
SMITH, J. D.. Baltimore, Md. 

I reprint. 
SMITHSONI.W INSTITUTION. Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1903. 

Catalogue of American diptera. 

Contributions to knowledge, v. 33. 

Miscellaneous collections, nos. 1440. 1444. i477. '57'' -"^nd 22 various 
numbers. 

U. S. National Museum: 
Annual report, 1903. 
Bulletin, no. 16; no. 50, pt. 3. 
Contributions, U. S. Herbarium, vs. 7, 9. 

Bureau of American Ethnology: 
Annual report, nos. 21-22. 
Spec, bulletin, v. i, pt. 2. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATO," Mexico. 

Memorias y revista, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

BoUetino, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DE ANTHROPOLOGIA, Firenze, Italy 

Archivio, v. 34 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DI SCIENZE NATURAL!, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
SC^CIETA REALE DI NAPOLI, Naples, Italy. 

Indice generale publicati, 173 7-1 903. 
SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTHROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, v. 1 1, fasc. I. 
SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy. 

Memorie, v. 20. 

Processi verbali, current numbers. 
SOCIETE D'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES D'ANGERS, Angers, France. 

Bulletin, v. 33, 1903. 
SOCIE'tE D'E'tUDE DE's SCIENCES, Rheims, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCII-:'tE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Toulouse, France. 

Bulletin, 1905, no. 2. 
SOCIE'tE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Geneve, Swit- 
zerland. 

Memoires. v. 34. no. 5; v. 35, no i. 
SOCIE'te' NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, v. 15, 1904. 
SOCIETE OURALIENNE D'AMATEURS DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, 
Ekaterinburg, Russia. 
Bulletin, v. 24. 



4i8 Field Columbiax Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, v. 29. 

Tables du bulletin et des memoires, 1876— 1895. 
SOCIETY FOR PSYCHICAL RESEARCH, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
SOUTH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Johannesburg, South Africa. 

Transactions, v. 2, pts. 3-1 1; v. 3-6; v. 7, pts. 1—2. 
SOUTH AFRICA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE TRAXSVAAL, Pre- 
toria. South Africa. 

Annual report (gift). 
SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Report, 1904. 
SOUTH AFRICAN' PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Transactions, v. 1—3; v. 4, pt. i ; v. 5, pt. 2; v. 6, pts. 1-2; v. 7, pt. 2; 
V. 8, pt. i; V. 15, pt. 4. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY AND ART GALLERY, Adelaide, 
South Australia. 

Report. 1903—04. 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Clem- 
son. South Carolina. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Brookings, 
S. D. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA. BLACK HILLS MINING MEN'S ASSOCIATION. Dead- 
wood. S. D. 

Report of meetings, 1904 (gift). 
SOUTHEASTERN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Wye. Kent, England. 

Journal, no. 14, 1905. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bulletin, current niimbers. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sunset magazine, current numbers (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. Springfield, Mass. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 48th. 1905. 
STATEN ISLAND NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Staten Island, 
New York. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, N. J. 

Catalogue, 1905-06. 
STOCKHOLM ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Arkiv for botany, b. 3. heft 4. 

Arkiv for matematik astron, b. i, hefts 3-4. 

Arkiv kemi. mineral och geological, b. i, hefts 3-4. 

Handlingar, b. 37, no. 3. 
STOCKHOLM. K. VETTERHETS HISTORIE OCH ANTIQUITETS AKA- 
DEMIEN, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Monadsblad, v. 17, nos. 2—3. 



I 



Oct., 1905. AxNUAL Report of the Director. 419 

STORRS .\GRICULTUR.\L EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Conn. 

Annual report. i6th. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg. Ger- 
many. 

Stiftungsfest, 1905. 

24 dissertations. 
STREBEL, HERMAN, Leipzig, Germany. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
STRONG. R. M., Chicago. 111. 

1 reprint (gift). 

SYDERE, ARTHUR H., Toronto, Canada. 

56 government reports, 1904, 1905. 
TEPPER, J. G. O., Norwood, South Australia. 

Early experiences of colonial life in South Australia. 

Society for the protection of birds (Adelaide Branch). 

5 pamphlets. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, CoUege Station, Texas. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Texas. 

Bulletin, scientific series, nos. 4, 6. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
THALBITZER, WILLIAM, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

.\ phonetical study of the Eskimo language (gift). 
THAXTER, ROLAND, Cambridge, Mass. 

2 pamphlets. 

f HOMAS, CYRUS, Frederick, Maryland. 

1 reprint. 

TIFLIS. JARDIN BOTANIQUE, Tiflis, Russia. 

Flora -Asiae Mediae, v. 7, pt. 3. 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
TOKYO. DEUTSCHEN GESELLSCHAFT N.\TUR- UND VOLKER- 
KUNDE OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan. 

Mittheilungen, b. 10, no. 1. 
TOKYO. GEOLOGIC.\L SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Journal, current numbers. 
TOKYO. IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Tokyo, Japan. 

College of Science journal, v. 20, art. 1-4. 
TOLEDO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Toledo, Ohio. 

Report, 1904. 
TOOKER, WILLIAM W., Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

2 reprints. 

TORINO. MUSEI DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPAR.\TA, Torino, 
Italy. 

Bolletino, v. 19. 
TORINO, R. ACCADEMIA DELLA SCIENZE, Torino, Italy. 

.Atti, current numbers. 

Memorie, vs. 50-54. 



420 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

TORRES, LUIS MARIA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 

Novitates zoologica, current numbers. 
TRIVANDRUM MUSEUM, Trivandrum, India. 

Report, 1903-04. 
TRONDHJEM. K. NORSE VIDENSKABERS SELSKABS, Trondhjem, 

Norway. 
Skriften, 1903. 
TUBINGEN., EBERHARD-KARLS-UNIVERSITAT, Tubingen, Germany. 

6 reports. 
ULLMAN, JOSEPH, New York City. 
Fur trade directory, 1905-06. 
UNION UNIVERSITY, New York City. 
Catalogue, 1904-05. 
Quarterly, v. i, no. 3. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Animal Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Report, 20th, 1903. 

Special report (diseases of cattle). 
Bureau of Chemistry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Report, 1904. 
Bureau of Ethnology: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 
Bureau of Forestry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Report, 1904. 
Bureau of Plant Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 
Bureau of Soils: 

Annual report, 5th, with maps. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Crop reporter, current numbers. 
Division of Foreign Markets: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 
Index cards to publications, issues, 12, 13, 15, 16. 
Library bulletin, current numbers. 
Office of Experiment Stations: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 



Oct.. 1905. AwuAL Report of the Director. 421 

Experiment Station record, vs. 1-12, 1889-1901. 

Report, 1904. 
Office of Public Roads: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report. 1904. 
Report of the librarian, 1904. 
Report of the secretary, 1904. 
Report of the statistician, 1904. 
Report of the weather bureau, 1904. 
Yearbook. 1904. 
U. S. DEP.\RTMEXT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Fisheries: 

Bulletin, vs. 22, 23. 

Commissioners' report, 1903. 

Reprints, 551-580. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Consular reports, current numbers. 

Special reports, vs. 31, 32, 33, 35. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey: 

Report, 1904. 
U. S. DEPARTMEXT OF THE INTERIOR, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Education. 

Report, 1903. 
Census Office: 

Bulletin, nos. 11-23. 

Special reports. 
Geological Survey: 

Bulletins, 232-241, 244-246, 248-250, 252, 255, 258-261, 264. 

Mineral resources, 1903. 

Monograph, no. 47. 

Professional papers, 24, 27, 33, 35, 39. 

Report, 25th, 1903-04. 

Stone industry, 1903. 

Water supply and irrigation papers, 95-118. 
U. S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 
American Library Association, Catalogue 1904. 
Check list of foreign newspapers, with 3 reference lists. 
Check list maps, published by foreign governments. 
History of the Library of Congress, v. i, 1800-1864. 
Papers of James Monroe. 
Report of the librarian, 1904. 

Select list of books relating to the Far East, with 9 other lists. 
Vemon-Wager manuscripts. 
5 pamphlets. 
U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY, Annapolis, Md. 

-Xnnual register, 1904-05. 
U. S. WAR DEPART.MENT, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Insular .Affairs: 

Census of the Philippine Islands, 1903-05, vs. 1-4. 
Inde.x catalogue, library of surgeon-general's office, 2nd ser. v. 10. 



422 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

UPSALA. K. VETENSKAPS-SOCIETETEX, Upsala, Sweden. 

Acta, ser. 4, v. i, no. i. 
UPSALA. K. UNIVERSITETS-BIBLIOTEKET, Upsala, Sweden. 

Bulletin of the Geological Institution, v. 6. 

Meddelanden of the Mineralogisk-Geologisk Institut, nos. 26-28. 
UTAH STATE BOARD OF HORTICULTURE, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Bulletin, no. 10. 
VALENTINE MUSEUM, Richmond, Va. 

Annual report. 1904. 
VAN GENNEP, ARNOLD, Chamart (Paris), France. 

Tabou et totemisme a Madagascar, with 10 reprints. 
VAN HISE, CHARLES R., Madison, Wis. 

2 pamphlets. 
VASSAR BROTHERS INSTITUTE. Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Debates and proceedings of the convention of the State of New York, 
June 17, 17S8 (reprint). 
VAUGHN, T. W.. Washington, D. C. 

I separate. 
VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Burlington, Vt. 

Annual report, 1 7th. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
VERMONT. STATE GEOLOGIST, Buriington, Vt. 

Report, 1903-04. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY AND STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 
Burlington, Vt. 

Catalogue. 1904-05. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 
VICTORIA. PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS AND NATIONAL GAL- 
LERY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Report, 1903. 

Report of the trustees, 1904. 
VICTORIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Proceedings, v. 17, pts. 1-2. 
VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

Calendar, 1905—06. 
VICTORIA ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, Mel- 
bourne, Australia. 

Annual report, 41st, 1904. 
VIENNA. CONGRES INTERNATIONALE DE BOTANIQUE, Vienna, 
Austria. 

Texte svnoptique, 1905. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Va. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
VON DEN STEINEN, KARL, Berlin, Germany. 

Diccionario Sipibo. 
VCN KONEEN, A., Berlin, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 



Oct., 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 425 

WADA, T.. Tokyo. Japan. 

Beitrage zur mineralogie von Japan. 

Minerals of Japan (gift). 
WASHINGTON ACiDEMV OF SCIENCE. Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON. STATE INSPECTOR OF COAL MINES, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. 

Report. 1901-1902. 
WASHINGTON STATE LIBRARY. Olympia. Washington. 

Bureau of Labor: Fourth annual report, 1903-04. 
WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Bar- 
bados, West Indies. 

Publication, no. 27. 

Report on the botanic station and experiment plots. Grenada, 1903-04. 

2 pamphlets. 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown. Conn. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgan- 
town, W. V. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Charleston, W.Va. 

Biennial reports, 2nd-7th, 1893— 1904. 

Farmers' re\4ew, current numbers. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, West Australia. 

Annual progress report, 1903. 

Bulletin, nos. 11— 14 16—19. 

Mining stan 'ard (special ed.). 
WHITFIELD. R. P.. New York City. 

I reprint. 
WIEN. K. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Wien, Austria 

5 reports. 

WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUMS, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen. 
WIESBADEN NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Wies- 
baden, Germany. 

Jahrbuchcr, v. 57. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1904, 1905. 

David .\. Wells Prize Essay, no. i. 
WILLISTON. S. W., Chicago, 111. ' 

6 pamphlets. 
WILLE, N.. Christiania, Norway. 

Nyt magazin for natur\'idenskabeme, current numbers. 
WINDSOR AND KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago, 111. 

Brick, current numbers. 

Street railway review (gift). 
WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Bulletin, nos. 5, 9-23, 25-50. 



424 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

WISCONSIN ACADEMY "of SCIENCES, ARTS AND LETTERS, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Transactions, v. 14, pt. 2. 
WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Milwaukee, Wis, 

ArchiEologist, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Bulletin, current numbers, 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wis. 

Index to the proceedings, 1874-1901. 

Proceedings, 1904. 
WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wis. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-5. 

Transactions, 1902-1905. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Madison, Wis. 

Bulletin, current numbers. j: 

Report, 2ist, 1904. -^ 

WOOD, NORMAN A., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Mass. 

Annual report, 1903-04. 
WULFING, E. A., Danzig, Germany. 

H. Rosenbusch, Phj'siography, bd. i, (mineralien.) 
WiJRTEMBERG. VEREINS FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 
Wiirtemberg, Germany. 

Jahreshefte mit beiliige, v. 61. 
WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, Wyo. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1904-05. 

Report of the president, 1903. 
ZIMANYI, KARL, Budapest, Hungary. 

2 pamphlets. 
ZURICH. GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT. 
Zvirich, Switzerland. 
Jahresbericht, 1 903-1 904. 



} Oct., 1905. An'nual Report of the Director. 425 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS.. 

DEP.\RTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State: 

To ALL to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed in 
the office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th dav of September, A. D. i8g3 
for the organization of 'the COLUMBIAX MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under 
and in accordance with the provisions of " An Act Concerning Corporations," 
approved April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now. Therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State 
of Illinois, bv virtue of the powers and duties vested in me bv law, do hereby 
certify that' the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally 
organized corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
great Seal of State. Done at the city of Springfield, this i6th day of September, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and of 
the Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM II. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

Wj, the undersigned citizens of the United States, propose to form a 

jrporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 

entitled. " An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all 

acts amendatory thereof; and that for the purpose of such organization we 

hereby state as follows, to-wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the " COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is lor the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrat- 
ing Art, Archeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a board 
of Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for 
the first year of its corporate existence: 

Ed. E. Aver, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch. James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. B'ack, and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 



426 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the Cit}' of Chicago, County of Cook 
and State of IlHnois. 

(Signed) , 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidnej- C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, 
Robert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, 
Ebenezer Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, 
Herman H. Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, 
Franklin H. Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade 
Rogers. Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. 
McClurg, James AV. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimmons, 
John A. Roche. E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. 
Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, 
H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John 
C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, 
Robert W. Patterson, Jr.., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, Geo. M. Pullman, 
William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, 
Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, 
Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W., Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, { ^^ 
Cook County. \ 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 
acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free 
and voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1S93. 

G. R. MITCHELL, ' 
[Seal.] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 

CHANGE OF NAME. 
Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the corporate members 
held on the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect 
was filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Oct.. 1905. An.\u.\l Report of the Director. 427 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(J.\XLARY 2g. 1900.) 



ARTICLE I. 



MEMBERS. 

Section i. Members shall be of five classes. Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life ilembers, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected 
from time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who 
shall pay an annual fee of ten dollars (Sio.oo), payable within thirty days after 
notice of election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. 
The failure of anv person to make sucli initiator},' payment and such annual 
payments within said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be 
ground for forfeiture of annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 
First. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum on any day. 
Second.— Ten tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 

days. 
Third. — A copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance door, 

and to the Annual Reports. 
Fourth. — Invitations to all receptions, lectures, or other entertainments which 

may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of '.ssociation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time- o time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in 
the articles of the association shall within ninety days from the adoption of 
these By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members, shall, 
within ninety days of their respective election, pay into the treasury the sum 
of twenty dollars (S20.00) or more. The failure of any person to make such 
payments within said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be 
ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. The annual dues of Cor- 
porate Members shall be five dollars ($5.00) after the first year of membership, 
and no one shall exercise the rights of a Corporate Member until his dues are 
paid ; and a delinquency of six months in the payment of annual dues shall be 
ground for forfeiture of corporate membership. Corporate Members becoming 
Life Members, Patrons, or Honorary Members shall be exempt from dues. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
dollars at any time shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Trustees, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees, upon recom- 



428 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 

mendation of the Executive Committee, from among persons who have ren- 
dered eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, 
and, by virtue of their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen from among persons who 
have rendered eminent service to science, art, or mechanics. They shall be 
chosen by a vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the 
Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. In commemora- 
tion of the 14th day of October, Honorary Members shall not be more than 
fourteen in number at any one time. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible to appointment 
upon Committees other than the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE II. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The respective members of the Board of Trustees now in 
office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. 
Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the re- 
maining members of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Secre- 
tary, and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall be 
chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early as 
practicable after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall be 
ex-officio a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman thereof, in 
addition to the other four members. The Secretary and Treasurer may, or 
may not, be the same person, and the Secretary may, or may not, be a Cor- 
porate Member. 

Any officer may be removed'at any regular meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any 
office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Com- 
mittee on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure of 
the Board. 

Sec. 4. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain 
to their respective offices, and such other duties as the Board of Trustees ma)' 
from time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such 
amount and with such surety as shall be approved by the Executive Com- 
mittee, and shall disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with 
the directions of the Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter- 
signature of such officers as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall have full control of the affairs 
of the Museum, under the general supervision of the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE III. 

meetings. 
Section i. In commemoration of the discovery of America by Chris- 
topher Columbus, the annual meeting of the Corporate Members shall be held 
on the 14th day of October in each year, except when that day falls on a Sun- 
day, and then upon the Monday following. At such meeting the Corporate 



Oct.. 1905. Annual Report of the Director. 429 

N[embers shall transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. 
Special meetings of the Corporate Members shall be called at any time by the 
Secretary uiKin written request of twenty Corporate Members. In such case, 
thirty da>s' notice by mail shall be given to Corporate Members of the time, 
place, and purpose of such meetings. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon 
the 14th day of October, except when that day falls on Sunday, and then 
upon the Monday following, and upon the last Monday of January, April, and 
July of each year. Special meetings may be called by the President at any 
time upon reasonable notice by mail, and shall be called upon the written 
request of three Trustt;es. Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum, but meet- 
ings may be adjourned by any less number from day to day or to a day fixed. 

ARTICLE IV. 

.\ME.VDMEXTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at anj- regular meeting of 
the Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the 
amendment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding 
or shall be recommended bv the Executive Committee. 



430 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER CHARLES B. CORY 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM STANLEY McCORMICK 



DECEASED. 



MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

WILLARD A. SMITH 






-V 



t 



- '•- -V 



bJi ^ - / C^ ^. '.' » ^.:^ - .. ^H 



+ 




S 



>ti.^ 



Oct., 



1905. 



Annual Report of tiiu Dikkctor. 



431 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS. GEORGE E. 
ALOIS. OWEN F. 
AKMOUK. ALLISON V. 
AVER. EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT. A. C. 
BLACK, JOHX C. 
BLAIR. WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD. ELIPHALET W. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM. EBENEZER 
BURN HAM. DANIEL H. 
BUTLER. EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS. W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK. JOHN M. 
CURTIS. WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN. SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

Q VGE. LYMAN J. 
GETTY. HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
HEAD. FRANKLIN H. 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KEITH. E, G. 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 

McCAGG, E. B. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MAXIERRE, GEORGE 
.MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PUTNAM. FREDERICK W. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SKIFF, F. J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WALKER, EDWIN 
WALSH, JOHN R. 



DECEASED. 



AR.MOUR. PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T, 
BISSEL. GEORGE F. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIA.M E. 
JACKSON. HUNTINGTON W. 
LEITER, L. Z. 



McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN. GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT. JAMES W. 
WALLER. R. A. 
W1LLL\MS. NORMAN 



432 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports Vol. II. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 



king, james c. 

kirk, walter radcliffe 

lawson, victor f. 
Mccormick, mrs. 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 

Mccormick, harold f. 
MacVeagh, franklin 
mitchell, j. j. 
murdoch, thomas 

newell, a. b. 



CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A, 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, R. T, 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. [PORTER 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 

JOHNSON, M.D., FRANK S. 
JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
JONES, ARTHUR B. [AYER 

KEITH, ELBRIDGE G. 
KING, FRANCIS 



ORR, ROBERT M. 

PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE T. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SCOTT, ROBERT S. 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMBERT 

WELLING, JOHN C. 
WELLS, M. D. 
WILLARD, ALOi\ZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



Oct., 1905. An.vual Report of the Director. 



43' 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



.\DA.\IS. CYRUS H. 
AD.\MS. MILW.VRD 
ALLKRTdX. ROBli;RT H. 
AM BERG, WILLIA.M A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BAN'GA, DR. HENRY 
BARXES, CHARLES J. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BEAUVAIS, E. A. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BELDEX, J. S. 
BILLLXGS, C. K. G. 
BILLLXGS, DR. FRAXK 
BIRKHOFF. GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAIXE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOTSFORD, HENRY 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BOL'TON, N. S. 
BRADWELL, JAMES B. 
BREGA, CHARLES W. 
BREMNER, D.WID F. 
BREYFOGLE, WM. L. 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROWN, GEORGE F. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 
BURLEY, FRANK E. 

CABLE, R. R. 
CARPENTER, A. A. 
CARPENTER. MYRON J. 
COMSTOCK. WILLIAM C. 
CONKLING, ALLEN 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE I 
COOLIDGE, CHARLES A. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 



COWAN, W. P. 
COX, ALFRED J. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAL, DR. JOHN W. 
DAY, A. M. 
D.\Y, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DELANO, F. A. 
DEMMLER, K. 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAND, ELLIOTT 
DWIGHT, JOHN H. 

EDWARDS, J. A. 
EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, CHARLES 

FAIR, R. >L 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FLANNERY, JOHN L. 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM, E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GUION, GEORGE MURRAY 
GURLEY, W. W. 



434 



Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol. II. 



HAMILTON, I. K. 
HANECY, ELBRIDGE 
HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING. JAMES L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEPER, LOUIS 
KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KENT, WILLIAM 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 
KOEHLER, THOMAS N. 

LAFLIN, ALBERT a 
LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W.- R. 
LLOYD, EVAN 
LOEWENTHAL, B. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McLENNAN, J. A. 



McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MACFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MAY, FRANK E. 
MAYER, D.WID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MEAD, W. L. 
MERRICK. L. C. 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MIXER, C. H. S. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, NELSON 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
ORTSEIFEN, ADAM 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PATTERSON, W. R. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PECK, CLARENCE I. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSON, WM. A. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
REHM, JACOB 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
RUMSEY, GEORGE D. 



Oct., 1905. 



Annl'al Report of the Director. 



43.=; 



RLN.NELLS. J. S. 
RVKRSON. MRS. M.\RTIN 

SCII.\FF.\1-:r, JOSEPH 
SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHMITT. A.N'THONY 
SCHWWRTZ, G. .\. 
SE.VRS. J(^SEPH 
SEIPP. NHiS. C. 
SEIIM'. \V. C. 
SELFRIDGE, H.VRRY G. 
SELZ. .MORRIS 
SHEDD, JOH.\ G. 
SHIPM.W, D.\NIEL B. 
SHOR'IWLL. JOHX G. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SMITH, F. B. 
SNOW, .MISS HELEN E. 
SOPER, J.\MES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE. MRS. ELIZ.\BETH 
SPOOR, J. .\. 
STEELE, HENRY B. 
STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STU.VRT. ROBERT 

TEMPLETON, THOM.VS 



TILTON, MRS. L. J. 
TOBEY, FR.VNK B. 
TRIPP, C. E. 
TURNER. E. .\. 

UIHLEIN, EDW.\RD G. 
UNZICKER, OTTO 

VIERLING, ROBERT 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, GEORGE C. 
WALKER. JAMES R. 
WALKER. WILLIAM B. 
WALLER. EDWARD C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WOLF, FRED W. 
WOOD, S. E. 

WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 
WOOSTER, CLARENCE K. 



DECEASED. 



BRAUN, GEORGE P. 
MILLER. THOMAS 



PALMER, .MILTON J. 
WICKES, THOMAS H. 



I 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 



VOLUME II— REPORT SERIES. 



OrPOSITK 

Paux 
The Lato Norman Williams 1 

Larsje Male in (iroup of Stone's Alaska Black Sheep (Ovis stonei) 10 

Osage Shields of Buffalo Hide 16 

Dinosaur Quarrv No. 15 — Near Fruita, Colorado 20 

Method of Mountins; Varieties of Corn — Department of Botany 31 

Group of Northern Wart-Hos from East Africa 39 

Ores of the Base Metals 44 

Pore Leg of Herbivorous Dinosaur 53 

Type Case of Plains Indians' Costume 59 

Femur of Herbivorous Dinosaur 64 

Cave Formations 69 

Haida Memorial Column 70 

One of the Three Herbariun. Rooms 75 

Type -^ " Wall Cases— Department of Botany 78 

Office and Laboratory of Curator of the Department of Zoology 80 

The Late Huntington W. Jackson 81 

Painting of Ideal Carboniferous Landscape 86 

A Case of Objects Illustrating the Utilization of Plants of the Amaryll 

Group. (Contrasting Label Cards) 92 

A Case of Objects Illustrating the Utilization of Plants of the Amaryll 

Group. (Harmonizing Label Card.s) 93 

Embroidered Silk Korean Costumes 99 

Equus Hurchelli Transvaalensis — The Transvaal Zebra 106 

War Clul»s — New Caledonia, Oceania 112 

Salish House Group 126 

New Coral Installation 137 

Geographic Geology 142 

Floor Ca.se — Department of Geology 149 

Wall Case — Department of Geology 155 

Virginia or Red Deer — In Summer, .\utumn, Winter, and Spring 102 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, President lOIi 

Hybrid Duck — Pintail Mallard 169 

Skeleton of E.ftinct Flying Reptile (Nyctosaurus Gracilis) • \ 175 

Hall of Egyptology 181 

Style and Sizes of Tablets used for Mounting Invertebrate Fossils 187 

Ancient Egyptian Priest's Leather Corselet 193 

Crow Shields of Buffalo Hide 199 

Group of Prairie Chicken 205 

4.37 



438 Field Columbian Museum — Reports, Vol II. 

Opposite 
Pai;e 

Hall 35. Paleozoic Fossils 211 

Series Illustrating Quantitative Composition of Copper Ores 215 

Hall 59. Mesozoic and Cenozoic Fossils 221 

Group of Spotted Hyenas 227 

Group of Clarke's Gazelle 233 

Case Illustrating the Method of Installing Economic Material — Department 

of Botany 237 

Method of Installing Specimens of Paper in a Transparency Frame — 

Department of Botany 242 

Edward E. Ayer 249 

"In Danger" 257 

Curry Powder. Method of Installation — Department of Botany 262 

Odontobaenus Rosmarus — Atlantic Walrus. (Front View) 266 

Odontobaenus Rosmarus — Atlantic Walrus. (Side View) 267 

Hall 72. Gold, Silver, and Lead Ores — Department of Geology 270 

Hamatsa Coming Out of Secret Room — Kwakiutl Indians, Nawhitti, 

Vancouver Island 275 

Haida Grave House — Queen Charlotte Islands 281 . 

Collection of Radio- Active Minerals 286 

Collection of Models of Famous Diamonds 293 

Vegetable Ivory Products. Method of Installation 300 

Hippotragus niger. Sable Antelope — Male and Female 306 

Albino Ruffed Grouse 3U 

Map Illustrating Important Zinc Mining Districts of the United States... :^0 

Martin A. Ryerson, Vice-President 333 

Model of Pawnee Earth Lodge During Ceremony of the Medicine Men... 314 

Late Greek Sarcophagus, About 100 A. D 349 

Prospecting tor Fossils in the Bad Lands of South Dakota, 1905 357 

Hall of Meteorites 365 

Steel Herbarium Cases • 372 

Carpographic Mount. Partial View 383 

Ovis ammon. The Argali 393 

Cobus Maria. Mrs. Gray's Waterbuck 399 

Four-Storied Nest of a Yellow Warl)ler 407 

Skull of Triceratops, from Montana 119 

Star Chart of the Pawnee — From a Sacred Bundle 431 

jjoTE. — Each Report has its own table of contents; see pages 3, 81, 163, 
249, and 333. 



Following is a free tr.\nslation of the Memorul adopted by the 
Congress at Mons, Belgium, in September, 1905, providing for 

THE organization OF AN INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF ETHNOGRAPHY: 

Article i. There is founded by the countries enumerated, 
and bv all those countries ■which hereafter subscribe to the present 
agreement, a permanent bureau entitled The International Bureau 
of Ethnography. 

Article 2. The object of the Bureau is the organization at 
common expense, of services pertaining to the scientific documenta- 
tion relative to the social state, the manners and customs of different 
peoples, especially peoples of inferior civilization. 

The Bureau especially concerns itself with the following objects: 

1. The organization of a permanent bureau of inquiry, especially 
by: 

a). The publication of ethnographic and sociologic questions, 
keeping account of the initiatives of different countries and of the 
results obtained; 

b). T^^ie sending out of these questions through the medium of 
competent authorities to all those who are apt to furnish results, 
especially to Colonial officials, to explorers, to missionaries, etc. 

2. The publication of the results of this inquiry upon a uniform 
plan, or upon a plan as uniform as possible. 

3. The distribution of the results to the different contracting 
States, to participating learned associations and to the public in 
general under established conditions. 

4. The elaboration of an ethnographic bibliography embody- 
ing the published writings (books and articles from periodicals) in 
all languages and in all countries; 

a). Published at all times (progressive service), 
b). Published during the current year (service to increase as 
much as possible). 

5. The publication of the current part of this catalogue, and 
the communication of the results for the anterior part. 

Article 3. To this end there is established in Brussels an 
International Bureau of Ethnography charged with the organiza- 
tion of such divers services. 

Article 4. This bureau enjoys all the rights attached to a 
civil person after the manner of permitting him to receive gifts and 
bequests, and of contracting for work and pubhcation, of civil en- 
gagements in the sphere of their privileges. 

Article 5. The bureau functions under the direction of an 



international committee formed by the delegates of all the con- 
tracting states. This international committee will be composed of 
three delegates for each nation, of which one delegate shall have the 
title of National Commissioner, who shall be especially designated. 

They are nominated for a term of six years. 

This committee will unite at least once every two years, and 
consider all the decisions and conclusions relating to the Inter- 
national Bureau of Ethnography. It shall be empowered to con- 
vene more frequently, but at the initiative of the executive of the 
bureau or at the demand of four of the adhering states. 

Article 6. The national commissioners shall unite at least 
once each year and exercise the control of administration, and es- 
pecially verify the accounts. 

Each commissioner will be, in place of his government, the 
ordinary intermediary to the International Bureau of Ethnography. 
He will communicate to it the results received by way of missions, 
of inquiries or otherwise. He will transmit the requirements of 
the International Bureau to his Government or Principal. 

Article 7. In the interval between sessions, the execution of 
the scientific decisions of the international committee, and the man- 
agement of the administrative affairs, shall be confined to an execu- 
tive bureau composed of the President, permanent Secretary, and 
Assistant Secretary. 

For scientific affairs not foreseen, the Bureau shall take, through 
correspondence, the advice of the delegates of the different govern- 
ments. 

Likewise for administrative affairs not foreseen, the Bureau 
will take, through correspondence, the advice of the national com- 
missioners of the different governments. 

It shall be the duty of the bureau to fix the dates of the meet- 
ings of the international committee, as well as to convoke the dele- 
gates of the contracting states, indicating the order of the day of 
meeting. 

The communications to the International Bureau of Ethnog- 
raphy with the adhering governments will be through the inter- 
mediary of the national commissioners. 

Article 8. Each country may encourage the co-operation of 
its own learned men and own learned societies ; but the communica- 
tion of this organization shall be made to the International Bureau 
of Ethnography. 

The bureau may enter into direct relations with all societies 
of ethnography, of sociology, of geography and other scientific or- 
ganization which wish to co-operate in the realization of the aim 
of the Institution; likewise with men of science and, in general, 
individuals. 

Article 9. If the amount of donations, legacies and subsidies 



arisinjL,' from individuals or free insliUitiuns, capitalized at 3 per cent, 
reaches at least the sixth of the allowance of the ])articipating states, 
there shall he formed a committee of donors which shall be represented 
by twQ members of the international committee. 

Article 10. A report upon the work and the financial ad- 
ministration of the bureau shall be addressed each year to the adher- 
ing governments. To the report will be annexed a statement of the 
preliminary budget for the following year and the program of un- 
dertakings. 

Article ii. The budget of the International Bureau of Eth- 
nography will be supported by annual assessments of the contracting 
members and states, by the proceeds of the sale of publications 
and by taxes to be calculated upon information furnished, and by 
gifts and legacies. 

The amount of the assessments assigned annually to the bureau 

by the adhering states, is fixed at the minimum figure of . 

(This amount shall be fixed at the first meeting of the international 
committee:, it will depend in effect upon divers circumstances not 
yet determined, especially upon the number of languages into which 
the documents shall be translated and published.) 

The asses^ifients not consumed in the operations, shall be re- 
ported at the end of the year. They may serve, should there be 
a surplus, to constitute a reserve fund. 

Above the annual assessments a capital of (likewise re- 
served as above) shall be put the first year at the disposition of the 
bureau for installation expenses. The States and Colonies which 
shall hereafter make use of the privileges of joining, according to 
Article 17, shall have to pay their share of this sum upon the basis 
of assessments as fixed in Article 13. 

Article 12. The States and Colonies which withdraw from 
the bureau at the expiration of the first term of twenty years, shall 
lose their participating rights in the common fund. 

In case of liquidation the common fund shall be partitioned 
among the States and Colonies of the International Bureau after a 
basis of distribution as provided for in Article 13. 

Article 13. The contributing part of the contracting states 
in the annual assessment to the International Bureau of Ethnog- 
raphy, as well as the first installments, is established in units upon 
the double base of their population and of economic activity. 

As for population, a unit shall be considered as 500,000 inhabit- 
ants. As for economic activity, a unit shall be considered as 50,- 
000,000 francs of foreign commerce, imports and exports together. 

Article 14. The amount of the personal contribution of each 
state is rendered in an agreed proportion in subscriptions to pub- 
lications calculated at a price of public sale reduced one-fifth. 

The use of collections by the delegates of the central administra- 



tion of the adhering states is free. It shall answer, without expense, 
to all their demands for information. 

Article 15. The total assessment of the contracting states 
divided by the sum of the units attributed to each of them in execu- 
tion of the preceding arrangements, will give the unit of the part 
leviable. It will suffice to multiply this by the number of units 
assigned to each of the states to find the amount of its contribution 
to the budget of the International Bureau of Ethnography. 

Article 16. In order to place the institution in position to 
reahze its object as exact and complete as possible, the contracting 
parties engage themselves each so far as concerns its own country. 

1 To execute, as rapidly as possible, the obUgations springing 
from Article 2. 

2 To address to the International Bureau: 

a). A copy of all official publications (books or periodicals) 
appearing which pertain to the aim of the institution. 

b). The Hst, manuscript or printed, of all works (books or 
pamphlets) which shall appear in the future. This list which shall 
be addressed to the Bureau of Ethnography with as much regularity 
as possible, shall be held as official. It shall indicate for each work 
the name and surname of the author, or the name of the pubhsher. 
The title of the work with eventually such necessary supplementary 
directions as to assure a methodic classification by contents of the 
work, on examining the title, the place and date of publication, the 
size, number of pages and price. 

Article 16. The rule of procedure having the same obligatory 
force as the present convention, but within the limits of this same, 
shall be made by the international committee. 

Article 17. Those States and Colonies which have not taken 
part in the present convention, may be admitted later. Their ac- 
cession will be made in writing to the Belgian Government which shall 
make the fact known to all the other contracting governments. The 
accession shall carry in full right adhesion of all the clauses and ad- 
missions, to all the advantages stipulated in the present convention. 

Article 18. The present convention shall go into effect the 
and shall remain in effect during twenty years. 

If twelve months before the expiration of the first twenty years, 
the present convention shall not disband, the Bureau shall exist 
during a new period of twenty years, and so on. Withdrawal shall 
be addressed to the Belgian Government. It shall not be in effect 
as regards the country which shall make it, the convention remaining 
executor for the other adhering countries. 



Later the National Museum and the Field Museum were invited 
to become members of the provisional organizing body. 



^ 



i 



i 



I