(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

LIBRARY 

OF THL 

U N 1 VE.RSITY 

or ILLINOIS 

SOT 




The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which It was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



FfB 1 19117 




UBHAny 



FIELJ MJit^ V I'i- rjAi.^-A. Hi-_, 



RF.P'^RTS PL. I. 




THE LATE MARSHALL FlELD 



Field Museum of Natural History 

Publication iiq 

Report Series. Vol. Ill, No. i. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1906 



LIBRARV 

OF THE 

''NlVERSlTyCflLUNOla 



IHE UBMRY OF THE 

FEB 14 1938 

•HWRSITY OF ILUNOIS 



Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1907 






\qo' 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, 4 

Officers and Committees, 5 

Staflf, 6 

Maintenance, 9 

Lecture Courses, 10 

Publications, 12 

Library 15 

Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling 16 

Accessions, 18 

Expeditions and Field Work 93 

Installation and Permanent Improvement, 28 

Taxidermy, 32 

Printing and Photography, 32 

Attendance, S3 

Financial Statement, 37 

Accessions, 40 

Department of Anthropology, 40 

Department of Botany 42 

Department of Geology, 46 

Department of Zoology, 50 

Section of Photography 54 

The Library 55 

Articles of Incorporation, 98 

Amended By-Laws, 100 

Honorary Members and Patrons, 103 

List of Corporate Members, ; ... 104 

List of Life Members, 105 

List of Annual Members, 106 



Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



George E. Adams. 
Owen F. Alois. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Stanley Field. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George Manierre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
Norman B. Ream. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 
Edwin Walker. 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



George R. Davis. 
FIuntingtox W. Ta-ckson. 



Jan., 1907. 



Annual Report of the Director, 



OFFICERS. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, President. 
Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Stanley Field, Second Vice-President. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, Chairman Executive Committee, 
George Manierre, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, Chairman Ex Officio. 
Edward E. Ayer. ^ Norman B. Ream. 

Owen F. Alois. Martin A. Ryerson, 



Watson F. Blair. 



FINANCE committee. 

Martin A. Ryerson. 



Stanley Field. 



committee on building. 
Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
George E. Adams. William J. Chalmers, 

Cyrus H. McCormick. Owen F. Aldis. 



AUDITING committee. 



George Manierre. 



Arthur B. Jones, 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



STAFF OF THF MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A. Dorsey, Curator. 
S. C. SiMMS, Assistmit Curator Division of Ethnology. 
Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archeology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 
Jesse M. Greenman, Assistayit Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farrington, Curator. H. W. Nichols, Assistant Curator. 

Elmer S. Riggs, Assistant Curator Paleontology. 

Arthur W. Slocom, Assistant Curator Section of Invertebrate 

Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

D. G. Elliot, Honorary and Supervisory Curator. 
Charles B. Cory, Curator. 

Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator. 

William J. Gerhard, Assistayit Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edward N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 
N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator Division of Ornithology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

TAXIDERMIST-IN-CHIEF. 

Carl E. Akeley. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1905-1906. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 



The death of Mr. Marshall Field, the founder of the Museum, has 
occurred since the date of the last report. The Trustees of the Museum 
have expressed their estimate of Mr. Field's character and services to 
society, by formal resolutions. The Director and scientific and busi- 
ness staff of the institution have no opporttmity of offering their 
tribute except through the medium of this report. 

It would be difficult to convey an adequate idea of the impression 
made upon the working body of the Museum by the death of Mr. 
Field without apparent exaggeration, but this must be said: There 
was no one in the service of the Museum who did not feel an iincommon, 
solemn sense of personal loss and individual grief. 

Mr. Field visited the Museum much oftener than would have 
been supposed by those acquainted only with his business habits. 
He had a better understanding of the purposes, the needs, the dif- 
ficulties, and the possibilities of the Museum than any person except 
those intimately associated with its direct management. It cannot 
be said that Mr. Field was proud of the Museum, but he was grateful 
that this institution had grown up in Chicago. He was conscious 
that his public spirit was doing good for society, and he was aware of 
the fact that his aid had contributed to give Chicago a standing as 
a culture seeking and teaching community, in every thoughtful, 
intellectual center, at home and abroad. 

Mr. Field did not command respect; he invited it. No one 
connected with the institution, from the least to the greatest in im- 
portance, but had been made to feel by some indescribable look, 
movement or expression, of which Mr. Field was complete master, 
that the efforts of this particular person were understood and appre- 
ciated by him. It gave everyone connected with the Museum the 
greatest satisfaction to know that Mr. Field was in the building and 
was inspecting his work. His questions and observations, though 
often keen and searching, were always marked by modesty and defer- 
ence, and strangers seeing him pass about the courts and halls would 
not distinguish him from a casual visitor. 

7 



8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

The serious and anxious bearing of all of the employees in the 
Museum, — the common laborer, the janitor, the skilled workman, 
the clerks, — and throughout the entire staff during the week preced- 
ing his death, and the expressions and manner of regret and grief after 
his death, disappearing very slowly as the days grew, gave unques- 
tioned testimony of the genuineness of the prevailing unusual sorrow 
that the improving and helpful influence of the splendid character, 
whose name was borne by the institution for which they labored, 
had been withdrawn. 

Naturally, while Mr. Field officially had nothing to do with the 
conduct of the Museum, many questions in one way and another 
reached him for advice and decision. Mr. Field was wise in his con- 
ception of a subject, and he seemed to get directly at the positive 
and negative elements of a problem. He was just and fair, and in 
weighing out a general proposition, he never appeared to lose accoxmt 
of the individual equation, that is to say, what the result might be at 
present, or in the future, to any individual, no matter how humble, 
who might be involved in the outcome. In cases where he had learned 
of the illness or misfortime of any one connected with the Museum, 
his personal and helpful attentions, where possible, were never lack- 
ing, while his individual courtesies were numerous and unfailing. 
From the day that Mr. Field permitted his name to be used in desig- 
nating the institution, no one connected with it doubted the security 
of its future, nor the certainty of its development along right lines. 
His name was a great asset, as it has become a valuable legacy. 



I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending December 31, 1906: 

The annoimcement of the change in the name of the Museum 
has been received with satisfaction by contemporaries, and with the 
approval of the general public. This change established, as it states 
clearly, the scope of the institution. In anticipation of this step, 
the Curators of the departments have been engaged for some time in 
removing irrelevant material, and since the date of the change, which 
carried with it a contraction of operations to within the exact lines 
of the natural sciences, much other material has been taken from 
exhibition and the departments readjusted to the new order of things. 

Coincident with the change in the name of the Museum, the 
Trustees made several alterations in the articles of incorporation and 
the by-laws of the corporate body. Among these, an important 



imAHY 
OF THE 

mmmyoFmois 




< 

UJ 

O 
b 



Ll. 



z 

? 

o 

_J 
_J 

o 
li. 

(/) 
>- 
< 
Q 



I 



a: 
O 
u. 

O 
uJ 

to 

O 
a. 

X 
UJ 

< 

Q 

Z 

o 

QC 

3 
UJ 
(O 

3 



Z 



(3 

z 
z 

CE 

o 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 9 

change was that of the fiscal year, which was made to close December 
thirty-first, instead of September thirtieth, each year. This report, 
consequently, covers fifteen months — namely, from October first, 
1905, to December thirty -first, 1906. 

A provision in the will of Mr. Field gave to the Museum the sum 
of four million dollars for a building to be erected upon a site to be 
furnished for that purpose, provided a suitable one is procured 
within six years from the date of Mr. Field's death. The plans for 
the new building which Mr. Field had under personal and constant 
supervision for over a year before his death, and in which he took the 
deepest interest, were upon a scale calling for the expenditure of more 
than four million dollars. The architects have, therefore, been en- 
gaged the past year in conforming the plans to these new conditions, 
and in this work the Director and the Curators of the scientific 
departments have been giving aid. The plans are now practically 
complete, and all of the authorities have agreed upon their adaptability 
and ampleness to and for the practical purposes of the Museum, and, 
when pending -questions affecting the proposed site in Grant Park 
shall have been determined, work upon the new building will be com- 
menced. Messers. D. H. Bumham & Company are the architects. 

The donation of $20,000, made by Robert F. Cummings for the 
purpose of an ethnological survey of the Philippine Islands, has en- 
abled the Museum to inaugurate this work among the peoples of that 
archipelago. It is believed that the contribution of Mr. Cummings 
will be supplemented from other sources, if not increased by himself, 
and that the Museum will be able to maintain parties for investigation 
and collection in these islands for several years. Account of what has 
already been accomplished in carrying into effect the intentions of 
this contribution will be fotmd in this report, among the references to 
the department of Anthropology. 

Maintenance. — The amount expended for the maintenance of the 
Museum from October i, 1905, to December 31, 1906, was $156,415, 
which, considering the period covered, fifteen months, is well within 
the authorized Budget. This is especially gratifying when the tinusual 
cost of repairs and improvements to the building is considered, which, 
as years go on, naturally demand increased attention and watchful- 
ness. The total amoimt expended, as shown by the financial state- 
ment, was $236,740; the difference is accounted for by special appro- 
priations for cases, expeditions, and collections purchased. 

Staff OF THE Museum. — The resignation of Curator D. G. Elliot 



lO ImIM.U MuSKU.M VI- XAlTkAI. IllsiOkV REPORTS, \'uL. III. 

of the Department of Zoology, and his acceptance of the post of 
Honorary and Supervisory Curator of the same department, was an 
important chanije in the scientific staff during the year. The change 
was the result of the consideration of two years, and is intended to 
give Mr. Elliot greater freedom of action with regard to his individual 
work and movements, and at the same sime to retain to the depart- 
ment, over which he has presided since the opening of the Museum, the 
benefits of his scholarly attainments and wide Museum experience. 
His successor as Curator of the department is Charles B. Cory, lately 
of Boston, but now a resident of Chicago, who, since the inaugura- 
tion of the Museum, has been the Curator of Ornithology. Orni- 
thology now becomes a division of the department of Zoology, and 
Mr. Cor^' becomes the curator of all the divisions and sections that 
Would naturally come under Zoology. The personnel of the depart- 
mental staff remains otherwise unchanged. 

Lecture Courses. — Three Lecture Courses have been given since 
the date of the last Annual Report, and a gratifying increase in the 
attendance has to be recorded. There have been very few lectures 
when the demands for admission have not exceeded the capacity of 
the hall. 

Following is the Twenty-third Lecture Course, with the subjects 
and lecturers, delivered during the months of October and November, 
1905: 

Oct. 7. — "Land of the Maya." 

Dr. Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany. 

Oct. 14. — "The Making of the Grand Canon." 

Prof. A. R. Crook, Northwestern University, 
Evanston, 111. 

Oct. 21. — " Hayti — The Negro Republic." 

Mr. George V. Nash, New York Botanical Garden. 

Oct. 28. — "The Trout and Salmon of North America." 

Dr. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

Nov. 4. — "The Fishes of Illinois." 

Dr. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

Nov. II. — "Primitive Art." 

Dr. Clark Wissler, Curator of Anthropology, 
American Museum of Natural History. 

Nov. iS. — "Meteorites." 

Dr. O. C. Farrington, Curator of Geology. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. ii 

Nov. 25. — "The Nesting Habits of Birds." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator of Ornithology. 

The following is the Twenty -fourth Lecture Course, delivered 
during the months of March and April, 1906: 

March 3. — "Colors of Flowers, Fruits, and Foliage." 

Prof. W. H. Dudley, Platteville, Wisconsin. 

March 10. — "Some Aspects of Archaeological Work in Central 

America." 
Dr. Alfred M. Tozzer, Harvard University. 
March 17. — "The Work of a State Geological Survey." 

Prof. H. Foster Bain, Director, Illinois Geological 
Survey. 
March 24. — "How People Live in Congo Land." 

Dr. D. W. C. Snyder, Lecturer for the Board of 
Education, City of New York. 
March 31. — "Love and War Among Animals." 

Mr. Ernest Ingersoll, New York City. 
April 7. — "Glaciers." 

Prof. N. M. Fenneman, University of Wisconsin. 
April 14. — "The Seri Indians of Sonora." 

Dr. W J McGee, Director, St. Louis Public Museum. 
April 21. — " How Plants Breathe." 

Prof. C. R. Barnes, University of Chicago. 

The following is the Twenty-fifth Lecture Course, deUvered dur- 
ing the months of October and November, 1906: 

Oct. 6. — "The Racial Problems of Oceania." 

Dr. Alfred Cort Haddon, F. R. S., F. Z. S., Univer- 
sity of Cambridge, England. 
Oct. 13. — "Social and Religious Evolution in Melanesia." 

Dr. Alfred Cort Haddon, F. R. S., F. Z. S., Univer- 
sity of Cambridge, England. 
Oct. 20. — "The Century Plant, and some other Plants of the 

Dry Country." 
Prof. WilHamTrelease, Director, Missouri Botanical 
Garden, St. Louis. 

Oct. 27. — "Within the Arctic Circle." 

Prof. J. H. Gore, The George Washington Univer- 
sity, Washington, D. C. 



12 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Nov. 3. — "Deep Sea Fishing and Fishes." 

Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

Nov. ro. — "An Omitholo.>,ast in Guatemala." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Ornithology. . 

Nov. 17. — "Some Phases of Plant Distribution." 

Dr. J. M. Greenman, Assistant Curator of Botany. 

Publications. — The following list is presented, giving the titles 
of pubUcations issued since the date of the last report, with the number 
of pages and illustrations: 

Pub. 104 — Zoological Series, Vol. VII., No. i. "An Annotated 
List of a Collection of Reptiles from Southern Cali- 
fornia and Northern Lower CaHfomia." By S. E. 
Meek. 19 pp., 3 illustrations (half tones), edition 
1,500- 

Pub. 105. — Zoological Series, Vol. VI. "A Check List of Mammals 
of the North American Continent, the West Indies, 
and the Neighboring Seas." By D. G. Elliot. 761 
pp., edition 2,000. 

Pub. 106. — Botanical Series, Vol. II., No. 3. "Praentmciae Baham- 
enses — I. Contribution to a Flora of the Bahamian 
Archipelago." Bv C. F. Millspaugh. 47 pp., edition 
1,500. 

Pub. 107. — Report Series, Vol. II., No. 5. Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees, for the Year 1904- 
1905. 10 1 PJ1., II illustrations (half tones), edition 
2,500. 

Pub. 108. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII., No. 2. "A Catalogue of 
the Fishes of Bermuda, with Notes on a Collection 
made in 1895 for Field Museum." By T. H. Bean. 
69 pp., 14 illustrations, edition 1,500. 

Pub. 109. — Geological Series, Vol. III., No. 2. "The Shelbume 
and South Bend Meteorites." By 0. C. Farrington. 
16 pp., 13 illustrations (half tones), 2 maps, edition 
1,500. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 13 

Pub. no. — Geological Series, Vol. II., No. 7. "The Carapace and 
Plastron of Basilemys Sinuosus. A New Fossil 
Tortoise from the Laramie Beds of Montana." By 
E. S. Riggs. 8 pp., 3 illustrations (half tones), 
edition 1,500. 

Pub. III. — Geological Series, Vol. III., No. 3. "New Forms of 
Concretions." By H. W. Nichols. 29 pp., 9 
illustrations (half tones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 112. — Geological Series, Vol. III., No. 4. "Zoisite from 
Lower California." By O. C. Farrington. 3 pp., 
I illustration (half tone), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 113. — Geological Series, Vol. II., No. 8. "A List of Devonian 
Fossils collected in Western New York. With Notes 
on their Stratigraphic Distribution." By A. W. 
Slocom. 9 pp., 2 illustrations (one map and one 
half tone), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 114. — Geological Series, Vol. II., No. 9. " Hypsocrinus, A 
New Genus of Crinoids from the Devonian." By 
Frank Springer and A. W. Slocom. 5 pp., i illustra- 
tion, edition 1,500. 

Pub. 116. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 3. "Description of 
Three New Species of Fishes from Middle America." 
By S, E. Meek. 3 pp., edition 1,500. 
The Museum Exchange List now numbers 1,207 names, of which 

589 are in foreign countries and 618 in the United States and its 

possessions. 

The following table shows the number of exchanges with each 

of the foreign countries: 

Canada, 27 Yucatan 2 

Central America, .... 6 Argentine Republic, . . .11 

Cuba, West Indies, and Ceylon, 7 Brazil, 10 

Mexico, 16 British Guiana, i 

Chile, 2 Malta, 1 

Peru, ........ 2 Norway, 8 

U. S. Colombia, ..... 2 Portugal, 5 

Uruguay, .•....'.. i Roumania, i 

Austria, ........ 29 Russia, 18 

Belgium, 14 Spain, 5 

Denmark, ....... 4 Sweden, 10 

France, 52 Switzerland, 14 

Germany 128 China, 



I 



14 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



Great Britain, 

Greece, 

The N'etherlands, , 

Australia, . 

Fiji Islands, . 

New Zealand. 

Borneo, 

Tasmania, 

Italv 



2 

I 

6 
I 



India, . 
Japan, 
liast Africa, 
Bjrypt,. . 
Lil)eria, 
South Africa, 



15 
6 



1 1 



Total 589 



Alabama, 
Arizona, 
Arkansas, 
California, 



I 

I 

31 



The following table shows the number of exchanges receiving the 

different publications: 

Anthropological, 291 

Botanical, 293 

Geological, 326 

Ornithological, 184 

Zoological, 269 

Report 589 

The publications are distributed to the different states as follows: 

Nebraska, 7 

Nevada i 

New Hampshire, .... 5 

New Jersey, 16 

New York 91 

North Carolina 

New Mexico i 

Ohio 22 

Oregon i 

Pennsylvania 39 

Rhode Island 5 

South Carolina i 

South Dakota. .... 2 
Tennessee, .2 

Texas . 2 

Utah I 

Vermont. . 3 

Virginia 3 

Washington 3 

West Virginia 4 

Wisconsin 17 

Wyoming 2 



Colorado 13 

Connecticut 21 

Delaware 2 

District of Colurtibia, ... 79 

Florida 2 

Georgia r 

Illinois 57 

Indiana 12 

Iowa, . . 13 

Kansas, S 

Kentucky. 2 

Louisiana, . . 4 

Maine, (^ 

Maryland 11 

Massachusetts 70 

Michigan to 

Minnesota. .10 

Mississippi, .3 

Missouri . . 15 

Montana,. . 3 



Total 



610 



The following tables show the number of exchanges receiving the 
different publications: 



Anthropological, 
Botanical. . 



257 
3'.S 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 15 

Geological 336 

Ornithological, 177 

Zoological, 272 

Report 610 

The following table shows the number of exchanges with each of 

the Insular Possessions. 

Philippine Islands, 2 

Porto Rico, I 

Hawaii, 5 

Total, 8 

The number of exchanges receiving the different publications in 
the Insular Possessions are as follows: 

Anthropological, 2 

Botanical 5 

Geological 3 

Ornithological, 2 

Zoological 6 

Report 8 

Library. — During the period covered by this report 5,187 books 
and pamphlets have been added to the Library, doubling the acces- 
sions of recent years. Among the purchases of special interest are: 
Blanco's Flora de Filipinas; Historia Naturali Palmarum; Biologia 
Centrali Americana, Botany and Zoology; a collection of zoological 
works obtained from Dr. D. G. Elliot, consisting of 1,244 books and 
pamphlets; and a collection of botanical works brought together 
by Dr. C. F. Millspaugh, consisting of 1,500 books, and pamphlets. 
Among the gifts special mention is made of the "Investigations and 
Studies in Jade," describing and illustrating the Bishop collection in 
the Metropolitan Museum in New York. This magnificent edition, 
presented by the estate of the late Heber R. Bishop of New York, was 
privately printed and limited to 100 copies. The Museum is to 
be congratulated upon being one of the fortunate recipients. Note- 
worthy gifts were also received from the Due de Loubat ; Dr. Antonio 
Penafiel, City of Mexico, Mexico; D -. T. J. Cheeseman, Auckland, 
New Zealand; Dr. Edward Seler, Berlin, Germany; Mr. George 
Murray Guion, Chicago ; Anthropological Society of Bombay, Calcutta, 
India; Musee du Congo, Bruxelles, Belgium; Musee d'Histoire 
Naturelle, Marseilles, France; Svenska Sallskapet Antropologia och 
Geografi, Stockholm, Sweden; Rijks Musee van Natuurlijke Histoire, 
Leyden, Netherlands; Cincinnati Museum of Natural History; and 
the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis. Exchanges have been 



i6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

received from 625 societies and institutions and 137 individuals. 
Continuous efforts are made to effect exchanges with contemporary 
institutions, and during the year 125 names have been added to the 
mailing list. No changes of importance have been made in the routine 
work of the library. Twelve installments of the John Crerar Library 
cards have been received and filed and 12,483 cards revised and 
newly written for the three catalogues. The books and pamphlets 
are distributed as follows: 

Books and Pamphlets. 

General Library 31,766 

Department of Anthropoloj;;y, I1275 

Department of Botany 2,786 

Department of Geology, 5,082 

Department of Zodlogy 850 

Departmental Cataloguing. Inventorying, and Labeling. — The cataloguing 
in the Department of Anthropology has been continued through- 
out the year as rapidly as possible, over eight thousand speci- 
mens being catalogued, and a card catalogue made of over sev- 
enty-five hundred specimens, all of which have been entered in the 
inventory books, which now number thirty. Owing to the great 
amount of material which has been received by this department 
during the year, and owing to the absence of the Assistant Curator of 
Ethnology on expedition for a large part of the year, a great deal of 
cataloguing had to be postponed. The manuscripts of specimen labels 
for the North Pacific Coast collections, numbering several thousand, 
have been prepared and are in the hands of the Museum printer. Case 
labels have been printed for six Northwest Coast Halls, as well as for 
all cases in California Hall, and nearly all have been put in place. 

In the Department of Botany, the cataloguing of organized and 
new material has been kept up to date in the forty-nine record books 
of the department. In this work, 15,490 entries have been made 
during the year, making a total of 193,498 in all. It is worthy of 
r-ecial notice that during the year a complete series of the extensive 
nd valuable Card-Index of Genera, Species and Varieties of Plants 
published since i88j (formerly issued by Miss Josephine A. Clark, 
Librarian of the Department of Agriculture, Washington, but latterly 
published by the Gray Herbarium of Harvard University), containing 
over 40,000 printed cards, has been acquired and carefully arranged, 
and a new steel case, especially designed to accompany the steel her- 
barium cases secured last year, has been installed to accommodate this 
index and the Index Botanique Universelle. 




< 

IT 

o 

z 
< 

s 
o 



.LIBRARY 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 17 

The work of cataloguing and inventorying has kept pace with 
the accessions in the Department of Geology, all material being entered 
as received. The total number of entries in the nineteen record 
books of the department is 63,102, of which 9,367 were made during 
the year. Approximately two thousand photographs are now 
preserved in the albums of this department; one hundred and seventy- 
eight being added during the year. To the series of photograph files, 
six have been added and one hundred additional photographs filed 
in them. In addition to the usual entry in the inventory books for 
the collections of vertebrate paleontology, a card catalogue has been 
inaugurated, which shows for each specimen its Museum and field 
number, when collected, locality, horizon, preparation and disposal, 
and a detailed description. The most important work of labeling 
performed was that of the systematic mineral collection. This 
labeling was required by the reinstallation of this collection. The 
new labels prepared show the name of the species, its number in 
Dana's system, its common name, if any, its chemical composition, 
the Museum number of the specimen, and its locality. The labels are 
of black cardboard and printed with aluminum ink. Each label is of a 
size to fit the block upon which the specimen is mounted, these blocks 
being in turn of sizes to fit the specimens. A total of 4,303 labels has 
been prepared for this collection, 2,871 of which have been printed. 
For the gem collection of Higinbotham Hall, labels have been pre- 
pared in part. These labels are printed with black ink on white 
cardboard to match the pads on which the gems are mounted, and 
correspond in size with the pads. They show the name and locality 
of the specimen, and, in the case of cut stones, the weight in carats. 
A total of 300 labels has been provided for this collection and in 
addition eighteen case labels. Labels have been prepared for the 
.collections of Hall 78 throughout, a total of 744 labels having been so 
prepared. These labels show the name of the specimen, its Museum 
number, and the locality whence obtained, and also state any special 
uses or characters of the material. Other labels prepared in the 
Department have been chiefly for new specimens installed. These 
include 68 labels for fossils, 206 for meteorites, 240 for ores, and one 
large descriptive label for the relief map of Niagara River. 

In the Department of Zoology the work of inventorying, cata- 
loguing, and labeling has claimed careful attention. The exactness 
and minuteness of the catalogue of the Illinois bird collection may be 
especially noted. In the division of mammalogy much time has been 



i8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. Ill, 



given to cataloguing, and a card catalogue of the general collection 
is almost completed. The identification and cataloguing of the 
various collections in the divisions of Ichthyology and Herpetology 
has been continued, bringing this phase of the work nearly up-to- 
date. The services of one of the collectors has been thus employed. 
The year's work in the Museum on catalogues and inventories is 
shown in detail below: 



Department of Anthropology, 
Department of Botany, 
Department of Geology, 
Department of Zoology, 

The Library 

Section of Photography, 



No. of 
Recor.l 

Books. 


Total No. of 

Entries to 

Dec. 31, 1906. 


Entries 

during 

1905-1906. 


ToUl No. 
of Cards 
Written. 


30 


80.124 


7.576 


84,014 


59 


193,490 


15.490 


* 


20 


62,202 


9.367 


6,630 


20 


57.350 


5.738 


22.413 


I I 


50.889 


7.187 


54.874 





48,923 


8.824 





Accessions. — The most important accessions in the Department 
of Anthropology during the year have been acquired by purchase ; 
the largest being a collection of several thousand objects from certain 
islands of the South Pacific, purchased from a dealer in Hamburg. A 
small collection, numbering about one thousand objects, was also 
purchased, most of the specimens representing the ethnology of the 
Polynesian Islands, and Benin, Africa. The benefaction of Mr. 
Robert F. Cummings made possible the purchase of two small, but 
exceedingly interesting, ethnological collections from the Philippine 
Islands. Either directly or indirectly, a considerable amount of material 
has been obtained through Museum expeditions. Such is the material 
from the Cheyenne, collected by Mr. James Mooney; from certain 
tribes of the Northwest Coast, collected by Dr. C. F. Xewcombe; 
from Borneo, collected by Mr. Alleyne Ireland ; from the Pawnee, 
collected by the Curator; and a large collection from the Mission 
Indians of Southern California, collected by the Assistant Curator of 
Archaeology. Among the important gifts to the Department during 
the year are those of Mr. Edward E. Ayer from Mexico, India, and the 
Philippine Islands; from Mr. Martin A. Ryerson, an excellent collec- 
tion of Swiss Lake relics, and a very interesting ancient Roman silver 
service from Mrs. Chauncey J. Blair. 

In the Department of Botany, the herbarium has been augmented 
during the past year by several important collections. Some of the 



♦This department does not use a card catalogue. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 19 

more noteworthy among these are the following: By gift: from 
Prof. J. W. Harshberger, 161 plants of Pennsylvania; from Capt. 
John Donnell Smith, 180 herbarium specimens, and 46 illustrations 
of Central American plants; from Mr. C. C. Haynes, 17 Hepaticeae; 
from Dr. George F. Gaumer, 374 plants of Yucatan; from Miss 
Edith M. Farr, 34 plants of British Columbia; from Mr. Albert H. 
Moore, 66 plants of Bermuda; from Prof. W. A. Kellerman, ;^^ 
plants of Guatemala; from the Geological Survey of Canada, through 
Mr. J. M. Macoun, 20 plants of Canada; from Miss Amy C. Lawton, 
105 plants of Nebraska; from the University of Chicago, through 
Prof. Charles R. Barnes, 122 plants of Mexico, collected by Prof. 
C. R. Barnes, Dr. C. J. Chamberlain, and Dr. W. J. G. Land. By 
exchange: from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 134 plants of 
Yucatan, collected by Dr. Geo. F. Gaumer; from the New York 
Botanical Garden, 615 plants of California, and 358 plants, chiefly 
from the Bahamas and the West Indies; from Mr. J. J. Carter, 
96 plants of Pennsylvania, and 13 from Maryland; from Estacion 
Central Agronomica, Cuba, 748 plants of Cuba; from Mr. Virginius 
H. Chase, 188 specimens of fungi; from the Bureau of Science, 
Department of the Interior, Manila, 996 plants of the Philippine 
Islands; from Prof. L. M. Umbach, 938 plants, chiefly from Mon- 
tana; from Naturhistorisches Hofmuseum, Vienna, through Prof. 
A. Zahlbruckner, 1072 plants of South Africa, collected by Eck- 
lon and Zeyher; from the Herbarium of Krug and Urban, through 
Prof. I. Urban, 50 herbarium specimens, consisting principally of 
type material. By purchase: from Mr. W. E. Broadway, 338 
plants of Grenada, W. I.; from Mr. O. B. Metcalfe, 578 plants of 
New Mexico, collected by himself; from Mr. A. H. Curtiss, 306 
plants of Cuba; from Mr. J. J. Carter, 227 plants of Florida; 
from Dr. Edward Palmer, 160 plants of Mexico; from Prof. 
J. W. Blankinship, 606 plants of Montana; from Mr. J. C. 
Blume, 100 plants of Colorado; from Mr. A. A. Heller, 532 plants of 
California; from Mr. T. S. Brandegee, 737 plants of Mexico, collected 
by Dr. C. A. Purpus; from Mr. Alex E. Wight, 402 plants of Jamaica 
From Expeditions: 762 plants of the Bahamas, collected by Mr 
L. J. K. Brace; Mrs. E. G. Britton; Dr. N. L. Britton and Mr. L. J 
K. Brace; Dr. N. L. Britton and Dr. C. F. Millspaugh; Mr. George V 
Nash and Mr. N. Taylor; 1062 plants of Mexico, collected by Dr. J 
M. Greenman; 616 plants of the Lake Chicago Basin, collected by 
Mr. O. E. Lansing, Jr. 



20 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. Ill, 



The following table shows the additions to the herbarium during 
the year, distributed geographically; it also indicates the total number 
of mounted sheets of herbarium specimens in the collection from the 
corresponding localities up to November 25, 1906: 



Locality. 

Africa 

Bahamas (in general"). 

Abaco, 

Andros, . 

Cat Cay, . 

Grand Turk, 

Great Bahama, . 

Great Isaac, 

Inaugua, 

Little Inaugua, . 

New Providence. 

North Bimini, 

South Bimini, 
Bermuda, .... 
California, 
Canada (in general), 

Alberta, . 

British Columbia, 
Central America, 
Colorado, .... 
Costa Rica, 



Cuba 1047 

Isle of Pines 

Dominica 

Florida 

Germany, 

Grenada, 

Guatemala 

Guiana, British 

Haiti 

Honduras, 

Idaho, . . 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Jamaica, . 

Japan 

Fonnosa, 

Kansas 



Additions to 


Total in organ- 


Herbarium 


ized Herbarium 


1905-1906 


to Nov. 2S, 1906 


1072 


1247 


118 


266 


300 


301 


I 


311 


13 


14 


51 


55 


205 


606 


I 


I 


7 


403 


2 


31 


191 


1504 


16 


17 


4 


5 


66 


21 1 


1142 


9454 


24 


1742 


I 


2 


45 


264 


46 


47 


lOI 


4422 


4 


318 


1047 


3915 


12 


650 


28 


74 


231 


8994 


2 


3940 


269 


768 


226 


351 


2 


68 


29 


294 


56 


112 


12 


710 


294 


14536 


95 


3190 


74 


858 


314 


3045 


I 


19 


I 


I 2s 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 21 

Additions to Total in organ- 
Herbarium ized Herbarium 

Locality. igos-1906 to Nov, 25 , 1906 

Maine, i 701 

Maryland, 13 608 

Massachusetts, 2 15 99 

Mexico, 1553 11090 

Minnesota, 3 477 

Missouri 3 565 

Montana, 1445 2862 

Nebraska, 105 147 

New Jersey, i 1221 

New Mexico, 471 1340 

New York, 25 4035 

North and South Dakota, 9 122 

Oklahoma i 45 

Panama i 28 

Patagonia, i i 

Pennsylvania 257 5939 

Philippine Islands, 996 997 

Porto Rico I 3125 

Texas, 2 2420 

United States of Colombia, i 2313 

Venezuela, 

Trinidad, 31 84 

Washington, 51 2551 

Wisconsin, . i 820 

Wyoming 19 322 

Yucatan, 307 443° 

1 1 403 

Among the important gifts in the Department of Geology may 
be mentioned a collection numbering 1,077 specimens of minerals 
and fossils from Charles A, Sawyer, in the name of his mother, Mrs. 
Elizabeth E. T. Sawyer. It is especially valuable for its stalactites 
from Galena, Illinois, and stalactites and minerals from numerous 
other localities. Mr. Ira B. Meyers presented to the Museum a superb 
fulgurite more than nine feet in length, doubtless one of the finest 
specimens in existence. The late Prof. Henry A. Ward presented 41 
sections of meteorites for microscopic study, making a total of more 
than 100 such slides received through his kindness. A fine series of 
crystallized barite showing a new habit and locality for this mineral 
was presented by Julian Pickles. A valuable representation of the 
kimberlite occurring in northeastern Kentucky was obtained by the 



22 Field Museum of Xatikai. History — Reports. Vol. III. 



gift of about loo pounds from Austin Q. Millar. Mr. Millar also pre- 
sented a series of gem garnets and olivines occurring at the same 
locality. About eighty specimens of garnet and sapphire from the 
United States of Colombia were presented by F. Pereira Gamba. 
A series of fossil plants from Ziegler, Illinois, containing many excel- 
lent specimens was presented by Joseph Leiter. Prof. C. N. Gould 
gave thirty-two specimens of sand-barite crystals of unusual character. 
From Harry Hill a good series of tin and bismuth ores from Alaska 
was received, and from the Premier Diamond Mining Company, a 
model of the CuUinan diamond, which is an exact fac-simile of this 
largest known diamond. Accessions by exchange include twenty 
specimens of the minerals and ores of Rhodesia, from the Rhodesia 
Museum, South Africa. In this collection an occurrence of gold in 
tc.lc is especially noteworthy, and other unusual occurrences are 
shown. By exchange with the University of Arizona a section of the 
Weaver meteorite weighing 372 grams was acquired, and, from the 
Natural History Museum of Paris, 62 grams of the La Becasse meteor- 
ite. From Dr. A. Brezina, Vienna, were received five specimens of new 
meteorite falls, and from the late Prof. H. A. Ward, a large section of 
the Cobija meteorite. A number of specimens of rare minerals were 
obtained from Mr. W. C. E. Seeboeck, also by exchange. A number 
of purchases were made within the year, chief among which may be 
enumerated relief maps of the Panama Canal, of New York City and 
vicinity, of the State of New York, of the United States showing 
rainfall and temperature, and of Niagara river and vicinity. Besides 
these, the Museum, acquired by. purchase a section of the Ilimaes 
meteorite weighing 393 grams, a full-sized slab of the Estacado me- 
teorite, 28 inches by 16 inches, and individual examples of the Ness 
City and Modoc falls. Other additions by purchase include a large 
series of the lavas and other products of the eruption of Vesuvius 
of 1906; a slab of fossil echinoids from California; and about 100 
specimens of Ordovician fossils of Bohemia, containing about 50 
species new to the collections. 

In the Department of Zoology an exceedingly large number of 
specimens were added — by gift, purchase, exchange and expedition. 
A collection of one hundred and seventy specimens of mammals was 
purchased from Professor Cory, most of the material having been taken 
in Florida and the West Indies. During the year in all six hundred 
and thirty specimens have been added to the collection of mam- 
mals. The most interesting mammals purchased were those from 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 



23 



a London dealer, which included a Chinese water deer, a blue 
duiker, a white-eared kob and a chimpanzee; all of which, with the 
exception of the last being species new to the Museum collection. 
About one thousand bird skins were purchased from Professor Cory, 
and 448 bird skins from Guatemala from Mr. William B. Richardson. 
By the expeditions of Mr. Heller, Mr. Barber, and Mr Dearborn 
about twelve hundred specimens of bird skins were added to the 
collections, from Guatemala. In Illinois, Mr. Ferry and Mr. Dearborn 
secured about six htmdred specimens of birds, eggs, and nests during 
the year. Dr. Tarleton H. Bean during his visit to the Bermudas 
collected about eighteen hundred specimens of fishes, many new to the 
Museum collections and some new to science. The efforts of Dr. 
Meek in Central America yielded about fifteen hundred specimens 
of fishes and a large number of shells and other zoological specimens. 
The purchase of one hundred specimens of mounted fishes from 
Hawaii from S. F. Denton of Wellesley, Mass., was an important 
acquisition. The additions during the year in the Division of Entomol- 
ogy aggregated 14,435 specimens; of this number 11,921 were pur- 
chased, 1 ,094 were collected by assistants and others on Museum expe- 
ditions, and 1,420 were presented. In the Division of Osteology no 
new specimens have been added to the collection and 464 skulls have 
been bleached and cleaned for use in the study collection of mammals. 
Twenty-seven skeletons were cleaned and prepared, but not mounted. 
The classification of accessions follows : 





Number of 


Number of 




Accessions. 


Specimens 


Gifts, 


196 


8,288 


Exchanges 


39 


5.850 


Collected, .... 


69 


27.763 


Purchase, .... 


80 


28,107 


Collated, .... 


. . . ..... 9 


78 


Transfer 


S 


100 



Expeditions AND Field Work. — The Curator of Anthropology continued 
his investigations among the Arapaho and Pawnee, the work in 
connection with the last-named tribe being performed on behalf 
of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Assistant Curator Owen 
made his second visit to the Mission Indians, in Southern California, 
among whom he spent the first five months of the year, visiting a 
number of tribes and revisiting others. As a result of this expedi- 
tion the collection from the Mission Indians is fairly complete. Mr. 



24 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

James Mooney continued his researches among the Cheyenne, in 
accordance with the arrangements entered into with the Bureau of 
Ethnology. Dr. Newcombe concluded the work which he began 
last year among the Haida and Kwakiutl. By far the most important 
expedition of the year has been that of Assistant Curator Simms to 
the Philippine Islands. This was made possible by the generosity of 
Mr. R. F. Cummin gs, which is referred to elsewhere in this Report. 
The fund subscribed by Mr. Cummings is to be used in defraying the 
expense of exploration in the Philippine Islands for the next four or 
five years, which shall have for its object the investigation of the 
linguistic stocks, their physical types and the general culture of the 
Non-Christian tribes of the Philippine Islands. Mr. Simms spent 
five months among Igorrot tribes in northern Luzon, and is now 
returning to Chicago, after having made an extensive collection, 
numbering over fifteen hundred objects. Miss Laura E. Benedict 
has also begun work in the Islands, and is at the present time conduct- 
ing investigations among the Bagobo. In December Mr. F. C. Cole 
of the Museum staff left for the Islands to take up systematic invest- 
igation of the tribes, commencing with those of Luzon. It is pre- 
dicted that from the results of these expeditions the Museum will 
not only acquire an extensive and interesting collection of objects 
illustrating the culture of the tribes of the Islands, but also that some 
important contributions to the knowledge of these tribes will be made. 
Dr. J. M. Greenman, Assistant Curator, Department of Botany, 
passed the greater part of the months of January and February in 
Mexico. The object of this expedition was two-fold: First, to obtain 
additional material and a field knowledge of the Leguminosae, towards 
the elaboration of this group in the forthcoming Flora of Yucatan ; 
second, to study the flora of the coastal region of Vera Cruz, chiefly 
in the so-called Tierra Caliente, in order to ascertain its relation to the 
flora of the xerophytic regions of Yucatan. As a result of the expe- 
dition over eleven hundred plants, including herbarium specimens and 
formalin material, were secured. Two months were spent in Europe 
by the Curator of Botany, in visiting and investigating the material 
and methods of installation in as many Natural History Museums as 
was consistent w4th the time at his disposal. During this visit the 
following Museums and Gardens were studied: The British Museum 
of Natural History, South Kensington, the Kensington Gardens, the 
Botanical Gardens and Museums at Kew and the Linnean Society, 
London; the Manchester Museum of Owens College, Manchester; 



Jan.. 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 25 

the Free Public Museum, Liverpool; the Museum of the [Royal 
College of Surgeons, London; the Rijks Museum and Herbarium, 
Leyden ; the Kolonial Museum, Haarlem ; the Museum der Provinz- 
Hannover, Hannover; the Botanischer Garten, Steglitz; the Botan- 
isches Museum, Schoneberg; the Naturhistorisches Musuem and the 
Museum ftirVolkerkunde, Berlin ; the Konigl. Hofmuseum, the Grosser 
Garten, the Botanischer Garten, and the Technologische Hochschule, 
Dresden; the Museum Regni Bohemiae and Botanischer Garten, 
Praag; the K. K. Hofmuseum, Vienna; the Museo Storia Naturale, 
the Giardino Botanico, and the Reale Instituto di Studi Superiori, 
Florence; the gardens of the Villa Pallavicini, Genoa; the Museum 
Civico and Giardini Publici, Milan ; the Cantonal School and Museum, 
Luzerne, the Herbarium Boissier and Natural History Museum, 
Geneva; the Jardin des Plantes and its great museums, Paris; the 
Dendrological Museum and the Museum of the Congo, Brussels; the 
Botanisches Museum and Naturhistorisches Museum, Hamburg; 
and the Naturhistorisches Museum, Bremen. O. E. Lansing, Jr., 
a preparator in this department, made occasional trips during the 
summer months in and around Chicago, and secured much desirable 
material. 

Early in February, a report having been received of a fall of 
meteorites in western Kansas, the Curator of Geology visited that 
section for purposes of investigation. His studies in the vicinity 
resulted in the discovery and the acquisition of one of the largest 
and finest meteorites of the fall. In addition, a number of other 
individual aerolites of the fall were obtained from residents of the 
locality. The collecting of vertebrate fossils in the field was continued 
by a party in charge of Assistant Curator Riggs during four months 
of the summer. Owing to heavy rains and the impossibility of 
securing proper camp help, the work of the party was considerably 
hindered, but a good collection of hitherto luirepresented forms was 
nevertheless obtained. The formation in which the work was carried 
on was the Loup Fork Miocene of Nebraska and Wyoming. A typical 
series of the fossils of this period was secured, and a large number of 
specimens were obtained, chief among which may be mentioned one 
excellent titanothere skull; thirty -one specimens of various forms of 
the camel family; twenty-four specimens of Oreodonts, representing 
three or four different genera and including in one specimen four indi- 
viduals ; four incomplete skeletons of fossil dogs and two mustellines ; 
two nearly complete skeletons and several skulls of rodents and four 



26 Field Museum of Naturai. History — Reports, Vol. III. 

quite complete specimens of turtles. The o[)ening of some new 
quarries at Romeo, Illinois, having disclosed fossiliferous strata not 
hitherto available, coUectinj^ was carried on by Mr. Slocom at the 
locality at intervals. In addition, he visited some already known 
but not lately worked localities of the same formation, such as those 
at Lemont, Hawthorne, Elmhurst, and Thornton, Illinois. In August 
about two weeks were also spent by Mr. Slocom collecting among the 
Middle Devonian areas in the vicinity of Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 
Field work in Cruatemala was continued for the Department of Zoology 
by C. M. Barber until May of this year. The Assistant Curator of 
Zoology was engaged for four months in the winter of 1906 in making 
a collection of fishes and reptiles in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and also in 
the Southern extremity of Mexico. The commission to the Bermudas 
of Dr. Tarleton H. Bean was fruitful in results, an extensive collection 
of fishes numbering over 1800 specimens representing 166 species 
having been secured. Dr. Dearborn of the Division of Ornithology 
spent several months in Guatemala, with the result that over 1000 
specimens of bird skins were taken. Collecting trips were made to 
Fox Lake, Joliet, Henry, and Havana, Illinois, and also Olive Branch, 
at the southern extremity of the state. In continuation of plans for 
the assembling of exhibition groups and study specimens, representing 
the birds of Illinois, an expedition under H. W. Menke of the Section 
of Taxidermy has been at work during the past year at Harlo warden, 
the estate of President Higinbotham. The locality, near Joliet, 
Illinois, proved rich in bird fauna and afforded special facilities for 
prosecuting the work, which consisted in taking the casts of leaves, 
making color notes for the accessories, the preparation of bird skins 
and eggs, photographing for backgrounds, and the collection of 
scientific data. For the groups, the members of the party collected 
nests and their natural supports, adult birds, eggs, and young, as it 
seemed best for illustrating nesting habits ; casts of leaves, color notes, 
photographic studies for backgrounds, as aids for installation. For 
the study series, adult birds including seasonal and other variations, 
young birds of different ages, illustrating development of plumage, 
skeletons, nests, eggs and food studies were obtained. The tangible 
results of the season's efforts consisted of the gathering of 283 birds; 
213 eggs, 48 nests; 617 casts of leaves and 195 negatives of habitat. 
It is estimated that there is complete material in this result for thirty- 
seven groups. The members of the East African expedition arrived 
at Mombassa, October 8, 1905, and sailed from the same port, return- 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 27 

ing with the collection, December 21, 1906. Of the intervening 
fourteen months, twelve months were spent in active field work. 
The tangible results are represented by a shipment of over seventeen 
tons of natural history material, chiefly zoological. The collection 
includes some four hundred skins of mammals ranging in size from 
that of a rabbit to that of an elephant, about twelve hundred small 
mammal skins, eight hundred bird skins and a fair number of mammal 
and bird skeletons. The expedition also secured about one thousand 
photographic negatives, as well as other studies of the material col- 
lected, such as plaster casts, measurements, leaves, mounting ac- 
cessories, etc. A small collection of anthropological material was 
obtained from among the Masai, Kikuyu and Kamba tribes. 
The collection of large mammal skins includes material for groups 
of about twenty species of antelopes; a bufifalo group of six indi- 
viduals; a fine series of lions — eight specimens; two large elephants, 
complete; one rhinoceros; one hippopotamus and many other speci- 
mens of more than passing interest. 

The following list indicates the 32 various expeditions sent out 
during the year: 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

Bahamas Louis J. K. Brace, . . Herbarium Specimens. 

Bermudas, . . . . T. H. Bean, . . . Fishes, Reptiles, and In- 
vertebrates. 

Guatemala S. E. Meek, .... Fishes and Reptiles. 

Guatemala, . . . . N. Dearborn, . . . Birds. 

Mexico, J- M. Greenman, . . Herbarium Specimens. 

Mission Region, So. Cali- 
fornia C. L. Owen, . . . Ethnological Specimens. 

The Everglades, Florida. Chas. B. Cory, . . . Nests and Eggs, Birds, 

and scientific notes. 

Joliet, 111., . . . . H. W. Menke and Assist- Material for Bird Groups. 

tants. 

Nebraska and Wyoming, E. S. Riggs, .... Vertebrate Fossils. 

Henry, 111 J. F. Ferry, .... Birds. 

Henry, 111., . . . . S. E. Meek, .... Fishes. 

Guatemala, . . . .CM. Barber, . . . Birds, Mammals, Fishes 

and Reptiles. 

Cairo, 111., . . . . E. Heller, .... Mammals. 

North Pacific Coast, . C. F. Newcombe, . Haida Ethnology. 

Andaman and Nicobar 

Islands, Alfred R. Brown, . Ethnological Specimens. 

Illinois, E. B. Chope, . . . Insects. 

Little Traverse Bay, Mich. A. W. Slocom, . . . Invertebrate Fossils. 

Romeo, 111., .... A. W. Slocom, . . . Invertebrate Fossils. 

Chicago Basin, . . . O. E. Lansing, Jr.. . . Herbarium Specimens. 



28 Field Museum of Natural Historv— Reports, Vol. III. 

Philippine Islands, S. C. Simms, Luzon lithnology. 

(R. F. Cummings li.xp.) 
Philippine Islands, . F. C. Cole Luzon Ethnology. 

(R. F. Cuniings Exp.) 
Kansas O. C. Farrington, Meteorites. 

fCarl E. Akcley, . . . -i 
Vernon Shaw Kennedy, v Mammals, Birds, Etc. 
Edmund Heller, J 

Installation, Rearrangement and Permanent Improvement. — There is 
more material in the Department of Anthropology awaiting instal- 
lation than there has been at any previous time during the last 
ten years. This is due to the fact that for three years very few 
cases have been provided, although several collections of great magni- 
tude have been received. This has made necessary a thorough 
rearrangement of the stored material of the Department, for which 
to provide even temporary shelter it has been necessary to utilize 
discarded cases which the Department of Botany found unsuitable 
for exhibition purposes. It is estimated that material is now in 
storage sufficient to fill at least six exhibition halls. The installation 
of the Northwest Coast collection has been completed, the Kwakiutl 
collection having been installed in Halls ii and 12, Salish collection 
in Hall 13, Bella Coola and Nootka in Hall 15. 

The new installations in the Department of Botany of old and 
additional material accomplished during the year make a very credit- 
able showing in the natural orders represented. They are as follows: 
Two cases have been added to the five previously representing the 
Pine Family, one presenting the carpology of the Pinaceae, together 
with many interesting products of the family; the other illustrating 
the use of Pine barks in native textile products and other ways ; the 
case illustrating the utilization of the needles of the Long Leaf Pine 
has been reorganized and augmented. The five cases representing 
the great family of the Grasses have received expansion by five new 
ones. One of these contains a very valuable and typical series of the 
useful bamboos of Japan ; another has been installed with the various 
utilizations of the fiber grasses and paper-making grasses; another 
exemplifies the manufacture of sugar from the sugar-cane and shows 
different forms of native sugars from many parts of the world ; another 
extends the products of Indian Com; another has been devoted to 
the various cereal grains; and the one case formerly_illustrating the 
types of maize has been amplified by a second, completing this impor- 
tant feature. The three cases formerly representing the Palm Family 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

nNSVERSITYOFILUNOIS 



ir 
O 
a. 

UJ 
K 



> 
cr 
O 
»- 
in 



< 

D 

< 
Z 



S 
D 



O 

_j 
UJ 




Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 29 

have been augmented by five others, installed with particularly inter- 
esting material, as follows : one case showing the growth and utilization 
of the Creeping Palms (the rattan and ivory-nut palms) ; another 
case illustrating by a fine series of specimens the character and utili- 
zations of the wood, ekels, and leaf of the Cocoanut Palm; another 
displays the various uses of the cocoanut itself, its "meat" and "shell ;" 
another has been arranged to illustrate the various kinds of fruits in 
the Palmae and their utilization ; another shows the fibers and other 
products of the Black Palms (Borassus, Arenga, and Coryphal), the 
fifth being devoted to the Bermuda Palmetto (Sabal Blackbeumianun). 
The Lily Family now has representation in a complete case of various 
products and characters, as has also the Banana Family. A half- 
case has been installed with interesting products of the Ginger Family, 
another with a fine series of the fruits of the Walnut Family, and a 
third adds to the former representation of the Fig Family a complete 
series illustrating the manufacture of Siamese and Laos papers from 
the bark of Streblus asper. A full case has been installed with various 
fibers of the Nettle Family, and another devoted to the wide range 
of fibrous materials yielded by the Mallow family. The three cases 
formerly devoted to the Legumes have been augmented by two others 
devoted to the Ground-nut, Gums, and various fruits and seeds of 
economic value or botanic interest. A half-case now inaugurates an 
exhibit of the Rose Family; another the Cycads and their starches, 
the Yews, the Rushes, the Naiads, and the Candle trees; and a third 
has been devoted to the Sedges and their utilization. A beginning 
has also been made in the proper casing of the extensive dendrological 
collections of the Department, three cases having been installed with 
the unique series of Jamaica woods, and a fourth devoted to a complete 
illustration of the products of destructive distillation of wood. In 
addition to these installations, considerable time has been devoted 
to the further and more complete organization of the study-reference 
material. This valuable series (duplicating for the purposes of 
investigators the specimens entering into the permanent installations) 
is daily proving its great usefulness to the ends of the Department. 

The most important work of installation in the Department of 
Geology has been the entire reinstallation of the collections of syste- 
matic mineralogy and structural geology. These collections occupied 
Halls 63, 64 and 65. All former cases were removed and new cases 
provided for the collection throughout. Twenty-two wall cases 
and sixteen floor cases were provided. Each wall case has two 







;o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



swinging lights of plate glass 68 x 70 inches in size. The interiors 
are fitted with shelves supported by metal brackets, which are screwed 
to strips of strap-iron having holes at intervals of one inch. The 
shelving is thus adjustable at small intervals of height or width to 
suit the demands of installation. The interiors of the cases are lined 
with painter's muslin stretched tightly and painted black, giving a 
smooth, even finish. The specimens are installed immediately upon 
the shelves. The labels are supported by individual wooden strips in 
which slots are cut. The floor cases are made as in paleontology, so 
that the small specimens can be easily and thoroughly examined. 
For this purpose it is obviously necessary to bring the specimen to 
the height of the eye and as little removed from it laterally as possible. 
Cases of the "A" type best meet this requirement and at the same time 
provide more exhibition space to a given amount of floor space than 
a fiat case. The cases adopted for this purpose were made four inches 
higher than those used in paleontology and the exhibition portion 
carried three inches lower. Thus, increased exhibition space was 
gained, the lights being 36 x 58 inches in size, as compared w^ith those 
31x56 inches used previously. It having been found that ground 
glass, as hitherto used in the top and ends, was not necessary for 
lighting, wooden panels were used in its place, thus securing an effect 
of greater richness and solidity. Triangular wooden screens occupy 
the interior of the case as before, and upon these the minerals are 
installed. Each specimen occupies an individual block which is 
fastened to the screen. The blocks used vary in size, according to 
the size of the specimen. The front of each block is beveled and 
provided with a bead which supports the label. All the case interiors 
are black and the labels are black cardboard, printed with aluminum 
ink. The plan of keeping the fittings and labels subordinate in general 
to the specimens themselves is thus maintained and a satisfactory 
and attractive effect secured. The floor cases are, as stated, reserved 
for specimens so small as to require close inspection in order to have their 
features of interest revealed. The collections were completely worked 
over before installation, so as to incorporate all new material and weed 
out duplicates from the exhibition series. About ten thousand speci- 
mens are now on exhibition in this collection. For the collection 
illustrating structural geology only wall cases are employed, since 
these are exceptionally adapted to the exhibition of large specimens 
and the collection is mostly of this character. The specimens as 
thus installed are well lighted and the hall makes a very satisfactory 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 31 

appearance. A relief map illustrating the oil-fields of the United 
States has been prepared and hting in Hall 71, devoted to petroleum 
and its products. This map is uniform in size and treatment with 
those already on exhibition, illustrating the distribution of zinc, 
copper, and iron ores. In Halls 76 and 77, devoted to physiographic 
geology, fifteen of the large relief maps have been covered with glass. 
This insures protection from further injury by dust and enhances 
the appearance of the display. The collections in Hall 78 have been 
remounted and relabeled throughout. A number of additional 
shelves have been provided for the cases, in order to accommodate 
the large increase in the collections due to material received chiefly 
from the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. These include large 
additions to the series of abrasives, salt, barite, phosphates and micas. 
The mounting is in the shape of individual blocks and stands calculated 
to exhibit each specimen to the best advantage. The four large 
floor cases containing the collection of gems in Higinbotham Hall have 
been thoroughly renovated. The case linings having become much dis- 
colored through age and the entrance of dust, the cases were therefore 
completely relined with white silk crepe. Pads of the same material 
bound with white silk cord were prepared, and upon these the individ- 
ual specimens have been mounted. New labels printed on white 
cardboard have also been provided. Thus, a background of uniform 
color is obtained, against which the gems form the only coloring, and 
the effect is very satisfactory. Case labels were also provided for 
the cases in this hall throughout. For the large Triceratops skull 
collected by the Paleon to logical Expedition in Montana in 1904, a 
special case 5x7x7 feet was constructed and installed in Hall 36. The 
large Mosasaurus slab, 3x12 feet, obtained the same year, was installed 
in one of the wall cases in Hall 59. Other specimens of fossil verte- 
brates installed include large skulls of Elotherium and Accra the rium, a 
skeleton of Dinictis, and several smaller skulls. The wall cases in 
Hall 66, containing volcanic products, rock textures, etc., have been 
thoroughly cleaned and the specimens reinstalled. Such work of 
cleaning and reinstallation, made necessary by the temporary cases 
employed, will not be required when permanent cases are provided. 
Three individual fulgurites have been assembled and mounted. In 
the paleontological laboratory the following specimens have been 
worked out and mounted: Complete skeleton of Mosasaurus twelve 
feet long; complete skeleton of Dinictis felina; complete head of 
Elotherium ingens; complete head of Hyracodon nebrascensis ; 
two skulls of Accra therium; two skulls of Mesohippus bairdii; one 



32 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

skull of Daphaenus; one skull of Hoplophoneus; one skull of Dinictis; 
pelvic i^rdle of Elasmosaurus. 

In the Department of Zoology, comparatively little new instal- 
lation was attempted. This is in a measure due to the resignation of 
Curator Elliot and the absence from the Museum of the Taxidermist- 
in-Chief. However, the Coral collection was very carefully gone over, 
reinstalled, and new labels prepared. The work on the Illinois Bird 
Collection is progressing and will soon be open for inspection by the 
public. No large mammals or groups were placed on exhibition, 
although several are in process of construction. The division of Ento- 
mology has been provided during the year with one hundred and 
twenty-six glass-topped drawers with racks, and ten dust-proof tin 
cabinets for the preservation of both pinned and unpinned insects. 
The pressing needs of an exhibition collection of local insects has 
not been forgotten. For this purpose two table cases have been 
prepared and assigned a position in an alcove of the West Court. 
In these cases will be placed representatives of Illinois insects as soon 
as the various orders are properly prepared for exhibition. In the 
Division of Osteology eight complete skeletons were mounted and 
placed on exhibition and seventy-one skulls were mounted for the 
special craniological study collections. In addition, four hundred 
and sixty-four skulls have been bleached and cleaned for use in the 
study collection of mammals. 

Taxidermy. — Owing to the absence of the Taxidermist-in-Chief, 
who has been on expedition in Africa, work in this section, as repre- 
sented by the construction of groups for exhibition, has been practically 
suspended. But much of importance and value has been ac- 
complished, and a large number of individual specimens have been 
mounted for the systematic series. The inventory of the skins on 
hand in this section — skins intended for mounting or exchange — 
has been carefully revised and amended to date, and presents a 
formidable list in both numbers and varieties. 

Printing. — The number of labels and other impressions made by 
the Section of Printing is as follows: 

Labels. Other Impressions. 

Department of Anthropology, 2.098 3 '600 

Department of Botany 1.298 12,300 

Department of Geology 7564 2,520 

Department of Zoology 1.642 10,815 

Director's Office 3 55.529 

Higinbotham Hall 976 

Library 11.200 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PL. V. 




Discovery of three associated skeletons of Promerychochcerus Pine Ridge. Nebraska. 

Museum Paleontological Expedition of 1906. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILUNOIS 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 



33 



It may be worthy of mention that the distinctness of the 
printing on black labels has been much intensified. This improve- 
ment has been brought about by the use of a size first and then the 
application of an aluminum bronze powder. The former method was 
to use aluminum ink only, which necessitated the taking of three 
or four impressions of each label in order to obtain a final clear effect. 
While more time is required to print the labels by means of the 
bronze powder, the results seem to justify the additional labor. 

Photography. — The Section of Photography has had an unusually 
active year. The following is a tabulated statement of the work done: 



Director's Office, 
Department of Anthropology, 
Department of Botany, 
Department of Geology, 
Department of Zoology, 
General Distribution, 



Negatives. 


Prints. 


Lantern 
Slides. 


Enlarge" 
ments 


67 


151 






1,342 
182 


2,197 

483 


242 
65 


56 


126 


440 


121 


10 


66 


1,308 
381 


293 
369 


• • 



Totals 1,783 4,960 1,090 66 

Total number of inventory entries to December 31, 1906. .48,923 
Entries from October i, 1905 to December 31, 1906 8,824 



Negatives developed for 

Department of Anthropology,* 312 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Botany, . . 240 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Geology, . . 146 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Zoology, . . 293 



Prints mounted for 

Department of Anthropology, 1,500 
Prints mounted for 

Department of Geology, . 25 



Total, 991 Total, 1,525 

*Negatives made in the field by expeditions. 

Attendance. — The total attendance for the period covered by the 
Report is 254,516. Appended is a list of classes, thirty or more, 
that visited the Museum during the year just closed. An analysis of 
the daily attendance is also given. 

LIST OF CLASSES. 
Schools and Locations. Teachers. Pupils. 

Jewish Training School — 199 West Twelfth pi., .... 2 32 

Chase — Cornelia st. and Point pi., i 40 

Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth st., ... i 40 

Englewood High — W. Sixty-second and Stewart ave., . . . i 30 

Chicago Kindergarten College — 1200 Michigan ave., ... i 39 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois, i . 44 

Perkins Bass — Sixty-sixth and May sts., i 37 



34 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . 
School of Education — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111., 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . 
Hvde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave.. . 
Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave. 

University of Chicago — Chicago, 111 

Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave. 
Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth st., . 
Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., 
Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave. 
Hyde Park Higli (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave. 
Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth st, . 

David Swing — Sixteenth and String sts 

School of Education — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111., 
College of Physicians and Surgeons — Honore and Congress sts. 

Parkman — Fifty-first st. and Princeton ave 

Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth st.. . 
Nomial Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth St., . 
Brentano — North Fairfield and W. Diversey aves., 
John Marshall High — West Adams st. near Kedzie ave., . 
Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave. 

Oglesby — Seventy-seventh and Green sts. 

School of Education — University of Chicago, Chicago, 111., 

Parkside — Seventieth st. and Seipp ave., 

Parkside — Seventieth st. and Seipp ave., 

Chicago Home for the Friendless — 5059 Vincennes ave., . 
Lewis-Champlain — Sixty-second st. and Princeton ave., . 
Van Vlissingen — One Hundred and eighth pi, near Wentworth. 

Paul Revere — Seventy-second st. and Ellis ave 

Van Vlissingen — One Hundred and Eighth pi. nr. Wentworth. 

Chase — Cornelia st. and Point pi., 

McCosh — Champlain ave. and Sixty-sixth st 

Parkside — Seventieth st. and Seipp ave., 

Joseph Warren — Ninety-second st. and Central Ave., 

Oliver Goldsmith — 210 Maxwell st. 

McCosh — Champlain ave. and Sixty-sixth St., 

Hammond — Hammond, Indiana 

Kinzie — Ohio st. and La Salle ave., 

Englewood High — West Sixty-second st. and Stewart ave.. 

Moody Bible Institute — 80 Institute pi 

Central and Riverside — Hammond, Indiana 

Riverside — Hammond, Indiana 

Lafayette, Franklin, and Central — Hammond, Indiana, . 

Smyth — Thirteenth st. near Blue Island ave 

Riverside — Hammond, Indiana 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth st. and St. Lawrence ave. 



2 
2 

■> 

4 
I 

2 
2 



3 

2 

9 

I 
2 
I 



40 

57 
56 
68 

58 

54 

SI 

43 

74 

31 

41 

37 

52 

34 

31 

31 

61 

40 

36 

35 

31 

45 

31 

31 

30 

39 

36 

30 

3i 

59 
45 
41 
32 
38 
31 
251 

lOI 

38 
I 26 

44 

83 

33 
67 

67 
247 

31 
61 

39 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 35 

Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., 45 

Sander — Blue Island, Illinois, 3 38 

Wilcox, Berry Lake, East Chicago — East Chicago, Indiana, 3 34 

Foster — South Union ave. and O'Brien st., i 41 

South Side — Blue Island, Illinois, 2 59 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., . . 46 

Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts., 2 52 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth st. and St. Lawrence ave., i 44 

South Side and Seymour — Blue Island, Illinois, .... 2 78 

Shields — Forty-third and Rockwell sts., i 34 

Greenwood and Sander — Blue Island, Illinois 2 66 

Hyde Park High (Branch) — Fifty-fourth st. and Monroe ave., i 81 

Greenwood — Blue Island, Illinois, 2 37 

Fuller — Forty-second st. and St. Lawrence ave. i 39 

Seymour — Blue Island, Illinois, 3 96 

Fuller — -Forty-second st. and St. Lawrence ave., .... i 40 

Lake High —  Union ave. and West Forty-seventh pi., ... i 39 

Garfield — Johnson st. and Fourteenth pi. i 39 

Se5rmour — -Blue Island, Illinois, 2 62 

Coonley — Leavitt st. and Bell Plain ave., i 34 

Seymour and Whittier — Blue Island, Illinois 2 123 

Cameron — Monticello and Potomac aves., i 42 

Fuller — Forty-second st. and St. Lawrence ave i 30 

Fallon — West Forty-second and Wallace sts., i 30 

Brenan — Lime st. near Archer ave. i 31 

Sullivan — Eighty-third st. and Houston ave., ..... 4 181 

Foster — South Union st. and O'Brien st., i 78 

Taylor — Avenue "J " and Ninety-ninth St., 3 224 

Pullman — Pullman, Illinois, i 69 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth st. and St. Lawrence ave., i 32 

Charles R. Darwin — Edgewood ave. and Catalpa Court, . ". i 31 

Kershaw — Union ave. and West Sixty-fourth st., .... i 30 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, ...... 24 32 

Dore — West Harrison st. near Halsted, 13 153 

Alfred Tennyson — California ave. and Fulton st., .... i 31 

George W. Curtis — One Hundred and Fourteenth pi. nr. State, i 32 

Foster — South Union and O'Brien sts., i 33 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, i 84 

Chicago Training School for Missions — 4949 Indiana ave., . i 40 

Moody Bible Institute — - 80 Institute pi., 3 69 

Tilton — West Lake st. and Forty-second ave., i 71 

Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth st 3 46 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois, i 35 

Bryant — - Riverside, Illinois, .. i 42 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, 2 75 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, i 30 

Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts 2 66' 

Keith — Thirty-fourth and Dearborn sts., 2 43 



36 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. ITI. 



Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kiinbark ave., 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
Hyde Park Higli — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave., 
University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois, .... 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh st. and Kimbark ave.. 
Normal Practice — Stewart ave. and Sixty-eighth St., . 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of acces- 
sions, names of members, etc. 

FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

Director. 



3 


81 


I 


46 


I 


36 


X 


ro2 


2 


31 


2 


54 


I 


38 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 37 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
From October 1, 1905, to December 31, 1906. 



Receipts. 
Cash in Treasurer's hands, September 30, 1905, . $ 9,936.75 

Petty Cash on hand, September 30, 1905, . . 739,95 
Dues of Members - — 

Corporate, $ 130.00 

Annual, 2,110.00 2,240.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms, 6,775.40 

Sale of Guides 400.00 

South Park Commissioners, 18,750.00 

Interest on Investments, 67,364.90 

Interest on daily balances • 267.27 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund, . . . 60.00 
Final Dividend on World's Columbian Exposition 

Stock, 233.43 

Sale of Securities, 55,000.00 

Donations 

Robert F. Cummings, 4,000.00 

Martin A. Ryerson, 1,500.00 

Stanley Field 250.00 

Watson F. Blair 250.00 

E. E. Ayer 250.00 

W. J. Chalmers, 250.00 

Cyrus H. McCormick, 250.00 

W. I. Buchanan, 25.35 

Department of Mines and Mining, World's 

Columbian Exposition, .... 50.00 

Sundry Receipts 290.28 

Marshall Field Endowment and Building Fund, 1,100,000.00 

Field Endowment Income, Real Estate . . . 112,000.00 

Field Endowment Income, Bonds and Mortgages, 3,977-55 



$1,384,860.88 



38 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 

Disbursements. 

Salaries S 87,227.00 

Guard Service. 15.418.20 

Janitor Service, . 9,180.15 

Fire Protection. 4.140.08 

Heat and Light — . 

Wages $ 4.38445 

Fuel and Supplies 7,925.03 12,309.48 

Repairs and Alterations 

Wages of Carpenters. Painters, Roofers. . Si 1.608.06 
Material used — paints, oils, lumber, glass, etc. 2.096.38 13.704.44 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases. §19,411.46 

Sundries 48735 19.898.81 

The Library — . 

Books and Periodicals $ 4,801.63 

Binding 1. 135-35 

Sundries 13009 6,067.07 

Sections of Printing and Photography 1,479.56 

Collections purchased 32,229.02 

Departmental Expenses, 7.285.71 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming, ... $ 2,395.00 
Stationery, Postage, and Telephone, etc., . 1,017.96 

Expeditions, 16,111.24 

Publications, 4.81 1. 17 

Sundries, 3.465. 11 27,800.48 



8236,740.90 

In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1906 $39,741.48 
In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1906. Field 

Endowment and Building Funds, 39,501.77 

Petty Cash on hand 739-95 

Illinois Trust & Savings Bank stock 3.661.00 

Mortgages, Bonds, etc., . . •. 1.064.475.78 1,148,119.98 



$1,384,860.88 



LIBRARV 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



K 
O 
0. 
UJ 



> 

O 

I- 
U5 



< 

z> 
(- 
< 

z 



UJ 

O 

_J 
ul 




Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 39 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM OCTOBER 1, 1905, TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



Attendance. 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults, 23,111 

Children, 1,321 24,432 

Free Admission on Pay Days — 

Schoolchildren 7,532 

Students 3.306 

Teachers, 762 

Members: Corporate, 27 

Annual, . . 114 

Life, 2 

Officers' Families, 126 

Special, 36 

Press 31 11,936 

Admission on Free Days — 

Saturdays, 44-633 

Sundays, 173, 5i5 218,148 

Total Attendance, 254,516 

Highest Attendance on any day (August 12, 1906), . . 7,691 

Highest Paid Attendance on any day (July 4, 1906), . . 548 

Average Daily Admissions (453 days), 561 

Average Paid Admissions (322 days), 75 

Receipts. 

Guides sold — 1,600 at 25 cents each, $ 400.00 

Articles Checked — 17,311 at 5 cents each, 865.55 

Admissions . ... 5,909.85 

$7,175-40 



40 P'lRLD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift u.n'less otherwise designated.) 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Cast of carved stone figure A bear-like figure, a pit on top of head, 
arms and legs clasped round a stump — Eraser Plains, Washing- 
ton (exchange). 
AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Large obsidian seal ring — Mexico. 

Ethnological specimens — Philippine Islands. 

Ethnological specimens from the Moro, Lake Lanao, Philippine Islands. 

Woven Shield from the Congo, Africa. 

Ethnological specimens, consisting of spears, swords, and knives, 

cannon, and helmets — Philippine Islands. 
2 Egyptian images. 
BLAIR, MRS. CHAUNCEY J., Chicago. 

Solid silver table service, consisting of 20 pieces — i large plate, 3 
small plates, 3 small dishes, r large cup, i shell-shaped cup, 6 
large spoons, 5 salt spoons — Tivoli, Italy. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND ART, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Skulls and skeletons of Cliff Dwellers — Arizona (exchange). 
CASEY. JOHN, Lehigh, Iowa. 

7 flint scrapers, 12 flint arrow-heads, i stone hoe, i stone, notched 
edge — Iowa. 
CLEMENS, F. L.. Durango, Colo. 

Large earthenware coiled vessel — Cliff Ruins, near Durango, Colo. 
CU.MMINGS, R. F., Philippine Expedition. 

120 Ethnological specimens from native tribes, Philippine Islands. 
Ethnological specimens from Igorrot tribes. Island of Luzon. Philip- 
pine Islands. (Collected by S. C. Simms). 
29 Ethnological specimens, Philippine Islands. 
FIELD MUSEU.M OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey: 

Pawnee Buffalo hide lariat — Oklahoma. 
Skidi fox skin warriors' head-dress — Oklahoma. 

One group of seven figures — Hamatsa, or cannibal dancers, coming 
out of secret room. 
Collected by AUeyne Ireland: 

Skull taken by Dyaks in head-hunting raid — Borneo. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 41 

Collected by James Mooney : 

Cheyenne and Arapaho Ethnological specimens — Oklahoma. 
Collected by C. F. Newcombe: 

Ethnological specimens — • North West Coast. 
Collected by C. L. Owen: 

Ethnological objects from Mission Indians of Southern California. 
Purchases: 

Ethnological specimens from Tarahuamari Indians of Mexico. 

Buffalo robe with ornamental porcupine quill. 

Ashanti skulls. 

New Guinea skulls. 

Ethnological specimens from Pacific Islands. 

Ethnological specimens — Siberia. 

4 arrow-points, i pendant. 

Ethnological specimens — Pacific Islands. 

2 skulls — New Guinea. 

I skull — Solomon Islands. 

Archaeological specimens — Northern Indiana. 

Skulls — Argentine. 

Ethnological specimens — Malay States. 

Porro baskets, Puyallup baskets, Haida baskets, Arapaho specimens. 

Specimens of bronze, iron, wood, and ivory — -Benin, Africa. 

Archaeological specimens — • Mexico. 

Ethnological specimens — Kwakiutl Indians. 

Maori skulls — New Zealand. 

Pawnee sacred bundle and contents — Pawnee, Oklahoma. 
': Sacred bundle and contents and "star chart," Big Black Meteor — 
Pawnee, Oklahoma. 

Ethnological specimens — Northern Iroquois. 

Ethnological specimens from Seminoles — Florida. 
HANCOCK, MRS. STODDARD, Chicago. 

I Fiji spear. 
LYMAN J. CHESTER. 

I George Washington china saucer. 

I Peruvian bronze casting of a sacrifice by fire. 
RYERSON, M. A., McCORMICK, CYRUS H., FIELD, STANLEY, BLAIR, 
WATSON F., CHALMERS, W. J. 

Ethnological and Archaeological specimens, copper implements, 
Wampum belts — Wisconsin. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

Swiss lakes dwelling material — Switzerland. 
TAFT, W. D. C, Chicago. 

Stone implements of various kinds — Central Illinois. 
WYMAN BROS., Chicago. 

Implements of quartz, etc. — Wading River, N. Y. 



42 Field Museum ok Natural Mistorv — Reports, Vol. III. 

di<:partmi:xt of botany. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

.\RTIIUR, PROF. J. C, Agricultural Experiment Station, La Fayette, Indiana. 

7 herbarium specimens — various loailitics. 
BL.MvKSLHE. DR. A. F., Halle. Germany. 

I specimen Phycomyces nitens — Germany. 
BRACE, L. J. K., Xa.ssau. New Providence. 

I specimen Nashia inaguen.sis, Mill.spaugli — Nassau. .New Providence. 

3 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
BRANDEGEE. T. S., San Diego, California. 

13 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Department of the Interior, Manila, P. I. 

qg6 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands (exchange). 
CALKINS, W. W., Chicago. 

8 specimens lichens — Illinois. 
CARTER, J. J., Peters Creek, Penn.sylvania. 

109 herbarium specimens — Maryland and Pennsylvania (exchange). 
CHAMBERLAIN, DR. C. J.. Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Vera Cruz, Mexico. 
CHASE, V. H.. Wady Petra, lUinois. 

188 specimens fungi and lichens — various localities (exchange). 
CORN PRODUCTS COMPANY, THE, Chicago. 

23 specimens corn products. 

I economic specimen amylin. 
COULTER. PROF. JOHN M., University of Chicago. 

herbarium specimens — North Dakota. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, Field Museum of Natural History. 

6 economic specimens — Vancouver Island, B. C. (transfer). 
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY, Field Museum of Natural History. 

10 specimens of peat products — California and Austria (transfer). 
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY, Field Museum of Natural History. 

12 herbarium specimens — Guatemala (transfer). 

6 herbarium specimens — Guatemala (transfer). 

66 herbarium specimens — Henry, Illinois (transfer). 
EMRICK, DR. G. M., Chicago. 

20 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 

410 herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 

46 specimens cryptogams — Cuba (exchange). 

141 herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 

132 herbarium specimens — Cuba (exchange). 
FARR. MISS EDITH M., Philadelphia. Pa. 

34 herbarium .specimens — British Columbia. 

1 herbarium specimen — Alberta. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collated by J. M. Greenman: 
3 descriptions of plants. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 



43 



4 plates and descriptions of plants. 

I tracing and description of Otopappus verbesinoides, Benth. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh : 

33 herbarium specimens parts of dried plants — Cuba, Florida, and 

Bahamas. 

II herbarium specimen parts of dried plants — Bahamas and Cuba. 
18 portions of herbarium specimens — various localities. 

3 fragments Senecio Hookeri and Senecio Lugens, i tracing of Senecio 
Hookeri — Canada. 

1 fragmentary herbarium specimen — Guatemala. 
Collected by L. J. K. Brace: 

762 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
Collected by J. M. Greenman: 

510 herbarium specimens, dried fruits and fruits in formalin — Vera 
Cruz and Yucatan. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr.: 

2 specimens leaves and fruiting stems Typha latifolia — Indiana. 
126 herbarium specimens — Lake Chicago basin. 

Collected by N. L. Britton and C. F. Millspaugh: 

10 specimens fruits in formalin — Bahamas. 
Purchases : 

50 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. L 
471 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 
275 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 
30 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. L 

3 economic specimens. 

227 herbarium specimens — Southern Florida. 

1 1 products of Sabal, Blackburnianum, and native tobacco — Bermuda. 
160 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

34 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. L 
606 herbarium specimens — Montana. 

9 economic specimens. 

100 herbarium specimens — Colorado. 

I economic specimen. 

525 herbarium specimens — California. 

5 economic specimens — West Virginia. 
116 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. L 
717 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

6 economic specimens. 

39 herbarium specimens — Grenada, W. L 

10 economic specimens of Lodoicea sechellarum — ^Seychelles Islands. 
201 herbarium specimens — Jamaica. 

8 economic specimens of drugs. 
4480 herbarium specimens. 

254 specimens American woods — North America. 
GATES, FRANK, C, Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Ravenswood, Illinois. 
I herbarium specimen — Chicago. 



44 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

41 herbarium specimens — Illinois (exchange). 

16 herbarium specimens — Illinois (exchange). 
GAUMER. DR. GEORGE F.. Izamal. Mexico. 

123 herbarium specimens — Yucatan. 

2 herbarium specimens — Yucatan. 

I herbarium specimen — Yucatan. 

I herbarium specimen — Yucatan. 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

20 herbarium specimens — Canada. 
GOODALL MATTING COMPANY, Kennebunk, Maine. 

7 economic specimens. 
GR.\Y HERR.VRIUM, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 

I tracing and 2 descriptions of plants. 
GREENMAN, J. M.. Chicago. 

I economic specimen — Formosa. 

46 herbarium specimens — Yucatan. 

I herbarium specimen — Germany. 
HALL, HERMAN J., Chicago. 

I specimen fruit stalk — Chicago. 
HARSHBERGER, PROF. J. \V., West Philadelphia, Pa. 

161 herbarium specimens — Pennsylvania. 
HAY'NES, CAROLINE C, Highlands, N. J. 

1 7 herbarium specimens — various localities. 
HAYNES, PIERRE E., Chicago. 

60 herbarium specimens — Channel Lake, Illinois. 
HERB. KRUG & URBAN, BerHn, Germany. 

50 herbarium specimens (exchange). 
HESSLER. MRS. JOHN C, Chicago. 

I specimen rope — Ellison Bay, Wisconsin. 
HILL, E. J.. Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
HOLLICK, DR. ARTHUR, Bronx Park, New York City. 

I coniferous amber, i coniferous lignite — Staten Island, N. \ . 
KELLERMAN, PROF. W. A., Columbus, Ohio. 

6 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

I 2 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

7 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

8 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

I I herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 
23 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

KUHN, CHARLES, Chicago. 

I package cigars. 
LANSING, O. E., JR.. Chicago. 

I specimen fruits. 

1 specimen rice. 

I specimen corn confection. 
LAWTON, MISS .VMY C, Omaha, Nebraska. 

105 herbarium specimens — Omaha, Nebraska. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 45 

MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 
I specimen popcorn. 
I specimen puffed rice balls confection. 

1 specimen cocoanut confection. 

2 economic specimens. 

2 specimens nuts. 

I specimen popcorn balls. 

I economic specimen. 

« economic specimens. 

I specimen "Jesuit chestnut rosary" — Lucerne, Switzerland.' 

3 economic specimens — Berlin, Germany. 
I specimen blue gum rosary — Pisa, Italy. 

4 economic products — Berlin, Germany. 
I basket, i wasp nest — - Wisconsin. 

I specimen Polyporus lucidus — Ephraim, Wisconsin, 
I specimen preserved dates. 
3 specimens products. 
MILLSPAUGH, MRS. C. F., Chicago. 

5 economic specimens — Germany. 
MILLSPAUGH, HOWARD, Elmira, N. Y. 

I specimen dried sweet corn. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Mo. 

I economic specimen (exchange). 
MOORE, ALBERT H., Cambridge, Mass. 

66 herbarium specimens — Bermuda. 
MORRIS, E. L., Washington, D. C. 

1 herbarium specimen — Patagonia. 
NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Vienna, Austria. 

1072 herbarium specimens — South Africa (exchange). 
NEWCOMBE, DR. C. F., Victoria, B. C. 

5 economic specimens — Vancouver Island. 

6 specimens dried fruits — British Columbia. 
5 herbarium specimens — Yale, B. C. 

NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, Bronx Park, New York. 

2 specimens dried fruits — New Providence Island, Bahamas (ex- 

change) . 

659 herbarium specimens — -various localities (exchange). 

258 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

100 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange). 

I herbarium specimen — Culebra Island, Porto Rico (exchange). 
NICHOLS, H. W., Chicago. 

I economic specimen — California. 
OSTERHOUT, GEORGE E., New Windsor, Colorado. 

I herbarium specimen — Colorado. 
POPE BEET SUGAR FACTORY, CHAS., Riverdale, Illinois. 

2 1 specimens showing beet sugar process. 
ROSING, B., Chicago. 

3 economic specimens. 



46 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

ROYAL GARDEN, Kew. London, England. 

134 licrbarium specimens — Yucatan (exchange). 
SCHUTZE, MRS. EVA WATSO.X, Chicago. 

I specimen bayberry candle dips — Xew Jersey. 
SMITH, JOH.X D().\.\ELl! Baltimore, Maryland. 

180 herbarium specimens — Guatemala, Honduras, and Costa Rica. 

46 plates of Central Air.erican plants. 
UMBACH, L. M., Naperville. Illinois. 

712 herbarium specimens — Montana (exchange). 

103 herbarivim specimens — various localities (exchange). 
UNITED STATES XATIO.XAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

1 herbarium specimen — Costa Rica. 

6 specimens fungi — Mexico (exchange). 

3 herbarium specimens — Texas. Mexico, and Oklahoma (exchange). 

3 fragments of herbarium specimens — U. S. of Colombia and Mexico. 
UNITED STATES SUBTROPICAL LABORATORY. Miami, Florida. 

2 economic specimens — Florida. 

1 economic specimen — Florida (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. Chicago. 

122 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift U.NLESS otherwise DESIGNATED.) 

A.MERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

5 prints illustrating Cape York meteorite. 
ANDERSON, JAMES, Glasgow, Scotland. 

2 specimens typical black-band iron ore, raw and calcined — near 

Glasgow, Scotland. 
BARRIXGER, D. M., Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 pieces iron shale, i shale ball — Coon Butte, Arizona. 
BICKFORD BROS., Nonvay, Maine. 

I crystal cesium beryl — Buckfield, Maine. 
BIRD. EDWARD, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

3 specimens variscite — Stockton, Utah. 
BIXBV. MAYNARD, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

I specimen brochantite, 2 specimens wurtzite, i specimen agatized 
bone, I specimen opalized tree 9,'^" x 20" — Utah and Idaho. 
BOTTSFORD. H. L., Calumet. Michigan, 

I specimen wliitneyite — Calumet, Michigan. 
BREZINA, DR. ARISTIDES, Vienna, Austria. 

1.5 grams Honolulu meteorite, 1.7 grams Pricetown meteorite, 1.2 
grams Ottawa meteorite, 2.9 grams Kerilis meteorite. 0.5 grams 
Or\-inio meteorite (e.xchange). 
CHAVES, DIOCLESI.V.X. Museo de .Nicaragua, Managua, Xicaragua. 

I fossil footprint — Managua, Xicaragua. 
CORBETT, H. R., Chicago. 

I specimen cobalt ore, i specimen copper ore — Sumter. Oregon. 



Jan., 1907. Annaul Report of the Director. 47 

CORY, CHARLES B., Chicago. 

2 specimens flint concretions, i specimen fossil wood, i specimen 
fossil shell — Desert of Sahara. 
DOWNING, A. M., Chicago. 

I specimen silver ore — Tabotacachi Mine, Sonora, Mexico. 
EGGERS, H. F., Chicago. 

I specimen concretion — Eureka Springs, Arkansas. 
FIELD, MRS. L. W., Orange, California. 

1 group of quartz crystals — Green River, Wyoming. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by Dr. T. H. Bean: 

296 fossil land shells, 66 fossil sea shells, 8 fossil sponges, 99 nodules, 
18 rocks and cave forms — Bermuda. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

2 specimens loess, 2 specimens volcanic ash — Scott and Ness Coun- 

ties, Kansas. 

I meteorite, weight 7 lbs. — Modoc, Kansas. 
Collected by S. E. Meek: 

2 specimens pumice — Lake Amatitlan, Guatemala. 
Collected by C. L. Owen; 

I smoky quartz crystal — San Jacinto Mountains, California. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

I nearly complete skull of Triceratops, 3 incomplete skulls of Tricera- 

tops, 2 partial skeletons of Triceratops, 3 partial skeletons of 

Plesiosaurs, i carapace of large fossil turtle, 25 specimens fossil 

sea-crabs — Montana. 
82 specimens vertebrate fossils — South Dakota. 
99 specimens vertebrate fossils — Western Nebraska. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

16 specimens fossil sponges, 186 specimens fossil corals, 201 specimens 

fossil crinoids, 138 specimens fossil cystoids, 105 specimens fossil 

brachiopods, 64 specimens fossil trilobites, 56 specimens fossil 

molluscs, etc. ; i specimen sphalerite, 7 specimens pyritized wood — 

Romeo and Lemont, Illinois. 
2760 specimens (73 species) invertebrate Devonian fossils — Little 

Traverse Bay, Mich. 
851 specimens invertebrate fossils, 21 specimens minerals, 3 specimens 

rocks — Suburbs of Chicago. 
Purchases: 

I specimen iridescent quartz crystal. 

4 charts illustrating origin of ores. 

5 specimens minerals, i slab fossil echinoids — California. 
393 grams Ilimass meteorite — Chile. 

104 fossil trilobites, cystoids, molluscs, etc. — Rokitzan, Bohemia. 

1956 grams (4 specimens) Modoc meteorite — Modoc, Kansas. 

I relief map of Niagara River and vicinity. 

I Ness City meteorite — Kansas. 

I full-sized section Estacado meteorite. 



48 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

I polished slab orbicular diorite — Dehesa, California. 

I specimen green tounnaline — Newry. Maine. 

54 specimens volcanic products, i photograph — Mt. Vesuvius, Italy. 

4 relief maps. 

I specimen tourmaline — Ramona, San Diego County, California. 

1 6 specimens lava and ashes of Mt. Vesuvius eruption of 1906 — Italy. 

I copper boulder, weight 13 lbs: — Delavan, Wisconsin. 
GAMB.'\, F. PEREIR.V, Pasto, Department Narino, Colombia. 

79 specimens garnets, sapphires and ilmenites, 3 specimens gem-bear- 
ing rock — River Mayo near Mercaderes, Cauca, Colombia. 
GOULD, PROF. C. i\., University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. 

32 specimens sand-barite crystals — Vicinity of Norman, Oklahoma. 
GUION, G. MURRAY, Chicago. 

I specimen quartz and hematite, i specimen banded novaculite, i 

specimen limonite concretion — New York, Arkansas, and Indian 
Territory. 
GUTHRIE, OSSIAN, Chicago. 

I photograph of diorite boulder. 
HEIGHWAY. DR. A. E., New York City. 

I specimen chrysoprase — Visalia, California. 

I specimen zinc ore — La Moza, Cuba. 
HILL, HARRY, Chicago. 

13 specimens tin ores and associated rocks, 3 specimens native bismuth 

— Seward Penin., Alaska. 
HUGHES, MRS., Parlaville, Hamilton, Bermuda. 

1 specimen volcanic dust from St. Vincent, B. W. I., i specimen vol- 

canic dust from Island of Martinique, B. W. I. 
JUDD, COL. L. S., Quartzsite, Arizona. 

3 specimens dumortierite, i specimen barite — La Cholla Dist., Yuma 

County, Arizona. 
KAY, PROF. G. F., University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 

2 specimens minerals — Colorado and Utah. 
KE.\KEL, L. v., Eggleston, Michigan. 

I fulgurite — Eggleston, Michigan. 
LETTER, JOSEPH, Ziegler, lUinois. 

14 specimens fossil plants — Ziegler Coal Co.'s Mine, Illinois. 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Los Angeles, California. 

I specimen tourmaline with albite, i specimen cyanite — California 
and Arizona (exchange). 
MARCH, JOHN, Tribune. Kansas. 

I specimen agate — Scott Countv. Kansas. 
McKAY, W. J., Chicago. 

I specimen ozocerite — Fort Worth, Utah. 
McMAHO.M, GEORGE, Chicago. 

29 specimens ores, minerals and rocks — Cripple Creek, Colorado. 
MEYER, EDGAR L., St. Georges, Bermuda. 

230 fossil land shells, i fossil sea shell, 1 7 specimens cave forms — St . 
Georges, Bermuda. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 49 

MEYER, IRA B., Chicago. 

I fulgurite 9 feet in length in sections — Chesterton, Indiana. 
MILLAR, A. Q., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

6 specimens kimberlite and alteration products — Elliott County, 
Kentucky. 

47 specimens kimberlite and associated rock — Elliott County, Ken- 
tucky. 

500 specimens garnet and chrysolite — Elliott County, Kentucky. 
MUSEE d'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

62 grams La Becasse meteorite (exchange). 
PETERSEN, NICHOLAS, Chicago. 

1 specimen No. 2 fare clay — Baston Mountains, Crawford County, 

Arkansas. 
PICKLES, JULIAN, Morrellton, Missouri. 

5 specimens crystallized barite — Morrellton, Missouri. 
PIERCE, HENRY B., Golconda, Illinois. 

2 specimens transparent fluorite — Golconda, Illinois. 

PREMIER (TRANSVAAL) DIAMOND MINING COMPANY, LLMITED, 
London, England. 

I model of "Cullinan" diamond. 
RHODESIA MUSEUM, THE, Bulawayo, Rhodesia. 

20 specimens minerals, ores and rocks (exchange). 
RONAN, THOMAS, Chicago. 

1 specimen galena with chalcopyrite — South Africa. 
SAWYER, ELIZABETH E. T., 

1077 specimens of minerals and fossils. 
SEEBOECK, W. C. E., Chicago. 

16 specimens minerals (exchange). 
SHAEFFER, SAMUEL, Ness City, Kansas. 

2 specimens novaculite, i specimen pelecypod shell — Ness City, 

Kansas. 
SHIELDS, JOHN, Shelburne, Ontario. 

2 photographs illustrating place of fall of Shelburne meteorite (ex- 
change) . 
UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA, Tuscon, Arizona. 

372 grams Weaver meteorite — Weaver Mountains, Arizona (ex- 
change) . 
WARD, PROF. H. A., Chicago. 

41 sections of meteorites for microscopic study. 
120 grams Cobija meteorite — Cobija, Chile (exchange). 
WARREN, CAPT. J. H., Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

I glaciated boulder — Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago. 

6 specimens fossil crinoids — St. Paul, Indiana. 
WENDT MRS. MATHILDA, San Remo, Italy. 

I framed photograph. 



5© Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(ACCESSION'S ARE BY GIFT U.VLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

AKELEV, C. E.. Chicago. 

1 flying squirrel. 

ALFARO, AXASTASIO. San Jose. Costa Rica. C. A. 

2 lizards, 2 rattlesnakes, 2 rattlesnake skins, i rattlesnake head — 

West slope of Costa Rica. 
ALLEN. MISS, Bermuda. 

I shell — The Flatts, Bermuda. 
BARBER, C. M.. Chicago. 

I barred owl — Laporte, Indiana. 

10 bird lice — Laporte, Indiana. 
BATTY, J. H.. New York City. 

I Coiba black howler monkey — Coiba Island, U. S. Colombia. 

34 bird skins — Panama. 
BAYLOR UNIVERSITY. Waco, Texas. 

104 reptiles and amphibians (exchange). 
BRACE. L. J. K., Na.ssua, Bahama. 

1 butterfly — Crooked Island, Bahamas. 
BRAND, CHARLES J., Washington, D. C. 

12 beetles — Tempe, Arizona. 
BRIMLEY BROS., Raleigh, N. C. 

26 salamanders, 45 toads, 6 lizards. 52 snakes, 41 turtles (exchange). 
BRITISH MUSEUM, London, England. 

2 fishes — .\rgentina, S. A. (exchange). 
44 lizards (exchange). 

150 fishes — Europe and Asia (exchange). 
CARPENTER, C. H., Chicago. 

2 spiders — Saugatuck, Michigan. 
CHOPE, E. B., Chicago. 

3 frogs — Chicago. 
CORY, C. B., Chicago. 

3 Japanese glass sponges. 

1250 insects — United States and Cuba. 

1 bobolink, 2 finches, 6 warblers, i throsher, i chickadee, 5 kinglets, 

3 thrushes — United States. 
DEARBORN, N., Chicago. 

6 flies — Chicago. 
DERBY, JR., WILLIAM M., Chicago. 

2 wood ducks — Central Illinois. 
DEWEY, C. L.. Chicago. 

1 mink — Dowagiac, Michigan. 
DUPEE, W. H., Chicago. 

2 mountain sheep — Lower California. 
FANCHER, LLOYD, Davis, Indiana. 

I great-horned owl — Davis, Indiana. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected bv C. M Barber: 



Jan.," 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 51 

40 lizards, 16 salamanders, 11 frogs, 12 toads, 15 snakes, 150 fishes, 

25 land crabs — Guatemala, C. A. 
5 1 river turtles — Havana, Illinois. 
138 bird skins — Guatemala. 

1 scorpion — Patulul, Guatemala. 
12 crayfish — Laporte, Indiana. 

25 clams, 15 snail shells — Fox Lake, Illinois. 
25 land snail shells — Willow Springs, lUinois. 

6 toads, 2 frogs, 17 salamanders, 50 cricket frogs — Laporte, Indiana; 
Willow Springs and Fox Lake, Illinois. 
Collected by T. H. Bean: 

11 sea-urchins and star fish, 44 corals, sea-whips, sea-fans, etc., 19 

sea-cucumbers, 3 sea-anemones, 20 sponges, 15 specimens '{of 
hydroids — Bermuda. 
1 8 18 fishes, 147 lizards, toads, frogs and toad-tadpoles, 116 spiders 
centipedes, millipedes, bugs, roaches, beetles, etc., 11 76 shells, 
chitons, slugs, naked molluscs, etc., 11 squids and octopi, 170 crabs, 
lobsters, crayfish, isopods, barnacles, etc., 57 worms, 11 bryozoa, 
I jelly-fish, I group of ascidians, i lot of fish parasites, i stomach 
of fish — Bermuda. 
Collected by E. B. Chope: 

2 snakes, 3 salamanders — Willow Springs, Illinois. 

1 lacewing, 2 caddice-flies, 3 stoneflies, 7 grasshoppers, 16 dragon-flies, 

35 butterflies, 38 flies, 45 bees, wasps, etc., 144 bugs, 144 moths, 
401 beetles — Walworth, Wisconsin. 
25 land snail shells — Willow Springs, Illinois. 
Collected by N. Dearborn: 

2 bats — Los Amates, Guatemala. 

I squirrel — Los Amates, Guatemala. 
61 bird skins — Chicago. 

1 turtle, 45 fishes — Los Amates, Guatemala. 
1000 bird skins — Guatemala. 

Collected by J. F. Ferry: 

2 snakes, 3 frogs — Lake County and Waukegan, Illinois. 
485 bird skins —  Illinois. 

Collected by William J. Gerhard: 

3 moths, 2 butterflies — Willow Springs and Chicago, Illinois. 
Collected by Edmund Heller: 

I lizard — British East Africa. 
10 frogs — Olive Branch, Illinois. 

12 snakes — Fox Lake, Illinois. 

1 barred owl — Olive Branch, Illinois. 

2 fox squirrels, 16 chipmunks, 2 striped spermophiles, i woodchuck, 

28 northern white-footed mice, 17 Michigan white-footed mice, 
3 house mice, 8 Norway rats, 38 common meadow voles, 6 prairie 
meadow voles, 7 muskrats, 3 jumping mice, 3 rabbits, 3 weasels, 
I skunk, 28 short-tailed shrews, 12 long-tailed shrews — Illinois. 



52 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Collected by E. Heller and C. .\I. Barber: 

4 pig skulls, I tapir skull, i bat — Guatemala. 

4 Virginia opossums, i white-eyed opossum, i three-toed anteater, 
I great anteater, 3 armadillos, 3 white-tailed deer, 4 white-lipped 
peccaries, 2 tapir, 2 tree .squirrels, 2 jaguarondi cats, i grison, 
I coati — Guatemala. 

49 bird skins — Guatemala. 
Collected by S. E. Meek: 

1500 lishes, 300 reptiles — Guatemala and Nicaragua. 

26 leeches, 45 shells, i freshwater sponge — Lake Amatitlan, Guate- 
mala. 

20 ticks, 2 centipedes, 5 dragon-fly nymphs — Mexico. .Nicaragua, and 
Guatemala. 

25 shells — Lake Nicaragua. 

10 shells — San Francisco, Nicaragua 
40 .sea-shells, b crabs — Corintn. Nicaragua. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

9 rattlesnakes, 6 gartersnakes, i gopher snake, 1 2 horned toads — 

Rawhide Buttes, Wyoming. 
Purchases: 

152 butterflies (77 species) — Natal, South Africa. 

30 bats, I anteater, 5 deer, 20 squirrels, 12 opossums, 2 porcupines, 

7 sloths, 25 monkeys, 37 mice, 30 rats, 2 agouti — U. S Colombia. 

S. A. 
I bear, 4 monkeys — Telok Betong, South Sumatra. 

1 moth, 44 butterflies — Natal, South Africa. 

2 antelope, i deer, i chimpanzee. 
I mountain lion. 

228 beetles, 4 lizards — Turkey in Asia. 

445 bird skins — Nicaragua and Costa Rica. 

17 moths — vicinity of Weenen, Natal, Soutli Africa. 

414 bird skins — Philippine Islands. 

I rough-leg hawk — South Chicago. 

26 humming birds, i cotinga, 2 pipras, i caliste. 
10S19 beetles — United States and Canada. 
100 specimens Hawaiian Islands fishes. 

1002 bird skins — various localities. 

700 shells, 500 insects, i bear .skin and skeleton, 4 cougar, 60 mammals 
— various localities. 

I live alligator — Mississipjii. 

107 mainmal skins. 

4 indigo bunting eggs, 3 yellow-throated vireo eggs, 3 gadwall duck 
eggs, 8 wood duck eggs — New York, Iowa, and Nevada, 

10 birds' nests and 41 eggs. 
FIFIELD, G. H., Whiting, Indiana. 

I albatros head and wings. 
FISCHER, EUGENE, Chicago. 

I skunk — Nekoosa, Wisconsin. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIYERSITir Of ILUNOIS 




> 
o 
o 

_J 
:0 

O 
N 



2 
t- 

< 



LU 



< 
O 

a: S 

< y 

C I 

no 

< a: 

. uJ 

1/5 -I 

Si 

:^ 

3  



03 

9 > 

2 in 
a. _ 
UJ O 
..Hi 

. z 

Uj LlJ 
- U 

Q. ir 

irO- 
< 



10 

o 

z 

I 

o 

z 
o 



UJ 
0) 
O) 

O 

05 

3 
UJ 
I- 
05 
O 
M 

a. 

UJ 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 53 

FREISSER, JULIUS, Chicago. 

3 turtles — McHenrj', Illinois. 

1 moth — Chicago. 
GAULT, B. F., Glenn Ellyn, Illinois. 

2 bats, I water-rat — Florida and South America. 
I bat — Cayenne, French Guiana, S. A. 

GERHARD, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 

36 dragon-flies — Pennsylvania and New Jersey. 
GILL, GEORGE M., Lebanon, Tennessee. 

I praying mantis — Lebanon, Tennessee. 

I beetle — Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 
GRACE, C. H., Chicago. 

I live alligator. 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago, 

I snake — Willow Springs, Illinois. 

1 wasp, I centipede, i bug, 2 spiders, 5 beetles — Chicago. 
HAYWARD, TUCKER. 

8 beetles — St. David's Island, Bermuda. 
HILL, CHARLES, Chicago. 

2 beetles, 3 flies, 2 sawflies, 3 bugs, 2 wasps and parasites, i stonefly, 

2 dragon-flies, i bee, i wasp — Chicago and Palos Park, Illinois. 
JACKSON, H. v., Durango, Mexico. 

I centipede, i whip-tailed scorpion, 2 scorpions, 6 spiders, 3 grass- 
hoppers, 3 praying mantis, i larva, i beetle, 4 bees and wasps, 
I egg mass, i salamander — near Durango, Mexico. 
KENKEL, LOUIS V., Chicago. 

I silver mole and skull — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
LEWY, ALFRED, Chicago. 

1 sharp-shinned hawk — Chicago. 
MANN, WILLIAM M., Helena, Montana. 

2 beetles — Wathena, Kansas. 
MEYER, EDGAR L. 

2 shells — Bermuda. 
MUELLER, F. R., Chicago 

I alligator — Louisiana. 
MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

I sawfly, 2 spiders, i bug, i beetle, i fly, i wasp, r hornet — Harvey, 

Illinois. 
NEILSON, MRS. L. F., Chicago. 

II humming birds, i sunbird, i starling. 
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM, Chicago. 

I spider — Chicago. 
PEDERSEN, J. K., Chicago. 

I muskrat —  Jackson Park, Chicago. 
POLING, O. C, Quincy, Illinois. 

I fly, 2 stoneflies, 5 ant-lions, 7 beetles, 7 bees, wasps and parasites, 8 
bugs — Quincy, Illinois, and Southern Arizona. 



54 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

PR.W. L. J.. Chicago. 

6 ground squirrels, i gopher, i rabbit — Fox Lake, IlHnois. 

2 squirrels — Dowagiac, Michigan. 
R.\nD.\TZ. R. C, Chicago. 

1 bat — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

1 centipede, 2 beetles — Antigo, Wisconsin. 

2 tree-toads, i frog — Wisconsin and Fox Lake, Illinois. 
SPURLLNG, MR., Bermuda. 

I star-tish — Castle Harbor, Bermuda. 
STEBBLXS. J. H., Chicago. 

I centipede — Chicago. 
TUCKER. ARCHDEACO.N', Bermuda. 

I shell — Xorth Shore, Bermuda. 
U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

29 fishes (20 species). 

bats (exchange). 
WALLISTER, GUSTAV, Chicago. 

1 scorpion — Chicago. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluflfton, Indiana. 

13 crayfish — Bluffton, Indiana. 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

I grasshopper, 14 bugs, 2 beetles, 2 flies, 9 bees, wasps, etc., 2 weevils, 
2 spiders, 2 bees — Illinois, Indiana, and Texas. 

SFXTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ELLIOT, D. G., New York City. 

43 lantern slides. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. M. Barber: 

50 negatives of general views, landscapes, etc. — Guatemala. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

1783 negatives, 890 lantern slides, 5160 prints, 66 enlargements, 99T 
negatives developed, 1525 prints mounted. 
Made by N. Dearborn: 

155 negatives bird studies, general views, etc. — United States and 
Guatemala . 
Made by George A. Dorsey: 

8 negatives of Indian ceremonials, 12 negatives of archieological 
subjects. 
Made by J. M. Greenman: 

48 negatives of plant studies, general views, etc. —  Mexico and 
Yucatan. 
Made by S. E. Meek: 

120 negatives general views, landscapes, etc. — Guatemala. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

174 negatives of museums, institutions, general views, etc. — Europe. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 55 

Made by C. L. Owen: 

156 negatives general views, landscapes, etc. — California. 
Made by E. S. Riggs: 

93 negatives of general views, landscapes, etc. — Bad Lands, South 

Dakota. 
60 negatives of general views, landscapes, etc. — Nebraska Paleon- 
tological Expedition, 1906. 
Made by S. C. Simms: 

12 negatives general views, etc. — Philippine Islands. 
Made by A. W. Slocom: 

29 negatives of general views, landscapes, etc. — Romeo, Illinois, 
Chicago, and Bay View, Michigan. 
Purchase: 

15 negatives of the "Paul Kane " pictures. 

THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 
(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

ACIREALE. REALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy. 

Rendiconti e memorie, ser. 3, v. 4, 1904-5. 
ADAMS, FRANK D., Montreal, Canada. 

2 reprints. 

AGUILERA, JOSE G., Mexico, Mexico. 

3 pamphlets. 

ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, Ala. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, University, Ala. 

I map. 
ALASKA EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALBANY MUSEUM, Grahamstown, Cape Colony. 

Records, v. i, pts. 5-6. 
ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Mass. 

I pamphlet. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

I parnphlet. 
AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. 

Memoirs, v. i, nos. 1—2. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Worcester, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Philadelphia. 

Proceedings, S4th and ssth meetings, 1904-5 (gift). 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Journal, current numbers. 



56 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY. Cambridge, Mass. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. 

Forestry and irrigation, current numbers. 
AMERICAN GE0(;RAIMIICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF HOMOEOPATHY, New York City. 

Transactions, 1905 (gift). 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS. New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Transactions, v. 36. 
AMERICAN INVENTOR PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

American inventor, current numbers. 
AMERICAN MINING CONGRESS. Denver. Colorado. 

Proceedings, 6th, 7th and 8th sessions. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Annual report. 1905. 

Bulletin, v. 21. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Memoirs, v. 9, pt. 3. 

6 reprints. 

A.MERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. New 
York City. 

Proceedings and papers. 47th and 48th annual meetings. 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven. Conn. 

Journal, v. 26, pt. 2; v. 27, pt. i. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Franklin Bicentennial Celebration, 1906. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMES BOTANICAL LABORATORY, Easton, Mass. 

Contributions, no. 4. 

7 separates. 

AMSTERDAM. K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam 
Netherlands. 

Proceedings, v. 7-8. 

Verhandelingen, v 11; v. 12. nos. 1-4. 

Zittingsverslagen, v. 13-14. 
ANDERSON. C, Sydney, N. S. W. 

2 reprints (gift). 
ANNALES DES MINES, Paris. France. 

•Annales, current numbers. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GRE.\T BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 
London, England. 

Tournal, current numbers. 
ARCHITECTS' AND BUILDERS' MAGAZINE COMPANY, New York City. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONWISSENSCHAFT, Beriin. Germany. 

Archiv, vol. o- 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 57 

ARIZONA UNIVERSITY, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, agricultural experiment station, no. 16. 

Bulletin, agricultural experiment station, current numbers. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Payetteville, Ark, 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ARMOUR INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Yearbook, 1906-7 
ARTHUR, JOSEPH CHARLES. 

16 excerpts. 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta. India. 

Memoirs, v. i, nos. 1-9. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia, Pa 

Journal, current numbers. 
ATKINSON, GEORGE F., Ithaca, New York. 

2 pamphlets. 
AUGUSTANA COLLEGE, Rock Island, 111. 

Publications, no. 5. 
AUSTRALASIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, Melbourne, 
N. S. W. 

Transactions, v. 11 (gift). 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Records, current numbers. 

Report, 1905. 

Special catalogue, v. 2, pt. i. 
AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

Walden's Birds of the Philippines (gift). 
BANDELIER, A. F., New York City. 

1 reprint. 

BASCOM, FLORENCE, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

2 excerpts. 

BASEL. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerlar. 

Verhandlungen, v. 18, pt. 2. 
BAYERISCHE BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany. 

Bericht, B. 10. 

Mittheilungen, nos. 34-40. 
BEAN, TARLETON H.. New York City. 

I excerpt. 
BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 
Belfast, Ireland. 

Report and proceedings, 1904-5. 
BELFAST NATURALISTS' FIELD CLUB, Belfast, Ireland. 

Annual report and proceedings, 1904-5; ser. 2, v. 5,?pt. 5. 

Appendices, v. 2, 7-8. 
BELLEVUE AND ALLIED HOSPITALS, New York City. 

Medical and surgical report, v. i, 1904 (gift). 
BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 



58 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

BERGENS MUSEUM, Bergens, Nonvay. 

Aargbog, 1005. 

Aarsberetning, 1905. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE LANDVVIRTHSCHAFTS OESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Mitteilungen, v. 21: 42. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, v. ii. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK. Berlin, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1905-6. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Notizblatt, v. 4, nos. 36-37. Appendix 12. 
BERLIN. KONIG. .MUSEEN, Berlin, Germany. 

Verzeichnis, 1906. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current numbers. 
BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Fuhrer. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. ZOOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Berichte, 1904, 1905. 

Mitteilungen, v. 3, nos. 1-2. 
BERLINER GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOLOGIE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fiir ethnologic, current numbers. 
BERN. HOCHSCHULE BIBLIOTHEK, Berne, Switzerland. 

29 inaugural dissertations. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Memoirs, v. 2, pts. 1-2. 

Occasional papers, v. 2, nos. 3-4; v. 4, no. i. 
BISHOP. ESTATE OF II. R.. New York City. 

Investigations and studies in jade (gift). 
BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
BOIS, STANLEY, Colombo, Ceylon. 

Final report, Ceylon exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 
1904 (gift). 
BOMAN, M. E., Paris, France. 

I excerpt. 
BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India. 

Journal, v. 1-6; v. 7, nos. 3-4. 
BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1904-5. 

Verhandlungen. v. 61, pt. 2; v. 62. pt. i. 
BORDEAUX SOCIETE LINNEENNE, Bordeaux, France. 

Proc^s-verbaux. v. 60. 



Japanese Woods. 



The installation in this case shows scntie of the more important Japanese woods. 
Each species is represented by a colored illustration of the plant in flower and fruit; 
and under the illustration are two portions of the trunk, one clearly displaying the 
natural bark, the other showing an unfinished and a finished surface of the wood in 
the same plane. 




1 VA/ 'J :^-»i^ A r% A 4 



b3 aid! a] nuiisUntta't 9ffT 

' liosA 

,,  ....  ^uli 



U3 

H 
tr 
O 

Q. 
UJ 

(r 



> 
tr 
O 

t- 



< 

a: 

I- 
< 

Z 



05 



Q 

-J 
HI 




UBRARV 
OF THE ^.^ 
tmWERSlTY OF ILUNOIS 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. . 59 

BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Mass. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1905. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual book-list, 1904-5. 

Annual report, no. 53, 54. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Mass. 

Occasional papers, vs. 1-4, 6-7. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Mass. 

President's report, 1904-5. 

Yearbook, v. 33. 
BOWDITCH, CHARLES P., Boston, Mass. 

2 pamphlets. 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine. 

Bulletin, no. 5. 

Catalogue, 1905-6, 1906-7. 

Librarian's report, 1901-2, 1902-3, 1903-4.. 

President's report, 1905-6. 
BRANDENBURG BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Berlin, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 46-47. 
BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, Germany. 

Abhandlungen, v. 18, no. 2. 
BRESSLAU, ERNST, Strassburg, Germany. 

3 reprints. 

BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England. 

Reports, 1904-5. 

I pamphlet. 
BRITISH ARCH^OLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London, England. 

Report, 1905. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report, 1905. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, Victoria, B. C. 

Sessional papers, 1905. 

Statutes, 1906 (gift). 
BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), London, England. 

Catalogue of birds' eggs, v. 4. 

Catalogue of cicadidag. 

Catalogue of corals. 

Catalogue of fossil vertebrata of the Fayum, Egypt. 

Catalogue of glossopteries flora. 

Catalogue of orthoptera, v. i. 

List of casts of fossils, 5th edition. 

Return, 1904—5, 1905—6. 



6o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

BROGGER. W. C, Christiania. Nonvay. 

Dot syndstlige \orge. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS A\U SCIENCES. Brooklyn, New York. 

Children's museum news, current numbers. 

Prospectus, 1905-6, 1906-7. 

Report of the Museums, 1905. 

Science bulletin, current numbers. 

Yearbook, 1904-5. 
BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUNN. LANDWIRTHSCIIAFTLICHE LANDES-VERSUCIISSTATION 
FiJR PFLANZENKULTUR, Brunn. Austria. 

Bericht, 1904. 
BRUSSELS INTERNATIONAL R, R. CONGRESS, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, v. 9, nos. 7-10 (gift). 
BRUXELLES. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES DE BELGIQUE, 
Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUXELLES. INSTITUT GEOGRAPHIQUE, Bruxelles. Belgium. 

Publication, 1 1. 
BRUXELLES. .MUSEES ROYAUX, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Guide sommaire. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Bru.xelles, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUXELLES. SOCIETE ROYALE LINNEEXNE. Bruxelles, Belgium. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUXELLES. UNIVERSITE NOUVELLE, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

I pamphlet. 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Program, 1906-7. 
BUDAPEST. K. UNGAR NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELL- 
SCHAFT, Budapest, Austria-Hungary. 

Mathematische und natur. bericht, v. 20, 23. 
BUDAPEST. MAGYAR ORXITHOLOGIAI KOZPONT, Budapest, Austria. 

Aquila, v. 1 1-12. 

1 book. 

2 publications. 

BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIOX.VL, Buenos Aires. Argentina. 

Anales, ser. 3, v. 5. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York. 

Annual report, no. 9. 
BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Buitenzorg, Java. 

Mededeelingen, no. 2. 

Verslag, 1904-5. 

2 pamphlets. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 61 

CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN. Calcutta, India. 

Report, 1905-6. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California. 
Publications, current numbers. 
2 pamphlets. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION,Sacramento,Cal. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1898-1901, 1901-1903, 1903-1904 
CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, Cal. 

Bulletin, no. 38. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, Cal. 

Bulletin, department of geology, current numbers 
Publications: Anthropology, current numbers. 
Botany, current numbers. 
Physiology, current numbers. 
Zoology, current numbers. 
University Chronicle, current numbers. 
2 pamphlets. 
CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

Publication, no. 42. 
CAMBRIDGE. MUSEUM AND LECTURE ROOM SYNDICATE, Cam- 
bridge, Eng. 
Annual report, no. 40, 1905. 
Library syndicate report, 1905. 
CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 
Proceedings, v. 12; v. 13, nos. 1-3. 
Transactions, v. 20, nos. 1-6. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Mass 
.\nnual report, 1905. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. MUSEUM OF ZOOLOGY, Cambridge, Eng. 
23 reprints. 

CAMPINAS. CENTRO DE SCIENCIAS, LETRAS E ARTES, Sao Paulo, 

Brazil. 
CANADA. BOTANICAL CLUB, Montreal, Canada. 

Bibliography of Canadian botany, 1904. 

Report, 1904-5. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual report, 1905. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Ottawa, Canada. 

Canadian yearbook, 1906. 

Polar expedition maps, 7. 

3 maps. 
CANADA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Annual report, v. 14-15, with maps. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, ser. 2, v. 11, 1905. 

Revista, current numbers. 



62 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPH:. DEP.XR T.ME.XT OF .\(;RICULTURE. Cape 
Town, South Africa. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Report of the government biologist, 1904, 1905. 

Report of the government entomologist, 1904, 1905. 
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. GEOLOGICAL COM.MISSIO.V. Cape Town, 
South Africa. 

I map. 
CAPE roW.X. I)EP.\RT.\IE.\T (JF AGRICULTURE, Cape Town, South 
Africa. 

Journal, current numbers. 
CARACAS. MINISTERIO DE FOME.\TO. Caracas. Venezuela. 

Bulletin, t. i, nos 13-15. 
CARDIFF .\ATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales. 

Transactions, v. 37-38. 
CARLSRUHE. .\ATURWISSE.\SCIIAFTLICIIER VEREI\, Carlsruhe, 
Germany. 

Verhandlungen, 1903-4, 1904-5. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D. C. 

Yearbook, 1005. 
CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annual report, 1905-6. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annals, v. 3, no. 3. 

Annual report, 1905-6. 

Founder's Day, 1905. 

Memoirs, v. 2, nos. 6-9. 
CARPENTER, G. H., Dublin, Ireland. 

Irish naturalist, current numbers. 
CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Carthage. 

Revue tunisienne, nos. 53-59. 
CARY, MERRITT, Washington, D. C. 

I separate. 
CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und bericht, 1903-5. 
CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GEOENIA DI SCIENZE NATURALE, Catania, 
Italy. 

Bulletin, n. s., v. 88. 
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington. D. C. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

10 di.ssertations. 
CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. Colombo, India. 

Tropical agriculturist, current numbers. 
CEYLON. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Peradeniya. Ceylon. India. 

Annals, v. 3, no. i. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CHAMBERLIN, T. C, Chicago, 111. 

18 reprints. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 63 

CHARLEVILLE. CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE, Charleville, France. 

Proems- verbaux, 1905. 
CHEESEMAN, T. P., Auckland, New Zealand. 

Manual of the New Zealand flora. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Annual report, nos. 26, 27. 

7 catalogues. 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1905. 
CHICAGO JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers. 
CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 33. 

Bulletin, nos. 71-73. 

Handbook. 

Special bulletin, no. 6. 

I pamphlet. 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago. 

Annual register, 1905-6. 

Botanical gazette. 

Journal of geology. 

President's report, 1904-5.' 

16 dissertations. 
CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago de Chile. 

Miscellaneous publications, 39 volumes. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 25. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Journal, v. 2, nos. i, 2, 4; v. 3, nos. i, 2, 4; v. 4-16. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual list of books added, 1905. 

Library leaflet, current numbers. 

Society for the blind report, 1905. 
CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Record, current numbers. 
CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Mass. 

American journal of psychology, v. ir-i6. 

Decennial volume, 1889-1899. 

8 reprints. 

CLAUSTHAL. K. BERGAKADEMIE, Clausthal, Germany. 

Program, 1906-7. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 37, 1905. 

Open shelf, current numbers. 
COCHIN STATE ETHNOGRAPHICAL SURVEY, Ernakulam, British India. 

Monographs, nos. 1—6, 8-9, 11. 



64 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 

COHEiN. MRS., L. GrcitswaM, Prussia. 

Mctcoritenkunde, heft 3, by E. Cohen (gift). 
COIMBRA. BIBLIOTHECAS E ARCHIVOS NACIO.NALES. Coimbra, 
Portugal. 

Boletin, 1005, nos. 1-4. 
COLBY COLLEGE, Waterville. Maine. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

1 pamphlet 

COLLET, R., Christiania, Norway. 

2 excerpts. 

COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton. Pa. 

Mines and minerals, current numbers 
COLLI XGE. WALTER E., Birmingham, England. 

Journal of malacology, cu nt numbers. 

I pamphlet. 
COLMAR. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCIIAFT, Colmar, Germany. 

Bulletin, n. s., t. 1-7. 
COLN. STADTISCHE HANDELS-HOCMSCHULE, Cologne, Germany. 

Bericht, 1903, 1904. 
COLOMBO MUSEUM, Ceylon, India. 

Report, 1905. 

Spolia zeylanica, current numbers. 
COLORADO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fort Collins, 
Colorado 

Annual reports, nos. 14, 16, 18. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Flora of Colorado, by P. A. Rydberg. 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Studies, sci. ser., current numbers. 
COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colo. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
COLORADO STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Fort CoUins, Colo. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
COLORADO. STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Denver, Colo. 

New Mexico campaign, 1862. 
COLORADO. SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, Denver. 
Colorado. 

School laws of Colorado, 1905 (gift). 
COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colo. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

Studies, current numbers. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1005-6. 

Contributions from the Geological Department, v. 12, nos. 102-106. 
COMPARETTE, T. LOUIS, Washington, D. C. 

I pamphlet. 



LIBRARV^ 

OF THE 

'fNfVERSJTYOFIUJNOIS 



CO 

H 
E 

o 

a. 

UJ 

a: 



> 
q: 

O 

t- 



< 

or 

D 
t- 
< 

Z 



2 

UJ 

If) 

5 




Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 65 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Annual report, no. 29, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
COOPER UNION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ART, 
New York City. 

Annual report, no. 47. 1906. 
COPENHAGEN. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Videnskabelige meddelelser, 1905. 
COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Mineralogical and Geological Museum: 

Beretning, 1902, 1905. 

Contributions, nos. 6-7. 

List of meteorites, 1905. 

3 pamphlets. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Experiment station report, nos. 14, 15 and 16. 

Librarian's report, 1904-5. 
COSTA RICA. INSTITUTO FISICO-GEOGRAFICO NACIONAL, San 
Jos6, Costa Rica. 

Anales, t. 9, 1896. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CRAGIN, FRANCIS W., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Bulletin of the Washburn Laboratory, nos. i-ii, with 19 separates. 
CREWDSON, W., St. Leonards-on-Sea, England. 

Ruxton's adventures in Mexico (gift). 
CROSBY, W. O., Boston, Mass. 

3 reprints. 
CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA DE CUBA, Santiago de las 
Vegas, Cuba. 

Bulletin, 2-5. 

Circulars, nos. 19-20. 

Primer informe anual, 1904-5. 
CUMMINGS, EDGAR, R., Bloomington, Indiana. 

1 reprint. 

CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPHS UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 
Austria. 

2 reports. 

DARMSTADT. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany. 

Notizblatt, 1904-5. 
DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, N. H. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
DAVIS, H. G., Washington, D. C. 

I pamphlet. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Del. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 



66 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE. Media, Pa. 

Proceedings, v, i. nos. 2-4. 
DENISON UMVERSrrV, Granville, (3hio. 

Bulletin, current number.s. 
DEARBORN, NED, Chicago. 

3 ornithological papers (gift). 
DETROIT MUSEU.M OF ART, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin, nos. 8-1 1. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin, no. 17. 

Report, 1905. 
DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCIIE GESELLSCIIAFT, Berlin, Germany. 

Zcitschrift, v. 57. 
DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DONALDSON, HENRY H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 separates. 

DORSEY, GEORGE AMOS, Chicago. 

Traditions of the Caddo (gift). 
DRESDEN. K. MINERALOGISCH-GEOLOGISCHES UND PRAEHIS- 
TORISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

I excerpt. 
DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 
Dresden, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, 1005 
DRESDEN. K. SAMMLUNGEN FUR KUNST UND WISSENSCHAFT, 
Dresden, Germany. 

Bericht, 1902-3 
DREW THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, Madison, New York. 

Yearbook, 1905— ft 
DRUGS, OILS AND PAINT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current numbers (gift), 
DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Abstract of the minutes for 1905. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Transactions, current numbers 
DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Report, 1904. 
DUBLIN. SCIENCE AND ART MUSEUM, Dubhn, Ireland. 

24 guides to collections in the Dublin Museum. 

I pamphlet. 
DUBLIN. TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

" Hermathena," v. 31. 
DUC DE LOU BAT, Paris, France. 

Codex Borgia, bd. 2. 
DUTTON, C. E., Englewood, New Jersey. 

I pamphlet (gift). 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 67 

EARLHAM COLLEGE, Richmond, Indiana. 

Calatogue, 1905-6 (gift). 
EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY. 
Canterbury, England. 

Transactions, v. 5, no. 3. 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Report, 1905. 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Proceedings, v. 24-25. 

Transactions, v. 40, nos. 3-4; v. 41, pts. 1-2; v. 43. 

EGYPT. PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, 

Gizeh, Egypt. 
Report, 1905. 

1 pamphlet. 

ELBERFELD. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Elberfeld, 
Germany. 

Jahres-berichte, 1906. 
ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, N. C 

Journal, current numbers. 
ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

Membership list, 1906. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ESSEX Ii\STITUTE, Salem, Mass. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Geology of Essex county, Mass., by Sears, J. H. 
EVANSTON FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, 111. 

Report, 1904-6. 
FARRINGTON, O. C, Chicago. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
FEILBERG, H. F., Vejen, Denmark. 

Jul. V. 1-2 (gift). 
FERN BULLETIN COMPANY, Binghampton, New York. 

Bulletin, v. 14, nos. 1-2. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lake City, Fla. 

Annual report, 1893-8, 1901-5. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 

FORSTEMANN, E., Charlottenburg, Germany. 
I reprint. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FRAZER, J. G., Cambridge, England. 

Adonis, Attis, Osiris. 

Lectures on the early history of kingship (gift). 



68 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

FREEMAN, E. M., St. Paul. Minnesota. 

Minnesota plant diseases. 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENUE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiberg, Ger- 
many. 

Berichte, B. 8-9, 16. 
FKi:iBERG. K. SACHS-BERGAKADEMIE, Freiberg, Germany. 

Program, 1906-7. 
FRIBOURG. SOCIETE FRIBOURGEOISE DES SCIENCES NATUR- 
ELLES, Fribourg, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, v. 12-13. 

M^moires, nos. 7-9. 
FRIEDERIC, GEORG, Leipzig. 

Skalpieren und ahnlicho Kriegsgebrauche in Amerika. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Natura; novitates, current numbers. 
FRITSCH. KARL, Groz. 

1 pamphlet. 

FRUGGATT, WALTER \V., Sydney, N. S. \V. 

14 entomological papers. 
FURLONG, EUSTACE L., Berkeley, California. 

2 reprints (gift). 

FUR TRADE REVIEW. New York City. 

Directory, 1906-7 (gift). 
GENEVE. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneve, 
Switzerland. 

Annuaire, 7th, 8th and 9th years. 
GENEVE. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE. 
Geneve, Switzerland. 

M6moire, current numbers. 
GENXEP, ARNOLD VAN, Paris, France. 

Mvthes et legendes d'Australie. 
GENOA. MUSEO CIVICO DI STORIA NATURALE, Genoa, Italy. 

Annali. current numbers. 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment. Ga. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
GERHARD, W. J., Chicago. 

Collection of 49 entomological papers (gift). 
GIESSEN. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK. Giessen, Germany. 

41 inaugural dissertations. 
GIGLIO-TOS, ERMANNO, Cagliari, Italy. 

Les problemes de la vie, pt. .3. 
GILCHRIST. DOUGLAS A.. Newcastle-upon-Tyne. England. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
GILMORE, C. W., Washington, D. C. 

4 excerpts. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 69 

GLASGOW. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Transactions, v. 6, no. 3; v. 7, nos. 1-2. 
GOTTINGEN. K. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Germany. 

Chronik, 1904, 1905. 

5 pamphlets. 
GREENE, E. L., Washington, D. C. 

I excerpt. 
GREENE, GEORGE K., New Albany, Indiana. 

Contributions to Indiana paleontology, v. i (gift). 
GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

5 separates (gift). 
GUION, GEORGE MURRAY, Chicago. 

Annual report of U. S. Mint, 1873-1895, 1897-1898, 1900, 1902-3, 
1905. 

British Museum, 3 guides. 

New York Survey, annual report no. 7. 

U. S. Army, engineering department, report of survey, v. 3, 77. 
HAARLEM. STADSBIBLIOTHEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1905. 
HABAXA UXIVERSIDAD, Havana, Cuba. 

Re vista, current numbers. 
HAMBURG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Hamburg, Germany. 

Bericht, 1904. 
HAMBURG. NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUM, Hamburg, Germany. 

Jahrbuch, v. 22, 1904. 

Mittheilungen, v. 22, 1904. 
HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada. 

Journal and proceedings, no. 21, 1904-5. 
HANNOVER GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 189 8- 1905. 
HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual report, no. 68, 1906. 
HARTLAND, E. S., Gloucester, England. 

I pamphlet. 
HARVARD COLLEGE. MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Annual report, 1904-5. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Memoirs, current numbers. « 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Mass. 

Biographical contributions, nos. 56-57. 

Busse}^ Institute bulletin, v. 3-5. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

Report of the president and treasurer, 1904-5. 
HASSE, C, Breslau, Germany. 

I separate. 
HATCH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Mass. 

Annual report, no. 18. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



7© Field Museum of Natural IIistouy — Reports, Vol. ill. 

HAWAII. liOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF A(rRICULTURE AND 
FORESTRY, Honolulu, W. I. 

Bulletin, current munhcrs. 
HAWAIIAN' HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Honolulu, II. I. 

Annual report, no. 13. 

Papers, no. 12. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS' ASSOCIATION, Honolulu, H. I. 

Report of the experiment station committee, 1904-5. 

Report of the division of pathology and physiology, v. i. 
HAYNES, CAROLINE C, Highlands, N.'j- 

4 pamphlets. 
HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany. 

116 inaugural dissertations. 

Hiil.M, A., Zurich, Switzerland. 

I reprint. 
HENRIKSEX, G., Nystrand, Norway. 

I pamphlet. 
HILGENDORF, F., Berlin, Germany. 

I excerpt. 
HIRTH, FRIEDRICH, New York City. 

Notes on some Chinese painters (gift). 
HITCHCOCK, C. H., Hanover. .N. H. 

I reprint. 
HOBBS, W. H., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

:; pamphlets. 
HONGKONG. BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPART.MENT. 
Hongkong, China. 

Report, IQ05. 
HORXIMAN MUSEUM, London, England. 

Annual report, 1Q05. 

Handbook, marine aquaria. 

HO WITT. A. W. 

I pamphlet. 

HRDLICKA, A., Washington, D. C. 

4 pamphlets. 
IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho. 

Annual report, 1Q05. * 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
IDAHO. STATE INSPECTOR OF MINES, Boise, Idaho 

Report, 1005 
ILLINOIS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Urbana, 111. 

.\nnual report, 1 903-4, 1904-5. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, 111. 

Statistical report, quarterlv numbers. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF FISH COMMISSIONS, Springfield, 111. 

Report, 1902-4 (gift). 
ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGIC.\L SURVEY, Urbana, 111. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-3. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 71 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, 111. 

Publication, no. 10. 
ILLINOIS STATE LABORATORY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Urbana, 111. 

Report of the state entomologist, no. 23, 1905. 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, 111. 

Register, 1905-6. 
INDIA. BOTANICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

Records, v. 4, pt. 3. 
INDIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 
Memoirs, current numbers. 
Records, current numbers. 
INDIA. SUPERINTENDENT OF GOVERNMENT PRINTING, Calcutta, 
India. 
Agricultural gazette, current numbers. 
INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 
Annual report, 1904-5. 

Catalogue of Indian decapod Crustacea, pt. 3, fasc. i. 
INDIANA. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Annual report, 30th, 1905. 
INDIANA. STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES, Indianapolis. 

Annual report, no. 16. 
INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Inland printer, v. 36-37 (gift). 
INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, Washington, 
D. C. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 
Railways in the United States in 1902, pts. 2, 4-5 (gift). 
IOWA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, Iowa. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
IOWA. HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annals, current numbers. 
IOWA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Proceedings of the Iowa Park and Forestry Association, annual meet- 
ing, no. 5. 
Transactions, v. 46. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Calendar, 1904-5, 1905—6. 
JAMAICA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Kingston, Jamaica. 
Annual report, 1904-5. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
JOHANNSEN, OSKAR A., Albany, N. Y. 

I reprint. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago. 
Annual report, 1905. 

Supplement to the list of serials in public libraries in Chicago and 
Evanston, second edition, 1905. 



72 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. Baltimore, M.l. 

Circulars, current numbers. 

Register, 1905-6. 
KANS.\S AC.XDEMY OF SCIENCE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, v. 20, pt. i. 
KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. Manhatt.m, Kansas. 

Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, no. 18, 1004-5. 

Industrialist. The. current numbers. 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. Topeka, Kansas. 

Report. V. 24, no. 96. 
KANSAS ST.\TE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, v. 9, 1905-6. 
KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Topeka, Kansas. 

University geological survey bulletin, 1902-3. 
KARNTEN. NATURHISTORISCHE LANDES-MUSEU.M, Karnten. Aus- 
tria-Hungary. 

Jahrbuch, v. 48. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington. Ky. 

•Annual report, nos. 15-16. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift).. 
KENTUCKY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lexington, Ky. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-2, 4-5. 

Report, 1904-5. 
KEW. ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, England. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht, 1905. 
KOCH-GRUNBERG, THEODOR, Berlin, Germany. 

.\nfange der kunst im Urwald. 

3 reprints. 
KONIGSBERG. BOTANICAL SOCIETY. Konigsberg. Germany. 

Jahresbericht. 1904-5. 
KOSMOS. GESELLSCHAFT DER NATURFREUNDE, Stuttgart. Ger- 
many. 

Kosmos: Jahrgang. v. 2. no. 2; v. 3. nos. 1-4. 

6 pamphlets. 
KRISTIN I A. UNIV-MINERALOGISKE INSTITUT, Kristinia, Norway. 

Norges geol-undersogelse, nos. 35, 37-43. 
LAKE MOHONK ARBITRATION CONFERENCE. Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

Proceedings, 1904-5. 

Report. 9th-iith meetings, 1902-6 (gift). 

LAMPE, EDWARD. Wiesbaden. Germany. 

3 catalogues. 

LANCASHIRE SEA FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool. England. 

Report, 1905. 
LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence, .Mass. 

Annual report, no. 34, 1905. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 73 

LEBRUN, H., Bruxelles, Belgium. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
LEHMANN, WALTER, Berlin, Germany. 

3 separates. 
LEHMANN-NITSCHE, R., La Plata, Argentina. 

3 pamphlets. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1904-5. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS GEOLOGISCH-MINERALOGISCH MUSEUM, Leiden, 
Holland. 

Sammlungen, ser. i, v. 8, heft 2. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS MUSEUM VAN NATUURLIJKE HISTORIE, Leiden. 
Netherlands. 

Notes from the Leiden Museum, v. 1-28. 

Index, 1879-1889. 
LEIPZIG. K. SACHS GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Leip- 
zig, Germany. 

Bericht, current numbers. 
LEISEURTZ, WILHELM, Munich, Germany. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, Cal. 

Register. 

Report of the president, 1904. 
LENZ, RODOLFO, Santiago de Chile. 

Diccionario etnologico (gift). 
LEVALLOIS-PERRET, L'ASSOCIATION DES NATURALISTES, Paris, 
France. 

Annales, v. 11, 1905. 

Bulletin, nos. 1—2. 
LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Register, 1906. 
LIMA. SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICO, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, t. 16-17. 
LISBOA. ACADEMIA REAL 'DAS SCIENCIAS, Lisboa, Portugal. 

Journal, no. 27. 
LISBOA. COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisboa, Portugal. 

Broteria, v. 4. 
LIVERPOOL BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England. 

Annual report, no. 19. 

Proceedings and transactions, v. 19. 
LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mycological notes, nos. 19-23. 

The tylostomeae. 



74 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

LONDON LINN^AN SOCIETY. London, England. 

Joumjil, botany, 
zoology. 

List, 1905-6. 

Proceedings, 1004-5. 
LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAIMIICAL SOCIETY. London. England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON. ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. London, England. 

Journal, v. 29, pt. 4; v. 30. 
LONDON. ROYAL SOCIETY. London, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
LONDON. SOCIETY OF ARTS. London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London. England. 

List. 1906. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Annual report, 1904. 
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

Annual report, no. iS. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
LOWELL OBSERVATORY. Flagstaff, Arizona. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-24 (gift). 
LUBECK. NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUM, Lubeck. Germany. 

Mittheilungen, no. 20. 
LUND UNIVERSITETS. Lund, Sweden. 

Acta universitatis lundensis, n. s. i, 1905. 
LYONS. SOCI^tI: D'AGRICULTURE, SCIENCES, ET INDUSTRIE, 
Lyons, France. 

Bulletin, V. 7. 
McCLURE. CHARLES F \V., Princeton, N. J. 

2 reprints. 
McGEE, W. J., St. Louis, Mo. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
McGILL UNIVERSITY. Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF LAND RECORDS AND .\GRICULTURE. 
Madras, India. 

Bulletin, nos. 5. 20. 32-41. 43-46, 48-51. 

Report, 1904-5. 
MADRAS. GOVERNMENT MUSEUM. Madras. India. 

Ethnographic notes in southern India, by E. Thurston. 
MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL. Madrid. Spain. 

Apuntes para una biblioteca de escrituras espanados, t. 2. 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITV ^^ sLUiswk- 



I/) 

H 

ir 

o 

Q. 



> 

(r 
O 

I- 
w 

I 



< 

IT 

< 
Z 



2 
3 
UJ 
CO 

5 




A»rr)8 10 TH^MTHAqsQ' TflUOO HTHOU 3HT W! YK 






Gallery in the North Court, Department of Botany. 



These views show a portion of the exhibit of useful articles derived chiefly from 
the natural family Graniinecp, or grasses. The upright cases are so disposed as to 
form successive alcoves in which related products are grouped, thus affording a 
ready means for comparison. The cases in the lower view are continuous with 
those of the upper from left to right. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 75 

MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Memorias, v. 22, 24. 

Revista, current numbers. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Annales, current numbers. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
MAINE UNIVERSITY, Orono, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

Studies, no. 6. 
MANCHESTER FIELD NATURALISTS' AND ARCH^OLOGISTS' 
SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 

Report and proceedings, 1905. 
MANCHESTER GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Manches- 
ter, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER MUSEUM. OWENS COLLEGE, Manchester, England. 

Publications, nos. 59-60. 
MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUXG, Marburg, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1905. 
MARBURG UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Chronik, 1905-6. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
Plymouth, Eng. 

International fishery investigations, ist report, 1902-3. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, West of Scotland. 

Report (gift). 
MARSEILLES. FACULTE DES SCIENCES, Marseilles, France. 

Annales, v. 15. 
MARSEILLES. L'INSTITUT COLONIAL, Marseilles, France. 

Annales, 2nd ser. n. 3. 
MARSEILLES. MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Marseilles, France. 

Annales, t. 9, pt. 2. 
MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Park, 
Maryland. 

Annual report, no. 19. 

Bulletin, current nu:nbers. 
MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Report, V. 5, 1905. 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE, Baltimore, Md. 

Annual report, no. 58, 1906. 
MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, College Park, Md. 

Report, no. 8, 1905. 



6 FiF.i.D Museum oi Natural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 



MARYLAND STATE LIBRARY, Annapolis, Md. 

House and Senate documents, 1906. 

Journal, House of Delegates, 1906. 

Laws of Maryland, 1906. 

NLirvland Senate journal, 1906. 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Mass. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Transactions, 1904, pt. 2; 1905, pt. i. 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1905, 1906. 

Technology quarterly, current numbers. 
MATTHEW, W. D., Washington, D. C. 

I excerpt. 
MAURITIUS, COLONY OF. Forests Office, Port Louis, Africa. 

Annual report of forests and gardens department, 1904-5. 
MEEK, S. E., Chicago. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
MELBOURNE. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Journal, v. 3. 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Calendar, 1906. 
MERRILL, GEORGE P., Washington, D. C. 

Contributions to the history of geology. 
MEXICO. DIRECCION GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mexico. 

8 government reports. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO BIBLIOGRAFICO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, nos. 1-3. 
MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, nos. 1-24. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Paregones, current numbers. 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL. Mexico, Mexico. 

Anales, current numbers. 

Paginas ilustradus, nos. 58-63. 
MEXICO. RED METEOR Y REVISTA CIENTIFICA, Toluca, Mexico. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Report, V. 1-2; 4, 6-7. 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Michigan. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
^^CHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES. Houghton, Mich. 

Yearbook, 1905-6. 
MICHIGAN STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Agricultural College, 
Mich. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 77 

MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

An ecological survey in northern Michigan. 

Calendar, 1905—6. 

Report, University museum, 1905-6. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Annual report, nos. 23-24. 
MINING MAGAZINE PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Mining magazine, current numbers. 
MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Annual report, 1905. 

List of additions, 1905. 
MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minn. 

Biennial report, no. 13. 

Collections, v. 10, pts. 1-2; v. 11. 
MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: Annual report, no. 12, 1903—4; 
no. 13, 1904-5. 

Report of the survey, botanical series, no. 5. 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Miss. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL STATION, Agricultural College, Mo. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Annual report, no. 17. 
MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, Jefferson City, Mo. 

Report, 2nd series, v. 4. 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Mo. 

Publications, science series, v. i, no. i. 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Mo. 

Collections, v. 2, nos. 5-6. 
MONTANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Bozeman, Mont. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-2, 12-17^ 19, 20, 33—38, 40—50, 52-62 (gift). 
MONTANA UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Mont. 

Report, 1904-5. 
MONTEVIDEO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

Seccion historico-filosofica, t. 2. 
MONTGOMERY, E. G., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
MOORE, ALBERT H., Cambridge, Mass. 

I pamphlet. 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Archaeological investigations in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi. 
MOSCOW. SOCIe'te' IMPE'rIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, Rus- 
sia. 

Bulletin, v. 4. 



-■ij 



Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



MUXCIIEN. K. B. .\K.\lJi:.MlI': DlvR WISSI-INSCIIAFTE.X. _ Munchen, 
Germany. 
Sitzungsberichtc, B. 34. 

mUnchen ORNITHOLOGISCHE gesellschaft i.\ bayern. 

Munchen, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 5, 1904. 
MUNOZ, JORGE, Washington. D. C. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
MUSfeE BOTANIQUE DE LEIDE, Leiden. Holland. 

Mus6e botanique, v. 1-3, 1871-1897. 
MUSfeE DU COXGO. Bruxelle.';, Belgium. 

Annales: Botany, ser. i. v. i, pts. 1-8; ser. 2. v. i. pts. 1-2; ser. 3, 
pts. 1-2; ser. 4, complete; ser. 5. v. i, pts. 1-2; ser. 6, pt. i. 

Ethnography, ser. i. v. i. pt. i; ser. 2. v. i, pt. i; ser. 3. v. i. pt. i; 
ser. 4, complete. 

Zoology, ser. i complete; ser. 2. v. 2, pts. 1-2: ser. 3. v. :. pts. 1-2; 
ser. 3. V. 2, pt. i; ser. 3, v. 3, pt. i. 
MUSfeE D'HISTUIRE NATURELLE, Marseilles. France. 

Annales, ser. 2, vs. 5-9. 

Bulletin, v. i. 
MUSfeE GUIMET, Paris, France. 

Annales, bibliotheque d'^tudes, v. 18, 20. 
MUSEU GOELDI DE HISTORIA E ETHNOGRAPHIA, Para. Brazil. 

Arboretum Amazonicum, 3rd and 4th decade. 

Boletin, v. 4, no. 4. 

List of publications, 1879-1904. 
NAPOLL UXIVERSITA IXSTITUTO ZOOLOGICO, Xaples, Italy. 

Annuario, n. s.. v. i. nos. 1-35. 
XAPOLL R. ACCADENHA DELLE SCIEXZE. Xaples. Italy. 

Atti, V. 12. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
XARODOPISXE MUSEUM CESKOSLOVAXSKE, Prag, Austria. 

Fiihrer, 1896,-1904. 

Narodopisny sbomik, 1897-1904. 

Vestnik, 1896-1904, iqo6, nos. 1-2. 

Vijstava, 1895. 

12 pamphlets. 
NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Durban, Xatal. Africa. 

Xatal plants, current numbers. 

Report, 1004-5, 1005-6. 
XATAL GOVERXMEXT MUSEUM. Pietermaritzburg. Xatal, Africa. 

Report, no. i, 1904. 
XATIOXAL ACADEMY OF SCIEXCES, Washington, D. C. 

Memoirs, v. o- 
XATIOXAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

National geographic magazine, current numbers. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 79 

NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY OF NORTHUMBERLAND, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, England. 

Transactions, n. s. v. i, nos. 1-2. 
NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada. 

Canadian record of science, current numbers. 
NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada. 

Journal, current numbers. 
NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE WOCHENSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 

Current numbers. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, Neb. 

Annual report, no. 19, 1905-6. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lincoln, Neb. 

Report, V. 2, pts. 2-3. 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Neb. 

Calendar, 1905-6. 

Studies, V. 6, nos. 1-3. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, 

Batavia, India. 

Natuurkundig tijdschrift, v. 65. 
NETHERLANDS GOVERNMENT, Leiden,Netherlands. 

Javanese wofang poerwa (gift). 
NEVADA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Carson City, Nev. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Mass. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, no. 54. 
NEW ENGLAND PUBLISHING COMPANY, Boston, Mass. 

Journal of education, current numbers. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, N. H. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
NEW HAVEN FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Haven, Conn. 

Report, 1905. 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton,' 
N.J. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, N. J. 

Annual report, 1905. 
NEW JERSEY STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, N. J. 

Proceedings, no. 31. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla Park, 
N. M. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NEW SOUTH WALES BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT DO- 
MAIN, Sydney, N. S. W 

Report, 1904. 



8o Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

NEW SOUTH WALES. UKPAR'iM EXT OF AC^RICULTURE, Sydney, 
N. S. W. 

Agricultural gazette, current numbers. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, 
N. S. W. 

Report, 1004. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTME.XT OF MIXES AND AGRICUL- 
TURE. Sydney, X. S. W. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Memoirs: Paleontology, nos. 5, 14. 

Mineral resources, no. ii. 

Records, current numbers. 
NEW SOUTH WALES LIXXEAX SOCIETY. Sydney, X. S. W. 

Proceedings, v. 30. 
NEW SOUTH WALES ROYAL SOCIETY. Sydney, X. S. W. 

Journal and proceedings, v. 38, 1Q04. 
NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIEXCES. Xe%v York City. 

Annals, current numbers. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, N. Y. 

Annual report, no. 23, 1904. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK BOTANIC GARDEX, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHAXICS AXD TRADESMEX, 

Xew York, City. 

Annual report, 1905. 
NEW YORK MERCAXTILE LIBRARY, Xew York City. 

Report, 1905. 
NEW»YORK. METROPOLITAN .MUSEUM, Xew York City. 

Annual report, no. 36. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
XEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY. New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, X. Y. 

Bulletin, nos. 95-6. 

Education department: Annual report, 1905-6. 

Yearbook, 1904. 

New York State Museum: Bulletin, nos.84-102. 

Report, 74, pts. 1-2. 
Report of geologist, 1903. 
NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Xew York City. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
XEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Xewark. X. J. 

Annual report, 1905. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago. 

By-laws, 1904. 

Report, 1905. 



( 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 81 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, N. Z. 

Annual report, 1904, 1905. 

Department of Geography: Tourist and health resorts, bulletin. 

Division of Biology and Horticulture. ^ 

Bulletin, nos. i, 3-15. 
Report, 1904-5. 
6 pamphlets. 

Experiment Station: Report, 1905. 

Dairy Division: Bulletin, nos. 7-8. 

Chemistry Division: Bulletin, no. i. 
NEW ZEALAND^ GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, WelHngton, N. Z. 

Bulletin, n. s., no. i. 
NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE, Wellington, N. Z. 

Transactions, v. 37-38. 
NICHOLS, A. R., Dublin, Ireland. 

2 separates. 
NICHOLS, H. W., Chicago. 

Minerals and mineral resources of Virginia (gift) . 
NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 

Annual report, no. 28, 1904-5. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fargo 
N. D. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NOVA SCOTIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, N. S. 

Proceedings, v. 11, no. i. 
NUMISMATICS AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY OF MONTREAL, Mon- 
treal, Canada. 

Medal to commemorate the bi-centennial of the Chateau de Ramezay 
(gift). 
NURNBERG NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Nurnberg, 

Abhandlungen, B. 15, pt. 3. 

Jahresbericht, 1904. 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberhn, Ohio. 

Report of the librarian, 1905. 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 23 (bulletin 152). 

Bulletin, current nu:nbers. 
OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio. . 

Bulletin, 4th ser., nos. 4-6, 8. 
OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

History of the Ohio canals. 

Journal, current numbers. 

The serpent mound, Adams county, Ohio. 



82 F^iELD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. ill. 

OHIO STATK BOARD OK ACiRICULTURK. Columbus. Ohio. 
Annual report, nos. 59-60, 1904-5. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, commercial fertilizers, 1905. 
OHIO STATE UNIVIlRSITY, Columbus. Ohio. 

Catalogues, 1005. 
OJEDA, TOMAS, Santiago de Chile. 

2 excerpts (gift). 
OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIME.VT STATIO.\, Stillwater, Ok. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Reports, nos. 14-15, 1904-5. 1905-6. 
OM.VllA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha. Xebra.ska. 

Bulletin, current numbers 
O.VrARK^). BUREAU OF MI.N'ES. Toronto, Canada. 

Report, pts. 2-3, 1905. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Toronto, Canada. 
Reports: Agricultural College, 1905. 

Bureau of Industries, 1903-4. 
Entomological Society, no. 35, 1904. 
9 government reports. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF M.VRINE .\ND FISHERIES. Ottawa 
Canada. 
Report, no. 38, 1905. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY. Chicago. 

Monist, current numbers. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERI.MENT STATION, Corvallis, Ore. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
OREGON UNIVERSITY, Eugene, Ore. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB. Ottawa. Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 
OUTES, FELIX F., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
La Edad de la piedra en Patagonia. 
2 excerpts. 
OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

( )uting magazine, current numbers. 
O.XFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEU.M. O.xford, England. 

Report. 1905. 
PALERMO. REALE ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 

Contributions to biology, v. 4, no. i. 
PARIS .VCADfeMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus, current numbers. 
PARIS MUSfi'J.M DHISTOIRE N VTURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletii. current numbers. 
PARIS S3CIETE DES AMERICANISTES. Paris, Francj. 

Journal, current numbers 
PARKE. DAVIS & OMPANY, Detroit, Mich. 
Bulletin of pharmacy, current numbers. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 83 

PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Mass. 

Report, no. 54. 
PEABODY MUSEUM OF ARCHEOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Papers, current numbers. 
PEARSE, A. S., Chicago. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
PENAFIEL, ANTONIO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Cantares en idioma Mexicana. 

Indiimentaria antigua Mexicana. 

Nomenclature geografica de Mexico (gift). 
PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Harris- 
burg, Pa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Division of zoology: Bulletin, monthly. 

Bulletin, quarterly. 
PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Magazine of history and biology, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual report, no. 30, 1906. 

Circular, 1906-7. 
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Locomotive tests and exhibits, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904 

(gift). 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Contribution, zoological laboratory, v. 12. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, FREE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND 
ART, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Department of Archeology: Transactions, v. 2, no. i. 
PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, 111. 

Annual report, nos. 25-26. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION, Boston, Mass. 

Report, no. 74. 
PERU. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS DE MINES, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
PERU. INSTITUTO HISTORICO, Lima, Peru. 

Revista, v. i, nos. 1-2. 
PHARMACEUTICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Review, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, P;l. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pa. 

American journal of pharmacy, current numbers. 



84 Field Museum of Natural Histokv — Reports, Vol. III. 

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia. Pa 
Report of the library committee, 1005. 
Transactions, v. 251. 
lMin..M)ELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
IMIIL.VDELPHIA LIBRARY CO.MP.X.W, i'hiiadelphia. Pa. 

Bulletin, nos. 55-57. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. Manila, 
P. I. 
Bureau of Agriculture: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Bureau of Government Laboratories: 
Annual report, nos. 2, 4. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-2, 4-5, 7-g, 13-20. 23-28, 30. 
Ethnological Survey: 

Publications, v. 3; v. 4. no. i. 
Mining Bureau: 

Bulletin, no. 4; map. 
Report, nos. 4-6. 
Journal of science, current numbers. 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1005-6. 
PIOLTI, GUISEPPE. Torino. Italy. 

2 pamphlets. 
PLY.MOUTH MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, Eng. 

Annual report, no. 7, 1905-6 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Me. 

Annual report, 1905. 
PORTO RICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Mayaguez, 
P. R. 
Bulletin, No. 7. 
FRAG. K. BOHMISCHE (lESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Prag, Austria-Hungary. 
General register, 1884-1894. 
Jahresbericht. 1903. 1905. 
Sitzungsberichte. 1903-5. 

1 pamphlet. 

PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Report, 1005-6. 
PREUSS, THEODOR K.. Berlin. Germany. 

2 reprints. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY. Princeton, N. J. 

Annual report. 1905. 

Catalogue. 1905-6. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, R. I. 

Annual report, no. 28, 1905. 



LIBRARK 
OF TWE 

tWtesiTyOflLUNOli 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 85 

PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Toronto, Canada. 

Annual archaeological report, 1905. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-2. 

Catalogue of birds. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Ind. 

Annual report, 1905-6. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 
Annual report, 1904-5. 
Bulletin current numbers. 
QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Geological Survey:- 
Bulletin. 

Publications, nos. 197-203, 205. 
Record, no. 2. 
QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Annals, no. 6. 

Ethnographic bulletin, no. 8. 
RAILWAY AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERING, New York City. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
RANDALL & COMPANY, Chicago. 

Clay worker, current numbers (gift). 
redwood' library and ATHEN^UM, Newport, R. I. 

Report, 1904-5, 1905—6. 
REID, HARRY F., Baltimore, Md. 

4 excerpts (gift). 
RENNES. L'UNIVERSITE DE, Rennes, France. 

Travaux scientifiques, v. 4. 
REVUE GENERALE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Journal, current numbers. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Kingston, 
R. I. 

Annual report, no. 18. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
RHODESIA MUSEUM, Bulawayo, Transvaal. 

Annual report, no. 4. 
RIEGxNER, DR., Breslau, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca. N. Y. 

I separate. 
RIGGS, ELMER S., Chicago. 

3 excerpts. 

3 United States folios (gift). 
RIPON COLLEGE, Ripon, Wis. 

Catalogue, 1906. 
ROBINSON, B. L., Cambridge, Mass. 

4 reprints. 



86 Field Museum of Natural History — -Retorts, \'ol. 111. 

ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Rochester. X. N. 

Brochure, v. 3, no. 3. 

Proceedings, v. 4. pp. 140-231. 
ROGER WII.IJAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, R. I. 

Bulletin, v. 13-14. 

AjKTtyx, nos, 2-3. 
ROME. REALE ACCAUEMLV DEI Ll.NCEI, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
ROSE POLVTECH.VIC IXSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Catalojjue, i()o6. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY. STRAITS BRANCH, Singapore, India. 

Journal, nos. 25, 47. 
ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, Brisbane, Queens- 
land. 

Geographical journal, v. 20. 
ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA, .\delaide, S. Aust. 

Memoirs, v. i, nos. 1-2. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 20- 
ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, Ireland. 

Annual report, no. 74. 
RUST. HORATIO N., South Pasadena, Cal. 

2 reprints. 
ST. LAURENT COLLEGE, Montreal, Canada. 

Ann^e acaddmique, 1Q05-6. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Mo. 

Medal to commemorate the semi-centennial, 1 856-1 906. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo. 

.\nnual report, 1004—5. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Mo. 

Annual report, 1905. 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St Louis, Mo. 

Bulletin, no. 4. 
ST. PAUL PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Paul, Minn. 

Report, no. 24, 1905. 
ST. PETERSBURG ACAD^MIE IMP^.RI.VLE DES SCIENCES. St. Peters- 
burg, Russia. 

Bulletin, ser. 5, v. 1-2; 3, nos. 1-3, 5; v. 4-7, 10, 12. no. 2; v. 20, no. 
5 ; V. 21, nos. 1-4. 

M^moires, ser. 8, v. 13, pt. 7: v. 14, pt. 9; v. 15, pt. i ; v. 16, pts. 
1 1-12; V. 17, pts. 1—6. 

Mus6e ZoQlogique annuaire, v. o-ii; suppl. v. i. pt. i. 
ST. PETERSBURG IMPERIAL BOT.WIC (GARDEN, St. Petersburg, 
Russia. 

Bulletin, V. 5, pts. 4-5; v. 6, pts. 1-2. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 87 

ST. PETERSBURG IMPERIAL RUSSIAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. 
St. Petersburg, Russia. 
Publications, v. 41-42, 1905-6. 
ST. PETERSBURG SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, St. 
Petersburg, Russia. 
Report, 1904-5. 
Travaux, v. 37, nos. 1-4. 
Botanical section, v. 34. 
Geology and mineralogy, v. 33, pt. 5. 
Zoology and-physiology, v. 35, pts. 2-4. 
SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Mass. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1905. 
SALISBURY, R. D., Chicago. 

I reprint. 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY, San Francisco, Cal. 

Report, 1905. 
SAN SALVADOR MUSEO NACIONAL, San Salvador. 

Anales, nos. 13-17. 
SANTIAGO DE LAS VEGAS, Estacion Central Agronomica, Cuba. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
SAO PAULO INSTITUTO AGRONOMICO, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Boletim, current numbers. 
SAPPER, KARL, Berlin, Germany. 

I I pamphlets. 
SARAWAK MUSEUM.^Borneo, India. 

Report, 1905. 
SARGENT, C. S., Boston, Mass. 

3 excerpts 
SCHARFF, R. F., Dublin, Ireland. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
SCHINZ, HANS, Zurich, Germany. 

1 excerpt. 
SCHLAGINHAUFEN, O., Dresden, Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 

SCHMELTZ, J. D., AND KOEZE, G. A., Leiden, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
SCHMIDT, MAX, Berlin, Germany. 

Indianerstudien in Zentral-Brasilien. 
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN COMPANY, New York City. 

Scientific American, current numbers. 
SELER, EDUARD. Berlin, Germany. 

Codex Borgia. 
SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, 
Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. 

Bericht, 1905. 
SERGI, G., Rome, Italy. 



88 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCllODL. New iiavcn.Conn. 

Contributions to mineralogy and petrography. 
SHERBORN. C. DA VIES. London, Eng. 

I reprint (gift). 
SHOUTING AND FISHING PUBLISHING COMI\\NV. New York City. 

Journal, current numbers. 
SINCLAIR, WILLIAM J.. Princeton. N. J. 

3 reprints. 
SMITH. HARLAN I.. New York. 

I reprint. 
SMITH, JOHN D.. Baltimore, Md. 

Enumeratio plantarum guatemalensium, pt. 7. 

I pamphlet. 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington. D. C. 
Annual report, 1904. 

Miscellaneous collections, current numbers. 

Bureau of American Ethnology: 
Annual report, no. 23. 
Bulletin, nos. 28-29, 32. 

U. S. National Museum: 
Annual report, 1904. 
Bulletin, nos. 54-55. 
Contributions to U. S. Herbarium, v. 10, nos. 1-3. 

Proceedings, vs. 28-30. 

Report of progress, 1905-6. 

b separates. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATO," Mexico. 

Memorias y revista, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA .MEXICANA. Mexico', Mexico. 

Boletin, t. i. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIAN A, Rome, Italy. 

Bolletino, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA. Firenze, Italy. 

Archivio, v. 35. 
SOCIETA ITALIANADI SCIENZE NATURALI, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Indice generale. 
SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome. Italy. 

Atti, current "numbers. 
SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI. Pisa,' Italy. 

Memoria, v. 21. 

Processi verbali. v. 14. nos. 9-10; v. 15, no. r. 
SOClfeTfe BELGE D'ASTRONOMIE ET DE M^T^^OROLOGIE, Paris, 
France. 

Les volcans de la terre 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 89 



• ^ 



SOCIETE D'AGRICULTURE,- SCIENCES ET INDUSTRIE, Lyons, France. 

Annales, no. 2. 1905. 
SOCIETE D'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES D'ANGERS, Angers, France. 

Bulletin, v. 34. 
SOClfiTED'fiTUDES DES SCIENCES, Rheims, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Geneve, 
Switzerland. 

M^moires, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES DES SAONE ET LOIRE, 
Chalon-sur-Saone, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DU MERCURE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Des d^vinit^s generatrices, by J. A. Dalaure (gift). 
SOCIETI: GEOLOGIQUE DU NORD, LiUe, France. 

Annales, v. 34. 
SOCIETfi NATURALE D'AGRICULTURE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, no. 7, 1905. 
SOCIETY NATIONALS D'AGRICULTURE, SCIENCES ET ARTS, Angers, 
France. 

M6moires, t. 8. 
SOCltTfe NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neuchatel, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, v. 16. 
SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, v. 30. 

M^moires, v. 17. 
SOCIETY FOR PHYSICAL RESEARCH, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
SOUTH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE TRANSVAAL, Pre- 
toria, S. A. 

Annual report, 1903. 
SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
SCIENCE, Johannesburg, South Africa. 

Report, 1904. 
SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Report, 1905. 
SOUTH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Sydney," N. 
S. W. 

Journal, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART GAL- 
LERY, Adelaide, S. Australia. 

Report, 1904—5. 



go Imeld Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 
SUUTII CAROLINA ACxRlCUL'l'LiRAL F':XPERIME.\T STATION, Clem- 

SDIl, S. C. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Brook- 
ings, S. I). 

Bulletin, current numl>ers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES, Rapid City, S. D. 

Bulletin, nos. 2-7. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, Cal. 

Sun.set magazine, current numbers (gift). 
SPRINGER. FRANK, Burlington. Iowa. 

Revision of the paljEocrinoidea. pts. 1-3. 

6 reprints (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Mass. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, no. 4g, 1905-6. 
SPRINGFIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Mass. 

Report, 1904-5, 1905—6. 
STATEN ISLAND NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, New York City. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
STEIN DACHNER, FRANZ, Vienna, Austria. 

2 separates, 
STEIERMARK NATURWISSENSCH.VFTLICHER; VEREIN, Graz, Ger- 
many. 

Mitteilungen, 1904. 
STEPHENS, FRANK, Los Angeles, Cal. 

California mammals. 
STETTIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKER UND ERDKUNDE, Ger- 
many. 

Bericht, 1901-2, 1902-3, 1003-4. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, N. J. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
STOCKHOLM. ACAD^MIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, Stockholm. Swe- 
den. 

Arkiv f6r botanik, b. 4. pts. 1-3. 

Arkiv f6r kemi, mineral, b. 2. pt. 3. 

Arkiv f6r zoologi, b. 2, pt. 3. 

Meddelandan fran K. 

Memoires, b. 40, pt. 5, v. 41. pts. 1-3, 5. 

Vettenskakad, Nobelinstitut, v. i, pts. 3-5. 
STOCKHOLM. KUNGL. BIBLIOTEKETS, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Arsberattelse, jqo<;. 
STOCKHOLM K. VITTERHETS HISTOIRE OCH ANTIQUITETS AKA- 
DEMIEN. Stockholm, Sweden. 

Antiquarisk tidskrift, v. 13, nos. 2-5; v. 15, pt. 3; v. 17, nos. 4-5; 
V. 18, no. I. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 91 

STOCKHOLM. SVENSKA SALLSKAPET FOR ANTROPOLOGIA OCH 
GEOGRAFI, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Tidskrift, heft r-3, 1905. 

Ymer, 1900-1906. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Conn. 

Annual report, no. 17, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAT. Strassburg, Ger- 
many. 

Stiftungsfest, 1906. 
24 dissertations. 
SYDERE, A. H., Toronto, Canada. 

27 government reports, 1906. 
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Contributions from the zoological laboratory, v. 2. 
TEXAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Austin, Texas. 

Reprint series, no. 2. 

Transactions, v. 7. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 
Texas. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Tex. 

Bulletin, scientific ser., no. 7. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
THAXTER, ROLAND, Cambridge, Mass. 

2 pamphlets. 
THURLNGISCHE BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Weimar, Germany. 

Mittheilungen, n. f. heft 21. 
TIFLIS. JARDIN BOTANIQUE, Tifiis, Russia. 

Publication, v. 9, no. i. 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
TOKYO GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Journal, current numbers. 
TOKYO. IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Tokyo, Japan. 

College of Science journal, current numbers. 
TOLEDO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Toledo, Ohio. 

Report (gift). 
TOOKER, WILLIAM W., Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

2 reprints. 
TORINO. MUSEI DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPARATA, Torino, 
Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 20, 1905. 
TORINO. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Torino, Italy. 

Atti, V. 41. 

Indici generali, v. 31—40. 
TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

President's report, 1905. 



92 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

TORRES, LUIS .MARI.\. Hucnos .Vires, Argentina. 

2 pamphlets. 
TRANSVAAL. DEPART.MHXT ()!• .\(iRICUl/rURE, Pretoria, S. Africa. 
Agricultural journal, v. 3, no. 12. 
Annual report, 1903-4. 
6 paini)lilets. 
TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Pretoria, S. Africa. 

Report of the geological surveys, 1905. 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 

Novitates zoologica, current numbers. 
TROMSO MUSEUMS, Tromso, Norway. 
Aarsberetning, 1903-4. 
Aar.shcfter, 1903-4. 
TROUESSART, E. L., Paris, France. 

I separate. 
TRONDHJEM. K. NORSKE VIDENSKABERS SELSKAB, Trondhjem, 
Norway. 
Skriften, 1904. 
TUBINGEN. R. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

I 2 reports. 
TUFT'S COLLEGE. Tuft's College, Mass. 

Studies, V. 2, nos. 1-2. 
UNION UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Animal Industry: 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circular, current numbers. 
Report, no. 21, 1904. 
Bureau of Chemistry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circular, current numbers. 
Bureau of Entomology: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Catalogue of publications. 
Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Forestry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Plant Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Soils: 

Annual report, no. 6, with maps. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circular, current numbers. 
Crop reporter, current numbers. 



UBRARV 

OF THE 

•'NIVERSITYOFILIJNOIS 



I- 

O 

a. 

UJ 



> 
o 

H 
(A 



< 
(X 

< 
Z 



UJ 

CO 




Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 93 

Index cards to publications. 
Library bulletin, current numbers. 
Office of Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Experiment Station record, current numbers. 

Report, 1905. 
Office of Public Roads: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 
Report of the secretary, 1906. 
Yearbook, 1905. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE A.^D LABOR, Wa.shington, D. C. 
Bureau of Fisheries: 

Bulletin, v. 23-24. 

Report, 1004. 

Reprints. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Consular reports, current numbers. 

Consular reports, special, vs. 37-38. 
Census Office: 

Bulletin, nos. 24-50. 

Special bulletins, 6. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey: 

Atlas of the Philippines. 

Report, 1904-5, 1905-6. 
U. S.' DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Education: 

Report, 1904. 
Comprehensive index to government publications, 1881-1893. 
Geological Survey: 

Bulletin [nos. 243-301]. 

Director's report, no. 26. 

Folios, nos. 21-80, 82—84, 86-107, 109-140. 

Mineral resources, 1904. 

Monograph, no. 48. 

Professional papers, nos. 34-55. 

Water supply and irrigation papers, nos. 1 19-186. 

27 topographical sheets. 
U. S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 
List of Benjamin Franklin papers. 
Report of the librarian, 1905. 
14 special lists of books. 
U. S.UNAVAL ACADEMY, Annapolis, Md. 

Annual register, 1905-6. 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. 'C. 
Bureau of Insular Affairs: 

Report of the Philippine Commission, 1900-4. 



94 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Index catalogue library of Surgeon General's office, v. ii. 
Notes on Panama, with map. 
UPSAL.\. K. UN'IVEKSITETS-BIBLIOTEKET, Up.sala. Sweden. 

Bulletin of the Geological Institution, v. -. 

Meddelanden, v. 30. 

.Xova acta, ser. 4, nos. 3-4. 

Swedish zo6logical expedition to Egypt and the White Nile, pt. ?. 

8 inaugural dis.scrtations. 
URUGUAY. DEPARTMENT DE GRANADERIA, .Montevideo. Uruguay. 

Anales, current numbers. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Logan. Utah. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VERM::)Nr AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEVT Sr.VTK^V. Burlington. Vt. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, no. 18. 
VERMONT STATE GEOLOGIST, Burlington. Vt. 

Report, mineral industries and geology, 1005-6. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vt. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

Centennial celebration, 1904, 
VERRILL, A. HYATT. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Melbourne. Victoria. 

Journal, v. 3, pt. 7. 

Yearbook, 1905. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, .Melbourne, Victoria. 

Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 
VICTORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS. AND NATIONAL GALLERY. 
Melbourne, Victoria. 

"The Book," 1856-1906. 

Catalogue of current periodicals. 

Catalogue of old books. 

Report, 1905. 

I pamphlet. 
VICTORIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Proceedings, v. 18. 
VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

Calendar, 1906-7. 
VICTORIA ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY, Mel- 
bourne, Victoria. 

Annual report, no. 42. 
VIRCHOW, HANS. Berlin, Germany. 

I separate. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Va. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Va. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 95 

WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS, Washington, 
D. C. 

Report, Eighth International Geographic Congress, 1904. 
WELCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London, Eng. 

Laboratory publications, nos. i, 4-61. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Conn. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 
WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMANT OF AGRICULTURE, Bar- 
bados, W. I. 

Report of botanic station, Grenada, 1904-5, 1905-6. 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgan- 
town, W. Va. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
WEST VIRGINIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Morgantown, W. Va. 

I railroad map. 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Charleston, W. Va. 

Report, nos. 2-3', 1906. 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Martinsburg, 
W. Va. 

Proceedings, 13th meeting. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Perth, 
W. Australia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, W. Australia. 

Annual report, 1904, 1905. 

Bulletin, nos. 20-22. 
WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen, current numbers. 
WIEN. K. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Wien, Austria 

1 I'annual reports. 

WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE,Wies- 
baden, Germany. 
Jahrbuch, v. 58. 
WILLCOX, O. W., Fort Hancock, N. J. 

2 pamphlets. 

WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Mass. 

Catalogue, 1905-6. 

General catalogue, '1795-1905. 
WILLISTON, S. W., Chicago. 

2 reprints. 



96 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. !Il. 

WILSON OR.\ITllOL()(iICAL CLUB, Oherlin, ( )hif). 

liviUctiii. current numbers. 
WINDSOR KE.NFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY. Chicago. 

Brick, current numbers. 

Street Railway Review, current numbers (gift). 

WINTEMBERG, W. j.. Toronto. Canada. 
I separate. 

WISCONSIN AGRICULTURAL Iv.KPERIMENT SlWrioX, .Madison. Wis. 

Annual report, no. 22. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Milwaukee, Wis. 

ArcluEologist, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Bulletin, 14. with atlas. 

WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Madison, Wis. 

Annual report, 1905—6. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Madison. Wis. 

Collections, v. 17. 

Proceedings, no. 53. 
WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. Madison. Wis. 

Annual report, no. 36. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY. Madison, Wis. 

Publications, current numbers. 
WISLAND, G. R. 

7 reprints. 
WOODWARD, ARTHUR S., London, England. 

Fossil fishes of the upper lias of Whitby. 
WOODWARD, HENRY, London, Eng. 

1 e.xccrpt. 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Worcester, Mass. 

Annual report, 1004-5. 

Finding list. 
WULFIN(i. E. A., Danzig. Germany. 

; separates. 

WURTE-MBERG. verein fOr vaterlandische naturkunde, 

Wurtemberg, Germany. 

Jahreshcfte. v. 62. 

WYE. SOUTHEASTERN A(;RICULTURAL COLLEGE, Wye. Kent. 

England. 
Journal, no. 15. July, i()o6 

WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERI.MENT STATION, Laramie, Wyo. 

Annual report, no. 15 (gift). 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Conn. 

General catalogue, 1Q05-6. 

President's report, iqo6. 
ZIMANYI, KARL. Budapest. Hungary. 

2 pamphlets. 



O 

a. 

UJ 
IT 



> 

q: 
O 
(- 
CO 



< 

z> 

< 

z 



UJ 
05 




> 

o 

:0 
O 
N 



z 

LU 

I- 
ir 

< 

LU 

Q 



UJ 

I 

in 



z. 
< 

< 
< 

I 



i 




> 

O 

_l 

o 
o 

N 
li. 

o 

H 
Z 

UJ 

I- 

< 

Q. 
UJ 

Q 

u 

I 

z 
< 

< 

< 

I 



LIBRARY 



vv: 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 97 

ZURICH GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 
Zurich, Switzerland. 

Jahresbericht, 1904-5, 1905-6. 
ZURICH. NATURFORS. GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland. 

Vierteljahreschrift, v. 50. 



98 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. HI. 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPART.MEMT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichse.v. Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the'office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under 
and in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," 
approved April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

.Vow, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State 
of Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby 
certify that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally 
organized Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In\Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed 
the^great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of 
September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
three, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and 
eighteenth. W. H. HINRICHSEN. 

(Seal . Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H HINRICHSEN. 

Secretary of State: 

Sir: 

We, the undersigned, citizens of the United States, propo^^e to form a 
corporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 
entitled "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all 
acts amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we 
her-iby state 'as follows, to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and tlie preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating 
Art, Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board 
of Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 99 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for 
the first year of its corporate existence: 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black, and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

{Signed) , 
George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, 
Robert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, 
Ebenezer Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, 
Herman H. Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, 
Franklin H. Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry 
Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, 
A. C. McClurg, James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitz- 
simons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, 
James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. 
Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peter- 
son, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen 
A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. 
Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman 
Williams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip 
D. Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, | 
Cook County. f ^^• 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 

certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and 

acknowledged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free 

and voluntary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

• G. R. MITCHELL, 

[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 

Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate Members 

held the 2sth day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 

was changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this 

effect was filed June 26, 1894, in the ofifice of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 
Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate Members 
held the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November, loth, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



loo Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 

(.\PRIL 30, IQ06.) 

ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 

Section" i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall 
pay an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after 
notice of election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. 
The failure of any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual 
payments within said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be 
ground of forfeiture of annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for himself and family to the Museum on any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year admitting the bearer to the Museum on pay 
days. 

Third. — .\ copy of every publication of the Museum sold at the entrance 
door, and to the Annual Reports. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all receptions,' lectures, 01 other entertainments 
which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of association, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named 
in the articles of association shall, within ninety days from the adoption of 
these By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members, shall, 
within ninety days of their respective election, pay into the treasury the sum 
of twenty dollars (S20.00) or more. The failure of any person to make such 
payments within said time .shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be 
ground for forfeiture of his corporate membership. The annual dues of Cor- 
porate Members shall be five dollars (S5.00) after the first year of membership, 
and no one shall exercise the rights of a Corporate Member until his dues are 
paid; and] a delinquency of six months in the payment of annual dues shall be 
ground for forfeiture of corporate membership. Corporate Members becoming 
Life Members, Patrons, or Honorary Members shall be exempt from dues. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
dollars at any one time shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Trustees, become 
a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. ioi 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees, upon recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee, from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and by 
virtue of their election as Patrons shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen from among persons who 
have rendered eminent service to science, art, or] mechanics. They shall be 
chosen by a vote of the Trustees, and only upon unanimous nomination of the 
Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

Sec. 7. All members of whatever class shall be eligible to appointment 
upon committees other than the Executive Committee. 

ARTICLE II. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The respective members of the Board of Trustees now in 
office, and those who shall hereafter be elected, shall hold office during life. 
Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be filled by a majority vote of the 
remaining members of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. The other officers shall be President, two Vice-Presidents, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of four persons, who shall 
be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees from their own number as early 
as practicable after the annual meeting in each year. The President shall be 
ex-ofpcio a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman thereof, in addi- 
tion to the other four members. The Secretary and Treasurer may, or may 
not, be the same person, and the Secretary may, or may not, be a Corporate 
Member. 

Any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees 
by a vote of two-thirds' of all the members of the Board. Vacancies in any 
office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The President shall appoint from among the Trustees a Com- 
mittee on Finance, a Committee on Property, an Auditing Committee, and a 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds, who shall serve during the pleasure of 
the Board. 

Sec. 4. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such other duties as the Board of Trustees may 
from time to time devolve upon them. The Treasurer shall give bond in such 
amount and with such surety as shall be approved by the Executive Committee, 
and shall disburse the funds of the Museum only in accordance with the direc- 
tions of the Executive Committee, upon the signature and counter-signature 
of such officers as the Executive Committee shall empower thereto. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee shall have full control of the affairs of 
the Museum, under the general supervision of the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE III. 

meetings. 

Section i. The annual meeting of the Corporate Members shall be held 
upon the last Monday of January in each year. - At such meetings the Corporate 



I02 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Members shall transact such business as may properly come before the meeting. 
Special meetings of the Corporate Members shall be called at any time by the 
Secretary upon written request of twenty Corporate Members. In such case 
thirty days' notice by mail shall be given to Corporate Members of the time, 
place and purpose of such meetings. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held upon 
the last Monday of January, April, July, and October of each year. Special 
meetings may be called by the President at any time upon reasonable notice 
by mail, and shall be called upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, but meetings may be adjourned by any 
less number from day to day, or to a day fi.Ked, 

.ARTICLE IV. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the 
amendment shall have been proposed at the last regular meeting preceding, 
or shall be recommended by the Executive Committee. 



UbHARY 

OF THE ^.^ 

='v?5SlTY OF ILLINOIS 



> 

X 



cr 
O 
a. 

UJ 

tr 



> 
a: 
C 

t- 



3 

^ 



5 

UJ 

5 




z 
O 

I- 

co 



z 

LU 

< 

z 

o 

Q 

z 
< 



< 

tr 



< 

UJ 

t- 

> 






< 

I 



Jan., 1907. Annual Report of the Director. 103 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER CHARLES B. CORY 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM STANLEY McCORMICK 

DECEASED. 

MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

WILLARD A. SMITH 



I04 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS. OWEN' F. 
ARMOUR. ALLISON V. 
AVER. EDWARD E. 

BART LETT. A. C. 
BLACK. JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD. ELIPHALET W 
BUCHANAN. W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM. EBENEZER 
BURN HAM. DANIEL H. 
BUTLER. EDWARD B. 



CHALMERS. W. J. 
CHATFI ELD-TAYLOR. H. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CURTIS. WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY. HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 



HEAD. FRANKLIN H. 



C. 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON. CHARLES L 

JONES. ARTHUR B. 

KOHLSAAT. HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 

McCAGG. E. B. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MITCHELL. JOHN J. 

PATTERSON. ROBERT W. 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PUTNAM, FREDERICK W. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WALKER, EDWIN 
WALSH, JOHN R. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR. PHILIP D. 
BAKER. WILLIAM T. 
BISSELL. GEORGE F. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS. GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE. WILLIAM E. 
HARPER. WILLIAM R. 
HATCH. AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON 

Leiter. L. Z. 



W. 



McCLURG. A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSO.N, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT. JAMES W. 
WALLER, R. A. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



> 

X 



I- 
ir 
O 

Q. 
U 

ir 



> 

O 

h 

05 



< 

I- 
< 



UJ 




z 
g 

I- 
< 

tr 
O 

_j 

o 
o 

HI 

> 

H 
O 

HI 

I- 
O 
tr 

a. 

z 

I- 
< 

cr 

H 

CO 



CO 

Q. 
O 
C3 
< 

_i 

CO 

a 
o 
o 
< 



< 

CD 

< 

I- 
Q. 

O 



Q 
Z 
< 

< 
Ul 

H 
O 

> 

z 
< 

LLl 

I- 

o 

> 



O 

> 

o 
z 
CO 



Jan., 1907. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



105 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALOIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, R. T. 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DRAKE, TRACY C. ' 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 



INGALLS, M. E. 



[PORTER 



ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE 

JOHNSON, M. D., FRANK S. 
JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH 
JONES, ARTHUR B. [AYER 

KEITH, ELBRIDGE G. 
KING, FRANCIS 



KING, JAMES C. 

KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSON, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE T. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SCOTT, ROBERT S. 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMBERT 

WELLS, M. D. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



io6 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUSH. 
ADAMS, MIL WARD 
ALLERTOX. ROBERT H. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 



COX. ALFRED J. 
CRAXE. CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHX 
CUMMINGS. E. A. 
CURTIS. D. H. 



BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BAXGA, DR. HEXRY 
BARXES, CHARLES J. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BEAUVAIS. E. A. 
BECKER, A. G. 
BELDEX, J. S. 
BILLIXGS. C. K. G. 
BILLIXGS. Dr. FRAXK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAIXE. MRS. EMMOXS 
BLAIR. HEXRY A. 
BOAL. CHARLES T. 
BOTSFORD, HEXRY 
BOUTOX, C. B. 
BOUTON, N. 8. 
BRADWELL, JAMES B. 
BREMXER. DAVID F. 
BREYFOGLE, WM. L. 
BROOKS. JAMES C. 
BROWX, GEORGE F. 
BROWX. WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY. CLAREXCE A. 

CABLE. R. R. 
CARPEXTER, A. A. 
CARPEXTER, MYROX J. 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
COXKLIXG. ALLEX 
COXOVER. CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 
COOX LEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH. CHARLES R. 
COWAX. W. P. 



DAL. DR. JOHX W. 
DAY, A. M. 
DAY. CHAPIX A. 
DEERIXG. JAMES 
DEERIXG. WILLIAM 
DELAXO. F. A. 
DEMMLER. K. 
DILLMAX, L. M. 
DUXHAM, MISS M. V. 
DURAXD, ELLIOTT 
DWIGHT, JOHX H. 

EDWARDS. J. A. 
EISEXDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH. CHARLES 

FAIR. R. M. 

FARXSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORSYTH. ROBERT 
FRAXK. HEXRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER. O. F. 
FURST. COXRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSXER. J. J. 
GOODRICH. A. W. 
GORDOX. EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM. E. R. 
GREEX, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GUIOX, GEORGE MURRAY 
GURLEY. W. W. 



Jan., 1907, 



Annual Report of the Director. 



107 



HAMILTON, I. K. 
HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HARRISON, W. PRESTON 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, JAMES L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEEP, ALBERT 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KENT, WILLIAM 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 
KOEHLER, THOMAS N. 

LAFLIN, ALBERT S. 
LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McLENNAN, J. A. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 



MACFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MAY, FRANK E. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MEAD, W. L. 

MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MIXER, C. H. S. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, NELSON 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
ORTSEIFEN, ADAM 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PATTERSON, W. R. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PECK, CLARENCE I. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSON, WM. A. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
REHM, JACOB 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
ROSENTHAL, MRS. OSCAR 
RUMSEY. GEORGE D. 



io8 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



RUNNELLS, J. S. 
RYERSON. MRS, MARTIN 

SCHAFFNER, JOSKIMI 
SCHMIDT. DR. O. L. 
SCHMITT. ANTHONY 
SCHWARTZ. G. A. 
SEARS. JOSEPH 
SEIPP. MRS. C. 
SEIPP. W. C. 
SELFRIDGE, H.\RRV G. 
SELZ. MORRIS 
SHEDD. JOHN G. 
SHORTALL. JOHN G. 
SKINNER. THE MISSES 
SMITH, F. B. 
SNOW. MISS HELEN E. 
SOPER. JAMES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 
SPENCE. MRS. ELIZABETH 
SPOOR. J. A. 
STEELE, HENRY B. 



STOCKTON, JOHN T. 
STUART. ROBERT 

TEMPLETON. THOMAS 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 
TURNER. E. A. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

VIERLING, ROBERT 

WACKER. CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER. EDWARD C. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
WEBSTER, GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 
WILSON, MRS. ELLA J. 
WILSON. M. H. 
WOOD, S. E. 
WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 



DECEASED. 



BREGA, CHARLES W. 
BURLEY, FRANK E. 
LOWENTHAL, B. 
MERRICK, L. C. 



SHIPMAN, DANIEL B. 
TILTON. MRS. L. J. 
WOOSTER, CLARENCE 



K. 



Tm UBRARY OF THE 

FEB 14 1938 

UNIVERSITY Of ILUNOiS 



> 

X 




UBRARY 
UtiWERS\TYOFlLUN0U 



m