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LIBRARY 

OF THE 

U N I VERS ITY 

or ILLINOIS 

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The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the Hbrary from 
which It was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

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Field Museum of Natural History 

Publication 128 

Report Series. Vol. Ill, No. 2 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1907 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1908 
THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB 141938 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 






C^A>•'^^ 



■^ 



CONTENTS. 



Board of Trustees, no 

Officers and Committees, m 

Maintenance, 113 

Staff, 112 

Lecture Courses, 114 

Publications 116 

Library, "9 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling, 120 

Accessions 121 

Expeditions and Field Work 128 

Installation and Permanent Improvement, 134 

Printing and Photography 141 

Attendance, 142 

Financial Statement i45 

Accessions, 148 

Department of Anthropology, 148 

Department of Botany, 149 

Department of Geology, iS3 

Department of Zoology, 155 

Section of Photography 159 

The Library, 160 

Articles of Incorporation, 198 

Amended By-Laws, 200 

Honorary Members and Patrons, 205 

List of Corporate Members 206 

List of Life Members, 207 

List of Annual Members, 208 



109 



no Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



George E. Adams. 
Owen F. Alois. 
Edward E. Ayer. 
W.\TS0N' F. Blair. 
William J. Chalmers. 
Stanley Field. 
Harlow N. Higixbotham. 



Arthur B. Jones. 
George Mamerre. 
Cyrus H. McCormick. 
George F. Porter. 
Norman B. Ream. 
Martin A. Ryerson. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff. 



Edwin Walker. 



DECEASED. 



Nor.man W'illia.ms. 
Marshall Field, Jr. 



George R. Davis. 
Huntington W. Jackson. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. hi 



OFFICERS. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Stanley Field, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 

D. C. Da VIES, Auditor and Assistant Secretary. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Edward E. Ayer. W. J. Chalmers. George Manierre. 

Watson F. Blair. Stanley Field. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Arthur B. Jones. Martin A. Ryerson. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING. 

W. J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. Stanley Field. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. George E. Adams. Arthur B. Jones. 



112 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



STAFF OF THE MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

George A niKSEv, Curator. 

S. C. Si.MMs, Assistaut Curator Division of Ethnology. 

Charles L. Owen, Assistant Curator Division of Archceology. 
Berthold Laufer, .Assistant Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator. 

Jesse M. Greenman, .Assistant Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

Oliver C. Farringtox, Curator. H. W. yucnohs, .Assistant Curator. 
Elmer S. Riggs, .Assistant Curator Paleontology. 

Arthur W. Slocom, Assistant Curator Section of Invertebrate 

Paleontology. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charles B. Cory, Curator. Seth E. Meek, .Assistant Curator. 

William J. Gerhard, Assistant Curator Division of Entomology. 
Edward N. Gueret, Assistant Curator Division of Osteology. 
N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator Division of Ornithology. 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Elsie Lippincott, Librarian. 

TAXIDERMIST-IN-CHIEF. 

Carl E. Akeley. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1907. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending December 31, 1907. 

The Museum has operated one year under its new By-Laws, 
whose complete revision was demanded by the establishment of 
its scope and the definition of its endowment. In revising the rules 
and regulations governing the staff of the Museum, the responsibilities 
and authority of the various officers and their relations to each other 
were clearly set forth, and the experiences of the year under these 
rules, have satisfactorily tested their rationality and effectiveness. 
The rearrangement of the financial and executive system of the 
Institution, including the election of an Auditor, has simplified and 
unified the business of the Museum. 

A most important event of the year was a contribution from 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone to defray the expenses of an expedition to 
Tibet, for collecting and study. Dr. Berthold Laufer lately of 
Columbia University accepted the charge of this expedition and is 
to devote three years to the work. Further reference to this 
expedition is made elsewhere. 

The controversy as to the site in Grant Park for the new Museum 
building has made progress in the Courts, but at the date of this 
report remains undecided. Much attention has been given to the 
interior plans of the new structure, more especially to the suites of 
offices, the location and arrangement of the lecture halls, the admission 
of visitors, checking systems, etc. 

Maintenance. — The sum of $161,750 was appropriated by the 
Trustees for the necessary expenses of maintenance during the fiscal 
year. The actual amount expended was $135,512, leaving a balance 
within the anticipated expenses of the year of $26,238. In addition 
to the cost of maintenance, sums were expended, upon authority of the 
Board of Trustees, for collections, books, expeditions, field work, and 
exhibition cases, that brought the total to approximately $180,000. 
This left a balance within the estimated income of $16,000. Com- 
paring the expenses of maintenance of this year with those of previous 

113 



114 Field Museum oi- Xatural Historn— Reports. Vol. III. 

years, a slight increase is discoxered in the compensation of the staff 
and assistants, ami in amounts expended for material for maintenance 
and repairs to the building. The matter of repairing and calcimining 
the exterior walls of the Museum has received considerable attention, 
and a contri\ance introduced by Mr. Akcley. Chief Taxidermist, 
seems to have solved the problem, and the entire Xorth front of the 
Museum and most of the two Annexes have received an outward 
application of stucco, greatly improving the appearance of the build- 
ing. It is the intention to complete the work as soon as weather 
conditions allow. 

Staff of the Museum. - One addition was made during the year to 
the Staff", that being the appointment of Dr. Berthold Laufer as 
Assistant Curator of Asiatic Ethnology. Dr. Laufer is a graduate 
of the University of Berlin and has for over ten years been a student 
of Chinese and Tibetan culture. He has been associated with the 
Museum fiir Volkerkunde, of Berlin; conducted two expeditions into 
Asia for the American Museum of Natural History; one into Siberia 
and the other into China, both in the interest of the Jesup North 
Pacific Expedition. More recently Dr. Laufer has been associated 
with the Department of Chinese, Columbia University. 

Lecture Courses. — Two series of Lectures have been given since 
the date of the last Annual Report, which were illustrated, and covered 
an unusually wide range of research and travel. The lectures are given 
at Fullerton Hall, in the Art Institute, and the attendance of the public 
indicates a continued interest in this means of public instruction. 

Following is the Twenty-sixth Lecture Course, with the subjects 
and lecturers delivered during the months of March and April, 1907: 

March 2. — "The Iron Ores of the Minnesota Ranges." 

Prof. C. W. Hall, University of Minneso'ta. 

March 9. — "Scientific Notes on the Russian Convict Island of 

Sakhalin." 
Mr. Charles H. Hawes, University of Cambridge, 
England. 

March 16. — "Bird Husbandry." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator, Division of 
Ornithology, Field Museum of Natural History. 

March 23. — "Tlie Blackfoot Indians." 

Dr. Clark Wissler, Curator of Anthropology, American 
Museum of Natural Historv. 



Jax., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 115 

March 30. — "A Superposed Vegetation — The Plant Rusts." 

Prof. J. C. Arthur, Purdue University, Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

April 6. — "The Monuments of a Prehistoric Race." 

Mr. Frederick I. Monsen, New York City. 

April 13. — -"The Indiana of Nature — Its Evolution." 

Prof. W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indiana. 

April 20. — -"How Some Insects have Solved the Problem of Life." 
Prof. Herbert Osborn, Ohio State University. 

April 27. — "Physiography and Life in "Western Norway." 

Prof. Mark S. W. Jefferson, State Normal College, 
Ypsilanti, Michigan. 

The following is the Twenty-seventh Lecture Course, delivered 
during the months of October and November, 1907: 

Oct. 5. — "In Quest of the Golden Trout of the Southern High 

Sierras." 
Dr. Barton W. Evermann, Ichthyologist of the 
United States Bureau of Fisheries. 

Oct. 12. — "The Landfall of Columbus." 

Dr. Charles F. Millspaugh, Curator of Botany, Field 
Museum of Natural History. 

Oct. 19. — "Earthquakes viewed in a New Light." 

Prof. Wm. H. Hobbs, Professor of Geology, Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Oct. 26. — "Here and There in Greece." 

Dr. C. H. Weller, Professor of Greek and Archaeology, 
State University of Iowa. 

Nov. 2. — "A Naturalist in Western Nicaragua." 

Dr. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology, 
Field Museum of Natural History. 

Nov. 9. — "The Indians of Alaska." 

Dr. Geo. B. Gordon, Curator of Anthropology, Free 
Museum of Science and Art, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nov. 16. — -"The R. F. Cummings Philippine Ethnological Expedi- 
tion." 
Mr. S. C. Simms, Assistant Curator of Ethnology, 
Field Museum of Natural Historv. 



ii6 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. TTT. 

Nov. 23. — "Zoological Collectinj,' in British East Africa — Part I." 
Mr. C. E. Akcley, Taxidcrinist-in-Chief, Field Museum 
of Natural History. 

Nov. 30. — "Zoological Collecting in British East Africa — Part II." 
-Mr. C. E. Akeley, Taxidermist-in-Chief, Field Museum 
of Natural History. 

Publications. — The established series of publications has been 
continued and the issues have appeared at the customary intervals. 

Below will be found the titles issued since December 31, 1906, 
with the number of pages and illustrations: 

Pub. 115. — Zoological Series, Vol. \'III. "A Catalogue of the Col- 
lection of Mammals in the Field Museum of Natural 
History." By D. G. Elliot. 694 pp., 92 illustrations 
(half tones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 117. — -Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 4. "Studies in the Genus 
Citharexylum." By J. M. Greenman. 6 pp., edition 
1,500. 

i^ub. 118. — Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 5. "Flora of the Sand 
Keys of Florida." By C. F. Millspaugh. 53 pp., 
19 illustrations (zinc etchings), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 119. — Report Series, Vol. Ill, No. i. Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees, October 1905- 
December 31, 1906. 108 pp., 16 illustrations (half 
tones), edition 2,500. 

Pub. 120. — Geological Series, Vol. III. No. 5. "Analyses of Iron 
Meteorites." By O. C. Farrington. 51 pp., edition 
1,500. 

Pub. 121. — Zoological Series, Vol. \'II. No. 4. "Synopsis of the 
Fishes of the Great Lakes of Nicaragua." By S. E. 
Meek. 35 pp., 2 illustrations (half tones), edition 
1,500. 

Pub. 122. — Geological Scries, Vol. Ill, No. 6. "Meteorite Studies 
II." By O. C. Farrington. 19 pp., 15 illustrations 
(half tones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 123. — Geological Series, Vol. II. No. 10. "New Crinoids from 
the Chicago Area." By A. W. Slocom. ^^ pp., 15 
illustrations (zinc etchings and half tones), edition 
1,500. 



Jan., 1908. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



117 



Pub. 124. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 5. "Notes on Fresh 
Water Fishes from Mexico and Central America." 
B}' S. E. Meek. 25 pp., edition 1,500. 

Pub. 125. — Ornithological Series, Vol. I, No. 3. "Catalogue of a 
Collection of Birds from Guatemala. ' By Ned Dear- 
born. 69 pp., 4 illustrations (halftones), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 126. — Botanical Series, Vol. II, No. 6. " New or Noteworthy Sper- 

matophytes from Mexico, Central America and the West 

Indies." By J. M. Greenman. 41 pp., edition 1,500. 

The Museum Exchange List now numbers 1,231 names, of which 

594 are in foreign countries and 637 in the United States and its 

possessions. 

The following table shows the number of exchanges with each 

of the foreign countries : 



Argentine Republic . . . .11 

Australia 27 

Austria 29 

Belgium 15 

Borneo i 

Brazil 10 

British Guiana i 

Canada 27 

Central America 6 

Ceylon i 

Chile 2 

China i 

Cuba 4 

Denmark 4 

East Africa i 

Egypt I 

France . . . . . . . -53 

Fiji Islands i 

Germany 126 

Great Britain 97 

Greece 2 

Italy 31 



India 15 

Japan 6 

Liberia '2 

Mexico 17 

Malta I 

Netherlands 13 

New Brunswick 

New Zealand 

Norway 

Peru 

Portugal 

Roumania 



• • • 5 
10 

. . . 14 
10 
2 
2 
I 
2 
2 

• • 594 
The following table shows the number of foreign exchanges 

receiving the different publications : 

Anthropological 289 

Botanical 299 

Geological 328 

Ornithological 186 

Zoological 275 

Report 594 



I 
. . . 6 
. . . 8 

2 

• • • 5 
I 

Russia 18 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland .... 
South Africa .... 

Tasmania 

U. S. Colombia 

Uruguay 

West Indies 

Yucatan 

Total 



ii8 Fir-LD Museum of Xatural History — Ref'orts. Vol. III. 



The publications are distributed to the different States and 
Insular Possessions as follows: 



Alabama 2 

Arizona i 

Arkansas i 

California 32 

Colorado 13 

Connecticut 23 

Delaware 2 

District of Columbia .... 79 

Florida I 

Georgia i 

Illinois 74 

Indiana 12 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 9 

Kentucky 2 

Louisiana 4 

Maine 5 

Maryland 11 

Massachusetts 69 

Michigan 11 



Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 



1 1 

2 

15 
3 
7 



Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey . 
New York . 
North Carolina 
New Mexico 
Ohio . . 
Oregon . 
^Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 
Texas 

Utah . . 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 
Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico . 
Hawaii . 

Total . 



I 

5 
16 

93 
5 
t 

22 

I 

37 
5 
I 
2 
2 
2 
I 
3 
3 
3 
4 

17 



637 



The following tables show the number of domestic exchanges 

receiving the different publications: 

Anthropological 264 

Botanical 327 

Geological 344 

Ornithological 182 

Zoological 285 

Report 637 

The distribution of the publications to foreign countries continues 
to be accomplished through the courtesy of the Bureau of Inter- 
national Exchanges of the Smithsonian Institution. 

The eighth edition of the Guide was issued during the year, and 
several improvements will be noted in its general make-up. The 
descriptions of the collections, in several instances, have been cur- 
tailed, thus making the book more convenient for ready reference- 
This issue is illustrated which it is expected will add to its value 
and interest. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 119 

Library. — The accessions in the Library during the year aggre- 
gated in volumes and pamphlets 2,755; by purchase 386, by gift and 
exchange 2,369, bringing the total number of books and pamphlets 
in the library to 44,514, distributed as follows: 

Books and Pamphlets. 

General Library 33.091 

Department of Anthropology 1,466 

Department of Botany 3.695 

Department of Geology 5. 299 

Department of Zoology 963 

The routine work of classifying, labeling, accessioning, and cata- 
loguing the books and pamphlets as they were received continued 
through the year on the same basis as in preceding years. Through the 
medium of exchange with contemporary institutions, upon which the 
library depends largely for its growth, it continues to receive valuable 
publications. Exchanges have been received from 583 institutions 
and 130 individuals. Gifts to the General Library worthy of special 
mention have been received from Mr. Stephen Sommier, Florence, 
Italy, I volume; Mr. Theodor Koch-Grunberg, Berlin, 4 volumes; 
Mr. John W. Barrett, Washington, D. C.,io volumes; Mr. H. N. Higin- 
botham, Chicago, 28 volumes; Mr. Frederick J. V. Skiff, 81 volumes; 
Naturhistorische Verein, Bonn, 58 volumes; Naturforschende Gesell- 
schaft, Zurich, 47 volumes; Royal Society, London, 38 volumes; 
Geological Survey of Canada, 12 volumes; Maryland Geological 
Survey, 7 volumes. Twelve installments of the John Crerar Library 
cards have been received, alphabetically arranged, and filed; 11,211 
cards have been written and distributed in the catalogue. A special 
feature of the work during the year has been the formation of a Library 
of Exposition Literature. The volumes presented for the formation 
of this library by Sir Henry Trueman Wood, Commissioner to the 
World's Columbian Exposition, Mr. H. N. Higinbotham, President of 
the World's Columbian Exposition, and Frederick J. V. Skiff, approx- 
imated 1,100 books and pamphlets. From this collection, 668 titles 
have been selected, chronologically arranged, accessioned, catalogued, 
and installed in a special room provided for the purpose. The un- 
bound books are at present in the bindery, and the miscellaneous 
pamphlets will be filed in neat cloth boxes. The whole forms a 
very creditable reference library of literature on Expositions from 
1851 to 1904. The duplicates of this material have been arranged 
in three groups. Group i contains 260 titles, group 2 contains 156 



I20 Field Museum ov Xatural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

titles, group 3 contains 88 titles. These several groups have been 
packed separately, and await further disposition. A number of 
valuable books have been purchased during the year, but many 
more are desired, jiarticularly in the departments of Anthropology 
and Botany. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying and Labeling. — The catalog- 
uing in the Department of Anthropology has been continued almost 
without interruption throughout the year, over 12,000 specimens having 
been catalogued, and a card catalogue made of about 7,500 specimens, 
all of which have been entered in the inventory books, which now 
number twenty-seven. 

All the specimens of a number of installed cases in the Department 
of Botany have been exhaustively labeled; all labels for the dendro- 
logic installation are printed and in readiness for use. The copy 
has been written for all the unlabeled material that has been installed; 
all new material has been properly organized, catalogued and cared 
for; the index of vernacular names and references augmented by 
several thousand cards, and all matters pertaining to the collec- 
tions and work of the department kept rigidly up to date. 

Specimens in the Department of Geology are inventoried and 
catalogued as received. The total number of entries made during 
the year is 10,635, which, added to the previously recorded number, 
gives 72,837 as the total present number of entries in the Department. 
The principal work of labeling performed was in connection with the 
systematic mineral collection and the collections in Hall 78. For 
the systematic minerals a total of 1.925 labels was prepared during 
the year, of which 1,536 have been printed and distributed. The 
sizes of labels used for this collection are governed by those of the 
specimen mounts, four different forms being employed. For the 
collections in Hall 78, 957 labels have been prepared, of which 838 
have been printed and distributed. These labels also vary in size, 
according to the size of the mount, three forms being employed, besides 
descriptive labels. Aluminum ink and black cardboard have been 
used for all these labels. The increased interest evinced by visitors 
in these collections since the labeling has been completed is noticeable 
and gratifying. Additional labels prepared during the year have 
included fourteen fully descriptive labels for the relief maps and about 
one hundred labels for meteorites and paleontological specimens. 

In the Department of Zoology considerable clerical work was 
accomplished, the entries in the inventory books registering 9,445. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 121 

while over 1,000 cards were added to the box catalogue. In the 
Division of Ornithology over 7,000 labels were prepared, and attached 
to the specimens in the study collection. 

The year's work on catalogues and inventorying is shown in 
detail as follows: 



Department of Anthropology 
Department of Botany 
Department of Geology 
Department of Zoology 
The Library 
Section of Photography 



No. of 

Record 

Books 


Total No. of 

Entries to 
Dec. 31, 1907. 


Entries 

during 

1907. 


Total No 
of Cards 
Written. 


31 


93,020 


12,896 


96,910 


49 


219,800 


26,310 




20 


72,837 


10,635 


6,630 


21 


67,452 


10,102 


23-911 


II 


57,130 


6,241 


66,085 


6 


59,523 


10,600 





Accessions. — The most important additions to the Department of 
Anthropology during the year have been acquired through expeditions. 
Foremost among these is the material obtained by Assistant Curator 
Simms from the Igorot tribes of northern Luzon, chiefly from the prov- 
inces of Lepanto, Bontoc, and Nueva Vizcaya. Mr. Simms remained 
many months in this region, as noted in the last report, engaged in 
investigation under the Robert F. Cummings fund. The collection is 
probably the largest and most representative ever made from any one 
tribe in the Island. Second in importance is a large and representa- 
tive collection of ethnological specimens, illustrating the culture of the 
Sauk and Fox Indians, of Tama, Iowa, made by Dr. William Jones. 
This collection admirably supplements one made at the same place 
several years ago by the Curator of the Department. As a result of the 
expedition from the Department of Zoology in British East Africa, 
Mr. C. E. Akeley brought back several hundred unusually interesting 
specimens, representative of the culture of several tribes of that region. 
Mr. V. Shaw Kennedy, who accompanied Mr. Akeley on that expedi- 
tion, brought a number of specimens to Chicago with him, and has 
presented them to the Museum. From Vice-president Ryerson has 
been received, as a gift, a small but valuable collection made a few years 
ago by Curator Cory among the Seminoles of Florida. From Tuan 
Fang, a viceroy of The Two Kiang Provinces, China, was received a 
very interesting, ancient Chinese monument, bearing inscriptions in 
excellent state of preservation. This gift of the Viceroy was to 
commemorate his visit to this Institution. Of the collections ac- 
quired by purchase, the largest was that secured from a well-known 



122 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

London dealer in ethnological material. This collection consisted 
almost exclusively of rare specimens from different islands of 
the Pacific, especially Polynesia, and some unusually interesting 
material from Benin, West Africa. The most notable specimens 
in this collection are four beautifully carved ceremonial clubs 
from the Marquesas Islands. From Mr. Irving Channon, for many 
years a missionary to Micronesia, was secured by purchase a collec- 
tion of several hundred specimens from that region, especially from 
the Marshall and Gilbert groups. These specimens are of more than 
usual value, for they were collected personally by Mr. Channon, and 
are thoroughly identified as to locality. From Mr. Rudolph Parkin- 
son, Ralum, Bismarck Archipelago, was secured by purchase seventy- 
seven skulls from New Britain. Two exchanges with other institu- 
tions have been made during the year, which are worthy of mention. 
One is with the Brooklyn Institute Museum, whereby this Institution 
secured a large quantity of osteological material from the Southwest, 
and a small, but carefully selected collection of ethnological specimens 
from the peublo of Zuni. Arrangements were made during the year 
whereby the Museum expects to receive shortly from the Museum 
fiir Volkerkunde, of Berlin, a considerable portion of the great collec- 
tion made in the interior of Brazil by Theodore Koch. Word has 
been received by the Museum that Mr. Cole has shipped from Manila 
a very large collection of ethnological material, which he has accumu- 
lated during his two years' residence with the Tinguianes, in north- 
western Luzon, especially in the province of Abra. 

In the Department of Botany the most important accession 
during the year is the complete herbarium of the University of 
Chicago, founded upon the collections of Prof. John M. Coulter, 
and augmented under his direction. This herbarium has been 
entirely rearranged for the purpose of cataloguing and distribution 
into the organized herbarium of the Museum. It is found to con- 
tain about 51,000 specimens, of which about three fourths are 
mounted. The principal collectors represented by fairly complete 
sets are: O. 'D. Allen; Baker, Earle & Tracy; John Ball, Thomas 
H. Bonser, Wm. Canby, M. A. Carleton, John M. Coulter, 
A. H. Curtiss, Drake & Dickson, B. W. Evermann, M. L. Fcrnald, 
Heyde & Lux, Volney Havard, F. H. Horsford, Thos. Howell, 
Marcus E. Jones, T. H. Kearney, Jr., T. Kirk, B. F. Leeds, J. G. 
Lemmon, G. C. Neally, Edward Palmer, S. B. Parish, H. N. Patterson, 
C. G. Pringle, C. A. Purpus, J. Reverchon, Sadie Rider, Robinson & 



Ikti. 



OF THt 
«II|VP»SITY flF IIMNQIS 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 123 

Schrenk, J. X. Rose, J. H. Sandberg, H. E. Seaton, Mrs. Dr. Henry 
Sheldon, J. H. Simpson, John K. Small, John Donnell Smith, W. N. 
Suksdorf, W. F. Thurrow, E. B. Uline, Geo. R. Vasey, Mrs. S. B. 
Walker, H. N. Whitford, and W. G. Wright. With this herbarium 
the University transfers all its taxonomic research to this Museum. 
Another important herbarium has been secured in that of the noted 
Swedish botanist, Dr. L. J. Wahlstedt. The collection numbers 
approximately 15,000 specimens, chiefly of European plants, and is 
especially rich in Characece, Violcp, and Epilobia. The Characecs 
alone are represented by upwards of 2200 critically determined speci- 
mens, and the Viola: by about 1500 specimens. Some of the more 
noteworthy series of exsiccates, illustrating these groups of plants 
included in the herbarium, are the following: Die Characeen Europa's 
in getrockneten Exemplaren , Prof. Dr. A. Braun, Dr. L. Raben- 
horst and Dr. E. Stizenberger; Characece Americance exsiccatcB, T. 
F. Allen; Characece ScandinavicB exsiccates qitas distribnenmt O. 
Nordstedt et L. J. Wahlstedt; Characece of Denmark, P. Nielsen; 
Characece exsiccatce, Migula, Sydow et Wahlstedt ; CharacecF of Great 
Britain, A. Bennett; Characece of England, H. &. I. Groves; Chara- 
cece suecicce, O. Nordstedt; Characece suecicce, L. J. Wahlstedt; Algce 
Scandinavice exsiccatce, quas adjectis Characeis, distribuit John Erh. 
Areschoug; Violce Suecice exsiccates, Neuman, Wahlstedt, Murbeck; 
Violcs exsiccatce, W. Becker. The Wahlstedt herbarium also con- 
tains many other important collections, including the excellent series. 
Marsiliacece in horto Berolinense ciiltce, editcs 1870, A. Braun; Flora 
exsiccata, and Rosarum Europearum exsiccatarum, M. Gandoger. 
The other notable acquisitions are: G. M. Emerick, Mexico, 257; 
Barbados Botanic Station, 115; C. Conzatti, Mexico, 362; Estacion 
Agronomica de Cuba, 156; Edward Palmer, Mexico, 949; N. Y. 
Botanical Garden, West Indies, 1362; A. A. Heller, California, 1329 
and Oregon, 419; W. A. Kellerman, Guatemala, 207; Louis J. K. 
Brace, Bahamas, 1715; Britton & Millspaugh, Bahamas, 922; C. C. 
Deam, Guatemala, 89, C. G. Pringle, Mexico, 343; C. A. Purpus, 
Mexico, 519; Bureau of Science, Philippines, 94; Frank C. Gates, 
Illinois, 137; Pere Duss, Guadeloupe, 1046, and Martinique, 574; 
W. W. Calkins, Illinois, 221 ; American Colony, Palestine, 172; Theo. 
Holm, Colorado, 201, and District of Columbia, ^2,7,; Mrs. M. Tuttle, 
California, 240; Mrs. E. G. Britton, Bahamas, 190; U. S. National 
Herbarium, Central America, 186; Caldwell & Baker, Cuba, 82; 
Gray's N. A. Cyperacece & Gramiuce, 158; and F. Lindheimer, Texas, 



124 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

623. The mounting and incorporation of the Patterson herbarium has 
been completed, and a large number of sheets from the herbarium 

of John K. Small, acquired some time ago, have been organized, 

catalogued and inserted. The accessions for the year (in so far as 
the specimens have been inserted in the organized herbarium) repre- 
sent the following localities: 

.\l)I)?:i) TOTAL IN 

.NOKTU .\MEIUCA TMI.S YEAH HKRBARIUM 

Alaska 8 319 

Canada 118 1,840 

Alberta 15 16 

Anticosti Island 6 6 

British Columbia 7 276 

Grinnell Land 6 12 

Labrador, 2 152 

Manitoba 3 3 

North West Territory 12 12 

New Brunswick 10 558 

Nova Scotia 6 102 

United States: 

Alabama 41 732 

American Plains 3 89 

Arizona 518 3.522 

Arkansas 27 185 

California 1,701 11,448 

Colorado 815 5.354 

Connecticut 11 217 

Delaware 137 836 

District of Columbia 390 1,808 

Florida 174 9.929 

Florida Keys i 223 

f^eorgia 43 3,025 

Idaho 6 718 

Illinois 1.556 15.565 

Indiana 91 3.254 

Indian Territory 18 149 

Iowa 30 1.269 

Kansas 10 176 

Louisiana 121 941 

Maine 175 853 

Maryland 70 738 

Massachusetts 413 2.038 

Michigan 156 1,989 

Minnesota 9 587 

Mississippi 25 i.757 

Missouri 41 626 

Montana i6 2,772 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 125 



United States: 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pacific Coast 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Rocky Mountains 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia . 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Yellowstone National Park 

Mexico 

Coronados Islands 

Lower California 

Yucatan 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

San Salvador 

United States of Colombia 

West Indies 

Antigua i 11 

Bahamas 

Acklin's Island 

Conception Island 

Andros 

Cat Island 

Crooked Island 



ADDED 


TOTAL IN 


THIS YEAR 


HERBARIUM 


3 


161 


34 


139 


237 


933 


163 


1,397 


213 


1,604 


378 


4,561 


no 


863 


40 


659 


910 


4,054 


47 


366 


498 


6,542 


84 


466 


19 


700 


44 


541 


I 


83 


113 


661 


936 


3,621 


180 


539 


232 


1,029 


148 


743 


436 


3,113 


38 


1,210 


10 


734 


307 


611 


25 


264 


2,955 


19,241 


I 


7 


242 


1,380 


I 


4,619 


28 


366 


415 


748 


1 1 


189 


I 


85 


I 


37 


20 


20 


99 


2,418 



255 


256 


50 


SO 


901 


1,216 


247 


367 


237 


294 



126 Field Museum of Xaturae Hi 



West Indias; 
Bahamas 

Kleuthera 

Fortune Islam 1 

Little San Salvador 

Long Islam! 

New Providencf 

Rum Cay 

Watling' 
Barbados 
Bermuda 
Cuba . 
Guadeloupe 
Jamaica . 
Martinique 
Porto Rico 
Culebras Island 

Europe 

Austro-Hungary 

Belgium . 

England . 

Finland 

France 

Germany 

Italy . 

Norway 

Poland 

Russia 

Scotland . 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Africa . 
Australia 
Formosa 
Palestine 
Philippine Islands 
Total 



STORY 


— Reports, 


VOL. 


111. 




ADDED 


TOTAL IN 




THIS YEAR 


HKRBARIL'M 




415 




576 




223 




308 






44 




44 






140 




140 






05 




'■757 






75 




76 






154 




185 






225 




305 






253 




473 






241 




4.243 






1,046 




I.05Q 






703 




3.819 






574 




601 






168 




3.334 






122 




210 






36 




4,101 






3 




70 






61 




133 






4 




8 






9 




1.453 






101 




4.046 






8 




Q13 






6 




207 






I 




42 






76 




1,226 






I 




I 2 






I 




41 






5 




462 






I 2 




1,005 






3 




I.44Q 






I 15 




78. 






2 




1,020 






1 7-' 




827 






04 




1,068 



22,650 



It is to be understood that the above summary does not include 
the whole herbarium, but only tabulates localities that have received 
additions durinj]^ the past year. 

Among the accessions by gift in the Department of Geology, the 
following may be mentioned : a large specimen of crystallized copper 
from Cananea, Mexico, from Mr. Edward E. Ayer; four superb 
specimens of emerald and aquamarine, one specimen of parisite, and 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 127 

eight specimens gold ores, all from the United States of Colombia, 
from Senor F. Pereira Gamba; eleven specimens rough and polished 
smoky quartz crystal from Butte, Montana, from Mr. A. P. Pohndorf ; 
seven relief maps from the Atlas School Supply Company; seven 
specimens of the diamond-bearing rocks of Pike County, Arkansas, 
from Mr. A. Q. Millar; two large specimens lead and zinc ores from 
Platteville, Wisconsin, from the Empire Mining Company; five 
specimens Peruvian vanadium ores, from the American Vanadium 
Company; nineteen specimens clays and briquettes, from Mr. John 
J. Moroney; and several specimens copper ores and barites, from the 
Chicago Copper Refining Company. Several valuable accessions 
were received by exchange, among which may be mentioned a large 
section, of the Santa Rosa meteorite, from Mrs. L. A. Coonley-Ward; 
of the Elm Creek meteorite, from Ward's Natural Science Establish- 
ment ; and of the Goalpara meteorite, from the Geological Survey of 
India. From the Geological Survey of Canada was received, in a 
similar manner, a fine cast of the Iron Creek meteorite; from J. E. 
Narraway, a series of fossil trilobites, and other invertebrates, and from 
Junius Henderson, a series of Cretaceous mollusks from Colorado. 
The most important accession by purchase was that of the Fultz 
collection of invertebrate fossils, numbering over five thousand 
specimens. This collection is especially valuable for the series of 
crinoids and blastoids of Lower Carboniferous age which it contains. 
They were collected from the Burlington limestone, at the locality 
which furnished the finest specimens ever secured while it lasted, but 
which is no longer productive. In addition, about four thousand 
invertebrate fossils from other localities in the Mississippi Valley 
w^ere secured with the collection. A small collection purchased from 
Prof. A. H. Cole furnished about 250 specimens of Palaeozoic inverte- 
brates from New York and Vermont localities. A seventeen pound 
individual of the Admire meteorite was purchased ; also a fine series 
of topaz associated with phenacite, from Chatham, New Hampshire. 
Accessions by expeditions include about forty specimens of ores, 
minerals, and rocks from the north shore of Lake Superior, collected 
by the Curator; about nine hundred specimens Devonian inverte- 
brate fossils, from Little Traverse Bay, Michigan, collected by the 
Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology, and about forty 
specimens erosion forms, from Little Sister Bay, Wisconsin, collected 
by the Curator of Botany. 

The Curator of Zoology reports that the accessions in the Division 



128 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

of Ornithology number 626 specimens, most of which were collected 
by members of the stafT, in Illinois and adjoining states. There were 
216 specimens added by purchase, and a number of valuable gifts 
also api)ear in the list. The Department collected mammal skins in 
Illinois, Wisconsin, and California, numbering nearly 500 skins. The 
expedition conducted by Chief Ta.\idermist Akeley contributed 
mammal specimens from British East Africa, mention of which is 
made elsewhere. In the divisions of Ichthyology and Herpetology, 
there were added, approximately, 2,000 specimens, of which one half 
were received from the East African Expedition. The number of 
insects added were considerable over 3,500, mostly from Illinois, 
Michigan, and Wisconsin. The Museum also ])urchased a valuable 
collection of shells from a collector in Indianapolis. An interesting 
series of shells, illustrating the pearl button manufacture, was pre- 
sented by the Automatic Button Company, of Muscatine, Iowa. Two 
sponges and two hydroids from Cape Nome were presented by Mr. 
H. A. Ring. 

Expeditions and Field Work. — During part of the year the Curator 
of Anthropology continued his investigations among the Pawnee, in 
behalf of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. In connection 
with this work he spent ten weeks at Columbia University, working 
up the linguistics of the Skidi Pawnee, under the direction of Dr. 
Franz Boas. Three investigators are now in the field in the Philip- 
pine Islands, engaged in ethnological investigation, funds for this 
work having been generously provided by Mr. Robert F. Cummings, 
as referred to in the last report. Miss Laura E. Benedict is still among 
the Bagobo, where she has been now for nearly two years. Mr. Fay 
Cooper Cole left Chicago in December, 1906, and proceeded to north- 
western Luzon, where he has remained since, investigating the ethnol- 
ogy of the little-known Tinguianes, in the province of Abra.. Ilocos Sur, 
and Ilocos Norte. During this time Mr. Cole has made several hundred 
photographs, a large number of life masks, and has made numerous 
physical anthropological studies. At the present time he is engaged 
in linguistic investigations. Dr. William Jones left Chicago in 
August, and proceeded to Manila, whence, after making certain pre- 
parations, he left for a period of at least two years' investigation 
among the practically unknown tribes in eastern and northern Luzon. 
When last heard from, Dr. Jones was ascending the Cagayan River, 
and expects to make his headquarters at Echague. His special object 
in this region will be the investigation of the Negritos. Before 



I 



OF THt 
UNIVf^RSlTy OF tUINDIS 



FIELD MESEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PL. XXI. 




Fossil Crinoids. Department of Geology. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 129 

leaving for the Philippines, Dr. Jones spent a month among the Sauk 
and Fox Indians of Tama, Iowa, making a study of their material 
culture, and .obtaining specimens for the Museum. Through the 
generosit}^ of Mrs. T. B. Blackstone, who has recently provided a 
fund, the department has been able to add to its staff Dr. Berthold 
Laufer, who is now making preparation to start for a three years' period 
of investigation in Tibet. This gift of Mrs. Blackstone marks a new 
era in the history of the department. It is not only the largest 
sum ever set aside for one specific object, but it enables the depart- 
ment to undertake an investigation of almost universal interest, and 
to place in charge of it one thoroughly competent. As a result of the 
Blackstone Tibetan Expedition, it is expected that not only will 
there be assembled a great collection illustrating every phase of the 
material culture of the Tibetans, which will be of the very greatest 
value to all students of the history of Asiatic culture, but it is believed 
that, through Dr. Laufer's investigation in early Tibetan literature, 
he will make material contributions to the general history of human 
culture. In this connection, it is interesting to note that the New- 
berry Library has made a special contribution of $4,000.00, which 
is to be expended by Dr. Laufer, during his three year's residence 
in Asia, in the purchase of a library of Tibetan literature. 

The Curator of the Department of Botany, in company of 
Dr. N. L. Britton, Director of the New York Botanical Garden, spent 
ten weeks of the early spring in a continuance of their explorations 
of the Bahamian Archipelago. A schooner was chartered and com- 
missioned, at Nassau, from which large and particularly exhaustive 
collections were made on Eleuthera, Cat Island, Conception Island, 
Little San Salvador, Long Island and Watling's. All these islands were 
crossed afoot at several points, and traversed for considerable distance 
in all directions, from a number of landing places. The expedi- 
tion returned about two thousand specimens, and secured critical 
notes, observations, and photographs of fully fifteen hundred more. 
This work was also augmented by commissioning Mr. Louis J. K. 
Brace to explore thoroughly Acklin's Island, Crooked Island, Fortune 
Island, and the north end and northwest side of Andros. His work 
resulted in two thousand additional specimens from these interesting 
localities. Another expedition, in continuance of this same work, 
was sent out in December, consisting of Dr. M. A. Howe, Mr. Percy 
Wilson, and Louis Brace; they are to undertake the southeastern 
islands of the group — French Cays, Samana, Mariguan, the Caicos, 



130 Field Muskum of Xatl'kal History — Reports, Vol. HI. 

and the Ragged Cays. Mr. Huron H. Smith, Preparator in Dendro- 
logy, spent six weeks in southeastern Missouri, at three forest points, 
in the collection of North American Forestry material. The collec- 
tions, amounting to over a car load of material, will be reported upon 
later. Mr. O. E. Lansing, Jr., has continued his field work in the 
Lake Chicago Basin, adding a number of species to his quite exhaus- 
tive series from this region. 

The Curator of the Department of Geology collected a series of 
ores, minerals, and rocks from various localities on the north shore 
of Lake Superior during a trip made to that region in July. Some 
valuable geological photographs of the region were also made. Pho- 
tographs illustrating the ancient shore-lines of Lake Chicago, designed 
for exhibiting in connection with the relief map of the region, were 
also made by the Curator during the fall. Mr. A. W. Slocom carried 
on some collecting in the region of Little Traverse Bay, Michigan, 
continuing the work of last year. Especially fine series which he 
secured were those of fossil corals, stromatoporoids and brachiopods. 
Pleistocene fossils, from the marls of Oden and Kegomic, were also 
obtained. In all about nine hundred specimens were obtained, which, 
added to those collected last year, afford a representative series of the 
Hamilton and Pleistocene fossils of the region. Occasional visits 
were also made by Mr. Slocom to quarries in the Chicago Basin, for 
the purpose of securing any new material excavated. From this 
material, and that previously secured, he described during the year 
nine new species of crinoids. No field work was undertaken in 
vertebrate paleontology, the work of erecting the Dinosaur skeleton 
having, of necessity, engrossed the entire attention of the staff. 

At the date of the last Report, the African expedition was on its 
way back to the United States. Mr. C. E. Akeley, the Chief of the 
Expedition, provides the following narrative: 

"We left Chicago August 13, 1905, arriving in London August 
26th, where we joined Mr. Vernon Shaw- Kennedy, who had gone on 
some weeks in advance for the purpose of preparing the outfit, most 
of which, consisting of supplies, food, tents, amunition, photographic 
material, etc., was purchased in London. Mr. Edmund Heller, who 
had been called from field work in Central America to accompany the 
expedition, overtook us in London, and on September 8th, we sailed 
from Dover by the S. S. President of the D. O. A. Line, arriving at 
Mombasa, East Coast of Africa, on October 8th. Our goods were 
duly landed, passed through the customs; porters, gun-bearers, and 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 131 

personal servants were engaged, licenses procured, and on October 
14th, we boarded a train on the Uganda Railway and on the following 
day arrived at Nairobi, 327 miles inland. October i8th, we began 
active operations in the field, within twenty-five miles of Nairobi, 
on the Athi Plains. Two and a half months were spent in this region, 
and in the number of specimens collected, this was the most productive 
period of the entire trip. On December 30th we moved our camp, by 
rail, to Kijabe, forty-four miles up the line, for the purpose of securing 
a series of Cape Buffalo. A month spent here resulted in obtaining 
only a single specimen of Buft'alo and a fair number of other specimens, 
among which were a series of Colobus Monkeys and a Rhinosceros. 
The following month (February) was spent at Lake Elementeita, 
fifty miles northwest of Kijabi, and this proved a reasonably profitable 
month. About March 8th the outfit was again moved by rail to Molo, 
484 miles from the coast, where we went into camp some twelve 
miles south of the railway. Our stay here was made exceedingly un- 
pleasant by the incessant cold rains, and failure, again, to secure 
Buffalo contributed to our discomfiture. We were fairly recom- 
pensed, however, for the time spent, by the addition to our collections 
of a series of Topi, a series of Jackson's Harteebest, a very fine male 
lion, and a number of smaller mammals. Early in April we returned 
coastwards to Voi, 100 miles inland from Mombasa. We had post- 
poned our visit to Voi until the last because of the unhealthfulness 
of the region, and the two weeks spent there resulted in a meagre 
showing of material collected, owing to fever attacking two of our 
party, as well as a large number of the employed natives. The 
caravan was discharged at the close of our work at this place, and 
we returned to Nairobi, and proceeded to pack the collections for 
shipment. Messers. Shaw-Kennedy and Heller made preparations 
to return home at this time. The work of packing the collections 
occupied five weeks, the lack of proper facilities making it a tedious 
task; fifty barrels that had been ordered from London proved use- 
less, and obliged us to resort to the use of old oil casks obtained from 
the Railway Company. About May ist, upon receipt of instructions 
from the Museum authorities, application was made for permission 
to cross the Tana River in quest of Buffalo, which was granted, on 
the understanding that we were not to avail ourselves of the privilege 
until July. It was therefore decided to employ the intervening time 
in collecting accessory material for some of the groups, specimens for 
which had been previously secured. Accordingly, about June ist, we 



132 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

engaged the necessary porters and returned to Athi Plains, where 
three weeks were spent at Kijabe in making studies for Lion and other 
groups, and three days in gathering accessory material for a Colobus 
Monkey group. We then moved to Xaivasha (June 28th), with the 
intention of collecting birds and accessories for a group of the aquatic 
birds of the Lake Naivasha region. Upon our arrival at the lake, 
we learned that a closed season had been declared, but, anticipating 
no difficulty in securing permission to collect the limited amount of 
material required, application was made to the authorities, who, 
much to our surprise, refused the desired privileges. Ten days 
were lost in awaiting this disappointing decision. The trans-Tana 
trip had been indefinitely postponed on account of trouble with the 
natives at the base of Mt. Kenya, where the government had sent 
troops, and were at this time, July loth, engaged in warfare, but as it 
seemed likely that the trouble was nearing the end, the services of Mr. 
R. j. Cunningham, professional hunter and safari runner, were 
secured, and we headed for Fort Hall and the Tana River, with the 
intention of looking for Elephants on the way; three weeks were 
spent on the Aberdare Mountains, during which time we prepared 
the skin of one Elephant, a series of Duiker, and a number of other 
specimens. Upon our arrival at Fort Hall, August 14th, we found 
H. M. Commissioner, Col. Hayes-Sadler, with his suite, about to 
depart in company with the Sub-Commissioner, Mr. S. L. Hinde, on a 
trip into trans-Tana country. Permission was given us to shoot 
Elephants on Ml. Ivenya, as well as Buffalo on the plains. We were 
honored with an invitation from the Commissioner to accompany 
the official party so far as our routes paralleled, an invitation which 
was gratefully accepted. A week later, the edge of the forest at the 
base of Mt. Kenya was reached, and here work with the Elephants 
was begun. The five weeks spent among the Elephants was emi- 
nently satisfactory in point of experience, and knowledge gained of 
the habits of these interesting animals, but disappointing in that we 
failed, for want of time, in securing all the specimens required for 
the group. The return from Mt. Kenya to the Tana River was 
distressingly slow and tedious, owing to the difficulties encountered 
in securing porters to move the material, but the Tana was finally 
reached on October 2nd, and a few days later we proceeded down the 
river in search of Buffalo. Some six weeks elapsed before we finally 
succeeded in securing the last of the si.x specimens desired. The 
three months in trans-Tana country were months of hard work 



OF THt 



X 



tr 
O 
a. 
ui 
c 



> 
cr 
O 

I- 



< 

< 

Z 



D 
UJ 




Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 133 

and bitter disappointments, but results, on the whole, were satis- 
factory, in that the material obtained was eminently desirable, and 
difficult to secure. We returned to Fort Hall on November 22nd, and 
with 175 porters proceeded to Nairobi with the collections. Mr. 
Cunningham returned by way of the Aberdare, to bring in the Ele- 
phant and other skins that had been left on the summit of the moun- 
tains, nearly four months previously. We reached Nairobi Novem- 
ber 27th and proceeded with the final packing of the collection, which 
was shipped by rail to Mombasa, which port it left December 21st, 
on the S. S. Admiral ; trans-shipped at Naples, and arrived at New 
York January 28th. The consignment of 84 packages, weighing 
upwards of 17 tons, arrived at the Museum in perfect condition." 

It seems a fitting opportunity for both the Museum management 
and the members of the expedition to express their gratitude to 
those who, through friendly interest and appreciation of the objects 
of the expedition, contributed to its success: to Mr. Vernon Shaw- 
Kennedy, for his untiring energy and loyalty to the best interests 
of the Museum; to Col. Hayes-Sadler, H. M. Commissioner for British 
East Africa, and Mr. F. J. Jackson, H. M. Deputy Commissioner, for 
many privileges and concessions which, by virtue of their high offices, 
they were able to grant; to Mr. S. L. Hinde, H. M. Sub-Commissioner 
for Kenya Province, the expedition was indebted for more than 
official assistance; and to Mr. A. Blayney Percival, Game Ranger, whose 
fund of information relative to the game districts was always avail- 
able. Acknowledgment is also made of courtesies and concessions 
granted by the officials of the Uganda Railway, and for the hos- 
pitality and good-will accorded the expedition by all government 
officials with whom the members of the party were brought in contact. 

The following list indicates the gentlemen who had charge of the 
different Museum expeditions during the year; the localities they 
visited and the material they obtained : 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

Illinois J. F. Ferry, Bird Skins. 

Bahamas L. J. K. Brace, Herbarium Material. 

Andaman and Nicobar Is- 
lands Alfred R. Brown, Ethnological Specimens. 

Philippine Islands, (R. F. 

Cummings Expedition) . F. C. Cole, Luzon Ethnology. 

Little Traverse Bay, Michi- 
gan A. W. Slocom, Invertebrate Fossils. 

Wisconsin and lUinois . . E. Heller, Mammals. 



134 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

L<jcality. Callector. Material. 

Illinois CM. Barber. Fishes and Reptiles. 

Bahamian Archipelago . . C. F. Millspaugh, Herbarium and Economic 

Material. 
Sauk and Fox Indians, 

Tama, Iowa .... William Jones, Ethnological Specimens. 

Illinois H. W. Menke, Material for Bird Groups. 

North West Coast . C. F. Newcombe, Ethnological Specimens. 

South East Missouri . H. H. Smith, Timbers. 

Bahamas N. L. Britton, Herbarium Material. 

Lake Superior . . . . O. C. Farrington, Ores and Minerals. 

English Lake, Indiana . . C. B. Cory, Birds Eggs. 

Illinois E. B. Chope, Insects. 

Philippine Islands (R. F. 

Cummings Expedition), William Jones, Negrito Ethnology. 

Installation, Rearrangement and Permanent Improvement. — At the end 
of last year the Department of Anthropology reported that more 
material awaited installation than at any previous time for ten 
years. This condition was due to the fact that the accessions for 
two years had been extremely large and numerous. The necessity 
for resorting to various makeshifts in order to store this great body 
of material has existed during part of the present year. Late in the 
year, however, 40 new cases became available, which, at once, made 
possible a general rearrangement of certain collections of the depart- 
ment. Since the arrival of the new cases, the following collections 
have been installed: Arapaho, Wasco, Pawnee and Javanese. The 
extensive collection from Borneo has also been installed, as well as 
a large part of the collections from Africa. For these collections, 
however, old cases have been utilized; those from Africa in cases that 
had been abandoned by the Departments of Geology and Botany. 
The material from the first Cummings' Philippine Expedition has 
been installed in Halls 40 and 55, and occupies 28 cases. The 
new cases have made it possible to remove many collections which 
have been temporarily installed in Hall 8, and that hall has now 
been restored to its former condition, and is again devoted exclusively 
to the archaeology of the Southwest. Hall 7 is temporarily occupied 
by Taxidermy, but it will ultimately receive the overflow collections, 
both archaeological and ethnological, of the Southwest. A portion 
of the East Annex has been transferred to the Department of Anthro- 
pology, and this additional space has made possible an extremely 
desirable change. There has been transferred to the Annex all 
collections from regions outside of America, and the provisional 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 135 

assignment of space at the present time is as follows: Halls 38, 39, 
40, 41 and 55, Indonesia; Hall 54, Polynesia and Micronesia; Hall 53, 
Melanesia; Halls 50-52, Africa; Halls 56-58, Asia. This installation 
of the collections from the South Pacific and Asia, has made possible 
the rearrangement of Halls 2, 5, and 6, which are now devoted, as 
are Halls i, 3 and 4, to North American ethnology. Mr. J. A. Burt, 
aside from assisting in the installation of several collections during 
the year, has carried to completion two interesting and important 
groups in miniature of the Pawnee, and is well advanced on three 
additional groups, one being Pawnee, and two Sauk and Fox. The 
two latter groups have been prepared under the direction of Dr. 
William Jones. 

The collection of ceramics having been removed from Hall ^;^, 
the Paleozoic fossils, heretofore exhibited in Hall 35, were transferred 
thereto. This necessitated the removal of the specimens from ten floor 
and eight wall cases, moving of the cases, and reinstallation of the 
specimens. Advantage was taken of the opportunity, also, to thor- 
oughly rearrange the collection. The vacated hall. Hall 35, has been 
cleared for the exhibition of Dinosaurs, a large amount of this 
material now being ready for exhibition. In the center of the hall 
the great Dinosaur torso collected in Colorado by the Museum 
expedition of 1901, is being erected. This work is of such magni- 
tude that it has occupied nearly the entire time of Assistant Curator 
Riggs and assistants during the year and is not yet complete. 
The torso consists of a nearly complete skeleton posterior to the last 
cervical vertebra, and is of interest as containing the largest number 
of bones of an individual Dinosaur of such a size ever mounted. The 
aggregate weight of the bones is about five tons and when mounted 
they stand fifteen feet above the floor at their highest point. In 
order to support this great weight and prevent swaying, it was neces- 
sary to construct a special framework of structural steel. This consists 
of a base surmounted by a superstructure, to support the specimen 
proper. The base has the form of a rectangle, measuring eight by 
thirty feet. It is made up of two longitudinal channel beams joined 
together at the ends by transverse beams of the same. Four trans- 
verse I-beams, intersected by a single line of longitudinal I-beams 
act as girders and form a series of four crosses in the median line for 
the support of the vertical columns. All are firmly bolted together 
at the intersections by means of angles, as in ordinary structural iron 
work. Four vertical columns support the weight of the specimen. 



136 Field Museum (if Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

These columns are each made up of four angle-beams joinctl together 
by means of solid "fillers," and all firmly riveted with flush-head 
rivets. They vary in size according to the load which they are 
designed to carry. Eacli column is braced at its base by four gussets, 
which are bolted respectively to the four intersecting I-l)eams, and 
riveted between the angle-irons of the column in place of the "filler." 
The four vertical columns support a longitudinal T-beam, firmly 
bolted to their upper ends. The angles formed by the two are tied 
by short diagonal braces. The T-beam forms the support of the 
vertebral column and is bent so as to conform closely to its inferior 
outline. It is tapered towards the rear end, so that its size is reduced 
in proportion to the load it is intended to receive. The individual 
bones are fastened to this framework by forgings of wrought iron. 
These supports are bent to conform closely to the surface of the 
bone in order to be as inconspicuous as possible. They attach to the 
bones, in most instances, by being bent so as to clasp them firmly. 
Work on the mount has progressed so that the greater part of the 
vertebral column is now in place. Many of the bones were so dis- 
torted as to require considerable modification before they could be 
fitted into their respective positions in the skeleton. A missing 
femur and ilium have been supplied by modeling them in plaster 
from the corresponding bones of the opposite side, and several 
ribs and chevrons have been restored as a whole or in part. As it 
was found necessary to perform a large part of the shaping of the 
steel contiguous to the skeleton, a gas forge w'as placed upon the west 
porch of Hall 35, so as to provide facilities for heating the individual 
steel pieces. A temporary sheet-iron shed erected over this permits 
continuance of the work during the winter months. In the cases 
left vacant in Hall 36 by removal of portions of the dinosaur skeleton 
for mounting, there have been installed a sacrum and seven dorsal 
vertebrae of Brachiosaurus, and some minor specimens. To the 
series on exhibition in Hall 59, have been added during the year two 
skulls of Promerycochoerus and single skulls of Merycochoerus, Hyaen- 
odon, Hyracodon, Procamelus and Amphicyon. In Hall 61 a superb 
complete skeleton of Promerycochoerus, worked out during the year, 
has been placed upon exhibition. Some minor rearrangements of 
exhibited series have been made in connection with these additions. 
To the hall of meteorites. Hall 62, a wall case has been added, to 
provide for increase in the collection, and new specimens received 
have been installed. Additions to the systematic mineral collection, 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 137 

Halls 63 and 64, have also been installed as received. A total of 
5,469 specimens is now on exhibition in this collection. The remainder 
of the collection, classified and arranged for study purposes, occu- 
pies drawers below the corresponding exhibition cases. The work 
of providing additional permanent cases for the collections has 
been continued by furnishing such cases for the systematic rock, 
marble, and building stone collections. These occupy Halls 66 and 
67. The specimens and old cases were entirely removed from 
these halls, and the walls of Hall 66 renovated and calcimined. 
Part of the cases removed were transferred to another depart- 
ment, while others were, with some alterations, placed in the 
departmental library. The new cases provided for the lithological 
collection are, in general, of the pattern employed for the systematic 
collection of minerals. The wall cases are, however, one foot instead 
of two feet deep, and the floor cases are fitted with glass at the ends 
as well as at the sides. The lights of the wall cases are 68 by 70 inches 
in dimension, and swing outward by means of hinges at the top. 
The specimens are installed on four series of six-inch shelves, sup- 
ported by L-shaped brackets screwed to narrow iron strips bolted 
to the backs of the cases. The lights in the floor cases are 34 by 56 
inches in dimension, and swing outward from the top. The speci- 
mens are installed on individual wooden blocks screwed to pyramidal 
screens which occupy the case interiors. The blocks are distributed 
so as to avoid a monotonous appearance, and allow for the exhibition 
of about one hundred specimens in each case. Drawers in the bases 
of the cases provide space for study collections. Sixteen cases in 
all have been provided for this hall, eight of which are floor cases, 
and eight wall cases. For the marble collection, the type of cases 
employed is like that already in use in Skiff Hall. In place of shelves, 
however, screens are provided to which the slabs of marble are fas- 
tened. The slabs are thus brought in uniform position and close to 
the eye, while the background enhances the appearance of the whole. 
Moreover, as in the meteorite cases, the sashes are secured by locks, and 
felted tongues and grooves, along all unjoined surfaces prevent 
the entrance of dust. For the installation of objects other than 
slabs, such as cubes, spheres, and other irregularly shaped specimens, 
flat cases have been provided. These cases are 44 inches high and 4 by 6 
feet in area. The height of the case portion proper is 12 inches. This 
portion is framed together, with the end lights removable. It rests 
upon four stout legs, tapering to the floor, all being capable of 



138 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

sustaininr;^ a weight of one ton. The top light in each case, which 
is that intended to provide the chief area of display, is 44 by 68 
inches in dimensions. Nine of these cases have been provided for 
the hall. Considerable additions have been made to the clay collec- 
tions. Hall 68, so that it has been necessary to add four cases to the 
hall, and to consign to storage some of the material previously ex- 
hibited there. The cases needed were obtained by moving some from 
Hall 67. These additions necessitated an entire reinstallation, which 
has been completed with very satisfactory results. The collection 
now includes: Two synoptic cases, three cases of brick clays, two 
cases of fire and potters' clays, and one case of china clays. So far 
as possible, burned briquettes have been prepared of each clay ex- 
hibited, so that the properties of the burned and raw product may 
be seen together. In addition, a series of type briquettes has been 
prepared, showing the effect on appearance, and other properties of 
the clay, of different contents of lime, iron, etc. About five hundred 
briquettes have been so prepared during the year for exhibition 
with the collection. The series of diamond-bearing rocks of Arkan- 
sas received from Mr. Millar has been installed in Hall 70. This 
completes this collection quite satisfactorily, as the South African 
and Brazilian series were already shown here. In Hall 71, the case 
exteriors have been painted and some needed cleaning and reinstal- 
lation performed. The collections in Hall 72 of ores of the precious 
metals and lead have been rearranged so as to conform to a geograph- 
ical classification, rather than one depending upon the metal in the ore, 
as heretofore. This seemed desirable for several reasons, one being 
that many districts have several metals combined in one ore, so that it 
has been necessary, in order to represent the different metals fully, to 
multiply the series more than was desirable. Again it has been found 
that mining districts are better known, as a rule, than their ores, so that 
ore is most easily looked for by the visitor under the name of the 
district. Moreover, the relations of ores and ore deposits to each 
other can generally be most clearly shown by an arrangement accord- 
ing to districts. Accordingly the collections were rearranged, and the 
following series are now shown in this hall : One case typical gold 
ores and placer ores; one case ores from Alaska and British Columbia; 
one case Washington ores; one case Oregon ores; one case ores 
from California; three cases ores from Nevada; one case ores from 
the Black Hills; one case ores from Utah; eleven cases ores from 
Colorado; two cases of Arizona ores; three cases of New Mexico 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 139 

ores; one case ores of the Appalachians; three cases ores from Mex- 
ico; four cases ores from Colombia; one case ores from other South 
American localities; one case ores of Australia; two cases ores of 
Great Britain; and three cases of European ores. The platinum 
ores, the metallurgical collections, and the large specimens occupy- 
ing centre and special wall cases, have not been essentially changed. 
One case, transferred from Hall 67, has been added to those of the hall, 
and a number of the cases have been repainted. Of the relief maps, 
Halls 76 and 77, thirteen additional ones have been encased in glass, 
making twenty-eight in all which are now thus protected. One 
map has been repainted and several retouched. A series of photo- 
graphic enlargements, twenty in number, 17 by 20 inches in size, 
illustrating typical geological or geographical features, has also been 
mounted upon a swinging stand in Hall 76. Including these, a total 
of sixty-seven relief maps, seven ordinary maps, and twenty-five 
framed photographs is at present exhibited in these halls, making 
an exhibit which, besides attracting the attention of visitors in general, 
is used extensively for detailed study by classes from the public 
schools and other institutions. The collections in Hall 78 have been 
somewhat rearranged, and completely labeled. At present they 
number as follows : Three cases of abrasives, two cases of phosphates, 
two cases of mica, two cases of asbestos, one case of sulphur, one 
case of gypsum, one case of borax, four cases of salts of the alkalies 
and alkaline earths, two cases of processes and two miscellaneous 
cases. For the present, only temporary cases, collected from various 
sources, are available for exhibiting these collections, but it is hoped 
shortly to replace them with more attractive ones. To the Depart- 
mental office and library, as already noted, several of the wall cases 
formerly in use in Hall 66 were transferred. These cases, with some 
alterations, have been made to serve as book cases. The additional 
space thus provided has been filled by the transference of a considerable 
number of books of a geological nature from the general library stack 
room, thus relieving the pressure on the latter. About 230 lineal feet 
of shelving, all under glass, have thus been added to the Departmental 
library during the year, and the total amount of shelving now available 
for books in this library is 650 lineal feet. A total of 4,500 books and 
pamphlets is at present kept in this library. The works are chiefiy 
serials, reports of Government and State surveys obtained by exchange, 
the private library donated by Director Skiff, and a series of separates 
and mineralogical books purchased from Mr. Kunz. Provision 



I40 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, \^ol. III. 

of suitable accommodations for an increasing number of maps and 
atlases was obtained by constructing a map case 2 by 2 by 5 feet 
in dimension, with 10 sliding shelves. This has also been placed in 
the Department library. A case of drawers, also constructed for 
the otfice, provides storage for labels, minor supplies, etc. The 
capacity of the storage room proper was increased by the provision 
of about 120 feet of plank shelving. In the paleontological labora- 
tory, a gratifying amount of material was cleaned from the matrix 
and made ready for installation. The material so prepared was as 
follows: A complete skeleton of Promcrycoclurrus, two complete 
skulls and a number of partial skeletons of individuals of the same 
genus; complete skulls of McrycochcBrus, Hyracodon and Leptau- 
chcnia; incomplete skulls of Amphicyon, Procamelus and Hycrnondon 
and an almost complete skeleton of an undetermined carnivore. In 
addition, the material in storage was carefully gone over, and all 
field packages which showed signs of having become loosened were 
replastered. This was especially necessary for packages which had 
been shipped from the field encased only in paste, as had sometimes 
been required by the exigencies of field work. 

The work on the Illinois birds and eggs has been pushed and with 
the e.xception of several special groups, is almost completed. Over 200 
birds have been prepared for exhibition, and the mounted collections 
in Halls 25 and 26 have been rearranged. A new idea in exhibiting 
fishes has been developed, a case designed, and the glass tanks to be 
utilized therein ordered from abroad, and which are expected within a 
short time. This installation is looked forward to with much interest, 
being somewhat of a change from previous methods. One of the 
illustrations of this report presents the latest experimental stage of 
this departure. In the Division of Entomology, the butterflies have 
been transferred and relabeled. During the year 680 skulls have been 
cleaned and returned to the study collection, and 16 ligamentary 
skeletons have been cleaned and mounted. 

In the Department of Botany, during the year, all of the original 
exposed installation in the galleries of the South Court, and a part 
of that in those of the West Court, have been taken down, and the 
specimens cleaned and readjusted for installation in new cases. New 
case installation has been accomplished as follows: To the Grass 
Family has been added a half case illustrating the use of a large 
number of gramineous roots and fibers; a full case illustrating the 
Oats of the world, and another the Sorghums, Millets, and various odd 



1 

1 

i 



OF THt 
UMlVtfRaiTY OF iiilNQIS 



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X 



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Hall 69. Coals of the United States. 



The coal measures are indicated by the biack areas on the map, and numbers 
on the maps corresponding with similar numbers on the specimen distinguish the 
mines or localities from whence the specimens were obtained. A label attached to 
each specimen gives analysis and economic and technical data. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 141 

food grains; another the Ryes and Barleys, and several of the cases 
formerly installed have been substantially augmented in species and 
in interest. To the cases representing the Palm Family, a half case 
has been added, exemplifying further utilizations of the Cocoanut Palm, 
and a half case of further specimens of various fruits, including an 
interesting Date series. A case comprising the Hat Palm, Pondweed, 
Rush, Calla, and Pineapple families is now in its systematic place. 
To the Banana family has been added a half case, illustrating by 
"hands" and ropes, the principal Manila fibers. Another case, in- 
cluding the Yam, Iris, Pepper, Orchid, Canna and Arrowroot fami- 
lies, has been installed in association with the related Ginger family. 
An interesting series, exemplying the uses of plants of the Willow, 
the Australian Oak, the Myrtle and the Birch families, has been 
added, together with a half case in further exemplification of the 
Oaks. A case of plants and products of the Poppy and Mustard 
families, the Smartweeds and the Wormseeds is now installed. Fur- 
ther material has been added to the Nettle family, and the Elms 
and Proteads have been installed in this relationship. The Clove 
family is now initiated by a very complete series of the various 
woods, oils and kinos of Eucalyptus, occupying an entire case. An- 
other case and a half have been included with those illustrating the 
Bean family. The Laurel family has been augmented to com- 
prise a complete case, and the Sumach family extended with the 
Cyrillas, the Bittersweets and the Maples, to fill another. The Cho- 
colate and Silk Cotton families are now well exemplified in an inter- 
esting complete case devoted to their products. The Olive, Gentian, 
Strychnine, and Milkweed families are now well represented, and 
v^arious other natural families, already installed, have received notable 
and instructive additional material. 

Printing. — During the year the following work has been per- 
formed by this important section: Labels. imp°rSions. 

Department of Anthropology 1,790 12,475 

Department of Botany 5.008 21,598 

Department of Geology 5,098 286 

Department of Zoology 785 72,325 

Director's Office 61,082 

Higinbotham Hall , 134 

The Library 9,003 

Photography. — The following table shows the actual results 
only of a large number of photographic operations, many of which 
required hours of preparation: 



142 FiKLD Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



Director's Office 
Department of Anthropology 
Department of Botany . 
Department of Geology . 
Department of Zoology 
General Distribution 

Totals .... 

Total number of inve 
Entries from Decemb 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Botany . 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Geology 
Negatives developed for 

Department of Zoology 
Total 



Negatives. 


Lantern 
Prints. Slides. 


EnlarRe- 
ments. 


13 


32 




3.554 


3.762 78 


45 


lOI 


237 142 


15 


38 


122 6 


25 


(U) 


1.50 I i(^^ 

74 142 




3.777 


5.818 73. 


85 


tries to December 31, 1907 


59.523 


06, to December 31, 1907 


10,600 



180 



13 



274 



Attendance. — The total attendance for the year is 215,422, 
which is a slight increase over the previous year. An analysis of the 
admissions is made elsewhere in this report. Among the classes 
that have visited the Museum in a body during the year, the following 
may be mentioned : 

Schools and Locations. 

University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois 

Lake High — Union Avenue and West Forty-seventh Place 

Yale — Seventieth and Yale Avenue 

Hvde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 
Normal Practise — Stewart Avenue and Sixty-eighth Street 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Forestville — Forty-fifth and St. Lawrence Avenue 

Joliet, 111., High — Joliet, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 

Yale — Seventieth and Yale Avenue 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 

Yale Practice — Seventieth and Yale Avenue 

Hvde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 

Lake High — Union Avenue and Forty-seventh Place 

Parkside — Seventieth Street and Seipp Avenue 

Hvde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 

St. Xavier Academy — 4928 Evans Avenue .... 

Jewish Training School — 199 West Twelfth Place 

Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie 

Aventie 1 30 



Teachers. 


Pupils. 


I 


41 


2 


82 


2 


36 


I 


59 


2 


41 


3 


37 


4 


46 


2 


41 


I 


31 


I 


36 


I 


37 


4 


39 


I 


33 


3 


36 


2 


36 


I 


48 


I 


40 


2 


43 


J 


46 


I 


31 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 143 

Schools and Locations. Teachers. Pupils. 

Parkside — Seventieth and Seipp Avenue i 39 

Parkside — Ditto i 32 

Hyde Park High — Fift^'-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . . i 41 

John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth streets . 2 35 

Wells — Ashland and Cornelia Avenue 3 68 

Englewood High — West Sixty-second and Stewart Avenue . i 148 
Prescott — Wrightwood Avenue and North Ashland Avenue. 1 67 
John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth streets . i 32 
Jewish Training School — 199 West Twelfth Street ... 3 60 
Frances E. Willard — Forty -ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue . i 43 
John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth^streets . 2 ^^ 
Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue . i 43 
John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighthjstreets . 2 ^^ 
Lake High — Union Avenue and West Forty-seventh[ Place . i 50 
Jewish Training School — 199 West Twelfth Street ... 4 114 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Ave- 
nue I 32 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois i 37 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 2 35 

John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth streets . 2 30 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth and St. Lawrence Avenue. i 30 

Washburn — West Fourteenth and Union Street .... 2 62 

Prescott — Wrightwood and N. Ashland Avenue .... 2 62 

John Ericson — W. Harrison and S. Sacramento Avenue . . i 32 

Auburn Park — Normal Avenue and Eightieth Street. . . 2 46 

John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth streets . 2 40 

Foster — South Union and O'Brien Street 2 122 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 2 135 

Walsh — Johnson and West Twentieth Street 3 91 

Goodrich — West Taylor and South Sangamon Street . . i 42 

William K. Sullivan — Eighty-third and Houston Avenue . 4 80 

John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Fortj'-eighth streets . 3 52 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois i 56 

University of Chicago — 2 82 

John H. Hamline — Bishop and West Forty-eighth streets . 2 30 

Mt. Greenwood — Mt. Greenwood, Illinois i ^^ 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois i 36 

Morgan Park — Morgan Park, Illinois i 46 

Ray — Fifty-seventh and Monroe streets i 

West Hammond — Hammond, Indiana 2 

Von Humboldt — Rockwell and Hirsch Street .... 4 
Victor F. Lawson — South Homan and West Thirteenth 

Street i 49 

Whitney — West Twenty-eighth Street i 36 

Joliet Training School — Joliet, Illinois 69 

Dore — -207 West Harrison Street 2 72 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 1 3 6 



42 
43 

47 



144 FiKi-n Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



Schools and I.xJcations. Teachers. 

Hyde Park Ui^h — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park Hij^h — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park Hi^'h — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Marquette — South Wood and West Harrison Streets 
Bryant — Forty-first Avenue and West Thirteenth Street 
Hyde Park Hi>jh — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Wendell Phillips Hi.i,'h — Thirty-ninth and Prairie Avenue 
Wendell Pliillips High — Thirty-ninth and Prairie Avenue 
Normal Practice — Sixty-seventh and Stewart Avenue 
Gladstone — South Robey and Washburne avenue 

Hoyne High — Illinois and Cass streets 

Englewood High — Sixty-second and Stewart Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High. — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 

Hoyne High — Illinois and Cass streets 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 

Joliet — Joliet, Illinois 

Joliet — - Joliet, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 

Chicago Kindergarten College 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Harrison — Twenty-third Place and Wentworth Avenue 
Normal Practice — Sixty-seventh and Stewart Avenue 
Normal Practice — Sixty-seventh and Stewart Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 

Yale — Seventieth and Yale Avenue 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue 
Gladstone — South Robey and Washburne Avenue 
University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois .... 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth and Prairie Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh and Kimbark Avenue . 



Pupils. 
48 

57 
39 
46 

38 
80 

33 
30 
31 
61 

30 
83 
46 

49 
90 

55 
49 
36 
30 
55 
38 
52 
30 
37 
40 

49 
45 
30 
98 

31 
30 
105 
43 
40 

35 



Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of acces- 
sions, names of members, etc. 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, 
Director. 



OF THt 



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Russian Woods, 
(royal appenages collection.) 



An alcove case containing Ash, Alder, and Oak. The specimens in the upper 
row show the trunk in cross and longitudinal sections, illustrating the well-marked 
annual rings and the grain of the wood on a natural and a finished surface in the 
same plane. The lower row of specimens shows radial, tangential, and oblique 
surfaces, and also a distinct view of the bark. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 145 



Financial Statement. 

GENERAL ACCOUNT. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
From January 1, 1907, to December 31, 1907. 



Receipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, Deceniber 31, 1906. . . $ 39,741 .48 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1906 .... 739-95 
Dues of Members — 

Corporate $ 20.00 

Annual 1,900.00 1,920.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 5,695.90 

Sale of Guides . . . 145-75 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Huntington W. Jackson Library Fund .... 40.00 

Interest on Temple Bonds 37-795-77 

Field Endowment Income 107. 333 -33 

Dividend Illinois Trust & Savings Bank Stock . . 7,932.00 

Interest on Calumet Club Bonds 360.00 

Interest on Daily Balances 587.98 

Sundry Receipts 73 -60 

R. F. Cummings Philippine Fund 4,000.00 

Donations — United States Gypsum Company, . . 25 .00 

$221,390.76 



146 Field Museum of Xatural History — Reports, Vol. Ill, 



Disbursements. 

Salaries 

Guard Service 

Janitor Service 

Fire Protectitin 

Heat and Lijjht — 

Wajjes $3,588.87 

Fuel 7,057.12 

Gas 338 98 

Supplies 867.78 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, 

etc 11,547.21 

Material used — paints, oils, glass, lumber, 

plaster, etc. 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases 

Office Furniture 



The Library — 

Books and Periodicals 

Binding 

Sundries 

Sections of Printing and Photography 

Collections, etc., Purchased 

Departmental Expenses . . . . 

Guide Account, Eighth Edition 



s 75.364.37 

1 2,524 . 1 2 
7,286 .94 
3,281 . 20 



General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming 

Stationery, Postage, Telephone 

Expeditions 6,529 

Publications 

Lecture Course Expenses .... 

Liability Insurance 

Northern Trust Company, Custodian 

Sundries 

Mrs. Timothy B. Blackstone Fund ... 
R. F. Cummings Philippine Fund .... 



II.8S2-7S 



Illinois Trust & Savings Bank Stock 
$30,000 Union Pacific ist Mortgage Bonds 

Petty Cash 

In Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1907 



4 /f 



3-404 • 


72 


14.951 


93 


13,724.69 






141 .50 


13.866 


19 


1,436.16 






678.70 






60 . 70 


2.175 


56 




1,203 


43 




7.227 


84 




4.853 


23 




499 


10 


1.737 21 






1,209 


96 






6,529 


45 






3.272 


29 






753 


80 






283 


50 






245 


59 






995 


01 


15,026 


81 




66 


74 




3-999 


18 




$174,179 


39 


$ 3,647 00 






28,752.14 






739-95 






14.072 . 28 


47.211 


37 






S221.390 


76 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 147 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1, 1907, TO 

DECEMBER 31, 1907. 

Attendance. 

Paid Attendance — 

Adults 19.513 

Children 1,400 20,913 

Free Admission on Pay Days — 

School Children 5.489 

Students 4,382 

Teachers 743 

Members: Corporate 10 

Annual 69 

Life 15 

Officers' Families 65 

Special  91 

Press 2 

Admission on Free Days — 

Saturdays . . . : 40,017 

Sundays 143,626 194,509 

Total Attendance, 215,422 

Highest Attendance on any one day (August 23, 1907) . 7.375 

Highest Paid Attendance on any day (July 4, 1907) . 407 

Average Daily Admissions (365 days) 618 

Average Paid Admissions (261 days) 80 

Receipts. 

Guides Sold — 583 at 25 cents each $ i4S-75 

Articles Checked — 13,551 at 5 cents each .... 677.55 

Admissions 5,018.35 

$5,841.65 



14S Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol, III 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AVER. EDWARD E.. Chicago. 

I strinjj of very small colored heads — Egypt. 
BROOKLYN LXSTITUTE MUSEUM. Brooklyn. New York. 
I Navaho skeleton — New Mexico (exchange). 

450 specimens Cliff Dweller objects from Cafion del Muerto and CaAon 
dc Chelly; also Zuni ethnology (exchange). 
CAMERON. MRS. \V. H.. 

I pair Klamath Indian tule moccasins. 
CORY. CHARLES B.. Chicago. 

I stone pestle — Brookline. Mass. 
FAN. TUAN. Viceroy of the Liang Kiang Provinces. Nanking. China. 

I stone image of the Yuen Chi Tin Chun (God of the Tang Dynasty) — 
China. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by C. E. Akeley: * 

816 ethnological specimens — British East Africa. 
Collected by William Jones: 

317 ethnological specimens from Fox Indians — Tama. Iowa. 
Purchases: 

I wooden pipe bowl carved face. 

1 stone image Beaver Mound — Bennington. Michigan. 

2 belts. 1 lance. 2 drums, 2 drums for hand-game, i javelin game. 

I warrior bundle, i shirt — Pawnee, Oklahoma. 

53 ethnological specimens from the Chilcotin. 

180 ethnological specimens — Polynesian Islands and Africa. 

I Solomon Island skull. 7 New Guinea skulls, i Chinese skull. 

279 ethnological specimens — Micronesian Islands. 

77 skulls — New Britain. 

I copper lance point — Dubuque, Iowa. 
HANSEN. DR. OSCAR A., Chicago. 

I water vessel of clay, i chipped stone blade. 
KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW. Chicago. 

37 specimens ethnological material — British East Africa. 
PUTNAM, JAMES R.. Chicago. 

I suit Japanese armor and case for same. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 149 

RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

4 blankets (Navaho), 4 tray baskets and i burden basket (Seminole 
Indians, Florida), i bow, 9 arrows (East India). 
SCRAPPER, FERDINAND, Blue Island, Illinois. 

I shoulder blade — Blue Island, Illinois. 
SHADWELL, BERTRAND, Chicago. 

, I earthenware vessel — Arizona. 
SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V., Chicago. 

I Navaho blanket (exchange). 
WILSON, J. M., Chicago. 

I small stone axe head — Chicago. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

14 specimens manila hemp — Philippine Islands. 
BAKER, EDMUND, London, England. 

I tracing of plant. 
BAKER MOSS COMPANY, Garrett, Indiana. 

6 specimens peat products — Garrett, Indiana. 
BARBER, C. M., Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
BARTLETT, H. H., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

I tracing of plant. 
BEBB, ROBERT, Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Texas. 
BERLIN ANALIN WORKS, Chicago. 

4 specimens economic products. 
BOTANIC GARDEN, Sydney, Australia. 

69 carpologic specimens — Australia. 
BOUTLOU, REV. A., Fairmont, West Virginia. 

I herbarium specimen — West Virginia. 

12 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 
BOUTONNET, E., Kerba, Algeria. 

13 specimens economic products. 
BRANDEGEE, PROF. T. S., Berkeley, California. 

I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 

I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
BRITISH GUIANA COMMISSION, W. C. E., 1893, Chicago. 

I gourd of arrow poison — British Guiana. 
BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, P. I. 

94 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands (exchange). 
CALDWELL, PROF. OTIS W., Chicago. 

82 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 

18 photographs of Cuban Cycadaceae, i economic specimen — Cuba. 
CALKINS, W. W., Berwyn, Illinois. 

I herbarium specimen — Berwyn, Illinois. 



15© FiKLi) MusKiM OF Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 

88 herbarium specimens — Bcr\vyn. Illinois. 

I herbarium specimen — Illinois. 

ij(> herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

I herbarium sjjecimen — California. 

5 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
CANIXHJJ-:, DR. CASIMIR DK. (k-neva. Switzerland 

I tracing; of plant 
CHAMHHRl-.MN. PROF. C. J.. Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Indiana. 

I herbarium specimen. 
CHASE, MRS. AGNES. \Vashin>,'ton. D. C. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 

CONZATTI, PROF. CASSIAN'O. Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico. 

362 herbarium specimens — Oaxaca, Mexico. 
COULTER. PROF. J. M.. Chicago. 

2 economic specimens — United States and Australia, 
158 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

DE.VM, CllAS. C. Hluffton. Indiana. 

207 herbarium specimens — Guatemala (exchange). 

1 herbarium specimen — Guatemala. 

2 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 

ESTACIOX CENTRAL AGRONOMICA. Santiago de las Vegas. Cuba. 

156 herbarium specimens — Cuba. 
FERRY. JOHN F., Chicago. 

^o herbarium specimens — .Mound City. Illinois. 
FIELD MUSEU.M OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collated by J. M. Greenman: 

49 plant descriptions. 

I tracing of plant. 

3 {jhotographs of plants. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

I specimen teak wood — Siam. 
Collected by L. J. K. Brace: 

1243 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
Collected by N. L. Britton and L. J. K. Brace: 

664 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh and N. L. Britton: 

922 herbarium specimens, 45 economic specimens — Bahamas. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs and J. B. Abbott; 

10 herbarium specimens — Wyoming. 
Purchases: 

1 8 10 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

448 herbarium specimens — California, Lower California and Colorado. 

15000 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

lOQ drugs. 

698 herbarium specimens — various localities in the United States. 

1 7 reproductions of fruits. 

3 economic specimens — Illinois. 






Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 151 

1 197 herbarium specimens — Guadeloupe and Martinique. 

151 herbarium specimens, 21 economic specimens — Palestine. 

423 herbarium specimens — Guadeloupe and Martinique. 

581 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

639 herbarium specimens — California, Oregon and Washington. 
FRYE, PROF. T. C, Seattle, Washington. 

5 economic specimens — Washington. 
FULLER, GEORGE D., Chicago. 

9 herbarium specimens — Alberta. 
GATES, FRANK C, Ravenswood, Illinois. 

137 herbarium specimens — Illinois (exchange). 
GAUMER, DR. GEO. F., Izamal, Mexico. 

I herbarium specimen — Yucatan. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — California. 

1 photograph of specimen. 
HALL, MRS. HERMAN J., Chicago. 

T photo Cyperus papyrus, r paper Cyperus papyrus — Palermo, Sicily. 
HILL, PROF. E. J., Chicago. 

67 herbarium specimens — United States. 
INDIAN MUSEUM, THE, Calcutta, British India. 

28 economic products — British India (exchange). 
JORDAN, PROF. EDWIN OAKES, Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 
KELLERMAN, PROF. W. A., Columbus, Ohio. 

207 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 
KLIPSTEIN & CO., A., Chicago. 

9 economic specimens. 
LAND, DR. W. J. G., Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Indiana. 
LANSING, O. E. JR., Chicago. 

2 economic specimens — Indiana. 

27 herbarium specimens — Illinois and Indiana. 

I tracing of Coreopsis incisa. 
MILLSPAUGH, BASIL S., Chicago. 

I specimen Saccharum officinale "Piloncillo" — Mexico. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

I specimen nut. 

1 specimen slippery elm bark — Illinois. 

4 specimens of fruits — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 

2 herbarium specimens — Porto Rico. 
I economic specimen. 

MILLSPAUGH, MRS. C. F., Chicago. 

10 economic specimens — Harbor Islands, Bahamas 
I specimen nut. 



152 Field Museum of Natukai, History — Reports, Vol. III. 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN. St. Louis. Missouri. 
023 herbarium specimens — Texas (exchange). 

1 specimen pod corn. 

2 specimens fruits — Dominica and St. Croix. 
NATIONAL COMPANY. THE, Chicago. 

I specimen corn oil rubber. 
Ni:\V(()MHE. DR. C. P.. Victoria. B. C. 

3 herbarium specimens — Queen Charlotte Islands. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN. New York City. 

296 herbarium specimens — Porto Rico (exchange). 
331 herbarium specimens — Jamaica (exchange). 
735 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 
I herbarium specimen — Antigua. West Indies. 
NEW NORK TANNING EXTRACT CO.. New York City. 

4 specimens products — Argentine Republic. 
PIPER. PROF. C. v.. Washington. D. C. 

1 herbarium specimen — Oregon. 
ROYAL GARDENS. Kew. England. 

37 economic specimens, i herbarium specimen — various localities 
(exchange). 
SLOCOM. A. W.. Chicago. 

2 economic specimens — Michigan. « 
SMITH. HURON II.. Chicago. 

4 economic specimens — Winchester, Indiana. 

2 economic specimens. 

I specimen fruit — Illinois. 
SPARKS. MISS ETHEL C. Chicago. 

I rosary — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 
TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales. 

160 economic specimens, 114 herbarium specimens — Australia 
(exchange). 
TRACY, S. M., Biloxi, Mississippi. 

20 herbarium specimens — Alabama. Florida and Texas. 
TRELEASE. DR. WILLIAM. St. Louis, Missouri. 

1 plant description. 

2 plant descriptions and photograph. 
TUTTLE. MRS. M.. Chicago. 

s,^ marine alg;c — Santa Cruz, California. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. Washington, D. C. 
16 fragments of type specimens — Mexico. 
47 herbarium specimens — Mexico (exchange). 
186 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

3 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. Chicago. 

51,606 specimens (Herbarium of University of Chicago (deposit). 
WARNER. MOORE &- CO., Richmond, Virginia. 
2 specimens of leaves — Virginia. 



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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 153 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
AMERICAN VANADIUM COMPANY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

5 specimens vanadium ores — Minasragra, Peru. 
ATLAS SCHOOL SUPPLY COMPANY, Chicago. 

7 relief maps 3^x4' — various countries. 
AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

I large sheet crystallized copper — Cananea, Mexico. 
BARTON, S. W., Chicago. 

I specimen crystallized calcite, 2 specimens analcite — Lake Superior. 
CHICAGO COPPER REFINING CO., Blue Island, Illinois. 

7 specimens ores and concretions — United States and Canada. 
COHEN, M., Assuan, Egypt. 

I specimen bloodstone, i specimen peridot — Mt. Sinai, Egypt. 
DAVIN, JAMES P., Chicago. 

I specimen calcareous tufa — Chicago. 
DIVER, DANIEL, Deerfield, Wisconsin. 

1 specimen fire clay — • Canada. 
DUNHAM, N. W., Somerville, Texas. 

4 specimens fuller's earth — United States. 
EMPIRE MINING COMPANY, Platteville, Wisconsin. 

2 specimens lead and zinc ores — Platteville, Wisconsin. 
ESSIG & CO., F. J., Chicago. 

4 specimens cut sodalite — Canada, 2 specimens cut azurite and mal- 
achite — Lyon County, Nevada (exchange). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

37 specimens copper and iron ores, pitchstone, agate and thomsonite 

— Lake Superior. 
2 specimens concretions, 4 specimens rocks — Montana. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

39 specimens beach pebbles illustrating attrition — Little Sister Bay, 
Wisconsin. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

4 specimens worm borings in Potsdam sandstone, i specimen Potsdam 
sandstone — Crevitz, Wisconsin. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

25 fossil crinoids — Burlington, Iowa. 

3283 fossil shells (representing 36 species) Pleistocene marls of Little 

Traverse Bay, Michigan. 
29 specimens concretions and pebbles, 860 specimens Devonian inver- 
tebrate fossils — Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 
Purchases: 

I relief map of United States. 

I seventeen pound individual Admire meteorite — Admire, Kansas. 
1369 specimens fossil crinoids and blastoids — Btirlington, Iowa: 4231 
specimens invertebrate fossils — Mississippi Valley; 62 specimens 
fossil plants — Pennsylvania and Ohio. 



154 Field Museum ok Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

3 specimens topaz and phenacite. i specimen phenacite on quartz — 

North Chatham, New Hampshire. 
258 specimens invertebrate fossils, 17 specimens clay stones — Mew 

York and Vermont. 
50 specimens rocks of the iron and copper districts of Lake Superior. 
I specimen vanadinite — Ma^dalena. New Mexico. 
GAMH.\. F. PERIi;iRA. Pasto. U. S. of Colombia. 

4 specimens emerald and aquamarine, i specimen parisite, 8 specimens 

gold ore — U. S. of Colombia. 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA. Ottawa, Canada. 

I cast of Iron Creek meteorite (exchange). 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA, Calcutta. India. 

I specimen. 6.6 grams, Goalpara meteorite (exchange). 
HENDERSON. JUNIUS. Boulder. Colorado. 

20 specimens fossil shells — Colorado (exchange). 
JOHNSTON. W. M., Chicago. 

9 specimens ores and minerals. 

4 specimens native copper — Copper River District, Alaska. 
KU.VSTMAN. ROBERT, Little Rock, Arkansas. 

I specimen soapstone, i specimen talc, i specimen pulverized talc — 
Saline County, Arkansas. 
MILLAR. AUSTIN Q., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

I specimen kimberlite — Elliott County, Kentucky. 

7 specimens diamond-bearing sand and associated materials — Pike 

County, Arkansas. 
MORONEY. JOHN J., Chicago. 

19 specimens ores, clays and briquettes — United States. 

I specimen tripoli — The Dalles, Oregon. 
NARRAWAY, J. E., Ottawa, Canada. 

32 specimens fossils — Canada (exchange). 
PEARSE, A. S., Chicago. 

I fossil bryozoan, 6 fossil shells — Chicago and Dresden. New York. 
POHNDORF, A. P., Butte, Montana. 

I I specimens smoky quartz — Silver Star Mine, Butte, Montana. 
RING, H. A., Nome, Alaska. 

25 specimens garnets, i specimen black sand — Nome, Alaska. 
TRISTAN, PROF. J. FID, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

8 specimens minerals — Costa Rica. 
WARD, MRS. L. A. C, Chicago. 

I specimen Santa Rosa meteorite (1933 grams) (exchange). 
WARD'S NATURAL SCIENCE ESTABLISHMENT, Rochester. New York. 

I specimen Elm Creek meteorite (382 grams) (exchange). 
WERNER, ALEX., Chicago. 

19 specimens fossil shells — Nome, Alaska. 
WILEY, E. N., Chicago. 

I specimen fossil coral — Charlevoix, Michigan. 
WOOL?, R. H., Chicago. 

I specimen rottenstone, 1 specimen paint clay — Fayette County, 
Iowa. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 155 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AUTOMATIC BUTTON COMPANY, Muskatine, Iowa. 

I series of shells showing the various stages in the manufacture of 
pearl buttons. 
ABBEY, E. S., Chicago. 

I moth — Chicago. 
BARBER, C. M., Chicago. 

I garter snake — Oak Park, Illinois. 

3 water bugs — Laporte, Indiana. 
BEAN, DR. TARLETON H., New York City. 

1 frog, 3 salamanders — Smithtown, Long Island. 
BEER, EMIL, Chicago. 

2 butterflies — Palos Park, Illinois. 
BUCHANAN, W. P., Chicago. 

I tarantula. 
BUREAU OF FISHERIES, Washington, D. C. 

33 fishes — Alaska. 
BURLEIGH, N. A., Chicago. 

6 beetles — • Chicago. 
CALVIN, DAVID, Chicago. 

I Carolina rail — Chicago. 
CARPENTER, C. H., Chicago. 

3 dragon flies — Chicago. 
CARR, MALEN K., Chicago. 

I tarantula — San Antonio, Texas. 
CHAVES, DIOCLESIANA, Managua, Nicaragua. 

21 toads, 3 frogs, 30 lizards, 3 snakes — Nicaragua. 

70 fishes — Nicaragua. 
CHATHAM, DR., Olive Branch, Illinois. 

I beetle. 
CHOPE, E. B., Chicago. 

16 beetles — New York and New Jersey. 
COALE, H. K., Highland Park, Illinois. 

9 bird skins — Australia (exchange). 

I hawk, I plover — • Hungary. 
DEARBORN, N., Chicago. 

I moth — Chicago. 
DERBY, WILLIAM M., Chicago. 

1 hybrid duck — English Lake, Indiana. 

2 shoveller ducks, i wood duck — English' Lake, Indiana. 
DEWEY, C. L., Chicago. 

I bull snake — Joliet, IlUnois. 
DITZEL, H, F., Chicago. 

I water beetle. 
DOHMEN, U. A., Chicago. 

I bumblebee — Chicago. 



150 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

DUNLAP. C. R.. Goldfield. Nevada. 

I shield-back grasshopper — Goldfield, Nevada. 
FERRY. J. P.. Chicago. 

I gray squirrel — Lake Forest, Illinois. 

1 fo.x squirrel, i woodchuck, i hoary bat — Lake Forest. Illinois. 

I grasshopper — Beach, Illinois. 
FIELD MUSEU.M OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by C. E. Akeley: 

I snake — Joliet, Illinois. 
Collected by C. M. Barl>er: 

100 fishes — South Chicago, Illinois. 

94 specimens beetles, bugs, centipedes, etc., — Olive Branch and 
Cairo. Illinois. 

I frog — Chicago. 

28 salamanders, 52 toads. 25 frogs, 44 snakes, 9 lizards, i turtle 

— Olive Branch, Illinois. 

I large alligator snapping turtle — Cairo, Illinois. 

II turtles, 4 lizards, 29 snakes, 47 frogs, 128 toads, 21 salamanders 

— Olive Branch, Illinois. 

I white footed mouse — Olive Branch, Illinois. 

1 turtle, 5 toads, 7 snakes, 6 frogs, i salamander — Waukegan, 

Illinois. 
Collected by E. B. Chope: 

1227 millipedes, centipedes, spiders. lar%\-E, bugs, grasshoppers, flies, 

bees, wasps and beetles — Chicago. 
Collected by N. Dearborn: 

2 salamanders and young embryos — Tilton, New Hampshire. 
10 snakes — Longwood, Illinois. 

Collected by C. L. Dewey: 

10 fishes — Joliet. Illinois. 
Collected by J ^^ Ferry: 

I grav squirrel — Olive Branch, Illinois. 

169 bird skins — Illinois and Indiana. 

3 ducks, 7 quails, 4 blackbirds, 12 woodpeckers, 10 sparrows, 43 war- 

blers, 12 flycatchers. 15 wrens and chickadees, 17 vireos, 11 
others — Southern Illinois. 
I duck, I heron, 2 hawks, 6 snipes, 2 cuckoos, 5 flycatchers, 2 canager 
and vireo, 6 sparrows, 12 warblers, i chickadee, 3 thrushes 

— Lake County, Illinois. 
Collected by William J. Gerhard: 

454 dragonflies, grasshoppers, roaches, bugs, butterflies, moths, beetles, 

flies, bees, wasps and parasites, etc., — Illinois and Indiana. 
614 dragon flies, ner\'e-wings, grasshoppers, bugs, butterflies, moths, 

Ixjctles, flies, bee.s, wasps. i)arasites, etc. — Illinois and Indiana. 
I gopher snake — Palos Park, Illinois. 
Collected by E. Heller 

128 mammal skins, 23 mammals in formalin — Southern Illinois. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 157 

I water beetle, 9 fleas, 24 ticks — Illinois. 

I blind fish — Golconda, Illinois. 

16 lizards, 3 snakes, i toad, i frog — Southern Illinois. 

40 turtles — Golconda, Illinois. 

no specimens of mammals — Illinois. 

36 turtles — Riverside, California. 

40 rodent skins — California. 

I lizard — Riverside, California. 

125 rodent skins, 25 alcoholic rodents — Northern Wisconsin. 

I pileated woodpecker — Ozark, Illinois. 

1 ruffed grouse, i pileated woodpecker, 5 hairy woodpeckers — Wis- 

consin. 
Collected by S. E. Meek: 

200 fishes — Wolf Lake and Lake George, Indiana. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

314 shells, I tree toad — Bahamas. 

50 weevils. 
Collected by H. S. Swarth: 

4 beetles — Joliet, Illinois. 
Collected by British East African Expedition, 1905-1907: 

6 specimens Cape buffalo — Kenya Province and Kijabe. 

8 specimens lion — Molo and Athi Plains. 

6 specimens eland — Kenya Province and Athi Plains. 

6 specimens topi — Molo. 

7 specimens wildebeste — Athi Plains. 

10 specimens and skull Jackson's hartebeste — Molo. 

10 specimens Coke's hartebeste — Athi Plains. 

2 specimens hartebeste — Naivasha and Kijabe. 

4 specimens Neuman's hartebeste — Nakuro and Elementeita. 

6 specimens and skull Dafassa's waterbuck — Elementeita. 

7 specimens waterbuck — Kenya Province and Athi Plains. 
13 specimens impalla — Athi Plains and Elementeita. 

16 specimens Grant's gazelle — Athi Plains. 

16 specimens Thompson's gazelle — Athi Plains. 

1 1 specimens bushbuck — Elementeita, Aberdare Mountains and 

Nairobi. 
13 specimens klipspringer — Athi Plains. 

9 specimens reedbuck — Molo and Elementeita. 

12 specimens Chanler's reedbuck — Athi Plains. 

10 specimens duiker — Aberdare Mountains, Elementeita, Kenya 

Province and Molo. 

9 specimens Zanzibar antelope — Mt. Kenya and Kijabe. 

10 specimens steinbok — Athi Plains, Molo and Kenya Province. 

8 specimens dik dik — Elementeita and Kijabe. 

7 specimens baboon — Athi Plains, Gil Gil, Aberdare Mountains and 

Kijabe. 
24 specimens monkeys — Kijabe, Athi Plains, Tana River. 

5 specimens zebra — Athi Plains. • 



158 Field Museum 01 Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

3 specimens ohetah — At hi I'lains. 

3 specimens Icdpanl - Ahcnlare Mountains and Athi Plains. 

5 specimens serval — Ahcrdare Mountains. Moln, Athi Plains and 

Elcmenteita. 

specimens sprinjjhaas — Elementeita ami Athi Plains. 

14 specimens jackal — Athi Plains, Kijabe and Ivlemcntcita. 

2O specimens jjenet — Mt. Kenya, Voi, Molo, Athi Plains. Kijabe and 
Elementeita. 

18 specimens monjjoose. — Athi Plains, Kijabe, Molu, .\aivasha, Mt. 
Kenya, and Aberdare Mountains. 

41 specimens hyrax — Athi Plains, Kijabe, Naivasha. Gil Gil, Ele- 
menteita. Molo and Mt Kenya. 

3 specimens wild do^ — - Athi Plains and Voi 

6 specimens wart hoy — Elementeita. Athi Pl.iins .md Kenya Province. 

1 specimen rhinosceros — Kijabe. 

2 specimens hippopotamus — Elementeita. 
I specimen porcupine — Athi Plains. 

1 specimen ratel — Elementeita. 
I specimen striped hyena — Voi. 
8 specimens Shamba rat — .Mt. Kenya. 

1 specimen and i neck and head j^iraffe — .\thi Plains and Voi. 

2 specimens and i skull elephant — Mt. Kenya and .Vberdare .Vloun- 

tains. 

1 specimen galago — Voi. 

2 specimens snakes — Elementeita and Voi. 
693 specimens bird skins. 

I specimen ostrich. 

252 specimens tish. 

265 specimens toads, frogs, lizards, chameleons, snakes and turtles. 

720 specimens small mammals. 

353 specimens insects. 

I rhinosceros horn, i set eggs Secretary bird. 

I skeleton Cape buflfalo, i skeleton lion, i skeleton giraffe, i skeleton 
Jackson's hartebeste, i skeleton topi, 1 skeleton Grant's gazelle, 
I skeleton Chanler's reedbuck, 2 skeletons klipspringer. i skele- 
ton Zanzibar antelope, i skeleton baboon. 2 skeletons monkev, 
I skeleton springhaas. i skeleton serval. i skeleton genet, i skele- 
ton mongoose, 2 skeletons hyrax. pufT adder, 4 specimens flamingo. 

1 death mask of buffalo, zebra, Jackson's hartebeste. Coke's hartebeste, 

eland, impalla. stcinbok. duiker, baboon, hyrax. 2 of topi, 3 of 
gazelle, 2 of bushbuck, 2 of klipsjjringer, 2 of monkey, i entire 
chetah. 
Purchases: 

37 birdskins — various localities. 

2 wildcats, I skunk. 

18 bird skins — Philippine Islands. 

I female passenger pigeon. 

12; bird skins — Central and South .\merica. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 159 

5 bird skins — California. 

2 bird skins — Philippine Islands. 

I alligator — Florida. 

31 bird skins — Costa Rica. 

I egg of brant goose — McGary Island, Greenland. 

7 bird skins — various localities. 

I gorilla skin and skeleton — West Africa. 

4000 shells — various localities. 

I Martha's Vinej^ard prairie hen — Massachusetts. 

1 goose, I duck, 3 night-hawks, i sparrow — various localities. 
FISCHER, E. J., Chicago. 

10 mammal skins, 5 mammal skeletons — Luxemburg, Iowa. 

2 varying hares, 5 meadow mice, i spermophile — Luxemburg, Iowa. 
FIX, WILLIAM J., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I beetle. 
GARDNER, C. A., Chicago. 

I saw fly — Chicago. 
GOODRICH, A. W., Chicago. 

I water dog — Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 
GOOS, MISS EMMA, Davenport, Iowa. 

1 series shells illustrating the mantifacture of pearl buttons. 
GRINNELL, J., Pasadena, California. 

5 chipmunks, i golden-headed spermophile, 5 pocket gophers, 2 
meadow voles, i wood rat — California (exchange). 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

2 garter snakes, 2 water snakes — Hamlin Lake, Michigan. 

48 specimens moths, beetles, bugs, crickets, spiders, parasites, etc, 

— various localities. 
HENDERSON, J., Boulder, Colorado. 

11 shells — Colorado. 
HILL, C, Chicago. 

2 snakes, i salamander — Clark Junction, Indiana. 
HOWELL, W., Chicago. 

I striped gopher — Marquette Park, Chicago. 
LANSING, O. E. Jr., Chicago. 

I beetle — Chicago. 
MARSH, DWIGHT, Hugo, Colorado. 

4 rattlesnakes • — Colorado. 
McINTYRE, G., Walworth, Wisconsin. 

68 moths — Walworth, Wisconsin. 
MEEK, S. E., Chicago. 

I bug — Chicago. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

36 spiders — Ephraim, Wisconsin. 
MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

27 spiders, grasshoppers, moths, beetles, flies, bees and parasites 

— Illinois. 



i6o Field Museum of Xatikai. History — Reports. Vol. III. 

NWTIONAL MUSEUM OF COSTA RICA. San Jose. Costa Rica. 

26 fishes — Costa Rica. 
9 fishes — Costa Rica. 

43 fishes — Costa Rica. 

16 fishes — Costa Rica. 

7 lizards — Costa Rica. 

39 fishes — Costa Rica. 

19 fishes — Costa Rica. 
NATIONAL MUSKUM, PARIS, FRANCE. 
131 fishes — Costa Rica ^exchange). 
O'SHAUGHNESSY. J. P.. Chicago. 

1 hair worm — Chicago. 
PRICE. MRS. ABNER. Chicago. 

41 mounted birds — lUinois and Indiana. 
REED. MISS. Honolulu. 

160 shells — Honolulu. 
RING. H. A.. Chicago. 

2 sponges. 2 hydroids — Cape Nome, Alaska. 
ROSENBAUM, W. M., Chicago. 

I humming bird moth — Chicago. 
SMITH. CASSIUS. Chicago. 

3 beetles — Mexico. 
SWARTH, H. S.. Chicago. 

I moth — Chicago. 
TIEMAN. B.. Chicago. 

I beetle, 3 flies — Chicago. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM. Washington, D. C. 

90 fishes — Philippine Islands. 
WARKE, MARGARET, Chicago. 

I salamander — Chicago. 
WISCONSIN NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY. Madison. Wisconsin. 

9 fishes — Lake Pekin. Wisconsin. 
WOLCOTT. A. B.. Chicago. 

I grasshopper. 7 bees and parasites. 3 flies — Palos Park. Illinois. 
WOODRUFF. F. M., Chicago. 

I lizard. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

DORSEY. GEORGE A.. Chicago. 

1 5 negatives of landscapes and general views — Peru. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C E. Akeley : 

623 negatives of general views, portraits, etc. — British East Africa. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

3,777 negatives, 5.S1S prints. 731 lantern slides, 85 enlargements. 274 
negatives developed. 






OF THt 
awrvf^RstTY nF liiiNOiS 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PL. XXVI. 




I 



Skull of Indian Elephant (F.lff<has maximus) about 4M Years of Age. 



The cranial bones are entirely disarticulated, spaced, and mounted in tlieir 
relative positions for study purposes. The cranium is hinged, and may be tipped 
back to facilitate the study of the sphenoid and basiuccipital bones. The two 
superior maxillary bones rotate, exposing the palatine and dental surface. 

The superior and inferior maxillary on the right side are cut away, exposing the 
roots of the teeth, displaying their character, development, and succession. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 161 

Made by O. C. Farrington: 

24 negatives of landscapes. 
Made by J. F. Ferry: 

74 negatives of general views and bird nests. 
Made by E. Heller: 

8 negatives, general views. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh: 

54 negatives of landscapes and general views — Bahamas. 
Made by H. H. Smith: 

12 negatives of trees — Chicago. 
Purchases: 

98 prints of Sun Dance at Fort Belknap, Montana. 

ig prints of Hupa Indians — Areata, California. 

THE LIBRARY. 
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 

(ACCESSION'S ARE BY EXCHANGE UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED.) 

ACIREALE REALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy. 

Rendiconti e memorie, ser. 3a, v. 1-4, 1901-1904. 
ADAMS, FRANK D., Montreal, Canada. 

3 pamphlets. 
ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, Alabama. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALABAMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Montgomery, Alabama. 

Bulletin, no. 9. 
ALASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Sitka, Alaska. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALBANY MUSEUM, Grahamstown, South Africa. 

Records, v. 2, pt. i. 
ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

2 pamphlets. 
AMBROSETTI, JUAN B., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

I pamphlet. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Proceedings, v. 18, pts. 1-2. 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FORESTRY ASSOCIATION, Washington, D. C. 

Forestry and irrigation, current numbers. 
AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



i62 Field Museum of Xatukal History — Reports, Vol. III. 

AMERICAN' INSTITUTE OF HOMEOPATHY. New York City. 

Transactions, vs. 1-2. loof) (gift). 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS. New York City. 

OtViccrs, members, rules, etc., 1907. 

Transactions, v. 37. 

2 pamphlets. 

AMERICAN INVENTOR. New York City. 

Journal, v. 16, nos. 1-2. 
AMERICAN LUMBERMAN. Chicago. 

Annual statistics, no. 34, iqo6 (gift). 
AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, Chicago. 

Tliinl annual conference, 1907 (gift). 
AMERICAN MINING CONGRESS. Denver, Colorado. 

Papers and addresses, annual meeting, 1906. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. New York City. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Anthropological papers, v. i, pt. 3. 

Bulletin, v. iS, pt. 4; v. 22. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Memoirs, v. 11. pt. 2. 

63 pamphlets. 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY. New Haven, Connecticut. 

Journal, v. 27. pt. 2; v. 28, pt. i. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia. 

Proceedings, current nuniliers. 
AMERICAN VANADIUM COMPANY. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

3 blue prints. 

6 pamphlets (gift). 

AMES BOTANICAL LABORATORY, Easton. Massachusetts. 
Contributions, nos. 4, 6. 

7 separates. 

AMSTERDAM, K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN. Amsterdam. 
Netherlands. 

Proceedings, v. 9. 

Verhandlingen, v. 13. nos. 1-3. 

Verslagen, v. 15. 
AMSTERDAM UNIVERSITEIT BIBLIOTHEEK. Amsterdam. Netherlands. 

Aanwinsten. 
ANGERS. SOCIETE NATURELLE D'AGRICULTURE. SCIENCES ET 
ARTS, Angers, France. 

Mdmoires, ser. 5. v. 9. 1906. 
ANNALES DES NHNES, Paris. France. 

Annales, current numbers. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 
London. 

Journal, current numbers. 
.\RCHITECTS' AND BUILDERS' MAGAZINE COMPANY, New York City. 

Magazine, current numbers. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 163 

ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONSWISSEXSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany. 

Archiv, v. 10. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, no. 17, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 
Arkansas. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Memoirs, v. 2, nos. 1-4. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ATKINSON, GEORGE F., Ithaca, New York. 

I pamphlet. 
AUGSBURG-NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR SCHWA- 
BEN UND NEUBURG, Augsburg, Bavaria. 

Bericht, 1906. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Memoirs, v. 4, no. 10. 

Record, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 

Special catalogue, v. 2, pt. 2. 
BARRELL, JOSEPH, New Haven, Connecticut. 

I reprint. 
BASEL NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland. 

Verhandlungen, v. 18, pt. 3; v. 19, pt. i. 
BAYERISCHE BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany. 

Berichte, Bd. 11, 1907. 

Mittheilungen, current numbers. 
BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Bel- 
fast, Ireland. 

Report and proceedings, 1905-6. 
BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
BERGENS MUSEUM, Bergen, Nor^^ay. 

Aarbog, 1906. 

Aarsberetning, 1906. 

Meeresfauna van Bergen, vs. 1-3. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOL., ETHNOL., 
UND URGS., Berlin, Germany. 

General register, vs. 21-34 (1889-1902). 

Zeitschrift fiir Ethnologic, current numbers. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, Bd. 12. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 



i64 Field Museum oi- Xaturai. History — Reports, Vol. III. 

hi: RM\. K. HIBLIOTHKK. Berlin. Gennany. 

Jahrcsbericht, igof)-;. 

Jahresverzeichnis. vs. 20, 21. 
HKKLIX. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN LXD MUSEIM. Berlin. Germany. 

N'otizMatt, nos. 30, 40. 
BI;KI.1.\. KOMGLirilE MUSEUM EUR VOLK I- R KU.VDi: , Berlin. Ger- 
many. 

Veroffentliche, v. 12. 
BERLIN'. K. PREUSSICHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN. Ber- 
lin. Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte. current numbers. 
BERLI.V. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE. Berlin. Germany. 

Zeitschrift. current numbers. 
BERLIN'. ZOULOGISCIIES-MUSEUM. Berlin. Germany. 

Berichte. 1906. 

Mitleilunj^en, current numbers. 
BERN IIOCHSCHULE BIBLIOTIIEK. Bern. Switzerland. 

10 dissertations. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM. Honolulu. II. I. 

Occasional papers, v. 3. no. i. 
BIRMINGHAM NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. 
Birmingham. England. 

Proceedings, v. 12. no. i. 
BLACK DIAMOND COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY. Bombay. India 

Journal, current numbers. 
BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn. Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte. 1906. 

Verhandkuigen. vs. 1-63. 1S44-1906. 
BORDEAUX SOCIETE LINNEENE. Bordeaux. France. 

Procbs-verbaux. 1906. 
BORDELEBEN. KARL. Jena. Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 
BOSTON BOOK COMPANY. Boston. Massachusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. Bnst.-n, .Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 31, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

I pamphlet. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY. Boston. .Massachusetts. 

Annual list of books, 1905-6. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, .Massachusetts. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of Director. 165 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

President's report, 1905-6. 

Yearbook, 1907-8. 
BOWDITCH, CHARLES P., Boston, Massachusetts. 

2 pamphlets. 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine. 

Report of the president, 1906-7. 
BRANDENBURG BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenburg, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 48. 
BRANDSTETTER, RENWARD, Lucerne, Switzerland. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
BRAZIL, VITAL, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, Germany. 

Abhandlungen, Bd. 19, heft i. 
BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Annual report, no. 25, 1906. 
BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England. 

Report, 1905-6. 
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, London. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London. 

Report, 1906. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA, DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report, 1906. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, Victoria, B. C. 

Sessional papers, 1906, 1907 (gift). 
BRITISH MUSEUM, London. 

Annual return, 1906-7. 

Catalogue lepidoptera phalaenae, v. 6. 

Catalogue madreporarian corals, v. 6. 

Synomic catalogue orthoptera, v. 2. 
BROGGER, W. C, Christiania, Norway. 

Die mineralien der Siidnorwegischen granitpegmatitgange. 

2 pamphlets. 

BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, New York- 
Museums' news, current numbers. 

Prospectus, 1907-8. 

Report of the museums, 1906. 

Science bulletin, current numbers. 

Yearbook, no. 18, 1905-6. 
BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUSSELS. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES DES LETTRES ET 
DES BEAUX-ARTS, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



i66 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

BRUSSELS. IN'STITUTS SOLVAV. Brussels. Belgium. 

Travaux dc I'lnstitut de Sociolopie. Notes anfl m(?moires, fasc. •^-4. 
BRUSSELS. MUSEE ROVALE D'lllSTOiRE .\ATURELLE. Brussels. 
Belgium. 

.M<5moires. t. 3. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHE'OLnr.IE. Brussels. Belgium. 

Annales, current numbers. 

Annuaire, v. 18, 1907. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE, Brussels. Belgium. 

Bulletin, vs. 35-43, 1897-1005. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE ROYALE LIN'NEENE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRY.V MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr. Pennsylvania. 

Monographs, reprint ser. v. 6. 

Program, 1907-8. 

Views of academic building. 
BUENOS AIRES. DEUTSCHE AKADEMIEVEREINIGUNG. Buenos Aires. 
Brazil. 

Veroffentlichungen, 1899-1904. 
BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Brazil. 

Anales, ser. 3. ts. i, 8. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York. 

Annual report, no. 10, 1906. 
BUFFALO SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCE. Buffalo, New York. 

Bulletin, v. 7. no. 4. 
BUITENZORG. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Huiten- 
zorg, Java. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BUNAU-VARILLA. P., Paris. France. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta. India. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Berkeley. Cali- 
fornia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento. California. 

Biennial report, 1904-6. 

Occasional papers, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE .MINING BUREAU, San Francisco. California. 

Bulletin, nos. 30-2, 36, 38. 40-44- 

Maps and registers of 16 counties. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY. Berkeley. California. 

Publications, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY. Cambridge. England. 

List of members and publications. 1906. 1907. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE. MUSEUMS AND LECTURE ROOM SYNDICATE. Cam- 
bridge, England. 

Annual report, no. 41, 1906. 



i 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 167 

CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

List of Fellows, 1907. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Cambridge, England. 

Report of Library syndicate, 1906. 
CANADA. BOTANICAL CLUB, Montreal, Canada. 

Bibliography, 1905. 

Report, 1905-6. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Ottawa, Canada. 
Geological Survey: 

Publications, 132, 412, 423, 425-6, 429, 434, 436-7, 438-441, 447-450, 

453-454- 

Summary report, 1905-6. 

12 maps. 

4 pamphlets. 
Report on Indian affairs, 1906. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, ser. 2. v. 12, pt. i. 
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape Town, 
South Africa. 

Government biologist's report, 1906. 

Journal, current numbers. 
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. GEOLOGICAL COMMISSION, Cape Town, South 
Africa. 

Annual report, nos. 10, 11, 1905, 1906. 

3 maps. 
CARDIFF NATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales. 

Transactions, v. 39. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D. C. 

Yearbook, no. 5, 1907. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Annual report, no. 10, 1906-7. 

Memoirs, current numbers. 
CARPENTER, G. H., Dublin, Ireland. 

Irish naturalist, current numbers. 
CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Tunis, Africa. 

Revue tunisienne, nos. 60-65. 
CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und bericht, 1906. 
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, Washington, D. C. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

I dissertation. 
CATTELL, J. McKEAN, New York City. 

I reprint. 



i6S Field Museum oi- N'aturai. Historv — Reports, Vol. III. 

(AX rt^N riAH. Chicago. 

Amnial report, list f)f members, etc., 1907. 
CEYLON AGRICULTLRAL SOCIETY, Colomlx). India. 

Journal, current numbers. 
CEYLON ROYAL RlVJANICAL CAR DENS, IVradeniya, Ceylon. India. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numl>ers. 
CHARLEVILLE CHAMHRE DE COMMERCE, Charleville, France. 

Procis-verbau.x des s«5anccs, 1906. 
CIIEESEMAN, T. F., Wellinjjton, New Zealand. 

I pamphlet. 

CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 

Natural History Survey bulletins, no. 4, pt. 2; no. 6. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, v. i. no. i. 

I I catalogues. 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Chicago. 

Report, 1906. 

4 pamj'hlets. 
CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY. Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 34. iqo6. 

6 pamphlets. 
CHICAGO UNIYERSITY. Chicago. 

Annual register. 1907-8. 

Botanical gazette, current numbers. 

Journal of geology, current numbers. 

President's report, 1905-6. 

University record, current numbers. 

18 dissertations. 

I pamphlet. 
CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago de Chile. 

Publications, 31 volumes. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 26. 1906. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Annual list of books, 1906. 

Library leaflet, current numbers. 
CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Catalogue. 1906-7. 

Record, current numbers. 

Studies, current numbers. 
CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester. Massachusetts. 

American journal of psychology, v. 17. 

Publications, v. 2, pts. 1-5. 



( 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 169 

CLAUSTHAL. K. BERGAKADEMIE. Clausthal, Germany. 

Festschrift, 1907. 

Program, 1907-8. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 38, 1906. 

Open shelf, current numbers. 
COLBY COLLEGE, Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

Mines and minerals, current numbers. 
COLLINGE, WALTER E., Birmingham, England. 

4 pamphlets. 
COLMAR. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Colmar, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, 1905-6. 
COLN. STADTISCHES MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Cologne, Ger- 
many. 

Fiihrer, 1906. 
COLOMBO MUSEUM, Ceylon, India. 

Reports, 1906. 

Spolia zeylanica, current numbers. 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Studies, science ser., current numbers. 
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado. 

Catalogue, 1906-8. 
COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
COLORADO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, Denver, Colorado. 

Eighth biennial report, 1905-6. 
COLORADO STATE HISTORICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 
Denver, Colorado. 

Report, 1904-6. 
COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado. 

Studies, current numbers. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York City. 

Contributions from the geological department, v. 8, nos. 60-61; v. 
13, nos. 116-118, 120-125, 127-130; V. 17, nos. 1-9. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
CONNECTICUT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Transactions, v. 12, v. 13, pp. 1-297. 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Annual report, no. 30, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



170 Field Museum of Nattkal History — Reports, Vol. III. 

CONNECTICUT. CO.M.MISSIONERS OF FISHERIES AND GAME. Hart- 
ford. Connecticut. 

Report, 1905-6. 
CONNECTICUT. STATE GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 
SURVEY. Hartford, Connecticut. 

Bulletin, nos. 0-9. 
COOK, M. T., New York Citv. 

10 pamphlets. 
COOPER UNION FOR THIC Al )VANCE.MENT OF SCIENCE AND ART. 
New York City. 

Annual report, no. 48, 1907. 
COPENHAGEN NATURHISTORISKE FORENING, Copenhagen. Denmark. 

\'i(lenskal>cli.i,'C. iqo6. 
COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY. MUSEU.M DE .MINERALOGIE ET DE 
• GEOLOGIE. Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Communications: g^ologiques. no. i. 

pal«5ontoIogique.s, no. 7. 
COPENHAGEN. STORE KONGELIGE BIBLIOTHEK. Copenhagen. Den- 
mark. 

Katalog, 1906. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, New York. 

Librarian 's report, 1900-6. 
COULTER. STANLEY AND DORNER. H. B., Lafayette. Indiana. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
CRACJIN, F. W., Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

American geologist, vs. 7, 9, 11, 13-17. 

Catalogue of the British fossil vertebrata. 

Etudes sur les mammifbres fossiles de Sausan. par Filhol. 

Geological magazine, London, dec. 3. vs. 7-8. 

Memoirs of geological survey of England and Wales, 1875. 1882. 
CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPHS-UNIVERSITAT, Czemowitz. Aus- 
tria. 

7 reports. 
DARMSTADT VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany. 

Notizblatt, 1906. 
DAVENPORT ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Davenport. Iowa. 

Proceedings, v. 11. pp. 1-124. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERI.MENT STATION. 
Newark, Delaware. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, current numV)ers. 
DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio. 

Bulletin, rurrent numbers. 
DETROIT .MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit. Michigan. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report. 1906. 



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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 171 

DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, no. 42, 1906. 

Books added in 1906 (Bulletin no. 18). 
DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 

Monatsschrift, vs. 3-7. 

Zeitschrift, v. 58, 59; nos. 1-3. 
DEWIT, ALBERT, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
DIAL PUBLISHLNG COMPANY, Chicago. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DIXON, ROLAND B., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

4 reprints. 
DONALDSON, HENRY H., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

3 pamphlets. 
DOUGLASS, EARL. 

I pamphlet. 
DRESDEN. GENERAL DIREKTION DER KONIGLICHEN SAMMLUN- 
GEN, Dresden, Germany. 

Bericht liber die verwaltung und vermehrung der Koniglichen Samm- 
lungen. 
DRESDEN. KONIG. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCHE- 
ETHNOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und berichte, Bd. i, nos. 1-5. 
DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 
Dresden, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, 1906. 
DUBLIN INSTITUTIONS OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, Ireland. 

Report of the director, 1905-6, 1906-7. 

8 guides. 
DUC DE LOUBAT, Paris, France. 

3 excerpts. 
EAKLE, ARTHUR T., Berkeley, California. 

I excerpt. 
EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY, 
Canterbury, England. 

Transactions, v. 5, no. 4. 
EDINBURGH. GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Transactions, v. 9, no. i. 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Report, 1906. 
EDINBURGH ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 
ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

Charter and bylaws, 1906, 1907. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 



i;-' Field Museum of Xatukal History — Reports, Vol. III. 

ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY. Baltimore. Maryland. 

Bulk-tin. current numl>ers. 

Report, no. 21, 1006. 
ESSEX INSTITUTE. Salem. Nfassachusetts. 

Collections, quarterly. 
KVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, Illinois. 

Annual report, no, 34, 1Q06-7. 
FARRINGTON. O. C. Chicago. 

4 pamphlets (gift). 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATU ).\. Lake City. Florida. 

Bulletin, current numl>ers 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 
FOLK-LORE SOCIETY. London. England. 

Jamaican st)ng and story, by Walter Jekyll. 

Popular poetr>' of the Baloches, by M. Longworth Dames. 
FORD. \V. E., New Haven, Connecticut. 

7 pamj>hlets. 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FRIBOURG SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Fribourg, Switzer- 
land. 

Publications, current numbers. 
FRIEDERICI, GEORG, Kiel, Germany. 

Die schiffahrt der Indianer. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN. Berlin, Germany. 

Naturas novitates. current numbers. 
FRITSCH, KARL. Gratz. Austria. 

6 pamphlets. 
FURBRINGER. M., Heidelberg. Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
FURLONG. EUSTACE L., Auburn, California. 

I pamphlet. 
FUR TRADE REVIEW. New York City. 

Fur trade directory. 1907-8 (gift). 
GADOW. HANS. Cambridge. England. 

Evolution in Mexican lizards (gift). 
GENEVE. SOCIETE I)E PHYSIQUE ET DHISTOIRE NATURELLE. 
Geneve, Switzerland. 

Compte rendu des sciences, v. 23. 

M^moire, current numbers. 
GENOA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA NATURALE. Genoa. Italy. 

Annali. ser. 3, v. 2. 
GENNEP, ARNOLD VAN. Paris. France. 

4 pamphlets. 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA. Rochester. New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 173 

GEORGIA. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bulletin, no. 13. 
GERHARD, W. J., Chicago. 

11 pamphlets (gift). 

GIESSEN. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany. 

9 inaugural dissertations. 
GIGLIO-TOS, ERMANNO, Cagliari, Italy. 

10 pamphlets. 

GIZA. ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, Giza, Egypt. 

Report, 1906. 
GLASGOW. NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Transactions, v. 7, no. 3. 
GOETTE, A., Strassburg, Germany. 

I publication. 
GOTEBORG K. VETENSKAPS-OCH VITTERHETS, Samhalle, Sweden. 

Handlingar, vs. 7-9. 
GOTTINGEN. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Germany. 

12 reports. 

GREAT BRITAIN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London. 

Summary of progress, 1905, 1906. 
HAARLEM. STADSBIBLIOTHEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1906. 
HABANA UNIVERSIDAD, Havana, Cuba. 

Revista, current numbers. 
HAMBURG. BOTANISCHE STAATSINSTITUTE, Hamburg, Germany. 

Jahresberichte, 1905. 

Mitteilungen, 1905. 
HAMBURG. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hamburg, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, B. 22. 
HAMBURG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Hamburg, Germany. 

Bericht, 1905. 

Jahresbuch d. Hamburgwissenschaft, v. 23. 
HANNOVER. STADT-BIBLIOTHEK, Hannover, Germany. 

Nachtrag zum kataloge. 
HARDER, EDMUND C, Madison, Wisconsin. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HARTLAND, E. SYDNEY, Gloucester, England. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 

HARVARD COLLEGE. MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Memoirs, current numbers. 



174 FiKi.u Museum or Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

n.\RV.\Rl) UNIVIiRSlTV. CainhruiKf. MassachuscUs. 

Catalo);uc, 1906-7. 

OtTicial register, 1005-6. 
Gray Herbariuni 

Bulletin, oiimiu immbers. 
HASSE. C. Hreslan. C.ennany. 

I pamphlet. 
HATCH AC.RICULTL'RAL liXPKRIMK.NT STATION, Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Annual report, 1007. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Iiulex, bulletins and reports, 1S8S-1Q07. 
HAW.MI .M^RICULTURAL EXPERIMK.XT STATION, Honolulu, II. I. ' 

.\nnual report, 1006. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS' ASSOt'IATION. Honolulu. H I. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK. Heidelberg. Germany. 

3 1 inaugural dissertations. 
HEIN, WALTER, Munchen, Germany. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
HELLER. A. A , Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

Muhlenbergia, current numbers. 
HENRIKSEN. G.. Nystrand, Norway. 

1 pamphlet. 

HERMS, WILLIAM B,, Delaware. Ohio. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 

HERRICK, GLEN W.. Agricultural College, Mississippi. 

4 pamphlets. 
HIGINBOTHAM, HARLOW N.. Chicago. 

Miscellaneous publications, 28 volumes. 

E.xposition literature, 427 books and pamphlets (gift). 
HITCHCOCK, C. H., Burlington, Vermont. 

2 pamphlets. 
HOBBS. W H.. Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

7 pamphlets. 
HONOLULU. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE AND FOR- 
ESTRY, Honolulu, H. I. 

Hawaiian forester, current numbers. 
HORNIMAN .MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. Forest Hill. England. 

Annual report, no. 5, 1006 

Handbook, no. 7. 
HOVEY. EDMUND OTIS. New York City. 

7 pamphlets. 
HOWITT. A. W., Adelaide, N. S. W. 

2 pamphlets. 
IDAHO. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Moscow, Idaho. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 175 

IDAHO. STATE INSPECTOR OF MINES, Boise, Idaho. 

Annual report, no. 8, igo6. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois. 

Statistical reports, quarterly numbers. 
ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Bulletin, no. 4. 
ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois. 

Collections, v. 2. 

Publications, no. 11. 
ILLINOIS STATE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Illinois. 

Report, 1907. 

I pamphlet. 
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Studies, ar. 6-9. 
Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
INDIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

List of minerals in the museum, 1907. 

Memoirs, current numbers. 

Record, current numbers. 
INDIA, GOVERNMENT OF, Calcutta, India. 

Agricultural ledger, current numbers. 
General index, 1900-1905. 
INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

Alcyonarians of the deep sea, part i. 

Annual report, 1905-6. 
INDIANA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Proceedings, 1903, 1904, 1905. 
INDIANA. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Annual report, no. 31, 1906. 
INDIANA. STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Annual report, no. 17. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Inland printer, v. 38 (gift). 
INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, Washington, 
D. C. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
INTERNATIONAL RAILWAY CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Proceedings, v. 13. 
IOWA. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ames, Iowa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Report, V. 16, 1906. 



176 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

It )\V.\ HISTORIlAL DEPARTMEXT. Des Moines. Iowa 

Annals of Iowa, sor. 3, v. 7. 

Hicnni.1l report, no. 8. iqo6. 
IOWA STATE IK^RTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Dcs Moines. Iowa. 

Bulletin. Kjo; 

Transactions, v 41. iqoA. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY. Iowa City, Iowa. 

Calendar, 1906-7. 
lAF-KEL. OTTO. Orcifswald. Germany. 

26 pamphlets 
JAMAICA BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. PUBLIC GARDENS AND PLAN- 
TATIONS, Kingston. Jamaica. 

Annual reports. 1005-6, 1006-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY. Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 12. 1006. 
JOHNS H(~)PKINS UNIVERSITY. Baltimore. Maryland 

Circulars, current nuinbers. 
JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY. New York City. 

Journal, current numbers 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, v. 20, pt. 2. 
KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. Manhattan. Kansas. 

Annual report, no. 10. 1005-6. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Industrialist, current numbers. 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Biennial report, 1005-6. 
KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Topeka. Kansas. 

Biennial report, no. 15, 1905-6. 

I pamphlet. 
KANSAS UNIVERSITY. Lawrence. Kansas. 

Studies, science ser. . v 4. no?. 1-6. 
KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM. Tiflis. Russia. 

Mitteilungen. 1904. iQ05- vs. 1-2. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Le.xington. 
Kentucky. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KEW ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDENS. Kew. England. 

Bulletin and appendix, current numl>ers. 

OtTicial guide. 3rd ed. no. i. 
KIEL. KONIGLICHE UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK. Kiel. Germany. 

Bericht. 1906. 
KOCH-GRi'NBERG. THEODOR. Berlin. Germany. 

Indianertypen aus dem Amazonasgebiet. 

Sudamerikanische felszeichnungen. 

I excerpt. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 177 

KOENEN, V. A., Gottingen, Germany. 

3 pamphlets. 
KRAUSE, FRITZ, Leipzig, Germany. 

Die Pueblo-Indianer. 
KUKENTHAL, W., Breslau, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 

LAFONE, QUEVEDO S. A., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

2 pamphlets. 

LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION, 
Lake Mohonk, New York. 

Report, no. 13, 1907 (gift). 
LAMPE, E., Wiesbaden, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 

LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 
Report, 1906. 

LAUSANNE MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Lausanne, Switzerland. 

Report, 1906. 
LEAGUE OF AMERICAN MUNICIPALITIES, Chicago. 

Annual convention, no. 10, 1906. 
LEBRUN, HECTOR, Bruxelles, Belgium. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
LEHMANN-NITSCHE, R., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

1 pamphlet. 

LEIDEN. GEOLOGISCHE REICHS-MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Sammlungen, Bd. 8, nos. 3-4. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH MUSEUM, Leiden. Netherlands. 

Publications, ser. 2, no, 15. 

Verslag, 1905-6. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS MUSEUM VAN NATUURLIJKE HI3TORIE, Leiden, 
Netherlands. 

Leyden notes, v. 28, nos. 3-4; v. 29, no. i. 
LEIPZIG. K. SACHSISCHE GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Leipzig, Germany. 

Berichte, mathematisch-physische klasse, v. 58, nos. 6-8; v. 59, no. r. 

LEIPZIG. STADTISCHES MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Leipzig, Ger- 
many. 
Veroffentlichungen, heft i. 
LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY. Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia. 
Register, 1906-7. 
Report of president, 1906. 

2 pamphlets. 
2 theses. 

LEVALLOIS-PERRET. L 'ASSOCIATION DES NATURALISTES, Paris, 
France. 
Annales, 1899-1906. 
Bulletin 1906, nos. 3-4; 1907, nos. 1-2. 



178 Field Museum oi- Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

LEWIS INSTITUTI-:. ChicaRo. 

Kej;ister, 1006-7. 
LI.MA. Sc-)CIIi:DADGE()(;RAPniCA. Lima. Peru. 

Bolctin. vs. 18. 19. 
LTSnoA C'OLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon. Portugal. 

Brotcria, v. 5. 
LISUOA. R. ACADEMLX DES SCIENCES, Lislx)n. PortuRal. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LISB( )A. SOCIETE PORTUGAISE DE SCIENCES NATURELLES. Lisbon. 
Portugal. 

Bulletin, v. i. no. i. 
LIVERPOOL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. Liverpool. England. 

Prorceilinj^s, v. 10, pt. 3. 
LIVERPOOL .MARINE BIOLOGICAL S 1 AiloN. Liverpool. England. 

Annual report, no. 20. 

Proceedings and transactions, v. 20. 
LLOVD LIBRARY. Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Bulletin, no. 9. reproduction ser. no. 5. 

Mycological notes, nos. 24-26. 

2 pamphlets. 
LONDON GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. London. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. London. 

Journal, vs. 31-32. 
LONDON LINN^AN SOCIETY. London. 

Journal of botany, current numbers. 

Journal of zofilogy. current numbers. 

List, 1906-7. 1907-S. 

Proceedings, nos. 118. 119. 
LONDON ROYAL SOCIETY, London. 

Homy sponges, by Lendenfeld. 

Proceedings 1800-1830, 1837-1854, 1867-1896 (gift). 
LONDON SOCIETY OF ARTS. London. 

Journal, cvirrent numbers. 
LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. London. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Report. 1906. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Baton Rouge 
Ix)uisiana. 

Annual report, no. 19, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
LOUISIANA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Bulletin, no. 4. 
LOWELL OBSERVATORY. Flagstaff. Arizona. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
LCBECK. NATURHISTORISCHES MUSEUM. Lubeck, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, no. 21. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 179 

LUSCHAN, FELIX VON, Berlin, Germany. 

10 pamphlets. 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India. 

Report, 1905-6. 
MADRAS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MADRID. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Bibliogratia. 

Catalogo de retratos. 

Madrilena, 1601-1625. 
MADRID. REAL ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Memorias. v. 25. 

Revista, current numbers. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Annales, current numbers. 
MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, N. S. W. 

A critical revision of the genus eucalyptus, pt. 8. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

Bulletin (gift). 
MANCHESTER FIELD NATURALISTS' AND ARCH^OLOGISTS' 
SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 

Report and proceedings, 1906. 
MANCHESTER GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Manchester, England. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Man- 
chester, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England. 

Owens' College, publications. 
MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDUNG DER GESAMTEX 
NATURWIS., Marburg, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1906. 
MARBURG UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Chronik, 1906-7. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
Plymouth, England. 

Journal, v. 8, no. i. 
MARK, E. L., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Contributions from Zoological Laboratory, Harvard, nos. 175-177, 
179-185, 190. 
MARKS, A. L., Toledo, Ohio. 

19 pamphlets. 
MARSEILLES. L'INSTITUT COLONIAL, Marseilles, France. 

Annales, 2nd ser. v. 4. 



i8o Field Museum of Xatural History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

MARSEILLES. MUSEUM D'HLSTOIRE NATURELLE. Marseilles. France. 

Annalcs, v. lo. 
MARYLAND AU.RICULTIR.XL I- .\ I'lCRlM i:.\ 1' STATION. College Park. 
Maryland. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1906-7. 

Hulletin. current numbers. 
MARYLAND (;EOL()r,ICAL SURVEY, Baltimore. Maryland. 

14 publications (gift). 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE. Baltimore. Maryland. 

Annual report, no. 50. 1907-8. 
MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. Baltimore. Maryland. 

Report, no. 9, 1906. 
MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. Boston. Ma.ssachusetts. 

Transactions, 1007. pt. i. 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. Boston. Massachusetts. 

Technological quarterly, current numbers. 
MAURITIUS, COLONY OF FORESTS OFFICE, Port Louis, Africa. 

Annual report of Forests and gardens department, 1904. 1905. 
MEAD. CHARLES W.. New Y'ork City. 

I pamphlet. 
MEEK. S. E., Chicago. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY. Victoria. Australia. 

Calendar, 1Q07. 
.MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico. Mexico. 

Boletin, nos. 29-36. 
MEXICO. DIRECCIOn" GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mexico 

4 publications. 
.MEXICO. INSTITUTO BIBLIOGRAFICO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, vs. 4-5. 
MEXICO INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico. Mexico. 

Boletin, no. 24. 
.MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL. Mexico. Mexico. 

Anales, current numbers. 
MEXICO. RED METEOR Y REVISTA CIENTIFICA, Toluca. Mexico. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
MEYER, A. B., Gries, Austria. 

I reprint. 
MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. Ann Arbor. Michigan. 

Report. V. 8. 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT Sr.\TION. Agricultural 
College, Michigan. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton. Michigan. 

Yearbook. 1006-7. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY'. Ann Arbor. Michigan. 

Calendar. 1906-7. 

Report. University museum. 1905-6. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 181 

MILLS, WILLIAM C, Columbus, Ohio. 

"Certain mounds and village sites in Ohio," v. i. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

80 pamphlets (gift). 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Annual report, no. 25. 
MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Annual report, no. 17. 

List of aflditions, no. 6. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. Anthony's 
Park, Minnesota. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Mississippi. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, JefJerson City, Missouri. 

Biennial report, 1905-6. 

Report, V. 5, ser. 2. 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Collections, current numbers. 

Review, v. i. 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri. 

Studies, sci. ser., current numbers. 
MONTANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Bozeman, Montana. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
MONTANA UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana. 

Bulletin, geological ser. no. 2. 

Register, 1906-7. 

Reports, 1905-6. 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Moundville revisited, etc. 
MOSCOW. SOCIETE IMPERIALS DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, Russia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

M^moires, current numbers. 
MUNCHEN. BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munchen, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, v. 2, pt. i. 
MUNCHEN. K. B. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Munchen, Ger- 
many. 

Sitzungsberichte, B. 35. 
MUNN & COMPANY, New York City. 

Scientific American, current numbers (gift). 



i82 FiELU Misi-iM f)K Xah-kai. History — Reports. Voi,. III. 

MUSEE DU CONGO. Bnixcllcs. Belgium. 

Annalos, current numbers. 
MUSEE GLIMET. Paris. France. 

Annales. vs. aa, 23. 
MUSEE TEYLER. Haarlem. Netherlands. 

Archives, sec. 3. v. 11, pt. i 
MUSEO DE LA PLATA. La Plata. Arj,'cntina. 

Annali's; l>otanica. v. i. 

paleontolopia, v. 5. 

Revist.i. v II. 
MUSEV GOELDI DE HISTORIA NAITRAL E ETIL\OGRAPHL\. Para. 
Brazil. 

Album lie aves Amazonica, fasc. 3. 

Arburctum Amazonicum, ist and 2nd decade. 
MYI:RS. \V. S., New York City. 

3 pamphlets. 
NAPOLI R. AClWDEMLV DELLE SCIEXZE. Naples. Italy. 

Atti. current numbers. 

Reiuliconti. current numbers. 
NASSAULSCHER VERELN FUR NATURKUNDE, Wiesbaden. Germany. 

Jahrbuch. v. 50. 
NAIAL BOTANIC (GARDENS AND COLONIAL HKKH.VRirNL Durban. 
Natal. Africa. 

Natal plants, current numbers. 

Report. 1906-7. 
NATAL. (;E0L0GICAL SURVEY OF NATAL AND ZULULAND. Natal. 
Africa. 

Third and final report. 
NATAL GOVERNMENT MUSEU^L Pietermaritzburg. Natal. Africa. 

Annals, no. 2. 

Report, no. 2. 1905. 
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Washington. D. C. 

Report. 1906. 
NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION. Winona. Muincsota. 

Fiftieth anniversary volume. 1906. 

Index. 1871-1906. 
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. Washington. D. C. 

NLigazine. current numbers. 
NATURALISTE CANADIEN. Chicoutimi. Canada. 

Journal, current numbers. 
NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE WOCHENSCHAFT. Berlin. Germany. 

Current numbers. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Lincoln. Ne- 
braska. 

Annual report, no. 20. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA NORMAL COLLEGE. Wayne. Nebraska. 

Catalogue. 1907. 



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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 183 

NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Calendar, 1907-8. 

Studies, current numbers. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREEN, Batavia, 
India. 

Catalogus der bibliotheek. 

Tidjschrift, v. 66. 
NEVADA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Carson City 
Nevada. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Mass. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

I pamphlet. 
NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. Johns, New Bruns- 
wick. 

Bulletin, v. 25. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, New Hamp- 
shire. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, New 
Jersey. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Report, paleontological ser. v. 4. 
NEW JERSEY STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Proceedings, 32nd annual session, 1907. 
NEW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Report, 1901, 1902, 1904, 1905. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla Park, 
N. M. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gitt). 
NEW SOUTH WALES BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT DO- 
MAINS, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Report, 1905. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Sydney, 
N. S. W. 

Agricultural gazette, current numbers. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Fishes of Australia, by D. G. Stead. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Annual report, 1906. 
NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 



i84 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 

N'l: \V SOUTH WALES ROYAL SOCIETY. Sydney, X. S. \V. 

Journal ami proceedings, vs. 30. 40; 1005. 1006. 
\I'\V SOUTH \VALi:S IECHNOLOGICAL museum, Sydney. N. S. \V. 

Technical education scries, no. 13 (gift). 
NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. New York City. 

Annal.s. current numbers. 
NEW YORK A(;RICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Geneva, New 
York. 

Annual report, no. 24. 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers (Rift). 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers, 
NEW YORK. GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADES- 
MEN, New York City. 

Annual report, no. 121, 1906. 
NEW YORK MERCANTILE LIBRARY. New York City. 

Annual report, no. S6. 1906. 
Ni:W YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM. New York City. 

Annual report, 1906. 

Index to annual report. 1871-1902. 
NEW YORK STATE FISH CULTURIST, Albany, New York. 

Report, 1906. 
NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, New York. 

Home education department; Bulletin, no. 45. 

Librarian's report, 1904. 
NEW YORK STATE MUSEUM, Albany, New York. 

Bulletin, nos. 90. 92, loi, 103-9. 

Report, no. 58, 5 vs. 

State botanist's report, 1905. 
Xi:W YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, no. 11, 1906. 
Ni:W ZEALAND. DEPART.MENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, New 
Zealand. 

Annual report. 1906. 

Division of Biology and horticulture: 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1906. 
I pamphlet. 
NEW ZEALAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Wellington, New Zealand. 

Department of mines: Bulletin, n. s. nos. 2-3. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark. New Jersey. 

Annual report, no. 18, 1906. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago. 

By-laws, 1904. 

Reports, 1905, 1906. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 185 

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, England. 

Transactions, v. i, pt. 3. 
NEWCOMBE, C. P., Victoria, B. C. 

I pamphlet. 
NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

Annual report, 1905-6. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fargo, 
N. D. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NOVA SCOTIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Halifax, N. S. 

Proceedings, v. 11, no. 2. 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Laboratory bulletin, no. 13. 
OCKERSON, J. A., St. Louis, Missouri. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
OHIO. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Journal, current numbers. 
OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, 
Oklahoma. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Annual report, no. 30, 1906. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Toronto, Canada. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Fruits of Ontario. 

12 reports. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Toronto, 
Canada. 

Annual report, no. 39, 1906. 
ONTARIO BUREAU OF MINES, Toronto, Canada. 

Report, V. 15, pts. 1-2. 
ONTARIO LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, Toronto, Canada. 

Annual archa2ological report, 1906. 

5 government reports. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Monist, current numbers. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
OREGON STATE BIOLOGIST, Salem, Oregon. 

Biennial report, no. 3. 
OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 



i86 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

OITUMWA PUBLIC LIBRARY. Ottumwa. Iowa. 

Report, 1906. 
OUTES. FELIX F.. Buenos Aires. Argentina. 

2 excerpts. 
OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY. New York City. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM. Oxford. England. 

Annual report of delegates, no. 19, 1906. 
PALERMO. REALE ORTO BOTANICO. Palermo, Italy. 

Index. 1906. 
PARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES. Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus. current numbers. 
PARIS. L'ECOLE D'ANTIIROPOLOGIE, Paris. France. 

L'ocole d'anthropologie. 1876-1906. 

Revue, current numbers (gift). 
PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE. Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris. France. 

Journal, current numbers. 
PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current numbers. 
PAVLOW. A. W., Moscow, Russia. 

4 pamphlets. 
PEABODY INSTITUTE. Peabody, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 55. 
PEABODY MUSEUM OF ARCHEOLOGY AND ETII.XOLOGY. Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

Papers, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Division of zoology: Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Annual report, no. 31, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. 

Catalogue. 1906-7. 

Provost's report, 1906. 

" University day," 1907. 
PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. Peoria. Illinois 

Annual report, no. 27. 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION. Boston. Mass. 

I pamphlet. 
PERU. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS DE MINAS. Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, nos. 41, 44-49, 51-52, 54. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 187 

PHARMACEUTICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Review, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

American journal of pharmacy, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Transactions, 3rd ser. v. 28. 
PHILADELPHIA FREE LIBRARY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Annual reoprt, no. ii, 1906. 
PHILADELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, nos. 58-59. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, P. I. 

Annual report, no. 5, 1906. 

Bureau of Government Laboratories, Report no. 4, 1905. 

Journal of science, current numbers. 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue, 1907. 

Department of archaeology: Bulletin, no. 3. 
PIOLTI, GUISEPPE, Torino, Italy. 

2 pamphlets. 

PIRSSON, L. v.. New Haven, Connecticut. 

I pamphlet. 
PLYMOUTH MUNICIPAL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, 
England. 

Annual report, no. 8. 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Maine. 

Annual report, 1906. 
PORTO RICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mayaguez, 
P. R. 

Annual report, 1906 (gift). 
PRAG. K. BOHEMISCHE GESELLSCHAFT DER ^WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Prag, Austria. 

Jahresbericht, 1906. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1906. 
PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1905-6, 1906-7. 
PREUSS, THEODOR K., Berlin, Germany. 

3 pamphlets. 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, New Jersey. 
Catalogue, 1906-7. 
Report, 1906. 



i88 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

PROVIDENCE ANTHEN.^CUM. Providence. R. I 

Annual report, nos 71, 72. 
PRUVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY. Providence. R. I. 

Annual report. 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY. Lafayette. Indiana. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 
Annual report, 1905-6. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalo)^ue. looit--. 
QUEENSLAND. DEPART.MENT OF MIXES. Brisbane. Queensland. 

Geological Sur\'ey: Bulletin. 

Publications, nos. 197-203, 205. 
Record, no. 2. 
QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY. Brisbane. Queensland. 

Proceedings, v. 19, pt. 2. 
QUEENSLAND MUSEUM. Brisbane, Queensland 

Annals, current numbers. 
RANDALL AND COMPANY. Chicago. 

Clay worker, current numbers (gift). 
RENNES. L'UNIVERSITE DE. Rennes, France. 

Travaux scientifiques. v. 5. 
RE VISTA HISTORIC A .ME.XICANA. .Mexico. Mexico. 

Revista. v. i, no. i. 
REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE. Paris. France. 

Current numbers. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Kings- 
ton. R. I. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
RHODESIA .MUSEUM. Bulawayo. Transvaal. 

Annual report, no. 5. 1906. 
RIGGS. ELMER S., Chicago. 

4 pamphlets (gift). 
RIO DE JANEIRO MUSEU NACIONAL. Rio de Janeiro. Brazil. 

Archivos, v. 13. 
ROBERTS. THOMAS S.. Minneapolis. .Minn. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Rochester, New York. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM. Providence. R. I. 

Bulletin, no. i 7. 
ROME. REALE ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI. Rome. Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Rendiconte. current numbers. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. Terra Haute. Indiana. 

Annual catalogue. 1907. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY. STRAITS BRANCH. Singapore. India, 

Journal, nos. 46, 48. 



J 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 189 

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY. CEYLON BRANCH, Colombo, India. 

Journal, v. 19, no. 57. 
ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, Brisbane, Queens- 
land. 

Queensland geographic journal, v. 21, 22. 
ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ROYAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, Sydney, Australia. 

Science of man, current numbers. 
ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 30. 
RUST, H. N., Pasadena, California. 

I pamphlet. 
RUTOT, A., Brussels, Belgium. 

20 excerpts. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
ST. GALLEN-OSTSCHWEIZERISCHEN GEOGRAP. COMMERC. GES- 
ELLSCHAFT, St. Gallen, Switzerland. 

Mitteilungen, 1906, v. 1-2; 1907, v. i. 

Report, Museum fiir Volkerkunde. 
ST. LAURENT COLLEGE, Montreal, Canada. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri 

Annual report, no. 61, 1906. 
ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, St. Louis, Missouri. 

3 catalogues. 

Handbook, 1907-8. 
ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Annual report, 1905—6, 1906—7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. EDUCATIONAL MUSEUM, St. Louis. 
Missouri. 

Catalogue, 1907. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, v. 3, no. 3. 

Catalogue, 1907. 
ST. PAUL PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Paul. Minnesota. 

Annual report, no. 25, 1906. 
ST. PETERSBURG. ACADEMIE IMPERIALE DES SCIENCES, St. Peters- 
burg, Russia. 

Bulletin, ser. v., v. 21, no. 5; v. 22-24; v. 25, nos. 1-2. 



190 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Muscle d 'Anthropologic et Ethnographic: 
Annual report. 1906. 
Anniversary number, 1894- 1906. 

Musde Zoologiquc: 

Annuaire, v. 11; 12, pts. 1-2 
ST. PETERSBURG. IMPERIAL BOTANICAL OARDK.X. St. Petersburg. 
Russia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ST. PETERSBURG. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES XATURALISTES. St. 
Petersburg, Russia. 

Publications, current numbers. 
SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Massachusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 
SAX DIEGO SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY. San Diego, California. 

Transactions, v. i, no. 2. 
SAN SALVADOR MUSEO NACIONAL. San Salvador. 

Annals, nos. 18-19. 
SANTIAGO DE LAS VEGAS, Estacion Central Agronomica, Cuba. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
SAO PAULO INSTITUTO AGRONOMICO. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
SAPPER, KARL, Tubingen, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
SAPPORO NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Sapporo. Japan. 

Transactions, v. i, no. i. 
SARAWAK MUSEUM. Borneo. India. 

Report, 1906. 
SARGENT, C. S., New York City. 

I pamphlet. 
SCHARIZER. RUDOLF, Czemowitz, Austria. 

I pamphlet. 
SCHLAGINHAUFEN, OTTO, Dresden, Germany. 

4 pamphlets. 
SCHUCHERT. CHARLES, Washington, D. C. 

6 reprints. 
SCOTLAND, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Oil shale memoir. 
SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT. Frank- 
furt-am-Main, Germany. 

Bericht, 1906, 1907. 
SILVESTER, G. F.. Princeton, New Jersey. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
SKIFF. F. J. v., Chicago. 

Miscellaneous publications. 81 volumes. 

Exposition literature, 247 books and pamphlets (gift). 
SLONAKER. J. R.. Stanford University, California. 

1 pamphlet. 



1 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 191 

SMITH, GRANT, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

I pamphlet. 
SMITH, JOHN DONNELL, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Enumeratio plantarum Guatemalensium, pt. 8. 

I pamphlet. 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1905. 

Miscellaneous collections, current numbers. 

Bureau of American Ethnology: 
Annual report, nos. 24, 25. 
Bulletin, no. 30, pt. i ; no. 31. 

U. S. National Museum: 
Annual report, 1905. 
Bulletin, no. 53, pt. 2; nos. 56, 59. 
Proceedings, v. 31, 32. 
SNOW, F. H., Lawrence, Kansas. 

I pamphlet. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATO," Mexico. 

Memorias y revista, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, Spain. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFIA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

Bolletino, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DE ANTROPOLOGIA, Firenze, Italy. 

Archivio, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, V, 13, pts. 1-2. 
SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy. 

Atti, V. 22. 
SOCIETAS PRO FAUNA ET FLORA FENNICA, Helsingfors, Finland. 

Meddelanden, 1904-5, 1905-6. 
SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Btilletin, v. 54, nos. 1-7. 
SOCIETE D'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, France. 

Bulletin, n. s., 15. 
SOCIETE D'ETUDE DES SCIENCES, Rheims, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Ardennes, France. 

Bulletin, v. 9-12. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES DES SAONE ET LOIRE, Cha- 
lon-sur-Saone, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



192 Field Museum ok Natural History - - Reports, Vol. 111. 

SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET IVHISTOIRE NATURELLE. Geneva. Swit- 
zerland. 

Mi'moires, current miinUcrs. 
SOCIETE NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOtlRAIMIIK. .Veuchatel. Switzerland. 

Hulletin, v. 17 
SOCIETE ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris. 

Monioircs, t. 18. 
SO.M.MIER. STHPHE.N. Florence. Italy. 

Un estate in Siberia (gift). 
SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
SCIENCE, Cape Town, Soutli Africa. 

Report. 1905-6. 
SOUTH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Johannesburg. South Africa. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town. South Africa. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Report, 1006. 
SOUTH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY. Cape Town. South Africa. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Sydney. 
N. S. W. 

Journal, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY. MUSEU.M AND ART GALLERY. 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

Report, iQO!;-6. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. ROYAL SOCIETY. Adelaide, South Australia. 

Transactions, v. 30. 

Index to transactions, etc., v. 1-24. 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Clemson. 
South Carolina. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Brook- 
ings, South Dakota. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH-EASTERN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. Wve. Kent. 

Journal, no. 16. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco. California. 

Sunset magazine (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SPRINGFIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Report, 1907. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 193 

STATEN ISLAND NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, New York City. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
STEIERMARK NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Graz, Ger- 
many. 

Mitteilungen, 1905. 
STETTIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKER UND ERDKUNDE, Germany 

Bericht, 1905-6. 

2 pamphlets. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
STOCKHOLM. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Publications, current numbers. 
STOCKHOLM. K. VITTERHETS HISTORIE OCH ANTIKVITETS AKAD- 
EMIEN, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Fornvannen, 1906. 

Monadsblad, 1903-5. 
STOCKHOLM. SVEN. SALLSK. FOR ANTHROPOLOGI OCH GEO- 
GRAPHI, Stockholm, Sweden. 

Ymer, current numbers. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Connecticut 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 
STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, Ger- 
many. 

Stiftungsfest, 1907. 

26 inaugural dissertations. 
SYDERE, A. H., Ottawa, Canada. 

32 government reports. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 
Texas. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Texas. 

Bulletin, sci. ser. nos. 9-1 1. 
THROOP POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Pasadena, California. 

Bulletin, sci. ser. no. i. 

Catalogue, 1907 (gift). 
THURINGISCHE BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Weimar, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, pt. 22. 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
TOKYO GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Journal, current numbers. 
TOKYO IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Tokyo, Japan. 

College of Science journal, current numbers. 
TOLEDO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Toledo, Ohio. 

Report, 1906 (gift). 



194 Field Mi'seum ok Xatlkal History — Reports, Vol. III. 

TORINO MUSEI DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPARATA. Torino, 
Italy. 

Bollettino, v. ai. iqo6. 
TORINO. REALE ACCADE.MIA DELLE SCIENZE. Torino. Italy. 

Memoria, v. 56. 
TORONTO UNIVERSITY. Toronto. Canada. 

Calendar, 1907-8. 

History and economics, extra volume. 

Publications, current numbers. 
TOZZER, ALFRED M.. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

A comparative study of the Mayas and the Lacandones. 

3 reprints. 
TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Pretoria. Transvaal. 

Journal, nos. 3-5, 10, 12-21. 
TRELEASE, WILLIAM. St. Louis, Missouri. 

I pamphlet. 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM. Tring. England. 

Novitates zoologicae, current numbers. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Hermathena, no. 33. 
TROMSO MUSEUM, Tromso, Norway. 

Aarsberetning, 1905. 

Aarshefter, 1905. 
TRONDIIJEM. K. NORSKE VIDENSKABERS SELSKAB, Trondhjem. 
Norway. 

Skriften, 1905. 1906. 

1 pamphlet. 
TROUESSART, E. L.. Paris. France. 

3 excerpts. 

TUBINGEN. R. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTIIEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

19 reports. 
TUZSON, JANOS, Leipzig, Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 

UNION UNIVERSITY. New York City. 
Annual catalogue. 1906-7. 
Bulletin, v. i. no. i. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Washington. D. C. 
Bureau of Animal Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 

Special report (diseases of the horse). 
Bureau of Chemistry. : 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Entomology: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 



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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 195 

Bureau of Forest service: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Plant Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
Bureau of Soils: 

Annual report, no. 7, with maps 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 

Crop reporter, current numbers. 
Library bulletin, current numbers. 
Office of Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Farmer's bulletin, current numbers. 

Farmers ' Institute lectures. 

Record, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 
Office of Public Roads: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 
Report, beet sugar progress, 84. 
Report of the secretary, 1906. 
Yearbook, 1905. 
a. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Fisheries: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1907. 

Pamphlets. 
Bureau of Statistics: 

Consular reports, current numbers. 
Review of the world's commerce, 1905. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Washington, D. C. 
Bureau of Education : 

Report, 1905; 1906, pt. I. 
Geological Survey: 

Annual report 1905-6. 

Bulletin, nos. 286-324. 

Folios, nos. 141-150. 

Mineral resources, 1905. 

Monographs, no. 50. 

Professional papers, nos. 46-57. 

Water supply papers, nos. 161-208. 

41 pamphlets. 

371 topographical sheets. 



II 



igo Fii:ii> MrsKL'M ok Xatukai. History — Reports, Vol. 111. 

U. S. INTERSTATE COM.MKRCE COMMISSION. WashinKton, D. C. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1906 (Rift). 
U. S. LIbRARV OF CONGRESS. Washin^ilon. D. C. 

Check list of the American almanacs. 1639- 1800. 

Naval records of the American revolution. 1 775-1 788. 

RcjHirt. iQO<). 

4 select lists of books. 
U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY. Annapolis. Maryland. 

Register. 1006-7. 
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT. Washington, D. C. 

Director of the mint; Report, 1904-6. 

Report of production of precious metals, 1901. 1903. 1904. 
U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT. Washington, D. C. 

Index catalogue, library of Surgeon General's office, v. 12. 
UPPSALA. K. UNIVERSITETS. BIBLIOTEKET. Uppsala. Sweden. 

2 dissertations. 
URUGUAY. DEPARTMENT DE GRANADERIA. Montevideo, Uruguay. 

Anales. current numbers. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan. Utah. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
UTAH STATE BOARD OF HORTICULTURE. Salt Lake City. Utah. 

Biennial report, 1905-6 (gift). 
VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Quarterly, current numbers. 
VASSAR BROTHERS' INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, New York. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-2.' 
VENEZUELA-UNIVERSIDAD CENTRAL. Caracas. Venezuela. 

Anales. v. 7, no. 2; v. 8, no. i. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY AND STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. Bur- 
lington, Vermont. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue. 1906-7. 
VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne. Victoria. 

Journal, current numbers. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB. Melbourne. Victoria. 

Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 
VICTORIA NATIONAL HERBARIUM. Melbourne. Victoria. 

Collection of botanical publications (12). 
VICTORIA ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY, Melbourne. 
Victoria. 

Annual report, no. 43. 1906. 
VICTORIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne. Victoria. 

Proceedings, v. 19. 
VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, Toronto. Canada. 

Calendar. 1907-S. 
VIRCHOW. HANS. Berlin. Germany. 

5 pamphlets. ^ 



I 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director, 197 

VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
WALTON, L. B., Boston, Massachusetts. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 

WARD, HENRY B., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Zoological studies, nos. 5-78. 
WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Directory, 1905. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, v. 5, 1907 (gift). 
WELCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London. 

Laboratory publications, nos. 62-69. 
WELLER, STUART, Chicago. 

3 pamphlets. 

WELLINGTON ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY, Wellington, New Zealand. 

Annual report, nos. 14-22, 1899-1907. 
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Connecticut. 

Catalogue, 1906-7. 
WEST INDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Bar- 
bados. 

Publications, current numbers. 
WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Morgan- 
town, West Virginia. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Charleston, West 
Virginia. 

Report, no. 5, 1905-6. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Perth, 
Western Australia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, Western Aus- 
tralia. 

Annual progress report, 1906. 

Bulletin, nos. 24-5. 
WIEGAND, K. M., Ithaca, New York. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen, current numbers. 
WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway. 

3 pamphlets. 



igS Field Museum or Xatural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

WILLIAMS. HENRY S.. Ithaca. New York. 

2 separates. 
\V1LL1.\MS. LEONARD W.. Cambridge. Massacliusetts. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE. Williamstown. Massachusetts. 

Catalogue. 1Q06-7. 
WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin. Ohio. 

lUiUetin, current numbers. 
WINCH ELL, A. W.. Butte. Montana. 

2 pamplilels. 
WINDSOR KENi'IELD PUBLISHING COMPANY. Chicago. 

Brick, current numbers (gift). 
WISCONSIN ARCIL^?:OLOGICAL SOCIETY. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

.'\rchaologist. current numbers. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY. Mad- 
ison. Wisconsin. 

Bulletin, nos. 15-18. 
WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. Madison. Wisconsin. 

Annual report. 1906-7 (gift). 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Madison. Wisconsin. 

Proceedings, 1906. 
WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. Madison. Wisconsin. 

Transactions, v. 27. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY. Madison. Wisconsin. 

Agricultural lixperiment Station: 
Annual report, no. 23, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Publications, current numbers. 
WOOD. HENRY TRUEMAN. London, England. 

Collection of exposition literature, 170 books and pamphlets (gift). 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 47. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WURTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE. 
Wurtemberg, Germany. 

Jahreshefte, vs. 62-63. 
WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, Wy- 
oming. 

Annual report, no. 17, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven. Connecticut. 

General catalogue, 1906-7. 

Librarian's report, 1906-7. 

President's report, 1906-7. 
YOUNG. ROBERT A., Columbus, Ohio. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
YUCATAN. LA CAMARA AGRICOLA, Merida, Yucatan. 

El agricultor, v. i. nos. 1-3, 5-1 1. 



I 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 199 

ZURICH GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 
Zurich, Switzerland. 

Jahresbericht, 1907. 
ZURICH NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzeriand 

Festschrift, 1 746-1896. 

Neujahrsblatter, 1799-1810, 1812-1865, 1867-1888, 1890, 1894-1896, 
1898-1907. 

Vierteljahrsschrift, vs. 1-36, 38-41. 
ZURICH UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, Switzeriand. 

Mitteilungen botanischen museum, v. 28. 

6 inaugural dissertations. 



aoo Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



i 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STAIL: UK ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE . 

William II. IIisrjchsrs, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come. Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, A. D., 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN' MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under 
and in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," 
approved April 18. 1872. and in force July i. 1872. and all acts amendatory 
thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

\'ow, therefore, I. William II. Ilinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State 
of Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby 
certify that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organ- 
ized Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, 
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM II. IIINRICHSEX. 

Secretary of State: 
Sir; 

We, the undersigned, citizens of the United States, propose to form a 
corporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 
entitled "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all 
acts amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we 
hereby state as follows, to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating 
Art, Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board 
of Fifteen- (h) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected everv year. 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 201 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for 
the first year of its corporate existence: 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E, Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black, and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago^ County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed), 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, 
Robert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebene- 
zer Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman 
H. Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Frank- 
lin H. Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C, Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, 
Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert 
W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, William 
E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, WiUiam E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryer- 
son, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, Melville E. Stone, 
Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, ( gg_ 
Cook County. ^ 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowl- 
edged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook Couxty, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 
Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members 
held the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this efiect 
was filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 
Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members 
held the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November, 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



202 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(January 28. 1907). 



ARTICLE I. 



ME.MBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, .\nnual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shalljpay 
an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure 
of any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual j payments 
within said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient 
grounds for the forfeiture of an annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to: 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on 
any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on 
pay days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum, when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other 
functions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the E.xecutive Committee; provided, that such persons named in 
the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of 
these By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, 
within ninety days of their election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty 
dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of any person to make such payment 
within said time, shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for 
forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate Members becoming Life 
Members. Patrons, or Honorary Members, shall be e.xempt from dues. Annual 
meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same place and on the 
same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board of 
Trustees, become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 




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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 203 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees upon recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by 
virtue of their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees 
from among persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only 
upon unanimous nomination of the Executive Committee. They shall be 
exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter 
be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall 
be filled by a majority vote of the remaining members of the Board, and the 
election may be held at any regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Mon- 
day of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the Presi- 
dent, and shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three 
Trustees. Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of 
officers or the adoption of the Annual Budget; when seven Trustees shall be 
required, but meetings may be adjourned by any less number from day to day, 
or to a day fixed, previous to the next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 
officers. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary, and a Treasurer. 
They shall be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those 
present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice- 
President, and the Second Vice-President shall be chosen from among the 
members of the Board of Trustees. The meeting for the election of officers shall 
be held on the second Monday of January of each year, and shall be called the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors 
are elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the 
Board. Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec. 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or 
designated from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE IV. 

the treasurer. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corpora- 
tion. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director 



204 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. HI. 

and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Direc- 
tor, warrants may be sijjned by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and 
in the absence or inabjhty of the President, may be countersigned by one of 
the Vice-Presidents. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating 
the occasion for the e.xpciuliturc, and verified and approved as hereinafter 
prescribed. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the Corpora- 
tion shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be 
designateil by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the 
income and principal of said securities as the same become due, and pay same 
to the Treasurer. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any 
or all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, 
namely; The President or one of the Vice Presidents, jointly with the Chair- 
man, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties, as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in 
the administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and ap- 
proved for payment by the Director. All vouchers executed for expenditures 
for the construction and maintenance of the Museum building, or luiildings, 
shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for payment by the Chairman 
of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in connection with the 
investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do with the endow- 
ment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved 
for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of tlie Museum, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have 
immediate charge and supervision of all of the property and afTairs of the 
Museum, and shall control the operations of the institution, subject to the 
authority of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee. The Director 
shall be the ofTicial medium of communication between the Board, or its com- 
mittees, and the scientific stafT and maintenance force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology, and Zoology, each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board, upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate stafT officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director, upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Sec 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 



Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 205 

the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the 
work of the Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be pub- 
lished in pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and 
for free distribution in such number as the board may direct. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, set- 
ting forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of 
the Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other 
times as maj' be required by the Board. 

ARTICLE VII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be four Committees, as follows : Finance, Building, 
Auditing and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The three Committees first above named shall each consist of 
three members, who shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual 
Meeting, and who shall hold office for one year, and until their successors are 
elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board 
shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairmen by the order in which the mem- 
bers are named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be 
chairman; the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second 
Vice-Chairman, succession to the chairmanship being in this order in the event 
of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 
Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing Committee, and three other mem- 
bers of the Board to be elected by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members of the Executive Committee shall constitute a 
quorum, and in all other standing committees, two members shall constitute 
a quorum. In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, 
a quorum cannot be present at any meeting of any committee, then the Chair- 
man thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member 
of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of 
such real estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to 
invest, sell, and reinvest, funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, extension, and maintenance of any kind and all buildings 
used for Museum purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall have supervision over all mat- 
ters pertaining to the Museum. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal 
year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the 
probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommen- 



2o6 Field Mi:skum ok Xattkal History — Kkpokts. Vol. III. 

dations as to expenditures which should be made for routine maintenance and 
fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective 
Committees shall be considered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed 
therein. No increase in the expenditures umler any items of the Budget shall 
be made, except by authority of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive 
Committee shall have authority, in cases of emergency, to expend a further 
total sum not exceeding two thousand dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all account- 
ing and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause 
the same, once each year, or oftener. to be examined by an expert individual 
or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the 
Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall have 
taken place. 

Sec. q. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and pro- 
ceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. io. The President shall be ex-oflicio a member of all Committees, 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Com- 
mittee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year, a Nomi- 
nating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make 
nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, tlie Building Com- 
mittee, and the Auditing Committee, and for three members of the Executive 
Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the ensuing Decem- 
ber meeting, and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE IX. 
amendments. 
Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, pro- 
vided the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



OF THc 
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Jan., 1908. Annual Report of the Director. 207 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER CHARLES B. CORY 

HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM STANLEY McCORMICK 

ROBERT F. CUMMINGS 

DECEASED. 

MARY D. STURGES 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 

WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 

VERNON SHAW KENNEDY WILLARD A. SMITH 



2oS Field Museum of Natural History — Rfports, Vol. 111. 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS. OWEN F. 
ARMOUR. ALLISON' V. 
AYHR. KDWARI) i:. 

BARTLETT. A. C. 
BLACK. JOHN C. 
BLAIR. WATSON V. 
BLATCIIFORD. ELIPHALET W. 
BUCHANAN. W. I. 
BUCKIN(;IIA^L EBENEZER 
BLRNIIAM. DANIEL H. 
BUTLER. EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS. W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR. H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CURTIS. WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH. JAMES W. 

FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS. FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HEAD. FRANKLIN H. 



HKilNBOTHAM. l\. N. 
HUTCHINSON. CHARLES L. 

JONES ARTHUR B. 

KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT. HERMAN H. 

LATHROP. BRYAN 

McCAG(;, E. B. 
McCORNHCK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PECK, FERD. W. 
PUTNAM. FREDERICK W. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SKIFF. FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE. A. A. 
STONE. MELVILLE E. 

WALKER, EDWIN 
WALSH, JOHN R. 






DECEASED. 



ARMOUR. PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS. GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS. CHARLES 
HALE. WILLIAM E. 
HARPER. WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON. HUNTINGTON W 
LEITER. L. Z. 



McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE. J. IRVING 
PETERSON', ANDREW 
PULLMAN. GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER. GEORGE 
SCOTT. JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALLER. R. A. 
WILLIAMS. NORMAN 



Jan., 1908. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



209 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 

BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
Bi^RRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, R. T. 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE PORTER 

JOHNSON, FRANK S. 

JOHNSON, MRS. ELIZABETH AYER 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KING. FRANCIS 
KING, JAMES C. 



KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSON, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, H. H. Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX H. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SCOTT, ROBERT S. 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMBERT 

WELLS, M. D. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



2IO Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



ANNUAL iWHiWBERS. 



AD.AMS, CYRUS H. 
AI).-\MS. MILWWKn 
.ALLKRTON. RoHICRT H. 
AMBERC, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR. GEORGE A. 

HAILi: V. EDWARD P. 
HAKER. SAMUEL 
BANG A. DR. HENRY 
BARNES. CHARLES J. 
BAR REEL. JAMES 
BECKER, A. G. 
BELDEN. J. S. 
BILLINGS. C. K. G. 
BILLIN(^,S, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF. (iEORCrE, Jr. 
BLAINE. MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR. HENRY A. 
BUAL. CHARLES T. 
BOTSFORD. HENRY 
BOUTON. C. B. 
BOUTON. N. S. 
BREMNER. DAVID F. 
BROOKS. JAMES C. 
BROWN, CtEORGE F. 
BROWN. WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

CABLE. R. R. 
CARPENTER. A. A. 
CARPENTER. MYRON J. 
COMSTOCK. WILLIAM C. 
CONK LI N(;. ALLEN 
CONOVER. CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH. Nn<S. ADDIE R. 
COONLEY-WARD. MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN. W. P. 
COX, ALFRED J. 
CRANE. CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY. JOHN 
CUMMINGS. E. A. 
CURTIS. D. H. 



DAL. DR. JOHN W. 
DAY, A. M. 
DAY. CHAPIN A. 
DEERING. JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DELANO. F. A. 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DUNHAM. MISS M. V. 
DURAND. ELLIOTT 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, EDWARD E. 

FAIR. R. M. 

FARNSWORTH. GEORGE 
FORSYTH. ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FiJRST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD. FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH. A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM. E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY. CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY. W, W. 

HAMILTON. I. K. 
HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS. JOHN F. 
HARRIS. N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK. R. M. 
HOLDOM. JESSE 
HOLT. GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS. JOHN P. 
HORNER. ISAAC 



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Jan., 1908. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



21 1 



HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, JAMES L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 



MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, MRS. NELSON 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 



JEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEENE, JOSEPH 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KENT, WILLIAM 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAWSON. VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 
McLENNAN, J. A. 
McWILLIAMS, LAFAYETTE 
MACFARLAND, HENRY J. 
MAGEE, HENRY W. 
MANSON, WILLIAM 
MANSURE, E. L. 
MARKWALD, LIEUT. ERNST 
MAY, FRANK E. 
MAYER, DAVID 
MAYER, LEVY 
MERRYWEATHER, GEORGE 
MEYER, MRS. M. A. 
MILLER, CHARLES P. 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MIXER, C. H. S. 
MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 



NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 

OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PATTERSON, W. R. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PECK, CLARENCE I. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PETERSON, WM. A. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
REHM, JACOB 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
ROSENTHAL, MRS. OSCAR 
RUMSEY, GEO. D. 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 

SCHAFFNER, JOSEPH 
SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 
SCHMITT, ANTHONY 
SCHWARTZ, G. A. 
SEARS, JOSEPH 
SEIPP, MRS. C. 
SEIPP, W. C. 
SELZ, MORRIS 
SHEDD, JOHN G. 
SKINNER, THE MISSES 
SMITH, F. B. 
SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 
SOPER, JAMES P. 
SOUTHWELL, H. E. 



212 Field Museum of Xatlkal History — Reports, Vol. III. 



SPENCE. MRS. ELIZABETH E. 
SPO(TR, J. A. 
STEELE, HENRY B. 
STOCKTON. JOHN T. 
STUART. ROBERT 

TEMPLETON. THOMAS 
TO BEY. FRANK B. 

UIHLELN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 



WALKER. JAMES R. 
WALKER. Wn.LL\M B. 
WALLER. EDWARD C. 
WARNER. EZRA J. 
WEBSTER. GEORGE H. 
WHITE, A. STAMFORD 
WHITEHEAD. W. .M. 
WILSON, MRS. E. C. 
WILSON, M. H. 
WOOD, S. E. 
WOODCOCK. LINDSAY T. 



DECEASED. 



DWIGHT, JOHN H KEEP. ALBERT 

LAFLIN, ALBERT S. 



TO€ UBW«y OF THE 

FEB 141938 

ONITO^mr OF ILLINOIS 



i 



Exhibition Case Containing Fishes Mounted and in Alcohol. 



The two large divisions and the two smaller in the upper left-hand corner 
contain mounted specimens, the others alcoholic, and all, so far as possible, are given 
their life colors. The alcoholic specimens are fastened to glass plates set edgewise 
in their respective boxes. The back of each division, whether it contains mounted 
or alcoholic material, is a transparency to which light is furnished through the top 
of the case, and which, with the addition of accessories, gives to each division an 
aquarium effect. This is considered simply a somewhat advanced experimentation. 



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