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T^ 




LIBRA R.Y 

OF THE 

UN IV f R 5 ITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

50T 
F45 

IOos/o<&- 1 3 OS 




Ilu- person charging this material is re 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



FEB 1 o 19!I7 




L161 — O-10')i, 



OF THt 

UNIVFRSIT* Hf IIIINOIS 



Fikld Museum of Natural History 



Pi blk ah )h 13, 



Report Series. 



Vol. Ill, No. 3. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



DI RECTO I 



\ 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1908. 




CHICAGO; U. S. A. 
January, 1909. 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB 14 19 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



F H 



u 






CONTENTS. 



Board oi Trustees 216 

Officers and Committees 217 

:'(>[' the Museum :is 

Maintenance 220 

ire Course 220 

Publications 222 

Library 223 

iloguing, Inventorying, and Labelling 225 

Accessions 227 

Expeditions and Field Work 233 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 238 

Printing and Photography 248 

Attendance 249 

Financial Statement 252 

Accessions 255 

Department of Anthropology 255 

Department of Botany 257 

Department of Geology 261 

Department of Zoology 263 

Section of Photography 268 

The Library 269 

Articles of Incorporation 311 

Amended By-Laws 313 

Honorary Members and Patrons 318 

List of Corporate Members 319 

List of Life Members, 320 

List of Annual Members 321 



ais 



■ l6 PlBLD Mrsi-CM OP Ni » REPORTS, \"<>L. III. 



Illl B< >ARD OF TRUSTEE-. 

Arthur B. Joi 
Edward B. A.ybr. George Manibrrb. 

Watson I". Blair. tua II. McCormick. 

William J. Chalmers. GBORGB P. PORTBR. 

Richard T. Cranb, Jr. Norman B. Kkam. 

STANLBT PlBLD. Martin A. Rvkrs 

Harlow X. Higinhotham. PrbdBRICK J. V. SkIFP. 

Edwin WALKBR. 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. George R. Davis. 

Marshall Field, Jr. Huntington VY. Jack 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 217 



OFFICERS. 

Haki.ow X. HlGINBOTHAM, i nt. 

M a r 1 1 n A . k v ]■: RSON, First Vice-President. 
Stanley Field, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 

D. C. Daviks, Auditor and Assistant Secretary. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 
Edward E. Ayer. \V. J. Chalmers. George Manierre. 
Watson F. Blair. Stanley Field. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Arthur B. Jones. Martin A. Ryerson. 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING. 

\Y. J. Chalmers. Cyrus H. McCormick. Stanley Field. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. George E. Adams. Arthur B. Jones. 



nfl 1'iiM.i) Mi'mtm of Natural History Reports, Vol. hi 



51 \N- I >F Tilt- MUSEUM. 

DIRECTOR. 

Pri k J. V. Skiff. 

DEPART'/ ANTHROPOLOGY. 

A. DORSBY, ( 
S. C. SlMMS, A 

('harms L. Owbn, Assistant I y. 

Hi'Ki HOLD L ' 

,\i B. l.i v, is, issistani I Ue- 

lanesian I 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

P. Mr gh, Curat 

J essb M. Grbbnman Hani I 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

< >i.i v i r c. Parring i II. \V. Nichols, . issistani ( 

Blmbr S. Riggs, Assistant Curator Paleontology. 

iiur W. Slocom, Assist, nit Curator rate 

Paleontolo 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

Charlbs B. Cory, Cui - ra B. M bbk, Assistant < 

William J. Gerhard, .1 ssistant t'urator l> : . v. 

Bdward X. Gubre r, Assist ■>» of I 

X. DBARBORN, . In.w.^Mh/ I /';';■: 

RECORDER. 

I). C. Davib 

THE LIBRARY. 

Blsie Lippincoti . /. in. 

TAXIDERMIST-IN-CHIEF. 

Carl B. .\ ; 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1908. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending 1 December 3 1 , 1908. 

From a physical point of view the condition of the Museum, while 
in detail showing a continued advance along those lines involving the 
better protection and more careful arrangement of the material on 
exhibition and in storage within the building, denotes little alteration 
except in two particulars: the increased number of new exhibition 
cases in all Departments, and the extension of the exhibition area 
into the East Annex. The new cases, approximating $26,000 in cost, 
make their best impression in the Botanical Gallery, and the very 
capable work that has been performed in transferring and rearrang- 
ing the exhibition material gives an entirely new value to it. The 
East Annex contained for several years the Transportation collection 
received from exhibitors at the Columbian Exposition. The reduc- 
tion of the scope of the Institution and the removal of these, there- 
fore, inappropriate exhibits, vacated about twenty halls and courts, 
and until this year that section of the building has been closed to the 
public and used for storage and assembling purposes. The pressure 
for floor space became so acute, however, that at the beginning of this 
year a large part of the Annex was refloored and repaired, and 
turned over to the Department of Anthropology, and this area now 
contains Philippine, South Pacific, and African collections. 

A serious, and it may be said rather expensive effort has been 
made during the year to improve the appearance of the exterior of 
the building, but at this date it is a regrettable fact that the North 
side of the building — the "weather" side — gives little evidence of 
the undertaking. Mr. Akeley of the Museum stall devised a machine 
which, with compressed air, applied liquid stucco to the exterior 
surface. At first, and for several mouths, the result seemed undenia- 
bly successful both in holding to the plaster and in preserving a uniform 
color, but the lifeless plaster, the decayed fibre of the staff, would not 
hold the hardened liquid, and while the general appearance of the 

-■ 1 <) 



22o Fibld Miseum 01 Natural History Rbports, Vol. III. 

biuldii luch impi it no* aothing can be doi 

to ] mceal the decomposing plaster and staff with which 

the brick walls of the buildis ed, 

the vc.ir the Cural Department of Anthropol 

survey of the I ithern 

Pacific in furtl • the plai the Museum to extend tl 

itions of that Department into those fields. Further 
reference to this tour, and to the movements of the other Curators 
and other field work will be made elsewhei 

While tin ral subj as will be consi in a 

subsequent pari ecially be made of 

the acquisition by purchase of the well-known Strecker butterfly 
and moth collection, numbering 50,000 specimens, and including the 
notes and working library of the collector. 

There has been but one change in the scientific staff. Dr. Arthur 
B. Lewis has been appointed Assistant 1 African and 

Melanesian Ethnology durin. The faithful performance of 

the forces of the Museum will be found reflected in the more detailed 
report following. 

Maintenance. — The Budget authorized by the Board of Trustees 
provided the sum of $171 ,640 for the maintenance of the Museum for 
the year. The amount expended v< I 17,510, leaving a satisfactory 
margin of $24,130. In addition to this amount $43,000 was expended 
by special authority of the Hoard of Trusl " collections, < 

^editions, ami exhibition cases, bringing the total expenditure for the 
ar to apprt • ximately $200,000. The amount allowed for maintenance 
for the year si ease over the previous This is ac- 

counted for by the addition of several new members to the working 
force and rdinary n to the Museum building. 

Lecture Course. — The usual tv if lectures have been given 

during the year, illustrated ii in unusual ran 

The seati: I the hall in which the 

.re given has been taxed to its utmost on every occasion, 
in the hall being tilled and the doors closed thirty 

minut. re the announced time of the lecture. 

lowing is the twenty-eighth Lectin- l with the subjects 

and lectures delivered during the months rch and April, 1908: 

March 7 —"The Wilderness of Florid 

Prof. C. B. Cor I itor of Zoolo: 



Jan., 1909. Annual Rbpori 01 un- Director. 221 

March 1 4- " Mt. IVle and the 1 >< struction of St. Pierre, Martinique." 
Dr. Edmund Otis Hovey, American Museum of 
Natural History. 

March ai. "Mosquito* I 1 and Vicinity." 

Mr. Win. J. ( rerhard, Assistant Curator ol Entomoloj 

March a8, "Holland's War with the Sea." 

Prof. James II. Gore, The G Washington Uni- 

versity. 

April 4- "Treasures of the Mexican Mountains." 

Prof. Rufus M. Bagg, Jr., University of Illinois. 

April 11. 'The Dominanl Geographic Features of Wisconsin." 

Dr. S. Weidman, Geological and Natural History 
Survey, Madison, Wisconsin. 

April iv 'The Pacific Salmons' Struggle for Existence." 
Dr. S. E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

April 25.- -"Archaeological Studies on the Coast of Ecuador." 

Prof. Marshall H. Saville, American Museum of 
Natural History. 

The following is the Twenty-ninth Lecture Course, delivered 
during the months of October and November, 1908: 

3— "Through the Cataracts of the Nile." 

Prof. James H. Breasted, The University of Chicago. 

10.— "A Naturalist in Venezuela." 

Dr. N. Dearborn, Assistant Curator of Ornithology. 
Oct. 17. 'The Great American Deserts as Seen in New Mexico 

and Sonora." 
Prof. Thomas H. Macbride, The State University 
of 1 
Oct. 'The Geology and Scenery of the Pipestone Region." 

Prof. Samuel Calvin, The State University of Iowa. 
Oct. 31. "Among the Bird- in Costa Rica and Panama." 

Mr. J. P. Ferry, Assistant, Division of Ornithology. 

Nov. 7. "Life of a Lake in Summer." 

\)v. Edward A. Birge, University of Wisconsin. 
Nov. 14. — "The Heraldry of the Indians." 

Mr. James Mooney, United States Bureau of Eth- 
nology. 



1 1) Museum < Natural History Rbi Vol.111. 

--" The Glaci Maslca." 

Prof. K. S. Tarr, l 

- - "Holland." 

Prof. James H rge Washing* 

Universil 

Publication he umi£ the 

durinj and their rom the 

Museum, 11 nui: 

numl 
i j 7. Seri Vol. VII, No. 6. ' The 7. 

ititlan and Atatlan, Guatemala, with 

E. Meek \- ■ 
[1 'ii 1 .500. 
Re] Vol. III. ' Animal Report of the 

• i 1907. 

102 pp., if» illustrati 'ies), ( ;oo. 

IX. Birds of Illinois and 

Wisconsin." By C. B. Cory. (In • 

inge list now numbers [,264 names, of which 
ign countri ad 646 in the Inr ad its 

as. 
The following table shows the aumbi ;es with < 

■ 

7 
2 

•7 
1 

'5 
1 

6 

8 
2 

S 

1 

19 

s 

I 2 

I \ 
I I 

2 
I 
2 
I 

2 
2 

. 6l8 



• tine K 


1 1 




. 


- 


n.i 


, 


- 


Mr--: 


iutn 


'7 


Malta . 


. 


1 


■ 


eil 


10 


■ 


:.an.i . 


1 




. 








6 




. 




J . 


. . . 




unania. 


. 


1 


Ru 




5 


:n . 


nmark. 


•1 


- 


. 


1 


itzerland 


. 


1 








•iia . 




1 


Trindad 




1 


U. S 


in 


100 




. 




; . 


Italy 




Yucatan 


I mi 


'7 


Total 



Jan., 1909. 



Annual R.BPORT OF THE Director. 



223 



The following table shows the number of foreign exchanges re- 
ceiving the different publications: 

Anthi cal .... 294 



■ inical 

< >rnith< >1( igical 

logical 
Report 



53 t 
[86 

.80 
618 



The publications are distributed to the different States and fa- 
ir Possessions as follows 



Alabama 

Arizona .... 

Arkan: 

Calif 

Colorado 

ecticut . 
. 
District of Columbia 
Florida . . . . 

gia 

Illii 
Indiana 



a . 

Kentucky 
Louisiana 

. 
viand 

husetts 
bigan 
Minnesota 
issi 1 <j >i 
>uri 
M> mtana . 
Nebraska 



3 


Nevada 


I 


New I Hampshire 


I 


New Jersey 

New V.Tk . 


13 


North < larolina 




New Mexico . 


2 


Ohio . . . . 


7" 

1 
1 


Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 


7 5 


South Carolina 


1 3 


South Dakota 


13 


Tennessee 


9 


. 


2 


Utah . . . . 


4 


Vermont . 


6 


Virginia 


1 1 

1 2 


Washington . 
West Virginia 

Wisconsin 


1 1 

2 

15 


Wyoming . 
Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico 


3 


Hawaii 


7 


Total 



5 
16 

93 

S 

2 
22 

1 

5 
1 

2 

2 

2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
'7 



646 

The following table shows the number of domestic exchanges 
the different publications: 

Anthropological 268 

Botanical 329 

Geological 347 

• nithological 182 

Zoological 387 

Report 646 

Library. — Accessions during the year aggregate in volumes and 

pamphlets 2,973; by purchase 661, by gift and exchange 2,312, 

making the total number of books and pamphlets 47.487 among the 

libraries as follows: 

era! Library 34,3 1 1 

Anthropological Library [,861 

inical Library 4,o(hj 

< . • J Library S>SS a 

logical Library 1.104 

Library of Exposition Literature 



Pibi Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

It is lent pro in the Library; more 

conditions for work, 
an ' a staff ai e public 

erally. T >f the older literature of anthro- 

pology and botany is being continued and important works, difficult to 
obtain, ha Anthropology there 

has been pur I a number of? ' md the Pacific Island 

in the map it was necessary to reclassify the 
literature already in the libr -e localities. For the 

Department of Botany a numl I print 9 have been 

secure Long the more valus Iditions are the following works: 

itt, Illustrati ; Hooker. Bxotic I ILim- 

' onpland. ' sixieme partie, botanique; Seeman, The 

botany of tlv Herald ; Sloane, Catal rum 

quas in insula Jamaica sponte provenient; Vahl, Eclo lericanae. 

Tl. it single ition received during the year was that ob- 

tained with the Strecker collection of moths and butterflies, which 
was received, however, too late to be catalogued. This accession 
consists of 318 volumes and 947 pamphlets, and contains a number 
of rare entomological works which are valuable both historically and 
scientifically. A preliminary ruination shows that there are a 

number of duplicates, which will be valuable for exchange material. 
With the purchase of the Proceedings and Transactions of the 
important entomological societies of this country the entomological 
library has been cons !y strengthened. Through the courtesy 

of Mr. Kiralfy, Commissioner-General of the Franco-British Exhibi- 
tion, London, the library received a collection of 89 catalogues and 
reports of the Franco-British Exhibition. The Superintendent of 
Documents, Washington, D. C, forwarded 195 publications of the U. 
deal Survey that fill many gaps in the files of its publications 
in the general library. From the ition. South Ken- 

sington. London, ceived 20 v 3 of miscellaneous publi- 

cations. Tl inical l ofBuitei r a, sent 57 volum 

Dr. John Coulter of the 1 of Chicago presented 25 botanical 

manuscri] ad Miss Alice Bache Gould of Boston an original edi- 

n of tl 15. The list of periodicals and serials re- 

cci if t and exchange from contemporary institutions, both 

jn, increases in number and value from year to year. 
During the- 'lumes and pamphlets were bound. The binding 

in plain black cloth of many back numbers of periodicals and serials 



^A»y 



. . . 

OF THt 
UNIVFBSITV OF Illinois 



field tory. 



Rt PORTS, PL. XXXIV. 




Type of Table Case Labels. Department of Bot.' 

- s illustrating Plants of the Bible. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 225 

has added greatly to the convenience of the staff, also the purchase 
of substantial, practically dust-proof pamphlet boxes that preserve 
material that is valuable lor reference but nut sufficiently so to war- 
rant individual binding. By miscellaneous gifts and exchange a 
number of duplicates have accumulated. An attempt is being made 
to systematize their disposal by sale or exchange. The progress of 
the work is necessarily slow as the regular work of the office consumes 
the time of the staff almost entirely. During the year two duplicate 
sets of World's Fair, 1S93, literature were presented, one to St. Louis 
Public Library and one to the John Crerar Library. Monthly in- 
stallments of the John Crerar Library card catalogue have been re- 
ceived, alphabetically arranged, and iiled. 11,600 cards have been 
written and distributed in the various catalogues. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labelling. — Owing to the 
absence of certain members of the staff of the Department of Anthro- 
pology less cataloguing has been done during the year than usually. 
Several important collections, however, have been catalogued, notably 
the collections acquired last year from certain islands of the South 
Pacific Ocean. About 1,200 catalogue cards were written during the 
year and entered in the inventory books, which now number 31. In 
addition there has been prepared certain classified tribal lists and a 
card catalogue has been prepared for the same. Individual labels 
have been written for specimens collected among the tribes of North- 
ern Luzon on the first Robert F. Cummings' Philippine Expedition. 
A large number of specimens of the Higinbotham Corean Collection 
have also been labeled. Labels, copy of which was prepared by Dr. 
Newcombe during his connection with the Museum, have been printed, 
and added to the collections from the North Pacific coast, as rapidly 
as they were received from the printer. Over 50 cases have been 
provided with case labels and numbers. 

The cataloguing of incoming material in the Department of 
Botany has been kept up to date, all specimens entering into the organ- 
ized collections having been properly and completely recorded. The 
total number of entries for the year in the 49 volumes of the Depart- 
ment is 17,980, making the total number of entries in the Department 
237,780. A card catalogue of the lay names of plants and their 
economics has been commenced ; this catalogue now contains about 
10,500 references. In addition to this a card catalogue of the Depart- 
ment Library has been completed to date; this catalogue now con- 
tains some 4,100 cards. 



Field Mus u ' ■ ■ urai Hi row Rbp Vol. III. 

Curatoi G tant work 

label baa been thai ' ; . collection, Hall 66, 

the relief maps, Halls 76 and 77, and I Eiigin- 

tham Hall. For the rock 

howinj men the kind of rock and locality, 

rther descriptive labels of rock ht hundred ai 

individual lal venty-four descriptive labels w< 

thus prepared and installed. The labels ma 

riptive in 1 and designed to indi- 

the most important raphic and t illus- 

trated by th< Six1 uch labels^ i pared and install) 

r the : n in Eiiginbotham Hall, labels were pr< 

which arc uniform in with the mounting of the collection and 

id the scattered effect and 1< [exhibit! ■ which the loose 

labels hit ployed involved. These individual labels corre- 

md in size with the tablets upon which the s] mounts 

and arc printed on transparent paper. Bach i Qed firmly o 

and upon the corresponding tablet. Tl ibels show tin- name, 

and in many eases the weight of the s exhibited. 

. hundred and six such labels were prepared and affixed. In addi- 

•1 twenty-three lal ids descriptive of the different imp< irtanl varieties 

of gems were printed on transpai r and mounted on white 

cardboard. In size they are 4x6 or 6 x inches. The;.' are 

placed in the cases adjacent to the corresponding gems. Five hundred 

and D labels have made and installed for new or hitherto 

unlabellcd specimens in the systematic mineral collection; three 

hundred and fourteen labels have been similarly made and placed for 

■ ecimens and one hundred and thirty-eight for pale' 

al s: as. In addition copy has been pre] for 

r hundred and eight individual and fourteen d< :ve 

lal • the marble and building-stone collections, and one hundred 

and twenty labels for the paleont I collet ' A',! specimens 

been numbered and ued, with the l 

of such v as have not been removed from the matrix. 

These an □ field numbers only until cleaned, when permanent 

numbers igned them. In addition about fifty cards hav< 

written for the rate fossils. The inventory books 

show the largest number of specimens for thi been 

recorded in in ntology, the number in this section 

ber 34. The number of entries in all divisions is 6,074. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Rbpori 01 mi- Director. 227 

In order that the total number of entries may show the total number 
01 specimens rather than as her e the total of the serial numb' 

of the inventory books, the number of specimens has been computed. 
The enumeration gives 98,979 as the total number of entries to 'late. 

In the Department of Zoology the cataloguing of specimens has 
continued as usual, and the various collections r 1 during the 

year have been properly inventoried and labelled, with the exception 
of the Entomological collections, to which more than 5,000 specimens 
have I een added. Printed labels have been prepared and installed 
from time to time as new groups of animals have been completed 
and placed on exhibition. 

The year's work on catalogues and inventorying is shown in 
detail as follows: 





N'o. of 
Record 

Books 


Total N'o. of 
• rics to 
.31, 1908 


Entries 

during 
1908 


Total N'o. of 
.'ds 
Written 


Department o\ Anthropology 


32 


Ml. 140 


1,120 


98.530 


Department of Botany 


54 


244,74a 


»4.i79 




Department of Geology 


20 


98,979 


6,074 


6,680 


Department of Zoology 


40 


73.1 2 9 


5.57o 


28,618 


The Library .... 


12 


64,921 


7.79i 


76.0S5 


Section of Photography 


6 


69,418 


9.895 





accessions. — Practically all the accessions in the Department of 
Anthropology for the year have been derived from field expeditions, 
consequently they are of unusual interest and of great scientific 
importance. The collections secured by Dr. Berthold Laufer are 
especially noteworthy. Of great interest also are the collections 
made by Mr. Cole in the Philippine Islands of Luzon and Palawan, 
as a result of the second Robert F. Cummings' Philippine Expedition. 
Mr. Aver placed the Museum under further obligations by securing 
interesting archaeological material of great value and importance 
from Egypt and Italy. Of especial interest are the two Mastaba 
tombs of the Fifth Dynasty, several Etruscan sarcophagi, and objects 
of bronze from Bosco Reali. 

The Department of Botany has been fortunate in securing dur- 
ing the past year the Florida herbarium of Professor A. S. Hitchcock, 
consisting of a little over 7,000 specimens, most of which are from 
Florida, but containing also a few important individual sets of plants 
from the Bahamas and the West Indies. The principal collectors 
represented are: J. II. Barnhardt, A. C. Bedorsha, A. \V. Bitting, 
A. A. Eaton, II. F. Henshall. A. S. Hitchcock, C. G. Lloyd, L. B. 



Field Mrsi um u Hi- Rep Vol. III. 

[■". W. Pickcll, A. I. Quaintance, P. H. Rolls, P. II. Rolfs, 
and A. \V. Bittii . . I II W. T. Swingle, H. J. Webber, and 

J. M. W< been r I and in- 

1 in t mixed pai iral herbarium. Purther 

aotable a herbarium during th< the follow- 

ing: American Colony, P W. II. Blanchard, Vermont, 

I. \V. Blankinship, Montana, 170; W. \V. Calkins, Illinois. 115; 
1 nzat t i . Mexi ' I Copei Ice- 

land, Greenland, M 150; R. A. Dixon, T< '■'. 

Ali California, 14a; W. G 70, and X 

Y<>rk, 109; G ical Sur Canada Dominion of Cana 

A! ind Labrador, 1,552; Gr Herbarium, Bahamas, 385; J. 

rinnell, ' rnia, 63; A. A Hel ( lifornia 19; E. J. 

Hill, Centra] Stairs. 65; Iowa '• ulture and M 

chanic A ma, 118; W. A. Kellerman, \6\ O. E. 

Lansing Jr., Illinois and Indiana, 9a; New Mexico Agricultural 
Exj erim tion, New Mexico. 204; New York Botanical harden, 

• and West Indies, 100;; E. Palmer, Mexico, 244; R. I 
traguay, 176; II. II. Smith, Missouri. '12'), and Wes1 Virginia, 339; 
\V. N. Suksdorf, Washington, 296; U. S. National Museum, Mexico, 
251. The most important herbarium additions are as follows: 



Locality 
NORTH AMERI' V 

Alaska 

. ) 
Alberta ... 
British Columbia 
Labrador . 
Manitoba 

v Brunswick 
N'ova Scotia . 
Ontario 
Uni" 

Alabama 

American Plains . 
lzona 
.'ifnrnia . 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
District of Col urn 
Florida 
Florida . 



iitions to Total in Or^an- 

Herbarium i*ed Herbarium 

1908 to Dec 9, 1908 



»3 


342 


69 


1.909 


268 


284 




690 


9 


161 


156 


i59 


6 


564 




M5 


1 


198 


2 


734 


3 


92 


18 


3.540 


2.150 


13.598 


10 


5.304 


64 


281 


6 


1.814 


5.752 


15,681 


306 


529 



Jan., iqoq. 



Annual Report of the Director. 






United States 
Georgia 
Idaho . 
Illinois. 
Indiana 
low. I 
Kansas 
1/ misiana 
Maine 
Massadiuset ts 

Michigan 
Minnes 

Missouri 
Montana 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Oregon 

Rhode Island 

Rocky Mountains 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas . . 

Utah 

Vermont 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 
Mexico (in general) 

Lower California 

Yucatan 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

West Indies 

Bahamas 

Andros . 

At wood Cay 

Caicos Islands (Providenciales) . 

North 

South (including Pine Cay) 
West 



Addition! to 

II'T! ■ 

I 

-''7 

56 

8 

l^ 

1 1 

1 1 

2 



[73 

2 is 

1 
7" 



j - 

5 S 

4 

-7 
1 
2 

4 

"7 

295 

7 

755 

5 



- ^ 



5 

1 . 1 36 

20 



1 1 
"7 
I 
^ 1 
1 1 1 
1 1 



Total in ' TK.in- 
l [erbanum 

tU 1 )il 1;, 1908 




719 


(5 


3..SOO 


i.j 7 7 




• 


. 


2,049 


1 ,991 


588 


642 


2,945 


557 


937 


' ■ »-• 


t.831 


!•'' $7 


865 


4.^ 


4.109 


47° 


7-7 


84 


663 


},959 


54 5 


1 ,096 


S.408 


1 . J 1 s 


7t' 


[9,996 


1,385 


4.7"4 


57' 


1 ,884 


209 


1 ,260 


"7 


l 


5 1 

1 I 1 


1 1 



230 Field Museum oi Naturai History — Kkports, Vol. III. 



West I :. :: 

BaJ 

it [gland . 

•..I 
. 
1 ll 
• une [aland . 

1 . irk .... 

: . . . 

. 
Ii 

Little [naugu 
Mari 

N< 

Ri ise [aland 

WatHng's I si 

los 

. 
Cuba .... 
Dutch West [ndiea 
Jamaica 
Martinique 



SOUTH AMERICA 



Para 



BUROF 

Aostro Htu .• try 

France . 

Germany 

Italy . . . 

Russia 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Africa 

China 

Philip; 



Addition 10 

rium 
1908 


Total in 

iirrliiinum 
t" Dec 9, 1908 


I I 




21 


6l 




428 


•7 




,n 


•7 




593 


16 




16 


»5 




Z'S 






60 






619 


68 




68 


12 




12 






69 


26 




420 


20 




5' 


168 




168 


2 74 




1.944 


4 




65 








IS 




323 


3 






644 




4.887 


7 




7 


194 




4.283 


1 




602 



176 



1.237 



108 


4.209 


1 1 


1.464 


4 


4.050 


r 


014 


3 


1 .229 


5 


46 


10 


1,015 


2 


3.833 




168 


' 


1,106 


10 


1.078 



dation does not represent the whole herbarium, 
only this year's additions thereto. 

Inr ecessions by gift in the Department of Geology 

inch. .f limb bones and feet tosaurus from the Can. 

Mammoth teeth an>l I from Texas from 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 231 

\V. L. Albright; a jaw of Smilodon and remains of Mammoth also 
from Texas from \V. L. Crawford, Jr.; six Large slabs of marble from 
the Alabama White Marble Company; a relief map of Palestine from 
the Atlas Scho ply Company; and a specimen of moss agate 

from Wyoming from B. Bridge. Exchanges made with several in- 
stitutions and individuals afforded considerable new material, among 
which may be mentioned twenty-two specimens of Colorado rocks 
and minerals from the Colorado School of Mines; fifty-four specimens 
of the minerals of Pennsylvania from the Philadelphia Mineralogical 
Club; thirty-three large crystals of selenite from the Deseret Mu- 
seum, Salt Lake City, Utah, through Dr. J. E. Talmage; and one 
hundred and eighteen specimens of fossils, minerals, and rocks from 
E. L. Moseley of Sandusky, Ohio. The Colorado accessions included 
especially tine specimens of fluorite, covellite, molybdenite, geyserite, 
lithophysa? and spherulites; that from the Philadelphia Mineralog- 
ical Club noteworthy specimens of cyanite, anthophyllite, andalusite, 
and orthoclase, and that from E. L. Moseley representatives of 
Macropetalicthys, Onychodus, and other Devonian fishes, and speci- 
mens of Zaphrentis, Cyathophyllum and other Devonian corals. 
Among material purchased may be mentioned the Leighton meteorite, 
all of which was obtained, and sections of the Ainsworth and Williams- 
town meteorites; relief maps of Nebraska, the Catskill Mountains, 
Ottawa, Illinois, and Marshall, Missouri; two hundred and twenty- 
five specimens of vertebrate and invertebrate, chiefly Miocene, fossils 
from Patagonia; two hundred and thirty-seven specimens, repre- 
senting sixty-eight species, of Devonian corals from the Falls of the 
Ohio; thirteen specimens of minerals and eight specimens of gold 
ores from the Raw Hide District, Nevada. The relief maps pur- 
chased, besides other features afford illustrations of stream^ robbing, 
old and young valleys, and a graded river. Especially important 
among the Patagonian fossils purchased are two skulls of the rare 
extinct ungulates, Protypotherium and Icochilus, lower jaws and 
part of a carapace of an extinct armadillo, and about twenty-five 
unusually well-preserved specimens of Terebratella. The series of 
Devonian corals purchased was selected from several thousand 
specimens of a collection made by G. K. Greene. Especially notable 
specimens are those of Blothroj >hy Hum decorticatum , a cup coral about 
one foot in height; Chonophyllum magnificum, a large cup coral; 
the largest known frond of Cladopora pinguis; a large group of 
cups 18 inches in diameter and excellent single cups of Cystiphyllum 



232 FlBLD ' LL History — Report>, Vol. III. 

mmatum; lai of Cystiphylhun in vagina turn; two 

lar hyllum and Haimeophylhun, the latter 20 

inches in Hum convergens, superior 

iens of Thecia r of thirteen species 

of Zaphrentis unusually well pn I. By collection were obtained 

twenty-;: ':■ >tite of Arkansas; 

phalt from Arkansas; about five 
th ' i Tertiary invertebrate fossils 

i; one hundred and seventy-five specimens Devonian 
fos 3 from (Michigan; and thirty specimens of ver- 

■ 
In the Department of Zoology two hundred and twenty-six 
: mammals have been added to the collection during the 

rly all of these were secured by members of the staff 
while in the field. One hundred and nineteen were taken in Ven- 
ezuela and adjacent islands and were either new or imperfectly 
represented in the collections. Valuable additions have been made 
in the Department of Ornithology, 3,643 skins and 2,717 eggs having 
been accessioned. Undoubtedly the most important acquisition to 
the Department of Zoology was the purchase of the butterfly and 
moth collection of the late Dr. Herman Strecker of Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. The collection is probably unequalled in America and 
unsurpassed in importance by almost any other collection in any 
part of the world. It is contained in over eight hundred glass-topped 
drawers, which in turn are d in twelve large cabinets. Over 

fifty thousand specimens are represented, among them being three 
or four hundred types, co-types, etc. Besides the species described 
as new by Dr. Strecker himself, there are also all of Rearkirt's types, 
likewise types and co-types of species described by Grote, Behr, 
.udinger, Skinner, Chapman, and Mengel. In addition to the 
above priceless specimens, there are many rarities found in but few 
collect md in no other are there so many aberrations or mon- 

strosities as well as remarkable examples of dimorphism, phrases 
of insect de ent in which Dr. Strecker was deeply interested. 

The pur* .eluded the arranged collection, all of the duplicates, 

the entire entomological library, and all correspondence relating 
thereto. The material was prepared for shipment under Assistant 
Curator Gerhard's directions and transported without loss or mishap 
to the Museum, where it has been arranged in the same order as it 
was at the time of Dr. Strecker's death seven years ago. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 233 

Expeditions and Field Work. — Mention was made in the report of 
last year of the work bein by Mr. Cole in the Philippine Islands 

in connection with the Robert P. Cummings' Philippine Expedition. 
Mr. Cole returned to the Museum in December after two years 
of research. The greater portion of his time was spent among the 
Tinguians, a pagan mountain tribe of Northwestern Luzon, number- 
ing about twenty thousand persons. They possess domestic animals, 
have extensive rice fields, and live in compact villages. Until recently 
the custom of head-hunting made loose federations among groups 
of villages necessary, and thus a number of dialect groups have 
sprung up, but the general culture is quite uniform. A peculiar 
but highly developed form of spiritualism, combined with an elaborate 
ceremonial life is found throughout the territory. Along the northern 
border of this section the people are excellent iron workers, turning 
out the greater portion of the spears and headaxes found in Northern 
Luzon. The most famous forge — that of Balbalasang — was 
secured and is now in the Museum. Mr. Cole visited nearly every 
village of this tribe in the provinces of Ilocos Sur, Ilocos Norte, and 
Abra, and also made extensive trips through the subprovinces of 
Kalinga and Apoyoa. The people along the Apayao river are one 
of the wildest and least known of the Islands. They have made 
numerous raids on the villages of the lowlands and have, until recently, 
refused all intercourse with the Spaniards and Americans. The 
collection from this section is the only one ever secured from this 
people. In each locality Mr. Cole spent sufficient time to make a 
study of the social and religious life of the people; their mythology, 
folklore, and language. There was also secured about seven hundred 
photographs showing the people in portraits and at their industries, 
their ceremonies and places associated with their religion; dwelling 
and other buildings and the country in which they are located. The 
views are supplemented by field maps covering the entire region 
visited. About five hundred physical measurements were secured, 
a series of life masks, and phonograph records of the various songs 
and instruments. Before leaving the Islands Mr. Cole spent a month 
among the Bataks, an almost unknown pigmy tribe found on the 
island of Palawan. These people live in groups of two or three 
families; they build only the rudest shelters, which are abandoned at 
pleasure. Little is attempted in agriculture as they live on roots 
and herbs and animals secured in the chase. Their weapons are the 
bow and arrow and the blow j,mn. A poison dart is shot from the 



PlBLD V M OF N'atuRAI HlSTORY — REPORTS, V*OL. [II. 

latter and t their proi y with the " □ the Bataca 

an red by the 1 " natives of the coast. In com- 

pany with Governor Miller, Mr. ('<>le visited pai 'he island hith- 

erto unknown to white men. Many J ' raph record- 

in- Lents, and a typical collection, were secured. The collection 

from the sections visito "'• I le numbers two thousand specimens 

and includes all the article ily life and reli ies. 

Dr. Win. Jones has d( ted the entire year to thi of 

the unknown tribes in the upper headwaters of the C □ Valley. 

Previous to his entry into this territory he had investigated certain 
tribes on the I. iyan. Dr. Jones' inv» in con- 

nection with the Robert P. Curnmings' Philippine Expedition. For 

tain reasons it does not seem advisable at this time to comment 
at any length on the investigations of Dr. Berthold Laufer. Suffice 
it • that at the present writing he is in China and that he is 

meeting with very great success. It may l»e noted in this connection 
that in addition to the work which he is performing for the Museum 
he is engaged in the purchase of Chinese and Tibetan literature on 
behalf of the Crerar and Newberry Libraries. It is Dr. Laufer's 
belief that Chicago at the present time possesses a Manchu Library 
more valuable than any to be found in Europe, not even excepting 
the one in St. Petersburg, which has great treasures from this field. 
The extensive collection of Chinese books, which Dr. Laufer has 
collected, is very rich in fine old editions of the Ming Dynasty 
an Is a perfect exhibit of the development of Chinese printing. 

The Curator of the Department spent the year in a hurried 
journey around the world. Leaving Xcw York January nth, he 
visited Cambridge, London, Berlin, and Rome, and proceeded 
direct to Cairo where he joined Mr. Edward E. Aver and remained 
in Egypt five weeks; then he spent seven weeks in India, two 
in Ceylon, and next visited Java where an extensive collection 
was made. After visiting the Australian museums of Perth, 
lurne, and Sydney, he proceeded to Simpson Hafen, 
Bismar k Archipelago, from which port he sailed on a month's cruise 
with the Governor of German I Dr. Hahl, visiting many 

villages in New Ireland and adjacent islands and the two German 
islands of the Solomon group — Buka and Bougainville. Return- 
Hafen from the Solomon Islands, a month was spent 
along the c man New Guinea, ascending the Kaiserin 

gusta River. He then proceeded to Manila, via Yap, the chief 



OF THt 

I1NIVFBSITY OF IIIINOIS 



■ 
- 



K 



or 



i 

a 
i- 



- 
■t 
■■ 



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x 
O 

u. 

< 

CO 

a: 

Uj 

H 
Z 



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a 
O 

UJ 

r 

O 

I 



Jan., 1909. ANNUAL Report of the Director. 235 

of the Caroline Islands, and devoted a month in Luzon in connection 
with the Robert P. Cummings 1 Philippine Expedition. Returning 
home from the Philippines via China and Japan and the Hawaiian 
Islands, he visited on the way Canton and Peking. As a result of 
this expedition the Museum has received about 80 cases of material 
and several hundred photographs. 

The Assistant in Dendrology has completed two periods of field 
work on North American Forest Trees, during the past year, his Spring 
work being completed in southern Missouri and begun in West Vir- 
ginia, and his Autumn work completed in West Virginia. As a result 
a large amount of valuable material has been added to last season's 
accumulation which is now curing in preparation for installation. 
There was also secured, in addition to the timber specimens, a val- 
uable series of tree photographs, fruit and herbarium specimens, as 
well as accessory material for the systematic collections of the Depart- 
ment in general. The Curator has made two extended trips to the 
museums of Europe, visiting Ireland, Scotland, England, Holland, 
Germany, Austria, Italy, Sicily, Switzerland, France, and Belgium. 
Resulting from this work is an extensive series of photographs, ex- 
haustive notes on museum technique, and valuable comparisons and 
studies made of type species. Mr. O. E. Lansing, Jr. has continued his 
field work in the Lake Chicago Basin during the past season, adding 
largely to the series of plants already secured to represent this van- 
ishing flora. 

Early in June about ten days were spent by the Curator of 
Geology in the newly discovered diamond fields in Pike county, 
Arkansas. All the important outcrops of the diamond-bearing perido- 
tite were visited and specimens obtained. In addition the gypsum 
and asphalt beds in the vicinity were visited and specimens of their 
products collected. The Assistant Curator of Paleontology in the 
latter part of the season, with two assistants, spent about two 
months continuing in eastern Wyoming the collection of Loup Fork 
Miocene fossils. Most of the work was done in the vicinity of Raw 
Hide Buttes, Wyoming, and a considerable amount of important 
material was obtained. Among this were some excellent skulls of 
the rare form Moropus, a nearly complete skeleton of Procamelus, 
some rhinoceros skulls, and specimens of Miocene horses. Collecting 
of Cretaceous and Tertiary invertebrate fossils was carried on by the 
Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology in Mississippi during 
April and May. The principal Cretaceous collections were made 



Fibld Mr \i. Ih Reports, Vol. III. 

in the vicinity of Ripley, Mis i, whc: ral hundn iinens 

Coll( in tlii <-cn V< 

iir with which the spcciin- 

rom the soil. In order to obviate this 
difficulty the Curator empli e which ; 

th- writh paraffin, imi m their ral. In this 

way the ined w I the collection 

is first 1 value that has ever been 

seenn ils. At Pon1 I ries <>i fossil o 

echinoids, and shark's teeth was col numberii hundred 

and twenty-tw. imens. Of these the echinoi re exception- 

ally tine ami a1 if the The Selma be 

of Houston yielded four hundred and eighty-six specimens of in- 
rtebrat ing sixty-five s] and a sandy limestone 

in the vicinity two hundred and thirty-one specimens representing 
twenty-five species. The collecting of Tertiary fossils was carried 
on chiefly in the vicinity of Vicksburg and about thirty-two hundred 
specimens representing one hundn species were secured. 

While the work of collecting here was considerably interfered with 

excessive rains and high water, the amount of material 
was on the whole very sati The assistance of Dr. Crider, 

State Geologist of Mississippi, Professor Sullivan of Millsaps College, 
and Professors I. owe and Brown oi the State University, is gratefully 
acknowledged in connection with the w r ork About twenty pho - 
■phs illustrating the formations were made and a considerable 
.ount of modern molluscan material was secured and transferred 
to the Department of Zoology. At Traverse Bay. Michigan, the 
Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology also collected one 
hundred anil twenty-eight specimens of Devonian corals, sponges, 
etc., which on polishing exhibit especially well-marked structure. 
A series of peculiarly eroded pebbles was also secured at this Locality. 
The results of the < 9 in the interest of the Department 

of Zoology to Central America, and Venezuela. South America, in- 
cluding adjacent Islands, during the early part of 190 
Dearborn and Ferry, proved most satisfactory. Their combined col- 
lections contained 3,21; bird skins of which Mr. Ferry 2.100. 
A fini from the Dutch islands of C >, Orul I Bonaire 
were nearly all new to the collections. During the summer Mr. Perry 
made several short collecting trips to local points in Illinois and one 
to northern Wisconsin, the results of which added 90 specimens, 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 237 

many of which were missing from those localities. Much attention 
has been h water fishes for exhibition 

purposes, and in this connection the Assistant Curator, Dr. Meek, 
made visits • irable localities in Illinois and adj ites, usu- 

ally in company with Mr. Heim, taxidermist, with the result that 
valuable material was procured and added to the collection. During 
the months . June, and July frequent visits were made by Dr. 

Meek and Mr. Heim to Pine and Millers. Indiana, to secure specimens 
of the large commercial : iken at these places by the fishermen. 

These visits and SOI mis and small lakes near 

by resulted in securing 70 skins. Of th are mounted and finished, 

are mounted but not finished, and the remainder is unmounted. 
The skins include 18 species. During the first three weeks of Sep- 
ral places along the Illinois River were visited where con- 
siderable commercial fishing was being done. At these points 98 
fish skins of 25 species were secured. Dr. Meek, Mr. Freisser, and Mr. 
Hildebrand spent two days collecting in the Fox River at McHenry, 
Illinois, securing 12 skins representing 6 s] During his vacation 

in October Dr. Meek spent two days on Lake of the Woods in north- 
ern Minnesota and prepared and shipped from there to the Museum 
32 specimens of large fishes representing 7 species. On the same 
trip he spent two days on Lake Superior at Marquette, Michigan. 
One lake trout weighing 25 pounds and one weighing 10 pounds, and 
a ling of 12 pounds were sent to the Museum. No extended field 
trips were made during the year for the Division of Entomology but, 
as usual, a fair amount of local collecting was done both by the As- 
sistant Curator and his assistant, special attention having been given 
to the species of Illinois. As a result of similar collecting during pre- 
vious years, the insect fauna of northern Illinois is now fairly well rep- 
presented in the Museum's cabinets. From the middle and southern 
portions of the State, however, little material has as yet been obtained. 
Several acquisitions were made by means of three non-entomological 
Museum expeditions. The most noteworthy material received in this 
manner was that collected by Dr. Dearborn in Venezuela. Mr. Slocum 
of the Department of Geology a! tsin Misissippi, and 

Mr. Perry lik brought with him a few interesting forms gathered 

in Costa Rica, Panama, and Venezuela. The following is a list of the 
expeditions: 

Locality. Collector. Material 

Costa Rica, Panama, 



Islands of Curacao, 
Oruba and Bonaire 



J. F. Ferry, Bird and Mammal Skins^ 



Pibld M> Natural History —Reports, Vol. III. 



Locality. 

• 
Solomon I 

l 
Phi'. 
Chii 

ppi .... 

i 

McHenry, Pax Ri 1 
DUnoia River 

iff, Wisconsin, .ml 
. Illinois . 



Arkansas 

.ia 
Fox Lake, Illinois 






Fox Lake. Illinois 

iff, Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Lake of the Woods, near 

ike < intario 
Local ami Northern Illinois 
Sikkim and Bhutan 
Philippine Islands (R. F. 
Cummings' Expedition), 



unan Islands 
Philippine I K. P. 

Cummings' Expedition) 



\. 1 »■ ■: 



N". Dearborn, 
A. W. Slocom, 

II. II. Smith, 



S. B. Meek, 

C. B. Cory, 

0. C. Farrini^ton, 
II. II. Smith, 
C. L. Dewey, 

L. L. Pi 

J. F. Ferry, 

E. S. Riggs. 



S. E. Meek, 
J. P. Ferry, 
B. Laufer, 

F. C. Cole. 



Alfred R. Brown, 



Material. 

Archaeological material 

Ethnological 
material from India, Cey- 
lon, Ja 

Ire'. ;ka. Bougain- 

ville, New Guii: 
the Philippine Islands. 



I and Mammal Skins. 
[nverte Qa. 

ibers. 

Fishes. 

Bird migration and studies 

for groups. 
Ores and Minerals. 
Timbers. 
Material for groups, birds, 

and nests. 
Birds and eggs. 
Birds and eggs, 
ebrate Fossils. 

Fishes. 

Birds. 

Thibetan Ethnology. 

Ethnological material from 
Tinguians, IS, Kal- 

ingas, Amurayans, Bataks. 
Tagbanaus. 

Ethnological Material. 



William Jones, M.ivavo, Igorot, and Ibalaas. 



allation, Rearrangement, and Permanent Improvement. — The acqui- 
n during the last few years of varying amounts of material from 
several tribes of North America rendered it necessary that the collec- 
tions from these tribes be reinstalled, thus there has been placed on 
permanent installation the year collections from the following 

kfoot, Sauk and Fox, Iroquois, Micmac, Ottawa, 

^eminole, Cheyenne. Arapaho, Zuni, 

ami -nia tribes. the first time in the history of the 



OF THt 

UllfVPB<5i T y f) f |H, N0|S 







■ 

■•■ 
O 

< 

Z 



? 
I 
X 






- ' 



— ■- 

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*" ! 

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- - 

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2 ; 



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* '- 

x - ? — 



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: E 



Jan., 190Q. Anntal Report OP hii: DIRECTOR. 239 

Department of Anthr y the collections from Africa have been 

thoroughly overhauled and have been entirely installed. They now 
completely occupy Halls 50, 51, 5a, and part of 53. Owing to the ac- 
quisition of additional material from Egypt, changes have been made 
necessary in the Egyptian Hall. New cases ha n provided and 

much of the material has been reinstalled. The ancient mortuary 
boat has also been provided with a suitable case. The lack of floor 
space has made impossible certain rearrangements and the installation 
of certain collections which were designed, and as a consequence a 
certain amount of confusion prevails in the corridors leading to the 
East Annex. With the addition of the collections brought from the 
Philippine Islands by Mr. Cole and the probable receipt of additional 
material from Dr. Jones, it becomes necessary to secure additional 
space for the exhibition of these collections. During the year several 
miniature groups have been prepared and placed on exhibition. Two 
of these represent important ceremonies among the Pawnee, while 
two depict the summer and winter habitations and indoor and out- 
door life of the Sauk and Fox Indians of Iowa. 

Two of the cases containing gems in Higinbotham Hall have been 
relined with silk and the specimens reinstalled. In Hall 35 installation 
of the great dinosaur torso has been completed, the hall having been 
opened to the public about the first of August. The torso has been 
mounted so as to stand upon a base 12x30 feet, with a rail surrounding 
the base at a distance of two feet. Above the base the mount rises to 
a height of 15 feet. The skeleton is shown from the shoulders back- 
ward to the middle of the tail. It includes more bones of an individ- 
ual dinosaur of this size than is known at present to be exhibited in 
any other museum. The contiguity of the bones as found also makes 
this skeleton important in giving positive evidence regarding the 
structure of these animals. A large descriptive label, drawings of a 
complete skeleton and restored forms, and a photograph showing 
method of quarrying the bones are exhibited in connection with the 
skeleton. The courtesy of the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh, 
through Director W. J. Holland, is acknowledged in providing casts of 
foot and limb bones for use in the mount. In addition to the dinosaur 
mount five new wall cases 7x12 feet in size have been added to the 
hall and in these the Jurassic dinosaur material formerly exhibited in 
other halls has been placed. This material includes vertebras, sacrum, 
and limb bones of Brachiosaurus, scapulae, vertebrae, foot, limb, and 
pelvic bones of Morosaurus, and vertebrae, scapula, and femur of Dip- 



240 PlBLD M k Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

:s. Tl if the Hall ar ist part, therefore, 

illustr of petri- 

rms has also been 
hall. It The transference 

of the di rtunity for n 

merit improvi 

Tl Uectiofl there 

s of cys- 
; to the Siluri iea on ex- 

hil hundr 

• the I) ian. To the C aboul 

three hundn nted on tablets 

e. Tliis n tied 1 "or I 

most part from the collection purchased from Mr. Pultz. The Tria^ 
^ils were als 1 Hal! Hall : installed. I 

this rearrangement it was made possible to devote Hall 36 almost 
wl Jurassic fossils. Two cases of Jurassic plants and inverte- 

■re reinstalled in this hall and two cases of Jurassic ichthyo- 
1 one of Jurassic fishes transferred from Hall 59 to Hall 36. 
The Cretaceous collections were moved to the east end of Hall 59 and 
new Tertiary vertebrates and iir rates thus afforded room in 

their proper sequence. Among new specimens of Tertiary vertebrates 
installed in Hall 50 may be mentioned two large nodules from the Loup 
Fork 1 showing remains of the fossil horse Hypohippus in 

the matrix, and several skulls of recently purchased inian fossils. 

Two of the two-foot wall cases in Hall 61 were replaced by three-foot 
cases and in them were installed tl ries of Titanotheres and some 
other large skulls. Some rearrangements were also made of the floor 
ex' in Halls 50, 60. and 61. In Hall 6 es have been pro- 

minerals that I fade on exposure 

t. These, alth they in e of the most showy and 

interesting specimens, had hithert necessarily kept in drawers 

The device pi 1 for each spec- 

which is hinged and 

•nen s> lude the light except 

s of levers connected with a 

■ se permits raising of the box by 

pr- the button the box drops back 

into plac :iecim< in. The specimens are thus 

- the moment when the visitor wishes 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 241 

to examine them. When several specimens which it is desired to pro- 
tect occur in one case the levers on the different boxes are connected 
with a rod so t: le button connects with all the boxes in the 

case. A single pressure of the button thus permits examination of all 
the specimens at one time. Protective devices of this kind were pro- 
vided for all the important miens of orpiment, realgar, topaz, 
rhodonite, proustite, ami lorandite, ami it is proposed to add others. 
New specimens ha • n installed in the mineral collection as re- 
ceived and individual pasteboard trays have been provided for a 
number of fragmental specimens. Twenty storage drawers have 
been added to the cases in Hall (14. Studies made of specimens of the 
mineral collection during the summer by the Curator and Mr. E. \Y. 
Tillotson, Jr., resulted in finding a number of new crystal forms and 
habits. These include one new form of bertrandite, two of calcite, 
three of linarite, two of olivenite, one of octahedrite and three of orpi- 
ment. A new axial ratio was found for olivenite and new habits ob- 
served for anglesite, barite, bertrandite, calcite, leadhillite, linarite, 
mimetite, octahedrite, olivenite, orpiment, realgar, rutile, and sphal- 
erite. In Hall 65 a wall case of stalagmites has been installed, es- 
especially notable specimens being a series of marcasite stalactites 
from Galena, Illinois, which were collected a number of years ago and 
presented to the Museum by Elizabeth E. T. Saw r yer, two large sta- 
lagmites from Missouri, and a series of cave formations from Crystal 
Cave, South Dakota. The stalactites installed in this case had 
been mounted in normal position, being hung from shelves by hooks 
inserted in the base of each stalactite. A number of fulgurites have 
also been installed in this case. Other specimens newly placed on 
exhibition in this hall include a number of groups of concretions, 
various erosion forms, and two large slabs of orbicular gabbro and 
granite. A cave exhibit illustrating the occurrence of a large selenite 
deposit in Utah is also being constructed in this hall. The installation 
of the systematic rock collection in Hall 66 has been completed, 
about fifteen hundred specimens having been placed on exhibition. 
The specimens are installed on individual blocks and fill eight floor 
cases. Of these the igneous rocks occupy four cases, sedimentary 
rocks two cases, and metamorphic rocks two cases. Descriptive 
labels have been placed in the cases in addition to the individual 
labels with a view to making the collection as instructive as possible. 
Eight wall cases in the hall have also been installed in part. 
These contain the series of rocks of Manhattan Island and the iron- 



u Hi- !"ky l\ Vol. III. 

ta, lava 

illustrating den- 

drr hi ihill 67 in 

and building stoi iou sly 

install' iiens which had b< 

m van ad not hitherl Ion account 

to standard sizes, pol- 

and 1 ibition. Six Alabama marbles in polished 

sla: t6 incl ' form another valuable addition to 

the t the (■ ins exhibited in this hall include 

[mens installed in eight wall cases, four 1 
the wall cases, and nine table cases. Of these 
>ur hundred and seventy-one a ished marbles and 

:tive st These consist chiefly of polished slabs cither 9x16 

inches or (a x [8 inches in size, although material both larger and 
smaller is included. This 1 i on occupies four of the wall and 

ses and four of the table cases. American marbles fill three 
cases, Norwi me-half case, English and Irish one and one-half 

ca> ireek and Italian one case, and French two cases. Of other 
decorative stones verte antique occupies one wall case, and Mexican 
onyx and alabaster two cases. The four table cases are occupied 
miscellaneous polished marbles, verte antique, ."•' 1 onyx and 

other decorative stones in various ornamental forms. The remaining 
five table cases are occupied by the collection of building stones con- 
sisting of two hundred and forty four-inch cubes. Of these, granites, 
limestones, and marbles each occupy one case, and .elud- 

ing lavas, occupy two cases. Hall 68, containing the collection of 
clays, soils, etc., has also been completely recased and reinstalled. The 
cases consist of four wall cases and sixteen table cases. Of these the 
cla etion occupies twelve table cases and half a wall case, the soil 

ble cases and one wall case, sands and cements one 
11 case, clay-like minerals half a wall case, and mineral pigments one 
collection is divided into two parts, a synoptic and a 
n. Of these the synoptic collectii >n is installed in four 
table cases, upon the floors of which diagrams show the derivation and 

ses of clays. In proper position upon 

th( ims are place imens of each group of clays. This classi- 

n separates the the numbers of 

which are similar in origin and industrial a The general 

collection of clays, numb' . enl five hundred and fifty sped- 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 243 

mens from different localities, is also arranged to correspond with this 
classification. In addition a small collection shows the influence of 
various foreign matters upon the plasticity, shrinkage, color, and other 
properties of clay. The collection of soils numbers at present one 
hundred and tifty-tiv< Lmens. ( )l" these a collection illustrating 

the derivation of soils from several kinds of rocks, and a collection of 
the essential and incidental components of soil fill two table cases. In 
these eases is also placed a collection of plant foods as found in soils 
and one illustrating the characteristics of the wider and well-recognized 
groups of soils. A collection of titty-four soils and subsoils arranged 
according to the special classification adopted by the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture occupies one wall case, and a collection of soils from all 
parts of the world arranged according to the familiar groupings of 
loams, marls, etc., occupies two table cases. The sands and cements 
which occupy a wall case are arranged according to their industrial 
applications, being grouped as glass sands, molding sands, etc. Trays 
or jars are employed for the installation of the specimens in this hall, 
according as a vertical or horizontal position is desired. A number 
of additions were made to the collection of relief maps in Halls 76 and 
77 and the collection rearranged. The work of framing the maps of 
the collection was also continued and is now nearly completed, forty- 
two large maps being at present framed. Smaller maps, which could 
not readily be framed, were placed in floor cases, three of which were 
provided for the purpose. Photographs of typical ancient shore lines 
of Lake Chicago and other topographic features in the vicinity of Chi- 
cago, made by the Curator, have been installed adjacent to the relief 
maps of the region. Complete descriptive labels have been made for 
a number of maps and have been attached to them in such a way as to 
be conveniently read while examining the map. This has been accom- 
plished by mounting. them over the map in many instances and hinging 
them so that any portion of the map covered by the label can be seen 
by swinging the label. In Hall 78 the old cases and platforms have 
been replaced by new cases throughout, so that all the exhibits are 
now under glass. The large specimens formerly exhibited near the 
walls have been brought forward to the center of the hall and promi- 
nently displayed in three upright cases. These cases are 40 inches 
square and 69 inches high. They have glass on all four sides and the 
top, so that their contents are visible from all parts of the room. 
The central case of these is occupied by large blocks of bright- 
colored rubellite, and those on either side contain monoliths 



244 Pibld Mi Natural Hi ports, Vol. 111. 

grouped seven 

TiiP Of s: 

.. B mc 
I ammonj ire 

an the process. 

Tv. i .11 illus' 

which was Eorm< i in a large upri in the 

the hall. A: in- 

■ . ills of the hall 
Dollar in design to those empl the mineral 

I. As 1 hting and capacity of the 

■s in the order 
ere made. Two wall cases eighteen 
im ith wall conl J, includ- 

mined al i. In 

tin ed such other specimens as were too 

the shallower cases. These Specimens include blocks 

oi gypsum, epsom salt, rock salt, and phosphate rock. The remainr 

inches deep. Of these the borate and nitrate 
cupies half of the case and the other hah" is occupied by the 
salt collection. Magnesian and similar minerals of economic value oc- 
cupy about a qu i wall id the remaining three-quarters 
contain the sulphurs. Abrasives an I ) their uses 
ckx 1 case and a h id half a wall case contains the collec- 
tions oi crude asbestos. Mica o X and the phosphates, 
ling to a mineral don, occupy 
ft and nearly half of another. Anion- minor details of 
install nail it may b< L that fl . -k tra; -been 
| tor ; ilar exhibits in place of the buff 
rly used. An in 1 numl >d specimen 
»een em; i a n< D of label holder is 
:• all labels m the wall C I Hall So has been thoroughly 
I and ; I iantled 

»f the collections. 
,n as • id that o\ a single ad litional 

rmanenl 3 will : led 

r all of the colle< ti •: the Department. Comparing th< ;':>u- 

n of the i ith th. ting at the time of the 

opening ol hat six halls are now devoted to 

the paleontological collections instead of three, as at that time. 



OF THt 
UNIVFflSITY nf |,,, H0|S 



- 
- 
- 



10 






3 
-. 



3 
3 













< - 



- 



- 
- 



- 



k 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report ok the Director. 245 

Marbles and building Stones n CUpy one hall instead of tv. 

and the metallurgical collections previously occupying one hall have 
been discontinued as a group. In connection with thi mge in 
the distribution of the rease in their number 

has 1m ected. Thus the paleontological collections now number 

about 60,000 specimens instead of 20,000, the number ol met' dls 

represented has been increased from 180 to 300, the number of miner- 
als in the systematic colk rom 5,000 to 15,000 and the economic 
collections show a net incn it 5,000 and a total of over 
15,000 specimens. Two hundred and live prints have been added to 
the Department photograph albums since the last report, making a 
total of -2,193 prints now in these albums. In the chemical laboratory 
a case has been built lor keeping additional apparatus and in the ot'hce 
of the Department one for some ot the larger pieces of physical ap- 
paratus. Two storage cases have been added to the paleontological 
laboratorv and fitted with wooden trays. Owing to work upon the 
dinosaur mount less opportunity than usual was afforded for cleaning 
material from the matrix m the paleontological laboratory. The 
principal work of this kind accomplished during the year was the 
preparation of skulls and parts of skeletons of Moropus and Hypo- 
hippus. 

The crowded condition in the herbarium has necessitated certain 
alterations whereby more space could be obtained to accommodate 
the collections. The congestion has been temporarily alleviated by 
transferring the mounting room from the second to the first gallery 
of the north Court, thus freeing the west room of the second gallery 
for herbarium extension. By this change sufficient space has been 
gained to accommodate the herbarium lor about two years: moreover, 
some additional room for temporary storage purposes was secured in 
connection with the newly appointed mounting room. A combina- 
tion steel table and bookcase has been installed in the library of the 
Department, especially designed for the proper shelving and preser- 
vation of the heavier and some of the rarer botanical folios, of which 
several have been acquired during the past year. The case is approx- 
imately 9 feet x iYi feet x 2>{> feet, with a capacity sufficient to accom- 
modate about 100 ordinary folios; in general style and finish it con- 
forms with the steel herbarium cases already in use in this Department, 
^withstanding the absence of the Curator on two extended European 
trips during the year, very satisfactory progress has been made in the 
rehabilitation of the .Section of Plant Economics. The entire south 



FlI : ' \'a i ik \! Hi Vol. III. 

I and la: 
■ llatdon removed from 1 
and 'list: install 

an . small 

sent installation 

[mens British Guiana, 

tuela, i Amazonas and Parana een 

ad rendered hoi ew 

installati I h se showing log, plank, and tree 

in < )ak and Ash ; a similar nt- 

inj I woods of the Empire, and tv 

omprising this in- 
:id highly I from 

the Imperial I" Bureau. One iprising the princi] 

an ' imbers i il Fi inn rain of 

th< I, and its tibility of finish. S in- 

illed with Japanese dendrologic material, making I of nine 

• timbers of that country. The new installation 
3 in thr nt and unique si the maj 

tion timbers in fine and representative exam; 
the cabinet timbers in ample show their markings and ti- 

bility to polish, anothi "her s] showing tl r forms and 

lized marking; anoth ting tl pecial timbers 

utilized for " toko ] th by di -of 

and om tailing the mboo 

as tion material. Thr< tnplifying the timbers of 

British India, in one of which is placi »und tabli uk 

(/'. 6 feel in diami i1 from a single board. 

and specimens of blackwood (Dalb* illustrating its pta- 

bil ulptun -id in two others a loi 

intry in ample examples. Three 
, by lar. principally utilized con- 

str ia. T - the tint 

am] timbei untry uately 

hich tl ielding them . 'he 

I to 

the m and most fri Brazil; 

one o! ii and two, the bark 

an'": - All thi 

, ely la' ir- 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op mi: Director. 247 

ance rendering them highly attr and educational to the public. 

In the genera] systematic scries, representing plant economics, the 
following additional cases have been installed: one case illustrating 
the S s including the Egyptian papyrus and its utilization in the 
ancient manufai rolls for writing the "books of the dead." 

A ease has been added to the Palms in which is represented a long 
series illustrative of the double or Seychelles coconut, the Largest tree 
fruit known. The maize series has received the addition of a ca 
of further utilizations to the four cases already in the suite. In order 
to avoid constant shifting of the cases to keep up the consecutiveness 
• he systematic installatii »n while 1 >ccupying the illy adapted quarters 
of the Department in the present rambling building, a second series 
has been begun in the west galleries and transept. Por this series 
these galleries are now fully occupied by new cases placed in position 
during the late Summer. The installation of these cases has proceeded 
thus far as follows: One case devoted to utilized fossil plants exem- 
plified by fossil woods, peat, and gums, with articles and fabrics made 
from each. One case illustrating various utilizations of plants be- 
longing to the Potato Family; principally, in this case, tobacco from 
various parts of the world; and anothei comprising the plant 

economics of the Trumpet Creeper family, which yields among other 
products the highly valuable calabash (( itia Cujete). The in- 

stallation of this entire section is anticipated to be finished by June 
next. In addition to the installation work many of the previously 
installed cases have been fully and descriptively labeled and "copy " 
has been written for all cases so far installed. 

During the year the exhibition collection of mounted mammals 
has been rearranged and seven new cases added. Eleven new spec- 
imens of mammals have been mounted by Mr. Freisser which have 
been installed in Hall 20. Among these were a fine male gorilla, a 
chimpanzee, and a jaguar. Several other specimens of the larger 
mammalia are being mounted, including wolves and bears, and these 
will be added to the exhibition collection at an early date. Two 
new groups of mammals, one of woodchucks and one of muskrats, 
have been completed by Mr. Pray. For the exhibition collection of 

birds 40 specimens have been mounted and installed, and a case 

illustrating albinism in animals, which includes a number of birds, has 
been placed on exhibition. The col lection of Illinois birds contained in 
Hall 27 is practically completed, several nests having been added 
during the past year as well as descriptive labels in addition to those 



:> Mr - . \ | | i ■ - :<\ R.BPOR1 •' iL. I I I. 

already placed. Pour larger and two smaller en 

■ 
ao inches high and about a< ide. I are n; 

ral 
•\n r rk in the 1 m . 

tli- lation of an exhibit of bul 

Unite a arranged for I 

ptu butterflies and I aoths, 

the Sphingidae and ed 

which work 
in I >urin r Mr. 

rhard spent six v. Ivania for 

shipment thi mtainii ooo s] 

menl i hich is made elsewhi 

Printing. — The foil rk bafl m this 

' • Q 

her 
Labels. Impressions. 

Department oi Anthropology 65 5.3°° 

Department of Botany ... i,8< 150 

■ memt of G ... - 39 05 

. y 1.407 12. 

74 - • 

itham Hall t ,a 

The Library u. 

Photography and Illustration. — The following taK be result 

of the operations 

Lantern KnlarRe 
Negatives. Prints. Hides. mr 

64 84 

thropology a,i; M76 100 14 

•any ... 51 B78 

•logy 22 245 do 

.35 2 i,.; 

ral 17 

To' 5.N 710 

J number <>t inventory entries to De 9 

; 1 . 1907 i . g,"- 

Department .1 

Total ... 6o<; 



Jan., 1909. 



.cm Kkport op Tin Director. 



249 



Attendance. -Th< for the year shows a slight increase 

over th' ar. The follow a list of the school 'lasses 

(thirty pupils or more) that visited the Museum during thi • 11 jusl 

■ed : 



•ion 

a -- Fifty ninth Streel and Monroe Avenue 

r a r' ixteenth Street and Wabash Avenue 

Hyde Park— Fifty seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

Thornton Township Harvey, [llinois 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Ave 

nue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Le Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Ave 

nue 

James Shields — South Rockwell, corner West third 

Street 

Hyde Park High —Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

versity of Chicago -Chicago, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Ave- 
nue 

ne High - Illinois Street, corner Cass Street . . . . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

Forest Park — Forest Park, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

Joliet High — Joliet, Illinois 

Jackson Park — Fifty-sixth Street and Stony Island Avenue . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 
Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence 

Avenue 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe 

nue 

e Park High Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Chicago Kindergarten Colleg* — 1200 Michigan Avenue 
Hyde Park Hij Fifty-seventh Streel and ECimbark Avi 

Parkman — Fifty-first Street and Princeton Avenue 

Goldsmith - 2IO Maxwell Street 

ewood High West Sixty-second Street and Stewart 

• nue 

aces E. Willard Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence 

Avenue 

Harrison Practice -Twenty-third Place and Wentworth Ave 

nue 

Thomai - Lime Street and Archer Avenue 

Hyde Park High Fifty Beventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

Morgan Park — Morgan Park, Illinois 

John H. Ilamline — West Forty-eighth and Bishop Streets 



eachcrs. 


Pupils. 


1 


.S° 


1 




2 




1 




2 


33 




34 



5' 

45 
35 

54 
4 5 
5° 
14 
40 

105 
35 
55 

jg 

30 

48 

3 5 
3° 
}8 
J 5 

'75 
40 



5 


30 


2 


60 


1 


>o 


2 


7» 


2 


38 



250 Field M Natural History Reports, Vol. III. 






1 

aue 
Due 
Parkside le 

J.'lin 11.11 

John H. Hamline W 

Blm Blue I [land, Illinois 

K» ■: .... 

Wen. ltll Phillij ninth S 

Due .... 
J. \ ghty-ninth 

Blue Island . Illinois 

Butt — Ashland A od Wal Due 

1 1 . 1 1 . 1 • . 
Blue Island ... 

Whittier ; 1. Illinois .... 

land, Illinois .... 

rk, Illinois . . 

• W main 

E. Will.i- -ninth Stn 

QU( 

Mark Si Streel and Walla 

John II. Hamline W rty-eighth and I 

le Avenue . 
M.i entfa Street and Sawyer Avenue 

\V. K. Sullh ity-thinl Street and II iuston Av< 

Shields l ird Streel and Rockwell \ ■ 

Thirty- sixth P ad Wal 

- Chicago, Illinois. 
irteenth PI : Johnson S 

th and 
'.'. 1 >hio Stn rner Lincoln Sti ... 

-ninth ind Emerald Avenue . 

Williai — Six 1 - Avers Avenue 

I \ enue and High Street . 

Hermitage Avenue 



■•.<• hundred and Eighth P 



ind ■ >'Brien Streel 

Inu Thirl afield 



ind Johnson Streets . . . . 

• 

Un: 1, Illinois 

Urr 

. Illinois 



Teacher*. 






34 






1 








2 


38 


1 


3° 






1 


40 


1 


'°5 




126 


- 


30 


1 




1 


40 








75 




80 




36 






1 




2 


68 


I 




I 




6 


iq8 


1 








1 






95 


1 


35 




98 


2 


56 


1 


48 


2 


36 


1 




2 


30 


1 


53 










5 


39 




39 




3° 




60 


1 


48 



Jan., 1909. 



Annual Rbpori op ihh Director. 



251 



Schools an 1 Location. 
John Spry —Twenty-fourth ind Marshall Boulevard . 
University of Chi. . Illinois 

le Park High - Fiftj eventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 
Hyde Parle High l enth Street and Kimbark Avenue 

Hyde Park High Piftj evenl and Kimbark Avenue 

le Park High Piftj eventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High Piftj 1 venth Street and Kimbark Avi 
John II. Hamline w th and Bishop 

Porestville — Forty-fifth S enue 

(il.i I - Smith Robey Street and Washburne Avenue 

e High — 1 iventh Street and Union Avenue 

Gladstone- -South Robey Street and Washburne Aven 

ademy — Forty-nintl and Evans Avenue 

:eld — Seventy-fir 

Hyde Park High — Fif ty-seventl and Kimbark Avenue 

Hyde Park High —Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High —Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 
Henry Clay — -One hundred and Thirty-third Street and Su- 

ri< >r Avenue 

Parkside — Seventieth Street and East End Avenue 

John C. Conley — Leavitt Street and Belle Plaine Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and ECimbark Avenue 

Morgan Park — Morgan Park, Illinois 

Vincent's High — Webster Avenue, corner Sheffield Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Minnesota University — Minneapolis, Minnesota .... 
II le Park High — Fifty-Seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Thornton Township High — Harvey, Illinois 



Teachers. 
16 



Pupils. 

385 

3° 

60 

52 
56 
60 

92 
3° 
43 

>> 

35 
118 

35 
36 

58 
42 
7° 

44 

34 
39 
36 
40 
38 
35 
4 5 
4« 
96 

3° 
3° 
54 

45 



Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of acces- 
sions, names of members, 1 

Frederick J. V. Skiff, 
1 director. 



2^2 Pibld M R bpos 1 9, Vol. Ill 



Fin wu \i Statement. 

< IENER \l ACCOUNT. 



IPTS \\l> DISBI RSEMEN Is 
iar\ l. 1908, to I >i i ml ei 11, 



Rkckipts. 

ish in Ti :iber 3 • $14,072.28 

Petty <'i ii <•:) hand, December ;i, 1907 . 1.95 

Hues of Members 1,770.00 

Admissions ai k Rooms - j . 70 

Sale of Guides 406.25 

:th Park Commissioners . 1;, 000. 00 

Huntington W. Jackson Libi ad 40.00 

Pie] tent Income ... 150,04' 

Int . Investments 45,585.19 

Int • ink Balances 771 .80 

•ts . . 1 .216.83 

Mrs. ooo.oo 

K. P. Cummings Philippii -00.00 

$270.50 






Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 253 

DISHURSBMHNTS. 

Salaries $76,993.38 

Guard Service (3*536. 59 

oitor Service 8,920.83 

Fin- Protection 1,870. 60 

• and Light — 

Wages $3,765.66 

Fuel 5,407.14 

Gas 334-73 

Sundries 1,049.69 10,647.22 

Repairs and Alterations — 

Wages of Cai Painters, Roof- 
ers 12,488.11 

Material used — paints, oils, lumber, 

'.jlass, 1 1,521.27 14,009.38 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases 29,743.98 

Office Furniture 502.^1 30,246.32 

The Library — 

Books 2,923.44 

Binding 998.50 

Sundries 105.85 4,027.79 

Sections of Printing and Photography . . . 1,943.60 

Collections, etc., Purchased 18,050.19 

Departmental Expenses 4,679.03 

Guide, Eighth Edition 128.62 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming . 3,959.52 
Stationery,?' phone.etc. S67.85 

Lecture Course Expense .... 624.32 

International Audit Co 250.00 

Publications 2,162.65 

Expeditions 8,395.95 

Sundries 821.42 17,081.71 

Mrs. Timothy B. Blackstone Fund .... 14,900.00 

R. F. Cummings, Philippine Fund .... 4,380.40 

$222,415 .66 

Petty Cash 739-95 

In Treasurer's hands, December t, 1 , 1908 . 47,348.32 48,088.27 

$270,503.93 



\i II is rom - Ki p Vol. 1 1 1 



\lll\h\v I VND RECEIPTS FROM i\\i \ IM i. I'O 

I \Ei EMBER 31, 191 

— 

. 

Annual 

Life .... 





1 1 

m Pree I >ays — 



Sundays M93 

.602 

38) 

est Paid Attei •n any one day r 7. 

B) 

1 tilv Admission 

Paid ' 

Rbcbip 

Sold — 1 .' 1 

Ar- h 593-°5 

•ns 65 






1 



RApy 



OF THt 
UNIVERSITY f)F IIIIMniR 



- 
■ 



X 

UJ 

IT 



I 

o 



< 

3 
■c 



I 

3 



3 




5 



I 

z 
O 

z 



ao 

-J 

I 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report OP the DIRECTOR. 255 



Acci-smons. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(ACCESSIONS AUK BY (WIT C7NLBSS OTHERWISE DBSIGNATBD.) 

AVER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

1 red pigment - Egypt. 
BARHKK. i". m.. La Porte, [ndiana. 

b trap, of split vane arranged and fa to form a narrow cane 

with handle of cane — Lake Atitlan, Guatemala. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE MUSEUM, Brooklyn, New York. 

23 Anthropological photographs — Southwest (exchange.) 
DEISHER, II. K., Kutztown, Pa. 

9 large photographs of groups of baskets of donor's collection. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by E. E. Aver: 

Archaeological objects — Egypt and Italy. 
Ethnological objects — from Nubia. 
Collected by F. C. Cole: 

Ethnological objects — Luzon and Palawan Islands. 
Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey: 

Ethnological specimens — Java. 
Ethnological specimens — Bismarck Arch. 
Ethnological specimens of the Todas — Nilgiri Hills, India. 
Crania, human — New Ireland. 
Crania, human — German Xew Guinea. 
Objects of Hindu Religion — Madras, India. 
Singhalese Ethnology — Ceylon. 
Lthnological specimens — Solomon Islands. 
Boomerangs, arrow heads, etc. — Australia. 
Ethnological specimens — German Xew Guinea. 
Ethnological specimens— Xew Ireland and adjacent Islands. 
Collected by B. Laufer: 

Ethnological objects — Sikkim. 
Purchases' 

Winnebago blood doctor's outfit 

1 wooden ladle, i quirt (bone handle). 1 game (feet bones of deer), 
1 quiver ibuffalo hide), 1 bow, 1 knife (deer horn handle) — 
Black River Falls, Wisconsin. 
1 skull of an African of Lumba tribe with tribal marks, 2 ventral in- 
cisors of lower jaw removed and sockets filled, al notch be- 
tween two upper centra] incisors - Afri 



256 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Sacred medicine bundle. 

Buffalo robe. 

Large gourd rattle of the Pawnee Indians. 

Buckskin shirt, trimmed with locks of hair, buckskin fringe, broad 
bands of old colored bead and large ornamentations in colored 
porcupine quill work on front and back. 

Ethnological objects from Nebraskan Winnebago Indians — Winne- 
bago, Nebraska. 

1 drum stick, 1 deer necklace, and bear claw. 

2 medicine rattles. 

1 ladle. 

3 balls of native twine. 

2 native made bags. 
Ethnological material — Winnebago. 
1 squaw pipe — Wisconsin. 

Ethnological material — German New Guinea. 
HALL, LIEUT. C. S., United States Army. 

Saddle bag of tanned hide with long fringe of same — Sierra Madre 
Mts., Sonora, Mexico. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. N., Chicago. 

1 chipped flint arrow point. 

1 chipped flint blade — Gary, Indiana. 
HOWARD, MRS. C. H. 

1 piece of timber rafter from ruins — Casa Grande, Gila Valley, 

Arizona. 
HUSSAR, MRS. LILIAN, Chicago. 

Ethnological objects — Camarine Prova, Luzon, Philippine Islands. 
LARKIN, T. J., Chicago. 

Sinew backed bow, eight arrows and buffalo hide quiver — White 
Earth, North Dakota. 
MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Ethnological objects — Brazil (exchange). 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H., Chicago. 

2 Chilcotin baskets. 
OPPENHEIM, M. A., Chicago. 

1 rain coat of intestine, sewed with sinew — Katzebue Sound, 
Alaska. 
PRICE, JOHN E., Seattle, Washington. 

1 Apache Indian medicine man's cap — Mexican border. 
SNOW, EDGAR M., Chicago. 

Fire sticks, obtained by donor from Samoa. 
SPENCER, REV. IRVING, Chicago. 

4 wooden figures (2 on one base, 2 singly), 1 wooden dish, animal 

shape with lid back — Bana, N. V. P. I. 
QUIBELL, J. E., Bedrashien, Egypt. 

2 photographs and one plan of the tomb of Niterieser. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 257 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

BARTLETT, H. H., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

6 herbarium specimens — Massachusetts and Georgia. 
BEBB, ROBERT, Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — Europe. 
BOLIVIAN COMMISSION W. C. E., 1893, Chicago. 

10 economic specimens — Bolivia. 

1 herbarium specimen — Bolivia. 
BOWERS, W. V., Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California. 

2 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
BRANNON, M. A., University, North Dakota. 

Herbarium specimens — Colorado. 
CALDWELL, OTIS W., Chicago. 

1 Microcycas calocoma parts of staminate and ovulate cones — 
Cuba. 
CALKINS, W. W., Berwyn, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — North Dakota. 

1 herbarium specimen — - Illinois. 

78 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

35 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
CHASE, MRS. AGNES, Washington, D. C. 

6 plant descriptions. 
CONZATTI CASSIANO, Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico. 

162 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

94 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

97 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
COULTER, DR. J. M., Chicago. 

3 drawings. 
9 fibers. 

COWLES, DR. HENRY C, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
CUSICK, WM. C, Union, Oregon. 

16 herbarium specimens — Oregon. 
DETMERS, MISS FREDA, Columbus, Ohio. 

9 herbarium specimens. 
EDUCATIONAL MUSEUM, St. Louis, Mo. 

1 tappa cloth — Pacific Islands. 
FAWCETT, GEO. L., Miami, Florida. 

1 flowers of Vanilla Eggersii. 
FERRY, J. P., Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Wisconsin. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collated by J. M. Greenman: 

2 plant descriptions. 



258 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

2 plant descriptions. 

aph i "t plants. 

1 description of Citharexylum lucidum. 

5 plant descriptions. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

ti drawings and plates. 

: drawings tracings, and descriptions. 

I herbarium specimens. 
Collated by Section of Photography and Illustration: 

1 photograph of Abronia Carletoni. 
Collected by L. J. K. Brace. 

r herbarium specimen — Bahamas. 
Collected by R. A. Dixon: 

324 herbarium specimens — Texas. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing, Jr.: 

91 herbarium specimens — Lake Chicago Basin. 
Collected by C. F. Millspaugh: 

I Juglans regia (nuts) Paris, France. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

180 slab specimens — Missouri. 
78 wheel specimens — Missouri. 
170 board specimens — Missouri. 
12 herbarium specimens — Missouri. 
48 winter twigs — Missouri. 
24 fruit specimens — Missouri. 

I I fungi — Missouri. 

20 economic specimens — Missouri. 

448 herbarium specimens — Missouri. 

168 branch specimens — ■ Missouri. 

20 hand specimens — -Missouri. 

352 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 

17 dry fruits — West Virginia. 

38 hand specimens — West Virginia. 

101 slab specimens — West Virginia. 

82 board specimens — West Virginia. 

29 wheel specimens — West Virginia. 

28 economic specimens — West Virginia. 

40 winter twigs — West Virginia. 
Collected by P. Wilson and L. J. K. Brace: 

756 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
Purchases: 

430 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

4 economic specimens. 

680 herbarium specimens — Canada, Alaska, Labrador and Nova 
Scotia. 

276 herbarium specimens — Nevada and California. 

176 herbarium specimens — Paraguay 

2i>6 herbarium specimens — Oregon and Washington. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 259 

7,077 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

163 herbarium specimens — United States. 

616 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

939 herbarium specimens — Western United States. 

29 herbarium specimens — United States. 

170 herbarium specimens — Montana. 

872 herbarium specimens — Canada. 

244 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

1,005 herbarium specimens — United States and Mexico. 

4 specimens economic material — France and Turkey. 

142 herbarium specimens — California. 

8 economic specimens drugs. 

261 herbarium specimens — Jerusalem. 

7 economic specimens — Jerusalem. 

2 Vitis vinifera grape sugar, Fceniculum vulgare — Fennel seed. 
FULLER, GEO. D., Chicago. 

16 herbarium specimens — Alberta. 
GARVENS, W., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

70 herbarium specimens — Florida. 

109 herbarium specimens — Maine and New York. 
GATES, FRANK C, Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
GEHE & COMPANY, A. G., Dresden, Germany. 

4 oar weed surgical appliances. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Mass. 

285 herbarium specimens — Bahamas (exchange). 
GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

1 colored plate of dacca cotton. 

1 herbarium specimen — Africa. 

1 photograph of Zea Mays L. 

1 herbarium specimen — Massachusetts. 
GRINNELL, JOSEPH, Pasadena, California. 

63 herbarium specimens — California. 
GUTHRIE, OSSIAN, Chicago. 

2 white oak (fossils) Chicago, Illinois. 
HILL, E. J., Chicago. 

65 herbarium specimens — United States. 
INSTITUTIONS OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, Ireland. 

29 samples of dyed yarns (exchange). 
IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS, 
Ames, Iowa. 

118 herbarium specimens — China. 
KING, E. W., Coyame, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
KONIGL BOTANISCHES MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

1 herbarium specimen — Guatemala. 
KNUDSON, P. E., Ephraim, Wis. 

1 fruits of Celastrus scandens L. — Wisconsin. 



260 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

LANSING, 0. E., JR., Chicago. 

i economic specimen Lycoperdon gemmatum — Illinois. 
LEWIS, A. B. p Chicago. 

i specimen cork — British East Africa. 
LUNLLL, DR. J., Leeds, North Dakota. 

ii herbarium specimens — North Dakota. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. P., Chicago. 

2 economic specimens — New Jersey. 

i Chrysobalanus Icaco, varach candle — Africa. 

i sophisticated maple sugar. 

i barley sugar. 

14 economic specimens — Austria, Germany, Italy, and Sicily. 

3 specimens — olives, opium, almonds — Palestine and Turkey. 
1 Catalpa speciosa fruit — Lake Chicago Basin. 

1 Catalpa bignonioides fruit — Lake Chicago Basin. 
MOSELEY, E. L., Sandusky, Ohio. 

743 herbarium specimens — Ohio (exchange). 
MYERS, G. W., Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — Colorado. 

NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New Mexico. 

204 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, Bronx Park, New York City. 

26 herbarium specimens — New Jersey and Jamaica (exchange). 

9 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

6 herbarium specimens — New Providence, Bahamas (exchange). 
29 herbarium specimens — Barbados (exchange). 

1 herbarium specimen — Jamaica. 

177 herbarium specimens — Bahamas and Jamaica (exchange). 
PRINGLE, C. G., Burlington, Vermont. 

1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
REECHER, S. E., Chicago. 

24 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

7 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

8 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
ROWLEE, W. W., Ithaca, N. Y. 

1 Dipsacus sylvestris fruits — New York. 
SEFFER, DR. PEHR OLSSON, Mexico City, Mexico. 

46 rubber samples — Mexico. 
SKIFF, F. J. V., Chicago. 

1 Cyperus Papyrus — Spain. 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

1 specimen fungus — Michigan. 
SMITH, W. O., Winchester, Indiana. 

1 diatomaceous earth — New York. 
UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

251 herbarium specimens — Mexico (exchange). 

1 herbarium specimen — Ontario, Canada. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 261 

VAN HOUTEN AND ZOON, C. J., Chicago. 

1 Theobroma cacao. 
WILLARD, O. T., Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
WOOTON, E. O., Mesilla Park, New Mexico. 

13 herbarium specimens — New Mexico. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

ADAMS, C. C, University of Chicago, Chicago. 

1 specimen thomsonite in matrix — Isle Royale, Lake Superior. 
ALABAMA WHITE MARBLE CO., Gantt's Quarry, Alabama. 

6 polished slabs marble — Gantt's Quarry, Alabama. 
ALBRIGHT, W. F., Chicago. 

Bones and tooth of mammoth — Dallas, Texas. 
ATLAS SCHOOL SUPPLY CO., Chicago. 

Relief map of Palestine. 
BRIDGE, B., Chicago. 

1 specimen moss agate — Guernsey, Wyoming. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Casts of limb bones and feet of Apatosaurus. 
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES, Golden, Colorado. 

2 2 specimens rocks and minerals — Colorado (exchange) . 
CRAWFORD, W. L., JR., Dallas, Texas. 

1 lower jaw of Smilodon, 2 leg bones of mammoth — Dallas, Texas. 
DESERET MUSEUM, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

33 large crystals of selenite — South Wash, Wayne Co., Utah (ex- 
change) . 
DAVIES, D. C, Chicago. 

2 specimens marl — Radcliffe on Trent, Notts, England. 
ESTATE OF H. A. WARD, Chicago. 

Section of Lampa meteorite — Chile. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by O. C. Farrington: 

3 specimens clay and cement materials — Dallas, Texas. 

22 specimens peridotite, 3 specimens asphalt, 7 specimens gypsum, 
1 specimen Ostrea — Southwestern Arkansas. 
Collected by J. F. Ferry: 

6 specimens rock of volcano of Turrialba, Costa Rica. 

1 specimen rock phosphate — Aruba, Dutch West Indies. 
Collected by H. W. Nichols: 

1 specimen bog clay, 1 specimen soil — Hammond, Indiana. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

Vertebrate fossils from Loup Fork Miocene, Raw Hide Buttes, 
Wyoming, as follows: 

7 specimens extinct camel representing two genera. 

4 specimens oreodonts representing three genera. 



262 Field Museum of Natural History— Reports, Vol. III. 

5 specimens extinct horse. 
2 specimens extinct dog. 
2 specimens Moropus. 

10 specimens extinct rhinoceros. 
Collected by A. \V. Slocom: 

4,950 specimens Cretaceous and Tertiary invertebrates. 

5 s] ns marl, 5 specimens concretions, 3 specimens minerals — 

Mississippi. 

11 specimens fossil corals — Little Traverse Bay, Michigan. 

1 1 7 specimens Devonian invertebrates, 46 specimens pebbles and 
concretions — Emmet Co., Michigan. 
Purchases: 

1 Leighton meteorite. 

2 sections Ainsworth and Williamstown meteorites. 
68 species fossil corals — Falls of the Ohi< ». 

200 specimens invertebrate fossils; 25 specimens vertebrate fossils — 

Patagonia. 
1 specimen vivianite — Leadville, Colorado. 

3 specimens chrysoberyl — Peru, Maine. 

6 specimens minerals — various localities. 

4 relief maps. 

5 specimens gold ore — Rawhide, Nevada. 

3 mineral specimens. 

1 specimen tetrahedrite - — Utah. 

Skull, tusk, and miscellaneous bones of mammoth — Alaska. 

4 mineral specimens. 

GAMBA, P. PEREIRA, Pasto, U. S. of Colombia. 

1 specimen gold ore — near River Guachicono, Colombia, South 
America. 
IOLA CO-OPERATIVE ZINC & LEAD CO., Zinc, Arkansas. 

1 specimen blende, 1 specimen blende concentrates, 1 specimen float 
galena — Iola Mine, Zinc, Arkansas. 
JOHNSTON, L., Chicago. 

8 specimens rock-crystal — Jonesboro, Arkansas. 
KURTZ, S. A., Bellevue, Ohio. 

1 calcite crystal — Bellevue, Ohio. 
LARKIN, THOMAS J., Chicago. 

1 specimen opal in breccia — Fort Bayard, New Mexico. 
MILLER, M. J., Chicago. 

5 specimens cinnabar pebbles — Washington Creek, Alaska. 
MOSELEY E. L., Sandusky, Ohio. 

94 specimens fossils, 13 specimens minerals, 11 geological specimens 
— Sandusky, Ohio (exchange). 
NEWBERRY, YV. W., Chicago. 

iS specimens ores, 16 specimens pyrite, 13 specimens fossils, 2 speci- 
mens siliceous oolite — Bromide, Oklahoma. 
PHILADELPHIA MINERALOGICAL CLUB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
specimens minerals of Pennsylvania (exchange). 



^A°Y 



i hi. 

OF THt 
UNIVERSITY OF II1INQIS 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PL. XXXIX. 




Group OF Woodchucks. Marmota monax. (LlNN.) 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 263 

RING, H. A., Nome, Alaska. 

2 specimens placer gold ores — Gold Run Creek — Seward Peninsula, 
Alaska. 
VERMONT MARBLE CO., Proctor, Vermont. 

1 5 polished slabs of marble — Vermont. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AKELEY, MRS. C. E., Chicago. 

2 beetles — Kilo, Congo Region, Africa. 
BARBER, C. M., Chicago. 

I waterbug — Chicago. 

6 frogs — Chicago. 
BARKER, F. H., Victoria, Australia. 

41 shells — Victoria, Australia (exchange). 
BRAZIL, DR. VITAL, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

II snakes — Sao Paulo, Brazil (exchange). 
CARPENTER, C. H., Chicago. 

1 dragonfly — Illinois. 

1 spider — Michigan. 
CARRIAKER, M. A., JR. 

12 fishes — Costa Rica (exchange). 
CHAVES DIOCLECIANO, Managua, Nicaragua. 

7 beetles, 1 moth, 55 butterflies — Nicaragua (exchange). 
CHILDREN'S MUSEUM, Brooklyn, New York. 

2 fishes — Guatemala. 
COBB, B. B., Chicago. 

1 turtle — Chicago. 
DEUBLER, L., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Chicago. 
DEWEY, C. L., Chicago. 

1 turtle — Dowagiac, Mich. 
FARRINGTON, O. C, Chicago. 

1 American woodcock — Chicago. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

Collected by C. E. Akeley: 

2 eggs of the Secretary bird — British East Africa. 
Collected by C. M. Barber: 

6 snakes, 7 frogs, 1 salamander — Willow Springs, Illinois. 

150 fishes — Willow Springs and Lockport, Illinois. 
Collected by C. B. Cory: 

Nest and eggs of Prothonotary warbler — English Lake, Indiana. 
Collected by N. Dearborn: 

50 fishes — Venezuela. 

204 specimens dragonflies, bird lice, bugs, grasshoppers, beetles, 
butterflies, moths and flies — Venezuela. 



264 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

27 lizards — Curacao, Dutch West Indies. 
1.1 15 bird skins — Venezuela and adjacent Islands. 
Collected by C. L. Dewey 

9 black terns. 1 least bittern, 3 yellowhead blackbirds. 

dwinged blackbirds, 1 bobolink, 2 king rails, 2 sora rails, nest- 
lings — Fox Lake, Illinois. 
Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey and Mrs. Clemens: 

531 specimens shells — various localities. 
Collected by J. F. Ferry: 

1 ,000 bird skins — Costa Rica and Panama. 

1,100 bird skins — Venezuela and adjacent Islands. 

1 heron, 2 blackbirds, 9 woodpeckers, 11 flycatchers, 3 vireos, 5 

thrushes, 7 wrens, nuthatches and chickadees, 8 sparrows, 2 
tanagers, 28 warblers, 2 cuckoos — Woodruff, Wisconsin. 
100 specimen shells. 

2 lizards, 1 toad — Costa Rica. 

1 snake, 9 lizards — Aruba, Dutch West Indies. 

2 lizards, 1 snake — Colon, Panama. 
1 toad, 3 lizards — Costa Rica. 

1 toad, 4 lizards, 1 snake — Costa Rica. 
6 lizards — Bonaire, Dutch West Indies. 

1 wasp, 2 beetles, 2 bugs, 3 bird lice, 1 grasshopper, 1 centipede — 
various localities. 

3 thrushes, 2 vireos, 2 warblers, 1 sparrow, 1 swallow, 1 flycatcher, 

1 rail, 1 snipe — Lake County, Illinois. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

1 toad. 

397 specimens dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, beetles, butterflies, 
moths, flies, bees, wasps and parasites — Illinois and Indiana. 
Collected by E. Heller: 

176 mammal skins, 5 mammal skeletons, 24 mammals in alcohol — 
Louisiana. 

2 snakes, 12 lizards, 1 salamander — Louisiana. 
Collected by S. F. Hildebrand: 

1 salamander — Wolf Lake, Indiana. 
Collected by S. E. Meek : 

2 fishes — Millers, Indiana. 
1 snake — Millers, Indiana. 

I snake — Pine, Indiana. 

3 fishes — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
8 fishes — Pine, Indiana. 

I I fishes — Baudette, Minn. 

6 fishes — Liverpool, Indiana. 

10 fishes — Fox Lake, Illinois. 

1 7 fishes — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
20 fishes — Millers, Indiana. 
63 fishes — Pine, Indiana. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 265 

Collected by S. E. Meek and W. Heim: 

5 turtles, 1 salamander — Meredosia, Illinois. 
39 fishes — Meredosia, Illinois. 

31 fishes — Pullman, Illinois. 

26 fishes — Alton, Illinois. 
Collected by S. E. Meek, S. F. Hildebrand, and J. Freisser: 

140 fishes — Fox River and McHenry, Illinois. 
Collected by S. E. Meek and V. Shelford : 

105 fishes — Calumet River, Clarke, Indiana. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom: 

157 fresh water shells — Emmet Co., Michigan. 

29 beetles, moth, bugs, bee, spider, grasshopper, etc. — Mississippi. 

203 fresh water shells — Mississippi. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

2 turtles — Batesville, Missouri. 

1 hornet's nest — West Virginia. 
Collected by L. L. Pray: 

1 blue jay's skin — Dowagiac, Mich. 
Collected by A. B. Wolcott: 

177 specimens dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, moths, flies, beetles, 
bees, etc. — Illinois and Indiana. 
. Purchases: 

6 snakes, 14 lizards, 18 toads, 7 frogs — Costa Rica. 

620 sets (2,500 specimens) bird eggs — various localities. 

146 specimens spiders, scorpions, grasshoppers, mantids, roaches, 

bugs, bees and wasps, beetles, moths and butterflies — Palestine. 
42 specimens jointed spider, digger-wasp, beetles — Arizona. 
153 specimens insects, 18 specimens reptiles, 51 mammal skins — 

Arizona. 

1 porcupine fish — Jamaica. 

50,000 specimens butterflies and moths. 
60 mammal skins — various localities. 
16 young alligators — Florida. 

2 7 alligator eggs — Florida. 

5 otter skins — Queen Charlotte Islands. 
5 mammal skins — British Guiana. 
2 finches — Horner's Ranch, Hawaii. 

1 albinistic robin, 1 albinistic sparrow — Geneva, Illinois. 

2 jays — various localities. 

1 jaeger gull, 1 vega gull — various localities. 
213 bird eggs — Iowa. 

i goose, 1 duck, 3 nighthawks, 1 sparrow — various localities. 

2 bird skins. 

1 whooping swan — Greenland. 

13 bird skins — Costa Rica. 

14 bird skins. 

2 mammal skins. 

2 barn owls — Enid, O. T. 



266 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

i golden eagle — Custer, Wyoming. 
298 bird skins — British Guiana. 
Mounted by E. N. Gueret: 

1 skeleton of tree frog. 

3 skeletons of turtle and snakes. 

2 skeletons of turtles. 

3 skeletons of turtles. 
1 skeleton of fish. 

1 skeleton of turtle. 

1 skeleton of turtle. 

1 skeleton of alligator. 

1 skeleton of turtle. 

1 skeleton of Dowitcher bird. 

1 skeleton of blanding's turtle. 

1 skeleton of black bear. 

2 skeletons of alligator and capybara. 
1 skeleton of tapir. 

1 skeleton of sea elephant. 

3 skeletons of turtles. 

1 skeleton of screech-owl. 

1 skeleton of fish. 

3 skeletons of snapping turtles. 

3 skeletons of turtles. 

1 skeleton of box turtle. 

1 skeleton of fish. 

1 skeleton of gar- pike. 

5 skeletons of fishes. 
1 skeleton of turtle. 
1 skeleton of bird. 

1 skeleton of screech-owl. 
FRIESSER, J., Chicago. 

1 beetle, 1 fly larva, 1 stonefly, 1 fly — various localities. 

1 snake, 6 frogs — McHenry, Illinois. 
3 fishes — McHenry, Illinois. 

FOWLER, DR. W. N., Bluffton, Indiana. 

2 eider ducks, 2 ivory gulls, 1 puffin, 1 jaeger. 
GEILHUFE, F. H., Chicago 

2 bullfrogs — Liverpool, Indiana. 
GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Chicago. 
HACK, PAUL, Orope, Venezuela. 

8 beetles — Orope, Venezuela. 
HERTZ, A., Chicago. 

3 roaches, 1 grasshopper — Illinois and Indiana. 
HILDEBRAXD, S. F., Chicago. 

1 spider — Chicago. 
HOWE, MURRAY, Chicago. 

6 muskrats — Iowa. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 267 

HULL AND BANGS, Waukegan, Illinois. 

5 crossbills — Waukegan, Illinois. 
HUME, J. A., Chicago. 

1 red bat — Chicago. 
KENKEL, L. V., Chicago. 

69 beetles — Michigan. 
KWIAT, A., Chicago. 

2 dragonflies — Clarke, Indiana. 
LANSING, O. E., JR., Chicago. 

1 lizard — Pine, Indiana. 
LILJEBLAD, E., Chicago. 

1 bee, 2 wasps — Memphis, Tenn. 
LONGLEY, W. E., Oak Park, Illinois. 

4 parasites — Oak Park, Illinois. 
MANWELL, J. M., Chicago. 

1 bumblebee — Chicago. 
McCORMICK, CYRUS H., Chicago. 

6 premolars and molars of horse. 

5 beetles — Brazil. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

2 moths — Toarmina, Sicily. 
MORRILL, MRS. A. D., Chicago. 

1 mounted apteryx. 

1 mounted bird of paradise. 
MOSELEY, E. L., Sandusky, Ohio. 

8 snakes. 8 turtles, 1 salamander — Sandusky, Ohio (exchange). 

10 snakes, 4 turtles — Sandusky, Ohio (exchange). 
MUELLER, FRED M., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Germany. 
MUNZNER, H., Chicago. 

1 beetle, 8 centipedes, 3 spiders — Illinois. 
NATIONAL MUSEUM, Costa Rica. 

22 fishes — Costa Rica. 
O'BRIEN, B., Corliss, Wis. 

r mole cricket — Corliss, Wis. 
RIECK, A., Chicago. 

1 bug — Chicago. 
SMITH, CASSIUS F., Chicago. 

2 water bugs, 11 beetles — Illinois and Mexico. 
SMITH, H. L., Chicago. 

2 wasp nests — Chicago. 
STEPHENSON, F. M., Chicago. 
1 Mexican deer. 

1 grizzly bear — El Paso, Texas. 

2 cinnamon bears — El Paso, Texas. 
STRECKER, J. K., JR., Waco, Texas. 

37 specimens beetles, dragon flies, velvet-ant, butterflies — Texas 
(exchange). 



268 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

TRIGGS, CHAS. W., Chicago. 

i turtle — Canada. 
VON LENGERKE & ANTOINE, Chicago. 

i great bustard. 
WALKER, DR. J. W., Chicago. 

i butterfly — Millers, Indiana. 
WATERBURY, J. C. 

i salamander — Chicago. 
WALCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

i tree toad — Beach, Illinois. 

28 specimens larvae, scorpions, spiders, stoneflies, bugs, flies, etc. — 
various localities. 
WRIGHT, A. H., New Concord, Ohio. 

1 great horned owl — New Concord, Ohio. 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

2,667 negatives, 5,863 prints, 710 lantern slides, 46 enlargements, 
609 negatives developed. 
Made by F. C. Cole: 

700 portraits of natives, landscapes, etc. — Philippine Islands. 
Made by O. C. Farrington: 

6 negatives of Old Chicago beaches. 

6 negatives of general views — Murfreesboro, Arkansas. 

6 negatives of general views — Kentucky. 
Made by J. F. Ferry: 

75 negatives of bird studies, landscapes, etc. — Costa Rica and Panama. 

30 negatives of bird studies, etc. — Illinois. 
Made by N. Dearborn: 

81 negatives of bird studies, landscapes, etc. — Venezuela. 
Made by C. L. Dewey: 

10 negatives of bird studies, etc. — Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 
Made by Geo. A. Dorsey: 

168 negatives of general views, etc. — various localities. 

220 negatives of natives, general views, etc. — New Guinea. 

40 negatives of general views, portraits, etc. — various localities. 
Made by Berthold Laufer: 

43 negatives of general views, portraits, etc. — Sikkim, India. 
Made by S. E. Meek: 

54 negatives of fishing scenes, etc. — Great Lakes. 
Made by C. F. Millspaugh : 

150 stereo negatives of general views, landscape, etc. — Foreign 
countries. 
Made by A. W. Slocom: 

26 negatives of general views, etc. — Mississippi. 



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Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 269 

Made by Huron H. Smith: 

16 negatives of trees — Chicago. 

120 negatives of trees — Missouri. 

226 negatives of trees — West Virginia. 

98 negatives of trees — Missouri. 
Purchases: 

6 colored lantern slides — Costa Rica and Panama. 



THE LIBRARY. 

BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 

(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 

ACIREALE REALE ACCADEMIA DI SCIENZE, Acireale, Italy. 

Rendiconti e memorie, ser. 3a, v. 4-5, 1904— 1906. 
ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, Alabama. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ALABAMA DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY, Montgom- 
ery, Alabama. 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
ALLEN, GLOVER M., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

1 pamphlet. 
AMBROSETTI, JUAN B., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

1 pamphlet. 
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Memoirs, v. 13, no. 6. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Proceedings, v. 19. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE. 

Proceedings, v. 56-58, 1907-1908. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR LABOR LEGISLATION, Madison, Wis- 
consin. 

Proceedings, first annual meeting, 1907. 

Women in industry (gift). 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, v. 1, 1907 (gift). 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City. 

Bulletin, no. 18-24. 

Yearbook, 1908. 



270 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Anthropological papers, v 1, pt. 1-6; v. 2, pt. 1. 

Bulletin, v. 23, 1907. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Memoirs, v. 14, pt. 2. 

Memorial: Morris Ketchum Jesup. 

Pamphlets. 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven, Connecticut. 

Journal, v. 28, pt. 2. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMES BOTANICAL LABORATORY, Easton, Massachusetts. 

Contributions, no. 7-8. 
AMSTERDAM K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, 
Netherlands. 

Proceedings, v. 10. 

Verhandlingen, v. 13, no. 4-6; v. 14, no. 1. 

Verslagen, v. 16. 
AMSTERDAM NEDERLANSCH-ANTHROPLOGISCHE VEREENIGING, 
Amsterdam, Netherlands, 

Handelingen, no. 1-3. 
ANGELIS, SABATINO DE, ET FILS, Naples, Italy. 

Catalogue illustre" (gift). 
ANGERS. SOCIETE" D'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, France. 

Bulletin, v. 36. 
ANGERS. SOCIETE NATURELLE D'AGRICULTURE, SCIENCES ET 
ARTS, Angers, France. 

M^moires, ser. 5, v. 10, 1907. 
ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France. 

Annales, current numbers. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRE- 
LAND, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ARCHITECTS' AND BUILDERS' MAGAZINE COMPANY, New York 
City. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONWISSENSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany. 

Archiv, current numbers. 
ARDENNES. SOClfiTE" D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Ardennes, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, no. 18, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 
Arkansas. 

Annual report, no. 20. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 271 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ATKINSON, GEORGE P., Ithaca, New York. 

5 reprints. 
AUGUSTANA COLLEGE, Rock Island, Illinois. 

Publication, no. 6. 
AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia. 

Transactions, v. 12. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Memoirs, current numbers. 

Record, current numbers. 

Report, 1907. 
AZAMBUJA DE, GRACIANO A., Porto Alegre, Brazil. 

Annuario do Estado Do Rio Grande Do Siil, 1908 (gift). 
BAMBERG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Bamberg, Ger- 
many. 

Bericht, v. 19 and 20. 
BARRETT, JOHN W., Washington, D. C. 

Venezuela-British Guiana Boundary Arbitration, 10 vs. (gift). 
BASCOM, F., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

1 pamphlet. 
BASEL NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Basel, Switzerland. 

Verhandlungen, current numbers. 
BASEL UNIVERSITAT, Basel, Switzerland. 

Mitteilungen aus der ethnographischen Sammlung, v. 1, heft 1-2. 
BAYERISCHE BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany. 

Berichte, current numbers. 

Mittheilungen, current numbers. 
BAYERN. ORNITHOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, B. 7. 
BELFAST NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 
Belfast, Ireland. 

Report and proceedings, 1906-7. 
BELFAST NATURALISTS' FIELD CLUB, Belfast, Ireland. 

Proceedings, v. 6, pt. 1. 
BELOIT COLLEGE, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

3 pamphlets. 
BENGAL SECRETARIAT BOOK DEPOT, Calcutta, India. 

History of the rise, progress, and downfall of Buddhism in India 
(gift). 
BERGENS MUSEUM. Bergen, Norway. 

Aarbog, 1907, heft 2-3; 1908, heft 1. 

Aarsberetning, 1907. 



272 Field Museum op Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GEOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Berlin, Germany. 
Monatsschrift, current numbers. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR ANTHROPOL, ETHNOL., 
UND URGS., Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift fur Ethnologie, current numbers. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKSTUMLICHE 
NATURKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturwissenschaftliche Wochenschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE UNIVERSITAT, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahres-Verzeichnis, v. 22, 1907. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, v. 13. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1907-8. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Ger- 
many. 

Notizblatt, no. 41, 41a, 42, 43. 
BERLIN. K. KUNSTSAMMLUNGEN, Berlin, Germany. 

Amtliche berichte, 1905, 1906. 
BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Fiihrer, ed. 14. 

Veroffentliche, current numbers. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSICHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current numbers. 
BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. ZOOLOGISCHES MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Bericht, 1907. 

Mitteilungen, B. 4, heft 1. 
BERN. S0CIE"TE ENTOMOLOGIQUE SUISSE, Bern, Switzerland. 

Bulletin, v. n, pt. 8. 
BERN. UNIVERSITAT, Bern, Switzerland. 

49 dissertations. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, H. I. 

Fauna Hawaiiensis, v. 1, pt. 5. 

Memoirs, v. 2, pt. 3. 

Occasional papers, current numbers. 
BERTONI, A. W., Puerto Bartoni, Paraguay. 

5 pamphlets. 
BIRMINGHAM NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SO- 
CIETY, Birmingham, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers 
BLANC, HENRI, Lausanne, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 273 

BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BOMBAY. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Bombay, India. 

10 annual reports of the agricultural and botanical stations, 1906-7. 
BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1907. 

Verhandlungen, 1907. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual list of books, 1906-7. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Occasional papers, no. 8-10. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual reports, 1906, 1907 (gift). 
BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

President's report, 1906-7. 

Yearbook, 1908. 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

Librarian's report, 1907-8. 
BRANDENBURG BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenburg, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 49, 1907. 
BRANDSTETTER, RENWARD, Lucerne, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet. 
BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, Ger- 
many. 

Abhandlungen, B. 19, heft 2. 
BRESSLAU, ERNST, Strassburg, Germany. 

1 reprint. 
BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Annual report, no. 26, 1907. 
BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England. 

Report, 1907. 
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London, England. 

Report, no. 77, 1907. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Victoria, B. C. 

Annual report, 1907. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, Victoria, B. C. 

Sessional papers, 1907 (gift). 



274 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

BRITISH MUSEUM, London, England. 

Return, iqoS. 
BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, Brooklyn, New 
York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Yearbook, 1906-7. 

Museum : 

Bulletin, 1007. 

Museum news, current numbers. 

Report, current numbers. 
BROOKLYN PUBLIC LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUNN LANDWIRTHSCHAFT LANDES VERSUCHSSTATION FUR 
PFLANZENKULTOR, Briinn, Germany. 

Bericht, 1907. 

Mitteilungen, 3 nos., 1899-1907. 
BRUSSELS. ACAD&MIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES DES LETTRES ET 
DES BEAUX-ARTS, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annuaire, 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRUSSELS. MUSEE DU CONGO, Brussels, Belgium. 

Publications, current numbers. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annales, current numbers. 

Annaire, t. 19, 1908. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, v. 44. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE ROYALE LINNEENNE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

Calendar, 1908. 
BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
BUDAPEST. SOCIETE ROYALE HONGROISE DES SCIENCES NAT- 
URELLES, Budapest, Hungary. 

Aquila, v. 13-14. 
BUDAPEST. UNGARISCHE AKADEMIE WISSENSCIIA I-TF.N, Buda- 
pest, Hungary. 

Math, und naturwis. berichte, v. 21-22. 
BUENOS AIRES. FACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA Y LETRAS, Buenos 
Aires, Argentina. 

Publications de la seccion antropologica, no. 2, 3, pt. 1. 
BUENOS AIRES. INSTITUTO GEOGRAFICO, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Bulletin, v. r 6, 17, tS. 21. 
BUENOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Anales, ser. 3, t. 7, 9. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York. 
nual report, no. 11. 1907. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 275 

BUFFALO SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCE, Buffalo, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
BUITENZORG. DEPARTMENT DE L'AGRICULTURE, Buitenzorg, Java. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

1 pamphlet. 
BUITENZORG. S'LANDS PLANTENTUIN, Buitenzorg, Java. 

Bulletin de l'lnstitut botanique, no. 2-21, 1899-1904. 

Mededeelingen uit S'Lands Plantentuin, no. 11, 14, 16-20, 22-25, 2S, 

30-33. 35-38, 40-47. 49-57. 59-65. 68-75 (gift). 
CALCUTTA. INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 

Echinoderma-holothuroidea. 

Memoirs, v. 1, pt. 2. 
CALCUTTA ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California. 

Proceedings, ser. 4, v. 3, pp. 1-40. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, 
California. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, California. 

Occasional papers, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California. 

Publications: 

Anthropological ser., -. 

Botanical ser., J- current numbers. 

Zoological ser., J 

CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

List of members, etc., 1908. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Cambridge, England. 

Report of Library syndicate, 1907. 

Report of Museum and Lecture room syndicate, 1907. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Ottawa, Canada. 

Canada's fertile Northland, with maps. 

Geological survey: 

Annual report, no. 16, 1906. 

Annual report of the mineral industries, 1905. 

General index to reports, 1 885-1 906. 

Summary report, 1906. 

27 maps. 

14 pamphlets. 



276 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Bureau of Mines: 

Report, no. 16, 1907. 

Summary report, 1907. 

3 pamphlets. 
CANADA. DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES, Toronto, 
Canada. 

Annual report — fisheries, 1907. 
CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings, ser. 2, v. 12, sup., ser. 3, v. 1. 

General index, 1 882-1 906. 
CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada. 

Transactions, v. 28, no. 2. 
CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Cape 
Town, South Africa. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Geological Commission: 

Annual report, 1907. 

3 maps. 
CAPITAN, L., Paris, France. 

2 pamphlets. 
CARDIFF NATURALISTS' SOCIETY, Cardiff, Wales. 

Transactions, v. 40. 
CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACH- 
ING, New York City. 

Annual report, no. 1 and 2, 1906, 1907. 

Bulletin, no. 2. 

1 pamphlet. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Founder's day, 1908. 

Department of Fine Arts: 

Twelfth annual exhibition. 
CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D. C. 

Yearbook, 1907. 
CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Annual report, no. 12, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Classified catalogue, ser. 1, v. 1-3; ser. v. 1-2, igo2-6. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 
CARPENTER, G. H., Dublin, Ireland. 

Irish naturalist, current numbers. 
CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Tunis, Africa. 

Revue tunisienne, current numbers. 
CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und bericht, no. 71, 1907. 
CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GIOENIA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Catania, 
Italy. 

Bolletino, ser. 2, fasc. 1-2. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 277 

CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Colombo, India. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Progress report, no. 40. 
CEYLON ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon, India. 

Annals, v. 1, pt. 2-5; v. 2, pt. 1—3; v. 4, pt. 2. 

Circulars, v. 1, pt. 1-14, 23; v. 2, pt. 1-9; v. 4, pt. 3-8. 
CHARLESTON MUSEUM, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Bulletin, v. 1, no. 1—2; v. 2, no. 3-4. 
CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 

Special publications, no. 2. 
CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Bulletin, v. 2. 

Catalogues, 12. 
CHICAGO HARBOR COMMISSION, Chicago. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1907. 
CHICAGO MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 1, 1907. 
CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 35, 1907. 

4 bulletins. 
CHICAGO SANITARY BOARD, Chicago. 

Sanitary District of Chicago, 3 reports (gift). 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago. 

Annual register, 1907—8. 

Botanical gazette, current numbers. 

Journal of geology, current numbers. 

President's report, 1906-7. 

Record, current numbers. 

University of Chicago Magazine, v. 1, no. 1—2. 
CHRISTIANIA MINERALOGICAL INSTITUTE, Christiania, Norway. 

Norges Geologiske undersogelse aarbog, 1906, 1907. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, no. 27, 1907. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual list of books, 1907. 

History, 1802— 1908. 

Library leaflet, current numbers. 
CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

Record, current numbers. 

Studies, current numbers. 
CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

American journal of psychology, current numbers. 

Publications, no. 6. 



278 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 
'i sheli , current numbers. 
Report, i')c>7. 
COIMBRA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Coimbra, Portugal. 

Boletin, 1906. 
COLBY COLLEGE, Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1907-S. 
COLE, GEORGE WATSON, Riverside, Connecticut. 

Bermuda in periodical literature (gift). 
COLLETT, R., Christiania, Norway. 

4 pamphlets. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

Mines and minerals, current numbers. 
COLLINGE, WALTER E., Birmingham, England. 

3 pamphlets. 
COLMAR. SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Colmar, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, n. s. B., 7-8, 1903-4, 1905-6. 
COLN. RAUTEXSTRAUCH-JOEST-MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, 
Cologne, Germany. 

Festgabe, 1906. 

Fuhrer, 1908. 

Jahresbericht, v. 1-4, 1904—7. 
COLOMBO MUSEUM, Ceylon, India. 

Administrative reports, 1907. 

Spolia zeylanica, current numbers. 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Studies, science ser., current numbers. 
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MIXES, Golden, Colorado. 

Catalogue, 1908—10. 
COLORADO SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Denver, Colorado. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Fort Collins, Colorado. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1908-9. 
COLORADO STATE BUREAU OF MIXES, Denver, Colorado. 

Report, 1905-6. 
COLORADO UNIVERSITY, Boulder, Colorado. 

Studies, current numbers. 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, New York, 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

Contributions, Geological Department. 
CONCILIATION INTERNATIONALE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, no. 1 (gift). 
CONNECTICUT ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report op the Director. 279 

CONNECTICUT. STATE GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY 
SURVEY, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Bulletin, no. 10-11. 
COOK, MELVILLE T., Newark, Delaware. 

1 reprint. 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, Ithaca, New York. 

President's report, 1906-7. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
COULTER, JOHN M., Chicago. 

25 original botanical manuscripts (gift). 
CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, 
Cuba. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ-JOSEPH UNIVERSITAT, Czerno- 
witz, Austria. 

3 reports. 
DARMSTADT VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany. 

Notizblatt, 1907. 
DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Delaware. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, no. 43, 1907. 

Bulletin, no. 19. 
DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DIXON, ROLAND B., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

1 reprint. 
DONALDSON, HENRY H., Philadelphia. 

16 pamphlets. 
DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH-ETH- 
NOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und berichte, current numbers. 
DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 
Dresden, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, 1907. 
DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 



280 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, Ire- 
land. 

Annual report, no. 76, 1907. 

Proceedings, 1S40-1860. 
DUBLIN. SCIENCE AND ART INSTITUTION, Dublin, Ireland. 

2 guides. 
EAST KENT SCIENTIFIC AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Can- 
terbury, England. 

Report and transactions, ser. 2, v. 5-7. 
EDINBURGH FIELD NATURALISTS' AND MICROSCOPICAL SO- 
CIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
EDINBURGH GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Transactions, v. 9, no. 2. 
EDINBURGH. ROYAL SCOTTISH MUSEUM, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Guide. 

Report, 1907. 
EDINBURGH ROYAL SOCIETY, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 
EGYPT. SURVEY DEPARTMENT, Giza, Egypt. 

General map of Egypt, with 8 other maps. 

Archaeological Survey of Nubia: 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
EGYPT. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, Cairo, Egypt. 

Zoological Gardens: 

List of zoological gardens of the world. 

Report, 1907. 

Special report, no. 2. 
EIGENMANN, CARL H., Bloomington, Indiana. 

10 reprints. 
EIJKMAN, P. H. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Chapel Hill, North Caro- 
lina. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ENGINEERS' SOCIETY OF WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Charter, by-laws, etc., 1908. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Annual report, no. 22, 1907. 

Bulletin, v. 13. 
ESSEX INSTITUTE, Salem, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 

Collections, quarterly. 
EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Evanston, Illinois. 

Annual report, no. 35, 1907-8. 
FERRIL, W. C, Denver, Colorado. 

1 pamphlet. 



books and pamphlets. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 281 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago. 

Purchase: 

General library, 37 

Department of Anthropology, 282 

Department of Botany, 187 

Department of Geology, 19 

Department of Zoology, 1,404 

FLORENCE. SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Florence, 
Italy. 

Archivio, current numbers. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lake City, 
Florida. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 
FOOTE MINERAL COMPANY, Philadelphia. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
FRANKFURT-AM-MAIN. SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFOR- 

SCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. 

Bericht, 1885-1895, 1897-1899, 1908. 

Festschrift, 1907. 
FRANKFURT-AM-MAIN. STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM, Frank- 
furt-am-Main, Germany. 

Veroffentlichungen, v. 1. 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FREIBURG. K. SACHSISCHE BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany. 

Program, 1908-9. 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, Ger- 
many. 

Bericht, v. 17, no. 1. 
FRIBOURG. SOCIETE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Fribourg, 
Switzerland. 

Bulletin, v. 15. 

Contributions, current numbers. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current numbers. 
FRITSCH, KARL, Gratz, Austria. 

1 pamphlet. 
FUR TRADE REVIEW, New York City. 

Fur trade directory, 1908-1909 (gift). 
GALLATIN, FREDERIC, JR., New York City. 

(His) Catalogue of books on ornithology (gift). 
GANONG, W. F., St. John, New Brunswick. 

1 pamphlet. 
GENEVE. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIN BOTANIQUES, Geneve, 
Switzerland. 

Annuaire, no. 10. 



282 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

GENEVE. SOCIKTK DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, 
Geneve, Switzerland. 
CompU 1 ivndu des sciences, v. 24, 1907. 
GENOA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA XATURALE, Genoa, Italy. 

Annali, ser. 3a, v. 3. 
GENNEP, ARXOI.D VAN, Paris, France. 

2 publications. 
GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Rochester, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, Washington, D. C. 

Bulletin (Alumni no.). 
GEORGIA. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment. 
Georgia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bulletin, v. 14-17. 
GIESSEN. UNIVERSITAT-BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany. 

4 inaugural dissertations. 
GLASGOW NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Transactions, v. 8, n. s. pt. 1. 
GOTTIXGEN. K. GEORG.-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT, Gottingen, Ger- 
many. 

Cronik, 1907. 

Report, 1907. 
GOULD, ALICE BACHE, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Blanco, Flora de Filipinas, 1S37 (original edition) (gift). 
GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, 
London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
GREAT BRITAIN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, London, England. 

Summary of progress, 1907. 
GREEN, G. K. 

Contributions to Indiana paleontology, v. 2, no. 2-3. 
GREENMAN, JESSE M., Chicago. 

Gray's new manual of botany. 

3 pamphlets. 
HAARLEM STADSBIBLIOTHEEK, Haarlem, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1907. 
HABANA UNIVERSIDAD, Havana, Cuba. 

Revista, current numbers. 
HAGEN, P. K., Hamburg, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
HAMBURG. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hamburg, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, B. 23. 
HAMBURG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERUNDE, Hamburg, Germany. 

Bericht, 1906. 

Jahrbuch, v. 24. 

Mitteilungen, v. 2, no. 1-2. 



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Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 283 

HAMILTON SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Hamilton, Canada. 

Journal and proceedings, sessions 1905-6, 1906-7. 
HANNOVER. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Hannover, Ger- 
many. 

Jahresbericht, 1904-7. 
HANNOVER. STADT-BIBLIOTHEK, Hannover, Germany. 

Cataloge. 
HARRIS, G. D., Syracuse, New York. 

1 pamphlet. 
HARTLAND, E. SYDNEY. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

HARVARD COLLEGE, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Annual report, 1906-7. 

2 pamphlets. 

Museum of Comparative Zoology: 

Annual report, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Memoirs, current number. 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

Report, 1906-7. 

Gray Herbarium: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HATCH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAUSWALDT, HANS, Magdeburg, Germany. 

Interferenz-erscheinungen um polarisiriten licht, pt. 3 (gift) 
HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, Ha- 
waiian Islands. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS' ASSOCIATION, Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAYNES, CAROLINE O, New York City. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 

HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany. 

26 inaugural dissertations. 
HELM, ALBERT, Zurich, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet. 
HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

Muhlenbergia, current numbers. 
HITCHCOCK, C. H., Hanover, New Hampshire. 

1 pamphlet. 
HONGKONG BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, Hong- 
kong, China. 

Report, 1907. 



284 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

HONOLULU. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE AND 
FORESTRY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

Hawaiian forester, current numbers. 
HORNIMAN MUSEUM AND LIBRARY, Forest Hill, England. 

Annual report, no. 6, 1907. 
HULL MUSEUM, Hull, England. 

Publications, no. 23-47, 49-50, 54. 
HULL SCIENTIFIC AND FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Hull, Eng- 
land. 

Journal, v. 3, no. 2-4; v. 4, no. 1. 
IDAHO UNIVERSITY. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Moscow, Idaho. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ILLINOIS FISH COMMISSION, Springfield, Illinois. 

Report, 1904-6. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois. 

Report, no. 9. 
ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Bulletin, no. 6-8. 
ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois. 

Collections, v. 3. 

Journal, v. 1, no. 2-3. 

Transactions, 1907. 
ILLINOIS STATE PENITENTIARY, Joliet, Illinois. 

Report, 1906 (gift). 
ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Studies, current numbers. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Laboratory of Natural History: 

Bulletin, no. 8. 

State Entomologist: 

Report, no. 24. 
INDIA ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

Frontier Circle: 

Annual report, 1907-8. 

Northern Circle: 

Annual report, 1907-8. 
INDIA BOTANICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

Records, current numbers. 
INDIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

Memoir, current numbers. 

Record, current numbers. 
INDIA, GOVERNMENT OF, Calcutta, India. 

Agricultural ledger, current numbers. 
INDIAN FORESTER, Allahabad, India. 

Indian forester, current numbers. 



1 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 285 

INDIAN MUSEUM, Calcutta, India. 

Memoirs, v. 1, pt. 1-2. 

Records, v. 1, pt. 1-4. 

Report, 1906-7. 

1 pamphlet. 
INDIANA. COMMISSION OF FISHERIES AND GAME, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

Biennial report, 1905-6 (gift). 
INDIANA. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND NATURAL RE- 
SOURCES, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Annual report, no. 32, 1907. 
INDIANA. STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Annual report, no. 18, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
INLAND PRINTER PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Inland Printer, v. 39-41 (gift). 
INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF AMERICAN REPUBLICS, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION, Washington, D. C. 

■ Annual report, no. 21, 1907. 
IOWA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Proceedings, v. 14, 1907. 
IOWA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION Ames, Iowa. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
IOWA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annual report, v. 17, 1907. 
IOWA. HISTORICAL DEPARTMENT, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Annals of Iowa, current numbers. 
IOWA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Plants of Iowa. 
IOWA STATE LIBRARY, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Agricultural reports: 

1879, 1882, 1884-5, 1886-1887, 1895-1896, 1905. 

Yearbook, 1905. 

Horticultural Society: 

Transactions, v. 14-17, 19, 22, 25, 27, 29-33, 3 6 > 3 8 - 4°- 

State Fish and Game Wardens: 

Biennial report, v. 14, 16-17. 

State Mine Inspectors: 

Report, no. 13, 1906. 
IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Calendar, 1907-8. 

Studies in psychology, v. 2, v. 3, no. 4. 
JAMAICA BOTANIC GARDENS, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Department of Agriculture: 

Bulletin, 1908. 
JANET, CHARLES, Paris, France. 

4 excerpts. 



286 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 13, 1907. 

I Imdbook, 1907. 

List of books exhibited, December 30, 1907 - January 4, 1908. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
JOHNSON". ROSWELL H., Madison, Wisconsin (gift). 

1 pamphlet. 

JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, New York City. 

Journal, current numbers. 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, v. 21, pt. 1. 
KANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Topeka, Kansas. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Report, v. 27, 1907. 
KANSAS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Topeka, Kansas. 

Collections, v. 10. 

Report, 1907. 

2 pamphlets. 

KANSAS UNIVERSITY, Lawrence, Kansas. 

Industrialist, current numbers. 

Studies, science series. 
KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE VEREIN, Karlsruhe, 
Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 20. 
KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia. 

Mitteilungen, v. 3. 

1 pamphlet. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 

Annual report, no. 18, 1905. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England. 

Bulletin and appendix, current numbers. 
KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht, 1907. 
KIKALFY, IMRE, London, England. 

89 catalogues and reports issued by the various sections of the Fran- 
co-British Exhibition (gift.) 
KJOBENHAVN K. BIBLIOTHEK, Kjobenhavn, Denmark. 

Katalog. 
KJOBENHAVN NATURHISTORISK FORENING, Kjobenhavn, Denmark. 

Videnskabelige meddelelser, 1907. 
KJOBENHAVN UNIVERSITY, Kjobenhavn, Denmark. 

Museum of Mineralogy and Geology: 

Contributions, v. 8. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 287 

KOCH-GRUNBERG, THEODOR, Berlin, Germany. 
Indianertypen aus dem Amazonasgebiet, pt. 3. 

7 separates. 

KOSMOS, GESELLSCHAFT DER NATURFREUNDE, Stuttgart, Germany. 
Kosmos, v. 3, pt. 5-12; v. 4. 

8 pamphlets. 
KROEBER, A. F. 

1 pamphlet. 

LAHILLE, FERNANDO, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

4 pamphlets. 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Catalogue, 1907-S. 
LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRA- 
TION, Lake Mohonk, New York. 

Proceedings, 25th meeting, 1907. 

Report, no. 14, 1908. 
LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 

Report, 1907. 
LANDSHUT. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Landshut, 
Germany. 

Bericht, 1904-1906. 
LA PLATA. MUSEO DE, La Plata, Argentina. 

Anales, t. 1, ser. 2. 

Revista, t. 12-13. 
LAWRENCE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 35, 1906. 
LEHMANN-NITSCHE, ROBERT, La Plata, Argentina. 

2 pamphlets. 

LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHNOGRAPHISCH MUSEUM, Leiden, Netherlands. 

Verslag, 1907. 
LEIDEN. RIJKS MUSEUM VAN NATUURLIJKE HISTORIE, Leyden, 
Netherlands. 

Leyden notes, current numbers. 
LEIPZIG. K. SACHSISCHE GESELLSCHAFT DER WISSENSCHAF- 
TEN, Leipzig, Germany. 

Berichte, 1907. 
LEIPZIG. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany. 

Bericht, 1884-1900. 

Jahrbuch, 1906, no. 1. 

1 dissertation. 
LEIPZIG. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Leipzig, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, 1906, 1907. 
LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY, Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia. 

Register, 1907-1908. 

University series, v. 1. 
LEON, N., Mexico, Mexico. 

1 pamphlet. 



288 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

LEWIS INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

Bulletin, alumni number. 

Register, 1907-8. 

Report, 1907. 
LIEGE. 1NSTITUT BOTANIQUE DE UNIVERSITE, Liege, Belgium. 

Archives, v. 1-4. 

1 monograph. 
LIMA SOCIEDAD GEOGRAFICA, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, t. 19, 21. 
LISBOA. COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon, Portugal. 

Broteria, v. 5, 7. 
LISBOA. SOClfiTE PORTUGAISE DE SCIENCES NATURELLES, Lis- 
bon, Portugal. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
LIVERPOOL BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Liverpool, England. 

Proceedings and transactions, v. 21. 
LIVERPOOL MARINE BIOLOGICAL STATION, Liverpool, England. 

Annual report, no. 21. 
LOCKYER, NORMAN, London, England. 

Catalogue of the Franco-British Exhibition (gift). 
LONDON HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON LINNiEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal of botany, current numbers. 

Journal of zoology, current numbers. 
LONDON ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON ROYAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
LONDON SOCIETY OF ARTS, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

List of fellows, 1908. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY, Los Angeles, California. 

Annual report, no. 19, 1907. 
LOUBAT, DUC DE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin de correspondance hellenique. 

7 other publications. 

1 map. 
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
LOUISIANA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE AND IRRIGATION, 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

State Crop Pest Commission: 

Circular, 1-11, 13—21 (gift). 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 289 

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

First biennial report, 1 906-1 908. 
LUND. K. UNIVERSITETS-BIBLIOTEKET, Lund, Sweden. 

Acta, v. 23-40; n. s. v. 1-3, 1886-1907. 
LYON MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Lyon, France. 

Archives, v. 9. 
McCLURE, CHARLES F. W., Princeton, New Jersey. 

2 pamphlets. 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
MADRAS GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India. 

Bulletin, v. 5, pt. 3. 
MADRAS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MADRID. R. ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Memorias, current numbers. 

Revista, current numbers. 
MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, 
Spain. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Memorias, current numbers. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Annales, current numbers. 

Ethnographische sammlungen, no. 2-3. 
MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales. ' 

10 botanical pamphlets. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
MANCHESTER FIELD NATURALISTS' AND ARCHAEOLOGISTS' SO- 
CIETY, Manchester, England. 

Report and proceedings, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Man- 
chester, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MANCHESTER MUSEUM — OWENS COLLEGE, Manchester, England. 

Publications, v. 61, 62. 

Report, 1907-8 (Pub. no. 63). 
MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDUNG DER GESAMTEN 
NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, Marburg, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1907. 
MARBURG UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

Cronik, 1907. 

31 inaugural dissertations. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
Plymouth, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 



290 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

North Sea Fisheries Investigation Committee: 

Report, no. 2. 11)04-5. 
MARSEILLE. Ml'SEE COLONIAL, Marseille, France. 

Annales, ser. 2, v. 5. 
MARSEILLE. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Marseille, France. 

Annales, t. r r, 1907. 
MARSEILLE. SOCIETE D'HORTICULTURE ET DE BOTANIQUE, 
Marseille, France. 

Revue horticole, current numbers. 
MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College 
Park, Maryland. 

Annual report, no. 21, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Baltimore, Maryland. 

General reports, v. 6, 1906. 
MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR PROMOTION OF THE MECHANIC 
ARTS, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Announcements, 1908-9. 
MARYLAND STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, College Park, Mary- 
land. 

Report, v. 10, 1907. 
MARYLAND WEATHER SERVICE, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Report, v. 2 (gift). 
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Catalogue, 1907. 

Quarterly, current numbers. 
MASSACHUSETTS STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Transactions, pt. 1, 1908. 
MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY, Victoria, Australia. 

Calendar, 1908. 
MERRIAM, JOHN C, Berkeley, California. 

7 pamphlets, 
MEXICO. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, current numbers. 

Catalogos. 
MEXICO. DIRECCION GENERAL DE ESTADISTICA, Mexico, Mexico. 

3 reports. 
MEXICO. INSTITUTO GEOLOGICO, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, v. 23. 

Parergones, v. 2, pt. 1-6. 
MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico. 

Anales, current numbers. 

Antiquedades Mexicanas (plates and text) 1892. 
MKXICO. SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA, Mexico, Mexico. 

Bulletin, t. 2. 
MICHIGAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Annual report, no. 9-10, 1907-1908. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 291 

MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Michigan. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Michigan. 

Graduates, 1907. 

Yearbook, 1907—8. 

Views. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Calendar, 1907-1908. 

Museum : 

1 pamphlet. 
MILANO. SOCIETA ITALIANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
MILLSPAUGH, C. F., Chicago. 

33 pamphlets. 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Annual report, no. 26, 1908. 
MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Annual report, no. 18, 1908. 
MINNESOTA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Bulletin, v. 4, pt. 2. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. Anthony's 
Park, Minnesota. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report 1907. 
MINNESOTA UNIVERSITY, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Annual report, no. 15, 1906-7. 
MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Mississippi. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, Mis- 
souri. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Report, no. 18, 19, 1907-1908. 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Collections, current numbers. 

Review, current numbers. 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri. 

Studies, science ser., current numbers. 
MONTANA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Bozeman, Montana. 

Annual report, no. 13, 1906. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY, Missoula, Montana. 

Studies, current numbers. 



292 Field Museum oi Natural History -Reports, Vol. III. 

MONTEVIDEO MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

lies, currenl numbers. 
MOONEY, JAMES, Washington, D. C. 

i pamphli ' 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia. 

Certain mounds of Arkansas and Mississippi. 
MOSCOW. SOClfiTE" IMPfiRIALE DES NATURALISTES, Mnsow, Russia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Memoires, current numbers. 
MOSELEY, E. 1... Columbus, Ohio. 

2 pamphlets. 
MUNCHEN. DEUTSCHES MUSEUM, Munchen, Germany. 

Fiihrer, 1907. 
MUNCHEN. K. B. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, Munchen, 
Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1906, pt. 3; 1907, pt. 1-2. 
MUNN & COMPANY, Xew York City. 

Scientific American, current numbers. 
NANCY. SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NAPOLI-INSTITUTO ZOOLOGICO, Naples. Italy, 

Annuario del Museo zoologico, n. s., v. 2, no. 7-12. 

Centenario, 1806-1906. 
XAPOLI. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Naples, Italy. 

Atti, ser. 2, v. 13. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
NATAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Durban, Natal, Africa. 

Natal plants, v. 5, pt. 4. 
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
NATURALISTE CANADIEN, Chicoutimi, Canada. 

Journal, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Proceedings, v. 8, pt. 1-2. 
NEBRASKA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lincoln, Ne- 
braska. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Publication, v. 2, pt. 4-8; v. 3, pt. 2. 
NEBRASKA STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Proceedings and collections, ser. 2, v. 7, 10. 
NEBRASKA STATE LIBRARY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Studies, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Studies, current numbers. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. DEPARTMENT VAN LANDBOUW, Batavia, 
Java. 

Jaarboek, 1906. 



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Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 293 

NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, 
Batavia, Java. 
Naturkundig tydschrift, v. 67. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE TAAL-, LAND EN VOLKENKUNDE, Ba- 
tavia, Java. 
Bijdragen, v. 6, pt. 3-4; v. 7, pt. 1-4. 
NEUCHATEL. SOClE"TE NEUCHATELOISE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Neu- 
chatel, Switzerland. 
Bulletin, v. 18, 1907. 
NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW BRUNSWICK NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, St. John, New 
Brunswick. 
Bulletin, v. 26, pt. 1. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, New 
Hampshire. 
Catalogue, 1907-8. 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, 
New Jersey. 
Report of the Botanical department, 1907. 
Report of the Entomological Department, 1904, 1906-1907. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1907. 
NEW JERSEY STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New 
Jersey. 
Proceedings, 33rd. annual session, 1908. 
1 pamphlet. 
NEW JERL Y STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1906, 1907. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla 
Park, New Mexico. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NEW MEXICO, BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 
New Mexico mines and minerals, 1904. 
1 pamphlet (gift). 
NEW SOUTH WALES BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT 
DOMAINS, Sydney, N. S. W. 
Report, 1906. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, N. S. W. 
Additions to the fish fauna, no. 1. 

New fishes from New South Wales, no. 1 , Beaked salmon. 
Report, 1906, 1907. 

Stead, David G., Edible fishes of New South Wales. 
1 pamphlet. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND AGRICUL- 
TURE, Sydney, N. S. W. 
Agricultural gazette, current numbers. 



294 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Annual report, 1907. 
Memoir, paleontology, no. 10, 13, pt. 2. 
NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
NEW SOUTH WALES ROYAL SOCIETY, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Journal and proceedings, v. 41, 1907. 
NEW SOUTH WALES TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Sydney, N. S. W. 

Annual report, 1906. 
NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City. 

Annals, current numbers. 
NEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, 
New Y r ork. 
Annual report, no. 25, 26. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW YORK. GENERAL SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADES- 
MEN, New York City. 
Annual report, no. 122, 1907. 
NEW YORK MERCANTILE LIBRARY, New York City. 

Annual report, no. 87, 1908. 
NEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 
Annual report, no. 38, 1907. 
Catalogue of keyboard musical instruments in the Crosby-Brown 

collection, 1903. 
Catalogue of the Morgan collection of porcelains. 
Catalogue of the musical instruments of all nations, 6 pts. 
Handbook, no. 10. 
NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
XEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany. New York. 
Report, no. 88, 1905; no. 89, 1906. 
Education department: 
Annual report, 1907, 1908. 
Bulletin, no. 46, 47. 
State Museum: 
Bulletin, no. 1 13-120. 

Report, v. 59, v. 1-4, 1905; v. 60, v. 1-3, 5, 1906. 
NEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 
Annual report, 1907. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Official guide. 
2 pamphlets. 
NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Wellington, 
New Zealand. 
Agriculture in New Zealand, 2nd. ed. 
Annual report, 1907. 
Division of Biology and Horticulture: 
Report, 1907. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 295 

NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF LANDS, Wellington, New Zealand. 

2 botanical reports. 
NEW ZEALAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Wellington, New Zealand. 

Geological Survey: 

Bulletin, n. s. no. 4, 5. 
NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE, Wellington, New Zealand. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 39, 40. 
NEWARK FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Newark, New Jersey. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Handbook. 

Report, 1907. 
NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne, England. 

Transactions, v. 3, pt. 1. 
NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NORTH CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SURVEY, Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina. 

Biennial report, 1 893-1 906. 

Bulletin, no. 2, 6-8, 12, 14-17, 19. 

Economic papers, no. 1, 3-4, 6-14. 

Report, v. 1-2, 1905, 1907. 
NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fargo, 
North Dakota. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
NURNBERG. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Nurnberg, 
Germany. 

Abhandlungen, B. 16. 

Jahresbericht, 1905. 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Annual report of the librarian, 1906-7. 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio. 

Bulletin, 4th ser. v. 9. 
OHIO STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Journal, quarterly. 

Randall, E. O., Ohio mound builders. 
OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

1 pamphlet. 
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1908. 

Contributions, v. 28, 29. 



296 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Stillwater, 
Oklahoma. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OKLAHOMA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Norman, Oklahoma. 

Bulletin, no. 1 (gift). 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, New York. 

Transactions, 1881-1884, 1892-1897, 1905. 

Yearbook, 1905. 

1 pamphlet. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada. 

Annual report, v. 1-2. 

Annual report of the agricultural societies for 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

14 miscellaneous reports. 
ONTARIO. LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, Toronto, Canada. 

Annual archaeological report, 1907. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Monist, current numbers. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
ORR, J., Transvaal, South Africa. 

1 pamphlet. 
OSNABRUCK-NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Osnabrtick, 
Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1 903-1 906. 
OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 
OTTUMWA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

Annual report, no. 5, 1907. 
OUTES, FELIX F., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

4 separates. 

OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Outing magazine, current numbers. 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1907. 
OWENS, C. L., Chicago. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
PACIFIC SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. 

Publications, special series, no. 1-2. 
PALERMO. R. ORTO BOTANICO, Palermo, Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 6, pt. 2-3. 

Semina collectorum, 1907. 
PAMMEL, L. H., Ames, Iowa. 

5 pamphlets. 

PARA. MUSEU GOELDI, Para, Brazil. 
Boletin, v. 5, no. 1. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 297 

PARIS. ACADfiMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus, current numbers. 
PARIS. ECOLE D'ANTHROPOLOGIE, Paris, France. 

Revue, current numbers. 
PARIS. MUSfiE GUIMET, Paris, France. 

Annales, current numbers. 
PARIS. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PARIS. SOCIETE" DE GEOGRAPHIE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, v. 17, no. 3. 
PARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France. 

Journal, current numbers. 
PARIS. SOCIETE NATIONALE D'AGRICULTURE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current numbers (gift). 
PEABODY ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Salem, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 186 9- 1887. 

Memoirs, v. 1, no. 1-6; v. 2: 

Shell mounds of Omori. 

13 pamphlets. 
PEABODY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 56, 1907. 
PEABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY AND ETH- 
NOLOGY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Memoirs, v. 4, no. 1. 

Report, no. 41, 1906-7. 

3 pamphlets. 
PENNSYLVANIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 
Philadelphia. 

Annual report, no. 32, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Division of Zoology: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE, State College, Pennsylvania. 

Announcements, 1907-8. 
PENNSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY, Philadelphia. 

Catalogue, 1907—8. 

Contributions from the zoological laboratory, v. 13, 1906-7. 

Provost's report, 1907. 

1 pamphlet. 
PENNSYLVANIA WESTERN UNIVERSITY. SCHOOL OF : MINES, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Announcement, 1908-9. 



298 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

PENROSE, R. A. P., JR., Chicago. 

1 pamphlet. 
PEORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Peoria, Illinois. 

Annual report, no. 28, 1907-8. 
PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE 
BLIND, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Report, 1907. 
PERU. CUERPO DE INGENIEROS DE MINAS, Lima, Peru. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
PERU INSTITUTO HISTORICO, Lima, Peru. 

Revista, current numbers. 
PHARMACEUTICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING COMPANY, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

Review, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia. 

Proceedings, 1907. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia. 

American journal of pharmacy, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia. 

Transactions, ser. 3, v. 29. 

1 pamphlet. 
PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL MUSEUM, Philadelphia. 

Report, 1907. 

1 pamphlet. 
PHILADELPHIA FREE LIBRARY, Philadelphia. 

Annual report, 1907. 
PHILADELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia. 

Bulletin, no. 60-61. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, P. I. 

Journal of science, current numbers. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Ma- 
nila, P. I. 

Bureau of Agriculture: 

Agricultural review, current numbers. 

Ethnological Survey: 

Publications, v. 5, pt. 1-2. 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
PISA. SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIENZE NATURAL!, Pisa, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Memorie, v. 23. 
PLYMOUTH MUNICIPAL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Plymouth, 
England. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 
PORTICI R. SCUOLA SUPERIORE D'AGRICULTURA, Portici, Italy. 

Bolletino del laboratorio di Zoologia Generale e Agraria, v. 1-2. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 299 

PORTLAND SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, PORTLAND, Maine. 

Proceedings, v. 1, pt. 1; v. 2, pt. 6-7. 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Maine. 

Annual report, 1907. 
PORTO RICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mayaguez, 
P. R. 

Annual report, 1907. 
PRATT INSTITUTE FREE LIBRARY, Brooklyn, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1907-8. 
PREUSS, THEODOR K., Berlin, Germany. 

4 pamphlets. 
PREUSSISCHER BOTANICHE VEREIN, Konigsberg, Germany. 

Jahres-bericht, 1905-6. 
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Annual report, no. 30, 1907. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Annual report, no. 20, 1907. 
QUEENSLAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Geological Survey: 

Publications, no. 207-212, 214, 216. 

Maps, no. 217-218. 
QUEENSLAND MUSEUM, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Annals, current numbers. 
QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Proceedings, v. 20. 
RADFORD, HARRY V. 

1 reprint (gift). 
RANDALL & COMPANY, Chicago. 

Clay- worker, current numbers (gift). 
REED, H. D., Ithaca, New York. 

1 pamphlet. 

REID, HARRY F., Baltimore, Maryland. 

2 reprints. 

RENNES. UNIVERSITY, Rennes, France. 

Travaux scientifiques, v. 6. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 
ton, Rhode Island. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
RHODESIA MUSEUM, Bulawayo, Transvaal. 

Annualfreport, no. 6, 1907. 



300 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

RIES, HEINRICH, Ithaca, New York. 

2 pamphlets. 
RIGGS, ELMER .S., Chicago. 

4 pamphlets (gift). 
RIVET, M., Paris, France. 

3 excerpts. 

ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Rochester, New York. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Elenco bibliografico dei periodici. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
ROME. SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

Bolletino, current numbers. 
ROME. SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA, Sydney, 
New South Wales. 

Science of man, current numbers. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY. CEYLON BRANCH, Colombo, India. 

Journal, no. 58. 
RUTOT, A., Paris, France. 

5 pamphlets. 

ST. LAURENT COLLEGE, Montreal, Canada. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. 

Annual report, no. 62, 1907. 
ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Catalogue, 1908. 
' School of Fine Arts: 

Handbook, 1908-9. - 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Catalogue, 1908. 
ST. PAUL INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota. 

Report, 1908. 
ST. PETERSBURG. ACADfiMIE IMP&RIALE DES SCIENCES, St. 
Petersburg, Russia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Mus^e Anthrop. and Ethnol.: 

M£moires, current numbers. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 301 

Publications, current numbers. 

Musde Botanique: 

Schedae ad herb-florae rossicas, no. 4-5. 

Travaux, current numbers. 

Muse"e G^ologique: 

Travaux, current numbers. 

Muse"e Zoologique: 

Annuaire, current numbers. 
ST. PETERSBURG. IMPERIAL BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Peters- 
burg, Russia. 

Acta Horti Petropolitan, t. 26, fasc. 1; t. 27, fasc. 1-2; t. 28, fasc. 1; 

t. 29, fasc. 1. 
ST. PETERSBURG. SOClfiTE" IMPfiRIALE DES NATURALISTES, St. 
Petersburg, Russia. 

Comptes rendus, 1907, pt. 5-8. 

Section botanique: 

Travaux v. 34, no. 3; v. 35, no. 7 — 8; v. 36, no. 3-8. 

Section de geologie: 

Travaux, v. 32, no. 5. 
SALEM PUBLIC LIBRARY, Salem, Massachusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1907. 
SAN JOSE. MUSEO NACIONAL, San Jose\ Costa Rica. 

Paginas illustradas, 179-194. 
SAN SALVADOR MUSEO NACIONAL, San Salvador. 

Annals, current numbers. 
SANTIAGO DE CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIONAL, Santiago, Chile. 

1 1 volumes of publications. 
SAO PAULO. CAMPINAS CENTRO DE SCIENCE, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Revista, current numbers. 
SAO PAULO. INSTITUTO AGRONOMICO, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
SAO PAULO. MUSEU PAULISTA, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Catalogos da fauna brazileira. As aves do Brazil, v. 1. 

Notas preliminaires, v. 1, fasc. 1. 
SAO PAULO. SOCIEDADE SCIENTIFICA, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Revista, v. 2, no. 1-8. 
SAONE ET LOIRE, SOClfiTE" DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Chalon- 
sur-Sa6ne, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Me"moires, current numbers. 

1 monograph. 
SARASIN, PAUL, Basel, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet. 
SARAWAK MUSEUM, Borneo, India. 

Report, 1907. 
SARGENT, C. S., Boston, Massachusetts. 

Crataegus^ n Missouri. 



302 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Crataegus in southern Oregon. 

Crataegus in various localities. 
SATURDAY REVIEW, London, England. 

I'urrent numbers. 
SAVILLE. M. H.. New York City. 

Contributions to South American archaeology, v. i. 
SCHMIDT, MAX, Berlin, Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 

SELER, EDUARD, Berlin, Germany. 

Gesammelte abhandl. zur amer. sprach-und alterthumskunde, 
Bd. 3. 
SERGI G., Rome, Italy. 

3 excerpts. 
SKIFF, F. J. V., Chicago. 

14 miscellaneous publications (gift). 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

British Columbia mining exchange, current numbers. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
SMITH, JOHN DONNELL, Baltimore, Maryland. 

2 pamphlets. 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

Contributions to knowledge, v. 34. 

Diary, thru Mongolia and Tibet, 1891-92. 

Miscellaneous collections, current numbers. 

Bureau of American Ethnology: 

Annual report, no. 26, 1904-5. 

Bulletin, no. 35. 

U. S. National Museum: 

Bulletin, no. 60, 61. 

Proceedings, v. 33. 

Report of progress, 1907. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico. Mexico. 

Memorias, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA MEXICANA, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, t. 2. 
SOCIF/TE' BOTANIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE" GfiOLOGIQUE DU NORD, Lille, France. 

Annales, v. 35, 1906. 
SOCIETE" OURALIENNE, Ekaterinburg, Russia. 

Bulletin, t. 26, 27. 
SOClfiTE" ZOOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, t. 31, 32. 

M^moires, t. 19. 
SOUTH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Johannesburg, South Africa. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
SCIENCE, Natal, South Africa. 

Report, 1907. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 303 

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa. 
Annals, current numbers. 
Report, 1907. 
SOUTH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South 
Africa. 
Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Adelaide, 
South Australia. 
Bulletin, no. 31-40. 
Journal, current numbers. 
Notes on agriculture. 
Report, 1906-7. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART GAL- 
LERY, Adelaide, South Australia. 
Report, 1906-7. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 31. 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Clemson, South Carolina. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Brook- 
ings, South Dakota. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
SOUTH KENSINGTON BOARD OF EDUCATION, London, England. 

Publications, 29 vols. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 
California. 
Bulletin, v. 7, no. 1. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, California. 

Sunset magazine (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1907-8. 
SPRINGFIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Massac- 
husetts. 
Report, 1907-8. 
STARR, FREDERICK, Chicago. 

A bibliography of the Congo languages. 
STATEN ISLAND NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, New York City. 

Proceedings. 
STEIERMARK. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Gratz, 
Germany. 
Mitteilungen, 1906, 1907. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Catalogue, 1908-9. 
STOCKHOLM. ACADEMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 
Publications, current "numbers. 



304 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

STOCKHOLM. SVEN. SALLSK. FOR ANTHROPOLOGI OCH GEO- 
GRAPHI, Stockholm, Sweden. 
Ymer, current numbers. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Connecti- 
cut. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1907. 
STRALEY, W., Nelson, Nebraska. 
"Collector's notes " (gift). 
STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, Ger- 
many. 
30 inaugural dissertations. 
SUESS, E., Wien, Austria. 

I excerpt. 
SYDERE, A. H., Ottawa. 

I I reports. 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, Syracuse, New York. 

Bulletin, ser. 7, no. 1. 

Calendar, 1908. 

Zoological laboratory: 

Contributions, v. 3. 
TEXAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Austin, Texas. 

Transactions, v. 9. 

1 pamphlet. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 
Texas. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Texas. 

Bulletin, sci. ser., current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
THAXTER, ROLAND, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Contribution toward a monograph of the laboulbeniaceae, pt. 2. 
THROOP POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Pasadena, California. 

Catalogue, 1908. 
TOKYO BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Magazine, current numbers. 
TOKYO. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR-UND VOLKER- 
KUNDE OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan. 

Mitteilungen, current numbers. 
TOKYO GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Journal, current numbers. 
TOKYO IMPERIAL MUSEUM, Tokyo, Japan. 

6 catalogues. 
TOKYO IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY, Tokyo, Japan. 

College of Agriculture: 

Bulletin, v. 5, 6, 7. 

College of Science: 

Journal, v. 22, ar. 2-6; v. 23, ar. 2; v. 24-25. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. . 305 

TORINO MUSEO DI ZOOLOGIA ED ANATOMIA COMPARATA, Torino, 
Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 22. 
TORINO. R. ACCADEMIA DELLE SCIENZE, Torino, Italy. 

Memorie, ser. 2, t. 57. 
TORONTO. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, Ontario. 

Checklist — fishes, Provincial Museum. 
TORONTO UNIVERSITY, Toronto, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
TORQUAY NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Torquay, England. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
TORRES, LUIS MARIA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

1 reprint. 
TRANSVAAL. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Pretoria, Transvaal. 

Journal, current numbers. 

Report, 1906-7. 
TRANSVAAL. MUSEUM AND ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, Pretoria, 
Transvaal. 

Annals, v. 1, pt. 1—2. 

Annual report, 1906-7. 
TRELEASE, WILLIAM, St. Louis, Missouri. 

1 reprint. 
TRING ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Tring, England. 

Novitates zoological, current numbers. 
TRINIDAD. BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT, Trinidad, West Indies. 

Bulletin, miscellaneous information, no. 50, 53, 55-56. 
TRINITY COLLEGE, Dublin, Ireland. 

Hermathena, no. 34. 
TRONDHJEM. K. NORSKE VIDENSKABER SELSKAB, Trondhjem, 
Norway. 

Skrifter, 1907. 
TUBINGEN. R. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
UNION COLLEGE, Schnectady, New York. 

Catalogue, 1908—9. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Washington, D. C. 

Annual report, 1907. 

Library bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, beet sugar progress, v. 5-6. • 

Report of the secretary, 1907. 

Yearbook, 1907. 

Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Annual report, 1907. 

Bureau of Animal Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Report, 1906. 

Bureau of Biological Survey: 



306 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

North American fauna, no. 27. 
eau ■ iJ Chemistry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Bureau of Entomology: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Bureau of Forest Service: 

Bulletin, current umbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Silvical leaflet, current numbers. 

Bureau of Plant Industry: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Bureau of Soils: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Bureau of Statistics: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Crop reporter, current numbers. 

Office of Experiment Station: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circular, current numbers. 

Farmer's bulletin, current numbers. 

Record, current numbers. 

Report, 1907. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR, Washington, D. C 

Bureau of Fisheries: 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1907. 

Pamphlets, no. 630-640. 

Bureau of Statistics: 

Consular reports, current numbers. 

Coast and Geodetic Survey: 

2 pamphlets. 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Washington, D. C. 

Bureau of Education: 

List of publications, 186 7-1 907. 

Report, 1006, v. 2. 

Report of the Commissioner, v. 1, 1907. 

Geological Survey: 

Annual report, v. 28, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Folios, no. 151-159. 

Mineral resources, 1906. 

Monograph, no. 50. 

Professional papers, no. 62. 

Water supply papers, no. 209-222. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 307 

40 pamphlets. 
100 topographical sheets. 
U. S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 
Report, 1907. 
14 lists. 
U. S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 
Annual report, 1907. 
Bureau of the Mint: 
Report, 1907. 
U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C. 

Index catalogue of the library of the Surgeon General's office; ser. 2, 
v. 13. 
UPPSALA. K. UNIVERSITETS-BIBLIOTEKET, Uppsala, Sweden. 
Algenflora der schwedischen Westkunste. 
Bibliographia Linna^ana, pt. 1, no. 1. 
Bref och skrifvelser — Carl von Linne. 
Linne portratt. 
Linnefest Skriften, no. 1-6. | 
Nova acta, ser. 4, current numbers. 
Zoologiska studien. 
4 inaugural dissertations. 
Geological Institute: 
Bulletin, v. 8. 
URUGUAY. DEPARTMENT DE GRANDERIA, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

Annals, current numbers. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Quarterly, current numbers. 
VASSAR BROTHERS' INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, New York. 
Bulletin, no. 1-2, 1907. 
1 pamphlet. 
VENEZUELA. UNIVERSIDAD CENTRAL, Caracas, Venzuela. 

Anales, current numbers. 
VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Burlington, 
Vermont. 
Annual report, no. 20, 1907. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
VERMONT GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Burlington, Vermont. 

Report, 1907-8. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Victoria. 
Journal, current numbers. 
Report, 1905-7. 
13 pamphlets. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Victoria. 
Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 



308 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

VICTORIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Proceedings, v. 20. 

1 reprint. 
VICTORIA ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATISATION SOCIETY, Mel- 
bourne, Victoria. 

Annual report, no. 44, 1907. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, 
Virginia. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, Richmond, Virginia. 

Annual report, no. 4, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, v. 1, no. 1. 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
VOLKART, HENRY, St. Gall, Switzerland. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
WARD, HENRY B., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

University of Nebraska. 

Zoological Laboratory: 

Studies, no. 71, 79-80. 
WASHINGTON ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
WASHINGTON STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Pullman, Wash- 
ington, 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
WASHINGTON. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS, Washington, 
D. C. 

195 publications (gift). 
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, v. 6. 
WATSON, H. O. & COMPANY, New York City. 

1 catalogue (gift). 

WAUGAUNI PUBLIC MUSEUM, Waugauni, New Zealand. 

Annual report, no. 13, 1907-8. 
WELCOME CHEMICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES, London, Eng- 
land. 

Publications, no. 70-85. 
WELLER, STUART, Chicago. 

2 pamphlets. 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Middletown, Connecticut. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
WEST IXDIES. IMPERIAL DEPARTM EXT OF AGRICULTURE, Bar- 
bados, West Indies. 

Publications, current numbers. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 309 

WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mor- 
gantown, West Virginia. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Morgantown, 
West Virginia. 

Report, no. 8-10. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Perth, 
Western Australia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Perth, Western Aus- 
tralia. 

Annual progress report, 1907. 

Bulletin, no. 27-29. 
WESTERN UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA, Allegheny, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Announcements, 1908—9 (gift). 
WESTMINISTER UNIVERSITY, Denver, Colorado. 

Bulletin, no. i. 
WIEN. K. K. NATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Wien, Austria. 

Annalen, current numbers. 
WIEN. K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Wien, Austria. 

5 reports. 
WIEN. K. K. ZOOLOGISCH-BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Wien. 
Austria. 

Verhandlungen, v. 57, 1907. 
WIEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFLICHER-VEREIN, Wien, Austria. 

Festschrift, 1907. 

Mitteilungen, 1907, pt. 6-10. 
WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway. 

Naturwidenskaberne magazine, current numbers. 

1 pamphlet. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue, 1907-8. 
WILLIAMSON, E. B., Bluffton, Indiana. 

7 pamphlets. 
WILLISTON, S. W., Chicago. 

4 pamphlets. 
WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WINDSOR KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Brick, current numbers (gift). 
WISCONSIN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Transactions, v. 15, no. 2. 
WISCONSIN ARCH/EOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Archeologist, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bulletin, no. 20. 

Road pamphlet, no. 1-4. 



310 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Annual report, 1908. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bulletin of information, no. 43. 

Proceedings, 1907. 

Transactions, v. 38, 1907. 
WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

Annual report, no. 24, 1907. 
WOOD, J. MEDLEY, Durban, India. 

1 pamphlet. 

WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 48, 1906-7. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WURTEMBERG. VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 
Wiirtemberg, Germany. 

Jahreshefte, v. 64. 
WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, 
Wyoming. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, no. 14, 16. 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Connecticut. 

General catalogue, 1907-8. 

President's report, 1907-8. 
YOUNG, ROBERT T., University, North Dakota. 

2 separates (gift). 

YUCATAN. LA CAMARA AGRICOLA, Merida, Yucatan. 

El agricultor, current numbers. 
ZIMANYI, KARL, Budapest, Hungary. 

2 pamphlets. 
ZURICH. BOTANISCHES MUSEUM, Zurich, Switzerland. 

Mitteilungen, v. 27, 33, 35, 37, 38, 42. 

4 inaugural dissertations. 
ZURICH. GEOGRAPHISCH-ETHNOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, 
Zurich, Switzerland. 

Jahresberichte, 1907-8. 
ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland. 

Vierteljahrsschrift, current numbers. 
ZURICH UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, Switzerland. 

4 inaugural dissertations. 



OF THt 
UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 311 



Articles of Incorporation. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the 16th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under 
and in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," 
approved April 18, 1872, and in force July 1, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State 
of Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby 
certify that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organ- 
ized Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this 16th day of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, 
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINR CHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 
Sir: 

We, the undersigned, citizens of the United State, propose to form a 
corporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 
entitled "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all 
acts amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we 
hereby state as follows, to wit : 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating 
Art, Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board 
of Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 



312 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

4. The following named persons are hereby selected as the Trustees for 
the first year of its corporate existence: 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, 
Charles L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, 
Emil G. Hirsch, James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, O. F. Aldis, Edwin 
Walker, John C. Black, and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed) , 
George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, 
Robert McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J.Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebene- 
zer Buckingham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman 
H. Kohlsaat, George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Frank- 
lin H. Head, E. G. Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, 
Thomas B. Bryan, L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg, 
James W. Scott, Geo. F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. 
Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, 
Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. 
Chatfield-Taylor, A.Crawford, Wm. Sooy Smith, P.S.Peterson, John C. Black. 
Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert 
W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, George M. Pullman, William 
E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, Willaim E. Hale, Wm. T. Baker, Martin A. Ryer- 
son, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Williams, Melville E. Stone, 
Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, ) ss 
Cook County. ) 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby 
certify that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowl- 
edged severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and volun- 
tary act for the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members 
held the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect 
was filed June 26, 1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members 
held the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN 
MUSEUM was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
A certificate to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the 
Secretary of State for Illinois. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 313 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(January 28, 1907) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes, Annual Members, Corporate 
Members, Life Members, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall pay 
an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice of 
election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The failure 
of any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual payments within 
said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient grounds 
for the forfeiture of an annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to : 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family, to the Museum on 
any day. 

Second. — ■ Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on 
pay days. 

Third.- — A copy of all publications of the Museum, when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other 
functions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in the 
articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named in 
the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of 
these By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, 
within ninety days of their election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty 
dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of any person to make such payment 
within said time, shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for 
forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate Members becoming Life 
Members, Patrons, or Honorary Members, shall be exempt from dues. Annual 
meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same place and on the 
same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
dollars, at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees, 
become a life member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 



314 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees upon recom- 
mendation of the Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered 
eminent service to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by 
virtue of their election as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board of Trustees 

from among persons who have rendered eminent service to science, and only 

upon unanimous nomination of the Executive Committee. They shall be 

exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter 
be elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall 
be filled by a majority vote of the remaining members of the Board, and the 
election may be held at any regular meeting. 

Sec 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Mon- 
day of each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the Presi- 
dent, and shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three 
Trustees. Five Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of 
officers or the adoption of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be 
required, but meetings may be adjourned by any less number from day to day, 
or to a day fixed, previous to the next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of 
holding meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLE III. 

OFFICERS. 

Section i. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 
Second Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary, and a Treasurer. 
They shall be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those 
present and voting being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice- 
President, and the Second Vice-President shall be chosen from among the 
members of the Board of Trustees. The meeting for the election of officers shall 
be held on the second Monday of January of each year, and shall be called the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors 
are elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees by a vote of two-thirds of all the members of the 
Board. Vacancies in any office may be filled by the Board at any meeting. 

Sec 3. The officers shall perform such duties as ordinarily appertain to 
their respective offices, and such as shall be prescribed by the By-Laws, or 
designated from time to time by the Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE IV. 

THE TREASURER. 

Section i. The Treasurer shall be custodian of the funds of the Corpora- 
tion. He shall make disbursements only upon warrants drawn by the Director 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 315 

and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Direc- 
tor, warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and 
in the absence or inability of the President, may be countersigned by one of 
the Vice-Presidents. But no warrant shall be issued, except in conformity 
with a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating 
the occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter 
prescribed. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the Corpora- 
tion shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be 
designated by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the 
income and principal of said securities as the same become due, and pay same 
to the Treasurer. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any 
or all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, 
namely: The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chair- 
man, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties, as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in 
the administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and ap- 
proved for payment by the Director. All vouchers executed for expenditures 
for the construction and maintenance of the Museum building, or buildings, 
shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for payment by the Chairman 
of the Building Committee. All vouchers executed in connection with the 
investments of the Corporation, or in any way having to do with the endow- 
ment funds of the Corporation, shall be verified by the Auditor and approved 
for payment by the Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE V. 
THE director. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have 
immediate charge and supervision of all of the property and affairs of the 
Museum, and shall control the operations of the institution, subject to the 
authority of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee. The Director 
shall be the official medium of communication between the Board, or its com- 
mittees, and the scientific staff and maintenance force. 

Sec 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology, and Zoology, each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be ap- 
pointed by the Board, upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director, upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Sec 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At 



316 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 

the Annual Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the 
work oi the Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be pub- 
lished in pamphlet form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and 
for tree distribution in such number as the Board may direct. 

ARTICLE VI. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, set- 
ting forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of 
the .Museum, and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other 
times as may be required by the Board. 

ARTICLE VII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be four Committees, as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The three Committees first above named shall each consist of 
three members, who shall be elected by ballot by the Board at the Annual 
Meeting, and who shall hold office for one year, and until their successors are 
elected and qualified. 1 n electing the members of these Committees, the Board 
shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairmen by the order in which the mem- 
bers are named in the respective Committee; the first member named shall be 
Chairman; the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second 
Yice-Chairman, succession to the chairmanship being in this order in the event 
of the absence or disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the 
Board, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building 
Commmittee, the Chairman of the Auditing Commitee, and three other mem- 
bers of the Board to be elected by ballot at the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members of the Executive Committee shall constitute a 
quorum, and in all other standing committees, two members shall constitute 
a quorum. In the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, 
a quorum cannot be present at any meeting of any committee, then the Chair- 
man thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any member 
of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 

Sec. 5. The Finance Committee shall have supervision of investing the 
endowment and other permanent funds of the Corporation, and the care of 
such real estate as may become its property. It shall have authority to invest, 
sell, and reinvest, funds, subject to the approval of the Board. 

Sec. 6. The Building Committee shall have supervision of the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, extension, and maintenance of any kind and all buildings 
used for Museum purposes. 

Sec. 7. The Executive Committee shall have supervision over all mat- 
ters pertaining to the Museum. It shall, before the beginning of each fiscal 
year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting forth the 
probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make recommen- 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 317 

dations as to expenditures which should be made for routine maintenance and 
fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the Board, the respective 
Committees shall be considered as authorized to make the expenditures detailed 
therein. No increase in the expenditures under any items of the Budget shall 
be made, except by authority of the Board of Trustees, but the Executive 
Committee shall have authority, in cases of emergency, to expend a further 
total sum not exceeding two thousand dollars in any one month. 

Sec. 8. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all account- 
ing and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause 
the same, once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual 
or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the 
Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall have 
taken place. 

Sec. 9. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and pro- 
ceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. 10. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees, 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any Com- 
mittee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board, each year, a Nomi- 
nating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall make 
nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building Com- 
mittee, and the Auditing Committee, and for three members of the Executive 
Committee, from among the Trustees, to be submitted at the ensuing Decem- 
ber meeting, and voted upon at the following Annual Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section i. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, pro- 
vided the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



318 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



EDWARD E. AYER 
HARLOW N. HIGINBOTHAM 
CHARLES B. CORY 



Stanley Mccormick 

robert f. cummings 

mrs. timothy b. blackstone 



DECEASED. 

MARY D. STURGES. 



PATRONS. 



ALLISON V. ARMOUR 
WILLIAM I. BUCHANAN 
VERNON SHAW KENNEDY 
GEORGE MANIERRE 



FREDERICK W. PUTNAM 
FREDERICK J. V. SKIFF 
WILLARD A. SMITH 
EDWIN WALKER 



Jan., 1909. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



3i9 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., JR. 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 



HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 
HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 

JONES, ARTHUR B. 

KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 



Mccormick, cyrus h. 
manierre, george 
mitchell, john j. 

patterson, robert w. 
peck, ferd. w. 
porter, george f. 
putnam, frederick w. 

ream, norman b. 
ryerson, martin a. 

skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, byron l. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
stone, melville e. 

walker, edwin 
walsh, john r. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON 
LEITER, L. Z. 



W 



DECEASED. 

McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALLER, R. A. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



320 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 



BARRETT, MRS. A. D. 
BARRETT, ROBERT L. 
BARRETT, S. E. 
BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACKSTONE, MRS. TIMOTHY B. 
BLAIR, CHAUNCEY J. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BOOTH, W. VERNON 
BURNHAM, D. H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CARTER, JAMES S. 
CARTON, L. A. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 
CRANE, R. T. 

DEERING, CHARLES 
DRAKE, TRACY C. 

FARWELL, WALTER 
FAY, C. N. 
FIELD, STANLEY 
FULLER, WILLIAM A. 

GARTZ, A. F. 
GRISCOM, CLEMENT A. 
GROMMES, JOHN B. 

HAMILL, ERNEST A. 
HILL, LOUIS W. 
HUGHITT, MARVIN 
HUTCHINSON, C. L. 

INGALLS, M. E. 

ISHAM, MRS. KATHERINE POR- 
TER 

JOHNSON, FRANK S. 
JOHNSON. MRS. ELIZABETH 

AYER. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 



KING, FRANCIS 
KING, JAMES C. 
KIRK, WALTER RADCLIFFE 

LAWSON, VICTOR F. 

McCORMICK, MRS. 

Mccormick, cyrus h. 

McCORMICK, HAROLD F. 
MacVEAGH, FRANKLIN 
MITCHELL, J. J. 
MURDOCH, THOMAS 

NEWELL, A. B. 

ORR, ROBERT M. 

PEARSONS, D. K. 
PIKE, EUGENE S. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PORTER, H. H. 
PORTER, H. H., Jr. 

REAM, MRS. CAROLINE P. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 
REVELL, ALEX. H. 
RUSSELL, EDMUND A. 
RYERSON, MRS. CARRIE H. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SCHLESINGER, LEOPOLD 
SINGER, C. G. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, ORSON 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, OTHO S. A. 
STURGES, GEORGE 

THORNE, GEORGE R. 
TREE, LAMBERT 

WELLS, M. D. 
WILLARD, ALONZO J. 
WOLFF, LUDWIG 



Jan., 1909. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



321 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BAKER, SAMUEL 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARRELL, JAMES , 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BREMNER, DAVID F. 
BROOKS, JAMES C. 
BROWN, GEORGE F. 
BROWN, WILLAIM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

CABLE, R. R. 
CARPENTER, A. A. 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COOLBAUGH, MRS. ADDIE R. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
COX, ALFRED J. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 



DEERING, WILLIAM 
DILLMAN, L. M. 
DUNHAM, MISS M. V. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, EDWARD E. 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM, E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, JAMES L. 



DAL, DR. JOHN W. 
DAY, A. M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 



INSULL, SAMUEL 

JEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 



322 Field Museum of Natural History — Reports, Vol. III. 



JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KENT, WILLIAM 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 

McCREA, W. S. 
McGUIRE, REV. H. 

Mclennan, j. a. 
mcwilliams, lafayette 
macfarland, henry j. 
magee, henry w. 
manson, william 
mansure, e. l. 
may, frank e. 
mayer, david 
mayer, levy 
merryweather, george 
meyer, mrs. m. a. 
miller, charles p. 
miller, john s. 
mixer, c. h. s. 

MOORE, L. T. 
MOORE, N. G. 
MORRIS, EDWARD 
MORRIS, MRS. NELSON 
MULLIKEN, A. H. 
MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

NATHAN, ADOLPH 
NOLAN, JOHN H. 
NORTON, O. W. 
NOYES, LA VERNE W. 



OEHNE, THEODORE 
ORB, JOHN A. 
OSBORN, HENRY A. 

PALMER, PERCIVAL B. 
PARKER, FRANCIS W. 
PEARSON, EUGENE H. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 
PINKERTON, W. A. 
PORTER, WASHINGTON 

RANDALL, THOMAS D. 
RAYNER, JAMES B. 
RIPLEY, E. P. 
ROSENBAUM, JOSEPH 
ROSENFELD, MAURICE 
ROSENTHAL, MRS. OSCAR 
RUMSEY, GEO. D. 
RUNNELLS, J. S. 

SCHMIDT, DR. O. L. 

SCHMITT, ANTHONY 

SCHWARTZ, G. A. 

SEARS, JOSEPH 

SEIPP, MRS. C. 

SEIPP, W. C. 

SELZ, MORRIS 

SHEDD, JOHN G. 

SKINNER, THE MISSES 

SMITH, F. B. 

SNOW, MISS HELEN E. 

SOPER, JAMES P. 

SOUTHWELL, H. E. 

SPENCE, MRS. ELIZABETH E. 

SPOOR, J. A. 

STEELE, HENRY B. 

STOCKTON, JOHN T. 

STUART, ROBERT 

TEMPLETON, THOMAS 
TOBEY, FRANK B. 

UIHLEIN, EDWARD G. 

WACKER, CHARLES H. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, WILLIAM B. 
WALLER, EDWARD C. 



Jan., 1909. Annual Report of the Director. 323 

WARNER, EZRA J. WILSON, MRS. E. C. 

WEBSTER, GEORGE H. WILSON, M. H. 

WHITE, A. STAMFORD WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 
WHITEHEAD, W. M. 



DECEASED. 



BELDEN, J. S. KEENE, JOSEPH 

BOUTON, N. S. WOOD, S. E. 

HAMILTON, I. K. 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB 14 1338 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS