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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

LIBRARY 

OF THL 

UNI\'f. R5ITY 

or ! ^ ' ' ^: ^ ' S 




The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the hbrary from 
which It was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result m dismissal from the University 

.^!!i!^:!!!!!L_^L^iil^^^^sj^RARy at urbana-champa,gn 



FPB 1 19 



8 t: ^.i 4 *> 



I LI6I — O-1096 



UBBAHY 



OF T«t 




Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 140. 

Report Series. Vol. Ill, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 



DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



glUW 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1909. 




THE LIBRARY OF THE 

FEB 14 1938 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 19 10. 



fiftf) WuACuU Of OtATUMAi HlSTOAV 



RtKMTt, ^LATt XIIV. 




Stantev Field. President. 



Field Museum of Natural History. 
Publication 140. ' 

Report Series. Vol. Ill, No. 4. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1909. 




THE UBRARY OF THE 

FEB 14 1938 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1910. 



^ 






c.^'^ 



(J 



CONTENTS. 



Pagb 

Board of Trustees 328 

Officers and Committees 329 

Maintenance 334 

Lecture Courses 334 

Publications • • 335 

Library 338 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 339 

Accessions 341 

Expeditions and Field Work 347 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 352 

Printing and Photography 364 

Attendance 365 

Financial Statement 367 

Accessions 370 

Department of ^Anthropology 370 

Department of Botany 371 

Department of Geology 375 

Department of Zoology 378 

Section of Photography 383 

The Library 383 

Articles of Incorporation 421 

Amended By-Laws 423 

Honorary Members and Patrons 428 

List of Corporate Members 429 

List of Life Members 43° 

List of Annual Members 431 



327 



ja8 Field M t or Natural I 



III. 



Tin-. BOARD OF TKISTEES. 



E. Adams. 
KtnvARu E. Aver. 
W F. Blair. 

\\ ILLIAM J. ClIAI-MERS. 

Richard T. Crane. Jr. 

Stanley Field. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. 



.\rthur B. Jones. 

("tKORGK MaNIKRRE 

Cyrus H. McCormick 

r.KORGF. I'" I'oRTKK 
.\|>RMAN H.*Kk\" 

.Martin A. Ryk:. 
I'kkdf.rick J. V. Skipf. 



Edwin Walker 



DECEASED. 



Norman Williams. 
Marshall Fifld. !r 



CfFoRGB R. Davis. 

Ht NTINGTON W. IaCKSOX. 



Jax., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 329 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 

Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 

D. C. Davies, Auditor and Assistant Secretary. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Richard T. Crane, Jr. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

administration committee. 

Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Richard T. Crane, Jr. George F. Porter. 



J30 FiBLD M 



or Natural niM«'Kv Rktmhts. Vol III 



G 



STAI K OK I HI- Ml SHCM. 

(XRCCTOR. 
pKFnKHirK T V StCITF. 

DCPARTMCNT Of AMTHROPOIOOT 



A. U' 



»» I » . . » 



Tini.n Lauprr. . .- 
kt B. Lewis. A 

Innesinn 



nf African and .\fe- 



DEPAHTMEST OF BOTASV. 

MlLLSPAUCH, Curator. 

Tl s>t \f nDrFV\(;^X^ .-J C\ ;'-./}!• f ('iit.il.'it 
OCPAftTMENT or OEOIOOV. 

O; ' Ta RRi NOTON, CuraA^r. H. W. ^xcwoL^, Assistant Curator. 

Llmik 6. Rir.c. ' 'slant Curator I \iU'outoloi^y. 
Arthur W. .^i • i ....... -•....... s,v/jV»ij 



DEPARTMENT Of ZOOLOOV. 

Ci B. C iirator. Sbth E. Meek. A ' Curator 

UtL^KBD H. iJsGuuD, Assistant Curator of XfamnuU^^f^v ar. 

nit'i 
\Vii t 1 ^\| J CtKKHARD. Ai . --.. Curator P«' -'f.'"' •' r..? ,...,7 
wn \ fttrwiT Assistant Cur at>''T / 

RECORDER. 

D. C. Davies. 



THE UMANV. 

Elsie Lippinxott. Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

1909. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the 
Museum for the year ending December 31, 1909. 

In the extension of its scientific operations into remote lands, 
and in the accumulation of material of great value from new fields 
consist the more important activities of the Museum for 1909. The 
expedition into Tibet, in the South Pacific Islands, and in the PhiHp- 
pines, and the acquisition of material by purchase from Egypt and 
German New Guinea, the Rothrock herbaria and library, and the 
collections made by subordinate Museum expeditions in Guatemala, 
British New Guinea, Bermuda, Fiji Islands, etc., have unitedly 
brought to the stores of the institution the most valuable material 
from every point of view that any year has recorded. This has been 
done without interference with the work of rearranging and labeling 
and recasing old material and the installation of new material in 
accordance with the plans for the occupation of the new building, 
inaugurated four years ago. In the introduction of new material to 
the exhibition series in all departments, and the consequent extension 
of geographical areas, scientific discrimination has resulted in con- 
siderable elimination of material in all departments, both because of 
space requirements and because of the transfer of apparent duphcates 
to the study collections, whereby the latter were rendered more 
complete in themselves without detracting from the interest of the 
exhibited collections, at least from a popular standpoint. In all the 
scientific departments increased storage facilities for duplicates and 
for exchange material have been provided and the spaces and systems 
for the accommodation of study material have been enlarged and 
improved. It will be observed too, that in response to the demands 
for reference books, necessary for the identification and description 
of material, the departmental libraries have had gratifying addi- 
tions. The capacity of the printing shop has been doubled to meet 
the requisitions for labels, the output of which this year has greatly 
increased. The generous appropriations for exhibition cases for all 
departments have hardly equaled the requirements, but the pro- 

33^ 



KAL li v. I. Ill 



.t 1 It.l I '!< 



'•r 
1111 to att.iin. 
In the pii ns of the Must-uni for the year. Curator Cory'» 

n" has attractcrl much favorable and 
<• tlu- • tive cat<ilo{nic> hy Prof. TarbcU. 

: ihc 1 • in the *' " " nn. 

'mi. i..',;\Na:'i i:.. /vytr. constiiuif.s by ,i; cunscnt a 

•iithbution to the hteraturc of classical ... ' "y. 

Th,- murder of Dr. William Tr.n.^ ..f the Dej .. .. :it of An- 
il' • -'V. while on an cx|- the Mu.seum anions; the 
II of the Philippine Islands, was a shock to his associates in 
the Museum, no greater, however, than it was to his compeers and 
to student ethnologists throughout the world. Dr. Jones was a 
young man of the ver>* best attainments in his chosen field, whose 
death came while perfonning scr\'ice fully as patriotic and hiph in 
purpose as that actuating any man whose career has had a tranf 
close. The Museum has just learned of the intended return "t 
As<;is» int Curator S. C. Simnis. who \-i.sited the scene of Dr. Jonrs" 
la- < and has secured the material and notes gathered by him 
and caused a suitable monument, funds for which were privately 
provided, to be erected at the spot where the body of Dr. Jones was 
buried. The Trustees have caused a bronze memorial tablet designed 
by Theodore Lcschcr to be cast for insertion in the wall surrounduig 
the V Vction in the Museum 

Tiu :ucnt of Curator Dorsey t- a series oi articles 

on th- ' ' • and sociology of the Old .. .. ; for publication in 

the (■ :tic. while depriving the Museum for a time of the 

in. of a much valued member of the scientific staff, is 

n( .ess so closely allied with the purposes and possibilities of 

the Department of Anthropology, that the arrangement might be 

The letters thus far published have attracted 

>n and ihere can be no doubt of the importance of this 

to the V of those concerned in the sociologic 

 •'■ "  i a:i 1 inosc specially interested in the r-- • 'v 

>fi.t '^K^r.^i avr"- •■ - of the United Sta; . y 

.. Its b*- , jtic of the peoples under- 

the capaMo srrutiny of Dr. Dorsey. Among other changes in 

the staff is • -ance by Mr. Wilfred H. ' ' . i of an appoint- 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLV. 




The Late Doctor William Jones. 



OF THt 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 333 

ment to the Assistant Curatorship of Mammalogy and Ornithology. 
Mr. Osgood brings to the Department of Zoology an established 
reputation of high order. He is a scholar, an author, and an educator. 
His better known labors have been with the mammals of the North- 
west Coast, and he is an acknowledged authority among the younger 
group of mammalogists. He is at present in London working up the 
Museum African material, in which it is beHeved a number of new 
types will be found. Prof. B. E. Dahlgren, the well known modeler 
in wax and glass, especially assigned to the Department of Botany, 
is an acquisition of importance. A number of striking pieces result- 
ing from the art, skill, and scientific knowledge of Prof. Dahlgren 
have already been placed on exhibition in the Botanical gallery. 
One or more minor resignations have been offered in the scientific 
departments, capable men accepting advancement to higher positions 
in other institutions. 

The creation by the Board of Trustees of an Administration 
Committee to which was assigned some of the duties theretofore 
imposed upon the Executive Committee, and the monthly meetings 
of this new Committee at the Museum, has been of distinct advantage 
in the more prompt consideration of important questions by the 
corporation authorities. 

The President (Senor Don Manuel Estrada Cabrera) of the 
RepubHc of Guatemala requested the United States Bureau of Fish- 
eries to recommend some person to make a survey of Lakes Amatitlan 
and Atitlan, for the purpose of determining whether and how the 
quantity and quality of the food and game fishes of those lakes could 
be increased. Assistant Curator Meek was recommended, because 
of his knowledge of and interest in Tropical fresh-water fishes. The 
survey was made by Dr. Meek while on a Museum expedition to 
Central America. The scientific result of this survey was recorded in 
a publication of the Museum, Vol. VII, pages 159 to 206. Three 
other Museum publications with a total of 75 pages resulted from this 
expedition. 

By consent of President Higinbotham of the World's Columbian 
Exposition, the collection of sketch models loaned to the Museum by 
the World's Fair of 1893, which have been on exhibition in the 
Rotunda since 1894, were presented to the West Chicago Park 
Commissioners for exhibition in the public parks of the city, excepting 
a few pieces selected by and presented to the Art Institute. A number 
of these models have been installed in Garfield Park, and add a dis- 
tinct note of artistic culture to the grounds. 



334 FiKt.J> MfsKUM or Natural History Rkports. Vol. Ill 

M ••' \ : .' " ...i. -- ^„^. Board 

of "^^ .  ■. ^. , .4 -., .-..;.........•' ->"■ '• ' '' •''" 

M' iT Thr .i. Ml.!! rirri'MnT tn 

$t ; the year 

s to the Mirnancc. sums were 

ns and new ilion.  *.ions. etc.. that 

br •<> $i()H.472. As will l)c observed irom the 

-nont. the total sum of $ji.t'>;. in indiviUu.tl 
.ao aiMj been disbursed for special lollcctions and 



L.\ 



» - 



Li — The S'.r.M.r ^f^^ Autumn I.irturc C"'""- 

•mt r-ir.r numlxT . in ^f,-l^. *: .in! Atril nrA 

in October and N 
same KralifyinR attend. t has now \h- ,< 

There have been few lectures when the demands for ad- 
mission have not • '--d the c;i the hall, and in no ca < 

l»ccn un- 
.c Thirticiii irtc i- 

ere<l dun ' mi .m- i v ' 

...< R. F. O. ..pine 1; Tr,v. •. 

Among the !• ATvivn is and 

Mr. F. C. Cole. I 
rhe Nation's Rosourrrs and the Nation's Futur« 
Prof. 11 < .il Survey. Wash- 

ington. U. C. 
.Marvh io. — "An Ancient Delta and its Fuj^sil Tr« 

Prof. E. ' ' University of Miii.ii^'aii. 

M. The Yoseiii ,- National Park." 

.Mr. \V'"i .M r f'u'fi. Washington D r 
April X. — "Crt)'^" i m." 

I)r n. .Xssistant Curator oi Ornithology. 

.\{ I. .■:*; n '! Swmiming Anin. 

Mr. K. N. (luerct. .\ssistanl Cur 
Apnl 17 —"The German South S< i I n Islands and 

New T 

Vr • <- • '■ _ Cural'jr 'n .viuaropoiugy. 

A-"' ^i ]"' !,■■■ •.,.,> n. New Guinea." 

A I' ir.^ior of Anthropologv. 

) ire Course, with t;.< 

«u I rluring the months of October and 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 335 

Oct. 2. — "The Bermuda Islands." 

Prof. Oliver C. Farrington, Curator of Geology. 
Oct. 9. — "Canadian Lakes." 

Rev. Frederic Campbell, Brooklyn, New York. 
Oct. 16. — "Savage Mutilation and Ornament." 

Dr. Walter Hough, United States National Museum, 
Washington, D. C. 
Oct. 23. — "Patterns and Colors of Marbles." 

Prof. Henry W. Nichols, Assistant Curator of Geology. 
Oct. 30. — "The Plant Life of the Sea." 

Dr. Marshall A. Howe, Curator New York Botanical 
Garden. 
XoY. 6. — "The Indians of the Painted Desert." 

Mr. Frederick I. Monsen, New York City. 
Nov. 13. — "Our Present Knowledge of Human Lineage." 

Dr. William Albert Locy, Department of Zoology, 
Northwestern University. 
Nov. 20. — "Zoological Collecting in Alaska." 

Prof. Wilfred H. Osgood, Assistant Curator of Mam- 
malogy and Ornithology. 
Nov. 27. — "Southern Florida and its Fishes." 

Dr. Seth E. Meek, Assistant Curator of Zoology. 

Publications. — The following list is presented of the publica- 
tions issued since the date of the last report, with the number of 
pages and illustrations : 

Pub. 129. — Geological Series, Vol. Ill, No. 7. Notes on Various 
Minerals in the Museum Collection. By O. C. Far- 
rington and E. W. Tillotson, Jr. 32 pp., 17 illustra- 
tions (i colored plate), edition 1,500. 

Pub. 130. — Anthropological Series, Vol. VII, No. 3. Catalogue of 
Bronzes, etc., in Field Museum of Natural History. 
By F. B. Tarbell. 144 pp., 300 half-tones, edition 
2,500. 

Pub. 131. — Zoological Series, Vol. IX. The Birds of lUinois and 
Wisconsin, by C. B. Cory, 764 pp., illustrated, edition 
2,500. 

Pub. 132. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 7. New Species of 
Fishes from Tropical America. By S. E. Meek. 5 
pp., edition 1,500. 



H.\i. H K .Vol. Ill 

K • • III. ^ 

T*tih I M r.. 

A w. s: 

i6 n 1.5c 

Pub. I ' ' al Scru-s. Vol. I. X of a 

of Birds from British East A: !'. . 

Ti. 49 pp.. I map. 
Pub. 136. - li -. Vol. II. No. 7. 

I * onthbution to a I r i.i m m* u.i. 

j>clago. By C. F. Millspaugh. 32 pp.. *. ..i 

I .too. 
Pub. 137 — O: »gical Series. Vol. I, No. 5. The Birds of the 

Leeward Islands, Carrihlx'an Si H. (' B. Cory 
63 pp.. I map. edition 1.500. 
Pub. I ^ /. il Scries. Vol. X. No. 1. A Peculiar Bear from 

Ala.ska. By W. H. Osgood. 3 pp . 1 half-tone, 
edition 1.500. 

The Museum exchange list now numljcrs of which 

649 are in foreign countries and 593 in the United States and its 
p. 

table shows the numln-T oi cxchan),'cs with each oi 

tLi^ju L'juuiiies: 

Ar Republic 13 Mrilain 105 

A j; * 

A ;.H W 

Br I^ Indl.i I'' 

R 

Br S Java 4 

B- - liana ; Libcri.i • 

I 

• ; 

t <> 

China I New Zealand f> 

.s 

2 

E.. -i I .: ^ 

Efrypi 

F' ^7 ff 

F , 

G ,2> 14 



I 3 


Mntain 


3 X 




;.H 




I ^ 


Indi.t 


1 


Jaj^an 


S 


Java 


^ 


Libcri.i 




Malta 


h 


Mcxicri 




\. ••.,..• . t 








New Zealand 




Ne»rway 




p-^. . 




.'. 




Roumania 


57 




t 




"J 





J AX., 1 910. Annual 


Report 


OP 


^ THE Director. 


337 


Switzerland 






16 




Uruguay .... 


I 


South Africa . 






12 




West Indies 


... 4 


Tasmania 






3 




Yucatan .... 


I 


Trinidad .... 






I 









U. S. Colombia 






I 






64 Q 


The following 


table 


shows 


th 


e number of foreig 


a exchanges 


receiving the different 


publications: 






Anthropological 












. 241 


Botanical 












, • 33 7 


Geological . 












314 


Ornithological . 












212 


Zoological . 












. 287 


Report . 












 649 


The publications 


are distributed to the different 


States and 


Insular Possessions 


as 


follows : 








Alabama .... 






2 




New Jersey 


. . . 16 


Arkansas 






I 




New York 


... 83 


California 






. 26 




North Carolina 


. . . 6 


Colorado .... 






12 




New Mexico . 


2 


Connecticut 






• 23 
2 




Ohio 


1 7 


Delaware. 


Oklahoma. 


I 


District of Columbia. 






• 70 




Oregon .... 


I 


Florida .... 






2 




Pennsylvania 


. . . 41 


Illinois .... 






• 5 7 




Rhode Island 


•   5 


Indiana .... 






12 




South Dakota 


2 


Iowa 






• 13 




Tennessee 


2 


Kansas .... 






7 




Texas 


  • 3 


Kentucky 






2 




Utah 


2 


Louisiana 






3 




Vermont .... 


• • • 4 


Maine .... 






7 




Virginia .... 


  • 3 


Maryland .... 






9 




Washington . 


4 


Massachusetts 






66 




West Virginia 


4 


Michigan .... 






13 




Wisconsin 


... .16 


Minnesota .... 






9 




Wyoming 


. . 2 


Mississippi 






3 




Philippine Islands 


2 


Missouri .... 






14 




Porto Rico 


I 


Montana .... 






2 




Hawaii .... 


. . . 6 


Nebraska .... 






7 








Nevada .... 






2 






.S9I 


New Hampshire . 






4 









The following table shows the number of domestic exchanges 
receiving the different publications: 

Anthropological 247 

Botanical 324 

Geological 326 

Ornithological 166 

Zoological 276 

Report 591 



Vi8 FiKLii ^: ! OF Natural History — Kf.ports, Vol. III. 

Tnt u* ' c Library v. • lins 5- volumes 



f 



4.S.H4 



(. 






I. 


. '. 1' 


• 




coYi :o 




lor the y 


*' 3.1 $3 iKMjk.H and painphl' * 




ivcd wuh c 


• additions h 




,.; ihc en-*- •• 


' • 'I ;;i".% I u JS throu;-'- 




. t II ifK r, .....;. 


..s way bcinjj quite an t . 



h. 

ci 

in ^ During the year approximately 500 U"* 

have been written soliciting exchanges from contemporary s- 
not on the exchange list. A number of favorable replies have aln-. 
been received and exchanges effectefl The largest single acquisition 
was that which accompanied the Rothrock herbarium. 

>nng of 34a books and 380 pamphlets. Many of the b<' 
:i. n the Mu.scum  " ' >n, and where they dn ' •<!. :;;t 

c ■• copy was pl.i. .1 m the Departmental ii .iiij. The 

R ry is valuable in that it is rof' -• • • -^ive of the l>otan- 

i- <i many years and contains : rare works. I: 

> interesting and significant to note that the price has advancH 
over the original cost of many of the IxKDks in the collection »• 
fifty to seventy-five per cent. Other noteworthy acquisitions were 
r« from the following: Madame Leo Errera. Brussels; Mrs 

Hvnry I" ; Mr. Edward E. Ayer; Academic des S de L'E- 

pcreur  ' ' I. rraguc; Botanic Oa^ ' ' 

Deutscl. .^.i u, M'M^iii Verein lur Bohm ; K. Uni ■.>..; - i...m. 
Ltin ! K..V.! Tl..'.ni. r..r,1,fi< of Cal«-<*" » kV,v.' (Virion^; K- 
a- IS. \V. 

u- i were loaned by the Un igo to the 

M for use in the Department of Botany. Collaboration has 

been re ' on of uivn List of Seruds for 

tr ^ ul i . and 1,017 titles have been supp' 

' -d by the John Crerar L,!ijr.. 
1 iii'jn ' — ivcn of value both to Ur 

-' An c... . : effort is being made to 

! r!Mr.!rr.ite material now in the Librarv 
d to each Curator from wh 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 339 

to select such material as might be desirable to retain. The re- 
mainder was then classified and twenty-five typewritten lists were 
sent to as many societies and libraries, with request for exchange. 
It was evident from replies received that the majority of these 
institutions did not have their duplicate material available for ex- 
change. However, small exchanges were effected, and as several of 
the lists are still out, it is possible that some further exchanges may 
be made. By request of the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture 375 duplicate bulletins and circulars received from that depart- 
ment were returned for redistribution. Fourteen thousand two hun- 
dred and twenty cards have been written and inserted in the card 
catalogues. Monthly installments of the John Crerar Library cata- 
logue have been received. To accommodate the ever increasing card 
catalogues in the library it became necessary to again add to the 
card cabinet. In view of the future use of these cabinets it seemed 
wise that, instead of adding to the wooden cabinets now in use, pur- 
chase be made of steel cabinets. A satisfactory type has been 
adopted. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling. — The most im- 
portant collections catalogued in the Department of Anthropology 
have been the R. F. Cummings' Philippine Collection, secured 
by Mr. F. C. Cole among the Tinguian and near-by tribes of 
Northwestern Luzon, and also among the pigmy Bataks and the 
Tagbanua of Palawan; the collections secured by the Curator in 1908 
in India, Ceylon, Sumatra, Java, New Ireland, Admiralt}^ and Sol- 
omon Islands; also the superb Parkinson collection from German New 
Guinea, the gift of Mr. Joseph N. Field of Manchester, England. 
Additions have been made to the classified Tribal Lists, and the 
Card Catalogue for the same has been maintained. 5,400 catalogue 
cards were written and entered in the Inventory Books, which now 
number 33. The work of labeling has also continued with gratifying 
results. 3,725 new black labels were placed in the department, 
distributed as follows: 525 in the Igorot collection; 930 in the Tingu- 
ian, Apayao' and Kalinga collections; 835 among the Bella Coola, 
Tsimshian, and Haida exhibits. The work of labeling the North 
Court, with its alcoves, has practically been completed. For this 
purpose 1,350 standard black labels, in aluminum ink, were used. 
About 85 other large case and hall labels of varying size were placed 
here and there throughout the department. 

The Curator of the Department of Botany reports that the 
labeling of specimens in cases being installed, and those previously 



?4« riKin y. ^1 op N History - Rbporth. Vol. III. 



t 



> 



•« t • t« t 



.1 ? tn meet  

t of t» 

.r is complete, while heavy o material in 

cr herbaria have been r. 31.679 specimens have boon 

54 record books ot the department, of which 13.95- 
irum ihc University of Chicago herbarium and 6.000 from th 
>n. The Geographic It 
.1 le to date. The car<i iti'iM<>> ■•, un- 'iijiUk 

h. ..w. ..;. . . vonomic plant names have multiplied. 1.250 t..;.-- 
h.ivinc horn written and or>;anizod into ihr tt Sco n w in the cases. 
acns in the Department of Ci cd during th< 

year have been inventoried and catalogued, as received, the number 
of entries for the year being 4,103 and the total number on the Dc 
partmcnt l>ooks 103,081. Sixty cards have been added to thr 
le of vertebrate fossils and a complete card catalogue of ihr 
Uc^'urimcnt library has been made. This numl>ers to date 1,816 
cards. A considerable number of temporary written la)>els have 
been prepared and placed in the collections to serve irifil printed 
ortr^ rnn be provided. About 400 such lal>els were pr- , for the 

I ns in Halls 65 and 66, and about 300 for the collections in 

Hall 7a. Some of the latter are more or less descriptive. Sixty-two 
printed labels have been prepared and distributetl in the gem collec- 
tion in Higinix)tham Hall, completing the lal>elling of this collection, 
and 271 p. :cal lat^els. some of them descriptive, have been 

r lUil m ti ns. In a 



nic coin v... 



l... . . , ... . . \n the .... "f thi . ..:..or. 

and labelmg of S| • s in the Department of 

y. d and at a rate exceeding that of the increase 01 

the ^ and encourages the belief that this work, which ha^^ 

•id on it of sudden large ms in the past, will 

' routine work. Dunng the year, about 8,00c 

 . inclu  m O' 

,2 m ' ' ' y 'ji inc spetiar 

m the 
s ^. Labels for < :nens have 



OF THt 
UNIVERSITY OF IIUNDIS 



s 

•J 
M 

m 
< 



4 

m 
3 






s 

3 
a* 
«> 
3 
2 

O 




Jan., 1910. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



341 



» 



»1 



been prepared and installed from time to time as required. The 
entire collection of both mammals and birds has been critically 
examined with regard to possible damage by insects and found to be 
in excellent condition. Material in pickle has been carefully ex- 
amined and supplied with fresh preservative. This material, which 
consists mostly of skins of large mammals secured by Museum ex- 
peditions, is being removed from pickle and dressed as fast as possible. 
Since July i, about 150 of these large skins have been treated by the 
tanners. 

The year's work on catalogues and inventorying is shown in de- 
tail below. 



Department of Anthropology 
Department of Botany . 
Department of Geology . 
Department of Zoology . 
The Library .... 
Section of Photography 



No. of 
R.ecord 
Books. 

n 1 
00 


Total No. of 

Entries to 

Dec. 31, 1909- 

99-543 


Entries 

during 

1909. 

5.403 


Total No. 
of Cards 
Written. 

103.933 


54 


276,421 


31.679 




20 


103,081 


4,102 


6,740 


40 


82,206 


9.077 


28,718 


12 


72,037 


8,116 


90,300 


6 


80,762 


11.344 





ACCESSIONS. — Among the most important accessions of the year 
in the Department of iVnthropology should be mentioned the two 
collections from German New Guinea, one from Huon Gulf, number- 
ing 500 specimens; another, a general collection of more than a 
thousand pieces, from the central coast region. The latter includes 
carved posts, large carved canoes, and two rare dance masks from 
Hansa Bay, the larger one more than 16 feet in height. These 
valuable acquisitions were the gift of Mr. Joseph N. Field of Man- 
chester, England. The material obtained by Mr. Ayer last year but 
not prepared for exhibition until last Spring consisted of 18 strings 
of beads, composed of carnelian, glass, and glazed earthenware; 18 
mortuary stone vases and jars of great beauty and valu^, among 
which is a beautiful alabaster vase for ointment ; 49 weights of a wide 
range of sizes, made of stone and copper; a mirror and bottle, each 
of bronze; 16 stone statuettes, some in a more or less fragmentary 
condition, among which is a beautiful figure of Osiris and also a 
fine red stone statue of the twelfth dynasty (inscribed "His father 
Teta, His mother Nefertari"); 4 mortuary cloths (in frames upon 
the east wall of Hall 9); i coffin lid of wood; 8 coffin hds of b.>ne, 
all somewhat fragmentary, with one exception; a large, inscribed 
brick; 4 burnt clay mortuary offerings; 2 wooden mortuary boxes; 
2 small mortuary figures of wood, one containing a rectangular cavity 
for receiving a papyrus; a mummied hawk; 2 mummied antelopes; 




?4> FiKi.t) M ' OP Natural Hihtomy Kki'orts. Vol. Ill 



«i a f' •). In 

. ' . . J 



ihr ! i. in t :m of ' 

E i«)un«I at Tchnch. Province of Mirich, Upj'< r 

E, i It IS the mumni> -ii With the figure arc 

in. with cakes of an undctcmiincd substance. 

I) ot Uus sl< 1 of a small group of dncrar)* 

vti.^i:» irom Etruria a:ui aiuunt Roman bronrc ^ ' now in- 
stalled in the North Court. The two larjjc M' * "' "^ 
, .^ .'. .! under the direction of Mr. Edward E. Avi ; ... , . , 

,1. one of them being the gift of Mr. Martin A. Rycrsrm. -• 
ferred to in the 190S rrport as anticipated accession*; were n 
at the Mu.seum the ; -ar and given storage in iai brick 

room constructed at th< ! entrance of the Museum, as it 

was I 1 adx-i^ • erect the tombs in the present build- 

ing. 1 iit' loinbs tilled 200 lar)4< some of them ten feet in length, 

tl • • '  ' . the installation of one of t' • 

slt:.i iu 1 . ii.iM i> i.Mii.M ;■. in another part of this '•• 

AtvioMf - \f r r.hvard E Aver were two rare, carved v. 

in '.   \. Mr. R. F. Cuninunr^ rnve a small Mang 

van c .n. made by Dr. Flciihcr Gardner. '. n?ton, Indiana, 

while ser\nng as a surgeon in Mindoro. This at is valuable, 

owing to the extreme scarcity of cave material m the Philippines, 
about 50 specimens of the lot coming from the burial cave of Pokanin. 
m- ' n( Bulalacao and M.t in Southern 

M r lauTL fts were S paintin;:.^ iji iiopi I ' 

b\ I. .. .....bank, pr i by Mr. Stanley McCormick. .1.. . .• 

uni Mir '.v..\.fi cirtnirit ntrd with tufts r»f human hair. t*i-»>ri.! 

in I iia by Mr. W. H. Dupee of ( 

and by him given to the Mu.seum. Of the important and intc 
a< « by purchase, were an EcNptian sar us of granite, a 

I of J id several A.<vsanian an<l 

B >•%! by Mr. Aver. Mention should be m.t 1< 

''' itral Africa, which forms 

j^^. ... ... •• . .. 

n to t; i .■..;,..;..■...;,;,.' '''^■" -■'•-•^ 

.ind librar\- ni Dr. J. T. ; 

rly sur ; the West, not only 

a: s himself, but through his asso- 



Jan., 1910. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



343 



ciation with Dr. Asa Gray, Dr. George Thurber, Dr. John Torrey and 
other early botanists, was able to secure many rare plants and sets 
of plants. His herbarium consists of nearly 25,000 sheets, largely 
from the west, north and southwest, Mexico and Florida. It con- 
tains long series of the plants of Bean, Berlandier, Bigelow, Bischoff, 
Bolander, Brendel, Burk, Canby, Chapman, Clinton, Curtiss, Garber, 
Ghiesbright, Hall and Harbour, Sutton Hayes, Kellogg, Kenney, 
Lemon, Leow, Mann, John Stuart Mill, Palmer, Parry and Palmer, 
Pope, Porter, Pringle, Regel, Reverchon, Thurber, Vasey, Ward, 
Wolf, and Wright. This herbarium comprises collections made 
principally from 1840 to 1880, thus directly supplementing that of 
Patterson, secured by the Museum some years ago, which dates from 
1880 to 1900. The Rothrock herbarium is mostly mounted and 6,000 
sheets have already been put through and placed in the organized 
herbarium of the Museum. The other notable herbaria now in- 
corporated with that of the Museum are those of Dr. Arthur Schott, 
M. S. Bebb, H. N. Patterson, C. F. Millspaugh, A. A. Heller, John K. 
Small, L. J. Wahlstedt, A. S. Hitchcock, and the University of Chicago. 
Other series secured to the herbarium this year are: Clemens, Philip- 
pine, 1,150; Bloomer, Arizona, 900; von Tuerckheim, Guatemala, 406; 
Conzatti, Mexico, 185; Purpus, Mexico, 523; C. R. Barnes and Land, 
Mexico, 303; Stewardson Brown, Bermuda, 150; S. S. Visher, Dakota, 
198; Botanic Gardens, Natal, 105; Fiebrig, Paraguay, 155; Tracy, 
Gulf States, 507; Britton and Harris, Jamaica, 770; J. T. Rothrock, 
Bahamas, 162 ; L. J. K. Brace, Bahamas, 231 ; Percy Wilson, Bahamas, 
489; R. A. Dixon, Illinois, 400; Wright, Illinois, 139; J. H. Maiden, 
New South Wales, 100; W. E. Broadway, Trinidad and Tobago, 450; 
J. Macoun, Canada, 335, and H. H. Smith, Georgia, 479. Arranged 
geographically the specimens added to the organized herbarium dur- 
ing the year are as follows: 



Alaska .... 
Canada (in general) 

Alberta . 

British Columbia 

Xewfoundland 

Quebec . 
United States 

Alabama 

Arizona. 



University 

of 

Chicago Loan. 


Museum 
Addition to 
Herbarium. 


Total 

now in 

Herb'm* 




195 


53 7 


38 


3 


1.95° 




47 


33^ 




103 


793 


244 


. . . 


464 


9 




45 


20 


39 


793 


1,227 


1,867 


6,634 



* Totals are from these few geographic localities only. This does not tabulate the whole 
herbarium. 



344 KiKLD Mr>Ki*M or Natural History Kkports. Vol. Ill 



United ??tatf % 

Ar 



\ .:'.}■. i 



li; 

Ir 

I. 



Mexican Boundan* 

M 

M 

M 

Mi5^soun 

Muntana 

Nevada 

New Ham(>shirr 

New Jeney 

\. •• 

N. - . . 

North Carulina 

O". 



Pa 

p. 

R 



>.fi. ('...1st 



T. 

Tr 

Vermont 

Viririnta 

W 

U 

W 

\V 



nc I'at'k 



1.(^4 

3()6 



LOW 






4 




'4 




4 


47 




|.,S 


aSa 
I.Stt 




' 7 3 


t$.<,^: 


1 . 


546 


4.t9t 


J 5' 


360 


t6.c^- 


. -,#. 


^4 
a 


3 4« 

ft44 




1 


. . ,  


." 


1 


a.cs; 




39 


•390 




1 1 


a.i 1 1 


t 




5>y 


5 


i'i 


t.S6o 


1 


8 


651 


'9 


5 




c 


t9 


^ - - 


i 




977 


- ; 


: 


t 4Qa 


"3 


.W 


' ■* 


I li 


at 


- • * 




36 


I.M* 




■>5 


- " ' 


:'r:- 







t04 






a 


; 


6.491 


t 




7»» 


5 




54 7 


74 




74 


10 


!» 


681 


ir4oa 


695 


6.ct'' 


417 


36a 


1.,\S3 


«83 


'i 


i-.^oa 


33 « 


a 


1.078 


Us 




4->9t 




36 


f.»54 




4 


745 




ta6 


86j 


.; 




a67 



Ba:. 



Andros I 



t.a64 



Jan., 1910. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



345 



Bahamas 

Cat Island . 

Crooked Island 

Eleuthera 

Fortune Island 

Inagua . 

Long Island 

Mariguana 

New Providence 

Hog Island . 

Riding Rocks 

Salt Cay Bank 
Elbow Cay 
Water Cay 
Anguilla 
Cat Sal 

Watling's 
Bermuda 
West Indies 

Cuba 

Dominica 

Grenada 

Jamaica. 

Porto Rico 

St. Kitts 

St. Thomas 

Tobago . 

Trinidad 
Mexico 

Coronados Island 

Lower California 
Central America 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Panama. 
South America 

.Vrgentine 

Paraguay 

Venezuela 
Europe 

Denmark 

Germany 

Italy 

Sardinia 
Asia 

India 

Palestine 



University 
ot 
Chicago Loan. 


Museum 
Addition to 
Herbarium. 


Total 

now in 

Herb'm. 






18 


446 






20 


33^ 






71 


664 






21 


344 






21 


441 






I 


141 






I 


169 






440 


2,386 






121 


190 






13 


13 






7 


7 






26 


26 






134 


134 






43 


43 






9 


458 






151 


627 






167 


5.093 






2 


78 






24 


801 






780 


6,056 






I 


3.969 






I 


10 






II 


438 






16 


56 






310 


394 


3.138 


2,268 


25,402 




2 


10 


227 


20 


1,632 


116 




487 


584 


423 


2,141 


75 




484 




7 


SI 


I 




824 




155 


1.392 




17 


959 


. . . 


I 


I 




I 


4,051 


3 




917 


I 




2 


2 


. . . 


727 






23 


1. 134 



346 FiRLi> M t or Natural II 



\ : . 



*>o 



10^ -' 4 



the organized heri>.ii>iiiii <lunn){ the ^ni 



3^ 



^'ift of the Tonopah meteorite, weighing ncarlv 
two • le accession. This was presented through tin- 

p. I Messrs. Sunley Field. R. T. Crane. Jr.. Cxtus H. Mc- 

and George F. Porter, of the Board of Trus- The mats 

lined entire and is the larj^ost imteorite sf>crtmen in the 
M as well as one of the largest known. The metrorito 

ex nc shaping and pitting in a • Vable degree 

A N«ij. iiii« ir-Miii>,' specimen of copper lx)uUler wv .,.i i.g as pounds 
fo»i'i.' "'-ar Lake (lencva. Wisconsin, and a "i'' • ••nen of .t^', .-..?..>; fr .m 
Ca were presentc*! by Mr. Edward E. .\ the H > 

tecs. Mr. William J. Chalmers of the Board of Trustees kindly ad<l(-<l 
to the Chalmers crystal collection a superb crystal of golden l>er\-l 
si. negative crystals. From Thomas S. Chalmers were received 

three specimens of gold ore from Cripple Creek. Colorado, showinj: 

 ' ' ore found in the early days of the Ind- " 
y. ■' tion. comprising over 300 specimens. •_•: na:. f 

».. -viic. hematite, datolite. and other minerals anl 

fo..... : :n th' T >Vi Sviperior r.- 'i .n wi*; n. lived from Mr"; 

Joseph . in of ( The « by her hus 

band, the late Mr. Austrian, during the early days of copper minr^.p 
in the Lake Suj>crior region and hence contains many spccim«Ms 
no longer procur.. From F. Pcreira Gamba were received 11 

»| and associated rocks of Colombia; from Xipp">n 

T s of clays and other : ■; used 

ir. • - ' *- *n L. \ . l^.•Jnkel a 

la ... . .V. '.•',..' - glacir*- -^ ' other 

p' fr-vm ent John Cmfl 45 , ..ens of 

f< and from W. W. Newberry 24 

s{ . Oklahoma. By exchange, speci- 

mens ot the I' and Futtehpur meteorites were obtained from 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 347 

the Geological Survey of India, and from Grebel, Wendler &- Co., a 
specimen of the Buschhof meteorite and ten specimens of minerals. 
Important material obtained by purchase included an unusually 
complete mastodon skull from Yorkville, Illinois, and a nearly com- 
plete skeleton of the rare fossil beaver-like animal Castoroides ohioensis 
from Indiana. A large slab 31K square feet in area showing over 200 
calices of the fossil crinoid Uintacrinus from Kansas and a series of 
well-preserved crinoids from the Kinderhook group of Le Grand, 
Iowa, were also obtained by purchase. Accessions by collection 
include several hundred specimen fossils of Bermuda; about 200 
specimens of ores and minerals of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, 
obtained from exhibitors at the Seattle Exposition; 76 specimens of 
fossils, ores and minerals from Oklahoma and nearly 3,000 specimens 
of invertebrate fossils from Wilmington, Illinois, and adjoining 
localities. 

The acquisitions during the year in the Department of Zoology 
were extensive and important, comprising 122 mammals, 1,170 bird 
skins, 300 eggs, 4,989 specimens of fashes, and 201 reptiles. An 
interesting and important collection of mammals and birds was 
obtained through the kind offices of Mr. Rodway of the Georgetown 
Museum, British Guiana. Mr. Rodway's interest in the Museum is 
gratifving and highly appreciated. Approximately 1,300 of the fishes 
were collected on the Florida Keys by Assistant Curator Meek; 30 
specimens were collected in Venezuela by Mr. J. F. Ferry, and the 
remainder from near Chicago by Mr. Hildebrand. A large collection 
of mostly fresh-water fishes was purchased from Mr. Woolman. The 
collection contains many rare species from the Southern States and 
from Mexico. Of the reptiles, 71 important ones were collected on 
the islands near Venezuela by Mr. Ferry, and the next in importance 
were secured through exchange from Mr. Hunter of St. Louis. The 
acquisitions in the Division of Entomology consisted mainly of small 
lots of insects, mostly of local species, though by purchase 1 63 specimens 
were obtained from Charles Weber, who collected them on the island 
of Palawan, Philippine Islands. 

Expedition and Field Work. — One of the most important expedi- 
tions of the year has been that of Assistant Curator Simms in 
continuation of the survey of the Philippine Islands, the funds for 
which are provided by Mr. Robert F. Cummings. On his arrival at 
Manila Mr. Simms proceeded to the Cagayan valley with the object of 
assembling the material collected by Dr. Jones and arranging for its 
dispatch to Manila. Dr. Jones, having made an exhaustive study 



u*'* Field MfsKUM or Natural HisTOKV Rki'dkts, Vol. Ill 

• •' • ^' '••; ■^■•Tisi. Alii a«l. and '^ ■■•■' •i, an<l 

 Du'n.i'.iTM \v;i , -J raft 

T :ij5 rc- 

itor Simras, JG. I1X)9. fn>m 

•.n. Mt . is of interest: " I have the pleasure to rejxr' 

that my stay in the Ifugao territory (u )i>umcyri| after com- 

N in connection with the athurs of the late Dr. Jonc^ 





havin 




than 


a t" 








• ! cutnj 


Tcaciisp. I 


. - . 


T fru'.ii :!u> 


1:11c: 




.ij- ;■■ 


;..* time 


«)| makin>^ 




•tion were 


hut i 


'i i • 


n thr 


• \!usciini 


1 In T?M. 


i 


•1 rV.i-rc is 


r. full 


■^u** 




•\e of inv 


estimation 


and i 


iR was 


among 


the 



< \Iv n« 

ub-province of Amburayan — principally at Bacun 
and immediate vicinity. From thi.s little knoWiTi area I m 

several hundrctl specimens which greatly increase the 
value oi all  and valuab- -n of Igorot material, 

by the ftllinK ;ii 01 a i're\*iously exi.MiiiK ,;a\). I sir. - ' ' • !-. 
get my matenal shipped soon, that it may reach Ci... ...... / ;..< :.r«.i 

•■ 'h. r.minr viar." The collections «)t Dr. Jones an<l Assistant 

now in transit from Manila. Dr. Berthold Laufer 

continued his ethnological survey of Tibet under the Blackstone fund. 

Early in May. Assistant Curator Lewis left for New Guinea and the 

tnds. iK-ginning the three years survey under the Joseph 

N. Ficltl South Parifi* lslan<is Fund. After a brief stay in H.iwaii he 

! to the Fiji • where he was able to secure a fairly com- 

" " • ijnsing about 70 type s- ' ' ts. 

. etc.. in various stages of . ; 'in 

. Sv.^n^v Anstralia. and :. . c to Her 

here, without delay, he set 

out upon a trip along the coast of German New Guinea, from Huon 

Gulf to Berlin Hafen. with the intention of returning to the former 

V to begin work Early in October Mr. Cole returned to the 

i'i ]<. F. Cummings* Ex; -i. to make 

•vild tril>cs oi th .trn ' ' He 

he M.i  ^' . t'j. a M.»,.i;.,tii tribe 

•M • . that used by other 

:is of Palawan he will 
sojourn. Upon completion of 
this work he w; > Mindanao for an extended stay among pagan 

tribes 1 the interior of that island. 



Jan., 1 910. AxxuAL Report of the Director. 349 

Three field trips in the interest of the Department of Botany 
have been successfully made during the year. The herbarium staff 
spent a week among the sandstone outcrops of the Starved Rock 
region, not only to assure a representation of the plants of that inter- 
esting locality in the herbarium, but to secure valuable exchange 
material. This trip resulted in 183 specimens, and 11 sets of speci- 
mens for exchange with other herbaria. Mr. R. A. Dixon, one of the 
preparators of the department, made a like trip to Madison, Mont- 
gomery, and Walther counties, Texas, securing 189 specimens for the 
herbarium and 575 specimens for exchange. Mr. Huron Smith, 
Dendrologist, made his field base this year in the mountains of West 
Virginia and Northern Georgia where he collected 149 tree specimens, 
no negatives of trees, 250 herbarium specimens of trees, 592 speci- 
mens of various plants for the general herbarium, and 1,342 specimens 
for exchange. Mr. B. E. Dahlgren made a trip to Jamaica in Febru- 
ary and March to secure studies, and specimens of tropic fruits for 
reproduction. From this expedition he returned 117 specimens, 
molds, and mounts together with a long series of water-color studies 
of living plants and fruits in situ. In his work on the island he was 
generously accorded accommodations at the Hope Botanical Gardens 
at Kingston and material assistance by the Director, Mr. H. H. 
Cousins, Mr. William Harris, and other members of the staff. • 

In March a trip was made to the Bermuda Islands by the Curator 
of Geology and full series obtained illustrative of the coral and aeolian 
limestones, cave products, soils and erosion forms of these islands. 
Of the latter forms, two large potholes nearly two feet in depth 
collected were especially important in illustrating these peculiar 
formations. Specimens of the fossil shells and corals of the islands 
were obtained in large number and about 60 photographs made, illus- 
trating various geographic features but more especially the variations 
in elevation and subsidence of the islands. The Alaska- Yukon-Pa- 
cific Exposition at Seattle was visited near its close by the Curator 
and a considerable quantity of valuable material illustrative of the 
ores and minerals of Alaska and the Pacific Northwest obtained from 
exhibitors there. Among the material obtained was a number of pay 
gravels from placer mines of Alaska, low grade gold ores of Alaska, 
copper ores, including those of native copper, from the Copper River 
district, tin and tungsten ores from Teller, Alaska, showing associa- 
tions like those of the Cornwall region, specimens illustrating the 
coals of Alaska, including anthracite and natural coke, sulphur and 
antimony ores from Alaska, representative ores from the mines of 



or Natural His Krpokts. Vol. III. 



c.i . the (i iron and chro- 

mitr from the black sands of Ci{H* Flattery, talc, firr 

s and a scries of silver-lead ores of the important 
•ir d'Alene district o. Somr •• in«n»r.i'. 

lined, including; a line }^up • irt/ 

c: ::i Ml. ii. < 1 an«l a spot iinon of the new r.um r.ii : 

S- 'tu Cp '-.■ •' 1 ,1 unique form of prcscrvatJ- i ^ 

ir. '!• •■'■' • .. . were also oli» litK-.l On the jwi: .• 

tr , , Los Anjjclcs, C.i i. and the Grani 

Canv^n of Arizona were v*isited and valuable specimens collected and 
p": tphs ma<U A l»ricf trip to Southern Oklahoma was made 

by the Aiisistant Curator from which ores, fossils, and other geological 
material of the territory were obtained. The ores secured were 
chiefly of iron and manganese and illustrative nf the gradations 
111- nd the replacement of limestone by iron. Good spc 

ot .liid were also obtained. The fossils obtained were » .-.- . . 

br i»i'' '>rachiop«:Kls. In adclition. specimens of ca'' »?*r'>ns .' 1 

si'i ^ were collected and some field studies ma 

the origin of the latter. The Assistant Curator of Invertebrate 
Paleontology continued cluring the year the work of collecting in- 
vertebrate fossils in the Chicago area and at Wilmington, Illinois. 
In the Chicago area over 500 specimens of Niagara age were collected, 
chiefly crinoids, sponges, and corals. Several of the crinoids fur- 
ni ' ' ' ' 'lonal illustrations of the new < recently described by 

tlit .i^^ ^ .iiit Curator and some new ivin^ ..ere obt.iincd. Several 
hur. i'. \ Pleistocene shells were also collected in the area. At Wil- 
m over a, 000 specimens of Richmond age were obtained, nearly 

all of which are new to the collections. These include representatives 
of about 2*0 ^ of Brachiopods, several species each of Pelecyp<"ls 

and < Is. and 35 species of Bryozoans. 

During Januar\'. Februar>* and March. Mr. John F. Ferry of the 
D- ...    Is of Bonaire. Aves. Los 

R I. liiantuuia. L<js Hermanos. Margarita, and 

"^ ... viic northern coast of South America. His 

' ^3 1 birds. 27 birds* eggs, iq mammals; and in 

^ of fishes, reptiles, and invertebrates were 
tn .\s a r • s and subspecies of birds new to science 

were number of species new to the collections 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE XLVII. 




Tonopah (Nevada) Meteorite. Weight 3,275 lbs. 



OP THt 
UltVOiilTt OF Illinois 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 351 

of the Museum were obtained. In addition much information of 
value in the study of migration, variation, and geographic distribu- 
tion was secured. In May, June, and July Mr. Ferry again took the 
field and worked in the vicinity of Prince Albert and Quill Lake, 
Saskatchewan, where he secured 195 birds, 22 mammals, 36 sets of 
birds' eggs with nests, and a large amount of accessory material for 
the preparation of exhibition groups of the water birds which breed 
in this region. Later a second expedition to the same locality was 
undertaken by Mr. Ferry, accompanied by Mr. L. L. Pray, to procure 
a series of pelicans and additional accessory material, which proved 
successful. In the early part of December, Mr. C. A. Corwin, Artist, 
and Mr. L. L. Pray, Taxidermist, spent two weeks in northern Louis- 
iana, securing sketches and accessories for bird groups in course of 
preparation. During March, April, and May, Assistant Curator Meek 
and Mr. Heim visited Key West and Dry Tortugas, Florida, for the 
purpose of collecting fishes and accessory material for fish groups, 
as well as making studies for the same. On this expedition 1,300 
alcoholic specimens together with 400 fish skins were secured, rep- 
resenting 50 species. There was also collected a large quantity of 
sea ferns, sea feathers, sponges, corals, starfish, sea urchins and other 
material for accessory work. Of the 400 fish skins about 200 were 
preserved in brine, 175 are mounted but not finished, and 2 5 are mount- 
ed, ready for exhibition. Over 1,500 entomological specimens were 
collected by the Assistant Curator of the division on a trip made in 
the late summer to the southern part of Illinois. Among the insects 
obtained were a number of interesting species which are not found in 
the northern section of the State, where most of the field work has 
been done in the past. As a result of a trip made by Mr. Freisser to 
Northern Mexico, over 200 very desirable insects were obtained from 
that section. 

Following is a list of the expeditions since the date of the last 
Report : 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

Key West and Tortugas . .S. E. Meek, Fishes for groups and study 

material. 
Margarita Islands and va- 
rious other islands off 

north coast South America J. F. Ferry, Birds and mammals. 

Saskatchewan . . . J. F. Ferr}', Birds, birds' eggs, nests, etc., 

for groups. 

Jamaica B. E. Dahlgren, Tropical fruits. 

Fiji — German New Guinea 

(Huon Gulf) . . . .A. B. Lewis, General Ethnological collec- 

tions. 



35a Field M 



or Natural Historv Rkports. Vol. Ill 

Coltoctor. 



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M;:; : ro. I». I 
Chiiui And TO 

A. Y. I' 1 



It 


II 




J 


M 


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s 


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p 


(' 


C.lr 


B 


La 


lUfcr. 


t * 


\ 


I >ti( ■»-% . 


II 


W 


'. Ni. ; 


O. 


c. 


PamiiKlon 


J 


F 


FciTN-. 



nonft Ijt- • 
tnbc* vi ni«rthcm Lui • 

' " ' - •tu«Ii..h, 

(teneral oollrction of Ethncil 



OJJV A- 



Rcc 



.".t* ami 



young, binla* eggs 



.. ,! 



n< 



i;mups and sti: I- 



rul WtlmtnRton; 



rn Illinois 
p T 



A. W. Sl«>com. 
W J "■■ ' 

Win I 



R A l)i\ .n. 



Invertebrate t>- 

. .... nS Av.l ■■. )!!or!i. •n-. 

.i-v.'.nR the 
vince Isabel.i 
Herbarium specnnens. 



iNSTAiLATKHt. RE ARRANOEMENT. AND PERMANENT iMPflOVEMENT. Thc ClhnO- 

l«>gical material se^uretl by M- n Northwestern Luzon 

during the second ^' ' ' vi:n:;ii:)i;> F'hil •• • • 



chiefly 



the 



1 in;;u;.i:i. 



\ - 



liecn ins;...!' • wi new cases cnurcl;. . .......^ .i ... .. 

H.iV :- V. irh thf .Krrntion of two cases. Hall 41 , 

w Tinguian tnl)c. This compr' .r exhibit 

ry, matting, a case fully illustratinR the manu- 
. blankctr>', women's costumes, men's dress and 
nc and foods, tovs and musical instruments, fish- 
Two Tinguian gmups are a' •.•<1 for 

ip of five ' :a:t.^ i;ic inanu- 

..inu ^p^•.l^S. A nu^. .in;. "> .,t.^,,,. 1.,.,1t 

n f>-»fi\-i> IwiV ri ill .»! kf i. .1! 7 '.' 

• nyinR 

res of the natives at their daily task<« 

n to t s of Kalinga-Tinguian- 

irom the Saltan River Valley and from the Tmguian- 



!;» 
a* 
ir 
Haii 41. A i:: 

fn • ' 

t. 

K' 
a< 
w 
Igorot r 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 353 

Apayao-Kalinga people of the Tineg River Valley complete the quota 
of 21 cases filling this Hall. In Hall 57 are already installed two 
additional cases of Kalinga-Tinguian-Igorot ethnological specimens 
from the Saltan River Valley; two cases of Kalinga material, one case 
each of Batak and Tagbanua ethnological material from Palawan. 
Over 200 photographs, along with new maps, have been placed in these 
cases to further illustrate the use of objects shown. In this Hall there 
vet remain to be installed two cases of Batak material and three of 
Apayao, for which cases are still lacking. 17 New Guinea house posts 
have been placed in the coves of Hall 58. In Hall 53 two cases of 
ethnological specimens, comprising basketry, weapons, house posts, 
drums, carved figures, a wooden bed, shell money, etc., from New 
Ireland and close-by islands, have been temporarily installed. This 
material, except a small quantity from the Parkinson collection, was 
gathered by the Curator of the Department during his hurried trip 
around the world in 1908. From the hall ceiling were suspended boats, 
outrigger canoes, from the Solomon Islands, New Guinea and New 
Britain, and a surf raft from the Solomon Islands. Upon the east and 
west walls were fastened ceremonial house carvings from New Guinea, 
a portion of the Voogdt collection, presented by Mr. Joseph N. Field. 
Here also have been installed two dance masks, the larger over 16 feet 
in height, from Hansa Bay, German New Guinea. These masks are 
rare since they are usually destroyed after having served the temporary 
purpose for which they were made. In Hall 3 7 has been installed a case 
of material from Sumatra and one from Java, consisting of material 
collected by the Curator during his recent visit to these islands. A 
case of Java ethnology stands in Hall 39 and two cases of the same 
material yet remain to be installed upon the arrival of the con- 
signment of new cases. Here also is a case of Apache- Yuma and 
Havasupai ethnology. In the south cove of Hall 38 have been placed 
temporarily four PhiHppine spirit houses collected by Mr. Cole on 
the second R. F. Cummings' Expedition. On the wall of the cove 
are four large rice planters from the Island of Cuyo. In the center 
of the Hall stand temporarily three cases of Apache material, con- 
sisting of two cases of Medicine Dance paraphernalia, and one case of 
painted buckskins, implements of the chase, various household uten- 
sils, tools used in tanning, etc. Some confusion of installation exists 
in Halls 37, 38, and 39, leading to the east annex, owing to the 
temporary use of Hall 7 by Zoology. As soon as it is released to 
Anthropology this condition will be improved by the installation 
of the collections originally designed for this hall. In Hall 



354 FiKLD M or Natural Histokv Ki . Vol. Ill 



tllV*-*!* «tl 111' 






n hi^Wr-Trv .in! w.irfnrr 

.1 !n 
Hall have been in the Navaho ex 

la- Mr. Aycr, and consistinc chiefly of blankets and a 

oUi Navaho basketry of old Tlinjfit anr. r 

has \ in Alcove lit. Owin){ to the crowded conditi ••. 

. Hall, the i- • of the ^ 

•vay, recently sccuica i<\ 'At. Ayer. nia'i'.- - ■•ns.'jvi.i 
iKHCJvsary. Case 41, Alcove 123. has Ih*'" 
ar- I- Hall 40 a rearranr'""^""^ of five cases was rer 

n» the arldition o: ..n material procured by Mr 

m Luzon. The cases of the North Court have b<>- 
feltefl anew and providc<l with suitable screws, rendering them m- '< 
dust proof than In-forc. 

•nomic botanical ctiUecltons have receiveti the adilit: 1 
ol ji ns of more than onlinary i' The projijress 

in ' '^ !^ irtment of Botany ^,l^ lar excce<led t*"^' 

.,.1 entire west jjallcries have l>ecn < ■■' 
illation of 40 cases, an-l .ir have been c 
The larpe and vahtable drm'! series from Par 

has been r< rcdr< ind it : with bark and wood in 

approximation, in 7 highly intercsiinj; cases; the 39 principal wo S 
of the Island of Trinidad occupy a half case brilliant and attract! • 
in color, these with 41 S] f woods from British Guiana, a- 

tl ' :.»rth 7 ' ' bian • 

at ' >t V' n /,m i.i, \ ::■ ' ' '••■ 

'>' ,. ; ,, s. TH'" ■'•■'ii'ri' 

■\ ordman.* ii 
an t" the structure of w cr a 1< - .: 

s« illustrating the manner and results of government 

timl»er !• The unique and highly attracti- lay of wo<^ls in 

the I t now comprises 45 complete cases tully and descrip- 

tively ;.. To the  MV. 3Q 

' ' ' lac yi:u.r. unc oi iricsc i..u.strate8 the 

. ^. .,-...,, :,.^ .r. ,!,.;.-.. <<vttations c 'v 

::ns. type«:. rr 1 
the snak 
Is. w,. »uttercups. pinks and bear- 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 355 

berries; and another the pmes, cedars, and fir. A case illustrates the 
wood chip industry of Japan together with a long series of interesting 
and comparative coniferous fruits from the Orient, Australia, and the 
tropics. A case of Coontie starch plants with their interesting 
cone-like flowers and fruits; and the cattail flags and objects of their 
utilization. An additional case in the grass family shows the utiliza- 
tion of grass fibres in cordage and basketry, and the roots in dyeing. 
Two and a half further cases, illustrating the palms, bring the repre- 
sentation of this utilitarian family up to 14 cases. An additional case 
of the oaks, walnuts, and birches has been added, and another to 
the representation of the mulberry family, containing the interesting 
tapa cloth, letter-wood, fustic, and other products. A highly in- 
teresting case of the breadfruit family with its rubber gum, nuts, 
and meal. A case illustrating the magnolia, custard apple, witch- 
hazel and sycamore families with their instructive fruits, woods, and 
other products. Four cases in the bean family have been added 
to the four previously on exhibition, the four new ones include the 
woods, fibres, fruits, seeds, gums, and dyeing and tanning barks pro- 
duced by this valuable family. The mahogany family now occupies a 
case of high interest as do also the orange family, the spurge family, 
and the soapworts. The buckthorns and vines yield a highly instruc- 
tive exhibit of products with the tea family occupying a part of the 
same case. The gutta-percha family with its rubbers, gums, and 
resins, and the passion flowers and lace-barks completes another in- 
stallation. The cacti, pomegranates, and mangroves fill another 
case, and the interesting and curious monkey-pot family with that of 
the clove and allspice another. The family of the parsleys yielding 
many odorous fruits such as the cumin, anise, angelica, caraway, and 
the ill-smelling gums asafoetida and angelica, is now well represented. 
The black gum, azalea, dogwood, and ebony families, producing many 
valuable products, and the sapodilla family, of chewing gum notoriety 
are fully exploited. The morning glory family, with the milkweeds, 
complete another interesting case; the mint family, and that of the 
sesames, another. The madder family with its coffee, dyes, and tans, 
and the potato family with many common food examples, complete 
the economic installation of the year. The plans of the Curator 
of Botany have been, from the first, to combine both taxonomic 
and economic characteristics in the cases devoted to systematic 
botanical installation. Up to the present year the absence of 
a capable reproductionist upon the staff of the department has 
necessitated installation of economic material onlv; now, how- 



\$,b PiBLU y >•« or Natural History - Rri'okts. Vol. III. 

' ' and pl.n c<l in ci, 

 . • •. ....... .. ....... < artist, and there 

'•f rl: in r n arc finlinc^ places in th«» ' 

: to the :uit family, ilh. 

.irly indicates the pro|>osed plan of in«t.. 
tiot) In this case the material illustrates the family character> 
and prcnlurts as follows: A life-size repnxluction of the end of a 
leafy, flowering, and fruiting branch of the breadfruit (Artocarpus 
I' the leaf-form and char the dis|K>siiion 

iM.ii.i. .1 iiv i the flowers, and i.i' immature and maiun 

fruit in i \.. relation; with this are two enl."^"'-'v'nts from 
nature exemplifying the intimate structurr .nn? icr of th. 

flowers, both male and female, the more ires of w; 

are reproduced, in glass to insure stability and pennanence in the 
reprt-Hluctions; in close association is a natural sized hpc fruit, shown 
in s< •<) illustrate both the developed ovar>* and the peculiar 

of the irmt itself. These four reprcxluctions together exemplify aii 
the ' * ' lers that distinguish the family and unite il> 

genei.i .lui >j-tHi<> in intimate relationship. Another v^- •' - ■- 
sf-.t!.'i..n 1i i< been conv'''*'-' '^'i-trating th- • '^ ■olate :..;...... ;;. 

ti Lie tree (7'; /') is repr< i in full fruit an'! 

leaf, an enlarged model depicts the peculiar flower in botanic de: > 
and a third the ripe fruit with its seeds (chocolate beans) invesletl in 
their natural coating of mucilaginous tissue. Several other group 
models now well under way will soon add deep and renewed interest 
t' !y installe<I with products only. No Museum has ever 

I • ' such comprehensive educational installation. ' ' 

li.' .'>wi. lii i ill. resting the public in plant life is already l)Cir • 
A ri- Tfangement of the two easterly herbarium rooms ; 
n- y in order to better arrange the departmental library to 

armmmodate the increase of books obtained through the Rothrock 
a •\. The herbarium cases in the northeast room were removed 

to the sout rn to replace the books therein. The entire walls of 

the former ruom are now in book shelves the content of which makes 
a '    inical library. The subject, author, and 

s; kept up to date and the accessibility 

a:. . J. i.wiably increased. The herbarium work 

has ; ^ nlv durint^ tho year, though there is still .i 

larp*» rart of *hf \V it, R. .. and University of Chic... 

l' - the organization that will render the specimens an 

' the Museum herbarium. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 357 

In Higinbotham Hall the series of gold nuggets and crystallized 
gold was moved to one of the floor cases and mounted and labeled in 
accordance with the method employed for the general gem collection. 
Unlabeled specimens of the gem collection were supplied with labels 
to the number of about sixty. In Hall 36 the large slab of Uinta- 
crinus acquired during the year and shown in Plate LI I was placed on 
exhibition. The preparation of this slab for exhibition involved 
considerable labor as the slab had been imperfectly mounted when 
received and was unsafe for exhibition without further treatment. 
In order to prepare it for exhibition and make a firm and durable 
mount, the surface designed for exhibition was covered with tissue 
and a thick covering of plaster poured over it. The slab was then re- 
versed and the plaster previously forming the bed carefully removed 
from the rear side. A thick bed of plaster was provided for this side 
and a heavy and durable framework placed around it. The plaster 
was then removed from the front side and the whole framed in heavy 
plate glass. In Hall 59 a fine mastodon skull from Yorkville, Illinois, 
has been installed in place of the large cast of Elephas ganesa. Some 
needful repairs were made upon the mastodon skeleton in the same 
Hall. A wall case, corresponding in pattern to those already in the 
Hall, was provided for a series of Tertiary and Quaternary inverte- 
brate fossils, including those collected by the Curator in Bermuda, 
and the specimens installed in it. Other specimens installed in the 
Hall include a slab mount of a nearly complete skeleton of the 
Miocene wolverine Aelurocyon, a skull and fore and hind legs of 
Moropus elatus, two skulls of Dice rathe rium, two skulls of ArchcB- 
otherium mortoni, a skull of Oligohunis, and a fore leg of Hypo- 
hippus. In Hall 61 a nearly complete skeleton of Castoroides from 
Indiana was assembled and installed in a wall case. This is a rare 
form of beaver-like animal of which only one other skeleton and 
three incomplete skulls have been found, although the first re- 
mains were found in this country in 1838. Besides its rarity this 
skeleton is remarkable for its large size, the animal having been 
more than two feet in height and five feet in length and having 
incisors ten inches long. In Hall 62 a large floor case four feet 
square was provided for the Tonopah meteorite and the meteorite, 
weighing nearly two tons, installed in it. The case is of the same 
pattern as the other floor cases in the Hall. Some readjustment of 
the other floor cases was necessary in order to obtain space for this 
one, and the time during readjustment was improved to thoroughly 
paraffin the series of Toluca meteorites, in order to check incipient 



35* iit;i.ii Mt'MctM or >kAiUKAi. Hisk'k^ KKruKib, Vol. Ill 

d*- 'n S'>nif •^mall mclcoritc s|>cciracn8 were also in- 

tt '*s in the collection. In 1 1 all 6$ a lari^ 

n^ • square by 8 feet high has been provided for 

an exhibit ot sclcnite crystals from Utah. These are mounted 

in the f : the gcodc in which they originally occurred. T: • 
1 with glass on one si«lc and the interior is lighted 

.\ A large number ot cr>'stals arc shown in t*"- 

gy it thelll \V"- ''>''i' 1 ift Wi'i'ti 'o ifiil (on fiiilir; ? s «'.irn, .. 

tl; of the ..;;;. 

nature 1. :i made as realistic as possible. A case has also been 

provided in this Hall for the remarkable fulgunte, 9 feet in Icn," 

from Indiana, and the specimen installed therein. The 
remaining collections in the Hall have been completely rearranged 
and ! ; and some new material added, including the 

of ct ' ' ' ; Ijrought by the Curator from ocnn ; 

In ' Ml I - lui I A u, ii> named the Halt as now installed cont<i.i.;> 

iv. ...*^s of cave products, one of ripple marks, mud cracks, etc.. a 
half case of glacial material and a half case illustrating rock weath- 
ering, two cases of concretions and one case of scptaria. In or 

mplcte the lal>cling of this Hall temporarily, about 200 writ- 
ten labels were prepared and installed. A similar rearrangement 
labeling has been made of the material in the wall cases in H,iil 
66. A half case is now devoted to rock textures, a half case to rock 
jointing, two cases to ' ' " lucts, a half case to faults ri- ! 

folds, a half case to deiiini- -, .1 .liit case to oolites, a half cas< 
vriv- "id a half cas«" '  ff > ?ii f<of metamorphism. A consider.!' < 
«T of rough 1 ami marble material of van ; 

oh had been obtained from a number of sources was reduc« i 
to unifonn size for installation with the regular building-stone .. 
marble jn in Hall 67. Twenty four-inch cubes of limestone. 

S.I -, and other building stones were added in this v. 

and six large p-  ' ' slabs of grar 
.; .s. In ' ' •  11 100 specimen 

p ■\ the " were grouped 

l« the St.. - - i 10 X 15 inches .' 

a >n. Twenty-five of these frames con- 

t- 1 one tn eight specimens each have been installed and thu.s 

a r of important specimens which it had not been 

p was added. About 70 temporary labels 

ik on biack cards were also prepared for this coll- 
: .\ series of specimens illustrating the manui'at- 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



THE BREAI>FRUIT& 



REPORTS, PLATE XLVIII. 




Combined Taxonomic and Economic Installation. The Botanical Characters Modeled. 



lU 



OF IHt 



UMlVPRiiTY nF IlllliOlS 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report op the Director. 359 

ture of Japanese pottery received from Nippon Toki Gomei Kwaisha 
has been installed in Hall 68. This series exhibits both material 
and stages of manufacture. Hall 70, devoted to varieties of coal 
and hydrocarbons, has been completely reinstalled during the 
year. New cases have been provided throughout and the speci- 
mens, with some additions, reinstalled in them. The cases adopted 
are wall and floor cases of the type already in use in Hall 68, 
with the exception that the wall cases are deeper. Seven wall 
cases and six floor cases of these types have been placed in the 
Hall. Five of the wall cases are devoted to the collection illustrating 
varieties of coal from lignite to anthracite. Besides the coals of this 
country those of England, Germany, and Australia are especially well 
represented. The two additional wall cases are three feet deep 
and are devoted to large specimens of asphalts, cannels, and other 
coals, including a complete section, six feet in height, of an Australian 
coal seam. Of the floor cases, one is occupied by diamonds and dia- 
mond-bearing earths and rocks from most of the important diamond- 
bearing regions of the world. Another is devoted to a very complete 
collection of graphites from various localities and countries. The 
others contain asphalts, gilsonite, and other hydrocarbons of economic 
importance as obtained from various localities. A complete collec- 
tion of rocks associated with the coals of Saarbrucken, Germany, and 
illustrating in a general way the rocks usually associated with coal 
occupies another floor case. The total number of specimens now 
exhibited in the Hall is as follows: 44 American lignites, 9 American 
cannels, 55 American bituminous coals, 29 English and miscellaneous 
European coals, 54 German coals, 17 specimens illustrating German 
coal washing, 12 specimens foreign bituminous coals, 17 specimens an- 
thracite coals, 17 large specimens of French and California asphalts, 
American anthracites, cannels, etc., 31 specimens diamondiferous 
rocks and gravels, 50 specimens graphite, 50 specimens of peat and 
its products, and 63 specimens of asphalts and related hydrocarbons. 
Hall 72, devoted to ores of the precious metals and lead has also been 
completely reinstalled during the year. New cases have been pro- 
vided and a complete reorganization of the collections made. The 
wall cases are of the type used in Hall 79 with some changes in the 
felting and hinging. Ten of these wall cases have been provided. 
On the floor of the Hall fifteen cases have been placed, five of which, 
placed in the center of the Hall, are devoted to larger specimens. 
These cases are similar to those used in Hall 79 except that the sides 
have been made in a single light of glass instead of two lights, and 



ji6o Field Ml'skum or Natural Hihtoky - Reports. Vol. Ill 

ire m '• entire when it is I to open the case. 

Ti f the ty|>c already in u.>c in Hall 68. Before 

. oi i; • ns ihry were tarefull ' and any 

• '■ ' iial eliminated. The ^iii>:.ii j-i.m of in- 

'^r- -iously .. ' .T>».-.t u ^«; retained, the ore* 

in Ri . . t'T in : • s. As before, the 

'ip of mining districts have been placed together and for 

all such an individual label has been prepared. It may be 

said that most of the important mining districts of the precious metals 

of the world are n ted in this collection. The large specimens 

on the floor of the liall are grouped g* hically also as far as 

Specimens t<»o largo for these cuit^ were removed to V.r 

All of the specimens in Hall 72 arc now protected by 

glass. Mill, h better pf'-f^Mtion of them i*^ invu', ! •' m s.c 

hern : rto. In .1 11 to the large ^, 

ontain a number of special collections, such as those illustrat- 
ing alloys of gold and silver, salvage of gold and silver waste, and 
platinum ores from various parts of the world. Three floor cases 
are also devoted to the metallurgy of the precious metals and lead. 
In one of these is exhibited an ' itc German method of treating 
' - ! lead ores, the results u: tac difTcrent pr ' n- 

i;.,. . to show the course of treatment. -\ 1 ..us 

.^ of silver-lead ores in th'" .rlm.rv u........ occupies 

In order to make the n . m of the process 

snm#»what more graphic, this collection has been provulcd with .i 
of a blast furnace. In this model, which was con.<:tructed in 
the Department, the various features of the blast furnace are shown 
in detail and a portion of the wall of the furnace is re* cd as 

^ • , rear so that the interior c" \ '^ 

' ' fa cyanide plant lor tr.i- t.\ r. u: gold 

.,,.» ,.t ....... t ;,, ..^., ...• »•,.. <1 . . "pjjg 

. .. .; with 

ns of • i in the 5 os. The 

: ; .: .,'5 shown in the model and a steam 
pu i tine box are shown. A summar>* of the collections at pres- 

ent en I in the Hall and their distribution is as follow.«!: One 

1 ores. Canadian ores and Appala- 

: ».aic. lead ores of the Mi^ . Villey; 

-~ io ores; one ca^e Nevada. Montana. 

■•^. and r*^' Tes; one case. Califor- 

. New orc<; one case. Mex- 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 361 

ican ores; one-half case, South American ores; one case, Colombian 
ores; one case, ores of Australia, Africa, and Europe; one case, gold 
ores of Alaska; one case alloys of precious metals; one case salvage of 
gold and silver wastes; one case ores of platinum; one case metal- 
lurgy of silver-lead ores; one case metallurgy of gold, silver, and lead, 
illustrated by models; one case large specimens South American 
ores; one case large specimens Mexican ores; one case large speci- 
mens New Mexico and Colorado ores; one case large specimens 
Colorado ores; and five cases large specimens of typical gold and 
silver ores from all parts of the world. The relief maps of Lead- 
ville, Mt. Blanc, Carmelo Bay, and Mt. Desert exhibited in Halls 
76 and 77 were repainted and framed during the year. Some addi- 
tions were made to the map of Auvergne and one of the large 
maps of the Henry Mountains was framed. About fifty labels were 
placed in Hall 78 in number sufficient to complete the labeling of the 
collections in this Hall and a few additional specimens were installed. 
In Hall 79 the large mass of manganese ore from Brazil weighing 
3,300 pounds, obtained from the St. Louis Exposition, was installed 
upon a mahoganized base. There was also added to the exhibition 
series in this Hall the important series of copper ores from Alaska and- 
Washington secured by the Curator at the Seattle Exposition, and a 
number of mercury, tin, tungsten, antimony, cobalt, nickel, and ison 
ores from the same source. About 100 hand-written labels were made 
for the new specimens. The West Dome not proving sufficiently well 
lighted for the display of small specimens, the four cases of lead ores 
previously exhibited there were removed and a number of large speci- 
mens brought from Hall 72 to take their place. For these as well as 
for the large specimens already on exhibition in the dome, neat 
mahoganized bases were provided and the general appearance of this 
hall much improved thereby. A number of important specimens 
have during the year been prepared in the laboratory of vertebrate 
paleontology for exhibition. The largest of these was the mastodon 
skull with one tusk obtained from Yorkville, Illinois. Although this 
skull was nearly complete when received, some restoration was found 
necessary to insure its preservation. The restorations made were 
based on careful studies of skulls both of ancient and modern 
elephants. Considerable treatment of the tusk was also found 
necessary on account of its strong tendency to fall apart, and 
long experimentation was required before a satisfactory mode of 
preservation was discovered. By imbedding the tusk entire in 
paraffin, however, and then removing the excess of paraffin, a 



i6j Fi»;m» MtsKfu or Natural History Rkports. Vol. Ill 

s,i' was li. As <»niy wnc tusK was present. 

.c«l in , i.i^i. r ami llic whole farcfuUy a ^ 'f^! 

..;. . . ^' ^^ »s then nv'>i"?«<' <HM>n a wcU-coi. ;;.. :c«i 

\ia<ir An - en of c^; al interest has thus 

Ik-. .\nother imr»r»rtant preparation was that of a skeleton 

of the Miocene camel (O .lus louppt's) the material for which 

was t u- Museum PaleontoloRical Expe<lition of 190S in 

N« Ily means of the restoration of a few V>ones a complete 

^ obtained. This skeleton stands over six feet in height 

an.i I to a striking degree the cliaracters of the camel family. 

Only <ii. 'ilier complete skeleton of the form is know^n A nearly 

compl* f' <^«lett>n of the Miocene wolven"« l./ur.. \.>n was chiseled 

from crix and mounted in slab I Is of Archa' 

other ium, one of which was collected in South Dakota in 1898 and 

the other in Nebraska in iqo.s. were also cleaned from matrix and 

moun' rhese skulls were unusually well preser\*ed and one may 

be a new species. A fore leg of Ilypohipptis obtained in Nebraska 

in 1908 and illustrating an interestir •> in the evolution of the 

' "^ ' t^ mounted. Two skulls 01 i;;l two-homed rhinoceros or 

..... rium from Nebraska, a skull of Oligohutiis from the same 

y and a skull and fore and hind legs of the remarkable f rrri 

■us were also prepared and mounted. Two cases of .«> 

trays were provided in addition to those already employed for storage 

of vertebrate fossils and were nearly filled with cleaned and identified 

specimens. A similar case of trays has also been provided for the 

invertebrate fossils which will Ik- used for specimens awaiting identifi- 

• their removal to the exhibition or the study Con- 

' made in organizing the study von 

'i wi,.-, .lij.i .-imi I . i.ii- 'iiii. minerals, a large part of the i»j - v .;..» n« 

hnvin< ^. • -i . 1. .n. ,! ur.tipcd. labeled, and distributed. To tin 

ums 179 prints have been added during 
the year, making the total numl>er 2.37a. Books, pamphlets, and 
maps to the number of 493 have been added to the Department lib- 
ra: -,ing the total number in the librar>' 6.042. and some bindiTij: 
and repairing of books and rearrangement of shelf series in this 

CO* 

.'jgy installed dunng i:n \Lar a striking 
'^ in the central r *"*^^^ >( the Museum. 

.^r .iirs have l>een , , 1 though several 
impor .s and of birds are well under way 




1-. 



S 

a 

« 

55 






O 

o 
O 



OF Trie 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 363 

and will doubtless be installed during the year. A habitat group of 
antelopes (Anielocapra americana) has been begun and in November 
Mr. Julius Friesser visited northern Mexico securing the necessary 
accessory material. Owing to the generosity of Mr. Stanley Field, 
who provided the necessary funds, four large habitat groups of birds 
have been begun and bid fair to excel any work of the kind which has 
been undertaken. These groups will show the following North 
American species under natural conditions: i, California condors 
(scene, mountains of Southern California); 2, wild turkeys (scene, 
forest of Northern Louisiana); 3, white pelecans, cormorants, gulls, 
etc. (scene, breeding grounds. Quill Lake, Saskatchewan region, 
Canada); 4, wild geese, ducks, terns, etc. (scene, breeding grounds, 
vicinity of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada). In this connec- 
tion the services of Mr. C. A. Corwin have been secured to prepare the 
painted backgrounds. Ten large mammals have been added to the 
systematic series of mounted mammals during the year. These 
include 2 glacier bears, i Stone's caribou i, mountain goat, 2 
Alaska wolves, i wolverene, and 2 Alaska lynx. About 80 small 
and medium-sized birds have been finished and placed on exhibition. 
A collection of photographs of living animals intended especially for 
use of the taxidermists has been begun and proves most valuable. 
One fish case containing 4 groups of fresh-water fishes and 36 jars of 
fishes in formaldehyde have been installed. One python has been 
mounted, and a large alligator has been installed in the exhibition 
rooms. In progress of preparation is a case 6x12 feet to contain 
6 groups of tropical fishes, each group with a glass front 3x6 feet; 
below these groups, occupying the entire floor of the case, is being 
installed a group consisting of a large tiger shark and her 44 young. 
Much attention has been given during the past year to the collection 
of local insects, with a view to installing an exhibition collection 
representing the insect fauna of the State. For several years it has 
not been possible to prepare the specimens as rapidly as they were 
received, with the result that a large amount of material has ac- 
cumulated which has not been pinned. It was to the preparation of 
these insects that more time was devoted than to any other work, 
by the Assistant Curator. Owing to facilities for degreasing skulls 
and skeletons, which were secured through the courtesy of Mr. 
William Warwick, Superintendent of the Standard Oil Company 
plant at Whiting, Indiana, who placed a building at the disposal of 
the Museum for that purpose, 43 skeletons and skulls were degreased. 



364 FiuLD MisKUM or Natural History — Reports. Vol. Ill 
In the Miisruni IalH)ratory the loiiowinK specimens were prc- 

•.-.! H 

•7 
S' mounted for ' •>•:> ** 

r It will l>c noiui'ii in.ii a larj^c nuinlK.T ui iai.'c;.s r.avc 

b« I' •; -Juring the year. The office is now well ' •;•• '^od. its 

fii cnlarj;tMl, and the number of etii''- ^ • ••< in ; _ The 

(v.. -^ h>iures show the number of impn • way of label 

printing and other impressions: 

L«b«U Otl>«r ImpraarioM. 

D- nl «»f Anthmpologv ■^■:J* $.>^o 

I). •  " • •■;%- '',081 ..>/.. 

I), j;y J7I 

Department of ZrtO\o^y •.•>! >9'Q>5 

D 75.005 

H>i;^;. .  11.1:1. 1 i.iil 

Pmotoorapmy and iiiusTiutioN. — Unusual actixnty marke<i the pr'>>j 
m this imi>ortant division. 87 itives. made in the 

held, were developed; over 1.200 lantern slides, and 84 Lumiere 
Autochrome photographs. The following is a statement of the 
work performed: 









I^n'.rrn i 






!'. t 




,\ r , .. ... 


i'nnU. 


StxlM. 




V..;-. ' 


w •. ; n 


Director's Oflice 


•■4 


281 


. . 


». . 






Department of Anthroi- 


1.807 


.0 


77a 






6 


D-  


aS 


s.u 




'S 


4 


3»» 


D 


83 


ao8 


166 




''.c 


114 


D- 


200 


388 


a40 


as 




47^ 


General 




07 










Gift 




Its 


tt" 






• 


Sale 




ol 


; r. 









T So. 763 

L:;:nci ircr.i uccciuLscr ji. i>^zs, 10 L'cccnu • ««.344 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 



365 



Attendance. — The attendance for the year shows a slight decrease 
over the previous year. The following is the list of school classes 
(thirty pupils or more) that visited the Museum during the year: 

Schools and Location. Teachers. Pupils. 
University High — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kinibark Avenue 
Hyde Park High —  Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Ave- 
nue 

Forest Park — Forest Park, lUinois 

Parkside — Seventieth Street and East End Avenue 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Ave- 
nue 

Oglesby — Seventy-ninth Street and Emerald Avenue . 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Parkside — Seventieth Street and East End Avenue 
Parkside — Seventieth Street and East End Avenue 
Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 

Joliet Township — Joliet, Illinois 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Burke — Fifty-second Street and Prairie Avenue .... 

South Harlem — Harlem, Illinois 

James Shields — South Rockwell, comer West Forty-third 
Englewood High — West Sixty-second Street and Stewart 

Avenue 

Prescott — Wrightwood Avenue and North Ashland Avenue . 
Harrison — Twenty-third Place and Wentworth Avenue . 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Ave- 
nue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

James Shields — South Rockwell, corner West Forty-third. 

Harvey — Harvey, Illinois 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence 

Avenue 

Gladstone — Robey Street, corner Washburne Avenue 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 
Kershaw — Union Avenue and Sixty-fourth Street .... 
Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence 

Avenue 

Earle — Sixty-first Street and Hermitage Avenue .... 
Raymond — Thirty-sixth Place and Wabash Avenue . 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 

Kenwood — Lake Avenue and Fiftieth Street 

Blue Island — Blue Island, Illinois 



I 
I 

I 

3 
2 

I 

2 
2 

I 
I 
2 

2 
I 
I 
2 
2 

3 
2 

I 



31 

45 
35 
55 

75 
47 
36 

30 
32 
43 
45 
52 
34 
36 
42 
92 

55 
38 
35 
31 

169 
30 
31 

45 
30 
44 
30 

31 

37 

149 

109 

4 5 

36 
44 
60 

64 
45 
35 





OB 




4? 








30 




3« 




3< 




14^* 







jof. FiKLU ' M Of Naturai History ~~ Reports. Vol. Ill 



I .»n(l Ax*enur 

f ncr \V. 



I I comer We«l 1 

AvcniH- 

I Avcnur 

V.' - Sixteenth Street and Avers Avenur 

! Manistee Avenue 

I ... : . 

1 Strrrt .nntl 

• :• t , 

I Itundrcil and Fourth Street, cumer Ch«rlr< 

« ic- 

V.'r nty-first .ind Ixximis Streets ; 4' 

•,ck Vacation — West Twenty-seventh Str^ :i< r 

c to 563 

; ... _ ri,;.- ,.... Tn..,..; ,a 

ijjo — ' Illinois 

••5 

] . . : $0 
James Wadsworth — Sixty-fourth Street and Greenwood Ave- 
nue 95 

p.T,- • r .'*..•— Forest r  ri- Tn;,,,.;. 4 «• 

rth — ^ rret and Grrenwnnd .\vc- 

. . 46 

UciiUclJ Phillips Hign - iluriy-nimh sircct and i'r.^inc Ave 

f-"* « 3; 

i Central Park, corner Armitage Avenue 1 81 

rth — ■- irth Street and Greenwood .\ve- 

Uw'>rth - Sixtv-fniirth Strrct and Greenwood .\x'e- 



..hington AxTnur 
between I..angley and 

. Place 
Oak Park High — Oak Park. Illinois 

H . are also submitte*i financial statements. list of acces- 

es of members, etc. Frederick J. \*. Skiff. 

Director 





44 


a 


7« 


7 


35 


3 


43 




43 


I 


3« 


; 


It 



Jan.. 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 367 



Financial Statement. 

GENERAL ACCOUNT. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
From January 1, 1909, to December 31, 1909. 



Receipts 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, December 31, 1908 $47,348.32 

Petty Cash on hand, December 31, 1908 739-95 

Dues of Annual Members 1,590.00 

Admissions and Check Rooms 5,719.50 

Sales of Guides 359-25 

South Park Commissioners 15,000.00 

Interest on Investments 45,289.28 

Field Endowment Income 172,156.89 

Interest on Daily Balances 1,069.47 

Sundry Receipts and Refunds 2,385.09 

Sundry Sales 239.16 

R. F. Cummings' Philippine Fund 4,273.07 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund ....... 10,000.00 

Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 1,000.00 

Huntington W. Jackson Fund 40.00 

Special Donations — 

Richard T. Crane, Jr. $ 693.75 

George F. Porter 693.75 

Cyrus H. McCormick 693.75 

Stanley Field 1,193.75 

Sundry 250.00 3,525.00 

Marshall Field Endowment Sinking Fund . . . 1,000.00 
New Building Moving and Furnishing Fund In- 
come 1,200.00 

$312,934.98 





»8a.oj3.;4 




«».79* J' 




R.^57 8a 




i.g4 : «* 


' 6.00 




;..o».50 




1.104 41 


I > . 1 ! } 01 



368 Field Museum or Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 

DmilUlltBMtNTS 



J 
I 
II 

w 

Fuii 

Supplies. . : ' ' 

Rcjirtirt • ' *' 

V . Pnintcfu. Roofers, elc 

Material used — paints, oils, glass, lumber, 
plaster, etc 

Furniture and Fixtures 
The T 

Hinding 
Sundries 

Sections of Printing and Photoi^raphv 
C 



$ 1 I . ; 4 ? 4 '• 



II r, A J " 



nl 



$i.;Si n 
;oi I » 



4.3340^ 



a.i7i.t> 

39.644-3 > 

6^43. oc 

7.'«-l 7 7 
j.aSi.f; 



•T. 



I' 



Northern Trust Company. 
Sundries 



.thv B h 



c Fund 



in fee 



)r^r> hand* Der^mher ti. nr < 

.^ MwviiiK and i'urni&h:n); t-un>i io- 
; »wmet. -.jj Fund Invent- 



!;64 OS 



$65,914.41 
73M05 



7.071.44 

I ;.coo c ; 
t> 19.636.0; 



mr: 



$.) 1 3.934-9^ 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 369 



ATTENDANCE AND RECEIPTS FROM JANUARY 1, 1909 TO 

DECEMBER 31,1909. 



Attendance. 
Paid Attendance 

Adults 20,160 

Children 1,210 21,370 

Free Admission on Pay Days 

School Children 5.318 

Students • 3.524 

Teachers 477 

Members: Corporate 77 

Annual 76 

Life 7 

Officers' Families 144 

Special 146 

Press 2 9>77i 

Admission on Free Days 

Saturdays . . . .• 38,499 

Sundays . 139.53° 178,029 

Total Attendance 

Highest Attendance on any one day (July 25, 1909) . 
Highest Paid Attendance on any day (September 6, 1909) 

Average Daily Attendance (365 days) 

Average Paid Admissions (259 days) 

Receipts. 

Guides sold — 1.437 ^^ 25 cents each 

Articles Checked — 11,176 at 5 cents each. ... 
Admissions 

$6,078.75 



209, 


170 


6, 


941 




549 




573 




82 


$359 


•25 


558 


.80 


5,160 


.70 



Firi.n M i op Natural History— Rkpokts. Vol III 



Accessions. 



AYKR. 



DKPARTMICXT OF AXTIIRUPOLOr.Y. 

IONS ARB BY CirT UNLB»S OTHBRWtSB DBSIONaTBO i 



Ic of the Papyrus of Ani, in the Hntish Muwum. 
CUMMl.\u>. K. P.. PI 

m n!!'i 1 >f Ii'iir. ^ 17. .11 t..!»fi(' rf*««l1«>< f»><1 T-i* 

I Hagobo skull (purchased Irom Mim Laura E. W. Hcncdi* ' 



Gardner). 
DORSE Y. r.EO. A.. Chicago. 

I If 'ill 

DUPEE. W HAMLIN. Chicap. 

kr. •. Angular woven garment. ly kilt, ornamented with tuft 

ot human h.iir —  I..owcr (.'aiitomia. 
PERRY. ' ' ' 

i <-t — .Margarita Island. 

FIELD. JOSEPH N.. Manchester. England. South Pacific Islands' Pumi 

I .oc 

500 eth- nens from Huon Gulf, (purchajied from C«|^ 

t.iiii il. . 

1 \tT-^rT-\f ,.r . , RA! '"-TORY. 

' .\ycr .. .\. Dor»ey: 

V tomb from Necropolis of Sakkara — F 
- Kgypt. 

fns — Berlin Hafwi. New Guinea 
I 



tribe known as the O 

> — Cev 

•. :r!ca. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 371 

2 Skokomish baskets — Washington. 

38 models of Igorot figures, to be used in group work of Northern 
Luzon, Philippine Islands. 

Mccormick, Stanley, Chicago. 

6 oil paintings of participants in the famous Hopi Snake Dance — 

Arizona. (Painted by E. A. Burbank). 
2 oil paintings of children in ceremonial costumes — Arizona. 
(Painted by E. A. Burbank). 
RYERSON, MARTIN A., Chicago. 

Mastaba tomb from Necropolis of Sakkara — Egypt. 
VOOGDT, CAPTAIN H., Freidrich-Wilhelms Hafen, New Guinea. 
I stone image — Huon Gulf, New Guinea. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AIKEN, W. H., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

I herbarium specimen — Oklahoma. 
AKERMAN, ALFRED, Athens, Georgia. 

I herbarium specimen — Georgia. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, H. I. 

4 economic specimens — Hawaii. 
BIRUM, ELI W., Saratoga, Indiana. 

5 economic specimens as follows : 

I five pound can sorghum molasses, '3 complete sorghum plants, sor- 
ghum canes, extracted canes, 4 fruiting heads — - Indiana. 
BOTANIC GARDENS, Sydney, Australia. 

109 herbarium specimens — Australia (exchange). 

I herbarium specimen — Tasmania (exchange) . 

103 herbarium speciinens — Australia (exchange). 

loi herbarium specimens — New South Wales, Australia (exchange), 
BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California. 

5 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
CALKINS, W. W., Berwyn, Illinois. 

1 herbarium specimen — Illinois. 
CHAMBERLAIN, C. J., Chicago. 

4 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

2 fruits in alcohol — Mexico. 
CLARK, H. W., Chicago. 

I Toxylon pomiferum fruit — Illinois. 
CONZATTI CASSIANO, Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico. 

185 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
COULTER, J. M., Chicago. 

I herbarium specimen — Michigan. 
CUSICK, WM. C, Union, Oregon. 

9 herbarium specimens — Oregon. 
DEAM, C. C, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

I herbarium specimen — Indiana (exchange). 



17* FirLD Museum op Natural History - Kbports. Vol. III. 



K ..... 



.ens (ruiU and gum — - AriionA. 

UI.XO.N. K 

•3 : ni — \ 

5 hcrbanum specimens — Montana. 

ois. 



FIKLD ' M OP NATUR.\L HISTORY 

< ' \\. Orrcnman: 



:.h<; 



» I 



imen. 



LOll 



— Bahamaii, Cuba, anl I.itv. 
ph of type specimen. 

4 economic spciMmens — Kentucky. Bntish India, \Ve«l Indies And 

11 

specimens — Jamaica. 

 i:- 

7 herbarium .*;• ■». 

.^a "" 

3 e' t'omia. 

t straw specimen, 
s c 

- .^... 

I tS economic 

" A. U. 
.rjum ■• 
T \f . Jr.. and R. A. D 



^f> 



7 ^ 
7 r 



I h 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 373 

4 specimens fruits in formalin — Georgia. 
13 herbarium specimens — West Virginia. 
7 dry fruits — West Virginia. 

28 economic specimens — West Virginia. 
40 winter twigs — West Virginia. 

loi slab specimens — West Virginia. 
82 board specimens — West Virginia. 

29 specimens wheel sections — West Virginia. 
Purchases: 

374 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

54 herbarium specimens — Tobago, West Indies. 

155 herbarium specimens — Paraguay. 

338 herbarium specimens — West Indies. 

The private herbarium and library of Dr. J. T. Rothrock, West 
Chester, Pennsylvania. 

61 herbarium specimens — various localities. 

303 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 

198 herbarium specimens — Black Hills, South Dakota. 

4 herbarium specimens — Tobago, West Indies. 

522 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

507 herbarium specimens — - various localities. 

406 herbarium specimens — Guatemala. 

597 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 

32 specimens crude drugs. 

414 herbarium specimens — West Indies. 

1.150 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands. 

28 herbarium specimens — Palestine. 

15 economic specimens — Palestine. 
Modeled by B. E. Dahlgren : 

II models of plants — Jamaica. 

3 qjodels of plants — Indiana. 
FULLER, GEORGE D., Chicago. 

40 herbarium specimens — Alberta. British Columbia. 

7 herbarium specimens — various localites. 
GARRETT, A. O., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

14 herbarium specimens — Utah. 
GATES. FRANK C, Chicago. 

43 herbarium specimens — various localities (exchange). 

2 7 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
GLOYE, MAX C, Michigan City, Indiana. 

I specimen Brazilian cedar — Brazil. 

I specimen laurel — British Guiana. 

I board specimen — Mexico. 
GREEN, CHARLES D., Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

I fruit specimen — Norway. 
GREEXMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

1 herbarium specimen — Massachusetts. 
5 herbarium specimens — Indiana. 

2 herbarium specimens — Utah. 



374 FiKio Mr^KiM or Natural History Rei'orts. Vol. Ill 
II: 

-ncnt — v«riou« !• 
llul'K HorAMCAL CiAKDEN. K . Jama.. .1 



isri.Y. I 

KlRKWtMH). J. E.. Tucson. Am- 



A. 



' E.. Jr.. Chic.iv:> 
t ill- en — I 



t f • V I.' I I I 



.1. I » 



•h Dakota 



MAC DOUr.AL. D. T.. Ti. 

J ph :i.t — M' 



MILLSPAUr.H. C. F.. Chi. 
17 r 



Ariiona. 



a economic specimens — Mexico, 
r -n — (Curacao. 

I frr 

\ hcrhaniim specu^ !vania. 

MISSfJURI I' KAL (.,\KUJ..\. .s: I^uis. Missouri 

I dc . ., .. : "f f" 'I''. ■'• ( cinerca. 
MITCHEM-. T C. ' 



MYERS, u 
NATAL I 



en strawberry fruits — Chicago. 



NEW Y< 



4 

3H 



•ru, •'•■torado. 

I. Durban Nntal 
Ti« — various * 
'.ART'""" *■ A.  \ TK. 

u% — b .•• ! Mr\;,.. 'r^fhantjeV 

imens — Cuba and B 
- J.iva (e\ 



m 



smens — Bemud.. 



Ri 



I ».il l»rt«l» .*.' > « ,\< U.tltk"'" 



ncn.^ — 111 



-. lUtoot*. 



» hr- 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE L. 




False Door of Large Mastaba Tomb. 



OF Trie 
UHlVPR^liy OF 111 HOIS 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 375 

ROTHROCK, J. T., West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

I steel engraving of Dr. Asa Gray. 

I photograph of John Bartram House. 

I photograph of C. S. Bradford. 

I photograph of Quercus Muhlenbergii. 

I photograph of M. Woronin. 

I photograph of Andre Michaux. 

I photograph of A. de Bary. 

I photograph of E. Stahl. 

394 herbarium specimens — ^ West Indies. 
ROWLEE, W. W., Ithaca, New York. 

I fruit specimen. 
ROYAL GARDENS, Kew, London, England. 

I specimen seeds — Niger River (exchange). 
RUSBY, H. H., New York City. 

1 economic specimen — Holland. 
SMITH, H. H., Chicago. 

4 economic specimens — Indiana. 

2 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 
2 economic specimens — Indiana. 

THE CHINA TEA ASSOCIATION, London, England. 

18 samples of English breakfast teas — Hankow, China. 
THE JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY, Jersey City, N. J. 

12 specimens illustrating steps in the manufacture of lead pencils. 
TRELEASE, WM., St. Louis, Missouri. 

I herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
UNITED STATES BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY, Washington, D. C. 

I specimen macaroni wheat —  South Dakota. 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Berkeley, California. 

173 herbarium specimens — Arizona (exchange). 
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, Chicago. 

303 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
WERTER, P. J., Miami, Florida. 

I economic specimen — Florida. 
WRIGHT, WILBUR H., Chicago. 

209 herbarium specimens — Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

AUSTRIAN, MRS. JOSEPH, Chicago. 

322 specimens of minerals, fossils, etc. 
AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

I specimen asbestos — Ontario. 

I glaciated copper boulder, weight 22 lbs. — Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 
BEEBE, J. O., Burlington, Iowa. 

TO plaster casts of fossil crinoids. 
CATLIX, H. W., Oaxaca, Mexico. 

5 speciinens silver ore — Oaxaca, Mexico. 



376 Finn M \TiRAi. History Kkports. Vol. Ill 

ClIAl 

COX. E. 

Fort I) A.I 



I 

PARKIN' 

•1 mntrix — h- 
4 — NewH 

PI' < RANt. K T . Jr ; Mr( OK.MICK. CVKLo II.. 

I ' TV 

1 ,;.• 

PIELI) y M OF NATURAL HISTORY 

C 

- Hntish « 



i antl OrcRun 
I glaciAtcd pebble — Homcwocxl. Ilhtvi- 



ore — ' 
t specimen Oaxaca. .MeMc«» 

. Ul.i 

- — Bermuda. 
-.d land* -- Bermuda. 



J F. F 



Yorkville. IIIm"i'> 

ir^.iri..i 1 -;.ii.i|<i. VcncEucla 
' mineraU — Bmmide. Coal < 

I". ' ' fv and Bav View. Michi- 



in,- 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 377 

2 specimens sandstone — Lemont, Illinois. 

46 specimens invertebrate fossils — Cook County, Illinois. 
I specimen bitumen — Thornton, Illinois. 
350 specimens Pleistocene shells — Willow Springs, Illinois. 
Purchases : 

3 specimen slabs of crinoids — Le Grand, Iowa. 

23 specimens crinoids (10 species) — Le Grand, Iowa. 
I slab Uintacrinus socialis — Beaver Creek, Logan Co., Kansas. 
I skeleton of fossil beaver (Castoroides ohioensis) — Fairmount, In- 
diana. 

I skull of mastodon with one tusk — Yorkville, Illinois. 
GAMBA, F. PEREIRA, Pasto, U. S. of Colombia. 

II specimens gold ores and associated rocks — Porvenir mine, 

Piedrancha. 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA, Calcutta, India. 

I specimen Dokachi meteorite (exchange). 

I specimen Futtehpoor meteorite (exchange). 
GOFF, JOHN, Pontotoc, Mississippi. 

45 specimens (2 species) fossil echinoids — Pontotoc, Mississippi. 
GOODALE, FRED, Bristol, Illinois. 

I specimen eroded limestone. 
GREBEL, WENDLER & COMPANY, Geneva, Switzerland. 

1 specimen Buschhof meteorite (exchange). 
10 specimens minerals (exchange). 

ROWLAND, LOUIS M., Paris, France. 

7 specimens fossil sharks' teeth — Cavaillon, France. 
KENKEL, LOUIS V., Harper, Washington. 

34 views of mines, caves, and rock formations — - Montana and Wash- 
ington. 

16 photographs of Alaska glaciers. 
LIEBINGER, FELIX, Vienna, Austria. 

2 maps of Dolomitic Alps. 
MILLAR, A. Q., Minneapolis, Minn. 

3 specimens diamond-bearing peridotite — Pike Co., Arkansas. 
2 specimens fuller's earth — Pike Co., Arkansas. 

NEWBERRY, W. W., Chicago. 

5 specimens silicious oolite — Bromide, Oklahoma. 

1 concretion — Bromide, Oklahoma. 

2 pseudomorphs — Bromide, Oklahoma. 
I piece stalactite — Bromide, Oklahoma. 

15 specimens fossils — Bromide, Oklahoma. 
NIPPON TOKI GOMEI KWAISHA, Noritake, Japan. 

I 2 specimens clays and other minerals used in the manufacture of 
Japanese porcelain. 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

I specimen jasper in hematite — Ishpeming, Michigan. 
TALBERT, JOS. T., Chicago. 

6 specimens gilsonite — Utah. 

I specimen anthracite — Colorado. 



378 FiELii M \Tt'RAL History Kkpurts. Vol. Ill 

WRRER • 

• AM H\ UiFI U»iL.S*k OTMBRWl»B UKSIONATCO > 

ANSIS. N. IV." 

BAKER. .. .,„..,,. 

t HI 
BLISS. I ' E.. jr ito. 

COALE. i - - - 

t mink — I mly. Illinois 

t deer T »nd I'.irk. Illinois 

DEUBLf '• • 

lilc. Indiana. 

a beetles — HeMville. Indiana. 
DBWEY. C. L . Ch 

t turtle — 1 ir, .Michi{(an. 

DOIIMAN. U. A.. « 

I bcc — Ch 

■o. 
D- 

t panuii«e birrl - mon Islands 



IS. 



I I   I * • -> 4 >1 ( t  i 



PI 



PIELti ^ 

t m 



H-i 





 I. 




, 


TxTnuy 




f.y. 


East Arnca 








and hee«, 




. . :.". l.'.iMrrfliri; 


niof fis 




etc.— 




. :i .»-71'_>; 


nville, Soiomo: 
:th .\nierica. 





»* » II . 1 IIIVI IV <s. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 379 

I turtle — Venezuela, South America. 

31 fishes — Venezuela, South America. 

I frog — Quill Lake, Saskatchewan. 

1 7 mammals — Saskatchewan. 

I moth — Margarita Islands. 

835 bird skins — Margarita Islands. 

15 mammal skins, i butterfly, i centipede — Margarita Islands. 

195 bird skins — Saskatchewan. 

36 sets of eggs (with nests) 192 eggs — Saskatchewan. 

27 nests (without eggs) — Saskatchewan. 
Collected by Julius Friesser: 

208 grasshoppers, bugs, beetles and bees, wasps, etc. — Mexico. 
Collected by W. J. Gerhard: 

735 spiders, nerve-wings, grasshoppers, dragonflies, bugs, beetles, 
butterflies, moths, flies and bees, wasps, and parasites — North- 
em Illinois and Northern Indiana. 

I lizard — Olive Branch, Illinois. 
Collected by S. F. Hildebrand: 

168 fishes — Stendal and Pikeville, Indiana. 

71 reptiles — Stendal and Pikeville, Indiana. 

I millipede — Pikeville, Indiana. 
Collected by O. E. Lansing: 

1 beetle — Starved Rock, Illinois. 
Collected by S. E. Meek and W. Heim: 

360 fishes — Dry Tortugas, Florida. 
942 fishes — Key West, Florida. 
5 lizards — Key West, Florida. 
Collected by L. L. Pray: 

3 fox squirrel skins — Tallulah, Louisiana. 

4 gray squirrel skins — Tallulah, Louisiana. 

5 black fur squirrels — Tallulah, Louisiana. 
5 mice — Tallulah, Louisiana. 

12 squirrels — Tallulah, Louisiana. 
5 mice — Tallulah, Louisiana. 

2 bird skins — Tallulah, Louisiana. 

I turkey buzzard — Tallulah, Louisiana. 
I pileated woodpecker — Tallulah, Louisiana. 
Collected by V. Shelford and S. F. Hildebrand: 
254 fishes— Illinois. 

4 turtles. 

3 snakes. 
3 frogs. 

Collected by A. B. Wolcott: 

533 dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, moths, beetles, flies and bees, 
wasps, etc. — Illinois and Indiana. 
Purchases : 

5 mounted reptiles as follows: i snake, i frog, i toad and 2 liz- 

ards — Europe. 



380 FiRLi) MisBUM OP Natural History - Rkiukts, Vol III. 

t muUI rudrnt - Daniwlinf;. India 

4 ' 

: 1 

^. Itxiui 

I' 1 (iuiAHit 

I ' -'liana. 

I • k 

I .^. .:i« 

I bracket - Hnti«h Gummi. 
I dog — Bri*. 

I T - !• -ta. 

I . .  .a, 

.!> HquirreU. mutkrats. mice, minkii. weaieU. mole«. and threw*. 
a flyinjj ! it ,. I.^landn. 

31- ■-••'' - I i .... 

II, :rtic8 — Palawan, i .:.<l^ 

; moihs — Palawan. Philippine Islands. 

, .         U. 

4 k..:. : . , , .'^ 

5 bees. pAra.<titr!i. etc.- - Palawan. I' ;.e lHland<«. 
34 beetles — Palawan. Philippine Ulands. 

a  ■"  "■    id*. 

a ^. • - • • . ••  i" 

I mountain Roat skin 

I porpoise. 

I '- • *• ,• '"  • Nrkansas. 

3.- •- :•  -■■■■- -■ • 

I gulden eagle — Boienrian. Montana. 

I I bird skins — Darjeeling. India. 

I V • • • • •• -i. 

ifc >. West Indies. 

143 ducks, ibises, toucans, tinamous. parmts. hawks, woodpecker* 
h Is. and others m< rfine birds — 

I American r. .; hawk — (Jcncva. Illinois 

FREEBURG. GUS.. Liverpool. Indiana 
a snakes — I. '. Indiana. 

PRIESSEH " ' " - 

K; imens of scale inj« Illinois and Michi- 

gan. 
% ' McIIrnry. Illinois. 

GERI1.\RI> ' • ' 

f'- . etc. — Eastern Pennsylvania. Southern 

New Jersey, and Maryland. 
GI.V.\.\. I' r 

I r L>owner's G'"- " Tn;n.^.;c 

GREGOR K Pulton. '■: 

la. 



J'AN., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 381 

GUERET, E. N., Chicago. 

I short eared owl — Grass Lake, IlHnois. 

4 red wing black birds — Grass Lake, Illinois. 
I rusty black bird — Grass Lake, Illinois. 

I snake —  Wauconda, Lake County, Illinois. 
HARDEE, F. E., Chicago. 

I snake — India. 

I skeleton of snake. 
HELLER, ISIDORE, Chicago. 

I owl (mounted). 

I cormorant (mounted). 
HILDEBRAXD, S. F., Chicago. 

1 beetle — Chicago. 

2 scorpions — Globe, Arizona. 

5 lizards — Globe, Arizona. 
HOWE, MURRAY, Chicago. 

2 skulls of bear — Alaska. 
HURTER, JULIUS, St. Louis, Missouri. 

19 reptiles (exchange). 
JACKSOX, H. H. T., Madison, Wisconsin. 

3 owls, 2 shorebirds, i bobwhite, 2 woodpeckers, 8 passerine birds — 

Wisconsin (exchange). 
KWIAT, ALEX., Chicago. 

I fly — Palos Park, Illinois. 
McCOY, G. W., San Francisco, California. 

5 rats — San Francisco, California. 

I mole — San Francisco, California. 
I weasel — San Francisco, California. 

15 fleas — San Francisco, California. 
McIXTYRE, G., Walworth, Wisconsin. 

6 moths — • Walworth, Wisconsin. 
MOULTOX, MRS. G. M., Chicago. 

I spine of catfish — Caribbean vSea. 
MUXZXER, H., Chicago. 

I bumblebee — • Chicago. 
OSGOOD, W. H., Chicago. 

I skunk skull. 

I raccoon skull. 
PARK FISHERMEX, Jackson Park, Chicago. 

1 turtle — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
RADDATZ, R. C, Chicago. 

2 woodchuck skulls — - Dry Bay, Alaska. 
RAVEN, HENRY F., Simon, Costa Rica. 

I squirrel skin — Simon, Costa Rica. 
I oriole — Cumana, Venezuela. 
I parrot — Cumana, Venezuela. 
47 bird skins — Costa Rica and Venezuela. 
SETOX, ERNEST T., Cos Cob, Connecticut. 

16 mice and shrews. 



:m or Natural History Rki'orts. Vol. Ill 



SMITl 



8 watp* — 



.H. Vera Cru«. Mexico. 



SMITH. 



I cat 
I lit 



STKV ; 
THAYER M 
TIfoMFS 



Park. Illinois. 
Illinois. 
. I'AUL. i . Texas. 

— '' • ....•, I •■■* '. " 

'.Ic. Tc.\ . 
- Brownsville. Texas. 
.V - n- !lc. Texas. 

, Texas. 
. Chicago. 



TUTTLE. 

40 b 



•■ • \f i;;.».-hu'U'ttS. 

^•s — Lower California. 
L.. Chicago. 
:n«'n fly — Chicago. 
\f 

.; — Santa Crux. California. 
INITED STATES DKrARTMKNT OP COMMERCK AND LABOR 
\V D C 

.. water shells — various localities. 
rS'IT \TES EXPRKSS COMPANY. Chir..; 

V. 

v..,.,v ,, »"• I -Nf \v.TshinRlon !' ' 

WEBER. C. M.. Palawan. Philippine Islands, 
a shells — Tara Islands, Palaw.-»n 
I shell— Bacuit. P ' 1 
1 !:hells — Cort>n I P.^lawan. 

pII —  Bine-t. Mt. Capoas. P.alawan. 



\S 



na. 



A. B.. ' 



 na. 
nv. Indian.^ 



FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE LI. 



( 




Section of tho ovary. 



Soctlon of tho ovary. 



ENLARGED FLOWER OF A MORNING GLORY. 



Rwal Havilin. 



ILLIMTRATINa FAMILV CHAHACTCRISTIC*. 



■prlng ft-om tho aiilla of tha laavaa. tha othar, tho baaaa inaartad upon tha tuba of 

CALVXi-Of 8 aaparata aapala in two aariaa tha ^Jhacorolia.thaantharanotrlalntabovatharim. 

outar ovarlapplns (to aoma dacraa at laaat) o'VLE: - SIngIa, alandar, tippad with a 2-lobad 

tha tnnmr atigma. 

eo»m I A- n* m. ..^.i. .^_>i....i.. _■. J . - OVARY: - (Partly Invaatad by a lobad, flaahy diak) 

COROLLA. • Of S patala oomplataiy unltad Into 3.5 callad (uaually 2) with two ovulaa In aaoh 

a ball-ahapad or oylindrlo, pialtad corolla, call. 



timaa lobad. 



BMMMIal Oncua. 



FLOWERS:. Arransad atngly or In oluatara that STAMENS: - 5. In two aariaa ona ahortar than 

aprlng ft-onn tha aiilla of tha laavaa. tha othar, tha baaaa inaartad upon tha tuba of 

CALVXi-Of S aaoarata aaoai. in two ..ri.. th. thocorolia, thaantharanotriaint abovatharlm. 



tha rim baing moatly antira though aoma- SEEDS: -With or without a long fringa of haira 



I on tha anglaa. 

*■**'»« <•"!»»•«> l»»m nattirs ky a. >. Oahlsrvx, lao*. 



Enlarged Model of a Convolvulaceous Flower. 



OF Trie 



lIKIVPRilTY OF Illinois 



Jan'., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 383 

SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

DAYKIN BROTHERS, Cleveland, Ohio. 

16 views of Bermuda scenery (exchange). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

2,142 negatives, 6,917 prints, 1,273 lantern slides, 53 enlargements, 
84 Lumiere Autochrome photographs, 875 negatives developed. 
Made by F. C. Cole: 

6 portraits of natives, etc. — Philippine Islands. 
Made by O. C. Farrington: 

54 negatives of general views — Bermuda Islands. 

24 negatives of general views ^ Mexico. 

18 negatives of general views — California and Arizona. 
Made by J. F. Ferry: 

300 negatives of general views — Saskatchewan. 
Made by S. E. Meek: 

84 negatives of fishes, views, etc. — Florida. 
Made by W. H. Osgood: 

4 negatives of landscapes — South Chicago. 
Made by H. H. Smith: 

1 2 portraits of trees — Chicago. 

146 portraits of trees, landscapes, etc. — West Virginia. 

36 portraits of trees, landscapes, etc. 
Purchases: 

721 portraits, views, landscapes, etc. 

465 portraits of mammals. 

80 views of India and types of natives. 

6 colored lantern slides — Bermuda. 

10 lantern slides — Bermuda. 

32 lantern slides — Bermuda and the Colorado River. 

34 lantern slides — Alaska. 
SKIFF. FREDERICK J. V., Chicago. 

9 portraits of living mammals. 
UXITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

I portrait of adult walrus. 

THE LIBRARY. 
BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND SERIALS. 
(accessions are by exchange unless otherwise designated.) 
ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY, Aberdeen, Scotland. 

I reprint. 
ADAMS, F. D. T., Montreal, Canada. 

I pamphlet. 
ALABAMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Auburn, Ala- 
bama. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 



3H4 Field M or Natural History Kkports. Vol. III. 

ALLBN. ' ^ ^'— '^*>'^ '■•• 

AMANI I* H LAMAVIRTSS»'HAFT-INSTITL*T. I)cul»chc>«u 

,\V V OP ARTS AND SCIBXCBS. Boston. Manwchu 

1 
AMERK' \ rV. H..5t<»n. Ma%»achu!iclU. 

1 rrent numbers. 

.\\' lATION OP MlSKl MS. PilUburxh. I»enn«ylvani«. 

! • -  -y 

AMI:RH KNAL PUBLISHJNG company. Balli- 

tnonp. Marvlancl. 

AMERIC ' ' TY. Cambridge. Massachuactls. 

J 
AMKRIfAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. New York City. 

J, crs 

AMERIC w... Ji MINING ENC.TVrrwv; v-..v V .ri r.tv 

I . V ^0. 1908. 

AMERICAN .MlM.Nl-i i( )NGRESS. Denver. ' !o. 

Rep'* ■'■'■'■—■ '-nRs. I ith annual St . :.. i<)o8 (jfift). 
AMERI'W N.VTL'KAL MISTDRY. New York City 

AMERlL .L..MAI- bUCIETY. New H.ivcn. Connccucui 

I . V ao 

AV \\ PHM.nsoPIIICAK SOCIKTY. Philadelphia. 

current n 
.\.VU— > JJ' L.\BOR.\ i'--'K 1 . liosiuii. i'cim'-yivann 

' -.s. no. o 

A^' i<n ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. Amsterdam. 



^HAPPEN. Amsterdam. 



.> itTUDES SCIENTI PIQUES. Anger;. France. 

t7- 
: NATIONALE D',\GRH'L*LTURE. SCIENCES ET 



A' Pranre. 

ANiimiiJi »K GREAl JiKllAiN AM> IRE 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 385 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, New York City. 

American journal of archaeology, current numbers. 

Index, vol. i-io. 
ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONWISSENSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany. 

Current numbers. 
ARCTOWSKI, HEXRY K., Melle, Belgium. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 

ARDENNES. SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Ardennes, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, no. 19, 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, FayetteviUe, 
Arkansas. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago. 

2 publications. 

ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL, Calcutta, India. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES, Philadelphia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ATKINSON, GEORGE F., Ithaca, New York. 

3 reprints. 

AUGSBURG NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Augsburg, Germany. 

Bericht, 1908. 
AUSTRALASIAN ASSOCIATION FOR ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Adelaide, Australia. 

Report, no. 11, 1907. 
AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM, Sydney, New South Wales. 

Report, 1908. 

4 publications. 
AYER, EDWARD E., Chicago. 

4 volumes (gift). 
AZAMBUJA DE, GRACIANO A., Porto Alegre, Brazil. 

I publication. 
BAKER, HENRY D., Hobart, Tasmania. 

3 pamphlets (gift). 
BALCH, E. S., Philadelphia. 

I pamphlet. 
BARBER, EDWIN ATLEE, Philadelphia. 

I publication. 
BAT.WIAASCHE GENOOTSCHAP VAN KUNSTEN EN WETEN- 
SCHAPPEN, Batavia, Java. 

Tijdschrift, v. 51, no. 3-4. 

Verhandelingen, v. 57. 
BATH NATURAL HISTORY AND ANTIQUARIAN FIELD CLUB. 
Bath, England. 

Proceedings, v. 11, no. 3. 



uM or Natural History Kkports, Vol. Ill 
nvYKRV ORMTI!t>I MI' f'.KSKI.I.SCHAKT. Munich. Germanv 



BBLPASl > 
MKI.F 



I> I'UlI.nsnpHirAI. SOCIETY 
I) CLUK. BeUMt. Irrlaixl 



BERLIN 

BERLIN 
BFRI.IV 



•rn. Norway. 
<;E<lLCKiISCHE GESELLSCHAPT. Berlin. Ger- 



mxuty. 



y 



7 



•"«. 



HAFT FCR ANTIIROP. ETHNOL 
i» L'KG>.. Berlin. Germany. 

I'K'HKrVDr Rrrliti 






BERLIN 



i. V. 14. 

HAFT FCK V»iLKSTr\fI.Hin:. BcrJin. 



N 



BERLIN. i\ r,i\.:->i lAi. nrriiTi, <_irrni.»iiv 

BERI MIBLIOTHEK. Berlin. Germany. 

J 9- 
BBRL?^' iiKR GARTEN '"^ r> ^i'XELM. Bet...., ,,.*. 

14. 45- 

BERLIN. K PK HE AKADEMIE HER WISSKNSCIIAFTEN. 

? V. 



1}L.K1 



\ 



'!•'. Berlin. Germany 

^tlL..^ .ML51«tM. Ucrlin. Germany. 

imenl r 
\r. Bern. 

-^nnr \tt'SKf\f n..n..l»i!i> H.»w.iii.in Uanl.^ 



t<» HFoR.scHlNG. Prag. Auntn-i. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 387 

BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, 1908. 

Verhandlungen, v. 65, pt. i. 
BORDEAUX. SOCIETE LINNEENE, Bordeaux. France. 

Proces-verbaux, v. 62. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts. 

5 publications. 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 57, 1908-9. 
BOSTON SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Boston, Massachusetts. 

3 publications. 
BOSTON TRANSIT COMMISSION, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, no. 14, igo8. 
BOSTON UNIVERSITY, Boston, Massachusetts, 

President's report, 1907-8. 

Yearbook, v. 36. 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, Brunswick, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1908— 1909. 

Librarian's report, 1908-9. 
BRAND, CHARLES J., AVashington, D. C. 

Guide to modern Peru (gift). 
BRANDEGEE, T. S., Berkeley, California. 

I separate. 
BRANDENBURG BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Brandenburg, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 50. 
BRAUNSCHWEIG VEREIN FUR NATURWISSENSCHAFT, Braun- 
schweig, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, no. 14. 
BREMEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Bremen, Ger- 
many. 

I publication. 
BRIGHTON AND HOVE NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHI- 
CAL SOCIETY, Brighton, England. 

Abstracts of papers and annual report, 1908. 
BRISTOL MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Bristol, England. 

Report, 1908. 
BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
London, England. 

Report, Dublin meeting, 1908. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY, Victoria. British 
Columbia. 

Sessional papers, 1908, 1909. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA MINISTER OF MINES, Victoria, Briti.sh Columbia. 

Annual report, 1908. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Victoria, British Colum- 
bia. 
Visitors' guide. 



jS8 Pirii>M NTLRAL History - Reports. Vol. 111. 

riklTIslI V \I. HIST" »kY'. I,"n'l'^n, KntrlanH 

lii :<TS AND SCIi:\» KS. brouklyn. New 

Bl r LANDES VKRSICHSSTATIOX PCR 

roR. Brunn, Austna. 

11 . . 

Hr^ !»KR VI:RI:I\ Hnr 

Bf iJi:.i> i.t.i I Kt-cs 

.. . .- ' 

UKU.-^ ''I' HK I/ETAT. Bruswis. b«:;4ium 

BK > !fIST<lIRE NATl'RELLE. BniweU. 

•\. 

BRl'.v . ...rit DARCHI^nl.OC.n-: Hni.;<«'ls. Belgium 

currrnl numbers 

BRYN ^f bryn Mawr. I'cnji^-yiv.irua 

•.>rint series, v. 7. 
BUDAI'K.-^i \M: IIONr.ROI.^K DES .*^ IE NOES 

" ^lpcst. HunKarv. 
Aqv. 

B AIRES PACULTAD DE FILOSOFIA Y LETRAS. Bucnr>4 

 'la. 
. 5. 
B; IH-: FARMACOLOGIA. Buenos Airen. ArRcn 

tina. 

rn-nvr^v i . .>E<> NACl"^^' " ■; Aires. An"- ••'< 

V t. lO. 

llLI-t '-'ARV. llu.'f^U.. New York 

riR M SI lENTES Bu <'« York. 

.Kiit'I.TL'RE. Buitenxorg. Java 

P PLANTENTUIN. Builenjorg. Java. 

h :r\\. STRVF.Y Bunna. India 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 389 

CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Calcutta, India. 

Annals, v. 11. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley. 
California. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, California. 

Biennial report, 1906-1908. 

Occasional papers, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE MINING BUREAU, San Francisco, California. 

Bulletin, 46, 50-53. 

Map. 

Report, Board of Trustees, 1908. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California. 

32 publications. 
CALL, R. ELLSWORTH, New York City. 

6 publications. 
CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

List of members, etc., 1909. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM AND LECTURE ROOMS SYNDICATE, Cam- 
bridge, England. 

Annual report, no. 43, 1908. 
CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge. England. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1908-9. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Cambridge, England. 

Report, 1908. 
CAMERANO, LORENZO, Milano, Italy. 

4 pamphlets. 
CAMPINAS CENTRO DE CIENCIAS. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Revista, current numbers. 
CANADA. BOTANICAL SOCIETY, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Report, 1906-7, 1907-8. 

3 pamphlets. 

CANADA. GOVERNMENT OF, Ottawa, Canada. 
8 reports. 
1 7 topographical sheets. 

4 maps. 

CANADA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Ottawa, Canada. 

Proceedings and transactions, 3d. ser., v. 2. 
CANADIAN INSTITUTE, Toronto, Canada. 

Transactions, v. 8, no. 3. 



I'iK.tii MiNKiM «»F Xati'hai, History Rkports, Vol. III. 
rypr nr r,i w iri iiiit>r hpp \i|X3^B\f Qp ACR *'"*'' T^'PT 



\fr;. i 

k 

I V 4; 

CAttfliri" 'I!lK'\KirS r..r,!ilT \V..lrs 

I .\K\KulK J For THK AI>\ ANCEMENT OF TEACH- 

I 
Annu 
:<NE(;iE INSTITUTE. 1' h. Pcnnnvlvania. 

A <• 

i^XEOn. i.iiwv xKY ••'■ '•••'-,.. >v.. •• '^unih. Prnn^yU .•••..• 
Annual iTji«>rl. i. 
Bulletin, cunrnt numtx*r 
CARNEr.IE y M. PiltslmrKh. Pennsylvania 

5  ■•■■ .•■u^, 

CARPENT H. Dublin. Ireland 

Irish natunilist. current numltcrs 
CARTHAr.E INSTITITE. Tunis. ^ 

Rcvuo tuniMrnrif .."^.■. t 

CASSOX. H!:rhf.kt \ 

I 
TATAXI.X. AllAnLMlA l.lOl.MA IM MlL..\ZE XA 1 L KAJ-1. Culania. 

!• .u- 

Bollcf irrent nuniliepi 

lETTE UXIVERSITit DE MONTPELLIKR INSTITLT I)E ZrK)LO- 
GIE. Cette. France 

M^moirc. no 17 
CEYLOX Af.RKMI.TrRAK StX^IETV. rolombo. India 

9 
CEYLON ; . iJ'MA.M". lJAKi-»i-.^^. Pcradcniya. Lcyion. 

; - tlons. 

CHARLKSTOX MUSEUM. Charleston. South Cart>lina. 

7 
CHIC.XGO V « >F SCIENCES. ChicaR" 

CHIC.VGO ART IXSTITITE. Chii... 



t 




cm: 

A 

'MIC AGO 

6 


KTV. < 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 391 

CHICAGO. SOUTH PARK COMMTSSTOXERS, Chicago. 

Report, 1 906-1 908. 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago. 

70 publications. 
CHILE. BIBLIOTECA NACIOXAL, Santiago de Chile. 

27 publications. 
CHRISTIANIA MINERALOGICAL INSTITUTE, Christiania, Norway, 

3 publications. 

CINCINNATI MUSEUM ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 1908. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

8 publications. 
CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

15 publications. 

CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

5 publications. 
CLARKE, JOHN M., Albany, New York. 

I bulletin. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

5 publications. 
COGNIAUX, A. 

4 separates. 

COIMBRA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, Coimbra, Portugal. 

Boletin, current numbers. 
COLBY COLLEGE, Waterviile, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1908—9. 
COLE, FAY COOPER, Chicago. 

I pamphlet. 
COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, S. Fiel, Portugal. 

Broteria, current numbers. 
COLLIERY ENGINEER COMPANY, Scranton, Pennsylvania. 

• Mines and minerals, current numbers. 
COLLINGE, WALTER E., Berkhamsted, England. 

5 reprints. 

COLMAR. SOCIETfi D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Colmar, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, B. 9, 1907—8. 
COLN. RAUTENSTRAUCH-JOEST-MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, 
Cologne, Germany. 

Ethnologica, v. i. 
COLOMBO MUSEUM, Colombo, India. 

Administrative report, 1908. 

Spolia zeylanica, current numbers. 
COLORADO BUREAU OF MINES, Denver, Colorado. 

Report, 1907-8. 
COLORADO COLLEGE, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Studies, science ser., current numbers. 
COLORADO STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Fort Collins, Colorado. 

16 publications. 



j9» FiiLD y M Of Natural His»torv — Reports. Vol. 111. 

CiiInttVTwi KTXTr JIISTfiRUAI. AND NATl'RAI. HISTORY SO- 

'•I i i . >C« l 'TK «- U) . 

nitoirc dr ■• et de ph-. ■<■ manlime*. 

•ur 

t I. I.I.. J s 
i loNAI.K. Pans. Franc* 

1 Al ADiCMY OF S('Ii:\l'i:. New Haven. Connecticut 
• - V n 
t . .ULLTURAL EXPERI.MENT STATION. New 

Haven. Connecticut. 
Hiillrtin. currrnl numbeni. 
RcjKirt. no ii-jjj. i«)07-8. 
CCK)K. MELVILLE T NVw.irk. Dclawarr 

(, rrpnnls 
Cl)<)PER ORNITHOLOCICAL CLUB. HollywcKxl. Caliiomia. 

TO •■"'•'• '.'mns 
C<M)PER I FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE. New York 

City. 
.\nnual rrix^rt. no 50. 
Cnrrvn vf.i'v Hi it \ vie GARDEN c^^uh^v-n lVnm.»rV 

CUHENH.UtEN. K. BlliLIOTHEK. C<)i«nh.iKcn. I>cnmark. 

). 
COPENi:.. . . :i. . KISK FOR F. VINT.. Coprnh.^ecn. DonmArk. 

Vidcnskabelijjr me<Idclclscr. iqc- 
CUKNELL UNIVERSITY. Ithaca. New York. 

Li' rrf>ort. 1907-*. 

« I . ^ 
COSTA RICA MUSEO NACIONAL. San Jos^. CosU Rica. 

CROSS, '^  iiii^i''!). i> < 

6 V. 

CROYDON NATURAL HLSTORY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. Cmy- 

don. I ! 

t<. I.. . 

C \. Santiago de las Vegas. 



t 



K. K FRANZ J"SEPH UNIVERSITAT. Cfcrnowiu. 



I PCR ERDKINDE. Darmstadt. Germany 

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Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 393 

DELAWARE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Delaware. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, no. 44, 1908. 

Bulletin, no. 20. 
DEUTSCHE DENDROLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Bonn, Poppelsdorf. 

Mitteilungen, 1908, 1909. 
DEUTSCHER NATUR. MEDISIN. VEREIN FUR BOHMEN "LOTUS," 
Prag, Austria. 

35 publications. 
DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DIBBLEE, MRS. HENRY M., Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Parrots in captivity. 2 vols., Greene, W. T. 
DIXON, ROLAND B., Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

3 reprints. 
DORSEY, GEORGE A., Chicago. 

32 miscellaneous publications. 
DRESDEN. GENERAL-DIRECTION DER K. SAMMLUNGEN FUR 
KUNST UND WISSENSCHAFT, Dresden, Germany. 

Bericht, 1906-7. 
DRESDEN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR-UND HEILKUNDE, 
Dresden, Germany. 

Jahresberichte, 1907-8. 
DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH-ETH- 
NOGRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

Abhandlungen und bericht, current numbers. 
DRESDEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHE GESELLSCHAFT "ISIS," 
Dresden, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte und abhandlungen, current numbers. 
DUBLIN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ART, Dublin, Ire- 
land. 

List of Irish birds. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
DUBLIN. ROYAL IRISH SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

Proceedings, current nutnbers. 
DUBLIN. ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND, Dublin, Ire- 
land. 

Annual report, 1908. 



X04 '■' *^^ NATrBAI HkTOBV - RfF'iBT*. Vol, HI 

l)l\IFK AM) \^ \.. \MJ .\.\- 

> t.' t \ \ IV,., 

AND Mil Ri»>< nlMiAL StX IKTY. I^ndon. 

' NATl'RAL HIST«»RY S<KIETY. E.. • 



ri^KR :■ iltm^'..r\- 

E AL S<H IKTY. KdinburKh. - 

I 
KI>l\Hl it- C.ARDKNS. Edinhurjfh ;- 

EDr M R«»VAL SCOTTISH MISELM. E«linlnirv' >t. ! 

" •■ 'n of n>cks. 

E II ROYAL SOCIETY. Edinburgh. Scotland. 



I \ IX 1 * I 1 , 



''ARL H . Bloominjftiin. Indiana 

»^i"ruj ri Hwissrv^:. II M-T V ERE I N. ElWrficld. German \ 

no. 13 
\I. AND MKTAIJA RC.ICAL INDUSTRY PIBI.ISII 

IM. I OMPANY. New York. 

• • ..- . V. • 

lATIl; lETY. Chajx-I "'"• ^'"rthC*««^- 

lina 

r.i.f.i 

AI.Fki 

V np WESTF'RV rnVVSYI.VAMA Pitt^htirtrh 
I'. 

int\ \rvi . Baltimore. Maryi.3n'i 

J ;. tooS 

LKKI-RA n 

tL\\ . ' J . MciU^ume. A 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 395 

FARRINGTOX, O. C, Chicago. 

45 pamphlets. 

3 iTiaps. 
FESTA, E. 

2 pamphlets. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago. 

585 books. 

431 pamphlets (purchase). 
FLEMING, JAMES H. 1 

2 reprints. 
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION', Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

Annual report, iqoS. 
FLORIDA STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Tallahassee, Florida. 

Bulletin, no. i. 

First report, i go 7-8 (gift). 
FOOTE MINERAL COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Complete inineral catalogue (gift). 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FREIBURG. K. SACHS. BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany. 

Program, 1909-ro. 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, Ger- 
many. 

Bericht. 
FRENCH, GEORGE H., Carbondale, Illinois. 

I pamphlet. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. UXD SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current numbers. 
FUR TRADE REVIEW, New York City. 

Fur trade directory, 1909-10. 
FURBRINGER, M., Heidelberg, Germany. 

1 publication. 

GENEVE. CONSERVATOIRE ET JARDIX BOTANIQUES, Geneva, 
Switzerland. 
Annuaire, v. 11, 12. 
GENNEP, ARNOLD VAN, Paris, France. 

2 publications. 

GENOA. MUSEO CIVICO STORIA NATURALE, Genoa, Italy. 

Annali, current numbers. 
GEORGIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bulletin, nos. i8, 19. 
GERHARD, WILLIAM J., Chicago. 

3 publications. 



xnf> M op Natvral History — Reports. Vol. III. 

lili; Him.lOTHKK «itr-.scn. licnnany. 



l.UA>i.' roRY SOCIETY. ttiasKuw. stuu.md. 

. ; ; :.•. numlicr*. 

W K.. Lund. Sweden. 

GORLH/. k-< iir/M»i. t.n.^ni.L.^ HAFT. Gorlil«. Genn.in) 

A' , 1. H n. j^. a6. 

s VETENSKAPS- OCH VETTKRMETS-SAMHALLE. 
tfOtcNirjj. Ctcrmany. 

ORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAT. GoilinKen. Germany 
Chronik. iqoS. 

GRAZ NATLK^' '--<■ ^^CHAFTl.lCHKR VERHIN FIR STEIRMARK. 

M ••< :1unf{vn. IQ08. 
GRAVES. F V . n-K- Run. Missouri. 

t jwrnphlcl <K'f^ ' 
GREAT BRITAIN GEoUXilCAL SURVEY. Lond..n. England 

•nmary of projjre**. iqo8. 
GLKMiV. J H 

\ rrprint* 
lUHAW MIHI.loTECA \ACin\AI.. Havana. Cuba 

.». I I. nos. i-a, 
MAUA.\.\ l.NSTITl'Tn DE SEULM).\ l..\SENANZA. Havana, luba 

Mrnvna '• ' '' ••io-;-S. 
HAMHLRc; HOT HE STA.VTSIXSTITLTEN. HamhurK. Gennany. 

Ja .-hie. 1006-7. 

MWflr . M FUR VOLKERKUNDE. Haml.unv Grnnanv. 

V. 9«. with Bcihcft. t-7. 
HAMII ion. New York 

H.\" niKK. n.»nnover. Gctmanv 

1908. 
HARR M R 

HA If. !«' I. JURARV. Hartford. Conner; 

HARTLA' Y. Gloucesler. England 

Ha. 'jr \(.i«.«achtiM>tt<. 

Museum ,v: 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 397 

HARVARD UXIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Catalogue, 1908-9. 
Official register, 1907—8. 
HASSE, C, Berlin, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
HATCH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts. 
Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, Ha- 
waiian Islands. 
Annual report, 1908. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS ASSOCIATION, Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Lslands. 

5 publications. 

HEIDELBERG. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Heidelberg, Germany. 

31 inaugural dissertations. 
HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

Muhlenbergia, current numbers. 
HERRICK, G. W., Austin, Texas. 

1 pamphlet. 

HONGKONG BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, Hong- 
kong, China. 
Report, 1908. 
HONOLULU. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE AND 
FORESTRY, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 
Hawaiian forester, current numbers . 
HORNIMAN MUSEUM AND LIBRARY, London, England. 

2 publications. 

HOUGH, WALTER, Washington, D. C. 

1 pamphlet. 

HOVEY, EDMUND OTIS, New York City. 

2 reprints. 

HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hull, England. 

6 publications. 

IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho. 

Annual report, 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ILES, GEORGE, New York City. 

2 pamphlets, 

ILLINOIS EDUCATIONAL COMMISSION, Springfield, Illinois. 

Final report, 1909 (gift). 
ILLINOIS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois. 

3 publications. 

ILLINOIS MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Illinois. 

Report, 1908. 
ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Fishes of Illinois and atlas. 



^oS FirLO MtsHiM <»»- N'ATrnAL HisToHv Rfports. Vol. III. 

ILI.I\«' 'V OF SCIKNCK. S| 

II.!.! 1. I.IHRARY. SpnnirfirUI. II 

ILLI.NDlb rlMDM. IlliD- I 

IVniA \K IRVKY « .l.nlltt. In.li* 



IM)I.\ II'' in.li. 



1 ' KVKN tu. India 

.Mcnn>in», currrni nut 

I\I> 1 t«, India 

.\i?ncultural l< nrrrnt numl)rf> 

a[i.kL<a>l. iixlia 

I\I>I.\N MUSEUM. Calcutta. India 

S ; 
i >i'l.\\.\ '" ■-''■'' 1 irn.iii.ip >iis, itnil.tlta 

Vt 
INDIANA BOARD OP STATIC CHARITIES. Indinr 

.\nnunl rcjiort, n^ )o8. 

B«:" ' 

INDIANA OP GE0LCH;Y AND NATURAL RE- 

SOURCES. Indiana|Kttis. Indiana 

RrjH»rt. n«» _\;i. iqoM 
FNLAND PRINTER PUHLISHIV' .^'I•^\V Chicajeo 

Inland printer, v. 42. 4 ; 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. Washinjjlon. D C 

.\nniial rr|><>rl. n«» JJ. looS 
IOWA ACAT>r\tv < .P ^rfrvrj.:. i>cs .M«.incs. Iowa 

Pr 
IOWA GEoUKilCAL SURVEY. Dcs M«.incs. Iiiwa 

Rciw>rt. V. iM. IQ07. 
Iowa STATE COLLEGE OP AGRICULTURE AM) MJ-fllWIi \UT<, 
Afnc5. Iowa 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

InW A -  Al. I»i:rARTMK\T Dcs M.,inc . low.i 

\- :rrrnt num'^ 

• t. no. o. 
. ICULTURAL .-"-It " ' wies low,,. 

V. 4V 

\n\\ IVERSITY. I 

i airndar. iqoq-io. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 399 

IRELAND. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND TECHNICAL 
INSTRUCTION, Dublin, Ireland. 

21 publications. 
JACKSON, HARTLEY H. T., Milton, Wisconsin. 

2 separates (gift). 
JAMAICA BOTANIC GARDENS, Kingston, Jamaica. 

Department of Agriculture; 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
JANCHEN, ERWIN. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
JAPAN ASIATIC SOCIETY, Tokyo, Japan. 

Constitution and by-laws, etc. 
JASSY UNIVERSITY, Jassy, Roumania. 

Annales scientifiques, v. 6, no. i. 
JOHN CRERAR LIBRARY, Chicago. 

Annual report, no. 14. 

List of books — reading room. 
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Register, 1908-9. 
JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHY, New York City. 

Journal, current numbers. 
KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Topeka, Kansas. 

Transactions, v. 22. 
KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Annual report, no. 21, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

Biennial report, 1907-8. 
KARLSRUHE. GROSSHERZOGL. BAD. GARTENDIRECTION, Karls- 
ruhe, Germany. 

I pamphlet. 
KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN. Karlsruhe, 
Germany. 

Verhandlungen, b. 21, 1907-8. 
KAUKASISCHE MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia. 

Mitteilungen, v. 4, nos. 1-2. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Le.xington, 
Kentucky. 

Annual report, nos. 14, 18-20. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England. 

21 publications. 
KIEL. K. UNIVERSITATS-BIBLIOTHEK, Kiel, Germany. 

Bericht, 1908. 
K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREENIGING NEDERLANDISCHE INDIE, 
Weltevreden. 

Natuurkundig tijdschrift, v. 68. 
KROEBER, A. L., Berkeley, California. 
I pamphlet. 



t or Matitral History — Reports. Vol. III. 

l^ PLA I ■•». .Vnjcntina. 

l-^Vru.M ui" '. i.L, A., liucno* Aire?.. Argentina 

1. VKK P()K 'LLICCfE. I^kc Porrst. Illinois. 

LAKE M"ii'Ms ..... V. f.^ ON INTKRNATIONAL ARHITRA- 

TI'>\ ,. New York 

LAN' \ FISHKRIKS LAIM )RAT« >R Y. Livcn»ool. BnKland 

LAW L'BLir LIBRARY Lawn-nrr. Mn^<uichufletts 

\- -mal report. 1907. 
LKICLSTLR MUSKUM AND ART li.VLLLRY. H-.n.uKh of Uicester. 
'"• -'id. 

Rcj 17. ioos-8. 

LEIDEN. RIJKS ETHN(X;RAPinS('H. MUSEL'M. Uiden. Netherlands 

Vrpilaff. 1007-M 
LBIPFV otiK< \ti-<rtM VAN NATriRMJKK HISTOIRE. Lei-I^n 

rjt. current numbers. 
H.ir^lU K. ^A^ iriS4'HE GESELLSTHAFT DKR WISSENSl HAPTEN. 

\| MR \«»I.KI:RKI'NDE. LcipiiR. Germany. 

I.rVAI! ..i L'AS^nr-I \Ttf)\ HTS N.XTURAMSTKS I^- 

Perret, Pi 
•ns 



rt. 190S. 



LIM • SI> GK« H.RAPICA. Lima. Peru 

I- H Limaica. New York. 

LIVER J TY. Liverpool. EnKUnd. 

V i». 
LIVi TY. Ltvprp'^1. England. 

LtVBRi \L COM.MITTLL. Liverpool. England. 

.. .., ... 71. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 401 

LLOYD LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Bulletin, reproduction series, no. 7. 
LONDON FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, London, England. 

Publications, no. 60, 63. 
LONDON. GEOLOGIC.\L SURVEY AND MUSEUM, London, England. 

Guide. 
LONDON. LINNEAN SOCIETY, London, England. 

8 publications. 
LONDON. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
LONDON. ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON. SOCIETY OF ARTS, London. England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
LONDON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
LOUBAT, DUC DE, Paris, France. 

4 publications. 

LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

5 publications. 

LOUISIANA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Bulletin, nos. 6—8. 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
MACRITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

2 pamphlets. 
MADRAS. AGRI-HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India. 

Annual meeting, 1909. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India. 

5 publications. 
MADRID. R. ACADfiMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

Memorias, t. 26. 

Re vista, current numbers. 
MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, 
Spain. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Memorias, current numbers. 
MAGYAR NEMZETI MUZEUM, Budapest, Hungary. 

Annales, current numbers. 
MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales. 

I pamphlet. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MAINE STATE LIBRARY, Augusta, Maine. 

5 state publications. 



/ 



y Natural HijiTorv - Reports*. Vol. ill. 

Xf.iinr 
t>F ARTS AND SCIKNi'BS. Mancholcr. 

V i<Y AND PHILOSOPHICAI. S<HIKTY. Man- 

•I.I.Kr.K M:inrh«-st*T KnplnnH 



U.\L. Ul.K UhbAM 1 1:..N 
i, Gcimany 



MVKKSITAT. Marhunj. Germany 



M AH lanctta. Ohio 

.VIAKI.NL. U «KIATH»\  i IHK LMTKD KINGDOM 

nd. 
In«- investigations. 1004-5. 

rrrni numlicrs. 
M.\K5l: ULTfi DBS SCIENtiis. Marseille. France 

.r. ,7. 

COLONIAL. NLirseille. France 
r . V. 6. 
M.\K5t i.i. DHISTOIRE NATUREI.LE. .M«rs«.n. i ,..,.. v 

I J. 
MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION < Park, 

M 



MARYLAND INSTITUTE. Baltimore. Maryland 

. .. IIORT?' • » T'^^AL SCKIETV p.i V 

It. i<. 
> INSTITUTE OF TH IINHLOGV. llo*l«n. " 

8. 
M.\CKJ T AND UAKDEN DEPAKiMt.M. M.iunliuv 

^ ntme. .Australia 

ME'v 'aAL. Mcxk'. Mexico. 

' ). Mexico. Me\ 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 403 

MEXICO. MUSEO NACIONAL, Mexico, Mexico. 

Anales, current numbers. 
MEXICO. SOCIEDAD GEOLOGICA, Mexico, Mexico. 

Boletin, t. 3-4. 
MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lansing, Michi- 
gan. 

Annual report, v. t8-2i. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINES, Houghton, Michigan. 

Yearbook, 1908-9. 
MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lansing, Michigan. 

Annual report, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

II publications. 
xMILANO. SOCIETA ITALIANA DI SCIENZE NATURALI, Milano, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
MILLS, WILLIAM C, Columbus, Ohio. 

I pamphlet. 
MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK, Chicago. 

60 botanical publications. 
MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Annual report, 1908. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, MinneapoHs, 
Minnesota. 

Annual report, 1908. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Botanical studies, v. 4, no. i. 
MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Collections, v. 12-13. 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Mississippi. 

Bulletin (gift). 
MISSISSIPPI GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Jackson, Mississippi. 

Bulletin, nos. 1-4 (gift). 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, 
Missouri. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
MISSOURI BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINES, Jefferson City, 
Missouri. 

5 publications. 
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY, Columbia, Missouri. 

I publication. 
MONTANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Bozeman, Mon- 
tana. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



404 M OF Natural History Kkports. Vol. III. 

MONTANA -iTXTP t-VI\-I-MmTN tl.. \!.i>!..!i.t 

\Io\T N ArH».\ A L. Montevideo. I' niRuxiy. 

A ' 

Vi inntr . • . Kit. .1. 

MiMiR: t^ H . Philaciciphia. Prnnsylvanin. 

\fl'\(lir -IIKS Ml'SKl'M. Munich. (Jcnnanv 

Ml M IIKN. K. K. AKADliMIK DKR WISSENSCHAFTBN. Munich. 
('. 

Hcnci 'nl numl)cni 

MUNN AND COMPANY. New York City. 

S American, current numl)ers. 

ML'SftB I> ' V BrusseU. HelRium. 

•» ; 
MIS^K OlIMKT. F'.ms. France. 

a 
MUSEO Z« <•*.,.*,,„ .» DKLLA K UMVI:RSIT\ DI \ A POLL Naples. 
Italy. 

.\nnuario. n. s.. v. a. nos. i-6. 8-16. 
Ml SKU PAUL I ST A. S;io Paulo. Bratil 

Kc vista. V 7 
NAPOLI. R. ACCADKMIA DELLE SClENZE. Naples. Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

R- M. rvirrenl numlxTs 

NAPOLI lA DI NATURALLSTI. Nap'. ?• <!v 

B . ser. t. V. ao; ser. a, %'. ai. 

NATAL BOTANIC GARDENS. Durban. Natal 

N \ 6. pt I. 

NATAL. Ui , ..:i:\T MUSEUM. Pi-'-"" irir^burK. Nf^- ' 

AnnaU. v. a. no. 1. 
NATIONAL GEor.RAPHIC SOCIETY. WashinRton. D C. 

M 

NATURAL.. '..--. lulinii ('.^i».-iil.» 

|oum»l. ctirrml numbers. 

•'■  HE GESELLSCHAFT. Ba<iel. Switterland. 

 r<s. 
NEBR i:S Liru..ln Nchr.ia,» 



r 



LTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Lincoln. Ne- 



\ L A L 6U R V E Y. Lincoln. Nebraska. 



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Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 405 

NEBRASKA STATE LIBRARY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Studies, current numbers. 
NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Calendar, 1909-10. 
NEDERLAXDSCH-INDIE. DEPARTEMENT VAN LANDBOUW, Buit- 
enzorg, Java. 
2 publications.' 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. INSTITUT DE TAAL-, LAND- EN 
VOLKENKUNDE, Batavia, Java. 
2 publications. 
NEDERLANDSCH-INDIE. K. NATUURKUNDIGE VEREENIGING, Ba- 
tavia, Java. 
Register, 1875-1908. 
Tijdschrift, v. 68. 
NEW BEDFORD FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts. 
Annual report, v. 56, 57, 1907-1908. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, New 
Hampshire. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Catalogue, 1908-9. 
Report, nos. 19-20. 
NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Trenton, New Jersey. 
9 publications. 
NEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1908. 
NEW JERSEY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Proceedings, 34th annual session, 1909. 
NEW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1908. 
NEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla 
Park, New Mexico. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
NEW MEXICO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Santa Fe, New Me.xico. 

8 publications. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. BOTANIC GARDENS AND GOVERNMENT 
DOMAINS, Sydney, New South Wales. 
Annual report, 1907, 1908. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES, Sydney, New 
South Wales. 
Report, 1908. 
NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND AGRICUL- 
TURE, Sydney, New South Wales. 
NEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales. 
Proceedings, current numbers. 



>F Natural IIimokv Rkports. Vul. III. 

\' S<'I1 New YcTk 

IlKAL i:xri:KIMi:.\T station. Uencv*. 

MU ^-'Kk \L CfARDEN Vork Cily. 

' V . ..IHRAI York Cily 

M \V N.'KK \fi;lK«»|M)IJTAN MUSKLM nP ART. New York Cily. 
A 

n 

N r. W \ " K K I H K A R Y . \>w York CUy . 
NEW \uKi\. M \ 1 1- I' 'Ki-M . riaii .\m> ijA.ME i"< ).MMi^M«i.\. ,\I■ 
\ i: W N M k K > r A r K L I H R a R Y . a Ibany . New York . 

K  

A 

\TK M !. Albany. New York. 

NEW !■■. ... >T .:o.•.|•T^ \..rkCity. 

A 

urrenl nu- 
M:\V /.i.\L.\.\I) DEPARTMENT OF AGRICL'LTURE. NVcIlingtnn. New 

ns. 
\i:\V ZKALAND. DEPARTMENT OF MINES. WcllinKt-n. New ZcaLiml 

(;. 

NEW . TCTE. Wellinjflon. New Zealand 

r KB. V. i-«. 

V 41. 

N GOVERNMENT. Guatemala. Nicarai: ; i 

VoRT' vr-KTffT Tt'R.XL EXPEH'^O'^^T xTvtihv 

« 

f- > lU.M. I.LtJ.NoMU ^LKVt^ 

IRAE EXPERIMENT STATION. Far^o 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 407 

NUMISMATIC AND ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Montreal, Canada. 

Canadian antiquarian, current numbers. 
NURNBERG. NATURHISTORISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Nuremberg, 
Germany. 

Abhandlungen, v. 17. 

Mitteilungen, 1907, no. 1-6; iyo8, no. i. 
OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Annual report of librarian, 1908. 

Laboratory bulletin, nos, 14, 15. 
OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Wooster, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Columbus, Ohio. 

I map. 
OHIO STATE ARCH^OLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Journal, quarterly. 
OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Columbus, Ohio. 

8 publications. 
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio. 

; publications. 
OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Stillwater, 
Oklahoma. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Bulletin, current numbers. . 
ONEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, New York. 

Yearbook, no. 10. 
ONTARIO. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada. 

15 reports. 
OPEN COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Monist, current numbers. 

I pamphlet. 
OREGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
OREGON STATE BIOLOGIST, Eugene, Oregon. 

Biennial report, 1907-8. 
ORNITHOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Munich, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 8. 
OTAGO UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Dunedin, New Zealand. 

Curator's report, 1908-9 (gift). 
OTTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 
OUTES, FELIX F., Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

10 reprints. 
OUTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Outing magazine, current numbers. 
OXFORD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England. 

Annual report, no. 21, 1908. 



N'ATrnAi. HiHToRv Rkports. Vol. III. 
KTO BOTANU'C) K GIARDINO COLONIALE. F»alcrm. 



luly. 



•V. V. 4. no. a 
(•(^NGRKSS. W 



I\\KI.*> •"^•■•'- " ris. tranrr. 

p\\ \THKC>IM)L(XJIE. Pam. France. 

r.\Kl> ' NATURELLE. Paris. Frame 

,.pj 

V\\ HES AMERICANISTES. Pari*. France. 

urrrnl numl>crs. 

K I) AC.KI' ' • !• «^'" »• '• r- 



Hullrlin.  rs 

PARKE. DAVIS & COMPANY. Detroit. MichiKan 

. . current ; .fl) 

PE.\u'-'i' 1 1 <-, I »"i»l>«Kly. M.»^-.i< nii^ik:>. 

A ', no. 57. iQoS. 

I OF AMERICAN ARCH.«OLoGY AND ETH- 
' KiY. Cambridge. M.iss.ichusctts 
V 4. no. J. 
H » 4J. IQ07-8. 

MA .XC.RICLLTURAL EXPERIMENT .STATION. Harris- 

luirR. P« • 

Ti..n^ , 

AKTMENT oF FORESTRY. HarrisburR. Penn- 

K 
rr\\>;vr / WD si nnnl of' IMU'STRIAI. ARTS. 



l't..N.NMi MVERSll^. rmi.iclclphi.^. Pennsylvania 

4 

F . JR . Ph«laHcl|»hia. Pennsylvania 

I cn.M >.- j^ ^'-r,- .X,, , '•• -KTTS SCH'"" *''»R THE 

I 

-t. no. 77. I / ' 
PERT! -RV MUSEUM. Perth. Scotland 

• 

K 
PERTHSHIK ETY OP NATURAE SCIENCE. Perth. Scotland 

rret* rr r.rvTrpr.c pE MI"^"^'^ I.ima. Peni 



Jan., igio. Annual Report of the Director. 409 

PERU I.XSTITUTO HISTORICO, Lima, Peru. 

Revista, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, 1908. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

American journal of pharmacy, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Transactions, v. 30. 
PHILADELPHIA FREE LIBRARY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Annual report, no. 13, 1909. 
PHILADELPHIA GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
PHILADELPHIA LIBRARY COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, no. 62, 63. 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. BUREAU OF SCIENCE, Manila, Philippine 
Islands. 

22 publications. 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1909. 
PIETERMARITZBURG. BOTANIC SOCIETY, Pietermaritzburg, South 
Africa. 

Annual report. 1908. 
PIOLTI, GIUSEPPE, Torino, Italy. 

3 pamphlets. 
PISA. SOCIETA TOSCANA DI vSCIENZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Memorie, v. 24. 
PORTICI R. SCUOLA SUPERIORE D'AGRICULTURA, Portici, Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 3. 
PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Portland, Maine. 

Annual report, 1908. 
PORTLAND SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORY, Portland, Maine. 

Proceedings, v. 2, pt. 8. 
PORTO RICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mayaguez, 
Porto Rico. 

Annual report, 1908. 
POSEN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR KUNST UND WISSEN- 
SCHAFT, Posen, Germany. 

Zeitschrift der Naturw. Abtheilung, current numbers. 
PRAG. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES DE L'EMPEREUR FRANgOIS 
JOSEPH I., Prag. Austria. 

24 publications. 



M. Hi*- Kkhokt>. Vol III 

VU\ lAKT I>i:k W ilAKTKN IV.1- 

LIBRARY. Brooklyn. New York 
.uml>cm 

PRBUS- •- «n. VKREIN ^Ijcrg. Gcr 

Pkr FY, Pnncelon. New Jersey. 

punvTi ' IV,,. ,,i,.„. ,. K'' — '■• !-' «nd. 

I'KOVII I'LHI.Il I.lhKAKY. Pmvidcnce. RhtKic Island 

TM'ttnt ,::, t- ! .r . 

V »»iiIiAL SURVKY. Hnshane. Queensland 

V \l> koVAL liliJHikAl'HU AU btKJIETY. Brisbane. Queens- 

land. 

(,' IKTY. Brish.inc. Queensland. 

ai. 



f \ 



(jrift). 
k lAkkY F . Baltimore. Mar\I .:. ! 



t r V u 

<Ts. 



.O. New York 



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tivTr TvcTTTi-T£ jro>% New v, ,-. 

witnnr T'tTT*u\i I'XPERIMENT «^T\TTr>v t 

^ .1 

f< .. New 



Jan., 1910. AxxuAL Report of the Director. 411 

ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Annual report, 190S. 

Bulletin, v. 1-4. 
ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LI.\'CEI, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Rendiconti, current numbers. 
ROME. SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIAXA, Rome, Italy. 

BoUettino, current numbers. 
ROME. SOCIETA ROMAXA DI AXTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Catalogue, 1008-09. 
ROTH, WALTER, E., Sydney, Xew South Wales. 

2 pamphlets. 
ROTHMAXX, C. G., St. Louis, Missouri. 

I pamphlet. 
ROTTERDAM MUSEUM VOOR LAXD-EX-VOLKEXKUXDE, Rotter- 
dam, Holland. 

Verslag, 1909. 
ROYAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIX AXD 
IRELAXD, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, CEYLOX BRAXCH, Colombo, India. 

Journal, no. 59-61. 
ROYAL DUBLIN SOCIETY, Dublin, Ireland. 

5 publications. 
RUTOT, A., Brussels, Belgium. 

4 separates. 
ST. GALL. OSTSCH. GEOGRAPH. COMMERC. GESELLSCHAFT, St. Gall 
Switzerland . 

Mitteilungen, v. 2, 190S. 

Report, 1907. 
ST. LAUREXT COLLEGE, Montreal, Canada. 

Catalog, 1908—09. 
ST. LOUIS ACADEMY OF SCIEXCES, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
ST. LOUIS MERCAXTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATIOX, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. 

Annual report, no. 63, 1908. 
ST. LOUIS MUSEUM OF FIXE ARTS, St. Louis, Missouri. 

3 publications. 

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1907-8, 1908-9. 
ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1909. 



4i» Piklh y. ! «>»' Natural Histoky - Rkports. Vol. III. 

'■Mil-: IM«"^«^f M.K I> rvr-r*; «;i 



.•'■■a' ^. Vtkl 



gj I . 1M1'1:K1.\LK DES .\.\1 LK.M.ibTES. Si 



CV ' 1 • ~«l«l . 



)I.LKCiE. Bourlwnnais. Illinois 



» •> I 



n MKCIIANICS INSTITUTE. San Francinco. California, 
orl. no. 5a. 53. 

SAN R Ml'SEO NAriONAI.. San Salvador. 

rrnt numt 
SAO TALi.O I.N^rlTUTd .\IiKu.m 'M ii < '. .>.i' i'aul>. Hvazu 

p. .»..•:. . Mrr.-nt niinil»crs 
SAO PA PAl'MSl Paulo. Braxil. 

SAU I'A ' H li-iJAU uiL.N iiii<_.v. oao I'aulo. Brazil. 

 3. no. "1 3 

S.\ANE ET LOIRE. S^M NvTK DES SCIENCES NATLKKLLES. ChAlon- 

 •. , r- - ,. 

Bui. ;l>crs. 

SARlM>VO STATL LANDW VKRSL'CHSSTATION. Sardov... Bulgaria. 

«.» 
SATURn.VN Ki,\ u/\S . i-'jim'>ii. CTi>;i.iti.i 

I'urrcnt t,Mn;V<'r<; 
SAUVAGBAU. ix. France. 

St*HARUi:,n. t\L i)OLP. Ora*, wcnnany. 

I iTpiinl 
S«:ilENrK. C A . BiUmore. North Carolina 

SCHLE.s..- ... 'lAFT FCR VATERI \VTUxf-TlF (MM TI'R 

.S*|IMII»T. in. tiennany. 

^ rrrmany. 

in ).\RD. ''■' V. :>coUand. 

HENDE GESELLSCHAFT. 
am- Mam. Germany. 

Sit ' 



OF THk 
tINIVERSITY OF llllNOIS 



ntiO MUMUM or MATUMM. N«TO«V. 



Htl*OHT». PlATt U¥. 



* 



* 





r*Ar;.r Va^V.^ Itjn*^ Hav Cir 



\'»>w n«i:n«»^ Hci?'''^'' ' ^' -t^fl I' ft^t. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 413 

SKIFF, F. J. v., Chicago. 

10 publications (gift). 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

I pamphlet. 
SLONAKER, JAMES R., Palo Alto, California. 

1 reprint. 

SMITH, JOHN B., New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

2 pamphlets. 

SMITH, JOHN D., Baltimore, Maryland. 

4 publications. 
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C. 

29 publications. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico, Mexico. 

Memorias, current numbers. 
SOCIETA AFRICANA D 'ITALIA, Naples, Italy. 

BoUettino, v. 28, no. 1—4. 
SOCIETA TOSCANA DI SCIEXZE NATURALI, Pisa, Italy. 

Memorie, v. 24. 
SOCIETAS PRO FAUNA ET FLORA FENNICA, Helsingfors, Finland. 

Meddelanden, v. 33-35. 
SOCIETE BELGE DE GEOLOGIE, DE PALEONTOLOGIE ET D'HY- 
DROLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, v. 21—22, 23, no. 1—6. 
SOCIETE BOTANIQUE DE FRANCE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DE GEOGRAPHIE, Toulouse, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE ET D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Geneva, 
Switzerland. 

Comptes rendus des stances, v. 25, 1908. 

Memoires, current numbers. 
SOCIETE DES NATURALISTES DE KIEV, Kiev. Russia. 

Memoires, v. i, no. i. 
SOCIETE DES SCIENCES, Nancy, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOCIETE ENTOMOLOGigUE SUISSE, Bern, Switzerland. 

Mitteilungen, v. 11, no. 9. 
SOCIETE FRIBOURGEOISE DES SCIENCES NATURELLES, Fribourg, 
Switzerland. 

Compte rendu, 1907-8. 

Memoires, v. 6. 
SOCIETE GEOLOGIQUE DU NORD, Lille, France. 

Annales, v. 36, 1907. 
SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES AMIS DE SCIENCES NATURELLES, 
D'ANTHROPOLOGIE ET ETHNOGRAPHIE, Moscow, 
Russia. 

Bulletin, 1908. 



r Xaturai. Himory KKiMikT>. Vol. III. 
•'•'*SE DF nr.v.RAPini  — ' 

• ISi; I)L (..LDUKAI'MIK. Ncucl.jlci. bwiizcr- 

DE SCIKNTES NATUREI.LI .n. Portu- 

WE DAMATEl'RS DES St'IENVES NATL'R- 

•cnnclnirx. R» : > 

<tv'\<^-\ DI- UnTWlori' ni-: HKI.C.K. Hni<.srlU. HclKuim. 

'l.<KilVtE UK FRAMH, I'ans. France. 

rH AFRICA GEOLOGICAL SLRVKV. Johannesbun?. South Africa. 

iii A I ^^ w. c" " 11.: V Town. South Afrt. I 

Tr VI. no. I. 

Til AFRICAN ASSOCI.XTION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
SCIENCE. Cfrahamslown. South .\frica. 

Rr - - 

TH Al IINTRAL L(K'UST BUR EAT Pretoria. South Africa. 

.\nnu.»l rrj-.rt. no. a, 3. IQ08. 1909 <K''' 
Til AJ Ml'SEUM. Cape Town. South Alnca 

R. 
ni Al illLOSOPHICAL SOilETY. Cape Tt.wn. South 

Africa. 

Tr 

rti \- I .r vcpTci't Tfwr wn i\- 

Hulletin. ctirrent nu? 

LIBRARY. MLSEUM AND ART GAL- 
■uth Au«tr.'ili.» 

\I SnCirTV A.lrl.i h Au-^trali-i 

TLRAL EXPERIMENT STATION. Clem 

P 

\L EXPERIMENT STATION. Brook- 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 415 

SOUTH LONDON ENTOMOLOGICAL .AND NATURAL HISTORY SO- 
CIETY, London, England. 
Proceedings, 1908-09. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 
California. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, California. 

Sunset magazine (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD CITY LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Report, 1909. 
STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM. Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. 

Veroffentlichungen, current numbers. 
STARR, FREDERICK, Chicago. 

4 separates. 
STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New 
York City. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
STETTIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKER-UND ERKDUNDE, Stettin, 
Germany. 
Bericht, 1906-07, 1907-08. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Annual catalogue, 1909-10. 
STOCKHOLM. K. SVEX. VETENSKAPS AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 
Publications. 
STOCKHOLM. K. VITT. HIST. OCH ANTIQ. AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 
3 publications. 
STOCKHOLM SVEN. SALLSK. FOR ANTROPOLOGI OCH GEOGRAFI, 
Stockholm, Sweden. 
Ymer, current numbers. 
STORRS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Storrs, Connecticut. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
STRASSBURG. KAISER-WILHELMS-UNIVERSITAT, Strassburg, Ger- 
many. 
17 dissertations. 
TASMANIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Hobart, Tasmania. 
Handbook of Tasmania. 
2 pamphlets. 
TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, College Station, 
Te.Kas. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
TEXAS UNIVERSITY, Austin, Texas. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Catalogue, 1908— 1909. 



F Natiral History — Reports. Vol. HI. 

T!t\T ntT; \t Mirkcr.«l. Dcnpi-irk 

<-nlccn. Scotland. 

!rn:». California 
number. : 
UK VERKIN. Weimar. Gcnnany. 

T»>KV« V. Tokvo. j.'ip.nn 

\I current numbers. 

NATLK.VL HISTURV. Tukyo. J*j .• 
• I. 
1 •. Japan. 

:>uinl>crs. 

•, umbers. 
1 ) PlBLIt- LIBRARY. Toledo. Ohio. 

R. 

Ti-iOTVn ' "M.(XJI.\ EI") \V\TM\fT\ CoMpVRXTX TuHn 

:j^. iqoS. 
r«;Kl.N«J. ; \u. DELLE SCI EN ZE. Tunn. Italy. 

\' •• r.-.-nbers. 

J. 
TRA DEPARTMENT OF .\GRICULTURE. Pretoria. Transvaal 



TRA \I. MINES DEPARTMENT. Pretoria. Transvaal. 

Sur\-cy. 1907. 1908. 
.». Transvaal. 

TRI \I. TrinR. England 

 number*. 
. ini.jnd. 

M. Trr. 
. IQ06. 

\NCIS<'0. Mcxic-ri M. 

TRUNUIIJI:\J K NORSKE VIDENSKABER SELSKAU. Trondhjem. 

V --» .. 

T RT. E L . Pans. Fr 

• t. 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 41 

UNION COLLEGE, Schnectady, New York. 

Catalogue, rgog— 10. 
U. S. GOVERNMENT, Washington, D. C. 

400 publications. 
U. S. INDL\N SCHOOL, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Indian craftsman, v. i, nos. 1-5. 
U. S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, Washington, D. C. 

7 publications. 
U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY, Annapolis, Maryland. 

Annual register, 1 908-1 909. 
UPSALA. K. VETENSKAPS SOCIETETEN, Upsala, Sweden. 

Nova acta, current numbers. 
UPSALA UNIVERSITY, Upsala, Sweden. 

2 publications. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
VAN HISE, CHARLES R., Madison, Wisconsin. 

2 reprints. 
VAN OVERBERGH, C, Brussels, Belgium. 

Collection de monographies ethnographiques, v. 1-3. 
VASSAR BROTHERS INSTITUTE, Poughkeepsie, New York. 

Bulletin, v. 1-2. 

« 

1 reprint. 

VENEZUELA. ESTADISTICA DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS, Caracas, 
Venezuela. 

2 publications. 

VERMONT AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Burlington, 
Vermont. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
VERMONT BIRD CLUB, Essex Junction, Vermont. 

Bulletin, nos, 1-3, 1906—08. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont. 

Catalogue, 1908-09. 
VICTORIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne. Victoria. 

Journal, current numbers. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 
VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, Toronto. Canada. 

Calendar, 1908-9. 1909-10. 

Victoria College: 

Bulletin, 1908-9. 
VICTORIA ZOOLOGICAL AND ACCLIMATIZATION SOCIETY, .Mel- 
bourne, Victoria. 

Annual report, 1908. 
VIRCHOW, H., Beriin, Gennany. 

3 pamphlets. 

VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, 
Virginia. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 



4l8 FlKLU MlsKTM OK NaTI'KAL lIlMokV K KP«»kTS. VoL. III. 

VIRGINIA. J :«)\V\ KXPOSITIOX CoMMlv 

\ 

\fsrr- 
Vh I.IHRARY. R Ma. 

\ 
VIRC;i^' •"'• VrTjinia. 

WAUOTT. A. B..< 

WARD, il T :"...i" \v?.r.a . 

WASlIIN(;n»N UADIIMY OF Si IICNrKS, Washi 

r 

U-\<m\i, TV W.ukhinRton. . 

WASHINi.ToN FHil.US<)|»HK AL S<H IKTY. W.mhinRtoi 

V 
WASHINi. '!vtr.i.i.i \Va.shingtnn 

WAl'GALNI I'l Hl-U MtSKUM. WauRauni. New Zealand 

Annual rriMirt ni> 14.1 
WKI.I.COMK « IM:MI(\I. RI> il I .\HnR ATnRIKS I.on.l-.n Kng- 

l.in.! 

I' 
WELLER ..>;•. 

.1 
WELLINGTON ACri.IMATlZATlON S<XIETY. Wclli c« Zc 

Annual rr|«>rt. u>o8-<) 
WELL!^' T'.v i.it.t 1, V ^Tt•K^I isTs- CLUB. Guelpi. - .......... 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. Middlclown. Connecticut. 

C 190Q. 

WEST TM ..;* i.KlAL DEPARTMENT OF AGR '• ' ' t' ^^ •• ?' - 

< ' •-.. WcNl Indies 
P >ns. current numljers. 

WEST VIR(.I.MA AGRICILTIRAL EXPERIME.NT STATm\. Morican- 
town. West Virjjinja. 
Bulletin, current number*. 
WEST VIRGINIA STATE BOARD OF AGRUULTU RE. Charleston 
Went Virginia. 

.' ri-:..r*^ 

WESTi IRALIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. Perth, 

W< -lem Australia. 

WEST! I nr.ICAT. f;T'RVPV Prrtli UVstrrn All*. 

A 

B.uifvin. <_urn:nt nuini'cr- 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 419 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA ENGINEERS' SOCIETY, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Charter, by-laws and list of members, 1909. 
WIEN K. K. XATURHISTORISCHES HOFMUSEUM, Vienna, Austria. 

Annalen, current numbers. 

Jahresbericht, 1907. 
WIEN K. K. UNIVERSITAT, Vienna, Austria. 

Handkatalog. 

6 reports. 
WIEX K. K. ZOOLOGISCH-BOTANISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Vienna, 
Austria. 

Verhandlungen, v. 58. 
WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Wies- 
baden, Germany. 

Jahrbuch, v. 61. 
WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway. 

Naturwidenskabeme magazin, current numbers. 

2 separates. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts. 

2 catalogues. 
WILLISTOX, S. W., Chicago. 

4 reprints. 

WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WINDSOR KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Brick, current numbers (gift). 
WISCONSIN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Transactions, v. 16, nos. 1-3, 5—6. 
WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Archeologist, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. Madison, Wisconsin. 

Annual report, 1909. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

5 publications. 

WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

31 publications. 
WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Bulletin, nos. 3-4. 
WITTROCK, BRECHER, Albano, Sweden. 

Acta Horti Bergiani, v. 3, pts. 1-2. 
WOOD, NORMAN A., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1907-8. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 



4 !: . Xattral History Rkports. Vol. III. 

K N.Ml'kKLNDE. Wurtembcnt. Grnnanv 

It; ^ ... .... .tl'\T STATION" I..iramic 

i 
\VVu.MI\4; Ji .1. A.M' i.i-OKOnii RMETY. W like* bwrrr. 

r V. 10. 

UMVKkSlTY. New Haven. Connr 

.» 
7T\r\\V! . . • Hutw'.irv 

ZIMMKKMAN. JKRKMIAH. Syracuse. New York. 
, . 

7t Hicif \lUSi:rM I)I:R INIVERSITAT. Zurich. SwiU- 

rland . 

.Mittetlunftrn. nos. 40-43« 4$. 54- 

ZTkiril , HISCH-KTHNOdR.M'HIStHE GESELLSCHAFT. 

Zurich. Switxerland. 

J 
ZORICH. .i..M)E (;ESELI.S( haft. Zunch. SwiuerUnd. 

\ ;t. current numlwrs. 




u 

o 



w 

^i 
W) 

O 
O 

u 

en 

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+j 

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OF THt 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 421 



Articles of Incorporation. 



i 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State. 
To All to Whom These Presents Shall Come, Greeting: 

Whereas, a Certificate duly signed and acknowledged having been filed 
in the office of the Secretary of State, on the i6th day of September, A. D. 1893, 
for the organization of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO, under 
and in accordance with the provisions of "An Act Concerning Corporations," 
approved April 18, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amendatory 
thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, William H. Hinrichsen, Secretary of State of the State 
of Illinois, by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby 
certify that the said COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF CHICAGO is a legally organ- 
ized Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In Testimony Whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the 
Great Seal of State. Done at the City of Springfield, this i6th day of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, 
and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and eighteenth. 

W. H. HINRICHSEN, 
[Seal.] Secretary of State. 

TO HON. WILLIAM H. HINRICHSEN, 

Secretary of State: 

Sir: 

We, the undersigned, citizens of the United States, propose to form a 
corporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, 
entitled "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all 
acts amendatory thereof; and that for the purposes of such organization we 
hereby state as follows, to wit: 

1. The name of such corporation is the "COLUMBIAN MUSEUM OF 
CHICAGO." 

2. The object for which it is formed is for the accumulation and dissemi- 
nation of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating 
Art, Archaeology, Science, and History. 

3. The management of the aforesaid Museum shall be vested in a Board 
of Fifteen (15) Trustees, five of whom are to be elected every year. 



4>> FiKLD M vTUKAi- IIiMoKV R; Vol. III. 

it«*rr<Kv select* '' T*'^!^^'''*^ ff>r 



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-.n R. V- 

. Fcnl . . r, . 

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f; \. R\-er- 

. N. B. Ream 'm<». .MciviUc K Stone. 

H t \V Blatchford. i'luiiij i.». Annuur 



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(or the uses and =* therein set forth 

 my hand and noUnal seal this ut • nlier. i»g.;. 

G. R ' 
NoTART PfBi III. 



• HANT.E OP NAME. 

i cd at a meeting of the < 

Vr he CO' ,A.\ M 



rHANGE OP NAMK 

«n1 at a meeting of the Corporate members 
Y .f the FIELD roLlMBIAX 

OF NATURAL T^t.t.^rY 
lo. IQ05. in the the 



Jax., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 423 



AMENDED BY-LAWS. 



(April 12, 1909.) 



ARTICLE I. 

MEMBERS. 



Section i. Members shall be of five classes. Annual Members, Cor- 
porate Members, Life Members, Patrons, and Honorary Members. 

Sec. 2. Annual Members shall consist of such persons as are selected from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, and who shall 
pay an annual fee of ten dollars ($10.00), payable within thirty days after notice 
of election, and within thirty days after each recurring annual date. The 
failure of any person to make such initiatory payment and such annual pay- 
ments within said time shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be sufficient 
grounds for the forfeiture of an annual membership. 

This said annual membership shall entitle the member to : 

First. — Free admittance for the member and family to the Museum on 
any day. 

Second. — Ten tickets every year, admitting the bearer to the Museum on 
pay days. 

Third. — A copy of all publications of the Museum when requested. 

Fourth. — Invitations to all special exhibits, receptions, lectures, or other 
functions which may be given at the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Corporate Members shall consist of the persons named in 
the articles of incorporation, and of such other persons as shall be chosen from 
time to time by the Board of Trustees at any of its meetings, upon the rec- 
ommendation of the Executive Committee; provided, that such persons named 
in the articles of incorporation shall, within ninety days from the adoption of 
these By-Laws, and persons hereafter chosen as Corporate Members shall, 
within ninety days of their election, pay into the treasury the sum of twenty 
dollars ($20.00) or more. The failure of any person to make such payment 
within said time, shall, at the option of the Board of Trustees, be ground for 
forfeiture of his corporate membership. Corporate Members becoming Life 
Members, Patrons, or Honorary Members shall be exempt from dues. Annual 
meetings of said Corporate Members shall be held at the same place and on the 
same day that the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees is held. 

Sec. 4. Any person paying into the treasury the sum of five hundred 
dollars ($500.00), at any one time, shall, upon the unanimous vote of the 
Board, become a Life Member. Life Members shall be exempt from all dues. 



«*♦, 



th 



Ih' 



f Nati'rai. His Rbports. Vol. III. 



ARTICLE n. 

I The I> The 

•)( the Board now in office, and th' II here^f'-rr 

t 



F ' shall :te a quonim. except for the election of o; 

th -■..-. . - . 



c written notice, desif^ating the time and place of 
■kli be given by the Secretan'. 

ARTICLE III. 

OPrtCBRS. 

The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a 



pr V to elect. The i First V 

A the Vice-President shall be chosen from atnong the 



...... .1 

:oe for one year, or until their si: 



B rt in anv office mav be filled bv the Board at any meet;- ..- 



dr  )Stees. 

ARTICLE IV. 



:nLta oy lac uy-i^a-«-s. or 



Tv„ T. 



I 



Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 425 

and countersigned by the President. In the absence or inability of the Director 
warrants may be signed by the Chairman of the Finance Committee, and in 
the absence or inabihty of the President, may be countersigned by one of the 
Vice-Presidents. But no warrants shall be issued, except in conformity with 
a regularly prepared voucher, giving the name of the payee and stating the 
occasion for the expenditure, and verified and approved as hereinafter pre- 
scribed. It shall be no part of the duties of the Treasurer to see that the 
warrants have been issued in conformity with such vouchers. 

Sec. 2. The securities and muniments of title belonging to the Corporation 
shall be placed in the custody of some Trust Company of Chicago to be de- 
signated by the Board of Trustees, which Trust Company shall collect the 
income and principal of said securities as the same become due, and pay same 
to the Treasurer. Said Trust Company shall allow access to and deliver any 
or all securities or muniments of title to the joint order of the following officers, 
namely: The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, jointly with the Chair- 
man, or one of the Vice-Chairmen, of the Finance Committee of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Treasurer shall give bond in such amount, and with such 
sureties, as shall be approved by the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 4. All vouchers executed for the payment of liabilities incurred in 
the administration of the Museum, shall be verified by the Auditor, and ap- 
proved for payment by the Director, and the Chairman of the Administration 
Committee. All vouchers executed for expenditures for the construction or 
reconstruction of the Museum building, or buildings, shall be verified by the 
Auditor and approved for payment by the Chairman of the Building Committee. 
All vouchers executed in connection with the investments of the Corporation, 
or, in any way having to do with the endowment funds of the Corporation, 
shall be verified by the Auditor and approved for payment by the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE V. 

THE DIRECTOR. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
who shall remain in office until his successor shall be elected. He shall have 
immediate charge and supervision of the Museum, and shall control the opera- 
tions of the institution, subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees and 
its Committees. The Director shall be the official medium of communication 
between the Board, or its Committees, and the scientific staff and maintenance 
force. 

Sec. 2. There shall be four scientific departments of the Museum — 
Anthropology, Botany, Geology, and Zoology, each under the charge of a 
Curator, subject to the authority of the Director. The Curators shall be 
appointed by the Board upon the recommendation of the Director, and shall 
serve during the pleasure of the Board. Subordinate staff officers in the 
scientific departments shall be appointed and removed by the Director upon 
the recommendation of the Curators of the respective Departments. The 
Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other employees of the 
Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular 
meeting, recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. 



43f N'ATifRAL History Rkports. Vol. III. 



■c 
••• and Mrmlicr.. 
an<l It iiutiilicr m« ihc B<x(rii •'■ ' 

.\RTHM.I-: VI. 

A' 

and tr 



AKTK'LK VII. 

•MITTBRS. 

Financr. Huildit.t;. 

 AtjflitJnr rommittee* shall each con- 
>f thrr< I the A shall consist of five 



late the Chairman and V .rman 



• he event of Ih- c or disability ol the I'ha; 

.f 

the ' two other niembcn oi the 'o be elected 



by \ 



. . .i; ^' 1^ •!?•• .1 .iii.irii'n I .f tin- T^vri -.it i\ €• f<ii". 

kll Other standing i omn. 

' ' .1 

•ny member ot the Board r>t Trustees to act in place ••i 

Thr Finance Committer ^li.»!! havr «:npcrvi.«ion of investing the 
her permanent ft; ration, and the care of 

•hority to invest. 

.•m of the con- 
•n. and exte: ' any and all buildings used for 



. « . * .^ I 



.IV I • -1,^, {^ '-'Tie to 

to do 



OF THt 

nnimm of miMoig 




m 
> 






Jan., 1910. Annual Report of the Director. 427 

by three members of the Committee, to act upon such matters affecting the 
administration of the Museum as cannot await consideration at the Regular 
Monthly Meetings of the Board of Trustees. It shall, before the beginning of 
each fiscal year, prepare and submit to the Board an itemized Budget, setting 
forth the probable receipts from all sources for the ensuing year, and make 
recommendations as to the expenditures which should be made for routine 
maintenance and fixed charges. Upon the adoption of the Budget by the 
Board, the respective Committees shall be considered as authorized to make 
the expenditures detailed therein. No increase in the expenditures under any 
items of the Budget shall be made, except by authority of the Board of Trustees, 
but the Executive Committee shall have authority, in cases of emergency, to 
expend a further total sum not exceeding two thousand dollars in any one 
month. 

Sec. 8. The Administration Committee shall have general supervision of 
the affairs of the Museum. The Committee shall hold one meeting each month 
with the Director at the Museum within a week preceding each Monthly Meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. The Auditing Committee shall have supervision over all account- 
ing and bookkeeping, and full control of the financial records. It shall cause 
the same, once each year, or oftener, to be examined by an expert individual 
or firm, and shall transmit the report of such expert individual or firm to the 
Board at the next ensuing regular meeting after such examination shall have 
taken place. 

Sec. 10. The Chairman of each Committee shall report the acts and 
proceedings thereof at the next ensuing regular meeting of the Board. 

Sec. II. The President shall be ex-officio a member of all Committees 
and Chairman of the Executive Committee. Vacancies occurring in any 
Committee may be filled by ballot at any regular meeting of the Board. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

NO.MINATING COMMITTEE. 

Section i. At the November meeting of the Board each year a Nom- 
inating Committee of three shall be chosen by lot. Said Committee shall 
make nominations for membership of the Finance Committee, the Building 
Committee, the Administration Committee, and the Auditing Committee, and 
for two members of the Executive Committee, from among the Trustees, to be 
submitted at the ensuing December meeting and voted upon at the following 

Annual Meeting in January. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Section i. Whenever the word "Museum" is employed in the By-Laws 
of the Corporation, it shall be taken to mean t?ie building in which the Museum 
as an Institution is located and operated, the material exhibited, the material 
in study collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, 
books, and all appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, 
installations, expenditures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lec- 
ture courses, and all scientific and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided 
the amendment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



,L HisTuRY — Kbports, Vol. III. 



HUNURAKY MEMBERS. 



I D B. AVER STANLEY McCORMiCK 

ii • UNHoTHAM ROHKRT F < L'MN' 

Cli ;^ - ..^wi<Y MRS. TIM "T^"^" i... .< rt.STONE 

DBCBASBD. 

ROE M. I 'AN 

n.vRY D. STLk.ui:.d. 



PATRONS. 

\T I .RMOUR JOHN S. MIM.KR 

b'RNHAM JOHN BART<)N PAYNE 

I iiRAHAM FK ; W. l M 

•^V '.'INNEDY Fkiv.'i.tM- i^ J. V. .-r^i.F 

i: WILLARD A SMITH 

KDWIN WAI.KKR 

i ' r. 1 h ^ "> r. I » . 

WILLIA^f T ntfMT WW 



Jan., 1910. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



429 



CORPORATE MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEX F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON V. 
AYER, EDWARD E. 

BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSOX F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 
CURTIS. WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSW^ORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUNSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUNTHER, C. F. 

HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 



hutchinson, charles l. 

jones, arthur b. 

kennedy, vernon shaw 
kohlsaat, herman h. 

lathrop, bryan 

Mccormick, gyrus h. 
manierre, george 
miller, john s. 
mitchell, john j. 

patterson, robert w. 
payne, john barton 
peck, ferd. w. 
porter, george f. 
putnam, frederick w. 

ream, norman b. 
ryerson, martin a. 

skiff, frederick j. v. 
smith, byron l. 
smith, willard a. 
sprague, a. a. 
stone, melville e. 

walker, edwin 
walsh, johnir. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BUCHANAN, W. I. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS, CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON, HUNTINGTON W. 
LEITER, L. Z. 



McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALLER, R. A. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 



4 or Natural History — Reports. Vol. III. 



LIFE .MEMHHRS. 

KING. PR.WriS 

KING. J.\M 

KIRK. WALii.^ «..\i" uIPFE 



rr MR*? A n 



riMoTIIYB. 



.\l 

M 
M 

i:.\GH. FR.\NKLIN 
.MHVHELL. J J. 

vrtrrr i •, ;* 



ORR. ROBERT M 
\M J 

PI vr < 



[ARf.KS 


Pi 1 

p* H n 

PoKll.K. H H . J« 


\.\I .\ 


REAM. ^ 
REVELL. ALEX, li 

RT I) A 

R'. \PWTr H 


':i.\ JJ. 


R\ 


\ 


"OLD 




ii. nvRov I. 

SMITH. ' 


E. 


-1 .. IV.. I..-,  "''.E 


KATHERP ; 





THORN E. GEORGE R. 
TREE. LAMBERT 

•JZABETH W!' ' M. D 

\V: \). AI.ONZO J 

5< WOLFF. LUDWIG 



Jan., 1910. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



431 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADA:\rS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AMBERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BREMNER, DAVID F. 
BROWN, WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

CARPENTER, A. A. 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISENDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, EDWARD E. 

FAIR. R. M. 



FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 
FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM, E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 
HOUGHTELING, JAMES L. 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JEFFERY, THOMAS B. 
JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEPER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KELLEY, WILLIAM E. 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. AL\RK. 



H or Natural History — Rbpokts, Vol. III. 
!'• hi\(;tox 

LAY. A. T 

I I k:' • ■•'• K p. 

I . Ii K' Al'M. JOSKPH 

ROSENPELD. MAURICE 
I \y, R. R' \ GEORGE D 

1 P. C. Rl ^ - i.i.LS. J S. 

I FRWK O >' JIMIDT. DR O L 

LVmiN ni-NRY C. S. HMITT. ANTHONY 

>CHWARTZ. (; A 
^j-P^p.^ ,, SEARS. JOSEPH 

pp.. ,, SF.IPP. NfRS (• 

.;.."•'"' SELZ. MORRIS 

[ , ^^, SHEDD. JOHN G. 

MANSURE. E SKINNER. THE MISSES 

MAY. FRANK E. SMITH. F R 

. Y SNOW. MISS HELEN E. 



\ t \\l*l.» T X' \ • 



HER. GEORGE ^f.??/ J*^^*^^ ^ 

ER. MRS. M A SOVTHWELI.. H E. 



L. T 



J, SPENl E. MRS ELIZABETH E 

SPOOR. J. A. 
STOCKTON. JOHN T. 



V X G STUART. ROBERT 

^' ' DWARI) 

y ^ ,, TEMPLETON. THOMAS 

v. ! .HARLESH ^OBEY. FRANK B 

v.T.f.v 'M«,i,pn LIHLEIN. Finv\PTi r. 

. H 
\- o W ^VA(•KER. CHARLES H. 

LA Verne w walker, james r 

WALKER. WILLIAM B 
• THEnDORE WALLER. EPWARD ( 

\ A WARNER. EZRA J. 

"-n-'n.N. HENRY A WEBSTER. ' ' ' H 

WHITE. A. . I) 

•AL B WHITEHEAD. W M 

W W: MRS E (• 

H w: " H. 

" W« . LINPSAY T 

DECEASED. 
^'" ^»^E F M«1RRIS. MRS. >N 

'• *^ '>\LL. THMM.v- O. 
E. HENRY B 



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