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Full text of "Annual report of the Director to the Board of Trustees for the year ..."

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NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Materials! The Minimum Fee for 
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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



NOV 6 m 



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Publications 



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FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL 

HISTORY 



REPORT SERIES 



Volume IV 




Chicago, U. S. A. 

K)IO-IQI4 







THE LIBRARY Oh IHh 

DEO 2 2 1942 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



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LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

DUMA 

Field Museum of Natural History. 



Publication 150. 
Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 1 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1910. 



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Chicago, U. S. A. 

January, 1911. 



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Field Museum of Natural History. 

Publication 150. 

Report Series. Vol. IV, No. 1 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



FOR THE YEAR 1910. 



^f^i bw. 




Chicago, U. S. A. 
January, 191 1. 



THE LIBKAK* OF IHt 

DEC 2 21942 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 









CONTENTS. 



Page 

Board of Trustees 2 

Officers and Committees 3 

Maintenance 7 

Lecture Courses 7 

Publications 9 

Library 12 

Cataloguing, Inventorying, and Labeling 13 

Accessions 15 

Expeditions and Field Work 22 

Installation and Permanent Improvement 27 

Printing and Photography . 36 

Attendance 36 

Financial Statement 40 

Accessions 43 

Department of Anthropology 43 

Department of Botany 44 

Department of Geology 47 

Department of Zoology 49 

Section of Photography 53 

The Library 54 

Articles of Incorporation 88 

Amended By-Laws 90 

Honorary Members and Patrons 96 

List of Corporate Members 97 

List of Life Members 98 

List of Annual Members 99 









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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 



OFFICERS. 

Stanley Field, President. 

Martin A. Ryerson, First Vice-President. 
Watson F. Blair, Second Vice-President. 
Frederick J. V. Skiff, Secretary. 
Byron L. Smith, Treasurer. 

D. C. Davies, Auditor and Assistant Secretary. 



COMMITTEES. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Stanley Field. 
Edward E. Ayer. William J. Chalmers. 

Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Harlow N. Higinbotham. Martin A. Ryerson. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Watson F. Blair. Martin A. Ryerson. 

Arthur B. Jones. 

BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

William J. Chalmers. Richard T. Crane, Jr. 

Cyrus H. McCormick. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

George Manierre. Arthur B. Jones. 

George E. Adams. 

ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Edward E. Ayer. 
Watson F. Blair. George Manierre. 

Richard T. Crane, Jr. George F. Porter. 



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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

1910. 



To the Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: 

I have the honor to present a report of the operations of the Mu- 
seum for the year ending December 31, 19 10. 

Under the proper heading and subheading following, the affairs 
of the Museum are considered and commented upon in detail, from 
which will be drawn many gratifying evidences of the steady develop- 
ment of the Museum and of the increase of its usefulness as an agency 
for popular education and for the acquisition and dissemination of 
scientific knowledge. Its field of operation has been greatly extended 
during the past year, especially in the Department of Anthropology, 
although all of the Departments have shared in the general outward 
movement. The death of Mr. Edwin Walker, who had been a most 
serviceable member of the Board of Trustees since its organization, 
must be chronicled. At a meeting of the Board held October 10th 
the following was recorded: 

"The closing of the life of Edwin Walker, after a protracted and 
suffering illness, removes from this Board one of its oldest members, 
whose constant services, especially in matters involving legal ques- 
tions, have been of very great value to the Institution. 

"Upon the larger interests of Chicago, in which community he had 
lived and occupied a conspicuous station for many years, and to whose 
welfare he was patriotically devoted, the death of Mr. Walker entails 
the loss of another of those strong men to whose wise, forceful, purpose- 
ful character Chicago owes its great progress and high place as a 
municipality. We feel it a most grateful privilege to express our ad- 
miration for him as a fellow citizen and as a friend." 

During the year two members of the scientific staff have died: Mr. 
John Farwell Ferry, of the Division of Ornithology, and Mr. Charles 
S. Wake, cataloguer and bibliographer in the Department of Anthro- 
pology. Mr. Ferry was a young man of much promise and of great 
enthusiasm, and his associates and others in similar work keenly 
regret the close of the creditable career that undoubtedly awaited this 
young scientist. Mr. Wake was well advanced in years and a gentle- 
man of unusual culture. He performed services of much value to 
science, but of a character not calculated to attract public attention. 

5 



N mi km Histor> Ivi pob rs, Voi . [V. 

mention t h<- lamentable 
her, who h.ul been 

i iii preparing the 
the new Museum buildinj A 
crupu] 

high station in his 
ion, for tl 

hina and Tibel in the inter 
nd und< the fund 

is worthy ial mention in vi< 

rded the thro m- 

i< >unt of matt-rial, but, what 
the \hi eum in the first 
that have entered this difficult and 

• "• ' : ms will be 

:il that in the meantime, a number of 
the knowledge of Tibel and China refl 

tudy will be made by Dr. Laui 
•it appointment of A < )urator 

ff of the Museum. While 
mention should be made of the genen 
ph N. Field : ical inve 

•ids; the contribution of the Standard 

ad material for the reinstallation tro- 

m Mr. Stanley McCormick for 

i Indians. The memb 
individually mad. 
•he Institution during the year. 

n made in and about the 

[O. Tin' entire exterior of tin- structure 

ad subordinate foundations, 

rdai 
I ). II. Burnharj m- 

I around the building ' 

in t! alls from falling 

from ion. The 

ith for I departmental and 

buildii • oms 

•on halls have 1 and 

I important additions to the 

the Museum ha vnting 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 7 

of botanical and geological laboratories and work rooms in a building 
on Jefferson Avenue, a short distance from the Museum. This is a 
well lighted and a well ventilated suite of rooms in a new brick building, 
and is a very gratifying relief from the dark, cramped, and generally 
unfit quarters that were provided in the Museum building. In these 
new quarters the Department of Botany is now engaged with a most 
competent force in preparing artificial plants, flowers, and fruits for 
the exhibition series, a number of which have already been placed on 
view and elicit unusual appreciative comment on the part of both the 
public and students. The close of the year finds a number of important 
expeditions in the field. Dr. Lewis in British New Guinea; Mr. Cole 
in the Philippines, whence he will go to Borneo; Dr. Osgood and his 
assistant in Venezuela; Dr. Meek in the Panama Canal Zone; Dr. 
Millspaugh in the Bahamas, and Mr. Smith in Oregon. In addition 
to these, expeditions are contemplated for botanical investigations 
and collections in the Tropics of the Pacific and in the Far East; for 
collections and reproductions among the Hopi; for investigations of 
the Potawatomi Indians and of the Mound Builders, and for ornith- 
ological collecting and sketching on the Island of Laysan. From all 
of which it is apparent that as satisfactory as the results of the 
closing year have been in all Departments, the coming year is equally 
promising. 

Maintenance. — The budget approved by the Board of Trustees 
provided the sum of $178,320 for the expenses of the Museum for the 
year. The amount expended for maintenance was $145,330, leaving 
the satisfactory margin of $32,990. In addition to this amount $49,800 
was expended by special authority of the Board for collections, expe- 
ditions, and exhibition cases, which brought the total to $195,130. 
A further sum of $20,865 was subscribed by friends of the Museum for 
special expeditions, material, and new installations. 

Lecture courses. — Two courses were given as usual, in the Autumn 
and Spring, bringing the number of courses given by the Museum 
to thirty-three. The attendance at these lectures has been steadily 
good, and the increase in the attendance of students and teachers has 
been observed with much satisfaction. The ready co-operation of 
well-known scientific men and lecturers in this work is gratifying, and 
occasion is here taken to thank the different gentlemen who partici- 
pated in the courses. 

Following is the Thirty-second Free Illustrated Lecture Course, 
with the subjects and lecturers, delivered during the months of March 
and April, 1910: 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 9 

Nov. 12. — "Plants and People of Mexico." 

Prof. Charles J. Chamberlain, Department of Botany, 
University of Chicago. 
Nov. 19. — "Gold Mining in Alaska." 

Prof. Wallace W. Atwood, United States Geological 
Survey. 
Nov. 26. — "Material Basis for Perpetuity of the American People." 

Dr. W J McGee, Washington, D. C. 
Dec. 3. — 'The Indians of the Province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador." 
Dr. S. A. Barrett, Curator of Anthropology, Public 
Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Dec. 10. --"The Winning of the West or Home-making by the 
Government." 

Mr. C. J. Blanchard, Statistician, U. S. Reclamation 
Service. 

Publications. — During the year eleven publications were issued, 
most of the numbers being of the Zoological Series. The mailing list 
has been considerably extended in connection with the exchange system 
of literature with scientific and learned societies. 

Following is a list of the publications issued and a table showing 
their distribution during the year: 

Pub. 139. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 8. Description of two 
New Pulmonate Mollusks with a list of other species 
from the Solomon Islands, collected by Dr. George A. 
Dorsey. By William Healey Dall. 10 pp., 1 plate, 
edition 1,500. 

Pub. 140. — Report Series, Vol. Ill, No. 4. Annual Report of the 
Director to the Board of Trustees, for the year 1909. 
107 pp., 14 illustrations (half-tones), edition 2,500. 

Pub. 141. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 2. Diagnoses of New East 
African Mammals, including a New Genus of Muridas. 
By Wilfred H. Osgood. 10 pp., edition 1,500. 

Pub. 142. — Zoological Series, Vol. VII, No. 9. A Synoptic List of 
the Fishes known to occur within fifty miles of Chicago. 
By S. E. Meek and S. F. Hildebrand. 105 pp., 12 zinc 
etchings, 52 half-tones, edition 1,500. 

Pub. 143. — Zoological Series, Vol. X, No. 3. Further New Mam- 
mals from British East Africa. By Wilfred H. Osgood. 
8 pp., edition 1,500. 



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Jan., 1911. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



11 



New Zealand 6 

Norway 8 

Peru 2 

Portugal 6 

Roumania 1 

Russia 19 

Sicily 1 



Spain 5 

Sweden 14 

Uruguay 1 

West Indies 4 

Yucatan 1 



682 



The following table shows the number of foreign exchanges re- 
ceiving the different publications: 

Anthropological 248 

Botanical 359 

Geological 329 

Ornithological 219 

Zoological 299 

Report 682 



The publications are distributed to the different States and In- 
sular Possessions as follows: 



Alabama 

Arkansas . 

California . 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware . 

District of Columbia 

Florida .... 

Illinois .... 

Indiana 

Idaho .... 

Iowa .... 

Kansas .... 

Kentucky . 

Louisiana . 

Maine .... 

Maryland . 

Massachusetts 

Michigan . 

Minnesota . 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska . 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 



2 

1 

28 

12 

23 

2 
70 

2 
57 

1 

13 

7 

2 

3 

7 

9 

67 

13 

9 

3 

14 

2 

7 
2 

4 



New Jersey 16 

New York 84 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

New Mexico 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 



6 

1 
2 

17 
2 
1 



Pennsylvania 41 

Rhode Island 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Philippine Islands 

Porto Rico 

Hawaii 



5 
2 
2 

3 
2 

4 
3 
6 

4 

16 

2 

2 

1 
6 



601 



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W. J. Chalmers 

 



ILD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 



REPORTS, PLATE II. 




white Pine Monograph. 
North American Timber Series. 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 13 

Magyar Termeszettu-domanyi Tarsulat, Budapest, Hungary; Institut 
de Botanique de L'Universite, Geneve, Switzerland; India Archaeo- 
logical Survey, Calcutta; Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein fur Schles- 
wig-Holstein, Kiel; Royal Cornwall Polytechnic Society, Falmouth, 
England; Kungl. Vetenskaps Societeten, Upsala, Sweden. 

The list of accessions will also show gifts that are useful additions 
to the library. .The work of correcting duplicate call numbers and 
cataloguing accessions received in the early years of the library was 
continued during the year. There were sent to and returned from the 
Newberry Bindery 876 books, periodicals, and publications of learned 
societies. For the several card catalogues 19,662 cards were written 
and filed. Twelve installments of the John Crerar Library cards were 
received, but were only partly distributed owing to the crowded con- 
dition of the card cabinets. The two units or sections of the steel 
cabinet received in the beginning of the year have proven entirely 
satisfactory. A sufficient number of cards had accumulated, however, 
to more than fill these sections before, they were received. 

Departmental Cataloguing, Inventorying, and labeling. — The Curator of 
Anthropology reports 1,625 catalogue cafd^XX-ritten and recorded in the 
Department inventory, numbering 33 volun^^./Trlig^nost important 
collections catalogued have been those from the Banawi and Igorot 
tribes, secured by S. C. Simms on the 4th R. F. Cummings Philippine 
Expedition; the Ilongot collection (partially) from Northeastern Luzon, 
made by the late Dr. William Jones; and the Etrurian archaeology col- 
lected by Mr. E. E. Ayer. The classified tribal lists have been added 
to, and the card catalogue for the same has been kept up. The work 
of labeling has gone on at about the same pace as during 1909, 3,755 
standard black labels of various sizes were printed for the Department, 
of which 2,030 were for Northwest Coast Halls, 1,575 for tne East Court, 
85 for the Egyptian Hall, and 66 for California Hall. 

The cataloguing of the specimens received in the Department of 
Botany has been kept up to date. The entry books of the Department 
number 56, in these 297,810 specimens have so far been catalogued, 
29,589 of which were entered during the past year. The cataloguing 
of herbarium specimens progressed satisfactorily throughout the year. 
Besides organizing the current accessions the Wahlstedt herbarium, 
consisting of 17,555 specimens, has been completed; 2,025 sheets have 
been added from the Rothrock herbarium, and 5,250 from that of the 
University of Chicago. About 3,000 cards have been written and 
added to the indices of the Department and the index books of the 
collections kept up to date. 



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buildii 

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.! num 

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ue 

600 in ( >rnith- 

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Jan.. iqii. Annual Report of the Director. 15 

The year's work on catalogues and inventorying is shown in detail 
below. 



Department of Anthropology 
Department of Botany 
Department of Geology 
Department of Zoology 
The Library 
Section of Photography 



Xo. of Total No. of Entries Total No. 

Record Entries to during of Cards 

Books. Dec.31.1910. iqio. Written. 

33 114,280 1,272 114-653 

56 297,810 29,589 

20 112,495 9,414 6,763 

40 87,830 5,624 28,718 

13 80,037 8,000 109,962 

6 87,139 6,377 



accessions. — Most of the accessions acquired during the year by the 
Department of Anthropology were gifts. Through Mr. R. F. Cummings 
more than 4,000 ethnological specimens from Igorot and Ilongot tribes 
of Northern Luzon, the Negrito of Bataan and the Bukidnon and 
Bagobo of Mindanao, were added to the Philippine collections. Full 
notes, photographs, and measurements accompany the collections. Mr. 
Barbour Lathrop, of Chicago, presented a magnificent royal sarong col- 
lected by himself in Jokjokartar, Java. Mr. T. A. Hagerty donated a 
bronze figurine of the Goddess Isis; Mr. E. E. Aver, an Etruscan jar. 
A collection of spears, arrows, knives, etc., from Congo and the Soudan; 
Etruscan burial urns of terra cotta and alabaster, as well as vases of 
terra cotta, and gold and silver jewelry from Kabyle tribes of Algeria, 
Africa, was presented by Mr. Stanley Field, Mr. Edward E. Aver, Mr. 
Watson F. Blair, Mr. George Manierre, Mr. George F. Porter and 
Mr. Richard T. Crane, Jr. Through Mr. William J. Chalmers and 
Mr. Byron L. Smith, the Illinois archaeological material was increased 
by the W. R. Head Collection. Mr. Homer E. Sargent enriched the 
Salish collections by the addition of 75 specimens, collected by J. A. 
Teit. The gift comprises baskets, bags, matting, clothing, cradles, 
necklaces, robes, pipes, toys, spears, stone implements, shields, etc. 
From Dr. Seemeyer of the National Ethnological Museum, Budapest, 
was obtained, by exchange, a lot of photographs illustrating the 
physical types and home life of the different peoples of Hungary. Of 
the purchased accessions of special interest and great value in the 
study of Belgian archaeology is the collection of 725 objects purchased 
from Baron Alfred de Loe of Brussels. This collection represents 
material from flint quarries and workshops, casts of objects of the 
Bronze and Iron Ages, pottery of the Belgian-Roman Epoch, and a 
number of originals of the Frank Epoch. Twenty Navaho ceremonial 
masks were secured from J. L. Hubbell of Ganado, Arizona. Museum 
funds in the hands of Alfred R. Brown brought together a collection 



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Jan., 1911. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



17 



North America: 

United States (in general) . 

Alabama 

American Plains 

Arizona 

California .... 

Santa Catalina Island 

Colorado 

Connecticut . 
Dakota (in general) 
Dakota (North) . . 
Dakota (South) . 
Delaware .... 
District of Columbia 
Florida 

Florida Keys 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory- 
Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 
Louisiana .... 

Maine 

Maryland .... 
Massachusetts 
Michigan .... 
Minnesota .... 
Mississippi .... 
Missouri .... 

Montana .... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey .... 
New Mexico .... 
New York .... 
North Carolina . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma .... 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
South Carolina . 
Rhode Island 
Tennessee .... 
Rocky Mountains . 



Added to 

Herbarium 

in 1910. 


Total 

now in 

Herb'm. 


II 


II 


168 


961 


5 


93 


515 


7.149 


652 


17,421 


1 


24 


11 


6,765 


25 


306 


12 


32 


158 


182 


19 


103 


268 


1,098 


18 


1.833 


1-592 


17.579 


139 


638 


129 


4.321 


362 


1,284 


514 


16,601 


58i 


4,021 


106 


215 


4 


1,286 


29 


250 


6 


650 


46 


991 


42 


1,13s 


47 


780 


168 


2,220 


139 


2,220 


98 


687 


9 


1,869 


320 


97i 


205 


3.187 


245 


646 


102 


1,079 


49 


i.54i 


3 


2,269 


34 


4,806 


322 


1.449 


98 


1,460 


5 


166 


587 


5.50o 


88 


6,579 


72 


619 


2 


474 


221 


902 


4 


731 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 19 



Great Britain (in general) 

England 

Isle of Wight 

Ireland 

Scotland 

Hebrides Islands 

Arran Islands 

Wales 

Europe 

Austro-Hungary 

Belgium 

Crete Island 

Cyprus Island 

Denmark 

France 

German}' 

Greece 

Holland 

Italy 

Corsica 

Sardinia 

Sicily 

Norway 

Portugal 

Russia 

Finland 

Lapland 

Poland 

Roumania 

Spain 

Minorca Islands 

Spitzbergen 

Sweden 

Gotland Island 

Switzerland 

Asia 

Afghanistan 1 2 

Asia Minor 

Turkey 1 i?9 

Ceylon 2 8 

India n 738 

Java 1 24 

Johore 8 8 

Persia 1 13 

Africa (in general) 5 3.837 

Algeria 5 8 66 



Added to 

Herbarium 

in 1910. 


Total 

now in 

Herb'm. 




1,290 


1.387 


1.495 


3 


33 


9 


9 


364 


365 


1 


1 


1 


1 


28 


28 


944 


5.802 


113 


183 


5 


5 


1 


1 


371 


372 


2.072 


3.536 


1,478 


5.529 


21 


489 


1 


14 


700 


1,617 


46 


47 


50 


52 


24 


116 


904 


996 


4 


5 


24 


1.255 


1 1 


19 


95 


106 


6 


48 


4 


4 


197 


243 


10 


10 


5 


5 


8,502 


8,964 


195 


196 


721 


1.736 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 21 

occurrence hitherto lacking in the Museum collections. An important 
series of books was also obtained with the collection in number about 
three hundred. Especially important are works relating to fossil 
sponges of which a very complete collection was obtained. Other 
books obtanied with the collection were of special value in completing 
sets of Geological Surveys previously possessed only in part. Among 
other gifts of importance the following may be mentioned: A complete 
series of ores and specimens representing various stages of concentra- 
tion of the copper ores of Bingham Canyon, Utah, donated by the 
Utah Copper Company; a large amethystine twin crystal of calcite from 
Joplin, Missouri, presented by F. P. Graves; a section of the Shrews- 
bury meteorite presented by F. Justice Grugan; three slabs of West- 
field, Alassachusetts, verd antique of standard museum size presented 
by the Westfield Marble and Sandstone Company; fifteen specimens of 
sand-barite concretions presented by Prof. C. N. Gould; a series of gold 
and silver ores of the Porcupine and Cobalt districts of Canada, pre- 
sented by Thomas H. Rea; a large slab showing fossil brachiopods and 
worm tubes in relief, presented by A. G. Becker; five specimens of 
polished Smithsonite of gem quality from Mex ; e«rj4ir^sented by Charles 
H. Beers; and a large map of Colorado ^^i^t^rfey^T^.^A. Dohmen. 
By exchange with the British Museum represehirlfive sections of the 
Eli Elwah and Uwet meteorites were obtained, and by exchange with 
the University of Bristol, Bristol, England, 121 specimens represent- 
ing 63 species of Paleozoic invertebrate fossils from various localities 
in Great Britain. From Rev. P. E. Nordgren 56 specimens of inver- 
tebrate fossils representing 15 species of Carboniferous and Devonian 
age from localities in Pennsylvania and New York, were also received 
by exchange; from A. G. Becker, 82 specimens representing 15 species of 
Devonian invertebrates; from H. G. Shelby, 12 specimens representing 

3 species of Iowa crinoids; and from Julius Bohm a fine specimen of the 
hydrous beryllium borate hambergite from Madagascar, all by exchange. 
The most important purchase was that of the entire mass of the 
Ahumada, Mexico, meteorite. This is a pallasite weighing 116 pounds 
and is the only meteorite of this group which has as yet been found in 
Mexico. An exceptionally fine skull of the Tertiary carnivore Hyaeno- 
don, two specimens of gold of unusual beauty and two relief maps, one 
of the Malaspina Glacier region, Alaska, and one of the State of Illinois, 
were also purchased. The Malaspina Glacier map is about 7 feet by 

4 feet 6 inches in dimensions and has the vertical and horizontal scales 
the same. It shows a portion of the lofty St. Elias range with innumer- 
able glaciers extending down the valley to the ocean and bays. Of these 



IV. 

 
 

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es 

'. 

Is. A 
1 . P. 

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In the I I 

Dr. < Hill- 

 
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■),OOC ' 



Jan., 1911. Annual Report of the Director. 23 

among the Bukidnon of North Central Mindanao. A collection of more 
than 700 pieces, with photographs, was made from that rapidly chang- 
ing people. Minor collections were secured from neighboring Mandaya 
and Manobo tribes. A representative collection and many photo- 
graphs were obtained from among the Negrito and Bataan. Among 
the Bagobo, dwelling in four districts around Davao Bay, Southern 
Mindanao, a collection of 600 pieces fully illustrating their life was 
made ; in addition 1 2 dozen photographs were taken and measurements 
made of 50 individuals. Collections are now being made among the 
Moro of the great Cotabato Valley. Dr. A. B. Lewis proceeded from 
Huon Gulf, German New Guinea, to Humboldt Bay in August 1909, 
and thence along the coast to Angriffs Hafen, visiting the coast villages 
as well as some toward the interior. Using Eitape, Berlin Hafen, as 
a base, for a couple of months, the neighboring villages were visited, 
resulting in a collection of 600 specimens with about 80 photographs. 
Going then to Alii Island, Seleo, Angel and Tumleo Islands were 
studied, their inhabitants being pre-eminently manufacturing and 
trading peoples. From Eitape a trip was made along the coast west- 
ward as far as Aissano, which yielded interesting collections and 
photographs. From Herbertshohe, Dr. Lewis went with the govern- 
ment expedition to the south coast of New Britain, visiting en route 
many north coast villages of that island. Landing at Cape Merkus 
(Arawe) two months were spent in visiting native villages along the 
coast, for forty miles in each direction. Returning to Huon Gulf, a 
stop of two weeks was made at Bukaua and neighboring villages. 
Then, via Finsch Hafen, Sattelberg, at an altitude of 3,000 feet, 
among the mountains was visited. Here are Papuan peoples quite dis- 
tinct from the Melanesians of the coast. Photographs were made and 
a small collection secured from the Hube, a cannibal tribe living about 
100 miles inland. From Friedrich Wilhelms Hafen short excursions 
were made on Siar and Rageta Islands. In May, Potsdam Hafen was 
reached. Native villages and Vulkan Island were visited, after which 
headquarters were established on Hansa Bay near A war and other 
native towns, forming a group of the highest type of culture to be found 
on the coast of German New Guinea. A month was spent in coast 
villages east and west of Potsdam Hafen. After some time spent in 
various native villages, both on the coast and inland, on August 9th, 
the Kaiserin Augusta River was entered on the steamer Siar. Only 
a portion of the eight days spent on the river was given to collecting. 
A study, however, was made of the culture along its banks. After many 
delays, due to various causes, Herbertshohe was reached near the end 



Hi IV. 

11 

- 



iininc* 






Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 25 

dikes in granite was also collected, one of the slabs being 26 by 14 inches 
in dimensions with a dike three inches in width traversing it. The 
Assistant Curator of Paleontology and part}- spent about three months 
in northeastern Utah collecting Eocene mammals. Search for spec- 
imens was first made in clay strata near Vernal which had yielded some 
good material earlier to collectors, but no satisfactory returns were 
obtained by the Museum party. In the adjoining sandstone ledges, 
however, good showings began to be discovered and these were worked 
with excellent success during the remainder of the stay. Moreover the 
fauna proved to be different from that which had been obtained in the 
clays. The horizons worked ranged from the lowest to the upper 
measures of the Uintah formation in a portion of the so-called "Uintah 
desert," lying in the basin of the "White River. Most of the fossils 
were found at levels of from 700 to 800 feet above the river. Owing 
to the arid conditions work was difficult and slow, since much time 
had to be consumed in hauling horse-feed and other supplies distances 
of thirty and more miles, and some of the work had to be done from a 
drv camp. Furthermore, owing to the thickness and toughness of some 
of the ledges, considerable drilling and blasting were necessary in order 
to secure specimens. Representative specimens of at least ten Eocene 
vertebrate genera were obtained, belonging mostly to the amblypods 
and titanotheres. Of the amblypods the best specimen obtained was a 
skull nearly three feet in length of the six-horned Eobasileus. This 
skull will make a striking exhibition specimen. Another form of 
which a good representation was obtained was Dolichorhinus. This 
animal seems to have been an aberrant branch of the titanotheres and 
is known only from the Eocene. Its skull is of peculiar and striking form, 
being shaped somewhat like that of the horse but with a cranium nearly 
as long as the face. Xo considerable part of the skeleton of the animal 
has ever been found before, but from the material collected by the 
Museum party it is probable that two practically complete skeletons 
will be secured. Another interesting find was that of a fine crocodile 
skull about two feet long and a lower jaw of a creodont (early carnivore) 
about sixteen inches long, indicating an animal larger than a polar bear. 
A preliminary list of the material obtained is as follows: Uintatherium. 
two skulls, one pelvis; Eobasileus, one skull; Dolichorhinus, two skele- 
tons, six skulls, three lower jaws; Tclmatherium, seven skulls, five 
lower jaws; Palaeosyops, two skulls, two lower jaws; Mesonyx, incom- 
plete skull and jaws; Crocodilus, one large skull; Tillotherium, incom- 
plete skull; unidentified creodont, one lower jaw; unidentified artio- 
dactyls, two incomplete skulls; testudo, three carapaces and plastrons. 






R i i l. IV 



 

 

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V H. 
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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 27 

this country is thus very greatly increased. The complete report on 
the collection has not yet been published, but two preliminary papers 
have appeared describing one genus and twenty-eight species and 
subspecies of mammals new to science which are contained in the col- 
lection. Several short expeditions for local field work were undertaken 
with successful results. Mr. Osgood spent two weeks in August in 
northern Wisconsin and a few days in northwestern Illinois collecting 
small mammals. 11 1 specimens were secured. Later, in November, 
through the kindness of Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, Mr. Osgood spent 
two days at White Deer Lake, near Champion, Michigan, making 
photographs and preliminary arrangements for securing material for 
a group of beavers. Mr. C. A. Corwin, artist, and Mr. Julius Friesser, 
taxidermist, spent ten days in July at East Tawas, Michigan, securing 
material for preparing bird groups. Mr. Corwin later spent several 
days at Dowagiac, Michigan, and a week in the vicinity of Yule, North 
Dakota, making sketches and color notes for use in background work. 
In October, L. L. Pray, taxidermist, spent two weeks at Dowagiac, 
Michigan, securing material for the preparation of groups of small 
mammals. The services of Mr. Henry F. Raven, of Venezuela, were 
secured for six months' work in Costa Rica and Venezuela as collector 
of mammals and birds. 

Following is a list of the expeditions since the date of the last 
report : 

Locality. Collector. Material. 

Northern Georgia . . .H.H.Smith, Timbers. 

Utah E. S. Riggs, Vertebrate fossils. 

German New Guinea . .A.B.Lewis, Ethnological. 

Costa Rica and Venezuela . H. F. Raven, Birds and mammals. 

Iowa A. W. Slocom, Invertebrate fossils. 

Maine O. C. Farrington, Minerals. 

Illinois, Wisconsin and Mich- 
igan W. H. Osgood, Mammals, birds, and group ma- 
terial. 

Philippine Islands . . .F.C.Cole, Ethnological. 

Ohio C. L. Owen, Preliminary investigation. 

Northwestern University, 
Milwaukee, Racine, Bea- 
ver Dam C. B. Cory Examining and comparing speci- 

or assistant, mens in local museums. 

China and Tibet . . . . B. Laufer, Ethnological. 

Texas R. A. Dixon, Herbarium specimens. 

INSTALLATION, REARRANGEMENT, AND PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. TWO CaSCS of 

Batak and three of Apayao material, secured by F. C. Cole in Northern 
Luzon, have been installed in Hall 57, now temporarily filled with 



i \ I 1 1 K i Vol. IV. 

Hall 

  

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Enlarged Flower Cluster of the Grape-fruit. 




Illustrating the floral characters of the family Aurantiaceae. 



- 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 29 

as one of their typical springs at which offerings are deposited. In 
addition, manuscript will be prepared for publication, labels, etc. 
For this purpose, the services of H. R. Yoth has already been secured, 
and he is now at work upon his notes, drawings, photographs, etc., as 
well as engaged in shaping the various figures needed for the altar 
work. 

In the Department of Botany material for general economic collec- 
tions having been exhausted by the large installations accomplished last 
year, there remained no complete case display to accomplish this year. 
The work upon the installation has, therefore, been that of finish rather 
than that of enlargement. Specimens in 84 cases, installed previous to 
1909, have been readjusted to render their appearance uniform with 
the newer and more satisfactory installations. This required the intro- 
duction of some modern mounts and labels and repainting with the later 
and "natter" background and mount color. Further material has been 
added to 7 cases; 3 cases have been completely reinstalled; and 2 
cases installed with new material. Despite many setbacks, caused by 
delay of the owner of the modeling shop in putting the same in proper 
condition for occupancy, satisfactory results have b^en obtained. A 
glass blower and a helper were regularly ad^^Lrioi-th^-.. staff. The 
following reproductions and models have been execuffeed^and placed on 
exhibition: A life size reproduction of a complete Sweet Potato plant 
showing the tubers; enlarged sectional flowers of the Akee, the Man- 
grove, the Pomegranate, the Sea Grape, the Sour Sop, the Grape Fruit; 
the male and female flowers of the Papaw (Carica) and the male flower 
of the White Birch; a full flowering rachis of the Papaw (Carica) and 
enlarged portions of the male and female catkins of the White Birch; 
a branch with leaves and fruits of the Paw T paw (Asimina), ripe and 
sectional fruits of the same; a large sectioned fruit of the Papaw (Carica) 
and a series of five reproductions illustrating the development of the 
fruits of the Mangrove. In addition to these, complete reproductions 
of large branches of Akee, Sea Grape, Pomegranate, Sour Sop, Grape 
Fruit, and Mangrove; a complete summit of a Pawpaw tree and com- 
plete plants of Aloe and Anthurium are ready for assemblage and 
finishing and the elements of all the various studies made by Dr. Dahl- 
gren last year in Jamaica are ready for reproduction. The glass blower 
has reproduced a large number of complete pieces, such as several 
natural sized spikes of the minute flowers of the Sea Grape and the Akee, 
complete clusters of Grape Fruit; Papaw flowers, flowers of the Man- 
grove, Aloe, and Pomegranate; and many hundreds of piece parts of 
plants (for instance, to show the necessities of this work, 1,200 fruits 



IV. 

 



' 






I 

- 

 

- 
In 

 
spec- I 



Tax., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 31 

imens have been placed on exhibition. The large map in this Hall, show- 
ing places of meteorite falls in the United States, has also been brought 
up to date by the addition of all recent falls. New specimens have 
here and there been added, with some rearrangement, in Halls 63 and 
64. In Hall 65 the collection of sand-barite concretions received from 
Prof. Gould has been added to the concretional series and the series 
is now as a whole perhaps the largest and most complete to be seen in 
any museum. Some small fulgurites have also been mounted and added 
to the collection of fulgurites in this Hall and some large cave spec- 
imens not previously exhibited have been placed on exhibition. In 
Hall 66 a considerable rearrangement of the specimens in the wall cases 
has been made in order to permit the introduction of new material, the 
most important of which is the series of trap dikes in granite obtained 
bv the Curator in Maine. Additional marble slabs received during 
the year have been installed in Hall 67, and a number of new labels, 
some of them descriptive, placed with the corresponding specimens. 
Each important series of marble in this Hall is now provided with a 
fully descriptive group label. From Hall 69 the entire series of speci- 
mens was removed, the cases and specimens cleaned, and the specimens 
reinstalled. This work will continue to be necessary at intervals in 
this Hall until dust-proof cases are provided. In Hall 70 the metal trays 
containing specimens in the form of powders or lumps have been removed, 
painted to a color uniform with the interior of the cases, and reinstalled. 
The appearance of the collection as a whole has thus been improved. 
Labels have also been installed with the collection throughout, the 
standard label holder being used. Hall 71, devoted to petroleum and 
its products, has been entirely dismantled preparatory to a complete 
recasing of the collection. Funds for this purpose have been generously 
provided by the Standard Oil Company and the construction of the 
cases is under way. Before reinstallation a complete renovation of the 
Hall will be made. The principal addition to the installation in Hal 
72 has been that of a working model of a twenty-stamp gold mill, which 
was constructed in the Department after designs made by the Assistant 
Curator. The model is four feet six inches long, three feet six inches 
high, and eight inches deep. It is placed in a wall case on the west 
wall of the Hall. It represents a section of a gold mill with the house 
in skeleton. Running from a mine not represented is an elevated tram- 
way upon which an ore car is shown. At the end of the tramway is a 
grizzly or screen with its pile of ore, followed by a crusher of the Blake 
type modeled in wood, and an ore bin of standard type. This bin is 
provided with a glass front which permits a view of the crushed ore 



k u II Rei Vol. IV. 

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Jan., iqii. Annual Report of the Director. 33 

all the sash screws and in place of screws of ordinary type the sash were 
all fitted with bronzed screws with an interrupted slot of the standard 
Museum pattern. Both the appearance and safety of the cases have 
been much improved by this change. In the same Hall considerable 
rearrangement of the collections has also been made in order to permit 
the introduction of new material. This material consisted chiefly of 
series of the rare earths which are coming into increased notice and for 
which inquiries are often made by visitors. In order to secure the 
space needed, considerable selection was made among the iron ores, 
especially those of Lake Superior, so that those of essentially similar 
appearance might be represented by the smallest possible number of 
specimens. It was thus found possible to reduce the space which this 
collection occupied without lessening the educational value of the 
series. In the readjustment selection was also made so that the series 
illustrating the lesser metals, such as mercury, tin, aluminum, nickel, 
cobalt, etc., should indicate as nearly as possible by their extent the 
relative importance of these metals. Thus the symmetry of the collec- 
tions has been much improved and space gained for addition of new 
material. These changes have, however, been restricted to specimens 
in the wall cases along the south and southeast walls. In one of the floor 
cases the group of specimens presented by the Utah Copper Company 
has been installed, space having been secured by the withdrawal of some 
of the specimens of Lake Superior copper. The new material consists 
of ^wo large specimens illustrating oxidized and sulphide ore and a 
series of crushed specimens representing the several stages by which a 
rich concentrate is obtained from the original low-grade material A 
large specimen of martite from Utah has been installed in a floor 
case, supplementing other large specimens of iron ores. Supplementing 
this exhibit a series of models illustrating the modern blast furnace and 
its evolution is in preparation for exhibition in this Hall. The discon- 
tinuance of chemical work in the Museum building having been deemed 
advisable, the portion of Hall 75 previously used as a chemical lab- 
oratory has been dismantled and the hood, desks, and apparatus pre- 
viously in use there have been removed to a building on Jefferson 
Avenue where partial accommodations have been secured. In the ab- 
sence of sufficient accommodations the Executive Council of Armour 
j Institute very generously placed the facilities of the chemical lab- 
l oratories of that institution at the disposal of the Department and an 
appreciated use has from time to time been made of these facilities. In 
j the paleontological laboratory the following vertebrate material has 
been prepared during the year: One skull of Brontothcrium ramosum 



k> iv. 









i 

irk will 

ii 

N rth 

 

•nn 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 35 

and the richly tinted foliage combines well with the black and bronze 
of the birds. (4) The Water Birds of Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, includ- 
ing 37 birds of various species, as the Canada Goose, Pintail Duck, 
Blue-winged Teal, Scaup Duck, Widgeon, Gulls, Terns, and Shore 
birds. About 100 birds for the serial North American and Illinois 
collections have been mounted and placed on exhibition. Room 22, 
which contains the exhibition collection of fishes has been improved 
by several changes and additions of new groups. Four cases not well 
suited for the exhibition of fishes have been transferred to the Hall 
devoted to Osteology. Two new cases have been added, containing 
15 groups of mounted fishes. Screens have been made for two other 
cases and these are ready to be put in place and installed as soon as 
the material now in course of preparation is finished. During the first 
half of the year attention was devoted to experimenting to devise the 
best method for preparing groups of fishes for exhibition, with most 
satisfactory results. Unfortunately work on several groups of fishes 
was temporarily discontinued last July, due to the illness of the fish 
taxidermist, Mr. Heim, who was obliged to seek a different climate, 
but who is now doing work for the Museum in Arizona and it is hoped 
he will be able to return to Chicago in the near future. Of the several 
groups placed on exhibition the largest and in many ways the most 
exceptional is that of the Tiger Shark with her brood of 44 young. 
This animal is viviparous and the adult was captured at a time when 
the young were about to be born. The group is probably unique. Dur- 
ing the past year the inventory of the great Strecker collection was com- 
pleted and considerable time was devoted to work on local insects, 
such as pinning, labeling, and distributing specimens already in the 
collection and others secured from time to time by the Assistant Curator 
and his assistant. 2,800 insects have been pinned and labeled. A large 
number have been determined and placed in the study collection. 
During the year the work in the Division of Osteology was continued 
as usual with satisfactory results. Through the courtesy of Mr. William 
Warwick, Superintendent of the Standard Oil Company plant at Whit- 
ing, Indiana, the facilities for work there were continued, and 38 skel- 
etons and skulls were degreased during the summer. The Assistant 
Curator made some experiments in working out a satisfactory method 
of exhibiting specimens without shelves, and a paper was written and 
read before the meeting of the American Association of Museums at 
Buffalo, New York, May 31, 1910, on this subject. Mr. Gueret also 
completed the labeling of specimens and card index of Osteological 
material to date. 









\i HisTom >r i^. \"«-i IV. 



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60 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 

Schools and Location. 
Wendell Phillips High — Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 
Bismarck — Armitage and North Central Park Avenues 

Saunders — Blue Island, Illinois 

Seymour — Blue Island, Illinois 

Harvey — Harvey, Illinois 

Frances E. Willard — Forty-ninth Street and St. Lawrence Avenue 

Wentworth — Seventieth and Sangamon Streets 

Prescott — Wrightwood Avenue, corner North Ashland Avenue 
Vaclava St. Wenceslaus — DeKoven Street, near Jefferson Street . 
Seward — Forty-sixth Street and Hermitage Avenue .... 
Gallistel — Ewing Avenue, near One Hundred and Fourth Street . 
Madison Avenue — Seventy-fifth Street and Madison Avenue . 
Scanlon — One Hundred and Seventeenth Street and Perry Avenue 
Motley — North Ada Street, near West Chicago Avenue . . . 

Sherman — Fifty-first Place and Morgan Street 

Pullman — Pullman Avenue and One Hundred and Thirteenth 

Street 

Burke — Fifty-second Street and Prairie Avenue 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Agassiz — Diversey Boulevard and Seminary Avenue .... 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois 

University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois 

Garfield —  Fourteenth Place and Johnson Street 

St. Benedict — Irving Park Boulevard and Leavitt Street . 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Immaculate Conception — Thirty-first Street and Bonfield Avenue 

Bryant — Riverside, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Visitation — Garfield Boulevard and Peoria Street 

Thorp Vacation — Eighty-ninth Street and Superior Avenue . 
Graham Vacation — Forty-fifth Street and Union Avenue . . . 
University of Chicago —  Chicago, Illinois . 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Nativity — Thirty-seventh Street and Union Avenue 

Jenner Vacation — Oak Street and Milton Avenue 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 
University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 

Normal Practice — Stewart Avenue and Sixty-eighth Street 

Francis W. Parker — 330 Webster Avenue 

University Elementary — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue 
Normal Practice — Stewart Avenue and Sixty-eighth Street . 

Thornton Township High — Harvey, Illinois 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue 



37 



Teachers. ! 


3 upils. 


2 


55 


2 


72 


6 


60 


4 


115 


1 


40 


1 


40 


1 


38 


2 


60 


2 


30 


1 


24 


I 


25 


2 


74 


5 


74 


1 


35 


1 


42 


2 


94 


2 


65 




40 


1 


28 


3 


55 




45 


1 


25 


4 


59 




24 


2 


32 




20 




21 




22 




26 




3i 


2 


33 


1 


25 


10 


312 




29 




24 


4 


25 


1 1 


97 


2 


32 


2 


36 


I 


33 




24 


2 


37 


4 


22 


1 


22 


3 


38 


2 


69 


1 


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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 39 

Schools and Location. Teachers. Pupils. 

Marks Nathan Jewish Orphan — 1243 North Wood Street ... 1 51 

Parkside — Seventieth Street and Seipp Avenue 2 26 

Moody Bible Institute — 80 Institute Place 20 

Lake High — Union Avenue and West Forty-seventh Street . . 1 42 

May — South Fiftieth Avenue, corner West Harrison Street . 1 20 

Jewish Training —  554 West Twelfth Place 5 60 

Gresham — Eighty-fifth and Green Streets 2 35 

Washington — Morgan and Erie Streets 4 44 

Bryant — Forty-first Court near Fourteenth Street 1 20 

Joseph Medill — Fourteenth Place near Throop Street .... 1 39 

Marquette — Harrison and Wood Streets 2 21 

Normal Practice — Stewart Avenue and Sixty-eighth Street . . 3 49 

University Elementary — - Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . 2 32 

Baptist Mission Training — 2969 Vernon Avenue 20 

Hyde Park High — Fifty-seventh Street and Kimbark Avenue . 1 46 

Kenwood — Lake Avenue and Fiftieth Street 2 46 

Northern Illinois Teachers Association 379 

Wendell Phillips High —  Thirty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue . 1 24 

Forest Park — Forest Park, Illinois 1 55 

St. James — Twenty-ninth Street and Wabash Avenue .... 2 27 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois ?■■   2 5 

Kosminsky — Fifty-fourth Street and Ingleside Avenu#^fi«^ .k*"*- 1 '*' ! 39 

James Wadsworth — Sixty-fourth Street and Lexington Avenue' **?>">..- .__ 127 

Farragut — Spaulding Avenue and Twenty- third Street . . .*"V 1 35 

Anderson — Lincoln and Division Street 1 53 

University of Chicago — Chicago, Illinois 1 27 

School of Education — Fifty-ninth Street and Monroe Avenue . . 1 29 

Herewith are also submitted financial statements, list of acces- 
sions, names of members, etc. Frederick J. V. Skiff, 

Director. 



k \ i 1 1 R i Vol. IV. 



FlNAM i\i Si \li WENT. 



( iENI I' \i VCCOUN1 
i EIPTS \M' DIS ITS 

. 1. 1910, to I I, 191 






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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 



41 



Disbursements 

Salaries 

Guard Service 

Janitor Service 

Fire Protection 

Heat and Light — 

Wages $ 3,449.82 

Fuel 6,452.35 

Supplies, Gas, etc 1, 335.67 

Repairs and Alterations —  

Wages of Carpenters, Painters, Roofers, etc. . . 10,800.06 

Material used, paints, oils, glass, lumber, plaster, 

etc 1,411.07 

Special Exterior Repairs 6,076.75 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Cases and Bases 12,638.90 

Building Fixtures * .. . . 2,967.10 

Office Furniture, etc 323.01 

The Library —  

Books and Periodicals 2,196.83 

Binding 7»5-35 

Sundries 5 r -97 

Sections of Printing and Photography 

Collections, etc., Purchased 

Departmental Expenses 

Expeditions 

Publications 

General Expense Account — 

Freight, Expressage and Teaming 7»° 2 7-33 

Stationery, Postage, Telephone, etc 1,136.17 

Northern Trust Company, Custodian Fee . . 338.66 

Lecture Course Expenses 975-95 

Insurance 245.74 

Sundries 1,098.38 

Stanley Field Ornithology Fund 

Field-Sprague Ornithology Fund 

R. F. Cummings' Philippine Fund 

Joseph N. Field South Pacific Islands Fund .... 

Mrs. Timothy B. Blackstone Fund 

Homer E. Sargent Fund 

Guide Account, Ninth Edition 

In Treasurer's hands December 31, 19 10 30,724.58 

Byron L. Smith, Treasurer, Endowment Sinking Fund . 500.00 

Petty Cash on hand December 31,1910 739-95 

New Building, Moving and Furnishing Fund Investment 20,000.00 

General Fund Investment Account 36,000.00 



$81,514.98 

13,22340 

7,612.15 

3-350-04 



11,237.84 



18,287.88 



15,929.01 



2,954-15 

955-46 

I5.I93-87 

5.950.40 

5,107.92 

2,237.05 



10,822.23 

853-65 

1.279-34 

3,108.80 

5,600.00 

10,000.00 

2515 
766.52 

$216,009.84 



87.964-53 



$303,974.37 



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ITTENDANCI Wl> RECEIPTS I I" >M i Wl MO 1 rO 

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- 

$i - 
II.885 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 43 



Accessions. 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 

(ACCESSION'S ARE BY GIFT UNLESS OTHERWISE DESIGNATED ) 

AYER, E. E., Chicago. 

Etruscan jar. 
BLACKSTOXE, MRS. T. B., Chicago. 

Ethnological material — China, India and Tibet (collected by Berthold 
Lauf er) . 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., SMITH, BYRON L., Chicago. 

Archaeological material — Illinois. 
CUMMINGS, R. F., Philippine Expedition 

General ethnological collection — Xorth Central Mindanao (Collected by 
F. C. Cole). 

Ifugao bench — Luzon, Philippine Islands (Collected by Geo. A. Dorsey). 

General ethnological collection — Luzon (Collected by William Jones). 

General ethnological collection — Luzon (Collected by S. C. Simms). 

9 Ifugao skulls — Luzon (Collected by S. C. Simms). 

1 Ilongot skull — Luzon (Collected by S. C. Simms). 
EGYPTIAN EXPLORATION FUND. 

Fragment of small lapis lazuli hawk — Abydos, Egypt. 
FIELD, JOSEPH N., Manchester, England. South Pacific Islands' Fund. 

General ethnological collection — German New Guinea (Collected by 
A. B. Lewis). 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collected by Alfred R. Brown: 

General ethnological collection —  Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 
Purchases : 

Collection of spears, arrows, knives from Congo and Soudan 

Alabaster and pottery mortuary jars, etc. — Northern Africa. 

Collection of Algerian jewelry. 

Collection of Belgian archaeology. 

20 masks of buckskin worn in " Ya vi chy" dance of the Navaho Indians. 

Steatite jar — Little Warm Spring Creek, Wyoming. 
HAGERTY, T. A., Chicago. 

Ancient Egyptian bronze figurine of Goddess Isis. 
LATHROP, BARBOUR, Chicago. 

Royal sarong — Jokjokerta, Java. 
NIGHSWOXGER, JAS., Harrisburg, Banner County, Nebraska. 

Pottery bowl — Banner County, Xebraska. 



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Jan., 1911. Annual Report of the Director. 45 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Collated by J. M. Greenman: 

1 photograph of Castilleja Covilleana Henderson. 

2 illustrations of plants. 

88 herbarium specimens — Yucatan and Mexico. 
Collated by C. F. Millspaugh: 

1 Polyporus lucidus (Fungus). 
47 economic specimens. 

2 herbarium specimens — Bahamas. 
Collected by R. A. Dixon: 

143 herbarium specimens —  Texas. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

43 herbarium specimens — Georgia. 

10 dry fruits — Georgia. 

1 fruit in formalin — Georgia. 

403 economic specimens — Georgia. 

56 economic specimens — Oregon. 
Purchases : 

703 herbarium specimens — California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, 
Utah and Wyoming. 

323 herbarium specimens — Arizona. 

222 herbarium specimens — Tobago and Trinidad. 

187 herbarium specimens ^— Oregon. 

96 herbarium specimens — United States. 

384 herbarium specimens — Philippine Islands. 

501 herbarium specimens — United States and Canada. 

526 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

1500 herbarium specimens —  Bahamas and Cuba. 
Modeled by B. E. Dahlgren: 

1 sweet potato vine and flowers. 

13 models of plants — Jamaica and Indiana. 
5 models of plants —  Jamaica and Indiana. 
4 models of plants — Jamaica and Illinois. 

3 models of flowers — Jamaica. 
Modeled by H. O. Mueller: 

2 models Carica Papaya and Thcobroma Cacao. 
FULLER, GEORGE D., Chicago. 

17 herbarium specimens — Alberta, Canada. 
FURNESS, DWIGHT R. 

13 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 

24 herbarium specimens — Vancouver Island and Yukon. 
GRAY HERBARIUM, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 
GREENMAN, J. M., Chicago. 

4 herbarium specimens (Cultivated). 
1 herbarium specimen — Mexico. 

GRUBB, MRS. R W., Darien, Georgia. 

1 Sesamum indicum, "Benny candy" — Georgia. 
1 Sesamum indicum "Benny seed" — Georgia. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 47 

ROSENDAHL, C. O., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

22 herbarium specimens — Alberta, British Columbia and Vancouver 
Island. 
SHULL, CHARLES A., Lexington, Kentucky. 

1 herbarium specimen — Kentucky. 
SMITH, H. H., Chicago. 

2 herbarium specimens — - Illinois. 
TOWER, W. L., Chicago, Illinois. 

19 herbarium specimens — Mexico. 

6 herbarium specimens — University of Chicago Greenhouse. 

8 herbarium specimens —  University of Chicago Greenhouse. 
TOWNE, MRS. H. A., Harvard, Illinois. 

107 herbarium specimens — Washington. 
TRELEASE, WM, St. Louis, Missouri. 

1 herbarium specimen —  Texas. 

2 herbarium specimens — - Mexico. 

UNITED STATES NATIONAL MUSEUM, Washington, D. C. 

21 plates Algae (exchange). 

12 plates phanerogams (exchange). 

520 herbarium specimens — Idaho, Oregon and Washington (exchange). 

364 herbarium specimens — United States, Canada, Europe and Aus- 
tralia (exchange). 
WOLCOTT, A. B., Chicago. 

20 herbarium specimens — Illinois. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 
(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

BECKER, G. A., Clermont, Iowa. 

1 slab of brachiopods and worm tubes — Patterson's Springs, Iowa. 

15 specimens invertebrate fossils — Clermont, Iowa (exchange). 
BEERS, CHARLES H., Eustis, Florida. 

5 specimens gem smithsonite — San Pedro, Chihuahua, Mexico. 
BLACK, H. M., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

1 specimen ozocerite in matrix — Kyune, Utah. 
BOHM, JULIUS, Vienna, Austria. 

1 specimen hambergite — Madagascar (exchange). 
BRITISH MUSEUM, London, England. 

2 specimens meteorites — Africa and Australia (exchange). 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J., AND SMITH, BYRON L., Chicago. 

3,500 specimens fossil sponges — Tennessee. 

1,500 specimens invertebrate fossils — Bridegport, Chicago area. 

3,000 specimens invertebrate fossils — Mississippi Valley. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 

5 pounds Bulli soil — Bulli, New South Wales. 
DOHMEN, U. A., Chicago. 

1 map of Colorado. 
DURANT, H. L., Prairie City, Oregon. 

1 specimen gold ore — Dixie Gulch, Prairie City, Oregon. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 49 

NORDGREN, P. E., Kenosha, Wisconsin. 

15 specimens invertebrate fossils — Pennsylvania (exchange). 
RE A, THOS. H., Chicago. 

10 specimens gold and silver ores — Cobalt and Porcupine, Ontario. 
RHONE, HENRY R., Grand Junction, Colorado. 

1 specimen elaterite — Fort Duchesne, Utah County, Utah. 
SHELBY, H. G., Burlington, Iowa. 

12 specimens crinoids — Burlington, Iowa (exchange). 
SLOCOM, MARTHA M., Chicago. 

634 specimens invertebrate fossils — Bay View, Michigan. 
THURSTON, DR. F. A., Chicago. 

1 specimen cyanite — Shawanaga, Ontario. 
UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL, Bristol, England. 

63 specimens invertebrate fossils — England (exchange). 
UTAH COPPER COMPANY, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

2 large specimens copper ore, 20 specimens concentrates — Bingham 

Canyon, Utah. 
WELLINGTON, J. L., Chicago. 

1 specimen diatomaceous earth —  Boise, Idaho. 
WESTFIELD MARBLE & SANDSTONE COMPAfcjypWestfield, 

Massachusetts. ^ t •.'.•■• 

3 polished slabs of marble — Westneld^Sraksa^ySSetts. 
WILLITS, E. D., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

2 specimens crystallized calcite — Pewabic Mine, Iron Mountain, 

Michigan. 
ZOELLNER, PAUL, Plainfield, Ohio. 

1 limonite concretion — Coshocton County, Ohio. 
ZDENEK, PASMA, Farrar, Iowa. 

1 specimen jasper — - Farrar, Iowa. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 
ABBEY, E. S., Chicago. 

I wasp — Chicago, Illinois. 
ARMSTRONG, EDWARD E., Chicago, Illinois. 

1 American bittern — Lake County, Illinois. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK, Chicago. 

1 large sawfish — Tampico, Mexico. 

1 Tarpon skin — Tampico, Mexico. 
CARNEGIE MUSEUM, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

530 fishes — British Guiana (exchange). 
CRANE, R. T., Chicago. 

1 mounted Whooping crane. 
COALE, HENRY K., Highland Park, Illinois. 

1 mink — Deerfield Lake Co., Illinois. 

77 bird skins (exchange). 
CORY, C. B., Chicago. 

1 hoary bat — Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 51 

2 beetles — Limon, Costa Rica. 
1 caiman — Limon, Costa Rica. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs: 

1 sand-cricket — Dragon, Utah. 

2 beetles — Dragon, Utah. 
Collected by E. S. Riggs and J. B. Abbott: 

6 snakes — Dragon, Utah. 
16 homer toads — Dragon, Utah. 
50 lizards — Dragon, Utah. 
1 bat — Dragon, Utah. 
Collected by A. W. Slocom. 

I beetle — Clermont, Iowa. 

1 grasshopper — Clermont, Iowa. 

2 bugs — Clermont, Iowa. 

2 bees, wasps, etc. — Clermont, Iowa. 

2 dragonflies — Brainard, Iowa. 

1 beetle — Brainard, Iowa. 

3 beetles — West Union, Iowa. 
Collected by H. H. Smith: 

2 turtles — Darien, Georgia. 
Collected by A. B. Wolcott: 

1 Carolina rail — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

461 nerve-wings, dragonflies, grasshoppers, bugs, beetles, flies, bees, 
wasps, etc., — Illinois and Northern Indiana. 
Purchases: 

2 golden eagles —  Bozeman, Montana. 
1 California condor. 

1 wild turkey — Sussex County, Virginia. 

1 great horned owl — Bogota. Illinois. 

30 bird skins. 

710 bird skins. 

231 bird skins — China. 

1 Pacific walrus. 

1 1 small mammals —  China. 

4 opossums — Bogota, Illinois. 

2 musk rats — - Maine. 

33 mammals — State of Washington. 

72 South American mammals. 

182 mammals — Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. 

4 beetles — Darjeeling, India. 
30 moths — Darjeeling, India. 

210 butterflies — Darjeeling, India. 

5 mounted reptiles — Europe. 

1 small rodent — Darjeeling, India. 

5 gorilla skeletons — West Africa. 

8 chimpanzee skeletons — West Africa. 

6 mounted gorillas — West Africa. 

1 1 mounted chimpanzees — West Africa. 

2 gorilla skulls — West Africa. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 53 

PLUM, MRS. D. C, Chicago. 

1 cockroach (this specimen no doubt was brought with fruit from some 

port in the West Indies or Tropical America). 
PRAY, L. L., Chicago. 

2 mice — Chicago. 
1 bat — Chicago. 

REED, E. D., Chicago. 

1 walking-stick — Fort Thomas, Kentucky. 
ROMAXO, JOE, Chicago, Illinois. 

1 moth — Chicago. 

1 Tennessee Warbler — Jackson Park, Chicago. 

1 olive-backed thrush — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
RIGGS, E. S., Chicago. 

1 mountain sheep skull —  Sheep Mountain, South Dakota. 
SELOXS, F. C, Worplesdon, Surrey, England. 

2 European moles — Worplesdon, Surrey, England. 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

1 pseudoscorpion — Chicago. 
THOMAS, OLDFIELD, London, England. 

3 pigmy squirrels — Boentoh, Borneo, and London, England. 
1 common European mole. 

THOMPSON, S. L., Toronto, Canada. 

1 fly —  Toronto. 

1 bumblebee — Toronto. 

1 beetle — Toronto. 

3 dragonflies — Toronto. 

1 nervewing —  Toronto. 

1 dragonfly —  Toronto. 

1 parasite — Toronto. 
TOMS, MRS. D. B., Chicago. 

1 humming bird — Chicago. 
WALLACE, W. L., Chicago. 

1 snake — Durango, Mexico. 
WILLARD, O. T., Chicago. 

1 evening grosbeck — Jackson Park, Chicago. 
WILLARD, F. C, Tombstone, Arizona. 

25 moths —  Tombstone, Arizona. 



SECTION OF PHOTOGRAPHY. 

(accessions are by gift unless otherwise designated.) 

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. 
Made by C. H. Carpenter: 

921 negatives Museum specimens, etc., 4,735 prints, 

398 lantern slides, 15 enlargements, 287 negatives developed for 
field expeditions, 21 photomacrographs of skulls, seeds, etc. 
Made by C. A. Corwin: 

7 photographs of landscapes. 

12 photographs of landscapes — Montana. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 55 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, 
Washington, D. C. 

Proceedings, v. 59-61. 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF MUSEUMS. 

Proceedings, v. 3. 
AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN FOLK-LORE SOCIETY, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Journal, current numbers. 
AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING ENGINEERS, New York City. 

Yearbook, 19 10. 
AMERICAN MINING CONGRESS, Denver, Colorado. 

Report, 1909. 
AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, New York City. 

29 publications. 
AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY, New Haven. Connecticut. 

Journal, v. 30. 
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Philadelphia. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
AMSTERDAM. K. AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN, Amsterdam, 
Netherlands. 

8 publications. 
ANGERS. SOCIETE D 'ETUDES SCIENTIFIQUES, Angers, France. 

Bulletin, v. 38. 
ANNALES DES MINES, Paris, France. 

Annales, current numbers. 
ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 
IRELAND, London, England. 

Journal, current numbers. 
ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

18 publications. 

ARCHIV FUR RELIGIONSWISSENSCHAFT, Leipzig, Germany. 

Archiv, current numbers. 
ARDENNES. SOCIETE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Ardennes, France. 

Bulletin, v. 14. 
ARIZONA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tucson, Arizona. 

Annual report, no. 20, 1909. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARKANSAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Fayetteville, 
Arkansas. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARMOUR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Chicago. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
ARTHUR, J. C, Lafayette, Indiana. 

19 pamphlets. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 57 

BERLIN. DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR VOLKSTUMLICHE, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Naturwissenschaftliche wochenschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. DEUTSCHE UNIVERSITAT, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahresverzeichnis der erscheinen schriften, v. 24. 
BERLIN. GESELLSCHAFT FUR ERDKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Bibliotheca geographica, bd. 14. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. K. BIBLIOTHEK, Berlin, Germany. 

Jahresbericht, 1909-1910. 
BERLIN. K. BOTANISCHER GARTEN UND MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

3 publications. 
BERLIN. K. MUSEUM FUR VOLKERKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Baessler archiv. v. I, no. 1-2. 
BERLIN. K. PREUSSISCHE AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN, 
Berlin, Germany. 

Sitzungsberichte, current numbers. 
BERLIN. VEREIN FUR VOLKSKUNDE, Berlin, Germany. 

Zeitschrift, current numbers. 
BERLIN. ZOOLOGICAL MUSEUM, Berlin, Germany. 

Bericht, 1909. 

Mitteilungen, current numbers. 
BERN UNIVERSITAT, Bern, Switzerland. 

38 dissertations. 
BERNICE PAUAHI BISHOP MUSEUM, Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

Occasional papers, v. 4, no. 4. 
BIOLOGISCH-LAND WIRTSCHAFTLICHE INSTITUT AMANI, Tanga, 
D. Ostafrika. 

Der pflanzer, current numbers. 
BIRMINGHAM NATURAL HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, 
Birmingham, England. 

Proceedings, v. 12, no. 1. 
BOAS, FRANZ, New York City. 

Pamphlet. 
BOHMEN NATUR. LANDESDURCHFORSCHUNG, Prag, Bohemia. 

Archiv, v. 15, no. 1. 
BOLTON, H., London, England. 

2 extracts. 
BOMAN, ERIC, Paris, France. 

I publication (gift). 
BOMBAY ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Bombay, India. 

Journal, current numbers. 
BONN. NATURHISTORISCHER VEREIN, Bonn, Germany. 

3 publications. 

BORDEAUX. SOCIETE LINNEENE, Bordeaux, France. 

Proces-verbaux, v. 63. 
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Annual report, 1909. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 












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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 59 

BRUSSELS. SOCIETE D'ARCHEOLOGIE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Annales, current numbers. 

Annuaire, v. 21, 1910. 
BRUSSELS. SOCIETE ROYALE DE BOTANIQUE, Brussels, Belgium. 

Bulletin, v. 46. 
BUCKING, H., Strassburg, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
BUDAPEST. K. MAGYAR-TERMES-ZETTUDOMANYI TARSULAT, 
Budapest, Hungary. 

10 publications. 
BUDAPEST. K. UNGAR-REICHANSTALT FUR METEOROLOGIE UND 
ERDMAGNETISMUS, Budapest, Hungary. 

Publications, v. 8. 
BUDAPEST. MAGYAR ORNITHOLOGIAI KOZPONT, Budapest, Hungary 

Aquila, v. 15, 16. 
BUDAPEST. UNGAR. AKADEMIE WISSEXSCHAFTEN, BUDAPEST, 
Hungary. 

Math, und naturwiss. berichte, v. 24, 25. 
BUEXOS AIRES. MUSEO NACIONAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Anales, ser. 3, v. 11, 12. 
BUFFALO PUBLIC LIBRARY, Buffalo, New York. 

Annual report, 1909. 
BUFFALO SOCIETY OF NATURAL SCIENCES, Buffalo, New York. 

Bulletin, current numbers. n 

BUITEXZORG. DEPARTMENT OF &8&ICJJ^971JRE, Buitenzorg, Java. 

18 publications. *^ ^^V/aj- 

BURMA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Burfife; India": 

Report, 1909-10. 
BUSCALIONI, L., Catania, Italy. 

3 pamphlets. 
BUZZACOTT, FRANCIS H., Chicago. 

1 publication (gift). 
CALCUTTA. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, Calcutta, India. 

Annual report, 1909-10. 
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, San Francisco, California. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Berkeley, 
California. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, Sacramento, California. 

5 publications. 
CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY, Berkeley, California. 

43 publications. 
CAMBRIDGE ANTIQUARIAN SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cambridge, England. 

Proceedings and transactions, current numbers. 



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Jan., 1911. Annual Report of the Director. 61 

CARTHAGE INSTITUTE, Tunis, Africa. 

Revue tunisienne, current numbers. 
CASSEL. VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Cassel, Germany. 

1 publications. 
CATANIA. ACCADEMIA GIOENIA DI SCIENZE NATUR., Catania, Italy. 

Bollettino, current numbers. 
CEYLON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Colombo, India. 

Report, 1909-10. 

Tropical agriculturist, current numbers. 
CEYLON ROYAL BOTANICAL GARDENS, Peradeniya, Ceylon, India. 

Annals, current numbers. 

Circulars, current numbers. 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. AND SMITH, BYRON L. 

Head collection, 455 books and pamphlets (gift). 
CHARLESTON MUSEUM, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
CHICAGO ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Chicago. 

Bulletin, v. 3, no. 3. 
CHICAGO ART INSTITUTE, Chicago. 

22 publications. 
CHICAGO GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Bulletin, no. 1-3 (gift). 
CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Chicago. 

Report, 1909. 
CHICAGO. SOUTH PARK COMMISSION, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1909 (gift). 
CHICAGO. SPECIAL PARK COMMISSION, Chicago. 

Annual report, 1909 (gift). 
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY, Chicago. 

59 publications. 
CINCINNATI MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual report, 1909. 
CINCINNATI PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

14 publications. 

CINCINNATI UNIVERSITY, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Studies, current numbers. 
CLARK UNIVERSITY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

American journal of psychology, current numbers. 
CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, Cleveland, Ohio. 

4 publications. 
COCKERELL, T. D. A., Boulder, Colorado. 

15 pamphlets. 

COIMBRA UNIVERSITY, Coimbra, Portugal. 

Boletim, 1908. 
COLBY COLLEGE, Waterville, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1909-10. 
COLLEGIO DE S. FIEL, Lisbon, Portugal. 

Broteria, v. 8 (ser. botanica.) 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 63 

CROYDEN. NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Croyden, 
England. 
Proceedings and transactions, 1908-9; 1909-10. 
CUBA. ESTACION CENTRAL AGRONOMICA, Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Circulars, current numbers. 
Report, no. 2, 1 905-1 909. 
CZERNOWITZ. K. K. FRANZ JOSEPH UNIVERSITAT, Czernowitz, 
Austria. 

3 reports. 

DARMSTADT. VEREIN FUR ERDKUNDE, Darmstadt, Germany. 

Notizblatt, 1909. 
DEBAR, JOSEPH, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

I publication (gift). 
DE FOE, ALFRED, Brussels, Belgium. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
DELAWARE COLLEGE. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, 
Newark, Delaware. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DELAWARE COUNTY INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, Media, Pennsylvania. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1909. 
DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Annual report, no. 45, 1909. 

Bulletin, no. 21. 
DEUTSCHE GESELLSCHAFT FUR NATUR- UND VOLKERKUNDE 
OSTASIENS, Tokyo, Japan. 

Mitteilungen, v. 12, no. 2. 
DEUTSCHER NATUR. MEDIZINISCHER VEREIN FUR BOHMEN, Prag, 
Bohemia. 

Lotos, v. 57. 
DEUTSCHER SEEFISCHEREI-VEREIN, Berlin, Germany. 

Abhandlungen, v. 11. 
DIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Dial, current numbers. 
DIXOX, ROLAND B. 

6 pamphlets. 
DOMINION MUSEUM, Wellington, New Zealand. 

4 publications. 

DORNAN, S. S., Bulawayo, South Africa. 

3 reprints. 
DRESDEN. K. ZOOLOGISCHES UND ANTHROPOLOGISCH-ETHNO- 
GRAPHISCHES MUSEUM, Dresden, Germany. 

Abhandlungen, current numbers. 

Bericht, current numbers. 












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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 65 

FEDDE, FRIEDRICH, Jena, Germany. 

7 separates. 
FERNOW, B. E., Ithaca, New York. 

Forestry quarterly, current numbers. 
FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Chicago. 

334 books and pamphlets (purchase). 
FITZPATRICK, T. J., Lamoni, Iowa. 

2 publications. 

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
FORBES, WILLIAM T. M., Worcester, Massachusetts. 

1 pamphlet. 
FOREST AND STREAM PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Forest and stream, current numbers. 
FRANKFURT-AM-MAIN. STADTISCHES VOLKERMUSEUM, 
Frankf u rt-am- Main . 

Veroffentlichungen, v. 1, pt. 3. 
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Journal, current numbers. 
FREIBURG. K. SACHS. BERGAKADEMIE, Freiburg, Germany. 

Programm, 1910-11. 
FREIBURG. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Freiburg, Germany. 

Publications, current numbers. 
FRIEDLANDER, R. UND SOHN, Berlin, Germany. 

Naturae novitates, current numbers. 
FROGGATT, WALTER W., Sydney, New South Wales. 

3 pamphlets. 

GAGE, S. H., Ithaca, New York. 

1 publication (gift). 
GENEVA. INSTITUT DE BOTANIQUE DE L'UNIVERSITE, Geneva, 
Switzerland. 
60 publications. 
GENEVA. SOCIETE DE PHYSIQUE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Geneva, 
Switzerland. 

4 publications. 

GEORGIA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Bulletin, no. 23. 
GERHARD, W. J., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

1 publication. 
GIESSEN. UNIVERSITAT-BIBLIOTHEK, Giessen, Germany. 

14 dissertations. 
GIGLIO-TOS, ERMANNO, Cagliari, Italy. 

Les problemes de la vie. v. 4. 
GLASGOW NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, Glasgow, Scotland. 

Journal, v. 1-2. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
GLEERUP, C. W. K., Lund, Sweden. 

Botaniska notiser, current numbers. 



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Ian., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 67 

HASSE, C, Breslau, Germany. 

2 pamphlets. 
HAWAII AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands. 

Annual report, 1909. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
HAWAIIAN SUGAR PLANTERS ASSOCIATION, Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands. 

5 publications. 
HAYNES, C. C, Highlands, New Jersey. 

5 pamphlets. 

HEIM, ALBERT, Zurich, Switzerland. 

2 pamphlets. 
HELLER, A. A., Las Vegas, New Mexico. 

Muhlenbergia, current numbers. 
HIGINBOTHAM, HARLOW N\, Chicago. 

10 volumes (gift). 
HITCHCOCK, CHARLES H., Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

2 publications. 
HOBBS, WILLIAM H., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

2 pamphlets. 
HORNIMAN MUSEUM, London, England. 

Annual report, no. 8, 1909. 
HOUSTON MUSEUM AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY, Houston, Texas. 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
HOVEY, EDMUND OTIS, New York City. 

2 pamphlets. 
HULL MUNICIPAL MUSEUM, Hull, England. 

6 publications. 

IDAHO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Moscow, Idaho. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Report, 1908. 
IDAHO. INSPECTOR OF MINES, Boise, Idaho. 

Annual report, 1907, 1908, 1909 (gift). 
ILLINOIS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Urbana, Illinois. 

Bulletin, no. 12-15. 
ILLINOIS STATE ACADEMY OF SCIENCE, Springfield, Illinois. 

Transactions, v. 2. 
ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Springfield, Illinois. 

Statistical report, 1909. 
ILLINOIS STATE ENTOMOLOGIST, Springfield, Illinois. 

Report, v. 25. 

Report. Index and contents, v. 13-14. 
ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY, Springfield, Illinois. 

6 publications. 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Urbana, Illinois. 

25 publications. 
INDIA. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Calcutta, India. 

10 publications. 



ki Vol. IV 



Jan., 191 i. Annual Report or the Director. 69 

KANSAS STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Topeka, Kansas. 

2 publications. 
KARLSRUHE. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER YEREIN, Karlsruhe, 
Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 22, 1908-9. 
KARNTEN NATURHISTORISCHES LANDES-MUSEUM, Carinthia, Austria. 

Jahrbueh, no. 28, 1909. 
KAUKASISCHES MUSEUM, Tiflis, Russia. 

Mitteilungen, v. 4, no. 3-4. 
KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 

Annual report, no. 21. 

Bulletin, current numbers (gift). 
KEW. ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, Kew, England. 

14 publications. 
KIEL. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN FUR SCHLESWIG- 
HOLSTEIN, Kiel, Germany. 

17 publications. 
KISSEL, MARY LOIS, New York City. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
KOCH-GRUNBERG, THEODOR, Berlin, Germany. 

Indianertypen aus dem Amazonasgebiet, pt. 4-5. 

I reprint. 

KONTGSBERG. BOTANISCHER VEREIN, Konigsberg, Germany. 

Geschaftsbericht, 1907-8. 

Jahresbericht, 1908. 
KOSMOS. GESELLSCHAFT DER NATURFREUNDE, Stuttgart, Germany. 

II publications. 

LA CAMARA AGRICOLA, Merida, Yucatan. 

El agricultor, 'current numbers. 
LAFONE-QUEVEDO, SAMUEL A., La Plata, Argentina. 

1 reprint. 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Catalogue, 1910-1911. 
LAKE MOHONK CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION, 
Lake Mohonk, New York. 

Report, no. 27. 
LAMPE, E., Wiesbaden, Germany. 

1 pamphlet. 
LANCASHIRE SEA-FISHERIES LABORATORY, Liverpool, England. 

Report, 1909. 
LEDON, GONZALO, Chicago. 

1 pamphlet (gift). 
LEHMAXN, WALTER. 

14 pamphlets. 
LEICESTER MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, Borough of Leicester, 
England. 

Report, 1909. 



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Jan., iqii. Annual Report of the Director. 71 

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Report, second biennial. 
LUBECK. GEOGRAPHISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Liibeck, Germany. 

Mitteilungen, v. 24. 
LUND. K. UNIVERSITETS BIBLIOTEK, Lund, Sweden. 

Acta, current numbers. 
LYON. MUSEUM D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Lyon, France. 

Archives, v. 10. 
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Montreal, Canada. 

Publications, current numbers. 
MACRITCHIE, DAVID, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

2 reprints. 

MADRAS. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Madras, India. 

Bulletin, no. 61. 
MADRAS. GOVERNMENT MUSEUM, Madras, India. 

1 publication. 

MADRAS. HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Madras, India. 

Proceedings, current numbers. 
MADRID. R. ACADEMIA DE CIENCIAS, Madrid, Spain. 

7 publications. 

MADRID. SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE HISTORIA NATURAL, Madrid, 
Spain. 

14 publications. 

MAGYAR NEMZETI MUSEUM, Budapest (^Hungary. 

Annales, current numbers. ^t&Nijjj - .. v . r '"_ 
MAIDEN, J. H., Sydney, New South Wales^ Vj 

8 publications. 
MAINE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Orono, Maine. 

22 publications. 
MAINE STATE LIBRARY, Augusta, Maine. 

15 state reports. 
MAINE UNIVERSITY, Orono, Maine. 

Catalogue, 1909-10. 
MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Man- 
chester, England. 

3 publications. 
MANCHESTER MUSEUM, Manchester, England. 

2 publications. 
MARBURG. GESELLSCHAFT ZUR BEFORDERUNG DER GESAMTEN 

NATURWISSENSCHAFTEN, Marburg, Germany. 
Sitzungsberichte, 1909. 
MARBURG. K. UNIVERSITAT, Marburg, Germany. 

28 publications. 
MARIETTA COLLEGE, Marietta, Ohio. 

Catalogue, 1909-1910. 
MARINE BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
Plymouth, England. 
Journal, current numbers. 



















 
















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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 73 

MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SURVEY, Lansing, Mich- 
igan. 

Publication I. (Biological ser. I.) 
MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, Lansing, Michigan. 

Annual report, no 22, 1908-9. 
MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Report, University Museum, 1909-10. 
MILLSPAUGH, CHARLES FREDERICK. Chicago. 

33 botanical publications. 
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC MUSEUM, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

3 publications. 

MINING WORLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Journal, current numbers (gift). 
MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC LIBRARY, Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Annual report, 1909. 
MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, St. Anthony 
Park, Minnesota. 
Annual report, 1909. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. 
Report, Botanical series, v. 8. 
MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Agricultural 
College, Mississippi. 
19 publications. 
MISSISSIPPI STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Jackson, Mississippi. 

Bulletin, no. 5-6. 
MISSOURI AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Columbia, Mis- 
souri. 

5 publications. 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Annual report, 1909. 
MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY, St. Louis, Missouri. 

6 publications. 

MONTEVIDEO MUSEO NACIONAL, Montevideo, Uruguay. 

Anales, current numbers. 
MOORE, CLARENCE B., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Antiquities of the St. Francis, White, and Black rivers. 
MORLEY, SYLVANUS G., Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

2 reprints (gift). 
MOSCOW. SOCIETE IMPERIALE DES NATURALISTES, Moscow, 
Russia. 

4 publications. 

MUNCHEN. K. BAYER. AKADEMIE DER WISSENSCHAFTEN. Mun- 
chen, Germany. 

Bericht. current numbers. 
MUNN AND COMPANY, New York City. 

Scientific American, current numbers. 



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[an., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 75 

JEW-CASTLE-UPON-TYNE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, New-Castle- 
upon-Tyne, England. 
Transactions, v. 3, no. 3. 
JEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, Durham, New Hamp- 
shire. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
Catalogue, 1909-10. 
JEW JERSEY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Trenton, New 
Jersey. 

11 publications. 

JEW JERSEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Report, 1909. 
JEW JERSEY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Proceedings, v. 35. 
JEW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Annual report, 1909. 
JEW MEXICO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Mesilla Park, 
New Mexico. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
JEW SOUTH WALES. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND AGRICULTURE 
Sydney, New South Wales. 

12 publications. 

JEW SOUTH WALES LINNEAN SOCIETY, Sydney, New South Wales. 

3 publications. 
JEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, New York City. 

Annals, v. 19, no. 1-3. 
JEW YORK AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Geneva, New 
York. 

11 publications. 

JEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN, New York City. 

3 publications. 
JEW YORK FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION, Albany, New 
York. 

Annual report, no. 15, 1910. 
JEW YORK. METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, New York City. 

10 publications. 
JEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, New York City. 

12 publications. 

JEW YORK SOCIETY OF MECHANICS AND TRADESMEN, New York 
City. 

Annual report, no. 124, 1909. 
JEW YORK STATE LIBRARY, Albany, New York. 

State Education Department: 

Report, 1909. 
JEW YORK STATE MUSEUM, Albany, New York. 

10 publications. 
JEW YORK ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, New York City. 

6 publications. 



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an., 191 1. Annual Report of the Director. 77 

)LIVIER, ERNEST, Paris, France. 

1 reprint. 
)MAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
)NEIDA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Utica, New York. 

Yearbook, no. 11. 
)NTARIO BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES, Toronto, Canada. 

Annual report, 1908, 1909. 
JNTARIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Ontario, Canada. 

30 publications. 
)PEX COURT PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Monist, current numbers. 
)REGON AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Corvallis, Oregon. 

4 publications (gift). 
)RNITHOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT IN BAYERN, Miinchen, Germany. 

Verhandlungen, v. 6, 9. 
)TTAWA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Ottawa, Canada. 

Ottawa naturalist, current numbers. 
)UT DOOR PUBLISHING COMPANY, Denver, Colorado. 

Out door life, current numbers (gift). 
)UTES, FELIX F., La Plata, Argentina. 

4 reprints. 
)UTING PUBLISHING COMPANY, New York City. 

Outing magazine, current numbers. 
)XFORD DELEGATES OF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Oxford, England. 

Annual report, no. 22, 1909. 
>ALACHE, CHARLES, Cambridge. Massachusetts. 

4 pamphlets. 

>ALERMO. R. ORTO BOTANICO E GIARDINO COLONIALE, Palermo, 
Italy. 

5 publications. 

>ARIS. ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES, Paris, France. 

Comptes rendus, current numbers. 
3 ARIS. ECOLE D'ANTHROPOLOGIE, Paris, France. 

Revue, current numbers. 
5 ARIS. MUSEE D'HISTOIRE NATURELLE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
3 ARIS. SOCIETE DES AMERICANISTES, Paris, France. 

Journal, current numbers. 
D ARIS. SOCIETE NATIONALE D'AGRICULTURE, Paris, France. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
5 ARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bulletin of pharmacy, current numbers (gift). 
D ARKS, WILLIAM A., Toronto, Canada. 

I pamphlet. 
•AVIA. ISTITUTO BOTANICO DELLA R. UNIVERSITA, Pavia, Italy. 

Archivos, v. 1-5, 1 874-1 888. 
3 EAB0DY INSTITUTE, Peabody, Massachusetts. 

Report, no. 58, 1910. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 79 

PROVIDENCE ATHENAEUM, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Annual report, no. 74. 
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Providence, Rhode Island. 

6 publications. 
PROVINCIAL MUSEUM, Victoria, British Columbia. 

5 guides and map. 
PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana. 

Agricultural Experiment Station: 

13 publications. 
PUTNAM, FREDERIC WARD, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Putnam anniversary volume —  Anthropological essays. 
QUEENSLAND DEPARTMENT OF MINES, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
QUEENSLAND. ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Journal, v. 24. 
QUEENSLAND ROYAL SOCIETY, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Proceedings, v. 22, pt. 1. 
RANDALL & COMPANY, Chicago. 

Clayworker, current numbers (gift). 
RENNES UNIVERSITE, Rennes, France. 

Travaux scientifiques, current numbers. 
REVUE BRETONNE DE BOTANIQUE, Rennes, France. 

Current numbers. 
REVUE CRITIQUE DE PALEOZOOLOGIE, Paris, France. 

1910-11. 
REVUE SCIENTIFIQUE DU BOURBONNAIS ET DU CENTRE DE LA 
FRANCE, Moulins, France. 

Revue, v. 22-23. 
RHODE ISLAND AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Kingston, 
Rhode Island. 

5 publications. 

RHODESIA MUSEUM, Bulawayo, Transvaal. 

Annual report, no. 8, 1909. 
RHODESIA SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATION, Bulawayo, Transvaal. 

Proceedings, v. 1-8, 1900-1908. 
RIVET, P., Paris, France. 

6 reprints. 

ROGER WILLIAMS PARK MUSEUM, Providence, Rhode Island. 

2 publications. 
ROME. R. ACCADEMIA DEI LINCEI, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 

Rendiconte, current numbers. 
ROSE POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

Catalogue, 1909-10. 
ROTTERDAM MUSEUM VOOR LAND-EN-VOLKENKUNDE, Rotterdam, 
Holland. 

6 publications. 
ROYAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND 
IRELAND, London, England. 

Archaeological journal, current numbers. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 81 

SATURDAY REVIEW, London, England. 

Current numbers. 
SAVILLE, MARSHALL H., AND HEYE, GEORGE G., New York City. 

Contributions to South American archeology, v. 1-2 (gift). 
SCHLAGINHAUFEN, OTTO, Dresden, Germany. 

3 pamphlets. 
SCHWARZ, ERNST, Berlin, Germany. 

5 reprints. 
SCHWEIZERISCHE ENTOMOLOGISCHE GESELLSCHAFT, Bern, Switzer- 
land. 

Mitteilungen, v. II. 
SCHWEIZERICHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Lausanne, 
Switzerland. 

Verhandlungen, 92nd jahr, v. 1-2. 
SCOTLAND FISHERIES BOARD, Glasgow, Scotland. 

2 reports. 

SELER, EDUARD, Berlin, Germany. 

7 pamphlets. 
SENCKENBERGISCHE NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Frank- 
fort-am-Main, Germany. 

Bericht, 1910. ****«'• 

SIMPSON, JAMES J., AbejJ^m Second. 
... ,. * v * ;<.',:■.;;. . 

I publication. 4> U»»i.'j 

SKIFF, F. J. V., Chicago. 

3 publications. 
SLOCOM, A. W., Chicago. 

B. & C. mining exchange, current numbers. 
SLONAKER, JAMES ROLLIN, Palo Alto, California. 

1 pamphlet. 
SMITH, JOHN B., New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

3 publications. 
SMITH, J. D., Baltimore, Maryland. 

1 pamphlet. 
SOCIEDAD CIENTIFICA "ANTONIO ALZATE," Mexico, Mexico. 

Memorias, current numbers. 
SOCIEDAD RURAL ARGENTINA, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

I pamphlet (gift). 
SOCIETA AFRICANA DTTALIA, Naples, Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 29. 
SOCIETA BOTANICA ITALIANA, Firenze, Italy. 

Webbia, v. 1-2. 
SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

Bollettino, current numbers. 
SOCIETA GEOLOGICA ITALIANA, Rome, Italy. 

Bollettino, v. 29, pt. 1. 
SOCIETA ITALIANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Florence, Italy. 

Archivio, current numbers. 
SOCIETA ROMANA DI ANTROPOLOGIA, Rome, Italy. 

Atti, current numbers. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 83 

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Report, 1909. 
SOUTH AFRICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY, Cape Town, South Africa. 

Transactions, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Adelaide, 
South Australia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA GOVERNMENT GEOLOGIST, Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

Report, 1909. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY, 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

Report, 1908-9. 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA ROYAL SOCIETY, Adelaide, South Australia. 

Memoirs, v. 2, pt. 2. 

Transactions and proceedings, v. 33. 
SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Clemson, 
South Carolina. 

7 publications. 
SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES, Rapid City, South Dakota. 

Bulletin, no. 9. 
SOUTH LONDON ENTOMOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY SO- 
CIETY, London, England. 

Proceedings, 1909-10. 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, Los Angeles, 
California. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, San Francisco, California. 

Sunset, current numbers (gift). 
SPENCER, L. J., London, England. 

2 reprints (gift). 
SPEZIA, GIORGIO, Torino, Italy. 

2 pamphlets (gift). 
SPRINGFIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts. 

14 publications. 

STATEN ISLAND ASSOCIATION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, New York 
City. 
Bulletin, current numbers. 
STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Catalogue, 1910-11. 
STOCKHOLM. K. SVEN. VETENSKAPS AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 

15 publications. 

STOCKHOLM. K. VITT. HIST. OCH ANTIQ. AKADEMIEN, Stockholm, 
Sweden. 
Fornvannen, 1909. 
STOCKHOLM. SVEN. SALLSK. FOR ANTROPOLOGI OCH GEOGRAFI, 
Stockholm, Sweden. 
Ymer, current numbers. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 85 

TROMSO MUSEUM, Tromso, Norway. 

Aarsberetning, 1908. 

Aarshefter, 1907. 
TROPICAL AGRICULTURAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, Mexico City, 
Mexico. 

American review of tropical agriculture, v. 1. 
TUBINGEN KONIG. UNIVERSITATS BIBLIOTHEK, Tubingen, Germany. 

7 dissertations. 
TUFTS COLLEGE, Tufts, Massachusetts. 

Studies, v. 3, no. 1. 
UNION COLLEGE, Schenectady, New York. 

Catalogue, 1910-11. 
U. S. GOVERNMENT, Washington, D. C. 

618 publications. 
U. S. INDIAN SCHOOL, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 

Red man, the, current numbers. 
UPSALA SOCIETAS SCIENTIARUM, Upsala, Sweden. 

Nova Acta, ser. 3, v. 1-20; ser. 4, v. 2, no. 7-9. 
UPSALA UNIVERSITY, Upsala, Sweden. 

5 publications. 
UTAH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Logan, Utah. 

3 publications. 
UTAH STATE HORTICULTURAL COMMISSION, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Bulletin, no. 1. 
VENEZUELA ESTADISTICA DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS, Caracas, 
Venezuela. 

2 publications. 
VERMONT UNIVERSITY, Burlington, Vermont. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 

Catalogue, 1909- 19 10. 
VICTORIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, Melbourne, Australia. 

Journal, current numbers. 
VICTORIA FIELD NATURALISTS' CLUB, Melbourne, Australia. 

Victorian naturalist, current numbers. 
VICTORIA MUSEUM, Launceston, Tasmania. 

Memoirs, no. 1. 
VICTORIA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS AND NATIONAL GALLERY, 
Victoria, Australia. 

Report, 1909. 
VICTORIA. ROYAL SOCIETY, Melbourne, Australia. 

Proceedings, v. 22. 
VIRCHOW, H., Berlin, Germany. 

14 pamphlets. 
VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Blacksburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, Richmond, Virginia. 

Bulletin, v. 3. 
VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY, Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Catalogue, 1909-10. 



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WIEN. NATURWISSENSCHAFTLICHER VEREIN, Vienna, Austria. 

Mitteilungen, v. 7. 
WIESBADEN. NASSAUISCHER VEREIN FUR NATURKUNDE, Wies- 
baden, Germany. 

Jahrbuch, v. 62. 
WILLE, N., Christiania, Norway. 

Naturwidenskaberne magazine, current numbers. 
WILLIAMS COLLEGE, Williamstown, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue, 1909-11. 
WILLISTON, S. W., Chicago. 

1 reprint. 
WILSON ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WINDSOR KENFIELD PUBLISHING COMPANY, Chicago. 

Brick, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Bulletin, current numbers. 
WISCONSIN STATE HISTORICAL SOCJETY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

3 publications. ^*'J.;-; - > ' iJ: - 

WISCONSIN STATE HORTICULTURE^ Sfeeig^Y, Madison, Wisconsin. 

7 publications. 
WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY, Madison, Wisconsin. 

38 publications. 
WISTAR INSTITUTE OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

18 publications. 
WOOD, J. MEDLEY, Natal, Africa. 

1 pamphlet. 
WOOD, NORMAN A., London, England. 

I pamphlet. 
WOODWARD, ARTHUR SMITH, London, England. 

29 pamphlets. 
WOOTON, ELMER OTTIS, Mesilla Park, New Mexico. 

4 pamphlets. 
WORCESTER FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

9 publications. 
WURTEMBERG VEREIN FUR VATERLANDISCHE NATURKUNDE, 
Wiirtemberg, Germany. 
Jahreshefte, v. 66. 
WYOMING AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, Laramie, 
Wyoming. 
3 publications. 
YALE UNIVERSITY, New Haven, Connecticut. 

21 publications. 
ZURICH. BOTANISCHES MUSEUM DER UNIVERSITAT, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 
Mitteilungen, no. 47-51. 
ZURICH. NATURFORSCHENDE GESELLSCHAFT, Zurich, Switzerland. 
Vierteliahrsschrift, current numbers. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 89 

Ed. E. Ayer, Charles B. Farwell, George E. Adams, George R. Davis, Charles 
L. Hutchinson, Daniel H. Burnham, John A. Roche, M. C. Bullock, Emil G. Hirsch, 
James W. Ellsworth, Allison V. Armour, 0. F. Aldis, Edwin Walker, John C. Black, 
and Frank W. Gunsaulus. 

5. The location of the Museum is in the City of Chicago, County of Cook, 
and State of Illinois. 

(Signed) , 

George E. Adams, C. B. Farwell, Sidney C. Eastman, F. W. Putnam, Robert 
McMurdy, Andrew Peterson, L. J. Gage, Charles L. Hutchinson, Ebenezer Bucking- 
ham, Andrew McNally, Edward E. Ayer, John M. Clark, Herman H. Kohlsaat, 
George Schneider, Henry H. Getty, William R. Harper, Franklin H. Head, E. G. 
Keith, J. Irving Pearce, Azel F. Hatch, Henry Wade Rogers, Thomas B. Bryan, 
L. Z. Leiter, A. C. Bartlett, A. A. Sprague, A. C. McClurg James W. Scott, George 
F. Bissell, John R. Walsh, Chas. Fitzsimons, John A. Roche, E. B. McCagg, Owen 
F. Aldis, Ferdinand W. Peck, James H. Dole, Joseph Stockton, Edward B. Butler, 
John McConnell, R. A. Waller, H. C. Chatfield-Taylor, A. Crawford, Wm. Sooy 
Smith, P. S. Peterson, John C. Black, Jno. J. Mitchell, C. F. Gunther, George R. 
Davis, Stephen A. Forbes, Robert W. Patterson, Jr., M. C. Bullock, Edwin Walker, 
George M. Pullman, William E. Curtis, James W. Ellsworth, William E. Hale, Wm. 
T. Baker, Martin A. Ryerson, Huntington W. Jackson, N. B. Ream, Norman Will- 
iams, Melville E. Stone, Bryan Lathrop, Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Philip D. Armour. 

State of Illinois ) gs 
Cook County ) 

I, G. R. Mitchell, a Notary Public in and for said County, do hereby certify 
that the foregoing petitioners personally appeared before me and acknowledged 
severally that they signed the foregoing petition as their free and voluntary act for 
the uses and purposes therein set forth. 

Given under my hand and notarial seal this 14th day of September, 1893. 

G. R. MITCHELL, 
[Seal] Notary Public, Cook County, III. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 25th day of June, 1894, the name of the COLUMBIAN MUSEUM was changed 
to FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM. A certificate to this effect was filled June 26 
1894, in the office of the Secretary of State for Illinois. 



CHANGE OF NAME. 



Pursuant to a resolution passed at a meeting of the Corporate members held 
the 8th day of November, 1905, the name of the FIELD COLUMBIAN MUSEUM 
was changed to FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. A certificate 
to this effect was filed November 10, 1905, in the office of the Secretary of State 
for Illinois. 



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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 91 

Sec. 5. Patrons shall be chosen by the Board upon recommendation of the 
Executive Committee from among persons who have rendered eminent service 
to the Museum. They shall be exempt from all dues, and, by virtue of their election 
as Patrons, shall also be Corporate Members. 

Sec. 6. Honorary Members shall be chosen by the Board from among persons 
who have rendered eminent service to science, and only upon unanimous nomina- 
tion of the Executive Committee. They shall be exempt from all dues. 

ARTICLE II. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Section i. The Board of Trustees shall consist of fifteen members. The 
respective members of the Board now in office, and those who shall hereafter be 
elected, shall hold office during life. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be 
filled at a regular meeting of the Board, upon the nomination of the Executive 
Committee made at a preceding regular meeting, by a majority vote of the members 
of the Board present. 

Sec. 2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the second Monday of 
each month. Special meetings may be called at any time by the President, and 
shall be called by the Secretary upon the written request of three Trustees. Five 
Trustees shall constitute a quorum, except for the election of officers or the adoption 
of the Annual Budget, when seven Trustees shall be required, but meetings may be 
adjourned by any less number from day to day, or to a day fixed, previous to the 
next regular meeting. 

Sec. 3. Reasonable written notice, designating the time and place of holding 
meetings, shall be given by the Secretary. 

ARTICLES III. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

Section i. As a mark of respect, and in appreciation of services performed for 

the Institution, those Trustees who by reason of inability, on account of change of 

residence, or for other cause, or from indisposition to serve longer in such capacity, 

shall resign their place upon the Board, may be elected, by a majority of those 

present at any regular meeting of the Board, an Honorary Trustee for life. Such 

Honorary Trustee will receive notice of all meetings of the Board of Trustees, 

whether regular or special, and will be expected to be present at all such meetings, and 

participate in the deliberations thereof, but an Honorary Trustee shall not have the 

right to vote. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 1. The officers shall be a President, a First Vice-President, a Second 
Vice-President, a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary and a Treasurer. They shall 
be chosen by ballot by the Board of Trustees, a majority of those present and vot- 
ing being necessary to elect. The President, the First Vice-President, and the 
Second Vice-President shall be chosen from among the members of the Board of 
Trustees. The meeting for the election of officers shall be held on the second Mon- 
day of January of each year, and shall be called the Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 2. The officers shall hold office for one year, or until their successors are 
elected and qualified, but any officer may be removed at any regular meeting of 





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Jan., 191 i. Annual Report of the Director. 93 

authority of the Director. The Curators shall be appointed by the Board upon 
the recommendation of the Director, and shall serve during the pleasure of the Board. 
Subordinate staff officers in the scientific departments shall be appointed and re- 
moved by the Director upon the recommendation of the Curators of the respective 
Departments. The Director shall have authority to employ and remove all other 
employees of the Museum. 

Sec. 3. The Director shall make report to the Board at each regular meeting, 
recounting the operations of the Museum for the previous month. At the Annual 
Meeting, the Director shall make an Annual Report, reviewing the work of the 
Museum for the previous year, which Annual Report shall be published in pamphlet 
form for the information of the Trustees and Members, and for free distribution in 
such number as the board may direct. 

ARTICLE VII. 

AUDITOR. 

Section i. The Board shall appoint an Auditor, who shall hold his office 
during the pleasure of the Board. He shall keep proper books of account, setting 
forth the financial condition and transactions of the Corporation, and of the Museum, 
and report thereon at each regular meeting, and at such other times as may be 
required by the Board. He shall certify to the correctness of all vouchers for the 
expenditure of the money of the Corporation. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

COMMITTEES. 

Section i. There shall be five Committees as follows: Finance, Building, 
Auditing, Administration and Executive. 

Sec. 2. The Finance, Building and Auditing Committees shall each consist of 
three members, and the Administration Committee shall consist of five members. 
All members of these four Committees shall be elected by ballot by the Board at 
the Annual Meeting, and shall hold office for one year, and until their successors 
are elected and qualified. In electing the members of these Committees, the Board 
shall designate the Chairman and Vice-Chairman by the order in which the members 
are named in the respective Committees; the first member named shall be Chairman, 
the second named the Vice-Chairman, and the third named, Second Vice-Chairman, 
succession to the Chairmanship being in this order in the event of the absence or 
disability of the Chairman. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of the President of the Board, 
the Chairman of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Building Committee, 
the Chairman of the Administration Committee, the Chairman of the Auditing 
Committee, and two other members of the Board to be elected by ballot at the 
Annual Meeting. 

Sec. 4. Four members shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee; 
three members shall constitute a quorum of the Administration Committee, and 
in all other standing Committees, two members shall constitute a quorum. In 
the event that, owing to the absence or inability of members, a quorum of the reg- 
ularly elected members cannot be present at any meeting of any Committee, then 
the Chairman thereof, or his successor, as herein provided, may summon any mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees to act in place of the absentee. 



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collections, or in storage, furniture, fixtures, cases, tools, records, books, and all 
appurtenances of the Institution, and the workings, researches, installations, expendi- 
tures, field work, laboratories, library, publications, lecture courses, and all scientific 
and maintenance activities. 

Sec. 2. These By-Laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees by a two-thirds vote of all the members present, provided the amend- 
ment shall have been proposed at a preceding regular meeting. 



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ADAMS, GEORGE E. 
ALDIS, OWEN F. 
ARMOUR, ALLISON \ 
AVER, EDWARD E. 



Annual Report of the Director. 

CORPORATE MEMBERS. 

HUTCHINSON, CHARLES L. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 



97 



BARTLETT, A. C. 
BLACK, JOHN C. 
BLAIR, WATSON F. 
BLATCHFORD, ELIPHALET W. 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BURNHAM, DANIEL H. 
BUTLER, EDWARD B. 

CHALMERS, W. J. 
CHATFIELD-TAYLOR, H. C. 
CLARK, JOHN M. 
CRANE, RICHARD T., Jr. 
CURTIS, WILLIAM E. 

EASTMAN, SIDNEY C. 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 

FIELD, STANLEY 

GAGE, LYMAN J. 
GETTY, HENRY H. 
GRAHAM, ERNEST R. 
GUXSAULUS, FRANK W. 
GUXTHER, C. F. 

HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 
HIGINBOTHAM, H. N. 



KENNEDY, VERNON SHAW 
KOHLSAAT, HERMAN H. 

LATHROP, BRYAN 

McCORMICK, CYRUS H. 
MANIERRE, GEORGE 
MILLER, JOHN S. 
MITCHELL, JOHN J. 

PATTERSON, ROBERT W. 
PAYNE, JOHN BARTON 
PECK. FERD. W. 
PORTER, GEORGE F. 
PUTNAM. FREDERICK W. 

REAM, NORMAN B. 
RYERSON, MARTIN A. 

SKIFF, FREDERICK J. V. 
SMITH, BYRON L. 
SMITH, WILLARD A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A. 
SPRAGUE, A. A., 2d. 
STONE, MELVILLE E. 

WALSH. JOHN R. 



DECEASED. 



ARMOUR, PHILIP D. 
BAKER, WILLIAM T. 
BISSEL, GEORGE F. 
BUCHANAN. W. I. 
CRAWFORD, ANDREW 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
FITZSIMONS. CHARLES 
HALE, WILLIAM E. 
HARPER, WILLIAM R. 
HATCH, AZEL F. 
JACKSON", HUNTINGTON 
LEITER, L. Z. 



W. 



McCAGG, E. B. 
McCLURG, A. C. 
McNALLY, ANDREW 
PEARCE, J. IRVING 
PETERSON, ANDREW 
PULLMAN, GEORGE M. 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SCOTT, JAMES W. 
STOCKTON, JOSEPH 
WALKER, EDWIN 
WALLER, R. A. 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN 






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POR1 I 
PORTER, H H . J«. 

M. MR- CAROLINE 
REAM, NORMAN B 
REVELL ALEX. II. 

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Jan., 1911. 



Annual Report of the Director. 



99 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



ADAMS, CYRUS H. 
ADAMS, MILWARD 
ALLERTON, ROBERT H. 
AM BERG, WILLIAM A. 
ARMOUR, GEORGE A. 

BAILEY, EDWARD P. 
BANGA, DR. HENRY 
BARNES, CHARLES J. 
BARRELL, JAMES 
BECKER, A. G. 
BILLINGS, C. K. G. 
BILLINGS, DR. FRANK 
BIRKHOFF, GEORGE, Jr. 
BLAINE, MRS. EMMONS 
BLAIR, HENRY A. 
BOAL, CHARLES T. 
BOUTON, C. B. 
BROWN. WILLIAM L. 
BURLEY, CLARENCE A. 

CARPENTER, A. A. 
COMSTOCK, WILLIAM C. 
CONOVER, CHARLES H. 
COONLEY-WARD, MRS. L. A. 
CORWITH, CHARLES R. 
COWAN, W. P. 
CRANE, CHARLES R. 
CUDAHY, JOHN 
CUMMINGS, E. A. 
CURTIS, D. H. 

DAY, A. M. 
DAY, CHAPIN A. 
DEERING, JAMES 
DEERING, WILLIAM 
DILLMAN, L. M. 

EISEXDRATH, W. N. 
EMMERICH, EDWARD E. 

FAIR, R. M. 

FARNSWORTH, GEORGE 
FORSYTH, ROBERT 
FRANK, HENRY L. 
FRASHER, JOHN E. L. 



FULLER, O. F. 
FURST, CONRAD 

GAYLORD, FREDERIC 
GLESSNER, J. J. 
GOODRICH, A. W. 
GORDON, EDWARD K. 
GRAHAM, E. R. 
GREEN, E. H. R. 
GREY, CHARLES F. 
GREY, WILLIAM L. 
GURLEY, W. W. 

HARDING, AMOS J. 
HARRIS, GEORGE B. 
HARRIS, JOHN F. 
HARRIS, N. W. 
HASKELL, FREDERICK T. 
HERTLE, LOUIS 
HITCHCOCK, R. M. 
HOLDOM, JESSE 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 
HOPKINS, JOHN P. 
HORNER, ISAAC 
HOSKINS, WILLIAM 

INSULL, SAMUEL 

JENKINS, GEORGE H. 
JONES, J. S. 

KEEFER, LOUIS 
KEITH, W. SCOTT 
KIMBALL, EUGENE S. 
KIMBALL, MRS. MARK. 

LAMB, FRANK H. 
LAWSON, VICTOR F. 
LAY, A. TRACY 
LEFENS, THIES J. 
LEIGH, EDWARD B. 
LINCOLN, ROBERT T. 
LINN, W. R. 
LOGAN, F. G. 
LORD, J. B. 
LOWDEN, FRANK O. 
LYTTON, HENRY C. 



too I N'aturai. Historn Km Vol. IV 



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